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Full text of "The German-English College at Galena, Illinois"



UNIVERSITY OP lyjNClS 






German -Enjlisli Collep, 

Galena, Illinois. 



55Q-15QO. 



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SMITH, MATHIS & CO., PRINTFRS AND BINDERS, DUaUQUE. 



iO\OODS WELL BOUGHT ARE HALF SOLD is a maxim as true as it is old. 
[Gc Knowing that our present stock was bought to fully meet the demands of the 
^^ times, and is being sold at prices that meet with -the approval of all purchasers, 
we most heartily invite you to call at an early day and look, at least, at some of the 
MANY bargains that we are oflering. Our stock consists in part of FINE DRESS GOODS, 
SILKS, PLUSHES, SHAWLS, JACKEIS, WRAPS, Laces, Embroideries, White Goods, Muslins 
and Knit Underwear, Lace Curtains, Window Shades, Ladies' and Gents' Furnishing Goods, 
Straw and Felt Hats, Shoes, Notions, Perfumery, Fancy Goods, Jewelry, Stationery and 
Notions. 

Again we invite you to call and see us before purchasing elsewhere. 
Yours Truly, 

J5ARK1' BROS., 

H. H. Chandler's Old Stand, Gm.e^.k, Illinois. 



I 



E. THOMPSON. 



THOMPSON & SULLIVAN, 

Undertakers 9 EiTtbnliiiers^ 

And Dealers in First-Class 

PARLOR, CHAMBER, AND OFRCE FURNITURE, 

A.lsa Chairs, Bedstencls, I^oakin^ Glasses, Btc., /3tc'. 

g. h. rottl^br, 
Baker § Confectioner, 

And Dealer in Cigrars, Fruits, Toys, Etc., 

136 MAIN STREET, 

GALENA, - - - - ILLINOIS. 

j^?^Weddings and Private Parties supplied on short notice. 

"""STRYKER 8c KERNT 

DENIHS'FS.- 

Office Opposite Coatsworth & Son, 

146 MAIN STREET. 

G-j^LiBisr^, _ - _ - iLLinsrois. 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



fBJSU>BNT« CUmCB. 



'pe^n^an ^ ^^.ngliak ^K^oll^ge^ 



GALBHA, - tLUHOtS, 



por tlpe JuL/eoty-seeoQd Sel?ool Year. 



1889-1890. 



GERMAX-EXCiLISH COLLEGE, 



Ragulipy. 



Rev. Frederick Schaub, A. M,, President, 

Mathematics and Commercial Work. 

Rev. Edward E. Schuette, Vice-President, 

Theology and History. 

Rev. Frank E. Hirsch, A. B. , B. D. , Librarian, 

Ancient Languages and German. 

Miss Carrie L. Schulz, Secretary, 

United States History and Normal Work. 

George M. Hewey, B. E., 

English and Natural Science. 

Miss M. Etta Berryman, 

Preparatory Studies 

Miss Nellie Roberts, 

Instrumental Music. 



GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



Genbi^al FjEMAr^I^S. 



MORAL AND RELIGIOUS 

We live in a land whose boast it is, that her founders feared God and reverenced 
His Word, and we justly attribute her superiority over the darker countries of the 
earth to the grand truths and noble precepts of Christianity. Very justly, too, do we 
rely upon our faith and practice as a Christian people for the perpetuation of our free 
institutions. If, then, we owe so much to the Christian religion for what we are, and 
depend so much upon it for what we hope to be, how important it is, that all our 
youth should be nurtured under its influences. We do not mean sectarianism when 
we speak of religious training, and the German-English College, though under the 
control of German Methodists, does not aim to teach the particular doctrines of Meth- 
odism except in the Theological Course. Its aim, howe\er, is, by precept and ex- 
ample, to teach the religion of the Bible, to which no reasonable man of whate\er be- 
lief can object. 

Each day's work is opened with appropriate religious exercises, which all the stu- 
dents attend. On Sabbath the students are expected to attend public worship at such 
churches as they or their guardians may select, and to be uniform in their attendance. 
The College Young Men's Christian Association has its regular meetings Sabbath 
afternoons, and the Young Women's Christian Association at an appropriate time dur- 
ing the week. A majority of the young men and women belong to these Societies re- 
spectively, and take a deep interest in the meetings, which are devoted t«i prayer, 
Bible-study, and other exercises. The Societies are under the control of the students, 
but members of the Faculty attend regularly and help to make the meetings interest- 
ing and profitable. 

In conformity with the practice of other institutions of similar grades, the College 
keeps the "Day of Prayer for Colleges" by appropriate services. 



DISCIPLINE. 

We take for granted that all students enter with the intention of devoting their 
time to hard study Our regulations, which are few, are such as will aid them in 
effecting their purpose. ' 

Control is exercised with mildness, yet with firmness and decision. It is our aim 
to instill principles of right conduct and self-government, and rely upon the honor of 
the students. Yet, though we endeavor to exercise that judicious supervision that will 
develop the better nature of the student, we cannot be held i-esponsible if reckless per- 
sons seek like companions and are led into bad habits. Neither can those who are 
guilty of improper conduct, and exert a detrimental, influence expect to be retained to 
the injury of others. 

As it interferes with the work of students generally, no association of ladies and 
gentlemen is allowed out of school hours, except on special occasions, and then only 
by express permission of the President. The use of profane language, tobacco, and in-, 
toxicating liquors, visiting billiard or drinking saloons, playing cards, and disorderly 
conduct in or about the building, are strictly forbidden. Study hours must be ob- 
served with systematic regularity, and students are subject to an account of how they 
spend their evenings. 



GERMAN-ENGLISH COLLEGE. 



ENTRANCE. 

All students filtering the College directly from other schools will be required to 
furnish evidence of good conduct. 

All students should be present on the first day of each term, as the loss of a few 
da\s only, often makes it necessary to assign the applicant to a lower grade than he 
would have been assigned, had he been present at the beginning. Although we make 
an eflort to accommodate students at any time t)f the year, it must be apparent that 
those who enter later are at a disadvantage, if they are put into classes that have been 
thoroughly drilled on the "fundamentals" of any branch for a week or more. To ac- 
commodate those who cannot come at the beginning of the year, a few new classes in 
the General Preparatory and the First Year's Normal and .\cademic Courses will be 
organized on the first Tuesday of November and at the beginning of the Winter Term. 

CERTIFICATES, DIPLOMAS, AND DEGREES. 

Certificates, showing the attendance and scholarship for the term, are issued to 
the students at the close of each term. A diploma will be awarded to anyone who has 
acquired a standing of eighty-five per cent, by written examination, in all the studies 
of either the Normal, the Academic, the Theological, or the Commercial Course. The 
Degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those who satisfactorily complete 
the Classical Course; and the Degree of Bachelor of Science, upon those who, in like 
manner, complete the Scientific Course. The Degree of Master of Arts may be con- 
ferred in fiirsii upon every Bachelor of Arts of three or more gears' standing, who has 
since graduation been engaged in some literary occupation. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Three Literary Societies are connected with the institution — The Teutonia. The 
Washingtonian, and The Willard. The first is for gentlemen, and offers the neces- 
sary and desirable practice in the German language; the second is also for gentlemen, 
and affords the same advantages in English; and the third, also English, is for ladies. 
They are held in the most suitable rooms of <he College building, on Fridays, immedi- 
ateh- after school. Good work was done by those who attended regularly. Those 
who do not join the Societies will be obliged to do literary work before the Faculty reg- 
ularly, unless excused for a special reason. Each Society has a library, of which all 
ha\e free use. 

GENERAL AND LOAN LIBRARIES. 

Students ha\e access to the general libraries containing valuable English and Ger 
man reference books. The Text-Book Loan Library enables the renting of books to 
students, thereby saving them a considerable amount annually. Every student who 
desires to rent books will be rec^uijed to deposit $5.00 with the Librarian to insure the 
institution in case of loss. ' When he leaves and returns his books, rent, at the rate of 
five cents per week, will be deducted from the deposit, and the remainder returned. 
The special books for commercial work are not rented. Students are ad\ised to bring 
text-books which they have for purposes ot reference. 



CABINET. 

Owing to the kindness of ex-students and other friends, we have a collection of 
Anatomical, Zoological, and Creological specimens, the latter of which were recently 
increased b)- one hundred and fift}- labeled rocks and fossils. Additions are alwa_\-s 
gratefull}- received. 



GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



ADDRESSES, PUBLIC MEETINGS, ETC. 

It is the design ol' the t'olletje to gi\e a broader culture than that obtained in the 
class room, and from the text-book. To secure this result it is the custom to have 
public addresses or lectures f^i\-en at intervals during each year. During the present 
year four such have been delivered. The first by the Rev. John Williamson, D, D,, 
Chicago, Illinois, on "Life's Crises," The second by Judge W. Spensley, "How Our 
Laws Are Made." The third by the Rev, C, E, Morse, "Elements of Success, " The 
fourth by Hon. Jas. Shaw, Mt. Carroll, Illinois, "The Ownership of the Childhood of 
the State. 

For the same general purpose, a series of four special Class Exercises was given 
before the students. These were by members of the classes in United States History, 
Physiolcjg}-, Physics, and Geology, who presented essays on special lines of study. 

In addition to these a series of "Chapel Talks" on various practical phases of the 
conduct of life, was given by the President, 

The Literary Societies also hold Special Public Meetings during the \ear. Four 
such literary entertainments were gi\en this }ear. 

At various times during the year the Christian organi;sations are accustomed to 
give special Missicm Meetings, with songs and addi-esses by the members. 



EXPENSES. 

Tuition, payable in advance for the ensuing term, per week $ .75 

Matriculation 50 

Instruction on I'iano or Organ, each, per term of 20 lessons S,oo 

Use of instrument for a term of 10 weeks, 5 hours per week 1,50 

Conferring of a Degree 5.00 

Diploma 2,00 

f^Susiness Practice 2,2s 



BOARD. 

There is no lack of good boarding places in the city. Many good families are de- 
sirous of student boarders, at rates ranging from $2,25 to $2,75 per week. Rooms 
can also be obtained by those who desire to board themselves. It is thus evident that 
the economical student can keep his total necessary expenses at about S3. 00 per week. 



PARENTS AND GUARDIANS 

May, if they desire, deposit funds with the President, or any of the teachers, for 
the expenses of their children. This is especially desirable in the case of minors. 



GERMAN-ENGLISH COLLEGE, 



(goUf^SES OP S^UDY. 



In the selection and arrangement of the studies in the following courses, -the ac- 
tual needs of students have been considered, and it is believed that they contain the 
outline of such work as will enable the earnest student to prepare himself for a use- 
ful life. 

The General Preparatory Course has been arranged with special reference to those 
whose advantages, in common schools even, have been very limited. An examination 
of the course will show that it is not a primary department for children; but a course 
for those who have (utti:[ro':(>ii the public schools, and are awakened to the fact that 
they are not properly equipped for this advanced age. However, the student is not re- 
quired to take all the studies of this course, if he is deficient in only one branch; but 
he is allowed, in addition, to enter such advanced classes as his qualifications permit. 

The Normal Course compares favorably with similar courses of other schools. We 
call special attention to the Elementary Course, which, it will be seen, contains all the 
branches required for a second or a third-grade certificate. What is said on "Normal 
Work" will be found under "Outline of Work." 

The Academic Course is designed for students who are to go out into practical pur- 
suits. Yet, upon an examination of its scope of studies, it will be seen that it lays a 
foundation for a truly liberal education. The numbers pursuing this course show a 
marked increase this year. 

The Commercial Course is arranged and conducted according to the plan of the best 
business colleges. It is properly graded, comprising a great variety of sets, finall}' 
followed by a special set in Business Practice. Class e.xercises and individual work, 
supplementing each other, make the course thorough. Extensive drill is given in all 
kinds of Commercial Papers. Students, however, should not enter this course until 
they are able to compute interest and discount. 

The Theological Course is designed for those who intend to enter the German min- 
istry; hence the recitations are conducted in German. This course is now settled, and 
being pursued by a comparatively large number. Those who pursue it have the priv- 
ilege of taking any other studies of the College which their time and grade will permit. 
Thus, we believe, such preparation can be given as is demanded for a minister by the 
times in which we live. 

The Classical and Scientific Courses are intended to meet the wants of the great 
mass of American youth. It is to be desired that a large number will pursue one of 
these regular courses. 

A more comprehensive description of the work done in these courses is gi\-en in 
the "Outline of Work." 



GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



OUJTLINE OF QJor^I^. 



We wish here to correct any possible false local impression that the College i?; pre- 
ponderantly German in its courses. While few institutions have better facilities for 
teaching the German language and literature, and while we are constantly and ener- 
getically developing the German work, still, none the less are our Normal and Aca- 
demic courses fitted for all who desire an English education. That our patrons may 
the better understand what is done in the institution, we give a brief outline of the 
work in different branches. 

I. ENGLISH. 

1. Reading, Spelling, and Orthography. — Special attention is given to these in the 
preparatory work. For spelling Reed's "Word Lessons" is used. For reading, Ap- 
pleton's Readers during the Fall Term. With the design of securing better lessons 
for practice, and, at the same time, of stimulating a love for the best literature, these 
readers ai'e, for the remainder of the year, replaced by Irving's "Sketch Book," 
Shakespeare's "Merchant of Venice," Hawthorne's "Biographical Stories," Longfel- 
low's "Evangeline, " and "fennyson's "Enoch Arden." 

2. English Grammar. — There are classes of two grades. First, for those who have 
never studied grammar, a class using Reed and Kellogg's "Graded Lessons." Second, 
a class of more mature students whose work is more analytical and scientific. In this 
class Reed and Kellogg's "Higher Lessoiis in English " is used. In both classes com- 
position work accompanies class work. 

3. Rhetoric — The science of Rhetoric, accompanied with many practical exer- 
cises, continues through the Fall and Winter Terms. 

4. Rhetorical Analysis and Criticism. — During the Spring Term the work of Rhet- 
oric is concluded by a rhetorical analysis and criticism of selections from various au- 
thors. Compositions are written and criticised by the class. 

5. English Literature. — This also continues through the Fall and Winter Terms. 
It is designed to teach the history of English Literature, to lead students to an ac- 
quaintanceship with the thought and life of our great writers, and to inspire a love 
for the thorough reading of good literature. A critical reading of the "Prologue to 
the Canterbury Tales," the First Book of the "Fairy Queen," "Hamlet," and "Mer- 
chant of Venice," five of "Bacon's Essays," two books of "Paradise Lost, " Macauley's 

"Warren Hastings," Goldsmith's "Traveler," and selections from Carlysle, Tenny- 
son, etc., constitutes the body of the work. 

6. American Literature. — This work is during the Spring Term, and follows the 
same plan as that in English Literature. A study of Irving, Longfellow, Whittier. 
Lowell, Holmes, Bryant, Emerson, etc., is made. 

II. GERMAN. 

1. Reading, One Year. — This course is designed for German students who need in- 
struction in pronunciation, and general elocutionary drill. As a text-book "Bone" 
will be used part of the year; and German classics: as, "Hermann und Dorothea," 
"Maria Stuart, ' the remainder. Spelling is taught in connection with the reading. 

2. Language Lessons, One Year. — The work is designed to make the student prac- 
tically familiar with the language. For this purpose many exercises in composition 
iire required. 



GERISIAN-KNGLISH COLLEGE 



3. Advanced Grammar, One Year. — This is a continuation of Course 2; but takes up 
the study of inflections more thorouj,'hl}-. Anal\sis and diaf,'raming after the most ap- 
proved modern methods are a prominent feature. 

4. German Literature. — The stud)- of the history of German Literature and read- 
ings from the authors of the different epochs accompan}- each other. In this way the 
character of the literature and of the epoch is the better learned, and an ability in crit- 
ical reading and accurate judgment of literature is developed. Works of Goethe, 
Schiller, Herder, Lessing, Klopstock: the "Niebulungenlied," etc., are read. 

5. Rtietoric. — It is designed to combine theory, practical directions, and exercises. 
Compositions are written and criticised. The I'rofessor furnishes the text from manu- 
script. 

The abo\'e courses are all designed for German students. 

6. Beginning English-German. — This course is for English speaking students. The 
"Natural" and the "Scientific" methods are combined. Conversations, reading, and 
the rudiments of Grammar constitute the work. Much attention is also given to cog- 
nate words and forms of the English and German. Part I. of Ruetenik's Grammar, 
and Stern's "Studien und Plaudereien" are used. 

7. Advanced English-German. — This is a continuation of Course 6. Much atten- 
tion is given to constructions and German idioms. The aim is to conduct the work 
wholly in German. 

Careful investigation, we believe, will show that our work in this department is 
superior both in practicabilit\ and efficienc}'. 



III. LATIN. 

1. Beginning Latin. — Fall and Winter Terms.. The books used are Harkness" 
Grammar and Jones" "Lessons." Latin composition is begun and continues through- 
out the first three years. During the Spring Term the class reads Cfesar. 

2. Classics. — The reading of Caesar (four Books), followed by Cicero, (four Ora- 
tions), constitutes the work. A main object kept in view during this year's work is to 
secure facility in translation, and an acquaintance with Roman military and political 
life. For the order of taking up the other authors we refer to the higher courses. 

IV. GREEK. 

The work at present in Greek is designed to give the Theological students a suf- 
ficient start to enable them to read the New Testament in the original. The first two- 
thirds of the year ai'e devoted to the Grammar and translation from the mother 
tongue into Greek, and vice versa. The last one-third of the year is given to the read- 
ing of the New Testament. 

V. HISTORY. 

In keeping with the importance of history in education, the College gives three- 
years to it. 

1. United States History. — To this is given a whole year. There are two classes; 
one following the other. The first closes and the second begins at the middle of the 
Winter Term. The second class accommodates those, who, for any reason, could not 
take the work the first part of the year. An especial effort is made to secure independ- 
ent effort and free thought on the part of the student, by a study of various principles 
and customs through the different periods of our history. This end is also i^eached by 
sending the student to books of reference for further studv. 



GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



2. Ancient History. — To this also one year is given. This course is'a history both 
ot the ancient nations and of their civilizations. The facilities for teaching this branch 
have recently been improved by the purchase of an excellent set of historical and geo- 
graphical maps. 

3. Medieval History. — This course continues twenty weeks. 

4. Modem History. — The time devoted will vary in different years. Special study 
will be made of some of the most important periods, in addition to the work of the 
text-book. 

The entire subject of General History, as well as Church Histor}' and Sacred 
History, is also tauglit in German. 



VI. NORMAL WORK. 

It is the aim in this department to teach both principles and their application to 
school-room work. The courses are as follows: 

1. School Management. — A course in the appliances, organization, and manage- 
ment of the school. 

2. Methods. — Attention is given to both primary and advanced work. The es- 
pecial difficulties to the teacher are treated. The class has actual practice in con- 
ducting lessons. 

3. Pedagogy. — A course in the principles underlying all mental development, and 
an analysis of various studies. • 

4. School Law. — This is a comparati\e study of the school laws of the states from 
which members of the class come: 

5. History of Education. — This is highly important to every teacher. It is hoped 
that g(iodl\' numbers will hereafter call for this branch. 



VII. MATHEMATICS. 

1. Arithmetic. — A class in Practical Arithmetic beginning at the Four Funda- 
mental Operations, and continuing throughout the year. Another class begins in No- 
vember and continues about five months. 

2. Advanced Arithmetic. — The first term is given to a review of Fractions and De- 
nominate Numbers; the second, to Percentage; and the third, to Involution, Evolution 
and Mensuration. Original problems are a prominent feature of the work. 

3. Algebra. — A class continuing through the Fall and Winter Terms, finishing the 
text of Thomson. A beginning class in the same book is fi-equently formed in the 
middle of the year. 

4. Advanced Algebra. — The class begins in September and continues twenty-two 
weeks. Much attention is given to the demonstration of theorems. 

5. Geometry. — A beginning class in Plane Geometi-y continuing during the Spring 
Term. 

6. Geometry. — A course covering the whole subject of Geometry. Much work 
with original problems is done. 

7. Trigonometry. — A course in Plane, Spherical, and Analytic Trigonometrv 
during the Spring Term. 



GERMAN-ENGLISH COLLEGE, 



VIM. NATURAL SCIENCE. 

1. Physiology. — Twenty weeks. A thorough study of the physiological eflects of 
alcohol is made. A skeleton and Yaggy's Anatomical Chart are used as aids in the 
study . 

2. Zoology. — Eighteen weeks. Most attention is given to the comparative study 
<if animals. 

3. Physical Geography. — Twenty weeks. Meteorology and Climatology are es- 
pecially emphasized. 

4. Natural Philosophy. — Twenty-two weeks. All formulas are applied in the so- 
lution of problems. 

5. Botany. — After studying the text of Wood, much time is given to plant analy- 
sis and records. 

6. Geology. — Dana's text is used. The work is illustrated by a good collection 
of rocks and fossils. 

7. Astronomy. — This work is aided by a good telescope of four inch objective. 



IX. PHILOSOPHY. 

1. Logic. — Sixteen weeks. Much practice with original s}llogisms is a prominent 
part of the work. 

2. Logic. — In the German language. 

3. Psychology. 

4. Ethics. — These last two courses are also in the German. They are, howe\er, 
open to all who can use the language. 



GALENA, ILLINOIS. 13 



(gALSNDAr^. 



Twenty-third School Year, 1S90-1S91. 

FALL TERM 
Begins Tuesday, September 9, 1890: closes Friday, December 19, 1S90. 

VACATION-TWO WEEKS. 

WINTER TERM 
Begins Monday, January 5, 1891; closes Thursday, April 2, 1S91. 

SPRING TERM 
Begins Monday, April 6, 1S91; closes Thursday, June 11, 1891. 

PUBLIC EXAMINATIONS, 
June 8, 9, and 10, 1891. 

COMMENCEMENT, 
June II, 1891. 



GEKMAN-ENCiLISH COLLEGE, 



©Bxni Booi^s. 



Arithmetic Robinson, Fish Complete 

Algebra Thomson, Schuyler 

Astronomy Newcomb and Holden 

Analytical Geometry Wentworth 

American Literature Shaw, Trimble 

Botany Wood 

Book-keeping Williams and Rogers 

Calculus Peck 

Chemistry __ Steele 

Civil Government Young 

Commercial Law Clark 

English Literature Shaw, Trimble 

Geograph\- Harper 

Geology Dana 

General History Myers 

GeometrN" Brooks, Wentworth 

Grammar Reed & Kellogg 

I Grammar Ruetenik, Plate, Heyse 

I Reader . . Bone 

German I Conversation Stem 

I Literature Greiner 

I Rhetoric 

([jj-eek Goodwin (White) 

History of Education Painter 

History of the United States Taylor 

Latin Grammar Harkness 

Latin Lessons Jones 

Language Lessons Reed & Kellogg 

Logic True 

Music: Vocal — Happy Moments. Instrumental. 

Mechanics Peck 

Mental Philosophy Haven 

Methods of Teaching Swett 

Natural Philosophy Steele 

Pedagogy Hewett 

Physiology Hutchison 

Physical Geography • Houston 

Penmanship Spencer 

I'olitical Economy Chapin, Gregory 

Reading Appleton's IV. and \ . — Classic Authors 

Rhetoric Kellogg 

School Economy Raub, Page 

Surveying and Navigation Wentworth 

Trigonometry '. • Wentworth 

Word Lessons Reed 

Zoology Orton 

Note.— These and all other necessary books and stationery can be bought at the school 
at reduced prices. Students can rent most text boolcs at a reasonably low rate. The stu- 
dent in that case deposits $5.00, from which five cents per weels are deducted when the 
books are returned. Special books for book-keeping- are not rented. 



CtALKNA, ILLINOIS. 



©OUr^SBS OP SH^UDY. 



¥\IJ. TERiM 

15 Wkeks. 



C./iA/iK.A/. /'W/i/'.l7^.\TOi?^' CaUIiSli 



FIRST YEAR. 



WiNTEU TERMSpRING TERM 

i 13 Weeks. 10 Weeks. 



SECOND YEAR. 



Fall Term JWinter Teum^ SPRfNoTEH.M 
15 Weeks. ! 13 Weeks. 10 Weeks. 



Eng-. Reading. Eng. Reading. En g-. Reading.' Eng-. Reading-. En g-. Reading. En gf. Reading-. 



Spelling:. Spelling-. Spelling. 

Arithmetic. JArithmetic. Arithmetic. 
Language Les. iLanguage Las. I Lang uageLes. 



Writing. 



Writing. 



Writing. 



Spelling. Spelling. Spelling. 

Arithmetic. Arithmetic. Arithmetic. 
Language Les Language LesJLanguage Lcs 
Geography. Geography. :i: | 

Geography. t+:Geography. 



ELEMENTARY. 



P^IRST YEAR. 1 




SECOND YEAR. 


F.M.T, Term 


Winter Term 


Sprino Term 


Fall Term 


: Winter Term 


Spring Terai 


1.5 Weeks. 


13 Weeks. 


10 Weeks. 


15 Weeks. 


' 13 Weeks 


10 Weeks. 


Reading. 


Reading. 


Reading. 


El. Algebra. 


El. Algebra. 


El. Geometry. 


Orthography. 


Orthoepy. 


Word Analys. 


Adv. Gram. 


Adv. Gram. 


Adv. Grammar. 


Grammar. 


Grammar 


Grammar. 


Physiology. 


Physiology. * 


* 


Arithmetic. 


Arithmetic. 


Arithmetic. 




Zoology. ■(■ 


Zoology. 




U. S. History.:|: 




Phys. Geog. 


Phys. Geog. * 




U.S. Hi,story. 


U.S.HistoryVt 


U. S. History., 




Civil Gov't. ■•■ 


Civil Governm't 


Vocal Music. 


Vocal Music. Penmanship. ' 


School Econ. 


Methods. Methods. 



ADVANCED. 



THiRD YEAR. 


FOURTH YEAR. 


Pall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


Fall Term 


IWiNTER Term 


Spring Term 


15 Weeks. 


13 Weeks. 


10 Weeks. 


15 Weeks. 


13 Weeks. 


10 Weeks. 


High Algebra. 


High Algeb. :|: 
Logic. ■t + 


Logic. 1 


Plane Geom. 

1 


Solid Geom. 


Trigonometry. 


Rhetoric. 


Rhetoric. 


Criticism. < 


{English Lit. 


English Lit. 


American Lit. 


Nat. Philos. 


Nat. Philos. :l: 




Geology. 


Geology. * 






Botany. -^-^ 


Botany. 




Astronomy. ^ 


Astronomj'. 


Anc't Hrstory. 


Anc't History. 


Anc't History. 


Med. History 


. Med. History.* 




Pedagogy. School Law. Hist, of Educ. 




Mod. Historyl- 


Mod. History. 



These are the studies of the Normal Course; with two years each of Latin and German 
in place of the Professional studies** they constitute the Academic Course. 

*Five Weeks. -lEight Weeks. :!:Seven Weeks. HSix Weeks. 

** School Economy, Methods, Pedagogy, School Law, and History of Education. 



GERMAN-ENGLISH COLLEGE 



C OMM It. 1i C J. V T. C (* UK S H. 



LANGUAGE. 




MATHEMATICS. 


PROFESSIONAL. 


Enjilish Keading-. 




General Arithmetic. 


Commercial Law. 


Spelling-. 




Special Com'l' Calculations. 


Business Forms. 

Double and Single Ent. Book-lv'g-. 


English Ciamraav. 




Partnership Problems. 


Actual Business Practice. 


Business Correspon 


dence. 


Examination Problems. 


Practical Penmanship. 



TUEOLOaiCAI. PRET*A.TiATOR\' COURSE. 



FIRST YEAR. 


SECOND YEAR. 


FALL TERM. 


WINT. TERM. 


SPRING TERM. 


FALL TERM. 


WINT. TERM. 


SPRING TERM 


Ger. Kead and Or 


Ger. Read, Or. Ger. Read. Or. 


Ger. Literat. 


Ger. Literat. 


Ger. Literat. 


Read. andOrtho. 


Read, Orthog. Read. Orthog-. 


Vocal Mu.sic. 


Vocal Music. 


Vocal Music. 


Ger. Lang. Les. 


Ger. Lang-. Les, Ger. Lang. Les 


Ger. Gram. 


Ger. Gram. 


Ger. Gram. 


Lang. Lessons. 


Lang-. Les. Lang. Les. 


Grammar. 


Grammar. 
Geography. :|: 


Grammar. 


Writing-. 


Writing. IWriting-. 


Geography. 


U. S. Hist. +•( 


U. S. History 


Arithmetic. 


Arithmetic. 


Arithmetic. 1 


Arithmetic. 


Arithmetic. 


Arithmetic. 



TJiEauaaiCAi, course. 



>i 


T 












1 


Rhetoric. 


General History. 


Biblical Geography. 


Catechism. 


H 


3 


Rhetoric. 


General History. 


Sacred History. 


Isagogics. 


tu 


3 


Logic. 


General History. 


Sacred History. 


Isagogics. 




1 


Latin. 


General History. 


Biblical Antiquities. 


Dogmatics. 




2 


Latin. 


Church History. 


Biblical Antiquities. 


Dogmatics. 





3 


Latin. 


Church History. 


Biblical Nat. History. 


Ethics. 


. 


1 


Greek. 


Hist, of Methodism. 


Apologetics. 


Homiletics. 


2 


2 


Greek. 


American Methodism 


Exegesis. 


Past Theology. 


H 


3 


Greek. 


Psychology. 


Exegesis. 


Catechetics and 
Church Discipline. 



These classes are conducted in Gei-man. 
:|: Seven -weeks. -H- Six -weeks. 



GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



soiH:KTiFia oauiiSE. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



F.A.LL TERM. 



Latin Gram, 
and Lessons 

German. 

Algebra. 

Physiology. 

Phys. Geog. 



WINT. TERM. SPRING TERM, 



Latin Gram. 1 
and Lessons Cn-sar. 



German. 
Algebra. 



• German 
Geometry 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



FALL TERM. WINT. TERM 



Physiology. * 

Zoology. ■*• [Zoology. 

Phys, Geog.* 

Civil Gov't •(■ ICi7il Gov't. 



CiBsar. 
iGerman. 
High. Algebra 
Anc. History. 
Physics. 



Cicsar. * 
Cicero. I- 
German. 

High. Algeb. :| 
Logic. ++ 
Anc. History 

Physics. :|: 
Botany. +•(■ 



SPRING TERM. 



Cicero. 
German. 



Logic. 

Anc. History. 



Botany. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



FALL TERM. 


WINT. TERM. 


SPRING TERM. 


Virgil. 

M. History. 
Geometry. 

Eng. Literat. 
Geology. 


Virgil, t 

Ovid.* 

M. History. 

Geometry. 

Eng. Literat. 
Geology.* 
Astronomy. + 


Ovid. 

M. History. 

Trigonometry 

Am. Literat. 
Astronomy. 



FALL TERM. 



German Lit. 
Analytical 
Geometry. 

Mental Phil. 

iPolitical Econ 



WINT. TERM. 



German Lit. 
Difieerential 



Moral Phil. 
Chemistry. 



SPRING TERM. 



German Litera. 
Integral 

Calculus. 

Psychology. 
Chemistry. 



C A.vlSS/C.il. COURSE. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 


SOPHOMORE YEAlt. 


FALL TERM. WINT. TERM. 


SPRING TERM. 


FALL TERM. 


WINT. TERM. 


SPRING TERM. 


Cii'sar. Cvesar. * 
Cicero. + 
Greek Gram . Greek Gram, 
and Exercises and Exercises 
High. Algebra High. Algeb. :t; 
liOgic. tc 
Anct. History. Anct. History. 

Physics. Physics. * 

Botany. ++ 


Cicero. 
Xenophon. 

Logic. 

Anct. History 

Botany. 


Virgil. 

Xenophon. 

Geometry. 
English Lit. 

Geology. 

M. History. 


Virgil. + 
Ovid. * 
Xenophon. 

Geometry. 
English Lit. 

Geology.* 
Astronomy.t 
M. History. 


Ovid. 

New Testament. 

Trigonometry. 
American Lit. 

Astronomy. 
M History. 


JUNIOR YEAR. ! 


SENIOR YEAR. 


FALL TERM. 


WINT. TERM. 


SPRING TERM. 


FALL TERM. 


WINT. TERM. 


SPRING TERM. 


Tacitus. 
Homer. 
Analyt. Geom. 
Political Econ 
Mental Phil. 


Sallust 

Homer. 

Ditferential 

Calculus. 
Chemistry. 

Moral Pliilos. 


Horace. 

Herodotus. 

Integral 

Calculus. 
Chemistry. 

Psychology. 


Theses. 

Plato. 

Mechanics. 

Philosophy of 
Education. 


Theses. 

Demosthenes. 

Descriptive 
Geometry. 

History of 
Philosophy. 


Theses. 
Demosthenes. 

Perspective. 

..Esthetics. 



The Scientific Course may be pursued after completing the first year of the Academic 
Course; the Classical, after completing the Lrst two years, with Latin. 



*Five Weeks. tEight Weeks. tSeven Weeks 



GERMAN-ENGLISH COLLEGE, 



Students. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Sippel, Conrad H., D. D. S Charles City, Iowa 

ACADEMIC COURSE. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Hodson, Harry R Galena, Illinois 

Louchheim, Carrie Galena, Illinois 

Spensley, Hattie A Galena, Illinois 

Wheeler, Bessie Galena, Illinois 

SECOND YEAR. 

Avery, G. Wynne Galena, Illinois 

Buss, G. Albert Rockham, South Dakota 

Eggler, Godferd LaCrosse, Wisconsin 

Redfearn, Charles W Council Hill, Illinois 

Rees, Earl B Galena, Illinois 

FIRST YEAR. 

Benz, Fred. G Charles City, Iowa 

Blewett, Blanchard D Galena, Illinois 

Hansen, Frieda D. M Earlville, Iowa 

Hoelscher, Clara E Colesburg, Iowa 

Kahl, Joseph A Radcliffe, Iowa 

Klotzbach, John G Giard, Iowa 

Koerner, William F Yellow Creek, Illinois 

Meyer, Anna C St. Paul, Minnesota 

Moser, Emma E Galena, Illinois 

Rudolph, Mary C Galena, Illinois 

NORMAL COURSE. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Campbell, Fitz J New Diggings, Wisconsin 

Fisher, Ida A Galena, Illinois 

Oldenburg, Lizzie Galena, Illinois 

Thompson, John H Galena, Illinois 

THIRD YEAR. 

Dubler, George J Galena, Illinois 

Meyer, Henry J Redwing, Minnesota 

Petersmeyer, Emma D Odebolt, Iowa 

Seubert, Fred Galena, Illinois 

SECOND YEAR. 

Buehler, John W Odebolt, Iowa 

Jewell, Alvina S ■ Galena, Illinois 

Lyne, Ella E Scales Mound, Illinois 

Oliver, Jennie Howardsville, Illinois 

Ringle, Ernest G Herman, Wisconsin 

Slattery, Walter A Galena, Illinois 



GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



FIRST YEAK. 

Bergheger, Adolph H Stitzer, Wisconsin 

Birkbeck, Samuel Council Hill, Illinois 

Campbell, Louis A Georgetown, Colorado 

Combellick, Alice S Council Hill, Illinois 

Croft, William New Diggings, Wisconsin 

Dillon, Martin J Galena, Illinois 

Edgerton, George H Hanover, Illinois 

Gibson, J. Will • Galena, Illinois 

Granzow, Richard W Hubbard, Iowa 

Grue, Jonn W Galena, Illinois 

Harris, Arthur Council Hill, Illinois 

Hart, Michael L Galena, Illinois 

Hatch, Lucy N Galena, Illinois 

Howarth, Walter J Elizabeth, Illinois 

Kluckhohn, Albert C Stitzer, Wisconsin 

Kluckhohn, Edward Stitzer, Wisconsin 

Koerner, Sarah C. A Yellow Creek, Illinois 

Leekley, John G Galena, Illinois 

Leekley, Simon R Galena, Illinois 

Lupton, Ina M ". . . . Council Hill, Illinois 

Melcher, Silvanus G Charles City, Iowa 

Miller, Anna C ■ Earlville, Iowa 

Mitchell, Wesley Elizabeth, Illinois 

Morris, Charles J Galena, Illinois 

■^Mueller, Ernest Galena, Illinois 

Obermiller, William F Galena, Illinois 

Palmer, George M Galena, Illinois 

Redfearn, Edward Council Hill, Illinois 

Redfearn, I'ercy A Council Hill, Illinois 

Reed, Isabella Galena, Illinois 

Shannon, Sai'ah E Galena, Illinois 

Snyder, Emma S Galena, Illinois 

■ THEOLOGICAL COURSE. 

THIRD VE.\K. 

Clausen, George C Odebolt, Iowa 

SECOND YEAR. 

Arnold, Christian S Brownton, Minnesota 

Buehlmeyer, Fred. J Giard, Iowa 

Schulz, Fred. C Columbus, Wisconsin 

Zastrow, Adolph G Horicon, Wisconsin 

FIRST YEAR. 

Gauss, Herman Grand City, Iowa 

Hein, William ' Sun Prairie, Wisconsin 

Koe?the, Fred. W Waseca, Minnesota 

Krause, Theodore H. W Spencer, Iowa 

Schlein, William Giard, Iowa 

Schmidt, Henry R a Charles City, Iowa 

Thiel, Fred. H Rockford, Iowa 

THEOLOGICAL PREPARATORY. 

Loeck, William J Galena, Illinois 

Loemker, Herman J Colesburg, Iowa 

Schaefer, Fred. W Schaller, Iowa 

Schmidt, William G Dotyville, Wisconsin 

Weghorst, William F Rockford, Iowa 

Owing to the changes in the Theological Preparatory and Theological Courses, 
several students are classified in the same year as Ihey were last year. 

^Deceased. 



GERMAN-ENGLISH COLLEGE, 



GENERAL PREPARATORY. 

Allert, William J Giard, Iowa 

Anderson, Minnie Dubuque, Iowa 

Benzer, Fred. J Galena, Illinois 

Carter, Herman S Freeport, Illinois 

Goodman, William Rickardsville. Iowa 

Hankemeier, William F Galena, Illinois 

Hellman, Lydia M : : Melvin, Illinois 

Hennig, Charles H. Iron Ridge, Wisconsin 

Hess, Frank Galena, Illinois 

Holland, Wallace N Avery, Illinois 

Holtz, Fred. C Galena, Illinois 

Knapp, John H , . . Yellow Creek, Illinois 

Langer, Alphonse W Helena, Montana 

Louchheim, Samuel Galena, Illinois 

Martin, Benjamin H. .' Galena, Illinois 

Martin, George F. J Galena, Illinois 

Niedfelt, William H. F LaCrosse, Wisconsin 

Oldenburg, Henry Galena, Illinois 

Schwieger, Emma M • Dows. Iowa 

Simon, Charles Galena, Illinois 

Stueve, Herman J • Earlville, Iowa 

Wachenheim, John Galena, Illinois 

Wann, Daniel Galena, Illinois 

Wessel, Henry B Colesburg, Iowa 

Yundt, Richard T Galena, Illinois 

COMMERCIAL COURSE. 

Avery, G. W3'nne Galena, Illinois 

Dillon, Martin J Galena, Illinois 

Edgerton, George H Hanover, Illinois 

Hatch, Lucy N Galena, Illinois 

Louchheim, Carrie Galena, Illinois 

Meyer, Anna C St. Paul, Minnesota 

Oldenburg, Frank Galena, Illinois 

Redfearn, Charles W Council Hill, Illinois 

Redfearn, Percy A Council Hill, Illinois 

Rees, Earl B Galena, Illinois 

Winder, Alfred U 5enton, Wisconsin 



GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



Gl^ADUAiITBS. 



GLASS OF 1871. 

Thei-esia Girdon Chicag-o, Illinois 

Fred. Hii-sch, A. M., Prof. Normal Institute LeMars, Iowa 

Delia Jewett 

Emma Klaus, Mrs. H. Spink Platteville, Wisconsin 

Mary Kluckhohn, Mrs. M. H. Blumenthal .. Columbus, Wisconsin 

Matt. S. Lorain St. Louis Missouri 

Malcolm McNeill, Prof, of Mathematics, Lake Forest University Lake Forest, Illinois 

Eugene Spare Chicago, Illinois 

CLASS OF 1872. 

Charles A.Davis 

Zach. T. Davis 

Lewis Fablinger 

M. H. Birmingham, Merchant Galena, Illinois 

John .7. Steele, Teacher Rice, Illinois 

.lohn M. Wilco.Y, Physician 

Chas. E. Davis, Physician 

CLASS OF 1873. 

Ihomas Birmingham, Lumber Merchant O'Neill, Nebraska 

.Tames Burton, Merchant Persia, Iowa 

Damon Litle, Physician Niobrara, Nebraska 

Christian Morsch. 

CLASS OF lh74. 

Mattie Angwin, Mrs. Thomas Annetts Galena, Illinois 

J. Wesley Cliff. County Superintendent 

VVm. A. Reynolds* 

Sarah Roberts, Mrs. W. Heed Clay Center, Kansas 

CLASS OF 1S75. 

Wm. L. Davis Deadwood, South Dakota 

Ruf us Ford* • 

George Horst 

Thomas Hayden 

K. W. Levitt 

Henry Ross, Lumberman Jenny, Wisconsin 

John "a. Sherard. Merchant ." Stockton, Illinois 

H. A. Salzer, A. B., Lumberman La Crosse, Wisconsin 

Lydia Wenz, Mrs. G. W. Hickman, A. B Leola. South Dakota 

John W. Wilcox, Principal Scales Mound, Illinois 

Lester E. Yerrington. 

CLASS OF 1876. 

S. S. Bailey, Principal Belmont, Wisconsin 

Thomas Johnson* 

John Wichman, Lawyer Garner, Iowa 

CLASS OF 1877. 

Sarah Von Berg, Mrs. J. Essig Essig, Minnesota 

G. W. Hickman, A. B., Minister Leola. South Dakota 

John M. Leekley, Lawyer Galena, Illinois 

Mary Leehan 

George Roth* 

P. M. Rindesbacher Stockton, Illinois 

CLASS OF 1878. 

Thomas Edwards, A. B Ashland, Wisconsin 

B. F. Fowler, Lawyer Sundance, Wyoming Territory 

Louisa Kerslake, Mrs. R. Rogers Elizabeth, Illinois 

John H. Merten Morganville, Kansas 

C. W. Runge, B. S Frederick, South Dakota 

Frederick Schaub, A. M., President, German-English College Galena, Illinois 

Matt G. Wenz, B. S Springfield, Illinois 

CLASS OF 1879. 

Gilbert E. Haase 

Clara E. Heron, Mrs. Dr. C. E. Bean St. Paul, Minnesota 

Wesley V. Records 

^Deceased. 



GERMAN-ENGLISH COLLEGE, 



CLASS (JF 1880. 

EmiM'hrist, Minister ..Fairfax, Minnesota 

Win. F. Finke, A. M., Prof, of Languages, St. Paul's Colleg-e St. Paul Park, Minnesota 

Fred. L. Riser, Physician Lansin>i-, Iowa 

CLASS OF 1 88 1. 

Thomas G. Matthews, Physician Earlville, Iowa 

Henry A. Dittmer, Physician Manchester, Iowa 

Edg-ai- B. Newhall 

Edmund Burke 

Christian Rohrer, County Superintendent Henderson, Minnesota 

CLASS OF 1882. 

John P. Von Berg-, Physician Albert Lea, Minneso\a 

Andrew Immer, Minister Big- Stone City, South Dakota 

John H. Klaus, Mini ster La Crosse, Wisconsin 

S. W. Klaus, Merchant Earlville, Iowa 

CLASS OF 1883. 

Lydia Kluckhohn Stitzer, Wisconsin 

CLASS OF 1884, 

Maude Burton, Teacher Oalera. Illinois 

Henry C. Hess, Principal Winnebago City, Minnesota 

Florence Oliver, Teacher Howardsville, Illinois 

Carrie L. Schulz, Teacher, German-English College Galena, Illinois 

CLASS OF 1885. 

M. Etta Berry man. Teacher, Gernian-English College Galena, Illinois 

Prosper E. Courtade, Teacher Dazey, South Dakota 

CLASS OF 1886. 
NORJIAL. 

Minnie Kluckhohn, Mrs. G. L. Schneidei- Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Paulina E. Schreiner, Teacher Red Wing, Minnesota 

Ella B. Strott, Mrs. Rev. G. R. Fritze Alexandria, Minnesota 

ACADEMIC. 

Jacob Diirbahn, Minister Albert Lea, Minnesota 

Arthur F. Fischer. B. S Northfleld, Minnesota 

George Hillmer, Teacher New Ulm, Minnesota 

Henry J. Robert, Minister St. Paul, Minnesota 



CLASS OF 1887. 



ACADEMIC. 

Frank E. Moll, Minister Blunt, South Dakota 

George C. Rheinfrank, Minister Minneapolis, Minnesota 

CLASS OF 1888. 
NORMAL. 

E. Blanche McFall Odebolt, Iowa 

Edwin L. Zahn, Teacher, Jennings Seminary Aurora, Illinois 

SCtENTIFIC. 

John C. Boevers, B. S., Teacher Gibson City, Illinois 

George V. Klotzbach Omaha, Nebraska 

CLASS OF 1889. 
NORMAL. 

AUieM.Berryuian, Assistant Principal Richland Center, Wisconsin 

Emilie Rieske, Teacher of German Chicago, Illinois 

Minnie E. Smith, Teacher Galena, Illinois 



CLASS OF i8go, 

NORMAL. 

Fitz J. Campbell New Diggings, Wisconsin 

Ida A. Fisher Galena, Illinois 

Lizzie Oldenburg Galena, Illinois 

John H. Tho!np.son Galena, Illinois 

THEOLOfilCAL. 

George C. Clausen Odebolt, Iowa 



GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



l<SO.>. 1S9(). 

25th Annual Statement 

Of the Condition and Standing of the 

Qerf(\ai) (psurapee Qo., 

OF FReePOKT, ILLINOTS. 



.Z^lAXAR^' 1st, If-IOO. 

CASH CAPITAL $200,000.00 

Reserve for Unpaid Losses 89,423.59 

Reserve for Agency Balances and other Claims 15,123.50 

Reserve for Taxes and other Contingent Claims 10,000.00 

Reserve for Re-Insurance 1.682,060.75 

Net Surplus 456,013.25 

Total Assets $2,452,621.09 

SUMMARY OF ASSETS. 

Loans on Bonds and Mortgages, and Interest ,$1,426, 147.86 

City, Town, County, Bank, and Corporation Stocks and Bonds 272,559.87 

Loans on Collateral, (Stocks, Bonds and Mortgages), 55. 899- 50 

Real Estate, (Company's Building) 15,000.00 

Bills Receivable, not matured, taken for Fire Risks 316,963.56 

Net Cash in hands of Agents 133.854.23 

Cash on hand and in Banks 232,196.07 

ToT.\L Assets $2,452,621.09 

M. HETTINGER, WM. TREMBOR, 

President. Secretary. 

T. J. BeRM INGHAM. E. W. MONTGOMEKV. 

WM. HOSKINS & CO., 

PICKETS, POSTS, SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, FRAIWES, 

Building Paper, and Building Material of Every Description. 

General Office, GALENA, ILLINOIS, Market Square. 
Branch Yards at Elizabeth, III., and Cuba City, Wis. 



GERMAN-ENGLISH COLLEGE, 



-^ILEEMHUIS & SCHULTE,!^ 

par'dwai'e, ^toVe?, and TiiiWai'e. 

COPPER, TIN, AMD SHEET IRON WORKERS, 

114 and 116 Galena Street, 
FREEPORT, - - ILLIi>^OIs. 

^. JVC. Sa S. ROBERTS, 

DROVERS AND DEALERS IN 

L^IVB STOCK, 

Highest Market Price Paid for Cattle, Hogs, and Sheep. 

ALSO PROPRIETORS OF 

CITY = MEAT = MARKET, 

Where they keep constantly on hand all kinds of Fresh and Salt Meats in Season. The 
Supplying of Hotels and Boarding Houses made a Specialty. 

GT^L-ENK, -. - - IL-UINOIS. 

JOSEPH STROHMEYER. ' ANTON STROHMEYER. 

^trol^meyer Bro5., 

Wholesale Manufacturers of all kinds of 

BooiTS, Shoes^ and Slippei^s, 

All Goods Warranted and Prices as Cheap as the Cheapest. 

SoliUii (Jalena hy-II. STROIIMIZYHR <V- SOJV. 



GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



WILLIAM SINIGER, 

Prugs § AepiciHss. 

T'itints, Oils, \^iimisih<?s, Gla.ss, nticl Putty. 

PURE WINES AND LIQUORS FOR MEDICINAL USE. 

170 Main Street, - - - GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



'*S»T. XjOTJISi JSTOH-ES.' 



R. H. FIDDICK, 



-DEALER IN- 



Dry Goods, Carpets, Notions, Etc. 

The Reputation of this Old and Reliable House for Good Goods 
and Low Prices will be maintained. 

Cor. Main and Washington Sts., - GALENA, ILL. 



-iWn. HURST.!^ 



-DEALER IX- 



READY MADE CLOTHING 

penis' |pui'nish|ing (qoods, Hals aqd Caps, yruriks arjd Valises, 
STRIOTL-V ONE PRICE. 

104 Main Street, - - - GALENA. ILLINOIS. 

DEALER IN 

Groceries, Provisions, Fruits, Etc. 

1S3 TVYKirSL STREET, 
GALENA, - - - - ILLINOIS, 



GERMAN-ENGLISH COLLEGE. 



JOHN PIDDICK. 



-DEALER IN- 



DBI COODS m CABPETS 

NOTIONS, ETC., 

156 and 158 Main St., GALENA, ILLINOIS, 



Forget not: We keep the Largest Stock at the Lowest Prices, 
Send for Samples. 

C. HENNING, 

Bnkor ettid Coutoctioiior^ 

Nuts, Fruits, and Canned Goods constantly on hand. 

149 MAIN STREET, 

GALENA, . _ - _ ILLINOIS. 



C. E. HAILE & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Books, Stationerjj, Wall ?iW, anil Faneji Goods. 

SCMOOL- S\^F>PLIES 7^ SPECIKUTV. 

Picture Frames Made to Order. 

Main Street, - - _ GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



G. JH. 7V^IL-L.eR, 7V\:. D., 

Fhy^ician • and • Sur^Gon. 

Residence on Bench Street, 

OALKNA, = = = ILLINOIS. 

News Dealer and Stationer^ 

WALL PAPER AND FANCY GOODS, 

iVo. 145 Mnin Street, 

GALENA, - - - ILLINOIS. 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY. 

— - 

(5. Br^ENDEL ^ Son, 

/T\er(;l7a9t Sailors, 



AND DEALERS IN 



READY-MADE CLOTHING, 

Heits mid Oeips, 

&rer)fs' • Kupr)isr)ir)C|- - &00aSj • ofc, • jQTc. 

136 Main Street, 
GJil^BJ^A, - - - ir^T^INOIS. 

A'- Students of the College will have a discount on all goods bought of us. 



GERMAN-ENGLISH COLLEGE, 



MARY BBRNARD, 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



COA^I^, COKE, A^Nn WOOU, 

\Vii|^ Mills ai)^ Plii|tps, 

■Improved Farm Implements and Machinery. 

All Machines Sold at Lowest Prices and Warranted. 

Opposite National Bank. GALENA, ILLINOIS. 

Irl. R. HOLDER, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

<^oGR OCBR IBSo^^ 

175 MAIN STREET, 

Gnlenn, - - Illinois. 

•iDeNTlST:- 

'J(JO Main street. Second F'loor. GALEIWA, ILLIWOIS- 

HuBERT Meyer, Supt. Isaac F. Moore, Sec'y and Ti'eas. 

Galena Boot and Shoe Manufacluring Companf, 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS OF 

Hen's, Women's, . . Q LJ ^ F^ Q 
. . . and Children's >».3 11 \1/ LwS-). 

special terms to students. 
1S4 Alnin Sti^cot, GALE:^\, //.Zv/AOJS. 



ARMBRUSTER & ROSS, 

MANUFACTURERS AND JORBERS OF 

Klegant Kurniture. 

All our Work is Warranted. We have everything kept by a First-Class House. Our Stock is 

sold at Manufacturers' Prices. Individual Orders filled on Short Notice. 

Personal Attention given to Undertaking. 

VWE KEEP TWO HEARSES. 

KACTi ) l{ J ES at rear of Market. riATFMA TTTTMOT'v 

WAKE ROOMS, 181 iind 183 Main Street. OALErHA, ILLl Li L^l Ji. 

^DRUGGIST- 

AND DEALEK IN 

"P^int^, Oil^, V/okrni^l^e^^ o^nel "©ye (§)tuff5^ 



174 MAIN STREEThe^^^es 

GaIvEna, , . Illinois. 

Call at Lane's Gallery when in need of Pictures. All my work 

is first-class and warranted. Special prices to Students, 

and a reduction on large orders. 

A large collection of Students' and Ex-Students' pictures can be seen by calling at the Gallery. 

"V7". HI. Xj^IsTE, 
Upper Main Street, - - - GALENA, ILLINOIS. 



L, M. LEBRON & SON, 

4UEWEI_ERSi«- 

1*JS Alnin Streot, 

GALENA, - - - ILLINOIS. 

Spac'inl A.ttentU>ii Pitid to Kapairinii o/' A// Kinds. 

We will make special prices to Students in all lines of Jewelry. 



'^:'Wm