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Full text of "Georgia State Park Views"

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MAR 9 '62 

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DIRECTOR • 
CHARLES A. COLLIER 




. PREPARED AND EDITED BY 
BARBARA J, RANKIN — RECREATION DIRECTOR 




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A CHRISTMAS MESSAGE 

As we approach the end of another year, 
we, in the General Office of the Department of State 
Parks, wish to take this opportunity to thank aU of the park 
superintendents and co-workers and other agencies for the splen- 
did cooperation given to us during i960. 

We wish to extend to each of you and your families a "Very 
Merry Christmas". May the spirit of Christmas make us even more 
conscious of the magnificient contribution that our work plays 
in the welfare of mankind. We are sure that you wil.l join with 
us in a resolution that 1961 will be a year of progress in meet- 
ing the leisure-time needs of the people of Georgia 
May peace and joy be with you throughout the 

Christmas season. 





f 



HURRAH ! 



THE GENERAL OFFICE WAS VERY PLEASED TO SEE MR. COLLIER RETURN TO 
WORK ON NOVEMBER 21. HE WAS VERY PLEASED WITH THE PROGRESS THAT 
HAS BEEN MADE IN THE DEPARTMENT, AND HOPES THAT HE WILL BE ABLE 
TO VISIT SOME OF THE AREAS IN THE NEAR FUTURE. 

WE ARE CERTAINLY GLAD TO HAVE HIM BACK, AND WE KNOW THE PERSONNEL 
THROUGHOUT THE DEPARTMENT EXPRESSES OUR WISHES FOR HIS CONTINUED 
RECOVERY FROM HIS RECENT ILLNESS. 





NEWS ITEMS 

Fall colors of the North Georgia 
mountains have brought thousands 
of people into our parks during 
the past two months. Every state 
park in the mountainous areas have 
recorded many, many visitors en- 
joy ng the countryside and the 
brilliant colors. Vogel, for 
instance, recorded 15,000 people 
in one afternoon. Unicoi, Black 
Rock, Port Mountain and Cloudland 
Canyon have all reported many 
visitors. 

****** 

THE PARK SUPERINTENDENTS CONFERENCE 
WAS HELD NOVEMBER 15-16, i960 

The 3rd In-Service Training Program 
was held at Veterans Memorial State 
Park. Mr. Harry Kenning. American 
Red Cross Field Representative, 
Southeastern Area, was the princi- 
pal consultant and did an out- 
standing job in training the super- 
intendents in first aid and arti- 
ficial resperation. The Department 
of State Parks would like to thank 
Mr. Kenning for his interest and 
wonderful cooperation during the 
training program. 

* •* * * •* * 

K0L0M0KI - Work has started on con- 
verting an old guard house into a 
comfort station for tent and trailer 
campers. We hope that next year our 
family campers will be better pleased 
with our facilities. 

****** 

A. H. STEPHANS - Democratic nomi- 
nee, Adlai Stevenson, and a party 
including Mrs. Marshall Fields, 
paid a visit to Alexander H. 
Stephens State Park, Crawfordville 
Georgia during the weekend of 
November 19 . He seemed very well 
pleased with the Confederate Museum, 
and felt that Liberty Hall was most 
interesting. The parks department 
was pleased to have such an out- 
standing visitor. 



THE SOUTHEASTERN STATE PARK DIRECTORS 
CONFERENCE WAS HELD AT IDA CASON 
CALLAWAY GARDENS. 

The 19th Annual Meeting of the 

Southeastern State Park Directors 

was held November 2-'i at Ida Cason 

Callaway Gardens Pine Mountain 

Georgia. 

The Georgia Department of State 

Parks was host for the conference. 

Park directors and their key per- 
sonnel from twelve states were 
represented. Many ideas were ex- 
changed with state park represen- 
tatives in addition to the National 
Park Service. U.S. Corps of Engin- 
eers and National Forestry Service. 

Dr. Hugh Masters, of the Univer- 
versity of Georgia made the key-note 
address at the banquet. Every- 
one felt that the meeting was a 
success, due to the fact that one 
state can always learn from another. 

****** 

THE STONE FOR THE MONTH OF 
DECEMBER 

The earliest jewelry known belong- 
ed to a Queen of Egypt's first 
dynasty and was made of cast gold 
and carved turquoise, an opaque 
skyblue stone, is found in Russia, 
China, Sinai, Tibet and south- 
western United States. Much 
American Indian jewelry is of silver 
and turquoise. 

The turquoise, a gem rarely found 
in crystals , is usually obtained 
in a solid mass. 

****** 

Temperance and labor are the two 
best physicians of man; labor 
sharpens the appetite and temper- 
ance prevents him from indulging 
to excess. 

Rousseau 
****** 



/ 



"THE PORT YARGO EPIC" 
By Rev. L. G. Marlin 

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The Rev. L G 
Marlin of Winder, Georgia has 
recently completed a paper titled 
The Fort Yargo Epic' 1 that will be 
of great interest to the people of 
the area. Local groups, who are 
working to get the old fort re- 
stored, requested him to make a 
research into the history of this 
old landmark. This he has recent- 
ly completed, after considerable 
research, and he has consented to 
let us publish it in The Winder 
News in several installments. This 
is the first and it will be contin- 
ued each week until completed. He 
later plans to have it published 
in pamphlet form--H.O.S. ) 

****** 

GUNNING FIVE PER CENT OF PUBLIC USE 
OF REFUGES, SAYS FISH AND WILDLIFE 

The Fish and Wildlife Service, in 
its latest annual report on how the 
public user; the wildlife refuges, 
says there were 9,936,000 visitor- 
days for the year, in all areas. 
Ninety-five per cent of these were 
for uses other than gunning. (it 
may come as a shock to some to 
learn that several of the refuges 
are partly open to wildlife shoot- 
ing in season.) 

Thirty-two per cent of the use was 
for fishing, but sixty-three per 
cent for picnicking and swimming 
and for observing and photographing 
wildlife. The Service explains 
that designated parts of 138 of the 
275 national wildlife refuges, where 
such use does not interfere with 
the primary purpose of the areas, 
are open to recreation of this kind. 

****** 



SNOWFLAKES 

Out of the bosom of the air. 
Out of the cloud-folds of her 
garments shaken 
Over the woodlands brown and 
bare , 

Over the harvest-fields forsaken, 
Silent and soft and slow 
Descends the snow. 

Even as our cloudy fancies take 

Suddenly shape in some diving 

expression 

Even as the troubled heart doth' 

make 

In the white countenance 

confession, 

The troubled sky reveals 

The grief it feels. 

This is the poem of the air. 

Slowly in silent syllables 

recorded; 

This is the secret of despair, 

Long in its cloudy bosom hoarded 

Now whispered and revealed 

To wood and field. 

By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 
****** 

Sam Watson, a tall, solemn-looking 
Negro., making his annual trip for 
his holiday purchases, was a little 
belated reaching the city on 
Christmas eve. Having finished 
bis shopping, he was hurrying to 
the station to catch his waiting 
train, when he stumbled; a jug fell 
to the sidewalk with a crash and 
the precious contents at once be- 
came a mere wet place on the con- 
crete. Sam stood for a moment 
dazed by his misfortune. Then, as 
he turned away from the heart-break- 
ing sight, he said in a lugubrious 
tone: "Dan now.' Chris'mus done come 
--and gone.'" 

****** 



All work is as seed sown; it grows 
and spreads and sows itself anew. 

Thomas Carlyle 



He that hath a trade, hath an estate. 
He that hath a calling, hath an office 
of profit and honor. 

Benjamin Franklin 




he understanding and appreciation 
of nature begins in the very young. 
Don't pass up an opportunity to 
show them the right way. 

****** 

WOOD-SPLITTING BLOCK 

Max Primodig, Manager, Ft. Wilkins 
State Park, Michigan, says it's 
a good idea to have a splitting 
block handy for camper use, other- 
wise some of them may be chopping 
wood on your good stone fireplaces 
or the handiest porch or bench 
available . 



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\ v For sandy soil, a bed 
of rock or 2 by 4 cross 
pieces will increase 
stability. 

Max takes a hardwood log about 5 
feet long and 8 inches thick, cuts 
a two or three-inch slab off of 
one side and then buries it in th p 
ground, flat side up. The flat 
surface is an inch or two above 
the ground The advantages of the 
splitting block are: (l) it won't 
tip over (2) it can't get carried 
off (3) it encourages campers to 
split their wood at one central 
point and (4) if you provide the 
ax as some parks do there is 
less likelihood of it getting dul- 
led or otherwise damaged 

For additional stability in sand 
soil, Max recommends a 2 by \ cross 
piece underneath each end of the 
log when it is put in place or 
rocks might be piled around it 
before the earth is backfilled. 



HOW DECEMBER GOT ITS NAME 

In the old Roman Calandar which 
started with the month of March, 
December was the tenth month and 
it was named for the Latin word 
'decern' or ten. 

When Julius Caesar changed the 
calendar in '46 B.C., December be- 
came the twelfth month but kept 
its original name. 

* * * * * * 

THE FLOWER OF THE MONTH 

The plant one thinks of first at 
Christmas season is the holly, 
December's flower with its bright 
shiny pointed leaves and gay red 
berries . The holly bears no flower 
in winter but in May its small 
white blossoms transform the country- 
side into a sea of beauty, especial- 
ly in England- where both holly and 
hawthorn are widely used as hedges. 

Since early barbaric times the 
people of northern- Europe have used 
holly and other evergreens for deco- 
ration at the midwinter festival 
which is now Christmas. Its name 
comes from 'holy tree". 

****** 

MISTLETOE 

Today is a good day to put up the 
Christmas mistletoe. People in 
northern Europe have been doing 
this for hundreds of years, tacking 
a spray of the yellowish-green leaves 
and waxy white berries over the 
doorways. In Druid times, the 
mistletoe was held sacred. In early 
times, its use was not allowed 
because the pagan had used it. At 
one time the mistletoe was supposed 
to have healing properties. Now, 
any girl caught under it must for- 
feit a kiss. 

****** 



To 



To make a boot string or a tie strap 
from odd pieces of leather, use this 
old Mexican method. The scrap should 
be trimmed to the largest possible 
circle, as in figure # 1. 



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Figure # 2 
A portable stand for frying pan or 
coffee pot can be made from four 
iron rods (approximately 18" long) 
and a short length of pipe. 
Insert rods in pipe, bend one end 
of each rod to a 90° angle, the 
other end to a 450 angle. They 
spread to form a very stable support, 
and fold to form a very compact 
bundle . 



Figure #1 -^: _^ 

Then mark off a decreasing circle line 

all the way to the center of the piece 

Place on a soft board, and cut along 

your dotted line with a sharp knife. 

You can get great lengths from very 

small scraps. 

4 pieces 
• 18" long 






4" 



90 



o 







6" 



8" 



45 ( 



Submitted by: George Greene, Supt., Georgia Veterans Mem. State Park 



SECOND DIGGING SEASON ENDS 
AT COLORADO'S WETHERILL MESA 

The national Park Service and the 

tional Geographic Society have 
completed a second season of ex- 
cavations at abandoned cliff dwell- 
ings of Southwest Pueblo Indians. 

Indians vanished from the Weathe- 
rill Mesa section of what is now 
Colorado's Mesa Verde. National 
Park before A.D. 1300. Archeolo- 
gists want to know how they lived 
and what happened to them. 

Scientists who were housed in a 
tent city there during the summer 
are conducting a broad program of 
research. Studies of the cliff 
architecture., artifacts, burials, 
soil, pollen, wood charcoal, and 
the area's plant life are part of 
the long-range project. 

Thousands of articles have been 
collected at the main cliff settle- 
ments, Long House, Mug House, and 
Step House. These include pottery, 
baskets, bone fleshers, bone awls, 
stone axes, and. surprisingly, a 
mummified turkey. 

by bit, the scientists are 
learning more about the shadowy 
people of the mesa?. Examination 
of rock deposits or near-by Mancos 
River and the La Plata Mountains 
suggests, for instance, that these 
were the sources of stone from 
which the Indians made tools. 

A poignant discovery was made in 
front of Mug House. Chancing upon 
a burial place, excavators found 
the remains of 23 Indians, most of 
them infants and children. There 
were meager grave offerings, pottery 
awls, vases, arrowpoints, and beads. 

Master floor plans are being made of 
the larger settlements . Survey- 
ors have located hundreds of smaller 
pueblo sites on the ridges of the 
tree-tangled canyon-scarred hills. 



During the first part of the Great 
Period, A.D. 1100 to 1300, people 
lived atop the mesas in well-built 
masonry pueblos. About 1200, 
possibly because of enemy attacks, 
they began to move down into the 
canyons and build their pueblos in 
cliff faces and caves. Eventually 
they departed, harassed perhaps by 
drought as well as enemies. 

Many pueblos, particuallarly Long 
House, were nearly wrecked by early 
looters. A chief objective of the 
Park Service -National Geographic 
project is to stabilize the ruins 
of We the rill Mesa so they can be 
opened to the public. 

The Wetherill cliff dwellings would 
then serve as an alternate attrac- 
tion to Chapin Mesa's famous Cliff 
House., which is literally being 
worn down by the growing numbers of 
visitors to the Park. 

Stabilization involves overhanging 
cliffs as well as the man-made 
crumbling masonry. This summer, 
engineers removed a ten-ton slab 
of loose rock that threatened to 
flatten rooms in Mug House. Remov- 
al of a large rock slide there re- 
vealed a whole complex of rooms 
whose presence was unsuspected. 

Cell-like rooms surrounded ceremo- 
nial courts, or kivas, in the large 
dwellings. At Long House, excava- 
tions below floor level have reveal- 
ed special features such as mealing 
bins and fireplaces. 

The Wetherill Mesa Archeological 
Project is expected to take five or 
six years. Dr. Douglas Osborne, of 
the National Park Service, is the 
supervisory archeologist . 

By the time father gets the vaca- 
tion bills paid, it is time to think 
about Christmas presents. 




8 



FAMILY CAMPING 

WEATHER - Weather extremes are a 
possibility when living outdoors, 
and it is wise to know how to 
stay safe and comfortable under 
various conditions. In this way 
you run no undue risks to health 
or have to turn for home in the 
midst of your vacation. 

There may be a sudden cold spell 
in midsummer or you may encounter 
very chilly conditions at high 
altitudes; be parpared for this 
extreme with warm clothing for 
all the family. You will be 
warmer sleeping on the ground 
than on cots, and newspapers 
under sleeping bags will help. 
If bags zip together, sleeping 
double will help. You can 
warm your tent by filling a 
Dutch oven or pail with coals 
or hot rocks. A gas stove or 
lantern will help take off some 
chill. A reflector-type fire 
at the entrance will warm the 
inside; aluminum foil in back 
of the fire will reflect more 
heat in the right direction. 
If caught in an unseasonal 
snowstorm, brush snow off the 
roof of tent with a soft bough, 
and pile boughs against the 
sides for extra insulation. 
When heating the inside of a 
tent with a stove or heater of 
any sort, be sure there is 
sufficient ventilation. 

In very hot weather, pitch your 
tent in shade and where there is 
some breeze. A large fly or 
white sheet pitched over the tent 
roof will help to keep the in- 
side cooler. Leave all windows 
and flaps open and lift the tent 
sides if there is no floor. A 
Canvas water bag hung inside the 
tent, with a tpan below to catch 
the drip, may help to keep the 
temperature down a bit. Sleep 
on top of your bag rather than 
inside. Know the symptons and 



first aid for sunburn, sunstroke, 
and heat exhaustion. Stay out of 
the hot midday sun. 

If a windstorm appears likely 
be sure your camp is well secured. 
Hold down plastic covers or tar- 
paulins v/ith rocks, collapse 
canvas chairs and cots. Drown 
campfire to prevent any sparks 
from getting under the floor, 
and if necessary, collapse the 
tent altogether. If there is 
any hail and the stones are large, 
slacken tent ropes. You may want 
to take refuge in the car if 
there is severe lightning . Avoid 
shelters in the open and if caught 
outdoors stay away from isolated 
tall trees and high places; seek 
protection in low ground; or at 
the foot of a hill or cliff. In 
hard rain , you may need to cover 
things inside the tent until the 
first period of spray is over. 
Remember to loosen tent guy lines, 
and be sure a fly or awning has 
no hollows to catch and pool the 
water. 

Adequate protection from the ele- 
ments and knowledge of how to cope 
with some few situations which 
may arise while living outdoors 
is the simple secret of a happy 
camping experience. May your 
next trip be the best yet. 1 

****** 

Sue: "I believe my husband is the 
most generous man in the world." 
Lou: "How's that?" 
Sue: "Well, I gave him a dozen of 
the loveliest neckties for Christ_ 
mas , and he took them right down 
and gave them to the Salvation 
Army . " 

****** 

Coming together is a beginning; 
keeping together is progress; 
working together is success. 

Henry Ford 



/ 



ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS STATE PARK 

LIBERTY HALL - The beautiful antebellum home of Alexander Hamilton 
Stephens in the state park bearing his name near Crawfordville is a 
home which has seen a lot of living, and somehow seems to have captured 
some of that exciting spirit of its hey-day. 

Stephens, vice-president of the Confederacy and Governor of Gaorgia, 
liked to entertain and he liked to do it in his own way. He enjoyed 
seeing his guests enjoy themselves. In his home the guests felt free, 
relaxed. That's the way Stephens wanted it. That's why he named his 
stately home "Liberty Hall". 

Some of the South 's greatest leaders have been guests in this house and 
as you walk through its massive hall and look into the gracious rooms, 
you get the feeling that all of Stephens' guests must have looked for- 
ward to coming there. 

You'll also find evidence of other traits of that great man. Like the 
mound of rocks in the corner of the garden where "Rio" and other faith- 
ful dogs are buried. He was a great lover of dogs. The epitaph on the 

mound makes this known. 

"Here rests the remains of what in life was a satire upon the human race, 

but an ornament unto his own, a faithful dog ,! . 

The house has a wine cellar and there is reason to believe he was careful 

and proud of this facility. And another room which he called simply "the 

tramp room". That's probably an early den, in the rough. 

The beautiful Brussels carpeting and the wall paper are reproductions, 

but much of the original furniture is there. 



10 



LIBERTY HALL (Continued) 

At the Stephens Park there is 
also a Confederate Museum where 
relics, documents, diaries and 
letters are preserved. Also at 
the museum are uniforms of the 
Confederates, muskets, swords 
and hundreds of other articles 
to hold your interest for hours. 

Every Georgia ought to visit this 
delightful park and tour this 
lovely home. Mot for its own 
beauty and interest alone, but 
for what its owner represented. 

Stephens, born in Taliaferro 
County, was left motherless while 
a baby and an orphan at fourteen. 
Frail in statue, he weighed around 
90 pounds. He was never married. 

After graduating from Franklin 
College, now the University of 
Georgia, he went to Liberty Hall 
after teaching school two years 
to study law. He loved the 
place, and when its owner died 
he bought it. 

While he lived there he served 
in the State Legislature as a 
delegate to the Charleston Commer- 
cial Convention and as a member 
of Congress for 26 years. He 
led Georgia's opposition to 
secession and when his state 
seceded he was elected to the 
provisional congress and later 
vice president of the Confederacy . 

Later he served as governor after 
teaching, writing and editing a 
newspaper. 

The park also offers group camp- 
ing, tent and trailer camping and 
fishing. It's a delightful place 
for a weekend vacation. It is 
located on Georgia W and 15 and 
U.S. 278. Any service station 
will assist you in marking the 
best route to this park. 



EXPLORING OUR NATIONAL PARKS AND 
MONUMENTS -- 5th EDITION 

By Devereux Butcher 

This is the book about the national 
parks and monuments under the care 
of the National Park Service. Since 
publication of the 1st edition, in 
19^7, it has gone through four more 
editions, with a total printing of 
100,000 copies. Each edition has 
been improved and revised to keep 
all information up to date. 

The book describes 26 national parks 
3^ nature monuments and 17 archaeolo- 
gical monuments. In 312 pages, there 
are more than 300 magnificent photo- 
graphs, including 16 pages in color, 
of scenery, wildlife, wild flowers, 
and prehistoric Indian ruins. Three 
maps show the locations of all areas 
described. Not only is this the com- 
plete guide to these sanctuaries under 
National Park Service care, but it 
expresses throughout, the highest 
principals governing their adminis- 
tration and protection. It is the 
ideal book for all wilderness and 
nature enthusiasts. In cloth covers 
it is $5; in paper $3.^5. Order 
from your local book store today a 
copy for yourself and gift copies 
for your friends, or fill in the 
coupon and mail it with your check 
to the publishers. 

Houghton Mifflin Company 

2 Park Street 

Boston 7, Massachusetts 

****** 

DATES TO REMEMBER 

Christmas Day 
December 25, I960 

American Camping Association 
District Meeting 
April 12-14, 1961 

Family Camping Workshop 
April 22-23, 1961 

* * * * * * 




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