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Full text of "George Taylor, Sr., 1838-1926 and his family : photographer, merchant, banker"

HAROLD B. LEE LIBRARY 
BRIQHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 
PROVO. UTAH 



Digitized by tlie Internet Arcliive 


in 2013 







http://archive.org/details/georgetaylorsr1800tayl 



(G ffi: (D) ffi (E e: t 

1 8 3 8 - 

AND HIS 



A IL (D) m„ sm 
19 2 6 
FAMILY 



Photographer 



Merchant 



B a n k e 



HAHOLD B. LEE LIBRARY 
BRIQHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 
PROVO. UTAH 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. AND FAMILY 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SECTION I Pag 
Title Page 
Acknowledge me nt 

SECTION II 

GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 

Large photo of George Taylor, Sr. 2 
Picture page of: George, Eliza, Henrietta, Emily, Phoebe. 

List of Children - dates of birth and death. 4 

Picture page of two wives and their children. 5 
Photo of house - 195 West Center Street, Provo, Utah. 6 

History of George Taylor, Sr. ^ 
Membership letter from the First Presidency 10/20/47. 21 

Copy of George Taylor's will. 22 

Copy of birth certificate. 3Z 

Chronological life events chart, 26 

Additional information on the will provisions. 24 

BYU Library acknowledging receipt of papers. 29 

Permission to examine and make copies. 29 
List of legal documents in BYU Library. 
Establishment of George Taylor / Provo Pioneer 

Photographer collection in BYU Library. ^0 

List of glass negative plates in collection. ^0 
" As I knew Grandpa Taylor". 

Geneve Roberts Dunn 

Arthur D. Taylor 35 

Bade D. Taylor 34 

Henry D. Taylor 38 

Clarrisa Taylor Eastmond 40 

Elton L. Taylor 36 

Stanley S. Taylor 41 

John W. Taylor 43 

Thomas N. Taylor 42 

Very short history of George's parents: 

Thomas Taylor 45 

Anne Hill Taylor 46 

List of George Taylor's children 4 

Photo of George Taylor's Furniture Store. 

47 

Picture of George Taylor in his garden. 47 

Picture of Provo Meeting House and Tabernacle. 47 

Picture of First National Bank of Provo. 47 

iii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS - Continued 



SECTION III Page 

ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 

Large photo of Eliza Nicholls Taylor. 48 
Picture of Grandma Eliza Taylor and 23 grandchildren. 60 

Biogia^Siy of Eliza Nicholls Taylor, 49 
Picture of her house - 415 No. 700 West, Provo, Utah. 60 

Picture of Eliza and her eldest granddaughter Edith, 60 
Picture of Eliza and Nettie Taylor, Roy Dixon, Ashted Taylor, 60 

A poem, " Grandma Taylor" - By Mayme W. Bird. 58 

Patriarchal bless ing. 59 

Picture of Eliza and her family 57 
" As I Knew Grandma Taylor"; 

Clarrisa Taylor Eastmond 61 

Delenna Taylor ^3 

Ethel Taylor Sessions 64 

Picture of Eliza, Henrietta and their children: 68, 75 

Hattie, George, Tom, Nettie and Polly. 

SECTION IV 

HENRIETTA SAWYER TAYLOR 

Large photo of Henrietta Sawyer Taylor. 66 
Picture of Henrietta's house with John and Norma 

175 West Center Street, Provo, Utah. 68 

Picture of Henrietta and daughter Ella. 68 

Picture of Grandpa Sawyer and granddaughters. 68 

Biography of Henrietta Sawyer Taylor. 67 

Biography of Joseph Sawyer and Henrietta Tranham. 69 

SECTION V 

HARRIETT CLARRISA TAYLOR MC CLELLAN 

Large photo of Harriett ( Hattie ). 76 

Photo of James F. McClellan, 83 

Biography of Harriett Clarrisa Taylor McClellan. 77 
Editorial in Provo Daily Herald : 

"Last Provo ' Original ' Pioneer". 81 

Picture of Hattie - Age 12; 17; and later years. 83 

Picture of her house - 712 West 4th No. , Provo. 83 

Photo of Hattie and Jim. 83 

Short history of James F. McClellan. 84 



iv 



TABLE OF CONTENTS - Continued 



SECTION VI Page 

GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR (Jr.) 

Large photo of George Thomas Taylor, Jr. 86 

Photo of Sarah Elizabeth Taylor 90 

History of George Thomas Taylor, (Jr.) 87 
Picture of his house - 187 No. 4th West, Provo, Utah 90 
Four generation photo: 

Eliza N. Taylor, George Taylor, Jr. , Edith 

Taylor Maiben, George Henry Maiben 90 

History of Sarah Elizabeth Thomas Taylor 91 

Snapshots of George and Lizzie's children 90 

SECTION VII 

HENRIETTA TAYLOR KERR 

Large photo of Henrietta Taylor Kerr 94 

Photo of George Affleck Kerr 95 
Three generation photo of : 

Basil, Henrietta Taylor Kerr, Henrietta 

Sawyer Taylor 95 

Photo's of: Rhea, Basil, Kenneth, Ralph Kerr 95 

Family group picture of George Mercer Kerr 95 

Short life sketch of Henrietta Taylor Kerr 96 

SECTION VIII 

THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 

Large photo of Thomas Nicholls Taylor 98 

Thomas Nicholls Taylor Autobiography 99 

Photo of Maud Rogers Taylor 124 

Group picture of Thomas N. Taylor Family 124 
Provo Tabernacle meeting - T. N. Taylor, Stake Pres. 124 

Picture of his house -342 No. 5th West, Provo 124 

Interior picture of Nielsen- Taylor JewelTy Store 122 

Tennis players on T. N. Taylor Tennis Court 122 

Taylor's horse " Golden Cross" 122 

Provo Railroad Depot 122 

History of Maud Rogers Taylor 125 

Spiritual manifestations and testimonies 97 



V 



TABLE OF CONTENTS - Continued 



SECTION IX Page 

MARY ANN ( POLLY ) TAYLOR ROBERTS 

Large photo of Polly Taylor Roberts. 128 

Photo of William D. Roberts, Jr. 130 

Picture of Roberts Hotel with family and friends. 130 
Picture of Taylor & Co. interior and owners; 

Geo Taylor, Sr., John T. Taylor, Polly Taylor. 130 

Picture of Roberts Hotel - Provo, Utah. 130 

Short history of Mary Ann ( Polly ) Taylor Roberts. 129 
Recollection of Roberts Hotel: 

Geneve Roberts Dunn. 132 

Short history of William D. Roberts, Jr. 131 

Hotel Roberts - A National Historical Site. 133 

SECTION X 

ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 

Large photo of Arthur NichoUs Taylor. 134 

Biography of Arthur NichoUs Taylor. 135 
Photo of Maria Dixon Taylor. 153, 181 

Group picture of Arthur N. Taylor Family. 153 

Picture of his house - 256 No. 5th West, Provo. 153 

Chronological life events chart. 154 
Provo Sunday Herald Mothers Day tribute to: 

Maria Louise Dixon Taylor. 156 

Autobiography of Maria Dixon Taylor. 157 
A tribute to Aunt Rye 

By Rhea Dixon Reeve. 177 
" To My Children and Grandchildren". 

Maria Dixon Taylor. ISO 



vi 



TABLE OF CONTENTS - Continued 



SECTION XI Page 

JOHN TRANHAM TAYLOR 

Large photo of John Tranham Taylor. 182 

Autobiography of John T. Taylor. 183 

Photo of Edna Puli^ipher Taylor. 188 

Short history of Edna Pulsipher Taylor. 189 

Group picture of John T. Taylor Family. 188 

Picture of Edna and John T. 188 

Pictures of John T. Taylor's store interior. 188 

Picture of Taylor-Poulton Grocery Store. 192 
Picture of John T. Taylor Grocery Store delivery wagon. 192 

John T. Taylor's first automobile. 192 

Pulsipher House article. 193 

SECTION XII 

WALTER G. TAYLOR 

Large photo of Walter G. Taylor. 194 

Walter G. Taylor history. 195 

Photo of Agnes McKinlay Taylor 204 

Group picture of Walter G. Taylor Family. 204 

Picture of his home - 722 West 5th North, Provo. 204 
Picture of Walter G. Taylor holding reins to "Golden Cross". 204 
" A True Story of a Good Friend" 

By W. M. Wilson 199 

Remembrances of Walter G. Taylor. 201 
" The Old-fashioned Pair" 

By Edgar A. Guest. 203 

A short history of Agnes McKinlay. 205 

SECTION XIII 

ASHTED TAYLOR 

Large photo of Ashted Taylor. 210 

Autobiography of Ashted Taylor. 211 

Photo of Agnes Katherine Strebbel Taylor. 221 

Group picture of Ashted Taylor Family. 221 

Pictures of Fontella, Leo and Roy. 221 

Picture of Riverside House. 221 

Picture of Kathrine G. Taylor. 221 

Picture of Verene P. Taylor 221 

History of Agnes Katherine Strebbel Taylor. 222 



vii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS - Continued 

SECTION XIV Page 

ELLA TAYLOR WESTPHAL 

Picture of Ella Taylor Westphal. 226 
Picture of the Westphal house in Santa Ann, California 

with her husband and John T. Taylor family. 226 

Picture of John Westphal. 226 

Very short sketch of Ella Taylor Westphal. 227 

SECTION XV 

GEORGE TAYLOR - Photographer 228 
Prints made from Geo. Taylor's glass plate negatives: 

Early photo of Salt Lake Tabernacle. 231 

Corner of Third West & Center Street, Provo. 230 

Center Street shops of: 230 

George Choules, shoe repairing. 

Bailey Bros. , grocery store. 

H,J. Maiben, paints and wallpaper. 

Provo Steam Laundry. 230 

Stereoscopic print of new Provo Tabernacle. 230 

George Taylor house. 230 

Name imprints on back of photo's 233 

Company name imprint on letterheads. 233 

SECTION XVI 

GEORGE TAYLOR - Banker. 232 

Picture of First National Bank of Provo about 1890. 234 

Picture of Provo Commercial and Savings Bank. 233 
Copy of letter from Utah Stake to First National Bank. 255 

SECTION XVII 

GEORGE TAYLOR - Merchant 

Brief history of the origin of Taylor Bros. Co. 235 

Picture of Taylor Bros. Employees - 1904. 238 

Picture of Geo. Taylor Furniture Store. 241 

Picture of Taylor Bros. Co. - 1890. 241 

Picture of Taylor Building - 1940. 247 

Taylor's - A Partne rhs ip. 250 

Taylor's Inc. - A Corporation. 250 

Picture of Building - Central Square. Provo. 247 

Dixon Taylor Russell Co. 239 

Picture of D. T. R. Co. - 295 We st Cente r , Provo. 241 

M. R. Taylor Company. 248 

Picture of M. R. Taylor Co. - Spanish Fork, Utah. 247 

D. A. Taylor Co. ( Taylor & Co, ) 251 

Picture of Taylor & Co. Building, Orem, Utah. 247 



viii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS - Continued 



SECTION XVIII Page 

Major interests the Taylor Boys were engaged in: 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 253 

Picture of Building - 290 West Center, Provo. 252 

Picture of Bank interior. 252 

Photo's of adve rtisements , slogans, cards. 252 

Provonna Beach Resort. 257 

Picture of launch at pier. 256 

Picture of A. N. Taylor & boys on beach. 256 

Provonna Sandy Beach, 256 

Wilson's boat "Bonnie" in River. 256 

Bathers at Provonna Beach. 256 

Geneva Resort, 261 

Picture of Dance Pavilion. 264 

Picture of Hotel and Dining Room, 264 

Saratoga Resort, 265 

Picture - Mineral Baths. 264 

Other Interests of the Taylor Boys. 269 

SECTION XIX 

First and Second Generation List by Birthdates. 270-271 

First and Second Generation Interments 322-323 
SECTION XX 

Chart of total Descendants of George Taylor by families. 272 
SECTION XXI 

George Taylor Family Roster. 273-31 6 

Explanation of Family Identification Numbers 321 
SECTION XXII 

Alphabetical Name Index. 325-338 

Index to Pictures, 317-320 



ix 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

'This book is a family effort and involves may lives, both living 
and dead. Many persons have contributed to its publication. 

The TAY LOR name has been an honest, upright and respect- 
ed name in this locality and the State of Utah, in the past. It is our 
responsibility to live these honorable principles and teachings as por- 
trayed in the lives of our departed forebears, so that we may perpet- 
uate their honorable names and their principles and examples, for the 
present and future generations. 

In order to avoid unintential oversight in enumerating those per- 
sons contributing their time, talents and encouragement;no individual 
name will be acknowledged, except those contributing the histories. 

We do appreciate and say "many thanks" to those who have help- 
ed in any way„ The members of the Arthur N. Taylor family assumed 
the cost for printing and binding the first 160 volumes. 

Material on the Kerr and Morrison families is incomplete, and 
current material was not available. 

There will be mistakes, omissions and criticism which will sur- 
face, but we can assure you they were unintential, for we have put 
forth an honest effort to avoid them. The compiler assumes all re- 
sponsibility for them, whether he made them or not. We would apprec- 
iate notification of them in order to correct them in the future. 

Clarence D. Taylor 
Compile r 



SSffi;<D)m(Kffl: TAYILOM, Sr. 1838 - 1926 



CHILDREN OF GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 



ID No. Birth Death 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 
Eliza NichoUs 
Henrietta Sawyer 


25 
29 
20 


Mar 
Apr 
Apr 


1838 

1 o o o 

1838 
1846 


4 

27 
2 


Sept 
J une 
Mar 


1926 
1 922 
1922 


1 


HARRIETT CLARRISA TAYLOR 

MC CLELLAN 




June 


loco 

1 858 


29 


TV yf _ 

May 


loco 

1 958 


2 


MARY ANN EMMA TAYLOR 


1 5 


May 


'^ a L r\ 
1 860 




July 


T O L 1 


3 


PARLEY G. TAYLOR 


A 

4 


Aug 


T O / O 

1862 




T 1 

J uly 


1863 


4 


GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR 


3 1 


Aug 


1 864 


1 5 


Dec 


1 941 


5 


JOSEPH TAYLOR 


10 


June 


1865 


20 


Oct 


1867 


6 


WILLIAM TAYLOR 


2 


July 


1866 


2 


Sept 


1867 


7 


HENRIETTA TAYLOR KERR 


6 


Oct 


1867 


1 


June 


1941 


8 


THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


28 


July 


1868 


24 


Oct 


1950 


9 


MARY ANN { Polly) TAYLOR 

ROBERTS 


14 


i? eb 


1870 


3 


T 

J une 


1 V50 


10 


ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


2 


Nov 


1870 


1 


C J. 

bept 


1935 


11 


JOHN TRANHAM TAYLOR 


12 


Aug 


1872 


23 


Apr 


I960 


12 


WALTER G. TAYLOR 


25 


Sept 


1873 


18 


Mar 


1959 


13 


ASHTED TAYLOR 


12 


Sept 


1875 


15 


Sept 


1967 


14 


ELLA TAYLOR WESTPHAL 


4 


Oct 


1875 


3 


Aug 


1959 


15 


AMY TAYLOR 


1 


Jan 


1878 


1 


June 


1880 



4 



George Taylor Family- 




Eliza 






Walter G. 
# 12 




Henrietta 




George Taylor 




George T. 
# 4 




Arthur N. 
# 10 




Ashted 
# 13 




Henrietta 
# 7 




William 
# 6 



Parley G, 
# 3 



M.A. Emma 
# 2 



J o s e ph 

# 5 



Amy 
# 15 




Polly 

# 9 




Ella 
# 14 



GEORGE TAYLOR SR. 
1 8 3 8 - 1 9 Z 6 



John Goodall, Registrar in the sub-district of Duddeston and 
Nechelle, in the County of Warwick, England, recorded that a boy by 
the name of GEORGE was born on March 25, 1838, at Windsor Street 
in the Parish of Aston, to Thomas Taylor and Ann Taylor, formerly 
Hill. 

George had one older brother William and a younger sister 
Mary, who later married John James Hickman. His mother was an 
invalid, but being a good seamstress was able to do some dressmak- 
ing, 

Thomas Taylor, George's father, was a good natured man - -al- 
ways looking on the bright side of things. He was the merry-maker 
of the town, often being called "The clown of the Village". George's 
birth certificate lists the father's profession as a 'well sinker', but 
on George's marriage certificate it lists the father's profession as 
'pump maker'. 

As was the case with most English lads of that time, George was 
taught early in life to work. At the early age of eight he went in 
search of work, and when asked what he could do, his answer was, 
"lean learn if I may try". This determination coming so early in 
his life, was the keynote of his successful life. He was finally given 
a job as errand boy, and at the age of eight years was a wage earner. 
At the age of ten it fell his lot to serve an apprenticeship as a scales 
maker, but his active and energetic nature would not permit him to 
s imply be a factory toiler. 

George's formal education was limited to only one week's dura- 
tion, for he had a desire to work rather than remain in school. His 
desire for accumulating knowledge was a driving force and a chara- 
cteristic part of his whole life. Of his weekly wage, of one shilling, 
from his first job, he gave it all to his mother with the exception of 
one penny. This was saved until he had enough to buy himself a dic- 
tionary, an arithmetic and a spelling book. While on his errands, 
he puzzled out the advertising signs on the buildings and in the win- 
dows, and thus learned to read. In his spare time he acquired some 
knowledge of the art of music. Later in life, he became a profession- 
al photographer by reading magazines, books and through his own 
expe rimentation. 

While still in his teens, he and some of his youthful compaaions 
were attracted to the Latter-day Saints Church where they were 
taught the Gospel by the Utah Elders. On March 3, 1855, just be- 
fore his seventeenth birthday, he was baptized a member of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Joseph Howard and 
became a very active member of the local branch. He and his com- 



7 



8 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



panions organized an orchestra and put on several entertainments for 
the benefit of the Branch and missionaries. It was while in the Ashted 
Branch Choir of Birmingham, England that he met his future wife, Eliza 
Nicholls. 

Although George and Eliza were both only nineteen years of age and 
both were members of the L. D. S. Church, they were married 
on July 5, 1857 at the Edgbaston Parish Church in the County of War - 
wick, England by I. Spooner, Vicar of the Church of England. The two 
special witnesses were Edwin Dedicant and A. Rogers. 

George Taylor was a very high minded, ambitious boy of nine- 
teen and he chose a good, unselfish girl who loved him and worked 
with him. Both were desirous of joining the Saints in Zion, where 
they could better live their religion. So Eliza volunteered to contin- 
ue her work and thus help to save enough money to make the long 
journey to Utah. 

On June Z3, 1858 a baby girl was born to this struggling couple . 
She was given the name of Harriet Clarissa and a blessing by Sam 
Western on July 11, 1858. Eliza continued to work in the Button fac- 
tory and the infant baby was cared for during the day by Eliza's sis- 
ter Emma. 

A little sister to "Hattie" was born on May 13, I860 and named 
after the nursemaid of the two children, Mary Ann Emma. Eliza 
continued her tireless working, and saving for that 'home in Zion'. 

On August 4, 1862, Parley G. was born. Eliza still worked and 
Aunt Emma continued to care for the children. 

After six years of skimping, saving and struggling, George and 
Eliza could wait no longer. They had saved just enough money now 
to pay for the ocean voyage. In talking over their emmigration plans, 
George would often remark to his wife, "If only we can get there by 
the skin of our teeth, I will sure be happy". 

They literally succeeded in making it to Utah by only "the skin 
of their teeth". For, as they passed over London Bridge, on their 
way to the docks, they had only a tuppence (four cents) cash to make 
their long journey. What they lacked in cash was made up in courage 
and unlimited faith. 

On June 4, 1863, George Taylor, his wife Eliza and their three 
children: Harriet Clarissa, age five; Mary Ann Emma, age three ; 
and Parley G. , age ten months; left London, England on the sailing 
vessel "Amazon" for a seven week voyage to America. George was 
ill during most of the voyage and it was most welcomed when they 
landed at Castle Gardens, New York the third week of July 1863. 

On their arrival in New York City, they were fortunate enough 
to meet an old-time friend, Joseph Harris, who loaned them the 
money to continue their journey westward. 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR, 



9 



Their transportation from New York City to St. Joseph was like 
they ship cattle to market. Straw was scattered on the floor of the 
box car to serve as their bed at night. As they neared St. Joseph, 
little Mary Ann Emma, the frailest of the three children, died and 
when the train stopped at the station an undertaker was waiting and 
immediately took the body of the little girl. Although George and 
James Poulton went in search of the undertaker, he was never locat- 
ed and none of the family or friends knew where she was buried. 

From St. Joseph to Florence the transportation was to be by 
boat, on the Missouri River. George again, became very sick, as 
was the little boy. Parley G. The child died three days out from St. 
Joseph. His little body was taken off the boat at Florence where he 
was buried. 

George now feeling better, joined Captain Wooley's Party for 
their trek westward. To defray the cost of transporation for their 
trip westward, George drove a wagon and yoke of three oxen. The 
party left Florence the fore part of August 1863 and after two months 
traveling, arrived in Salt Lake City on October 4, 1863. 

George left his wife and child in care of friends in Salt Lake and 
proceeded to Provo to establish a home. There being no demand for 
a scale maker in this frontier town, he was forced to accept any kind 
of job that became available. One of his many jobs, was that of a 
hod carrier for the brick masons on the Provo Tabernacle. 

After a month's time he was able to secure a one room log house , 
with no doors, windows, or wood floors. Brother Abraham Halliday 
of Provo, on his trip from Salt Lake, brought his wife and daughter 
to their new home in Provo. 

George and Eliza had barely made it to Utah "by the skin of their 
teeth", and had to endure many trying hardships, sickness, death 
and agonizing trials. Their faith in God and their testimony of the 
truthfullne ss of the Gospel had sustained them in their hour of need. 

Their long time dream of owning their own home materialized 
when George traded his soldier outfit, including a gun and sword, to 
Thomas Clark in exchange for a two roon, adobe house, which had 
been used as a sheep pen by its former owner. As was most of the 
early pioneer houses, it had a dirt roof, a dirt floor, and the wind- 
ows had to be covered with a blanket to keep out the storms. The 
dirt roof had to be continiously repaired to stop the leaks. 

George had accepted the principle and practice of polygamy, as 
advocated by the leaders of the L. D, S. Church, at that time. So on 
March 5, 1864, George took his wife Eliza and Henrietta Sawyer, a 
beautiful, good girl of eighteen, to the Salt Lake Endowment House, 
where he was married and sealed to his wife; and married and seal- 
ed to Henrietta Sawyer as a plural wife. 



10 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR, 



In this little two room, adobe house, located on 8th Street be- 
tween C and D Streets, Prove (now 1st North between 6th and 7th 
West), four of Eliza's children were born and three of Henrietta's 
children were born. 

These two wonderful, choice women, who equally shared their 
home, the responsibilities of the household, and their husband; were 
able to live in peace and harmony and support each other in rearing 
their individual children. 

The frequent harassments by the Indians, in stealing food and the 
driving off the pioneer's cattle, necessitated the maintaining of a Mi- 
litia. George joined the Territorial Militia and drilled on the bench 
lands now known as University Hill. He was a member of the Militia 
at the time of the Black Hawk War of 1866. 

One of the odd jobs George employed in making a living for his 
families in 1866, was that of a furniture salesman for the Cluff Bros. 
The Cluff Bros, were pioneer, hand made furniture makers in Provo. 
They permitted and encouraged George to sell their hand-made furn- 
iture on a commission basis. He proved to be such a good salesman 
that he decided he would open up his own furniture store. 

He rented a small, frame building at about 250 West Center and 
hung out his sign, " G, Taylor FURNITURE". He stocked his store 
with all the hand made furniture the Cluff Bros would let him have. 
He then borrowed a wagon and team of horses and went to Salt Lake 
to H. Dinwoody Furniture Co. to buy what furniture they would let 
him have to put in stock in his new store. Not having ready cash to 
pay for his merchandise, he had to borrow the money at 24% interest 
per annum. To the Cluff Bros, goes the credit for the encouragement 
and stimulus for George Taylor going into the furniture business and 
the beginning of his successful business career. 

Before going into the furniture business, however, he decided to 
make use of some of the knowledge he had gained from books, in the 
art of photography. In 1864 he purchased a photographic camera and 
began his career as a photographer. At that time he knew nothing 
about the business and read all he could find about photography in 
magazines. He then experimented bymaking pictures of his own fam- 
ily. He made and mixed his own chemicals, experimenting in the 
cellar of the house, oftimes working all night as one mixture after 
another proved ineffective, until he finally would come upon a form- 
ula which was fairly successful. From here he would continue to 
work and test until he obt ained the result he desired. This experience, 
led him to devote a section of his furniture store to a photographic 
gallery, taking photos, finishing, tinting as well as dealing in a 
stock of photographic supplies. His gallery became the first photo 
supply house south of Salt Lake City. In the beginning he used the old 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



n 



tintype negatives. He took the picture of the person and developed 
the negative, which was then given to the purchaser. No prints. 

The next year he began to use the chloride plates, and for some 
time he had to prepare the plates himself; smearing the chloride over 
the glass just before making the exposure. He became adept at both 
the wet and the dry plate method. He always insisted on the use of 
what he termed the "water finishing method" where the prints, after 
going through the chemical treatment, would be washed for many hour s . 
As a result, many of the pictures he made in the 60's and early 70' s. 
are still clear and distinct and show very little, if any, fading out. 

About 1870, he sent his daughter Hattie, to the studio of C, R. 
Savage in Salt Lake City to learn re-touching, and the latest ideas or 
methods of printing. She was the first re-toucher south of Salt Lake 
City. He quit the commercial side of photography about 1885, but 
continued making pictures as a hobby until the 1920's. 

As George's furniture store prospered and grew, he followed 
the example of the Cluff Bros, and employed the services of Thomas 
Mitchell, a cabinet maker, to make milk safes, cupboards, and 
lounges. Andrew Sward, a life long employee of George Taylorand 
Taylor Bros, , finished, painted, varnished and grained the furniture. 
He also made the mattresses from excelsior. Andrew Sward was a 
most versatile man. He could take pictures, develop, print and 
touch them up. He could handle any and all transactions in the store. 
He was even a ventriloquist and could throw his voice, which caused 
much dismay and merriment with his customers and friends. While 
serving as nightwatchman, in his later years, he fell down the elevator 
shaft and broke both of his legs. 

The love of music acquired in England, now became a part of his 
life in this new land. He became a member of one of the first bands 
and orchestras in Provo, and played for all dances, theatres and 
church entertainments. This interest in music prompted him to add 
a music department to his furniture business. His business now 
carried the name, George Taylor Furniture and Music Store. The 
chief musical instrument handled at first, was the parlor organ. 

By 1869, George had qualified as a desirable and permanent 
resident of the United States with a desire to become a full fledged 
citizen, with all its rights, title, interest and responsibilities. His 
application for citizenship had been accepted and his United States 
Naturalization papers were granted to him on June 15, 1869. He 
could now vote and even hold a public office. 

With a household consisting of husband, two wives and six child- 
ren, larger living quarters were a must. In the spring of 1873, Eliza 
moved her family to living quarters above the store, in the building 
owned by Peter Stubbs, Henrietta and her family occupied living 



12 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



quarters in the rear of the store building. 

It was in this upstairs home that Walter G. Taylor was born to 
Eliza on September 25, 1873. Eliza and family lived in this upstairs 
apartment until the Spring of 1875 when George found them a small, 
one room log house on the corner of Seventh West and Center Street. 
Here Ashted, the last baby of Eliza was born September 12, 1875. 

Henrietta's third baby girl, named Ella, was born in the apart- 
ment at the rear of the store on October 4, 1875. 

George still owned the adobe, two roomed building on First North, 
which had remained unoccupied for some time. By November of 
1875 he had re-modeled it and Eliza and her family moved into it. 

While Henrietta was still living in the apartment at the rear of 
the store, she gave birth to her last child, a baby girl named Amy. 
When Amy was two and one-half years of age, she was drowned in 
the Mill Race, an open stream flowing south on Second West. George 
was working in his garden, located on the corner of Center Street 
and Second West. Amy must have seen her father and was on her 
way to him. In crossing the narrow bridge, overthe stream, she 
fell in and was drowned. Her body was found a short distance down 
the stream where she was lodged among some branches. The Mother 
and family were grief stricken. George took a picture of little Amy 
which became a great consolation to the family, 

A few years later, George built a home for Henrietta on the lot 
East of his garden, where she lived the remainder of her life. 

As to George's reputation for honesty and fair trading, his son 
Walter G. attests: 

"As a lad, one of my early responsibilities was to take father's 
horse and wagon and go to the Railroad Depot and pick up the furn- 
iture organs, carpets and other freight items brought in by the rail- 
road from the Easte rn factories , and which were to be sold in father's 
store. As has always been the policy of the railroad companies, no 
freight was to be released until the freight charges had been paid in 
full. At times, when father did not have the cash to give me, I would 
go to the freight agent and tell him I was George Taylor's son, and 
that he had sent me to pick-up the freight but would be unable to pay 
him until the next day, ( or at some definite date). The freight agent 
never turned me away, but would tell me that if George Taylor had 
promised to pay on a definite time, that is when the freight would be 
paid, I would then haul the merchandise back to the storeo " 

George accepted the old adage, "An idle mind is the devil's work- 
shop". He always managed to have something for his boys to do. He 
had just purchases a piece of ground near the top of the Provo Bench 
dugway, which had never been cultivated and was covered with sage- 
brush. This particular day, Walter G. was instructed to take the 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



13 



team of horse s and go out and pull all the sage brush out of the ground, 
ready for burningo One of the neighbors seeing the boy spending so 
much time and effort in clearing the land came over and suggested 
that he smarten up and take the plow and plow under the sage-brush, 
thereby disposing of the sagebrush and plowing the ground ready for 
planting, in one operation. This appealed to Walter G. , so he plowed 
up the land and reported back to his surprised father, in short time. 
He told his father he had found a quicker and better way of preparing 
the land for planting. His father then asked him what he had been 
instructed to do, and if he had followed instructions. To this question 
Walter G„ answered negatively. Then his father proceeded to give 
him a lesson in obedience. One he never forgot. The next day, 
George took the boy and went out to the plowed and cleared land, 
taking with them sufficient seed to plant the area. They planted the 
area that had the sagebrush cleared off the ground the same as where 
the sagebrush was plowed under. Then his father said, "Now we will 
wait and see what happens". That fall when the wheat was harvested, 
the cleared land produced more than three times more wheat than the 
land with the plowed under sagebrush. 

Assuming an interest in civic affairs, George was appointed to 
serve on the committee of the Utah County Board of Trade to give a 
report at the next State Meeting on, "Home-made Furniture". He 
also served as a Director in the Commercial Club which was organ- 
ized in 1901 to aid and encourage, protect, and for the advancement 
of all business interest in Provo and Utah County. 

In 1882 a charter for a Bank in Provo to be called The First 
National Bank of Provo, was issued. This Bank did a good job for a 
few years until the panic of 1893 when they were forced to close their 
doors. George had purchased stock in the new bank and had been 
elected to its board of directors^ He had also become a director in 
the Utah County Savings Bank, and at one time served as its presid- 
ent. The Savings Bank was an affiliate of the First National Bank, 
but it continued to function, even after the First National closed its 
door. 

With the closing of the First National Bank in 1893, George be- 
came chairman of the committee to gather pledges for its re-opening. 
The depositors failed to support the acceptance of time certificates, 
so the Bank went into government receivership. The Bank paid its 
depositors the full amount of their deposits, mainly due to the dupli- 
cate liability of the stockholders. The First National Bank of Provo 
was then taken over by the Provo Commercial and Savings Bank. 

The following was copied from a notation George had written in 
a First National Bank booklet, with pencil on the inside cover in his 
own handwriting: 



14 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR, 



" GEO. TAYLOR SR. was a stockholder in First Nat'l Bank of 
Provo from its organization in 1882, Have been connected in Provo 
Commercial and Savings ever since. Occupying same position ( as 
a director ) until Jany. 1924, then because I would not consent to un- 
necessary extravagance in Bank Building and other doings. I was 
kicked out after 42 years service. I blame this to J. F, Farrer and 
C, E. Loose. 

First National Bank, Provo City, Utah organized 1882, Was 
chairman of Executive Committee. 

si GEORGE TAYJLOR SR, " 

The twenty- five foot frontage property next door Ea st of the furn- 
iture store was owned by W. O. Beesley. The twenty-foot frontage 
property East of the Beesley property was owned by George, but the 
title was recorded in the name of Emily Pafford. When George's son 
Thomas N. and Julius Jensen wanted to expand their Jewelry busines s , 
Beesley was willing to sell them his twenty-five foot frontage property. 
Tom went to his father to talk over the proposed purchase. George 
felt this property being next to his furniture store was more valuable 
to him than anyone else, so he agreed to sell Taylor and Jensen 
Jewelers, his twenty foot property, where a beautiful new jewelry 
store building was built, and the upstairs area became the home for 
Tom and his wife, George then bought the twenty-five foot frontage 
property from Beesley, In 1884, when George's son John T. was 
seventeen years of age and his daughter "Polly" was nineteen years 
of age, he set them up in business in this Beesley property. 

With their father's help and with plenty of hard work, John T. 
and"Polly"developed a most attractive and successful retail grocery 
store, specializing in fresh produce with attractive displays in the 
front of the building, but carrying a staple and fancy line of groceries, 
fruits, fish, imported and domestic produce and sundries. This bus- 
iness was called Taylor & Co. As George's part of the Company, he 
brought in a stock of photographic supplies, including; Snead's dry 
plates, elknogen, nitrogen of silver, chloride of gold, pyrogolk acid, 
hyposulphite soda and sulphite soda. 

In 1882, the Edmunds Law, a federal law which made polygamy 
a felony, subject to imprisonment; forced George to go on the "under- 
ground". Which means he had to stay clear of being apprehended by 
any of the federal officers. "The Fed" was the nickname these of- 
ficers were known by. 

For five years, George had been able to keep out of the reach of 
the "feds" by living with the Poulton Family and other friends in 
Provo and Utah County. On one occassion he was hanging a picture 
in his store, when a "fed", posing as a salesman, sneaked up be- 
hind him. To avoid being caught, George had to out run his pursuer, 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



15 



going clear to the river bridge at the top of Fifth West, before he 
could shake him. 

In about 1886, after having evaded the "feds" for five years, he 
was finally arrested by an agent named Norell. This agent had rep- 
resented himself as a traveling salesman taking orders for merchan- 
dise to re- sell in the George Taylor Furniture and Music Store. At 
the trial, there was no complaining witness, George was set free 
without a sentence or fine. 

Previous to his going on the "underground", George had trans- 
ferred title to his business and property to his oldest son George 
Taylor Jr. He did this to avoid his property being confiscated by the 
Federal Government in case he was arrested for being married to 
two wives. 

In November 1886, George Taylor made a separation agreement 
with his Znd wife, Henrietta, and made a division of his property. 
Each wife was given the home she and her family were living in. To 
Eliza he gave five acres of land between 7th and 8th West on 4th North, 
and a lot on the corner of 7th West and 5th North. To Henrietta he 
gave the five acres of farming land in the Southwest part of the City, 
called the "Fort Fields". He then moved into one of the rooms of 
his sister's Son's home, George Hickman, at about 245 West Center 
Street ( just across the street from his business ), a small, frame 
house he was renting. 

There had been some conversation relative to the sale of George's 
furniture and music business, between George Taylor and Henry 
Southworth. Henry Southworth owned and operated a general merch- 
andise store on the corner of Fifth West and First North, in the "old 
Round House". Mr. Southworth had offered to pay $10,000.00 for 
his merchandise, fixtures and building, George was seriously 
thinking about the sale and also contemplating a trip to England with 
the proceeds. 

When problems arise in families or between individuals, there 
are always two or more viewpoints involved. In the disposition of 
George Taylor's furniture business we do not have his viewpoint, but 
knowing of his forthright, straight-laced honesty and considering his 
principle of "his word being as good as his bond", there may be some 
justification in his first refusal of selling his business to his wife 
Eliza and her sons, because of his prior committment to sell the 
business to H, Southworth, 

We do have the written account of this transaction in the journal 
of his son Thomas N. Taylor: 

"Things went on smoothly until the persecution of our people for 
the practice of polygamy in (after 1882). Father, who had two fam- 
ilies, decided to go away to England to escape the penalty of the law 



16 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



•which was six months in the Utah Penitentiary and $300.00 fine. He 
had a friend, Albert Singleton, whose first wife had no children. She 
made the trip with father. There was a decided change came over 
him on that trip. Before leaving he deededthe store and real estate 
to my brother George Jr. and put the business in the name of Taylor 
Brothers. He deeded a home and five acres of land to Mother, a 
home and five acres of land to my Aunt." 

"On father's return from England he was restless and wanted to 
sell the business. There was some letters come into my possession 
he had written to Mrs, Singleton (who, by the way, had procurred a 
divorce from her husband and taken her maiden name Pafford). These 
letters indicated that he intended selling the business and going away 
with this woman. She had received about all Singleton had. Mother 
knew something was wrong and there grew up a coldness betweenher 
and father. Now the first real sorrow of my life comes in. As a lad 
father had been good to me. I stuck to him in the store, and in re- 
turn he gave me almost everything a boy could ask --a pony, a goat 
and wagon, a velocipede a bicycle, pigeons. He had J. M.Mitchell 
make me a pigeon house and Mr. Sward paint it. He gave me rabbits, 
a pistol. He was good to me." 

"When this trouble came between him and mother, I must take a 
stand. I did with my mother. I had assumed management of the bus- 
iness. Father wanted it returned, I made him this proposition that 
he give mother five thousand dollars ($5,000.00) which I figured she 
could loan at 8% and have an income of $400. 00 a year. I would re- 
turn him the business. He refused. Said he would have his own set- 
tlement with mother and it was none of my business. During our 
talks, and we had many of them, some very unpleasant things were 
said. I told him he could not and should not send my mother to the 
wash tib for a living, that she was entitled to one-half the business, 
and that I had put in my full time there and received very little for it 
and what we had done entitled her to this amount, I considered the 
business worth $10,000.00. The rangle went on. I wanted to get a- 
way from it all. " 

"Father insisted on me turning over the business. I refused un- 
til he settled with mother. - - Finally after dreary months of agony, 
father went to the home ( he and mother had ceased to live together) 
and offered to sell her the business for $11,000, 00, building and 
business just as it stood. Things were looking better. We were 
doing about $1,000.00 per month then which was a good furniture 
business for those days. Mother at first would not listen to him. He 
said he would give her one-half (1/2) and sell her the other one-half 
(1/2) for the $1 1,000.00, She told him he had offered it all for 
$10, 000, 00 and felt it very unjust to ask her $11 , 000, 00 for the one- 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



.17 



half. She said she would give him no answer until she talked it over 
with me. After going over the situation with mother, I advised her 
to buy him out. " 

This stand taken for the protection of his mother's financial 
interest against his father, alienated father and son to the point of 
being disallowed any proceeds in the will of George Taylor Sr. other 
than being given the gold watch and chain which the son had previously 
given to the father. 

The transaction for sale of the furniture bus ines s was completed, 
which included the land, buildings and merchandise, for $11, 000. 00. 
The new purchasers were: Eliza N, Taylor, George Taylor Jr. , 
Thomas N. Taylor, Arthur N. Taylor, and John D. Dixon, doing 
business as Taylor Bros. COo Terms of settlement, which were 
underwritten by the First National Bank of Provo were: George was 
to receive $3,000. 00 cash at the signing of the agreement. Four 
bank- guaranteed note s of $2,000.00 each we re given, bearing interest 
at 10% per annum. One note was to be paid off every three months, 
and all were to be paid within one year. All notes were paid promptly 
as agreed. 

Taylor Brothers Company was then incorporated under the State 
laws of Utah in 1890 with "Grandma" Eliza NichoUs Taylor as Presi- 
dent, George Taylor jr. as vice-president, John DeGrey Dixon as 
secretary and treasurer, Arthur N. Taylor as a director and Thomas 
N. Taylor as director and manager. 

With his retirement from the furniture and photographic busi- 
ness, George then devoted his energy and time to buying and selling 
real estate, handling securities, and as a director in the Provo Com- 
mercial and Savings Bank where he closely followed their financial 
success . 

George Taylor was a man of his word and expected the same 
from everyone else, even his own children. Sometimes the lessons 
he tried to impress on to his sons were quite severe and hard to ac- 
cept, but it carried home the point and was not easily forgotten. 

During one of the hard winters of heavy snow and freezing cold 
weather, George Jr. had run short of feed for his horses. His ready 
cash was depleted. He went to his father for a loan to buy some feed. 
A short term loan for four months was made, with the current rate 
of interest and with a specific date for payment in full. Shortly after 
making the loan, George Jr. received payment of a debt owed him. 
He tookthe money to his father to liquidate his note. His father 
would not accept the money at that time. It was not yet due. 12:00 
o'clock (noon) on June 12th was the payment date. That is when he 
wanted it paid and not before nor a minute after. 

While Tom was still working for his father and just getting start- 



18 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



ed in the jewelry business with Julius Jensen in 1885, they needed a 
show case and a little more merchandise costing $112.00, or $56.00 
each, Tom went to his father for a loano It was necessary for Tom 
to put up his mare and colt (valued at $125. 00) as collateral on the 
note. When the note became due, he asked his father for an exten- 
sion of time for payment, as he had put the money into new merchan- 
dise for the businesSo His father refused, saying he knew when he 
borrowed the money when it was due to be paid back. His father , 
George, took the mare and the colt in default of payment of the note. 
Punctuality was one of his cardinal rules. 

An example of how principle was passed from father to son is 
clearly demonstrated in this humerous episode: 

A rival suitor of one of the fair lassies of the Provo Third Ward 
offered Walter G, a quarter if he would throw a bouquet of flowers 
onto the lap of his girl friend, while she was attending Church Ser- 
vice. That quarter looked like a silver mine, and the time and work 
to earn it was so short and easy. Walter G. agreed to do the job. 
Unobserved he inched up to the bench she was sitting on and quickly 
thru the flowers. The girl screamed with surprise, disturbing the 
whole congregation. A humiliated George, grabbed his son by the 
collar and took him out of the building where he was chastized sever- 
ly and asked why he had done such a thing. A repentent boy told his 
father that he didn't know she would scream out. He was only trying 
to help this man show a favor to his girl. He was being paid for it, 
and besides he had made an agreement and he was bound to keep his 
word o 

George's marriage to Sarah M. Blair, a Sunday School teacher 
at the time he was Superintendent of the Sunday School in the Third 
Ward, was of short duration of only about a month; with its mutual 
dissolvement on March 13, 1890. 

The records show a civil divorce, instituted by George Taylor, 
was granted him from Eliza N, Taylor on September 6, 1901, al- 
though they had been separated for several years. It was not contest- 
ed by Eliza, 

On their trip to England, George Taylor and Emily Pafford 
Singleton were married in the New York City Hall on July 19, 1906. 
Emily died of cancer on January 11, 1914 at Provo, Utah. On heT 
huge, granite monument, in the Provo City Cemetery, George had a 
photo of Emily permanently attached with the epitaph, "You Will 
Miss Me When I Am Gone". 

In 1920, after the high waters of the Provo River and Utah Lake 
had washed out the dike and flooded the farming land of the Skipper 
Bay Drainage District, which had been spearheaded by Arthur N. 
Taylor; some of his former co-workers in Taylor Bros. Co. came 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



19 



to him expressing their desire to organize a corporation and buy the 
Barton Furniture Co., located on Academy Avenue, or the Bates 
Furniture Co. on East Center Street. 

In talking this proposition over with his father George, Arthur 
was advised against the buying of an existing company and having to 
pay dearly for the goodwill of the existing company and in buying the 
old stock and fixtures., "Why don't you organize your own company, 
build your own building and stock it with new, clean, up-to-date 
stock and fixtures? " the father asked. Arthur answered that he had 
just lost $ on the Lake Project and didn't have that kind of 

money, and he was sure the other boys could not finance it<> 

George told his son Arthur that he would not loan him the money, 
but he was a director of the Provo Commercial Bank and he would 
see that the money to finance a new furniture business was made 
available to him. He then went to the president of the Bank and told 
him to let his son Arthur, borrow the amount he needed to start a 
new business and to help him finance the construction of a new build- 
ing. That was the beginning of the Dixon Taylor Russell Co, , under 
written by George Taylor Sr. 

Phoebe Carter Christensen became George's fifth wife on Oct- 
ober 26, 1915o She survived him at his death on September 4, 1926 
at his home at 195 West Center Street, Provo, Utah. Funeral ser- 
vices were held in the Provo Third Ward Chapel on Monday after- 
noon at 2:00 p.m. Interment was in the Provo City Cemetery. 

George Taylor was the father of the following children: 



By his first wife, Eliza Nicholls Taylor: 



Harriet Clarissa T. McClellan 


B 


23 June 


1858 


D 29 May 


1958 


Mary Ann Emma Taylor 




13 May 


1860 


July 


1863 


Parley G. Taylor 




4 Aug 


1862 


July 


1863 


George Thomas Taylor 




31 Aug 


1864 


15 Dec 


1941 


William Taylor 




2 July 


1866 


2 Sept 


1867 


Thomas Nicholls Taylor 




28 July 


1868 


24 Oct 


1950 


Arthur Nicholls Taylor 




2 Nov 


1870 


10 Sept 


1935 


Walter G. Taylor 




25 Sept 


1873 


18 Mar 


1959 


Ashted Taylor 




12 Sept 


1875 


15 Sept 


1967 


By his second wife, Henrietta Sawyer 


Taylor: 






Joseph Taylor 


B 


10 Jun 


1865 


D 20 Oct 


1867 


Henrietta Taylor Kerr 




6 Oct 


1867 


1 Jun 


1941 


Mary Ann (Polly) T. Roberts 




14 Feb 


1870 


3 Jun 


1950 


John Tranham Taylor 




12 Aug 


1872 


23 Apr 


I960 


Ella Taylor Westphall 




4 Oct 


1875 


3 Aug 


1959 


Amy Taylor 




1 Jan 


1878 


1 Jun 


1880 



After all expenses for probating the will of George Taylor were 
made, the court records show there was $32, 865. 00 distributed to 
the heirs of George Taylor Sr. , deceased. 



Clarence D. Taylor 
December 29, 1978 



20 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



Although embittered in his later years towards the Church and 
his outward action and speech showed much contempt towards it, 
George Taylor's inward soul retained his love and esteem and high re- 
gards for both the Church and his divorced wife, Eliza, evidenced in 
the two L„D,S, Temple Certificates (recommends) found among his 
most valuable possessions in his "strong" box, after his death. 
The context of these recommends reads: 

CERTIFICATE 

Provo City June 12, 1887 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

This certifies that GEORGE TAYLOR 

has renewed his covenants and is a member of the Third Ward, in the 
Provo City Utah Stake, of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints, in full fellowship, and as such we recommend him to the House 
of the Lord, 

s/ Myron Tanner 

Bishop 
s/ A. O. Smoot 
President of Stake 
The second recommend reads the same as above, except it is 
made in the name of ELISA TAYLOR 

In the life of George Taylor Sr. , a lesson can be gleaned from his 
inability to separate and distinguish the human frailities of man from 
the teachings and practices of the Church. 

Some close friends who were members of the Church, holding 
prominent and responsible offices in the Priesthood, and in the eyes 
of George, did not conduct themselves in an honourable, christian, 
everyday behavior, especially in certain business transactions. Such 
activities resulted inGeorge becoming bitter and inactive in the Church. 
Rumors even had it that he was excommunicated. 

While Arthur D, Taylor, a grandson of George, was Bishop of the 
Provo Third Ward, wrote a letter inquiring of the membership standing 
of his grandfather. The following reply was received: 

(Letter in full on next page) 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



21 



October 20, 1947 



Bishop Arthur Taylor 
Dixon Taylor Russell Co. 
Provo, Utah 

Dear Bishop Taylor: 

Your letter of October 17 regarding your grandfather, George 
Taylor, has been received. 

We can find no record of any action ever having been taken again- 
st Brother George Taylor and apparently you cannot find any. Under 
these circumstances it would seem that we must assume that none was 
taken and that he retained his membership until the time of his deatho 
No man loses his membership by mere inactivity, but he does deprive 
himself of the blessing which comes from activity. 



Faithfully yours. 



s/ 
si 
s/ 



GEORGE ALBERT SMITH 
J. REUBEN CLARK, JR 
DAVID O. MC KAY 



First Presidency 



Copy of W I L L of 



George taylor, Sr. 

r, GEORGE TAYLOR, SR., of Provo, Utah County, State of Utah, 
being eighty- seven years of age March 25, 1925, and being of sound 
and disposing mind and memory, do hereby make and declare this to 
be my last will and testament, I hereby revoke all wills and codicils 
and any testamentary paper at any time heretofore made by me. 

First - I hereby direct the payment of all my just debts and fun- 
eral expenses as soon as practicable after my decease. 

Second - I hereby give, devise and bequeth to my wife, Phoebe 
Taylor, as her sole interest in my estate, one-third of all my real 
property that I may be possessed or seized of at the time of my death. 

Third - I hereby give, devise and bequeth to my nephew, James 
J. Hickman, the sum of Five Hundred Dollars ($500). 

Fourth - I hereby give, devise, and bequeth to my niece, Annie 
Hickman, the sum of Five Hundred Dollars ($500). 

Fifth - I hereby give, devise and bequeth to the children ofGeorge 
Hickman, my sister's oldest son, to-wit: George Hickman, Ada Hick- 
man Gardner, and Albert Hickman, each the sum of Five Hundred 
Dollars ($500). 

Sixth - I hereby give, devise and bequeth to Leo Taylor, Jack Paf- 
ford, and Harry Pafford, each the sum of Five Hundred Dollars ($500). 

Seventh - I hereby give, devise and bequeth to my daughters, 
Harriet Taylor McClellan, Nettie Taylor Kerr, Polly Taylor Roberts 
and Ella Taylor Westphal, each the sum of Four Thousand Dollars 
( $4, 000). 

Eighth - I hereby give, devise and bequeth to my son Thomas N, 
Taylor, my Elgin Watch and chain. 

Ninth - I hereby give, devise and bequeth to my sons George 
Taylor Jr., John T. Taylor, Arthur N. Taylor, Walter G. Taylor, and 
Ashted Taylor, each the sum of Five Dollars ($5.00), and in connec- 
tion with this last bequest I desire to say that I have heretofore made 
other provisions for my said sons named in this paragraph, which to 
my mind is just and fair, and so that my mind and intent in connection 
with what I may have done for said sons may be made clear I desire to 
say that neither they nor any one of them is indebted' to me in any sum 
whatsoever at this time. 

Tenth - I hereby give, devise and bequeth to my sons, George 
Taylor Jr, , John T, Taylor, Arthur N, Taylor, Walter G. Taylor and 
Ashted Taylor all the rest, residue and remainder of my estate, real, 
personal or mixed, wheresoever the same may be located, said sons 
so named to share in the same share and share alike. 

Eleventh - I desire that my coffin be made of plain pine boards by 
a Provo carpenter, with no varnish or paint, with six plain Japanned 
handles . 



22 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



23 



It is my wish and I so order that there be no flowers at my funeral 
and no automobiles carting me around to meeting houses for show. 

It is my wish and I so order that there be no remarks at my fun- 
eral, but that I be borne silently away to my last resting place. 

It is my wish and I so order that the epitaph to be place on my 
plain headboard be worded as follows: 

" He earned his rest". 

Twelfth - I hereby nominate, constitute and appoint my sons, 
George Taylor Jr. , John T, Taylor, Arthur N. Taylor, Walter G, 
Taylor and Ashted Taylor, as executors of this my last will and test- 
ament, and it is my desire that they be permitted to act without bond. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, the said George Taylor, Sr., have 
hereunto set my hand this 24th day of December, A.D, 1925. 

(Signed) GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 

<^ st^ vt* 

^fs 



" I believe in the dignity of labor, whether with 
head or hand; that the world owes no man a living but 
that it owes every man an opportunity to make a living." 

"I believe that thrift is essential to well-ordered 
living and that economy is a prime requisite of a sound 
financial structure, whether in government, business 
or personal affairs. " 

"I believe that truth and justice are fundamental to 
an enduring social order. " 

"I believe in the sacradness of a promise, that a 
man's word should be as good as his bond; that charact- 
er -- not wealth or power or position -- is of supreme 
worth. " 

John D. Rockefeller, Jr. 



Additional information pertaining to provisions in the will of 
GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 

■Third Provision: - James J. Hickman was a local school teacher who 
was sponsored by his Uncle to leave England and come to Utah 
and live in his home and work in his furniture store. At the time 
he received his $500, he was teaching school in Garfield, Utah. 
He was paid by check # 55. 
Fourth Provision: - Annie Hickman had returned to England with her 
parents in 1901. Her $500 check (Money Order) was sent to: 

Mrs. Annie H. Thompson, Birmingham, England on Sept . 
26, 1929. 

Fifth Provision: The balance of $500 each was paid to the children 
of George Henry Hickman on July 10, 1929: 

George "H" Hickman, check #54 

Ada Hickman Gardner, check #53 

Albert H. Hickman, check #52 
Sixth Provision: - Jack & Harry Pafford were brothers of Emily Paf- 
ford Taylor, George Taylor's fourth wife. After an exhaustive 
search, information on the Paffords was found in England. Harry 
Pafford had died. His son Harry John Pafford was his executor 
to whom a $500 money order was sent. Jack Pafford was living 
in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England and was paid his legacy of 
$500. Both payments were made in 1938. 

Leo Taylor, the only grandchild to be remembered, had 
his right hand cut off in a corn silage chopper accident while 
still a young man in school. This handicap was recognized by 
his grandfather in giving him $5 00. 
Seventh Provision: - Each of the daughters received the balance of 
their $4000. on July 10, 1929: 

Harriet, check #50. Nettie, check #49. Polly, check # 48. 
Ella, check #47. 

Eighth Provision: - The Elgin watch and chain here, is the same one 
Thomas gave his father when he was in the Jewelry Store busi- 
ness. The father never forgave his son for the stand he took in 
protecting the interests of his mother in the furniture store tran- 
saction. This is the only provision for Thomas in the will. 

Ninth & Tenth Provision: - This definitely states that none of the sons 
were indebted to their father in any sum, and that the five sons 
mentioned would share in the remainder of his estate, share and 
share alike; which they did. 

Eleventh Provision: - His many friends and family disregarded his 
order of no flowers at his funeral. There was a viewing at his 
home and a brief L.D.S. service was held in the Third Ward 
Chapel. Burial was in the Provo Cemetery on the plot where he 
had erected a large 7 foot granite monument for Emily Pafford 
Taylor. 

24 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



25 



He had taken a photo of Emily and had it laminated onto the 
granite stone. The following was inscribed on the north side of 
this monument: 

Emily Pafford Taylor 
January 11, 1914 

"You will miss me when I am gone" 



On the south side of this granite monument the family inscribed 
the following: 

George Taylor, Sr. 
March 25, 1838 
September 4, 1926 

" He earned his rest" 



" Only workers wear the laurals, 

On the mountain of fame 
While the idler lingers always 

At the foot without a name. 
And the vastness of the mountains. 

Makes oblivion darker still 
O, the dreamers have the wishes. 

While the workers have the will. " 

" The heights by great men reached and kept, 
Were not attained by sudden flight. 

But they, while their companions slept. 
Were toiling upward in the night. " 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. Chronological Events 

AGE 

1838 March 25, George Taylor was born at Windsor Street, in the 

Parish of Aston, Birmingham, County of Warwick, England, 
Mother - Ann Hill 
Father - Thomas Taylor 

1846 Errand boy, earning one shilling a week 8 

1848 Apprenticed as a scales maker 10 
1855 March 3, Baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of 

Latter Day Saints by Joseph Howard 17 

1857 July 5, Married Eliza Nicholls in the Church of England, 

Edgbaston Parish by I. Spooner, Vicar 19 

1858 June 23, Harriett Clarrisa Taylor was born in Birmingham, 

England 20 
I860 May 13, Mary Ann Emma Taylor was born in Birmingham, 

England 22 

1862 August 4, Parley G. Taylor was born in Birmingham, England 24 

1863 June 4, Set sail from London, England for Utah on ship "Amazon" 

Total cash reserve -two pence 25 
3rd Week in July - After a 7 week voyage, arrived at Castle 
Gardens, New York. Borrowed money from Joseph 
Harris to continue the journey West 

July - Latter part - Mary Ann Emma died and was buried at St. 
Joseph, Mo. 

Three days later - Parley G. Taylor died and was buried 
at Florence, Neb. 

August - Forepart - Left Florence for Utah, driving a three 
yoke Ox team 

October 4, Arrived in the Salt Lake Valley with wife and daughter 
November - Went to Provo to find work 

1864 March 5, George endowed and sealed to Eliza Nicholls Taylor and 

married and sealed to Henrietta Sawyer 26 
Traded a soldier's outfit for a two room house in Provo 
August 31, George Thomas Taylor was born at Provo, Utah 26 

Purchased first camera. Started experimenting with 
developing chemicals and printing procedures 



26 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 

AGE 

1866 A member of the Territorial Militia - Black Hawk War 28 

Started Geo, Taylor Furniture Store in Prove 

June 10, Joseph Taylor born at Provo, Utah, to Henrietta 
July 2, William Taylor born to Eliza 

1867 Sept. 2, William Taylor died 29 
Oct. 6, Henrietta Taylor born to Henrietta 

1868 July 28, Thomas NichoUs Taylor born to Eliza 30 

1869 May 10, Completion of transcontinental railroad 

June 15, U. S. Naturalization papers delivered to George Taylor 31 
Oct. 20, Joseph Taylor died 

1870 Feb. 14, Mary Ann (Polly) Taylor born to Henrietta 31 

Hattie goes to C. R. Savage Studio in Salt Lake to learn 
photography "touching" and latest methods of printing 

Nov. 2, Arthur Nicholls Taylor born to Eliza 

1872 Aug. 12, John Tranham Taylor born to Henrietta 34 

Music Dept. ( organ) added to store 

1873 Spring Eliza and family moved to apartment above store 35 
Sept. 25, Walter G. Taylor born to Eliza 

1875 Sept. 12, Ashted Taylor born to Eliza 37 
Oct. 4, Ella Taylor born to Henrietta 

1878 Jan. 1, Amy Taylor born to Henrietta 39 

1880 June 1, Amy drowned in Mill Race 

Henrietta's family living in store apartment 42 

1881 Jan. 1, A member of the County Board of Trade, whose 

committee was to give a report on "Home Made Furniture" 

1882 Was an organizer, stockholder and Director of the 

First National Bank of Provo 

1882 - 1887 Edmund Law passed on plural marriages 44 



27 



28 



GEORGE TAYLOR, SR. 



AGE 

1884 George Taylor's nephew James John Hickman "Jimmie" 46 

(age 15), came to Utah to work in furniture store. Lived 
with Eliza. Saved enough money to send for his brother 
George and wife, from England. 



1885 George quit Commercial Photography, but continued in 47 

photography as a hobby and selling supplies until 1920 

1886 November Made a separation agreement with Henrietta 48 

1887 June 12, Temple Recommend issued to George and Eliza Taylor 49 



by Provo Third Ward Bishop, Myron Tanner and signed 
also by President A. O. Smoot of the Utah Stake 

Edmund - Tucker Law enforced against polygamy 
Deeded his property to his eldest son, George 
Went on the " underground " 

1889 Sold his furniture & Music business to Eliza Taylor 51 

Set-up a grocery business for his daughter Polly 
and son John T. In connection with the grocery store 
he included a stock of photo supplies. Called this 
business " Taylor & Company " 



1890 


Nov. 


13, 


Disolved his marriage with Sarah M. Blair 


52 


1893 


July 


22. 


On the committee for gathering pledges for the re- 










opening of the bankrupt First National Bank of Provo 


55 


1898 






His sister, Mary Taylor Hickman, husband and her 










daughter, Annie, arrived from England. Three years 










later they returned to England 


60 


1901 


April 


14, 


His sister, Mary Taylor Hickman, died of asthma in 










Birmingham, England 


63 




Se pt. 


6. 


George Taylor was granted a civil divorce from Eliza 










Nicholls Taylor 










Was President of the Utah County Savings Bank 




1906 


July 


19, 


George Taylor married Emily Pafford Singleton in 










New York City Hall, New York 


68 


1914 


Jan. 


11, 


Emily Pafford Taylor died at Provo, Utah 


75 


1915 


Oct. 


26, 


George Taylor married Phebe Carter Christensen 


77 


1922 


Mar. 


2. 


Henrietta Sawyer Taylor died at Provo, Utah 






June 


27, 


Eliza Nicholls Taylor died at Provo, Utah 




1926 


Se pt. 


4. 


GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. died at Provo, Utah 


88 



Harold B. Lee Library 



Brigham Young University 



December 1 , 1980 



Mr. Clarence Taylor 
2130 Temple View Drive 
Provo, UT 84601 

Dear Mr. Taylor: 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your 
recent donation to the Harold B. Lee Library. The collection 
of materials belonging to Maria Dixon Taylor, Henry Aldous Dixon, 
George Taylor, along with the various books and photographs will 
greatly enhance our Manuscripts Collection. 

It is understood that descendants may examine the papers when they 
wish and may have copies made of preferred items, 

I appreciate your interest and concern in the BYU Library and 
your endeavors to help us meet the needs of the students, scholars, 
and members of the community. 

Sincerely, 




LeGrand L. Baker 
Gifts Librarian 



md 



Enclosures 



29 



Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (801) 374-1211 



ITEMS DONATED TO 
THE BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 

by 

Clarence D. Taylor 
February 22, 1980 
Taylor Family History and Correspondence 

1. Book: My Folks the Dixons . Clarence Dixon Taylor, 1969. Provo, Utah. 
Contains: pictures, biographies, autobiographical sketches, patriarchal 
blessings, etc., of the Henry Aldous Dixon Family (included is a loose 
paper containing the patriarchal blessing of Maria Degrey). 

2. Book: My Taylor-Dixon Pedigree . Clarence D. Taylor. 

Contains: author's personal pedigree as well as many of his ancestors' 
biographical sketches and photographs. (Included is a loose paper con- 
taining the patriarchal blessing of Maria Degrey.) 

3. Book: Henry D. Taylor Talks 1958-1973 . 

Contains: selected messages of Henry D. Taylor, Assistant to the Council of 
the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

4. Letter: from Henry A. Dixon to his sister, Mrs. Anne Hartman, July 13, 1874, 
sent from Provo, Utah to Grahamstown, South Africa. 

Mentions: death of their father and gives instruction to the sister pertaining 
to inheritance, H. Dixon's testimony, economic conditions, growth in Utah, 
St. George Temple, Brigham Young in St. George to improve health. (Xerox copy, 
not original ) . 

5. Letter: From Henry A. Dixon to his sister, Mrs. Anne Hartman, November 16, 1874. 
Sent from Provo to Grahamstown. 

Mentions: receiving a copy of the will and 100 pounds, asks for Genealogical 
information, includes H. Dixon's testimony. (Xerox copy, not original). 

*6. Photograph: old view of Provo, East Center Street, by George Taylor, Sr. 

*7. Photograph: old view of Provo looking northwest, December 1890. 

*8. Glass plate: old view of Provo Center Street, Provo Tabernacle at right 
(broken corner). 

Salt Lake Tabernacle. 

Provo Steam Laundry. 

Provo, includes Bailey Brothers Grocery, Ingersol Watch. 
Provo Tabernacle (2 images). 
Admiral George Dewey (broken corner). 



*9. 


Glass 


plate : 


*10. 


Glass 


plate : 


*11 . 


Glass 


plate: 


*12. 


Glass 


plate: 


*13. 


Glass 


plate: 



* Separated from collection and placed in Manuscript Photo Archives. All George 
Taylor/Provo Pioneer Photographers photographs will be retained in a collection 
under his name. 



30 



George Taylor Legal Documents 



1. Deed to Provo City Cemetary Lot, N.W. h lot 101 Block G, 

2. Perpetual Care--to cemetary lot. 

3. Marriage certif icate--New York City. George Taylor--Mrs. Emily Singleton, 
July 6, 1906. 

4. Deed from Henrietta Sawyer Taylor to George Taylor, Block 65, Plat A. 
66 X 198 (home). 

5. 4th District Court Decree of Divorcee. George Taylor, Plaintiff, vs. 
Eliza Taylor, Defendant, September 6, 1901. 

6. 4th District Court--Complaint for Separate Maintenance, Phebe Taylor, 
Plaintiff, vs. George Taylor, Defendant, April 10, 1917. 

7. 4th District Court--Decree of Final Distribution for the estate of Emily 
Pafford Taylor, July 20, 1914. 

8. Utah County Savings Notes (out of date). 

9. 1st District Court, Territory of Utah, Record of Citizenship and 
Certificate, September 7, 1901. 

10. Separation Agreement--Henrietta Sawyer Taylor, November, 1886. 

11. Separation Agreement--Sarah M. Blair, November 13, 1890. 

12. 4th District Court--Summons , Phebe Taylor, Plaintiff, vs. George Taylor, 
Defendant, April 9, 1917. 

13. Letter (statement) from George Taylor about Phebe--leaving , wanting to 
come back--leaving, 1922. 

14. Power of Attorney from Emily Pafford to George Taylor (Recorded in Utah 
County) June 14, 1980. 

15. Emily Pafford Taylor funeral costs, January 1914. 

16. 4th District Court--Emily Pafford Taylor/George Taylor, Sr., Adm. , March 2, 1914. 

17. Warranty Deed: Emily Pafford to George Taylor, Sr., Block 20, Plat B, 
May 21 , 1904. 

18. Power of Attorney: George Taylor, Sr. to George Taylor, Jr., April 23, 1921. 

19. Dusenberry-Loan , MTE, Note, Deed, Sale, George Taylor, Emily Pafford. 

20. Utah County Savings Misc. 

21. Worthless mining certificates. 

22. Pafford legal papers for George Taylor will. 

23. Lease of George Taylor's home, 195 West Center. 

24. Copy of Articles of Incorporation of Utah County Savings Bank. 

25. Warranty Deed from Reed Smoot and wife. 

26. Articles (verse) from a Friend. 

27. Temple recommends of George and Eliza Taylor, June 12, 1887. 



31 



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" AS I KNEW GRANDPA TAYLOR 



George Taylor Sr. was my grandfather. He lived next door to 
my dear grandmother, Henrietta Sawyer Taylor. He was never much 
of a part of my life. I never saw him at my grandmother's house or 
lot even though his home was just through a small gate in the fence 
between. My grandmother seemed quite friendly with the (housekeeper) 
a Mrs. Singleton, who I now suppose was one of his wives. I often 
visited with her when I was at grandmothers because she had such a 
quaint old fashioned house and seemed glad to have me come, but not 
if grandfather was there. I knew he didn't like children in his yard 
trampling his garden. 

In the front of his yard near the street was a very interesting 
old tree that had been cut down but never removed. It had a large 
trunk and from this had sprouted many small trees. This fascinated 
me and several other young children of the neighborhood, so when we 
thought he was not at home we often entered his yard to play in this 
miniature forest. When he returned home and found us the re he orde red 
us home immediately. He probably never realized any of those child- 
ren were his own family members. That was my first impression of 
my grandfathe r , and any later encounters didn't erase this impression. 

My mother, Polly Taylor Roberts, and I often met him on Main 
Street, or in front of grandmother's house, where she stopped to chat 
with him and I stood silently by, still a little fearful of him. He never 
seemed to show any interest in me, so I also ignored him. I had 
heard he preferred boys to girls, that he was connected with some of 
the banks, being a girl and short of money left me out of any personal 
dealings, so I felt he had no interest in me. 

I'm sure I could have gained a greater insight, had I really made 
an effort to get to know about him. Now that I have a large family of my 
own, I realize how difficult it is to learn all about each of them, unless 
they also have a desire to establish a relationship. 



Grandchild No. 18 



GENEVE ROBERTS DUNN 



AN EXPERIENCE WITH GRANDFATHER TAYLOR 



I was living on the Ranch, near Duchesne, Utah at the time, and 
had made one of my few trips to Provo to pick-up supplies with my large 
team of horses and a wagon. In calling on Grandfather Taylor at his 
home at Center Street and Second West, I found him out in his front yard 
cutting and trimming up a tree which he had just cut down. I suggested 
to him that I could bring my team down and drag the logs around to the 
South of his house, to be cut into kindling wood; and that it would be a 
lot easier for him than having to cut it up on his front garden and then 
carry it around back of his house. He told me he would think about it, 
and let me know. 

The day before I was leaving to go home to the Ranch, my father 
asked me if I had moved the fallen tree for Grandfather. I told him I 
was waiting word to go ahead. My father suggested I go back to Grand- 
father's home and see if I could remove the tree, before leaving for the 
Ranch the next day. 

After viewing the situation, the logs were still there, and I could 
see by removing two sections of fence along the Millrace bank, I could 
use one horse to pull the logs across the plowed garden, along the 
narrow ditch bank, miss the lattice trellis and get to the back of the 
house without too much damage. 

As I started my big Perchon stallion, named "Mac", pulling one 
of the largest logs across the garden. Grandfather came running out of 
the house yelling for me to stop, which I did. He said, "That is too 
much to pull with a team of horses, let along just a single horse. You 
will kill that horse. " 

After he went back into the house, I gave the word for the horse 
to go, he settled down, nearly to his knees in the soft plowed garden, 
and with one mighty heave started the log moving and with very little 
noticeable effort, pulled this log and the rest of them to the back of the 
house, ready for Grandfather to split into firewood. 

After putting the fence back and straightening up the garden and 
yard , Grandfathe r came out and expres sed his amazement at the strength 
and power of my horse, which weighed almost as much as any team of 
horses he had owned. 

To climax the story, he dug deep into his purse and gave me a 
silver dollar. 

Grandchild # 12 BACLE D. TAYLOR 



34 



AS I REMEMBERED GRANDPA TAYLOR 



On the 12 June 1922, just 5 days before Eliza Nicholls Taylor 
died, Maurine G. Taylor, wife of Arthur D, Taylor, gave birth to a 
lovely and healthy baby daughter, their first. 

Arthur D. , the proud father was floating on cloud nine, and in 
passing Grandfather George Taylor's house on Center Street, saw him 
out working in his garden. Thinking that his Grandfather would like 
to share some of his elation and happiness, unlocked the gate and 
walked to where he was weeding the garden. 

"Grandfather", he said, " I would like to tell you that I am the 
father of an eight pound baby girl. " 

Expecting to be congratulated and praised, as had occurred on 
all previous announcements that morning; Grandfather stopped his 
working and said, "My boy, what a mistake, how sad and unfortunate 
to bring this little girl into this cruel, wicked world. " 

The deflated and crestfallen father lacked words to answer and 
silently returned to his work in the store, in thoughtful contemplation, 
the rest of that day, knowing full well that his Grandfather's words 
echoed his outward armor and not his belief deep in his heart. 

Just five days later, hearing of the death of his first ex-wife, 
Eliza, he remarked, " She was a noble, wonderful woman. " 



Grandchild #15 



ARTHUR D. TAYLOR 



AS I REMEMBER GRANDPA TAYLOR 



Grandfather, George Taylor, acquired a tract of farmland in the 
"Fort Fields" which was located about two miles West of his home in 
Provo. There produce from this farm, helped to feed his two families. 
Often the supply of food was so meager that some meals were missed 
in order to feed his children and two wives. 

Times when there was insufficient food at home to put up a noon- 
time lunch for him to take to the farm he would walk to the farm with- 
out a lunch. At noontime, when the other men working in the nearby 
fields would gather at the spring, he would take enough time out to go 
over and take a big drink of the cool water; then tighten up his belt 
and go back to work until sundown. 

After Father acquired farm land located about a mile farther 
West from the "Fort Fields" and near the mouth of the Provo River; 
I had charge of the operation of this farm, along with Uncle Jim 
McClellan. One of the many jobs was the digging and keeping the drain 
ditches open. This particular day I was out digging in the drain ditch 
and saw a fine, spirited team of horses on a buggy coming down the 
North road. As they came closer I recognized the driver as Uncle 
George Taylor and sitting beside him was Grandpa Taylor, Grand- 
father Taylor would never ride in a automobile, so Uncle George 
would frequently call and take him out for a buggy ride, which Grand- 
father enjoyed very much. 

Uncle George drove to where I was working and stopped his team 
of horses. Grandfather, after looking me over, pointed his finger at 
me and asked Uncle George, "Whooze that? ". Uncle George replied, 
"Oh that's just an Irish boy Arth ( nickname for Arthur N. ) has work- 
ing for him. " Then Grandfather replied, " No one but an Irishman 
would be dumb enough to be out there, working that hard by himself. " 
That nickname "Irishman" remained with Grandfather for a good many 
years thereafter. I still have a letter, written by Grandpa while I was 
on my mission, which I value very highly. It begins, "Elton, my dear 
Irish Boy". The letter was then signed, " Your loving Grandpa". 

When we were building the D. T. R. building, on the corner 
Center Street and Third West, Grandfather Taylor would make a daily 
inspection trip of the progress of the construction. He took a personal 
interest in the building, although not having any financial interest in it, 
he had been instrumental in having his son, Arthur N. consider build- 
ing a new building and then arranging for the financing of the construc- 
tion through the Provo Commercial Bank, of which he was a Director. 

Uncle Ernest Dixon was in charge of the excavation, cement 
and brick work of the new building and he had given me a job as a 
common laborer, shoveling, wheeling brick and cement in a wheel- 
barrow and doing the odd jobs that needed to be done. 



36 



On these daily tours of inspection, Grandfather would always 
come to where I was working and if Uncle "Ern" was nearby, he would 
say to him, "Ernie, you've got to give the Irishman a "blow". To 
which Uncle Ern would reply, "He's got to earn his money, the same 
as the rest of us. " 

Later as I became a truck driver for D. T. R. Co, in hauling 
new crated merchandise from the railroad spur to the store and deliv- 
ering the sold merchandise to the customers, Father had given me a 
standing order that I was to haul the old wooden crates to Grandfather 
Taylor's house on Second West. He would then knock down the crates, 
remove all the nails and then saw them for burning in his wood-coal 
kitchen range. I marveled at how a man, then in his eighty-first year 
could cut this hardwood material. I was amused to watch him save 
every nail, as he pulled it from the wood; putting it in a can or bucket 
which was always close by. It indicates one of a characteristic and 
dominating traits of his life. Thrift and Frugality. These traits have 
been passed on to his posterity, many of whom still "save and hoard, 
to be used someday". 

On some trips, after I had unloaded the future firewood, Grand- 
pa would sit on the chopping block or saw horse and I on the fender of 
the truck, and I would listen to him as he recalled some of his earlier 
life experiences, especially his pioneer life in the early settlement of 
the Provo area. 

It did not take him long to get around to discussing some of the 
earlier Provo Church leaders. He felt he had been wronged and dis- 
honestly treated in some of his business dealing with them. He lived 
to the letter of his business creed and expected everyone else to do the 
same, even his children: " A man's word is as good as his bond". 

These bitter feeling, which he could not reconcile with the 
Gospel, eventually took him out of Church activity, however, I espec- 
ially remember one occasion when he talked about his early church 
activities in Birmingham, England. 

After he joined the Church, he became a member of the Branch 
choir. Eliza NichoUs, our Grandmother, was also a member. He 
became a very active member and often went out with the missionaries 
to hold cottage and street meetings. His eyes glowed with pride as he 
told me how he held the attention of the crowd at street meetings„ Then 
he quickly changed the subject as tho' embarrased at what he had said 
and then continued his "tirade" about some of the local church officials, 

ELTON L. TAYLOR 

Grandchild No. 24 



37 



MY MEMORIES OF GRANDFATHER, GEORGE TaYLOR 



I was graduated from the B. Y. High School in the spring of 1921 . 
In the fall I entered college at B.Y.U. At the conclusion of the school 
year in the spring of 1922, Uncle LeRoy Dixon offered me the position 
of bookkeeper at the Dixon Real Estate Company. Elsie C. Ross who 
held the position had received a call to serve as a missionary in the 
Eastern States Mission. 

The Dixon Real Estate Company had purchased a parcel of bus- 
iness property from Basil T. Kerr, upon which a mortgage was held 
by my grandfather George Taylor, from whom Basil had acquired the 
property. Grandfather insisted that the interest on the mortgage be 
paid on the morning of the first of each month. It was my responsibility 
to deliver the check to him. He lived on the Mill Race in a home facing 
the west onSecondWest and Center Street. Sears later built a business 
building on this site, Lerner Shop occupying it later. 

Grandfather was a hardworking man. Even in his ad vanced years ' 
he would be found laboring in his garden or cutting wood. He was very 
thrifty and conservative. His word was his bond. He was exacting in 
keeping his word and expected others to be the same way. 

On the first of one month I was involved in affairs at the office, 
and it was after 1:00 p.m. before I was able to go to his home with the 
check. He was waiting for me. What a blistering tongue - lash ing I re- 
ceived! He gave me to understand that the payment was due on the 
very first thing in the morning. He taught me a lesson in punctuality 
and promptness that has stayed with me throughout my lifetime. After 
that experience, I was never late again in delivering his check. 

He was a sincere, devout member of the Church in his earlier 
years; but inlater life he became disillusioned with the Church through 
business dealing with some of the early Church leaders in Provo. This 
made him critical and somewhat bitter. 

In 1924, after I had received a mission call to the Eastern States 
Mission, when I went to deliver his monthly interest check, I advised 
him of my call, and that this would be my last visit to him. He looked 
at me for a few moments, then said: " I think that you are a damn 
fool; but go my boy, and do your very best-- and may the Lord bless 
you. " He then reached in his wallet and handed me a $5. 00 bill. 

That evening at the dinner table as I related my visit with grand- 
father and told of his gift, father was amazed and said that grandfather 
had not offered nor provided him a single centwhenhe was a missionary. 

Before I returned from my mission in the latter part of 1926, 
Grandfather Taylor had passed away. He was a very distinctive 
individual as the eleventh section of his will indicates: " I desire that 
my coffin be made of plain pine boards by a Provo Carpenter, with no 
varnish or paint, with six plain Japanned handles. " 



38 



"It is my wish and I so order that there be no flowers at my 
funeral and no automobiles carting me around to meeting houses for 
show. " 

"It is my wish and I so order that there be no remarks at my 
funeral, but that I be borne silently away to my last resting place. " 

"It is my wish and I so order that the epitaph to be placed on my 
plain headboard be worded as follows: " He earned his rest. " 



Grandchild No. 32 HENRY D. TAYLOR 



s{c >!< >!; >)( >!c i]< >|( 



" A father taught his son to get much pleasure 
from a hobby. The boy selected as his hobby the col- 
lection of moths in the fall and planned to watch them 
emerge as creatures of beauty in the springtime. One 
spring day as the boy watched the moths emerge, he 
observed that each one made a terrific struggle to free 
itself from the confining cacoon. Pity came to his heart 
and he went to his father to explain what had happened. 
The father, a man with an understanding heart, purch- 
ased a new pair of scissors and proceeded with the boy 
to watch this phenomenon of nature. When the first 
moth began to struggle, he cut the confining threads of 
the cacoon. The moth died. Turning to the boy, his 
father said: "Son when you deprive the moth of its right 
to struggle, it dies. So it is with men", he continued, 
"When you take away the struggle they become flaccid 
and weak. " 



39 



GRANDPA, GEORGE TAYLOR, SR 



Tho a very eccentric personhe was a manknown and honored for 
his honesty and outs poke n ways . As in pioneer days, his associates 
trusted him with their savings to care for until a bank was established. 
From then on he was associated with aBankof Provo and was a trustee 
until shortly before his death. 

It was the Provo Stake high officials, at the time of the panic, 
when all Utah banks failed; they withdrew their support from his bank, 
and when he would not betray his friends, (the depositors), he was 
forced to go to Church Authorities first and they were unable to help, 
he went to the gentiles, who knew him and gave him aid. This was 
the crowning blow that caused his withdrawl from the Church. He had 
accumulated enough personal property: he turned the Furniture Store 
(first) to grandmother and family and a home, placed Aunt Nett in pro- 
perty on main street, two homes on it and set Uncle John and Aunt Polly 
up in a business. He later married ( out of the Church) an English lady, 
we knew as Emily. There on Center Street, in the heart of Provo, he 
turned his frontage into a vegetable garden. Photography was his bus- 
iness hobby for which he made his own chemicals for developing. He 
continued in his banking business. He made several trips to England 
with Emily. She passed on a number of years before him. He placed 
a memorial, with her favorite saying to him, "You will miss me when 
I'm gone. " He did too. 

Two sisters, both widows, went after him; mostly for his money. 
He married one, Phoebe; and believe me she kept him in hot water the 
rest of his days. 

A familiar figure on the main street; white shirt, vest and black 
armlets to the elbow, keen, alert and never idle. Death came as a 
result of chopping down a huge tree on his home lot in his eighty's. 

While grandmother vowed he would never see her again, and 
never did, she always sent her sons, to talk over their problems and 
ask his advice. If ever he lent them money he set the day and amount 
that must be paid promptly, and held them to it. 

After his passing Provo Main Street really changed. He had 
owned and controlled all the property between First West and Third 
West on the South side of the street, where now stands Kress, Sears, 
D.T.R. building and smaller buildings in between. 

His epitaph read: " He has earned his rest. " 

To him idleness was a sin. 

Grandchild No. 13 CLARRISA TAYLOR EASTMOND 

( Written to her neice, Ann Sutton, in October 1961) 

Clarrisa was killed in an automobile accident November 14, 1961 



40 



AS I REMEMBER GRANDPA TAYLOR 



After we terminated the furnishing of milk and cream to the 
Newhouse Hotel in Salt Lake City, we bottled part of the shole milk 
in quart bottles and separated the balance of the milk into cream and 
churned the cream into butter which we sold to John T. Taylor Grocery- 
Store. The butter milk from the churning was sold to Sutton Ghase 
Drug Store . 

1 was in Junior High School and it was part of my job each day to 
deliver the fresh milk, cream and butter to the grocery store which 
was located on West Genter Street. Grandfather Taylor's house was 
just across the street, and was one of our customers for milk. 

Grandfather was about 85 years old, very set in his ways and 
inclined to be ultra conservative with his money and which caused con- 
siderable friction with his 5th wife, Phoebe. Apparently in order to 
obtain the necessary spending money she needed for the household 
and for herself, she had resorted to going thru his pockets, at night, 
to pick up his spare change. 

Father owed Grandfather money on a loan he had made, and on 
the day it was due ( not before and not later) I was instructed to take 
the payment and deliver it to Grandfather personally and no one else. 

When I left the milk at the house and told him I had a payment for 
him, he would say, " come with me my boy" and he would lead me out 
to the coop (shed). Here he would take off his shoe and sock and 
instruct me to put the money in his sock, saying, " Now I shan't lose 
it." 

I would ask him, if he would not lose it when he went to bed that 
night, and he would reply, " I sleep with my socks on. " 

Another occassion 1 well remember was when he asked me if I 
had a girl friend and I told him I sure did. He asked, "Does she like 
you? " I answered, "I sure hope so. " He then dug deep into his pocket 
and pulled out his purse and squeezed out a quarter and said, "Here 
take your girl to a show and have a good time. " 

Grandchild No. 42 STANLEY S. TAYLOR 



41 



MY FATHER, GEORG E TAYLOR, SR. 

" My commercial life was very fascinating. Father's store was 
small. The photograph gallery was for a time very interesting in my 
boyhood. The freckles were very thick on my face, and in order to 
give me some experience in re-touching or as the photographer would 
say, remove some of the blemishes. Father gave me a negative of my- 
self to smooth out. I certainly made a mess of it, for instead of remov- 
ing the freckles, I ptted them so that when we printed, my face looked 
like I had just recovered from a bad case of small pox. I wasn't put on 
the staff as a re-toucher. " 

" As a lad father had been good to me. I stuck to him in the store, 
and in return he gave me almost everything a boy could ask - a pony, a 
goat and wagon, a velocipede, a bicycle, pigeons, and had J.M.Mitchell 
make a pigeon house and Mr. Sward paint it; also rabbits and a pistol. 
He was good to me. When trouble came between him and mother, I 
must take a stand. I did with my mother. " 

From the Journal of THOMAS N. TAYLOR 

Child No. 8 



42 



AN EXPERIENCE IN CONNECTION WITH GRANDFATHER TAYLOR 



For over seven years at about 7:00 a.m. each morning, winter 
and summer, my father would call me and tell me to get on my pony 
"Billy" and take a quart of milk to Grandfather 's house on Center Street. 

In the wintertime it was so cold I would have to tuck my hands 
under my upper legs while sitting on my pony to get some of the heat 
from its body. I had this pony trained so I could guide him by nodding 
my head in the direction I wanted to go and would not have to use the 
reins . 

Upon arriving at Center Street and Second West, I had been given 
detailed instructions by my Grandfather, what I should do: 

I was to ride up to the latched gate, reach over and unlatch the 
gate, then let the pony push the gate open with his head, then walk thru 
the gate, turn the pony around and close and latch the gate. The one 
time I left the gate open, I received such a "scotch blessing" from my 
Grandfather, that it was the first and the last. Next I was to walk the 
pony down the gravel path, and not let him stray an inch off it; and 
above all not let him take a nip of the vegetables in the garden. Coming 
up to the kitchen door, which was on the East side of the house, I would 
pick up the empty quart bottle from the milk box, replace it with the 
full milk bottle that I had in a sack which hung from around my neck. 

Having delivered the milk I would retrace my steps down the 
gravel path, open and lock the gate securely and then be ready for a 
race with the electric railroad car, which I never lost in those seven 
years . 

Where the electric railroad tracks crossed over the "Heber 
Creeper" tracks, the electric car was required by law to come to a 
dead stop, blow its whistle, then with the clanking of the bell continue, 
which was the signal to start the race. With the pony's quick start, we 
could get quite a big lead, and if we could maintain that lead we would 
continue down Center Street to Seventh West where I would turn North 
for home. If the electric train could get good traction and I could see he 
was going to overtake us, I would turn off at Fourth West or Sixth West 
and retain my perfect race won record. 

If Grandfather was outside, when I delivered the milk, he would 
acknowledge me by saying, "How are you? " or "Thank you for the milk" 
or " Tell your folks thanks". But I never had any long conversations 
with him. 

Mother being a good cook, would often send him some of herhome 
cooked food. She would wrap it in paper or a dish cloth and put it in a 
flour sack so that I could ride my pony and deliver it to him. 

Grandfather's favorite cake was coconut. Mother had just baked 
this coconut cake and father came out in the potatoe patch, where we 
were weeding and asked me to leave this work (which I was glad to do) 
and get on "Billy" and take that freshly baked cake to Grandfather. 



43 



I had a new pony "Dolly" and I wanted to ride her, but my father 
said, "Take "Billy". After he went in the house, I climbed on "Dolly" 
and with the cake in one hand headed for Grandfather's house. Going 
down Fourth West, just before coming to Uncle George Taylor's, a dog 
came bounding out, nipping at the heels of the pony and the next thing I 
knew I was laying in the middle of the road with the would-be cake under 
me. Only now it was just a sack full of crumbs. 

After sitting away the time it would have taken to go to Second 
West, I returned home. When asked how Grandfather liked the cake, 
I replied, " Boy, he sure did like the cake. " 

That evening, after a family "buggy" ride, we stopped at Grand- 
father's house. I did not want to go in - not even to see all the stuffed 
birds he had in a large, natural setting, glass display case. 

When father asked Grandfather how he liked the cake his wife had 
sent him, he replied, " What cake! I didn't get any cake. " 

Father came out of that house and the rod was not spared in teach- 
ing me a lesson to never lie to him again. 



Grandchild No. 44 JOHN WESLEY TAYLOR 

I. D # 12. 7 



HONEST Y PAYS 
A certain youth, trained from early boyhood, to 
tell the truth, was bidding goodbye to his mother. She 
had carefully sewed in a leather belt, around the lad's 
body, thirty pieces of silver - their combined earnings. 
The boy was required to travel many hours by coach 
over unfrequented roads before he could reach his dest- 
ination. Near the journey's end, the stage coach was 
waylaid and passengers at the point of a gun found them- 
selves face to face with a band of bandits. The robbers 
roughly gathered their swag. As they approached the 
boy, the first bandit shouted, "Well, lad, what have 
you? " 

"Thirty pieces of silver, " came the frank and 
earnest reply. 

"Where? " said the robber. 

"Sewed in a belt about my waist, " was the reply. 
"Who put it there? " came the next question. 
"My Mother," answered the lad. 
"Keep it! " said the bandit. 



44 



THOMAS TAYLOR 



Thomas Taylor, according to his son George, was a good natured 
man, always looking on the bright side of life. By his wit and humor, 
he was called the clown of the village. He was a pump maker by trade. 
Thomas Taylor was born May 21, 1792 at Birmingham, England. His 
parents were Richard Taylor and Margaret BroughalU 

He married Anne Hill, of Birmingham, England, the daughter of 
Joseph and Sarah Tedd Hill. 

Thomas Taylor and Anne Hill were the parents of the following 
three children, all born at Birmingham, England; 

William Taylor Born May 26 1835 Died 

George Taylor Mar 25 1838 Sept 4 1926 

Mary Taylor Mar 3 1840 Apr 10 1901 



45 



ANNE 



HILL 



TAYLOR 



Anne Hill Taylor was born June 13, 1813 at Birmingham, England. 
She was the daughter of Joseph Hill and Sarah Tedd, 

Anne Hill and Thomas Taylor were married prior to 1835, for 
their first son, William Taylor, was born at Birmingham, England on 
May 26, 1835. He died before reaching maturity. 

Although Anne was an invalid and suffered greatly most of her life, 
she was an excellent seamstress and contributed much to the support 
of the family. 

The second son, named George, was born March 25, 1838 at 
Birmingham, England, He was an ambitious and obedient son, who 
started working at the age of eight years. Of his first wages of a 
shilling, he gave it to his mother, except two pennies, which he kept 
for his own use. He joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day 
Saints and together with his wife, Eliza NichoUs Taylor and three 
children, migrated to Utah in 1863. He died September 4, 1926. 

Anne Hill Taylor's daughter, Mary, was born in Birmingham, 
England on March 3, 1840, She married John James Hickman and 
had four children, two boys and two girls. She died on April 10, 1901. 

Clarence D. Taylor 
September 1979 



46 




George Taylor 
Furniture Store 




First National Bank 
of Provo 




George Taylor 
Home & Garden 



Old Provo Meeting House 
New Tabernacle 



BIOGRAPHY OF 
ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 

Eliza Nicholls Taylor's father, Thomas Ashford NichoUs was a 
pensioner from the British Army, at the time of his death, at age 51. 
His wife's death certificate shows he was a gun furniture polisher , re- 
quiring him to move periodically from one garrison to another. Never 
being able to stay in one place long enough to own a home. 

Harriet Ball Nicholls, Eliza's mother, had been married to John 
Patt erson and had one daughter, Carolyn Patterson. Eliza's half sis- 
ter was born in 1829 and died at the age of eighteen years. John Patter- 
son died in 1831 and soon after, Harriet Ball Patterson married Thomas 
Ashford Nicholls, 

On February 17, 1833, Thomas Ashford Nicholls was stationed in 
Dublin, Ireland, for it was here that Eliza's oldest sister, Mary Ann 
Emma was born to Harriet Ball Nicholls, 

We next find the Nicholls family at the garrison in Birmingham, 
England, where Elizabeth Nicholls was born on October 20, 1834. The 
first son, Frederick Nicholls, was born on May 3, 1 836. Bothof these 
Children died before reaching maturity. 

Eliza Nicholls Taylor, my Grandmother, was born to Harriet Ball 
Nicholls in Portsmouth, South Hampton, England on April 29, 1838. 

Harriet Nicholls, the younger sister of Eliza, was born to Harriet 
Ball Nicholls and Thomas Ashford Nicholls, at Dover, England on 
May 14, 1940„ Another younger sister, Phoebe, and a younger brother 
Thomas, were born in 1842 and 1843 and died as children. 

At Chatham, England, Harriet Ball Nicholls, gave birth to a son, 
William Nicholls, on Nov. 11, 1845. 

Harriet's youngest child, John Nicholls, was born in 1847, prob- 
ably in Birmingham, where he died as a child. 

Eliza was a beautiful, lovely and ambitious child. At the age of 
five and six, she went to school and learned the alphabet. But it was 
not until she came to Utah that she learned to read and write by copy- 
ing the writing in the Church publications. 

By the time Eliza was eight years of age, her family had moved 
back to Birmingham. Her father had now been pensioned from the 
Se rvice . 

Eliza wanting to help with the finances of the family, persuaded 
her father to permit her to work at the local Button Factory, promis- 
ing to go to night school to keep up with her education. By the time 
she was fifteen years of age, just before her father died, she had been 
advanced in the factory to where she was in full charge of the covering 
of silk, satin, velvet and cloth buttons. For this work she was receiv- 
ing a grown woman's wages. 

Eliza's father, Thomas Ashford Nicholls, died at Birmingham, 
England on July 17, 1854, Her Mother, Harriet Ball Nicholls, died 



49 



50 



ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



just seven months later on February 12, 1855, at Birmingham, Eng- 
land. 

The early training to work and having a good paying job, now be- 
came a blessing to the Nicholls family. Mary Ann Emma stayed home 
and took care of the house and the younger brother William. Eliza 
and Harriet worked and contributed their wages for the support of the 
orphaned family. 

Eliza's father and mother were very strict, religious people, be- 
ing members of the Church of England, where they regularly attended 
Sunday School and Church Services. 

One Sunday morning as Eliza was on her way to Sunday School, 
she met her girl friend, Mary Rabould, who was going in the opposite 
direction. Eliza asked her where she was going. Mary answered 
that she was on her way to a new Church by the name of Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. "Did she want to go with her? " 

Mary was a trusted friend , coming from a very respectable family, 
so Eliza joined her. 

The next Sunday, Mary called for Eliza to go to the "Mormon" 
Church. Eliza asked her father's permission to go with Mary, The 
father said, "Brigham Young is the head of that Church, and he has 
ninety wives, hasn't he? " 

Mary promptly replied, "Mr. Nicholls, it takes a good man to 
keep one wife, let along two. And he couldn't have them if he wasn't 
worthy of them. " 

"Well, Thomas", her mother said gently, "If they don't do her 
any good, they won't do her any harm, anyway. So let her go." 

About a year later, Thomas moved his family to another section 
of the city and Eliza had to discontinue her attendance to the meetings. 

Shortly after the death of Eliza's father, one of her girl friends 
came to see hee. Annie Baldwin was a girl who had been born and 
raised in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. She took 
Eliza to her Branch of the Church and encouraged her to attend reg- 
ularly. 

Annie Baldwin and Eliza became very dear friends. It was she 
who accompanied this seventeen year old convert to the pool on Villa 
Street, Birmingham, England on October 15, 1855, where she was 
baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 
by Elder Abraham Awn. 

In the Ashted Branch of the Mormon Church in Birmingham, Eng- 
land, a young, handsome, nineteen year old convert, who sang in the 
choir and played bass fiddle in the Branch orchestra; attracted the 
attention of nineteen year old Eliza. Although George Taylor and Eliza 
Nicholls were both members of the L. D. S. Church, their bans were 
published in the Edgbaston Parish Church of England by the Vicar, I, 
Spooner, who married them on July 5, 1857. Edwin Dedicant and A. 
Rogers were the witnesses. 



ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



51 



George Taylor was a very high minded, ambitious boy and he chose 
a good, unselfish girl, who loved him and worked with him, as his wife. 
Both were desirous of going to Zion, where they could better live their 
religion among people of their own belief. So, Eliza volunteered to 
continue her work in the button factory and thus help to save enough 
money for their long journey to Utah. 

June 23, 1858, the couple was blessed with a bright, blue eyed, 
girl with golden hair who was given the name of Harriet Clarissa. 
With a future home in Zion, ever present in the mind of Eliza, she 
continued to work at the button factory after the birth of her child. 
Her sister Emma took care of the baby while she was at work. Very 
close to the button factory was a Catholic Church. Emma would bring 
Eliza's baby, periodically through the day, and Eliza would rest on the 
steps and nurse her infant daughter. 

A second baby for Aunt Emma to take care of, was born to Eliza 
on May 13, i860. Eliza continued to work in the button factory, de- 
termined to build their "transportation to Zion fund", although the date 
was temporarily extended. This second baby was named Mary Ann 
Emma, after her second mother. 

Little Parley G. Taylor was born to Eliza on August 4, 1862. Now 
with three babies to take care of. Aunt Emma, remained steadfast in 
supporting Eliza and George in their desire to migrate to Zion. 

As the increased cost for raising the growing family developed, 
so also the determination to get to Zion increased, even if it were by 
the "skin of their teeth". Eliza and George continued to skrimp and 
save and pray and work, and with Aunt Emma's loyal support, they 
now had just about enough money to pay for their transportation. 

Eliza and George had now spent six years of their married life in 
accumulating barely enough money for their long journey to Utah. 
George had often promised Eliza, "If only we can get there by the skin 
of our teeth, we will be happy". 

They could wait no longer, so on June 4, 1863, George and Eliza 
and their three children:Harriet Clarissa, Mary Ann Emma and Parley 
G,; with their passage ticket paid, four pence reserve, but with an 
abundance of faith;left London, England on the sailing vessel "Amazon". 

For the next seven weeks they tossed and rolled on the wide Atlantic 
Ocean and finally docked at Castle Gardens, New York, It was a weak 
and exhausted woman, as Eliza walked down the gangplank that evening. 
Her only nourish ment that day had been a cup of gruel. She was so 
weak that she had her husband throw down a quilt on the ground so she 
could lie down and regain sufficient strength to continue on. 

Their prayers had been answered. They had arrived safely in 
America. Now an old time friend, Joseph Harris, an Uncle of Bishop 
Ralph Poulton who with others was on his way to Zion; came to their 
aid by loaning them enough money to continue their journey to Utah. 

Passage in "steerage" on the sailing vessel had been clean and 



52 



ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



airy and comfortable, compared to the railroad box cars, they were 
herded into, for their transportation from New York to St, Joseph, Mo, 
Straw was scattered on the floor of these partially open box cars and 
which allowed the smoke and dust to blow in. These quarters were 
crowded, uncomfortable and soon became filthy dirty. 

Little Mary Ann Emma, being very frail, could not stand the hard 
trip, in these box cars, and died the latter part of July 1863. The Rail- 
road had called an undertaker to meet the train at St„ Joseph, and re- 
move the little body. When George and James Poulton went in search 
of the undertaker, they could not find him. No one ever knew where 
the little body of Mary Ana Emma was buried. 

From St, Joseph, Mo, , Eliza, George and party traveled by boat, 
up the Missouri River, to Florence, Nebraska, where a company 
was to be formed for their long trek across the plains to Utah. On the 
boat, George and little Parley G, became very ill. Three days after 
leaving St, Joseph, little Parley G, died, the latter part of July 1863, 
while on the boat. He was buried in Florence, Nebraska. 

With the loss of two of her three children, and now with her hus- 
band deathly ill, Eliza poured forth her heart in silent prayer , "Father , 
Thy will be done, not mine. But, Please God, spare my husband to go 
with me into the Valley". 

Eliza's faith and prayers were again answered. Her husband, 
George, fully recovered. At Florence they joined Captain Wooley's 
Company, which began their journey West the first part of August 1863. 
George drove three yoke of oxen. The original family of five was now 
reduced to only three: George, Eliza and little golden haired, Hattie, 

The people along the way-were destitiite of clothing, so Eliza sold 
her dead children's clothes to buy food for her remaining child. Hattie 
related that a band of Indians saw her bright, curly, red hair and want- 
ed to trade for her. Her mother refused but became worried for fear 
that they might return and steal her, so she cut off Hattie's hair. For 
a long time thereafter, Hattie wore a sun bonnet, until her hair grew 
back. 

On October 4, 1863, the Taylor Family, realized their dream of 
mingling with the Saints in the Valley of the Mountains, when they ar- 
rived in Salt Lake City, with thankfulness for their safe arrival and 
with faith, hope and plans for their future. 

A short time after their arrival in Salt Lake City, Eliza and her 
husband were walking down the street, when a familiar looking lady 
came running out of the house, calling them by name. 

It was Mary Rabould, ( now Mrs. William Wood) she who had first 
taken Eliza to a Mormon Church Service. How happy Eliza was to now 
have such a dear friend in this new land. Mary insisted that she and 
little Hattie come and stay with her. Since George had gone to Provo, 
looking for work and a place to live, they accepted the invitation and 
stayed with her for a month. 



ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



53 



In the early part of November 1863, George Taylor sent for his 
wife and child to come to Provo„ He had found a one room log house 
for her to live in, B rothe r Abraham Halliday had come to Salt Lake on 
business and was returning to Provo, He gave Eliza and Hattie an in- 
vitation to accompany him back to Provo, which they re adily accepted. 

George and Eliza's dream of life in Utah was not as rosy as they 
had thought it would be. They found Zion very different from what they 
had anticipated. Both found it hard to get used to the new ways and 
laws of the people. They were born of refined, old English Stock and 
were more or less of a pious nature. Here in this new country, the 
settlers were rough and roudy. The country was new and wild and these 
things troubled them. Eliza took things for granted and began home- 
making. Her trust and faith in God were so strong that she could ac- 
cept all changes graciously. Her husband, on the contrary, found it 
hard to accustom himself to the new life. 

One night Eliza pondered over the one principle of the Gospel that 
was most trying. Having taken her trouble to the Lord in her past life, 
she did not forget Him now, in her hour of doubt. So, she now prayed 
earnestly that she might know if polygamy was true. She prayed with 
heart and soul, for in this knowledge much depended^ 

The door opened and a beautiful personage came in. He did not 
wear a hat or coato His shirt was spotless white„ His hair was comb- 
ed high upon his forhead. His eyes were clear and bright and they 
made her feel at ease in his presence. He sat down on one of the two 
stools which graced her humble home, and said, "Sister, you want to 
know if polygamy is true, I say to you, verily it is true. But trials 
and troubles are numerous, and there will be more damned than saved". 

This was her salvation, for she knew that she had talked with 
Joseph Smith, the Prophet, and that he had come in answer to her 
prayer. In her thankfulness, she prayed, "O Lord! Help me to do un- 
to others as I would be done by". So the Lord gave her strength and 
she made this prayer her life motto. She had received a wonderful 
testimony of the truth. 

One of the first visitors to enter her home was Aunt Hannah Clark, 
whom most of the early pioneers remember, for her many acts of 
kindness. Aunt Hannah came as a ministering angel of mercy when 
Eliza, after her hard trip, lay ill in a strange, new country. She made 
a cup of tea ( a luxury in those days ) and did many things to cheer and 
comfort her. This marked the birth of a friendship which will last for 
time and eternity. 

Eliza's husband had a soldier's outfit with its various belongings 
which he traded for a two-room house. There was one large room 
and a small bedroom. The house was built of adobe and had a dirt 
floor. To this home Eliza moved in March 1864, It was here that her 
husband brought his second wife, Henrietta Sawyer. She was a good 
girl. She and Eliza shared equally in a household of peace and happi- 
ness. 



64 



ELIZA NICHCLLS TAYLOR 



On August 31, 1864, Eliza gave birth to a little boy, who was 
named after his father, George. 

Eliza'a fifth child, a little boy was born August 2, 1866. William 
Taylor died after a week's illness on September 2, 1867. 

Thomas Nicholls Taylor, his first name taken from his grand- 
father's, was born on July 28, 1868. 

On November 2, 1870, Arthur Nicholls Taylor was born to Eliza. 
He was the fourth child born to Eliza in America and the last child she 
gave birth to in this little two-room, adobe house with its dirt roof, 

Eliza's home was typical of many of the early pioneer houseSo 
The dirt roof had to be repaired after each hard rain. Sometimes 
large holes would appear and the children would lie in bed and try to 
count the stars. When it rained very hard, the mother would put the 
children under the bed. She would then busy herself getting pots and 
pans to put on the beds to catch the rain and thus keep the bedding as 
dry as possible. Many mornings, after it had been raining all night, 
Eliza would cheerfully thank the Lord for the bright warm sunshine 
which made it possible for her to dry the bedding for the next night. 

During the stormy season the mud would rundown the white -wash- 
ed walls. Eliza would then re-whitewash the house in order to make it 
clean and home like, A woman of her nature could live only in a 
clean home. Thus the brave little woman endured her poverty, and 
thanked the Lord for all that he had given her. 

In the spring of 1873, Eliza moved up town into two rooms over 
her husband's furniture store. It was here on September 25, 1873, 
that Walter G, Taylor was born. Here she lived until the early spring 
of 1875, She then moved into a one- room, log house located on the 
corner of Seventh West and West Center Street. While living here she 
gave birth to her last baby, Ashted Taylor. He was born September 
12, 1875, His first name was taken from the name of the Church 
Branch in Birmingham, England, where she and her husband, George 
first met. 

While living in this little log house on West Center, Eliza's hus- 
band re -built the little home on First North, which had been vacant 
for some time. In November of 1875, Eliza again moved into the little 
adobe house which had sheltered her when she brought four of her 
children into the world. 

When Ashted was four years old and her children had outgrown 
babyhood, Eliza accepted the call as a teacher in the Third Ward 
Relief Society. The Provo Third - Ward Primary President, Rebecca 
Doolen, selected her for Second Counsellor in 1884. The following 
year, 1885, Annie K. Smoot, President of the Utah Stake Primary 
selected her as First Counsellor, This office she held for over ten 
years. For the next few years she was holding down two Church jobs. 
In 1887, Eliza was called to act as First Counsellor to Sister Lamira 
CoUine, the President of the Young Ladies Mutual Association of the 



ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



55 



Provo Third Ward. In the Spring of 1890 she was set apart as pre sident 
of the Relief Society of the Provo Third Ward by Bishop Myron Tanner. 
This position she held for twenty-three years. When the Third Ward 
was divided, she became President of the new (Pioneer) Ward Relief 
Society. 

In the Spring of 1890, Eliza took her son Arthur, on a trip back to 
her childhood homeo In the four months they were gone, they visited 
Eastern United States, England and France. It was a very pleasant 
trip, but she was glad to return to her adopted country. 

On a later visit she made to Europe, to see her family in Bir- 
mingham , England, her sister tried to persuade her to remain and 
live in England, She proudly straightened up and said, "I'd rather be 
a lamp post in Zion than the Mayor of London", 

In the 1890's, Eliza and Sister Collins used to attend nearly all of 
the young people's parties. On one occasion she was asked why she 
enjoyed these affairs so much. She laughingly answered, "Well, you 
see I am interested in the young sparks and their love affairs". If 
questioned, no doubt she could tell some of them as much about their 
romances as they knew themselves. 

At onetime a party of young people wished to make a trip to Straw- 
berry Valley. Grandma was asked to chaperone them. The roads in 
some places were very dangerous and the girls insisted on walking. 
Her son, Arthur, was driving the team and Grandma Taylor was sit- 
ting by his side. The girls begged her to get down and walk, as the 
wagon appeared to be tipping several times. She answered them with 
her cheerful smile and said, "No, I go where my son goes. He can 
watch and I can pray". And who knows but what her faith alone saved 
that young party? 

On another occasion she was on a trip with her son, Tom and 
family. They were camping in South Fork Canyon, on the banks of the 
river. A terrible storm came up in the night. As the tent was on the 
banks of the creek, there was danger of it being washed away. The 
stream was rapidly rising. It seemed that any minute they would be 
carried with the rushing, roaring waters. Maud began to prepare to 
run to the mountains. The lightning served as her light in sorting the 
children's clothes. Just as she was ready to start. Grandma Taylor, 
who was sleeping with her two little granddaughters, raised up from 
her bed and said, "Girls, what is the matter? Didn't you say your 
prayers? Where is your faith? Get back into bed and cover up your 
heads". The storm finally abated and peace was restored. 

Grandma Taylor was never afraid of anything. After she was fifty 
years of age she learned to drive. Many will remember seeing her 
dashing down the street with her horse named Browney, hitched to a 
little yellow buggy. Those who rode with her would hold their breath. 
She would only laugh and say as the horse plunged on, "I am pray- 
ing all the time and the Lord will help me". 



ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



On one occasion she was driving a strange horse. Sister Collins 
was with her in the buggy. The horse became frightened and started 
to run. The ladies were thrown out and Grandma Taylor's arm was 
broken. When gently chided by her sons, she willingly confessed that 
for once in her life, her faith had been weak. She had forgotten to pray. 

Grandma Taylor had a dear friend. Grandma Dixon; they were 
neighbors and each had a family of boys and only one daughter. They 
were very happy when Grandma Dixon's one daughter, Maria (Rye), 
married Grandma Taylor's son, Arthur. In Wildwood, Provo Canyon, 
several of the Dixon Boys and the Taylor Boys built cabins . Arthur and 
his wife built a nice bedroom on the back of their cabin known as the 
Grandma's room. In the summer these sweet little Grandmothers 
would go up together and stay. In the day they sat out on the front porch, 
in wicker rockers, and visited as they rocked. In the late afternoon, as 
it would begin to cool off, their grandchildren living in the camp and any 
other children who wished to go, would gather on the porch and when 
the Grandmothers were ready, all would go for a walk down the road, 
around the bend and to the shore of the river. There Grandma Taylor 
had her special rock to sit upon and Grandma Dixon had hers. After 
a few minutes rest, back to camp all would go, 

Eliza Nicholls Taylor was known far and wide for her beautiful, 
unselfish life. Always doing good and administering to the poor and 
needy. Carrying for the sick, as well as the dead, when the occasion 
arose. Her life has been one long act of devotion -- devotion to God, 
devotion to her children, devotion to her friends, to the poor, the rich 
and to all humanity. 

Although Grandma Taylor had her full share of trials, troubles, 
hardships, heartbreaks and disappointments, she openly expressed 
her thankfullnes s to her Heavenly Father for blessing her with a large, 
obedient and respected family, who loved her and gave her all the 
luxury and comforts and attention she desired. She was a queen among 
friends and family and loved by everyone who knew her. 

Eliza's grand-daughter, Delenna T, Taylor summed up some of 
the many, wonderful qualities of her: 

Faith in God. 
Willingness to work. 

A tolerance and understanding of people. 

Cleanliness and order, 

A sense of humor. 
Eliza Nicholls Taylor was tried, tested and remained faithful to 
the end. She passed away at her daughter's home, June 27, 1922, at 
the age of 84 years. 



Clarence D. Taylor 
September 1979 



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58 



ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



The following poem was written by Mrs. Mayme W. Bird of the 
Provo Third Ward in honor of Grandma Taylor's seventy-eighth birth- 
day: 

GRANDMA TAYLOR 

She left her home, and all most dear 

To come to Zion without fear. 

The trip was hard, her poor heart bled. 

For her poor children, alas! were dead 

And buried in unknown graves, 

In the land and in the waves. 

She bore the trial without complaint; 

"God's will be done, " now said this Saint. 

And on she came, her children left. 

Though her heart was sad for her bereft; 

She had a kind word for those she met 

And still those kind words she has always kept. 

Now here in Utah her trials did not end. 
But she bore them so bravely and so intend 
To make others happy. 

As years passed by, her wisdom increased 

And trials and sorrows were released. 

Her family she raised -- a credit, too, 

With marks of progression through and through. 

Now Grandma's life will blend 

Into others and be their friend. 

'Tis Grandma Taylor for each and all; 
For counsel and advise, just give her a call; 
She'll be ready for you with a word of good cheer. 
And if you take it you need have no fear. 

May her life be as long as she desires, 
Roses strewn in her path, not briers. 
Her birthday today we celebrate; 
She so noble and so great. 
Now let us follow Grandma's plan. 
And always do the best we can. 



ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 59 
PATRIARCHAL BLESSING OF ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



Patriarchal Blessing given under the hands of George Halliday, 
Patriarch in the Utah Stake of Zion, upon the head of Eliza N, Taylor, 
daughter of Thomas A. NichoUs and Harriet Ball, Born the 29th day 
of April A.D. 1838. Given the 24th day of August A, D. 1894 at Ameri- 
can Fork, Utah. 

Dear Sister, I place my hands upon your head and give unto you a 
Patriarchal Blessing, for you are of the seed of Israel and of the lene- 
age of Ephraim, and thru obedience to the gospel you have a right to 
the blessings of that tribe. 

God, your Heavenly Father, has reserved you in Heaven, and sent 
you here on earth through honorable parents and blessed you with a 
kind and loving heart. His spirit has been your guide through life, of- 
ten in your lonely moments in your habitation. Angels have been near 
you, and although you did not see them you have felt their influence. 

The light of the Lord shall give thee wisdom and as thou hast all 
ready been blest of the Lord by revelation to teach thy sisters and their 
children, so shall it increase upon thee and thou shall never be barren 
and unfruitful in the knowledge of God. 

Thou art a blessed woman and all that know thee love thee, the 
righteous shall always honor thee and thousands of children shall grow 
up to maturity and remember the council thou hast given them, God 
thy Father loves thee because of thy integrity in the house of the Lord. 
Thy name shall be recorded as one of the saviours upon Mount Zion. 

Holy men and Prophets shall bless thee. In His house thy tempo- 
ral wants shall be supplied. Thou shall never suffer hunger, but the 
Lord will remember thee for thy liberality and will deal liberally with 
thee. In all thy afflictions God shall give thee comfort. In all thy 
duties He shall give thee strength, both of body and mind. 

Thou shall be preserved to a good old age and as a mother in 
Israel thy councils shall be sought after, for thy experience shall give 
thee wisdom. Thy patience and love shall give thee power and many 
shall hear thy voice and bless thee. 

Remember this blessing when thou art bowed down in thy feelings. 
Read it and it shall comfort thee. 

In the morning of the resurrection, with the faithful, thou shall 
come forth and go on to thy exaltation to eternal increase and enjoy 
eternal life. Thou shall behold thy Saviour and rejoice inhis presence. 

For all these blessings I seal upon thee in the name of the Lord, 
Jesus Christ, AMEN. 




415 No. 7th West, Provo 




Back: Lester, Walter, Sterling, Edith, Arnold, Melvin, Bade, Arthur 
Middle: Alden, Ethel, baby Leo, Vesta, Clarrisa, Nellie, baby Victor 
Front: George, Marion, Leona, Grandma Eliza Taylor holding babies 

Fred & Henry, Fontella, Lynn, Elton 



GRANDMOTHER, ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



I am grateful to Leona (cousin) for her biography. She no doubt 
had names, places and dates direct from grandmother, because she 
lived with Aunt Hattie for some time, and grandmother was at that time 
making her home with Aunt Hattie. But always when one writes of 
another, they give their impressions. 

While my brother , Walter , was the pride and joy of the McKinley' s ; 
but because I was a name sake of Aunt Hattie, I seem to fit into their 
special favors. 

Grandmother was a Stake officer in Utah Stake when the area ex- 
tended thru Utah County. She drove a little horse in a phaeton and 
would take the time to come pick me up and take me with her on these 
long visits. She often would take me to General Conference in Salt 
Lake. When that was a real occasion, my mother would expend more 
effort in preparation for that event (which was seldom) than I do going 
for a trip to far away places. 

As I wore my hair in curls, it was her extra job to see to my 
hair and dressing, and I enjoyed being with her. Perhaps that is why 
I loved her so much. She has always been my ideal. She was rewarded 
by her family. They made sure she had every comfort to be had in her 
day: special carriages ; she built a new home , fully furnished in the best 
furniture of the day. That was the first satin and brocade furniture I 
ever saw. 

Keeping her family near her , every Sunday afternoon. They came 
to her home for supper, before going to evening service. When there 
became so many children, they were sent to Uncle Tom's or Uncle 
George's, to be taken care of by the older boys and girls. What fun 
we had together. I guess that is why I love my cousins so much. All 
were dismissed in time to get to church;important because Uncle Tom 
was Bishop or in the Bishopric. Some had chores, some had young 
children, not all made it to church, but few instances kept them from 
her home on Sunday afternoon. 

Always X'mas, the number one obligation was to go to see our 
grandmother, always a gift for everyone, then you made your arrange- 
ments. This went on after she finally gave up her own home, she built 
an apartment on Aunt Hattie's home, but the meals were eliminated; 
the children called enroute home from Sunday School; the sons and 
wives made calls instead of visits. But even after L was married, 

Sunday calls and Christmas presents were continued. 

Grandmother officiated not as mid wife or nurse, but as aid and 
comforter at the births of her grandchildren, even down to the birth of 
my first child. Her faith, her cheerful spirit added greatly on such 
occas ions . 

Her sons consulted her on all their affairs or business deals. 



61 



62 



ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



They must have appreciated her help or it would never had continued 
through the years. 

Her queenly manner demanded respect and attention whether she 
was your hostess or presiding officer at meetings. ( She was Relief 
Society President for many years.) 

It was my privilege to stay with her at nights, when Aunt Hattie 
would go out on the ranch in summer time. I shall never forget her 
wonderful prayers, in fact from her I learned to pray ( really before 
then my prayers were for myself and our family, but her prayers cov- 
ered every one, from the " sick and afflicted, to those tried and 
tempted") . 

Her lovely dark brown hair hung past her waist, always brushed 
and braided at night. It waved naturally about her temples, over her 
ears to her bob at the back; her sharp grey blue eyes always seemed 
to be softened with a smile. When the sons would kid her about getting 
old, she would say, " ther's nobody th' old but the old Nick". Truly 
her spirit never grew old. Papa would question my new styles or tease 
but grandmother would back me up with, " just as well be dead as out 
of style. " 

She was loved and was Grandma Taylor to all who knew her. I 
am so glad she was mine. How proud we should be of our heritage. 

Grandchild No. 13 CLARRISA TAYLOR EASTMOND 

( Written to her neice, Ann Sutton, in October 1961) 

Clarrisa was killed in an automobile accident November 14, 1961 



"Let not thy left hand know what thy right hand doeth", 
"O Lord! Help me to do unto others as I would be done by". 
"I'd rather be a lamp post in Zion, than the Mayor of London". 
" A perfect faith will lift us above fear". 



AS I REMEMBER GRANDMOTHER TAYLOR 



When I remember Grandmother, she had an apartment in the 
one side of the house in which Aunt Hattie McClellan lived. On Christ- 
mas day all the family were to gather at Grandmother's. My sister, 
Mary, remembers the Christmas Grandmother gave identical dolls, 
except for the color of their clothes, to Mary and her three cousins 
who were born the same year. Books were often given to her grand- 
children at Christmas time. 

Each Tuesday at five o clock I had a private audience with her. 
As soon as Primary was over, I would ride my bike as quickly as poss- 
ible to her home --a gentle knock -- and then Grandmother's voice, 
"Come in, me gal. " She would be sitting in a chair waiting for me. I 
would kiss her cheek and then go sit on a small stool facing her. "And 
what happened in Primary today? " After about fifteen minute's con- 
versation, she would say, "Go out by our Hattie's way, she has a bit 
of cake. " I would go down a long dark hall and knock on Aunt Hattie's 
kitchen door. She would invite me in and I would sit very carefully on 
a black leather sofa and catch the crumbs in my apron of the current 
cake, which I heartily disliked. Then I would carry the crumbs in my 
skirt over to the coal bucket and brush them out. I would ask Aunt 
Hattie if she had any errands she wanted me to do on my bike, if not 
"goodbye" for another week. 

Grandmother's life was a pattern of faith inGod and belief in the 
necessity of doing good. She gave many years of her life to the service 
of her Church; to the wise guidance to her children and grandchildren. 
June 27, 1922 at the age of eighty-four, Eliza Nicholls Taylor's life on 
earth finished. 

There were many wonderful qualities of my Grandmother I 
should like to emulate; some of which are: 

Faith in God 

Willingness to Work 

A tolerance and understanding of people 
Cleanliness and order 
Sense of humor 

DELENNA TAYLOR TAYLOR 

Grandchild No. 45 



63 



AS I REMEMBER GRANDMOTHER TAYLOR 



It is said, one remembers the past better than todays events. 
I am not sure of that, but my memory of Grandma Eliza dates to when 
I was three or four years old. 

There was a command performance to go see Grandma Taylor 
as soon as Sunday School was over. ( 12:00 Noon). I was always hungry 
that time of day and wanted to go home first, but Father would put me 
on the handle bars of his bicycle and pedal me to Grandmothers house 
to make the Sunday call. When Father was busy at Church, my brother 
Sterling would take me by the hand and escort me, instead of the bike 
ride . 

As I walked along First North, I grew more hungry, and on the 
corner of Sixth West, one-half block before we reached Grandma's 
house, the Clark family had a beautiful cherry tree. When the cherries 
were ripe, a limb or two hung over the fence, I could never understand 
why { if they covered my path), I could not have a few of them. But 
it was a NO! NO ! . 

Arriving at Grandmother's we were warmly welcomed and asked 
what we had learned in Sunday School. I liked stories and did my best 
to remember and tell her them. Now comes the big moment. We were 
to sit quietely on a rug near the fireplace. (Grandma was VERY English) 
We then were served a piece of current cake (which I loathed), cautioned 
about crumbs on the floor. After finishing the cake and thanking her we 
were dismissed to return home and dinner. 

When I was twelve or thirteen, I don't remember the exact date 
for I never have been historically date minded, ( about 1906 ) Grand- 
mother came to live with us. That is when she took over, so to speak. 
I was her errand girl, maid and so on. When she moved into our home 
she brought a load of hollow silverware , tea sets and all sorts of silver 
service. My job was to polish the darn stuff. I vowed I would never 
own any silverware that I had to polish; but I do have much to much. 

One of my errands was to take envelopes to three widows in 
the Ward. In the morning, Grandmother would say, " Thomas I shall 
need three new five dollar bills today. When Father came home for 
dinner she would receive the money she had requested. After finishing 
eating she would look at me and say in her English accent, "Cm me 
gal". I would then follow her upstairs, she would close the door and 
we would move over to her chest of drawers. She would pull out a few 
envelopes and begin her work. Years before in a horse and carriage 
accident, her hand was injured which left her fingers somewhat stiff. 
I would then watch her take a fresh new bill, slide it into an envelope, 
fold in the flap and then say, "Now me gal you will take this to sister 

so and so . You will say I was asked to deliver 

this evelope to you. Then walk away, immediately. Now remember, 
me gal, you must never let the right hand know what the left hand doeth". 
I learned later that when they first came to Provo, one of these women 

64 



ELIZA NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



65 



let Grandmother and Grandfather live in an adobe shelter, which she 
owned, a dirt roof, dirt floor, makeshift windows; but it was a shelter. 
Grandmother was always grateful. I know less about the other women. 

We were in the South Fork of Provo Canyon one summer. A 
real electric storm suddenly came on. My Mother had a terror ofthe 
elements, such as summer storms. We were camped in a tent with a 
dirt or grass floor. The thunder boomed, the lightening streaked, the 
rain poured down causing the stream to rise and roar by. The storm 
became furious. I was sleeping with Grandmother. She sat up and 
said, "Maud, what are you doing? " Mother answered, " I am sorting 
the children's clothes, I am getting out of this canyon at day light". 
Grandmother said, " I say Maud, did you say your prayers? " Mother 
answered, " Of course I did". "Well then, go to bed and give the Lord 
a chance", answered Grandmother as she cuddled down and went to 
sleep. Grandmother had absolute and complete faith in prayer. 

One of her many faith promoting experiences which had a great 
influence on my life and which she told to me: 

"George, your Grandfather, came to me and said that the brethren 
had requested us to take another wife. I answered him by telling him 
that we had only an adobe house with one room, that the roof leaked; 
the place was but a shell. We do however have a fire place. ( A must 
for an English man and wife. ) " 

"Then Grandmother began rocking and praying for the answer. 
Those were the days when there were no store hours and George was at 
the store. It was raining, there were pans on the bed to catch the 
water, the children were on the floor under the bed. " 

" I sat in my rocking chair looking at the fire and dozed off. A 
voice awakened me. I was, I thought, dreaming. Finally the voice 
called again. I opened my eyes and before me stood the most handsome 
man with the bluest eyes, and he said, "Sister Eliza, the principle is 
true, but it will damn more than it will save". 

Well, George had another family and there were later problems. 
But from those two families have come Bishops, Stake Presidens, two 
General Authorities, Patriarchs; some valient and not so valient mem- 
bers. I have lived long enough to see some of the damned families. 

I have told the story as Grandmother told the story to me. I 
could never forget it as she told it to me. 



Grandchild No. 6 



ETHEL TAYLOR SESSIONS 
April 4, 1981, Age 89 years 



Biography of HENRIETTA SAWYER TAYLOR 



Henrietta Sawyer Taylor was born on the Isle of Jersey, off the 
shores of France. She was the daughter of Joseph and Henrietta Tran- 
ham Sawyer of Brightlingsee, Essex, England, born April 20, 1846. 

Soon after her birth her parents moved to Swansea, Wales , where 
her sister Mary Ann was born on August 17, 1848. The family lived 
here for ten years where they first met the Latter Day Saint Elders. 

In 1856 they set sail on the ship "Samuel S. Carlin", landing in 
New York City, where they remained on account of financial difficulties . 
Four years later they crossed the plains in the Je s se Murphy Company. 
The team and wagons hauled the provisions, and the young people had 
to walk. They had many exciting experiences, especially with the 
Indians. On one occasion they came upon a camp where the Indians 
had killed a whole company of persons who were on their way to Calif- 
ornia. The thrashing machine, which was being taken to California, 
was broken to bits, A little later the Murphy Company was overtaken 
by this same band of Indians. They asked for the Captain. When he 
appeared they had him open his vest and show his underwear. When 
they saw the marks on his garments they rode away leaving the company 
unharmed. 

The Murphy Company arrived in Salt Lake City in I860, where 
the Sawyers lived for a short time, then they moved to Provo. Their 
home was on 7th West and 2nd South. 

At the age of 18, in 1864, Henrietta became the plural wife of 
George Taylor. She lived in the home with Eliza Nicholls Taylor, the 
first wife. This two room home was located on First North between 
6th and 7th West. The two families all lived in this home for some 
time, then Henrietta moved into her own home, which was located in 
the same building as her husband's Furniture Store, on West Center 
Street. While living in this location, her little child, Amy, 3 years 
of age, fell into the Mill Race and was drowned. 

Henrietta enjoyed the visits she made to California in her de- 
clining years. Soon after her last trip she became ill and two weeks 
later passed away, March 2, 1922. 

Her children were: Henrietta (Nettie), Mary Ann (Polly), John 
Tranham, and Ella. Joseph, the first born, died in infancy and Amy 
was drowned at the age of 3. 

Henrietta was a woman devoted to her home and her family. She 
was very retiring, but she caused much laughter with her dry witt, 
and her friends always enjoyed visiting with her in her home. 

Maria Dixon Taylor 



67 



Henrietta's Home 
175 West Center, Provo 
Granddaughter Norma, Son John T. 



Nettie Ella 




Biography of JOSEPH SAWYER and his wife HENRIETTA TRANHAM 



In giving a brief history of Henrietta Tranham Sawyer I would like 
to go back to the year her mother, Mary Ann Rasberry, was born in 
1802, presumably at Brighlingsea, Essex, England. While she was a 
very small child, her mother and father came down with yellow fever 
and died within a few days of each other, leaving her and her younger 
sister orphans. She and her sister, Pleasant Rasberry, were very 
young at the time and although there was an estate and money left, how 
much or how little we never found out. As it was the custom in Eng- 
land at that time , to put all money and property not settled in chancery 
where no one could touch it for one hundred years, then it was suppos- 
ed to be distributed between the heirs. But after one hundred years 
no one knew what happened. Their Godmother and Godfather took 
Mary Ann Rasberry and her sister to their home and raised them. 

Pleasant was not married until late in life ; but Mary Ann Rasbe rry 
was married in Brighlingsea on the 26th Day of July 1819. She was 
then seventeen years of age and married John Tranham, who later be- 
came comtroller of the customhouse at Portsmouth, England. He was 
also a member of the Royal Yacht Club. They had nine children, one 
who died soon after birth. The others were seven girls and one son 
named John Tranham, after his father. The father was drowned dur- 
ing a heavy storm in the Portsmouth Harbor while on his line of duty. 
This was some time about the 15th of November 1853. His body was 
not found until the next February. He was buried on the 15th of Feb- 
ruary at Brighlingsea 1854. His only son, John Tranham, was appoint- 
ed to his father' position as comptroller of the customhouse at Ports- 
mouth, a position which he held with great credit for over fifty years. 
He too became a member of the Royal Yacht Club. He was pensioned 
after fifty years service. 

Henrietta Tranham was a daughter of Mary Ann Rasberry and 
John Tranham. She was born at the home at Brighlingsea on the 2nd 
of September 1821, and it was in this town that Joseph Sawyer met her 
when she had grown to young womanhood. It was a case of love at first 
sight. He first saw her on the street and told the young fellow with 
him, "There is the girl I am going to marry. " He immediately made 
it his business to meet her and kept right on her trail until she mar- 
ried him. He almost camped on her door step. They were married in 
a beautiful little church in Brighlingsea on the 17th of July 1841. They 
were a fine looking couple at that time, and years later, David Johns, 
President of Utah Stake, while preaching Joseph Sawyer's funeral 
sermon at Provo, Utah, said, "I first met Joseph and Henrietta Saw- 
yer in Wales at Swansea, and I have traveled all over the world, but 
it has never been my privilege to see a handsomer couple than these 
two people." I do believe he spoke the absolute truth. 

The Sawyers lived at Brighlingsea. It was there Joseph Sawyer 
was born on the lOth of July 1816. He was a son of John Sawyer and 



69 



70 



SAWYER 



Mary Ann Mann. His heritage is strong, sturdy, long lived line of 
ancestors, both on the Sawyer and the Mann side of the family, some 
of them living beyond the hundred years. 

When Joseph Sawyer was three years old, an epidemic of small 
pox broke out in the village. The Sawyer family contracted the disease. 
Joseph and his father were both in bed very ill with the disease when 
his father died. His mother was left a widow with seven children to 
support. She had a very hard time doing this for awhile and keeping 
up her home. She had a very proud and independent disposition. While 
her children were still young, she married a young man by the name 
of William Seagers. They were married the 30th of November 1822. 
Joseph Sawyer was a boy six years old at that time. He always liked 
his step-father and said he was a fine man and was very good to his 
mother. 

After his mother married William Seagers , she had six children, 
making thirteen in the family. 

Brighlingsea is a seaport town so it was not surprisingly that 
although Joseph Sawyer had been apprenticed to a farmer in his early 
youth, when he was old enough he went to sea as many of the young 
men of that section did. Then for a very short time he was a body 
guard to Queen Victoria; but the lure of the sea was too strong for him, 
so again he went to sea. It was on one of these trips home that he met 
and married Henrietta Tranham. 

They lived at Brighlingsea for awhile and their first child, a son 
was born here on the 3rd of June 1843. They named him Joseph. He 
died May the 8th 1844 while they were still living at Brighlingsea. 
From here, Joseph and his wife moved to the Isle of Jersey, where 
their second child, a daughter, was born April 30, 1846. They named 
her Henrietta. Later the Sawyer family moved to Swansea, Wales, 
where their third child, Mary Ann, was born on August 17th, 1848. 
They lived in Swansea, Wales for about seven years. Here in Wales 
they met the Mormon Elders. Henrietta was converted but her husband 
would not give his consent for her to be baptized. She was in very poor 
health at this time. The Elders administered to her and her health 
improved so rapidly that it was partly responsible for the conversion 
of her husband, after which he gave his consent for her and the child- 
ren to be baptized. Later Joseph Sawyer was baptized. He labored 
for some time in the Welch Branch of the Church, after being convert- 
ed, before emigrating to Utah. 

Joseph Sawyer was a man of strong faith and a strong supporte r of 
the Gospel. He had a gift of healing, in a measure; the gift of tongues, 
and the discernment of many things that were manifest to him. I might 
mention one occasion in a testimony meeting in Wales. He arose to 
bear his testimony and as he did so, he said the room seemed to fade 
away from him and he was in a great forest beside a campfire. In 
front of him a large group of dark skinned people stood, and he was 



SAWYER 



71 



preaching to them in a strange language and could not help speaking. 
When he sat down one of the Elders arose and interpreted his talk and 
said that he had been talking to the American Indians in their own 
language. At that time Joseph Sawyer had never seen an Indian, but 
later saw many of them after coming to America. 

While living in Wales, Henrietta's sister Louise's husband was 
lost at sea and she had to go to work so the Sawyers took care of her 
daughter, who was the same age as Mary Ann. Then their neighbor 
and friend died, leaving a daughter, Elizabeth, an orphan and the 
Sawyers took this girl also, who was the same age as their own girls 
and gave her a home as long as they lived in Wales. 

When the Sawyers decided to emigrate to Utah, they only had 
enough money to transport their own family on the ship, so Louise 
went to live with her own mother and Elizabeth had to remain in 
Swansea with other friends. Later when Elizabeth was grown and 
married to James Tuckfield she with her husband emigrated to Salt 
Lake City, Utah. She always called the Sawyers father and mother 
and was a frequent visitor to their home. When the Sawyers went to 
Salt Lake they always stayed at the Tuckfield home. 

The Sawyers left Wales for Utah in 1856. They sailed on the Sam- 
uel S. Curlen, a sailing vessel and were on the ocean six weeks. 
Joseph Sawyer cooked on the ship to help pay for their passage to New 
York. This was quite a come down for him as he had gradually ad- 
vanced in life at sea and had aspired to the Captaincy. They had a 
calm voyage and arrived safe in New York Harbor and went ashore 
with very little money; not enough to take them to Utah, so had to re- 
main in New York. He lived for a while in a large tenement house and 
had a very hard time - no work and no money - so they sometimes 
went hungry. 

One dayJoseph Sawyer went down to the docks inhopes of finding 
work at the docks unloading cargoes from the ships. There were no 
ships in. Hungry and discouraged he wandered along the beach where 
there were no buildings or people. There he knelt down and asked the 
Lord to open the way for him to find work and get food for his family. 
When he finished he opened his eyes, and there stood an elderly man 
with gray hair and beard. He told him a ship had just come into the 
docks and if he went he would get work. Joseph Sawyer looked in the 
direction he pointed and then turned to thank him. The man had dis- 
appeared; there was nothing there, only the open beach, not a building 
or anything around. He went back to the docks and there a large ship 
had just arrived. He was given a job immediately unloading cargo. 

In relating this later to the Elders, they thought he had seen one 
of the Three Nephites. The Sawyers later moved across the Harbor 
to the New Jersey side and south along the coast about one hundred 
fifty miles to a town called Toms River. Here they lived until they 
emigrated to Utah in i860. They fared much better at Toms River. 



72 



SAWYER 



All the family worked and saved to earn enough for their emigration to 
Utah. Henrietta and Mary Ann picked cranberries and huckle berries 
in the swamps to add to the fund. They left Toms River in I860 in the 
Jesse Murphy Company of Ox Teams. Joseph Sawyer drove one of 
the ox teams, to help pay their way. All the women and children had 
to walk and drive the loose stock, gather buffalo chips along the way 
to cook the meals, as wood was very scarce on the way. Joseph Saw- 
yer's wife, Henrietta was allowed to ride part of the way on acco\int 
of ill health. They had many adventures along the way with the Indians 
as told in Mary Ann's life history. 

The Sawyers arrived in Salt Lake City and entered into Pioneer 
Life of the city, buying a lot in which is now a business part of Salt 
Lake. When Joseph Sawyer decided to move to Provo, he sold his lot 
for a bushel of potatoes and a pair of second hand shoes. 

They joined the pioneers of Provo entering into all the activities 
of that section. Their two daughters became very popular in the com- 
munity. Henrietta married George Taylor, a pioneer furniture dealer 
and photographer of Provo, Utah. Mary Ann married John Watkins 
on the 21st of March 1 863. When John Watkins moved with his family 
to Provo Valley to pioneer that section, Joseph Sawyer and his wife 
bought their home and land. It consisted of two large adobe rooms and 
the lot of one complete city block. Here the Sawyers went into the 
gardening and fruit raising. They planted all kinds of fruit trees, 
grapevines, and berries. At first the going was very hard, they were 
beset by crickets , then gras shopper s and many conditions of the climate. 
Many times the young trees had to be completely covered with cloth to 
keep them from the insects that would completely devour them. 

Gradually these conditions were overcome and they had one of the 
finest orchards in the country with a fine nursery and vineyard. 

They built a large grape arbor we called the "bowery". It was 
about thirty- five feet wide and extended for more than half a block in 
length, completely covered with grapevines. Each year it bore sev- 
eral tons of grapes that we picked and stored in bins in a large granary 
until they could be sold or made into grape juice and stored in twenty 
and forty gallon barrels in the big cellar to be sold as time demanded. 

They had two large storage cellars with shelves for the storing of 
apples and the large winter pears that began to ripen at Christmas 
time and kept until March, bringing in a very good price for the family 
budget. The apples grew very large and when the good seasons came 
they raised hundreds of bushels that were stored for spring selling or 
sold in the fall. 

When the cellars were full, large planks were placed between the 
trees and loads of straw were bought and placed on the ground, then 
the apples were placed on it in a great pile covered with straw and 
leaves, then with a large canvass to keep them from the frost. In the 
spring they were uncovered, sorted and sold at a good price. Better 



SAWYER 



73 



than the price they would have brought in the fall. 

A new brick home replaced the old adobe house. Nothing was al- 
lowed to waste that could be saved. There was a large cider press 
with two vats and a hopper with the grinders and a wheel with a handle 
for turning the grinders by hand. From here the pulp fell into large 
vats and when full, the vats were pulled with a hook under the press 
screw. All the wind- fall apples that coul§?be saved in any other way 
were made into cider and the grapes were ground for the juice. This 
press was a three horse power, but I found out when I lived there that 
I was the three horses. The big press screw had four iron pins or 
knobs, a heavy wooden lid was placed inside the vat over the pulp, the 
screw was turned by hand until too hard to turn, then we placed a 
long hardwood pole between the pins taking hold of the end of it and 
walking round and round the press in a circle forcing the press down 
and the juice out in a stream. The cider was used for vinegar as this 
was the only kind of vinegar the pioneers could get at that time. 

The grape juice was put in twenty and forty gallon barrels and 
stored in a large cellar and later sold for grape juice or made into 
wine, of course there were always people who used these things for 
the wrong purpose. 

The success of their fruit raising venture depended on the good 
management of his wife. She was a wonderful manager, forceful in 
her dealings, a real aristocrat and her word was as good as her bond. 
Nothing was allowed to waste, the best of the windfall apples were 
gathered and in the evenings we peeled and cut them for drying. They 
were placed on long scaffolds of white pine boards and all over the back 
roof of the house to dry. When dry they were sold to the stores for a 
good price in the fall and winter, for dried fruit at that time was in 
great demand. 

All the grandchildren helped harvest the crops ;but those who were 
the real mainstays of the work were a granddaughter, Polly Taylor, 
(real name, Mary Ann), a grandson John Tranham Taylor, The grand- 
daughter, Polly Watkins, who lived with them, ( her real name Mary 
Ann) and a grandson, George Tranham Watkins, who came for the 
summer and helped with the harvest. Although Henrietta was always 
handicapped with poor health she always managed the work. She was 
a great lover of flowers and spent a lot of time caring for them. She 
prized her choice tulips and abundant roses and honeysuckle , snowballs , 
peonies and other choice flowers adorned her front yard. She also 
valued her friends very highly. 

Joseph Sawyer was a kindly, cheerful dis pos itioned person and 
gained many friends. In the early days he was on most of the com- 
mittees for celebrations. For a time he served as president of the 
Exchange Block, a group of business men who had joined together in 
buying and building up a business block of buildings for rental on 
Center Street, 



74 



SAWYER 



For a number of years the Second Ward ofProvo held their yearly 
reunions and picnic parties in Joseph Sawyer's orchard. These were 
very gay affairs with several hundred people gathered with their fam- 
ilies and large baskets of food. They built a long plank table the full 
length of the Bowery, with plank seats on each side extending down the 
length of the shaded bowery for over a half a block. The tables were 
cove red with snow white table cover s and a bounteous spread of all kinds 
of food, surrounded by a happy throng of people. Here they presented 
their programs and speeches, music and songs, while they feasted on 
the best of foods. The band was generally in attendance and they had a 
regular jubilee . 

Joseph Sawyer always kept along smooth packed runway between 
the long rows of large apple trees. This was kept free of all rocks 
and weeds and we always called it the race track. Here all the con- 
test games were held, races and prizes awarded. A large swing hung 
from a tall apple tree for the pleasure of all. It was a gay affair and 
held yearly over a period of years. 

Joseph's wife Henrietta always had a dislike for the month of 
March. She always said when it was over, "Now I will live another 
year. " She died on March 15, 1893, at the age of 72 years. His sec- 
ond wife was Harriett Norgrove. He built her an adobe house of four 
rooms on the south-east corner of the block. His second wife died a 
very few years later, preceding her husband by several years. After 
her death he lived with his daughter Henrietta Taylor at whose home he 
died after a three weeks' illness at the age of 87 years. At the age of 
70 years he received his second sight and threw away his glasses and 
from then on could see to read the finest print up to the time of death. 

His congenial disposition made his many friends and at the time of 
his funeral, 12 small boys came and asked the privilege to walk ahead 
of the casket to the cemetery. He was survived by his two daughters, 
13 grandchildren and several great grandchildren. 



Taken from A Brief History of 
the Pioneer, JOHN WATKINS 
By Mary A. Schaer 




Eliza NichoUs Harriett Clarrisa Henrietta Sawyer 

Tom George Henrietta Polly 



Biography of 
HARRIETT CLARRISA TAYLOR MC CLELLAN 

Harriett Clarrisa Taylor Mc Clellan was born in Birmingham, 
England, June 23, 1 858. She was the daughter of George and Eliza 
Nicholls Taylor. Her parents heard the Mormon Elders preach and 
were convinced of the truthfullne s s of this religion and were baptized. 
The spirit of emigrating to the Rocky Mountains came upon them, but 
they as other young people, were struggling to make a livelihood. 
Eliza began again to work in a button factory where she had worked 
before her marriage, until a short time before the birth of her first 
child Hattie, as we all now call her. 

A short time later, Eliza's sister Emma, who was married and 
had a home, offered to care for her baby during the day so that she 
could again do her work in the factory. A Catholic Church was not far 
from her work. During the noon hour, Emma carried the baby to the 
Church and Eliza sat on the steps and fed the baby, then to work again 
in order to help her husband accumulate enough means to finance their 
trip to Zion. The husband and wife worked hard and saved every penny 
possible, but two other babies came to the couple's home which made it 
harder to get the money needed for the trip. 

The family now numbered five and being so anxious to come to 
Zion, left the verdant shores of England with barely enough money to 
pay their passage. Though their purse was light their faith was strong. 

They set sail on June 4, 1853 in a small sailing vessell called 
the "Amazon". Hattie 's father was sick nearly all the way, but when 
he felt strong enough he used to take Hattie upon deck to get the sun- 
shine. Nothing delighted her more than to watch the big waves roll 
along. She had her fifth birthday while on the ocean. After seven 
weeks of ocean travel, it seemed like heaven to catch the first glimpse 
of America- - "The Land of Zion". 

They landed at Castle Gardens in New York with only two pence 
(about four cents) in their purse, but a good friend loaned Mr. Taylor 
money enough to proceed on their way. The next step westward, found 
them riding in box cars like cattle, with a little straw scattered around 
for beds. 

Little Mary Ann Emma, being the frailest of all the children, 
could not stand the hard trip on the cars, and as they were nearing St. 
Joseph, Emma died. When they reached the City, an undertaker had 
been called. The little body was taken from her mother's side, but 
none knew where she was buried. 

From St. Joseph they travelled on the Missouri River to Florence, 
where they were to form a company and start across the plains. The 
father became ill and also the baby. Parley G, , who died three days 
later while on the boat. His little body was buried in Florence. 



77 



78 



HARRIETT TAYLOR MC CLELLAN 



The father recovered his health and drove three yoke of oxen 
across the plains. The hearts of all were heavy to think of leaving 
their babies behind. Little Hattie was very lonesome and missed her 
little brother very much. They traveled in Captain Wooley's Company 
and left Florence the first part of August 1863. The people were quite 
destitute of clothing and the mother, brave to the end, sold her dead 
children's clothing for food for the only remaining child. Hattie loved 
to sit next to her father and help him drive the oxen. Every mile meant 
new sights and experiences for her mother and father's brave little 
girl. 

One day while the mother was preparing the food over the camp 
fire, some Indians appeared and wanted her to give them little Hattie. 
Eliza was so worried in case they should try to take the last child, she 
cut her auburn ringlets off so the Indians would not recognize her, if 
they came back. After traveling over two months, they reached Salt 
Lake City, October 4, 1863. 

Soon after their arrival they met one of Eliza's girl friends who 
invited them to her home until they could get located. The husband 
left for Provo to try and find work, leaving Hattie and her mother with 
this friend. It was a happy month's stay for both of them. In the early 
part of November, George sent for his wife and child. Abraham Hall- 
iday was going to Provo and took them along. 

The husband and father had prepared a one room log house for 
them to live in until he could build a home for them. They had no 
furniture , the bed-stead was made of poles and the mattress was made 
of straw. They had stools for chairs and a box for a table. There 
were no doors or windows. Blankets or clothing were hung up to keep 
the cold out. This humble home was across the street from Aunt 
Hannah Clark' 8 , as she was familiarly called. She came to the Taylor 
home, many and many a time, as a true ministering angel. As the 
mother became ill after so much worry, hardships and lack of food, 
this good neighbor brought food and gave what she could. Hattie used 
to go over to this kind lady's home and sit on her steps and sing all of 
her little songs. She was rewarded with a nice slice of bread and 
butter, which tasted better to her than pie or cake in later years. 

Hattie's father had a soldier's outfit with its various belongings, 
such as a gun and sword which he traded to Mr. Thomas Clark for a 
two roomed house, which had been used for a sheep shelter. There 
was one large room and a leanto as a bedroom. The house was built 
of adobe brick with a dirt roof. To this home the family moved in 
March 1864, after it had been thoroughly cleaned and whitewashed. 
Four of Hattie's brothers were born in this house: George, William, 
who died a short time later; Thomas N. and Arthur N. 

The dirt roof had to be repaired after each rain storm. Some- 
times large holes would appear. Many a night used to be spent by 
Hattie and her little brothers, counting the stars through the roof. 



HARRIETT TAYLOR MC CLELLAN 



79 



When it rained very hard, the mother put the children under the bed. 
She would get all the pots and pans to put on her bed to catch the rain 
and keep the bedding as dry as possible. Many raornings, after the 
rain, Eliza would cheerfully thank the Lord for all the bright, warm 
sunshine which made it possible for her to dry the bedding for the 
next night. 

Hattie's father married Henrietta Sawyer, a fine young woman, 
who now came to live in this small, humble home. 

The father worked at whatever jobs he could get which brought 
in a very small income, not sufficient to supply the family demands . 
Hattie, being the eldest child was left to care for the house and child- 
ren while the two women went to the fields to glean wheat, to provide 
flour for the family use. They also picked ground cherries. Later 
when the children were older, Hattie also went into the fields, glean- 
ing and ground- cher ring with other girls and boys. Her life was not 
as other children for she took most of the responsibilities of the home 
that ordinarily belonged to the adults. 

One occasion as Hattie was gleaning in the fields, she felt some- 
thing cold and clammy go over her bare foot. The snake passed on 
but Hattie found that she was in a snake's den. The boys ran to her aid 
but Hattie told them not to harm the snakes as they had done no harm 
to her. In later years she came in contact with many different kinds 
of snakes in all parts of the country. It delighted her to see how charm- 
ed the snakes were when she sang to them. She never harmed any of 
them. She has always loved animals and could never stand to see any 
of them mis-treated. 

As the family grew in s ize , Aunt Henrietta moved in some rooms 
over the small furniture store owned by George Taylor. Eliza, Hattie's 
mother, had a home built on the same spot as their first one. 

Eliza's health again became poor and Hattie again assumed the 
full management of the home. As the mother's health improved, Hattie 
felt she would like to go out and earn some money to help her get some 
clothes. She went as an apprentice to Miss Alexander, a dressmaker. 
After several months, she went to Salt Lake to C. R, Savage, the 
pioneer photographer, to learn how to retouch photographs. After one 
month she came back to assist her father with printing, retouching, 
and other work in his gallery. Aside from his furniture business, he 
established the first photograph gallery in Prove. Many of his pictures 
can be found in scores of homes in a perfect condition to-day, showing 
the high standard of his material and workmanship. 

After working faithfully in this work she loved so well, she want- 
ed a different experience and went into a tailor shop and assisted in 
making men's clothing. After some time she went into her Uncle 
William NichoUs' notion shop. She did not marry very young as her 
mother was in poor health and felt she needed Hattie. 



80 



HARRIETT TAYLOR MC CLELLAN 



On June 1, 1890, Hattie married James F. McClellan, son of 
Samuel and Almeda Stewart McClellan. They lived in Springville and 
Payson, where his folks had been some of the early pioneers in build- 
ing up that part of Utah County. Her husband went to Missoula, Mont- 
ana to work in an ore mill. He secured a cabin and sent for her. It 
was high up in the mountains with very beautiful scenery. She enjoyed 
walking through the forests gathering flowers and wild berries, which 
grew in abundance. Many times her walks took her for miles; fear 
never stopped her from exploring sections of the country. She was 
never afraid of wild animals in the mountains. The call of the mountains 
and the mines seemed ever present in her husband, for after leaving 
Montana they moved high upon the mountains of Park City to another 
mining camp. 

Their next move took them to Knights ville , near Eureka. Her 
husband had procurred work with Uncle Jes se Knight. They left Knight- 
sville after living there several years and moved to Provo Bench where 
they tried farming for a short time. They moved into Provo and built 
a home on Fourth North and Seventh West. A few years latter Hattie's 
mother gave up her home and went to live with them. A nice apartment 
was built onto the home in order to make Grandma Taylor comfortable. 
She died in this home, being 84 years of age. Their home was always 
open to orphans who needed a home. They adopted one girl and raised 
a boy to manhood and many others have shared the hospitality of their 
home . 

The McClellans found their home on Seventh West too large, so 
they sold it and moved to the home where Aunt Hattie lives at present, 
on Fourth West between First and Second North. Her home has always 
given a warm welcome. 

Her husband died on May 29, 1934. Although Aunt Hattie is near 
82 years of age, she carries herself in a dignified and lady like way. 
She is interested in things of daily happenings and is a charter mem- 
ber of the Provonas Club. She delights to meet with members who 
she has known and loved for many years. She is a great lover of things 
of nature and music of all kinds and especially the old time songs of 
which she used to sing when a member of the choir. 

When but a child Aunt Hattie found the following verse, which 
has ever since been her motto: 

"It's better to give your flowers this very day 

Be they white or red. 
T'is worth countless roses 

Placed upon your casket when you are dead. " 

All those who know her can vouch for her practice of this poem. 
She is, and will ever be, a true example of her beloved ancestors, the 
pioneers - the stalwarts of Zion - the fearles builders of the West. 



By Maria Dixon Taylor, her sister-in-law 



HARRIETT TAYLOR MC CLELLAN 



81 



One of the most outstanding events in the life of Aunt Hattie.was 
when at the age of ninety-one, she applied to be re-baptized. Her 
Church record had been lost in the Provo Third Ward. 

This was performed on August 12, 1949 by Bishop Arthur D. 
Taylor of the Provo Third Ward. Her brother, Ashted Taylor had the 
honor of confirming her. 

On September 9, 1949, she went to the Manti Temple where she 
received her endowments and was sealed to her husband, James F. 
Mc Clellan. Ashted Taylor had the honor of doing his work for him. 

Aunt Hattie and Ashted stood for James F. Mc Clellan and his 
first wife, to be sealed to each other. 

Since then Aunt Hattie has had two severe accidents, being hos- 
pitalized each time. The last accident being in October of 1951. She 
is now recovering and is up and around and able to wait on herself. 

LAST PROVO 'ORIGINAL PIONEER' 

Editorial in Daily Herald, June 2, 1958 

The death of Mrs. Hattie Taylor McClellan, 99, late Thursday 
night, marked the passing of a phase of Utah history, as far as Provo 
is concerned. 

Mrs. McClellan, according to officials of the Daughters of the 
Utah Pioneers, was the last surviving Provoan classified as an 
'original' Pioneer, 

In other words she was the last Provo resident who had made the 
pioneer trek across the plains prior to completion of the railroad to 
Utah in May of 1 869. 

There are still approximately 10 aged Provoans classified as 
"native" pioneers. They were born in this state prior to completion 
of the railroad. At least one of these was born a few months before 
Mrs. McClellan. But if DUP records are correct, none of those still 
living crossed the plains. 

Mrs. McClellan would have been 100 years old had she lived 25 
more days. She was born in Birmingham, England June 23, 1858, a 
daughter of George and Eliza Taylor. 

Her family joined the LDS Church, and in coming to Utah they 
helped write the great saga of Mormon pioneer history with their cou- 
rage and sacrifice. 

Mrs. McClellan celebrated her fifth birthday on the sailing ves- 
sel Amazon, on which the family sailed from England to America in 
1863. 

As did many other convert families, the Taylors traveled as far 
west as St. Louis via railroad, then outfitted for the 1000 mile trek to 
Salt Lake City. Five year old Hattie trudged most of the thousand miles 
by foot. 



82 



HARRIETT TAYLOR MC CLELLAN 



The family moved immediately to Provo where Hattie's father, 
George Taylor, became the city's first photographer and later estab- 
lished a fui-niture store, the beginning of what is now Taylor's. The 
Taylors of that and subsequent gene rations have left a deep imprint on 
Provo. Hattie married James F. McClellan. He died May 29, 1934. 

Mrs. McClellan experienced hardships in pioneering which are 
strictly foreign to present day generations . . such as gleaning wheat, 
making her own clothes by crude pioneer methods, traveling by ox 
team, and enduring the many privations that came with colonizing a 
new state. 

Mrs. McClellan for years had been a familiar figure at old folks 
outings and pioneer day events. She was honored on many occasions, 
and always she was extremely gracious and appreciative. 

Provo will miss her . . . and her death seems all the more sig- 
nificant because of its reminder that the days of the surviving pioneers 
are drawing fast to an end. In another decade the thinning ranks of the 
original and native pioneers in Utah may have vanished completely. 



THE JUNE 23rd - T AY LOR FAMILY REUNION 

To pay tribute and honor the STALWART PIONEER, whose name 
she shared with her aunt - Harriet CLARRISA TAYLOR Mc Clellan- 
Clarrisa Taylor Eastmond together with her husband, Frank H. East- 
mond; designated June 23 (Aunt Hattie 's birthday), as a special day and 
invited all the George Taylor families to bring their picnics and join 
them in celebrating this birthday with them at their Saratoga Resort on 
Utah Lake. 

All of the Resort's facilities were made available at no cost: 
Free use of the Reserved Lunch Pavilion. 
Free swimming. Free rides for the kids. 
A free program and lots of visiting. 
Aunt Hattie was the honored guest, seated in a comfortable 
rocking chair where she could be seen by all. Here she reminisced 
with the older generations and became re-acquainted with the younger 
folks. 

This really became a TAYLOR FAMILY REUNION - tradition 
until the untimely death of Clarrisa and Frank. 




Age 17 



•Hattie lived 99 years 11 months Rattle, age 12 




712 West 4th North, Provo 



Hattie & Jim 



JAMES F. MC CLELLAN 



James F. McClellan was born on January 20, 1859 atPayson, Ut. 
to Samuel and Almeda Stewart McClellan. He married 
who became the mother of one child, neither of whom survived. 

On June I, 1890 he married Harriett Clarrisa Taylor , They made 
their first home in Springville, and a short time later in Payson. His 
family, the Stewarts and McClellans, were very prominent early 
settlers of the Pays on- Benjamin area. 

During his employment with Martin and Dirde, who operated one 
of the local livery stables, as well as contractors and mining, they 
sent him to work at the quartz stamp mill in Martina, Montana. Here 
he was able to get work for his brothers-in-law, Arthur and Walter. 

From Montana his employment was transferred to the mines in 
Park City, Utah, and then later to near his home town, Payson. He 
worked for Uncle Jesse Knight at his "Humbug" mine at Knights ville , 
near Eureka, Utah. 

Tiring of the mining camps he and his wife Hattie, moved to a 
farm on Provo Bench where they divided their time between farming 
and that of homesteading and cattle raising in the Vintiquin area, 
located north of Soldier Summit. 

Being a near relative of the Allen Family, owners of the Allen 
Ice Co. , who in the winter time cut ice on their pond, and stored it in 
the two big storage houses, to be delivered to the families and busines 
houses in the County. He often helped them harvest their ice during 
the winter months. 

A young, energetic and ambitious school teacher, Frank East- 
mond, desired to utilize his summer vacation days by building a fleet 
of row boats and then rent them to the fishermen and bathers at the 
mouth of the Provo River on Utah Lake. 

Since Frank was teaching school in Salt Lake City, he needed 
some one to carry on the renting business during the months he was in 
school. 

He influenced Uncle Jim to buy 20 acres of land from Minnie 
Hamilton, located across the river north of the Provo City Grove near 
the mouth of the Provo River. Here he could farm in the summer time 
and carry on the renting of boats in the Spring and Fall, the school 
months . 

This association, as a partner with Frank, continued until Frank 
grasped the opportunity of buying the run-down Geneva Resort, just 
north of Vineyard, where he and his Father-in-law, Walter G. Taylor 
developed one of the best pleasure resorts in Utah. 

Taking Frank's place as a partner at the mouth of the Provo 
River, was Arthur N. Taylor, Jim's brother-in-law. Uncle Jim con- 
tinued to farm his 20 acres on the north side of the River and the rent- 
ing row boats to fishermen and bathers from the City Grove. 



84 



JAMES F. MC CLELLAN 



85 



With the building of the vehicle bridge across the river, the two 
cabins in the City Grove were moved down near the Lake Front and 
Uncle Jim moved the boats to the mouth of the river. 

In the winter time Uncle Jim hired a crew of workmen and har- 
vested the ice from Utah Lake by cutting it into large blocks and put- 
ing it in an ice house, located about two blocks from the lake front. 
Here it was stacked, frozen solid and then insulated with saw dust, 
to be removed in the summer for the cooling of soft drinks in the store 
or for refrigeration of perishables. 

He continued to spend the Spring, Summers and Fall of the year 
at the mouth of Provo River on Utah Lake and the winter months at his 
home at 155 North 4th West, Provo. 

He died at his home on May 29, 1934. 

Aunt Hattie was fortunate enough to purchase two burial plots 
from their long time friend and neighbor of the Provo Third Ward; C. 
Enock Clark, in the Clark Family lot in the Provo City Cemetery, for 
Uncle Jim and herself. ( Lot 15, Block 2). 

vl^ vl^ x'^ s'^ j'^ 

THE BRIDGE BUILDER 

An old man going along a highway 

Came at the evening, cold and gray. 

To a chasm vast and deep and wide. 

The old man crossed in the twilight dim, 

The sudden stream had no fear for him; 

But he turned when safe on the other side 

And built a bridge to span the tide. 

"Old man, " said a fellow pilgrim near, 

"You are wasting your strength with building here 

Your journey will end with the ending day. 

You never again will pass this way; 

You've crossed the chasm deep and wide, 

Why build you this bridge at eventide? " 

The builder lifted his old gray head, 

"Good friend, in the path I have come, " he said, 

"There foUoweth after me today 

A youth, whose feet must pass this way; 

This chasm, that has not been hard for me, 

To that fair-haired youth may a pitfall be; 

He too must cross in the twilight dim - - 

Good friend, I am building this bridge for him. " 




(GEOmCGK THOMAS TTAYILOm, (Jr.) 



GEORGE 



THOMAS 



T AY LOR 



George Thomas Taylor was born the 31st of August in 1864 in 
Provo, Utah. His parents, George and Eliza N. Taylor had been con- 
verted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latte r- day Saints in England and 
after several, long hard years they saved enough money to join the main 
body of Latter-day Saints in Utah. They sailed from England and joined 
the John Wooley Company crossing the plains, arriving in Utah in 
October of 1863. The trek was hard and before they arrived in Utah 
they had left a son and a daughter buried along the plains. With one 
daughter to raise alone, no doubt the arrival of George must have been 
a most welcome event. 

Early life for George wasn't easy, as was the case of many of the 
early settlers in Utah. His parents were extremely poor for many years 
living in a mud hut with only a blanket at the door to keep the cold out. 
Hunger was a common visitor in their home and many of the luxurious 
things of life that were enjoyed by the neighbors in their homes, some- 
how never seemed to find their way into the Taylor home. George re- 
ceived his education in the Provo Schools. It is believed that he attend- 
ed the Franklin School and then later the B. Y. Academy. 

Young George Thomas Taylor began working at an early age inhis 
father's furniture store. Later when his father sold the store to his 
sons, George became a partner in the new Taylor Brothers Company, 
serving as its first vice-president. He later sold his interest in the 
Company, but for many years he worked as a "floor walker" in the store. 
As a "floor walker" he greeted people as they came into the store and 
directed them to the department they were looking for. In the early 
years of Taylor Bros . he spent many years traveling throughout Southern 
Utah selling organs and pianos. His greatest interest and love, however 
wasn't in the furniture business but was in the business of buying and 
selling horses throughout the State, and which he did for many years. 
Many town such as Levan, Utah began their town-owned herd of horses 
with horses they had purchased from George Taylor. 

George met Sarah Elizabeth Thomas and they were married on 
December 28, 1884, it is believed in Provo. The first six years of 
their marriage brought two children to their home, Edith Apaline and 
George Arnold. On July 16, 1890, the Manti Temple had recently been 
completed so George and his wife, "Lizzie", took their two childrenand 
traveled to Manti where they were sealed as a family in the Temple. 
Five more children were to arrive, later on, to bless this marriage; 
making a total of three daughters and four sons. 

George is remembered by all as a mild mannered man with a big 
heart. On a business trip to Nephi, Utah, George found that a friend 
had just lost his wife leaving him with an eleven year old daughter to 
raise. George and Lizzie took pity on this young girl and took her home 
to raise as their own. May Painter was sealed to her parents and al- 
though she took the Taylor name, she was never legally adopted by 



87 



88 



GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR, Jr. 



George and Lizzie, but ne ver-the-less they loved her and treated her as 
though she was their own. 

He also had a deep love for the Indian people and many were the 
times that Indians would stay with the Taylors in their home. Neighbors 
can remember many times Indians would pitch their tent on the Taylor's 
lawn and Lissie would prepare meals for them, or they would move 
right in the home with the family. A close neighbor remembers one young 
Indian girl that came and stayed with George and Lizzie for quite some 
time, working in their home for them. One family of Indians lived up 
Rock Creek and were frequent visitors of the Taylor family, sometimes 
staying with them for many days. 

George is remembered as being a very compassionate man. On 
one occasion he and his wife were going to travel to the "Ranch" out in 
Duchesne County, where their two sons, Arnold and Bade were living 
with their families. They had a neighbor, Mrs. Elizabeth Clayton 
Choules, who was a widow trying to raise her children alone, in those 
hard days before Social Security and other forms of relief. Mrs. Choules 
suffered from a bad heart and with the lack of money in her life she very 
rarely had the opportunity to leave the Provo area to travel. On this 
occasion George packed his wagon with pillows and invited Mrs. Choules 
to go along with them. While she rode in the wagon, her two boys, George 
and Don rode along the wagon on horseback. It was a hard journey for 
Mrs. Choules and she returned home very tired, but very happy and 
grateful to the Taylors for the opportunity they had given her to see the 
Indian Reservation. She never forgot that trip, nor did her children, 
who remembers George T. to this day, with a grateful heart for what he 
did for their mother. 

Although George wasn't a Church going man, he could often be 
found sitting in his second floor bedroom, next to his big black, pot- 
bellied stove reading the Book of Mormon. He loved that book and knew 
it well. He believed strongly in the temple covenants he had made and 
honored those covenants to his dying day. 

Following his father's death, George was left with the inexplicable 
task of executing his father's estate. Due to feelings caused some years 
before, the Last Will and Testament didn't treat all family members as 
fairly as George felt it should have done. George knew what he must do 
but felt so guilty having to go against his father's wishes. One night 
Lizzie awoke to find a man at the foot of her bed. At first she thought 
it was George until she realized that he was still beside her in bed. 
When she realized who it was she woke George to tell him that his father 
was there to see him. George grumbled that if the old boy wanted to see 
him he could darn well call on him during the day during his visiting 
hours as most people did. As they discussed the experience the next 
morning they realized that George 's father had appeared to let him know 
that he was pleased at the way his estate had been executed, and held no 
hard feelings towards George for the decisions he had made. This ex- 



GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR, Jr. 



89 



perience remained with George for many years giving him the comfort 
and peace of mind he needed. 

George was a very proper man in his actions and dress. He loved 
to take a cold bath and would never leave his room in the morning until 
he had shaved and was fully dressed, including his coat and tie. The 
last three years of his life when he was bedridden, were difficult times 
for George. It bothered him a great deal when he wasn't shaved and 
completely dressed every morning. 

He was well loved by both his children and his grandchildren. It 
wasn't a job for his grandchildren to help him with his yard work. 
They enjoyed trimming the large hedge which went around the front and 
side boundry line of his large lot. 

George was an adventurous gentleman. When the first automobile 
came to Provo he really wanted one. The day finally came when he was 
able to buy one and a happy day it was. After a ride around town, he 
returned the car to the barn. As they approached the barn, George for- 
got how you were supposed to stop the auto, so as he pulled back on the 
steering wheel he started yelling "whoa". The car plowed through the 
barn door. This is an experience the neighbors and family still remem- 
bers. 

A member of the Sons of the Utah Pioneers , George Thomas Taylor 
left this worldon December 15, 1941 at the age of 77 years, He died at 
the family home at 187 North 400 West in Provo, Utah, on a Monday 
evening following a three year illness. Funeral services were conducted 
by his nephew. Bishop Arthur D. Taylor in the Provo Third Ward Chapel 
and he was then laid to rest beside his son, Willie Cleon, in the Provo 
City Cemetery. A noble son, a devoted husband and a loving father and 
grandfathe r. 



Ronald Garth Taylor 



G.reat, great, grandson 



45 24 
June 1981 



II 



You can't beat the game of life". 



Judge not that ye be not judge 



d". 



GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR, (Jr.) FAMILY 




Edith Nellie Leone 




187 No. 400 West - Provo 

Leone, Nellie, Lizzie, May, Edith 



SARAH ELIZABETH THOMAS TAYLOR 



Sarah Elizabeth Thomas was born in Salt Lake City, Utah the 18th 
of April 1863, a daughter of David Pritchard and Joyce Jones Thomas. 
She received the nickname, "Lizzie" which she was to carry her entire 
life, at an early age. Her father was converted to the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter Day Saints in his native home of Wales. Because of 
his skill as a mason, he was asked to come to Utah to work on the Salt 
Lake Temple. He often commented on the fact that the base of the 
temple was so made that a team of oxen were able to walk clear around 
the base. Lizzie could remember at an early age of going to the temple 
with her father. With her father close behind, she climbed the ladder 
to the square of the temple. From her birds-eye view from the temple 
wall she was able to get a complete view of the City of Salt Lake and 
the surrounding area. Many buildings and homes today stand as a tri- 
bute to Lizzie's father, including the home where she and her husband 
later lived in Provo. Her son. Bade, can remember when water was 
being piped into the houses in Provo. He went into the basement of 
their home with George Strang to drill a hole through the foundation for 
the water pipe, Mr. Strang made the statement, while he was drilling 
the hole by a hand drill, that the foundation was certainly wide and that 
the mason who had laid it really knew his business. It was a pleasure 
for Bade to respond to his comment by telling him that his Grandfather 
Thomas laid the foundation to their home and did the mason work on it, 
and he was indeed a skilled mason. 

Not much is known of the early life of Lizzie. Her parents left 
Salt Lake City when she was very young and moved to Provo where they 
spent the rest of their lives. She received her education in the Provo 
City Schools and made many friends, one of which was Harriet Clarrisa 
Taylor ( Hattie). On one occasion, Hattie and Lizzie went down to the 
train station to wait for the train to come in. They were young ladies 
at this time, and as the passengers were getting off the train, Lizzie's 
eyes caught sight of a cowboy, dressed in boots with his six shooter 
strapped to his side. She was very impressed by this handsome cowboy 
and mentioned it to Hattie. Hattie was pleased to introduce Lizzie to 
her younger brother, George Thomas Taylor. From this first intro- 
duction, a courtship began which turned to love and the young couple 
were married December 28, 1884. Six years later, after the Manti 
Temple was completed, George and Lizzie took their two young children 
and were sealed together as a family for time and all eternity in the 
Manti Temple on July 16, 1890. 

Life wasn't always easy for Lizzie, nor did she always have hap- 
piness without sorrow. Perhaps the darkest day of her life occured 
when the black diphtheria plague hit the city of Provo. It hit many homes 
and the Taylor home was no exception. Lizzie's four year old son, 
Willie Cleon, contracted the dreaded disease. She spent many hours and 
days by his bedside swabbing out his throat, which felt as though it was 
filled with cob-webs. When death finally closed the small boys eyes, it 



91 



92 



SARAH ELIZABETH THOMAS TAYLOR 



was in the middle of the night. The hearse came and took the boys life- 
less body directly to the cemetery for burial. There was no funeral 
service or other things which come with death to give comfort to a 
bereaved family. The fear of spreading the dreaded disease was so great 
people were afraid to even be around a victim of the disease. 

Lizzie's parents must have been a very close couple. Several 
times after the death of her father, he would appear to Lizzie to warn 
her of danger her mother was facing. One particular night, it was ex- 
tremely cold outside. Lizzie was awakened about 3:00 a.m. to find her 
father standing by her bed. He told her to go immediately to her mother's 
home. Lizzi.e dressed and walked through more than a foot of snow, 
from her home on 400 West and 200 North to her mother's home on 
800 North and 200 East. When she arrived there she found her mother 
had gotten up in the middle of the night and had fallen and was unable to 
get back into bed. If Lizzie hadn't arrived when she did her mother 
would have frozen to death. 

As a mother, Lizzie was very strict with her children and often 
her children were forced to learn a lesson the hard way. At one time, 
May Painter, a young girl who had come to live with the Taylor at the 
age of eleven years and who lived with them as their daughter until she 
was married, learned one of Lizzie's hard lessons. She had seena 
beautiful, large ribbon in a store window which she wanted very much. 
She went to work baby sitting and doing other jobs in order to earn 
enough money to buy that beautiful ribbon for her hair. She finally 
saved enough money and bought the ribbon. When she arrived home she 
laid it on the banister, thinking she would take it up to her room when 
she went upstairs. Lizzie had tried to get the children not to leave 
things on the stairs or on the banister. When she saw may's ribbon on 
the banister she was extremely upset. She picked up the ribbon and with 
May watching, she threw it into the stove. May realized that it was a 
hard lesson to have to face but it was a lesson she needed to learn and 
it was a lesson she never forgot. 

Lizzie was an excellent cook and kept a spotless home. She was 
also a loving and compassionate daughter and daughter-in-law. Knowing 
how much her English mother-in-law and her Welch mother missed the 
traditions of their old countries , she would invite themto her home once 
a week for "tea". Later in her life, as her children married and left 
home, she would invite them to her home for dinner. Her grandchildren 
can remember waiting in the parlor while the adults went into the 
dining room for dinner. After they had eaten and visited, the children 
were then allowed to come in and eat. 

When May, Edith and Arnold began bringing the grandchildren to 
their parents home, Lizzie insisted that she and Qeorge be referred to 
as "Mamma and Papa Taylor". When the later grandchildren arrived 
they became known only as "Grandmother and Grandfather Taylor". 



SARAH ELIZABETH THOMAS TAYLOR 



93 



Lizzie was active in the Daughters of the Utah Pioneer s for many- 
years and was an avid supporter of the Relief Society and Primary for 
over fifty years. She always kept a jar in her kitchen cubboard where 
she would put all of her pennies she saved faithfully for the Primary 
Penny Drive. Just a week before her death, she was featured in the 
Provo Daily Herald giving her birthday pennies to the Primary children. 

As Lizzie and George grew older, the family home was too large 
for them so they converted part of their home into an apartment. Many 
of their children and grandchildren have fond memories of the years 
they spent living in Lizzie's apartment in her home. It was in this 
apartment that her son Jack (John Donald) and his wife Margaret were 
living at the time of her death. 

On February 8, 1950, Lizzie got out of bed and fixed herself a 
bowl of bread and milk. She sat down in her favorite chair to eat it 
when death came and closed her eyes for the last time. Her son Jack 
found her the next morning still sitting in her chair, the bowl of bread 
and milk still in her lap. 

Funeral services were held in the Provo Third Ward and Lizzie 
was buried next to her son, Willie Cleon, andher husband George, who 
had left this life nine years earlier. Lizzie left behind, three sons and 
four daughters. Her son Willie Cleon had died prior to her death. She 
was also survived by many grandchildren and great grandchildren. 



Ronald Garth Taylor 



Great, great grandson 



45 24 
June 1981 



11 



Helping hands and willing feet make life's pathway, 



mighty sweet". 



HENRIETTA TAYLOR KERR FAMILY 




George Affleck Kerr 




HENRIETTA TAYLOR KERR 



Henrietta Taylor was the first daughter and second child of 
Henrietta Sawyer Taylor; and the seventh child of George Taylor, Sr. 
She was born in the Provo Third Ward in a little, adobe, two-room 
house on First North, between Sixth and Seventh West, on October 
6, 1867. Fourteen days after her birth, her fourteen month old 
brother, Joseph, died. So she became a most welcomed addition to 
the family. 

For the most part of her first twenty years, she lived on Provo's 
Center Street, around which most all activity for the area centered. 
Her first move onto Center Street was into an apartment in the rear 
of her father's furniture store. He was also the first commercial 
photographer south of Salt Lake City. Later she moved with her 
mother to her house at 175 West Center Street, Provo, until her 
marriage . 

At the age of twenty years, she married George Affleck Kerr, 
the son of George Mercer Kerr and Jane Affleck, in the Logan Utah 
Temple, on December 14, 1887. 

They made their first home in Provo, Utah where their first 
child, Henrietta Rhea Kerr was born on November 11, 1888. 

Their second and third children were also born in Provo: 
Jennie (Jane) Kerr on May 16, 1892 and Basil Taylor Kerr on May 
12, 1894, 

While living in Ogden, Utah, their fourth child, George Kenneth 
Kerr was born on February 22, 1887. 

Back in Provo, their fifth child, John Ralph Kerr was born on 
September 17, 1900. 

Twelve years after Ralph was born, the father, George Affleck 
Kerr, died in Ogden, Utah on May 27, 1912, where he is buried. 

Henrietta Taylor Kerr spent most of her later years with her 
family in California. She died in Los Angeles, California on June 
1, 1941, and is buried in Inglewood, California. 



96 



SPIRITUAL MANIFESTATIONS AND TESTIMONIES 



As we go through life, there are certain events or experiences 
that fasten themselves upon us. The world in which we live is a very 
practical one, and we are loath to accept any truth that we are unable 
to demonstrate in a practical way. We are not prepared to come out 
and refuse to accept the miraculous yet we do not accept that which 
we cannot quite understand. 

I am sure that none of us want to lean so far that we appear 
fanatical, yet in dealing with matters spiritual, we must "live by 
faitho " A case in point: 

Bp, Myron Tanner was Bishop of the Provo Third Ward for 25 
years ( the ward I was born and raised in)„ He was a very practical 
man, thought by some to be not a very religious man. I am sure you 
would not call him a religious fanatic, yet I have heard him relate 
many times the following experience at the dedication of the Kirtland 
Temple : 

Bishop Tanner, a young boy, not old enough to go to the Temple 
services, saw Heavenly Angels or being goingto and from the temple. 
He called his mother and tried to show them to her but she could not 
see them. Knowing Bp. Tanner as I knew him, I am sure he was not 
mistaken and although his mother, a splendid good woman, was not 
permitted to see them, I am sure he did. 

As a young man, soon after the age of ten, I was ordained a 
Deacon and in later years was called to labor in the Bishopric in the 
Provo Third Ward and labored as a Councilor and Bishop for some 
28 years. During this time I had many very unusual and faith pro- 
moting experiences. 

The impressions we receive in childhood are usually the most 
lasting ones. 

I remember when in the Deacons Quorum one of the older 
brethren, Bro. Dugdell who was in charge of the quorum, would close 
his talks with these words: "Now boys, remember the race is not to 
the swift nor the battle to the strong, but he that endureth to the end. " 

Judas Iscariot, was a pitiable example of one who could not 
endure; ambitious for power of this world, he lacked that element of 
endurance . 

Impetuous Peter must learn a lesson we all must learn, that in 
order to stand the test of endurance we must get strength from a high- 
er power. Peter got the lesson of endurance, stood true, and gave 
his life for the cause. 

Thomas N. Taylor 
President of Utah Stake 

From notes of a sermon 



97 



THOMAS 



NICHOLLS 



TAYLOR 



One must admit they were born. I do. Had a mother and father 
who came from Birmingham, England, in 1863, on the Amazon. Took 
6 weeks. They left England with three children, two girls and a boy. 
Death called two on the way, one boy and one girl, so they arrived 
with the one girl, my sister, Harriet. After their arrival in Utah, 
they had six sons, one of whom died leaving six children out of nine. 

I was born July 28, 1868, at Provo, in a little home on First 
North between 6th and 7th West. 

As I look back over the past 60 years, I must admit they have 
been full. The first ten rather uneventful, yet boy friends and kind 
neighbors leave pleasant memories. We lived close neighbors to an 
English family, Collins by name, a rather unique household. For 
many years, four brothers all lived in the one home. The one who was 
married being in charge. They were kind men and in our extreme 
poverty (and we had it to the point of hunger) these men were good to 
me. The fourth, son of Agatha, the one of the group who was married, 
was my senior by a few months. We became fast friends from boy- 
hood until my tenth year. He followed the mason trade. I went to work 
in my father's store. Our occupations separated us some and we 
drifted apart, but are still, I hope, good friends. 

In September, 1878, when I had just entered my eleventh year, 
I started to work in father's store. He had a small stock of furniture 
and a photograph gallery. ( He had the reputation of being a good 
photographer). My job was to watch the store and call him should a 
customer come in while he worked in the gallery. The first record I 
have of a sale by myself was a clock shelf to Martha Bullock, September 
1878. 

I had ten weeks for school each winter but usually spent Saturdays 
in the store. I became very much enfatuated with my work and tried 
very hard to become a good salesman. My first school teachers Rollo 
Roberts and Mrs. Oakly were quaint, unusual people. Then came 
Laurie and Anna Larsen, two strong characters, followed by L. A. 
Wilson, good but weak, then the great Geo. H. Brimhall. I say great 
because as I look back upon his efforts of those days, it seems to me 
the great gift of inspiring others to do was his. (It has never left him). 
He was and is a great teacher. 

It was my good fortune to take a class in 1885 under Dr. Karl G. 
Maeser. He taught honor stronger than arithmetic. I shall ever be 
grateful for the inspirations he gave me in my boyhood. One came in 
to my life that gave me new ambitions. Zina Y. Williams, now Card, 
lost a son by the name of Thomas or Tom. I was chumming with the 
older brother Sterling ( for whom I named our oldest son) and having 
the same name, Tom, was taken to the Williams' home as a companion 
of Sterling, lived there six months. Up to this time poverty was my 



99 



100 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



lot. The little refinements of home had never been mine, but I got a 
taste of them in her modest home made me want them. 

My boyhood friends were John Collins, John D. Dixon, J. F. 
Bennett, Sterling Williams, Van or O. C. Beebe, John Rogers, Wm. 
D. Roberts, John Wilson, Willard Croxill, Marinus Jensen and many 
others, but as time went on my close associates became fewer. John 
D. Dixon became the closest friend as a boy and throughout life. My 
activity in the store brought me in contact with many boys and men. 
It was during my boyhood days, I came under the guidance, in a church 
way, of Bp, Myron Tanner, with John D. Dixon, Alfred W. Harding, 
John E, Lewis and others. We formed a group that the Bp. gave spe- 
cial attention to, I was ordained a Deacon soon after I was ten, gath- 
ered fast offerings, went up to the Bp's farm, got loads of large water 
willows, cut them up into stove lengths for kindling for the widows of 
the Ward. Later was ordained a Teacher, visiting the families of the 
Ward as such. Later ordained a Priest, held cottage meetings, offi- 
ciated in baptizing, administering sacrament, and had a good exper- 
ience in Ward work. 

At seventeen years of age , I became president of the Young Men's 
Mutual Association of the Provo 3rd Ward ( which by the way, is the 
Ward I have lived in all my life to date-69 years), I held this position 
for some years, was ordained an Elde r, Seventy, and 1891 was ordained 
a High Priest by Apostle Francis M. Lyman and set apart as 2nd Coun- 
selor to Bp. R. S. Gibby, Provo Third Ward. At the death of Bp, 
Gibby, Bp, W, J. Lewis succeeded him, I was chosen 1st Counselor 
to him. At the death of Bp. Lewis, I was sustained Bp. of the Ward 
and ordained a Bp. and set apart to preside over the Provo 3rd Ward 
by Apostle Reed Smoot. On October 26, 1919, I was sustained and set 
apart by Apostle Stephen L. Richards to preside over the Utah Stake of 
Zion which position I still hold at this writing. My church work has 
always been pleasurable, from Deacon to Pres. of Stake. I have had 
many opportunities to administer to the sick and seen the power of God 
made manifest in healing them, have attended and spoken at many fun- 
erals ( perhaps as many or more than any other one man in the Utah 
Stake the past 37 years.) Have performed marriage ceremonies unit- 
ing some 143 couples. Called by Pres. Heber J. Grant to be Vice- 
president and chairman Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees 
of the Brigham Yo\ing University ( an institution that it has been the 
good fortune of my wife and myself to give a number of pianos to the 
last, a $2, 500.00 Knabe Concert Grand in 1928). In this capacity I 
have come in contact with the President of the school, Dr. Franklin 
S. Harris and learned to love him. 

Once more I pause to give thanks and express gratitude to my 
Heavenly Father for the blessings of the Gospel and the opportunities I 
have had in working in the Church, for the association of so many hun- 
dreds of loyal and true men and women and express my love and confi- 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



101 



dence in President Heber J. Grant, and the joy I have received in his 
testimony, his confidence in me I feel, has been a great stay in my 
life. 

Some of the important things accomplished while Bishop, was 
the organization of the Priesthood quorums into active work. The 
Deacons with their fathers made a trip up Deer Creek in Provo Canyon 
and got some seven loads of wood for the Ward house and the widows. 

The teache rs quorum were active with the olde r brethren in visit- 
ing the Saints. A splendid quorum of Priests held meetings through- 
out the Ward, which at the time included the now Pioneer Ward and 
practically all of Grand View Ward . A new meeting house was erected. 
We received but one thousand dollars from the Church. The balance 
was paid by the people. 

A very interesting incident occured in connection with the build- 
ing of this house. I called the Priesthood of the Ward together and 
explained the desire of the Bishopric to build a new house but told them 
it meant donations of hundreds and not tens and suggested that men 
like Bp. Tanner, ( who had been our Bp. 25 years) would be expected 
to pay from three hundred dollars and up. When I got through the Bp. 
got up and said he did not propose to have any one tell him what he 
should give as a donation and rather resented my naming the amount 
of three hundred dollars. When he sat down I told the brethren to pay 
no attention to the Bp. for he would be the first man to pay his. The 
next morning about 9 o'clock, I met the Bp. and he said, "well, I have 
just been and paid my three hundred dollars. "Said he, "I don't pro- 
pose to raise a boy and have him make a prophecy and then let it fall 
to the ground." Many other very interesting things occured in the 
building that would take too long to tell. A hundred dollars in those 
days was more to the people than five hundred is today. 

The Collins Bros. , while only one was a member of the Church, 
worked from early to late. Uncle J. Will's, words were always, "we 
can all sit on the same bench yet". 

After we completed the Church and had it dedicated, we started 
our amusement hall, one of the first ward amusement halls in the Stake 
and among the first in the Church. In a conversation with Pres. Jos. 
F.Smith about this hall, he said, "the Church would give five thousand 
dollars ($5,000. 00) providing I would guarantee the balance". The hall 
cost $20,000. 00 and is now all paid for having been finished under the 
direction of Bp. H. A. Dixon. Death has taken a heavy toll from this 
ward of the group who were active 50 years ago when I first became 
active. There are but few left. Thos. Collins and John Collins are 
all I recall in the Ward now, many more are living but in different 
ward s . 

Since my appointment in the Stake, I have given my major thoughts 
and work to Priesthood activity. In discussing the question of Church 
activities , on one occasion with the First Presidency, then Pres. Grant 



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Lund and Penrose, I made the remark there was not so much difference 
between the Churches of the world and our Church, called their atten- 
tion to the many good things the other Churches had, but remarked if 
there is a s pecial difference it is the Priesthood. Bro. Penrose reached 
over and gave me a slap on the knee and said, "that's it". I remarked, 
"it isn't much good if you don't use it". We started to hold big Priest- 
hood meetings. Pres. Grant attended one in our Stake house or Taber- 
nacle where something more than 2, 500 were present, just men and 
boys holding the Priesthood. The Sisters did not attend these meetings. 
After this meeting, we held many more with a full house; not quite so 
many present, but about 2,000. First Pres. Ivins, Apostle Stephen L. 
Richards, Apostle J. E. Talmage, and others attended these meetings, 
and I am sure it had atendencyto arouse the Priesthood to activity and 
emphasize its importance, I welcome with all my heart the emphasis 
now being placed on Priesthood work by the Church, Sunday School, 
MIA and all organizations taking their plans to promote Priesthood 
activity. During the nine years just closed we have had a time of build- 
ing activity. Some ward chapels started before, but were completed 
and dedicated since my appointment are: Sharon Chapel, Bonneville, 
Provo 4th, Provo 3rd Amusement Hall at a cost of $20, 000. 00. 

New buildings in course of construction:Grand View $22,000.00, 
Pleasant View $28, 000. 00, Edgemont $25,000.00, Manavu (finished 
but not paid for) $60,000.00, Provo 1st ( under way of construction) 
$72,000.00. Timpanogos ( remodeled) $12,000.00, Provo 6th (modern 
fixtures, toilets, etc.) $3,500.00, Lake View Amusement Hall $1 , 000 , 
Seminary ( finished and dedicated) $13, 500. 00, Tabernacle organ over- 
hauled, new bench, extra pipes, Knabe Grand Piano, stand repaired 
and cleaned $9,500.00. 

The Stake Presidency with their fund appropriated for their ex- 
penses, have spent $7,900.00, the amount sent them, in beautifying 
the Tabernacle grounds, re-papering and painting the Tabernacle and 
Administration Building, furnishings for Provo and Lincoln Seminary, 
made a contract with Provo City where they get water for Tabernacle 
lawn at a very small, almost negligible amount. The Tabernacle 
grounds are a pride to Provo Citizens and a joy to visitors, beautiful 
trees and a wonderful variety of shrubs. 

In Nov. 1, 1924, the Stake was divided. The Springville Wards, 
Mapleton, Thistle and Soldier Summit being formed into the Kolob 
Stake thus leaving us 1 6 wards with a Church population of something 
over 12, 000. 

On Sept. 16, 1929, the Stake was again divided taking the 7 wards 
on the north and forming the Sharon Stake that left Provo with 9 wards 
as the Utah Stake with a population of a Ittle over 8,000. 

My commercial life was very fascinating. Father's store was 
small. The photograph gallery was for a time very interesting in my 



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boyhood. The freckles were very thick on my face, and in order to 
give me some experience in re-touching , or as the photographer would 
say, remove some of the blemishes, father gave me a negative of my- 
self to smooth out. I certainly made a mess of it for instead of remov- 
ing the freckles, I pitted them so that when we printed, my face looked 
like I had just recovered from a bad case of small pox. I wasn't put 
on the staff as a re-toucher. 

Much of the furniture was finished or partly so in the early days 
after we received it. Later on Thomas Mitchell joined the force. He 
immediately commenced the manufacture of cupboards, milk safes, 
double lounges, and others. Andrew Sward was head man. He made 
the mattresses and waited on the people , painted and finished the furn- 
iture. Father ran the gallery and bossed the bunch while I was general 
roustabout. 

Mr. Sward had me finish some of the furniture. Soon I was left 
to paint and grain. The public was tolerant for as I think of some of 
the finish I put on and especially the graining, I blush. It was nothing 
short of a tragedy. In those days we did much picture framing and es- 
pecially framing mottos. I think every home had the motto worked in 
burlin wood on perforated cardboard "God Bless Our Home" or some 
other sentiment. I remember working one ( for I had this department 
in charge), "Kind words can never die". It still hangs in Vic's bed- 
room in our home. We sold mostly furniture but later added carpets, 
organs, dishes, and stoves, and a few pianos. Things went on smooth- 
ly until the persecution of our people for the practice of polygamy. 
Father, who had two families, decided to go away to England to escape 
the penalty of the law which was 6 months in the Utah Penitentiary and 
$300.00 fine. He had a friend, Albert Singleton, whose first wife had 
no children. She made the trip with father. There was a decided 
change came over him on that trip. Before leaving he deeded the store 
and real estate to my brother Geo. Jr. and put the business in the 
name of Taylor Brothers. He deeded a home and five acres of land to 
Mother, a home and five acres of land to my Aunt ( Henrietta his 2nd 
wife). On father's return from England he was restless and wanted to 
sell the business. There were some letters come into my possession 
he had written to Mrs. Singleton ( who, by the way, had procurred a 
divorce from her husband and taken her maiden name, Pafford). These 
letters indicated that he intended selling the business and going away 
with this woman. She had received about all Singleton had. Mother 
knew something was wrong and there grew up a coldness between her 
and father. 

Now the first real sorrow of my life comes in, as a lad father 
had been good to me. I stuck to him in the store, and in return he gave 
me almost everything a boy could ask - a pony, a goat and wagon, a 
velocipede, a bicycle, pigeons, had J. M. Mitchell make a pigeon house 



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THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



and Mr. Sward paint it, rabbits, a pistol. He was good to me. When 
this trouble came between him and mother, I must take a stand. I did 
with my mother. I had assumed the management of the business. 
Father wanted it returned. I made him this proposition that he give 
mother five thousand dollars ( $5,000. 00), which I figured she could 
loan at 8% and have an income of $400. 00 a year. I would return him 
the business. He refused. Said he would have his own settlement with 
mother and it was none of my business. During our talks, and we had 
many of them, some very unpleasant things were said. I told him he 
could not and should not send my mother to the wash tub for a living, 
that she was entitled to one half the business that I had put in my full 
time there and received very little for it and what we had done entitled 
her to this amount. I considered the business worth $10,000.00. The 
rangle went on. I wanted to get away from it all. 

I pause here to relate a circumstance that was the beginning of 
my making some real money. A Danish man by the name of Julius 
Jensen came to me in about 1885 and wanted me to go into the jewelry 
business with him. He was to do the repair work and have that for 
himself and would split 50-50 in profits from sales. In order to put in 
a little stock and buy a show case we had to raise $112.00 or $56.00 
each. I had a very fine mare and colt and gave them to father for sec- 
urity for the $56. 00 he loaned me. We rented a room from him. Bus- 
iness went good. It was the first jewelry store in Provo. We kept 
Benj. Aliens & Co. catalogue on our counter and sold from that and 
gradually increased our stock. When my note became due for the $56, 
I asked father to give me more time as I had been putting my money in 
to merchandise. He refused. Said he, " you knew when you borrowed 
the money when it would be due". He took my mare and colt for the 
debt. I valued them at $125. 00. This was his way of teaching me to 
be prompt in meeting my obligations. I think it was a little rough, one 
more experience. 

W. O. Beesley owned 25 feet front just east of the store and the 
next 20 feet was owned by father ( by the way, he had it in the name of 
Emily Pafford, Albert Sigleton's former wife). Jensen and I had been 
very successful. We sold watches and jewelry all over the County at 
a good profit and decided to build a store. I talked to Mr. Beesley 
about buying his 25 feet. He said we could have it for $500. 00 or $20 
per foot. I talked to father about it. He said this property joined his 
and he would take it and let us have the 20 feet. When we came to pay 
him for it, he charged us $600.00 or $30. 00 per foot. Jensen said to 
me," you are a smart business man". I thought I had not been treated 
just right by father, still I was working for him and he was perhaps en- 
titled to the Beesley deal. 

To continue with the family trouble, father insisted on me turn- 
ing over the business. I refused until he settled with mother. He got 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



105 



to writing checks, signing them Taylor Brothers by Sr. I was com- 
pelled to go to the bank and notify them not to pay on that signature. 
It became a perfect hell. We were getting more and more involved for 
merchandise. Finally after dreary months of agony, father went to the 
home ( he and mother had ceased to live together) and offered to sell 
her the bus ine ss for $11, 000.00, building and bus ine ss , just as it stood , 
Things were looking better. We were doing about $1,000.00 per month 
then which was a good furniture business for those days. Mother at 
first would not listen to him. He said he would give her one-half {^) 
and sell her the other one-half (|^) for the $1 1 , 000. 00. She told him 
he had offered it all for $10,000.00 and felt it very unjust to ask her 
$11,000.00 for the one-half {\). She said she would give him no an- 
swer until she talked it over with me. After going over the situation 
with mother, I advised her to buy him out. Although I had gone into 
the jewelry business and was anxious to get to myself, I told her we 
would incorporate and make it go. The deal was made. Reed Smoot 
had just organized the Provo Commercial and Savings Bank. We were 
doing business with the First National. I asked them if they could 
loan us $11,000.00 in order to pay father. They said they did not have 
it. I then went and asked Reed Smoot. He said they would but would 
expect us to bring our business there. I told Wm. Dusenberry, cashier 
of First National of my arrangements. He took me to Pres. A. O. 
Smoot's office, in the rear of the bank, and after talking the matter 
over, they sent for father and we made the following settlement - - - 
paid him three thousand ($3,000.00) cash, gave him four notes for two 
thousand dollars ($2,000.00) each bearing interest @ 10% per annum 
payable one note each three months, all payable within one year. The 
bank guaranteed these notes and they were all paid promptly. There 
was one unfortunate thing of this settlement, father's other family felt 
that I should have insisted on his making provisions for their mother 
at the time this settlement was made. I wish 1 could have done so, but 
it was impossible. One of the other family told me that after the settle- 
ment, father told them that I had taken all he had. I asked him on two 
different occasions if he had made such a statement and he denied it 
most vigorously. He afterward started my brother John and sister 
Polly up in the grocery business. John continued in it and was very 
successful becoming a very rich man for a small community like Provo. 
What father did for their mother or the rest of their family I do not 
know. At times, I have sore regrets that I ever got in the mix-up. I 
was anxious for my mother, could she have had something to live on 
and I gone on with my plans alone, I am sure I should have escaped 
many heart aches. Jensen and I were doing well in the Jewelry busin- 
ess, had built a beautiful store and making money very fast, but the 
deal was made. The next move was to get the business in shape. We 
incorporated the business under the name of Taylor Bros, Co. for 
$50, 000. 00 with a paid-up capital of $30, 000. 00. The property from 



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THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



father was taken infor $22, 000. 00; $11 , 000. 00 of which went to moth- 
er. She borrowed $3, 000. 00 more giving her $14, 000. 00. George Jr. 
put in $5,000.00. Arthur $1,500.00. I $5,000.00 and John Dixon 
$5,000.00. This made up the $30,500.00, the money we raised, 
mainly all cf which was borrowed; paid off the bank the $11,000.00 
borrowed and left some to go into the business. The officers and dir- 
ectors were elected. We elected mother. President; George, Vice- 
president; John Dixon, Sec. -Treas. ; myself, manager. These with 
Arthur made up the Board of Directors. This year 1890, the boom 
struck Provo and our business went by leaps and bounds. Prior to this 
our business had been for $13,000.00 to $14,000.00 per year. This 
boom year we did $50, 000. 00. We were carried off our feet, built a 
large three (3) story building, one of the first on Main Street. Things 
were fine for a few years, then came the panic of '93. It was a strug- 
gle to hold the business together. I had bought out Geo. ; traded him 
the building Jensen and I had built. I had bought Jensen out, S. Nielsen 
took one-half {j) the stock, I took one-half {^) stock and the building. 
Nielson died and I purchased his interest. I moved the jewelry out, 
had different men run it but never paid much after Nielsen died. Mrs. 
McClellan (my sister) her husband, Arthur and Walter went up to Mon- 
tana to work in a gold mine. Sent their check ( after paying for their 
living expenses) down to me to help with the business as a loan. It 
came in very handy. Later we were able to pay it back. 

The business was very successful, furniture, carpets and wall- 
paper was our main lines. We added stoves and hardware, crockery 
and all household furnishings. A music department that has always 
been a very important department. Some years later, 1913, we open- 
ed a dry goods department. Walter Needham of American Fork, tak- 
ing charge. In 1914, we opened the Men's clothing and furnishings. 
Sterling taking charge. 

The business has made wonderful strides. It has been a great 
satisfaction to me to see it grow from a little business occupying a 
small room to one that the floor space is measured by acres, with 
more than 50 employees. A very unusual thing occured in 1921, my 
brother Arthur sold me his interest in the company. He wanted to en- 
gage in reclaiming land around the lake. He met with reverses the 
first season and then the most unusual thing happened. Nothing like it 
that I have ever known, he organized a company, called it the Dixon 
Taylor Russell Co. , got Albert Dixon from our Spanish Fork Store, 
took the heads of all our departments and left us to build a new organ- 
ization. I paid him at the rate of $1,053.00 per share for his stock 
that was the value he put on it, much higher than value put on it by 
Stanley Dixon the Sec. & Treas. of Co. , but he had been with me for 
thirty (30) years. I had been sick a great deal. I felt to pay him what 
he considered fair in as much as he was going out of business. We had 
paid up on capital to the $50,000.00 cash and stock dividends. Arthur 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



107 



held $5, 000. 00, I paid him $50, 530. 00 for his 10% of the stock, but so 
it goes and all will work out for the best. We each have a family of 
boys and by separating they will have a better chance to grow, 

I had always wanted to get some sort of an organization going 
that would help young men save; thought of a number of things one was 
a mutual insurance. I talked to Reed Smoot some about it but he was 
afraid it would not go. A group of us organized the Young Men's Inv- 
estment Co. , bought the Horton Corner, 5th West and Center, but 
found it did not reach out to enough people. One day while talking to 
John Bennett, a boy friend, he called my attention to Zion's Loan and 
Building Society, of which he was a director. He came to Provo and 
explained it to the Bishops. After I had failed to interest the business 
men, all of whom assured me it would fail, I got the Bps. together. 
John came to the meeting and helped us get started. I spent more than 
six (6) months in getting enough subscriptions to start and in 1904, as 
I now remember, we started the Provo Building and Loan Society with 
paid up capital of $2, 500. 00. That institution has grown until today it 
has nearly three quarters of a million dollars ( $750, 000. 00) working 
at an expense of about $3,000.00 per year. The Sec. is the only one 
receiving a salary. This has been one of the greatest blessings that 
has come to Provo. Hundreds of the beautiful brick cottages are the 
result of this Society. 

When being invited to furnish my biography for Who's Who in 
America, ( a book I have felt I had no right to be in ), they wanted to 
know what I considered my greatest achievement. Without hesitation, 
I said from a business point of view, the organization of the Provo 
Building and Loan Society. I have been President and Trustee since 
its organization, no salary, not one cent for my labor. 

In 1906, we organized the Farmers and Merchants Bank of Provo 
with a capital of $50,000.00. I was elected President and have held 
the position since its organization. We commenced a new building on 
the corner of 3rd West and Center. The building was not completed so 
I received deposits and made loans from my office, which was then 
situated at the south end of the balcony on the east side of our store 
(Taylor Bros. Co.) This business has grown far beyond my fondest 
hopes and expectations. When we reached our one quarter of a million 
mark in totals, we got out a special statement. Our totals at this writ- 
ing are one and one-half millions ( $1,500,000.00). We doubled our 
capital from $50, 000. 00 to $100, 000. 00 in order to become a member 
of the Federal Reserve System. We had accumulated $25,000.00 
surplus and declared that as a stock dividend, then had the stock hold- 
ers pay $25,000.00, thus doubling their stock so that by paying $50.00 
per share, they received $1 00,00. Since then, we have accumulated 
$32, 500,00 and have paid a dividend from the first year of the bank's 
organization. When the National City Bank of Salt Lake City failed, we 



108 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



purchased their marble fixtures, vaults, safety boxes, enlarged our 
banking building to double its former size and are now equipped with a 
beautiful bank, one of the finest in the state. 

It was a strange incident that brought about the establishment of 
this bank. The First National Bank had been taken over by the Provo 
Commercial Savings Bank. Whenwe opened our account (Taylor Bros. 
Co.) with them, I went to Reed Smoot, who was the President, and 
arranged with him for a standing loan of $5, 000.00 and the privilege 
of a $5,000.00 overdraft making the loan at its height, $10,000.00. 
Reed was elected to the U, S. Senate and left Provo. Some time after 
he had gone, I was called up to the Bank and Mr. C. E. Loose, vice- 
president and manager in charge told me they wanted some security on 
our loan. I asked him what was the matter and told him of my agree- 
ment with Reed; asked if we had at any time exceeded the amount we 
were to have. He said no they felt they must have some security. 
I asked him if the agreement of their Pres. would not stand. Told him 
we would give him a statement of our affairs and that he would be at 
liberty to verify the same. Next day I was called up and was told that 
they insisted on proper security. I went to Salt Lake, met my old 
friends, John Bennett and W. R. Wallace. They took me over to Wells- 
Fargo Bank, introduced me to the Cashier, Mr. Miller. John said, as 
I remember, "Tom will pay all he agrees to". I explained our situation 
to Mr. Miller. He asked me how much money we needed. I said, 
"$10,000.00". He said, " Here is a small check book, we will get you 
a large one made up. In the meantime, go pay your bank off. You may 
have a $10,000.00 overdraft privilege here", and he gave us a much 
lower rate of interest. I went up to the Provo Commercial next day 
and asked for the amount owing them, gave them a check for it. Mr. 
Loose was there and asked me if that meant we were closing our account. 
I asked him what else I could do. Our business was evidently not satis- 
factory. We had no choice in the matter. I said, "by the way I owe you 
$500. 00. Do you want that paid up too? " He said, "Yes, we want it all 
cleaned up". I went over to the State Bank, borrowed $500.00 and paid 
the Commercial Bank off. The State was a small bank with only 
$25, 000.00 capital and were unable to handle our account. I gave them 
my personal account and a local account of the Company, one we used 
to pay our freight and salaries, and held our main account with Wells- 
Fargo. When Walker Bros. Bank bought out Wells- Fargo, I received 
a letter from Mr. H. M. Walker asking us to continue with them, which 
we did; but it did not look well for us to be asking people to trade in 
Provo and we to do our baning outside. So we decided to open a bank, 
the Farmers and Merchants is the result. 

When Jesse Knight bought the old Provo Woolen Mills, he came 
to me and wanted me to join him. I could not take much, put in $1500. 
Went on the board and a member of the executive committee, and re- 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



109 



mained there until Mr. Ottenheimer got control at which time I resign- 
ed. I like some Jews, but from what I knew of him, I was sure I could 
not get along with him. The mill never paid but one dividend, and 
since Ottenheimer has taken it over, I am not looking for one, but if 
he will keep the mill running and give employment, I am satisfied. 
The stock has been cut from $75.00 per share to $30. 00, but that's 
that. 

Later, at Mr. Knight's solicitation, I helped him organize the 
Springville -Mapleton Sugar Company at Springville. It was against my 
judgement, but got in and went through with it. I acted on the board of 
directors and member of the Executive Committee until I sold out in 
1928. I lost several thousand dollars, much time and worry, but the 
experience was worth something. 

Went in to the Mutual Savings and Loan, was on the board for a 
time but question came up I could not agree to, so I sold my stock at 
a loss and withdrew, more experience. 

Henry J. Maiben, a painter who had been well to do but failed, 
was running a little paint shop on Center Street. John Bennett who had 
taken over the Sears Glass and Paint and called it the Bennett Glass 
and Paint, was in Provo one day and suggested to me that we organize 
a company and put Henry on his feet. We were to take a third interest 
each. We organized the Maiben Glass and Paint Co. John let us have 
our stock on easy terms. Business went good until Henry died. We 
had Leslie R. Cockrell manage it until he went to Idaho, then we put 
John L. Russell in charge. Bennett and I bought the Maiben interests, 
gave John some stock and he bought some. Things went fine until 
Russell formed the habit of playing cards for an afternoon instead of 
attending to his business. In checking him up, we found we were worse 
than broke. It cost us a little over $11,000.00. Russell insisted he 
had not gambled our money away, but admitted he had played cards 
when he should have gone to work. Well, he had a family and we de- 
cided to take his word and drop things. We have the business now in 
the hands of Vernand Anderson. He is making a go of it and will soon 
have it on a good paying basis. Looks as though this will work out to 
be a good business. 

The Taylor Investment Company was organized to buy up real 
estate. We have sold all we own but the building now occupied by J. C. 
Penney Co. , the building just east of the Bank. It was a very success- 
ful concern, the stock of 11 shares held by each stockholder cost $300, 
is worth at this writing about $5,000. 00. I took Arthur's over when I 
bought his Taylor Bros. Co. stock, so I now hold 22 shares of the 55. 
I am Pres. of the Company. 

The T. N. Taylor Co. was organized so that my family could 
hold stock in- tact in other companies. My idea is to transfer my hold- 
ings in other corporations to this one, as fast I can get my obligations 



no 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



taken care of. At present, this company holds 100 shares of Taylor 
Brothers Company, this is a company for the family only. I am Pres. 

I bought a 52 acre farm on Provo Bench with "ample" water but 
not enough. Spent something like $4, 000, 00 more for water in order 
to have enough. This farm has hardly paid its taxes since I owned it, 
yet my neighbors have done well. They have worked their farms, I 
have rented mine. Am convinced that the farm belongs to the farmer 
or as Bill Nye once put it, "every man aught to have a farm who can 
afford it". It looks better now and may yet pay. 

My sheep experience was good until we had a hard winter and a 
very heavy loss, but if prices hold up, I may yet get my money out of 
what there is left of the herd. I hope so. 

I have kept pretty clear of mines, yet I did put up some money 
for Geo. Morrison to develop the Ambreath and North and with J. M. 
Holdaway in the Aurom, they built to my folly and have decided mines 
belong to miners. 

When the Beneficial Life Insurance Co. was organized, I went 
on the Directorate and remained there until the Church took the Com- 
pany over. It was a good investment, paid well. 

Am a director of Home Fire Insurance Co. It's a good company. 
Wish I had more stock. 

My political life has been very fascinating to me. When a small 
boy, we had two political parties in the field. One the Peoples ( com- 
posed of the Mormon people) and the other the Liberal ( composed of 
the non-Mormon.) Bp. Tanner had me drive a buggy and take the old 
folks to the polls to vote. Pres. Geo, Q. Cannon was on the Peoples 
party ticket for Delegate to Congress, ( I do not recall now who the 
Liberals were running). The Bp. would say, "Now, Thomas see that 
the ballot says Geo. Q. on it before it goes in the box". ( Later on I 
was on a city ticket. I shall relate what took place during this meeting 
and the following city convention and election as I can. ) Bp. Tanner 
presided at the meeting ( each ward was entitled to an alderman and two 
members of the city council). The Bp. said he would like to be Alder- 
man all OK. And then said he, " I think Bro. Samuel Liddiard should 
be one of the councilmen ( he was our Supt. of Sunday School and a 
good one but very English). O. K. Before the Bp. named the next one, 
I got to my feet and said, "Bp. , don't you think we should give the 
young men a chance". I then nominated my boy friend John Dixon, 
gave as good a talk as I knew how, and then came the climax; Bro. 
Liddiard arose to his feet and in his English said, "I knows en I knows 
en as well as any one ere, and if e gets any thing in that silly od ed of 
e's thee nor no one else will ever get it out. I second the motion ". 
John went through with a whoop. We were then to meet in convention 
and make up the ticket. It was agreed that the convention would nom- 
inate who ever was named from the various wards letting each ward 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



111 



name its alderman and two councilmen and the convention would ratify 
it. Well, the Bp. insisted on my nominating him at the convention. It 
was all new to me, but the Bp's, request was to be complied with. As 
the time came along for me to get up, I was very nervous, and to make 
things worse, the Bp, whispered louder than some people talked, kind 
of a whistle, whispered out, "Thomas it's time to nominate me now", 
well, I did, amidst the smiles of the convention. John E. Booth was 
nominated for Mayor. The Liberals nominated Geo. Sutherland, (now 
a member of the Supreme Court of the U.S.). Booth won. 

Later I was nominated by the Democrats of the 4th Ward (after 
we divided on party lines) for the City Council, but was defeated by Dr. 
Simmons by a few votes. 

Later I was nominated for City Treas. by the Democrats. Was 
defeated by J. T. Farrer. (? ) 

In 1899, I was nominated by the Democrats for Mayor and was 
elected over S. S. Jones by a very small majority. 

In 1897, there was a convention of citizens called and they decid- 
ed to have a non partisan election, so they had the convention and a 
number of names were presented for Mayor. I was one of them. I 
was not a member of the convention, but some of the young men wanted 
me to run so I consented to do so. After balloting for some time the 
candidates were reduced to three: Roger Farrer, S. S. Jones and my- 
self. Finally Farrer was nominated. He had always been a very 
strong Democrat and some of the Republicans became dissatisfied and 
called a Republican convention and nominated S. S. Jones, The Demo- 
crats came to me and wanted me to run as they had called a convention. 
Aunt Electa Bullock was spokesman for the delegation ( it was hard to 
resist Aunt Electa). I told them my name had been before the Citizens 
convention. I could not in fairness do other than support the candidates 
of that party. They reminded me of Mr. Jones being in the same posi- 
tion and that he had accepted the Republican nomination. I said, "I 
can't help that I must stand with the nominee of the Citizens convention", 
which I did ( and have never regretted it). The convention then named 
R. A. Barney with two Democrats in the field and the town being norm- 
ally Republican, Mr, Jones was easily elected. Two years later, 1899, 
I was elected with a Republican council. We got along pretty well dur- 
ing this administration. We started the laying of cement sidewalks that 
have since been extended until we now have miles of same. The City 
was in debt $100,000. 00 paying 6%. I went to Chicago to try and get 
4% money. We after received bids for our new bonds @ 4^% a saving 
to the City of $1 ,500. 00 per year. In 1901, I was again nominated. 
Mr. Ed. Loose was the Republican nominee. I had no hope of winning, 
in fact I had had enough, but once in the fray, I was anxious. The city 
was Republican by 200. Mr. Loose had the support of Sen. Smoot, Mr. 
Holbrook and many business men. I won by 5 votes. During my ad- 
ministration, the water supply increased by bringing spring water to 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



the City. We bought the Thayer Spring, did away with the old settling 
basin, improved our lighting system, bought the acreage for the cem- 
etery, and made a few improvements I am sure were helpful. We at 
least did our best. The Mayor's salary those days was not so large 
that one would get the swelling of the head, $300 per year. 

I was nominated for the State Senate but was defeated by A. L. 
Booth. He was much better man for that job than I. 

In 1920, I ran ( or walked) for Governor, was nominated by the 
Democrats convention assembled in Salt Lake City, but went down with 
a crash under the Harding wave. While I was out in the campaign, I 
was elected a director of the Home Fire Insurance Company of Utah. 
After the election, I attended the first meeting. J. C. Cutler, former 
governor, W. W. Riter and some others, jokingly said they thought 
there should be a speech from the new member. Without giving the 
president ( Pres. Grant) a chance to say anything, I arose and said, 
"Gentlemen, a man is usually chosen to a directorate on account of his 
influence among the people, and to show you gentlemen what splendid 
judgment you have, I have just returned from a 2,000 mile trip, have 
s pent $3 , 000. 00 , made 52 speeches, and did not carry a single townl 
spoke in, that I know of". 

Thus ends my political life. I enjoyed it, love the good men who 
supported me, only wish I could give time to bring about some changes 
on taxation. I am happy the part I took in bringing about prohibition, 
it will yet prove the greatest blessing that has ever come to the U. S. 

My father's name was Geo. Taylor, born in Birmingham, Eng- 
land, March 25, 1838, died at Provo, Utah, September 4, 1926. 

My mother's name was Eliza Nicholls, born in Portsmouth, E ng- 
land, April 29, 1838, died June 27, 1922, Provo, Utah. They were 
married in Birmingham, England, joined the Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter-day Saints in Birmingham, came to Utah in 1863; left with 
three children: Harriet, Parley, and Emma. The latter two died in 
the plains on their journey to Zion. It was a terrible trial to mother 
after their arrival. The following children ( born in Provo, Utah): 
George Jr. , William ( who died when a babe ), Thos. N. , Arthur N. , 
Walter G and Ashted. I was the fourth son and sixth child; was born 
in Provo, July 28, 1868; have taken no beauty prizes, and do not re- 
call being especially run after by the ladies; with red hair and freckled 
face, very tall, slim, small legs, and large feet. When 20 years of 
age I was nearly 6 ft. tall, weight 123 lbs. was rejected by N. Y. Life 
Insurance Co. for insurance. Dr. W. R. Pike who made the physical 
examination thought I had heart trouble. I married soon after and my 
heart trouble was cured. 

I went into the store in my eleventh year, had many boy friends, 
was very fond of out-door sports but never very good at any of them. I 
loved baseball, organized a club, was allowed to pitch because I helped 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



113 



liberally to furnish the balls and bats, was never a good runner, poor 
jumper, but tried them all. Was put in charge of the dances in the 3rd 
Ward when I was 18; loved to dance, was very fond of the drama, took 
part in many of the Ward shows , cultivated some ambition for the stage 
but had it all knocked out of me when our troop visited Payson. I was 
in Denver when the booking was made, received a wire that the show 
was to be presented on a certain night, giving me just time enough to 
get home. 1 arrived in Payson 30 minutes before the curtain was to 
rise. They had some fellow walking up and down the wing trying to 
learn my part. I did not have time for make-up, so went just as I was. 
It was the chilliest reception I ever got ( and I have had some cold re- 
ceptions). Well, our manager had arranged to have us stay at the 
hotel that night, but from the climate feeling around us, we decided to 
leave for home immediately after the show. Drove the 18 miles in the 
old fashioned hack; it was very cold, but I am sure the cold was better 
than the warmth that was brewing in Payson that night. We had a meet- 
ing and decided to disband ( I have wondered since if the stage did not 
loose a star). Who can tell. Well, we quit. 

In my church and business life, I was closer to no man than John 
Dixon. We worked in all the quorums of the Priesthood together from 
Deacon to High Priest. When I was called in as a counselor to Bp. 
Gibby, John was made Ward Clerk. When I was called as President 
of Utah Stake, John was a member of the High Council. We walked to 
lunch together for many years. When we incorporated the Taylor Bros . 
Co. he became the Sec-treasurer, the only member not of our family 
to hold stock in the company. When we organized the Farmers and 
Merchants Bank, he became the cashier. We have had many business 
dealings together. We were married the same day. I guess I had 
better mention about this marriage business, for I did get married on 
September 18, 1889, to Maud Rogers in the Manti Temple. President 
Anthon H. Lund performed the ceremony. We were blessed with nine 
children: Thomas Sterling, Ethel, Lester R. , Vesta, who died Oct. 
11 , 1905, Alden R. , Marion R. , Victor R. , Mary Maud, and Delenna. 

My home life has been a very happy one. Mrs. Taylor was always 
considerate of me. I do not recall going into the home and being met 
with other than a smile. It meant peace, although I was out in church 
and other duties, she said nothing, but took the responsibility of the 
children and the home and encouraged me to give my best to public life. 

The few things I have been able to do, standing back of me, has 
been that sweet smile and faith of this most wonderful woman. For 
many years my health was broken. She cared for me as though I was 
a babe and when others would give up, she carried on. Well, I will 
have to be careful if I go on in this strain, I might turn this sketch in- 
to a love scene. 

One little habit Mrs. Taylor had I must mention, few times did 
she ever come to the kitchen or dining room with her hair uncombed 



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THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



and her shoes unfastened. There was that much formality that always 
pleased me. No vulgarity was allowed in act or speech. We are en- 
tering our fortieth year in a home of prayer, love and peace with eight 
children who never overlook an opportunity to bring sunshine to us. 
The 5 boys have all filled missions for the Church, extending over a 
period of something more than 13 years. It cost us about $10, 000.00. 
The best money we have ever spent. The girls are jewels. I am ac- 
cused of being a crank over them but no sweeter girls ever graced the 
earth and that is saying somethings 

There are circumstances that come into our lives that give us 
courage and cheer. In life we had a reakstate boom inProvo in 1890, 
where we all lost our heads, followed by a panic of 1893, and lasting 
until 1896. Few businesses survived. Three of the four banks in 
Provo failed: Utah Savings Company, First National and Nation Bank 
of Commerce. The Provo Commercial withstood the storm. I was 
taken very sick, nervous breakdown. Our business was tottering, my 
personal affairs was so tied up that I was worse than broke. I was ad- 
vised by Dr. F. W. Taylor to go away and see if a change would help 
me. I went to California. Sterling was a little chap;he was sent along 
to wait on me. While I was away some four weeks, John F. Bennett 
spent his Sundays in my office straightening out as best he could my 
affairs. After I returned, John sent me a check on the Utah State Bank, 
signed, but amount left blank for me to fill in the amoiint I should need. 
In sending the check he said he had been saving his money. Told me 
the amount he had and he would not touch it and for me to use any part 
or all of it if I need to, but don't fail. The check was never used, but 
John was willing and made the offer. I have tried to pay him back by 
little investments we have made together. The Taylor- Bennett Co. 
property used by Maiben Glass, the building on 3rd West, represents 
an investment of about $5 , 000. 00 is worth today $25, 000. 00. Taylor 
Investment Co. cost of $300 . 00 now worth $5,000.00, but he has al- 
ways done more than his part. Do all I can, he comes through just a 
little stronger. Edgar Guest wrote a poem he called "Friend" that 
expresses in part my sentiments, but only part of my love for John 
F. Bennett. 

When a lad, during the "crash" of 1893, Edward S. Payson of 
Boston came in to our store and asked for Tom Taylor. He was a 
traveling salesman for the Emerson Piano Company. They had been 
selling their piano to Jos. Daynes of Salt Lake for many years and 
when Daynes- Colter formed a co-partnership, they had the line. Mr. 
Daynes said in a sarcastic way when Mr. Payson solicited him for 
business, "You had better go to Provo and sell your piano to Tom 
Taylor". He came. He said nothing to me about pianos but asked me 
about irrigating the farms. I took him to the hills east of town and 
then to the fields west. He told me of his farm in Lexington. Had a 
great visit. Next day just as he was leaving, he said, " I am going to 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



115 



send you one of our style Rosewood pianos. If you sell it order 

more. If not and it gets in your way, I will tell you what to do with it". 
It was the first piano we sold after it was put on the floor. In a few 
years we were appointed state agents for the Emerson and sold nearly 
two thousand, as I recall it. No better piano for the money, in my 
opinion, was ever built. This business transaction led to a friendship 
that still endures. The old Emerson Co. has gone, Mr. Payson finally 
became Pres. John Wanamaker got control and finally sold it out to 
parties who are now manufacturing it in Norwalk, Ohio, but his going 
out of the piano business has had no difference to our friendship. For 
many years, he came to see us. The last few years on account of his 
age, he is now in his 86th year. I have gone to see him at Lexington, 
Mass. , where he lives. We correspond and get letters every two or 
three weeks from each other. My life has been enriched by my assoc- 
iation with this wonderful man. His acquaintance with people from 
Chas. Dickens to the great actors and musicians of the early days is 
wonderful. How I have enjoyed talking with him about the men and 
women of the stage. We have spent many days in Boston, New York 
and Chicago together attending the theatre and baseball games . He had 
a stable of fine horses at Lexington, Mass. I bought from his stable a 
beautiful show carriage stallion "Golden Cross". I think the most beau- 
tiful horse I have ever seen. I had a string of his colts in a Provo 
horse show. They caused a sensation. 

I am just in receipt of a letter of three pages, beautiful penman- 
ship, from Mr. Payson now in his 86th year, as smooth and steady as 
though he was a young man. He has been a great inspiration to me. 

While I was Mayor, the D. & R. G. Railroad asked for a fran- 
chise to build a passenger station on Academy Ave. at 6th South, but 
in doing so they would shut the U. P. out so that the only way you could 
get to either the U. P. freight or passenger station would be by going 
around the station and crossing all their tracks. I did not think this 
was fair, so I called on the D & R.G. officials and explained how I felt 
and asked if they would not build on the sight where the old building 
now stands on the east side of the street coming out a little, so as to 
give free access to the street, thus leaving the U. P. the west side 
where they now are, without shutting them out, but they refused. I then 
tried to get them to join together and build a Union Depot. They talked 
of it some but decided they would not. I told the D&R.G. people I could 
not approve of the franchise they asked for and unless they were will- 
ing to build on their own side of the street, I would veto the bill should 
it come to me. Well, they got the ordinance passed the Council. I 
vetoed it and after considerable persuasion on the part of the U. P. 
they got enough members to vote to sustain my veto. Thus ended one 
of the Depot troubles in Provo. Some years later when C. F. Decker 
was Mayor, the question of a union depot for Provo came up, urged by 
the then Commercial Club. I was asked to head a committee to see 



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THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



what could be done. We met with the Mayor and I became one of the 
committee. The members as I now recall them was Jesse Knight, R. 
R. Irvine, L. O. Taft, Wm. M. Roylance, C. F. Decker. 

And myself as chairman. We waited upon the officials of both 
lines and urged them to build a Union passenger station the location to 
be left to themselves. The companies were slow to act. We urged 
and urged them. Made many trips to Salt Lake to see them, as chair- 
man of the Committee. I wrote them many letters. Finally they made 
an appointment to come to Provo and look things over, on account of 
freight and industrial tracks and the fact that there was a street or a 
continuation of University Ave. , south of 6th Street and further a large 
City pasture where many cows were taken daily. The officials did not 
take kindly to the University Ave. site. There was talk then of West 
Center street, 3rd or 4th West. Finally it was decided that 3rd West 
would be a good location. Then the trouble began. The committee had 
beem appointed to get a Union Depot, but it was soon discovered that 
unless they could have it on University Ave. they did not want it. Some 
Committee. Things dragged along. City election was coming. At the 
election, J. H. Frisby, who was favorable to the station at 3rd West 
or any other location the R. R. people might decide upon; was elected 
Mayor. Two more years went by and no decision. The next election 
Mr. W. M. Royalance was elected Mayor. He took a stand that we 
wanted the station and in a speech and also by several letters expres- 
sed himself as of course we must leave the location up to the officials. 
By this time the question had developed much sectional strife. The 
committee had become hopelessly divided. Mr. Decker stuck to his 
first stand that wherever the R R people decided, there was his choice. 
Roylance said as Mayor, he was neutral. Taft had committed himself. 
Mr. R. E. Wells, General Manager of the Salt Lake Route, now the 
U. P., wired me while in Denver, that Mr. Slacks (? ), General Man- 
ager of the D & R G would consent to go to Third West, provided 
ground could be procurred. I answered, "Ground will be procurred". 
On his return, I got in touch with him and was shocked when I learned 
they wanted the south quarter of the block between 2nd and 3rd West 
and 3rd and 4th West on 6th South. There were a number of buildings 
on this property, among them a large, brick residence, formerly 
owned by James Dunn. At this time this property had come into the 
possession of a man living in Illinois. I sent Geo, W. Craighead, agent 
for the Salt Lake Route to buy the property while I got options on the 
rest. We got it very cheap. Many of the property owners were in 
favor of the depot coming there. As I now recall it, we paid something 
like $6, 000.00 for the ground we wanted. Then came the rub. 

When the companies asked for a franchise, so strong was the 
opposition that the Council stood six for and 4 against. Then C. H. 
Miller changed his vote to give all time to think it over. 

The next day a committee headed by Jesse Knight got out an in- 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



junction against the Council, 

Mr. Wells had me invite the committee to come to his office in 
Salt Lake that he might tell them of the RR decision. I had already- 
told them but they decided to go. This meeting will long be remember- 
ed by me. On our way to Salt Lake, Roylance, the Mayor, came and 
sat down by me and showed me a petition signed by a number of in- 
fluential people asking that the D & R G reconsider their decision for 
3rd West and build on University Ave. I told the Mayor, if I were he, 
I would not present that petition. If they insisted on its being presented, 
I would have one of the others present it, but he insisted on doing it 
himself. Mr. Wells was there representing the Salt Lake Route and 
Mr. Welby the D & RG. Mr. Welby had been against the 3rd West site 
but his company had decided to go there so he was there to stand by 
their decision. Just before the meeting opened, Mr. Taft called Mr. 
Welby out and told him that if the D & R G would pull out and build on 
University Ave. , he could promise him much business. This was an 
open insult to Mr. Welby and did not help their cause. Mr. Wells said, 
"Well gentlemen, I am authorized to tell you that you will have a Union 
Passenger Station on 3rd West Street". Mr. Roylance was up instant- 
ly and said, "Mr. Wells, before you go further, I want to present this 
petition to you". Mr. Wells took the petition looking it over said, "It's 
a little late to bring this to us here, and by the way, I notice some 
signatures here who were on other petitions leaving the location to our- 
selves". "In fairness to Mr. Taylor", Roylance went on, " I want to 
say he knew nothing of this petition until I showed it to him on the train 
coming up this morning". " Mr. Taylor is the only man on the commit- 
tee in favor of 3rd West. The citizens are against it and as Mayor, I 
am against it". When he sat down, I asked permission to say a few 
words. I expressed appreciation for the decision made, and was sure 
the people would enjoy having better station accomodations. Then I 
turned to the Mayor and said, "Mr. Mayor, I have been very much 
surprised in you today. First your statement that I am the only mem- 
ber of the committee in favor of 3rd West is untrue. Mr. Decker from 
the first has taken the position that he was for the site selected by the 
companies. The Mayor, Mr. Roylance, is neutral. He has told me 
so many times. He has told the citizens that. He has written that to 
the R R officials, so he is not against me, so you see, there are at 
least three who are not opposed to 3rd West. Some other members 
have expressed a preference but all as I recall it, went out to get a 
station". No one answered me. When the crowd was leaving. Mr. 
Wells was helping me on with my coat and said, "Come back soon as 
you get rid of the crowd". When I returned, he said, "Two things I 
have always tried to remember: the winning man can always afford to 
be gene rous , and you can catch more flie s with molasses than vinegar". 

The trouble started when the companies asked for a franchise to 
build the station on 3rd West. Objections came to the Council thick 
and fast. At the election, C. F. Decker was elected Mayor. Six of 



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THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



the Council favored the franchise. Four opposed. Just as the vote 
was to be taken, C. H. Miller changed his vote to no and said he want- 
ed to give the other side a little time to think it over. Well he did, the 
next day. There was an injunction issued against the Council restrain- 
ing them from granting the franchise and practically the entire legal 
profession of Provo retained to represent this committee headed by 
Jesse Knight. C. H. Miller did not look for this turn or he never 
would have voted as he did, for subsequently he stood with the five. 
John E. Booth was on the bench. He was prejudice and the City asked 
for another judge. Judge Lewis of Salt Lake was asked to hear the 
case. The Council asked the RR Co. for some legal help and Walder- 
man Van Cott, in my opinion one of the ablest lawyers in the West was 
given the case . 

Judge Lewis decided it must go to a vote of the people. 

I pause here to say that never in my life have I seen such feelings 
worked up. I became the target. Meetings were held on the street, 
in the Opera House and I was abused by the side against the franchise. 
The people living in the East part of the city, for it had developed a 
sectional fight, were bitter against the people of the West and vice a 
versa. The East side went so far that some of them started a boycot 
against our store and many of them are still carrying it out. The 
officials of the BYU were so bitter that Sterling and Ethel and Lester 
could hardly stay in school. Jesse Knight was a powerful influence, 
and the best friend the school ever had. He was the money power be- 
hind the opposition. They got a letter from Pres. Jos. F. Smith ask- 
ing the defeat of the franchise. I stood up pretty well under the criti- 
cism of business, and the school, but when they brought the Church in, 
it was hard. 

The Stake Pres., Pres. Jos. B. Keeler with his counselors, 
Lafayett Holbrook and J. Wm. Knight signed a circular published by 
the other side, urging the people to vote against the franchise. The 
bitterness was increasing day by day. J. M. Jensen and S. P. Eggert- 
sen was doing some of our talking. Geo. Powelson, President of the 
Council, took a very active part for the bill, guiding it through the 
Council and defending it before the people. Judge Whitecotton and Geo. 
H. Brimhall did most of the talking for the other side. John Dixon was 
a tremendous force. He knew how to handle a campaign. His brother 
LeRoy, who afterward was Mayor, a State Senator, my bro. Arthur, 
Jos. H. Frisby, Andrew Knudsen and many fine stalwart men took up 
the fight. The six (6) City Councilmen who voted for the franchise all 
put in mighty licks. 

The climax of the meetings was the one held by the opponents of 
the franchise in front of the Utah Power and Light Co. on University 
Ave. where Judge Whitecotton was the principle speaker, and the one 
we held on First West and Center at which S. P. Eggertsen presided. 
Geo. A. Startup, Geo. Powelson and A. O. Smoot were the speakers. 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



119 



A. O. Smoot was an orator of the first water. Soon as it was learned 
that he was speaking at our meeting the crowd left the Whitecotton 
meeting and came to ours. It broke their meeting up entirely. Bro. 
Smoot came to me one day and said, "Tom, there is some very serious 
charges going against you, and it seems to me you owe it to yourself 
to refute them. Otherwise the people have nothing left but to believe 
them". 

I had refused to make any statement during the campaign and 
told him I had no statement to make. I had spent my entire life in 
Provo, had been in the business actively since I was 10 years old and 
people who wanted to believe the lies being told about me would not 
believe me if I made a statement, so I would say nothing. He asked 
me if I had kept a copy of all my correspondence with the RR officials 
relating to the Depot question. I said I had. He asked if I was willing 
to let him look them over. I handed him the complete file, he said if 
you will not answer these slanders, I will, and I will use these letters 
to do it with. Well, he did. I have heard A. O. Smoot make some 
good talks, but it seems to me I had never heard him as effective as 
he was that night. When he took the charges against me up one by one 
and branded them as falsehoods, conceived in an unholy mind and read 
letters one after another to prove his statements,! always was a great 
admirer of Owen Smoot, but this act made me feel much closer to him. 
The street was packed and the crowd cheered him time and time again. 

The feeling in the town was very tense. It was disrupting every 
thing. Some people on our side saying they would not let a child of 
theirs go to the BYU, even if they had to go without an education. 
Friendships were being broken. Never in the City's history had there 
been such feeling. It was silly. Well, the electionwas held and the 
station was finished, we held a public celebration and banquet. A num- 
ber of the RR officials were present. I had the pleasure of presiding 
at these functions. 

When the World War broke out, I was appointed a member of the 
State Council of Defence by Gov. Bamberger; was elected Vice-pres. ; 
member of executive council; member on Co. organization; other 
committee and Administrator of Explosives for the State by the Govern- 
ment. It might of been my initials of TNT that got me this appointment 
for I knew nothing about explosives. The Council had or assumed 
charge of many of the activities, raising money to carry on the war, 
by selling bonds and savings stamps. Utah went over the top in all 
the drives; YMCA, Red Cross, and every request or call made. When 
the Utah-Carbon oil tanker was set afloat, I represented the Council, 
went to San Francisco with Gov. Bamberger and his party. Mrs. 
Taylor accompanied me, got better acquainted with the Bambergers 
and like them very much. 

At the State Bankers Association Convention held in Logan, I 



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THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



was elected President. The next year when the Convention was held, 
the American Bankers Journal of New York paid me the compliment 
of delivering a very short address but comprehensive, with a wide 
group of conditions. Well, it was short. I look upon this as a distin- 
guished honor for I was young in the banking game. 

I was appointed a member of the Mormon Battalion Committee 
to raise $100, 000.00 to match alike amount appropriated by the State. 
We apportioned it out to the various counties. I took Utah Co. , T. F. 
Pierpont accepted the chairmanship for Provo where a large part of 
the money was raised. Of the Co. apportion, we raised our quota 
long before the balance of the State raised theirs. I attended the ded- 
ication on the Capitol Grounds. Pres. C. W. Nibley offering the ded- 
icating prayer. 

Was appointed one of the Regents of the U. of U. Served four 
years. Was a member of the Executive Committee, the Finance Com- 
mittee, and Chairman of the Grounds Committee. I enjoyed my as- 
sociation with the Board very much. At the same time, I was serving 
on this Board, I was Vice-president and Chairman, Executive Com- 
mittee, of the Board of Trustees of the BYU, a position I am still 
holding at this writing. I served on the U. of U. Board 4 years. I was 
Pres ident of the BYU Alumni Association. It has been a great pleasure 
to one to come in contact with men in school life. Mine has all been 
with the practical. They at times seem to me to live in another world, 
but I have enjoyed them very much. One of the children said that if I 
wasn't careful, I would believe in education. 

I had the pleasure and honor of dedicating the New City and 
County Building in Provo in 192_ I appreciated this very much. 

It has been my good fortune to visit many foreign countries, 
Mexico, Canada, England, Scotland, France, the Maderia Islands, 
Gibraltar, Italy, Austria, Germany, Holland, Belgium. In 1907, with 
my mother and my daughter, Ethel, then a little girl, we went to Eng- 
land. Ethel and I went to Scotland and France. 

Mrs. Taylor a d I with Dr. H. G. Merrill and wife made the 
trip to the Medi teranean, where after stopping at Maderia and Gibral- 
tar, we were met at Naples by Sterling and continued over the conti- 
nent and then to good old England. This was in 1913. 

I have made 10 trips to Boston, 8 to N. Y. , 4 to Washington, 1 
to Buffalo ( Pan American Expos ition) , 25 to Chicago, 2 to St. Louis, 
(Exposition), 6 to California, 4 by train, 2 by auto; 1 to Atlanta, Ga. , 
1 to Denver, Colo. These trips have brought me in contact with many 
fine people, and I am sure given me a much broader appreciation of 
life. My first trip away from home was to Denver with Geo. A. Kerr 
and W. H. Freshwater. I had seen very few people other than our 
good people of Utah. I learned as I went about that there were many 
fine people in the world. 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



121 



JUST ME 
It's a hard thing for one to describe himself without seeming 
egotistical. 

I am very sensitive to flattery or criticism. From my early 
training I have loved recognition, easily hurt if slighted, either inten- 
tionally or otherwise , from boyhood my personal looks, always subject 
to criticism, by the boys, emphasized this. Was dull in school and a 
poor athlete. As I grew older, I developed one characteristic that to 
s ome was looked upon as a weakness and others as a strength. I tried 
to be loyal to my Church, my Country, and my Friends. I have tried 
to do my part in the Church, to support it with my money and myself, 
uphold and defend it by word and act. 

I have tried to uphold and sustain my Country, to obey the laws 
and not put my fellow citizens to the expense of hiring peace of- 
ficers to watch me. I have never been arrested for breaking any law 
of my Country and never in court for so doing. One explanation I must 
make here. 

During the polygamy raid, a number of young men were appointed 
to serve as special officers to keep track of the activities of the U. S. 
Deputy Marshals, men who had been brought here to arrest those liv- 
ing in polygamy. I was born and raised in this principle. To me it 
was true and sacred and I felt it my duty to defend it and all who were 
living it. Our business was to get word to the men who might be wanted 
for living this principle whenever these deputies came to town, so 
they might make their escape. One of these deputies was in the habit 
of frequenting the home of a woman of the lowest type, she was a 
drunkard and entertainer of men. He had a family living in town but 
he was a sample of the men selected to do the work of enforcing the 
polygamy raid. He came to our home one morning about 9 a.m. , just 
as I was eating my breakfast. Having been out most of the night, I 
was cross and the acts of these men bringing this persecution upon the 
best men and woman I ever knew was playing on my nerves. He came 
there to subpeona mother. Father had been arrested. Mother looked 

out of the window and said, "Here come old for me", 

I said, "Well, he will not get you. Get your shawl and hat and go out 
the back door". We had an old fashioned poker mother brought from 
England, very heavy, I got it. When he knocked at the door, I asked 
him what he wanted. He said, "Hello Tom, is that you? " I said, "Yes 
Mother is not here so you will not serve your papers on her". He 
said, " She is there, I saw her through the window. " " Open that 
door or I will force it open. " I think that was the first and only time 
I felt murder in my heart. I stood to one side with the poker and told 
him to come in, for it would be the last door he ever forced. Am afraid 



Provo Railroad Depot 




NIELSEN & TAYLOR JEWELRY CO. 
230 West Center - Provo 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



123 



I would have settled him had he come in. We talked some time. I 
told him he knew that I knew what manner of man he was and that my 
mother couldn't and would not be seen on the street with him. When I 
felt sure mother was well out of the way, I opened the door. He enter- 
ed, observed the big iron in my hand, went through the home and 
found not mother. He was so enraged, he went back to the Court House 
and swore out a complaint against me for resisting a U. S. Officer. I 
was cited before the grand jury then in session. It was a picked bunch 
of apostates from the church, mostly. David Evans, a bitter apostate, 
was prosecuting attorney. He asked me what I had to say. I was very 
young but stood 5'11", weighed about 125. I knewthe jurors well so 
I said, " Do I look like I would resist anything". It turned the table. 
One of the jurors said that fool answer saved your bacon. I was glad 
when the raid was over and peace came. 

If this was breaking the law, then I was guilty, but at no other 

time . 

In my business relations I have stuck to my friends. No one has 
ever had to ask the second time my stand on a question or where I 
would be. My friends have always been my first thought. 

When a young boy, I had saved money to buy my mother a present 
and decided to get a large family Bible. I was unable to get one in 
Provo, so I went to Salt Lake to C. R. Savage's store and there bought 
one and met for the first time, John F. Bennett. I met him often after 
that and there grew up between us a friendship that few boys and men 
have enjoyed. John can do things for a friend as only John knows how. 



This autobiography covers the life of Thomas Nicholls Taylor 
from 1868 to approximately 1928 and taken from his journal. 

After twenty years as President of Utah Stake, Thomas N. 
Taylor was released on February 19, 1939 and ordained a Patriarch 
of Utah Stake the same day. He died at his home, 342 North Fifth 
West, Provo, Utah on October 24, 1950 of pneumonia. 

" All the world's a stage, and all the men and women 

merely players; 
They have their exits and their entrances, and man in 
his time plays many parts", Shakespeare 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR FAMILY 




Marion, Lester, Ethel, Sterling, Aide n, Victor 
Mary Maud, Thomas N. , Delenna,Maud R. 




342 No. 5th West, Provo 



MARY MAUD ELON ROGERS TAYLOR 



Mary Maud Elon Rogers Taylor was born June 30,1872 at Provo, 
Utah. Her father, Issac Rogers, and her mother, Lestra Stewart, 
were Americans for several generations back. 

Maud was a blyth spirit and was known for many pranks. As a 
young girl, she often gave "readings" in public such as "The Old 
Maid's Prayer". 

At seventeen she married Thomas Nicholls Taylor , a red haired, 
freckle faced Provo merchant twenty-one years of age. They were 
married in the Manti Temple. Many years later President George H, 
Brimhall met two of the daughters and said, "I never could see how 
that pretty Maudie Rogers ever married that ugly Tommy Taylor. " 

As a wedding gift Tom gave Maud a complete dinner set, service 
for twelve. No gift could have been more fitting for Maud's home. 
There hospitality was ever the rule. 

Maud had nine children whom she directed with firmness and 
love. She taught her daughters that so long as a man provided a home 
for his wife it was her duty to keep it clean and pleasant. Just before 
time for Tom to come home she would put on a clean dress and comb 
her hair. 

As the wife of a Bishop, Mayor , Stake President, and a Patriarch, 
she always had the home so that guests were welcome, one or a dozen. 
Many marriages were performed in the living room. 

Maud firmly believed that all one could take with him into the 
next world was that knowledge one had in his head. Never did she sit 
down or lie down without some reading material. When her children 
were young, she took a nursing course of forty weeks duration. This 
knowledge she used many times to help in the community. When her 
children were older she attended school at the BYU. Until the year 
before she died there were very few years that she did not take at 
least one class. She was particularly fond of poetry, literature, hist- 
ory, theology, and genealogy. 

Maud traveled across the continent several times and spent six 
months in Europe. This enrichment of her life she tried to share 
with her family and friends. 

She was a gifted story teller as her children and their friends 
discovered. She never tried to write these stories, but would make 
them up as she went along, responding to the pulse of her audience. 

One of her greatest pleasures was helping to organize the Alice 
Louise Reynolds Chapter 12 or Creative Art Group. She loved Miss 
Reynolds whom she entertained often in her home. She loved the pur- 
pose of the club which was to foster local talent. 

For many years Maud was a member of the B. Y.U. Women, a 
group of woman whom she loved and who stimulated her thinking. 

Tom had much public speaking to do in his life, Maud not so 
much; however, on one of the occasions when they had presented the 



125 



126 



MAUD ROGERS TAYLOR 



B. Y . U. with a piano, each of them was asked to say a few words to 
the students in assembly. Maud's speech was obviously more accept- 
able to the students than Tom's. 

Maud was always active in the Church. She served as President 
of the Ward Mutual, Class Leader in Relief Society, and served in all 
the organizations as she was needed. In her later years she did Gen- 
ealogy work. 

Mrs. Taylor was one of a very few Utah women to have her 
Biography appear in the London Publication, "Principal Women of 
Ame rica". 

She served for five years as a member of the Carnegie Public 
Library Board and was active in the erection of the Provo Library 
Building. Later her lovely home was donated to be used as a Branch 
of the Provo Library, 

Maud was never strong physically. The last 30 years of her life 
she suffered pain, yet no one ever heard her complain, and she greet- 
ed all with a smile. 

Some of the guiding principles of life which she taught her child- 
ren were: 

"The best weapon in the world is kindness". 
"Always play fair; do your part and a little more". 
"Always be clean; the spirit of God cannot dwell in an unclean 
body". 

"Always do your part first; and then turn your problems over 
to the Lord". 

"If a man furnishes a home, it is his wife's responsibility to 
keep it pleasant". 

Her life and character are summed up in the tribute paid to her 
by President David O. McKay: 

"She is more than benevolent - - she is beneficient. A bene- 
volent person may desire to do good; a beneficient person does good. 
She not only desired; but she expressed that desire in acts. " 

Maud Rogers Taylor died in her home December 11, 1946, at 
the age of seventy. She died in the home in which she had reared her 
nine children; entertained B.Y.U. Women, the Creative Art Club, the 
Daughters of Utah Pioneers, the people of Ward, Stake, and City; and 
had enjoyed the privilege of sharing the hospitality of her home with 
several Presidencies of the Church and most of the General Authorities 
over 20 years. 

" All you can take with you is that which you have in your head 
and your heart", was the adage she left with her children. 



Maud Rogers Taylor 

The flowers will die and fade away, 

The notes of music pass, 
And time erase the words we say, 

Like stalks of last year's grass. 

But time nor space cannot destroy, 

Her spirit, strong and free. 
For like some golden winging joy, 

It lives eternally. 

The lives of those she touched will bear. 

The fruits her love begat, 
And multiplying, share on share. 

Preserve each loving act. 

Her inspiration fraught with power. 

Her gift of word and thought. 
Will bloom like some bright wayside flower, 

Unmarred by human rot. 

"There is no time but now", she said, 

"Today is yours, so give". 
And Sister Taylor is not dead, 

While those she loved still live. 

We of this group she led along. 

Pay this last tribute here. 
And pledge our hearts to carry on. 

The work to her so dear. 

Mildred B. Hall 
December 15, 1942 

This verse was dedicated by members of Chapter 1 2 of the Alice 
Louise Reynolds Club for the love and inspiration of MAUD ROGERS 

TAYLOR 



127 




MiMmiz Mmm ( PoUy ) ttayilcjdbr 



MARY ANN ( POLLY ) TAYLOR ROBERTS 

Polly was the second daughter of George Taylor and Henrietta 
Sawyer, born 14 February 1870, at Provo, Utah. She received very 
little formal education, her parents evidently felt it was not necessary 
for girls. Being of an independent and energetic nature, much like 
her father, she very early showed signs of her natural ability for lead- 
ership and accomplishment. Her mother's home was located on Main 
Street in Provo, so at an early age she started a little sidewalk stand 
where she made and sold "home made" ice cream, later adding some 
discarded or unwanted items from her father's business a block away. 
These things she disposed of to some advantage. Before age 10 she 
had found a way to earn, so that she never from that early age was 
without money she had earned by her own efforts. 

As she matured, her energetic nature, good common sense, and 
dependable disposition made it possible to move into a larger store, 
across the street, where she carried a full line of grocery items. With 
the help of her younger brother John, they built one of Provo's leading 
grocery stores. She was really a career girl ( at a time in history 
when such a thing was unthinkable ) but a very successful one. Years 
later at the time of her marriage to William D. Roberts, she sold the 
store to her brother. She worked at several other jobs until her hus- 
bands family, bought at auction, an old badly run down hotel which she 
and her husband over the years, built into the leading hotel south of 
Salt Lake City and one of the most successful. 

She was never afraid of work, or of a challenge, telling us, her 
children, that if she was put down into any strange city or country she 
would be able to make her way, knowing she never feared. She was 
honest, fair and fearless, but never domineering or pushy; reserved, 
determined, and with complete control. We, her children adored and 
respected her, as did those who lived or visited in our hotel. Her 
work and worth was behind the scenes in the good meals and service 
and comfort of our guests. Her good husband supplied the welcome 
and friendliness and entertainment so necessary to lonely or weary 
travelers who came to stay with us in those early times. 

Her family remember she was always imaculately dressed, even 
after long working hours. Anyone knocking on our door would find her 
well groomed, clothes neat and presentable, ready to step out into the 
lobby and cope with any or all emergencies which could and did happen 
in the many years of their lives there. She remained active and suc- 
cessful in any and all her ventures until a few months before her death 
on June 3 , 1950. 



Geneve Roberts Dunn 

129 



Wm. D. & "Polly" Roberts Family 
■& Friends in front of the Hotel 



("Rear ) Roberts Hotel 

"Pulsipher House" Addition 




HOTEL HOBEI^TS 

192 South University Avenue - Provo 




TAYLOR & COMPANY 

George Taylor, Sr. "Polly" Taylor 
John T. Taylor 




William D. Roberts, Jr. 



WILLIAM D. ROBERTS, Jr. 



William D. Roberts, Jr. was born on January 6, 1867, the son of 
Julia Maria Lusk and William DeWitte Roberts. 

I am sure my father, William D. Roberts would have loved to 
have been an actor. He had a flair for the dramatic and a keen imagi- 
nationthat colored every event with interest. Even as children we 
knew that a walk to the market or grandmother's with him became an 
interesting walk through a story book land, as he pointed out the details 
of the surroundings on our way; the trees, birds, insects or a sunlit 
boulder where we might stop to rest or eat a fresh doughnut he purch- 
ased at a bakery on our way. He was warm, friendly, sentimental and 
always humorous, anything was fun if father was with us. 

He had a good singing voice, could yodel and was a gifted humor- 
ous story teller, with a good memory for detail. He could greet an in- 
coming guest by name even after months of absence. He was in great 
demand at social gatherings, weddings, banquets, B.Y.U. and other 
church assemblies. We children were very proud of him. He used 
this talent in building a successful hotel business. Keeping the guests 
welcome and contented in their "home away from home". There was no 
radio or television in the earlyl900,sohe supplieda measure of enter- 
tainment by his own talents and the talent's of his guests as he was able 
to involve them in participation, around a huge fireplace, in the winter 
months, as he served crisp, rosy red apples from our own farm, as 
the family and guests spent a friendly evening together. Often rare 
talent coming to the Y for an engagement found themselves giving an 
impromptu home evening performance in our lobby and enjoying them- 
selves. Father usually acting as master of ceremony but no one of 
his children ever heard him relate an off color joke or story. He felt 
that any one who had to rely on offensive material could not be consid- 
ered a real humorist. 

He was a push-over for a hard luck story and a get rich mining 
scheme and would have had little for later if mother's common sense 
hadn't aided some of his decisions. He loved to make everyone happy 
by his good nature and talents if possible or by a hand out, if that seem- 
ed to be necessary. We all adored him, and I hope didn't take too much 
advantage of his good nature. 

Most of his eighty years were spent dealing with the public in the 
hotel business, his own, and managing others in Salt Lake, after he 
had sold the Roberts Hotel, in Provo, Utah. 

William D. Roberts died on the thirteenth day of October 1947. 

GENEVE ROBERTS DUNN 



131 



THE ROBERTS HOTEL 



Being the oldest of Wm. D. Roberts' children, I do remember 
from about 1900 when I was three years old. I am that little girl with 
the doll buggy in the old photograph taken in front of the Hotel. The 
infant is my brother Paul. My sister was born there later. 

My first recollections are of the long, dim hall, lighted only 
by oil lamps attached to the walls, which seemed to be always in need 
of cleaning the glass chimneys. 

I remember talk of mortgages and plans of improvements and 
soon we enjoyed electricity, then came the telephone , and the remodel- 
ing which was continious during our ownership. A new wing was add- 
ed, the lobby enlarged, the dining room added on, and a top floor added 
on the old part. My father and mother worked long hours. We lived 
on the floor above the lobby so they were available, or on call twenty- 
four hours a day, seven days a week; whenever a cab brought new 
guests from the railroad depot. 

Mother supervised the maid service and the dining room ser- 
vice. Father, the genial host;able to remember and greet almost every 
guest by name ( who was a regular visitor). He was a tireless worker 
in trying to up date and beautify the hotel; adding rose gardens, per- 
gola, a water fountain and these became an ice skating rink, and a 
frozen delight in the winter time. With his wit and congeniality and 
with a good singing voice, his love of people kept them from becom- 
ing bored or lonely. Without Radio or T.V. for entertainment in 
those days,- they were welcome to join others in a friendly group on 
the porches and lawns, in summer or around the fireplace in winter, 
where they were served apples or fruit from our own farm and which 
also provided fresh vegetables, milk, and eggs for the dining room. 

Our meals were famous. The steaks served came from 
Kansas City. Our prices were one thing which kept the hotel full and 
the cafe a drawing card for people from Salt Lake and many surround- 
ing towns. When I was cashier, our weekday lunches were 35<;^; our 
full course Sunday dinners 50^. We had some regular guests who 
lived with us for years and became like part of our own family. The 
hotel kept well filled with others from all over the U.S. 

It was a happy place to live, except for an occasional tradgedy. 
During World War I we had to help nurse soldiers who were taken ill 
with that dreaded "flu" in 1918. Mother's nursing care helped them 
survive until they could be on their way. One young man wasn't so 
fortunate . 

We did occasionally have some well known guests. I well re- 
member when Helen Keller and her teacher- companion, Ann Sullivan 
were there; also Wm. Howard Taft, about the time he was Chief Just- 
ice. I well remember when the tile floor was laid on the lobby with 
Jack Dempsey as one of thos workers. 

Being the leading hotel south of Salt Lake, at that time, we 



132 



ROBERTS HOTEL 



1 33 



did have many leaders who came to Provo to entertain or instruct at 
church or school assignments at B.Y.U., and my father either help- 
ed to make them comfortable; fed them well; entertain them; or have 
them entertain us. 



Life then was at a slower, enjoyable pace, but is now filled with 
wonderful memories of that old hotel "THE ROBERTS HOTEL" my 



YOU ARE INVITED TO BE IN ATTENDANCE 
AT HOTEL ROBERTS ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1982 
AT 2:00 P.M. TO WITNESS A PRESENTATION. 

THE UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY WILL BE 
PRESENTING A PLAQUE TO THE HOTEL DESIGNATING 
IT AS A NATIONAL HISTORICAL SITE. 



home . 



GENEVE ROBERTS DUNN 
May 6, 1982 




192 South University Avenue Provo, Utah 84601 



Area Code 801 373-3400 



WE HOPE YOU WILL BE ABLE TO BE PRESENT 
FOR THIS SHORT CEREMONY. 




AmTHawm ]siEc:ffl©iL]LS tat^ilom 



BIOGRAPHY OF 



Arthur nicholls taylor 

Arthur Nicholls Taylor was born in Provo, Utah on November 2, 
1870, the son of George and Eliza Nicholls Taylor, Pioneers of Provo 
who left Birmingham, England on June 4, 1863 and arrived in Salt Lake 
City, October 6, 1863. 

The home of his birth was anything but a mansion, for the house 
had originally been a little adobe sheep pen of one of the old settlers, 
located on First North between Sixth and Seventh West. In fair weath- 
er, the family fared very well, but when it stormed, the roof would 
leak, the wind would blow rain and snow through the windows, for there 
was no glass to keep the storms out. It was necessary for his Mother 
to hang a quilt over the window, and if at night when the quilt was being' 
used on the bed, she had to hang up some of her wearing apparrel in 
order to keep out the storms. It was often necessary for the children 
to sleep under their Mother's bed to keep from getting wet. In clear 
weather, Arthur could lie in bed and look up through the i*;oof and see 
the stars overhead. 

Thus as a boy he shared the vicissitudes and harships of Pion- 
eer life and learned the homely lessons of honest toil and integrity. 
Yet, with this poverty and trials, he recalled his childhood days as 
the happiest days of his life. He was of a very quiet and retiring 
nature, never one to show off up in the front of the crowd; but always 
assuming more than his share of responsibility, and never resting un- 
til the task at hand was completed. He was very methodical and ord- 
erly in everything he did. First of all, his plans had to be worked with 
thoroughness and detail, in his mind, or on paper; then the plan had to 
be attacked with all the vim, vitality and energy he could muster. 
"Plan Your Work, Then Work Your Plan". This to him would spell 
success . 

In his early youth, it was his responsibility to take the cows out 
along the foothills where they could graze. They did not own a pasture, 
so it was up to someone to herd the cattle wherever grass could be 
found. 

In order to obtain money to buy ready made clothes, shoes, and 
spending money; it was necessary to do any odd job that came along. 
Many days were spent in the fields gathering ground cherries and 
gleaning wheat, to be converted into cash. Sometimes the boys would 
help the old basket weaver peel the bark off the willows which were 
used in making baskets. This was a tedious and tiring job, for the 
bark had to be peeled off with their teeth. 

At the age of ten years he received employments from Samuel 
Liddiard, the early pioneer contractor and builder; carrying drinking 
water to his workmen. For the next seven years he continued in his 
employ, driving teams and doing odd jobs. 



135 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



His ambition and initiative, characteristic of his early life and 
carried on throughout his life, is portrayed in the following incident: 

Samuel Liddiard had the contract for building one of the school 
houses in Lehi, and the Provo Brick Yard was supplying the brick. 
This necessitated hauling the brick from Provo to Lehi, a distance of 
eighteen miles. The regular brickyard teamsters were making one 
trip every other day. 

At this time, Arthur was driving a very light team, composed of 
an old race horse and a family driving horse. On his first trip to Lehi, 
he fo\ind the loose sand on the Lindon Hill was almost too much for his 
light team, so he borrowed a saddle horse from his brother Ashted 
and hooked it up as the third member of his span. In appearance, it 
was anything but a well matched and suitable team of horses for the 
heavy work of hauling brick. But it had its advantages over the fine, 
extra heavy draft horses of the other teamsters. 

Each evening, Arthur would get one of his brothers to help him 
load 1500 brick onto his wagon, before it became dark; then he would 
drive the wagon home where he would unhook, feed and take care of 
his horses and get prepared to leave for Lehi at daybreak the next 
morning. 

Soon after daybreak, he would be on his way. After unloading at 
Lehi, he would then trot his horses a good portion of the way back to 
Provo, arriving at the brickyard in time to load his wagon with 15 00 
brick before it became dark. This routine was followed each day. They 
were long and tiring days, but he was able to make a trip every day, 
and being paid by the load he was able to make just twice the money the 
other teamsters made, who made only one trip every other day. 

It was while working for Samuel Liddiard that he initiated the 
movement to buy, trade and barter for the necessary materials and 
labor to build his Mother a new, larger and more convenient house. 
This house was built next door West of the old house and just East of 
their good neighbor, the Collins. With the help of his brothers, a 
comfortable five room house was completed and furnished for their 
Mother. 

From the time he began working and receiving wages, and as 
long as at home, he voluntarily followed the old English custom of 
turning over his wages each week to his Mother. All he kept for him- 
self was enough for his clothes and sufficient pin money to occassion- 
ally go to a dance. 

He was very fond of dancing, and became one of the best waltzers 
in the community. While on a picnic at the Old Provo Resort, on the 
shore of Utah Lake, he was persuaded to enter one of the dance contests. 
He was not only judged winner of the prize waltz, but gave a demon- 
stration of balance and smoothness by waltzing around the floor with a 
glass of water on top of his head. 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



137 



In 1887 he left the employ of Samuel Liddiard and went to work 
with his Father in Provo's first furniture store. The George Taylor 
Furniture Co. was established a year earlier, in 1866. 

In 1889 he was overcome with a severe illness which he was un- 
able to get rid of that summer and winter. In the spring of 1890, not 
having fully recovered, he went with his Mother on a trip to Europe, 
It was hoped the change would put him back in good health. During the 
next four months they visited Eastern United States, England and 
France, namely the following large cities: Denver, Kansas City, 
Chicago, Buffalo, Niagara Falls, New York, Glasgow, Scotland; Liver- 
pool, Birmingham, London, England; and Paris, France. A most de- 
lightful four months was spent and he returned home in the best of 
health, as had been promised in the blessing given by Pres. David John, 
before he had left on the trip. 

Before going on the trip to Europe with his Mother, he became 
an apprentice to Soren Nielsen, as a watchmaker. At this time, the 
East section of Taylor Bros, store was rented by Mr. Nielsen for his 
watch repair shop and jewelry store. 

In the winter of 1891 he entered the Brigham Young Academy and 
graduated from the Commercial School in 1893. He was the only mem- 
ber of his Father's children to graduate from College. 

While still in school, his brothers purchased the Furniture Bus- 
iness from his Father. He bought some stock in the Business and 
worked in the Store during the summer of 1892. 

Martin & Dirde, operators of one of the local livery stables, 
were also mining and contracting men, who had gone to Montana on a 
contracting job. They employed James F. Mc Clellan in the livery 
stable, so when they needed additional help in Montana they sent for 
J, F, Mc Clellan and his wife, Hattie Taylor Mc Clellan. 

Early in the spring of 1893, after the school term, business in 
the newly re-organized Taylor Brothers Company was very poor, not 
sufficient to support all employees, so Arthur took the job obtained 
for him by his brother-in-law, J. F. Mc Clellan, in the quartz stamp 
mill at Martina, Montana. 

All the money he earned, above actual living expenses, was sent 
home each pay day. It has been said, from good authority, that if it 
had not been for that money coming into the new business that summer, 
it could never have survived financially. It was not very much, but 
sufficient to keep the store going. In the fall of 1893 he returned to 
his home in Provo, Utah. 

On May 9, 18 94, he took Maria Louise Dixon, the only daughter 
of Henry Aldous Dixon and Sarah DeGrey Dixon, to the Salt Lake Temple 
where they were married by President John R. Winder. 

Their first home was located on First North between Second and 
Third West, directly North of the rear of Taylor Brothers Store. 



138 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



A short time later they moved into the old Dixon home on the corner 
of Third West and Second North, where their first child, Arthur Dixon 
was born October 4, 1895, 

Shortly after his marriage, Arthur was called to be President of 
the Yo M.M.I. A. of the Provo Third Ward, a position he held for seven 
years, up until he was called to go on a mission to Great Britain. 

Soon after he was appointed President of the Y. M. M. I. A. , he. 
realized the boys of the Ward were not coming out to their meetings, 
but were spending their time at other places of amusement. 

To encourage the boys to come out to Mutual, a complete set of 
gymnastic equipment was located in a used store in Salt Lake City. 
Arthur and William P. Silver, took the Taylor Bros, Co. mules and 
wagon and drove to Salt Lake where they purchased this equipment for 
$300. It was brought to Provo and temporarily stored in the basement 
of the Third Ward Church House. 

The upstairs of the Horton Building, located just West of the H. 
G. Blumenthal building, on West Center Street and Fifth West, was 
rented. The upstairs partitions were removed making one large gym- 
nasium room. It was here the "Mutual League" held their first meet- 
ings. Enthusiasm for Mutual Work was increased, as well as skill and 
proficiency as gymnasts. 

Later, many of these young men pooled their resources together 
and formed the Young Men's Investment Co. for the purpose of buying 
this Horton Building, as well as the vacant property on the corner. 
The organization was set up with Arthur N, Taylor as President and 
William P„ Clayton as assistant. Stock certificates were issued to the 
members , 

During 1896 a two room house was built on the south half of 
Grandma Dixon's lot, on Fifth West between Second and Third North 
Streets. It was in this two room home that their second son, Lynn 
Dixon, was born on May 6, 1898, 

Later as the family increased, more rooms were addedto accom- 
odate the growing family. In order to construct and furnish this first 
addition to the house, it was necessary to borrow a little money. This 
loan had been made with one of the local brethren, at an interest rate 
of 12% per annum. When it became known that Arthur was going on a 
mission, the lender of this money became quite concerned and desired 
the loan be paid up in full, at once, 

Arthur then turned to Uncle Jesse Knight and explained his fin- 
ancial situation, and also his desire to fulfill a mission. Uncle Jesse 
Knight then told him that he was paying a higher rate of interest than 
he should, and he would be pleased to make him the loan at 6% interest 
and furthermore, he would not have to pay anything until after his re- 
turn from the mission field. This one act of kindness, when it meant 
so much in the life of Arthur, has endeared the Knight Family close to 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



139 



his heart, and was never forgotten. 

On June 22, 1900, their third son Elton LeRoy was born. 

On October 20, 1900, Arthur departed for the British Mission 
Field. In order for him to go into the mission field, it was necessary 
that his wife and three children rent their newly enlarged home and 
move in with Grandma Dixon and her family, next door. Arthur's 
Mother asked for the privilege and the blessings for supporting him in 
the mission field. He was later appointed Pre s ident of the Birmingham 
Conference, the City where Grandma Eliza Taylor and her husband 
had accepted the Gospel. 

Toward the close of his mission, his wife came to England to 
meet him and to travel back home with him after his release. For 
seven months they were both doing missionary work in the British 
Mission, returning home in February 1903. 

Their fourth son, Henry Dixon, was born at Provo, Utah on 
November 22, 1903. 

Upon his return from the mission field, Arthur was called into 
the Utah Stake Sunday School Superintendency to labor with L. E. 
Eggertsen and W. S. Rawlings, He was later sustained as Superinten- 
dent, serving in this capacity for a number of years. He was set apart 
as a member of the Utah Stake High Council on August 31, 1906 and 
served continiously in this position for the next twenty-five years. 

For a good many years, a group of the young folks from Provo 
had spent many happy times hunting, fishing, riding and vacationing in 
the South Fork of Provo Canyon, Some had even contemplated build- 
ing themselves permanent summer cabins in the South Fork area. 

There had been only three or four homesteads taken up in this 
area, and a group of these young men could seethe great pos sibility of 
buying up two of these home steads , one from Oscar Mann and the other 
from thus opening up a large area for the grazing of cattle. 

The water rights were on the homesteader's land, and a vast area of 
Government grazing land adjoined. 

In the latter part of 1903, John, LeRoy, Ernest, Charles Dixon 
and Arthur N. , Thomas N, , and Ashted Taylor and others organized 
the South Fork Cattle Co. A beautiful young herd of balle-faced cattle 
was purchased and Charles O. Dixon was appointed as Manager of the 
Company. 

To supplement this summer range in the South Fork, eighty acres 
of land was purchased West of Spanish Fork, where enough hay could 
be raised in the summer to feed the cattle through the long, hard winters. 

W. W. Ercanbrack and Thomas Lewis offered the Company a very 
good proposition for the purchase of their holdings , which was accepted 
by the Company, thus ending the existence of the South Fork Cattle Co. 

In the year 1907, the Riverside Hog and Chicken Farm had its 
beginning when Arthur and Ashted bought 35 acres of land from Ray- 



140 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



mond and E. D. Partridge, and two acres from a Mr. Robinson; loc- 
ated on the North bank of the Provo River, about half way between the 
railroad bridge and the main wagon bridge at the top of Fifth West. 
This land was all river bottomland and some was covered with a heavy- 
growth of trees and tall grass. Other parts were nothing more than 
rock piles, 

Thefirstyear on this farm they planted several acres of potatoes, 
some beans, and 10,000 cabbage plants. They also commenced to 
fence the property as, well as to dig ditches and throw up dikes on the 
river bank. 

Each evening after working at the Store, Arthur, Ashted and 
their boys would go over to the farm and work until dark. On Satur- 
days, the boys always had a job on the farm, waiting for them. 

A farm is never complete without a house and someone to look 
after it, for both Ashted and Arthur were working full time at their 
jobs at Taylor Bros. Store. It was decided that if they could get a 
house built on the property, Lizzie and Peter Strebel, elderly parents 
of Ashted's wife, could move in and take care of the farm. Peter, an 
inexperienced carpenter and rock mason, volunteered to put in the 
foundation. The finished foundation was substantially built, but not 
true to being square. After Ernest Dixon laid up the brick, some cor- 
ners hung over the edge of the foundation, others the foundation pro- 
jected beyond the brick. The house was finally finished and Peter and 
Lizzie Strebel moved into the new, one room house on the farm. 

Before the house was completed, Charles Westrope, a former 
resident of the mid-west, was raising pigs very successfully and mak- 
ing big money, on a farm south of Provo, So naturally there was only 
one thing for Arthur to do - - go into the pig business. 

Arthur interested Ashted in the great pos sibilitie s of this project, 
but Ashted favored starting on a small scale and increasing the brood 
each year. This would provide them with the necessary experience to 
qualify them as hog raisers, for neither of them knew anything about 
raising pigs, except what they had read in books, and that was not very 
much. 

Arthur's philosophy of going into this venture in a big way, which 
would provide volume as well as keep down operating expenses, finally 
won out. Twenty sow weaners were purchased from Charles Westrope 
at that time. A little later they purchased a Poland China boar hog at 
Omaha and had it shipped in with the hog purchased by Charles West- 
rope. The $30 paid for this ten week old hog, seemed a lot of money 
to Ashted, but Arthur thought it was alright, for in the long run it was 
money well invested. The better the stock one had to sell, the higher 
the price you sold the offspring. 

Up until this time, the pigs had been kept in the rear of the old 
Taylor home on First North. They were now getting to the stage where 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



141 



they needed more room and more attention; especially in the spring 
when they would start farrowing„ It was then decided that Ashted would 
quit his job at the Store and move out on the farm and take care of the 
farming and raising of the pigs. Up to this time, the heavy work had 
all been done by hired help. 

On Washington's Birthday of that winter, Arthur and a group of 
the employees from the Store, spent the day on the farm, helping to 
build the farrowing pens. Sixteen pens were completed that day, after 
which they all enjoyed a big feed in the new farm house. The lumber 
for these pens had been obtained from the old popular trees in the rear 
of Taylor Bros, store building. They had been cut down and hauled 
over to the saw mill, located on the corner of Second West and Second 
North, where they were sawed into boards. 

Soon the farrowing season commenced. Luckily only a few of the 
sows at a time. Ashted didn't know how to take care of them so Doc. 
Loveless came over to help, but was of no practical assistance, ex- 
cept to pronounce one sow dead that he had ween working with. Finally 
by following the instructions of Mrs. Mitchell, an authority in the 
neighborhood on hogs, Ashted finished the farrowing season with a de- 
cided increase in the hog population of the farm, as well as a skill in 
hog raising that you cannot get from a book. 

As the new hog population became weaners, the prospects of get- 
ting into the profits column rapidly disappearedo The going market 
price for weaners was only $5. 00 each, insufficient to bring much of a 
profit. Arthur then decided to feed the pigs and fatten them up and sell 
them over the block. 

Hog feed was purchased and slops gathered from the residents in 
town, to feed the pigs. For several weeks they were doing fine. They 
were growing and putting on some weight. Then one morning when 
they were called to come get their feed, no hogs appeared. So after 
breakfast, Ashted went out to see what was wrong with them. He found 
nineteen of them dead. 

From this sad experience it was concluded they were not hog 
raisers, and until they learned more about them they had better raise 
just a few on an experimental basis. 

As Arthur looked over this Riverside property, with two small 
spring creeks converging and forming one large creek; he realized the 
great possibility of an ideal trout farm. He could visualize a shallow 
rearing pond in the West creek, for the pin heads; and with larger and 
deeper ponds further down the creek for the larger fish. 

This dream soon materialized with the appearance of Scott Stewart 
on the property with his surveying instruments. Arthur had employed 
him to make a survey- and determine the number of rearing ponds that 
could be constructed, as well as know exactly the fall of the ground, 
which would be a factor in providing the depth of the end pond for the 
big, marketable trout. 



142 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



The completed survey assured the owners of five or six ideal 
trout rearing ponds. The location for the dams and the elevations were 
determined. The cement dams, with their proper screens were con- 
structed under the direction of Ernest Dixon. The ponds were banked 
and cleaned and water turned in ready for the fish. 

Upon inve stigation, the newly hatched pinheads could be purchased 
50^ cheaper per thousand by buying them in one hundred thousand lots. 

On April 21, 1909, Ashted went to the Mountain Trout Co, at 
midvale, Utah, where he purchased 100,000 pinhead trout for $280.00. 
Thirty thousand of these were sold to Hy Smith. The seventy thousand 
balance were placed in the newly constructed ponds at Riverside, 

For a while everything was going along smoothly, the pinheads 
were ravenously eating the ground beef hearts and corn meal, which 
was their chief diet. But as the snow began to melt up in the tops of 
the mountains, the river and the creeks began to rise and fill to capa- 
city. Some neighbors, like Gaffer Stagg, became excited over the 
possibility of the river flooding over again, so they dug channels from 
the various creeks to the river, as well as level the dikes and break- 
wataersthat had been constructed along the river banks. The two creeks 
on the Riverside Farm, became filled to overflowing, and ran over the 
pond banks and dams. Most of the fish were washed out into the river, 
never more to be seen by the owners. 

It was on February 11, 1908 that a large incubator for the hatch- 
ing of baby chicks was purchased from A. J, Southwick, and set up in 
operation. During the incubation period of twenty-one days, the temp- 
erature in the incubator had to be maintained and each day the eggs, on 
long sliding trays, had to be pulled out and the eggs turned over. After 
the little, fluffy chicks were taken from the incubator they were trans- 
ferred to brooders for a few weeks until they were acclimated and had 
grown sufficient to be transferred to the regular coops. 

One large coop had been constructed on the Riverside Farm 
where Peter Strebel was caring for the growing chicks. By the fore- 
part of April he was gathering a few eggs and selling them. 

Later Arthur built a chicken soop at the rear of his house on 5th 
West, where it was close for the family to help take care of the chick- 
ens. Later when the family moved out on the Hillcrest Farm, chicks 
from the big incubator, in the East room of the basement in the house 
on 5th West, were transferred to the small fireless brooders on the 
farm. As the chicks grew in size and appetite they were put in the 
coops provided for the chickens. 

To Ashted Taylor , there was no one on earth who measured up to 
his brother Arthur N, Taylor. He has, mentioned many times thaf'Arth" 
or "Boss", as he called him, was the only Dad he really knew. As a 
lad if he ever needed a dime or a quarter, it was his brother Arthur 
he approached, and was neve r turned down if the request was justifiable. 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



143 



The answer was always, "Are you sure that is enough, for you can 
have more if you need it". 

Before George, Walter or Ashted ever made any kind of a major 
deci sion, they always talked it over with their brother Arthur. They 
did not always take his advice, and when they didn't they were most 
generally sorry they hadn't. His foresight and judgement was very 
keen and far reaching. His solutions were simple, direct and clean 
cut. 

On the 18th day of November 1906, there was a great day of re- 
joicing in the Arthur N. Taylor household. The fifth child born to 
Maria and Arthur, was their first girl, receiving the name Alice 
Louise. Now the four boys could look forward to the time when they 
would have a sister to do the dishes and other household duties, which 
so often had become their duty. 

To keep his growing family of boys busy with some worthwhile 
project and off the street, a few cows and horses to take care of, was 
a permanent fixture in the Taylor domain. 

Each morning before daybreak, the boys would be awakened by 
their father with the salutation, "Arise and Shine". Even on the cold- 
est of winter mornings they would roll out of their warm bed, pull on 
their cold clothes and go out into the freezing weather to chop up the 
frozen carrotts, which was mixed with hay for cow feed. After the 
cows were milked, one of them had to take the cows to the pasture, 
while the others would separate the milk and cream, and do other 
chores. This all had to be taken care of and completed before going 
to school. 

In the afternoon, directly after school, instead of going out and 
playing with the other school kids, it was necessary to report home 
and prepare for the evening chores, including getting the cows from 
the pasture; feeding, milking, taking care of the horses, the chickens 
and pigs; or getting in the coal and chopping the kindling wood. 

At first the six or eight cows were kept in the big, red, brick 
barn, in the rear of the home on 5th West. The cows were driven 
each day to the pasture at Riverside Farm. As the dairy grew, it was 
necessary to find larger quarters, so the cows were moved out to the 
fruit farm at "Hillcrest". This farm was located about a mile North 
and a mile West of Provo, on the brow of the hill overlooking Utah 
Lake. Here a large silo was built for the purpose of storing chopped 
corn or sileage fodder. Additional Holstein and Jersey cows were 
added to the herd, making a total of from fifteen to twenty cows being 
milked each day. 

At first the whole milk was separated and the cream churned 
into butter, by Arthur's wife. A large 30 gallon barrel churn, to- 
gether with a butter working machine was purchased. This was a 
great help in handling and working with such a large quantity of cream. 



144 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



All of the butter was sold locally to steady customers, who declared it 
was the best butter that could be obtained in Provo. Eventually the 
butter business became so large, it was impossible for Maria D. to 
take care of her growing family as well as this butter business, so the 
cream was sold in bulk to various wholesalers in Provo and Salt Lake 
City. 

Soon after Arthur returned from the Mission Field, one night 
each week was set aside for a "Home Evening".. This particular even- 
ing was not reserved exclusively for members of the immediate fam- 
ily, but was open to any of the neighbors or friends, especially those 
English converts, who were living near by. 

Usually apart of the evening was spent in studying some religious 
subject, after which the remainder of the evening was spent in conver- 
sation, entertainment by the various members, or in playing games. 
There was always fresh, crisp apples, and usually roasted peanuts and 
raisins for refreshments. On special occassions, there were dough- 
nuts and cider, or some other delicious refreshment. 

This hospitality and bond of friendship has been of lasting dura- 
tion and a highlight in the lives of all who participated. 

Just a few of the many who participated in these"Home Evenings" 
were: A. E. Eves and family, Arthur Salt and wife, Elsie Ross, Lily 
Owens, Lizzie Clarkson, Janet Poole, Mary Russell, Ann Russell and 
many others. 

Arthur N. Taylor's interest in civic problems and the educational 
welfare of the youth of the community was shown by the service he con- 
tributed while a member of the Provo City Schools, 

On December 2, 1908, Arthur N, Taylor was elected, by the tax- 
payers of his district, to become a member of the Board of Education 
of the Provo City Schools. He served as a Board Member for the next 
fifteen years, at which time the new Central School and the new High 
School buildings were erected, and many other improvements and in- 
ovations made. During this time he served as President of the Board 
for three different periods of time. 

Fellow Board Members, serving with him were such men as: 
A. O, Smoot, J. W. Farrer, Lester Mangum, Ole Olsen, Evan Wride, 
J. W. McAdam, R. Eugene Jones, 

School Superintendents working with the Board of Education were: 
L. E. Eggertsen and H, Aldous Dixon. 

The pressure and lack of time brought about by organization of 
the new Home Furnishings Store, Dixon Taylor Russell Co. , required 
that he resign from the School Board on July 10, 1923, at which time 
Mrs. Margaret P. Maw, whom he had defeated in the last election, 
was appointed to fill his unexpired term. 

A. O. Smoot, a very close friend, stated that Arthur N. Taylor 
was a man of integrity. His three most outstanding characteristics in 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



145 



his life were his faith, his stability and his ability. 

May 11, 1909, their sixth child, a boy was born and named 
Clarence Dixon Taylor. 

In the year , Arthur N. Taylor, T. N. Taylor, John F. 

Bennett, John D. Dixon and William R. Wallace organized the Taylor 
Investment Company, a corporation for the purpose of acquiring and 
managing real estate. 

On the east and adjoining the new Farmers & Merchants Bank 
building, this corporation constructed a two story brick building. The 
upstairs was converted into offices and the downstairs was rented to 
J, Co Penney Company. 

When the Provo Building & Loan Society was first organized, 
Arthur subscribed to a good block of stock, some of it was put in his 
children's name, with the idea in mind that when it matured it could 
be used to finance them in the mis sion field. It was understood and ex- 
pected that each boy would go on a mission and they all anticipated this 
opportunity to represent their Church as an Embassador of Truth. 

In 1913, just a few hours after his own birthdate, his wife pre- 
sented him with another son, whom they named Orson Kenneth Taylor, 
born November 3, 1913. 

The eighth and last child, Ruth Elaine Taylor, was born March 
20, 1917, at 256 North Fifth West, Provo, Utah. 

From 1887, when he quit the employ of Samuel Liddiard, and 
started working with his father in the George Taylor Furniture Store, 
he had worked off and on, after school and on Saturdays and sometimes 
during the summer vacations, until the fall of 1893, when he started 
working full time for Taylor Brothers Company. He remained with 
Taylor Brothers Company until the latter part of 1920 when he sold 
his interest in the Company. His health had not been the best and he 
wanted to get out in the open air. For many years he had held the 
position of vice-president and assistant manager. It has often been 
stated by some of his friends, that the Company was run from the little 
office in the rear, behind the elevator shaft. Especially during the 
time when the manager was campaigning for the Governorship of the 
State, or to become Mayor of Provo City, or on a trip to Europe, or 
in his Church work; the responsibility and work of managing the com- 
pany was skillfully shouldered by Arthur, without fan fare or publicity. 

So it was to be expected that after the dike on Utah Lake washed 
out, and the farmlands flooded; that he turned back to the work that he 
knew best and was best qualified - - that of the Furniture Business. 

Upon the advice and backing of his Father, he and the following 
associates organized a new business: Albert F. Dixon, Sidney W. 
Russell, J. William Howe , Jr. , Orson Bird, William D. Norman, and 
Hans 0„ G„ Miller, The name of Dixon Taylor Russell Company was 
chosen, which represented the names of the vice-president, president 



146 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



and secretary and treasurer, respectively. George Taylor's advice 
of organizing a new business and erecting a new building was followed, 
rather than buying out an already established and going business. 

Arthur traded his Taylor Investment Company stock and other 
consideration to his brother T. N. Taylor, for the vacant corner lot, 
which was across the road south from the bank building. During the 
summer of 1921, a brick building 100 feet by 68-| feet was erected. 
Joseph Nelson, the architect, designed this brick building with two 
floors and two balconies , which was really a credit to Arthur N, Taylor , 
its owner. 

On October 6, 1921, the newly organized Dixon Taylor Russell 
Company opened its doors to the general public. During the summer, 
Arthur and the other buyers of the Company, had made their purchases 
on the Eastern Market and when the doors were opened to the public, 
the attractive new building was stocked with all new and the latest and 
most up-to-date home furnishings. 

The policy of marking each piece of merchandise with its selling 
price, which was the cash price and the lowest price, was well receiv- 
ed by the public. 

This one price policy for merchandise was something new for 
this area and displayed the integrity and honesty of the Company in its 
desire to treat all customers the same, be he rich or be he poor. 

During the next eight years, branch stores were established at 
Springville, Payson, Pleasant Grove , Spanish Fork, Nephi, American 
Fork, Price, Heber and Helper. During the depression of 1930-33 the 
stores at Nephi, Heber and Helper were closed. 

The worries and responsibility of keeping the business open, 
what with the banks folding up and closing their doors, and other fin- 
ancial organizations demanding payments due them; customers being 
unable to pay their bills, practically no sales being made, and the 
prospects of the business being shut down, with all the employees 
having no work and no means of supporting their families; was just too 
much for one man's shoulders to carry. His health began to fail and 
he was never able to completely regain it. He with the loyal support 
of his associates were able to pull the Company through the financial 
crisis of this period and the business continued to grow and prosper. 

One of his guiding philosophies of life and which exalted him 
in the eyes of his associates and friends - - "I would rather suffer a 
wrong than do a wrong", can be traced throughout the pattern of his 
life. 

From the time they became brothe r- in- laws , Arthur N. Taylor 
and Jabez W. Dangerfield took a keen interest in the investment field. 
Neither had much ready cash, for Jabez was building a job printing 
business and Arthur was building up a furniture business. Occassion- 
ally when they could scrape a little cash together, ( and without letting 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



147 



their wives know), they would study the mining stock market and invest 
their little cash in some of the stocks. Sometimes they hit it lucky, 
as was in the case of Tintic Standard, but other times they took their 
losses. From this experience, crystalized the philosophy with Arthur 
N. , that a little profit was better than none at all„ So in his later tran- 
sactions he was willing to sell out with a reasonable profit and let some 
other person stand to make a little profit or sustain the loss. There 
were many of his friends, at this time, were holding their stocks un- 
til they hit the highest peak, before s-elling, which usually resulted in 
waiting too long before selling; the peak had been reached and the 
bottom of prices had dropped out. 

The Wildwood cabin was built from the earnings of Iron Bios som 
mining stocks. 

As Dixon Taylor Russell Co. kept growing and needed additional 
storage space, the partnership of Dangerfield and Taylor came into 
existence. The 55j feet of ground lying west of the Consolidated Wagon 
& Machine Co, and east of the new building occupied by the D, T, R, Co. , 
was purchased or traded with Farmers & Merchants Bank stock, from 
John D, Dixon. 

A full basement and the street floor was erected on this property. 
The basement was used for warehousing stock of D. T. R. Co. The 
ground floor was divided into three separate store sections and rented 
to small business, such as: White Sewing Machine Co.; Mrs. Jones, 
the milliner; a barber shop and pool hall; real estate office; appliance 
store; optometrist office and others. 

The D. T. T. Co. kept expanding and one by one, took over the 
two and one-half street level divisions of this new building. 

Prior to the building of this new structure, the partners had 
tried to get E. A. Menlove, a photographer, to trade them his little 
studio, which lay between the Dixon lot and the Arthur N, Taylor 
building to the west. They even offered to build him a new studio ad- 
joining the Consolidated Wagon & Machine building, and trade him 
straight across. He rejected all offers and propositions. Later Mr. 
Menlove became financially hard pressed and Dangerfield & Taylor 
purchased his two story building, which now connected all three build- 
ings. 

Even after the many years as partners, J. W. Dangerfield made 
the remark about his partner, A. N. Taylor: "Arthur N. Taylor was 
the best friend 1 had". The same could be said of J. W. Dangerfield 
by A. N. Taylor. 

Although of different political affiliations, this did not hinder 
their congeniality, nor warp their keen business judgement. They re- 
cognized each others viewpoint and respected and admired each others 
character. 

The fertility of the land along the shores of Utah Lake, coupled 



148 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



with the fact that the irrigation of the growing crops was unnecessary; 
sold Arthur N. on the idea of buying farming land along the north bank, 
near the mouth Provo River, on Utah Lake. The first forty acre 
tract was purchased from George Cook, where sugar beets and wild 
hay was raised. Later twenty acres was purchased from L.L.Bunnell 
and twenty acres from George I. Clark; five acres from Charles Mad- 
sen and the Hamilton sixty acres from J. F. Mc Clellan. 

All of this land was in the Skipper Bay area, and much of the 
ground was covered by the raising of the Lake water in the early spring 
of the year. As a means of putting this flooded ground into useful and 
productive cultivation, the Skipper Bay Drainage District was formed 
with Arthur N. Taylor as its president and chief moving power; for the 
purpose of constructing a dirt dike along the Lake front. This dike 
was to run from the high ground on the north to the high ground on the 
banks of the Provo River, a distance of better than a mile in length. 
This dike was about six feet high and ten to twelve feet wide, on top. 
On the inside was a large drainage canal to catch the seeping water 
and which was pumped back into the Lakeo 

By constructing this dike and various drainage canals acres 
of land could be protected and be permanently cultivated. The dike 
was constructed by W, O. Creer and Company in the winter of 1920, 
Unfortunately the spring of 1921 was one of the wette st springs in many 
years and the river was swollen behond its capacity with flood waters. 

The dike front, facing the Lake and the River, withstood the 
flood waters very well, but the shallow river channel, near the Island 
and wagon ford, overflowed its banks, allowing the river to cut its 
course down through the fields in behind the dike. The dike had not 
been built to fight the waters from the rear, so the majority of the dike 
was swept away overnight. 

When Frank Eastmond bought an interest in the Geneva Resort 
on the shore of Utah Lake, he sold his lease of the Provo City owned 
Grove, near the mouth of Provo River, to J, F. McClellan and A, N. 
Taylor. "Uncle Jim" had been in partnership with Frank, in the capa- 
city of renting the row boats, to fishermen, duck hunters and people 
going bathing in Utah Lake. 

Under this new partnership, Uncle Jim would handle the boats, 
and act as caretaker of the property. The store was to be run by 
Henry, and Elton was to supervise the forty bathhouses that had been 
erected on top of the dike at the intersection of the River and the Lake. 
During the rush hours, Donald Dixon and Clarence were to leave the 
farm work and help where needed. That winter and spring, the ice 
and high water destroyed the dike and bathhouses. Remenants of the 
bathhouses were scattered all over the Skipper Bay District. 

For the next few years, the resort business was practically non- 
existant, save for the renting of row boats to the fishermen. 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



149 



a bridge was placed across the river, near the 
City Grove, and a lunch room and store was erected in the grove of 
trees on the Lake front. At times the mosquitos became so viscious, 
that it was impossible to picnic or enjoy the cool lake breezes, unless 
some protection was afforded. So this lunch room was screened. It 
had a shingle roof and sand floor and tables and benches for the pic- 
nickers. Ashted Taylor and his family moved down to the lake front 
to operate the store and lunch room. Uncle Jim Mc Clellan still hand- 
led the renting of boats, from the City Grove. 

Later the cabins from the City Grove were purchased and moved 
down on the lake front and the boats were rented from the new location. 
About sixty bathhouses were erected on the sandy shore of Utah Lake, 
but were built on skids so they could be shifted away from the flood 
waters of the Lake. 

Still later the lunch room was extended to the South, and a new 
maple dance floor was constructed and a large record playing phono- 
graph was installed to furnish music for dancing and the picnickers, 

A modern refrigeration system for keeping foods and ice cream 
was installed together with soda water coolers, root beer dispenser, 
a modern soda water fountain and display counters. 

Arthur N. financed and supervised the project. Uncle Jim Mc- 
Clellan handled the boats and was caretaker during the off season. 
Henry acted as manager, Alice ran the store and did the cooking and 
washing, Clarence took care of the bathing houses and Kenneth helped 
wherever necessary. AH other members of the family were on hand 
during the holidays and other busy days. 

A large investment had been put into this resort venture, but 
like so many other projects, its only result was the providing jobs for 
the boys and girls, when not in school. 

With missions, graduation from school and going into other bus- 
iness, forced the Resort tobeleased, and it was only a couple of years 
until the Provona Beach Resort passed out of existence and was dis- 
mantled and the land sold. 

Whenever a holiday came along, to Arthur N. that was a full 
days time to be spent working on one of his special projects. To his 
boys this was not a holiday, but a special work day; for they were al- 
ways invited and were expected to be present and participate. On One 
Washington's Birthday, it was the building of hog pens at the River- 
side Farm, On the 4th of July and the 24th of July, it meant being 
present at Provona Beach, to provide extra help in accomodating the 
bathers, the picnickers, the dancers or sightseers. On one Labor 
Day it was the pulling and burning weeds and especially cockle burrs 
along the Beach, on the lake front, or the grubbing of willows along the 
river bank. On Labor Day, during the fruit season, there were peach- 
es, pears, apples and other fruit to pick and pack and ship. 



150 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



On Christmas and New Year's Day, after all the chores were 
finished, the day belonged to the boys. Usually the Father would ar- 
range to take his own boys, together with their boy friends, down to the 
Lake to ice skate. He was a very good ice skater and enjoyed this re - 
creation in the open air very much. 

Early in the spring of 1930, one hundred ten head of sheep were 
purchased at $11 per head and placed on the Lake farm. Here there 
was plenty of vegetation for their grazing in the summer and in the fall 
there were sugar beet tops and the alfalfa fields to winter on. A new 
sheep shed was built on the bend of the river, together with lambing 
pens . 

The majority of this Lake farm had been fenced with a net wire 
fence, making it an ideal set up for the running of sheep. That sum- 
mer a "buck" pasture was built on the lake front, just north of the two 
summer cottages, and three rams were purchased from a Mr, Hansen 
of Lake Shore, Utah, for $40 each. 

The damp, rockless soil caused a hoof rot to develop in the sheep, 
necessitating the taking them to higher range land during the summer 
of 1931. When they were brought back that fall, the herd was divided 
with the Ewell boys and A. N, Taylor's herd was sold. 

For his eight children, Arthur N, Taylor never did intend to 
leave them a fabulous fortune of monetary wealth, but he did leave 
them a respected NAME, and exemplary life, and a philosophy which 
was an underlying power in his life's work: 

1. To teach and direct his children how to work. 

2. To send and support ( the boys ) in the mission field, 

3. To provide them with a good education. 

With these tools and experiences he felt they should be capable 
of supporting themselves and family; to be of value in rendering ser- 
vice to their community; and to be in a position to push forward the 
work of the Lord; and be an exemplary churchman. 

How well he carried out his philosophy can best be judged by a 
few of the many things he did for his children: 

1. During his whole lifetime he not only made jobs available, 
but actually paid out money to provide and maintain projects which 
would provide his children with work. Not only was the work provided, 
but he led out in showing them how to work with his own hands and mind. 
His motto was, "Come, let us work", and not, "You go work". 

2. He set the missionary example by spending twenty-eight 
months in the British Mission Field. His wife, Maria D. Taylor, 
spent seven months in the same Mission Field, 

a. Arthur D, , the eldest son, spent four years in the 

Australian Mission. 

b. Lynn D, Taylor. , spent twenty- six months in the 

Northwestern States Mission. . 

c. Elton L, , spent twenty-eight months in the Eastern 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



151 



States Mission. 

d. Henry D. , spent twenty- six months in the Eastern 

States Mission. 

Both Elton and Henry were in the mission field 
for eight months at the same time, 

e. Clarence D, , spent twenty-eight months in the 

South African Mission and four months in trav- 
eling home . 

f. O, Kenneth, served twenty-five months in the 

British Mission Field. 
3. All eight children graduated from High School. 

Arthur D,, entered into business after his return from 

the mission field. 
Lynn D, , graduated from the B. Y. U, with an A. B. 

degree and also attended the School of Interior 

Decoration of New York, 
Elton L. , attended the B. Y. U. and the U.SA.C. for 

three years. 

Henry D. , graduated from B, Y. U. with a B,S. de- 
gree. Attended the New York School of Retail- 
ing, receiving his Masters degree in Retailing. 

Alice L. , graduated from B. Y. U, with an A. B, 
degree. 

Clarence D. , graduated from B. Y. U. with a B. S. 
degree. 

O. Kenneth. , graduated from B. Y. U. with an A. B. 

degree and and attended the School of Interior 

Decorating of New York. 
Ruth E. , graduated from B. Y. U. with an A. B, 

degree. 

Judge Maurice Harding has made the statement that of all the 
families he knows, none have turned out as well as the Arthur N. and 
Maria D. Taylor family. 

Other community activities Arthur N, engaged in, besides that 
of being on the Provo Board of Education, included a charter member 
of the Provo Chamber of Commerce, which carried on the work of the 
old Commercial Club, of which he was a member. In 1924 he became 
President of the Provo Chamber of Commerce, and was also a Direct- 
or and Officer for many years. 

Arthur N, Taylor was alert to the fact that new industries were 
necessary for this locality, so in the I920's when feelers were sent 
out regarding the establishing a steel industry in this area, he became 
one of the leading figures in raising the necessary money to buy atract 
of land between Provo and Springville, This land was turned over to 
the Columbia Steel Company to build a steel mill. 



1S2 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



This tract of land between Provo and Springville was a very de- 
sirable location for the erection of a steel industry, for it was at the 
railroad junction point where the iron ore from the extensive iron de- 
posits around Cedar City converge with the unlimited coal deposits 
from Carbon County, in Southeastern Utah. The Columbia Steel Co. 
built one blast furnace here at Ironton, which was the forerunner of 
the giant Geneva Steel Mills which were built at Geneva in 1945. 
Arthur N, acted as a Director of the Provo-Springville Holding Com- 
pany from the date of its organization to the date of his death. 

Although actual construction of the Deer Creek Water Conserva- 
tion project had not commenced during his lifetime, he was a staunch 
advocate of its desirability and a firm backer in obtaining this Govern- 
ment project. He realized the value of water for the development and 
growth of this area, and did all in his power to put it before the proper 
Government officials, who finally approved and built this reclamation 
project. 

One of his last projects was the acquiring of about eleven acres 
of land on the South bench of Rock Canyon. Lynn and Henry had built 
their houses at the mouth of Rock Canyon, on the South bench, where 
a magnificient view of the whole Utah Valley was obtained. 

The property at the base of the hill was being used as a dump- 
ing ground for rubbish and trash and really becoming an eye sore to 
visitors and residents. In order to correct this situation, Arthur N„ 
purchased eleven acres of land from the Receiver of the defunct Provo 
Meat and Packing Co, , which covered the location of their old slaught- 
er house. With the aid of the County, a fence was erected on each side 
of the road, thus blocking off access to the property used for a dump 
ground. The land adjoining to the South, was leased from Provo City, 
and the whole area turned into a horse pasture. It was not many years 
until the vegetation grew tall enough to hide the old rusting tin cans 
and junk, and started to look half way respectable again. 

On days that Arthur did not go for his horseback ride, or after 
his evening horseback ride, he fenced off about an acre of land, on 
top of the hill, where he planted several hundred grape vines. 

As his health began to fail, one of his greatest sources of satis- 
faction was to sit or lie on a cot on the South and West side of Lynn's 
house and look down and admire the beauty and growth and activity of 
this Utah Valley, where he had spent his entire life, fortune and effort 
in making a beauty spot for his posterity and fellowmen to live and to 
work and enjoy. 

His philosophy of Life, "The making of two blades of grass grow 
where only one grew before", is reflected in his life's work and ac- 
complishments. 

He died at his home in Provo, Utah on September lO, 1935. 

Clarence D. Taylor 
February 1955 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR FAMILY 



MARIA DIXON TAYLOR 




Elton, Clarence , Alice , Henry, Kenneth 
Arthur D. , Maria D, , Ruth, Arthur N. , Lynn 



256 No. 5th West, Provo 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



Age 

1870 November 2. Arthur Nicholls Taylor born 

1880 Worked for Samuel Liddiard, Building Contractor 10 

1887 Started working for Father in furniture store 17 

1889 Contracted a severe illness 19 

1890 Spring - Health trip to Europe with his Mother 20 
Taylor Bros. Co. incorporated, bought stock 

1891 Commenced school at B . Y. Academy 21 
November 15. Ordained an Elder 

1892 Summer work in Taylor Bros. Co, 22 
December 16. Ordained a Seventy 

1893 Graduated from B. Y.A. Commerce Dept. 23 
Depression 

Worked in ore mill, Martina, Montana 

1894 May 9. Married Maria Louise Dixon 24 

1895 October 4. Arthur Dixon Taylor born 25 
President of Provo Third Ward YMMIA 

Obtained gymnastic equipment for gym 
President of Young Men's Investment Co. 

1896 Built 2 room house - 256 No. 5th West 26 
1898 May 6. Lynn Dixon Taylor born 28 

1900 June 22. Elton LeRoy Taylor born 30 
Left for British Mission. October 20th 

November 9. Arrived at Liverpool, England 
Appointed to labor in Birmingham District 

1901 April 14. Aunt Mary Taylor Hickman, only sister 31 

of his father, died at Birmingham, England 
October 31. Appointed Conference President of 
Birmingham District 

1902 Aug 21. His wife, Maria arrived in Liverpool at 2:15 p.m. 

1903 Feb. 19. Released from Mission, sailed from 33 

Liverpool for Boston Mass. 
November 22. Fourth son, Henry Dixon Taylor born 
Appointed counsellor in Utah Stake Sunday School Pres. 
Later sustained as Supt. of Utah Stake Sunday School 

1906 June. Charter member of Wildwood Resort 36 
August 31. Ordained a High Priest by L. Holbrook 

1907 October 24. Set apart as member of Utah Stake High Council 

by David John. Served for next 25 years. 
November 18. Alice Louise Taylor born 37 
Wildwood lot #1 assigned by drawing from a hat 
1907-1908 With brother Ashted started the Riverside Hog farm 
and chicken ranch 

1908 December 2. Elected to Provo Board of Education 

Served for next fifteen years 



154 



ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 



Riverside Fish Farm planted with 100,000 pin head trout 
Milk and butter business operating from 256 N. 5th West 
Fruit farm and dairy at Hillcrest, Provo Bench 
May 11. Fifth son, Clarence D. Taylor born 
November 3. Sixth son, Orson Kenneth Taylor born 
March 20. Eighth child and second daughter, Ruth 

Elaine Taylor born 
Rented George Madsen Lake farm 
Purchased Geo, Cook 40 acre Lake farm 
Sold stock in Taylor Bros. Co. to brother Tom. 
As President of Skipper Bay Drainage District, built a 

dike on shore of Utah Lake 
Dike washed out 

Built a 4 story building for use by DTR Co. Home Furnishirg 

"The One Price House" 
November 1 Organizer of Dixon Taylor Russell Co. 
Dangerfield & Taylor - partnership with J. W. Dangerfield 
1924 President of Provo Chamber of Commerce 
February 1. Opened first Dixon Taylor Russell branch 

store at Springville 
May 24. Second DTR branch store opened at Nephi 
August 15. Third DTR branch store opened at Payson 
February 23. Fourth DTR branch store opened at 

Pleasant Grove 
March 17. Fifth DTR Branch store opened at Spanish Fork 
Provonna Beach Lunch room built at mouth of Provo 

River and Utah Lake 
March 15. Sixth DTR branch store opened at Heber 
September 10. Seventh DTR branch store opened at 

American Fork 
July 3. Eighth DTR branch store opened in Price 
June 14. Ninth DTR branch store opened in Helper 

The tenth DTR branch store was opened in Orem 
Depression years 

December 12. Due to poor health, left for Mesa, Arizona 

to spend the winter and recuperate 
In early April returned to Provo 

September 10. Died at his home, 256 North Fifth West, 
Provo, Utah 



155 



A MOTHERS DAY TRIBUTE 



On the front page of section two of the Provo Sunday Herald 
of May 11, 1941, appeared a large picture of MARIA LOUISE DIXON 
TAYLOR with the following tribute: 

"Typical of the mothers who are being honored to day is Mrs. 
MARIA DIXON TAYLOR, mother of eight sons and daughters, who 
has found time along with her many home duties to busy herself with 
church activities and interesting worthwhile hobbies. 

Always actively engaged in various church and auxilliary assign- 
ments, Mrs. Taylor has of late years devoted herself to genealogical 
work, writing family records and arranging pictorial albums. 

Her seven living sons and daughters include ARTHUR D. , LYNN, 
HENRY D. , and CLARENCE TAYLOR, and Miss RUTH TAYLOR of 
Provo; ELTON L. TAYLOR of Price , and Mrs. ALICE T. NELSON 
of Denver. She has fifteen grandchildren, and is proud of the fact 
that she had six sons in the mission field. " 

Her youngest son ORSON KENNETH TAYLOR died in 1940. 



156 



Autobiography of MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



On January 5, 1872 in Provo, Utah, I made my entrance into this 
world at five minutes past nine o'clock p. m. I weighed ten and one 
half pounds. On January 13, 1872 I was christened by my father. 

My parents were Henry Aldous Dixon and Sarah DeGrey Dixon. 
I was the only girl in a family of nine children. There were eight 
brothers: John DeGrey, Arthur D. , Ernest, Charles Owen, Walter D. , 
LeRoy, Arnold, and Henry Alfred who was born November 14, 1865 
and died in Salt Lake City, Utah on July 1, 1867. 

When I was about eight years of age my father was called on a 
Mission to Great Britain. My Aunt Mary, who was Father's plural 
wife, together with her children, my brothers and sisters; moved to 
our home. It was surely a little house well filled. At one time there 
were eight of us down with measles. I took cold and they went in on 
me. I was surely sick. They said I had black measles. My life was 
almost dispared of but through the faith of my good Mother, I was re- 
stored again to health. 

While my Father was away, my brother Arthur had diptheria. 
None of the rest of us contracted it from him., although we were in 
the same small house. Doctors were almost unknown in our home. 
People at that time seemed to exercise more faith in a Higher Power 
for healing, than the skill of the Doctor. 

Our home was one of the best in religious environment. Father 
and Mother both were very religious, and their greatest desire was to 
see their children keep the commandments of God. 

We had our family prayers morning and evening, and we kept the 
Word of Wisdom strictly. I never remember seeing tea, coffee, tob- 
acco or liquor in any form in our home. 

Rigid economy had to be practiced in the home to make ends meet. 
We had good wholesome food, which gave us good strong bodies. 

My education started in the old Round House. It was two stories 
tall and built of adobe. It stood on the lot near Lester Taylor's house 
(corner of 4th West and 1st North). I think Mrs. Oakley was the tea- 
che r . 

My second school was to the West School, located a block south of 
the Southeast corner of what is now Pioneer Park, on Fifth West and 
Second South. My teachers here were Laura Larsen, later Mrs. Oran 
Lewis of Spanish Fork, and her sister Annie, later Mrs. Gillispie, 
librarian at the B. Y. U. for many years, who just recently died at 
the age of eighty years of age. 

My next teacher at the West School was L. A. Wilson, followed 
by George H. Brimhall, who later became President of the Brigham 
Young University. 

A new building was erected in the East part of town, on the corn- 
er of First East and Second North. Before the building was completed 



157 



158 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



one large room on the north ground floor was finished and we went 
from the West School, with our teacher, George H. Brimhall, to 
what was later called the Parker School. This ended my schooling 
for some time . 

Later, for two terms, I attended the B. Y. Academy, which had 
temporary quarters in the Z. C. M. I. Wholesale House on South Univer- 
sity Avenue, because their building, the Lewis Hall, had burned down. 
When this Z.C. M.I. building was erectedmy father was working at the 
Z. C. M. I. in Salt Lake City, and in 1883 they sent him to Provo to 
become Manager for this new branch of the business. 

In the days of my youth we had to make our own amusements. As 
I look back and compare them with the amusements of today, I think 
we enjoyed them more because we had to put forth an effort to make 
them worthwhile; the more we put into a cause the more we get out of 
it. 

We had no picture shows, where we were entertained with little 
effort on our part. We had what we called an exhibition in which small 
children sang or recited. I remember when I was a very small child, 
one of these exhibitions was put on in Cluff's Hall on Second North and 
Second East Street. This place was where the Fourth Ward held their 
meetings and general assemblies before they built their present meet- 
ing house. At that time we were living in the Fourth Ward, which ex- 
tended to Third West. Later the tier between Third and Second West 
was put into the Third Ward. Now it is in the Fourth Ward again. The 
upper story, at Cluff Hall, was used by the Church, the lower floor of 
the building was used for the making of furniture by the Cluff Brothers. 
This furniture was sold by George Taylor, who became my father-in- 
law, and owner of what is now Taylor Brothers Company. 

My sister Sarah, just one month older than I, enjoyed each others 
company almost like twins. We dressed alike and were inseparable 
until we were twelve years of age. 

On one occasion Sarah and I were asked to speak little pieces. 
The only way they got us to consent to do this was to let us go on the 
stage together. We went holding each others hand. I said mine first. 
It is about the only thing I remember along that line. I think I will 
write it if I can recall it: 

"Come and see me Mary Ann this afternoon at three, 
Come as early as you can and stay till after tea. 

We'll jump the rope and dress the doll, 
And feed my sisters birds. 

And read a little story book all full of easy words. " 



Then Sarah took courage and began hers. As she was sort of 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



159 



tongue-tied at the time and couldn't pronounce her words plain, it 
caused a lot of laughter. If I can remember some of it I will give it 
he re : 

" I want a piece of calico to make my doll a dress, 
I doesn't want a big piece, a yard will do I guess 
( and etc. and etc. have forgotten the rest)." 

That was my first introduction to performing before the public. As 
time went on I took several parts in Sunday School entertainments and 
later M. I. A. We had a lot of fun rehearsing for them, but the audience 
had more, for they were real side splitting scenes. Many we re intend- 
ed to be real tragedies, such as Shake spear's "Hamlet". Some were 
blood curdling scenes such as "Down Black Canyon", with real villians. 

Prof. Henry E. Giles put on "Pinafore", a musical comedy. This 
was staged in the Opera House on First North and First West. This 
building is now used for the Armory. The first performance went 
over big. The cast agreed to tour some of the northern towns of Utah 
County; Pleasant Grove, American Fork and Lehi. Most of the cast 
went in lumber wagons, perched upon high spring seats. My brother, 
John, drove some of we girls over in a two seated surrey or buggy. I 
took part as one of the cousins in the chorus. When we were ready 
for the first performance, one of our main actors did not show up. 
After searching for some time he was discovered in a saloon with a 
black eye. As he took the part of Dead Eye Dick, it was quite becom- 
ing to him. 

Before arriving at Lehi some of the drivers bantered each other 
for a race, the results were that some of the leading singers had to 
appear before the audience with bandages on their heads. 

We had a lot of sport after it was all over. One of our favorite 
recreations was dancing. Most of the dances were held in the meet- 
ing houses. The benches were either piled in one corner of the room 
or taken out. Some were left arranged around the room for seats 
when the dancers were tired and also for the spectators. There were 
many spectators, especially the older ladies who wanted to know what 
new love matches were being made. And believe me they knew it all, 
nothing escaped their notice. 

The young married folks took their babies, it they had no one to 
leave them home with. After nursing them they were put in their bug- 
gies or laid on a pillow on a bench in the back room. 

There were very few round dances. The Church at one time ask- 
ed the people not to dance them, but they gradually came back again. 
The square dances, such as the plain quadrille, scotch reel or poly- 
gamy dance, as some called it, where each man had two women part- 
ners, were enjoyed by young and old. There were no wall flowers 



160 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



during the square dances. The lancers was a very pretty dance, as 
was the waltz quadrille . 

Surprise parties were very popular. The young married people 
joined with the older ones. My Mother and Mother-in-law often accom- 
panied us and our babies. What good times we had, although some of 
the men did not enjoy them. My husband never did like them. He did 
love dancing though, and was a very graceful and good dancer. 

In the summer time, for a few years, a dance floor was laid amo- 
ngst the big Cottonwood trees in Tanner's Park. This Park was across 
the street from the old adobe yard which was the second fort of our 
first Pioneers, who came to Provo. It is now called Sowiette Park. 
It was grand to dance there by moon light to sweet strains of music. 
Tanner's Park holds sweet memories to hundreds of people who used 
to attend our Ward Reunions there. It was great sport to go swimm- 
ing in the stream running through the Park. The girls had a swimm- 
ing hole there. I never heard of a boy's swimming hole in the Park. 

There were large swings in the Park and we girls enjoyed going 
there with our boy friends. They used to swing us so high we nearly 
touched the branches of tall trees. A boy stood on each side of the 
swing ahold of each end of a rope; by putting the rope across our waist 
we were pushed ever so much higher. 

In the summer time we looked forward to the Fourth of July and 
Twenty- fourth of July. After a day or two of cooking and packing we 
were all very excited about going to the canyon. As soon as it was day- 
light, not later than four o'clock, we climbed into a wagon. Most of 
the wagons had a white canvas stretched over the bows and supports 
to shelter you from the sun and rain. It took hours to get into the 
canyon then, where it only takes minutes now. 

My children make quite a joke of it now. If we are going on a trip 
they say we must start at daybreak or Mother won't thinks she is going 
on an outing. 

Our Ward Outings were looked forward too. Some times we went 
over to Nelson's Park on the hill above Lake View. This place had 
beautiful trees and arbors with climbing roses and vines, large fields 
for ball games, swings and merry-go-round. Some times we went to 
the Old Lake Resort at Utaii Lake, where we enjoyed bathing, boating 
and dancing. A street railway ran from town through the swamps and 
marshes to the resort. Mr. William Probert was owner of it. It did 
not last long, as he lost a great deal of money on it. My bathing suit 
was very diffe rent from those the girls wear today. There was an under- 
garment of black sateen with elastic in the bottom which held it tight 
around the knee. The outer garment was made of black alapaca or 
mohair, with high neck, sleeves to the elbow, a belt joining the waist 
and skirt which came below the knee. We always wore black cotton 
stockings that reached above the knee. In case we forgot our stockings, 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



161 



it was just too bad for us, as we didn't dare to go in with bare legs. 

Our winter sports consisted of skating and sleigh riding. As soon 
as the ditches froze over, we who had no skates or didn't know how to 
skate, enjoyed sliding on the ice. 

Most children had home-made sleds. TheY were rather crude, 
but answered the same purpose as the very fine ones my children and 
grandchildren have now. 

Bob- sleighing was the most fun for all. A wagon box was put on 
runners, nice, clean straw was put in the bottom with hot rocks and 
bricks and plenty of quilts to keep one warm. It didn't matter how cold 
the weather was. A good team with plenty of sleigh bells, put us in 
the spirit for a good time. We generally ended by all joining in sing- 
ing songs. 

I had a very happy girlhood. My sister Sarah and I being so near 
the same age, have always been very much attached to each other. I 
have always admired and loved my sister Alice. She, being older 
than Sarah and I, never cared for dolls and to play house with us. 
She would rather play with my brother, Arthur, who was nearer her 
own age . 

My greatest ambition was to marry a clean, honest, Latter-Day 
Saint man and have a fine, happy family. I am happy to say that am- 
bition has been realized just as I wished it to be. 

My Father died when I was twelve years of age, on the Fourth of 
May 1884, not long after his return from the Mission Field. He left 
two wives and thirteen children. My Mother's family as follows: 
John DeGrey, Arthur D. , Ernest, Charles Owen, Walter D. , LeRoy 
and myself. ( Arnold was born three weeks after Father's death). 
Aiint Mary's family as follows: Alice, Sarah Ann, William Aldous, 
Albert F. , Parley S. , Harriett Amelia (Hattie). 

My Mother was only thirty-nine years of age when Father died. 
We were not in poverty, but it was a struggle to make ends meet. 
Mother wished me to have every advantage, being her only girl, but 
I felt I had younger brothers who needed more education than I. If I 
could find something to do I could help my brothers. My brother John 
procurred a job for me in the Provo Book and Stationary Co. , where 
I worked for some time under Robert Skelton. George S. Taylor be- 
ing a stockholder came in and Mr. Skelton was released. 

In a short time Mr. Skelton went in business for himself, and I 
went to work for him until I was married to Arthur N. Taylor on the 
9th of May 1894, in the Salt Lake Temple by Pres. John R. Winder, 
counsellor to President Joseph F. Smith. 

Our mode of transportation in those days was much slower than 
now. We left home on Tuesday morning on the Union Pacific steam 
line train, in order to be in the Temple on Wednesday morning. We 



162 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



went in the Temple at eight o'clock in the morning, getting out late in 
the afternoon. There was only one session a day then. Now there are 
about seven. 

Then we had to wait until Thursday to get home again. There was 
only one train a day. Now you can make the round trip in just a few 
hours . 

Before this time my brothers built my Mother a nice home, at 
270 North 5th West. It is now owned by my eldest son, Arthur D. and 
family. We did enjoy our new home with its large spacious rooms, 
after having been so crowded in our little home. 

My brother, John, worked as book and time keeper for Samuel 
Liddiard. He also was bookkeeper for Smoot Lumber Co. 

Arthur and Ernest worked as water carriers for Samuel Liddiard, 
and finally they learned the mason trade from him. The did the brick- 
work for Mother's home. John traded one of our teams to Tom Patten, 
for his services to do the carpenter work, on the house. Mother took 
boarders to help get money to pay for the materials. Her farm furnish- 
ed produce for the table. By planning and hard work, our home was built. 

After our return from Salt Lake, in preperation for our wedding 
re ce ption, all the beds and furniture that could be spared, were moved 
out of our house to make room for guests. One hundred and forty - 
eight guests and relatives sat down to a real banquet. 

Our first home was on First North between Second and Third West, 
just north of Taylor Bros. Co. Store, where my husband worked. We 
lived in this little home and were very happy. I used to say it was 
like playing house, when only two of us sat at the table, after being 
used to such a large family at home. 

Some time later we moved into my Mother's old home. We had 
it renovated ajid cleaned throughout. It was very comfortable. In 
this home our first child, Arthur D. was born on the 4th day of October 
18 95, A year later we moved into our own home, which was built on 
part of my Mother's lot. She was very anxious to have me near her. 
As we had little money, we built two rooms first; then we added other 
rooms as we were able to pay for them. Although not the most modern 
with all conveniences, still it holds many fond memories for me. Our 
children, all but one, were born there: Lynn D. was born on the 6th 
of May 1898, Elton LeRoy on 22nd of June 1900, Henry D. on the 22nd 
of November 1903, Alice L. on the 18th of November 1906, Clarence 
D. on the 11th of May 1909, Orson Kenneth on the 3rd of November 
1913, and Ruth Elaine on the 20th of March 1917. 

My husband's parents were pioneers who crossed the plains and 
endured the hardships of the early pioneers. They had barely enough 
money to pay for their passage. The burried two children before rea- 
ching the Valley. 

Eliza NichoUs Taylor suffered many trials that would ordinarily 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



163 



have crushed a much stronger woman. She was physically weak but 
spiritually strong. She trusted in her Heavenly Father and came thr- 
ough victorious. I have never seen a person with such strong faith. 
I remember on one occasion we were all camped at South Fork, Provo 
Canyon. A terrible flood came down, and the creek near our tents was 
in danger of overflowing and washing us out. The women gathered 
their children ready to rush to the near by mo\intains. Grandma Taylor 
said, "Girls, where is your faith? Did you say your prayers and ask 
your He avenly Fathe rs protection? If you did, cover up your heads and 
be quiet. " She told her son, Tom, to go to the River bank and watch. 
She would pray. That had the desired effect and all was well. 

My Mother and she were very dear friends and loved each other 
very much. For about sixteen years they looked forward to several 
weeks visit with us at our summer home in "Wildwood" , Provo Canyon. 
It was a joy to us all to have them with us. It meant so much to our 
children partaking of their sweet uplifting influences. My husband 
purchased two easy wicker rocking chairs, just alike , and placed them 
on the front porch of our cabin and they sat in "State", as it were, to 
receive homage from all the campers as well as guest who came to 
our resort. For they were both loved by everyone. The chairs are 
still placed on the porch when we are there, but the two noble women 
who occupied them have passed on to a great reward which they so 
richly de se rve . 

Some time after our marriage, my husband was called to preside 
over the Y. M.M.I. A. in the Third Ward. He held this position for 
seven years. Then he was called into the Mission Field. At times, 
after the babies came along, and tusseling with them all day (for 
they were cross due to colic) I felt at night, how seething it would be 
to have my husband sit by my side and tell me things that would take 
my mind from such a strenious day. But alas ! my hopes were gone, 
when he came in and said, "Mother, will you please hurry with supper 
while I wash and prepare to go out". I knew it was not Mutual night, 
but he said, "You see it is Mutual League to night". I said, "but why 
do you have to go? You have spent months of time and a lot of money 
(for I know) getting the hall and equipment ready. Can't they get along 
without you? " He would look at me in a wistful way ( for he loved his 
home and family) and say, "You know I would love to stay with you, 
but we have just got to make a success of this physical education pro- 
gram. If we get the boys interested there, we can get them interested 
in our Mutual Meetings. You know. Mother, if I say come on boys 
let's go, it will have more weight with them than if I say go on boys 
and have a good time. " 

As usual I could see his point of view. I let my mind run back a 
few months to the times when the boys were not coming out to their 



164 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



meetings as they should. They were seeking amusements and other 
things which were not of the best environment. The Officers talked it 
over. They thought instead of trying to preach them to Church, it would 
be better to lead them in a different way. They rented the Horton 
Building (where the Superior Motor Co. stands)(corner of CenterStreet 
and Fifth West. They took out the partitions and made a large room up- 
stairs for a gym. The next thing was to find money for the equipment. 
My husband and William P. Silver took the delivery wagon and a span 
of mules from Taylor Brothers Company, and went to Salt Lake City 
to a second hand store where they paid three hundred dollars, cash, 
for the apparatus. I know how hard they had worked and I concluded 
I would make it just as easy as possible for him even if it did mean 
three nights a week being without his company. 

One thing we women did do. We got together and said the women 
need a little relaxation as well as the men. We made us gym suits. 
Mine was of wine colored flannel from the Woolen Mills, with a 
black water wabe ribbon sash, a bow tied at the back. We hired Miss 
Mame Gates, the gym teacher at the Academy, to teach us. One night 
a week was hubbys turn to stay at home and take care of the children. 
What fun we did have. First swinging the dumbells and Indian clubs, 
then on the giants ride, last but not least going over the vaulting pony 
(or trying to) then through the exercises. Some of the older ladies, 
when they were on the floor flat on their back and told to get up with- 
out touching their hands, found difficulty in doing it which caused a 
lot of fun. It made the women more contended to stay at home three 
nights a week if they had one night out. 

Before our marriage, my husband purchased some stock in Taylor 
Bros. Co. where he was working. 

October 20, 1900 my husband left for a mission to Great Britain. 
We had just completed our home and furnished it. We had 3 boys, the 
youngest, Elton being three months old. I wanted to take boarders or 
do something to help pay his expenses. He would not consent to this. 
He, with my Mother and brothers worked out a plan unknown to me. 
The furniture in the house should be sold and the house rented. Then 
he was sure I could not do something that would undermine my health. 
He felt my children were enough to care for. My Mother and brothers 
were very happy for the opportunity of having me and my children, who 
they adored, come home and live with them, 

I shall never forget how I felt when I was packing the things and 
breaking up our home, which we had struggled so hard to build and 
furnish. It was like parting with old friends. Now I can see it was 
the only thing for us to do. We rented the house to Doctor Slater, 

My baby, Elton, cried so much with colic it nearly wore me out. 
The strange thing about it was the more he cried the fatter he became. 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



165 



When he was four months old he weighed twenty-two pounds. I became 
so nervous and was in such a run down condition, I had nervous head - 
aches which kept me down a great deal of the time. 

The first month my husband was in the mission field I sent him 
ten dollars. When Grandma Taylor found out, she was hurt and said, 
"Please don't send any more, don't you see he will get his blessing 
for leaving his work and his family? You will get yours for sacrific- 
ing his company so willingly and doing for the children out of your 
limited means. Please let me finance him so that I may share the 
blessings with both of you". She won. I never sent any more money. 
She certainly was blessed as he was appointed President of the 
Birmingham Conference in the city where she and her husband lived 
and left from, when they decided to join the Saints in the Rocky Moun- 
tains. Now their son could carry the same message that a good Elder 
had brought her, back to her native land. 

My husband enjoyed his work so much. He loved the Country and 
the people, and was so anxious to have me come to England and enjoy 
the sights with him, which at that time seemed an impossibility to me. 
By him urging from that side, and my folks on this, I finally consent- 
ed. My Mother came to my rescue, telling me she thought she had 
enough experience in caring for children, to be capable of caring for 
mine in my absence. Grandmother Taylor borrowed the money and 
my brother-in-law, T. N. Taylor, secured a pass for my railway fare 
to Chicago and return, which was a great help. 

I left Provo August 4, 1902 for Salt Lake City. There I met Mrs. 
Wm. Smith, whose husband was laboring in Birmingham, England 
with my husband. 

My brother Albert, was called on a mission to Great Britain, and 
accompanied us. At Ogden, Utah, Walter Parry, another missionary 
joined us, making a party of fourteen. 

The first night out I was very ill. I don't know if the cause was 
due to eating such a hearty lunch we had prepared, or sleeping in an 
upper berth. The next morning I was feeling fine and enjoyed the trip, 
going through the sage brush country of Wyoming and the corn fields 
of Nebraska. We spent two days in Boston, including a trip to the 
Emerson Piano Co. where we met Mr. Edward Payson, manager of 
the Piano Co. Albert and I presented letters of introduction given us 
by T.N. Mr. Payson treated us very kindly. Although he was a very 
busy man, he closed his desk and told the office force he would be out 
for the day. We left our Hotel at 9:00 a. m. and returned to our Hotel 
at 7:00 p.m. After visiting many points of interest in the older part 
of Boston; Kopp Cemetery, one of the oldest cemeteries and occupied 
by Italians. We had dinner in one of the Italian re staurants , and spent 
sometime at the different beach resorts. 



166 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



The second day we sailed on the Commonwealth, one of the larg- 
est boats afloat at that time. Our voyage was perfect as far as the 
weather was concerned. A traveling salesman told me it was his 
thirty-fourth trip and the best trip of all. There was hardly a wave. 

We saw two whale spouting water in the air, a short distance from 
us, and schools of porpoise. We experienced a great thrill as we ap- 
proached the Irish Coast. It surely did look good to see land again. 
When we arrived at Liverpool, England, my husband and Elder Smith 
were at the docks to meet us. I was very happy to meet Art, but sad 
to part with Albert. He was assigned to labor in the Grimsby Confer- 
ence. Hull was Albert's Headquarters, the birthplace of his Mother. 

We arrived in Birmingham about 10. 00 p.m. Rode about three 
miles from the station, on top of the bus or tram where we could 
look into the pubs or saloons and see women in there drinking. Many 
were drunk, holding babies in their arms. When we reached the Con- 
ference House at 23 Albert Road, the Elders were all up and waiting 
to see what the President's wife looked like. They invited us in for 
supper, I told them we had our lunch in Liverpool. They laughed and 
said you must eat five or six meals a day. I told them I was sure I 
never could do that, but it was only a short time until I ate every time 
I had a chance, and was still hungry. All I wanted to do was eat and 
sleep. The results was seventeen pounds gained in two months. 

My first Christmas away from home was spent in England, the 
birthplace of my Mother. When I came down the stairs, the mantel 
above the fireplace was decorated with all kinds of things, mainly 
lovely presents for Sister Smith and me from the Elders. Among the 
gifts was a small pig from Elder Spokes. It had a little verse stating 
it was just a reminder that when he visited at my home I was to serve 
him a sucking pig, for he was a true Englishman. I never had that 
privilege. He died in Salt Lake City shortly after his return home. 

Art arose earlier than I and there was a beautiful black, silk dress 
on my bed. He told me to get up and try it on, if it fit I could have it 
for a Christmas present. I found out he had the same dressmaker 
make it for me that I had engaged to make me another dress; there- 
fore she had my measurements. 

We had dinner at Art's Uncle Ebb and Aunt Harriet Hands, where 
we were treated very kindly. 

My first disappointment came at Conference time when I expected 
my husband would be released. President Francis M. Lyman was 
there and said that President Taylor could not be spared at that time. 
It would be six months mo re, I felt very badly and told Pres. Lyman 
I thought he was a very hard hearted man. It meant I would have to 
go home without my husband, as I had left three children at home. He 
said very quietly, "Very well, Pres. Taylor can spend ten days in 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



167 



London with you". 

I was arranging with Elders Lund and Brough, of Nephi, and 
others to accompany them home, when I received a letter from Mother 
saying in case Art did not get his release, I was to stay as the child- 
ren were well and she was getting along fine. I stayed seven months 
and shall always feel grateful to my Mother for the extra time I stay- 
ed. It was the most enjoyable time of all. I was more acquainted and 
better able to find my way around. Sister Smith and I were always 
spotted as Americans; especially when I handed a clerk three five dol- 
lar gold pieces or three pounds English money, for a twelve shilling 
purchase ($2. 50) . 

Art used to write about how wonderful the pantomine s were, but 
I never expected to see them. In Birmingham I saw "Jack and the 
Beanstalk", and thought it the most wonderful thing I had ever seen, 
but when I was in London and saw "Mother Goose or the Goose that 
Layed the Golden Egg", I felt that I had been transformed into another 
world. The beautiful girls who flew from the stage out over the pit 
(the area where we were sitting) and dropped flowers was spectacular. 
There was about one thousand people on the stage for the finale. This 
was at the old Drury Lane Theatre, a very old and noted place. I also 
saw "Puss in Boots" at the Hippodrome Theatre in London, and many 
very wonderful stage plays. 

The Tower of London was a very interesting place. I was thrilled 
to see the beautiful jewels and crowns of the Kings and Queens, set 
with such precious stones. We went into the different towers where 
so many notable people and royalty had been imprisoned. Some had 
even traced their coat of arms on the stones with their own blood. 
We stood on the spot where the guillotine stood that beheaded Ann 
Bolyn, the wife of Henry VIII. A brass plate marks the spot. The 
moat that encircles the tower, was a drilling grounds for the different 
regiments of soldiers. We enjoyed watching the drills. 

Our trip to Westminister Abbey was most interesting. It gives 
you a rather queer sensation to stand in these high places, with stone 
monuments on each side representing royalty or some famous person, 
who was buried underneath the building, many under the stone floor. 
St. Paul's Cathedral was wonderful too. 

I can't begin to tell all the wonderful things I saw, but Madam 
Truasades' Wax Works was so outstanding to me. I could hardly be- 
lieve that the wax figures were not real living people, much to the 
amusement of my husband who stood a short distance away watching 
me. The British Museum was full of so many interesting things, a 
person could spend weeks there and then not see them all, I said I had 
seen more in that ten days, than about all my life before. 

When we returned to the Conference House, the Elders wanted to 



168 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



know if I was ill. I was so thin and looked so haggard, but we had 
such a short time to see so much. 

I always loved to read about the old Castles in England and what 
a thrill I got when I was able to go through some of them. Art took 
me to Warwick Castle, Lord and Lady Warwick resided there. When 
they were in London the flag was hoisted on the Castle and the public 
was allowed to go through. The grounds were very beautiful too. I 
decided I would not like to live in these rooms, they were so large and 
bare. I think I enjoyed the Maxtoke Castle more than any. The public 
was not allowed in there; but one of our friends, Charles Wells, who 
was Station Master and a friend of the caretaker, got permission for 
us to go through. It was built in 1385 and in a perfect state of preser- 
vation. It was the only Castle I saw with the original moat filled with 
water and covered with water lilies all out in bloom. 

Art and I spent a very happy day at Dudley Castle. The ruins are 
still standing on a hill above the city. As I stood there, I fancied I 
could see my Mother playing on the Castle green, as it was called, 
with her sister and other children, when she was a child. Dudley was 
her birthplace and she lived there until she left for America when ab- 
out eleven years of age. 

We visited many places of interest and I enjoyed everything so 
much, but sometimes my heart was very heavy when I thought of being 
separated from my children. 

In February 1903, my husband received his release to return home 
on the ship "Canada" which sailed on the 19th of February. I was so 
happy I felt I was walking on air. Art did not feel that way. He said 
there were so many things he wanted to accomplish that he had start- 
ed. It was some job packing and getting ready to leave. Most of the 
Elders came in and many parties were given for us and Bro. and Sis, 
Smith ( the lady I went over with). We all shed tears at the station, 
where so many friends came to see us off. We had learned to love 
those people and we knew it would be the last time we would see many 
of them; others we expected to meet in Utah. When we arrived in 
Liverpool, we found the ocean very rough and we had to go out to the 
ship in a tender. Pres. Lyman bid us goodbye at the office, but be- 
fore the vessel sailed he with others came out and onto the ship. He 
said we would have a very rough voyage, but we would land in safety. 
The time came when we were very thankful to Pres. Lyman for those 
words. We did have seven days of storm and nearly all the passengers 
were sick. The Captain, mate and nearly all the crew were also sick. 
Art went down to bed at Queenstown, Ireland and was never back on 
deck until we reached Halifax, Canada, one beautiful Sunday morning. 
It was quite a sight to see this harbour surrounded by huge cannons to 
guard against enemies coming in. About half of our passengers got 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



169 



off the boat at this place. From there we sailed down to Boston, glad 
to be on land again after many exciting experiences. 

We went to the Emerson Piano Factory to visit Mr. Payson. He 
was very kind to us and introduced us to Mr. Powers, President of 
the Company, and many of the official staff. He went to the station to 
see us off. We arrived in Chicago about 11:00 p.m. Now we had to 
be separated. Art took a taxi and we drove across the City. He put 
me on the Union Pacific, as my pass was on that line, and he came 
home on the D. & R. G. Railway, which was the line the Church chose 
at that time. I arrived in Salt Lake and went to the National Bank, 
where my brother John had his office. We went to his home and when 
I met Sarah we both wept. I was so glad to see her. John said that 
was a funny way of showing our joy. At that time there was only one 
train a day to Provo. I had to wait until evening, when my brother, 
Charles, who was working in Salt Lake , accompanied me home. When 
we reached Provo, Mother was there with my husband and children. 
When I rushed to take Elton, my baby in arms, he screamed and said, 
"Go away I want my mamma. She has gone on that train". That nearly 
broke my heart. After being away for seven months, my baby had 
forgotten me. The strange part of it was when I left he could only 
say a few words and now he talked so plain. In a short time he came 
to me and said, "You are my mamma". After looking at me he remem- 
bered me again^ 

After nearly three years of separation, it was grand to be home 
again with our family. We only furnished three rooms, as we shared 
two rooms of our home with Bro. and Sis. Salt. They came to Provo 
from Salt Lake and could not find a home to live in, so they lived with 
us for one year until they went back to England. After they left, we 
began to furnish our home again. 

As our family was increasing, for we had four boys now, Henry 
being born November 22, 1903; we decided we had a problem on our 
hands of finding employment for them during vacation time, to keep 
them from running the streets. 

My husband and my brother, Arthur, bought a farm in Grandview 
from Ed. Loose. Five acres was in grapes, not being a very good 
variety, these were taken out and in their place was planted eight hun- 
dred Bartlet pears and a large peach orchard. 

During the summer the farm house was cleaned and made comfort- 
able for us to live in. I enjoyed living out there. We had a beautiful 
view of the valley and lake below us, as our house was on a hill. As 
Art had his work to do at the Store, it was necessary for me to go 
out with the boys and supervise them. We also hired men to do the 
heavy work. Before going to the farm, we bought an incubator hold- 
ing four hundred eggs. It was so interesting to watch the eggs 



170 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



In twenty-one days the incubator was alive with the cutest little biddies. 
We had fireless brooders made for them on the farm. I took a great 
deal of pleasure in caring for them. I also had my first vegetable 
garden and it was wonderful to study catalogues in order to know of 
the best varieties of seed and etc. I had the earliest garden, the first 
peas in Provo and sold some of them to John T. Taylor for $3, 25 a 
bushel . 

We did enjoy our vegetables, being able to pick them fresh each 
morning from our own garden, also the lucious strawberries with 
thick cream from our own Jersey Cows, fresh eggs and home cured 
ham, and all kinds of choice fruits from our orchard. We raised our 
own hay to feed our horses and cows. 

As I had help in the home, I devoted the most of my time outside. 
I took great delight in trying to make the most outstanding butter. I 
had more customers than I could supply; although at times I was mak- 
ing forty pounds a week. It was not such hard work, as I had a fine 
churn and a large butter worker & etc. The buttermilk was delicious 
and I learned to like it better than the water we had to drink. 

The first season was a very busy time for us. We hired a great 
deal of help. At times I had twenty- seven people in the packing house, 
packing peaches and pears; as well as a large force of men out in the 
orchard picking the fruit. My husband loaded cars with our fruit and 
together with some of the neighbors' fruit, and shipped them to R. 
Bingham & Son in Omaha, Nebraska. I enjoyed every day I was on the 
farm, but I took too much responsibility, against my husbands wishes. 
He felt I was overdoing myself, so he hired a man, Roland Snow, to 
take his family and live there the year round. We spent many summers 
there and I hated to give it up; for our boys were at the age where they 
needed something to employ their time and give them good strong bod- 
ies. The boys had another thought. They felt they should be free when 
out of school to do as the other boys did. 

We had an understanding with Roland to take the boys during the 
summer months and supervise their work. He was a fine man, and 
we had much confidence in him. 

Art could always see something that was needed on the farm. His 
cows all had their pedigrees and most of the horses and hogs; which 
cost a lot of money. Sometimes I complained, e spe cially when I wanted 
something new for my home or other purpose. He always had to do 
something extra on the farm. There was a silo to be built, a new fence 
to be put up, or new machinery needed. I told him it was a good place 
to throw money away, with scarcely any returns. Expenses were very 
heavy. His reply would be, "Which is the best, to spend money the 
way which will keep your boys from roaming the streets, and which 
would be your boys salvation, or save the money? " 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



171 



During my early married life, Hattie Hands, a cousin of my hus- 
band who came from England to make her home withGraJidma Taylor, 
lived with me for about five years. She then married my brother, 
William. 

When I was in England,! met Janet Poole, a convert to the Church 
during Art's time there. Later I was in need of help and she emigrat- 
ed to Utah and came to our home. She was a great help to me while 
my children were small, not only helping in the home but her influence 
was felt for good as she had high ideals. I am sure she suffered many 
times with the confusion when all the neighbor's children came in to 
play in stormy weather. She hadn't been around many children in 
England. She was very much attached to my two yoxingest children, 
Kenneth and Ruth. We all felt she was part of our family and missed 
her after being with us for nearly thirteen years when she married 
Joseph Munk of Logan, and went there to live. She worked as an Of- 
ficiator in the Logan Temple for many years, and treats us royally 
when we pay her a visit. 

I have always been inclined toward religion. It has always been 
easy for me to believe in the Word of the Lord, when spoken through 
His Servants. I have always enjoyed attending my meetings in the 
different organizations, in my youth and also in later life. I have a 
great satisfaction in doing my duty whenever I have been called. 

I worked in the Primary as a teacher with Edith Holt. Then I was 
made a counsellor to Mary E. Davis. In May 1913, our Ward was div- 
ided and Sister Davis was chosen President of the new Ward (Pioneer 
Ward). I was set apart as President of the Third Ward. I resigned 
after working about ten years. 

I worked in the Relief Society as class leader of the Theology un- 
til October 13 , after serving for nearly twenty years. At the 
present time I am a district teacher with my Sister Sarah McConachie. 
I feel that Relief Society is one of the greatest organizations of our 
Church. 

I have helped at many social affairs, bazaars and other things to 
raise money. 

I was elected Treasurer of the County Camp of the Daughter of 
the Pioneers, and a holdover the second term, making four years in 
all. Grace L. Cheever was President of the first term and Bernetta 
M. Beck the second term. 

I learned to love those on the Board and enjoyed my work very 
much. In Jime 1939 I was elected Historian of the 4-6 Camp of D. U. P. 
In 1941 our Camp was divided on Ward lines. The new Camp in the 
Third Ward will be called Camp Prove. I was elected Historian of 
the new Camp. 

In April 1 937, Bishop Eves called a few ladies to meet him after 



172 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



Church one S\inday. He told us he was calling us as a committee of 
the widows of the Ward to raise means to cover the large room in the 
Chapel with floor coverings, after the remodeling was completed. We 
felt it was a huge task, but if the Lord would help us, we would do our 
part. Sarah L. Dixon was chosen as Chairman. Later she was ill, 
and I was chosen Chairman. We all worked very hard. We made quilts, 
rugs, put on a bazaar; but made most money by having pie sales. The 
pies were made by our own committee. Our pies were sought after in 
every part of town. We raised over Six hundred dollars in cash. 
Our carpet cost over thirteen hundred dollars. The balance being made 
up by the Church. We certainly felt the Lord had blessed the. "Widows 
Mite". I never worked with a finer group of women. 

Our children, all but Alice, attended the Timpnaogos School. She 
went to the B.Y. U. Training School. 

After Arthur finished High School at the B. Y. U. , he worked in 
the office of Taylor Bros, Co. for one year, then he was called to fill 
a mission to Australia. He celebrated his twenty-first and twenty- 
fourth birthday there. He was gone for four years. He acted as Pres- 
ident of the New South Wales Conference, also Mission Secretary for 
sometime. About a year after his return home, he married Maurine 
Goodridge. The have the following children: Elayne, Kent, Nancy, 
and Dixie . 

A short time after Arthur's return home, Lynn was called as a 
missionary to the Northwestern States. He served as Conference Pres^ 
ident part of the time. He was released after serving about twenty - 
eight months. After his return home he graduated from College and 
married Celestia Johnson. They have the following children: John 
Arthur, Janice, LynnAnne , Kathryn and George Terry. 

Elton followed Lynn into the mission field, going to the Eastern 
States. He was appointed President of the West Penn. Conference, 
where he laboured for about two and one-half years. On March 31, 
1926 he married Ethel Scott, their children are: Julia, James Scott, 
Paul and Louise. 

Henry went into the same mission as Elton, the Eastern States, 
and was there for nine months before Elton's release. Henry served 
as Mission Secretary under Pres. B. H. Roberts, with headquarte rs 
in New York City, for about one year. He was transferred to Conn- 
ecticut, where he became President of that Conference. After his re- 
turn he went to college where he graduated and later married Alta 
Hansen. They have the following boys: Henry D. , Anthony, Stephen, 
and David Arthur. 

Alice graduated from the B.Y.U. where she acted as Secretary 
and Historian of the College her last year. She spent much time and 
study in oil and water color painting and made some very fine pictures. 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



173 



After graduating, she went into the interior decorating department at 
D. T. R. Co. , to help her brother Lynn. She worked there until her 
marriage to El Roy Nelson. They went to Troy, New York to live, 
where he had a postion to teach at the Russell Sage College. They 
have the following children: Arthur Taylor, John Christian, Christina 
Louisa, Henry Aldous, and James. They had a nice home in Denver 
where he taught at the Denver University. They then moved to Salt 
Lake City where he taught at the University of Utah and later became 
a vice-president at The First Security Corporation. 

Clarence filled a mission to South Africa, the birthplace of my 
Father. He acted as Mission Secretary for over a year and a half. 
Then he was sent to Port Elizabeth to act as President of that District. 
He labored for twenty-eight months and was then released. He came 
home by way of the East Coast of Africa and the Holy Land, where he 
saw some very interesting sights. After his return home he worked 
at D. T. R. Co. and graduated from the B. Y. U. 

Kenneth, the last of our six sons, was called to labor in the Brit- 
ish Mission. He first went to Portsmouth, later to the Birmingham 
Conference to be the President, the office his Father held in the same 
Conference thirty-six years before. After two years he was released 
to return home. At Christmas time he started school and graduated 
from College in the spring of 1939; after which he went to work at D. 
T. R. Co. He later married Ethelyn Peterson. 

Ruth graduated the same day as Kenneth. She had signed a con- 
tract to teach at the Franklin School, where she has taught for three 
years. She is very much interested in oil and water color painting 
and has made some very fine pictures. She later married Fred D. 
Kartchner . 

My life has been a very happy one, although any mother raising a 
family has a few strenious and anxious moments and years, especial- 
ly during sickness. None of our children had any severe illness. All 
have grown to adult man and womanhood. 

My husband worked at Taylor Bros. Co. for thirty years, and 
proved to be a very successful business man, and was loved by those 
working under him. Some of the boys felt they had been working for 
others so long and would like to go in business for themselve s . They 
wanted Art to join them. We borrowed the money to erect the build - 
ing where D. T. R. Co. is located. It was quite an undertaking, for 
none of them had but very little money. They all worked very hard 
and we all had to make sacrifices. After twenty years, we are all 
proud of the progress made. At this time, July 1941, they have seven 
stores with workmen doing a very efficient work. 

My husband worked day and night, as did the others, to make it a 
success. The responsibility was just to great and his health began to 



174 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



faiL In 1930 he had a severe hemorrhage of the stomach and was 
never entirely well after; although he kept up his part of the work. 
The depression added to his other worries. He had a slight stroke, 
which took the use of his limbs and speech. On the third day of 
I called the older boys and had them administer to him. After that he 
was able to get around and talk, but was never as active again. 

On December 13, 1934, the Doctor thought if we took him away 
from the business the change would help him. We went to Mesa, 
Arizona, as the climate in the winter was mild and dry. We spent 
three months there, with little improvement in his condition. After 
returning home we took him to the Clinic in Salt Lake, After a thor- 
ough examination, we were told there was no cure for him. He had 
high blood pressure which brought about hardening of the arteries and 
his stomach trouble came back again in a severe form. 

Clarence had a bath room put in our cabin at Wildwood, Provo 
Canyon, and I stayed there with him until two weeks before his death, 
which occured September 10, 1 935. His loss was felt keenly by all, 
but I felt reconciled because my religion teaches me that after our 
spirit leaves this earth it returns to the home it lived in before coming 
to this earth, and progresses on. 

I was left with a family any mother could be proud of. All of my 
children are thoughtful and considerate of me and my happiness. 

Art's funeral services were held in the Stake Tabernacle on Sept- 
ember 14, 1 935, attended by over one thousand people. The stand was 
banked with beautiful flowers. 

Five years later I was called upon to part with my sixth and young- 
est son, Kenneth, one of the sweetest and most angelic spirits ever 
sent into a home. He was loved by everyone. In fact many remarked 
it seemed he was almost too perfect for this world. I feel very thank- 
ful he was permitted to remain in our home for twenty-seven years. 

When he was fourteen years of age, he had rheumatic fever which 
affected his heart. June 27, 1940, he married Ethelyn Peterson. They 
went to New York where he took a six weeks course in Home Furnish- 
ings. He studied too hard which overtaxed his heart. On their return 
home they came to our home, but it seemed he couldn't regain his 
health. After an illness of two months, he passed away in the Utah 
Valley Hospital, where he was taken the week before, on October 31, 
1940. He was hurried on his twenty- seventh birthday, November 3, 
1940. 

Again I had to hide my grief with an assurance it was the will of 
our Heavenly Father, who had a greater work awaiting him. His works 
and records recorded on earth will be approved, and a royal welcome 
would be awaiting him by his Father and other loved ones. 

It is hard to part with any of our loved ones, but I am so grateful 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



175 



I have seven of the kindest and dearest children anyone could wish for, 
left to bring joy and comfort in my declining years, in fact I feel that 
I am one of the most blessed women in the world. 

My Mother was nearly eighty-two years of age when she died. I 
have lost six brothers, most of whom were very outstanding citizens, 
Church workers and Community Builders. 

( The greatest part of the next few years was devoted to genealog- 
ical research work, and the writing and compiling of individual Pioneer 
histories. Being Historian of her local Daughters of the Pioneers 
Camp, she was the means of accummulating and having bound a volume 
of pioneer histories, which is now in possession of the Camp Officers. 

She has searched out thousands of names, bearing the names of 
her ancestors; submitting them to the Index Bureau and on to the 
Temple for baptism, sealing and endowments. ) 

EXTRACTS FROM HER DIARY: 

Sunday January 11, 1942 

I fell on the waxed floor and suffered a very bad wrenched back 
and torn ligaments. I was in bed for about three weeks. 
October 28, 1946 

Suffered a great deal with my back, and for the past two years, al 
most a continious pain in my side and across the kidneys. Then I had 
a very sever pain in my back. I spent a month at Wildwood and after 
returning home had many X-rays taken. They showed my kidneys were 
clear. Other X-rays showed I had an ulcer in the outlet of my stomach, 
that my gall bladder was not functioning properly and that I had colitis. 
Later another X-ray showed I had arthritis of the spine due to a frac- 
ture in my back when I slipped and fell. A cartilage had formed over 
the old wound and formed a wedge between the vertibrae. I came to 
bed Sept. 16, 1946 . . . It is seven weeks today. I still suffer a great 
deal of pain. Dr. Boyer came in and has given me four treatments. 
I have already felt relief. 

While in Denver, visiting with her daughter Alice, during the lat- 
ter part of April and the forepart of May, she mentioned at times of 
having a terrific backache. 

When she came home, she was ready to go to Wildwood, where 
we thought she would be able to relax and rest and feel more like her- 
self. 

At times she was unable to sleep at night or completely relax dur- 
ing the day; which was something very unusual for her while in the 
Canyon. It was even necessary to get some sleeping tablets in order 



176 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



for her to get a good nights rest. Instead of getting better she did not 
improve, and finally decided it might be best for her to be home where 
the Doctor could examine her and give her the necessary attention. 
X-rays were taken and treatments prescribed, but failed to give com- 
plete relief. First it was thought to be her back, then the kidneys, 
then the stomach, and then arthritis of the spine and colitis. At this 
point Dr. Boyer was called in to try and help give relief for arthritis. 

One Sunday afternoon, Aunt Sarah L. Dixon was visiting with 
Mother. She feeling chilly and instead of her asking someone to pull a 
blanket over her, she reached down to pull the blanket up. There was 
a very noticeable pop in her leg, midway between her knee and hip. 
She cried aloud, "my leg is broken". I have never seen her loose 
control of herself as she did at this time. The pain must have been 
terrific. We, as well as the Doctor s , thought it was a strained ligament 
or " charliehorse " . .It was so swollen that a complete examination was 
impossible at that time. 

On January 4, 1947, the family, with Mother's consent, decided 
that she should go to the Utah Valley Hospital for observation and 
examination, for she was not improving, and her pains were getting 
worse. It was here on her 75th birthday, the 5th of January that she 
received many cards, visitors, and a birthday cake, made by her 
daughter-in-law, Ethelyn, 

After a complete examination, the Doctors thought it advisable 
that she should be taken to the L. D. S. Hospital in Salt Lake City, 
where Dr. Gil Richards, a specialist, handle her case. 

After about a weeks observation and another complete set of X-ray 
pictures, his diagnosis revealed a cancerous growth spreading through 
the bones, settling in the spinal column and her leg. Her leg was fra- 
ctured, which was the result of the growth spreading and absorbing 
the calcium in the bones and causing them to become very brittle. 
This cancer originated from a goiter, located much lower than the out- 
ward goiter visible in her neck. The Doctor stated that even had she 
gone through an operation for the removal of the one goiter, they would 
never have cause to look for this lower one which was trouble maker. 

As time went on the pains became more sever and frequent. 
The Doctors recommended an alcohol injection in the spine to relieve 
the pain in her back. This was accomplished, leaving her completely 
paralyzed from the waist down, and for a short time she was out of 
pain. Later the pain developed higher in her back and in her neck. 
After 37 days in the L.D.S. Hospital in Salt Lake City, she passed 
away at 11:45 a.m. on Monday, February 17, 1947, with her daughter- 
in-law, Ethel, at he r bedside . 

A BETTER MOTHER NEVER LIVED THAN MARIA LOUISE DIXON 

TAYLOR 



A TRIBUTE TO AUNT RYE 



They ask, "What is in the name? " 

It seems to me, there is much that is unseen- 
Something of the divine that symbolizes one's identity. 

In this life and all eternity. 
There are names that stir the soul. 

When they fall upon the ear- 
Names, that keep us free from all fear- 
There are names we mention in revered awe 
Melodic, and tender like a refrain. 

And names of heroes that have be come - 
A part of our country's glory and fame ! 

There are names flashed on 
Broadway for all to see - - 

Names that signify a high degree - 
And just names of sweet simplicity 

Like "Aunt Rye". 
I have loved this name since the days of my youth. 

And idealized its owner 
For her virtue, wisdom and truth - 

"Aunt Rye", it is such a home -spun, humble name - 
No glamour nor pretentiousness 

Did its bearer ever claim. 
Calm and serene she stood, 

Meeting life's tests and trials 
Believing life was good! 

Aunt Rye, was a participant in life - 
She liked to be in the midst of things, 

And share its joys and strife. 
Names were very important to our Aunt Rye, 

Names of the living and names of the dead. 
She believed in "Salvation's " plan. 

She always had much work, ahead. 
She enjoyed "Temple Work". 

And always tried to do her share, 
For the less fortunate souls 

Who haven't the "Gospel" over there. 
Her genealogy records are well done - 

She toiled to complete them from sun to sxin. 
Aunt Rye was steadfast in her faith - 

She loved the "Gospel Plan", 
She loved her God, and served Him well. 

She loved her fellow-men. 
Avmt Rye was a saleslady. 

She had loveliness to sell. 



177 



AUNT RYE 



Aunt Rye was a dreamer and planner 

And she always planned well 
Aunt Rye was a comforter, 

She was always where 
Illness and grief were despair, 

Her presence was soothing, 
In healing she had a skill - 

When asked if she'd stay with you. 
She always answered, "Sure I will". 

We all felt relieved when 
Aunt Rye was close by. 

Because of her helpfulness 
We could always rely. 

Aunt Rye was a historian. 
And a recorder too. 

She was proud of our Pioneers 
And preserved their life stories for all of you. 

She cherished her birthright. 
Was proud of her kin, their accomplishments - 

And what they had been. 
She painstakingly preserved their history, 

For all of her beloved posterity to see. 
Aunt Rye was a student, 

She liked to read. 
She appreciated talent, 

And liked to see other folks succeed. 
She endeavored to find out about the new things 

In her daily pursuits, 
In this way, she acquired much knowledge. 

And became an educated person 
Without going to college. 

Aunt Rye was a teacher of Z ion's youth. 
She loved little children and taught them the truth. 

A\int Rye was a devoted sweetheart and wife, 
Always pretty and neat. 

She seemed to sparkle, her spirit was so sweet 
Her choicest role was that of mother. 

She placed that assignment above any other 
Her home was her castle, 

Her love and good-will did abide - 
The atmosphere was lovely; because peace 

And tranquility reigned always inside. 
Her family by good example were taught. 

She practiced doing good. 



178 



AUNT RYE 



Her character and service, 

Have honored womanhood! 
Her family have all lived exemplary lives. 

As have their children their devoted husbands and wifes, 
This to their parents much happiness brought. 

Aunt Rye was enthusiasticand busy as a bee. 
She lived life abundantly, 

And gloried in its opportunity! 
She liked to work, she liked to play, 

She loved to chat with her family and friends, 
And always had something interesting to say. 

She liked to laugh, hike and swim. 
And was always full of vigor and vim. 

Folks were anxious to meet Aunt Rye, 
And passers-by would say, 

"So you're Axint Rye Taylor, 
We've heard about you. " 

And soon they'd be calling her Aunt Rye too. 
They felt a close kinship, because of the nice things she'd do 

And as the greatest of all teachers, by example taught. 
Aunt Rye's splendid lessons to us all brought 

Renewed faith, better judgement, and many a good thought. 
It has been said that all we take with us. 

When we leave this earth, is what we have given - 
Service measures our worth. 

As our Creator challenged us, 
"To do unto the least of these. " 

Aunt Rye has met this challenge 
And her Creator will she please. 

Her widow's mite was always giving or her time and substance, 
So Aunt Rye has taken with her. 

Something more precious than gold. 
Her record of good deeds, 

Will bring blessings manifold. 
And the heritage she leaves, 

To family, neighbors and friends, 
Remembering her goodness; no one knows how 

Far its influence extends. 
And to show our appreciation, for this life so fine 

We can like her - so live. 
That we too may have something as worthwhile to give. 

And I know today in that 
"Eternal Home" not so far away 

Aunt Rye will not sit idly by. 
She'll be helping, always doing her share. 

And folks there too, will love our Aunt Rye. 



179 



Rhea Dixon Reeve 
February 1 947 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



Copy of Letter Deposited in UtaJi Stake (sealed) Relief Society Box 

Provo, Utah 
256 North 5th West 
October 12, 1930 
TO MY CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN: 

W hen you receive this letter I will long have passed to another 
world after having lived a very happy life. 

Having one of the kindest and best husbands, and the Mother of 
eight children who are very fine boys and girls. I am especially thank- 
ful for my parentage. - - - 

Since my marriage my husband and five sons have been in the 
mission field. Clarence is on the water at this time enroute to South 
Africa as a missionary to the home of his Grandfather for which I am 
very thankful for and trust that he will be able to locate some of my 
Father's people and get some of their genealogy as I am anxious to do 
their work in the Temple. 

Working in the Temple has given me a great deal of joy and I pray 
that I may be able to get more genealogy and connect my ancestors, 
which I know will please my Father as he died before he had a chance 
to do this work. And now my children, I beg of you to keep your fam- 
ily records from one generation to another. Whereever you can, trace 
our family line; go into the Temple of the Lord and do the work 
for those who did not have the privilege of doing it for themselves , for 
how could you feel a greater satisfaction than doing something for 
some one they could not do for themselves. 

And now my children and grandchildren, keep the commandments 
of God and you will be blessed and prosper. 

Read the Book of Mormon and remember how the people at that 
time were blessed beyond measure but as soon as they became indif- 
ferent, they forgot God and fell into destruction and decay. 

I bear my testimony to everyone of you, that this gospel is true 
and has brought more joy into my life than anything. 

Joseph Smith was a true Prophet of God and was brought forth in 
these latter days to establish the Kingdom of God upon this earth and 
this Church will grow and I want everyone of you to remain true to the 
end, so that when your earthly mission is completed, we may all meet 
and associate together as a happy and united family ,having love in our 
hearts for Heavenly Father and each other. When this letter is read 
many changes will have taken place but our Heavenly Father never 
changes. Look to Him for aid at all times and He will answer your 
prayers in faith, as He has answered mine. 

And now my dear children I seal this up with my blessings upon 
you all. 

Your loving Mother and Grandmother, Maria Dixon Taylor 



180 



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF JOHN 



T R ANH AM 



TAYLOR 



I was born August 12, 1872, in Provo City, Utah, the son of 
George Taylor and Henrietta Sawyer Taylor. Father had two families 
and both lived in the same house located between 6th and 7th West on 
1st North Street, Provo. Later he moved our family to an apartment 
on Main Street, in the rear of the Furniture Store, 250 West Main St. 

It was while we lived here that the youngest child Amy was born. 
When she was two and one-half years of age she was drowned in the 
Mill Race, an open stream flowing south on 2nd West Street. Her 
father was on the corner of 2nd West and Main, where he was doing 
some gardening. Amy must have gone to find him and in trying to 
cross on the narrow bridge, she fell into the water. Her body was 
found a short distance down the stream where she had lodged among 
some branches. This was a very sad thing to have happened to our 
family. Mother took it very hard and all were grief stricken. Father 
took a picture of her which was very much appreciated by her loved 
ones . 

A few years later. Father built a home just east of the corner 
where the garden was cultivated. (Corner of Second West and Main 
Street. ) 

Our family consisted of the following members: 
Joseph born June 10 1865 at Provo. Died Oct 20, 1869 

6 



Henrietta (Nettie) 
Mary Ann(Polly) 
John Tranham 
Ella 
Amy 



Oct 
Feb 
Aug 
Oct 
Jan 



14 
12 
4 
1 



1867 
1870 
1872 
1875 
1878 



Jun 1,1941 

Jun 5,1950 

Apr 23, I960 

Aug 3,1959 

Jun 1,1880 



I was baptized by Bishop Myron Tanner on 10th day of July 1882 
in the baptismal font of the old Provo Tabernacle, which was located 
on Main Street between the Avenue and 1st West Street. I was con- 
firmed by Alfred W. Harding, the same day, July 10, 1882. I wentto 
the school located on 2nd South and 5th West, and later attended the 
Brigham Young Academy in the Z. C.M.I, building on the Avenue and 
6th South. 

I was living over the Furniture Store when the Academy burned, 
which was located on the West corner of the block. I remember seeing 
a brigade of men form a line and pass buckets of water from the Mill 
Race, a block away trying to extinguish the flames, but with little suc- 
cess. 

As a young boy I helped Grandfather Sawyer in raising a garden 
and in picking and loading fruit onto the peddler's wagons. Billy Grout 
was one favored customer I well remember. He and Charles Twelves, 
a merchant, were two men who delighted in partaking of the delicious 
grape juice that Grandfather made each year. He always reserved one 



183 



184 



JOHN TRANHAM TAYLOR 



tree loaded with peaches for an Indian named Anketywatts , who showed 
great delight in receiving his favor. 

In years of abundant crops of fruit, the folks would dry it and 
sell it to the West Co-op Store, then located near 5th West and Main 
Street. Apple cider was also a product readily disposed of. 

Father being a photographe r he was very anxious to get a picture 
of me, so got me sitting on the back step of my home, very much 
against my will. The picture shows clearly my displeasure, but father 
was happy to get it on my 4th birthday. 

I remember many happy times I had at the Sawyer home located 
on 2nd South and 7th West in Provo, where he owned a city block and 
had homes for his first and second wives. He made his living by sell- 
ing fruits and vegetables here. Men came and loaded their wagons with 
produce, taking it to the mining camps and even as far as Wyoming to 
sell. He raised grapes, pears, apples, apricots and cherries. Also 
almond nuts and fillberts. The cherry trees had to be covered with 
mosquito bar to keep the birds from eating the fruit. When I got a 
little older I got a "flipper" and killed these robbins which Grandmother 
made into pie and was delicious. Grandfather was the first in Provo 
to raise asparagras; also broom corn, which he manufactured into brooms, 
the first of such industry to start here. This netted him a progressive 
income for a number of years and I being his helper was assisted by 
the income. 

The grape bowry was an attractive place where we welcomed 
Sunday School parties and other Ward entertainments. One special 
part of the block was laid out for foot races and other amusements. 

I took delight in picking apples and was quite nimble. I could 
catch a limb and swing so as to jump to the next tree. These precious 
years spent with Grandfather gave me a very good experience. At the 
age of 14 I started working with my brother-in-law, George Kerr, in 
the wholesale fruit and produce business. He was located on the Ave- 
nue near 1st North. Hyrum Cluff had an Undertaking Establishment 
next door. He would pay me 50^ for delivery of a casket to the State 
Hospital. While he went inside I was left with the casket. Some pat- 
ients of the Hospital climbed into the wagon and jumped on the casket. 
It frightened me so that I didn't care to earn another 50^ in that way. 

On one occassion, Sheriff John Turner brought Wallace Wilkensen 
in to father for a photograph, before he was to be executed for murder- 
ing the Sheriff's son. The prisoner was then taken to the "Point of the 
Mountain" where he was seated upon his coffin or box and shot by a 
firing squad. Before this he sold his body to a local doctor for a pound 
of candy. The doctor wanted to use the skeleton for his practice, so he 
placed the body in the coffin or box and covered it with quick lime, to 
eat the flesh from the bones in order to have a perfect skeleton. This 
made quite an impression upon all of us young boys. 



JOHN TRANHAM TAYLOR 



185 



As a boy I worked for a basket maker by the name of Hindmarsh, 
located at 140 West Main Street. He made a drink that contained alco- 
hol and was intoxicating. He called it, "What is it? " He had to serve 
time in the Penitentiary because he broke the law by selling intoxicants. 

When 17 years of age, I established a retail grocery business 
with my sister Polly. Our father gave us a start, locating our business 
next door east of the Furniture Store. It had an open front where prod- 
uce was displayed, making the business more attractive to the public. 
We worked very successfully together until 1895 when Polly was 
married to William D. Roberts. 

Not long after, I went into business with Ralph Poulton, which 
partnership continued until March 1, 1903 when I bought Mr. Poulton's 
share and continued the business in my own name, "John T. Taylor 
Store", located at the same place, 140 West Center Street. 

On January 3, 1900, I married Edna Pulsipher, daughter of 
William Pulsipher and Esther Chidester Pulsipher, in the Temple at 
Salt Lake City, Utah. 

On October 24, 1900, our first child was born, a lovely girl we 
named Henrietta Lorine. 

I took ill with typhoid fever on October 21 , 1903 and my health 
was impaired for more than two years. During the first eight months 
my sister Polly took charge of the grocery store. My wife kept the 
books and helped with the clerking. When I got strong enough to go to 
the store, my wife spent her time with the business, continuing to do 
the bookwork, letter writing and checking of bills. She remained with 
the business for five years and had many interesting experiences; 
and making friends on every hand. 

Early in my wife's experience at the store, she went to the cash 
register to get the slips to post in the books and noticed two young boys 
standing near, so she decided to wait upon them. Asking them what 
they wanted. They said, "have you any 'all day' suckers? " She thought 
for a moment and then answered, "No, we haven't any all day suckers, 
but we have some nice fresh salmon and bass". The clerk, Ed. Perry 
fled to the back of the store to avoid laughing in her face. When Sam 
Barlow, a traveling salesman for Shillings Products, came into the 
store, they told him of the incident. It so thrilled him that he told 
different ones in Richfield, where she had taught school. Soon after 
he brought a traveling friend of his to make her acquaintance. 

One day when my wife was on her way to the store, about 1:30 
p. m. , she met a sus picious looking character headed toward our home. 
She immediately turned and hurried to catch him as he was walking up 
the path to the house. Her younger sister was taking care of our little 
child, and as the man was at the door ready to ring the bell, my wife 
asked him what he wanted. He said, "Something to eat". She directed 
him to Police Headquarters. He noted that he met her down the street. 
She then watched him to a neighbor's door, then on to Main Street, in- 



186 



JOHN TRANHAM TAYLOR 



stead of where she had directed him. As my wife stood in the store 
window selecting lettuce for a customer, the man passed and saw her. 
Soon he passed again and saw her. She stepped to the telephone and 
called a policeman, who was at the store instantly. A third time the 
man passed and he was put into jail for ten days. When released, he 
came again and she telephoned for an officer who captured him and 
gave him so many minutes to leave town. 

As we had a large stick of fresh bananas hanging near the front 
window, two B. Y.A. students came in and asked the price of bananas. 
When I told them " 2 for (5^ nickle", they hurriedly said, " 3 for a 
dime". I quickly replied, " Yes, to students". 

Later two young girls walked in and were looking at the canned 
goods upon the shelves. We had Owl brand of corn, and further down 
we had oyster with a picture of a pointer dog called "pointer brand 
oysters". So one girl said to the other in surprise, "They have canned 
owl inhere". The other said, "That's nothing, they have canned dog 
down here". 

Two women drove up and came into the store. They asked for 
two packages of "Lucky Strike" and two bottles of "Pabst Blue Ribbon 
Beer". When I told them we didn't carry either, they said, "Lets get 
out of here ". 

An old lady by the name of Jane Cochrane came in and was having 
a drink of "soda pop", H.'er friend said, "My but this is charged high". 
Jane said, " I don't think so, its only 5^. 

Many interesting experiences were enjoyed during more than 
50 years selling groceries, when on May 15, 1940 we sold out. I often 
meet old friends who call to mind my slogan, "Cash tells the story at 
John T. Taylor's". 

I was ordained an Elder in the Third Ward, Utah Stake, on Dec- 
ember 31, 1899 by my brother, Thomas Nicholls Taylor. I was Pres- 
ident of the Elder's Quorum in the Fourth Ward for 1 year s : 1 924- 1 934. 

When I was ordained a High Priest, August 12, 1934, I served as 
a "home missionary" for two years, going in company with Bro. J. F. 
Wakefield. We had many interesting experiences and became great and 
lasting friends through our work visiting the people. 

I was President of the "Retail Grocers Association" for a number 
of years . 

I was elected a member of the Provo City School Board on Dec- 
ember 2, 1925, which position I held for two terms; or ten years. 

I was an official member of the "State Food Council" under 
President F. D. Roosevelt's Administration, July 1934. 

I was made a Director of the Farmers & Merchants Bank in 1925, 
when my brother Thomas N. Taylor was President. 

We started our son. Max, on a mission to Germany on January 
13, 1932, the day after the Bank closed its doors temporarily. The 



JOHN TRANHAM TAYLOR 



187 



Bank opened again on August 12, 1932 with Alex Hedquist, President, 
I was retained as a Director. 

Dictated to Edna Pulsipher Taylor 
February 12, 1953 



The closing of John T, Taylor's grocery store marked the end 
of an era of proprietorship business on Provo's Center Street. This 
was the oldest individually owned business in Provo dating from 1890 
to 1940, under the same management. 

During the greater part of his married life, John T. Taylor 
specialized in the raising of prize winning, thoroughbred Jersey cows, 
which were kept in his barn and pasture adjoining his home on First 
North. He later transferred them to his farm in the South-western 
(Sunset) section of Provo where a Jersey Herd Dairy was maintained 
and later became the property of Ralph Hoover. 

Like his father, who always raised a garden on his property on 
Center Street and Second West; John T. cultivated his garden on the 
corner of First North and Second West. 

John T. Taylor family together with the Alma VanWagenen fam- 
ily took many early trips on the dirt wagon roads of Southern Utah. It 
often being the first automobiles to traverse these dusty roads. Even 
trips from Provo to Nephi, in those days, by automobile was an ad- 
venture . 

During their retiring years, John T. and his wife Edna, spent 
many enjoyable trips to New York to visit their daughter Henrietta and 
son Max; or trips to California to visit John's sister Ella and son 
Wendell. 

John Tranham Taylor died at Provo, Utah on April 23, I960. 
His passing was the last child of his mother, and the next to 
last child of his father's. 



"The first great gift we can bestow on others is a 

good example". 



JOHN TRANHAM TAYLOR FAMILY 




Wendell Norma Max 
Henrietta John T. Edna Nadine 



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF SARAH EDNA PULSIPHER TAYLOR 



I was born 12 February 1878 in St. George, Washington County 

Utah. 

Father died 12 March 1880 and mother moved the family to P rovo 
in the spring of 1882. We lived with Mrs. Deborah Billings' family 
on 3rd South and about 5th East as our home was not ready for us. 
Mother designed a home which was located on 2nd South and the Ave- 
nue, and was later known as the Pulsipher House or the Occidental 
Hotel. The building enlarged the house ten feet each way and added 
an upstairs; making it too large for a family residence, so Mother 
turned it into a hotel, now known as the "Hotel Roberts". 

Mother carried on the business as Hotel Keeper for about five 
years. She married John Chauncy Snow in October 1883 and her first 
child by him, LaPrele, was born 10 September 1884. Neither she nor 
her husband liked hotel business so she sold it to William D. Roberts, 
Sr. , in exchange for a home on 5th West and 2nd North Street and 40 
acres of farm land on Provo Bench, now known as Orem. 

I first attended school on 1st East and 2nd South. My teacher 
was Sadie Robinson. When I was 8 years old, I took part in a play in 
the 3rd Ward where David Felt was choir leader. I was little Maud 
and he was Grandpa, in "Grandpa's Birthday". I said, "Grandpa take 
these flowers, they are for you to keep, Grandpa take me in your arms, 

1 want to go to sleep", and I went to sleep while the chorus sang. He 
often put on cantatas in which I took part. 

I attended the 2nd Ward School where John Foote was teacher. 
He gave me a special promotion after 10 weeks, into the 3rd grade, 
and at the end of the year he promoted me to the 4th Reader. I then 
went to the Central School where George H. Brimhall taught me for 

2 years, in the 4th and 5th Readers. Under this excellent teacher I 
learned to analyze examples, diagram sentences, and I committed to 
memory different poems. When G. Stanley Hall came to visit from 
the Leland Stanford University, Brother Brimhall asked me to recite 
"The Clansman's Revenge", which I did with gestures. I was the 
smallest and youngest in the class, 12 years old. I and my dear 
friend, Louise Hedquist, were both little girls and sat between two 
girls who were especially large, full grown. 

On Friday afternoons I would rush home to attend Primary where 
I was often asked to read something to the class of little girls. At the 
age of seventeen, I taught Sunday School with Sister Clara Henry, a 
very pleasing woman. We put on a play in the ward called "The Econ- 
omical Boomerang". It was very amusing and full of laughs. Bert 
Choules was the husband, Nellie Reeves the wife, and Myrtle Maiben 
the hired girl. Bro. George Powelson was the only married person in 
the play. The house was filled and much entertained. In the fall of 
1895, I took a Second Year Normal Course at the Brigham Young Aca- 
demy. Brother Brimhall was teaching there and when I went to him 



189 



190 



SARAH EDNA PULSIPHER TAYLOR 



to ask what studies I should take, he mapped them out for me as follows: 
Theology, Psychology (these were taught by him); English from Prof- 
essor N„ L, Nelson, Literature from Alice Louise Reynolds, and 
Training from Miss Hale, a teacher from the East. 

When I left school. Brother Brimhall advised me to get recom- 
mendations from these mentioned teachers, which I did to my great 
advantage. I left home for Richfield, Sevier County, 12 September 
1896, where I spent two years teaching the 4th grade ( the first year) 
and the 5th grade ( the second year). I followed my pupils as they 
asked me to. Then I taught one year in Provo. 

On January 3, 1900 I married John Tranham Taylor in the Salt 
Lake Temple by Elder John R. Winder. 

My first trip to California was 30 January 1914. We were gone 
two weeks. My second trip to Los Angeles was by automobile with 
our friends, Mr. and Mrs. Alma Van Wagenen, 4 October 1920. We 
went through the St. George Temple to witness the (second) marriage 
of my brother, John Pulsipher, to Laura Anderson, on the 6 October 
1920, then went on our way to California. 

I joined the Relief Society organization in I9IO where I taught 
the Literary lessons. My first subject was Jane Adams and her work 
in Chicago with the wayward girls . Then years later I was asked at 
about 9*00 a. m. to give a presentation of Jane Adams and her work 
with those girls, during the 10:00 a.m. Sunday School. The previous- 
ly prepared account came to my mind very vividly, so I was able to 
present it quite successfully. 

During my life I have served as Sunday School Teacher , Primary 
Teacher, Religion Class Teacher, and was set apart as First Coun- 
selor in the Ward Relief Society to work with President Agnes Lewis 
Durrant in February, 1924, I served for three years. 

My first trip to New York City was by train on 27 August 1925. 
We were in company with the Van Wagenens, our good friends. We 
went by boat to Boston, Massachusetts with our daughter and son-in- 
law, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred James (Henrietta) Fowers, and the Van 
Wagenens. We visited many points of interest with an automobile 
driver, Kenneth McKensey, and returned to New York City by bus. 

We visited Washington, D. C. , on our way home. We were gone 
a month. We visited the White House where President Coolidge re- 
ceived and shook hands with 200 people. I left with my son Max for 
New York City the 8th of May 1927. Returned home by automobile 
with our son-in-law and daughter and two other cars of friends. We 
visted the Hill Cumorah, Sacred Grove, Niagara Falls and returned 
home over the "Pioneer Plains" road. 

On July 23, 1928 I had an operation for a growth in the stomach. 
The operation was performed by Dr. Aird at the Aird Hospital. It was 
considered a very serious operation, but through my faith and pray- 
ers, sincerely uttered, the prayers of many friends, and good work, 



SARAH EDNA PULSIPHER TAYLOR 



191 



my life has been spared. My testimony is, "That God lives, that He 
hears and answers prayers, and is mindful of all of us if we will live 
faithfully". I bore my testimony in the St. George Temple in April, 
1950, and talked with many people about my illness. 

On the 27 of February 1953 I had a minor stroke. When I got 
up rather quickly that morning about 7:15, I was dizzy and unable to 
walk without the aid of others. I had to lie down for a couple of weeks 
and be waited upon. 

Then on the llth of July, 1954, I drove my car out of the lane 
and proceeded eastward. As the dishes of food on the seat were mov- 
ing (when I made the turn from the lane into the road), I turned my 
attention to them and ran into a light pole across the street. I injured 
my chest, back, broke my nose, and loosened some teeth. I have 
pretty well recovered from the injuries. ( The above information ob- 
tained from Sister Taylor's record book written by her. ) 

Sister Taylor is remembered from many years back as having 
been active in Church work. She led the music in the Ward for many 
years, until she was past 70 years of age. She also played the piano. 
For a number of years she was a member of the Utah Stake Relief 
Society Board. She also led the Singing Mothers ( Relief Society) for 
a number of years. She is presently an active Relief Society Visiting 
Teache r . 

She is a member of Alice Louise Reynolds Club, also a member 
of Daughters of Utah Pioneer s. She was past Pre sident of each club. 



Her children are: 
Henrietta Lorine Taylor 
John Max Taylor 
Wendell Hoyt Taylor 
Nadine Louise Taylor 
Norma Jean Taylor 



Born 
24 Oct 1900 

1 Mar 1908 
23 Oct 1910 
19 Jul 1914 

5 May 1921 



At 

Pro vo 

M 



Married 
Alfred J. Fowers 
Sara Stahl 
Elizabeth Gessford 
Robert M. Ashby 
Frank H. Gardner 



Her brothers and sisters 
William Zera Pulsipher 
Mary Esther Pulsipher 
John Madison Pulsipher 
Eunice Pulsipher 
Charles Henry Pulsipher 
Augustus C. Pulsipher 
Minnie Minerva " 
Sara Edna Pulsipher 
Anna Luella Pulsipher 

Her half sisters 
Mable LaPrele Snow 
Myrtle Blanch Snow 
Arietta Snow 



4 


Mar 


1863 


Washington Co, Utah 


20 


Nov 


1864 


Shoal Creek 


It ti 


22 Apr 


1867 


Hebron 


II II 


15 


Mar 


1869 


Hebron 


II II 


27 


Jul 


1871 


Hebron 


11 II 


21 


Oct 


1873 


Clover Valley, Lincoln Co. Nev. 


17 


Dec 


1875 


Hebron, Washington Co. Utah 


12 


Feb 


1878 


St. George, 


11 M 


27 


Aug 


1880 


Shoal Creek 


11 II 



Same mother, their father, John Chauncy Snow. 



10 Sep 1884 
24 Jul 1887 
16 Oct 1890 



Provo, Utah 
Provo, Utah 
Provo, Utah 

Nedra P. Sumner, Scribe 
November 8, 1958 



JOHN T. TAYLOR GROCERY STORE 
140 West Center, Provo 





John T. Taylor Store interior 
Grover Miller, John T. , Elton Sumner 




Taylor- Poulton Grocery Store 
John T. Taylor & Ralph Poulton 
standing in the doorway 1895-1903 




John T. Taylor Grocery Store 
Closed - 1940 



John T. Taylor Store interior 
John T. , Albert Hickman, ? , Jim Sumner 




John T. Taylor Grocer delivery wagon 
Mel. Cox, Jim Sumner, Albert Hickman 




John T. Taylor Family's first car 



THE 



PULSIPHER 



HOUSE 



The Pulsipher House was located on the corner of Second South 
and University (Academy) Avenue, and was built by Mrs. Esther C. 
Pulsipher, widow of William Pulsipher, who died in Hebron, Utah on 
March 12, 1880. 

Mrs. Pulsipher was very anxious to educate her children in a 
good school, so she applied to President Erastus Snow for a release 
from the mission she had been called upon to fill with her husband in 
Southern, Utah. She and her family came to Provo in 1882, where they 
resided with Mrs. Deborah Billings for a few months, as the house she 
expected to occupy was not completed. The builders had enlarged the 
house ten feet each way and had added an upper story, which made it 
necessary to use it as a hotel. 

The house faced the east and was entered by way of a front porch, 
leading into a hall with a staircase. On the north side were two bed- 
rooms, and on the south side was a parlor which was about equal in 
size to the two rooms on the north. At the west end of the hall was a 
large dining room, warmed by a fair-sized heating stove. A large 
dining room table accomodated the boarders. An outside door on the 
south end led to another porch. West of this room were the kitchen, 
pantry and storeroom. Sugar, rice, flour and etc. were purchased in 
quantity, making a store room quite necessary. 

Underneath these back rooms was a cellar with an extra large, 
open well that provided the culinary water for the hotel. Going upstairs 
from the front of the hall, extending the length of the back part of the 
house, were smaller rooms, very convenient for sleeping. Each of 
these contained a fair- sized window and space for only necessary furn- 
iture . 

Lawns, flowers and trees have always made the premises to this 
attractive hotel one of the beauty spots of our lovely "Garden City". 
When the "Pulsipher House" changed hands, W. D. Roberts Jr. be- 
came the proprietor and operated it for many years. It was in about 
1901 when he enlarged the building in order to make room for the many 
travelers who wished to stay at his attractive hotel. He had partitions 
removed to make a fair-sized lobby north of the staircase. He also 
combined the dining room, kitchen, pantry and storeroom to make an 
adequate dining room, and built on a new kitchen and also a display 
room for traveling men to show their samples. A Third story was 
also added. 

In a few years he and his wife decided to build on a north wing, 
three stories high, leaving room for a beautiful front lawn and flowers. 
This addition afforded large rooms for people who desired quarters for 
living at the hotel for months at a time. 

The top story was not immediately partitioned off into rooms, but 
was used as a dance hall for a while. At this time most up-to-date 
plumbing, beautiful electric fixtures, and modern decorations were in- 
stalled. These added much to the attractiveness of the establishment 
which has always been the most alluring hotel in the city. 

Edna Pulsipher Taylor 
193 



WALTER 



TAYLOR 



The life of Walter G. Taylor began in the upstairs room of the 
store building at 268 West Center Street, in the center of the Provo 
business district, on the 25th day of September 1873. He was the eighth 
child of Eliza NichoUs Taylor and George Taylor, early pioneers of 
Provo. A portion of the east wall and corner of this original building 
can still be seen in the hallway of this building, presently occupied by 
the Bernina Sewing Machine Company. 

A short time later, a log house on the corner of Center Street and 
Seventh West was obtained from the Collins family which provided Eliza 
and her young infant and family shelter until the new house on First 
North between Sixth and Seventh West was completed. 

As a boy, Walter attended the Franklin Grammar School and the 
old Brigham Young Academy in Provo. He was also enrolled in the 
Brigham Young College at Logan, Utah. 

A boy with the energy and curiosity of Walter G. could not help 
but have a most exciting boyhood. One of his early pranks consisted of 
crawling under the old "English" shoemaker's building, near to his 
father's furniture store, and banging up on the floor boards, until the 
old shoemaker became wild with rage and profuse with his "cockneye" 
dialect; but being unable to crawl under the building to catch the little 
"villains". 

As a young boy, life was not always a life of fun and pleasure, for 
there were the regular chores around the home, and in the fall it was 
necessary that all the children go out in the fields and glean the wheat 
and pick ground cherries for winter food. As Walter G, became older, 
it was necessary he help his father in his furniture store. He has often 
made the statement that he had "black leaded" more stoves and ranges 
than any other person in the country. He declared that when he got on 
his own, he would never black lead another range. This he had to re- 
tract for in his declining years, while he was "chief cook and bottle 
washer", during his wife's illness, part of his chores was the black 
leading of their kitchen range. 

As a boy, Walter G. could not see why the work should not be 
mixed with a little pleasure. So when his Mother sent him to the old 
East co-op Store on East Center to pick up the freshly butchered meat, 
he could see no reason for not having a short game of marbles with the 
neighborhood boys on the Penrod corner. The meat being wrapped in 
thin, brown paper, was protected, so down on the ground went the meat 
and off to the marble game went Walter G. Becoming so absorbed in the 
game that several hours passed before he suddenly realized he was sup- 
posed to be home immediately. By this time the juice, from the meat, 
had softened the paper and there were a million, million flies on the 
paper. This did not worry Walter G. for he had been a winner, and now 
he had to think up a good excuse to give to his Mother. 



195 



196 



WALTER G. TAYLOR 



A rival suitor of one of the "fair lassies" of the Ward offered 
Walter a quarter to throw a bouquet of flowers in the lap of his girl, 
while she was attending the church service. The quarter looked like a 
silver mine, and the time and work was short and easy, so Walter 
agreed to the job. Unobserved he inched up to the bench she was sitting 
on and quickly threw the flowers which landed on her lap. She screamed 
with surprise, disturbing the congregation. Walter's humiliated father 
grabbed him by the coat collar and took him out of the church building 
where he was chastized and asked why he had done such a silly thing. 
He told his father he did not know she would scream out and that he was 
helping this man show a favor to a girl, and was being paid for it. Be- 
sides he had made an agreement and he was bound to keep his word. 

His father always managed to have something for his boys to do. 
He had just purchased a piece of ground near the top of the dugway, 
North of Provo, which had never been cultivated and was covered with 
sagebrush. This particular day, Walter G. was instructed to take the 
team of horses and go out and pull all the sagebrush out of the ground, 
ready for burning. One of the neighbors seeing the boy spending so 
much time and effort in clearing the land came over and suggested that 
he smarten up and take the plow and run through the ground, disposing 
of the sagebrush and plowing the ground ready for planting, in one op- 
eration. This appealed to Walter G. , so he plowed up the land and re- 
ported back to his surprised father in short time. He told his father he 
had found a quicker and better way of preparing the land for planting. 
His father then asked him what he had been instructed to do, and if he 
had followed instructions. To this question, Walter answered negatively. 
Then his father proceeded to give him a lesson in obedience, one which 
he never forgot. The next day Walter and his father went out to the 
plowed land, taking with them sufficient seed to plant the area. They 
planted the area that had the sagebrush cleared off the ground the same 
as with the area that had the sagebrush plowed under. Then his father 
said, "Now we will wait and see what happens". That fall when th.e 
wheat was harvested, the cleared land produced more than three times 
more wheat than the land with the sagebrush plowed under. His father 
had known this would be the result. 

In about 1887 he met a beautiful little black- eyed girl who had come 
to ""^rovo with her parents fromScotland. Her name was Agnes McKinlay. 
They were sweethearts for five years, both working and planning for 
their marriage. They were married September 28, 1892 at the home of 
his mother, Eliza Taylor. The wedding ceremony was followed by a hot 
supper and all the trimmings. Agnes was petite and looked darling in 
her eggshell, satin dress which accentuated he r beautiful complexion and 
dark eyes. Her lustrous, long, black hair was carefully styled on top of 
her head. Walter was six feet tall with bright, blue eyes and fair com- 
plexion. They made a striking couple as they waltzed around the floor. 
It was a gala affair. 



WALTER G. TAYLOR 



197 



Walter and Agnes later united for time and all eternity in the 
Salt Lake Temple on June 6, 1900. 

Their first home was a large log room with a lean-to for a kitchen 
and pantry. Here their first two children were born. Over the years 
this happy marriage was blessed with seven children, five boys and two 
girls. 

Work was a part of Walter's life from his earliest years. As a 
lad, one of his early responsibilities was to take his father's horse and 
wagon and go to the Railroad Depot and pick up the furniture, organs, 
carpets and other freight items brought in by the railroad from the 
Eastern factories and which were sold in his father's store. As has al- 
ways been the policy of the railroad companies, no freight was to be 
delivered until the freight charges had been paid in full. At times, when 
his father did not have the cash to give him, Walter would go to the freight 
agent and tell him he was George Taylor's son and that he had sent him 
to pickup the freight but would be unable to pay him until the next day or 
some specified time. The freight agent never turned him away, but 
would tell him that if George Taylor had promised to pay at a definite 
time, that is when the freight would be paid, and he could have the mer- 
chandise to haul back to the store. 

Before the railroad was extended up to the Eastern Utah coal min- 
ing camps, and even after, Walter made many trips to the camps with 
a wagon load of fruit from the Provo area, which he would sell to the 
residents of Pleasant Valley. After selling his fruit he would load up 
with coal, paying $2.00 a ton, and return to Provo where he would sell 
the coal, or use it at home on very special occasions. The wood hauled 
from the nearby canyons still comprised the bulk of the fuel used for 
cooking and heating. 

A Mr. Brown, opened a bakery shop in the building East of the 
George Taylo r Furniture Store . He hired Walter G. as an outside sales- 
man and delivery man. Early each morning Walter would load up his 
delivery wagon with bread and pastry and deliver them to his customers 
throughout the County. Mr. Brown was moving from Provo, so he sold 
the bakery business and equipment to his old German baker and Walter 
G. Taylor. 

The old baker was to do all the ordering and baking and Walter 
was to sell and deliver the baked goods to the customers. This partner- 
ship sailed along smoothly for some time until one of Walter's close 
friends advised him to terminate the partnership before he was hurt fin- 
ancially. His choice of a business partner had not been very wise, for 
the old baker was not conducting his private life as he should and that 
could carry over into his business life. The old baker kept the business, 
and Walter was glad to keep the delivery equipment, including the horses. 
He felt he was very fortunate to get out of the partnership when he did, 
recovering only the horses, wagons and harnesses. He was at least 
relieved of the financial liability connected with this questionable char- 
actor, the baker. This very well illustrated the soundness of the often 



198 



WALTER G. TAYLOR 



repeated advice of his mother, "You cannot be too careful in choosing 
your friends and associates". One of the horses and wagons was sold 
to ^arley Hindmarsh, who was just starting his meat store on West 
Center Street. 

Uncle Billy Nicholls, who owned and operated a notions and hard- 
ware store just East of the Geo. Taylor Furniture Store in "^rovo, had 
taken over a hardware store in Springville, so for about a year Walter 
operated this store for him. 

While he was still working in the Taylor Bros. Store for $25,00 
per month, Smoot& Beebe offered him a job of delivering dairy products 
to the people of Eureka at a salary of $75.00 per month, plus a free 
house to live in and free butter, eggs and milk. What a tempting offer 
this was; one he just couldn't pass up. His mother reasoned with him 
to stay where he was and help build up the family business, which she 
promised would eventually bring them bigger dividends than the life in 
a mining camp. She finally won out and Walter's salary was increased 
to $30. 00 per month. 

After his marriage, work was hard to obtain in the depression of 
1893 and the family needed financial assistance with the store; so he and 
his wife decided to go to Montana where his sister Hattie and husband 
were employed. He worked in the Quartz Stamping Mill, first as a 
feeder of the ore crushers, and later as a boiler tender. He also be- 
came a painter for the mill, painting the main buildings and some of 
the company houses . 

Walter returned to Provo and again worked in the family store. 
He was head of the Hardware Department and worked ten hours a day, 
six days a week. Walter liked people and therefore was successful and 
happy in his work, although it left little time for home responsibilities. 

In 1915 Walter had a very serious illness. It was necessary to 
operate on him. The doctors despaired for his life and said he would 
not live more than a few days. They told his wife he was full of cancer 
and there wasn't anything that could be done for him. 

Early the second day folowing the operation. Patriarch Jones 
went to his room in the hospital. There, alone with the patient, he gave 
him a wonderful blessing and promised him a long life. Walter's many 
friends joined in prayer for him. Through faith and careful nursing by 
his wife, he was restored to good health, but there were several years 
of care and nursing before he was able to really do much again. At 
this time he retired from the furniture store business and worked his 
farm which was mostly a large apple orchard. 

Sometime after 1915, Walter purchased the building at 268 West 
Center Street, his birthplace. It was first rented to Bailey Brothers, 
a grocery store. At one time a portion of a wall was removed in order 
to have access to Taylor Bros. Store, where it became the men's furn- 
ishings department. 



WALTER G. TAYLOR 



199 



A very close friend, Billy Wilson, put to verse, Walter's illness 
and his miraculous recovery, which appeared in the local newspaper. 

A TRUE STORY OF A GOOD FRIEND 
By W. M. Wilson 

We have a good friend most everyone knows 
And where ever he is or where he goes, 
Where ever you see him, where ever the meeting 
You are sure of a smile and a cordial greeting 

I think it was during the year 1899 (1915) 

He suffered an illness hard to define. 

Some thought it this, while others thought that; 

Meantime our friend lost plenty of fat. 

He consumed nasty potions, all sorts of pills 

Suggested as positive cures for his ills, 

His folks became frantic. Seized with alarm, 

They decided he must quit work on the farm 

And go see the doctors. Find out for sure 

What was the trouble and what was the cure. 

The doctors decided after much wise debate 

That the right thing to do was to operate. 

They cut him wide open, looked all about 

But what they discovered we couldn't find out. 

They sewed up the incision, then put him to bed 

And told his folks "in two months he'll be dead. " 

Our friend has great faith in a Heavenly sphere 

But feeling much better preferred to stay here. 

Very soon he got up and decided he would 

Remain on this planet just as long as he could. 

All pills and potions he threw out in the yard 

Then adopted a system of soda bicarb'- - 

The soda bicarb' with much faith and prayer, 

A little light work in our pure mountain air 

Soon had our friend feeling quite fit and fine 

And put much added fat on his front and behind. 

Now, his muscles are strong and his biceps hard, 

But I don't give all credit to soda bicarb' 

I'd much rather believe it was faith of some order 

That kept our good friend from going "over the border. " 

Who is he? Well, he's neither soldier or sailor 

But a very good citizen Our friend WALTER TAYLOR. 



200 



WALTER G. TAYLOR 



From 1922 until 1929 he became a co-owner of Geneva Lake 
Resort with his son-in-law Frank H. Eastmond. Geneva was situated 
on a beautiful spot northwest of Provo on Utah Lake. During the summer 
months, all the family worked and lived at the resort. They expanded 
the facilities to include two swimming pools and a big water slide. 
Name bands played for the dances at Geneva. Through their hard work, 
Geneva became the most popular pleasure resort in the area. 

As a worker in his community, his aim was always for a bigger 
and better Provo. He was very active in establishing the Provo Muni- 
cipal "'^ower & Light Company. He acted as Democratic Chairman of 
the precinct in his district, for many years. 

Perhaps because his father, George Taylor, was the first photo- 
grapher in ''^rovo, Walter had one of the most complete collections of 
early pioneer pictures of Provo and the early people of any one in this 
area. He was also a collector of all kinds of musical records. Brigham 
Young University possesses numerous pictures from his collection. 

Walter was one of the key men in organizing the local chapter of 
the Sons of the Utah Pioneers. He served as its President for several 
years, and took an active interest in erection and furnishing of the 
Pioneer Memorial Building located in Sowiette (North) Park. Today 
this building is enjoyed not only by townspeople but also by tourists from 
all over the country. 

Walter was a constant worker in the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints. He served on the building committee for both the 
Pioneer and Rivergrove Ward Chapels. He was also on the High Priest 
Insurance Committee. During his early manhood, he was Presiding 
Elder of the Grand View Branch of Utah Stake for over ten years. 

Walter G. Taylor was ordained anElder by George Choules, April 
29, 1898. He was ordained aSeventy by WilliamStartup, March 9, 1905; 
and a High "Priest by Harvey H. Cluff on November 2, 1913. 

Walter G. Taylor died March 18, 1959 at the home of his son 
George H. ( "^eg) in Pleasant Grove, Utah. He was buried in the family 
plot in the Provo City Cemetery. 

Inez Taylor Sutton 
June 1981 

"The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone} 
It is the vigilant, the active, the brave". 



REMEMBRANCES OF WALTER G. TAYLOR 



Grandpa and Grandma Taylor and their home in Provo had a 
special place in the growing up of all their children for three generations. 
Even now, the mention of their names triggers floods of memories of 
events, traditions, attitudes, and values that have shaped the lives of 
their posterity. Let us reminisce through a few of these memories. 

When it comes to deliberate nicknaming, Walter G. Taylor would 
win a prize. It was pointed out that in grandfather's own family such 
dignified names as Melvin Taylor, Walter George Taylor and John 
Wesley Taylor took on the permanent nicknames of Mike, Peg and Bun 
respectively. Among his own children, Grandpa Taylor gave the girls 
no immunity. Clarrisa (Jean) was called Margurite; and the youngest, 
Inez, was referred to as Little Molly. 

Grandoa took pride in his luscious green lawn and his majestic 
blue spruce pine tree in the front yard. He was always dressed imacu- 
lately. In the morning, he would go up town to take care of "business". 
He drove a grey "^ontiac sedan with a floor shift. He got up early in 
the morning and insisted others do likewise. 

It seemed grandpa knew everyone in town. He spoke to anyone 
who passed the house. If it happened at mealtime they were automatically 
invited to "have a little bite to eat". Grandma always set an extra place. 
In that wonderful old country kitchen there was always room for one or 
two more. 

What a lot of people didn't know was that Walter G. was a great 
ice-skater. He really had some weird skates -- they had screws that 
went into the heel of his shoe with a str?Lp around the ankle and clamps 
to hold them on the toes. In spite of the skates, he was a good skater. 

Grandpa and Grandma were beautiful dancers. The waltz was 
their specialty. Several times they won the prize at Ward dances for 
being the best. The ^rovo newspaper reported, " The '^ioneer Ward 
married folks dance was one of the enjoyable affairs of Friday evening. 
All types of dancing were enjoyed. Prizes were won by Walter and 
Agnes Taylor. At the close of the dance, refreshments were served to 
about 50 couples in attendance. " 

Grandpa had a way with animals and could get them to do a lot of 
clever tricks. Most impressive was his she phe rd- collie mix named 
"Tiny". Of course he wasn't tiny at all. Tiny could take the ponies to 
the water trough, some distance from the barn, and bring them back. 
Tiny could even jump over the Shetland ponies' back on command. Dog 
lovers never tired of these demonstrations although Tiny did. 

Walter loved all domestic animals, especially horses, and main- 
tained one of the finest stable in the country. He always had Shetland 
Donies for his children and grandchildren to ride. 

In about 1900 he went back to Boston, Mass. and brought back the 
famous stud horse. Golden Cross. Walter felt it necessary to ride in 



201 



202 



WALTER G. TAYLOR 



the box car with the horse, the entire trio to Provo. His anxiety over 
the horse's health and safety was the orime reason. 

Besides the warm relationship with people, the comforts of a 
home full of love and the aroma of good cooking, there were two price- 
less treasures at Grandpa's house. One of these was a couple of book- 
cases full of picture books and a full set of the Book of Knowledge, some 
20 volumes. Endless hours were spent reading these books and enjoy- 
ing them. "Practically whole sections of them were memorized by his 
grandson, Jeff Eastmond, 

The other treasure was a coUectionof dozens and dozens of phono- 
graph records. These records were from an earlier era than the music 
children were accustomed to hearing. They were intrigued and thrilled 
with the melodies, the instruments, and the words of these old songs. 
Hours and hours were spent playing these records over and over again. 
The melodies and words still linger with such old timers as: 
"Oh, Dem Golden Slippers , Oh, dem Golden Si ippers , 
Dem Golden Slippers I's gwine to wear to climb da 
golden stairs . . . . " 

"Oh, that Strawberry Roan, Oh, that Strawberry Roan, 
that sunfishing critter's woth leaving along, there's 
nary a bucker from Texas to Nome can ride that Strawberry 
Roan. " 

^oUy Burnham, Walter's granddaughter, spent many, many hours 
with him t aking pictures of old houses, sheds, and landmarks around 
^rovo. He would usually call to "bring your mother's camera; I have 
the "filmits". Getting in position and adjusting the camera was an ex- 
perience in itself. She stood on old barrels, in back alleys, in snow up 
over her shoes, and other such "fun" places. She waited while Walter 
visited with old friends for what seemed like years, but she had been 
taught to wait very quietly until he finished. Once in a great while, if 
the adults were getting tired of waiting, she was allowed to quietly tug 
at the back of his coat, but very seldom. 

Memories, Memories. Yes, it was these sights and sounds, the 
books, the records, the smells, the cold sheets after a dash from the 



warmth of the fire, the loving relatives, the food, the fun Yes, 

it was all of these things that formed our heritage, our lives ! 

I.D. No. 

Zola Alcea Berriman, granddaughter 12.61 

Donna LaJean Burnham (Polly), granddaughter 12,42 

Clarrisa Taylor Eastmond, daughter 12.2 

Jefferson N. Eastmond, grandson 12.24 

Ann Adele Engstrom, granddaughter 12.63 

Inez Taylor Sutton, daughter 12.6 



WALTER G. TAYLOR 



203 



The Old- Fashioned Pair 
By Edgar A. Guest 

"Tis a little old house with a squeak in the stairs, 
And a porch that seems made for just two easy chairs; 
In the yard is a group of geraniums red, 
And a glorious old-fashioned peony bed. 
Petunias and pansies and larkspurs are there 
Proclaiming their love for the old-fashioned pair. 

Oh, it's hard now to picture the peace of the place! 

Never lovelier smile lit a fair woman's face 

Than the smile of the little old lady who sits 

On the porch through the bright days of summer and knits. 

And a courtlier manner no prince ever had 

Than the little old man that she speaks of as "dad". 

In that little old house there is nothing of hate; 

There are old-fashioned things by an old-fashioned grate; 

On the walls there are pictures of fine looking men 

And beautiful ladies to look at, and then 

Time has place on the mantel to comfort them there 

The pictures of grandchildren, radiantly fair. 

Every part of the house seems to whisper joy, 

Save the trinkets that speak of a lost little boy. 

Yet time has long since soothed the hurt and the pain, 

And his glorious memories only remain; 

The laughter of children the old walls have known, 

And the joy of it stays, though the babies have flown. 

I am fond of that house and that old-fashioned pair 

And the glorious calm that is hovering there. 

The riches of life are not silver and gold 

But fine sons and daughters when we are grown old. 

And I pray when the years shall have silvered our hair 

We shall know the delights of that old-fashioned pair. 

This poem is a perfect reflection of the home and 
lives of WALTER G. TAYLOR and AGNES MCKINLAY. 



WALTER G. TAYLOR FAMILY 




Walter, Melvin, Clarrisa, George , Fred 
Inez, Walter G, , Agnes, (John) Wesley 




722 West 5th North, Provo, Utah 



Walter G. Taylor holding 
Golden Cross 




AGNES MC KINLAY TAYLOR 



Agnes McKinlay Taylor's life was a life of service to others. This 
special spirit entered this world on the 16th of October 1872 at 10:30 a. m. 
in Ballingry, Fifshire, Scotland. She was the ninth child in the family 
of seven girls and three boys born to George Hamilton McKinlay and 
Jane Johnston McKinlay. Agnes was a pretty child with dark, snapping 
eyes and beautiful black hair, with a slight natural curl. She had a 
bright, s parkling personality. 

Agnes lived near the ruins of an old castle, where she often played 
as a child. The family lived in a coal mining area. Her father was a 
coal miner and provided the family with a modest income. 

George was a devoted Latter-day Saint who served as President 
of the branch and in many other capacities before they left Scotland. 
The children were brought up in the faith, and as soon as they were old 
enough they were baptized into the Church. It took many years before 
her mother accepted the Gospel. Shortly after this, her father left for 
America and Utah to make a home for his family in Zion. The family 
followed a year later, when Agnes was about eight years of age. Her 
mother was rather retiring, so the responsibility of the children during 
the voyage and travels was left to James. Her mother was ill practically 
the entire voyage. The quarters were poor (steerage) and the food was 
third class. Agnes soon became a favorite of the ship officers, and 
especially the cook, who gave her many dainties for herself and also to 
take to her sick mother. 

The family traveled from New York to Utah by train. Upon arrival 
in Utah, their little home was located in the Provo Fourth Ward, where 
Agnes made many friends. She and her sisters rotated semesters in 
a school kept by Benny Walton. He was a good teacher and with a 
bright pupil like Agnes, she made the most of her school time. 

The Church offered activities and opportunities for those with 
talent. Agnes was gifted with a beautiful alto voice and sang in a trio 
with her friends, Matilda Foote Walters and Barbara German Coats. 
They assisted in an operetta called "The Gypsy Queen". She and her 
sister, Elizabeth, were great companions. They worked at the Provo 
Woolen Mills together and enjoyed each other's company. They often 
dressed alike. While Agnes was raising her family, Elizabeth often 
gave her clothes to make over for the children. 

In between her semesters at school, Agnes helped in homes in 
Provo as a hired girl. Her work was generally that of the mother who 
was confined with a new baby, besides looking after the patient and new 
arrival. 

For many years her father worked in the mines at Scofield. Dur- 
ing the summer, one of the girls would go to the camp to keep house for 
him. This was generally Agnes' job, for the other girls became home- 
sick for their mother. Agnes realized she was helping her father by 
making life more comfortable and easier for him and she enjoyed being 



205 



206 



AGNES MC KINLAY TAYLOR 



with him. There was a close bond between this father and daughter. 
He affectionately called her "Nanny". 

At about the age of fifteen years, Agnes went to work at the Provo 
Woolen Mills as a weaver. Because of her alertness and agility, she 
was given the larger looms where, doing piece work, she made very 
good wages for those days. Agnes gave all her money to her mother 
except for an allowance for personal needs. 

One day as Agnes carried lunch to her father, who was working on 
the Provo Tabernacle, she became acquainted with a young lad, Walter 
Taylor, who was also helping on the building. He had seen and admired 
the little black-eyed girl. They were sweethearts for five years, both 
working and planning for their marriage. They were married the 28th 
of September 1892 at the home of Walter's mother, with a hot supper 
and all the trimmings. Agnes made a beautiful bride. Walter gave her 
a chest to keeo her things in; a choice oarasol was another gift. Robena, 
her sister, broke the lock on the chest and took the parasol. This 
aroused Agnes' "scotch", but Walter was good natured and excused the 
injustice with a oromise to replace the parasol. 

Agnes was quite a horsewoman. One of her gifts after marriage 
was a bay gelding named "Bill". Her daughter, Clarrisa, remembers 
her in her navy blue riding habit, derby hat included. "Bill" was her 
riding horse, and hitched to her single surrey, he gave her transport- 
ation for many years. Later Walter bought a former race horse they 
called "Ronie" because of his color. He remembered all the tricks of 
the track. He never let another horse pass him and could be depended 
upon to get the inside track at the corners. With all his many traits, 
this horse was known all about town and was loved by the family. 

Walter and Agnes' first home was a large log room with a lean-to 
that provided a kitchen and oantry. With their wedding gifts they were 
very cozily housed. Here their first two children were born. For a 
short time after their marriage they went up into Montana where Walter 
worked in a gold mine, and they returned to Provo just before the birth 
of their first child. On Christmas day, 1893, a baby boy came as a 
Christmas gift. The little boy was named Walter McKinlay. He had 
large blue eyes, dark brown hair, and won the hearts of both families, 
particularly the McKinlays, where boys had been such a premium. He 
was idolized throughout his life by his mother's sisters. Following the 
birth, Agnes suffered comolications , especially of a caked breast. Every 
remedy prescribed or suggested was tried, but it was five months before 
she was able to get about and attend to her home and baby. She was 
never able to nurse her children on the left side afterward. These months 
of illness incurred a debt on this young couple, at a time when wages 
were low, that took many years to oay off. 

The following February, the second child came along. The new 
baby girl was named Clarrisa Janllett. Walter liked to tell about his 
taking the team and delivery wagon, backing into the ditch to make it 



AGNES MC KINLAY TAYLOR 



207 



easier for "Aunt Hanner", the mid-wife, to get into the seat; how her 
getting ready seemed an eternity. They arrived in time to assist 
"Mother Taylor" who was always on hand to aid at the births of her 
grandchildren. There was a debate on the suggested names. Sylvia was 
high on the list, but they finally decided on Clarrisa for Walter's only 
sister and Jannett for Agnes' sister. 

Soon after this, Hans Anderson, a Danish convert, then near 75 
and their nearest neighbor, lost his wife. Through sympathy for the 
old fellow, they bought his farm of eight acres and an adobe house of 
three rooms. With the growing family, the extra soace was welcomed, 
as there was another member added to this family. On May 2, 1897, a 
second son, whom they named Melvin McKinlay, was born. He was a 
fine, strong, healthy child. When he was a few months old, the couple 
made another change by renting the home and moving to a farm on Provo 
Bench. Here it was that Agnes proved herself as a true helpmate. She 
would drive Walter to the store, where he was manager of the hardware 
department of Taylor Brothers Company. Store hours, in those days, 
were from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Returning home she had all the 
family duties, plus churning pounds of butter, dressing as many as 25 
chickens which were sold to supplement the income of the family. Night 
chores had to be done and children put to bed before Walter would get 
home. There were no conveniences in those days; even the water had 
to be carried for nearly one-half block. Grandpa Anderson did all in 
his power to help, keeping the garden, tending the chickens, caring for 
the children, turning the hand-operated washing machine and churn. 
While they were living on the farm, a third son was born, celebrating the 
founding of Utah, July 24, 1900. George Hamilton, named for Agnes' 
father, was welcomed into the family. Soon after this the farm was 
sold and the family moved back to the Provo home at 722 West Fifth 
North where they remained the rest of their lives. 

Moving back into town with an increase in the family made it nec- 
essary for the house to be remodeled, and a separate room was built 
for Grandpa Anderson, who lived 20 years in this home. At least two 
meals of the day were carried on a tray the last 10 years of his life. 
He worshipped Agnes and her children, and always said he wanted to be 
buried by her. 

On September 1 2, 1904, Fred McKinlay, Agnes' fourth son was 
born. He was in complexion very dark. When born he was called little 
papoose, but was the pride and joy of the entire family. He was so much 
like his mother. 

OnOctober 28, 1906, a great surprise and joy came into this home; 
a baby girl blessed them and they called her Inez Agnes. 

On December 9, 1910, another son was born. He was truly a 
Taylor, with a sandy complexion and hair a dark auburn. They named 
him Wesley McKinlay, but when he was older he had his name changed 
to John Wesley. He was a joy to the family, and filled a place in the 



208 



AGNES MC KINLAY TAYLOR 



heart of his mother who had so recently oarted with her mother. 

Walter and Agnes had many uos and downs, but their greatest 
trial was parting with their children. Walter, the eldest, was thrown 
from a horse and killed at the age of 12 years. Freddie was ill for 
more than a year before his oassing. To watch this child, who had been 
such a live-wire, suffer and gradually grow worse, was heartbreaking, 
but they were willing to give him ud rather than see him continue to suf- 
fer. He, too, was 12 years old, and lying in his casket he looked just 
like Walter, his brother; black hair, long black lashes. Their burial 
clothes were alike and they were buried side by side in the family plot 
at the Provo Cemetery. 

Agnes was a solendid cook. Her bread, cakes, fruit and oies were 
unsurpassed. While living at the Geneva Resort, she did most of the cook- 
ing. Her oies bacame famous in a wide circle. Her cellar was always 
a sight to see. There, stored for the winter, were hundreds of quarts 
of fruit, jelly, pickles, etc.; besides apples, winter pears, flour and 
potatoes . 

Agnes made all of her children's clothing. Many nights it had to 
be done after the children were in bed, with a lamp on the end of her 
sewing machine. She worked far into the night. 

Agnes served four years as President of the Pioneer Ward Relief 
Society. She served as a visiting teacher for more than 50 years. She 
was a member of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers for many years. She 
was never idle, always crocheting, embroidering, piecing quilt tops and 
preparing rags for rugs. The homes of her children and her grandchild- 
ren all display her handiwork. As she neared 80 years, her beautiful 
black hair was snow white, but her skin still had a fine texture. She and 
her companion Walter, still working, kept their home together until 
shortly before their deaths. 

Agnes McKinlay Taylor died July 4, 1959 at Provo, Utah and was 
buried beside her husband and children in the Provo Cemetery. 

Inez Taylor Sutton 
and 

Clarrisa Taylor Eastmond 



"What e'r thou art, act well thou part". 



Today upon a bus, I saw a lovely maid with golden hair; 
I envied her - she seemed so gay - and I wished I 
were as fair. 

When suddenly she rose to leave,! saw her hobble down 
the aisle; 

She had one foot and wore a crutch, but as she passed, 
a smile. 

Oh, God, forgive me when I whine; 
I have two feet - the world is mine ! 

And then I stopped to buy some sweets. The lad who 

sold them had much charm. I talked with him - he 
said to me: "It's nice to talk with folks like you . " 

"You see, " he said, "I'm blind. " 

Oh, God, forgive me when I whine; 

I have two eyes - the world is mine! 

Then walking down the street, I saw a child with eyes 
of blue. We stood and watched the others play; 

It seemed he knew not what to do. I stopped for a mom- 
ent, then I said: "Why don't you join the others, dear? " 

He looked ahead without a word, and then I knew he could 
not hear. 

Oh, God, forgive me when I whine: 
I have two ears - the world is mine ! 
With feet to take me where I'd go. 
With eyes to see the sunset's glow. 
With ears to hear what I would know. 

Oh, God, forgive me when I whine; 

I'm blessed, indeed! The world is mine. " 



209 



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF ASHTED TAYLOR 



I am the youngest son of George Taylor (Sr. ) and Eliza N. Taylor. 
This couple came from England to Salt Lake Valley the 4th of October 
1863. Upon reaching the Valley they met a girlhood friend of Mother's 
( Mary Rabould), now Mrs. Wm. Wood. She welcomed them into her 
home. Mother remained with her while Father came on to Provo to 
make a permanent home for them. 

Their first home was a log cabin on what is now 6th West and 2nd 
North. This had just a dirt floor and holes cut on the sides for windows 
and door, which were covered with some kind of coverings to keep out 
the cold. 

Here they were blessed with a wonderful friend by the name of 
Aunt Hannah Clark. Many times Sister Clark brought food to Mother 
which they didn't have. While in this home Mother had a dream or a 
revelation as to the truthfuUness of plural marriage. The Prophet 
Joseph Smith appeared and told and assured her it was true; but the 
way some persons were practicing it, they would be condemned more 
than exalted. 

Her second home - Father made a trade to Thomas B. Clark, 
giving him his army equipment and other things for a lot, located on 
First North between 6th and 7th West. On this lot was an old adobe 
shed that Mr. Clark had used for a sheep shelter. After putting a 
floor in it and whitewashing and cleaning it thoroughly it was ready to 
be moved into. Although it still lacked a roof, other than just a dirt 
one, when it rained the water came on through. While in this home, 
four sons were born: George Thomas, William, Thomas N. and Arthur 
N. While living in this second home, Mother shared her husband with 
another wife, Henrietta Sawyer. A lean-to was added to this home to 
accomodate all, as Henrietta gave birth to four children while here 
also: Nettie, Mary Ann (Polly), Joseph and John T. In mentioning the 
dirt roof, when it rained it would come through and Mother would have 
to put the children under the bed to keep them dry, and then place pots 
and pans around to catch the water so as to keep the beds from getting 
wet. 

It became necessary to build a new home, so the families moved 
to Center Street in the upstairs store building of Peter Stubbs and which 
was located between 2nd and 3rd West. Father had a furniture store 
on the ground floor. While living here, Walter G. was born. 

Another move now was made to a little log cabin on Center Street 
and 7th West. A place belonging to the Collins Brothers. While here, 
I, their last baby was born on the 12th day of September 1 875 and given 
the name of Ashted. Later this place was used by the Collins' to store 
wheat in. 

Henrietta gave birth to two more children around this time, Ella 
and later Amy. Our four room home was now ready for us to move in. 
It being located on 1st North between 6th and 7th West. 

21 1 



212 



ASHTED TAYLOR 



I was very close to my Mother, she taught me to help with inside 
and outside chores for her. 

The earlier part of my life I was very interested in pets. I had 
dogs, goats, eagles and a coyote. As I grew older my fancies turned 
to horses and cows. 

Mother was very active in Church work and she had a good deal 
of traveling around the County in behalf of the Primary and Relief Soc- 
iety and other work. She looked to me for help to keep her horse and 
buggy in readiness for her. On long trips she said it was too hard on 
her horse so she would use mine. 

My first schooling began in what was known as the Second Ward 
School, now known as the old Franklin. This was located on 5th West 
and 2nd South. Later I went to the Timpanogos and then down to the 
ZCMI warehouse , which was known as the Brigham Young Academy . 
This was between the years of 1883 to 1893. 

About this time I begangoing with mixed crowds, and the summer 
of 1892 I took my first trip to Strawberry Valley with Mr. & Mrs. 
James F. McClellan ( Hattie), Arthur N. , Louie Hills, Webster (Nebb) 
Hoover, RenaConover and Hattie Hands. Our trip lasted about a month. 
These became yearly occasions only with different members in the 
party, generally Mother, Arthur N. , and wife, Rye; Brig. Madsen, 
Mammie Harrison, Bert Bullock, Annie Anderson and Kate Strebel. 
Sometimes some of these others: Andrew Sward, Uncle Will NichoUs, 
T.N.Taylor, Grandma Dixon, Arthur Dixon, John DeGrey Dixon and 
his wife Sarah, Ernest Dixon, Charles O. Dixon, C. E. Clark, James 
Hickman, Ada John and others. 

This as you can see by the dates was before the Strawberry Lake 
was built. The Strawberry Lake was commenced in 1912 and completed 
in 1913. The first water was taken out in 1915. Our last trip as a 
crowd was in July 1897. 

In the Spring and Summer of 1897 I went to work for Arthur Dixon 
in Eureka, helping to build the Taylor Bros, store building. On my 
return home I did some farming, worked in the brick yard, and in Sep- 
tember of the same year I left for my Mission. 

On the 11th of April 1900 I was married in the Salt Lake Temple 
to Agnes Katherine Strebel. We lived in a two room adobe house on 
1st North between 6th and 7th West. While there three children were 
born: Fontella, on the 27th of December 1900; Leo, on the 11th of June 
1903; and Katherine, the I 3th of July 1905. Katherine passed away on 
the 2nd of August 1905 of whooping cough and bronchitis. She was 
blessed by T. N. Taylor the 2nd day of August and given the name of 
Katherine . 

During this time I was working at Taylor Bros, Store. While 
there my brother Arthur interested a group of we young men in what 
was known as the Young Mens' Investment Co. ; purchasing what was 
known as the "rock corner" on 5th West and Center Street. On this 



ASHTED TAYLOR 



213 



property was a two story brick building and joined on the east by the 
Blumenthal Store. We used the top floor for the 3rd Ward gym. .This 
property was later sold to S. P. Eggertsen. Arthur also interested a 
group of us young men in what was known as the South Fork Cattle Co. , 
and under the management of Charles O. Dixon. This Company con- 
trolled what was known as Bunnell Fork, Big Spring Fork, The Three 
Forks ( right, middle and left). All in South Fork of Provo Canyon. 
Later we took over 160 acres known as Snyders' Ranch, as well as 80 
acres west of Springville and north of Spanish Fork. We had a nice 
herd of cattle, two draft teams and some saddle horses. But through 
"cold feet" of some ( not A.N.T.) some of this wonderful country was 
sold to W. W. Ercanbrack and Thomas Lewis, both sheep men. The 80 
acres near Spanish Fork was sold to Chas . O. Dixon. The Snyder 
Ranch in the South Fork was still kept by a few of us to make a summer 
resort. Later it was also sold to Ercanbrack and Lewis. 

In 1902 I went to Eureka to help Joe Larsen in the Taylor Bros. 
Store, during the absence of D. D. Hanks, the Manager. I was there 
but a few days when I was called home on account of the illness of my 
wife. While home my Mother and Mrs. Elmira Collins had an acci- 
dent with the horse and buggy. Mother had her hand broken and her 
face bruised. Mrs. Collins just received bruises and shock. Mother 
wanted me to act as her nurse and take care of her and while I was 
doing so, Kate's Mother fell and broke her arm; so she took care of 
her Mother and I was with mine. We were with them from August till 
the following March 1903. 

In 1904 I went on the road with Roy Dixon to the coal camps of 
Carbon County, soliciting for Taylor Bros. Co. July 1905 my health 
broke and under the direction of Dr. Fred W. Taylor, my wife, Mother, 
and my family went to South Fork Canyon and was joined there by a 
number of the Dixons. We remained there for a month and then I re- 
turned to my work at the Store. 

Between the years of 1905 and 1906 we moved to a larger brick 
home, it having five rooms, a pantry and bath. LeRoy was born here 
on the 24th of December 1906 and on the 3rd of October 1909, Stanley 
came along. 

The Farmers & Merchants Bank opened in 1906 and we purchased 
some stock. We sold it in 1930 and in 1932 the Bank closed, but later 
re-opened. 

About 1908 Arthur N. suggested that we purchase a farm. We 
first bought 20 acres from Raymond Partridge, then 15 acres more 
was added, purchased from Edward Partridge and 2 acres from a Mr. 
Robinson's Estate. This land is located on the north bank of the Provo 
R ive r and east of the Union Pacific and D. & R.G.W. Railroad tracks . 

Our first adventure was to try out in the fish business. Like my 
brother A.N. , it was to be on a large scale. Our ditch was surveyed 
and Ernest Dixon and Charles H. Miller helped me put the dams and 



214 



ASHTED TAYLOR 



screens in. We got one hundred thousand fish. Our neighbor, Hyrum 
Snnith, on the north of us took thirty thousand of them, to help us out 
as he had two or three fish ponds. This still left us with seventy 
thousand. The feed we used was beef liver and corn meal. This at 
first was a very small item, as it could be bought for a small sum, 
but prices on this fish food increased and ourweak fish would get on 
the screens where water snakes would get them. Even with this we 
did not get discouraged until the high water came along and washed 
them all out. We had prepared for this, but my neighbor, Mr. Dogett, 
on the east of me and joining the River; borrowed my scraper, and to 
protect his cottonwood trees, turned the water so it came over on us 
and washed all our fish away. 

Our next move was on a smaller scale, with chickens. Arthur N. 
had a large incubator and in order to take care of this we built a lean- 
to on the one room brick house, which had been built some time before 
and in which Kate's parents were living. They took care of this pro- 
ject the same as they had started to with the fish. 

In the fall of 1 909 we decided to try our luck at raising pigs. We 
purchased sixteen little brud sows from Mr. Charles Westrope, who 
seemed to be doing pretty good in this business, and we thought we 
might do the same. 

In the Spring of 1910 we moved from town out to the farm. Two 
rooms had been added to the brick home, but there were no modern 
conveniences . 

We now felt we needed a boar. Mr. Westrope wanted a new hog 
so we sent for two which cost us $40 each, at two months old. At this 
time this seemed a lot of money but I later found it to be a good invest- 
ment. We had done pretty well so far, but there were losses as well 
as gains. One loss that looms up above the others was with the herd 
of 1 9 pigs which were all ready to kill. I went out to feed them one 
morning and when I called they failed to show up. On looking around 
I could see we had something serious in the herd. In less than two 
hours all were dead. I called a Vetenarian, but after a blood test from 
the State Lab. there was no showing of Cholera, and they didn't know 
what it was . 

In the Spring of 1911, Mr. John Westphal and his son Fred came 
over and drove the pipe for an artesian well which we surely did appre- 
ciate. This was much handier than carrying water across the field 
from the spring. Sometime later a pressure pump was installed and 
modern plumbing was put in the house. 

During 1912 we were trying to get the telephone. At this time 
Provo had two telephone systems; the Independant and the Bell Co. In 
trying to get the phone, the Bell Co. finally said they would install the 
telephones if we would dig the post holes. My neighbor, Arnold Taylor 
and Hyrum (Hite) Smith realizing the need for a telephone offered to 
dig the holes, so the telephone was installed. 



ASHTED TAYLOR 



215 



There was still no electric lights in the neighborhood, so as 
neighbors we sent a committee to meet with the Utah Power and Light 
Co. The first proposition was that we put up $1500. 00 and then they 
would put in the line. We felt that too high and told them we only want- 
ed to buy power not an interest in the plant. 

Our neighbor, "Hite" Smith had a good site on Spring Creek for 
a little electric light plant and he preferred the site for a 3 homes 
plant. Jim Clyde, in the North River Bottoms, had such a plant and 
his son Archie offered to oversee the buying of mate rials , building and 
operating a small plant, free of charge until we could take it over. 

We called another meeting of the neighborhood and invited Mr. 
R. C. Curtis, fieldman for Utah Power and Light Co. to come and 
offer suggestions. After the meeting, Archie took us over to his 
father's plant which was surely an eye opener and it had its effect. 
Next morning by 8:00 a.m. , Mr. Curtis was at my home with another 
proposition. I told him we had decided what to do and we were not in- 
terested in his plans. He made three more trips that day and his last 
proposition that if we would sign a contract for five years for $3. 00 a 
month they would install the power. I told him if he would insert in 
his contract "be delivered in 30 days" I would sign the contract and 
guarantee it to be satisfactory for the rest. We got the power. 

The year 1912 we took first prize at the State Fair for some tall 
silage corn. This prize was enough to take us all to the fair. 

Five years after we had been on the farm, the 11th of November 
1915, Fred was born. 

Sometime around now there was a trade made between Arthur N. 
and Mother, whereby the farm was turned over to me. We had a few 
cows now, and we thought that would be our best investment as our 
location was ideal for a small dairy. Eighteen more acres was bought 
from Tracey Loan and Mortgage Co. and a little later five more acres 
was bought from Mena Trope. Then ten acres was bought up on the 
hill, west of the Hail's farm. We traded our home in town for it. 

Our first milk customer was Startup Candy Co. We sold cream 
to them for making ice cream and candy. Our next one's to serve, 
was Newhouse Hotel in Salt Lake City. We had to increase our herd 
now to take care of the increased demand. 

March of 1919, Kate and Fred had the "Flu". They were put in 
rooms to themselves and Mrs. Clara Gay would come in and help take 
care of them. The fall of 1919, Fontella and Leo came down with it 
and Kate took care of them. The following Spring, I and LeRoy had it. 

September 12, 1919, Genevieve was born. When she was about 
six years old she took sick and was unable to go to school. She was 
taken to Doctors here in Provo and Salt Lake, but they were unable to 
help her. Through the arrangements of Dr. C. M. Smith, we took her 
to the Mayo Clinic back in Minnesota, the year of 1927. They had 21 
Doctors there that checked her over, but at the end of a week the 



216 



ASHTED TAYLOR 



Doctors said we should bring her home and let her have as much 
pleasure out of life as possible, because she had a tumor of the brain 
and she couldn't live long. She died the year of 1930 on November 1 9th. 
She was laid to rest in the Provo City Cemetery. 

About 1920 we invested in a small herd of sheep. We felt we were 
doing very well until the dogs raided them, killing some and crippling 
others. We sold the balance to the butcher. 

In the fall of 1920, Leo lost his hand while putting up silage. 
1921 I had my goitre removed and was laid up for awhile. 

One morning I had a call on the phone from Salt Lake, the mana- 
ger of the Newhouse Hotel wanted to know if I could meet a price for 
milk and cream that others had made him. I told him at that price my 
cows were all dry and for him to get it where they could offer it tohim 
cheaper. In less than 3 days he called back and wanted to know if 
they could continue to get milk and cream from us at the price we had 
let them have it before they had stopped. I told him we had established 
another good market and would be unable to let them have any. This 
was in 1 921 and we had a market for our milk and cream by bottling it 
for John T. Taylor Grocery Store. 

On June 27, 1922, my Mother passed away at the age of 84 years. 
In keeping with her Church calling, her service was held in the Stake 
Tabernacle. 

About 1 924, Joseph Crawley was added to our milk list. He ran 
a little store just across the road east from the Timpanogos School. 
We also had a few individual customers that we sold milk, cream and 
butter to. This brought a lot of work into the house, for Kate and 
Fontella. Every day they had to wash the bottles and every other day 
churn and make butter. We sold all the butter milk we had to Sutton- 
Chase Drug Store. 

In the summer of 1926, Kate, Leo, Fred, Genevieve and I went 
to the Provona Beach Resort, to run it for the season. This was own- 
ed by Arthur N. and was located at the mouth of Provo River. We 
would have gone the next year but due to Genevieve's illness we stayed 
on the farm, which during our absence had been run by LeRoy and 
Stanley. 

The Fall of 1928 we sold the cowherd to a Mr. Booth from Delta, 
keeping only two or three of our choice cows. 

The Spring of 1929, June 26th, LeRoy was married to Elsie Bean, 
daughter of Bro. & Sis.Nide Bean. September 4, 1929, Leo married 
Annie DeVeda Hansen, and in the same year Stanley married Mildred 
Warren on the 16th of November 1929. With all my help gone, but 
Fred, I found myself handicapped, so Kate and I talked it over and de- 
cided it would be best to let the farm go. Roy and Elsie thought they 
would like to buy it. They were living on the ten acres where Fontella 
and Dean first lived. They turned the acres back to me for the first 
payment on the farm. This happened about the year 1936. 



ASHTED TAYLOR 



217 



1936 Kate was operated on for appendicitis and the 4th day after 
the operation she had a stroke. After we were able to bring her home 
from the hospital, Mrs. Eva Horth took care of her. 

The 23rd of November 1 935, Fred was married to Donna Louise 
Ostler. They had one baby and then seperated. 

The Spring of 1936, Roy and Elsie moved into the house and Kate 
and I used two of the rooms until we could finish our little house we 
had started. One room was used for the storing of our furniture. 

On the 4th of July, Fred and his pal called " Pappy ", dug out 
the basement. They did it in one day and almost killed my horses 
doing it. Ernest Dixon with his power mixer and two boys, and four 
other hands he told me to hire; poured the basement in five hours. 
Arthur Clyde took over the carpenter work, and then Ernest Dixon and 
his son Ralph did the brick work. Mack Bricky did the plastering and 
Ted Symes did the wiring. Paxman Hatch put in the plumbing. After 
this was all done I started cleaning windows, floors and etc. As I 
came in one evening from working on the house, I found Kate slumped 
in her chair breathing extra hard. Roy's children had been in to take 
her the paper to read, but when they heard her they thought she was 
sleeping so they didn't disturb her, I could see she had another stroke 
and was in a comma from which she never recovered. On the 11th of 
November 1936 she passed away. Anson Hatch was our undertaker, 
and on account of the roads being so bad, her body was taken to Leo's 
home on 5th West, then up to the Grand View Chapel where Bishop M. 
E. Kartchner took charge. Burial was in the Provo City Cemetery. 

My second marriage was to Kathrine G. Kopp on June 2, 1937. 
We went to the Manti Temple. I stood for her husband to be sealed to 
her as she had never been through the Temple on her first marriage. 
Then we were married for time. We moved into my little home which 
I had just finished. Here we had many pleasant past times. Her hobby 
was flowers and she enjoyed working with them. We also raised some 
bannana squash which we got first prize for and second prize for some 
tall corn, at the County Fair. 

Our first trip we took was to Fish Lake with Hyrum Hysell and 
his wife. Our next trip was when her son Herman, wife and Eddie 
came from California to see us. With them and her son Ed and his 
wife Bessie, another son Sam, and her youngest daughter Elsie, we 
went to Wolf Creek for breakfast and on our way home came by Straw- 
berry Valley. 

The next trip was in company with Bro. & Sis. Chris. L. Riding and 
his wife Lizzie. This trip took us to the Kiabab Forest and across the 
desert to the Navaho Bridge, back to Duke Lake, Zions Canyon and 
Hoover Dam. 

Up to this time Fred had been living with us since his separation 
from his wife. On the 12th of February 1942 as I returned from help- 
ing Roy with the milking and chores, I came home to find "Keddela", 
as I called my wife, seized with a stroke and inside of 36 hours she was 



218 



ASHTED TAYLOR 



gone. Fred helped me a great deal during her illness. She was taken 
care of by the Berg Mortuary and then brought to our little home for 
her friends to call and see her. The services were in the Grandview 
Chapel, and she was laid to rest by the side of her husband, Samuel 
Kopp in the Provo City Burial Park. Her boys insisted on taking care 
of 50% of the funeral expense. 

The Spring of this year, Fred left to find work in Idaho and he 
met Beulah Maurine Rose. They were married on the 13th of July 
1942 and have two children, a boy and a girl. 

I was all alone again now, but I continued to go down and help Roy 
on the farm and in the dairy, as he was working at the Ice and Cold 
Storage Plant. 

In the Spring of 1943, I met Verene Peay at a dance in the Third 
Ward. We went to other dances as they came along. On the 8th day 
of December 1943 we were married in the Salt Lake Temple. We did 
the work for her and her husband, Mr. Peay, and then we were mar- 
ried for time. 

We moved into my little house and again made a home of it. 
Verene joined the Grand View Relief Society and later the Daughters 
of the Utah Pioneers and became very active in both. The Daughters 
of the Pioneers put on a gay nineties show and she took part in it as a 
young male dancer, dancing the cake walk. 

The two of us did numerous costumings for dances and celebra- 
tions, receiving first prize for some. One was a dance where Rena 
dressed as Red Riding Hood and I was dressed as the woodsman. 
Another time was at a High Priest Annual dance and again at a Centen- 
nial Celebration at the SCERA in 1947. We were on a committee to 
display relics and we took first prize for our old time costume. 

Each year we enjoy celebrating with the Black Hawk People if it 
is possible. Our first celebration with them was in Spr ingville in 1946. 
The program they put on made us decide we would attend as many as 
we could, as they were the best. The second was at Heber City in 
1947. Everybody made us feel so welcome and you get to feel very 
close to these people. Our third time was at Monroe in 1949 where 
we enjoyed ourselves very much in visiting around for a week with the 
many friends that we have made and going to the wonderful programs 
that are arranged for these outings. Instead of going right on home, 
we went to Bryce Canyon. Rena was taken up with the beauty of all the 
Canyon, and of the trip in general. The next outing with the Black 
Hawker's was in Payson in 1950. While at this camp meeting I met 
some folks I had met in Arkansas 55 years ago. Their granddaughter 
was Princess of the Black Hawk for this year. 

I was always interested in civic affairs of our City. My political 
belief was that of the Democratic Party. During the election years I 
made it a point with the help of such staunch members as Amanda Young 
and Lillie Holdaway, to make my horse and surrey available for the 



ASHTED TAYLOR 



219 



transportation for those who were unable to get to the polling place. 
As is customary, we had our victories and losses. 

The years of 1914 and 1915 was an entanglement between the 
East and West part of the City to see where the Union Railroad Depot 
was to be built. Thinking the Third West location was the proper one, 
I worked very feveriously to have it at that point. This was finally 
accomplished through a City Election, and the evidence is there to 
show our success. 

Another feature we felt that was important was to ask for shorter 
hours in the stores for clerks. With such men and women as Brig 
Johnson, Robert Curtis, Miss Lue Nelson, Annie Book, myself and 
many others; our aim was to get the merchants to close at 6:30 in the 
winter and 7:30 in the summer instead of working the help from 8:00 
in the morning till ten at night. We found who the broad minded and 
sympathetic ones were. Which by odds was the big majority. In our 
success of this it gave us more time for enjoyment at home with our 
family and friends. 

After we moved on the farm we decided we needed a closer pol- 
ling district, for we were having to go to 11th West and 2nd and 3rd 
North, and we felt this was quite a distance out of our way. So with 
the help of DeanBuckner and others we contacted our County Cle rk and 
after some time we were given District 31 with Eva Horth as our first 
registration agent. 

In 1934 and 1935 the people got together to see what could be done 
to get a bridge across the river on what is known as 9th North. With 
such men as J.J. Johnson, Abe Smith, Goldie Knudsen, Provo Ice and 
Cold Storage and other property owners on 6th West between 6th and 
9th North and with the help of our wonderful friend Mayor A. O. Smoot, 
Jr. ; the bridge stands to tell the rest of the story. 

About this same time we got the City water and in 1936, Provo 
decided we needed a Power Plant of our own. After a very bitter fight 
of six years with Utah Power and Light Co. , in court and at the polls, 
we won out and now we enjoy what I feel is a little gold mine. 

Our next project was to get our mail boxes moved from highway 
91 closer to our homes. We did get them moved down by our bridge, 
but had a great deal of trouble having our mail disturbed. Our next 
move was to get them closer to our homes, which was done between 
the years of 1948 and 1950 with the help of our acting postmaster, La- 
var Christensen and our present postmaster Raymond Green. 

The next improvement we received was our street lights, which 
we obtained in about 1951. 

I was born the 12th of September 1875 in Provo, Utah and grew 
up with the boys of the neighborhood in the Third Ward. I was ordained 
a Deacon about 1884 and one of my outstanding remembrance in my 
quorum was Edmond J. Stewart speaking of the personality of God. He 
told us of the English Prayer Book that teaches of a God without body. 



220 



ASHTED TAYLOR 



parts or passion, which to him was like a bootless stocking without a 
leg. I was active in the work the Aaronic Priesthood offers us. 

In the Spring of 1897 I was asked by my Bishop, William J.Lewis 
If I would go on a Mission. On account of the Ward Records being 
lost, I had to be re-baptized and confirmed. So on 11th of September 
1897 I was baptized by George Powelson and confirmed by Bishop 
William J. Lewis. The 20th of September 1897 I was ordained a Seven- 
ty by George Reynolds. I left the 22nd of September 1897 for my 
mission to the South Western States. My labors took me to Kansas 
and Arkansas. I was out about 27 months. 

After returning home I worked in the Church as a Ward Teacher, 
Home Missionary in Utah Stake, and appointed a Ward Collector with 
William P. Clayton for the B righam Young Monument in Salt Lake City, 
This was about 1900. 

In 1901 we commenced to build our new chapel in the Third Ward. 
This was under the leadership of Aquilla, Job, John, Tom and Em 
Collins; Arthur Dixon and others. 

I was called to work in the Young Men's Mutual Improvement 
Association with B. H. Bullock and G. E, Henrickson. I had charge 
of the gym which was located in the building on Center and 5th West. 
It was also known as the Young Men's Investment. There were some 
wonderful entertainments put on in the Third Ward Chapel that was 
first worked out in our gym. There is one especially stands out in my 
memory and was called "Professor Make Over". It brought out talent 
that had never before been used in the Ward. It played for two nights, 
both nights to capacity crowds. 

In 1911 I was a Ward Teacher in the Grand View Ward. On 
Nove mber 10, 1912 1 was set apart as Pre si dent of the Y . M. I. A. with 
C. H. Davies and J. P. Gourly as my counselors. One of the high 
lights at this time was our 3 act play which was played in the Third 
Ward, Bonneville, Sharon and our own Ward. At this time all these 
Wards belonged to Utah Stake. 

In September 21 1914 I was released from the M.I, A. and set 
apart as Second Counselor to James H. Jenkins, Presiding Elder. 
When he moved away in 1917,1 was appointed to act as First Counselor 
to Fred Buss which occured on December 30, 1917. The 27th of Nov- 
ember 1921 our Ward was organized with M. E„ Kartchner chosen as 
Bishop and I was First Counselor and C. L. Riding as Second Coun- 
selor, We were set apart 22nd January 1922 by Apostle David O. McKay . 
During this time, Kate worked in the Relief Society as First Counselor 
under each of the Presidents, Rose Stewart and Johanna Maxfield. I 
was in the Bishopric with Bishop Kartchner for ten years. 

From 1 932 to 1934 I had charge of the Adult M.I. A. Class. At 
present I am acting as a Ward Teacher. July 1953. 

( Ashted Taylor died at Provo, Utah on the 15th of September 1967). 



ASHTED TAYLOR FAMILY 




Agnes Katherine Strebel 



Fontella, Rc 




Stan, Leo, ASHTED , Roy, Fontella 



Kate 




Kathrine G, Kopp 





Verene H. Peay 




AGNES KATHERINE STREBEL TAYLOR 



Agnes Katherine Strebel Taylor was born at Firth, Bayern 
Germany on January 1, 1877, a daughter of George Peter and Eliza- 
beth Ebursberger Tiefel Strebel. Her father was a stone cutter and 
her Mother was a farm hand. 

Katherine was the 6th in a family of 10 children whose names 
are: George Frederick, Annie Katherine, Johan, Andrew, Ulrich, 
Agnes Katherine, Walentine Anthone, Michael and Martin. 

The family were members of the Lutheran Church when the 
L.D.S. missionaries came to their home. In due time, after studying 
and attending meetings, they joined the Church and her father, Peter 
Strebel, was chosen as Presiding Elder of the little Branch in which 
they lived. Their home became the home of the Elders from then on. 

One Elder, Alfred Budge, of Paris, Idaho, became especially 
interested in Agnes Katherine and for her desire to come to Zion. He 
proferred to bring her to America and to his mother's home. At this 
time Agnes Katherine was 13 years old and had graduated from school. 
Her teachers and others of her friends who learned of her plans to go 
to America with the Mormons, told her she would never be able to 
hear from her folks or be able to write to them because after the Mor- 
mons got her inside the big wall surrounding Utah, she would never be 
able to get out. 

These stories had no effect on Katherine, as her faith was such 
that she knew these stories were only falsehoods and just an effort on 
the part of these people to keep her from going on with her plans of 
remaining in "This Terrible Church". 

All arrangements had been made for her to accompany Elder 
Budge. The passage had been arranged for them to come Znd class. 
Elder Budge at the last minute was called to remain longer in the 
Mission Field, Kate was to go, however, as the other Saints were 
going to America. 

Through the maneuvering of one, Gredkin Coalback, the tickets 
were changed. Katherine was only a child and knew nothing about the 
tickets, so she came steerage. She didn't learn how this came about 
until after Elder Budge came home. She was telling him of her trip 
and how unpleasant the voyage had been. Then it was learned that 
Gredkin Coalback had changed tickets with her. 

Her condition when she landed was most terrible as the food had 
been poor and in the filth she had become infested with head lice. Her 
hair had to be cut off in order to get rid of the pest. 

When she reached Paris, Idaho in 1890, Sister Budge gave her 
every care and she was soon back to good health and as clean as she 
was when she left her home. 

Life with the Budge family was ideal and she remained with them 
until the Spring of 1891 when her father and brother Andrew arrived 
from Germany. They came on to Provo so Katherine came down to 



222 



AGNES KATHERINE STREBEL TAYLOR 



223 



keep house for them. 

They lived in the 4th Ward on 3rd East between 2nd and 3rd North. 
Here she soon became acquainted with Frances and Heber Harrison, 
brother and sister, who lived together as their parents had died. 
Frances worked in a photograph gallery, owned by Adam Anderson. 
Heber was a brick mason. They needed help in their home so they 
asked Katherine to come and help with the house work. This was a 
great help to her in learning the English language, for at home, with 
her father and brother, they spoke only German. 

In the early summer of 1892 her Mother and her brothers Ulric, 
Walentine, Antone, Michael and Martin arrived from their native land. 
Now with a mother in the home, Kate went to work and stayed at the 
Harrison home. 

Wages at that time were very meager. She got her board and 
room and a few clothes and a very little spending money. Kate re- 
mained with the Harrisons about three years. During this time she 
met Ashted Taylor. 

One evening while Kate was still at Harrison's, Ashted Taylor 
and Nettie Ferre came to visit. A group of people were there and it 
was suggested that Ashted and Net go get some watermellons . Ashted, 
as usual, had his horse and buggy. He suggested "Dutchie" as he call- 
ed Kate, come and go along. 

It was quite noticeable. Net didn't like this, so that evening she 
told Ashted maybe he should go on seeing "Dutchie". He said that 
would be perfectly satisfactory with him and thus their courtship began. 

Later on Kate worked at the Gulick Bros. Laundry at 35 North 
3rd West and lived at home again with her folks. 

TheStrebels after sometime , decided to move to Wasatch County. 

While going to Mutual, Kate became acquainted with Susie Young 
Gates. Mrs. Gates was her class teacher and she asked Kate to come 
work for her. 

When her work at the Gates home was finished she decided to go 
and stay with her folks at Center Creek, Southeast of Heber City. 

Ashted came to see Kate while she lived here. He came on horse- 
back and would stay over night. On one of these trips, Kate decided 
she would like to go back to Provo. They were to use one of Kate's 
father's horses. As Ashted thought his horse was best, Kate rode his 
horse and he took the work horse. After staying at Taylor's a few 
days, Kate went to work for Mrs. John Wilson at 667 No. 5th West. 
Now wages were $1.25 per week and board. 

Next she worked for Mrs. George Howe on North Academy Ave. 
She was working here when Ashted Taylor went on his mission, Sept- 
ember 22, 1897. 

Before Ashted left, Kate was re-baptized, September 11, 1897, 
because the record of her earlier baptism was lost. George Powelson 
baptized her and she was confirmed by T. N. Taylor. 



224 



AGNES KATHERINE STREBEL TAYLOR 



Each year from July 1894 including the summer of 1897, a group 
of friends had an enjoyable excursion into Strawberry Valley. The 
party consisted of Mrs. Eliza N. Taylor ( Ashted's Mother), Arthur N, 
Taylor and wife, Maria D. Taylor, Hattie Hands, Ernest Dixon and 
his sister, Alice Dixon, Bert Bullock, Annie Anderson, Ashted Taylor, 
Kate Strebel, Brig Madsen and Mammie Harrison. Sometimes others 
were included. The trip was from three to four weeks, and all had a 
glorious time fishing, hunting and horseback riding. Of course the 
trip was made by team and wagons. 

Kate worked at the Woolen Mills for some time and was still at 
that place when Ashted returned from his mission, January 13, 1900. 

They were married on April 11, 1900, in the Salt Lake Temple. 

They made their home l|^ blocks west of the Third Ward Chapel. 
While living here, 5 of their children were born: 
Fontella on December 27, 1900 
Leo A. June 11, 1 903 

Katherine July 13, 1905 Died Aug. 2, 1905 

Roy S. December 24, 1906 

Stanleys. October 3, 1909 
When Stanley was just a baby they moved over to the farm across 
the river, in the Spring of 1910. It was no pleasant thing to leave a 
modern home and come to a three room farm house, not modern in 
any way. 

Through their determined effort they finally got lights, telephone 
and water in the house and also the bath. 

They had a dairy farm and many were the milk buckets and cans 
to be washed. Sometimes they churned as many as 50 pounds of butter 
in a large barrell churn, in a day. 

After coming to the farm, two more children were born: 
Fred S. on November 11, 1915 
Genevieve September 12, 1919 

Fred was 3 years old when the bells were ringing on the first 
Armistice Day and he thought they were ringing for his birthday. 

When the first Relief Society was organized in Grandview Ward, 
Johanna Maxfield was chosen President, Kate Taylor as 1st Counselor 
and Rachael Smith as 2nd Counselor. Kate served as 1st Counselor 
under three Relief Society Pres idents : Johanna Maxfield, Rose Stewart 
and Lottie B. Davie s. 

She was called to work with the County Home Demonstrator, es- 
pecially under Miss Lee of the Farm Bureau. Kate Taylor, Emma 
Riding and Nellie Kartchner bought the first three pressure cookers in 
the community. 

The next real sorrow to come to their home was when Leo lost 
his right hand in the ensilage cutter on October 1920. His Grandmother 
Taylor bought him his first artificial hand. It was with the help of Dr. 
Fred W. Taylor, who spent many hours taking proper measurements 



AGNES KATHERINE STREBEL TAYLOR 



225 



that the artificial hand was secured for $125.00. 

Fontella was married to A. Dean Buckner on February 10, 1926 
in the Salt Lake Temple. The Taylors had a lovely wedding for their 
daughte r . 

During the summer of 1926 the family, Ashted, Kate, Leo and 
Fred managed Provana Beach Resort, at the mouth of Provo River on 
Utah Lake. Roy and Stanley took care of the farm work. 

Everything seemed satisfactory but for the condition of the 
youngest child Genevieve, whose illness had increased since she was 
six years old. Now it had been determined that it was a brain tumor. 

She was taken to the Mayo Clinic in March of 1927. The Doctors 
gave her a very minute examination and finally said nothing could be 
done to relieve the situation. They said all the operation they might 
perform could not possibly help her. They also set the time of her 
passing and she lived within 3 weeks of the limit given. 

Kate Taylor gave her little daughter every possible care until 
she passed away November 19, 1930. 

During the year of 1929, three of their sons were married: 
Roy who had returned from a mission to Great Britain, 
married Elsie Bean on June 26, 1929 in the Salt Lake Temple. 

Leo married DeVeda Hansen on September 4, 1929. Kate 
and Ashted accompanied their children through the Temple. 

On November 16, 1929, Stanley married Mildred Warren. 

This left quite a vacancy at home, but they often came home for 
supper or Sunday dinner. 

Kate and Ashted were again enjoying life. Going as usual to 
Church and Ward functions. One evening in January 1935, after Kate 
had been to Relief Society Meeting and both she and Ashted had been 
to M.I. A.; she became very sick and said she had noticed the pain 
while at Church. The pain became worse and the Doctor was called. 
He gave her a shot and she spent a fairly good night, but the next 
morning she was operated on for appendicitis. On the 4th day after 
the operation she suffered a stroke. To the family this was a shock, 
as Kate had been getting along so well. After another week in the 
hospital she was brought home and Mrs.EvaHorth helped care for her 
for 8 or 10 weeks until she was able to be up. She never was able to 
walk alone, again. Her right side remained paralized. 

As Ashted had to spend so much time caring for Kate, they de- 
cided on a change, 

Roy and Elsie were to take over the farm, Ashted was going to 
build a small home on the Northeast corner of the farm. 

While the house was being built, Ashted would take Kate in the 
car and she would watch him and Mr. Clyde as they worked on the house. 

One afternoon in early Novembe r, Kate suffered another stroke 
and passed away on Novemh>er 11, 1936.. 



14th child of George Taylor 




JOHN WESTPHAL 



E LL A 



TAYLOR 



WESTPHALL 



Ella Taylor was born October 4, 1875 at Provo, Utah. 

She was the fifth child of Henrietta Sawyer and George Taylor, Sr. 

Ella Taylor was housekeeper at the Roberts Hotel for many years. 

She married John Westphall , June 17, 1914, when she was 34 

years of age. 

Ella was the second wife of John Westphall. 

After her marriage she moved to Santa Anna, California. 

Her death occured on August 3, 1959 at Costa Mesa, California. 

Ella Taylor Westphall was buried at Provo Cemetery, Block 1, 

Lot 58 on August 6, 1959. Age 84 Years. 



227 



GEORGE TAYLOR - - - PHOTOGRAPHER 



George Taylor, Sr. is recognized as the first photographer south 
of Salt Lake City. Even before he purchased his first camera, he had 
an intense interest in photography. He read all the books, magazines 
and other written material he could lay his hands on; and grasped every 
opportunity of conversing with persons with a knowledge of photography. 

With this knowledge he had gleaned from books he commenced to 
apply it to practice with the purchase of his first camera in 1864. At 
first he began experimenting with pictures of his family and friends. 
He mixed his own chemicals, experimenting with different mixtures 
often until the wee hours of the night, until he finally came up with the 
result he was seeking. If by the next night it was not just the result he 
wanted, he would start his experiment all over again. 

Later, not having the money to buy a new camera in order to im- 
prove his work, he made his own. His son John T. Taylor was given 
one of his cameras and which he prized highly. It was stolen from the 
house when it was being moved from First North. 

George's persistence and patience rewarded him with such good 
results with his picture taking that he set up his Photographic Gallery 
in his furniture store where he also carried a supply of photographic 
supplies . 

Always wanting to improve the quality of his pictures, in about 
1870, he sent his daughter, Hattie, to the veteran photographer in Salt 
Lake City, C. R. Savage Studio, to learn to touch-up the finished 
pictures and to learn any new products or techniques. 

His first pictures were the tin type negative pictures. Instead of 
a picture being printed from the negative, the only copy, the negative 
was given to the customer. 

About a year later, 1871 , George began to use chloride plates which 
required him to make his own negatives by smearing the chloride over 
the glass plates before making the exposure. He became very success- 
ful with both the dry and the wet plate methods. 

Six of these glass negative plates are in the George Taylor photo- 
graphic collection in the H. B. Lee Library on the B. Y. U. Campus. 
Pictures printed from these plates just recently, are reproduced in this 
book on pages No. 

Many of his pictures made in the l860's and l870's are clear and 
distinct and show very little fading which he attributed to the "water 
finishing" method he insisted on using. 

The large and swift Millrace ditch ran down Second West, just to 
the West of his home. If he knew there would be no dye dumped into the 
water from the Woolen Mills dyeing vats, he would put his prints in the 
Millrace water, after going through the chemical treatment, and let them 
wash for many hours. 



228 



t 



GEORGE TAYLOR - 



- Photographer 



By 1885 George had given up commercial photography, but con- 
tinued on as a hobby until 1920. 

With the sale of his furniture business to his first wife, Eliza and 
her sons, George set up his seventeen year old son, John T. and his 
nineteen year old daughter, "Polly" in the grocery business, in the 
building just east of the Furniture Store. In connection with the grocery 
business he brought in a supply of photographic supplies, which he 
managed. The combined business was named TAYLOR & CO. 

With the marriage of "Polly" to Wm. D. Roberts, Jr. and the 
creation of the grocery business of John T. Taylor and Ralph Poulton; 
George's photographic Supply business was moved across the street 
to 247 West Center Street, where he continued in business as GEORGE 
TAYLOR, Sr. Store. 

To honor one of the early pioneer photographers of the West and 
the first photographer South of Salt Lake City, the Brigham Young 
University Library has created a special GEORGE TAYLOR PHOTO- 
GRAPHIC COLLECTION of his pictures. They would welcome receiving 
any and all of George Taylor's pictures in this permanent collection. 



" Lives of great men all remind us, 
We can make our lives sublime; 
And departing leave behind us, 
Footprints in the sands of time. " 



229 



I 




SALT LAKE TABERNACLE j 

I 




Corner of 3rd West & Center 






1 



GEORGE TAYLOR - Banker 



George Taylor's reputation as an honest man, whose "word was 
as good as his bond" had been earned with his business dealings with 
his friends and neighbors in the County. 

Before the first bank had been established in Provo, many of the 
merchants and his personal friends would bring their money and other 
valuables for temporary safe keeping in a large strong box he had. All 
the security they received was his word that he would protect it as his 
own and a receipt of the amount of the valuables left with him. 

In 1882 he took an active part in organizing the First National 
Bank of Provo, becoming a stockholder and Director of the Bank. 

With the panic of 1893, when so many of the banks in the State 
closed their doors, he served on the committee to secure pledges from 
the stockholders and depositors to leave their money in the bank and 
take time certificates so the bank could remain open and re-organized. 
Several of the large stockholders and officers in the bank, who also 
held high Church positions in the Stake, would not agree to this proposal 
but insisted on withdrawing their money from the bank, which resulted 
in the bank going into a government receivership. This action by these 
Church officials was the crowning blow, causing him to withdraw from 
the Church. 

Although the Utah County Savings Bank was an affiliate and located 
in the same building as the First National Bank, it was able to continue 
on in business after the bank failed. George Taylor was one of the 
organizers, was a Director, and a President of the Utah County Savings 
Banko 

The Provo Commercial Savings Bank was organized in 1890 with 
a capitalization of $100, 000. 00, It's officers were : Reed Smoot, Pres . ; 
C. E. Loose, Vice-president; J, T. Farrer, Cashier. 

The Commercial Bank was able to weather the panic of "93" and 
took over the First National Bank when it failed. 

George Taylor became very active in helping the Commercial 
Savings Bank to collect and liquidate the old loans of the First National 
Bank which they had acquired when they took over the old bank assets. 

From this activity and his becoming a depositor and stockholder, 
he was made a Director of the Provo Commercial Savings Bank and 
served on its Board of Directors for the next forty-two years. 

The following was copied from a notation George had written in a 
First National Bank booklet, filed in his strong box. 

"Geo Taylor Sr. was a stockholder in Fir st National Bank of Provo 
from its organization in 1882, Have been connected in Provo Commer- 
cial Savings ever since, occupying same postion ( as a Director) until 
Jany. 1924, then because I would not consent to unnecessary, extrava- 
gance in Bank building and other doings, I was kicked out after 42 years 
service. I blame this to J. F, Farrer and C. E. Loose. 

First National Bank, Provo City, Utah organized 1882; was chair- 
man of executive committee. " 

s/ "George Taylor, Sr." 

232 




George Taylor, Sr. 



Letterhead 



G. TAYLOR'S 









Ohm jL<*»if>«, 




Geo. Taylor, Sr. 
PHOTO SUPPLY HOUSE. 

247 W. CENTtK ST. 














Provo City, Utah. _ 


190 



aEOR<}E TAYLOR, 



liotographer, 



PROVO CITY, 
UTAH. 



Photograph Backing 




Provo CUty, - Utah. 



Back of George Taylor's 
Photographs 




A thirsty George Taylor 
near Utah Lake 



A Brief History of the Origin of Taylor Brothers Co. 

George Taylor, a pioneer to Utah and Provo in 1863, opened a 
photographic studio at approximately 250 West Center Street and in 
1866 was the first photographer in Provo. 

To supplement his photographic income, he started selling furn- 
iture pieces made by the Cluff Brothers at their factory located on the 
ground floor of the Cluff Hall, the corner of 2nd North and 2nd East. 
This furniture was made by hand and sold by George Taylor on a 
commission basis. George Taylor proved to be an excellent salesman 
and decided to become a merchant dealing in furniture. 

Being without capital to start his furniture- selling venture, he 
was required to borrow the necessary money at an interest rate of 
24% per annum. Desiring to stock a greater variety of furniture than 
that manufactured by the Cluff Bros. , he made the acquaintance with 
Henry Dinwoody of Salt Lake City, who sold him the additional furn- 
iture he desired to put in his stock at Provo. 

The Cluff Brothers must be given the credit for the stimuli pro- 
vided to get George started in the furniture business and for him to 
continue in business and become the successful merchant he became. 

Having no delivery wagon, it was no unusual sight to see George 
Taylor and one of his sons delivering a load of furniture on their backs, 
from his store to the customers' home. 

Although the George Taylor Furniture & Music Store continued 
to prosper and grow, George retained his photographic shop in connec- 
tion with the Furniture & Music Store until 1890. 

With the passage of the Edmund Law in 1882, it became necessary 
for George Taylor to go on the "underground" to avoid being appre- 
hended by the "federal agents" for having two wives. For five years 
he had been able to keep out of the reach of the "feds" by living with 
the Poulton Family and other friends in Provo and Utah County. On 
one occasion he was hanging a picture in his store, when a "fed" 
sneaked up behind him. To avoid being caught, George had to outrun 
his pursuer by going clear to the river bridge, at the top of Fifth West, 
before he could shake him. 

In about 1886 after having evaded the "federal agents" for five 
years, he was finally arrested by an agent named Norrell, who had re- 
presented himself as a traveling salesman taking orders for merchan- 
dise to re- sell in George Taylor's Furniture & Music Store. 

At the trial, there was no complaining witness so he was set free 
without a sentence or fine. 

Previous to his going on the "underground" George had trans- 
ferred title to his business and property to his oldest son George 
Taylor, Jr. He did this to avoid his property being confiscated by the 
Federal Government in case he was arrested for being married to two 
wive s . 



235 



236 



TAYLOR BROTHERS COMPANY 



In November 1886, George Taylor made a separation agreement 
with his 2nd wife , Henrietta, and made a division of his property. Each 
wife was given the home she and her family were living in. To Eliza he 
gave five acres of land between 7th and 8th West on 4th North, and a 
lot of a block) on the corner of 7th West and 5th North. To Henri- 
etta he gave the five acres of farming ground in the Southwest part of 
Provo, called the "fort fields". He then moved into one of the rooms 
of his sister's son's, George Henry Hickman, at about 245 West Center 
Street, which was_owned by, John Beesley. 

There had been some conversation relative to the sale of the 
George Taylor Furniture and Music Store by George and Henry South- 
worth, who owned a general merchandise store in the old "Round 
House" on the corner of 5th West and 1st North. Mr. Southworth had 
offered George $10,000 for his merchandise, fixtures and building. 
George was seriously thinking about the sale and also contemplating a 
trip to England with the proceeds. 

Inasmuch as title to the property and the business had been trans- 
ferred to the oldest son, George Taylor, Jr. as to avoid possible 
confiscation by the "feds" and since the sons of Eliza had worked 
with their father in building the business; they thought it only fair and 
right that they and their mother should have first chance to buy the 
business; so the boys through their mother offered to pay the same 
price ( 10,000) that Mr. Southworth had offered to pay. The offer of 
$10,000 was refused by George Sr., Since he did not have title to 
the property and the business, he knew -had to work out some kind of 
a deal with the family; so he agreed to sell the business, including the 
land, building, and stock for $11,000. The new purchasers were: 
Eliza N. Taylor, George Taylor, Jr., Thomas N. Taylor, Arthur N. 
Taylor and John D. Dixon, doing business as Taylor Bros. Co. 

To raise this $11,000, the First National Bank agreed to under- 
write the following settlement whereby George Taylor was paid for 
his mercantile business in Provo: $3, 000 cash was paid at the signing 
of the agreement. Four bank- guaranteed notes of $2,000 each were 
given by the purchasers, each bearing interest at 10% per annum. One 
note was to be paid off every three months and all were to be paid with- 
in one year. All notes were paid promptly as agreed. 

The Taylor Brothers Company was then incorporated under the 
State laws of Utah in 1890 with "Grandma" Eliza Nicholls Taylor as 
President, George Taylor, Jr., as vice-president, John DeGrey 
Dixon as secretary and treasurer, Arthur N. Taylor as a director and 
Thomas N. Taylor as a director and manager. 

Taylor Brothers Company was incorporated for $50,000 with a 
paid up capital of $30, 500. The land, buildings and stock of merchan- 
dise taken over from George Taylor were set up on the books at $22, 000; 



TAYLOR BROTHERS COMPANY 



237 



$11,000 of which went to Eliza NichoUs Taylor. She mortgaged her 
home and the 5-acre "promised land" farm and contributed this to the 
corporation, bringing her total investment up to $14,000. George 
Taylor, Jr. put in $5, 000, Arthur N. Taylor (who was still in school) 
$1,500, Thomas N. Taylor $5 , 000 and John D. Dixon $5, 000. This 
made a total of $30, 500 subscribed and paid-up stock. 

The name "Taylor Bros." was derived from the original three 
brothers: George Taylor, Jr., Thomas N. Taylor and Arthur N. Taylor 
and the two younger brothers, Walter G. Taylor and Ashted Taylor, 
who joined the Company after 1890. 

The year of Incorporation was a boom year for business. A 
normal year's business volume amounted to between $13,000 and 
$14,000. Sales volume for the year 1890 amounted to $50,000. 

Such prosperity and youthful optimism encouraged them to ex- 
pand, so a three-story brick building was constructed, one of the first 
on Provo's Main Street. Things went along smoothly and successfully 
for a few years, then the depression of 1893 struck. For the next few 
years it was really a struggle for this new and growing corporation 
to meet its obligations and stay solvent. 

James F. McClellan, his wife, Hattie Taylor McClellan, Arthur 
N. Taylor and Walter G. Taylor went to the gold mining area of Mont- 
ana where they worked in the ore mills, sending their wages back to 
the struggling corporation to help defray their expenses and keep the 
business doors open. 

In the beginning, furniture, carpets, organs and wallpaper were 
the main lines of merchandise. Later, stoves, hardware, crockery 
and all household items were added. In 1913, Walter Needham of 
American Fork joined the organization and a dry goods department 
was added. A year later a men's clothing department was added. 

After "weathering" the depression of 93, Taylor Bros. Co. con- 
tinued to grow physically as well as financially. A three-story building 
106 feet wide fronting on Center Street, the original site of the small 
store first started by George Taylor, and extending nearly one-half a 
block long to the north, was built. Years later a special warehouse 
building of two stories and over one hundred feet long was built adjac- 
ent to the northwest corner of the main building. 

Eventually Taylor Bros . Co. expanded their operations in the way 
of branch stores in Eureka and Spanish Fork. Albert F. Dixon, a well- 
liked and long-time employee, was manager of this Spanish Fork branch. 

Taylor Brothers Company had records of serving families of four 
generations, and in many cases, son, father, and grandfather had all 
furnished their homes from Taylor Brothers Company. 



Taylor Brothers Co. Employees 



DIXON TAYLOR RUSSELL COMPANY 



The first furniture store in Provo, started in pioneer days, 
was owned and operated by George Taylor. His son, Arthur N. Taylor, 
with a group of young Provo business men, in the summer of 1921, or- 
ganized the DIXON TAYLOR RUSSELL COMPANY. Arthur N. Taylor 
was the President and Manager; Albert F. Dixon, Vice-president; 
Sidney W. Russell, Sec. & Treas. ; and Orson G. Bird, J. W. Howe, Jr. 
and William D. Norman were Directors. The Company received its 
charter to do business on October 6, 1921, and opened the doors of its 
first store, in Provo - a three story brick building, at the corner of 
Third West and Center Street - on the First day of November 1921. 

Arthur N. Taylor, who had been in the furniture business for 
more than 30 years, believed that merchandise should be sold at one 
price to all - the lowest possible price - and that partiality and special 
favors to individuals should not be. This "One Price Policy" was the 
foundation of the Dixon Taylor Russell Co. Discounts were done away 
with. Goods were sold at the cash price, and if people desired install- 
ment payments , convenient terms were arranged and the customer paid, 
in addition to the cost of his merchandise, a small carrying charge 
covering the length of time he wished to run his account. 

This policy for a furniture store, was revolutionary in this inter- 
mountain country at that time. It was a hard program to start with, as 
the public had been schooled to trade for discounts. Every man, depend- 
ing on who he was, seemed to have a different purchasing power. It 
was not long, however, before the public realized that the Dixon Taylor 
Russell Co, was sincere in carrying out their policy of One Price to all. 
They saw that every man, regardless of whether he va s a good friend, 
a rich man, a poor man, or a stranger, paid the same price, A child 
could go into the store and buy a bedroom set or any other item, and 
would receive the same deal as the most skilled traders. This policy 
established confidence with the public and brought increased business 
and resulted in a pleasing growth. 

Arthur N. Taylor also dreamed of a business that would bring 
furniture, house furnishings, and service into the rural communities 
at prices as low as could be had in the larger cities and trading centers, 
in order to do this, he could see that a large buying power in carload 
lots direct from the factory was necessary. It would be necessary also 
to have a display in the smaller towns where it would be convenient for 
the people to see the things offered for their homes. 

This started the opening of Branch Stores; with their Managers: 
The Springville Store opened Feb. 1, 1924, S. B, Mendenhall, Mgr. 
The Nephi Store opened May 26, 1924, John C. Hall, Mgr. 
The Payson Store opened August 15, 1924, Golden Taylor, Mgr. 
The Pleasant Grove Store opened Feb. 23, 1926, Elton L. Taylor. 



239 



240 



DIXON TAYLOR RUSSELL CO. 



The Spanish Fork Store opened March 26, 1926, Arnold Angel, Mgr. 

The Heber Store opened March 15, 1927, Glen Baker, Mgr. 

The American Fork Store opened Sept, 10, 1927, Glen L. Taylor. 

The Price Store opened July 3, 1929, Elton L. Taylor, Mgr. 

The Helper Store opened June 14, 1930, Allen Halverson, Mgr. 

The Orem Store opened , Thomas Reese, Mgr. 

By the year 1 929, ten stores and three districts were in operation 
in Central, Eastern and Southern Utah, Carload shipments were roll- 
ing constantly direct from factories to the Provo warehouse and from 
that point distributed by company trucks tp^^he branch stores. 

In November of 1946 a warehouse/on railroad trackage at the 
corner of 5th South and 5th West was purchased and three large ware- 
house buildings were constructed. Furniture and furnishings were ship- 
ed in by carload lots and were emptied directly into this spacious ware- 
house. Company trucks then distributed the merchandise from here to 
the stores. 

In 1922 there were 12 carloads of merchandise received at the 
Provo Store, By 1940 the number of train carloads, unloaded at the 
trackage warehouse, had grown to 100 carloads. 

Other services rendered were: A large drapery workshop, em- 
ploying ten to twelve women who made up curtains, draperies, slip 
covers, etc. 

An upholstering shop, employing eight men who reconditioned 
and rebuilt furniture. 

A shade shop, making up custom window shades, 

A furniture repair shop for the repair of broken furniture. 

A refinishing shop for reconditioning damaged surfaces and mak- 
ing new finishes and color effects on furniture. 

An appliance repair shop for installing and repair of major home 
appliances, 

A floor covering service department of ten men to install linol- 
eum, carpets, tile and other floor coverings. 

Trained decorators to advise on the decoration of the home with 
draperies, floor coverings, wallpapers and furniture. 

Over 8640 special jobs were performed by these service depart- 
ments in 1939. No other institution in the State, at that time, offered 
such a varied service. 

After a fire on July 20, 1963, which did considerable smoke 
damage to the building and merchandise, business was never the same. 
So, after nearly forty-three years of operation, the Board of Directors 
decided to cease operation of the Dixon Taylor Russell Company. 



George Taylor Furniture and 
Successors 

Taylor Bros, Co., D. T. R. Co., M. R. Taylor Co. , Taylor Partners , 

Taylor's Inc., D.A. Taylor Co, 




Geo. Taylor - Furniture 




Taylor Bros. Co. 




PROVO, UTAH 



Dixon Taylor Russell Co, 



( Copy of letter for sale of Taylor Bros. Stock) 

Apl. 5/21 

Dear Bro. Tom, 

In regards the matter of selling my stock in the Taylor Bros, 
Co. and the Taylor Investment Co. that I was asking you about some 
time ago. I desire to say that I am of the same mind and desire to 
make the following proposition: I will transfer my 50 shares of 
Taylor Bros. Co. stock and my share in the Taylor Investment Co. to 
you for $50,000. ( fifty thousand dollars), and 68 ft. of ground on the 
south side of Center Street south of the F. & M. Bank ( Farmers & 
Merchants Bank), and the Dodge car. 

I have figured the values over, and believe this will be a fair 
proposition to you as well as to my self, under the present conditions. 
You can see from the list of inventory that I gave you how I arrive 
at this value. 

Trusting this will be agreeable and satisfactory with you. I. 
remain as ever. 

Your brother, 

s/ Arthur N. Taylor 



242 



Arthur N. Taylor's valuation of Taylor Bros. Co. stock 

April 1921 



Provo Store ground 105 ft @ 350 
" " building & equipment 
" Smith Corner 106 ft. @ 300 

1st North 3rd West corner 198 ft. @ 50 
" " " " warehouse 

Lewis Corner 132 ft. @ 50 

Sp. Fork Branch - Building & ground 

Eureka 

Stock on hand - Provo, Sp. Fork & Eureka 

Accounts & bills Rec. over & above 
bills & acc'ts. Payable 



36, 750. 


00 


100, 000. 


00 


31 , 800. 


00 


9, 000. 


00 


25, 000. 


00 


6, 600. 


00 


16, 000. 


00 


16, 000. 


00 


242, 050. 


00 


300, 000. 


00 


542, 050 


. 00 


100, 000. 


00 


642, 050. 


00 


6.4. 205. 


00 


706, 255. 


00 



Business goodwill 10% 

500) 642050 ( 1284. 10 per share 500 ) 706255 ( 1410.51 per share 

500 ) 542050 ( 1084. 10 per share 



Provo Store ground 105 x 100 ft. @ 500 per ft. 52,500.00 

" " main building " & equipment 100,000.00 
" " ground 105 x 99 ft back of main 

building @ 100 10, 500. 00 

" " building & warehouse above 10,000.00 

Smith corner 108 x 199 ft. & bldg. @ 500 54,000.00 

3rd West 1st North corner 198 x 199 @ 100 19,800.00 

Warehouse on above ground 20,000.00 

Lewis corner 1st No. 2nd West 115 x 115 @ 50 5, 750.00 

Sp. Fork ground 46 x 1 98. Bldg. 46 x 65 16,000.00 

Eureka 16,000.00 



304, 550. 00 



Mdse. stock on hand, Provo, Sp. Fork, Eureka 

including fixtures, trucks & auto's 300,000.00 

Acc'ts. & bills Receivable over & above 

bills & acc'ts Payable 100, 000. 00 

704, 500. 00 

Business goodwill 10% 
Also bills & acc'ts. thrown out & called 
lost that will be collected 

500 ) 704,500 ( 1409 per share 



* Includes 1/3 cut 
243 



Taylor Bros. Co. 



RESOURCE AND LIABILITIES 
19 2 1 ? 



Cash on hand 5, 658. 71 

Bills Rec. 83, 327. 51 

Accounts Rec. 20,779. 31 

Mdse. as per Inv. 200,323, 20 

Store & Office Fix. 8,885.10 
Real Estate & Bldgs. 78,693.45 
Autos 1,962.28 
Trucks 2,613.48 
Stocks & bonds 7, 163. 65 

409,410. 69 

Bills Payable for Mdse. 5,041.58 
" " Banks 39,450.00 

Acct's Payable 55, 200.79 

Other Bills Payable 16,515.00 
Total Liabilities 116,107.37 
Capital 50,000. 00 

Surplus 243,203. 32 

409,410. 69 



244 



Taylor Bros. Co. 



RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES 
1919 



Cash on hand 
Mdse. Inventory- 
Bills Receivable 
Accounts Receivable 
Autos 
T rucks 

Real Estate & Bldgs. 
Store & office fixtures 

Bills Payable 

Capital 

Surplus 

Accounts Payable 
F. & M. Bank 
Stocks & bonds 



3,317. 05 
146, 151.40 
82,576.79 
75, 182. 12 

1,416. 28 

1, 192.50 
69, 704.49 

9, 608. 22 



27, 150. 00 
50, 000. 00 
225, 848. 24 
42,978.51 
6, 840. 80 



2, 704. 32 



391. 853. 27 



391,853. 27 



Taylor Bros. Co. Stockholders 



T. N. Taylor 
T. S. Taylor 
Eliza N. Taylor 
A. N. Taylor 
J. D, Dixon 
S. L. Dixon 



25 2 Shares 
1 

141 
50 
28 
28 



500 



TOTAL RESOURCES: 

Accounts owing 
Bills , " 
Bank 



42,978.51 
27, 150. 00 
6. 840. 00 



Plus cut in stock 

Plus gains 1920 (40, 000) 



391,853. 27 



76, 969. 31 
314,883. 96 



73, 075. 70 
20. 000. 00 



500 S )407,959.66 ( 815.91 per 

share 

Plus the goodwill and established business should equal 
$ 1000 per share. 



245 



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246 



George Taylor Furniture and SUCCESSORS 




'Taylor Bros. First Truck 




M. R. TAYLOR FURNITURE CO. 



Marion R. Taylor ( son of Thomas N. and Maud R. Taylor) 
came to Spanish Fork in October of 1 923. He brought with him his 
bride, Josephine Crandall of Springville and a six month old son, 
Richard, 

Marion became manager of the Spanish Fork Branch of Taylor 
Brothers Company which had opened for bus ine ss in 1916 with Albert 
F, Dixon as manager. The business was located in a building on 
the west side of Main Street at 273 North, three-fourths of a block 
north of the Spanish Fork Post Office. This building which is still 
in the Taylor family ( now owned by Richard and David Taylor) was 
built in 1891 by a local cooperative known as the Young Men's Co-op. 
The manager of the co-op was Pratt P. Thomas. This business did 
not succeed and went into receivership a few years before the build- 
ing was acquired by Taylor Bros. Co. 

The building was wonderfully constructed and still is in superb 
condition. In 1965, when David was remodeling the building and 
replacing the roof, it was discovered that the roof sheeting was six 
inch tongue and groove one inch lumber which was just as bright as 
though recently installed. 

Marion and Josephine jumped into the community and church 
life of Spanish Fork. At age 29, Marion was president of the local 
Kiwanis Club and Josephine, who was a fine musician, ( a singer 
and a violinist ) quickly became involved in musical and other cult- 
ural activities in the community. The business prospered in the 
twenties, but Marion found time to assume leadership positions in 
the American Legion ( and Josephine in the auziliary) as well as do 
church work. Marion was Supe rintendant of the Palmyra Stake MIA 
for about years, at a time when the MIA was a great part of the 
Church. 

Just before the depression of the thirties struck, Marion ac- 
quired a 40 acre irrigated farm in Benjamin which he farmed while 
operating the Furniture Store. Richard remembers that the two 
operations took most of the hours of most days. Marion enjoyed 
farming as much as selling furniture and he didn't mind the extra 
work. 

During the thirties, the old building became somewhat run 
down - there was little money to remodel or maintain during that 
period. Richard remembers an old Wise furnace in the basement 
of the building with a 32 inch fire pot. There was no stoker and in 
cold weather the top of the furnace often burned a cherry red below 
a huge iron grill, on the main floor level, where the rising heat es- 
caped to the entire building. There was many a hot foot on that 
grill ! 

During the early and mid thirties, the store sold the usual 
furniture, such as living room, dining room and bedroom sets; and 
also kitchen ranges (Montag), Apex washers and various brands of 



248 



M.R. TAYLOR FURNITURE CO. 



refrigerators, floor coverings - mostly 9' by 12' rugs were also a 
big item. If the rug didn't fit the room, you surrounded it with 
"woodoleum", a very thin linoleum which was grained to look like 
hard wood flooring. Put a coal circulating heater at one end of the 
room and you had a typical "front room" in Spanish Fork in the 30's. 

One interesting feature of this period was that another branch 
of the Taylor family - Arthur N, Taylor, one of the or iginal Taylor 
Brothers, together with his sons and Albert F. Dixon, first Spanish 
Fork Branch manager of Taylor Bros, Co, ; were major stockholders 
of Dixon Taylor Rus sell Co. who operated a branch store in Spanish 
Fork. The two Taylor stores competed for the same furniture dol- 
lar. So, most of the people in Spanish Fork bought furniture and 
household appliances from a Taylor, no matter which store they 
went to. 

By the time World War II broke out in September of 1939, 
Marion and Josephine had five children (two boys, Richard and 
David, and three girls, Elizabeth, Patricia and Merle) aged six to 
sixteen. The outbreak of war soon brought an end to the depression 
and the problem in the furniture business was not how to sell mer- 
chandise but how to get it. Marion proved very adept at this. How- 
ever, tragedy struck the family on December 18, 1943. The family 
went to a movie and while away the family home was gutted by fire. 

The fire turned out to be a blessing in disguise, however, 
since it prompted the purchase of Taylor Brothers Branch Store by 
Marion, who then ran the store as his own as M. R. Taylor Furniture 
Co. from that time until his death in 1956. During this period, 
David learned about the furniture business from the ground up and 
spent much time on his knees laying carpet and linoleum, unpacking 
and assembling furniture and appliances and learning much about the 
business. He now has a most beautiful furniture store in Orem and 
a carpet warehouse operation in Provo, the latest link in a chain of 
furniture and household retail business which the Taylor family have 
owned in unbroken succession since 1866 - for 117 years. 

By 1956, when Marion died after a long bout with illness, the 
business was not doing well, but upon Marion's death David took hold 
and brought the vigor of youth and experience to the business and 
operated it in Spanish Fork from 1956 until January 1982 when the 
Taylor furniture business finally closed in Spanish Fork after 66 
years continous operation. The building now is occupied on the main 
floor by Utah Office Supply and in the basement by Taylor and Taylor 
(Richard and son, Jim ) who have law offices there. 

Richard Taylor 
April 1983 



249 



RESUME' AND HISTORY OF TAYLOR'S, INC. 



Taylor Brothers Company, a Utah corporation, was formed 
in 1890. It continued in business as a retail department store at 
its original location at 250 West Center Street, Provo, Utah up to 
approximately the year 1942. 

In 1942, T. Sterling Taylor, eldest son of Thomas NichoUs 
Taylor, returned to the State of Utah at the request of his parents 
to assist in the management of the family business. Upon the re- 
turn of T. Sterling Taylor, in approximately 1942, a family part- 
nership was formed to operate the retail operation of its business. 
Taylor Brothers Company retained ownership of the land and the 
buildings and the partnership was the operating company and leased 
the property from the Taylor Brothers Company. The partners 
were: Thomas Nicholls Taylor, Lester Rogers Taylor, H. Rex 
Taylor, T, Sterling Taylor. 

Thomas N. Taylorhad a 51% interest in the partnership and 
was the controlling and managing partner. This partnership con- 
tinued on until the year 1947, at which time a new corporation was 
formed, Taylor's, Inc. 

Taylor's, Inc., a Utah corporation, was formed for the pur- 
pose of taking over the responsibilites of the family partnership, 
the retail operating company leasing the store and building from 
Taylor Brothers Company. The corporation was organized with 
two classes of stock, preferred, non-voting stock, and common, 
voting stock. The partners in the family partnership received stock 
interests in Taylor's, Inc. to replace their partnership interest in 
the family partnership. Thomas N. Taylor received preferred 
stock, Lester R. Taylor, H. Rex Taylor received preferred stock. 
T. Sterling Taylor received the common, voting or management 
stock of the corporation. The percentage of stock in the new corp- 
oration were the same as they were in the family partnership. 
However, T. Sterling Taylor bought and paid for additional common 
or voting stock. Thomas N. Taylor made the decision as to who 
was to receive the common stock and who was to receive the pre- 
ferred stock. The effect of the decision of Thomas N. Taylor was 
that T. Sterling Taylor, his eldest son, should have the control and 
management of the retail operating company. The family members 
retained their stock interests in Taylor Brothers Company, the 
owner of the land and buildings upon which the retail company op- 
erated. The Taylor's, Inc., the operating company, leased the 
land and buildings and the family members participated in the lease 
income. In 19^4 Taylor's, Inc. moved to a newly remodeled build- 
ing in Central Square, Second West and Second North. 

Thomas Sterling Taylor, Jr. 
I. D. # 813 

250 June 1983 



D. A. TAYLOR COMPANY 
( Taylor & Co. ) 
A Fourth Generation Furniture Dealer 

My early furniture experience began as I assisted my father 
in the Taylor Brothers Branch in Spanish Fork, Utah. All the child- 
ren of the family learned the basic merchandising skills and father 
was patient in teaching us to work. 

In 1949 I served a mission to France for the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints, and upon returning home went to the 
Brigham Young University and completed a degree in business - - 
graduating in the spring of 1954. 

After college, I went into the Air Force and became a pilot. 
When father became seriously ill, I was released from my Air 
Force duties to come home and assist the family. Father died a 
few days prior to my Air Force release, and I took over the opera- 
tion of the Spanish Fork Store, April 1 , 1956, purchasing the busin- 
ess from my mother. 

In 1957 I opened Taylor Carpets, a carpet specialty operation, 
in Orem. The business was located on the ground floor of an old 
home that I purchased from Frank Woffinden, and the top floor was 
made into an apartment. During the ensuing years we added addi- 
tional floorspace to the old home five times, the last being in 1978 
when a near disastrous fire destroyed a large section of the store 
and forced us to rebuild. At that time we added additional floor space . 

During 1975 the name was changed from Taylor Carpets, a 
carpet specialty store, to Taylor and Company; now offering a full 
line of fine furniture. 

Our merchandising emphasis has been in the broad, middle- 
price range, with emphasis on style and good value at reasonable 
price So 

The furniture business has been exciting and demanding-- very 
challenging, like a roller coaster that you can't get off and are not 
sure you want to. 

David A. Taylor 
I.D.No. 864 

David Alan Taylor is the fourth child and second son of Marion 
Rogers Taylor and Josephine Cook Crandall Taylor and was born 
and raised in Spanish Fork, but is now a resident of Orem, Utah. 



251 



F a r m e r s 



Me r chant s Bank 




Farmers & Merchants Bank 
290 West Center 



Capital $100,000.00 

Control Yourself . . . 

by spending a little less than 
you make and put it in the 
Bank to draw interest. We 
will appreciate your account. 



Farmers & Merchants Bank 

T. N. Taylor, Pres. J- D. Dixon, Cashier 

John F. Bennett, Vice-Pres. 

Arnold Dixon. Ass't. -Cashier 




Farmers & Merchants Bank 
Interior 



or l»K«»V«>.l TC\H. 



CAPITAL » 50,000. 





' WE SOL.CIT >OlJR auSlNtSS, 
PHOMISING THE MOST CABEFUl- 
ATTENTiON 




Farmers & Merchants Bank 
Taylor Brothers Company 
West Center Street 



DECEMBER 27. iW> 
:jBitnitJ Irom R.-ptirt m>ie Sec<rt»ty ol Sulc) 



RESOURCES 



.SH AND SIGHT EXCHANGE 



l.fi-Jl OS 

iie.iss.6S 



i.i.uiin 



Protection 
For Your 
Valuable 
Papers 



klcd for the con- 
vctiii-iu ful tin r> "l'li- "I ProoanJ vicinity 
a l.iri-.l'...of v.iuli flui-J up with the latest 
H.f.'U J,-p..sil lloxos lor. I..- .aU- keeping of 
\ :,lu..bl.- l'..nor. 1. ..^ ■<<>"••'• M"Tt««e.. 
„..,.,., s„Kk (:.r,ilK..c,.\..l."HeJ'»'''>- 
, I !,>■«■ Si.fe.> Ik. 



' renteil tttr 



$1.00 AND UP 
PER ANNUM 



FARMERS & MERCHANTS BANK 



On September 2Z, 1906, the Farmers & Merchants Bank was 
organized with Thomas N. Taylor as President; Homer Rich as Vice- 
president; John D. Dixon, Cashier. Directors were: Alma Van Wagenen 
John J. Craner, Simon P. Eggertsen, and Wm. R. Wallace. 

A new two- story, brick building was constructed on the corner 
of Center Street and Third West, on the corner previously occupied by 
Lewis Hall, the original home of the Brigham Young Academy. 

From his journal, T. N. Taylor records the beginning of this 
organization: 

" It was a strange incident that brought about the establishment 
of this bank. The First National Bank had been taken over by the Provo 
Commercial Savings Bank, When we opened out account (Taylor Bros. 
Co.) with them, I went to Reed Smoot, who was the President, and 
arranged with him for a standing loan of $5,000.00 and the privilege 
of a $5,000.00 overdraft making the loan at its height, $10,000.00. 
Reed was elected to the U. S. Senate and left Provo. Some time after 
he had gone, I was called up to the Bank and Mr. C, E. Loose, vice- 
president and manager in charge said they wanted some security on 
our loan. I asked him what was the matter and told him of my agree- 
ment with Reed, asked if we had at any time exceeded the amount we 
were to have. He said no but they felt they must have some security. 
I asked him if the agreement of their Pres. would not stand. Told him 
we would give him a statement of our affairs and that he would be at 
liberty to verify the same. Next day I was called up and was told that 
they insisted on proper security. I went to Salt Lake, met my old 
friends, John Bennett and W, R, Wallace. They took me over to Wells- 
Fargo Bank, introduced me to the Cashier, Mr. Miller, John said, as 
I remember, "Tom will pay all he agrees". I explained our situation 
to Mr. Miller. He asked me how much money we needed. I said, 
"10,000. 00". He said, "Here is a small check book, we will get you 
a large one made up. In the meantime, go pay your bank off. You may 
have a $10,000, 00 overdraft privilege here. " And he gave me a much 
lower rate of interest, I went up to the Provo Commercial next day 
and asked for the amount owing them, gave them a check for it. Mr. 
Loose was the re and asked me if that meant we were closing our account, 
I asked him what else I could do. Our business was evidently not satis- 
factory. We had no choice in the matter. I said, "By the way I owe you 
$500. 00. Do you want that paid up too? " He said, "Yes, we want it all 
cleaned up". I went over to the State Bank, borrowed $500.00 and paid 
the Commercial Bank off. The State was a small bank with only 
$25,000, 00 capital and were unable to handle our account. I gave them 
my personal account and a local account of the Company, one we used 
to pay our freight and salaries, and held our main account with Wells- 
Fargo. When Walker Bank bought out Wells-Fargo Bank, I received 
a letter from Mr. H. M. Walker asking us to continue with them, which 
we did; but it did not look well for us to be asking people to trade in 



253 



FARMERS & MERCHANTS BANK 



Provo and we to do our banking outside. So we decided to open a bank, 
the Farmers and Merchants Bank is the result. " 

" In 1906, we organized the Farmers & Merchants Bank of Provo 
with a capital of $50 , 000. 00. I was elected President and have held 
the position since its organization. We commenced a new building on 
the corner of 3rd West and Center. The building was not completed so 
I received deposits and made loans from my office, which was then 
situated at the south end of the balcony on the east side of our store 
(Taylor Bros. Co.). This business has grown far beyond my fondest 
hopes and expectation. When we reached our one quarter of a million 
mark in totals, we got out a special statement. Our totals at this writ- 
ing are one and one-half millions ( $1 , 500, 000„ 00). We doubled our 
capital from $50, 000, 00 to $ 1 00 , 000„ 00 in order to become a member 
of the Federal Reserve System. We had accumulated $25,000.00 
surplus and declared that as a stock dividend, then had the stockhold- 
ers pay $25, 000. 00, thus doubling their stock so that by paying $50. 00 
per share, they received $100, 00, Since then, we have accumulated 
$32, 500. 00 and have paid a dividend from the first year of the bank's 
organization. " 

" When the National City Bank of Salt Lake City failed, we pur- 
chased their marble fixtures, vaults, safety boxes, enlarged our 
banking building to double its former size and are now equipped with 
a beautiful bank, one of the finest in the State. " ( 1940 ) 

During the depression in 1932, the Farmers & Merchants Bank 
along with Provo Commercial Bank, the Knight Trust & Savings Bank, 
ran into financial troubles. Provo Commercial Bank closed its doors 
permanently. The Knight Trust & Savings Bank was taken over by the 
Eccles Boys ( First Security Bank) of Ogden and Salt Lake. The 
Farmers & Merchants Bank had a run of money by the depositors and 
was forced to close its doors for lack of immediate liquid cash. 

Under the leadership of Alex Hedquist, John T, Taylor and other 
local Provo business men, the Farmers & Merchants was able to re- 
organize and re-openfor future business, without the depositors loos- 
ing a cento The stockholders were the one's who sustained the loss. 

In 1954 a new building was constructed acros s the street west of 
the old building, on the corner of Center Street and Third West, with 
three drive thru teller windows. Business in the new building commen- 
ced on September 25, 1954. 

The Walker Bank & Trust Co, of Salt Lake, who had been a cor- 
respondent bank from the organization of Farmers & Merchants, pur- 
chased all the stock in 1955 and changed the name to Walker Bank and 
Trust Co, - Farmers & Merchants Branch, and later dropped the 
name of the branch. 

With Walker Bank becoming affiliated with the First Interstate 
Banking chain, all Walker Bank installations changed its name to the 
First Interstate Bank on June 1, 1981, including the Provo West Center 
Branch. 

254 




^ / 

M 



Office Of 






^^^^^^^ ~ ■ * 



tx^^e^e^-c-r^ ^-^s^ve:^^^ yUr^OfJ^^ -e^i^^i^r-y^ t/ (9,cc^<^ 






f 




Notation on back of above letter 



In Reference 
to B,Y. Academy 
note for $2000, 00 
owing 1 St National 
and Utah Co. Savings 
Bank Provo, 
Later I raised $6000 
borrowed from Wells Fargo 
S„ Lake to enable them to 
pay their notes by going 
security with President 
Wilford Woodruff, signing 
a note for the same. 

GEO. TAYLOR Sr. 





"Billy" Wilson's Boat "Bonnie" in 
the Provo River - Provonna Beach 



Sandy Provonna Beach 



PROVONNA BEACH 



Provonna Beach was the bathing, boating, picnicing and dancing 
resort located on the north side of the mouth of Provo River and the 
sandy beach of Utah Lake. 

Its predecessors were the Omansons, Gammons and Eastmonds, 
who mainly operated row boat rentals for fishermen, bathers and 
boaters on Utah Lake, from the Provo City Grove, 

Frank Eastmond, a very energetic and ambitious school teacher 
of Salt Lake City and his wife Clarrisa Taylor Eastmond built a front 
addition to a small, one room caretakers cabin located in the willow 
grove between the first and second bend of the river, near Utah Lake. 
Here they put in a stock of candy, drinks and a limited supply of picnic 
groceries and refreshments, to sell to the fishermen and picnicers. 

They were successful in persuading James F. McClellan to join 
them in their venture, and to farm the 20 acres of land just across the 
river and to help build a new fleet of row boats to be rented. When 
Frank was in school, Uncle Jim would act as caretaker and take care 
of their boats as well as other boat owners. 

They were very successful and even expanded by stocking a few 
bathing suits to be rented. After a couple of years operation, the 
Eastmonds and Walter G. Taylor acquired an option to buy the old, 
run down Geneva Lake Resort, north of vineyard. 

Uncle Jim's brother-in-law, Arthur N. Taylor, had just purch- 
ased the 20 acres of land across the river, to the west of the City Grove 
which fronted on the sandy beach of Utah Lake. He took over Frank's 
interest with the same arrangement with Uncle Jim. Arthur's boys 
would help on the farm and operated the store and boat rentals in the 
summer time. Uncle Jim would take over the rest of the time. 

In 1920-21 a vehicle bridge was built across the river connecting 
the City Grove and the Hamilton land with its sandy beach. This 
same year a large earthen dike was constructed along the lake front to 
protect the farmlands and the proposed resort from the flood waters of 
Utah Lake. The Skipper Bay reclamation project. 

At the mouth of the River on the lake front about forty bathhouse s 
were built up on stilts, level with the top of the dike. Now the patrons 
of the resort could drive their cars to the Lake front, change into their 
bathing suits in the bathhouses, rather than in the willows or cars, and 
take an invigorating swim in the Lake or bask in the warm sunshine on 
the sandy beach. After the swim they could return to the City Grove 
for their picnic where refreshments could be purchased at the store. 

These bathhouses on stilts, only lasted for the one season, for 
that winter the huge piles of ice, driven by the Northwest wind on the 
Lake wrecked the bathhouse s and the high spring flood water scattered 
them all over the Skipper Bay. When the flood waters receeded, sal- 
vage crews in boats and wading, picked up doors and lumber all along 
the lake front, and on the adjacent farm land. 



257 



258 



PROVONNA BEACH 



By 1923 the flood waters had receeded so the black willow grove 
at the mouth of the river was cleaned up, the two blue cabins in the 
City Grove were moved across the bridge to the willow grove on the 
lake front. An artesian flowing well was drilled for drinking water; 
an ice storage shed was built on the Hamilton property, near the 
bridge. A screened lunch room with tables, benches and a sand floor 
was built in 1924. At the north end of this lunch room an enclosed 
room with hinged shutters which could be lowered and raised; was 
built for use as a store. 

During these first years, Uncle Ashted Taylor and his family 
ran the lunch room and store and Uncle Jim McClellan handled the 
boat rentals. 

In the winter time when the ice on the lake had frozen to a depth 
of about two feet or more, Uncle Jim McClellan and his crew would 
cut the ice into large blocks and haul them by sled to the ice house. 
Here they were stacked one on top of the other in the center of the 
building and with a few nights of freezing temperature, it became al- 
most a frozen solid block. Sawdust would then be piled between the 
ice and the inside wall of the building and on top of the ice for a depth 
of about three feet. This protected it against melting until needed. 

When ice for packing ice cream or for cooling the soft drinks 
was needed, the sawdust on the top was removed down to the block of 
ice and here a small block of ice of fifty pounds or more was removed, 
washed and chipped ready for use. 

Uncle Jim McClellan was an old hand at the ice business, for he 
belonged to the Allen family who operated the Allen Ice Company of 
Provo. They harvested ice in the wintertime from their large ponds 
at 6th West and 8th North and stored it in two huge ice houses. This 
was the principle source of ice in the summer time for Provo and 
Utah County. 

In 1926 the salvaged lumber, which had been picked up after the 
flood, was hauled back down to the Lake and J. W. Howe, Sr. began 
re-building the bathhouses. Since the level of the lake fluctuated so 
much each year and in order to be near the water edge at all times, 
these bathhouses were built on log skids so that a section at a time 
could be moved to any location on the lake front. As the water receed- 
ed the bathhouses could be moved closer to the waters edge. 

At first there was no electricity in the bathhouses on the beach, 
so a kerosene lantern was hung over the dressing room door and a 
lantern was given to each bather to take in the dressing room if they 
so desired. Each day the glass chimneys of the lanterns would have 
to be polished, kerosene added; trim the wicks; sweep out the drifting 
sand from the dressing rooms; carry fresh water and fill up the foot 
tubs where the bathers could rinse the sand from their feet; and see 
that the rented bathing suits and towels were washed and disinfected. 



PROVONNA BEACH 



259 



When the Arthur N. Taylor family took over the operation of the 
resort, an extension to the flowing well was made so that the store had 
running water, an eight section ice cream cabinet, an eight foot refrig- 
erator, a soda water fountain and accessories was installed together 
with the existing soda water (bottle) cooler and dispenser and the Mag- 
nus root beer barrel. 

With each new batch of syrup for the root beer barrel, adjust- 
ments had to be made as to the amount of concentrated syrup measured 
for each "mug" full of root beer required for that "heavenly" taste. 
Sometimes this became quite a long drawn out testing process. The 
end result, to the tester, often amounted to surplus gas in the stomach 
and emiting several belches. So it became quite an apologizing expres- 
sion to say "magnus" (meaning Magnus Root Bee r) with each and every 
belch, disregarding its cause. 

Provonna Beach, at the mouth of Provo River on Utah Lake, was 
owned by Arthur N. Taylor. Uncle Jim McClellan had charge of the 
approximate 40 boats and he served as caretaker. Henry D. Taylor 
was the manager, buyer and public relations man, Alice had charge 
of the lunch room, banquets, foods, cooking, washing and keeping us 
awake early in the morning with her learning to type. Clarence had 
charge of the bathhouses and renting of suits and towels. Kenneth 
helped in the store and collected bathing tickets on the pier. On holi- 
days, Arthur, Lynn and Elton would help wherever needed. 

The demand for private dance parties and the unde sirability of 
blowing and drifting sand in the lunch room, resulted in the extension 
of the lunchroom building to the south, overlooking the river, and 
doubling the length of the original building. A hard wood, maple floor 
was added and a canvas curtain, on rollers, was hung on the outside 
of the screen wired windows all around the building. This canvas 
covering could be rolled up in good days or lowered when the wind 
blowed or it rained. A small white, movable fence was located across 
the width of the floor. This fence could be moved in either direction 
to provide more lunch room space, or a larger dance floor. 

One of the first electric amplifying phonographs, a Brvmswick 
Panatrope, was purchased and furnished the dance music. The ampli- 
fying cone was taken out of the cabinet (phonograph) and placed on the 
ceiling near the center of the dance floor. An operator was required 
to always be present to change each individual record and turn the 
machine on or off. This was very satisfactory to furnish free music 
to the patrons in the lunch room and proved adequate for private part- 
ies where they rented the hall and the music was included. 

With the advent of Victor's Electrola, which played ten records 
without help from the operator, a 5^ charge for each record was made 
possible . 

A 5^ coin box was installed on the dance floor. When a coin was 
dropped in the box it closed a circuit which turned on the phonograph. 



260 



PROVONNA BEACH 



When the record was completed it dropped the coin, in the box, break- 
ing the circuit and turning off the phonograph. Ten records could be 
played, one after another, before the operator had to re-load the 
record rack. 

Two, one room cottages, built on 7 foot stilts and overlooking 
the lake, was built north of the pavilion. These cottages were for the 
use of the owner, his family and guests. 

In the late summer, when there was very little water coming 
down the river, the sand bar across the river's mouth almost com- 
pletely closed the river channel. At times it was even impossible to 
get a small row boat across the sandbar without an exerted effort of 
muscle and digging. At these times and in order to rent the boats to 
the fishermen and bathers, it was necessary to move the boats out of 
the river into the lake. To make the boats accessible to the public 
in water deep enough to float the boats, a portable pier of wooden 
planks on tressels was built. As the water receeded, the pier could be 
picked up and moved to deeper water. This pier also provided a 
walkway for the bathers to get to deeper water without having to wade 
through the shallow water. 

In 1930 the resort was leased to the Browns of Payson who built 
an open air dance floor adjoining to the small enclosed dance floor. 
Then with the depression and other factors, they sub-leased it to Ken 
Hoover and others, who let it run down to the point it was vacated and 
in 1932 the dance hall was torn down and part of it used in the building 
of Lynn and Henry's houses on the hill. 

The farm was sold to Arnold Taylor and later Provo City pur- 
chased part of the land and built the Provo Boat Harbor, which latter 
became the Utah State, Utah Lake Harbor and Recreation Park. 

jl^ jl^ jl^ vl^ jl^ jl^ jj^ 

" I'd rather see a sermon than hear one any day, 
I'd rather one should walk with me than merely show the way. 
The eye's a better pupil an more willing than the ear; 
Fine counsel is confusing, but example's always clear; 
And the best of all the preachers are the men who live their 
creeds , 

For to see the good in action is what everybody needs. 
I can soon learn how to do it if you'll let me see it done. 
I can watch your hands in action, but your tongue too fast may 
run. 

And the lectures you deliver may be very wise and true; 
But I'd rather get my lesson by observing what you do. 
For I may misunderstand you and the high advice you give. 
But there's no misunderstanding how you act and how you live." 



GENEVA RESORT 



Geneva Re sort , Utah County' s most popular recreation spot from 
the early 1920's until the early 1 930's was mainly the result of the 
energies, enthusiasm and vigor of Frank and Clarrisa Eastmond and 
Walter G. and Agnes Taylor, co-owners of the famed facility during 
that era. 

Development of the site dates back to March 26, 1888 when 
Captain John Dallin bought the 10 acre tract on the east shores of Utah 
Lake for $200. He planted lombardy popular trees, dug an artesian 
well and built a small home on the site. 

By 1 893 the site included piers , bath houses, a hotel and spacious 
open-air pavillion and a saloon. It had been named Geneva Resort in 
honor of the captain's daughter, Geneva Dallin. 

Between the years of 1890 and 1935, the prosperity and activity 
of the resort area closely paralleled the level of Utah Lake. High 
water brought good business and low water made business poor. 

Around the turn of the century, as many as four special trains 
could be seen at one time on the Geneva Resort spur of the Denver 
and Rio Grande Western Railroad, Trains originated fromOgden and 
Salt Lake City on the north, and Provo, Eureka, Manti and Nephi on 
the south. 

Family outings were all-day adventures which usually involved 
competitive sporting events. 

Following the golden era of the nineties, there was little activity 
at Geneva until 1907 when Capt. Dallin sold the resort to a group of 
local businessmen called the Utah Lake Club. 

They planted more trees, dug wells, made picnic areas and a 
baseball diamond. Weekly dances were held and regular excursions 
once again established. At this time a number of cabins were built 
to house guests at the resort, since fishing and boating attracted 
numbers of sportsmen for weekend activities. A large motor launch 
was in use for carrying passengers across the lake. 

During World War I, Geneva Resort entered a second period of 
decline when the lake level dropped. JackWestphal and Levi Carpenter 
owned it during this time. It was principally used for pleasure boating 
and commercial fishing. 

In 1917, Charles C. Rasmussen took over the property on a lease 
arrangement. He installed an electric generating plant, and for the 
first time electric lights were used to illuminate the buildings and 
grounds. For a short time there was a revival in the resort's popular- 
ity with boating, fishing, regular excursions and weekly dances again 
re sumed. 

In June 1920 Leonard R. , Thorit C. , and Wallace S. Hebertson 
purchased Geneva Resort. They operated the facility for two years 
and in 1923 Frank H. Eastmond and Walter G. Taylor acquired title to 
the resort. During this period the level of the lake reached an all time 
high. 

261 



262 



GENEVA RESORT 



It didn't take long for the new owners to begin renovation of the 
run-down re sort and soon a great family fun area was back in operation. 

The hotel contained a large dining room, a very large kitchen, 
a lobby with a confection store and a billiard room with several tables. 
The upstairs of the hotel, with approximately 12 rooms became the 
living quarters for the Eastmond and Taylor families and several full 
time employees. 

The attic area of the hotel was inhabited by thousands of bats 
and occasionally one would creep into the living quarters, whereupon 
pandemonium would break loose. 

Directly across a court from the hotel was the large dance hall. 
On the east and west sides of the court were located hot dog and ham- 
burger stands. 

In the rebuilding of the resort, acres of lawn were planted, re- 
pairs were made and gallons of white paint covered everything. A 
fresh green trim made the whole area look spic and span and almost 
new. In the center of the court, a circular flowerbed and fountain 
were built and tons of new gravel covered footpaths everywhere. A 
playgroiind was installed along the lake shore between the hotel and 
the cabin camping area which included swings, slides, tricky bars, 
teeter-totters and even a small zoo with a bear as a feature attraction. 

At this time all swimming was in the lake and a diving barge 
beckoned the more proficient swimmers and divers to swim and sun- 
bathe in the deeper water. 

It wasn't long until a large heated swimming pool was built with 
individual bath houses on both the north and south ends of the pool. It 
had a shallow end for the use of children and a deep end with both low 
and high diving boards. The pool was west of the hotel and below an 
embankment which was terraced with rock walls and lawn. 

A long pier stretched behind the bathhouses and far out into Utah 
Lake where one could fish or rent a row-boat for a pleasure ride. 

People moved into the cabins for their summer vacations and the 
building of life-long friendships. 

For the first dance under the management of the new owners, 
the large , beautiful arches in the dance hall were decorated with truck- 
loads of organdy rose garlands in all shades of pink. Also a small 
candy and refreshment stand was included within the dance hall area. 
The regular Saturday night dances became so popular that soon a 
large out-door addition was built on the large covered hall, doubling 
the dancing area to handle the huge crowds. Ariel's Orchestra from 
Salt Lake City was the most popular band. 

Another cold water pool was built to catch flat carts that carried 
swimmers down a 40 foot slide and a skim across the water. Swimming 
had been very popular but the addition of the large slide made it even 
more exciting. 

Mrs. Taylor, who did the cooking for the hotel dining room was 
noted throughout the area for her delicious homemade apple and lemon 
meringue pies, available at all times. 



GENEVA RESORT 



263 



With the purchase of the Saratoga Resort, located across Utah 
Lake, by Frank Eastmond in 1928, and who managed both resorts 
iintil 1935; the Geneva Resort was sold to Utah Power and Light Co. 
as a potential site for a steam power plant. 

With the receeding lake level, plans for a steam power plant 
were scrapped, the buildings razed or destroyed by fire and all that 
now remains of the once popular and romantic amusement park of Utah 
County, is a small grove of trees. 

Taken from the April 2, 1981 edition of the American Fork 
Citizen from material furnished by JEAN EASTMOND GORDON. 



SARATOGA 



Saratoga Resort, located on the west shores of Utah Lake, is the 
oldest swimming resort in Utah. 

The hot springs at Saratoga first received attention in 1856 when 
several Indian renegades (including a squaw) of Chief Tintic were found 
slain nearby. 

Several arrowheads and other Indian artifacts found in and around 
the Saratoga area leave historians to believe much Indian activity took 
place in and around the resort and neighboring areas prior to the com- 
ing of the white man. 

Around 1862, the hot springs at Saratoga were first used by a 
young Austrian painter to irrigate an apple orchard. The area shortly 
the reafter became a popular picnic place with those people establishing 
communities in nearby Lehi and Lake City (later renamed American 
Fork). 

The resort was named Saratoga after the famous New York State 
Park because of its many similarities and hot springs and soon it began 
to take on the look of the New York Spa, only on a much smaller basis. 

According to Clifford Austin, a resident of Lehi and former 
owner of Saratoga, the resort, owned by a John Beck, was sold to the 
Utah Sugar Company sometime in the I890's, At this time and for a 
brief period the resort was called Beck's Hot Springs. 

As near as can be remembered, a swimming pool and other 
buildings were built during the I890's. Mr. Austin said, "Ed Southwick 
was in charge of the resort at that time. My father. Parley Austin, 
was superintendent of the farm.s for the sugar company. I used to go 
to Saratoga with him when I was around six or eight years old, I was 
born in 1892". 

As near as Mr. Austin can recall, both Saratoga Resort and 
Saratoga Farm were purchased by the Austin Brothers in about 1916. 

They operated the resort until about 1928 when it was sold to 
Frank H. and Clarrisa T. Eastmond. 

Mr. Eastmond, a native of American Fork and a school teacher 
at this time in Salt Lake City at the Irving Junior High School, was 
well acquainted with the art of managing resorts and recreation areas 
around Utah Lake which he dearly loved. The Eastmonds got their 
start by establishing their first resort at the mouth of Provo River in 
about 1918, right after World War I. Mr, Eastmond built row boats 
and sailing crafts which he rented to the public for fishing and joy rid- 
ing. He built a refreshment stand which Mrs. Eastmond managed, 
selling picnic supplies, sandwitches, soda water, candy and ice cream. 
In 1923 the Eastmonds purchased Geneva Resort (together with Walter 
G. Taylor) which they improved and managed for the next twelve years. 

Frank Eastmond, impressed with the possibilities of the hot 
springs at Saratoga, immediately installed one of the finest and most 
modern filtration and chlorination systems in the state. He always 
cheerfully remarked, "Saratoga's swimming water is more fit to drink 



265 



266 



SARATOGA RESORT 



than Salt Lake's drinking water. " He took great pride in the cleanli- 
ness of his swimming pools wherever he operated them. 

He was a firm believer in the fact that clean, clear swimming 
pools were far safer to swim in, cutting down the possibilites of 
drowning and spear-headed a group of resort owners in Utah in adopt- 
ing the filtration and chlorinization laws in the state. He established 
an enviable record at Saratoga by managing the swimming resort for 
over 30 years without a drowning. 

As the years passed, the resort became a family operation. It 
grew and flourished and after World War II Mr, Eastmond's sons join- 
ed him in the enterprise. 

In about 1 953 Frank Eastmond suffered a slight stroke and though 
he fully recovered, he semi-retired from the operation and he and Mrs. 
Eastmond spent much time traveling. 

In November, 1961 a tragic automobile accident took the lives of 
both Frank and Clarrisa Eastmond while they were on a trip to Calif- 
ornia. From this time until 1963 the resort was managed by three of 
the Eastmond boys, R. T. (Dick) Eastmond, J. N. (Jeff) Eastmond, and 
R.M. (Mick) Eastmond. The two remaining family members, Jean 
E, Gordon and F. Taylor Eastmond were merely shareholders. 

In April of 1963 Mick Eastmond became manager of Saratoga 
because the other family members had more pressing business and 
professional interests. 

Mick Eastmond was interested in converting Saratoga into an 
amusement park and by 1966 the resort featured 30 midway rides and 
games, four natural warm spring swimming pools, an arcade, a mina- 
ture golf course, a boat harbor, lake cruises and food stands. 

In May of 1 968 adisastrous fire at Saratoga de stroyed the struct- 
ure housing the indoor swimming pool and the large original dance hall 
that was now used as the arcade building. Also burned were food stands 
and dressing rooms. The loss was great since the insurance carried 
by no means covered the cost of rebuilding the facilities. 

The high costs of maintenance and insurance, plus a rash of law 
suits, forced Mick Eastmond to sell the amusement rides except for a 
few of the small kiddies rides. 

Over the years, circumstances caused Dick and Taylor to sell 
their interests in the resort to Mick and Jeff. 

At the present time Saratoga is still a favorite place for swim- 
ming in the four large warm water pools. Camping in the area set 
aside for tents, trailers, campers, etc. west of the resort area is 
enjoyed by many, as is boating or fishing with a laiinching ramp and 
harbor on Utah Lake. There is picnicing in several covered areas 
around the park. Baseball, volleyball, soccer, badminton and other 
individual sports while picnicing can also be enjoyed. 

In 1979 Mr. Eastmond built a large water slide 350 feet in length 
and three stories high. It is called the "Kamikazi Slide". It uses a 



SARATOGA RESORT 



267 



pumping system that pumps 2000 gallons of water per minute to give 
the riders a most thrilling experience and is by far the most popular 
spot at the resort. 

Saratoga Resort will long remain a favorite place to enjoy a 
swimming holiday with the whole family. The water is clean and warm 
and the prices are minimal. 



Jean Eastmond Gordon 
American Fork Heritage 
April 2, 1981 



D, T . rv . 
OFFICERS 

ARTHUR N. TAYLOR, PRESIDENT 
ALBERT F. DIXON. viCE-PRESlOENT 
ARTHUR D, TAYLOR, seC'Y-TREAS 

DIRECTORS 

ARTHUR N TAYLOR. ALBERT F. DIXON 
S.W.RUSSELL, j.Wy HOWE. JR. 
WM D. NORMAN 



CASH TELLS THE 
STORY 



-AT- 



John T. Taylor's 

GROCERY 

PHONES 27 AND 28 




TH« ONE PBICE MOUSE" 

DiXON-TAYLOR-RUSSELL CO. 
THE HOME FURNISHERS 
CENTRAL, SOUTHERN AND EASTERN UTAH 

) - SPRINGVIULE - NEPHI - PAYSON - PL. GROVE - SP FORK ■ HEBER • AM. FORK - PRICE - » 

mnovo, UTAH 



1 J ^ ■ 



D, T, K. 



CG, 



STORE MANAGERS 

SIDNEY W. RUSSELL, PROVO 
HOSMER R. TUCKER, SPRINGVILLE 
MERLE SARGENT, NEPHi 
GOLDEN TAYLOR, PAYSON 
HAROLD S. WALKER, PLEASANT GROVE 
A?NOLD ANGEL, SPANISH FORK 
WALTER MONTGOMERY. HEBER 
GLEN L. TAYLOR, AMERICAN FORK 
ELTON L. TAYLOR, PRICE 
ALLEN HALVERSON. HELPER 



ESTABLISMEO. 1866. 



Hotel Roberts 

HOME OF THE 
TRAVELER 

Merchants' Lunch 60c. 



PME8I0ENT. 



A. N Ta>LOB. 

VtCC-PRtSlDCMT. 



INCORPORATED. 1690. 
T. N. TAT1.0II, 

SccRCTAHr, THcoauncii 

*NB MANAQCM. 



Taylor Bros. Gompany, 



Furniture, Carpets and Wdll-Pdper 

^ Pianos, Organs, and (Husical ^dse., 

Stoves, Crockery, Jewelry. 
iPKO-v-o cxx-sr, ----- xjT-A.li. 



Some of the Other Interests of the Taylor Boys: 



GEORGE, Jr. 

Buyer of horses for the U.S. Cavalry. 
Buying, selling and trading horses. 

Ranching on the Duchesne River (Indian Reservation). 

THOMAS N. 

Provo Building & Loan 
Taylor Investment 
Farmers & Merchants Bank 
Beneficial Life Insurance Co. 
Carryhurst Farm 
South Fork Cattle Co. 
Owner of "Golden Cross" 

ARTHUR N. 

Hillcrest Farm 

Taylor Investment 

Provo Building & Loan 

Y. M. Improvement Ass 'n. 

South Fork Cattle Co. 

Skipper Bay Drainage District 

Provonna Beach Resort 

WALTER G. 

Fifth North Apple Orchard 
"Golden Cross" stud & colts 
Geneva Resort owner 

JOHN T. 

Taylor & Co. (Grocery) 
Taylor & Poulton - (Grocery ) 
Provo South-west farm 
Registered Jersey Cows 

ASHTED 

Riverside Farm 
Trout & Hog Farm 

"Nellie & Oriel" Shetland Ponies & colts. 
Dairy 

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GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 1982 










LD. N 


o. 


Birth 






Death 




GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 


25 Mar 


1838 


4 


Sept 


1926 


Eliza 


Nicholls 


29 Apr 


1838 


27 


June 


1922 


1 


HARRIETT CLARRISA TAYLOR 


23 June 


1858 


29 


May 


1958 




James F. McClellan 


20 Jan 


1859 


29 


May 


1934 




Lived with them as sons & daughter: 














George Hickman 














Ruth McClellan 














William Roylance 












2 


MARY ANN EMMA TAYLOR 


13 May 


1860 




July 


1863 


3 


PARLEY G. TAYLOR 


4 Aug 


1862 




July 


1863 


4 


GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR. (Jr.) 


31 Aug 


1864 


15 


Dec 


1941 




Sarah Elizabeth Thomas 


18 Apr 


1863 


8 


Feb 


1950 


41 


EDITH APALINE TAYLOR 


25 Feb 


1 886 


17 


Jan 


195 3 




Warren Henry Maiben 












41 1 


GEORGE HENRY MAIBEN 


15 Feb 


1909 


3 


Mar 


1981 




Beth Dixon 












411 1 


GARY HENRY MAIBEN 














Marty 












411 2 


CAROL MAIBEN 














Roger Welch 












4113 


MARGARET MAIBEN 


27 May 


1 924 










Jack Walsh 












4114 


ANN MAIBEN 














Steven Sifton 












412 


FAY MAIBEN 


Mar 


1911 

X / J. J. 










Thomas Patrick O'Conner 


24 May 


1905 








4121 


MICHAEL WARREN O'CONNER 


14 May 


1941 








4122 


MARGARET THERASE O'CONNER 12 Feb 


1944 









Jim Leeds 



( # 41 Family - is incomplete ) 



273 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - 
As of December 31, 1982 



ROSTER 



I.D. No. 




Birth 






Death 




GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 


25 Mar ] 


L838 


4 Sept 


1926 


Eliza Nicholls 


29 Apr ] 


[838 


27 


June 


1922 


4 


GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR (Jr.) 


31 Aug ] 


1864 


15 


Dec 


1941 




Sarah Elizabeth Thomas 


18 Apr ] 


1863 


8 


Feb 


1950 


42 


GEORGE ARNOLD TAYLOR 


8 June 


1888 


27 


Feb 


1936 




Hazel Martha Bowen 


6 Nov ] 


1888 


30 


Dec 


1956 


421 


ELMO ARNOLD TAYLOR 


14 Apr ] 


1909 










Edith Emery 


5 Aug ] 


^909 








421 1 


ELMO EMERY TAYLOR 


20 Dec ] 


1929 










JoAnn Setlow 


29 Dec 1 


1928 








42111 


JODEEN LIZBETH TAYLOR 


3 Nov ] 


1950 








42112 


AMY ANN TAYLOR 


17 May ] 


1955 








421 13 


LAURIE JO TAYLOR 


11 Oct ] 


1959 








421 1 u 


Patricia Lou Dunning 


29 June 










42114 


MICHAEL DUNNING TAYLOR 


23 Jan 


1970 








4212 


MARY HAZEL TAYLOR 


30 July : 


1931 










Gerald David Doezie 


21 Feb : 


1931 








42121 


DAVID ARNOLD DOEZIE 


19 July : 


1951 










JoAnn Hinckley 


28 Oct : 


1951 








421211 


DAVID TROY DOEZIE 


6 Sept 


t973 








421212 


KANDASE BROOK DOEZIE 


27 Mar : 


1977 








421213 


TYCE DEREK DOEZIE 


5 May '. 


1980 








42122 


MARY DEANNE DOEZIE 


14 June ] 


1954 










Robert Carlson Dangerfield 


25 Sept : 


1950 








421221 


STEPHANIE LYNN DANGERFIELD 4 Jun 


1976 








421222 


SHANE CARLSON DANGERFIELD 21 Jul ] 


1977 








421223 


TRISHA ANN DANGERFIELD 


1 2 Jan ] 


1980 








42123 


CHERYL ANN DOEZIE 


6 Aug ] 


1957 










Ronald Scott Hanks 


24 Oct ] 


1956 








421231 


CASEY SCOTT HANKS 


24 May ] 


L977 








421232 


BRADY SCOTT HANKS 


2 Jan 


1980 








421233 


ANDREW SCOTT HANKS 


26 May ] 


1982 








42124 


JULIE ANN DOEZIE 


26 Jan 


1959 










Kelly Duane Phillips 


2 July 


1958 








421241 


ADAM KELLY PHILLIPS 


11 Dec ] 


1981 








4213 


LAELONNIE EDITH TAYLOR 


5 Sept ] 


1942 










Ronald Terry Ming 


7 Sept ] 


1940 








42131 


KINDRA LYNN MING 


4 Mar ] 


1961 










Kenneth Roy Roberts 












421311 


KANDI KAY ROBERTS 


28 May ] 


1980 








421312 


KORY RAY ROBERTS 


28 July ] 


1981 








42132 


TALON ARNOLD MING 


2 July 


1962 








42133 


DENA MARIE MING 


30 May ] 


1964 








42134 


SHALE WILSON MING 


15 Dec ] 


1967 








42135 


SOYALEN MING 


21 Dec ] 


L969 








42136 


JADE TAYLOR MING 


2 June 


1971 








42137 


KAMERA DEE MING 


2 Oct ] 


1972 









274 





GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY 


- ROSTER 




As of December 31, 1982 




I.D. No. 




Birth 




4 


GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR, (Jr. ) 


31 Aug 


1864 




Sarah Elizabeth Thomas 


18 Apr 


1863 


4214 


PEGGY ANN TAYLOR 


7 Aug 


1947 




Ernest Paul Larsen 


15 Feb 


1941 


42141 


WENDI LEE LARSEN 


26 July 


1967 


42142 


DUSTIN PAUL LARSEN 


5 Dec 


1968 


42143 


CHRISTINA LARSEN 


28 Sept 


1972 


42144 


MISTY DAWN LARSEN 


20 Apr 


1974 


42145 


JAMIE HANS LARSEN 


14 Sept 


1975 


42146 


KELLY TAYLOR LARSEN 


8 July 


1978 


42147 


SHAWN DAVID LARSEN 


7 Feb 


1981 


422 


DOROTHY TAYLOR 


27 Nov 


1910 




Glen Nelson Horton 


2 June 


1907 


4221 


LOIS JEAN HORTON 


29 Sept 


1929 




Paul Homer Shurtleff 


27 Apr 


1928 


42211 


BRADLEY PAUL SHURTLEFF 


10 July 


1951 




Patricia Ann Smith 


25 Mar 


1953 


422111 


CARLY SUNSHINE SHURTLEFF 


23 Dec 


1973 


4221 12 


MANDI PATRICIA SHURTLEFF 


3 June 


1976 


42212 


MICHELLE SHURTLEFF 


13 Nov 


1954 




Albert Re id 


30 Oct 


1953 


422121 


TYLER REID 


16 Sept 


1978 


42213 


SHANA SHURTLEFF 


29 June 


1957 




Mathew Nelson 


18 Dec 


1955 


42214 


GLEN COREY SHURTLEFF 


13 Mar 


1962 




Elizabeth Dixon 


1 Jan 


1963 


4222 


JOANN HORTON 


22 Apr 


1931 




Dell "B" Walker 


5 Aug 


1931 


42221 


DEANNE WALKER 


22 Oct 


1951 




Roland Duane Robison 


31 Aug 


1947 


422211 


STACI JO ROBISON 


11 Dec 


1975 


422212 


COY ROBISON 


18 Oct 


1978 


422213 


KELLI DEE ROBISON 


19 Oct 


1981 


42222 


GREGG DELL WALKER 


11 Oct 


1954 


42223 


GWEN WALKER 


31 Aug 


1957 




Gary Lynn Heslington 


3 Nov 


1954 


422231 


AMBER LYN HESLINGTON 


28 Jan 


1978 


422232 


ASHLEE HESLINGTON 


28 Jan 


1978 


422233 


JODI HESLINGTON 


4 July 


1980 


42224 


SCOTT "G" WALKER 


1 Dec 


1959 




Barbara Ann Francom 


16 Apr 


I960 


4223 


VIRGINIA HORTON 


24 Dec 


1932 



Death 
15 Dec 1941 
8 Feb 1950 



25 Oct 195 5 



21 Jan 1933 



275 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1982 






LD. No. 






Birth 




4 


GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR, (Jr.) 


31 


Aug 


1864 




Sarah Elizabeth Thomas 


18 


Apr 


1863 


4224 


FRANK ARNOLD HORTON 


20 


May 


1 937 




Kathleen Ann Rasmussen 


7 


Dec 


1934 


42241 


LOUIS ARNOLD HORTON 


16 


June 


1958 




Lisa Kirk 


18 


Nov 


1958 


422411 


AMY JILL HORTON 


12 


Dec 


1976 


422412 


LOUIS WAYNE HORTON 


14 


Oct 


1979 


422413 


MATTHEW ANTHONY HORTON 8 


July 


1982 


42242 


WILLIAM TODD HORTON 


31 


May 


I960 




Mardica Henderson 


22 


Apr 


I960 


42243 


SUZANNE HORTON 


20 


Nov 


1962 




Paul Renge r 








422431 


SHANE PAUL RENGER 


2 


Apr 


1980 


422432 


CHASE TYLER RENGER 


1 


Oct 


1982 


42244 


STEPHEN GLEN HORTON 


16 


Apr 


1965 


42245 


MICHAEL PAUL HORTON 


22 


Nov 


1966 


423 


RALPH DAVID TAYLOR 


20 


Oct 


1913 




Elva Park 


15 


June 


1912 


4231 


NORMA LERAE TAYLOR 


24 


Nov 


1930 




Ralph Gene Askew 








42311 


DEBRA DENE ASKEW 


12 


Sept 


1950 


42312 


CHARLES DAVID ASKEW 


24 


Apr 


1954 


4231 h 


Al V. Webb 








42313 


MICHAEL ALLEN WEBB 


24 


June 


1954 


42314 


JANE CAROL WEBB 


21 


Apr 


1956 


42315 


BRIAN JOSEPH WEBB 


8 


Jan 


1957 


42316 


CRAIG ALLEN WEBB 


20 


Aug 


1958 


4232 


NANCY VERA TAYLOR 


19 


Aug 


1932 




Don Sharon Taylor Bradshaw 


13 


Apr 


1931 


42321 


RICHARD RANDY BRADSHAW 


15 


Dec 


1950 


42322 


SHARON BRADSHAW 


30 


May 


1952 


4232 h 


David Allen Schonleber 








42323 


LINDA SCHONLEBER 


17 


Apr 


1958 


42324 


ANCHOR SCHONLEBER 


11 


Feb 


I960 


4233 


RICHARD ARNOLD TAYLOR 


23 


Nov 


1934 




Sarah Darlene Cahoon 


3 


May 


1936 


42331 


BETH ALEENE TAYLOR 


14 


July 


1954 


42332 


MICHAEL REED TAYLOR 


23 


Sept 


1955 


4234 


CARL DAVID TAYLOR 


19 


Sept 


1935 



276 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1982 

LD. No. 

4 GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR, (Jr.) 

Sarah Elizabeth Thomas 

424 DEAN BOWEN TAYLOR 
Blanche Jacobsen 

4241 ROBERT DEAN TAYLOR 
Colene Pearl Bame 

42411 KIRT ROBERT TAYLOR 

42412 BRYAN DEAN TAYLOR 

4242 RANDALL GRANT TAYLOR 
Connie Ranae Wiberg 
Brenda Jean Dansie 

42421 BRANDIE LYNN TAYLOR 

42422 MEGAN TAYLOR 

42423 KARA LYN TAYLOR 

4243 LORALEE TAYLOR 
Neil Thompson 

42431 JENNIFER THOMPSON 

42432 PHILIP DEAN THOMPSON 

42433 SCOTT JACOB THOMPSON 

42434 JEFFERY JORDAN THOMPSON 

425 LEAH TAYLOR 
Vernon Thomas Jacobsen 

4251 DOUGLAS VERNON JACOBSEN 

Diane Houston 

42511 JODY DOUGLAS JACOBSEN 

42512 MATHEW JACOBSEN 
425 2 SHERRY JACOBSEN 

Roger Alan Barlow 
425 21 JEFFREY ALAN BARLOW 

425 22 MICHAEL LINDSAY BARLOW 

425 23 JAMES ERIC BARLOW 

425 24 JOHN THOMAS BARLOW 

42525 JACOB MARK BARLOW 

425 26 CHRISTY BARLOW 

425 3 SHAWNA JACOBSEN 

Stanley Rees Spafford 
42531 JASON STANLEY SPAFFORD 

425 32 ANGELA SPAFFORD 

42533 SCOTT THOMAS SPAFFORD 

425 34 MEGAN SPAFFORD 

426 SHIRL BOWEN TAYLOR 
Lois Mae Stevens 

4261 SANDRA TAYLOR 

Lucille C, Lamb 





Birth 




31 


Aug 


1864 


18 


Apr 


1863 


18 


Feb 


1915 


29 


Nov 


1912 


16 


Fe b 


1939 


6 


May 


1941 


8 


July 


1959 


25 


Jan 


1963 


17 


Nov 


1950 


28 


Nov 


1 950 


13 


Mar 


1977 


R 


Apr 


1 979 


18 


July 


1982 


20 


Jan 


1954 


19 


Jan 


1 949 


26 


Aug 


1975 


16 


May 


1977 

-■■/II 


10 


Oct 


1979 


16 


June 


1982 


10 


June 


1917 


14 


Apr 


1917 


11 


Dec 


1936 


22 


Feb 


1943 


16 


July 


1965 


17 


Oct 


1968 


15 


Sept 


1942 


14 


Aug 


1940 


5 


Nov 


1961 


13 


May 


1963 


13 


Dec 


1969 


17 


May 


1973 


11 


July 


1977 


21 


Oct 


1979 


4 


Oct 


1948 


3 


Mar 


1944 


5 


Nov 


1969 


10 


Dec 


1972 


22 


June 


1975 


5 


Apr 


1979 


27 


Mar 


1919 


31 


May 


1922 


26 


May 


1952 


29 


May 


1924 



Death 
15 Dec 1941 
8 Feb 1950 



277 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1982 






LD. No. 






Birth 




4 


GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR, (Jr.) 


31 


Aug 


1864 




Sarah Elizabeth Thomas 


18 


Apr 


1863 


427 


JOYCE TAYLOR 


4 


Apr 


1921 




Stanford Jay Bonnett 


15 


Jan 


1917 


4271 


KAREN LEE BONNETT 


8 


Mar 


1942 


4272 


JANICE BONNETT 


26 


June 


1943 




Richard Curtis Pearson 


12 


June 


1938 


42721 


LAURI PEARSON 


13 


Nov 


1965 


42722 


JANEN PEARSON 


19 


Oct 


1967 


42723 


DAVID CURTIS PEARSON 


17 


Apr 


1970 


42724 


RACHELLE PEARSON 


21 


Jan 


1974 


42725 


JOANNA PEARSON 


26 


July 


1976 


42726 


JARED BONNETT PEARSON 


20 


July 


1978 


4273 


NANCY KAY BONNETT 


2 


May 


1946 




Wayne R. Baker 


18 


Feb 


1946 


42731 


KELLY WAYNE BAKER 


11 


May 


1970 


42732 


LANNING R. BAKER 


13 


Apr 


1971 


42733 


LEIGH BAKER 


4 


Jan 


1973 


42734 


ALEXIS BAKER 


15 


Apr 


1974 


42735 


ADRIANNE BAKER 


3 


Mar 


1976 


42736 


MEREDITH BAKER 


2 


Aug 


1977 


42737 


RISA LYN BAKER 


29 


Jan 


1979 


42738 


LINDSAY BAKER 


6 


Sept 


1980 


4274 


STANFORD KIM BONNETT 


14 


Sept 


1951 




Shelley Sue Jones 


2 


Aug 


1953 


42741 


BRODY JONES BONNETT 


3 


May 


1979 


42742 


BRITNEY BONNETT 


8 


July 


1980 


4275 


PAMELA BONNETT 


5 


June 


1955 




John Douglas Risser 


2 


Aug 


1961 


42751 


NICHOLAS JOHN RISSER 


6 


Apr 


1980 


42752 


ERIC STANFORD RISSER 


29 


Dec 


1982 


4276 


MICHAEL GEORGE BONNETT 


28 


Dec 


1957 




Kristina Peters 


6 


Nov 


1963 


42761 


TERIE NICOLE BONNETT 


19 


Oct 


1982 


4277 


TERI BONNETT 


28 


Mar 


1963 




Kenneth KoUer 


11 


Sept 


1959 



Death 
15 Dec 1941 
8 Feb 1950 



26 July 1942 



278 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1982 










I.D. No. 






Birth 






Death 


4 


GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR, (Jr.) 


31 


Aug 


1864 


15 


Dec 




Sarah Elizabeth Thomas 


18 


Apr 


1863 


8 


Feb 


428 


MARTHA LOUISE TAYLOR 


9 


Nov 


1 933 








Vernon Smith Cheever 


17 


Oct 


1 922 






4281 


PATRICIA ANN CHEEVER 
Alva Edward Nelson 


17 


Apr 


1943 






42811 


KERRY EDWARD NELSON 


23 


Nov 


I960 






42812 


KRISTINA LOUISE NELSON 












4282 


VICKIE LEE CHEEVER 


20 


May 


1948 








Bruce Henry Coles 


10 


Nov 


1944 






42821 


SEAN BRUCE COLES 


30 


May 


1967 






42822 


ME LISA COLES 


16 


July 


1969 






42823 


ANGELA COLES 


12 


Jan 


1 974 






42824 


JENNIE COLES 


19 


Aug 


1 975 






42825 


JILL LYN COLES 


25 


Jan 


1978 






4283 


GARY ELMO CHEEVER 


23 


July 


1952 








Linda Sue Huff 


21 


Mar 


1956 






42831 


SHANNON SUE CHEEVER 


13 


Dec 


1976 






42832 


ELISHA ANN CHEEVER 


15 


June 


1979 






42833 


COURTNEY CHEEVER 


1 1 


Dec 


1981 






4284 


RONNIE VERNON CHEEVER 


4 


Feb 


1957 








Cindy Lee Ball 


15 


Feb 


1958 






42841 


MANDI LEE CHEEVER 


17 


Nov 


1975 






42842 


DANIELLE CHEEVER 


3 


Mar 


1978 






42843 


JESSICA CHEEVER 


21 


Apr 


1980 







429 




LYNN THOMAS TAYLOR 


17 


Oct ] 


1925 






Margene Liddiard 


13 


June 


1928 


4291 




RICKIE LYNN TAYLOR 


13 


Oct ] 


1946 






Jacquelyn Sue Teisher 


26 


July 


1946 


42911 




RICHARD SHAWN TAYLOR 


24 


Apr ] 


L963 


42912 




TAMMY LYNN TAYLOR 


12 


Apr ] 


[964 


42913 




ADAM GREENFIELD TAYLOR 


1 


Aug ] 


1968 


4291 


w 


Paula Ann Thornton 


31 


July 


1957 


42914 




ISAAC JONATHAN TAYLOR 


20 


Feb ] 


[981 


42915 




ETHAN MICHAEL TAYLOR 


1 


Dec ] 


1982 


4292 




REBECCA TAYLOR 


6 


Oct ] 


1947 






Max Steiner, Jr. 


3 


Dec ] 


1947 


42921 




SHANE THOMAS STEINER McMaste 


r 5 Ma] 


r 196 


42922 




BRYAN M. STEINER McMaster 


13 


Mar ] 


1970 


4292 


h 


Alexander Clawson McMaster, Jr. 


4 


Oct ] 


1946 


42923 




KELLY MCMASTER 


23 


June 


1977 


429 


w 


Lael Reba Rose 


5 


Mar ] 


1931 


4293 




JANALYN TAYLOR 


16 Apr ] 


1959 


4294 




KEVIN THOMAS TAYLOR 


18 Oct ] 


1961 



La Lane Brewer 



279 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 







As of December 31, 


1982 










l.D. No. 








Birth 






Death 


4 


GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR, (Jr.) 


31 


Aug 


1864 


15 


Dec 




Sarah Elizabeth Thomas 


18 


Apr 


1863 


8 


Feb 


42. 10 




LLOYD BOWEN TAYLOR 


15 


Feb 


1928 










Amplus LaRue Kinder 


1 


Feb 


1927 






42. 10. 1 




DIANA LYNN TAYLOR 


4 


Dec 


1949 










Randal D. Johnson 












42. 10. 1. 


1 


AMY JOHNSON 


19 


July- 


1970 






42. 10. 1. 


2 


CORY BRENT JOHNSON 


5 


June 


1972 






42. 10. 1 


h 


Duane Ben Dietrick 


23 


May 


1940 






42. 10. 1. 


3 


JASON BEN DIETRICK 


2 


Feb 


1978 






42. 10. 2 




RODNEY LLOYD TAYLOR 


2 


Oct 


1951 










Kathy Bringhurst 


2 


Apr 


1954 






42. 10, 2. 


1 


ROBERT LLOYD TAYLOR 


22 


Mar 


1973 






42. 10. 2. 


2 


AMANDA TAYLOR 


20 


Mar 


1975 






42. 10. 3 




LISA TAYLOR 


6 


May 


1958 










Brad Alan Moon 


13 


Sept 


I960 






42. lOo 3, 


1 


AMBERLY MOON 


1 


July 


1980 







42. 11 






HAZEL COLLEEN TAYLOR 


14 


Oct 


1935 








William Shields Green 


30 


Nov 


1933 


42. 11, 


1 




KRISTY GREEN 


5 


June 


1954 








Steven Charles West 


8 


Dec 


1951 


42. 11. 


1. 


1 


BRITTANY WEST 


27 


Sept 


1977 


42. 11. 


1 


h 


Christopher Craig Hales 


1 


Apr 


1949 


42. 11. 


1. 


2 


BRADY LYN HALES 


2 


July 


1982 


42. 11. 


2 




JULIE ANN GREEN 


16 


Dec 


1955 








James Irwin Grant 


11 


May 


1954 


42. 11. 


2. 


1 


J US TEN JAMES GRANT 


22 


July 


1981 


42. 11. 


3 




JAMES WILLIAM GREEN 


8 


Nov 


1956 








JoAnn Louise Smith 


5 


Sept 


1959 


42. 11. 


3. 


1 


JERMEY JAMES GREEN 


19 


Aug 


1979 


42. 1 1 . 


3. 


2 


JESSE WILLIAM GREEN 


25 


Feb 


1982 


42. 11. 


4 




MELISSA GREEN 


2 


Mar 


1961 


42. 11. 


5 




NANETTE GREEN 


5 


June 


1 962 



280 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1982 



I.D. No Birth 

4 GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR 31 Aug 

Sarah Elizabeth Thomas 18 Apr 

43 NELLIE ELIZA TAYLOR 8 Aug 

Stuart Morrison 20 Dec 

431 STUART TAYLOR MORRISON 20 Mar 
Juanita Ann Mason 6 July 

4311 BILLY LEE MORRISON 2 Apr 

432 MAX TAYLOR MORRISON 12 July 
June McLean 25 Dec 

4321 CHARLES TAYLOR MORRISON 5 Nov 

4322 MICHAEL MC LEAN MORRISON 4 Dec 

4323 ROBERT STUART MORRISON 15 Oct 

4324 BARBARA JANE MORRISON 27 May 

433 GEORGE LYNN MORRISON 4 Oct 
Margarette Berkon 13 Oct 

434 THELMA MORRISON 23 May 

435 RUTH MELBA MORRISON 24 Aug 
Kenneth E. Spencer Oct 

4351 KENNETH LEE SPENCER 29 Feb 
Helen Dale Sanders 

4352 TERRY RAY SPENCER 29 July 
Margaret Hill 

4353 KATHLEEN SPENCER 9 May 
Verlund K. Spencer 

4354 ROBERT STUART SPENCER 24 Nov 

436 IRMA VIRGINIA MORRISON 21 Mar 
Edmund Felix Philippet 15 Jan 

4361 LINDA LYNNE PHILIPPET 25 Aug 

4362 CHEREME VIRGINIA PHILIPPET 12 Feb 

4363 TAYLOR OCTAVE PHILIPPET 20 June 

437 NELLIE MAY MORRISON 19 June 
Karl Brown 10 Mar 

4371 JOSEPH BROWN 5 Sept 

4372 DAVID BROWN 7 Nov 

4373 NANCY ANN BROWN 18 Feb 
437 h Ed. Bailey 



864 
863 
890 
888 
913 
921 
941 
914 
924 
950 
952 
954 
961 
915 
921 
917 
918 
914 
936 

938 

947 

953 
922 
917 
946 
949 
951 
928 
925 
947 
948 
954 



Death 
15 Dec 1941 
8 Feb 1950 
10 Sept 1944 
10 Nov 1945 



21 Mar 1978 



29 Jan 1972 



( # 43 Family - is incomplete ) 
44 WILLIE CLEON TAYLOR 7 Jan 1893 3 Oct 1897 



281 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1982 



T n No 






R i rth 

X_^ 1 X Lll 






D*a a fVi 


A 


GFORGF THOMAS TAYLOR {^r \ 


3 1 

^ X 


Ana 1 


O ^ 


1 5 


l^C 




w^dl^cLll XIj 1 1 ZcL L/C til J- XXiJIIXcLo 


i o 


xl.lj X 1 


RA3 


o 

o 


Ff^h 
i c u 




RACT.F DAVTD TAYT.OR 

XJxiV^ X-jX_i X-xXi. V X X> X Xi. X XjV^X\ 


1 f) 

X \J 


T a Ti 1 
U dll 1 


RQ5 








•i- \ \X Li i -L CL X L/ ^ i. 


27 


J\iric J 


892 


30 


Jan 


rt 3 1 


RACT F DON TAYLOR 

X_J./x 1 / X_j X_/ 1 N X Xi. X I— J X\ 




X. C U 1 


Q 1 7 








J— ILLL-ILIC; d. X 11 & W X til 


1 2 

X C< 


Nov 1 

X N v^ V J 


Ql 6 






rr J 1 1 


RACLE DON TAYLOR II 

X-J -^X V.> X_JX_J X-^ \^ X ^ X Xa. X J~J N^X\ XX 


? 


A-n r 1 

Xx X J 


Q42 








j—i y iic^ L L w 11 diJ iiicxxi 


\ 1 


Ort ] 


945 






*T 1 1 J. 


RACLE DON TAYLOR III 

XJ Xi. X_J X^ X N X X^ X .X^N^Xv XXX 


1 4 

X 


Nfn V 1 

X N V J 


Q67 

7U < 






^ ^ J. ± ^ 


TAMARA TAYLOR 

X Xi. AVXXl. X\X*. X Xi X J-J^^X\ 


27 


Dpr 1 


7 u 7 






4"^ 1 1 


TIFFANY TAYLOR 

X XX X Xx X ^ X X X^ X X_JN^X.\ 


21 


Tan 1 


Q7 1 

7 f J. 






4S 1 14 


MICHAEL GLEN TAYLOR 


27 


Nlar ] 


974 

7 ' ~ 






45 1 1 5 


TERRANCE SCOTT TAYLOR 


23 


Ma r ] 


976 






4S 1 1 6 


TRACY LYNETTE TAYLOR 

^ X \. X X \^ X ' ^ X X 1 X_J ^ X. ' * X X X X ' ^ X X 


4 


J n 1 V 1 


979 

7 ' 7 






45 1 1 7 

T ^ X X 1 


WENDY TAYLOR 

■ * X_J X ^ X^ X X X X X ' ' X \. 












45 1 2 


MICHAEL DALE TAYLOR 

X VXX V> X XXi X-J X^X^L X-^X_^ X XX X x^ xv 


1 5 

X ^ 


Feb ] 

X X 


947 

7~ ' 








X >1 cLll y XVX CL X IC X^ X ll^IxD^ll 


20 


Nov 1 

X ^ V X 


947 

7*T ( 






45 1 21 

" — ' X d X 


LINDSEY MARIE TAYLOR 

X_J X X >l X^ X_J X XVXXXXVXX^ X XX X J_J>»^X\ 


Q 
7 


Sf^nt 1 


966 

/WW 






45 1 22 


ZACKARY MILES TAYLOR 

^— J X X X ^X XXV X X VXX * ' ' ■* X. X X X ' ' X V 


Q 

7 


Sent 1 


971 






45 1 23 


NATHAN ERICKSEN TAYLOR 

X ^ XX X- X X.XX X > X_J XVX V> X Xhw/ X^ X ^ X XX X J-J X V 


c 

O 


M a V 1 
J- Vict y 


977 

7 ' ' 






451 24 


ANDREW" MICHAEL TAYLOR 

X X X ^ X^ XV Xi^ T T XVXX X XX *■ ' t ' ' ^ X X X f, J XV 


1 

X V/ 


J n n 1 


979 

7 1 7 






451 3 


GREGORY OWEN TAYLOR 


20 


June ] 


953 








Angela Rae Shoemake 


6 


J an ] 


954 






45131 


ASHLEY ANE TAYLOR 


2 


Feb 1 


979 






451 32 


TRISTAN GREGORY TAYLOR 


4 


June ] 


982 






45 2 


GEORGE HARPER TAYLOR 


16 


Nov ] 


918 








V X^XCt U ^.^XX^O 


14 

X 


T~)(0 r- 1 


921 

7 J. 


11 


Nov 


4521 


VIOLA DIANE TAYLOR 

■X- V vy \j xx\^ y » * CL y XX v> x-/ t^x uuv^x xx^x 


21 


June J 


944 






4521 1 

~ ^ X X 


JAMES TAYLOR BUTTERFIELD 

O XX XVX X_J X Xx X X_-i Xv X^ Vm' X X X_J XVX- XX_J X_^ J— ^ 


1 7 

X ( 


Ort 1 


973 

7 ' 






45 7 1 2 


TEREMY WILLIS BUTTERFIELD 

\J X_jXVX-JXVX X VV XJ iX^Xku' X-f VJ X X X-jXVX XX_J X-JX^ 


3 1 


Ort ] 


Q74 

7 ( rt 






452 1 3 


COLLFFN RIITTERFIFI>D 

V> JkJ J-^ XLj X^ X N XJ \J X X. X_i X\ X X Xli X-iX_/ 


1 3 

X ^ 


fc-* C LI L i 


Q76 

7 f U 






45214 


LUCINDA BUTTERFIELD 


28 




Q7R 

7 ' O 






4521 5 


REBECKA BUTTERFIELD 


3 


Nn V 1 

X ^ V X 


Q7Q 

7 ' 7 






4521 


JILLIAN BUTTERFIELD 


10 


t-' C LI L 1 


Q8 1 

7 O i 






45217 


THOMAS MARK BUTTERFIELD 


24 


Fpb ] 

X C U/ X 


983 

7 O 






4521 8 


KENNETH RODNEY BUTTERFIELD 


22 Dec 


1 958 








Joan Koeja Liogoy 


7 


June ] 


960 






4521 81 


LOI ANN BUTTERFIELD 


19 


T 3 Tl 1 
U CL XX X 


982 






4521 9 


DEAN WAYNE BUTTERFIELD 


18 


Dpr ] 


969 

7 7 






t J (1, ^ 


GLENDA TAYLOR 


25 


r e D 1 


94A 








Raphael Elvin Dennis 


29 


Apr 1 


939 






45221 


TAMARIE DENNIS 


2 


May 1 


970 






45222 


MICHELLE DENNIS 


28 


May 1 


972 






45223 


BRUCE MC KAY DENNIS 


23 


Mar 1 


974 







1941 
1950 

1955 



282 





GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 




r\ S 01 J^c CG ITlDc r J i- f 


1 QQ9 

J loC 




i. JJ. INO. 




xj 1 r Lii 




4 


GFORGE THOMAS TAYLOR (Jr ) 


Ana 


1 R(S4 

X ^ ^ 




oaran. -iiiiizaDctn. inorrias 


1 -^p r 


1 D J 


/I c o o 


n T TT "Nin A T A V T R 

KJ J— iXLi IN -LJ jTV ± 1 J_/W£\ 


91; Fq k 

C\J J: e D 


1 QAA 




xvapnaei -njivin i->'eniiis 


9 Q A T-> f 

c 7 -rt.p r 


1 Q*^ Q 

■1 7-5 7 


/I C *> O /I 

4d Z ^i4 




91; A n n- 
t,D .Mug 


X 7 f D 


/I C "5 *? C 
4D LLO 


MTCHAFT RORFRT DFNNTS 

XVXX Vw> XX^x ±Li J-j X\ XJ Xlj X\ X X^ Xl« 1 N 1 N 


1 n Or-f 

X W L 


1 Q77 




ANNETTF DFNNTS 


1 A Ian 


1 Q7Q 
1 7 ^ 7 


4D ^1 ^ » 


RICHARD TAYLOR DENNIS 


1 Q Ana 


X 7 V 


^ 


DON RAPHATTT DFNNTS 

X-/ V-/ IN Xvxxi iTxV. J—i X_i X-/ Xlj IN iN ±\J 


4 Or-f 


1 QR9 

J. 70 ^ 


4D ^ J 


DAVTD PtFORHF TAYT OR 

X-/XX V XX-/ VJ X_j V-/X\ VJ 1-j X XX X 1. J V^X\ 


94 No\7- 


1 Q47 




J i y xi fcJiiiiLii 


9 Ma-ir 
t«u xvxay 


1 Q4Q 


4D J 1 


DIANF TAYLOR 

X^XxA.XNXIj X XX. X X^Vv/X\ 


7 Nov 


1 Q7f^ 
17(0 


'±0 C D L 


GORDON GFORGF TAYLOR 

VJ XvX-/ V— N vj X_j Vw-/X\ \J XL* X xx X X— JV^XX 


"^0 Ma -r 


1 Q7« 
1 7 • 


4D ^ J J 


SARA ANN TAYT OR 




I 70 1 


4D Z4 


RON AT n OARTH TAYT OR 


Q TnKr 
7 J U.1 y 


1 Q4Q 

1 7'±7 




juiie v-inrioLidrioeri 




1 QR 1 


AC 9 AT 
4D ^41 


TIFFANY MAY TAYT, OR 

X XX X XX X N X XVXxx. X X xx X ' j v -/ r\ 


X _) ij ep L 


1 Q79 
1 y 1 c 


A£;9 A9 


TRENT PETER TAYLOR 


17 Anr 

J- 1 X i L/ X 


1 974 




TRICIA EDNA TAYLOR 

X X\XV-^Xxi. X_J X^ X N XX X XX. X XjV- 'X\ 


1 Nov 

X X >J 1^ V 


1 Q7A 

1 7 / D 


/I C 9 C 
4D <1 D 


TTTANTTA TAYT OR 


9 7 Nov 


1 QR 

I yD J 




JAdiiciy ivxx critic i ucicy 


7 Dp> 

1 XJC c 


i.yo c 


/I c C 1 
4D CD 1 


RYAN MTOHAFT TTTTFY 

X\ X .rtiN IVXX v..* n.xA.XIj X_j \J X X_iXL< X 


9 9 T 1 1 n 


1 Q7R 

1 7 1 


AC 9 C 
4D ^ID ^1 


RRYAN WTT T ARD TTTT FY 

Xjx\ X .rVlN VV X J_( J_i.rt. X\ X^ \J X X-iJli X 


22 June 


1 Q7R 
1 7 1 


4D <1D J 


ANNF MARTF TTTT FY 


£, ivxay 


T QRl 

1 70 1 


AC 9 A 
4D CO 


T DAN TAYT OR 


A A r> 


1 Qt^R 
1733 




vJXeaxlllC wJIlltJXUo 


D\J J IXIi" 


1 73 f 


AC 9 A 1 
4D ^LD 1 


ANNATFTSF TAYT, OR 

xxlN INxx X^XIj Xk^ XLi X xx X J_jV— /X\ 


9 T Afir 

^ X -rt.TJ X 


1 Q7Q 

17(7 


AC 9 A9 
4D CD^l 


VTOT A NTOOT F TAYT OR 


1 R A n rr 
J. J .ti. Llg 


1 QR9 

1 7 


AC 9 7 
4D ^ f 


TODD LFF TAYT OP? 

X V-/X-/ X-/ X_jX-j X XX X J_jV-/X\ 


^ D#» r 


lyoy 


Ac; 9 
4D C 


KIM NFLDON TAYT, OR 

XX.XXVX X N X_J X.JX^ \»/ X N X XX X x^ x\ 


Q Ort 


X 7 v> U 




DAT,F H TAYT, OR 


Ma r 


X 7 ^ ^ 




A r1 Kyf n 1 4* *^ 1-1 
"Qd iVX(JU.XtUIl 


99 Ff^h 


1 Q9n 

1 7 W 


AC 1 1 
4D J 1 


RTTTH FT T FN TAYT OR 


7 A t-\ T- 

( -f^-p r 


1 QR A 

1 7 -3 D 




Xi.iIIl XllUIIido J aC_ J\. L) XI 


J. J wJtjpt 


1 QR A 

X 7 -J 




KIM TAYLOR TACKSON 

X^J.XVX X XX X X-J X\ U xX XVk-/ Vv'X N 


1 7 Spnt 


X 7 VJ 


At: '119 
J 1 C 


BRANDON LEE TACKSON 

XJ X\ xxX N X-* \-/ X N X^X^X_j w/ Xi. V-^ X^w-/ V^X N 


Lrf X k~/ C Li L 


1 Q8 1 

X 7 i 


AC, 9 


RAOTTFT T F TAYT OR 


X D J une 


1 QR 7 
1 yo 1 


4d J J 


DALE "M" TAYLOR 


1 Sept 


1958 




Paula Palmer 


30 Jan 


1959 


4534 


ROSE ANN TAYLOR 


23 Nov 


1963 



Death 
15 Dec 1941 
8 Feb 1950 



283 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1982 



I. D. 


No. 




Birth 




4 


GEORGE THOMAS TAYLOR (Jr.) 


31 


Aug 


1864 




Sarah Elizabeth Thomas 


18 


Apr 


1863 


454 


GORDON LEON TAYLOR 


25 


Oct 


1929 




Mary Elizabeth Walters 


13 


July 


1940 


4541 


DAVID LYNN TAYLOR 


26 


June 


I960 


4542 


PHILLIP WAYNE TAYLOR 


18 


Sept 


19^1 


4543 


DOUGLAS EUGENE TAYLOR 


29 


Nov 


1964 


4544 


LEOLA ELIZABETH TAYLOR 


4 


Oct 


1970 


4545 


BACLE GORDON TAYLOR 


24 


Jan 


1972 


4546 


MICHAEL JOHN TAYLOR 


4 


Feb 


1975 


4547 


GEORGE RYAN TAYLOR 


19 


June 


1978 


455 


RUTH TAYLOR 


28 


Oct 


1931 




Joseph Birch Holt 


31 


Jan 


1929 


4551 


JOSEPH B. HOLT II 


15 


July 


1953 




Linda Kay Young 


5 


Mar 


1955 


45511 


JASON BIRCH HOLT 


28 


June 


1976 


45512 


JULIE KAY HOLT 


3 


Oct 


1978 


45513 


JEFFREY MARDEN HOLT 


19 


Jan 


1981 


45514 


JOLYN JANEL HOLT 


9 


June 


1982 


4552 


MARY RUTH HOLT 


18 


Sept 


1954 


4553 


KEVIN MC KAY HOLT 


1 


Oct 


1956 


4554 


MICHELLE HOLT 


19 


Feb 


1962 




Curtis Walton 








4555 


SUSAN HOLT 


14 


Apr 


1966 


456 


EDITH COLLEEN TAYLOR 


23 


Sept 


1934 




Norman Glen Van Woerkom 


18 


June 


1930 


4561 


CYNTHIA VAN WOERKOM 


27 


Apr 


1957 


4562 


STEVEN GLEN VAN WOERKOM 


5 


May 


1959 




Jennifer Day 


5 


Aug 


1961 


45621 


STEVEN GLEN VAN WOERKON, Jr. 


2 Apr 


1982 


45 


w Sadie Leola Peay Loose 


3 


Dec 


1910 


46 


LEONA LOUIE TAYLOR 


8 


Jan 


1897 




Ed Nolan 








461 


MICHAEL NOLAN 








462 


PATSY NOLAN 








47 


JOHN DONALD TAYLOR 


19 


July 


1906 




Katherine Huish 


1 


Oct 


1907 


471 


ROBERT ROYAL TAYLOR 


31 


Mar 


1928 




Rella Dail Sharrock 


23 


July 


1931 


47 1 1 


KERRY ANN TAYLOR 


22 


Mar 


1 949 


472 


JOAN ELIZABETH TAYLOR 


26 


Mar 


1932 




Robert Lawless 








47 


w Margaret Belle Yokey Myers 


2 


Jan 


1899 


6 


WILLIAM TAYLOR 


2 


July 


1866 



284 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1982 



LD. No 




jj 1 r tn 






i.-'e am 




GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 


c J ivi d. r 


1 R ft 

i O -J c 


4. 


oept 


1 97A 




Ltd fc— ' cx w y c X 


9 n A »-> -1. 
iSU /\pr 


i 0'±D 


9 
C 


Mar 


1 Q 9 9 


5 


JOSEPH TAYLOR 


i u J une 


1 Q A c; 

I O D D 


7 n 




1 C A7 


7 


HENRIETTA TAYLOR 


D \JCZ 


1 OA7 




June 


1 Q A 1 




George Affleck Kerr 


4 Or-f 


1 fiA4 


1 7 


iviay 


19 17 


71 


HENRIETTA RHEA KERR 


1 7 Nov 

XX IN V 


-1 O o o 










Virgil Riley Cross 




-I O 7 W 








711 


JAMES RILEY CROSS 


A Ana 


1 932 








72 


JANE ( JENNIE ) KERR 


J xvicL y 


1 RQ2 




Ma r 


1972 




William Ronald Holt 


1 4 May 


1 894 


1 7 

X 1 


Ma r 


1972 


721 


WILLIAM RALPH HOLT 


31 Oct 


1923 


30 


Nov 


1961 




Venice C. Lloyd 


4 Dec 


1925 








721 1 


PATRICIA VENICE HOLT 












W 


EfVifl Bron<?on 












7212 


ROSE MARIE HOLT 












721 3 


JENNY LEE HOLT 












7214 


WILLIAM RICHARD HOLT 












722 


DAVID EARL HOLT 


17 May 


1928 










Mary Elizabeth Black 


11 Apr 


1934 








7221 


HELEN LORRAINE HOLT 












7222 


JANE ELIZABETH HOLT 












73 


BASIL TAYLOR KERR 


1 2 Mav 

X i~i xvxcL y 


1 894 


28 


Nov 


1 980 




Vivian Hastincs 

* X V X CL -L JL X A CX O U X X± O 


17 Tan 


1 R97 


i 


i-J c C 


1 977 


731 


MAURINE KERR 


Q T n 
O >J clll 


1917 


1 7 


iVJLcL y 


1975 


732 


GEORGE RUSSELL KERR 


J 1 ivia r 


1919 










Mary Marguerite Hayes (Marjorie) 


7 M a \7- 
^ \j IV J. ct y 


197 3 








7321 


GLENN RUSSELL KERR 


I rr J Lillet 


1 94R 










Glenda McConnell 


77 Nov 


1 948 








73211 


GLENN RUSSELL KERR, Jr. 


5 Nov 


1 968 








73212 


JEFFREY TAYLOR KERR 


21 July 


1970 








7321 w Terry Lee Cleveland 


23 Mar 


1948 








73213 


GRADY RICHARD KERR 


14 Apr 


1980 








73214 


SUMMER LEE KERR 


27 May 


1981 









285 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1982 



I.D. No. 






Birth 




732 


GEORGE RUSSELL KERR 


31 


Mar 


1919 




Mary Marguerite Hayes (Marjorie) 


20 


May 


1923 


7322 


BONNIE DEE KERR 


3 


Dec 


1950 




John Albert Morris 


30 


June 


1950 


73221 


JULIANA MORRIS 


2 


May 


1973 


73222 


AMY MARA MORRIS 


16 


Aug 


1974 


73223 


JOHN DANIEL MORRIS 


17 


Nov 


1975 


73224 


LISA PEARL MORRIS 


17 


Apr 


1977 


73225 


STEFANIE MORRIS 


23 


Jan 


1950 


73226 


MICHAEL MORRIS 


24 


July 


1981 


7323 


SHERRY LYNNE KERR 


24 


Aug 


1952 




Craig Martin Greenman 


2 


Aug 


1949 


73231 


JOSHUA CRAIG GREENMAN 


9 


July 


1977 


73232 


JASON TAYLOR GREENMAN 


23 


Apr 


1979 


73233 


JENNIFER LYNNE GREENMAN 


27 


May 


1981 


7324 


GREGG RICHARD KERR 


11 


Mar 


1959 




Shauna Stephan 


24 


Feb 


1962 


73241 


WENDY MARIE KERR 


25 


Sept 


1982 


733 


HAROLD KERR 


13 


Mar 


1920 


734 


HOWARD KERR 


13 


Mar 


1920 


735 


RICHARD LEROY KERR 


4 


June 


1923 




Marjorie Mae Summe r ville 


6 


Dec 


1 923 


7351 


SUSAN DIAN KERR 
John Hole 


25 


Oct 


1948 


7351 1 










7351 2 










7352 


DEBRA JEAN KERR 
Robert Johnson 


13 


Apr 


1951 


73521 










73522 










73523 










7353 


NANCY ANN KERR 
Stan Smith 


18 


Feb 


1954 


73531 










73532 










7354 


RAYMOND RICHARD KERR 


25 


Mar 


1958 



Death 



13 Mar 1920 
13 Mar 1920 



7355 WILLIAM KERR 



286 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1983 
I.D. No. Birth Death 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 


25 Mar 


1838 


4 Sept 


1 926 


Henrietta Sawyer 


20 Apr 


1846 


2 


Mar 


1922 


7 


HENRIETTA TAYLOR 


6 Oct 


1867 


1 


June 


1941 




George Affleck Kerr 


4 Oct 


1864 


27 


May 


1912 


73 


BASIL TAYLOR KERR 


12 May 


1894 




Dec 


1980 




Vivian Hastings 


17 Jan 


1897 








736 


KATHRYN KERR 


3 Jan 


1928 










Vyvyan Stanley Clift 


25 Oct 


1923 








7361 


MAURINE CLIFT 


12 Dec 


1948 










Steven Brent Nuttall 


31 Dec 


1940 








73611 


TRAVIS JAMES NUTTALL 


23 Dec 


1972 








73612 


KATHRYN NUTTALL 


26 Aug 


1976 








7361 3 


SARAH NUTTALL 


21 May 


1979 








73614 


REBECCA NUTALL 


22 Sept 


1982 








7362 


DANIEL EDWARD CLIFT 


18 Dec 


1 949 










Juleen Fredrickson 


14 Nov 


1 951 








73621 


DAVID ALLAN CLIFT 


8 Apr 


1 973 








73622 


ELAINE CLIFT 


13 Dec 


1 974 








73623 


MARGENE CLIFT 


4 Sept 


1976 








73624 


MICHAEL BRANDON CLIFT 


14 June 


1978 








73625 


AARON DANIEL CLIFT 


9 Aug 


1 980 








73626 


KEVIN GRANT CLIFT 


8 Aug 


1982 








7363 


CHRISTINE CLIFT 


2 May 


1952 










Ifeith Warren Aurich 


15 Feb 


1953 








73631 


BRIAN KEITH AURICH 


24 Feb 


1977 








73632 


TODD STANLEY AURICH 


18 Sept 


1979 








73633 


TRISHA ANN AURICH 


24 Nov 


1980 








73634 


MELISSA AURICH 


10 Aug 


1982 








7364 


MARTIN TAYLOR CLIFT 


13 Sept 


1954 










Peggy Lynn Norland 


20 Nov 


1956 








73641 


KERRY LYNN CLIFT 


1 2 Jan 


1 979 








73642 


JONATHAN TAYLOR CLIFT 


25 Feb 


1981 








7365 


LOUISE CLIFT 


28 Apr 


1956 










Linde Gayle Hatton 


21 Mar 


1949 








7366 


ANNETTE CLIFT 


17 Nov 


1958 










J eif rey btewart White 


1 1 Apr 


1966 








74 


GEORGE KENNETH KERR 


22 Feb 


1897 










Julia Alice Teams 












75 


JOHN RALPH KERR 


17 Sept 


1900 . 










Esther Selma Nielsen 












751 


DOROTHY ESTHER KERR 


1 2 Jan 


1928 










Alan Stephen Fabricant 












752 


EILEEN ANN KERR 


2 July 


1931 









Waldo Romney Richardson 



287 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1982 
I.D, No. Birth Death 

8 THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 28 July 1868 24 Oct 195 

Mary Maud Elon Rogers 30 June 1872 11 Dec 1942 

81 THOMAS STERLING TAYLOR 7 July 1890 

Nell Taylor 1 2 July 1891 7 Dec 1961 

811 VESTA TAYLOR 14 Dec 1916 25 June 1935 

812 NELLIE JANE TAYLOR 3 Mar 1920 
Francis Marion Henderson 16 July 1915 

8121 FRANCIS NELSON HENDERSON 12 Apr 1942 
Barbara Lynn 9 Jan 1946 

81211 DEBORAH HENDERSON 3 Apr 1968 

81212 BRENT NELSON HENDERSON 21 Nov 1969 

81213 JEFFREY LYNN HENDERSON 28 Feb 1975 

81214 MARY ELIZABETH HENDERSON 5 Nov 1977 

8122 JOHN ODIS HENDERSON 17 May 1943 
Carolyn Marie Bowes 8 Aug 1950 

81221 SHELIA MARIE HENDERSON 17 June 1971 8 Aug 1971 

81222 ROBERT ODIS HENDERSON 30 Nov 1972 

81223 RICHARD WAYNE HENDERSON 22 Apr 1974 

81224 RAYMOND LEON HENDERSON 22 Apr 1974 

81225 RONALD ALLEN HENDERSON 1 2 Sept 1975 

81226 RANDALL DALE HENDERSON 2 Sept 1977 

81227 RYAN KING HENDERSON 23 Apr 1980 

8123 JANET TAYLOR HENDERSON 1 Nov 1945 
Thomas Irving Walsman 6 July 1943 

81231 THOMAS FREDERICK WALSMAN 3 Aug 1972 

81232 MICHAEL TAYLOR WALSMAN 20 May 1974 

81233 JENNY MARIE WALSMAN 19 Oct 1975 

81234 DAVID MARION WALSMAN 8 Jan 1977 

81235 WESLEY BRIAN WALSMAN .5 June 1978 
81 236 DANIEL STERLING WALSMAN 14 Aug 1980 
81237 MATTHEW CHRISTIAlSi WALSMAN 8 Mar 1982 

8124 DAVID ALLEN HENDERSON 27 Dec 1947 
Zeltha Janeel Ashmead 25 Apr 1950 

81241 DALLEN HARVEY HENDERSON 13 Jan 1975 

81242 LANEEL ALLEZ HENDERSON 25 Dec 1975 

8125 JULIA ANN HENDERSON 15 Feb 1949 

8126 NORMA JANE HENDERSON 22 Nov 1951 

8127 THOMAS HILDRETH HENDERSON 26 Jan 1954 
Mary Frances Mclntire 4 Aug 1955 

81271 MARCUS GABRIEL HENDERSON 7 Jan 1980 

81272 MIRIAM EVA HENDERSON 6 Feb 1982 

8128 WILLIAM STERLING HENDERSON 15 Dec 1955 

8129 NANCY MAE HENDERSON 9 Mar 1957 



288 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1982 



I.D. No. 

8 

813 

8131 

81311 
8132 



81321 
81322 
81 
82 



83 

831 

8311 

83111 
831 12 
831 13 
831 14 
8312 

83121 

83122 

83123 

832 

833 

8331 

83311 
83312 
8332 
8333 

8334 
8335 
8336 



w 



THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 28 

Mary Maud Elon Rogers 30 

THOMAS STERLING TAYLOR II 19 

Myra Hansen 13 

MARK JAMES TAYLOR 1 

Jane Higley 7 

JENNIFER ANN TAYLOR 21 

ANNE CHRISTINE TAYLOR 26 

Terry Wayne Kallas 1 

TAYLOR JAMES KALLAS 2 

HEATHER ANNE KALLAS 2 
Vivian Kay Hulet 

ETHEL TAYLOR 26 

Harvey Homer Sessions 9 

LESTER ROGERS TAYLOR 24 

Vivian Smart Parkinson 28 

LESTER PARKINSON TAYLOR 23 

Shirley Louise Sanford 3 

CHERYL LYNN TAYLOR 21 

Carl Dean Pedersen 4 

SHARI MARIE PEDERSEN 8 

KRISTIN NICOLE PEDERSEN 8 

CAMERON SCOTT PEDERSEN 24 
MICHAEL SANFORD PEDERSEN 17 

LISA ANNE TAYLOR 22 

William Randall Cone 21 
WILLIAM RANDALL CONE, Jr. 30 

DEVON CATHERINE CONE 23 

SCOTT TAYLOR CONE 17 

EDWARD PARKINSON TAYLOR 5 

ROSE PARKINSON TAYLOR 27 

Max William Sharp 7 

ROGER TAYLOR SHARP 22 
Terrie Lee Hansen 
ANTHONY TAYLOR SHARP 
NICHOLS TAYLOR SHARP 

CAROLYN TAYLOR SHARP 28 

GREGORY TAYLOR SHARP 12 
Kathy Lynn Tolistrup 

EDWARD TAYLOR SHARP 4 

ROSILYNN TAYLOR SHARP 7 

BARRY TAYLOR SHARP 9 



Birth 

July 

June 

May 

Feb 

Sept 

Dec 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

June 

Oct 

Apr 

Mar 

Nov 

Nov 

May 

Sept 

Jan 

Oct 

Feb 

Feb 

Oct 

Nov 

Apr 

Apr 

Aug 

May 

Oct 

Feb 

Jan 

Dec 

Sept 



June 
Dec 

Jan 
Oct 
Mar 



868 
872 
924 
924 
951 
957 
974 
955 
952 
977 
979 

892 
883 
893 
893 
919 
928 
948 
941 
971 
971 
973 
976 
956 
953 

979 
981 
982 
922 
924 
918 
949 



1951 
1952 

1957 
1958 
I960 



Death 
24 Oct 195 
11 Dec 1942 



3 Apr 
2 Sept 



1968 
1962 



6 Oct 1955 



5 June 1954 



289 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 1982 




I.D. No. 




Birth 




8 


THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


28 July 


1868 




Mary Maud Elon Rogers 


30 June 


1872 


834 


DEANNE PARKINSON TAYLOR 


9 Feb 


1926 




Curtis Vernell Harrison 


29 Jan 


1926 


8341 


LE ANNE HARRISON 


10 Dec 


1947 




Peter Butler Giles 


31 Mar 


1944 


83411 


ADAM BUTLER GILES 


5 June 


1 969 


83412 


AMY LAURA GILES 


21 Jan 


1971 


83413 


JENNIFER LEA GILES 


9 June 


1 972 


83414 


TAYLOR HARRISON GILES 


5 Mar 


1974 


83415 


AFTON JEANNE GILES 


20 June 


1975 


83416 


RYAN PETER GILES 


21 Jan 


1978 


83417 


SARA VIVIAN GILES 


8 Apr 


1 979 


8342 


BRIAN CURTIS HARRISON 


28 Feb 


1 949 




Denece McKinnon 


1 May 


1956 


83421 


DAVID CLARK HARRISON 


20 Mar 


1977 


83422 


JONATHAN HASTINGS HARRISON 7 Nov 


1978 


83423 


SAMUEL PARKINSON HARRISON 


11 Feb 


1979 


8343 


JANET TAYLOR HARRISON 


23 Apr 


1952 




Robert Ernest Craig 


8 July 


1951 


83431 


JOY KARIN CRAIG 


11 May 


1975 


83432 


ROBERT LOUIS CRAIG 


10 Nov 


1976 


83433 


CURTIS WAYNE CRAIG 


10 Jan 


1978 


83434 


LESA CRAIG 


25 Nov 


1980 


8344 


RONALD TAYLOR HARRISON 


28 May 


1955 




Deborah Marriott 


30 Mar 


1957 


83441 


SCOTT MARRIOTT HARRISON 


11 Dec 


1979 


83442 


MARK CURTIS HARRISON 


11 Dec 


1979 


8345 


PEGGY TAYLOR HARRISON 


11 May 


1958 




David Grant Geddes 


11 Dec 


1955 


83451 


AUDREY ROSE GEDDES 


29 Oct 


1979 


83452 


RACHEL MARIE GEDDES 






835 


PHILLIP PARKINSON TAYLOR 


6 Sept 


1929 




LaRene Rhees 


7 June 


1928 


8351 


DIANE TAYLOR 


12 Aug 


1956 




Richard Floyd Taylor 


23 Nov 




835 1 1 


SCOTT RICHARDSON TAYLOR 


20 Mar 


1 978 


83512 


LESLIE ANN TAYLOR 


6 Oct 


1 979 


83513 


STEVEN RHEES TAYLOR 


30 June 


1982 


8352 


SUSAN TAYLOR 


13 Mar 


1958 




Kevin Lincoln Card 


8 Nov 


1953 


83521 


KERI SUE CARD 


2 Mar 


1979 


83522 


LISA CARD 


20 Jan : 


1981 


8353 


TONI TAYLOR 
Glen Allen Clawson 


22 July 


1959 


8354 


BONNIE TAYLOR 


9 May 


1962 


8355 


REBECCA TAYLOR 


24 Aug 


1963 



Death 
24 Oct 195 
11 Dec 1942 



290 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1 982 










I.S. No. 




Birth 






Death 




8 


THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


28 July ! 


1 868 


24 


Oct 


1 95 




Mary Maud Elon Rogers 


30 June 


1872 


11 


Dec 


1942 


84 


VESTA TAYLOR 


28 June 


1 895 


10 


Oct 


1 905 


85 


ALDEN ROGERS TAYLOR 


1 1 June 


L 897 


24 


Feb 


I96I 




Mary Caroline Hughes 


16 Sent ] 


I 898 


17 Dec 


■I 7c5 1 


851 


HELEN ELIZA TAYLOR 


1 3 June 


[922 










William Waldo Barrett, Jr. 


26 M^ay '. 


[917 

L 7 J. 1 








851 1 


WILLIAM WALDO BARRETT III 


3 Aug ] 


[ 945 










Julie Ashton 


7 Oct ] 


947 








851 11 


MELISSA BARRETT 


1 7 Aug 1 


973 








851 12 


ELIZABETH BARRETT 


19 Oct 1 


976 








851 13 


EMILY BARRETT 


26 Sent ] 


97R 
7 ' 








8512 


MICHAEL TAYLOR BARRETT 


5 Oct 1 


948 










Stephanie Jean Kern 


1 2 Apr ] 


949 








85121 


ERRIN ELIZABETH BARRETT 


18 Dec 1 


973 








85122 


CHRISTOPHER TAYLOR BARRETT 22 May 


1976 








8513 


MARY PENNY BARRETT 


24 Feb 1 


950 










Blaine Burton Bodell 


3 Sept 1 


947 

7*T ( 








85131 


LUCUS BARRETT BODELL 


1 7 Anr 1 


Q7 1 

7 ' i 








851 32 


CORRINE (Cori) BODELL 


26 Sent 1 


7 ' -> 








851 33 


JACOB WILLIAM BODELL 


1 Ancr 1 


Q7 7 
7 ' ' 








86 


MARION ROGERS TAYLOR 


10 July 1 


899 


16 


Mar 


1956 




Josephine Cook Crandall 


10 Oct 1 


899 


3 


Oct 


1 Q76 


861 


RICHARD MARION TAYLOR 


2 Mar 1 


923 










Lucille Gatenby 


17 July 1 


931 








861 1 


DOUGLAS TAYLOR 


3 Jan 1 


950 










Margaret Ann Kuehne 


25 Sept 1 


7 3 U 








86111 


CHRISTINA BETH TAYLOR 


9 Aug 1 


977 








861 12 


JULIA KATHERINE TAYLOR 


17 Mar 1 


982 








861 2 


SUSAN KATHLEEN TAYLOR 


21 Aug 1 


952 










Robert Blain Hansen II 












86121 


LUCY ELIZABETH HANSEN 












8613 


JAMES RICHARD TAYLOR 


29 Apr 1 


954 










Lisa Dawn Page 


2 Aug 1 


954 








86131 


MICHAEL THOMAS TAYLOR 


1 2 Jan 1 


977 








861 32 


MATTHEW JAMES TAYLOR 


24 July 1 


978 








86133 


JEFFREY RICHARD TAYLOR 


6 Sept 1 


982 








8614 


MARY ELIZABETH TAYLOR 


26 Sept ] 


955 










Kendall Lee Bosen 


13 Feb 1 


949 








86141 


ELIZABETH ERIN BOSEN 


24 July 1 


980 








8615 


MARTHA JO TAYLOR 


10 Feb 1 


959 










Vernon Kirk 












86151 


ALEXANDER VERNON KIRK 


16 Sept 1 


982 








8616 


JOHN STEWART TAYLOR 


14 June 1 


967 









291 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1982 




I.D. No 




Birth 




8 


THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


28 July 


1868 




Mary Maud Elon Rogers 


30 June 


1872 


862 


ELIZABETH MAUD TAYLOR 


22 June 


1924 




Blaine Milton Porter 


24 Feb 


1922 


8621 


CLAUDIA PORTER 


10 Mar 


1945 




Karl Dean Black 


6 May 


1942 


86211 


LAURIE BLACK 


26 Aug 


1966 


86212 


DAVID TAYLOR BLACK 


13 May 


1968 


86213 


MELISSA BLACK 


19 Nov 


1969 


86214 


KIMBERLI BLACK 


8 July 


1971 


86215 


ADAM JOSEPH BLACK 


27 May 


1972 


86216 


CHRISTOPHER MC KAY BLACK 2 Apr 


1973 


86217 


JENNIFER BLACK 


1 2 Jan 


1978 


86218 


TRIANA BLACK 


22 May 


1979 


8622 


ROGER BLAINE PORTER 


19 June 


1946 




Ann Robinson 


7 Feb 


1952 


86221 


ROBERT ROGER PORTER 


25 Oct 


1977 


86222 


STACY ANN PORTER 


24 July 


1980 


8623 


DAVID TAYLOR PORTER 


14 May 


1951 




Lorrie Parker 






8624 


PATRICIA ANN PORTER 


16 June 


1952 




Paul Hintze 


22 Mar 


1950 


86241 


AMY ELIZABETH HITZE 


20 Apr 


1973 


86242 


HEATHER ANNE HINTZE 


1 5 June 


1974 


86243 


KARI^YN HINTZE 


3 1 Jan 


1976 


86244 


EMILY JANE HINTZE 


29 June 


1979 


86245 


AMANDA MARIE HINTZE 


27 Nov 


1981 


863 


JOSEPHINE PATRICIA TAYLOR 


27 Feb 


1927 




Paul Whitney Cook 


28 Apr 


1926 


8631 


BARRY PAUL COOK 


27 Mar 


1951 




Julee Orme 






86311 


BRENT PAUL COOK 






86312 


MARK COOK 






8632 


KEVjSISJ TAYLOR COOK 


8 Jan 


1953 




Rhonda 


13 Feb 


1952 


86321 


lylARCI ANN COOK 


25 Nov 


1977 


86322 


MELISSA COOK 


22 May 


1980 


8633 


CATHERINE COOK 


14 Nov 


1958 


864 


DAVID ALAN TAYLOR 


4 Apr 


1929 




Joyce Catharine Bright 


19 Sept 


1934 


8641 


SHAUNA TAYLOR 


17 Dec 


1957 


864 w 


Sally Helen Thorne 


2 Oct 


1939 


8642 


MATTHEW MICHAEL ALAN TAYLOR 14 Aug 196 


8643 


JOSEPHINE LYNN TAYLOR 


4 Oct 


1962 


8644 


JENNIFER MARY TAYLOR 


14 Nov 


1964 


8645 


ANDREW DAVID TAYLOR 


26 Oct 


1968 



Death 
24 Oct 195 
11 Dec 1942 
29 Dec 1963 



292 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY 



ROSTER 



Jjesjcsfc 





Ja C /~\ T ll A O "fV^ W T* ^1 

-0.0 D X. J-/ C C 11 iU tJ X y 


1 QR? 




T T) IMo 




-1— J 11 Lii 




D 
<5 


TMOlVyTA^^ NTPHOT T ^ TAYT OR 


c« o *J ^x y 


1 rAr 

A o u o 




xvxQ, ry xvxd, LiCi x— injxi x\c^cx o 


Tn 


1 R72 




FLORENCE MERLE TAYLOR 


8 June 


X y D J 




Eugene S. Maier 


28 June 


1 7 J _) 


OOD 1 


MARISHA MARIANNE MAIER 


23 Aug 


1 Q^^ 

1 yDD 




Christopher Allen Johnson 


8 Dec 


J. 7_) 1 


O ^-^ J- 


ELIZABETH ANGELA JOHNSON 23 Sept 


1 QRD 

1 7 O W 


O D -J O 


MARIDIN MAIER 


13 Jan 


1 Qi^i R 

1 7 J O 


RA^ 

O U 3 -? 


ERIC MAIER 


R June 


1 qad 


R7 


VICTOR ROGERS TAYLOR 


3 Sept 


1 QO? 
17^^ 




Dorothy Ericksen Park. 






QQ 

oo 


MARY MAUD TAYLOR 


28 June 


1 qdA 




Merrill Daniel Clayson 


22 Oct 


1 RQQ 
1077 


R R 1 

oo I 


ETHEL JEAN CLAYSON 


28 May 


1 Q?7 
1 7 ( 


RR? 
o o t< 


JANICE MARILYN CLAYSON 


4 June 


1 Q30 




Reid Kay Larsen 


27 Nov 


1 Q3 ? 


RR? 1 

oo <-< J. 


REID KAY LARSEN, Jr. 


18 Apr 


1 3 




Linda 






RR22 

KJ O L-i C-i 


GREGORY KIM LARSEN 


10 Sept 


1 954 
1 7 J ** 




Deni se 






O O ^ ^ -L 


GREGORY KIM LARSEN II 






RR222 

O O t-i t-« 


TRESSA DENISE LARSEN 






RR2'^ 

O O -' 


KEVIN LON LARSEN 


29 May 


± y t 




Susan Neff 






RR? ^ T 

O O w ^ JL 


JUSTIN BERKLEY LARSEN 






RR24 


THOMAS ANDREW LARSEN 


18 Jan 


1 QSQ 
1 7 J 7 




Michelle 






88241 


ANDREA LARSEN 






RR24? 

O O trf 


JACOB LARSEN 






RR? 

O O ^ -J 


KRISTINE LARSEN 


17 Jan 


1 qai 




Lvnn Chfifitisin Hanspn 


12 Dec 


1 Qc; A 


RR26 


MELANIE TERESSA LARSEN 


12 Feb 


1 QA3 

X y \J ^ 




Tracy Zimmerman 






RR*^ 

O O J 


MERRILL DAVID CLAYSON 


26 Mar 


1 Q34 

X y 


RR4 


PAUL TAYLOR CLAYSON 


17 Apr 


X y J y 




Melanie Irene Anderson 


21 June 


1 951 

1 7 J a. 


RR41 


DANIEL PAUL CLAYSON 


11 Apr 


1 973 

X y ( J 


RR42 


RUTH DIANA CLAYSON 


1 Oct 


1 97A 


RR'^ 

O O -J 


CLAUDIA MARY CLAYSON 


14 Sept 


1 941 

1 7^ J. 




La Nell Topham 






8851 


STEPHEN LA NELL TOPHAM 


27 Oct 


1965 


8852 


MARY CHRISTINA TOPHAM 


17 Apr 


1969 


8853 


TAMARA MARIE TOPHAM 


8 Apr 


1971 


8854 


DAVID ERNEST TOPHAM 


13 July 


1973 


8855 


JULIE TOPHAM 


1 2 June 


1977 


88251 


RYAN LYNN HANSEN 


8 Feb 


1981 


88252 


WHITNEY JAN HANSEN 


4 Sept 


1982 


8843 


JOHN TAYLOR CLAYSON 


23 Feb 


1979 



Death 
24 Oct 1950 
11 Dec 1942 



16 Mar 1980 



14 Dec 1970 



?93 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY 



ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1982 




LD. No. 




Birth 




8 


THOMAS NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


28 July 


1868 




Mary Maud Elon Rogers 


30 June 


1872 


89 


DELENNA ROGERS TAYLOR 


28 Dec 


1911 




Hyrum Rex Taylor 


7 June 


1911 


891 


NICHOLLS VICTOR TAYLOR 


2 Sept 


1934 




Jeraldine Willmore 








Barbara Eddy Powell 


11 Jan 


1940 


8911 


ANNA CHRISTINE TAYLOR 


1 Mar 


1963 




Jim Sullins 






8912 


REX NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


21 Dec 


1971 


8913 


FRANKLIN VICTOR TAYLOR 


12 Sept 


1974 


892 


ADRIANNE TAYLOR 


26 Nov 


1935 




Rodney Sherwood Taylor 


11 Nov 


1933 


8921 


MICHELE TAYLOR 


29 Sept 


I960 




Rick Stauffenberg 






89211 


VICTOR LEE STAUFFENBERG 


19 Aug 


1982 


8922 


TOD SHERWOOD TAYLOR 


22 Nov 


1962 


8923 


COLETTE TAYLOR 


15 July 


1964 


8924 


LEX CURTIS TAYLOR 


4 Aug 


1967 


893 


LARRY HUGH TAYLOR 


28 June 


1939 




Noreen Nelson 


19 Nov 


1933 


8931 


HYRUM SANDERS TAYLOR 


6 May 


1961 


8932 


HEIDI TAYLOR 


18 July 


1963 


8933 


NATHAN HUGH TAYLOR 


10 Apr 


1965 


8934 


MARTHA TAYLOR 


23 Jan 


1971 


894 


ROY NATHAN TAYLOR 


17 May 


1943 




Cheryl Ann Doughty 


26 Sept 


1944 


8941 


BRAD DOUGHTY TAYLOR 


22 June 


1964 


8942 


LAURA ANN TAYLOR 


21 Feb 


1968 


8943 


ANDREA TAYLOR 


26 Apr 


1972 


895 


KRISTI TAYLOR 


16 Aug 


1946 




Stephen Wayne Lawrence 


22 Aug 


1947 


8951 


TIMOTHY WAYNE LAWRENCE 


17 Feb 


1972 


8952 


DANA LYNN LAWRENCE 


23 Oct 


1974 


896 


NATALIE MAUD TAYLOR 


14 June 


1950 




Murlin Ronald Ralph 


6 Mar 


1945 


8961 


REBEKA MAUD RALPH 


30 Sept 


1973 


8962 


ADRIANNE KRISTI RALPH 


28 June 


1975 


8963 


MURRIE LYN RALPH 


29 Sept 


1977 


8964 


MARJORIE JO RALPH 


10 Sept 


1979 


8965 


JILL HELEN RALPH 


19 Jan 


1983 



Death 
24 Oct 195 
11 Dec 1942 



294 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1982 

LD. No. Birth Death 

GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 25 Mar 1838 4 Sept 1926 

Henrietta Sawyer 20 Apr 1846 2 Mar 1922 

9 MARY ANN ( POLLY ) TAYLOR 14 Feb 1870 3 June 1950 

William Daniel Roberts 6 Jan 1867 1 3 Oct 1947 

91 GENEVE ROBERTS 28 Feb 1897 

Joshua Harold Dunn 22 July 1896 29 Dec I960 

911 ROBERT EDWIN DUNN 10 July 1918 
Kathryn LaVern Rock 3 Apr 1922 

9111 ROBERT HAROLD DUNN 5 June 1944 
Linda Killorn 14 July 1947 

91111 BARBARA ANN DUNN 18 Jan 1971 

91112 RICHARD ROBERT DUNN 28 Oct 1973 

91113 AMBER MARIE DUNN 14 Mar 1976 

91114 JEFFREY PAUL DUNN 27 Oct 1978 

91115 DIANE KATHRYN DUNN 29 Aug 1981 

9112 LARRY JAMES DUNN 1 2 Aug 1947 

9113 ROGER WILLIAMS DUNN 28 Nov 1949 
Dorothy Edith Steggall 17 Sept 1951 

91131 ROGER WILLIAMS DUNN, Jr. 1 1 Sept 1974 

91132 JARED WAYNE DUNN 15 June 1976 

91133 MERRILL WILLIAMS DUNN 10 Mar 1979 

91134 COREY "H" DUNN 6 Sept 1980 

9114 SHIRLEY IRENE DUNN 12 July 1954 
Stephen G. Farnworth 14 Aug 1949 

91141 CHRISTY FARNWORTH 20 Apr 1975 

91142 SHAUNA FARNWORTH 27 Jan 1977 

91143 SCOTT MICHAEL FARNWORTH 22 May 1981 

9115 STEVEN HOWARD DUNN 29 Sept 1958 
Tori Ann Jorgensen 14 July 

912 PAUL HAROLD DUNN 24 Apr 1924 
Jeanne Alice Cheverton 16 June 1925 

9121 JANET CAROLYN DUNN 19 July 1947 
Gary Gough 31 Dec 1946 

91211 CAROLYN JENNIFER GOUGH 30 Aug 1971 

91212 TRAVIS DUNN GOUGH 9 Jan 1978 

91213 TYLER RAY GOUGH 9 Jan 1978 

9122 MARSHA JEANNE DUNN 9 Mar 1950 
Jeril Dewey Winget 6 June 1948 

91221 TAMMY SUE WINGET 9 Oct 1971 

91222 JEREMY BRET WINGET 5 June 1973 

91223 BRADLEY PAUL WINGET 30 Apr 1976 

91224 MARK JERIL WINGET 10 Jan 1981 

9123 KELLIE COLLEEN DUNN 1 8 Aug 1959 
Mike Mcintosh 10 May 1957 

91231 BRANDON MICHAEL MC INTOSH 24 June 1981 

91232 ADAM CHRISTOPHER MC INTOSH 6 Dec 1982 

295 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1982 










I. D. No. 






Birth 






Death 


9 


MARY ANN ( POLLY ) TAYLOR 


14 


Feb 


1870 


3 


June 




William Daniel Roberts 


6 


Jan 


1867 


13 


Oct 


91 


GENEVE ROBERTS 


28 


Feb 


1897 








Joshua Harold Dunn 


22 


July 


1896 


29 Dec 


913 


NORMAN DAVID DUNN 


22 


Feb 


1926 








Lois Olsen 


17 


Sept 


1924 






9131 


LOWELL WILLIAM DUNN 


8 


Feb 


1949 








Sylvia Baker 


14 


July 


1949 






91311 


CYNTHIA DUNN 


14 


Nov 


1971 






91312 


STEVEN LEWIS DUNN 


14 


Mar 


1974 






91313 


MICHAEL DAVID DUNN 


3 


Oct 


1976 






91314 


DEBRA DUNN 


13 


Oct 


1978 






91315 


MARIE DUNN 


19 


Oct 


1981 






9132 


DOUGLAS NORMAN DUNN 
Rosa 


27 


June 


1950 






91321 


JO ANN DUNN 


12 


July 


1974 






9133 


DENNIS DAVID DUNN 


27 


June 


1950 








Shari Nealy 


12 


Oct 


1952 






91331 


DIANNE MARIE DUNN 


21 


July 


1972 






91332 


JAMES DAVID DUNN 


27 


July 


1977 






91333 


HEATHER LYNN DUNN 


30 


Nov 


1981 






9134 


GLORIA DUNN 


23 


Oct 


1951 








Larry Wilkenson 


11 


Jan 


1948 






91341 


AARON WILKENSON 


16 


Aug 


1973 






91342 


ISRAEL DAVID WILKENSON 


27 


Dec 


1974 






91343 


LARRY DANIEL WILKENSON 


31 


Aug 


1978 






91344 


JON KEVIN WILKENSON 


24 


Aug 


1979 






91345 


JESSICA GENEVE WILKENSON 16 


July 


1982 






9135 


BEVERLY DUNN 
David Pulver 


14 


Nov 


1954 






91351 


JULIE ANN PULVER 


28 


Mar 


1972 






91352 


ADAM DAVID PULVER 


6 


Apr 


1973 






91353 


SCOTT MICHAEL PULVER 


1 


Aug 


1977 






9136 


NANCY DUNN 


30 


Mar 


1957 








Mark Ostler 


19 


May 


1957 






91361 


SARAH ANN OSTLER 


17 


Jan 


1976 






91362 


DON M. OSTLER 


12 


Apr 


1978 






91363 


KEVIN MICHAEL OSTLER 


29 


Aug 


1980 






9137 


HOWARD LEWIS DUNN 


13 


July 


1959 








Darla Dunn Dunn 


14 


Oct 


I960 






91371 


BRANDON LEWIS DUNN 


6 


Aug 


1978 






91372 


DANIEL LEWIS DUNN 


22 


Dec 


1979 






w 


Lori Williams 


17 


Feb 


1964 







296 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1982 

I.D. No. Birth Death 

9 MARY ANN ( POLLY ) TAYLOR 14 Feb 1870 3 June 1950 

William Daniel Roberts 6 Jan 1867 1 3 Oct 1947 

913 NORMAN DAVID DUNN 22 Feb 1926 

Michele F. PetruUo 1 9 Aug 1943 

9138 TAMMY LOUISE DUNN 15 Jan 1966 

9139 JOHN HAROLD DUNN 24 Mar 1967 

913.10 PAUL MORGAN DUNN 19 June 1969 

913.11 BONNIE DANIELLE DUNN 4 Apr 1974 

913.12 RYAN DAVID DUNN 5 June 1973 

913.13 TIMOTHY MICHAEL DUNN 15 Jan 1978 

913.14 TIFFANY MARIE DUNN 28 July 1979 

913.15 SHAUN PATRICK DUNN 16 Nov 1981 

92 LAWRENCE PAUL ROBERTS 22 Apr 1899 15 Apr 1965 
Dot Anay Jensen 

93 MARY ROBERTS 18 July 1908 
Thomas Ward Warnock 24 June 1905 

931 MARILYN WARNOCK 24 Aug 1934 

Robert Mac Calder 16 Oct 1932 

9311 SUSIE CALDER 1 1 Mar 1953 

Kent Okelberry 3 Apr 1951 

931 h Phil Montoya 5 Oct 1929 

9312 LINDA MONTOYA 14 Aug 1964 

9313 BILLY MONTOYA 8 July 1966 

9314 JOHNNY MONTOYA 2 Mar 1969 

9315 VELITA MONTOYA 25 Nov 1971 

932 RICHARD WARNOCK 13 Dec 1938 
Carole Spaun 1 Mar 1940 

9321 BRENT WARNOCK 28 Sept 1966 

9322 DAVID WARNOCK 9 Aug 1969 

9323 PAUL WARNOCK 22 July 1972 

9324 DIANNE WARNOCK 18 Dec 1975 

9325 MARY ANN WARNOCK 20 Apr 1977 

933 ROBERT ALLEN WARNOCK 10 Nov 1944 
Suzanne Ostler 1 June 1948 

9331 SHANNON WARNOCK 26 Mar 1970 

9332 SHAUN WARNOCK 26 Mar 1970 

9333 RYAN WARNOCK 26 Feb 1975 

9334 LESLIE ANN WARNOCK 15 Jan 1980 



297 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1982 



LD. No. 






Birth 




Death 




GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 


25 


Mar. 


1838 


4 Sept 


1926 


Eliza Nicholls 


29 


Apr 


1838 


27 June 


1922 


10. 


ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


2 


Nov 


1870 


10 Sept 


1935 




Maria Louise Dixon 


5 


Jan 


1872 


17 Feb 


1947 


10. 1 


ARTHUR DIXON TAYLOR 


4 


Oct 


1895 


20 July 


1979 




Maurine Goodridge 


2 


Nov 


1899 


24 Apr 


1981 


10. 11 


ELAYNE TAYLOR 


12 


June 


1922 








Grant A. Fisher 


8 


June 


1919 






10. Ill 


TERRI FISHER 


27 


May 


1950 








Lawrence Jeremy Jensen 


17 


Jan 


1950 






10. 1 11 1 


JENNIFER MAURINE JENSEN 


29 


Dec 


1 977 






10. 11 12 


SARAH ELIZABETH JENSEN 


27 


Feb 


1980 






10. 1113 


EMILY ANNE JENSEN 


9 


Jan 


1983 






10. 1 12 


JEFFREY TAYLOR FISHER 


24 


May 


1952 








Donnette Morrison 


18 


Oct 


1953 






10. 1121 


HILLARY FISHER 


20 


Dec 


1978 






10. 113 


KATHY FISHER 


12 


Apr 


1955 








Paul H. Duncan 


10 


Dec 


1 956 






10. 1131 


MEGAN DUNCAN 


15 


July 


1979 






10. 1132 


TIFFANY DUNCAN 


1 1 


Jan 


1982 






10. 12 


KENT GOODRIDGE TAYLOR 


5 


Dec 


1925 






10. 13 


NANCY TAYLOR 


15 


Nov 


1927 








G. Keith Stewart 


12 


Aug 


1928 






10. 131 


BRENT TAYLOR STEWART 


6 


Mar 


1954 








Karen Gardner 


24 


Dec 


1954 






10. 1311 


VHARI STEWART 


20 


Nov 


1980 






10. 1 32 


KIM TAYLOR STEWART 
Lauri Ann Balser 


15 


Apr 


1956 






10. 133 


JAN STEWART 


9 


Mar 


I960 






10. 134 


JON TAYLOR STEWART 


25 


Dec 


1965 






10. 14 


DIXIE TAYLOR 


9 


Mar 


1932 








Boyd M. Frampton 


30 


Apr 


1932 






10. 141 


MARRIANNE FRAMPTON 


25 


Nov 


1956 








Ned Booth Bushnell 


16 


Jun 


1956 






10. 141 1 


STEPHANIE BUSHNELL 


6 


Sept 


198 






10. 142 


DAVID TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


9 


May 


1958 








Keri Ann Wheadon 


1 


May 


1959 






10. 143 


BRUCE TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


22 


Feb 


I960 








Connie Lynne Bird 


11 


Dec 


1959 






10. 1431 


JEREMY TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


11 


Sept 


1978 






10. 1432 


CHRISTOPHER TAYLOR FRAMPTON 30 Mar 198 






10. 144 


SUSAN FRAMPTON 


30 


Nov 


1961 








Ryan Farrell Fisher 


30 


Oct 


1982 






10. 145 


PAUL TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


12 Sept 


1964 






10. 146 


ALAN TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


22 


Dec 


1967 






10. 147 


KENT TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


25 Sept 


1969 







298 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 , 


1 1^ o O 

1 982 








LD. No. 






Birth 




JJeatn 


10. 


ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


z 


N ov 


1 870 


1 bept 1 V^D 




Maria Louise Dixon 


5 


Jan 


1 872 


17 Feb 1947 


10. 2 


LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 


6 


May 


1 898 


2 July 19d7 




Celestia M. Johnson 


8 


Apr 


1 903 




10. 21 


JOHN ARTHUR TAYLOR 


2 


Oct 


1 928 






Catherine Pearson 


24 


Dec 


1931 




10.211 


JOHN ARTHUR TAYLOR, Jr. 


1 3 


TV X 

May 


1 958 




10. 212 


THOMAS TAYLOR 


14 


Aug 


1959 




10. 213 


DAVID PEARSON TAYLOR 


Zl 


J an 


1 974 




1 0. 22 


JANICE TAYLOR 


24 


r e b 


1 A 1 

1931 






Monte B. DeGraw 


3 1 


Mar 


1 r\ 

1 929 




10, 221 


MICHELE DE GRAW 


9 


A ~ 

Aug 


1 A C /I 

195 6 






Frank otriblmg 










10. 222 


DERK TAYLOR DE GRAW 


1 8 


A _ 

Aug 


195 6 




10. 2Z3 


GREGORY lAYLOR DL GRAW 


Z 1 


J uly 


1 A ^ o 

1 9dZ 




10. 224 


NICOLE DE GRAW 


Z5 


J uly 


1 9dd 




10. 225 


"X /TT T T A T — » T rrr A T 7 T /'"N T~* T"* A TXT 

MICHAEL TAYLOR DE GRAW 


1 


Dec 


1 979 




1 0. 23 


LYNN ANNE TAYLOR 


1 7 


May 


1935 






H. Bryan Richards 


1 8 


Mar 


1 934 




10. Zil 


L>ARU1_, ijiiN KiUHARDo 


O A 

29 


Apr 


1 959 






• TAT" « 1 

K-im Wolsey Gregson 


1 A 
1 


J an 


1 A C ^ 

1 9-» D 




10, Z31 I 


DANIEL KIM GREGoON 


Z3 


June 


1 A '7 A 

1 979 




10, Z3Z 


oHARl RlGHARDb 


o o 
28 


AT « . . 

Nov 


1 A ^ A 

1 9dO 




10. Z33 


BRYAJN iAYl_i(JK KlUrlARDo 


O A 

zo 


oept 


1 VbZ 




1 A O O /I 

10. Z34 


RUBYJN RiCHARDo 


Z8 


Dec 


1 Vdd 




1 A O "3 C 

10. Z3d 


T_r TJ^T r~\ T ID T i_r a D T~\C 

rlii,lDl KIUHARDo 


3 


May 


1 A ^ '7 




1 A O "2 ^ 

1 U„ Z:5d 


T~> IT* Xa TP A D T /" T_r a TD T^C 

Rli,BxL.UUA RlUrlARDS 


c5 


J uly 


1 n "7 A 
1 7 f U 




1 A O ^ '7 

JO. Z3 r 


T TT" T\TT\T"V T "V AT TD T <^ ZJ A TD r~\C 

JiLiINrNY J_/YiN RlUrlARDo 


c 
D 


Nov 


1 n "7 
1 9 f Z 




1 A o o r> 

10. Z38 


T /^TLJT AT A \7 T /^TD TD T TIT A TD T^C 

J vJHJN iAYHJK RiGHARDo 


O A 

20 


J an 






1 0. Z4 


KATHRYN DEE TAYLOR 


1 1 


oept 


1 941 






A, Brent Brockbank 


25 


Apr 


1 937 




10. 241 


ATT I % TV T T^ t n T rn "T^ T ^ A TV T T 

ALLEN BRENT BROCKBANK, J 


r. 3 


bept 


1 964 




10. 242 


A TV T TV T T ^ T~* A TV T T ^ 

ANNE BROCKBANK 


4 


Jan 


1 967 




10. 243 


T T 7 TV T T X^ T ^ n» A TV TT^ / \ 

LYNN BROCKBANK (F) 


29 


July 


1 968 




10. 244 


T A T T A T~> T>^ 1~i A TV T T-^ 

LAURA BROCKBANK 


3 


J uly 


1 970 




10. 245 


REBECCA BROCKBANK 


20 


J une 


1973 




1 A O A L 

10. Z4d 


DIXUN TAYLOR BROCKBANK 


1 1 


"NT 

Nov 


1 975 




10. 247 


MARY KATHRYN BROCKBANK 


30 


bept 


1 977 




1 0. Z48 


UAVIU BKUCKBANK 


3 


June 


1 980 




10. 25 


GEORGE TERRY TAYLOR 


1 3 


bept 


^ t^t A A 

1 944 






Debra oue Wagstaif 


1 2 


Mar 


1951 




10. 251 


DOUGLAS DIXON TAYLOR 


19 


May 


1972 




10. 252 


DAVID LYNN TAYLOR 


1 


Dec 


1973 




10. 253 


ANNA LISA TAYLOR 


31 


Mar 


1977 




10. 254 


ALLEN CRAIG TAYLOR 


9 


Feb 


1979 




10. 2312 


MICHAEL THOMAS GREGSON 


15 


Nov 


1981 





299 





GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 




As of December 31, 1982 




I.D. No. 




Birth 




10. 


ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


2 Nov 


1870 




Maria Louise Dixon 


5 Jan 


1872 


10. 3 


ELTON LEROY TAYLOR 


22 June 


1900 




Ethel L. Scott 


13 July 


1904 


10. 31 


JULIA TAYLOR 


30 Aug 


1927 




Kenneth R. Anderson 


2 Feb 


1924 


10. 311 


KRISTINE ANDERSON 


25 May 


1952 




Phillip Bench Bandley 


8 Feb 


1953 


10. 3111 


JEREMIAH PHILLIP BANDLEY 


27 June 


1977 


10. 3112 


CHRISTIAN ANDERSON BANDLEY 22 Jul 


1980 


10. 312 


SCOTT TAYLOR ANDERSON 


30 Mar 


1954 




Annette Buffo 


27 Mar 


1958 


10. 3121 


MANDI ALESE ANDERSON 


26 Jan 


1979 


10. 3122 


JASON SCOTT ANDERSON 


25 June 


1981 


10. 313 


KENNEN ANDERSON 


11 Apr 


1958 




Fred Bandley 


2 July 


1957 


10. 3131 


NICHOLAS EDWARD BANDLEY 


18 Mar 


1978 


10. 3132 


STEFAN LOUIS BANDLEY 


6 Nov 


1980 


10. 314 


JED TAYLOR ANDERSON 


1 May 


I960 


10. 32 


JAMES SCOTT TAYLOR 


10 Mar 


1930 




Deanna Kay Hoen 


8 May 


1940 


10. 321 


JAMES HOEN TAYLOR 


3 Dec 


I960 


10. 322 


SCOTT HOEN TAYLOR 


15 Oct 


1962 


10. 323 


TERI TAYLOR 


16 May 


1964 


10. 324 


KATHY TAYLOR 


12 Nov 


1965 


10. 325 


DAVID HOEN TAYLOR 


11 May 


1967 


10. 326 


JULIE TAYLOR 


26 May 


1969 


10. 327 


STEVEN HOEN TAYLOR 


8 Feb 


1971 


10. 328 


THOMAS HOEN TAYLOR 


7 Apr 


1973 


10. 329 


KENT HOEN TAYLOR 


29 Nov 


1974 


10. 32. 10 


SUSAN TAYLOR 


3 Sept 


1976 


10. 32. 11 


ANNA TAYLOR 


6 Oct 


1978 


10. 33 


PAUL SCOTT TAYLOR 


7 July 


1933 




Nancy Lee Tanner 


30 Aug 


1937 


10. 331 


DIANE TAYLOR 


27 June 


1959 




Scott Linn Hodson 


4 Feb 


1959 


10. 331 1 


LANE TAYLOR HODSON 


11 Sept 


1978 


10. 3312 


MELANIE HODSON 


4 Dec 


1980 


10. 332 


WAYNE TANNER TAYLOR 


27 May 


I960 




Miriam Rowberry 






10, 333 


JOHN TANNER TAYLOR 


18 July 


1963 


10. 334 


PAUL SCOTT TAYLOR, Jr. 


25 July 


1973 



Death 
10 Sept 1935 
17 Feb 1947 



13 May 1967 



2 Dec 1974 



300 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1982 






LD. No. 






Birth 




10. 


ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


2 


Nov 


1870 




Maria Louise Dixon 


5 


Jan 


1872 


10. 34 


LOUISE TAYLOR 


1 


Aug 


1938 




Clifford A. Woodruff 


11 


Dec 


1937 


10. 341 


SHELLY K. WOODRUFF 


14 


May 


1958 




John Craig 


26 


Dec 


1957 


10. 342 


BECKY LYNN WOODRUFF 


11 


Nov 


1959 




David Wood 


19 


Dec 


1958 


10. 3421 


JENIFER LYNN WOOD 


12 


Nov 


1977 


10. 3422 


TRAVOR MARTIN WOOD 


6 


Apr 


1979 


10. 3423 


KAY LYNN LOUISE WOOD 


27 


Oct 


1981 


10. 343 


BARRY CLIFFORD WOODRUFF 


3 


Mar 


1962 


10. 344 


RUSSELL ELTON WOODRUFF 


21 


Nov 


1963 


10. 345 


TAYLOR JARVIS WOODRUFF 


30 


Mar 


1971 


10. 346 


WENDY LOUISE WOODRUFF 


13 


Jan 


1975 


10.4 


HENRY DIXON TAYLOR 


22 


Nov 


1903 




Alta Hansen 


17 


Dec 


1905 


10.41 


HENRY DIXON TAYLOR, Jr. 


27 


Feb 


1931 




Colette Green 


13 


Apr 


1933 


10.411 


HENRY DIXON TAYLOR III 


14 


Apr 


1956 




Denise Meshinski 


28 


Mar 


1957 


10. 411 1 


RACHEL TAYLOR 


2 


Aug 


1977 


10.4112 


REBECCA TAYLOR 


26 


Oct 


1980 


10. 412 


THOMAS GREEN TAYLOR 
Kathleen Clark 


10 


Dec 


1957 


10. 413 


BRADFORD GREEN TAYLOR 


8 


Apr 


I960 


10. 414 


AMY TAYLOR 


22 


Sept 


1961 


10.415 


GEORGE GREEN TAYLOR 


3 


June 


1964 


10,416 


NICOLE TAYLOR 


12 


Nov 


1965 


10.417 


BRIGHAM GREEN TAYLOR 


8 


Apr 


1967 


10.418 


MEGAN TAYLOR 


5 


Apr 


1969 


10. 42 


ANTHONY HANSEN TAYLOR 


4 


Apr 


1935 


10. 43 


STEPHEN KROGE TAYLOR 


6 


Jan 


1942 




Lorna Bird 


16 


Feb 


1947 


10. 431 


STEPHEN KROGE TAYLOR, Jr, 


15 


May 


1972 


10. 432 


WILLIAM OLIVER TAYLOR 


11 


Mar 


1974 


10. 433 


AMELIA KATHARINE TAYLOR 


12 


Nov 


1977 


10. 44 


DAVID ARTHUR TAYLOR 


27 


Mar 


1 946 




Kristine Boynton 


29 


Oct 


1952 


10. 441 


EMILY TAYLOR 


2 


Aug 


1973 


10.442 


ANNA TAYLOR 


18 


Sept 


1975 


10. 443 


PHILLIP DAVID TAYLOR 


6 


Mar 


1978 


10. 444 


MAREN TAYLOR 


25 


May 


1981 



Death 
10 Sept 1935 
17 Feb 1947 



6 July 1967 



301 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY 
As of December 31 , 1982 



ROSTER 



I.D. No. 






Birth 




10. 


ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


2 


Nov 


1870 




Maria Louise Dixon 


5 


Jan 


1872 


10. 5 


ALICE LOUISE TAYLOR 


18 


Nov 


1906 




G. El Roy Nelson 


20 


June 


1905 


10. 51 


ARTHUR TAYLOR NELSON 


22 


May 


1937 




Bonnie McKay 


22 


Feb 


1939 


10. 511 


MICHAEL MCKAY NELSON 


15 


Dec 


1966 


10. 512 


JEANNE LOUISE NELSON 


3 


Jan 


1970 


10. 513 


THOMAS TAYLOR NELSON 


12 


Jan 


1971 


10. 52 


JOHN CHRISTIAN NELSON 


14 


June 


1940 




Mary Lynne Sanders 


9 


Feb 


1942 


10. 521 


CHRISTINE NELSON 


28 


Aug 


1966 


10. 522 


DAVID CHRISTIAN NELSON 


23 


Oct 


1968 


10. 523 


CATHERINE LOUISE NELSON 


18 


Nov 


1973 


10. 524 


MATTHEW JOHN NELSON 


7 


July 


1976 


10. 525 


STEVEN SHARP NELSON 


5 


July 


1977 


10. 526 


CAMILLE NELSON 


12 


July 


1981 


10. 53 


CHRISTINA LOUISE NELSON 


18 


May 


1943 




Ronald W. Preston 


4 


Nov 


1942 


10. 531 


SUZANNA PRESTON 


15 


May 


1969 


10. 532 


TREVOR JORGE PRESTON 


3 


June 


1972 


10. 533 


ELIZABETH PRESTON 


16 


Aug 


1979 


10. 54 


HENRY ALDOUS NELSON 


28 


Apr 


1946 




Kristy Stewart 


26 


July 


1949 


10. 541 


REBECCA NELSON 


9 


Apr 


1971 


10. 542 


ANNIE NELSON 


9 


Aug 


1973 


10. 543 


SCOTT ALDOUS NELSON 


29 


June 


1975 


10. 544 


MELISSA NELSON 


27 


Apr 


1977 


10. 545 


ALLISON NELSON 


23 


Nov 


1979 


10. 546 


ANTHONY STEWART NELSON 


2 


Oct 


1981 


10. 55 


JAMES NICHOLLS NELSON 


3 


Mar 


1950 




Consuelo Marquez 


9 


Aug 


1946 


10. 551 


SARAH JANE NELSON 


21 


June 


1979 


10. 552 


ANDREW LUIS NELSON 


16 


Dec 


1981 


10. 6 


CLARENCE DIXON TAYLOR 


1 1 


May 


1909 


10. 7 


ORSON KENNETH TAYLOR 


3 


Nov 


1913 




Ethelyn Peterson 


2 


Nov 


1914 



Death 
10 Sept 1935 
17 Feb 1947 



31 Oct 1940 



302 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr, FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 , 1982 




I.D. No. 




Birth 




10. 


ARTHUR NICHOLLS TAYLOR 


2 Nov 


1870 




Maria Louise Dixon 


5 Jan 


1872 


10. 8 


RUTH ELAINE TAYLOR 


20 Mar 


1917 




Fred Dixon Kartchner 


6 Dec 


1914 


10. 81 


LINDA KARTCHNER 


23 Apr 


1 943 




Steven L. Tyler 


17 Feb 


1943 


10. 811 


MICHAEL TYLER 


8 Dec 


1968 


10. 812 


DANIEL KARTCHNER TYLER 


1 5 Jan 


1971 


10. 813 


JENNILYNN TYLER 


7 Jan 


1 972 


10. 814 


RUTH ANN TYLER 


16 Nov 


1976 


10. 82 


KENNETH TAYLOR KARTCHNER 


11 Dec 


1944 




MariAnne Allene Davis 


1 2 June 


1944 


10. 821 


DREW KARTCHNER 


5 May 


1971 


10. 822 


HEATHER KARTCHNER 


27 Oct 


1972 


10. 823 


ROBIN KARTCHNER 


27 Nov 


1974 


10. 824 


NATHAN KARTCHNER 


14 July 


1976 


10. 83 


ELAINE KARTCHNER 


26 June 


1947 


10. 84 


ELLEN KARTCHNER 


13 Oct 


1948 




Rand GlenFarrer 


12 July 


1947 


10. 841 


DAVID GLEN FARRER 


14 Nov 


1975 


10. 842 


HILARY ANN FARRER 


1 June 


1980 


10. 843 


MELISSA MICHELLE FARRER 


25 Nov 


1981 


10. 85 


RICHARD TAYLOR KARTCHNER 


7 Apr 


1950 




Kathryn Andersen 


21 Sept 


1952 


10. 851 


MARK ANDERSEN KARTCHNER 


20 Feb 


1974 


10, 852 


KERIANNE KARTCHNER 


19 July 


1975 


10. 853 


TAYLOR ANDERSEN KARTCHNER 


21 Sept 


1976 


10. 854 


KELLI KARTCHNER 


8 June 


1978 


10. 855 


KENNETH ANDERSEN KARTCHNER 5 Apr 


1980 


10. 856 


PAUL ANDERSEN KARTCHNER 


29 Apr 


1982 


10. 86 


DAVID TAYLOR KARTCHNER 


3 Apr 


1951 




Karen Renee Nelson 


15 Mar 


1952 


10. 861 


JEFFREY NELSON KARTCHNER 


6 Apr 


1976 


10. 862 


BENJAMIN NELSON KARTCHNER 


8 Apr 


1978 


10. 863 


BRITTANY ANN KARTCHNER 


10 Jan 


1980 


10. 87 


ROSENA LOUISE KARTCHNER 


14 July 


1952 




Alan Perry Heal 


28 Nov 


1950 


10. 871 


MARIA ANN HEAL 


27 Nov 


1976 


10. 872 


AMY LOUISE HEAL 


22 Sept 


1978 


10. 873 


JARED KARTCHNER HEAL 


4 Oct 


1980 


10. 874 


NICOLE HEAL 


8 July 


1982 


10, 88 


MARY ANN KARTCHNER 


27 Nov 


1958 




Steven Lane Warner 


8 May 


1956 



Death 
10 Sept 1935 
17 Feb 1947 

16 Mar 1980 



21 Oct 1947 



24 Dec 1980 



303 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY 
As of December 31, 1982 

LD. No. 
GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr, 
Henrietta Sawyer 



ROSTER 



11. JOHN TRANHAM TAYLOR 

Sarah Edna Pulsipher 

11.1 HENRIETTA LORINE TAYLOR 
Alfred J. Fowers 

11.1.1 NADINE LOIS FOWERS 

Robert Funk 
11.1.1.1 ALFRED JEAN FOWERS FUNK 

11.2 JOHN MAX TAYLOR 
Sarah Stahl 

Anne Grass Scheinin 

11.3 WENDELL HOYT TAYLOR 
Elizabeth Gessford 

11.3.1 WENDELLYN JANE TAYLOR 
Richard Gordon Mills 

11.3.1.1 RICHARD TAYLOR MILLS 

11.3.1.2 MADELEINE ALICE MILLS 

11.3.1.3 MELODY MARGUERITE MILLS 

11.3.1.4 MAUREEN PATRICIA MILLS 

11.3.2 MARY ELIZABETH TAYLOR 

Everett Clifford Nickerson 
11.3.2.1 KAREN ELIZABETH NICKERSON 
11. 3. 2. 2 SUSAN DOROTHY NICKERSON 

11.3.2.3 JENNIFER CECILIA NICKERSON 

11.3.2.4 ANDREW CLIFFORD NICKERSON 

11.3.2.5 CYNTHIA JEAN NICKERSON 

11.3.2.6 TIFFANY JOY NICKERSON 

11.3.3 NANCY JOY TAYLOR 
Preston Lee Simpson 

11.3.3.1 JEFFREY SCOTT SIMPSON 

11.3.3.2 GLEN DAVIS SIMPSON 

11.3.4 MELINDA SUSAN TAYLOR 

11.4 NADINE LOUISE TAYLOR 
Robert Morrell Ashby 

11.4.1 BRIAN NED TAYLOR ASHBY 



25 
20 
12 
12 
24 
19 
30 
8 
28 
1 

13 
9 
23 
3 
17 
5 
3 
24 
21 
7 
3 
3 
13 
22 
27 
29 
28 
28 
7 
13 
2 

19 

6 

19 
9 
18 



Birth 

Mar 

Apr 

Aug 

Feb 

Oct 

June 

Aug 

Feb 

Apr 

Mar 

June 

Sept 

Oct 

Feb 

Feb 

Nov 

Sept 

July 

Feb 

Apr 

July 

Nov 

Mar 

Apr 

Apr 

Mar 

June 

June 

Dec 

Apr 

Apr 

Aug 

Feb 

July 

May 

July 



1838 

1846 

1872 

1878 

1900 

1898 

1936 

1932 

1970 

1908 

1906 

1930 

1910 

1910 

1939 

1934 

1963 

1967 

1972 

1977 

1939 

1937 

1969 

1970 

1971 

1976 

1977 

1977 

1941 

1937 

1969 

1974 

1945 

1914 

1912 

1944 



Death 
4 Sept 1926 
2 Mar 1922 
23 Apr I960 
18 Nov 1961 

12 Jan 1973 



29 Apr 1962 



304 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1982 



LD. No. 






Birth 




Death 




GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 


25 


Mar ] 


838 


4 Sept 


1926 


Henrietta Sawyer 


20 


Apr ] 


846 


2 Mar 


1 922 


11. 


JOHN TRANHAM TAYLOR 


12 


Aug ] 


872 


23 Apr 


I960 




Sarah Edna Pulsipher 


12 


Feb 1 


878 


18 Nov 


1961 


11. 5 


NORMA JEAN TAYLOR 


5 


May ] 


921 








Frank Homer Gardner 


8 


Mar ] 


921 






11.5.1 


SHERMAN FRANK GARDNER 


16 


Aug 1 


945 








Barbara Anne Heyman 


23 


Mar 1 


948 






11. 5. 1. 1 


ERIC RAYMOND GARDNER 


8 


Oct 1 


970 






11. 5. 1.2 


JONATHAN TAYLOR GARDNER 


5 


Dec 1 


971 






11. 5. 1. 3 


ABBI RUTH GARDNER 


1 


May 1 


973 






11.5.1.4 


EMMALEE KRISTINE GARDNER 


11 


Aug 1 


976 






11.5. 1.5 


AARON PHILIP SHERMAN GARDNER 


16 Oct 


1979 






11. 5. 2 


JANICE JEAN GARDNER 


29 


Sept ] 


948 








Craig Ash Soffe 


9 


May ] 


944 






11.5. 2. 1 


HADLEY GARDNER SOFFE 


12 


Oct 1 


975 






11.5.2.2 


ALEX TAYLOR SOFFE 


28 


Sept ] 


977 






11.5.3 


JOHN BRIAN GARDNER 


24 


Mar 1 


952 








Julia Katherine Hallgren 


3 


June ] 


954 






11.5.3. 1 


ELIZABETH KATHERINE HALLGREN 28 June 1977 






11.5. 3. 2 


JAMES JOHN HALLGREN 


26 Apr 1 


979 






11. 5.4 


SUSANNE GARDNER 


20 


Nov 1 


954 







305 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1982 



LD. No. 






Birth 




Death 




GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 


25 


Mar 


1838 


4 Sept 


1926 


Eliza N 


icholls 


29 


Apr 


1838 


27 June 


1922 


12. 


WALTER G. TAYLOR 


25 


Sept 


1873 


18 Mar 


1959 




Agnes McKinlay 


16 


Oct 


1872 


4 July 


1959 


12. 1 


WALTER MCKINLAY TAYLOR 


25 


Dec 


1893 


6 July 


1905 


12. 2 


CLARRISA JANNETT TAYLOR 


27 


Feb 


1895 


14 Nov 


1961 




Frank Hindley Eastmond 


7 


July 


1892 


14 Nov 


1961 


12. 21 


JEAN ESTHER EASTMOND 


14 


May 


1915 








Glen Hudson Gordon 


10 


Aug 


1913 


19 Sept 


1973 


12. 211 


GLEN PAUL GORDON 


23 


June 


1937 








Judith Ann Rowland 


26 


Dec 


1941 






12. 212 


FRANK HUDSON GORDON 
Gloria Yvonne Wright 


30 


Dec 


1942 






12. 2121 


GLEN FRANK HUDSON GORDON 


13 


Nov 


1967 






12. 212 


w Connie Ruth Mott 


7 


July 


1942 






12. 2122 


CLARRISA KATHLEEN GORDON 


28 


Nov 


1973 






12. 2123 


RYAN LE GRAND GORDON 


7 


July 


1979 






12. 213 


JOSEPH EASTMOND GORDON 


6 


Mar 


1946 








Janice Love 


1 


Jan 


1950 






12. 2131 


ANDREA GORDON 


3 


Aug 


1974 






12. 2132 


JANALEE GORDON 


8 


Oct 


1976 






12. 2133 


WILLIAM GLEN GORDON 


13 


Apr 


1978 






12. 2134 


AMANDA JEAN GORDON 


15 


July 


1981 






12. 214 


MARILEE JEAN GORDON 


8 


June 


1 947 








Billy August Candelaria 


22 


July 


1940 






12. 2141 


LITA JEAN CANDELARIA 


27 


Oct 


1972 






12. 2142 


GLEN TODD CANDELARIA 


4 


Sept 


1974 






12. 2143 


CLARRISA KAY CANDELARIA 


7 


Feb 


1978 






12. 215 


GARY GEORGE GORDON 


1 2 


May 


1948 








JoAnn Winmill 


26 


Dec 


1952 






12. 2151 


JO ANN CANDICE GORDON 


19 


June 


1973 






12. 2152 


JEANNIE LYN GORDON 


25 


Apr 


1975 






12. 2153 


JAMIE G. GORDON 


17 


Feb 


1980 






12. 22 


FRANK TAYLOR EASTMOND 


15 


Aug 


1916 


7 June 


1976 




Ardis Christensen 


12 


May 


1918 






12. 221 


ELAINE EASTMOND 


4 


Aug 


1945 








James Dean Elwell 


24 


Nov 


1942 






12. 221 1 


SUSAN MARIE ELWELL 


17 


May 


1969 






12. 222 


RONDO HINDLEY EASTMOND 


28 


Oct 


1954 








Shellie Lee Stacey 


7 


Aug 


1962 






12. 2221 


JESSICA RONDO EASTMOND 


19 


Nov 


1973 






12. 2222 


JESSIE PAUL EASTMOND 


22 


Feb 


1977 






12. 2223 


JAMES TAYLOR EASTMOND 


17 


Oct 


1980 






12. 223 


DOUGLAS JOHN EASTMOND 


11 


May 


1956 


8 Aug 


1978 




Celesta Striegel 


22 


Aug 


1 955 






12. 2231 


IAN DOUGLAS EASTMOND 


31 


Dec 


1977 







306 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1982 

I.D. No. Birth Death 

12. WALTER G. TAYLOR 25 Sept 1873 18 Mar 1959 

Agnes McKinlay 16 Oct 1872 4 July 1959 

12.23 RICHARD TAYLOR EASTMOND 18 Mar 1920 4 Nov 1981 
Margorie Ashton 28 Aug 1922 

12.231 KATHLEEN EASTMOND 8 Aug 1946 

Robert Neldon Evans 1 2 May 1944 

12.2311 SEAN ROBERT EVANS 7 Apr 1970 

12.2312 SCOTT RYAN EVANS 1 8 May 1971 

12.2313 JACOB RICHARD EVANS 20 Dec 1975 

12.2314 ALYSON EVANS 20 July 1980 
12. 232 RICKI EASTMOND 22 June 1951 

Donald Craig Allred 16 Feb 1950 

12.2321 OAKLEY ALLRED 19 July 1980 

12. 233 KRISTEEN EASTMOND 5 July 1952 

12.24 JEFFERSON NICHOLLS EASTMOND 20 Oct 1922 
Alberta Van Wagoner 20 Mar 1925 

12.241 JEFFERSON N. EASTMOND, Jr. 20 Feb 1946 
Irene Summerhays 2 July 1944 

12.2411 SUZANNE EASTMOND 9 Nov 1972 

12.2412 JONATHAN FOREST EASTMOND 28 Aug 1974 

12.2413 ABRAHAM BENNION EASTMOND 5 Dec 1975 

12.2414 RACHEL EASTMOND 21 May 1977 

12.242 ANNA CLARE EASTMOND 1 9 Sept 1947 
Earl Pack Shepherd 15 July 1945 

12. 2421 BRYAN EARL SHEPHERD 1 2 Aug 1975 

12. 2422 JESSICA ANN SHEPHERD 22 Sept 1976 

12. 2423 CRAIG ERSCHEL SHEPHERD 22 Dec 1977 

12.2424 NATHAN JEFFERSON SHEPHERD 19 Aug 1979 

12.2425 DEBORAH LYNN SHEPHERD 10 Jan 1981 

12.243 JANICE EASTMOND 7 Dec 1950 
Bruce Nee rings Hathaway 

12.2431 SCOTT LEONARD HATHAWAY 31 Dec 1979 

12.244 REBECCA EASTMOND 1 9 Aug 1952 
Wayne Richard Earl 17 June 1950 

12.2441 AMY BETH EARL 17 Aug 1974 

12.2442 JAMES BENJAMIN EARL 8 June 1976 

12.2443 STEVEN ROBERT EARL 12 Feb 1978 

12.245 DANIEL VAN EASTMOND 1 3 Oct 1954 
Deborah Ann Crammer 13 May 1957 

12.2451 ANDREA EASTMOND 5 Sept 1977 

12.2452 LISA EASTMOND 14 Apr 1979 

12.246 DAVID ALBERT EASTMOND 23 Mar 1956 



307 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31, 


1982 








LD. No. 






Birth 




Death 


12. 


WALTER G. TAYLOR 


25 


Sept 


1873 


18 Mar 1959 




Agnes McKinlay 


16 


Oct 


1872 


4 July 195 9 


12. 25 


ROBERT MC KINLAY EASTMOND 8 


May 


1924 






Charis Springer 


25 


Dec 


1924 




12. 251 


SHANNON EASTMOND 


26 


Feb 


1951 






Nielson 










12. 251 1 


CORI MICHELLE NIELSON 


27 


Nov 


1969 




12. 252 


SHELLY EASTMOND 


26 


Feb 


1951 




12. 253 


MC KINLAY DIRK EASTMOND 


20 


Oct 


1954 




12. 254 


CHARIS ANN EASTMOND 


6 


Aug 


1957 




12. 3 


MELVIN MC KINLAY TAYLOR 


2 


May 


1897 


27 May 1947 




Zola Roberts 












Sophornia Wilson 


15 


Dec 


1902 


17 Sept 1927 


12. 31 


LESTER ALEXANDER TAYLOR 


2 


Oct 


1921 






Virginia Sarah White 


22 


Dec 


1920 




12. 311 


VIRGINIA CLAUDIA TAYLOR 


28 


May 


1940 






Paul Benion Arnold 


18 


Apr 


1938 




12. 31 1 1 


VIRGINIA CLAUDIA ARNOLD 


7 


June 


1959 






Ben H. Giles 










12. 31111 


JOHN BEN GILES 


30 


Jan 


1979 




12. 311 12 


JAMES WAYNE GILES 


23 


Dec 


1980 




12. 3112 


PAUL STEVEN ARNOLD 


13 


Dec 


I960 




12. 3113 


BARBARA ANN ARNOLD 


12 


June 


1964 




12. 3114 


DAVID MATHEW ARNOLD 


26 


Mar 


1967 




12. 312 


LESTER ALEX TAYLOR 


9 


Feb 


1947 






Pamela Wilson 


5 


Nov 


1948 




12. 3121 


COLLEEN ANN TAYLOR 


30 


Dec 


1968 




12. 3122 


LESTER ALEX TAYLOR II 


12 


Dec 


1972 




12. 3123 


TONY ALVIN TAYLOR 


17 


Dec 


1976 




12, 313 


GAYLE LESLIE TAYLOR 


9 


Sept 


1950 






Elwin Dee Burgess 










12. 3131 


SHAWN DEE BURGESS 


31 


Aug 


1971 




12. 3132 


MELINDA SUE BURGESS 


14 


Jan 


1974 




12. 313 


h Grayden L. Kemp 










12. 3133 


CASSEY LLOYD KEMP 


13 


Oct 


1978 




12. 314 


MICHAEL ALVIN TAYLOR 


25 


Apr 


1953 






Christine Davis 


4 


Mar 


1957 




12. 3141 


CHRISTIE BERNICE TAYLOR 


7 


Mar 


1980 




12. 31 


"w Mary Larena Jensen 











308 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1982 
I.D. No. Birth Death 

12. WALTER G. TAYLOR 25 Sept 1873 18 Mar 1959 

Agnes McKinlay 16 Oct 1872 4 July 1959 

12.4 GEORGE HAMILTON TAYLOR (Peg) 24 July 1900 1 6 Nov 1982 
Norma Culmer Simmons 10 Nov 1899 14 Nov 1978 

12.41 WALTER GEORGE TAYLOR (Sam) 2 June 1921 15 Nov 1977 
Naomi Thompson 1 July 1920 

12.42 DONNA LA GENE TAYLOR (Polly) 5 June 1923 
Grant Kendall Burnham 24 Feb 1923 

12.421 DENNIS TAYLOR BURNHAM 20 Sept 1944 
Patsy Mae Davis 13 Feb 1946 

12.4211 DENNIS GRANT TAYLOR BURNHAM 18 Feb 1963 

12.4212 TONY FRANK BURNHAM 9 Apr 1965 

12.4213 RICHARD HAMILTON BURNHAM 28 Jan 1968 

12.422 NANNETTE BURNHAM 16 Oct 1951 
Richard Mark Bartholomew 5 Dec 1949 

14.4221 NAOMI NICHOLE BARTHOLOMEW 4 Oct 1975 

12.4222 HOLLY DENNETTE BARTHOLOMEW 27 Sep 1978 

12.43 KENT HAMILTON TAYLOR 29 Apr 1925 
Virginia Jeanne Hellerschmidt 31 Oct 1926 

12.431 KENT HAMILTON TAYLOR, Jr. 10 Sept 1946 

Cynthia Lee Jellison 23 May 1948 

12.4311 WENDY LEE TAYLOR 15 Mar 1971 

12.4312 JULIE MAY TAYLOR 14 May 1975 

12.4313 DANA LEANN TAYLOR 14 May 1975 

12.5 FRED MC KIN LAY TAYLOR 1 2 Sept 1903 6 May 1914 

12.6 INEZ AGNES TAYLOR 28 Oct 1906 
Harold Theron Sutton 1 9 May 1897 

12.61 ZOLA ALCEA SUTTON 27 Mar 1928 
Karl Irving Berriman 5 May 1925 

12.611 BRADLEY SUTTON BERRIMAN 26 July 1948 
w Sylvia Salazar 17 Mar 1949 
w Carmella May Mortrude (Joey) 15 Feb 1951 

12.612 JEOFFREY IRVING BERRIMAN 13 Apr 1951 20 May 1975 

12.613 MARIAN JEAN BERRIMAN 6 Nov 1964 

12.614 DUNSTAN CHRIS BERRIMAN 1 2 Oct 1965 

12.62 MARIAN SUTTON 9 Nov 1933 10 Jan 1958 
Richard Keith McDonald 18 June 1929 

12.621 TAFFEE LYN MC DONALD 10 Feb 1954 
Scott C. Turner 5 May 1951 

12.6211 BETH TURNER 9 May 1978 

12.6212 BENJAMIN JOHN TURNER 11 Sept 1981 

12.622 MARK SUTTON MC DONALD 4 Aug 1955 
Pama LaRay Linschoten 17 Jan 1958 

12.6221 TIFFANI JANE MC CONALD 21 Jan 1980 

12. 623 DOUGLAS KEITH MC DONALD 24 July 1957 

12. 6222 KRISTOPHER MARK MC DONALD 28 May 1982 



309 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - 
As of December 31 , 1982 



ROSTER 



LD. No. Birth 

12. WALTER G. TAYLOR 25 Sept 

Agnes McKinlay 16 Oct 

ANN ADELE SUTTON 10 June 

Gustavus Casper Engstrom 8 Sept 
GUSTAVUS SUTTON ENGSTROM 25 Dec 

JENNIFER ANN ENGSTROM 21 Feb 

GUSTAVUS ERIC ENGSTROM 20 Aug 

HAROLD MARK ENGSTROM 18 Oct 

EMILY ENGSTROM 13 Sept 

ESTHER ANN ENGSTROM 16 June 



12. 63 

12. 631 
12. 632 
12. 633 
12. 634 
12. 635 
12. 636 

12. 7 

12. 71 

12. 711 

12. 7111 
12. 7112 
12. 7113 
12. 712 

12. 7121 
12. 7122 
12. 713 

12. 7131 
12. 714 
12. 715 
12. 72 

12. 721 

12. 722 

12. 723 
12. 724 
12. 73 

12. 731 



JOHN WESLEY MCKINLAY TAYLOR 9 Dec 

Alta McEwan 27 Jan 

CAROL LIND TAYLOR 20 Nov 

Louis (Bud) Lamborne Bonnett 28 Dec 
JON BUD BONNETT 5 Apr 

Delaina May 22 Nov 

JON BUD BONNETT, Jr. 28 Sept 

SHANNA MAY BONNETT 13 July 

ANNA MARIE BONNETT 20 Sept 

JOSEPH TAYLOR BONNETT 28 Oct 

Jean Tippetts 24 June 

CAROL NICOLE BONNETT 23 Jan 
ALISE BONNETT 4 Sep 

DAVID CHARLES BONNETT 4 Oct 

Lani Elliott 23 Feb 

JESSICA MARIE BONNETT 11 Feb 
JAMES R. BONNETT 8 Aug 

CLARRISA BONNETT 9 Sept 

JON MC EWAN TAYLOR 25 Dec 

Silvia Manton 31 Dec 

KENT MANTON TAYLOR 30 June 

Tracy Ann Graves 22 Mar 
JON SCOTT TAYLOR 9 Aug 

Tammy Taylor 14 July 

JULIE ANN TAYLOR 28 Feb 

MARIA TAYLOR 23 Dec 

MARK MC EWAN TAYLOR 10 Sept 

Marva Casper 29 May 

KELLY CASPER TAYLOR 17 May 
Cheyanne Jones 
12. 732 TONYA TAYLOR IMar 
12.73 w Winona Peterson 



873 
872 
936 
928 
961 
963 
964 
967 
975 
977 

910 
912 
932 
930 
953 
955 
976 
978 
980 
955 
956 
978 
980 
959 
958 
979 
961 
964 
936 
937 
959 
961 
962 
963 
966 
973 
941 
941 
959 

1963 



Death 
18 Mar 1959 
4 July 195 9 



25 Dec 1961 



Stillborn 



310 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY 



ROSTER 





As Ox JJecember oi, 


loo 




T AT 

1. D . No. 




liirth 




1 2. 


WALTER G. TAYLOR 


25 bept 


1873 




Agnes McKmlay 


lb Oct 


1 87Z 


1 2. 74 


AT A TT\T T7* '"P A '\J T /^"D 


1 9 iJec 


1 946 




Jack Carl Hattaway 


5 Uec 


1 940 


12. 741 


JACK CARL HA 1 iAWAY, Jr. 


5 bept 


1970 


1 2. 742 


J^TK yf "D TP T) T TLT A A TXT A XT' 

KIJVLBERLY HAi iAWAY 


7 Dec 


1 971 


1 O '7 /I "2 

1 Z, 743 


T/^^t-TTM TP A V T l^TD T-I A T'T' A AAT A "V 

J OrliN IAYIjCK rlAi iAWAY 


D J an 


19*4 


1 Z. 744 


JAKiLiiJ iAii_iCK rlA i iAWAY 


Z4 r e b 


1 n "7 c 
1 9 f -> 


1 Z, /4d 


D T TI! XT' A LJ A T" TP A WT A "V 

KiLiiSiiiCCA rlA i iAWAY 


D oept 


1 "7 




T T TC T" TAT T" A V T t^TD XJ AT'T'ATAT'A'V 

JUoiiJN iAYLUR hlA i iAWAY 


O T 1 

9 J uly 


1 'T 

1 978 


12. 747 


JAMES TAYLOR HATTAWAY 


24 Feb 


1981 


12„ 75 


TERESA TAYLOR 


22 July 


1954 




Craig Lewis Miller 


15 Apr 


1954 


12. 751 


JASON CRAIG MILLER 


4 May 


1975 


12. 752 


MELISA ANN MILLER 


28 June 


1978 



Death 
18 Mar 195 9 
4 July 1959 



311 





GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 








As of December 31, 










I.D. No. 




XJ XX Lix 




x-zc cL un 




GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 


71; Ma r 


1 ft3R 
1 J 


4 oept 


1 9 A 

J 7 ilD 


-I— 1 1 1 Zd. IN 


1 r*i ^ 1 1 C 

ICIl U L I a 


29 Anr 


1 P3R 

X C -J C 


27 June 


J 7^1 ^1 


1 J , 


AQRTTTn TAYT OR 


1 2 Sent 


1 875 


1 D oept 


J 7D ( 




r\.giie s rvatne i int; otrcuci 


1 .T Ti 


1 P77 


J X IN v 


1 Q A 




FONTFT-T,A TAYLOR 


77 Df^r^ 

J XJC 


1 Qon 

X 7 W VJ 


ci J an 


1 Q '7 
i 7 1 




xA. xilU LQ X-'cd.ll XJ IXC K.I1C i 


1 1 Sf^nf 
X J lj t; [J L 


i 7 7 


1 Z r e b 


J 7 M 


J J . i . i 


ni FTN TAYT OR RTTOKNFR 

V.J X-( JZjiN X S\ X X-j V>'X\ Xj \J X\.iN 1 ; x\ 


zj ivxd, r 


1 Q77 








Doris Llewellyn Brown 


1 7 Mav 
X 1 xvxcL y 


1 Q3 1 






1 1 1 1 
ij. 1,1,1 


U \JX\ XO Xj X IN IN Xlj XJ U V-" i\.iN xLi X\ 


1 y T 1 1 

X J LLiit3 


1 Q5 1 

X 73 X 








x\on vjeLim 










1J,1,1,C 


GT PN TAYLOR RTTGKNFR TT 




1 Q5 






iJ. i. i.J 


MTCHAFL DFAN RIICKNFR 

IVl 1 v. > 1 1 J\. V t V i X-/X-Jii.lN J-J \^ V>Xi.±NX_jX\ 


1 ^ Fph 


1 Q5 5 

1 7 J _) 








X (JK-U OllillllZU. 


14 Tnlv 


1 Q5 5 

J 7 J J 






iJ, i. J.rr 


XVX_*Xn in JZj ± JTX VV r\. X IN XLi XJ \J \^ X\.±N X_j x\ 


? R Tvl;* r 

J XVX d X 


1 Q57 

X 7 J ( 








iNdXlCy J Ux CldXi 










ij. 1. I. J 


WAT TPR DON RTirKNTTR 

VV ir\. X-/ X XLi X\ X-/ v_-/iN JD v-' X\.iN XL* X\ 


77 Dp-r 

^ f XJ c L- 


1 Q5 Q 

1737 






ID, 1. i.U 


PATTT A AT TCF RTTCKNFR 

X -Ti J_JXi, jTi. X J X V_> X_j XJ vj XV 1 N X-j X \ 


1 Q Tnrif^ 


1 Q67 

X 7 ^ ^ 






1 1 1 7 


X-J X_* kj kJ X V— ' XXX XZj Xj V-' X \. i N X_j X\ 


7 R A -n -r 

xV ^ X 


1 Q7 1 
1 7 f X 






1^1 7 


FTTOFNTT TAYT OR RTTOKNFR 

XZj \J W Xlj IN XLi X .Ti X Xj wX\ XJ O X\.iN XZjXv 


77 AiiCT 


1 Q7 Q 
I 7£,7 








\j ixrioT^ Tt'^i^tio T/~\noc 


1 7 S(^r>f 

X / C iJ L 








iJ. i.e., J 


PART T TTF RTTr"T<'MTr R 

-O. X\ i Xj XLi XL/ XJ U V-" X\.iN XLi X\ 


1 Tan 
X -3 J tall 


1 Q5 7 

1 7-3 1 






iO. J. /I. d 


PAT T^TANTT RTTOKNFR 

A xA X U l.t\ IN Hj Xj VJ XVI N JLi X\ 


1 7 Ma r 

X ( IVXd X 


1 Q5 Q 
1737 








KATT-TY RTTOKNFR 

X\..iTt X XX. X XJ \J V_> Xv i N 1—1 X\ 


■^n Tnnp> 

D\J J IXIlt^ 


1 Q6 1 

i 7 D i 








ANN RTTOKNFR 

iiXNlN XJ \^X\.1NX1« X\ 


7 Tl<=> <- 
XJ e c 


1 7 -J 






1 3 1 7 '^ 


GFNF CHRTS RTTCKNFR 

X-j1 N * t 1 XXXXwJ XJ \J VJ X\.l N \ * X\ 


C L 


1 Q7 1 

i 7 < J 






13 13 


MARILYN RUCKNFR 

XVXXx X\X J i X X N XJ VJ XXJ. N X_J xv 


7 7 Nnv 

£-( f i N VJ V 


1 Q3 7 
i 7 J 








No 7* TT~i^ n TjpRov F^^fmi o*Vi 

^ vj i. 11 let i 1 J — i \^ -i-WJ y X-i CL L \J ^ t;^ 1 1 


1 R Ort 


1 Q33 

J 7 J J 






13 13 1 


LA RAE EATOUGH 


1 Q Jul V 


1 95 7 

1 7_» I 








X- X cL y X\VJLJXlJ.OVJlI. 


14 Nov 


1 955 

X 7 _> J 






13. 1.3.2 


CRAIG NORMAN EATOUGH 


1 1 Sept 


1 958 

-I 7 -J 






13 13 3 


STFVFN ROSS FATOTTGR 

i-J X X-j V Xli i N X\ lJ X-jxi. X V—/ \J v_i LL 


6 Nov 


1 959 

7-* 7 






1 ? 1 "^4. 

Jj. i. J.rr 


TtpRRY DAT F FATOT TO M 

J Hj X\ XX X Ur\. X_/ XLi XLi-TA. X W U VJ Xx 


17 Tnlv 

X ( u n L y 


1 962 










Q Nov 

1 N VJ V 


1 974 

X 7 ( 






13. 1,4 


DEAN TAYLOR BUCKNER 


1 ft T^<:»/- 

j c XJ e c 


1 9"^ ft 

i 7 -J 








Judith LaVerne Stoddard 


CO iviay 


1 OA 1 
X 7^ -l 






13. 1.4. 1 


KAREN BUCKNER 


iLk> Aug 


1 Q A C 
i 7DD 






13. 1.4.2 


TIMOTHY DEAN BUCKNER 


14 Oct 


1966 






13. 1.4. 3 


KELLI MARIE BUCKNER 


23 May 


1969 






13. 1.4.4 


TROY RICHARD BUCKNER 


5 Mar 


1973 






13. 1. 4. 5 


MICHAEL ROBERT BUCKNER 


28 Mar 


1967 






13.1.4.6 


JANA DIEM BUCKNER 


6 Nov 


1972 







312 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY 



ROSTER 







As of December 31 , 


1 982 




I. E 


>. No. 




Birth 




13. 




ASHTED TAYLOR 


12 Sept 


1 875 






Agnes Katherine Strebel 


1 Jan 


1 877 


13. 


2 


LEO ASHTED TAYLOR 


11 T 

1 J J une 


1 903 






DeVeda Hansen 


2 Dec 


1 900 


13. 


21 


LEON H. TAYLOR 


27 Jan 


1 93 1 






Alta L, Carter 


r\ T*^ 

9 Dec 


1 936 


1 3 . 


21 1 


CATHY TAYLOR 


To A 

19 Aug 


1 954 






Roger John b rederick 


30 May 


I 95 J 


i 3 . 


Z 1 1 1 


JNAiHAN J UHJN 1 REDERiCK 


1 O T^ 

1 3 Uec 


\ 974 


1 3 . 


2112 


TENNILLE JANE FREDERICK 


30 Aug 


1 976 


1 3. 


Olio 

2113 


CORY REED i REDERICK 


r\ T 

9 Jan 


1 979 


1 3. 


J 1 4 


CAELiE DAWJN FREDERICK 


30 bept 


1 981 


13. 


21 2 


JEFFERY C. TAYLOR 


10 June 


1 957 






Barbara Jean EsteUe 


7 June 


1 958 


13. 


2121 


KENDRA MARIE TAYLOR 


6 Apr 


1 983 


1 3. 


21 3 


DIANE KAYE TAYLOR 


7 Jan 


1959 






j^l T T~> 1 

Garth Lynn Roundy 


23 June 


1956 


1 "3. 
i s> , 


^ 1 J 1 


T A T? A TV MIVT IT D OTT'NT'PS V 
i A ±\. A I_( 1 iN IN li, X\ U IN U 1 


J 1 ivLa r 


TOOT 

i 9o 1 


i J . 




XVAO Jli 1 AiN IN K W U iN U 1 


1 { Aug 


TOO"? 


1 3. 


214 


JAY Dii^E TAYLOR 


22 Feb 


1 962 


13. 


215 


TERI LIN TAYLOR 


14 Sept 


1 964 


13. 


216 


DAVID LEE TAYLOR 


19 July 


1966 


13. 


22 


EVAN C. TAYLOR 


4 Mar 


1934 






Constance Buttle 


21 June 


1939 


1 "2 
1 J . 




ELIZABETH ANN TAYLOR 


4 Oct 


1 Q5 Q 






Randol Eugene Morris 


30 Aug 


1 957 


1 3 


?? 1 1 


ROBERT EUGENE MORRIS 


24 Dec 


1 980 


1 3 


771 7 


ERIN MORRIS 


1 6 June 


1 9P!2 


1 3 


777 

t-t 


JENNIFER LYN TAYLOR 


14 Sept 


1 960 






Val Wendell Peterson 


13 Nov 


1 954 


13. 


22 2} 


MITCHELL TAYLOR PETERSON 29 June 


1982 


13. 


23 


KATHRYN ANN TAYLOR 


20 Sept 


1 938 






La Maun Matson 


19 Nov 


1 n "2 1 
i 73 J 


13. 


231 


STEVEN LA MAUN MATSON 


9 Oct 


I 965 


13. 


232 


ALAN LEE MATSON 


8 Feb 


1 n A n 


13. 


3 


KATHERINE TAYLOR 


13 July 


1 n n c 
1 705 


13. 


4 


LE ROY STREBEL TAYLOR 


24 Dec 


J 905 






Elsie Bean 


3 Apr 


1 ri A ^ 

1 VOd 


1 3 


41 


BERT LE ROY TAYLOR 


1 Aug 


1931 






Marva Burgess 


23 July 


1926 


13. 


41 1 


JALAINE TAYLOR 


26 July 


1959 


13. 


412 


JENNIFER TAYLOR 


31 Jan 


1962 


13. 


413 


LORINNE TAYLOR 


12 Oct 


1964 


13. 


414 


BRYAN TAYLOR 


1 Aug 


1967 


13. 


223 


ANGELA GAY TAYLOR 


5 Mar 


1967 



Death 
15 Sept 1967 
1 1 Nov 1936 
5 Aug 1978 



2 Aug 
9 Feb 



1905 
1977 



313 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1982 



I. D . No, 






Birth 




Death 


1 3. 


AbHiEJJ iAYLUK 


1 2 


bept 


1875 


ICO i 

15 Sept 




Agnes Katherine Strebel 


J 


T 

J an 


J 877 


1 1 "NT ^ 

1 1 JNov 


13.4 


LE Kwi biKil,r5il.L iAYJ_,kJK 


O /I 

24 


De c 


c\r\ L 

1 905 


9 -t eb 




Elsie Bean 


■J 


Ap r 


1 o n ^ 

1 9Ud 




1 "J A 1 

1 3 . 4 i 


"R IT D T T cr v> cyw nr A v T od 
JDiLrvi J-ziLi rv^^i i A 1 J_( w rv. 


1 


Aug 






W 


Uona JViay r-'edier rlilton 


4 


J an 


1 o o 

1 929 




1 "J /tic 


iJavia iNiel riiiton 


1 7 


IN O V 


1 n/i 
i 94 8 




13.316 


Ray Layne Hilton 


1 1 


Dec 


1949 






1 « T* W 1-* 1 ^ ^ r-J 1 1 ^ 

ooraon x\icn3,ra niLLon 


Q 

7 


June 


1 7D J 




13.418 


bhryl Ann riiiton 


/ 
D 


TV /T « 

May 


1957 




1 o /I 1 n 
13.41V 


Shirley Kay Hilton 


/ 
D 


May 


1 95 ^ 








1 

1 


Mar 


193 d 






Dennis Wayne Trent 


J ( 


0^-(- 

wct 


J 9 




^ AO! 


T TTCT Ttr" ATMTVT T''D'ir'l\T'T' 

J_iiiiC> J_/iiL, AiNiN 1 KJiilN i 
Gary JVLoody 


9 1 


J uly 


1 n c ^ 
1 95 D 




J 3 . 4^ 1 J 


TtJ CT'TM'T ^ /f r\ (~\ T'\ "V 










J 3 . 4^ J ^ 


rp D T /" A/^/^/^'PW 

HjKiU JVLLJvJiJ I 










TO A O O ' 


T A T' TLJ A M C f^" T'T' T D TP TVT T" 


1 


Mar 


1 9d0 




1 "2 /I O "5 


Lynn Smith 










J J , 4 J 


jt\. \J LJ SLiSS. 1 iN A 1 liAiN 1 X\ XLiiN 1 


1 O 

1 7 


J une 


1 Q A 9 




1 J . 4 ^4 


■pTPTTTR TWA'Pl'nTTTC: TDtTTvIT 
iriLiLiLtXx i ri/vUiJi Uo i i\iL.iN i 


9 "3 


June 


I 7D J 




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13. 44 


JEAN ANN TAYLOR 


22 


May 


1941 






Enoch J. Groberg 


9 


Mar 


1944 




13. 441 


ENOCH TAYLOR GROBERG 


9 


Sept 


1968 




13. 442 


CHRISTOPHER JOHN GROBERG 


13 


July 


1969 




1 3. 443 


JULIE GROBERG 


2 


Nov 


1971 




13. 444 


SARA GROBERG 


4 


Sept 


1973 





314 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1982 



LD. No. Birth 

13. ASHTED TAYLOR 1 2 Sept 

Agnes Katherine Strebel 1 Jan 

13.5 STANLEY STREBEL TAYLOR 3 Oct 

Mildred G. Warren 6 Oct 

13.51 MELVIN TAYLOR 1 9 Aug 
Janet Morley 10 Feb 

13.511 KIM TAYLOR 28 Aug 

13.512 KARI TAYLOR 12 Feb 
Tracy Eliason 3 Aug 

13.513 KELI TAYLOR 5 June 

13.514 KENNY TAYLOR 1 6 Sept 

13.515 KURTY TAYLOR 5 May 

13.516 KONI TAYLOR 1 5 Sept 

13.517 KRISTI TAYLOR 7 Nov 

13.518 KASEY TAYLOR 28 Oct 

13.52 DELBERT TAYLOR 1 9 Aug 
Janet Llewellyn 24 Apr 

13.521 JEANNINE JUNE TAYLOR 6 June 

Rod Bernard 

1 3.522 BRENT TAYLOR 1 2 Aug 

1 3.523 KATHLEENE TAYLOR 17 Nov 

13.524 DAVID TAYLOR 31 Aug 

13, 525 DARIN TAYLOR 2 Apr 

13.52 w JoAnn Bohn 25 Oct 

13.53 THOMAS STANLEY TAYLOR 5 Oct 
Kathern Herschi 17 Dec 

13.531 THOMAS SHANE TAYLOR 26 Oct 

13.532 MORGAN STANLEY TAYLOR 7 Feb 
1 3. 533 DUSTEN TAYLOR 30 Oct 
13, 534 CLARISSA TAYLOR 21 July 
1 3. 535 DEBRA TAYLOR 21 Sept 

13.54 TIMMI JOE TAYLOR 10 Jan 
Tanya Spencer 2 Mar 

13.541 CODY TIM TAYLOR 1 8 Nov 

13.542 BRENDEN TAYLOR 17 Dec 

13.543 CLINTON TAYLOR 4 Aug 

13.55 JACKIE LYNNE TAYLOR 30 Aug 
Randy Paul I-evingston 21 Mar 

13.551 JAMIE LYNNE LEVINGSTON 24 Sept 

13.56 WANDA TAYLOR 8 Oct 
Robert Wright 9 Apr 

13.561 RICKY WRIGHT 8 Feb 
Sherie Dunn 19 Feb 

13.562 PAMELLA WRIGHT 23 Aug 

13.563 MARTY WRIGHT 17 Nov 



875 
877 
909 
911 
932 
937 
958 
960 
958 
961 
963 
965 
966 
969 
972 
932 
935 
957 

959 
962 
968 
971 
934 
944 
946 
970 
972 
973 
977 
980 
948 
950 
969 
971 
976 
958 
957 
976 
939 
930 
958 
961 
960 
964 



Death 
15 Sept 1967 
11 Nov 1936 



11 Nov 1979 



315 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1982 

LD. No. Birth Death 

13. ASHTED TAYLOR 1 2 Sept 1875 1 5 Sept 1967 

Agnes Katherine Strebel 1 Jan 1877 1 1 Nov 1936 

13.6 FRED STREBEL TAYLOR 1 1 Nov 1915 6 Oct 1974 
Donna Louise Ostler 

Buelah Rose 

13.61 KENNETH TAYLOR 1936 

13.62 MICHAEL JOSEPH TAYLOR 25 Nov 1943 
Chrystal Sayre Looslie 8 Jan 1938 

13.63 SHARON SUE TAYLOR 31 Aug 1946 
LeRoy Ulrich 

13.631 JENNIFER LEE ULRICH 5 May 1971 

13.64 KERRY IAN TAYLOR 8 Nov 1953 

13.65 KRISTI ANN TAYLOR 8 Nov 1953 

13.66 GAIL TAYLOR 20 Aug 1955 

13.7 GENEVIEVE TAYLOR 12 Sept 1919 19 Nov 1930 



GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. 
Henrietta Sawyer 

14. ELLA TAYLOR 
John Westphal 

15. AMY TAYLOR 



25 Mar 1838 4 Sept 1926 
20 Apr 1846 2 Mar 1922 
4 Oct 1875 3 Aug 1959 



1 Jan 



1878 



1 June 1880 



316 



INDEX TO PICTURES 



Picture No. Page No, 

1. George Taylor, Sr. 1838 - 1926 2 

2 Eliza Nicholls Taylor Wife of Geo. Taylor 3 

3 Henrietta Sawyer Taylor Wife of Geo. Taylor 3 

4 George Taylor, Sr. 3 

5 Emily Pafford Taylor Wife of Geo. Taylor 3 

6 Phoebe Carter Taylor Wife of Geo Taylor 3 

7 George Taylor, Sr. , Family: 

Eliza Nicholls Taylor 5 

Henrietta Sawyer Taylor 5 

Harriett Taylor McClellan 5 

George Thomas Taylor, (Jr. ) 5 

Henrietta Taylor Kerr 5 

Thomas Nicholls Taylor 5 

Arthur Nicholls Taylor 5 

John Tranham Taylor 5 

Mary Ann "Polly" Taylor Roberts 5 

Walter G. Taylor 5 

Ashted Taylor 5 

Ella Taylor Westphal 5 

8 George Taylor, Sr. House From Glass negative 6 

9 Geo. Taylor Furniture Store 47 

10 Provo First National Bank 47 

11 George Taylor, Sr. In his garden 47 

12 Old Provo Meeting House - New Tabernacle 47 

13 George Taylor, Sr. Posing 233 

14 Provo Commercial Bank 233 

15 Geo. Taylor Supply Co. Letterhead 233 

16 Imprint on back of G, Taylor photo 233 

17 Imprint on back of photo G. Taylor's Gallery of Art233 

18 A thirsty George Taylor drinking from flowing well 233 

19 Eliza Nicholls Taylor 1838 - 1922 48 

20 Grandmas Eliza and Henrietta on donkeys 60 

21 Eliza and Edith Taylor 60 

22 Eliza Nicholls Taylor Home 415 No. 7th W. 60 

23 Eliza N. Taylor and Grandchildren 60 

24 Eliza, Henrietta and 5 children 75 

25 Henrietta Sawyer Taylor 1846 - 1922 66 

26 Henrietta S, Taylor's Home 175 West Center 68 

27 Henrietta (Nettie) and Ella Taylor 68 

28 Eliza , Henrietta, Hattie , George , Tom, Nettie , Polly 68 

29 Grandpa Sawyer 68 

30 Harriett Clarrisa Taylor McClellan 76 

31 James F. McClellan 83 



317 



INDEX 



TO PICT URES 



Picture No. Page No. 

32 Eliza NichoUs Taylor Family 56 

33 Hattie Taylor Age 17 83 

34 Hattie in later years Lived 99 yrs. 11 mo. 83 

35 Hattie Taylor Age 12 83 

36 Hattie Taylor McClellan House - 712 W. 4th No. 83 

37 Hattie & Jim McClellan 83 

38 George Thomas Taylor, (Jr. ) 86 

39 Elizabeth Thomas Taylor 90 

40 Four Generations: 

Eliza N. , George T. (Jr.), Edith & Geo Maiben 90 

41 Jack & Bade Taylor 90 

42 Arnold Taylor 90 

43 Edith, Nellie, Leone Taylor 90 

44 Lizzie Taylor & four daughters 90 

45 George Taylor, Jr. house 187 No. 4th West 90 

46 Henrietta Taylor Kerr ^4 

47 George Affleck Kerr 95 

48 Kerr 3 Generations: Basil, Henrietta T. Henrietta K. 95 

49 Rhea, Basil, Kenneth, Ralph Kerr 95 

50 Geo. Mercer Kerr Family 95 

51 Thomas Nicholls Taylor 98 

52 Maud Rogers Taylor 124 

53 Family of Thomas N. & Maud Rogers Taylor 124 

54 Interior of Provo Tabernacle - 1925 124 

55 Thomas N. Taylor House 342 No. 5th West 124 

56 Farmers & Merchants Bank 290 West Center 252 

57 Farmers & Merchants Bank Interior 252 

58 West Center Street - Corner of 3rd West 252 

59 Farmers & Merchants Bank brochure 252 

60 Provo Railroad Depot 122 

61 Utah County Horse Show 122 

62 T. N. Taylor Tennis Court 122 

63 Interior of Nielsen & Taylor Jewelry Store 122 

64 Mary Ann "Polly" Taylor Roberts 128 

65 William D. & Polly Taylor Roberts Family 130 

66 Roberts Hotel (Pulsipher House) 130 

67 Hotel Roberts 1 92 So. Unive rs ity Ave . 130 

68 Taylor & Company About 1890 130 

69 William D. Roberts, Jr. 130 

70 Arthur Nicholls Taylor 134 

71 Maria Dixon Taylor 153, 181 

72 Arthur N. & Maria D. Taylor Family 153 

73 Arthur N. Taylor House 256 No. 5th West 153 



318 



INDEX TO PICTURES 



Picture No. Page No. 

74 John Tranham Taylor 182 

75 Edna Pulsipher Taylor 188 

76 Edna P. & John T. Taylor 188 

77 Early Interior of John T. Taylor's Grocery Store 188 

78 John T. & Edna Taylor Family 188 

79 Interior of John T. Taylor Grocery Store 192 

80 Taylor & Poulton Grocery Store 192 

81 John T. Taylor Grocery Store - 1940 192 

82 Interior of John T. Taylor Grocery Store 192 

83 Delivery Wagon in front of John T. Taylor Store 192 

84 John T. Taylor Family - First Automobile 192 

85 Walter G. Taylor 194 

86 Agnes McKinlay Taylor 204 

87 Walter G. & Agnes M. Taylor Family 204 

88 Walter G. Taylor House 722 West 5th No. 204 

89 Walter G. Taylor holding reins to "Golden Cross" 204 

90 Ashted Taylor 210 

91 Agnes Katherine Strebel Taylor 221 

92 Fontella, Roy, Leo Taylor 221 

93 Ashted & Kate Taylor Family 221 

94 Kate Strebel Taylor 221 

95 Kathrine G. Kopp Taylor 221 

96 Verene H. Peay Taylor 221 

97 Ashted Taylor House Riverside 221 

98 Ella Taylor Westphal 226 

99 Ella Taylor 226 

100 Ella and John Westphal House - Santa Anna, Cal. 226 

101 John Westphal 226 

Printed from glass negatives 
of George Taylor: 

102 272 West Center Street, Provo 230 

103 Salt Lake Tabernacle 231 

104 Corner of 3rd West & Center Street, Provo 230 

105 Provo Steam Laundry - 375 West Center 230 

106 Geo. Taylor House from Second West Street 230 

107 Provo Tabernacle 230 

108 Copy Utah Stake Presidency letter - Bank Note 255 

109 Provo First National Bank 234 

110 Provo Commercial Bank 233 

111 Taylor Bros. Co. Employees - 1904 238 

112 Geo. Taylor Furniture Store 241 

113 Taylor Bros. Co. 241 

114 Dixon Taylor Russell Co. (DTR Co. ) 241 



319 



INDEX 



TO PICTURES 



Picture No. Page No. 

115 M. R. Taylor Co. Spanish Fork 247 

116 Taylor Partners 247 

117 Taylor Bros, Co. - First truck 247 

118 D. A. Taylor & Company Orem, Utah 247 

119 Taylor's Inc. 247 

120 DTR " The One Price House" 268 

121 "Cash Tells The Story at John T. Taylor's" 268 

122 Taylor Bros. Co. - calling cards 268 

123 "Home of the Traveler" Hotel Roberts 268 

124 Saratoga Mineral Baths Lehi, Utah Lake 264 

125 Geneva Resort Dance Pavilion, Utah Lake 264 

126 Geneva Resort Hotel and Dining Room 264 

127 Provonna Beach Resort at Sunset - Utah Lake 256 

128 Arthur N. Taylor & sons at Provonna Beach 256 

129 Provonna Beach Lake Pier 256 

130 Provonna Beach - mouth of Provo River & Utah Lake 256 

131 Wilson's "Bonnie" docked in Provo River 256 

132 Sandy Provonna Beach 256 



320 



EXPLANATION OF FAMILY IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS 



The family identification number is a simple way of being able to 
look at any of the names of George Taylor, Sr's. posterity and by the 
identification number assigned to this individual, immediately deter- 
mining which of the fifteen children they descended from. It will also 
show if they are of the first, second, third, etc. , generation and where 
they fit into each family according to date of birth. 

As an example: 

I.D. No. 10. 252 



I.D. No. 10. is Arthur N. Taylor - 10th child of George Taylor, Sr. 
" 10.2 is Lynn D. Taylor - 2nd child of Arthur N. Taylor. 

" 10.25 is George Terry Taylor - 5th child of Lynn D. 

" 10. 252 is David Lynn Taylor - 2nd child of George Terry. 

OR 

I.D. No. 89211 



I.D. No. 8 is Thomas N. Taylor - 8th child of George Taylor, Sr. 

" 89 is Delenna T.Taylor - 9th child of Thomas N. Taylor. 

" 892 is Adrianne T. Taylor - 2nd child of Delenna Taylor. 

" 9021 is Michele T. Stauffenberg - 1st child of Adrianne. 

" 8921 1 is Victor Lee Stauffenberg - 1st child of Michele. 

OR 

I. D. No. 11.3.1.1 



I.D. No. 11. is John T. Taylor - 1 1 th child of George Taylor, Sr. 

" 1 1 . 3 is Wendell H. Taylor - 3rd child of John T. Taylor. 

" 1 1 . 3. 1 is Wendellyn T. Mills - 1 st child of Wendell. 

" 1 1 . 3 . 1 . 1 is Richard Taylor Mills - 1 st child of Wendellyn. 



321 



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INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I. D. No. Page 

A 

12.232 ALLRED, RICKI EASTMOND 307 

10.314 ANDERSON, JED TAYLOR 300 

10.31 ANDERSON, JULIA TAYLOR 300 

10.313 ANDERSON, KENNEN 300 

10.311 ANDERSON, KRISTINE 300 
10.3121 ANDERSON, MANDI ALESE 300 

10.312 ANDERSON, SCOTT TAYLOR 300 

12.3113 ARNOLD, BARBARA ANN 308 

12.3114 ARNOLD, DAVID MATHEW 308 
12.3112 ARNOLD, PAUL STEVEN 308 

12.311 ARNOLD, VIRGINIA CLAUDIA TAYLO 308 

12.3111 ARNOLD, VIRGINIA CLAUDIA 308 

II. 4.1 ASHBY, BRIAN NED TAYLOR 304 
11.4 ASHBY, NADINE LOUISE TAYLOR 304 
42312 ASKEW, CHARLES DAVID 276 
42311 ASKEW, DEBRA DENE 276 

73631 AURICH, BRIAN KEITH 287 
7363 AURICH, CHRISTINE CLIFT 287 
73634 AURICH, MELISSA 287 

73632 AURICH, TODD STANLEY 287 

73633 AURICH, TRISHA 287 
12.232 h Allred, Donald Craig 307 

10.312 w Anderson, Annette Buffo 300 
10.31 h Anderson, Kenneth R 300 
12.311 h Arnold, Paul Bennion 308 
11.4 h Ashby, Robert Morrell 304 
4231 h Askew, Ralph Gene 276 
7363 h Aurich, Keith Warren 287 

B 

42735 BAKER, ADRIANNE 278 
42734 BAKER, ALEXIS 278 

42731 BAKER, KELLY WAYNE 278 

42732 BAKER, LANNING R 278 

42733 BAKER, LEIGH 278 
42738 BAKER, LINDSAY 278 

42736 BAKER, MEREDITH 278 
4273 BAKER, NANCY KAY BONNETT 278 

42737 BAKER, RISA LYN 278 

10.3112 BANDLEY, CHRISTIAN ANDERSON 300 
10.3111 BANDLEY, JEREMIAH PHILLIP 300 

10.313 BANDLEY, KENNEN ANDERSON 300 
10.311 BANDLEY, KRISTINE ANDERSON 300 

10.3131 BANDLEY, NICHOLAS EDWARD 300 

10.3132 BANDLEY, STEFAN LOUIS 300 
42526 BARLOW, CHRISTY 277 
42525 BARLOW, JACOB MARK 277 

42523 BARLOW, JAMES ERIC 277 

42521 BARLOW, JEFFREY ALAN 277 

42524 BARLOW, JOHN THOMAS 277 

42522 BARLOW, MICHAEL LINDSAY 277 
4252 BARLOW, SHERRY JACOBSEN 277 
85122 BARRETT, CHRISTOPHER TAYLOR 291 

85112 BARRETT, ELIZABETH 291 

85113 BARRETT, EMILY 291 
85121 BARRETT, ERRIN ELIZABETH 291 
851 BARRETT, HELEN ELIZA TAYLOR 291 
8513 BARRETT, MARY PENNY 291 

85111 BARRETT, MELISSA 291 

8512 BARRETT, MICHAEL TAYLOR 291 

8511 BARRETT, WILLIAM WALDO III 291 

12.4222 BARTHOLOMEW, HOLLY DENNETTE 309 

12.422 BARTHOLOMEW, NANNETTE BURNHAM 309 

12.4221 BARTHOLOMEW, NAOMI NICHOLE 309 

13.521 BERNARD, JEANNINE JUNE TAYLOR 315 

12.611 BERRIMAN, BRADLEY SUTTON 309 

12.614 BERRIMAN, DUNSTAN CHRIS 309 



I.D, No. 




Page 


12.612 


BERRIMAN, JEOFFREY IRVING 


J w J 


12.613 


BERRIMAN, MARIAN JEAN 




12.61 


BERRIMAN, ZOLA ALCEA SUTTON 




8621 5 


BLACK, ADAM JOSEPH 


2Q2 


8621 6 


BLACK, CHRISTOPHER MC KAY 




8621 


BLACK, CLAUDIA PORTER 




8621 2 


BLACK, DAVID TAYLOR 




86217 


BLACK, JENNIFER 


PQP 


o621 4 


BLACK, KIMBERLI 


PQP 


8621 1 


BLACK, LAURIE 


PQP 


8621 3 


BLACK, MELISSA 


2Q2 


86210 


BLACK, TRIANA 


292 


85132 


BODELL, 


CORRINE (CORD 


2Q1 

^7 1 


85133 


BODELL, 


JACOB WILLIAM 




85131 


BODELL, 


LUCUS BARRETT 


291 


8513 


BODELL, 


MARY PENNY BARRETT 


2Q1 


12.7122 


BONNETT, 


ALISE 


1 

J 1 w 


12.71 13 


BONNETT, 


ANNA MARIE 


J 1 u 


42742 


BONNETT, 


BRITNEY 


278 


42741 


BONNETT, 


BRODY JONES 


278 


12 .71 


BONNETT, 


CAROL LIND TAYLOR 


310 


12.7121 


BONNETT, 


CAROL NICOLE 


310 


12.715 


BONNETT, 


aARRISA 


310 


12.713 


BONNETT, 


DAVID CHARLES 


^ 1 


12.714 


BONNETT, 


JAMES R 


^10 
J 1 u 


4272 


BONNETT, 


JANICE 


278 


12.7131 


BONNETT, 


JESSICA MARIE 


J 1 \J 


12.71 1 1 


BONNETT, 


JON BUD JR 


J 1 u 


12.71 1 


BONNETT, 


JON BUD 




12 .71 2 


BONNETT, 


JOSEPH TAYLOR 


^10 


427 


BONNETT, 


JOYCE TAYLOR 


27 8 


4271 


BONNETT, 


KAREN LEE 


27 8 


4276 


BONNETT, 


MICHAEL GEORGE 


278 


4273 


BONNETT, 


NANCY KAY 


27 8 


4275 


BONNETT, 


PAMELA 


27 8 


12.71 12 


BONNETT, 


SHANNA MAY 


310 


4274 


BONNETT, 


STANFORD KIM 


27 8 


42761 


BONNETT, 


TERIE NICOLE 


278 


4277 


BONNETT, 


TERIE 


27 8 


05141 


BOSEN, ELIZABETH ERIN 


291 


00 14 


BOSEN, MARY ELIZABETH TAYLOR 


291 


4232 


BRADSHAW 


, NANCY VERA TAYLOR 


276 


42321 


BRADSHAW 


, RICHARD RANDY 


276 


42322 


BRADSHAW 


, SHARON 


P76 


10.241 


BROCKBANK, ALLEN BRENT JR 


299 


1 .242 


BROCKBANK, ANNE 




1 .210 


BROCKBANK, DAVID 


2QQ 


1 U .^HO 


BROCKBANK, DIXON TAYLOR 


299 


1 n oil 


BROCKBANK, KATHRYN DEE TAYLOR 


299 


1 n oiih 


BROCKBANK, LAURA 


299 


1 U .cHJ 


BROCKBANK, LYNN (F) 


299 


1 n 0)17 


BROCKBANK, MARY KATHRYN 


299 


1 .245 


BROCKBANK, REBECCA 


9QQ 


'♦372 


BROWN, DAVID 


9ft 1 




BROWN, JOSEPH 


£0 1 




BROWN, NANCY ANN 




ll O T 


BROWN, NELLIE MAY MORRISON 


281 


1 "a 1 o ll 


BUCKNER, 


ANN 


J 1 c 


13.1.1.7 


BUCKNER, 


C'LESS TOTTIE 


312 


1J.1 .2.1 


BUCKNER, 


CAR I LEE 


J 1 c 


10 . 1 


BUCKNER, 


DEAN TAYLOR 




1 o i 1 i 

1 J . 1 . 1 . 1 


BUCKNER, 


DORIS LYNNE 


J 1 c 


1 o 1 o 
10.1 .2 


BUCKNER, 


EUGENE TAYLOR 




13.1 


BUCKNER, 


FONTELLA TAYLOR 


J 1 c 


13 .1.2.5 


BUCKNER, 


GENE CHRIS 


1 2 


101 10 
. 1 . 1 .2 


BUCKNER, 


GLEN TAYLOR II 


J 1 £ 


13.1.1 


BUCKNER, 


GLEN TAYLOR 


312 


13.1 .4.6 


BUCKNER, 


J AN A DIEM 


312 


13.1 .4.1 


BUCKNER, 


KAREN 


312 


13.1 .2.3 


BUCKNER, 


KATHY 


312 


13.1 .4.3 


BUCKNER, 


KELLI MARIE 


312 



•JOC 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I.D. No Page 

13.1.1.4 BUCKNER, KENNETH WAYNE 312 

13.1.3 BUCKNER, MARILYN 312 

13.1.1.3 BUCKNER, MICHAEL DEAN 312 

13.1.4.5 BUCKNER, MICHAEL ROBERT 312 
13.1 .2.2 BUCKNER, PAT DIANE 312 

13.1.1.6 BUCKNER, PAULA ALICE 312 
13.1 .4.2 BUCKNER, TIMOTHY DEAN 312 

13.1 .4.4 BUCKNER, TROY RICHARD 312 

13.1.1.5 BUCKNER, WALTER DON 312 
12.313 BURGESS, GAYLE LESLIE TAYLOR 308 
12.3132 BURGESS, ^CLINDA SUE 308 
12.3131 BURGESS, SHAWN DEE 308 

12.4211 BURNHAM, DENNIS GRANT TAYLOR 309 

12.421 BURNHAM, DENNIS TAYLOR 309 
12.42 BURNHAM, DONNA LA GENE TAYLOR 309 

12.422 BURNHAM, NANNETTE 309 
12.4213 BURNHAM, RICHARD HAMILTON 309 

12.4212 BURNHAM, TONY FRANK 309 
10.141 BUSHNELL, MARRIANNE FRAMPTON 298 
10.1411 BUSHNELL, STEPHANIE 298 

45213 BUTTERFIELD, COLLEEM 282 
45219 BUTTERFIELD, DEAN WAYNE 282 

45211 BUTTERFIELD, JAMES TAYLOR 282 

45212 BUTTERFIELD, JEREMY WILLIS 282 

45216 BUTTERFIELD, JILLIAN 282 
45218 BUTTERFIELD, KENNETH RODNEY 282 
452181 BUTTERFIELD, LOI ANN 282 

45214 BUTTERFIELD, LUCINDA 282 

45215 BUTTERFIELD, REBECKA 282 

45217 BUTTERFIELD, THOMAS MARK 282 
4521 BUTTERFIELD, VIOLA DIANE TAYLO 282 
437 M2 Bailey, Ed 281 

4273 h Baker, Wayne R 278 
10.313 h Bandley, Fred 300 
10.311 h Bandley, Phillip Bench 300 
4252 h Barlow, Roger Alan 277 

8511 w Barrett, Julie Ashton 291 

8512 w Barrett, Stephanie Jean 291 
851 h Barrett, William Waldo Jr 291 
12.422 h Bartholomew, Richard Mark 309 
13.521 h Bernard, Rod 315 
2.611 w#2Berriman, Carmella May Mortrud1309 
12.61 h Berriman, Karl Irving 309 
12.611 w Berriman, Sylvia Salazar 309 
8621 h Black, Karl Dean 292 

8513 h Bodell, Blaine Burton 291 

12.711 w Bonnett, Delaina May 310 

12.712 w Bonnett, Jean Tippetts 310 
4276 w Bonnett, Kristina Peters 278 

12.713 w Bonnett, Lani Elliott 310 
12.71 h Bonnett, Louis (Bud) Lamborne 310 

4274 w Bonnett, Shelley Sue Jones 278 
427 h Bonnett, Stanford Jay 278 
8614 h Bosen, Kendall Lee 291 
4232 h Bradshaw, Don Sharon Taylor 276 
10.24 h Brockbank, A Brent 299 
437 h Brown, Karl 281 
13.1 h Buckner, Arnold Dean 312 

13.1.1 w Buckner, Doris Llewellyn Brown 312 

13.1.4 w Buckner, Judith LaVerne Stodda 312 
3.1.1.4 wBuckner, Nancy Jordani 312 

13.1.2 w Buckner, Vivian Irene Jones 312 
3.1.1.3 wBuckner, Yoko Shimizul 312 
12.313 h Burgess, Elwin Dee 308 
12.42 h Burnham, Grant Kendall 309 
12.421 w Burnham, Patsy Mae Davis 309 
10.141 h Bushnell, Ned Booth 298 

45218 w Butterfield, Joan Koeja Liogoy 282 
4521 h Butterfield, Rodney Wayne 282 



I.D. No. Page 
C 



931 


CALDER, MARILYN WARNOCK 


297 


9311 


CALDER, SUSIE 


297 


12.2143 


CANDELARIA, CLARRISA KAY 


306 


12.2142 


CANDELARIA, GLEN TODD 


306 


12.2141 


CANDELARIA, LITA JEAN 


306 


12.214 


CANDELARIA, MARILEE JEAN GORDO 


306 


83521 


CARD, 


KERI SUE 


290 


83522 


CARD, 


LISA 


290 


8352 


CARD, 


SUSAN TAYLOR 


290 


42833 


CHEEVER, COURTNEY 


279 


42842 


CHEEVER, DANIELLE 


279 


42832 


CHEEVER, ELISHA ANN 


279 


4283 


CHEEVER, GARY ELMO 


279 


42843 


CHEEVER, JESSICA 


279 


42841 


CHEEVER, MANDI LEE 


279 


428 


CHEEVER, MARTHA LOUISE TAYLOR 


279 


4281 


CHEEVER, PATRICIA ANN 


279 


4284 


CHEEVER, RONNIE VERNON 


279 


42831 


CHEEVER, SHANNON SUE 


279 


4282 


CHEEVER, VICKIE LEE 


279 


8353 


CLAWSON, TON I TAYLOR 


290 


885 


aAYSON, CLAUDIA MARY 


293 


8841 


CLAYSON, DANIEL PAUL 


293 


881 


CLAYSON, ETHEL JEAN 


293 


OOiL 


CLAYSON, JANICE MARILYN 


293 


oo43 


aAYSON, JOHN TAYLOR 


293 


Q 
00 


CLAYSON, MARY MAUD TAYLOR 


293 


oo3 


CLAYSON, MERRILL DAVID 


293 


884 


aAYSON, PAUL TAYLOR 


293 


8842 


aAYSON, RUTH DIANA 


293 


73625 


aiFT, 


AARON PANIET. 


?R7 


7366 


aiFT, 


ANNETTE 


287 


7363 


aiFT, 


CHRISTINE 


287 


7362 


aiFT, 


DANIEL EDWARD 


287 


73621 


aiFT, 


DAVID ALLAN 


287 


73622 


aiFT, 


ELAINE 


287 


•73642 


aiFT, 


JONATHAN TAYLOR 


287 


736 


aiFT, 


KATHRYN KERR 


287 


73641 


aiFT, 


KERRY LYNN 


287 


73626 


aiFT, 


KEVIN GRANT 


287 


7365 


aiFT, 


LOUISE 


287 


73623 


aiFT, 


MARGENE 


287 


7364 


aiFT, 


MARTIN TAYLOR 


287 


7361 


aiFT, 


MAURINE 


287 


73624 


aiFT, 


MICHAEL BRANDON 


287 


42823 


COLES, 


ANGELA 


279 


42824 


COLES, 


JENNIE 


279 


42825 


COLES, 


JILL LYN 


279 


42822 


COLES, 


MEL ISA 


279 


42821 


COLES, 


SEAN BRUCE 


279 


4282 


COLES, 


VICKIE LEE CHEEVER 


279 


83122 


CONE, 


DEVON CATHERINE 


289 


8312 


CONE, 


LISA ANNE TAYLOR 


289 


83123 


CONE, 


SCOTT TAYLOR 


289 


83121 


CONE, 


WILLIAM RANDALL JR 


289 


8631 


COOK, 


BARRY PAUL 


292 


86311 


COOK, 


BRENT PAUL 


292 


8633 


COOK, 


CATHERINE 


292 


863 


COOK, 


JOSEPHINE PATRICIA TAY 


292 


8632 


COOK, 


KEVEN TAYLOR 


292 


86321 


COOK, 


MARCI ANN 


292 


86312 


COOK, 


MARK 


292 


86322 


COOK, 


MELISSA 


292 


83433 


CRAIG, 


CURTIS WAYNE 


290 


8343 


CRAIG, 


JANET TAYLOR HARRISON 


290 


83431 


CRAIG, 


JOY KARIN 


290 


83434 


CRAIG, 


LESA 


290 



326 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I.D. No. Page 

83432 CRAIG, ROBERT LOUIS 290 

10.341 CRAIG, SHELLY K WOODRUFF 301 

71 CROSS, HENRIETTA RHEA TAYLOR 285 

711 CROSS, JAMES RILEY 285 

931 h Calder, Robert Mac 297 

12.214 h Candelaria, Billy August 306 

8352 h Card, Kevin Lincoln 290 
4284 w Cheever , Cindy Lee Ball 279 
4283 w Cheever, Linda Sue Huff 279 
428 h Cheever, Vernon Smith 279 

8353 h Clawson, Glen Allen 290 
884 w Clayson, Melanie Irene Anderso 293 
88 h Clayson, Merrill Daniel 293 
7362 w Clift, Juleen Fredrickson 287 
7364 w Clift, Peggy Lynn Norlund 287 
736 h Clift, Vyvyan Stanley 287 
4282 h Coles, Bruce Henry 279 
8312 h Cone, William Randall 289 

8631 w Cook, Julee Orme 292 
863 h Cook, Paul Whitney 292 

8632 w Cook, Rhonda 292 
10.341 h Craig, John 301 
8343 h Craig, Robert Ernest 290 
71 h Cross, Virgil Riley 285 

D 

42122 DANGERFIELD, MARY DEANNE DOEZI 274 

421222 DANGERFIELD, SHANE CARLSON 274 
421221 DANGERFIELD, STEPHANIE LYNN 274 

421223 DANGERFIELD, TRISHA ANN 274 

10.222 DE GRAW, DERK TAYLOR 299 

10.223 DE GRAW, GREGORY TAYLOR 299 
10.22 DE GRAW, JANICE TAYLOR 299 
10.225 DE GRAW, MICHAEL 299 
10.221 DE GRAW, MICHELE 299 

10.224 DE GRAW, NICOLE 299 

45226 DENNIS, ANNETTE 283 

45223 DENNIS, BRUCE MC KAY 282 
45228 DENNIS, DON RAPHAEL 283 
4522 DENNIS, GLENDA TAYLOR 282 
45225 DENNIS, MICHAEL ROBERT 283 
45222 DENNIS, MICHELLE 282 

45227 DENNIS, RICHARD TAYLOR 283 

45224 DENNIS, SUSAN 283 
45221 DENNIS, TAMARIE 282 

42123 D0E2IE, CHERYL ANN 274 

42121 DOEZIE, DAVID ARNOLD 274 

421211 DOEZIE, DAVID TROY 274 

42124 DOEZIE, JULIE ANN 274 

421212 DOEZIE, KANDASE BROOK 274 

42122 DOEZIE, MARY DEANNE 274 
4212 DOEZIE, MARY HAZEL TAYLOR 274 

421213 DOEZIE, TYCE DEREK 274 
10.113 DUNCAN, KATHY FISHER 298 

10.1131 DUNCAN, MEGAN 298 

10.1132 DUNCAN, TIFFANY 298 
91113 DUNN, AMBER MARIE 295 
91111 DUNN, BARBARA ANN 295 
9135 DUNN, BEVERLY 296 
913.11 DUNN, BONNIE DANIELLE 297 

91371 DUNN, BRANDON LEWIS 296 
91311 DUNN, CYNTHIA 296 

91372 DUNN, DANIEL LEWIS 296 
91314 DUNN, DEBRA 296 
9133 DUNN, DENNIS DAVID 296 
91115 DUNN, DIANE KATHRYN 295 
91331 DUNN, DIANNE MARIE 296 
9132 DUNN, DOUGLAS NORMAN 296 
91 DUNN, GENEVE ROBERTS 295 



I.D. No. 






Page 


9134 


DUNN, 


GLORIA 


296 


91333 


DUNN, 


HEATHER LYNN 


296 


9137 


DUNN, 


HOWARD LEWIS 


296 


91332 


DUNN, 


JAMES DAVID 


296 


9121 


DUNN, 


JANET CAROLYN 


295 


91 132 


DUNN, 


JARED WAYNE 


295 


91114 


DUNN, 


JEFFREY PAUL 


295 


91321 


DUNN, 


JO ANN 


296 


9139 


DUNN, 


JOHN HAROLD 


297 


9123 


DUNN, 


KELLIE COLLEEN 


295 


9112 


DUNN, 


LARRY JAMES 


295 


9131 


DUNN, 


LOWELL WILLIAM 


296 


91315 


DUNN, 


MARIE 


296 


9122 


DUNN, 


MARSHA JEANNE 


295 


91 133 


DUNN, 


MERRILL WILLIAMS 


295 


91313 


DUNN, 


MICHAEL DAVID 


296 


9136 


DUNN, 


NANCY 


296 


913 


DUNN, 


NORMAN DAVID 


296 


912 


DUNN, 


PAUL HAROLD 


295 


913.10 


DUNN, 


PAUL MORGAN 


297 


91 112 


DUNN, 


RICHARD ROBERT 


295 


91 1 


DUNN, 


ROBERT EDWIN 


295 


91 1 1 


DUNN, 


ROBERT HAROLD 


295 


91 131 


DUNN, 


ROGER WILLIAMS JR 


295 


91 13 


DUNN, 


ROGER WILLIAMS 


295 


913.12 


DUNN, 


RYAN DAVID 


297 


913.15 


DUNN, 


SHAUN PATRICK 


297 


91 14 


DUNN, 


SHIRLEY IRENE 


295 


91 15 


DUNN, 


STEVEN HOWARD 


295 


91312 


DUNN, 


STEVEN LEWIS 


296 


9138 


DUNN, 


TAMMY LOUISE 


297 


913.14 


DUNN, 


TIFFANY MARIE 


297 


913.13 


DUNN, 


TIMOTHY MICHAEL 




42122 h 


Dangerfield, Robert Carlson 


274 


10.22 h 


DeGraw, Monte Bowen 


299 


4522 h 


Dennis, Raphael Elvin 


282 


4212 h 


Doezie, Gerald David 


274 


42121 w 


Doezie, JoAnn Hinckley 


274 


10.113 h 


Duncan, Paul H 


298 


9137 w 


Dunn, 


Darla Dunn 


296 


9113 w 


Dunn, 


Dorothy Edith Steggall 


295 


912 w 


Dunn, 


Jeanne Alice Cheverton 


295 


91 h 


Dunn, 


Joshua Harold 


295 


91 1 w 


Dunn, 


Kathryn LaVern Rock 


295 


9111 w 


Dunn, 


Linda Killorn 


295 


913 w 


Dunn, 


Lois 01 sen 


296 


9137 w#2 


Dunn, 


Lori Williams 


296 


913 w#2 


Dunn, 


Michele F Petrullo 


297 


9132 w 


Dunn, 


Rosa 


296 


9133 w 


Dunn, 


Shari Nealy 


296 


9131 w 


Dunn, 


Sylvia Baker 


296 


9115 w 


Dunn, 


Tori Ann Jorgensen 


295 


12.2441 


EARL, 


-- E 

AMY BETH 


307 


12.2442 


EARL, 


JAMES BENJAMIN 


307 


12.244 


EARL, 


REBECCA EASTMOND 


307 


12.2443 


EARL, 


STEVEN ROBERT 


307 


12.2413 


EASTMOND, ABRAHAM BENNION 


307 


12.2451 


EASTMOND, ANDREA 


307 


12.242 


EASTMOND, ANNA CLARE 


307 


12.254 


EASTMOND, CHARIS ANN 


308 



12.2 EASTMOND, CLARRISA JANNETT TAY 306 

12.245 EASTMOND, DANIEL VAN 307 

12.246 EASTMOND, DAVID ALBERT 307 
12.223 EASTMOND, DOUGLAS JOHN 306 
12.221 EASTMOND, ELAINE 306 



327 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I.D. No. Page 

12.22 EASTMOND, FRANK TAYLOR 306 
12.2231 EASTMOND, IAN DOUGLAS 306 
12.2223 EASTMOND, JAMES TAYLOR 306 

12.243 EASTMOND, JANICE 307 

12.21 EASTMOND, JEAN ESTHER 306 
12.241 EASTMOND, JEFFERSON NICHOLLS J 307 

12.24 EASTMOND, JEFFERSON NICHOLLS 307 

12.2221 EASTMOND, JESSICA RONDO 306 

12.2222 EASTMOND, JESSIE PAUL 306 
12.2412 EASTMOND, JONATHAN FOREST 307 

12.231 EASTMOND, KATHLEEN 307 
12.233 EASTMOND, KRISTEEN 307 
12.2452 EASTMOND, LISA 307 
12.253 EASTMOND, MC KINLAY DIRK 308 
12.2414 EASTMOND, RACHEL 307 

12.244 EASTMOND, REBECCA 307 

12.23 EASTMOND, RICHARD TAYLOR 307 

12.232 EASTMOND, RICKI 307 

12.25 EASTMOND, ROBERT MC KINLAY 308 

12.222 EASTMOND, RONDO HINDLEY 306 

12.251 EASTMOND, SHANNON 308 

12.252 EASTMOND, SHELLY 308 
12.2411 EASTMOND, SUZANNE 307 

13.1.3.2 EATOUGH, CRAIG NORMAN 312 
13.1.3.5 EATOUGH, JASON DEAN 312 
13.1.3.4 EATOUGH, JERRY DALE 312 
13.1.3.1 EATOUGH, LA RAE 312 
13.1.3 EATOUGH, MARILYN BUCKNER 312 

13.1.3.3 EATOUGH, STEVEN ROSS 312 

12.221 ELWELL, ELAINE EASTMOND 306 
12.2211 ELWELL, SUSAN MARIE 306 
12.63 ENGSTROM, ANN ADELE SUTTON 310 

12.635 ENGSTROM, EMILY 310 

12.636 ENGSTROM, ESTHER ANN 310 

12.633 ENGSTROM, GUSTAVUS ERIC 310 

12.631 ENGSTROM, GUSTAVUS SUTTON 310 

12.634 ENGSTROM, HAROLD MARK 310 

12.632 ENGSTROM, JENNIFER ANN 310 
12.2314 EVANS, ALYSON 307 
12.2313 EVANS, JACOB RICHARD 307 
12.231 EVANS, KATHLEEN EASTMOND 307 
12.2312 EVANS, SCOTT RYAN 307 
12.2311 EVANS, SEAN ROBERT 307 

12.244 h Earl, Wayne Richard 307 

12.24 w Eastmond, Alberta Van Wagoner 307 

12.22 w Eastmond, Ardis Christensen 306 

12.223 w Eastmond, Celesta Striegel 306 

12.25 w Eastmond, Charis Springer 308 

12.245 w Eastmond, Deboraih Ann Cramer 307 
12.2 h Eastmond, Frank Hindley 306 
12.241 w Eastmond, Irene Summerhays 307 

12.23 w Eastmond, Margorie Ashton 307 

12.222 w Eastmond, Shellie Lee Stacey 306 
13.1.3 h Eatough, Norman LeRoy 312 
12.221 h Elwell, James Dean 306 
12.63 h Engstrom, Gustavus Casper 310 
12.231 h Evans, Robert Neldon 307 

F 

751 FABRICANT, DOROTHY ESTHER KERR 287 

91141 FARNWORTH, CHRISTY 295 
91143 FARNWORTH, SCOTT MICHAEL 295 

91142 FARNWORTH, SHAUNA 295 
9114 FARNWORTH, SHIRLEY IRENE DUNN 295 

10.841 FARRER, DAVID GLEN 303 
10.84 FARRER, ELLEN KARTCHNER 303 

10.842 FARRER, HILARY ANN 303 



I. D. No. Page 

10.843 FARRER, MELISSA MICHELLE 303 

10.11 FISHER, ELAYNE TAYLOR 298 

10.1121 FISHER, HILLARY 298 

10.112 FISHER, JEFFREY TAYLOR 298 

10.113 FISHER, KATHY 298 

10.144 FISHER, SUSAN FRAMPTON 298 

10.111 FISHER, TERRI 298 

II. 1 FOWERS, HENRIETTA LORINE TAYLO 304 
11.1.1 FOWERS, NADINE LOIS 304 

10.146 FRAMPTON, ALAN TAYLOR 298 

10.143 FRAMPTON, BRUCE TAYLOR 298 
10.1432 FRAMPTON, CHRISTOPHER TAYLOR 298 

10.142 FRAMPTON, DAVID TAYLOR 298 
10.14 FRAMPTON, DIXIE TAYLOR 298 
10.1431 FRAMPTON, JEREMY TAYLOR 298 

10.147 FRAMPTON, KENT TAYLOR 298 

10.141 FRAMPTON, MARRIANNE 298 

10.145 FRAMPTON, PAUL TAYLOR 298 

10.144 FRAMPTON, SUSAN 298 
13.2114 FREDERICK, CALLIE DAWN 313 
13.211 FREDERICK, CATHY TAYLOR 313 
13.2113 FREDERICK, CORY REED 313 

13.2111 FREDERICK, NATHAN JOHN 313 

13.2112 FREDERICK, TENNILLE JANE 313 
11.1.1.1 FUNK, ALFRED JEAN FOWERS 304 
11.1.1 FUNK, NADINE LOIS FOWERS 304 
751 h Fabricant, Alan Stephen 287 
9114 h Farnworth, Stephen G 295 
10.84 h Farrer, Rand Glen 303 

10.112 w Fisher, Donnette Morrison 298 
10.11 h Fisher, Grant A 298 
10.144 h Fisher, Ryan Farrell 298 
11.1 h Powers, Alfred J 304 
10.14 h Frampton, Boyd M 298 

10.143 w Frampton, Connie Lynne Bird 298 

10.142 w Frampton, Keri Ann 298 
13.211 h Frederick, Roger John 313 

11.1.1 h Funk, Robert 304 

G 

11.5.1.5 GARDNER, AARON PHILIP SHERMAN 305 

11.5.1.3 GARDNER, ABBI RUTH 305 

11.5.1.4 GARDNER, EMMALEE KRISTINE 305 

11.5.1.1 GARDNER, ERIC RAYMOND 305 

11.5.2 GARDNER, JANICE JEAN 305 

11.5.3 GARDNER, JOHN BRIAN 305 

11.5.1.2 GARDNER, JONATHAN TAYLOR 305 
11.5 GARDNER, NORMA JEAN TAYLOR 305 
11.5.1 GARDNER, SHERMAN FRANK 305 

11.5.4 GARDNER, SUSANNE 305 

83451 GEDDES, AUDREY ROSE 290 
8345 GEDDES, PEGGY TAYLOR HARRISON 290 

83452 GEDDES, RACHEL MARIE 290 

83411 GILES, ADAM BUTLER 290 

83415 GILES, AFTON JEANNE 290 

83412 GILES, AMY LAURA 290 
12.31112 GILES, JAMES WAYNE 308 

83413 GILES, JENNIFER LEA 290 
12.31111 GILES, JOHN BEN 308 
8341 GILES, LE ANNE HARRISON 290 

83416 GILES, RYAN PETER 290 

83417 GILES, SARA VIVIAN 290 

83414 GILES, TAYLOR HARRISON 290 
12.3111 GILES, VIRGINIA aAUDIA ARNOL 308 
12.2134 GORDON, AMANDA JEAN 306 
12.2131 GORDON, ANDREA 306 
12.2122 GORDON, aARRISA KATHLEEN 306 



328 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I. D. No, Page 

12.212 GORDON, FRANK HUDSON 306 
12.215 GORDON, GARY GEORGE 306 
12.2121 GORDON, GLEN FRANK HUDSON 306 

12.211 GORDON, GLEN PAUL 306 
12.2153 GORDON, JAMIE G 306 

12.2132 GORDON, JANALEE 306 
12.21 GORDON, JEAN ESTHER EASTMOND 306 
12.2152 GORDON, JEANNIE LYN 306 
12.2151 GORDON, JO ANN CANDICE 306 

12.213 GORDON, JOSEPH EASTMOND 306 

12.214 GORDON, MARILEE JEAN 306 
12.2123 GORDON, RYAN LE GRAND 306 

12.2133 GORDON, WILLIAM GLEN 306 

91211 GOUGH, CAROLYN JENNIFER 295 
9121 GOUGH, JANET CAROLYN DUNN 295 

91212 GOUGH, TRAVIS DUNN 295 

91213 GOUGH, TYLER RAY 295 

42.11.2 GRANT, JULIE ANN GREEN 280 
42.11 GREEN, HAZEL COLLEEN TAYLOR 280 

42.11.3 GREEN, JAMES WILLIAM 280 
42.11.2 GREEN, JULIE ANN 280 
42.11.1 GREEN, KRISTY 280 

42.11.4 GREEN, MELISSA 280 

42.11.5 GREEN, NANETTE 280 

73232 GREENMAN, JASON TAYLOR 286 

73233 GREENMAN, JENNIFER LYNNE 286 
73231 GREENMAN, JOSHUA CRAIG 286 
7323 GREENMAN, SHERRY LYNNE KERR 286 
10.231 GREGSON, CARCL LYN RICHARDS 299 

10.2311 GREGSON, DANIEL KIM 299 

10.2312 GREGSON, MICHAEL THOMAS 299 

13.442 GROBERG, CHRISTOPHER JOHN 314 
13.441 GROBERG, ENOCH TAYLOR 314 
13.44 GROBERG, JEAN ANN TAYLOR 314 

13.443 GROBERG, JULIE 314 

13.444 GROBERG, SARA 314 

II. 5.1 w Gardner, Barbara Anne Heyman 305 
11.5 h Gardner, Frank Homer 305 
11.5.3 w Gardner, Julia Katherine Hallg 305 
8345 h Geddes, David Grant 290 
12.3111 hGiles, Ben H 308 
8341 h Giles, Peter Butler 290 
2.212 w#2Gordon, Connie Ruth Motti 306 
12.21 h Gordon, Glen Hudson 306 

12.212 w Gordon, Gloria Yvonne Wright 306 

12.213 w Gordon, Janice Love 306 

12.215 w Gordon, JoAnn Winmill 306 
12.211 w Gordon, Judith Ann Rowland 306 
9121 h Gough, Gary 295 
42.11.2h Grant, James Irwin 280 
42.11.3w Green, JoAnn Louise Smith 280 
42.11 h Green, William Shields 280 
7323 h Greenman, Craig Martin 286 
10.231 h Gregson, Kim Wolsey 299 
13.44 h Groberg, Enoch J 314, 

H 

11.5.3.1 HALLGREN, ELIZABETH KATHERINE 305 

11.5.3.2 HALLGREN, JAMES JOHN 305 
421233 HANKS, ANDREW SCOTT 274 
421232 HANKS, BRADY SCOTT 274 
421231 HANKS, CASEY SCOTT 274 
42123 HANKS, CHERYL ANN DOEZIE 274 
8825 HANSEN, KRISTINE LARSEN 293 
86121 HANSEN, LUCY ELIZABETH 291 
88251 HANSEN, RYAN LYNN 293 
8612 HANSEN, SUSAN KATHLEEN TAYLOR 291 



I.D. No 






Paee 


88252 


HANSEN, WHITNEY JAN 


293 


8342 


HARRISON, 


BRIAN CURTIS 


290 


83421 


HARRISON, 


DAVID a ARK 


290 


34 


2HARRIS0N, 


DEANNE PARKINSON TAY890 


8343 


HARRISON, 


JANET TAYLOR 


290 


83422 


HARRISON, 


JONATHAN HASTINGS 


290 


8341 


HARRISON, 


LE ANNE 


290 


83442 


HARRISON, 


MARK CURTIS 


290 


8345 


HARRISON, 


PEGGY TAYLOR 


290 


8344 


HARRISON, 


RONALD TAYLOR 


290 


83423 


HARRISON, 


SAMUEL PARKINSON 


290 


83441 


HARRISON, 


SCOTT MARRIOTT 


290 


12.243 


HATHAWAY, 


JANICE EASTMOND 


307 


12.2431 


HATHAWAY, 


SCOTT LEONARD 


307 


12.74 


HATTAWAY, 


ALAINE TAYLOR 


311 


12.741 


HATTAWAY, 


JACK CARL JR 


311 


12.747 


HATTAWAY, 


JAMES TAYLOR 


311 


12.744 


HATTAWAY, 


JARED TAYLOR 


311 


12.743 


HATTAWAY, 


JOHN TAYLOR 


311 


12.746 


HATTAWAY, 


JUSTIN TAYLOR 


311 


12.742 


HATTAWAY, 


KIMBERLY 


311 


12.745 


HATTAWAY, 


REBECCA 


311 


7365 


HATTON, LOUISE CLIFT 


287 


10 871 


HEAL, MARIA ANN 


303 


10 87 


HEAL, ROSEN A LOUISE KARTCHNE 


303 


81212 


HENDERSON, 


BRENT NELSON 


288 


81 241 


HENDERSON, 


DALLEN HARVEY 


288 


81 24 


HENDERSON, 


DAVID ALLEN 


288 


81 21 1 


HENDERSON, 


DEBORAH 


288 


8121 


HENDERSC9J, 


FRANCIS NELSON 


288 


81 23 


HENDERSON, 


JANET TAYLOR 


288 


81 213 


HENDERSON, 


JEFFREY LYNN 


288 


8l 22 


HENDERSON, 


JOHN GDIS 


288 


81 25 


HENDERSON, 


JULIA ANN 


288 


81 242 


HENDERSON, 


LANEEL ALLEN 


288 


81271 


HENDERSON, 


MARCUS GABRIEL 


288 


81214 


HENDERSON, 


MARY ELIZABETH 


288 


81 272 


HENDERSON, 


MIRIAM EVA 


288 


81 29 


HENDERSON, 


NANCY MAE 


288 


01 2 


HENDERSON, 


NELLIE JANE TAYLOR 


288 


O 1 


HENDERSON, 


NORMA JANE 


288 


O 1 ^£.0 


HENDERSON, 


RANDALL DALE 


288 


1 c.c.*^ 


HENDERSON, 


RAYMOND LEON 


288 


81223 


HENDERSON, 


RICHARD WAYNE 


288 


81222 


HENDERSON, 


ROBERT GDIS 


288 


81225 


HENDERSON, 


RONALD ALLEN 


288 


81227 


HENDERSON, 


RYAN KING 


288 


81 221 


HENDERSON, 


SHELIA MARIE 


288 


81 27 


HENDERSON, 


THOMAS HILDRETH 


288 


8128 


HENDERSON, 


WILLIAM STERLING 


288 


422231 


HESLINGTON, AMBER LYN 


275 


422232 


HESLINGTON, ASHLEE 


275 


42223 


HESLINGTON, GWEN WALKER 


275 


422233 


HESLINGTON, JODI 


275 


86245 


HINI2E, AMANDA MARIE 


292 


86241 


HINTZE, AMY ELIZABETH 


292 


86244 


HINTZE, EMILY JANE 


292 


86242 


HINEE, HEATHER ANNE 


292 


86243 


HINTZE, KARIE LYN 


292 


8624 


HINTZE, PATRICIA ANN PORTER 


292 


10.331 


HODSON, DIANE TAYLOR 


300 


10.331 1 


HODSON, LANE TAYLOR 


300 


10.3312 


HODSON, MEL AN IE 


300 


7351 


HOLE, SUSAN DIAN KERR 


286 


722 


HOLT, DAVID EARL 


285 


7221 


HOLT, HELEN LORRAINE 


285 


72 


HOLT, JANE (JENNIE) KERR 


285 


7222 


HOLT, JANE ELIZABETH 


285 


45511 


HOLT, JASON BIRCH 





329 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I.D. No. Page 

45513 HOLT, JEFFREY HARDEN 284 

7213 HOLT, JENNY LEE 285 

45514 HOLT, JOLYN JANEL 284 

4551 HOLT, JOSEPH BIRCH II 284 
45512 HOLT, JULIE KAY 284 

4553 HOLT, KEVDJ MC RAY 284 

4552 HOLT, MARY RUTH 284 

4554 HOLT, MICHELLE 284 

7211 HOLT, PATRICIA VENICE 285 

7212 HOLT, ROSE MARIE 285 
455 HOLT, RUTH TAYLOR 284 

4555 HOLT, SUSAN 284 
721 HOLT, WILLIAM RALPH 285 

7214 HOLT, WILLIAM RICHARD 285 

422411 HORTON, AMY JILL 276 
422 HORTON, DOROTHY TAYLOR 275 
4224 HORTON, FRANK ARNOLD 275 

4222 HORTON, JOANN 275 
4221 HORTON, LOIS JEAN 275 

42241 HORTON, LOUIS ARNOLD 276 

422412 HORTON, LOUIS WAYNE 276 

422413 HORTON, MATTHEW ANTHONY 276 
42245 HORTON, MICHAEL PAUL 276 
42244 HORTON, STEPHEN GLEN 276 
42243 HORTON, SUZANNE 276 

4223 HORTON, VIRGINIA 275 

42242 HORTON, WILLIAM TODD 276 
42123 h Hanks, Ronald Scott 274 
8825 h Hansen, Lynn Christian 293 
8612 h Hansen, Robert Blain II 291 
834 h Harrison, Curtis Vernell 290 
8344 w Harrison, Deborah Marriott 290 
8342 w Harrison, Denece McKinnon 290 
12.243 h Hathaway, Bruce Neerings 307 
12.74 h Hattaway, Jack Carl 311 

7365 h Hatton, Lindle Gayle 287 

10 87 h Heal, Alan Perry 303 

8121 w Henderson, Barbara Lynn 288 

8122 w Henderson, Carolyn Marie Bowes 288 
812 h Henderson, Francis Marion 288 
8127 w Henderson, Mary Frances Mclnti 288 
8124 w Henderson, Zeltha Janeel Ashme 288 
42223 h Heslington, Gary Lynn 275 

13.415 Hilton, David Niel 314 

13.417 Hilton, Gordon Richard 314 

13.416 Hilton, Ray Layne 314 
13.419 Hilton, Shirley Kay 314 

13.418 Hilton, Shryl Ann 314 
8624 h Hintze, Paul F 292 
10.331 h Hodson, Scott Linn 300 
7351 h Hole, John 286 

721 w Holt, Ethel Bronson 285 
455 h Holt, Joseph Birch 284 
4551 w Holt, Linda Kay Young 284 

722 w Holt, Mary Elizabeth Black 285 
721 w Holt, Venice C Lloyd 285 
72 h Holt, William Ronald 285 
422 h Horton, Glen Nelson 275 

4224 w Horton, Kathleen Ann Rasmussen 276 

42241 w Horton, Lisa Kirk 276 

42242 w Horton, Mardica Henderson 276 



J 

45312 JACKSON, BRANDON LEE 283 

45311 JACKSON, KIM TAYLOR 283 

4531 JACKSON, RUTH ELLEN TAYLOR 283 

4251 JACOB SEN, DOUGLAS VERNON 277 

42511 JACOBSEN, JODY DOUGLAS 277 

425 JACOBSEN, LEAH TAYLOR 277 



I.D. No. Page 

42512 JACOBSEN, MATHEW 277 

4253 JACOBSEN, SHAWNA 277 

4252 JACOBSEN, SHERRY 277 

10.1113 JENSEN, EMILY ANNE 298 

10.1111 JENSEN, JENNIFER MAURINE 298 

10.1112 JENSEN, SARAH ELIZABETH 298 
10.111 JENSEN, TERRI FISHER 298 
42.10.1 .1 JOHNSON, AMY 280 
7352 JOHNSON, DEBRA JEAN KERR 286 
42.10.1 JOHNSON, DIANA LYNN TAYLOR 280 
86511 JOHNSON, ELIZABETH ANGELA 293 
8651 JOHNSON, MARSHA MARIANNE MAIER 293 
4531 h Jackson, Kim Thomas 283 
4251 w Jacobsen, Diane Houston 277 
425 h Jacobsen, Vernon Thomas 277 
10.111 h Jensen, Lawrence Jeremy 298 
8651 h Johnson, Christopher Allen 293 
42.10.1h Johnson, Randal D 280 
7352 h Johnson, Robert 286 

K 

8132 KALLAS, ANNE CHRISTINE TAYLOR 289 

81322 KALLAS, HEATHER ANNE 289 

81321 KALLAS, TAYLOR JAMES 289 

10.862 KARTCHNER, BENJAMIN NELSON 303 

10.863 KARTCHNER, BRITTANY ANN 303 

10.86 KARTCHNER, DAVID TAYLOR 303 

10.821 KARTCHNER, DREW 303 

10.83 KARTCHNER, ELAINE 303 

10.84 KARTCHNER, ELLEN 303 

10.822 KARTCHNER, HEATHER 303 
10.861 KARTCHNER, JEFFREY NELSON 303 

10.854 KARTCHNER, KELLI 3-03 

10.855 KARTCHNER, KENNETH ANDERSEN 303 
10.82 KARTCHNER, KENNETH TAYLOR 303 

10.852 KARTCHNER, KERIANNE 303 
10.81 KARTCHNER, LINDA 303 
10.851 KARTCHNER, MARK ANDERSEN 303 
10.824 KARTCHNER, NATHAN 303 

10.856 KARTCHNER, PAUL ANDERSEN 303 

10.85 KARTCHNER, RICHARD TAYLOR 303 

10.823 KARTCHNER, ROBIN 303 

10.87 KARTCHNER, ROSENA LOUISE 303 
10.8 KARTCHNER, RUTH ELAINE TAYLOR 303 

10.853 KARTCHNER, TAYLOR ANDERSEN 303 
12.3133 KEMP, CASSEY LLOYD 308 
12.313 KEMP, GAYLE LESLIE TAYLOR 308 

73 KERR, BASIL TAYLOR 285 
7322 KERR, BONNIE DEE 286 

7352 KERR, DEBRA JEAN 286 

751 KERR, DOROTHY ESTHER 287 

752 KERR, EILEEK ANN 287 

74 KERR, GEORGE KENNETH 287 

732 KERR, GEORGE RUSSELL 285 

73211 KERR, GLENN RUSSELL Jr 285 
7321 KERR, GLENN RUSSELL 285 
73213 KERR, GRADY RICHARD 285 
7324 KERR, GREGG RICHARD 286 

733 KERR, HAROLD 286 

71 KERR, HENRIETTA RHEA 285 
7 KERR, HENRIETTA TAYLOR 285 

734 KERR, HOWARD 286 

72 KERR, JANE (JENNIE) 285 

73212 KERR, JEFFREY TAYLOR 285 

75 KERR, JOHN RALPH 287 
736 KERR, KATHRYN 287 
731 KERR, MAURINE 285 

7353 KERR, NANCY ANN 286 

7354 KERR, RAYMOND RICHARD 286 



330 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr.. FAMILY ROSTER 



I.D. No. 

735 
7323 
732111 
7351 
7321J1 
7355 
86151 
8615 
4277 
8132 h 
10.8 h 
10.86 w 
10.85 w 
10.82 w 



KERR, RICHARD LEROY 
KERR, SHERRY LYNNE 
KERR, SUMMER LEE 
KERR, SUSAN DIAN 
KERR, WENDY MARIE 
KERR, WILLIAM 
KIRK, ALEXANDER VERNON 
KIRK, MARTHA JO TAYLOR 
KOLLER, TERIE BONNETT 
Kallas, Terry Wayne 
Kartchner, Fred Dixon 
Kartchner, Karen Renee Nelson 
Kartchner, Kathryn Andersen 
Kartchner, MariAnne Allene Dav 



2.313 h#2Kemp, Grayden LI 

Kerr, Esther Selma Nielsen 
Kerr, George Affleck 
Kerr, Glenda McConnell 
Kerr, Julia Alice Teams 
Kerr, Marjorie M Summerville 
Kerr, Mary M Hayes (Marjorie 
Kerr, Shauna Stephan 
Kerr, Terry Lee Cleveland 
Kerr, Vivian Hastings 
Kirk, Vernon 
Koller, Kenneth 



75 w 
7 h 

7321 w 
7^ w 
735 w 
732 w 
7324 w 
73212 w 
73- w 
8615 h 
4277 h 



Page 

286 
286 
285 
286 
286 
286 
291 
291 
278 
289 
303 
303 
303 
303 
308 

287 
285 
285 
287 
286 
285 
286 
285 
285 
291 
278 



88241 


LARSEN, 


ANDREA 


293 


42143 


LARSEN, 


CHRISTINA 


275 


42142 


LARSEN, 


DUSTIN PAUL 


275 


88221 


LARSEN, 


GREGORY KIM II 


293 


8822 


LARSEN, 


GREGORY KIM 


293 


88242 


LARSEN, 


JACOB 


293 


42145 


LARSEN, 


JAMIE HANS 


275 


882 


LARSEN, 


JANICE MARILYN aAYSON 


293 


88231 


LARSEN, 


JUSTIN BERKLEY 


293 


42146 


LARSEN, 


KELLY TAYLOR 


275 


8823 


LARSEN, 


KEVIN LON 


293 


8825 


LARSEN, 


KRISTINE 


293 


8826 


LARSEN, 


MEL AN IE TERESSA 


293 


42144 


LARSEN, 


MISTY DAWN 


275 


4214 


LARSEN, 


PEGGY ANN TAYLOR 


275 


8821 


LARSEN, 


REID KAY JR 


293 


42147 


LARSEN, 


SHAWN DAVID 


275 


8824 


LARSEN, 


THOMAS ANDREW 


293 


88222 


LARSEN, 


TRESSA DENISE 


293 


42141 


LARSEN, 


WENDI LEE 


275 


472 


LAWLESS, 


JOAN ELIZABETH TAYLOR 


284 


8952 


LAWRENCE, DANA LYNN 


294 


895 


LAWRENCE, KRISTI TAYLOR 


294 


8951 


LAWRENCE, TIMOTHY WAYNE 


294 


4122 


LEEDS, MARGARET THERASE O'CON 


273 


13.55 


LEVINGSTON, JACKIE LYNNE TAYLO 


315 


13.551 


LEVINGSTON, JAMIE LYNNE 


315 


8822 w 


Larsen, 


Denise 


293 


4214 h 


Larsen, 


Ernest Paul 


275 


8821 w 


Larsen, 


Linda 


293 


8824 w 


Larsen, 


Michelle 


293 


882 h 


Larsen, 


Reid Kay 


293 


8823 w 


Larsen, 


Susan Neff 


293 


895 h 


Lawrence, Stephen Wayne 


294 


4122 h 


Leeds, Jim 


273 


13.55 h 


Levingston, Randy Paul 


315 



I.D. No. 



4114 

4112 

41 

412 

4111 

411 

41 13 

8653 

865 

8652 

8651 

13.232 

13.23 

13.231 

1 

12.623 

12.6222 

12.62 

12.622 

12.621 

12.6221 

91232 

91231 

9123 

42922 

42923 

42921 

12.751 

12.752 

12.75 

11 .3.1 .2 

11 .3.1 .4 

11 .3.1 .3 

11.3.1.1 

11.3.1 

42133 

42136 

42137 

42131. 

4213... 

42134 

42135 

42132 

9313 

9314 

9312 

931 

9315 

13.4212 

13.421 

13.4211 

73222 

7322 

13.221 

13.2212 

73223 

73221 

73224 

73226 

13.221 1 

73225 

4324 

4311 

4321 

433 

436 

432 



age 



M 



MC DONALD, 
MC DONALD, 
MC DONALD, 
MC DONALD, 
MC DONALD, 
MC INTOSH, 
MC INTOSH, 
MC INTOSH, 
MC MASTER, 
MC MASTER, 
MC MASTER, 
MILLER, JASON CRAIG 
MILLER, MELISA ANN 
MILLER, TERESA TAYLOR 



273 

273 

273 
273 
273 
273 
293 
293 
293 
293 
313 
313 
313 
273 
309 
309 
309 
309 
309 
309 
295 
295 

KELLIE COLLEEN DUNN 295 
BRYAN M. STEINER 279 
KELLY 279 
SHANE THOMAS STEINE 279 
311 
311 
311 



MAIBEN, ANN 
MAIBEN, CARCL 

MAIBEN, EDITH APALINE TAYLOR 
MAIBEN, FAY 
MAIBEN, GARY HENRY 
MAIBEN, GEORGE HENRY 
MAIBEN, MARGARET 
MAIER, ERIC 

MAIER, FLORENCE MERLE TAYLOR 
MAIER, MARIDIN 
MAIER, MARSHA MARIANNE 
MATSON, ALAN LEE 
MATSON, KATHRYN ANN TAYLOR 
MATSON, STEVEN LA MAUN 
MC CLELLAN, HARRIETT C TAYLOR 
MC DONALD, DOUGLAS KEITH 

KRISTOPHER MARK 
MARIAN SUTTON 
MARK SUTTON 
TAFFEE LYN 
TIFFANI JANE 
ADAM CHRISTOPHER 
BRANDON MICHAEL 



MADELEINE ALICE 304 

MAUREEN PATRICIA 304 

MELODY MARGUERITE 304 

RICHARD TAYLOR 304 
WENDELLYN JANE TAYLOR 3 04 

, DENA MARIE... 274 

, JADE TAYLOR 274 

, KAMERA DEE. 274 

, KINDRA LYNN 274 



LAELONNIE EDITH TAYLO 274 



SHALE WILSON 

SOY ALEN 

TALON ARNOLD 
BILLY 
JOHNNY 
LINDA 

MARILYN WARNOCK 



MILLS, 
MILLS, 
MILLS, 
MILLS, 
MILLS, 
MING. . 
MING. . 
MING.. 
MING.. 
MING.. 
MING. . 
MING.. 
MING.. 
MONTOYA, 
MONTOYA, 
MONTOYA, 
MONTOYA, 
MONTOYA, VELITA 
MOODY, ERIC 

MOODY, LESLIE ANN TRENT 
MOODY, TRENT 
MORRIS, AMY MARA 
MORRIS, BONNIE DEE KERR 
MORRIS, ELIZABETH ANN TAYLOR 
MORRIS, ERIN 
MORRIS, JOHN DANIEL 
MORRIS, JULIANA 
MORRIS, LISA PEARL 
MORRIS, MICHAEL 
MORRIS, ROBERT EUGENE 
MORRIS, STEFAN IE 
MORRISON, BARBARA JANE 
MORRISON, BILLY LEE 
MORRISON, CHARLES TAYLOR 
MORRISON, GEORGE LYNN 
MORRISON, IRMA VIRGINIA 
MORRISON, MAX TAYLOR 



274 

274 
297 
297 
297 
297 
297 
314 
314 
314 
286 
286 
313 
313 
286 
286 
286 
286 
313 
286 
281 
281 
281 
281 
281 
281 



331 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I. D. No. Page 

1»322 MORRISON, MICHAEL MC LEAN 28l 

43 MORRISON, NELLIE ELIZA TAYLOR 28l 

437 MORRISON, NELLIE MAY 28l 

4323 MORRISON, ROBERT STUART 281 

435 MORRISON, RUTH MELBA 281 

431 MORRISON, STUART TAYLOR 28l 

434 MORRISON, THELMA 281 

41 1 w Maiben, Beth Dixon 273 

4111 w Maiben, Marty 273 

41 h Maiben, Warren Henry 273 

865 h Maier, Eugene S 293 

13.23 h Matson, La Maun 313 

1 h Mc Clellan, James F 273 

12.622 w McDonald, Pama LaRay Linschote 309 

12.62 h McDonald, Richard Keith 309 

9123 h Mcintosh, Mike 295 
4292 h#2 McMaster, Alexander Clawson Jr 279 

12.75 h Miller, Jason Craig 311 

II. 3.1 h Mills, Richard Gordon 304 
4213 h Ming..., Ronald Terry.... 274 
931 h#2 Montoya, Phil 297 
13.421 h Moody, Gary 31^ 
7322 h Morris, John Albert 286 
13.221 h Morris, Randol Eugene 313 

431 w Morrison, Juanita Ann Mason 281 

432 w Morrison, June McLean 281 

433 w Morrison, Margarette Berkon 281 
43 h Morrison, Stuart 281 

N 

10.5 NELSON, ALICE LOUISE TAYLOR 302 

10.545 NELSON, ALLISON 302 
10.552 NELSON, ANDREW LUIS 302 

10.542 NELSON, ANNIE 302 

10.546 NELSON, ANTHONY STEWART 302 

10.51 NELSON, ARTHUR TAYLOR 302 
10.526 NELSON, CAMILLE 302 

10.523 NELSON, CATHERINE LOUISE 302 

10.53 NELSON, CHRISTINA LOUISE 302 

10.521 NELSON, CHRISTINE 302 

10.522 NELSON, DAVID CHRISTIAN 302 

10.54 NELSON, HENRY ALDOUS 302 

10.55 NELSON, JAMES NICHOLLS 302 

10.512 NELSON, JEANNE LOUISE 302 

10.52 NELSON, JOHN CHRISTIAN 302 

42811 NELSON, KERRY EDWARD 279 

42812 NELSON, KRISTINA LOUISE 279 

10.524 NELSON, MATTHEW JOHN 302 
10.544 NELSON, MELISSA 302 
10.511 NELSON, MICHAEL MC KAY 302 
4281 NELSON, PATRICIA ANN CHEEVER 279 
10.541 NELSON, REBECCA 302 
10.551 NELSON, SARAH JANE 302 

10.543 NELSON, SCOTT ALDOUS 302 

10.525 NELSON, STEVEN SHARP 302 

10.513 NELSON, THOMAS TAYLOR 302 

11.3.2.4 NICKERSON, ANDREW aiFFORD 304 

11.3.2.5 NICKERSON, CYNTHIA JEAN 304 
11.3.2.3 NICKERSON, JENNIFER CECILIA 304 

11.3.2.1 NICKERSON, KAREN ELIZABETH 304 
11.3.2 NICKERSON, MARY ELIZABETH TAYL 304 

11.3.2.2 NICKERSON, SUSAN DOROTHY 304 

11.3.2.6 NICKERSON, TIFFANY JOY 304 
12.2511 NIELSON, CORI MICHELLE 308 
12.251 NIELSON, SHANNON EASTMOND 308 
46 NOLAN, LEONA LOUIE TAYLOR 284 

461 NOLAN, MICHAEL 284 

462 NOLAN, PATSY 284 



I.D. No. Page 

73612 NUTTALL, KATHRYN 287 
7361 NUTTALL, MAURINE CLIFT 287 
73614 NUTTALL, REBECCA 287 

73613 NUTTALL, SARAH 287 
73611 NUTTALL, TRAVIS JAMES 287 
4281 h Nelson, Alva Edward 279 

10.51 w Nelson, Bonnie McKay 302 
10.55 w Nelson, Consuelo Marquez 302 
10.5 h Nelson, G. El Roy 302 
10.54 w Nelson, Kristy Stewart 302 

10.52 w Nelson, Mary Lynne Sanders 302 

42213 h Nelson , Mathew 275 

11.3.2 hNickerson, Everett Clifford 304 

12.251 h Nielson, 308 

46 h Nolan, Ed 284 

7361 h Nut tall, Steven Brent 287 



412 0' CONNER, FAY MAIBEN 273 

4122 0' CONNER, MARGARET THERASE 273 

4121 0' CONNER, MICHAEL WABREN 273 

412 h 0' Conner, Thomas Patrick 273 

9311 OKELBERRY, SUSIE CALDER 297 

91362 OSTLER, DON M 296 

91363 OSTLER, KEVIN MICHAEL 296 
9136 OSTLER, NANCY DUNN 296 
91361 OSTLER, SARAH ANN 296 
9311 h Okel berry, Kent 297 
9136 h Ostler, Mark 296 

P 

42723 PEARSCW, DAVID CURTIS 278 
42722 PEARSON, JANEN 278 
4272 PEARSON, JANICE BONNETT 278 
42726 PEARSON, JARED BONNETT 278 
42725 PEARSON, JOANNA 278 
42721 PEARSON, LAURI 278 

42724 PEARSON, RACHELLE 278 

83113 PEDERSEN, CAMEROJ SCOTT 289 
8311 PEDERSEN, CHERYL LYNN TAYLOR 289 
83112 PEDERSEN, KRISTIN NICOLE 289 

83114 PEDERSEN, MICHAEL SANFORD 289 
83111 PEDERSEN, SHARI MARIE 289 
13.222 PETERSON, JENNIFER LYN TAYLOR 313 

4362 PHILIPPET, CHEREME VIRGINIA 281 
436 PHILIPPET, IRMA VIRGINIA MORRI 28l 
4361 PHILIPPET, LINDA LYNNE 281 

4363 PHILIPPET, TAYLOR OCTAVE 281 
421241 PHILLIPS, ADAM KELLY 274 
42124 PHILLIPS, JULIE ANN DOEZIE 274 

8621 PORTER, CLAUDIA 292 

8623 PORTER, DAVID TAYLOR 292 
862 PORTER, ELIZABETH MAUD TAYLOR 292 

8624 PORTER, PATRICIA ANN 292 

86221 PORTER, ROBERT ROGER 292 

8622 PORTER, ROGER BLAINE 292 

86222 PORTER, STACY ANN 292 

10.53 PRESTON, CHRISTINA LOUISE NELS 302 
10.533 PRESTON, ELIZABETH 302 

10.531 PRESTON, SUZANNA 302 

10.532 PRESTON, TREVOR JORGE 302 

91352 PULVER, ADAM DAVID 296 
9135 PULVER, BEVERLY DUNN 296 
91351 PULVER, JULIE ANN 296 

91353 PULVER, SCOTT MICHAEL 296 
4272 h Pearson, Richard Curtis 278 
8311 h Pedersen, Carl Dean 289 



332 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I.D. No. Page 

13.222 h Peterson, Val Wendell 313 

436 h Philippet, Edmund Relix 281 

42124 h Phillips, Kelly Duane 274 

8622 w Porter, Ann Robinson 292 
862 h Porter, Blaine Milton 292 

8623 w Porter, Lorrie Parker 292 
10.53 h Preston, Ronald W 302 
9135 h Pulver, David 296 

R 

8962 RALPH, ADRIANNE KRISTI 294 
8965 RALPH, JILL HELEN 294 
8964 RALPH, MARJORIE JO 294 

8963 RALPH, MURRIE LYN 294 
896 RALPH, NATALIE MAUD TAYLOR 294 
8961 RALPH, REBEKA MAUD 294 
422121 REID , TYLER 275 
422432 RENGER, CHASE TYLER 276 
422431 RENGER, SHANE PAUL 276 
42243 RENGER, SUZANNE HORTON 276 

10.233 RICHARDS, BRYAN TAYLOR 299 

10.231 RICHARDS, CARCL LYN 299 

10.235 RICHARDS, HEIDI 299 

10.237 RICHARDS, JENNY LYN 299 

10.238 RICHARDS, JOHN TAYLOR 299 
10.23 RICHARDS, LYNN ANNE TAYLOR 299 

10.236 RICHARDS, REBECCA 299 

10.234 RICHARDS, RCBYN 299 

10.232 RICHARDS, SHARI 299 
752 RICHARDSON, EILEEN ANN KERR 287 
42752 RISSER, ERIC STANFORD 278 
42751 RISSER, NICHOLAS JOHN 278 
4275 RISSER, PAMELA BONNETT 278 

91 ROBERTS, GENEVE 295 

421311 ROBERTS, KANDI KAY 274 
42131 ROBERTS, KINDRA LYNN MING 274 

421312 ROBERTS, KORY RAY 274 

92 ROBERTS, LAWRENCE PAUL 297 
9 ROBERTS, MARY ANN( POLLY) TAYLO 295 
13.1.3.1 ROBINSON, LA RAE EATOUGH 312 

422212 RCBISON, COY 275 
42221 ROBISON, DEANNE WALKER 275 

422213 ROBISON, KELLI DEE 275 
422211 RCBISON, STACI JO 275 
13.213 ROUNDY, DIANE KAYE TAYLOR 313 
13.2132 ROUNDY, KASEY ANN 313 
13.2131 ROUNDY, TARA LYNNE 313 
896 h Ralph, Murlin Ronald 294 
42212 h Reid , Albert 275 
42243 h Renger, Paul Renger 276 
10.23 h Richards, H Bryan 299 
752 h Richardson, Waldo Romney 287 
4275 h Risser, John Douglas 278 
92 w Roberts, Dot Anay Jensen 297 
42131 h Roberts, Kenneth Roy 274 
9 h Roberts, William Daniel 295 
3.1.3.1 hRobinson, Tracy 1 312 
42221 h Robison, Roland Duane 275 
13.213 h Roundy , Garth Lynn 313 

^ S 

42324 SCHONLEBER, ANCHOR 276 

42323 SCHONLEBER, LINDA 276 

13.1.1.1 SELIM, DORIS LYNNE BUCKNER 312 

82 SESSIONS, ETHEL TAYLOR 289 

83311 SHARP, ANTHONY TAYLOR 289 



I. D. No. Page 
8336 SHARP, BARRY TAYLOR 289 

8332 SHARP, CARXYN TAYLOR 289 

8334 SHARP, EDWARD TAYLOR 289 

8333 SHARP, GREGORY TAYLOR 289 
83312 SHARP, NICHOLS TAYLOR 289 
8331 SHARP, ROGER TAYLOR 289 
833 SHARP, ROSE PARKINSON TAYLOR 289 

8335 SHARP, ROSILYNN TAYLOR 289 
12.242 SHEPHERD, ANNA CLARE EASTMOND 307 

12.2421 SHEPHERD, BRYAN EABL 307 

12.2423 SHEPHERD, CRAIG ERSCHEL 307 
12.2425 SHEPHERD, DEBORAH LYNN 307 

12.2422 SHEPHERD, JESSICA ANN 307 

12.2424 SHEPHERD, NATHAN JEFFERSON 307 
42211 SHURTLEFF, BRADLEY PAUL 275 

422111 SHURTLEFF, CARLY SUNSHINE 275 
42214 SHURTLEFF, GLEN COREY 275 

422112 SHURTLEFF, MANDI PATRICIA 275 

42213 SHURTLEFF, SHANA 275 
4114 SIFTON, ANN MAIBEN 273 

II. 3.3.2 SIMPSON, GLEN DAVIS 304 

11.3.3.1 SIMPSON, JEFFREY SCOTT 304 
7353 SMITH, NANCY ANN KERR 286 

11.5.2.2 SOFFE, ALEX TAYLOR 305 
11.5.2.1 SOFFE, HADLEY GARDNER 305 

11.5.2 SOFFE, JANICE JEAN GARDNER 305 

42532 SPAFFORD, ANGELA 277 
42531 SPAFFORD, JASON STANLEY 277 
42534 SPAFFORD, MEGAN 277 

42533 SPAFFORD, SCOTT THOMAS 277 
4253 SPAFFORD, SHAWNA JACOBSEN 277 

4353 SPENCER, KATHLEEN 281 

4351 SPENCER, KENNEIH LEE 281 

4354 SPENCER, ROBERT STUART 281 
435 SPENCER, RUTH MELBA MORRISON 281 

4352 SPENCER, TERRY RAY 281 
8921 STAUFFENBERG, MICHELE TAYLOR 294 
89211 STAUFFENBERG, VICTOR LEE 294 
4292 STEINER, REBECCA TAYLOR 279 

10.131 STEWART, BRENT TAYLOR 298 

10.133 STEWART, JAN 298 

10.134 STEWART, JON TAYLOR 298 

10.132 STEWART, KIM TAYLOR 298 
10.13 STEWART, NANCY TAYLOR 298 
10.1311 STEWART, VHARI 298 
10.221 STRIBLING, MICHELE DE GRAW 299 
8911 SULLINS, ANNA CHRISTINE TAYLOR 294 
12.63 SUTTON, ANN ADELE 310 
12.6 SUTTON, INEZ AGNES TAYLOR 309 
12.62 SUTTON, MARIAN 309 
12.61 SUTTON, ZOLA ALCEA 309 
4232 h #2Schonleber, David Allen 276 
3.1.1.1 hSelim, Roni 312 
82 h Sessions, Harvey Homer 289 
8333 w Sharp, Kathy Lynn Tolistrup 289 
833 h Sharp, Max William 289 
8331 w Sharp, Terrie Lee Hansen 289 
12.242 h Shepherd, Earl Pack 307 

42214 w Shurtleff, Elizabeth Dixon 275 
42211 w Shurtleff, Patricia Ann Smith 275 
4221 h Shurtleff, Paul Homer 275 
4114 h Sifton, Steven 273 

11.3.3 h Simpson, Preston Lee 304 
7353 h Smith, Stan 286 
11.5.2 h Soffe, Craig Ash 305 
4253 h Spafford, Stanley Rees 277 

4351 w Spencer, Helen Dale Sanders 281 
435 h Spencer, Kenneth E 281 

4352 w Spencer, Margaret Hill 281 

4353 h Spencer, Verlund K 281 



333 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I.D. No. Page 



8921 h 


Stauf fenberg, Rick 


294 


^292 h 


Steineri 


. Max Jr 


279 


10.13 h 


Stewart, 


. George Keith 


298 


10.131 w 


Stewarti 


1 Karen Gardner 


298 


10.132 w 


Stewart, 


1 Lauri Ann Balser 


298 


10.221 h 


Stribling, Frank 


299 


8911 h 


Sullins, 


Jim 


294 


12.6 h 


Sutton* 


Harold Theron 


309 


Jl O O 1 Q 


TAYLORt 


ADAM GREE3JFIELD 


279 


O'jd 


TflYT DB 


flDRTiMMP T4VT OT) 


294 


Poo 


TAYLOR, 


ADRIANNE 


294 


12.7m 


TAYLOR, 


ALAINE 


311 


Be 
00 


TAYLOR, 


ALDEN ROGERS 


291 


10.5 


TAYLOR, 


ALICE LOUISE 


302 


1 .254 


TAYLOR, 


ALLEN CRAIG 


299 


1 U . H J J 


TAYLOR, 


AMELIA KATHARINE 


o n 1 


421 12 


TAYLOR. 


AMY ANN 




10.414 


TAYLOR, 


AMY 


J W 1 


15. 


TAYLOR, 


AMY 


316 


8943 


TAYLOR, 


ANDREA 


294 


8645 


TAYLOR, 


ANDREW DAVID 


292 


451 24 


m Jl ITT A TN 

TAYLOR, 


ANDREW MICHAEL 


282 


891 1 


TAYLOR, 


M IT IT it OTT T^ T f ^ T%T ^ 

ANNA CHRISTINE 


294 


10.253 


TAYLOR, 


ANNA LISA 


299 


1 .442 


TAYLOR, 


ANNA 


301 


4526 1 


TAYLOR, 


A \T KT A r n T O 

ANNALEISE 


283 


8l 32 


TAYLOR, 


ANNE CHRISTINE 


289 


1 .32 . 1 1 




A IT ITT? 

ANNL 


300 


1 .42 


T A VT no 
1 AlLUnt 


AMTUAMV UAMCPM 


301 


13 .43 1 


T A VT AD 


A D TM r*U D T O T TKT L* 


314 


10.1 


TAYLOR, 


ARTHUR DIXON 


29o 


10. 


TAYLOR, 


A n TTTTT T\ \T T ^TI rtT T O 

ARTHUR NICHOLLS 


29 


451 31 


m A r\ T^ 

TAYLOR, 


AOTTT ^V A IT 

ASHLEY ANE 


282 


13 . 


TAYLOR, 


A n TT rn o T\ 

ASH TED 


312 


lie 


TAYLOR, 


BACLE DAVID 


ofto 


)l CI 1 


TAYLOR, 


BACLE DON II 


ofio 


\ 1 1 


TAYLOR, 


BACLE DON III 


oil 'a 


451 


TAYLOR, 


BACLE DON 


282 


4545 


TAYLOR, 


BACLE GORDON 


It 

264 


13 .41 


TAYLOR, 


BERT LE ROY 


313 


42331 


TAYLOR, 


BETH ALEENE 


276 


8354 


TAYLOR, 


BONNIE 


290 


8941 


TAYLOR, 


BRAD DOUGHTY 


294 


10.413 


TAYLOR, 


BRADFORD GREEN 


301 


42421 


TAYLOR, 


BRANDIE LYNN 


277 


13.542 


TAYLOR, 


BRENDEN 


315 


13 .522 


TAYLOR, 


BRENT 


315 


10.417 


TAYLOR, 


BRIGHAM GREEN 


301 


4241 2 


TAYLOR, 


BRYAN DEAN 


277 


13.414 


TAYLOR, 


BRYAN 


313 


4234 


TAYLOR, 


CARL DAVID 


275 


12.71 


TT> A WT 

TAYLOR, 


CARCL LIND 


310 


1 3.21 1 


TAYLOR, 


CATHY 


313 


83 1 1 


TAYLOR, 


CHERYL LYNN 


A 

2o9 


1 2.3 141 


TAYLOR, 


CHRISTIE BERNICE 


9 AO 

3O0 


86 1 1 1 


TAYLOR, 


CHRISTINA BETH 


291 


10.6 


TAYLOR, 


CLARENCE DIXON 


302 


13.534 


TAYLOR, 


aARISSA 


315 


12.2 


TAYLOR, 


aARRISA JANNETT 


a£ 

300 


13 .543 


TAYLOR, 


aiNTON 


315 


13 .541 


TAYLOR, 


CODY TIM 


315 


8923 


TAYLOR, 


COLETTE 


294 


12.3121 


TAYLOR, 


COLLEEN ANN 


308 


4533 


TAYLOR, 


DALE 'M' 


283 


453 


TAYLOR, 


DALE H 


283 


12.4313 


TAYLOR, 


DANA LEANN 


309 



I.D. No, 






Page 


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864 


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10.325 


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10.252 


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290 


13.535 


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315 


13.52 


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315 


89 


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DELENNA ROGERS TAYLOR 


294 


89 


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284 


832 


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EDWARD PARKIN SCSI 


289 


10.11 


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298 


1^ 221 


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313 


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28^ 




TflYT nn 

1 AXLiUAy 


OORHOM T FON 
uVJAL^Uli L*C« VJliI 


284 


IIRI 
*t3 1 J 


TAYT OR. 

1 AXLi VJ Ay 


ORT^ORY OWI^ 

VJ A LAJ W 11 X VJ n 1-ui 


282 


1 
1 


TAYT OR 
1 AXLi VJ Ay 


HARRTFTT CI ARRT*sA 

HaAAXD 1 1 V^IjaAAXOa 


27 3 


119 1 1 


TflYT OR. 
1 AxLi Lf Ay 


HA7 ]^ POT T FFN 

llAXi lIiLi V-^L/IjljuCjli 


280 




TflYT OR. 
1 AxLi VJ Ay 


nuxx/x 


294 


RR 1 


TAYT OR. 

X A XIj w Ay 


ur\ pM EI 17 A 
n r*' f i-ui i^iLi XX4 A 


291 


11 1 


TAYT OR. 

1 rixij VJ Ay 


HPNRTFTTA I ORTNE 

n£(il AXu X XA Xj\./i\XllXJ 


304 


7 


TAYLOR, 




285 


10.41 


TAYLOR, 


HENRY DIXON JR 


301 


10.411 


TAYLOR, 


HENRY DIXON III 


301 



334 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I.D. No 






Page 


10.4 


TAYLORt 


HENRY DIXON 


301 


8931 


TAYLOR, 


HYRUM SANDERS 


294 


12.6 


TAYLOR, 


INEZ AGNES 


309 


42914 


TAYLOR, 


ISAAC JONATHAN 


279 


4526 


TAYLOR, 


J DAN 


283 


13.55 


TAYLOR, 


JACKIE LYNNE 


315 


13.411 


TAYLOR, 


JALAINE 


313 


10.321 


TAYLOR, 


JAMES HOEN 


300 


86 13 


TAYLOR, 


JAMES RICHARD 


291 


10.32 


TAYLOR, 


JAMES SCOTT 


300 


4293 


TAYLOR, 


T h\7 AT VIT 

J ANALYN 


279 


1 .22 


TAYLOR, 


JANICE 


Oft ft 

299 


13.214 


TAYLOR, 


T A V T\T^ 

J AY DEE 


O -1 o 

313 


13.44 


TAYLOR, 


T AH A «T \T 

JEAN ANN 


314 


13 .521 


TAYLOR, 


T A \T IT TXJ T^ T TT ITT^ 

JEANNINE JUNE 


315 


13 .212 


TAYLOR, 


TnT^TnT^T^V o 

JEFFERY C 


313 


86 133 


TAYLOR, 


TT^T^T^TIT^V TiT/^TTAT^T^ 

JEFFREY RICHARD 


Oft 4 

291 


8131 1 


TAYLOR, 


JENNIFER ANN 


o O ft 

2o9 


13 .222 


TAYLOR, 


T TT»T liT T" T^ T* T V^T 

JENNIFER LYN 


313 


h li 

8644 


TAYLOR, 


T T^T lTTTr»T^Tl ki A TI V 

JENNIFER MARY 


OftO 

292 


13.412 


»P A VT /^Ti 

TAYLOR, 


JENNIFER 


313 


472 


TAYLOR, 


JOAN ELIZABETH 






1 AlLUn, 


T nnPOT T T*7 tJ C*TU 


VTh 
£1 


in o 1 1 


J. AILUn, 


TnUM ADTUTTD TD 

UnN iiitinUn J n 




in o 1 
1 U .ill 


T A VT ni> 


T r^UM A DTUTTU 

J UnlM iinlnUn 


cyy 


47 


fp it VT 

TAYLOR, 


T r\tl \1 T\r\\'X A T T\ / T A ^ V \ 

JOHN DONALD (JACK} 


284 


1 1 .2 


TAYLOR, 


JOHN MAX 


304 


13.43 


TAYLOR, 


JOHN RCBIN 


314 


8616 


TAYLOR, 


JOHN STEWART 


291 


10.333 


TAYLOR, 


T OTT IT A \T MC* D 

JOHN TANNER 


9 ftft 


1 1 . 


rn A VT T> 

TAYLOR, 


T ^TT \1 flTO A «T TT A \M 

JOHN TRANHAM 


O ft II 

30*4 


12.7 


rrt A VT B 

TAYLOR, 


TrtTT\T tTTTiOT T7V U/TTTTlLTT AV 

JOHN WESLEY MCKINLAY 


O 1 ft 

310 


12.72 


rri A VT B 

TAYLOR, 


JON MC EWAN 


O 4 ft 

310 


12.722 


TAYLOR, 


JON SCOTT 


O 4 ft 

310 


5 


m a VT /\ n 

TAYLOR, 


T /\0 W TITT 

JOSEPH 


o Qc 


8643 


m a VT ^ T> 

TAYLOR, 


T rtOT^^TT TITP T ^rtTM 

JOSEPHINE LYNN 


OftO 

292 


00 3 


TAYLOR, 


JOSEPHINE PATRICIA 


OftO 

292 


13 .42 


m a VT 

TAYLOR, 


JOYCE 


O 4 It 

314 


427 


fn A VT r\ Ti 

TAYLOR, 


JOYCE 


ov O 

27 o 


4525 


rn a VT B 

TAYLOR, 


TTT AlTTTi A 

JUANITA 


o Oo 

2o3 


10.31 


fYl a VT n 

TAYLOR, 


JULIA 


o nft 

300 


86 1 12 


fn a VT T> 

TAYLOR, 


TTtT T A A Ttl T'B T*T t» 

JULIA KATHERINE 


Oft 4 

291 


12.723 


rri a vT n 

TAYLOR, 


TTTT TT? A\T\T 

JULIE ANN 


O 4 ft 

310 


12.4312 


rp A VT 15 

TAYLOR, 


TTTT XTT» 14 A V 

JULIE MAY 


O ftft 

309 


10.326 


fn a VT 

TAYLOR, 


JULIE 


O ftft 

300 


42423 


rn A VT T3 

TAYLOR, 


A T5 A T VllT 

KARA LYN 


OT T 

277 


i o CIO 

13.512 


TAlLORf 


KARI 


315 


13.518 


fn A VT r\ Ti 

TAYLOR, 


KASEY 


315 


13.3 


rn A VT r> 

TAYLOR, 


V A TT 1 T? O X IT C* 

KATHERINE 


313 


13 .523 


rp a VT T5 

TAYLOR, 


KATHLEENE 


315 


13.23 


rn a VT f\ 1~> 

TAYLOR, 


V A T TI VIT A IT IT 

KATHRYN ANN 


313 


1 0.24 


pp a VT /~\ F> 

TAYLOR, 


TT A T T5 VIT TM? C 

KATHRYN DEE 


Oft ft 

299 


10.324 


fn a VT /\ 

TAYLOR, 


V A n^T V 

KATHY 


300 


13.513 


rn A VT T^ 

TAYLOR, 


KELI 


315 


12.731 


rn A VT /\ T% 

TAYLOR, 


KELLY CASPER 


310 


13 .21 21 


rn a VT r\ Ti 

TAYLOR, 


VT^lT TM^ A \t A Ti TT* 

KENDRA MARIE 


313 


13.0 1 


rp A VT T5 

TAYLOR, 


VTm iTC nti 

KENNETH 


3io 


13.514 


rn A VT r\ Ti 

TAYLOR, 


trC»*T ITV 

KENNY 


O 4 C 

315 


10.12 


fTi A VT r\ D 

TAXLORf 


KENT GOODRIDGE 


29o 


12.431 


rn A VT /\ r» 

TAYLOR, 


T^T^»T fn TT A **TT fnrt»T T T^ 

KENT HAMILTON JR 


309 


12.43 


TAYLOR, 


r^T^\T m TT A \M^^ fn^lT 

KENT HAMILTON 


309 


10.329 


fn A VT T5 

TAYLOR, 


KENT HOEN 


300 


1 2 .721 


fp A VT r\Ti 

TAYLOR, 


T^^\T fT> \t A IT rp^lT 

KENT MAN TON 


310 


117 1 1 
till 


T AVT no 
1 AILUn, 


WVDV AMKT 

lvc.nni RUN 


dim 


13.64 


TAYLOR. 


KERRY IAN 


316 


4294 


TAYLOR, 


KEVIN THOMAS 


279 


4528 


TAYLOR, 


KIM NELDON 


283 


13.511 


TAYLOR, 


KIM 


315 
277 


4241 1 


TAYLOR, 


KIRT ROBERT 


13.516 


TAYLOR, 


KONI 


315 



I.D. No. 






Page 




T4VT nR 


VPTCTT flMM 

Knxoxx ati [>i 


516 

3 1 U 


1 a K 1 7 


1 AILUn, 


IfRT'xTT 
ri.n J.O X X 


5 

3 1 J 




T A VT np 

1 AILiUn, 


VPTQTT 
l^AXo X i. 


5Q11 


1 "3 CI K 


T 4YT nR 


IfTTPTY 

n X X 


5 

3 1 ^ 


Jl O 1 


T AVT nR 


L AHL urj i>i xcj CfUxxn 


57 4 


oyj 


T AVT nR 

1 AILUrt, 


T flPPV HITnP 

LAnni nuun 


5Qll 


Qft ]| 


T A VT no 


T ATTRA AMM 
LAUAA ANN 


5Qil 


ll O 4 1 O 

421 13 


T AVT r\D 


T ATTPTir Tn 
LAUnXE. «J u 


57 ll 


13.4 


T A VT nR 


T TT PnY "^TPPUT?! 

lCj nux oxnEiDCiL 


515 

3 1 J 


4i:l> 


T A VT np 


T ITflP 
LI!iAn 


577 


1 3 


T4VT np 

1 AILiUn, 


T cn fl'vHTTrn 
LCtU Aon X r*!^ 


515 

3 1 3 




T4YT np 


I Trnr fl in T7 at^pto 

LCjULa £iLX.uADEjXn 


284 


1 3 1 


T AVT np 


Lr#uri n 


^ 1 ^ 


HO 


TAYT np 


T T?nM fl T nil TV 

LC«U1>IA LUUX£j 


t. U *T 




TiVT np 


T P'^T TP ANN 

L £iOL X£< All n 


2Q0 




TflYT np 


T P<?TPR AI PY TT 


308 


15 '515 


X aXLiW A, 


I P^TPR AI EX 


308 


15 5 1 


TAYT np 




308 


03 1 


T AVT np 
1 AILUn, 






03 


T A VT np 
1 AILUn, 








T AVT np 

J. AILUn, 




5Q4 


JlC^I 51 


TflYT np 

i AXLUn, 




282 


ft5 1 5 


TflYT np 

1 AILUn, 






115 1 fl 


TflYT np 

1 AILUn, 




280 




TflYT np 

1 AILUn, 


T nPAT pp 


577 


15 ll 1 5 


TflYT np 

i AILUn, 


T nPTMHP 


51^ 


in 5ll 


TflYT np 

1 iiXLun, 




301 


1 n 55 


TflYT OR 
1 AXLUn, 


T YMN ANMF 

Ij 1. 1Y 11 All It i-i 


299 


1 n 5 


TflYT OR. 
X nXLUn, 


T YNW DTyntJ 


299 


ll5Q 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


T YWM THOMAS 


27 Q 


1 n iiiiii 


TflYT np 

X AILUn, 


MAPPM 


^01 


1 5 75ll 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


MAPT A 
ruin Xn 


^10 


OD 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 




291 


Rl 5 1 
O 1 J 1 


TflYT np 
X nXLvjn, 




289 


15 7 5 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


MAPir MP PUAN 
PlAJifw III n ATI 


^10 


OD 1 3 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


MAPTHA .TO 


291 


llOP 
HtO 


TflYT np 

X AILUn, 


MAPTHA T niTT^P 


27 Q 


RQ5il 


TflYT np. 

X AXLun, 


MAPTHA 
ruin xriA 


294 


Q 

y 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


MAPY ANN fPOTTY^ 
ruin X Aiiii 


295 


O 
c. 


TflYT np 

X AILUn, 


MAPY ANN PMMA 
ruin X nXi li c«i irm 


27^ 


115 5 


T flYT np 

X AXLUn, 


MAPY PT T7 ARPTO 
rUiiX X aD £i xn 


^04 


1 ll 
00 1 H 


T AVT np 

X AILUn, 


MAPY PT T7 ARPTH 
niin 1 JLLtJMnDCtLn 


2Q1 


ll5 1 5 


TflYT np 

X AILUn, 


MAPY HA7Pr 
ruin X niuu cxi 


274 


oo 


TflYT np 

X aXLVJA, 


MAPY MATTT) 
rxrin X i^Jiu u 


293 


ftA 1 55 
OO Mc. 


TflYT np 

X aXLUA, 


MATTHTHJ JAMP^ 
rxnxxniiin uaiil«o 


291 


00*tt 


T flYT np 

X AXLUn, 


MATTOTHJ MTPHAPl AT AN 
rXn X XIl£in nXwilACiLi aIjAIi 


2Q2 


in 111 R 


TflYT np 

X AXLUA, 


MPn AN 
nCiU Alt 


301 


1151155 


TflYT np 
X AXLun, 


MPn AN 
njZiVj All 


277 


11 5 ll 


TflYT np 

X AILUn, 


MTTT TNT^A QIT^AN 


^04 


15 5 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


MTTTVTM MP TfTNT AY 
rxrA t V isi itxiiXjAX 


308 


15 K 1 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


KfPT V TN 

nctLiV xji 


J 1 J 


15 5 1 ll 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


MTPH A T^ AT V TN 
nxwriAEiLi ax^v xit 


^08 


llRI 5 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


MTPH APT T^AT P 
riXwIlAlIiu Unl^C* 


282 


1151 111 


TflYT np 

X AILUn, 


MTPHATTT T^TTMNTNO 


274 




TflYT np 
X AXLun, 


MTPH A III nT F}i 
rxxv/ji aCjXj viuCiit 


282 




TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


MTPH APT TDHN 
riXL^iiAizxi o unit 


284 


15 fi5 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


MTPH A T n^PPH 
rxxunAijLi w woc*x n 


316 


1155 55 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


MTPH A TTT PPPfl 


276 


ftfi 15 1 
00 1 D 1 


TflYT np 

X AILUn, 


MICHAEL THOMAS 


291 


ftQ5 1 


TflYT np 

X aXLUA, 


MICHEL E 


294 


1 5 t;5 5 


TflYT np 

X aXLUA, 


MORGAN STANLEY 


315 


HjH W 


TflYT np 

X aXLUA, 


Mary Elizabeth Walters 284 


11 il 
1 1 .M 


TflYT np 

X aXLUA, 


NADINE LOUISE 


304 


115 5 
1 1.3.0 


TflYT np 

X aXLUA, 


NANCY JOY 


304 


115 5 
1 1.3.3 


T flYT np 

X aXLU A, 


NANCY JOY 


304 


ll55 5 


TflYT np 

X AXLUA, 


NANCY VERA 


276 


in 15 
1 U . 1 3 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


NANCY 


298 


oyo 


TflYT np 

X AXLUn, 


NATALIE MAUD 


294 


45123 


TAYLOR, 


NATHAN ERICKSEN 


282 


8933 


TAYLOR, 


NATHAN HUGH 


294 


13.432 


TAYLOR, 


NATHANIEL JOHN 


314 



335 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I. D . No 






Page 


43 


T A VT D 

TAlLOnf 


NcILLlL haLIZA 


o D 1 

2o1 


81 2 


'P A VT r\ T5 

TAiLOn» 


NEILLIE JANE 


200 


o9 1 


T ft VT r\ Tt 

TAiLORf 


MTAUAT T O TTTATAD 

NILHOLLS VILTOR 


on ll 
294 




T A VT A D 
1 AlLUKl 


M T A AT C* 

N I LUL L 


301 


1 1 .b 


1 AlLUKl 


MADMA TI7AM 

NUKMA J LAN 


one 
3(J5 


ll 0*3 1 
1 


T A VT no 


MADMA T T?D A I? 




1 U . f 




unouri fwiM. i.Cj in 




3 


T4Y7 nP 


DA PI W A 


HI J 


in o o )i 


rp ftVT AD 


DATTT OAATT TO 

rAUL oLU X X JK 


o A A 
3UU 


10.33 


TAYLORf 


PAUL SCOTT 


300 


4214 


TAYLOR. 


PEGGY ANN 


275 


1 .443 


TAlLORf 


Ot_T TT T T T\ATTTT\ 

PHILLIP DAVID 


O A 4 

301 




m A VT AD 


DU TT T TD DAD^TXTCAKT 

rnJLLJ.r rAKK.lNoUM 


OOA 

290 




T A VT AD 


DU TT T T T D T.T A V\TC* 

rnlLLLlr WAiMCi 






T A VT AD 

1 AlLvJny 


O A AUCT 

KAUnciL 


301 


423 


m A VT A D 

TAiLOnf 


DAT I50 T^AT^TT^ 

KALrn DAV X_D 


OT £ 

270 


)l O Jl o 


T A VT AD 


DAMrvAT T ADAMT 

KANDALL (jKAN X 


27 1 


4532 


T A VT AD 

TAlLUni 


D A ATT CT T T7 

KAUUELLL 


2o3 


1 •41 12 


rp • VT AD 


dt:^ t? a a a 


o A i 

301 


4292 


m • VT rv D 

TAlLORf 


tST?D t? A A A 

REBECCA 


OTA 

279 


8355 


TAYLORf 


REBECCA 


290 


o91 2 


T A VT AD 


DC*V M T AtJAT T C 

RhX NlUnULLo 


oft )l 

294 


42 J 3 


T A VT AD 

1 AILUny 


DTPUAOr\ ADMAT FN 

nlLnARU ARNULU 


270 


00 1 


T A VT AD 


DTAlJADr\ VfADTAM 

nlLnARU MARIUN 


231 


JroQi 1 


T A VT AD 


D T AU A D r\ C U A LTM 

nlLnARU on AWN 


0*7 Q 

27 y 


It oft 1 

4291 


T A VT AD 


DTAt^TP T VTTM 

RlLKlb LINN 


OT ft 

279 


It O ll 1 

4241 


T A VT A D 

TAlLORf 


DAD COT TM7 AM 

ROBERT DEAN 


OT 

277 


ll T 1 

47 1 


T A VT r\Ti 

TAYLORf 


O^TO COT OAVAT 

RCBERT ROYAL 


2o4 


ll cr o ll 
4b24 


A VT r\T> 

TAYLORf 


O AXT A T r\ A A O TXl 

ROTALD GARTH 


203 


ll CO ll 

4534 


TAYLORf 


O A O C A \T \T 

ROSE ANN 


o Oo 

2o3 


033 


rp > VT r\T\ 

TAlLORf 


DAOC* TiADt^TMOAM 

ROSE PARKIN S(W 


oQ ft 

2o9 




T A VT AD 

1 AlLUnf 


DAV W A TU A M 

KUi NAXnAN 


Oft Jl 

294 


in fi 
1 U .0 


T A VT AD 

1 AlLUKf 


DTT TV CT A TUT L* 

KU X n iliAJJJc. 


o no 
303 


ll CO 1 

453 1 


T A VT AD 

X AlLURf 


DTT TIJ CT T E*HT 

KU Xn ELLEN 


2o3 


JlCC 

455 


T A VT AD 

1 AlLUnt 


DTT TU 

KU Xn 




HtiO 1 


T A VT AD 

i AlLUKf 


o AITT^D A 

oANUKA 


277 


lie oo 
45233 


T A VT AD 

X AILUKf 


o A O A AXTM 

oAKA ANN 


203 


1 A O O O 

1 0.322 


m A VT AD 

1 AlLUKf 


CAATT tJACTlT 

oLUlX nUCU 


O Aft 

3UU 


Qo c 1 1 

0351 1 


T* A VT A D 

TAYLORf 


OAA*T"P n T ATT A nT\C' /^T 

SCOTT RICHARDSCWI 


OftA 

290 


13 .03 


m . VT AO 

TAYLORf 


OtI A O AM CTT C 

SHARCVl SUE 


o 1 C 

3 1o 


S;^ ll 1 
0041 


T A VT AD 
X AlLUKf 


OTT ATT M A 

oHAUNA 


OftO 

292 


'*£:0 


T A VT AD 
X AlLUKf 


CUTDT DA1.T17XT 

onlKL oUWEN 


27 ( 


1 o c 
13.5 


T A VT AD 
X AlLUKf 


CTAXTT l?V CTD17DCT 

oXANLEl oXKEdcL 


O 1 c 

315 


in ll o 1 
1 .'♦3 1 


T A VT AD 
X AlLUKf 


OTr'DlJOXT l^DAAl? TD 

oXErnEN K.nU(jE JK 


O A 1 

301 


1 n ll^ 

1 U . Hj 


TilYT OR 

1 AlLiVJAf 




1 


10 .327 


TAYLOR. 


STEVEN HOEN 


300 


8351 3 


TAYLOR. 


STEVEN RHEES 


290 


8612 


TAYLOR. 


SUSAN KATHLEEN 


291 


1 .32 .10 


T A VT AD 

TAxLOnf 


CTT CAM 

oUoAN 




0352 


T A VT AD 
1 AXLUJlf 


CTT CAM 


9 on 


ll C 1 1 o 

451 1 2 


T A VT AD 


rp A U A n A 




ll on 1 o 
4291 2 


T A VT AD 

i. AlLUnf 


lAnfU LINN 


t ( y 


1 O T C 

1 2 .75 


T A VT AD 
1 AlLUKf 


TPDI?C A 


■ail 


13 .215 


rp HVT AD 

TAlLORf 


TC O T T TliT 

TERl LXN 


1 ^ 
313 


1 .323 


T A VT AO 

TAlLORf 


Tr*DT 

ILnl 


nn 


ll C 1 1 c 

451 15 


rp Ji VT AD 

lAlLUnf 


TPDDOTPP CPATT 


^0£ 


4 A ll 4 O 

10.412 


m jt VT AD 

TAlLORf 


TUAMAC PDPITKT 

THOMAo UnLciN 


■am 


10.328 


TAYLOR. 


THOMAS HOrU 


a nn 


o 



TAYLORf 


TU AU A C XT TPU AT T C 

THOMAS NlLnULLo 


^00 


13 .531 


A VT A O 

TAYLORf 


TLl AU AC CU A MC 

THOMAS SHANL 


1 K 
315 


13.53 


rri a vT AD 

TAlLORf 


TLIAMAC CT AlkTT CV 

InOMAS SlANLbl 


a IR 

3 ID 


813 


TT> a VT A D 

TAlLORf 


TtJ AU A C CTT7DT TMP T D 

THOMAS SiEnLlNLi oii 


^oy 


Ql 
Ol 


T A VT AD 

TAlLORf 


TUAMAC CTTTDT TMP 

XnUMAS Si CiRLXNU 


^0 


10.212 


rp a VT AO 

TAYLORf 


Ttl AU A C 

THOMAS 


^y y 


45241 


rp a VT A O 

TAYLORf 


TTCCAMV UAV 

TlrrANx MAI 


203 


451 13 


T A VT AD 
X AlLOKf 


TTPl? AM V 

1 Ir r AN I 




1 O C Jl 

1 3.54 


T AVT AO 

X AlLUK. 


TTMMT TAT? 


a 1 e: 


8922 


TAYLORf 


TOD SHERWOOD 


294 


4527 


TAYLORf 


TODD LEE 


283 


8353 


TAYLOR, 


TON I 


290 



X. XJ . IN . 






Page 


12.3123 


TAYLORf 


TONY ALVIN 


308 


12.732 


TAYLORf 


TONYA 


310 


451 16 


TAYLORf 


TRACY LYNETTE 


282 


45242 


TAYLORf 


TRENT PETER 


283 


45243 


TAYLORf 


TRICIA EDNA 


283 


451 32 


TAYLORf 


TRISTAN GREGORY 


282 


D 1 1 

81 1 


TAYLORf 


VESTA 


288 


D ll 

o4 


TAYLORf 


VESTA 


291 


o7 


TAYLORf 


VICTOR ROGERS 


293 


4521 


T A VT 

TAYLORf 


VIOLA DIANE 


282 


45262 


TAYLORf 


VIOLA NICOLE 


283 


12.311 


TAYLORf 


VIRGINIA CLAUDIA 


308 


1 

1 2 . 


TAYLORf 


TT AT OIT^T^ n 

WALTER G 


306 


40 ll 4 

12.41 


T A VT 

TAYLORf 


WALTER GEORGE (Sam) 


309 


12.1 


•P A VT r\ TS 

TAYLORf 


WALTER MC KINLAY 


306 


13 .56 


TAYLORf 


WANDA 


315 


10.332 


TAYLORf 


WAYNE TANNER 


300 


11.3 


T A VT /~\ 

TAYLORf 


WENDELL HOYT 


304 


11.3.1 


TAYLORf 


WENDELLYN JANE 


304 


12.4311 


TAYLOR, 


WENDY LEE 


309 


451 17 


TAYLORf 


WENDY 


282 


1 .432 


TAYLORf 


T T TT T T A If ^T TTTnT^ 

WILLIAM OLIVER 


301 


r 



TAYLOR, 


WILLIAM 


284 


)l )l 

44 


TAYLORf 


WILLIE aEON 


281 


ll c 1 00 

451 22 


TAYLOR, 


ZACKARY MILES 


282 


ll llO ll 

42434 


THOMPSON f JEFFERY JORDAN 


277 


42 43 1 


THOMPSONf JENNIFER 


277 


4243 


THOMPSON f LORALEE TAYLOR 


277 


ll ^ ll ^ 

42432 


THOMPSON, PHILIP DEAN 


277 


42 433 


THOMPSON, SCOTT JACOB 


277 


Qc 

oo5 


TOPHAM, 


aAUDIA MARY CLAYSON 


293 


0854 


TOPHAM. 


DAVID ERNEST 


293 


oo55 


TOPHAM. 


JULIE 


293 


8852 


TOPHAM. 

i> w £ 11 m If 


MARY CHRISTINA 


293 


Oc 1 

oo51 


TOPHAM, 


STEPHEN LA NELL 


293 




TOPHAM, 


TAMARA MARIE 


OQO 

2y3 


1^ 425 


TRENT, 


HEIDI TAYLOR 


a 1 ii 


1 3 427 


TRENT, 


JAMES 


a 1 li 


13 ,422 


TRENT, 


JONATHAN SCOTT 


a 111 


13.42 


TRENT, 


JOYCE TAYLOR 


314 


1 i ,42 J 


TRENT, 


LESLIE ANN 


314 


10 ll 0^ 
13 .426 


TRENT, 


PATRICK DENNIS 


314 


10 ll ll 

13 .424 


TRENT, 


PETER THADDIUS 


314 


ll AO 

13 .423 


TRENT, 


RCBERT NATHAN 


314 


12.621 2 


TURNER, 


BENJAMIN JOHN 


309 


4 A £ A 4 1 

1 2 .021 1 


TURNER, 


BETH 


309 


10 1 
12.021 


TURNER, 


TAFFEE LYN MC DONALD 


309 


10.812 


TYLER, 


DANIEL KARTCHNER 


303 


10.813 


TYLER, 


JENNILYNN 


303 


1 ft Q 1 

1 .01 


TYLER, 


LINDA KARTCHNER 


303 


•1 A Oil 


TYLER, 


MICHAEL 


303 


1 U •Ol 4 


TYLER, 


RUTH ANN 


303 


ll CO .« 

453 w 


Taylor, 


Ada Moulton 


283 


4 

13 . w 


Taylor, 


Agnes Katherine Strebe 312 


1 A 

12. w 


Taylor, 


Agnes McKinlay 


306 


10.4 w 


Taylor, 


Alta Hansen 


301 


40 4 

13.21 w 


Taylor, 


Alta L 


313 


12.7 w 


Taylor, 


Alta McEwan 


310 


ll 1ft • • 
42 . 1 W 


Taylor, 


Amplus LaRue Kinder 


280 


I| c 1 1 « 

4513 W 


Taylor, 


Angela Rae Shoemake 


282 


11 T » JfO 


Taylor, 


Anne Grass Scheinin 


304 


QQ1 Jio 

091 Wff2 


Taylor, 


Barbara Eddy Powell 


294 


10 010 . . 
1 3.212 w 


Taylor, 


Barbara Jean Estelle 


313 


424 w 


Taylor, 


Blanche Jacobsen 


277 


4242 w#2 


Taylor, 


Brenda Jean Dansie 


277 


13.6 w#2 


Taylor, 


Buelah Rose 


316 


1 A 01 » » 

1 U .ii 1 w 


Taylorf 


Catherine Pearson 


299 


10.2 w 


Taylorf 


Celestia M Johnson 


299 


894 w 


Taylor, 


Cheryl Ann Doughty 


294 


12.731 w 


Taylor, 


Cheyanne Jones 


310 



336 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I.D. No 
12. 3U w 
13.62 w 

4241 w 
10.41 w 

4242 w 
13.22 w 
12.431 w 
13.2 w 
10.32 w 
10.25 w 
10.411 w 



Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 



13.41 w#2Taylor 



13.6 w 
87 w 
421 w 

11.3 w 

13.4 w 
423 w 
10.3 w 

10.7 w 
4526 w 
42 w 
89 h 
4291 w 
8131 w 
13.52 w 
13.51 w 
891 w 



Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 



13.52 w#2Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 



4523 w 
86 w 

4524 w 
47 w 
13.53 w 
10.412 w 
10.44 w 

4294 w Taylor 

835 w Taylor 

429 w#2 Taylor 

8613 w Taylor 

426 w Taylor 

10.43 w Taylor 

426 w#2 Taylor 

451 w Taylor 

861 w Taylor 

451 1 w Taylor 

8611 w Taylor 

47 w#2 Taylor 

429 w Taylor 

10. w Taylor 

13.41 w Taylor 

12.73 w Taylor 

85 w Taylor 
12.31 w#2Taylor 

13.43 w Taylor 

8 w Taylor 

10.1 w Taylor 

13.5 w Taylor 
10.332 w Taylor 



813 w 
10.33 w 
4512 w 
12.41 w 
81 w 
893 w 
12.4 w 



Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 



12.312 w Taylor 
4211 w Taylor 
291 w#2 2Taylor 



Page 

Christine Davis 308 

Chrystal Sayre Looslie 316 

Colene Pearl Same 277 

Colette Green 301 

Connie Ranae Wiberg 277 

Constance Buttle 313 

Cynthia Lee Jellison 309 

DeVeda Hansen 313 

Deanna Kay Hoen 300 

Debra Sue Wagstaff 299 

Denise Meshinski 301 

Dona May Pedler Hilton 314 

Donna Louise Ostler 316 

Dorothy Ericksen Park 293 

Edith Emery 274 

Elizabeth Gessford 304 

Elsie Bean 313 

Elva Park 276 

Ethel L Scott 300 

Ethelyn Peterson 302 

Gleanne Shields 283 

Hazel Martha Bowen 274 

Hyrum Rex 294 

Jacquelyn Sue Teisher 279 

Jane Higley 289 

Janet Llewellyn 315 

Janet Morley 315 

J era! dine Willmore 294 

JoAnn Bohn 315 

Jolyn Smith 283 

Josephine Cook Crandal 291 



No. 



I. D 

4533 w 
471 w 
8351 h 
892 h 
45 w#2 
864 w 
4233 w 

II. w 
4 w 

11.2 w 
831 w 
12.72 w 



Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 



12.3 w#2 Taylor 
12.722 w Taylor 
13.54 w Taylor 
12.721 w Taylx)r 
13.512 Taylor 



452 w 
12.43 w 
12.31 w 
81 w 
83 w 



Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 
Taylor 



12.73 w#2Taylor 
12.3 w Taylor 



864 w 
4243 h 
885 h 
13.42 h 



Taylor 



Paula Palmer 
Rella Dail Sharrock 
Richard Floyd 
Rodney Sherwood 



Page 

283 
284 
290 
294 



Sadie Leola Peay Loose 282 
Sally Helen Thorne 292 
Sarah Darlene Cahoon 276 
Sarah Edna Pulsipher 304 
Sarah Elizabeth Thomas 273 
Sarah Stahl 304 
Shirley Louise Sanford 289 

310 
308 
310 
315 
310 
315 
282 



Julie Christiansen 



283 



Silvia Manton 
Sophornia Wilson 
Tammy Taylor 
Tanya Spencer 
Tracy Ann Graves 
Tracy Eliason 
Viola Jones 

Virginia Hellerschmidt 309 
Virginia Sarah White 308 
Vivian Kay Hulet 289 
Vivian Smart Parkinson 289 

Winona Peterson 310 

Zola Roberts 308 
Joyce Catharine Bright 292 

Thompson, Neil 277 

Topham, La Nell 293 

Trent, Dennis Wayne 314 
13.422 w Trent, Lynn Smith 
12.621 h Turner, Scott C 
10.81 h Tyler, Steven L 



314 
309 
303 



Katherine Huish 


284 










Kathern Herschi 


315 






U 




Kathleen Clark 


301 








Kristine Boynton 


301 


13.631 


ULRICH, 


JENNIFER LEE 


316 


LaLane Brewer 


279 


13.63 


ULRICH, 


SHARON SUE TAYLOR 


316 


LaRene Rhees 


290 


45253 


UTLEY, 


ANNE MARIE 


283 


Lael Reba Rose 


279 


45252 


UTLEY, 


BRYAN WILLARD 


283 


Lisa Dawn Page 


291 


4525 


UTLEY, 


JUANITA TAYLOR 


283 


Lois Mae Stevens 


277 


45251 


UTLEY, 


RYAN MICHAEL 


283 


Lorna Bird 


301 


13.63 h 


Ulrich, 


LeRoy 


316 


Lucille C 


277 


4525 h 


Utley, 


Randy Michael 


283 


Lucille Farnsworth 


282 










Lucille Gatenby 


291 










Lynette Chapman 


282 











Margaret Ann Kuehne 291 

Margaret Belle Y Myers 284 

Margene Liddiard 279 

Maria Louise Dixon 298 

Marva Burgess 313 

Marva Casper 310 

Mary Caroline Hughes 291 

Mary Larena Jensen 308 

Mary Lin June Lothyan 314 

Maud Elon Rogers 288 

Maurine Goodridge 298 

Mildred G Warren 315 

Miriam Rowberry 300 

Myra Hansen 289 

Nancy Lee Tanner 300 

Nancy Marie Ericksen 282 

Naomi Thompson 309 

Nell Taylor 288 

Noreen Nelson 294 

Norma Culmer Simmons 309 

Pamela Wilson 308 

Patricia Lou Dunning 274 

Paula Ann Thornton4 79 



4561 


VAN 


WOERKOM, 


CYNTHIA 


284 


45621 


VAN 


WOERKOM, 


STEVEN GLEN JR 


284 


4562 


VAN 


WOERKOM, 


STEVEN GLEN 


284 


456 


VAN 


WOERKON, 


EDITH COLLEEN TAY 


284 


4562 w 


Van 


Woerkom, 


Jennifer Day 


284 


456 h 


Van 


Woerkom, 


Norman Glen 


284 



42224 


WALKER 


, SCOTT 'G' 


275 


42222 


WALKER , 


GREGG DELL 


275 


42221 


WALKER, 


DEANNE 


275 


4222 


WALKER, 


JOANN HORTON 


275 


4113 


WALSH, MARGARET MAIBEN 


273 


81236 


WALSMAN, 


DANIEL STERLING 


288 


8134 


WALSMAN, 


DAVID MARION 


288 


8123 


WALSMAN, 


JANET TAYLOR HENDERSO 


288 


81233 


WALSMAN, 


JENNY MARIE 


288 


81237 


WALSMAN, 


MATTHEW CHRISTIAN 


288 


81232 


WALSMAN, 


MICHAEL TAYLOR 


288 


81231 


WALSMAN, 


THOMAS FREDERICK 


288 



337 



INDEX TO GEORGE TAYLOR, Sr. FAMILY ROSTER 



I.D. No. Page 



81 

O 1 £J I? 




FY RRTAM 





t J J •* 


WAT TON. 


MTTHFI T V Hfll T 






WARNnPV 












507 


7 J £ *t 


WARNOrif 




?Q7 

7 1 




WARNnfJf . 
n /tnii w orwf 


T P«n TF AMM 


907 
*1 7 I 


1 

73 1 




MARTT YN 


?Q7 
^7 1 


9325 


WARNOCK, 


MARY ANN 


297 


93 


WARNOCK, 


MARY RCBERTS 


297 


9323 


WARNOCK, 


PAUL 


297 


932 


WARNOCK, 


RICHARD 


297 


933 


WARNOCK, 


ROBERT ALLEN 


297 


9333 


WARNOCK, 


RYAN 


297 


9331 


WARNOCK, 


SHANNON 


297 




WARNOCK, 


SHAUN 


2Q7 

^71 


ll?'? 1 R 


WEBB, BRIAN JOSEPH 




ll?'? 1 ft 


WEBB, CRAIG ALLEN 


CIV 


ll?'^ 1 il 
•tt J 1 


WEBB, JANE CAROL 




Jl?'^ 1 
•t^j 1 J 


WEBB, MICHAEL ALLEN 


276 


•t 1 1 £ 


WELCH, CAROL MAIBEN 


273 


42 . 1 1 . 1 


WEST, KRISTY GREEN 


280 


14 


WESTPHAL 


, ELLA TAYLOR 


316 




WHITE, ANNETTE CLIFT 


287 


7 1 3^ 1 


WILKENSON, AARON 


2Q6 


7 1-3" 


WILKENSON, GLORIA DUNN 


296 


7 1 


WILKENSON, ISRAEL DAVID 


296 


Q1 ^iiS 


WILKENSON, JESSICA GENEVE 


2Q6 

7U 


J 1 J*t*T 


WILKENSON, JON KEVIN 


2Q^ 

^7U 




WILKENSON, LARRY DANIEL 


2Q6 

^7U 


Q1 


WINGET, 


BRADLEY PAUL 


b73 


Q1 ??P 


WINGET, 


JEREMY BRET 


2QR 

^ 7«/ 


91224 


WINGET, 


MARK JERIL 


295 


9122 


WINGET, 


MARSHA JEANNE DUNN 


295 


91221 


WINGET, 


TAMMY SUE 


295 


10.342 


WOOD, BECKY LYNN WOODRUFF 


301 


10.3421 


WOOD, JENIFER LYNN 


301 


10.3423 


WOOD, KAY LYNN LOUISE 


301 



I.D. No. Page 

10.3422 WOOD, TRAVOR MARTIN 301 

10.343 WOODRUFF, BARRY aiFFORD 301 
10.342 WOODRUFF, BECKY LYNN 301 
10.34 WOODRUFF, LOUISE TAYLOR 301 

10.344 WOODRUFF, RUSSELL ELTON 301 

10.341 WOODRUFF, SHELLY K 301 

10.345 WOODRUFF, TAYLOR JARVIS 301 

10.346 WOODRUFF, WENDY LOUISE 301 
13.563 WRIGHT, MARTY 315 
13.562 WRIGHT, PAMELLA 315 
13.561 WRIGHT, RICKY 315 
13.56 WRIGHT, WANDA TAYLOR 315 
42224 w Walker, Barbara Ann Francom 275 
4222 h Walker, Dell 'B* 275 
4113 h Walsh, Jack 273 
8123 h Walsman, Thomas Irving 288 
4554 h Walton, Curtis 284 

932 w Warnock, Carole Spaun 297 

933 w Warnock, Suzanne Ostler 297 
93 h Warnock, Thomas Ward 297 

423 h#2 Webb , Al V 276 

4112 h Welch, Roger 273 

42.11 .Ih West, Steven Charles 280 

14. h Westphal, John 316 

7366 h White, Jeffrey Stewart 287 

9134 h Wilkenson, Larry 296 

9122 h Winget, Jeril Dewey 295 

10.342 h Wood, David 301 
10.34 h Woodruff, Clifford A 301 
13.56 h Wright, Robert 315 
13.561 w Wright, Sherie Dunn 315 

Z 

8826 ZIMMERMAN, MELANIE TERESSA LAR 293 

8826 h Zimmerman, Tracy 293 



338 



DATE DUE 



iEP 06 TO 



SEP 1 m 



TEBT 



2^ 



r 



MiG 1 4 



APR 1 4 m 



Brigham Young University 



BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 




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