(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Gilbert Family Collection 1748-"

/K M- Jcupa^. /f ^ 



Q-flUi^^t -FkmJü^ Col/ectyp'^ 



^/3 



mcHivd/y 



/ 






34 4 



>ll1ii> iMMl —'■—■■ -■- -■ - ^Tfl1intl*Bfcl1 aMÜMWlftlli' i^rf-innififrrni-ii'tlltif I 



mmr 






Af^Cp'^c 






^/Vi/^^^^ 4^Qji^ : 



fiji 



r 









t 
3 

I 






■T- // 







^^"^äxwi^^ 



7 



2^ 









T 






^*Vt^ 






7t^o^/o 






C-Vi^ 



I« 






II 












/!/ 



r 



-7^, ' 



fi 



C'VUa^v^fc- 



w-^<A^ 










C^.' 



A.«rv 






fc^i/ 









// 



n 



^yYot^ 



Oi^r^^ 



■ 4 






TP, 



^(^ 



' Z^' •^ >^^A^ 









jr 



il 



>] 





X 




<t-wt.<<,<^0 



v^4/v^- 



^w^wv 






t^ 



/^^rvwvuc ; 



v^^ 



;? 



■/■ 



<1x7'7': d--u-u-p 








^2 



^0 



n 
rz 



1/if 



IT 



:^^ ri^y^yyviJL^ : 






>U-^vr 



^"^^^U /c 



c^^ 
















^ecJhn^ 






^^^'V^^'d^wu- 









^J3 



^ 



f^c*^ 




C<^' y ((y^i'ViJ^/ 



^^ y<^^ 



^ 



4^ ' 










y^f 






/fff 






IT 






'A^VW^f^ 









>? 



I 



I 







y// 

y^f 
Ly/^ 

yj7 






yf 

y/^ 



x// 




/// 



11 
H 



^^^^JU.^ 7^'^^,,^ /.^^yi^-Jn^ 




/1^'i/vm, 



0. 



Vf-V^»/' 



^'ALs: 







y^7 






I 
I 



I 










Äit^^ - A^^^ - »^ 



^^^, 




y 






**■** '«'*»<'4^ 



^■*Ui^ 






^i*^^^',^^tU^«^^. 



-<i^-»-*^-^ ;^ 



ecyuiu4^A 



^ t^^ 



^0^A>f^K^ ,/i:,v«iv^"»-*'**-*' 






\r'~ 



w 






- f- ^^^ 



^^^. t^klc ! 




^-^ ^ ^ ^ ^c^ 









-«^^-t^' 



«^"^-t-u*- - <lt; 







/t 



^ 



Ä/tf» f 



•/ 







'l a^ 



^ 




^tX^-v-u-u^ <1^ ►^^ 



ij^ 



}^m^t 



^^*«^t^^/ 







n 



/T 
^J 







yc^ 



9 

f 

^^ , 



Y^/ 



n^ Uyi^^yty^(J^2''nyty^ 



^ 



^CC< ^/i^i^-^-i^^'^^^ uy^ 



yO"^'^'^^^ -*^ ^-UT..^T^V-7 







9 





A'^0^ V 






w^ ^ 



^v^ 



^ 




1-1^ 



'^, 



t-r' 




V^-O 



yt 



y:? 






<^// 

/</^/ 



^ 



<^ 



aJ. 



V. 




«..^ 






^ 



y/i^^. 




'U^<^^4 . ^^^-^ fi-^U^ 




a^* 



v^"*-; «-*«/'^ -^C-^ . y^ 



yt'»' t^t.^.-^ 



J^J^ 



^o^' ^^i 




T»^.Uff. 



^t^ 



.yOi^ f^^ 



'^ 



V* ^^« 



.M ^aJJt 



^ <^f->^ Jyi,/^ uh/ 



^r^ 



/ 



J 



Uy^^ ^ 




r^^U^^C^^^. M"A^^i^ 



^ 




I 



I 



^„^z^*/.^ (f.^y^^s. 







Ä*y 



^ */C^^. 




I _^v*ni^^/^i^y. -^^ 



. ^. 



4^(i^f^,0^^ ^ *« ^<^<^<c^;;.»«^. 



^.^V, 



'^w*^ 








^^• 




<:?> 



/ ?^Jm*,hCu*w, ^ 4^<^.«<.^ ^; >^^ ^ 



^, 



<^ x^#M«wi*f^ 



y r 



;ßc 




c^ 



^^^ m^f 



"d^ , 4*>*C (^e/fU^t4u ^*4^ta-yj^ 






J^ 



^^ 



- '^**.vy^.->^. Q^j»4^,^ i^ '^*4^/^ ,c 



y. 



oy/«.«»/. ^i^U» 



M>t < < 



^t- 



^ 



^^'^ 



'^wx^ ^>r- :? ^a^. --< 



Jh^/ 



^■•' ^ .^^/»^ 



3^**,«^^ >^.-. 



< 




-Cm 




^ ^<^**w-v.^y 



<U«i( 








^z<J»^, 




ys 







^ 



.'V 



,^<id. "^v^L*^ ^ 




cx^<*^<' . ^J z^«. "^^ 




^, 



^ 



^*^ ^ 



9A/^ 



d.Zm^ VWi^W y/*>^J^t, , ^'C>u #0/...^.^ X^V»— 




^ 



/-C'^^ 



'J^i-^^ - 



UxfrTK *{»/ «aA-'^^*,- 



i ;^. 






^^ 



^ 





^ 






A^*^/^-^"»«. 



i^A^^. '^^ 



'^^^JTO^J. 






^t 



/*^- 



^«-y^ 




<r 



- iMo, - '3t' 



Ovw^W^ 



T' 



f>i^ (L^^ii-^ ^^ 



/ 



^^ 



r/< 



^* 



*v. -"^tft^Jii y^t^»^4^> 



0^,. 



U. 



rt^'*/^ ^..^.^.m 



Ä^l-' 'tJU' -V-K^^i^.*^'<^ 



<«J^v/ •li;^. 



^- ^. 



ei^,->.u^^ ,^ ^ ^^. 4^y^ 






.^- 



X^^ 



^iqf^t^' A/^-f^ 



^^ ^ Vf ClJj^, ^^h,^. 



'^^^^0^^- 





'^ ^-t-^i^w,'^ 



V*-u^^, ^/l-^ /V^ 



^f y^*/* 



»-^.uX^/C-t^ 



y.-^. 



^vyl- 








4.. 




'«' ^ 



;«& 



f fiv^. ^^ 






V 



^^yxc 




^^^ 



j. 



^ 



yU^ >w*; 



^-/ 




^^J^»^ 



^u»^<.s^ '^«^ Q*/U>i 



yfyv^^ J^A'ypU^. ,y^ «V^- 



^ 



IV 



r ri 



/ 



u 



M 



v#^'^ C^^^-^ ^«-w^ 








ytw „ 







y£ ^'^O^. 











y^rti^yd^ 



■JJJi. » U--! S.i.LJL„ J^g;Lli.b' 



/ 



^<^* Z*^*,. #^1**^ ^^1*-. »x^.*-v*^w^ ^*^>/^ 

0^*yU. ^>*r.*— «2£b«w«'/ .^wv.V^ 0^'^ - 

^*^- ^2 leOW ^--^-v. ^fj^ {^^.^^'JU- 
0^ J^^ -*^^ ^-^ ; .^^ < ^0^y^ 




^X.x^Cr C^^<^c ^^x^ ^A*:^ 




// 



r^-^-^^t-»^ ^K^u, 




c^. 




*% *•• 



^. 



JU^^ (^^'^ 



y- 



^< 



•^ P1'^'.K^^^, 



cyC<e»\0i *it>r 



«iw^^^W^ 4^^ 




yJU^i^ 





^4^^;^, c/w,v>4*^ '^U:,^^icU.^^^^if!C^ 



'^. 



-**^*>' ^^{'^i.Ht^U.**^ . ^*Ä//'^^«<i4^ 



.// 






.y(<»<w-V^^4Xcx ^^*^^C^ 



>^ 





^'^'^ <u^. X'^ 



/^ 



^^'^ ^C,/kr^> 







^/x^ 



<:?^ 



*y^ 



-4 



;?:i^- 



-^ /^-W ^<Xy. *// 




X 




y. 



<u.,«^ 






C- 




'4^*^^jb 



^c^iry^ 



>P^^«> •«^uM'^uy^,- ^ »fcv^»^ . J&ißyC^*-'*^. ^'*^»t/. 



Ävw ^l^cvt 



/-•-^ 



A^^ ^*.y. 




^<i2^ 



. /% 













^/.^.-W*. , M 




^ö 4'^. »wU/ ^::^ 

^t^^ Ä^4. /l;-^^ 






^>/. 





i/^ 



*y^.AH^* 






^. 






^Ä-i,*,W ^,>^^ ^ Sci^t-v-*^ 



X^ 






^ 



<^^ 'TL^U X.^*^ *^*..^ '^^W*.**^*. 







y^ 








^>c/i^ -A 



^ 




^ 



-<<v^ 



»s/tL' 



;^4^. 



V 




«^it^byt/^^^ 




^>\AC»t 



i 



Ji 



/0«A¥^ 




^u^ y/4^:- . /j[^cAi>cjc^ 



6<66;^H*.**^/ 




V 



^l^**', 



'V 



>i?^-Ä<CJ»^iä^ 



e^ 



[ 



\ \ 



I 



'n/ 



v^ 



fi^- 







4i/iiy%4 



:;. 



.«A.«vVV^t^. *^A.^ y^ÄflX 



*- >^ 



/,^-/ 





U 



^>l.'f^><i'^Vt«-W«^ 







"^^ 



^ ^<y>^, /^S^r-tf, 



5C 



^ 



/<//// 



'/ 



>^ (XcX^<:^'^y^*^- 




^\^%0^ «x^A« 



^ 



^ 



*<Jw. ^ 



^' 



'V**^ 



JU't^\^fi/r) /^i»v*vfi^ , ^»^c-**Ai«i^ - 



J^*X /^«^c «^«- ^^^ ^ 



^x^'jQ^ 



AkUuu»^ /»vto,>^C^ >K«U6i4^ \Z!m^ 






V/ 



/ ^ # 



>^ 4>l>*«- 



<r 



^ y*4^ 4**^^ ..,,,,^ ^^^^.iv-iiu^, . ;^>^ 



^ / ^«^ *'^*^>, C^ 




if 



^*<** 







*-v**^ ^ ' 





f 



1f- 

-^*^.*.**t*^ -www, ^^X. * #<i^ , 



/IH4^ 



Ol 







/ 



7 



Ä^Vt^- 



i^^Qyvy^ <^^^-^^ ; 







/»'»va/' ^1,,^^ ^/Ci^u^' .>tty€ . Ktty^^^^yCi^ (/i v->-7i' 












M^t^V^ 



^/ 



^^^V-u^ 






•^'*' x-iv.^/^ V'^^i 




M^v-v^t^ 



li 



>^H 



^u^ 






,j^, 



-.e^ 



^ 



rf^.. 




.y^^^. 



r 



■3,^/C 



-rK^ ,^<ri 




li 



iZi^U^^ ^0ii^Ul^ ^^<^ 



•^^K.-;^<>^- 



^Vcr- 



^ 



^ ♦'-VW"/ s^ 



r> 



^-C^U"^/V^-' 



'Vu-K* — 



> 



UV 



.^,^ ^K^ 



t^^V iU. 



^V7* 



•X^Cv^ ^•^ 



/* 



1 



^4^ 



^^•*-K 



^ 



•^-U»-, 




cy^^^ 



«•t*"V"» 



«^ 



*-wn*^ 



V>a^ 



I ^ 



^ •^Ci^ äu^p^S^C 



-^^ 



^Vt^ ^ 



9 



«^'^'S-^^fc.*^, 








I 



>; 



Z 



/ 




y;^ 



«^^tl^i^vV 



^ 



ii^f^" J^ . >^v*^/ 



^^2v^ 




^ruyk^j^ ^S" a^ ^.X^^^ tÄ.- <^-^*^-K 



v^ 



/ 



-CXv^ 



/- 



y^ ^1^^ cyt^'^^K0^\r'-n^ ^/.^ o^t^UfS^ XtVr-w^i^ 



/ 



/^Lr 



c^uic^^-w^ 



/. 



vn^" 



/^. 



>^ 



*v^fc*r^ 



/ 



^. 



*v^>n; 



5Zy. 



.^c/C^ 



^^ *-' -^Iv^n^ ft^ Z^'*^ ";;?^/^W^ 



Ä^t'W^l*' 



- Y"^ ' ^ '^♦^^-W.^^^'Xh^ 



^, 



/ 



^^'C^C^^^^ 



"k^i 



J. 



UV^ A" 



>y>» yy 



A*^-w» ^^ 



^ 



^i« /t**^W . *y 



***r 



ft^ 



«-if 



A*" 



;^<(,-t/^ 



■//- 



^ :? 



/ 



<?T>-v^ ^ 




y< 



Cy'-^A-.^v^*' , ^^ «/^Ow-w-w V/^ 



*<rLv/ 



^•t-Vt 



^. 



^ 



^^^1^%^^ 



^4^- 




^..^1// C^«^<x)6^ V«-t^ '^^"•«'♦^ 



/ 



to 




'^A-'U^ **^i 



'^^^ 



M/r^^ 



^ ^^^f'^^ 



- yC^^^^^ y^'U^ ^. "Xi 






^Jt'***"^-»/ 



t-> 



- C^*.^Vv,,^/3^ 



^v 



I- y4..^,yU4- .yü.^ 



^ 



ux^ 



\ 



-ci-i/ x,'./.^ ^jUp^ . ^,^u^ 





/T. 



VtV-^ 



^ 



x/V ^u* ^ ^/^- 




.x^>-ri 



>f^t<^u^l^ 



^ 



^ 



/^ 



•^'^ 



'it 



^^•^ -H^ ^^c^n-^uW ^^ ^^4. 'P^^r^ 






^ 



2./Cv 



1 



-^ 






C'J ^-Co,' 9i 





•^ 



^"Ti^ij-yi 



^. 




W<-v- /. 



"^t-^Vu^/^^. 




k»*'!.*«' 



/v, 



in^ 



^^• 



•<*fJi^y ,^%>^^.^t^ A^^^f -iÄ^^y 



/y 






-^ 



^^...^c^^ 



*% %I%C M 



^ 



M J 



^ (7h 



J ^Ji^^i, sv^-*.^-^-- 




t/iJ^r^^ 



(^^.^uw*^ 



/ 






^ 




-^^:^. 



\ ^ 



>/? 



^ x/f , -^1,- 




^ 



^•^ A'^iJ^ 



v^> 



^. 



<n»^ 



w; 



/^<u^#^ 






'-^V ^«-^ 



<^-K4y. 



;? 



-^•^-»Vv^ /VÄ-v^^'x^i^-K 



t/V» 



^•^ ^'.«^ .4^ 



Ä. 



v//. 



,,_;^ ^2^^>^ 



y4^/ui^^ A^C^^ . 



•%^ut.yt^!^^^^ 



^^C' 



/^ 



i#^ x^Äi^v^ 



iZ 



p*^ 



«-v-v y frv<>w^ »^ ^^s-t — 










■^ 




«•v. 






\ 



I 
i 
I 



oyCCt 








4^^ 



%3»^»^ 



^;? 



^tf-uv/i 




^^^^ 




.^7wv»<C >>£>■.. 9*>v^ ^4/U^u^ ^.^^^-^ 

^■x.,,,^ JU^ ^ -*^- ^<-^ ^s>*^ 






«•A, 




/^4/«*^'i-<f b— ' ^^Jti'J-y^ tf.^.^..^^»« 



7 



•**^ 



^-^. 














->'• 




r^' 



m 



^7 




'V 





/^ 



t 





N^^ ,^^^^-»^1 



^U^j^^ 



^U^^^ O^^-V^' 



>c^ 




«V 



I 




^:«*X 







r?^r^^ 



Aj; 













„- ;fe^».iv^. /^ 



4^^A€/^ ol^V« 



^.^ 



i^r**^ .xw.,v*</ tf^>^-»**^ 






1 



^- 



^ 



4^0%,>>^^/^<tA^ t^ % .%.^*- • et^oi^ '^i^^jh»Cf> — 




/Co^tv*-^«-* 'V*-^ ^«.U^Ux^.^ 



^^-^ 






^. 






^ 



.;^ V' 



* >^l^. <yrr^*^'^ 



'V^^'Vw 



7^t^4^ • o^^y^%,.^^y ^i 



^ 



y*^^' A^4u^4yc/ 4^6^ ^^ -^'«^ 



^ 






/ 



.^>^ ^/i 










-^h^v^K^-^^ ^^^ 








^^. 



x/*-C\ 



2> (^ 



■^1^ *^2JJ-»'fc T^sA/^ 





yr^^. 





.^;*^. 




«^ ^( 



^ 



y4^uu ^%^u^ ^iu '^^»Vw^.^C^ 



4^ -V'- 



•^ 




•^^— u-u-wr-t- ^i/6i0>^^'^^tX^o/' > ^*w ^ /l^ ^^ ^^ ^ 



^ 



^/4r4A/^ ^ ^'^ «xK H* fi^t^iA.^^ 



^ 



/; ^i/a^/^>^^ jL^.^^ ^jy^ 






/ 



6>f .^^t.^AyUi'^nnr^ 



U 0^ 




i ^Vu 




^ 



^•^^ 



^' 



-a^>U;i^<>U. .vtl*- -^^44^^^^^ 



X^C^UM.,a*<,^g!U^ c /^ ^^-1-^. /*-^«- 



'^ •^^ 94^>^.y->^'^''.'^ 



c^<^.\ ^^ 



^ 



0^ ^^ 




4^.^ M^^ 0^ 



^ 



^, j^ f^ M»^ ^^^a^ ^u^ yff^^-^^*^ 



>» 



M 



/i^Vfc^ui^'y 'V 



7 






^^>C 



^d^iw sy^^^^S^^s^ijU^ 



yi^y^i 








IS 



^ 










^^^'C^ OLcOi ^y^Cw 




/ -<.; ; v^> /C-^^U^^^U^J . ^^ 





i'/ 



^'■.•-- >u ^U^'M. 




^* 




'^ -^-^^^^i^',/^ *^v*^, 






-^^ • 



J^fx^i^y^^^^ 



y. 




L.-^- 




^v«^/^ •^^ ^L-v,^,»«^ w^4< 




u - 






vt^ 



^. ^'^K^ ^*t^v-^/^ , "^^^t^^-i-v.*^ «^(^^«..v^^ 



^•^. 







.^ 








i 



Uli 



io 



<4^u yj^"^ 




h'S^. 



vCift^ 



0^ >^U^ ^•/♦i- 




<^*^'g 







*^ 







%r. 



'T^Kwi^ nCiw^ xr^*^«/^ 



'-^ <^ ^wv^-^ ^i^:>V^ 




^. 



-^»^ ^-^^c^*/^ y 



r 



*-"'***-;?' '^'? .^i--'^ 



9* 




x> 





^ 



^'^^ Jl. 



^nt 



Uli 



^ ^^»vJL^ 




v>t 



>t^^ 




// 





^ 




yfUY^U^ 



^ 



/tA 



^^JUi^^^ 



^/wwwv. 



x^^ 



^04J^*C^^Z^2^^%^ 





^. 



^-^V^k-kV^ 



-f/ 



•^*ri 





^*a/«^iSUv», ^W y//'*0(u^, JiC ..v-^.^^ ^*^v^ 






y 



^r^ 



-wv** 



•^^•»y. 



•. 




^*^v/ **.-». 




x^. 



S2. 



^ 



<^**i^. 



?< 



^y^nl 




0S^ ^/<'^VU-*^Ö-^* 




7^^^ /^^^^^ 




j ^H^>.-. n/u^,c^^.y 





^'t-i^ 



*» ^ryC^ 




4 



-ii^u^, y*c^ *^M.L. 





*^<^i^^ ^ 



^ 



y*^- «fw'jij^ 




c^, 



^f-'-V^«' 00-V-».*^«. - 



-^•-2-^ 



v-^ 



^^ 



^ .w^v/ ^ */. 4c^U^ 



^ 



Ju**' 





^- 



'^ ^ 



-^'^»v^i-^ . s^t^^C^ ^ ^bn^v^4^i^ , o^^%^ 



fJC^^0ceu^ 



*->•.' 




^^^^^v ••' 



z***^ 




/i-Z^^-^y^^^- 



^ 



,^ 




^^^^1^^ ^^^ 



ij r^ 



y/^^yC^'^ ^^.VaV^ 



'V^^^ 



/ 



L-v<-«><i^ 









Jl^^^ _^'>iri**. tf^m i>* 



^ ^, •**•*/", -^1^ <y9/^^?^^ ^^f 



^lr. 




A^U^, ^«w ^'.^^. 




0^ ^Lv!'^dc*«< . ^^ 



V v'' 



/^i/, 







^^^«.t-l'^ «-t*^ 



^' 



j^^ii^-^/tw '^^'Ä 



(P>i/iti^J'^U^- jiA^^c^ 



#»<»*' 



- ...-rf 



Xu:J^ 







/ 



3 Sf^A^> 



^l^^e^j . / , ^ 



f. ^^v'. r'i/^^r^ 



//^-vw/- 



rf-^-" 







/^ ^flv^, 




/ 



•' /pw" ^' 



fl 





;^^ 



/^ 




'-^ 



>y9tnn^o> ; "^'^ . U^ - ;?>, 




< IV 




«^i^ «Cm^-. ^4V. 



.X^ 




^>Me.r4^ 




^Cuw/- 





v^^^Ui^^u« 



^ 



c^ 



A«» 





*«»• 



'V*vi'^4^^ «^-^A^^-: ^^w"^ — 



JJ' 








^-^wC 



^ 



c^--^ AT 




vt^ 






^,t<^^ ^ 



Ci?'' 



/- 



<;?2.. 






>.V^ 



'/' 



4^/- 





U«^ 




i 



ji 

^ 

^ 






u^^ 



-/ 



7 












>^ 



^U%^'^)^*> ^%K<U^ . 



I 



»%^>il^^f 








9 

^.^JU^ ^^^^ <{?4U-i-' ^-v.^- *-^^^- 

J^^ — >^« ^* .^/-wu- •^^^ x.^.*^ 



■; 




s«^ 



< 



»-, ' 1 

1 



^C-/^"-^ 



/^« 



1/ 



^. 



^.^>^, 







^ ^.^^ ^ 




J^ 



• A 



1» 



t or 






5^ 








/y ^/-^. 



^ 



^<v 



- ^7 



C22^^ 



^^ 



y 



7] Uv^A>^Ji^*. •^*t^-^^*u/ 






/ 



^ 




V-V4. 



v^l/Ci^fc^ ?ww ^.^.iX^^i 






V . • » 




'-7 ^/ 



tA^jv ^JwU/ ,0Cu\/^^ J^^^ 




<y^^ yK^ 



,^^/^ ia^ . ^/f */^* c^u6r/ j^uMa.^ ^^^ ^^^^^: 



i^ ^JyÖA^Uy^y, yi^t^. Jy 



'y^ix^u. 



7 



^c/^. ^f/' . CÄ'^ ^^ 



-^ 









j ^ . C/^-£^ 



-/^ 



^V 



Ayuu 




( 






r 



/)/(^/^i^^ y^ ^^^i-u-. 





/' 



.^1^ 



^^iyt^n^^iyCL 7^^4( 



-/«? 



•^ /^^ 



^-V^^CwlwW X^Cx-U-ww^X^^tf^ 




/ 



«-<-<-fc«'W«-^ 



--7 




/^CU'wn*' 



y^ 



y/J 



^V- 



;/ 






(/ie>-^ 




- (:^. 



Kyo^i^'^^i 



^4. 




uy^f^ 



/ 





fJ^vv'^C^ <^- x--^--*^ ^^^'OC^^' 







/ 



4^^fc^ 



^3-<^( 




/^»^ 



<.^^. I'J 








'tC^ #^ ,^ 



^ 



.^r-i'. 



CT^iuxT, 



^v/. 



r^ 



y^^**.' 




Z-^-— '^^•^'^--V 



O^o-o-t^ 




<«>. 



^^ 



,.<^^< '^. 



^T 



4o 



// 






^^^ 



^-t^. 





t'U' 



•^t 



V'^T-i-»* Wv-T-^i/'t 



'y 



<r<Z ^, 



O^t 



^l'l'*t*C 



a^tt'> 



^ 'Vy-t' 



Z^r 



eX^^H(^^ C^Zj^ 



<-w^ 



crz 



>'<*-l-*V^ 



^*^'<^^^.^ (T^^CJS K^ ^1^-U*< 



-^/^ 



y 



'-^ 





v^ C 



•'"»'l^V-1' 









S 



auyö 




JfoO^^u^ <^^e^^/eii 



/^ 



^"i/ty^ 



:^^ 








^ 



^ 



>Uv»< 






/; 






\i 



Ot-a^^'^^ *^^ 




0^00^^%^^^^ 






•^ jy^ä^'/^C^^ 



^ 



V 



'^^'O' X<^<^,^*^w 



-<i^.'>^- yt<^%^t^ -> 




U 





€0 ^un< «. 



^K-^wC^ ^— ^fTutj/a^^^^"^ ^^-^ f-y^r,^" 



tJ- 



0/)c 



^ 



r 



J^ci!^^ /-v^v^'f*- (y3^^^<' 



0^ ^%0^^^^'y »^ 




fii^^^ 






c^^uo. 



^^x-^*^^ ^#^' Ca, 




^>^** 4« 



yn^^'i^^. 



^^^l.'*^ 







>f, 



4.^*^ 



V 



'*-' c/^ 



♦^*^ -/ix^l'0^^^ 




c^w««*« 



»»«»^%^»T*' >^ , A 



/ 



^i*>- -^lU-r^Sv,^ ^ i^^ 




^ 



(y^U^/l 



(^.c^^^i.^^ (A^^^ä.^-^ 



/P/k^yt^*^ , <it^--v>/U- •<'^v-..'/6-»v'^>->^ 



v-^ 



^>tl^ 



/ 



^ 



^. 



>^ 



'^/ 



t 1 



z*^ 




CuC*^»^ 






v^- 



^. 



^ 



•^*>f^i^uv^ 



^-^ 



^/fi^ / A^ /^'^ 




<^-v.O^. 



■^ 



%/t 



O^ ^-^U*^ 



;s^- 



/^Ä^-ui^^ ^^ 



-o: 



X 



'^ 




^y^ 




its- 



„.^i^ , Pu.-U^ 



/V> 



v^ 



^ 



-^>fJt**«f ^Ä- 



Ä^^ 

^ 

>i/^- 



«.wv^x^ ^.%it/^ ■' c^'^^iy^i^'^^*'^ '■^•t/^ 



/ 



O^C^K^ä</ 



d'VW^ 



c::?} 



cw 



^ 



^ 



--nx 






/^/4p'>^^ d^i^t/K ^-v-t^«^ . ^ '^'^nri^^y^ K0>^L^^ n/A^H^ 



/y%%^0^'' 



•iCvlo^ .^if^:^^,^,^ ^ t. 



..^ 



?^ 



/i^ 



n 



^^ 



:t^i„v.v.„v<C ^y*«-** io^^ 



-^»Cj.^^ y^e^t^y^ 



|i 



1 






>/«<6A^4v-. 







^v>*«s<Xä;^-*,/ 



/ 



?«> 



•^ 



4^ ^ 



ft 



I 



<»3 




^7 




^ 



^^ 



^L^k0^ 



1%^V 



^d 



>il^k^ ^'^^^ -^ 







*^ 



/ 



>l-v 



^> 



>x-^ 




^„.^.X^V^i*^^ »f^ 



r*^' 






y^^.,y^^ y^uf-^<^ '^^t.u^ ^ -i-^^^-^ **-tr 



c:^:;a^ ^^^^j^^/u , <-^^v^;-'.^— -? • ^/^^^^^ 






Ct'^yX^^ ^<O^V«-^ 




ra>v 



^A*^ 






-^z. 2 



;^ 



^t^f^n^'ryi ät»' 



> 



c^«^ 



^.vÄ 



^.^ <^C^ 






^<i*-«W>* 



^ 



;^ 



^. 



v; 

^^. 



^. 



yfyC^ys^ 



»<»<»v^ 



.^Ct,„y>iX^ y£^^ 



^•-•-v 



Mi^ 



2^>{^ 




^/^U^ "^^^^"^^U^ . «^^^<^ 



t^yfs^iC/^ 




-^-w^sj:^ 



y4V«^>^ 




1 ' 










r 





^^ 



•"..^ 




•*^<. 



VJ^ i-^>^ 




0'*-V^^^ue^ 



^^w^^^^n**^ ^-^»V^ ^-^t^M in^'^/iyfty)^ 



/; 



y >'->*->/^-^ -^ -• ,• :rl/o-^^ ^*'- 






/ 







<?, 



7 







(5^^IX.WW,>^ 



/ 







^ ...-www-V^ -^4^- .yCU^ y <^ 



















^- 



^ y^y'^^^^iy^f^^^^ ' 



t!l 



2Ü 



1)'' 



l 



Ä^^/ 



yin^} 




4( 




-^. 




^ 



1^^^^»^ 



A-fif^.^.^ ^.-fcW*«'^ y**/.,^ ,-1/.-.«,.^.. ^/^.^^^ ^, 



**? 







^^L^i/i/d <.^ . yt/'t^ 



% 






.^^t-'W 






1 1 



^r 




9^^. 



'/^^ 



-71^ >^^ 



x^- «t^. 



iy<7-CK^' 



JU 







^>>TU>^ . >^V»^. 



^ ^. 



A^/ 



1^ 



*^u*#' 



F. 



^ 






// 




^<-*.*.*< 




^^ 



^ ^-wr^ 



i) . 





i%X x^* 



(Äv^_. ^V 




♦^S'-» 



o""^-^^' : '^ayCuu^C' 




4j C^.^-u.'. C^.^uU^ 




^f 



cyC'yf^^^U £f Uf^U 




^ 



9 la^ a^ 



c^. 



■^ (^'yk>^^ 



;^< 



;r^ 



-^u^^^^'jfj^-^^ 'ii'^Jyfc 



ClH 



/ 



^^^^^^ /i''^«^ — 



/«'-.''■•e^ 



^ 



g 



'<^ 






<^*..«,iU«,- r^^^*-^*^ ^*-*Cä^*^ rpnfii^t'CA 



^^^ 



^L^ 



^^^y: 



^4^*-»*- ^»*^i 



/ 



/t'«-- ö^'eyi- 



^sX^> 



J?.^-. 



/ 



JU^^ 



V*-, ??o*yt/^ «-*^*' 'i^* 



/^t^ ^.^-^ ^^-/, 



(^^^^4yCf 



V. 




^ 



i) 



.^e:^ 



^•^ 5 



'^ -^n^ 



'C^^^^* 



t/c^ O^Z, 




^ ^^<UV^^V^' 



^^}£^ 



^ ^^lijJ^'- 



JaJs^j; xCw^^ 



^J2^ 



/^t,,,^ JfUi^ 



^'J^- 

V/ 



7^'.. ^* 



/ 



'/• 



/^"C-K^i 



lä 



n> 




9. 



. ^i.^ CA*C'^^»/A5 *^ 



M 






»^. 







^n-v 




^<^ 



^/^^ 











*!^d^< 






^ 






S/ 



y^i^'^y-,^ A^SCu.^^ yjL*^^^^^ 



;i -^ / /^7^^ ^^^^S^^ 



^. 





^C*«> ^- J^^^.>K^ J^:.U,^^ Jg^OMi^ c 



M' W 





^»^^^ ^^a^ (Th'i^fc if^t^ . ^^'f i^Jo^'^'^y^ 






n 



n 



C^^*/ -y,^ ^^^g^^ 



i 



JUrU' '>/'.^X 






^, 



f 

















C^^^^ </U . 






a 
1 






' (^.^^ 






«<f-- ^j*^>j^ *^^i«A^ 




^, 








^'5 



gf^^lß^^ XT^^Sh-'WW^ ^^ 



^cii^^^c^^iuu^ . jCjL^ ^^-^u^ . 




/In*- 




^;^ 



^^7 ^^. 
^^-,-y' 



V 



-V. 





J^ 



*-^^ 



/y. 



/9^'^;>f^- 








I 




^ ^^••' 



'^fi^: 



(^V/Vit^-ync^'^ 










n 



^6^*—- ^^1^0^ ^ a^'Ut,^ r^' ^o^yu^^rx^i/T' 



^' 



^/ 




*. / j- 



/»-yj / 



'^'"»l-'-» ^^k-TT- riC^ / ^* ^■.-»-^»■■^..y ^^^ 



f'^" 
« 



Ä' 



^/Vv e^'A^ 



/^ ' 



r 



3^ 





<yf\>%r'Tcn^ 







9u»^ 



ou. 







( 









^^»n^ 'V^w^ 



Pt^-vr^S^^^uu-w-y ^^n-s^ 



^. 







1^. 




^ 






v^ 




j 






I 



1 






0^ ^^ 



•^ 



^■ 




/^ 



<Ut«V«-M^^ ^*^*» 



^.^^ 



^^^y.*^^«^^ ^«--i--i^x*^-4-^nt^-^Z^^fe{it.^-i^ ^^^ i>^9>'^Ai^^ 






^^, - <^:<^. 



7 



T^'-vn-v^. 



C-<_ t 



.•/^ 



>7^. 



*.«w 



^ 



'^^>- 



^"O-^JU i^cA/^ n/^^^ 



^•^ 



A-^^wL^ 




r-Vi^i 



*^^cyf% 






y ^. 







'^ -^ 







^f^L^ 



"^>V14^ 










^ ' '/ •*.-f^. 




n 



( 



m 






JiJ 



^-nrtUy^^' 



V 



< 



^^o**^*^ 




d 



'/ 



^. 



tu^ 



y^'4^^ 

^ 



C^A'^ 



-i^.^^^-U^.i^ 



^ 




.•v^^< 



M^^^c^'C^ i.r^ 



K 



^^^-l'-Vt^ Ä^^^tX^^ '^^ 



^Ä^n.'U'«^*^^/^' *^>-«^ -vZ-u^ 



7 



/ 




V 



l^U^^^ 



^<>ww^ 



/^W-1^ 



^'^^^ ^^^^ (/ •- 



«^> 



r^ 



-&L^ ^^U^^ 9^P6- - 



ä^' -V\ 



yUou%4^ 



9. 



tC-t^ 



./ 



-^^ 



^ ^c-^. 




-<^ 



i$^>l^ 



.-ä;- 




^/•*^^ /i^^^S^ 



v'IO^ ö^<U*v^ V^ 



^-/c^ 5C 



C^'X^^^'x^ 






^»iW«W, 



^CcLA^^^^t^Jt^ 



%^ 



<H-^ 




'>-t^ 



^^>-?t^tf^x-t ^ 






«^'^^^"t-w ^^C^^-f-H-^K ^^ 



^z^^*"^^*^ r^^^^^^ ' ^ 




Vi 



// 



yt/t-'U^ — 



^ 



// 




>^ ^^^^6}^ cy^'ii^ 



^t 



^^i^k.^ 



^i 



/^ 



v-?<^7^Ä&<^Ä** 



^ £^. 



4<. 



y M- ca ^v^ . %c,Xa^^ 



^ 



■»'*^'*" 



^l 



^i^ 



-*iW^- 



^>^'^ C^jC^^lU. 



^^^^(J^ia 



(In^^ 



.^"V»* x^"^ 



«fiy. 



^ /'^Ä^-X^* ^«^ ^ 



^. 



■; 



/ 



^. 



';^" 



^<^^>U 9iM ^^U :^U^ _ ^>»t>/. 



/ 



« f 




:?i/. 




'^^/n^w 



^^^CUL^ 



-^a 



Z' 




-^ ^ 



'W-M-r-o^^^ 



;^/^. 



^/r, 



^&'*->-f^ 



^ 



^ ^ 



4(yui^^ >tt.. 



''^■; «»-^--7^*^^ . "^'^ ^*. - 



^^l'^Wv 



V 



•-n^ 




*^i»/. 



^. 




;h^. 



Q^^^ 



O-V«^ 



Z?-^ 



/V'^>-.-i**^^'^ < 



>' 



-1^^ 



1^ 






«^— x-^^^U^-^ J ;-^ _ .^^. ^_ 



-/-^ 



--^«>t 



;jc 




Xty^/ 



^^-^^ 



"^^^^nri^^^^t^ 










// 



/^^äJfJ'C^^^filjr . ^2*v-vA' -^Ä/ c/^a£cjI^^ -^uut^ "^'^äCyiOts^ \ 



yy/^' /^ /^ 



"U^ 



ty^u^ 



/VC^ 



Cy^i^u^^^u^ ^ 






^^ 



€-^ ^^U^L^ 



^H.^C*^C ^^^* 



/ 



C^^^y^ A/O-^ 



>yi ^ 



^ 




^L^-v— k/< 




yx^t^ •^'<^V^#uvi*^ 



^^. 



y ^Zy4 



nh^^ 



^^^^^y^ 



rf^^T 



^^^^ 




ä/;- 



,/^xy/^4^'^<.w ^^^'^"^^ fj *^{ 



^^'^O *-v- 






^(/Uy^^ 



'.^^1^ 



fi^*^ ^.^Ay. 



^M- 




u 



Ä'*.'^ tu^ 9/ZiU^^ ^^i^-^ 




^i 



I 



^2. 



^4jt^ 




^^ 



2c--^. 



;?! 







^ui^-^ x^w^^- -^•a:.,^. 



^y^^ — /H^ 



^; c/^ 



-^ 



^u^s^/^ y/^nr^ Y/Z. 



^-^i-i-w^ /U/y^^y^^ 



•v*/ 






^^•.€^ 



'^ ^^^V? ^Uiyl^ /^A^^ci' 



-^<-^^- 



^^'^ 



It^i 



# ^ < 




J ^^l^rV 



^^ 



- ^ 



/^/^y 



P. 



..^, 



^/ 



7' 



/ 



x^. 



^4^ 




.>^ i'^ 



/ 



^^y^tf/^ 



i'^l»*/ 



- c^-in-^ ^ 



i'VT^yr* ' 




/*^' 




^*^ .*^ 



-»v»/ 



-^-r^ 



^ 




-/ 



^-w^. 




^*-^^^^^-^ 






^y^ 



r>^ 



(^ 



'> 



-^ ^^ 



;^^- 



:*^ 



C-<^ ^j^^ ^^' <c^Z,^i>^:,^ ?/// 







/«--»-t-^^ -i^?^^^ 



£*<-*-^^ C^i^a-^C^ ^J^ ^/^^V^Sirf-v.*-' ,V**-*-» '^'-»■x^f^a. 



r 



^^ 



>»- 



/^- Z*^-^. 



-^l^x^ 



(:Z^^-zc^ 





V 





'7*'-.^ 




• 



/-^ //2. 



-^t"-«^ 



'/ 




-J" 




/ 



•/J^X-^/" 




-f'r 






vc^iC^ 



'^A 



4^^Z¥ 






<2^ ^.^ 

c:;?^^^^'' 



^ 



^^ 



«-^^ ^>^ /^ 



-v^ 










i 



/^ 



-ryi^' 



Zr'^A-»^ , 'yi'y>^«c>£U't^'-ieJ»>^*''^*^ . ^/i^-r-*^ 



„a^t,^*' /^tt.'i^','^*^ " 




a 



^^ ^ 



/'ir?-' 







ftU'U^^ ö.^^^ 



-"V^ ^i55^ 




^^^^.^ 



i«^*-^^ x>»^rv* 



w^ 



/ 




'^>«^ 



x^^ 



</->7^ 



^^^^^*^^Vt^ A^*.^ c^>^/ T^^U^^*— '<^Ö^^^^ -^ 






Ci^(:^ ^^^^ ^.Ct^ i^ a^ • 



^ 



// 



I ! 

I 

I 1 




O^*' yXy^' ^t^*-^ ^''t-» >^' 



^ 



''/^ ^^' *^ ^"''"^ 



^-Z- 



r^^-U/. 



^. 



T Ci^ *^i7iiy^a^ ^ 



4i>-v 







Yc 



/ 



■^J. 




ji-Tsy^, 



«»-<*4-r 



'/ 



i^ n^i 



iZ'^ 



■^/> 



A 



T^ 




"^ 



¥ . ^. 



4-^ 



2>^t/- 



c 



V 



M-rT^./*. 




'<S^ 



'^. ?J1 



y. 



-^.-3^^ 



y^cZ 



^t^L^ty ypyi 



-^j 




S g 




'/■ 



<^^^-^^f^^^ ^'J^ 



^. 



fl. 



/ 



/ 



^^-^TL-Ä-'^'X--» 






Ic^^^^.^X'-^^ '^-^4,.^ *^^ /^.^, 



C,.y^ — 



/y 



^^^'/^^ L*^ 



<2-^^^ 



ei-'^^'t.^^ 




~^U4r^ 



a^ 



^^ 



-f 



*^^f^>.^^^f^.iL^ ^JL^*^^ 



(Z^ . ^^' *' 



/ 



'^J^-^^ 



//. 



J^^f' 




^. 



'-/^ 



*-v^ 



a,,<>^^^ 



c 




^ «'^«-fc« 




-/' 



^ ^^ 



^./^y 



r :^ - •^■^ ^ ^ ^ *'* 



J'/ /^^^. 




*y2'X^ 




■4^. 



y-^ 



'> . . 



r" 



^/ 



/^'♦< 



^ 



^ 



^-"Ut, ^X^-r"^ 



^^Ciyt^t/CA^ 




/f^ 




//y 




.«^ 



.>^ 



^ 



I 



fs 





^ 



.-/L 



W^ 






5;^2^^-i..«>>u/ * " C-7^ 



- -^ 



tf^ i^x*i^. 



^J*-v^ 



^ if^^ 



/ 



-^ 



>^^- 



t^ 





:-^D^ 



CL^ 4^ 




^A^ 




C' 



^ 



I 



/" 



»^ 



-^ ^^ii/l/^t/l/» 



^ 



I 

i 

I 



^^n^oX^,^-!*^ 




^■y-y^ Ci 



^ly^j^t^^t^^r'-y^A 




^^j^ .^^X^-^ 



».^^^^^v^"^- 



:? 



/C 



A'-^x^^ 




^ 

// 



■>^i-»t--»-t 




^. 



^^»•WV^ 



>: 



.Ha^j 



A 



/z' 



r 



^^i^y^ 



/ 




>/. 



-/i 






^ t 



<^. 



^*i <^V-w-i^ ^■^'^ 



7 



^t.'^j^'^^^^^^^ 



Ä-'Si^ 



^ 



?^> 



^ 




/ 



^2^' >^ 



K^i^t.^ 



^ 



^/ 



!?y ^ ^^^U^'cc^ n/t^u^^^>^ ^i^^ ^^^^^^f^^^-^c^iCy- 



j 



f 




-'3 



/ 




j' 




4.-«-' 








x,>u^ 



^ 



^-^»v^ 




^ 



^ 



•a^'^yf 



<K 7, i' /-> '«-*-^^-v**<^ 



^.^ 



.^^o^ 



^^^'^ 






•-^^iw — 







^^^^ ^ ^<^ 









2/ 



i 






7i 




y^T^Ä.'WU^ 



vd- 



X 



.^>^ 



*-v^ ^U^C 





-x<^ /ys^ -^S^^ 



-^ 



^ 







KT^/^^ 




A.yiU^ 






^. 



^if^ 



73 



mZ. ^ .^t-«^^!.'^^-^^'«— 



*'S»<* X 



^.^j?;.^^ ^,/^^'(CyA;^ 



Z-l^ 



• • i 



''^ii%«'%« — 



c/^yO ^ 



^(^v^^ 



A^ 



--^ 



iti^<-r' 




•e-^ 



^^v 



^.^^P^J^^^ 



ii>f*f 



>^ 



-^ 



^--^ 



^"l^UC 



tf 



Y 



y<^. 



^•^xy^' ^ '^''^ 



-/<W<^UrV^ ^^Un^^'^C: ^ ^*^' 




/ 




;;^^v, ^ 



-^ 



tv« 



9U.'^. 



/l//<>^yH^ *'^^H/C^y\.^%A 






^.^■v*,' -4:-^- ^v^^^ 




V 



/ 



.^ 










/ 



i^^iZc^^^C^^^^ 



a 




<C't<. 



^ , .=,.t^>^— 




.^^ 



^^ ^. — ^^ 



^ 



'>yyvt ' c — 




/O 



^.^ ^y^^'-y. 



.'^UU^'^ 






?r 



/ 



/)A.,^^<,-KT^^ , ;^>w^ 



(^ 



t^^a^ 



T 



/ 



^^^^. 




U 



^12^ 



.^-2^'<f»-^^ ^ 



,^-^/4yi^^ 





^. 



y 



^f^^L^, 



-^ 





/: ^^ 



j< 



/t^i" 



-^if 



•/^ ^ 




/. 



a^ 







^^*Vl 




.-^ ^ 



-;^. 



*.*^ 



^^a^ . ^ 



-^-r^. 



/^ 



^-^^-w^ 




(^^^^ryiTTU^y^J , ^^-«^^o^ ^^^'-^y^, -K'v^Uc^c^J^ 



^^*Zr 



g< H, ' „„ j 



^fi'H«5B»«_LJJJ_Bi 






<:; 



•^' 



^/^x-^-o*, 



a 



r;^ 



^ 



4/^ 



>-v^ 



if" 




i^ 



"^tx^vi*,, ,^< 



.^xUy^'.^c 



^ 



^^e^e^ 




r 



/' 



nu 



^^^ ^C*^^ , ^^uy/t^' ^♦r-«'*/ - ^ /c-^U^ 



^. 



^ 






^u^ 0^'cy^ ^^^' 





^/^ ^^^ 



^M- J^ 9^-^' K^'^^'-C^ 




(tyt-'U^ 



7^ 



^«^- 5=^ 



fiC^X^'*^ 





M. 




^ 



Ji^x^ . ^.iti^ /♦v^^. t^4:U.^ 



(yc-^^>~^ä^ iH^^^'^^it,,^ ^ci^c^'^ '^Uyi.u^Hiy<fi<4^ 




*^^ 



<fr ^ 



'^ 



<| «-'Ä^3t.<^ 



^^a^'u^^CyJ^ yo^ä^'ß^4^ . -^^ <>rv^J^ 



^^>ti^ 



»- Vc-ti' — 



-^^»^ 



^^^^, 



nA-»>v^ 



yx?; 



>rv 



^. 



_.*4 






^ . ^.<u 



^w 



■;4^ 



;^/ 



- ^. 



<^^, 



^^u-^ 



'^^ 



7h^^-< 



u^ 




^ 



*^. 



-.<itS^*-,^ 



/^ 



-r<: 



2^r 







/f/ 



Ä^ 




<^ 



1'^ 



^r 



^. 



(yuu.,,,,,^ /'K'yy^A^ •^ ^'i*-«*:^ y^^* ^ y/''-^ C, 



/^7!t**V 



f/- 



/^ 




t^. 



^ 



x^-v^^v/. 



/y. 




^^c 







^- 



.^«^ 



-/. 



^Jc,..^ 



^ 



^ 



^ 



/^t,>- - 



'-:^, 



;^ 



7 






1 I I 1« 



^ 



/ 



^^. 



^\^ 




/•" 







•fe 



/^ 



^/"Unr^ 



L ^'^^c-w» — 



y 




:? <^i<: 




vu^> ^.^^^ c:^'jk 




^y. 








I 



S 



/5 




/ 



/" 








^ f. ^^ 



/ CL^ ^^/C^-^uu^ ^n^ 



^. Sö^j . ^o.^ ,,^C,^^ 






^^^y* 



•' 



«-^Vt 



/ 



^ 



^^iC^-A^ 









'A 



^CK^yi^^ c^^*^« 








j- 



7 






5' 



w: 




*^'^ 



-?■■ 




<^~ 




!i 



/ 



/ 



^ 






L 




/ 



/ 



'/ 



*<t/*^ 



ic 




? 



O^^^ 





9c 



; 



n^ 



J. 



/ 



^ 



M 



^ A,^ C 




♦^ ff 



ia 



ifi 



/t-7'yt 



2i4>VW«</U' 



f< 



7 



X'. 



^ 



^.^-^ 



-^*^ - -^ 



dT?^^ 



'-^- 



y/i^^yW^ 



^ 



'/ 



-Vuv 



^ 






^^^C$y^^ 



^€0^' 




a^' 




kTh^^l^ 



.yl/j^- jJCnp ^C^^-^ 



>vV^ Ä^y* 



vv/* 



Wy/"«» Ä>wv 



^ 






r^ 







'/ 



<««^^ 



^^uw i^v/t: 



u ^»n 



^•. 



/ 



s. 



'1 



Cvi^S/^ .. ' f*^ ^ ^^^^t^0^^u 



i 



^i 



/ 



^-^^-v^ 




^c 



'?*v. 






I 



^*. 9^Jt4L,^ v^'V/-^^ A.vxa/.^j^^^^ ,..ww,'^ 



li 1 



" #^.^#^ v^V 



,y 



w« <«i/ i«vV tf 



I » 



11 







• • • • 





/ 






X-^ 




-« 



v^: 






^- — 



-«i^ 






4 ^>^-'<^ 

r 



'u^ -Ä/. 







.<! 



i'- 



I 



^ 










/ 



•;^ 



^ 






/ 







x/Ji'^ 



;ll 



^ ' *^ /ß^ 








«<^i^^ 



"^^^^ 



JU'^^ 



.^ 



>^ 



7i ^ 



it T 



i, 









I 














^^^^ -^^ww*^ rri^v^^^^-v'^^ >*-v 




yir,Mr^.ai/y 



e^.,«*/. 



I 1 

t 

'3 






7Z,^ü 



" JU^^ 













y 



f^^cCk 



^ ^ 






U/^^^ ^ 



1 J? 



1>^ -I- 






% *'*<W»* **♦ 



■'■-4r i# ^'' 



-V*T^«=^ «t » <l 



6,^—»^* 







/. 



/- 



/' 



^^«W^/^^.^1^ 



/^ -^ 






:r<: 



«4 






^ 



. 91 



4 



\\ 



^y. 

7»^*^*^ 




> 






5^ 



/ 




'/ 



rV 



V 










<^« 




7 



.^- ^v^. 








^ 






^to-. 



V •- 






f; 






^. 



^ /^ 




^cyfT '^^r 



A 



yu/^ 






/V'*'''* '^"'»^■^fc * t-^ 







v/'' ,-•' :^*^ 



*• « 







c^ 






7^ 




t 






.>5' 






r 



r ^ 











^i> . ;^. 



/^ 



J #-ivt,-^. . ■• ^'^-A-' 



^■^t 



^/^ 'y''^ "'•«^ V<.wJw '*«*"*v./*w 



^1 






■<v 



-;r7 



- / 



«'^ 



ii 



i*^ »-t '^ 



^^* 



9^- 



^^ 



i 




«i 



I 











-wn/ V^<: 




-^ 



i;^ 



-««:>»• 



> - - 



'i .-^ 



'. ^ # * 






i: 




^»i<^i'%0t^ 



"x*.^-. «^*-^' 



^ 




*^ 







>«< 



■^ ^» 



• - w 



^ WH' , 



e^ 



I 







^^^r^tai 



/ 



A 



r 



-.;. 






r 



Tc'-'-^Ä^ ^c^a/* . v"^. 



/v-j,^ 




^^<V«^ -t«^^ jk».^U.*V2^v^ ^/<^,w*-*^ ^»^* ^^- 




'■-f»^W<6. if(tilL^-y^ 



i^U 



^':i/^ 

//.^•w 



-iy^U-'y/Lv. 



-1^ 



-VI» 



A*V 



^^-c.^. 



-: 




J^C^I 






< 



// 






^. 



</ 



4^. 





.xf-v-..wl-^4-_^. // ^, /7 2 



/ 



^.; ,^^. 



*v^ 






i^ 







^c-/ 



^"i-l-ftfyC C^\^9-ty£, 



^'^^ 



^ 



^V^ 



.^. 



^c^^LCv^yr 



^ 



^^ 



/ 



A< 



I ^' 



^t"*^ ^cdy/^ 



V..- >^ 



^ /• 



z«^. / ^ 3 ^:<4.>i* 



-/ 




/ 



^^-ß^ i-nnwCv^* C^-^h'>^6->^ 



••«» 



xV^* 



;. ^^.^y 



^-^-C 




;*. 



4 



/'wlr^ 



V 



r. 



/ 



<^ 



►"^/fc^ 



'^^1^ .^ *-W. — 



/^ 



!V 



^. 



i 




'^U^l^U^M^^ ^X^ 



^^/t^vt^ ^e^ • ^ 



i/*n*v 






^v /^^^M«^ JL^ ^^^ fi*^ 



X '^' 



y 




,K^ J^-rJif***^ 



■J ^' •«., «-T.%„^ 



^. 



fi 



^^-^-u* -^^-^^^.^/U^^^/ti. . ^'^ -^ 



7^ 



*^'. 



<Ä*<ud.U6C^ 



V7'c-*t.'^1^*-^ 



V^. >- 



«C.«» 



/ ' ^ «/^'i^bf^'t'. "^'^'--ik*/- tj 



-n^ »^ > 



^^^^iu^^u^r^t^ 



^ 



# 4%^^>tJi ^ ^vv»v «^^^ 




^hnrf9 




a 









^ 



/^ 



^ 



^^^i^ 




.^; 



---f- - 



^'T'^i-t^ 



/ 



y^ U\^ 



^^ 



y*y<-^. 




\ 



I 



f 






V. 



'^^ 'üU/i^'C/^- ^V^^ 



f^^y-K^C'^^ '^^'^^h.tjC^^.^- 







^*V*1^ 




-Pi^. 



<^ir^ 



"^^f^t^Ji 



irO^^U* 



^ 



^ ^^^^^ 




/ 



* '1 



^^^^^^ i^^^y^i 






^ 



\^>v«w ■'KiujMiu.JuwvBHHpsmpHnpRmnni 



I i 



n 



I I,, 



a 



4- 



I 

i 



n 



j< 



M^^ 



; -^-^ 



^»^ 





UV 



'«^ . J^.j>r^ w\ 





III /-kU^ 




-'*C-<', 



<^ 



K/Cu.^ >«/ 




>^ 



w^K>gV$-p 



<:^ 



^V>t 



>^«^'*Ui.-)/9,it,,v^ 



?^' 



^/' 



/: 






/ 



.^. 



■»K^ 



J- 



;i:i/. 



yY:^:u^ a .m] , ^. 







^f 



/^4y%^^ ^v^i. 



y^if^0>^^^ 



U^'^^^ 



^ 



-/-^/ 



6#^^' «^X^^t^^ 



<^^^ 



\y^t»%^^ 



/ 



/ 



/^Ä-Ct^ ^Äti.V>^Ä*^lh*Ä^ 



/ 



-^^ 



«>/; 



tU^s^ y^'-^ 



.x^^U*^. 



> 



'^J^y, 6C^% 



^iyf^^ — 




• ^ 



yVcxf v=-w 4i^ 



^^i^' 4nn/y ^^"l/^ ^^ 0^^^^ 



A^. 



i^ >w« 



JU^.^*^" 



^ -Ivi-V^^'^ ^^ 



^U^..C^^ ^"^^C 



5Pc 



>-^ 



^^-U-t-^Jr *^*^>^ 



^^t^t/CiA^ >^iÄu-n te^ •^l* *»^-t*fc#i «*^ ^ *-»^^ 



^^ 



U: 



.<^^' 



^ 



*"v 



/? 




/ 



^ />T 






'^' t7 



^£c^^ ^'^^ 






i/M 



^^ 



^/.^ 




^^•^ 



t^^^^^^v^wwy^^ 




^ ^^^ 



4X^/M^ 



^^H-n^^^' 




#«^ ^^ ^Cy^^kv-v^ 



/ 



'n.-^^^ 



^ 



1. 



^ y-K /.J^^^^^ -^ ^^T^M^f^^^^TH., 










^' /tv 



7" ^ / 




nnrf^^ 



^l^v^ 




^r-r»/^*- ^^«i^**'^ ^v ^ y^«*C^ 



•^^<^A..*^A 



^fe^^ •// 



/ 



/ 



x^ 



^. 



>i^ 



^-"^. 



/: /' 



'^w-v* -/» 



c-'t-'i^j 



/ 




A«^*^^tw*w- ^U-^^ , >Cr^*-^ 



a*//* 



/ 



^i^V'^j^^^r^ysuCivt 



^ 



i' '^ tf^^,' X^'* -^i^X*^* 'S-, 



O'e? 



y^^M^^VC^ 




^ 




I 



I <* 



^ ,<^i^ *,*-.. ^^v ^ ^ f^^ 

r * 



y 




it 



5. .^y. 







*^ ^ 




^^ 






r^^-v 




^-fc.-K- v-^ 









> • 






, • * * 



/ . ? 








/ 



^^«^<^ 




^^I^W.f^^^-V'^^ t'l-Uyfyj- 






■^ 










^^^^ 



^vi 




/ 



n =* 



4 

k 

v- 



/'f 



y. 








4 






^ ^^a^'^^v^' .^tW^.^ ^^*^-u^ . Ä^iLw^ft^- 
^-H^w-äC^ ^^^^i>^^n^K^ JU.c/i^^ yy^t^ ^mC^^^*^ 







;^4 



^uv* 



^ 
/* 




...J 






.^^^-v^-t^^ ^ ^< 



XW' 









40 «tf 



y^C^c^i^ 



I 



i 



timimmd 



/OS 



06 y/^^y<—^'/Z^ y^Cf'^V-v-' x*y-^''^— 



^- 



V.w»w6C 



1 



i i'^. 



'/ 















•^ ^v 



r^^ 



y^. 






y^^U^. 



W 



? 



./ 





•-«^f:> 




^u:/^'i.^ «^d^^^^-^c^v^ -^it^'^^y/ ^A-^f^ '^ 



/ 









/" ^ 



7 c^^y^^\^^''^^%^^/fZ^c^\^u^y£4^^^^^ jt^ 



'Ä^ 



^/n^ f^>y- 



*/ 



I .< 









<^/' 



K 



^ 



»1 



"/fl^fcwv ''^ 



< 



i 






<T^ 1 ,• 'i-n^-' /^v<^. /'^v A4^^t^ 



V ; -^ 





^»^^ ^'<^»ua.,;/i>nt^ ^Jt^ 



„4-%>^^/t- ««X.«^ 



^-»'♦i^ 



. ^. 






/ 



,^«£ -»-"i^^^ ^ ' 



*/- 



> 






^ y/-»*' 



^**r^ 



4 



f 



fi 



^ ^n^^A*^ 








4^. 









/ 



•» 



^ 



/ 





Jt^ -^^ 







y^/ 



4 ^^fpUi^^^^'. "^i 





i 

-^ 



li 



II 



// 



f 






i 



i 



,^k 



^C 




^<fÄi 



;^ L j V -. ^ 



-^.-,^^, 

^^^ 










<tt'/»«»V>UC»^, 



x/^- «^^t* - 









i^^^ 






/ - 



^"« 









/" 




^ 



'>r/. ,^i-n-.>^**vv^ 











Ti^'A^ 






<Vi^pJ|^' 



/r 









I 



IH # 






dj iCu^/fi^ 



.A/ ^'-^ ^•''' . ^V^^^v^-M^A^ 



*^ 



i 



V)*^^ /l^ $ 







f 



#< ^0i^(^*M/ </%^V«^,^ww,.w<f ^C*/»«>Äf*^ ty^Uj . ^ 



^ 



0*i^ ^'i 



^ 






j I 



x«y» 






/^ 



■/ 



^ 




;;.^/ 



«Zw$< 



i-V 



I 



! 



11 




/V-'w^ 



':2-vvXa/c/*v*,^ .*^*/ ^5w.#i^v^, ^i.^^^c 



<Hi, 



IJ 



1^ 



^~. 






yXW-i'*^ 



-l'-V-V»^ 






ui. 



'/■ 



Q 






V ,^ 



v-^ 



Vm*^ X' 




J«/l^ ^yt..,.^^ ^ 



/;^^<!ä^ 




<^ 



/cfl !r^>^ ^C0C> 



^C^^Ui^ . f/.i ^--»c^ > 



^-^^yf^^e^i- 




^4. 



^ 



^ y^^^^ 



'^ ^^-v^- 



91a ^^ 



I jc.i.^*^^ ..^ 



^xvn^ 



V6f' 



,^«^M-*U^*^ 








^y/yrc//' /W'^y^ X-Ji.'i/t^ -Ä-ua^i 




.•a^ 



"Ki^d^^ ^^^ ^^ y/r^< 



« t0^^ 



'^4^ 










a 



>v 



^*^'**<*C' jl^*^tyt<49^ 






'^ 



.^^ 



"^iyfr^»**' '^«'vt* '^M-^t'^/St«*; ^^' 



V. 






^iu^. 




yhC^ 



/s 






^ ^*-' 




I 









I 

J 







^ ^^«/^ 



'*Ä-K?^^ 





.^.: 




*-<^ 



^:? 











^^ ^'^ 



/ 



// 



y^A^t-'w'^^ i.. , >*- 



-w'-r 



'/^^^ ^, 




. % 





.;^- 



-^ 






'7 



u£^ ^•-'^i^ÄCyC 





^ ^'^, 






i I 



y/v 






J 











^y<t^ ^-w '^ri^-.^C^ -pÄVii 




^*.>/^ 





» 






^w«<2 







<^ 



• 



-; 



i^t^ t/^'X'^^^U^' Ui^ ^X-^uv^ 



.^i 






^0^.^44. 



1 






<y 






/yi 



X. JUv^t^'^^ 







(Z>c 



^/'►♦^V*^ 



I 






X'^^' 



^^ t^^C^"»^^^ 




/ >^ 



^ ^ 



. J^. 



<^ 



• ^ 



^^uC^l 



-ßf^(^^ 



i/^.,^ yi^\^ /^Ju^ 



V' 




"i/i^ 



uj 5^*^. 



// 



"^W^ 



?l^aU, 



^ lU^ yry^ ^i''yi^<^-' ^u-.«-«^ yÄ'H>3.<^ A-^ 



.^V ^ 






/^<^. 




-f ^^ y^ 




'>^^^ 



.^4 l/n^'^ ^ y^f-'C^ . ^^^-^-^ 



Ä^^^^j^ 




/ 



^. 



'^-. ^ 



7 



^■ 



^ 



^<. 



ViiX; . ^ T^^v; 



(^/Ue^iCy, -^. 



/^ 



vi^»y ^-»'*^ 



z^ 



C^*^^4^K, 



H 



\ 



it 



/> 






I 

I 



/u 




t 



<t.*y9<<> 




^^vi/: 



-r*'*^ ^„^y^,^ 



S 



■>a 







^ 



^^. 




^^^. 



/ 



Cfc. 



/ 



^A^< 






^ >^, ^ 




/- 
^j%^^ 



"/ 



..^ 



-/- 



^ 













^^- 



■/ ^«4^i^S>»«^^ «AL<«<^i 



^- 



^ 



/Cm/-. ^ 








/. 



'/ 



*^ 



0>r 



• • • » 



^ ^^^ M-^^-^. 



1^^ 



y 



■^ -*^^ 



I 



. ^ 



/^- 



2^/ 



y 



f^Ul,^^ ^^V -^-v^^'..^ 



-gi^Ä-«^« 



ZZZ.. 



/ 



,X - / '-' 



> -^ 



-< 



^><'-^ 



r 



^ ^ <o4^Y ey^^»^t^<^'^->f^K^ 



»•»^ - •» 



/-^ , ^, ^^^^,^,y^ 



-* 40 



,rl*f ... ^ 



-i > 



XU.^ *4i -v>W*v' 



t/Ck-ic^ 



-^ 



^y4 •-^ 



V^i^ 



9/ 



<^^ J'^.^uu 






/ 



F 






v<i^ ^/lik.«*^ *^5^ 













- ^. 



-'i^ 




tl. 



^ 



II! 









/V^ -•<Jjfc/4«-V 



^ 






7t 




^6^<^-^ 



4 



A? 




9. 



;j^ ^^ 



«^ 



^^ 







^- f 



It 




^, 



li! 



I 



I 



E f 

1' |t 






""^^ 



A 



^ »^4^6^ ^^v ,,^, 



/ 



>t^ 



i 



) 




X? 



^ "V 



^t^J" ^ -^ 




^r^^.^^ (^ 



y/ 



>^/ 



V 



^ 



Vl^'A^'^V^^^. 



^^'^ Y 




i^^l^400^C 



"^Ci 



.«i/ 



-/^ 



/V^T^ 



•". 






.•^ 



1?^^ 



.X-»"V-, 



^•^ 



-^c^Z^ 



^U^^^^c 



'/ 



^ 



> 




y/^^ 



y 



/ 



**^ y^'^ 



#>■ 



/ 



<^ :7 



/•z> 



^a^e^A^cXi:^ f 



30 



^r^ f'^y 



U^y^ ViÄ^'./6»/, 



•-J •«■*-.> 



■^u^^^^ x-^. 



p/. 



^si ,^^4/6,0^^0^ .^U'Ui^^^^t^ 



Jl^.^^. 



y 




■r— - ".^«■■'■-.:.--^.- 



Jlli /iO 



\^ 



i 



\ 



I- 



/ ^Ä^ ^ 



/- 




'V 



>V 



^ 



^ ,^z^ . y^tf c^^^ 



*/»**> 



■^*t' -^ ^x 



J !^ ' v-^^/w^ 



9c 



>^ 




t^^^ iySJL'^^s<^. 



^iyUf"* 



'f^' 



%^^ 



^^ 



■^ 



/".U^^ 



'; 




^y/- /-.C^ £ ^.w^- , 6^ 



- 4u^^. -^Cu,,^^ 



^^,.,^<-Cr'. 



j 






^<-,'-,- 




./. 






^ 



^. 



&s- 



(Je ^e^) . s^\ 4 — -^ 




*r 






-*.. ^#c. 



x^^ 



^ 



^ v: 



</4,^ •'^*- 







^ c-^^^'; *">-«-^ 



^^l»*^ 



/^v<C ^«,-*-«i^</ 



^ 



v^->^- 









^a^-vt^ 






^^ 



^^i^Ut ^'^ -^'U^'*,! , f Ä<C^ 4-^ 



1 



•^ 



Ä 



'^V A^-^ -^Ä<^^U^ 




^ 



"H^^L^^U^iA^ 



w^ -^i.^^ 






-*w-«v* 



^^^6,^^ 



^^ 



^1^ ^ «^ 



5? 



♦^ ^..^ 



^-t^^t 



Wt -w ^ 






i^ t^^v^Sf/fi^ 







•^fc^v^-r 



Hiw ^^ 



r 



\T 



i 
i 

»1 



^ 

X 



^ 



-'1 






^"^ ^*.^ 



fc»* ' 
















./<^' y/(<-<\ 




V«'*' *t<»-i«|^ 



<V« .KftA.^ ^i^ ^v^:«*)^ U/ >t*' 




'/ 





i 



/'/:? 

^ 



y/*'*' 



«C' 








V5^' 



# .> 



> ^»^ ^-^' 



.'^<U- *^Lv^ 







r*-!^ •< 






0^ -^^ 






/ 






^^A^ ^'>1(t-^ 







.'t '.,. 



v'^kV, ^...- ^.y^ im^ ^^^ ¥t^^'i0>C^ 



,^'p^^^f,£^ 



ft, 



v^^ -^* 



I 

ll 



II 



i 

"1 



y^/ 

A^^ 




^ ^//t^*.i%^ ^^ 



l/^i'^cA^ 



^ 




/^ 



u 



^♦v^'* 



^^^ ^M 



/ 



// 



y 



■ 




^^••^ 



v^ 



/ 



^ 



^.^^^? 



^ 




■^— »•*<'-. 



v^— ■ 



•^ ^-^. 



^ 





**j^^,'*^. 






n 



^uy*^ 



^ ^'^4^ rfl^ 



'^Ä^w 



^ 

v^-' 



^ 





i/^ 



««^^ 



-^•"Sp^^^^-^-v-i^ ^^ v^ 



A 



^^tt^' (>^^:/ . ^.^ ^*,- ^.^..OK. 



*/p$^<^<^^ jlC%-u-u*f "t^ ^«.^^«n^ ^^i^<>^ 



^r 



V»C^ 




^«^ 




t*-n^v 



^-'^ '*--^^/^^-^, ^^^i^it^^^ <^'-u_^ 



/ 



'iii 



^ 



Ä 



y-i^r 



<lv 



^<> ---^-wv ^.^ ^ ^.^^^ 



/ 



^f^^ 



tC^ 



-^^ 






.-r^ ^/C- 



-i- W 



;^ 



/i^'/ 






^-v/ 



/ 



-"^•^ 



/ 



''^ // 




5^ 










*4' ^. 



'*• -^^1.*. 



■v 



y CltÄ^ -^ rfü^fLu. , ;J^ 



/*^ 



^».^t-.^, /<JS'^ 



-.' ' 



"TJ -'^„^'•^ri0f-\t*^ 




^ 



'p 



^ 



/^K.'V^yh»^ »l^ • ^Cu.i^ty^ t^i^A^ >/ *f 



n 



^al-#*r 



'Ä^-V* 



^^W'^^-C*,.^*^ ■'VW <<^'>W-^ 



"t-Zf^ 



-T*»'*' 



^ 



'^ ^aiytf^k,^i,^d4.,.k^-^-fi ^, 



V- 



7 



^vf 



;u 



'^ Af' -.^ 



t*^ 



4^ 



y(0^'*> 



w^v/- 



^^ W 



^-^ 



'VWk'^x 7^^ 



--Ä/^ 



-< 



-»v 



^*- ^ 



HU 



r 



^,4 r 







i.a 



.^v,^»^ Ä-r' ^ ^ZC^ ^*,v.„^'^ 



"^ 



.0^ 



/IJ 



j 







* ^ 



^^ 



^^ , ,.-i -;^^ r .^- 



'^ V 



^ 



I 

1 



.^^/. 







/ 





-^v^V 



^-^'w 



xi^^ i.' 



:t/ 



«• ^ 



*^ 



j) 






h ii 







mUy,^ . ^t^UX ^y^*^.yC ^^-^^^-/.^^ 



/^v <?t,v-«->4;^. . €i^ 



/ 



'/ 



^ 



•< 



^-^-^ 



^A*Ui 



^M^^-,^^ -^^U <^A,w*^ 6,^,^1^^ 



't 



1 



V-?. 



y/^^ */ 




/ 



*4*^ 'i>i*^i 



,^' 



''^ 



y 



«/ 



;^/?Ä^^<. 



^^••^/"^ 



r 



'^^ 



fs; 



'^<t^ •*. 



<, i<^- 



v^ 



,^ 



.^' 



-d. 



v-/- 



/■ 



t>t 



^<^ 



'Ti'A.^ 



^. 



^^^^Uy^ 



ul 



^ 



%/1ä^<^^^^ y '^.'^ 



^/. 



w/*^ 



- , /3*/>^ 




■^ 



-A^^^ 

</*^, ^ 






.^«x^ -»**•»..,. 



^J 



*j^4rt^^.^ ^X^J-r^ . ^ 



^'*^ ^fK^f''^ 



^^O'" 



yt*-^"1 ^'<^'>^ 



^^A.4n^, 



1^ 




^^ 



i^./^^ 



.t^A.'^ ^- 



»»^Vu^ 



»^^ 



^6^ 



• *^*t 



j*^ 



"V-l-^ 



■'** t 



^V-^ 



-^ 



"-V --. --!»'*. ■; /V<y«^ 



/ 



/ 



^^ 



4 

I 

i 






\ 






j^^ 



X^- 



•;. 



^ 



'-^^>piyp4tit . ^'-^^ 



^/^^^ / ^7 



«-^ '^fc-^ ^ß/ft^'»^ 



ff 



i 



/r>- 



-H<. 



'/vt ■.■^' 



^>^ 



i^f bu^ V 



/^»-»W-k^^^, 



'^. 



:? ''^ ^ . ÄU.^ 







^^.^ 9^'y>**^,/Ä^ 




v-vi^ 



-rfv- 



l-^^ f>^^*» 



A^^U%0>*i0^ 



^A^'O^ ft^»^ ^cM- ^^&y . 



<^ 




>A<« 




>g 



^?r^' / IrO t»"»^ C^ , ^tU' . 




^Ji 



P 




'^O 






\ 



\ 



V^ 



^ 



7 



-iwjv ^*«!*/ 



JU^^' "^^l^^t^^^äJfi^ . ^«**V*v. vC-yi^ v^U«4- 










'J"- 



^. 



'^^ ^Z^' 



*'4kV* 



'tUs.^ ^t/iX>.L>^ ^^^ , *^aj^-,^ '^<^^'^^^^::^^ 



( 



'jfrf'cA-nij^ 



^♦'<' 



t^ ^»^z >^«^ Vt4-/'V' y ^ > ^/ .W 



^dki 



i 






/ 



^i 



*-^4> 



^00^" ^^u.^^ ^0'i 



.^ ^■ 



-U-wt^ /^^*u<7^. 



^. 



^-vi-^^v*«*^ ^ *^. 



r 



t.rU.ä/ ^' 



^IKa-^ 



1 



C3^^ 



^ 



^n«^* 






f<^d^*t, 



>t ^ / 



/^ /^V*.J^«'**^><l.w*' u^Z^K^i 



4 



'Ä-w-v' x/2> ML' .^vf 



<^<n/f' 



*^^^ 



^t^^U* J^ 



7 



/ 



'^, ^r7y 



I 




X 



/;/ 



o^ 




V ^Ji^K^ 



^ ^H^/' 









,/^ 4-*< «^A**»/ -^ 



-Si-I*^««, <!^«^ /t^i^f^ ^^d>*Yftu- <. ^ «; 



'A*^ 



•x^-- . .,^**' 



i^^„*^^^fU ^ 



^x^^^. ^'«— c*w*7**.«uÄ^, ^:u, /^^ 



^u ^* 



(/^ 



<> i(; 



/^*^ 



;t^^ 







•/^ . /^ 



^'W^ 



^>ii.*-i^- 



'f / i/, 



<?w ^*.^ 



x^ 0^ 



^^^ ^'^"A^ ^'^Zr^-^ ^^A^ ^ u)a^\.4c. ^-^ 






/-.y' 



**- 



,*-fc«'»«^:,^ 



./^ 



f-V -r. > 



-.^ * 



^^ 






/• 



><''y> - 



'i'Vv^ 



J>2 *^ / 

^4/^*^ 



^ :- ^ X^ 



'^'^'*- Aii^^^ ^^ . /v^ >^;<^ 



r 



^'tA 



i«*W^ 




c^ 



/ ^ . ^^^ 




•Vi, u 



^Ä-^^^ ^^4^ #*^-u^ -^Jw^^liU...^^ ^4^^ 



^»^i^i-*^ ^•^ 



.^>i^ 






i( 



.^ 






^ Tl -•. 1^ 



I 



h 



M 



y^V 




J *MfA^ 



•^ j^i^fi-,^^ 



y ^ ^^w:> 



c 



"^ >»^4» 



C 



^u/96^ 



^' M. 



■w '^' 



<2 



iA 



«-v^^l-* J^"/' 0^4^ 



^ icL^ muv^ 



>»5^ 



■>>«^ '^^U^^ 



,y 



'«*'-^ >»'«^ ^y^ti}^ ^x^Z.Ou.c-U' 



^M ^ 




^^/ 



-^/»^^-*» >,<-4*^, 



4^.^ 



^^ ^t^!^^^m < 






■^ 



>-'V^4r I 



<^ 



.^ V 



.^^ ^ 



-'r 



V r 



/ 



t»,-» ^ 



/ 



'/^'^^■' £0»yy^c0'^' 



M 





/ 



T ic>^ 



■^^ .^ • 



<» • -- 



^ • 



I i^ •. 



7; > -> 



* ^ 



/i 



^^hf'J /^^^^-t^«* 



*<?■ 



^v*» 



Jö^ <*/. 



S^. 




- /*,-*<C^ 




•^^ ^ 



^^'*^%i^Us^ 'M.K.^ ^^'^.f^^i^ ^^./^fj **^^^, 



^cuUl^ 



•^<^y:Je/' ^^^ *.<e4^ 




»«<Ui^ «»^ 



/ 



ty 



^<? ;3äU' 






^ ^■^ 1^ ^»^ 



/^- 






.s*^^»*-* 



y>^ ^d^^*^ 




-^ ^ 



x^v/-^ 



v; ^< 




f^ 



if^^ 



v^^ 






i,^^v^ ^^U^i' J^^JJ^ 



/(^^ g0fC^*^y C^t0m0ß(j t0 



^'lt09. 




\ -%i 



/l 



i 



IHI 



// 




^ 



I 



y1 ^ 

^10 1 






^^i/Ot^ 



/: 



^/-^i^^ -^^^ ^^ 



%^ 



/^-} 



>v> 



» * 



r^ 



•^> 



^ 




^i^ .^^..^ti^cj:^^^^^ y 



m0^^0^ 0u^^ 



V -^ 



CP<^r^^ 




/Vi^v • 



y. 




-^. 



W'a-^/ 



«^ 



i'Wf' 






i^y^ jv^ »^ . - ii-^ 



^ ^'i^ "«^-a ^ dl^' 



^ «^. 



>g/-»^ 






.^-w 



>^f/. 



y^ 



H-^' 






< ^ 



/ 



>^-^ 



^ 



77 



A^i0^^' J/i^vv 



^ 




^0,4Ur^i^ -Ä'^/i^"^^ 



^ ^4y^ ^1^^*^ y^y^"*^ 



jfJy4^ 



^y. 



^ 



t 



^' 



^^'i -♦ ^ 








-v:?^ 



"^iiw- /'^^^^t^^^''k/^'(^Jl/U^^^\^ 



c^ 



^ 



y^ 



x^/ 



x** 



..*^ 



^i^ 



-Ji^ "-C 



^y. 



^. ^ 



/ 



-" > -^y i^7^^>^/»'*^'^ 



/ ^ 



>■ 



^ » 






^i^cA^- ^U//' 



':♦*-• V«*» 



'VVl 



^*— »WH^^ii^ 



^ 



^.4»^ 



>^#^^ — 



^.7 -■>^ 



'^^ 



^•»^ 



^(» - ' > 



cv 



f »--' /^ • 



/j^^^ 



-u^ 



f 



iVi" 



A? 



^ 




^ 






'/^-f t 



SECOND INTENTIONAL EXPOSURE 



r' y^r 



<2 



i 






j 



/# 



ji 



X 








^ , X^ «^. w ^ -"^ **^ *' ^^ ^^ 



fc^ 






/IV» 



'^- 

^ 






s^^ 



V 

f 







^ 




.....^^ ^^A^ ^^^^^^ 






^V^^ 



•1^' (/^^^C^c^^ ^J . C^ ^.^u^^/^ 



> 



i.#^ 



'.^ 






in^-v 






• » 






^i^0t^^m»mm 




t ^» 









x^/- 


Bn| 


.--,-<_* 


f ! 


.^i^%0u**<i 3 ^■^ ' 


> 


% 


r?^. 


► ^^^ - 


. 


^)i^i=^t^^€^ , 


> 


^ ^y>u^r. 


1 




* 



rc 



I 



v^ -^ 




I 









V 



t ^ - - i 






.«• w«*,'<-' 



.;>>v-^.*'(c .^ » 



: V 



-^y' 









H J:*^ . 



f. 



-/ 



.* y 



y^ 



-^ 



' IUI 






/ r^ f 



l< 



4 

jl 






! 






^^ ^-v^ 



- /^-w-u.n-v^4-7 yH^^%^ 










(■ 
-2*^, 



- ^^ 



^<//f 



^ »V 



--''6'. 



. ^irr ^. 



^*iWT^ 









<^ 






'^>A»t^ 



r 






? y^ 



^y^ ;^vr. .^-.^ 4€/^^^^ fl^ 




/ 



•^^ 




/ 




^»*^i^ 



v*</ 






/^i 



-/ 



; 







/ liU 







-^ ^/ 






^_ 'w 



•?B* 'lU' 



^ - -^ 



•^ # n ^ 



¥!( *^-^-^ 






.<■ 



' ' V*^ ^w 



7 



^'<- ^rV^*«!^ 



A 
t i' 



*<< 



-»* ^ 






'/fC^'u^i^ 



/- 






i 



h 



^' 



^ilf 



c 










v» <-«>'^--.^^ 








/ 




^ ,-6iiw^ >: 



^-^ 




v^-' i^ 






• 



^ 



x^/ 



4y^4^ ^ /^' ^ 







3 '■'f i;«'«,.^ 




2 



i; 



r^- 



V ^ 



-^ 






^yn^^^^l^i 



yiC40 



» * 



c?''? 



<!/ 






^-u>^ 




A^.-v- ^'-v ^tC-t,^ -^kV-«^-». 



-<J'. 



- ^ — .. 



/ 






/»• 



^->'. 






^- 



^^0 



i 



/y*^^ ^ 






0^ 



^A *i^v 



'w. ^«-^ 



# • ^ 


















^- 



/^ 



^ 







>^r 



'4 












^1/U1^0i ^ 






/V? 



#y<> 






*^ ^^^'^^^ 



•v -^ 



/(.„t^C^ . ^v-*y^»./»v /, 



^-^-^ W^ <?^*,'/.w/'*^^ .- 



• *-/ 



•^ 



»<7' 



;r. 






'üA'" ^ 



^ Ute/ 






/ 



/ 




« 






^ 



'-< 



-^O,-^ 

7^«»'^ 







4 - *» a^ . 



'* - 




^ >>' 












«i^V A*H.^^'5 f^ / «'^Ä^t,^' 





■ Ä 



-•t 



I I. 







h 



yfi 



^^. 



.A^' 



u / 



■^4^ >.»' 



/' 



/ 



<y- 



i I 



y 



■/"^ 



-■'V I» *»• 



"f ' 



-^ J^ 



'*-,•*. 



'^CAil 






H 




d ^A.^'^l.u^ ;/4^^ 



'^^ 



f^ 



^ 



^ 



-/ 



«>1*V^ 



^4^ 



'/" 



./7/^- 



^; 



^ 




^^« ^'Wwfr«;)!«^ V^ 



;^ 



^♦* w 



^^ ^l^^^^^^fl'^»-^ ^/.^-^».^^ 



1") ''^yi^ 



^ 4€/'4^'^'^ ti..*-*iX*^'JL . 



^' 



>^<^ 



p4^ 



yt '"^r ^ ^^ -V t» 



,/ 



U^>^^^ 



-w'-^ 



..* * 



u ^ 



4^^^t 



w f • '«^ ^r»'*^^ w 



^^' 



^f^ 



4^JL 






^ju^^MjC 



*4*n^V 



4^ #4 <>C- 



^r fe- 



V 



<ä\v/< 



'^ ,yh^au^ yä^u^a€ y^ttAvi-Ky^ 



t^ 



I 



M? 



/; ^' 



V 



-^ ^tr^t^l^ 



^ 



t^tf- > 



r 



:'i<#< 




^^ 



^; ^. 



V 



VA^ 



'>\^ ^ ^f .f^ "♦ ^-^ ^ /^. 



V ^ -^ # 'S 






•^a^</^M^ ^H^ 



/ 



vC» 



•» ' 'V 



J "i 



, 4 » -* V 



^^ r^ N^^V- 



»•'^ 



IJ 



^ 



^VW»***!^ 



(/^l/ 




/y^A-^WW^ 



^ «JV^ 



/• 



'^ ^^'^^tf;.^^^^^!^ 



<iv^ 



4AiyrM24t^ 



/^J ^ 



^-/ 



1/ 



fV#^ 



/ / 



>^/. 



'i^v^^H ^ •^.jü^ -*"*»• ^ 



>• V 



-V*Tg^4.^ 



y^. ^ 



V 






tq^i 






--^ 



"^^■K-^w^xSSi 



/><^'/?« 



1^* -^ -.'-v 




^-^^^ y^ 



*^i;' 



y-- ^, 



V -^ 









^ 

f ^ 



j 



// 



^ 

4 









4^ 



4**VV 










o»^ _ k 



t ' 6^ 



• «< 






^v^c-^A.^^^^-*^!^^*^ ^/xw*%«. ^S^^^y^ 



^ 



^ 



/»- 



-^ 






^^ 



«A^ 




^^ 'T I 



^lU» *^*v^ 



r-^ 



V x<>t 






^ 



Ui^^ÜJ 









yfr: 














^0^ •» 1^ =w , 








•^ 



t^Ä^-v.^/^, -^3^ 



-/ 



x^ ^*v^4 Ä^ . ^fc-vA-**^ ^^^sCp^ ^^</ ^^*^ ^-U^ - 



^/iXv/- :r6^2,-t*-w ^^"Ä^^ -^'^ / 4^ V 












^4^. 



, C^A^^^ ^'/^ 



-^. 



>^'*-^ 



' " 



/1 



i 



it 



y 



1 



1 



J 




/f, 






/ 



»^»-•v/H^ i^i^ .^ 



^ ^ -* iU^ 

^ ^ 



'V-w*^ 






^;' 



4ß ^»i ^ -V' *=^r 



-w ^ ^ 






> /%**Ä--i^ ty^u-^Cw 



/v«.^^^ , 



. .^' 






A' 



%g/^* V Vf <f 



♦ / 



*^ «J 



^^ 





;<; 



i 



f 






y^ 



^ > 



^.^ 



Ä^^.^ .j^:^ /^.— /^H.**^. 



/ 1 










-^^ 



'V 



y^ ^ßTt^*^^- - 



^^y--<-v y-^ > 



<" 



^'1^' »^ U^ '^'C'^ *^ tj. .- 



' 7 



' ^-^^ 



/" 



^ <■* — ' 








^«.^- 






/?-■ 



/■'' 



:^ 









/6<^^ 



,/^..- -*s -^..-, /C /#^ 



^p 



i 



< 



J 






*- Tt^^^a .v^^- ^>^.**^ ^'^^ <^^ ^< 



/■■•' 



^-►1 « 









-^ 



•fc-^ 





.^^ 



'»•^^ 



.W*,^ » 



^V^» 







/ 



-^ ... 



,». / » 



J'Är-^ 






/;; »4.^%^ ^ /O^ ^ X^*^^^. 






•^ 



% 



X^! 



^^^Y* ^'»^ Vfc^Vi. /^«.•^C«.-!^»/^^^»*/^ v/«-»''^ 






k^C/" ^t^>X>y ^' «'. 



7 



^ <- . .^ ,1>^' , 












li 







Ä^vi^V. 




^^ 



;.^i^ -^i>K- - 












y 



I 



\1 



/ i' 




'^Vw>^i^ 




c^ 



C^s^'%0^ •'^ * ^' ^ 



-^ A 









^"> 



i *»••*-. »•» »»^ y''!'^ »w 1 






^ 




-7 



#Vt> 



^tf f- 



A? 



■^* 



^./ 



/ 



/ 



Ufe Oh^-JL. 



^t 



: 



n 






1 









<^'^ 



4^»^^^V^' 





j 






! 
4 




^ 


( 


" 1 


1 



I 






O" 









^^>^ ' '"^^ • -u-l^ '*iJU^ 



' ^£^^1^ (^^^^ ^^^JyUt/4 ^UiyX^^ .^4'^iyU^^^ -i,'--U^ 



/^ 



'-^^a«-^' H^t^" ^^w-** ^*i6^x^in^^ o 



/><>»v ^^0.1^ 



^ y^Cuty^^i/l^fiC y . /^^>^ v-^i-.-^ 



-^Vj^ ^ ^^^^^Cc^ 



y^f 









'^-y;^. 



'—i'^yCt' 



^c^ 



^i. 



fh 



^ 



^ 



^ -u 



^ ^ cldyin^ u^^T^^Z^ 



,^ 







^ 



Ä^y^ igf ^^ , 



L^m^v 



^M/Uur^ 









f ^^k^O S *^C^ 






'WVn v^ 



/ 







y^ 



t^-V^I 



4C^f^' ^ ^^ '^M^ t^ V u>i^ 



/ 






^ 



.<L. 



i^ 



x^ 









i 



i 



1' 



y^i 






-#. 










^ 4/iyT^ ^ .-^^V-^ €^^^ "♦^^^ 



-^^<^ -O^" yf^^^ Jl 



-7 



"^7i-<r. 



i^i^<^t.i^ ^ P^CUC.^'9^ 









//^^ 







^ ..^^-^'- 




yi^/n^'*y 






.^i^,^^^ 



4^- 



^,^v<^ ^y/t^.^u^ ^^->*^ . 



HoO 



CT 



•^' >^'*^'>^^' 



^ Ä^ 



.>^^ •'^-^T^ 












^*. 



"^V^u^-'-i^iV /^^^^ Va^'^y^-t^ ,xt-^--w%-^ <^/^>l^ 



/£- *<i>- 



'e/^i-'^H'^ 



ZrT. 



y^ 






p . 




^ O'^.^J^^L^ 



A 



h 




l ^ 



yU/^t^<^^^^ --^c-wwu^ ^^^^'^^-^-u^K^ ^V-^^' /^* 
<JcJU''L>'UQyO ^^tf?^<^i^^ C^-^^^<y^'y. iL^i^'o^C^^^cy^ »<-^-^^^^^ c^^^^ 



^ 





L 



it 







/' 



^ 

y 







/". 



^y/) 



/st 



/^ A. 



>^OC-»- '/<^C^fh*^' 



U^ 



C ^^'"^ ^c^t^'oC*'^ 



/ 



yo 



yU^ 




i /^ 



y>i^ 



/0^<y 




^ 



^ ^^6^ 



><i— yC'O ^ 




^( 



,u 



^' 



u 



-/' 



1^. 



^. 




/^C^-->/^4C^^ 



I 



I 




y/J-/ 



0(li.^ ^K^4^Z^ ^>^ y^ 



/^C^U^.^ /^^^^^-v-?^ 




J 



cyuS^t/^ 



^-v^ 



■^. 



'»«^'C^ji^«-.!^ ~- ^c-^ 



••n 






^1^ 



^ 



C^ 



V ^^< 



^ 



'V^*^^^ 



c-n-v^^ 



^ 'V^'u^L^' 







<^^^ -^-^ 



<>»^ 



-^^y^-'^c-^ 



^ y^'^^^t^ 



tx^n^u^ 



c-^ 



w^^^^U^r' 



/'Z-vO 



^ 



^^^ 



r 



> 



/ 



^K^' ^ifü-y^u' ^<er^- ^^^^^^^-^^ ,^/^A 



n^ 



J:c 



CX^ir^.^ 



^^^-/-"^"^'^'l'T^ 





i-^ 



/Wt^C<^' 



'^X * % ^ I 






*/. 



>^^r< 



^ 



->. 







.tfxo^ 






/ 



^ .m 



/ 



a^ 



/ 




/ 



1 

4 

f 



i 



I 



i 



y> - 



( i. 



I 






J^ 



.^^C^■^'■y^A^ / ^i^ 



^^^C-v-L-ww^ .^^y^^^y^^-^ OCt-^^a. ^^^W" - c^ ^K^f^Y^^ 

I 






>c? 



^Cv-, 



xT. 











/ 



^ 






^/ y>^^^ 



*-»-w.*^. 








« 



I 









^.£^ 



4.^»^ 



/ ) 



w-v. 







/^4<^^^ /O^ 



yfy^ 



^^^^. ^ 





y^^ ^V-V^v^' 







•'--7 



i^w^^ ^- 



j^^'^p^- 






y^ 



^>u£^ 



/ 



ll 



/ 



1 



I 
( 

I 



a^ 



/ 



y> 



- / 



/, 



v< 



^ 



/4 






/^ 



y/? 



^. 



<s^ 



.;vv^- ^^^^^-t^aX^ 



x-vj/^V 



^ 



^^n^i^'i^^ 



^^i^^y^t. 



/< €y^-3^^ 



y'^j^t.-X^f^d^^^^ 



/ 




'^^ 



y!^v^ 



^- 



^. 



't^i-^u-w^ 



>- 



'/ 



Ä^>-r?4/ 







Jl^yl 



k: 




^'^^ 



<^^n, /•» 



.^•-w^ 



^•^. 



^^^^^c^^yc/u, ^i,',.-^ -o^* 



, <^^ 



-/^. 



:?2t. 



7 



X<V?XWWV*^< 



-^wu^^ 






^..A^. 




-r^ - - 



^ 



^ 




- I 



va^ 



/d^4^ Jji^Ji/.^yC^. ^,-^ *.^>C^ 



^ftVX^ 'i^t^-on^^*^'-^ ay/t^'y-^ .^^«-vw^'.^' 



4 




6^,^^^ ^^.Vu*/*>-*^..v^ ^ 



.w^- 



-><, 






•r-» 



:/<'. 



y^^ lyfi 



v: 



V*vyl 



^^• 



«^ 



«Z '^' 




(^ 



<^-<->^ 




^^^- 



/vv^ 



Y^^^?J ^^ ^.^^^^ >c^->w*^ x»^*-»- 




^. 



*-^^ 



^w^>^ ^^'^ 



/J'y^. 



vy 



--«H 



.^»i.^"JBüJft*«B- 



/ 



/ 






C »7a^-uix^ 



a^ 



/ 



9t^'.^ 



y. :!Kyy^ 



'y^ 



< ^^ 



^1'^^»'*^ 



^ 



<*^' 




t-i** 



^ ^X^ Z?.^^ 



x< - 




• ^^ 




^c^'-^i^ 



.hZ ^^4^^' ^ 



"^^y^^L^ 



^*.N^W/^i-*.n^ -U^ , ^ 



*^ 



x' 



// 



1 





yc^ — 



X 



> ■* 



> 



;_v^ 



^« 



/1 



I 



<; 






/^ 



l 



Ä 
^^^' 






4^/"^..^-^ .--^^i-C^- ^ 




-^ 



u^^:^>^U^, •i 



^^^^ -o^-^n-i 



^w^ ^^>r- 



-^«^i 



^4^' iA^ 



•-A« 




i 



l;:i^ 



/^/3 



-<^u^ 



^ <r^* 



*^ 



^yf^/'i'f^jc.^ y,. 



V> 



"Xi 







U^^i^- 



yi-<^^' 



^ 



^ 



f ' iij / » 









*^-! 



^^M^'-Ä^ ^^^ ^'*^ ^^»n-v xw^^i^' ^J^^v-»v» 
^4^i^ ^!i^A^ '^^^ 




'»»■»^i^' 



^^-^4-*ä 



y 



^-^ 



Ay^ tj ty^C^i^^^ , 




-6.^ 



(Q 




^"^-v-^-l^ 



Y^^ 



^ 



;^ 



'^i^u 



'K^'^^u^>-i/U.^ /U^s^^tjL^ yji 




^'^•Jv-^ <^- ^4'-yd-^'«-H-^ ^^,^^-^aJW . ^^^'«^t-^* ^c-Ä-r 







K^ 



y1^y7i^y,^, 



I 



j/m 



! 



/ 



/ 



I 



^ x; 



\ 



1 — 



f 



y< 



JL 









/^ 






/^^W^ *^ 




^^ «^^^'^Cv- V^-M'^'^-V**^^ 



■t-v-*<X^-' 



^'»^^.^t^ 



-^c 



W4^^.^ 



-Ä^ 



.^ 



*^^ 



<^ y^^^ x*^'*^ ^-»^ 



^, 



<^ -i- 



^'.^^.^uö^ ^A^ 



^. ^C^ 



/ 






«<^ ^^v-^^ fWU, 





^. 



-^•^ <yKy^<''^'>^ 



»^ 




*-l"-V-v«^^^ 



^ 



>;>^. 



^ 



.^ ^ 



y«'. 



Z^. 





•^•->^^-,' ^» 




« 



*- 



-9 > 



^/'y 







y. 



(^ 



^^4't'^ 



"^(^f 



^''X'Cyi 



_ ^*a-»^ "CV*. ^ 



*<1^ ,^^. lt, 



^. 






•»^ 



^ 



•^^>Wi 



•\>«* 



^. 



/ 




i^ni^^^ 



^/ 




- /^•»/'. 



•»-V^. 




<-. 



r 



6^<-nf-^ 



^i^t^X^^0'%m •/ 



<C*'V'^*'%» 



3«^ 



,?V.^ Ä^^ 



•>^ 





^i; «j:^^* ei-MJi^ ^u> 



S'^'^i, 



^<^Mp^ 



CA^^^ jt,-^c cr^V 




<0 




^ 



C'U*^^^ 



-^*-xCw^ j ^U^> ^"^^ ^ 



^ 



^ / 



/ 



a- 



I 



y^ - 



xc 



X' 



<r. 



/y 

-^ 






/^ 



^am^ 



V// 




X<^ 



?. 



<u.^^ 



f^^ 



/ 



A-*y5</ 






'<</t^< 



^. 



"Jt^ "O!^ -3-w^4 



t^ f-^* <^ Ä.-«^4^ *- 




/ 



^^^ 



J 4» ^ ■»■■* 



'VV'V-vn «^^Lww^ 



y/Cy.^^0^ Ä^A^ ^^ 



/ 






^y^dt^'iC^, 



4XMX^^«%.M , %l^^^^i00^ »-^ '^C--» 




^^- 




^V 







\ 



* 



1 



/*, 



•^. 



^ 



/^ 



^y tr^ 



^V-««*V«*' 



^ 



"i/^ •^<^ y^ tf<l^'f 



^c/t^ ^^^^^ 






>*^y^ 



V 



..^u/ 






^y>^>^ "J^v^i^ 



'^Vi'vC.^V */»-i-i.*- ^>^iA>vu "^^ 



-c 






>^ 



•^ 



J'. 



i-y>^. 




^.^ 



<^ 



>^ 




•»^«^,-w, //(l.^^ -^ 



rfi^.' 



,^*vW*^ 



^ 



^ 



J^^ -4-,vay ^-i--,- ..,.^.-»^>/^ 



<?--r^ - »-s^t^-^ 



^ 



^•-'*t 



:^^ ^^^^ 



^' 



^ 




Ä-^.^^ 






*^ 




jUif^^^' 



-^ 



/ 



^v<«-»-r-»«*< 



Vi 



-1^ yfO^*/" 



•A ^^- 



*4^. 



^ 



w ^ 



4 




\ 



I 



/ 



/ 



c ^ 



I 



X. 



I 



X 



/^ 



>1^ 






'■^<^*' l^^f^ty.^ ^.^fr-.- ^^.vs,^J>^'' 




•x:*^ 



**'^iu«^*> 



^ 



/^i^ '^--' 



^•.X^ -^. 




^, 



/ 



^<*- 



u^ 



J .,3^U^yr 









^4^ ^•.^ y/^-a^ y^^ ^^^ ^^^ 




c^,^^ 



y^>uC 



x^*^>xÄ/^ "^^^ ^^^vrV^^ 



Ä' ^C^* »^ 



f 



^^ 



^^ 





I "< /< 




0, 



**i: 



<^^ j ^^ 



71 



-tf'Tl-u»^ ^^(^ 



i^^^^ 



Ä<. 



w<. 



x«^*- 



/. 



^^•i 



^ ^y^i^rU^^r. 



^ ^^^ 



.jL^-^-^dn^^. y^ 




'^ 



x^^^-^-^^^V. 



I 



^ a-..^^. 



l 



/ 



.y^<.-<^^ 




^^^^^^A. 




f 



\ 






rTl 



x//0 



/lr/>^^^U ^•^ •^- 




^v 



tC\.-\,^hyt ^^A^-t,tfyf , "^ 



,yC6 ^^4-^ ^^*-,"'3V*" 



^ t^— *& „-i — -<^«_„^ 



^ 



>-^ 



y* 



^ 



^ Iß 



U^t. (f^. 



^. 



yy--^^ 





^ x^.-4.^ 



^ 



^ . 



0L^D'4f^ 



C^ 



C^ 



6^ /^^ 



- *^c^r^ y^ ^^ y^'-^'^ 4 "V / 



3^ 



^ 



K^o^i^^c^ 



"U. 



O^ 



x^ 



^- 



^ U4^^ t-^-yiC' ^x^^n..^ ^c</^ o,^^!-,^ 



^. 




-^.yO 



■ZU^ 



>aX 



^ <? 



^>^2-v^j.^Ä.v^^ ^^^- cy-y^a^'-^' y^ 



.^ 



^c/uT 



^ ^ 





^y^^%^ 



/a 



/' 



Xi 



/- 




<^«/ 



— <!t^ 



V 



/ 



^^^>V7 **-w.tX^'<X^ 




/ 



■..t^ 



•.o.v<C^ 



;/ 



^^^^^-vAL 



\ 






/>o 



« 



Ci.itrjfi- V- ^'^' 







-^wy^ 



^c 



■^ 



n 




aZ^- 



(n^ 



/ 



^h^tyi^ 



^c^- 



^l-K^ 



^. 









x^ 



.^ 



I 





•^C'.>^ 



<^ 



y 



y>y^ 




>C/ 




w<^' 





:.^, 



(^< 



•^ 



■^ 



^ 



y 



rfS*"^^ «T*! 



«-^ 







l/Uu>\^^ <t i/^s^0^ ^i 



'^X^ -<C; ,X-v,^<j<f 



//J'^? 



^^^^--» 



V 



U^^t.^ 



r 



'^ ,u\ 



y. 



y. 




.'/S^. 



<?. 



■^ 





^/ 



y^? 



I 



(y, /ofC^ 



^ 



y»^ 



n-i' 




*.<^*^ 



V, 



Cvi-v-ww/ '^f^f -tx^J-** 



f' ^.ViJU't-- t-<^, 






>^^ 




I 



aX^^ 









6 ^ 



Die hesten GliicckwiKnischr 
zum nVilniachhjeste und zum 

neuen Jahre 

TojiTo Solo 
Fuehrer & Bolmehchvr 
f Cho, No, JOS Aoyama - Kitamachi 



o 




o 




O 









m 


§2 


llfc 


/ 


^^ m 


St 


• 


A 


9 


mi 


V 


M 


,"1". 


A 


m 


-=• 


fH 


n 


^ 


A 


•y 


— 


•jii 



=r ^' 



r 



yL y- 






ra 



A 



m 



e42 



:f 



7 



i/ 



yi^ 



^ 






*4 



b A 



:*5c 



k 4? ^>^)^ 4-1* 



TS ^ 






^ ^ 



i/ 






A 



?^ 







FLOWERIST, GARDENER, 



an( 



HORTICULTURIST. 



T- ]^ 



IBE. 



Taiko-ven, 

NUjöjShibB Park, 



iJT'fc 




3^fl 


^3 


-f 




^ 


*^ 


•^ 


Ü 


f 

T 


# 




^ 


/- 




r 


* 


^ Ü 






i 



^ ^tir -M tüT .3»t ^ ^ 4^ 



^ 



P- 1 



n 



GUCHI 




MEGURO SH IN FUJI, TOKYO. 



o 



o 



o 



O 



St @ nfc ^ ^T m m 



- iti 



'1 



f- '^• 



7" 



JC a 



b m 'S? A P[] 

b A r 






ni 



'^i 



A 



:^ 



fti» 



re 



a 



PPJ 



y^- 



fr 



-»* 



^ 



*4- 

■^4 






*An 






n 5 



4J S ^? tt lä 



/ 



p 



4* - ^ 
^ >r: A^- 



m\^ 



fr * ^ ^ A 



;i 



-y 






5- 



'^ 



A 



%7 



H«. 




7»^ 



y'l^ 



'>^ ® f^ 



ifli 




iA 



r 

;j^ 



{•)■ >H 



ۥ 








^ m 






::..^ 



/ 



:,-M 




-> 









wm 



u] 



»■V 



V s 






m 



,v 



7 



frtlC^^ fiA^^I(^i^4 



(ßhi^i \Am^Uk<^^ 



^^ 



MCH^^ 



r 



kR\o2S 



3/4 




ch^ru 



i^\^ssknd 



A 



$4/4 



i 

4 

( 




^//A-fiMöMs^ /OM üiuiAsi(m(l ^"-^ • 




il 



ß^U 



AAJ^.^ L^trt^ 



t'^C/^V' 






i 



•^/yx^i'^^ y^^y^^ ^ rJC^ : 



;% 






^v^r^z^iJiU Jim/* ^^-^vvvv<K^Ä^ ilyr^i'nty) 



Viük/ 



t 



ST- 



so 
-3^ 






1 



'i 






I 



"TU^J 




fv^u^i 






J' 



^ Ü^l^ 






y 



^-'f^, :^Ä*^ 



^^. 



*-^ i^ /inn^^ 






'^-^i^vV' 



^ ^/iTf^ cy 



M 









\U *^^ fC ^f i^J, 



fi^^tn^ 






/CCj/'^c^ 









^■* % »yi 



£"V. n.^ i^^i-'i-^ 



^■-t--i'fc>t»v* t*' 



(• /» 









/***^ 



'/Ja-wv/ 






*^i 









4 






ri 



! 



I f 






J 




^-y^ 



't/k/u' / 









/ 









f9 













ä 



7 



L 






iC^^y/l^yll yT. Jjf] 



4i«V«V4»vt t^ 



^t^liV^ 



XgK^^^^k^t 



I/a 



Z/^^^tn^^ 



XJ 




? 






wx;;-^ 



"^wX^^ 



^^Ty^ 



»"V 






t m'Cm^ 



*i 






^uA 



(U 



8^ 



^7 



-r? 






> r 






I 



I F 



ä 



y 



I 



I i' 






'/(rvi. 






'^ 









^•? 



^^^^^^^ >^'^J ^^ 



X.^ 









<iU4t 






« 

« 









^AU^ 



{^XMxi^<gxvu<^X^ 









T 



liM- 



C/ 






41 






(l-> 



\% 



t 

A 

4 



/ 



^ 






^^ . 



jUcyK-fi'^U.^ 



)^ -^ i^ > 



M-^ 



'V 



*■ -J 









'^}CiyCi,oJAl^ 



.' /"j 






'^'c»-i»i i^-^^ 



•0^' 






/^ 



/1 



•I 



^, 



O^iUyiy 



1 









V^^t.'->''VU'»x 



^ J 



^. 






<Äc^v\^. 



f 



»^ -^ l.XVt*»-!^^'« 



/// 

/y/ 
y/<)' 

y/>^ 



f 



I* 



t 



n 
li 



I T 



^ ^^uyif«Uin^ 



i 



/ 



\ 



r 






^, 







J'V^T-T»*, 






^ 






yv^ 



1 



,.yi&4y^äua-fi 



«f 



'IS 






xf 




I« 



^i'Jn,'-^-'^^c-^^^u^t^.t,,.^iyC^^ 



i 






It'V^U«^ 






/£^ 



^^ 



y^y 

y?^ 









I TT 



A 

I 






/ 



•I 



I 



J 



1'^ly^0^ 



• ^/^Ä^W4r i^i/C^/'X^ 



Ju^ 



J ^"^n^ yO^^ 



'i*^-^k^\. 






i^'-W^'. 



r. 



7^ 






yCifU' 



"^ ^->*^ .^^ ^^:^. 










I 






-^/^ 



/ 

4/ 









^^- 




./W 






^Li-A 






/ 



•-♦i^ 













^^^7* 



I 



I w 









/ 



■ \ 






Avb^ 



rfc^'i'V'V^ rfii-^-^U-V 






QtnMt^tlJU^ 



7 



%. 




^ ^/Yi^n/l^/^ 



'M^^-%L^ Ofc 




/y-x/ioe/ 



■^^^pl.. iii.iTi -»■■. 






cA"^ 



^^t/t'j.^'i' 






i/ 






irt 



irj 



l^ 3 



i 









) 



mUV 






J^-A 






Ä-V 



^^' 



^ 



4<t.-i>t-^''t**^' /'•Vt' 



»</<i^ -vyvW' v!^ 



IL*U^ 






Z?l 
■17} 



^^j 






a 



ü i s- 






r^/ 









T 

Jl 



t 



i 



/ 



:s: 






is^M 



ley 







^ '•H^y^i 



4 






■^/ ,^.. 



^^ yfrw iT^ '/'^1^'^^'K 



\ 



^^jy^^-c^^Ji 






^ ^C^^^i^A,^ 



^ 



*U^ (u^/ ^,^f^ jji^^^i^i^ ^u^ 






^A^i/ r^n^^yyi^i^ 



z^u 



' V 



'.-.^..rrjiy' %^i,^^ 



iU 















^n 






;■ 



» ^ 






« 
• 



r 



I 



i 



H 



t. 






* ^5^-V-^ ^-O^ 






3^^ 



c/ 



/ y 









^/4^^ 



.jA'^^-^M/^ /U^Lv4 AJi^y^Ji 



^ 



US 






^/j 



0'. - 

/ 

/ 



I :^^'^ 



I ' iE 







i 



/ 






-^.a^^. 



)r(/^^ 



^SyUVtutiCi/ 









M 



1 




k 


^^}}i 


^V/ 


i2^ 


v 3 cd aJi/ S'.yV'i;'^ 


"lif 


3}l 


^U-y^- ^^^ 


^.V 


^H 


^Ai^<St,i,.wi^ /t^ s i''^^ '^-^^^^'^^ 


yi'5 


5^/ 






3r/ 


C- ^ Ayi"^' .''U^^t^^ VzJz^ / yyv^2^'<' 


f 


'^7'/ 


-^/^^■^^v^ I^^M^ä^ 


Of!f 




Jui^^ - 'V <U^vv^ 


^^y 


;^^ 


9w ^./U^ • ^'.^r^^'^. 


3/? 


-^¥1 




^.7 


^v<* ; 


^^^ -iX^rV» '^>tJ.-^ i} .^-y^i^^i^^ 


^S^ 


ir^ 

' 


wi'-vvx ^&-T-«^' -TTM^i^i»^ 


^^9 







4 
i 



/ 



f 

t 

i 



1^ 










^4. t. 



CA^^t^ 






9ä^yi oL^ ^ 



^v^Wd^ 






•^f- 



I -:f(>iX^ 



I 



:?^i 

:?>/ 



'3 ^y^ 5^/ 

* ff r 

-in' 



I 









i^^ 



^ 



g^^ . 



'\'jUA'n iS^^ ^^^ d^i^.U/ ^i/Vt^ ^l^^ 



'iu 



sy^ . 









•7 y a 






I 



1^ 



I 



wr 



a 



% 
i 



/ 



'<1 



: 1 
\ 












7 V i/ 






1 •- 



r 









-.? ' 






I 






/^/^. 



Uli 


HlL 


•^S}, -/^f , 


/i^ 


til'fii 


rn 


iiii 



I 



/ 



// 






a 













^fl 



^^1^ 



4 






Li 9^ >iZ io'/Ä/ ai^ö^>n«/ /4-^w^^' ^ 




OY^ ^ 



^^ 



n 



Pi^ 



/ 



X 



,■ f 



^'\ 










4 



/ 






(Jl C^^l^i'^'^^ ^^CJs^^^/Ü^^ ^-W-VW- X^*-^ 



•'l^'V^' 








Z 




/ 



^. 




X^ — /j-^L^^- ' ^^ 



>-»>/ jZy^" 



t^utli^ ^*-vi^/fi^fi-vv- . ^'■<' 








f 



i 



J^^/•' ' 



0^ci^^'C^^^^ QJK/^^^^ >-lX/^n-b^ i^ 



/Will/ -^'C^ ^-^^-VU^tC^ ^OA^^C^ y<0^^pt y^Cv^j 



V^uu*v^r6 xWT^ ,xu*-u^' ^iC-u^i^ ^ ^c^*%^ y&n^^ 

\-<^^<J^^^JL4U ^c^€.w ^ >^:^' ^Ä^d^ 5?«Ä<i 

1 






A<^ 



) 



9 



K' 






I 



'^^ ^'^Z y/S" 4fU^*^. 'We^'/»^ ^*^ — 






4 



/ 



< \ 






4i 



'T- 







C^'^^^ 









^ 









^•"Wv-i^iv-T^ Ä^<g^;/.^ 



■O^ 



'/Vvwrv 




'/ 



^. 








t^-yOyCr'^ «^»^vw^^a^^ 



^■«--»-*«^ /^*f'^'»^*C^ /i^'uL 





V, 




fr-uv*/- 



^ 



./(^ ^- 




(T^^ 



/*^_. 







JL 



» 



! 



C 






/ 



1 



^ 



^^^ 



? 



L^y^ A^ ^kI^ </^' •VUv/ 






>-VTUU^, 



^^^t^^^«^ #t fl^^ww' 







'VVtfrvv^ Cf^ K>i/U^ X-^i^ A^4^ ^>U^ '*^^/' 



^<^0UC 



\A^t4{ytk»\^ 



>^^/< ,^^*^ <Vt..vw^ TSu-vv^ 




^^ ^1 










'H'UVU'ÄU'VI^C. 



^-. 




'f 






•^ 



//;'/::• 



c 



«^ 








6^^ 



V- -<- ^?«W^-.'"^ , V 



^ 






I !• 



^^-».^^^ <Uv^(t^^^ 75^ifÄ:,Vvv/^Ui^ M^rwJ^^ Tä^-^U^ 






/ 



'^ 




\t 



I 



i 



5 



J^uL. r^*Acu: 



JcA/ü--*^ 



m 
m 
* 


. 1 i 


1 


'i 


1 


1 
1 


( 


! 


< 


j 

1 


1 


t 


* 








t ! 








iJ^^ 




/VU-U-O. 



«^ /^t'uvv'^'^iü?^^^ /'^o^r'^y 



9 



a^rvlt.»^ ^Vw^fj 



t^^ 



V. 



/T/Uu^^ .^^ 



y\',K.U^ x-z/t-v^ -^<>**^(J,-t1^ 



a^c^^i^i^ Jq,o^^,^ y^yr^fl^J 



tfuvu*" juyyi^''^ 



^ 



"tA/U 



^4x^ 



'^^u^^ 
/ 



^.^ 



^'.^^ 



y /Cctu 



— ^ /. 



^v>n^^^^ 



>-- ^^j^ ^^ 



W0>^^ 



■u 



Cyi^^ 



yVi.^^fC 







f(rr <^/v</^^uv MxL^u^ 



y'T? 



^kÜJU 



^/V<Ä--u^ 




>'>^^^/>^^ yr^^^^ J^^ U!:^^ 



Ä^ 



^ ^ 



«r^ 



^ 



/^•C^L 



«-r*/^tf^ 






-^•/>- .*^ ^^^, 



x^^tÄ^t-V yU^'i^/^ ^^ 



^^-w-v» 



üU 




yy.>'yiy 




yft^^lyJUU 4v>vvW:^ 



:^.;.i 



c^ 



/? -^ 







•^. 



''KA^^ Jyl^^C^^^. 



w/VVit,'yt\' y^ '0^^^ J^,^%^h<' ji>CtAl>t^ ■ '3'v'VV 




>^ - 



y^i^-^YvL ^(U^fc^ ^^^UH^^Wvt^ 



^'* ^^/-«y^ . Jx^cL^ "Jw >-o^ j^^ 



i-iC^ 



';4^ 



^1^-**^ ^ 






SECOND INTENTIONAL EXPOSURE 



I 



M 



ll 



i 

ä 



y 



Ml; ^ 



l 



JUJ^ (i*MKy^^^rvplju ^ ^ct'^ /i.^ ^i (fi j^ 




/VM^^< 



/ c 







>lJiJU 






-. I 



-^ <c^ .' . ^/^^ |//(^rr^4.v^ •HtyJ'^fl^vw X^^*r^•^-^^ 1^^^ x*{*<^ 
7^ ■ «^ xX'<^ .'«^^^^w xK^;/ ,^, 






«-^t*** y /Cit^^ 



jUwv 







.^^Cb-y 

















I 



I 









i 






^.-^ > 



II 



^C/A'Ä^'^. ^CTT^ /^l^/^ .^A<^^ ^^^^i^ 

^Ä^' W(^<^ /^K/vU^ •,/^-^-u.^-^ Vtn/^^" 









^ 




•/l>Wk|^ 



y 



2<U' ^^tyuJJ: ^^ Au/- 



V#^ ^w*v» ^-^tUU c//^ 



Jl" 



^«.*v^ /»^i-VvvU 



if-\>-u0 



l 



;'i^!! 



Mi 












/^t/V^t^VU^ /q^(L0 






^ u 









T 




^^ - 5? .^ , ' ^/4^' /^ 






.-^ ' -* 






I 



•m 



Hl 



i 



I 



II f 



t 
( 

y 




S^-1 



i 



1 



LI 



m 



h 



!!' 



'ff 



} - 





C/^'U^A^ y//, v^^ 



^ 











^<>*.*^^Vtf-t**^ ^ ^i^PT^ ^^t-'l^ yP^cX 

77 /V^ &^H^(j.r7*v^A-^ , /^'jtpCi 



^ (y^c 



1^. 







.-^^ 






I 







*-C/ 






'^^♦-»-^i' 




*y^'X^i't/C 



/ 



A/i 




/'- 







y1h^^y\^ . /c^ ^^^Cvt/^#w^ />VV</ ^•^*' ..i^l^v^ w:^4vi4^ 



'^JU.^^Ji. 



' '^BL'-MM^^ 



1 






i i 



i] 



f 



fliflHf 




^•^^^^^t^i^i/^v-vr; 



^-^2^^ ^Ä.^K5i^ ^'^^^vryf^ 






4^ 



f 

9. 

I f 






I 



i \ 



in 



IT 



!h 




^A-^ 



»./^Ä^Uwwi,^Ct.<''^»'Vr'**^ / .»A.^ ,^^^*v ^^"^^^ 

y^(>y ^./X^^'/^sZU.^ ^-v- ^^«^ ^.o**' /^ . 





•^«,0^^ .C^U/^tLT ,,Ä>^*v^ ^<K >^i.<-*- ^««^'' -A^^t^ 



S'. 




w-1- ■ -^ 



-^T^^ 








^ '^^^ 












J^T^a-Zy/ >^-i*^ ^l^<6«l^ ./^-Vt^H^ 



/ 



■Ä^-*^' -«^u^ •^«it,^^^ 






-^^^^ 











x^i-u^ — 



\t 



I 1 



h 



i ' -i' 



<i 



r 

\ 



t^ 









4^^^ '^. 



S4^ v-<rvi^ 



^^<^c.*^/ y^n^' 



X 



..'i'^ jUt/^ 



/c-^^i^*^ 'hC'^^.^i^ ^(^^'Uu^ 'i^.i^c.,.,^ 



PtrA^ 




s/ 



/V^^4^ ^c^^i^ ÄCv^t^ ^ey>' ^a^^^/SuyC 



'-.</'i*<>'^' 








•^-►V-^t^ <^ '7''PyfS,''^'tÄwß^-/ y^^y^i 



lii^i^' 



C/«^ ^^*^-i^^^ /-r'^'^ ^ y^eCi^ Xt-^^^i^^^-y^r-i^ 



^^ 



^^^A^ 



^T^c^^ Y:£a^- 



^<^y<t/ 



/^nou^ 



/ 



^ 



A0<i0 V>>Vfc^ 







J^C^ JSjU^'^t^ 



^■^V^**^'!.****, 



'^ «"^^ y^/. J x//^, 



^''*^*» 



^ 



'-^ 



/^i^ 




^ 



-r-^i 



// 




d^Vl^ 



yl^Uiyß^ 



^^ 







'^^^^^ 




^(^p^ 



C<r 



/-^^2^<*<^^^^ ajW^ ^ 



^0iy^ 



-^^.^4^ 



J^^ .^i^^^ y^^v^^v^;^ .^.^^ 




X^^ >^ 



^-K' 



^?^ 



yiZ'^^ 



.^C^C(r>f 



ti^a^ 



d^ix^-' 



^ ^^-i/K^ir>^ 













/t/t/L^ 



O^C-^ 



"fi 






a 






s?, 



^ ^^/^^Vt^ 



•^ 



/ 




^^^' ^'»^ ^fHM.uuu^',^\'4A^ly ^iX^fiCy^i.tA^ O^t^ -<^<>^ . ^Z^t'iJk^JJ 







';-<i-y / 



,^^C^/Ly4^ 



IC/yu., ^rci^ ^(fP**^. 



^ .^Vg^>v// i 



{ t J 



.IU_, 



1 



? 



I{ 



H 







^^n^^i 




ii 







/ 




'^e/h<r^ 



■^i^«-^ X-M^fi^ ./U.,^1^ Ji^,,i^ 



J3 

f^' " '0^ ß^ -cZ, 



J<^J^'^. 



/^.w/- 




'/^' 



,%/. 





/ 







U*^*^^ ^< 






> 

^ 







4feH^ 







\i 



I 



i 



► 






ii 



illii 











/r 



^. 




/^ 







fr-v^ ^/-«^Iw. 



^-7 



4/ «^ 



' xA 



-•^K 




fiCe^- Ozc, 



iii 



.^ ';^ <^i..^ ^^. .6^..^. 




yd^Cy ^Ul^nruC xX^"'*^*-»'*' ^..-wi-w,-.*^ yU^i^»C^ i, ^^ 

/^«^m^ ^pC*^^^ 9^\^ „-»i^ yu^^cJ^ 



l i 



(! 




I 



1 1 



1^ 



. . 



i f 



tl. 






I -..l 



Hilf! 







^sdt** ,^<t-x- 



«^ 



^/ 













'ffr^L^ ,ctt^ 





V*'->»li.l^ - 









'■■♦•♦»/ 




/^^l/l 






/^^t^ Jit^^ J,tn^O^ 






.<^ >:^ >f^ ,,^^ Jt.^yi.U^t^ "^^^ 
•'^''^^ ' •-' '' • ^Ä^i/' y^..^rC X^ ^->t^ 



^^'^Cyi^ 



cZ/t-w^ Q/>i 




'^/C^- 



^^i^ 



r«^ 






-»>'- 




I 



i' I 



i f. 



,i 






4^^ ü 



]l '• 



■l 



1 * 



3ö 




',: 



' ♦■ 



* i" A- 



1 




J 



^ t. 



H ! Il i. 



i- i 



2^ 

Jt/^4^ ^lUf ,^**^.ut,*<^ >^**,/<i^ J(/^U(.,4^ 

(^/U^^Hii^^^i^ i4*^^-/3£^^^ ^yi^^^J J^ f^ 

^^^^^- j^4->u»» ^Cu^.»,.^ ^' n^ ^ 



4 ^ 



CJJ- 







e^ 





/^ 






^ 



/ 




<^ 









Uw 



/ 







^<t-^l<^^ ^>A.'V-w<Vi 



>^ ^^^^-u*^ ^..^c^^t*^ 



^ 










I 



. l 



Hl i 



M 



tW : il 



3^ 



f 




^^ 



'yiry 



'Sx^t^ 



Cx^>* 






V 



..^nnrc. 



A 







^? 



\ß^u^i^ Ol4c,^^ x^ 




i ^ 








/ 



^. 



>tÄ^ ^^..^^ ^^^u/ ..^^^^^ ^ Ja^^^^^t^ 















V'» ( 



^'<^^^ 




/ 







/ 



v^ 



/"ti^^ 




I 



5 !■ 

ijl 





.^A 





\ *4^, 




^'^y^^^^y^ 



n 

-^•^ ^^^^>^ ,^M ,cU^^ 

'''^'*^ ^^s^^' ^i-t^- ;/£^^ 













(^^ 



<^-^/ 



yU^^C^t^ 




^ 




^lA- >tvK^ yfi.1^«^ 'ßvf^Hlc.<jL^ /^y,Ur*^*6 
^il^C^' J^i^,4i^ ^- .&i^^ y^Oc ^uO^A. ^ 



A I 






J 



-^^ ^-^-' -''- ^2^^- ,^^y 




.^^'«^ TTi^wVS^ 



// 









"f^fi*/' > %y*<^u^^ ^t^^ 



x/-*^ 



^. ^;, ^>*l^i 



( :■ 







^Uj^ 



\ r 



^Wtu 



^^o 



f"^^ 



j\ 



? 



/ 



k 




^^/ ^^. <^^^^ J^^,^ ^ 



^^^^r^MMi^, ^tfiizjT''^*''*^ ^"^^'^•^'-^■W Ö ^ 



/'^ 










t 



/ 



^&^i 



/ 



Ä6, 



e^'C^^aU (y^ ^ 



'tvf 




^ z'^&C'l.^.-wi^ ,44.^/^ ^/^ ^y-t*'^^^^^ 



•C0>.\ 



'^>**C ^.^.t^ . ^^i^^*^ At^^r;^ yu-'ut^^ 



<^\ 







t*-»- 



r. 



J 



I 



4 



I 



i 



i. 



H 

y^^ -^A<^^ ^^^^^U' "^^^-l^ ' 4U^O^ ' 








17 








-<4 



'^^'^U^^, 




I • 



X*^ ^.U^ -^fr^ 
^-^^^ ..^«Ä^ .^K>C^>i^ . '^^ 



C^IZ^ 




^./^c. 

,^^ 




^-<xlV^ ,^'^i.^- yU^'C^ yUi,^L4/C ^^C^»^ 



v^ 





"/ 



.A^- 






^. 






! u 



1 



ff 

^l^^^fC ^^^ ^.^ >!^^; 



■^' 
















AtJ 







^ 



^^'^ ^^^ i^'^^V /Wy^^?^^^<^^ <^C^-^ 










/ 




^ /^*-- 

^J^. 











O^ 



y^^ ^ 




S. 



ii^ri^n 6^^— t*^.uu ^^. ^ 



^^/^ ^^v^/<^ ^-fc^i/' ^d^i^«^«^ -^->*W^A^ ^^fc 



C^^«^J^»^ 



i. 



'^- ~" ' 7tüi i «u 



J 







c^^sX^ 




V 




>-^- .^.^ ^..^.^w .^^^u. 





-'' /i^-u^ 




ii>*v 






^^^- 



Ji^^' 



o 

^*^ 






•Vt^ '-^ 











M-. 







& 

y^^ 









^ A^c^ ^ 




J 



I 




u^^>^^yaf/< 



^ypy^ 




!»/•'.: 



^^t-v,:.- h^^^ cAZiu^ 
yh^^^^^ ^u. cly >^ ^„«^ ,^,^^ 



t^lA>^ yK>^t^ Cy^C 





/ 





\ 



'x^«^ '^jfCS^i 



7 






0^^^^ yi^C-^->^ ^^U**/^ ^-fiOU. 

•'^v^V .xi^- ^^> t/4y^cu*^^aMs. rcOy^ccl^n/c 
2^'6>^ ^-u-v^ x*v*^^ ^nrr^^i^ , /^?<,> ^^-vi^^ 





tii 



I 



>/^i^Ui^ ^^^-w,-^ ^fCu^ l/CZf-f 



^.- 




tf^*-. 














"/^ "'^^'^f 





^J-*^ 



f C'-i.^tS^^yi*^ yAtit^^ ^>*t.4-r>^ 












■»'' 

«^ 



^' 





"^-^ /-T-T-M»^ 



-->wv^ <;2:w^<^ .Z-t^^- ^; 








. (I 




i. 



1 



li 



H' 



I 




,1^ 



\m 



s: 







/•> 



'^^r^ 



\\AW-, 



'^t'^o^tucJ^ . /Uff 



ri 








^u^< 








^^'^^ ^^i^t<^ />f/7l^ 







^'t^u^^u^ Vc^^ ^.^^^.^Ui/C y^^.l^C'-AL^cJi^ y^Cy^^e£^p4 , 



^e^^m ^^t-ti^i^ 




IJ 



^7 



.U»^' C> 



Sv oUu-^ „dct^^nJ^l 



v^Ä-tf^'/T /{rU', 




^*t^.rUj^ A-^-^U.-^^ /H^>t^^V^.i-^ 
^-^^. -^'^ ^'^^ .^4^^ ^..^ ,^ 



'Z'''^/ 






^iuu 






' />^i^ ^f't-vwyit^'Vw^i^ 



yi^i^u^^nr ^c-^y^ 




sr 






Z^r^A-^^!^.*-!»*-^ y^m^l^^/ , -^^ 



^C^yX^A^^ ^fiU^/^C^^^ fC^'^^y^ ^^U^-/^ ^/iju^^t^ ^'yf^€^ 
14nA/iA< Cy^-^ xvwu^/^ W^^ /i^^Ä^ /iH^U^^ y4^<^ ^ 

y<i^u^^ ^l(j^^yr0^ ^^Xv:ww/l-i^ ^^^X^w-V^-w-ww /^ 
M^t'Wv^^l/i^ y^A^^A-K^ yi/^^ ^^#%u^ '^C'^^^^ ^^(/^^^ 




^ ^^ - v^t^ *^^ 




■' ■» 



l!^. 



J 



I j 







./^ -^ .^^ 4£^w^-. 5^^^ 








Atj.^^ ^, 





4^ i^'^0C 



^"*^'^ -f^ ^^ ^x^ 



/ 





'.Ä-r^Tt 













/M^Äfc-v-w^^^n***^ * yÄ^ä 





^.(^^ 




''i*^*-^^''^.!^'*^ 





^^ i 



yh)^ff>i 



-^^'i^ui^ x^>^ x^^ ^iSitiv^Ä^p.^ .^^l-v' ,x:v^W v.-^ 

"^i:^^ jL^n^ T^c^^" ^^i/i^uy^^ ^(^i^i^ri^ /^fiui^ 



l'i 



^ 



/ 



li 






. , . , .^'^^'^ -r^ "^^^^ ^ a^^nr 



/^W'-^V 




•r 










'-^tf*» 



y. 










■' I 




X^ yÄ^ ^/^ ..Ä^ lyLi^Q^r-yQ^t-iyrrGrvy^ . Cc^V^ 









/TTV^ 



/ 






I 



j 



n 



i\ 



^C 




f ^ A^ ^^U^ ^..^ j^^^^^ ^^^^ 





\ -^^^ i^St^^L. 






^fph^y\^ 



-V^v^ 



/^ 



0^Uuu ^m-ww .^:wvJ, ^. y "^^ ^**^ ^ 







// 










>tß. 





/"^^^^/i ^^t^'^ 



<^ 



A'^'^v^^^KV 



•.kU. 



^c^a^^ 




^/>-»;^*4..v*.w- ^'fi^^ On^yt¥^/i<Xi'-r' 



^^^^Afe-^"*^ \re>^r^kA^ . k^r »>vv^*C /(/urj^ M^^^vu^ /«itr^cX- i.r^UA'lJ . 



I 

J 




.1' 



u 









A-^ w ^c^U4^^ ^-^ X'.^ i.^ ..^ 




^Äxf- .^Z-UC^^t-^Ult-wl^ y.^J*'*'*^ .^i^'^i» Q^iV" 



'^iS^^ 




5^. 






^ 




^ 












1 . 1^ 



^^ 



Ml 



M 



^"^. ^-^-^ --v -^^ ^*-^ . 

"T*^ ^«- ,4^ ,^^ ^^ ^^c^^ 




^f 






yp(4>^^%^yuC^ 









\ \ 



^(J-U<^ ^C'Uk^' 



/ 







^^^Vi^ 



^ i/!^ 






^xMi^rXrC/ ^ ö^^r^' ^^Cuycd^ , 





/ 










1' 



i !<, 



Id 



.t 



ii ..I 




.^tl/z 








-/^^^^^ijm 'VK-aV -^^^^ 



Ju. 




.V 














r 



"^^Jt^ 



^wUiJ.^--^ «^Ä-rvut^ ^A^-^^-K^ Tt/ry9n^Ani£u A 



^ 




,'^; 



' 1: 






I, 



\l 




t 



i\ 



'iffr 
liii 



i ii • 







,^ 



**--«^ -^-i^ Jc^,U^ i^^^^ v.H^,,^V,- 




^< 






^etf^- 





4/14 fi'^'/^ 

(7, 



^ 



\A\^0^ yCy^ ' 



r 



j> 



^f 






/ 



X^^<»V^^ ^^ClhyC ^>U^^ ^ÄH-v^ y^^^^^Jf- 






^ /^ ^^vw^4^«^ 



'/ 



/ 



1x^4 



^^^L%^ 



y { 



70 



V. 



\^t^^ X«J. ^t^ /»^^V" ^^^"^ 




xw. 



(fit^ 'U.c<r ^^Cuiyi/yC' 



4^*^ A 



lyC^ l/L^L^ 



^./n/Ai-^i-v-a^^ 




^'uU^^j^fc-yV^ V«^ ^fiCl 







-^v^vd 



/ 



yt 



/vn 



/^C'W^HS^' ,.4*^äXuv^ 






'^ ^ 



c:^- 
«(^ 



^W^vwvf 



'V/->' 



^Ut,^ yfX^XC ^^A*. ^ 



iv^ 





I 



ft(A0^ ^^/^^ ^fiC^'t^ /riTu^y^y^i 




r*-^«* 






/ 



y^// 



y/>^ 



ii 



^ 






^ ^ 





-/^.,^^ 



^t^y^^cyyi 






•^^^^ 




^-! 



^f^^»^ ,1^.^ ^^*-^ ^<*^iS^ 







..i!^;^ 



>^<— 







Vl^Vf ■^UT^'t^.^C 



>//. 








^«-rA-^iti. 



/cß^uCf 



/ 



-^ 



/.^ 



; 



^Ui 



^yH^^i^^y^^i''^^ ^^L^i.^lyuuy^ 



t^ "^VUi^^^ 



^^sw^^^-^ 



^y V' /^-^ 



/ 



y^^<^^^^ ^0^i 



^ ^4^c/ ^ 







^^..uy i^/i/^ A^'t^, 



w 



rJ 



i 



t 




/oe4 ^^ 'rCu- ?-/t.^ *^7^ ,ty^,4**j;^^^ 



1 




'O^U yiU^ jt-'wU^A-y^ U/it^,^0i/y^i 






/ 





:/A 



r^ 






^U^«' /rUZ^ ^c^ i/TtfA.*^- 
4':u,^ // ^^^. ^Mi^t^. yi^^ ^/tf^vt,^^* 



;';? 




v«^^^ 



v^- 



Ä^. 






y; 



^^^<**^ 








XV£*'V*l x'Oufc"*^ ' 



tf*^. 



^•"-^ 




^' ^' 




^'Ji ^^U^ y^U»^ >^'l. ^-^^ ^ 



'y 






t>/3b 



/^ 



/-^.^ 





>V«^ ^ 



^^ •-' ^^ /1^'c^^ '^t'C^^iyi^ "" y^^^ 

/y C'Ww /'T^ U^-Li/i ^-^wt-i^^ y^iniU^s^ ^cZiyun^z^ 

j)M~r7Vi 




^ 




7<^^>^ 



• f, 



1, 






,1 



.iyt^\y>^0^ . 



^^tXu 




^•^^ 



^^K^U^Wf 




t ; 



4|l 



f^ 



»it.* 



"YU^ff^c^ , O^'^^' (i^t<..i.^iA^ ^c^^ .^^U^ 2cu/ ^ 



/i^^^<U^ .^iyiL^^(yi^ y^^(*^(>H^, 

':::i)cclcy^A^^ v^^tv^^ ^^^ ^'^^^ >i/>i^ ^A^cyt^ ^ 



^yu^c^ M" 



AUL^Ui^ 



\C/vty 



/ 



A^ (^''•y^ OLyuJ\J' 



^^^^i^(yWj<y/iy^ 



^^"^W^ ./^t^^i^- 



1 






n 






^^. 



^^^'^^'t^ 







/<^. 



^<^ 



^a^^^'i 







^c^^ 




.^ 



^-^ 







^^-^^Ct^ ^y^' fi^ .^^6r^yUy^ ^ h'/*^^^<^' 



«•i^ci-^'J^L'n-^ .^< 




y 






f^' 




"t 









; » 




-tt^' 'I^C^U .i^^ ^O-^^ <^ 



''/• 



^^^ .^Uu^yT' ^'^^^^^L^V'U't^ 






Ilf 



I 



-H 






^ ^</U^^<.\^^^ 



<^C-^.^^J,-y* 



lyCi^.,^ -^--T-tt-i.*^*:: 



^eX^ ^ ..A^ ^^i*^' x^dv-3^ -t-v*C^ ^ L^J^t^C'C.'^y^ i^^4^<^ 



i^ ^(iy^m^^Ucy^ : fiC<yf^ T^c^ 



'Ä^^J 



I 



'^V'^^^uut^ ^U^^yu^^ ^Jc^x.^^ yi^'^r2.^f^CQj2ocj'^ Vv^v ^X^ty 



1 ^^^-'Vi^ Tt^C^U^u-LyC VCn^Ci^U^ 



^, 



/i^ 44^<^i^'ty2^ ypi^4^.t^i^ 



n 



•UyU (^'>-^i^^^-T^crki^^ ^'rvvl^^ ^»i:^ ^t 



/S^< 



1'*■^^c^c->rd:^uM^<>l -^4^'^^ .>-vU,^ 



^*->t ^£-£^ ,^'^ ^-<^-S^ 



^'«^c-t-t* 



^^: 



/i^<^ 






.^ 



Ci^4--t-w /- 



ycyO'i^^t^' ^^a.^uv/^c^cJ^ ^'<^ 



^v ^^^-^^^^^l^^*^ . t^v x>^ v^ 



/'^^H^ 



^^ 



<>^ /yt^yu 



^C^iL-c^ 



x^vi^ 



/ 



Jl^Ut^ 



A 



Huw^^uiy^ 



l^i^^l^y^ 



£^ 



/^t<, yt,,Wl^rC 



.£,*^i^ 0«-t-i,^ ^i,^%y^ (/i^ r'»'vi^ 



^^ 



^^ ^.^^zi^ ^^ ;v^. ,^^^ 4, 



-^^ ^. -^V ^c^tv^JU., 






^^. 



-C^c^ ^^. 



^? 



^5'^J-K'^^^'t-t-l^ 



^, 



v^^>n/ /^ 




^n^'Cc^*^ yi^ yi^C^ux^i^n,^ .l^fc^^^ 



'^yf^^i^ ^ £^^L,>u^ 



^?J 



7 



^. 




-^ ^«» 



i^^ 



^k^^^ 



xiZ^^ '^C^' ^^ /^U^U^ -^/i^^^ l^a^ ^..-vW"' 



.^^/' -^. 



x,^X'^j^''2^^Cl^ 



/f 





i>-t^ ^"^ ^ ^'^c^' rS^-M.^^- 



.^ 



/^ 



^i-'«.^^^*'^^^ 



yiZyu c^^^' 



C^' 



4^u^ 



^'yn.-<c 



vt.'«-«^-^ 



-r4^'^ -."i^ 



^l^ui^ 



^ 



'c:C.<Z^l^ a ZCf'^ 



V^>»-^ 




^^<^ 



^^K^t^i-^^ 




-^ 






^A-'V*^>^U*'w-»' / ^^t^yt^C^ /i>\yi,^'%/i' 



.t 



^\u^'/U^^^ ^ 



^^' .^ 



' ykey^^ 




^a.y\^^ 



^ 



l-7y^C^ 



^ 



<%.x^C^ 



i^^W-^^O- y^Cy^i 



^C 



C^u^y 



^i;i^^lUf'' .^^ 



*K.yu^i^^ 




'l^Cy 




0(!^' ^^ 



yL<^i^ 



r 



^5:^, 



i>^Cv^^^ 



..'-^vj-'^-v^^!^ 



?^ 



- >^ 



- .jCt^Z^: 



^ifi-'.»' 



-6/ 



t-JX^ 



:V'i^^t''p^y%,^ 



yy^O'C^ 



-ifU^ 



-:yu^^ ^:>^ ^T^c 



•^t^^l,ytyO ^ZjL^^ 



i^^i^ 



^ ^^^"»' 




;y/ 



>#^* 



•^ 



1^- 



>/^ 



Zi-^'^i ^.^^ 



/) 



^Vt.'vi^ 



-^ 



*^ 



i^ V»/\w 



■^ 



^^ipvi 



^ 



««1 



^p?^» 



}'' 



) 



tll 



!KKI^f 



i" 








^J^\ 








''e-^^'W >C-f'(<^/ ^t^Wt^ -^^^i-,^ 

Z^yl^ Z^*-^!^, V'^y^^'c^'^^ x^^^>*^.^ ^..^a^f-^^^^^L^^ 

.^-/S^:^ ^^.:>^^ ^yPU.^^.^ J^^^c^^^O^ ^ ^-^^^^^^j^^^i^ 




^ 



/ 



.ryo^ 



^/V'^^^ -Lc^Jl^ 



-*^/* - 



< ^u^ Ju^^^ /^^oM^'J. J^^^^^jj, — . , ^^<K- ^^;^^ 

J^o^i^ J^T"^ y^^iirrv'i^^'1^ y^uL-^^ tIa-tt^o^/ f^^^-r-^', 
C^^'^ /^V^'^ ^.^-,<^ /cUi/i^ l/c/A^<^c. ^^K^e^ut^ ^JrzJi 




> • 



/ 



-a<^ ^Uc^^^ C^^^ yi.,.^^ -^j^J^ 




^^yn^^/^ y ^^i^-v»^ 



^.^r- 

/ 



N., 



tf 



I ' 






^^-^^ 






.^ti/fiy -P^pyr^^rr^ i^ 



7i^^i^-t*^ -^CyL^l^J'<J(^^C^i^^ 



^ 



^0^' 






n^/t^i^'i^t^s^f 




'•l 



JiC^u^^i^tÄx^ ,>Ai^' 




' y^^' '.JU^ 




\^C>'L^ y^'JCm'y^ 



^^^^-'ixCw^w^w* ' 



/ 



'^c>' 




d^^^^^^-v>^t>' 









^-Vi 



^^a*^0^t0^oy^^^'^ü^u%^ , 



^ 



''CH^ . 



i--.. 



„-^^T'^'^^^Ä^-t** ^£f ^^gcy^L 



'fiC^'c 



^i-VH-l^l^-j.^^,^^ 








^^ 



^ 
^ 



y 

/ 



! ) 



i • 



4 



w 






»I 



<^^(n^^X/^c ^^ y^'^' ui^ 



^x^' nT^^i, iit^v<^ 



A 



/" 



/IV^L^ .J^fC/Ut^ ^^^-uv-i^ y*Auf^ 'J^/'i^e 



^j^JC/PuiC^ 









^ 



^Ä--t-x 



*iil 



y^T^L^ 



^. 



'i>\\ 



il>^ 



v*^U^fc-i^ y/^ ^^^-^ . 



cC^K^^^<^ 



W 



c 



A 



^4^M^uvi^ ^T/lA^A ^Uf^^ y^uiyVn^ 




^^v-u^^ 



tÜi/Zy 



V 



O^yiyj' 



ya^<^ ^'^C 



y^A^ 



^2 ^'^u^ yKa^u^ 



l 



^yüc/u^' 



t^(!u^ /%^n^^ aX^' jlX^x^ Ci^ 



>^ 



'^^c^^ 



^(^i,^ 



*\..^>*^^k^^ 



^'^X' 



^^ 



^uuu^ 



f'yiyA^^ 






V 



•"i^ 



A^-cv .^' 



y>t/^ 



'^^y7C>^ ^fCjl^fc^ 



/ 



-^^ 



^/M^ r ^^ 






r-V6^ ^ 






(Ti^^-^-^^l^ /f^. J^^ 



yi 



/UdJ^. H 



/3 



C^-^^^^^^ .^^CiryO .^^c^ yptu^'^c 



/A-^Uv^u-t'^'^^vw 7^1 



-u^^^^4^^i^^^»V^ ^:i€^ 



jÄ6»^'^ 



-^ ^^C'^^^HJ'W'V^ 



'/ 



J^^^'^L^t^^ 



'^ 



a 



i^i^- 



"^^ ti^ 



>^' 



j^'Z'^I^^Ut 



X 



/ 



^'lU^'i^ ^t/iC-yTy£ 



^'T'i^^c^.t^c^L^a^ 'Ti.^i.^.'u^c^' ^^^.,,.,^ ^^^ 



■/ 



4^-^! 



/^ ,-jJi:^ 



<«-<< 




.^^L^^i,^^ 




S-' 



/^ 



5^. 



«ys>»' 



r«:^ 






t*»- 




^X-, 



^<^. 



^y^^^a<^ 



^"^Ä-^l^r'^/i 



z' 



a^^H^^^t^^ 



^Ä^ nAnO^^U. <^/.^ ^>^ .^.-V^ ^^''^■C^Uy-^ 




C'^V^^ 



^-y^ 






^'^''i^O^.^^uUt^ ^^'^ 7.--^'^ 



t/%*^' 



^ 



^. 



^''O^T^'^^'U^ 



^ 



0^. 



..u^C 



a^^a^^-t^ .^^/tZ^>^^'^ ^;^iyw ^"U^o^^s 



i^l^-t.^^ 



C/<>^ ..yiC^i^ 



^ y^cyZ^^'^^'l^.4^ ^'^ 



X-, 






y^a^^^n^' ^^ 



^c^a^iy^. 



9>^: 



/*i>Ut. 



'^-1-'^ ^^ '-i^i^iu'^'f^-^ 




tf<- 



6f>^vwi^ ^<^vw ^V^iviX-K'^/^ ^^^U^^^^^'^A^t^jM ^lA/i^L.^'r^ ^(/iryi' 



'O.«^' 



^J-vx^ 



't^V-K-^ui^ü 



^^yi^cy >y^ 



<J<^si-^<-^ 



^V^ ^i^ >^fUy^.^^^ 



<t-**% A<^t^t>(t 



4^-^t^i<>>-^^.e^i..<^ ^^^^^,)f^ 



^^^f'^^tJ 



/t-x/ 



\/L^Cy\^^ 7^ 



^^o» V£^V*^ 



C Vfc 



^^l^^..\^ci.^ U.j^'.^,_ ^crwsup^^t^ 



'^'^ Oi^i^a^^^^ , ^' ^.^^U ^yt^ 






i 



^(^ -4.0^ >«<,^ 4. 



^ 



'^6iy(y(ypS-^i^%^ 






:u - 




^L^C ^ 



^'U^ 



0/ 








/^' 











'>r>' 



/ 






"MyC^ 






- <^ 



1» 



</ 



a-t-i-vi*'. 

















^-^ 



/ 



^c^^^u^ ^^u^c^a^ ^^.cw'.w/ ^•.,/ 



^- 



--t'^Ui^yZ^ 




^4i^.-, 



f 



§^ 



m>: 



I 






i/1^^ A^^ui^^l^yJ" 




M' 



/ 



^y^^^y)^t>tJ 



C^i^ 



'^^ ^.^-^ Q^^.^, 



'rfW^-K-' 



't^^tt.'^^ ^^^ 



.^yK 



y 



^cixt^ 







Tc^- 



<^^ 




-^ t^^ ,;i^ ^^i^^U/oM^^^ 




^^c^ 



yt^ 



^^c 




'^ ^yC^'.^\ 



i^rYi x//// y^^u^ ^^^^ 




/^a^^Oi 



'UMiJU^'' 



<.yC^ 



-^ 



JZ^ 



ji ' U'^tAypi 



>^yU^ 



-*-♦ 



ifVC^t^^^ 



^c-^ 



Z^c^i^i^ ^ 




X^ .^::^- C3c<t^^uUc^ ^^ ^ ..f^X-^ 



y* 



*^T-t-« 



U 



\\ yt^uc^-u^- 



yi^X^^^U^ 



^i/^,^' 



'/ 



.^t- 



^^'«-«^^-^W^ ^^yCc^^i^ 






-^«^-Ufc 



^. 




^. 




^^t^x^w, 



^5^ 



.^^ 



W<^^ 



yc^^^^'uui^ 



^-"»-^ ^i^c^^c. 



^ 



C^ - 



ifc. ^^^ ^^ ^, 



/ 



^^-t^' ,^'^ ^.^a^U. Uuu/^ 



<'^''*^ll^i^t>{c^ /^ 



't-rr; 



^«^^^ ^^-u<^U.^Q^:Ji^ 




Ä-*^ y^'^^t 



-iH-ixT 



J^c.-J^a ^^-^ ^^„^^^ 



/ 



•'^*^ ^5^ v^^ y^^ 



yt'i^^^'yHJu-u^ <^-r-^?iCs*^ 



<^- 



/M 



-<^. 



d^ue/^ 



■j^ 



i^^C^k^t^ 



%/yu 



^■ 



a 



'^^^^ a-^^L^- e,^^ ,4^^- t/-vn A.,.^^^*^ 



'^^— -s^ '^ 



i2--«-«. 




^^^-K-, 



^;: 



^- 4 




x^^v^A--?^ 



yU<X^'^^c 



'^^'^^L^^^'T^ 



^■^^t^tAZ, 






>^ -'-^^ .^t^C^ ^f^U^ ^.^^ ^Mc^-x^^^/a^ 



V^^ I yi^.'i^ j(^' 



yf^ 



x<^<'-«— 



€/ 



-/^ g 



'^..-^ ^^^ 



C^y^)^ 




-^a-y^/;^ , '^^ 







^i^-iL^^ ^ 



^^ ^y^^i^C^L^^a.^^ j^^ 



V 




c^ 



/ä«-<^ 



o 



/ 



•^c 



C^^^'L.X^^ 




S4^i/n>i^ 



^A- 



/ 



/ 



Vi 



■^e. 



^ 



c-V 



^^, 



r 



v^ 



ft^^i^^^^i.^6^ t^V^ ^^4.^^^ 




.>^*i^. 



^.w»*<; 



4^CiyUi.^ 



y^M 



yui 



A<-^ ^<^^^^-t^ yU<^^(^ 



(^I^Ui C^^^'U^ 




'^/U^ui^i^ 






^ 





'Zj JCt^ ^/<M ^U^^ J'eJL^O^-^ T'y-irx^ /vw*^ 3 A/^Le..^ 



't^H^jc^^ OtU^ ./^'»^^c^^ y^^^^^^ULükj^ ^A^<ryjAry^ih_^^ 



t 






X^. 



-^>/ 



/ 



(Kl 



^^^-^-v^y. 





•^tUa4^ 




^^£^±£^/ a^^ ^yZrc^c^, 



^x^u^-^ 



\ ^' 



i2-«-t 







i^^ 



/ 



^^^^^A^ ß^Ct^ 



^Oi^e^ ^^T^^oi^ 



-^^«-t--^^;^ <;f C«.«^ 



^"- X^^ Jr^,^,,U^M^ ^ 




/ 



V. 



OL^^ 



Cy^C^%-i^ 



"^c^Ut;^ ^^^^ ...^u.,^ 



-^-^ .^-^^^ 



^c^- 



•^i-*»-*^ 

^ 






^^wi^ 



^^-t-*^ 



^^-Ut 



C7^. 



^*>u*^ 



-^..^ -^^ 





'^^ 



^v^'^^ . ^ 



^^n^t^ 



"Vc^ 



^^^^•6*.^ 



■^ 



/ 



A-^^^*.^ 



xi^^i/. 



.'^^Ot^y^ 











7 



'''-Tf^^&l^ 



7 



^^'Ut^^v 




,^'C«^^ 



•^^^'^»^ ^^^^^ 



y«., 



'^i^ 



Z^i/'^t^ .^^«^v^ 



■^2^^ 




>f^e^. 



Sf 



a^-^^ 



V' 




C^i^'C^ y/c^^^£^C^ 



lyuu 



/^ 



y 



Xi/, ^Ju^^^^ 4^ 



-^. 



^^.'^t-^l'^^t^m^ 



fa^^^' 



'^ C'^Z^^jC^^^^ 



^^0^^ 



^c^>^ yj, 










-^^^ ^^. 



^C^^^x^c 



»^L^i^yU^ 



>^' 






/ 




>t 









v^^^-< 



''^^ 



// 



/i^'l^^t-t-^, 



.-^•^^ yc^-i^a^^^ -.^i^^.^.,^ 



•^Vtt-v-r 



'<f*^ 



^*t^-^ <:Ä^"?<2^ 




•V 



it-^v^i^y^u^^t^*^ 



<zr. 



^^ 






9 

J 




y^'Z'wt^t^ 



C^x^'^ 



^j 



^^y'V^L^ 



-i^^4^^^ 



-^'^ <^*i^^z^^ h^/^ 




/ 



-'^^c^i^/^^c^. ^^,,^.,_„^ 



y^^ C' 



'"^^ ^**^'^ I M^^c^ 



^^^ '"'^'«-^^i-r>-V^'^U/^ 



y^ 



/^ 



^^^^-^^ Xf^ztXr ^ 



^j <f>^d^^^ /Lh^^ ^***^ 



^, 



-^^ZiU^ 



^^^'-^^^w^ux^ ^^ 







'c^ 






■^c^y^c^^ 





90 

^>W^^ ^..^W^ ^^^a^_^^ ^^ 








^C^-i^*^ 






T ^ 



Ou-^^^u^.,^^^^ ,Xc^ 






™^ ..^ ..^ ^^ ^^_ __^ 




r 




'"^^ ^^-y^^ 



/y 



-li. U-l>%.n^ , ^'C^L>-u^, 



//^ 




^io'^^'U^,^^ cy 







.^<-i-^i 



^!^U>[.-U1^ 







^ -T^-^i^t^ ^.^*-». ,^%ii^'^ .-ow-^^, 



w 

/ 



/ 





y^^-t^-^t^-y^ 



^ ^U^i 



r^^tt^ 




1?^^^/^-— ^ ^U.'^^ . 



n 






-^4>^ 








^^1^<«-P^^ 



I»- 



t N 














--**'. 





t; '^^~ —^ ^^-^ ^2..^ 



-^ 




/ 



>r^ 



z' 





ii 













9} 












<< 





>il 



h 




. 1- 



9^ 



^^ 7/cü C.^^ yu^u.,,^ 



C^^-^' 



^C^^l.-uwU^ / ^ 




C^l^^^ 







n^t-uit^'^^' 



w .'• 




^'i^ U-i^4^ ^>^i^ u^^^ 





'd^^^ 



GL. 



'.c*^ ^'^»«^ Vw^^iu^. 



:UULi£/ 










i:L-ui^^ 












^^^c^/^Ah^ 








^. 



Z' ^ 






^/■v< 



^' 



■y^ 



/ 



.^^ 



'-K>^*-^ 



V 






*C — ' 








A 






/ 



'^ 






r 



cyUyi/iy^-^ C>^ .x^t^^U^uv ^a^'wv'VI^' '-^ 



y 



/^)/Uf,A><^ 



^>u^Li^^L^ ^^ci^' 






-^ ^^-^ y^^->i^-y^X^ 




.1 



» 






/ 



'^C^\ 




\ /UAyui/^i^u ^ ^^ 



/ 



^^ 



ii'^^t'lxuixj 



4^ 



?>7^ ^,.^2^^ 



/ 



'^ 







-^vm^^ ^,^i^„^ .^^^-r^^ 





^/ 







-i» ^ /Uycc<y^^ 







J'^'^'''^ .^'fC^c^'^yuvc^ ^i>u^L^c^ ^gy<iZ^'^ ^ ^Zi^^i^y^^i^ 

V 










,y«^ 






X' 



\l 



t > 



9J 






/ 




/ 



^<J>T-^ ^<^t^ .^'^^^ 



c^'y^'u^ 








i^^a^) ^ 



^J 





A^C^ 



ii 






^^ 



V. 



Ut4^'^ 



'^ 



-'^^*-^' ^K^^^^^W^ 




^/ 







'^^-^'^ ,i^l^- 





^'^ 




V • — ' " 




r 








ry 



^C*-v<if 




M M 



1 1- 



^ '! 




'1/ 







-t^t''t'<'VX-^ '>^ 



y^ r-^^^ 




'y^^'^^a*. /^w^-^ ^c.*^-^ ...^^^ 




*^ 



'•*-»' 



fy^^i^^fCi 






^vi^/c^^i^ 







^^•y^v^c. 





V" 




;>K 









x*4«^ 








y^^ 






/ 








/' 



li 



r 









•'*««C 




I 




n^t^y'fiCC' .^U*^ 









/n 




f 

/ 



/ 






/^ } - 







xi^u^'-u^^Ö^ 




.? 



ii , r 



l(l' }' 



• ! 







l'*>^^^ 







l&Kx^Av-ww* 









y^3 













^-w, 




'^r^'^^^AU*^ Q<^ 



''^ !*^Ai*t 



^ 



Ä*fc<#!^ 




-^ 



<^-. r 



^/C^-'^AU^-JUi 



^S^yui^A. 







J+^'WVW ^ 



X 



<=^*'^'^ '^iUr^t 



/^Vt^'//, 



C^iU'i^iX^ ^^ 



^:ii2:^ ^4^2*:;^^ 




"^ . ^^^- S.^^^,i,u^C 



:A'v 







/ 







/fff 



^/i-v^-"^ 



/vi.^i.'-v^vx/H.fr*-*' e*^ 



J- >^ 



/• 



^ - lyi^ yf%^ /L^^^4^ tJl 



^/^ ^ ^/»V^^* ^ Mt.-»^ 



M'^i^'cX^ ^^^^ i^A-iCu^ ^x/^i.^^ ;^- 



M 



.^^. 



'^;*-rr 



/ 



-^ 



/^n^ 



^ 



^/H^'H^-'wVyi 



^ 



y^^l 



^ 






^^c^, 



r 



'/^^ 



^^* 




,y4u^^y^ 



^ "tti^ 



Ji^^^U^l/h^ c^ ^ 



Ä^ ^*^ 




7 




' 'Vnr^ ^ 




i^* -^^ 



'i^yg/c^i^ 



0^ y^'^/^'^^^' ^>U^^ 






^tC 



.^,^0y^^HtJL''k0y/ 



'Vfi^VJ^/^.vu^ 7&lX^^.^i^i/iU1.i.^*-^ yf/{yyi0^y^<^M^' d^^4^ 



yUi^'^y^ 




y^ ^i 



ÄxH-^^^t/t-^^^-V^ 



/ 



y^^^,^ ^-1^^- ^c>^^ 



4^ir^. 



^/UtA^\y\^ yUy^^0^ /^Uf^ ^^t 



0^ ^^\ 



^^wv^i^v/i 



i^^ 



^. 



U-^>^ 






^^y 







/ 



'A-V 







\ i 



^i^ yi<^0^- 



ytc^^^ 2^ ' ^^'^ ..^ ^'^ <^' 



C^O^ 






y^l^f^'^^u^^yit^ 



'(^C^v^ , 






^ 




^ 






^^u^i^-i^ V^/-u^ 






^>^^^ 



^-»-v 



^ ^ e^i 



'clc^ y't'^^^^^^ C^ui.tyu^i^',^^ vtd^'^^ 



^-^-^ -^^y^^'^c^^ (^'/Z 



/ 



"rvt^yut^yr ^^C^' 




C^^T- 



Q 



^C^ y^U^ 




A^U^^- 



/ 



^y^^t^ ^y^-r^^O^Cjy^ - 



-^^#-Uw ^l>Co^ '^^^^-►-vo^^^^.^c^^^^' ^OlC 



>^-'V'U<^ 



-'^^ 




Ä^ ^^-^ 



y^t^^C'^^ -^^^tr-Z^ u^^^-v^ civ 



/ 



J-^rOL^i ^;fCui^K • 



^^^-^-^ .^^ß-\yL<.M.^C^ 



.O 



^i^ C^ 



/ 



<^^. 




-^'^-■v^^Vt^<^^. 




^J^yu^^y^ 



Ji<yk 



S^i^^uxc^ 



4'c^c 



->C^t^ y ^^-r^-VX^X^ 



-J^ 



y^^^l^iy^ ^Ui 



^2^^„^^^v^^ 



-.-i5<r<: 



Ä<T^ 




k 



"[f-nry^' cl^"/. .*-wu-.<^ y^^ffv^' ^ä^^S'^^U^ rW, 




\u^ 










K'i 






.' -^/^ 



•■\ 



'(/U^ 



O 



I 



74> 



^ 



(^ ^i 







hfCi' -^wt^v^^ ^o^ 




^(.CU ^y^i^^i/^^ >4>^^^/^ yUL^uz^ .^^^^ 






^M^. 











/ -* 



yt^C^ ^ 



r 







Al^il^ ..^^^ 



•/ 



/ 




^-^>«^. 



















xiyUi^A^i^u^*^ , 



^ 



4tf^ 



U\^Wl^ 



^ ^c^' x^^K> 












Ä^ 



^y 




■•1' 







/ 






^^V ^^^^ >i--«^-i^ y^O^^^V^V^ö^ 



^ö i^V</Üc^i.''i^<i^^i-^^^ 



/ 



^^aJ^^ >co^>^ 



-fc^h^'^^- 



a 



'-C-^v^ 



,^. 







/ 











^ 






/ 






'^yi^ 






4b 




■fb 



I 



V"- 






.^U-if 



i 



l 




./t**^' , /^x,*^ £Ul^^ Ji^'^ ^(^^ Q^c^^cL^^ 

•Ä-f'"^ ^VU'«^«^ /tv-u-.,-^ 7><U*^^/<^n-^ ^.»^♦VV^-t-vw-»'«^ ^f«-*-»/^ 



-^ ''^ -^ i/i\.y%^^k^ 



^/ 



^'^•^- ./^ ^ ^^.^ ^, 



'(^c^n^y^'t^ — 




-^o-^*Cr yf^X^^, 



-a 



^l^^l-'W^ 



^*<^-' <^üx^^u^. 



ytxt-u^ 




^ 



^ ^^.^Wt.*-.^ ixu^^ ^^^-<-<^l^.^^ 






/ 



^^ 



^' ^^ 



/ 



/ 



■^' 



-.wt-.,^ ^t-i^^t .,A,^,^^*Hi. ^t^^^^^ Atf^Ä^— ' 

^4l.'^^ ^^,^ _^,^ c.^^ 

-yi^oU ^i^U^ ^^^^ ^.j^^;^ J^^^ ^^ 



/ 



/ 





'O^CA^ ^ 



jn 



ydlÄ'uU . ^ ^eu^i>^^ y-J^ "^^ 



^^- 



Q^ 



ÄXU'H *• 






C/^yi^L^ /UtCyiyt ^^t'^»^ 










^l'^yC^ 



^Ät^ ^/^ 



\^ 



y^l(C.i^<yu^ /' i^^Jt.^^ /U^fU^ -^^/^to^ ^^i^t-w^ y^'y^"^ 



'A^ 



'Ut^ 







-^J-^Z^*^ 



y'^lyl^^f^ 



^ 



yu^^^x0<^uu 



^ 



^ lyuut^u^ 



.>^^^^^!j^7t^<^l^w.<^^^ ^^/U , -^t,^ S^i^ C.^>iy4 t^-^-^^ ^'^yZ^ 



y^K^' yf^Vt^ yh>7' 



.X^^W 



;^ 



/ IC^L^^ /t^<xC<J< — 



/'CAy^^ ylycX'' lyi^.^ yuw^^iyi^ 4/^*-^ .>^^«-*^ X^C"^^ 



"Hi^i^w 



^ 



Q 



^J 



^"^^^c^riL^^ z^, ^ 



;iVi^»^. 






v/. 




'/t^ 







/ 




'^ 



/tiyw\ry^^ 



Ji^Aiy ^'^ ^^, 






7 




y£^^ 



^ 



'^' cÄ/^(.^ny, 



',M^' 



yOi 



Cs^' 




?Uu^^ 



^ 



'Au 



dc^y 



.Uc 



/ 



^'C - 



^.^CV. 



>^<^' 



/ 



^-f^- 



'^^ ^>y^'^y^ yli^^^^^^jC^i^ 



M^C^'^ yU,^^ /c.-C^U.'J^ . XV JUt^'>^ ^c 



'^ yiyyiyyUu^lJc^ lU^'y^ ^yytyyiyi'j^- 



Jyv^^jrC { '^(yyiyy^^ yy^.'^i^C y^'c^iy ,' /fU^ty^* 




^(yytyyi^i 



LCc^' t^uM.^^'U^ 



^ 



/fc<^4^*vi.^A 



j^yUi^ 



<^iyf' 



yi^'^i^^^ >^ü/%ryc 




"^>/ .^^C^^^uiyT^ ^y{^ 



yCiil/Pln^/^^c,.^.^^yyu>^i^^y^^^ ^l^ O Cy^t/^' ^4^^^ CöfC^ ^i;^' 



^y4^ 



n^-yi^c^^^Uo^ ^i^^^. ^yZ^^^c^^^ 



'^(i 



(C^ 



^'(«Cs*^. 



^^ 



'^^' 



cyy^^ 



y 



"^i^^ 



"^ .y^- 



^. 



/ 



^p-^L 



'C^ 



^ 



■^c 



^^^^«-'fc^ J'i^'^^-*' 



r^-^ - 



n 



A 



y 



/}U.c^^ yy^^i^ -'t^k^u ' ^'^ ^c4/£^ yt^c/ä-c^'^^ A<^^7-^ 



^^/L^ ^^' Y'tt/^i^ h^^ Vuu y'^c^^-^ '^c^^r€i^-u^^e^fc-c^ 






Jik.J^-^y^'^O^i^ &^1^^''*<^^J^ yi^Xyty y^'U^^C^Vv^^^C^^^'^^ 






C/W^ 



yCK/ui(Z^ 



y 



^yu^iyiyi^ 




o-^^n^^u^^Xi/D^i^ /^yK^lf^p ^ 



y^ 






^^.^^^ 



/ 
't,^^4^ '•^r^ n^^ ^4/>* a>^uuiyy>^ 






^'^ 



y 



/J/^^WW* 







m 




n/^i^i^'4^. 



^i 



>^tPCr 










^J 



A.^<yi 







i^««' 



/ 



^ 







y^^^ 



« 



/ 



^4^ >^C^ ^ yU^uu^^^ 



-^ 




yi^L^n'^^yU^ 






A 

1 
I '■ 

1 ^^ 



.»/; 






yi^C-ux^ ^U'i-^ ^'yc^ty a^-n^'^Ä/y'^ ^* j/^ yj^^ y^^L^t^^^'^ 




-7^7-^- y^i 



-H^ui^^yU^ 



"K'U^i^M M^ „^t*<^ 



'/ 



x^^yt^i^ 



V ./l'^'*'^.^.*^ ^ 






'y^Uf y/ ^^»^ 




/ 







y2Sr->^^ yt^':> ^4.U^ ^^^, ^ 







c^^ 




/ ^ 



^^^>L-u.^ y^'ULy y-yy^u X^<>^/^ A^x^ ^^i>^ ^^-c-i^ii^ 



'i 



V' 



^^^ 



yy^ii^nrv^ 




/ 



iSU^ 







<t 



' l 



„t 



A 

yd 

Ju 

A 

4^ ' 



yy 




i^^*!^ 







^eyr 



'^' 



V<^^ 





at>u.. 



^ y>^ >Ui. >^<^^ 



y^A^^f^'U^' 



/(•^WO^ 





Ä^ 



-C^cd^U ^-U^-w^ ^^'-K' '^4^C^' 
A^CyU^.^'yC1L^^ ^<2U^ ^P'i^t«^ ^^^^ ^^^-<>^^. ^t-^^^^^Z^cA/f'^' 



yU't^ 



V 



^^ 



^^ "^C^'^f 



1^ 



.ty A^ 






'^^H^ 







4^ 



M 



y^^i^C^i^i^' C2 ^ ^C^^^' 



'/- 



/ 






1( 



A)/.i.4.1(j 



/l 








^c^A-^4^ 



/ 






^'^ ^M^ xf^'^'M^^^ ^ J^^ ^^ jJUxA^;^ 



yyl^n^ 






a 




^ 











y- 



«-'^-t.^*-^'^ 




^^-^ 



Cy^^^^^^yi i.^ 




/? 



<^V ^i^-^^ 











^'■^'"^ ^C^U^^i^X^' -Z^lyt^tf^^-^^^ ,y^^^><y^^\ 



y^L^e^ä 



'^ 



^^^x^au y^u^i^^^^cM.^ . X^ c-^-^w^ ^-^^ ^^a^j^ 



in 



' ! 



!,'■• 



A /u 



I 

Ju 



y 






U 





^4A^ -A^*-^ Ji^r^^ ^y^-^--^'^^ 






/^ 



/<! 



•l-*!. 



1*1 



^1/in/r^ ^^v //y-ii^ x-M^-uv*^ ^ ^x^Lyp^^^^iy^ n/^iyCf'yx^ 



^j^' ^cX^^^c^^ ^^^^ "TZ^^ 



yu. 



4yU^ 



<^^'^^ 







tV Tn^^cX yX 



A^L^^yf^ A^^t^Uf -^<>i^u^ 



/ 











c 



"V^-^y 










^ 




^^"ixt.^ 



yf^wuxyv L ^^^M^i^'w-w^t ^ 



^ l^yi^L^^^^ ^ U^^^X^L-'i-u^' i/fl^L^t-tÄX 



-^ "^C^L^ux ii^C^ ^tuCi^^yf\ 



V 

t 



Fl 



A JU 



'\ 



Ju 

Ju 






y 






Ä 






ii 



'>*/. 



.rc^^^. 



^ >^ ^Ocy^i^^y^^^^ 



xU^y ^'^ yi^ ^^Z<^cy ^^cy^My^c^c^.^- y^xU 



^-^-w — 



"^^iyi /yiyux ^J>yi 








/ 



V 





^ y7^ ^Jf'^ AcyU^':>^u .^. 



C 



yj^c^i^^ yt^ ^cyu^ ^cyL.^r^^ ^^'c^ '"Ty^^ 











J/O^ytyx^ - 



XC^L^ , yC^C^ jyy-A^^ ^^X^' P^^ 








y^t^uiy 



yi^l^K^C- 



/ 



^C 



C^^ 



'n/^iy ^J-ttx y^VC^'^C.y'i^*^ 






^^--*/^ 'yi^c/i^xyi^ 



<?jf^-M^^ >»tii-^^^^^ 



/f^'t^t^ ^ 




-*^ 



^^<iyviy Ay^ 






w 



■ I 



),.'' 



•71 



A 




'if 



^B 



.(C y^'-'^ 



u 



^'(y/^ 



ä^e^ 



^••«-^ ^^a^i 



r 



'e^e^ 






/ 



.^ 




^^ JU^tA X(^^*A^ ii^<l^'y<yt ^^V CBt 



/is 



t 



yi/UK 



-^ 



■I 





J>Vrfii 



Z^' 



^ ( 







yuu'^>''T^ ..^i 



^^v-wi^ /i/l/fyfL-'^ -. 



/. 



lyL^^^^i^ 



y^^i^^HHc^^^ ^^^>^^'^vu' 






^^ 



/ 



/*<^.^^ 



^^^4^ 



7^ 



VH^ -^fC^^L 



^^n/^ 



/^■S'- 







^Ut^ty^i ^^C,^>i>4^i^t<Ji^ 1 ^.^U^ (^C..ylU^ y)^ ^ 



4^;*^^?^^^»-^^ C^^ yPi^'X'^ ^XjCt xI^/C^ X^^rU^ /H^4^ 



x^C^ 



J^'yp^t^y ' ^^^u-v-i^ 









^-C-.^ ^^t^ , ^^ ^^^^-n-*.?.^ 



/ ? 



>^ 



^^-^--^ /-^^i 



^ 



.>4^^'<^ 



<>W1X^ 




/^- 



>7vt 



^1 ; //^*^ ^y ^ ^;s;i*v- ,.^v 5^^i^ ^fa^t^t^i^^.^ ^'^' I (^ ^tiU ^^ 



/^f*^ y^^>^n^ yCK^:^^ !^ Cji JU^ ^^ 



\ -^ 



i^Cv^ 



•^T^ftf 



yW^^ 



^^ 



^ 




.-t^t^- ^^■^U' .y^/C 



^^u(^c^t^ f^'cjy)' ,>t> /c^U^cy J^;,i^, 



^J^^ ^Ä^^t— ^^— A^r^^^^Uu ^J^ ^^^'^ A^^..^,,,^^ Cf^ 



4 



/ivui^wt^W' 



«-4^^ 



•y^- 



<-K* </^^«^ 



'^ 



>« 



JlS^'C^^^CL^Cy,-^^^^ .^^,,>w-^-,^^'^ 



^^^^H.0^^ ^ ^Wf>^i.^.v^ 



■^ 



'^^'^ /^^^'^^vn.»- 



(^•^/^ 



^ /<-«^ 



i^^ 



^V^U^ 






i^aJi' 



'/' 




'A.^1^6^^ //iu'Ut^^C^ — H -4^ 



y 



r 



s^'^iu^i 



/^' 





'^^Ui^ 



^ n.^^c^^ /PV^^^'J^ /h^;^^^^'^ jyuty Jo^t^A/f^o^^ 1 ^^-^ .t^^yji^^^ 



'Ü^C.^^'^ ^^ y^ C^^-^^^^^^^^CC' ^t^,^^ 



Vty^n^ 



>kv^>Uc^ ^ ^^cJ^'J Jy^^ .^^w^- ^Z>^ 




-^Vtf-'K.^ 



^/iy(/i 



<^>f^x.^i^^^ 



^^ 





/VJ'^^ 



ij 



A)c^-^fJ>\7^^^Z%^,) 



-y-t^tt^ 



--;^*V7^ 




,^' 




.^- 



/ 



? 



J 



/1A 



Jl i 



^ 



XI 



^^ 



^ 



m 



'- c/1 



y^^i^^i^U/^ ^^V C^JO //rC^ X'd^li-^ yiy^"'^ ^Oiyi^J. 



C '2^ C^' C/^ i^C<^\^ yVty^</^l^^i^v^^^^<^ ^ac^UyU'L^^.^i^^c/^ ' yfu 



t 



u^^ 



/ / / / 



/C<-r^^'i^ 



^. 



^. 



^^Vvi ^^«.«^^' 



^. 



/^r 



^. 



/ 



^^ 



57, 



/ --C^ 



^ 



/ 



'T 



/ 



/ 



C^ 



Vl..-<^<-^;^^>'^ 




C^Ai^*^ 



/ 



^i,,A^r^(^ i/^'^iy^ ycn-^^^^cy^ 




^^ 




/ 



J^ '^C^A.p^ <^^/lL^ ^ 



'ß^ y(/t * ^ 



^ 




/ 






y^t^ u^yiut^' ^"^^ y. c/^'^^^^-'i^Ci^t^ yiL.<>i^^ 



4>«^ 






/yi/i^-v^'x^ ^/ 



'»V^.<>^4,.W»^ 



Ä^Wf^ 



"^>t<W^ 



V^-M^ 



^^wv 



^^' 



^ 



'^ /hn'/^'^ C^y^^^i.^yCf'i^ ^^co^ ^^ 



Ji^ Vc^y^^OyC^n^x^^-^ y^t^ ^/t^^V ^ 



^-t-i^ 



^ 



^^v^t^ ^ 



•^^ ^'^^ yjl^t-f^A'J^ ^/^V /i;^^^^ .yA/^i^'//^ 



^>vu*i^ 



'/^'Vn^^ />vx^ui/^y^ 



1/i/^ ji^i^'-T^c^i 



'^ "Vn^-^ 



Ji 



i^ y/U* 



/ 



yi/t^C 



"^< y^ y^S^y^^^i^i 



/ 



yU^Uf^^ 






^^fixyi^a^i^'u^ C^'/^ 



^O 



ryu^^y^tJ,''-^^ /IM^J^U^ ^^^ ^^/^.Ji^ ^^->^< 



-V 



<^ 



'/fk^'^ . c- ^ yAo^uC' 



/^yf^<^'C^ ^^C^^^'^*'*^ y^^^f^U^^ 



^^. 



^^ ^u^^^u.^^.^ C^'^^^ 



yl^' 



ci 



>^^i 



'A^^>x*i,f yVi.^ 






^^4,^ 



/•i^i^^i^ 



J^ 



^^v«^ 



^:k^^f^yUt Cy y^' 



^^i 



cy>w-^^ / ;/ 



^rT^^^^^t^^ 



>w^^ {^ ^<^^i^C^ 



^^fi^^ /l^l^'c. 



^t^^ ^^«^^ 






'^C'^'-Ut^t^ 




'^ <^.*^ -^/t^ 



^-^«-»^•' 






^ ^^' C^^n^L^ ^^t^^ 



/ 



yy^i^' 



y^cr^^^ 



y^Cy^'-l.-i^ty^xy 



/■ 




y^^ 



A^^i 



j^^^-^^ 







c^^'^U'^^u^ 




'^ /hy' c^c/Ci^^y^gy^i^ 



/ 




/^/^ 




/ 



^^^ 






^ 







\\ 




i. :> 



f 



^ 



^ 

^ 



H 






^ 



,11} 



"I 



.^;5=i 



^ 



^ 



s 



^4 



';l 



/ 

^^ u;,^!^^, A^^^ -^^ y.^4/^ ^^^ ^^^ - 



'•V 




ol^'/^JI^^ C^^^-if^' J^^^-"^^^ ^'^^' 




^^!^vi^^ (^AjU'tJi^ ' 



Mc 



'/ 



< I 



7 



H^^^i^ A<..^m/C ^iU>^ y^/lUi^J^f-Al^'U^^fy^^^^ 







y^'^t^C' 











'^- 









'H^^ y^iy^^y^^ ^^<^^^J^ y^t^.^x^'u^ yUi^i-^' -^^^ 




y 



/ 



/ 



V " 



';^' 




j'\ /isp 






^^^/^Vw^^>>^ ^ £-^ , ^^c^ ■ 



-fit ^ 



y14^ 



\ 



^^ ^U-wvti^t-v ^>9^ /u»^ ^,.^'UU ^w^t-U»^ ^^«^A.**/ 

^"' y^ ^fc^ /vv-w^ Ww^ ^(/i<iyU^'^ ,/**^^ ^-^i^V^ 



-Ifi 



JtUU - ^^i^'i^yi^ ^0<M^^ 



■\ 



\\\ 



\\ 






y^i^ 






tAC^' 



/>J^, 



vOu- 











><xM 



v/yf 






r 




cr^ 



^^CfA/yU^ 






c 



^/ 



^^A.^*-w-^ y^'nX^^ yf^^ ^/^^^t>ui^i^^ , y'cy^yyi^'^ 






I 

I 



A 

I 



■ \ 



1!. 



.). 



l 



llr 



\ \\ 



Ä 



>'t^ ^*t^*^ ^»vW^ yty^M' ^K^' ry^-cU^'^ J7)'M . 
,.^A^<-v^ ^<^vv>^Ä.<^- ydin^/^^^ ^'^ ^c^U>iy 






i 



^/^^C/jTÄ-'^^t^AVÄ'k*^ ^*^ /t^Uyi^ 



^fi^ 



^/V4L J^^^M^c4/ Jl^\^(U '>*'-^ ^^1-*^ yii^,i^Ji 



^A>t^^ /w^/^ y^y^^^ <«^^ /-r*^ 



/ 



^ 



'^<^>«,^yl-K- ,^a>4^i^ 



\ 









^i^C^n^'A>tn/i/^ 'V^'n^ ,^<^ 



i^^t^ ^T^^t^*^.*^' 



//:^J 






/ 




/^uü^ ,/u^.^U^ ^^^-^--^ /Wt^/t.^^^ (^/C^^ ^ 

.:^ j <2y<^ c/^t^ ^ts^^^c^ ^t^^^^^i^^^^ ^^^^.^^^^^ y^oi^ut/^ /^*a^^ 



r 



/ 



.1 




L^iiyH^>^^uu x^^r^'V^^'^ß 



/y^U^. 



/ 



AUvLOyi^^ yn/\.^i^^i^^ Z^c^yyCy i^<\^ ä^c-«^' ^^j^i>-^<^<^ /y^ 



'ifC<y^' 



,5 r 



V: 



' \\ 



i< 1 



V 






:;■!! 



Ill 






y^f 












6 /L/i^^^£^',yfU^ *ZyU(^^,.i^ ^^'/^^-t^ 






^ 



^ cfi^ /fft^ff^e^-n-' yi^^^^ ^^Zc-^ '^tly^yt^i^ A^f'iy*^^ yU^^^t^ 



y^ 









lAt^ 






<" 



^^y^ y^ cy^ ^'yf^^^^ 



<P^ 










^y^^^'^k^'^t/M^ y^ln^'-^^ ^^ii^^ "^tß^iU yl^L^L^^y^ ( Ct^^^^äZ^h^^C 



/ 



^ 




■ « 

1 

A 



\ 



ill 



% 






■\ 



/H 



yi^ 



^yi^'y^' 



yf 



^ JL^' ^yuJ 



xt^i^-wt^^w^Ä-HT^i^iJ^ 




/ 



Acyi^^y^yi^ .i-^-'t^ ^^^ yf^-/ S/^y x^-***-^/. ^^^^'^ 




Sji^'^ 



^iP^^**-*^ 



/// 



/ 



9.-^- 



^d^n^'A^ ^ .^^d^ ^t^v ^.^::<^^ yfC^U. ^. X.. £, ^yj!. -t^^^ 

V 



t 



/U^iyuyi^ 



1 ", 






^ 



V^ ^^^y^l^yiy' Jiu^iy. 





C^ 



j' 





"^ ?V4X f<^ I/C; tf ^^^ ^ 






i 



ii 



t 



!! 31 



? il 



A 



T^ 



'Mi 



A 



/^ 



ii 



1*1 













fiC' ^4^1^^^^^ 










t/ 



yyt^^c^' ^j^ 



<?^><^' 



^,^j^ ^ü(yW ^^^ 






/ 



\ ^ 



K 



AI 



•I; 



^£y''U^t^i^ ^..Ü^^-^^C^ - 




^^wÄ-v^^^ 



^'^^i^i^ 



^^,^1-^1^ 



.'^ ^. 



yLyn/cy'i^^ ■ -^-T^ 





^^. - 




^ ^, ^^ . 



^J^^^y^^ ^1^ 4^^wv^ y^^^/h^^j 



/ 



>^ 



^ ypyU^ yl^u^ 



/^ 



/ 

C 



'1 I 



'>t>%^<>^^ 



^^'^ >^^ 



*-1^V-^^ y^i 



^C't'lyfp/iL 



' ^ny^Or' 



1/ 






^ - ^' 






^' ^ ^_, ^ ^ 

^1U>^^ ->^r-in-^ ^^c^ ^^^t^^^L^i^t^^^^yl^^^C^ 









yd 






I ;i 



^c/e^^ ^C-K<r ^t^-»'*-t-u-*-#; ^^{^^/t^ui^^ 'zc^^^^C'^i^*^ fvSyz \ ( P^^ 



/// 



yUlyt't^ 



/ 



5^-r^- 









^ C^^l^^ 



c^c^^^ , y^f'^ /c^i^'yi^ 






A 



\\\\ 










f 




^ 



'A 



Mi 

I 

iii 



^ 







\ 















/U\ .4-<X^ ^v .^^-^-t^ ^^^^-t^ ^^ 



C>^'/l/LCy'\^^ 



y. 



,? 







■i ", 1 1 



W:^'^ ;a7^ ^^i>-i^ A^ 







o 




^y'^lytxt^ 









^'^•^ 






/ 








i 



yd 

A 



^ 



lü 



«i 



A 



^ 



T./U^^'KVV 



ck 






/^3 



.^v //^^^^^2^<a4^c^^^ ^^:^C^(^ J 42^ ^r^ yje^^^^ C ^ti^t^^^^ i^^^^^ic^i^ 



'H>r ^'^ 



c^a^^y^äi .^^-r^^/L-'i^yC^ 



^^t^^'^«'^*^^^-!^ , ^.X^"*^"*^ ^^'-^C-K,^-M-, 



/WC^i^^l 



^^^"»'V^t^JixC^' 



i^^ 



'^^ ^t^fiiy 




"i^^UL^ 



/' 



'^-**- 



V 



,<»-»'l^<»»-»»'«rc^K,.^C-*-1 — t-i.*'^!'Cf fc^ Ud^ - 



7 



f 



••C*-^^ /f^fyi^^ ^t^C"*^ ^^'^^'«-^^^^-^«-^■f^xi'i^'«'-*^ 



^K^ 



^^^^C0^ <>^i^>*^'C^U4'^k yCc,»^' (/Mt^ ^yi/I^T*"!^ O^^U^ ^^.£yt/i^^^i^f^ a^ d^ 



yC^ 



^ 



^?^V ^,n^vy 




-^t-t^»^ ^ifC^i^ -^x.^ ^ ^^^' 



-^ 



-w?^< 



'^^^^^^ly^r^t^i^ 




J 



iiyiyi/fin^ CA^i^cnJL ^^-tm^u-c^^ V«.'^^ 7/1-*-*^ 







C'-k'-y a^^HyC^ 



J4^ 



■7" 



•/ _ ♦ 



./^ 



^^^6^ 



■'%i^^< 




yu.'^rp^. 



/^ 



^t-^^^>l-» /»vo>^ ^^ 



/>^ ^A:ifV 




A 



'^ 



^vi^^l^*-»^ 



•k;^. 





^^^ 



^^ 



^. 



<* / 



U.^' 



/ 



/^^^-u^U-M^ 



.-2J^' 






«vJ/c^ Oi c.y:3yu-t-tX- ^j^4^- C><^'^ayi^<^ - ,,-^£^rx^^iyi^'^^' - 



\/^'''t<^l^v^'^i^'t'^VC0^ 



^^ 





Ä^-! 



'^^^^ 



^. 



>^V/t^ ^."^f^^l^ 



/^ 



4^U^ 



'Mj:^^^ 






/\n'^/ty*^X^^ 



/ 



.^^' 



x^ 



i^i^/O 



'^/^K.i^^> 



ß^i^iy^A^^L^t^'ß^'p^^ y:^c^^ C P^^^-^^u-^^ /^^Cyf' 



l/Oy/i^^L.^ t/c^' '^tif^ 



Y^^i^pC ^ ydi^ ^tu^^xj*""^^^' ^'^''^^m^^^^ 



/ 



/ 



>^^i.^ y^y^^ ^^^H^i^X^-^-^^/i^ y^a^^i 



'O^n^r^ 




y^/U^ X^ 



^^' 



/^ 






Vv^Wi^ ^^< 



i>^ /^/^nyU<2y^ 4^ ^ JA 



4^ 



^/UuiAC^^^^^^^^^y^^^ 



^^^^ 



'/^ly^i!Ly^'/>lÄ^ Oot, 



^C^t^C^x^y^ '/^ 



^i^^V'wt^i^ y^yt^yp 






^ 



^Mii ,^.t-r>' 



i^L/fiti^ ^^^i^lxfc^ / ^t'^i 



C'l'^t^ 



^/fvyTt^y^ 



-/y 



/^ 



/<^^ t/vi^l^ 




Ji/'^''^yty /^Uf^C 'VLy/fltt^ 



'^y 



yl/Uft't^ 



U ^^t^^fiC ..^^ti.<Xyi^ ^ I v^^t**- ^ ^i:^*-K 



■ll 



IUI 



k'-;;^^ 



•^ 



fy.-:*^^ 



^^ "i^cxJJv.ckjU l ^U^i^c-Ä^.^ ^ ifi^4^k^4a^^ 



^J^^CyA^i'yy^ . J>L^c. J^^A^ 



^a^frrt^ 



/yy^4^'/^t^ ^ 



^^^t^, 



O^ <^<xt^ -^i^^i-^^it^^^ ^'^C^ /^ty^lyiyi4^ /l^^'^^ y'^T^y^' 



t 



lll 



4 

1 



A 



\ 



!ii 






/^^ 



^-rc^'^ ^ x^r-7*^^ 






O'Y^^fiu /2/y^'*.Ui^^ yt^L^^v^ c^C 







^^^♦^"K-^^^* 



/4t*^^^*^* 



/ 



"^T^yv^'y^^ ^^^>r>^ 



/ 



<^>^'' 



-/-' 




yfj" 



^^ 








^^ 2yuy 



c^ 



\ 



f). 



JJ^x^^'S 5^^^^ 4 fc^ 






^.Z^u^ 



y;-cCu^ i^i^^yiyC ^c/^c^ (yi ^Ci^^ 




y^\^C/^u^ ^lyÖ-n'y^^C^^ 




/ 



fi6<yCy 

* 

-^^yj^c.^ 



•\ I' 



/ 



^t^'Mur 




l^y^' 



/*v-u^ /-J^^Ci-^-^ ,.^0^ 






V i^'^i^Xt-^X^^^ ^-*' *-^ 









yc.^2y^<^'^^ 



jz . 






i 

I 

A 



«# 



if 






\ 




/^c^t^icy/ /i^u^'/ y^(^'/^^ ^^^V^.^1^ ^4,.^,>v^ r^yt^'. 




/— / 







y^c^C^^-t^ 







c^^^^^e^ cCc^ 



^clj ^ ^i^^(^ ^y4y^ ^ /j > /^i^ (yi M^y^j.u^'^^ yPia^^^^L^^ 



^>4AcÄ^ * ^i> y^^. 



<^- 



'^^^ 










^c^ ^ 



/ 

^^"'^^ e^-ut^ , ^^C^ Vx^^r-^'t^ yl^^ut^^ ly^ ^ ^/^1> .^*-<^ 

4^yi 







'^'y^C'^^i^ 



'.'., I' 



I 



I 

Ji 



l 



V 



\\ 



w '\h 







f/L^I^ 



-d^^ /^C^C 




i 



A 



O^^ yAy$^i^ /l/U'i^^i^t^ yJ^C^C^>*^ y(/uu^u^ yi^t^^ "In^ CC^^c^-^'*^ 
J^M^(yi^ yt/u^^^l^^ yUt^t^^ y^C^^i^»^ yUi.^x.^1^ ^a.y^ — 







^yC^i 



I 

'1; i 






^2/ 



^ 



^v C^. 




jUn^ju /^^/T^^^ 







C^/rC^U^ yKc^^-f-^jyC yiyyi<^^ ^x^^^->-»^ yVC^^^ ^ 



Zf^ CSc^^f^ y^C^Cyt^V^ /^^^^^ 






/ 



fZ ^.^^t^ ^^ lnr>^ ylß^i^^i^t^ y^^-n^' ^^^t^U'H^^'V»^^ yi/(^^^4yi 



/ 







y^'-i, ^i^^'^Z'^^'^i^ Ayi^<,y^cy Ayt"^ ^^c^^^i^x^ ^^ä.-k^, 
^ty^^^i^ yt^^^tA^ ^^ "Z)^^-^^^' ^^^-^^ - ^^.-ti^^-^. Jl^ 

-^-nyy '^^^ yu^c^i^ ^^^'«^ ^äL-i^^ ..-U^^^ y^^-i*^ 



c^' 






^6 



X 






'lis 



A 




>^ 



^ 



^^ 



1, -j 



/^T', 



^^W? 




) 







^-U ^.^^ %^,^^,.^.^, /(; y/uOyl^^fC 





C^ 




/ 



vfcri'^i 










x/^y 



,X^^ 15 "U^f^i 



^ 



C/ 



*c^ 



^i^^T^^'-t'^-wf-i-* — — ^^^^' -^''»^''^ 



/> 





^^^*->^ ^W*-»^ -C^^^i^ ^^w,^^»— ^ t^^^^ty ,^^^^^^1^-1^1^ 

V^^^»^w-w-^ ^t^^t^u-v-P^ ^yTZ/lu £^>^^^6C' cA. ^*u VCT^/t^^r^ 

^o ^Jr/a.^ry>uc^ y^iLi^L^i^ , ^^T^yy J/i^^ ^e^^ yu^. 



■C^' /i'w*^ ^-^^'.^ y^rJ^y^:2y^/2a^^^<^1^,-i^6^ 



^ iJi^iy ^)/> 



' ►! 




lll 



/' 



<2 




\ : 



yi/t 












/p^'^r-^ ^c^r^ yPi^'4.^i 






^^^ C.^U(^ ^fi(^^ 2^, ,y^A^ 









XI 



^^ 




>5^^wXA^*.-^ -j4^C.v^ ;;*^^-i^.wv. 



' >^ 



^ A^i^i^iyiyi^ /(/t^ 



/«^ 



'^ ^^ 



/'^^^^ 



^64H>^ yjuuiy^y^^i/li /l4^Ut^ 



A 



yf} 



f/n^^^^^ 



^0^^^^^ ^^Cyuiy^^'>i</ C^ ayi^c^^'^'^-^ yUL^t>^/i ^>C^^>»^ (/c^^ 



a.^iy(^ 





p^ 




:^/jc*.<^ ^-^^*^ 



/i>t/(/i/i/nyu^i 







,^v S'^VL-^ 




/t^. 



/lA^ui^ /h^'c^ yfju^c^^ yi^^'/^ "^'^^ ^^-it^^ yii^^-^^ 




4 



/' 



c 






y^ 



\ :\ 



'I 



i 



/ 


y- 


11''- 


y' 


^, 


M ■ 


p 


-^t 


f' 





1 








/yj' 



^^t-^*^ 



^ ^ ^ <T ^ < Vri^ 






yt/UUl*y/^ 



^ 




>/. 



xX^ 



y^Ui^ V>^'^^^^<^**-"^^^^*^'^^^^^<-^ ^/^'c^c^' /^^x^y^i 



Ä-t^t/C^J\M Uyt'iA^ yS^ 









"P/i^^ 



X^ 



y^^9^'yiy.y^ 






J^^L^ 



^CC'Ji^ j2y^<^ 



<)c^ ^ 24 (Ji'^yi^ d^ y^'^ y^yCu44J^'iy/i ^ ^'i^.^^. 



cJ/UCy ZC/c^^ x^ ^^^i-^-w ^>-ut^ y/S^^riyC ^^^^^^<X-t^x^^:^^^ ^*-<''^;I^^ 



/ 



x^^-*^^ I ^cry\<^ a^yiU 



(/^i^ C'^0'%0^ 



/T 



C4/My 



/ 



^^cy 



•aC 




^.^</Vf XXl^ ^^^vt 



t 




yfcÄ. ^yU^ ^^4-»^ Jl^' I ^c^y^^k^^cy^ 



/ ^ *- I 



/UiC/f' £4' 



^^ 



^^l^i 



JCiyv*' 



,^ 



a^ 



^^ 



y^l^e^ A^^iX/^ S^iiU^ * yt^^fiC '/A.Jit.^^'rl*^^ 



y<fl'<^ 



Vt--»-w 









d 



C^^ 



f' >1'^ 



^^^^fc^ 




/ 










'cA^ 



ofl^Cyu 



"^^^yrfi^ e^. J^. 



<c^ 




u. 






•^^^^-^^ ^u^^^ <^ 



/ 



yycy^''''^^ 



y^^^^^yi^^^'^^^L^i^ ] yiit^^ s^y^^'^cyC 



Wc^pc^iy xA^^ yi^i^"^ Ay^^^u^iyC ^ix.^>^ I 4^v jUttJ' 



*M^^i^ 



7 



e^. 



"U/^ 







J^ay( 



cy^^LA/^c 



/i^iy^ 



^u^ytZiiU 



^-«-•^ >t> JyY^C^ 



•U. 



%C>y <^ 



X^^^ 




a. 



t^A^>iyvHy(yU^ 



y^^^lyv^Cy 




0>y'y>t^^^i^ 



"^.y,.^.^^^ ju-^ 



/ 



/Uy^'^^C^ 



yi^'^ 



/yio^^^^^ 



y^ciz4i^ " 



^^Ji^— I -^ 




> 



u. 



.^^ ^^.>u^ 



/^ 






h 






x^ 






1 



^^C^**^ ^^^-i4^ ^xt^w^u^.-^-' ^^v*. 



///•/ 



^C^^ ^ I 'W^iL^y^Ai.^'^a^ 



/ 



/^*^ 



^^^-- .^^n^V^d^i^r^^ <^ ^ -^ 



x.^^ 







£<yiy/ ^ 






C^i^^U^' — 







Jyic^'J^ /Ä^^z/w /t^^^^'u^ jU^^^<^ yk^i^^cy ""^lyut^ 

2. 






Ä^->^ 







c 





r^*^ ^X^ 



/ 



^^u^^ /]rro^ ^^-^ -^^^j ^^^ y^^ 



'V^^ 
.^i^ 



/ ^ 



/H/t 



? 



.AA^'^^iy^ 



^^^?^^^X.M. /l^y^^^^fiCo^. ^^i^u-^ VL<7f^^ 



L/^ol^a.cA M^Uy^ yjUcJ^-^ x;^^<xt^ yf-y^^yM 



C^ v^^xt/'txl^ - 






S^^^^txuw* ^*-^^ ycZ^O^ 



Ä^t/vw^ 



f 




y^ 






A 



j. t 



1 ! 



^ 



■Tl 






I ; 



M 



/^ 



/j^A^^rr ^^^y\A^ 






y^n^^^ 



/\/yyyyA' 



Svuu2/<t , Ayiy^ (y^y^y^y^^^' ^ 



^>Wl^ - 



^^14^ /i^^v*^ ^JL^"^ >t^-r3//n •v^ v^u'V'»^^-^ ^/ixt^vu^ z^/v^* v^I^^^Ji/W 
^(AV>-ww6^ut/t . JA^i^ i/A^Uv^UiV'-^ y^A^^ ^Ä^'^U^ui/h^ ^fC4A<y 

^^Uvuw . y-^A^4^ y^'^^^^Ly jgl^Ut^i^)^' u^ yS^'JCi'i^^ yu\^^ i^y 

/i/^^yi^^^ y^;,^ y^C^ 4f^ v^'^^<^ yC£<iuux^ ^y^u-y^ 






/ 



^yU^'/^ /oitA"^^ Am^"'^^ yi^^y^^ yt^^^"^^ C y^^^'^^^^t-v*^-*^ 

/^K-<!^r^ /.^ /y^'^ JtiL^^<-^ ^O'^ y^duY lÄAf^ cof- 

/y^yA.yi /itL Ma'U /a^M' ylAAyvtyywd^i^ J^A^yc.^^^ 

JciM M^ ^ci-^ '^ciy^^^^^^^ y-<;>i^^'^— ^^ 



/ 



,<^-W^WV ^k/l^ -• 












/^>V7 



'-•-•:.'.jg-.;^-aE.i«i 






lll 



y- 






A 



y 



tf 



y^ 



II; 



j I 



1 



-/. 



J7 



7^'e. 



^^/ 



>><^ 



j> 




^ 



u 



^ 



i.^T^M'^ - 1 ^di^ ,^^yicZ/ a.,0^' yA^'^^*^.^. ^ ^^' 



x-**^ 



*> lyC-^ "2 



^^t^*l^ -^(^„«X , yUr^Ot'/^ 






i^v^ "ZU^X.'X ^^ v^. 



-^fr*' 



^,.._ 4"^^^. 



^X.,^yl^<^Cy 



'^ 



^ 



A^iy^^ ^*-w ^yfa^ 







a^ c^ 



yi^^V 



/ 



Cic^Uv^i^ y^^^-^'-f^ 



^ J^ 



t^^Cx^ ^A^ 



Ä^^'l^'Z^ 



CV^ -^-v^ 



^^ 



T' 



^^.^^ ^^^-1^4- v>t^/t-^ ^Ou^^ 



€. 



Ä^g^ 



^ 



-w<^ yiA^i^ 









-^^i 



^>/ 



r^ 



z^ 




^ 



Ä^^ 



A^^'^ 



^ 



wy^^ 







^■^tyC ^ 



aa.^'^. J.i^^^^ c^-M-- ^^^^- 1^^'^'^^ 




W - 



^ 



^^I^UU^. 



'y<yt^ 



V 





,,^* ^r-tf-^^^^— K- ^^Ut(^^ 




0^ yi^^ 



y 



/ 



Ä^^i 



/i^^^^»^ 



*<^ 



/ 



T 



V^:-«-^ 



(/ipc^^^ 



/ 



/.^^ 



^-^-^ y^^ui^^ ^eM^'^^''^. -^ ^-U ii.^ I J^c^^^k// yui^t^t4y^ ,(Uu^ 



U.' 



^*i.yu^(. 



^ 




^,^.^^<^ ^c^'y^ 



^ 



^^.^^ 



^ JU^ ^Ci^üt^ixe.-'^ ^ ,X'^' y^^ 



"t^^ yt/^^ir'*'^*^^ 



</^ 



^yC 'Ät^ 




^^-w^ 



.^^ 




6' 



^ 



^"l/I^U^^i 



^^..'^^a^ ^/T >^^ 



-^^'-^ Vy^^iJu^^^'^ ^^<^^UO^^ 




.^^Cv 



^^ .X->-4^ ^J-^'j^^'y^ . CL-- w. 



a 



i^V^yX^'^ 






r^ 



^jn^c^'y^ ^^M^^^^ 



^ <^^ 



^;V^ ^ <^5^vi^v*^ 



^ 



^'^u^u^u*^*^ 



» 



I. 



Il 



i 



y 






A 

1 



H 



l\ Y. 



y 




AI 

.,yi^<>f .<yl^ ^i^ n^i^^^ '^C-ut-.^^i^l-^-i.-— X ^yf* 



/ 



"f 



/^ 



;^ 



^^ 



V 



(/Ci^l^ ^^(^7' ^V^* 












( _..„ 






y/j 









j. 



'^Ui^ 



yU^ 



^Uty^C^i^ yU^^«yf' ^^C^'Cy^ ^'^txt^ 



^ 



'fc^ 4^^^ig>>^4^l xt^^^^ ^vx^ -<>un^^i^^ 



^- 



^ ^c.:^^ ^.^^u^^^ ^A'Z^-^.^ ..^'^^^ 










-/ 



'C^vu^ 




-v. 



^A^t^k/^ 







üiiL 



l' 



y 






\S 






\ 



1 



> 



y' 




^(X ^^^-v-wv-i^ A^^^x^'y^ /^yu-y^uC ^.x^'i/C^ £.^u*^.4^0ye/h^' cMi 



^v«. 



,/lytyi^^LyC ^^^u^ yf2 



'A^i. 






/C^V^y^^ ^^y^iy^oiyn^^i^^^.y 



ypi^ 



4-n»^ A. ^^-»^ 








'(jUi^i^a^, 



/ 

1y^'>'''^-'^^'^ -C-^i^^-i^ /t'wv.wv^ ^cA^^m^ ^^t^U^f^ yt^ K.^t^^^"^»"''^^ 






y^ yi^e^n^C^ 4^^»^^ 



a. 
^ 






.^^r' ^if-^^ ^ ^V^>fc-i^ ^:^ 'y^<^C 



-v 






^ <p. 



a^-n^ 



/ 



/CC^^^'*^*-*^ ^^^ 










^Cy^ '^Z^^^ ^o:^^(C^^ Qc.^i;^y^r>^ ^<Uc 






"^XU\*«V^ 









/ 



!'»i :; 



*1 






vCf^^U^i^i^i^ 



') ifU(U >*Ji^ «^ ^tVH4^ JyyU^*^ 4^a^4^. 




u 



y 






A 






^ 



x^ 



il 




"I 



JU 



J^cJlJ' yfC/^ <J-tV^ OiA/^'UW. y^^ j'a, ^:^ >*^t^^/l ^-^U^»^*-*»- .^A^ J"^?W/^ l.^,.^. 



^^ 






^. 



/l/iy\/^^i^ £/^Uyi>' 






yPyrä^^Avc^%^%^ 



i^ 



V^^ 



2/C^^^ 



^f^a^Ui^^^n^^ ^Cy^^<yfi^^ 



J. 



xtu^^"^ 



.i^O^J' ^^^L^i^i^ i^^i^ It/^^ ^1 



e^ 



y^/z^ , 



^i^0fi^ O^^l^^-^U^^ yiP^^^^ ^«-^ V-r 






^ ^.^^C-^.^ ^^^^ 



2)^^ ^>^'^^^*^ ^.J^i^ '^a.^Uu^u^ ^^"^^ 4^cy^^^^ 



y^^^^c 



<X/l^ Cf^it^Vt^^4y^'C>^''r^*-'^-^ ^>i^« 



CC^c-^i^^;^ ^^£^' 




x^ 



^^ 



y^ 



^ 



^^. 



'ii^^ 



C^^w^ 



/^i/iytyi^^ 



^*/. 




/^ 



^, 



^•^Xy^y^y^' 






*C^ y^-yvn^'*^ 



^ 






•^ 



x^ 



'-'^w-r'i 



^l^t^^ 



^^ 



v 



-f^-^ 




^..^ 



Ci^^nTi^^c^^ /h^'^y'iX' yt/"*^ 



yJA^^^'y^i^ 




a^<^i^M ^^jt^'^^^ 



-(^^t^^^iyr^^ I ^^^'^'^v '^^' 



^.^^ 



\^^^^ ^./^i'^^'WU-l^i^^-Xr^i 



^^^^^ J^J^^ ^'^ 





^ 



.^^ 



.>4^ -.^^ 



/ 



^ .:^i^g>^ I ^'^ /x^^^ ..*^' ^^c^ ^ ^^' -^..^^^ J^cJ^ 



J^ 



i/^ 



/^6- 



^ 
./ 



^^ ^. 



1.^^ ^cy{/Ci 




<^^. 



-^ 



cJz^ d^i^^ly^^^^^ <!>4^ 



^yXy^^^^ 



/ 



ir: 



(Kyi^C^yriC^ 







C7i^^. 



^^*/^c^^ 



^rr^^'t^^^ 



ixu.*^ 1/yiyu\^ 



? 



et 



? 



^vr* 



'-^t-wV 



^^/-^^ ^«x^ ^ jCl. Cf yuc^^^ , y^'iM^'c^ ^*^ I ^<>/ 



if"/ 






'/^ 



^ 



^A ^y ^iyAyUui^t^y^ " I •icyCcc^" 




^Ul^t^i^lx^ 



/ 



..^^ 



/^V^V yi/^^UU^ 




'U^i^^yl/U^Z^^i^i^^^^^ 



/ 




'A>^> yU^^U^L^i 



7 



£yW%0^ 



^^ 



-*^. 



i:^^ 



^- 



^/J^ 



CLyi^ C / ^ ^^l^i^y^^tx^'/C y^^^i^PUr'T^^^ 



|1' 



lif't 






\' 



y 









f^ 



y 




m 






% 













^^^. 






/ 



y?/ty1^^i^ 



V 



'^'y<- ^c^^4^ 






Uyi/^ 



/ 



A<*«W«x«- 




^ ^^<yty 



<r^-^ ^^€^ ^/U^4f^'^^ 



JCy{/lCy u . A , v^^ , 

yU,0^xyi0^ ^yl/i a^y/i^' C^n^ , KHyLyiyu ^y> 

yiyiy.y'Lyyiyf' /Uyu^iyty^^ /^n'^ /l^ tyi^ U s^-i^^^ yiy^.'un^ C^yh-C^yti^' 



J; 



/Vt 



.,^iyx^/0 



r 

/ 

V 

Cur C^^lA^ *^;>t^fc^ yCCs^i 
VcAii^^CyC /^i^V ^^ 






/ 



/ 










i^^->-' 









M^U^^^yl ^.^^^ ^^^^^^^ 






'^^ yp< 



l 



'II 



'f^ 



■*^M 



y 






yl 



II' 

1 ! 



Il 



\ [ 



I 



y 



h 



i 



% 



/ 



^.^ *^ ^y^'C^ ..^^ 



^ ^^^^ 



r 



^yCf\ 






/t'^üy^^ ^'"^ rH^ i^u-u-»^^/-K;^^^-»^ , ^^'i^ ^v-l^^ i^^^u»^ 

/ 



C)^^ 






yi^ f^^^^ ^^ -t,^^ 



'iZ^\ 



JZ^I^^^ 



^ 'Tit^HmH 



ü,^^. 











Oyt^ 



/ 






Ai^J*^^ ^«'t-*-^ V-/^-^ ^«^l-^y^ <z-v<,*,*-<^^ ^.- wt^«-«^ 



/2^^ 




^ 



/ 




.*^ ^/j^ 



ij-t-*-^ 






< 1 



iliigl 






i 
yi 



y 










)) 





x^ 



a^ V-» 




^ 




/ 



f 






"t^oU/^fijJ^^dc^ 0ä^t.<^t 



C'rT' }\yi'^ 



f 



'C>^' 



A^y.-^^ 



X*.-«.*^'- -^lA-i-^M,*-/' 7^/Ulyy C/^^^f^<^y^ yS^.^i^t^ ^f'V^, 




U 



J cn^ of'-ti/i^ ^^n-**^ 4kh,^-<-<^ y^Vy^^eJi^i^i^ 

r 

^^UU. T^^J^^ "^U^-^^^ Z^^-^ ß^c..^^ 






^/l^i^t^^U 



<7j ■ 




.^^C/^i 



^.dhy ^ 6^^^^u^U^' ^ .^^^i^tU^ 



y] ^^.-w^ titi^'i^oiyi t^^' ^t*', ^- 






/ 



.VV<^ ><>^ -^'-^ ^*^*^^^ /^A^ 






;?4<^'/^«A*.**. ^i^a)*^-' /♦i«^ /^^ 



A^^^^^^^t.^ . ^'^ v^ ^^^^ 







^y^^T^ 



i^%y 






y^^'C^aJ^k^c 



Ol^ 






«^ At ^^-^<>^w ^Cy^y^ 




C^^^ - 



0> 



^^ ^.^>^ J^/^yCv^ 



j^-^^>t^ ^^>^ y <^^^ -'^'-^^ "^^^ 



-tu^'^nJit^^^ ,.^^h^a^ 



.H. S ty-i^wiys . 




y 



M 



\ l\ 



,4' 






y 




ill 






% 



J?2 






'^^^.t^, ^ -2^^'^^^ ^^— ^ ^^^^-^^ 



/ 



/ 



Ä^i^^i^x/i i 






^/tA 



•^^ 



^ 



/ 






cc 



^»/^»^T^-t-W-t-»^ 



^:? 



yy^t^^ir}^ 



CX- 



i^I^-t-^U 



; Jc^'A<y^ . OVyr J^^^^^ 



/^ 



ayL^i^ 



" yt^ /i/u%4yi^^»^ /t^un^^i/ü^ yL^,^^' c/M y^^^^^^ <yc 



^0^^iyL' " 






\ Z^Ju^ 



^IfWw^ 



</'^'^. 



m^^ ^' iy ^W^V*^ 




'^4^ ^^i^ 



i^^i^ty 






//i^ix^ ,/IV* 



^ 



/ 



/"i^^^ yU^U1ytyi/L ^<^/t^" ^/4-Vxy^^(^ 
i:^^' ^^^>— ^^y-,-^^Cy^^'^^^^ ylyui^ ^^^^^^ </C^ 

/t/iA'^^ ^'A-^ ^i^-^ Jy^i^^^^ QyC^'cA y^^^^^ 
/ V^* ^>.wv *--• yiX.<AyOy' C^^ ' <J6^ Juvc^^^^i-^ /Pi^^ ylA. 



yay}- ^cui^-^c- y^c<^ ..^^^'^ ^^-^^"^y^' 




yaic^ J^y y^>^ /^ m^^^-c^^ 



ycc^>' 









ni 




n 



y 









U 



y^ 



' I 



4^ 



y 








* K^^i^^iy^ 






^ 



'^>^ ^^Ä-^^ 



/ 






yC -^(y f (^ 



V 






/>y^ 







y,z^-j^ / 

^^*x^ ^.t^v-w^^ J^-rt^ >w^ /g^'^y^ .^^(/^^^t^'y^ J^ ^ 






^? 



£2fV Äi^i-^c/t^ ytl^^'^c^ ' yU"^^^^^^ y1^'^^ 



/viyL 



c^ 



y</{.yyly9* 




ey-^xyr' 




c^ 



y^c^^ i^. Jl 



i'uiy 



A 



„^ C-^ 



^ 



^^.«^ ^.^^i:,**^ y''^*^, x^fi»^^ >«X^^-^ J^£f'<^ . 

/^vu;««{^ /i^^^^^ ,^1^ A<^yA<^ ^'^y^ 

-4«^ JuJ ^^^ .^^^-^'^^^ ■' ^«Ä^^ e^^^****^ 



.^ 



iXt/hi.^ ^'y^lCi^ 




^ ■ PI 




y 






A 






y 



w 



\ 



^ 



% 



; ! 



\\ 







f- 



<^ 



Vc 



'M 



i^-V, 



y4<euy "Vz-u^ ynu^ ->^*'^^^^''<<t^/^^^ x^V^^'-tv^ y^^yviyi4L^ 
yh'/i/o^.^ , ^/^u,^ ^<^*.^w/^ f!^^^^ ^^^ 

•X <^ y^ (^ 

^'^h^'/^ y^f^'^^u^ ^C^'o,^ 










^ 









-^^?^^^ 



«W«««>fc> 







.^^^M^a^;^ 



>t'i^<<^C^**^i-^ 



;^ 



.^* 



.. ^-*- ^^^fU-^^..^^.^ : fJ^^f^^^■,'^'■■^<'^^^*^■ 



Ij (t,. ^*/ 






I v 



I t 



I < . 



• r ■! 






•«t 






^ 



y 



y 



y^ 



A 



y^ 



y 



1|. 



yf?y 



1^P/ 



^a.^^^^^'iyrt^' a^^^^^"^^^ ^-K-^^/J^ , iC^x^ ^.-t^ - I y^^cZ^ ^ 



a^^i^'^f-^^^^v^' Z^i^'^^ 



' '^i^^*'^^ — ^^^Cyt^i^Uy^i 



a^^r^x. 



^^^ ^'J^ ^^^ ^JW ^ J.^r^s,Z^ ^^. 



;?:^ 




^-^^ 



'fiCi^ 



^«'^'^•^••«»w' 






^Z-^t-^ 




C^C^^ — 



r^^V 'Vi^V^VT'^W'«^*^ 



o^^^wu* 



/ 



^^ 



t'^^ä^^uu^yZ^t^^c,^ -^ ■ yyf^"^^' 



6^' 





X^i 




'^a.^^^ 






^ .^'^^^ 




.^z 



V'^i^-V-W* 



--^ 






>4-*^t'<J^^-t,J yjc^'iO^C^' Cy/cy^ 



'•A 





't^H 



^^^^■►^ ,^^^^^^V^ 



Cyt'^Lyl'C^^ 



■y^. A^ /y^ 



yU^^'^ 



^/Uiyt^^Uyi^^'^^ily^^ ^^v 



yf"^^ 



yi^yi^''^ 



./. 



^Wv^ ^y6^C^ /^^C^ y^i^^A.^tyX'^^^i^ 4^U, - I ^''^ ^-"v^ "^tW^^^i^*^ 



^^i;^ 



U^ 



^i-i^ 



^^/^ 



Tf^f^-t^ 



/ 



/ 



*1^ 



e-<^ ^:t.<.*C*-*<il-»' «-»>v< 



^ 




<-^ 



^*^. 



y%<yU^^ 



'"'Jy/L^'^ 




T^' 



A.^i::i^^ 



J^. 



V 



"lyt^^yr 



A^yiy^i 



^-"^ 



y^,<^ 



^cy<^ 



^^M^ 



'^^^ 



^^^y^fiC^^^^yt^^' 



-^M^ 



y 



-row^ 







^^^i^ O'n^^' 



4^^cyC4y^*> 




/ 



A^ 



'^^'^ ^'y^A^' 



/ 




/ 



^1 



r^i^^ 



4-v^ .X^^WH^^ ' 



/ 




ä^^A t^.^C^C^'^ 







o 



it-^i^ 



./Vu< 



7^ >^ 



X^^U-tH^ 



/ 



^^^< 



A^' 



y^^^C^^ 




Jli 



y 



y 



y 



>! 



A 



^ 



y 






^/f7 



OZif^^ t^'^^ 



r 



'^. 



»o 



V. 



'ir''*-^'?^^^ 



jW 



y^Z^\yU,y^ 



^. 




'y^i 



J 



/ 



.fiC^ 



cy ytry^^ 






-# 



/ 



/hn'c^ 



fi.^'nr^c^ 



X^' 



■/. 



a^^u^x 









'^^ y^. 



/ 



^ 



^^t^^iyC^ yi-^*-» 





>^ 



yj/^' 



Jz/iT^^^'^^^ 



/t^^'y>r 



V 



M' 



/?v-» V ^-*'' 



y^^- 



7 




— i^«,^'.^'' ^Cy^ ^ <-^'^ 



.^■^. 



/' 



CZ^y^^^' y^c^ 



.^yK^u^^r^^ 



J. 



X 



"^- 



/V?'^ 




/V-u^U^> 



— ^.^til^ 



u^ 



Ä-<ixx^' y^>uv%^ 



/ 



x^*^ 



^'y^^ ^<:.^>^^ 4r^^^^ ^'A^ux^ I ^/t^ ^Jc^'^^ ^-^C'w.-v.'*^ 



^^*/^ 



••• -<^ 




^/Ä <iL-v-H-^- 



yCnr'iJ^'^^^^^^' j .c^^^^^^j^i^ww^ i/OyC'^ 




^U^lyf 



/>' 



y^'^L^^^ 



,^ 







^y/U^ y<^'^ 



^. 






/: 



.^' 



&ft— «^ 



0^;-^^ 




'^^^. 



•>i'^^^ 



^^ 



.^ 



ylA^UU'\^ yi^l^^U^ ^^Of' t^ „X^-KVl^ 



y- 



^^»-r^ y^y^ 



'gl ly^ tC /i^.».7«^<6*v-*>v'^9^« 




O 



^, 



^'^'^H^ ^^^ 






**-*,^- 




*-^^' 





; 





y^JU'^y^yC^ cJi^ y4}t^ 



2^ 



yi^/f y^cK^' 



"J^- 



'/V' 




^ 



^•t/?^ J^y'U, C^'^y^L^ sl^^Ly' 



.ytLy^^u^ 



7 



y/i^'J- y^ 



,/ 



7 



^* 



^, 



-i^ .-.^^ 








/ 



<^- 



y 




>l^«— 1>/^ 



^. 



.'W'^« 



^/u^ 



u. 



4^yi^>y 




-^f-»-^ ^C^nr^/n^X y^p^r^'y^S^^^-t^ 




iiiiif 



y 



y 



A 



X 



^ 



i)^ 



JSl 



JlX^^-x^ /r'^^JJ ^'cM^'Ju ^Uk^' ^ 



C^Cy^ 



^^^^vt^ I y^C0^t^%^\^nyK^ 



'//:? 







^^^y^^i^i 









'^^■^ /i^^yC^ ^ (y^^^-^ , yAn: />t^ .yli'^r-^^Uyp/^ 



Jc^^ 



■^ ^y^ 



^^xyL^L^i^ (^ yrS/C. 



//. 



.^yC^ 



^^t^uX^l^ ^ilyuty^^^ 



Ö^. 



■7 



■6^.^ x^t-*^-«^! ^^ 



A- 



^, 



^U^^X' 



^. 



CZ^ y^^y^ 



^^^yiy-L ^ 



m 



'<jyi/\^ /^y>tyC -twt-n'y x^4^^ ^^^ 



^yiXA^ 



yiyiy^y^ *^ 



^' 



A 



i>^C^Uy 




y-U^yU^.yuci^^ , y^>^ — ^^Cy^T^c^iyn^ .' t/ ,y^ y^ 



a^-*n^A 



y^^i 




,yt^ ^Cytyiy^ 



•^ -<^H 






<^ 



^^. 



X.-y^ 



y 



' y^ 



y^^ 



y 



^^ 




^yv 



cyC^ . ^^' ^^^ ^.^yiA^^y^»- 



^.y^ayyi'^^t^-^ ^c^ayii" ^'^ yt^^^' tX^ ^0Cyi'^ -oÄ^^^^^-'^^'i^^ 






/ 










^ 



ay^-y% 



/ 



,^^' 



x-^ 



/^l^ 



^^ 



tf^*-»» ^«,-t^tZt, 








^ 



v^ 



^Cy/i^Ly 



^Uc^, Z, 



:-^-*^ Cy^y^ y^yV^U^^ ^yCi i 



^iy^ , ^Mcy ;z£^.^^^^>^, 



^U^l^4/r '"'Z^^^^*;^ ^'^^^l ^^^^ y^^js^^yC 



^. 



^^Cy^ 



fyt/y^c 



cx^^i^yi^ 



^.^iy^ 



-f^' 



/i^CyiC^^'^^ 



<fyy 



^^^ ^yVTL.yc^ yifZi^y^ 



yy>iyi*yU 



<• 



V 



n^'*''^ aC' 



•■^y y^i 



M^' 




y^' 



w 



X 



<1 



y 



yi 



iif 






a^^/u^ 



<j^^^4^ 



^ 




c^. 



/^ 



r 



^yC't.^ 



— V />« 



^22:22^^^ ^^ ' y^^ 







y^U't^^ 



c^^aA/i>l/ 




^ 





^^-^f^Uy 



A^ 



x^C-r-^^Ä ^-«-«^ 



^ 



^, 



.,>^<^ *^^<^W^ 



'^4 



^ a^^uh>^ 




^ 




V yp^^i^ 



■^ 



^. 



„^ 







/// 




^7T-r^#n^^i 



^ ^^f*^' ^ 'y^ 



^>V<^<V- 



"^"^'/^ ^^'^^^^'^^ 



yv c^cyAv/f > '^^ c^ cC (^'^^u^ 



■*»^«' 



.^£^^t<^'' 



-^^ x'^r^/u4't>-Z^^>u^^v^' •^ 




C^ X^^ 






x^^v^ 



^^ ^^ 



v^- 



/ 



^ 



^v^Vw-W^ 




<^ -V-u-^ i^i^l.^ 



<?Q.^^. 



^ 



^^>- 




^'^Cy^ 



\^^^ ^'^ y9c>^ ^'^'tyfc.,^ ^^Xi 



■■:>^ - 






Tyu^ 



^ 



CA\^ 



yv^ 



tf/ii^-wwwc^ 



I 



^y4>vt*^i--'^-Wc-^>^->'>-i^^;>^^^'^^ ^ 



m 



y 



\ 



A 



x 



\ '' 



\\ 






^ 



ir 



% 



/fU 



A 



-^ ^ y/<y%^C^n^^*^ ^C^i^ / T^i^. i' 



'"^r^ 






~y €>^^^' /f y^l^yi c^ U.cy^ >^«^ ^ <?^^^%-w.-*-w 



^. 






A^ ^J /^ 



^\,fru ^'^^^t-r-» 



^T'M^-^-v^^^ 



■^. 



'^^^ 



•> i' 




^'fc* "J^^U-wvv^ — w^-3. ^»-^ Ji"-!-^ 



--^ 



^^--wt^, 



:^. 



' ^Cyyi^^ .^^-i-wt^^i-^^ 



.> ^1^. 



^ aJ-y^tu-u^t^ty^ ^ 



^^^^K^^^y^-'^i^ i. 



^U 



Ä^-p- •<>>^ ^-<^- ^y^^^ 




^ 



/^^^ 



x^ 



<« « ^r*^ I ^ 



^Ä-r^, 



"?»-' 



'.•si. — K^'i^t.'e^^ 



.-^' 







iO^\y{y^(^^^00^^ 



^^c 



y^ 



cyi/^iy^ 



^^fß^U^V^^ C.0^ .^^»^^ 



/^lA^^tri/^ 



-"^^v^t^ 



/^ 






t/C c/ui''%^'ny^ 




^H^^WO^^I^ 



e^e.^ e,,^^^-^^^^ ^ 



y^c^^ 


^ii^ur^"^^ 


<Sy^c^>^ 


y/^-^ X 


^^^<xK.^/' ^^^ 



^ 



^/^ay^^'^^-r'e^-i^'%^ . c ^^ yV^ ^^^^^-^j 



V 



t'-'^^""!-^ ^ ^ ßU£-s^ 



^:- 






><c 



^^/1^^^t0^ 



yl^^y^ 



<.>^t/^i^ ^'^y(^ 



'X 



^^- 



'y. 



cy^c^^ / ^ c^^ , '^^v*-!^, 



j^ 




/y^'^y^^ A C^^' iy^y^' ,y^ y^^j ^-"«-'«^^ 



^^ 



>- 



xMxtc^ 




^-^^ 



^yPi^i/yi^. 



^ ^xt^ 



^c^i^ -.^ 



A'^^^u^^ 









/ 



■^. 



•^- 



• 
^*^ ^^, 



^. /. 



^i^ 



-^y 



-^^>^ ''^^ay<:^^r-y^' 



r 



j 



^ 



/Ut^^' ^ 




y^^J^^'U^ fi/4^n^u»^ 




'^5^ y/it^C^^Cyh.^ ^^^CyäV^ 



a^<^ 



i^-w-v^ 



^^-^'^ 



/ 



O 



^- 



^^. 



>r- 




yf'yy^ /^j/^V^ 



.-K^' 



^n^'C^ 



^. 




^d^ 



y'U^J^ 



xi'> 



7 



-^ 




< 



^1 



y 



A 






^ 



u 







> 





i 




1 


1-, 




'li' , 


1 1 


h ■ 

1 




mkiL 


1 



t 



nut. 



y^9 





y^Cy^yu^^ ^.^.^^^C t.-y-n^y^ .^'c^^ t^ ^^^^^uun^Ty^ 




Mz^^^ ^,zA^ ^'^ ^^'^ j^,^^ ^ 

'"^CnJlc.^^ ^cyt^y^ny^ y^c^^^^uvl^r- . 2) ^l^^ y^;^0Z^^C^ 



^ 

J. 








V 





..<*/ 



•/ 









i? - 




/^^^'V— • 



/ 




y^>*-K^^^^ 



yyiy^ 



xi^t^i 



^. 






^ ^yu€ O'^u^u^i' ^^n^ 


















'*^ V-'.^V-». 




y^c^Cfi^t.^ "iyy^ ^a^A 



/U^^ 




: i 




y 



y. 



i\ 



II 



il: 






y^fy 




'^^ 



f^ 






^ 



HL 



)il 






'1 




ÜB Li j fl^ffli ' 



/f2 




/ 



»^^ 




^-^^ 







J^ ^t^^'x^ T^^^^xv^^ 



^ 










\ 





/ 





,^»- 



i^*'/r< ■ 






^^%^f*^4^ ^ ^^S^ yl^'X .i^A^ ^i^,^-^^,^^, 
\/y3 O-^-^^y-^O^f ^^^ -«^ tf^*^— -*4-^ ^it*y^ ^^ 



/*^* 




<^^- 



/^^ 



^' 



yff9 



y 



y 



/f 




,! 



'C'KiU/c^ 



.^y%x^i 



9ic,^a 



y 



>' I 



1 ^ 




II: 





















A.i^ 












^1 




















I ai. 














Pf 



ii 



y 



w 



Ii' 




^"^ 



i ■!«Pi 



y 



%m 



i 

1 • ' 


t» 


■ü. :l'^ 



i 






^— ^ .4^0^^^- 



I 






aX^y^'^vX/C 






A^^^ 



c^^/Cu 



^^•^y^ ^^t^^i^ 







/ 



y^C^y/^^ 












l^t^« 





A i ^v^J^a <{Xr^yi/^ 







a^n^A 



4. 




C/^ 







^-K-- 



>y/^?y , C^ yt^^^ ^^^ ^>^^ ^^^ <^^ 




y'^cy^ y^-v-iyO ^Uyf'^ ^^L^^ yux^^^U ./xX.^^ 

Jc^^ Ji^^ 7^'^c^^ ....^^.^ ^^^: ^^>e>/_ 
^^>^ y^'c^^ ^y^l^ ^ 7^'U^ ^..-^^ ^^^ 
^6-1^ y^^y^^ ^i^^^ V^ ^Cy^^ 'c'iC^ ^^c^ 



•ijc^ a^vX^^i^^ ^i 




P;^ 







7-' 







V' 






y 






jr:; 4^a^ ^-^„^ a .^,6,.^.^ 



Ä'^ 



A-t»^ ^^'(^oi^ Jytf'.g^ 



-t^ ^'^ ^ ^^.^^ ^^ 



J2 crv 9./.^^ ^cf^^^ 



/^^^. ^,^^C I ^ ,,^^ ^^ 



^y^'^i^ Ä-r-«^ 'V^-^^^j/'-. 









^c^^^^^^lr^ ^^^^^J /.tw^>/^ 




^ 



V 



^ ^^^n^lu^^^ 



L/Yiu^UA 



J^C'C^t^y^ 



yi/'W^'^l^ 




V^ 



/.L^ 



S y<^U^, 



^ 



5^ 



/^l^V^V^ ^^ 




-i^V y^^Cn^y^s^ ,y^^ ^/^ 



'^^k^'C^J. 



'^ 



c^ 



^/t^ ^'4 



.^. 




.^' 



^l^^^^vt::.^^ 







■^ 




/<v^*^-,-n^ «i^^j*., />-»'i^ :^ 



f<''i^t'-^ ^^A 



l/iy^ C' V- f-i 



-«-♦t/^w- .^U^ym^A/i. ^t 



/)*n-^^ ^/üW-»-?^ '/^a^iZ 



^ 



^>b-c 



'^V^n^-V'-^^ 






^ 



^ C^m^ß 



n^^ 



a^,^!^ 






*fi^^^ 



y^^ 




/ 





^. 



i^ 



^ y^e^-^ aCi'i^ 



V 










y 



>/ 



2^c**%^ 



AaJ 



-^-l^'V-lr 






.4^^uiyr' 




^/i^i^L' ^ 



J^ 



T^i^ 






,••' w-'wt^*:^ 



*v-i^' 



^^""^ - ^^<^- .^^;^^ >t-*^^^^c^« 



^■^'^^^ ydyu^^^ ^>;/.-^ 



<^^^-. 



«-»^ /^2^t^^'^^ £^. 



^^^^^^-n/^ ^ ^' Ol ^^ ' -^cy^ 



a 



Cx^A— r^i/ 



/ 



^^^WU^^^^^"^ 






C? 



^^^'*^ ^(y^'iy^t,,,^^^^ 



^Xl^^ ^i>^^ 



4-^. 



Ä-^^^^^^W 



■^ 






^i^ 



'^tf-K- ^C^ c^ y^ 



/^-^ (y2 



/^ 



C^'C^^-r-n^ 



t , 



'"/^Ä 



^^>^ 



./. 



/ 



yt^4^»^ 



JiJ 






yuu^ 



'^ 



'«'^^ y-^^^r ^^^^%^^ ^^yv^^i^^^ 



^ 



V71 

Kl 

>1 






}■ 



<i 



y 



1 . 



.»1 1 



'Tl ♦ 




' I 



^/ 



Ca/U\'^ 












^. 



c^ 



'^2>n^ 



/n^^ 




^(ynn- 



<^^^ yi^. a . ^. l^t^-^-y r/i^ ^ 



^/'T'vuu-T^ yux^^i^nyC ^^*-»-«-fc^ /x'^^^'t^i^'i^ *>-v^ ^^^c^''^ 
>txu*6-^ />l^v.-w^i^6^^ ^^'^ S^i^^ ^^.u^ä^ ^>i.i-i^^> 

.(y'^U'^>r^ yu-yi^\4^>^-»^ , C^cA^sr^^ /^l^ ^X^i^i^ ^C^^i^ - 
Ttf/^Cy^c^^'^ y^^i^^^yy^C^" y^.^^.'-x^^ yy^^^c^i^^ ^^^i>v^ ^^^^ 



i>?' 



/ 



:J^ 









n 




( • 



# >» 



U^ 



A 



i-tiu^u^^^^ ^L^'un.^^ . ^^V y4cyt^/^^^u4^ y^'-^ 7^'^tyC 



<l 



y 



II 



>f 









-?^ 



^ 



^^Oi'yU.yf^^iyfi 



V^ ^^i 




yVC^a^C'^yiy y^t^, 



/^/ 



y^C^'y^t^ ^.i^^^^U^ y/^/^t^^U^ ^A^^-WW^ ^^, 



,£ 



'^. 



<>< 



^/^'^'l^-rOiyC 



*n^ 



^^2i^ ' ^^ ^^ — ^' 



Ä^^ 2^ >^^ I l^,^^ y7^^^ ^^c^ 



/iy^^c^ 



J^ 



'>y%^. 



OCl^^'^^lA^ 



y^6^'/t^ 




^'n^u^c/C ^^i 




ä^%^ 



^^t^ ^^a^^^uiy^c. 



i>C^^ H^^^c 






^fiiyj' /fCi 



ux<^ 






Cy^4/i 



0O J/^fi^ ^"S^C^ 



M 



u- 






'^ 



^^(^^i?ii^ 



/ 




l^c^ 



^ 



/ 




c^^ l^^^^ 



yU^ ^ 



/%0l^ aU4yiy^^i^^^ x/ U^ 




Vi/M^ 



•^ 



•>1 



^ 



^ S^f 



J^ 



4^4^^ 



J2^ ^6li^ ^ 



-; 



'/Ä-l-i^ /t^«-%-v^ ^>^.^^B^^^^ '^(y^ 



/ 



-^ 



..^- 



A.^'Ul^i 




'^ 




^^^^ ^ ^t>^C^ £X^^^. 



'yi^i> 



A 



c^'y:>f 




y. 



^li^y^^^ ^^ y^'/4n^Ay ^i^^^ ^y(/i 



/c^ 







^. 



c^^c^c. J^yy^'^cy^ ^'>C^ ^.^ 



xPv^ 



x^C-r 



nn^^ 



l2^n^%^ 






/ 



i^^-n^*^ ^<.^^1^l^l^L^ ^ Jyp- y^A^^l^v^vjA ^^/»t^tf^ 



V^^^ K ^^^ ayti^u.iy7^ a^' KcX^c^ n/c^^ 



i 



/ 




•^^ 4^^uv^, 



l^^c^-tn 






'/^.^^ i^ 'i/x.4^'y^ 



'Ul^'UV 



4^^'L^'ii^ 



^ 




yl^i^ 



Q 






'pl^^^'y'^y^s 



yj^yCL^un^jf^^^i^ 



U^ 




yi^ ^cZ(r/1 ^^' 



^^U'^i'^ f w^ 



s». 



c? 



yi^ ^ ^ ^^yy^'Qy^y^ 






^«^^«w. 



-^i>» 



**X^i^ 7t ^^c4^ 



^>w-»*^ ^ y^y^'t-'^JC 



n 



t-y)^' 



^Oi^'iJ^,^ : ,^v 4a^^ V. 



'C^u^ 



't.'^'^^^C^ 



c:». 



^cylyip^ 



/t^^ 



/ 



^ ^cA-^^^^ y^ 



-j 



^^n*-!.^ 




-Z^v^i«^ 



>^^ , ^, 



^ l/fu^^-^ 



^. 



/l^A^ yC'^C' ^,t^,>vt^ ^y^^c^^ ^J^ y^^ a/L^ 



-^^< 



^->^ . /^>»^ 



/ 



/ 



/Uyx^ 



.^V -<^ 



v^ 



y^vi'c^ 



\ I 



y 



\\ 






\ 



»h 




, ty. 



/ 






i^^^^ 



1^ y^^^^^^ y^^t 





/?^/t<^ 












Ä^-t.^1-^ 



^^'^ ^<=-'>- yy^t^y^ ^^o..^.,^^^ ^ >u.^ 






^^ ^^c^ ^^^ ^^^ 91^^ -i^,^ 



'tf-^r^- 






y/^'i^ Jle^'X^' 



V 




X'/> J^'J^'^ ^, 



^ 



A-f^^-'^'l^ 



^;^> ^> 



>t>t' - 



^ 



-iPiV/^ 



^a^ ^c^^'Acy^ , VC^- OCf^^rj ^ 



ji^^ V cn^^ 




/ 

^'«^^ >'>*1^ <t,'-^ ^l-w-fc-n. ^ 'T/y^^^ .yf^ 



< . 



^. 



U. 



Jt'1'*<, 



^•^w^-T^ - 




c^-^^ 



A 



<^ 



V 







U^Uui^t 






^ 



r 



y 



\\ I 



% 



Q^O 



icä. 



'/ 



c/i 



/ 



'^L 



C^ 



'^/ix^'^^^'' 



u^ 



^ ^ 



-/ 



C^i^i 



^-^--w-u^Ä^rT 



.^■^Ci^L^ 



ty^ 






7 



-^ 



•tiXc-' e^ 



^ 



n^lf-r 



f 






^OUv*^ ^^fr-v- -^ 




<-<-l-w-^6^' 









^ 



.Aw-w-l^ 






y4^C^^ ^.«t-n^ ^^A-*- .ypC/'/ui^ ^e^c^ **i^t,*-^ 



F>. 




/ 






^ 



<i^ 




^C^y^'iL 



^ yU^^i^^ ^^v4^ ^^M^«^ ^<^<^ 



^^ c^^a^ 



4 



'^'TJ^S 



^ •%>V'*-v^^a^^'^-K^ 



^^' 



yt/Lyn. 



/a 



fi^\^k^ 




<-<^i 



'.^'^ 



.^. 



A'^ly^i-^'yux^. 



/ 



xt^. 



X^^^ ^^. 



pX^L^i 




'yrVi^^i^u^ -</Lvi.^^>#- ^(L^'C-^ 



Ä^^^M^ 



^1/^O^'A ^^/Uv^ 



yiAyi 







^""^ A,^^/^' /o<^^ ^cc^ • y^(ry^ /Pvv Jx>n^^^>^ ^^ 




,^^->-^ ^i>ww^ y^-^*cy^ >f cy^n^ 



y^/^c/^^-^^ A^ 




,a^^\^. 






^/^'y^^ ^.^Uuu/ ^ 





^-v^^x^ 



ß'i^^^ 



^ 



^. 



/ 



'^ 



yf(yi ^ /h^ ^ 



^y^'^rt^y-^ ^/o-*^ 






yh%<.^^ 






A. 



1^ 
•?1 



^^ >^^^ 't^o^^'^'(y^ 



.^ 



;^^**nr 






7 



/^*-»> 



'^ 



C/\0'^^ 



/l/^^irtM^ yi^L^'C/i^ OyC^ 



(TU'i^ A 



/VX^ 



(c.^^ /U^00^ 



ßyyyi, fiCC 'i/^^ y^a0^ 



^. 



r, 



% 



^Xl-T 









^> 



>g^' 



^.i^- 



/ 






^ 



,^C^ 6v<:y^^*'4^^-wt-'-w^ ^^6 



-:^ Jl^c.^^^ . "U^.^ 7 iUu^ 



yU^4^^ 



/ 



£y^yi^^€^ 



•^ 



^ 



^ 



^t:!- 



^ 



*V. 





1l 



In 



t; 



4« 



Ul 



yMÄy^uCyCCi^ 



') 




^. 




7a^ , 

x^t^W^«--«^ y^U^i^^>^^ y^t^^^ <>1.W^-*^ . ^ ^C^^/i-f' 






■^^^^^ti^ 




/ 













/ 











im mt^* 









ryW^ (^ y^^ /iyu^^^.^^.^ ^^a^^ '^''^J-k/ 








_M^' '^ ^-^^"^ ' \f C/L^ yf^^^iX^^, 




«K^»4^ X'«>«4 



^'/ 






■"7; 




•- ^c^^ 



I 



yiC(}u 



UiCU/^ yt\^ y^^^cxi^ ^yl^ y 



}^'.>.'y^^ 






C^^^0^ y4/^ ' *» » »► ♦ • V^.»^' *V/^ ,<» 



t > 



Il 



M 



i^9 



a 



ä^-^ C 



-U^ 



C^^^''l/(6'4^ 



'^ ^^ 




'f-^^-^-^ ^or ^i^^^c^- . ^.^4w 



^A/^^^ 



"-^ 



Q 



ty^^'%>^' t^yvi 



/ 



7' 



^x. 






-/ 



U 



>^ yu>*>^ ^ 





^^*yPtAi^ C^ 



^hIu 



^^^ ^ ^^»vo-^ 



,>^(^'\y9* ^ 







'rl 



■<y 



^^'Uiy^c/^ 



/Uyn 



>i^'U^^r%^ 



'^. ^. <^^^y^^ 



^Un^^yf^i^n^'t^i^Cl^' *^^i^'»^ 



^:;^^ 




7 ^c.^^'^yC^^^y^^' ^^4^^ 



xf^ 



>C-< J^u*^ 






'^, 



<5 



y^(^i^ C^2--T» 




^i^y^'y-y^^ 



Ä-'Wt^?' 



^^ 



I 






^. 



•^^ 



/ 






^t^c 



<>^ 





><^^ .^ 



Ä*^. 



^c^Cw 



'U^ 



^ 



£^ 



^. 



.^^ y. 



%f i^> :f ^^i^^u-f 




.^. 



^^■^tf'i^vn^ ,^yr tL^p^y^/Ctfi^ ' pt^u^t^u t%y ^/U^.^2^ 



M. 



/ 



^^-•-t^xt^'w-** 



'^ V ' ^^ :y^'/* 



-^•^ y^lv ^.x^^v^*^ "^COTiM. 



^-iiAu^ 



/^ 



^ ^<^^>t^/^< 




'Ui^C^^r^^C 



^ 



^ 




^a^^ r^//.^^ lY^^r-A^dJ^^ 



^ 




f 



'«/V< 



^^' 






^^v-n^n^ 



4^tn<i' /Vy^' 



/ 



^^J^t'^'i^V^ 




^^wx-^u^^ .^<^- 



'^ tf-'vn^-w^^yi'*^»' '^flytU^V^Yl ^^^^^wu^un^ 



'/- 



^yCc^'^l^iyp' 



yl/i^t^ " 



t^r^'ytM.i 



•/■ 




l^C^ 







'» 



s 



*c^a,-r 



^ :^^<^ 



/ 



^c^^ 



x^. 




f' 



-'^V^V ^'iX/^iA^ 4^^A^\^ .^^w^ ^C^^C^'^<^ 



^4^ 



*i^ ^/^L^U'U^' ^^i, 



^^♦•6-^V< t'C^t^y,^ -(fc^^y^^ 



J. 



tl^'^^ 



X^L^^^^^f 



e^^ 



^ y4^ ^(^^^^^ a^ j^^C^i^^^ß 



C^n^ C 




•V 



^^. 



,^. 



./-^ 




C/^iX'^' C^ ^C^^,>^'aa c^c^^^ ^t^C^i^^^ ^^^f^^^^yT J-^\ L^ l^^^^ 



Cy . ^^^ J^y^^A/^ /U^ 



^ yUPV'A^^t^^^^ 



^^' ^yUx^C^ jU^^^^a^^iJu 



^, 



dij 



r 



'• 




'I 



fi 






^4/^.^1^^ y^>u.%^^ y^c^^^^^xy^ ^^oCp' /c^^Ur^ ^cU^ ^^^ 



I 



fC^A^^^t^'/^^^t/kx 







•>' 



/U^ y 







^^yUa^- J/iä,^ ir JiA>^ ytM -^i^ yUt^ ^c ■ 




/ 



V» ^ yC^^'^^<''^i^ 



//^ 



■f 



•^ ^■ 



/ 



/^ 



<>.^ 






.-^^^<*</ ^^- ^^S-^^ ^^C^^,^^^ ^^ ^ 



i 



f#' 



Z^^ y<-r'Ji^, 



^Cf'UU.J^Ü- 'l^/C^i 









/ 






T'*:.». 



tl 



'•f 



m 



i^y 




l^£i^ 



AJytyL^cy ^aUi^ j2..^^'c^:s^ ^.^^^.^u^ c^ ^^ ^^^^UC^;.^ 



c^i^n^^ 






V 



/ 



ZCi^ 




^C^H^^ ^ 








t^f^ 









'Wf 



^-'^a-W^'u^^ : c>(^^iJ^^ ^. 





■ytyi'i 







<^A^ <^^ 






i^Un^ 



^r 






■.' 'I 



1 



.^.r: 









i 






. ^' W^ y^^C^-^t^U ht^ ^*' 



'c^ 




C^^l^S^^ ^ 




^.^ 



/ 
4^V/^ /yi^i^y^ /y^XyUC^' /h^^cUc^ ^^.^u^ yC^ C^ CyL^^yf' ^ 



>C//^ 




^4 



/^pt<y^^^ y/CA^C<f 



^ 

--'*'*-* H»-»-*^ 







.d^-<ucy a^^'A A^^i^/a ^ >j^^^/^ ^'^.yfA)i//A, 
.^- ^.^ ^-^ ^.^<^. ^.,,_ .^^^.^ ^.-^ , 



." »t 



.y^l'iyiy^ -^C^L^e^ 



c 






/ 



• ^^^ ^>^ C^^L^x^-^cy^ 



/ 



^Ua^'^^ JyT' 



,/ 



ui^^ 




7 






• ^ 



pi^f^'-^^V^C^' 











.' I. 



/ -/ 



r^ 



r"-y--i'n 



^1 



»;i: 



JTi 



(76 » 



:i*1i 



W-^ 



4 



\ 



-'^^Ä.^^^-^ J^ ^^^^t^^ 



^^Tt^n C'^'yyUi'C^ 



-^ce^^ 



^^4>»"' 



^^^^ ^ ^>f*^ AyC^^ ^Uo-^ ^^y^<^ 
yd'^ yU/f2 ^^^^ , 

/^^^'^ ^C^t.^ .^.w^^ -^^^ ^^'^ 



^^ 



^6^ 






/^ 



,^4^ ^^> -^7^^^>c.<^>vi^^ 







'1 







« 



'iC 






2^J 

^Ty^. ^ 

"yy^^^^f^^i^ ,^^t^^ /u^^'y^ ^^^i^u^ '^c^A.i^^ 



w 



.( 



•/^ 







rr^<yuuty^c.''y'y^ ^^/Vi.^^i^w'j^ 




i' 



r 



r ii 



% 



ilf 

-^J^' C^^C<.^ yJi^' /« i'^iyt^ ^Xi^-wi-^ ^^^i^-w*-" ^'I^Cn^'y^CyU^^ J^An^^ 

^^^^ ^<y^^4i# ^^iplnit^ \Ir2 c^^ c^L^a^^' r^i^^^ - 

'^ /^ U^ y^/4c^^ y^^^^ ^t^^ , Cv/*^ X^>C^^ y^'Jiv^ 



/ 



•iJc^^l/^>^i 












2zr 

/ 

yfC*-i^ yUu^cyC->^ lyL^i^ y^a^c^L^^ /l^'y ^A^y^^ 

^•i^ /V^'x^ y^yUcyUuCy^ yux^yiy^'/i w<L 



f^' 



f' 



»^ 






.^^,.rr 



t 

.^ '* 



■^ 



^<^ 



£<<i^i-f 



r*.^. 



.^ 



.-^v ^^ 



/ 





/f^<yi^ ' 



tl 



vi' 



^A^Ul 



iU 

y^6^ x^^-^>n.^ "l^y^i^i^ />-»-ILX^ ^^V*^ ^i^:i^M^-i^ -^^ 



/ 



,^u 



/ 



9^^^^-»^ <f^i>**^ Ji^^^i^c^ U^i^^^-^^'^ ^^6xtxt^.(i-^ 



X 



^^C^'^^^'^^ yUn^<^ yt^fy^^ .y^^^^ ^^^^-wv^ i/CX'Uuta^ ^ 



iZ 



-vu^ 



i<''^Z<^^ ^^ 



C^^^i^^i' 



c 



■/ 



^ 



*<^ 



^t* 



^ 




^ 






.^. 










\ 







( '* 



cyfcy^ >'>^^t^ ^ C^'^ 



, /^ 



^a^^i^L 



i/ 



<>^-^i-w«^ /'■^.^t--^ ^^^ 



i?. 



'(t^'^^</fa^,^ J. Cyt 






ä 




l^^-/^ ]y^^ ^.^.wv^ -^^^^, .Xy .y^ <^^vy/. 



^ 



iiili 






•jri 



fi 







jZ^f^^ 



Z'^l^' yܫyf' 



^2 



^■U X,'^. 



^t-wV, 



'U-^ 




^t-'t-^ 





'^ 



Uc^ 



>* 



■^Z^ 






^^/i^ . -<C ^U^C^ -^-^^ .;?^it^4C-I -/-^^ 



/ 



</. 



^x^<: 



■rl 



^n^C^^Z^ v-i^ "i^c-^ .x-i>.^^ 



^ 



T^-^C^-v"^^ 



'^iL-^ /Sv<^^i^^^ ^"^'V'^^ 



..^ 



^/ 



'^, 
•^. 



oy^w*^ 







'^-^ Vii^v-t^'^.^V'* 



.--^^ 



^. 



>/ 



,^< 



Cyfi^f'^'f^ 



^---- Wwi^^l ^^ 



^^^<^>t^ 



-^ 







^ >u-i-^ 



lM^c^ y^A^/^ ^y^^ C^'-^^*^^^^-^'"^ ' ^c^n^-%^'iy^i^^ 



yt/'t^'t^c^i^^ c^^u\^^ 



^^. — 



'tf>^ y^^ ^ 



r^J 



■ 



•<s6 



;^' 



'i-^^ J^^L^-i^^ 



C' 



^ 



iX.'Of 



A^^L--»-'!-' . -^'^c- 



/'^^^ 



>^^ w^^ ^yi^ 4-*-*- ^4-ui^ / dyt^/^^X ^^ 



^ 



>.-<^ 



/••t^^^-r- 






%yt^i^x^' 



y^C^'y^ 



G 



^"'i^n^ •A'-^v-'t^ 



^?^ ^^Ä-'^i 




cy^/^^^*^ x^^ 



^.^.^..^ ^y..^^-- M.t^^-^'^^ 



^ 



'^ 



H^ 



*-»' — ^^«ir yt*m/^ 




/ 



W^^-^^^L^^ 



•^ 






tJ^^^ ^c^ 2) 



-* ^ 




xt^ 



"^^^ 3 / 



y. 



^TU^i^y^\ 



'^o^Jlo-^ >4..^j-ff^. 



A^* 



.^e<-^' 



mn> iCyt^L/'^l'^d-^^ii^ C. yU*^^^ ^Afii^ . ^6^^^^^ ^U.C^^ ^^'^^ 



yfirn^^U^ 



^^C.^^ Ai 



UJ2 



/'V«»»Wi^.* U '^*'^ 



-^ 









-^•r<-Ä^ 







:/• 



^i^-V^^^. 



mr 



^y^^^^^tA/ y^^ 



p p 



^^^\ yi<^ 



4-^^ ^4^ 



V^ 



/' 



*^t<^ 



- ^• 



,^ 



! 9^ 




7 



nrv-i.%^ 






*v 



>£^J ^c 



•^ A-5^ ^.2^ ^>^-^ ^;<^- 



i^^a.^' ^CcJt^^^^^ y^y/^^ . U ^ ^t^i^l-t^^^yCc^ 



I ^ 



|i 



;^v- 



^ CLJui0^t^rGt, ^^uAyt^ 



J- 




U 



4 iAyp-t^iiy^^i^ ^"^hn^^ ^ (i i>£^' yO^C^ 



^^^ 4y^^ ^^'^ JiaJi.^^ /^u 



^ 




c^ 






Tz:z 



»hii 



m 

l Lj^ ^. ^.^^,^,,^^ 



^ 



u ^^fm 












^^ 



yty'^^V^ 



^ 47Cyt^ ^^a^f" .^wC^ 



V. 



•^!^^^'T''U-U-l-W— 



;^. 



'c^irl^^^y^ 




/ 



y^yL.iy 










^3^ 













1 



:'d>L>4^^ 






^C-l-t^ , ^^fi-r- ^^*^Ot-^^ 



/ 







^U' 



^<^ 



y^^^>^ ^^i 







t/^c^ aU^T' 




U^ ' ^ c-rrv^ :ry^ J'VyU^ X^^^uu^ - /- 



/ 




>f-iX4M ,yuut 4xt^ .^.^ /V?'^ ^t^il^ 



^' 



fZ 



^.^^. 





.^ a^ 



^. 






/Pl^*^^^ %^. 




^.--U^'t-t,*^ 






N 



iT 



r^l 



,U' 



• ' !i|, 



A^x^-K 








7^ 



'/tA^9^ ^A-«.*^ ^^^^t-v-f ^tU'^o^''^^ 

J/i'^ ^iky^^^^^-^^A.^^ ^^^.Ä^i^n^ ^ey^y/ yt^^^^t^ur C^«>«--«-*»^ ^-<^ - 
V<>f- ^aj^'cy^ > '^C.jc^y.uy l^/^c.^-^ yt^^'y^o^ y^^^i^^ 




v^ ^^ 







-I 



yhcy^ i 



T 



-^^^ J^rU/c 



y: 









^r- 




fal 



.»• 



A^ 











' V ^: 






i 



^..^kX'^t^i^ ^^^^^ii^ y^'^ ^^^t^x^t,^ 



l-U**^^ 



" II 



I ' 






V ^CU^CyXy^y ^Z Ky^/^^C^^^^^^*^^'^^^^'^"^ 












iff^^rt^uu 




u.cJ't^i.^ 



yi,<.^yuucr ^'^ /»-^ y^^' ^o'4U^ //^tr^ 




Jx^ yyZ^ 



^j2i/i,c^» 






i 





/ 






r^ 




yui^-^ 




1/i^y^ /V^'^k^u^^^'^ ß iy'u^ . ^ i 




/ 




i 



2i(, 



^3 






^^n*^ 



^ ^. 



a^a^ c^-^ 



/ 



V 



'^ 



C^'/^C^'-i-u^ VT/C^<C-»^ "Pyl^^J^I/t^ ^X'C^^ ^ O^'y^l^i^^J 



tZ'C^ 



o 



'^^ 



'.«Ä-^ 



^^d^<uU>-^. 




(^-^n.^ 



y/lX't^ 



^^'c^ nZ^ 



Ä-^xK^^ 



JilcJfc^ 



^/(/t^^U< 



^ /tW^x/ I <C^' y(/^ CUi/i/i x^V^ ^^^y^ 'm^ A^^ 



^Sji-A^^ V ^:/^ 



9 



'i 



>i;-*^ 



x^^^^ 



yl^'/t"^ : /"X-»*^ /tx^^^^t^U^U^ 



-^^vt 



*^'y>^i^ 



(yi<!^c 



'^V M'^^t^i^ y2<yu<^ C^^M^ ^c^4^ 



y^/^yT«^ -^ 



^M^ 



^1 



6^-^^^ 



^;/ 



^^'/ '^^ C^.^^ >/^^-^^ ^^ 



,C.<^^^l,-w-v-7 ^t^'^X^ 




-1^.1^ ^^ yff C^-nn^^i 



'c^C^ ,^^>u-i^. 



£y^ c^ 



^^4 4x/ii 



/ 



'/ 



--^^^t^ 



y-: 




i:^ C Ci*<>/^ -5 



/^^ 



■/ 






C^ 



^ a.^-ir^C'^ 






4^ 4x^ 



/ 



Jyn(^^>^ CL^C^ ^^^^ 



A 



y^^t^l^L^j'' /(A^^^t^r^n^ p 



^^W 




/l^Aä^^f^'l^ 



/ I 



^JX^y^t^ 




• /^ 



iST 



■.i 



\\ < 



I 

i 






"Kc 



^..-t^ix^^ 



/ 



^ 



fU<Ay^ 



^ -t 



^5/ 




^ '^/ut^^'i^ .yt^c. 



*^ 



-P' 








x^'t^^i-^ 



;; 







Vc/- 



^^'*/ <^'^yu0^y^^^^ ^^of >^^>«^»-^ ^iytyi t>uuf ^-«-^-1-^ ^'xÄ^-f'i^'*-^ 
y^/A^x^^y*^-^ ^x^^wwtx^ >^^>t^ • ^C//^^ C^'^^'^*^ y^C^'y^'^'^^ 

ys^s^0,^^ CU^.0%yti :^^ u^,y^ V^M>»* vw*--i-,^ , 



<:^ — 



-^ yfVl ey^^\^ yi^ yty^^"^ ^'^fyTT^^ . /^'-^^ y^ <tyk^ 
^UuC^ ^^i/u^ i"^ i:^^ ^^ C^Jyy<yO^ ^e^^u-tx-^^ y^^^^t^i^^ 



il I 








^;l^<^, 




/ 



/i^^ 









'J^'^y^ 



yr,/^'^y^yiyly^>^y%^ <^*<^;>ww<^*^ ^r^^ yf' ^y^ 

;y^ a^^iyH/^U\yu^' y^(<^ y^ -^^ t^V^iy^ ^y^ ^yU^.-^^ :yiy 



: y 



"Vnr^^y^ , 



^ 




y^y^-^yt^ y^^Xy^^^^U^ 






^yu^^ yf4y^*^ 



4 



, A 



^. 



^t^U^^ 



C/1^ 



^M^^.^ /'^i^'fty^ 



li' 



i/'^lyt> C'^'^ty 






J^'^^ 



^;. 



c/C' d/^cyC" *^-7>^^^'ä-»^. 



t<yt^ 



^^^^^^t-^^^^Ui-^vw^, yjy^ 



^>-wn«^ ^t^^" 



V 



'U^' 



^ ^ 



^yU^'^L 






Cyty^'^ 



y^yi^i ^^i{>^ 



<7^ 



-^ 



T 




Z^J«--*^ 



i;^^cy^^^ >x^^^ 




«/^^^xX ^^4.-vi^ yi4*y^^^^yT^ ^i^U^^^vu^ ^'Jt> ypOf'yx. 



y^ ,.'^ Ayffwr 



c: 



^- 



f -7 



// 



';^' 



r' ^'->^ 




.^i^ 



•^ 



^^ 



^ , X/ .^ 



.^ 



.yC 



.^ 




/ 



^ ^ ^>C<^ 



^ ^^V ^^j^^^^ --**-^ yi^ A. i^U^L^^x 



S^'.i^'^' /^^^^^ 



/ 



x^^ 



K^^yC^ 



y. 



C^^ /U>^'/^ ^.U^*^ <u'liyy^^' 



yC^*^*^ " 



19^ 



J2^ 



^ x<i>^*^' ^*«^'t^*-tr Ä^'W» ^<^' 



^..:,^- 



y- 



r?. 



.w^ 



^^. 



^ 




Ä-rX ^ 



r/ 



-^ y^ c^n^vOf't^^ ^ Cy^ iii^<^iy^<.''%^%^ ^y^a^^ • 



x^ 



^ 



^-^W >/• V^/3uy Jyi^u^ 



T 



"Vt 



c^ 



^/^'^^S'' 




y 



N>i/ ^w, ^1^ 



- y 







■ä-^^-»' 



•«^ 




.--^t» ' 



i/^yL^u^ 



yi ny^'y/Ü^ ^' tyC^ 



U 



b. 



0^ ä^^t^' l,^ 



C. 



c/^ /uy^ 



'/^ yiyi^^t^^^^ 



.?. 



^^^U-»' 



/? 



yry^^^^yL ^ryfy^ 



^- ^' V 



^ly^-^v^ 



yC/f y^S^ ^^^'^ >^''^-^^V-^ 



( ♦ 







>**• 






:^/ 



/"^-^^ ^<^*-V'*-*'< 



*^^ 






V^—l^ * ''^-^ y^W*- 



^^fU-Wv^ ^^,^^ui^ ^y(U^iyuZ^ 



■4. 



^/"KZiy^^ yiy^^ 



J. 



'/ 



Piy^yy' 



c^i/^ . -- 



.«^^ 



^v 



'^y^^ 



^*.-^^ y^j^yyn^ V^^i>u-i^ yfrr^^yi j^-y> ^/t^^*^*- 



^- 



IKt ^(yLnr/Z 



>ww 



jly^-^iyiy^i 



\\ 



<^r-. 



^ A^^^i^ 



^^'y>^^ 



<^i^^t^y^' 



,yyt^i 



>^ 



-^ 



jL^ty<0 <?• 



cytyuiyy t jyyii 



fiLy^^U0' yty^^t^^ut^yi^ 



'^ 



Cy^i0^ 



\X%0^ .-^tyt 



4X^^»t'->^'^'^^ ^' ^syy 



jiyr 



JyCt^/u^^ 



^ 



.^. 





<^. 









/^<^ 






]/Uy^^^ ^^ U/^ /3(,y^ny^ y^i^^y^ ^i/C^^ i>ut^ ^^'^ Cv«^ - 
j/^<yu^^'^ / y^^^i^' /KAKA^ y^Q^a^^ y^^'^yi^^A^^ 
^^V% ^t^w^ ytX^-^ ^' ^<yf<>^ ^,-rt.iÄr..-«.-u^ , 



xM^fcw^' 






'S^^ 



-^^^ ,A^^Ly(X^ 



/ 



C^z*-^ 




£4^3 . 







I 



V 



--^ ^^i^i^^^ ^'^^yyn4^ 



C^. 



ä^ ■ y^f^m'^ - ^r^.'^'^J . -^^^ 






^^^l-U^^^-r- Vv-Vt.-!^ ^ .^^'-^ ->^.i -? .xWV^-U-1^ •^"n^UCC^ — 



L^^<^^ y<:^i<4^ 




A 















/ 



y^^i/C^ 



^-"-Wfc^ 





yCi.^C^ -V 



^-^ ^^. ^^^.y 



-^^^U.>^ ^-^^«^ ^^^^^-^ ^Tk^^c^^O^ 



/: 



/ 



J«^ yp^y^t-^iyCCy ^ ^ilui^V-^^*^ 



zCrff. 



i t 



Ü 



I) > i 



1 



2^9 



IC^t^'i't^ *' ^yt/i^^ 



yyCi'^'ü'iXyC'urt/y 



^ 



^ 



<>X/ £^' ^"ivc^ 



'^< 







^yC{i4^'\^^ ^^ 



A^'UV't-»^ 



y^'Uty^ 



'X'O^ ^C^i^t^^ 



^ 



i^^y^ 



^^x^^ ^'v jn^-'t^i 



Jj f 



l/'UU 




•v^'-»^ 



/ 



u^ 



/ ^ 



^^.i^ 



y. 



t^^uv^ Z^^^'V-»^ 



^. 




^ x^^yl<r 



^^AxÄxt-n^^ ^stx^^v^^^t'^V'^ ^V^^.^-*^ 



:/ 



v^' 



/ 



^U<i^ 



,0^ ^'V^V-W^- 



y^^^^ f4 



.^^C^'^ 



^A 



y^t^yu^^L^^^ yi^^ C^Cy^ j^O^'^lyrt^i 



i/t^^^ 



/y/ 



/£?x^" 



X«^ 



U i^-^-^yiCf' i^ ^Jz^c^i- 



yu^.^ M^^ J^ JU^-^ 



/ 




-r^^ 



Jt^^ ykey'^x^-^ y^yCu ..4xi^j^Al<^^-- , V^ <r^^f^- 




^ 



V-^ 



AH^^' 



t^-^^n*"^' ^^^ 



,.ycCfC*^t^ 




c^/^ 








i^/' 






/ 









I 



J. 



^t^ti^^ 



/ 



/ 



^^^wfc."^ y>/i^^^f^ty ^^ ^>^i^' yt/^i^'^yC y^c^-v^ ^ i^nn" ^^ ^ 



/f <*' 



/1/V^' G/U iy^^>^ 



>^^^-VVl-nr 



>^uOf'c^ ^An; ^cy^ . ^'^ 



^^^^ "* a^L^ty^/'^^ y/^Z/H/^'c^»^ 



ujt^i^ .iU''Uty/ ^^^-»-v^ t. >/^^ 



y>ynr. 



.U^' J^^ 



/ 



<Jc/^^ Ov.^-^c^^'g^^.^m' 



y^^'-C^ ^ 



yZ^c^'^^'t^' ^ ^ 



^Ct^^i^ 



^ 






■^ 



y^yf'y^c^ 




^ jy^' yf^'/^^ 






yy^^^i..,J^i/C ^^ £^H/^ T/iTi^i^ 



y^t^'^^^^ xU^yuu^^ 



X y^C'-^^^cM ,^^V ^K^^^-^n^ .Xt.*..^ ^ 



yUi^(>^^^^ 



>Anriaic^%u^ Vtx? 



^^^ 



>^ y^^ Ui^^C^^ > 






>v^' ^cJ^ 



^^C' 



C^ ^-i-i^ 



<^ 



7' 



^<-/ 



^^s- 









<f 



(yr .V Xv*v «t^y*.*«'^ '«'^-«^ - 



y^m^i^i^' ft^ '^*t^ ^ 



^ 



<;u^*^ x^ 



>;z/ 



yt/i^ yt 



^^C^ ^y^ry^*^'^^'^^^'^'^ — x^^ 




("yio^ruX 



•; 



^>-vt7tw^ y4^t.^^^ 



/>yic- 



U. 



I' t> 



u^ 



J 



^^^n^txu «xv Vuu/a,X-r* 



) 1 



CD 



y^ 



.•^ //)/)'^i^ 



C^^ yl^L^t^ 



yOiTT^^i 



^T^M/ 



>^/i A-fS- 



^U^L^ -^^-l^^^^//^^^^, 



/ 



^ytn^ 



^-n^nx 



'/^a^^r^ 




^ 



/y^^ 



:; 



,:<«" 



•w: 



<iK^^^ J><'*' a 



J^ 



X-t^/^^i^ 



e^ 



^-»O--' 




.^^ 






.*^ i 



^^'^ M^^Cl^U^)^-!^ .^^^«1^ 



5v>.^. 



x^t-^-** - i 



^-i 




X^*!»? >^ 



>^ 



V^>»^ 



-^C^ ^ ^ ^O^^'/^^ 



'Cyfi 



^i>Uw/i-K4^ ^Cf^'^ 



6, 



.x#^^i*-^ 



^y^(r^^^ ^' /y^ 



/l^yO u C^ 



V. 



/ 



-^ 



>i^^'.^ ^^ 



/»-U^ x'^^i c^ /t^ 




^ 



J 



"^^^L^ 











^ ^<>/^>ww<>^^ ^c^iÄ^ A yK^^ OvL^j/^ — ^^c^ ^^wi.^'Z^ -i^^ ^'^ 



ky'c.^ ^^^^i^K^^j^^ ^.^- 



"^ 




> 



yyyi^L^^'vy 



^^^cy^ . 



^^Ay^ 



iTy^. 



u>r 




^ 



/^ 



' Kl 



^ 



7^^ 
.^^ 



^ 




y/^ <yt/CC 



K-*^^ 




0. 



^^«-<-* 



^ 




.^, 



^^-^»v^t^'i^ 



'^,yv<.''W\y^0^iyfi' 




^ayVty' ^*i/u^ 



% 



yU/i^^^^^L^ 




^tyu<yf^^ xjty^ /v ' 



y/ y^ Ayt/K^iy^ 








K^y^y^ 



A, 




/t'V^VT^ 




tu'^^ZjC^ 






^4^cy y^iA^U^^ c^Ym^U , Vc/^ /Py^/l ll^ai^uP^Ct^ 



1 ^^Ä'^t.-a^i^i^-»-!^ 



jSyUyuy' 



- lyU^c^.^i^Cr , ^>^*^^^ 



1 ^-not^^ ^(>*i-^ yHs^^y^"**^ 



) 






ii'' 



e^/ 



'^W^ 







-^^t^ xtr-*-v-»-; y-^^-y^ ^^ ^^^,,,^ X ^i^^,^ ^^ ^ 




•JU 







^, 








t 

p 




■r-. 







i^rtTTtT, 



'\i 






£/if 



Cy^^^^-^ 



^r-iL 



'yiy^yu^t^^ 



<^^ 7^^'^ yPiJ y^cyu^^'s^<>vv^ : ^Si.^ ^^?i:^^M^ >^v^ ,>w^ 

yT(MA Jy^^ <4^' ^"^-^ Jc^X^Cyfi ^^^^^tx^^^^J 



yWnr 



^ 



\nn^^^^ 



/SA^^y^ 



&/i^f^^^ ViT^ ^c^ C5^ x<^^6^^ 

^46lM /Uy^^C^l^ , ^^' xA^^^ y^U*^ y^L^L^t^ ySc^A'x^ 



VÄ^VL< 



r/^7^ 






^-/ 




^>^ /SX^X^ ytA.'U^^ ^JLrCvt^ .Ä^w^^ ^.^^rtr^^ 




^^i/'Ty^ ^^'y^t^ ^•t.l^' ^.Z 



^^4^ x^^ 



,/a 



^/' 






9^^ ^14 




^ ^ 



*t/u^ 



^^.^^ 



^ ^ y 



cC/L^ C i^'ty^ Vnr^ yii-i'C^ ^'^ yUyt »^y»^ ^^^^ >-^-^ 






/ 




'i;frPi 



Oa 



£r^ 



" 



h. ' 







/t4/i 



<<^^ 



^ky^^L^ 





K/yi 



i^X^U^t^ ^ Jf , c/y(y 






Tc^L^C^^C^i^ 



J^^c 



J.a 




^ ^^-^ ^,^^'^U^ 



^^^Ky%^>^ 




/t-*^^^. 



7" 



-i^ 



ci^^'r' 



fiC-xSt^ 



j^^^^^ $^Jj- 






^. 



/Uf 



N^ ^^^L^^ 



^ 



a^ 



4r ^^»^ A-KiÄ^'«^ 



^-^--i^ 




V 



-f 



*^ 



-^Wfc^«^ 



'- ÜM^^'i/^ 



^/i4^d^ ^ 



i:ri 



yt. ^^'-'^^L^'^ ^yC^'/^^ 



i^^ c/ ^^-vt^ 



^ 



/t^ 





C^*^ '^^,.,^' .^/^^^ .^- /^, <^'^ ^^c^-^ M- 



yl/^^ 



^U^n»^ 



S^^l^L^^ ä^%^-u^ 



^ 
^ 



a 



/ 



tyUL0^ 



^X^i 



A^ 



^ 



^^ ^i 



^^^1 



'-r 




c 



M 







(^n^C0^ yU^<y^ -^ 



/ 







4>^K^ 



^ 



<f^.^ 



<::^' 






^£yC^ c 



^ Z^4s^y^ y^^T^X ^^^^^ (/J^^^<^^ 










ya< 




/-^«-"x^**-»^ — 



^^ 



K ,'i 



:il' 



r 















^M 







/ 



^^--^'(J/^cJ ^^ ^, 



ojc^ ^yZc' ^'^ y^iA^f^-^ 







> 



/ 




f'^ 



rv^J^^l 



j^yrrc^ ^ 




A^' ^^ ypy^c^y/^ ^y^^ ^^jU^^ ^^^^nri^^ f^V^-tX^ ^ 
yj^)^ iJU' , <yyl£y ^>AriL^y^<^ J^ ^' £.^<^ ^^' ^ >A^*L>^ 

^ c.^uu>^i/^>^^ ^ ^ ^Vn^ y^' X-i^c^^-^^ -"^^c^i^i^^ ^a^t.^^ 

J^O^^ yty^^ux^ yU^^i^^ ^^'^ ^'U^c^ ^^c^ J^' 



I 



,:.., 




;i^- 



nu. 



/ • ♦ 



) 



ll 



Ä->'-w*'/'*^«-w.-. ^^^ 



V V/^V^^^rVt^xl^C^ ydi^^iyf -t^^U-v^ yi^^^L^U^ VCtf^.^-uuw, -«^C^v^ 





X4^n^^ 













Ä^t-^-c^^-^»*-* 



x^ 



xiS-v^ .«» 



yjyi^r-a^a^ ' ^'i^ y4/yi ^ ^ >X^^ ^^ys^^ . 
J/lAc^^ , £y%^ jj^.u^^^^^'- y^(^^C<^^^^ yt^^.^y^ A^" ^ 

>^V^A^ XV^<^ yy^^^X^ß^ ^,U<Jl/i ^t^U-U^-^ ^.^«-t^-^^^ /^^;j^^>^ 



w 



$ 



y^/y{M.(y V^ A<v^i^^ /i(y^y\yr ^^ Cy^^i^nr^^^^^^^^ ^i^h-.-^'#^ 



i 



1«. I 



» 



% 
I 



2 



^ 



Uo 






^,.»U%..,^yC^ /^T-*<^ <V-?U^' 6->^ ^Ju^'/i , ^' ^^1^*^ y^l 



^ 



/U^'^U. t 




£ 



Wc^ 




J /W^^f^^^ ^C/^^ y^^ 



^c^ (71/ ^c 




z 



.fi^'^ '^r^l^i--^ Ä' ^iZry^ 



/ 



ö-H^( 



e^ ^■ 



^ 






•^ , y^^ 



^Mti 




y^'^^ y^yi^ 't^i^i^ 



'^ O^^c 



CyCi^^^ 



yVnr< 



/' 



^. 



Q^^ 



/ 



^v^u^c^ 



X^ 



x*^ 



>/^c.i^*^ VjC^'y^'^^^ 



-./^--^^-^-^ "^7 ' '^^ ^ 




V^^-^Xu/. 



y. 



x^^*^ 



^ 



Ok^U y^H^. 



V' 



^^^^ ^^cyu^ ^*^t/^ Ai^^H^ ^i^ 



/ 






V 



x^<^ ^4^*^ 




/ 



^^yä^UC^ ^>f^ ^c, 



U^rl^^UT^ 







2) 



-Z-^*^ 










'SyU^'^^ / ^ ^^.^^ ^'f 7 



C^^^ x^*^^ , X^ 






,x^<^ ^ -1^ ^'^'^*^-' r^-u/i^ ..«.wv^^ 



i^^-y^ 



'4 ^^c 




yl^ 



i--*>J//l^^ •^Uyt^^t^y^ y^yt» ^t^uC^, 



4/. 



>*^ 




'y'fr-7^' 



^. 



^^ - 



1 







.<<-»• 



y^tyU^x^t^ 



/ 



x^r^^^ y^6^ yi^C^ 



'^ 



ri>^ 



'...i^- >t^ ^ 




^^^w^ V"-*-^^ ^'-^ 



^ 




Vufc-^ 



<?!^*/«^ 



/^tf- 



r 



^'^ 

M^' 



<2^^ 



yA'^C'^ -^r^rs^. 






■/( 



yUt^^y"*^' 



M^' 



^y4u//^ ''/^V^^-*^ yUUiyC 



^ 



"if 



M. 



Äxt^^^^->^ 



fi--^* 




^V 



4-^' 



V— ^ 



?£-. 



y. 



.^-. 



„ -^4^ ^ 



A<M. 



i^m^ ^y i/ 





•^ ^> 




yh' 



\* M 



y^c^^ y^^p0<^ 4-^^yU^^^^ .f^nn^i'^^ 



J^i^c 



\1 



I '' 



I I 



y 



U2 



dcju^i^t^c^^ 



^^y^^ j. 



X /h^<C/*^C^ -V^^ yl^/^^^u^ ^^,^ 



^€^ ^^a^ 

J^^ 



"tf^C^ 



x-*^ ^U^^^ ^e^<X^ y^^l^C^^ ■ ^^^ ^ 



(. x*^ 



^^' 



J 



c^c^^ 



/ 



^y1^ 






^d^^^'ä^, ^C^'^ /Cjiyi 



y(^'C^ 





^^^-•^ (^yr^ ^ 



^^^ J,'C^ 



'/^' 



^ 



C^c^ 



y^t<A 



n/ 




^ 






* ^y^ajfm 



A. 



Cf^l^U^^ 




/^' 












Jsc^^^,^ ^^. ^r:.-^^ ^U^-x yi,^€Ju>^ 



J(A^c^'/'i, 



>/ 



*^ M^'^o^. ^v >^-^- 



^^;? 




i^i-ixi. 



>^ y<Ci'^ C^td^t 



C/ JyU^^<.C0^ 



" C ^A-^^/k^' , i^^^- 



CU<^<yiC^ yy ä^C^H^ yUiyt AyC d^^ y^</^ 






^ 



^^yi^/Ui^^'^^t^ 



% 






\^in^ 




^U-txixK^-»^ 



^-c^ 91/ ,*^->-^ 



i^L^^e^ 



^y^-^^^ y^C^^^ ^y>4^Ju^^<^J^^^^ y^yf-^^ 



^^'^ Cv^-^ ^WVi^ 



^ 



X^^- 




•^4^ 



>f^r^< 



4 



JiyviyL y^y^c 



'C^ 



-^C^'/o^^Xc^ yl^.yUyi yyf'Jiy^^"^ y^-n^ui^^ 






(T' 



^/^»-l-i.-^'^/^ t-n-w yp./i.l'^^i^^s^ yt'l'ty^ ^K-Ä-*^ ^^Ä-i^ü 



U /n/V'^ 



y---./ 



i 4 




yiy^^ 



■f 



iAi^ 



Ci^c^ 



A^' 



U^ 



^ CÄ-l^t^^^-«-^'-»'^^ 







/ 



^i 



Uf 



zw 



c^y^ 



y'VU'-i^W 



•^ ' »O^'cmC^ 



n^lry 



^ ^ 



^ 



jL^i^%^ 



V (/O L^< ^ i^iy^^^^t^ 



^/'t^u^ 



>/. 



a. 



'/ 



ju 



'f 




Ä^ 



n^ 



c^. 






.^(^^^ --^^ ^i^C^ yC^ ^ a^^p-t^ a..^^ 



y^ 



uyu^ 



A^'t- 



^^ 



Ä--^ ^X^ 



1 y^ 



6^ y^y^t. 



J>u^ ^ ^^^>^^^ 



/ 



^. 



P->^ yUty^ 



.^• 





y^tr^Cy^' -^ Cy4^ c^' /U/^ 






.y*^ ^'^v« 



/ 



lUt^o^ ^'^ : ^ ^. 



'?^ 



^^^^i^^ ^C^^i.^ j 



v^ 



^ 



- iz:- 



/ 



-C^' 






''^C^^ sZy 



/Uy^ 



/-y^i^^ 






4^-^ 




^ /U^' i*^^ ^^'xw-u^^* 



^/^ 



/" 



x^^ 



^ ^,*C^S. 



wT« 



/ 



1 



Pa^-x^fi^^ / / y.^' :?/ . ;^-^^;^ 4^,U^^^ 



^fiyiyi^ 



>7>^<^^>*-^ 'I^*-*^ 



>-^/^i 



'^ 






I 



,^> ^ 



-^^^ /'Vy-y^t.^%^U- 



^--fc*. 



^^- ^/. 



^ 



^"«^ 




^- 



•Vf-y-U^*<i' ^ 



if^t^'^t, ^iu, cyp'a.^ y^i 



*-V 



l!i 



Hill 



x«' 



^)yiy%^ 



/Uy^^^^^ ^L^'^^'^^ ^^'tyfy^^^^fyC^' y'i^n^'^i^ 



y^Js. 



^A-%-%«'^ 



"W^y^^ JiiU^C''^^^^^ >^cy^^ .x^V ^/h^A^^^^^ ^y^dy^A^L^ 



f... (::^--^ 






.^' 



"Y^'c-^' 



^^^yiyy^ Ä^o^^ ^/U C^^ '^y y^yi^^^^ 



/ 



^ 




j^ 



,^/(y - 




4^>J/-^C^- 







/ 



-i4 



yi4^ 



'^ ^X^' ^u^'' 




-^ C^-Kxrf-^^ ^^ 



X^ 



^.^ 



/ 



V <*» 



t^-^^ 



.^>'' 



5. 




^^ f^A^ 



/ 



'^ut^ />H^^^ 




-^, 



/i't* 



^.^ 



*-^ 



^<'»^. 



•ti^^/^/Z*.^ , i/>''K>Ct' ä^^^Z^' ^ 



.£^ 



, \ 



t^ ^,y«^>-^ ..^fC^p-t^ ^^v ^^.«i^^^x.«. 



■«♦» v> 



et 



i 


b 

1 
1 ■ 


1 


r 


) 


1 

• 


1 

- 


1 

* 
1 


i 


>* 


1 




h 




J 


r 


i'i. 






^ 




JcA^^ 



J. 



y^^^^ 





i^/ 



^cyO 







^ 



yC>'i^ ,^e^ y^^. v*^ ^i^'y^ M^i^ x^-r-*-»>/. 
^^^Ji, ^'yl/ /*wv,U. z*.-,-*^ ^.»U^ ^ 




.'^^ 




-^^, 



/ 



.^. 




3 TU^^^nr ,^^in^>L yityph^ ^äy^-Z/^ 



yUiiry^ 



'.^"»'UÄ-'*- 



^ 



/ 













j 



4 
I 






in 





^v Z^^t^ 







uCi^L^ 



-y 



1 



/ •!»■ 



^ 



-4 



^// 



y<^(rfd ^.^ X/r ^^(Uu^^t^ yi^Z^i^^c^ut^Hät^ ^J<^^ 



JU yU^^^ ypl^ y^i 









„.•^-H-^Ä-^^C/ , ^d^ „^^ifCw**^ 



r^ 



<:^- 



^ 



.^, 



^^f^U^'/^ 



^ 



*-^^€-^ 



/ 





^>^ 



„^C^y^Ui 



^■. 



^«^^y. 




/ 



i>^i 



'C^^u^f^^t-^" y't« 



/ 



W^i^^^ÄT^^'^i-o^ ^^--^^-n--^^ 



(^5)'^^ . ^' y^^ 



/^l 



i^v 



y^^C^i^ 



yly^' ^ y^^ 






^'f^ 



>fV 





-4^. 



*^ ^^C^' cSv-^'k^.w«^ ^.^S^^^wu-y 



K^t^ 





^H^t^'^y^ A^X^c. 



- y^T*-^^-^^'^ 



^^ 




(Uy^ 



^ 



>c^ 



yU^^ 



>^-1^ ^^^^t-lx^-UÄtf^ 



^J^'y^^^iy^k 






Ji^ 



/// 



;«^ /^</v-n^ y^ li'i.'i^^e^- iiy/f 




y^- ^'^ 



--fe^t.^, 



^ 




Ä^i'i^?^ 



^<L^^' .C^yn^^U^c 






A^' 






^U/I^y 




,yty% 



fiCc^u^ 



0<^c 



• <>^ yfe.^'y^ 



,^-*-^-t 



/^''l^yW^fic^ . ^' ^'*/ 



^-r^ 



JitU/ 



V 



,^/^^^ ^. <^ 



v-^ ^w^ 



'yi^t^l^t^^y 



C /^^l 



1^^ 



>^>^^it/fc 



■,^w^ 



Aw*«^ 



^^i*/A**^^'l--w-' , ^^^^ y>i^^ y-i-i-^-i, r U'^i^ 



y^ 






/^y^^ 



y^^ 



i//iy^^ yt'yC >^v^ .^-^ 



yi^ 



,7 



^v/. 



../ 



^«^ 



^yiy^^^ ')yiy^^ C' 0fC^6ytn 



1 



:Ä^yy^ 



'/ 



^. 



'>J^ ^^^V ^ <yv^p ^^y^^Zi^ t^ 



CK^d/^ ^y^^^^ 



^-'"^-^ 



^ 



C^^U*y^ 



^i^^u^u-l^^^i^-w^ ^C^f\yiy^ ^ 



^i^ 






/J iii^^y,^. X.^ 



' II 



l I' '^ 



■fl. • 






^ 



( I 







^^ 



'^^(y^yy^i^^ 



^^^i— Ä^ /v<:^,^„,^ 




:iv 



^;:^4<% 



(.^ 






.^ 




^. 







Jh^Lyr^ 







^ 





^ 



.y^'^ 



U^ 



^/ (ri^yuMt*^^ 




t^'^y^^'X^^ 



'«^ 







/'!*•' «v 






y^Ccy^-^^^y^ 



:?>' 





-;yo'^ 



^^. 






-^ # ^ 



^ 



/ 




-^ ^'^^ 










«•^ . >^^ 1^ 






!| • 



y 



■^^ 




I 1 



^/c^ ^-^^ P^^^. ^^^^^ y^_ J^^ j^ 








>^^^4-^ 



^ 




^^-^ CS j^^^a y^^cy^ 



/ 



yU^'^ -^^nru^ 




2P3 

!■! n » IJ - » l» ■ ■ II I UP III 



I 






^ 



^i^ ^crv^.^'i^ 4^ y^C^'^S^ ^ 




'^^ii^i^ 



^ ^/ 



^'^^ >^' /Wi' yy^^2/^ \A^ 




IJIr 






llir 



Hill 



.ai. 




.^ /V/^ ^^^ . 



j 



X 



> I I 



V 






Jl^^0<00^i 



.^v^~ ^V <^^ -^A^i^ '. 



O/ii/i 



'// 



^^'^ ^' 



'y^ -^^i^^;c<^4.^,j4-t;^ 



yUi^ufC^ 



^^^ 



yiPc^^t^ 






'i^-^e^tfC 



^^■f-y^^t 




'/' 




^.V. 



^/^ 



/ 



,/ 



^/S'- V.^ 



' ^^t^i^ 




^«^ /^ 



^:^'^>^"j «^ ^ 



y 



'^V^o^ 



■A-^^^ 



.n^^ 



•^ 



/^t 



<^. 



"^^ 



^ 



^„^ 




^^^^^ ':^cc^ A^^ 



■^ 



■^ 




i%<,y y^^-y^ yi^ ^^,>t-w^ -4<>A-,^ ^^c^ 



r. 



(/'^^ 



Jy'i^^ 



y 



^i^'ylyi. 



X,' 



</'^ y^^l/^U^L^Cy^y^ 



^J>^. 



y^U^^l^ y^, 



%). 



^^. 



^y^'i^ P/<M ^^^ 









V. 




^/i-iH.***' 



/ 



X^^^ 



X^^'^ ^^.vv.- ^^ /c^lC^^^ ^^ J,/.. 



JP^ 



J 



^^li^tyi 6/^ 



^»^rZu^ ^^y^//t''^>^^^^i^ 






J^ y4^ 



'ijvn^t.^w^ ^ J^^-'Tvv^ 



/l^^l^ 



v^' ^' ,y^ j:^' JC^Jx^, 




J^t'^t^uwfT' 



.^L^t^ ^^' ^^.^^^ ^t, 



\ I 



^t.^^ yj/'i.^^n^ 






^ 



yPl^^^^,, 




^ 



>^ 






0^iy'U>-y^^^ ^^^ry^ ^^ ^^^ 




>>'^^^*^>U^u.t^ 



i^ 



^i^^ 




^y^^/^" 



o^n 



\y^6^^yn' ^^c^' Qri^ >/i^^ y^'^<y1i^¥i^^^^^iy /^k^a^ , 



^' 






/ 



x^6/U^ y^iy^y(^ 




y^\n'^^3^ 



't^r""-^^ 



1^ c^ 






/ 



^' 



^'. 



yUuC 



^. 



i>'i'-t^''y i^ ^ 



^ 



^^^ ^'Cj^ y^^"^ .^w^^^ w^^v-^^^^!^ 



'IxU'^ 



01 



'• /^ ^i^^i^u^^ J C^H^ ^v^«^ 



ry^A>0^iy 




:/- 




^4^^^^'»^ y^U^ j^^ y2^ 



"^U 




/; 



^ 



^vfyVt-*^ 



■1« I 



t 



2 



"vi. 



«v4 



y 



^ 






J 



^Jt-'l^^U^'^ 



^^ 



^ 



iyCcJ\. 



yl^ 



^i^y^ ^^i^n^ '^C^t^^C.'-r'^^yt^c^ ij ay^' 







/ 







^c/.^ ^'py^ .4<^ B M^uu^ 0,t„yiU^ e. e^^ 




yr 



^. 



//. 



i I I . 



^ 



^ ^^>tl*V^:^^K ^^^X^'t^^^it^ '^-wi*^ ^ 



XZ^-i^^ 



^* 




/ 



'^'o-^6(^ 



2^ 



•Ai^ -4". 



^^^ 



•^ 



*^f^i^^ 




^/O^^'n^^U^U^W-WW^ 



r^. 



'/ 



/ 



^-'^.''-U'l^ 



^A,C^^^ 



^- 






<y^ 



>f' «^ 



-^ 



^^i^ ^y^Ct<^^i^nyC^ 




£^ 



4Yc. 



^ 



7 



^-^ i^'Vt ^* 





^'><..-u^ 



•^ 



^-V' ^i^n^tfL. 



•>^ 



/ 




>^-^ 



t^ 



^ 



^.-^^ 



Xl^ 



^ 



/Vi^*'>y 



^^. 






<^ x^t<.^^ 






^^^>^ 



x^4 



(^^t-i^- 



y^C^y^^'^^^ >^ß>u*.a^ 







y^tyi^i^^ 



Cy^ 



J 



^(Li^d.^^t/^ . ^/^-u^ ^i>^^%^ ya:^c 



y^ 



,JU 



J^.^^^ v^l. ^^>^. 



^/i^^^ ^:. 



y>^ 



v^ a^^u-i^'^yC^ 




^' - 



-^ 



.,^* 



^^U^L^^fi^^*^ — 



^^tCi^^ <t.^u^yf' y^(yC^' yi^ y^' 





-?^- 



'^"^Ct^ x^».-«i^ — 




^ 



c-<^ 



^^V "T^M^ . ^y^ y^.-^^ 









/ 




yytyt.i 



^ 



'A 






^. 



ü 



1t, 



M 



1i 






^^*-7-v^ e ^>A^ ^ 



/^/t^ 
^*>/. 




^C^' ^y^ 



/^v 



^^'^ 



/^^-^-^ 



^•^^ 




yi^^ 



^ G> ^ C^\^%,y^^^^^^C^ ^C 



^*^ ^^^' 



^cX^^^^^ ^^ - ^^^.^^ 






.^ 



<i^^ 




^a^-^a^ , 



4^1 



> 



/^ 



/ 



i^*»*^ ^^^ 



^ey^^"^^ ,y^t<y0L^4^ 



(yC ^t 




/ 



^-^< <^-^^ 



^7^ 



.x^ 



..i^ 



^^ ^i^.'^ 




^y^i^'-^(U uii^^>^^ 



Qtf 



C^' 






y 



'^ 




c^Af, 





>>i^-.^ 



/«-r* ^ 



^ 



^^«-»•^•p,^^ ^j.^..,,,^^.^ 





«.-« «' 




^-♦i^, 



Ä^ 



/ 



y^ C^U^^^ 






yl/^. 



yl^v^ ^ 



^ 



^Vr 






'^ 



^xi'— ' „^'//i 



/ 



■^ ^. 



^'H^-A^,,'^^ , ^^li-*' ^^X^ 



V 



^. 



-^^ 



-..«^^ 




t/. 







^ 



'yyyny'i^ 




C^Ul^' 












^;^^ i;>i^ yi^uO 





x«]i>M^^^KX^ 



Y/ ^ '^ y^'^^^-^ ^''^ yPi^'^ 



:1 n 



!l .;* 



UV 



/ 





^^'i> ^^^^-K^ ^.^^^i-^-vi^ ^^ä^^L.^ ypy'C^^^s^n^JiuuL 

<M*^C^xt^*-^ , 't^/Z/ /In^ö^y^n^ yo^<^ ^fdy^y^ 











-u^xt^^ 



C /^'/»^^^l^'V^U'^ 






> 



■^ 



c^^yC^ 



ij ii^J/i^. 



^'^^&^^. 




i^^ 






^ ^^-r^ 



^ 







^ 
.y^ 



^. 







yy^A^C"'!^ *xt - 




'-^^ ^^^-r 





^- 




^^(^Cf yi^ ^^6^^ ^'\^^^'t*-i^^i^^^ 




^^ 





ll 



H 



il 



in 



^ 



y 



II! 



161- 



i/3 







^^ 



/ 4,^^ „^uC-^ 



^ 



^ C0»^ 



.^' 



^'-J^ xW^. 



^--' 




^ 



^/U^H^i. 





y 



y^ A 



^ 



« ./. 



l 




<^^**-»-^ ^1^ 



^^1^' 




\\ 



y^^^^^^'^^ 



"it-^^ y^i^Co'^Ay^ y^L.^^^'iy^^ 



'C^i^^ ^i^ > 



^. 



if 




/ 



ji^i^ 




/^^^^^ , 



yi/{^^^^1^ 






0-«^i>^ -^^^^^/^ a .^ 



<- f~ 




a 










■^ 




^^H. 




0LyLyiyU ^*v- 



fi^^-^.^^^^ . l^-i^. 



'^JU 



^£'^(>'^iy^ y^U ^„^^V 









^^»■'liu-^ ,^^- 



*^ 



/ 



w^ >v^- 




^^C^ 



^^ 



•^ X^^-f^^^ 



',y^^<^^ 




y^l^ 



^ 



^*^ 




cy^y^Z^c/^^^t/d//^^ 



c>^ 







/ 



y^^^yi 



xM.^< 




/ 




^ ^a^ ye,^.^ -^^^wX 




^. 



C^^^X^U^ V ^ 



V 




yj^^a^^C^- „^ . t^U^ J^i^^^o^. .A*-7y/-^^(u>'U^ 



•# 



^')2^, 



^ 



-J^' 



cyf 



\ 



yj^ 



^ 



*^e^' <^C^ 



r 



^«*^»V " V»^—i^Wi^< 



/J^v» 






yk^^r^^c^ ^ 






l^Uyk^ ylyXyt^C^ 



^>)/->-r^> 



^. 



r 



.-^ 



C>l4-u^ ^y^^^^U ^y^^^^yCl-^^^"^^ 



^^ 





CTKy^L^ 



^^^ C^% ^i^r^ 



y 



J 



f 



^lr>^iy 't^^ c. Ä^ 



>^ -/. 



^/^:X<^<><'^C^^ 



^^ 



ß^^rZ^ A^ ^f^^ 



y'TL^cX/^ (^y^U.^^^ 



/ 



^d^-t^t^ 




^ 



^^ 



^i^Xw^ -f^^A-ww^^i 



iy^.^^ 



' J^ 



L^ 




/ 



^< 



/"^ 



'y«'- 



y<^^ .- ^^^4^.-«/ ^.w. 



f^?*V»-v* * 



I^i-Wfc »<^>t'>^ -tw' J</<!6w'W >^ 



r 



/ // :^^ir3^ Z^- 



j^'/^ ^ ^yCu <v*^y«-*-v»-**f Vtf'^T-**^ /^y5 



'4^ä/^ 



9. 



•yc^ 'V^' 




J. 



4t 



/-n/ 



^^^/^iyl^^^y^l/U^ ^Ä^** 



yU^i^yQ^ 



^c 



<>v^ ,/if 



y^a,^^ 



.iHiX.^ 



^^^ 



t* ^i^rU g^,0^9A^.pi^' w^^^'4.^^ 



^^.^ /U^^4^^ 



/^ 






lt^U*^0(.^. 



I' .'i 






^^I^^UW^ii^t^ 



iZ^^ ß^^^^iyCfc^ 









L^ yc^' 






/^ 



^^. 



*^ ^f/Ci^ 



/ 




^) 



y'i^u«^^^^ 



^^' 



Ä-^. 



yU>^ (^<00^>^h0^ ji^' 



A 



1^ 



- ^*.y 



-<-t-t^ T-t-t^ 



^, 



^^'»'l-'i-«*.-*-* 




/^^ 



/^iyuCC ^yifL'^^ ^(^t^ 




/ 






y^y^^ 



yt^^^ 



^ 



t: 



r 



^u'U' ^jL-o^y^^c,*^ 



J. 



/ 



^C^y-Z^^ 



^^^Cy^^'"^^ 



-;^-v^tf^>/-— '/^^ yPy^^i^^C-^ J^'P'iiU^ 



^t^*'V-*^V»' 






^. 






/ 



x^^^ 



,^6-^ ^J^l^^'w-w*' ^Cyi^ /-Ät-v^^ ^ 



^^ 



-U^'^ jcc/^^^--^^ XwT^ / V<^7 ^v1>,^ 



^/L-.^^'^^' ^y^^i-^^J^c^^^^^-^ /^^"^^ 



*• /'T^ cy^^i^'^^w 



4^^^' <i^u^^'i^^^ j^^-i^^:^ 




y^v'^. -&a^ 4^'^-- cÄ.^i.^^->w^ ^^Av<Cv,^.t^ 



^ fp4^, ^l^*^, ^ 



i^'.u^ A,^ , 'y^^dCh ^ 



/>•*» 



J^t^^ ^t^'jiUt^' 



i^t^iX^^^ 



/ 



«•«* 



e/ y/<^ /rlt-*/ 



/^ 




^ 



^ 



C^y^'i^t^ 



J'^ 



^u^',^ yy^.^^ 



<7^'^ 



-t^ 



'^■a^- 




o^«:^* 



.^eC^'^'-'^'^ yi^ ^'ct^»^-U^^KJC< ^t^'" 






'/- 



^- 



■^x. 



r> 



->-fc-» 'M^ 




Jyr-ec^n^t. 



"-^ 



y/ 



^ 



^ 



^^. 



A^^i^-» 







yf^^ ^^V ""^^ty C^' yO^'yA^'f »^ ^i^'^*^^«-* *- 



P. 



^^ 



^C^^i^C^ 



/ 






/ 



^i^i-^ 



f' 



^ ^^^^^/^ 



J^' ^/. 



^%r L 






/V 




^. 



^^ ^1^'^-Ji y^. ^:> 



y^^u^f-^i^ — y^(r>^i^'y^ 



y^^ 




^vr^ - 



^4.^ ^^,4^ ^ y^^" Ä^t.^' Jcy^y^^ y^^fi^'^^ 



/ 










yf.-^i 



^ 



<^c 



A 



c^^^^t^ /^yUi 



(^ 




^ y^ ^ :.->'>' Jyi/H>^ 



*-'^ 






U- 




>y 









^ ^^. 



^'^^ ^i/'. 



C.U. 



'VA^-^.w^ 




il-*^ 



/^•f-wi. 



^>A' 



<' ^i'-^fc-'- 



x/>* 



..^ 



^' 



/'kU't^^t 






crn^i-y^ — 



/^lyiyi^'/i' y^'y^^'^v^ 



/ 



'T^iLyf' ^'i^ ^i^' 



C^yd^'C^^^ 



7 



/ 






-V 






-/ 



i.^<^ 



h/Vlyt^ 



JU ^^v ^- 



<^ ;^. 



y^i>^ 



O^ »^JZ'v^ 




/H-^ 



Ä^. 



y^"^' 



/-VcV^U^^*^' 



/ 



.^. 



'<^^ 



ß^^^^^^^^'y^l^^ 



'^'ZiiT^C^.'U^ i^fvr*w vW^4/>u^^*^ >^4^, ^^ «^> Ä^ ^ 






Zi»*^ ^<^*^< 



^^«.A •>• 



<>**•. 



^^^ 










U/ 



i^a^.-r^e. 



4>^^u^ 



/ 






-7^ 



/ 



!^i>^ 



-^J^b^^ 



^ ^ C/^L 



C^ ^l^yn't. t/i 



y^ 



c^<^^ 



/ 



/^^V^' 



^cyAyC^ yf'yiy^ ^•^v ^^ 



J^^^0^^ 




>. 



^ f^^ 



V*'^»^ 



7 



^ 



Z^;^ 
^X^ 



^^^ . yu-i^'p'uC^ 





^ O iT-y^L^ ^ry^jy/t^ A 



,^^^ y't^^^ 



/ 



yU^^'/C '^^{^.CfL^ "h^^^-t^'U^.f^- ..^^U->u<^ ^^^'-^ 



yi/v^ 



V^*-*^ ^^--»^Vt^*^ *-v^ 



^;^^* 



^^ 






^^cy^ y^'-y^i^^-^»^^»^ ^^^ 



9'o 



■i^c 




^ 



ylt^ 



y<f^:^ j^ y^ 



X 



a.^ 



&^« 



^ 



^C^' 



f'r> 



.i J. 



m 



äi, ■*5«r ..m löE*« m.. 



2/, 



■^ 



£f/ 



a^ 



c^^ 







^ 



y^^c^y^'j 



'^^-«.^^ 



,>^^.>w^ <^. 



/ 



.^'..v..^ 





/ 



yiX^"^ f^' 



yv< 









yi/L^TT^ 



i^c^. 



4-^{^''*<^' 






*^ 




■f^ 



^' 



.<^ 




•' 



■^ ^ 



J^'*^ 



C^4^ — -v>^ -^-^C-t^. 



yö^-Ju/. 




yV'x^ 



■^ 



M' 



'/' 







'y1/ ^^<^1U^ 



JC.^ cA^ C^%Z>^' cJl (^ yZ4 



/^ 



^. 



xM^^^v^-^f ^ 






/ 



^c^Ay^ yd^A^S^ 



J^ 



•.^ 



7 



>C.wi^' 




<7L^ J^r^c^ -x^>U*^ yf^y^ 



^ 




^JCH^<^ 



Uh.^ 



---^^»1^;3^4*7 



^-r 




yZ^i^ ^. 



o^' 



r Chr-/u/(yL^L^'^U- , ^^U-c^ ^>^i^ ^t^U^^^^^a. A^c^yC 



C/T y^i^ y^'i^ ¥i^^ 





yt^ 



a0<L>'X^y< 



J. 



/ 



^ *^^ ^...^ 




.^ 




^J-li-^?*-» 




^ 



^ 






->^ y^'Cy^^Cy^w .^^^^M^^C'^Cy^Z^ o^^ 



^yCs^^. 




yKyyif^'y^, 



/ 



^,^^0^4^'^ .^^ 



^ 



'^ 



yi^iyt^^i/^t 



'^^ 



'y 



WT. 



-^■»t»^* 



4 



c/ 



•i*^ 



^ 




• t1 



A>^4yC/ y ^L»C^' ^%^' ^^e> 



y^^ 



/ 






^^t<*/ 



^X^/ ^*> ^t^i»^ 




/lyyp^^U^ yU^ 4x4^ ^^< 



^V-tr-zi. 






-f 



a^ , ^^i-v-' y^^i^^y^ ^k 



.-v-^ 



<<--«^*^- 



v>^ 




Tl 



). 



-^ 



I 




^^* 



c^ 





-^. 







V- 







/ -^^^ 










/ 



.^. 



.^^»^ 







^^^ 



■^z^»' y^'i"^ , l/U^^^ 



•("f 







/ 





^. 




.^. 






'^ 'T^t-t^ 



^^-. 








/>Xt> /1/y^Ci^ ^^j^Ui-^ y^^lut^^h^i^ 



c/ 



« I 



m 



1 1 



■) 



/ 



|i' 



i^9 

/liyiML^x^^ y%y^C^'/3A yiA.^^'^ "^^-^ ^^e^^y%^if^ . -^*-*-^^^ 
^^/^ / -^-^'^ ^^' ^-^ ^^--v^ yu^^^u^t^ ^t^l^i^C^ 



y 



I 




* / 




yUiC4^yi^ ,^^^^«-^ ^^V ->V^^. ^*-i^4-^-^ 



/ 



d»^- "^ '^^'* " 




/ 





/z 




a^ 




^yuy^<^ yC. 






y^;^y^ /^iy%y\. wv^ ^^^ 






x'Z'uJv. 







/ 



,t 



•f ' 



19^ 






^l/xy^^''^^ ^/^V ^^^'6^ i,>/Lx^ yJ^'^''^>^ 



^ 



^>ü^t' 



'.t^C-. 






-?^ ^-^ 












y^^ut<i 




/ 



'tyf' yy^ 



/// 







v^^«--uV >^ 



Cy^i^\0^, 



1 



^ ^^ 



X^ 'i-^ xr 



y/U^ 



^ U^y^*^ ^^Z^i^ U^L^^^^^" ^#^V ^x>i^'-X*«^ ^^!^>--»^ y^Uk0^,^u^/C^ 



V 



Vu^ ^. <^ 



//t/iywi^^ 



'^^t-y*^*-** * 











y \. 



i 



^' m 



/^U-u^n*^ 



^ 




/x/i^ "^U^i 



X^r^rx^x^ fyjA c£ii^ ^^c 




'/n^ 



■"%, 



/// 



/^ 



0L^ 



1^ 



yC^ii^^'^ -fco^ ^^ <^<^X^, ^ 



C/^ 



/'^♦U'U-'i'V» 



^e..^^ 



"^ifC yffc/if^ ^^C^ 'hC^ y^Ui.4^ ^yU'^.^^y/'*^-^ y^'f^ y^U^'^ ^A^ >^w.l^^ 



^^^^Xi^'f 



■^ 



y>y^ 



o< 



■.^ 




X^^l^-M 



C^Vk^^i^i-^ / ^^-t^ ,^j;iCuL>nyi^ ^y^'-^i^ ^i^C^^i^C^iy^e^L^ ^^^.<i^ 



^(i^ 



yuu 



^. 



i^*-^^ ^5^<^^^ 




^^1^1^ 



^- 




^^^^ yt^^^^^ yihyi>^ 



/^yu^/^^(^^^ ^d^r,^ '^vCC^^^U'uiy j^J<^j^(i^, "y^'c^ 



y/l/^ 6"-*^ 







d^'^' 



n!^d^>^V .x^ 






<^V^ 



-^. 






'/ 



/ 



X'^^*^* 



^.W^ 




/i^-K?- 




>^ 



-t:^- 






yvx^'^ 



1^ y^c/^ 



^U 









yi/lA4/i<^ 



-y-C^y^^ 




IH cJ^^'iJU £^t/i/^c'^^äü^ /l44^ 



y/1^>r y. 




^^ua^ ^^ 



^ /^^-v^ 



^•'^v^ x^'xX>^*— »^ ,y^<y>/^i0^ yt^i-^ 




^ 




^^A^ 



y^e^'y>% 



y'T^U^C^y^ ^y/,^ x>w^ 




<^> 



^ ^^i 



#i>* 



*1 



-^-vu^^f^"?»^ 




^ 



/ 



^. 



'yy Cy^^^ 



oC/yf'iy^y^^^ yy^^ 



-^'^ ^^ 



'^v <<{-^C>^^^'yU^ ^^' "^^^^xyi/^ 



yi 



^Un' i^O. 



'^^ :^*<'^-K^- 



y^yuu^ ^i^ - 



-^^ 



y^i' cj (T-r"!^ 



^^ 



/M 




>^ 



'^ ^/^^^M^ (^4Ua.r^ Jii 



y^ 




y^cC^C^x^ yi^ /-r<^^^'^ ^. 



*2^^ 



'^.-U*!^^ 



,..^^:^^ 



yyyLyt>^^ 



^"^L/iy^^ 



liy^^lM A^y^^^ ^ C^ c/I^^Uy^ '^^ ^^ 



yy^ 



\yC A^ 




i 



x^V ^l^Cvn^ 



^ ^Ue^' ^^.^i^'^.^^ ^^^yQy^^h^ 



/^ 



-^ 



7 



<?*' ' 



u»^ 



*-, 



jH^'^-'^ y(^y^<y^'^ ^•/— ' 'r^'-^-y' 






'»«»' 



■J- ', 



I 
I 



'iirv 



/s^ 



i^.'Uvi^ 



*'^'i>'Cv>yi/i 




y'^iU^, 



a^C^-^^^^ ^^^1^ ■ /^^^ ^^^'.^^^ ^y^-r^^^. 



^ 






^ 



yV^ 



'^ 



y^ 



^^^ 



"i^-u-u-w , \tj c^^ y^y^ >(^v^ 



^^^^V'i^ 





^-^n^L 



0^ ^>C^\>^^^^ 



y^x-T^u^^a^p^^ "^^{...-^^^^^^^ 



^■^'i^ 



-^ ^. 




y^ l-<^' y,^'! 4, ^i 



>4U^^'^ 



V' 



-^v '46^-^.^c^.{U^ 



yy^'cWK^ 






iv^V 



^. 



^^^- 



a^. 



^ ^ 



tf^^-V^ 



^Av^ 



/-u.^^i^/-.t^ ^^i^ >U^ 



/ 



V 



^1 u-v**^ ^^^^ 



^^n^'in^i 




'^* 
.^i 



^^n^. 



'^^1 



'^^'l.'^^ 
/^^ 



^ 



^^ 



c^'^"^ 



y^ 







x^v> 



>' 



Ä^ 



^ 




^z^< 



i^ K^-r^r^^uC ,^' 



./ 



x>i ^*n.^ - ^^o^ 



C^U^^^44^ 



^ 
-<<^. 



/-v^ 



r 

y^^^ ^^^ ^^'^- 



^i-n-i^ X'- 



^ 



r^ 



.«^ 



-^ 



'?*<>» 



•^ 



^Cw 



yi^'i^ 



■uU- 



iyi^^-^ 






y. 



^,^^- 

i^.. 



^i^t^ 



^2n-.^4 



^^-^^ J^ y^tX^^'/fi^t^ -^^ 



•t^^^ fi^^x^^fyf ^^ä0y^ w 




.^^ 



^ 



/Z- 



/•^ 







y>t 



.^w'*>^ y/CU'/l/l Q/^AJ^^yi^ 



^^U 










^ 



^. 



^ 



/ 



^ ^/C^' A y-'y'^^ yi/>^^^y^ ^^y^yt^i^ 






C^-^^y^ ^^»^^U'/tivww^ 



^- 



y. 



*-*r^ 



Ä.'^^^-^-' 



^^ 



^^^. 



^t^^' 



>'Txf 



^ 
,-^^ 



/i^^y^ 



yC^^i^ ^\^ y>^. 







<?<?'l- 




i^-\^ fin^^<^. 



I^ ^6<?/^ 



C^ 



;^ 



^. 



J 



' /^ 




.^^^ 



^y^^^^iAyC 



^^ '^A^^'u^ A^yi^Hyi^^a^ ^^yi^ ^^A^^^^Cw^ yi^^i^^ 






^^3 



-V '^ ^-^ y^'-^ jZ^^..>u^^ 



'^-^ y^/t^'^C^%^ ^^ClX^^i^t.^ -w^ >^ 



^^ 



ytAy% 



XJ^w-t 



tf/^*->^ 



•^^t^o^v^v^ 



x*^ 



/ 



/yin^^ ^i 



^C^c^^i'^^ ^L^'y/^ 



yi/iyfi-^'y^i'^^^^ ^iZ^ 



yUi^^iyi^ 



yUU^yi^' y^cUi^ ^C^'Cy yp^Ut/^ y^/y^C^/Ci^ ^i 



^^'^ ' ^^'^^t^i^^^^-u^^ ^..ixi^^txv».*^' 




Jyu^^u^^Uo'^^^i^ 



y/yy^*^^ , ^I^U^ 



VLV-^i^ ^^-^ ^^^cX-i^u^' 









\J ^y^^L^' ^ t^r-^y^^^'^ ^ /. 






C^^ y^Cyf' y/2<^ 



ik^w^ 



^/^^u— l^i^ 



x^^ 



•^ 



-^. 



x->r«i-^' 



■/^ 



'^.VO^ 



x^^^. 



<:Xi.^^\^ -^y^^i^ . ^ ^i/*^ ^ ^j^^^ 







yi(<^J^ 



yhyi 



>x^ 




^y^^^L^^^^t^^c^ yp y^'*'^ 



^£^^ 



/^ 



Jy^ 




^ 



yL 






.^' 



^. 



^x"!^»*"!*--!^ 



tf^ 



^^"''^-^ ^Oy^^^y^t^ <-^ .^> CVti^u^ ^ 



^*<^>l-*^ 




^' 



^2/^ 




>' 



c^^^O^ky^ 



y^^ 



-?^kxt"^ 



^' 



/ 



.^' 



>^ 



^^ 



c^i-«' -^ i^^/^^i-^Cix y^y" 




■y^l^U^ 



^ 



/2,y^,^'A' yuv«„,^ -^^l^ 



yt'-y^ y^ 



^4^J^ 



y. 



y^y>n 



ä^ "U^Ä^^^^-t, ^ ^V-uv 



^. 



>^- 





J^^^^yu^ y^tyn'y^^ (y^'tf^*^i'i-i.^^^^i>i><^ yj/ur'^^ 






yur^y^^ yU^'^ (y^'J4^ty^y 



"^ij, 



^/U^c 



>^ y^^^^^^'v/v dyuy i/^^i^%yty^ 



^ 



y^V»C^- 



ä; 



^^'^^Cy^'t^' ^(y{^*n!' yi^ 



cyd y^i 



Äxt^'W^ 



^y%^^ 







^ 



t->^. 



'.-^^ 




x^-V^--*^ ^^ 









Hfl 



i I 



.1 



u 



r 1 



\i 



3^r 



^aJy^ y^,^,.^^^^ C^^-r^S^f^, 




i^C^ yy^^^L^^^ 



y^ 







». ^» 



^^^^%^ 



H^- yfc^^n/t /n^u.;^ yU^ -^y^u-,- '7i,/4^ U^- ^*^<^ 



1 

f 



4 



/: 



■C*S' 



.^' 




y<^ 




I 



^•^U.%^^v^ /Wi.^ J^^yC ,4u^i^ "^-1/^^ ^^^ 



I > 



z' 




^^^ ^-^^/C-^ '^'^ *^ 




^ 




y/u^^ 



^^^Zt^^ ^♦^fc^^ 



/ • 



>w * 



"3^^ 



';^ft^^ My^ 






; I 



/ 



i>^^*^ 






.^. 



^^^^^ 




J^i^Uy , ^yyt'^ /^yuiy^ Jnn^ 






:?^/ 



x^' 









M 







'H.'i/i.-i^ ^- 



*<>' 



m 




/ ^-v^yn^*-^-*^ .^^ixi-v^<^4^ — 





•^ >i 






t» 



0ß^ 



3^i 



A 



•/i-^/i^ , ^^><t,-*i^^*^ 



</ <^' 4^c^^*^ y^'"'^ ^*<^ 



M^ 



y^ 



* »^^^»* 



/ 



^,^^^^ju</ ^^;i^ 






J.^ 



yy 



^^C^^-^^ ^-i^t-i^ 







;*^^^i^^ 





ij/ui^^^i.y^/^^'i/i' 



A 



ejL 



S U^ 



H)^'. i^^. J.6c^yCyi 




yu^'y 




J^^-i4 ^ ,A^v ^^^^ ^A^ ^^'-y ^ 



-^K^- 



> 



^ 




'/ 



y^4^ä^'(y^ 



/C^. 





'4^^i^t^ 



jt^^^^>4v yiA^K^ 



Wa^" 



^C^*yU% 



l^^i^yu 



Ä^t^V ^4t^ 




/^/ 



«w^ 



■^■w»»» 






/ 




/ 



n^e^^ 



^(^ ^^v ^^^^^i^ 



1 r 



^ 



<rVi^ ytuus^ ^ "^L^-v JfoU^ /t-t^^i^-v UtL^f^Uk^t^ 



//CTL 



lyf^'t'T^*^ //^ . <^ 



i^'^^t'-«*-!^, 



^ ^iTh^ 



"^cr^^Ucl^ 



^*- ^^U^ 



.A> 




<)(u<^ . y^^i^^ j^' pv^-y^ S ^^CA^ J^-' ^^t. 



>i « 




y^ü 



7Ci 



>i*i--)**-»' 



/^. 



^. 




^*^ 



^^<t<,t^-^>^l** ^ ^<^'^ -^Ai^' 






^ 



yPi0^ 



^2^^-^«-^ ^ , r^/^ü^ y^ty^*^ ^ 



,^v '^J^jih ^^' A^^^^ y x.<<^v- 



y'flA^ />^J^^ui/^ 



^ 



c^c^^^^^ 







y^»^ 



<^-^' Jc/i^^y^^ <^ 



^n^v^ 




V^ 



^^.^^^ y^ 0^^ A.-^ .^^^ ^-^^ /A 



X.y^^'^yC 



-4/^ 



^i/t^' UPyr''^ i^*"**^' ^yt^' y^'y^n^' ^iiy/t^' yin>i^ 



^ 



yi'-vvT^»«*»'' ^^Ä.^, 



'**-»'.,.Ä*^ 



^/ 



:?-/'^ 



^' 



^/ 



't^^ ^y. 




^^(C^-i-^w y^^nyty&^ ^J*a^^.0^ ^^c 



^£y^^ yi^y/*- 



/^ 



^ 




^ 



ii^ 



^'^^^/f^ 






<^ 



'^L^^^^^ 



•%m0^ 



Z^' 



»^V-<^ 






-A 



/^^. 



^^ 



/ 



'X 



l^rn^^uu^i^ 



I ' f 



/ 



v^^ 



' p^2y^i0^ 



S^^ 



^^^ 



^^ x:^A^ 



/ 



^ 



i^ ^y^ 






^^V'U'^^Ä..^ — ' 



^^^1 





^i/L^ur y^i^^ 



u^ 



Uvxy^^^fi' 



^ 



'/i/^ ^/^v ^^W/t^^ij 



^ y^J^ ^/U^' 



/f^Lvi-A^-' 







■<£,■ 



/ 



U^-y^t^ 




/ 



^' 



^^>U^ ^Cyf" (/Si/^c 



4 ^^^'^Cy c^ c^^ic^ '^^^U'^^ 



-^-^/^ ^U^^tytA^, J yX^'/^y^ '^i.iU^ 



Äa^' 



^<^7 



U/'^u^ </^-^ J^-^ A^ .^^ ^./j:^^ j — tii:: 




x^ 









*^i^^%^ 






t \ 



I -1 




I 



'9^^ 



j/j 



-^^-^ a^*^ ^oa^X^ iC^^.^-9^ 4^^£'d/c^ yi/i^^ yft^'^'^^ä^'^ <^ ^t 



-n/ 



^^c 



^. 



y' 



/- 



>l.<^ 



*.<-*'*-»-< 



^. 



Y« 



'%l.Z- 



ify^^'iyT^Uui. 1^ :^ 



.^^rVJ^v^w^'r -^-w^ xX-v^ £^^vy%^s^ 



^ 



/S*---!^ 



•/ 



^ 



>«^ 



^ 



^ 



»/ 



^ 



/ 



^^-^ 



•-^-1^ ^X^ 



/ 



J' 






^ 

/. 



^ 



C i.yCy^.'K'^ 



y 



^c^^^cX 



C^^fT^^^^^ ^^^^^^'i-*!^ 






I f 



/^^i^ A 



'^;^^ 



x-t^ 



^. 






V' 



w^^v^ ^^'A^ -It^'Z. 



l'^-T^i.-^äy^ ^'^ .' -4^,^^ 



-^^ r. 



^^v^ 




t 



^,^^^t.^t/^ 



/1A^ 



^C 



^e^i^ 




w'Ai^i'^^lx^*'^^ 



^i/Vi--i^ 



^y^\,//^' ^C^- Oil^^ 












F 



.i^ 



/t^^ i/wi^ l^^^. ^^ 




'/S^iA^ /^ 



y^^^^ ^^.^ ^ 



x^ 



y/t^* *^ 



l^-vw^^^^^ 



^ 



>^ 



2^-J^ PIA. ^-w:^r 



<>^ 



^ 



- ^. 



// 



Xt^wt t^t/io^ 



JBbS 








?, 





x^^'V. 



'^ ^s^cnyCi 



ylj i^ f. SUJi., A^' Ä. 




.xÄ.'W'n^a^*-*^ 






a^ 



/W 




y^'yv^^xt'u^ '^■'^•^ y//y iy^ 



ypi^' 



yi^ 



-tC ^^-w 



^^-Hr 




^. 



^^-^Oi^ 






w 



^/f 




^TI^W-V^^ yl^C^'J yi^.^^^ ^^^^ ^C^-^ ^At^-^^ 

^^^yiy^yu4y^/yi'c^ yU^" ^ (l^ i-^^^-^'^'^Vx^'yrV' t^ 
^U yly^^-'*^'t^ l^ , yi^(^ 4yxyiy^^^ yC^i^Ly <y/U^-y^i^ ^i 



^ 




yp^t^^^ ^fi^^x^ ^i^i^ ^fCi/^cy . -^^>i^'x>^ v^cyß^^ ^^-rrU^ 



/^' 






:?/-r 









n 





^4^' ^Vl-W X^^ 

^>1^ A^ ^cCiy^^^^^tycyf^ Jyr^^-^Z^ yC^A^' ^,A£l. 
yA^yfJyi^^^^^^ ^^4^' ^.u-w^ ^^-^ ^/^^ ^;.w^ 




^^'^Vu-w-w-v^*.^ ^jxM>-ww*^ ^^yUiy^lyS^tyvit^L^^ ß^yT^i^^/^, 




I f 



.' I 



\ 



1 I 



t». 

)i 



'. 



! I 






^ 






x^-l^ 



r-^-i-^^^?-^^ 



'^ 



^' y^lX.'^^.JS^'^' t^ ^t/ *y y^y^-yUt*l/ X^ 







^' 



Stt^u^C^ " 



^- ^/^. 




^Ut^^^ 



-^ 






■■t 





a.^' y^ 



■■■ (■nfiiTii tf I 






yf'^^ 



trt^ 







^i^i/^i, 






X^^r^^/ y C^^.y^yi/Ci 



'X^hrriü^. 









JTiU^^^^V^'^'^ x-^V ^.^fjwn^ ^A^-.^^ iji^-lr«.^ ^^-^-^ ^^ 



Al/l^ ^ ^ i^'^^^ ^ "^^f/i^^ Ziyu^-^ X^r^ 



^yl'^^U' ^Ci^Lyr' Kc^i^u^ y^'^^ ^tZ%^^ "1/ ^^n^'^P^ 










-^^^ 



i^uti^u^ 






^Il 



1/ - 1 



I'i 






y 



v^ 



i' 1 



^^^^ ^,-U, yl'-U ^f^^- ^'^<^ ' ^^' 



u 




C>'\yu^ *^ 












/ 



■w- ^^' 



^4^ 





y(/^ »U^ <<y^ ^/<-*-*^ ^*/< 

iU ^f^L.^^ yuu^, ^^^^ y^^ ^^'.r*^ 






4) y^^L>4/^ ^^'^ 



yf^ u^p^^^if^i 







'^tf-^ 



^^">^' 



'/ 






•^•^, <r^ >^ 












"^y«-*- CX-y*^ -^c^jM/i 



■ ^ 






/ 






*^ 



/ '' 



120 



x'ö'*i-t-' 



(,yi^i' ^ 



t/>^ 






C^^^ yO^a^- ^ 



^-r^Vt^ -« 



^< 




c^&.C^ . <^^yi^t 



l^ 



^.''u^ <^ ^^^yC^ i 




^. 




'^. 



3^ lu^Oc^ ^^*^ 



^^ 



^ 



^^^ 



y»^ /HA^' C ^ y^^t^'^^L^i 



/Uu^*r^ 



^^'U^ 



1^uU 



^^-^■^ 



^ 



a^^t^^ 



r 



/V\..>^v^' i/^ > "^i 



y^ 



(.yUt.'C*.^ 



/I^- 




J%>* 



-<tJb 



^^t-w*. y^C U^ 



^^cAc^ 



ypt^ 



^Cc^ 



cy^^-i^A,^^ y/4^ 




,4^*^ 






hu 



\ 




^^Ul4^'^(^^u^ ypyt^y/^-^ C^^'c'fi^ 4^-*^^ ^^ 



g 



>y ^ 




s^/^ 



^^'^^'^^ y^'^^ y^ Cyu^i^'^y^'. 



^ 



^^f^vi^c 



^'cJi 



^ 



/ 




>t^<^ 



^. 



'■r'1^ 



^. 



'L 







^c^ 






>^ 



^ y^^uZ.*^ : S Ä^^ Jn^^^^'^ 




% i« 



« ' f 



••' 'l 



) 



/ 'l 



«i 



o^ ^ 








/ 






• • i' 




^. 



1 . 

' ' ' 1 


1 

i , 11 


M 


■ l 


i!' 1 


\ 


1 1 

1 • 




l 








'1 

! 

f 


i 




e, 



"J 



yi^ äL.^ ,/<^w^.ww«^ ^^^:-hX<^-wi^ y4yX^'-^^i^ ^xt-wu.^^ 

yi/ui^'^^ ^'^^^U^^^'^ yt/^^%.^1^ ^Avi^^ yi/L^i^tyC '^yt/ur<>yU^ 



i 



4 



4 



3Z} 









c^ 




•^■'-^^'f Ä-fc^y*-^ ^-^c^.-«^ —u.,«^- 






^<-i^ 



7^ 




■%<fin>^< 



^^ 




^. 



^-^''-»^ c^'^2^C<^ 



^. 



'ed^^^ 







yiA>^ 



"^yt/A^i 



^^"-»^1^ 



<AX€^t^J^ ^t^y^^y^U,^^ ^tO^^t.^^ J^ 



'cZc-^ 




TP 



I 
> 



1 



I ( 



^'1 



II 



21 f 



C^y^h^y^ 




^ 




y4cX^ lyT^t^H^^v^i.^ ^^^u.^-^^ /l^l^'^X ^aXf*-^ 



N 



yPiyir/L^ut^ 







^- 








i-^-v-« 




-^ 









j • 



^. 









^ov^^. 



■i 




/ 



d^l^4^^cyi^iyf*t^^ 






— yt^0^' yl/Ui ^^^u%^ y^^ 

^*,,-ÄU: y^^c^^^^ ^^^„^.„^U ^^.1,^ ...t^^ 

^^U^ .^fyiJ^-Ji ^,^^' ^^ J/^^ jU^^. 




^ 



^ 



^ t^^ h^^^ y^X ^^.^^^, I >- 



/ ' 



"IZi 



/n/^ 



^ ^tf^^^WlX /in^^A/ ^/^> y^4^^i^>^ 



9. 



T^' 




i "' 

■ ) 


i 


\ 


1 

1 


1 ' 


1 

i 


1 


t 


1 








^ 



a 



>A-V 



i^-w^ 



^^. ^ 4y:Ji>^ ^ 



^A' 



■ii 



^^U^ 



><^Ä^^iJ^>•/-^-^ '^.^i:^-^^ pU^^^ i>-^ ^^X^ >^" 



^.^^aA.^4^ ^^^^U^K-v^ 



/P/y-t^^i^^ 




^^r^^^ Q,^^ 



^C/ki^n^i 



/ 



yi 



'^i 



^'c^ 



^ 



^zp 



^ 



^ 



£--T-^- 



A^^l^%y^i 






-^ U^ dyo'^Uj^^y^ 



^ ^fi^^ 






i^' -v • .^«^ >^. 



O 



^a/ i^'^''^'^<^'/^-^ 




/y ^^. 



''/^ C^'/0 C^t^. 



t<yC^ ^yC^ 



'^ 



vw^»^ c/ü^'y^c^ ^^^i^-^v 



Cl)a.^^t.^ j^/^^^^ 



c9^. 



>^^^. 



.^ 



Jlnrc-^.^ K/yPl^ ^(f^^Ul^n^'U^ y^^'t^ V^>w-i.^^^ 



^ /yi^nyii'^>\Ay ^/USyi /^fh^v^h/^ /^^ 



^.-^C^^l^a^ ypii^^ C/ *^ .^t'-W'-V-w^*>-VT^^^^^J*-V^ 




-7, 



v<r 



■^ 



/<^, 




^. 



c^^c^p, y^<^c^ J^^ ^r^i^'-- I / 



'/ 



Oy^/^^ 




aM^" >/'^^^t^X'-^ii-^ 



c^yu\yi' 



^lC>w„**^^ <^ 



r^'^ yi'^ J/^^^^^ V 



■Ä?w, 



^L^^u^^* 



^^•WT^ >^>«^>^. 




^.^.^ ^^^^t<^^ 



/ 



"V^^p^ 




-^(^ i.^^C^-w^ ^Cyt'n^ 



yU^n^y^'p^i'^ y^»< ^ 



^jrf^^u^/>^ 



■/. 






■"H !*ii 





^^n^ 



% 



'^11 



111! » 






V;^ 





y/ 



^2/ 

.Jyl (r^ i''''^-^ — yUC^ /Uv^*-^i^ ^i^-rv»^ ^Ä-«-w^ 
/^^V ^fiCcy%^ y^U-»*-^ "Y-Sr-WL^ 
>fc^ yäyuUA^^i^'^^^ ^'^ ^'^ ^^/'V iA?'^- 

^<?^' ^*?xV ^<^-uv^ ^t^C^l^ >V»^.« 




cA^i^l^-Z^ 




j^j^^^j^ 



•m 



.^uu% ^Ci^ ^ 't^ x^^L^i-yf^ 




',^u^-.w^ ^^"U^^^ 



/ 



.^^-T-^/l-^Vt^ 






^ 

>'^. 



^'Cv'^-^ 








/ 



^ih>*A^ — ' 



/ 



'! !«f 



TWf- 



JleaLM-. 



1 




!ll 



i) 



|H»i 









3iÜ 








a^. 



/ 




^ 



-C^^'^ t^l^'' 




yV^y^'y^^i^t^^^^ ^^<^ 





<^_^ ^^';^ ^.^M^ ^^ <:^'^u.,.^U 

^>a^i^^^^ -^-^ t^^^*- y^'^"^ J'^y*^ ' 








&>'>%<^ -» 




/^>^ 



>^ 



/^ 



^^.^- 







/• 



-^- 











^3/ 







■s 








/*^ ^ .x^^ "'^ 



^.^ 





-^^-v^w^^ y^^Ut/f i^^^r-^p^^^^'yf ^* 









a^^i^n^ ^y 












^/^ 



-^cC; 




/ 



i/- 






^^^> 






• r 



il 



0ß^ 



3il 





/u^^^^-^'^ 



■£ J^-- yj^.^^ 



CP^ 



xT <^ 




^'^ ^'^ 



'^^ ^^^ 







3i5 



/^/U^' A 



M 



"Tyiyi^ 




^^-^ w^ 



^ /^r^^^'iyH, ^ 




^i^s^ ^i^^/oT^ '^a^^c 



C^^i^a^y^ 



u 



U0<^^u^ 



,^^ ^c.y^^>^i/^ .a^ ^t^ci^y^^^^ 



y^y>u^r-i 




,^x^>w-fc--»^ 



j^: 



Ql^J 










5^<^'^-' ^^'^ au-t<^'->^''^ ^^ 




^'Mu 



^i^c^u<^^^ 



y^P^C^''%^L^ 



>/ ^,..^dx^^4^ '^ ^ 



<C^.^^'-^ 




A 



W(/'<^'^'^ 










■^ 



^. 



■■"^ty^y 



l>U\ 



-^ 



-^-H^^' 





^ ß^^U^ C^-yy^ n^^^ '^L^nJv^^ Sy^ t'S.U^i^ ^i^Ji^ 



yi/iy\, a.,yC^yV(yp 



/ 



,u^' 



,yCu^*y%^ y^.^ — ^^^V ,0<^iyV 



yi^ 



^^'^ y^e- ^ 



^C^^l^' .^H--^ 



■^ 



7 



yytir4,yt^Un^ 



'/ri^^ 



''^(C^C^ ^cy^'^i^^t^ '^^d>^^ 




a^' ^^Ä>^ 



^y^ /^t/'^^<^ 



^^'X^ ^- 



<>T^ — 



^^.^^^^^^ C^fi^y^^L^L^A 



^, 



y^V^iyn^U 



s 






'/ 



^. 




Ui^ 



y2^^\y/' 



^c^' 



^^ 



/•] 






Ä 



/ 



Jt4>X<^ 



i>^. 






'/ 






n/ 



y>yn 



^U^ y^y^^u^^ 




'y^yty^iiy ^cyL>^ 4. ^yUyi^ 



y 



'^U^ 



<^ 






y^t/Clyy^ /^•"^'^^ y^ 



'^ y^ 



-^^i^^S^v^^^Tl.^ ^y^'/} c^^^.^^'^y^'^ ^ 






/>1^ 



y^H^^-^ ^ 



i I: 



) 



mm 



41 



(*■' 



»i 



ifi 



I.. 

I 



iir 



3^/ 




yP-i^i^y- 




7 /r-<i^i''-d^'j 




/ 



.>*-» 



AC^ 



a^^U^Ui 



Jyf^^^^x^ ^cy^'^^-^^ ' y^"^-^ .^'cX^ y^^i^y^ 



,^M^^ 




/ 



^1 






,'^ 






rt^c^ü' cy^%yAA^u4yr ^lyA.'i^ß/^ 



y4 C,^,^ f[yL^%>^ ** 



V 








33:r 



?^ 






y^/^Jto i;^t^o-a' ^i/^^i^u^Ci^ ^^^' -i^^-rs2^^^j^^ 

/iMC^^i^^ ^A^Cf^.^ ^.Ju^.y-t'^ ^Uc^^^ <U-l^^<^y^-^ 



' «^ Ü 



• "» t , 



/^ 



^ f 



v^ 



QÄii<jAÄ(>^ ^y-t^ 






yC A^ 



r: 



^' 



^«Jil^p-it^ rfWi^ /*^ c^' 



/t-t-t-*'^' 



fl'M^) ■ 



if:|| 



m^ 



•ill *ll 



) , > 



.t 



) ' 



^ .1 



i . 



fl^/C^W-fc 



"du 



-Ä-^Är 






/^ 






^^ 











/t^ 







<^'^ 



1"^^ 



>t>t< 










/t^vn^ 





^•^ 







^"«"W 





^XJ^ 



^v 





z' ^' 



>^ 



/ x»' j.^C^yC Y .>^'t^ ^i,^\.^./i^ t-r^ y^ i2^iyt/d'i.'^,^^.<.^<^y>-i^:Zi^ 











;y. 



^ c.^1^ J" ^Vc^^u^ X^C^iy .^^^u-t-^x^ .-t^-^-^ h^al^^'^^ . 



.--U-k 







V 








^^X^6^i^/* 



T 



^.^c^*. 






11 



I ■ I 



I, 



- 1 



.1 1 



1 


\ 

i 

1 




1 


1 
■ .1, 

1 





^.,^'y^ ^^i^'^ .^'^^^-^ <^-^^^^ 







/^/tAi-'-^ 






^iy/^ 




^/^i^-^y^ 







^ 




/ 




^^-'l*/ 



^^^ <^ 



yU.(X 



^?.^/^-x^T<t ^r>/7' 



y 










u^ 









« / 



^yi^ ;fC^ €^' y ^ 



^^'o^ 







• — 



^-^-^ mr4 ^'^^' 




ftC 



If 





1 

1 

:) 

) 
1 




1 
1 ' 1 




1 ', 




1 1' 

u 


i^*. t-' 


i 






n 


t 


JlL 


1 
\ 

! ■ 1 
i 


■i^^.i 


i 



3y^ 



/ 



^u. 



/ 



^(iO^n^fi^' 



^A.'^mJ^ 



^ 






/ / 



* 





-<^-*^>«-^^*'' 



// 




^. 



^^- 

^^^ 



r4.^ 




^Cw^ ^Qy6^^^^^ ^fc..wt-^^ lyH^c^. 

C^l^.^ .^C^.^.^^^ X^^-^~ ClI'^ ^H>/- ^'.^ 
^^.^-v^ Ocju^u^ y^^y<f^ ^ux.^^^ ^>t^Vi^/Ui^-, 




^ /«^^fc^'* ^ 



T^JLkit^f*^ 



^^^^r'"mr^^ 



^ij/^^ 



/^/ 



/"/^ 






4^ ^ (l'U'^.^yiyf -.-Uw^ ^^4 



</ 



^-t-t 



^i^i^ 



.^J^ ^^>-MX^ y^."-^-^ 



>y) 



'yi^-^/y^'p^ ^^ ' /^ ^ ^^^y^ V-^''-'^^ /^Jn^-^^ 




I ! 




^ 



Uyf'^-^Cfi 




C^u 






^ 










j^ r 






/' 



n^^Ul^ 



.. I P " ■! ■ 



)*. H i 



!!'! 






^^^ 



^4oi'Jty)^in:^ y^ ^^ 



CJ^i-^w^u*^ >-r-*'7t-*' 



^il^-yc^ ^M ^^' 




i! 2Ux^ 



i/"»^ ^ 



^•«, Q^^ ^cy^ 




9x^. ^-/>^*^* 



1 




1 « 




'S 




■ 












^^^^^ 



y^ 



V^ ^^ '^ yC^i^y^ 



^a^ 



iTkty 






^v 



09i 



















j^ 



y 



■«IP 



;) 



1/ • 



)l 






li 



y^ri^^'^^ WX6^V^>w^ >t-lk^^^Ä^-wv;^ ^2.^.^-^ 7 Ä^yi^y^^, 
^^•)*Ä-^wv/^ Jl/yi^0Uuu^ ^d^'^Ayiyi/^ yi^(^ /f 

y4^a^' y^S.4/^ . ^^^ JtK4A^ yUx^'^-4/^ y^^- 



"^ 




<• 

£• 




^ 



/C^'" /^vv^ ^^»xwt^ ^^^*-^-^ y^yyi^^ , ^.^-^ 



^ 






c^ ^«vt,-^ 



^. 






^-wt i>iL''^'^ 



•.;i^^' 



^t^4-i^>^ — 






/fi'^u>af^ Ji. 



4J y^tf'x^. 







y1 



^ 



»^^-v^V 




JO^ii^n * x^ yn^f^-^y 



Vi "" 

<y i^^ ^^A^-f-n-.-u^ yC^*^ /y C^'^i^^'^ ^ .^.^^ :^'-^^ i/Ci^C^^ 



' "« 









/>y'^ vC^^x^'^—^ .4c^^ cJiyC^'i^ 



■ U 



n> 



r* 




/ ^ I' 



II 



ü;- 



^¥^ 



^ 



^ 






^-o-v-v^ JLn*' 



// 



/ 



^^^ 



^c^ 



:/a 






/^^^i^^y^^y^^^v^' Ä.-t^ ^^*^ "IC,:. 






\ 




y^>y 






}./ 














^//-K ::^Mio 



\(y^' vTv 

/ 




v?^. 



7 



c?- 




w^*' 



*u^- ^y>y y^^c 







y. 






I t 



!tlt 






> 






Jy/ 




^. 



•v 







a^'A ^^^' 



/>y^i 



9^^^^ ^C(y(yLy9'-H^CL^c 



Orf 



C' 



4i 



'/ 



/ 






^^r^^ 



H^-^^-^C^ y<^^tS<4y ^^^ 



^ß^ti^ 



/ 



O 



■V- 



u. 




92/ 



CiUd [VM^] -^c^Y >vv^ ^^^ '^c^.^. 



fi^<AA/lUO 



yU^'u ^l^ 



iU/c^ 



^^^- ^^aJ/ä 



^Li/^ 



^ 



/ 



^^d^i 




'^e^ f iy^U^ y^^a^' >^-^4x^^^^-w^..-viJL^^^ 




'y .Li 



Ci/i^a^ -ynU y4^'/Ui^^ 



M^.^ A 



// 



Cut<ut4^ 



C3 



'yUUr^^^UiC^i^x^ 



^v a/ 



^^^i^utxui^tx/iV ,4/1^ X^^»^ 



'>ff 



^^^^^.'V^ 



^A/ ^f^^^«^ £yT<X^'^^ (/i/L'A 



Ju^ 



^ 



>^^ 



'/^'^ 



,///i^e^ 4y^<y^^^ ^Hyify^^.^äZä^ 



y^U. 




e^^yC^C^^ 



i.^v^ 




■^ 



■-^c-c^ 



/ 



jtyr 




J 



^- 



^" M 



-^yu- 



^t-v^< 



'^^**-t^ 



ir'C' 



^/ 



x-^ 



^V*-^ *X^^^-^ ■ ^ycCf'c^ä^ yJy^'J^^ j^Oy^ 




^. 



äU^' 



.^. 



/ 



/t--» 



^t-Jv/U 



^ A i.'V-y^-^ (TtX^ . Jy^ ^'^^ f^j I Jy^-^-U^C-^-^ ^>^V ^^:^. 



^ -^ 



T^ 



.^t^" 






^^. 



l/'Ä-r- 






':^^ 






^^. 



y 



'/^nfr 



c,-^ >^. '^.V 9/^ ^^ ^^- 



■.WS!^ 



>^ 



^.::^4^ 



^"^'^ Ci yUUi^-^. ^^/^ Zy^'^y^ ^ ''^ 



^yiyU{y9\ ^yC^" <i'n^ ^yi^'i^-^C'i^ yyy'ä^r^^i 



< 



^^- 



^^^>'u-i^ y^(y^'^ 



/A 




'Z^V^i 



'^ 



.X^«--r^ >l^ 



>"-^ 



^/Ci^'i^ 



' yi^^^i^ "^ 



>J ' '-^ ^^W'VM^ffc^j^ )U^.^^,^^<f^ H^U***^ i*^*^ *^* --^ 



^*ir', -H«» 



Ui^'p*' /JfSf ^'^ ti..^rc*^^H» 



Si^^^fh»»^ r- » V««^ i^^^^ 



^*.^,*<--f--^ ll^.*^-*' -f 



»•^ 



«■<■ 



1 



i 



'1,1 



:j^r 




,i^a^ y^'i,'^^^ .x^**-<--t-w ^^e^'»' ,^*«-t-^^ 












'^■v^^-u^'xt'*^ Ji^irv^ , V/^^ZiA^'^ 



■: 



^yl'A^ yi^^ ^^i^^ ^Cyi^.y^j^ ^^. ^ 

/Tiy^C^ ,^^^*<^ i>U.w-v^ 



7r 



'CX^n^ 




x'2xt-t*"<^l''W< 






Uc 



^'^^t-u-w^ 






7 



*^ / / 

-^.g.^^' ^^^L^zTZr^ JJ^.^ , /''7 

' V*Ä ^^^i^*if^ yU^^^ ^^Uy^ K^C-i^^^ "^--^^ ^J^C^' ■^'"^^ 





2^ r-^-T^Är 







V-. > 




■ I 



^-/^> 



S^'Z 







M ^'i^ 



i^^^ yy- 



^/"'T'Vl^i 



-/ 



u. 



<^' 




O^iUf a^yc-AX^: 



t;*-^^ 



^c 






f^J.. 



^^^^ .^-i. in/l^^^ ^^^. ^^^:^X^ 



.^u- 






'^A 



^^'^4.-*<**^^.,.^^^ ^s^4. 



'>Ct 



^^i^^i'^'^i^ ^ 



^, 




^Ci^^uu^tyiix^-y^ i^~^^ 




^Ä-'X-^ ^ 



"^Ä-^- 

^/L^, 



^-^ 



d*^' 






^2^1^ 



ciC^ / "^ 





^ 



^'iy^i^' ^^ i^^'iy^^L^ ^^^ 




<^^^ -yl 



^^:^ 



..^^<:>^- 




^^ti^i^ 



/ 



^^c 



^w^ 



'^^^^•--»-u-w*^ x^i^^ .^y^-rVc. 



'^ ^^^' 



yU-^'^^U ^ac^ ^^t^^^ X.>/ 



/ 



'^' 



^'^^y'^^ ytfc^A 



K/uuy 




^^ 



c^^ 



^yz^' 



'X^^ y^i^i^C^ 




Cf^ 



y^i^^^cy^ y^,^> 



l^t^x,^ 



Jcy^^ 



L 




ß^L^i^-u^ 






/ 






^ 



^^i^^ttfOWt- 



^ 



-^ /^v^'^ 



y}--7^^ 



0^^^^ y^C^'t^^ 



%£hn^z^fi^^ 



'6 



y<^ 



-^^ l€fi/c/^'^ o^^t.^ 



fi<^^^ 



^^^vli-^^^^^^l^ui^ , -^' ^1-^ >W/ 




^•^ 





J^'i^'X,^*^ 




■i^ 



(yu><^^,'>^ ^,^<0'%^ ^ 



w^ 



/ 



A>. 



i*-?^' 



Vu^w 




'^^"^ y^i^x^^-'t^ C^.y^^1^<^'^ 



f 




J\ 



I 



I 



ii 



of^ 



$ss 



>^ 






x-lxt^u^ 



iLy^yf^ 




r^'i/K^^'^n^^^^^^^ 




yn 4 



ilu^C^i->^ iy^' 



/ 



M. 

^.^'^^'^y^ ^ 



vac< ^ 




(jh^^-t^^^^^-^ ^'>^ Jt^i^-t^4^^' '^^t-v^ ^^ 



y^ 



(^^aM^ 



-^ ^^' 



^ ^c.'-L^v.'xyU^iy^ ^ -^^^ . Sf'y^*^ y^^^-^ >^^^^^y^^^* 




^ 



X^ 



i^v^ ^ 



^^^'^ ^L-v^.^/^' 



^^/^^ i^^y^' 7 ^ Äv 



^, 



C^Ui^^i^^^^ 






X^y^i^ y^^^^ ^y^^L^ty^iy^ 



^ 



M, 



tYgyu^yi. 



A^. 




/ 



Cr->^^ 



''uc. 



,4^0,' 



S^ 



'^ 



X^' 



.^. 



<:^ 



i,^pC^^^<^< 




JyUU ^^^ 






:r 



;; 




jt^y^-^^ 



/ 



r*^^ 



v4: 



^ i^»-v-i,,,-^i-*-fr^;^c-'^ -Ä /c^ 



■^* 



/ 



./< 



^^«*n^ -- 






A>r^c^c<»^ct«^^ 



-.^-^ 



'^iyi^ 



.^. 



/U^'^^^ 



^ 



y^i^-^ L/Cc^^^-yj^^^L^^L^ 




^■i 



II 



! 



I I 



:?/"<? 






V^iet^^ 



Sfp. 



■fO> 




:i| 




sy c^^" cywt/t^ 



uL^/^<Ji 



nrr^ 



7^^^ 



u^^ 



4yi^ 



^ 



•Ä-^t-t^-^-^C^ .^^ 



^H;:22r' ^-^i^^JI^ >i.^^ 



-^^^^ 



<^ 



ä^^n-'^iy^ 



/f 



'/i^t 



S^ Qy>t 



^^"l^^c 



^^^Jl^ yTli^^yy^^ 



J^ 



y^^J^ 




ji 



xt^V ^ c^-i/ij 



^. 




C^^i^ ^ 



Jt4^yt4j 



//l/U'l^^i'^^^ 



C'^m'^n^^ 



■i 



/\/Ux 






^ 



uliJf 






■(/C^ 







:> 



y 



^.''Vv**^ 






l/(/tyi0'n^»^(ry * 






fc' .i- VT^^t-^ ' 



^i:^ 



^^'^. 



^^ 



c^ 




•i^ 



'>c «-^ ^^yC^^i<^ 







*— "^c^ ^.^V^v^ 




c^'^yr"^^ 



.^' 



4^^^/^v <ju^[>^^ 



/t-^t^^ 





,^ 



^./- 



'vf ^^t^v^ 



/ 



y^Ut^ 



II 






/ 



>; 



tI 



a^ 




/^v 



^^^t/t^ 



-d^' ^'^z/f 



yi^t/Cs^^ (^<y^<U^\ 



^. 



/l^L/U^' U ^ 'v/^*^4*-u,^^ 



— - /^' fc-'-'V-» 



/ 



•<■ 



^^- 



'C4yt *^ yv"^' 



•y*^ 






'^i^ittw 



; 



.<*/^ 



— ^ 



^ Wy^i^ :i^ (Z^' ^ y/l^-*^ J'n/i' yt^t^ ^W^*4Xw^4^>-»**^^ 



:ii' i'''ii 



l 



> 



,) 



h 



1 ' \ 



m 



'il 






^/y I 

l j^^ 1^^ ^c/^' ^^' ^^' 4^^^<-^^^^'' 



Jy/ ^(/C^ v<^^ 



?u 







.'--•* 



'Vt\/^{A/C 



uU 



/^ 



<y(yU0 



/' 






^</ 



/i7. 



C^^■''^^^-v,^ Z^' 1-^ ^,4uu^ 



^r> 



Xt'V-«**^ 



i^'*^ 




^'^ iH^^u^u^i^ 



-^^. 




•V^^'y/ ^^C^ ^H^ y^Ly^^y^ ^ ^C^J^' 4-^ ^1^ 'yVK^U - 



^^^v 




■^' 




-^> 



"pyC^'Kyiyiy yyu% A^^'^^ ^y^^ y^i'^ ^t^>^ty yU^'^ ^Myu<y^^<y 



'*"• r 



>^/ 



■4i^ 



>^ "^c/^ 



^«'^ '^^^i^ x^- 






^^'i^ ^^^ynyu^' 



\ c^fy^y'^iy^yi' 



i 



» 



1 

4 \ ■ 


• 


\ 


»1 

) 


1 




1 

[ 






|- 







\ 









yU(^ 



(^^ 'lyU'%^ y^i 







y^lA^tC' ^i'Ci^U^'U^ v/ä/*^^ ^/^V -//o^^Lf^^ 



5^/ 



^. 




'•^-Jw^-^' 



^■y^e^^Q^^a 



d"*^ ^'Vw-' 



^y. 



^^/ i;^->*^ 



xwfc.'^^^. 



'/^^^ '^^-i^j^ a^C'^.^ ^^<Cy^ I ^U^^ cy^^f^ J^^n^cy^y^ 



'^"^'-^Cyt'C^'^ ■ 



y^^'y^"^ y/K/C 64^^ ^^H^t.'^^-l-WV 



/^C^^L^^LyUty^l/f^ 




•A^^^ 



/h^c^^ yiyi 



^ 




-M 



V>i<^^*t''i'-fc'i*^ 



y'^J £yiyt^^ 







.^ 



4>^^Uf ^/ii- 



^'A^ ^^^^^r-^^y^^t^ »^ 



/ 




S^^^^-'^^ 



^i> 



y</. (0^- 



^ — •-^- 



Z, 



>/- 



/?^ 




'7/(/-V IM 1^^ V 






'%^ 



-^ 



üy^^^i 



y^ ^(yyCi^^J^^^^^t^^ , ^/t. 



r 



^/ 



xi^^ 



■o ; c^ i/C^ -^-^ ^ti^.-^-vt^fc-»»-' '^'K^i 



(1,»^ tWl^t.'t/'^ 



/ 



^* 



^ 



/t^?^^>va--u-u-^ ^^i^' TC^^^ i^'P^Ä^^iyi^'X^CJ'^^^' ^ 



yJ^^ /^CJ ^ 



-^Of^K,^ — 



-t^i^td/^ . y^^Ciyf' 



/ 



V. 



^. 



rfC-^Z^ 



^cy^^'^i^ ^Cc^ 



y 



i-<.^ x^ 



^^^>f. 



y^i^t^ 



vi yTTy^i 



C^^^yy^^ .y0fy(^>iyr f C^^y^C^^^ 



-4/ 



<J^-<^ >' 



Vä-^-^ 



^ 



/" 



^^^' /ty.yiyi'yf^ y^.yy^^ >*^ y^ 



U^^ 



^c 



*C 



^f^Lu^tr-PT* 



^- 




^^'.^tyl^yM^-^'-^'-'^ ^^^^ /^l^ 



X' 



> 



^o^ 



/1 . / 



^< 



<t-V 




ii 



f '. 




"SU 







3fJ 






^ 



1^ 






.^. 



Wi^ .^- 



/ 





^^s^ 



/ 



'^^*/'* 





wx^^-^^ 








^< 



^<-^i^ 



d^l^L-^'U'^ 



L 



jLCi .^^-TyC/^ f^^^^ ^^U^ ^^^^<^i^ 



) ^^'1"*'$ P^U^, y.^. 



y^^^^ ^^/JiyL<y 0^/vz^X^ Qy/T^Z^^S^ ^^ ^l/Cj'^^ ^^*^ 
"""^yf- J^^l^ ^f^>^ y y^C^' yt^yi^'^"^ ^i^^^^ 



''"« 



y^^^'^'^^^;^^^yp^ -» ' 



> 



ii 



) 






i(^ '. 



i <i 



i 






^^'y^''^ ^y^--^^ ^l^lr-'^i^'K'^ 



yU 



/ 



C^UI 




^C4y^ß^.^4^ .j^^^^ 



X^-U-w^'X i/Jx^^-^s-^y^ ^/X^^^-u^ y^ /V-: ^^»^^p^ yK'-^ 



:}oj 






/ 



^t;^>^ ■ cx^^^ 



^^C^^^yZ^^^^Vy^ iL^I^^ f/C(>y^ p 




/ 



t^'^t^ cy^ 




'^—^ yLf^CyO:.^ <yU c^ ^ ^<y^i 




yt^^u^c^c 



91 



Cyt^v^' i^^i^ f^^ 



/ 



„^^^C-v^-* /ciyf cyyt ^^^1^ y^ ^C^r^t^ 






'tf^Vi^ 






Jyrv^i^iy t^-^ /hy^'yr^'W^v^t-'Ui^.^yT yt^*^ 'X^Si^ ^ I A/l^^ C^t^%^ 



^ey^i 



c^(^'^^ , cw^ y 



</y'^ >>^ y^yiyf'^ yU^y^ /^C-Hi^^^^ 



ykc^<^'^y^^ y.</cy^ i^^'t*Uyu<''<<^y^^ 



ij Julr^'iU^', Vi^e^d^'j . 



I 1 



|i i! \ 



t ' 



l' ' 

f 



h 'iiii 



'h 



^ii 



^- 



C^ ^ 



^^ 



a.^^t^L0^ 



9 ■ 




^^V ^uC a^ut^ ^Ut^ 4ycyU y^Cy^cy^c^ 

^^1^ eU^ -^ ^ayi^^'^ ^i^u^-k^^t^ y^iyf^ ^^^x^<c>r>n^ - 



.':- 1 



Ciyu't/r 



^, 



/Vt-v-K^i ^Jl^ U^ 



^^H^i-^-u^ 



^4^^^ 






^t^^^ 



-t^ut/K. 



/ 



«**<t 



^/V y^f /fZ^ ■ yji^\>\(^ ^yvy ^yt,.'^'^ c^ch/ ■ 








•- .^v^V 



^ 







^ 










^v 



/ 



'^^^ ^^ ^'^-^^^^-U^'y^ ^^' ^^fft^ 



.^. 







^ ^^^ 




c^-ju^^^^^*^^ 



/ 

u 



> 



t'i:; ^' 



' ,»*} 






l I 








i 

\ 
( 

1 

! 


f 






I 

i 


%■■ 






1 


i 

i; 


■ 1 





y4c<^ 







i/C'^'V 



J/C-%.%,^,^^y/C y/^i^^^^^ 













<?^. 



^ 
^ 







.^. 







/^U/. 




^y^ 



»Cj'a^ y4 yify\,^,^x^ ^^yC^^r ^Zn^n^CtyC 






U^cJ yi^ ^ 



y^^^yd/i 



^ 






^ 

^ 



''^^i^ 






ri 



1 

'71 * 






1 I 



■^n«>»i^ 







^^^^"1^ Jyt/^y^' J^'y^^y^ yU^^t-^ 



y^iyf 




//i^L 



H^^^^-j^'^^i.-*-!^ ^Ayin-'^y^ 



^ t^^J^r, 



.^J^^'' 




Cyf^C^-^'X^ 







^'CyßCy^^^ yi^e^'*^ y^A"^ ytXyx^^^ WCy^C^^-ujCuL^^ 




■i 



.^t^fiZ- ^A-^' 














^Jl- yf'^ y^(^ ^(^.^y^y^ ^/>w/<-^-^ ^ 

yMii, r^^ J^^^ JL^L^ U^ Q.^<^ i^^-^^'^ , cU' (yl^^yf>y^^ y^^^'^iyk^ 



/ 



). 



> 



^f^SjS 






1 H 



t ', 



n 



1 

1 

1 

1 ^ 

1 

( 

1 

i 

i 




i 






^^/C^'t 












--^^Vl^V^ 






: ^/u- 
^ 



^/c 














/UrC^'/c^ CiZ^'^^ ^4^ ^U,^ /PUlMyi^^^K.^,4^ 



Jp3 



^^/(^ ^c^jU ^^-^ y^-^ ^A^ ^.-H^ 9?.J^ . 



^^^ 



'/' 



»ii^'/fU, 



V -ii, 



^ 



.tU^ 'iuJjL , 






y^C/Cl^ ^^v-i-un>^ JL^'y^^^^'' TCt^iA'yTty^A^yC 







U^^yi^^^t^j 







<&y. 








C 



,^i^>^ 



II 







JJ/S 



v//(>ww //UtX^#^C^i-^^^^*'Ww yoX^ ^^6^ n^un^'^^ ^Cy^/i^ 

M^M^>^ A^f^-^ y^i^ /Äx^t^ ^(/c^'^^ i/lrr^^ C^^^-^'^^^y^ 



'xf'-»*-^ 



•^ 




^^t^^^/J^ >^>^ ^^'^ /M^vi,^ t^^^ ^V'— 



tfxixu^. 



) 



•i 



iii 



i 









/ 










I 



•'Lu.YV 




yt^' 




J^ 



'^ 








x^ 



*v»-^ 



t^v»* 



^: 



<?ix — 



^>Ut^l-W^t^- ^/U-l^i#<^ 



/ 



/ 



^ 



V7 



--^>V 



^■^ ^i^'»^^ /^>-.*^ ^^' 



/ 



/^ 



sK 



ll 







Jü" 



tH«! 



vi 



!;1 



:-1 



.11 • 



I i' 



m) 



%i 



t 



% 




m i 






^.^^^^t^ - ^^ 



'/ÄVi 



"tl. 



/U, 



»,<A0- 



'/^ 



A 



-X^^^v-i-^-^i^ 




/ - - ^ 








> 



/^fi^ ^a^'^-^^ ^^^^i^-uv^ ^/^'<><^ ^>^^i-^^ '^ 






f 



^> 



i 



^ 



/^^'t'Z^^^rT^-VK^^'t't^ ^ 



^ 






^T/^'ir%'y0* 



Cy l^ ^ 







c^ 



Pf 











) 



c^ 



.^^- 



f/V ^y^ f^y^iy 



^. 



4^ 










.<^v .<«^v ^x tU y ^e^'c^'^ , ^ 



K^^^ t^'f^ yt/I^U^" ^ 



A^u/ 



U^ 



K^OC. 






>; 



lj9^,u^. Q^^'^^'--' 'f^^-^-ijMU^. -f^^ 



X^^*^ 



•mm 



1 

i 
i 






1 
1 


! 


111 , 


1 


■ 



1 .1. 





^ 



( : 



/ 



I 



^ ^U^uj 




Ci ^ — ' 



^ 








.4 



yU, 



yjt^yuui^ 





./* 









^ 




yi/i^n^^ Y^^^^^'i^'' ..v^-v.-*^^ yiX^^^ ^,Ä:<^i>ww^ y^^i^ 




T\ 



4^ 



f > 



-«<4^ 



>^ 



/ 



*^% ^^ I0%0^ 






), 



7" 




# 



^. 




^^ 



c^ 









i-4^i> 



^ 



^•^ 



^ 



/ 



> 
















ff ' * ■ 



-fim 



t 



I i 



I 



/J^^ 










:?// 







^f 



y1/^\ 



/ 








^^/ 



^^. 



^^^ 



/ 



/^^^V ^fi^' 




V 



iy^ t^^i^uA^c^'/^ ^yfyC^ 







c*«^* 



^iT^ -5?^^; 






I^J^ß^-fc 













"in 



C>-r^ 



/ 









/W***7r 



). 



). 






I 1 



i 



1 ' 

, i 

1 


1 
i 



? 













— / 




•^' 




yi^^T^i^i^ 




3.V r/ic^.'iJi 



>^^^ 




/IAA 







/x^ 



^'.^ 



'sj />i'^^if cy^' '^ c^y-S^cyC^^ 




7 



l/iT^i 



^^ 




yj^owt^-Jv^^^ ^^'^ -v— -^^^-^ "-«-^ <3^'-^ 



•^^ 



^ c^^^ "^^v^v-v^^Vn^u-t^ /y^'^/C /1/unr^y^ /«^^wt'i^^?^-^^ 

0^ 



y^y^i^^^^^ ,yU^ 



-'■^W 



VI 



/^ 






^ 



U 



). 



>; 




'■ f, 



■■RIPapiiM 



1 ll'^ 



I ) 



II« < 










I 1 




y^ (yn/f ^ (-^ "^"^ 




v^- 






/ 






^"»iw w ^ 











äC^ 




i^^'i 



7 






^dyl' d^^ i.-^^ ^U^y3,^ 



A^ 



(1> 



^^n^^y^. 




^jC^'^ 



/iv^u-viV^^ ^;ni^ ^/t /«'uw^ y^Zu^ a 






/ 



/ 



>u*^ 









^yf*^ 



V' 



-^ 


















/ 



/ 



i*il< 



■pp 



I 



! V 



i , I 



i,i|?i: 



i < 'i 











I 



^ 



^o^ t^ 



7 cm^ K^ u^.^'^.^L^ 0^ 




^>t^ 






^ 




^--«»-»«*<»^ 



«t«»^ 



?^.-^ ^-^ /^^- ^^^^^ 



x^ 




^^^^^ 







? 



// 







xWVUv^ 



^f 



Q^^yv^^ 



^ 



4/ 



^^<^ 






^^ 



^- 



j^U^Cyv ^Z/^ y^ü^^Ct^ ^^^'^^^^ ,^/Ui.^'yT/^ Z/y^C^*^ 

<Jy'Cy Lt^^t/iy^^-^^L^ ^^i.^^^ /us^^L^'/^ >^^.v^V 
.xtxw-w»^ Ji4^>^^ yriyui,0^^ ^c^^^ ^^'^'^ 4y^^^^ 




■fe 



) 



f 



) 



> 



i 



.JSJSSBS. 



II 





P 



i|i. iiir^iii 



fil)< 



.y. 






'^6^ 



6^' 



<yn^' 













^c 



u^ 









/^y^iUi'y^ 








ii'i I 



/ 



% 



/ 

^ 



i,i 






/^ 



y^i^'yl^^'^ ^^^^^^^'^^w . 



■i; 



J»H 



I I 



,;) 



■! 



'11 



1 ', 

i 




; t 
1 








/^.^ /A^'^u-^au^fc^ 



o^ 



(yi Li-C^^u^^ ^ -(^--^c^^^ ^«>-«.^ ^^v^i^ 



^^Iai^C ^ÄL^fc^u^lXH^ ,yt/C^' 



^ 



^/^ ^u-^i.>^%^(>n^<,.4y/ut sZcc^ 






; : t 



'tf^vw' 



^Av<^ ivvvC/ \}^AyiyU>^J^ J/ftA/f' //^L^ J^'^ 




/*^ 



^ 

•^ 



f^ ' 










/ 



/C^^' 



^n^*^^' X*^^>'W^6-^' A^^Xx^^'^Cu-"^ ^^<^^-^*^/W^ ^.^„^w-w-w^ 

y4y(f ^O/tA.^lX^^^'^^^ '><^-v*^ ^Cy(yC^i^ yl/\.^LyC/U^ J[.<.^^^^^./^' 

AA^y^^ ^^<^ A^yviy^^ dZ^'^'^ ^Cy^^oC! 



fiL^^C 



'(^y CU</i^^fi c^ Cyi'%^ 



/ 





« 



I 



y* 



» v\ 



I \ 






y4><yi^ ^' 



•^ ^'^Zi'itCc' Cci^, 



t^c^ C^u^y}^ 



yt/l^^ ^ 



-5^ ^tO^^i/i^ ^-'Ü^* 




*yc^ 






^•y^' f^'^U^.,^ ^y4U^^'>U,^ ^nni xr >^ 



y^y4 



r 



/ 



y^ 









^^^U't^ 



^^c 



C0^ U 





Oyi^^t^ ^l^y^ 



.^'i^ --64^^ 



iL^Ui. 



/ 



^^1-»^ yi^n^y^ 






.y^L^lyU^ 



.^ 



/ 



4y\; y^yt^ty 




'yL-ry-^"-^ y^ Ua^U^^ 



y. 



^ 



iy 



•i-t-i— K« 



^^^^'\y(yKi 



■'f^'i^;'^ ^ 



£yi*irc^, 



:^~ 



^^ ^C^Cy^ ^iyUyy'^^'Uy^ 



yilcypy ^c^^^^yuÄ^^'y^ y<^ 



"^^xi.*^ 



•tC>-<^. 






^^ Jl 




A: 



/ 



4.4^ <^ 



.^ 






^ 






7' 



^n/tyy-iyi^ Qy%y^i 



yi^i.^^ yü^^ ^T^i^^C^^"^ 



mmrn^ 



^tfCyQyi^'^, 



V. 



xtt-1^ 



/^■»^Jl^ „^J%Ä^ 



J^J 



» t 



yyy^^ y^ 



'•C <^^«-a*^ ^X^xH/^-X^tf^^^-u-^^tf^^K-V^' u-v^ 



Ax^ ^ 






^<^ <^ 



C^UL 




^y^^yy^yf t^c 



C^O"^^^^ yp^y^ 



L^<y^ 



^U^ 



\X 






-^-c";*.«^' 



X?» 



CyCAy^ 




^^^^^-^^ ^U>utJ2y . y^^^^-iyt^ C 



"^A^y^r-t^ 



yiC^^ 1 ^ (y^ ^ 



MnA^\ysy\^ Ot^' t^ ^ <^ ^^•^v^ ^^^^M^t^V^^^^^^^V^^^^^^ 



^^ 



./-K ./-n^ .^^iv' 



^ 



y/tiiM,> 



w 






yr2^'^r2/iy^ 



cy/ UcyC^ 



9v6^->c.^^^ ^' 






J^^^ Cyi^ '^cyk/' 




^ ^yiy(/Cy.yyL^^' yC'<y 




AyCT' y^'-f 



^ ^yCf'^ 



m 



yi^'yf^ /hy-c^l^-^^^^^^^"-^^ 



Jyf'Cy^^ 



/ 




.^^Couyi^' 4^c^^^yi<A<- yf'ty^ 



yiyLy^ y 



^^-^t-» — 



V' 



t-^i^ 



/ 



X 



^/ 






-v 



*^ 



zt-i^i^ 



^ 



«•<f. 



,>' 



I 

I 



1 



PT 






[(< 



i 



■i 



^n 







v-*'%Cf^ 







y" 



^ 
•/ 







A^yV ^ 






c^ ^7^7' C — ^^^^"^ 



^^ 



/.-^ 







l^yC^l^'yn^y^ " 



^. 



^"'lA^^.^^^uC^i^'^^^^ 



/^. $i 



^/y(y^yUUt/ , 






flu 







X«****-*-*' 




>d,'.^ 









<^" 




„/^^ 



*- 

/ 



;4 






y^n22£cxj^ >u^ 




/ 















X^** 



Tt( 



f^ 






\ ii':'l'^ 



1 

1 

i 

i 

< 

1 


■ 


1 V 

t l 





'X^oZi^^i^ ^^V-ww-u/^ ii^AyT" 











c/ / 



(^A^ 






rV >^-^'^'^S'<y^ C»^'^ 



1 


>■' 




, 1 


k 


! 





ygi^'/«-**' ^'"^ ^äX^^-v J-^r^ , ^^fi'-^ 

if u^ j.^ /^ ^U.^' 4'—^^ -^ 

^^<^ ,.;*^ yt^C^'^t^ -^A^J*^ J'^Y'^'^/ 



^^ 



^ (rv^.'^iy^/t<^ , Ä^ , ^/UL^^L/iy . 



S'v^ y?^ 



^^C.<Jt/yfA-l , iA-^ >^i^ 



i 1 



//r^^yfM /u.^u^ /^/^vn,^ >^fc-v-AiiA-v «, •. ^/^-u-L — ,1 

^C^nk>^<yLo /i^f^Jv^ ^^-^ '^i^'/fj' y</.^' f^-^-^ £ 

^V-cvV/^ ^/*wa,v^^^ yKy(lU^ ^Ä-A-'l^/^ 



:«i 




f! 



> 



1 



ii 



' 



^'flW"'* 



^ 



i 
1 


1 
\ 




t 




! 




' 


. 1 




1'' ■ 




1 


1, 




1 
1 


f 





fl 



1 






1- • 




^ 1 

} 

i 

i 

y 


L 


1 

1 

\ 



^0Ut/ ifAt(,M y^i,^^ ^JaJh-^^ .yi^J*^^ y^-C,^^,^.^ 







^w*i 










/l^^'A/^^^'^ </C^(yU^ 




4^vw x^^ 












^^*Wi^ 



^. 



'/ 



'U/t^>' 




'i^^'n^ Jcyi// . 



yu^^^ yt^ ^t^U.v-w' ~>>'>^*^--»^ ^c^fu^f^^ yyc^y^c^p' " 



y^^^i^^ ;u-vt<^^^^T^ ^<c^ ^ 



^i^'yi^Cy^^ ^irj/6 ^y^yi^' /^*^ ^^C^'^"^^^-^ .^^^^-^-^^ 

X^ ^/y'^^d^Jic^ ^ >-^ /r-^^ ^- 

^^.^^ x^'..^ 1^-^ ^ A .^ fw^^^ ^^^^-^ 



> 



I 



) 



y 



ti 



Hl 
5 



n 



1 



HJiHiili _^ 



i-^ 



It 



io^ 



^^u-^ y^ii.^u<Mi<J^t^-^'^ An'CyC 



Vt-^-v" 






yi,^,,:,^ y^'^*'^ ^^«y"^^ -^'..vn^ ->t^ yi^ 





^' 






JL^K0%M , 



y^Uv^^ -^^>^V yi'/Ln^i.^ (/i Cy^< fiy^^^x^i^^ ^^tf- ÄvX^' Vlo-u- , 

^,7^ ;^^<-^^v*^ /f^t^i/^ i/^ w^tiii^w^ y^cc<yu ^e^in:,,^ 
^^vi^^ /C(y^i^^ y^i^'y^ ^^wi^-w*/^ >i^-u-u-t-^ ^i^u^v^^-iC^^^/^Cw^i^ Itl 




««^b«««« ^ 






^. 



'^^i^'V^yV ^^y^^ y^i^*' 



d4^U^^^ 



^ 



n 



5 






I 



' II 



^"^■p 



i 



i 1 



l'l 



m 



i 

: .1 


i 
1 




'!•' 


1 




11 •!■ 




1 


1 '■' 




l 






f^^^^K 



/ 



y^ 



^^K^ 



ßCiyU 




/ 













X^*"^ yi^' ^^ ijf/n^ "i/i/^^t-^ 







u^ » 



«^L^xu-u^ •^i 



6^^-^^ . 



-v/o^ 



.*^^ 



4y^C,^ ^.^ /^^^^--Wt ;L<.v^;^i> 











^^ 




A^. 













^^-V^^ 



^. 



4>'. 







III 









/^y 






> 



y<yc/i^^^^ yf.i^ ^^ 



JcJii^ -t^u^.^ 



-Z^-^^^i^'^ * 












/ 




^ 



"hy-^i^"*^ 






i- 



^ly^'/C^ yl^cJ^ ^^^^"^^ 













44,^^'^^ ^ *— ' »^ M-^i H^ V'v 






. ^ ■ -- ^g- — 



i 



I'* 

' I 



\l ' 



\ " 



ii 



f^^ 








-^/V (^ ß^^i^l^TJf^ ^ <^' ^l^ y^4^c^ ^'^"^ ^^^^^^ i--.-w- 



Z^, 



-ÄXUt-^U^Ut^ 



^-1^ 





^^Cr^A/^^^^ ^/ ^^ 



::2i 



/yU^^yi^vyi^ , 



>^V yyZyC^ /VuyOc^ ^i^ x^wwT'-*^> * ^'^' 






/- 



CC'ifu^ yl^^^,^ 



'/ 



^- 



,>^. 



Ü 



;»^ 



/ 



^^'^i ^ 






f >. 



1 



(y'L>^y^^ 




^Z^ ^ 



/ 



> 






% 



y^X^ >-ÄXH^^^ . yiu^iy\y/ >-wU^ C^-^t^ 



^•<r 



•^ 



/ 



/t^<^ 



^ 



K/3/f'eyi^-nyUi, 




^Oyy'-X^c 



'^Cvi/Te^ 



^/^txuv 



,>/<^ 



/> 



<4U^ i^Cv^ . ^<^ -^^^Jr^ ^^>*^ ^/^' ^fC^^'^: - 



I 







/ 



AI 



jJ I w i J I M 



If <i 



^ 




I 





'i 


. 


i 

1 


IN't 

1 


! 


1 


; 1 


i 1 


1 


1 


1 


fr 



^^ ..1^^ <^^^ .xv^— ^ ^^— ^^fi^^zy^ 

^.^U^y^ -/^^^^i^i^ , ^/^'-^ '<>Ly^y^ y^'^ 







^d> 



y'^^r^^^ 







s.yt^ 



'iU^W^-U*^ ^-^^ 



J.^^^ 



/ 




ZX^^^-^ ^'.-^ Jyir^^ ^'^^ ^t^i^ ""^^ 



y^/ ^ 



/ 






I 



/ 






/ 

< 

f 










\ 




\ 




^A^-iCf' 



.^■,.^ ^<! 



(^ t^^y y^ 



D 



* I 



'^i''irir^- 



1 

1 















^ 



'^ 



>/ >v^ 4^4^ y^^ /yt^ ^-^v-u-t^ 






/ 



'A^Li^^. 



-^^ 




>^^^^ 



^^^ y\^^^' 



yiyfyt 



■X 



/XA^y^/^cX^ ...a^i^iy^ yiiayn/%^ jC/C^x^iya ^4^^u^ ^-^y/ i 




'^' 







^<</ -- 




^/r^<^ 



yC{yy^ /^"^y yy^yi*^ >^^-vt^ 




) 



'^ 



c^^>/. 




/ 




/f 













^*^w^ Ö^C y<iyt^ iy^y^ ^(^"yi^ 

'//w^.Ui. .»^,^. <2u->, ^ v^v^^ X- -Ä'-^v-*^ >*^^'>U*^ y.fCh^*'-^ '^^ 



yi^ 



' ^ 



i; 






1 



il 

I M 



■- ^ 



^/'^ 



i 


l 

1 




1 


! 
1 

1 : ' 




i 


1 

! 
j 

1 ; 




1 j 


1 

1;' 




1 

i 


1 

1 


i 


1 


i 




1 


.1 


1 , 


1 ' 


< 




' 


1 


i 








! 


■ f 

i 


1 


. 1 

1 






f 

1 


1»! 11 


il 






/'l^^^ 



</ 




u^^ 



t/ys^ ^^ ff^^^c^^^^^yrVL^n^'i^x^^ 



,^1/'%^ 




/ 



r^ 



y4^*(y y^'^ 



•^ 








^A' ^i^i^d^ yf^^'^'i'^ 



/Tdyt^ii^" ' >^-^^^*^ yUfy^*' 







j^/J - 



/py^^i^n^ii 



x^/U-fc^, 



^^/U/in^ C"^ c^* ^/t^u-i^ x^'^ ^yncy^(yy , ^>w^ y^'^zy^ 

'^yl^fi A {^.yyy^a cy'.Q^ ^y/IC^' /y^M (^'^^^ ^^i^^^ i^^^'^^^f (. ^t^^^^ 
yVCy^^ /yiy\yyy^ cy^^^ yÜ^'X^^^y ^^^aJU^^-^ ^lA-^ ^ ^ 

,ytL^ yCi'i/ C^^r^.^^ ^iZt-ß y^t^*^ ^ y^'J^t^ 
-^^; V^ t^iry-^,^ ..f^^-^^-^ ^''^ yC>'^M^ ^'^«-^ - 



t 



/ 



* 



i 




i>. 



II 



l 



9^¥ 



^(^^^ ■ Myf y*^^^' 



(^^^^ 




4^^V 



^ 



i/yy^ t/^ (y^"^ 



C^yy^rnry fi- 






y 



/ 



/ 






/ 



<^' yAyiy\yf' 



V. 



1J^- ^'«^ ^^ 



^(^•^X^^ti/Trc^yiJ- 



^^ y^' 



'^^t^ Jä^r^^i^^^ ^■'^^^-^^■ 



7^ 




t^ A^ 



.^'l.-ww 



> 



1^ 



UJJ >c^— ^^. ^ ^-^ 



Axuv-v^ 



^- ^^^^^t^u-W 



^d^'uOO /t.cxwv^^^^ ^ 




Wi^l^' ^ 



Jl/^i^4/f^ 



Ih' 



r 



4yl^y^ 






40^£y^ 



M^ 



- ^ci^^^^^'^ 






'•Ci*^*'^*'^ 



^ 



Ä^^-l^^ 



^Ä^ /1U^ ^.^^*-V%^ 



.!■ 








.^^-u^v^ x^ >^C^«^< 



T^"" 



-//r^ 



/lA^^i^^ 



^^' 



^>^^>^ y^'^ ^/^y^^ 



u^ 



y^^^'^"^^"^ 



6yC<^i-0y 



/ 



,^ 



/ 



,(/C^.yiyf^ ^^i- 



,X^n<^<^* T^^^T^ 



y^C^i/c^U^U^ yÜ 



'-V 






y^c/^y \M^-^^ i^ Cy^bn^ y^/iy^ Jl^-^ 



.^ 



^r> 



•>^ <^ 



^^4y^^^ly^yr ^^^^ *^ 



y%/C^ y -^L»^ 




/. 



lyu-^ 






^ 



i 



^C-'^X-^t^ y^d^<^ '.^ -^'yi^^O^ 



r 



^^Ui^' ^/^ ,.«^PiX^-<-i^^ J^!*^^ 



/f <>vt-' i^^iiy^^'*^ //Yi^^yCii^^ >*t-l^' ^(,'1'^ C ßyCC^ 



'4i^'ti^ 



.^ yO a^'^'-^i'l'^y*^ ^ •'*'*'^-*^ 



/ 



*^ yU^.^t^'l^^^'Cy 



/ 



>r^(y^ 



^ 



■A 4^^'y6 



it..^^ yi^' 



-<S^-^> 



yWiy,^ i^^U^i^ ^'^ 






^y^^/K^yiy^ 



yn4 



^ 




^ ^ 






Jn^ 



<^n^ 



/y%iA<^- 



/U^Cn' 



/ yn/t^^»yy^ ^J^Tc^W*^/ ^i-w XV^*- 



^' >^^ 



^y^U^(>y^ ^/^(^ 



/ 










Aj6(y^ 



y^^^l^ 



^^^ 






,^- 



^^^^ 



^<^'.A.w,^w^ K.-H^ .^^4^-w -'l^^^iyyS/o^' ^ \ 5 



L- 



1 



JTff 



w* 



-Äa««r.,Ä,3F** .^ «t.-^i« 



w \ 



j^ J^ ^^y^ ^«^^ *i^Uv**^ yy^^rrt^^.- 

^yy^ yfX^^fl /rCy^'l-^^ yi'>^ yU'.t.^ i^ Ä-H,/^ Ä^^^ 



Jlc'-yr'i/C^ ^d'^'^^ i^^iC^'y^-'^-^ 



,^rv-w>-v«.^ 



'/- 







^^i 



/ 



I 



/•»t/^rf-rvix 







'>^>^' xv^^ ^-.-^^ ^"^-^^-- -^^ 










^yi^ 



^ 










^' JUryi^y^' 



rok^ 



J/\^ ^^^**v**»^ 







y6 (//^sJiC yUi 



i 



"Tll 



11/ I 



li I 



'^ 



ii/lß 







^^u. icf^, J^ J^ <^^^^ 





/ 



<^. 










i^Z^c 



"yCi/^^ ^ ^^^o^ >^^ ..ii.1^. . 

V/VUVt-'^^S/i ;x^><^ - Tt^'^^IV?"* yU^^'^^U' x^^^"«^^^*-^ ^•-V^^-^^^ 

^^ yj^lAyt^^'^^y^ y^^ C /i-^-ix yfl^L.^ <^<<^ %,iyt^^ 

^■^-^v^i>utx — V'^ Jyyt^ ^^xu-ixt^ JyOc^i^i ^i^'^^^y^ i 



x^ 



^j^^' (>^^^ C^yi^c 








C^^'^'fiyC^y 



^ 






1 



\ 



..»Ä»3steL-asa. . 



<^z^ 



yyui^^ x^'" .A^t^* 



■^i^^^<g-^*-^ 



^'yr.^ 



/ 



^^ 



^ /Uut^^c 



'C'^l/i^ 



'/■ 




y%A^^^^^ ^x^<-^*^*^ >^'^^a^-i-'yvu</'>i-a.'i^^ 



'^M-^ 







yi^itMu^^^i^^ A^ 



l^ 



C^l^V^W 



-^-V<U^<«/^;>vw^*i-*^'i-^ ^.*^*-^^ 



^t-.'A'^— *55>--ri? 



<:^ 




xr'^ 



K^*^' yh^'^'^-^^' 



-^^" C3^u^ 







/ 



/^ 



'^Ul^i^^'y^^ 



y^^yi 




^ 



^JUi yi'yy^i 




6^^i 



/1/^^^^^ 



X 



/ 



A^I^^^U 



y^^y'iy yUC'^^^'V^'^^V^^ 



-/ 




Ä^n.1^ . vvi^ ^^.^ 4y^^A / 



'^f^üy^a^^ 






'/ 



/ 



; Vfc^i*^ r fc- 



y^ ■^. 







i 



^^ 






T^- 



>. 



^^><^ 



7 
^ .*<^ 






f 



ä/i^^inny 



/ 



45../- 



/^...^^2.W-^Cw^P(i< 



^dytJic.^ ^'Uc^ y/y^^l^ Jt^^ ^^ "^X^^ 



^ 



jlytyn.'Xi^.^ 



t^vi^w^^ 



'^U^t-r^ 



J^ oJc^^ -jA" -^-^^ 



'^^^^^Z^U'W 



>^ >»^< 



i>^' 



^, 



^l^U^'.^ 



^^^Vw^ 



% (^f^ c/^a^^fU^ 






L^ x^^J^J^ ^ 



>^ 



^''>^ yyc^^'^r 



-^^^«^ •^I^'^^^^^'**^'**^ I -^v^i'^ui^'^S^'tv/^ yüC^k^ yi,^^yL^^>'^y^^>^^yCL^' 4<^ 




■Z 



y 



K^äc^^ ^■Z.^^y.i-^ -^/yiy^iUl^fi^t^'^^U^^ 



K^w^ 



i^U^CCi 



/^♦t*^ "^C^i^o^^^ 



,0/^ Ww*.'»-*^^<i' 



li-H^ 



2; -A-' 



y/ 1r c?Üuu^**^>^*^ 



{(I 



ll 



Ml! 



ill' 



^il 



jrc^ 




^' 



V ^a^ 



M. 



^^ 



'^ 



■% 



y(Uurz4y Jt/öu^-^f^c^ A^i^dt^^t^ »üc^^^'^^ 



'C^,^ 






y^/ r 






^äyi.^'X.-^ ''VC'-U^U,(^ y(Cl'^ yü/l^^ ^,1»^^ y/y^'/U^^ 

^^-.wu^ /yiyf^ /;^a^\^ yi/^^-^' '^ ^"•""""^A yf' "^"^ 



> 



'.£ 









^^^y^^\%0»' 



y^ 



M 



Mri 



ttt^ 



Jl/iyy^ 



i^^>-4 



y4^ .^0^^ 



A 



^yU/{/<y}* 



i/C ^^t 



•^ 



^y^ 



^X^>-u-» ^^-i 




^^ 




-^^ 



<i^<<-^ 



jC^fcyut/f-^ 



0,^0^^ 






J< 






^ 



'^^ ^*/i^- ^yi"^^.^ / -^^<k< Z^^**^*^ 



-^•i^ 



V 



-Ä^. 



^X-y^' 



A^'iiy 



''^/'Vy^ yt'UU'^ 



' ,y)k,^.'^^ä^-y/(t^. J^U^^ 



Wa 



1 



y)/i/^ 



^' 



U^ Q 



i 



00^0^^^ 



.^^ 



^ ^cc/yl'^ 



^^//^/Uw-i-^ 



y4^ 



M 




l^i^Ul^W^ 




.^, 



^^^ 



/ 



v^ ^->^ 



^C^'^yU^^^ 



^^' 




^If f 



-ix^ Vi-^ -;u^ ^4^t^^Ä^^-'t-v -'U*-!^ 



/• 



'^^U^'-tC^ 



^J.W-<^ 



i.'Ä-/«/ 



^ 



xV^ 



>^^^Uvn^^Öt^ I ^/X-^vv^ 




,-x' 



^^■^ ^^^t/ ^ 



.«^ 




CT) 






^ << 



^<£ 



yi/^/z 



'^yirt'^^^^ y^'^M^ 



^ 



^ 



x^t 



jy^^ yM^ 



/ 



^ •/ ^'^C'iXk 



^. 









-^ 



^i^ ^n/^i^^yiyL 



c^ cyu^^^^ 



"^^.tt^Wy^ 



y\M.^yUf 



y^^ 



.^ 



i^^^ ^Xt> 



^ 



^u*' ^/^^«--^<*<i^'' I ^^^^i^ 









•^ 



€^^^ 



y 



■^>^y. 



^ 



A-U-ta-V*^ 




•x/-' y*^'^ 



//. 




^^v^ ;^ 



4'-*^ 



V. 






^. 






■^■ 



iy' V 




M 



^^r^i^ x'^u^ 



^^Vn-^a^^^ >^ ' 



^ 



yi/^^' 



J^ 






Ä-^A^ 



y^(^ tL^t^ ^y's^ ^Ja/cM yy^ y^^yi^y^ yt/zOr yU^ ^ t^^ />i 



^^ ../Av^' 



J/'\yL<0^ir^t^*^ 



yWn 



'/l 



^H 



^^ !L^^*n* 




*i/C^'ty 



^'^^- ^-7^ 



ti^ 



I ! 



■ 

I' I 

I 

I 



( ,' 



)« 



> f 



\ 



m^ 






^^Ut-^ 



-^4^ ^^^ 



Ä^ 






'/S-^t^^v^* X^t^^^ 









^^^" Vt^^^^ut^" ^^^' yfy^'yt^ 



V 







0.' 



.j^-wwcy^^ ;^£.. ^ 



:2 



7 







ii} r 














^^v >4^^uv^^ Mi^^UCu 9)yi.'u^-l^.J-^--^>^^ ^^^^^\ S.Jr\^tT. ^'^r-^ 



1 

i 



Ot A^*-*^ 'y^'^K^ y4y^''1'fi J^' 

.pvu^t^^yt^' ^^^•^^.— ^^^^"^'''"^ 

^ >,,*^ ^>^ x^— Z"^^' 



1 



ft'l 



/^^...t^ (>v-^v^ 4^ «^ -^y^v4^ C^^'/Ci.,^ ^.w^^n^^ ^X^^^^^i^ 

^Xi^^U^'^i^ ^'^-^ y^^'yi'^A^ y^^n^yi^oA 








<A^ 



a 















•1^*' 







)- 



<£ 



^-.; 



^^< 



-#4 



<^ / 



(^ 



^. 






'yy^ 







'--M,- 



Jy^^','^t^*/C^'^iy^.>^ yyiM.^1^ ^^L^l^'^"^^ ^ «^^^^-^ i 

4. 



i 

J 
DJ 



]! 



/ ' 



I 



. "U 



i3ü 







^/(f^^^^ >-wU*-,^ t^^A^l^^C^ 

y^/tMi.^-^-^ 4/U'>L<ly jLn^A.^^^ A^ 

^'i^/\^^Jil(^t>^ yi^^^^U' yi^^.^ y^H^*^^ ^cl«'^^ 



JU^4u 



ii 



yJ 



/ 



/Wu^ y^cy^y^ yU^ cJiX^ yf^ \ 



^- 



yC4 ^uJs^' f^t^""^ c^^^^^^^'^ 











^ 



yiOi'<y 



/ 






♦t.-fc-«' 



' "»-W^ A ^i-* fc «»11 



/ 



I 



II ' 



. » !■'" — '•«■«■BM^HIB 



ii ' 



i 






• I 



H 






4^52- 



G 






V«.*^ ^^' 




^yi<4j»^f^^ 



C>^ X^w 









Ay«-^ 



HO 



jta^^ ..t--^ >x> 4^*' <^ 



,^V "i^ii^t^^-^ 







^^^^ ^^ -^^ ^--'^ V^— ^-^^— 






^(Tl/^ ^^' ^ y^' 






! c:^^^, 



/ 







^Jv/«^ 



/ 






\ 



i1 



«1 






VJ ' 



I \ 



ii 








// 







/^lyA/nn^^' 



ik 



/ 



^yrv 









/ 



i^ 




I 
















/Ziyy^ y(f-^' a^t-u-v,-,^ /yt^^^i-^iJc-^ 



^ 



^, 



""^ 






^ ^^ Jr£^^ ^^^^ /1^-cU^ 






//<:^. 




i; 




11 



I i 




Bihtor IHtt^ailomitfd} ^asn|rt|om. 

l * ' Con IJlodbbrud »ctbot?ttJ 

Cr«gop Jaroho« 

«iMÜ^ 2Ö««nie^, ben größten runi!cE)<n SDkiter bcr ©eßenWört 
l)dbtn flc ermordet. , . l 

SCflö«mein l^rrfd^t bic Stnfld^t. böfe Scnin, Stopft rnib bte SowjctI 
«UQ€nbItcfIi(^ in ©rolrujjlQnb wßicrcn, btxf) t[t baS nici^t mef)r bct 
3fan. 2)i« ©otüjetä unb bt€ SolfSbeauftragtcn Fjoben il)rc fd^inbote 
37lad^t längft t)CTloren, unb bic Qan^i ^walt ruf)t je^t in ben ^nben 
ber BSlitgliebet ber ^uBerorbentlid^n Äommifrion ^ut ^fäm^fung 
b«t ®|>cfulatton unb bcr ©fgenreoolution. 

SHid^t of)iie Äom^t l^aben bte ©ott3rct§ ifjw Stellung öufgcceben. 
6d^an im Oftober öortncn 3af)re8 begonnen bie ©otüietjournaliften 
m faft oCten fommuniftifd^n S3lottern iljten ijclb^ug gegen bie 
„2:f{i^re&n?t)t|<fyitnoiö'' (bie „Slu^er4>rbentlid)e'') ober, mie ber ei(ien- 
cvtlq f-amiliäte 3Jlo§fn.ueT fie li'cbetjofl nennt, bic .,2;f(i;reS«Jt)tfcf)flita*. 
damals waten äße ©eföngnifye betört übetftiOt, bte 3:tibuna(e mit 
%tUii bcrart überf^äuft. bo^ man, um ntd^t boreilige Urteile föDcn 
^u muffen, bie ben ©efongenen 3ufteF)enbc 5laf)rung ju froren unb 
cnbcrcrfeitS bie „Sdjul^ljoftfdjanbe* au3 ber SÖelt ^u fcfjaffen, in ber 
^.'Äu^erorfcetttlic^n* einen red^t eigenartigen (Sntfri^Ut^ fnfete unb 
ßw^ burd^^ufüfircn begann. Sluf il)ren Sefef)! würben bie ©cfangenen 
no^ in ber 9lad)t, bic bem 5)erf)aftung§ta9e folgte, einfad^ furjer* 
f)anb etfdjoffen. . . . S)ie ®erid]t§oerl)anblun0en über ben ^üU fanben 
bann einige Xage ober SCßod^n, ie nöd^ ber ?lrbeitSluft unb nad^ ber 
SÄcnge bc8 SJlatcrialS, ftatt. 6teüte fld^ babei ^erau§, bafe ber 
^üfilierte unfc^ulbig war, fo ging bie Hommiffion fogar fo weit, 
ba^ fle ben i^ü ,>eb<iuertc''. S^i einmcl eingef'ül)rte, Öufeerft 
bequeme Softem würbe nun nidjt me^r auf^efyoben. unb fo lam c5, 
bö| bie aJlitglieber ber Sowiet^, bte ebenfo gut wie jeber onberc 
o^ne ©ertc^t, einfad^ infolge einer SJenun^iation ober ouf SDßunjcft 
eine« aJlitgltebeS ber ,.Slu&erotbentltd)cn'' crfd^ffen werben lonnten, 
bm ftampf gegen biefe neue öinrid^tung oufnol^men. Slber, wie t% 
fc^int, erfolglos. (Sana erfolglos! . . . Unb augenblidli^ regiert 
in ®ri>Bru&Lanb bie „2lu^rorbentlid)c Äommiffion ;^ut . . / 

Slucl^ aSkSnie^ow tjaben [\e bor einigen Xögen ermorbet. 2Da§ 
golt fein l)ol)e§ Filter (er ift 1848 geboren), waS galten feine 55cr» 
bienftc t)or ber ru|rtid}en unb toor ber SSklttunft, wq8 galt fdjlicMicf) 
feine „Unf(i)ulb*? a)ie SJlörber t)aben feftc^efteflt, ha^ ber Äünftlcr 
ein ei)rcnmitglieb beS „SunbeS ed^t rufrifd)er ßeute" war, unb il)rc 
6uf)nerl)itnc fonntcn barauS feine anbere ilonfequen.^ /\icl)en, al§ il)re 
eiüig einzige, bie fte noc^ cinigcimo^en einig mQd)tl Unb S3ifror 
!B2ic^iiowit[p^ lebt nicf^t mctit. •• 



Ucbet feine ©ebeutung alS ftünftlet fönnte man biete* unb bodi 
nid)t8 9icue§ fd)reiben, S)te ^l)nt)cit, bie Äraft unb bie eigenorti^ 
fünftlcrifc^ ®en>on^t!}eit, mit ber er feinen ^infel füljrte, gaben ilun 
ben Jl<tmtr\ bc§ ruffifcf)en 33uonarottt, unb bamit ift wof)^I baS meifte 
gelagt. SllS ©o^n eineS ruffifd^n ^riefterS trat er 1868 im aitet 
bon 20 SfQfjtcn ol8 ©tubent in bic bamoligc fatfcrlid}€ Slfabemic ber 
fünfte ein, abfolbierte fie aber nid)t unb ging fürs bor ber Sc- 
enbigung feiner ©tubict^ nad> Stallen, um ba feine ßel)r3eit aum 
5lbfd)luf3 3u bringen. 25ann fam er wicber nad^ S^u^lanb, wo er mit 
einer !Reif)e fleinerer ©enrebilber in bie Deffcntlid)feit trat S)ie 
^erfe biefer Seit finb aagemein bef<mn*, ba§ befte ift wo^l ba« 
„Äricg§telcgramm'. Slbcr für baS ungefjeuere Talent 3Bo§nje^ow8 
war ber 0lal}men bc5 ©enrc§ au eng, unb fo toerlieö er bicfeS ©ebiet. 
um fic^ einem neuen, breiteren unb fetner ßroft meljr entfprcdjenben 
au^uwcnben. Sßa3 er bon ba an t>on feiner l^unft wollte unb wie 
er fie auffaßte, ,fann man am bcften auS feinen eigenen gu (Staffow 
gcfprod)encn Söorten ertennen. (jr fagt: 

„SCßir werben nur bann unfer Xeil in bie ©d)afe!ammcr ber SCßelt- 
funft einbringen fönnen, Wenn wir olle unfere strafte auf bic ®nt- 
widlung unfcrer eigenen rufftldjen Äunft fonaentrieren, ba^ fiei^t, 
wenn wir bie HJiactjt unb ben 8inn unjerer 53olf§bilbcr, unferet 
rulfifdien 37atur unb 9J?enfd^n. unfer gegenwärtiges Öeben unb unfere 
SJergongenl^eit, unfere Sräume unb Hoffnungen unb unferen ©lauben 
mit ber für un3 möglid}ftcn SSoHenbung unb pllc a«m SluSbrudC 
bringen, nnb wenn wir imftanbe fein werben, in unfercm (ydjt- 
nationalen baS eigene ewig Unberganglid^ wieberaugebcn. . / 

®te|er ©cbanfe würbe a««^ ICeitmotio beS gonaen ©d^o^fenS 
SSaSnje^owS. (St beginnt biefe a^eite ^eriobc mit 2J^Qrd)en. unb 
8agenbilbern, bic einen ungel}euren Streit pro unb contra ent» 
feffeln unb xifm in gana 9flu|lanb einen Flamen fdjöffen. 2)ie brei 
größten (^«agcnbilber: „^Ijo ^uxi>mt^\ „3>te brei ^ü^n" unb 

S>a8 ed^Iad^fclb" (ollc brei in ber 8ommIung ber Grübet 
iretjafow' in !Dlo§fau) ftnb jefet in ber ganaen SCÖelt befannt ©eine 
ajJärt^nbilber: „SDie brei 2)örfer be8 unterirbifd^n Uiiä^', „Xtt 
fliegenbe 5cppid^', „Scriewitfd) ^toan a-uf bem grauen ÜRoffe* unb 
bic unbcrgleidj!irf)e „«Ijonufdjfö' werben je^t al8 ttd^nifd) unböfl- 
tommen onge[e^n, waren aber ^ut 3eit be« erfd>cinen8 eine 
Offenbarung für bie 3ei5genoffen unb werben SO&cSnie^ow immer 
neue unb begciftertc 2krc§rer bringen. 

2:<tnn berann bic britte unb le^te *Perix)be im ^rf)affen befi 
^ünft'ers (jein crftc§ grrt-eS 2Öcrf bie|cr 3«it tft bie SSanbmalerei 

lln'^ere 5:" vjaliren tn ber eteinjeit" im Hiftorifd:en Hllufeum a- 
^Ut)?fau. Tie^§ 2£crf ncvrnlottc ben tpiofeffor ^ ^xüd;m, oI« 
man c;r.c:i .(tünfticr fiir bic ^Jlfilcre-cn a"t 9>cnenbun<j bei 
2iM'n^imir-c'?n ^<ttl;ctrr:e (aiMnbin:irifii ecbor) in Ittew f-udj'e 
bie 5(tbeH SSJnSuieK^ 3»' überlaffen. Sie würbe ^um aJleifterwerf 



be8 ÄönftTerg unb inx größten (Jtrun^jenfd^ft in ber SÖeWftr*€«t 
fünft ^n SRu^lanb fpric^t man je^^t allgemein t>on SOa§nje|owfd^n 
©efid;tcrn unb klugen, unb ßmile 3oIii fagte über bic bon 
SöoSnje^ow gefd^affcnc .,3Kutter ®Dtte8^ fie wäre bic bcftc bct 
HOe'tmabonnen .... 

SDiefeS unb nod^ ein anbereS 2öerf beg ÄünfllerS „SCaS jüngfte 
(&crid|t', bo8 er im Auftrage beS ^rtn 3. % ^lietfdf^ajew.^naltcw für 
feine Orabtiffird^e in ben 3}ialtewwerfen moltc unb baS bic Äritif 
all „bog gefd)Ioffcne Ergebnis ber (Jrrungen^d^ften ber gefamtcn 
curoöaifd)wd)riftItd^n Äultur* beaeid^nclc, mu^ man felbft fe^en. 6« 
lol)nt ftd^ nid)t, etwoS barüber a" fd)rciben. ba man mit Söorten nid)t 
im entfernteficn bic (Sewoltigfeit, bie ^Jlad^t unb bie eigenartige 2öa8. 
nje^owfd}? Sdjönbeit ber 2ßerfe mtSbrürfen fann . . . 

S)tc legten ^af)re oerbrod^te ber ßünftlcr immer nod^ fd^ffenb in 
3}lo§fau, bis etneS 2ageS bie „SlufeeroAentlid^" ^rouSfanb, ba^ et 
nid)t nur cm genialer Wlakv, fonbern aud^ ein (J^rcnmitglieb bc§ 
„^unbcl ber cd^t ruffifdjen ßeutc" war. ÜDaS fdjabcte c?, ba^ ber 
53unb feit langem ntd)t mcl)r ejifticrte, wnS fd)abete eS, bob SQDaS- 
njc^ow feXbft, fdyon feineS f)o]^en ÄlterS wegen, feine ®efaf)r für bie 
ruffi[d)e „Sf^eüolution" bilbete? . . . 

Unter ben betau fd)en{>cn ^rebigtcn übet bic bemofratifd)e unb 
au^drpolitifdöe Äunft ber ^rrcn iOunatfc^rffi, ^orbcnffi, ©orft unb 
tiicler onbercr würbe ber geniale 3Ba8nict^ow in ®efcll[d)öft einiget 
Spefulanten; gftüubcr unb 5)lörber erjd)offen . , 

Unb fRu^lftnb? ... Unb Wir? ... 

SicUcic^t tft es ba« ©djidfal ber ^mcnfc^ljett, ba^ Ttc il^re ®röfetcii 
Wie 0lüubcr bet)anbelt unb mit ifinen ermorbet? . 



M/^- ^'^CAhlny , ((jö\ 



Gnl^i >>H^^ (j>IIM} 



&7W 



3/5 



Afi^/f/'W^ 



/ 



^ 



r 




^/k/fl^ >y^ö//^'^^^ 



3 5 



X'^/ 






/?J-f// 



f 





^(/J/^'^^yj^L/'j^ 



J 



y^iM\il^ ^uiw^ /.VAir^6f^-*i^^ 




L^ixtrvL^iU^' 





1301. 



r^-T^,/; 



djj //VlA^ tV-j , 




li'ji 



Miy 



/^ ■!f(^ /i^'^^ /^U^ /a^ j /J^pyf^^y^^ ^^^' • ^_1 

-^ tl. AZn^ ■ 

£3 ./^t^u^ 






A^/v^ ,^;^v%> /'ivw/" ^^c^'..^w9lJl>^-^--/ '^-^ f^^'Vi^^ y^^ ' 

£y AiC^ . . _ _ -- 

y^. : --, 



/ 



Vt^-w^ 



£f A^ ... '■ 

yyKiy-*^yU' MJy>^ /i*^-/" •^oV /i"/^ My^ /Wv^ ^^A^'M/^ 



'IS A^yA^ 



&jLr:^ 









^ 







y./^ ^^.-u- ^^^X^^^nuvw 










7^ 



Tl/fr>'*^<»-' 










^o^^/^^*^ 

^y^'**^«.*«».*^»' 



^. 






AUU^'^'^ ^.-t^^vv^ ^"^^"i^ /^A^^ ^/v-^^ ^^Jyy^i/ Auf>^^^ 



yP 



WV'*'^.^ 



/\'^^^yynC>M' /''"K^i^ v^'^iV, 




^^'i/uU ^n4^^ 



dk^^^<yjr(^f^^^^j 



-'V^v*-V»-^ 







'^! 



^/^/^'^'■^•^ 



TVAvTvV^l ^/^^n.'vTVv^^ ^/vwvV /-/vw/^ ^WvC'. 






^/>A^ 






^ J/LyU^^^y^ 



^ÄV^/ 







4^ 









r 




y 



^^^^^^^ 




/l/^^^ />w^ 









^Vv-w^ 






/^^^ 



i 






Atn^ /^ 



I 




.A^ 






a^y^ 



/'MXVtt-Wi*^ 






/^ 



.^^^^^ vv^ A^.vA..w^ ^''^'::;^ - 

^^, ^:^^^ 1- — 



r 



^/v^ 



vu /V'^"^^^' 



/ 



.-^^^^C^ A^ m'Vw^' 




'^•t^ 






/t^' 




^ 



/\}yy\A/ 



t^'^y^i^ 



A\Ä^y^ Tl^'^u^-^v^ y » ^^ ^ »«i "^ 7 » ^^^ /J<W^^ 



i^/»^^nv?nVA 






/^^ 



/yM^Xvuv„^ . </^^->^ L^-^.^ ^V-y^ /i^' 






OK^^^ /^CZv^ ^ci^ -Z'*/^ ^'^^ /^l^-^i^.^^ /^.^^ ^ 1-- 




''T^A^l' 



u 















C 




//w^ 



// 



/>/V%<^.%^ 



i 






^L^^ 



'•V^-***^ 




/^VV 



/i^^h^,^ ^hy^-^ 




/v-rvk/. 



[y\4^'//^/f^ /r^ ^h^ /f^'/h/^ /i^'^i^ /lAv-^ 

•^'^'v^^^-^' /yKJ^^j^y^^XJO^ I /^hr^ Ay^^^h^ ^^irKJi^ A-^^y-^ /apUU. 

/v^vw/ rj'^'^-'^'^ /u^^ — %^rv^u*-wv/ 
^uvv/ /V-vn.^^ "iyyy^n^^ CL^i^U^ /-vu^^ /v4-^ LO^ß^i/L^ y^J^^ , 



/^fi\y\^ z'-,^ /h^^^^'^^^ M/^r^^ y-i'/^Jvx^^ y^^-^^^v^^-^x^^v 

>>vy-v/Vr-^^ /V) *^^^ /V^/^-v-^ M^t\^'/^C ^A^^»^;;^!^ ^{x^-^^Ä..^^—- 






/^^^•^-^ aJ^^^^ 



v^.^n. 




' /i/wwV /Miii^Jjy^^--^^ Yir 



^7/^ ^.w-.^ ^-w A— y..^^^^ /^^^^^^^ l^ 



/; 



rm£ ^ 







/l/U 



K 'v' /i'/^^ /4uia-r 



^ 



r^ 






'AAhr^^^nA^J /^J'f^ ^P^ 












^^ 






/V^A^ 



sJ-^i^^flJ^^-''^^^^ ^/^^^^^ 



Jz-W-l/ 








■^ 



' "^/uyowVS.^ A^y\M A)i^/^ A^^^ ./n^y^^ 

^..^^rM^ ^^^i^^/l^ /f^'^ ■ &^ A^> ^7v^ 



/r^yC-^ 



CA ^ ^ ^ . ^ ^ ^ 

^^ko^ '-y^^^^^ yU 'i/f M^r.^-^ ^cJi^ y^h-^ x'^^K^^U*^^ V-:; ^^^ 

^^-V^Wvv^^ /^ t;y /^J^Y\A^ >^M^^^V-y^ ^l/^^iy\^^^J^\.^ M^ 
Mi^y^j^r..^ d^U^ ,y^^^^ /^/-^f-^^^ yp-^ 



/V^*^^ 



*Ly\^^ 




i 











/y^/l^li^y^^^^^^^t^ 



I 



y<^ ^ ^'™2^^ 



^v-w^ /V7^^ww xi^^Vi^«^^ 



/VJ>2/Tu-tv^ /\„^' ly^n^ 



f^ Ö 










w^^^V^i^^ 



\y^.M^^ 



n^'^ ySL' iTC y^r^/k/i jJ ^ /tvi^>v-v^-vw--v^^^ 



y^- 






♦v^/U'-vi^ 



-^•^ 



,,^W-i^ 






A/^3k^ 






10 ^ ^ 



^'/i^ 



f/ 



f^/«t- 



t/ /'i>A^ i/Y^i/y ii(/C , x/iA^ ..^c^ 











/» V 



,^^/^»*.^ ^-^-„v^ /H*-v^ .^2x»'»^ ""C^Kv^^ r^'^ //^»^nn^/tJr 



^ 






n^C' 



- ^^ /^' 



M^^V* ^ f*^ /«V^^ 









/'l^n^ 



/^' 



fK/iÄ/C'^4AJi^ 



Ax/x^/^ 



>-ivi h'^/H^ />^t^^ /ih-'-^ U >C-»^ ^v^L^ /o'A^ yiu/^^u^ O >uf " 1^ 



/^y^^K,^^ 









.-^ 



^i^VU*' 






VW^'fc;>».v/w "^ <«^^Vi^i^«^^V^^''u^w-v-^^ „^^ ^/q^ ^V^^ y^y^^yy^' "^^^^^//JL^-^ 

l/f^^^^'/^w k-xy(A A^ "f^^-^-^ ^A>^^>^^^M^^>^ ^^v^'^ 





,/C'yi,*V%K' 







(hJ^ 



\ 



/^^^(i^W^y^' ^^^ .^^^ ^'^-^^ <:^'^ "j^^^^^f^ 



Hl 



* ■ I /^ / y 



o 



n 




1! 



t; 



% 



^V^^^^^^ /yy^^^^tUr^^^^ ir/W^/l^U^ //iM/'y^yiy^ 44'^^>*>nA'^ , VvL^ 

^ /^>vn^ .^v^J^-y^i^^.^ /Vj'xwnx-i-«^ A^^^^Jjvi 






^\»\i^ 



^v-*^ 




< 




^L^'^Mi^ 



yP ! 






/ 



xv^ 



^yX^y^^^ 




li 



1 
j 



K'^*''^ '/i/''*^ *^^rrUU:' A ^t^'^i^/v-^'-Vv-u-i/VI^ 



^^vi^vw /Y^y^\y /v'^^y ^A'X^^/yy^'^n^ *^'^'^::^„/^'"''"^W /^^«^«o^y^'W»— ^ 

i^yM^ yj/y^^M^ yr>y /v^ir^^ yr■?v^-^ — ^ i^^^kj^'-»^^^ .^j/vw^v^/ 



I 



^ 






>>^ /U^ 



rr4 






i 



«f 



^^v^ /v^h^ ^"-Zv^ (^h/ru ///^»n^y >vva.#N^>v-uv^^ t/:wv^ 

x^^u^^.-^^--^ y-njn^(^ /j^ ^ /vwA pr^M^ fi'M^ 

/4^;^t/^>v^ ^/-y^ /y2 Ulo^^ ^KT^4n.^ ^^/w "^v^ /^"^ 



/<^u^ /», 





i 



I 



/w3w ^'Wv^ 



Al/l^A^'^-^^^/t^ . 



^^yi^\4^ 



r 



1 



^Vw-u-^-u-u^ yiyi^^^^^y-^y^ Li/ry^ M^^^^-^y^-^ ^^^^A-W^'*''^"^ ^f^-'^y^ " 
/'\h'^ ^/tv»-vv^ ^t-viV /2/^>^ ^^u^Äo^J^u^ ^n^^yl^'yA.^ /d^J%^ j 



^v>v 






J^ iMa^I^^ 




^•A^ 



^'^WV^ 



ifv^ 










>v^ 



) 






> ,1 

j 




/ 



/> 



'V 



/ 



^ •^Z^--. /%s^ j^vvi^^ ^^h^ /^iM, ^tw^ /^^^"^'^^ 








''--^ /^ '-^->''^^ .. .^ j^Uf 1^2^ c^^v^ 




i. 









/ 



/•^^-^ ^}-^ y'y^/L' x^^l^-^^ Ä/^n/^Uv-^^^Vu-ww- TU/V.-^ 







:'l 





X/*Uy^y^ /^^/j^ U^^^/i^-V-*/ Jy%/ifA^, y^lV MuU"^"^^^ 



fV^ /T-^wvxi /^ 




/VVTW^ 



y<<W<^*^ <^>v^^ /\/'^r yhr^ i^' /YL 




/Wi^^i^^Vv.'>''^^^-^'^^^ Jj^y^^^^^.^'-^J/L^ /^^^^^r^^^h^''^^ lÄ/r\^^r>^AA^,^ 



/ 



^^ 



^l^^ /V^^^^^ uil^]^, 



/^ ^ ' 




/W^ O^V^1w/^«/v^i— - /Xi 




/ 






y^J'iy'^^-^ 






i^j/^-W^-^^ 



/v/t^^ ^^^^Ji^^^^4n^^^r^ 













/Ä^w^ 



/Vu«v-u^ 



, ^'^'^ ^/U/^ 







71/^ 






^/^>C/ /V^/vv^/j^w VV/f/^^ 



i 



if 



/l^nv^ ^^r%^ /v-\>i^^ /al^/^.^-^,^ ^AvA-r^U^ AOi^j^X^'-''^^^ 




/>'>v^ 






>^VaAV H^^^ ^'T^'^'']/ A^'M^^W^ ^'^^''^^'^^"'''^^ 



^ ' 






Jrr>^jnUy /l/wt^vV^ 



^ 



^^^'*-^^^ 



/'^^^^^ 






']^$^^ ^^^^ yj^i'^^^^ ^ /u^--i^n^/- 





'^^u^-^ /i^ 



^ j^. 





j^^ /iZuv/ ysj-yy^ 

















»^^»^ -^«»^ii^^i^^ 




v^ 



/ 



U) 



/4^WVvvk#^ 



V 



t. 






/VW 



/tv 







"^>' 




.'A.^^ iKn^j ,;>^ ^<^ fll^/^ ^}W "L^^^^ 



.. ^ 




4^ ^ 



•v*-vw 



^ ^^^r^-^U^^^ X^u-u-iiw^ XxV-u'vAv^ /vu^tv-t/^ X^Av^ ^x^nxu/^^-'*-»''^ 



/ 






^ 



*>-r-^^4okw^ /W'»-^^^-^-^ vWA^^^^H^^^ /JWv^ /^ /n.^,^^.^- yjy\^A-'-^>--y^ 

/ir^-y^^/^h^ /^^^/^y..'^.^^ i/UjnZ^^^ V^t^VwiV, /^^ ^J^^^y^ 




/^^^l^ /^W^ ^^^1-^ yU^ /Wu/^'A^t^^-— (^/LUi, ^ 

/ AA^ •^^/y^^vs. /^wovA^n^ /^vuyjA-^ Vt^^ /U^^^^^y^Jy^^ 

^ /^ ^yU'Vu-u^^ 4,^ JJ,^.^ /U,^^^ ^L^/yily^J^ ^ ^^^ 
^ ^^-71/vy ^ ^^^ z;^ .^ ,,Vi. ^^>^ /^^l.'A___ 






/lu^w^ // ^^-»^ 




^ 



/^/U^ Jl^4^%>'>^ ^^ivo^wA^ A-n/Vv^ '^ 







•^T^'lX'^-^^^ 



/ 



^J 



/^^K^\^ ^/Vv^ f-'T^^y^ tJ>^^.'^^^^ 







Ar^y^^i^ 



^>vvA^ 








4 










/|A^v^ /if^/^ J/yX^'^^^ //''>^^ 









/ ^ « 






/0# /^ 



/w^ 



^ 



T^ ^^:^ ; -^ -^^y^ ^^ 4yC ^..^ 



. /«^ Wv^ :^^T^ ^f^mUiuu^- 

^^'A^'^t ^ J^4^ ,^^4^ dX-^JjL 



^/V- 



4'^''V^ 




'-^ 














^^1 



Vw^ 







/'^Vv^w^ 



■ ■!■■ I ■ iBBi^^^to« 



^^ /Äv^yw^ 'S'»^ /M-^*.^^^-^^ ^>Kt-*V^ An,-u^^ '^'^ .xi/V^'^^^ 

Ät^ivr^A^^ /^h^Z^ ''ÜA^^/hJL^ Ji^ " J^'yy^M^'^m^^^^^ 






i- 



r ^^-^7 



ii 



, ^"/k^^ ^^ CfT^^,,;^,^ Xw^H^ ^JZj^/^^ 

<VWi ^^A^V^ ^tviX/ .^/vL^ ^^^/V^n^ ^Wvn-^ .'i^ 



9 



/^>Vv^ ^. 



t 






,-Äy^^ 









^ 

^^M-**^ 






I I 



^/^vo^in-w^ ^^Syxv»^ "Ä-^-V-T^^w*^ 



.1 












^^ 



•^ 



«^-l^Xw'*-''/Va^A-r^'^ 



/ 



//vU /U>^\y^^^^ /XjJT' 



^^/kV ^ 



/ 



taX (L,^ 




I 



ff 



^ '^■-^w^ .wv^^vw^ ^)^v.>vwv^ tft-* • 




^e 



'W^^ 




{/"M-^ t/'">''i'v.^''*»v-wfy» 



^"'^^^-^ /^/^v^^ O^rh-Ujj /^o^^ww'^. 

Cß>4^ / ^^ A^ ^/^/^/'(^lyi^^ CA'I^X/L y'y^^^ %^yJ^ 



/V^^'»'^''-^— 



^/Vu^ 



^0 



/f 




i ^^ ^^-<^U-^ ^^^^' ^ ,^Vv,-vjvv-^ .-i^/fUy^ 
.yUjl.^^ ^/iu).vv^^ /^rJ^J/lJL^ ' 



>W, -^j 



5/ 



^^ 




AvW^x^^/v^^ yiT" 



/"l-A-V«-/^ 



|A»^*^ X\/Vw%,^ ^ 



^ 



v*/ 



II 

l! 



A«v/5» 



.^v^^^ z''^'^--' a/v; ^amc^ .Av^Cv/^ ^vC<Cw 







Vh^ ]^?v^^ J^/^^ y^\/^^^'^ 

-^v-^ ÄtM^^^^. /j^ Jn^ /hJ yJyJL^ a ^. y^ 



/ivv*. 



^'''t^/rw^^H-uv^ i -^»V^Vy^^ /i/Vv^-w^-^^x^ 



'c/*-7 



7 



yj-^^r- 



"/'W->'*VVv%w^ 



>/^ 



y^'^'^Y'^'^^^^/ /<</*vt-^uw^ 







/ 







I 



'!1 



•W«-W^ 







'i'U 




/t^^-v '/i^ .^Av-/* i'^'-'^'^ ,j,^ /^.v*^ .yuj' 

^> — /^yvTw'vv^ i^t^<yi^y ,yJ^A->4>^ >-^ ^t.:;^ 

^-^^^' ^.^ ^j^ M^^ ^-^^^r^-c ^j,^ 

Vv^ /1^-V<r 2,f '^■A.y,^ ;:;$S^^I^ .^n.^U.^.,44^ 




Ji 



**?r'**«»r^ 



/\AA J'^ 



'l'l^'Äv^ /^Vu-v^ 




A^u44 /-^^vv-rv^ ..^^.^^ ^vw^ >^ ^^vOw *A-^.v,^w:r 

^6 i r^ , r; ., hTi ^ fp I .» ^ ti ^ ^ fi N^ o/v .^Uw/' ^4^;v^ *^wv^ ^J^^-m,^.' 



^J"^ 4^'^ J^ ,,M^ Ju^U^A^^ 



/^nWi^ , rJy^ L^J^jyy,^ ^ /2/>,.vw- x/vVvyv^ (\h'/pKO^ J^""^^ 




I 



'^Viy^u^^ V-vv X^i[,ji.w^ ^^^\^ ^^^w^ ^v^vn^:/ ^^^^v-vAy 



/-wVu MlAv4^/^^^v^ /Wv^ ^^y^^X^ ,^^ltjvw^ ^'U^Mjy 



!^T^^^^^^^ -^^y^'A^w-v^ //^r»'»---^ 



'^•^^s/^ 



Ti'w^^^ 






/VX-v' 



f^L^^-^^y^ 












Ht 




/Vh-^^ 



^v^V^ 



/y^T^^ PU^Al'Ut /f^" 




/^l^ ^^«^ i/^^^U /t^-W^ , ^"^^w^ 



^ 



''Iav 



<^ 



/t/w-w^/ 



r^/ 



! ^*Tv ^i'^i^ ^J'^ ^^^■^'^^^ ,^^^^^ J/*4^r^ 

I /'it/^^Vw /V*wwV^ AM'yd ilLUy^ C^\/fu /U^ „^Vu^^^^J/U*-^ _ 

^ ö'v^'ä^ Äi^k^ Ci^ir^'^ ,/Kvn-i/ ^.vvl^ ^nv^xi^^^»--»^^^ ^ ^w^Ui^ ^- 

/>/lU^ T/KAA^^^ /^'^^y^y^^ JysiJ/^Jl^s^y^ //i^, ^Lj^i//\J^J^^^'^ 

Mjp,^^ ^ /^y^ 'J^vWw- ^i;;^ avC^i^ XW^ /U^l^^-^ y^^'^^^ty^^ 






/^^l/J^v^ , /l/vA^ /^^ i^' C^^JWl^' ^^l^ /^; 



( I < "^w ^ » ^ 



/'^w'-'W . 



« ■^^^** w 



^^ 






yü^Vyyy 



6^^. 



n 



^'U^^ ^-^Vv-w»/ 



-^■/i 







^/l-vW^ - ^i Vu- 1 ^^ /UriT^ h-^ "Kyy,.^^ y^J^ ^jj^lv-w^w' 




X1'^.--vV ^ J3^J^ v/Cu-vSA Pl^mjtCj /?,v-w^/>a^^^^.y^ 



^^^'Vi^' 



^-^-vV^'^^-vv^^-W« 






K 



yi^la/yL' C^K^ ^A^vi^ ^/Wiv^ />y\Stl/ 







(/^V>v-K^ 






/ f 




•^'^4 



/ 









''^.»VVW^^ 



^^^ /vi^.yiv. ^K/i^ 






A-v^ 



V^3--^ 



V\/^^ 




' U^i^^^K^^ 



^ 



/^w:^J^ 



/ 









^/yy 



^^' 



/^ , ^vi^ ,^/kAv^ Tl^/n^ y^/^^y^yß/t /Ww*^ /Uv'iX^ /^^ 

/v^^^MJTA - ^"^h^/\ry^ -\^Vv^v-t.M-.^w^ ^i/v^ /^^-a^ ^/C^^^ 



I 



JM^I^^ Ovuv^. r^rJ yruL^ /U 



/Uw-w /WMVT^ Vtti/^^v^ 









^^^n^>u T^'^'i^'^ n^ 



^' 








J 



^tAv ^^^^ ^//r^^ ^A.^.^ /^y^ Af^ 



^. 



! I 



^, 



r^^^Uj^^^y.^ ^^Y^^ww^/ i^Hi^^--^^ ^ ^Ur^..^ 



^T^^k^/lv^^^^Wv^ \y^'^ yy\y^ r^u^^ t'v^Jj^^ x^vW^ ^/lA-/^' 



H^ 



/Vvw^ 



/^W 







^ J/')yh^>u^ ^U^^ yK;^^<^^i^4^ 



^^'^t^^yH*^^/vu/L<x^X'Vvv^ / T^ X^O^' /U^iA'Ji xA^^ ylA^^ ^^i^ipl^-^^^^^^^^^^ ^v^W /^*v/^**>^vi|^ 






^0 









^^^krm^m 



t 
I 

fr 
* 

< I 

i 



,/^'^^^/y^)/h/i' yjZj /^ A^^w^ ,Ä/w;cv^ -^^'^<^ ^V ^XJU^\^ 

/l^ /Vt^^^ii/ ^^/Vn/W^ yi^V^%^ >^/,^^W^*nxk*^ j>l^ ^^xV-w-wwi^ 

^^^^^ x^^>v>vi^ .xvi'v-^i'vv^ /u\^yfU^^J ^^]h^/n />vi.,4^i^ /i^T^i^ 

H^ ^y ,<;.^ ^ ^j,,^ ^.j^^^Wu^ }^^>^'^^^^ 



^^/^ 









/ 



/V^>v^^ 



/^ -^ 



i-^itW^ x^;^ '"'^'^'^^ j:^^-^^yl^ ^^Cv<^»-v- ' , ^.Vii^ 






:/ 



/n^u^-r 



^Vv^W-n^«^- 



.^Ui^ 






/L^ /tv^^ ^:^^ 

y^r^ A^^ A^^^-^ ^^'U'^k^/*^^ y^ynJ /•^/^^'^y^r^U^ 

/^/mJUw^ ch^.^y^^.^Jy ß^^1j^vj(/h'^ I y}ny /i}u^\^ 

V ^/v^vwv^, * 



Hi 




*l!: 



1 1 




^l 



>v*w— 



/•"f^'^T^P^T^^ 



/y>>-^^(^/'A^ -."U^C^ - ^Z^ ^rrC Vv^ /*W^ 

^^"■"^ — f^''^ '*^" ^''^ ^'^-^i*^ ^.^■■>^J^ jU^z. 

^ *w^. '??^ ^.^^ ,^,V U yy.^^'M^ "' 






^ 



>\i 




^ 








^y>v.vw d^^y]/^^u.^^ ^"r^ ,x^>>-/^!cv*^»i^ •i.wiV 



/y^f^ 



"t 















/y^ A 



r w IM - - ' 1 




V, c n*-. 



ifyvy^ 



/\^ *^ 



^/l/W*-»^' 






^. 



^'^, 







/W A>r^^(AJlJ /VVvv3/>y ^vv^v^ VO^ /i^/A^ , ____ 



H 



♦'l' 






'A 




^l^iU^'^ y^m ^^. ^^^ 



T 






^ /^ 



^.»^^i'%W^ 



.V-^ ^iWw^ 








TLUy^, ^'i^jy'^...^^ y^h>^^ C^A^y^^^^ JJK^^ dJSif^, 
r..^ ^M^^/y^y^ >Wb>^fi.^^ ih^ryy^.^ y^y^^M^^ 








^h^^^ Jy^<^^^^^^ k^/Vvo^ 



/y\^Ci^l^ x/*^ /^^t'-^V^^^-^^-' 



Mpti. 







t 



^^w ^/^ 



r>^W%.v-r 



,>^^ /Vv^^'^vw;^ ^'t/ ,,^/;v^-vO^ 



u 



y 



I 






/4^-v*v^ 










I 









H 






^«•»v-^/Tw^ ^^.;^tw 











/^VW ^^J\^'4t^)^^ A^ ..^O^^Xv^^-^^ 



'^^^'V' /r>^ /^ V 



"V^'^ /^yt^^ Ar^^ 



rr\y^M^ 



^ 




#' 



i^i 



'^^^^•vtA^^ ^Av ^vC:v ^A.>^ "l^i-v^ 






/Yh\^^ 



/^-V^V^ 



Af^y^-^^U^^n,^-^ 



^SA.^^^^v^x A^^ 



/ 



/J^-W-k-»- 



/%^ 



^« 






ih^ \y A^-U^V "^ 



y^**^^^ ^vJi 










VP 




v^****^. 



II 







A/^ 










-<^v*v. 






,*Twv.v£^ 




^Vwj^/U^ 




Vx-n 



>->^/»U^ 



^-i^-i^v/ 



'T>^^^*'**»v/ 




'^^^'^'"^ ,^i^X^ a9c^ -v^ .^^wvvw ^/l^'J^ Jh^^^ ^^^ 



1 



/ / 



xv^ 




/W^W^ 






^)^\^y%,M00^ 



n 






\ 



v^vv 



^/ 










^^^^^^I^K^Pa 









^/^i/vw^ yA-'v^ ^/4w^/ /^^'T^^^^ «^i-u-*^ A^U'-^/v^ >^ 



^A^ •V^t^i^ 



^^«^•'»«. v/»<^ Vvm^ y^J^/^vw^ ;Ai^' 






/•^ ^n*''*''^ 






->/ 




'-^ 



/lv*-»V^ 



/ I 



Ä^"^vu«^/ 



^^T/vw-vV 









.-^ 









st 



/ 



^ 






C '' 



' >^ -, 



/^/wv^ y^J^ A^^ ^j/viV ^/t/^^vw^ i^Myf /^Uw-vj^^^'^.'^ 



1 — -^- 











'^. 



^ ^^V^/Vu^ ^, 
















^^lAw/ U^y\yl» 



Oy - 



/^ 






V l»> W /^>^^^ 4j 




I^XlVw^ ^UyW^J^^ >1^V/VV^ 'l^y^yU^ Zl.'^'/L H 






/ 




/A-wv^ ^nrU^ypL^^...^ y^H^C^y^y^y,^-^.^^ xt/VU^Ji<^f^^^»^-- / 







/ 



V'^*' 






Pr 






:5^, ^ * 



;'?£-;'? -1 ^ ;tf, >■ 



'u^ / 



fif/5- 



, £i^ '^ . 



's I 



cl. 




V^'t/2v /t^fi^ ^■'iUA'^ 







A<^. 



1 



5r 









C <2 



/VW/^/ 



.-<? 








^ iZ^ i^^'^ ^y^i /l^/l' Ac^v^, ' 



Xl^'^'^V^v^C-.^ 










/V*- x>^^ 






i7^'^v**-r^,.1^^uV' ^^""""^ yptJ />*->^ '^i^vi^rvw ^,>^ ^hwi»/^ 










^h^T-^ ^^4^ 



I 



/P^ 



^^ixXd^ 



1 



H^. 









/^'V^.'Vv'V 




/^vWp^^/i.^^ 




1 



;^ 



^ * 



\^V >><w^/h^ U^^^ /vu-w/ .^v^wv/ ^^.v^ /^^^^^^ 



vLi 



.f;i 



o^ 



^' 



/VV» 



:^^.j2y' 




%'W^ 



^>vi1 






/s-'i^v^^i'v^-^ . yY</^y^.Y)^'/^A%.^^^^ ^ 









t.^:^ 



^M^y^^^^^Jo-..^ oC^^^n^ 



/l,^^^ ^.^jUy rh^ 



^^^S^^^^ y^'^ ^''^i.^ /^^ />^^ >«^^ A^^ily,^' 



^'^'t<^WK/%*' 






,,XKvv-/ 



/^/^V^^^^I^i^K^^»«^ A^0^4^..*v%^ 



fS 




'ky^y^Mi^^ ^^j'iUi^/C 




/f 



I 



^/2w^ 




•-Vu^^ 



/vt-vw /i^ o^A/ÖUvw^ y^ ^ Ji^wx^.^ ,.<^H>4v,^ 'fyvJy^p 



XL-v^^-v^ 



MxH^k« 



^^^^^4^^^^ /^^^^ iT^ y^^ /W^ Xl^'^^^^ P^V%/6' /^^O^y^ 

Al^ /W^^^^^ y^y^Uf^ ysJ /^^^ ,^^^^ S^^^ /fi^Hj^ 

^/^^ ^ J^ ^nl^^vjL^,.^^^ /U^ .^'.^ ^"^4^^ '' 
J /^^n^xA^^t/ ^^'^/tA'Wi.^*^ y4^^/yy^yUK^ /i/syn/ln^ x^^U^^^Wcv^ 




f. 



fp 



n 



A 



Y 



A 



^ 



r> 



'>- ^^^ V A.'^ ^^^^ ^^4^J, V^^ Kji^ /W^W^ ,/A^^^ c^ 



j, ^ ««^*Y- ^(^^^ „^.^'«^ 



^A^n^j^'i/p 



,^^W<^-^-K ^-...y^^ 6^^g^i*viy /v^*.r^:r>w5^ 









/V-VJA^V^ 



^/^A-o^j^/)^ 



'^0m /^^^u^^ 7? ;kx^^^ 







v/ 



^y /J/l^'t/ ^^^'Vj/^ ^V^ /^''^^ ^^'^'"^^^ "^ y^^/f^ , 'VT^^.n^^;^ 

/-^j^K/j^ /h-'m/ ^Vz.^ /^^iwV^/^ xvV^ l^v»^Xww-A.-.w- /njnU^ 



/<Uv^v^ 




i sl 






'^»■VU^-vV^ 






/VW^*^ 



^. 










/ 



/^)^<<: 







f 




1^%^^»^ ^^|^^l„-|i*%-V 



,^ 



i\ 












^U^^t ^..^ /jp^-'^yy^ ^^u^-r^ Am^ ^/v4 xO^Y^ 




^. 






MJ ^^A^ 
^~^ 



. 'II -C^»^^, i^^iM^- ^/fr>„4uM ^^vv;*v^^;4^ 5'^^^^ 

i———— —————— - » 




.- ! I( 



/i^i^^^ /-}>^ Ad,^^ ^L^i ^L^ (^cyj^ /^ UIaU^ 
^^A^^/f/^^^ ^^'^J^^A^^^ A/-''>f^--^y^J^^ 

^ /U'uw /</i^uvy ^v^>v^ (^Ti/^q'^ /^/^'^^ ^>yM^ ^^^vi^«^ yv^^^^ 



) 



yyii/u^y^^^^^\^/7^^y^''^. 






1 

% 






^> 



/T^rrv^ 



■^ ^^-^^^^ ^yj^ ^^^^ I^Uwu -^.A^^ //^^^-^Wv^vti./'X^ ^',^^: 



"' d^^^^"^ 



/ ^^ 



^Vh/v^ 






A\A\^^ 






''f'^yi^Ji^J^ f^ ^>^ /Hv*' ^'^ ->^Vv ^^^^J^/Uf-^-i^^ 
y^J^ ik'^iU^- y^'/i>^ ^U^/h> ^^h<^yu4^ — 



y%i^»^\^^ /f 



/^vn^>^ 




^ ^^v^^^^^^l^^^y /V'l-^ -^V.'^vW^ //j^^^ /l^r^. 








/V^'^ 



/k'^'^'V *• 



, ^' 



< M 



/•iv-v^^^ 



'^ux 






y^'lMh^ "j/y^M^ /yv^^Jf^^^^-^^ /V^^ ^^w/u^t^v<7^un^^g^^ 




Z*^-*^"^ A/\y^^^>y^ /vV^ 




,0A^(l/P^^)>^0^ /yl^'h/f^^^A 



A^/i^'*-^ 



/L^^v'V^v^ . X^^^^r^'V^l^ A/w •<h/^jA^u^ 



t 



^ 



trs 



• 



/^^n^^-^ ^Ww42^ ?/^^- 2^y^ >W^, 




^'Vix' 



/2vn^Xa^ ^Wi-vix^^-' 



^i 



/5v^'ii''*-i^u- 



< ^^vx« 









* 



y 



(^:^ 






^J^ho.^^^^ ^Vt'VN-'x-^ yK^l^^^ 



''/'Vu>vw^ 






/ 



/^n^i/vY 



'•^i?.-^- — 



"^/^^v-w-^ 



^4"^"^ 






^hrM^ 






/^ i^f//yV^OWT*%^ 






Vlv^ 



/O 




^/\/i/\y^ 1^^^^ A/^i/^y^^ /v^ 






5^^' ;v. ' 



t 

I 
f 



! '> 



I 



^/^ ^ ^<^^') 




r. 



<^v 



T^^i^ 




'/\/\r. 



iX^^ 



^-;^iv^ yAx^v^v.^^ Ai/ /iSW 



^.^w^ 













Aa>^ - /wv4f/vv /y^"^ A^^^-nf "^"UyUp^ 





. •" . 



/K*/ 



^/j/W^A^^yO^UV 



.^{/x/^r^./'^'^^l^^^^^ 









///-- 



i^Wi 9/W>^ ^^U/ A>W^ 



^?v>n^ 



/ 



•'Vv^L.^ 



II 



•'>'*^ ^T r^ -^"'^^ ./v,-v^-^ .»v-yf ,.tJ^ Z;::^ 







v — •» 



V'^'Vi/u*^^^/^ /V^ ^vv /•-»'^V'w.-v''^*^ 4^1A ^ry^^'^''^ xvi*-<^ 








/iyr^4^Jr>^>>^ A'^^^(^^/-\hrJ^j^ A^/Jy^^^ 



^^^y^^y 



M^r- 



n 










^>nr^' 



'.o^ 



K 



/:. 



-^'^^Hxuvn-vs^ 




/Vi/w 



i! 



^-^-w.^ ''J^^^^v^W^'a^'^^.w i^^p/y^A^^^^ >v'n^.^A^. .A^v^ 



y^^j/^ /jjhyVl^ ^AvV^ 












yf/UC ^^-^ ^dn^' 



r 1 



^^^ 



r^ 






^n^^J>^t^ 



CS r^ ^A^^^^^ r-^^nt^/L M /vju^v^ 






.^^^ ^V'^Vvwc^ ^yy\yy*^^>^ >^"vT^^^7^* JO-'V^A^wvvV^ xuVU 



1 



/K^W^vV 



yUr^^ 




^ 






\'> 



/ 



Ix^ -v>2:^ Cn^Jj.^ yj^,^ T^iu^^ Aui^^^- 

^xi^^Vwv^ ^ ^' V^^^^^^Cyir^ Ar>y K^--^^ /^^^-^ M^'y>^ yt'^ 

y^f^^^^^ A'V^a^A.^v^^ . HjiA^i^ ^JLy^ /U^y^ ^yr^^\^ 

^-r^p^'A.^ .Ji^^y^lJ ,/Au^v^^.w^ ^U-K.^ 

y^^ P^-^^^jy^^ >/^^-^ /<^*viWvi /♦'uJ^ ^:^ 



y>^^ Vk-U- 



//^ 



'^^'^^^ r/^ -ixuo/^^^wu^ 










yx^-^.^.'yyL^..^^^ -h^^i^y*^-^^ 



W>^ 



A^i^^^l/Un^ 




. ^ Av ,^^/vv- "7^->/^ /l^yy^ ^i^r^Ai^ , y}yr^yiJ yh^ ^/Z 



>t^'^^^' ^/Ww'^^^-i — 




A^A^-^vwv^ y^ß'^ y^yyy ^y 



I 



A*^^^y^y^^^l^^ 




y 






-U-v^ 



# 








/3/H-K%' 



r 



i^ ^A^ ^'^J^^^/^ ^^-t:; -'^:S^ ^i<^.w- 

v*^^^ ^ X^ y^'^^ ^-.h^ y^r^M-UtU :^A->^< 
/^ ,/vlW ^,ufj^4\^ ^^v^W <-,^X^ '^^"^''■^1 z*-*-^ 

^(A.^ <^<l/vwu.,o.^vA-^^ •^'vx^/^ ..w^v^-'Vw^ ,/tWi^-^y^^ 



^. <', 



^i/e^'Vi*»^^.*' 



Vl'ixJ^i-i^ . 







>v'Vvn./**^ 






/^''-''^V^ ^^^y^y^n^U^"'^ , "W, 



«f 



.-%-vX ..^^w^^ ^i^J^^ . j^^^H^ ^ 97V. ,^^yov^^ 



/Vi/V" ^'^^jAh^ ^nU^^y/^ ^^^y^vv-v.^..wv^ /4.^ y^^^^^'^U^^^ 

'/^/^ /Vv-v^ /l/l.--«-V^ 4^y^M/(M^%..,.s^ A^ -UX^u^ /^^-v,,^ 



/^u'V'^Vv^'.^^-j^v^ ^., 



J 



^ 






y^/^^^^ A^ 



", \ 



/K^ 



r^^^^^i^ "f^ ^e^/>o^^ ^v^i^^ ^v^ 



/ 












y^^^^r/^'/iy^^^^ vJ-S/^ 




y^: 




'x^ 




^^^^ „ '^ 'i-vj^i^-i^ MJk^^ x^t^^i^vu^ 







"^»»r*» 










<^ 



^y^rv 



• 



^ 




nM^^^ MJ^J^ /3x.-a^n^ A^^^f.(^ ^fJ^^^^^A^, ^^ 



^^ ^/v^ ,/lvW>.^^,^^ XWVv.i^n^ /d%-'vv- -?>JXU^ ^^jp-^^ ^>;/y^ 



/ 



Wvw^ , 



'5>^ 



^/i 



Mw4^^^vi/vw 



- ^ 



/^ 



'^/^''/t-Vw'v.vA^ ^äX^Av,^^ 



j ^"^ ^^Y^/Y^Q^^ x^J^Vvvi^?i^>v>^ ^yy^^''^ ^u/?wvn..wn^ xvuw-wo^ 




$9 



f 



* 



^. ^ 



Qhh-A^ ^ y^ /^ory^^ ./Vn'yU- .Jn^^^^ ^^fW^^^ 

s__ ^ ^ 'l ^»>Vr ^ AlV" ,VV-v^ <>V^^ ^/^ CiA'^y^%^\/ ^nn^^ 



V 






^ 



/%-• 










y'^UC^^^>^/'*'^''^^ >^Vnv^4,; 





A; 



f^ysZ/^/i^\>^jJ , 



/"^•^^^^^ yV/^jUAy^^*^ yy^-^ M //^"^ ^f^^ ^'^Ax^^ Ä-^.^^^ 
"Zu ^4n^uto'^Ji\x J^^y^ -'^('^^ x>V^^^-^ ^/Su^^u^ ''^^'^^^^'^»^^'"»'''T^^''^ 



V'VSC^Ww^ 



yim^^ 



/iry(y^h/i. 13^^ 




hy^»%0<<^\^ t 



J 



\ 



/V^^y^yyi^' (T^^y I /yy'^y^ J''^^''-^^ \y*^^ ^ ^/i^yy^yi' j yU^'^^'^yy^^C^^^y^ 
J uAy^-^ X»^u^v^^ •^^'"^ t^"^^"^^ Ws-^iw^ <:^/^ 




z' ^n^ 



<^ 



i^^ 



r 



^vx^4^.,^^uvj^v^ ^w^-wJ* y\h^^^ ^yjlx^^ ^ y%^ yUryiyt^ V 



L - 



Sl 







I 






Tt-vw.-^ 




y^if^iy u<^^4n^i^t^ X^^^^^ 







>?'>l'l^vVx^v*i-%^ 



^1 
/V^ ^^-^ ^>-^ >^/^ y^^^v4^Ml J^ 



S3 



/ 



/ 



^www^ 



V^^^V"»^-^^/4v'A^ . ^ /^'^ .«/^y /r^M^^^/J ^^^^^ * /V«^ xlA^ Cin^yMW /^U^ xnA-y- >Vl^ ^/A^.^^^^ 



y ^/K-.^ 



A 









/ ^j^^t/ '-t^^ /t.^ ^>'/'|.W^, ^ 




*^ ii^ 



*.^-/^ ^i.4-^i>'>4.^u^ ^^J/V|^^ •'Vv'v-u^ yhJy^..^ , V^'VkWI ^ 



/^Ai^ ^4V^V AyU'T^^ ,,^^ ^H^ /lÄ^ ^^.^^iX^ ^ ^f^Ci'u.^r-*^ , \f i^ -A-vv^ ^^X^ ^ ^^^i/i^)0^^ /^-^^i^j^^i^vy^ /^^K^-U*^ 



;^ 



J( \r^ A'^.'vw 






^j.v2/^j^vv%^ ^y^^rvuv>^^ ^fn^fViyyf^' 



/ 




x-V^TvCvvy^uvx^ ^t/^ /i^^^yJ^ Tj/^^rv*^ ^Xr'^^^ ^^^vtvww. 



VJUv*^ 









♦^ 






C^r^ 



SS 



^^ 








r- 



>ww%^ 



/^^fci^»*uj 



'"^yf^^ 







/^'(J ^UhMx^ y^^yU4%^ ,^^uvWU^ "^^""V^ ^^ 4^J-v^ . 



I 









/ÜyVMU-v^ 






^ 



A"^^^^ 



^r 




Ur^ %L^ .w^ Tiy^' J^' /UIk.'^^ tJ^^-iA-ww /^xiJvt 

I 




;<t^'::^ 



y^^"^^ 



y^' 






"^ y^Jkj 



'/^y^^mt 









y^'^^'^^^yyy^/i^^ ii¥n>i^^ 



f^i^ /^^./^^^ 



^ 



''y-v-iA'^^ 



^ 



/V^k'^t^ 









^ 






n. 



Qvi 



y^yijyi^y^/ 



/JU^ww^ 



/jA-v* 



/u-»' kJyUJ' ^-vvi.^ O Ä^tn^iA^^^^^ ^"i- 



^ 



''W^j^Vl^ 



c; 



'.^1/^ >'1*^,/6/fc*,^H*^>HVW-^ 



/^■/f/ ^^JA-/ /^^/^'»i /yiA^' i/^''^^ u/'i^M//y^ ,iA^ /-yi-vii-> 

•^*^vo^' Av>^ wCiV %^^^^^^^ ;C3^ <W*^^ 
^^•^^^ ^Y^^ ^^ A^"--^ /"^^ ^^^-^^ iC^'^^- 





^7 

/T^^u.^ (/%^ //^.vt^ ^"^^ y^ //4ox^ /i^A^y^^ 

^4^^^*^ />^ V»-^ YUv^ xA-r /^i^a..v.rvv^^^>;;^,^,,r^ 

I/^-WVvV^ ,^V^ /t^^ y^C^I-Oi^ /Wl^V-^ y/fhU^>^^.^^ ^V*^/'**-^ 
' xf 'VU/, /n^wi^^ JA ^^'VLxu^ix /H-M^xv-v-v^ /l^w"**^ ^>v^V^ 'yy^</^ 

.^ ^ ^^^t-'V^^Vw /^^H.U/wvvv-^^, -^-v^v^ywv^ 



yT^-^vv^-w 







/WM>1-',,|mC.A^(vv^^ Wivv— oL'.frjlSf /Mx^ yi*^f^ 








u^ 



I 



I ^ 



/^ 






•»L,_ 





t ^ 



A^ß^r^U)-^ ^^^r"^ /^'i^ /i/w^^-^^-v^ /Vvwn-^»v^ iov^a-vv^ . ^^4^ 

— - r- - 

Op-U^rww C^A. Jf^ U 

l-^i*«^^ • ii-ljt ) 

"^l^^^fc^ ^ ^8 - rü 

• ♦ ♦ ■• *. ' , 




Q M^-O 




>V>>n^^v^ 



* /rt»^^ W ^4^ 



^'l^^ 



C/\MA/^A/-Vy^i 



/Y^^y^ ^<;,ii. V^'k^ /♦w^iV^^<^y>-^ /y'^^*^ 










U^^2lk 



f 



(tir^^ ^tiAv^w>f J^ x-vvv^ ^J^l^^^^ /K/k^^ /JW" y^^^ ^ l'k/iAL^ 



'■f 



u^^M^ '5'''"^ 






^5^>^ TiWvrJ^^ xi'^^J^^^^^^ ^,^^.^'^^,1^^^ a^^u^yt..^ ^'^^vJ^T* 



.y^&^iM, ^nM^'L^ r/'^Y'^ -"K^^tM,^ 




rv^to^ AwV <!j^.^W^ A/ifc^ /w^i/^ J/(m^^ yr^i^ Jvf^'i^f^^^A^'Ui, 
os>..-vw v^ /Huv ^ ^^rry^ , y^*-^^ ffS ^^^^ '^'^^ ^^^^^ 



^)r^yJ-^ xv^/^ !7iM- /^^Jjl^yfh^ 



f.. 




A-/J/1 



i^ 



r^ J^ 'im; IJ^. iiw,j^ G^uUfJX^M^ A^u^J^^L^ 






i 



Aa ^0^1? 



6\L&6^T r/\WLr coutcrvou 



W| ''^€\MC«J^UA o| OUW' Co\Wc-+icM 



A^^jc^ 








Uünechar 



\^ 



I.. 



A 3^ b 




I 



m 





*°~ -iiiilUMUlillf liin'" ' II " " 



U6td«*Mt«te 



l' lltlllll 



■iiiiiiHii 



.Um 



m 



'fUU^yVi^ ^iv-6^-^^ 






"^i'ir a,^o^' 




^^^ 



>^ 




/-^ >r/. 



■!! 



rn» 



:/-" 



iTHrHf"'*'"*!"*^' 



,^!5SPWf!*"»W'*'»'»ffT"*'^?r — '-■- 



LJJtUttttAUA 



•11 



ii 






V ^^ 



V -^^ 



4w. .•i,-/-if* ^-Z' 



-../."•'^ 






V. ( 






t .j % ^ 



^. ♦ 



i! . 

* • 

Hl 



/^ 






N»./ • n • 



«► » -1 'V* * ■* * -• 



» K 



*l 



''j. 



|:;3 



r 



* ( 









P R E F A C )B 



The one handred three objecta described in this 
oatalogue are only beautiful remnante of a oollec- 
tion hioh numbered eight hundred thitty six 
pleces in 1923 and was built up in nearly fifty 
years« 

In 1942,during the German occupation of the 
NetherlandSfOur property was stolen by the notorious 
"SS" and only a few pieoea oould be regained* 
While the men fled the Ganadian Shells these pieces 
remained behind in the attic of the hous« where the 
"SS" had had their last quarter s. 

Most of the objects of our colleotion had been brou^ht 
home from travela in the Par and Near East. However 
there were additions* We bought from famous experts 
like Edgar Woroh,Joeg TrUbner, Prof .Kümmel as well 
from reknown oollections to mention only the counts 
Meida and Otani^Dr.A.Breuer« 

In this way we suoceeded in building up a small bat 
adequate survey of some brauche s of Far Eastern Art 
in which I had beoome interested already at the end 
of the last Century. The ho spi table house of the 
Japanese consul Oustav Jacoby with his famous ooilec- 
tion of Japanese Art,later the pride of the "Ostasia- 
tische Kunstabteilung der Berliner Museen",furni8hed 
the natural centre where it was poasible to beoome 
aoquainted wlth and to seeyto feel the essenoe of 
the Par Eastern Art^as well as to meet scholars, 
artistSfConnoisseurs and collectora. 
Here I laid the foundation to ray knowled^^e which 
enabled me to collect on my travels true works of 
art. Here I met the director of the "Ostasiatisohe 
Kunstabteilung der Berliner Museen" and its keeper, 
Otto Kümmel and William Gohn,to mention these na.ties 
only. Dr.Cohn now director of the Museum of Piastern 
Art and adviser to the university in Indian and Par 
Ka Stern Art at Oxford. 

Thus I entered a cirole to which I am indebted for 
immense Stimulation. I bacaxne a member of the 
"Kxpert Commission of the Eastern Art 's Department 
at the State Museum, Berlin" (1924-1953) and a 
co-founder aa well as a member of the board of tha 
direotora of the "öesellsohaft für Ostasiatisohe 
Kunst" Berlin (1926-1938). 






l'M 

■ • «4 



;i 



•i^if . *- 



tc 









t 



{ i -.J-'-r • f • 



w X K i- i 1 






! JK-. i 



i,ux4^..1.^i^>.L>:ij;xv»tM*j*^--'-^ ^~'----^'*^***'*'— 



> aa iiBi . <«*a^B**^* 



. ■.:».4titt'"itnii^i 



4, : 'A 



; i 



i^x 



.k ~ 



'\ 



v'' 1' "J »hJI ^ 



.*. ,'«..» ♦ • — 









.T^^fcO t -'^ * t' 






•'; < 






* ji 






. i' 



9., .-» ;r 



..*./., .• .'. , -■■■ > .«^ 






)• 



'• ''. . "^ 






. .', j. 



■ '* • - 



I 



»■ »♦ 



S 



"l. C 1 .'» 



^ . *i f 



rv' 



:*.?-,4.:-:^> 






X -j/. 






fl 

r ' I • r,- !• 

V*' •• • 



■• .« 






v!:a-j.^ 



1r 



1v. 



V 






JKI.f 

T 



.-<( 









T •■. 



;> 



T 



4o» .., 



IT 



In oonsequenoe of the seoond world war th© 0«t- 
a»iatl80he Kiinstabteilung der Berliner Museen 
as well 88 the (Jeaellöchaft für OBtasiatieche 
Kunst exifct no more. But our ••buildlng" too 
is destroyed,8lnce the greaiter part of our col- 
lect Ion haa diaappeared. Chine ae and Japanese 
paintings aa well aa the lacquera have aliaoat 
oompletely vanished. Our Japanese No maaks, 
netzuke and oolor prints seem lost for ever« 

Using the wonderful opportunity wfaioh New York 's 
libraries offered rae I have nevertheless tried 
in this catalogue to give aome meanlng to the 
rraaina« 

The mernory of some of our lost werke of art is 

preserved in aonie publioations and in some 

Ciitaloguee of those exhibitions where parte of 

our oollection have been shov/n* 

I mention: 

1912 ••Auöstellung alter ostSGietiacher Kunst" 
Berlin, Akademie aer Künate 

1929 •Ausstellung Chinesisoher Kunst** veran- 
staltet von der Ges.f.ostas. Kunst und 
der PreusBiöohen Akademie der Künste, 
Berlin. 

1934 "Sechs Jahrtaueenae Toepferkunst" Akademie 

der Künste, Berlin 

1935 "International Kxhibition of Chinese Art" 

Royal Academy of Arte, London. 

1939 ••Netzuke uit ae oollectie G." Kunstaaal 

Tikotin,aen Haag (Holland) 

1940 "ßruikloen G.van Oost-Aziat lache Kunst" 

Gerne ente iuuseu:::,den Haag (Holland) 
1946 "Bruikleen Herbert Ginsberg, Zei st" 

Museum van Aziatisohe Kunst, Am8terdam(}iolland) 
1935 "Ausstellung der Kunst deö alten Japans" 

Kunstgewerbe ivluseum, Basel (Switzerland) 
195Ü "The Art of Greater India" 

Los Angeles Gounty Museum( California) 



'•twr 



•^ A 



aH ^ 



Forest Hills. L.I.N.Y. 
1951 



I 



31 r^ T *?■ r 



l,. i , W ül l ■ 



lv.r 



I'IM 









••"••■...,,, ''■'"■' •.'I'I 'i • •"• ,..."' 



CONTENTS 



HH 



:;;; 

:?•' 



•:•! 



|8:; 






?ti 



'> rf 






t -j 






I * 



iv r.?. 'X>'f' lo 



^it 



r» .3.. 



^ .\i'\ 






Ki. 



; f'i 



t - - V 



i J 



. \ 



iii. 



:;)■>•. 



i '' ' 



.\ t: '. r '}^i;, ' 



«., 



V 



.L , 






# . ♦<•. 



< *' 



"C ■* 



' 4 • 



1 <'-v;..fir'T'' 






.' j r V 



••' -^ia;^.: 















•,n 



.>^*^i 



♦t 






U*i A 



.*. :■.. 



f«* *t ,•«.' T \ 



( 



.>>»"»»f» 



>* 



I 
II 

III 
IV 
V 
VI 

VII 



A. CHINA 

Anoient Chine 8e Bronze s 

# 1-25 

Anoieat Chinese Soulptures 
w 2o-*34 

Ancient Chinese CarvinÄS 

# 35-36 ^ 

Anoient Chinese Ceramios 
, ^ * 37-51 

Anoient Chinese Paintinga 
ff 52 

Anoient Chinese Lacquer 

53 
Anoient Chinese Ruga 
# 54-57 

VIII Japanese Sword-Gear Masters 
TY . . * 58-67 
AA iinolent Japanese Potterv 

# 68-75 

X Anoient Japanese Lacquer 

ff 76 

XI Anoient Japanese Netzuke 

XII Anoient Japanese Painting 

ff 78 

XIII Anoient Japans •• Color Printe 

^ 79-33 



C, INDIA 



XIV Anoient Indian Art 

^ 84-90 



XV 

XVI 



D. NKAR EAST 

Anoient Bronze, Ceramio, I vor v 

# 91-94 ^ 

Anoient Oriental Rugs 

# 95-102 



B. PACI?IC 
XVII Anoient New Zealand 

# 103 



1 

11-45 
46 

49-61 

62-64 

65 
70-85 

86 

87 

88 

89-91 



92 

94-97 
98 

103-106 
107-108 

109 

110 
111-114 



115 
118-124 



125-127 
128 

133-136 



137 



'.iir 



' • II • • »ti*ilW^!tTr' 



jasMüMMeifies* 



t'IIHill 



:;::} 



■■•<» 



r 



;^tt 



1 

II 






9 



^ 



•-l'I-'^ 



VI 

V 



v' ^ 



■ <• r ^. r r , 






I Ott 



IV 



< . A 



f:-:. M.if: 



'•-..-♦. 



-V 



«•1 , • ^ c 



Vo-.fc 



;^ 






'\ 



Ji 



i-c/:i 





"(Mi;,- •..: Sr ■)i' • 
VT 




' 1» . ». - 




l.i> 



\f ) 



* '■.• 



l^a 



'.n 



• 



s. . r / 4 < 



• 1 



:^fl9 



v;>! 



„ v, J>. 



• *d 



y 



I ■ 






A. C H I N i 



!• ANCIENT CHINESE BT?nW7.Tgg, 



Some notes on carly Chinese bronzes. 
«» Veseels - Utensils. 

^JJL^^^v'^* Chinese ceremonlal bronae ressels.recovered 
from tombs or unearthedwlfcn bullding modern ro^ds.attlJn 

o?o^f*^'J/r^^*^° Perfectlon and belong to th^ wo?^ 
of craft which prooured world value to t*w Chinese ArtT 
They are unique in the art hlstory of the woSdV 

They are monumental in the very sense of the worjd 

V Webster:" of the nature of a monument; hence massive. 

Iastlng,impre8sive. " ) 
They speak their own language cleaj^and mighty,they teil 
of the religion and the belief s that inspiJed them. 

Hature /»tt seif oared affectionately for these works of mea. 
i-ecuiiarity in the oomposition of the bronzes as well as 
in the Chinese earth, which preserved these treasures so 
long a time.enriched them with a patination not known to 
any other bronze art in the world. 

J=f *foo^c\^S^/£°5 prehistorio to hlstory beglas when the 
Hsla i 2205-1766 B.C.) are suaseeded by the S H A N G ,also 
called Y I N (1766-1122 B.C.). * 

The Shang (Yln) moved their oapitals five times. Their ca - 
Pital An-yang near Hsiao-t'un on the Huan river in Honam 
has been exoavated in 1929. Sinoe then praotioally «ti» whole 
of our ideas about dating ofi early bronzes ha« changed. 

The exoavated bronzes of the Shang people show ao advanced 
a raetal art that we have to take for granted that centuries 
of avt tradition must have preoeded such perfectlon. 
ür as Karlgreen puteit: " Our material proved that the fitst 
great classical art in China ^vas mature,finished,ready in 
all detail s and in all Infinitive varieties already in Yin 
time,and there was but little to add in early Chou time." 
The vesaeis show great variety of form, size,decoration. 
There are large reotangular veB»els,completely covered with 
elaborate ornanentations,with flanges and bold relief, 



It., ii«>>t; 



UMiwiliiiiiiri. 

f' 



• • • '^"illir--;"— - - ^4MiM: 



llr 



,j^^..,,-}r .,. ..ivv.Yt ■ 



r 

JL 



Q 



.1 






Pf f' 



• ». 



i 






\ 



Kl-. ■■. 



«1 
t 



' t 






i? 



i'xo 



-r m 'xo 



) 



.■;•{ 






e' '*i 



IX«* 



•xi^v 



0*f 







x-i. V -» 


--«'-" 




V 


rif) f;;t • 




- 




i *^ 




* * 




^ 

i. 











*^ 



1 .. ^ r^-ftll 



»^-iv '^ <, 



- -*> 



i 



liii 



4>'xvrr- 






r 



■>taio-.. 



flamboyant of a oertain barbarous beauty, 

aS?«t noM?f+ vessele simple "severe" in atructure with a 
quiet nobility in line.the decor restricted to small frl« 
l^nu^J^J enhancing the beauty of a piain smSo^Tsirfacr 
lLl^^ Karlgreen again :" Decoration of the body of tS* 
less ^e^'Sir.nJ?; ^^'^'f"? simplicity to overloaLd ricL 

^priMtlv^ nn JJi'®^^*^^^^'' ^°^y • ^°" *^e lese far from 
nS i^ !• i°« *^® oontrary very elegant." 

Sf+?J:!^*- ff^"" *^^ beginning the tendenoy was to elabo- 
until tL°nS?ior'^^*' oonventionalized and sjmbolic dls^a 
out Lh L??i^®°!i° *®''® completely covered with a deeply 
out and brillantly executed pattern in a style that bear* 
Jw^icaf " likeness to that of the templeJ of Centra? 

«nmi+n«»^^® evidence that e.g. the magnificent pieces of 
sumptuoua appearanoe füll of aooumulated power and compres- 
sed ensKy, John Ellerton Lodge acquired fSr the neaS? 
incomparable ?reer GolleOtion in Waahington.originated in 
the same epoch as the vessels of simple beauty whlch are 
described in the following pagee. 

Although little is knovm about the ceremonial of the an- 
cestral oult,it is undisputed that th.. vessels wäre used 
for food and drink offeringa. 

Por wine libations three most appreoiated bronze tvpes 
were employed ; Yu , Ku , Chüeh . 

The millet wine was brou^^ht to the ceremony in the oovered 
Container calleri "Yu". 

To toaat the spirita of the departed a oertain amount of 
the sacrificial wine was poured from the Yu into the^Ku" 
whioh was then swung in the different directions whereby 
the high rim prevented spillin^fthe wine. 
To give pledge to the spirits, wine wie poured into the 
tripod libation cup,calle* " Chüeh ". A little of the con- 
tent wie poured out the spout^to the earth; the rest had 
to evaporate into the sky while the vessel vvas set over a 
fire. 

In the following deacription I was gviided by the fundamen- 
tal studies of Karlgreen,I have already quoted. 
Karlgreen divides the early bronze s into four epochs; 
1, YIN (" means the same as Shang ") 1766-1122 3. C, 



'k tS^..r.^^kk,Ji 



^«■■liii'ii'lilliil I ih'l'l^^..^ , 



giniilliii^f"-""" 



im, 



mmm 



S 



• ■•» 
• •« 

. ..< 

• ■ « • 



'" 



. V 






•Q 

< 



s 



i| 



» 



r. 



Pn 



ar^rtrrp:-'' P. .ri-fii f 



r\ 



^j: 



t r 



V 



I 



' 



> 



Am 



f: 



»i!l 
|.'l 



1 



2.YIN-CH0U U "first half of Weatern Chou"U122- 947 B G 

("meana that the Chou time art 

was atill essentiaBj the same 

art of the Chin "dth but small 
. .., imiovations.") 

3.MID3LE CHOU n.r ^^H o n 

4.HUAI (- late Chou) ^tzlV- l?^\ 

The ORNAMENTATION is oomblned with the purpoee of the vea- 

?hi-/''°^f ""^^ "i'^J ^••- *° appea8e,tS render favorab!« 
the anoestral spirits who might be able to avert disaste? . 
bring good luok also to natural phenoma like rain and har- 

V© 8 w • 

Important Karlgreen^s addition: - The cult of the dead in 
ancient Ohlna was above all a fecundity cult intended to 
ineure re8urrection,vitality and propa^ation of the family 

4?u'xJ 1^^® ^^ ^^® reason for its intimate connection 
with the fertility cult, the oult of the soll — a hißhly 
natural, primitiye logio as shown by parallele all over the 
World — then it is reasonable to expeot that the decora- 
tlons on the bronzes used in the ancestral oult should 
have a votive d^nificanoe* •* 

Therefore the decorations of the bronzes are s^/mbolio Or- 
nament 8,inoötly zoomorphic figures set on a Spiral ^round- 
worke 

I oan here enter only into eoae of these forma. 

1. SPIRAL PILLirTS,the so^oalled "Thunder pattern(Lei-we.i)" 
also called neander or fret pattern. 

Karlgreen prefers »* to combine the whole series under the 
simple name of 'apirals '"and reject the designation above 
as a "somewhat risky Sung-time speculation." 
Confronted with Karlgreen's authority I mention the expla- 
nation of Adolf Harnaok,given in his "THE G INESE CiIRPET", 
with sorae doubt. Harnaok derives the lei-wen from the ol- 
dest hieroglypic form of thunder (l) chari^ed from round to 
Square form (2) and combined in a double picture for deco- 
rat ive purpose (3) 






»»IW^I, 



il M ■« «1. •,,,.,,. ^ 



Jl><> I l*^fc*<jLA^A » 




!!!-!!:;u- 



1.; ij 



■;'i 



:•;! 



• ■ » 



'f> ff 



^- 1 



. >*X 



f»Cf 






XX 



Jfi 



/ 

I 

i 
I 

V 

.1 

AT 



i ifiiio ,i 



.T«*"';/ ^ 
***«»^ 



ts-T r r: rt»T> -xni 



^ «^ '^ '- V # vj ' 









n ^ 



'i t»^-' 



/ , I 



However we muet keep in mind that the spiral is a very far 
ßpread symbol of the sun among people« who were more or 
lese oontemporaries o£ the Shang. I have only to refer to 
the exoarvationa Marshall 's in India (lAohenjo-Daro 3250- 
2750 B.C.) and the finde in Denmark and Sweden. 
Since Sun and Rain with oocasional thunderstorm are essen- 
tial for the agriculture in the whole world I prefer to 
believe that the spiral is not only an artiatio preferenoe, 
but was useg^ also by the early phinese as a magic expedient. 
The same opinion seerns expreasedf^an the denotation "meander- 
thunaer" I found used by i^lan Priest. 

2. ZOOMORPHIC ?I(JURES 

The use of more or less fabulous beings mostly zoomorphio 
in form is no doubt partly syinbolio of the animistic reli- 
glon of the time. By taking as ornament> they beoome appea- 
eed; they invoke the potency of animal spirits. What animals 
are represented is often a moot point. 

For esoteric purpose is the use of ''double faced" animals, 
a peculiarity whereby one and the same ornament in a com- 
bination with a second of the same or other kind lets see 
a second face. 

a* The T'AO - T'IEH = The voracious glutton. 

The name was used by the soholar LU Pa-wei not earlier than 
232 B.C. and is taken from the ancient texts as one of the 
four monsters mentioned in connection with the legendary 
emperor Shun. It became an accomodating term Inwh^ shelter 
e f whioh the most diverse elements have becn merged. 
Or as Karlgreen puts it: " The t'ao-t*ieh ocours in an In- 
finitive series of varieties from the most realistic ani- 



symbolism 

B great part? 



l*s head to the most oonventional vague fi^s^ire, sometimes 
80 dissolved into geometrical designs that only the symme- 
trioally plaoed eyes oan help us to demtect it." 
Alan Priest calle* it "the magnificaat rebus" and tries 
the Solution of the rebus writing: 
" Isn't it the Import ant thing that tkm in the 
of the early Chinese a Beast and a Bird played 
Does it matter muoh whloh bird,whioh beast? While our 
ioonot^raphers bicker and wrangle over the bull and ram,the 
tiger and water buffalo,the pheasant and the owl,most of 
them persist in ignoring the answer to the magnificaat 
rebus of the t 'ao-t 'iehithat interlooking conposite of bird 
and beast which is the symbol of one fundamental precepts 
of Chinese thinking - the balanced dualism of yin and yang, 



JMMM.riin iibiUhi 




IwvA 



;';: 



ä 









fi 



V-i. ». 



•.' " 



« u a ; ^ 4- 



• ^> . «i 



il 









sä: 



[\\\\ 



Kt 



•*:♦ 






ö^ j^il i'-' 



— rr f r»"» 



/ 



c. 



ureei.in the ßirth of China, deaonstrated most of tha ei« 
?rl^^£.*^^ ^^^^«- ^« Pointed out - and no one has coiträ- 
dicted him - that if you bisect the mask of the fr^at ?acia« 
SrrP«J*r'' «ill find, that the two halves of the deeigi SaJ^ 
be read as profile piotures of beast facing beast noarto 
noee. He also demonstrated that the same profile aa /be read 
a'birrfn^Jn ^'I^°J °««« **^« hindquarter« oftJe b?^^t become 
LS Tn^f ^ f"" i*'® °*^«' direction. Only one thing reznain- 
on^i J /^""""^^r*® ^^* ^^^ Mrd.full faoe,with wlÄgs out- 
8pread,i8 an integral part of the front facing maak. Thia 

n«^r^*M^^^^ ^°Ü® ^"^ *^^ November 1938 iseue of the Metro- 
politan Museum of Art Bulletin " 

Por the reut 1 agree with Dagny Carter: " The name of the 
?f «* !J ?®f* «io^B j^o* really matter: what doea matter is the 
ract that it constantly reappears in the designa. Sometimes 
the entlre ornamentation of a bronze consists of two or three 
t ao-t ieh heada placed in marked relief on a back^round of 
fine splrala or meander f igurea. Or it raay be one or two 
realistic heads placed in a oircular band...» 
These just mentioaed "realistic heads" look mostly like 

1^ 8 tieads. So I do not winder at the further Suggestion 
of a Ohinese scholar to take the t 'ao-t 'ieh as a syrabol 
for the bull, all over the world the symbol of power and aale 
fertility. 

The newest thesis belongs to Oswald Siren who explains 
"that the meaning of the t »ao-t «ieh denends upon its com- 
bination with other Bymbols"and he laentions as especially 
Blgnificant in such combination the dragon and the cicada, 

b. The CICADA pattern(Ch«an-wgn) 

Small Jade objeots injforra of the cioada have been used from 
early times to be placed on the tongue of the dead. 
Since the cioada is ar^beraating inseot that oomes to life 
in spring again,the use of the oicada in cinnection with 
the ancestral cult aa symbol of the resurrection needs no 
further explanation. Nevertheless it äeems worthvlle to 
mention Karlgrten's thesis that the shrill notes of the male 
cioada, if produced by thousands, likens the whistle of the 
wind and might easily beoome connected in the feelings of 
the ancient with the voice of ghosts. 



>J*»fTff^», 



i'ÄS. 



'./ 



'.1 



'-'Waiiim 






't 



«> 



ti 






*-c 



J J- 



to 



iA jUC 



•^ -«« » / 



10 



S {iL> 



t> 



till'i^w 






'•T 



;^i^c -iu^ - »5*i-j» "^ "•- V i»^ 



1 



t 



'•!« 



C 



O, AMIMAL TRIPLE BAND 

Karlgreen uaes thls denotation to deÄominate a most ourioua 
decoratlve element; A band in three horizontal seotions 
whioh upon close examinatlon turneout to be an extremely 
dlssolved animal shapei in eome of ite best varianta a 
row of wingquills at the top and an animal eye is distiat- 
ly recognlsable. "^ ■^° "-^ox-l«». 

YIN - CHOU period (1122-947 B.C.) : The Yin tradition in 
bronze production ia oontinued vrith relativelv few ofiai^ea 
MIDDLE CHOU period (964-770 B.C.) : DietiiSl^e new etemeni. 
coiae to the fore. Spiral and meander backgrounds corae almost 
to an end.relief ia lese clearly cut and the forma of the 
vessels tend to be heavier. Vhen in 770 B.C. the capital is 
Boved from Hao to Loyanß,from Shensi to llonam.the art of 
bronze naking deteriotes,the traditional decorations become 
overloaded and baroque, 

HAN DYNASTY (203 B.C.-221 A.D.) : Centuries of strife end. 
when general Lien Pung founda the Han Dynasty. The deaAnating 
tendenoy in bronze art beconies now of inoreasing simplicity, 
Heavy reliefs of conventionalized animal forns disappear, 
refinement with perfect pr >portious reaiain and the inlaying 
of preoious netals on bronze v/ins a peculiar ap?eal,even 
in the Ornament ations of the acceseories of warriors* oha - 
riots. With the warrior in füll regalia on it,it must have 
raade a resplendend sight,when Chinese armiea n-ere sent to 
epread the power of the Chinese emperor into North, South 
and far into the We8t,to protect also the curavans along 
the so-called "silk road" aoross Aeia on the route to the 
Roman Empire. But it did not last. Internal strife broke 
the Chinese empire. 

SIX DYNASTIES (222-589 A.D.) : This term refers to the dy- 
uasties which have their capitals on the site of the present 
Hanking; it has come to be applied loosely to the period 

Batween Han and Sui. because of its convenient simplicity. 
But political chaos in China reigns. The North is in the 
hands of invaders. I will her^'Wntion fft^v the T'opa tribes 
which been known as the WEI DYNASTIES (386-550 A.D.) with 
their capital Tatungfu. 

SUI DYNASTY (589-618 A.D. ) : A Dynasty of Short living splendorj 
it is Said that in these thirty years the Chinese population 
increased from twenty to fifty millions. But the dynasty 
is wanting in military strength to oust the invaders. 



--^' 



./ 



• t mmt i 



: 7..^ .'7 1 fit 



mti- 






^ 



». 



ü 



fil 



» - 






TANG DBfASTY (618-906 A.D.) : T'ang T»ai Tsimg,Chiaa*8 
greateBt emperor,born as a son of a Shaael official,win8 
his Position as foimder of the Tang Dynasty with the sword. 
He re Stores the Kmpire on a broader and grander foundatio n 
than ever before. China becomes exposed to foreign oontaott 
to foreign influences;they are distinctly visible also in 
the bronze works of this time,in hich the produotion of 
ceremonial bronzes has oeased» 

3ÜN(J PEHIOD (960-1279 A.D.) : Ceremonial bronzes appear 
again. 3ut their quality and artiatioal perfection is not 
to compare to that of their splendid predeeessors two 
thousand years ago. 

MINa DiNASTY (1368-1644 A.D.): Baroque transforaatioa of 
the cla^-sic foras and decorations — to use generally 
familiär terms. 



■"i n f^ * 






\ iM'f 



V 



» ; 



* 
t 







^Uii 


Uiw 


.VA^-'^ 


n&': 


T^-eciia. 


*j 


r\ -^ ^w 


• • ■■- 


i 


vx-i. Jiü^i:. 


noiii tii 


• 




b e 






<^' 



• .1. V^ 



t 

j 
i 



101 



vni 



fi; 



et 



1 . 
i 



OOMPOblTIüW, GAST, PATINA OP EARLY CHINESE BRONZE VESSELS 

Prom the analyais of Yin(Shang)fragraent8 slur is learned that 
the used material shows on the average 83 per oent oopper 
and 17 per oent tin. In addition to this traces of silver, 
aÄtimony, magnesium were foand. 

In the oast usually the "lost-way ( oire perdue ) " process 
is followed." This means first naking a wax model of the 
entire objeot,inoluding i^i Ornaments and oovering this with 
a liquid clay coating. Iloles were mad^? in the Clay mold so 
when the object was baked the heated liquia wax oould run 
out. iifter the clay model was empty and cold|the molten 
m tal was poured in. Wlien thoroughly hard,the nould was 
broken and the bronze was ready,exoept for final retouching. 
The technique of the Shang netal workers was so perfeot, 
howeverfthat actually little retouching appear s to have 
been needed"^ (D.Carter) 

The color of the bronze patines is often very beautiful,de- 
pending upon the oomposition of the original bronze, the 
ohemicals and the degree of moisture in the soll in which 
it has been burie4,and whioh are able to develop the highly 
estimated a z u r i t e (blue basic oarbonate copper) as 
well ae malachit evgreen basic oarbonate of oopper). 
We cannot be sure '.*ther the bronzes v;ere ori^inally oopper 
oolor,as ortth most new bronzes or wether the surface was 
treatcd to produce varioua oolor effects 

Host bronzes that have been long buried are not very at- 
tractive when exoavated,and have to be freed from disturbing 
inorustations and carefully oleaned.To what extent the 
bronzes stiould be oleaned is a point of oontroversy. 



' ■ fWI TT ' ' '" . 






^t^Mtt^aiäJäääätMf ■ 



yMMMMMO^ 



"^^^n ' 



*<3 



w 

-4> 



Ui 



.1 

J 






hüj 



;:;i 



r 



;^r 



t 



iiit 






7 

n 
i 



,. 



j 



i 



njL.' 1- ^ 






t 



> 

f 



8 



b. Early Chine ee Bronze Mirrora. 

whioh ie atteeted also by iSeJJJy ;vldenj;. °'' °' "^^^^ 
^J'u'f^i'"*^^« ^^^« °^ **ie moBtly round metal diak ia no 

iiSiasfinr?r?;r?ii^ JÜ^ ''""^^ ^•' usJany'deloiltS " 
Zzll^ !^ v^ ^ relief . They are in the beginnlng flat and 
Ciii«?? beoome in the course of time heaJier a?d largS! 
Espeoially oonsplcous is the change at the be^innini of tA« 

biofLr^n?^^ i'"": '^* °"^«' 'i«» °^ tJe reverfe^idf ll " 

i^nJ«i^%^ shallow diak. At thls time the knob in the 
wS?oS «^,n^° ^ hemiapherical form with a hollow.throu«h 
7oi Li^^i** passed the braided cord that formed the handle 
for holding it or for the fastening rtMÄxto a stand. 

orLm!n+'^.'?J°'' °^ **^ *^^''°' ^^°^ was not an incidental 
«S« «w«^ rr ^"I *" ^^'^ ^ purpoae. While the ornament 

M^r» ^^^*^^^f! ^''^"'^ °^ *^« «o*«^«! period.the forma, 
signs.syinbolios beUng to catain categorical number of 

n^'^l^i li«terature and mythology as well aa to their astro- 
nomioal syatem. Even the round form is su)posed to be sybo- 
lioal.representiag the heaven. Through itthe importanoe of 
the bronze mirrors was greatly increased over the mere fact 
being used as looking-glaas for the toilet. 

There existed the religious-magical belief that by usin/? 
synbol* represeating the Universe or parts of it in mini- 
ature.it would be posBibl-- to win some of the concentrated 
power of the greater Universe in order to give strength 
and prottotlon against deraons or evil influencee to an 
individual. Uaing thie conoeption in the ornamentttion 
on the backe of the mirrors, they are credited with all 
kind of raagical power as magio instrumenta that put the 
cosmio foroes at the servioe of the owner and they were 
Bupposed to ward off evil iaflueüces. In some cases they 
were said to be able even to forcast the future.to reflect 
the interior of the patient's body, enabling the phyaioian 
to diagnose diseases. 

So it is small wonder that the mirrors were used in fune- 
ral ceremonie8,«iready from the Chou time onwards all the 
way down to the Ming until glass iiirrors became handy.They 
were put in the tomb on the dead person's ehest as " heart 
proteoting iairror " or added as a symbol of light. 



y.^' 



: *i«\». »^ •* II 







' HjTir'tif - - 



n 



:i:ii 



. i /' 



1&JU.-J 



:t:s 

• •»# 

i! 

■•:;: 



9A$ 



M*i 



i f.* 



i 

X 
i 



^t 



•«•4 






*' 



" ' -^w <; 



r-'^fr^ 



The mirrore are adralred for their technical perfection 
in alloy and caste. Their bronze oompositlon ia nearly of 
Zu f.f^^.^'^'^^^ ®® ^^® bell-bronzes used in Europe duriag 
the Middle Ages. They oontqin 75-80 per cent of copper. 
20^25 per oent of tin and often 1.4 per cent of lead. 
It i8 evident that their superior workmanehip was reached 
oy raeans of soft stone master-moulds as described by 
Schyler Camman : •• The emall^pointed boesee.and probably 
the large central boes as well^were apparently drilled 
into the flat stone, while the main stright lines were 
gonged out in ehallow groves; then the characters and in- 
tricate figures of the baokground must have been engraved 
with a Sharp tool. The shape of the characters, in particular, 
unquestionably indicates cutting in -tone. Probably the 
stone carving then served as a master-mould for a wax model 
from -hich another moulci was made by the lost-.way(cire perdue) 
proce88,for certain irreguliarities in the inner surface 
ßuggest a wax rather than a stone contact in the direct 
mould* After removal from the mould,the central bo8s,grooves, 
and rims were regulary burnished. . . . •• 

Among the patines the ao oalle* "hei ch'i ku = like bleck 
lacquer" is especially estimated, According to W.P.Yetts 
the quality of the black lacquer-like surface is so per- 
fect and uniform that It could not be accidental and 
waa probably due to siliceous .matter mixed with layer of 
the mould which came in contact with molten metal* 






I'* 



^^^jjmnf^. 



•Wt^T 



' l>»M *l t I . 






tl-AAA^^ . . 




I 






itoe^'^^^' 



Ic 



%*; 



Xt 



r. «' 



\" 



r< 






f . 



laovoQi;^^!^ 



'rlo - . 



<>« 



Pt 



■•*- .' ' i 



-J ^ 



fr r 



j £U: 



eV 



Is I 



:;::'•'•'••"»» 



10 



I 



11 



er 

Priest, Alan 



BI3LI0(}RlPHy 
Ancient Chinese Bronze s 

Andersan, J.G, ''The (Joldsmith in Ancient China" Bulletin 7 

M.?.E.A., Stockholm 
Bochhofer,L. "A Short hietory of Chine ee Art*' lf«w York 1946 
Carter, Dagny "if^our thousand years of Chinese Art"*N.Y. 1946 
Preer (Jallery of Art,A descriptive and illustrative catalo^^ue 

of Chinese Bronze s «acquired durin^^ the adminis- 
tration of John Eilerton Lodge. A.S.Wenley, 
Washin^^ton D.C. 1946 
Peddersen, Martin ** Chine s.rCunstge werbe "»Berlin 1939 
Kelley,G,P,and Chen Meng-chia "Chinese Bronze s from the 

Buokinjham Collection".The ^rt Institute 
Chicago 1946 
Kümiiel, Otto, Grosse "Ostasiatisches Jer^t" .Berlin 1925 
KüiiLnel,Otto "Chinesische Kunst". 200 Haupt verke der Ausstellung 

der Cxesellsohaft fUr o^siatische Kunst in der 
Preussischen Akademie der KLüiste, Berlin 1929« 
Chinese Bells,Drun3, lirrors" Burli:i^t.Magaz»193ü 
"Chinese Bronze s of the Shang throu^h the T'ang 
Dj'^nastyyintroduotion to the exhibition :letropo- 
litan Museum. New York 1958 
Priest, Alan "Birds".June 1947 issue of Metropolitan Uuseuin 

of Art Bulletin (page 264) 
Karlgreen, Bernhard "Yin and Chou in Chinese Bronzes." 

lletin of the Museum of ?ar Kastern Antiiyuit. 
^* btoc.holm 1935/36 
fcrlgreen, Bernhard "New dtudies on Chinese Bronze s"Bulletin 

No.9,etG 1937 
Karlgreen, Bernhard "Huai and llan" Bulletin etG.No.l3. 1941 
Siren, Oswald "History of Chinese Art" 1948 
Swallow,R.W, "Ancient Chinese Bronze x:irrors".?eiping 1937 
Schuyler Caminan "TLV Pattern on Cosmic Mirror of tne Han 

Dyna st y". Journal of the American üriental 
So-iety Vol.63,Nr. 4f Oct .-l)ez.l948 
Schuyler Camman "Chinese Idirrors and Chinese Civilisation" 

Archeology Autunin 1949 .Vol,2,No.3 
,catalogue of the collection ouoitomo 
Illustrated catalogue of ancient imperial 
Treasury,calle4 SHOöOIN. Tokyo 
Umehara, oueji "Shina /Code Seikwa or Selected Helios of An- 
cient Chinese ironzes from collection in 
Kurop> and America ?^^art II • 1933 
Yetts,.t^ercival"The xeorge Kumorfopoulos Collection.Vol.il. 

Bronzes, Bell s, Drums, Mirrors et c . London, 1929 
Yett8,Peroival"Catalogue of the Gull Chinese Bronzes", Lond. 1939 
Voretsoh "Altchinesische Bronzen" 1924 



'i% 



Sen-Oku Sei-Shö 
Toyei bhuko . 



Mü i MMtlil i m Ml ilMMtl iiii ' ' ^ 






..rj.JUHimitr- 




VUUJJJlitl 



IIA*« LA*. 




11 



I 



CATALOGUE OP CHINESE BRONZES 



!• 'vOvered Vessel for fragant wlae,( Yu ) H. 20 cm.; 8 



II 



Body elliptical section with coavex sides on ^ shaliow 
spreading foot, -V'ithin faiatly fluted bände are borders • 
of flat eutjraved Ornaments; 

a) Aroond the body drae-on-like animala,perhaps Karltjroen^s 
i: "feathered dra^on"^ broken by T'ao t'ieh aasks in higü 

I* relief. ' 

b) Around the foot the two lines of the " Hsien-wftn " 
c bow's Gord pattern, 

c) Around the oover six drat^an-like aalmala placed anti- 
>^ thetically to make up the central parts of four t'ao 

I ' t *ieh maaks, 
The main ground of the veasel remains piain» 

The Cover is surnounted by a fluted knob-handle. Loops 
on both sides of the body hold the swing-hrandle in the 
shape of a twisted rope which can move only far enoU(;^h in 
each direction to peruit the lid to be easily renoved. 

Insoriptions of pictographic characters inside oa the 
bottoms of body and cover^ in the body set into a car- 
touche.Both ciee:)eAed in the broaze. 

The purpo^e of the Container haß been to bring the wine 
to the sacrificial cerenony, 

The bronze ia strongly covered by patination,green over 
red copper oxide (cuprite) with encrusted malachite de- 
i posits# 

Yin (Shang) 1766-xl22 B.C. 

' Llt.: Karlgreen '• fin and Chou in Chinese Bronzes " 

Exhibition: 1931/32 i>epßrtment of Far Eastern ..rt of the 

Museuris of BerlinCC^erinany) 
1939/41 Gremeente :iuseum,aen liaag (Holland) 



■rfHlfffJfP 



• ' -W U,...,.. 7 



^ "-^-g^MiAl^M 



S^iiliiiMMlMlllIP^ "WTII I II I IIi l llllll llllllll lll l ll l lllll l lH^^ ^ ^ I 



ItTJItT^MiiilU;-- 



•;■,;! 



^11» 



' ^*» 






m 






■i#p^ 



^^ 






» - ■ , ( 












1 

1 

i 






; 4\ 






: 




« 


1 

1 




1 


* . '; 


. 


t 


1 

i i 

1 






j 








# 






t 


♦ 






'y_ 
















1 
























i 




1 


k 


i 




' 


1 






i 








1 




-^^ 






"C^ ■ 







^'*^ k>tä 






,! j 












12 



'• '^°°^ ''■^■' foi- «'.'■riflnl.l ^-M-n f n. ) H.25.5 03. ,10 1 

miaaie and below -double faofd' t'«^ ,i^ K^'^'^'f"'- ''" t*"« 

?«K'"u'er„r"° "°''"'' ""''••«" ■" -"^1— n",.h, t„u„. 

The form of the cereraoaial beaker meetRttö ,-,« *<„ *, 
A certain amount of the sacrifinf«? «Jf ae: tination. 

the Yu (cp.ao.l) Into the Ku Sr ti if® '^Pared from 
of the deoarted 'PHp hJ,t < °' toaeting tte the spirits 

wine when'?jrb;a]^er waf eii^/IHhe^??'^'''"^' °f ^"^^ 
Uviting the spirita to parUofpa?e! ''^^^^"-'^* uirectiona 

The broiize ehows a fi/ip H;:jt'' r>»««.^ .».j 

oxide, U.ht depo^It'J"|/^^i,grS„S,*if l?rSea':t.°°''" 

Yin (Shang) I766 - 1122 B.C. 

Llt.: Karljreen " Yin and Ghou in Chinese Bronze«" 

Künur.el "Chinesische Kunst", iTMll^lTrll^.r 
, Ausstellung aer Ses.f .octas.Kunst in der 
PlIlB^illl ""^^ ^^^ Künste, Berlin 1929. 



Bxhibition: 









1929 Ausstellung Chines.Ku.ast, veranstaltet 

B^J^?n^o;S•^•!^''^'^" Akademie der Künste 
iq^i/?9 i ^l^^'. ^^^^^^& ao.l7. 
iy51/52 Department of Par Bastern Art of the 

iQ^fl/.i ^^^«'^f °^ «"lin (Gennany) 

ly .50/41 ^emeente Museum, den Haag (Holland) 






•m^ 



^fK«%^..^,„,,,„ 






13 



i 









::l 






:;J 
im 




m 



• M« 



tl|: 




i 



|if:^ 



." ••»^^, 



TnnHIrlMMMM»!...,.,^. 



.>^" 



f/ 




3. Trlpod Llbation Cup ( Chüeh ) . H. 21 cm, | Q \ 



11 



Inverted helmet bhape on three spear-head epreading feet; 
a lateral dragonhead loop handle is attached to the body 
of the cup. 

Beeide the ohanucled spout two posts rise well above the 
pointed rim topped by bell-shaped finiale to facilitate 
the removal froa the fire with the help of sticke. 

The body iß encircled by the ".Animal triple band" (Karl^^reen) 
with a row of wingquills at the top and an aninal eye. 

Two inscriptions of archaio ch:^racters,ofae below the loop 
handle, one belo^w the bell-ühaped finial« 

This bronze llbation beaker was used in a pledge to the 
epirits« /*fter a little wine was poured out<»rthe spout, 
it v;as G€t over a fire and the content b evaporated« 
?inally it v/ae removed from the fire by grasping its two 
small poüts between two^sticks whereby the bell-^ihaped 
finiüls helped to keep the stioks in place. 

Patination of the bronze in purple red and green wixh 
encrusted aalachite depc^its. 

Yin (Shang) 1766 - 1122 3.C. 

Lit.: Karlgreen " Yin and Chou in Ghineee Bronzes" 

Exhibition: 1931/32 Departmnet of ?ar Eastern Art of the 

Muaeuias of Berlin (Grermany) 
1938/41 uemeente :Äuseum,den Haag (Holland) 



iÜMiiWUiiiinnAÜi... 




:;?:t 



::.:'l 















r t 



j.'.'t 



r 










■w«wir. 



14 



4. Halberd ( K'uwi 



L.20 om, I 7 3/4 



N 



Head of a halberd (Prenfh " ho-n v ^ ^ 

of the Ko « da5i;r!axe and «i^Jr^^"^' ^ ^°^«^^<-'' 
The "nei",a klnd of h-an?!«^ Bhatted. in like nanntr. 

"ei. '""^ ^^-^1 incieion bet-^een dagcer and 

The aei is decoriited with thp t'^o +1.; u 
with Spiral. Ornaments in 'lat reli^f^? r,aBk,the dag,,er 
culiar shape as Rene rrxou-,'4t illil ,n^, Z''}^':''^'' ^'"^ ^«- 
Bronzes Chiaoi«e ^^rohaioues" h^^o^k ^^""^^^^^on des 

^e dragons^ui on Pu^a'^L^^^o.^r^^-o^ie^' ^.i^^^i^l^ 
Yln (Shang) 1766 - 1122 B.C. 

Luj^,rfopoulos colxec.ion.rome I.pa^^e 63,plate 



Exhibition: 1931/Ü2 Departnent of >'ar Bastern Art of the 

Museuae of Berlin (iJtraany) ^ 

iQ^A '^^"»«^^^^e I'luseum, aen iiaag (Holland) 

Wuseufl van Aziati-che Kunst, Amsterdam. 



1946 



niSiiSiiMi'mii'^'"" 



[;:::: 



\ 



:i| 



•\i 



:•! 







II 



'. uhtii 



• 



^' 




15 



5. Ceremonial Jfood Vessel . (Ghlu or Kuel) 
H.13 cm.; 5 1/4" . D.17 cm.; 6 3/4" 

YettB mentlones that this group of bronzes for offerixig 
cerealB was calle* by some scholara " Kuei " ,an equivaleat 
term,pronounced like " Ghiu " in ancient times* 

Circular form,reourved sides on a spreading foot,wide mouth. 

Arourid the rim and the foot on a diaper of epiral filllng 
borders of diasolved draoon ornanents: k very peouliar 
dra^on-lile animal v/ith turned head and vertical friaged 
ötrokes^preHunbely feathers : Karlercen's ^ Fenthered drarjon^\ 
The Ornament Ip broken by t'ao t'ieh nasjjs in hierher relie*. 

Two vertical dra^on-head loop handleb with downv/ard 
pendants are attached to the body. 

This bronze seems 

for the 3hlny surf a _ . ... ^ . ^' 

the stroking of the hands of ^enerations of discrininatmg 

coliHctors« 



to h^ive long been a collector|s fdece, 
'ace of deep purple Ti^n^ greerf/witness-^« 



Yin-Chou, 'iret half of the Western Chou. 1122-947 B^C. 

Lit.: Xarlgreen " Yin and Chou in Chinese bronzes ••. 

Exhibition: 1931/32 Departnent of ?ar >:a3tern Art of the 

itiuseuns of Berlin (Oernan-) 
1938/41 j-eneente MUseum, aen Haag (Holland) 



, |1«;l<n 

""•'•VliiililtiiiniiM^'^' 



:\v.\i 



I « » 4 l>. 






» ■ ' ■ « 

iiiii 



i 



^if***l>|MB 




I 



•H 




illt 



1 



16 



6. 



T*ao - fleh ManV. 
h. 9 om. ; 3^ « 



The wheel of oae aide ot a hopse's snaffle-bite 
in the form of the t'ao-t' iöh aask. 

The bronze shows a aephrite .^reen patiaation with red 
spota aud raalachite incruBtatioru 



nn-Chou,first nalf of the Western Chou. 1122-J47 B. 



C 



Lit.: Martin ?eddersea "Chinesiches Kunst^jewerbe" 1 09 

.4bb,9ü, Seite 105 

Exhibition: 1931/32 Depart.aeiit of ?ar I-astern Art of 

the iuuseums of B rlin (Jermaay) 
1938/41 Jemeente .uU[.eum,dea Haag (Holland) 
1946 j.iuseum vän Aziatiscne Kunst, ^asterdam 



fr 



tÜiJMtlniiiwtHilii.; 



•;;;n 

i ■ - •»> 



M 



?( r 



:;::) 



;:;i 

'.:;: 







^A 




7. 



17 



Basln for Ritual WashlnK ( Hai 
D. n.^ on. I 6 1/3" 



I 



H. 4.5 cm.; 1 3/4" . 

i 

Hooad basin on ittlll foot vdth recurved sites and 
projectiiiß rim» 

Around the body relief banae witn two t'ao t'ieh 
mask with loope« 

The inner and out er surface of the oh ein hae been 
gilt and decorated with engraved oloud-aorolls. 

The rllöi bronoe is strongly p^tinated xn green and 

rusted red« 

Han. 206 B.C. -220 A.D. 

Lit.: W.Peroival Yetts " -he oatalo^ue of Jaor^e 

i.umori'opoulos collectionyTone I,A 7l(Plate LI) 

Exhibition: 1929 Auotellung chinesisclier Kujist in 

der ?reUo3.Akadeiiie der Künste, Berlin 



19 



(aermanir) . Kataloc Ho. 31. 111. p. 43* 
33/41 vl'jiah-ente :Oascuiii,clen rlaa^ (^oll.'^nd) 



) 






1..' *****!* 



■: 



|lM> 



:!l 






} 



i 




1^ 



i 



!;i 



i 



« »■<•■— P^WW. H-,y^ _ ^ . 



,^' 



8. 



18 



QereniQnial Wlnc Vcs^el ( CMh^ ) 
K. 18.2 on. ; 7 1/3" • 



The pöblet 'b mala (irour.d is piain, ornamented only 
by ineanß of the IIöien-vv§n = bo^'^^'c cord pattern. 

Inside 9^ the foot/in elevated oast/the archaic 
character for father. 

The bronoe is rioiay patinated in red and green 
enliauoed by deposite of azurite. 

Han. 206 1.3.-220 A.J^. 

Exhibition : 1938/41 -lemeente Museum, den Haag (Holland) 



.i 



:*^ 



;;';;i 



iiMJiiiiti/i^riKii»'- 
1 



19 



I 



bi 



ViVA 







9. 



Ladle 



L.22 cm. j ai- • 



[ 



The ladle 'e handle with the crane's head hae an 
elegax^t, soft shape,pre8Uiiiably stinulated by 
Helleuistic influeuces. 

Bronze with green-blue patination. 

Han. 206 3.0. -220 A.7). 

Ex colleotion Breuer* 

Lit.: Icartin Pedderaen "CMnesiches Kmnstgewerbe" 1939 

Seikte 114,i^bb.l06 

Exnibition: 1929 Aubsteliung Chinesischer Honst in der 

Preu3a..4kadeuie der -CUnste,3erlia(&ermany) 
Katalog no.78« -Abb. p,58 
1953/41 sjemeente x-u^uöeum, den ilaag (Holland) 




.t 



m 



Hl 

i 

t 

l 



I » 



r 1 



|{|>'« 





imnwttfMuuMttttvttMmrH» ' 



• »I t n 

( " " 1« 



11 



f—^^ 



y>'M 




<S «aoH 



I I 



' 




FH*«***»9rtmM»m, 



nttMtt.».^ . 



20 



10, Reversible Lajip (lu lu t^riK- "riir^^eä^ lamp) 



II 



L. 14 om* ; 5^ 

H. 13 cm. ;5 1/8" (when open) 



A rounded oblong brouze bowl with a hiriged haif-oover 

which turns back over the oorreeporiding stationary 

Cover, thus forraing an oil cup. 

^then the hiii(j;ed lulf-cover iö turned up,it stände on 

the foot and leg of a goor?e, showing a spike r^nid, 

Around the spi^ce one end of the ^Ick was coiled,while 

the lighted end eKtended beyond the edge of the Short 

projected guttcr. 

The uptarnf^d h^lf of the cover im« repleni^^hed wlth 

oil fröre the reservoir below,Hnd,when it vbs cloeed, 

the unused oil in it flo^bock into the reservoir, 

Han lamp makerp uped the ^oose's foot nnd leg not in- 
ciäentally. The goose wag a frHcred bird in China and 
eleo in India. " It is es^entially a eyrabol of spirit 
and li£,ht and a form of the sun bird. "(Ananda 'Joo:nave«- 
wamy). 

i 
This special fom of a folaing lainp was used in China 
since the Chou dyaasty(Allen ill.ii; and is a very 
practical Solution of a portable Light. 

Bronze with green earthy patination. 

Han 206 B.C. -220 A.D. 

Lit.: Allen, Maud Hex •'Early Chinece Lasps" in **Oriental 
Art " J5pring 1950 (Vol. II. 4) 
?edder8en,i*.artin "Chinesisches Kunstgewerbe" 1 1939 

Abb.99,p.ll2 
Yetts "The cataloeiue of the George EujLorf opoulos 
coliectiou.1929 Tome I,A 7l(plate LI) 



JiAU. 



iLMUlrfÄiiMr*' 



* • ' « 



21 



# 




r Ttff 



«TA . >4 



1 ' • 



i » J" xJ. 



11. 



HariKln/^ Lamp 
H.l« cm. ;5>" 



Here the reservoir of oil is formed by a cylindrial 
vessel; half of Its oover oould be turned up by 
means of a hin^e in form of a gooselihead; the upturn- 
able part is. now mi3sing,preauiaably shaped and used 
as described^no.lO« 

The whole broaze body is oovered by jewel-like crystals 
of iialaohite^gr en basic carbonate of oopper built ap 
by eeoration out of the bronze in oonsequence of long 
time stratifioatioii in particular soil. 

Ilan 206 B.C.-22Ö A.D. 



Lit.: Japanese exoavations of Chinese toaibs in 
Lo tanß (»<;orea) 
Voretsoh " Altohineßische Bronzen" Abb. 51 



" \ 



A > 









r •• 



T^uri; ^j:j 1. 



.t 





Mi;:;;;; 






■ ■■ 't 
» . I * 

■■ ■ f 



i^liMI 



^'• ' ■ ^ ■' ■ • -"^i'!'.k.''f ' ^i^,.*--:>i\ 






•«1« 

I • it I 

I ' *•• 

M • •• 




M 



«-''■• 



22 



12. 



Sokctecl polo rest of ohariot. 
L.23.5 cm. ; 9 1/4" 



This inlald ohariot finial is formed by atrectan/jular 
soclcet with added snake's body,elonjated upv/ard^ia a 
beautlful curve.and endine; in a smeeVie head. 

^^hen I acqairea it from Oiiina in 1S29 the jurpose was 
not ::uown. '^Ve had to f iud'i out ffcß. the Po K'u T'u lu 
(=the hundred AntiüUieö),the S^^iifr repertoire of the 
emperors Hui-Tsun^(1101-2t> >^.D. ) collection in the 
H8Ü9n-ho-;.iiiace(published 1110 a.J).) Tom 27,par:e 32: 
" Ch'i huan kxuiß k'o i jung hen linng 



Oh^e cfi'i t'o y^Jlan ye. 



= loa ciroular oavity oan take up the oroGS-jeaiü 
'iherefore it ia called :pole-rest of the criariot, 

Anaeraon calls a similar pieoe "pole rnountin^" and 
presiuaeB 'ita purjjüse as ena laounxing for tne carrying 
pole of a sedan oiiaire and the iike.*' 

I believe tiiat the socket v^'as fixed on the horae's 
yoke uid that the pole of the cliariot re^ted in the 
graceful bendlng of the snake'a neck. 

The oronze is richly :^doTned by ailver inlay v/ith 
ßpirala of slender silver tlireads L-omewhat obscöred 
by patiiijtion aiid ciocrir^ioa, 

Han 206 B.C. -220 A.D. 

Llt.: /inaersDüu J.J. "The Goldsnith in Ancient >)iina" 

Bulletin /,Tne .Auseuia of j'ar Sastern 
Antiquiti?B, 'tookholn 1975. 

iüxhiüition: li^29 Jepprtrüeat of .^ar Ejatern Art of 

the .Jubeums of liexlin (J-ermany) 
1933/41 Jcneento i!u<^9TLm,den 'iaa^sC 'Holland) 



r 



•^""U««. «.»«•.! 



MM 



;;:•;;;'•; .^ 



• • > • I« 

. ' *# 



iWvUf 



;;•.:: 








t'i 




i 






j iir I 






w 



23 



15. Coigmiojürrorof the H«n r. 

•L'J.a.iö om, } 7.3" 

These mlrrors whloh are oiin«,i k * 

^rrors are by the cSneee ifLJ^f^'^^«" collectors TLV 
name of the maker or accnrnfr^f^^^y dassifled unaer tL 
of deooratioa found^rthem'"^ '° **^« ^"Bcriptionr fo^ 

ÄonSe;:Jir3rr:n'j:^^^^^^ ^'-ze alrror-back 
perforated aad almoat hemloAhf . ^® °^"*er rises the 

brodd frame enoloslng the whnif o ^^^^^^- Annexed is a 
alternate twelve saall 0^70«^ V^""^'* ^^^^^ i« ^hich 
and the "twelve branßh««« . ^ bossea or nipaiear-iu" ) 
characters: ra?,oxr?iä?V^Jrj^^«^ ^^^ '«üef with'' ^ 
monkey oook.dog:pi^:^^^''^"^''^^«SO". 8erpent,hor8e, «heep, 

the twelve -avlBions of the »i ? °^' °o™PUtatioa by cenJurv 
twelve cyclical anilJs. ^°liPti°(orbit and aunf.the ^' 

conlcal bossea, eaoh **atld ^on a r^i^^^ ^«lie^.eight 
four groupB of so-called TLV Jorms ^^atrefoild.and 

ChLlÄa^So'Je'^'^ ^"^ ^^«^-^'- '^-y -long to the 

rgrl^fnl ZX'?^:*!^;? pe^olf ol^tL^^^^^^'* *^«^ 
The oorainencemeat of Sprin« V^lnti 7 ^® ^^^^^ 

of Hununer. Summer Solsti?!' ThlnL'^'^^''°''' ^^« Coamenceineat 
iiutumnal equinox. The Gnmml„« oomoencement of Autumn. 

But theyrmlänmL.'?^e e^hr?:o'i1t°Uo"^f- ^^^*«' ^°l«*i°e. 
eight pillara ofthe Universe wMoJ ^™*?J*«l8 ^nd even the 

Umehara took these signs merelv aa nart« .-p +^ - 

de sign (Wan tzu t 'ou) wi%h«,,^^ as parts of the "meanderi ip" 

Bishoi White waaofthr^?? special significanoe. ^ 

geometrical a;Srea oJ LeSision anf **^^'^ ^^^'^^ represent 
old idea that the earth !s iJSare? °°'^^«--ted with the 



<iiiiiin'i1iillli);jntiÜJl.:f»''»*** 






1 



l'ü^^ 



\ 



h.-trf 






m 



M 



; I 



! t 



• f 



[.<] 



It 




Bw4 



,-e 



'J i 



)i J 



.>^- 



,;^* 



^^' 



24 



Karlbeck asciibed to theo a technlcal orl^m 

Peroival Yetts stated hla hpHa^» ♦k„* *u 

detail aad to ByrnboU^nhateiei fSJ^fon'th''''"''^''*^^ 
on tbe dial, «"aüever runotion they served 

Recaatly Sohuyler Camman.the ourator of the Chin.«« 

"?Se%^:r::%o live 't'.f ie'nt'?arj:jt\\t J^NÄrr^^tV^*^^'^ 

as tht^.a<^dd?TM*'^,°^u*''^} ^^''«'*' '"'^=* represent China 
^^^ ? + ^^'^^S ^ngdoni",while the area around it . exttndiiir 
off into the four direotions.representß the "?oui Seas" ^ 

th! tV^ "Pour Seas" was purely figurative^and referred to 

GhiM f^H^f^i^v^^^ *^^* stretched beyond the oonfines of 
China,izih bited by uncivilized barbarians.good aiid evil 
spirita,and wild animala. .. 

^Jji^J^« *ie^ £^iOt±OTi of the Vs was apparently to mark 

off the bounuarles of the four quarters of the v/orld.while 

the spaoes withia the Vs merely represented the nonlexistence 
ox lana« • • 

In s}iort,the total plane of the mirror gaves the impressioa 
that someone had placed a ciroular pi,the jade eablem of 
heaven.in top of a Square plane og the Barth, like the 
lln-poUame;board,and then out off the projecting cor- 
ners of the latter, flush with the curve of pi . .. 




»'i-mgaag 



MniiiiliUilllil, 



••) 



diu 



:^3 






'' m lir 



iti 






»■' ( 






p^ 



, \ 



i f 



u 



^ 



•'■X 






w «Anj 




25 



.••the broad band whioh outllnes the inner Square has 
the four T «s projeoting from it in the four Car- 
dinal directions.... The explanatioa for these T's is 
provided by the traditional conoept of the Pour Gates of 
the Mlddle Klngdom^mentioned in Chinese olassical lit- 
terature« 

The invertes 1 •s at the end of the Pour Seas would 
appear to be more difficult to explain, But they,too,seem 
to have re.resented barrierSfPerhaps analogous to the 
gates of the outer enclosure of the Han plaoe of saorifioe,. 
all bend In the same direction around the mirror they 
eerve to glve the pattern as a whole a rotating effect 
and perhaps they had the added function of presenting 
the rotations of the Pour SeasonsjWhich v^ere closely 
associated with the Pour Directions* •• 

The next enciroling zone oontains the dedicatory inscription 
of twenty three characters,naming the artisan who cast the 
mirror, ending with the aoolamation of the father for whoee 
tomb the mirror was intended: 

• You,oh gBBtleman,are worthy of 

protection by the (Heavenly)Official. •• 

Of like width is the next zone,filled with the oblique 
'•oomb-tooth" pattern and on this abuts the beleved edge 
of the mirror 's thickened rim, 

The rim is decorated in two ooncentric belt ornaments 
in flat relief by the "pearl-line'* and the "running(or 
drifting) - olouds patterns. 
Here our mirror shovvs two uncommon pecularities: 

1. In the olouds are foui|aninial8,ruAning with might and 
main, seeming to compete with the speed of the olouds. 

2. Clouds and animals spread over their own boundaries in 
the pearl pattern, 

Three of the four animals oan be distinguished: 

A oh'ilin (the unicorn), eymbolio of illustrious birth, 

a hare and a dragon» The fourth is obscured by patination 

and accretion« 

Since these animals are figured on the portion of the miror 

that represented the (rim of) the sky,it would be perhaps 

possible to infer that they were oelestial animals, possibljr 

representing oonstellations» 

Bronae of black oolor with green patination and acoretion. 
Especially beautiful at the refleotion 8ide where the black 
beoomes glossy ''like black lacquer" (hei ch^i ku) with some 
areas of cloudy green. 



• I t4«»»inM«4 



i«Mi.li>aSxtttiim 



jlYi4j,'*niK 



Sil 






m^ 

• i 



liMi 



) ! 



i -Tl. 



hm 



t iMT^ y ' 



mt 



\m' 




„ j_.-... ».v 



*i'l 



« « 9W J, M- 



tt 



— W.' i. ' " 






^yjj. j^^^^^f^ 



/i/ ^ iü* 



4- V S ' ** '*f "^ 



11 V 



1 1. ♦ /v^' »-^ A r^; «*i >.• 



ju •5- 



\9t iO' 



^r. tr 



j j 









«I 



»T:hö i.:». 






«fixii b 



<^.i^ ^ ^A. '^' j^ * ' > 






eai / 



S(i 



^ p. 






i 






Uli 



•xoaiiu ©:.^ 


^ ..,.^ ^ .. ..0 fcerf 


<i> «•>« ^. r-J •-- ;-, ,.. 


f/ 'V f 1 . *r.> .»,*f-f ' 


.^ , ^ + .^. 




^jLVi 









?T 



JE ' ilO 



26 



Joerg Trübner brou^^ht thie iiiirror,amoiig a wonderful 

coliection ot Chou lairrors/fÄ hls last Journey from 

China» 

In his '•Joerg Trübner zum GredHOhtnis" writes Kümmel 

in hls preface(l930) : 

" Den Bronzen gehoerte seine Liebe den groessten 

wissenschaftlichen G^ewinn stellt aber die stolze Reihe 
von tSpiegeln dar, die säanatlich das hoechste an Chine- 
sisoher Spie^jelicunst geben, und von denen reichlich die 
hälfte uns neu ist» Hätte Joerg Trübner nichts beschert 
als diese einzi ;arti(?;e Samnlung,er wilre unaerer Dank- 
barkeit gewiwS,'* 

Han (206 B.C.-220 A.D.) beginning of the first Century A.D. 
probably 9-23 A.D. 

Iiit.:"Preer aallery of -Arf^Vashin^s^on D.C.1946 

Sohuyler Canr^ian '•TLV pattern on Cosaiic ..irror of 

the Han Dynaety'* Journal of the ".American 
Oriental L^ociety" Vol. 68, n». 4 (Gct-Dez.+S) 
do. '•Chinese ."lirrors and Chinese Civilisation" 

in "Aroheology" Autumn 1949. Vol2,no.3 
Swallow,R.W. "Ancient Chinese Bron*e Mirrors?-?eipino 1937 
Yett8,?eroival. "The Gull Chinese Bronzes" 1939 

Exhibition: 1931 Department of ?ar Eastern Art of 

the Museums of Berlin (Grermany) 
1938/41 Ceaeente Iiluseuiii,den Haag (Holland) 



.ff 



m 



f ••■I ' 



•;::; 



.'" •<■% 



> •■••?• 




xo 



•. . ■.»■ 



,,,i.,i,,. 



V- <«..— -. 



•. :.^i: 



»•*.'"« • ,«. ■^- .«. »^ -. ^ V« ^ '^ 



f t\i 



r 








27 



14. 



A 3even Flf-nircs Mt rrnr 
Dia. 14 om. ; ^y 



caetinf if reUe??"^' ''''°""' "'''^°' ^^ >^eoorated with 

Li/ ®4. °°^^°«^*5i° ^elt Ornaments Surround the central 
perforated boi.s for the cord. ^cxiwi-e«x 

The f i r s t zone contains nine corJ.oal boeees alter- 

f^l\'^t 'Vi ^^i'^e/^ifid -orms correeponding tonhe nine 
fiftlds of heaven": Sun,i.loon,Seven Stars of the Oreat 
Bear Constellation. 

Ihl ^®^^° ""/ Zone i 8 fllied -vith an interlaced line. 
"nL>,\ iv."" <^,,3nd the f i f t h zones with the oblique 
oomb-tooth pattera" enoircle the f o u r t h , the niain 

Ths maln zone containa seven fi^urea in linear relief al- 

ternating -.vith seven conical bosses.eaoh bosa sittin/r 

upon a oircle with eight ousps. . , 

Prom the figures sijc belong to the zoJiac anii»!«« 

Pra^onjruniiing ^oat.a oreöted bird n-ith raised wiivs, 

a seooi« dra,5on,the win-ed tiger and ^cieeling -oat." 

The seventh figure is a "vvinged spirit man", aUnome-like 

raoe of beings,called hsien,'.vho people the Taoist Otherworld. 

ihe seven oonical boases are supposed to refer to 

"the aeven lu:p.inaries" or "hulers of 'JJijiea and ^eaaons"- 

bun,.;oon,i'ive Planet s," - 

The broad rim ia sharply set up against the deeoened 
raiddle field. It is filied rvith the " rollia • oioud oattern" 
between an inner " saw-tooth pattern" and an outer piain 
border, 

The broaze is patinated evenly in blaok, eo-oalled "hei chi 
Icu" meaaing the material is like blaok lacquer,with li^-ht 
traccß of aloudy green. 

Han (206 3.0.-220 A.D.) Later :-Iaii. 



Lit.: Peroival Yetts ♦• The Gull broazes" no.29,plate 32. 



.•'M»" 



■:■:'! 



;■:.! 



I 



11 

!Bf"l 







^ PI* 




1 






ro 



t; 






:.rt:; 



• ! < 1 . V.-' 



i 



a^. 



j ß 



» • ' fcv ,'. ', •: 



'** \^ «^ ' # >A» 



■^ * / 



r. 



*»« 1 ^ 



-^•!,i , '.■»•^.' 


•.1 


'■' 


* * • 


• • J. *: '■ :< 


•V^ J-\-:i -' 


^"; . , :. 


•V . 


•i 


■'I 


• 


"^-'r/ i: •-:>.. 


' -y ': . 


< J?. 


i;,.i 


j.. 


■'^ :v;u ; 


* ■! n/ -^ >:••'■ 



♦^ f r f • . . , ■ 



^ . r-* 



i: 



i -,..', '* 



10 



• -i 



..*. w* 







%; * 



28 



15. 



Tl^er-Ca t^ Ordoa Clothin^ Ornament . 
L# 5 om. ; 2" 



Bronze Ornament in the f»ji« oi|a tiger-cat intended to 
De rastencd to the olothing by means of loops on the back 

i^i.^f^""-^*"^}® doubt,that thp^ desi-n combined ornament. 
Utility and macjio,like a useful charm to protect the 
bearer acjainst evil influences. 

Already in prehistorio times the ti^-er was considered 
Baored,for a tiger amulet was found at one of the 
prehistorio sites. Throughout Chinese history tne ti^er 
has oeen considered an auspicious and saored animal, 
as the Chief of all animals ofi earth just as the dragon 
became the Chief of all animals in the sky* Even today 
Chinese children wear tiger caps in orcier to protect 
them against evil epirits. 



The term " r d o s " was proposed by E.H.Minns for 
these relics found in Sino i-iongolian borderland,e spe- 
cial ly abundantly in the desert oounty named 'Ord4s ' 
in Suijuan across the great wall enclosed in the 
northwest bend of the Yellow Hiver (Huang-ho). 

Most of such animal-style Ornaments are attributed to 
the period of the Han Dynasty,a time when the Huns 
icept great armies beyond the Chinese f rentier, 

Bronze thickly covered with greenish black patina 
and accretion, 

Han, about lOÜ B.C. 

Lit.: i^nderson, J.Gr. "Selected Ordos Bronzes" 

Exhibition 1933 in the Museum of ?ar Lastern 
J^ntiquities, Stockholm 1935 



.;*TF»|^ ,,,^ . , 











il^: 



1 



i'ü? 



•'Äj 



*■ 




/ 1 




28 a 



15 a. 



^ lfii.3 cm. ;2.5/ 1 H ^ 



2ä£SjLCutin t 



Bronze Lion-Like fi — -.«^o/ i « 

^^e figure is cut ±TT °'°"°^^^ °^ ^^s hanches and ^ 

The bocv lll '^ °^ «^ «"• ' ^-^ntication 

Z :l'''^^y omcu.3 to 'aZuH^' '' '''''^' --^3 
0^ t.e tan, .33 sent Previ :; .^^t^^"/'^" "^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ 
^--e ..u. ,.een an. re. pa,, ^^^^^^^oation. 

«an» about 2ü0 v.Ch. '• 



'•? 



, hJ. 




»f 




IjSff'iiirinM 



""""'*■'■■■■ liltii 



fl«t 4 






i- J- 




Ti r« f> n " 






! I 




( 



\ \ 



»• 



/ 



' .* 



"^•;i.i7i(t.il 



J 




16. 



2? 



Large Mirror Wlth Zodiaoal Decor . 
Diam. 24 cm. ; g^»« 



The knob in the deepened midale field of the round bronze 
mirror is enolosed by a Square. The Square 's boundary line 
is deoorated and its four corners filled with lion laaske. 

?our other lion masks bite into the*"*Öorder and fill four 
iaverted V shaped aagles — the TL Liarks of the Wim 
mirror no*13 have diaqpeared — dividing the rast of the 
middle field into four oomparteiaeats eaoh ocoupied by one 



a 
tf 



cred animals 



X c a r d i 



of the " Pour s 
nal Points 

These animals re.^resent the four Quadrant s of tlie vault of 
) eaven : 

Th "somber "7arrior"( artortoiae and a serpent) in the North 
The** blue-green(azure) Draßon " in the East 

veriaillion''Bird " in the oouth 



The" 
The" 



White Ti^er " 



*^ 



in the West 



V. 



Two aso^nding belts with the " saw-teeth " pattern lead to 

the broad rim with three concentric belt ornanents : 

On the narrow or inner belt an inocription of forty rhyming 

characters, while twelve zodiaoal aninials foliow eaoh other 

round the middle belt. 

.Hocordiiig to the Chinese Z o d i a c - uif^erent from the 

European - there are: 

l.rat. 2.bull. 3.ti^er. 4«hare. ^.drß^on. 6.sriake« 

T.herse. S.ram. 9.nionkey. lü.cook. ll.dog. 12.boar. 

The ariiuiaie are placed in little pnnels betreea paths with 

flowcr Ornaments whioh lead to the out er rin with spirale 

motlves. 

The riyiiiinß inscription gave creat difficulties. 
The firct who .^jucceeded with the translation v;as Otto Kümmel. 
-AoGording to him and translated once more from Oernan into 
English it regds • 

(The iMirror in;A-?ang palace (palace of the 

beautiful re^-ion) reflecti: the .A'all. 



tf 



(The -lirror) 3 8 n 
hangs in the palace. 
The w a t e r - o 
illuininated surfaoe. 
The m o o n i s s 



S h o u (beacvolence a id lo^pvity) 

is hidden ?;ithin uhe 
in the pitoher. 



he s t n u t 



usoended 



4 

I 









30 




Yn^vy 



f 



'> ,.r. 



V' r" 



I ';• tr .0 



rt i' 



.1 . 




T*.' 



^X 



'K^* 



/.'C 






U. 



r'i 



* ' V 



'' w ■ ♦• 



i..;:^ :. 



'>' 



' i : • ' ^ 






:, .♦ . 



'! r 



•f 



'•. ?. ■ r 






« •' •■ 



• .;. 



V 1 












« 



, !■ 



'■'D 




.( 



\ " " «■■ W 



;..-. ■. 'V 






; 4 .. 'J 



i 



U 



i - 






;- « 



I . 



, / 



-j ' 



4 

) - 



k t' 



4 W W . 



.> , 



' ^ 



^^ ;ii.-vi ...; ''iv 



{ ... 



4 









All formö which look in its center are recorded by hiat 

The fullmoon -reverse side Is like the empty heaven« 

Hill demoiis dare not to oome forth* 

The water-subetance feels humbled by the work» 

Ab good ae I could I wrote theee jev.'el-li:^e Square cha- 

raoters and engraved tnem for eternity upon the ^jreen 

bronze«" 

Küminel remarkslrightly ** a long ooniinentary is neceasary •• 
to it» 

Light bronze with lov-jly patiriation in sinooth s^een with 
silvery spots (yin k'Sng) on the reverae. 'j^ht face side, 
pollshed b iiiercury,green and red inorusted, 

Six Dynasties orLiu Chao (222-581 A.D.) ^ 

Coiaiaentary. 

•*A-?ang-?9laoe'' : Acoording to the le ^^nd a iiirror hung in 

thie palace bullt by Shih Huarig-ti 212 3. C, which reflec- 

ted the 'V^alls" of the p4»aoe ladies a.xäi revealed wether 

they were faithful or not* 

"SSn-Chou-.lirror»': This mirror took Its nnrie from a palace 

of the 3hin dynasty in the third Century of our era..It 

was hung oonoeled and arranged in 3uch a way thit^the faces 

of thOBCfVvho passed by,were refleoted upon its sarface, 

although they were uiioonscious of the fact. 

I remember a aimilar 'jrrangeaent in the audience ohamber 

of the AuLitrian oalace 3choe.n ^r^mn. 

»^^Vater-ohestnut": The middle inotive of eoae Chinese nirrors 

is thuü oalledtperhaps^allision to the rna^io nirrors. 

»'iioon ßU3pended in the pitch": ^erhaps allusion to the«raa :i^ 

cian in the pitch" a kind of counterpart of the rluropean 

»Man in the moon'* , who jractioed by magic all heaven s 

niraoles into his lodging - a jitoher. ' 

"Hill dexions dare not oome f orth" : Acjording to old,also 

European perception,the niirror in which they have to show 

their faceg is the greatest terror for evll ghosts. 

"i?^our saored animals of cardinal point": /^ccording to Yetts, 
thero is no evidenoe about trie loor tapernatural animals 
to prove ttiax tney existed ab a ey^bolic i^oup ^f-i:J;f^, ^^^®^ 
about the third Century B.C.and he is inclincd t4 thlnx 
that with advance of rejearch they jaay De ioona iess 
•Chinese' than is t^eaexalLiBiaiiiiiija. 



%. ^ 



I 
■ • • I 






!♦ •' 

::;i 



ii 

•« 



l;i 



J 






n 



t 

X 



. rr 






■rt ' 1 rj 



v7 »4, .L 






{•. 



»■. -. ♦ . 






, i 



V V 






"} ' i'i ' . t 



'.> A i ': ! 



'■!.'■ 






^y- 



.j 



f '^-^ W W" ,-7 . ,", • 



'. . 






1 -KT 



; .? 



■ -v'i .; 



f ■<. 



xC J» 



' ».'iU xJtc 



J..'.. 






:: r. 



'< 



.r- 



u • 



f 



.'. k^ 



»i 



ii 






^'JU'"' ,'uj ..c 



**f' Jr 



.■ .i ■• 



f^ 



w 















«•■ • 



f ■ 



r- # 



Tf ;• 



V 4.1. 



)' . 



c ■ 






\ Ilv.'i 't =, .... 



4.., 









i . 



• ' '• \ * 






< » 



r, ; '. J 



i 















m 



31 



I 



•fortoise and Scrpcnt** - ••Sombre ^Tarrior'*: 

The syabol of the IJorth's aeüotation as •sonbre warrior' 

c«n,acoordi lg to Alan iglest, be ex:>lf^ined b^^ the ambigai- 

ty of the expreasion *• haüan wu" • It ir^ay be translated 

as somber warrior or also,accoräi:iß to the 'oolc of Rites, 

as tortoiöe« 

Chinese tradition ascribes to the tortoise the feiaale sex 

only aüd e^lves d^ t^ .-nate the serpent. 

to the expressioii " nsUan wu " may have wota later the ;aea- 

nirig Ox a saeak and of a ayatioal <jreation l^orn of a 

eerpeat father a id a tortoift^e ;*oth€r . ntanding to^jether 

al.«o for the Yln Yang prlnoipletth-^» dualibtic alteniation 

and harnony of all things« 

"The Vermilliori Bird" : . , 

Tiie ayrabül oi' the oouxh,the Vermixliou 3ird also i?'eng Huang 
or ^hoeulx,repre3entb the Yang prin^iple or solar e.^cfc.ice. 
It prt öide:- over the . oath and is the Summer 5)ltloe,the 
clinax of Yang po"/er« ■ 

Thus are the cola and the darkaess of winter l»rou,-ht 
together with the syiabol« )i* fire and xiv^ht, summe r 
aad the uoiith . , l'he perf ect yin yang. 



" Zodiao " : The zodiao or circle of aulmals :ieans astrono« 
fiiical an ' iiua^iaary uelt in tne heaven^tne pathb of the 
aoon and all the priaciple planet s änd,at ixs aiadle linet 
tiiS eciiptio or sun's .ath." 

'xhe Zoaiao nas tweive aevisions or sign». These signe 
are reckoned froia the point of mtersection of eciiptio 
aud equator. i>esoribiag our niirror I gave the s i^^ne in 
the OhirifcHe astroaoiaical oraer* But the oraer of the 
mirror it&elf diifers; here follow the nu. oera 
1, 12, 5, 10, 9, 0,7,0, 5, 4, 11, 2* ^ .. ^ . . v> 

The iiuropean or» er and nanes are : HaJi,3ull,Twin8,o»aD, 
-aion, Virgin, Balance, Scorpion,. Archer, roat, 'Vater ^earer, 

i?*ishea» (V/ebster) 

The ^'ar Kaet diviaes the day iiOotwelve double houra 
usiiig the nuneö of the zooiac sijns as denotations; 
it bcgins vvith tne hour of tne rat i.e. -leven xo 
one o 'olook.P.^i« 



•i 



'«iijjjiiiiir'*^ 



32 






l'.'.'A 



froj. *5 ü.vi'^. 



V. ,. 



.^ : i ' 



.1 -- 



i, :"t: 



\. r 



-Li '•■••'• 



--ü.-;: 












i ' Vi? "vr- . •• 






i.r 



' r 



'^> 












i«-/ (LI ■"" ' . '■ ' <* 



t<..i 



J I 



f. .< . 

i.. ./VC 






i- 



«11 >fc 



i» 



•■:^''o » 



; 4< 



■■ <*' 



^ .. -1.'' 



:> • 






•y^i * ^ 



'f • 1 






;.' i 



^ 

X 



a- 



. i. 



i . 






o: 



>« • 



u 



£_• 



f tv ^ li 



'*< :( 



■/ , 






l. 



I 
t < \ 















»Alf 



r:, f.' 



•J /. V 






•■-.(■ 
•1 



.>tyii 






V 4 



• " 

" f. 



>: 



V* 



/ . 



« L 



1. " 1 • ., '• T> t, ■' 



The date. ^ ^ t^ k-, 

The opiniom dif f er to ".-hich period the mirror should be 

??29f Kü.;rr.el in hie "ChinB -A^t"(p.52)d3ted it eeventh 

B^eoiSn of a rather rare type v:nich is aortly 
aSrlbu?ed to the iui period (581-618). Nearly 

?lentioal is the nirror of V^ J^^^S'Y^;i^2S) 
(Tolaru ;akea Kokaa ^.'^^^Ij^'^-y'^^o 1J2^ I.plate 26). 

The -lore 8inple,but in eil eeueattal po int f. cor- 

s-6^25? ihr/e.oL%^^°;rorruro?-^ii.ia^ 

1335. ?hf international Ex^dbition .f Ohinece Art in London 
^ dBtee the niirror in its catalogue ( no.499 ) 

siv J^masties or Liu Ghao (221->ol A,i>. / 
bix L»ynaB^.xcö ^* » ., lateet excavaticns in 

I prenui.ie tht resalts ol x.^e ;^-'''*^'^* ^ .. . ,^ 
Korea induoed .T.Yettb to aasicn this t,p to an 

eqrlier period, 

Tn+o,.o-tUL" to rc-embtr that the J-iu Chao iJynaety waa a 

the inasination of European ''^f J^^^^ jf t^bee^uent Inva- 
They preceded and in aome wa-s inej)±Tea .uoee.^e 
Bllne «w* of the Mon.:iOl and the Manchu. 



Lit. 



*„r.^«„i,h nnre-ice "Chinese CallibroP^y»-'''°«Hy '*"*^ 
■■ 'ff^JS- '°3£er ^..Itr.,;. ;ur Km.t und ,..Uur..- 



f Ancieiit Jhinese toh-^^^ '■--"• ""--- -^ „+_ iia 
and America" Part.II -Ancient :.irrors^Pla^ 

Künael " Chine s.lCunut" 20^ v^^Py^JJ-^J^st m der Preus- 
der i^eBellschBft für os*«^i«t^^°rrlir?^2oV Plate L.vXIX 
Birchen Akademie .i er -^^'^-^^J^^irJ^?;;: Zeitschrift 
Küiaiael Meue Chinesische VpleLel ^OsXas.^exw 



lieu "'olf'e 6ter laiir 



o 



!^i'^.1930 pai5.170 ff. 



1929 






■■« 



'/ 



,^" 



UiiiliilMiriimiiMt 






M 



■;! 




m 





*. 4 



t 



» •. 






•J.' 



.t. 



ttJ^r.A:- 



i f 






..' ». 



.3 



>'^^' 
./•.•,< 



.. a y- ' 



, / 1 4^ 



« •■! 



i ' ■'■ :;..iJ.^.'- "^^' •^• 



:^f'. 



V' 



1^' 



1 . *' 



t J 



«f. I 



' i 









.^ .^■. 



r .. 



V.^ *"• 



■:;e.' 



a. 



■•■.' n " 



W- ' 



I i. 



n 



'■> UV 



•I • t 






'"■'i 






■iLl 



> 



'■> K 



r 



f'-.^. 



\.. -- ■' 




•- 


. • VI ■'. '■*«. ,' 


'. ', 




9-<*'iUA 






U.;'. 


r ■ 


,< j-'v 






■ 9'J ynn^ 


•» 


t • !. 


T 


* ; 


i»iV , 


.Ü 


-*^- 




3 






• : i 



X j . . 



L ♦.'. >. .. 



: f") 



.'J 






33 

Kvuict ujia der i^K^aemi» 
Kataloß ^0.459 ^ Chinese Art, 

1935 I^t^^f-^f ^S;ä of *rt3!iondoa.Cat.ao.499 

1946 i.ais8tt3 van AzlatlBon« .Min.., 



I 



l 



^ . 



t ' 



'•', 



. ; ' 



% - 







^, V ••* »»^ »,* S* « ^«P 









, A «. 4i; < 



^^ 



ri'.'i' 






fi:;! 
Iiiil 



■ ■( 




li= 



) 



1 i 




:\i 



n. 



34 

Spherliial Box . 
H. 9.7 eil. ; 3 T/S»* 



A Bpherical box wtich Is deoorated only by soae clrcu- 
lar llnes and oovered by a lid with knob. 

It Is an Uteneil of the oult,a medicine box,attribute 
of YaOfthe medicative Buddha. 

Black sllver bronze. The green patination oovers the 
old repait too» 

T^ang Dyiiasty (618-90? A.D.) seventh-eighth Century. 

Lit.rKünimel '•Chinesische Kunst" 200 Hauptwerke der Aus- 
stellung der Gesellschaft für ostasiatische Kunst 
in d er Preussischen Akademie der Ktlnste Berlin. 
1929. Plate XCIII. 

Exhibition: 1929 Au.-stellung Chine s. Kunst, veranstaltet 

von ler öe Seilschaft für ostasia tische 
Kunst una der Akademie der Künste, 
Berlin. Kat.no. 422. 
1938/41 (remeente ilu8eum,den Haag (Holland) 

The box was excavated with its careful repair; a sign 

how much my predecessor,niore than thousand years ago, 

cared for this plece of bronze. 

The bronze was also endeared to ne through its perfect 

form, its simple beauty. 

I am sorry to say that after the :iazi robbery the bronze 

returned to me broken to pieces. 

Such a Short time in barbarian hands was enough to uestroy 
ix . 



I 



? 






r . . , , 






> < . I 
■ < ■ • 

, • »«^ 





■1i 







35 



-.0 



">, 






18. 



Kujidlk» Bottle 
H. 25 cm. ; 8 7/8 " 



The Jcundlkä bottle for Amrita (» nectar),!« an attribute 
of the -oddeBs iCuan-yin and an Utensil of her .^riest. 
The form showe Helienlstio influence, 

Our pieoe is very aimilar to the kundlKä in the ool- 
^l :t \, *^f Japanese Kraperor 'vhich was formerly 
in the Horyuji teraple near Jara ae a gift from a Japa- 
nese cmprees to the temple in the year 736 A.iJ. 

Black eilver bronze with earthly green and red patination. 
T'ang Dynasty (618-907 A.D.) ei^ht Century. 

Lit.: Künael,:Jro6se "Octasiatieches Jeräf 1925 plate 35 

KOimael "Chine s. Kunst" 200 Hauptwerke der Auesteliun« 
aer ^esollschaft für ostasiatif-che Kunst an 
der Preussichen ^ikademie der KUn st e, Berlin. 
1929. Plate ICH. * 



Exhibition: 



1929 /msstellung Chinesischer Kunst, veranstal- 
tet von der xeselischaft fdr ostasiatischer 
KU. st und der .Akademie der Künste, Berlin. 
Cat.no. 423 

1938/41 iremeente Museum, den Haag (Holland) 



•TW!!!^^?!7M7''nT»T«r.'«,i.t...,,......, 



•••«•.., 1 ,:;• 



-1 



^'M 






: 





'»»♦fHH. 



Jp. 







56 



19. 



Ladle v/lth Suok Head» 
ZI. 99 cta. ; 13 " 



Tills ladle is heavy in shapc and 'veight, 

The grlp ends in a duck head and throat,ene:röved 
with feather ornament while thc we^^ curved haft 
and ladle show leaves as Ornament - as farTthe 
white-green spotted patination permite. 

T'ang Dynaßty ( 6.8 -907 A.V.) 
Ex oollection Breuer. 



Lit.: KümiaeljAuotionskatalog Breuer,fIo.364fAbb,pl. XXXVIII 
Exhibition: 1938/4-1 Oeneente Museun,den Haag (Holland) 



:*^««i^* 



m 




;} 



» r .M 



m» <■ * 



■ü 




^ 



i^ 



■^' 



20^ 



5T 



Yessel ?or ^rltlng Utensils , 

H. 7 om.5 3 " 
Dia .10 oni* j 4'' 



I 



Cylindrlcal vessel with five round and one rectsn- 
^ular opening« oa the top for nestboxe e of whioh 
three are preserved. The rectanoular opening is for 
the ink stone,! am sure. 

Gilt bronze with green and blue patination. 

Prof.KÜrcir.el acquired this veseel from a Sung tomb 

in Korea 1927. 

Sung Di-nasty (907-1280) or earlier. 



I . 



• t i 



■, < *- 



. *. -^ 




riät"^" 7 ^' ; i ."TSaR Bl '^^■:"- -r^F-»:wT?" 



38 



1 

1IW 




'.1 

'.■ 1 



1 

I 



5' 




». ',' s. •• 



/li- 






21/22 



H 35.5 cm, ; 14 w 



shaped foot. «"-^^ruction reets on a round bell- 

Uli Doraexfa of riat ea-raved apiral ornameat. 
Bronze with clouüy green and red patination. 
Sung (907-1280 A.D.) or earlier. 
These two candleeticks belon-ed to a "Vfu Ein/." 



«»• . % 



;i T 



Lit. 



' S'^dlkutschSri^«^* über archäologische Arbeiten 
schalten ?qof PI* ^^^^^i^^ Akadanie der Wissen- 
&cnaiten.l906. Plat V ; » Boshisatva kneelin^' 
befoiB Buddha with burning oll laap. '^^^^'■'^'^^ 

- i-resoot'Xurfan eit:hth Century. 



s 



»•■ «i» 



!'.^" 



\1 "'i' 



V ^'' V 



% #.i 



^'V'l ^'x 






,1^. ■ 



.'^r ^^■'fl lr<) 



I' 



lA i 



X. V 



:^ 




, s, \). 



' f ' 



^ -■■■--'-'■»'' ''''"Winn'-'-'iiiiäijiid. ,,ii 




T' 



3.:* 



;■; i ■ C^ 




^T 



■Va- 



- - lA » 



Ol' iiJ^'2: 



i-\ . 



■ '.r 



n 






. { 



-r .'^ '^ 



^ 









.^ .üv:^.^ : 



» ,• 



-V r 






J /"? 



» »i.K» i » ■' 






i..... 




39 



23* 



ToJco.ReoeptaQle for the Arrow-^Plaj ^. 

H.59 Od.; 23.2« 



The bronze receptacle is composed of two partsi 
The socle v^ith four foreicners,b3rbarlari8,apparerit 
priGoners of war,who oarry the quadratlo box with 
fear paaels,deoorated by out-out ^wastica Ornaments, 
The top, a ooiunLa-Bhaped,hollow crlinder with two 
S'iort open pipe8,adjoined at the head and ornamerited 
by out-oat floral desi^^ns. The cyllnder itself is 
coveredw^ flat rellefs: Waves with lotus Tlowers, 
leavee and oloudes. In salient relief two lizard- 
li>e dröi^ona (hydra) are added to the 6ides,the iriaie 
crawling upward8,the female downwards, 

The purpose of this veesel,the arrow - play, 
is icnov/n fron the Shosoin,the ancient tr asury at Jara, 
Japan, where a yar is oreserved of the T'aiig Dynasty 
in which still stick feathery arrows with a round ball 
ixiötead of a Sharp point. 

-Besides I know two fi./arativc representations where 
the form of the veseel ie in aocordanoe with our own 
and where even the performanoe of the play can be seen: 

!• On a coromandel ecreen in the Kijks Museum of .Amster- 
dam, ladies oircle around auch a receptacle tryiag to 
throw arrows throu^jh theshort open pipes,v;hich are ad- * " 
joined at the head of the cyllnder, 

2. On the ^^reat rnakinono "^:prirlg L'^ec^tival on the YelloM 
River*' in the iietropolitan i^iui eum,>iew iork,^ent leinen of 
"a drinkin£; party" are devot ed to the same sport, 

The decorat ion of captives of war on our vessel may be 
connected with the re.:.e:abrauce of the old custom to jraiit 
arrov' vases as military distinctions, Yet it is a long 
way from yerious military trainin^;^ to a mere üastiue, 

Black bronze* 

Hing Dynasty • 1363-1644 A.D. 

Lit.: "Toyei '>huko" Illuetrated catalOe^ue of ancieit impe- 
rial trea8ury,calle4 ühosoin, Vol.II.plates 74-75. 
""Cn^lng ivling Shang :io" = :::priag Festival oh the Yellow 
River, .'iing makiiiono of a Sung Version by Chang Ts% 
Tuan(ll20). Metropolitan .iuseum of Art,ilew York, 
Bulletin VI,6,:>(o,liO, June 1943. 



mm^mMmm*^ •ftaA**«^4f 



M .«äi.4p;^ti»^^ jTm tl i 



i w i" w w w iw wt 'i M w m w « H ill III m 



^^^^^g^ig; |i-; ^ =-'..i«SW»-ggH 3S-,gI»^-e»g^« 



.m 
• <•« 
»IM 

I •• 

'♦♦ 



r-T 



j. -. 



i 



^ 



„" ti .; c; 



:.]■*••' 




^ »^ V 



f.' i • 



r 



"'^rev . 





i- 



♦ ■ « 



> f 




40 



24. 



Fiat Drum (T'ung Ku) 

jJiaia.SO cm* ;19,6" 
H. 29*cm. ;11.5'' 



The form of the broAze drum is oircular: A hollo-'- case 
with bulging Shoulders, open at the bottom, covered by 
a flat top. 

The Oase chowe the castus seam and on the sides four 
loopÄQ for Suspension by cords. 

Linar Jeooratioas fill the enciroling rings, eadirxg at 
the bottom in ^reat angle s resetmoling the Konan letter 

The topidisplaying in the center a tv;elve pointed,high 
reliefed star,i8 deoorated with twelve enciroling rings, 
iilled with Ornaments in low relief : oigns r^ senbling 
the Honan letter T,wave8,nipples, parallel lines, Spiral 
eleraeatö,a id in the broadeat part signs of which the 
principal parts resemble Streaming peiaants. 

These last signs belang to an ornarient ^vhich in the 
course of time beoa«ne unintelligible to the workmen. 
They led at list to the conjlusion that also these 
brouze drums belong to the oult of the anoestors« 
Heger su^^^eeted that they might have represented ori^'i- 
nally the head finery of a rauslcian or dancer. 
In i) 'on^sonC Yünnam) newly aiscovered drurn fraginents,aow 
in the iritish Museum, show them as hu^;e feather head- 
dresses of men in long orowed shi. s,each in the attitude 
of managing a paddle. 

Goloubew has argued from the resent practice of the 
Daya-cs in Jorneo that these ships are for the transport 
of the souls cf the dead to the Jsland of Paradise. 
V-e concludes that these druins are intimately corm cted 
with the eilt of the dead and points out that offerings 
to the dead are plaoed in these drums by the ilaren of 
i^urnia • 

Oereful studies have been inade on th#s« kind of druns. 
All agree that they are c.iaracteriL^tic products of the 
Shan tribes between South- Ve st ern China, 3urma and even 
farther in the Polynesien Islands. 

All agree that in the ecoratio.i many allen i.e.Unohinese 
elements exist. i^or instance the star in the center is an 
otherwLse in Jhina unknown pattern and inay result from 
astrononiical studies in aeighbouri i(i India. 



k . I 



iii MAil M M H ■ i ÜÜmUIII^' :* 



41 




L 













,- - i 



%^S:^' 






«'•:.. 



.A ■' J - X 






. ^-^ 



- • V 









r > 



^' V 









u 






4^^ 



:':: / 



'•■'.' 



'.M. 






(. ^, 



> ■ • t r 



i - 



-l 






.; ' < 



« 




The tradltion whlch relatee that such drums made a part 
of gerieral Ghu-ko Lian'ö booty (oalle« acoordingly Chu-ko 
Ku) oontalns a certaln quantura truth. The j;eneral made 
an cxpedition a.jalnst the,till then imoonqu€red,bouthern 
tribes ( miaut zetLoloSfbhan) in 225 A.D. 

But at the same time it is knovm that some rums were maie 
inChina and more ar leßs modified fron the orit;inal modelß. 

At all events the view that most of the drums go back 
to the Man period is untcnable and it ie very difficult 
to ^ive even an approximate date. 

— ... M, 

Bronze with cloüded green patination. . 

bouth China, Shan tribes. First milennium A.D. 

Lit.« De Groot "üie antiken 3ronzepauken im Ostindischen 

' ... Archipel und auf dem j'e&tland öUdostaBiens. 

1901 " 
(Jray.Basil "Ohiiia or ]J'ong-son" Oriental ;;rt,II,3a950 
Heger "Alte Jronzetro^eln aus Slidostasien 19^2 
MOnsterberg "Chinesische Kundge schichte" 1:^1^. 
• Voretsch ".^Itohiuesische bronzen" 1924. 






^ .vt 



^ . 



........ -.-.finHTfffl^fTSWW . ,. 



,M«-«'.«i»«-*JJ 



,'/' 



.#r^' 



mi.::,'u,tuM-:'.imi';*;»;';';>f>tt 



[V.W.Ii 







i 
i 







._. i^i f 






. -4 4 l'i. W^-' 



i n.^ 



rV / ^ . " T « ■ /"•• 






.1. 



■•» t 



/i 



: • 1» -k- 



j * /j ».' 



1 * 
• '. f 



« ^. 



V" 

i: 



.'■■ _Ai^«i 



Vi* •. 






O'.,. 






.y, 'i ish 



Vi 



»V 



i .' 



V 



w 










|!!!li4:i;... -;i:.:-i:. 



42 



CK11W5JB OLOISOKHK t]HA!ffiL 
?ou-lan Chlen « ayÄautin« Inoruated ^^ork 

k A«w developnieat in metal mMmifaoture oa.Ti# with tn« 
latrociuotiou of oloi.^oaad en»^:Bel# 

Althouijh very yoim,^ In yeere oompsred ^ith the lopoelng 
«ntl^julty of Ohln*»9e ceremoul«! broAZßs, Chinese cloiao in^ 
•liQr««o wlth the l«tter tne eame unuertalAty ao to it» 
orltiiua aad the aame carioua laok of priiaitiveat 

It waa Cfilled in China •* i^o(u)-(lin)lan »•• 
The •lan* ie a dlal^jutio tr^^nöfornatlon from *lln*aid 
the whole word 'fo-lia* the tranaf i*vjur»ition oi the vJr^alfc' 
woyd •poliii*('n'oAt/) ^Q ^yaantiaum was oalled In the 

alvldle e^jea« 

la Jyaantinum ololsoaa^ -~the word lo derived from the 

Pranoh word cloißon*cell-~ v/h© ^>roduoed. It niay late baok 

ao far iß^tha tl.ue of Ju8tiaian,t*^e ;.aet--.oman Ki;ip*ror(527-565)» 

K-^aiupli i:, of tli« «l(i:th centuxj' horeT«» :'ire oartaln« 

It Iß no doubt tijjt hetween Bj^antlÄUin-Kaat Koma and 0hl. .a 

there was 4i direot tr :fflCt;)robably n^ dl^jtfifd r,y tha Arabs* 

Thiö "oul'i explain that cloiiio.ui^ ia also calied 

*'Ta-6hlh-yao" = Arabian kiln« 

TÄerefore It is ^^ibaoiux^iy po^aible \h^\ the teohniqua 

of the 'yÄa.itlne oioiscn.i^ enaincl wae introduoed into 

Chl/oa&f the first tima aurln^j the T'an^ p«riod(6l.i*906) 

whloa reoeived oo ruaay incitations fron tha <6st# 

P^*rhap8"^ti» th« rlddle of the airror ^Ith the oloisonn* 
oaok in tne Jhoöoln oould be öolved of ^vnloh l.«? certaln 
thut the nirror »vae left by the hnp<^ror t;hoiau of Japan 
( 724-743 )'\ith ßo mariy other treaBurea troA the ^hlneae 
T^an^ period to the nudiiia of Hara* 
Oraaru :ieigai and :datano -är.aku in the "'^e'^ord of tha 
liÄparial 2re3öury Shoöoin" renark ri,;htXy th'it thcre iö 
"no parallel ex^mple eitner anong tha inoient mirrora ot 
:hlaa or a.io;i-r our o>m ixlrTor3 of l^t» r jro iaotio.i*'« 
aut their su,je-tion thot the nirror ie ••probable i\ prodaot 
of the anoiant ar^a of Jn^v.ti'' la wltho it tne lichtest 
proof ndix very luiprobnbly* /orntdeßic^n.ooior oowe ,^ond 
Mioh mora to the atyie of 3hina# ^. ^^ i 

At all evüüxs xniß uniqua pi.^oe aade na kno^a an artlr.tlcai 
parfact iadui^ry w^»ioh i)ac3n:e for^jotten in tiie hietory 
of Ohliia for ceiituries« 



'^"«HMIW 



»• » » 







■ ••• 






_ Jt%^ k. 



^■•^-f 



f»f 



©f. 



n 

1 *' 



•^ «J.?J-'-' ^'Ä 






vk* 



OJ 






\,Jt^ 



• * 



.; «^ .V 



^>i' V 



i J ^ 



••-»■> ;>1 !0r^ 






»4 *i' . '■ 



N. ; 



c.-.. 



■ • ^ 



i • . "^ 



X .^ 



« f 



' \ .•/ 



J' . . 









f. 



V. .' 






* ^ 



i ■ ^ 



.( ' 



•,1 



•X V 



■ M 



.vi 



•V / 






f.. ■ 



. J 



-roi 



». ■> 



1 • 



'4:\; 



\ '■^'■. 



*• (« 



t/ * . . ■ 




S»^ • 






T^ ' > •••/ 



-♦i' 7 



. • '1 : 



^:.'i 



•.;v », 



tf./' 



• -i • 



/• 

M 



i" .. 






f»- 



, ;/'■ 



c. 'j- r\ ■- 



' H .? ^' 






■ / 



-r t • 
A Li 






47. 



•<\- ■ 







45 



Under the Mongols the clolponn^ enamel Is introduced into 
China from the West oaoe more, It ia eaia that the flrst 

/?oS^^n5^^® ^®®^ "^*^'' ^" ^^-^^ durlng the Yuan Dynasty 
^1280— 1368 A.D» ) 

This'easely imae^inable when ohe learns for instanoe from 
frlar Guillaume de Hubrouok's memoirs that in 1231 he was 
actonlehed to find ajnong many foreign artieaus hie com- 
patriot " maitre v^uillauine BoaGher,orfSvre Parieiaii.qui 
avait demeure 8ur le ^rand Pont h j'axis " as a golda^iith 
at the brilliant oourt of the ^ji'cat ..ublai Khan at 
Karakorum and when one remembers that at Linoges the 
Romane sque enamel art-^iolsorm^ aa well ae champlev^- 
flourlehed since the twelfth ceB-cury, 

These artisans will of course follow the brilliant oourt 
to Peking when Kubl^.i iOian usurps xhe dra^on throne and 
foonds the fixan Dynasty« ' 

3eside thls possibility it is absolutely siiure that 
mohaJüedaa inhabitants ot the province Yünnam foanaed at 
x^eking in the fourteenth or fifteenth Century Workshops 
where they began to produce tnis cloiso.xne eaan-el vnioh 
bright colors raust nave appealed to the rather unaopais- 
tioatea, showy taste of tne Irlongols. It is perhaps this 
beginaing which adds tne denotation '• Kuei kuo yao " 
= i^evil's Land kiln to tne others mentioned aoove, 

Jlevertheleas the Vist najority of the stock of extent 
exaTiples belonje defiuitely to the severiteeuth and 
eighteenth C]ieturie8,to the late Mlng and the early 
Ch'ing Dynaety (K'ang-hsi, Oh'ien-lung) which c:^me to Eurooe 
and to the United 3tates after the sack of the 8uraiier 
Pölace at Peking in 1560. I have to .-aention only the 
Chinese Tiuseuiü of the palace ^t j^^ontainebleau near Paris 
(Franoe), 

The enamel of the Ming D^Tiaaty, ypeaking ^eaerally^is 
charaoterised by a boldness of aesign,breadth of treat- 
ment wnile the technique is not by any means perfecta 
The polish is dull and the surface of the enamel shows 
nunerous un-anted holes and pittinge. 

In the Oh'ing Dybaety tne teohnical finish is improved 
in every detail. The tone of the color is much brir^hter, 
the polish brilliant, but in the whole the ena:-el works 
have for nie considerable lesB aesthetic ap.^eal* 



.1*1 



:";•: 



Ei <4«| 
I«M«. 



[•«il 



l i.< 



'^ iS.tm '- 






.•<o* w>i:TXy 



\ • 



4. • ' ' 






'• >»<■ . 



'^' 



'3!> ••; j .> j 



^ . 



» ' .' 



'-» 



-..ii, 



.' i 



X \ 



.{f.: 






K'. 



H ^O 



• > 






^y J. 



-'J ' .' 






r .'■ 



^>L' 






.1 J 



•" •^>.) 



4 1. 



iv 









•^■''^;; 



ri>v.. 



-1 % 






»- . .•! 



.' '!.J > t* • O 



.« 









' « .4. 



.in:J 



\r -iiv 



r • w ' 



I . 



•% 



Ci 



.^■' /1.1 






i/. ■f-j'- ^J,-, l-^j, X ■ 







V.' 'S 









. V>a' - 



r- i 



r f 






i>^VO' 



t ■' 







V < 



> '^ r 

- iv 



44 



The deeorlptlon of methods used at 
ByÄantlÄum are so eimilar to those of the Chinese that 
they ' upport the belief , expressed above,that the art 
of ololsoiin^ enamel was brou^jjht to China from the West« 

A pleoe of inetal,in China raostly bronze or brasSf 
Is hammered out in the det^^ired shape,leavlng a smooth 
surfaceiupon whloh the ciealj^ is oarefully traoed with 
a flne brush* Then follow the applicatlon of a thin 
flattened wire ribbon of coppert silver or gold,fastened 
e^^ewiae to the vace by a unlque procees of solderlng, 
Hövlnt: retard to all intricaeiea of the dejoration,the 
wire parcels out the field i.ito so :nany cella or cloison- 
nes as there are colors. Witn the wire complcted,tne oells 
are filled with powciered eii^imel(gl8Es)Tri0isteried into a 
puste v.'hich is applied wlth the aid of a bamboo brush* 
/\fter the oolored pastes become dry the object is baked 
by laeauB of a charooal fire,usu»3lly in an open courtyard, 
Protect cd only by an ir4n uexwork cover. A auaber of ;ien 
with faas regulate the fire» 

Several applications of the colored paste and repeated 
baking Mre leoe sary. Then the exitire surface is oarefully 
rubbed down with pumice stouei^ until tne surface is 
eno ;th a.id the desi^^n is well defined. ifter a final po- 
lishing and cieanin^ very often the cop )er at the 1001; 
and Ups of the vase ae well the free ed^e of the laetal 
bandSfWhich run over the r.urface of the pieoe,are gilaed. 



Lit*: Bushell, Stephan "Chinese Art" Vol«2. London 1924 




Coniiaentary: 

"polin" : The stran^je fact tnet the accusative of 

tne GrreeJc word poliß was used to denote 
the "capital" Byzantlnum in the aiddle 
a^e« was explairied to ue with tne abore- 
viation of the phra^e ": il<- t^ ti7 'TTöX/k* 
m towards the capital. 

!?rom the same phrase the Tarka will ..erive 
"Is-tani-bul" when they had oonquered byzan-^ 

tinum in 14b'3. 
"examples of the ei.^hth oentury?: e.^^Heliquary of the 

True Oros3(6taarothek) at the .uetropolilHn 
Muäeum in N.Y.dated Bycantinuni 3-9 Century^ 
x>robably brouc3ht to Italy by a ^rusaüer ; 
once owned by Pope Itinocance IVC1245-l^r?b) 
who r;aye the relic in it to the church of 
Lavagna( Italy) 




1, . ^^iMHIIIIH>||IHntTwiWitW^ 



rrf" 



■ >■>' 

1.1, J 



I:.::J 
■ ' t 

"'■■\ 

■:;;j 
'.1 







i f 

1 / • w '. 



f V 



.► >K • 



4 






" .• 



< -i 



i ' 




^. « 



/:;T^'i: in-i 



i 



■••.^ * 



r i 



.* 



J. 4 



I I 



/^ 



i.T 






' ö'-- r 



*^- 1* tx 



iSv 






.. uv.v ,nr>i t '% 






• 


•' ■ f.f '• , ' '*• 'J C'' 


1 






'/:;..■. .• t 


■ .l.-«'- 


. ' i' • r\ • (. 


*• t ^« f » 


'.' ■ , • .• ^' T r « 



/. ■ ; 



.: r.i'.' 



!' <•"• 



.. ^1 f 



^ > :« J^ • 






J. ). 



••i 



•W - V 



Vf' 



^J 



':.r-. ■:€■ 



' > 



• 






• r ., ■ -• ■,*:. 


. • 


/ 






. .' ' 


« 




J :j . , &<^ ■ ' "^ «5 


■'- 


X 1 




■'ix.. ■-'-* ^ ^ ■■ 


■ f 

t 


1 -r 


*. .. 




.% 




'. 


•■/.. ,' •■ 


1 


' ' 


%.' 


■■ '■ ' i-'" V- 



t * 



4» 



25. 



TWj^ piah. Cloigoniid oa brasse 

Dia, 28 ca. ; 11" 



Colander shape with straieht rovmded sides and wlde 
flanged rlm with flat base. 

Decorated on the base with Phoenix and floral designs 
on the sidee v/ith running horses. in polyc.-jrome 
enamels apon a ^roen ^round. 

The style of the deeign io simple and broad. 

The executLn without the technical fxnish of the 

later periods» 

Ming. 1':J63-1644 A'P' 



* • 



\ ' V- 



♦ A **■ 



.. V ' • 



f. 



.V < 






1 i ». 



f '< ', 



t » ' » 






^4 



•V. *-• 






r ' 



«"> 



f\ 



t • 



■•. ■■■...>....... .n.if'f^WMUW»»««« 



■^Slj|i;ii,y|jfflii;*fiM.:u£ 



MX' 

»IM 

ff» 



» » » 
■■•<<l 
.LH 



• •I>1 

• OK 

I ., 



l ', 



< M 




f 



* ■ - - ♦ '►•!•• ■• 



i 




l!l. ■' 



l^'Fl 



46 



!!• ANCIENT CHINKSE SCÜLPTUHES • 



Some not es on early Chinese Buddhist Sculptures, 



221 A.D* the Han Dynasty flnally oollapeed. 
Barbarlan ohleftalne^often Iseues of marlages with 
Chinese prlnceö8eB,olalmed to be helra to the fallen 
throne» 

Pour hundred yeare of ^;ar atrocltles aad confualon 
followed. In the mldst of oruel Invasion, a new rell^lon 
oonquered the Chinese world« 

The worship of a p mtheon of mostly deetructlve and 
fearsom natural powere and the oult of the anccstors 
were unable to furnlsh to the worrled mlnd of the 
people the consolatlon whloh the new reli^ion, 
Buddhl sm, offered, 

Buddha is born about 560 B.C. and dled about 477 B.C. 

Buddhlam Is reoorted In China already In the flrst 

Century A.D. Bat it iisa not before the flfth Century 

A.D. that It swept the country. 

It Is not wlthout Irony that the bringer of thls 

centlest of rellglons were the ^«arllke and cruel 

T'opa trlbes from Lake Baikal In Slberla who took 

the lead and enteit^lnto ::hlnese hlstory as the 

North Wel Dynasty (386-554 A.D.) ^vho 

ßet up Buddhism as thelr state rellt^lou. 

The '/eis becaiie ardent Buddhlsts and brou^ht to China 

the art that had to serve the new divlnity in stone 

carvln^a as well as in gilt bronze etatuettes- .... 

Prom the «Ifth ceutury untll the fourtheenth an 

enormous amount of the country 's crentlye genlus 

will be aevoted to glorlfy the new creed. 

S iu aX the Weis be^an to build natural ra.iotuarxes 

filled with buüdhiötic inasee out out «^ * *^«^'°°^-^, 

The c avee of Y'ün-Kang .aituated uear 

thPir caoital T'a-T'ung-l''u(i'rov.Shan8i), offered 

a soft sädstoie v,hich facilitated the ^ork. There . 

thp work wlli ended about 495 A.D. /n ^««a 

The capitäiwas traiisfered father South to ^-oy^4^iioa^) 
He?e ?he caves of L u n g - M g n ^=^1^« ^^f ^^],f ^* 
thrDossibility to oontinue in haraer grey to black 
liLs?one aad black narble the pious work. carried on 
latlltll eißht Century by the 6ui and l-autj dynasties. 



! 1 



L/-*' 



;■'''' 1 '^••-..j. . »».<,..»ij.^ 



.-»rr.t.r*i;. 



t»**t*t«*4** 









,.V! 






l'::::i 






U 





\ i 


1 


1 





H 



f.- 



. .. r .-. f 



i. -.JT^ " 



•^■^ >' "5 . 



.'; " < 



.( 



e 



y. .* 






•>• r- 



tO , -T 2 X ^ *^ 









: u l ;: i^ t> * ^ • 



'►' v^ u 



. ». 4, 



*;i V 



> t Vj » ., N, 



.•^*- i^-.C'xvi . 



■ .; :. t 






h.ri **o 



ri^v *!■. 


•L- 'i ^v-i • ''- 




JLC; 


.. f. 




..001 <>.•>■ 


f .17 vj.i .;. -"-^ 




•^>-i:> €i 


^ , locr . j:^ • >r ■.'.. 


^•C' . 


Oii^ i .^■•^ 




. 1 




, .•-:;Ä.r . > '^a r; t • r. 


T;^ ::»:•/ : 


^0 0^ ;^■•: 


■ \ < X / ■ » 


;f. -r- 




.i :; /.' J '• •''''■' vi 


. .w -^ 


* 


• c-'i^ j.:.; 


,;. ..: S:. 




'^ . , ,, ^■i\; j. X j 1, 


•••^U-J.t 


tufif.»:^ 










' '^cri , ? 



*Vir.>i.: J ■ tCf ;^ 



^c^?.r.^* 



I V -^^ : 1 t ^■ 



dr 



t) 






k > 



i ^t' 



li ;; 



'i 



*,x 






»%v 



.Kt* 



^W 






^^ - ?^ i; 



-» ^/ 



"V / 



r ^ ^ i^ 'f 



t***^' 



47 



Many divergent influenoes contributed to the so-called 
North- V/ei style, 

The invaders brou^^ht Indian(Gandhara) aiid Ceatral Aaiatio 
(Kucha) influenoesjthey brought soulptural gift aad metal« 
lurgio akill. 

But as often before and afterward s: The Chinese onited 
all that with their own traditionifine technique and 
refineraent and as reeult an Individual Chinese Buddhistic 
aoulpture of their own bioBsomed« 

The Chinese altered the forme a.;oording to theil? oxm 
Ideals» "o mention only soine alterations: The fat round 
headSfthe broad Shoulders disappeared. Lon^j and slim 
heads blender Shoulders aade their appearance. The 
transparent jarment ol:ianged to robes which let tne body 
disaopear. As in other 'archaic' souptures,the fi^ures 
obey*the law of frontality. ( f 26 u.27. 28 ) 

Alan Priest is ri^sht when he oalls the term 'archaic* 
misapplied to this style, although he consent e that 
there are tr :it8,truly archaic in enrly ^rreek Goulptures. 
I have only to refer to this niystic ec-itallif amile of 

the Wei* ^ 

Intere stilig also ^Uan jriest's sugtiestions about the 

origin of this peculiar style: 

'• The iconography of the early Vei temples obviouiy 

oane from India and from the off shots at least of the 

aandhetran school,but tho style na it appears at Yün Kang 

is far cry fron the irandh-ran Rtyle. 

The route of the early Indian influeace at 'fün Kaag 

I believe to have been across Türke stan. In style the 

Central Asian soulptures a id wall paintings are a 

mixture of Jandharan^^raeco Roman, Per siau aud local 

Ornaments, and the last of then,ce:)ecially the wall 

paintings from the temples of the ilyzil oa:' 

"Budahiotische 3pätaritike ia rlittelasien" ) 

the most brilliant things ever created. 

If these thin^s indeed date no earlier than tne sixtn 

Century, one can only gue: s at the missing links between 

Jandhara and Yün y:ang,which caur.ed so con.plete ^n art 

to appear so suc&nly at such a reitiote distance from i-.s 

oarent stem» , . 

It has be-n su-^e^ted that the iconography was ^rans- 
ported by means of manuscripts which were ^^ea as jlans 
by the scuiptorES of the caves. The linear quaiity oi 
Wei sculptxire seems to encouraoe this tneory. 



is 
ra 



(-i^e 

k aiaong 



Goq 



iitÜH'ilSI 



wg^pnif* •* MSiM' 



T»**T---*^- 



m 



48 



1 



.■.■.:; 1 



n 





h¥* 



i- ■ 



\ i*'^' 






..■ ♦-> < 






\ ... 



•• r\-».- 



.^^ 






v j^ 



<m' 



• ' 



■t ^t 



i<^ «-U-'J 



I > 









. I . 






.i. . 



'-■ V 



T. r * r- -- 






f r 



:>.'.,ü/ li^i^O '-•■'v^' ;^# 



• - ^ ' . * 






w. 



, I 



• f 



4 



>. 

/» 



».' 






'. • • 



»- V 



•J 



^t ? i "^ 



'1 



►l 



' f 



. ij^ U" '■. .•.-- '' 1 



. i 

» .-1 












♦ C w. 



I .■ 






1 



. :' /f 



l; 



V» 



N '••' 



:i 



«.1 } 3 



\ ' 



«.,, 






iu r i -i ► «^ 



- »J- 



', •> 



. 1 



• ■ * • 
... - --.. ;.M 



*- ■> 



\'i l v^ i.'^ 



.i.M;-^c : •; 



II 






M ' 



Acoording to Sirerx,aboat the middle of the sixth Century 
new waves of i^ofth Iiidian influeuoes beco le visible. 
( Käst 7/ei ^34-!:>50 A.D. ^ 29; 3ui 537-613 A.h. 30,31) 
The S u i form a tiny but lovely introduction to 
the Stridor of T'ang. That for the Short period of 
the Sui Dynasty we have euch a large number of eurvi- 
ving examplestls explained by the nearly incredible 
zeal with ' hioh the first emperor of Öui patronized 
Budahism, It is aaid that he ordered nearly four 
thousand new teiiipleß^over a huiidred thousand new 
Images and the restoration of some niliion and a 
hülf imageß. Besides already fron the Six Dy>aas.tie8 
on famoua temples kept Stocks of gilt bronze iniaoca 
on hand to be b^ought as üouvenir8,or dedicated by 
pilgrlxas« 

In the middle of the seventh Century, in the reigns 
of the T'ang Dynasty (613-906 A.i;,) 
ChineEe ßoulpture v/ill reach ite zenith or,to use 
a generally famiHar terra, it^ dasei cal stage (/ 33 )• 



f^ * 



BIBLI05RAPHY 



t' '. 



BacJ*f er, Ludwig "A ehort history of Chinese Art'^ 1946 
Carter, Dajny "?our thousaäa years of Chinese Art" 1943 
Priest, Alan "Chinese ..culptures in t-ie Metropolit an Museum? 
Sir^Kn,Oowald"Chinese sculptures from t.:e fifth to the 

fourteenth Century'* 1925 









.'i . 



■L t 



Af *■ 



U. f . ' A' 



I * " ^ 






^ \ 



t^ '0:^ 



■:' '/..^' 



itC .C. 



-«>* 



>>d 










n 



•f i,,,,.,ii 



w X. 



.i*f . 












49 



«••M 



,:a 



i, t* 



li 



. i- 



m 





26/27. 



• <- 



f- 



» j 



'ij 



f 



, ,-'^:'-^::;': ' 



1 




TwQ Bodhlsattva Heada » 
H.12 cm,; 4.i2»' 



The headQ,endo»?ed with a particular charm, show a 
certain influence of the Gandhararx and Ilathura 
School of NtW.Indian KOulpture,thoußh In lo stroag 
degree. The eyee are treated as elits^the aouth 
fixed in a amile singulary suji:3cytlve of certain 
Greek types* 

Thb decisive artistic traits are pure Chinese, as 
the Wei Tartars were fanatio absorbers of Chinese 
modele, The relation to the occidental Romaiiic art 
is striking* 

The Bodhisattva heads \7ere taken by a Jerman collector 
in one of the teapie-oaves of Ytin-kang at T'a Tang-fu 
in Shansi# They belon^^ed very probably to a jroup v/ith 
Buddha before his Knlightenment, sitting under the 
Bo-tree in meditation. It seems even now possible to 
determiae to whioh cave both aid belon^, 

Grey sandstone with reat of oolor. 

Morth /ei .(336-534 A.D.) .\boat 48Ü A.D. YOn-kanc caves. 

Exhibition: 1929 Ausstellung Chinesische Kunst, veran- 
staltet von der reseilscfiaft für ost- 
asiati-che Kunst und er ii'reussi sehen ^ 
Akademie der .:.laste,i3erlin.Cat.no. 233/9 
1931 Deprt.Tient of Par Enstern ^rt of the 

Museums of Berlin ( lerniany) 
1935 International Exhibition of Ohinese Art, 
Royal Acade'iy of Art s, London (Knc^land) 
' I930/4I Gemeente ]Iuseum,Qen Haag (J'ollanf) 



Lit; 






Künniel "Ohinesisohe Kunst", 2üO haupt «erice 
der .'iusbtellung uer Gesellschaft 
für ostaLiatibohe ivunst iu der x^reus- 
bischen \:cadeaie der Kiirißte, Berlin. 
1929. Plate LXV 



-— ■"»•»<?-!■ -•' 



■/ 



■ «'4 M 



■.'.;t 

'•'4 

:;j 

'•:t 






. u 



j ai 



•.;0^v 



:l.tl .';» 



^i. 



J 



fl 



II 



50 



Keldemelster ••L'expoßition ä© l*Art Ghirioiße a 

Berlin*' Oatette des Beaux Arts, 
p. 250/51 1930 : 
L'öpoque des Wel du Nord(3ö6-534)e8t Ohara et eris^^, 
ßurtout h la fin du V. et au d4but du VI, eifecle, 
par l'appar -tion de la sculpture buddhique chinoise 
archalque. La repr^sentation de la divlait^ boub 
la forme humalne eBt,ici,la i3roblfeme principal 
que se posc l'art, 

Lee monument 8 les plus importants de l'^poque se 
trouvent aana le temple souterrain de fun i(.aat<,f 
dane la province de ühaiisi* II est dommage au'oa 
n'ait pu raoatrer unse dep statunttes caracteristiques 
de Maitreya,dans le genre de oelle qae possÄde le 
Kusee CerausM. öeules^de petites tStes de Bodhisattva, 
exquise dans leu* Charme auet^re et qui appartiemient 
&laoolleotio/i Ginsberg de 
Berlin, eormeit uiie iaee de cet art." „ 

Cohn "Skulpturen aus YUn-kang und vom ^ ^^^''^^^Z^\7\ a^ 
üstas. Zeit Schrift, Neue ^^olee,9ter JahrgU933n44 
In der AcilUiev Ostasiatifcchen j^IunstsaroluA^ •••• 
sind als Leihgabe der 3 a m m 1 u n g Herb er t 
Ginsberg zvei Koepfchen aus Xün-Kaiig aus^^e- 

Mit Bu'dh^'ale öodhisattva unter dem ^o-öaum vor 
BCiiier -lirleuchtuna in Meditation aoeoen die oeiüen 
Koepfe der ^ianmlung ilinsberg in Verbindung zu 
bringen sein. Ja, vielleicht kaiin man aie beider. 
K^opfchen für di^ beiden Figuren «^Jf . °«^f ^^^J^ 
HoPhle in Anspruch nehmen (jJaido jekKitsu Taiicwan, 
iokji 1925,?afel 56) mch die Bruonsteilen.Jroessen- 
verhältnisse scheinen zu stiaaen. „bri en 

Wenn in diesen Werken die btren^e <iff .^f :;i5j^f ^ 
unverkennbaren «ord-Wei-ötiles zu Zierli.hKeit 

und Liebreiz jemilaert efscheint,so i.t das aas 
^om v/n-nv hpraua zu verstehen, in dem exn tjewis^er 
tusdruci durchbricht, wie aus den kleinen Dimenaxonen. 
Pif A^beitS aus Yün:<8ng(SH_m8i)reichen «» "-«^i^. ^^«^ 
zurück }Me Hoehlen entE^tanden zuineist ^^^.'^tlJtlllT 
Slfte ^.P8 f^lnften Jahrhunderte, in der Blütezeit .er 
dei N-ora^Vei-Syaaety. In Wn-kang stoseen wxr zwei- 
ffllof auf^nor^.e.tinii3Che(.sndhara)u.nd -entral^ 

asiatische :.;inflür,se,.ber es .i^tein^^^^^^ 

3Ci\auutigfWeaa man sie jnau ^ciu. 
stellt. 






^vsv^T^^V^yfTrTirrTm^ftfSBSI^-^ 



r d i >: i9 m 



f 

t 



Im 

* • • « 









h 



< i:* V v' 



;•« 



!*■ 



•>: 



' _ > * 



' < 



* 1 



/• ♦/ 



i'l; 



I 



J 





51 



••Dean die Haupt zü(ie der okulpturen uad insbe sonder s 
die künstlerisch entscheidenden Züge koennen nur 
rein chinesisch genannt werden, sie haben wohl ihres- 
gleichen in Lung-m8n und anderen Stellen in China 
um die Wende des sechsten Jahrhunderts, aber nir^enas 
sonst« Und diese Kunst, der ^'/estlich romanischen la 
ihrer geistigen und formalen struktur merkwürdig 
verwandt, inuss zu. uer nicht eben ^erin^en Zahl 
künstlerischer Grroistaten Chinas ^ereci-inet werden.*' 

Ashton,Leie3h "Chinese Art", London 1935 

Chavanne "ilission aroh^olOt^ique aaas la Chine septentrional" 

Paris 1909,plate 105-160 
(Haaer,ix^urt in "Chinesische Kunstgeschichte" (Springer) 

S. 25, Abb. 23 
Sir^n "Chinese Soulpture" London 1925. Piatos 17-66 



J 



■in uiiiui. 



'^rtitoÄ' 



m 



•••ti 





%, t 



•i.- 





ikt 



V 



».•^ « • s- • 



4 ' V 



f ifÜf' 



'•ii.i;i 




52 



28. 



Standing Bodhlsatva wlth Two Adorlrifc Monks 

H.13 cm.; T" 



Bodhlsatva (« Knowledge essentiallty ) is a being, 
Bature to become a duddlia» 

Developed fro'Ji the le\^:;end of the historic Buadha, 
who was a prlnoe,a Bodhidatva is nostly lepresen- 
ted by a aiandlng young man in royal attlre# 

Thus our Bodhlsatva wears a long,on both sides 

projectlng, vestiaent wlth long sleeve3,elaborate 

jewela and a pecullai^ f oriuf.d crown. 

He ötanda on a lotuö thalanus supported by a lierced 

bracket and holds hie hands In the Abhaya-iaddra , 

the geeture of oonsoll.xg: Don't be afrald, 

Behlnd hls head a heart-shaped aiandorla wlth lloicing 

flames In rellef. 

In front of the 3odhiiatva,on the bracket iteelf, 
two Buddhist ifionkB (eaoh h,1.5") In adorlng attltude, 
perhaps Sudaha's d.sciples A Nan( nnanaa ) and 
Mo Ho Ghla( ivlahSkasyapa ). 

(illt bronze v/ith epots of green patlnatlon. 

North Wel ('536-!;34 A.D.) ^'econd quarter of the sixth ct. 

Sxhlbition: 1929 i^us^t eilung Chinesischer r:u.ist,\reran- 

ctaltet von aer ieaellschaft f ir jot- 
aniati acher Kunst unci der .'^kjdemle der 
KUnste •'Berlin, Katalog no.2D4 
1931 Deps^rtaent oi ?ar :ia3tern ;^rt of tlie 
Museung of Borlln (C^ernany) 
' ' 1933/41 >emeente :aöeun,aen ^^aag (Holland) 



Lit* : KUimnel "Die Aufstellung tfer ^3aa\lung Perzynskl 

im Berliner /.unst^^ewerbe .viuseaiii, Ost- ^ 
asiat, Zeitschrift 11,461 (1913/14; 
airajiel " Chine oi sehe ..unst" Zweihunuert ilaupt'-'/erke 
der ;»ubbteliun^- aer vr.O..'vin aer -^'^euco. 
Akademie der .^jiiiatet^^eriin. Plate ^-^'-^^^ 
Shlna Ujutüuöhl Cnosohen, :'okyo(191.>)-^late ^^f/J^^ 
fairen "Chinese Sculpture% London 1929 Plate 31^a 



li 



?y''[ 



•''^iteilM^tliiii^'**' '^' 













?»•; 



•» . 



t^r< 



• :fJttl 



53 



29* 



Va.1rapaal# 
H.52 cm. {20P 



High relief figure of one of thc temple 

guardlans« 

They mostly appear es a pair at the eatranoe of the 

caves of the rook-out temple St 

Gtriking in our figure is the energetic expression 
of the face, the poise aiid the verve in the moveiuejat . 
A particula^ formed cap covere the head,a s^.ort laaatle 
both Shoulders • The undergarment falls in beautiful 
pleats and is bound over the hips. 
The left hand is raised to the breast. in the rii:,ht 
hand a hint of the Vajira(thunderbolt). 

Kümmel describes his significance: ^ 

« Vajrapani,Indra,alß der Donuerkeilträger.der Vertei- 
did;er aer buddhistischen Welt d^jen die Dämonen, 
spaltet sich im noerdliohen Buddhismus in verschie- 
dene Formen. ^ / va_ u. 
Kr verdoppelt sich zu Chin-kang-shön Übersetzung 
von Vajrapani),die in iestalt von stark bewerten 
niesen mit dem Donnerkeil in der Hand vor allem 
die Tempeltore bewa^-hen und in der japanischen 
Form der .^^io (JSn-wang) am besten bekamt sind. 
Er vervierfacht sich zu den Wächtern der vier 
Himmelsrichtungen, die meiit in ruhiger Haltung . 
als gewappnete Ritter auf einem boesen Jamon 
stehend dargestellt werden." - -^ - 

The Limestone, out loose from the rock as the reverse 
proveü,ha8 ßained a beautiful tawny oatina. 

East-Wei (434-550 A.D.) about 550 A.D. 

Ex collection Breuer. 



Exhibition: 



'.I ' 



tt *■ 



u 



1926 Pepartmeat of Far Easterh Art of 
the Museums of Berlin(ü-ermany; 

1929 Aufstellung Chinesischer Kunst, veran- 
staltet von der See. für ostas.Aunst 
un der Preuss. Akademie der Künste 
Bt^rlin ((Je.many) Cat.No.245 ., ., 

1938/41 Jejaeente .Museum, den Haag^iollana; 

1946 Museum van Aziatische Kuast.Amsteraara. 



P 



:i. 



'/ 






M 

'.;;;'l 




54 



lo 



Llt#: Cohn ••Ausstellung der üamralung Dr.A.Breuer in der 

Ostasiatisohen Kun8tabteilunß"«0aßta8.iieit- 
80hrift(The Far East) 1926 Bd.l3tl92/3. pl.20« 
Kümael "Chine siscne Kunst" , Z^'eihundert Hauptwerke 
der Aubsteliung der vreselischaft fdr oötasi- 
atieche Kunst in der Preussischen Akademie 
der Künste, Berlin. Plate LXXVIII 
Sir^n»« Chinese öoulpture", London 1925. Plate 24-fi,293 
Visser^iuedeeling van het Museum van Aziatisohe Kunst 
Amaterdam. " In •Phoenix 'No. 5, 1946, p. 29 

BXCERPTS 



w i, 




£1^: 



¥ I 



V 

•V 




' V C' * 



X\-. 



Cohn, O.Z. 1926, tom 13,page 192/3: 

••Für die auf Tafel 20a abgebildete Steinskulptur 
durfte eine re ht ^euaue Jatjerung moe.^lich sein. 
Kein Oebiet der chinesisohen Kunst ist uns ja 
bekannter als die frühe buddhiatisohe Plastik, 
dargestellt ist zweifellos ein sogenannter Tempel- 
hüter,wie sie, meistens zu z^"eien,an den Eingängen 
zu Hoehlen und auf Stelen vorkomnien. ^ 

Wenn er in Tracht und Auffassung von den in der 
I^ang Zeit üblichen, bekannteren Typen abweicht, 
so löt er aber für eine Gruppe von Werken charak- 
teristisch, die in der Zeit vor und u m die 
Sui-Dyna st y( 589-618) zugeschrieben werden müssen. 
Hier findet sich des oefteren dieselbe Kopfbedeckung, 
und auch die eigentümliche Koerperbehandlung 
sehen wir jer-ade bei Verken der Sui Zeit etwa aus 
der Provinz Chih-li. 

Das Stück der Breuer sehen Sammlung hebt sich durch . 
die Energie des Ge Sichtsausdruckes und durch den 
Elan der Bewegung von dem Gross der so oft nur 
handwerklichen Skulpturen dieser Perioae glücklich 



ab« 



N 



Küm-nel, Prefaoe to the catalo^jue of the "Sannlung Dr.A, 

Breuer, Berlin, Ostasiatische Kunst" CaBsirer,rfa.bing 

12. und 13.i':ai 1929< ^ ^ . ,. ^^ 

"Unter den Skulpturen ist vor allem der merkv^rdlöe, 
Boweit ioh sehe, einzigartige Tempel^vächter zu nen^ 
neu, der, in 3bereinstiia.iung mit öir&i,der Zeit um 
550 zueCfc schrieben wird. 
Vi8ser,H.E. "Med.v.h.M.v.Az.Kunaf'in Phoenix no.3,1946,p. 29: 



i\ 



•i 



*^,9 



Wß 



^£^.X^i A. 'fX-^i. 



'm 



.ä^MMawMM 



.**r" 



:*^*«^i«iö« 



^' 






55 



IV.VA 

( - . , , 
■ ' ' i 



\ .-V • - 



-• t 




.-. lirj^O j..'^. , 



't r. V 



'* 




i*< 



t^ 






{.. 



i> 



c»-«^* 



• ^ X-!..M 



ry ..•*/.- Pi 



?i f 



■ < - V 



•r». 








.:i*»^^ 



Vi8eer,H*E,"Med.v.h*Mu8*v.Az,KuAst" in PnOKaX,no.5f 1946,p*29 
•^v^nigen tijd geleden heeft het Museum eene 
Delangrijke collectie Ohineesche en Indische 
kunet in bruikelen ontvan^en ait 
de omvangrijke verzameling 
van dr.H erbert Sinsbergte Zeist» 
Tot de fraaiste stukken behooren de h i e r ; i j 
af^-ebeelde Chineeeohe steehsculp- 
t u u r ••♦chineeeohe Bronzen, bronzen figuren 
uit het groote gebied van India* • • 
Voor heden bepalen wij ons tot een körte bespreking 
van de gere ^roduceerde figuur. 
Deze aanwinet-in-bruikelen is bijzonder welkom 
omdat het Museum nog geen voorbeld van beeldhouw- 
kunst in eteen uit de eeuw,die aan den beroemden 
T*ang tijd vooraf ^ing,bezat, 
Deze TemBpelwachter dateert n.l.uit de zesde eeuw^ 

Of het beeld tot het bejin der Sui pf^rio e mag worden 
gerekend,is noeiiik vaet te stellen, ^^r /-^'i 1 U am Co hn 
heeft in de "Ostacdatißche Zeitschrift", 3/4 1926 
een beschouv/ing aan gewijd,en wel naar aanleidmg 
van te tentoonstelling der coli. dr.A. Breuer in ac 
OBtasiatieche Kunstsainrolung aer Berlijn^che musea. 
Het stuk behoorde n^l^vroe^er tot ^^^ze bekende 
verzameling,waaruit ons Uuseum ver^chillen stuicken 

ver^'^orven heeft» •• . r>^ ' ^4- 

Ha ver^elijlcin^ met eenigen platen in Sirens groot 
werk over Ghineesche plastielc'coint John tot de 
concluBie, lat onze te3«pelwachter tot de^/^;^^ 
voor en oastreeks de Sul dynastie gere^end noet 

TpTe^ote C^ineesor. Teatoonsteilln, te B^^^^^^^^ 



nog ale bezit van dr. Breuer tentoonüesteld wordt het 

11^ (No.243) als vol.it oedateerd;'.ach Sirin 

wahreoheinlich Ost-Wei (b54-b50;. 

Kort na Kenoende tentconstellinö ^verde de collectie 

Scuer bi1 Casairer-IIelbing te BerlÄin ^eveild. 

!ls UO.240 !^eregi3t«erd,wodt thans als dateering 

"um 550" aana^even. 

M«n ziet uit een eu auaer.dat het niet altijd zoo 

feSaSfliS is een -^rlc der ^^f^^^'''' 

op een ticatal jaren »^auwkeurig te dateeren. 

Laten wij er ons mee *«7«J:?.f J^i^^ead^ euf 
iets voor of in de tweede helft der zesde euw 

te plaatsen. 




»^-'■'•'"■■■■'niti 



•1M< 




U , W •.— 



• », 



^ tf^r^ '1 



iiw ♦ . . 



♦ -• .. -* ^.. 



/v r 



-> 



. A • i: 



1'.. 






i*« 



; I 



K? 



■n 



V. 






/ r 






« ^ t « ^ 



» 41 r* 






I ; 







1 






Tni#HW>^ 



nri. 



56 



Welke b e t e ek e n i s nu heeft de zesde eeuw 
in de OAtwikkelin£ der "liineerche plastiek,raeer 
in het b4jzonder der Boeddhistische plastiek? 
Het kan kort ci:«foriiiuleerd worden; 
In dit tijfeverloop beleeft laea deontwik- 
k e 1 i n g van den strengen etijl. 
die ZOO karakteriLtiek is voor jaren voor 500 
tot oiüBtreks 530 , v i a k a n s t w^rtoe o n z e 
tempelwachter behort,n aar de 
nog wel eterk geßtyleerde,mar toch reeds t.o*v. 
de groep van voor 500 - omstr, 530 v e e 1 
minder streng aandoende 
plastische kunst der Sui periode. 
Deze prächtige plastiek vormt 
weer ^ea duidelijken overgang 
naar het omvangrijke coiaplex van de plastiek 
der Tang periode 

Tot de fraaiBte detail s van dezen Tempelwachter 
behooren vorzeker het niodel(5 van den kop en de 
ploienbehandlang van het .je^^aad. Ue geheele fi.^uiir 
is iets 5edron^en,een inaruk die ver;tÄrkt wordt 
door den laag aangebrachten gordel. 

De kalksteen heeft een f jLaie,lichtbruine patina 
aangenoiiL'nen. . . De achterkaat van net staik wijst 
er op,dat äet uit een rotewand ftehaKt is en 
der halve den toe^^ang tot tdt ruimte van een 
BoeddhistiöChe rotetempelcoiüplex be\^dakte# 



tt 



• • • 



... »***•>, ,(, 



ä-'^'' 



i 



^,*H^i»l;, 



'aiff 



ü» 




» 



i 



;i 




...Ä,» 



I 



57 



30. 



Bodhlsatva Tl--T8an^ . 
H*18 cm. ; J.J^ 



The gilt bronze ficure of the Bodhlsatva is to be 
Imagined as an attendaut of a dedioatory group,li.-ce 
the altarpieoe frora the Tuan ?ang col^^eotioiiinow in 
the ivtußeom of ?ine Arte in Bo8ton(Maas)dated 593 A.D. 

In Chinese Buddhism the Bodhieatva Ti-Tsang ranks 
next to Kwan-yin ^vlth ^hom he is often oonneoted, 
Both are savioure from Hell,both a.^ree in preaohing 
repentance as the way to salvation, 

Ti-Tsang's boundless oompaesion tries to save nankind 
from all sufferings and to lead to a general conversion. 

With the briiliant luHtre of iiis "precious pearl** he 
penetrates and iliuminates the i)ark Palace^chanjing 
Hell into Paradifse. On the evening of his birthday 
the festival of the dead,the Dllambana, oojies to au 
end.Hell is closed^vowe are made to assist and save 
all lonely couls for whoin no relatives care. 

Ti-Tgang is either represented as 3 Bodhlsatva with 
a crov/n on his head or as a priest. 

In our Gase he is in the shape of a priest v/ith shaven 
head and sacerootal robe ; he Stands upon a anall lotus 
pedestal, With the right hand he holde upwards the 
"preoiouB pearl",the Jewel,while the left hand poiiits 
downward in varada mudra. The flaming manaorla is 
fixed directly on his Shoulders ; it is an open circle 
bordpred with licking flaines,the lassest just above 
his head« 

This gilt bronze ima^^^e is typi'-al for the short phase 
of extrene elei:,ance through whioh Budahist öcuipture 
passed ander the short-lived Sai Dynasty ,which has 
often provoked a comparison with the bsauties of the 
European »iothik» 

öui (581-618 A.J).) Seventh Century. 

Exhlbition: 1931 Depart.of Par Eastern i^rt of the Museoms 

of Berlln(Jerinany) 
1958/41 Gemeente i«IUBeujn,aen flaag (Holland) 
Lit. : M.W.de Visser"The Bodhlsatva Ti-Tsaxig(Jiz3r) in 

China and Japan" üBtas.Zeitsc^irift Bd. II & III 
(1915/14 cfc 1914/15) ; chapter V "History of 
the Ti*t£ang oult in China at the time of 
the Sui Dynasty"(II,297) 






• tik- 

■•.'AI 



The famous poet Li POfOne of the "Eight IminortnlG of 
the Wineoup",who lived at the time of the T*ang Dyiisty, 
in the eighth Century praleed Ti-Tsang in a poen 
quoted in a Buddhist work: ''^e read there; 

"Li ?oh made the following praise -^-r 

of Ti-Tsang P'u-sah. 

The original heart is like the empty space 
It is pure,it is nothing. 

If one burns lewdne88,anger and foolishness 
It iß fully enlightened and appears ae a Buddha. 
That Ti-Tsang »8 holy effigy,painted in five colors, 
Gives insight in the truth is not a false tradition, 
It wipes away likc snow all diseases, 
And aakes the soul bri^^ht like the pure, cool i^^ky. 
Praising this sea of virtous actions, 
For ever I proolaiLi this to far »^enerations*" 
( de Visser O.Z.II,299) 



53 



31 



Bodiiisattva Head . 
H.3,5 cm. ;1.5'' 



The little head b loogs to the ^^^^ ^raceful worke 

of Chine Be oculpture. The snildfis :ive3 the earthiy 

refleotion of the cnlightement. 

The oombination of Btrength of form with tue liv£ 

moSellines directs to the second half of the bi.th 

o«Atury# 

High relief in yeliov; uiarble,broken out probably 

from a votive etele. 

Sui (531-G13 A.J.) iibout 600 A.K. 



^. " i 



Exhibitlon: 19^41 ''eme 



ente iTUiseum.den Haas( Holland) 



\ • 



, I 




£ J 



al-^r 




Hn 



■pp 



.'^Wi 



*j 



f\¥§ 



B 



h9R 



M 



i'i 




i::! 









i i 



, 1.1 / i!4 



.«-'*<'^^^^^!!tT?'^l!fiH'f^ 




. iXlti 






I 



59 



52. 



StaadlnR Fi^^ure of Buddha 
H.22 cm. ; BaO»* 



The gilt bronze Ima^e Stands upon a lotus thalamus 

whloh restß ori a)^ octaxio^jal base. 

A broad oalm face with a rapt expresc^ion below the 

Usnisa,eloa(;atQd eax lobea« 

The cloak in elaborate ooncentric folds, joined with 

thebody to a harrionious unit* 

The hands in Abhaya and Vara iiCldra bestow upon the 

worshipper fearleaanes and blessing. 

The effect of the Indian sculpture of the Mathura 
and (Jupta tnOhool ie olearly notioeable. 

Oilt bronze ötrongly inorusted with green putination. 

Korea , Early T'ang period,aboat 700 A.D. 
Ex collection Breuer» 

Exhibition: 193ö/U Jeneente .uuseuin,den ;ia&g(Holiand) 
Lit. -'KttirLmel "Die Sajumlung :r, A .Breuer, Ootas .Kunst" 

No.252. 










L_ 



I Ms, # J / .-• «.I 



■»-X^ef; 



t.j':. 



.^" 



!'!'l ' !}! HrrTTT-TTTtTHT , . ... . 



60 




33. 



Buddha He ad» 
H.18 om. ;7" « 



Excellent example of the Buddha 3hape of the high 

T'antj periodi 

Monimeatal fonnß,yet ^^hioh priös eoftly fron one 
to the other; the Ups füll, the eyes nlmond-ßhaped 
curv-^^d b» low the rai^hty round aroh of the eye- 
aockcts under the hxi^h artificial ooiffure» 

Iligh relief froia the rock-cut temples in the 
South cave of Lun^-id§xi,i?roviuGe lloaan. Goudition 
of the reverse ,>roveö that the head nas been 
broken out of the rockt 

(jrey-blaok Lime-stone* 

T'angC 618-906) About 7üC a.^. 



Exhibition: 



l')31 Department of i?ar Elstern Art of 

the .uuseume of Berlin (Geim^ny) 
1953/41 vre^eeate !:ueeum,den Haag (Holland; 
1946 Museum van .Aziatii?che Kurist, Am .terdam. 



... ^ 







• tu 

Hl 












61 



34. 



Sittlng Lioa 
H,15 cm. ;5.12" 



The lion is sitting on a base.the powerful head 
and neck thrown baok,the mouth open,the ehest 
bultjingjWleverly contra sted wlth a supple and 

elifthtl^ curvec body. 

The sense of latent power is vividly aohieved, 
iubt as much as In the laxGe guardian 
1 1 o n B ut the tcafcs cf the al^^y or at 
the gates of the teraples. 

Since lions v; re unkAovrn in China the sculptors 
had to rely on representations the> hau oome to 
know fron Western i.tjia and which they suoceeded 
to fuse into pomethlng unmistakdü-y Chinese. 
The sculptural qunlity of the T'ang aninal 
conception coaes out very stron^ly in splte 
of the enall din-^nsion. 

Yellow jaarble. 
T'ang (613-906 A.D.) 

Exhibition: lOH Department «^ -';:^^(tf Sermanyf 

the i>iU2eunis of Berlin Urermany> 
1933/41 ^eaeente liusciua.den HaagtHollana; 



:»: 






1 

■;'.l 



i:;;;! 




i- 



f 





^ 



l 



fe 



62 



^^^' ANGIENT CHIWESE CARVTTJf;?. in JAm. A-JT^ Tvnpv 



35. 



Qeremonlal Jade Hatchet. 



,-V . . , -i ■ 

This emUlea of huaan author ty is oarved out 

J^ t ^ 1 '^ °. ^ ^ lephrite 7>aterial 
which v/ae found in the neighbourhood of the 
G ho u oapltal H8i-an-fu in oheasi as well 

in bhonsi» > .. .... 

This material ";as regarded ae a unioue.conae- ' 
crated subf:taace and adapted to ritual purposea. 

Wm» reotanöular blaae of the hatchet ie pierced 
to faßten it to the «Irale. It Is used cereaonial- 
iy m Baorifioes aad worn at court functions. 

J a de (ya) of greenii,h,^rey,blück aiid brownieh 
hue. ihe hue is rathpr dull in compariEon with 
tiM briiiht translucent.raoLtly green, stone, -hich 
wa» imported not before the thirteeath Century 
from Eastern Vurkistan, Yarkandjfrora the ^aikal 
bea and frora Burma , 

C h u (1122-25'j B.O.) 

Exhibition: 1938/41 (^emeente i.iUceum,den Haag( Holland) 

Llt.: Collis,iiiäurice ^'i^he first holy one^ilew /ork 1943 

Henne. sey,"Jna Pope '*Jades" in Chinese >irt, London 55, 



Ui 



% ^ 



\ 



^ Exoerpte 

The great Confuciue (the Latin reudering 
of the Chinese K^ung Fu-tzu = stör TOzng of the 
Jesuit 8 "Oonfucius Sinariiri Philosojhu^" Paris 1637) 
v^'ho llved 550-479 B.C. at the end of the Chou 
Dynasty when the old Fooiety of China was disinte- 
grating,epitoi:ilzed the jade thus; 

"It is not beoause JBde is rare thnt it ib so highly 
valued.It^^^s becaut:e,ever since the old üaySfWise 
Tien h^v^Vin jade all the differeat virtues, 
It is 80ft,sniooth and 8hining,liK:e kindnesö; 
it is herd,fine and streng, like inteiiigence; 
its ed.-^es Sharp, bat do not cut,like justice; 



it han^a do 



to the ^roundjlike ha.^ility; 




.i>i<<i>>4->- 



■v-i 




I • i 



i\ 




i'l^ 



s 



.V 












. C?v; r. ,. .'i<^i. ^ .^ii 



ä^v-t-: 



(Yv.., 



ftf. 



•'' n r* ^. i. Jb 



. / 



•k 1 • 


;i c d r 




.I:u;--.!l? rtjt 


;:i^'^•^ / 


- li'i: 


••' •^->; ,. 


1 ^ ' * 




■ r 


(.;.::. ^ '•' . 




■• '-■.: •" ^ 


\ \^ ) ü !) iiv - 


^ 




, . 


.: J -^ t ..- ••'> 


■ 1 • 


J .1 " .. a j :• A' 


/•^.c 


' V "r IWj . . . . .. 


» ' 





« • 



• . . ./ 



• 1 



! • ^ l'i A. «ii 



j .1. .. ■ ■ 



.'in.' • ^ 



I? 



_ 4 



V 'i 



♦ V 



4 ' 



• *- • •■ ' 






••i *. 



»■» 



-? f 



Ä 



i''') 

!•••! 
I««<« 



■:! 







63 



when Struck it e^ives a clear, einging sound,lik€ nusic; 

the stains in it,"'hlch sre not hidden and whioh 

add to to Its beauty,are lik=? truthfulness; 

ite brlghtnesB ie like heaven 

whlle ito fima aubßtanoe,born of the mountains 

and the watora is like earth. 

The Book of Poetry says: 

Wheu I tliink of a jvise man, he eeüna liko jade» 

That is why wise men love jade« 



I« 



Una Pope aenaessey "Jade": 

"Jade... the pureat and most divine of natural treasures 
to be the vehicle of ooirüiiunicatlon ^^dth the unseen 
pover of the unive-. rße,it r^s adoptea too as the 
eiüblem of human authority and the prophylactio 
a^ainat disriarraony. . . • 

To Ohineae sensibilities which are in coae res 
fint;r than oar own,jade has tv;o qualitiee that 
Bhould not naturally jttribate to it,a tactile 
value and an auditive value« 

Not only di.i the handling of Jade engender suavity 
and Gomposure, Dut tinkling pendents 
for the ^jirdie aad the head vvoula by 
tho nagio their nusic generateä,keep depravity 
from the heart." 



»ects 
we 



For the imported jades the merchants foond terms 

fuil of phantaey: . 

fei-tsui , kingf isher-feather creen ,hUB-h8ua-tai-tsai, 
lüoee enta^led in snow , white jade ^'Ith z^eea veins.... 

The supornatural is preserved ^Iso in the term ' j a d e •• 
It ia darived from the ^panish "piedra de i j a d a" a 
otone of the flank or aide» In figurative aenoe: pain in 
the fi ld0| einoe the stonc ie being supposed to oure this 
pain (Webster). Thua the relief in the ^ti'ioaöy of oontaot 
with jade aa a rernedy for internal oomplalnts ia evidenoed 
in ita nane# Jeyond it reachaa the belief that jade pos- 
oe eed the property of precerving the flesh of the body 
and preventi/ig deoay* 



i-^rs---'*-**«,*»-,* 



t»l t 

if «f ■ 

< I* M 

■Fi 













■i 
i 



•■•'•'ri ,.,. i. 




irT':;;'!5Ttv»! 



i- .. 



£X .-■ >i 




t:^ 



n 



■y^ \.^j' 






■j^ 



1 ^ 



i. ^ 



\ 









i> X i }: ) n 

/, : ,': «f > - ■' r 



1*- 



-I'.. 



•w 






iy 



'■ *-. 



l. V 



■ , \ 



7 






*; • i"» ■ 



t ß : « t. 



X •'>'.' ^ 



4? ^^ 



Kl« t^^ 



»ii j. 



»^ r * - 



■■ J: 



•V .' 

4. V 









^ •':' 



\t 



>»> 



: / ^ , 












> . V 



64 



36. 



Ivory 31/^net;Linn 
JL . u eilt . 



The form of the llon,to be oorrect of the Po ( »Buddha ) 
l^og,i8 convention.-li3ed and ad.^pted to the oval form 
of this pieoe of ivory; the ball in the liori's mouth 
ie tne "jewel (chee)", symbol of purit;* 
Uader the ba^e ^euply carved the geal-charaoters* 

Ivory with old patination 

.uiiig (1363-1644 A.s).) Seventeenth Century, 

Ejc oollectiou Breuer. • . ^v 



* , 



Lit. : Kitiiuel und Crosse ''Ostasiatisohes aer'4t'* 192t? 
i^late 37. w v 

Exhibition: 1929 -Au^-^tellung Chinesisoher Kunst, " 

veranstaltet von der ^es.f .ostas.Kunst 
und der Preuss..**lad8nie der iCünste, Berlin. 
Kat.no. 669 
1938/41 ienoente Mu3eum,den Haag (Holland) 



»■> 



, \ 



,' i 



s 



c i: 



•V« r« 



•r. 



. .». 1 



^ r ... '> 






. 't 



^ ^ 



*M 



t . 



4 %4 i 



•■*» * . 

. »* I ' 

I .-M 

, > f • - 



65 



H 



[■1 .s 



' 1 



» > 



. f» r.'XO\^ 



J- ' 



«i 



«,' 



♦ • -< 







it/. 



iVOi 



i. ^ 



.■%Y' ** "^T' 



.v> 



" .8 ♦'' .. "U^'. i''^ 



/. 




|l.,Tfrn, 







IUI. 



ANGI>:NT C^I^resK CIEHA:a03. 



Some not es on early CoineBe Ceramics, 



Pottery raaking in China h^B an imparalliled oontinous 
hi Story of five thausand years* 

Prof »Ander öon* 8 excavation^: in Ilonan and Kansu were 
the first to show funeral pottery painted ?/ith v/eil 
developed geoiiietricül and spiral decorations^from 
the Btone ages. 

From these prehißtorio,neolitio bo^l^ of loess soil 
aad clay to tne ivory-oolored ceramio of the Shang(Yin) 
(1766-1122 B*C. ),diooovered in .Aayan2,iB a £^reat step. 
Besides broken pieces only two oomplete vessels have 
been found.The one in the Freer j-allery of .^rt in 
'7ashiU:i:ton D.O, shov/s isair/ed desii^^ns^identioal with 
thoi:e Oii bronzes of the aarae period. 

To tlie funeral pottery belong most of the gla^ied 
veajsels of the K a n ü y n a s t y (205 B.C. -221 A.V.) 
formed afxer bronze modele. Their ieaf green lead glaze 
±3 often dibsolvt.d into irriaLscejit silver pf peculiar 
beauty (/' 37). . . . ,. 

WitA^T'a ng Dynasty (618-906 A/i*). )bejins the 
stru^^le for perfection. 'my foreiji influences are 
reGO(jaisable,nellenistic and othero,both in forma 
and ^It^z^e: -lIuc proportions a:id beautiful linesj 
poxCellaneous v/are and even purc;elainir(. 33,40) 
" l'he dhineue tii.mselveü do not trouble to mai^e a 
dic;tixiction between porcelain and stoneware. If 
the wäre is compact and hard a:id rin^^s with ausical 
note when ütruc;k,it iL cla^sed by them as porcelain, 
even though the body be dark-ciored and opaqucand 
of a type 've s^iould re,:ard as stoneware. ''(^^obson) 
The -Word porcelain , derived iro.Ti the i^atm 
porceila(a oowrie sheli),iö in use at leaßt since the 
da 



days of Marco Polo wro visited Chiaa in the thirteenth 
Century, our defuiitioa 'white transiiiceat n.iterial 
is far Htrioter than that of the Ciiinese äquivalent T 

To the ceraudcs belong elöo tht se oharaing terra cotta 
statuettes of -o-jen, -a -.ufaotured for funeral purpoaes. 
Ihey reflect reaiisticly the daily life of the period 
like the sr^ceful Tana^ra figurinea of the Ureece of 
the fourth oe.itury B.C.found in great numbers m the 
tombee at Ta-iat.ra in Boeotia. ( # 39) 



z 'u 



II 



. SÄWa«««»': 




^:;::i 



• . I 

■ * • ' i 



ö 



1; 



•^ J V u' 



i 






X 



m tiixif 



) 






^ «# 



Xt.X 



«/r 



rx 



J a 



t •• 



\ ♦ V, » 



'. w 



^^7 * 









I < • / '•'^ 



k» 



r». 



I ' 



T A 






' s' 



•■e 









:-ä 



1 .• ' *^' 



^^l »V 



'i'v- 4 " 



-' -;. 



1 



f • n - 



i 



< ,> 






r-. * 

.i. .. 



+* .< -. , 






i .'' 



1 . ' 



K 



)-. 



f.'i«**i 



^ f 
* 



ii i Ä X 1^ T c (^ 



•V «^xlT 



';:;• 







r* '^ r i' 



^> U^- 






\»' w 



*0 






(t'^ % ; 



•l^. t 



66 



The S u n g e r a (960-1279 A.L.) signif ki the zenith 

of perfection and beauty In early oeramics. 

The Chinese kilns begin to turn out magic resulte. Some 

Sung kilns,no doubt,are oontinu^itlons of T'ang e stabil sments. 

The great advance durlng the Sung dynasty ^^ae assiated 

considerably by Imperial patronage, ßut that did not 

mean oonflnement fo* the use of the court only. 

Por Instance the simple utlllty veKüels,found at 

Küluhsie n,Ä city inundated durlng the Sung era 

by the Yellow Rlver(ll08 A«3).),8how a vory fine 

quallty ( # 41). 

In Chine oe desoriptlom of Sung_cer aiiilosLare alw aya; 

among the flrst mentionedsTtTie producta of the 

T i n g kiln8(yao),situat d In Tlngohou south of 

Peking« fhlte belag the color of mourning,all China 

aervlces were ohanged to these ivory-white ceraialcs 

when the court v/ent into mournlng, Althou^h >nly 

poroellaneouSfthey appear almost translucent» 

The rlm of these exijulsltes Tlng-yao bowls 

and plates ( f*^ 42,43 ) were often l^ft unglazed to 

be covered with a metal oollar. The aecoratlon,mo8tly 

floral motlves aometlmes enrlched by the mandarln 

ducks,emblem of oonublal blla3,or the phoenlx, emblera 

of the empres8,^'^as oarved ijiylfe artlst 's hand unaer 

the ^^laze on the porcelaln clay. 

Hobson remarks : ^ Good specimen of the ivory white 

wäre with bold free-hand carvlng are ainong the 
most beautlful v/orks of art of the Sung ootter." 

Qulte dlfferentfheavy In pottery and glaze^are the 
brown-black Ch'len-yao bowls ( ^ 44 ). 
They are destlned to £ erve the ncw custoin of tea 
drlnklng* The priest of the Ch'an Bect( in Japan later 
Zen ) Introduoed lt,in orKder to keep awake auring 
long hours of medtation. 

Aßcetlc simpllclty as •ell'^^aeetetio subtlety,the 
philoBOphy of the Sung tea drinker, waa oonferred 
upon the tea-bowl maker ^t Ghlen-uing ?u in Fukien. 
These bowls are in a certaln sense simple with thelr 
thlck materlal whlch preserves their coolnesa in spite 
of hot content 8, whlle e.^. fur-llke markings in a 
lighter shade on the darker baokground,proauced vvlt4 
all the sicill of the xpert potter, aid thls aesthetxc 
subtlety whloh should please even the severest connoisseur. 



il 



ifi 



n 



n •• 






i^inj 



;.;3 

«IM 



■T ,; 



JA-Xt' 



U U ^ JL Xi A 



V 



h u^ 



;,-!> 



.\t' 



^.-, 



r 






o 0* 



%•- «v 



iS 



>.v 



ii 



t 



; • 












» . 






t ':;i 



<> 












f r 



f^^nl^^ ^(\;j' 



?* . . 



' • V 



i.'/ 






• 1 ^ 






• !:i. 






n 



Jl iu 



::».: 



h f^ ^ 



i" K^" 



3t 

r 



f1 



K 



♦ :i V.-, ü/ 



( ■• f f 









^: 



67 



'■Vhen latpr tea drlnking bacaae faehionable the glaze 
was excellently suited for games in ^loh the pereon^ 
won.^-hose bowl dried up last, the dark color maKing It 
eaey for the Judge to arbitrato. 

The era of the Yuan D y n a s t y C1280-1568 A.D.). 
founded by the oonqueriag Mongole under Kublai Khan 
oan be regarded, relativ to the oeramic art.as a 
Prolongation of the üung period. 

As 80on as the Chinese Empire ^^^l%^''lYl%^\ H^l^"" 

§rcrsrrÄ!?a^^ 

o+ 4-h*. v«n^tÄe river wine not only imperial paxroaage 
?Jt wlJ bf d^veloped to China 's «'«-*«* ^f^^f^f^J^ft 
center.when 1369 the old kilns are replaced jy *J«/i"* 
Imperial porcelain factory. 

•Vi*lt a new epoch begins in Ghina'a nost ancient art. 
ihlte t?anslucent wäre, the real POf^°«l^>^ «^^"° '° 
Wettern Standard, becomes the prevailin^ Ji^^is.where 
In ßpite of the Jounds at ^f 2^^^^ ^Jf.i^^^^ve been 
white porcelain fragments of ^ ang o^ioin ^gfi^itively 

^"f tl^^'i^lr^r iSiS tVlTe thaV?3rfe\u3ntities of real 

ror!riairwere^pr?duced during ^f -^ing P- o^-^^^ ^^^,,,3,,, 

The hillB which Surround Ching-t8-^.nen xumj. 

Chief materialf : -',^^A ir a o 1 i n ,from the 

A very pure white °l«.j;' ^fi^'J^ere it was foind" (Webster) 

Chinese "kaoling^ni^h *^^ ■'■■'•' ^2 ^^ ^ t b e ,from 

and the feldspatic ^'to'^e, P e - x u _ ^^ (Webster) in 

"theChinese pai-tun-tzu= ^^,^i*« ^ji^ref^? the factory. 
which form the raaterial "«^/^^^Hi^sh of the wäre. 
Hobson compares them to bone and fiesn o ^^^ 

The infueible kaolin «>^«"1^^ *^tXh liquefies at a 

plasttioity '.hile the Pe*^;^J«^'^^f °J the porcelain body 
Sigh ten^erature.confer. not only to^the^P^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ 

its tranc-parency bat suppiies 

with a little lime. ... pi.^orial decoration 

Prom the dif f er- nt ways used JJJ^^J^^^f ^ention only the 
of the -Mte porcelain Jo^^J^/^^^^iied before the glaze is 
unaerglaze colore v.-hich «^« P^f J^^ , disyosal only two 
added. The iling PotJCer^iv^je at tem.erature neededV 
oolors which 0«^ stand the hi^htem ^^^^^^^^^ biue 
the glaae: oobalt and copper oxyae 
and red. 






I - » « 4 a 



■;.: 



■ ' ■ « 

■ . . .» 
•1, 

m 

■ ■ ■ » 

■ ::l 




r» «^ 



i» * »^ 



- J-u ^ 



^ i ft X « p 1 



1^». -^ 



• H 



- ' r.^t *- V 













.-». 










^'10 




»' »s. 


1*. ■- i 


-t.rl*^ 


«» 

•? 


1 


u 


X 


n 


•: 




n 


. 






wtOfc 


jti 


'^j- 


'T, f^ i 




^/s 






1 




▼• 


r 






j 






¥ 


flöi*/!' 


^0 


«^ 


/ 


i; 


• q 


M 


I 






f5 


;fi 


^ 


1 * . ' 


ii 




. * 


' 3v 


Xa 


i»» 


: f , 




.. i 


k 







••r 



V A - 






J V 



rtH 



r ^ 
















.^/:;r 



t'-?;: 



^ « ^ • 



öi-tu^xii 



•Id 6 



' r 



.' X •■ ^• 



Ii 






»^ < 



.< '. i 









i . . J -i. 



i. • .»«. 



* s 






t i ^'* 



4^^V 



lö 



?^ rr ?^' 



( ' , 



• * 



^. 



- -vV^X 



•^ Jk 



.Äl 




68 



phase begins: Ii:ie universal deroand for 

NVIDIA »M^ «rU<<4'AM 



With it a rxew 

poroelain in ••blue and white" with its 

olimax in the Hing period during the rei^s of 

Hsuan T8(l426-35) and Ch'8n^-Hua( 1465-87), the blue 

and white and underglaze red reoeiving special mention(f^ 47) 

In the early pieces the natural cobalt hae a greyish tinge* 
It will he improvcd by Import of superior material from the 
Near East,probably ?ersia,the so-called "Mohanedan Blue»* 
(Hui Ch'ing); but these supplies were not only costly but^^<> 
irregulär and lacklng entirely at tines, 
The freshness and spontaneity of the deeigns in the 
early I4Lng picturial por .elains be^^ins to disappesr at 
a later atage ^fi^i^n the process of manufacture becomes 
more and more systeiaatized* 

In the :iing period also the fine white and highly 
vitrified porcelain of T 8 - h u a in the .)rovince of 
P u k i e n startedi the body and the luscious milk^or 
02BQe=white glaze merge insensibily into each other. 
The decoration is formed by moulding,application of 
reliefs. ( #46 )• The European trcidera at Amoy brought 
this porcelain to Europe v'here it became knovm as 
blanc de Gliine". 



ti 



The Ch'ing Bynasty (1644-1912) of the 
l.anchu ''^as estahlished flrst in lianchuria with ^-^i^kden as 
capital. When the last lliug emperor killeü hiraselfjthe 
I.IanchU8 moved aouth and placed one of their own prtees 
on the vaoant throne in Peking. , -, j » 4.k„ 

The Start of the new dy lasty was not favorable for the 
cero--ßic industry. In a rebellion ißamst the Manchu 
the Imperial dactory at Ghing-t8-Ohln was destroyed;the 
effort to aove the faotory to Peking failed. 
But the brilliant and able personalities «^J*^« f 5'°^5^ 
emT)eror and hls grandson.knom as K'ang H8iU662-l^^^; 
and Ch'ien Langtl736-95^ stimlated al.o ^^^« «^^«f ° 
arts to new nrosperity. In 1630 the Imperial factory at 
Ching-tS-Ch8n '."BS rebuilt and put unüer excellent 

n^farSek of Ch'ing porcel.in «--^if^^^^Sf J^^f J^^** 
■Pnr blue and white wäre. The nature cobalt blue oi the 
I-Lf Si «a attSines by experimentations the aoet p^rfect 
bluS? "We Sear nothiag of the iBportation of blue at 
this time, but ^-e are told that the native cobal-t mmeral 



X 



% 



. .ȆS^IH 







"ttl 



I . 

j 1 n. I 



u '■:} 



m 



■' "f 



69 



was refined aad purified by elaborate processes and 
that the differcnt grade s of blue were obtaiued by mixing 
the refined and the unreflned cobalt in varying pro- 
portions. "(i^obson) 

Perfect workmanship replace^ the verre {r- 48,49 )• 
Each pieoe paüsea through many hands^mata one painter 
outlines the de8i[^n3,another pute in the fillings: 
Perfection instead of ori^inality leads quitc naturally 
to standaraized modele and ende in lifeless repetition. 



BI3LI05K-4PHY 



\ii 



t:i 



f'i^ 



m 



V ..« 



iJ 



I ♦ 



«a 



:^ . 



« .: 



^' n 



J 



■:} 



'i • V *.••■*< 



•^^•il^^ \ :f 



u 



yi 



IV 



w*- 



i.» 



I , 



t^■! 



K ^ 



f-i 



r^ - 



< , 



V i. 



r.: 







* 


• j 


..t 






i' j 


. * 


► 


\ r 


f ' , 


1. -^ i-.' 


1 


} '■■ 


> ■- ' t 


1 


.Xil. 


i'.f ; 


■_• 


• -y** •- 




k. 


' •' .■ 




• 




' ^fl< 




f 


- , 1. 


■» 


*> !* 


*. 




.1 




* 




V 



C :. •^. 4.- 



••,:. ^ : 



,t 



.^. V 



> ■.. 



Ilii 






5 »• <* 'V 



Carter "Four tnousand years of Chinese Art" 1948 
Kobson "Guide to the pottery of the i?*ar Saat" 1924 
Ilobson "The potter 's Art" 1935 
Schmidt "Chine sieche Keramik" 1924 
Ziioiiermaan " Chines.lcches Porzellan " 1913 



'%t 



* i.i ' 



> ' ^ . 



70 



l'.'.VA 

iv.-:A 




— ^ j u -1 



I 



^ t^ ^»e^A 



r 




li'A 



HATALOaUE 0? CHINESE OERAMICS 



37. 






Ja r on 3ear Pect , 
H,14 cm. } 5.0" 



The round jar »deslgned after a tronze aodel, 

is oarried by three squatting bears. 

ThlB aniaal was dfavorite Alth Han potteriei 

It was thought to be a pov/erful tonb gujtsdian 

ynd evidently condidered the oaryatid of tne 

perlod» 

The iar beloiigs to the m o r t u a r y p o t t e r 

of middlehard grey-red earthenware. The glaze is 

lead-8ilicate,colored ?;ith oxia of copper, 

resulting in a fine leaf-green. Due to long 

burial in the earth,the soft lead gl^.ze is 

aissolved into layers of silver iriaesceat 

of peculiar beauty. 

One bear foot is missing« 

Han (206 B.C. -220 A.O. ) 



Lauf er •• Chinese Pottery in the Han Dynasty 



II 



Lit. 

...i^ition: 1939 ^-^rsiSf^^^ .efoTseÄ 

für ostasiatische Kunst i»nd der 
Preuasisohen Akademie der Kl^ste, 

Berlin. Katalog no.Ul rPoilaid). 

1938/41 aem. ente -duseam.den riaag CRolland;. 



I 



^m 



" — -»•■»»'TT- 



»sHitHt- 



t;!::i 



;;:i 



i l 



I 






. 




58. 



• ♦ «v 



71 

Covered Graln Jar 
1U22 cia*{ 8.11" 



• ♦ 



V .♦ 



The jar is finely proportioned and covered by 
a lid with knob, 

The hard white wäre is made on wheel aad covered 
Wth a thin,pale,atrav^colored ^laae,miauteiy 

crackled. 

T'ang (613-906 A.D.) 



SxhiWtion ; 1331 Deixrtr.ent of J-^^'^f^J^^S^i^, °3 

the Museums of 3er im v^eriaa^iy^/ 

1938/41 Gemec 



nte Liuseun, den üaagCHolland j 



a*. 



I* 



'jL, . •' ■.'" i, 



: it 



f i 



^\ « /- (1 ♦ I 




-i 



r/ 






«4Mi 






^.♦f^' 



■f*"?!- 






Um 

*• «1 

[liij' 

11*4 

Mt 4t 






ii 



I 





/ Kr 










f^PPin 



^^fSSKßtK^- 






72 



39. 



H.17 cm. jl.il" 



A sittifig t5irl,KlÖfeliieaäv/«drtl| the typical T'ang 
head-dress leHi dow i^presaes her left band aj^ainst 
her boüom with a stro:.g expression and bearing 
of mo Urning. 

This un:;laced terracotty tomb figure 
was LI ade f'^r funer al parpo.se b with the läea that 
the 3pirit of the deed folloved the pursaite v/hich 
had engaged him in life, 

Terraoottaiof^reddish olay vdth oome traoeb of pigment. 

T'aag (613-906 A*3.) 

Lit.- Siren, Oswald "I^ie Gtilentv.dcklong der ^hine- 

siLchen vJrabfiguren" Jahrbuch der -iener 
Freunde Asiatischer Kunst, 1930/51 

Exhibition: 1931 Department of >^ar Bastern irt of 

the i^lueeums of ßerlin(>/ernany; 
1938/41 Jemeente Mubeunijden HaagC Holland; 



*' 



mrmmPTfftssssfS^ffmm 



fV 



'W««p«i. 



\' 



'^' 






t 



> 1 




>> 



* J .: 



h:- 






■"i^n»» 



75 



40. 



Mclon-f:har'ed r)Ot » 
H.H. 5 OQ. } 4.0" 



for liquid clay - and ooyered 'vith a JJ^"^^^^^'^; J^ 
eome dlataiioe Short of the baW««. 

Late T'ang (613-906) or Early Sung (960-1279). 
>4bout 900 A.D. 

1938/41 r,emeente Museun.aea Haag ^Ho.laaa; 



»♦ 



:jr.:; ■•-•:■••••♦>'• »»«>>»>»«». 




"^»fe»«**»^ 



W^mw: 



»••«'I 

1 1 * « * 






< • t 




•v r 'i 



... T 



/IX 





74 



41. 



Dian. 21 on. ; 3.5 '• 
H* 9 cm.; 3.10" 



The deep bowl on a Bhort foot is of hard,buff-t;rey, 
porcellarieouB wäre; it hr^s a coating of white slip 
oovered with a creü_^*-tiiited ^laze, clooely crackled 
in "o'otrioh-ego»' etyle. 

The {jlaze ends in a wary line some distance snort 
of the baae. '♦oxjur-iaaxics" ixiside the bowl bhow 
thJt the bov/1 has oeen lired upsiae do.m; they 
are the scars left on the base of the wäre oy the 
pointed Supports on whioh it rested in the kiln. 

i/uoh of this kind of wäre ^^s exoavated in Southern 
ühili Yfhere the to^m OHU-LU was ciestroyed by inÄun- 

dation in 1108. . . ^ . 4. 44. 

The Word R3r&^ behind Chü-lu mee s district city, 
distinct fron departnental ("chou") and prefectural 
("fu") Gity. (Hobson) 

Karly Sung . About lOUO A*D, 

Lit.: :{ob^jon"^;uide to tl^e Pottery aud 2orcelain of 

the i*'ar Bast" 1924 ^ i 

Yetts "The catalogue of the George Kumorgopoulos 
collection" 1929. vol*6,pl.23 

Exhibition: 1931 :^ep?rt eat of l^ar f^f ^^J^;^* ?^ 

the IIUGeuTdS of 3orlin tv^er.ia.'iy; 
1938/41 ^Jeineente Uu3eun,den naa^^HoIlana; 



>« 



.-..^j. _ >^^ ;:■!?«♦*»*•»** ■ 



» ♦ «jwt ; XrtKtttttftTT • 



.V.l 









:i 






4 . 






J^ 



■^.' 




75 



42. ?ai(v/hite; TIak Cnrvcd Conical Bowl , 

Diöm.23.5 oin, ; 9.5" 



k cleep bowl of corxÄlcal form on a short foot, 
The l:>ody oloöely grained,'"hite a:id porcellaneoust 
The e^laze hya the oolor and texture* of a warm 
ivory white \7ith "gunmy drops" on the 
exterior,also oalle* "tear drops'* and regaräcd 
as evldenoe of genulneneas by Chinese collectors* 
The foot iö gl-^red^not the mouth rim, -livin^j the 
impresrion of hnvin^?ired upside do^ra. 
The raw edge of the aouth rim is conoe-äled by a 
metal oollar* 

The interior K^sTlecorated by a design before the 
bov/1 ^^as glazed and baked in the iciln. 
It ie a r V e d on the porcelain clay with 
the bold free-hand h«Äi of a na et er in tne best 
Cung st y 1 e : 

Two mandarin duks (Yuan yang),embleni of 
coiTubial blisS|Swim among rushes ^/hile 
the water is depicted with oombed waves. 

The exhibition of Chinese Art 1:^29 in Berlin ö^ve 

the pobsibility for scicfciny and oomparison with 

three other l^ai Ting bowls oi sirailar quality 

ana deooration, 

These belonged to the oollections of 

iAixaorfoooulos,Tiondon( Katalog no»594) 

KoeohiAn, Paria (Katalog no.593) 

Steiner, Berlin , i/Catalog no.596) . 

Our bowl (Katalog ho« 59!?) 

with the fainous ?-iULiorfopoulos bowl a 

portions and is doubtleasly oarved by the same 

hand,to^ioh Reideneiater acoribea also the 

Koechlin bowl (see below) . It was formerly in 

the collect ion of the archeologist V^'u Ta Ohen 

in Sooohow. 



x 



corresponas 
so in oro- 



3aaß (960-1279 ^^.d/) Factory of Ting Chou in Chihli. 



^' . 



'? 



*^*y^' 



/ 



■ 1» 
> • 



mi 



'■i\ .i.'.-Vli 






•flHP' 



76 



l»hlbltion: lü20 /iui]:;itellu;ig Chiacöl&cher Konstf 

Vfrran italtftt von ler CJesellechaft 
für oetaaiatlüche Kunst ua. der 
PreusöJtehen Akodemie der KUnstet 
Berlin. Katalog no.595 

1931 )epairtT?ie.at of .^ar >:aatera Art of 
the Uöeume of iierlin( rerniaiiy) 

lf58/41 ^ew^nte 24ueeura,dt;n HaagCiiolland) 



Litt 



11 



i 



■>k 









Ift 



;lob on **'ruide to the pottery and porcelaln 

of the Far East, 1924 
Hoböon ••The potter 's arf* 1335 
i<eiden»'ieter ^'L* Exposition de l'Art Chi-iois 

a Berlin 1929 " in CJa^etxe des 
ieaux-^rte p«254 
Yetta **'Ch#^ oatalo/r^ie of the C^eorje .-j^orfopju^ 
loe oolif*otion" vol.6|i)l?5 



Bxoerpts; 

Ho^HOn im /:uiie *0ood apecimt n of the ivory white 

wäre with bold free-haad oarviag 
are «iiiong the nost beautifiil works 
of art of the Sua^j potter" 
Heid'^m^ietrr in 'azette d.B.A«: 

•<L'4tuae minutieuee et la ooapariGoa dce 
objete expos^o noue a.; >reiment aurai que 
la tradttlon ohinoiBe,qui fixe l'orii;ine 
de types diiterrriaöe ^ «s fiteliera ddter- 
nln43,;ie doit pao itre mirje en doute# 
Je n'ai qu*S laeutiomir^r let3 rares coupec 
du ty::>e t 1 n ß qai jorterxt ua c. icor 
rrav4 d*oien et doh. vajuest 
jju^tre :>i>0ps rjont reimiea ioi provenan, 
entre autreöjdee oolleotions K o e o n 1 
et Jinsbers. A leur exanen^per- 
somie ne peut douter qu%^l-eL :iip.;artieRiit 



i n 



au aÄne rtteIiür,ri:io:i ^r^ 



rtiste*'' 



froa th06e lour üowls,oa(je UJiited at the exhir.Uion in 

^ ' ' and t^aria 



.>ff^; 




..•.Bm»«**>«-aA*ft,« , 



I 



!■ 



.M....«j,..,,*ui-»".:^!t;tnnprrnTmTr: 



,t^ 






'^nmmm^Mm 



.ftiüh': 




• IM* 



«• •• 
• ••» 
•4 »ä 



.r 



ifi 




•y 






^ 



■';, /*• ktJ^ 



Ä - ' / 



« 'S . 



r -i ^ 



• t. 



i« < 









-•r 



n X 



'^ ^ 



77 



43 






The djah,tdi^ied by a short footVwlth a hi^h rim, 
io of p riect circulrir form ^nci of ^lelicate color. 

The body,b r o w a i s h porcellaneous iicird wäre, 
is covered,exGept on the top of the rim and the 
foot,v;ith an ivory white colored t^laze. 

The interior decor,phoenix flyin^; over '^^aveSjiöstan 
oarved on the poroel-iin clay before th.e glaze, 
nevertheleas nearly ''-orn out by use and heavy 
oraokles. On the outer rim a pattern of vertioal 
lines ie recoGiiisable« 

Sung (960-1279 A.D.) Ting Chou in Ghihli. 

Exhibition: 1929 Ausstell'ong Chinesischer Kunst, 

veranütaltiBt von cer Oesellöchaft 
für ostaüiatitrche Ilunst und der 
Preussißchen Alademie ö,ex Künste^ 
Berlin. Hat .no. 608 
1933/41 Jencente :i-Uteud,den liaag(Holland) 



i > 



\ 






«« 1 * •! *•»«&«, 



:ii:«4!}SH}"»4!m1.4|W«1ICJ1: 



•■r»HU,»u;Hii^MÜ' 






V.]'.',t 



i « 






I 




N 



A r- A^ 



< ' 



.1 



t / 






J 



*■( 






i> 1 1 



i 






;/" 



73. 



A^, 



Ohlen ^are.Oonlcal Tea Bowl , ( Tenrioku ) 
Diama2.5g».; 4.15" 



The ooriioal bowl is of liard blackish pottery with 
a thiok blue-blnok glaze ::l2Baked with .golden browA 
in fine lihes like " hare's für '*• 
Base and mouth renained un^jlaaed ; the rim is pro- 
teoted by a silver oollar. 

These bowls v/ere populär in the tea-testixig compe- 
titiona of the Sung jynasty, v.here the po^vdered tea 
sacceeded the cake tea of the T'ang* '/hile the oake 
tea was boiled,the ;;;ireen. leaves of the ahrub ?/ere 
^round to Tine po'vder in a snall stone üdll and the 
preparation v;as vvhipped in not 'vater by a delicate 
whisk made of s.Ait baraboo^ 

In Japan the masters of the tra-ceremony have al- 
v;ays deli(shted in the Chien yao bo\vJ.s. Their thiok 
naterial made thein cool to hold andf)*l)laok glaze 
showed MX) the leost trace of the green tea. 
It iö Said that Buddhist monks from the Ch'an 
nonastery on T'ien-mu bhan,in Ghekiang,introduced 
the Chien yao into J^pan and that the -lesignation 
as "teiiL-ioku" is derived from ühis ori^jin. 

Sung (960-12/9 A*I).) Chien-ua:i^ ?u in ?ukien. 

Exhibition- 1929 Aui-steiluas Chinea.iCun8t,verQ'ist-^l- 

tet von der Gresellechaft f.lr ostas. 
Kunst und d er i^reussischün nkadenie 
der Aiinate, Berlin. Katalog no.!p39 
i.'eoartiient of i^'ar .Lastern Art of 
the Wu^eums of Berlin (Gernany) 
1933/41 "rejieente .:useuii,den .^iaagtHolland; 

Lit. • hobson'Vruide to the pottery of t-e rar ::.ast»' 
Mobson'' The potter 's ;\rt " 
ükakuro Kakuzo ''The book of tea. 



1331 



m 



Ml»« 
I«'«' 



f.: 



H 



\ l 





et 



V. 



i 1 J. 



-< .r 



■-CT&nr.-^^^-- 



■"fk A ^^«*- '^*' 



• "X 



.- 



45. 



79 



Small Vase with Long Heok . 
iI.18 cm, { 7.2 



«f 



Middlehard grey-red wäre vdth a leaf-green glaze 

whioh,due to burial in the earthihas become silver 

Iriidescent. 

The decoration,moulded in low relief,prune twigs 

and Volute Ornaments is yellow colored; so is 

the rlm, 

Ming. 1368-1644 A,:), 



<;. ■- 



. *,' 



Exhibition: 1929 Ausstellung:: ChineBischer Kunst, 

veranstaltet von der G-e Seilschaft 
für ostasiatische Kunst und der 

i:. / ,i- Preussischen .Akademie der Klinstet 

Berlin. Katalo^^ no.676 
1933/41 G^emeente ivlui:eum, den ]iaag(Holland) 



)!' 



'i 



■ä'*'" 






irf^ 



i""'f 



• <# ■ 

i I • < • <| 



• • » 

■ . . . , 

«.''1 



• .II 



i 



\ r- 




;— -j 



46. 



80 



Sourd-Ghaped Poroelaln Bottle > 
H.24 om. ; 9.5" 



The body of the vase is of fiae graia,unctous and 
very white* The glaze is thick and solid. 
The deooration is painted in underglaze Imperial 
b l u e and copper red. '*whiich was 
at its best at this time. "(Hobson) 

The style of the decorat ion is fresh and spontaneous. 
Below: Two Phoenix (f§ng huang),the emblem of the 
empress|between cloud and fire Ornaments. 
Above: tSpibols of good luck and fire Ornaments. 
On the bottom the reign mark of Oh* Sag Hua. 

Ming,Ch*«ng Hua 1465 - 1487. 

Exhibition : 1958/41 Gremeente :/TUseiuii,den Haag (Holland) 

Lit. : Hobson ?The pottei^s kxV 1955 

" The reicn of Ch'«ng Hua (1465-87) and 
before the reign pf j^süan T8(l426-55) 
were regarded as one''' the classic r 
periods in the ceramiciL of this aynas- 
ty. The blue and white and underglaze 
red are specially mentioned." 



IP 



'*.-« 




\\ 



iTTsiuirir 



msmm 



i^^^yT TBWS ^SS^^^rTT^?!!!!!.— IZ-Z? 




1 



81 



I 1: 



t 




;i'-^'.f, 



<"%i. ,'• 




** 't »» 






. »x,.r J'J»; 



iv.O/:^/'f ti •';•• 



• V 



47. 



Small grill -tfahaped Vas^ ,» 



Porcellaneous wäre with soft looking,cre9my-white 
glazefiainutely crackled. At the rim a lizzard 
and a beetleoire applicated in hi^h relief. 

Body and glaze merge in3ensibl|r into eaoh other, 
having a charm ofttl*fr own, 3o-calle* "3 1 a n o 
deChine"* 

Ming 1368-1640 • TS-hua , province of «^^ikien. 

Llt*: Hobson " The potter 's .Art " 1935 

. . Schmidt, Robert "Chinesische Xeramik" Tafel 82 f 



N) 







Ali 




?*»^»»-'»TjIIKJ; 



t. ^-j.*-(| t ii fciftu^Aiii ?ii »- ..'.-..1' :.*. . %.•>.' tJ 






l^mmmmm»*: 






'''S 



:,i 




^ 'n' i-y. 




f. 



M -»-/ 



r r 






^ /> 



j\nlM 



, ^ I- 



48. 



82 



Porcelaln Jar , 
H.27,3 ora. ;11" 



The body of the big jar is of white material 
with a pure limpid ^^-lazei the oombined effect ßhowe 
a white whioh Hobson oompares with " well-set curda". 
On this baokgroimd the decoration of )eonies v/ith 
their leaves is masterfully distributed in b 1 u e 
which biends harmoniously with the white, 

This b 1 u e , which varies from a deep saphire to 
a pale blue,receives life and movement from its 
graded waehes. 

The spontaneousness of the Ming painter ia super- 
seded by perfect workmanahip. ,;; 

The rim is protected by a copper collar# 
Carved teak wood cover and stand« 

Ch'ing Dynasty, K'ang Hsi (1662-1722 A.D.) 

Lit, : Hobson "Guide to the pottery and porcelain 
•^ • ■ of the ?ar Ea st " 1924 
Hobson "Potter 's Art" 1955 



iii 



ii 



m. 



II 




.>r;';;;':;.;;-^Tr 



>* 



iHMTHT^ 



tjil! LilHiitWV; !fffg!^?ffllPII 



:!"• 









Ml» 



Ift*»» 




?> 



!i I 



•» i» 



et 



c? 



- :f> 







■11 



: . J- 



#^ 



:;3 




*'■ I f 



49* 



85 



Small Poroelain 3qw 1> 

Diam*17.4 c :. ;7.2" 
H, 4 GH. ;1.8" 



Ihe porcelain niaterial,glaze and decoration of 
exqulfite finish, 

Inside the bottom a big imperial five-cla^ved dragon 
en face in iron-red on imder^laze b 1 u e 
waves; white are the break s as welln^the ^^Ide 
rin,,undeoorated except'a small blue double line. 
Out aide, in the eaine color 90heme,ten small dragons 
in Profile, in different shapee and movement s on 
wave s • 

TJnder the bottom the seal mark of the rei^n of 
Ch'ien Lung# 

Ch^ing Dynasty, Ch'ien Lung ( 1736-95 A.i)J 

Exhibition: 1938/41 (Jeiaeente liluseum, den Haag (Holland) 

Lit.: Hobson •'Guide to the Pottery and Porcelain 

of the r'aT Köst" 1929 .* 
" The long and prosperous reijn of 
ChUen Lung was the last of the ^reat 
periods of Chinese ceramic history* 
The celebratcd T'ang fing was now 
appointed to the suprene control of 
the Imperial factory; a:id during hie 
rule,which ended in 1749, the King- 
techen potters touched the zenith of 
their Bkill»'( lobson) 
Schmidt, Robert »«Ohinesische Keramik" 1924 

Tafel 126 d 



'j 



f 



••Hftlfs, 



I I 



84 



. . ( 



* ( < 


1 










* • • . , 


! 


;! 




• > t 
» * r 








i 












t 9 










' ' 1 










" ■ * 










..■' 










' ■ * 








1 


• ■ • 








[ 


• • • 










' *» 










;r: 




^ 






■■; 


^ 




! 
1 


' «i 


' 


; 




■ r 


( 


; 




• 


\ 












4 







\ 



' 








1. i , 



(,• 



{ .1 - a. 



<,* ö 



t 



A" r 









iii ■ ' * 



^> 



jiTivT r 



IQ nl 



3 i ' nC 



) 



^^^4.- 



•i4*\6c(r'I rnoiifi 



-i 



j <>r« :• 



« , < 



x{ 



Q toi .r? 






t^ 



50. 



Sraell Vae e -vlth Inn ^r r^>r>L^, 
lj.18 cm, ; 4,15" 



ihe glaze of the poroelaln vase is so-oalled 

? i * i/u* •* ' L u n e % a pale blue 
Bhadc which waa obtained by laixing cobalt with 
the white feldspatic glaze. 
Uiider the foot the reign laark of Gh'ia Ohing. 

Ch'ing Dynasty,Ch'ia Chiag (1796-Id2ti A.D.) * 

Exhibition: 1953/41 ^>emeeate MUreiun.den 'laag(Holland) 
Lit. : Hobson '• The Chia Ch'iag period is from the 
- , oeramio poiit of view a Prolongation 

of the Ch'ien Lang." 



r. 



:.\. *. 



i ♦ 



, i f. 



•.y 






1 



n 



» 



^p 



•j. 






«..L^ . m .'■»««••« «k .» ' 



»♦¥»T*7^^m^jÄi*ä^ 



Im». 
|«i«>» 

•"H 
.Uli 



Mi 



85 



::;';« 



,....1 

i 



.;'.'!! 



U I 



ac 







. .i-t;. 



1_. 



J 




ül 



: 



V*'W 



!f 



I 



51* 



Poroelaln Plate l^ ecorated in Bl^ack and G^old . 

Diam*23.5; S»* 



The ,:oroelain plate belonged to a table servioe which 
was ordered In the seventeenth or ei^hteenth Century 
in China for European use. White porcelain from 
Ching-tg Chin ic decorat cd after a European en^ravin^j, 
a foreign merchant brought to Canton, so* well or so 
curiously as the Chinese copist understood the matter* 

The black lines of the European en^rraving are ^^iven 
dili-ently.&<Ä»|«^ö^t|iese^ black lines this kind of 
porcelain is' callea/^*^2;wärte Kunst", while the general 
term is "Chine de Commandc". 

Our plate shows insidc Its bottom a mythological 
8Cene,probably one of Jove's love affairs. His eagle 
and two oupids are preseit^a peaoock too. There are 
8o:ie misunderstandings in trie reproduction of the 
surroundin^s. -i ^old ornanented edge ieads to the 
broad rim with interlaoed band-ornaments in black 
and{^old. 

Porcelain from Chin^tftChSn, the decor-^tion probably Canton, 
Seveiiteenth - ei^hteenth century# 

Exhibition: 1933/41 ^'te leente :.Iuseuia,den ;aag(Holland) 

Lit»: Hobson"^>uide to the ;orcelain and potters of 

the ?ar East" 
Schmidt, Robert" Ciiines. Keramik " Tafel 132 
Zimr.iermaiin, Ernst "Chinesisches Porzellan" Tafel 107 

Pro Memoria ' 

This plate belonged to the famous Chine de Comi-nande 
Gollection of ivirs.Sphie EltzbaGher,-A.asterdam. vUie 
built up lifijr voiui.iinous collection oy urchases in 
the I^ether lande. Therefore we can presume that also 
this plate was made i»««^rd4a:g to order of tne -)utch 
East India Company, founced by Pierter'z Coen in 1602. 
4fter the death of .nrs.r)ophie Eltzbacher in 1900 the 
whole collect ion,exce?t a few pieces,w8ß ?;iven by 
Mre. Hedwig Lachmann-Kitzbacher, Berlin, to the Kunstge- 
werbe Museum, in memory of her late mother. Thus tne 
collection was in the Sc;hloss iiU6eujn,when we left 
(Jermany. If the collection has not survived the bom- 
bardement of the becond Vorld vVar,this plate at least 
will keep the memory of her collection for Xher 
desoendents. 



4l 



IM 



•* 



,;''^*HiJ*tn*'HfHtHi;iilH*^*: ' 



/ 



;:';! 



;:;;! 



■ ■•;) 






;ij 







lo 



■1 J tv 




.* 



i U 



■^ t *. ^ 



V IC » 



> 



• r 



. Most/V» 



. ■■ V 



ro 



V ^ 



.i.. 



86 



7. ANCISIT CHIITISE PAINTTIG. 



52. 



BirdB and ij'lowers 
Kakemono on darkened Silk in brooade moonting. 
102 X 49 cm,; 4.0.3 x 19*5" 



A great f a 1 c o n cowers on fie broad stem of a 

pine tree; on the brandes above him a pair of amaller 

blrds; on the .^round beiow a phesant among 

soiae shrubs. One of the ahruba with olive leaves, 

soarlett b u d s aad b 1 o s s o m s,another with 

Biaall white f 1 o w e r s . 

On the rißht aide dedioatory inscription of thirty one 

characters. 

Yuan (Mon^^ol) Dyaasty 1260-1568 

Prom Daizen,Kioto 

Lit.: Laurence Binyon "Painting and Gallisraphy" ■ 

p 6 " In 1260 the Itioiigols beoame masters or ühina.. 
Painting oontinued the 'j\xn^ tradition,\vith 
a oertain dif xerenoe, . . 

The life of aninials,birds and flowcre beoomes 
a far more sigaificant motive than with ua, 
?lowers espeoially;for all Chinese nave 
a revereatial paösion for flowers. In 
oainting they are asually associated witn 
birds.as if songs and movement s of the 
btrdB lent an elequenoe to the silenoe 
of the flowers." 



" 



^.4. 






M ♦► 



m 



i . -'- 






>» 



um 
it 1 »i . 1 









:;;.'i 



■•■i 



;;;;] 



I«« -•! 






*i 







•s? 



^ 



ff- 



, t 



• ■• t. 



I \ 




/■•',;'<. 






: i /* 






IC 

r 



I 



»■"i 



*■ \ 






a 






iBi 



87 



VI. ANCIENI OHINESE LAO^UKR 



53. Rectangular Box ^or Incense with Paiated Decoration . 

H. ft cm. ; l.S" 

ö. 6 X 6 om. ; 2.6 x 2.6" 

The foundation of the lacquer w4rk is wood. 

The decorat ion (hua oh'i) is a paiated upri^jht soarlet 

oelestial five-clawed dra^on in profile amidst clouds 

and li£;htenin2 Ornaments. 

The favotirite three color scheiae of the Ilin^; is used: 

Soarlet, o^^en and bro^^ni oa black ground. 

3oth parts of the box are franed with lead. 

Ming(l368 - 1644) Sixteenth Century. 

Ex collections Prof .Crrobse, Br.-^. Breuer. 

Exhlbitions:1929 Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst veran- 

v'r:taltet von der leselischaft für ost- 
asiatische KiJinst und der Preusüi sehen 
Akademie der Kllnste, Berlin. Ivat.No. 772. 

1935/36 Royal .^cadenie of -Arts, London. In- 
ternational Kxhibition of Chinese Arts. 

1933/41 Oe-:ieente i'useuin,den Haag (Holland) 

Lit. :"Trani:-actions of the Japan Society of London? 
Vol.XII,Plate IX 
Leight Ashton" Sculpture and Lacquer ** 1935 : 

"Lacquer is one of the oldest arts in 
China. The foundation of the niateriai 
is the natural guin of the Ch'i shu 
tree.The gura iB dried form is crushed 
and strained throue;h cloth to refiae 
it,is next colored to the varioua 
tints required ana then ready for use. 
The Chief oolors are:scarlet,yeilow, 
blac'<, oro '/n,ali30 green... 
v;ith the materals thus )bt2ip.ed the 
lacquerer paint on hie coats over a 
foundation^ of wood,metal or paper mS»he 
in suocesive layer8,never lese than 
three, allowing eaoh coat to dry before 
the next is applied. Tlie objeot is then 
ready for deooration. . . 
The Chief ce.iter of painted lacquer 
was Ghia-haing fu in the province of 
Chekiang. 



^/^' 



:;1 







,.^.*^*- 



* ^ ,. . • 



\ 9/M 



f 



«. ü 



V ,. 






> V%t«rt»: ^ 



^l. A 



3 ^ 



-» . 



t t-. "• 



'>r- ^- 



,'ot-''. .. i 



^ ^ 



■ ♦ 






1 



I ^'. 



t> ( 



V ^1 



•0 

« - 









4i 



n'- 









r .1 



nr r 




tri I. t 



« « « 



r 



irxl«) 



^^i 



»t/ 



•'i 



88 



late'^ar^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^""^ produced at a comparitively 

^part from the early fragnents,found by Aurel Stein 
in Central AbIq on the old "üilk-traoks" , a few 
pieces of T'ang time3,part of emperor Shomu's gift. 
exist in the ^iDüo-in at Ilara. 

The nomade tribee of China »a western bordere in 
Chinese-Türke st an brou^ht induatrial art of oarpet- 
weaving alrendy fron Central Asia. Besides, Tarne rlan 
settlea Persian oarpet-weavere at Sanarkand aboat 1406. 

Nevertheless the Chinese carpet develops a style of 
its own,prinary in its prinoipal oentres of oroduction 
at Yarkand and Kaahjar,later,when the carpet-weaving 
industry ie greatly promoted by the emperors X'ang hsi 
(1662-1722) and Ch'ien rang(l736-1796) in the province 
lichantung and in -:'eking.Here the propor, piain Chinese 
patterns develop whioh differ greatly froni the Turkestan 
designst - 

Both have in ooimr.on principal feature8,aiverc;ing fron 
the carpet ^: of the Ilearer East* uch laore loosely knit- 
ting,cutting of the pile to offset the an^julBrity of the 
decign; different color 8ohemes,yellow and blue being 
the predoninant sha^es. 

The piain Chinese patterne trace back to the very aiicient 
art of silk - -reavingj^vhich brou^ht in the antiqj.ity the 
naue "beres" to the Chinese. 

The traditionil une of '^ooepted inoti^ffs form the basis 
of nany a pattern, J^loral and animal patterns — 
pruriusppeony, ohrysaatheiauni,lotU8(f iowers of t:ie lour 
dra^^on, Phoenix, dog of Po — ?lay a gre^it role, 
8o do the "Thunderpitt^rn'SI»ei wen or Chinese Meander, 
the 6wastika,aere arabol for ijood lack only in diverse 
badd-combinations; as well pattern ayiaoolisixici olouds 
and water,iioiitui.i^ and fire; alüo the ^'vic^ht Trigranö'» 
(Pa kua),the "Twelve Ornaments, the "Äight Buddliist 
embleias« "* 



. ■ « 

% 

^•1 



seasd^ns) ; 



Bibliography: 



ElR«nu.:iEwiminTT 



A8ht0:i "Chirxeae Art" 1335 
nacicaaoK "Der J.^aesisoiie '^epplch^ 1921 
.lüisteroerg " Jliiuea.KttJistgesoMcate .^.xI.lJJ.*: 
Toyei ohuko.Iiiust.C ^talo^ue of jiioient 

imperial treasury,oalle« 

biioßoin.vol II 

"Seres" :The aatlve name of t-e natural silk fibre '''^'^, 
••s6U"..-'rora this üri,-in fora the «Jreek the word 
"3er",for t'ie woven artiole aericon,"hioh aeones 
in Latin «ericum.Khen un er the Han |^«Jwee^^^^. ^„ 
114 B.C. tili 127 A.D. Caravans on the"silic traoKs 
oarry silk frora China to the Persian s\xU for 
the luxuriouB Horaans. 



fl 



»» 



;;;::i 



':::i! 



1.(1 




8 9 



/ 



•t^ <^- 



* V 4 










'Hwn 




54. 



Shantung Wpol Rg^ 
200 X 256 cm. ; 79 x 101. 1»' 



In the mlddle of the crearay ground a circular medaillon 
in blue and yellov;. In it the lionlike shaped '•»o - Dogs". 
These dogs (?o is the Chinese term for Buddha) ^uard 
budhistio sanotuariea^the male carryin^ the ball-shaped 
ohu (a jewel),the symbol of purity. 

Over the rest of the creamy surfaoe are gracefully scat- 
tered some prunus tvags in orange, yellow and bro^^m,while 
the four corners are filied v/ith scrolled stenes with 
peonieSfthe '*iau dan hua*', symbol of wealth ind esteem, 
beiu^ simaltaneously oae of the four season*s fiowera ' 

The borders are dark: Chinese Meander or Thunder pattern 
in blue,yellow,brov/n on orange ground, suÄrounded by 
a dark blue c^round ^vith peonies and tendril pattern. 

About 1750 (OhUen Lung). Province ohantung. 

Lit.: Holt "Rugs oricntal and oociaental antiqae and 

moaern" Chicago 19Ü8 

Exhibition: 1929 Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst 

veran.vtaltet von der Gesellschaft 
für ostasiatiscne* Kunst und 
der i^xademie cier Künste, Berlin 
Katalog no.ll22 



^ , 



•^» 



^^Ai«l^'..,- 



90 



«tt t 

M -A 



I 



1 . r 



S I A . \. 



r ■" f . r 




\ 
J 



D 






X t ■' v' Ö ^' 



: »i Li. 



I;:i 




55* 



Cninese-Turkestan vVool R\Xf{ 
265 X 120 ci:.,i 104aOx47.5" 



Ploral an ^ geometric pattern on deep ruby-colored 
ground* 

Principal ffiatures are the three circular medaillons 
in tiie oentre part -.^ith cloud and floral motives on 
blue ground. The "revexsea line" in black Tills the 
four cornerß» 

On the borders tendril-work oh blue,flower rosettes 
on ruby and the "swastika-band-ornament" callei 
^ wan dsi bu daw tou = ^ood luck v:ithout end." on 
yellow ground. 

Yarkand , East Chinese '^urke&tan, Vest China* 
Nineteenth Century. 

Lit.: Bushell "Chine £6 .^rt" vol. II (1910) 

Hackmack" i)er Jhinesische 'icppich^*(l921) 
iSinsterberg" Chinesische Kunstgeschichte" Ed,IlCl312) 



56. 



ChineBe->?urkestan Wool Rüg 
220 X 115 cm. |36.14 x 45*4" 



The backgound of the niddlefield is nearly turquoise 
wherebey the Chance of shades aads to the peouliar 
charm. In it a pomegranate trce.the s^Tubol of f-rti- 
lity.mryeITowl^ii^j{S;. out of a aniall vase; l}f ^"^^S^^ 
horizontioally and symiietrically arran^ed,fill t;ie 
ground; the leaves and fruit s ^i^e,in epite of styli- 
ainp'.clearly recognisable. ,. ,^ .• u 

lio borders eaolose the ru^;, Hoth In lidiit reudish 
ahades.tne iruier T^-ith ilor-jl ornar.ent;s,tne outer 
with the "s'vasitira-band-onnneaf in uromi^h .lute. 



Kashj^ar , K«st CMneee Turkestan/Test Oliina. 



About 1300. 



■ r.t 



;il!f ! li, q g?-'..ii i i!", | " i , !i w 






■ 4 »I 

l'.'.VA 






h: >' 



■ tii« 












t 



;:;! 




".4 ■ 



o 



i:-.;! 



i..r^. 









M 



'K^'J 



■3J?TXttr 



JHkdLa:de.:n 



j 



t> ♦ 



h 



"> 4 



91 



57. 



Aroade Praver Rus 
180 X 78 om. ; 70.14 x 50.11 



The whole sarface of this rue with a tile-red backjound 
ie divided into six prayer niclles.building together the 
a r c a d « " • 



n 



Bach niohe ia decorated with the pomec^ranate tree, a 
very ancient oriental eymbol oi fertility: Üut of a 
vaBe '^rows a etalk vith a blo&som ou the top ana tT/igs 
arran?ed synuuetrically vdth more or lese styled leavea 
and flowerß in two ahedee of blue and a little white. 
The Bame two shades of blue are ueeu for the iraming 
of the niches and the bact^oond of the boraera with 
their flo'ver motives in tile-reü, 
Pine wo Ol with a silky lustre. 
Kashgar.gast Ghinpse TurV:estan,V.'ebt China 
Ilineteenth Century. 

These rurs are also called "Saaarkand prayer rugs" 
a?ter ?hf more central situated old ana ^amous 
capital of Turkestan. They were used by the ':;Ojamedan 
Population for cor.non pravers.directinö tne gable exaa 
of the nichc to the -'-aBt (r.eccaj. ^ 

Here the oom.eotion with ^J^^J^J^f ^.'.«J^f J^or wMch 
The deEi.;n rosenblee the Moudjar H^^l ^^ ,,o.t 

of the niches reauin unfülea enc aiiif-^ 
of their backt^round 



iit. 



Pediersen "Chinesische KunstgeEicrdchte" ill.193 




B ■ ^:4 



A 



'- 1 : 



e. 



i-i 






Ti» 



k/^ 



ftlMklftftAAAjift, 



■'- '""'Hm^ 




9.2 



B. JAPAN 






:;;$ 






;U 






1^ f 



4 



• - ■ r-^ 



«nj.r<" 









14 



"i..->- 



'- 4 






r , 



\ > 



^ 



• -• 'V 



toi' V ^^^ i'-^ 







f : . 


' . , '■.' ■ 




^ -r: ' 1 v' t. i" 


• 1 






J\^ 




. / *..;• -•,.^ • 


t. 

• 

1 







ri-s. 



. -t 



■if 



VIII Sword--aearIvlasters 



The swor^.-gear is not forged by the blade-smith 
who s OGoapation had an almost religious character; 
particular schools of artists in metal wroaght them. 

The Japanese distinguish between decoration-ornaments 
on the sword and the decorated parts of the sword -dlt, 
To the first belong the sword-knive ( k o d z u k a ), 
the s^ord needle (kogai ), which found their places on 
both sides of the scaboard^and .the small Ornaments on 
both sides of the hilt (menuki); 
To the latter the guard(tsuba) ,pomiiiel(fuGhi ) and 
hilt-f errule (kashira ) • 

The Goto school is considered as the classical 

sohool of ohiseled sword gear. 

It was founded by the samurai Goto ivlasoku(l459-1512) 

who was born in the provinoe i.'-ino and lived at the 

luxurious court of the Ashikaga Shoguns, Kis artist 

name is Yujo. 

During four centuries (1460-1856) , in sixteen generations, 

the G-oto school, will preserve raore or less its style 

and will work nearlv exclusively for princes,the great 

feudal lords(daimio') and their foliowers the samurai, 

the gentry. ^ _. 

Yiio is the first master who decorated sword gear with 
T^liefs. The fourth aoto master, Goto J^oyo 
>litsuige 1550-1620) is said to been the first to use 
h^oman figures for his decoration,using silver for 
faces and hands,while from the fifth master, Goto 
Tokuju (Mitsutsuge 1549-1651 ), the first kodzuka 
with the Short steel blade have originated. 

As ground metal the Goto masters used principally 
s h a k u d ,an alloy formed of a basis of copper 
with varying admixtures of silver and gold. 
They decorated tne grained surface 
(n a n a k o) in relief either of gold or in partly 
goldplated shakudo . 

Prom the first tili to the tenth the master of the 
Goto school lived in Kyoto. The tenth, Renjo(+ 1709), 
became appointed to the splendid court of the Toku- 
gawa Shoguns at Yedo, 



^ I 



- w 

.1 



1 !!?'**•«♦#«•**•(*■*»**■.■ 



'"^nm^^'- 






• •-* * 



y.'.A 



I - 1 I 



.1; 



1^ 



1 








I »! I 



#ifri 



1 ;)J:;ri:Bq 






"t 






Jü* V ^' 



/ ü >i iJ s fc ^ 



5( > t^ V i-A^?i— b'.i* . '• 









U'> 



-t •• 



tv 



V 



Z:)!^:* t^ßrf- 



ei' 



( 






i. - 



o 









e;;.C Ji- 



- /-low 1 h:..' •^GX: :> 






...iVC.»!^^ 



(i 






' :-^., 






.] -i--^ !■: 



j 1 : -*^ 



1-t. 



'^i'i;': ii-^- 






c '1 

^. ^ — 



•n-J 



•>^". 



f • 



( . Jl » 



t*J-' IC : 



r/ / : 



1 






i ' <'j Ü iv V.« ^' »■' 



;■ -.iJ.^ 






.. t> :<. e \, ^ 'i. 



j 1 ^r '..... ( ( -^ 



> 1^' 



iJ -f: 



'f.' » 



1 V 



«.« 



4 



J .. 



' « 



£ )i -W 



V -" i. 






4 •' 



i 



': < o 



d * 






'1 rr 












r '- 

r 






^1 






r-i 



1 V.0 l-J 



* f 



rj • ■ i 






ri;3-ii ^; 



: -8- • --> •• 



1 ^ 






:l « ■ 






T • ' 



.'1 » .» e 



' . ( 



1 . > 3 ^'' 



95 



Vorks of the Joto masters for other puri>08e8 iiian 
aword-gear aro very rare« I oaly know of the t^^raaps 
of slldlrig doors(hiklte) in form of h.aaij:ing bamboo 
vases with Iflttüös flo^"»er deooratlonütfurnlfihcA for 
tht pleaßure s^at of the prlnoe ivatsura of /laoho 
near liotOfaad the aacjikaXushiinail heaaB,used to 
ooaceil the nails v^hich join temple-oolu.m and 
ceilln3-beaa# In the flrsttenple Higaehi Hongwanjl, 
whioh ^^8 bullt on or er of }Iideyoshl,they were iu 
the form >f f lo^ting tennina» 

The few kodssukas here desorlbed are the rest of a 
nall colleotlon bulltTin To>io 1903. 
for the liitroduction Into this braxioh of Japanese 
art I an iadebted to my frlont (Justav Jaooby and 
Paul VautierfWho o\med o le of the^^ -"^9,?* Importaat 
oollectione of sword-. aar. It waB'^'iJeV^/ho introauoed 
me to tiie expert and aealer Aniia in l'okio and ^^ave 
xe valuable actvice» 



IAt#: Ausstellung Japaniccher r.lein:<uiiQt,3aaalung 

iJuGtav Jaooby, ^CuiiQtßewerbe :4uoeuj7i ßerltn 1908 
Aue Stellung Japanlo':her '.mstwerke,3a:!i.aanä 
:i08l(S, Berlin 1909 

'•Japanische tichbl Itter" und Schwertsieraten', 
Sarmlung freor;- Oedert ^sohi-ei'oendes Verzeichnis 
von Paul Vautler. larause^e ;eben von ot1.o Küünel» 
'^t-!rlin 1916 







f - 



■ h 



^^rtlöltlU.:,- 



li 




II 



;.::i 




•>t.ÄJ% 



/•^ 






53/59 



94 



Two Hail-Oonoealer In Th*. Shape of Floatirifi 
"" Tenniaa. 



L. 45 cm. j 17.22" 
H. 11 om. I 6.11" 



46 cm. j 18.1" 
19 cm.; 7.8" 



the drumstioks in both handTs. 

Both fl^urirxes were fixed to the ^^^^^'^''"fJ'Jil.^ 
üoxn iio^ij."^ .'onev/anii to conceal the nalis 

the teiaple Hlfc,ashl -iOngY/auj-"- " .,. -^ „„ 
iSch joined teiaple-colioim and ceiling-toeam. 

(" Kugikakußhi ") . u , ,^« 

Copper .round Plated .ith sold silver -^ shakudo. 

The trifold P«**«''r^'^ in« ?he silv°r S represent 
Streaming gowns -d ri-onB.the 3U-|,,,3,,,,3,feet. 
the uncovered upper P"^ » 

a.id the Bhakudo the ^^a^^' vracelets as well es for 

Lhakudo is U8ed ^^'^^^ ^^^.^f^ ^e layed ou the ^old as 
t.e ^lo--/-S: loJ ieside: en^ravin.a and trexlis 
deooratioii lor xne t-u"!!. 
pattern in blaok enamel. 

Attributed to Goto Kojo. 1530-162Ü 
Exhibition: 1312 



1935 



14-^-,. natfl^^iati Jacher Xunst" 
"t-r.:i^altft"irde?^roeWionen .^ 

lemie der K^ in st e zu Berlin. 
Katalog 110 '280/ 281 Jaoan" 

"Ausstellung Kunst des alten ^apa 
Basel, -bewerbe r.useujii.-at.no.i:> 



Otto Kün..el f °^«,^fi,:Sj:riiirauj^rthrfeS' 
of the seveiiteenth Century, ux o 

Higaehi ^io^fi'""^^-i^>"%aied now more ...recisely that 
T believe it can oe bayea iio« .,chool,is 

öoto iojo,the foarth ''^^^^«^°J.* 1550-10 20 fit into 

the artiet. Not -^j!^^J^^ fir.t Hi^.shi ^ongf^^^ 

:fKroro(?iniched I602).al- tj Sntroned.characteri.- 
and silver for face and har» ar 
tic for this master. 



fMHnnlBKfmllllh.. 



ipi 



• t 



;'?«^lfi»» 



\^ms^i-'''' 



■ .-» 




¥. !■ 



h 




95 



Saall woader that the rrotomaster yielded to suchen 
imcoDUtioa task. It whb the onuiipotent TalkoCgreat 
counselor) Hldeyoshir (1512-1598 ),lover of Bumtuous 
deooration,ira:mseTT'^ho oraered the traasfer of the 
headquarters of the western branch of the Hougwanji 
sect to Kioto and was in consenince Interested in 
the erection ofa temple building which met hiß taste, 
still to be Seen in the .Aain Hall of the Nishi - 
Hongwanji,erccted at Kioto in 1591* 
The Iiigashi - iiongwanji temple v;as only finished 
after ^lisdeyoshi 's death,when leysau To^u^jawa, ^ 
Hideyoahi's ^reateat ceneral,had aacceeded m naking 
Japan his ov/a. 

In 1788 a fire destroyed the tenple. A-nong the few 
thin:^s rescued these tea^ins were saved and oane 
into'"poös*ßn of the counts Otani,high priest e of the 

Hondo sect« . ^^^ 

"/hen on July 5,1909 the Otani possessions were fcoia 
by auotion I was able to get the tenains. 



KUinnel "Kun 



;t Chinas, Japans, "Coreas" Handbuch der /<^'>- 



,:J'' 



»Kunst Chinas, Japans, '.oreas ^ ^"^"!;^:;^^^. 
WiüBea3chaften,1929 . (111.154, P.172J 






t 






,..f 



I ♦*-♦ 






^\ 



».VI 



Hi 



•^ ;.- _L «? V_.^ 



V . 



• 1 V 






. A- 



X »^ 






1'> i i : 



j j 



o; : 



li w t****** * j 



..,, n^..,,.M,f^ 






)| ' I| '' I ' U I I l | i |t i .l l lll Hl ' il '! ! 



■«PtMn 



^^raKIWM'.'" 



mimm 



':vÄ 



96 



t.« M 






^i 


i| t 1 




1 


• '•# 








^ »• »j 








. * ., 








>.*.<■, 






» •. «. 








'^M> 








w 








w\ 






i 




I 

i 




V» 







1$:: 



•• 



K 



^0* K odzuka 

A golden rake in relief besidc a tombstone with jold 
insoription on grained Shakudo groixnd. Frame hal' ^^old 
half shakudo. 
The reverse half gold plated,half even shakudo. 

(roto Master, eighteenth Century. 



61. 



Kodzuka 



Two monks with rosaries in their hands approach timidly 

an oni whOfdis-^uised as a samurai,is coing to strike 

the great temple-bell ?7ith t:ie haminer. 

Relief in ^^old, silver, shakudo with inlayin^ and engra- 

ving von grained shakudo .jround. G-old frame» 

Reverse shibuishi v,dth signature. 

Goto Master, eighteenth Century. 




62. 



Kodzuka 



Saigyo Hoshi (prince Sato Hioye Norikiyo 1115-1138; 
as pilt:;rim Stands lost in viening trie »^^uji-yaaa. 
The faruous oontour of the mountain ie engraved on 
even shakudo i::round,the pi? t3'rim,the lotus,the 
cloud-band are inlaid in gold and silver. 

Provinue Ka^a,eii;hteenth Century. 



63. 



Kodzulca 



A hare sitting between grasirce^ looks at the moon, 

whJLch is half covered by clouds. 

Ground material is iron,the hr^.re gold relief, the 

moon and grasaes silver. 

The reverse is gilued and aecoryted oy fine shruDs 

in engraving. Signaturen i^atsushita Yoshiro 

Provinoe Kaga, seventeenth Century. 

64. \ • Kodzuka 

An ape purouir^ wich its eyes a f^^f ^;^^y- .^.^ ... 
Oround material iron,the ape relief m bhakuao,w..e 

drigon-t^y gold inlaying. 
Provinoe Kaga, eighteenth oeiitury. 



m 




I im 



>.^., ;j(a(SffWWpi^*iWW'.'iiiffHliMH-.J 






m 



MM» 




.:-.:a 



I ' . 



i ., 



< \; .' 



■ M 






'.\^ 



/!"•" 



' < 






n' 



' , • * 




.■-Lt^: ;^t^o 



v'o": 



^; 



i '<■ 



i ,. C'T..^ 



r . 



• i 



■■"■^^ ■ ■^,^::^ ^ 






f. 



'.?'*'*■ . •''*"!«W|i,,. 



w 



97 



65, Kodzuka 

A cherry-blossom (eyrabol of sacrifioing one's life) 
twig iß inlaid on even shakudo in gold and silver. 
The top of the kolzuka is fraaied in £old,tiie bottom 
in silver. 
Provinoe Kaga,eighteenth oentury. 



66. 



K.od zuka 



Tiger in rain. Relief and gold inlaying oa iron. 
Signatare : Suzuki Kasugasu. 

ldit»,eighteenth Century 



a 'i, '" r 



67, ' '■ •' ' ' Kodzuka ' 
Cherry-trfje branohe in relief on iron sround, 
enriched by blossoma in silver and gold. 
öignatuxe . 
Mlto,eighteenth Century 



S;>t"o? Sf of the province Eaga are renom in the 

ergL%^it Ä^^ Hin. 

S nfc'a'liranf -fistfc: y erfect^^ 

ly even shakudo, metal.tinted in anycolor.^ ^^^^ 

Since the artloving «^aisiioß of Ka^a invixea ^^^^^ 

to time tue most important ^^asters oi ti^e j 

to thcir oourt.raany works exeouted by tneir p p 

sho'« the Gloto style. 

*i'to: i. ,-p nnw^r^al axid artloving priaces 

nineteenth Century. 



«^•»»••«4Mat.ii>k** feA*«*««>a.*^ft«r4kk 



'iiil^ 



:::\ 



98 



r? 



!:'.:!: 



^ • < • • i 
■ ■4>i 



IVC . 



%►/, ^ ^ 



* » V* f 



. Uv : 



1, i 



;> XJ 



^^ . V 



r ' ■' <■ 



..:^^^.'i^i 



ä ' 



- •• "# 






t<it 



. j 



•.'.JL . 



.•e 



* - -* 



■ n 



- K' 



-A 






4 












.). ir 



rT 



t 



i'ti -^ i"* ^' -^ •' 






> . 



• I 



* 



>^ 






U-l 



' -v 



•» j * 



" f 






1 »^ 



, -..■<.» 'iiC :*J 



r^' 



i j 



'•«0--ti 



II Ancierxt JAVAIT-RSE POTTERY . 
Some notes on pottery used in the Cha-no-yu 

al^ays translated with TEA CBRi-MONY. 

In Japan the potter 's art <i«^«l°?tJ,^^3^JJ,*^iJ^:J^g " 
Century and it^cane at the «am« time |« *J« ^^^^^^^ 

of the Chinese J^^|4|^^«3J:j!^^f;omeLn?^ 

The chien yao bowls from the -^S^time.the so-called 
ten So 2 u (see oat.no. 44, page 78),were hi-hly 
estimated as c h a w a n . , 

The potter Toshiro lef-^^^f^??'' "''°'' °' - 

joarney to China m ^223 toi||/. ^^^ Chinese 

ün hia return to Japan J^f^^JfVrT 3 a r a 

material,making little ^^^|i*^Jo,,^,the faious 
v,ith flowins gla.es ^^o>aambe^^ro,^^ ^ 

"kara mono i.e. ^^ ^^ . j^^^ ^^^^ province 

of famouB pottera. 

«+^-ih«tPd to the rapid progress of the 
Three events oontributea \q 

Jaijanese tea oeraaics. o-oular tea-oeremony by 
First the Constitution of^seoular^^^^ ^^ the shogun'-a 
Ashikaga Yoshiaasa after hl. aou ji^kakuji or 
Junity » in l^'^^'^^,^?i^^^Se with his favorites Soaai 
silver P^iVillon a^/ifj;. elevated the tea ceremony 
and Shuko he /«°:5Jjf 'f iftle first tiny tea-room 
to the rank of a fine «^^^J^^^^ ^ith the canon prea- 
(cha-8hitsu) built i^^°-°^^\^ the proper size for 
crihing four and a half ^^^s 

Sc»! : Hld.yoshi B fS^r,i°S/ioiean potters w.r, 

in th€ ^/ake of ^^°^^° ' .^ various parts of Japan 
Sou^ht baok.who settled ^^^^fW /k i o t o and 
atsatsuma.la'^a^ 
K a r a t c u. 











r:,/ 



> • • • ll 



,^mmm^^*^mmit 







tl 



mJL ^:^ 






# i 



■ .4 



r-.-> 



r-T 



5^ (* 






h 



l'-./J *^ -- 



:.v^^^ o-f»'^ 5»^*^'''' 









4 10 

'< ^; « 



Tt ' 



tf 



- - ^ 



H 'c- 



o ll u\ i.iöi^ 









.r,r^ 






*.* 






/ ! 



. v- *i* ^ 



ö 'i - •• 









vt 



.A. 



1. ••/ ' <••;'•. 



i>i 



» • w 



».. 



^Jl 



n:»:.*- 



*•>#■ 



:3 



iL 



^ if 



w 



../ 



i* 



• J J 








• 


1 




i 


"'. < .'• 




.T. ■.." 




1 




- 


■••n 




7 


m 




■lJ si 






i > 





:%'-^ ■ 



i 



f ♦ 



:l 



f-, 



. j... 






- <f 



. . -, 1^ B 1 » ^ 






99 



Third 5 ' the Convention •)f the diverse schools of 
tea-drinking whioh Hideyoshi calied together in 1594 
at hlB palao« of FuBhimi, Here one of the greatest 
tea-master 3en-o-H i k y u oollated,purified and 
codified the tea-ceremony. 

He tookJTfHe^BimpIicitylvijil and raised it to a oanon 
of taste. The v^Drship of simplicity ai^d^of the 
antique in objects of art,tor,ether withiotservanoe 
of an elaborate oode of etiquette are the doctrine 
and discipline of the tea-ceremony, which has aever 
varied einoe. 

The Japanese potters did not wrk in great organised _ 
oentres like those of Ching-tS-ChSn. Uaually one or 
two potters run sraall wor< shopa. Henoe the S^eat 
variety of the ware,henoe the individuality of every 

T^r Japanese tea-maeters ( c h a j i n = tea man ) 

lent their inspiratiou to the =^^'^^^«°^^« °^ *^J ^he 
Utensils used in the tea-ceremony. The beauty of the , 
Ss^ä o«amics depends nostly on the «f «^f^^^ .^^ 
•xTireaaed in form and ijlase. The tjreat manipulatea 
sSu iB of?en ma.ked Ih^ roughnesB. One or more 

llowing glazea oover the '■^«^«•^^^/f^f ^^3^'"''^°^' 
and ending abruptly before reaohing ^^«^^^J; g^^pja,, 

At *«e first Sl^;« *^«rtf e riSt .t^entlvl mLd 
^'f^"iLr?he'noble«t pjeceltäiiated creationa.belon- 
will find the "?''i®^7,+?f^ni ■hlGh h^ve be^jn exeouted 
ging to the ™°^* ^«|^^^,^'ii, t^°Secomes understandable 
äarthrrapaSesi^i'^alCr/aoh pieoes to eword blade 

The'^lateem in Vihich t^^^« ^«ffo^eJ^art-appJecJation 
the difxerence of Japanese and foreign an, 



Siee not ^±ve the füll sense. 



The 



flu of a piece depends 
di^s'not give the ^^H^f'^f 'thrvork of art itself. 
not only upon the ^^^-'i^^y. °^ ^^ical eveats which it 
ED.ential for it are ^^«;^^Jf ^gch it wae treated. 
lived to see and the ^l'^'H"^ l' ^f great importance 
Henoe the acoessories also are u ^&^ ^^^ brocade b 

and 

to'th;"c;ior-of the üla^e; tj« -^ ^';-,;-f the piece. 
old piain wooden boxes fittea to 



•«fft^ 


xM 




m^ 




/. 


1 



1 1 



^"^ 



" 1 ■ ■ Tfl«. 



„*^m«i^;4;utwi^^' 



l "Ol 

• ••l 




ll 



i.v; 



^^ 



rort 






ir. -^ 



:< 



i t 






rt u ) 



t L 

_ ♦ 



A > %Jf .^ 



[:r fio 



>.. 



•*' <-.■* 



^*. -. , 



-^•- 

- 'T ^ 






I , 



T 5T 






r«--. 






\i 



V t 



^ i:^" 






• f 



.f.." 






4.. I3< ^4 t . 



'• 



\ •' 



%f 



r-.^^>•^ 







iI V 



li 




100 



By an Inscription in some historical calligraphy on th« 
piain boXy auoh a piece skyrockets to prioe ideas unin- 
telligible to the foreign collector. If the Inscription 
18 added by a famous Ghajln like Hlkyu or ünshu the 
plece beoomea a •'melbutau", preclous beyond mea8ure,the 
valuatlon phantastlo and Its posse^ion makes a Japanese 

houae famous. 

I had once the opportunity of seeing such a Meibuteu Chalre. 
It was riecessary to open a whole series of boxes,one 
withln anothertbefore reachlng the • shrine'it seif , the 
Silken wrapoing in hose soft folds lay — one small ohaire* 
(cp.Küiaiiielj'iroöse^Ostaaiatisoiies 'lerät"ili.par;e 38). 
It looked veryTiike the 3eto bunrin of my o^m (no.69). 
But I was told that this holy of holies "-^as a Toshiro 
Karamono.the inscription on one box by the grectt Hiiciu's 
own hand« 

■ , * 

I learned to love these old tea-caddies and tea bowls 
at my friend Paul Vautier collection's in Tokio 1908. 
3)e*=iring to take a few good examples v^ith me,ßOOi also 
in^the Japanese sense,I purchased the pi6ceß,described 
on the foilowing pa^es,from the expert D a i s e n 
in Tokio and from Vautier ioiiaöelf ,who gave me his 

?hxou^h Paizen I had the Chance to ^««o'^^acqualnted 
with the tea-oerenony practically. Iheoretically I toew ^_ 
the orinciples ulready from ükakuxa -«kuzo'e "Book of Tea. 
I had read it before leavlng for Japan, a better intro- 
JuSlorcaniot be found. .Voove all: It stre.Bes how 
ceremony and arts are born in the spnere Ox the 7. , 
3 u d d h i e ni.i • 
"^^n" derived from the word "Ch« an ".Chinese translation 

Sihe lalscrirword "i>y--%---i^e »^f i^^.^J^'ie'.ched. 
of the six ways throußh whdch Buadhahood •:^y J« ^^^°f ^■ 

The monks of the southern .en ^^^^»J^^^J-^J^thc f^ge - 

KS?r^^ef Siri^JicS ^lialirfe?Soped into the 
It was xne ^®" -^•^^'^^;: . ^.u^ -^ifteer.th Century. 
Tea-cerenony of Jopan in the xiixeeuuu j 



Z e n 



.^' 



'^m'^ 






m 






m 




ii 

i 



^9f%lK^. 



4 J^^ 



t. ^ 



l ^ 



Ff,^ 



P^l. 



X^'ä.- 



* l. V 



•« . i^- 



f »\' 



i*", j' r .'^ f. 



r ii'iS . 









*•. - iHm m 



i i 



J-i 



•f. X m 



" f 



i. 



2 SSV :yr .^Yi.r C 



♦ - . 



^1>^J\- 



. . h- 



^ '. 



' ■ *^ • f. A 






.i.*./.1 






^ - 



• ... 



.1 « 



'»!» t rfi»' «• < 



^c J J iji »«'y .c>'.^' 






« 1 1 •' 4- t* 



) i) 






. yM 






-i i 



i 




: , 



' ' V t > ^ 



'i^ 



>• i-' !^ 









101 

1 «an't do \>«ttcr than to quote llteralLy Okaicuro Kakuzo 

in the f Ol lowing poragraphs: 

•• T«aism f a a oult fouaded on the adoratioa of tha 

baautlful among the sordid facta of every day «xistenoe. 
It inouloataa parlty and harmony^tha mytary of 
mutual oliarltyfthe romaatioism of the sooial order. 
It ia esiaatlally a worsnip of the Imperfect,as It Is 
an attampt to accomplish soraetliing posßible in thia 
Impoecible thing wc know ao life# 

Tha Ptiiloaophy of Tea ia not pure sesthctiolsm in the 
ordiuary aoceptance of the teriii,for it e/preasaa 
oonjoiutly ^ith etliics axxci religion cur (i.atJapaneae) 
point of viaHw about aa*i and natura» 
It ia hygianoffor it enforoae olaanlineiiü,it is 
aoonoDio,.or it shows ooafort in airipiioity rather 
tiian in tn« ooiapiex and oostly; it is aoral gaoaetry 
in afl mxoh as it acfin^^a our sence of .)roportion 
-CO the uni Verse: It representa the true spirit of 
Kaatern deriocraoy by maktn^j n\i its vo^ariaa 
aristocrat^B m taste." 

* It ia in the Japanese toi-cereniony that we aee the 
oulraination of tea iueais. 'i^ea became laore ^f^^^n 
idealization of the forn of driA/cinö* it la a religion 
^.i"* 4: 4» flT"toflife« j 

The b-ver^-» ^rew to be an exouse for the parity aad 

the -uect joined to prociuce for tnat oooa&ion the 
atmost beatituue oi the aufttlaae. 

The tea-rooi -vjs *m oasie in the areary «^»e^« «f. ^„ 
ex!.tef.ce%eary traveilers oould neet ^o driox xrom 

the oo..:.on a riag of «^*-^»^'f «^n* «aL woven uboS 
wae aa iuprovieed draiaa -.noiie Pio *««»•' *°^«^ ''"^'"^ 
tue tea, the flowers and ttie ^jaintiag. 



,»t . ÖSiSr trSlrturrtn« tone o." tn. roon.^ot . 

A 8\ibtle pniloöophy lay behlnd it an. 
'raoisa in dia^^ße* 












* I « • 



:,;i 



-♦♦'-■(»♦ii.. 





»■.«.»•n .... I 



irt 



i ^- ^ 



^ t «4 



V .V X , 



■^ • • A 



fc- * 



■•( 



,1 






■^ r? ;! 



V , 



V ^ 



^1 



: . ^ ■' 



<»*'■ V 



.'.*•' 



V.A '. •. 



J i. 



i;'. vT 






.^. .% 



II > 



!. "> 






r'-T 









1^ 



V 7 



. f. 



■» •*) 



f-, 4. 



^;; ^;^ .; «'ä'X« s,^ --ra*; 






■^^ ;^ . 



A»^. 



0^ 



fS 



«1 SV. * 



^ ^ 



102 

Finally it is necessary to know thc iieaning of the 

technioal term " Itokiri "• 

Ito is a thread,kiri = cut,toge-ther it raeans ''Thread Mark'*. 

These marks,oonoentrio lines uxiaex the "ba8e,origixiate 

when the pottery with a piece of string or wire is out 

from ite bed on the wheel. 

They trend . . 

a) as a rule from ri^sht to left: ilon-itokiri 

b) sometime from left to ri<.:ht : Kara-iiioiio=.Corean pieoe. 
which is the result of the loxHeJOt praotice of tarniag 
the v/heel with the left fo t. .4.-4-1 

c) sometinesJalTTT^srricp^acentric oirc^^^ a^^v^tA 

d) sonetime. ooaceitric oircles of -reater aisxancerUza-itoklrl. 
It means Whirlpool and is used mostly on big jars. 

These markö are very carefally executed on tne l)est 
pieces and the J8paneße,deG0ribing these potteries, 
never fordet to mention them. 






Biblio^^raj^. 



4herr*Lllly "Y^^mato,der ^Jendungs-laube des Japanieoheu 
L>^f j Volkes" 1^'36 

(Ju-tav Jacoby. L^&b 
Kiimiael ">'u.istgevrerbe in Japan^^ 1^11 
KdiTnel, 'rosse ' Oötasiaxisches vrerdt 13^^ 



(I .. 



s . 



, » 




. ■ c 

* t 



,...1 



j 1! 



• ■*•■ 



f 

i 
f 

i 



t 



■> ■'< •> 




JJ.« 4,- 



.i k* 



,~-J c 



* »• 



I * 



! » 



''»r 



I 














*.- ' > 



»> 



*?^i 



^ ->i 



103 



a« Pottery used in the Cha • no - yu . 

68. Chat subot Big Jar for Iea->Leaves yrtt h wo öden oover. 

H.18 om. j 7 " 

Red brown wäre with three loops* Dark brown glaze with 
metailic Bpeoks aud flecked yellovdsh run.ain£ drops. 
Uzu itokiri. 

Scto before 1650. voutnern iIondo,Pro¥ihoe Cwari. 

Exhibition: 1935 Sewerbe /luseuui Basel "Kunst des alten 

Japans." Kat.no. 4-06 (S'^itzerland) 
1933/4-1 Creme ente Museum, den Haag (Holland} 

69» Ohaire,r>mall #ar for ^owdered $ea * 

H. 6 om;2.2" 

Very thin wäre of apherioal form, so-oalled "Bunrin" 
= appleform. L^elioate surfaoe. Bro^vn underrsand upper 
gla*ze,the latter -Ith a very light purple ^^iimmer. 
Careful ivara-iaono-itOKiri. 
Ivory oover, old brooade bag and bo3^. 

Seto before 1750. 

Exhibition: 1935 Oenperbe Museum,Bagel(3vdtzerland) 

.4Uöt3tell<3.^aaGt des alten Japans.ivat.no. 401 
193öAi C-eneeute -.useum, den ■laagCiloliand) 

70. Chaire.cTar for 'o-vdered i^ea . 

... H.IO c;q. ;4" 

Reddish wäre of atrai-ht, üiia cyiir^drioal fora. Blaok-bro^ffn 

Carefull ".on-itokiri. Ivory oover, old örocaae ^ag and box. 

Seto. 

Exhibition: 1955 iJcvverbe ilur:e-ai-i, JaselUwitzerland) " konst 

des alten Japans" X.at.no.AO^ 
1953/41 Je-icente MuseuE.den iJaag U^oiiana; 







r 






r^ 






f 






f 


1 


i 






i 


f 




Ji 






'■'_'' 






f'" 



'*Htfir»*' «U-H^i . ' ; ''"' 






'I 



fl» 





■'X 

...»Tt.i,, 

•■'"■' t- 7t, ,„, 



^ 



i. u 



yPR 



"••tu 



1 t 

ii 



il 



iii{ 



x\ 



'1 



It 



} 




■•-*•• 



ta 



':<:%'). 



n 



vr.i ^-f. 



Mi.«wsy 




• ; t: 



A f^ 1 



• •'• » 



S K r 






71 • 



104 

' ' "■ ■■•i^*«» 

H,7 O-Ti. ; 2,10" 



Form "Daikai". Ked-browu wäre with dark and llpht 
brown glaze. ^ 

Hon-itoiciri. 

Ivory oover,old trooade öagaud hox. 

Seto 

Ex colleotion Vautier* 



d Tea 



72# . ■. Cheirg.Jir for to'vdere 

1 . K* Ö QPA.; 3.3" 

Bellled form rith tied rieck and tv/o loopo, 
Heddish brown wäre with coffe brown, iüetallic glaze. 
Hon-Itokiri •Ivor^ cover,old broaade bag and box. 

Takatorit Island of Kiushiu,province Chikuzen 



73. 



t ."' 



C haire.Jar lor 3owdered Tea . 

II.lÜ cn. i ;.li)" 



,< ', 



Straj^, olim, cyllndrlcal f orni, 

(irey brov^n wäre with thin blank aud a thick grey slaze. 

The grey glcse is cnding in a drop oa the black, sniivel- 

led iato di;'tict f'ilobales which are coipcired to 

" Dragon-8:vaie6" {ja kateu), 

Hon-Itokiri. 

Ivory Cover, old brocade lats ^^^ box. 

SatGU!na,princedon in the aoathcrn part of the ieland 
of Klushiu. 

Exhibilion* 1^35 lew-rirbe kIuseuI^,BaBel(^>wit3eriand) 

"Kunst des alten J-pans" Kat.no. 435) 
1933/41 ^em^ente iuüeum, den Haag (Holland) 









m 



i 



-/t^^--- 



''^'mm 



r 

w 



^i 



II- 



::i 




II 



106 




Conmentary. 

The iJutch in Japan « 

When in the first decacie of the neveriteenth oentury, 
to bring the oountry lasting peaoe,the Gatholic mis« 
sionaries ^^^ere dri'^ren out and Christanity extirpated, 
Dutoh merohanta nanaged to gain favor 
with the po^^erful ToJ^Ui^av/a offering to the shogun 
the benifits of foreign trade w i t h o u t the 
drawbaoks of a forei^i relii:ion» 

Indeed the 7mtch traders o^ved much of the s i n s u 1 
toleraticn that tney cane to enjoy,tae part 
they played in the anaihilation ofthe Christians 
of ohinabara in bombiUr;; the Kara Castle i^ebraary-Maroh 
1653. (Gp.p.47,54/^b "Ne-; I^a^vn in Japan'' by Everett 
J,3rie53S,^ew York 1343), 



a r 



The jjutch trader 
for more than tvo 
oonditions« 
The Jutch factory 
of the harboi^r of 
foreühore« ' o 



reoeived a commerolal monopoly 
oenturiesjbut ander humilaxing 



'*=9C situated at Deshiina,then an islet 
^. i]a.5asaki,^imt nov absorbea in the 
-:t h<^pDened that Ua^esakl beoarne tue only 
Dlaoe' where any co.iraunication \«^xth the outer -/orld 
Sasper^^tted^he .^utcäf'ffie sole ^^^^f f fn^L^oanese 
the "Lrope of the seventeenth Century ^^Jf Jf ^^J^^*^^""- 
The Jutoh co-:i.^rce too was restricted !'^,-^^.^^^;^^i^ 
lirnits^y^^ '^utoh interfer-noe in the atyle ^^^^^^J^^^^J^^ 
deooration i3 beyond question. ^^^^Z PJ^^^ orci.lly 
ted by them and bomc are aioo nanufactured .jeci:^liy 
to their order for that purpoöe. 



^^w,^ -h.rm H v^vi rt i^ = '- to bake'' and laeans the pro- 
th« name of « to..n,;>rovluoe or an artist 3 i^ulj. 






.■i 







I 




^.fW.» 



T?T*"'*" ^"T ff Y f" " ' *^ ' " " '■»■■'»■ 



■miiiii. 






h::;4 



.1 .» 



i'-'.'.} 



.1 






'^ 



♦ ' 



fcjüii 



it 



<. 



I ? 



♦^ ♦ V. 






I 




t 



;/"•>■.: ':. 



«r ■».', 



J.J 






V 



. JA. 









K 



« ^ 



i V. 






-"ta':> 



/. / 



-• xi^ 









'. 'T 



i 

■ t 



'Wftt^. 



74. 



105 



b. .'^ottery for every day use. 

Koro.inoense vase of enameled ear thenwara , 

H.5.5 on. ; 2.2" 



Cyllndrioal forn* rTreyiBh boay -dth crackled yellowed 
glaze deoorated Tvith faketchy landöCf^pe destgns in blue, 
gTf^.riifßOld enamel coIoä 

Kioto, style of h'inoei about 1700 

Ninsei 'van a famous pott- r ^7ho chose his artist naiae 
after the temple of Ninwa;ii,close by his native village. 
Hc Ib the pupil of 5ohaka,niaster of tea-c€renionieB,and 
famouß at being^ble to evoke stimulatin-3 nsture impres- 
eions with a fev; strokes of his brush. 
With his iecoration he etarted a national style of 
decoratioa v;liich beaaae typical of Japanese pot'ucry. 



75. 



\.i 



kr. 



Box Vith Lid o f painted earthenwa rei 

Diam. 11.5 cn. ; 4.10'; 



U. 



10. um. ; 3.12" 



» • 




Gray wäre of epherical fori-i 'sith s thin crea-ny glaze 
miimtely orada.ed,yaij:ited in ülue e.ianel color. In the 
"ülue ti-TOund foli&fje and blosson orjiaierits,boruered by 
Spiral bands,are Epared. 

Spiral bands too border the circular a^aalllon on the 
top of the lid with the half-fi5üxe of a 1) u t c h m a n 
in the oostuiae of the eeveixteenth oentury. and with the 
Roman letters "10 5 
These lett 
Dutoh ha 

in the 

Sraall Sunda italan'.a of 1602. 

It seerae orobable that the bo. was ^-^^f Jf^f ^^X* 
of ?he snall kilna axou.-.a "a^iasaki whereto tne ^uuoh 
has access rro.^heir fac^ory^at .eshina. ,. ^^^ ^^^^ 

firSvixis,Bince the coi)iöt 3ven trisd to i.-io 

liues of the oridiJ^al ea^röVln^. 

« ,4 - -H (<?) Varlv ei'hteenth cenoury. 

Hagasaki-yaici \")» K-arxy ej.^»i 

Ex oolleotion Paul Vautier, Tokio 



en- 



■ kn, «••••. •.».>.nr;nr 




u 



,1 



1 1 1 ', 



107 



:i:musi 



[ " • ' M 
MtXn 






■•;.. 



f 



i.,^ 



! 



-) 







' » * 



r. .{ " 



d 



^ ww • 



1 

L 






; •* 



' f 












^i*i^ M^i*^'^ 












i f^ »r 



.» -^ «.' 



1 



1 . 



'f 4.- - 



c *:;• Ä-. 



^ >f»i' 



iX 



4«f 



.,i-i 



.; X 









«ifc'ii 



.X ÄV- 



VI 



fc*! • 







.•' r 



' -»■< 



,1.^ ^ 



y r. ^ -. n V 



I ANCIENT JAPANESE LAOq UER 

Our oollectlon of Japanesa laoquer work gave a fairly 
well eurvey contairiing e^ foturty pieoes. To be robbed 
of our twelve No masks fiBom the Meida oollectlon as 
well<iof our inros mostly of the Vautier collect ion^ 
I eepeoially resent* Thie noble pieoe,described below, 
Is the only remainder* 



76, 



Koro.Incense Vase » 
H.7 cm.; 2.12" 



Cylindrical form. 3-old lacqaer decoration on wood 

foundatlon: Dark n a s h 1 j i («pear) ^round,so oalled 

because the gold,powdered 0V:3r the olaok lacquer surface , 

resembles the skin of the Japanese pear. 

Design in gold laoquer, m a k 1 - e ,lit erally »'powdered 

ploture" : Inhiramaklje i.e.flat lacquer fishlng 

boats on small wavcs at the s höre, where fishing-nets are 

huAg up; two round medaillons with buddhistic symbols, ^ 

the swa stica and tnc p a g o d a . 

In takaraakije i.e.relief lacquer aad 

kirigane i.e. inlaying of gold foils, the shore 

iteelf with ro ks ana a tree, 

The interior of the koro is protocted y^-ainst the heat 

of the burning incense. 

Ashikaga period (1336-1365) Sixteenth oeutury. 

^Lit.'- Jacoby '»Die Lackarbeiten^im Katalog er Sammlung 

lÄosl^, Berlin 1909 
KU "ine 1 "kunstge-^erbe in Japan" 1911 



t 



-.i . 1 



Conunentary 



s . a B t 1 a (Japanese mnjl) is ä""«'»/"'; 

hooked-orose-foriB from *"« ^°°„„ .l^o.g are doubtful. 
of fire driliing or fron J-^;j^;JJ°^^ J^uw India by 
It iB proved by the latest «f^^f-^^^^^ \^^ i^dus civili- 

J. Marshall in ^'o^^^^^°:i^r+M /dia-ram v,as there before 
8ation".rx>adon 1952) t hat thisdia.r^ ^ 

3,000 B.C. i.e. one t^ousand years beror ^^.^^ 

lAvaded India. It has oeen tr.ced bacK^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ 

gammadion in Troas «"^^^^'33^° Jestward to Jccland, 
and 18 supposed to have pabac 
eaatward to China, Tibet, Japan. 



?s?a?¥S8B!iHH!lR 



1 



I 
11 



r 



1 

!■■■ 



:;:;* 



i'ii 






im 



'i:i3 

> (. 1 
I • - i 



.n 



» f-.rs 



I 



( ^ -' w * 



ff 



>Ä 



tC tv 



. r r 



\ .--,, . •> t ' >' ^ ^- ^' • ' *■' *" ■ ' 
' . c. . : <? u Ci : j- 1 ^ :• 



^ i.t Alvi 



^ r ., 



j 1 






.' - ;;..'..l. 






.Ci<;i ' 



ni 



. * I 



>-- ^ 



i^ 



ft. . tf 4- / . » 



^ B Ä 1 t » n if 



o 
» / 



ft-(^ ' 



■* f>. 






• 9. 



■••#i^: 



108 



Proni the swastikon sprang laany decorative patterns as for 
instanoe the Chinese 8wa8ti2a-band-ornaiiient,Galle4 wan dsl 
bu daw tou a good luck wlthout end* 

Por this mystio diagram many explanations have been given. 
On our koro it means,I am sure, symbol of Budahist eeoterics« 
Genera lly it was considered ae symbol of luck.On the heart 
of Buddha, painted or inlald in gold,it means love and con- 
iidcration evtn for the love st oreature,in the Hitler-Grermany 
race hatred, Jew-baiting* 

Rouasel-Le gives further explanations in "Typische Bildwerke 
der buddhistischen Tempel in China»* (Sinika,VI,6,p.286) : 
•' Dieses Symbol, das aus der vor^^e schichtlichen Zeit längst 
vergangner Rassen stainrat -wie die Ausgrabungen lehren- 
hat im Laufe der Zeit mancherlei neue Auslegung erfahren. 
So sieht man in ihm ein Symbol der Drehung des Weltgesetzes 
und der Y;andelwelt,bei entge^en^e letzter Drehung, der Er- 
ic e surig* 

In China wird es meist als Zeichen der Zahl 10,000 d.h. 
unzählig aufgefasst. iis soll dann, unter anderem, auch auf 
unzählige 'Äonen, ri cht i^-^er gesagt, auf das Ewige deuten, 
das sich in Buddhas ^eist oder Herz - beides ein .vort 
in China - offenbart .Dauer die i\nbringung des Zeichens 
auf der rust Buddhas in Herzhoehe. 

Das Swastik Kreuz als Symbol des ewigen Weltgesetzes(dharma} 
un; der I^redigt oder Lehre von ihm, ja der Buddhistischen 
Religion überhaupt (was alles dharma heissen kann) ist zum 
Zeichen des Buddhismus g< 
den älteren Dreizack verdrängt." 



s rreworden und hat 



I 



syaibol 



of the 



P a K d a (from Taaü pagavadi): ^nother 

BuJdhiat dootrine. These towerlike Btoried structures - 

Statute" - are als» of Inaian orif^in. But *^«y.^«^^i°^*J.tJ 
to absolute Chinese form,xaken over in the typical Buadhist 

tem^ll arcöitecture of ^^Pf '^^-J-^^f^fonff he' h;avene 

Eaoh of its stories raust be *^°^^^* °J, ^^^°^!u° 

while the Square ^ase is a «f ^«J^^^^^f ^^'3^*117 round, 

In India the uppcr part of th f '^°;^^^^^!„'' ^ 

but m China the Square shape is "^o^« f^^^r^^l^eauentlv a 

Throu^h the Center of the ^^^^Jil^f.^j^r.i^posrbuf is 

maat or axis nhich serves ^^^ f fjj^^^^^-^gpfje euds usually 

l^Tl^C fr ?L^K/1^iei:Sa;oifeii the purit. of 

the law of the Enliehtened one. 



{ , 



'''4 



T. , 



1' 



....•.,,,.,,»,„,,,,,.,_..,_ . 



^fiff 



vm 



I . ! . "* 

1 1 . ( „ 

' M . . ., 

f ' • ' ■< 
t ■ ' ■ * ^ 



\l 



■■■^ 






r . 



•:> '.:a 



I ) 




t,'j. 






% • 'i 



:/. 



v>. 




r- 



r-.^ N(» 



N/r 



■. .V r- 






' : 
1 .. . 



lii 






.•.A 



'- f. 1 












:^^ t* .f ^ ^-' 



h* 



• I 



— i..- 






;f >. f 



1 . • t 



. I 



:vr\.;^ 1t!. 



N ^^ 



. */ 




f.. 



— n 



♦.• * 



»1 




XI 



109 



AHCIENI JAPANESE NET ZUKE 



The netzuke (ne=root,tzuke=hang) is a button with the 
purpose to keep the inro or tobacco pouoh in the girdle 
and to oounterpoise it. The Japanese soulptor raised 
this practioal problem into the artistio sphere giving 
this buttom the form of an often very complioated and 
agitated oarving which nestled softly to the hand and 
gowi. 

In such a manner the netzuke belong to the Japanese 
Utensils and apoear in Kümnel's "Oatasiatisches 
ßerät", illustrated vdth sample s from my carefully 
seleoted oolleotion, which was assembled dithctly from 
old oolleotions in Japan of 1908, Hence the unusual 
high quality« 

Now only the describing oataloguelwith 183 numbers and 
172 photographs remains and one solitary piece which 
ie described belowj everything eise was stolen. 



77* 



Grasing Hör ae 
H.6 cm. I 2.6" 



Ivory oarving which adapte the figure of a grasing 
horse to its purpose by conventionalising it to a 
firm contur. On the back holes for pulling through 
a cord« 

Tokugawa period. Kighteenth Century. 

Lit .• Kümmel " Ostasiatisches Gerät" mit Einführung 

von Grosse. Bruno Cassirer, Berlin 1925. 
See frontispiece and page 126. 
Graf '•Japanisches Gespensterbuch" see page 12, b2. 

VYhihltlnn« 19*59 ''Netzuke uit de collectie Ginsberg" . , ,, ^. 
i^xhibitlon. ly^y Kimetzaal Tikotin,Nas3auplain,Den Haag (Ho 11 and) 



I .►. j v 



(, ».. 



4i 



»<T.V;S'- 'M! 




.*^' 



i:;:;i 



m 






:;5J 

• ••• 



•1*4 



' *•» 



::;5 






I # » 

!J: 
litt' 

1(1 •( 






1^ 






Iv*- 
i 'i' 




ß 




f *r^V ^ 






-I 






a. ^ 



: .t: 



«... • 



. i. : 




mnn'U^rrfmH. 



XIII 



111 



Ancient Japanese Color Prlnts 



In the obituary of Raymond Koechlin,the famous collector, 
Kümmel CO. Z. 1931, p. 205 ff) reports that Koechlin told him 
onoe of having been fetched in 1890 to the Ecole des Beaux 
Arte in ?ari8,where Bing had arranged an exioibition of 
Japanese oolor printB,ödding: " Oe fut le coup ae foudre.. 
de oe jour date ma vie du oollectionneur. " 
I mention t^iis^beoauBe this episode is inuch like mj own, 
only ten years later* 

It was about 1900 that Japanese color prints av/akened my 
deaire to collect art of the j'ar East. A few years l^ter I 
was if^lad to collect in Japan 326 prints, v/hich QQVe a (r;ood 
survey of thic art from the micuile of the seventeenth tili 
to the bet;inAing of the nineteenth Century, and pleuty of 
incitations besides, Every ^jhase of Japanese life is illus- 
trated in thses prints, Y/hereby beautiful women,actor8, 
famous landsccipes play an important part» Characteriatic 
the Japanese denomination: "ukioy<5" = passing world ptoturi, 

As the last peculiar creation of the artistic oolor print 
the surimono appears ia the eighteenth Century. 
It Combines a picture v/ith a poen, relative to it. It is 
ordered for special ocoasions,to be distributed among friends 
on xlew Year Day^on birthdays,^7edding8,as invitations eto. 
As the surimono ^^'^s print cd but in siaall edition and was of 
Miall Biae,the cost was not of such importance and thcrefore 
special care could be given to paper,colors and teclmical 
luxuries. »^hile the intended effect of the color print is 
normally reached with seven to ten oolor-plates,for the 
surimono tweuty to thirty are used,often applying gold, 
silver and blindpres^ure profusely. 

Only a few of my prints remained which a re described here. 
But from this part of cur coiiectiou there exist exceilent 

monuments of remembrance : a-,^^^ n +o 

l.The catalogue of the exhibition ^^usstellung Alter Osta- 
siatischer Kunst, ver^instaltet von der üicademie der Kdnste 
zu Berlin 1912 - where a selection from cur collection 
together with selections from the famous colletions 
Jaec-cel,Mosl^,Oeder,otrauss-.Nlegbaur represented the 

Suo^tafeln, ausgewählt, eingeleitet unab^ 
Julius Kurth.Joseph Altman Verlag,Berlin 1924 which 
glves still :iore eviaencc. ^^ovin^ fac- 

To this publication I gave P^^^^^^^Jjj/'J.tce^t^^^ 

similiea of prints out ^^ -[^^^f ^3^^^,^^^!^^ orLinal 
were reproduced in the orii^mai sizie,wiwii 




in 



1 






.-.^i-ST- 



110 



m 

'Hl 



• *•» 



'> 






r i, 









/ -l. , 



» .^ ,v 



«t 



CO 



1" ' ' 



,- >. 



. -:-:^i 



■ , ( 






.. I •* - ri 



. r -Tf 



:k 



r-; 



i 






* .1 



Vi 



': ' . ] 



III. 



ANGIENT JAPANESE PAINTINQ, 



^M.h^t!^^''^ Portrait, deecribed below,i3 the only palnting, 
v/hich by Chance was öaved. 

Loet iE "The goddesa Beriten (Saresvati) %o Buddhtitic cult 
palnting of Kamakura's fourteenth Century, in r«d and gold 
rornif^rly in the Hayashi collection,lopt '"^he '^e^ Harvest" 
by Jwaea ilatahei (1573-.1650) whcfs o^ur led to the laasters 
of the u]<ioye(pa8siag world picture). 

Lost our jold-grouiided byobus v;ith Kano Mitsonobu'g(l600 crj 
sno^caped pines,the ^diding doors of the chi^aidaiia wtth 
the curysantenum braAch,lo-t oor pair of apes by Kori Sosen 

(1747-1327) to meution bat some charatteristic sample s 

of our colleotion* 

78. Portrait of a "^3^rior . 

kakeinono 
120 X 55 cm.; 47.2 x 21.10" 

Soroll paintiii^ in color on f::oft,darkened-5rey paper» 
Üittirig on tne niatt in solenin^ujrinoved po£e,the oeremonial 
portr -dt of a Samurai -dth thin beard at lips,cheek aiid chin, 
offers a firm oontur. 

The bearded {^entleman has an jiriGtocxatic face. The cut of hi 
eye B, the swing of hin noöe-ridge|the snapc of nis sa* jnouth, 
given rith h few axro-ies, ciiaracterise ti-ie man v;ho vas iden- 
tified in Jrir)an,-^here I bour^ht this painting,Q8 M a 3 a - 
R h i 5 e k\i SU n k i . He feil, Ji^^nt lug fcr tiie emperor 
in the battle of liinato.^av/a l>36,9t a tiae,v;hen it was without 
pro3peotB to fih'ht for uhfe Jiiiae. xn Ijji the rule of the 
Mikaao had t^een rerotored,but for a öhort time only. The rebel- 
lion of Takauji a b h i k a g a ana the batüle of idnatogawa 
broutiht forth ag?iin the Shojiinate,at this tine of the Ashikaga 
family whioh becapie predoiuina .t. 

i The ^anurai i^ eouipned with the conioal bl3ok cap of his 
ran3c,-hite robe/oreast-^^r-nor and tash-s for the thights. , 
ün liis leit cide two crvoris,on his back the bi3 bow and 
arrows in the invisibl- quiver. The fan of co^iana rests 
clOBed in his ri^ht hHnd,oovered with the archer^s ^love . 

Ihe kökenono has been daiaa.red. Old repair. 

Aöhikaga period (1153-1565) 



3 



\m 




iit' 



Oj 



1 e 



A^....;..:!!ü ' .',H 'wwgBqBS!güRi- 



,**^rt)».Ju„.,.„,4.;iiit 



I t • ' • H 

[""1 



:::•! 



1 ' > ■ . - ■ ^- 



>J 



■^ 



I '] 



h:i 




,#«i 



79* 



112 



colors arid even the the old-a^e traces« There are 
€arly prints of Torii II Kiyoina3u(l679) in Iloso-e 
Urushl-e,Beni-e and with gold powder. There are 
ßoiac of Toshusai Sharaku's actors half-len£,^th 
Portrait s oif mika {.round (l794-)ias wellö^one of 
Li ehe sei Naj^ayoshi 's silver {jround prints, the 
ßirl,who tith snowDvered umbrelia leans oon a male 
servant in a red coat vhile heavy snow is fallias* 
Bat there are also the most famous printe out of 
KateUBhika Hokusai's (1760-1349) "Thirty six views of 
?u3i" Serie, the "Great v;ave of Kanagawa inlet" and 
"The Fuji of Jaifu Kwai sei". 



Rekisentai ^'Ari » Audience vdth the l^y rees. 
12ü X 57 oa. ; 47.4 x 14.9" 



1 



■Hi 



in the imperial p=.villon the eapress, vearing ^;^« ?f «„^i^g^^t, 

the metal-decorated >).lu3trade,two raaids of «itmg wi 

fans i^,^^«^^*^-^tL'''at'eativfl4y at the little procession 
They all are loo^.cxuo "^^ lly^Zllae wall.covered oy tiles 

aM bordered vdth co'üferous trees. ^ 

-„■i«n attft'ided bv two isaids of nonor, 
In front of the P^o^f s«^°^'^f ^„^3 °^ent black court ^own 
the prince 8^'ep8,at^ired in a ttansparent ^^ 

with the oeremouial ^f^^^^^^J^^^rcarries the katana(=lon6 
corte«e: A littel ^^^*f,^'^.^-^/^.taudaS oearer.courtiere. 
swordT.laiaies xn v.-aitiuc.. ^ .^^of ghoes.an obi of ^'Hocade, 
Partly they carry tjifts -; ^f.^^^^J^^^y the ox-drem palan^uin 
a big saria*at-box,partly the accomp . ^^^ p^i^nquin will 

with two toiß/f,:\^;iJ°es< wiUdescend to pay her respect 
be lifted aud the prince s.. ^/ii- 

to the empress. ^ ,3_i to^ether 

Serie of five P^^f/'/'^f^^J ^xaied. 

mounted on Japanese silk and ^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ 

j.pan about ^^^'^^^l^^'^^^lo^XoeT^ new typ of womaA 
aristooratic Hosoda Usln.^^o ^^^^^^^_^^^ 

beauty with ex ^^Y^^«^- kno\m. ^ , 

Very few prints of nim «« .^^°/^ . ^^^^ j^^,,,,,^ color prints' 
Kxhibition: 1939 Haarlem u^oUand) 



1 i 



I 



b><; 




:> 



n 



!►' i 



^^-, 



S *r 4 -' ^ ■ U/i. 



-i.»r^ 



113 



80. 



Ku))o Shumman : Chine ae PoeVess . 
16 X 19.5 cm. ; 6.5 x 7.9" 



The artist copied for this surimono an old Chine s« 

album-leaf painting ol" great deliGacy,giving even the 

daraatjed ^dges. 

The pocWess is sittiag in the garden beside an old trunk 

out of Wiiich fresh twigs wtth oherry blossom fiower. Her 

beautiful faceiabsorbed in thoughts.rests on her hand 

holdln^ the brushj her arm leans on the ston« table where 

the ixik stoue is ready to eaabla her,to .^ive vicible 

e--i)ret;sion of her verses on the petal in her left hand, 

A poeia,relating the result of her thoaiihts,in the right corner. 

Signa ture. 



81, 



Kubo ^;ha.-"jian:The Tea-House Jirl . 
9 X 22 021. } 3.9 X 3 " 



Thlß surimono repre genta a tea-house girl who in 
Her uplifted hand carries a red laok stand ",itn a silver 
Cover ed bowl. The black obi showe in ^old the pattern of 

coniferous twi^s. 

Two poems fill the back ground . Signatare. 

iLobo ühumaan, 1785-135 6, i£ oonsidered w the clasaical 
maeter of the surLnono. 



32. 



•.»t.n«tkP. ilQVu. ai:lV o Jiadjes^n the_i.a. raen l-erraoe . 
27,5 X 13,5 C31. ; 10.13 x 5.6 " 



> ^^< o-rin. ono Bliding-wallE with peper filling, 
On thib B u r i n. n o J;^^"; - ^. terrace on the aide, 

«irr i^ S'-^^t^tr'ilv;' cÄ furnisJ the back ground. 
*hile byobus with oilvei oi-oaub ^ + q^ which are 

A^alnst them a table «J^^' ^^^^^^i^^JfLoc'de.a red laoquer 

a pack of booka ^a.^ped in ^reen-goia ^ j^'j.gather. 

box ana a white -^orcelam vase >^ith a P««^^.^^ ^,,^,, dies 

In the fore^rounu two i-'^^/^'^^J^paper sheets and to fold 

in tl;eir coi^*^^«'^f,,f fL«°iittirs«ip. or palanquin.perhaps 

snali things which loo^ liKe ^Y^ ^ japqneBe -All Soul Da^j, 

the "boatB of the f^l"'"4Jt.th 'onth!?o float dov^ the river. 

th« fifteeth aa;, ot the *''*-"" ^^^^e 

On the left aide the poem. bi^nature. 



*i! 



? ! 



»*» • 1 



Itf^' 



#^ #v 5 * r ,r t. 



...^ 






' i 



'♦•»tr 
■» 1 1 1 » 

• II V«J 



I '"l 



1 1 • * 



E 









1 »i 



.1 



i 



i 
^ 



'■" I 



''T*'??^', 



M 



■t' 



,ie 



f- 



r 






umt £lo 



.• n 



>■' 



.1 



pii 



114 



83* 



Uoya Hokkei!?u.1iYa:aa . 

18 X 20 om. ; 7 X 8" 



This surimono ^^ives a color dream around this 
famous mountain, The Fuji-jana rises out of the mist in 
blind pressure and silver. In blu« tints a chain of mountains 
"before himmln the fore^^roond a small mountain meadow 
in soft green with ooriiferous trees in bronzc color. 
Clouds in gold terninate the color- symphony of v;hich I 
havc mentioned oniy aome eiaineut tintst 
Poem in the right oorner» 
Si^natxire- //ith red seal characters. 

Katucika Ilokusai (1750 -1349) and Uoya HokkeK 1730-185 4) 
are Icnovmi to excell in sariiuonos. 






II 



<*s 



. . . » - 



. J» 



* , > 



y 



V 



rTurzrn 



u.-^^'*!*»»^ 









'n 






ü 



(*c 'I-l-'- ^ _ i 



f- -. *':. 1 




•'•'■•it«4«Art al«! * I Z 



H 



115 
0* I x^ D I A 



Borne aotes about Buddha and his representation. 

n?S.Srf a?^DÄt^^^^'^^'^^ Contents of the buddhiati 
iioeraxure are partially of symbolio significanEe. 

The S 1 d d h a r t 







mo?.'n r ^J^^® Of b a k y a from Kapilavaeta in the Hi~ 
mala/a territory of sepal. .ccording to the legend he resigned 

b^KXAMüNI a herinit of the bakya race or G- A U T A M A, 
the asoetio,who lived in tae ßolitude until he -ron the vcnow- 
ledge of truth for the reaemption of earthly suurferlns.growing 
to B U D D U A = the ENLIi^H^LNi^D. 
He died about 477 B.C. (acaoraing to Max Mueller), 

In the first cejttury after his death he aiid his doctrine are 
reyreaented by symbola only,above all by the wheel (eansorit: 
a k r a )• i3uddhism was, aß long as the doctrine remained 
pure,a philo so phy not a religion, 

327 B.C. Alexander fne 'Grreat jtnvaded India; he laarched over the 
Kabul pase into i^'orth V/est India; after hib death 323 B.C. his 
einpire ia divided aiao:ig iüs ä^'i^^^ls (^iadoones). 
In 2bt> B.C. the ^joveruor of 3aGtria,Diodotos,nakes iiimself in- 
dependent, The araeoo-Bachtrian kingdom origin'^tes,extendlng 
its r\ilc to xMorth West India, including the landscape a a n - 
d h a r a ,then inhabitated by ladian races^now Ai^^hanistan. 
v/hen Budahism entere Uandhara in the tinie of Diodotos,the 
doctrine laeets with a Hellenietic ouiture,a hybria,coaposed 

S^lSSJltJf aifif SMil?rJI.>.r.ts to t.e Bud.Mstlo »orld 



e- 



3 C 



n t a t i o n 



BuIdMstic^iSc^rlne'with tHe'sun hero Hello « J^P^o 1 1 o. 



chan.-tes to a religion.the tirst oue of 



world-wide importance. 



'♦I 



as 
y be 
of arranging a knot 

out of a mi sunder- 



of hair on tiie cro".^ of *-^«^f ^J^/^Jg i^to a protuberauce. 



uii^i^*'' 



II* 'f 
<■*♦ 



• •«« 

• < 






hüll 




.:;:3 



••• 



♦ 



■i 






• JjJ?:» 



^ A 



V 



*\ * 









x... 



.-..- t'.M • * ' "^i^- ' - " -^ ^^• '■ '"-'•' 


' ^ »^ >. r.. ^ 


- J .. 




i. vvu. , V iriO • VC i..-^^/.. 


.^i. »'5 : .^ '. 




« 






..._.•. :■••■. .-. J '.i - V . • ' .-j' 


<• . / . .'. 




4* .y- 


• 




:• . ^ i t ^ .,. > :.. .:J4.X b, - 


t 


• \ 


' ' ,,( :: ^^ ViOus.^ :: l: •. ;: 


'^TIm'- 




« " • ■ - i'./ A <'-«.■ ^ • • 


■ ' : *"* / 


• 

• 


•.'- ' . . 


. . . b:^'^^ 


- i. '" ^ 


, ; J .1 V i O' 


\:yr j. 


• t 


V. i ,, .^''J . : l^itJr.i . » C 1 ' 


. f ^1 :^ 




>•.•' :. t ..t^.'■^ '.\, ' , ■:l.» . m ..i-' l^^ ^ , 


/ 
' i 


f- , . 'i.^ 1 ''J J ■' ,^' ^ , >'^. ' ■-• 


.. '■ i: . ^1- "^ rt ;. .^ f •, ^ •■' .. 






1 ■.«»,., ,. 




' "^ V r>l ;r •.. -^ 


:• ^-i :. a. • . ::.j 


i ^5» i i 


<» A *« •' i: 


V 1 \ 


i 


1 • - • ' -« : , 


l' r> 1 .f - 


* 


^. '-'''' .. ^ ^-.l }'^r ic 


■^ tut- '^' 


» . 1 • 


^ : ^ \''' .'■ . { '.n j . ! 


. * •. ji. V ^ 


»^ . 


• m 
• < 


' r ■ ■ 




V M 


- 


• 


•. ^ . .. . " ' - >i:..i. r,v rr»; 


i7i-0 .•>-- 


•^a 


. - I ^ 0" - -^^ 


'• ii ■ 



il I 



Tit 



*( 



> S 



<. • »»• » ' 



■:? 



>*»^! 






U6 



onangea to a hora-like point,rieing upwards like a 
elabor^t! ^ffll ^'^^'^f^ l^ter becomes aore and more 

5. r**-'-® *^^® "^^^'3 ^)etween the eyebrows, a third eve. 
which "Bhiain^ lik. silver or anow^ e^x^bU luadta t7 * 
illumiaate the Jniveree. 

The ^^Elongsted Ear Lobes'' »pulled dov/n by the vA^ht of 
the royal Ornaments, rhich Siddharta later took cff,beoome 
an attribute or bea^uty es v/ell as a symbol of Buddha »s 
world-wide listening syinpathy, 

These body features,forined already in Oandhara,renalned 
prinoipally unohan^ed throu^-h the whole buadhistio world, 
whlle the transformation of the helieni^tic typ to the 
Indian physiocnony triBuee by degrees, xt diriers greatly 
iu the difiererit radiations of Buadiusm to oouth and Farther 
India,to Indonesia and the j?'ar üIr st (China, Japan), lo the 
i'ar 2äet the re:rreseutation of i^uddha comes partly direot 
froni Inaia,partly frow Central .'\sia(Turkestan), 
Helatively "oesw the s tyle of »fandhara iß upheld in Japan; 
the treatnent of dra.jery,the i^nrow of the pleato is almost 
Oreoian; the robe ie so set as to ghov; the contour of the 
body,foldj followinc- the linee of the limbes in a natural 
and* iinconatrained vvay. This iö attributed to the inported 
statues fron -vorea einoe the sixth Century A^D. ,executed 
there by artiats v/ho caifie fron Central ^isia. ^ 

In the beginning China foliov;ed tue Granahara influenae too, 
■ßut in the oourae of time developed succesfully a style of 
her ov/n. The lanaisti^; fi^jures only preserve tJ^e Indian type , 
Coming from Nepal aoro3s Tibet. 

Likewise moict of the g 
BodhisatvaSfthe " u u d 
to be found in v}aMhara. 
haiids 3'iows the gyrnbolio 
of a soene from Buddha 's 
or they embody a oertai i 
''':)hariiiacakra madra"* 



\f Buddha a.id the 



e s t u r e s o:^ 
ras'* (iixaraly 8ejl),are already 
.10 st strongly the attitude of the 
■neanin(ä. They al'vays -:ive a hint 
legend-life,of a oertain aotion; 
State, a reli'^ious oonoept^on; 
.ture of tiurnin^^ the wheel o" dootrine. 
The nanas are icepx lu ixont of th-: brest so that tlie fin^er 
tips oontactjthe palm of the ri-ht han^ is tur.ied out^vard, 
the palm of 1 1« left hand inward. 



r« o.' 



jMJ^icg« LHljJJlBU.-Llll — 



«■ 



t * t 



tri<l^! 






, I 



• I 



«' 



(/ 



r 






.^ 



t. i\^ 



-. f -f 



} 






"ii 



(i 



*«r r 



•.■> . 



:■> . 



> •♦ -r 



* • 



> . -' - 



, »^ » 



i 






1' 






J 


. L 


♦ k •« *^ » ' / ^ . 


-\* 


u 


« 


w i. : i 






- >V • , -7- ' 


(• 


> .•'. 


# '•■ 


■«Ä' 






J 










•_, .* 












( . 


.'('. ' "'-.t 


t 




i>^ 






. <. M. 


^'• 


1 


» ■•• -^ :. •- . ^*r 


■' ' 


K 






^ 4 » ^._ 




* 


9 

... / 


•i 


r 


* • 



V V 



i. 



■; • f i 



• j 



e j. i 









f'J V- 



• > 



« f^-^s 



: O^ 



t 



'ii 



« • • ♦ • - * t' 



( j 



)■■* 






o 



: üi 



117 



" BhÜmispara müdra "^ : the geeture of touchiag tlic earth 

or calling the earth as witneas (in the dispute with Mara» 

the demon of evil). The hand,palia on\vard,hangs down, 

•• Vera rnftdra '* : the ge sture 01 blesaing.The hmd palm outward,'*«^''^^^- 

^ Abhaya müdra *' : tne geature of consoiing,of feariesneas. 

The hand is lifted in teaohing. 

•• Dyana mMra *• : the ^esture ox' rneaitaiiion. Both handa lie , 

on aaoh other in his lap. \'^ 



BODHISATVA(a Knowledge e8oe'itiality)arc beinss,iiiature to 
beooiie Buddha, The )rit;inal type is 3 young man royally 
attired,decxed v/ith braoeletB,necxlets,bre3t-chains,develo- 
pcd fron the legend of the historic Buddha,. 7ho came,a8 we 
learn,from a princely house. 

^ccordiilg to tKc ine.ii^otion of the northprn ßu^idhist eyery 
•• MÄllU;>IBÜi)ljHA " i.e.a Buddha in hur^an ahape nas a inyetic^ 
inage. This ina^^e is to be f ound in an ^^^^^^^f y/^^^fj^?^^^ 
t^rraces which coriesi.ona with the iour ^r&üeß ol refleotion 

Of e'^ation out of the ^^^-^-^^ ^^^^^'^'l^^^ 
buacina has his Dyanibudiha (?ischel-Luders : bein verlclar- 

^«4-^«n-no-i cifs^ o -oduced by e:aanatlon, 

spirltuai so-M^-^'^'-^^y^ ):^ >. ---> > v^vIpp- dep-r^es rcsult: 

Fron this ^^^,^^>^^^t^ !j;' t,i^Jha ol iSeaGura^)le spleador. 
Dyaiübociiisatva: .valo.-citcsvara er .au^apanl. 

ManueibiMdha : ^^""^^r^'^f^':!:,^^-^ still 3odhisatva,will 
In the futiire a^e i.Ax^i^.r,iA,ax pr.oe.iu 

becoue i.lanusibuddha. 



ar 



1925 



Lit, : 



..iam,Leoiili«rd "f f ;;^^^l^gf Lf iu^hlsmus' ..eip.ig 1900 
Jrünwfedel,.Mbert r^J^i^^tio art in Inaia". Translated, 
Gr;inwc-dei, Albert " -^^^^'!\^:^°/eniaräed by .-.cßargess, 



u» ' 



revisvd 
London 1901 



* 



l jL 



.f • 



.' f 



M«! 



-«»' 






i!t 



l»-?-«^. 



"tnjtttflli 



.aassjastsa^ 



I,,»- 



I 





i 



i ' 



, V-- c_ 



i 



'•Ou.-.r > 









ll 



< 






"'% 



• 1<>i>: '^ • 



; t/ " 







. iiC 






I 



■I 



Ci -i.i5 



^00 



K . Hztil 






f * r-a » ^ 



Wir- 



i 






J 



i 




f>ii 



N 



118 



84 



2Ji^^i^ii-Ji£34^rom_Hadda. 
8 cm.; 5.2" 



I'p^^ l'rj^^ort°KX?-3^^..J,^^: t.e sun.,.. n e 1 i o 
Prototype for the Buddha JS^?'''!''^ "^^ '^««'^ ^s a 

certaia tracec of transiti^n +^+2:^4^^ ^"^ ^P^*« ^^ 



s • 




Stucco. 



Kadda, ?oarth Century A.D. 

Ju^^f^^^f^^^^!^^. ^^^:*^^ ^f ^alabad in Afghanistan 



the froQtier of the North-^est irovin 



n 



ear 




^^^ f. V^nisha,the protuberance of Ms sxrull.explai- 

ned^e tne bump of inteiU^ence,waE .reserved fere as " 
a relic in a richly decorated and carefully ^uarded vihSra. 

The head was purchased fro:n the YoelkerkiLUe i^useoa. Berlin, 
übt-iliins der Uiati^.hen SamLilu^i^enCilrnst TalascI^at). 



Ut. 



Bachhof er "Zur Plastik von Hadda^ 0. Z.n.Ii^. 7. Jahg. I93I 

Cohn, /illiam in Tne Crif^ntal .rt, Vol.I,io.l 1943 

".AlthoU(3h the gmall sculpturos fro^ Hadda have 

,:\ much in Coronen with Jandhnra and pernulated 
v.dth weatcrn cl3:Ti£nts,the^- form a^class of 
their o^7n,diEtin niished by fresiineGc of invcntion 
and artistic spirit, iilany of them ar.tioipate 
Ina miraculous wav the whole lat^,r develooment 
of Western .^rt.'* 

Jodard "J*:xposition des r-eoentes d^couvertes et des 

r^cents tr:;vaux aroh-^olosiii^ec en .Afghanistan. 

Hus^e ruin:et,l'324 
Haokin ''Les Pouill^s d<» la d^lö^ation archeologique 
ä Hadda". ^evue des Arts .nsiatiques. V,2. 



«H. 



} f 



• Mit 






:;:;! 



...... 



t f 






•. 



n 



i 



I 



I ; 



. )•:. 4 



»i-- 



• V i :^. 



n ! 




. , , . . 



f^ 



Oi.; . 






»f 



I 



V - . ' 






r i t 






- f 



.ir • 



fc. 



hl 



.:; 



u 



öt). 



119 

11 cn, j 4,5" 



S:tiuct?y°flinäjr^*^^ '' dlB.olved; the features are 

+?!h+r^^i"'' V'- h^ c'^ansed to füll resigning lips, 
tlghtly elosed. The eyes loo c doA-nwards.the for- if 
the eyeball protudes ander the eyelid. 'fhe ears 
ienghtened aocording to the oanon, 

The hair,8urrounded by a bandli>e line,is tracnforaed 
in a Cluster of locke, conoeiling tne protuberaiice of 
the SKull topped by the "rasai" (flame) In the sißple 
form of a cone, 

Br n z e with tsreen patiaation. 

K h m e r i^rt,Ca:aodia (3o th East Parther India) 
IX - XIII Century A.Li. 



Conraentary. 

The people of the iüimer replaced the people at the 

lower idenam and l<iekang.in the ninth Century A.D. 

I\n empire orijiaated which included the ^jouth part 

of the present oiam. i'he i'Ümer e::ibraced Iiidian calture, 

in the middie of the tenth Century foonded the oapital 

Angkor Thom and,aear ^,in t::c eleventh Century 

the tenple ofAngkorVat. 

Long fi^htß vlth the people of Tai,wno,c:i!aiiö from the 

south of Cfiina,presi-ed laore and mor*j to the oouth; 

The empire of r^hmer v/ill at l^^ot succumb to them, oecome 

a part of the kingdom of 3iam,the ^^ianieGe people a 

"croes-breed of Tai and Khmcr" (nei.^e xelderj. 



-.■ ^■■^ 



n 



\ 



'Mi* 



'*4 

M't't 



:::•! 



¥\ 






K- 







V, J , x 



r»w 



» V 



•« •. i ' 






fr 



y y 






i. ' 









ii 



-' ', i 



.> z 






• 4 •.y 



120 



86« 



Buddha Head ymm sjj^, 
la.cm. ; 7.2" 



Pull face nlth a long pointed nose. The «yes look 
do'vnwarrls. The curvatures of the eyeballs protru'e 
diBtinctly unaer the eyelids. The eyebrows join the 
forehead wxthout hardn-es as a li-htly elevated roll 
«eneath the füll lips a round! sh chin. The ears of 
atereoty ,e length. 

i^ach carly hill of the olaster of lock;s,-"hiQh reach 
, f ar down the forehead,is of big scale. The ras'ai, 
, the ilsjae , ri sing out of the top of the usnisha,the 
protuberaxice of skull, is disjointed. 

Bronze with green patination. 



3 



i a m , art of the Ayathai empire(13^;0-1750 A.D.) 



Indian art fiows fron East I/idia to the :''arthcr India 

into the preseut Horth Siam^habitated sinoe times of 

cid by the oeople of Tai-cnan. 

First Lüiited by the ki^i^^cio^l of bukothai-Savankolok, 

it iß — accordiri^ to Voretsch — reaerved to the ^^'orth 

to create the **riatioiial ülaraese art''. 

Kowever,xhe present '.Uanieße peopic 7;ill ori^'iaate only 

after tne Khmftx öuccunoed to the Tai and, uaitiag, create 

this hybrid race. 



Lit. : E.A. Voretsch 
Üetaüiatisohc 



M 



ber .iltbuddhistische Kunst in Siam'^ 
eitschrift 1916-13. V,l und VI,1 



baijWUllBüL'ffff 



•****«».<* iM-it^htLI£n^.* 



^mm 



»■tS«i»fftU. 



121 






f 



4 ^ 



. i 



.0 



rr 



a:^ U- 



*^f 

t 






.t. V J^- 



" t 




r o X 



CT 



;♦. I.- 



i ■ 






." ? 



V4 









87. 



N at Deva from Burma. 
59 cm.; Ib. 3" 




rlght 

aide. 4. 4. i 

Vestnient and jewelry siiow th« court attire 
of the thirteenth Century, cuatomary for diviae aa weil 
demoatc bein^ö to vhich the Mat Ucva belong. 

On the forehcad the urna The eyebrows in a lightly 
elevated roll over loa^ dra-ra eyet: whioh look domv-ards 
unde half closed lids; at«t,;iht noee aoove tirea ixps. 
The hair is coapletely covered by a JIM of -'^«^f * 
'vhich Imitate 3 in a baroque way -iuddha ^ clubter oi 
locks with the to.ping rasmi. .^ested to this helmet 
i° a head-baad with lonß wiage-like Ornaments which 
surrou^a the ears.frame the face aad Jf f^^^^JJ J^,,^. 
smalier winß-lixe Ornaments fixed tn to the Shoulders. 

The Upper part of the body is coverea by 3-Ptuous 
jewelry only: P'^J^f ^^^^^"^^^^.^S^d neXarms a..d ankles - 
ri^Lraif llthir.eir"L "r.own whioh encloees tha 
fbdonä'tLSly is covered with preoioua stou .. 
The fidure .robabiy -l^'V^ed to . c.roup..a.^^^ ^^ ^^ 
the icnees and sr-all d<..aa^c o^-t.-.^ 

altar aud the rape done by .oroe. ^^^^hend 

Bronze ,ilaed. oartly darkeaed,at tne back freshend 

7'. r . a .NW .arther India. ITth - IBth ce.tury. 
.orn^^rly in the colletion of '.alter Heynel.'uaich. 

v^v^ 41 Ge^e'nte r.'.useum, aen IlagueC Holland) 
Bxhibitxon: 1.3c3-U ^^-^^ ..u.-io sen Ku.st des 

.,t.:.cher.a..n".enxen^-^-,j|^3gs". 

'•^'eisÜf al/^ '^«- Buddhismus 
...y -Hat Jeva sind -«^^^f ij'-.'^andelte aestalten 

Bis -^^r Oder .inaer ^^^.^^^^,,^, i^^^^^, 



U 



als w( 



• »•••tu k« 



■«*"*?wmin»m, 



;;; 












k 



v 






O "5 •* <.! 







J.i 



/ i . i t 



ri 



:!'>. 






tf f 



--*-^' 



0\'^ 



i. 



-.1^ 



:„>• I «, ',. 



i 



;i '' •- 






i? il 



r "^ 



1 1 " ' ' f ' ■ • 



•) 



122 



Id. 2 cra. ;7.1** 



thrioe bent; attitude on a iotus p^deptal. 

Arourxd hips and ti.:h*8 the long shava-like uppergarnent 
i / !^ ^^ thi- manner of a scarf in which the sacred 
cord lyajnopavita),runriin^ from the left Shoulder, 
ucatleö wnile the euds in -jleats hang deeply down in 
front and at thr aide. 

The features are pure fllndu. l'he lo g hair is dressed 
nißh, oounaEot to,:ether to a crowning knot in Hcllenistic 
manaer. In front of the knot a band holds a diadeiii,richly 
adorned and with Anithaba .-^ucdha^P's spiritual father,in 
the Center. n>avy enr-penciants in the elon::?^ted ear-iobi, 
a necklacejarn claps aad braceiets co:apiete the adorniaent, 

It iE to be assumed that the left haad ori;,inally held 
a lo'i,^--stem:.ied Iotus; the rij^ht hand in '*vara mMra", 
the o^Gture of bleesing, 

The baüksiae \vith heck. 



Bronze with green and blue patination shov;s rest 
of formier {^ilding which accratuated the veiv fine work. 

North India , llth - 12th Century. 

Kxhibitioas: 1933-41 uemeente ilueeum, den ITaag( Holland) 

1946 I'Iuseun van i^ziatisohe Kuiißt,i\riStcrdam 

Coirjnentary. 

Pi^DMAPAlU may be absooiated ae well to Avaloicitesvara 
(=rhe who looks fron a\iove) as to Vajrapani( cp.no. 29) 
This .-^odhisatva repreeents the most inportBnt figure 

in the Pantheon of ':ibet. .^ :, ^^u „ 

Th' l^orthern Church,the Lamaisin, has n^te all Buddhas 
and Jodhisatvas to ;ods,who are to be aaorated, xt is 
from hiri especiaily that jeople inplore help i-^ all . 

nceds. To hin they dircct the :Knov.7i evocation ("iiantras" ) : 

"om -ini kdma Kum,Lo!^« = The Jewel in the i.otus...ol 
The 3odhisatva Padnapaiii nas alv'ays proauced new represen- 
tations Hia four-armed fotn i.. always incarnated m the 
headol the laLi Stic cHBrch,in tl.e rulin,, Daiai Lana. 

T-j-f. TÄrtn Qrri Adam "Bu dha otatuen 1925 
'"• AlS^rf'rSdel •'..yt hole sie ^es BuddMonus in Tioet 

und der .onjolei" lyuu 
A'bert Grllnwedel(J.Barces)"Buddhi3t Art in ludia" 1901 



g^^ 






ü 



l. 



\ 



: % 



f-7>t 



'/■ 



/*?f 



/ 



w 



123 



89. 



f.: 



.1 







. . A 1 



.%rV\ 



i 



Dftkini »a-ro 



Th* Pii ^ bodv vdth small firm breaets 
Lamaißtio goddcss. The sli- ^^^^ ^'''^.^^ ^^ >rirdlc,ann 

^J^:^^^^^ SuU.!5.rU. Kai. «win^s 

Killed denons ^^^ °f.ft rai^es" drinkiag cup.cut from 

Oval pedestal wx.h lotus o aocordiug to th« 

B r n 2 e. The ^^^/^i^lt^.k. probable that 
the lidiire onderwent a great ix 
H <, p a 1 , sixteeatli oeatury. 



JuU. 



II 



.. 1 ,-i^ des Huddhisnus in l'ibet 

^uMier -antra 'Ottheit Mxa^ - ^. ^^^ ^^^ 
?iaf berdi'» er^i^l "'^ir.eif.rin oder vieU«icf 
« "^^ •'•Srr4rrdex^v:5;avar..dist, sie xst 

SchutzgoetUn der ,otiz,üass dxe_epa ^^gitea. 

latere.saat ist a ^^^,^^^^,^ .attia 
für aic liUvaruj. 



// 



I 



► »'H • 



■^1 






tL^ 



; tl'T 



t m-t* ^ *••.»■* 






■■•',!5-'l*''i'**^'*** 



124 



90, 



Buddhist Priest 's Bell. 



iUlC cm* ; 5 5/<3 



;l 



m ■ 



li t 



'» -. 




1. 






Ä ^. - "t c. 



t- 



1 n Q « 



1^ ./iM'i" 



«»' 



r.'U 



1 



•li* ' «.'f V 



Th^ hpaidle of the ciroular bell is in the shape of a 
vSira (thunderbolt) ,the reii.:ioas sceptcr u3C5d by tho 
Buddhi.^t priest to Gymbolize the irristib.^ f'^^^uf 
pray^r,n^ditr,tio'i and incaatgtion. varnauated is the 
handle by -a Naäa,a kind og v/^ter-dra-on. . 
Where the handle and the body of the Vll Dom two 
bands of delioate foliai^e deoi^i adorn tne round* 
ClappeT inside. 



Bronze 



smooth sreen ^vith inorustations. 
.lilendra period,late ei^hth to early ninth Century, 



ThI Ln^as ^ouaa near tne sx^^^^^ l^"] " 

v/hich was erectea in the .ailenara er<i ki 




The 



M 



«^ 



■ ♦». 
...» 

l-.i 

M 






1^ 



II * 



. rrKJtWWt* 



/ 



•)•■ 



■ ' t 

■ < * 



.vi 



( 



• • • 




j : 



*•(.. i . - ^ * 



. ^ ' - . V' J « 



4^ 



1 . 



D. 



125 



IE AR EAST 



91. 



XV. AHaiMit BROHZK.CKRitMIO.IVORY CAHVINS , 



Wattr BovtI. 



Biam. 30 cra. } 12" 
H* 26 ora. ; 10" 



The big tronae vesisel is of spherioal fora,the Wide opeaing 
«noircled by a aaali protruding rim wiiich broadens into 

two opposite handle 3, v^o»-^ 

The bo'iy and rim are filled with en-raved and enbossed 
ciecorationa.Ihe mi. die part of the reeurved Sites 13 

filled '7-ith arcedea in which are depxoted le.'.ends or 
ie^iern ÄsLin the raan.ier of early mi.iatures. Above 
and be^ovJ.oetween interlaoed patteran,run x r i e z e s 

rXSt V^pr,iSr.a'lr:ra%h°o?h,r Ij round „edaUlon= 

wlth sittlnä angels or a"il»l?; fi„,„r3,ea=h handle 

ir^ Jusl;:d°rrr; L; "S.dalUon'wiih°H,.r;. chax=ct«= 

:f äiLfqu, firou,>d ».tSer-n fl,htine anl=al,. 

with green pa^ination. 

Scljuk XIII Century. (?) 



B 

A 



r o n 3 e 
s i a i^ i 



n T 



Comaeiitary. 
Seither the Oriental Seninary,B-rlinU^^^^ ^^^ ,3^ 

the J-'if ,;^;«^.J^f ^iiy w«e able to translate the .lebraw 
^SSp? ofs^nro^nS^-opean lan.ua,e ^^^^^3. 

Th?y «Cr^e.that the i'^"^f,i::^t ^h.t the bovrl is at least 
Sterated into H«'°'«« ^^^i^'^^^^aoly manufacturea in Asia 
five hundred year. cid and pr 

Corpakso. .ith a snallcr but '^^^^ i^n paxt 

Il.iiew forK,i.lay ^^»^''^^L^,,.-. the baiae kind of ^'Q-™",^"- 
Hebrew charaotora md ^ 

sr.5."»"~>'"" ■■""■ " 




'.::.i 



m 








mtätm 



l\ 




• X? 



, i'^ll 









i.» ?. 



r> 










' t 



<^ , « 



l - ' 



126 



92. 



Earthen---a re Plate. 

'"'''*"■ '" — ~-— — 'I Uli • laMSH«» 

3)i.32 cm.; 12. 5" 



Brown wäre v/ith yelloish- white glaze vvidely craokeled. 
i)ecoration in the so-calle4 MohaüTedan undcr- 
glaze b 1 u e : In the centre a hare, carnations and 
leaves; around the riia inscriptioa in Persian letters. 

The blue colür,the so-calied MohaSedan 31ue,wa8 much 
valued and iinportecl by the Ghinese iDotters in the 
IlBüan-T8|period (1426-55) and in the reigns of Gh«ng T% 
and Ohia Ohing in the sixteenth Century. 

? e r 8 i a i i:}ixtecnth Century, 

Exhibition: 1953/41 :>emeente Museum, den Haag (Holland) 



■•*)»**- 



93. 



j'ayence Tile 
19.5 X 19.5 cm. 



^ ^ 



tf 



The tile has the fora of an octagonal star and is filled 

^i?h "arabesque-.aacordias to ■'^^^'''l'//^rlnilllil ■ 

- ekirid of ornamentation consMiu^ of a ^antastic ^^._ 

Sterlaciag pattern of ^^o^f ^^^^^^^Ü °^ ^"^'*' 

often with fiöures of -aan or aniaals. 

„^ n n 1 i ht relief f i uratie decoration 
öa the white '^^o'^-^^^^^^^^^^J^g*« and clossoms in the 
surrounded by ornameutal ^.jljj^^rev.yellov; etc. 
email colors oi ^f <=J|^i'''^!!;e' Va r y or Maris 
Strc'S'i'lT; la t': foufce syinoolL aniaals: 

s! nis a co..ectio. with ^.e oriental oeo of ^^^^ 
l Tnil M I l K S .who ^^^^rle^Uon a.d deii- 

through a pane of oia^s 
P e r 3 i a /.ieventeenth Century. 



(raiie) 



i 



I 





fW». 






•■«Ml 



^•!^ 



•H» 






r:s! 






trimmtm?»- 



ttttmm**"^"'"^ 



-■- i<>-«<«il 



i 



^'> ^ 



lo 




t -*• - 



J _t 



u 1 5 1 



• 1 






il I 




:i 



' J ■ ly 



;»r»j ^• 


t 


T •• >M ■ 








7^ *^*^ 


n^j 



'\ 



M 




127 



94. 



Ivory Handle , 
H.12,3 om;4.15*' 



Fiat relief carviag diviciee the curved surfaoe of the 
dagger-handle throefold. Great figurabVe- 
dccoration fill the miaale )art,enolosed above and 
below by ornamental borders. Lon^ use has softly ground 
off the surface so that from the human faoes the out- 
^lines only remain reco^nisable. 

The side which I oonslder as the front view shov?s a 
king in medieval, formal attire with crown standing 
ander a canopy. ; . ,t^, 

Arabian iascriptions on the borders above and below 
the king run : 

NASHUM NUN ALLAHI = HKLP BY OOD 
WA FAT HUi^ KARIBUNI = And Viotory Near. 
The figure as well as the Arabian letters are raised 
from a baokgound of foliage. 

I surmise that the other side presents the same person 
in informal attire to^ether with his wife or mistress. 
The king's ri^ht arm ie foudly put around the neok of 
the lady and we would probably believe seeing a oo^^Pl« 
of the Prench Gothic world if it wcre not for the lady 
trouj3cr8,showing ander the long garment,ivhich direct 
our thoa^^hts to the Near Is-ist. ^.n.^ 

This side without inscription.The borders are filled 
only with a kind of cloud orn-im-nt* 

Thia handle is all which remained from ^ dag^er I boucht 
were stolen. ^ 



s 



A r m e n i a 



fifteenth Century* 



,, . •ctü.d bv Prof Mittwooh,Berlin,that the 
It has ^"^^f ^3"^^^L!^^ ^nd executed 

ivory carving is oi iJi^^^^-^'^ 

for Aiiraenia. 



I 



^•^l 







ritmntMiomit 






•yU^ 



ininMffuu 



tTtTPft"*^*"******* * 



iiit»*»*rT»'» 




m 

«4 f * 

iiü 

■■ *.» 

■Ktt 

»Kl 

"«■ 
■ <•» 

■«■••. 

\m 



IM 

■ ■♦• 



u 



n 




bnh"' 



•r 



r.> 






fjO„ 






,^4 1%^ * -< i : 



r»-; 



• i 



A k' 



^ \\ 



f > 



}. 

> 






I .. .4 



r :o 






t 



r. 



XV: 



*l . . . 






4.W J. 



|ii 



128 



XVI 



ANCIKIIT OHIENTAL RUGS. 



a n c 1 e n t all 



Pollowing the European uoe I call 

rugs ori,^inating before 1800. 

Perhaps it would be best to call a n t i q u e only 

those rugs where the ooonection of production and 

drav/ing be longa undouÄtly to the sixteenth and eeventeenth 

oe.itury. 

But the habit in U.S.A.is different. liere the trade oalls 

"antique" every rüg 'vhich is at least one hunared years 

old. 

Rugs orombly ori>-inated "/ith shepherd tribes in the dim 

dawn of civlLization, The magnificerit rugs macle by Baby- 

loai'jns.Assyrians 3nd Egyptians have loag siace disappeared. 

Howcver the fragsent of a rug.woven in Kgypt about 40ö A,ü. 

nov? in the lietropolitan Museum, :iew York, and surely one 

of the oldect pieoea in exi^:tence,p^oveE that this rüg 

-;as wovea by methods still in use by ^oäexa cxaitnen, 

Li^cewiae old syrabols live on: The warp as the i>^;;"^*a^J;« 

fo^ces 0^ the worl;',the weft as the transient af^^air «^ 

ma^ "elievin^ that colors exert influe.ces on the numan 

?f^; P^ih color has Ita om 8i*nificanoe: Thus means 

Yellow the earth 'hich is con.Lred ^^ ^^«/'^«f iJ^^^re ' 
-hItP the nietal.wniondoairiates the wood and Red, the fire, 
Chioh'ie Stroms it. Vhile Blaok synboli.es -ater.whxcn 
ov rcoiTiee t^ie fire« 

There are two orinoipal techniques for mal<»j rugs : 
Tapestry ^eaving and Ij'^f ^^--^f '.^^ ^^^ave: The weft 'is ' 
The oUest «ethod xs ^^f^^^^^,^'ot the pattern 
„oven bj.k and ^«^*^^^^jJf ;ay the whole faoric beoo:aes 
in various ^^'^^^^'l'^l^ll lo aic.callei in the Near 
Jas^" ^fLir-rpoeeibly'Serfved x4o. the landscape , 

äJäiraf^-ilin-^^ !^tilf ?ofaf in%reTaufars!oril^ed 
the teohnique used btill toaay i ^^ ^,^^^ ^^^^^^ 

n^^lAAKir (cp.below ^0-99). ^^J^ Jorming tne pattern. 
is sevm 30lidly ««JJf^^^JiJ'^a iilim. Hut perhaps one 
The ef -ect is somethiag U^e a ^^.^^oidery. 

could better say i. is "°^^ ^ ^^^ ,,,^ ,, 

The knotted rüg on -inated f rom ^^ ^^^^^^3 

afrength.ning the floorcover .orms^P^^^ 



■M 
k 



• i\ » 




ia#' 



.•i.*mi»immi 






•<♦! 



129 



These kaotted rugs will find the greatest circulation« 
The fineriess of the weave is estimated by the number of 



;n} 

i ■ « «t 

■ 'V 

» •*< 
• • «[« 

Mit 
tili 
' • Ml 

;;} 

<•!• 

•UM 

) ••• 

1 

•M« 

« * 4 

.. n 









;» i 



<* 



% .-1 f 



r:ij -• 



c -^ 



» 



«•; 



^r 



> 1 









'iii:r 2r- 



• i 



vK 



f-. 



<•) 



/ '. 



-* •_ ^ 



:) i o 



X ^v' ^ , 



'? 
>-.. 



: r^ 



^ f^. 






K' 



;^t" J -r;. ;tr j .. '•>'" 



^ .: 









* 



•• • 



t *^ 



1 ^. 



^^ 



.;-/''i-^ 



.?\'.7C 



4 












.•-•■.v 



^ ^''tÄ^' 



&* : 



/ » 



{^; i 



>* -t 



n ?! 



«t 



I I 




knots to tn . Square incn. -"or metanoe xne lanu 
Ardabil car:.)et in the Voctoria and Aloert • ueeua _. 
London aumbers 52,500,000 knote on 61.5 q:n. 

By the sixteenth Century the z e n i t h of the art 
of rug-weaving will bu reached in Per a 1 a in the 
reign of the Safavid Dyaasty ( 1502-1736 ) , e special iy 
during the reign of Shah Abbas (1537-162^). 
The ('eometric design with kafio charaaters of the , 
14th and l^th centviry disapi-earsi Arabesque s.this Kina 
of ornaaentation co .süting of a fantaatic interlacing 
pattern of flo^er.foliace or fruit, often with ±iö»ires 
of men and animals (WüDester),floral sorolls.variouB 
Chinese raotivs amoug then dracons ana waaoering oloj^ 
barvda orevail. I knew that the cloud band is of uhineoe 
S?fiiA- ho'veve; the stnte.ent of the ^^f JJf|,^f,/'"^- 
+ nH'.p'opn lejüiohkunde page 39 that it oriüi-'^ally 
nrpie itB t^ie "holiy sponge", calied tschi and syabolizi-^g 
?^S!?itrin^/ch ne W^^ 

Srrfon::ntfonäi;rdrthreutL?sU.»ent of the arabeaquea 
leads to ^eoxetrio fiüiires. ^ 

f ornlöi^Sdlr-s on of ^^^^^"^^ .ovea in the 
are very ^\- l^^'^l'^ ^.J^^,. them are the " p r a y e r 
villa^es. Best cnov/n •^;'<'*2t'v vPlated in design but woven 
r u 6 8 ". 'i'lxey are «^^^f y ^^,f,Jf g West 'uiatolia 

at bifferent c.uters m ^^ ./^ XcJS>l^ ^^ -«di^« 
at .dela8,.ihiordCB,..-uia , xn ^ast .^na .^^ 

They wBue oven very probaoly :^%^^ ^^ m 1455) . 

(Constanti^opU.-'as ««^^^^f ^.,^ tenoe '.vhich can bedated, 

but to.lay few pieces «^^^J-^.^'JeJtury.in coasequeuce of 

,arlier t en th%«^^;!f/^'^f ufe? Srtia in his "Ilistory 

beine articles of ^^"^ ^f 1300» shows in figure 540 
of ctrpets orien alj ^^ore^lBO^^ of tKe aohaaeaan 



a 



• carpcts orienTiaj. ;'^t ^h« .i-^te 1110 of t'.e aonaaea 
Ladik p.ayer ru^ «ith the date^lll ,^^^^^ 



calendar. '^^^ ^ ^X^^^^^^^^^'\^^T^ 
He-ira(?liü^t o^ *''® ^ VTi:» norrerponds to 1753 ^*^* 
r^f rf^ne^Ohristian^era Uiujorr ^P^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ 

and I do not un. ersx .- 

1699- .,,,s" ow f eir ori,-in to 1^'^«/^^*,°^/Sy the 

-LlJSf tS ^:??orUily nve^ Pray^^ 

^°'«^ ^a'tJ -^thef a?tortS death of Mahaaet( 569-632 
fith'principal/°g- , „^,,,ed resoul Allaht" ^ 

"^Lre'f/-i aoJiut .>od 1 ^aho.et is . P 



J 



■ i<^«*«<4** 



lililü 



HMMIMIII 



130 



> I- 



r 



#- 



f' Li 



Vi. ^J 



H' 



u 

* 



r ^ 






'j 



«4«^ 



.i . 

I 



1- '•>4 






- f -* 



3 '^-^ 



-r .^ 



^ i.. 



V *..♦ *. . . lt.- 






,. -i,^ ' 



Jl 



r! 






■* - 



».» 



c; •- ^ 



r »^ 












r f 



-^n f * 



^ -' - • ,* 



• • 



I>urinß the prayer the eyes have to be turned to the "Kebla" 
or^oint of thf heaven in the dixection of Mecca,indicated 
internally in ever^y mosque by a niche " AI Mehrab " , ex- 
ternally bv the positiona of the rainarets (from Arabian 
ipanarat = ilghthouse). Therefore every prayer rüg has a 
de -ir-n "/hioh preaents this niche. Ähile in use for P^^y^^S 
the p.able-end of the niche hast to point in this presoribed 

direotion» ^ , +4m-o 

Th« believer steps on +he broad end. He repea-fes aeveral times 
laudatary ejacvaations* "God is grsat.aod is Poweriul! 5od 
ia all por/erfui! " Hov;i.ag to the angels (ninictering spirita) 
to the ri."ht gnd left,he props on his arnis and finaliy 
touches thfc earth (i.e. the ru^;) ".Ith his head. 

The Caucasian rugs are not tc be "^^^^^«^.Vf^Sd^^^eoLSio^^'* 
BrilUant in colors, strohig contraots, sii^plif ied ^eo^etrlo 

fUs acoording to acieace.bascd on bixa. and^.^ 
"^foi^-r'oL'rslitrs^firs'^oSltS^riouo .t^ Between 

They look likc ^^^^^^^^^'^ SntSes of sinUe parts of 
the desi^n* 

The Tur^osa^ ^^^^^^^^l^l ^S^S^'T^^ red. 
^Jiaall eometrxc patterna appear Ol constantly.these 

,,in.e all ^^^* f^^^^f ^^a^fof the furnishing. Although 
SSdMy :Svcn'thf ^eafand tear is eepecially hard. 

Kxecept^he .ur.onan rugs,.here the trad^ 
has not uhanged ^adicailj ovtr a j;^^^ pattorn cro^s 
oroducts 3how the ««f .^f^J"-;.?!; tt i..at,BO that tne deeper 
stiff f3;id beüomea ^if^^^^^^-^^^^^^L: nas ^'oeu lost as well 
Safing of -f y/,^,nrtr?hraiy;er of the tine being. 
to the carpet weaver aa to u ,,. ^. 





1 



t';| 



ii:; 



i:i| 






^:i 



vi 






^F«*4»««44Aa^4 



■ r**r^ 




\ \ 



j'ljll 



• * 



^ 1 



'. M < A 



r 
I. 



11 

m 



. i 






? ; 



. j^v 



41, - 



1- »l 



.. ' SM 






• X 



^• 






r N 



i ■ •«' I 



.. 1 



\ ^ 









i8 u 



•* 



-")'^-, 






1. «*■ \i 



t. 



M 



■» . * 






. '. 7. '>' 



r»4s 



% 



o 



^:l 



\:"-( 



•"* 



« «' 



ifrifl 



4 



1^ 



)>• 



it ■ 



^i, LO 



»^V 






■%! 












:j • 'i 



>ft.''' i 



*> 






i 



i .- 



». f 



•. TT 



w .» . > 



.,.-♦♦> 






f *4 -f ! ?r c» 



Vi 4-- ' 






.1 •: ; I 



i .. 



/» 



M 




.l.UULi..iU.:Mr- .-»4«»^.... 11. 



131 



f f 



It is sad to learn that the second v/orld war has destroyed 
Bome of the f inest collectioas of early rugs in exißtence: 
The oollection of t e "Kaiser Friedrich ^iuseuia" in Berlin, 
most cleverly brou^ht together by Wilhelm Bode searching 
old Spanieh and italian churches at a time wiien the general 
interest ^"as still lacking,oiiared in the safe-deposits of 
the ncw •'Reichebank" it Berlin. The colleotion in Hunioh , 
mostly from the posse^sion of the former reigning family 
v/ittelßbach,was wantonly destroyed by the Nazis before 
ttm surrender to the allies» 

i^ll the nore v/e have to be thaiikful that antio rugs er 
every kina have found their way to the I^'ew World and to 
BBfety. New York ^iletropolitan Atz Museum' ö oollection of 
orieatal ruga dives an extraordinary ooportimity to ^et , .^ , 
an idea of those nasterworks of " o o u r t r u g s , 
even of the füll fres^uiess of their ^^^^^^^Tl^^^^^ 
T n^^f^d onlv mention the "emDeror's carpet" from oaöJie 
LhoenbÄ near ?ienna,the^'animal carpet" irom the shrine 
o? ?haik^fi at Ardabil and one of the last acquiratxon, 
tiie " Anhalt carpet "• 4. „.Ar^^^ «nrt px^laias also 

it8 pe.'fect conditio-!. It 'vas ^robably Hiade d^^ring ^^^_ 

reign of Shah '^^«Sric^shars al^' 'ibrls betv^een 1524 and 
factury of ^J« Jf ?f ^^g-^^'^Stoooesession of the sultan 
1|?55. ?ron Persia ^^ ^I^I^I^'I^'a the Turkish arniy,perhap8 
in Conetautinopel aad «coompanied the ^^33 to,be used 

the bultan ni:r.seif ,to the o^e^e o. ^^^^ driven 

ia ^reat affairs of sx^te JJ^y-^f ^Je -Xurkish booty to 
back.the carpet ««me.ae a part 01 ^^ .^^^^ ^^ 

the duke of -^^^^^l?' f ^Itl ilis rediBOOvered by Chance 



London' s ex-ilt'J-i'-i-O'i 't ,^^.^ „o or,+^f• tu.te 
}5ut likewi e the 
prayer ru 



s. 



impler kind of ^!,^iJ\f ff 'American mseuniB 
g s, are represented ^^^^^«^-Jf ^hem used 
utity and ^ariety. I Baw m^ y 

io ^nU'-v en'old 'A^ncrican ^^^^l^. ^Kemto the^mblio 
cities took n.ins to °oll«°\"^J.^ir.e^he rieh Anierican 
ii the uost i'r-Pree^ive ;^«> 'ent^^ brou^ht the.e pieces 
iJrcliants of ^^^f/^g'^^f'^r their' ■eautiful homes.^^nostly 
Ji^ln'iLr.?yle"vScrare%tili no. re.reeeatative for 

their^'homly charm. 



\ ^ 



Uli 



i:. 



> » 



■1 '"'lüBfi^tä 



.mmmt 



• ' mn;:; 



. c. 



K 









* ^ U 



!l5; 

m 

in 

ii; 






1' ii 



1,1 



i I 



I I 



^V 



. i. V -!, 






i. j 






a 



5* ' 



• > 



A. > 






Jb*.-"-« i- i • < T J^r 






^ •*- 



«^ » 



;^ ' ** ^ in M» »^l h. 



-. i' 



-* «^ 



1 i-t:. 



' I 






!%-^ ( 



t k ^. 



*» -T /T 



«'» 




immnriuriiiii 



lUlIÜl!"'- 



132 



The modeiit c^^rpctsfof daiiy use of the eiishteenth Century 
I am going to epeak about below,have still preserved at 
least one quality in oonunon with the classic iiasterworks: 
The harnonic effect of their colors. In spite of irianifold 
coloriag and vivid contrasts,they are alv;ay restful to the 
aenses,attribute alv/ays and esseatially to the harmony of 
the roora they adorn« 

Time and the fading colors do not effect their beauty, since 
the predordnant colors, red,yello?/tblue fade 
least aad the traditionel, öejiaible, tastful use of the 
organically dyed material renains. 

\nth the use of the anilin colors, inrented in 1359, this 
harmonizing of colors xill becin to fall. 

In the following I have classified the rugs into four 

grOUpS : _ M r^iz r^ 

1, ^^urkish-.Anatolian f 9b-97 

2. Gaucasiaii v 9B-99 

3. Persian ' f, 100 

4, Turkoinan(noTaades) -n 101-102 



Li+.- ^lartia.J^.H. " A ilistorj of Oriental Carpets before 1800" 

V . nr-l^ti •'■^andouoh der orientalischen Teopic- 

,.. Institute if ^^^3^^^^^r^^^^^y 
Bulletin of t.e ^^^^^^^1^"^^^^^ ^^^^''^ 



.11 




I* *1 

• * •] 






;« 



VI 



• vWWft? 



^i4mtttf«^*Mi.4aKi*^v,4i4*^«^^ 



tmtr?t»Hmr«"fiif:smj2*Hw«>» f- 



m 
m 

PI 
[«Ml 



4». 



In 






$i 



<fl^a> it> 



^.1^ 



I* •• • 






r, 






X* - ..^JH^i^ 




■ fei 



.* 




Ii:i!. ;.I;M; 



' • < 1 . » . r . irr 



95* 



133 

Prayer Hug (I4el3sj 
125 X 94 cm, ; 49.3 x 37 " 



The ffround of the prayer-uiche 1b red, A mosque lamp 

in yellow harie^s down into the aiche# ^^, 

The columns whicn support the gable-end/ the gable-field 

itseljf/'blae and yellow, 

öiaall enolosuLj on creamy^broad bord'3r8 on brown s^o^^d 

with floral forins in different oolors, 

Uuch worn and torn, 

Aeia 'lnor,Turkey-Anatolia,Mela8, Ki^hteenth oentory. 



96. 



Prayer Ru^ (Ladik) 
200 X 111:) ca.; 7ö.l2 x 45" 



i)istinct division in three parte: The principal,the niche 
in the middle,dark rieh red, the foot-part on white, the 
gable-p^iirt on greeu ^-round. ^ . . ^. v. -, ^ 

Below a kind of gable-staire a ^u» to remind tne believers 
of the v/ashings ordered by the Kor.mitiny lie,ht-liK:e 

poiats on both sides. ^ ^ .. ^. ^,^«« 

On the wnite ^rouna below three bat t lerne ut-li:<e fieiures 
and five tulips on lonn st*ces,on the green ground 
above two^ö^s and floral formB,anong them two pal:aettes. 

S ?hf bordirrnor;! P,«ern3 to^ethcr .1« the oloud-ban. 

motive. 

In ^ood repair. 

A8ia .dnor,Tur ey-.aatelia.Ladik. -.igheeath Century. ^^ 

•■.4. o^+in "A historv of orieiital carpets before 1809" 

^'fu!559.^adK about 1700 in the mosque .la-al-din 

^eu'eStu;r ^ Orendi -landbuch der orient.Teppichkunde" 
colored plate III ^nd 111.59. 







I' *| 



4 ■ •■ 

* * *m 






• »••I 






rt;; 



lä«4«U,iHI 



HHMMMt ' ''' ''li mi ii i iiiiiiii iir'' ^i......::;.!:u;;.::. . . , . 



if^iiitit 



W\ 








.v?<i 



»•> •• 



' o:; i i 






97. 



134 



Prayer H tt|g (iCula) 



Color haraony of blae and yellow^disbandtuc of the 
borders in 3tripes,are characteristic for this Icind 
of carjet. But also the yeliow t r e e - ornament 
in the the deep blue ^rourid of the prayer-niche, 
reoreseuting the "Tree of Life" v/hioh iirom in the 
midat of the Garden of Eden,eating of v/hich gives 
eternal life» 

Blue is the color of mournia^j in the Near Käst; 
thie kind of rüg serves as a funeral oarpet,f iröX 

and firully it is used by the re.atives to prayo" 
near the tomostoae. 

Aßia t'lnor,?urkey-Anatolia,i:ula. Zi.hteenth ceatury. 



Neuöebaucr 



Ä Orendi "llandbuch der oreintalischen 
Teppichkunae" cclor plate V ana 111. bi 



t'.:i 



X r'.t^d-L> 'jlx 






r 



\ 



\- » ' 1 



.bi 



. •■ i 



• ':.*■ '■ 



:, 'j 



\"i 



••••I 



... I 



!l 



I 









4«M|U <MMm **.*^ 



i liiUfcm I I faiftiuXi^ia— ^^^fca 



.iiiiiiiamm 



i_LMi±i4fcS-i *± ti 



'■ ■ "«« 



i* 



!ln 






i'i»" 



Vi 



Ü) 








b 



»!!: 



155 



98; 



310 X 13b ou. ; 122.5 x 53.2" 



The back^round of the prlxioipal mi die part ie red, 
ol^the borders yellow,white und i;.roYTi. CJeometric 
iio,.ives m ./ello\\' aad white with brom aad a fe\7 
lijht blue ßhape the ornaaentation. 

bouth Caucaßue ciietrict af Sohirwan. Bi>5hteenth oentory 

Neujebauer : Orendi "i^andbuch der orientalischen 

Teppichkunde" ill.37 (p.l48) 



99. 



Oa ucasian Ku/-^> (^Sumakh) 
270 X 220 ou. ; 106.10 x 36.14" 



This carpet ib woven in the tapestry iuaniier I mentioned 
in the introauction (p.l28). 

The principal colorc are red, blue in two &nades,yellow 
aiid A^rcen. The ornaineiitatioii is ^^eoiaetric. 

The raiodle field ^Tound is red,but two polygons in 
deep blue ^ive predo:.iinarit efrect and divide it 
into t^"0 enual parts. '/ith great ingenuity a nulti- 
plicity of "st'irs and polyi^ons in di.f^^erent shape, 
Bize a^id coloring are dispersed over the '.vhole surface 

Thr.e boraers er.close the rüg. The niddle on yellow "' 
ground vdth patternc vhich looks like the side strokee 
of the Latin H united by the i^atin cross,separated 
from each orher by a de sign which reserables the :<oiaan 
fascee. Jn both sniall sides a border is added with 
hooks rumaing on. 

Oaucaaus.aistrict of Sclürwan. T:ighteeAth Century. 
AccorHinc to the "üaudbuch der orient'al.x'Gppic:ikuride" 
P.72 the desi.Mation " •3umakh " ia aarived from the 
Hebraic nomination of the capitnl of the Gauoasiaa 
provirice ichirwan. 

The no.98 and 99 rmre bought at Tiflia in 1909. 



ri 






t:] 



üi 



!•,;■ 
i;.! 

iri 



w^ 






m 

m 



! » ■' I 



l'lffi 



\, <^^'"^ f'^i^i^ 



^ '^ ^ 









:.<iikr ^«mr, ;'^ 



^Ldai>. 






;js. -.„*.; 



^.\-."'.,V."'tJLr: 



» »i> 



s«,. 








■:^j 



im, 







m 




•G^ 



/\ 







.'■ -■' 



' IV i l^: 




iim iiiiM ii i li iii H t yi i ltl i mumtiiii ii l i Lt«.,;^....,.....^^ ..Li.iu.^.u.ui 



^i$*M»*»»j<. 



^ ■>-*^* **f"t fit iftl •■■■■! *•■■■■■*■■ 1 1» 




100. 



156 

Perslan Ru^; (Karada/^h) 
375 X 165 om. J147.14 x 64.15" 



The backgounu of the long rojtangular mi-lale field is 
dark blue,of the twosmall bordera yeilow aid of the 
broad border between them red. All are filled ••vith flo-ral 
Ornaments in reci.blue auü yellow. 

North Persia.provinüe Haerbeidschan.lJistrict Karadagh. 

i'-.igriteynth Century. 

Heugebauer and Orendi" iaadbuoh der orientqli sehen Teppich- 



Kunue 



ili. ill and 112 



101 and 102 



Vwft VftVrRturkonan P.up.s 

155 X -^7 cm.; bl.l x ^4.4" 
151 X d5 cm. 5 53. i X 53. B" 

T-1— e -u.-s are in the trade nostly called " iHikharas ". 
T^rJo^l^^has a Bllky lustre. On the ^-^1^%^'^^^' 
«5-111 -eon-tric patterns in deep dark-blue and yeliow, 
oalled'^by the ■x^eic.ceturl.oman tribes "flyinä eagles". 

rpHn Tpi'VGtu-co-ins nrc 'vanuerins tribes (nonades) in 
S^tr^r^siä in '^u-kectan between the Gaspian Sea and 
Pnihnri 'Tho-' are lent dwellers and these rugs integral 
^rif 0^ Th^ir urnishin,; th^^ 

?^rtrfcer'oi"ext'reSlli; h^rfwear and tear are vieib.e. 
The date of eeaving ia very difficult to ^^^^^^^^ 
trauitioael u.ttern does not ^"^J^^.^ the ru^s 

,eu.ebauer aud Orendi" Handbuch der orient..e.pioh.unde" 



Oettin,jen 



2,5ÜÜ - 3i500 knots on 10 j cic.-. 



.^PIMn^mpii 



ii,Vit 



'1 



€ 






5.'! 
v.i 



y.'i 



V.'.\ 

Hl: 

itt • 

» ■ ■ 



t' i 



mm •' — • ■ 



^rfvWw ■ •'•## ■ 



f 



'•™ 



u 



■ 

I 



üsS 



':i 



»yt»» 







^n- - ^ 



;5Uü«MMtiMÜwiiiiii'i!i« 



^i iti1MnimLt^....^...:i„..:i' "■■'n iimmmu 



««.■■■ ' ■■ i ' : i ' i 'Mu tiMaatKtiiiiMm 



..:::::::::!:•:• ::::'iii^.ii': ;^^■l:. HM!., t^UlMMMMJ«^. ;,.::: 






It" 



137 



xvn 



E. 



P A C I ? I 



ANCIKNT HKW 7.y .AT.AgT^ 



!;:| 



103* 



C eremonial J^x g. 
i*33 cia. ; 13" 



implenie.it in the aricestral ritual. 

It has t.iö for^i of stroke-weapon; on the ströme side 

the v;hale boae is flattened to a siiarx) edge. 

ine grip io placed weil iDalanced between a dra-on's 

head at tne end of the handle and the inonster wliich 

aeeras to crcep ^loii^ the uppcr rim* 

3oth fi,-ureG are decorated in the typical M a o r i 

fashdon v/ith deeply out orasmentsjthe eyes inlaid 

with iaot:T.er-of-pearl. 

iielow th nead a hole as if for laiitening to the 

Sirdle* 



New Zealand (Australia) before 1642. 

Ma^ori art oefore V.urooean era i«e •before the discovery 
by T^diöEian in 1642» 






Lit«: üahier d'^rt . 1929 2/3 (.waiis/iivril) i?'ig«14 



ii^ 






r,:- 
n 



öuüä::':" - • • -^ 



> I »t ' f * t*l I 



r 







«.; : ; i:u, :;l;i:;::„.. ' ■ '?.tt«H....:. :..,:;:.'::: •, , ,ii , > M uytt iittiiit>ii it ii i M^i:>.:^^..,...; . 



Itl trtlJMtüfM 



1i'r'Mifit*>fctt*«<l*IM»i>*»^t 



— ( 



•^ 4 . 






P. 



138 



E G Y P T 



104 



Cat and Kittens . 
H. 9 cm.; 8.3" 



Frontal s^oup of nother-cat and two kittens, 
Simplified contour in typical Egyptian manner witiiout 
oraitting characteristic traits of the animal. 

. ..^_ ... ..1 Oblation to the cat-headed goddess 

^ t 3 t e t , orotectress of love afiairs and of the 

art of the teilet, v;ho se temple has been at B u b a s t i s 

Va eaatern Delta of the llile where thxs image has 

been found. 

Bronze with dark green patina on green marble sockle. 



_. _ y -v.J. 



S g y p t , nOO - 

^, kx^^a-j- , -^^r.+inn nf the Roval Lluseum, Berlin 

Acquirefi/froSi t .ection or ^ne ^"^ „ director 

No:2600 väth Tninistrial permission.Uetter oi aire 

Schäfer of mar oh 11,1922) 



i 




I 



l'.:J 






ß:: 






iii;;««-:'* 



Aa \o?2 



e\i.\l.^Q'^ fAM\L.y coLLCcT^ou 



Vb- ' ft^co^uj o^ Cur rol(<?c'ha/i 



^"^5 



A 



/ 



;^ 1 028 

g:,|W+ Wily (^M 



^71^ 



4] 7^ iRö^^'-^ ^^ ^^ 



ijüWuhQY^ 



y\345 



k0 



HMRBEHT CrlNGB^ItG: Rr^iAIMS OF A COLLRCTION 



P R E P A C F, 




fp 



The one hundred and throe objects described ia this cataio^oie 
are the remains of a collection which numbered eight hundred 
and thirty-six pieces in 1923 and was bullt up in nearly fifty 
years, 

When in July I938 upon a summons from the Gestapo we decided to leave 
oex\feouBB In. äBerlin, wBtwere granted permanent iesidence irilHolland and 
the collection was accepted as loan in the Gemeente Kuseum, Den Haag. 

HTt^v the German , Invasion of Holland in I94O we had to give up cur home 
in Den Haag and move further to the interior, to Zeist, where about two 
years later we decided to go "Underground". After liberation in 1945 
we found out that the Germans had also plundered the museums. Thanks 
to the tireless search of Dutch friends amd the assistance of the 
Dutch Kunstsichtingskammer the pieces here catalogued were found on 
an attic in a Nazi residence at the bordertown of Velp - the 
private booty reserved by an individual with some taste for the Far East* 

Most of the objects of the collection, i.e. its foundation, had been 
brought home from trips to the Par and Near East in I907/8, with 
additions through the years by purchases from experts like Edgar 
Worch, Joerg Truebner, Prof. Kümmel, as well as from collections, to 
mention only Dr. A. Breuer and the Counts Meida and Otani of Japan. 
Thus it was possible to build a small but adequate survey of some 
branches of Far Eastem art in which I had become interested already 
at the end of the last Century. 

The hospitable house of the Japanese consul in Berlin, Gustav Jacot^, 
with his famous collection of Japanese art - later the pride of the 
"Ostasiatische Kunstabteilun^ der Berliner Museen" - was a natural 
Center where it was possible to become acquainted with, to see, and 
to feel the essence of the Par Festem Art, as well as to meet 
scholars, artists, connoisseurs, and collectors. - Here I laid the 
foundation to my knowled^e v/hich enabled me to collect genuine works 
of art on my travels and thus I entered a circle which provided 
constant Stimulation, a^nd pleasure. 

I became a member of the Expert Commission of the Department of Eastem 

Art of .the State Museum, Berlin (1924-1958) and a co-founder as well as 

a member of the boafd of directors of the "Gesellschaft fuer Ostasiatische 

Kunst (GOK/ Berlin (1926-1938). WWII put an end to it all ~ as well as to 

my collection. Kevertheless, with the help of the wonderful New York 
Public Library I have tried in this catalogue to give some meaning to 
its remains. 

However, some of our lost works of art will be remembered through 
publications and catalogues of exhibitions in which they have been shown: 



f 



< 



1912 "Ausstellung alter ostasiatischer Kunst" 
Akademie der Kuenste, Berlin . 

1929 "Ausstellung" Chinesischer Kunst" veranstaltet von der 
Gesellschaft fuer Ostasiatische Kungs (g.ü.K.) und 
der Preussischen Akademie der Kuenste, Berlin. 

1954 "Sechs Jahrhunderte Toepferkunst " 
Akademie der Kuenste, Berlin. 

1935 'International Exhibition of Chinese Art" 
Royal Academy of Arts, London 

1935 "Ausstellung der Kunst des alten Japans" 
Kunstgewerbe Museum, Basel 

1939 Netsuke uit de collectie G." 
Kunstzaal Tikotin, Den Haag 

1940 "Bruikleen G, van Oost-Aziatische Kunst" 
Gemeente Museum, Ben Haag 

1946 "Bruikleen Herbert Gineberg, Zeist" 

Museum van Asiatische Kunst, Amsterdam 

1950 "The Art of Greater India" 

Los Angeles County Museum, Los Angeles, Cal. 



i 



Forest Hills, L.I., N.Y. 
1951 



•^1 



• 



ttmmmmmmimimiimmi 




C o nj 



Ot. C-%^yOtr 



JL^ 



^<A,h^ 



JU- 



\/ V^t^^C^-i/v^ .^^L^ (>-*u3 



Vt/. 



r 



,v^ 



^-^-o 



to >Cf'./2t^ 



tö >^r^4*, ^Z 



->-^ 



^o 



:A- 



^-'*->- 



-V, 



^< 



* U^-r>-w«, *^ y 



^.^:2l 



•^ ti^- 



-<^ 




\/ cr—yc^ 



-u-^ ^S^A-»' 



^4? . ^>C 




-4,- 



■/- 



-^^ i^ _y-2. 






» 



1^ 



I 



vasüß^^ 







ri 



sei 
•5:1 



ci 



<! 






{ 



THt. RJEMAINS OF OUR COLLECTION 



Herbert Ginsöerg Gilbert 



i ■. 



» 



■ ii i lil lW WI lI pWIllfPIfffffWWII 



lanmi IM I kitfMtmmitatmwti 



\ 



I 



m 



I 


Ancient 


II 


Ancient 


III 


Ancient 


IV 


Ancient 


V 


Ancient 


VI 


Ancient 


VII 


Ancient 



CONTENTS 

A. CHINA 

Chinese Bronzes 
no8.1-25 

Chinese Sculptures 
no 3. 26-34 
Chinese Carvings 
nos. 35-36 
Chinese Ceramics 
nos. 37-51 
Chinese Paintings 

no, 52 

Chinese Lacquer 

no« 53 

Chinese Rugs 
no3,54-57 



1 

12-47 

48 
51-63 

G4-66 

67 
72-87 

38 

89 
90 
91-93 



i 






B. JAPAN 

VIII Japanese Sword-Gear Masters 

nos. 58-67 

IX Ancient Japanese Pottery 

nos. 68-75 

X Ancient Japanese Lacquer 

no. 76 

XI Ancient Japanese Netzuke 

no. 77 

XII Ancient Japanese Painting 

no,78 

XIII Ancient Japanese Color Prints 

nos. 79-83 



94 
96-99 

100 
105-108 

109-110 

111 

112 

113-116 



••tl 



C. INDIA 



XIV Ancient Indian Art 

nos. 84-90 



117 
120-126 



' 1 



D. NEAR EAST 

XV Ancient Bronze, Ceramic, Ivory 

nos. 91-94 

XVI Ancient Oriental Rugs 

nos. 95-102 



127-129 

130 
135-138 



I 



S. PACIFIC 



XVII Ancient New Zealand 

no.l03 



139 



1 



»^^^^^^■ mM4 * . i -g 'Jtt»: 



»*«»Y*-*yf-- T^-i' *■* 



■ iiiiliiiii iiri ri 



^'! 



. ' ' » 



. * 



. . j 



.. .. ^ ' r^ ^ 



I 



i 






.' 



11 = 



F R £ F A C E . 

The one hundred p.nd three objeots dcscribtd in this 

catalogue are only rcmnants of a collection '»'[•'ic^. 

numbered eight hundred and thrity-six pieces in 1923 

and was built up in nearly fifty years. 

In 1942. during the German occuptition of the Nether lands, 

our pro^erty was stolen by the notorious "SS" and only 

a few pieoes could be regained. 

Whlle the men fled the Canadian Shells, thes« piecas 

remained bohind in the «ttic of the house where the 

"SS" had had thoir last quarters. 

Most of the objects of our collection had been brought 

home from travels to the Par and Noar Last. However. 

there were additions. We bought from ^f ^Jj^Jf "'/,,ii 
such as Edgar Worch, Jörg Trübner, ^^^^ •^"""%^' " "^J^ 
as from reknown coUections, to mention only the counts 

Maida and Otaai, and Dr. A.Breuer. 

In this way we succeeded in building up a small but 
idequate survey of some branches of F?-r Lastern Art 
in Jhich I had become interestod already ^t the end 
of the last Century. The hospitable house of the 
?Lane9e consul Gustav Jacoby with his famous collection 
o?'5apanes Tt, later the pride of the "Ostasxatisohe 
Kun Stabteilung der Berliner Museen", furnished the 
IZulTllJZl whero it was po.sible to J-/- ^J^ ^^^^ 
with to See and to feel the essence of the Par Elstern 
Irt.'as well as to meet scholaxs, artists, connoisseurs, 

rere^S'irir"; foundation to ^ ^^l^^^^ ^^l^'' 
Tel e 1 i:ri::e:n"''a:d its Keeper. Otto Kümmel and 

'"''T ^;s^^rtSrii:u':f%r::n°Airanf ;d:i:oi 

;rthr::l:er:urinTd?:n and Par Eastern Art at Oxford. 

?- ' -U^:Lu:r1%::a:rf memb:r^"ire'-xpert 
C^:::- rsi^n'^f " ElsLrn Arfs Department at the täte 
Museum. Berlin" ^924-1938) and a -found r as wel^^^^^^^^^ 
a member of the board of the ^irectors oi 
für Ostasiatische Kunst", Berlin ( 1926-1938 J. 



% 



M« 



n 




I 



.i.Hutttm 



■UM^kMMHWMt 



•• I 



» 



s> 



i l 



I 



I 



II 



H 



As a result of World War II the Bstasiatische Kunst- 
abtöilung dor Berliner Museen as well as the Gesellschaft 
für ostasiatische Kunst cjeased to exist. But our 
"building'» too is destroyed, sincc the greater part of 
our colloction has disappeared. Chinese and Japanese 
paintings, as well as the lacquers, have almost completely 
vanished. Our Japanese No masks , netzuke and color 
prints seem lost for ever, 

Using the wonderful opportunity which New York's 
libraries offered me, I have nevertheless triöd in 
this catalogue to give some meaning to the remains. 

Tho memorr of some of our lost works of art is 
proserved in some publications and in some oatalogues 
of those exhibitions where parts of our collection 
have beön shown. 
I mention; 

»»Ausstellung alter ostasiatischer Kunst", 
Berlin, Akademie der Künste 
»'Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst" veranstaltet 
von der Gesellschaft für ostasiatische Kunst 
und der Preussischen Akademie der Künste. Berlin 
"Sechs Jahrtausende Töpferkunst", Akademie der 

Künste, Berlin 
"International Exhibition of Chinese Art , 
Royal Acadeny of Arts, London (England; 

^^Ausstellung der Kunst ^^\^}1^''^^''^^IIa 

Kunstgewerbe Museum, Basel (Switzerland) 
-Netzuke uit de coUectie G.", Kunstzaal 

Tikotin, Den Haag (Holland) ^^ 

'»Bruikleon G van Oost-Aziatische Kunst , 

Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland) 
"Bruikleen Herbert Ginsberg, Zeist , ..^^.\ 

Museum van Aziatische Kunst, Amsterdam (Holland) 
•»The Art of Greater India" , ...^^^. x 

Los Angeles County Museum (California;. 



Forest Hills, L.I. N.Y. 

1951 



1912 
1929 

1934 

1935 

1935 

1939 

1940 

1946 

1950 



i'A 



Hl 



I 



I 



'i ' 






-'••^''liiiHii 



mitmmtmimmmmmim 






\ . 



u 



, »' 



..l 



MI 
I 



A. CH I N A 

I. Al^CIEM CHIMi^Si^ BRONZr.^ 

Some njtes on early Chinese bronzes. 
a, Vessels - Utensils 

• 

The ancient Chinese ceremonial bronze vessels, recovered 
from tombs or unearthed when building roads, attain the 
highest artistic perfection and belcng to the works of 
craft which secored world value to Chinese Art; they are 
unique in the art history of the world, 

They are monumental in the very sense of the word, (Webster; 
*'of the nature of a movement; hence massive, laating, im- 
pressive/*) they speak their own language olearly and 
mighty, they teil of the religion and beliefs that inspired 
them. 

Nature herseif oared af f ectionately for these works of men. 
Peculiarity In the composition of the bronzes as well as 
in the Chinese earth which preserved these treasures so 
long a time, enriched them with a patination not known to 
any other bronze art in the world. 

The transition from prehistoric times to history begins 
when the H SI A (2205-1766 B.C.) are succeeded by the 
S H A N G, also oalled Y I N (1766-1122 B.C.). " The 
Shang (Yin) moved their capitala five times. Their oapital 
An-yang near Hsiao-t'un on the Huan river in Honam has been 
excavated in 1929. Since then practically all our ooncep- 
tions öoncerning the dating of early bronies have changed. 

The excavated bronzes of the Shang people show so advanced 
a metal art that we have ti take for granted that centuries 
of art tradition must have preceded such perfection. Or as 
Karlgreen puts it:'»Our material proved that the first great 
classioal art in China was mature, finished, ready in all 
Details and in all Infinitive varieties already in Yin time, 
and there was but little to add in early Chou time." The 
vessels Bhow great variety of form, size, decoration. There 
are large rectangular vessel«, completely covered with ela- 
borate Ornaments, with f langes and bold relief, flamboyant 
of a oertain barbarous beauty. 



fe 






;iti 
M 



1 



i 



'(1 



I 






I in 



MS^ f • '«f t 




ab0Sf%üKi^t 



.^ I* 



] 

.: 



i ii nfu tat^tMttttmmmmttitmmtfä 



ämmmukmmmämltttliillk 



L|l.,J 



* t 



And there are vessels, simple severe in structure, with a 
quiet nobility in line, the decor restricted to small frie- 
zes around enhancing the beauty of a piain smooth surface. 
To quote Karlgreen again:"Decoration of the body of the 
vessels ranges from extreme simplicity to overloaded rich- 
ness. We have entirely piain body; non the less far from 
'primitive', on the contrary very elegant." 

Or Priest: "From the beginning the tendency wasto elabo- 
rate the complicated conventionalized and symbolic designs 
until the objects were completely co/ered with a deeply 
cut and brillantly executad pattern in a style that bears 
a remarkable likeness to that of the temples of Central 
America." 

There is ample evidence that e.g. the magnificent pieces of 
sumptuous appearamce füll of accuüulated power and comprös- 
sed energy, which John Ellerton Lodge acquired for the neariy 
incomparable Preer Collection in Washington, originated in 
the same epoch as the vessels of simple beauty which are 
described on the following pages. 

Although little is known about the ceremonial of the ance- 
stral cult, it is undisputed that the vessals wero used for 
food and drink offerings. 

For wine libations three most appreciated bronze types 
were employed: Tu, Ku, Chüeh . 

The millet wine was brought to the cerd^ony in the covered 
Container called "Yu". 

To toast the spirits of the departed a certain afllount of 
the sacrificial wine was poured from the "Yu" into the "Ku" 
which was then swung in the different directions,whereby 
the high rim prevented Spilling of the wine. 
To give pledgo t'^ the spirits, wine was poured into the 
tripod libation cup, called "Chüeh". A little of the con- 
tent was poured out of the spout onto the earth; the rest 
had to evaporate into the sky, while the vessel was set over 
a fire. 

In the following description I was guided by the funda- 
mental studies of Karlgreen already quoted. 
Karlgreen divides the early bronzes into four epochs: 



I 



I 



CJ 



»ff 



I* 



i 



«« 



i • 



I 



! 



r 



i j '.?;•■!' 



'mn^ 



liJffWT 



iMMMMt 



»!'l 






»' 






* i 



1' 



III 

lll ( 



H 



» 



.1 



I ! 



1: 



1. YIN ("mua^s the same as Shang ") 1766-1122 B.C. 

2. YIN-CHOU '= "first half of Westen. Chou") 112E- 947 B.C. 

{"means that thb Chou time art 
was Stil: esscntially the same 
art of the Chin with but small 
Innovations.") 

?. MIDDLi, CHOU ^'*^" ^!^ ^•^• 

4. HUAl (= late Chou) ''''^O" 2^5 B.C. 

Likewise I followed Karlgreen in his attempt to explain 
the ornamentation. 

The ORNAJltNTATlON is combined with the purpose of the ves- 
sel: Ancestral cult i.e. to appease, to runder fevorable 
the ancestral spirits who might be able to avert disaster, 
bring good luck also to natural phenoma like rain and 
harvest. 

Karlgreen' s appendage is important: "The cult of the dead .r. 
ancient China was above all a fecundity cult intended to 
insure resurrection, vitality and propagation of the family 
line. If this is the reason for its intimate lonnection 
with the fertility cult, the cult of the soil -- a highly 
natural, primitive logic as shown by parallels axl over thö 
World — then it is reasonable to expect that the decora- 
tions on the bronzes used in the ancestral cult should have 
a votive signif icance," 

Therefore the decorations of the bronzes are symbolic Orna- 
ments, mostly zoomorphic figures set on a spiral groundwork. 

I can here enter only into some of these forms. 

1 SPIRAL FILLING, the so-calied "Thunder pattern (Lei-wen)" 
also callid meander or fret pattern. 
KarlKreen prefers " to combine the whole series under the 
s'^iirname of -spirals- and rejects the designation above 
as a "somewhat risky Sung-time speculation . ^^^.ona- 
Confronted with Karlgreen' s ^^^>-'°rUy I mention the exp.ana 
tion of Adolf Harnack, given in h^\"™t CHINc.r. l>^P^T 
with some doubt. Harnack derives the lei-wen ^^om the oldest 
hieroßlyphic form of thund^r 1 changed from round to square 
5o?m (2) and combined in a double pi«ture for decoratxve 
purpose (3) 



II 



i:i 



:i1 



I. 



^ 



z . "Z] 



j. 



[ 



1 



I 



I 



"tt l*«a^«ftAtttAl£ 



t 

1! 



«.«« i>Jkw .^ . 



twnämH 



l'l 



MI 






^ 



<i 






I 



However we must keep in mind that the Spiral is a viidely 
spread symbol of the sun among peoples who were more or 
less oontemporaries of the Shang, I need only refer to 
Marshall' 3 excarvations in India (Uohenjo-Daro 3250-2750 B.C.) 
and the finds in Denmark and Sweden. 

Since sun and rain with occasional thunderstorm are essen- 
tial for the agricultare n the whole irorld, 1 prefer to 
believe that the spiral is x.ot only an artistic preference, 
but was also used by the early Chinese as a magic expedient. 
The same opinion seems to be expressed in the denotation 
"meanderthunder" I found used by Alan Priest. 

2. ZOOMORPHIC FIGüRi-S 

The use of more or less fabulous beings mostly zoomorphic 
in form is no doubt partly symbolic of the animistic reli- 
gion of the time. By being used as ornaments they become 
appeased; they invoke the potency of animal spirits. What 
animals are represented is often a moot point. 

For esoteric purposes "double faced" animals are used a 
peculiarity whereby one and the same ornament in a combina- 
tion with a second of the same or other kind shows a second 
face. 

a. The T'AO - T' lEH = The voracious glutton. 

The name was used by the scholar Lü Pa-wei not earlier than 
232 B C and is taken from the ancient texts as one ot ihe 
four nonsters mentioned in connection with the legendary 
emeror Shun. It became an accomodating term in whose shei- 
ter the most diverse elements have been merged. 
Or as Karlgreen puts it: "The T'ao-t'xeh ^-^^^" . ^^^ J^^^^' 
finitive series of varieties from the most rea.istic ani- 
mal» s head to the most conventional ^^ff /^^f ^; J"^^';f ' 
30 dissolved .nto geometrical designs that only the symme- 
trically plac^d eyes can help us detect it, , . , 
ilan Priest calls it "the magnificant rebus" and tries to 
find the Solution of the rebus writmg: 

"Jsn't it the important thing that m the symbolism of the 
ea'!y Chinese a Last and a Bird played a great part? Does 

r;'atter much which b.rd, which ^-^J^^^^^^^J^J^r 
graphers bicker and wrangle over the bull f^^^^'^^^ ^^ 
figer and water buffalo, the pheasant and the owl most of 
thprnfirsist in iijnoring the answer to the magnifioant 
rSs'of he r ai'?'ieh! that interlockiug oomposite of bird 
and bealt which is the ;ymbol of one fundamental precepts 



5:: 



!! 



1; 
i » 



i 



l( 



I 



■iilittil 



—mmtat^^aaamm 



tniLmmitUtmmmtmm 



:\ 



\ \ 



I- 



il 




Hl I 



of Chinese thinking - the balanced dualism of yin and yang, 
of darknoss and light, of moon and sun, of female and male/' 
... "Creel, in the Birth of China, demonstrated most of the 
elements of this rebus. He pointed out - and no one has con- 
tradicted him - that if you bisect the mask of the front fa- 
cing monster, you will find, that the two halves of the design 
may be read as profile pictures of beast facing beast nose to 
nose. He also demonstrated that the same profile may be read 
backwards, in which case the hindquarters of the beast become 
a bird facing in the other direotion, Only one thing remained: 
Tr demonstratö that the bird, füll fact, with wings outspread, 
is an integral part of the front facing mask. This was most 
ably done in the November 1938 issue cf the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art Bulletin..." 

For the rest I agree with Dagny Carter: "The name of the 
monster mask does not really matter; what does matter is the 
fact that it constantly reappears in the designs. Sometimes 
the entire ornamentation of a bronze conslsts of two or three 
t'ao-t'ieh heads placed in marked relief on a >ackground of 
fine spirals or meander figures. Or it may be ono or two 
realistic heads placed in a circular band..." 
These just mentioned "realistic heads" look mostly like 
bulls' heads. So I do not wonder at the further Suggestion 
of a Chinese scholar to take the t'ao-t'ieh as a Symbol for 
the bull, all over the world the symbol of power and male 

fertility. , . „ . . 

The newest thesis belongs to Oswald Siren who explains that 
the meaning of the t'ao-t»ieh depends upon its combination 
with other Symbols" and he mentions as especialxy significant 
in such combination the dragon and the cicada. 

b. The CICADA pattern (Ch'an-w6n) 

Small jade objects in form of the cioada have been used from 
early times to be placed on the tongue of the dead. 
Since the cicada is an hibernating insect that comes to Ute 
in spring again, the use of the c.cada in connection with 
the ancestral cult as symbol of resurrection needs no further 
explanation. Nevertheless it seems worthwhile to mention 
Ka?lgreen's thesis that the shrill notes of the male cicada, 
if produced by thousands, likens the whistle of the wind 
and might easily become connected in the feelmgs of the 
ancient with the voice of ghosts. 



( 



lli 



II 



^ -"'""•" 



I 



n 






\ m 



tili 



I 



I il 



Jt 



« 



AKIMAL TKIPU BA^D 



Karlgreen uses this denotation to denominate a most curious 
decürative element: A liand in three horizontal sections 
which upon cltse examination turiU out to be an extremely 
disaoived animal shape; in some of its best variants a row 
of wingquills at the top and an animal eye are distinctly 
recognizable, 

TIN - CHOU period ( 1122-947 B.C.) : The Yin tradition 
in Bronze production is oontinued witk relatively few 

öhanges. 

MIDDLE CHOU period ( 964-770 B.C. ) : Distinctive new ele- 
menta come to the fore. Spiral and meander backgrounds 
cpme almost to an end, relief is less clearly cut and the 
forms of the vessels tend to be heavier. When in 770 B.C. 
the capital is moved from Hao to Loyang, from Shensi to 
Honam, the art of bronze making deteriorates , the traditional 
decorations become overloaded and baroque. 
The then following centuries of strife end, when general 
Lien Pung founds the HAN DYNALIY in 203 B.C. 
The dominating tendency in bronze art now becomes cf in- 
creasing simplicity. Heavy reliefs of conventionalized ani- 
mal forms disappear, refinement with prefect proportions 
remain, and the inlaying of precious metals on bronze wms 
a peculiar appeal, even in the ornamentations of the acces- 
sories of warriors» chariots. With the warrior in füll 
regalia on it, it must have been a resplendend sight, -when 
Chinese armies were sent t-» spread the power of the Chinese 
emperor into North, South« and far inte the West, to protect 
also the Caravans along the so-called "silk-road" aoross 
Asia on the route to the Roman Empire. 

But it did not last. Internal strife broke the Empire, ^n 
PPI A T) the Han Dvnasty ended. 

llX mlksTui ( 222-589 A.D. ) follow, a term which because 
of xfs ooivenxent .implicity. has cc:.e to be appUed ocsely 
to the period bet^eeu Hai;ä and Sui and -^ich refers to .he 
dynast.es which have their capxtals or the 5ite o. the pre 
sent Kanking; but polit.oal '^haos in Chxnareign.Th. North 

is in the har.d of invaders, I -^'^IVirT nrN^ST^'s f386 - 
i'opa tribes, which are known as the WEI DYNAiii£,S (386 
ssn k n ) with their capital tat-ongfu. , . , -, 

U? DrJiiT ( 589-610 a!d.) : A dynasty of ^n^;^ J^" 
dor: xt 15 saxd that in tuese ^aii ty j^ , 

dynasty is wantmg in miiitary si.röiigt.i 



;;. 



f 



u;> 



■!Vl 



««•I 
• ••i 
•*tl 



\ i* 



!l 



(< 



:*\WT 



^♦'iMK, 



MiaMMMMi 



.^...^OMMMMI^ 



^atfttHMÜtMt 



1?^ 



!• 



f. 



I «ii 



iii 




W I 



N 



i 



l 



i • i 



I 






i I 



* I 



Hill 



TANG DYNASTY (618-906 A.D.): T'ang T'ai Tsung, China' s 
greatest emperor, born as a 3on of a Shansi official, wins 
his Position as founder of the Tang Dynasty with the sword. 
He restores the empire on a broader and grander foundation 
than ever before. China becomes exposed to foreign contact, 
to foreign influences; they arc distinctly visible also in 
the bronze works of this tiae, in which thö prodaction of 
ceremonial bronzes has ceasod. 

SUNG PERIOD (960-1279 A.D.): Ceremonial bronzes appear 
again. But tbeir quality and artistical perfection is not 
to be compared to that of their splendid predecessors two 

thousand years aga. - 4, ■ * 

MINGDYNASTY (1368-1644 A.D.) : Baroque transformation or 
the classic forms and decorations - to use generally fami- 
liär terms. 

COMPOSITION, GAST, PATINA OF MRIX CHINtSt, BRONZt VESStLS 

The analysls of Yin (Shang) fragments shows that the used 
material contained on the average 83 per cent copper and 
17 per c.nt tin. In addition to this traces of silver, 
antimony, magnesium were fcund, ^^^^pec 

In the cast usually the "lost-way (cxre perdue) f ^«^^ 
is followed." This .eans first making a wax "»^J^;; °^. ^,f ^. ,.„ 
entiB object, including its Ornaments and covering this w.tn 
a 1 quid da; coating. Holes were made in the clay mold so 
^h n%he ob/ect .as baked the heated ^;,<l"^?/^y /^^Jf 
out. After the clay model was empty and ^/^f ■ /^^^T^^^"^^ 
.etal was pourod in. When thoroughly ^^rd th mou^d was 
b-oken and the bronze vjas ready, exiept for f.nal je-ou.ning. 
krtoc^ique of the Shang :etal workers was so Perfect 
Jowever that actually littlo retouching appears to Lavo 

?re%oror1';-tleiro;::\atines is often very beautiful de- 

e^di^g^apon the co^positionof the original br.nz.^the^ 
Chemicals and ^he degroe of mo.s ur n the ^^^^ ^^^^^^ 
it has been buried ani which are ^b ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ 

estimated ^ ^ ^ ^ ?; ^ ! ^ f^^een basic carbonate copper). 
r'' " ^""b^ urewLhr the bronzes were origmally copper 
llliris lleZl:llllon^es er whether the surface was 
treat;d to produce various color effects. 
Most bronzes that have ^e.n b.ri.d for a l-g tj.e are^not 

very attractive .vhen excavated. ^''^^^f J, ^^J ^o what ex- 
disturbing incrustations an car u ly Ol aned.^T^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

tenl the bronzes should be cieanea ü. v 



¥ 

' in 






h 



!i 



!• 



I; 



I 





■i 



• HMiMMiM<<liMM 



iIHni 



IUI IHf ' "* 




H»-*'!«« 






■t 




!M f 



i 



! 



\ 



I 



I! 



I !l 



'i'l 



inllll 



' • -tjäti ■< •«» ' j IJ*T^?T?TTTTT?ii?^ii^i^^^T^^ST??^T^?irT??ä?jT??J?^iI5^^!iSi? 



8 



b, Early Chinese Bronze Uirrors. 

Different from the hdroic bronzö vessels, the Chinese bronze 
mirrors form a most charming group of their own. 

The earliest which have becn reoovered from t mbs are thought 
to data about the seventh Century B.C. (Late Chou or Husi) 
which is confirmed also by literary evidence. 

The reflecting aide of the mostly round .etal dxsk is po- 
lished by mercury, whilö th^j reverse is usually decorated 
with casting in ralief. Tkey are in the begimiing flat and 
small and become in the course of time heavler and larger. 
£»pooially conspicious is the ohange at the beginning of the 
first Century A.C. The outer rim of the reverse side is 
broaded and raised so far, as to let the back of the whole 
mirror look like a shallow dish. At this time the knob in the 
Center gets a hemispherical form with a hollow, through 
which could be passed the braided cord that formed the handle 
for holdiug it or for the fastening to a stani. 

The decoration of the mirror back was not an inoidental 
Ornament, but was put on for a purpose. While the ornament 
always shows the art trend of thd aotual period, the forms, 
Signa, symbolics belang to certain categorical numbers of 
Chinese literature and nythology as well as to their astro- 
nomical system. Even the round form is supposed to be symbo- 
lical. representing the heaven. Through it the importance o. 
tho bronze mirrors was greatly increased over the mere fact of 
being used as looking-glasses for the toilet. 
There existod the religious-magical bel.ef that by u«ing 
Symbols representing the Universe or parts of it ^n "^'^;- 
ature. it ^ould be possible to win some of the ;j;=J^ "^^^ 
Dower of the greater Universe In order to give strength 
I^dpr Lotion against domons or evll influencas to an 
individual. Using this conception in J^« »^^^^^J^^^^^J^^J^. 
the backs of the mirrors, they are credited '^i^J/J^^^J^f!;. 
mafiical power as magic Instruments, that put the cosmi. for 
magicai power g ^^ ^^^^ supposed to 

TaJdlff ev Influe;ces. In some cases they were said to ba 

Ib e vL l; forcast the future, to ^^^''^^\''^l'J^Zl'' '' 
the patienfs body, anabling the physician to diagnose 

It is thus small wander that the mirrors "^^^ ■;J^^/ ^^ f;;""' 

IZe'lZ in Jt: timf oT^he^ead Person" s ehest as "heart 
prcte°ting mirror" or added as a symbol of light. 



(« 



ii: 



'ii 



1-. 

I 



5:. 



*' * 1 
"»1 
"t'i 



I 



I 



« 



1* t •ir*'«* ».. »< »«riMB<:-4M ^■»» 




'^ 



A 



\\ 



m 



■':M 



i;i 



'I 



The mirrors arc admired for their technical perfection 
in alloy and caste. Their bronze composition is nearly of the 
aame allcy as tht bell-bronzes used in Europe during the 
Middle Ages. They contain 75-80 per cent of cjopper, 20-25 
per cent of tin and often 1.4 per cent of lead. It is 
evident that their supwrior workmanship was reached by 
moans of soft stone master-moulds as described by Schuyler 
Camman: "The small, pointed bjsses, and probably the large 
central boss as well, wer© apparently drilled into the flat 
stone, while the main stright lines were gonged out in shal- 
low groves; then the characters and intricate figures of 
the background must have been engraved with a Sharp tool. 
The shape of the characters, in particular, unquestionably 
indicates cutting in stone. Probably the stone carving then 
served as a master-mould for a wax model from which another 
mo.ld was madc by lost-way (cire perduo) process, for certain 
irreguliarities in the inner surface suggest a wax rathor 
than a stone oontact in the direct mould. After removal from 
the mould, the central boss, grooves, and rims were regulary 

burnished. . ." ^^ a 

Among the patines the so called "hei ch'i ku = like black 
lacquer" iü especially estimc;tfed. Aocordirig to W.P.Yetts 
the Quality of the blauk lacquer-like surface is so perfdJt 
and uniftym that it could not b. acoidental and was probably 
due to silireous matter mixed with layer of the mould which 
camtf in contact with molten metal. 



;;t 



\ i u!:| 



•1 



■i 



i 

1*1 




i^\ 



I; 



1 1 



J 



ii ' « » * »*** »,)»-»*N V 



: TT I . i ■ f , 1 j « .*j «.* » TT! I - ItTTT^UFjT^^^ • 



nrrrr?TnnnnTS*rr?p 



Lii'j_-ii"::n: 



^:m 



i f 



.iäl- 



ittütimufitttmii» 



iiMm 



■ 1 



li 



! i 






r 



lil; 



T ■ \ 



.1 



Kümmel, Otto. 



10 



BIBLIOQRAPHY 
Ancient Chinese Bronzes 

Anderson, J.G. "The Goldsmith in Ancient China", Bulletin 7, 

M.F.L.A, , Stockholm. 
Bachhofer, L. "A Short History of Chinese Art", New York, 

1946. 
Carter, Dagny. "Four Thousand Years of Chinese Art." 

Ne>T York, 1948. 
Freer Gallery of Art, A descriptive and illustrative 

Catalogue of Chinese Bronzes acquired during 

the administration of John Eilerton Lodge. 

A.G.Wenley, Washington, D.C. 1946. 
Feddersen, Martin. "Chinesisches Kunstgewerbe*.* Berlin 1939, 
Kelley, C.F. and Chen Meng-chia. "Chinese Bronzes from the 

Buckingham Collection". The Art Institute, 

Chicago 1946. 
K^immel, Otto Grosse. "Ostasiatisches Kunstgerät", 

Berlin, 1925. 

"Chinesische Kunst". 200 Hauptwerke der 

Ausstellung der Gesellschaft für ostasiatische 

Kunst in der Preussischen Akademie der 

Künste, Berlin 1929. 

"Chinese Beils, Drums , Mirrors". Burlington 

Magazine, 193o. 

"Chinese Bronzes cf the Shang through the 
T'ang Dynasty", introduction to the exhibi- 
tion Metropolitan Museum, New York 1938. 
"Birds". June 1947 issue of the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art Bulletin, (page 264) • 

Karlgreen, Bernhard. "Yin and Chou in Chinese Bronzes". 

Bulletin of the Museum jf Far Eastern Anti- 
quities, no.8, Stockholm 1935/36. 

Karlgreen, Bernhard. "New Studies on Chinese Bronzes". 

Bulletin no.9, Museum of Far Kastern Anti- 
quities. Stockholm 1937. 

Karlgreen, Bernhard. "Huei and Han" . Bulletin no.l3, 

Dto. 1941. 

Sir^n, Oswald. "History of Chinese Art". 1948. 

Swallow, R.W. "Ancient Chinese Bronzu Mirrors." Feipmg, 

1937. . ^ u 

Schuyler, Camman. "TLV Patten, on Cosmic Mirror of the Han 

Dynasty". Journal of the American Oriental 
Society; vo..68, no.4, Oct./Dec. 1948 . 



Lauf er . 
Priest, Alan. 

Priest, Alan. 



( : 



M 






^ 



i 



tii 

i 



I it 



L 



„Uiuti 



. II I J*>i H f ■ 




~- 9 



• I 



•.*' 



11 



Schuyler Camman. 



P 



Sen-Oku Sei-Sh8. 
Tüyei ShuX.o. 

Umehara, Sueji. 



"Chinese Mirrors and Chinestj Civilization" 
Archeology, Autumn 1949. Vol. 2, no.3. 
Catalogue of the Colleclion Sumitomo. 
Illustrated catc.logue of ancient imperial 
Treasury, called SIIOSOIN. Tokyo. 
"Shina Kodo Seikwa or Selected Relics of 
Ancient Chinese Bronzes froja colleclion 
in Europe and America". Part II, 1933. 

Yetts, Percival. "The Oeorge üumorfopoulos Collection, 

vol. II: Bronzes, Beils, Erums , Mirrors, 
etc. London, 1929. 

Yetts, Percival. "Catalogue of th« Gull Chinese Bronzes". 

London 1939. 

Voretsch. "Altchinesische Bronzen". 1924. 



I 



i- 






i!i:. 



!• I 



%\ 



m 



;ii 

X 

•1, 



'( \ w 



0\ 



V 



\ 



Ml' 



\\\ 



! \ 



\\ 



I 



'*Ä 
st 



I 




»liWUlW' 



j«;:^,., .^tiMMiiii 



■ ^■■■. '• ■^"' 






■™ 



r 



II 



)fii 




. IUI 



12 



CATALOGUE OF CHINtSb bRONZES 

1, Covered Vessel for fragant wine. ( Yu ) H, 20 cm.; 8" 

Body elliptical section with convex sides ©n a shallow 
spreading foot. Within faintly fluted bands are borders 
of flat engraved Ornaments: 

a) Around the body dragon-like animals, perhaps Karlgreen's 
"feathered dragon" , broken by T'ao t'ieh masks in high 
relief . 

b) Around the foot the two lines of the •' Hsien-wgn " 
= bow's cord pattern. 

c) Around the cover six dragon-like ani:aals placed smti- 
thetically to make up the central parts of four t'ao 
t ' iah masks . 

The main ground of the vessel remains piain. 

The Cover is surjiounted by a fluted knob-handle. Lcops 
on both sides of the "bjdy hold the swing-handle in shape 
of a twisted rope which can move only far enough in each 
direction to permit the lid to be easiiy removed. 

Insori^tions of pictographic characters inside on the 
bottom of the body and the cover; in the body set mto a 
cartouchc, Both deepened in the bronze. 

The purpose of the Container was to bring the wine to the 
sacrificial ceremony. 

The bronze is strongly covered by patination, green over 
red copper oxide (ouprite) with encrusted malachite de- 
posits . 

Yin (Shang) 1766-1122 B.C. 

Lit.: Karlgreen 'Tin and Chou in Chinese Bronzes". 

Exhibition: 1931/32 Department of Far Eastern Art of the 

Musoums of Berlin, (Germany) 
1938/41 Gemeente MuJ^eum, Den Haag, (Holland) 




i! i I 






fr 



:;il 



tili 



i \ 



1 4 



i ü^ 



-lo; ^v iurrntj^vj^ir wt t^T«*« ***>**^mfmfr'***^- 



i 



\ 



i I 



ll 



■ 4' 



^ r 




^ 



13 



2. Vase used for sacrxficial winc lib ation. ( Ka ). H. 25, 5cm; 10.1" 

CircuUr sections with spreading foot and trumpet shaped 

mouth united by the kiiob in the middle. 

Fiat encraved ornaments: Mouth with cicadae pattern (Ch'an- 

w§n) in the form of the "rising blades" (Karlgreen). In the 

middle and bel.w 'double faced- t'ao f leh masks, on the 

foct Ijelow a band of horizontal cicadae. 

Once the t'ao t'ieh mask is formed by four eyes between 

four vertical projected f langes. The sucond time two 

"trunked dragons" (Karlgreen) are placed antithetically , 

to make up the central part of a t'ao t'ieh Whi.e he 

hind parts of the dragons are raised vertically high, -ht 

combined trunks go to form its nose. and their «yes are at 

the same time the eyes of the t'ai t'ieh. 

The ground shows "spiral filUng" or "Lei-wen", the thunder 

pattern. 

The form of the curemonial bcaker moets its destination. 

A certain amount of the sacrifioial ,.in. was poured frrm 

the Yu (cp.no. 1) into the Ku for toastxng the sp^^xts of 

the departed. The- high rim prcvents spilUng ^'f ^« "{^^ 

when the beaker was swung in the different directions m- 

viting the spirits to participate. 

The bronze show» a fine dark green patina over rej =opper 

oiide; light deposits of azurite enhanoe its beauty. 

Inside of the foot a Short inscription: 
= (For) ancestor I (Kümmel) 

Yin (Shang) 1766-1122 B.C. 

Lit • Karlgreen "Yin and Chou in Chinese Bronzes" 

KüLfl "Chinesische Kunst". 200 Hauptwerke der 
Ausstellung der Gesellschaft für l^'-^'^^^'-'l'};^. ^909 
Kunst in der Preuss. Akademie der K'onste, Berlin 19^9. 

Plate XIII. 



Exhibition: 



1929 Ausstellung Chir.es. Kunst . veranstaltet 
von der G.O.K. und der Akademie der Künste, 
Berlin 1929. Katalog no.l7. 
1931/32 Department of Far Kastern Art of th., 
Mu«c'xms of Berlin, (Germany) (u^^^.nA^ 
1938 41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, (rio.iana; 



i 



'^ 






I 



III . iL."i«.i «.(. 



LAfA<.<i>yi.'' 



.i^tmmmmiXi^» > 



4 




M 




--»•"». 



14 



3. Tripod Libation Cup { Chüeh )■ H. 21cm.; 9^" 

Inverted helmet shape on three spear-head spreading feetj 
a lateral dragonhead loop handle is attached to the *ody 

Beslde thechanneled snout two posts rise "«1J^^^°:;« Jf 

pointed rim toppod by bell-shaped fxnials to facilitate 

the removal from the fire with the help of sticks. 

The body is enrircled by the "Animal triple band" (Karlgreen) 

with a row of wingtuilU at the top and an animal eye. 

Two inscriptions of archaio characters, one below the loop 

handle, the other below the bell-shaped finial. 

This bronze libation beaker «as used in a pledge to the 
RTiirits After a little wine had been poured out of t..e 
e^o^ It wls set over a fire and the oontents evaporated. 
Flnaliy it was removed fr^m the fire by graspxng its .wo 
«mall posts between two sticks whereby the bell-shaped 
finials helped to keep the sticks in place. 
Patination of the bronze in purple red and green with 
encrusted malachite deposits. 

Yin (Shang) 1766-1122 B.C. 

L,t.: Karlgreen "Yin and Chou in Chinese Brv.izes" 



Exhibttion: 



1931/32 Bepartment of Far Eastern Art o^ 
the Museums of Berlin, (Germany) 
1938/41 Gemeenta Museum, Den Haag, (.Estland; 



UV 1 

' "S* 
> >>» 



•«.f(il 



.;;s;. 






ml 

!thl 



r I 



I 



mmmmm, 



-.[Ali: t it i,**,4 



■ — ^— ra^l III lll*«l« 



( I 



.1 






t I 







15 



4. Halb^rd ( K'uei ). L. 20 cm.; 7 3/4 " 
Hcad of a halberd (French " hallebarde 



") , a forerunner 
örthrKo Tdllger-airand »hafted in lihe manner 
?he "nei% a Und of handl«. passes through a slot .n the 
,haft- the thongs are threaded through the hole of tke 
'daggl; Td tSe^'laeed round the small inoision between 
dag^r and nei. 
THö nei .3 decorated with tho t'ao fleh mask, the dagger 

iih":i;:i Ornaments in flat ^^'^T^ fl,^};^^^' 
culiar shape, as Renö Grouss^t m his "Lövoiutxon des 
Broizes ChL^isos ;.rohaiques- ^escribes a sxmUar decor 
"Triangle decor^e d-une töte de fao-fxeh on l'une pair= 
de dragons. qui on pu -^asser pour evoquer une oigaxe. 
Beautiful patination of the bronze in rusted red with 
incrustation of jadeliko green dopcsits. 

7in (Shang) 1766-1122 B.C. 

Lit.: W.Percevnl Yetts, "The Catalogue of the George 
Eumorfopoulos Collection". Tome I, page 68, 
plato LXXI A 152. 



txhibition: 



1931/32 Department of Far Eastern Art of 
the Musuums of Berlin, (G«rmany) 
1938/41 Gem-entv. Museum, den Haag, (^Holland; 
1946 Museum van Aziatischo Kunst, Amsteroam, 
(Holland) 



i 



m4 






\ 4 1 









.. M l — — nm I iia^ 






it<... .. .lüruioi. 



\i 



T. 





4 



1 



16 



5. Ceremonial Food Vessel . (Chiu or Kuei) 
H. 13cm.; 5^ " . D. 17 cm.; 6 3/4 " 

Yetts mbntions that this group of bronzes for offering 
cereals was called by some scholars " Kuei " , an äqui- 
valent term, pronounced like " Chiu " in ancient times. 

Circular form, recurved sides «n a spreading foot, wide 
mouth. 

Around the rim and the foot on a diapcr of spiral filling 
borders of dissolved dragon ornaments: A very peculiar 
draeon-like animal with turned head and vertical fringed 
ftrckes. presumably faathers : Karlgrean's "Feathered dragon". 
?he orn;ment is broken by fao fieh masks in higher relief. 
Ti.0 vertical dragon-head loop handles with downward 
Pendants are attached to the body. 

This bronze seems to have long bean a =°l^^ = ^f : ^ Pj';" '^^g 
for the shiny surface of deep purple ai;d green J^ars witness 
to the stroking of the hands of generations of discr.mina- 
ting collectors. 

Tin-Chou, First half of the Western Chou. 1122-947 B.C. 
Lit.: Karlgreen "Tin and Chou in Chinese Bronzes". 



if 



Exhibition; 1931/32 Department of Far f f ^|•;:^^^^ 

the Museums of Berlin, (Germany; 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, (Holland] 



4« 



m 
i 

m 



tili 



11 



n 



m\ 



f^V 



' Itii 




:;i;!»j,!. :,',,,;, 



iÜ 










.■ ' 



i. 



tl 







17 



6. 



T* ao ' V ieh Mask, 
h. 9 cm.i ik " 



The wheel of one side of a horse's snaffle-bite 
in the form of the t'ao-t*ieh mask. 
The bronze shows a nephrite green patination with 
red Spots and malaohite incrastation. 

Yin-Chou, first half of the Western Chou. 1122-947 B.C. 

Lit • Martin Feddersen "Chinesisches Kunstgewerbe" 1939, 

Abb,90, Seite 105. 

Exhlbition; 1931/32 Department of ?ar Eastern Art cf 

the Museums of Berlin, (Germany; ^ 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, (Holland; 
1946 Museum van Aziatische Kunst, Amsterdam, 
(Holland) 







iiilii 



I 






<'. 



m 

Uli 




i; 



ir 



I 



■;^v 



\4 




'4 



18 



i; 



7. 



Basin for Ritual Washing ( Hsi ) 

D. 13.5 em.; 6 1/3 " 
H. 4.5 cm.; 1 3/4 " 



Round basin on small foot with recurved sites and 
projecting rim. 

Around the body relief bands with two fao fieh 
aasks with loops. 

The inner and outer surface of the basin has been 
gilt and decorated with engraved cloud-scroUs. 
The gild bronce is strongly patinated in green and 
rusted red. 

Han. 206 B.C. - 220 A.D. 

™ ., „1 v^ttc "TViP Pataloeue of George Lunor- 
Lit.: W.Percival Yetts The tataiogu /p,:.„ ,T^ 

fopouloa Collection", Tome I, A 71, (Plate Li; 
Exhibition: 1929 Ausstellung chinesischer Kunst in 

der Preuss. Akademie der Kuns.e, Dti-j-ii, 
(Germany). Katalog No.31. 111. F. 43. 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, (Holland; 



1 



:;:!: 



•:-:'s; 



i!' 



iil 



' I 



I 




# 



»> \ 





■I I 



ll 



« ,\ 



aUi^Hi*«***— 



iiÜ 



,1 





I 




I 1 




A 



I 



.dU. 



8. 



Ceremonial Wine Vessel ( Chih ) 
H. 18.2 cm.; 7 l/8 " 



19 



The goblet's main ground is piain, ornamented only 
^y means of the Hsien-w6n = bow"s cord pattern. 

Inside the foot, in elevated cast, the archaic 
character for father. 

The bronze is richly patmated in red and green, 
enhanced by deposits of azurite. 

Han. 206 B.C. - 220 A.D. 

Äxhibition: 1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, (Holland) 






', 






;;;:!i 



■»(»I 



T 



'!,;'.'. 




.«iÖttttt*»**' 







i ! 



1 



t 




I 



20 



9. 



Ladle 



L, 22 cm, ; B^ 



The ladle» s handle with the ^rane's head has an 
elegant, soft shape, presumably stimulated by 
Hellenist ic inf luences, 

Bronze with green-blue patination. 
Han. 206 B.C. - 220 A.D. 
Ex coliection Breuer. 

Lit • Martin Feddersen "Chinesisches Kunstgewerbe" , 1939, 

Seite 114, A b.l06. 

Exhibition: 1929 Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst in 

der Preuss. Akademie der Künste, Berlin, 
(Germany); Katalog no.78, Abb. p. 58. 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, (Holland) 






i, 



<ii 




»'*M 







ti 










l 4 \ 






...;;. ufitinnH^ 



.% , v' '■ ' 




,i'. ^.^Il^t7i-vrw^f9 



l \ 



h q,^ 



Ui •' 



.») j 



16 



^ 



''ji 




if! 






22 




; 



11. 



Hanging Lamp, 
H. 14 cm.; 5^ 



»t 



Here the oil reservoir is formed by a cylindrical 
vessel; half of its cover could be turned up by means 
of a hinge in from of a goo3e*s head; the upturnabie 
pari is now missing, presumambly it was shaped and 
used as described in no.lO. 

The whole bronzo body is covered by jewel-like crystals 
of malachite, green basic carbonite of copper built up 
by secration out of the bronze in consequence of long 
time stratif ication in particular soil. 






■1/ • » 

I 



Han 206 B.C. - 220 A.D. 

Lit.: Japanese cxcavations of Chinese tombs in 
Lo lang (Korea) . 
Voretsch "Altchinesische Bronzen", A^b.51 



.W 



i\ 















ff 



ufftfttoömw, 



raff w wiiw;« ins ai: 



:\'. 




:-W 




*ii 






.liitrtiij' 



23 



12. 



SoKe tfed pole rest of chariot, 
L. 23.5 cm. ; 9^ " 



This inlaid chariot finial is formed by a rectangular 
socket with added snake*s body, olongatüd upward in a 
beautiful curve and ending in a snakö's head. 

When I acquired it from China in 1929, its purposc was 
not knovm. We had to find it out from the Po K'u T'u lu 
(= the hundred Antiquities) , the Sung rcpertoire of the 
emperor Hui-Tsung's (1101-25 A.D.) collection in the 
Hs*an-ho-palace (published 1110 A.D.), tom 27, page 32: 



ti 



Ch'i huan kung k*o i jung hen liaug 



Ch' e ch*i t' o yüan ya. 
= Its circular cavity can take up the cross-beam, 
Therefore it is called pole-rest of the chariot. 

Anderson calls a similar piece "pole mounting" and 
presumes "its purpose as end mounting for the carrymg 
pole of a sedan chaire and the like." 

I beliöve that the socket was fixod on the horse's 
yoke and that the pole of the chariot rested in the 
gracefui bending of the snake*s neck. 

ThG bronze is richly adorned by silver inlay with 
spirals of slender silver threads somewhat obscured 
by patination and secretion. 



Han 206 B.C. - 
Lit.: Anderson, 



220 A.D. 

J.G. »'The Goldsmith in An?ient China'' 
Bulletin 7, The Museum of Far Eastern 
Antiquities, Stockholm 1935, 



Exhibition: 1929 



Department of Far Eastorn Art of 
the Museums of Berlin, (Germany) 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, (Holland) 



I 1 



i 



tMr 






t 



W 



l . 



■ 1% 



i ^ 



^i^ 



'^;i;;' '■ 



■''■■'■■Uiiüisiiitiiiri'ii^. 



;Kr;;;-;!:?:'!»;H'*-"^- 



iii 




I 



1 




i 



.^ 



'imüh*i*- 



24 



13. Cosmic Mlrror of the Han Dynasty with TLV Pattern. 



Dia. 18 cm. ; 7.3 



tf 



These mirrors which are called by foreign collectors TLV 
mirrors, the Chinese generally classified under the name 
of the maker tr according to the inscription or form of 
decoration found on them. 

Casing in relief deoorates the r'^und bronze mirror-back 
with conoentric arrangement. In the center rises the 
perforated and almost hemispherical boss from a circle 
and a small Square frame in thread relief. Annexed is a 
broad frame enclosing the whole Square field in which 
alternate twelve small conical bosses or nipples ("ju") 
and the "twelve branches" inscribed in relief with 
characters: rat, ox, tiger, hare, dragon, serpent, horse, 
sheep, monkey^ cock, dog, pig. 

According to Swallow this combination formed "the circle 
•f sixty" which corresponds to our computation by Century, 
the twelve divisions of the Ecliptic (orbit and sun) , the 
twelve cyclical animals. 

Next is a crowded field containing a medley of eight 
lively animals and little curls in linear relief, eight 
conical bosses, each placed upon a raised quatrefoild, and 
four groups of so-called TLV forms. 

The eight animals lack all symmetry; they belong to the 

Chinese Uranoscope. 

The eight conical bosses are symmetrically disposed; they 

probably represent the eight periods of the year; 

The commencement of Spring. Vernal equinox. The Commenoement 

of Summer. Summer Solstice. The commencement of Autumn. 

Autumnal equinox. The crmmencement of Winter. Winter Solstice. 

But they also mean the eight Taoist Immortais and even the 

eight pillars of the Universe which would support simulta- 

neously Schuyler Camman's new explanation nf the TLV pattorn. 

The four sets of geometric figures, resembling the Roman _^ 
letters TLV, which provide the common name "TLV mirror" 
are all symmetrically disposed. But about their significance 
opinions differ greatly. 

Umehara took these signs merely as parts of the "meandering" 
design (Wan tzu t'ou) without special significance. 
Bishop White was of the opinion that these signs represent 
geometrical angles of precision and are connected with the 
old idea that the* earth is a square. 



;::;:j- 



1 



I 



i 




l»''. ' 



I» 



25 



i-.,i 



-. V. 



♦ , J 



;•) 



Karlbeck ascribed to them a technical origin. 
Thö Peking archeologist Mueller was the firsi to point to 
an cid stone from the Tuan Fang collection v|hich has the 
appearance of an astronomical instrumont and in which the 

signs TLV appear. 

Percival Yetts stated his belief that these aarks were 
horrowed from the Han sun-dial to serve as ornamental 
detail and to symbolize whatever function they served 
on the dial. 
Recently Schuyler Camman, the curator of the Chinese section 
of the Univorsity Museum of Pennsylvania, has triei to find 
a more extensive explanation. According to his very convm- 
cing publications these TLV marks serve to make of the 
inner pattern an anciont plane of the earth. 

His thesis runs: ._ , • o^t-w. 

"The inverted V »s help to establish the whole inner pattern. 
Thev serve to give the central porti .n of the mirror the 
appearance of a square placed in the middle of a cross which 
forms a simple Illustration of the ancient Chinese conoept 
•f the Fivö Directions : North, South, üast, West and Center, 
with additional connotations involving the Five Elements 

and the Four Seasons ... r\.^r.u 

In this diagram the central square must represent China 
as the "Middle Kingdom", while the are around it, extendmg 
off into the four directi^s-^epresents the"Four Seas . 




The term "Four Seas" was purffly figurative, and referr.d to 
the ias? territories that stretched beyond the -nfines o 
China, inhabitated by unoivilized barbarians, goad and evxl 
Anirits and wild animals ••• ^^ . ^«>.v 

off the boundaries of the four quarters of ^^^ "°^i^' J^'J^,.^ 
?he spacos mithin the Vs meroly represanted the non-ezisten.e 

?n «^rr'the total plane of the mirror gives the Impression 
in anorL, tne ».ui. x >/ „^-„„inr Di the lade emblem of 
that somcone has placed a cirou^ar pi, tne J "«= 

>^r«vf-n in toD of a Square pl;m« of t).e, Earth, Uke the 

neaven, m uuy wo. «- »^h^ *' ^ x>v ^u^ T^Y•A•;Ä-»t in^ cor- 

lin-po(game) board, and then out off the proje.ting 

nersof the latter. flush with the curve of pi... 



w 



»5; 






._ .i.„,mm 







n 



X 



.1 



26 



• • • 



the broad band which outlines the inner Square has 
the four T 's projecting from it in the four cardinal 
directions ... The explanation for these T's is provided 
by the traditional concept of the Four Gates of the Middlö 
Kingdom, mentioned in Chinese classical literature, 
The inverted L ' s at the end of the Yiux Seas would ap- 
pear to be more difficult to explain. But they, too, seem 
to have represented barriers, perhaps analogous to the 
gates of the outer enclosure of the Han place of sacrifice... 
all bend in the same direction around the mirror they 
serve to give the pattorn as a whole a rotating effect 
and perhaps they had the added function of presenting 
the rotation of the F')*^» SeaBona; which w^ra closely 
associated with the Four Direotions, " 

The noxt encircling zone contains the dedicatory inscription 
of twenty-three characters, naming the artisan who cast the 
mirror, ending with the acclamation of the father for whose 
tomb the mirror was intended: 

'* You, oh gentleman, are worthy of 

yxotection by the (Heavenly) Official," 

Of like width is the next zone, filled with the oblique 
"comb-tooth" pattern and on this abuts the beleved edge 
of the mirror' s thickened rim. 

The rim is decoratod in two concentric belt ornaments in 
flat relief by the "pearl-line" and the "running" (or 
drifting) - clouds patterns. 
Here our mirror shows two uncommon pecularities: 

1. In the clouds are four animals, running with might and 
main, seeming to compete with the speed of the clouds. 

2. Clouds and aniaials spread over their own boundaries in 
the pearl pattern. 

Three or four animals can be distinguished: 

A ch'ilin (the unicorn) , symbilic of illustrious birth, 

a hare and a dragon. The fourth is obscured by patination 

and accretion. 

Since these animals dre figured on the portion of the mirror 

that represented the (rim of) the sky , it would be perhaps 

possible to infer that they were celestial animals, possibly 

representing constellations . 

Bronze or black color with green patination and accretion. 

Especially beautiful at the reflection side where the black 

becomes glossy "like black lacquer" (hei ch' i ku) with some 

areas of cloudy green. 



)i 



ii 

..,1,1 



1 



mM 















m 



«« 

{ 





m 



■.UV 



.wp*llf?l'l'"''"' 



u 



;! '• 



i 







i.^.tl 



' 



#r 



r^s; 



6- .1 ; 



,3 . 



V ■ 



,' u 



27 



Joerg Trübner bro.ught this mirror, together with a wonderful 
collfection of Chou mirrors back from his last journey to 

China. 

In his "J->erg Trübner zum Gbdächtnis'' Kümmel irrites 

in his preface (1^30) : 

" Den Bronzen gehörte seine Liebe ... den grössten wissen- 
schaftlichen Gewinn stellt aber die stolze Reihe von 
Spiegeln dar, die sämmtlich das höchste an Chinesischer 
Spiegelkunst geben, und von denen reichlich die Hälfte 
uns neu ist. Hätte Joerg Trübner nichts beschert als 
diese einzigartige Sammlung, er wäre unserer Dankbarkeit 
gewiss • 



M 



Han (206 B.C. - 220 A.D.) beginning of the first Century A.D. 
probably 9-23 A.D. 

Lit.- "Freer Gallery of Art»\ Washington D.C. 1946 

Schuyler Camman '^TLV Pattern on Cosmic Mirror of 

the Han Dynasty" , Journal of the "American 
Oriental Society" vol. 68, no. 4 (Oct.-Dec .48) 
do. "Chinese Mirrors and Chinese Civilization" 
in "Archeology" , Autumn 1949, vol.2,no.3 
Swallow, R.W. "Ancient Chinese Bronze Mirrors", 

Peiping 1937 
Yetts, Percival. "The Cult Chinese Bronzes" 1939 



Exhibition; 1931 



Department of Far Eastern Art of 
the Museums of Berlin, (Germany) 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum. Den Haag, (Holland) 



\\ 



»<; 



HIj 



lUh;; 






St. :;:. 



» > , . I • 




Üi; 



(;i 




<l 



i;u 



M 



>«*^J 




w 



. \ 




w 



I 



\ ■ 



^^i .»t»'Mti 



29 



15. 



Tiger-Cat. Ordos Clothing Ornament 

L. 5 cm.; 2" 



Bronzb ornament in the form of a tiger-cat intended to 

be fastoned to the clothing by means of loops on the back. 

There is littlo doubt that this design combined ornament, 

Utility and magicr, like a u3eful eharm to protect the 

bearer against evil influences. 

Already in prehistoric times the tiger was considered 

sacrod, for a tiger amulet was foiind at one of the 

prehistoric Sites. Throughout Chinese history the tiger 

has beon considered an auspicious and sacred animal, 

as the Chief of all animals on earth, just as the dragon 

became the chief of all animals in the sky. n^ven to-day 

Chinese children wear tiger caps in order to protect them 

against evil spirits. 

The term "Ordos" was jroposed by E.H.Minns for 
these relics found in Sino Mongolian borderland, aspe- 
oially abundantly in the descrt co^onty named 'Ordos' 
in Saijuan across the great wall enclosed in the 
northwest bend of the Yellow River (Huang-ho). 

Most of such animal-style ornaments are attributed to 
the period of the Han Dynasty, a time when the Huns 
kept great armies beyond the Chinese frontier. 

Bronze thickly covered with greenish black patina and 
accri.tion. 



Han, 
Lit. 



about 100 B.C. 

Anderson, J.G. "Selectod Ordos Bronzes", 
Exhibition 1933 in the Museum of Far Lastern 
Antiquities, Stockholm 1935. 



lii 



1 



I 



i 



m 



j:.', 






?!;::;; 



.!■ 



:;.:i1 






t' 




^..-•»«*»-»-i.zr«.tif^*^T^f *•%••■ r»»t»i»*tf t' i»^Ö»lFI 



«»«»-'■ 
«•"•" 



• ( 




4 



30 



16. 



Large Mirror With Zodiacal Decor. 
Diam. 24cm. ; ^' 



The knob in the deepenod middle field of the round bronze 
mirror is enolosed by a sqaare. The Square» 8 boundary line 
is decorated and its four corners filled with lion masks. 

Four other lion masks bite into the border and fill four 
inverted V shaped angles ~- the TL marks of the Han 
mirror no.l3 have disappeared -- dividing the rest of the 
middle field into four compartements eaoh occupied by one 
of the »'Pour sacred animals of car- 
dinalpointa". ^ ^ 

These animals represent the four Quadrants of the vauxt ot 

heaven : \ • ^v, v *v 

The »'somber Warrior" (a tortoise and a serpent) in the North 

The "blue-green (az^^e) Dragon'» in the East 

The "vermillion Bird" i^ the oouth 

The "white Tiger" ^^ ^^^^ '»^^^ 

Two ascünding belts with the "saw-teeth" pattern lead to 
the broad rim with three concentric belt ornaments: 
On the narrow or inner belt an inscription of forty rhyming 
charactors, while twelve zodiacal animals follow each other 

around the middle belt. 

According to the Chinese Z o d i a c - dxfferent from the 

European - thore are: 

l.rat. 2. bull. 3.tigcr. 4.harc. 5.dragon. G.snake 
7.horsü. 8.ram. O.monkoy. lO.cock. U.dog. i^.boar. 
The animals are placed in little paimels ^^^"^^"^ P^^^'J J^^^ 
flower Ornaments which lead to the outer rim with spirale 

motives. 

The rhyming inscription gave great diff iculties. 

Th first who sucoeeded with the translation was Otto Kumm.!. 

According to him and translated once more from German .nto 

tnglish it reads: ^ ^ ^ ^ . a 1 a c e (palace of the 
" (The Mirror m) A - F a n g p a x d o c \y 

K^.intifnl reeion") reflects the gall. .. 

(^hfmlriorr S in S h o u (benevol.nco and longevxty) 



hangs in the palaco. 

The water - ches 

illuminated surface. 

The mooi. is susp 



t n u t is hidden within the 
e n d e d in the pitcher. 



'■'tM 



^ 


lilif 




vK 







1 







•'••I»i» 




¥m 



Vi 



31 



All forms which look into its center are recorded by him. 

Tho fullmoon - reverse side is like the empty heavan. 

Hill demons dare not come forth. 

The watGr-substance feels humbled by the work. 

As well as I could I wrote thesa jewel-like Square 

charactors and engraved them for eternity upon the 

green bronze." 

Kümmel rightly remarks that here "a long commentary is 
necessary" . 

Light bronze with lovely patination in smooth green with 
silvery spots (yin k'^ng) on the revorse. The face side, 
polished by mercury, green and red incrusted. 

Six Dynasties or Liu Chao (222-581 A.D.) 

Commentary. 

"A~Fang-Palace" : According to the legend a mirror hung in 
this palace built by Shih Huang-ti 212 B.C., which reflcc- 
ted the "galls" of the palace ladies and revealed wether 
they were faithful or not. 

"S8n-Shou-Mirror** : This mirror took its name from a palace 
of the Chin dynasty in the third Century of our era. It 
7/as hung ooncoled and arranged in such a way that the faces 
of those who passud by^woro reflected upon its surface, 
although they were unconscious of the fact. 
I rernembor a similar arrangement in the audience Chamber 
of the Austrian palace Schönbrunn. 

"Water-chestnut" : The middle motive of some Chinese mirrors 
is thus called, perhaps an allusion to the raagic mirrors. 
'*Moon suspended in the pitch": Perhaps an allusion to the 
"magician in the pitch", a kind of counterpart of the euro- 
pean "Man in the moon", who practiced by magic all heaven*s 
miracles intD his lodging - a pitcher. 

"Hill demons dare not come forth": According to old, also 
European perceptions, the mirror in which they have to show 
their faces is the greatest terror for evil ghosts. 
"Four sacred animals of cardinal point" : According to Tetts, 
there is no evidence concerning the four supernatural ani- 
mals to prove that they oxisted as a symbolic group earlier 
than about the third Century B.C., and he is inclined to 
think that with the advance of research they may be found 
less 'Chinese* than is generally imagined. 



!{■ .•> 



( , i 






• ■ 
■ 

1 



Knhm 



j 



' i [*^ 



1' k 



.} 



■; r ; 






^i 



< 



m 



n 



32 



"Tortoise and Serpent" - "Sombre Warrior'»: 

The Symbol of the North* s denotation as 'sombre warrior' 

can, according to Alan Priest, be explained by the ambigui- 

ty of the expression "hsüan wu" . It may be translated 

as somber warrior or also, according to the Book of Rites, 

as tortoise. 

Chinese tradition ascribes to the tortoise the female sex 

only and gives as its mate the serpent. 

So the expression "hsüan wu** may have gotten later the 

meaning of a snake and of a mystical oreation born of a 

serpent father and a tortoise mother, Standing together 

also for the Yin Tang principle, the dualistic alter- 

nation and harmony of all things. 

"The Vermillion Bird" : 

The Symbol of the South, the Vermillion Bird also Feng Huang 
or Phoenix, represents the Tang principle or solar essence. 
It presides over the South and is the Summer Solstice, the 
climax of the Tang power. 

Thus are the cold and the darkness of winter brought to- 
gether with the Symbols of fire and light, summer and the 
South. The perfect yin yang. 

" Zodiac *' : The zodiac or circle of animals means astrono- 

mically an ''imaginary bell in heaven, the paths of the moon 

and all the principle planets and, at its middla line, the 

ecliptic or sun's path." 

The Zodiac has tw^lv^ divisions or signs. These signs are 

reckoned from the point of intersection of ecliptic and 

equator. Describing our mirror, I gave tho signs in the 

Chineso astronomical order. But the order of the mirror 

itself differs; here follow the numbers: 

1, 12, 3, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 11, 2. 

The European order and names are: Ram, Bull, Twins, Grab, 

Lion, Virgin, Balance , Scorpion, Archer, Goat, Water Bearer, 

Fishes. (Webster) 

The Far £ast divides the day into twelve double hours, 

usmg the names of the zodiac signs as denotations; 

it bögins with the hour of the rat, i.e. eleven to one 

j'clock P.M. 



I 



"'•'ifj 

m 






I 




,ä 



i 



\ 



Im 



I 



\\- 




sfmBsaatmmmm^ 






'\r 




• ' . 



V •* 



-i::,; -r 






/ 



33 



The date. 

Opinions differ to which period t}ie mirror should be 

assigned* 

1929. Kümmel in his "China Art"(p.52) dated it seventh 
Century A.D. with the following explanation: 
"Uxcellent specimßn of a rather rare type which is 
mostly attributed to the Sui period (581-618). 
Nearly identical is the mirror of the Seki collection 
(Toiuru Waken Koken Zuroku, Kyoto 1925, I, pl.26). 
The more simple but in all essential points corres- 
ponding mirror of the Po-ku T«u-lu, p.l5, is dated 
622. Therefore the date of Sui or teginning Tang 
dynasty will be right." 

1933. Umehara brings in his '^Ancient Mirrors" (pl.ll4) 

our mirror and speaks of a "so-called Sui mirror", 
showing that he does not agree with Kümmel' s 

assignment . 
1935. The International Exhibition of Chinese Art in 

London dates the mirror in its catalogue (no.499) 
Six Dynasties or Liu Chao (221-581 A.D.) 
I presume the results of the latest excavations in 
Korea induced Dr.Yetts to assign this type to an 
earlier period, 

It is interesting to remember that the Liu Chao Dynasty 
had been foundöd by the Ch»i-tan, this tribo of herders having 
invaded and conquered the country. They gave to China the 
name "Cathay" that fired the Imagination of European .nedie- 
val minds. (Swallow) They preceded and in some ways in- 
spired subsequent invasions of the Mongol and the Manchu. 

Lit.: Ayscough, Florenco. "Chinese Calligraphy, Poetry and 
Painting". Wiener Beiträge zur Kunst und Kulturge- 
schichte Asiens, 1932. Bd. VI, p.37 ff. 
Feddersen. "Chinesisches Kunstgewerbe". Berlin, 

1939, Abb. 125. ^ . . * 

Laufer. "Chinese Beils, Drums, Mirrors". Burlington 

Magazine, 1930. j do^^c 

Umehara, Sueji. "Shina-Kodo Seikwan or Selected R.l.cs 
of Ancient Chinese Bronzes from Collactions in Lurope 
and America", part II, Ancient ^^^^lll> J^ ' '^^^\^ 
Kümmel, Otto. "Chinesische Kunst". 200 Hauptwerke 
der Aufstellung der Gesellschaft für ostasiatische 
Kunst in der Preussischen Akademie der Künste, 
Berlin 1929. Pl.LXAU. • . • v,. 

Kümmel. '^Neue chinesische Spiegel", ^f J^^^^^/;^5^.,, 

Zeitschrift, Neue Folge, ß-^^^^^'«^^«' .^^^'- ^* ^T,,^' ' 
Yetts "The catalogue of the George humorfopoulos 
coUe^tion". Vol.l!. Bronzes , Beils, Drums , Mirrors . 
1929. 



H 



•! 




I 




r«l«P«*l •***»«1M.E*' S-tM * •?<*> !T»f». 



" i; '< 'I f -i- i'«..i : ■ _ V •'***i*^*^i^i ,, ,, 



.Hil: in »»»•»»■ 




M 



in 






., '» 



> nr\ ' •• < 



34 



Exhibition: 1929 Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst, 

veranstaltet von der Gesullschaft 
für ostasiatische Kunst und der 
Akademie der Künste, Berlxn, 
Katalog no.459. 

1935 International Exhibition of 

Chinese Art. Royal AcadonQr of Arts, 
London. Catalogue no,499. 

1938/41 Gemeinte uiuseum, Den Haag, Holland. 

1946. Museum van Aziatische Kunst, Amsterdam. 



,; 



}!.,:;,, 



n 



it 



ifl 



•.••••11 






i 

m 

> • » I • 

I 



1 k.4 . 9 t «AAA •'i.tttA'Lil ftk^ * 




( \ 




s 



\x 




1 



1» 



I ; 



35 



17 • 



Spherical Box. 
H. 9.7 cm,; 3 7/8" 



A spherical box which is decorated only Yy some circu- 
lar lines and covered by a lid with kjiob. 

It is an Utensil of the cult, a medicine box, attribute 
of Yao, tho meditative Buddha, 

Black silver bronze. The green patination also covers 
the old repair. 

T'ang Dynasty (618-907 A.D.) , seventh to eighth Century. 

Lit.: Kümmel, Otto. ^Chinesische Kunst" 200 Hauptwerke 

der Ausstellung der Gesellschaft für ostasiatische 
Kunst in der Preussischen Akademie der Künste 
Berlin. 1929. Plate XCIII. 



Exhibition: 1929 



1938/41 



Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst, ver- 
anstaltet von der Gesellschaft für 
ostasiatische Kunst und der Akademie 
der Künste, Berlin. Katalog no.422. 
Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, Holland, 



The box was excavated with its careful repair, a sign 

how much ny predecessor, more than a thousand years ago, 

cared fcr this piece of bronze. 

The bronze was also endeared tc me because of its perfect 

form, its simple beauty. 

I am sorry to say that after the Nazi robbery the bronze 

was returned to me broken to pieces. 

Such a Short tiue in barbarian hands was enough to destroy 

it. 



IM 




üi'- 



m 



*a: 



t: 



•OW;-' 




^c 



\ 




.1 
! 



'.(UUiiU- 



36 



18. 



Kundikft Bottle 
H. 25 cm.; 8 7/8 



l( 



The kundika bottle for Amrita (= rxectar), is an attribute 
of the goddess Kuan-yin and an Utensil of her priest. 

The form shows Hellenistic Influenae . 

Our piece is vory similar to the kundika in the col- 
lection of the Japanese Emperor which was formerly 
in the Horyuji temple near Nara as a gift from a Japa- 
nese Emprcss to the temple in the year 736 A.D. 

Black silver bronze with earthly green and red patination. 
T'ang Dynasty (618-907 A.D.), eighth Century. 



I I 



m 






•AM 



t 11 

m 




Lit,: Kümmel, Grosse. '^Ostaaiatisches Gerät", 1925. pl.35 
Kümmel. "Chinesische Kunst" 200 Hauptwerke der 
Ausstellung der Gesellschaft für ostasiatische 
Kunst in der Preussischen Akademie der Künste, 
Berlin, 1929. Plate ICH. 



hxhibition: 1929 



1938/41 



Ausstellung Chinesischer Kurist, ver- 
anstaltet von der Gesellschaft für 
ostasiatische Kunst und der Akademie 
der Künste, Berlin. Katalog no,423. 
Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, Holland. 



'•>.(tii 
fc:tt!t1 



i^ili!« 



■/.'^ 






i jißfej 



-v* 



.1(|*»T* 



f ' 



■ i 



: t 



. ' 4 




**-'^. 



19. 



Ladle with Duck Read 



ZJ^ Gm.; 13 " 



37 



This ladle is heavy in shape and weight. 

The grip ends in a duck head and throat, engraved 
with feather orjiamont, whilo the well curved haft 
and ladle shoir leaves as ornament - as far as the 
white-grean patination permits. 



t 



;;;;?» 






T'ang Dynasty ( 618-907 A.D. ) 
£x collection Breuer. 

Lit.: Kümmel, Auctionskatalog Breuer, no.364. Abt .pl .Ay.AVIll . 
Exhibition: 1938/41 Gemeente ökuseum, Den Haag, Holland. 



i! 



<, ' 






m 



J 



i 



■:€\ 




f 






l^i 




Nil 



20. 



Vessel For Writing Utensils. 

H, 7 cm. ; 3 

Dis. 10 cm. ; 4 



n 



I» 



38 



Cylindrical vessel with fivc round and one rectan- 
gular opening on the top for nestboxes of which 
three are preserved. I am convinced that the rectangular 
opening was for the ink stone. 



ii 



■ i 




Gilt bronze with green and blue patination. 

Prof .Kümmel acquired this vessel from a Sung tomb 
in Korea 1927. 

Sung Dynasty (907-1280j) or earlier. 






i; :: 



»"•"•1 

••■•*» i 



f.!.*::l 




^■jii/i^e 'j: **-t 




\ 




h 



i 



39 



21/22. 



Two Candle3ticks of an Altar Set. 



H 35.5 <2m. ; 14 



M 



The principal features of each candlestick are two 
horizontal basins. 

The small basin on the top (dis.8 cm. 3 3.3") for wick 
and oil respectivoly for the candle. 

The larger basin below (dis. 17 cm.; 7") to impede the 
trickle of oil or wax on the altar. 

Both basins are united by a colunin-shaped cylinder 
while the whole construction rests on a round bell- 
shaped foot. 

Around the foot, as well as around the two basins 
run borders of flat engravod spiral ornament. 

Bronae with cloudy green and red patination, 

Sung (907-1280 A.D.) or earlier. 

These two candlesticks belonged to a "Wu King", 
an altar set of fivö pieces : two vases, one censer 
and these two candlesticks. 

Lit.: Grünwedel. "Bericht über archäologische Arbeiten 
in Idikutschari". Bayrische Akademie der Wissen- 
schaften, 1906. Plate V : "Boshisatva kneeling 
before Buddha with burning oil lamp. Fresco, 
Turf an eighth Century." 



"■■■mh, 

•■H 






'•::tt 



■ I 

I 



l 



^ . f -.. . /.'l'.'^T'T 



» '< . r(^*J« 



''% 



p 



II 



e€ 



1 «' 



m 






M 




II 



40 



23. 



Toko, Receptacle for the ^ ^ ro^^^^siy ' 

H. 59 cm.; 23.2" 



The bronze receptacle is composed of two parts: 
The socle with four foreigners, barbarians, apparently 
pr isoners of frar, who carry the quadratic box with 
four panels, decorated by cut-out swastica Ornaments. 
The top, a column-shaped, hollow cylinder with two 
Short open pipes, adjoined at the head and ornamented 
by cut-out floral designs. The cylinder itself is 
covered with flat reliefs: ITaves with lotus flowers, 
leaves and clouds. In salient relief two lizard- 
like dragons (hydra) are added to the sides, the male 
crawling upwards, the female downwards. 

The purpose of this vessel, the arrow-play, 

is known from the Shosjin, the ancient treasure at Nara, 

Japan, where a^j^ar is preserved of the T*ang Dynasty 

in which still stick feathery arrows with a round ball 

instead of a Sharp point. 

Furthermore I have seen two figurative representations 

where the fcfm of the vessel is in accordance with our 

own 6ind where even the Performance of the play can be seen: 

1, On a coromandel screen in the Rijks Museum of Amster- 
dam, ladies circle around such a receptacle trying to 
throw arrows through the Short open pipes, which are ad- 
joined at the head of the cylinder. 

2. On the great makimona "Spring Festival on the Yellow 
River" in the Metropolitan Museum, New York, gentlemen of 
" a drinking party " are devoted to the same sport. 

The decoration of captives of war on our vessel may be 
connected with the old custom to grant arrow vases as 
military distmctions. Still it is a long way from 
serious military training to a mere pastime. 

Black bronze, 

Ming Dynasty. 1368-1644 A.D. 

Lit.: "Toyei Shuko" Illustrated catalogue of ancient impe^ 
rial treasury, called Shosoin. Voi. II ,pls. 74-75. 
"Ch»ing Ming^hang Ho" = Spring Festival on the 
Yellow River. Ming makimono of a Sung version by 
Chang TsÖ Tuan (1120). Metropolitan Museum of 
Art, New York, Bulletin Vi, 6, no.lO, June 1948. 




i 


' ■ t 




1 • ' • . . - 




!:-;:;: 


W 




;■ .':• 




• - ' ■ 






i. :■■•■■ 


^ .•,:: 


i 


■; \ 



' - 



I- ^ 






1 






? 1 



m 



m 



CJ f- 



A 



\ ft 




i 

) 



■ 4 

I 

« 



iH 








41 



24. 



Fiat Drum (T*ung Ku) 

Dianu«50 cm. ; 19,6" 
H. 29 cm,; 11,5" 



The form of the bronze drum is circular: a hollow case 
ffith bulging shoul<lÄrs, open at the bottom, covered by a 
l*lat top, 

The ^^Ae sho^s- the i?ast's seam and on the sides four 
loop8 fcr Suspension by cords. 

Linear deoorations fill the encircling rings, ending at 
the bottom in great angles reserabling the Roman letter V. 
The top, displaying in the center a twelve pointed, high 
reliefed star, is decorated with twelve encircling rings, 
filled with omaments in low relief; signs resembling 
the Roman letter T, waves, nipples, parallel lines, spiral 
elements, and in the broadest part signs of which the 
principal parts resemble Streaming pennats. 

These last signs belong to an ornament which in the 

course of time became unintelligible to the workmen, 

They lad at last to the conclusion that also these 

bronze drums belong to the cult of the ancestors. 

Heger suggested that they might have originally represen- 

ted the head finery of a musician or dancer. 

In D'on-son (Yonnam) newly discovered drum fragments, n:w 

in the British Museum, show them a s huge feather head- 

dresses of men in long prowed ships, each in the attitude 

of managing a paddle. 

Goloubew has argued from the present practica of the 
Dayaks in Eorneo that these ships are for the transport 
of the souls of the dead to the Island cf Paradise. 
He concludes that these drums are intimately connected 
with the cult of the dead and points out that offerings 
to the dead are plajed in these drums by the Karen of 
Burma. 

Careful stMdies have been made of this kind of drums. 
All agree that they are characteristic products of the 
Shan tribos between South-Western China, Burma and even 
farther in the Polynesian Islands. 

All a^ree that in the decoration many alien, i.e. unchi- 
nese, elements exist. For instance, the star in the ct^nter 
is aA, otherwise in China, unknown pattern and may result 
fro.Ti astronomical studies in neighboring India. 



i 



'm 




t 




1 •••>>. 1 


:.j 


c 












'i 




1 




i0 



I 



■ ipH"«!" 



'H,: 






I» 



i f 






v'.. 



?^* 



42 



Thö tradition which relates that such drums formed a part 
of göneral Chu-ko Llan's bocty (called aceordingly Chu-ko 
Ku) oontains some truth. The general made an expedition 
against the^ tili thea unconquered, Southern tribes 
<Miaut2e, Lolos. Shan) in 225 A.D. 

But at the same time it is known that some drums were made 
in China and more or less modified from the original 
modeis, 

However, the opinlon that most of the drums go back to 
the Han period is untenabie and it is very difficult to 
give even an approximate date. 

Bronze with clouded green patination, 

South China, Shan tribes. First millennium A.D. 

Lit.: De Groot "Die antiken Bronzepauken im Ostindischen 

Archipel und auf dem Festland Südostasiens» 
1901." 

Gray, Basil. "China or D»ong~*on", Oriental Art, 11^3, 195o. 

Heger. "Alte Bronzetrommeln aus SüdostasienV 1902. 

Münsterberg. Chinesische Kunstgeschichte". 1912. 

Voretsch. "Altchinesische Bronzen." 1924. 



i 



I 



m 




I 



i.. 



i . #'■ 



• I ■ « • ' • TTTT': »itLui^Siiiii»» j 








\f 



.1 'I 



\:\ 



^J' 



iß«i 



« .> 



*^ iij ^ ! 1 i.V. i .? •- .- 



( .. -f 



t /- 



)>: 






< ■ * 

4. .. ^ 



:.'.*.>.A 



•;^.' ' 



•tir. 



'V... 



i 



's; 



I 

f 



m i 



A 



43 



.. CHINiiSE CLOISONNü. ENAMEL 
Fou-lan Chien = Byzantine Incrustüd Work 

A new development in metal manufacture came with the 
introduction of cloisonn^ enamel. 

Alth-^ugh very young in years compared with the imposing 
antiquity of Chinese ceremonial bronzes, Chinese cloisonnö 
ahares with the latter the same uncertainty as to its 
origins and the same curious lack of primitives. 

It was called in China " Po(u)-( lin)lan'* . 
The *lan* Is a dialectic tremsf ormation from ♦ lin* and 
the whole word 'fo-lin* the transf iguration of the Greek 
Word 'polin' (1^i*oAi/) as Bytantium was called in the 
middle ages. 

In Byzantium cloisonn^ - the word is derived from the 
French word cloison=cell - was produced. It may date back 
as far as to thü time of Justinian, the üast-Roman Emperor 
(527-565). Examnles of the eighth Century however are 
certain, There can be no doubt that between Byzantium - 
East Romt and China there was direct traffic, probably 
mediated by the Arabs. This would explain that cloisonne 
is also called "Ta-shih-yao" = Arabian kiln, 
Thörefore it is very possible that the technique of the 
Byzantine cloisonn^ enamel was introduced into China for 
the first time during the T*an^ period (618-906), which 
received so many incitations from the West. 

Perhaps thus, the riddle of the mirror with tl e cloisonne 
back in the Shosein could ba solved. It is certain that 
the mirror was left by the Emperor Shomu of o^'apan (724- 
748) with 30 many other treasures from the Chinese T'ang 
period to the Buddha of Nara. 

Omaru Seigai and Metano Migaku in the "Record of the 
Imperial Treasury Shosoin" reraark rightly that there is 
"no parallel example either amcng the ancient mirrors of 
China or among our own mirrors of later produotion", 
But their Suggestion that the mirror is "probably a 
product of the ancient arts of Japan" is without the 
slightest protff and very unprobable. Form, design, color 
correspond much more to the style of China, 
Anyway this unique piece acquainted us with an artisti- 
oally perfect industry which was then for centuries for- 
gotten in the history of China, 



n 



*; . 







/ ; 


' ■ 






Mim 


^.;.., 




i!:;*' 




Ilii 




i; ,':.■: 



f 










t 



l 
t 






( ' 



II 



e> 



I 



.'•• ■■.ff 



V r 



• 1» .1 



'■ \ 



!'V 






44 



Under thö Mongols the cloisonn^ onamel is introduced into 
China from the West oncfe morb, It is said that tht first 
tinamel was madö in China during the Tuan Dynasty (1280- 
1368 A.D.) 

This is easy to believe when one learns for instance from 
friar Guillaume de R-brouck's memoirs that in 1231 hü was 
astonished to find among many foreign artisans his com- 
patriot "maitre Guillaume Boucher, orfävre Parisien, qui 
avait demeur^ sur le Grand Pont l Paris" as a goldsmith 
at the brillian court of the great Kublai Khan at Kara- 
korum and when one remembers that at Limoges the Romanesque 
enamel art - cloisonnö as well as champlev^ - flourished 
since the twelfth Century. 

These artisans will of course follow the brilliant court 
to Peking when Kublai Khan usurps the dragon throne and 
founds the Tuan Dynasty. 

Bösides this possibility it is absolutely sure that 
Mohamedan inhabitants of the province Yünnam founded at 
Peking in the fourteenth or fifteenth Century Workshops 
where they began to produce this cloisonn^ enamel whieh 
bright colors must have appealed to the rather unsophis- 
ticated, showy taste of the Mongols. It is perhaps this 
be^innlng which adds the denotation "Kuei kuo yao " 
= Devil's Land kiln to the others mentioned above. 

Nevertheless, the vast majority of the 3tock of extent 
examples belomgs definitely to the seventeenth and 
eighteenth centuries, to the late Ming and the early 
Ch'ing Dynasty (K'ang-hsi, Ch'ien-lung) which came to 
Europe and to the United States after the sack of the 
Summer Palace at Peking in 1860. I need but mention the 
Chinese museum of the palace at Fontainebleau near Paris 
(France) . 

The enamel of the Ming D>'nasty, speaking generally, is 
•jharacterised by a boldness of design, a brcadth of treat- 
ment , whila the technique is by no means perfect. 
The polish is dull and the surface of the enamel shows 
numerous unwanted holes and pittings. 

In the Ch'ing Dynasty the tejhnical finis.. is Improved 
in every detail, The tone of the color is much brighter, 
the polish brilliaufit, but on the whole the enamel works 
have for me considerable less aesthetic appeal. 






Ä 







I* ■ 
I« > . 

aiij 






"'T 

i 

* 



I iiii^l^i^ 



( ^ 



* ' !■ . ' I), ., r' — 






.?.', 



11 



■M 






C, •■! «< 



- « 7 ,r 



'El 



,' 1 



■ ' .•• ( 



•• .V 



« • 



■ M •; l! 



n 



fl 



46 



The destrlption of methods us.d at 
Byzantium aro so similar to thoaö of thö Chiii68& that 
thfey «upport the ablief exiMressed above that the art of 
»loiwim^ önamel was browght to China from the West. 

A piece of metal, in China mostly bronze or brase, 
is hammered out in the desired shape, leaving a smooth 
»urface upon which the design is carefully traced with 
a fine brush. Thön follows the application of a thin 
flattened wire ribbon of oopper. silver, or gold, fastened 
edRowise to the vaso by a uniqut proccss of soldering. 
Having regard to all intrioacies of tho l^^oration the 
wire parotis out th«. field into so many oells or clo.aon 
n^s as there are oolors. With the wire oompleted, the 
cells are fi:ied with powdered enamel (glass; moistsncu 
int. a paste which is ?ipplied with the aid of a bamboo 
brush. After the colored pastes become dry , the object 
is baked by means of a charcoal fire, usually in an open 
courtyard, proteoted only ^y an iron networK cover, A 
n-omber of men with fans regulate the fire. 
Several applioations of the colored pastes and repeated 
baking are ne.essary. Then the ontire surface is careful.y 
rubbed down with pum ce stones until the surf leeis 
smooth and the deaign is well finished. After af.napo- 
lishing and cleaning. very often the copper a. the fool 

and Ups of the vase, as well as the free edge of tne 
metal bands, which run over the surface of the piece, are 
gilded. 

Lit • Bushell. Stephan »Chinese Art", vol. 2. London 1924 
^ " ?oyei Shuko "^-Illustrated catalogue of the Japanese 

Treasury, called ShÖsöin". Issaed by the Shiali 

Shoin, Tokyo 1910. Vol.I, color plate XXVi. 

"Twelve sided mirror. Back decorated with gold 

cloisonne" . 






Commentary : 

"pol in" 



• The Strange fact that the- aocusative of 
the Gr.ek word polis was used ^o denote 
the "eapital" By^antium in ^he mdd.e ages 
was expLined to me with^the -^^^^-^^^^ 
of the Phrase "±LCT-y^"oU^ = towards 

ll::?^l''ll:n. Phrase the Turks will Jerive 
"is-tam-bul" when they had conquered 
Byiantium in K.53. 






u 






i 



I 



tns«i 




'I I 




i 



iÄ,*^— «"^aSm" 



"^^'^i^h: 



■■J(- 



»V«V« 









iii 






II 



\ f II 



^* 



Jf- 



46 



u. 



•i.. -^ 



■( I 



t -1. 



rw 



. A 



, •> 



/ > T. 



\-, i 






I ■ 



Commentary (contd.) 

"examples of Ihe eighth Century»* : 

e.g. Reliquary of the True Gross ( staurothek) 
at the Metropolitan Museum in New York, 
dated Byzantium 8-9 Century. Probably brought 
to Italy by a crusader; once owned by Pope 
Innocönre IV (1243-1256) who gaye the relic 
in it to the church of Lavagna (Italy). 






! 



\ 



i. 



I BT 

' 1 



fc 



Mm 



^ 



i 



iknt,'r~^. 



!^fwl^'t ■ 



r 




ä 



'-^ P 



•Üt* 







VA 



47 



25. 



Deep Dish. Cloisonne on brasse. 

Dia. 28 cm,; 11" 



Colander shape with straight rounded sides and wide 
flanged rim with flat base. 

Decorated on the base with phoenix and floral designs, 
on the sides with ruwiing horses, in polychrome 
enamels upon a green ground. 

The style of the design is simple and broad. 

The execution without the technical finish of the 

later periods, 

Ming. 1368-1644 A.D. 




m 




h: 



\ 

f 



I 






m. 



-..t<l.l.. 111- >"l!?iT»W 



fi«tw«( 




•;'> 



. • > 



it' 




i I 



•» I 



48 



II. 



ANCIEHT CHIllKSt SCULFTURiiS . 
Seme notea on early Chinese Buddhist sculptures 



221 A.D. the Han Dynasty finally collapsed. 
Barbar ian chieftains, often issues of marriages with 
Chinese princesses, claimed to be heirs to the fallen 
throne . 

Four hundred years of war atrocities and confusion 
followed. In the midt of oruel Invasion, a new religion 
c-ooiquered the Chinese world, 

The worship of a pantheon of mostly destructive and 
fearsome natural powers and the cult of the ancestors 
were unable to furnish to the worried mind of the people 
the oonsolation which the new religion, Buddhism 
off ered. 

Buddha was born about 560 B.C. and died about 477 B.C. 

Suddhism was reported in China already in the first 
Century A.D. But it was not before the fifth Century 
A.D. that it swept the country. 

It is not without irony that the bringers of this 
gontlest of religions were the warlike and cruel 
T'opa tribes from Lake Beikai in Siberia who took 
the lead and entered into Chinese history as the 
North Wei Dynasty (386-534 A.D.) who 
set up Buddhism as their State religion. 

The Weis besame ardent Buddhists and brought to China 
the art that had to serve the new divinity in stone 
^arvings as well as in gilt bronze statuettes. 
From the fifth Century until the fourteenth an enormous 
amount of the country» s creative genius will be devoted 
to glorify the ne^ craed. 

In 414 A.D. the Weis began to build natural sanctuaries 
filled with buddhistic Images, cut 3ut of the rooks. 
The c a V e s o f Y* ü n - K a n g, situatGd near 
their capital T*a-T'ung-Fu (Prov.Shansi) , off ered 
a soft sandstone wh.ch facilitatod the work. There 
the work ended about 495 A.D. 

The capital was transfered farther South to Loyang 
(Honan). Here the caves of L u n g - M 6 n (=dragon gate) 
gave tho possibility to continue in harder groy to black 
limestone and black marble the pious work, carried on 
until the eighth Century by the Sui and T'ang dynasties. 



9 



M 



'A 
M 



t •itsra<.«^»'tf t.i(rl« 









r.^r.-vr^ii*-^!^-'^"' 






".^t»-i^"'.^->^- 




.y^A 



. ;« -^'C- ; '^ 



iii 



. - '. '■ 



:■) • v 



I < 



I 



,! 




49 



Many divergent influences contributed to the so-called 
North-Wei style. 

The invaders brought Indian (Gandhara) and Central Asiatic 
(Kucha) influences, they brought sculptural gift and metal- 
lurgic skill, 

But as often before and afterwards; The Chinese united all 
that with their own tradition, fine technique and refine- 
ment; and as rosult an individual Chinese Buddhist ic soulp- 
ture of their own blossomed. 

The Chinese altered the forma according to their own Ideals. 
To mention only some alterations: The fat round heads, 
the broad Shoulders disappeared. Long and slim heads, Blen- 
der Shoulders made their appearance. The transparent garment 
ohanged to robes which hid the body. As in other 'archaic' 
sculptures, the figures obey the law of frontality. 
( ♦ 26. 27, 28,) 

Alan Priest is right when he calls the term 'archaic" mis- 
applied to this style, although he agress that there are 
truly archaic^ traits^, in early Greek sculptures. I have 
only to refer to the mystic ecstatic smile of the Wei. 
Interesting also Alan Priest* s suggestions about the origin 
of this peculiar style: 

" The iconography of the early Wei temples oliviously came 
from India and from the offshots at least of the Gandharan 
school, but the style as it appears at Tun Kang is far 
cry from the Gandharan style. 

The route of the early Indian influence at Yün Sang I 
believe to have been across Turkestan. In style the Central 
Asian sculptures and wall paintings are a znixture of 
Gandharan, Graeco Roman, Persian and local Ornaments, and 
the last of them, especially the wall paintings from the 
temples of the Kyzil oasis (Le Co% "Buddhistische Spät- 
antike in Mittelasien") rank among the most brilliant 
things ever created. 

If these things indeed date no earlier than the sixth Cen- 
tury, one can only guess at the missing links between Gan- 
dhara and Yün Kang, which caused so complete an art to 
appear so suddenly at such a remote distance from its 

parent stem. 

It has been suggested that the iconography was transported 
by means of manuscripts which wäre used as plans by the 
sculptor« of the caves. The linear quality of Wei 
sculpture seems to encourage this theory." 










4 



V.v.'A 



»•••'•I 



I 



I 



^.± 






•ff i? II 1.*.-.. •,'•-» 



%*<{; 







;.. ^?".^ 



•' » 



f » 






. J 



> 






li 



50 



According to Siren, about the middle of the sixth Century 
new waves of North Indian influences become visible. 
( East Wei 534-550 A.D. * 29. Sui 587-618 A.D. * 30,31.) 
The Sui form a tiny but lovely introducticn to the 
aplendor of T'ang. The nearly incredible zeal i^ith which 
the first emporor of Sui patronized Duddhism explains the 
large number of surviving examples for the Short period 
of tho Sui Dynasty, It is said that he ordered nearly 
four thousand temples, over a hundred thousand new Images 
and the restoration of some million and a half images. 
Besides, already from the Six Dynastios on famous temples 
kept Stocks of gilt bronze images on hand to be bought 
as Souvenirs, or dedicated by pilgrims. 

In the middle of the seventh Century, in the reigns of 
the T' a n g Dynasty (618-906 A.D.) Chinese 
sculpture will reach its zenith or, to use a generally 
familiär term, its classical stage ( ♦SS), 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Bachofer, Ludwig. "A Short history of Chinese Art" 1946. 

Carter, Dagny. "Four thousand years of Chinese Art" 1948. 

Priest, Alan. "Chinese Sculptures in the Metropolitan 

Mu s e um • 

Sirön, Oswald. "Chinese Sculptures from the fifth to the 

fourteenth Century" 1925. 



I: 







l'l 



V 
V. 



I 



i 



\ 



;l 



r • 







^.^. 



!i 



t 



\ h 



\l 



n 



! 



iiUi 




•■-^ « ■ I ■l l.fj-^JI 



■ ■I«—«]! I|> ||%| -^l 



'-■ ' ■•>•■■; ' .. ;. ' .>....., ' ."|- ■"'<..■■. ■ .,.LJ! I JJ!V!l ' !! ' . ' itii^ !!W!!ffiP!ffW!!!!!!!!!iWff^P?'W?Sff 



'»•»'. .».^i..!.'' ' '' »«*.».♦, 



51 



26/27. 



Twt Bodhisattva Heads. 



H.12 cm,; 4.12" 



The heads, endowed with a particular charm, show a 
certain influence of the Gandharan and Mathura 
SohoGl of N.W.Indian sculpture, though to no 3trong 
degree. The eyes are treated as slits, the mouth 
fixed in a smile singulary suggestive of certain 

Greek types. 

The iecisive artistic traits are pure Chinese, as 
the Wei Tartars were fanatic absorbers of Chinese 
modeis. The rolation to the ocoidental Romanic art 
is striking. 

The Bodhisattva heads were taken by a Germar^^Dllector 
in one of the temple-caves of Y^in-kang at T*a Tung-fu 
in Shansi. They belonged very probably to a group with 
Buddha before his Enlightenment > sitting under the 
Bo'tree in meditation. It seems even now possible tc 
determine to which cave both did belong, 

Grey sandstone with rest of color. 

North Wei. (386-534 A.D.) About 480 A.D.Yün-kang caves. 

Exhibition: 1929 Ausstellung Chinesische Kunst, veran- 
staltet von der Gesellschaft für ost- 
asiatische Kunst und der Preussischen 
Akademie der Künste, Berlin. Cat.no. 238/39 

1931. Department of Far Eastern Art of the 
Museums of Berlin (Germany). 

1935 International Exhibition of Chinese Art, 
Royal Academy of Arts ,London(England) . 

1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland.) 



Lit 



Kümmel "Chinesische Kunst", 200 Hauptwerke 
der Ausstellung der Gesellschaft 
für ostasiatische Kunst in der Preus- 
sischen Akademie der Künste, Berlin. 
1929. Plate LXV. 



«r 



i i 











f 



'f.: 

I: 



; ^>«Mm*...JI!.;;"'i'"' '•■• ...»■■ 



^ 





I 



L 



1 



tt 



52 



Reidemeister "L' exposition de l'Art Chinoise ii 

Berlin, Gazette des Beaux Arts, 
'' ' p. 250/51, 1930: 

" L'^poque des Wei du Nord (385-534) est characterisee, 
surtout & la fin du V. et au döbut du VI, sifecle, 
par l'apparition de la sculpture buddhique chinoise 
archaique, La repr^sentation de la divinit^ sous 
la forme humaine est, Ici, la problfeme principal 
que se pose l'art. 

Les monuments les plus importants de l*^poque se 
trouvent dans le temple souterrain de Yun Kang, 
dans la province de Shansi. II est dommage qu* on 
n'ait pu montrer une des statuettes caractdristiques 
de Maitreye, dans le genre de celle que poss^dc le 
Mus^e Cernushi. Seules, de petites totes de Bodhisattva, 
exquise dans leur charme austere et qui appartiennent 
ÄL la oollection Ginsberg de 
Berlin, sonnent une idee de cet art. 

Cohn "Skulpturen aus Yün-kang and vom T'ieh-lung- 

shan". Ostasiatische Zeitschrift, Neue Folge, 
9. Jahrgang 1933, p.l44: 
In der Berliner Ostasiatischen Kunstsammlung ... 
sind als Leihgabe der Sammlung Herbert 
Ginsberg zwei Köpfchen aus Yün-kang aus- 
gestellt. . . 

Mit Buddha als Bodhisattva unter dem Bc-baum vor 
seiner Erleuchtung in Meditation mögen die beiden 
Köpfe der Sammlang Ginsberg in Verbindung zu 
bringen sein. Ja, vielleicht kann man die beiden 
Köpfchen für die beiden Figuren einer bestimmten 
Höhle in Anspruch nehmen (Daido Sekikitsu Taikwan, 
Tokyo 1925, Tafel 56). Auch die Bruchstellen, 
Grössenverhältnisso scheinen zu stimmen. 
Wenn in diesen V.erken die Strenge de? im übrigen 
unverkennbaren Nord-Wei-Stiles zu Zierlichkeit 
und Liebreiz gemildert erscheint, so ist das aus 
dem Motiv heraus zu verstehen, in dem ein gewisser 
Ausdruck durchbricht, wie aus den kleinen Dimen- 
sionen. 

Die Arbeiten aus Yün-kang (Shansi) reichen am wei- 
testen zurück. Die Höhlen entstanden zumeist in der 
zweiten Hälfte des f'ünften Jahrhunderts, in der Blüte- 
zelt der Nord-Wel-Dynasty. In Yün-kang stosson wir 
zweifellos auf nordwestindische (Gandhara) und 
zentralasiatische Einflüsse, aber es gibt eine fal- 
sche Anschauung, wenn man sie allzu sehr in den 
Vordergrund stellt. 



I' 



... ........ 



UU':u-i 



!,<:.■ 



# 



4Km\ 



) 



^^ f«»4tAl* < ai^h. 1. . k 



■' ■. 



'.r 



'!*)>■ 



M 



w. I 1 * 



U' ^9i' 



fv -^ ■-» 



,v • " 



) 1 



i. <v, 



;;\ 



*, 






53 



*' Denn die Hauptzüge dtr Skulpturen und insb^sonders 
die künstlerisch entscheidenden Züge können nur 
rein chinesisch genannt werden, sie haben wohl 
ihresgleichen in Lung-mSn und anderen Stellen in 
China um die Wende des sechsten Jahrhunderts, aber 
nirgends sonst. Und diese Kunst, der westlich roma- 
nischen in ihrer geistigen und formalen Struktur 
merkwürdig verwandt, muss zu der nicht eben geringen 
Zahl künstlerischer Grosstaten Chinas gerechnet 
werden, " 

Ashton,Leigh "Chinese Art", London 1935. 
Chavanne "Mission arch^ologique dans la Chine 

septentrional" , Paris 1909, plate 105-160. 
Glaser, Kurt in "Chinosisch<j Kunstgeschichte" 

(Springer), S.25, Abb. 28 
Sir^n "Chinesö Sculpture" , London 1925. Flatus 17-66. 



« 






i 



•'1 ' ' 



V' 



I . 



!::■ 



> !• I • 



. i . .. . i i^£* ttf 



«»«>L«A^AA^ttt«*«*j« ***«Aii^i^irrs«M«5T'f?T**5rr7TTr»i^rT 



'■ •^äii 



MI' 



I 




54 



28 Standing Bodhisatva with Two Adoring Monks. 

H.18 cm.; 7" 

Bodhisatva (= Knowledge essentiality) is a being, 
maturo to becomo a Buddha, 

Developed from the legend of the historic Buddha, 
who was a prince, a Bodhisatva is mostly represented 
by a Standing young man in royal attire. 

Thus our Bodhisatva wears a long, on both sides pro- 

jecting, vestment with long sleeves, elaborato jewels 

and a peculiarly formed orown. 

He Stands on a lotus thalamus supported by a pierced 

bracket and holds his hands in the Abhaya-MÜdra, the 

gesture of consoling: Don' t be afraid. 

Behind his head a heart-shaped mandorla with licking 

flfcones in relief. 

In front of the Bodhisatva, on the Wracket itself, two 
Buddhist monks (each h.1.5*') in adoring attitude, 
perhaps Buddha« s disciples A Nan ( Ananda ) and 
Mo Ho Chia ( Mahakasyapa ). 

Gilt bronze with spots of green patination. 

North Wei (386-534 A.D.) Second quarter of the 6th cent. 



Exhibition: 



Lit. 



1929 Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst, veran- 
staltet von der Gesellschaft für ost- 
asiatische Kunst und der Akademie der 
Künste, Berlin, Katalog no.254. 

1931 Department of Far Eastern Art of the 
Museums of Berlin (Germany). 

1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, Holland. 

Kümmel "Die Ausstellung der Sammlung Perzynski 
im Berliner Kunstgewerbe Museum. Ost- 
asiat .Zeitschrift , 11,461 (1913/14) 

Kümmel «'Chinesische Kunst". Zweihundert Hauptwerke 
der Ausstellung der G.O.K. in der Preuss. 
Akademie der Künste , Berlin. Plate LXaXVI 

Shina Rijutsushi Chosohen, Tokyo, (1915), pl. 287/88 

Sir^n "Chinese Sculpture", London 1929, pl.318a. 



1 




p- 






!■ 






I 



I 



mmmmfmmmSmi 



• fc • * ■ • K^ .2 









'PM)ri'' 



II 



li 






I 





Hll 



55 



29. , 



Va ,^rapäni» 
H.52 cm.; 20^ 



f t h e 



t e 



p 1 e 



High relief figure of o n e < 

guardians. 

Th^ mostly appear as a pair at the entrance of the caves 

of tha Tock-cut templ^^. 

Striking in our figure is the energetic expression of 
the faoe^ the polse and the verve in the movement. 
A particjuLariy formed cap covers the head, a short mantle 
^oth Shoulders. The undergarment falls in beautiful pleats 
and is bound over the hips, 

The left hand is raised to the breast, in the right hand 
a hint of the Vajira (thunderbolt) . 

Kümmel describes his signif icance : 

" Vajrapani, Indra, als der Donnerkeilträger, der Vertei- 
diger der buddhistischen Welt gegen die Dämonen, spal- 
tet sich im nördlichen Buddhismus in verschiedene 

Formen. 

Er verdoppelt sich zu Chin-kang-shÖn (Uebersetzung von 
Vajrapani), die in Gestalt von stark bewegten Riesen 
mit dem Donnerkeil in der Hand vor allem die Tempeltore 
bewachen und in der japanischen Form der Nio (Jen- 
wang) am besten bekannt sind. Er vervierfacht sich zu 
den Wächtern der vier Himmelsrichtungen, die meist in 
ruhiger Haltung als gewappnete Ritter auf einem bösen 
Dämon stehend dargestellt werden." 

The limestone, cut loose from the rock as the reverse 
proves, has gained a beautiful tawny patina. 

East^Wei (434-550 A.D.) about 550 A.D. 

HjX collection Breuer. 



Exhibition: 



1926 



1929 



Department of Far Eastern Art of the 
Museums of Berlin (Germany) 
Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst, veran- 
staltet von der Ges. für ostasiatische 
Kunst und der Preuss .Akademie der Künste 
Berlin (Germany), Cat.no. 243. 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, (Holandj 
1946 Museum van Aziatische Kunst, Amsterdam. 



i 



I 






i 






:^:'m:-- 



s-a-* 



,,Mii-l 



M**' 



56 






u 



<■» ■ ." 






i>! 






, f 



m 



Lit,: Cohn »'Ausatellung der Sammlung Dr. A.Breuer in der 

Ostasiatischen Kunst abte i lung" . Ostasiattische 
■ Zeitschrift (The Far East) 1926. Bd,13, 192/3. 
. pl.20a. . . 

Kümmel "Chinesische Kunst»», Zweihundert Hauptwerke 

der Ausstellung der Gesellschaft für ostasia- 
tische Kunst in der Preuss, Akademie der Künste, 
Berlin. Plate UCXVIII 
Sir^n "Chinese Sculpture" , London 1925. pls.245,293 
Visser "Mededeelingen van het Museum van Aziatische 

Kunst, A^nsterdam" . In 'Phoenix* ,no.3,1946.p.29, 

EXCERPTS 

Cohn, O.Z. 1926, tom 13, page 192/3: 

"Für die auf Tafel 20a abgebildete Steinskulptur 
dürfte eino recht genaue Datierung möglich sein. 
Kein Gebiet der chinesischen Kunst ist uns ja 
bekannter als die frühe buddhistische Plastik. 
Dargestellt ist zweifellos ein sogenannter Tempel- 
hüter, wie sie, meistens zu zweien, an den Eingängen 
zu Höhlen und auf Stelen vorkommen. 
Wenn er in Tracht und Auffassung von den in der 
T'ang Zeit üblichen, bekannteren typen abweicht, 
so ist er aber für eine Gruppe von Werken charak- 
teristisch, die in der Zeit vor und um die 
Sui-Dynasty (589-618) zugeschrieben werden müssen. 
Hier findet sich des öfteren dieselbe Kopfbedeckung, 
und auch die eigentümliche Körperbehandlung 
sehen wir gerade bei Werken der Sui Zeit etwa aus 
der Provinz Chih-li. 

Das Stück der Breuerschen Sammlung hebt sich durch 
die toergie des Gesichtsausdruckes ^ond durch den 
Elan der Bewegung von dem Gross der so oft nur 
handwerklichen Skulpturen dieser Periode glucklich 

ab " 
Kümmel, Preface to thc catalogue of the "Sammlung Dr.A. 

Breuer, Berlin. Ostasiatische Kunst" Cassirer, Helbmg, 

12. und 13 Mai 1929: ^ , • • . 

" unter den Skulpturen ist vor allem der merkwuraige, 
soweit ich sehe, einzigartige Tempelwäohter zu 
nennen, der, in Uebereinstimmung mit Siren, der 
Zeit um 550 zugeschrieben wird. 



I 1 




UUiihtHt*'^' ■ 



1:1 



1 1 



«.■f 



l|il 



57 






»1 



■',' 



,:tiii : IJ-R'U -«, 



,: i^ 



c 






."i 



»• • • • , 

•>■♦- • 



. < 



f ; .: . ■....' 



;■» .: ;» ': 'j-' 






> i' 





in PH0iiNlJC,xio.3,i946, 



db m V a n g 
van dr. Herb 
Tot de fraaiste 
afgcbeelde C h 



u - p~ 



Visser , K.xl. '*uibd. v .h.iiüus. v.Az .Kunst" 

p.29: 
henigen tijd gLleden heeft het Museum eenc 
belangrijke collectie Chineesche en Indische 
kunst in bruikleen ontvangen uit 

rijko verzameling 
ert Ginsberg te Zeist. 
stukken behooren de h i e r b i-i 
ineesche steensc 
t u u r .., chineesche bronzen, bronzen figuron 
uit het groote gebied van Indie... 
Voor hedan bepalen wij ons tot aen kcrte bespreking 
van de- gereproduceerde figuur. 
Dezc aanwinst-in-bruikleen is bijzonder welkom 
^mdat het Museum nog güen voorbeeld van beeldhouw- 
kunst in steen uit de ceuw, die aan den beroemden 
T'and tijd vooraf ging, bezat. 
Deze Tempelwachter dateerd n.l. uit de zesde eeuw. 

Of het beeld tot het begin der Sui periode mag 
•worden gerekend, is moeilijk vast te stellen. 
Dr. William Cohn heeft in de "Ostasiatische Zeit- 
schrift", 3/4 1926, een beschouwing aan gewijd, en 
wel naar aanleiding van du tentoonstelling der 
jollectie Dr, A.Breuer in der Ostasiatische Kunst- 
sammlung der Berlijnsche musea. Het stuk behoorde 
n.l. vroeger tot deze bekende verzameling, waaruit 
ons Museum verschillende stukken verworven heeft... 
Na vergelijking met eenige platen in Sirene groot 
werk over Chineesche plastiek, komt Cohn tot de 
cjonclusie, dat onze tempelwachter tot den tijd 
voor en omstreeks de Sui dynastie gerekend moet 
worden. 

Op de groote Chineesche t^ntoonstelling te Berlijn 
(1929) nog als bezit van dr, Breuer tentoongesteld, 
wordt het stuk (no.243) als volgt gedateerd "Nach 
Siren wahrscheinlich Ost-Wei )534-550)." 

Kort na genoemde tentoonstelling werd de collectit? 
Breuer bij Cassirer-Helbing te Berlijn geveild. 
Als no.240 geregistreerd, wordt thans als dataering 
"um 550" aangegeven. 

Men ziet uit het een en ander, dat het niet altijd zoo 
gemakkelijk is een werk der Chineeschen plastiek 
op een tientaal jaren nauwkeurig te dateeren. 
Laten we ons crmae tevreden stellen het stuk iets 
voor of in de tweede helft der zesde eeuw te plaatstn. 



♦• 



ü 






:v:,'.:\ 



ftt.!lX>. ^ ! 



I J l|H Ijm i?' 



niXElfITUlM 



i\ 



'.'.' 



1 ' 
1 



-1 



:^l 



^m 



i > 



58 



■''^'^.t 



k- 

tot 
z e 
d e 



Welke beteekenis nu heeft de z^sde eeuw 
in de ontwikkeling der Chinoesche plastiek, meer 
in het bijzonder der Boeddhistische plastiek? 
Het kan kort geformuleerd worden: 
In dit tijdsverloop beleeft men de o n t v? i 
k e 1 i n g van den strengen stij 
die ZOO karakteristiek is voor jaren voor 500 
omstreeks 530, viakunst waartoe o n 
tempelwachter behoort, n a a r 
nog wel sterk gestyleerde, maar toch reeds t.o.v. 
de groep van voor 5J0 - omstr. 530 v e e 1 
minder streng aandoc-nde 
plastische kunst der Sui periode. 
Deze prachtige plastiek vormt 
weer den duidelijken overgang 
naar het omvangrijke complex van de plastiek der 
T* ang Periode, . . 

Tot de fraaiste d^tails van dezen Tempelwachter 
behooren voorzeker het modele van den kop en de 
plooienbehandlung van het gewaad. De geheele figuur 
is iets gedrongen, een indruk die versterkt wordt 
door den laa^ aangebrachten gordel. 

De kalksteen heeft een fraaie, lichtbruine patina 
aangenomen. . . De aahterkant van het stuk wijst 
erop, dat het uit een rotswand gehakt is en der 
halve den toegang tot de ruimte van een Boeddhis- 
tische rotstcmpelcomplex bewaakte... " 



!i. 



H 




i ( 
I 




1:5 



•; 



1 




^ ¥W.>^ 



If 



inj 



V 




t 



nr,:;;m 



59 



30. 



Bodhisatva Ti-Tsan f ;. 
R. 18 cm, ; 7.3" 



The gilt bronze figuro of tho Bodhisatva is to be 
imagined as an attondant of a dedicat^ry group. like 
the altarpiece from the Tuan Fang coUection, now in 
the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Mass. , dated 593 A.D. 

In Chinese Bu^ldhism the Bodhisatva Ti-Tsang ranks 
next to Kwan-yin with whom he is often connected 
Both are saviours from Hell, both agree in preachin/tj 
repentance as the way to salvation. 

Ti-Tsang' s boundless compassion tries to save mankind 
from all sufferings and to lead to a general conversion. 

With the brilliant lustre of his "precious pearl" he 
penetrates and illuminates the Dari Palace, changing 
Hell into Paradise. On the evening of his birthday 
the festival of tho dead, the Ullambana, comes to an 
end. Hell is cloßed, vows are made to assiste and save 
all lonely souls for whom no relatives care. 

Ti-Tsang is either represented as a Bodhisatva with 
a crown on his head or as a priest. 

In our case he is in the shape of a priest with shaven 
head and saoerdotal robe; he Stands upon a small lotus 
podostal. With his right hand he holds upwards the 
"precious pearl", the jewel, while his left hand points 
downward in varada mudra. The flaming mandorla is 
fixed directly on his Shoulders; it is an open circle 
bordered with licking flames, the largest just above 
his head, 

This gilt bronze Image is typical for the short phase 
of extreme elegance through which Buddhist sculpture 
passGd under the short-lived Sui Dynasty, which has 
often provoked a comparison with the beauties of the 
i^uropean Gothik. 



Sui (581-618 A.D.) 
Exhibition; 1931 



Seventh Century. 



Department of Far Eastern Art of the 
Museums of Berlin, Germany 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, den Haag (Holland) 

Lit.: M.W. de Visser "The Bodhisatva Ti-Tsang (Jizo) in 

China and Japan", Ostasiatische Zeitschrift, 
Bd. II & III (1913/14 & 1914/15); chapter V: 
History of the Ti*tsang cult in China at the 
time of thd Sui Dynasty" (11,297). 



i; 

t: 
i: 

■V. 




I 



s: 



r: 



f 



lil 



60 



I 



* 



■ > ! 



i i 



■ I 



\ 




'■^^ 



i 




31. 



Bodhisattva Head. 
H.3,5 cm.; 1.5" 



The little head belongs to the most graceful works 
of Chinese sculpture. The smile gives the earthly 
reflection of the enlightenment, 

The combination of strength of form with the live 
modelling directs to the second half of the sixth 
Century. 

High relief in yellow marble, broken out probably 
from a votivo Stele, 

Sui (581-618 A.D.) About 600 A.D. 

Exhibition: 1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland). 



Vi 



I 







fir. 



-k*MiL<<: .' aut.^' .^'.. .' ■■' -^-■■-'— '■■■-— - — .4j- i\..':j 



kttl ■ > < * tai.1*. . 



f 







1 



) I e: 




• k 



k 



„fi^Hiii 



61 



'■'■'^'*{iJ 



32. 



Standirif^ Figure of Buddha 
H.22 cm.; 8.10" 



The gilt bronzt Image Stands upon a lotus thalamus 

which rüsts on an octanogal base. 

A >road calm face with a rapt expression below the 

üsnisa, elongated ear lobes, 

The cloak In olaborate concentric folds, joined with 

the body to a harmonious unit. 

The hands in Abhaya and Vara müdra bestow upon the 

worshipper fearlessness and blessing. 

The effect of the Indian sculpture of the Mathura 
and Gupta school is clearly noticeable. 

Gilt bronze strongly incrusted with green patination. 

Korea, Early T'ang period, about 700 A.D. 

Ex collection Breuer. 

Exhibition; 1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland) 

Lit.: Kümmel "Die Sammlung Dr. A.Breuer, Ostasiatische 

Kunst", no.252. 



li:i 



j 

f: 









j: 



^rt*-. 



-; %j.« ta-ti ? tAl Jk^fcLAl— iA& 






f ' 





;.•}•:• 



62 



"'■•■'<wi 



33. 



Buddha Head, 
H.18 cm. : 7" 



Excellent example of the Buddha shape of the high 
T'ang period. 

Monumental forms, yet which pasa Boftly from one 
to the other; the lips füll, the eyes almond-shaped 
below the mighty round arch of the eye-sockets 
under the highly artificial coiffure. 

High relief from the rock-cut temples in the 
South cave of Lung~M8n, Province Honam. Condition 

of the reverse proves that the head has been broken 
out of the rock. 



Groy-black Lime-stone. 

T'ang (618-906 A.D.) About 700 A.D. 



hxhibition: 



1931 Department of Far Eastern Art of 

the Museums cf Berlin (Germany) 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum^ Den Haag (Holland) 
1946 Museum van Aziatische Kunst, Amsterdam. 



:( 



,p 



^ 



i 



i 



i; 



l I 




63 



34. 



Sitting Lion 
H.15 cm.; 5.12" 



The lion is sitting on a base, the powerful head and 
neck thrown back, the mouth ojen, the ehest bulging, 
cleverly contrasted with a supple and slightly curved 

body. 

The sense of latent power is vividly achieved, just as 
muGh as in the large guardian lions atthe 
tombs of the mighty or at the gates of the temples. 

Since lions were unknown in China, the sculptors had 
to rely on representations they had come to know from 
Western Asia and which they succeeded to fuse into 
something unmistakably Chinese, 

The sculptural quality of the T'ang animal conception 
comes out very strongly in spite of the small dimension. 

Yellow marble. 

T'ang (618-906 A.D.) 

Exhibition: 1931 Department of Par Eastern Art of 

the Museums of Berlin, (Germany) 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, (Holland) 



Hl- 



U- 



I 



'-i'-vM 




i ■ 



4:: ::{ 

m 






"-!L r"^ 






'■*n 



64 



i 



I t 



III. ANCIENT CHINESE CARVINGS IN JADt, AND IVORY. 




II i 



• I 




35. 



Ceremonial Jade Hatchet. 



This omblem of human authority is carved out 
indigenous nephrite material 
whic5h was found in the neighbourhood of the C h o u 
capital Hsi-an-fu in Shensi as well as in Shansi. 
This material was regarded as a unique, consecrated 
substance and adapted to ritual purposes. 

The rectangular blade of the hatchet is pierced to 
fasten it to the girdle. It is used ceremonially in 
sacrifices and worn at court functions. 

Jade (yü) of greenish, grey, black and brownish hue. 
Thü hue is rather dull in oomparison with the bright 
translucent, mostly green, stone, which was imported 
not before the thirteenth Century from Eastern Turkistan, 
Yarkand, from the Baikal Sea and from Burma. 

C h u (1122-255 B.C.) 

Exhibition: 1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, (Holland) 
Lit.: Collis, Maurice "The first holy one" , Kew York 1948 



« ; 



Hennessey, Una Pope "Jades" in Chinese Art, 

London 1935. 



Excerpts 

The great C o n f u c i u s (the- Latin rendering of 
the Chinese K'ung Fu-tzu = Master Kung of tho Jesuits 
"Confücius Sinarum Philosophus" , Paris 1867) who lived 
550-479 B.C. at the end of the Chou Dynasty when the oxd 
Society of China was disintegrating, e>itomized the 

jade thus: 
"It is not because jade is rare that it is so highly 
valued. It is because, ever since the old days, wise 
men have found in jade all the difforent virtues. 
It is soft, smooth and shining, like kmdness; 
it is hard, fine and strong, like intelligence; 
its edges sharp, but do not cut, like justice; 
it hangs down to the ground, like humility; 
when sfruck. it gives a clear, singing ^ound like music, 
the stains in it , which are not hidden and which 
add to its beauty, are like truthfulness; 



li- 



v. 
f.. 



.1 .,■ 

I '* 

• ! » • 1 



1 



■,^0e^ 



... 't 




I 



65 



its brightness is liko heaven, 

while its firm substance, \rom af the monntains 

and the waters is like eaifth. 

Tho Book of Poelry «aye: 

When I think '^ a wlse man, he stöms like jade. 

Thal is why wise men love jade. 



II 



Una Pop^ Jiejin^ssey "Jade": 
"Jade»»# the purest and most divine of natural treasures 
to b^ the vehicle of communication with the unseen 
jofrer of the universe, it was adopted too as the emblem 
of human authority and the prophylactic against 
disharmony . . . 
To Chinese sensibilities^ which are in Bome respeots 

finer than our own, jado has two qualities that we 
Bhould not naturally attrlbute to it, a tactile 
valuo and an auditive value. 

Not only did the handling of the jade engender suavity 
and composure, but tinkling pendents 
for the girdle and the head would by the 
magic their music generated, keep depravity from 
the huart. " 

Tho supernatural is preserved also in the term "jade** 
It is derived from the Spanish "piedra de i j a d a'^ = 
stone of tho flank or side. In figurative sense; pain 
in the side, since the stone is supposed to eure this 
pain (Webster). Thus the relief in th§ efficacy of con- 
tact with jade as a remedy for internal complaints is 
evidenoed in its name* Beyond it reaches the belief 
that jade possessed the property of preserving the flesh 
of the body and preventing deoay. 



ti: 



I 



r 



% . 



I: 



v 






I i ' • n 

m 







■) 



.4 



•M- 

IV.: 



66 



36. 



Ivory Signet : Lion 



The form of the lion, to be correct of the Fo (=Buddha) 
Dog, is Conventionalised and adajpted to the oval form 
of this piece of ivory; the ball in the lion' s mouth 
is the "jewel (chee)", symbol of purity. 
Under the base deeply carved the seal-characters, 

Ivory with old patination. 

Mlng (1368-1644 A.D.) Seventeenth Century. 

Ex collection Breuer. 

Lit.: Kümmel und Grosse "Ostasiatisches Gerät", 
1925, plate 37. 

Exhi^ition: 1929 Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst, 

veranstaltet von der Gesellschaft 

für ostasiatische Kunst und der 
Preuss. Akademie der Künste, Berlin, 
Kat.no. 669. 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland). 



1 



j;. 



f 



j; 










in.!; !''M'' 



ßlrtiSft«' 



;^ 






.• i 



,/ ► I f. 



il 




M 



67 



IV. 



ANCIENT CHINESE CERAMICS 



Some Notes on Early Chinese Ceramics. 



Pottery making in China has an unparelleled oontinous 
history of five thousand years« 

Prof .Anderson» s excavations in Honan and Kansu were 
the first to show funeral pottery painted with well 
developed geometrical and spiral decorations from 
the stone ages. 

From these prehistoric, neolitic bowls of loess soil 
and clay to the ivory-colored ceramic of the Shang (Ym) 
(1766-1122 B.C.), discovered in Anyang, is a great step. 
Besides broken pieces only two oomplete vessels have 
been found. The one in the Freer Gallery of Art in 
Washington, D.C. shows carved designs, identical with 
those on bronzes of the same period. 

To the funeral pottery belong most of the glazed vessels 
of the Han Dynasty (203 B.C. - 221 A.D.) formed 
after bronze modeis. Their leaf green lead glaze is often 
dissolved into irridiacont silver of peculiar beauty (*37). 

With the T'ang Dynasty (618-906 A.D.) the 
struggle for perfection begins. Many foreign influences 
are recognizable, Hellenistic and others, both in forms 
and glazes: Fine proportions and beautiful lines; porcel- 
laneous wäre and even porcelain. (*38, 40) 
*' The Chinese themsolves do not trouble to make a 
distinction between porcelain and stoneware. If 
the wäre is compact and hard and rings with musical 
notfc when Struck, it is classed by them as porcelain, 
even though the liody be dark-colored and opaque, and 
of a type we should regard as stoneware." (Hobson) 
The Word porcelain , derived from the Latin 
porcella (a cowrie shell), has been in use at least since 
the days of Marco Polo who visited China in the thirteenth 
Century. Cur definition "white translucent material" 
is far stricter than that of the Chinese equivalent "Tz'u". 

To the ceramics belong also the charming terra cotta 
statuettes of women, manufacturbd for funeral purposes. 
They reflect realisticly the daily life of the period 
like the graceful Tanagra figurines of the Greek of the 
fourth Century B.C., found in great numbers in the tombs 
at Tanagra in Boeotia. ( *39 ) 



i ' 



i^ 



t 

V. 



m 

m 



■ < • « • 



-^UBi 



-. f ■ 



68 



Ml 






r 
I 



The S u n g e r a (960-1279 A.D.) signifies the zenith 
of perfection and beauty in early ceramics. 
The Chinese kilns begin to turn out magic results. Some 
Sung kilns, no doubt , are oontinuations of T*ang establish- 
ments, The great advance during the Sung dynasty was assisted 
considerably by imperial patronage. But that did not mean 
confinement to the use of the court only. For instance, 
the simple utility vessels, found at Küluhsien, 
a city inundated during the Sung era by the Yellow River 
( 1108 A.D.), Show a very fine quality. (Ml). 

In Chinese descriptions of Sung ceramics, the producta 
of the T i n g kilns (yao), situated in Tingchou south 
of Peking, are always among the first mentioned. White 
being the color of mourning, all China Services were 
changed to these ivory-white ceramics when the court went 
Into mourning. Although only porcellaneous, they appear 
almost translucent. The rim of these exquisite T i n g - 
yao bo^l-s and plates ( ♦42,43 ) were often left un- 
glazed to be covered with a metal collar. The decoration, 
mostly floral motives sometimes enrichted by the mandarin 
ducks, emblem of conubial bliss, or the phoenix, emblem of 
the empress, was carved by the artist's hand under the 
glaze on the porcelain clay. 

Hobson remarks: "Good specimen of the ivory white 

wäre with bold free-hand carving are among the 
most beautiful works of art of the Sung potter." 

Quite different, heavy in pottery and glaze, are the 
brown-hlack Ch»ien-yao bowls ( M4 ) . 
They are destined to serve the new custom of tea drinking. 
The priest of the Ch'an sect (in Japan later Zen) intro- 
duced it, in order to remain awake during long hours of 
meditation, 

Ascetic simplicity as well as aestetic subtlety, the 
philosophy of the Sung tea drinker, was conferred upon 
the tea-bowl maker at Chien-ning Fu in Fukien. These 
bowls are in a certain sense simple with their thick mate- 
rial which preserves their coolness in spite of hat Con- 
tents, while e.g. fur-like markings in a lighter shade on 
the darker background, produced with all the skill of the 
expert potter, add this aesthetic subtlety which should 
please even the severest connoisseur. 



I f 



1 < 



V 

V. 



.)ii< 



Mi 

.;t,; 



I 



^ ':' 



'•V. 



^'!'! :;'•■''■' " ' ' '■ 



uUiU4Un-i 



69 




/i«."' ., 



' •- » 



?ii 



lii 



.^ 



I 



1 , 



;|| 



When later on tea drinking became fashionable, the glaze 
was excellently suited for games in which the person won, 
whose bowl dried up last, the dark color making it easy 
for the judge to arbitrato. 

The era of the Yuan D y n a s t y (1280-1368 A.D.), 
founded by the conquering Mongols under Kublai Khan can 
be regarded, relativ to the ceramic art, as a Prolongation 
of the Sung period. 

Aa soon as the Chinese Empire haa been restored by the 
native Ming Dynasty (1368-1644 A.D.) with 
the first capital at Nanking (the second at Peking), 
pottery making enjoys its former significance. 
Onoe more Ching-t^-Chön in Kiangsi, not far from Nanking 
at the Tangtze river, wins not only imperial patronage 
but will be developed to China* s greatest pottery making 
Center, when 1369 the old kilns are replaced by the first 
Imperial porcelain factory. 

With it a new epoch begins in China' s most ancient art. 

White translucent wäre, the real porcelain also according 

to Western Standard, becomes the prevailing type. 

In spite of the founds at Samara on the Tigris, where 

white porcelain fragments of T*ang origing have been 

dug up, the 'porcelain question' is not yet definitively 

»ettled, while we know for sure that large quantities of 

real porcelain were produced during the Ming period. 

The hills which Surround Ching-t8-ChÜn furnish the necessary 

Chief materials: 

A very pure white clay, called k a o 1 i n , from the 

Chinese "kaoling=hill, where it was found" (Webster) ' 

and the feldspatic atone, pe-tuntse , from 

"the Chinese pai-tun-tzu = white briquettes" (Webster) in 

which form the material was delivered at the factory. 

Hobson compares them to bone and flesh of the wäre. 

The infusible kaolin enablcs the paste to retain its 

plasticity, while the petuntse, w^ich liquefies at a 

high temperature, confers not only the porcelain body 

its transparenoy but suplies also the glaze when mixed 

with a little lime. 

Of the differ^nt ways used for the pictorial decoration 

of the white porcelain body I will here mention only the 

underglaze colors which are painted before the glaze is added. 

The Ming potters have at their disposal only two colors 

which can stand the high temperature needed for the glaze: 

eobalt and copper oxyde for underglaze blue and red. 



f.. 












.tttw» 




: ^i_-j^j^V,._||gJ 



— M«*>» 



i! 



70 



< .« 



V '» 



ll 



|! 



li 



With it a new phase begins: The universal demand for 

porcelain in "bluo and white" with its 
climax in the Ming period during the reigns .-)f Hsuan 
TÖ (1426-35) and Ch' Öng-Hua (1465-87), the blue and 
white and underglaze red receiving special mention (*47)e 

In the early pieoea the natural cobalt has a greyish tmge. 
It will be improved by Import of superior material from 
thö Near East, probably Persia, the so-called "Mohazzanedan 
Blue" (Hui Ch'ing); but theae supplies were not only 
costly but also irregulär and lacking entirely at times. 
The freshness and spontaneity of the designs in the 
early Ming picturial porcelains begins to disappear at 
a later stage when the process of manufacture becomes 
more and more systematized. 

In the Ming period also the fine white and highly 
vitrified porcelain of T 6 - h u a in the province of 
F u k i e n started: the body and the luscious milk=or 
öreme=white glaze merge insensibly into each other. 
The decoration is formed Hy moulding, application of 
reliefs. (*46), The European traders at Amoy brought 
this porcelain to Europe where it became known as 
">lanc de Chine". 

The Ch'ing Dynasty (1644-1912) of the 
Manchu was established first in Manchuria with Makden 
as capital. When the last Ming emperor killed himself, 
the Manchus moved south and placed one of their own 
prlnces on the vacant throne in Peking. 
The Start of the new dynasty was not favorable to the 
ceramic industry. In a rebellion against the Manchu the 
Imperial factory at Ching-te-Chgn was destroyed; the 
effort to move the factory to Peking failod. 
But thu brilliant and able personalities of ^^^^ ^^^°^J_. 
emperor and his grandson, known as K'ang hÄi (1662-17^^; 
and Ch»ien Lung (1736-95) itimulated also the ceramio 
arts to new prosperity. In 1680 the Imperial factory at 
Ching-tÖ-ChSn was rebuilt and put under excellant 

Hrfard';! of Ch'ing porcelain :ontinue the preferance 
for blue and white wäre. The natura -obalt blue of the 
K'ang Hai era attains by experimentations the most 
pe^ffct blue. "We hear nothing of the importation of 
Tlue at his time. but wo are told that the native cobalt 
m neral was refin d and purified by elaborate processes 



i^ 



V. 

<> 

«■ 



4! 



fi: 



m 




r ..H.J».!J[mi"" 



^m* 



• "-»ft«^}i>»}t*'Hi»*«*w.»Wi|t 




r 



1 



'^r 



71 



■'fti 



i 



*'. ." 









1« 






and that the different grades of blue were obtained by 
mixmg the refined and the unrefined cobalt in varvin^ 
proportions." (Hobson) ^ 

Perfect workmanship replaces the verve ( *48,49 ). 
Each piece passes through many hands: one painter'out- 
lines the designs, another puts in the fillings; per- 
fection instead of originality leads quite naturally to 
standardized modeis and ends in lifeless repetition. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Carter "Four thousand years of Chinese Art", 1948 
Hobson "Guide to the pottery of the Far East" , 1924 
Hobson "The potter' s Art, 1935 
Schmidt "Chinesische Keramik", 1924 
Zimmermann "Chinesisches Porzellan", 1913. 



^ 



i^ 



* 



i 



\ ^ ' 







H 



1 



* I 



R 





72 



37 



Jar on Bear Feet. 



H.14 öm, ; 5.8 



n 



The round jar, designed after a bronze model, 

is carried by three S(^atting Vears. 

This animal was a favorite with Han pottery. 

It was believod to be a powerful tomb guardian 

and evidently oonsidered the caryatid of the 

period. 

The jar belongs to the mortuary pottery 
of middlehard grey-red earthenware. The glaze is 
lead-silicate , colored with exid of copper, 
resulting in a fine leaf-green. Due to long 
¥urial in the earth, the soft lead glaze is 
dissolved into layers of silver iridesoent 
of peculiar beauty, 
One bear foot is missing. 

Han (206 B.C. - 220 A.D.) 

Lit.: Lauf er "Chinese Pottory in the Han Dynasty" 

Exhibition: 1929 Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst, 

veranstaltet ron der Gesellschaft 
für oßtasiat ische Kunst un der 
Preussischen Akademie der Künste, 
Berlin; Katalog no.l41 
1938/41 Oemeente Museum, Den Haag (Heiland). 




V. 



I: 
t:. 



!; 






♦* ■ 

t: 







1 



; ! 



«? ; 




i b 



' / 




73 



38. 



Covered Grain Jar. 
H*22 cm.; 8.11" 



The Jar ia finely proportioned and covered by 
a lid with knob . 

The hard white wäre is made on wheel and covergd 
with a thin, pale, straw-colored glaze, minutely 
crackled. 

T'ang (618-906 A.D.) 

üixhibition: 1931 Department of Far Eastern Art of 

the Museums of Berlin (Germany) 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland). 



m4 



II 



i 



ft I 












^ 



iü 



|i| 



iL 



M I 



r» <-' 



r 




•) 



' \\\ 



HIEE»*^»«*'?» 



wi^llft,nw \m_m^n »« iitt: 



7< 



39. 



Mourning Girl. 
Ha? cm.; &.11" 



A sitting girl with bowed head, wearing tho typical 
T*ang head-dress, presses her left band against her 
bosom with a strong expression and b^aring of mourning. 

This unglazod terracotta tomb figure was 
made for funeral purposes with the idea that the 
spirit of the dead followed the pursuits which had 
engaged him in bis life, 

Terracotta molded of reddish clay with some traces of 
pigment , 

T'ang (618-906 A.D.) 

Lit.; Sirön, Oswald "Die Stilentwicklung der Chinesischen 

Grabfiguren"; Jahrbuch der Wiener 
Freunde Asiatischer Kunst, 1930/31 

Exhibition: 1931 Department of Far Eastern Art of 

the Museums of Berlin (Germany) 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland). 



Mxi • ( »4 

|**<t. • « i. 



H 




TKV"- 



\ V- 




i 




\ 



1» 

V. 

1, 



s t 



75 



' "T i üi,' '■''*'^" 



.fl 



40. 



Melon-shaped Pot 
H.H. 5 cm, ; 4.8" 



il: 



The fruit-shaped pot is of hard buff-grey porcellaneous 
wäre. It ia coated with white slip - th6 pottor's term 
for liquid olay - and covered with a transparent glaze 
green spotted and minutely crackled. The glaze ends 
some distance short of the base. 

Late T'ang (618-906) or harly Sung (ö60-1279). 
Abüut 900 A.D. 



Exhllition: 



1931 
1938/41 



Department of Far Kastern Art of 
the Museums of Berlin (Germany) 
Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland) 



» - 



4 



ii' 



■ ;■• r 



Ji 



ii 



^ i 





76 



41. 



Deep Bowl. "KULUHSIEN" Type. 

Diam. 21 cm. ; 8.5 " 
H. 9 cm.; 3.10" 



The deep bowl on a short foot is of hard, buff-grey, 
porcellaneous wäre; it has a coating of white slip 
covered with a cream-tinted glaze, closely crackled 
in "ostrich-egg" style. 

The glaze ends in a wary line some distance short 
of the base. "Spur-marks" inslde the bowl show 
that the bowl has been fired upside down; they 
are the scars left on the base of the wäre by the 
pointed Supports on which it rested in the kiln. 

Much of this kind of wäre was excavated in Southern 
Chili where the town CHU-LU was destroyed by inundation 
in 1108. 

The Word HSIÜN behind Chü-lu means district city, 
distinct from departamental ("chou") and prefectural 
("fu") City. (Hobson) 

Early Sung. About 1000 A.D. 



Lit. ; 



Hobson 
Tetts 



"Guido to the Pottery and Porcelain 

of the Far East", 1924 
"The catalogue of the George Eumorf opoulos 

collöctlon" 1929, vol. 6, pl.23. 




i 



i 



Exhibition: 1931 



Department of Far Eastern Art of 
the Museums of Berlin (Germany) 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland). 



i; 



m 

a:;::;: 



yr 



i 



fi 



* 



1*4 

i 





i i 



\'- 



1,1 



« 



77 



42. 



Pai (white) Ting Carved Conical Bowl. 
Diam. 2"3»5 cm.; 9.5" 



A deep bowl of conical form on a short foot. 
The body clcsely grained, white and porcellaneous. 
The glaze has the color and texture of a warm 
ivory white with "gummy drops" on the 
exterior, also called "tear drops" and regarded 
as evidence of genuineness by Chinese collectors. 
The foot Is glazed, not the mouth rim, giving the 
impression of having been fired upside down. 
The raw edge of the mouth rim is concealed by a 
metal collar. 

The Interior has been decorated by a design before the 
bowl was glazed and baked in the kiln. 
It is carved on the porcelain clay with 
the bold free-hand of a master in the best Sung 

style: 

Two mandarin duks (Tuen yang) , emblem of 
connubial bliss, swim among rushes, while 
the water is depicted with combed waves. 

The exhibition of Chinese Art 1929 in Berlin gave 

the possibility for scrutiny and comparison with 

three other Pai Ting bowls of similar quality 

and decoration. 

These belonged to the collections of 

Eumorfopoulos, London (Katalog no,594) 

Koechlin, Paris fKatalog no.593^ 

Steiner, Berlin (Katalog no.596) 

Our bowl (Katalog no.595) corresponds 

with the famous Eumorfopoulos bowl also in proportions 

and is doubtlessly carved by the same hand, to which 

Rcidemeistor ascribes also the Koechlin bowl (see belowj . 

It was formerly in the collection of the areheologist 

Wu Ta Chen in Soochow. 

Sung (960-1278 A.D.) Factory of Ting Chou in Chihli. 



•I 



1 ( 



ir.- 



TT , . , TT ■. ? t -■ i * » . , 1 tf-. » .'.:'■ 



*t.t f,k£Ci..^ 




ra^n 



■,ft 



78 



ci 



'i \ 



■• ^■•. 






"•• • 



^' 



v/ 



:-iV .■• 



,.' Sr.y- 



,,\ • v;-.,. 









Exhibition: 1929 Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst, 

veranstaltet von der Gesellschaft 
für ostasiatische Kunst und der 
Preussischen Akademie der Künste, 
Berlin, Katalog no,595. 

1931 Department of Far Eastern Art of 
the Museums of Berlin, Germany . 

1938/41 Gemeente Museum, den Haag, Holland. 



Lit. 



Hobson "Guide to the pottery and porcelain 

of the Far East. 1924. 
Hobson "The potter' s art" . 1935. 
Reidemeister "L'Exposition de l'Art Chinois 

\ Berlin 1929" in Gazette des 
Beaux-Arts, p.254. 
Yetts "The catalogue of the George Eumorfo 
poulos collection" vol,6, p.l25. 



Excerpts: 
Hobson in guide 



i ■ . ; 



! 



•i*. 



..■*«- . 



.*/ 



ti 



'\ ■■ 



^- 4. •- 



».. •« 



^*;.' r.'>'' '. " 



"Good specimen of the ivory white 
wäre with bold free-hand carving 
are among the most beautiful works 
of art of the Sung potter" 

Reidemeister in Gazette d.B.A,: 

"L'^tude minutieuse et la comparison des 
objets expos^s nous apprennent aussi que 
la tradition chinoise, qui fixe l'origine 
de types d^termin^s ?l des ateliers deter- 
min^s, ne doit pas Ütre mise en doute. 
Je n'ai qu' ^ mentionner les rares ^oupes 
du type t i n g qui portent un decor 
grave d'oies et des vagues. 
Quatre pi^ces sont re^unies iei provenant, 
entre autres, des collections 
Koechlin et Ginsberg. 
A leur examen, personne no peut douter 
qu'elles appartient au mSme atelier, 
sinon au m8me artiste." 

From these four bowls, once united at ^^^/^^^^^^^^^^. J^ 
Berlin, twcr are naw in the museums of London and Paris 
(Eumorfop<nilos and Koechlin), ^^^ (S^f^^^^)^^^^ \l\l 
at Sothebey k Co, London, on the fourth of May, 1948, 



i!:: 



in« 



^ 










1/* 



w 



I 




l w. 








.1. 



• ■ • 



>■ 



, * * 



79 






43. 



TZn ( flour ) > Ting Dish. 
Diam. 25 cm, ; 10" 



The dish, raised by a Short foot and with a high rim, 
is of perfect circular form and of delicate color, 

The body, brownish porcellaneous hard wäre, 
is covered, except on the top of the rim and the 
foot, with an ivory white colored glaze, 

Tho interior decor, phoenix flying over waves, has been 
carved on thü procelain clay before the glaze, 
nevertheless ncarly worn out by use and heavy 
crackles. On the outer rim a pettern of vertical 
lines is roGOgnisable • 

Sung (960-127Q A.D.) Ting Chou in Chihli. 

Exhibition: 1929 Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst, 

veranstaltet von der Gesellschaft 
für ostasiatische Kunst und der 
Preussischen Akademie der Künste, 
Berlin. Katalog no.608. 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, Holland. 








/J&r-, 













l( 



i'J •• 



I 




' 




"*mf^ 



BO 



44. 



Chien Ware, Conical Tea ^owl, ( Teamoku ) 
Oiam. 12.5 cm.; 4.15" 



The conical bowl Is of hard blackish pottery with 
a thj.ck blue-black glaze streaked with golden brown 
in fine lines like " hare's für •♦. 
Baze and mouth remained unglazed; the rim is 
protected \j a silver collar. 

These bowls were populär In the tea-testing compe- 
titions of the Sung Dynasty, whers the poifdered tea 
succieeded the oake tea of the T'ang. While the cake 
tea was boiled, the gxeen leaves of the shrub were 
ground to fine powder in a amall stone mill and the 
preparation was whipped in hot water by a delicate 
whisk made of split bamboo. 

In Japan the masters of the tea-ceremony have always 
delighted in the Chien yao bowls. Their thick material 
made them cool to hold and the black glaze showed up 
the least trace of the green tea. 
It is Said that Buddhist monks from the Ch' an 
monastery ob T'ien-mu S}an, in Chekiang, introduced 
the Chien yao into Japan and that the designation 



as 



"temmoku" is derived from this origin. 



Sung (960-1279 A.D.) Chien-nung Fu in Fukien. 



Exhibition 



Lit. 



1929 Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst, 

veranstaltet von der Gesellschaft 
für ostasiatische lunst und der 
Preussischen Akademie der Künste, 
Berlin, Katalog no.539. 

1931 Department of Far Eastern Art of 
the Museums of Berlin (Germany). 

1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland; 

Hobson "Guide to the pottery of the Far East" 
Hobson "The potter' s Art" 
Okakuro Kakuzo "The book of tea' . 



; 








! 


i: 
1; 
l: 
I: 



):t: 



i i 



( 



i»!»-*' 







I i 



>-\ : : r 



'■ ^W. 



> ; 




♦ >* 






^ . 



i.\ • 



'J ^. 



45, 



Small Vase with Long Nei^k 
H. 18 cm.; 7.15" 



81 



Middlehard grey-red wäre with a leaf-green glaze 
which, due to burial in the earth, has bccome silver 

Irideaoent. . , 

The decoration, moulded in low relief , prune twigs 
and volute Ornaments is yellow colored; so is 
the rim, 

Ming. 1368-1644 A.D. 

Exhlbi^ion: 1929 Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst 
i-xnioivi" veranstaltet von der Gesellschaft 

f*ir ostasiatische Kunst und der 
Preussischen Akademie der Künste, 
Berlin. Katalog no.676. 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (HoilanlJ. 




V 



\4 




w 



■■■m 



•T**.- 



x-^fe ^»._>^ . Aj-Bft<MMaa^'«^kjkA..di:^l^ :.lit »-t«i^»>iL_ii^. i^^. . 



: 4 ^ ■ kj^&kK • 




f 



1. , . '" ■^^•, 



f t 

II ' 



( 



ll 



a'H 










- . ' 



I • 



:\y. . 



*fS 



82 



46* 



Gourd-shaped Poi'eelain Bottle. 
H. 24 cta. ; 9.5" 



The body of the rase is of fine grain, unctous and 
yery white i The glazo is thick. and solid. 
The decoration is painted in underglaze Imperial 
b 1 u e and ooj^per red, "Which was 
at its best at this time"(Hobson) . 

The style of the decoration is fresh and spontaneous. 
Below: T?ro phoenix (fing huang) , the emblem of the 
empress, between cloud and fire Ornaments. 
Above: Symbols of good luck and fire Ornaments. 
On the bottom the reign mark of Ch*6ng Hua. 

Ming, Ch'gng Hua 1465-1487 A.D. 

Exhibition : 1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland). 



Lit. : Hobson 



"The Potter« s Art", 1935 

" The reign of Ch' eng Hua (1465-8") and 
before the reign of Hsüan TS (1426-35) 
were regarded as one of the classic 
periods in the oeramics of this 
dynasty, The blue and white and under- 
glaze red are specially mentioned." 




I 



I 



!■ 

V 

v 
V.. . . 

tf • - • i 

♦». . ■ • 



.5 



ff'' 



> 



d'^ 



83 



47. 



A 



[ tiiti 




Small Fruit->shapfcd Vas^ 
H. 15,5cm. ; 6,1" 






r. 



.... -ir '^-"•' >_•- 



Poraellaneous wäre with soft looking, creaay-white 
glaxe, minutely crackled. At the rim a lizzard 
and a beetle are applicated In high relief. 

Body and glaze merge insensibly Into each other, 
having a charm of their own. So-called "B 1 a n c 
de Chine". 

Mlng 1368-1640 A.D, t«-hua, province of Fukien. 



Lit. 



Hobson "The Potter^s Art". 1935, 

Schmidt, Robert "Chinesische ReramikV ,Taf «1 8^f. 



u 



I 






SM 



— .. — ^.^-_^_. — . 



I ' ■ " » * • ii 







» .! 



'1 

I 




! 



V * 




d.* 









i - •? 'i: ^r , , 






A 



84 



48. 



Porcelain Jar> 
H.27.3 cm.; 11" 



The body of the big jar is of w h i t t material 
with a pure limpid glaze; the eombined effect shows 
a white which Hobson compares with "^ell-set curds". 

On this background the decoration of peonies with 
their leaves is masterfully distributed in b 1 u e 
which bXends harmoniously with the white. 

This b 1 u e , which varies from a deep saphire to 
a pale blue, receives life and movement from its 
graded washes. 

The spontaneousness of the Ming painter is super- 
seded by perfect workmanship. 

The ^rim is proteoted by a copper collar. 
Carved teak wood cover and stand. 



Ch 



' ing Dynasty, K' ang Hsi (1662-1722 A.D*) 



Lit. : Hobson »'Guide to the pottery and porcelain 

of the Far East" 1924 
Hobson "Potter' s Art" 1935. 



1 



i 




■V. 
%' 



•#. * • ■ « « I 




"iSSp 



fv 






1 



.'•-r-! 



:| 



T| 









t^ 



.5 




85 



;;mj 



49, Small Porcelain Bowl, 

Diam. 17.4 cm. ; 7.2" 
H. 4 cm.; 1.8" 

The porcelain material, glaze and decoration of 
exquisite finiah. 

Insiie the bsttom a big imperial five-clawed dragon 
en face in iron-red on underglaze b 1 u e 
waves; white are the breaks as well as the wide 
rim, undecorated except for a small blue double line. 
Outside, in the »ame color scheme, ten small dragons 
en profile, in different shapes and movements on 
waves. 

Under the bottom the seal mark of the reign of 
Ch' ien Lung. 

Ch'ing Dynasty, Ch'ien Lung (1736-95 A.D.) 

txhibition: 1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland) 

Lit.: Hobson "Guide to the Pottery and Porcelain 

of the Far East", 1929: 
" The long and prosperous reign of 
Ch'ien Lung was the last of the great 
periods of Chinese ceramic history. 
The celebrated T'ang Ting was now 
appointed to the supreme control of 
the Imperial factory; and during his 
rule, which ended in 1749, the King- 
techen potters touched the zenith of 

their skill". 
Robert "Chinesische Keramik", 1924, 

Tafel 126 d. 




I 



:: 



n 
u 



Schmidt , 



t; 



ftif' 



~'*f-H^<i*M^:- 




rf 



f^i-' 



.» in 



.r 



':.^ 



50 4 



Small Vase with Long Keck 
H.l« <?m.; 4.15" 



86 



\ ii- 



. 

I* * 

u 

: 



1 



*!t! 



1 



l! 




4 .• «« » 



i J A 



F« .: 



• -• 



* V 



■ r* 



\f\ 



I 



The glaze of the porcelain vase is so-called 
"Clairc de Lune'*,a pale blue 
shade which was obtained by mixing cobalt with 
the white feldspatic glaze. 
Under the foot the reign mark of Ch»ia Ching. 

Ch'ing Dynasty, Ch'ia Ching (1796-1320 A.D.) 
Exhibition : 1938/41 Cremeente Museum, Dtn Haag (Holland) 



Lit. 



Hobson 



"The Chia Ch»ing period is from the 
ceramic point of view a Prolongation 
of the Ch'ien Lung." 



E f 




.^•l 



r 



r 






;■ '^ 



I «' 



•^ 




I 



87 



'»f^ 



51. 



Poroelain Plate Decorated in Black and Gold 



Diam. 23i5 om. ; 9" 



I ! 



It 



The poroelaiji plato belonged to a table Service which 
was ordcjred in the seventeenth or eighteenth Century 
in China for European use . White porcelain from 
Ching-t§ ChCn is decorated aftbr a European engraving, 
a foreign merchant brought to Canton, so well or so 
:iuriously as the Chinese copist understood the matter. 

The black lines of the European engraving arü given 
diligently. Beeause of these black lines, this kind of 
porcelain is called in the Netherlands "Zwarte Kunst", 
whiiö the general term is »^Chine de Commandb 

Our plate shoivs inside its bottom :: nythologicai 

soene, probably one of Jove' s love affairs. His ^agie 

and two cupids are present, a peacock too. There are 

some misunderstandings in the reproduction of the 

flurroundings. A gold ornamented edge leads to the 

broad rim with interlacud band-ornaments in blac^k 

and ßold. 

Porcelain from Ching-tg Ch€n, the decoration probably 

Canton. 

Seventeenth - eighteenth Century. 

Exhibition: 1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland). 

Lit.: Hobson "Guide to the Pottery and Porcelain of 

the Far East" . ^ 

Schmidt, Robert "Chinesische Keramik" Tafel 13. 
Zimmermann, r:rnst "Chinesisches Porzellan Tafei 13.. 

Pro Memoria 

This pl-it. bclongsd to the famuus Chin. de Com:.c^de 
ooll.ction of Mrs. Sophia Eltzbaoh.r Amsterdam Sh. 
buiU up her volumlnous colloction by P^J^f "^^^^ JJ ;^-^ 
M^-fVi^rirnds Thereforc we can presume v-hat .--so tr.is 
p at iaf :;d! :o%rder of the Dutch ^^^\'-f;'^^^,^'^ 
founded by Pietor's Coen in 1602. After the death of 
irritzbLhcr in 1900 the .hole collcca^^^^^ 

llr' ^his tha lleSt ion .as in the Schloss Museum 
mothtr. Thus tne >''-^-^« f<niiection has not sur- 

for her descendents. 



\ 




w 



f » ■ f ^ ttm 



>^mt-,- 



II 



I 



l 



w 

I 




i, i 




' r 






88 



V. tMnh.TiT r.HINt.SL PAINTING 






=2 Birds and Flowters. 

Kakemono on darfcened Silk in brocadt mounting. 
102 X 49 om. ; 40.3 x 18.5" 

■^ f.- or. -ho branches above him a pair of 3mai..r 
VHrrt.*- on the eround below a p h e s a n t among 

::rri:t W; a.: blosso«s. another with ««all whUe 

LMeMglt'slde ded.catory inscript.on of th.rty one 

^•hara^ters. 

Tuan (Mongol) Dynasty 1260-136 A.D. 

From Daizen, Kioto . 

r.rs "P-iintinß and Caliigraphy*' : 
p.6. •' In 1260 the Mongols becaac mast^rs 

ptinUng contxnued in the Sung traditio., 
,Uh a eertain difm^^^ 

The life ^J^^i^f^'^.giif.cant motive 
become» a far more signx ,, ^^^ 

^K.^ ^^th US Flowers espeoxaUy, lor 

^°' ^7!d with Jirds, a3 if songs and 
as3o=iated with bir . ^ eio^uence 

movcojents ol tne oiru „ 

to the silence of th« flowers. 



Lit. ; 




1 m-i 



i: 



I- 




dt I' i .A. 




i 



'- ■'(, 




'■*P: 



89 



VI. ANCIENT CHIWESK LACQlLbR 



53, Rectangular Box For Incense wlth Painted DecorBitionr '^ 

H. 4 cm.; 1.6" 

G. 6 X 6 cm.; 2.6 x 2.6" 

The foundation of the lacquer work is wood. 

The decoration (hua ch* i) is a painted upright 

acarlet celestial five-clawed dragon in profile 

amidst clouds and lightening Ornaments. 

The favorite three color scheme of the Ming is used: 

Scarlet, green and brown on black ground. 

Both parts of the box are framed with lead, 

Ming (1368-1644 A.D.) Sixteenth Century. 

Lx colloctions Prof .Grosse , Dr^A. Breuer, 

Exhibition: 1929 Ausstellung Chinisischer Kunst, 

veranstaltet von der Gesellschaft 
für ostasiatische Kunst und der 
Preussischen Akademie der Künste, 
Berlin. Katalog No.772, 
1935/36 Royal Academie of Arts, London. 

Internat. Exhibition of Chinese Arts. 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland). 

Lit.-: "Transactions of the Japan Society of London". 
Vol. XII, plate IX. ^^ 

Leicht Ashton "Sculpture and Lacquer i^Ot> . 

"Lacquer is one of the oldest arts m 
China. The foundation of the^material 
is the natural gum of the Ch*i shu 
tree. The gum in dried form is crushed 
and strained through cloth to reime 
it is next ctlored to the various 
tints required and then ready for use. 
The Chief colors are: scarlet, yellow, 
black, brown, also green. . . 
With the materials thus obtained the 
lacquerer paints on his coats over a 
foundation of wood, metal or paper mtlchce 
in successive layers, never iess than 
three, allowing each coat to J;y ^^^J^^ 
the next is applied. The object is then 
ready for decoration... 
The Chief Center of painted lacquer 
was Chia-hsing fu in the province of 
Chekiang." 




1^1 






l4 



IT' 



* 



"«^iÄT^ ■ 





Rb 



U i 









m 



•'.\ 



6ä 



-ft. ' 



1 |i 



•3'; 






j- •' 



»' 






^? ? 



/ 1 ' , < 



»■ • 



V .. •. 



*. 



< 
> 



' .'W 



! 



w 



\ ./ 



: -n .'• 






■'<. 






^ »4 > 



:;.■•"'» 






t 



:> 



*> 



• '»:! 



■•-.•■ - ' 



\-i -^ 



■', i t 



90 






VII. AKCIüJJT CHINESii. RUGS 



The majority of rugs was producod at a comparatively 

late date. 

Apart from the early fragmentß foiind by Aurel Stein in 
Central Asia on the old "Silk-tracks" , a few pieces 
of T'ang time , part of emperor Shomu's gift, exist 
in the Soso-in at Nara. 

The nomade tribes of China' s western borders in 
Chinese-Turkestan brought industrial art of carpot- 
weaving already from Central Asia. Besides, Tamerlan 
settles Persian carpet-weavers at Samarkand about 1408. 

Nevertheless the Chinese carpet develops a style of 
its own, primary in its principal centres of produotion 
at Yarkand and Kashgar, later. when the carpet-weaving 
industry is greatly promoted by the emperors K^ang hsi 
(1662-1722) and Ch' ien lung (1736-1796) in the provmc. 
Sohantung and in Peking. Here the proper, Pj^^f /^^^^^J^,^ 
patterns develop which differ greatly from the Turkest^n 

designs, 

Both have in common principal features, diverging from 

the carpets of the Nearer tast, Mu=h looser knitting, 

r^ottin/of the pile to offset the angularity of thu 

desigi;? difJerent oolor schemos, yellow and Uue being 

the nrodominant ghade»» ^, <^«^^ y^t 

The piain Chinese patterns trace back ^o the very anci.nt 

ait of silk-weaving. which in the antiquity brought the 

»^Qmc »«cif.rp«*" to the Chinese, 

Jhftradi onal use of ao.epted motives form the bas.s 

of many a pattern. Floral -«^.-^f .J^^ ^ ,'th. four 
Prunus, p.ony. Chrysanthemum, ^^J^^^^^^^^^^J ° , rolc, 

and water, lightning and ^ ^^'=- f =° '*':;j,igif Buddhist" 
(Pa kua), the "Twelv« Ornaments , the fcignx. ^ 

emblems , 

Münsterberg "Chinesische Kunstgeschi.hi., 



Toyei Shuko 



Band II, 1912. 
"Illustrated Cataloguc- ot 
Ancient Imperial Treasare, 
called ShoBoin", vol. II. 



..Seres" : The native name of the natural silk f.bre 

was 



♦*8SÜ" 



\ 



■#• 



f l; 



m 




^ 



^ 



jt^ 






1 



I 



91 



.■13 



wi 







r 




T . 



•• 1 



^ ' 4 






I 



54. 



Shantung Wool Rüg. 
200 X 256 cm.; 79 x 101.1" 



In the middle of the creamy ground a circular mcdaillon 
in bluc and yellow. In it the lionlike shaped "Fo-Dogs", 
These dogs (Fo is the Chinese term for Buddha) guard 
buddhistic sanctuaries, the male carrying the ball-shaped 
chu (= jewel), the Symbol of purity. 

Over the rest of the croainy surface somö prunus twigs 
in orange, yellow and brown are gracefully scattered, 
while the four corners are filled with scrolled stcms with 
peonies, the "mu dan hua" , sym>ol of wealth and esteem, 
being simultaneously on of the four seasons' flowers. 

The borders are dark: Chinese meander or Thunder pattern 
in blue. yellow, brown on orange ground, surrounded by 
dark blue ground with peonies and tondril pattern. 



a 



About 1750 (Ch'ien Lung) . Province Shantung. 

Lit.: Holt "Rugs oriental and occidental antique and 

modern", Chicago 1908. 



Exnibition : 1929 



Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst 
veranstaltet von der Gesellschaft 
für ostasiatische Kunst und der 
Akademie der Künste, Berlin, 
Katalog no.ll22. 



W> t 



f 



.4 




i 




X-- 



■>■»*»'. • 




!|»5 




« ( 




l ■ 



I . 




92 



55. 



Chiriüse-Turkestan Wool Rüg. 
265 X 120 cm.; 104.1 i 47 •5" 



Ploral and geometric pattern on deep ruby-colored 
ground. 

Principal features are the three circular modaillons 
in the centre part with cloud and floral motives on 
blue ground, The "reversed line" in black fills the 
four Corners. 

On the borders tendril-work on blue, flower rosettes 
on ruby and the **8wastiKa-band-ornament" called 
" wan dsi bu daw tou = good luck without end " on 
yellow ground. 

Yarkand, East Chinese Turkestan, West China. 
Nineteenth Century. 



Literature: 



56. 



Bushell "Chinese Art", 1910, vol. II. 
Hackmack "Der Chinesische Teppich". 1921 
Münsterberg "Chinesische Kunstgeschichte", 

1912, Band II. 



Chinese-Turkestan Wool Rüg. 
220 X 115 cm.; 86.14 x 45.4" 



The background of the middle field is nearly turquoise 
whereby the change of shades adds to ^^\Pf ^J^^^ . . 
charm. In it a pomegranate tree, the symbol of fera- 
lity. grows in yellow out of a small vase; ^ts Uigs, 
horiEontically and symetrically arranged fUl the 
ground; the leaves and fruits are, in spite of styli- 
aing, clearly recognizable. ^^.ev 

Two Mörders enclose the rüg Both in ^«^- J^JJ J 
shades the inner with floral ornaments, the outer 
wuS Jhe "swastika-band-ornament" in brownish tmts. 

Kashgar, East Chinese Turkestan, West China. 
About 1800. 




■rw»;- 






fff 



f 






m! { 



^i 



l 




i ■ 



r '_ Zr 



■ ^ - 



93 



57. 



Areade Praygr Rüg. 
180 I 78 cm.; 70.14 x 30.11" 



The whole surface of this rüg with a tile-red background 
is divided into Sil prayer niches, buildmg together 
the "areade" . 

Each niche is decorated with the pomegranate tree a 
very ancient orlental symbol of fortiUty; 0^^ f J 
»ft«; »rows a stalk wlth a blossom on the top and tnigs 
arranged syLrrically .ith more or less ^ty -1 le-es 
Sd flowers in two shades of blue -^^/j^^J/^^^^J* 

The same two shades of blue ^«/"* J°\ii' f.Tith 
of the niches and the background of the borders with 

their flower motives in tile-red. 

Pine wool with a silky lustre. 

Kashgar, East Chinese Turkestan. West China. 

Nineteonth Century. 

These rugs are also called "^^^^^^,^\^IZTJ^^'" 

xneac xu^^ c-^fnatpd old and famous 

after tho more central "^^^^^J /^^^^ ^„ ^he Uohamedan 

capital of Turkestan. T^^^^^^t J''Afe-end of the 
p^ulation for common prayers the gable ena 

niche pointing to ^h^^^^i, ^^^^.^^^i^:, pattern seems clear. 
Here the connection wUh the mamxc pa ^.^^^ ^^^^^ 
The design "sembles the Moudjur ^^^^ 

Shows the same Ji-^^^^^.i'^^^.furd a^^ differ in the 
most of the niches remam unfiiiea ^ 

solors of their background. 

v.artPrsen "Chinesische Kunstgeschichte", 
Literature: Feddersen ^^^^^^^^^^^^ 193. 




I 



i' 



li: 








94 



* •> 



<¥ 



mm' 



^'' 



* • r. 



! 1^ 



li ■ 



B. 



JAPAN 



VIII. Sword-Gear Maaters 

The sword-gear is not forged by the blade-smith 
who's occupatio!! had an almost religious eharaoter; 
particular schools of artists in metal wrought them. 
The jaixanese distinguish between decoration-ornaments 
on the sword and the decorated parts .^^ ^^^^"".^^^^^V 
Tn the first belong the sword-knive ^ ä • d z u K. a ; , 
'the B^ord^eedle (logai) , whxch found their Places - 
both sides of the scabbard, and the .mall ornaaents on 
both sides of the hilt (menuki); /, ...n „„d 

To the latter the guard (tauba), pommel (fuohi) and 
hilt-ferrule (kashira). 
The Goto sohool is oonsidered the classioal 

aehool of chiseled sword gear. /^to im?^ 

lllll founded by the ^^-uraiQoto Maseru (1439 1512) 

who was born in the province ^^'^l^^^l^'^ll^^lZ., 
luxurious oourt of the Ashikaga Shoguns. His artist 

name is Tujo, . slxteen generaticns, 

Durlng four centuries (1460-1856;, ^^ us style 

the Goto sohool will P^^^^^^J^L P^in el the'great 

?:Jd:i^iordf (d:r.X)"a:i";hrii%oiioL.s the sa.u.ai, 

illo'lfli-e first .aster ^^.°^^-orated sword gear w.th 
leiiefs. The fourth aoto .aste G^o t^o^ K^^ r ^^ 

(Mitsuige 1530-1620). ^ /J^^J^^^.i,^, ,sing silver for 

use human ^^«7/%^fi. J^om the fifth master, Goto 
faces and hands, ""^^"J^" ,n ,j,g first k o d 
Tokuju Mitsutsuge J^t^-lW, the 
with the Short steel blade have origi 




z u 



k a 



A 
s 



im uiio o^^v ~ .„11,, 

1 .v= rr.f^ masters used prinoipaliy 
s ground f ^^^\i^:i5:;%:^:'ef of a basis of oopper 

" ^ ^ "^ ^ ;^™?xtures of silver and gold. 
with varying admixtures °^^ aurfaoe 
They decorated the ^g^r^a x^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^ .^ p^^tly 

goldplated shakudo. 
Shoguns at Yedo. 



I 



'* 




'^^^*1^ 



t^ 



95 



•J 



r f 



f -: «^ - ^ *1 ' 5 ' .^ •' 






.1 * 



t i 



Horks of the Goto mastors for other purpos^s than 
8word-gear are very rare. I only know of tho grasps 
of sliding doors (hikite) In form of hanging bamboo 
vases with various floner decorations, furnished for 
the pleasure seat of the prinoe Katsura of Kacho 
near Kioto, and the nagikakushi, nail heads.used to 
concell the nails which join temple-oolumn and 
ceiling-beam. In the first templo. Higashi Hongwanji 
which Sas buht on order of Hldeyoahi, they w.ro in th. 
form of floating tennins^ 

The few kodzukas her. described are tho rest of a 
small collection built up in Tokio 1908. 
For the introduction into this br&nch of Japanese 
art I am indebted to «ry friends Gustav Jacoby and 
raul\autier .ho o.ned onc of t e .03 . rtan.^^^^^_ 

°.;i^rirt: vziirz'^ dLi:; u in xokio and 

gave me valuable advico. 



Ir.:-: 



Lit. : 



Ausstellung Japanischer Kleinkunst, Sammlung 
Gustav Jacoby, Kunstgewerbe Museum Berlin x905. 
Jussreliung japanischer Ku.st«erke, Sanunlung 

Uoslö. Berlin 1909. seh^^ertzieraten" , 
"Japanische ^tichbiä-ter uno d ^^^.i^hnis 
Sammlung Georg Oed«r. Bes.hreioena ^^^^^^ 
von Paul Vautier. Herausgegeben von Otto Kumm 

Berlin 1916. 



«* 




.*t^^ 



~w^ 



lü 



I 



'I 




/•♦ 






96 



58/59. Two Nail-Convealers in the Shape of Floating Termins, 

L. 45 cm,; 17.12" ♦ 46 cm,; 18.1»» 
H. 17 cm.; 6.11" * 19 cm.; 7.8" 



Tho two Tonnins (sanscrit Apsaras). Buddhist angels 
of femalo sex, are represented floating in the air 
and plRying on musical Instruments , One is holding 
the flute (tohou) to her lip», while the other carries 
the drumsticks in hoth hands. 

Both figurines wre fixed to the timber-work of the 
tomple Higashi Hongwanji to conceal the nails which 
joined temple-column and ceiling beam. ("Kugikakughi") 

Copper ground plated with gold, silver and shakudo. 

The trifold patterned gold is used to chisel the 

Streaming gowns and ribbons, the silver to represent 

the uncovered upper part of the body, faces, arms, feet, 

and the shakudo the hair. 

Shakudo is used also for the bracelets as well as for 

the blossom ornaments which are layed on the gold as 

decoration for the gowns besides engravings and trellis 

pattern in black enamel. 

Attributed to Goto Kojo. 1530-1620. 



Exhibition: 1912 



1935 



^'Ausst-aiung altsr Ostasiatischer Kui.st", 
veranstaltet in der Königlichen Akademie 
der Künste zu Berlin. Kat.-.log no.280/i. 

"Ausstellung Kunst des alten Japan", 
Basel, Gewerbe Museum, Kat.no. 13. 



■^m i' 



i 



IIP 

ti- 



li; 



Otto Kümnel wrote 1912 "Gotomeister in the beginning 
of the soventeenth oentury, originally in the ttmple 
Higashi Hongwanji". ^c.wthat 

at K fo finishcd 1.02?, also the usa of hunan figurcS 
and silver for faco and hands are mentioned as 
charaoteristic for this master. 









.;^. 



"l^^iÄ r*"*" 




1. s. 




Small wonder that thc Gotomaster yielded to such an 
unoommontask. It was the omnipotent Taiko (great 
oounselor) Hideyoshi (1512-1598) himself, lover of 
sumptuous decoration, who ordered the transfer of the 
headquarters of the weatern hranch of the Hongwanji 
sect to Kioto and was in consequencG interested in 
the erection of a templc building which met his taste, 
still to be Seen in the Main Hall of thü Nishi- 
Hongwanji, eröctcd at Kioto in 1591. 
The Higashi-Hongwanji temple was only finished after 
Kisdoyoshi*3 doath, when leysau Togugawa, Hideyoshi' s 
greatest general,had succeeded in maUng Japan his own. 

In 1768 a fire destroyed the temple. Among the few 
things resoued, these tennins were saved and came 
into the possession of the counts Otani, high priescs 
of the Hondo seot. 

IVhen on July 5, 19o9 the Otani possessions were sold 
by auction, I was able to got the tennins. 

Kümmel "Kunst Chinas, Japans, Koreas»' Handbuch der Kunst. 
^issenBohaft.,. 1929. (ill.154, p.l72.) 



f 






w 



#. 



>w*^- 



i 



\K 



ll 



i 





i 




I 

i 




98 



60. 



Kodzuka 



A golden rake in relief beside a tombstone with gold 
inscription on grained Shakudo ground. Frame half gold, 

half shakudo, 

The reverse half gold plated, half even shakudo. 

Goto Master, eighteenth Century. 



61. 



Kodzuka 



Two monks with rosaries in their hands approach timidly 
an oni who, disguised as a samurai, is going to strike 
the great tomple-bell with the hammer, 
Rolief in gold, silver, shakudo, with inlaying and 
engraving on grained shakudo ground. Gold frame. 
Reverse shibuiehi with signature. 

Goto Master, eightecnth Century. 



62. 



Kodzuka 



Saigyo Hoshi, (prince Sato Hioye Ilorikiyo, 1115^1188) 
as pilgrim Stands lost in viowing the Fuji-yama, 
The famous contour of the ijiountain Is engraved on 
even shakudo ground; the pilgrim, the lotus, the 
cloud-band are inlaid in gold and silver. 

Province Kaga, eightoonth Century. 



63. 



Kodzuka 



A hare sitting between grasses looks at the moon, 

which is half covered by clouds. 

Ground matorial is iron, the hare gold relief, tne 

moon and grasses silver. oV>.n-h«» 

Tho reverse is gilded and decorated by f^^^^ shrubs 
in engraving.; Signatur«: Matsushita Yoshiro. 

Province Kaga, seventconth Century. 



64, 



Kodzuka 



An Rpe pursuing with its eycs a Jragon-xy. 
Ground material iron, the ape relief in shakudo, 
the dragon-fly gold inlaying. 
Province Kagft, eighteenth Century. 



k? 1- 



«... 

¥ 

v 

i: 



i 



■ * ■. 
* 't 

• MM 

1 ■»' 

' • I ■ • 




f^... 






fl 



99 





F. 

f 


■i 


J 


i 






■1 

















■i« 



« 1 



H 



./ 



■1 



"■/: 






65. 
A 



Kodzuka 



t7Ti£ is inlaid on even shakudo ix; «^^^and silv.r 
The top of the kodzuka is framed in gold, the bott 
in silver. 
Province Kaga, eighteenth Century. 



om 



66. 



Kodzuka 



67. 



Tiger in rain. Relief and gold inlaying on i^on. 
Signature: Suzuki Kazugasu. 
Mito, eighteenth Century. 

Kodzuka 

Chorry-tree tranch in relief on iron ground, 

enricLd by blossoms in silver and gold. 

Slgnature. 

Mito, eighteenth Century. 



Province Kaga; r6nown in the 

Works of art of ^ho provinc^ K.g^- are r ^^^ 

eighteenth and nincteenth c.ntury ^ ,, ,ech- 

of gold and ^^^^^l'^^'^'ll^.iX Ground netal mostly 
nioally and ^'^^^^^^^JJ^^n in mW col^^^- 
Sic« the artlovmg daimios ol ^^g ^„^^^^ 

to time the most i-^P-f^jf, ^eouted by their pupils 
to their C50urt, many work." execu^ 

Show the Goto Ftylfe. 

Mito: ., ^ „. -nowerful and artloving princ.s 

in W. i t , resxdenceof powert ^.^^^^^^ ^ 

groat «any ^^«'^^^"'''^J:^!! ^ middle of the nxne- 
middle of the eighteenth to the m 

teenth Century. 





f ■. • 



( 



■•. • 






J 



\* 



• • 




100 



IX ANCIüJ^T J APANESE POTTERY 

3ome notos on pottery used in thD Cha-no-yu. 

r^u r,« vu literally means "tea' s hot water" but is 
always translated with TEA CEREMONY. 
Tr, Tat>--ri the potter' s art developed in tha thirte^nth 
Century and it came at thc saoe J ^^^^ .^ 

of the Chinese cult of ^^^'f/ ^^ '^f;, i.plements: 
b.came necessary above all to g t P^^^^^^^ ^^^ 

tea - bowls = c n a w a n, tui^ j 

estimated as o h a w a n . 

The potter Toshiro l-rned Chinese .ethods on hxs 
journey to China in ^223 to 1^^7 ^.^^,^ ^^.^^^^^ 

On his return to f PJ^^^^^j,^i/3 jf^ t o a J a r 8 

material, making ^i'^^J^^^^^e^ brown, th. famous 

_<»v ■Plnwino clazes Ol an amoei i'i^ ) 

with flowing gl „ , Chinese piece. 

.. K a r a n o n o „;^'o . t o in the province 

generations of famous potters. 

. .nnt^-ibuted to the rapid progross of the 
Ihree ovents conti iDuita 

Japanese tea =eraaics. aecular tea-ceremony by 

The first .as the ^'^^'''f^^'lCL^.ur. of the shogun" s 
Ashikaga Yoshimasa ^^^^^^/-'J .^^ »he Ginkakuji or 
dignity. In 1479 ho built ^-^f ^^ ^^, favorites Soami 
sllver Pavillon «^ .'^^'/"•/fi'.^ated the tea oormony 
and Shuko he Pr^^^,f°\!fi„ the first tiny tea-room 
to tho rank of a fine «^//Jf, ,,,^ ,he canon pres- 
(cha-Bhit8u) built J- -=^/^^ ,, ,,e proper sxre for 
orlbing four and a hau ^ 

such a room. jjtinn aBRinst Corea m ^i>-ic, 

Second: Hideyoshi' s oxped.Uon^g ^^^^ potters were 

m the wake of which %"^'^°f °'ious parts of Japan 
V „vt hft-k who sottled in various *' - . ^ g and 
brought ba^K, «"^ TAkatori, ».i" 

at S a t 8 u m a , T a k a 

£ a r a t 8 u. 



ti 




T^;. 



,, . ..«11 



rpk*-r 



■ c« «4 f — — 



t 



101 



< ( 



• i 



i:!l 



i ' 



Third: thc Convention of thc various schools of 
tea-drinking which Hidoyoshi called together \n 1594 
at bis palace of Pushimi. Here one of the greatest 
tea-masters Sen-o-Rikyu collated, purified and 
codified the tea-ceremony. 

He took up the simplicity and ralsed it to a canon 
of taste. The worship of simplicity and of the 
antique in objets of art, together with the observance 
of an elaborate code of etiquette are the doctrine 
and discipline of the tea-ceremony , which has never 
varied since. 

The Japanese potters did not work in great organised 
oentres like those of Ching-t8-ChÖn. Unusally one or 
two potters ran small work shops. Hence the great 
variety of the wäre, hence the individuality of every 

piece. , , * \ 

The Japanese tea-masters ( c h a j i n = tea man; 
lent their Inspiration to the manufacture of the 
Utensils used in the tea-ceremony . The beauty of the 
used ceramics depends mostly on the expediency 
expressed in form and glaze. The great manipulatod 
skill is often masked by roughness. One or more 
flowing glazes cover the wäre, running partly in drops 
and ending abruptly before reaching the base. 
At first glanae these potteries appear very simple. 
But all who View them in the right attentive mood 
TiV find the neblest pieces to be animated creations 
befongi^g to the most beautiful which have been exeouted 
in th! c!ramic field. Hence it becomes ^^^^^J^/^^Jf^^^^ 
that the Japanese equaliJ^e such pieces to sword blade 

only. 

The esteem in which these '^'^^^'\''lll'}t\^,T 
the dlfference betwoen Japanese and foreign art 

appreeiation especially Jif f ^J^^;^, ^^i,,. ^^ereas 
Tho foreigner considers first ^J^ jf^J^;;,;tance that 
for the Japanese it is of the g^^^J^^f J^JJJ, translation 
auch a piece possesses "ajl . ^^^ . \. ^.. ^f a 
»Tslt^äoes not give the füll .eanxng ^Je a . f » , 

piece depends «^^ onj^ ^J^t a e'?h Xs r cal events 
art itself . Essential for it are ine n 

which it lived to see and t^e manner n which ^^ .„p^^tanoe 
treated. Hence the ^^'^"^«^JtL^he old brfcade bags 
and essential for the ^J^f 'iJ'',ilf tastfuUy adapted 
with their lini-8» °^,; ^" ^l d ivory lids and the 
to the color of the 8^*'^' "^^ ^y,^ shape of the piece. 
old piain wooden boxes fitted lo vn 



i: 



■i:T 





vf 



^.y 



103 



■( 1 •« 



>. 's-^ 






\ 
♦V.- 



v 



«:: 



•-»?. 



:^< 



J' < 



»- .-■ 






: • • .} 






^ « '. 



ii»»" 



. -C • '*i»:\i 't •> J,' 



S- . 



^ •- 



i 



j. 



. ^■ 



'■> • i 






li 



l' : 



I cannot do better than to quote litcrally Okakuro Kakuzo 

in the following paragraphs: 

" Teaism is a cult foujided on the adoration of the 
beautiful amoja^ the sordid facts of every day 
exiatenee. It iaculcates purity and harmony, the 
mystery of mutual charity, the romanticism of the 
sooial Order. It Is essentially the worhip of the 
Imperfecta as it is an attempt to accomplish something 
possible in this impossible thing we know as life. 

The Philosophy of Tea is not pure aestheticism in 
the ordinary acceptance of the term, for it expresses 
conjointly with ethics and religion our (i.e. Japanese) 
point of Tiew about man and nature. 
It is hygiene for it enforces cleanliness, it is 
economic, for it shows comfort in simplicity rather 
than in tho complex and costly; it is moral geometry 
in as much as it defines our sense of proportion 
to the universe: It represents the true spirit of 
Eastern democracy by making all its votaries 
aristocrats in taste." 

•• It is in the Japanese tea-ceremony that we sea the 
oulmination of toa ideals. Tea became more than an 
idealization of the form of drinking. It is a religion 

of the art of life. 

The beverage grew to be an excuse for the purity and 

refinement, a sacred function at wbich the host and 

tho guest joined to produce for that occasion the 

utmost beatitude of the mundane, 

The tea-room was an oaais in the dreary waste of 

existence, weary trarellors could meet to drink from 

the commoi spring of art-appreciation. The ceremcny 

was an improvised drama whose plot was woven about 

the tea, the flowers and the painting. 

Not a color to disturb the tone of the room, not a 

sound to mar the rhythm of things, not a gesture to 

obtrude on harmony, not a word to break the unity 

of the surroundings, all movements to be Performed 

Bimply and naturally - such were the aims of the 

tea-oeremony. „»-p.,i 

And stranelY enoußh, it was often successful, 
And sirangiy e^^u^ix, v^v,^,.ri it all- Teaism was 

A subtle philopophy lay behind it an. 

Taoism in disguise.*' 



I 



II 



( i««i«».»t« 




I 




rf* 



-V 



Wr' 





4 



! 



liil t 



.» . 















'T j i ^ ' /• i 



^ *■• • • • • 



> - .. ^ ^ 






♦• 1 



« » 



•» - ,• «.' jV Ä -• 



r -^ . 



*1 ' < 



i .* > 






/. 



f . 



\ ^ VI 






■f- 



t. 



. f 



• Lwt' 



t a 






•• ♦ 



j 



. ^.. «^ 



7 «. J^ 



I r» 



. f 



•« /" 



c 
d 



XL 



104 



Pinally it is necessary to know thb meaning of the 

technical torm ••Itokiri", 

Ito is = thread, kiri = cut, together it means "Thread 

Mark", These marks , concentric lines under the base 

orignate when the pottery with a piece of string or' 

wire is cut from its bed on the whoGl. 

They trend 

a') as a rule from right to left : Hon-itokiri. 

sometimes from left ot right : Kara^mono =*Korean 
piece; which is thü resuit of the Korean praotice 
of tuming the wheel with the left foot. 
sometimes concentric circles appear : Maru-itokiri, 
sometimes concentric circles of greater distance: 
Uzu-itokiri; it means whirlpool and is used mostly 
on big jars, 

These marks are very carefully executed on the best 

pieces and the Japanese, describing these potteries, 

never forget to mention them. 

Bibliography . 

Abegg, Lilly "Yamato, der Sendungsglaube des japanischen 

Volkes", 1936. 
Chamberlain, Basil Hall "Things Japanese", 1905. 
Hobson "Pottory and Porcelain of the Far East", 1924. 
Kakuzo, Okakujra "The Book of Tea", 1906. 
Kümmel, Otto "Töpferarbeiten" in Ausstellung Sammlung 

Gustav Jacoby, 1905. 
Kümmel, Otto "Kunstgewerbe in Japan", 1911. 
Kümmel k Grosse "Ostasiatisches Gerät"» 1925. 



1 






i 


• 








i 






1 




1 





t:: 

t:: 

V- 



! 



% ^ 






V. 




c«-;^ w.»? ■^•- 



-^^ 



I la Mi«! ■■ ■■m ■■■■iniiiaiiil 



-•••^•li^ 



•Wl. 







ll 



Mill 



\H 



itilf 



I 



• I 



f i I" : 



I? 



I^ 



f • 



ü 



' . 



••■..1.-^ •« 

M * ^ 



X: ^ 





.>•» 









r 



I • 



i ■ 



. 'I 



105 



a. Pottery used in the Cha - no - yu . 



^ö' Chatsubo> Big Jar for Tea Leaves with Wooden Cover. 

fl* 18 cm.; 7" 

Red brown wäre with three loops, Dark brown glAie with 
metallic apecka and flecked yellowish runninÄ droDs. 
Ü2U itokiri. 

Seto before 1650, Southern Hondo, Province Owari« 

Eihibition : 1935 Gewerbe Museum Basel (Switzerland) , 

**Kun3t des alten Japans". Kat.no. 406. 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland) . 

^^» Chaire. Small Jar for Powdered Tea. 

H, 6 cm.; 2.2" 

Very thin war© of spherical form, so-called " B u n r i n " 
= appleform. Dclicate surface, Brown under- and Upper 
glaze, the latter with a very light purple glimmer, 
Ca3*eful Kara-mono*itokiri. 
Ivoty Cover, old brooade bag and box. 

ßeto, before 1750. 

Exhibition : 1935 Gewerbe Museum, Basel (Switzerland), 

Ausstellung "Kunst des alten Japans", 
latalog no.401. 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland). 

70. Chaire, Jar for Powdered Tea. 

H. 10 cm,; 4" 

Reddish wäre of stralght, slim cyllndrical form. 
Black-brown metallic glaze. 

5§S?f4o^e?:4?iiH^6cade bag and box. 

Seto. 

Exhibition : 1935 Gewerbe Museum, Basel (Switzerland), 

"Kunst des alten Japans", Kat.no. 400. 
1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland). 



\ 


;•>« 






1 


r 




1 ■: 




1 

1 > 

1: 
1. 





( 



tt::;:;; 






' 



'^rr^mki 



m^r 






p»' 



^f 



r7'T 



(I wr 



MIW^ 



;i'a 






M V i^ M '.I 



<ti ■■ ■ > 



t III la 



■f - ^ ,0 



1 c 




n' 



.r 






106 



71. 



Chaire, Jar for Powdered Tea, 
H, 7 cm.; 2.1^2" 



Form •'Daikai". Red-broim wäre with dark and light 

brown glase, 

Hon-itokiri, 

Ivory Cover, old brocade bag and box, 

Seto 

Ex collectlon Vautier. 



72. 



Chaire. Jar for Powdered Tea. 



H. 8 om.; 3.3" 

Beilied form with tied neck and two loops. 

Reddish brown wäre with coffae brown, metallic glaee, 

Hon-itokiri. 

Ivory Cover, old brooade bag and box. 

Takatori, Island of Kiushiu, province Chikuzen. 



73. 



Chaire, Jar for Powdered Tea, 



H. 10 cm.; 3.15" 

Straight, slim cylindrical form. 

Grey brown wäre with a thin black and a thick grey glaze. 

The grey glaze is ending in a drop on the black, 

shrivelled into distinct globales which are compared to 

" Dragon-skales" (ja katau) . 

Hon-itokiri. 

Ivory Cover, old brocade bag and box. 

Satsuma, princedom in the southern part of the island 
of Kiushiu. 

Eihibition : 1935 Gewerbe Museum Basel (Switzerland) , 

"Kunst des alten Japans", Kat.no. 455, 
1938/41 Gemeante Museum, Den Haag (Holland). 



I 






j 



ii;:i^;;;i 






SPfIPWWP 




x> 




f 




;i:i: 



-Jl ii 



»..ü. 1 . u. 




f) 



•t^f 




t •• 



t 



..*C0^ 



^- 1 -J fl'-« s' 



t.: - 3 H 



f V^f'".- 



ji: »• *;'•"- 



/': 



t^ 






# a. 




•« . .V 



107 



74. 



b. Pottery for every day use. 

Koro. Incenae Vase of Enameled Earthenware. 

H. 5,5 cm.; 2.2" 



CylindridÄl form, Greyish body with crackled yellowed 
glaze, decorated with sketehy landscape designs in blue, 
green^ gold enamel oolors. 

tioto, style of Ninsei, about 1700. 

Ninsei was a famous potter who chose his artist name 
after the temple of Ninwaji, close by his native yillage. 
Ho is the pupil of Sohaku, maater of tea-oeremonies, and 
famous at being able to evoke stimulating nature impres- 
ftions with a few strokea of his brush, 

With his decoration he atarted a national style of 
decoration which bocEune typical of Japanese pottery. 



75. 



Box with Lid of Pa i nted Earthenware. 

Diam. 11,5 cm.; 4.öa" 
H. 10 om.2 3,15" 



Grey wsire of spherical form with a thin creamy glase 

minutely crackled, painted in blue enamel color. In the 

blue ground foliage and blossom ornaments, bordered 

by Spiral bands, are spared. 

Spiral bands too bordor the circular medaillon on the 

top of the lid with the half-figure ofa Dutchma 

in the oostume of the seventeenth Century and with the 

Roman letters •• I S •• , 

These letters prove that the box was ordered by the 

Dutch East India Companyo the foundation of Pieter Coen 

in the South Asiatic and Oceanic Islands Sumatra, Java, 

Small Sunda Islands, in 1602. 

It seems probable that the box was manufactured in one 

of the small kilns around Nagasaki whereto the Dutch 

had access from their factory at Deshima, 

Like the "Chine de Commande" (cp.cat. •51) the figure 

of the Dutchman is painted after a European engraring, 

sinca the copist even trled to Imitate the lines of 

the original engraving, 

Nagasaki-yaki (?). Early eighteenth Century. 

Ex collection Paul Vautier. Tokio 1908. 






*)!>♦ 






V 
V 

v 




A ' 




J'f" 






r-W 



.'i 



-.'1 ' r '■■'■ -ti'' ■ .' '•' 






.fl' 



i .^' 



iC.'i- 



1 w 
.51 



■ rf« 



t 



\t 



1 . 



.<w^ 



* i-' 



• . • .» : 



I 



1 \ 



. . i 



■ ■ ;*# 



108 



t i n 
part 
t i a n 



Commentary 

« 

The Dutch in Japan. 

When in the first decade of the seventeenth Century 

to bring the country lasting peace, the Catholic mission- 

aries were driren out and Christianity extirpated, 

Dutch merchants managed to gain favor 

with the powerful Togugawa offering to the shogun 

the benefits of foreign trade w i t h o u t the 

drawbacks of a foreign religion, 

Indeed, much of the Singular tolera 

the Dutch traders came to enjoy, they owed to the 

they played in the annihilation of the Chris 

of Shimabara in bombing the Hara castle in February-March 

1638. ("New Dawn in Japan" by Everett J, Briggs, New York, 

1948, p.47, 54/55.) 

For more than two centuries the Dutch traders received 

a commercial monopoly, though under humilating con- 

ditions. 

The Dutch factory was sit..ated at Deshima, then an islet 

in the harbor of Nagasaki, but now absorbed in the 

foreshore. So it happened that Nagasaki became the only 

place where any communication with the outer world was 

permitted, the Dutch being the sole representatives of 

the Europe of the seventeenth Century for the Japanese. 

The Dutch coxamerce too was restricted within narrow 

limits, yet Dutch interference in the style of ceramic decora- 

li^Seyond question. Many pieces were exported by them 

and some were also manufactured specially to their 

Order for that purpose. 

The term "yaki" is = "to bake" and means the product of 
a kiln with the characterical addition to the name of a 
town, province or an artist's family. 



\ 












i ittSf 


> 


:: 




• 1 



I ' • 



;i:;) 






>*? ,■ 



'Mi 



V\\ 



M;^ • 



r, 




JB ' .^.ibil* 



■ 1 



I H- 
.11*1 

'I < ' 



109 



X^ ANCISNT JAPANülSE LAC QUER 

Our collection of Japanese lacquer work gave a fairly 
well survey containing forty pieces. To be ro^bed of 
our twelve No masks from the Meida collection as well 
as of our Ijuros mostly of the Vautier collection, I 
aspeclally resent. The noble pieee, described below, 
is the only remainder« 



76, 



toro> Incense Vase, 
H, 7 cm,; ZAZ'' 



Cylindrical form. Gold lacquer decoration on wood 
foundation: Dark n a s h i j i (=pear) ground, so 
oalled becausG the gold, powdered over the black lacquer 
surface, resembles the akin of the Japanese pear. 
Design in gold lacquer ^ m a k i - e , literally "powdered 
picture»« :In hlramakije i.e. flat lacquer 
fishing boats on small waves at the shore, where fishing- 
nets are hung up; two round medaillons with buddhistic 
Symbols, the swastica and the p a g o d a » 
In takamakije i.e. relief lacquer and 
kirigane i»e. Inlaying of gold foils, the ahore 
itself with rocks and a tre<e. 

The Interior of the kopo is protected against the heat 
of the burning incense. 

Ashikaga period (1338-1565). Siiteenth Century, 

Lit,: Jacoby "Die Lackarbeiten" im Katalog i^er Sammlung 

Mosle, Berlin 1909 
Kümmel •'Kunstgewerbe in Japan*\ 1911. 



Comment€ury . 

Swastica (Japanese manji) is de 
Sanscrit "swasti" = good luck. Derivat 
hooked-cross-f orm from the wooden cross 
of fire drilling or from the suri-cross 
The latest excavations in NW India by J 
Mohenjo-Daro ("M.-D, and the Indus civi 
London 1932) prove that this diagram wa 
3 000 B.C., i.e. one thousand years bef 
invaded India. It has been traced back 
gammadion in Troas anterior to the 13th 
and is supposed to have pasfeed westward 
eastward to China, Tibet, Japan. 



rived from 
ion of the 

for the purpose 
are doubtful. 
.Marshall in 
lisation" , 
s there before 
orc the Aryans 
to the Oreek 

Century B.C. 

to Jceland, 





. 




■■;*f 








1 








1 
















^ 




:: 




{.•:;;r 



I 



I 



|! 



:::: 



(• 



• W)". ""•■^ 




—1 



.X 



^ Ctßf 



^ ' Bt 






;1f<^^ ," 



I 



r 



» . 



iTf 






"^.f 



. .r . 



; 'i Y 






? » • J r :. 



■•• ♦■■• 



►* 



; f 



tJ 
/" 



* • 







110 



From the swastica sprang many decorative pattern as for 
instance the Chinese awastica-band-ornament, called wan dsi 
bu daw tou = good luck wlthout end. 

Por this norstic diagram many explanations have been given 
On OUT koro^ I am sure, it means symbol of Buddhist 
esoterics^ Generally it was considered as symbol of luck. 
On the hoart of Buddha, painted or inlaid in gold, it 
means love and consideration even for the lowest creature 
in Hitler-Germany race hatred, Jew-baiting. * 

Rousselle gives further explanations in "Typische Bildwerke 
der buddhistischen Tempel in China" (Sinika, VI, 6, p.J>86): 
'• Dieses Symbol, das aus der vorgeschichtlichen Zeit längst 
vergangener Rassen stammt - wie die Ausgrabungen lehren- 
hat im Laufe der Zeit mancherlei neue Auslegung erfahren. 
So sieht man in ihm ein Symbol der Drehung des Welt- 
gesetzes und der Wandelwelt, bei entgegengesetzter Dre- 
hung, der Erlösung. 

In China wird es meist als Zeichen der Zahl 10.000, 
d.h. unzählig aufgefasst. Es soll dann, unter anderem, 
auch auf unzählige Aeonen, richtiger gesagt, auf das 
Ewige deuten, das sich in Buddha* s Geist oder Herz, - 
beides ein Wort in China - offenbart. Daher die An- 
bringung des Zeichens auf der Brust Buddhas in Herzhöhe. 
Das Swastik Kreuz als Symbol des ewigen Weltgesetzes 
(dharma) und der Predigt oder Lehre von ihm, ja der 
Buddhistischen Religion überhaupt (was alles dharma 
heissen kann) ist zum Zeichen des Buddhis- 
mus geworden und hat den älteren Dreizack verdrängt." 

P a g d a (from Tamil pagavadi) ; Another symbol of the 
Buddhist doctrine. Thesü towerlike storied structures - 
Boerschman called them "lighthouses of Buddhistic world- 
statute" - are also of Indian origin, But they developed 
into absolute Chinese form, taken over in the typical 
Buddhist temple architecture of Japan, often used as reli- 
quaries. Each of its storiea must be thought of as one of 
the heavens while the Square base is a symbol of the earth. 
In India the upper part of the structure is usually round, 
but in China the Square shape is more common, 
Through the Cbnter of the building there is frequently a 
mast or axis which serves no structural purpose but is 
rather thought of as the world axis. The spire ends usually 
in a lotus bud or flaming jowel, symbolixing the purity 
of the law of the Enlightened one. 



ff 


Ij 'M: 


n 




r •' Ti 






"it 






s 


-■• 






, 






i 












a ■ 






( 




> 1 


' 





I 












m 



■ I 



4 J « 



:'V: 



< • 



1 ."• 






*.' 



^ii* }ii-r' 



•» ^ 4. l i^ 



In. 



i > 



(Uli 



' ••• 



.•*'V 



I » 




^ ^ r ;' :; r« 










i I 



111 



XI 



AKCIENT JAPANESE NETZUKE 



The netzuke .(ne=root, t2uke=hang) is a button with t^n. 

and to counterpoise it. The Japanese sculptor raised 
this Practical Problem into the artistic sphere givinß 
this button the form of an often very complicated and 
agitated carving which nestled softly to the band and 
gown. 

In suoh a manner the netzuke belong to the Japanese 

r \!h^ f.^ ^ ^ ^"^ ^PP®^^ ^^ Kümmel"s "Ostasiatisches 
Gerät ••, illustrated with samples from my carefuUy 

selected collection which was assemblad directly from 
old collectiona in Japan in 1908. Heuce the unusual high 
quality. ^ 

Now only the descrlbing catalogue with 183 numbers and 
172 photographs remains and one solitary piece which 
is described below; everything eise was stolen. 



77. 



Grasing Horse. 
H,6 cm.; 2.6" 



Ivory carving which adapts the figure of a graßing 
hörst to its purpose by oonventionalising^ it to a 
fitn contur. On the back holes for pulling through 
a cord. 

Tokugawa period, Eighteenth Century. 

Lit.: Kümmel "Ostasiatisches Gerät" mit Einführung von 

Grosse. Bruno Cassirer, Berlin 1925; 
See frontispiece and page 126. 
Graf "Japanisches Gespensterbuchy see page 12,62. 

Exhibition: 1939 "Netzuke uit de collectie Ginsberg"; 

Kunstzaal Tikotin, Nassauplein, Den Haag, 
(Holland). 



V 



ntt 



!} 



V. 






*rtw*»w_ 



ap 




j» ^><' 



:rt 



■,) 




112 



XII. 



AKCIENT JAPANESE PAINTING 



The Ashikaga portrait, describod bolow, Iß the only 
painting which by chance was saved. 

Lost is tho **Goddess Benlen (Saresvati)", a Buddhistic 
cult painting of Kamakura' s fourteenth Century, in red 
and gold, formerly in the Hayashi collection; lost "The 
Tea Harvest»* by Jwasa Matahei (1578-1650) who's opus led 
to the ma^ers of the ukioyö (passing world picture). 
Lost our ffolden-grounded byobus with Xano Mitsonobu's 
(1600 er.) snowcapped pines, the sliding doors of the 
Chigaidana with the ohrysantemum branch; lost our pair 
of apes by Mori Sosen (1747-1827) — - to mention but soine 
characteristic samples of our collection. 



I 



78. 



Portrait of a Warrior. 
kaKemono 

120 I 55 cm.; 47.2 x 21.10" 



Scroll painting in color on soft, darkened-grey paper. 
Sitting on the matt in solemn, unmoved pose, the cere- 
monial portrait of a samurai with thin beard at Ups, 
cheek and ohin, offers a firm contur. 

The bearded gontleman has an aristocratio face. The cut 
of his eyes, the 8wii«of his no»e-hr.dge, the ^hape of his 
sad mouS. ^iven with a few stroKes f-Jf ^^^/^^^^^.^^ 
who was identified in Japan, where I bought this painting. 
fl« Masashige Kusunoki. He teil, 

? ghti^g for the emperor in the ^«^^^%°^f ?f °f^',:/'''' 
fl* « time when it was without prospeots to fight for 

lll luV. 1^1333 the rule of the ^^^ll\f',^Z]i' 

Knt for a Short time only, The rebellion of Tanauji 

\\ hl k a ß a and the battle of Mlnatogawa brought 

forti ag ain'the Shogunate. at this time of the ashikaga 

family which became predominant. 

The .»ur.i IS .,ulppod -ilh i>" "-t'.^^.'JSf.Sr.äg!;" 

The kakemono has been damagod. Old repalr. 



I 



Ashikaga period (1138-1565). 




11 






t 







^T»-. 



•aMMUBlk 



VIV.V, 



**** ^*^^ 



I 






K^\f •■ 



r .' 



t ' i 



■ r • 



! 



•A 



• « 



!l 



• • 



^l^l 



. r ) 



.•\ • 



l ^v. 


«''.** ' • 


^-''" V -^ 


:.V ■ '^ V 



: - 



> ■ 



i\> 



« * 



tJ 



rr 



r fc:! 



• •• 



i.F' 



r- • 



X13 



XIII 



ANCIENT JAPANESE COLOR PRINTS 



In the obituary of Raymond Köchlin, the famous collector, 
Kümmel (O.Z. 1931, p.205 ff) reports that Köchlin told him 
once of having been fetched in 1890 to the Ecole des Beaux 
Art 8 in Paris, where Bing had arranged an exhibition of 

Japanese oolor prlnts, adding: "Ce fut le coup de foudre... 
de oe jour date ma vie du collectionneur," 
I mention thi», because this episode is rauch like ny own, 
only ten years later, 

It was about 1900 that Japanese color prints awakened my 
desire to collect art of the Far East. A fe?r years later I 
was glad to collect in Japan 326 prints, which gave a good 
survey of this art from the middle of the saventeenth tili 
to the beginning of the ninetoenth Century, and plenty of 
incitations besides. Evory phase of Japanese life is illus- 



trated in these prints, whereby beautiful women, actor^, 
famous landscapes play an important part. Charaoteristio 
the Japanese demomination: "ukioye" = passing world picture. 

As the last peouliar creation of the artistic ^olor print 
the surimono appsar« in tho eighteenth Century. 
It comblnes a picturo with a poem, relative to it. It is 
ordered for special ocoasiona, to bs distributed among 
frlends on New Tear's Day, on birthdays, weddings, as 
invitations, etc. As the surimono was printed but in small 
edition-.and was of small size, the cost was not of suoh 
importance and therefore special sare oould be given to 
paLr, color s and technioal luxurles. While the intanded 
17L{ of the color print is normally ^eaohed wx h seven 
to ten color-plates for the surimono ^wenty to t^xry are 
usod, often applying gold, silver and blindpressure 
profusely. 

nnW a few of m prints remained which are doscribed here. 
B^l'from this ^art of our collcction thero exist oxoellent 

rX^cit^Lrunr^enxhibition "Ausstellur.g alter 
'• 'osLiafx^crer Kunst, verar.staltet von der A.adenje der 
^ -iQ-jon wV^prp> a selection irom our 

cS?::ti:n':o th wüh1elccu:ns from the famous 
ToUertloL jicckel, Mosl^ , Oeder, St^.uss-Negbaur 
reprssented the Japanese ^^'^f P^;"li.33hi„e. 40 Licht- 
2. The publication "^-.f -^J:,^,! ,f '^f ^fs^hrieben 
J:r5uU:s"Kur^?h^^]:s^ph riSrVenag, Berlin 1924-.. 

P.'^i^ ^piriLfti^oi ^°^T -i:;uorH:n^ 
.:-^i^-otrdirthro;Lrnartirerri-"- original 







r:' • •• 



» 



1. 



V.. 



9L.% 



114 



I 



.11 




^ 



.■V- 



;.r. 



! ,■:*/•/( 



' -,'■»' 






i - ; 



> ii 



; t 



* - 



colors and even the old-age traces. There are early 
prints of Torti II Kiyomasu (1679) in Hoso-e Uruahi-e, 
Beni-e and with gold powder. Thore are some of Toshusai 
Sharaku's actors half-length portraits on mlke ground 
(1794), 83 well as one of Eishosai Nagayoshi's silver 
ground' prints, the girl who with snow-oovered umbrella 
leans on a male «ervant in a rod coat while heavy snow 
fallinK But there are also the most famous prints out 
of Katsushlka Hokusai's (1760-1849) "Thirty-six views 
of Fuji" serles, the "Gröat lave of lanagawa Inlet" and 
"The Pftji of Oaifu Kwaisei". 



18 



■ ■■Xl 



79. 



Rekiaentai Eiri t Audienge with the Smpress. 
120 X 37 cm.; 47.4 x 14.9" 



In the imperial pavillon the ^f^^f • 'f ^l!" ' Ut?irsor- 
nhi It^ans aeainst a small table; beside her a littie ser 
fani sS it^conceiled by a bamboo-roll-blind whxch xs 
Iran^pSent onough to let her aee wha xs goxng on 
in front is a veranda to which some Bteps lead. Here, 
behind tb motal-deeorated balu3trade.two.aids of 
wfiting with fans in ^heir han s are xt^g. ^^ 

They are looking «^tentively at the littl. P 
which is approaching along the P^J^«; ''^''' 
tiles and bordered by coniferous trees. 

.♦♦c«HflH bv two aiaids of honor, 
in front of the P-f =» ^/l/rt^J^spareit black court gown 
the prince steps, attired in a tr p ^^^.^^ ^.^ ^^^ 

with the ceremonial ^^f J^^-^^^Jj,' <,„^ies the katana 
cortege: A H^^^'T^wairiiga Standard bearer, cour- 
(=long sword), ladio3 in ^^^J^^g; J ^^ ^^ shoes.an obi of 
Uers. Partly they ^^f^ f ^'^/i/^hey aocompany the ox- 
brocade, a big g"'°^''^-^°^;„^!^cels Soon the curtain of 
drawn f I-J-Jjj^t'uf t andlh; prin=ess will deseend 

lo pay her respect. to the empress. 

V, 9ii T 37 cm and signed. 
Series of five prints, each 24 x 37 cm ^^^^^^ 
All together «ounted on Japanes si k ^^^^ 

Japan about l^^O The artist belomg^to^t^^ g ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ 

the -i«^-"ii° ":::fgera ed'bodilj structure. 
woman beauty '^^^/J^^'^e known. 

\ iQ'.g Haarlem (Holand) "Raro Japanese Color 

Exhibition : 1939 Haarlem ^ 



l 




.i !•;. 



• r r . 



J 




^ 



l 



'^t*t ih'iä/t^At . < 



I(i 



^ 



• « 



115 



1 




t 



■V 



r-y\ 



••- 



PI*' 









. -.-V 






'- * 



^ • . ••• 



».i.- . 







80. 



Kubo Shumman : Chinese Poetess. 
16 X 19.5 om. ; 6.5 x 7,9" 



•The artist copied for this surimono anold 
Chineae album-leaf painting of great delicacy, giving 

even the damaged edges. , .^ u ♦« „v 

The poetess is sitting In the garden besido an old trunk 
out of whioh fresh twigs with cherry blossoms flower. Her 
beautiful face, absorbed in thoughts, rtsts on her hand 
holding the brush; her arm leans on the stone table where 
the ink stone is ready to enable her to give visible 
expreaaion to her ver.ee on the petal in her lef hand 
A poem, reiating the result of her thoughts. m the right 
Corner» Signaturo. 



814 



gubo Shuana r^ ; The Tea-House Girl. 
9 X 22 cm.; 3.9 x 8" 



This surimono represents a tea-house girl who 
in her uplifted hand carries a red lack stand witha 
tilver covered bowl. The bla.k ob^. shoirs in gold the 
pattern of conlferous twigs. „.„„.ture 

Two poem» fUl the background. Signatare. 

^r,ac tac.n la eonsidered the classical 
Kobo Shumman, 1785-1856, J.» consiaoi 

master of the surimono. 



82. Katusito Hokusai 



Two i-Artias on the r.Arden Terraee. 



27.5 X 13.5 om.j 10.13 x 5.6" 



, -, n n ^ sliding-walls with paper filling, 
On this 8 u r 1 m n =^ ^uaing ^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ 

given in il^''^f,-:fi:;,':;fudf furnish the background 
while byobus "^^^^^^^^ '^i" v lacquer top on which are 
Against them a table ""^^^^J^^y";?^ trocade, a red lac- 
a pack of books l^^^f P^J/^^igHese witha peacock feather, 
quer box and a white P^^^^^f ''J^iy ^lad with silver 
in the foreground ^^^..J^f ^^^^/J^^/to cut paper Sheets 
needles in their coiffurc are du y ^^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

::d to f old =»»«^11 ^^f f » "^tfat f äe soul" . used at 

or P'^l»°'l-i°',?r'soS s' Day! tho fifteenth day of the 

the -^X'^rth -> fl at doiA the river. 
aeventh month, to 1^°'*'' sicnature. 

On the left side the poem. SignaLu 



I 



i 

J 

J 

t 

i 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 










■ — yj 



• 'WM^HS S Srn f^' 




-.iTl 



»M; 






il 



116 



t 



■■)riJ 



f* 



!( 



i I 



;^ 'o ItB 



•i . 



.V. 

•x. 



ri: 



«• .'5 



J .. 



:♦ 



V .•- 



,« ♦ f 



r. 






..< 






• - • 4 



*•'- ^< 






>■■■»• 






> 



83. 



Uoya Hokkei ; Pujiyama, 
18 X 20 cm. ; 7x8 " 



This surimono gives a color dreao oround this 
famous mountain. The fuju-yama rises out of the mist in 
¥lind pressure ami silver. In blue tinta a chain of moun- 
talns before him. In the foreground a small mountain 
meadow in soft green with coniferous trees in bronze 
color, Clouds in gold terminate the color- symphony of 
which I have mentionod only some eminent tints. 
Poem in the right corner. 
SignaturB with red seal charaoters, 

Katusika Hokusai (1760-1849) and Uoya Hokkei (1780-1854) 
are known to eicel in surimonos. 




H 



4 3 



«an « < »•«teJ.k^U UUISSCj 




r 




k\ 



Cf^ 



y f" 






« 



5 ** :< 






•-, ^ 



'^ ■♦ -i 



• -» 



^^ 









f 



;: ; ■ 



<: 



V . / 



-f ". 



.-f- • f I 



Ä 



f 






r.--;.- 



117 



C. 



' M 



XIY 






I N D I A 
ANCIis^JT INDIAN ART 



Some xlotes about Buddha and his representation. 



Whlle there no loÄgiir is any dou^t about the Historie 
Personality of Buddha, the legendary contents of the 
Buddhistic literature are partly of «ymbolic significance. 

T*he Siddharta was born about 560 B.C. as the son 
of the princely house of S a k y a from Kapilavasta in 
the Mimalaya territory of Nepal. According to the legend 
he resigned his prinoely life, cut hia hair -iiocthis curls- 
and became SAKYAMUNI = hermit of the Sakya race 
or G A U T A M A, the ascetic, who lived in solitude 
until he won the knowledge of truth for the redemption 
of earthly auffering, growing to B U D D H A = the 
ENLIGHTüNfcD. He died about 477 B.C. (according to 
Max Mueller). 

During the firat Century after his death he and his dootrine 
are represented by Symbols only> above all by the wheel 
(Sansorit : c a k r a ). Buddhism was, as long as the 
doctrine remained pure, a philosophy not a religion, 
327 B C. Alexander the Great invades India; he marches over 
the Kabul pass into üorth West India; after his death 323 B.C. 
his empire is divided anong his generals (Diadoches). 
In 256 B.C. the governor of Bactriy, Diodotos, makes him- 
• elf independent. The Graeco-Bachtrian ^i^«^^« ^^^f^^^^^'» 
extending its rule to North *est India, including the land- 
scape G% n d h a r a, then inhabitated by ^^^^^^ "^JJ' 
now Afghanistan. When Buddhism enters Gandhara in the time 
of Diodotos, the doctrine encounters a Hei enistic culture. 
a hybrid, composed of Greek and ^riental elements 
Hellenistic art in Gandhara presents to the Buddhisti. 
-/>rld the f i r s t saaples ofa figurative 
Te p r e s e n t a t i o n of Buddha, identifying the 
founLr of the Buddhistic doctrine with the sun hero 
^^^*** 1 « /> 1 1 o With this introduction o: an 

Hl- .^# ^^fonioenee" or supermind. ^X-s origj." «»«v 
the '•bump of Inteiiigence ux ^u>' o^-rAnoinc a knot 

traced back to the Hellenistic cu»to»ofarrangingajn^^_ 

of hair on the crown of f^«^f ^^^i^^f/^jf . protuberance. 
Standing was changed by later artiau 




i: 




N, 



m 








•« 



*- 



118 



«: 



A ; G H 1 



^*' 



ii»v X 



VT7. 



«♦ 'f.fc' #«01 



*. .£ 



CCT^t 









J - 



•ilt .rtj^it o;. i^'iS>vf' "^ t^;-t>fc?^Ä';. *l^5/ir^;r''I 






•ä.'? . 



n r. 



• ^ 



< y 



ii 



;:. ,.. j .:• : . '■: 









j. y 






-V » 



- 'S. 

,;V^: : 1 M ^ )| ^ "^ / • '«f ^*- ' 






• I * 



J.« 



Vi 



/*.*; 



. i : 






>k ' •» 



'*\ 



. I 



••■.•■ r 






• : ^ 



^/ 



f 



J » 



1 ■ * -• k 



., V- 



• . \ 



r ' ^' jf 



i- 



/> 



. 1 









i . .^. ;. 



u** 






ft-v ■» ' 



;■ . > A 



f ^ 



It is very dou^tful, if the hair-toot of the early ApoUo- 
like figures generally oonceiled a protuberance. 
The Short curly hair of the later types only makes the out- 
gr<rwth of the skull distinctly visi>>le. The knot of hair 

changes to a horn-like polnt, rising upwards like a flame 
(raami). The rasmi later becomes more and more elaborate, 
until the origin is hardly more recognisable. 
The »• ü R M A ", marked as a little pearl, symbolises a 
eircle of little white hairs between the eyebrows, a third 
eye, which "shining like silver or snow" enables Buddha 
to illuminate the üniverse. 

The "ElongatGd Ear Lobes", pulled down by the weight of 
the royal ornanents, which the Siddharta later took off, 
becoae an attribute of beauty as well as a symbol of 

Buddha' s world-wide listening sympathy. 

These body features, formed already in Gandhara, reaained 
principally unchaged through the whole Buddhistic worid, 
while the transformation of the Helleni&tic type to the 
Indian physiognoasy ensues by degrees. It differs greatly in 
the different radiations of Buddhism to the South and 
Parther India, to Indonesia and the Par Jtast (China, Japan). 
To the Par East the representation of Buddha comes pertly 
direct from India, partly from Central Asia (Turkestan). 
RelativelyT^hFibes^ style of Gandhara is upheld in Japan; 
the treatment of drapery, the throw of the pleats is almost 
Grecian; The robe is so set as to ahow the contour of the 
bocHy, the folda following the lines of the limbs in a 
natural and unconsirained way, This is attributed to the im- 
ported statues from Korea, since the sixth oentury A.D., 
eiecuted there by artists who came from Central Asia. 
In the beginning China followed the Gandhara influenae too. 
But in the course of time she successfuUy developed a 
style of her own. The Lamaist ic figures only preserve the 
Indian type, Coming from Nepal across Tibet. 

Likewise most of the g e s t u r e s of Buddha and the 
Bodhisatvas, the " frl u d r a s " (literally seal) , are 
already to be found in Gandhara. Most strongly the attitude 
of the hands shows the symbolic meaning. They always give 
a hint of a scene from Buddha« s legend-life, of a certain 
action; or they embody a cortain State, a religious con- 

ception: 

"Dharmacakra Müdra" : gesture of turning the wheel of 
doctrine, The hands are kept in front of the breast so 
that the finger tips contact; the palm of the right hand 
is turned outward, the palm of the left hand inward. 



:\i -i. n- 





I.S"v5\«t ♦ ' 14 




119 



irtiir' 



II 



-cllO<jk \i\i^^ 









V • 









e-^i'fc.» 






.V ■>. 



• i 



, r 



»' c; 



•'•i >'• . •• . ..jf <!.: ^I 

^X"3 ixoÄ- est* 

• .'- bvji::f»A ^-^ A H fl :; -^ >-^' 



.ii 



\ i' I 



•>' 



n 



•V»' 



• -» 






.r- V' 



»/ - 



' 'f " .. 



«I 



<) 



-•l'. 



r. 



rr • 



& 1. 



\ 



••' 






'n ' 



ff 



Bhüaispara mOdra " : the gesture of touohing the earth 
or caUln« the earth as witnes3 (in the dispute with Mars 
the demon of eril). The hand, pala inward, hang» down 
" yara „üdra " : the gesturc- of b lessing. ' The hnd^;!, 
outward, hangs down. ' ^ 

^ Abhaya mödra " : the gesture of consoling, of fearless- 
ness. The hand is lifted In teaching. leariess 

" Dyana müdra " : the gesture of meditation. Both hands 
lie on each other in his lap. 

B0DHI3ATVA (= knowledge essentiality) are beings, mature to 
become Buddha. The original type is a young man royally 
attired, decked with bracelets, necklets, breast-chains, 
developed from the legend of the historic Buddha, who came, 
as we learn, from a princely house. 

DYANI BUDDHA 

Aocording to the Imagination of the northern Buddhist every 

♦^ MANUSIBÜDDHA " i.e. a Buddha in human shape, has a 

mystic image. This image is to be found in an imaginary 

heaven of terraces which correspond with the four grades 

of reflection and is called "DTiNIBUDDHA " . 

The conception is that the Eanusibuddha 3riginates by means 

of emanation out of the Dyanibuddha. Therefore every 

Manusibuddha has his Dyanibuddha (Pischel-Lüders : 

"Sein verklärtes Ebenbild im Himmel"). 

And further: Every Dyanibuddha has his Dyanibodhisavatva, 

his Spiritual son, produced by emanation. 

From this in our age (kalpa) the following degrees result: 

Dyanibuddha ; Buddha Amithaba, the Buddha of immeasurable 

splendor. 

Dyanihodhiaatva : Avalokitesvara or Padmapani. 

Manusibuddha : Sakyamuni (Gautama). 

In the future age MAITRje.TA, at preaent still Bodhisatva, 

will become Manusibuddha, 

Lit.: Adam, Leonhard "Buddha Statuen", Stuttgart 1925 

Grtnwedel, Albert "Ifythologie des Buddhismus", Lpzg. 1900 
Grünwedel, Albert "Buddhistio Art in India" , trans- 

lated, revised and enlarged by 
Jac.Burgess, London 1901. 







'"^f^,.,^ 



iimv 



^Hi 



[!?^'™!i!f*l 



7^™ 



^» 




I 

•a^:g 



jM. 



..ft.A 



ll 



.?^4i**n 



X 






r 



x-^ 



y; •'- ! 









'•r : 




...■.-jr,v| 



IUI 



.L 



. 't . • i- ^, ., •' ö .. -j -j -.iv zc, i ■-^»' 



v^ 



"•."^'f'^ ■ 









J iv</i 



'f. 



r. 



.' r *i ** 



t 



• ., 



< • • 



«> 1 



.^ :t.' 



n-; 



»' "^ 






T, 






"?t • Ski: 






r 



•- . » ' » ( 



■7 



•:f' I 



l: .-■' £ V ;. 



•^ ; ' 






( • 



1 



•I 












li 



n^ 



•v . \ 



itv. 



•^:i 






».1 



: / 






-v^ 



:i j 



ji } 






j. 









t. 



120 



84 



Buddha Head from Hadda. 
8 cm.; 3.2" 



s - 



It is clearly recognizable that the sun-god Hell 
Apollo of the Alexandrine period was used as a 
prototype for the Buddha head. The Apollonian features 
ßtill belong to the classical antiquity in spite of 
certam traces of transition to the type of the Indian 
race Prcm the finely mculded nose the eyebrows strive 
aloft; the eyelids are longly drawn with shaipedges; 
a gently smlling mouth in füll fleshiy parts. According 
to the Hellenistic custom the hair is arranged in a 
krobylos, the head crowned by a tuft of hair, tied to- 
gether. The hair is roughly treated, unfortunately the 
greater part of the crowning coiffure broke away 

Stucco. 

Hadda, fourth Century A.D. 

Hadda is situated south of Jalabad in Afghanistan near 
the frontier of the North-West provinoe of India. As 
we know from the record of the Chinese pilgrim Fa-hien 
(about 400 A.D.) the town Hi-lo, the present Hadda, was 
up to the fifth Century a flourishing place of pilgrimage. 
Buddha» s Usnisha, the prctuberance of his skull, explained 
as the bump of intelligence , was preserved there as a 
relic in a richly decorated and carefully ^uarded vihöra, 

The head was purchased from the Völkerkunde Museum, Berlin, 
Abteilung der Asiatischen Sammlungen (Ernst Waldschmidt). 

Lit.: Bachhof er "Zur Plastik van Hadda", Ostasiatische 

Zeitschrift, Neue Folge, 7. Jahrgang 1931. 
Cohn, William in the Oriental Art, vol. I,no, 1,1948: 

"Although the small sculptures from Hadda 
have much in common with Oandhara and 
permulatöd with Western elements, they 
form a class of their own, distinguished 
by frcshjiess of invention and artistic 
spirit, Many of them anticipate in a 
miraculous way the whnle later develop- 
ment cf Western art." 
Godard "Exposition des r^centes d^couvertes et des 

re'oents travaux arch^olcgiques en Afghanistan", 
Musee Guimet, 1924. 
Hackin "Les Fouilles de la Delegation Archeologique 
\ Hadda". Revue des Arts Asiatiques, vol. 2. 









m 




I . f m\ ■ "T ■ 




I". 







121 



85^ 



Buddha He ad from CamhnH^;. 
11 cm,; 4.5'« 



tightly closed. The eyes look downwards! the farm^f 

he eyeball protudes ander the eyelld. The ar are 
lengthened according to the canon 

3'!!%^!?'''/''"^^'*'. ^^ ^ bandlike Uno, Is transformed 

the skull topped by the "rasmi" (flame) in the simple 
irom Ol a cone. 

Bronze with green patination. 

K h m e r Art, Camodia (South £ast Further IndiaV 
IX-XIII Century A.D. ^' 



Commentary. 

The people of the Khmer replaoed the people at the 

loT?er Menam and Mekang in the ninth Century A.D, 

An empire originated which included the South part 

of the present Slam. The Khmer embraced Indian culture, 

in the middlc of the tenth Century founded the capital 

Angkor Thom and, near by, in the eleventh 

uentury, the temple of Angkor Vat. 

Long fights with the people of Tai, who , Coming from the 

south of China, pressed more and more to the South; 

the empire of Khmer will at last succomb to them, 

becoming a part of the kingdom of Slam, the Siamese people 

a "cross-bread of Tai and Khmer" (Heine Gelder). 



!:■ 






ti : 



^♦«4 



4 



\ 



I 



rtt 



ftuft!:- 



^ 

M 




•n ' 



1- f 



I 



( i 



;|l 



1 

i 



•• I 




1^ 



86. 



Buddha Head from Slam 



18 cm.; 7.2 



»1 



s-'^'t,* . 



.HnfP 



122 



Füll face with a long polnted nose. The eyes look 
downwards. The curvatures of the eyeballs protude 
distincly under the e'l^elids. The eyebrows join the 
forehead without hardness as a llghtly elevated roll 
Beneath the füll lips a roundish chin. Tho ears of 
stereotype length. 

Each curly hill ji the Cluster of locks, which reach 
far down the fcrehead, is of a big scale. The rasmi, 
the flame, rising out of the top of the asnisha, the* 
protuberance of the skull, is disjointed. 

Bronze with green patination, 

Slam, art cf the Ayuthal empire (1350-1750 A.D.) 

Indian art flows from East India to the Farther India 

Into the present North Slam, habitatod since times of 

old by the people of Tai-Shan. 

First united by the kingdom of Sukothai-Savankolok, 

it is - according to Voretsch- reserved to the North 

to create the "national Siamese art". 

However, the present Siamese people will originate 

only after the Khmer succombed to the Tai and, uniting, 

create this hybrid race. 



Lit« : E,A. Voretsch 



"Ueber Altbuddhistische Kunst in 
Siam", Ostasiatische Zeitschrift, 
1916-1918. V,l and Vl,l. 



^^ 



4 



m 



f 

j' 




t 



n 



Mtm 




■ ♦... 



.'fl'; 



llini 



• r « . • * 



.' t. 







-s 



/i 



r> 



i* ^ 



# 





123 



87. 



Nat Dbva from Bur ma( 
39 cm*; 15.3" 



•1*1«« 



Kneeling figure of great charm in attitude: the arms 
wlth elegant long fingers i-iae In graoei^ul movements, 
the head, bent a little backwards, is turnod to the 
right sido, 

Vestments and jewolry show the coürt attire 
if the thirteenth Century, customary for divlne as well 
as demonio belngs to which the Nat De\^a belong. 

in the forohead the uraa* The eyebrows in a lightly 
elevated roll over long drawn eyes whloh look downwards 
under half-closcd lids; straight noae abovo tired Ups. 
The hair is completely covered by a kind of helmet 
which Imltates in a baro^ue way Buddha^ s Cluster of 
locks with the topping rasmi» Fastened to this helmet 
is a head-band with long wing-like orti&ments which 
•urround the ears, frame the face and öorrespond to 
smailer wing-like ornaunents fixed on to the Shoulders» 

The Upper part of the body is covered by sumptuous 
jowelry only : pendants around breast and back crossed under 
rosettes^ Yroad chains around neck, arms and ankles - 
all inlaid with Jewels. Even the gown which encloses the 
abdomen tlghtly is covered with precious stones. 

The figure probably belonged to a group; a hole beneath 
the kneet and small damage auggest the fixing to an 
altar and the rape done by force. 

B r n 8 e gilded, partly darkened, at the back 
freshened up, 

B u r m a, NW Farther India. 17th-18th Century. 
Formerly in the collection of Walter Heymel, Munich» 
Exhibition: 1938-41 Gemeonte Museum, Den Haag, Holland. 

Lit.: Schermann "Genien in der religiösen Kunst des 

birmanischen Buddhismus". Ostasiat. 
Zeitschrift, 1919-20. VIII, 25. 
"Nat DGva sind Geister, die mit dem Buddhismus 
als mehr oder minder abgewandelte Gestalten 
der Hindu Mythologie ins birmanische l^^d ver- 
pflanzt wurden; an ihrer Spitze der altvedische 
Godd Indra, Thagya genannt, wie alle ^eine 
Genossen als wohltätige Hdfer betrachtet . 



I 



^m 






124 



m 



$ 






• 



« 



88. 




Padmapani (Avalokitesvara. Va lraT^ani) 

18.2 cm.; 7.1" 



The Dyanlbodliisatva (cp.page 119) Padmapani ( = h« with 
the lotus in thü band) Stands in triancla (Sanscrit = 
thricc bent) attituda on a lotus pedostal. 
The f. «et, the upper part of thü body are uncovered. 
Araund hips and thighs the- long shawl-like uppergarment 
is twisted in the manner of a scarf in which the sacred 
cord (yajnopavita) , running from the left Shoulder, 
nestles, while the ends in pleats hang deeply down in 
front and at the side. 

The features are pure Hindu. The long hair is dressed 
high, bound together to a crowning knot in Hellenistic 
mannor. In front of the knot a band holds a diadem, 
richly adorned and with Amithaba Buddha, Padmapani» s 
Spiritual father, in the oenter, Heavy ear-pendants in the 
elongated ear-lobes, a necklace, arm clasps and bracelets 
complete the adornment. 

It can be assumed that tho left hand originally held 
a long-stemmed lotus; the right hand in "vara müdra", 
the gestura of blessing. 

The backside with hook. 

Bronze with green and blue patination shows rest 
of formor gilding which accentuated the very fine work. 

North India, llth-12th Century. 

Exhibitions: 1938-41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag, Holland 

1946 Museum van Aziatische Kunst, Amsterdam. 

Commentary 

PADMAPANI may be associated as well to Avalokitcsvara (=:he 
who looks from above) as to Vajrapani (cp.no. 29). This Bod- 
hisatva represents the most important figure in tho Pan- 
theon of Tibet. 

The Northern Churcli, the Lamaism, has made all Buddhas 
and Bodhisatvas to gods, who should be -.dorated. It is 
from him esptcially that people implore help in all ^ 
needs. To him they direct the known evocation ("mantras» j: 

"Om Mani Padma Hum, Lol = The Jewel in the Lotus. Lol 
The Bodhisatva Padmapani has always proiuced new represen- 
tations. His four-armed form is always incarnated in the 
head of the Lamaistic church, in the ruling Dalai Lama. 

Lit.; Leonhard Adam "Buddha Statuen", 1925. 

Albert Grünwedel "Mythologie des Buddhismus in 

Tibet und der Mongolei", lyoo. ^^ 
Albert Grünwedel (J.Burges) "Buddhist Art in India , 

1901. 



"iwWPPPBBi 








"r 



wf^' 






r:i: 




i.. iitn- .^nii 



■:;tt 






*;! 



125 



89. 



BakJRi Ka-ro. 
14.5 cm. ; 6" 



Lamaistic goddess. The- slim body with smali fi>. v 
is nude except for pendants aroU he LoJ llT.tT" 
arm and feet clasps and a diadem of skulls ThJ V.l l' ■ 
f]ows down the back. SKuiis. The long hair 

Jil?.rr^^"^ movement, striding with might and main over 

Oval pedestal with lotus ornament. 

B r n 2 e. The former gilding is lost; according to the 
bronze color and certain damages it .eens probable that 
the figure underwent a great fire. 

Nepal; slxteenth Century. 

Exhibition: 1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland) 

1946 Museum van Aziatische Kunst, Amsterdam 

Lit. : Albort Grünwedül "Mythologie des Buddhismus in 

Tibet und der Mongolei*', 19oo 
" Eint besondere Klasse von Göttinnen sind diö 
D a k i n. i 3 . Das Wort gilt als Femininform 
zu einer Tantra Goddheit Dftka (=Luftwandler) . 
Eine berühmte, viel abgebildete Dakini ist die 
N a r , welche eine Begleiterin oder vielleicht 
eine besondere Form der Vajravar^h^ist , sie ist 
Schutzgöttin ä.QT Sa-skya Schule. 
Interessant ist die Notiz, dass die Nepalesen sie 
für die inkarnierte Bhavani, die Gattin Civas 
halten," 



•1 



i ■: 



( 1 



• • • • 



«■itMiWtll 



.«!* 



mi^mm 




ff-' 




Li 

kl 




*■' 



( 



•!U 



127 



D. 



NEAR EAST 



XV. 



ANCimBRQNZF. n.p.... ivqhy CARVT., 



91. 



Water Bowl. 

Diam, 30 cm. ; 12" 
H. 26 cm.; 10" 

The big bronze vessel is of sphe-ioal frnm .v .^ 
opening oncircled by a s.all Jr'tr^L'ng ni lll^' 
broadens into two opposite handles. 
The body and riin are filled with engraved and embossed 

fillod with arcades in which are depicted legends oJ 
Western Asia in the manner of early miniaturfs. Ibove 
and below, between interlaced patterns, run f r i e z 
in Hebrew letters on arabesque ground 
arranged in eight sections Joined by an unintefrujud 
band, but separated from each other by round medaillions 
with sitting angels or animals. 

The rim is ornamented with bxrds and flowers, each 
handle embcllished by an oblong modaillion with Hebrew 
characters on arabesque ground between fighting animals. 



e s 



B r 
Asia 



n z e 



with green patination, 
1 n r , Seljuk, XIII contury(?). 



Commentary , 

Weither the Oriontal Seminary, Berlin (Prof .Mittwoch) nor 
the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, nor the Jewish 
Museum of New York City were able to translate the Hebrew 
inscriptions into a European language. 

Thoy agree, thtt the inscriptions are A r a bi c, trans- 
literated into Hebrew letters, that the bowl is at least 
five hundred years old and probably was manufacturod in 
Asia Minor. 

Comparison with a smaller but otherwise very similar 
bowl, formerly in the collection of Joseph Brummer 
(auction part II, New York, May 11,1949), leads me to 
suggest a more exact date. The Brummer bowl shows the 
8£ime kind of monumental Hebrew characters and is dated 
in tho catalogue: "Seljuk, Xiii ct.". 

The Seljuk, a Turkish tribe, built a great empire over a 
grcat part of Western Asia with capitals in Bagdad and 
Jspahan. Our bowl was excavated at Jspahan. I believe 
that this fact would also Support my suggt;£tion. 



V i 



SiIflfW(t#J»4»i^t»t,|.t„,t. 




W^, 




( 






128 





1 






^ ''1 J! 



t 



.j;); 

• l.«l 






' »1 




, ! 



I 



I 



• I 





92. 



Earthenware Plate. 
Di. 32 cm.; 12.5" 



Brown wäre with yellowish-white glaze widely orackeled. 
Decoration in the ao-called Mohammedan under- 
glaze b 1 u e : In the oentre a hare, carnations and 
leaves; around the rim inscription in Persian letters. 

The blue color, the 3o-called Mohammedan Blue, was much 
valued and imported by the Chinese pottora in the 
Hsüan-TÖ period (1426-35) and in the reigns of Ch6ng T8 
and Chia Ching in the sixtoenth Century. 

P e r s i a, sixteenth Century. 

Exhibition: 1938/41 Gemeente Museum, Den Haag (Holland). 



93. 



Fayence Tile. 
19.5 X 19.5 cm. 



The tile has the form of an octagonal stRr and is filled 
with "arabesque", according to Webster' s definition 
'• a Kind of ornamentation consisting of a fantastic 

Interlacing pattern of flowers, foliage or fruit, 

'^ften with figures of men or animals." 

On the white ground in light relief figurative decoration 
surrounded by ornamental foliage and blossoms in the 
email colors of aubergin, graen, grey, yellow etc. 
Under the glaze: In the centre Mary or Maria 
(mne) with C h i 1 d ; in the foliage symbolic animals : 

pigeon, Qss, hare, duck. 

Around the rim inscriptions in Arabian letters. 

I surmise a connection with the oriental ser^t of 
i A R I A M I T E S , who give priority to the worship 
of the Virzin Mary. They believe in conception and 
delivory effected like the transmission ^^.^^^ 7^^; 
light through a pane of glass without impairing the 

virginity . 



F e r s i a 



seventeonth Century. 









t -^- 



ii\ s 



' # 



i 

1 







''m 



% \« 



i ti 






-.'S 



( 








j 



129 



94 



I vory Handle, 
H. 12.3 cm.; 4.15" 



Fiat relief carving divides the curved surface of the 
dagger-handle threefold. Great flgurative 
decorat ions fill the middle part, enclosed above and 
helow by ornamental borders. Long use has softly ground 
off the surface so that of the human faces the out- 
lines only remain recognisable. 

The side which I consider the front view shows a king 
in medieval, formal attire with crown standing under 

a canopy. 

Arabian Inscriptions on the borders above and below 

the king runf 

NASRUM NUN ALUHI = HELP BY GOD 
WA? AT HUN KARIBUNI = AND VICTORY Nii^AR. 
The figure as well as the Arabian letters are raised 
from a background of foliage« 

I surmise that the other side presents the same person 
in informal attire together with bis wife or mistress. 
The king's right arm is fondly put around the lady's 
neok, and we would probably believe we were seeing a 
couple ^f the Prench Gothic world, were it not fo^J^^ 
lady's trousers, ihowing under the long garment, whlÄ 
direct our thoughts to the Near East. ••■ 

This side without inscription, The borders are filled 
only with Q kind of cloud ornament. 

This handle is all that remained from a ^^«ß^; J^^^^^ff 
in complete condition in M c e d , tho ojd oap^tal of 
the Armenian kingdom, in 1904. The very ^^^^J^^f 
steel.blade as well as the artistically ornamented 
leather scabbard were stolen, 

A r m e n i a, fifteenth contury. 

It has boen suggested by F-^-^^^.r^^shiriif^-cItef 
ivory carving is of Egyptian «raftmanship and 

for Armenia. 



1; 



lU 



■^^ »»»TTT 7 



llKi.^ 



Ut > t l«i. » ta 1 



n' 



f'' 




; r 



t 



» 



* * 



130 



ijl |i' 



XYI 



V w 



« 






«il!:i! 



^ • 



X 
l'i 



I • 



V 



ANCIENT ORIENTAL RUGS. 



a n i e n t 



Pollowing the European usage I call 

all rugs originating before 1800. 

Perhaps it would be best to call a n t i q u e only 

those ruga irhere the connection of production and 

drawing belongs undoubtly to the sixteonth and seven- 

teenth oentury. 

But the usage in the U.S.A. is different, Here the trade 

calls "antique" every rüg which is at least one hundred 

years old. 

Rugs probably originated nith shepherd tribes In the dim 
dawn of civiliEation, The magnificent rugs made by 
Babylonians, Assyrians and Egyptians have long since dis- 
appeared, However the fragment of a rüg. woren in Sgypt 
about 400 A.D,, now in the Metropolitan Museum, New York, 
and surely one of the oldest pieoes in existence, proves 
that this rüg was woven by methods still in use by 
modern craftsmen. Llkewise old Symbols live on: The warp 
as the immutable forces of the world, the weft aa the 
transient affair of man. Believing that colors can influ- 
ence human life, each color has its own signif icance: 
Thus Yellow means the earth which is conquered by the 
Oreen, the wood; White, the metal, which dominates the 
wood and Red, the fire, which destroys it. Black symboliies 
water, which overoomes the fire. 

There are two principal techniques for making rugs: 
Tapestry weaving and knotting. 

The oldest method is the tapestry weave: The weft is 
woven back and forth to form the shapes of the pattern 
in various colors. In this way the whole fabric becomes 
a sort of reversible color mosaio, c>alled in the Near East 
" I I L I M '* , possibly derived from the landscape 

Kilikien. ^ , 

Closely affiliated to this kind of weave procedura 
is the technique used still today in the Caucasus, called 
"SUM^XH" (cp.below no.99). Here a sort of chain stltch 
is sewn solidly across the warp, fcrming the pattern. 
The effect is something like a kilim. But perhaps one could 
hetter compare it to an embroidery. 
The k n t t e d rüg originated from the ^'-^\f 
strengthening the floorcover. For this P^^P^^^/^^^^^^^ 
.f diverse materials are knotted into the woven ground, 
leaving a pile which may be loose or tignt. 



I 



ilU 



^1 i 



1 



liii' 




>*■ 




■ «1 



/ \ 






^ * « * 






I 



! ' .' 



i 






■ I 



131 

from 80 to 400, although rugs are knoim with over 2.000 
knots to the Square inch. Por instance the famous 
Ardabil carpet in the Victoria and Albert Museum at 
London numbers 32.500.000 knote on 61.5 qm. 

In the slxteenth oentury the t e n i t h of the art 
of rug-neaving will be reached in P e r s i a in the 
reign of %bd S4farid Dynasty (1502-1736), especially 
during the reign of Shah Abbas (1587-«1628). 
The geometric deeign with Kufio characters of the 
14th and 15th oentury diaappears; Arabesques prevail, 
this kind of ornamentation oonsisting of a fatastic 
interlaclng pattern of flowers, foliage or fruit, often 
with figurea of men and animals (Webster), floral scrolls, 
various Chinese motivs among them dragons and wandering 
oloud bands. I knew that the cloud band is of Chinese 
origing; however the Statement of the "Handbuch der orien- 
talischen Töppichkinde" page 89 that it originally 
ptesents the "holly sponge", called tschi and symbolizing 
immortality in the Chinese mythology, was new to me, 
By degress the plants and animals then become more and 
more Conventionalized; the entanglement of the arabesques 
lands to geometric figures. 

In T u r k e y the "court rugs" appear to be a somewhat 
formaliied version of elaborate Persian carpets. They 
are very different from the Turkish rugs woven in the 
villages. Best known among them are the " p r a y e r 
rugs". They are cloacly related in design but woven 
at different centers in Asia Minor. In West Anatolia 
at Melas, Ghiordes, Kula, in East Anatolia at Ladik. 
They were woven very probably since early Mohammedan times 
(Constantinople was conquered by Mahomet II in 1453) , 
,liut today -in consequence of being articles of every 
day use- few pieces are in existence which can be dated 
earlier than the seventeenth Century. Martin in his 
"History of Oriental Carpots beforc 1800" shows in 
figure 340 a Ladik prayer rüg with the date 1110 of the 
Mohammedan calendar, Since the Arabian calendar begins 
with the Hegira (f light of the Prophet from Mekka to 
Medina) in 622 of the Christian era, 1100 corresponds 
with 1733 A.D., and I do not understand how Martin comes 
to figure out the date of 1699. 



m 



•■V.i 



■W: 



il 



1 



l l)f 



132 



• r. . . 






•- • .'. .i> : «. 



i 



\ 



I , 









.■fe- 



il 



Th« "prayer rugs" owe their origin to the need of the 
¥ellever to perform daily five prayers, as ordered by the 
Koran (lit.=read or teach), the Mohaaunedan Holy Soripture, 
collected after the death of Mahomet (569-632 A.D.) with 
the principal dogma: 

••La lllahs il Allah! Mahomet resoul Allah!" 
There is no God but God! Mahomet is the Prophet! 

During prayer the eyes have to be turned to the "Kebla'», 
the point of the heaven in the direction of Mecca, indicated 
internally In every mosque by a niche "AI Mehrab" , 
externally by the Position of the minarets (from Arabian 
mansrat=llghthou8e) . Therefore every prayer-rüg has a 
design which represents thls niohe. While in uae for praying 
the gable-end of the niche has to point in this prescribed 
direction, 

The believer Steps on the broad end. He repeats several 
times laudatory ejaculations: "God is great, God is power- 
füll God is all powerful!" Bowing to the angels, (minis- 
tering spirits) to the right and left, he props on his 
arms and finally touches the earth (i.e. the rüg) with 
his head, 

The Caucasian are not to be confused with other groups: 
Brilllant in colors, streng contrasta, simplefied geometric 
forms, according to science, based on birds and beasts. 
They have a oertain savage grandeur. We find rectangulars, 
rhombe», polygons with stars, multifarious stars, ßetween 
or also joined to them are strangely formed structures. 
they look like claws and tongs and hooks, sometimes on 
long stakes, stmetimes following the contures of singl 
parts of the design. 
The Turkoman rugs are the product of wandering tribes. 
Small geometric patterns appear on a ^^^J^ß^°^^^^^^ f Jf 
red. Since all tent dwellers use their rugs constantly, 
these rugs are an intergral part of the ^^^^^^^^ß- ,, 
Although sturdily woven the wear and tear is especially 

hard. 

Except for the Turkoman rugs, where the ^"ditional 

patteru has not changod radxoally °-^^;. «^^^ J °'' 
'^ ducts Show the same deollne • ^^e 

tiff and in the end ■unintell-gibie, 



e 



if 



all the other pro 



Uving pattern becomes «^^^%*^^ ".".^ese Ornaments 
so that the deoper meaning of »^'^y/f^^f ", ^d is 
was unknown to the carpet weaver of long ago, ana 



was unknown 

also lost to today's admirer. 



, ■ ■■«« »m f 



4U»Ul.i.>JLMMIi, 



if Wii ii I 




'. •• •► . 



• .^ 



1 






r »r. 



^\ 



• • • c 



~. v • - '( 



n w 



%>. 



■4. ■ ■ * 

" '* **>' A C C 



•i ( 



• V 



••■v: 5 



.' i5 ♦=; *! : 



♦ • '•<♦ r f* V * 



. > 



it 



' 



. ^ I 



■ I 

' M • 
■1 ., 



133 

Time has not dealt kindly with rugs, being vulnerable 
to dirt and wear. The bare or only slipperod feet of tha 
eastern countrymen were muoh less harah than the heavy 
footwear developed in Europa Trhich so often wore the 
lustrous pile away. And yet : The diamed colors of the 
old rugs still bring out the oonsummate art of their 
design and we oan still enjoy their beauty, though to a 
lesser degree. 

It Is sad to learn that during the Second World War some 
of the finest collections of early rugs in existence 
were destroyed : The collection of the "Kaiser ?riedrich 
Museum" in Berlin, most cleverly >rought together by Wil- 
helm Bode searching eld Spanish and Italian churches at 
a time when the general interest was still lacking, char- 
red in the safe-deposits of the new "Reichsbank»^ at Berlin, 
The collection in Munich, mostly from the possession of 
the former reigning family Witteisbach, was wantonly des- 
troyed by the Nazis before their surrender to the allies. 
All the more we have to be grateful that antiques rugs 
of every kind have found their way to the New World and 
to safety. New York Metropolitan Art Museum' s collection 
of oriental rugs gives an extraordinary opportunity to get 
an idea of those masterworks of "court rugs", 
Gven of the füll freshness of their original beauty, 
I need only mention the "Emperor's Carpet" from castle 
Schönbrunn near Vienna, the "Ailaal Carpet" from the 
shrine •f Shaik Safi at Ardabil and one of the latest 
acquisitions, the "Anhalt Carpet". 

The hi Story of the Anhalt carpet is typioal and explains 
als« its perfect condition, It was probably n-ade during 
the reign of Shah Tahmasp (1525-1576), woven at the State 
manufactory of the Safavid shahs at Täbris between 1524 
and 1535. From Persia it came into the possession of the 
Sultan in in Constantinople and accompanied the Turkish 
arnor, perhaps the Sultan himself, to the siege of Vienna 
in 1638, to be used in great affairs of State only, When 
the Turks were driven back, the carpet came, as part of 
the Turkish booty, to the Duke of Anhalt. At the ancestral 
Castle at Anhalt it remains forgotten until it is redis- 
covered by chance and the late Lord Duveen shows it fi^st 
to the public in London' s exhibition of Persian Art in 1931. 



an 



But also the simpler kind of antiquo rugs, like the 
p r a y e r r u g s, are representel in the Anieric 
muse-oms in an amazing quantity and variety. I saw many 
of them used to enliven rld American ^^^^^^^^'' ^''J.^^ 
museums of great eitles took pains to collect and br.ng 

ighteenth 
ent 
which 

are still now representative for' their homely charm. 



f'i 




5"n"'' • 




Him^ 






il 



!i 



V 




i ! 



' J * 



n k 



♦ •■ 









. « 



r 1 



134 



The modest oarpets for daily use of tht eighteenth Century 

I am going to describe below, have stil preserved at 

least one quality in common with the classic masterworks: 

The harmonic effect of their colors. In spite of manifold 

coloring and vivid contrasts, they are always restful to 

the senaes, attribute always and essentially to the harmony 

of the room they adorn. 

Time and the fading colors do not effect their beauty^ 

ainoe the predoninant colors, red, yellow, 

b 1 u e fade least and the traditional, sensible, taste- 

ful uae of the organieally dyed material remaias. 

With the use of the anilin colors, invented in 1859, this 

harmoniting of colors will begin to fall. 

In the following I have classified the rugs into four 
groupa : 

1, Turkish-Anatolian 

2, Caucasian 

3, Persian 

4, Turkoman (nomades) 






95-97 
98-99 

100 
101-102 



Lit,: Martin, F.R. "A History of Oriental Carpets before 

1808", Vienna 1908. 
Neugebauer & Orendi "Handbuch der orientalischen 

Teppichkunde", Hiersemanns Handbücher, 

Band 4, Leipzig 1909. 
Art Institute of Chicago "Exhibition of Antique 

Oriental Rugs". Chicago 1947; 

Charles P.Kelley. 
Bulletin of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 

vol.V, no.2, October 1946; "Osborn, 

the Kress Benef action". 



w 



3 

'X 









■ 







li 



'i ; 



?/• 



) 




f 




135 



95. 



Prayer Rüg (Melas). 
125 X 94 gm.; 49.3 x 37 " 



The ground of the proyer-niche is rod. A mosque lamp 
in yellow hangs d<rwn Into the niche, 

The Qolumns which support the gable end, the gable-fiöld 
itself UluÄ &nd yellow, 

Small enclosing on creany^ broad borders on brovm ground 
with floral forma in different colors, 
Much worn and torn. 

Aaia Minor, Turkey-Anatolia, Melas. Eighteenth Century, 



96. 



Prayer Rüg (Ladik) . 
200 X 115 cm.; 78.12 x 45 " 



Distinct division in three parts; The principal one, the 
niohe in the middle, dark rieh red, the foot-part on 
white, the gable-part on green ground. 

Below a kind of gable-stairs a jug to remind the believers 
of the washings ordered by the Koran, tiny light-llke 

points on both sides. 

On the white ground below three battlement-like figures 
and five tulips on long stalks; on the green ground 
ahove two Jugs and floral forms, among thea two palmettes 

in different colors. . ^ ., ^ a 

On the borders floral patterns together with the cloud- 

band motive. 

In good repair. 

Asia Minor, Trirkey-Anatolia, Ladik. Eighteenth Century. 

Lit • Martin "A Histpry of Oriental Carpots before 1808"; 
Lit.. Martin J^^^^^J/^^^^j^ ^^..^^ 1700 in the mosque 

Ala-al-din in Konia. t^^v^t, 

Neugebauer & Or.ndi ''HandWch der orientalischen 
Teppichklmde\ colored plate III, and 
ill.59. 



i: 



i. 



:U''. 
■'■1-. 



ji-. 



w-^ 



u<A 




./r 



M) 



i. «v 




I 






136 



97. 



Prayer Rüg (Kula) > 



Color harmony of blue and yellow, disbanding of the 
borders in stripes, are characteristic for this kind 
of carpet. But also the yollow t r e © - ornament 
In the doep blue ground of the prayer-niche, 
representing the "Tree of Life" which grows in the 
midst of the Uarden of Eden, eating of which gives 
aternal life, 

Blue is the color of mourning in the Near East; 
this kind of rüg serves as a funeral oarpet, first 
io oover the cofpse, then the coffin of the faithful, 

and finally it is used by the relatives to pray on 

near the tombstone. 

Asia Minor. Torkey-Anatolia, lula. Elghteenth oentury, 
v-„»^ A nrendi "Handbuch der Orientalischen 

111.61. 






V.: 



m 



■-.■i<"' 





III 




* M 



. « 



137 



98. 



Caucasian Rüg (Schirwan) . 
310 I 135 cm.; 122.5 x 53.2 " 



The background of the principal middle part is red, 
of the bordors yellow, white and brown. C-oometric 
motivea in yellow and white with brown and a few 
li^ht» blue ones form the ornamentation. 

South Cauoasus distric of Schirwan. Eighteenth Century. 

Lite- Neugebauer & Orendi "Handbuch der orientalischen 

TeppichkundeV ill,87,p.l48. 



99. 



Caucasian Rup (Sumakh). 
270 X 220 cm.; 106.10 x 86.14" 



This carpet is woven in the tapestry manner I mentioned 
in the introducation (p.l30), 

The principal colors are red, blue in two shades, 
yellow and green. The ornamentation is geometric. 

The middle field ground is red, but ^/^^ .P^J^ß^f .^^^ 
deep blue give predominant effect and ^ivids it into 
two equal parts. With great ingenuity a «^ultiplicity 
of Stars aSd polygons in different shape s ze and 
coloring are dispersed over the whole surface. 

On both narrow sides a Doraer 
running on, 

province Schirwan. 

The nos.98 and 99 wore .ought at TifUs In 1909. 




9* 



1 ' 



i;. 



-tjiitft 



• .- 




r '! ' 







»I. 





ItiwtÖ. 



138 



100. 



Persir;n Rüg (Karadagh). 
375 X 165 cm.; 147.14 x 64.15" 



The bp.okground of the long rectangular middle field is 
dark bluo, of the two small borders yellow and of the 
broad border between them red. All are filled with floral 
ornamentations in red, blue and yellow. 

North Persia, province Azerbeldschan^ distric Karadagh» 

Eighteenth Century, 

Lit,: Neugebauer and Orendi "Handbuch der orientalischen 

Teppichkunde," ill.lll & 112. 



101 and 102, 



Two Tekketurkotaan Rugs> 

155 X 87 cm.; 61.1 x 34.4 " 
137 x 85 cm.; 53.1 x 33.8 " 



The trade usually calls these rugs "Bukharas". 
The wool has a silky lustre. ön the deep red background 
small geometric patterns in dee dark-blue >nd yellow, 
oalled by the Tekketurkoman tribes "flying eagles". 

The Tekketurkomans are wandering tribes (nomads) in 
Central Asia, in Turkestan between the Caspian Sea and 
Bukhara, They are tent dwellers aa^ these rugs integral 
pp.rts of thöir furnishing; therefore the rugs are in 
constant use and thus, in spite of the sturdy weavmg. 
the traces of extremely hard wear and tear are visible. 

The date of w^aving is very difficult to teil since the 
traditional pattern does not change over a very long time. 
Tet the rieh deep colors let us surmise that the rugs were 
wovon still in ihe eighteenth Century. 

Lit • Neußcbauer A Orendi "Handbuch der orientalischen 
.lt.. r^eugcD u Toppichkunde", ilius. 140. 

Oettingen "Teppich Kartenwerk", Serie V/2 , bl.26 

"One of the finest craftmanship pf knot- 
ting, 2.50O-3.5-00 knots on 100 qcm," 



r 
r 






■"««'^W... 




'i 








r • 



'r (• 



-V i r 






ir.-t 



^^ 



« . 



• '' • < 



•J* 



^w I» I 



.. ' , * 



V y 






/» 




n-U0.' 



The axc, cut out of a whale bone, served as a ceremonial 

Inplement In the ancestral ritual. 

It has the form of a stroke-weapon; on the stroke side 

the whalG bone is flattened to a sharp edge. 

The grip is placed well bulanced between a dragon' s head 

at the end of the handle and the monster which seems to 

creep along the upper rim* 

Both figures are deoorated in the typical M a o r i 

fashion with decply cut Ornaments, the eyes inlaid with 

mother-of-pearl, 

Below the head a hole as if for fastening to the girdle. 

New Zealand (Australia) , before 1642, 

Maori art before European era, i.e» before the discovery 
by Tasman In 1642. 

Lit.: "Cahier d»art", 1929, 2/3 (Mars/Avril) , fig.14. 



1 



^: 



f »•:■!•: 





/iii- \ov^ 



(^\1^±.<^U'^ ^-/xHyi-/ cOci-^CTvOM - ^y( 



C2 



KJok. 



A 22/^ 



^ ^ 



6 



, 




) 


••- 






•"— • 


»», - 






. ♦ 


» 




* 


i^** • 







)|ec 



HtTie-V 



A3-^:5 



f?-« 



V- 



)-'y~- 



■m 






f 



'■„■^'.tt«; 



CoUectors' Japanese art 

The Times-Sotheby Index/Gerald im Keen 



Over the last tew years ceriain 
aspects Ol lipanese art have 
turned into populär almost 
lashionable -collecting iields in 
thc uest. I hc nel^uke. a small 
biitlon-like loggle that was used 
lo atlach itcms hanging Ironi 
the waht and which was ot'ten 
carved with consummalc art. 
has bccome a collector's iteni 
pai excellence. I Ins has the 
widest follov^ing of collectors 
of any Japanese art torm m ihe 
v^est. 

ils dosest competitor \s the 
inro. a poiich or Container with 
•^everai separate compartmenls 
^^hieh was originally used to 
carry seals in and later lor 
carrying medicmes. fhe inro 
hung trom a cord and was 
attached at the waist by a net 
sukc. On if was la\ished the 
finesl art ot thc lacqiierer — an 
art iorni which was mo^t highl\ 
regarded and dcvcloped in 
Japan. 

Japanese metaiwoik. particu- 
larh the tsuba or vvvord guards. 
and sword littings now ilso 
command a lollowing in the 
wesi. Ihc artislr\ heic lies 
again in thc decoration ol the 
picces Lising nian\ ditterent 
nietals and allo\s including 
several decoratne allo\s only 
u^ed in Japan. I his tield 
attracb a lar NnialJcr and niore 
speciali/ed group ot collectors 
and thc sanie applics lo Japan- 
ese prints and drawings. 

Ihc collect ion ol Japanese 
works ot art in the west today 
seems to underlinc bolh in out- 
line and in detail thc ditference 
bctween eastern a\mS wettern 
cullures. In spite ol thc Japan- 
ese economic miracle. purchases 
b\ Japanese collectors play a 
very small part in the western 
market. I hey arc not biiMng 
back such Japanese treasures as 
are to bc tound in the wcst \o^w 
anv Scale, tconomic prosperily 
8nd the collection ol works of 
art tend to go band in band bui 
the most notable impact ot new 
Japanese collectors on the 
London market has been in the 
fjelds of mipressionist paintings 
and Chinese ceramics. When 
important pieces of Japanese 
porcelain comc up for sale in 
the west they may also find 
Japanese buyers. and this is 
aKo true of the finest Japanese 
prints. But in the main such 
Japanese art works a^ are to bc 



found in thc wcsl changc hands 
bctween western collectors. 

Vct t^urope is no mcan treas 
ure house — nor is America. Ihe 
rcason for this lies in the huge 
exports of works of art froni 
Japan in the late ninetecnh 
centur\. I rom 1639 lo 1853 
Japan had virtuallv no intcr- 
course iih the outside world. 
Emperor succeeded Emperor in 
the direcl family line trom the 
Sun goddess Amaterasu. ihough 
thc Emperor with his glittering 
imperial court at Kyoto was no 
more Ihan a nominal rulcr. J he 
leal power was vested in t!ie 
Sbogun. or military rulei. aiid 
the feudal system of govein 
ment was run by the military 
class. Each local baron had his 
own Samurai to enforce his 
authority. The upheava! which 
followed the arrival ol thc 
.American Commodore Perry in 
1853 and the reopening <)[ reia- 
lions with thc outside world 
saw the Fimperor restored as a 
rulcr in fact as well as nanic 
and thc disbandmcnt of loc 
privileged class of samurai. I'^c 
economic trials that tiiis 
brought in its train torad 
many familics to seil thc wcrs- 
uics liiai ihey hat! acquired 
o\ei the centurics. and a i\o<K\ 
of Japanese works of art 
poured into Europc and 
.America. 

On the vvhole. Japan did not 
pari with ils fmcsi treasures— 
or at least thosc which were 
most pri/cd in the countrv 
itselt. Ihus thc finest Japanese 
paintings arc hardly to bc 
tound in the west: ihe ancieni 
potter\ icabovvis which passcd 
from master to master of thc 
traditional lea ceremony it 
mained vviih thosc who valued 
them most highly. and thc 
finest and most ancieni Japan 
cse sword blades are hardly to 
bc found outside Japan — while 
rumours spread Irom Japan 
itselt" o'i leabowls and bladcs 
that can today change hands 
loriSOorilOO.OUU. 

Ihus the flood of works of 
art that reached the west was 
largely made up of examples of 
Ihose arts and crafts which 
wcrc less highly considered in 
Japan itself. fn so refined and 
highly civilized a society tre 
mendous artistry was lavished 
on the daily appurtenances ol 
litc. J he art of lacquering was 
very highly deveioped and con 
sidered, and great masters 
turned their hands to decoral- 
ing the inro — though this was 
still a minor, domestic app/ica 
tion of a great art. Netsuke 
carving was definitely consid- 
ered a lower form of art. 
Japanese prints were made. for 
thosc who could not afford to 



purchase paintings. for a cheap 
populär market. In a military 
society great care and crafts 
manship was laxished on sword 
fiilings. but It was thc blades 
themselves that were most 
highly pn/cd in Japan and the 
sword filtmgs rather than thc 
blades that reached the west in 
such quantities. 

Japan had been sealed o\\ 
from the rest oi the world for 
more than two centuries and 
thc importance o\ their artistic 
achievements. suddenly rc 
vcaled. had a trcmendous 
impact in Europc. In I rancc 
Japanese prints were a great 
new inspiration to the artists o\ 
the Impressionist school. And 
by the end of the Century there 
were already many great collec 
tors of Japanese art. who had 
mastered the complicated 
Japanese language and made 
themseKes familiär with thc 
history. myth and legend that 
lie behind this art. and the 
rcligiou.s and symbolic signif 
icance associatcd w ith the ireat- 
ment o\ cven thc most common 
subject. 

Ver> large and important 
collect ions of Japanese works 
<^^\ art were for med at ihis 
period. Sonic o{ them are now 
in museums : thc rest form thc 
basis of the present day market 
in Japanese itcms in l'urope 
and America. Ihe most strin 
genl regulations ^re now 
applied to the export o\ works 
ot art tri)m Japan and ver\ 
little currently finds its way out 
oi thc country. 

Ihe most outstanding dcvel 
opment oi the l96Us has been 
thc spread o{ interest in collect- 
ing netsuke. culminating in the 
sale over ihrce years of the 
Hindson coJlection at Sothcby's. 
which not only saw the first 
netsuke tetch more than il.OOÜ 
at auction. but the last of the 
scven sales in which prices 
steadiiy rose, saw one liny carv- 
ing make as much as £2.800. 

While netsuke were originally 
used as buttons, it is thc tre 
mendous artistry that they dis 
play as miniature carvings that 
atlract the present day collec- 
tor. Ihe l"imcs-Sotheb\ index 
shows them on avcragc four 
and a half timcs more valuable 
in 1970 than in 1960. Ihis is in 
a sense an Understatement. At 
the beginning o\ the decade 
there were very fevv sales and a 
very limited number of collec- 
tors. As the years pas^ed more 
and more people became inter- 
ested. books about netsuke were 
publi.shed, and collectors 
became increasingly selectivc. 

The finest examples have in- 
creased hugely in price while 
modest works arc not much 



inm up S timc^ 



-^ \etsuke up 4 titnes 




Left ; a modcl of a kirin b> Tomotada sold at £1,800 last ycar. Ihc same netsuke wassoid in Germany in 1962 for £204. Centre : a reclining cat by Kwaig^oku Masatsugu 
sold last >ear for £2.800, thc highcsf prive over paid for a netsuke. Rlght : a reclining ox, a subject much t'avoured by Tomotada and his schooh 



more expensivc than they were 
10 years ago. Since modest 
works are more common thc 
avcragc multiplication in pricc 
is not so great. Ihe best net- 
suke felch perhaps 10 times as 
much as thc> did in i960. In 
1962, \oy cxamplc, a brilliant 
tiny model o\ a reclining horsc 
by kwaigyoku Masatsugu, on^ 
o\ thc most sought .ifler mas 
lers. sold at Sothebys tor oni\ 
116.'^ ; today a piecc o\ this 
qualit\ b\ this mastci would he 
worth around £2.500. 

Present dav coIlector> tcnd to 
pii/c abose all the decorative 
qualities ot netsuke ; lhc\ aie 
perhaps Icss academic in thcir 
approach than thc great collec 
tors o\ the turn of thc Century. 
Ihe netsuke carvers tackled an 
immense \ariety ot Nubjecis. 
1 herc are man\ figures .md 
events from the rieh minc o\ 
Japanese m\ th and legend . 
there are man\ mythological as 
well as real animals. in addilion 
to fruit, flowers. shells. fish 
and other subjects drawn from 
nature. Even such naturalistic 
subjects tend to be imbued with 
religious or symbolic attributes. 
Ihus the study ol netsuke alone 
richly illustrates the main 
facets of Japanese lifc and 
thoughi. Ihis was ol prime 
importance to the early collec 
tors. fascinated by the discove^v 
of so essentially foreign a cul- 
lurc. 

Western art forms are gen- 
erally collected for their aes- 
Ihetic qualitics and it is this 
approach that the new gencra- 
tion o\ western collectors take 
in their search for netsuke. The 
highest prices today are gen- 
crally paid for animal net- 
suke-a type to which no 
particular importance was 
attached by the older gcnera- 
tion o\ collectors. Research has 
also singied a number o\' artists 



who>e netsuke are oi outstand- 
ing orjginality and qualitv 
thei work is naturally particu- 
hirU sought after. 

Kwaigyoku Masatsugu. ah 
artist who worked in Osaka in 
the ninetcenth Century, is one 
o\' thc most highly considered 
ant^ several süperb examples o\ 
Ins work have been seen at 
au*.lion Mention has already 
neoii made o\ a reclining horsc 
whch brought 1165 in 1962 ; in 
I9(s another example o{ his 
uo'k. a pupp> holding a bird 
whistle, brought a new auction 
rec\)rd for a netsuke ;il £900 
and in 1969 a reclining c.tl a 
rare Mibject made i.2.80(i. 1 Ins 
reiiiam> the highest auction 
pnce on record for a netsuke. 

I herc is a special complica- 

tion with some o\' ihe great 

eighteenth-century masters since 

iheJ! >ignatures tended to be 

idded to pieces b\ many pupils 

and follow'crs. Ihe wi>rk ol thc 

niosler himself can onl\ bc 

distinguished by itv quality. An 

example of this i> I omotada ü\ 

Kyoto. One of his best known 

subjects i> that oi thc reclining 

o\ : an a\erage pnce for a 

school work is around £150. In 

1969 an example o\ süperb 

quality, clearly b\ thc master 

himself. came up for sale and 

nvide £950. Ihe ^ame quality 

combmed with a less Standard 

subject can fetch cven more. A 

splendid carving o\ a mxthical 

creaturc known as a kirin made 

11,800 last ycar: in a sale in 

Germany in 1962 the same net- 

siike had brought 1204. 

Ihis is. of coursc. the too o' 
thc market. 1 he majority of 
netsuke still fetch bctween £20 
and £200. Ihe field has not yet 
achieved so wide a popularity 
aiiong collectors as lo make 
e\en the modest examples cx- 



collectors who had been buying worked in the early eighteenth 

Century, and the niiieieenth-cen- 
tury master Shibala Zeshin. In 
1961 an unusual sheath inro by 
Ritsuo from the Kitson coUec- 
iion made only £38 ; when the 
Hindson inro were sold in 
October \%9 another very fine 



netsuke with thc idea that it 
was an inveslment and those 
attracted to the field by the 
glamour of thc Hindson sales — 
it is rare for a major collection 
to come on thc market and this 
caused unprecedented interest — 



may have dropped out o\' the example of the artisfs work 



market for a time. 

Ihe enthusiasm for these tiny 
ear\ings m thc west seems 
hardly to have aftecled the Ira 
ditional Japanese vievv thai net- 
suke are a lower form of art. 
Inro. on thc other band, were 
traditionally more highly con- 
sidered . from thc carliest times 
lacquer was grcatly admircd 
and the techniques of lacquer 
work were deveioped to a higher 
degrcc of artistry in Japan than 
anywherc eise in the world. 
While inro weie perhaps a 
minor application of a grcal 
art. most of the greatest masters 
of lacquer turned their hands to 
them from the sixteenth Century 
on wards. 



made in die form of a Icather 
pouch brought £1,250. Ihis was 
rhe first occasion on which any 
inro passcd the £1,000 mark at 
auction. A record price for an 
inro was established in the 
same sale with an example by 
Shibata Zcshm decorated with 
chestnut husks and nuts at 
£1.900; this inro had been sold 
togethcr VMth another for £11 
in 1947. 

On the whole, however, inro 
still fetch lower prices than 
netsuke and interest fewer col- 
lectors. This is one of the many 
curious reversals of artistic 
Standards born of the western 
inieresL in Japanese art — the 
netsuke \Kas originally an unim- 



I he last fevv years have seen portant appendage of the inro 

a major increase of interest in H'^ed to suspend thi^ sumptuous 

this field in the wcst and a item from the waist. 

small but significant number of Another startling reversal ot 

new Japanese collectors starting Standards lies in the compara- 

to make purchases. Ihe result Ove prices of Japanese prints 

has been a rapid increase in and drawings. Prints began to 

pricc. Ihc I imes-Sotheby index be produced in the late seven- 

shows inro on average eighi teenth Century as a cheap alter- 

times more expensive in 1970 native to paintings for the pros- similar objects in previous sales. 



And there are as many keen 
collectors in Japan as anywhere 
m the west 

Drawings. on the othci hand, 
atlract \er\ little interest. .^n 
average drawing bv Hokusai 
may cosl 13-500. while one o\ 
bis finer prints may cost £2.000. 
fhe very low prices that fine 
Japanese drawings command 
slem in pari from thc diffi- 
cultv of finding them -there is 
only one dealer in London wh*) 
speciali/es in this field. Mr. 
Sawers of Kegan Paul And 
collectors lend to make for 
belter publici/cd fields. 

Note. 

lor this special arlicie the 
1 imes-Sothebv index method 
has been used to calculate the 
rise in average prices of netsuke 
and inro since i960. Ihe prices 
recorded in sales in 1959, i960 
and 1961 were averaged to 
establi.sh a level of prices in 
"around "■ i960. This level of 
prices is compared to the prices 
recorded in sales m 1965 and in 
1970. Ihe price of a piecc is 
only Used in deiermining the 
average irend when it is re- 
corded by a pholograph in the 
auction catalogue. In this way 
account can be taken of the 
relative quality of each picce in 
relation to its price and to 



than they were a decade earlier 
Ihe increase is larger than that 
measured for netsuke since a 
number of very high quality 
came up for sale in around 
i960 — and as for netsuke, it is 



perous artisan class. Ihey were 
never looked on as anything 
other than a cheap. populär 
form of art in Japan until the\ 
began to be so greatly admired 
by western artists and collectors 



the best ihai has advanced so in the late nineteenth Century 
much in valuc. 

Inro are also 



today most 
prized for their artistic merit 
and for the orginal and difficult 
effects achieved wilh ihe 
medium of lacquer. 1 wo artists 



Poday the graphic work of 
great artists such as Hokusai. 



pensive. In fact this ycar there whose work is now parlicularly 
has been some fall in price for prized — and which has shot up 
less outstanding pieces. Ihose in price— arc Ritsuo. who 



Hiroshige. Utamaro and Shar- 
aku can command several thou- 
sand pounds for a single print. 
The same sort of price must be 
paid for " primitive " early 
prints of the late seventeenth 
and earlv eighteenth centurv. 



Auction prioes tend to be 
irregulär — it is perfectly possi- 
ble for twice as much lo be 
paid in one sale a5 another for 
very similar objects. The index 
averages these variations. Preci- 
sion of measurement is impossi- 
ble and the figures in the 
accompanying chart should be 
considered as rough Orders of 
magnitude. A larger number of 
netsuke than inro were sold in 
thc three years on which thc 
Chart is based : they were not 
of exceptionally high quality 
while Ihe inro were outstanding. 



vA^>. ^^^T.-^'J<Zc 



? R 



PAG 



'fhe oae hundred three objeots desorlbed In thl« 



pieoe^s In 192,5 aad v/^ 3 bullt up in nearly f i ^ty 
yearn# 

In i:)42,ilurl i.i the iori^iU oocup;l^ion of tno 
IletheTlanäSfOur proper t/ ^ao etol^'/i '^'j taa notorious 






nnd oniy fi i*ew pleaoc 0)uW bc r'^jfiinfnu 



'''h5.1e tne inen fir;* tho :,unßf^i.tn bacIIö ^neoB .>l«o06 
raraainüd oeriiaa in thn atuiu of tiio üouoe «mere t»ic 






iaad had tfietr l^rrt quarter «• 



'4>^ of tne obj«otö ox o*r ooil^;Ci*ion :uid bocn brouont 
-^ ./oiu travelu in thc ?ar niad :iear vi^itt« ; ow^ver 






iJLvcf? •^^]^:,ar -oroii,- o^^^c ^rUoner,^rof» :fici.::el, af. ^7cll v 



fro-i re^cAO'vn oollectioas ,to .aentiou oal- tl:e ooujite^^ 
::oido and Otani^r^r.^. ^leuor» \ 



In this wö^ ^M üUü»iöOvied in ouiidincs uj 



)•. Do;:ie »'r^taOii^^a oi 



^iX 



2i a-'all tnit 



in ^-hich 1 ;:ad iieoo-i© inter«i»tea ilr©iid^ ^t t.'u> eail 

tiaDa/toB« coni7ai ^ub^^^v JacoV?y ^/ith rds rerK^aji ooA.leo~ 
•? Ion of. t»a i/^ne!^#»^ >rtt?ntor tnr ri^e oi" taie '^üBtaei-u- 

tho uaturnl oe a^**«^ ^'"^iiGre ix »•täs por.Gibi<? to i>«ooi.e 
Honuainted «»ith m^ Xc sef^t^o ^^*-J- ^' *- eju^onoo of 
the 'ar >^iQt» rn irtfao **«il ai-i to ;uet:i nunDlartSf 
artlBtCf con loiijöcurs , i*ad collectorü« 
Mer^ iaict t\s^ found:;tlon to ny »uio^led^e tloh 
eimbieu r-^ ^o <':5l -* ot an my trivel» Xvw t>rkB of 
arx» >^re i riet tho dxrer.rjor of the '* J8ta4ji;.tiu.Gne 
i^unjitabteilunfi; aer Beniner ^iUB€on'* and i^r ..er-i>cr, 
>^t%o c iUr;r:el <?nd iiliai^ 'olmtto *iie;;^ion xht: c na -^eü 
onl\% jr.'John^iow ciircGtor >r the uoeuia of ^•:aatorn 
.rt^'and aüviivcr to i'.t' w...iv'x-lxy in I::-1^n 3 id ^ar 
. a«tern -rt dt Oxford. 



Thuß 1 enternd a oirole to vhiah X ^'1 >aii^t>tea xor 
inuiena© 3tii:*uJL^ition« i baon ^e u .iit..;/c* .., tLo 
*»'.Xi><.rt Co v:i..cion x^f ti.e u^^^ iX 'rt'b oHatnieit 
at titie .töte iU3f*a:i, n?rlln'* (1924-133 «nd 



co-iou-u'.-cr au v 



7C« I ^ 

< v< Ju ->- 



iiuücr ü 



-•» 



xhe 



bO* 



rii 






♦ V«, 



dircutore cf the *» Jf ^v /L^uhuft f :r Jata latiBcho 
Jiunef* Berlin (Ii26-lj5^). 



\ 



XI 



/U 



a 




If6d<^d 



pai:itiiv:B a« v?ell ^-^ tlie lacquoru h^v». .•!, ;oot; 
iMitrsiike ani color priatr r c n lost for cvor. 






The rao^iory ^>-: so'^ie of cur lo!:t ^^rkj? o:f »rt v^ 

1912 ••AU":^tolluiit; ^?1^^^ oata l'^tlüoher ; VLif^t" 

H' rlla, ^»Jr.T'rtnio rr linste 
1929 ?Aa^7etellan^j Jhlntr^jincticr Kuriit* vor«n- 

der '.Uiüte» Berlin 
13'55 "Intcr^^ation-l K.'hi^.itio.- of •^Jtlucße Art" 

IMö Virulkl on '•vja 0o8t-;.2:iatli^cne •^UIk^:t" 

.luüuu:^ Vau ;5i ;tlüohe .u-i^irt^ ^'ifcittrd^t:!^: olinrui ) 
'Auroteiluivi; ^^^r ..a.ct dot. alten *r^:-»ant:'' 
^iüiöt,;e";erbe u.eoiut ^öfc^€?iC v?itÄorl'^iui; 

:#oa :*n;>eloB .:ou:it^ .u^ottinC California) 




.J46 



--.5b 



\>r€r»t Hü 
ljt>l 









• - • 




Liebe Erika, Es wäre gut, diese Inhaltsangabe auf einer Seite zu haben. 

Schlage vor, alles etwas nach oben zu rücken. 

Die Seitenzahlen müssen entsprechend Deiner Zählung abgeändert werden, l ! l ! 



ü S T K ?l T li 



I 
11 

ILl 
IV 
V 

VI 
V I 



A* aiiiriA 

Anoient Chi.* . e Bronr-r 
^ 1-21? 

Anclent Oni:ifuie Carviii^a 

^uxuleat Ciiiiiocu Oerwriicc 

Aaclent Oniuoee i'öiiittrvts 

^ 52 

Anolerit >hlne«« r*?icquer 

moieut Chi.iete AUt;!; 

' 3 '^-.> / 



1 

7%r n 










IX Anolerit Jtpaii^bi) 'ottory 

X Aaolent .f^-^iiPrirfRe ''.aci.u^r 

7G 

^ 77 
XII ^ajleat Jopan»^i3e r.*u itiurj 



7a 

CHI Anclerit Jr •' ( 



wolor PxiaXB 



0. I:<:;IA 



\IV .vnoieiit Aiuliuii \rt 



94- j7 









:',H K4;T 









13? 



voo 



r.'.^^ 



eu-xec' r^jnX^ 'tfj« 



Qcr 



-^.tlPuiiil aw'^Sb.^U'^, O'-i::^/ f>>l 



f5X±lln ^>d.'ll 



.IX y-f 4... ... 



ilSCfi 



j i P.l: 



\^' 



l\ 



: r 



^*^Ki.} fc ,T0 



■', ^ ' •" 



tr 



r • /"• 



*-» i _ . 



1 ^i]- 



f- -i 



,v i ' .-' 



•J'. 'J 



f'!«». 



■^ t 



' * ' • 



Li l -V t 



n 



ijio. 



r; I 



\ 



A. G n I II 



I. A:i omnT qiiin:^c£ broi^zes. 



Some not es on early Chine oe bronzes. 
Et Veuaels - Utensils» 



The anoient Chinese oeremonial broriae vessels,recovered 
froui tombs or iinearthed in building modern roads, attain 
the liiijheet ar'"'' tic perfection and belong to the works 
of craft vihich procured ^-^orld value to the Chinese Art; 
2hey are imique in the art iiiotory of the woild., 

They are nonuimmtal in the very oense of the v/or|d 
(Webster:" of the nature of a monunent; heace inasoive, 

loBtlngfirapreBsive. " ) 
They speak their o\m lan.^uage clear^, and mi^^Ktypthey teil 
of the reli^i^ion and the belief s that inspired them. 

Nature itself oared afrectionately for theee works of i^n. 
Peculiarity in the oomx:)Oüition of the bronzes as ^toII ao 
in the -'liinese e(jrth,v'hich prfM^erved theae treut'ures 00 
loa,3 a ti2ne,euriQhed tiien \vith a patination not tciown to 
any'^other bronze art in the -vorld« 



The tr^nBition from oreJiistorio to hictory beyina whea the 
Hsia { 2201^-1766 B.C.) are ouccöeeded by tho S H A il ^ ,alao 
callod Y i H (1766-1122 B.C.)* 

The Ghang ( :in) aoved their capitais five tiaes. .::ieir oa - 
pital An-yang near IlBiao-t'un on the üuan river in lonam /, 

has bv^on excavatedin 1929t ^inoe then practically the wnole ^^/ 
^f our ideas fi^Sa^oatin^^ oi^^jarly bronzes hau chan^i^ed. 

The exoavated bronaes of the^ölian^s people show ao advanced 



a laetal art that we have to tjke for ^.^rantea that oenturxes 
of art tradition niist have preoeded ouch porreotion. 
Or as Karlcrecn putBit: " Our Material proved that the i^ilTGt 
ßreat olai^aical art in China ^vas mature,finiehedtready in 
all detailG and in all iafinitive v ^ricties already in /in 



tline,aud there ^vas 



bat llttle to aad in early Chou tinie.'' 



The vesnelß dhov/ .^reat variety of fora, size,uecoration. 
There are lar^^e roctan-ulnr vesüele, oo-.plotely covered with 
elaborate orariaentatiensi^with f langes and bold relief^ 



flamboyant of a oertuin barbarous beriuty» 
Axid there or© vesBels oimplo **Bevore" in straoturo ^^th a 
quiet .lobility in linetthe aooor roütricted to umall frlo- 
ses arouad e ihanoin^ the boauty of a plnia enooth rurfaoe. 
Xo quote ;>rl ;reen 0^;^^^^ :" Decaratlon of the body of the 
veae^is raajeo fron oxtreme airiplioity to overioaded rich- 
ueos« '/© havo eatirely piain body ; aori the leao far fron 
• priiiitivo S on the ooutrriry very elQ;3aiit»*' 
Ox Priest: '* Frora the bO(:;in:iiag the tendeaoy wna to elabo- 
rate t:i*? aoTipllomted oonvoiitioiialiaed and a^/nbolio i©rjif>iio 
uatil the objecto wcro oonpletely oovered vdth a deej>ly 
c:.it ar^ui brtliaatly ercecutod pnttern in a style thet bear© 



A 



a ramarkabl© lik^möas to that of 



the tenples of Central 



h^ 1® amplo GVidoxioe th:^t e^z. tho :najulfioo:;t plecos of 
QUiiptaouB cip^^eiraaoo füll of aoouiiuleted po'ver aad oonpres- 
eed eumti'^p^^yüi Kilertoa Iiodcje acquired for the aeorly 
Inooinparable ^ei^v Collccfcioii ia /aolilatrbontorijlnatod ia 
the ea.a© cpoch as the veoB^le of 3ia|)le oeauty wliioh are 
deeoribed ^n the followiag pa^^oo» 



Altlioußh little io knomi about tne oereiaoalai of the an*- 

aestral oiiltfit ie tiniinputed thut thr veaaoi© "?ero usod 

for food arul dri^k offeriiigB« 

^'or ^'/ine Hbations tiiree noBt appreoiated broase typeo 

•vere e.iaployed : lU f lu 1 'hdoh • 

The nillot -^dae v/3 8 brou.,/ 1 to the oereiioay ia tho oovered 

coataiaer jallod ''xU**. 

2o toaüt the r^piritü of tha dojirted a oertaln anooiit of 

the s^oriflGiai ^'lae v/00 „»ured fron the lU lato thc'^Ku'* 

nhich vmo thea owdui^ ia the differeat 'Ureotioao whero ;y 

the ni(;h ri:a prevoatod opüiia^^iYt/ie wiae» 

xO zXye pied,;e to the opiritSfWiao /gfeo poured iato the 

tripod libt^tioa oupioiille* '' ChLleh *». litt.le of the 00a- 

teat 4iB pQ'Kired out ^t he f:pout»vto the ^arthj the ro!:rt n^}(d 

to eva:jorate lato tho ßky vhlle the vesGel '-ns oet ovor a 

f Ire • 



in the folloiving deeoriptioa I ati .suiaod h^ the fuadanea-' 

tal ütudiee of Karlorf?ea,I:iaiiwaife alrtm<ly quoted. 
.uirl/:roea illvidoo the early broa^^s lato foar epoohs: 
!.• fri (** mcuan the aane aö v^luing ") 1766-1122 






\ 

2-n:U0 fOU (« »^fir^t half of eBtcra Chou»')ii22- 947 '\0. 



'moans th t the Chou time art 
was otlll eüceutial the same 
art of the ;nin '?ith but amall 
iariovationsa ") 



4*nUAl (« Ir^e 



Ohou ) 



946- 771 i^.ß. 
7 70-255 H.C, 



T^l^?..^...4 ..^ T foiio'-^d Knrl(:reen in his atieiapt to oxj^lain 

ti*c oriy;i.ii:ntatioii# 

The OHIlAIitl^^jiTATIOll is oa;nbined with the parpoae of the veo- 
i^cl: Aa^^eetral oult i»e» to appe'ißefto reiiaer i^avorablo 

tho aiioe^jtral spirite "-ho ni;;'it be ahie to av^/rt diBostf^r » 
bri^i^ .:ood iuok jäU^o to »uitural phenoma li>e rain und har- 

I:::portarit •Carlcreon*!' aoditlo^i: *' 'jChc cult of tiia dead in 
ancieiit Ohina '^ms ebove oll a feciiridit ' oult iatcaded to 
iiiöurr re8urreotioa,vitality aad :)ror)ar;atlon oi tne fainlly 
li.ie. vT this is the re ^öoi; for itö iutiniate ooiaectioa 
with ti;0 fertility cult, the oult of the aoil — a hiijhlv 
antural,.>ri;.itiy0 10^:10 ao aliown by paralielG Jiil over the 
'vorid •— theii it is rcMGoaa'ole to ex^^eot th.3t tho üecora- 
tio:iß oa the bxoazeB UDcd in tho aiiceGtral ouxt aiioald 
have ü votive di^/iiricnnoe» ** 






herefore the deoiratioris of th© bronaes are ay.^VDolic or- 
nanentot niOBtly aoonorphic fi^^^uree aet oa a Si)iral ..^rouiid- 
vvork» 
I Q-m here eritor only Irito oone of these forne« 

1» ;?IRAL ?i:.'J-T3,the 8ü-oalled ^•'::huader ;>attern(-.ei-we 0" 
iilso oalled aea ider or fret pawtr:rn« 

Karlgreea prex^cre '^ to oonbiric the whole aeries uridcr the 
eiaple .larie of •s:>lrBiB' **ai;d rejeot tho debiü^ation above 
ae a *Hjorie?mat ri^ky .uae;-ti:ie six^oulation*'* 
Üoarronted wi%h K.*-irit;reeii'o autnarity I meiitioa taa axpla* 
aation of ..dolf larmiok, jivea ia his '»V;ih illEoE Gi\Ii:?KT*', 
with oo:::ie doubt« 'b^Tiiack derive:::: the Ici-wau fron tUe ol- 
de^:t hierar:lyi)la torn of thiuivlar (i) c!iaa-;ed f ro . round ta 
©quere :!orn (2) a üd oonblned in a doub3.e pioture to deco- 
rat Ive oiirpo^e b) ^ , r-. . , t ' 



-^x^^ 





Hov;ever um lauet k««p In miad that the splr«! is a *very fa 
Bpread sviaboi of the buü naiOiio peoj^lejf who 'ar© aor© or 
lefcjö oontemporarleö oÄ tiie .>iiang« I /Öggyonly tm Te£eT to 
•yaeTrxc^ryttttünsx^i^ri^h ludia X:I^ieujo-i)<iro 3250- 

2750 B«C») aod the "TÄBreTK^j^^emaörk and i>w0dea# 
;>inoe •'>im aad Küiu vilVir oo^;a0loaal ti-iuadarotorm are eB^en- 
tial Tor the agrioulture in tha wliole worl^, I pT^t^T to 
beiievo that the H;>iral is not only aa artistio prei%reaoe, 
but vBü (dTsedTaloo by the ^arly ühiiieöe as a luaf^lo expadtent« 
The Biu^ opiriioa' ueer:ie^*$::^eL4>od lA the deuolüitioa ■'^iiec^nder- 



2. ZOO^AORm^O jr^jm^3 

The uae of aore or leoe fabuloua beiiitjo noütly :5ooi:iorphio 

ia form lo üo do'^bt partly syrvTbolic of the ':^iii:iit:itio reli- 
,;io;i of the tlne. B;/ %j"<ici. ' itf «^^b orUvi'acnt they beoone appea- 
BC'i; thry irvroKo the pot'rucy of anim:»l ^^i^irlta« Wnat aiilxoals 
arc repreucated is often .* :>ioot poiat# 

^OT efBotorio i)urpoa«ii>i«^''irtnT~nse-of ''double faoed" aniraale, ^ ^ 

a peoiiliarity v/hereby ono and the 8!ane oraainent iii a oohv* 
binatiou ''ith h socoud of the uame or other ::iud liiitn rp<g nj^^r^-^ 
tt oeooud face« 



a 



'Tho 2'^0 - T'IKH « If'he voraoiouB ol^itton* 



The name who used by the ooholar LU ?a-wei üot earlier trjia 
232 B, ;.and is taken fron the aaoierit texts oö oric of the 
four riouöterfö :';exitioned ia uoaaeotioa w^tii th?^ ^*^^'^i^£M>( 
eii.peror ::»huri# It beoaiie an ucoonodatiuc^ teria ia %*tet^%uoTter 
oi;-«^öioh tho nost diverse eieiueatt: h'^ve heen neroCd* 
JfalT larljj^reea putö it: *' 'i'he t»ao-t*ieh oocuxu iu aa ia- 
finitive seriea of varleties fron tha oio^t realifitio aai- 
mal'fö he>id to the moot ooiiveatloaal va^ue fl,;iire,c^oinetlne8 
ßo diasolved lato jeonetrioal ae i^AB that oaly the üymra^- 
trioatiy pl^saed eyes oau h<ii> ae ^ de«tect it." 
Alan ^^iervt oalLöji ^ ''tho maijuifioant rebUB^' and triea 
the Bolutioa oi" the rebus writing: 

•• Ißn't it the imiiortiat thiag that tkm In the syi^iboiisin 
of tho early Ohineoe a Heaöt mid a >ird i^layed a greot part? 
Doee it .notter lauoh ^#iioh birdtv\?hioh beast? hiie our 
iooaO:;raplieri> bicker aad ^/raa^^le over the ouli 3ad*Ta:a,the 
tiefer aaü*^ater buXi^alOfthe ,jhoaö?5at ^iua tlie owi^noj^t oi 
theiu perwiut ia it:;AoriiM5 the anewor to the iifji:;niiicaat 
rebuo of the t ' iO-t*ieh,thiit iaterlooki^ig oonpOBite of bird 
aad beaet vmich is the s^/nbol of one fand^^neatai preocpts 
of vhiaeBe thiaiciag - the balaaaed duBÜsm of yia aad yaa^;, 






of darkne»« «ßd lirhttof moon and iiuiitof tmwmle «ad a«ie."t, 

'^Creelfln the Dirtl: ox' Jhina^deiiionBtrated moot of th© *ae - 
ia*?At8 of thle rebus« i'b pointed out - üad ao o.ie has oontra- 
dicrted him - ttot if you biaeot the HUisk of the froit Sdoiati 

moaBteXf^oa "dll findtth.ät the t^'fo h-slvea of tiv deai^a moy" 
be read as proi^iie piotures of bcast fnoiji^j beaet noae to 
aoBe. fie ait:o di^moaetrated that the same .Profile may be read 
baoKwurnetiii hioh oase the hi.idquarters of the beaat beoomo 
a bird f^icia^^ in tiie other direction» >nly one thtri/ij re%iiiW 
ded: xo deiaonetrüte tliat the bird, fall faoe,with '^da^ö out- 
epredidtia an inte.^3ral -yart of the froat f^ioinf^ niaalc. This 
was moBt ably doae in the doveiabor l')3 3 ioeue of tho ntro- 
politan :taBeu/a of Art 4u.lietin,*«««" 

For the xeo% 1 a^^roe with -^aony Carter: '^ The aam© of tho 
^aoa-^ter •'xawk doee not re-^li/ '«f'^er: what doos t^atter ia the 
faot th:it It coasta/itlj ra:ii>i)<3ar8 ia tho dosi^as. .;oraötiiat)s 
the eutiro ora-iiicritatiori of 3 broaitso aoasieta of two or tiirv?e 
t'ao-t'ioh heads placed ia ni^rkod raliof oa a ^.iOCoi^oitid of 
fino s.)lrsle or :::caador fi.jaroö« )x 1% :w\y na o-aa or tv;o 
realietic hoada plaood ia .1 airculor bind«..'* 
'rhio*3 j..4^.t r^eationed ^'reaÜJitio heads'* ioo/C :nor.tiy llke 
bui:ijJfe'^:5e3d:% :.>o I do aot -i^nder at tlie farthor BU.;;:eH,tiDa 
of n ihiiiooo ^oholar •-o t':^;c6 tfie t'fjo~t*ioh aa 'i ayaool 
for tho bull,:ii.i ovi-r tao -/orld the s;/:abol of povior aaa j^:il« 
fertility« 

[^hB aewej;>t theeie «mloa^^fi to Os^vnld t>lr«n ^^ho explains 
"th^t the noaatn^^ of the t'ao-t'ioh deponda upon itö ooni- 
bin^^moa v/ith otht^r s^r^hol n^* 'n\d hf» ne.itioao an esje iail^ 
öl^^nilMuaut xa »uoh oo.^iiiiiyjtioa the drfit;:oa ^ad the oioada, 

b. Tha OICADA p3ttorn(Gh»an-^^?^a) 

Bmaii j*^ae onjeotB lii^f'^rn ^"»f the clcada h^ve boen u^cd from 

©iriiT tittioB zo bf plaood oa the toa^j^ue of the dead» 

:-*inoe the oicai.a lo aii[hibc raa tia^^ IxiL^cct that ooraeG zo lif© 

ia föprin^ a(;ain,thc uoe of the cioada ia oiai^eütioa ".ith 

the aaoe8trr:il cult os B;anbol of the rei^urrcotioa aeede ao 

further explaiuntioa. :^üVCT%l'i€l(iüB it veema ^'^orthlle to 

raeation ;^ar lor^ea' 

üicad^^ , if produced 

wi:u- ../vd if^ii^ht eacil;^ b':co::::€ comif^cted Ia the f^j^oiiu^e of 

tiie nacieat ^'itH the voioc of t^hoi:jts» 



acDiö that the i:.hr ili uotao of the niii# 

by thoaisaadöfiikeao ttw -/uiatle of tiie 



Karl/ween '. ■ '^is damt-it on to denonlnate a laost ourlous 

aeo^rativc n it : A band in threo -orlsontal cctions 

vfhich uyo.i cioso oxanlmitlon ttixri out to be aa t- a.re «ly 
di= aolved aniraal ch8.>ci ia üO^ of its ooat Variante a 

row of "A'i.i.viullis at t-ve top aad an arilaal eye >«f disti-iot- 



t^.. 



A-ö 






TI^: - Cvn}U r^erlod ( 1.122-947 3,3. ) : The Yia tr^ditlon 
La broas« j?roauotioa ii. ooatiriued ith rrlttlvely few 

SS'^LF*C!?OU i>r;riod( 964-7/0 B.S. ) : liptiictive uew ele- 
-ieitp corw to the forc. ■■plr.-a »^ncl aeandor uaoiK,?roU!Uu-, 
cone'nlnoGt to -m ead.rt-Iiei' ie lost? cle'.riy cut «-ici ^ha ^ 
*'or?n«^ of th«-. vp <•!;-'• s 1;«;iwi to b« heavier. »neu i.. / /w j,-.. 
tb-'ofjVital iB novecl i'roa iIbo to /^-auflif from Uhs'.iui to 

on-TT.,thc art of oronwe mokti^g .äeteriorstesttr-c t;rBaiti.O!inJ, 
acoortitiouG becorae ov rloaaett aaa uaro.r.ie. 
■'<i4.-~i:Jj'ir centurice oi" Ftrife (■-ii.d,v.iien f-»-aer')I i^l«-" ^^u„ 
fouiict;: t.he lUS DlfiJAl.'i'Y in 2v;3 «.C. - 

^?he iionluaticE t- rutenoy In brouao ftrt beoonea nor-,- oi .u-^ 
orcfinr i ir:niißity, Henvy rellefs '■■■£ coisve.itfc»:iaii^:^'d ...u- 

reiainlfhul the-inlD-ina of preoioue motals on orouae jina 

uories of v;arriora' charxota. itii tnr ^^.rri.or in iUll 

e-wr.r iuto U'orth, L^ovivh anu ::ar into tue .'■e^t.tü ^^^;^^ 
jilao t-ie ca»5iVHa& ulon,: thc üo-ualxeä 'ali..;-i-c;ja aerobe 
.-.ula oii -sl.e rouwe 'wO trx ivO.'ian Knpire. ^ v,..--i~« •- 

Uut it dii; not lußt,I.iternril nXxxic -;.roKo vno^:4a^l..t. ^.. 
;> ■>! 'i.';,the 'an ,n7\ast.Y Ciided. »^-k— c; 

SIX I>mAJ)'nKÖ ( 222-i>B9 .k.I>. ) -rollov;,a t.ni w0mu:e Ol 

*o +1- .>.rin<- i3et-."'^fn 5'.«n und iit B>id w^.ioh rel'-i.i. to tne 

Ig in thc hn.arts o,f invaaern. - will '''^SfT^:^J^^^±o AD) 

lt]I%m¥TY"^^'8?iia''t''f dynasty of short living splendor; 
it is Said that in these thirty years the Chinese population 
increased frora t-venty to fifty millions. But the dynasty 
i's wanting in military strength to oust the invaders. 



TAÜO UrHA^^M (613-906 A.l). ) : T^aug T'ai Touiig, China 's 

bis ßOBiXiok na foMüX^r^r .-^f tne Van^^ \>yaa6ty wlth the öwrd, 
!!e reotore® the Kmplrc on ni hrofider and gyandc^r foumiatio ri 
than ever beforo.onian l^aom»« exi>oa^^d to foreirj^n ooiit.HOt, 
to fareign iaflu^:^noea|thr;/ are aiBt;lnotly visible nleo ia 

acnl'U "Hit thoir qnnlit'j -aad artifitiaal perfectioa iö aot 
to'^n-^pare ^to tna*^ of tneir Bpio^uild :)r6deoeaBora tv?o 
th^Tif55iad yeaxa aco» 



fanillrir terms. 



■ul uecor-itioae 



\UiO i^aeraHj 






Gouu^g.i.iXiu*l,OAolil,^?^:CxiU Oi? i:.a.v:ji^ C.il.iil^i.^-^ ^Ixiuil^jL /Abw-vi^K> 

?s k\ 17 por oeiit tin* la Hdilitioii ta t,hi8 tr ^oe:: or ailveXi 

^.4l't1.:■^.o iv,ftia;j;nc!^5iu;n ^-rr- ro-.ad# 

Ja tl^e oaet u^uallv lihe **loQt-way ( oire ^Kirdue ) ^prooor^jo 
X^-^ followed*^ ''hi?-^ noauB fir^it ;ia]iiao a mix no.iel of tho 
»lilre obi*^ot,iuniuai:x2 its >rnmaento aud aowriiiiz tiiio ^^nth 

wheti i/»e oojeut '•«ae if%il:ea tue hüat*eci liquid wax oould ruii 
out# a'ter th^ o3.ay moael m\B ompty aud ool^ift e moltea 
r^iet'^l 'v;iö i>>ure<l iii. '0!i3ü thoroUijhly iiara,t^e nould was 
brokis^n aad xne i.>ro]ii^e wa$3 reau^'t oxoot lor x'inal retoacliia/:» 
The teoJxiioue o.? vna ; iiaü^ metal ror^ers v^r :o p^-rreo^, 

Tlii, oolor of %m byoai^t; iHi^ino« iti often vcr.v ^eaatlfultde- 
peadiiig unoA the oo.\DOi^.ition 03^ the ori^iaal oronaettHe 
ol*#mioals*Had tne de*-^^roe oi! noloture In tho eoil ia ^^;hich 
it hHh b^^ea harieA^nnd r»iich ar© able to levelop the hijhiy 
ef^tir * ö 2i u r i t e ^blue bp^hlc oarboaote oo^i^cr) ab 

well nr. n ^^ 1 a o h i t eurrocu bneic carboa^te of ooi^per)» 



r-^ 



'^- OHllAOt 



uire vietner t^e 'oron 



^"e1l•e or-.-inßlIy oo .per 



oolor^aBdUMfc :aoot new brcnaoB or -i^thor the eorföce was 

treutcd to produoe v^rious color effeuta/ * . (. , , 

fiOGt brouaes that li/ivc been ltme"biiricd isre not ymt'j at- 
traotive '\'hen e:<oavatod,a;id liave to b^ fr^^ed fron iisturbi;i(j; 
iaorustntiono aad oarefully cleaned.To ^/fiat eateat the 
broiises shonld be clearied i;' o poii^t of OGatrovoray* 



8 



b« ^%arly Ohlnt se Bronze Mirrore» 

Dlfferent fron th© heroio broase vebBrls the Ciilneä^e broiuse 
rairrors fona a moet oioijrnii.ig j^roup of their own« 

The earlieet wliioh have booa reoovered fron tombe are thou^i^ht 
to dato about the aevonth oeutury B.O.(Late :)hou or Huai) 
^vhioh is atteated also by literary evuierioe* 

The refleotlUfi eiüe of the moKtly round metal disk is po - 
liBhed bj merlEuryt^vhlle the revero© ia usualiy decorated 
vdth oaatin^ ia relief» Tney are in the be^inning flat and 
ö:aall ind i>eco:ae in th»: oourBO of tine heavier and laxc^x* 
Ivöpeolelly consplcouB io the oäan^:;e at the be^ilaiiing of the 
first ceatur;^' .Ul^ The oiiter rira of the Tovexue aide is 
broaded and raised eo faXfat to let the v/hole mirror baok ^,_ 
look. llKe & cihallov/ dich» At thiö tioie the k:nob in the 
Center ß^ts jB heiiispherical form -vith u hollow^throuGh 
svhloh oould '|w5iotr0d the braided oord that formed the riaudle 
for holdiag it or for tJ^K? fastenin^j ntMaiksto a stand» 

The vecorution of the itirror imok wat^ not an inoidcMtal 
Ornament, but was i>ut oii for a purpowe« hiie the ornaraent 
öhow© always the art trond of thf; ootuel period,the foras, 
Gi^netsymbolias >elöntj: to certHin caief^oricol ntuiber of 
Chinese ll«$terature and nytholociy bb weil ao to their at^^tro- 
noiaioal oyate^-ru i::Yen the round form ie su /poi ed to be oy bo- 
lioal,rei)reJ3<*nt in^ the heaven« Throu-^h it the importanoe of 



the bron^;6 nirrorß was ^^reatly increased ov^^r the mere foct - 






KX 



being uoed as lookin^-^^laoa for the toilet« 

There oxif^ted the reli,;iouo-na4^ioal belief that by uoing 
Symbol« rcproöe itla,,; the inlverse or jarta of it in mini- 
Hture,it ' ould be >oB8ibl to ^^fi.i soine of the concentrate^ 
power of the .^xe^^ter ilniveree in orcier to .;ive Btre:*(:th 
and :>roi*ütion fieininat demons or evil inflaeno<?G to m\ 
inctividuol, Uöinä thie oonception in the orn:jnent**ion 
n the backs of the nirror3,they ore cre ited with ill 
kind of aa^^ioa power as nügio inatraients that i>ut t?ie 
ooBmio foroee at the Service of the o^ ler and they ^vere 
eup^>08ed to ward off evil iniiue icoö» Ui some cases they 



I 



be oble even 



to 



Coroai^t the futui'e,lio reflcot 



were eaid to 

the intorior of the pdtient'ü body,enBDlin^ the ph^/sioien 

to iia^^nooe diseaBet^« 

i^ it ia aniall *^onder that the rairrorB orc used in fune- 
ral cereiionieöfHiiready from the Ohou tlrie on^'-arde all the 
way down to the ünß until t^leös uirrors bf*oame liandy^They 
were put in the tonb on the dead person's ehest ae 
proteotin^;:; Arror '* or aaded bb b eymbol of li^ht* 






♦» 



heart 



The mirrore arc adnlreü for tiieir teohaic«! perfeotioti 
In alloy a id oaste» l^heir broaze conpofiitioa ts^ uearly of 
the oaiie alloj ao the beli-broriaeß used in ::urope darlng 
the iiidcile Ages. They ooritain 75-0 > iDer cent of oopper, 
20-25 per aent of tiu -iud oftca 1.4 per cent of leid« 
It 18 evidetit th'it their ©uperior ^^^.^ TtaruiBhip woo reao?ied 
b;/ ^neaas of «oft frtorie ^r^ ittor-^aouldö ao dosoribod by 
bchyl' r Caiirnan : *' 'i'he Bmall|POiuted bo e: i: o b t and probably 
t e lar^«^ oentral booe ob wellt^vere appsr? atiy drilied 
iato the flBt otoiie , while the nairi etrit^ht lines vmre 
i^oar^ed out in f-hallo*^^^ [Toves; tnoa the aharacturö aad in- 
trioate fi^^ures of the baolc^roiuid xnuot hiive becn en^^raved 
with :i enerp tool» The shapo of the clviracterSfin piirticultir, 
unquestiouably iulicatea euttlag in tone. Probably the 
stone carviug then jjcived bü a mafrter-:iould for a wax oodel 
from hl oh aaoth r riaoula waß nade by the 10Dt-way(clre peruue) 
proce86,for certain irre-uii iritics in tue innt^r ourfaoe 
BU;^oeBt a *mx rather th-;#a a atone contact in the direot 
aoüid. After removal fron the mould,tne oeatral boso,;jrooves, 
Bnd riras were re::;ulary bvirniched. • • . *• 

Aixioaß the patinae the qo calle* "hei ch'i ru « ÜKe blaok 
lacquer'* ie eopeciaiiy •;' .xiinated. .iGcorainü to v/.?. Yetta 
the quality of the blac.c iaonaer-Iike surface li-, bo jct-^ 
feot* ^Mid uniforn thüt t oould not be ?5coidei4tal and 
was proV>!sbiy duo to ailiceous :uittt>r mixed .^Ith IrjeT of 
the moiild ^^^hioh oame in oontoct with nolten .wtalt 



/ 



10 



flIBLIöGHIPHY 
Anoieat "Ihinoöe "5roas5e8 



l4iÄl'€r 



AjndcrsfinnpJ» vU **The AoldBinith in uicleat Chiaa" Bullr;xia 7 

M# P#B# A, , ntoo :holra 
Bachhof erfT.* "A snort lilBtory of Ohiiieso Art*' Ile^/ York li946 
Carte r,J>a(;ny »•I'*our thousand ^earö of CliiueBe Art'U'u ¥• 1943 
ir'recr vr^illory of Art,.\ vteEorlptive aad illustrative oatalo,;ue 

of ;:hinoBe x^roiiaes acquired duriiiti the adniüie- 
tration of Jolm Hllerton uOd(-;e# ^u^y^'/ealey, 
Wa«hia,;tori i:.«0» 1946 
.Pedderöeii,*'!iirtin " Chine .^•^:uastt>0'A'erbe"f '>erlla iy39 
KelloyiO^'^^and Qhen ilüa^-ohia *' JhineBe ^roazee £roi^ the 

Buokin^^ham s;oiieQtioa *• Th© .^rt iastitute 
Chicago 1046 
Kümniol,0tt;o,3roü3e "0ütaoi?iiiöah6e :rer'lt-* .Jberlia 1925 
KSlnL'ielf s>tto ''Chiaeüifjohe Kuasf »200 llaupt^^^erke der .uio^^tellua^ 

der Geh>ollBChaft fdr o^iiiiatifjohe Kuant ta aer 
•."reucieiöühea Akaaenio aex Kilustet -^c^rlla i929« 
*• Gliiaeöe i.>ollaf}>ra:aöt irroTB'' .iurii:i/jt«.:.iac^a2i»19j^u 
?rle3t|.^laa **^vhiaese .iroa^ea of the Shaa^g throu^jh the 1:*miß 

Dyaastytiuti'o^iaotioa %o tne exliibition .letroiK>- 
litaa :UBeuni»;*ew Vork 1933 
.v^lest,Alaa "3irds*'.truae 1947,iöBU0 of 'etropoHtaa ::u;:5eiari 

of Art "ullctia (pa^je 2G4) 
Kfirlgro an t Bernhard ''/in and Ohou in ^iiinese Bronaoe." 

^lulletin of the tuae^in of ^ar ':aötern Aati^it* 
"^•'^* ..toc holm 1935/36 
/larl^p:*?en, Bernhard ''-Je^ : tiidios on Ohineae ^.roiiaeß'V; ulictin 

ilo*9fOto 1937 
KarlcS^oettf Bernhard "Huai and lern" iJulictin <3tc«lIo»13* 1041 
uir0n,Oß^aid ^»Hiütory of Ohlnf^ae .rt** 1943 
üwallow,K«v;^ 'Mnoieat •3l\inc3e ^roni^e ..irroro"* 'eiping 1937 
UQhuyler ^vur^nan "T-.V Gattern oa ;Jo^>i7xia ..iirror of tnc 'lan 

l);faaBXy'\^fo,iTiml of the aruerioan w^riental 
'lo^^iety Voi,63,lrf4fOot»-])ej5«1043 
Sohuyler Carir^an ''Jhinoöo Mirrora and Uiiiaese Uviliaation*' 

/♦roheolo^y ^uturaa 1949 •Vol«2, ^o«3 
2*a-<)ku C€i-5h6 toataioouo of tiie collection uidtorio 
Toyei hulco • Iliuotrated oatalo,:;ue of ancient iraporial 

TroaGary,caile4 SHOBOIII« xok^o 
Jmenarat»^^ueji "Shina :odo eikwa or heleoted Iwelioö oJl ^^n- 

«ient Jhineof? ^ronzee from oolleotion in 
Hurop^ aad Anxericai' Yjrt II • 1933 
Yettai ^'f5raival**^he loor^^e r.;UuorfopouIoo doliection.Vol.il« 

Bronsseet^^ellö, ^rmüB, trrore eto.\ondoatlj29 
YettBti.\?roival"0!italo^;ue of the Oull Jhincse ronaeo", iiOad,1939 
Voretoüh " UtoliineeiBOhe :tronzen" 1924 



vo 



^W. //- 



CAi'ALOyJE ÖP OimV&SK BKOiZKö 



1« Ocrvpred V eaeel f or fr mmt wine.C 'Ai ) K. 20 cm. j 3 " 

Body ellix>tioal Becxioa -vith orivex sides on i shaliow 
ßpreadiiig foot. 'ithiu faiivtl:/ 3"lut':-^d baiule are borders 
of flot Gii^-raved orriomeatß; 

a) Arouau tae bouy ära,:on-like aai2ial0|i>^3rhapo Karl^:r-ou'8 
"fev^thered ara^^oa*' brokon by T^ao t*ieh mna^8 ia hig - 

b) Arouiid the foat the two llaee of tno ♦* üöt a-w6a '* 
sa bow*8 oord xmttern« 

q) Arouiui the oover si,i: cirB,-^<ia-li/^e aainirils plBoed aati- 
theticall/ to 2u:i5ce up the aeatral ports of four t'ao 
t 'leh moBks» 

The tmia ts^ouna of the voüböI reiiaiaa piaiu. 

The Cover i^^ surtnounted by a flutcd laiob-hriadlct Loopo 
oii both Bidee of tlie body hold the c^dat^-hr^ridle ia tiö^ 
Bhapo of a twietcd rope 'vJ^iah oaa nove Diily far onou^h in 
eaoh direotion to per.iit the lid to be eaßily re .icved. 

liiöoriptioae of pio1|0(5raphic chorncters iasicie oa th« 
bottoriif of^ody aAdr-§bver4 ia th^i boAy set l-ito a oar- 
touone»i^oth aee.^e.ied ia the broaae» 




to bring the ^Xue 



The purpo e of the ooatnlner h 
to tho Bacrificlal oercnoay» 

l*he broaae is ©troat^ly oovared oy mtiaatlonfßTGea over 
red Güpper oxide (cuprite) with enoruated : 1 ioiiite de- 
^.i .'üitsit 

Yia (:>haae;) 1766- .122 B.:^.. 

it#: Karlßirnoa '* an Qad Ohou in Ohiaese Broasen " 

Kxhibition: 193l/:J2 j^epartneat of p'^bt Kantern >rt of the 

wUaeuiiB of ßerliu( Jeriiaay) 
1933/41 ireneeate useurif^a l;aag (Uolland) 



HERBERT CxINSBIiRG: REMAINS ÜF A COLLECTION 



P R E P A C }C 



The one hundred and three objects described in this catalogue 
are the remains of a collection which numbered eight hundred 
and thirty-six pieces in 1923 and was built up in nearly fifty 
years • 

When in July 1938 upon a summons from the Gestapo we decided to leave 
bbunhouBB linv.Serlin, wBewere granted pei?inanent iesidence ihLHolland and 
the collection was accepted as loan in the Gemeente Museum, Den Haag. 

Ktt'^T the German Invasion of Holland in I94O we had to give up our home 
in Den Haag and move further to the interior, to Zeist, where about two 
years later we decided to go "Underground". After liberation in 1945 
we found out that the Germans had also plundered the museums. Thanks 
to the tireless search of Dutch friends amd the assistance of the 
Dutch Kunstsichtingskammer the pieces here catalogued were found on 
an attic in a Nazi residence at the bordertown of Velp - the 
private booty reserved by an individual with some taste for the Par East, 

Most of the objects of the collection, i.e. its foundation, had been 
brought home from trips to the Far and Near East in I907/8, with 
additions through the years by purchases from experts like Edgar 
Vorch, Joerg Truebner, Prof. Kümmel, as well as from collections, to 
mention only Dr. A. Breuer and the Counts Mieida and Otani of Japan. 
Thus it was possible to build a small but adequate survey of some 
branches of Par Eastem art in which I had become interested already 
at the end of the last Century. 

The hospitable house of the Japanese consul in Berlin, Gustav Jacoby, 
with his famous collection of Japanese art - later the pride of the 
"Ostasiatische Kunstabteilung der Berliner Museen" - was a natural 
center where it was possible to become acquainted with, to see, and 
to feel the essence of the Far Eastem Art, as well as to meet 
scholars, artists, connoisseurs, and collectors. - Here I laid the 
foundation to my knowledge which enabled me to collect geniiiine works 
of art on my travels and thus I entered a circle which provided 
constant Stimulation, and pleasure. 

I became a meraber of the Sxpert Commission of the Department of Eastern 
Art of the State Museum, Berlin (1924-1958) and a co-founder as well as 
a member of the boafd of directors of the "Gesellschaft fuer Ostasiatische 
Kunst (GGKy Berlin (1926-1938). WII put an end to it all - as well as to 
my collection. Nevertheless, with the help of the wonderful New York 
Public Library I have tried in this catalogue to give some meaning to 
its remains. 

However, some of our lost works of art will be remembered through 
publications and catalogues of exhibitions in which they have been shown: 



1912 "Ausstellung alter ostasiatischer Kunst" 
Akademie der Kuenste, Berlin • 

1929 "Ausstellung Chinesischer Kunst" veranstaltet von der 
Gesellschaft fuer Ostasiatische Kungs (G.Ü.K.) und 
der Preussischen Akademie der Kuenste, Berlin. 

1934 "Sechs Jahrhunderte Toepferkunst " 
Akademie der Kuenste, Berlin. 

1935 'International Exhibition of Chinese Art" 
Royal Academy of Arts, London 

1935 "Ausstellung der Kunst des alten Japans" 
Kunstgewerbe Museum, Basel 

1939 Netsuke uit de collectie G." 
Kunstzaal Tikotin, Den Haag 

1940 "Bruikleen G. van Oost-Aziatische Kunst" 
Gemeente Museum, ^en Haag 

1946 "Bruikleen Herbert Ginsberg, Zeist" 

Museum van Asiatische Kunst, ilmsterdam 

1950 "The Art of Greater India" 

Los Angeles County Museum, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Forest Hills, L.I., N.Y. 
1951 



> 



j\t\OZ& - /\uivfixh)^fen ciMtOk \\aJlÄ(A \mÄ ^iOM}Lmc^ ^\%^ 



(hlk^t'^m^l^ öill^fi&r^ 



V4- 



fifCWUM^ 



/ 



M.m 





w 



[ji\\ßii^ef^ 



Oiai(Akcin^ iMr^'^ 



m 



€n^ 




^3^k 



) 



TAGEBUCH NOTIZEN 



Autofahrt cm durch Frankreich 
uad Italien 

Sommer 1959 



i 



I 



Die letztem Fahrten brachten ume in dem 

Fernem s , Mittleren^ , Nahem O&tem« 

Diesmal war unser ZielfToreckichtliche Malerei 
umd frühmittelalterliche Kunst Europas im uns 

aufzunehmen« 

Der unermütlichem Lenkerin dex '^Citroen** , 
meiner unendlich fursorgenden, geliebtem 

Tochter Marianne 
ist diese kleine Arbeit in Dankbarkeit 

gewidmet* 



Forest Hills, New York 
Mai i960 



^ 



j 



INHALT 



L 



AUTOFAHTEN DURCH FRANKREICH, NORDSPANIEN, SÜDITALIEI,SICILIEN 

19 5 9 



( 



Flug New York - Londo» (TWA) 

ENGLAND 



Ayleebury (Stross) - Oxford (Williaa Cokn) - London(Reifenberg) 2 
Flug mit Jokn Gaul die London-Paris (BEA Viscount) 2 



l,?=A_N^K^R„E^C H 

PARIS, Hotel Montalembert 

Citroen Miete - Touring Club de France :Essence Coupons 

Printemps-Musee de Louvre--Jeu cte P ume - place Vendome 

Place de la Concorde. 

SmwLC Bar: Royal Printemps , Hotel du Louvre 

Mit Lily und SylTie Goldsckmid :Rect.Lucienne,Eif lel Turm 

"Chez PaulV Mit Edi Lackman , Marianne , Jean Guillibert 

Ausflüge: 

St. Denis ,Chantilly(Musee Cond*) ,Abbaye de Royoumont 

Chateau d» Anet »Chartres 

Paris - PERIGEÜX »Hotel Domino 

Katkddrale St. Front. 

Hökle Yom L a s c a u x . Les Eyzier »Hotel de Cro Magno 

Perigeux - CAHORS 

La Bugue sur Viz*re :Stalaktitenköhle Proumeyssac 

Souillac , Byzant./uppelkirche »Portal 

Cakors,Pont Valentpi 

Chateau Mercu^s 



M o i s s a c, St.Pierrt 



Gabors - TOULOUSE 

Kirche und Kreuzgang von 

Montauban» Ingres Museum 

Hotel Grand et Tivolliers »Toulouse 

Ba8.St.Se^nin,A;gli^3e des Jacobins»Kathd.St.Etienne 

Toulouse - ST. JEAN DE LUZ 
Biarritz, Hotel du Palais (1?) 
St. Jean de Luz. Hotel Moderne 
Biscaya Bucht. Hause de l'infante »Eglise St. Jean Baptiste 

Baslütnkuste. 

St.Jeancfe Luz - SANTANDER 

Grenz nach Spanien : Irun/Hendaye 



2/3 

5 
2/3 

5/7 
2/7/ 

3/^ 
5/7 

8 

8/9 

9 
10 

10 

11 

12 



13 



£ 



B P A N I £ N 



II 



San Sebastian- (Guernica) -Bilbao- SANTANDEK, Hotel Real 

Hökle Ton A 1 t a a i r a_ 

Santillana de Mar: Alte Palast e,Kollegiatkirc he mit Kreuzgang 

Bodega de Suan Infante 

Fahrt durch Kantabrische Gebirge (Paeeo de Freeno) 

BURGOS »Hotel Contestable 
Kathedrale 16/17/19 

Plaza Mayor,Paseo del Espoloa. Casa del Cordon 
Cartuja de Mirafloree. Real Mon&sterio de la Huelgas 
Gasa de MirandaiMuseo Arquelogico Provincial 
Arco de : anta Maria 

Durch Gebirge über Logrone ,Tudela in die Ebroebne 
ZARAGOZZA , Gr an Hotel 

Kathedrale San Salvador(La Seo) : Gobelinsammlung 

Wallfahrtskirche Nuestra Senora del Pilar 

Castillo de la Aljaferia 

PAMPLONA 

Kreuzgang der Kathedrale 

Durch die Pyrenäsen: Pass von Roacevalles 
Spanische Grenze: Valcarlos 



15 
16 



17 

17/18 
18 
19 

19 
19/20 



21 
21 



?^?^A^N^K_R^E^|^C_H 

Französische Grenzstation St.Pied de Port 

PAU, Hotel de France 
Lourdes 

ALBI ,Hostelierie de Grand St.Antoine 
Kathedrale St.Cecile {2'j>/2k) . Palais de la Berbie(Laitrec ) (23/ 
St.SalTi 

CastreSfGoya iMuseum, Gedächtnis Austeilung 100 Jc^hre Jaur'^s 

C ARG AS SONNE , Hotel Terminus 

Die Cit*: Chateau Comtal^Ringmauern, Kathedrale St.Nazaire 

Hotel de Cit* . 

PONT DU GARD (Provence) , Hotel de Vieux Moulin 

über Narbonne, Beziers. S^te »Montpellier 

N i n e 8 

Lunch ijtt Hotel Cheval Blanche;; mphithater ,M^ison Carr* 

Jardin de la Fontaine 

über Tarascon,St,R*my:Les Antiques;Kloster St.Pcul (van Gogh) 
Les Baux (27/28) 

Ehern «Beaediktiberabt ei ilontmajour 

ARLES, Hotel Jules Cesar 

Kathedrale.S.a.i n t T r p h i n e und Kreuzgang (28/29) 



22 



24 



2k 

24 
25 



26 



27 

26 
28 



3 



III 



J 



Römiiscnes Theeter; Ar*ne(Afiiphithater) ; Alyscamps 
Balkon vom Restaurant Forum« Terrasse Hotel Jules Cesar 



29 



Ausflug: 
Saint 



G 1 1 e 6 



La Camargue: Äigues Mortes • (Les Marie ae la Her) 

A T i g n n 

Papetpalast ; Sx|Dxt|Bxixxt . Pont d*Avignon ; Stadtmauer 

Johnny verlä :st uns, fahrt mit Eisenbahn nach Ptris, Italien. 

r a a g e : Antikes Tr.eater .Triumphbogen 

LYON , Hotel Royal 

Musee Lyonnaise des Arts Decorative ,Rue de la Charit* 31/32 
im ehern ligen Palais ^es Seigneur de Lavalj e(1739; 
Musee Historique des Tis6US,Rue d» la Charit* 3^ 
im ehemalig. Palais des Duc de Villeroy (XVIII Jh.) 
Restaurant ae"la MERE BRAZIER",Rue Koyai 13 

Hinein durch die '• ^ote d'Or*' nach Burgund 

1 a a g a • 

Stiftung des Kanzlers Rollin: Hotel Dieu 

Haus der Herzöge Ton Burgund. Eglise de Notre Dame 

la Kapitelsaal :Fläa.Wandteppicne '^lapisserie de la Vierge" 

Lunch ia Hotel de la Poste (3^) 

DI JON , Hotel de la Cloche 

Im ehemal. PPalast der Herzöge von Burgund:Musee des Beaux Arts 

Geschichtliches : Die Herzöge von Burgund (35/36) 

Kirche St.Micael 

Hinein nach Lothringen 

Geburtsort der Jungfaau von Orleans Domremy-La Pucelle 

Langres 

NANCY, 

Place Stanislaw mit vergoldeten Gittern und Brunnen 

Rathaus mit Rokokotreppe , auch von Jean Lamour 

L'Hemicycle de la Carriere mit Kolonnaden 

Alter Herzogspalast mit Musee Historique Lorrain 

p -rte de la Caraffe 

Hinein in das Elsass 

STRASSBOURG, Hotel Maison Rouge aa Klber Platz. 

Müaster (3Ö/39) ; Rohant Schloss 

Frauenhausmuseum (Muöee de l'oeuvre Notre Dame) 
Mit Dr. Fr. Herbst Abendbrot im '» Au Gour. e sans Chique'». 

über Mulkouse nack C o 1 a a r 

ünterlinden Museum: Grunwalds "Isenheimer Altar" 

Kathedrale St. Martin: Schongaucrs '» Maria im Roenhaag*» 

Vor Französischer Grenze Lunch .üit Nationalgericht: "Choucroute" 



29 

50 
51 

32 
35 



5h 



55 



5^ 

55/36 

57 



58 
58 



59 



IV 



i 



SCHWEIZ 



Grenze HuniAgue - BASEL ^0 

Kurz r Besuch cbs Kunstmuseums «Wiedersehen mit Witz und Holbein 

ZÜRICH , Hotel St. Peter 

Wiedersehe! mit Margarete Glicksman und Johnny (aus Be3 lin) 

Mit Eisenbakn nach 

BASEL »Hotel Schweizerhof 

Eisenbahn nach Thun 

Hünibacli bei Stenger. Familie Ramseier mit 2 Kinaerm. 

Zürich »n uer Airterminal zum Flug nach Italein 



^0 



^1 



3 



ITALIEN 

s = = = = = = s=: = rr = =:=:xx 

Kloten,Swi66 # 300 «Flug über Parma iFlorenz nach 

ROM t Hotel Medici-Hassler kZ 

Marianne Nechansky mit "Forsche" 

Vatican^Museo Etrusco Gregoriano(^3) ;Villa Guilia(4^) 

St. Peter »Grotten (46) ;Piazza di ..an Pietro 

Museo National delle Terme(44) ; 

Altstadt um Pantheon, Piazza Navona,Cor60 mit Palästen (42) 

Forum, Santa Maria Antique ,Hau8kapiplle cfes Papstes Johann VII(47; 

Kirche S.Cosma und Damianus: Mosaik 

Campidoglio-»^ Marc Aurel Reiterstatue .Capfttälini ches Museum 

und Konservatotenpalast (4?) 

Museo Bqracco (30) 

San .7iovannÄ in ronte ; S»Cle:nente (48) 

Fontana Trevi (49) ; Aqua paola,pÄSsagiata Margherita (50) 

Ausflüge: Hadrians Villa ; Tivoli m. Villa d'Este (43/44) 

Tarquinia m.Necropolis ; Tuscania, Bas. Santa Maggiore(45) 
Caprarola,Farnese Palast (45) 
Villa Baifnaia (Lante) (49) 
Villa Medici ( 4Ö) 

Alex und ildred Lachman (46/48) 
Stefan und Eri Bach (49/50) 







( 



§Ü?rl?4LIEN: NEAPEL^SICILIEN^CALABRIENjAPULI^^ 

la Bcrchs'»v;olseley Six Eighty" nack Neape l 
überfahrt mit SS Sardenia der Tirrenia nach Palermo 

SICILIEN 

PALERMO tJolly .lotel 

Palazzo Normanni:Capella Palatina (53) 

S.Giovanni Eremiti; Porta NuoTa ; Dom^Königsgräber 

Galleria Nationale di Sicily;Museo Nationale 

Moderne ViertelrVia Maqueda ;teatro Massimo. (5^/5t>) 

Villa Giulia. 

Kathedrale von Monreale und Kreuzgang 

Tempel von Segesta 

Bolcstrate am Golf von Cc stelamare 

(j # f a 1 u ;Dom San Pietrp 

über Nicosia nach E b n a (Ca8trOfc?;iovanni) 57/5Ö 
PIAZZA ARM£NIRA,Jolly Hotel. Villa Romana di Casale 



K 



7/5Ö 



SygACÜS , Hotel Villa Politi 

Latomia del Capuccini. Dom. Amphitheater ^Griechisches Theater 

vj. Giovanni, K<-*takomben. Restaurant Bandiera(5Ö) 

Catania,Dom (60) ; Restaurant Gemarino 

TAORMINA, Domenico Paiace. (6o/62) ;Griechisches Theater(62/ 

Messina (63) 

CALABRIEN,A1^lIEN 

Co£enza,Jol y Hotel. Ponte Alerico 

TARANTO,Jolly Hotel. Dom, Kastell 

Gioa del Celle flu.^tschloss Friedrich II 

Manduria,Plinius Quelle (6^) 

iL^?„c.? « »Kirche S.Croce; _San Nicolo e Cataldo 

Tancred von Lecce 

BrindiBi: Säulen am li^öd^ der Via Appia, Hafen , Kastell 

OstuBi (Dom),Fasano (P. l.Comi.unale) ;Trulli,Albarello 

BARI , Hotel des Nations* 

Ba.silika di San Nicola {66/67) ;Kastell (67/68) 

ß i t o a t o tliat hedrale Sa n Valenti no ;Palz.SulOo Labini 

Ruvo di Puglia, Kathedrale ot«nta Maria (68) 
C. astel i ^ l Hont e 
TranitKathedrale San Nicola p llergrino 



52 



55 
5^ 
55 
56 

57 



5b 
59 



60 



63 
64 

6V65 

65 

66 

66-60 
68 

69-70 
71 



< ) 



VI 



l 



r 



BARLETTAfJolly Hotel. "Der Colussus" •Kaiserbiiste 72 

T r o i ff ,K thdr gl^ ^^n f\f^.cQnd±no 72/75 

Benevento: Porta Aurea (73) 

NEAPEL , Hotel Royal 73 

Salerno , Hotel Jiana .plendid 

P ä » t u a (74) 

Museo Capo di Monte (7^) ; National M^seu« (75) 

"Lecture'^ Ste fans in der Aula -^dell Intituto Fisiologica ' 75/7^ 

in der voä Friearich II 1224 gestift ^em Universität Neapel. 

Restaurants am Hafen Santa Lucia: Ca Teresa^rransatäintico ,Ciro 

Cctserta Veccnio,Doin t.Michele. 76/77 

Capua . Cassino ,hotei Canon (Kloster Monte Cassino) 77 

ROM, Hotel M'dici-H ssler 
Viterbo »Papst Palast (77) 

SiENA , Hotel Excelsior 

PinacoT:ieca di Siena im Pc^lcszo Buftsignore . 

Campo» Piazza del Duomo. Dom. 

Vol terra (79/8o) 

San Gimignano/ Lunch im Hotels Cisterna 

Appeninfahrt« Durch ilorenz. 

BOLOGN A Hotel Majestic-Baglioni 

lorre Asinelli und Garisenda. Restaurant ft^w Papagello(Öl) 

Autostrada nach Mailand und Como. 

Lunch im Hotel rietropol am See. 

Fahrt am Corner S'-e: Villa d'Este. Villa Carlotta. 

Italiensiche Grenze in die SCff^EIZ am Luganer See. 
LUGANO , Hotel de La Laix. 

Stefans bringen mich im Auto nach Mailands Flufcplatz Malpensa 
Air Ff^ance nach Parie-Orly 
TWA Paris-New York 



78 
78/79 

8o 

81 

81 

82 



83 



{ 



c 



( 



Autofahrten durch Frankreich , Nordspanien »Italien . 

Sommer 1959 

Freitag 10. Juli; Einsteins bringen mich nach Idlewild ,da Marianne unab- 
köm. lieh. Im Cafe gesellt sich Johnny zu uns .TWA noch im alten Teil|da 
eignes Gebäude noch im Bau, aber von der T\wA Lounge direkter geaeckter Gang 
zum Flugzeug. Angenehm, da .chwüle in Regen sich lost. 

Flug # 700 im'^Jetstream,Ambassador'» mit Turboprqp,Antivibrationspropeller 
ist mein ae Luxe Abteil ganz hinten. tun.<-tlich lb:CC ab. Bin erstaunlicher- 
wei3e der einzige Passagier im Abteil. Senr comfortabel. Runiger Flug. 
Um 8 Uhr gutes Dinner .Lötr che zeitig Licht. 

Samstag 11. Juli : Rasiere mich, um ungestört zuain,in der Nacht. Viel heis- 
s s Wcsse ,das aber kein Scnaum erzeugt, 
ße^omüie vor richtigem breakfast Saft und Tasse Cafe. 

'.Vie ich mich überzeuge »Tourist und Economy class ,die vor der Anrichte lie- 
gen, gedrängt voll. 

Pünktlich nach 12 stündiger Fahrt an London , Ortszeit 10:50. 
Bus bringt Pascogiere zum alten Airport Gebäude. Es ist kühl und es regnet. 
Dort erwarten mich Wilnelm und Gert Stros s mit ihrem Auto. Formalitäten 
minimal. Im Auto zum Telegrapnenamt ,i>lanni meine Ankunft zu melden, und zum 
gros;.en modernen Terminal, um gleich bei der BFA meinen Flug nach P. ris 
am l^.Juli zu "checken". 

Die hübsche Fahrt durch grünes England leider durch Regen und Kühle nach 
Aylesbury KHBt(Buks ) ,wo mich im Hayden« Hill House ro^rses nimmer mit .veiter 
Sicnt in Landschaft erwartet.- am Nachmittag lerne ich zum ersten Mal Kor- 
resiondenz durch Taperecording kennen, die mit Sohn in Bombay geführt wird. 
Dadurch auch möglich farbige slides vorzuführen , die von Toms eigner Stimme 
erklär lend begleitet werden. 

Sonntag 12. Juli :Kahle macht Erwärmung in meinem Zimmer und im //ohnzimmer 
notig. Gemütlich geplaudert ,Strossens indische Reise eingehend« besprochen. 
Nacn einem high tea,der Abendxbrot unnötig macht »bringen mich Strossens 
zum Hote-L Randolph nach OXFORD , wo nach Beendigung .ler "Fair" Zimmer für 
mich bereit Steht(No ,1^2 mit 3ad h 2) 
Wie brieflich veraoredet , erscheinen vVilliam und J -.a Cohn am 8 Uhr zum Cafe, 

Als postalische Lesitung^nzuarkennen: Ein nacn Aylesbury , erichfetter Expresi 
Brief Manni's wird mir noch heute ausgehändigt. 

Montag 13. Juli : William holt mich zum Spaziergang ab;Auriol und Park von 
Worcester College.- Lunch oei Jsa.- Dinn<-r im Randolph mit Willi^ms;zum 
Cafe erscheinen Schlesingers. 

Dinestag l4.Juli :>lit Taxi zum ßahnhof. Aber vorzeitiges Kommen, da Eug nicht 
von Oxford abgeht , zwecklos. Im ankommenden Zug, auch die erste Klasse sehr 
vol].Hein grosser Koffer bleiot im Gang;d e viitfahrer helfen mir sehr 
hilfsbereit meine T^-:Schen im Netz zu verstauen. Ab Oxford 9:07. 



( 



An London lü:15. Diesmal sind Träger und Taxi sofort zur Hand. 
Taxi bringt mich ä* st zum n^uen Air Terminali West Terminal Cromwell Road , 
ganz mo lerner umfan»Areicher ßau,wo ich mein Gepäck nicnt gleich aufgeben 
kann - nur drei ^tunuen vor Abflug - ^ ondern in Verwahrung geben muss. 
Ich habe Taxi /;arten lassen;Chauf f eur verlangt für ganze Fahrt »einschliess- 
lich der Fahrt nach cfer Upper Richmond Road 1 fc ,w s ganz angemessen ist. 
3ei Reifenbergs besonders nette nufnahme »raffiniertes Eßsen »dessen Bereitunf^ 
'»Tergif» besonders Vergnügen macht. Angenehm, das-s Wetter^erlaubt im Garten 
zu plaudern •uöciKMMkM]^da6S Taxi zar Rückfahrt zum Airpe*^^ telephonisch be- 
stellt werden Kann . Am Air f^t^ treffe ich Johnny »wie verabredet »mit dem ich 
20:^0 den Air Bus zum Airport besteige. Dort wertet unser ein Vis count de r 
BEAw er London 22:Üü verlässt. J-der Platz besetzt »recht eng;spielt aber 
keine Rolle »da wir bereits 25:05 in PARIS landen. Da Omnibus besetzt »nehmen 
wir Taxi zum Air Terminal Invalide »um""5or€ unser Gepäck zu erwarten. 
Ich denke erst daran»dass heute der l^.Juli 1769,aer Tag der Erstürmung und 
Zerstörung :r-r B^astille^ist^ als ich auf der fahrt Beste des feiernaen, tanzen 
den Paris ^w^+re und aif ^em Place de 1- Concorde o.^n verlas- enen Riesenaufbau 
für G-n.de Gaulle stehen sehe, die seiner Auffc^ssung von "glcäre'' entspricht. 
Unter Ziel ist Hotel Montalembert »5 rue ae Montalembert aifif .er linken Seite 
der Seine, „s liegt neben *m eleganteren Hotel lont Royal»wo wir keine Zimmer 
bekamen. Ab«r auch unser notel .nacnt anständit^en Eindruck;kleines Foyer mit 
winzigem Frushtücksraum und kleinem Esssaal;kleine saubere Zimmer mit Bad . 
Preis^alles incJ.pro Zimmer 6»C00 fr. ,aa 1 Oollat neute ca.^ö^ Fr. kamt = 
ca. ^^ 6 . 

Mittwoch 13. Juli: i'arianne hat beim Autoclub in New York ein Auto für unsere 
Peise bestellt und bereits % ^Uü an, ezahlt. Mr haben als Adresse, wo wir 
das Auto anzufordt,'rn haben »Neuilly »Rue Perronet 121. Dort führt uns ein 
netter, ,^"ut deutsch ^rechender Elsässer mhs den neusten Citroen (1959) vor 
und schwärmt von «inen Eigenschaften, /vagen nat ori inelle Form mit einer 
Art Walfischschnauze »sient xe.. egant tas »ist schwarz und führt die Nummer 
'* 7341 - HR - 73 - F ". Für Gepäck reichlich Platz. 

Mit Taxi zurück zum ^Varenhaus Printemps »wo im gro sen Stil Einkäufe von 
Parfüm (Lanvin) »vor allem für i:rJiditTung Ma's Auf träge »machen. Da alles 
gesondert eingepackt und abgere hnet weraen muss ,at Laciiiert man uns eine 
nette Dame ,die für entsprechende Abwicklung sorgt. Für Ool] arzahlung er- 
halten vdr 20% Rabatt. So kostet z.B. eine Flasche lanvin '»Arpeche' statt 
Fr. 2 »700 nur 2,l6c = ca.A-y. Dollar. 

G/£gendber eine 4rt ■ nack Bar "Royal Pri n temps '^ wo wir amüsant lunchen. 
Der^ ^MÜ Club de France »wo.vir g-p: n Vorzeigung d?r Autopapiere Eesence Coupo ns 
erhalten können^dDmiciliert Blvd.des Italiens no.i9,im « ersten Stock des 
Credit Lyonnais. Vir können zunächst nur Coupons im Werte von i^r.24.000 
kaufen. Auch hier brinn^t Doi:" arzahlung .wesentliche Ermässigung rAir haben in 
Dollar nur den Gea:enwert von Fr. 19.^^0 zu zahlen. 
Tee im tiotel auf unseren ,i^i mm.rn. 

lim 7 Uhr holt mich Edi Lachman »Pariser Vertreter des hollandischen All/^,emen 
Handelsblaat, mit seinen kleinen Auto ab. ir essen in einen kleinen ausgezeich 
neten '»echt'» französischen Restaurant " Chez Faul '», Place Dauphin '<U ^uai des 
Orfevres, -it Ausgang nach beiaen Seiten. Dann fährt er mich in (*n ma.risch- 
t en Teil von Montmartre »wo noch echte Weingarten ä.nd und wo hxt in ^inem 
kleinen bictro aen Abend mit einem Cafe beschliessen. Reizender anregender 
Abend! 



( 



c- 



< 



Donnerstag l6 . Juli: Will heute beginnen Johnny Wesentliches von Paris zu 
zeigen, underschönes W-tt-r hält an. Beginnen im American ' xpress ander 
Place de 1* Opera zwem Ausflage zu buchen: Chartres und Chantilly. 
Wandern über Plage Vendome (Hotel Ritz) , durch Rue Roya l zur Rue de Rivoli 
Hier ist eine uns empfohlne Buchhandlung für Reiseführer. Da meine vorc.us- 
gesandten nicht aigekomr.en sind, kaufe notgedrungen bei Galignani ,224 Rue de 
Rivoli, einen "Guide Bleu'' von Frankreich und cBazu einige von aen ausgezeich- 
ten grünen" Michelins ; vorhanden leider nur :.rovence und Bourgogne. 
Lunchhn am Rlace Royal c in aer Snak Bar des Hotel du Louvr e. M n sitzt an- 
genehm halb im Freien mit blick auf aas Palais Royale »Auswahl und 2;Ubereitang 
der Gerichte entspricht ganz unserem Geschmack. 

2:15 geht die Coach vom Am. Express ab. Program:Gare du x.ord , St .Denis ue la 
Chax3elle,Chantiily j.^bbaye de Royournont. 

3t. Denis de la Ghapelle : Von dieser Kath drale ,die sLcn ub-r dem Grab des 
Hl.Dyonysius erhebt habe ich schon viel gehört und auch vieles gesehen, #asÄ 
hier enstande8xlst''SSS''^?izf'' durch die elt zerstreut ist: "Der Thron des 
DagobertVJetzt in Paris ,Cabinet des r.edailles. Ebendort äxkä der sog,Ftolemäus 
3echer aus orientalischem Sardonix mä die : hhhle des oassanidenkönigs Chosroed 
II(590-628)als "Tasse de^^ Salomo" im Schatz von St. Denis. 

Im Louvre: "J^sta" Bergkristail in »^ugers Kassung,von .demselben die Adlervase 
auf Porphyr una ein Silb.Wasserkanne ; Inder National Gallery of i\rt in 
Wsnin,~ton (früh r im Besitz von »<Vidner) Suger»s Sardonix Kelch, 
jrosse Rolle in <fer Geschichte Frankreichs: Im V. Jh. wurde hier eine Kirche und 
ein Klo ter erbaut .Dagobert I (+638)macht reiche Stiftungen und wird hier 
beigetsetzt . ieine um 7^0 begänne Erneurung wurde unter Karl d.Gr. vollendet . 
Abt Suger - über den Erich Panofsky eine ausführliche Arbeit geschrie-ben 
hat — i8t der Vertrauensmann von Ludwig VI(1137 +) -In seiner Amtszeit (1122- 
1151) wird der grossartige Neubau begonnen, der erste gotische Monumentalbau 
Frankreich». Hier wurde die königl .Krigesflagge ,die "Criflagge" am Altar auf- 
gehringt . Hier übergab 768 Pippin einen Söhnen Farl und Karlmann das Reich; 
1^29 hängt hier Jean d'Arc ihre waffen . uf,hier trat Heinrich IV 1593 zum 
Katholicismus über und hier wurde lÖlC Napoleon mit Marie t ouise getraut. 
Jetzt ist (*s hier still geworden und nur seltene Besucher fragen nach aen 
zum Teil senr w rtvollen kanstleri^c nen Grabmählern 

Wir treten nur in die Vorhalle durh das recht schlecht restaurierte Tor 
D-S Halbdunkel der von 3Dhv<^ ren Säulen ;-etragnen Vorhalle ,noh ais Sugers Zeit, 
steht im age,^^ ansatz z\x der leichten Eleganz und Klarneit d?s aus em XIII Jh. 
stamiienaen it relschif f s. 

Mit diesem flucntigen Eindruck mü :en wir usns begnügen. 

Schöne weitere Fahrt durch '^al-.er nac;h CHantilly ,das ich cfes letzte Mil hä^ 
Olly be achte und in seiner Lage so eindrucksvoll in Erinnerung geblieben 
ist,dass ich es John jeuenfalj-S zeigen wollte. 



() 



<) 



( 



Eintritt durch g^o.^ es Gittertor. Rechts jenseits des Wassergrabens ein 
nüchterner Bau, das 1770 als Chateau d'Enghien für Gäste errichtet ;vurde . 
Beim Writ. rgehen sieht raan das Reiterbild Anne * s de Hontmoren cy auf einer 
Terrase von aer man bes.schöenen überblick aber l-ark hat(lö66). hr baute 
hier den vorhandenen goti^-chen Barn im Rtnaffi^sance. til um und fugte später 
ein Erweiterungsbau, das sog.Chatelet hinzu ( 1^<:J9»1^67) ♦ 

Anne de Montmoreny's Enkel verliert I632 im Aufstand ^egen die Krone Leben 
und Güter, die an ^^einen Schwager, den Prinzen Heinrich von ßourbon-Cond* 
kommen, Sein Sohn Ludwig II von Cond* , wegen seinet: Geistes und Kriegstaten 
als aer " Grosse Cond » " bekannt , macht Chatilly Schauplatz glänzender Feste. 
Den Eiipfang Louis XIV im Jahre I67I kennen wir aus Beschreibungen in Brie- 
fen der iMme de S*vign* , worin sie auch erzählt, dass sich der Leibkoch Vatel 
wegen Ausbleibens des für die Festt:: f el bestellten Seefisches sich das Lgben 
nahm. 

Während der Revolution wurde dcs HauptschlOoS gänzlich zerstört. 
Der moderne Bau, in aen /vir jetzt eintreten , stammt vom aera Erben des letzen 
Cond*,dem Her zog Heinrich von Aumale , vierter Sohn des FÖnie-s Louis Philipp, 
ÄÄr(lo22-lö97) ,d^r ihn I876-ÖI erbauen liess. Die Kunstsa-nmlungen stanmen 
meist ais altem Familienbesitz , soweit sie interessant sind, und bilden heute 
den I nhalt des ''Mus*_e_C_ond* " ,das durch Erbschaft in den Besitz des 
Institut de Fran e kam. Es wurde sehr gewinnen ,//enn eine strengere Auswahl 
unter den Bilaern gemacht würae. So muss man dem Fahrer durch eine Reihe on 
Sälen folgen, bis man endlich zum eir.entlichen Kern der D^mmlung gelangt. 
..ieser besteht aus den im Sanctuario vei-sammelten ."iilaern: Raffael "Madonna 

aus aera riause Orleans'' (1507) und.dLe drei.^bracien" .sowäi kt Miniaturen, 

T n- 4. -. • • ,. tiy?:e d^Heures; . , . ' 

von Jean pouquet,die us einem GebetDucn heröusgenommen woraen sxnd,dae 

far Estienne Chevalier »Scnatzrneister unter Vark VI J^^2-60 gemalt worden 

sind. Anstossend eine «jallerie mit grau in grau gehaltenen Glast-;emäluen 

die nach Kartons aus cfer Schule Raffaels f .r das ochloss Ecouen gefertigt 

wurden, das ursj ranglich für Anne le t4ontmorency l^Hl erbaut , später in den 

Besitz der Conae überging. Ge;.,enübvr diesen renstern nervurrc. genae Portrait 

Zeichnungen des XVI und XVII Jh. besonders von Clouet(Jean + 15^0) 

In .ler Bibliothek Sammlung wundervoller Grollier Einbänae und Handschriften 

darunter als Hauptobjekt " li^Les Tr*s Riches H^ ures" >es Herzog toon Berry 

von iaul von Limburg und sfinen Brüdern (141)-l6) ; kann beim Ausgang 

ein usg zie hn- ts i chlein ;iit 12 Reproduktionen daraus erwvcben. 

Aus dem XVITI Jh.reizenuer i^aum "Salon des Singes" .-. r f en in Kleidung und 

Haltung der vornehmen G .eelischr f t . ;ohl aus deselben Zeit|Wie die pracht 

vollen Pferdeställe ,tie ein Mineiter Ludwig XV. ,J-einrich von Bonrbon-5Zonde 

errichten liesüen und aie ich d s letzte M?-l nit Clly oesichtigte ; diesmal 

begnüo;en wir uns niit Blick von d r Ferne. Dies ist leic-erduch mit dem Park 

o.er F-^ll,der Ursprung} ich von Je ^^otre angelegt , spater im enli-cnen Stil 

gewandelt wurde. ber schon d-r Blick über die 7as^:er umgegben Grüns mit 

aem W.^ld im Hintergrund ist dessen "esuch wert. Kommt bei dsm/trahlenden 

Wetter natarlich zur vollen Geltung. 

TY 

Durch schöne- Wald zur Abbaye ae Koyoumont , die Ludwig der Heilige(122b-4o* 
ge':rünriet hat; von der i^. irche nur grandiose Ruine übrig. Vom Kloster ßchlaf- 
sale und Refectorium, uche. leute z.T. für Konzertauf fahrun^en Genutzt. 

Um 7 Uhr sina wir wi er in Paris. Lohnender Ausflug. 



( 







< 



( 



Sylvie Goldschmid,die INichte von üohn,holt uns mit ihrem kl-inen Auto um 8 Uhi 
ab. billy una die Kinoev wohnen jetzt in AuteiiLil,59 Rue Boileau »Paris XVI, 
Hübsche wohnung mit Blick ins Grüne. Lilly übersetzt und arbeitet har*-. 
Gepflegtes Abendbrot, Auf .<era Rückweg fährt uns Sylvie an der angestrahlten 
JMotre )arne vorbei. Herrlich. 

Freitag- 17. Juli ; Her aicheo Wetter hält an. Es wird wärmer. 
Zeige John .esentliches vom Musee de Louvr e: Lange Gallerie »Cabinette um 
di» Medicisäle, Griechische Plastik. Dabei lerne auch ich etwas Neues kennen: 
X)ie Schenkung von Luise de Croix ,eine ausgezeichnete Sammlung meist orienta- 
lischer Kunst ,byzantini. che XMKiSt Malerei »Ikone ... 

Jeu de Paum ; Die Sammlung der Impressionisten ist wieder nem • eordnet .Monets 
Studien der Kathedrale von Rouen sind nun in die vVand eingelassen. 
Blick von 'Ȇllys Sank" auf Place de la G oniorde , fascinierend wie immer, ob- 
wohl die mitten parkenden Autos den Eindruck etwas mindern. 
Abends sind Iiilly und Sylvie G. unsere Gäste im Restaurant 1 ucienn e ,12 ,rue 
succouf,da£ sie SBlüst vorgeschlagen haben. Charmante Unterhaltung nit Sylvie. 
ßssen nicht aufregend. 

Sa>nstc.g l8./Juli: Unsere zweite Coachtour vom Am. Express aus ist ein ganze 
Tagestour, begleitet von derselben Fuhrerin,die durch ihr posi^:j.jjes /vissen 
den Ausfläg besonders reizvoll machte. Hauptpunkte sind Chateau und Chartres , 
Bidet aber "auf dem ÄÄg Hin= und Rückweg noch vieles mehr, was man ebenü nur 
auf einer Autotour wahrnehmen kann. 

Ausfahrt über die Avenue de la arande ^rmee. Unwahrscheinlich , wie sich aich 
hier Paris ausdehnt iModerne Sportsarenen , Ausstellunggebäude ,j^'abriken(SimkaO) 
Natürlich auchdie jetztaufder ganzen .Veit unvermdeidlichen Hochhäuser. 
Schlo: s iMalmaison bleibt hinter den Bäumen des Parkes verborgen. Furzer Halt 
vor Schloss St .Ger.nai n ,das Francois I und Henri II gebaut hat. Hier wurde^ 
Louis XIV geboren. Leicht verständlich ,dac~:s er sidh ctenach Versailles ertramte 
und nur von hier die Wasser für seine neue Schonung xMxkiKr bezog durch die 

■^ Madine de l-arly'». 

Aufenthalt im Chateau d'Anet ,von Jem ich noch nie etwas horte. 

Es ist eigentlich ein Jagds hlöeschen,da8 Henri II 1552 für seine Geliebte 

Diane de Poitiere: , deren Erinn rung in den groi^sen Schlössern von Fontaine- 

bleau undaideren verewigt durch die verschlungenen Initialen D/H. , erbaute , 

die Maria vcn Medici nach Möglichkeit nach Henrichs Tode durch C/H xä er- 

setzfeH.XÄKXÄKktex Der Charakter als Jagdschösscehn wird gleich durch die Lir 

sehe und nunde über dem Eingangstor festgelegt .Diana wc.r eine grosse Jägerin 

von stattlicher Schonneit ,die sie aenr pflegte und war,v/ie die vielen Bilder 

zei'^enjbesonaers stolz auf ihre makellosen Brüste. 

Das^'schloss ist heute im besitz des ComteaeDreux; da es unt r National Schutj 

steht ,muss er Besichtigung zü^Bes* ruimf en *agen'und Stunden gestatten. 

Die Anlage zeigt den aus.serordentlichen Geshm.ack von Diane ;alles in guten 

Mssan,die es noch heute bewonnar machen. Junaerschones Tl^eppenhausI Überall 

Möbel und Kostbarkeiten aus ihrer Zeit , selbst dsr Silberauf satz auf dem Tisch 

im Speisezimmer,. es en /^änSe^^fdn die :en Platz gewebten^ Gobelinsgedeckt weraen 

Schlafzimmer mit dem Originaloett und Bettdecke, in dem sie angeblich starb 

Sie ruht in einer von einem Dom gedecKten Kc.pelle gegenüber dem Schlo.-s^ 

die Reliefs von St.Goujon zieren. 

An das Schloss schliesst sich innerhalb des Gitters einschier unübersehbarer 

Park .Mit herrliche Bäumen;ausserhalb des Gitters ein grosses Jagdrevier, 

der dichte vVald von Dreux,in dessen Mitte ein Rendezvous H^us für die Jäg^^ 

zur Zeit Louis XV stent. 



( > 



( 



Anfahrt auf CHARTRKS. Die Kathedrale ists sahon von weitem achtbar .Klar 
erkennbar diTTIid^ Turme .Biohfesder ge,:en 1170 vollendete Sudturm mit 
geschlossenem Spitzhelm und TUitkt links aer Nordturm, der ert^t um 150? 

c;fin unruaieces Ende erhält. . ,. 

Salt unweit der Kathedral e -Gutes Lunch bei Cazalie.Wir lernen bei dieser 
fie^eaenheit zwei be onaers sympatische amerikanische Damen kennen. 
?ch bin «it Slly öfters hier gewesen.wohl zuletzt im Juli 1926. Nie schwächt 
sich*r Sndruck dieses b eaterhaltenes B eispiel französciher Früh-Gotik ab. 
Immer wieder zerstört, wird deser Bau 119^-122 unter Dach georacht. 
IZ uZltL rt.1 (lorte Roy al) mit meinen drei Eingängen hat .^iguren.die sich 
St ihrln .astrec kt7ncS7pern,ihren abgeflachten üesichtern.den ornamental 
^ffuhrten Farallelfalten ihrer gewänder der Architektur absichtlich unter- 
ordnen. ?ür weitere Entwicklung der ilastik vorbildldah, deren .Veit.rent- 
wIcK^^Ag an den etwa 20 Jahre spateren Vorhaben d.r .. itenportale ver olgt 
CerdeHannzD. r til er grossen Statuen wird reifer .ihreAusdruckskralt er- 
staunlich: grossartit^e Beispiele der gotischen Monumnet^-lplastik. 
o'sSner; ist in Raum.bmessungen höchst eindruckstooll.Aber aen Bauptein- 

d^Lk Tachen immer wieder die farbigen Fenster.die f ^--^-^^f ^.J^^^ait^r- 
121C und 1260 entst ndensind und cfen grossartigsten riesttnd an mittelalter 
lieber Glasmalerei ä^rstellen, den es gibt. Besonders .«hön die ^>nster .er 
drei über 113^ m.hohen Rosen. Wahre Juwelen.wenn die Sonne sie dirchleutet . 
011» und ich haben oft rmi diese* Farbenspiel genossen. T«v^a.ai- 

Diesmal zum«-sten Mal, dank *r vortrefflichen Führerin, schenke ich dsmlnh^t 
der Darstellung mehr Aufmerksamkeit . In den unteren Fenstern sind «esit bib- 
Jlchen Scenen Snd neiligenl.genden dargestellt, in den Hochfenstern.die im 
Langh.-us zu je z ei gekoppelt und von *n Rosen bekont sind.hinzelf i.uren von 

mäcntiger ?;irkung. t k „ /-v,,.-io-n. 

Tm mittelfen=ter über dem Heuptportal Svenen aus dfsm Leben Christi, 
Tod der Maria ,. ti.tung der Schuhmocherzunft ,'^ie r.an aus dem Schuhmacher 
anct>r Arbeit .-m unteren 1'eil les Fensters sieht. Im Schiff: 
Legende des Hl.Sustach.GL ichnis vom verlornen .iohn.vom barmherzi^^en Sama- 

Siftu^gder Bäcker:^.ei Ho hfenster des .Mittelschiff esj«»aria mit *m Chri tus 

kind. Der Apostel Jacobus. _. -jn^« 

Schliesslich iarf ich nicht die " Belle Verriere" vergessen, die das sudlicn 
Seitenschifr de. .hors schmückt: In Mitten schwebt •^"^^««'^«(heiliger 
Geist)auf Maria mit holdesten Anlitz nieder, aie Christkind auf ochoss halt. 
üii^ Übrigen jelaer von r,ngeln gefulJt. , . . 

öti au die en . enctern beherr.chenue Farben: Rot und blau. Das Hot scheint 
Rubinen in aie .ammerung der .-athedraie zu schütten, das Blau m ver.cniedene 
NuanSen Sapphiere.Dazu helfen ,rüne und Goldfarben diesen unbeschreiblichen 

Effekt schaffen. ■ , j. -„^^^ 

Ich wpiss nicht, ob man weiss, wie die. e Farbenef iekte erzielt wuraen. oicher 
ist daFs ««n selbst nit .-.itteln der modernen Wissenschaft nicht im Stanue i^t 
diese translucide .irkung zua:h.ffen. Be' ei^. die beiaen Fenster, die '«r 
^venigen Jahren von reichen Amerikaner gestiftet in einem Atelier von Ch.rtres 
angefertigt wurden, aie viel besjer Bind,als das meiste,., man im äLl£emeinen 
zus=nen bekommt , aber an die alten .lei. ter>-.erKe niciit neranreicht. 
Hinter iem Chor aer Kathedrale eine Terrast- e mit hübschem i^lick hinunter au« 
die Unterstadt. Daneben steht aer eheffii-lige t^i fjchpf sptilast aus dem XVII Jh. 



(~) 



c 



( 



Inf dem i-ückweg nach Paris interessante Blicke auf: 

Schl oss Maintenon >das d« fthemaligg trzieherin der Kinder Louis XIV und 
der Mme de Monte span.gMKkMklxisfeSÄm und die er schliesslich heiratete. 
Renal. snceCharakt^r und der Wassergraben sind erhalten 

Schloss Rambouillet : Es liegt hinter einer grossen Rasenfläche breitgelagert. 
Franz dex I.ist hier gestorben »Napoleon lebte hier und es ist heute der 
Sommersitz des Präsidenten der Republik. 

Fahrt durch ßois o.e ßoulogne bringt uns vorbei am neuen ganz modern gehalte- 
nen Unesco iebaud e . 

Um 6 Ihr sind wir wieder an der Flc.ce l'Cpera. 
John hat h ute ßilJ et zu den Tanzender Baker, die wieder fruf tritt , um far 
die vielen Kinaer,die sie adoptiert hat, sorgen zu können. 

So bin ich froh.dass ich zu Hause bin, als MARIANNE eintrifft. Überraschend, 
veil ihr cabel uns nicht erreichte. Glücklicherweise macht es keine Schwierig- 
keit ihr ein Zimmer mit Bad, sogar uf un-erem Flur, zu vfr chaffen. 
Soupieren zusammen bei '» Chez Pau lis das ich erst vorgestern dirch Eddi kennen 
lernte. Ausgezeichnet »besonders eindrucksvoll aie Riesenartichocken. 

Sonntag 19. Juli : Wuncerba-res ''etter hält an. 

Mit a und John durch Tuilerien ':..rten;beide wandein dann stadt A-arts ,um im 
Cafe de Paris einen drink zu nehmen. Ich han,:e auf Cllys Bank auf der Terrasse 
üb r der PI ade de la Concorde ein wenig sentimentalen Erinnerungen nach. 
Ein freundlicher Franzose kann nicht umhin sich i;iit mir des schönen Bildes 

zu freuen und dem Ausdruck zu g ben. •,-,-,. u 4- 

Im Hotel zurudtgekenrt, erwarte ich Dora horwitz' ..cnwiergersohn Jean Gaillxbert 
ie la L.nzipre,aen ich gern kennen lernen wollte , nachdem ich viel Gutes 
überihn gehört. Kr er^-cheint mit Blueim far Ma^mir bringt er einen Katalog 
d.-r Versteigerung Langweil. War ein;nal aie berühmteste Händlerin fhr Ostas^en, 
der mein Fr^-und Consul Jacoby Blumen sc hie Kte .1^5 ach ibiem Toae \^jurde ihre 
Privatsammlung versteigert ; sie hatte zur ckbeh.lten ,was ihr und ihrer Zeit 
das Beste erschein. Beim Durchsehen des K taiog. sehe, wie sich mziBchen 
der G^scrimack geänaert hat. a ist z.S.ein Byobu auf Gold. rund ,aen ...Z. 
Morgan .c^rn erwerben ^llte. Sie lehnte ab mit dem Bemerken : Sie sind nicht 
recih genug! 'A^elche Verkennung von »«Werten". 

Zu viert dinner wieder bei "Chez Fau l", weil 'iiir nichst besseres und echt 
französiches einfällt. Jean macht aisgezeichneten Eindruck, so bedaure ich 
ausserordentlich,das:.,wir mo-enaiderr Verabredungen »keine Zeit haben nachdem 
Essen noch zusammenzubleiben. 

Marianne hat bei ihr m Studium in Paris viel im Hause von Erwin und Lilly 
Goldschmid verkehrt. So ist der begreifliche Wunsch ein.ndBTzu sehen. 
Lilly hat als Treffpunkt das Restaurant oben im Eiffel Tur m vorgeschlagen 
So kommen wir an abend noch zu dem schönen blick von der Terrasse des Turms 
-uf Altzeit: Dom des Invalides und Ecole Militaire von breiten Rasenflachen 
gtrennt - und Neuzeit : Palais ae Chailiot im Halbkreis gelagert mit schönem 

Wasserspiel . . , . .n • u 4. 

Das Restaurant ist geschickt rnit gewi^ier Elegance m die Terra.se eingebaut 
Gutes ii:ssen,aber nicht billig. Unser "Surpiise Eif f el"(=Baked Alaska), ein 
iiberbackner Schaum mit Eisfi innen, e.re.t durch seine Riesigkeit das Schmun- 
zeln uer um uns . itzenden Gäste. 



8 



(J 



( 



Autofahrten durch Frankreich und N o rdspanien , 
Besuch der Hohlen von Lascaux und Altamira . 

Montag 2v .Juli : Früher Auf bruch ,wir haben bis Perigeux 510 km. zurückzu- 
legen. 
Punkt 8 Uhr brin^',t Mr. Bollos '»unseren" Citroen von 1959 (73^.HP. 75.F) 
und gibt Marianne di nöti£;sten Instructionen , die später durch Erfahrung 
erweitert vi,'erden müussen. 

Ausfahrt 8:31 durch die Porte Orleans. Mit Rücksicht auf den weiten Weg 
bleibt nicht viel oeit uns unterwegs grüridlidher Umzusehen. 
So bleibt von der Stadt Orleans nur in Erinnerung ihrer Lage an der Loir e , ,| 
einer hochragenden Kathedrale und Auffrischung der mit ihr verbünd nen 
geschichtlichen Ererigniöse: Befreiung der btadt von den englischen Beset- 
zung durch die am 6.Jam.l^l2 in Domremy-la pucelle geborne Jean d*Arc, die 
"Jungfrau von Orleans" 8,Kai 1^29. 

In Limoges hätte wohl die Kc>thedrale St.Etianne mit ihrem gewaltigen West- 
turm einen Besuch verdient. Vir begnügen uns mit uem blick auf die Brük- 
Ken aberdie Vienne und der Erinnerung,dass dies die Stadt ist, in der die 
Herrlichkeiten mittelalterlicher Emailkunst , die heute Zierde grosser Mu- 
seen sind(u.a. London, New York, p&ris) »vorn 5. Jahr. an hergestellt und im 
13.0c h. ihren höhepunkt erreichten. 

Die letzten 100 km. führen erst am hüb chen Vienne T0I abwärts , dann durch 
Heideland und reizvoll gelegne ^.rtschaften vielfach mit alten Schlössern 
und Türmen. Die guten Stras^^en sind von herrlichem I^^aumbestand eingerahmt. 
6:30 erreichen wir PgglOEUX.Das Hotel Domino liegt am Place Franc heville 
Gute .immer mit Bad unl"Äü~Jsicht aif den Platz sind far Hgs^ggs^^vi^^"^ • 
Ein etwas altmodisches Haus .Angenehm, dacs man im geräumigen Hof im Freien 
essen kann. 

Unser Hauptinte esse gilt den Trüffel n , die in Perigord zu Hause sind und 
" fois gras "= fette Leber, die durch gewaltsame uberfütt rung von Gänsen 
erzeugt /in Mitten .rit ein r ocheibe Trüffel geäiicjckt ist. 
Fois gras des Hauses ist nicht ganz so, wie sie ei:^entlich sein sollte und 
die grotien schwarzen Trüffeln, die hier in Eichenwäldern von Schweinen 
gÄicMKÄÄÄXKSXXaus dsr Erde gewühlt we den, und aie ich am liebsten ohne Zutat 
gekocht iiiit fri.-cher Butter esse »erscheint hier mit Traffelsauce übergös- 
sen. Seltsam. Aber das sind nur kleine i.inwände gegen cfes sonst recht gute 
Essen, das mit einem ^-usgezeichnetem Souffle schiiesst und von einem sehr 
guten .-OS* aus <ier Gegend begleitet ist. 

Dienstag 21. Juli : Nachts angenehme Abkühlung. Wir brechen früh auf , da der 
Andrang zu cfen Höhlen von Lascaux stark ar in soll. Wir haben 8^ km.bergauf zu 
fahren, um bis zum Parkplatz im untrren VezereTal nahe bei dem Städtchen 
Montir^nac zu gelangen. Der Parkplatz iot oereits stark oesetzt und wenn wir 
eine Kurze Strecke zu Fuss zurückgelegt mitten durch v.aldiges Hügelland, 
finden wir viele Besucher wartend vor unter einer weiten »gedeckten Laube. 
Die Besucher w rden nur in Gruppen hineingelassen. Man hat letztes Jahr die 
Höhle airconditioned in einer Art, die bei Unterseebooten verwende! wird 
und ie mit doppelten Bronzetüren verschlossen, um die feuchte Luft auszu- 
schliessen,die diese Höhlnebilder zu verderben drohte. 

Der erste Eindruck ist überwältigend, wenn man die Türen durffeschrittenhat . 
Mai kann sagen veilleicht ähnlich der, enn rnan zum ersten '^'^al die Chartres 
Käthe irale-^etritt. 
Hunderte von Tieren scheinen über die Wölbung der Höhlen zu huschen. Der 

Realismus , die erhaltene Färbung ist um so verblüf f en aer ,wenn man weiss, ^, 

aass IGCO Jahr rpätei' die Nachfolger der Cro-Magnons hinterliessen nur 
rohe symbolische Zeichnungen. 







( 



i;8 tnftt mi«rh nicht unvorbereitet. Die farbigen Bilder in Skiras »»Prehis- 
toric J:aintings'»,'»Lascaux or the Birth of Art" geben eine gute Vorstel- 
lung.Ic h habe natürlich aich gelsen,wie zuf:Äliig diese Hohlen 19^0 ent- 
deckt wurden, wie äLie Zweifel an der Autencität und Unberdhrtheit der Far- 
ben von cfen esten bachverständigen beseitigt wÄrxtn sind. Die Entstehung 
schätzt maa 15.000 Jahre vor unserer Zeitrechung in die Ende der Eisperiode 
Die Künstler waren a:a{i.er des späten Paläoliticums,die mit die^sen Bilder 
nicht üeabiacntigten "Kunst" zu schaffen oder Freude zu machen, sondern die 
mit ihnen eine Art Magic ausüben wollten. Viele der Tieren an len Vänden 
der Höhle sind mit i feilen oder Lanzen durchbohrt ; ofienbar glaubten die 
höhlenmen.schen damit das ef f ektitoeTöten leichter zu machen. Hie ineiiten 
abgebidleten Tier sind weiblich und chwanger. 

In besonderer Erinn rung bleibt ein grosser chwarzer Kopf -ines Stiere 
mit gros^en Hörnern, eine Reihe von schwimmenden Hirschen , eine springende 
Kuh; darunter eine Reihe von ponieartigen Pferdchen. 
Der x^achteil der Massenf ü:irung macht es unmöglich die p:anze Ausdehnung der^ 
Höhlen zu dirchuringc n. So sehen wir z.B. nicht den toten jMbnn,d^n Anette Lamingj 
in ihrem Buch "Lascaux , : c.intings aid i;ngravings"(Pelican Book) erwähnt und 
nicht das h:hinoceros ,das dicht dabei abgebilaet i,_t. 
Gleichwohl; Lin grosser Eindruck bleibt abrig. 

vVir nehm-n den Rückweg üb-r Les Eyzier . Di- Landschaft der Dordogne i.t 
hi reinfach zauberhcft :Kalkklippen , Steineichen »Pappeln in .^e wo 11 teil Eerrain 
Das Hot.rl üe Cro-M.gnon hat den Stern im ichelin wohl verdient .Hier ist 
aie iate de fois x;ras unübertrefflich , ebenso wie .ein canard truff* . 
Dazu sitzt man wunderschön im chattigen G rten una die Bedienung ist eben- 
falls, wie Mian es sich'b nur wünschen kann. 

Nachmittag sehen wir uns in der Stadt perigaedx ein w nig grünalicher zu Fuss 
um. Lebhaftes Städtchen mit viel Neuoauten. Hauptort aes Department D ordQ_gne 
Die Kathedrale St. Front hat daa Grundriss eines griechsichen ■ reuzes 
und wird von fünf hohen Kup ein überragt , was ihr ein orientalisches Aussehen 
verleiht. Das ist äDe auch alles , was an ihre Nachahmung der Apoi^-fe^elkirche 
in Konstantinopel heute noch erinnert. Von dem Bau des 12. Jahrhunderts ist 
nicnts übrig, ausser dem Kreugang an er Süaseite.^in romanischer Glockenturm 
überra t die r.ingangshalle. Das rings um die Kathedrale alte Viertel ist 

leider im Abbruch. Es muss recht malerisch .^rewesen ein. 
Keben unserem r.uto vor dem Hotel ist ein grosser Rolls Roys eingetroffen. 
Und fällt die Nummer auf: "CD no.2". Ein wenig i^ufmerksam zeigt uns den Ei- 
gentümer: Hohe schlanke Gestalt in vorgeschrittenen Jahren, der seinen Wagen 
ohne Cheuffeur selbst versorgt. ftin FfiStu sient ebenso distinguiert aus. 
Ms^ hoher engliicher Beamter oder Botschafter sein. 

Gutes Abendbrot im Garten des Hotels. ^Marianne und John lernen "Ayala" ken- 
nen, eine Chatapagner M-.rke,die etwa.- ausser i- ode gekommen ist . Guter Jahr- 
gang. 

Mittwoch 22. Juli: Den eiterweg nehmen wir, auf Empfehlung des Wirtes ȟber 
Le Bupue sur \STere , reizend gele,>:ner Ort, in dessen Nahe wir aen iiingang zur 
St^titen"Höhle von Froumeyssac finaen. Ich begnüge mich von einer firt 
Balkon in die Tiefe und auf die malerisch beleuanteten Stalkktiten zu schauen 
wanrend Marianne mit John unter Führung die eler<:triöch beleuchtete "Cathedralc 
de cristal" aurchwandelt . 



10 



( ' 



{ 



Fahrt weiter durch ungewöhnlich reizvolle Landschaft mit schönem Vald und 
romantischen alten S chlös sern auf den Anhöhen, von denen besonders Montfort 
in ^Jrinnerung blieb. 

Wir halten in Souillac zu gutem Lunch im Grand Hotel und zur Besichtigung 
der bgmanisch-byzentinischen Kuppelkirche , deren Entstehung wegen aer nahen 
Verwandtschaft mit den Sculpturen von .oissaclll2-ll4o gesetzt wird. 
Die Kirche ist einer grandlichen vViederherstellung unterzogen worden. Dabei 

wurae das Nordportal mit dem Tympanon einer Himmelfahrt vermauwrt ,das 
Westportal »soweit e» noch verwendbar war, in das Innere der einschiffigen 
gekuppelten Saalkirche verlegt. Zwei Figuren stehen rechts und links vom 
i-ortal.von denen äD r nur noch lesaias deutlich erkennbar ist. Aus dem 
Tympanon ist das jüngste Gericht darüber eingesetzt. Der Türsturz, der früher 
als i'littelpf eiler aiente und für den kein Platz mehr ist, wurde als Trag- 
pfeiler auf der rechten Seite und als Fentterpf eiler (Opfer AbrahmasC ! ) 
verwenaet.Die Arbeit .rinnert an byzantinische Blf enbeinarbeiten und ist 

äusserst ausdrucksvoll. , .. ^ ^ • 

In annlicher Weise ist ein interes antes Giebelfeld des 12. Jahrhunderts m 
den verfallenden Glockenturm aer ehemaligen Kirche St. Martin eingemauert. 
Unser Endziel ist heute CAHÜRS ,cl. s wir nach Zurücklegung von 17ö km. 

erreichen, wenn auch unserl'üH^erkunft in einem etw s weiter ausserhalb der 
Stadt gelegnen enemali^•en ßi&ctofsschloss vorgesehen ist. 

Die K athearale St.Etienne ist eine einschiffige kuppelgedeckte Saalkirche, 
die nur -us zwei i<uppelraumen üe.-teht,die hell und ungeschmuckt sind. 
Sie wurde 1119 geweiht und von dem ehemaligen Schmuck zeugt nur noch das 
Nürdportal,das z.T. in der Erde steckt. Hier im Bogenfeld Himmelfahrt Chris- 
ti und Leben (tes Hl.btefanus. Am Westende ist ein gotischer Rsum mit hübschen 

Fenstern angebaut. . - m tu 

Schloss Mercu ^s stammt ursprünglich aisdem IJ. Jahrhunaert und wurde im 17^Jh. 

als 3i-chofssitz umgestaltet. Heute ist es ein Hotel. 

Wir sehen es schon von mtem,als wir die 7 km. zu ihm zurücklegen , hoch über 
die Landcchaft der Lot hervorra .en mit ainen Türmen und Mauern. 
.Vir halten vor dem Tor ; der einstige Gr.ben ist nun mit einer Steimbrucke 
zu überschreiten. Grost^er ef eubewach.-ner Schlosshof. Marianne und ich bekommen 
eine -uite bestehend aus Turmzimmer , einem Rie.enraum ,in aem ein Riesenbett 
steht und einem Ankleidezimm r mit Bad. Jonn einen normaleren Raum mit einem 
echten Empirebett. Über eine Terrasse gelangt man in den grossen Garten mit 
einem pool,in aem sich das Schloss mit einen Türmen spiegelt ; weit r unten 
gKiÄHxtschliesbt sich in völlig verwilderter Garten eine vorsprin,,enae 
Bastion. uDerall schöner Blick hinab in oia.- Tel der Lot und die weite Land- 
schaf t .J(^aenfalls vielachoncrr und amüsanter als in einem Hetel der kleinen 

Stadt. Das Dinner ganz ausgezeichnet .Tadelloses foix gras und eine "loularde 
en deuil'» ,aeren Truff elbelag unter der Haut d s ganze .fleisch durchzogen 
hat. Unterkuntt für uns drei&Fr .3-Ö..G= ca.S 7 an . (fes Dimner a 2.500-ca.5 S. 

Abends das erste Gewitter auf unser Fahrt mit Gewitterregen. 

">onn erstag 23 . Juli; Der Regen hört aaf. Temperatur abgekühlt. 
7 km. zurück zur Stadt CAHGRS,um die Font Valentrj ein berühmtes Beispiel 
einer mittelalterlichen Verteidigungsanlage zum Schutz der Brücke aber die 



Lot mit drei Türmen aus 



dem l^.ürhrhunaert. Daneben Rste der alten r-tadt- 



auer 



und die alte Stc.dtwache aus em 15 . J'-hrhundert . 



( 



11 



(j 



( 



Zu der kleinen Stadt MOISSAC ist es nicht weit, ein unbedeutender Ort von 
etwa lO.COO Ein^A;ohner »dessen Bedeutung die Kirche und der Kreuzgang von 
von St. Pierre ausmacht;beide gehörten zu einer im ?• Jahrhundert gegrUnde- 
ten,1790) aufgelösten, Bennediktiner Abtei. (Tarn-et-üaronne) 

Es ist sehr lange her,dass ich im Albfeu.-^smuseum des alten, inzwi sehen abge- 
rissenen »Trocadero von Paris vor dem Abguss des pprtal s stand. Seitdem be- 
stand bei mir der dringende Wunsch das Original zu sehen. 

Heute ist es endlich soweit und ich muss sagen, es übertrifft noch meine 
hoc)5estimmten Erwartungen. Es ist sicherlich mit 5.einem rit^ur^^nschmuck das 
schönste in Sudfrankreich. 

D:S Portal steckt heute als Süd eingang in der befestigten Vorhalle des 
Glockenturms , der um einen älteren im 12. Jahrhunaert erbaut wurde. 
Ob dies Hauptportal ursprunglich als vVestportal diente und erst nach dem 
Brana von II88 anleine jetzige Stelle versetzt wurde, ist zweifelhaft .Der 
Skulpturenschmuck stammt jeaenfalls einheitlichxaus der Zeit um 1120 . 
Das Giebelfeld zeigt die Majestas Domini 'rdt den vier Tieren der Evangelisten 
stRBx belegte Engel in kunstvollster , weicher Modellierung und die , ältesten 
der Apokalypse , wie ich las, nach Apok.l9.^ unter Einwirkung der Visionen des 
Ezekiel und Isaias. Darunter Rosetten, die nach galü orötnischen Vorbilder kopieri| 
sein sollen, auf dem Türsturz, der von einem Mittelpfeiler t_ietragen wird. 
-ieser Mittelpfeiler zeigt auf der Vorderseite drei verschränkte Löwenleiber, 
seitlich' Je einen Apostel und Propheten, uf ..en beiden Seitenpfeilern links 
St. Peter mit aen ochlüsseln , rechts aer Prophet Isaias ,die dieselbe Bewegung 
wie die ngel im Tympanon zeigen. Die Löwen des Mittelpfeilers erinnern an 
Elfenbeinarbeiten des IC . Jahrunderts ,aie na; h byzantinischen Vorbildern für 
den Kalifen en^eferti, t ..ein sollen. 

Auf den Seitenwänue n: Rechts die -ollust und der Geiz;der Tod des Geizigen, 
die HölJe,der reiche Prasser, der Tod des Lazarus, das Paraaies. Links die 
Verkündigung und die Heimsuchung; die Anbetung der Heiligen drei Konige, die 

Fluciht nach Ägypten. 

Die Kirch e wäre die frühste der KuppelKirchen(einschii f ig) ,wenn die Weihe 

durch len Abt Durandus I063 die Vollendung voraustietzte.^^/^hrscheinlicher 

Bezieht äLch (iis spätere Vveihedatum ll8c alf .en heute erhaltenen Bau,desse3cn 

Kuppeln im l4. Jh. durch gotische Gewölbe ersetzt wurden. 

Der Kreuzhang zei^t aoa /-.ittelpf eiler des Vestflügels die weiheinschrift des 

>,btes Ansquitilius aus dem Jahre llCO. Aus iies^:r Zeit stammen die Bilder 

des geannnten .^btes und ob s .-btes Curandus »sowie Apostelreliefs. 

Die Sogen ruhen abwechseln auf einzelnen und Doppelsiulen und haben Kapit al 

von un;nirri.ich reicher Gestaltung.üm nur einige Beispiele zu nennen: 

Opfer Hbrahc^ms ,der miracuJ.öse Ei chzug, Daniel in der Lö^engrube »Apostel 

Johannes wird durch Jen Angelder Apokalypse geweckt, das -^eib von Samaria 

(La Samaritaine) ,Samson schlägt den Löwen, Löwin tiräbt ein Kalb, David und 

Goliat, Löwen und Tauben, die Hochzeit von Canaan Daneben fincien sich 

stilisierte Blumen und doppelköpf ige Tiere »die von orientalischen Teppichen 

Geweben kopiert asin .nassen , neben Arbeiten rein georaetrsichen Charakters. 

In einen kleinen Büchlein, das ich kauf te »werden 88 verschiedene Darstellungen 

aufgezahlt. 

411es befindet sich in einem ausgezeichneten Erhaltungszustand! 

Wir sind allein im Kreuzgang ,der im ::chatten einer grossenalten Cypresse 

seine undlich friedlich beruhigenae ^irkung ausüben kann. 



( 



12 



I 



i 



Vor der Kirche ist ein Platz mit Cafe, wo es aber nichts zu essen gibt. John 
holt frisches Weissbrot »däzu eine taste vom Flei eher, was mit aera Expresso 
ein ausgezeichnetem Lunch ergibt. 

Durch das breite Tarntal aufwärts .Von Montauban bleiben in Erinnerung die 
Ziegelbauten uno die Terrasr enf ront an der Brücke über die Tarn. Dichtbei der 
Pont Vieux das ehemalige bi.-chöfliche Palais von 16^)9, das als Museum aient 
und unter anderem das Vermäcnnnis des hier gebornen Malers Ingres (17Öl>lö67) 
enthält. Es sind neben einif^^en Olgemalaen im wesentlichen Z. ichnungen. (^OCO) 
Nach Zurücklegung von insgesammt 150 km. erreichen wir unsere,, heuti e Endziel: 
TOULGlJSEjden kulturellen Mittelpunkt Südfrankreichs , das seit 125C Universi- 
!?!«lÄlt und fünftgrbsste Stadt FranKreichs ist.iLS liegt an der Garonne,über 
die die tont Neuf führt zur Rue de Metz, an der un.-er Gr^nd tiotel et Tivolliers 
liegt. Trotz seiner 3 .terne im Fahrer recat alt'nodii.ches Haus. 

W'ir nehmen sofort ein Taxi, um wenigstens einen flQGhti.^^en Eindruck der äusserst 
lebhaften Staat zu gewinnen. 

Am Ende der R\xe de Metz liegt die Basilika St .Sernin . Imponierender Bau, den wir 
zunächct umwandern. ÄrMitKKXÄaHXMxtx!^ÄÄrxlBRgHÄÄKE4±6i^6xgKJiEiktii:MitxfkHfxraÄxaten 
||RWEikt:4imxi2xikxxHtiRHXÄtBe:.onders cchön die dirch neun I<apellen reich geglie- 
derte Chorpartie und^dgr über die Vierung in sechs Geschossen sich verjün- 
gender nochstreSender^5urm. Chorpartie wur e 1075 begonnen , aber er t im 12. Jh 
"vollendet. Am südlichen Seitenschiff Porte Mi^geville mit Plastik aus dem 
12. Jahrhundert. Im Tympanon grosFartig^ , besonders ätrenge Majestas mit bart- 
losem Christus. Massig der vVestbau mit Vorhalle. 

Seit Zerstörung von Ciuny bt.Sernin ist jetzt die grösste romanische Kirche 
Frankreichs. Dus Innere der kreuzförmig angelegten Kirchehat eine länge von 
115 m.bei 21 m. Höhe .Tonnengewölbe aber L nghaus. 
Im Chor Hochaltar üoer Grab des Hl. Saturnin. Im Chorumgang Marmorflachreliefs 

aus dem XI. JahrhunaertCChristus »einzelne Engel und Apostel) ,aenen eben im 

,. . gesennenen ,. 
Kreuzgang von MoiHsac verw.^ndt. 

Die Krypta berühmt wegen ihrerbedeutenien Reliquien z.T. in alten Schreinen, 
wie z.B. die Reliquie vom heiligen Kreuz in wundervollem LiTiAges .t^maille 
Kasten des XIII. Jh. Einige schöne Holzplatiken des XIV. Jh. 

Weiterer '^eg nach Norden führt über littelpunkt der Stcdt: Place du Capitole 
mit dem 1755 erb.uten CapitoK,: enannt nach den Capitols, en Bürgermeistern 
der Sti.dt).Dae Rathaus eleganter Barockbau. estlich cfevon aer Zriegelbau der 
zweiscndifiigen b^lise des Jacobins um 125^ begonnen ,l:?ö:? eingeweiht .Gewölbe 
ruhen auf hohen Rundpreilyrn,aie die Kirche teilen , erstes Beispiel aer zwei 
schiffigen Kirchen, aie die nouxnikaner oevorzugen. Seitlich ein schöner Turm. 

Die Kirche in Verfall, zur Zeit in HieaehrPsteliung. Im eheamligen Kapitel- 
saal aes Kloöters und cer Kapelle St.--^ntonin Fresken des XIV. Jh. sehr beschä- 
digt. Reste eines Ereuzganges. 

/nieder ganz nach Süaen zur Kathedrale .it.Etienne auf weiaCträumigen Platz. 
Das dreischifii"e Innere in kuhn-r nordfranzosis- her Gotik war Ende de.-^ XVII 
J&nrhuncierts mit 19 m.Spannw ite cier breitette überwölbte Raum Europas. 
Fenster des XIV-XVI .Jh. Schöne Bildtetpiche (XVI-XVIII) aber gutem Stuhlwerk 
des Chors (1611) und im langkkus. 

Zum Besuch aer^ Musee des Augustins , -as viele bedeutenae Skulpturen aus 
Toulouser Kirchen enthält ,leiaer zu spät. Es liegt dicht bei unserem Hotel, 
in das wir zurückkehren. Oinner im Speisesaal , der ebenso reizlos, als das Essen 



15 



c 






Freitag 24, Juli: Heute haben wir 309 km ,zuracteulegen,um nach St. Jean de uz 
zu kominen,wo wir einen Huhejjunkt einlegen wollen. 

Ab Toulouse 9 U/it. Leichter sea mist.Gute Wege durch schön bewaldete Land- 
scnaft. Durchfahrt durch t_a. u»wo wir uns erst auf dem Rückv/eg aufhääiten wol- 
lifen,zei t noch viele schone Privtabesitzungen-Bayonne zeigt sich d»m Auge 
als bedeutender Hanaelshafen , begünstigt durch seine Lage an dfer Einmündung 
der Nive ±n den breiten Adour, unweit des Atlantischen Cceans« Vorher Lunch 
ixxSxÄKKitxin kleinem Bistro am Wege , das seine <^ualität durch die vielen hier 
haltenden Lastwagen anzeigt. 

Halt in Biarrit z im cour d'honneur vom Hotel au Palais tehemals Sitz von 
Napoleon III und Eu^enie , deren Initale kokett noch immer die 'äse he zeigte, 
als ich im Juni 1913 «lit Olly hier wonnte.Das erste Mal ^var ich im iMärz 19C6 
mit m inen .vltern hier . unge.iein fashionable Gesellschaft um Eduard 1-rince 
of *Vales( spater E^^uard VII) und .-ir Ernpt Cassel. Die Lage und Einrichtunng 
des iCfSsa-ls und der G; sei. schaf tsraume ist noch immer äusserst elep:ant;wie 
schön, wenn man die tuien in den Esssaal hinaosteigt und sich der Blick auf 
die schäirnnden Flippen durch die i^'ensterrunde öffnet 1 

Neu ist drau sen der Swimtriingpool. Neu ,daso aid^ re Hotels der einst abgelgnen 
Jage auf den leib geruckt sind. Trotz einiger Solls Koys niit Chaiüfieur .nacht 
das Hotel ausgestorbnen Eindruck. 

Kein ,> undei' ,wann wir im Orte sehen , wie sich der ^.^anze Ch rkkter verändert hat. 
Coach Touren beherrschen d. s Eeld. 

In Windungen ber-^an und bergab auf dem Steilufer der Cote de Basques mit 
Ausblicken auf Meer und Pyrenäen. ;)urch die kleinen Seebäder Bidart und 
Gue*thary erreichen wir unser heutiges ^iel:ST^JBAll_BEiM_LUZ. 
Dieser Badeort hat sich .eitdem ich cfes letzte~~äI'"Eier'"seRf "vorteilhaft ent- 
wickelt .Viele mo ierne Hotels;wir haben das Gluck, dass unser Hotel ilodern , 
das wir nur wählten, weil wir keinen aiueren jrlatz bekamen, zu dan besten gehört. 
Offenbar ganz auf gefrischt , wird es seit l^^b mit 4 Sternen ausgezeichnet. 
Wir bekoto-aen ganz ^noderne Zim.ner mit i3ad;aass mein Zimmer 2? nach t^er Strasse 
Tixckwärts .^eht, stört ,^ar nicnt.Vor aem Hotel klt-iner Platz im Freien ait 
Blick auf Strand und .-ieerjden rnan auch von cen Gesellschaftsräumen und vom 
Speisesaal hat. ...usgezeichnetes Essen gut serviert. 

Samstag 2$. Juli; Zauberwetter hält an. Mari^^nne und und John gehen baden. 

Ich genie:.se umherwanderna die wunderbare L^ge an der Biscaya Bucn t. 
Rundgang durch C'rt zei-vt auffallend viel Lebensmitl elgeschaf te ,viele Bade- 
gäste. Es gibt sof.-ar' historische *ÄxJtR Plätze im Ort; Df^r kleine Hafen mit 
kleinem Schlösschen , wo Louis XIV abstiefe, um seine spanische Braut , Infantin 
Marie Theresa,die wir xn vielen Entwicklun^/^sstadien von den Velasquez Por- 

tialts im Kunsthistorischen Museum in vien herkennen, zu empfangen. Oie Infantin 

stieg in einem kleinen Haus ab, dass noch heute ^ 'Haus der Infant in'^ heisst. 

In einem Memoirenbuch lass ich vor kurzem, dass Louis es sdcth nicht nehmen 

liess , sich seine Braut incognxto vor der Hochzeit anzusehen. Die Trauung fand 

in der tyrdschen baBkischen Schifferkirche mit Gallerien statt mg.Juni l66ü 
Die wundervolle vergoldete Alt«Rwand , die man gern mit diesem "reip-nis zu- 

samrr.en bringen möchte , stammt erst aip dem iS.Jahrhunaert , während die Kirc rie 

xg±fe tSt.Jean Baptist e selbst aif dea XIII. Jh. zurückgeht . 

Reizend ist,v.xe am ir^trand für das Vergnügen der Kinae gesorgt ist! Die El- 
tern können ungestört sich sonnen. Auf faliedd - f.r mich - die vielen^Bikini" 
xxMi5t5^$til deren völlige Entblössung sich * eit^entlich* viele Oamen nicht leistea 

können. 



' ) 



l^t 






( 



Nachmittag vergnügen sich Marianne und John auf einem Tretboot. Ich geniesse 
den Chaam des Ortes. Nachher treffen wir uns zur Jause auf dem Platz vor 
dem Hotel. iAusgezeichnetes dinner. 

Tonntag 26. Juli ; /virhäben beschlossen bei diesem Zauberwetter auch noch den 
Vormittag in St.Je^n de Luz zu geniessen,erst nachdem Lunch aufzubrechen. 
Abfahrt 1:30« Fahrt ander Baskenküst e entlang schön und abwechslungsreich. 

'übertritt nach S__F A__N__I__^E__N an der G renze Irun-Kenday e ohne 

Schwierigkeit ^nacH9em"3ürcH"" ][5wef füng der Peseta ( 6c Pes = 1 1i)x3t&xtxxi3^fty 

jede Beschrankung fortgefallen ist. 

Hinter San Sebastian , dem gröbsten spanischen Badeort, der sich seitdem ich 

hier war, weiter ausgedehnt hat,verlässt die Strasse das Meer. Das Städtchen 

G uernica ,im Burgerkreig zerstört , wieder aufgebaut und durch Picassos Bild 

(Mas.of Modern Art , New York, berühmt fworden , bleibt nördlich liegen. 

Bei Bilbao erreicht (Tian wie j er das VVrSser .Es hat sich durch seine Erzlager 



zu einem bedeutenden Industriestadt und, durch en breiten für Seeschiffe 
fahrbaren Nervion , Hafen entwickelt , wie der Augenschiän , sogar mit Wolkenkrat- 
zer beweist. 

Gegen 7 Uhr nach Zuracklegung von 28ü km. ist unser Heutiges Ziel SANTANDEK 
erreicht. Die Fahrt war herrlich trotz vieler Kurven;gute otrasten7scEone 
Wälder. 

Santander urde 19^1 nach einem ivirbelsturm durch Feuer fast völlig vernich 
tet .Seitdem ,' natürlich' mit ..Volkenkratzer moaern wieder aufgebaut .Under 
Hotel Real ,ein Kiesenbau , liegt am Rande aer Stadt, hoch über aem Meer 
mit weitem r-,lick über '*E1 Sardinero" ,aen Badestran, ^^ir müssen uns zu ihm 
durcnf ragen. 

Sin netter Schweizer von der Oirection v»eist uns gute z.immer mit Bad und 
schönem Blick anfs Meer weit unter uns. Oas Hotel ist gut besucht, wie man 
beim Dinner sieht , meist von Franzosen und Spaniern. 
Es beg:innt zu regnen, 

Montag 27*Juli; Zu der Höhle von Altamira ^dem eigentlichen Grund unseres 
Hierseins , wobei unser Absteigen inx Santander nur ein Notbehelf. Eigentlich 
wollten wir in dem der Höhle nahe gelegnen Städtchen Santillana del f-^ar 
im Parador Gil Blas (ehemals Palais ßarreda)benannt nach aem Helden des 
Sc.:elmBaro.mans von 1707 »wohnen. Es ist wp<^en Umbaus leider zur Zeit ge- 
schlossen. So müt'sen wir dorthin 20 km. von Santander zurückle^^en. ^in mo- 
derner 'Veg fahrt zu ihr, die l866 durch Zufall durch einen Jäger entdeckt 
wurde. Die prähistorische Malerei in ihr wurde eret 1Ö79 durch die Tochter 
vom Madrid-^-r Professor Sautuola,dip ihren Vater zu Grabungen in der Höhle 
begleitet hatte ,KÄtatHKkic und um sich schauend plötzlich die Bilaer von 
Bisons an dem Felsen wahrnahm, «eitere Ufli|schau in der Höhle ergab Bilder von 
Hirschen, primitiven Pferdchen , alles Tiere, alles Tiere, die einst in der 
Gegend von Altamira gelebt natten,wme petrifierte Knochen bei Grabungen 
in der Hohle bewiesen. 

Die Echtheit der Bilder wurde lange bezweifelt , endgültiger Beweis der 
Echtheit wurde erst 192^ durch Prof i\ivi*re in F: ris bei der Acaaeraie 
der Wissenschaften geführt .Gleichzeitig Zu eisung an die Palaolitische 
Periode, die frühe Steinzeit. 



V '^ 



Präriistori: che Z-iten messt in 3 Perioden eingeteilt: 

Pilaeolitische : >infang unbekannt endet um Ö.OOO Jai.re vor uns.Zeitrechng. 
Neolitische(FoJ.ierte Steine) : endet um 3i^'^0 vor uns. Zeitrechnung 
Zeitalter . ei' .etalle: a)Bronze i eriode bis etwa 8gO v.Ch. 

b) Eisen P-riode bis etwa 200 v.Ch. 



15 






( 



Wie ich aus dem kleinen Bachlein von Dr. J.Carballo sehe,dcis ich an Ort und 
Stelle kaufte jSch^Ac nken die Schätzungen über Entstehung der Maleria von 
Altamira zwischen 25.000 und 12.0C;0 flahgen vor unserer Zeitrechung. 
Ich lernte ferner, dass die fiir die Bilder irebrauchten Farben Ei^^en Oxygen 
(Ocker) , Pflanzen Kohle v rinischt nit Tier fett und Blut sind, woraus dann 
rot, gelbe und braune Effekte entstehen; schliesslich wird die notwendige 
Beleuchtung der dunklen Hohle durch Verwendung von Tierfett erklärt. 
Naci^tm wir vorher die brixliant erhaltenen farbi' en Bilder in den Höhlen 
von lascaux (s^Seite 8)kennen gelernt haben , enttäuscht die Malerei, die wir 
hier sehen. Die Farben sind viel verblichner ,die Bilaer schwerer wahrnehmbar. 
Grund dafür w^hrr :Cheinlich,aas6 Altamira viel früher entdeckt ,lc.nge ungün- 
stigen JLinflüssen ausgesetzt war, bevor notwendige ocriutzmassregeln getrof- 
fenwurden. Trotzdem freue icn mich, hier ge>;esen zu sein. D^-r räumliche Ein- 
druck vor allem bleibt. 

Und dann vor allem: Es gibt Gelegenheit das nur 2 km. entfernte alte Städtchen 
Santillana de Mar kennen zu lernen, das ä.lein eine Reise lohnt. 
Um die raoster und die Kirche der Heiligen Juliana iXfixatxiixkKHXsKtjt — 
das Kloster stammt as em 6. Jahrhundert mit schönem Kreuzgang, die Kollegiat 
Kirche au^s cfem 12. Jahrhundert — hat sich ein Städtchen von einigen tausend 
Einwohnern geb ilJet mit vielen wappengeschmückten alten Adelshäueern ,die 
dem ( rt einen ganz einzigartigen Charakter verleihen und ein Bild des 
bescheidenen spani-chne Adelsleben des XVIII Jahrhunderts geben. 
Wir fahren durch ;ie mit Kopfpflaster gedeckten Strassen zum Platz vor der 
Kollegiatkirche ,zu der eiöe Plattform mit zwei Löwenwächtern leitet. 
Die Kirche ist aussen innen vielen Veranierungen unterworfen worden ; der 
wesentliche Eindruck bleibt romanisch, "^ie prächtigen Reredos sind l$.Jh., 
der ^Itravorsatz - us getrieben Silber ist eine interessante mexicanische 
ArbeiJ, uieDon Louis Sanchez de Tagle,der erste 'arquis von Altamira l686 

l'^r Kirche stiftete. Das Haus der Familie mit Dopi cleinjängen ,mit Batons 
im ersten Stock, dazischen das i<amilienwappen und eine Gdlerie im wrxtÄn 
im z\weiten Stock sahen wir beider Einfahrt. 

Unvergesslich der Kreuzga ng mit einem achier« unvorstellbaren Reichtum an 
Erfindung und Abwechslung in den Kapitalen seiner Doppelsäulen. Hier haben 
die mittela:. terlichen Steinmetzen tvebmuster , symbolische ocenen, ie Eresig - 

nisse ccus dem neuen und Alten Testament mit ausserordentlichem Gesfafcck dar- 
gestellt, wie wir bisher nur ähnliches in Moissac's Kreuzgang( s.S . 11) Sr^hen. 
"es gelingt uns in einigen der alten Paläste Einlass zu linden. Dd^ der 

Kirche näihst-^^elegne war ursprünglich ciis Haus aes Abtes ; es gehört heute 
der Erzherzogin ,':argarita von Osterreich , die xzk^k den alten ßc^u durch viele 
moderne Einrichtungen mehr bewohnar -eraccht hat .Seltsamer Eindruck sich im 
vi/Qhnzimtoer von gespentigen Eamiliembilder umgeben zu finden, darunter der 
'»junge" Franz Joseph mit seiner schönen Elisabeth. Ganz grossen Stil finden 
wir im epfhbumwachsenen Piilast -er Velarde Eamilie , dessen grossen Räume Ur^t.«*! 
Rahmen für eine Hochzeit mit einem Putschen ristokraten bildete. Er liegt 
hinter der Kirche an der Plaza de las Arenas ,HH5i von deff manaich einen 
schönen Blick auf die eine Apsj-S der Koliegiat Kirche - rein romanisch- 
hat. 
Wir lunchen in der " Bodega de J^ue^n Infante '» ,die einen strohgedeckten Hof 
hc;t.Die ■:ame,aie die honneurs macht, sieht aus als ob sie zu den Palastbe- 
sitzern gehört ,jedenfal] s repräsentiert im Ausseren und M nieren besten 
spa nisc h«-c? r is t okr at i s c he n Typ . 
- Es ist schwer wirklich gutes Petrol zu finden, wie überhaupt die Tankstellen 
äusserst selten sind. F.s glückt schliesslich; scheint irgend ein "raci-et" 
damit zu aein. Nachmittag regnet es Auf /.immer geothrieben. 



16 



( 



(^ 



Dienstap: 28. Juli: 9 Uhr ab Santander. Um Burgos zu erreichen haben wir l8ü km 
zuräc^ulegen. Die Fahrt nach Süden geht erst durch leicht gewdlte Lanaschaft.| 
Dann duixh *s Kantabri^che Gebirg e ,d.;.s yein vienig dramatisch gestaltet/ an den 
Gran Canon von Arizona , allerdings ohne^eine Farben ,erinnert« Gleich nach 
P£.6sierung des Ebro Staase e dringt die onne aurch und von nÜn an ist über 
uns wieder blauer Himuiel. 

Nach ; em Poso de Fresno (1028 m)geht es abwärts , immer auf guten Strassen hinab] 
in das Talbecken des ..rlanzon und ilald sieht man in rer Ferne die Türme der 
Kcthedrale von BURGOS* 

Unser Hotel ContlesfaBle hat seinen Eingang von der Galle de Vittoria ,aber 
seine Hauri'front nach äsm Fluss Arlanzon zu, nicht weit , wo die Fönte S^üaria 
auf cfeio andere Ufer für.rt. 

Es hersciit Wat ermängel,so ^nacht es nicht viel aus,dass nur Marianne ein 
Doijplezira.'aer mit Bad hat ; schlimmer ,dass akch der lektrische ot rom und cfemit der 
Aufz.^g zeit'K)ilig unterbrochen ist. 

Nach gutem Lunch fanren wir gleich mit einem Taxi zur Kathedrale ,die ich im 
Mai 1913 mit Olly sah. Sie hinterlässt diesmal einen grösseren Eindruck. Man 
muss nicht vergessen, dass 30C Jähre §n^inr gebaut mrde und man muss den Fi- 
gurenschmuck als "Juwelierwerk" ( '»plateresk'^,nicht als Zucfcerwprk einschät- 
zen wozu man bei nianchem Figuren und Verzierungen leicht verfahrt wird. 
Der Weg führt vorbei am Denkmal des Söldner fuhr ers r:odrigo Diaz de Vivar(102b-| 
1099) , der clen ;::paniern durch seine Siege über die Araber als "Cid "(araD.=Herr) 
zum Nationalhelden geworden , hier geboren und seit 1921 mit seiner Gattin Jime-I 
na unter der Kuppel der Kathedrale beigesetzt ist. 

Die Kathedral e lehnt sich ai aie grossen französischen Kathdralen aes XIII Jh. 
stärkeran,als ich m r.inner-^ung natte.Kier endlich mal prachtvolle .H:leichartig| 
vollendete ,ÄMZÄkariaÄkmÄ Tarme mit durcnbrochnen Helmen, erst ä4^2-^8 von Hans 
von Köln ausRefünrt;wie in F;pankreich ,aber dem Mittelportal prächtige Fenster 
rose undxHÄÄ eine Königsgallerie. Schöner marmoratiger Kalkstein. 
Das Innere als Gesammteindruck licht und hocjj .-.n das 25 m.hcfeite dreischif- 
fige Langhaus, schliesst sich d:;S 59 1. v<)uerschiff ȟberragt von Vigranis 1559- 
1567 e. richtet» "2£l£il2il" decsen Kuppel mit ihren Rippen einen ;tern,daB sog 
"Cimborio" bildet. Es ruhtauf vier ge»valtigen i-f eilern und ist^ nach meinem 
Geschmack /mit Wappen und Figuren überreich geschmückt ; es gilt als ein Meister 
wrk der "plate; e' ken'* Kunst ,4ciifi ich oben erwähnte. 

Der Coro um 15uO erbaut. In ihm das eemiliierte Denkmal des Gründers der Kathedrl 
drale des Biscofs Mauritius (+ 12^0) ;die prachtvolle Reja (ßronzegitter) ist 

von l6c2. 

In der Capilla Major ein reich vergoldeter Hochaltar von 1577 in Renaissance-I 

Stil. 

Dahinter führt vom Umgang ein durch ein prachtvolles ßronzegitter (Reja) abp:e- 

schlossenes Tor in die Capilla del Condestable , für mich einer der Hauptreize 

Simon, der .' ohn des oben genannten Hans, von Kön hat sie seit 1^62 errichtet. 

uftraggeber Pedro Hernandez Velasco »Greifen von H^^ro und eine Gattin Dona 
Mencia de Mendoz^ ,Conaeza ae haro.Der Condestable , der auch Vizekönig von Kati- 
lien war, starb 1^92, sine Gattin 15C0. ^in eite grosszagige Schöpfung im 
reichsten plateresken Stil .Hierist aber noch rtaakes Vorwiegen reiner Gotik, 
j^rachtvolle Einfassungen , wie Spitzenarbeit , aas bewöibe durchbrochen. In den 
ienstern alte üiismalerei; darunter Inder Mitte ein Retablo mit lebensgrosseh 
Figuren ,in uen I\-»-schen rechts und links die Wappen von überaus dekorativer 
'/.irkung. Hechfesiidcivon ^eht der überaus reizvolle Altar der Hl. Anna, für mich 
der behönste der ^':anzen K. theurale / und dan- Den ein feines anmutiges Trypicho 
des Gerard David: Verkündigung, GeburtCnristi , und Kuhe aif der Flucht.- 



17 



i 



Nach cfem To^e des Contestable xiat die überaus reiche Witwe, die dem Francisca- 
ner Orden nahe öband — daher an dem Stbdtpalais das 'nit aem Franciscanergdr- 
tel seltsam verzierte Hc-^uptportal- die Kapjieile voliendt. Nun ruhen beide, 
iem R^bl«^o ;ait gefalt: ten Händen zugewandt ; fleissi^'e , aber nicnt ergreifen- 
Marmordenkmäler • 

Zu erwähnen wäre noch: Dir hoch oben aider Mauer befstigte Koffer des Ci d, 
den er, mit band gefallt, len Juden Rachel und Vidas als Sicherheit für ein 
Darlenen,das er für einen Feldzug orauchte , hinterlegte. Nach Eroberung von 
Vajencia löste er sein pi.and aus. Ich mochte gern wiöeen,wa6 die Spanier hierl 
am meisten bewundei'n. 

In uer Capilla gel Santisr.im o Chr isto ein ebeneo verenrter ,als acheusslicher 
aus^r- topf ter Christus aus Baf feihaut mit angenahten '^ enschenhr«.aren,'*El I 
Christo de ßurgos". Da ist mir ochon aie Capeila di Santa Tecla ,die 173^ 
Chuirit^uera im RokoKOstil erbaute , trotz ff;ewisüer UÜertreiDungen lieber. 
.Vir haben die ürbeitan und masslosen Übertreibungen seiner Schüler m Mexico 
gestehen und wissen , woher der schlechte Kuf kommt, aen er eine Zeit lang ge- 
nossen hat. 

Restlos festlich und achbn ist die Escalera Dorada ,die zur lorta de la Coro- 
neria hinauffuhrt und heute nur noch für gro.be ceremonielle Angelegenhei- 
ten Denutzt wird, s ist eine 1^19 erbaute Doppeltrepce von ^9 Stufen mit 
reich vergolaeten '.-elänaer und vcippen des Bischofs Fondeca,des Stifters. 
Diego sKÄÄf de Siloe schuf sie. Sie würde besser in einen prilast pausen. 

x^ ur aen Claustro ist es zu spat ^^eworaen. Oafür gelingt es unserem ^anz gut 
englisch sprechenen H"ührer,ühne den wir in keine^KÄpelle hineinr-ekommen wäre 
uns einen Blick in c^n Tresoro werfen zu las.senjder viel grosse Silberstucke 
schöne Kirchengewänder , aber nichst wirklich aussergewohn] iches enthält. 
!ch freue mich,dass Marianne so hier ihre Kenntni.se von spanischer Kunst 
erweitern , John eine erste Vorstel.:ung gewinnen konnte. 

Entlang des Flussufers geh^t eine hüb.tche Promenade , der paseo del Fspolo n, 
mit hübschen Anlagen und vielen 5^afes. Hier scnauen wir den Promenier andeniu^ 
beobachten fas leben in den Cafes -n:i begnügen uns zum Abendbrot init einio:en 
Sandwiches. 



•o 



Bevor wir un^er .otel zurückkehren noch einen r.j ick aaf die Ilaza Majo r 
mit dem Rathaus (Casa Consistoriai ) un.t dem von /rkaden eingefa^sten Fünf- 
Eck mit viiien Läaen.In ar y'itte das Standbild Karl III. 

Mittwoch 29*J uli: Der " Servicio ae Autobus d e Burgo s ,Itinr ario Turistico^^* 

gibt uns die iioglichkeit das Wesentlichste , .as grosse ntfernungen ein- 

schliesst , kennen zu lernen. Heriliches Wetter! 

Abgang um 9 Ühr unweit unseres Hotels. Bequem llatz im Autobus, -ler , um zuerst 

den dbolz aer St dt, die liodernen c] ortplatze, zu zei; en^weit herausf anrt ,danr 
aüer in die Stadt zurückkehrt und auf der Flaza de Calvo Sotello vor der 
Cafea del C^rdon hält. Ich erwähnte d s .tadthaus des Constable schon oben 
mit seinem rranciecanerst . ick als Portalu.!irahmung,das Ende des XV. Jahrhund, 
erbaut wurde. Hier h ben die katholischen Könige 1^97 Columbus öei seiner 
Ruckkent empfangen , hier aber auchstarb ^hiipp der Schöne I506 und liess 
eine untröstliche Gemahlin , Johanna die .ahnsinnige , zurück , die von hier mit 

der i eiche im Glassarg unstät umher-vandern wird. 

Schöner scnattiger iVeg hinaus zu der 5 km. entfernten Cartuja de Miraflor e.s 
König Johann II hat sie c-n -teile eines .Schlosses begründet ;nach einem 

Brande wurde .je^ lk[-)k von Haas und Simon von Köln wieder aufgebaut. 

Grander des ^ arthäuserordens ist dsr Hl. Bruno (1032-J.lCl) ,der zuerst in der 

Chartreuse bei Grencble wirkte und das chwei egebot einführte. 



( 



18 



( 



In einer Kapelle sehen wir fein von Manuel lereira 1667 geschaffnes äusserst 
lebensnahes Holzbildnis. 

Auch die Vorschriften f^.r die Besucher sind sehr streng. Der antierende Mönch 
gestattet selbst Herren nicht ohne Rock einzutreten. John , der ein hemd -^'lit 
kurzen armeln an hat,vvird der Eintritt erst gestattet ,aJ-S ein liebenswürdiger 
Spanier ihm mit einem Rock ausgeholfen , seine "Blosse" bedeckt hat. 
.Jh t^x> gotischen Kirche ist einschiffig und in drei Teile geteilt: der west- 
liche für das Volk, der mittlere für aie Laienmönche ,aer östliche für die 

Geistlichen. 

An L er Nordwind der Kirche in einer Nichs^ das Grabmahl des Infanten Alfonso 



( 



von GilBt de Siloe;der Infant starb l6 jährig 1^70 und sein Tod machte den 
Thron von Köstilien für Jsabella frei. Derselbe r^ünstler schuf aen stark ver 
aoldeten Hauptalta r , ^er mit aem uberreichtum an Figuren etv.as verwirrende.- 
hat, wie, auf Bestellung von Jsabella ,1409 das r-iarmor grabmah l ihrer Eltern 
Koni^ Johann II und Jabelia von Portugal, das vor ihm aufgestellt ist. 
Auf einem achteckigen unterbau ^ait unzähli,-en Nischen, Balaachinen und Statuet 
ten runtn, durch eine Marmor brüstung getrennt, aer König mit halb geöffneten 
Augen, einen Kin/C Inder Hand, die Königin in einem .ebetbuch leeend. Genau, wie 
beim hauptaltar zei<2,en Einzelheiten herrliches: Die oben sitzenden Statuet- 
ten cfer betenden, die schvveDenden Engel ,abpr als Ganzes zu unruhig, wenn aucn, 
wie Bädecker schreibt "viellei ;ht dao reichste Kunstwerk dieser Art in Spa- 
nien." 
Schönes Henaissancegestahl von 155Ö,das mir stark von i^ichelangelos beein- 

fluset zu seinscheint. 

Das Real Konast. rio de la Huelgag ^^Melgas= Erholung) wurde ajs einem Lust- 
schloss ier kastilischen Könige in ein vornehries Zist-^ rienserinnenstif t 
ura|ewan§eli ,in dem die Äbtissin als"Senora de horce y cuchillo" besondere 
Hechte ein^^eräui/it ,die otiftsdamen nicht "Schw*- ter"(sor) sondern"Senora 
dona" genannt wurden. Es ist unser nächstes Ziel und liegt k km. südostlich 
von ßurgos. Man betritt zunächst eine Vorhalle , über die ein mächtiger Turm 
aufragt, udt Sacrophcgen von Santiago und Calatrava T^ittern. 

In der 12^9 erbauten j3:oti.schen Kirche d r Coro le los Capillanos mit einer 
den M uren 1212 in ler 3chlacht von Las Navas de Tolosa abr-enomen Fahne 
und >en knieenden Statuen von Alfons VIII, dem Gründer Klosters , und SE^iner 
Gemahlin Eleonore von England. In einem nderen Raum eine türki-che Fahne, 
die 1573 bei Lepanto erceutet vurde und eine Sammlung von hochinteres - 
santen ;.to ffresten de-s XII bis XIV Jahr hundert, die :nan in Gräbern gefunden 
hat. In der Papilla de -antiagö ,die unzugcm^lich wur, solange aas Kloster 
an sie bestand, KiHsdie Holzfigur eines Santiago .sitters, ein Schwert m der 
Hand, mit dem er mittelst eines .-lechanismus , aen Ritterschalg erteilt. I-h 
konnte leider nichts näheres darüber feststellen. Anatos.-end an die Kirche 
ein Stimmungsvoller romani eher Kreuz^^^ang . 

Zurück zur St<^dt.In uer Gaiäe de Calera no.b^ die Casa ae Miranda ,ein 15^5 
erbautec stattlicher Adelspalast Einfache Front mit reicher Tarumrahmung; 
an den Enien Rundt.irme mit vVas£:erspeiern oben, i rachtvoller Säulenpatio mit 
reizendem Fries; reiches Trepi enportal mit nmoret^en fuhrt zur Tonnentrewölbe 
ge.ecirtes Trep enhaus. Als ich mit Olga 1913 hier iv..r,war das Ganze im Ver- 
fall und zu verkaufen. 1955 hat jie i rovinz es ffeKauf t ,\viede hergestellt 
una das Museo Arquelogica Fr ovincial in die eehr t^eeignetf^n Räume verlegt 
Es entnalt herrlicne fruhiittelalterliche Geräte ,wie JtxixxiiaspcÄxeinen 
golaenen Altarvorsatz mit E f:ailleeinlagen des vll Jh. , arabische Elfenbein- 
kästchen d rselben ,eit;die Bildersammlung ist w-niger beaeutend. 



-- i 



19. 



I 



Wir verlassen den Ajtobus bei den Arco de Santa Maria . Er ist 153^ erbaut und 
besteht aus einem von zwei Türmen flankierten Tor mit vielen Fii^'uren ,die wie 
Körrikaturen wirken. Cid ist darunter und das ganze gekrönt mit der Statue 
Karl V. ,deii die Stadt nach dem Aufstand der Comrnuneros ,den 3egaBe des Ein- 
heitstattes , versöhnen wollten. 
Die ^jtrasse durcn dsn Bogen fuhrt geradezu zu einem Platz mit dem erzbischöf- 
lichen Palast und zu der kleinen F-laza de .anta Maria, wo mtn vor der gross- 
arti:2:en:^X3ixKMtKKxtBÄxtKiixi5^^&xiiÄxieKHxixÄMKKxtiixMMgKkaÄt«H3(Fas8aae j^K^^RKkiBÄr 
KJCÄktxder Katnedrale steht, der wir gestern unseren Antrittsbesuch machten unadi 
wir jetzt ^ern num zeiten Mal besuchen. 

Die groteske l-'igur aes "Fapa-Moscas" ,der über aer Uhr die Stunden schläe;t| 
zeigt an,aass bereits 12 ühr vorbei ist , was aber nicht hindert, dass unser 
Führer alxe Kapellen für uns offnen kann und wir manches sehen, was uns gestern 
entgangen ist , wie z.B. die Capilla de la Visitacion mit aem von Gil de Siloe 

1-^17 errichteten Grabdenkmal de^ Gründers , des biscofs aIohbo de Catagena,der 
14^6 ..estorben ist. Leider bleibt uns auch diesmal die ge^^-.enüberliegende_Tur 
zam Cl austro verscnlossen ,die aus dunkJ em Holz wie eine Bronzearbeit wirkt, 
und herrliche frugotischeir^ Schnitzwrrk zeigt. Aus meinem ersten iJesuch 1913 
erinnere ich mich, dass der Kreuzgang hervorrc.gende 'Grabdenkmäler enthält. 
Die Führung, wie überhaupt der ganze Ausflug gab uns viel; er endet 1:30; wir 
Wc-ren ky^ Stunden untervvegs. 

''/ir lunchenvan einem kleinem Restaurant unterhalb der Kathdrale mit Blick aif 
iSire malerischen Türme . 

Nachfem wir auf aem Paseo del Espolon wieder der flanierenden >ienge zugeschaut 
haben, wo sich anscheinend ein gut Teil des gesellschaftlichen Lebens der Stadt 
abspielt, und un eren Cafe getrunken heben , kehren wir zum Dinner in unser Hotel 
zurück. 

Donnerstag 30. Juli: Das ffihöne Wrtt-r hält an. dir besciiliessen lamplona nur 
auf dem Rückweg zu berühren und heutedirekt die 330 km. nach ZARAGOZZA zu fah- 
ren, eine Stadt berühmt für inre JBKxklii&tKH Verteidigungen und die Wallfahrts- 
kirche Virgenilft Fillar. /^eg führt durch Gebirge über I.ogrona ,Tudela in die 
E broebn e ,die dank weiter Jewa .-erung xn uppigr Fruchbarkeit prangt .Vunaerbar 
Blick über das aragonische Tiefland , über welchem die ganze kette der meist 
schneebeaeckten Hochpyrenäen aufsteigt. 

^Vechselreiche Geschichte .Rö.nische Gründung, ouwtia ,^Vestgoten wechsln ab, bis 
es in die ande der M-.uren fällt .Scheikh ouleiman ruft ^ arl aen Grossen gegen 
len iL'mir von Cordoba zur Hilfe. Karl kommt, mds aber Belagerung aufgeben und 
we^ven des uf Standes der achten nach Franken zurückkehren. 

lllö entreisst Alfons der I von Aragonien die Staat aen Mauren und macht es zu 
Residenz der Aragonsschen Könige, bis diese, nach Heirat mit Jsabella von Kasti- 
lien die Hauptstadt nach Ddxfltrifltxdem mehr central ^.elegnen Kästilien verlegen. 
Heute ist es eine Grosstadt von 300.000 Einwohnern , einer Universität und Fchon 
bei der einfahrt merkt man, dass eee ine lebhafte Stadt mit bcieten Strassen 
vielen Neubauten und Hochhäusern ist. 

Ein PDakat an <Vege hat uns auf ..as ganz moderne Gran HoteK jedes Zimmer mit 
Bad)aufmeiksam gemacht. ;ir finden es unschwer in derCalle de Costa S, dicht 
an einemder ^roesen Boulevard und bekommen aucti sofort die gewünschten Zimmer. 

anz mo-ern «iJtxJdXÄx ingerichtet . 
Sofort mit Taxi af den /»'eg,um die HauptsehenswurdiKkeiten zu besichtigen. Sie 
liegen dicht an &br o:Nostra Sen.del riljar,oder unweit vom Flus6,wie die ehr- 
würdige gotische Kathedrale San Salvador «kuiz La Seo ; en annt,d±e Wi.r zuerst be- 
suchen. Sie lügt an Ostende Er z.T. mit /.nla^-en geschmückten Klaza del } ilar 
und wurde an Stelle der maurischen Moschee erlebtet und hat einen schlanken 
lurm von l6ö6. Es dämmert bereits, als wir durch aas gro - se Nordwestportal von 
16<d3 die ?irche betreten. Grosser indruck in der Dam lerung die LChlank auf- 
steigenden Bünaelpf eiler mit uionnigfachen Kapitalen »Gewölbe mit vergoldten 



n 
U 

n 
O 



20 



I 



kleineren Azule joskup^e 
welcher die h. Jungfrau* 



( 



Rosetten;prachtvoller Reja am Chor ;marmorner Fusfcboden. In Sacristei schöne 

g stickte Gewänaer »Kopfrej iquiare und ^rocessxonsf i^uren. .. .leide keine Zeit 

mehr far Details. Denn »IjÄRHauptreiz im oberen otock,zudBrn wir auf Treppen 

hinauf steiferen, eine Art Museum gebildet aus aen Entwürfen Goyas und Bayeu's 

für Decken.i^emälde in der Caplla de Nuestra Senora ,die wir nachher sehen werden^ 

und einer schier einzigartigen Sammlun.^ von 32 Gobelins, die gut aufgehängt 

und De-euchtet sind, ie Mehrzahl l^.und 15 . Jchrnuniert . Ich notiere: 

l4.Jahrh;'Schiffe auf Expedition aes ßrutus nach Aquitanien" 

l^.JhVOie Passion" und die Kreuzigung. 

I5.J . .'»Glorification .arias" Seide mit Goldfäden. 

IJ.JhVGeschicnte des Jef ta"; "Erhebunt< der Ecter zur Königin von Fersien" 

Die Wfcllfahrtsk ircne Mues tra Senora_del_Filar liert zwischen der Plaza del 
Pilar und ctem"^;brouf er ; siesteigt 'lalerit.ch mit ihrer grossen Kuppel und den 

In aber dem Lbro auf. Sie enthalt die Siule(pi lar ; ,ai^f 
gern * nac R antiago ziehenaen .\postel Jc-.cobus erschien . 
Die j^^zige Kirche wurde an Stelle einer kleinen K&pelle befc,onnen(l6öl) von 
Herera,:.eit 1753 von Venura Jtodriguez fürt.;eführt und ist ein ausp:ezeichne- 
tes Beispiel des -tiles Louis XVI;sie bildet ein dirch zwei Säulenreihen in 
drei Schilfe geteiltes Rechteck mit einem die p.anze Kirche umgebenden Kapel- 
lenkranz. 

Der westliche 'ieil der Kirche enthält den Coro mit einem gotischen Petablo 
aus Alaba ter z.'r. farbig behandelt mit Keliefdarstellungen überragt von einem 

feinen Baldachin. 

Im östlicnen Teil die '' Capi lla del^uestra Senora del_rilar". 

Edxer Marmor , vergoldete drönze* von einer auf .Marmorsäulen runenaen , mehrfach 

durchbrochnen Kupi el überdeckt .Die Kuppel (iirüber von Antonio Velasquez — 

hat nichts mit Diego Hodriguez Velasquez(1599-lC)6c) —1795 ausgemalt , während 

die Kuppeln, die aie Kspelie umgeben, von Goya und Bayeu 17ol/o2 ait Fresken 

fereschmackt wurden 

An cfer Westwanj. dieser Kpelle 5 Niechen mit Altären;über em mittleren eine 
Marmor gruppe im pompösesten Barock, die Madonne auf volken von ngeln umgeben, 
links der r.Hl.Jacobus Jiit seinen ochalorn und rechts die K^^ von einem tra h- 
1 rikranz umgebn e aus dem XV Jah. stam mende Alabasterf igur der Jun^-^frau ai^ 
'^ der'^riit >Dilber beschlagnen_Saul£ (s.oben). Von der Jun-frau ist nicht viel 

zu sehen, ^in reicii gestickter Kantel Dedeckt sie fast bis oben. 
.6ine kostbare silberne Balustrade hält die Betenden im gebührenden Abstand. 
Loch werden, wie wir sehen , feSbtlich gekleidete Kinaer von .horkaaben zum Bilde 
selbst geleitet, um dort, ihre ndacht zu verrichten. Für die Frwac»-senen dKK ist 
auf cfer Ruckseite .er Altarwand eine ;■ teile freigelegt ,v;0 sie die Säule küssen 
können, wovon zaiilreich Gebrauch üecßc.cht wird. Diese Madonnü ist ebenso reih 
mit Schmuck versehen, wie ihre Kollegin die"Srnora >.e los Desamparados»» in der 
Capella ae Fiudriö zu Valencia. .Vie dort sind Beispiele inres chatzes ausgstell- 
(Valencia l':>5^ »'^gb.S . 6I) 

Ganz im iVe.ten ;er St at die Plaza del iortil.o mit dem Hronzestendbild des 
'»Madchen von Zara-oza" ,die neben ihrem Geliebten gegen die Franzosen lÖOÖ 
kämpfte una als er zu lo egetrofien zu -.OAen«nk,an -einer^s-att di- Kanone 
abfeuerte. Durch Lord Byrons Verse im "Child Harola 1,5^ ff .unsterblich gewor- 
den. DiCiit dahinter das " Castillo de la >>.ljaf eria^,d^ s heute wie eine /,aserne 
oussieht.was es auch zuletzt war. Ursprünglich Sitz des nirbauers Scneikh Abu 
:£Cr.afar .hrned , spater ocnioss der Aragonischen Könige aus Jgren Zeit noch 
einige schöne Raume eraälten sein sollen. Es ist nur .lit besondeier Erlaubnis 
zu besuchen und befindet sicn offenbar im zustand er , Wiederherstellung. 



21 



I 



Sin gefälliger Aufseher läset uns hinein, wo eben aus dem Umbau die alte 

pa]a c,t ,r pQschoe h erau^ geschält wird. 

Unser Taxi bringt uns zurück zur breiten Promenade des Faso de la Indepen - 

denci3 mit / rkaden ander V»est<*seite und einer Unzahl TC f f ehäuser ,wü wir 

uns erfrischen. Ich gehe zu Fuss zurück in unser nahes Hotel »während Mar. 

mit John noch Shopping; gehen. 

Gutes inner im Hotel. Kellner überbieten sich im Eifer, als sie ^-ariannens 

spanische Kenntnisse entdecken. 

Freitag 31. Juli; Heute geht es über 1 ampelona und den pass von Ronceval 
zurück na h Frankreich. Im Ganzen 39^-^ km. Daher früher Aufbruch. 
Abfahrt Zaragossa 8 Uhr. Oas schöne wetter halt an. .^uf der Ebrobrucke schö- 
ner Rückblick aif die Stadt. Interessante Fc^hrt an|alten Städtchen una Schlos- 
sern (Tudela,Tafalla) vorüber. nach PAMir-LONA . 

^Ur natten urspr^n-iich diese öcaat (Pompaelo=Stadt J. s lompejus in roemi^ 
.eher Zeit)als Nacntquartier im Auge. Auf iarem Mittelpunkt , der } laza del 
Castillo sitzend, freuen wir uns Zara.<ossa aen Vorzug gegeben za haben. 
Eindruck einer Kleinstadt , die frahert.inmal als Hauptst. dt von I^ varra 
Bedeutung hatte.. -ir bemerken aen pc seo de .arat e,der aaran erinnert ,iass 
aer r.ro. oe üeip;enkunstler (lÖ^H - IgOö) ,den ich in meiner Jugend :üit Begeis- 
terung in b-rlins Pnilharmonie öfters horte, hier geboren iet. 
Und hierräctit sici. einmal, dass meine spanischen Bädecker mich nicht er- 
reicht haben. Die moüerne Fast^aae der Katnedrale nimmt uns die Lu^fe weiter 
uns umzusehen und cfemit versäumen .vir einen Blick hinein und in den anscnlicf 
sen..en Kreuzrang aus cem X IV zu tun, der - nach BädecKer - einer der sciön 
sren Spaniens ixtxsein soll. Marianne holt Post aus lem Hotel La Ferla, 
das, wie rie sagt ,äs«^ keinen guten vmndruck nacht, und dann geht es nordwärtj 

weiter. 

',ie Fahrt über die waldigen Pyren äen ehört zu den schönsten Lö^ndschaf ts- 
bildern,aie >nan sich nur wünschen kann. rinter aem alten Marktplatz 
ßurguete schlängelt sich (tr .eg talaufwärte , zwischen den Vorhohen der 
im Hintergrund aufrtgenaen Pyrenäen. 

Am FinPang aes beranmten i^yrenäenpasses Ponc e toalles eine HauserKrupre um 
eine im xll Jh.gCc^rundete . ugu röin^ rabtei. und eine goti;?cne Allfahrts- 
Kirche Zum neiligen Geist, iie an£;eblica Karl d.Gr.a s Grab lar meinen 
PiO&iinen Roland erbaut hab-n soll. 

Die Fortstezung der Stresse führt durch cfen Pass von Roncevalles (1207 m) 
und an Ort und Stell begreift man leicht, wie f.s möglich war hier üie 
Kachhutdes von k^arago.ssa zurucmarschieren len Heeres unter defehl des 

kaiserlichen p. ladins ,abzuschneiaen und zu vernicnten (77Ö.cf.auch S.19) 
Ein fuEnz.Epos aus cem 11 Jh. feiert aen i^effen Karls des Grossen Roland 
im "Chanson* Holand',der in der ital. Renaissance icntung zum Ideal des 
galanten Ritters wird und dessen s-ili^xeite Statuen »»Rolanassaulen'^ in 
norddeutsch'-n Städten zum Zeichen cer GerichtsbarKeit . eraen. 
Die spanische Grenze ist Valcarlos . Bevor wir sie überschreiten haben wir 
dort r-utes Lunch und eine nette Unterh .tun:.; mit einem Spanier imi dortiger 
Gasthaus. In StPied ae Port überschreiten wir dann die franz osis cne Gren- 
ze. An der sp.:<ni&chen erfreuen icn die Zöllner an r4arii-nnens Sprachkenntni.- 
~na an beiden gibt cs nic.t die geringsten ::«; hwierigkeiten. 



() 



Dieul^ foy "Kunst in Spanien ,S . 1^0 : "Auf dem Gebiet der Sacralarchite ■ tur 
ragt ier Kreuzgang der Kath ed ral e von i-amplona hervor, oein sehr reines 
gotisches lasswrrk und zarte Ornemantierung der Arkaaen , Wimpergen und 
Kapitelle machen ihn zu einem einzigartigen -Verk." 



22 



( 



Wieder in F__R__A___N__K__R^_E^^I^_C^_^H 

Um 6 Unr erreicEen"wir PÄÜ •"März I9Ö6 war ich mit meinen Eltern hier, 
//ir haben z^immer im HQteI"cie i^'^^ance , dessen Hauptfront nach den Pyrenäden geht 
und sonst an die Place Hoyale angrenzt. Mein nimmer hat herrliche Aufsicht 
weit ins Land, unter mir lauft der Boulevard des pyren^es. Geblieben ist die 
prächtige Lage , aber sonst ist das Hotel arg heruntergeKommen. b in Publikum, 
die früher reichen ijngländer und küssen sind ausgestorben. 

«.ir weraen uns mit diesem Blick begnagen und auf das Scaloss und Geburtshams 
Henri IV ,das aiii aideren Ende des Boulevard liegt^ verzichten. In Pau ist der 
harschall Bernadotte 176^ geboren, der Ahnherr des jetzigen Königshauses .dessen 
Portrait ich zuletzt im StocRholmer Schloss an '^unauffälliger Stel±e bemerkte- 
Die vVasas hatten die besseren Pl^itze . ^leichwonl ich hätte, bei genügender Zeit/ 
g.rnain .Geburtshaus besucht mit RacKsicht auf mein persönliches Verhältnis zuiri 
jetzigen König Gu-tav iiaolf. Aber Marianne und ttohn wünschen sich^Lourdes 

isennen zu lei-nen. 

Un-er Hotel Kann sich kein eigantliches Pestaurant mehr leisterg.'^e einzige 
Stel.ie,wo man noch essen kann, ist ist im üntcrgeschoss; vermutlich die einstige 
Br, jetzt "La Cremaillaire" benannt. Langweiliges Menü, das wir durch eine 
Fiische Ayala, aufheitern. Oas einzige , was an alte Z iten .rinnert ,ist der er- 
graute Kellner, der im besten Stil serviert. 

Samstag I.August : Das schöne .Vetter bleibt uns treu, ^/ieder früher Auf^iii,da 
wir heut wieder über 3CG km. zum ■ ndziel Albi zurückzule^ren haben. 
Der Umweg aber Louraes kostet etwa eine c^tunde. Es ist uer R-rosste katholische 
rValifahrfesort mit Ja rlicn iiehrere Millionen Pilger. 

Die wallfahrt verdankt ihren L^rsprunp: den A o. rienerscheinunge n ,die das Hirten- 
mädchen Bernadette Souoirous lö^^ in der Grotte von Massabielle hatte. Auf Ge- 
heiss der i^ia.ia u'e ,rabne >)uel-.e gilt als neilkraftig. 

Durch Strassen, die voll vmn "Andenkenlacien" sind .vir parken unter der Bracke, 
Hinter der die KspT na_ -e_ d e s iro c^:ssio ns beginnt .Hier , an dsr einen Seite das 
Asile i^otre Dame de 'Lourd'iS , eines der beJden grossen Krankenhauser , an der ande- 
ren Seite die unterirdische Kirche ± lus IX , angeblich eine» i^iesenraum,der 2l.0(C 
Menschen f asst . Ich habe mich mit uem Blick auf die Betondecke beKUagt. 
Am Ende der hsplanade ,als Point de Vue,die Rosenkranbasiliky (I005 romanisch- 
byzentinisch) mit Hampen an beiaen ceiten,ciie zu aer^ aufc^ier Höhe des Jrotten 
felsens "Ä^kaS4:en, Basilika, aie bereits l86^-71 erbaut wurde , führen. 
Ich begnü..e mich mit der unteren Basilika , die überreicn mit Goldmosaik etc 
verziert und wo sogar die einzelnen Platten unter den -.osaiken von Gläubigen- 
ge^ü/ entsr^recnen.e Gebunr natürlicn - mit Goldinschriften versehen sind, wie 
z.b. eine, auf die mein Auge fiel '»Zwei arme New Yorker''. 

Eindrucksvoller für mich ist die Menge um die Grotte von Massabielle mit 
Lichtern und Pilgerchören und vor allem durch die Kranken, die von freiwilli- 
gen Helfern zu dg» Wasserin aer Höhle gefahren .erden. 

Meine beide egleiter lassen sich nicht nehmen zur Hohe auf c:ien Rampen zu 
klimbem;ich setze mich auf eine Bank, beobachte die ^^enge und bewundre mit 
welchem Geschick und LieDenswurdigkeit lers^^nen ^er höheren G- istlichkeit 
in lila alle Anfragen -- in allen Sprachen-- beantworten, Retschläge geben. 
Wiederlich bleibt das Schachenn der Händler und die .esc iimacklosigkeit der 

angebütnen V aren. 
•ir kaufen an einem offnen Stand ProvisQon für die Weiterfahrt ; vvir wollen 



so 



unter.v i^-'^s an einem netten Plätzchen lunchen. 



i 



23 



I 



I 



W 



terfahrt durch waldige Gegend. An einem reizenden Plätzchen verze ren 

t.John gelihp;t es in einm nanen Haus eine Flasche 



.chöne Vei 
ir den gekauften I rovian 



Wein dazu aufzutreiben 



Eine ß-anze Kolonn 



e von Zigeunern versperrt den v'eg,a 



ber nicht mit den alten 



von Pferden gezognen vVohnwagen 



Die Herrschaften fahren in L^anz moaerne 



n 



Station v.'agons und w 



rfen uns, als wir ena 



lieh ^urchfanrt erzwin^^en »finstere 



Blicke zu. 
wurde und von jer 



ufälj.iK las ich später inaer Zeitung, dass die Kolonne angehalten 
Polizei viel Diebesgut in geräumigen > utos gefunden wurde 



Der Weg 



lünrr, über Toulouse , wo wir un 



s ^ :^r nicnt aufhalten. Es ist 5 Uhr, als 



wir 



in A L B I einfahren, so fahren w 



ir gleich weiter zur Place Vigan 



aorl'aiEen, gehört zu dbn -rotsen Überraschungen der Rei-.e 



i/Vas wir 

Der Platz wird beherrsct 



t von den määntigen , festungsartigen Ziegelbauten 



XHR der Kathedra 



le t.Cecile (1262-1390) und des Er zbiüc ho f liehen Palaxs de 



la Berbie ,ein 

Diese f estunasartige 



mäcr.tiR^er Wehrbau des XIII Jahrhundert 



ilbiu?nser den 



isiFmen 



auten orinR-en zum B 



ewustsein .dass ^.Ibi aer Sekte der 



zu aeren Ausrottung blutige Kreuzzage 



o 



ie sind die letzten we 



ste -ierw^i^^v^y'brfi^ tpi^n jjrni chaer ekte y Ctenen 



;efuhrt wur »en 

der 



ti 



sute Gott reiner "veis 



g 

be ist'*. • i'^ öbanaen 



t ist.aem nichts schlechtes anhaftet un 



d dessen \Vesen lie- 



alj en kirchlichen Lehren mn 



d In titutionen ablehnend fegen- 



der 



üb 



er., ie t;:laubten »dass die 



elt schlecnt ist,dass ÄÄÄrx^fiKXXXKxMKHXKkBHxiiKii 



göttlichen Funk^ 



sxs 



Kenntni 
Ketzer, die aue; 



s(gno 



aera ab;-r einige Menschen ^^eheime 
daher Gnostiker)hatten. ie galten der K4rche als Häretiker 



en einlese. 'ilooc^en sexR,von 



zurottr-n seien, obwonl treibst e.in ■•■ann , 



W 



ie" -ernhard von Clairvau 



-1153) der I rediger des 2ten ?;reuzuge6/,einma 



( 
"nichts christlicheses 



m- 



l1 zu^^eben muss.dass es 



gäbe, als diet e Häretiker ^ä.«:»..a 



eh 



Das Paliis 



de la Berbie ^nit seinem grossen Turm und allen Zeichen sr 



mkm 



ni 



ehrhaftigkeit, Client heu 



te friedlichen Zwecken; die l'M.vallung wurde zu Ter- 



•assengärten im 1?. JahrhunJert urage • a 



ndlt und seine grossen Säume dienen im 



w 



e.sentlichen der i^u^stel-ung aer 



rbe 



ten .-e;i hi r geöornen 



ün^tlers enri 



de 



oulouse lau 



trec(peb.löb4,gect.l9 l)aiseLn Museum . i 



r hc^ben ;:lück;e^ ist 



bi, 



Uhr offen 



ir lernen nici t v 



i 1 iveues.da Mariann 



e und ich eit langem 



en " un 



5tler sch-iten und .. ric-nne sog^ 



r alt einzigen SchmaCK ihrers ..ohnzinmer 



ei-nige seiner berä...:ten • ithogr&pnien an aen 



änaen hat,d runteraie farbige 



•La iertie de Gampagne 



b:r 



s ist p'ut .^uf ai 



oe 



ise e3 .niü^l eine über, icht 



über sein 



samm 



t.verk wi-der einmal zu gewinne 



n 



iiin gefälliger ärter öffnet un^. eine 
-i p . fii-ras.sen^^arten una auf das j_ 



a • <. I" a 

haben. 

Die . athtarale ocinte 



ur,von aem wir schone _ blicke hinunter 
lusetal-.er Tarn aiit ^:einen ^li^en rücKen 



^cile ist ein wahres 



/unaerwerk der südfranzö ischen 



Gotik, i-n maCxjtiger ehroau n 



it 4x Metdrhohen cue 



rn una einem Kev.altigen Turm 



von 7ö -ter 



.öhe 



ine ireT)"i en 



flucnt lai.rt aurcheamfi i-rt ^ingangstor zu 



der reichen -Vrirbr Iap 



^^ 



Miit 



1 nag 



iiocn 



m 



enannt ,zum Sü 



dportal. . rin.'.ert, an plater^o e'/.Wfe 



m.'Dreit 



von kj- ich 



Jas JjQlL-l.S__einc weice einsChiiiiKe 

XXXiXHXBXXRH8K> 

von itali nitj^n 



alle lit eitefl' ap^e 



g^ä 



'\ 



en 



ohe 



♦ o 



ff'.^nz aus emahlt 



KiftSßHgßmäiifi- an dßx *ÄxtxÄHEtxxiSÄ. itaiiEÄXSKU&xxxÄÄXtiKrM 



en ünttlern'v Anfang aes Ib 



Li . 



aas ■^jiinp'-^tft Gprichf an der 



■stwand .ein Hies-ngemäliefranzo 



siccher .rbeit , vielleicht von rOger van der 



/eyaens ..i 



beit im --otex 



de 



.>r'«-'»^ 



Das chiff wird von einem i e 



;ieu in eaune *trw-*-^* 
ttner ^reteilt, er Is uerschonste F^nkreichs gilt, 



f 



2k 



Üiine i.ircne in cer Kirche ...eiche infdi-.sung,'.'vxe Spxt . env^erk • 2.ntzuckende 
rnusiecierenae En.; el;am ' ingang veiKandet einc^r <>er .ladonna aber aen. Gang 
hin :g, was öie zu erwarten hat. Gro^.sartig die i ortraitf i^mren ,aie Esther 
und ouditl^^trophet ^saias und Jeremias genannt, einfach zeitgenössige ^ 
1 ersonen'^v.ieaergeben. ohl aie schöntften . rbeiten burgundisciier bildhauser ^ 
i.unst vürdera vei-fail. tXV.uh. ; 

Nur ung rn verla sen wir ie ivöt riearalfc .r.in Trost, aass v;ir sie noch einmal 
besucnen uönnen. 
unsere nestelie/ie ae^iG ran d St . Antoi ne ,15 Rte St.Antoine mit einem reizen- 
den Teufelchen als Zeichen vor dem .fiingang.Ein adaptiertes Kloster, seit 
1734 in der i?""amilie Rieux. Nette Zimmer mit Bad. Wir wei den in verschiedenen 
Etagen des verschnörkiitfin alten Baus unteo-eDrahht. Das gute Dinner wirdim 
angebauten Speisesaal bei offnem Fenster serviert, der nach dem Garten geht. 
Ich ziehe mich zeitig zurück; Marianne und John erfahren ,dass nachts die 
Kathedrale innen erleuchtet ist',ein grosser Genuss,der mir entgeht. 

Sonntag 2. August : Ein grosS' b Vergnügen bei prahlendem Wetter im Garten zu 
frühstücken. Brechen zeitig auf und parken noch einmal auf dem Platz Vigan 
So komme auch^ich BQ einem zweiten Besuch von St .C^cile ,der meinen Eindruck 
vertieft . 

Zu Fuss zu einem kleinen malrischen Kreuzgang der romanischen Kirche St .Sa2 
vm. Dabei Gelegenheit Blicke auf einige alte Häuser zu tun. 

Auf aer '.Veiterfahit nach Süden berunren wir das malri.£chai aer Agout gelegne 
Städtchen Castre s ,wo uns wieaer eine kleine Überraschung narrt. 
Im ehemaligen Biscnof spalast von 1666 - Jetzt Kathaus - andern sich ein 
schöner Garten in französischem Stil anschliesst »befindet sich ein joya 
Mu p eum . X}giiJ!l::i^älLlig.hÄftxn .UermXAhtaJ&J^Be ginnt^a £ rüseum mit spanischen i-rimi- 
tiven,hab,och arrangiert und beleächtet ,2ifeammen mit Messgewandern ;es XIV 
und XV. Jahrhundert. Es folgen einige rortraits des • eisters(17^6-]|.828) ,darun 
ter auch an ausgezeichnetes Selbstportrait , schliesslich ein gross anvele^^te 
-;Verk: Oie Junta der Jrhilippinien(lÖl4) ;charakteristisches /erk,von dem ich 
noch nie eine -bbildung san und das^^XÄÄKXtxxKKxxiKkxHxiHHHXK ,Loga nxKkt 
KXMXKxtxxxK^EZÄiß:iiÄfitßy-Ailai2ixw[(2[kÄxsKXHar>.R2.iiXißriiHgKH nur im Verzeichnis der 
«verke erwähnt:" Sitzung der fünf G^e.nios in G genwart König Ferdinands. 
Gast res, Museum , Stiftung ßriguibou l . Aus der Sammlung O.Angel M.s.ria Terradil- 
los.=' Ausgezeichnete Abdrücke seiner Radierungen fehlen nicht : Desaet . de la 
Guerra,Carriccio. . — anschliessend eine Janrhundertau-setllung des in 
Castres gebornen Jean Jaurfes (1059-191^) - ^n wunderberer Mensch und Redner, 
der vor j-.usbruch des Krieges von Chauvinisten ermordertwurde,den ich sehr 
bewundert habe .} hotographien zeigen die Schar Mier BeruhmthBiten ,die die 
Aus.-tellung besucht haben , darunter sene ich den Ceiliöten Casals mit seiner 
hübschen jungen Frau. 
Zuerst urch das , 

in ? ne rebenreiche ..bne bis in der Ferne die Cit» ,die StaflAburg CARCA|- 
SONNE erscheint. 

Trotz frühzeitigen chreibbns war es air nicht möglich dort oben/ im Kotel 
Citft^Zimner zu oekommen. Ich musste mich oegnügen für uns im Hotel Terninu s 
unterzukmmmen.it.£ liegt ander ^ahn undwxrkt entsprechend. I.:t aoer durchaus 
ordentlich in Zim-ierndnit Bcd) ,wie im issen,das wir gleich im Restaurant, 
das v/ie ein Bahhhofr estaurant wirkt ,einneh'rien. 



jare..que Tal aann bergan zu finer i asshöhe und wieder abwärt 



t)ie Idee sich einer -^Tour'' anzuschlissen wirkt tich ungünstig 



ms 



daj^d 



le 



Da-'ie,die die Fahrung übernommen hat, auf eine sich stark verspätende aneri- 
kanische Gesellschaft 2.u varten hat. 



25 



$ 



3 



Cbwonl in rieinera franzosiüchen ''blauen" Fahrer ausdrücklich d rauf hinge- 
wieen «.rd,dftss die öesichtiijung der FestungswerKe der Cit'^nur mit Fuhrung" 
möglich ist, wäre es wahrscrieinlich besser ge\^ ben mit un. erem Wagen hin .uf- 
zuf3h^en,anstatt den Nachmittag mit vVarten zu verluuern;ich bin f st sicher 
dcxss es uns geglückt wäre, auch ohne Fuhrung aas Weseritlichste zu sehen. 
So istberet£.1i 5 ühr,als wir -iit unserem n'agen der Coach folgen una vor der 
Forte Narbonnaise ,aie in die CitI' funrt , parken. 

Die Cit* hat .ie beaeutendsten Festungsmauern be^^ahrt,die vom Mittelalter 
in tiiuropa hinterlassen wurde; wir können sie nur mit aer Kitterstaat in 
Rhodos vergleicnen.nier,wie dort sind es Peconstructionen ,hier von Violet 
le Duc( 101^-1879) ausgeführt; er hat bei dieaem vVieolBKaufbau nicht so viel 
Scnaden anrichten können, wie bei rein kunstlexischen Dingen. 
^yvir beginnen mit dem Chateau Comta l,das sichai die innere Qmwallung lehnt 
und als Bollwerk far sicn verteidigt Verden konnte. Unter einem schattigen 
Baum sitend 1 . sen wir einen Votrag über uns er.k;- hen ,in d^m die Führerin 
die Entwicklung dieses Mauerwerks be. chreibt von d?n Westgoten des 6. Jh., 
über Ludwig den Heil-gen xmxii ,i hilipp d n Kühnen im 1^. . Jahrhundert . 
Anschliessend wandern wir über die Kingmauern mit ihren ^4 Türme n und lasse 
uns die raffiniert ausjekJ.a elten Verteidigungsmöglichl eiten erklären, die 

er Cite den Ruf aer Uneinnehmbarkeit verschafften. 
Hint-r dem Tor von St.Nazaire ist eine Freilichtbühne eingabaut ; hier 

hat der Gesst im Hamlet Gelegenheit a f einerrichtigen Mauer seine Er- 
scheinung zu machen. 

Die Führung endet oei (fer Kathedrale St.Nazaire (XI-XIV Jh.)Da6 im Jahre 
ir96 besonne Schiff ist ein machtiger romanischer Bau ..it schönen korin- 
thischen Säulenkapitalen;:;juerschiff und Cnor 1- 70-132C entstanden zahlen 
zu (^n .-elun. enaten /erken cter pjotischen Architektur des Nordens. Im ..)uerschif 
schöne i ieta;im Chor bl iben Statuen in Erinnerung ,Ai* von Künstlern aus- 
gefahrt (Phoino-n ,die von cen schulen von Reians und Amiens angeregt »u sein 
scheinen. Die letzten Strahlen erleuchten die pracntigen Glc smt lereien im 

Cnor. 

An Jen Kirchplatz stösst das Hotel de Cit» ,inaem wir leiderkein Unterkommen 
fanden. 'sin durchwj nuern der Gesei jschaf tsr iume zexct ein naus ersten Ranges 
Im Garten nit hubscrien :.lick nehmen wir einen drinK;im E^iSScial wird be- 
reits ainiert. Elegante Gesei-^schaf t . 

Hinab durch die Sawirr winKliccr Gassen zurück zu unserem uto. 
Von der Pont Vieux haben wir nocheinen schönen umfassenden Rückblick auf 
aie Festung, bevor .ir zur Ville Basse zurückkehren, ir ziehen vor, nicht im 
Sveises.ai unseres noteis zu e sen,sonaern ^hlen die Terrasse des Hotel 
Bristol im Freien um die Ecke ,'A'O es ai.^:e nehm zu sitzen ist und wo wir mit 



c 



taunen die Menge der cjuartiersuchenden Besucher beobachten können. 



: 



Montag 3.Aug:ust :Heute beginnt ,>er Rückweg wieder nordwärts durch Frankreiche 
Gstse-.te. Zunächst in die PROVENCE; über Nimes nach Pont du Gard 2^1 km. 
Der Weg fuhrt übor N^rbonn e ,eine zur KÖmerzeit mit .. em Meere verbundne Stadtj 
vorbei an c^ra malerisch aif einer Höhe gelegnen Bezi . r s dufchübcCheH Land- 
sci.aft racn Sfete ,v\o \aLr ^as^eer erreihhen. Ich hatte keine - hnung,dass dies«| 
von Kanälen durchzogne Stadt nach Marseille der beaeutenste französische 
Hafenan .ittelmeer ist. n'xr passieren M onty ellie r nitau ial-nd vielen 
Aael6=und Kaufmannsplaitästen des aVII und XVIII Jahrhundert und .veraen von 
unserem ruidbook daran erinnert ,dass di^se Staot Sitz einer viel besuchten 
Universität war(seit 1209) , die Petrarca u.31^ ,R- bexais 1530 be. uchten. 



u 



26 

Mittags erreichen wir Nimes > Lunchen ausgezeichnet am Place des ArAnes 
auf cter Tarrasse des Hotel Cneval Blan c,aes6en Froschschenkel und der aus 
Riesenflasciie ge.'.penaeter Cognac Fine Champagne ,E.Remy Martin(V.S .C.P. ) 
besser in ii^rinnerung naften,als dierömischen Vermächtnisse, Zugegeben ,dass 
Amphitheater (l.Jh.n. ch Ch.) besonders im Oberteil besonders gut erhalten 
ist , was au hvom Jrodiumtempel ,.iem Maison Carr^ , (20-12 v.Ch) p;esagt weraen 
kann. Aber v/ie provincial ist das alles , auch aas -iWe des ^ntiques im Innerer! 
wir kennen zu viele aer Bauten in den klassischen Ländern an trt und Stelle,! 
um diese Fremdlinge richtig zu goutieren. uanz anders ist cfer Fall mit dem 
Jardin de la ontaine ;hier ist FranKreich auf das beste: Eine stim.uungsvollel 
i:'rkanl;..ge mit Kanälen auf aes. en grünen .'/assern yei^ie Schwane leise i-i«i^^ 
ihres Weges ziehen una dalBstraaen zärtliche i uttengruppen halten. Zeit/17^0. 

ntike Ruinen, ein sog. Die natempel ,ist die Anlage noechst passend einbezogen. 
Die vVeiterfohr gehtdurch mnderschöne landschc.ft über üz*s mit altem Herzogs 
Schloss;hier gent die Strasse Vnach dem Hotel du Vieux Mouli n am linken Ufer/ 
hoch ober der Gardon :it sem schönsten Blick auf aen Font du Gard , eigentlich 
fein Aquaduct. Ein entzückendes llatzclaÄn una so viel schöner hier zu ver- 
weilen, als in der Stadt und in einem alltäglichen Hotel. 

Dies Hotel i.st aus einer Mahle entstanden und seine Zimmer sind kurios ^^e- 
.scnachtelt z.T. mit antikem Material. Mi-rianne bekommt ihr Zimmer und John 
teilt sich ait mir ein Doppelzim^ne ^ ,dem sogar ein C abinet de Toilette mit 
Dusche angegliedert ist; das J^C nicht allzu weit entfernt. hIso ganz comfor- 
tabel. Amüsant John's Kampf nit dem Drachen(Wirtin; ,um ein zweites Zahnputz 
glass und um ein anderes nandtuch! 

Agrippa,ocnwiergersohn und Mitregend des .Augustus hat disen Aquaduct, der 
das tief eingeschnittne rlusstal k6 m hoch und 277 ^ lang in einer dreistöcki 
gen ßogenreihe überspannt 15 v.Ch .ang-legt ,um Aer Stadt Nimes ,d. i.der 
Augusteishen Gründung Colonia Augusta Nemausus Vvasser zuzufahren, das auf der 
obersten bOkenreiae in einem ged ckten K nal verläuft. Es ist einer der ge- 
waltigsten und bec terhaltenen Römerwerke der Erde und nur dem Aquaduct von 
SeROvia vergleichbar , der auch aas der Augusteischen 2/eit sx-ammt und den v^ir 
auf unser loeri.-^chen Heise 195p oewundern durften. 
Marianne und John erklimmenden Aquaduct, ich beschränke mich zu ihm hinzu- 

andern und von dort die läge unseres Hotels f hotographisch festzuhalten. 

l'Vir dinieren recht gut auf der Terrasse mit Blick auf den Aquaduct hin,dery 

als die DunKelheit heräinbricht^angestrahlt v/ird. -loechst eindrucksvoll. 
Es könnte nicht s:höner sein. 



Plans tag 4. August ; »fetter bleibt veitei herrlich. Zeitiger Aufbruch, unser 
abendliches ^^iel Arles ist nur 35 km. weit, aber wir liol^^Bn auf dem W^ge 
wesentliche Funkte der rrovence besichtit.en. 

Es geht über ßeaucaire am r.^ hten Khoneufer nach Tarascon ,das am linken 
Shoneufer liegt. Jed^r kennt aie §o hübsch erzänlte Gescnichte Dcudets 
■'Tartarin von Tarasaon'' ,der in iNimes geboren(lÖ^C-lÖ97) »seine Südfranzosen 
gut Kennt und sie in Gestalt dieses französischen Münchhausens schildett. 
VöJlig unbekannt dagegen war mir,dass hi^r ein Schloss des Königs Ren* 
staht , der , durch Heirat mit der Erbin, xhm i othringen mit seiner Grafscjiaft 
Provence 1^31 und seinem Titularkönigtum von I^eapel verbindet. 
Er ist der vorletzte Herr der i rovence(l^C9-1^8o)bevor diese Tandschaft 
an Frankreich kam. Das xhloss hat im letzten Krieg stark durch Bomben 
gelitten. bs steht oberhalb der Hängebrücke ,üie aber die r häne führt. 



C ) 



27 



O 



( 



Wir pasoieren St.P»my ;l km weiterkam Fuss der Voralpen('»Alpilles) die Stätte 
des k6o AD von ten 'A/'estgoten zerstörten griechisch-römibchen Siedlung Planu m 
(2,Jh.v.bis 3.n.Ch.);ein Wegweiser deutet '* Les Antique6 ".Sie befinaen sich 

rechtfe von der btrasse und bestehen aus einer Art Triumphbogen und einem 
Cenotaph(EhrenKrbmahl) . Der Bo^en ist ,8Äiel^hend von lenen in Kom,keine 
Erinnerung an mirrh Triumph eines siegreichen Feldherrns »sondern 4JdiLi5&4?t / 
um aie Errichtung der St dt und Taten d?r Legionäre , die aie Sttdt schufen, in 
aer Erinnötung f estzufealten> Obwohl 6t4r«rk zerstört , sind schöne Einzelheiten, 
i^rucntguirlunüe, Kassettendecke im Bogen, Reste von Säulen und Skulpturen gut 
erkennbar. Das Ehtengrabiiiahl ist ungewöhnlich iiut erhalten und wmp e errichtet, 
wie die neaaten ünter.;.uchtungen ergeben haben, um die Erinnerung an Enkel des 
l^aisers Augustus festzuhalten , die frühzeitig 9;estorDen sind. (Anfang des IJh.) 
Seltsame Idee hier fern von Rom! 

Von diesen Antiquitäten wusste ich nichjts. -lir ist der Name St.R^my ausschlie, 
lieh in Erinnerung im Zusammenhang mit dem Leben und Sterben dea Malers van 
Gogh jriech der starben geistigen Störung in Arleslööb ,;vo er sein Ohr abschnitt, 
fin ,et er ünterkomaien in dem Asy l, das damals in dem ehemaligen Kloster St. faul 
de Maus ol^ untergebracht Wc-r.Hier bleibt van Gogh lb6ö und I889. .< r malt die 
7^~t"alt;aoer vor allem entstehen hier die wie brennenae Fackeln gen Himmel 
flackernde Cypressen ,die Olivenbaume unter glahenaer onne gespensterhaft be- 
wegt und jtilieben, .ie aie Iris in einer Vase, die heute in :}rucken über die 
gonze elt verbreitet sind,abe- damals kejg^p Beifall fanden. i^ach einer be- 
sonders schweren -ttacKe verl i.^st er St.Remy und be ribt sich nach Auvers,wo 
Dr.aachet,d-csten eiil5nlV' er" -ifalt^^m -i^.Juli erscnies t e:- sich und wird in Au- 
vers beigesfe^zt. Daran muss ich denken , als ich die kleine rumänis che ? ircjie 
dee e:;emaiiKen Klo.:ter s beir^i^dä-f^e ; sie liegt auf der linken S-ite,aan wenig 
abseits es Weges. Das . immer, d.s der Maler aamals bewonnte ist nicht mehr 

zu besichti-en. 
Nun hinein in die '»Ali il tes ' ,zerK_L ii tete wei se Felsen von ver tein rangs- 
reicnen liozänkalk^ie ein phantastisc .e Landschaft ^geben,in der sich seit 
aem ll.uanrhunaert die " Seigneurs de Bau x'' eine ebenso phattastidhe Residenz 
erbauten. Sie ehörten zu dem uiäcntisgten Lehnsherrn des Südens. Im 13» Jh 
wird sein L-ebeshof nit Jen Troubadours berühmt , ebenso wie die Untaten des 
Raymond ue Turenne,der 1372 Vormund seiner Nichte ,A : ix d? Baux ,berüchti^:t 
cind;AeT)von ;^n vereinten Kräften aes in ..vijvnon r^ siaierenaen i apstes u] 
de^ franzosischen Königs sc .liesslihch unschädlich gemacht, #*r^. 
Nach dem Tode von Alix ,princesse de Baux ,±x±±twird die Her- schaft der Pro- 
vence und schlisslich Frankreich angegliedert , die eien Besitz an verdiente 
Männer verleiht, o ist I53Ö der conti töble Anne de ..ontmorency ,dera wir 
zuletzt in Chantilly begegnet sind , damit oelehnt.In den riänden der Familie^ 
i'janville wird es ein Sbmi'ielpuni« t des Protestantismus .Louis XIII , schliesslich 
dieses unruhi^.en und ^^derspenstigen Vasaj len üb ■rdrässig,lässt Schloss und 
Verte .digungswerke XK^Eif Knzerstören , legt den Einwohnern eine Ungeheure 
Ents..hädi.<ungEumme auf, die aus£:erdem aie Kq ten der Zerstörung bezahlen müssen 
Ich muss an die "Kristal] nacht" Hitlers denken, der die ou.en für aie von 
.seinen Leuten zerstörten Fen ter. heiben zahlen liess. 

Die Ruinen liegen auf einem deilen Vorgebirge ; wir halten auf dem davor lie- 
genden Larkplatz und treten durch die Porte Eyguiferes in die Reste der 
Stadt ein. s genügt uns bis zum ilace St. Vincent vorzudringen;kleiner Platz 

von Bäumen bescnt^ttet anu Deherrscht von der rojiani^cnen Kirche r^it ihrem 
gracieusen Glockenturm , der so.,. "lanterne des -^orts" im Renaissancestil. 
Die bei en Schiffe im Inneren sind^roiianisch; ich freue mich,dc.ss die junge 
Dame, die mit uns die Kirche oetritt/ihre kurzen shorts mit einem Rock be- 
aeckt,Jen sie in einr Tascne De i sich trägt . r.ub«rsciier Blick vom Platz ninab 
indie TaWde la Fontaine und de l' nfer. " "' 



und 



28 






V 



< ) 



Zurück durch die Grand Rue. Viele iixiitRRHaiuöer aus oem XIV - XVI Jahrhunder. 
Aufi l'^nd viel Versuuhe der Wiedeherstellung .Die grandiosen Ruinen aer 
Burg bewundern wir von unten. i\ahe unseres; Parkplätze:^ Blick aber die Mauer 
hinunter a\k^ das liotel üu;r.teau de Baumani^remit Swimming pool davor, mitten 
zwischen den Felsen, dessen orsKlassiges Restaurant im i?'ührer erwannt ist. 
Sprachmässig interessant ist,dass der ^q-^^ Les ßaux sich vom provencalischen 
Li Baus d.h.j?elsen ableitet , das aich dsii zuerst iö^:;^ gefundenen Tonei-cie , die 
für j Uiiiiniumgewinnung wichtig ist , als "Bauxit'* den l^iamen gab. 
Die grot-sartifi:en Ruinen der im X.J hrhundert gegründeten e .emalmg:en Beneaik - 
ti nerabtei Montmajour ^auf ^inem Felsen gelegen, sind schon von v either sicht- 
bar. Sie beherrscnt die Ebne von Arles una bestehen ais zwei imposanten B'U- 
teilen:Das eine ausdem -iittelalter ,da: andeie ^us ctem lÖ.üyhrhun^ert . 
Der letzere Teil verdankt seine ntstehung dem setzten i.bt,viem Cardinal 
xNohan.der in aen Halsbandskandal Marie Antoinettes ^verwickelt w»r. Der 
erboste Louis XVI unterdrückt , um ihn zu bestraf en, die Abtei. 
Es ist kurz vor 12 (Jhr, Is wir eintreten und müssen dem arter ein gutes 
Aort geben, um enigstens einen fluchtip-en olick in die romani che Kirche 
und in dsn Kreuzgang ais ijsm 12.o&hrhunjert zu 'ver(fien. imponierend der mächtige 
Donion aus dem l4. J. hrhuna^rt »der dem Ganzen einen f estungsartigen Charak- 
ter verleiht. 

Fs gent uoer die Rhon e nach__A_.F_L_F_S hinein. Gleich bei dar hinfahrt beuier- 
ken wir .las Cafe, wo van GogR~~5ei'seinem Aufenthalt I887/Ö8 ver .ehrte und 
daf er versciii dentlich gemahlt hat. 

Wir halten auf em Forum , Mittelpunkt der römischen >"olonie und. noch Mittel- 
punkt .er heutigen Stadt. Na h Zerstörung Marseilles durch Cesar w.ra es 
e-tn wichtiger Knotenpunkt von Kanaelswc v en von ItaliinK und Spanien ,aie 
aii en luxus des Orients hier zu /larkte bringen, nit dsr See durch Kanäle ver- 
bunien.iieute ist o s ijorum ein von Bäumen oestandner i iätz mit dem DenKmal 
aes rrovenca.en Dichters Mistral und umgeben von Hotels und Restaurant», 
/'irnahlen d'S Restaurant du j rum ,wo.ar im Freien tut seinem Balkon angenianm 
luncnen können, bevor wir unser Hotel Jules Cesar aufsuchen. ,das am breiten 
baumbestana nen Boulevöira ae Lices. p:elefrren ist,undwo uns gro.;se '/»immer 
rnit Bad erwarten .Gut^r Findruck! Dieser ßoalevara Liebiingspromenaae a. Staat. 
V/ir rac chen uns zu Fuss gleich eui den :^eg. 

^m tlace de 1- Repubxique mit Obeliken in seiner Mitte aus .. er äiemaligen 
Rennbahn. Gegenüber dem Rathaus die Kirche St.Trophine .Gegründet zu Ehren 
des iipost'-s,der xrovence das Christentum brachte^hat viele 'A-^ndlungen durch- 
gemacht lUrsprunglich karolingisch wird sie im 11. ,12. und 15» Jahrhundert um- 
gestaltet .Barbarossa empfangt hier die Krone vun /^rles(llVÖ) ,aer König Ren8 
heiratet hier Jeanne de Laval,die Königin Je^nne. 

Die vVestfassade aufs reichste :iiit Bi]/3iissen ges hmückt entstammt dem Ende 
des 12. J nrhunaerts. Auch //enn wir wissen, dass nie Fassaje von ot.Giles,die 
wir morgen Srhen wer;.en,als Vorbild gedient hat, so bl-ibt sie doch eincV^^ 
bedeutend^fe/t erkiiofe'r gallo-romanischen Spätantike .Die Fortalumrandung füllt 
die anze Westseite .Zwei Sockel. Darüber in Wandnischen stehenae Heilige. 
Davor je 3 Säulen^ein gewaltiges Gebälk tragend. in der Pöhe ctes Tursturz,der 
von einer die Tur teilende Säule iietr^p^en Wird, der seitlich vorkragende 
Hauptfries: Bilder der Aj;ostel,das jüngste Gericht. Im Bogenfeld aie Majestas 
mit d»m bärtigen Christus mit den :,vangelistensymbolen. ber c/er .nrchivolte ein 
leicnt ansteigender Giebel. 

Vom Jmneren Rammen Langhaus aus der ersten Hälfte des 12. Jahrhunaerts ,der 
Chor noch jünger.Fs bleibt in Erinnerung ein Sacrophag aus dem ^. Jh., der 
als Altar dient. 



29 



O 



( 



Der zur Kirche gehÖrenae Kreuzgang höt aeinen j.irisang von der Rue de lyioitre. 
Hier wechain Jrf'^iler mit gekop elten Säulen, deren ?{' pitele mit i>cenen aus ä 
dem ^Iten und Neuen lestament aufs feinste skulptiei-t sind, T e±^.er ist die 
L'rhaltuni nicht die beste;anden Pfeilern riguren von Aposteln una Heiligen^ 
dazwischen Reliefs der Christus und Heiligenf^eschichte «Besondere Aufmerk- 
samkeit verdient der Nordv^estpf eiler , wo man das Datum ll8ü findet ,HRtaKK 
.iß i'iguren von 1 etrus »Trophinus »Johannes nahen j.er i) rsteliung cfer ufer- 
siexiung ..hristi,aer i^raaenan Grabe . . • .".as Datum bezeichnet den /tbf.chluss 
der Arbeit am nördlichen RreuzgangflÜK;el. 

Ifliclitraassige Blicke in üds r ömische Theate r »da- schon frühzeitig a^s Stein| 
bruch ^j^ i e nt e und das /.mphithe ter (ar*ne),das im ^Mittelalter c^ls Festung 
diente ;sie bieten nicnts Neues. 

Be jaiy.erlich ,dass uns die Zeit nangelt hinaus zum A.lyscamp s (^efilcie der 
Seeligen) , eine Grabersteasse ,die iiir von 'h inem let^^ten Besuch 1933 s^lß 
besonders äbimiiiung voll m ^.rinnerung ist. Ich finde in meinem Tagebuch(VII , 
Seite 30) "Ur-_ anglich röuiircne , später christliche Begr .bnissstätte ,die 
sogar Oante erwähnt • bleute hinter reizvolaern Hest ein s ,fx;otischen Torwegs 
eine mnder volle ßaumallee mit skulptierten Sfeeinsärgen ,die ,wie Olly richtig' 
bemerkt, wie eine ophinxallee zur Kirche St.Honorat geleitet •£ sind wun- 
dervolle Re.-.te d.ner verlassenen '^irche aus dsm Anfang des XII Jh. von ergrei- 
fender Einfacnheit ;ung heure oäulen tragen das Gewölbe." 

Die ßegr.Abnisst itte war im >iittelalte . o berühiät ,dass man die Toten zur 
Beste ttung von i-veither brachte. 

;'bendj.icJiefc Dinner auf der Terrasse d e s rotels Jules Cesar ,wo man angenehm 
sitzt .Unerfreulich ,dass das Essen langweilig ist und alles auf "Nepp" ange- 
legt ist.o kostet eine Flasche normalen Bordeaux l^^d. Fr. 



iMittwoch 3 «August : Das prachtvolle vVetter hält an. Den Vormit-cag benutzen 
wir zu euner .Rundfahrt. 

Der erste H&lt in St .Giles ,ein kleines Städtchen um eine vom hl.Agidiis 
(+ 721) gegründeten Abtei. Die j^bteikirche der BenediKtiner ward im ö.Jh. 
errichtet ; aie jetzige :\irche stammtaus dem 12. Jahrhunaert jßaubeginn 1116, 
wie eine Inscnrift an dsr sudlichen Aussenwand meldet. 

Von der Kirche selbst ist nicnt allzuviel abrig.ReligionsKrige und xKinxxxs- 
xxxöch die franz. Revolution Hessen schlies lieh nur aäe im 17- Jh. restau- 
rierte Schiff und ..en Ostteil d*^B Krypt^sowift die Gruft aes Heiligen 
(1116 qe onneü und get-en ii8u mit merkwürdigen Spitzbogen veioeb^n) abrig 
ImyChois die berahmte 'Vendeltreppe des hl . A^idius ,die im Mittelalter als 
aa .;€ or ^entlicnes Mütter, erk der Lehre von iinn Körperschnitten galt- 
ich gestehe ,dö.:S ich die Bedeutung dieses "Meister// rKe nichtverstanden 
hdbe. Dagegen verstehe ich gutj^ass die mächtige Fassade ,die für St.Tro- 
phine vorbildlich ist, das bed.utenste Garae ist, das die monumentale Bild- 
hauerkunst der romanischen rchule der . rovence hinterla en hat, bei Nach- 
hmung römircher Vorbilder besondere bei Anordnung derB-uteile und bei den 
gros en Figuren der Apostel. Sie istsicher llk2 in Arbeit und umf:\sst dre i 
Fortal e von Säulem umrahmt, die e in , ai - <; einen aulfalend bewegten , figuren- 
reichen Fries im Gebälk tragen. Die Kunsthistthrik hat darauf hingewiesen, 
dass ander Ausführung mehrere Schulen (Toulouse ,Ile de France etc.) be- 
teili t sind und das am Fries die i-.inwirkung des -tils des Bischof sthronee 
m StNicola zu Bari erkennbar sei. Zwischen den portalen W/^ndnischen mit 
Fipjuren. In den Bogennischen über den lortaleniMitte Majestas Christi mit 
den .Symbolen der ..vangeiisten;Iinks anbetung cfer .^lagier , rechts Kreuzi^-ung. 
Ganz grosser Eindruck! 



30 



I 



I 



Man bekom/nt alLnählich Verständnis da.tür,wa& so vif^e KUn.'?tler in der 
Provence finden. ">a sind Cypressen , Oliven Haine ,vVeinpflanzungen »Farmen 
und reizenüe Dörfer mit honigfarbenen Hausern, g deckt mit orangefarbenen 
Zieffeln , überragt von Kirchtürmen. Oas alles in iner schön bewegten Land- 
6Criaft,die an Van Gogh und Cezanne denken läset • Darüber aie im.ner wecnse.n- 
de ßeleucntung. einer starken Sonne. 
Als wir jetzt ntch Süden/der Küste zu fanrenylernen wir einen neuen V.ug der 
Provence kennen: Schill" durchv.achsene Sümpfe, darre Salzfl^ichen und Dünen, 
cUf denen hier una .a :chirm. ini' n ,/?' cholaerbäume unj T marisken wachsen. 

Wir sind im ./estteil der Camargu e »die vom Rhonedelta gebilaet j.ird. 
Untere i-ahrt erst an .er Petit t^hone entlang, beru.rt aen E ang de :^camandre 
und kreuzt xen Hhonecanal^ oevor w4h? twa* Ucs eigenartige Bild xxHXHreiner 
u mwallten Stad t vor uns liegt: Aigues Hortes . 

Seinen Na.nen ''lote nasser" v^^.-rdankt es seiner Lage /zwischen Sümpfen und 
Teichen. Die oampfe sind im 19. Jh. z.'.l. trocken :-elegt und mit .ein bepflanzt. 
r:.inmal .: ag die Staat am Meer. Ludwig (^r heilige gründete sie, um einen riafen 
auf eig-nem ßoden zu haben, auf dem er sich nach >em iieili^^en Land einschiffen 
Konnte.Als benutz des aafens baute er aätH Tour Gonstance . 124ö schifft er 
sicn hi r für den i:ieDetvnten rreuzzug nacn Ägypten und f ar aen achten 1270 
nach Tunis ein, wo er sterben sollte. 

Luawigs Sohn ihilipp der Kühne ksxt fügt dem Turm Constance di e ümwallung 
ab 127l hinzu, ein fast rechtecKiges j: -^ralleJ loe:ram mit 20 Türmen und 10 To- 
ren;sie ist unversehr eraalten, wie sie im I3. Jahrhundert war.Lin einzig- 
artiges Statdbild,das uns an Carcasonne aenken lässt, obwohl hier dee «^^«t' 

f.,anz anders ist. 

;.ir machen eine kleine Rundwanaerung um die iWauer , treten zu elnm Tor hinaus 
und la . en uns schliesslich am Place St. Loui s im Vorgarten des Restaurant des 
Voyageur s zum lunch niederi^^Ds gibt Mut:cheln und , chnecken ,auch prachtvolle 
grosse rote eintrauben. 

Eine reizende Legende hatte ..lir en Besuch von'^ Les St. Marie de l a Mer '^* 
wünschenswert .emacht : unsere weiteren llane erlr:.uben uns das leider nicht, 
"o will ich wenigstens die Legenae festhalten: Auf der r lucht von Judaa 
landen hier im Jahre ^5, um Wie irovence zum Ciiristentum zu bekehren, 
iMaria Ja co baa ,dxe Schwester aer hl..-iunp:frau , :varia Salom e , Mutter cer Apostel 
Jacobus und Johannes , und Maria Magdalena , die .-iüsserin. Mit ihnen war die 
schwarze Diner jn oara. Ich höre,aat.s im ai und Lktober grorse 
v^al.i fahrten, der ^-.igeuner öesoniers , hierher kommen. Ob die schwarze S -ra 
dafür ein Desonaerer '.rund istV 

Zurück dir ch einen anaeren Teil dgr Camargue, der noch exotischer wirKt,nach 
Arles,v;o unser Reisekamerad John seine machen packt; er reist heute abend 
von Avif^/non nach Paris und äer >.cnweiz. 

vir bringen ihn auf ^"^^ g n , Denutzen ab r gleichzeitig die Z.eit uns wieaer 
einmal Avignon anzusenen.is wird vom Papstpalast beherrscht , in aem sieben 
Papste .m l4.Jh.aer Lnsxcnerheit von Rom entflohen. Die Anlage imponiert 
aussen dirch de Vucht cfer J inien.D- s Innere wirr-it in einer Massenf unrung 
viel entt uschen^er,als ich es von meinem letzten x^esuch nit Ol. yy 1^3# 
in Erinnerung hatte. Leere Ri : senhalien ,nur iuiponierend in ihren ^.usmassen 
Charkteristisch für Jie r.angelhafte iührung,dass iskiner der ^xxxkKHxxxx 
Säle gezeigt wurde, die mit Fresken g.: schmückt sind . Z.B. Im Au.-ienzsaal von 
Matteo Giovanetti,wie im 'rbeitszimmer Clemens Vi,^em sog. Chamber de C^rf 
mit )arstellungen von Jagd und i-ischfang etc.(Tgb VII, S. 55 ^^) 



31 







( 



Hinunter zum vr^^ai du Rhone zur Pont St«Benezet aus c iter Anh inglichkeit an 

das Kinderlied "-ur le pont d'j^.vigno n l'on y aanse tout en rond..'* 

Dabei iöt >ie anrucke daiur viel zu eng; der Platz, wo die Einwohnersi- h erholer. 

ist unter den erhaltenen ß05en.Es sind nur nocii Vi^^r. Der iieilige Benazet 

der Jien BcU aer Brücke aui" Geheiss eines üngels veranla; üte 1177ikonnte 

nicrit veriiinaern , lass sie aeit 1669 "^^ur HäJ f te zerstört ist. 

Sie fahrte einst hinaber zu Villeneuve Les vignon , ein s. t von Philipp dem 

Schönen als ÖolJwerk gegen die apstre.'L idenz angelegt , dann ''/ohnort vieler 

Kardinäle •-ioll noch heute »obwohl verarmt , von meinem alten Charme bewahrt 

haben. leider keine Zeit sich aavon zu ubeizeu en. 

Wir bringen John's Gepäck zum -;ahnho f ,der jenseits der gros :en Stadtmauer , 

die noch heute Avi^non umzieht , liegt ;par.K.en dort unser Auto und wan ern zu 

Fusstln die C ours Jean J&ur es hinein , Beginn der Raupt stra.^se , die die ganze 

btadt bis zum Papstpalais durchzieht . Im matten^edeckten hof des Hotel Cri l- 
Ion essen wir ausgezeichnet zu Abend; das bscniedsinahl für unseren Roise- 

a. je i adelndem wir rnit Asti Spumante -merkwürdige Wahl Mannis und Johns in 
Frankreich!- weiter gute R- ise wünschen. Erst später fäl t :air ein,d&ss Olly 
und icn 19:>3 auch in diese.u aehr fe'-;epflegten hotel gewohnt heben. 
John * s Schlafwagen geht erst serir spät ab;Marianne möchte nicht den Lieimv^^eg 
bei tiefer Dankexheit aatreten. :0 nehiien wir am Bahnhof . bschie d. > s war eine 
in j - der ..-eise gelungne , e:neinsarrie Reise. 

Ruckfahrt nach ;.rles ohne Schwierigkeit ; es ist ^ni Verkenr und die Vegschil* 
der selbst in der Dämmerung und herembrecnendeu Ounkeiheit gut bu lesen. 
/vas für eine herrliche Luft! #ir lieben xieute mit Runafahrt und dem Hin und 
H>r nc^ch i^vi .non Cci.26^ kii. zurückgelegt . 

Morgen gibt es eiHBn c.nderen ^btchievu.Wxr wer^.en die Provence verjuatsen una 
in das Department cfer r^hone übergehen. 



( 



32 



1 



l 



Donnerstag 6, August; Ein herrlicher Morgen! Heute geht es ohne weitere 
Abschweifungen genau nach Noraen. 

Vor ier Ausfahrt bei cter Banque de France kaufen *ir für 20 $ Benzinschei- 
ne.Langwier%iges Unternehmen , das die Kühe di .ses würdigen Unternehmens 
erheblicnstört . 

Auf der Karte sehe ich, das unser v'i'eg uns nicht entfernt von Chateauneuf 
du laye voraberführt .Angenehme Erinnrung an einen der feinsten V/eine aus 
Khonethal ,der von einem Booen stammt |der ursi^rünglich im Besitz der 
Papste in Avignon war. Durch zart getönte lanaschaft ifiit Blick auf die 
breite _^hone. 

In Orange gro- eer Marktb^ trieb , so d^ss wir sfakwer auf dem Ilace de la 
Republique Platz zum Parken finden. Oann drängen wir unsdurch die Menge 
zum antiken Theater ,::!esen Besuch sich i-irklich lohnt;es ist eines der schön-l 
s ■ en und besterh. Itenen Thef^ter aer römischen Antike. ntstanden um Beginn| 
der ]• aiserzeit.' .it seiner ^us mäcntieen SteinbJ ocken aufgeführte mehrge- 
schossige Bahnenrackw. nd (103 m. breit, 3b m.hoch) , sowie nit einen sich 
an den Berg anlehnenden Rängen und ätzstufen far etwc< 7,C00 Besucher gibt 
eine vortreffliche Vorstellung von einem römit^chen T eaterraum . Tm nneren 
sind an der kuckwond wieder Säulen aifgerichtet und es ist vohl das einzige 
Iheater Inder Welt, wo selbst noch die Kaiserstatue des Augustus in der 
grossen Mittelnische erh-lten ist. 

Orange war einst Hauptort aes kleinen Fürstentum Ürenien,das 1§31 an die 
nieaerlandische 1 ini- des Hauses Wassau kam, wonach die Königin der Nie- 
aerj&nde nocri heute oen Titel einer iirincessin von Oranien-Nassau fahrt, 
obwohl Orange 1713 an Frdnkreich cbgetretn» wurde. 

xÄÄi'A'ir versehen uns vor der Ausfahrt -r.it Proviant, um unterwegs zu früh- 
stücken. Bei cfer Ausfahrt passieren wir auch noch die zweite römische Sm.k 
Sehenswürdigkeit , einen Triumphbogen , der nachdem Siege Caesars ^9 v.Ch. 
eriichtet wurde. Er ,= ilt trotz Verwitterung als riner der schönsten in 
Frankreich: Drei Bo^en mit Kassettenwolbung bilaen die :)urchgänge .rries 
init kämpfenden Kriegern-,wohl f ine (^allierschlcht .Gefangen , die wohl die 
Gefangennahme eines gallischen Heprfuhrers symbolisieren ; gallische Schiff 
trophäen etc . 

Der weitere Weg f,.hrt ins untere ^^one tfeaf^^lo km vor Lyon,ancfem wichtigen 
Verkeiirsweg von der i-roven e nach Burgund.Zur romi-.chen 3'aiEerzeit 4ie 
Vienna die zweite Haui.tst dt Sudgalliens und besitzt aus4ieser Zeit und 
Mittelalter noch bc^leutende Baudenkmäler , deren Besichtigung uns aus Zeit 
mangel unmöglich ist. Wir können uns nur kurz umsehen, ei-n berühmtes Nougat 
kaufen, das Inder Nähe fabriciert wird , und Cafe trinken 

3:3C fahren wir in LYON ein , aes.ben prachtige Lage zwischen Phone und So^ne 
uns schon bei der nlnfährt deutlichwird. 

Hauptsitz der französischen Textilindustrie »Hauptstadt cfes Department Rhone 
staatliche und frei Katholische Univer^ ität ,techni. che Hochschule .... 
mit etwa 700.000 Einwohnern die dritt£<,rosste -tadt Frankreichs. 
Um zu unserem Hotel zu kommen , fahren wir über aie örücke zu der Schwemmland 
Insel zwischen H^iösne und oane ,..o MBeen und Behöraen li gen. In Mitten 
der scijonste Platz der Staat:Pla ee Bel±ecour ,Qer l6l7 c^geJ egt/ in .er Mit- 
te ein :,ro- es Reiterstandbild Louis äIV. Hier liegt aicn unser Hotel 
R oya l ,aas seine Krtskla^sigkeit nur durch unverscnAmte i reise beweistund 

keine -apfealung verdient . -Vom Platz aus hat man einen schönen Blick hi- 
nauf zur Höhe von Fourviere mit der K<- tne:.rale;hier stc nd eiBBt die Haupt 
stadt_ lugduneum dei^tffrovinz lugdunensis seit 42 v.Ch. 



( 



33 



I 



1 



Zwei suseen interessieren mich aehifbeide sind nur bis 5 Uhr offen. So ist 
es lar'\'nich äusserst angenehm ,dass diese difaht bei unserem Hotel liegen. 
Jrüher waren die ,::chat^e im Calais du Commerce vereinigt. Jetzt sind sie 
in zwei ir lais es XVITI Jn. übersiedelt und beideliegen von meinem Hotel 
um die ucke in aer Rue de la Gnarit fe. 

No. 30-32 ist das ehemalige lalais des Seigneur de j avalle von 1739. Hier 
im echten x^ahmen sind die Schatze des M usee Lyonnais des Arts Qecorat ive, 
pr&chtvoile Möbel jBilatec-L iche ,j? htyencen. fr&nz .AquareiJ e una Zeichnungen 
stilgerecht untergebraäät . 

N0.34 enthalt das liusee historique des Ti ssus. im wun ervollen Rühmen des 
I-alais des r c de Viileroy , einst -ouverneur von Lyon; ::(sM:iiat auch ais dem 
aem XVIII Jahrhundert , ist abr natarlic h a-ineiaTSTstimmung anp:eT>aPst. 
Die Seidenw berei wurde erst von Italinern im 15. Jahrhundert in Lyon ein- 
geführt ;yLe hatte ihre Bliitez^^it im 17. und I8 .Jahrhundert . i;brr ie reichen 
C-eidenweber üaben verstanden einen weltweiten berblick üb r die Webe^-^unst 
von ihren ;\nf^änr;:en bis in die Gegenwart zusamnenzubringen- 
r)a sind Kirchengev/änaer aes VII . Jh . ,byzantiniche vebereien des IX. Jh., far- 
bige 5;arf]tweberei de? XV.Jh,wie man sie in tersien nicht -riehr .sehen kann, 
engli'^^ihe tickereine m i^^arbe und Cold auf Weberei rund aus d?m XIV Jh.. 
Itaiieni: ne -amte de XVI. Jh. und naturlich aucri ine vol ständige über- 
sieht de^; ei-'nen rzeu nifse anter louis XIV,Iouis XV bis zur Gegenwart. 
l;nmö,.slich ±n k -.rzen iVorten diesen Reicntum auch nur anzudeuten. 
i;s w„ r vÄieder ein .anz grobcer Genussl 

Marianne treffe ich wieder im Hotel. Der Friseur hat sie inzwvischen in eine 
Französin verwandelt. 

Kin Taxi bringt uns in die Rue Royale 13 ,eine en^e Gasee in der Altstadt. 
Hier läägt das Restaurant der 'Me re B razier ". um es genau zu sagen , aj.es iöt 



nur" Jhr Sohn, der im Gui ^e Micheiin 'La v>ualit^ .e la lable" nur 2 Sterne 
nct,aeren Bedeutung aefi^nieit ist : ^^H ^rvorragende Ku he, ver d ient einen Um - 



w e R- i^ 



■ ^ 



agegen 



die yxUtter:.Lie ist d±e einzige i?r..u,aie im Guide MicLieiin 



dreier oterne wardig befun <en wurae una dies -;eit 30 Jahren! 

3 Ster ne werden aef inie^-t ; " b-i-n^ aer be ten / uche FranKreicn- ; eine Reis e 
wer t 'on y mange parfois merveilleusement . 

s Restaurant cer .-utter liegt aber lö Kl. von Tyon entfernt auf einem Hügel. 
Grund genug uns mit dem onn zu'»begnugen" , zumal aas I^'enu das gediehe ist, 
wie oei cer »nutter.. )as unveranderlicn g l eiche M enü erklärt die utter mit 
den Worten''Nur so könn ich gcrfection e j-eichen. 

iiis bestedt aus : Fonds d'artichauds aux fois gras; -uenelles au i^-ratin = 
Hecntklosschen .lit Rahmsauce; Volaille demi deuille= Roularde ,cter unter der 
naut vorsichtig danne Traf i elscheiben einc^efugt sind, deren vorh ri^e Be- 
handlung eine Sac e für sicri ist und hier zu weit fahren werde, -ch werde 
das Kecept am Knde des Bandes beifigen. 

■'<ir beenden unser E'sen rait frischen , duftenden -Valderbeeren . 
Fine alte BedienerinxiBÄXKRut -maa kannes nicht ano.ers nennen-betreut unj; 
sie emptienlt uns ai h den pr^^chtvol. en Bordeaux 1 uilly zu nserem Schlemmer 
mahl, das erstaunlich preiswert ist: Rechnung mit IQ))'- Service Fr.!7,^9C = 

S 11. 

Oas Ganze war ein ebenso guter Beweis hoher französischer Kultur, als nur 

eine der grossen rornani oben 12 uten,diewLr in letzter Zeit/ahen. 



^^ 



( ) 



< 



( 



Freitag 7. August ; Ausfahrt ais Lyon .era aufe der Rhone folgend, tleg^nte 

vVohnvie tel werden von schönen Landhäu^:ern in grossen i^arks abgelöst. 

Über dem Rhonetal liegt leichter Nebel. Impressionismus musstt in Frankreich 

entstehen. 

^ir sind Mitten im Land der berühmten Burgund erw^ise .3eau jolais liegt ein 
>A^enig abseits. von unoer Poute , ab: r sonst lesen sich die Namen der i.rtschafter 
die wir berühren o..er nahe komnen,wie eine v\/einkarte:Fcuilly-fuisse ,Macon , 
Puli:^ny-Montrachet ,Volay »Fomiriard. . .um nur einige zu nennen, von den berühm- 
ten Namen der "Cote d'or ". 

Gegen Mittag halten wir in Beaune .Es liegt inmitten des berahmten burgun- 
dis hen ÄxkiRt^Wiinbaugebiet iMxkaixHxMs ehemalier Sitz des Herzöge von 
Surgund besitzt es zahlreiche mittel- Iterliche Bauten, die einen Besuch sehr 
lohnpn.-.vir halten vor dem Hotel de 1.-^. Poate ,Blvd.Clernanceau , .essen Küche 
berunmt und vom M:|Chelin mit einem Stern ausgezeichnet ist. seine Ecrevisseß 
a la crne und sein Volnay geoen dieser Auszeichnung refaht.Man sitzt ;-Jue- 
seriemaehr angenehm im Garten vor dem Hotel bis der Besuch des Hotel de 
Dieu um 2 Uhr wieder mö-:lich ist. 

Das Hotel -Dieu ist ein Krankenhaus »des -en Entstetmng einer Stiftung des 
I30Ü in Autun gebornen K-^nzl rs Nicol. s Rollin und seinerFrau Guigone de 
talin zu aanken i.'it.i^s wurde 1^4^ bis 51 erb. ut 

Durch eine Vorh:.lle tritt man in einen .'.hrenhof ,dar mit seinen zweistocki- 
k«n von Turmchen gekrönten HolzarKaden und seinen vielfarbigen Dächern, dem 
Ziehbrunnen und Kreuz ein äusserst wirkunsgvolles Bild :^rgibt,das keines- 
falls an elnan Hospital aer Armen denken lässt. 

Die Fuhrung beginnt mit dem gros.sen 72 m. langen Krankensaal , aer seit kurzem 
nicht megr benutzt wird. 26 Betten, durch Gardinen von einander abgesonaert, 
stehen parallel d^r v,and und können von beiaen Seiten erreicht werden. 
An jeaera Bett ein Tischchen mit altem hübsch geformten Kupferfeerät. 
In Mitten eine Kanzel fo± Biblevorlesungen. 

Anschliessend ist die Kapelle ; wir haben das Glück die Schwestern beim Got- 
tesdienst zuaehen;sie tragen noch heute die beider >^.ründung vorgeschriebene 
Tracht; ie erinnert mich an beguinen in . echeln.riier hing früher der in da£ 
'luseum aberfuhrte grosse P.oger van der veyden. 
Es .:<'eht über cfen Hof in die Küche : Altes Kupfergerät durch mo:ierne Herde er- 
gänzt, ^ms denen das neue Hospital versorgt Wird. Der piess im Riesenkamin 
wird durch einen utomat in Form eines N^annes gedreht, der "Messire Betrand'». 
Die i^potripke hat ihre mittelalterliche .-inrichtung voll bewahrt. 
Im sog.Museumssc.al wird die Langswand ganz von ctem riesigen Flu^elaltar ,den 
-vQcr er van (fer veyden für die Kapelle 14^2-5C schuf, eingenommen; Das jungdte 
Glich t, äusserst farbenprachtige Oar£ tellung. In -itten ein mjestatischer 
Christus tronend auf dem liimmelbogen aitten unter a-n nackten v^estalten als 
höchster Hichter.Von iiingeln umgeben stosst der Erzengel -ichael in die Fosau 
ne.Die Jungfrau und Johannes aer Täufer erflehen die i'Iilde des Herrn. Dahmfer 
in Gestalt von Aposteln etc Fortraits Gekannter Persönlichkeiten. Natürlich 
ist aer aftraggeber Kanzler Hollin , wie ahi „ohn der Kardinal und die i'rau 
des ranzlers darunter ,. ber auch Fapst Lug® IV und Philipp aer 'K:^x^.^^Z^ 
Gegenüber ein kleinerer Flagelaltar mit ..en tiervorrag^enden Fortraits des 
Kanzlfrs una seiner Frau^begleitet von den Heiligen Sebastian und -ntonius, 

Schutzheilige des no. pitals ,und cenen aus der Verkundung. m Grisaille. 
Pn aer Fin.=rangswand erdbeefarbne Gobelins mit Wappen und Initialen der 
Stifter G und N. ,aazu die Devise "SEUL'» ,in welchem Wort der Kanzler seine 
trfrue Ergebenheit für s^me : ebensgefanrtin auszuarüken wünschte. Diese 
vVandteppichte hingen früher .n hohen Feiertagen vor ien i:>etten im Krankensaa 



~frv w^'^\ *^j» 



■ Twwc. tx-y>< 



55 



I 



< 



Vom Fhrenhof schaut :ian in einen Stilgarten init geschnittenen Hecken. 
Das jetzige Krankenhaui- wird nicht gezeigt .man hört aber mit Genugtuung, 
w±e klug (fer Kanzler Hollin für die Krhaltung una rarsorge d r ?:ranken 
voraujrsch uend ;^esof:t hat. Er hint^rlies, statt eines Vermö^:ens ,das wahr- 
scheinlich im Laufeder Zeit verloren ge angen wäre, ein grosses Areal 
da* besten Weinberge , die noch heute ^^roc.^^e Einnahuen bringen. Die irn 
Novekrnoer stattfinde Auction der hochwertigen Weine ist jedes Jahr eine 
Sens tion und far die Preisentwicklung des Jahres masfLgebend.E.s ist an- 
zunehmen , das s die ^ieine des J hres 195>9 ein besonders gutes Resultat in 
Güte und ireis bringen \^/prden. 
Im ehemaligen Haus aer Herzoge von Bur^und ist ein IVeinmuseum urtler-^gebrach 
\vo aie .anze Geschiente des bur^^undi^chen Weinoaus una eine Übersicht der 
daiiiit zusaminenhängenaen Geräte '»pichet , b.>ateil i es ,tastevin'» ausgestellt 
sind.'vVir begnu.ien uns in aen äusserst malriochen Hof des im 15.una ib.jn 
entstandenen Jebciudes zuschauen. Es liegt dicht bei der Eglise de^ fto.tre 
Dame mer Kircce des XIV una XV. Jh. mit dreischii ^iger Vorhalle;in einem 
Saal aes a-schliessenaen e hemalir^en Kapitel gebaU'ies flamisch e "andteppiche 
die v.m Kardinal Rollin für die Kirche in Auftrag g geben wurden; 
" Tapisseries ae la^Vier^^' um ISGC .Schonfarbige narstelJung ^es Lebens 
der oun laru im Leinen und Seidengewebe . 

Der '^^eiterweg setzt :ie '» Veinkarte" fort. Ich erwähne nuriNuits -t. George, 
Vosne Romanee ,Chambertin. . . bevor wir MJON erreichen. 

Unser lotel de la Cloche liegt am Place Darcy einem grossen Garten gegen- 
über. Wir legen nur unser Gepäck ab ,|carkR»und fahren gleich durch die 
hier abgehende Ru de la Liberty zum holbkreisföririigen llace de la 1 ibea^e 
tion(l68b) vor aem e..emc>iigen"iogis du Roi", jetzt Rathaus, m den Barockbau 
Vön"Harduin- .ansard :ind veile des aes mittelalterlichen Palasf.es de r 
Herzöge von Burgund einbezogen. 

Hier be.inaet sich auch das ..usee des Beaux ..rts , im Ostflugel aes Her- 
zogspal-;.stes,zu oem man von er Place de aiiit Chapelle /.ugang hat. 
Der Platz heisst nach (tr Kapelle aes alten Laiastes, auf die wir gleich 
nach Lintrittstossen..i.xn hoch gewolb^pt Saal ais dem l4.Jh. ,in dem der Crdeja 
vom goldenen Vlies seinen Sitz hatte. ^inge Erinn-run^sstucke sind noch 
hier;die Hauptsachen befinden sich heute m aer Weltlichen Schatzkammer 
in cfer iienier Hofburg als sog. "Burgundenschatz'» ,der jedes Mal, wenn ich 
Gelegenheit habe ihn zu sehen , meine höchste .^.ewunderung hat. 

Einige geschichtlichen Anmerkungen zu r eignen Klärung: 

Konig Jonann von Frankreich gibt 13^3 -einem jüngeren Sohn Philipp XEKXXaig^^ 
" Le Hardy'U Kühn e) das Herzogtum Burgund, der d^mit die burgundische Neben- 
linie des Hauses Valois begründet. Er regiert von 136^-1^^^ und feERMKÄKt 
erwirbt durch Heirat mit dsr Erbtochter der Grafen von Flandern die 
Niederlande ;als Ruhestatte eines Hauses begründet er 13^^ die Chartreuse 

de Champ'iiol. 

Ihm folgt Joan ^^Sans Peur '^ l^C^-1^19. 

Unter Philipp " Le Bon" {ikl9'lk67) erreicht das Herzogtum Burgund den 

Gipfel ff;iner Macht;es umfasst auoser Burgund grosse Teile Holland , Belgiens 

Luxemburg, Flandern. Er vermehrt sinen Reichtum w.iter durch Heirat mit 

Jsabell von Portugal l429. 

Philipp le Don ist oranger des Orden s vam_ Goljenen_ Vlies , dessen Messornat, 
Schwurkreuz, WapT:enkette etc heute in der wiener Schatzkammer ruhen ; 
Maximilian, Erzherzog von Osteriieich ,liess sie dorti.in nach seiner Heirat 
mit M ria von ßurgun überfahren. (1^77) - - 



36 



(.' 



( 



Charles__^'Le T*in*raire" ( aerTolikahne)1^67-1^77 ist cfer letzte der Herzo,.^e 
von Bur.^:und" aus cera' Hause Vciloi6,ein von i^.hr^^eiz verzehrter Mann.^r ist 
dauernd in Kriege verwickelt • Bemäcritih,t sich Lothringenswird o ber ,al6 er 
sich 1^76 auf die öchweiz stürzt, bei Granson und Kurten geschl: c>;en Die 
Schweizer -nachten grosse Beu^e,aie im .. richer Historischen !4useum von 
dem ß:rossen Luxus zeugt, xit dem sicn dsr herzog umgab. Der Herzog von ' othrin 
gen erobert niit Hilfe der chw izer sein Land zurück. Charles fällt 1^77 
bei der Belagerung von ^;ancy. 

r.r hinterlässt eine Tochter , Maria von burgund ,die reichste ^:rbin Europas. 
Ihr vVunsch das Erbe sicherzustellen stimmt mit dem Wunsch der Habsburger, 
durch Heirat ihre H ausmacht zu vermehren überein. So heiratet/^en :.ohn 
Kaiser Friedrich III, den Erzherzog Maximilian von Habsbur^ 1^77. 
Ihr ;iohn aus der Ehe ist Fhii ipp( der .-^chone ) , Erzherzog von Österreich. 
Auch er vermehrt aie Rabsbur^^ische Hausmacht aurch Heirat mit Jonanna vo n 
Kastilien, Tochter von Js^bella von Kastilien und Ferdinand von ,^.ragon, 
dTe'~"I'binkier spanischen Monarchie. Nachdem lode von Jsc^bella von Kastilien 
kommen Ihilipp und Jon nna nach Kastilien, um aie Regentschaft von Kastilien 
zu übernehmen, als Philipp pkotzlich ^ tirbt . (15ü6) .Jonanna , schon früh r 
schwermutig, v rfalat in Wahnsinn, lebt bis zu ihrem Toae 1!>S5 im Schlosse 
Tordesilias in Kastilien. in Gefangenschaft. ^ 

Aus aer Ehe sind zwei ..ohne hervorgegangen. '''''i£v^i^|§||)ISH!i(ig8i^i ^JS^^ 
Köni g CEE veremi, t n Spaniens , erbt 1!?19 von KäiBe? MxiiiiiliaA dl^ fictüöbur- 
Tischen Erblanoie ,ust er eich ,K ernten, St- iermark , Vor.. e roste eich, Tirol und 
die Wiederlande. arl _:ibt aiexKxfaixHiiK östreichis hen ^rblande an j^ inen 
Bruaer Ferdinand. (1521) ,tier durch Heirat Böhmen und Ungarn seinem Reich 
ninzuf agt • 

Doch zurück in das Mus^e des Beaux rts 

/u gezeichnete Gemildegc:: 1.1 erie n ch - hulen geordwat . 'Jnter aen frühen Fla- 

men'^bleibt besonders "die Anbetung da|ri.MjAr3:itej^''^9ieuö^4ßS^5i¥0^y6ilS§'^^® ^^ 
Erinnerung, von .^en deutschen cmr unbekannte Bil ;er von Konrad >itz. 
Im Salon Cond^ ,aer ^Is Gouv-meur hier residierte Jastellie von La Tour 
und andere französiehe Meister des XVIII Jahrhunderts. 

r,er einzige e?'haj.tene Raum aus der Zeit der burgundischen Herzöge ist der 
S .gie de s Gardeg . Philipp ler Gute(1^19-l^ö7) hat ihn als Festsaal ge- 
scnaffen. Heute dient er den aus der 179^ zerstörten Chartreuse de Cha 'p- 
-;.ol g- retteten ßrabmahler und Kunstwerken. 

Grabmahl Philipp Le 4ardi vvur.e l3ö:?-l^ll von Jean ue Karville »Claus ..luter 
far ie Chartreuie gescnaf f en. Der •'»acntige^Tote^das ÖgV^Kalfen^'" /^''^^'^ 
raht mit gefaltenci^ n Händen von geflügelten H.nr.eln behatet ^^^^§J"^^^ 
scnwarzen'^Marinors.-.crophag,a-r unten von einer Art gotichem kKKUxyuHR um- 
geben ist, in dem xji^^m die -JicxaHMrMitgliea -r des Trauergefolges circulie- 
ren. Das Gr^ahl far s inen Nachfolger a^c4-19) Jean sans leur und .^ ine 
Frau Margare te von ß.-.yern vvurüe l^^jj-7- nali\ demsieben j-luoter c-usgefahrt. 

Hier sind auch zwei prachtvolle , vergoldete und farbige . cnnitzaltar e 
aas cfer Gnartreuse ,die ihilxpp Le Hardi be teilte und ie 1390-1^99 geschaf 
fen wuraen. ..chlies lieh hän^^t hi^r auch ein Portrait von rhilipp dem Gu- 
ten, dem .chöplar des Saal s, das in sein r Qualität von Roger van der 'Veyden 

sein Könnte. 

Auf em i^ückweg merzen wir noch dnen Hlick in die Kmc^ensäle des alten 

Herzogsschlosses ,it mächtigen Kaminen ..nd Pbzugsvorrichtungen. 



/<i-H^ tr CX J 



1>1 



Y 



c 



4u6 dem 'luseurn ko.'nrnend , f ilÄ t and ^r Blick auf eine interd^" '-nte Fös c^de 
am Knde ter Rue Vaillant;sie ist eigen rtig horizontal gegliedert mit 
aufgestzten Turmenden, fcs ist die Kirche St «Michael , die im l^). Jahrhundert 
gotisch begonnen, im laufe d^r Zeit eine Renaissancef ä.sade bekommen hat. 

Die Zeit erlaubt leiaer nicht, uns nachanaeren interes.^anten bauwerken um- 
zusehen »an denen die Staat noch reich sein soll. Vergecliches shopren in der 
rtue ae la Libert* , eine der Maupt^j schäfts8tFa?ssen,n.'Ch "tastevin" /vVeinKOster 
von cfenen wir selbst ein besondersschöne: Exemplar in ^-.ilber besitzen. 
Was uns aigeboten wird, ist meist hisslich und , wenn eLni^ermossen »viel zu teuer 
C.1S kleine Aufmerksamkeit unseren Freunden mitzubring n. 

So kehren wir in unser hotel zurück, wo inzwischen eine grosse 'Tour''' angekom- 
men sein nuss« /'llesist aberfüllt ,:^uch cfias Restaurant. ;;.o ziehen wir vot^ 
lieber im Gran d Ca fe gegenüber an d?r Ecke de^i Blvd.de Brosse Sandwiches , die 
mit v.iner aiTs^ e ze ic hn ten .'taste beie.t sind, zu verzehren und ein Glas Bier 
dazu im Freien zu trinken. 

Samstag 8. Aur^ust ; Heute ist für die '»normalen'* Gaste des /lotels ein Frühstück 
Raum serviert , was gesten abend eigentlich auch der Fall hütte sein iiüssen. 
Die "Tour'' f ulJ t Jen Speisesaal voJlkommen. 

Schönes //etter.Oer '.'eg vveiter durch Lothringen führt dicht bei ' Pomr emy- 
la-}u cel3 e (Vogef.en) bei, dem Geburtsort der Juni/frau von Orleans, der wir 
dort uf uns rem Hinweg nt-ch üden gedachten. A'ir ; a&,-:ieren I- ngpes C Ht .Marne) 
Prächtige Lage auf einem Bergsporn des Plateaus gleichen Namens mit tlten 
Befestigungen und Iter K:^thedrale. Icü gestehe, da?s icn noch nie von aiesem 
Ort gehört habe und auch nicht ..-Uo^.te ,dass hie aer grosse Philospoph Dide- 
rot (1713-Ö4) geooren ist. Das GanÄ hat aber etwas so einladendes ,dass /ir be- 
dauern, die Zeit für einen besuch nicht sparen zu können. Unser Hauptziel ist 
ja heute Nancy . 

Es ist die alte Houptstadt Lothringens .iNlach dem polnischen '.rbf olgeKrieg(17j/3 
-j^5)tgat F'rsnz von Lothringen , ier •.:latte ;,aria Theresias, im /Viener Friedeten 
sein Herzogtum an den Schwiergervater Louis XV' ,aen enthronten polnischen 
König Stanislaw Leszinsky, ab . 

Er hat aus Nancy ein Juwel gemacht. ;4ein alter lang ver.-torbner Freund, Prof. 
Kurt Giaser,vom Berliner Kupferstichkabinet nat mir zuerst von aieser Stadt 
vorgeschwärmt . 

Der neue inerzog legte ciie Neuschaffung in die Hänae des hier gebürtigen 
Emanuel H<^r*iUen 17!:2-6l schuf er j.ie einheitlich abgelegte Flatzfolge von 
f stiicher Schonneit und hoechoter Eleganz. 

Mittelpunkt ist die Place tamislaw .. it dem ?^eiterdenkmäl des neuen Herzogs. 
Er steht vor iem grö.-^ten }alais,dera Rathaus »Fassade im klassicistischem 
^til;innen fuhrt eine Treppe nit i:r.AChtigem Rokkogelinler in den • rsten Stoci? 
zu einem Festsaal, in enw-r von auf en hineinscheuBn. Vier weitere sttatliche 
mit Balkons und Laternen geschmückte Palais an ein an eren S iten fassen den 
fast quaaratirchen Platz ein. Die ab gestumpften ^c ken de sPla tfeee s — unddas 
ist einzigartig -- sind mit wundervollen vergoldfTen Glt'E'ern von Jean laraour, 
von dem auch das Gelanaerim Fatliäus stan;iiit,versenen;z'- i dieser Gitter umrah- 
mit Bleifiguren ;eschmuckte Brunnen. 

Die Nordseite begrenzen einstockige Gebauaebauten , die sich in er Llace de 
la Carri^'re fortsetzen. iHxxHxxXxtteZu ihr kommt man durch einen Triumphbo- 
gen,a:r i7!?7 zu Ehren ouis XV errichtet wurde. Eine langgestreckte Allee 
in cer Mitte f jhrt zu cfer ovalen 1' Hemicycl e de la Carri^re mit Kolonnade n und 
dem Gouverneiuenthaus . - - 



59 



O 



Sonntag 9 .AuKUst ; Frdhstü.ke im Freien aif *r Terrasse vor dem Hotel, als 
Ti^^TUnnT^^Zrd^ ßhn zurückkehrt .wohin sie Dr.H .begleitet hat. 
Abschiedsbesuch vom Münvter. Die erneuerten fi.,uren von *r W stfassade^ 
di Statuen cfer Propheten .Statuuen der ^rügenden und Laster. der klugen 
und törichten Jungfaru«n zeigen schon «ieder starke .-Cha.en.ts ist gut/ 
die (ripinale in Sicherheit zu wissen. Umhergehen im Munster durch Got- 
dienst behindert. Gut, das.- wir gestern unoehinuerten tindruck gewonnen. 
Ebenso verhindert der Sonntag den noc :mali,sen Besuch des Kaison de iio 
1 'Oeuvre de Notre name;es öffnet «-st um 12 Uhr. Schade. 

^Veiterfaart über .ylulhoue e -.dort hatte mein Vat-r einen Freund, den er von 
der >bschule kannte; als gesettelter ; extilfabrikant haben wir ihn vor 
ians-en, langen Jahren in seiner schönen Villa besucht. _ 
Oamals war Colmar Mt a-inen Schätzen noch kein Begriff far mich. 
Mit s.^inenTitill Fachwerkäusern ist es si her die schönste tadt des 
Flsasacnach £tr .ssburg. Im 14. Jahrhundert *r Colmar eine be ieutende 
Handelsstadt, in *r Kunst und Wissenschaft blühten.Martin Schongauer 
akH^-91) ist hier geboren und Katthias_Grune.;_ld .eigentlich Mathis 
Neidhardt aus Wurzburg(geb .um l'+VO .gest . in Halle a.d.S.ale 1^2») n-.t 
hier Bewirkt, wovon das hier bewahrte Hauptwerk zeugt. 
Am^tadfrand liegt das im XIII Jh. gegründete Dominikanerkloster Unterlindec 
in teinen Jlostergebäuden und Inder 1269 «.«K^c^^Ht^geweihten frugotischen 
Kirche ist das U nter linden Museum untergebrabht.In ihr vortrefflich auf- 

«estert eine Sammlung von Bilaern der rheinischen ..chule des l^.Jahrhun- 
aerts mit ihren hauptsachlisten Heprasentanten Schongauer . Menmann und 

Matthias Grünwald. ., , . , ^ . ,, itic 

im Mittelpunkt naturlich der Isenneimer Altar . Grunwald nat ihn um 1515 
für das Klester Isenheim bei Geb^eiler gemalt. ..s ist eines der erscnut- 

t^rnsten Werke der deutscnen l'alerei in glühenden Farben und ubermachtm- 
ger Phantasie, ts ist in voitref ilichem <iuet*na .nach dem letzten 5 rieg 

zrLrgehlrend'slnd -.. Ende des Chors die Iculpturen des Altars von Nico- 

ui^aen^KreÜzganrin p.anz moderner Aufstellung sind gute tlastik des ik und 
15.Jahrnunaert6 verteij t .alte Glasfenster in die Wände gelassen.... 
in =e' K athedrale .'t.Martin am r.ingang des edlen hoch.'otischem Chor - 
^^,^^^M.n h. leuchtet - MJTtin Schon saue rs "M.- ria im Rosenha^' von 1^*73, 
eines seiner fruhstens Gemäße und^chon ^volj^endet .Bezaubernd! 

Vor der schweizer Grenze er'Jisc"ht uns einliewitter »i\ «i'^«». '-"If ^J^^^f ' 
der uns zwingt in einer Wirtechaft an "ege Schutz zu mchen. Hier lunchen 
wir gleich und machen Bekanntschaft mit dem e:.säsi-chen Nationalgericht 
"ChoScroute" .d.s aus Sauerkraut mit Kessler und ..rfefcchen sich zusammen 

setzt .Ausgezeichnet • . 

Dann fahren wir .als daB R-:: gen »ich beruni t nat, der Schweizer Grenze zu. 



( 



ko 



t 



J 



wir treten ohne Schwierigkeit in die §_C_H__^_E_I^Z über die Grenze 

Huningue - Base l. 

jetzt sehen wir zum er.^ten Mal,.vie nahe Elses Wohnung in der Rämelstrasse 
der französischen Grenze ist. Unser Besuch dort ist für spater vorgesehen*, 
J' tzt hat M rianne den vvunsch wieaer einmal das Kunstmutseum zu besuchen, 
VVieaersehen a. t >.en Konrads v'"^itz und Holbeins zu begehen. 
Auf bekanntem schönen /'eg nach Zül^ICH ,ao unsere Autotou r mit dem Citro en 
ihr Ende finde t.Afir hr.ben mit iHin' efwa 4,100 km, » ?-ur uckgelegt . Morgen 
wird der .Vagen verrbredungs.cemävss abgeholt wer-^en. 

Ifn Hotel St. Feter er.warten uns, wie immer , /nimmer mit Brd nachdem Garten. 
Diesmal sind es ZL^ und 2C6. und wie angenehm ,da3' man hier im Garten essen 
kann,vo uns "unsere'* Kellner freu lig begrd -en. Lei ler müssen wir feststel-| 
len,dacs unser Freund, der alte Direktor , seines Leidens wegen^ sich zur ick- 
gezogen hat;oein Ersatz raacht auf donarr-ten Blick keinen -llzu günstigen 
Eindruck. 

Montag IG. A ugust : Am Morgen wird uns ein eing-^schriebner Brief überreicht, 
der seit ochen auf uns wartet. Der Portier vom Hotel Montalembert hat ihn 
an die einzige Adresse gerichtet , die ihm bekannt war. In dem Brief teilt 
er uns .nit,dass das von mir to ahnsüchtig erv-rtte Bucherpaket mit allen 
Reiseführern einen Tag nach unserer .-breise angekommen ist. Lech, die recht 
zeitige nkunft hatte mir viel *>ger erspart. Aucin jetzt gibt es noch 
Kumplic^'^tionen: Kr kann ;ie Weitersendung, eil eingeschrieben , nicht ver^n- 
la. ^3en,fagt -ber gleich einen : ntwurf hinzu, wie er sich unseren Antrag 
an -ie zuständige" teile denkt. Mein Trinkgeld hat sich wirklich ^elonnt. 
Du auchcUrch die Lagerung Unkosten enfetanden sind von einigen hundert 
Francs, füge ich cfer Sicherheit halDer ..^leicn einen tauend Frc.nkschein bei. 

üblicher Rundgang in die St.^^t: Geldwechsel in aer ? reditc.n:: talt ,Lrufunng 
meiner Llugreservationen bei S«vit-.s Air, Air l^rance und T"A »Bestellung des 
Bectenbiliets für mich ,fiackfanrtkarte für >iari:.nne nach Basel , aa wir ja 

ab neute ohne Auto p.ind. 

Mitta>^s er^.cheint ver breaungsgemäss 4arp:arete Gliksman . A'ir es.-en zusam- 
men Mittag, die traditionelle Forelle/ bei /rl.Anna im '(eplerhof »trinken 
Tee auf UBBerexm Zimmer, da es gie-st und essen aicn abenis zusammen im 
Hotel. 

Dienstag 11. August : Jonnny ist wieaer da. Bringt div.^hokola Je aus Berlin 
mit ,aie wie namanns dünne Platten, Most Iralinen aite trinne/^ungen auf- 
frischen. mit ihm besorge Hausanzug«mit'»Weste ,was hier kein } roblera ist, 
hole das Ferienbillet ab. Zum hchluss suchen wir eine goldene flache Arm- 
banduhr (Eterna) ,di sich J. schon lanf.:e wünscht, und eine kleine Damenuhr 
bei:'iegrist in der Oetenbachgasse 26 aus, bevor ±ca mich r'iit '"arianne bei 
Feldpaus treffe, wo wieaer gute iink^ufe gelingen. 

Der übrige Tag i. t j-Urgarete Glicks m ann gewidmet . Zunächst dinieren wir 
allein auf (ter Terr cse d r Congresshalle , trinken C fe im :7c.rten des Hotel 
Baur au lac ,w s sie sicu lange gewünscht hat und plauaern,was die Haupt- 
sacne ist. -- oenas wieder Gewitterre en.^so bi iben wir im Hotel und 
essen zu vi- rt im Bauei'nstübel . 

Mit-i^'och l ^ .y.ugust : ,Ur sind wieaer allein. Mit Marianne zum Ihutogr- phen 
ge.schaft inaer Storchengasse 13.Erf. hren ::iit BedauÄrn,dess uns'^^r alter 
Freund sein ..eschäft an z.r^i junge ..eute verkauft hat, die jetzt firmieren; 



kl 



I 



1 



c 



"3ril] enigntitut Hoehn und Zehnder". //ir vertrauen oer neuen Fa.unsere Ne- 
gative an und hope :or the best, Einkäufe bei Locher Lederwaren am Münster- 
hof mit ans-^chliec-^endem Bummel die Bahnhof ^tras.se hinunter ,w.simm^^r amü- 
sant. Mittag noch einmal bei Fr I.Anna und der tr^ aitionelien Foreile im 
Kr pJ)l^-rhof . - W chmittag im Kinä; '^ vir i\/un^erkinae r" c-musante Satire auf 
Oeutschlan^js Entwicklung , euch na . h Hitlers Sturz. 
Abendbrot im "Moewen picK" am .i ar. deplatz. 

Oonn-^rstag 1^. August ; Heute benutzen wir die SBB zur Fr-^hrt nach Basel zu 

B;lseund Anne.nar ie üinsber^^Die neuen Aluminium iVa^en I. Kl. bieten wirklich 

<ien liochc:ten Comfort,sie nahen sogar reclininr seats. 

In Ba el geb- n wir er.:t mein GepacK im Schweizerho f ab. Ich bekommen aiesmal 

mit no.l(j5 einen uberrau^hend schonen modei'nen Rcum mit einem 3yd der lezten 

Finessen. rt'eSiter Blick aber daß Anl ; en des Bahnhof splatzes . Freue mich,dass 

der Küum aucn Nlarianne gefällt. 

Zu Ti.-ch in dar Ramelstra- se ^ . Besonders reizende Aufn. hme 

9:35 fahrt o-rianne uit der Eienbahn zurack;ich be-leite sie naturlich zum 

/,ug und sie gesteht .jir,iass sie froh ist , meiner Anregung^ laitaer Bahn auch 

zurückzuf«nren , gefolgt ist. 

Freitag l^ . bis Montag 17«Augu.st ; Vormittag bl.=^ibe meist fdr mich , schreibend , 
._.eitun^T: lesend -- intar ssant einmal ciie deutschen :^eitungen in Puhe durchzu- 



se 



iien ittags und abenasbei ü'lse. 'mmal mit nne narie im Kino, um einen 



alten Daney Key ^'ilm ^'F<^ustkampf ^' anzusehen.-- Von Zürich Telephon; Da s 
yaket iFt luCkiich da und ai Stenger g; sandt , ^o. eit ich ^ie Führer für wei- 
tere Keise noch brauche. ^as traditionelle Festmahl »das meinen .-,uf ent- 
halt abi:Chj.iesst , diesmal vor cfer Stc.it im Sc bloss Henni ngen , zu dem man mit 
Tr^ra 7 bequem -el ngt. Ku 1 1 iviert'-s aus mit rovser lerr'se, Garten . 'ir 
ziehen vor in ocr r'onsternii-che mit 31ick in cfen Garten zu speisen. VortreffI id. 

Dienstag lö. August ; Anneuiarxe begiftitet nie ., wie iratiier,zur Bahn. 
Ab Basel 9:31 ^"^ dire/ten vv.^gen nach Thun,wü mich mein alter :**^eund Konrad 
Stenger erwartet und mit Taxi hinauf nach Hünib -ch .Riedstrc sse fährt. 
Übervaschende .inwesenheit von ax^u Ramseier mit 2 Kinaern als logierbesuch, 
was die Junggeselienatmosphäre wesentlich veränaert.- Telephon von Marianne 
aus Iv'ntresina ,die gute /^nkunft dort im ^uto melaet. 

Mittwoch 19 «"Freitag 21. August ; ;,' eiderwieuer meist beuecktes Vetter mit ge- 

witter und Kuhle, -o dass Konraa die Centralheizung in ^wwegung etzt. 
Kcbnrad zeit';t jiir farbi,^-e i^ufnahmen von seinen Rei en in Griechenland und 
Ägypten jAfobei auch meine Tennins,dxe in i^orest nills aufgenommen wurden, far- 
big auf der Leinwand erscheinen, it gro.sen Gewinn sehe/mit riinblick auf die 
Kommende Reisemit BachS/ durch; Decker "Italia Homanica" ,Schroll ,vVien. 
V ttavo Vol. des i ouring Club Itaiia: I uglia,Iucania ,Caiabria..:ilano 1937»-" 
Freue mich von arianne Kechansky Nachricht zu erhalten;sie ist mit dem 
"FORSCüE" in Klagenfurt auf dem Wege nach Rom. 

SaiQstag 22.Au>ust ; Gestern sp-at abends i.st Hans Rü^mseier mit seinem Auto g- kom 
men und ich habe mich gefreut, ihn \Afenisg. tens Karz zu sehen. Morgens , als wir 
mit seinem vVagen ::.ur r^ahn fahren vollen , stellt sicii hera\^dass :;ein Vagen 
einen Fiat hat.^in herbeigeruf nes T^rxi schafft es gerade noch und >- ogar 
mein ..epäck kommt auch noch in meinen 2'/Ug,dank nans R.Riesenkräf t^ ;Habl , 
behalte -ntel an. 9:^^ ab 'ihun , umsteigen auf selbem Bahnsteig. 11; 4^ an 
Zürich , wo im neuen Airterminal bei S viss Gepäck nach Rom ufgebe . 13* 55> 
bringt mich Omnibus nach Kloten,wo nette Hostess mir frühzeitiges Einsteigen 
ohne Wettlauf ermöglicht .Swias # 300 ab Zurich(Nur Tourist )15:00. Im dichten 
Nebel über Larma , Florenz ;]Siv bei licnteTsich trst bei Annänrung auf Rom, wo wir 
mit leicnter Verspatung( statt 17;20) erst gegen lö ;00 im Airport landen. 



kz 



ITALIEN 



I 



a) ROM 



( ) 



Samstag 2^> August ; Vom Airport Ciampino bringt mich der Bus zum Air 
Terminal im Hauptbahnhof , wo ich SDhaBll mein Gepäck erhalte und mit Taxi 
hinauf zur Trinita dei Monte zum Hotel Medici-Hassler fahre. Empfang 
als geschätzter Besucher ;werde von jungem Schweizer hinauf gf?leitet zum 
obersten -tock ,wo unsere Zimmer reserviert oind. Die Schiebetür zwischen 
den Zimmern steht off en; discret ( ! ) fragt mein Begleiter, ob mir das Recht 
sei( ! ) • Marianne Nechansk y ist bereits da, mit ihrem '^Forsche " von Wien 
glücklich herübergekommen« 

Unsere Zimmerlie^-en so,dass die Turme von Trinita dei Monte den Lärm von 
unten abschirmen , den eiten '^lick aif Rom und die frische Luft freilassen 
Unsere Bäder liegen an Eingangskorridoren, die durch die oben erwähnte 
Schiebetür abgeschlossen werden können. Ideal ! 

Beide Zimmer sind vom Hotel mit eiumen geschmückt. Wir sind sehr glücklich 
und machen far beste Verwendung anderes auf 1^ Tage bemessenen Aufent- 
halters Pläne. Freue i-nicn,dass Marianne Rom nicnt gut Kennt, WcS die Auf- 
g. be,inr amegewählte Teile der ewigen btc^dt und ihrer Umgebung zu zeigen^ 
besonders reizvoll macht. 

Das Terrasfc^enrestaurant unseres Hotels ist aif 'unsei-r * Etage. Als wir 
um ö unr dinieren liegt nur das näcntliche Rom mits einen Licntern vor uns 

Sonntag 2^. August ; Marianne ist von ihren bekannten gewarnt worden, ihren 
vVagen in der Stadt zu benutzen. ir haben von unserem Hotel den sehr beque- 
men Zugang über die jriazza ael Bopclo.Ich zeige ihr das Mausoleum des 
Kaisers .KUgustus und den Ära iacis zur würdigen inleitung, bevor unser 
iiuto zwi chencfen Kirchen in den Corso Vittoare Emanuele einbiegt. 
Der Palazzo Regis mit dem xMuseum Baracco ist leiierbis Anfang September 
geschlossen. Ich entschädige Mar. durch Besuch des Fal. >icissimo alla Colonne, 
Betrachtung der Cancdleiia und Änderung über die Piazza h squino zur 
Piazza Navonajum meiner Begleiterin gleich eine Idee des alten ^oms zu 
geben /'^yyir Ifahren; weiter zum Pantheon und gehen durch die "-^este der Alt- 
stadt bis zur ' irche Gesu. Zurück über die fazza Minverva and lunchen 
unweit in d.ner Trattoria ,diedurch Ausstellung herrliche-r^Fruchte zum Näher 
tretn einlädt.. Vir lunchen ausgezeichnet und beschliessen mit ^^Cranje'* 
Pfirsichen, die von Zandvoort m guter Erinnrung^ind. 

Am Pantheon besteigen wir wieder d-^s parkende Auto, das uns über Monte Cito- 
riOjiikazza Colonna,Via Tritone zurück ins Hotel bringt. 
Es gab nicht die geringste Schwierigkeit. 

Nachmittag wiedermit Auto über den Pincio zum Bor. hese Garten. Blick in das 
Casino,wo uns für allen Ungetchmack ein besonders reizvolles Frauenbild- 
n±c von Carpaccio entschädigt. 

Die Jause in <^r Via Veneto ibt Mar. keine rechte Vorstellung. Die eleganten 
Röe^jund was mit ihne zusammenhangt , scheinen alle v rreist zu sein. D- ruber 
k-nn auch der Coupe Ooney nicht hinwegtrösten. Wohl äD er unser Dinner auf 
'»unseier " Dachterrasse , wo wir bereits anfangen, wie Srammgäste behandelt 
zu wer-aen. 

Montag 2^. August : Angenehm ,dass ich Inder Via 5xstina,ohne die spanische 
ireppe zu benutzen , Geld wechseln kann. Ich bekam heute für > ICO Traveller 
check Lire bl,ö5ö. —^ 



^3 



1 



« 



Mit dem Auto zum Vatican zy kommen, meht keine Sc hwierif'jkeit »schon eher das 
tr^r en dort.I h will heute [Marianne la^ neu a-eordnete Muneo li.trusco G rego - 
riano zeigen, xr erhalten unten iie ".itteilung,das. .Sammlung geschlossen, 
ginauffahrt zur Direktion ; uer Dirner bringt meine 'lit^.-li^ dskarte des 'e- 
tropolitan Museums mit m iner Visit en.vc.rte hinein ,^7orauf sofort Erlaubnis 
zur Besichtigung erteilt und wir zum lAngang aer Samnlung geleitet werden. 
Mir liegt vor allem daran die Fun.e aus dem R^lini-Gala ssi Grab bei Cerve- 
teri zu zagen. /^n der /icnd ist ubersicntlich dargestellt , wie alles im 
Grabe stand^als man einarang.In einem Glatschrank sind die ^'^^g|g|?h^Si^" 
zerate versammelt , die die Tote bedeckten. De ist vor allen die t^ofM Fibel 
mit dem T öwendeKor u-rinr;t von Palmettenranken; Verbindun-sdecor und Schlie- 
se mit granulierten Zjickzackmotiven una Greifen. Die Granulationsarbeit in- 
"teressiert arianne naturlich besonders , weil Arnola,iar lann, diese selte 
ne lochnick in cer Kunststhule gelehrt hat. Sie kommt ursprunglich vom Osten. 
Ich sah sie vor kurzem in der Koreanischen Ausstellung in Kew York auf eineml 
frühen chinesi.chen , chmuckstuck. '^ann ist da ein breites goldenes Armband 
mit getriebenen .iguren von Göttinnen , die Palmblatter trtgen.Auch hier ist 
wieder die Granulationstechnik ver .^ndt. (Zeit für beide 6!pO v.Ch.) 



war 



und -stark 



( 



Aufgestellt ist d^s ßronzebett e ,auf der uie lote gebettet 
aus Re-ten zusaminengesetzt und ergänzt- ein - hron und ein und ein zwei- 
radrii':er Staatsw^^^'-en> - Aus demselben Grab stammen interessante reliefierte 
:älbc:rsch len von Ihöniciechen Ursprung. Ganz herrlich ist die Vasen - 
sa mmlung im anstossenden H^um meirt griechischen Ursprungs, Athen ,Corinth . 

8-5 Jahrhundert v.'Ui. Danach 2Bige ich nur noch die auc;sergewohnlich gute 

Ikonsammlung am Eingang in ciie Pinakothek. 

Um nicht noch einmal einen ai.iren Fli^tz zum Parken des Wagens .-suchen zu müs- 
sen, lunchen iir gleich in einer nahen kleinen Trattoria. 

N^,chm;ttag bummeln wir zu Fuss durch die Staü(tt: • pc^nische Treppe hinunter, 
Vii Condotti,Corso und jaussen im nftien elegc.nten Cafe Al±emagna nah an der 
Piaz/.a Venezia. T)inner wieder auf unse^ Dachterratee. 

Dienstag; 2:> .August : Fr iohtwetter. otrahlenae Sonne. So recht g eignet zum Aus-| 

flu?: nach Tivoli . 

Wir fahren gleich zur '^ Villa Hadrians ^^ , eigentlich eine :e alaststadt ,aie 
Kaiser zwischen llö und l^ö A.n. rricnten liess mit Bauten, die er ahn erin- 
nern sollten an bauten, die er auf s inen Reisen in Iriechenland und Agyy-ten 
gesehen hatte. I:: .ittelalter nat ::ian die Knla^,e ..Is Steinoriich aisgeplun^ier ^^ 
s^e ging weit über die heute freigelegte Fläche hinaus. 

üeim ;^Lin;.ang ein guter platischer ^rientierungsplan ,auch ein .^uter gedruck- 
ter Führer erhältlich. 

Die Namen»die heute den Ruinen beigelegt sind willk ^rlich. Besonders em- 
arucksvoli noch heute"das XKXxInsel Wymphaum" ,auf uac sich an^^eblich der 
i^aiser zurückzog ,..v-nn q:" allein sein wollte;eine gute Reconstruction in Gips 
steht in ein r Vandnische . 

er "Kanopos" ist acner eine Erinnerung an d.s berahmte Serapis Heiligtum 
in(ir kl^Anen Stadt Kanopos bei Alexandrien. -^oS vorgelagerte Wasserbecken 
soäil an dpn dort vorgelagerten Kanal erinnern. 
Während die mei-ten ler ^^unstwerke ,die bei (fen 'Grabungen hier gefunden wurden 
in vi-len Kuf een c^r W^lt zerstreut &ind,str-hen hierum das .Vasser T^olonnaden 
und eine Art og-xia mitsechs Karyatiien »Kopien der berahmten F^ echteion 
Koren, sov./ei einige Gipsabgüsse \H-s jetzt gefunden wird, bleibt hier. Im Ge- 
bäude seitlüch.':es W^-^sserbeckens i.-^t aafur ein kl-ines Museum eingerichtet. 



kk 



I 



1 



i 



\l.s wird weiter gegraben und stark restauriert at^»^ wesentlichen Bauten, auch, 
«s-cs wichtig, 'A'asser in tiecken und Fontänen zurucijgeleitet . 

H&uptsacne und was besonders in Srinnerung bleibt:T)ie landschaftliche Schön- 
heit .ieF p.anzen Anla^re, 

Wir fahren zurück und halten in Tivoli vor dem T^in^ang zur Vill a d'Este . 
Auch hier ist wieder wesentlich die landschai tliche Schönheit , ier Jark 
mitsrinen sprin,2;enien W-SKern, Blick :-\xf die S bimer Ber^e von jer Terrase. 
Hierist jetzt eine kl ine Bar ein .erichtet , so cii^-s wir /snd^>.j.ches und Expres 
so inichönster Umgebung haben können. 

Ich h be meinen phOLO.p]. rat im Vagen gel.; en.So 1 >o. en wir uns bei ar-r 
Fontana della Sibilla »der-n JVasfcer hinter uns herabfallen ^photograpnieren ; 
dts Bild können wir gleich iiitnehTien, 
Recht befriedigt neim. 

Wir können uns niclit entschliesi en ein anderes Kestaurant , an denen in Rom ja 
kein Mangel ist »aufzusuchen. Jir haben es auf ''unserer" Terrasse, ant unserem 
Ecktisch so3:hön.A'ir könnten es nir.-.ends besoer haben. 

Das Publikum ist gut,&b-r kaum Abendtoiletten. So koumt !4 riannens Abend- 
toilette, die sie sichauf meinen Wunsch hat machen la.ssen, nicht zur Geltung 

Mittwoch 26. August ; Die l:;^)^ ^-^Is päpstlichen Sommersitz gebaute Villa d i 
Papa ;. iulio (Papst Julius ill von Vignola erbaut :.it Stuccos von Taddeo 
Zuccari) enthält als Mu-eo ai Villa Giulia ,die modernste una reichste ^^ 
etruökische Sammlung in Pom, deren Hflipt^ucke aus pal«^:strina »Falerii ,Ve ji 
etc.otammen.oae ist mir seit vi len u:^hrzehnten lieb und hat in neuster 
Zeit eine moa rne Auff.tellung bekommen , wo bei gleichzeitig aus den überrei- 
chen Hestänien eine gewisse Auswahi getroffen 'urae. 

So sind jetzt von den Terracotten n.r ein h^rvo ragendes Beispiel eines 
11x1^1x1^11 mit einem Ehepaar aus Caere Ueute Cerveteri) ( 6. Jh.) neben 
dem Apollo von Veji (um 50C v.Ch),von oben beleuchtet, «virkungsvollst 
aufg teilt. Im Oberstock .-ind die iironzen vereinigt .Hervurra.^end die 
überschlanken ganz modern snmutenddpn Votivfiguren ,di schönsten eisten mit 
ihren reizvolJ en henkelfi^uren und feinsten Gravierungen. y^^.^^ 
Neu hinzup-;ekommen,seit meinem letzten r;esuch,eine hervorragende ^ S;,mmlung 
griech. ichen und etrupkischen Ursprungs. 

Mir schien es passend ein Besuch -es Museo Nationale delie Terme anzuschlit 
sen,in iem die ahön^ten griecniichen Originale ,aie Rom besitzt , versammelt 
sind. Oie 3 e hatschon wieder ein ,sicherbei einem . chiffbruch versunknes, 
Kunstwerk hergegeben und a.mit wieaer einmal eine gewis^r-e ümordnung nötig 
gemacht. ,.ir genie&sen aie Herrlij^hkeita^n grosser Kunst wieaer ^ehr . 

Im .ßerstock Gemal e und ,:tuccaturen . Däe hierher übdüö^gne FresKenraum 
aus cter Villa Julia vom Kapitol inte.e -iiert i-l rianne besonders; sie dankt 
in -aieser M^^nier einen i^aum in ^mtter^am far ihren Enkel, Gabys Sohn,auzu- 
malen. Merkwürdig ,aass niemand ^f J|g ^g^J'f l^cfes^^.irK^?^^^^ Sammlung dem 
Thron mit ^er Geburt aer Aphrodite einen besseren platz einzuräumen. 
^iiin viel zu kleiner ^aum umschlier.stiiar zusammen mit -r schalfenaen Erinys^ 
dem Kiesenkopf .veäner Juno aus ctem 6. Jh. und ihr von Goethe weit überschätss- 

tes Gegenstuck die^Liiovisi^uno *.ius dem Anfang aes Römischen Kaäserreichs . 
Wie bei allen römi:.chen^Si§x^M Sich einem Ide^ltyp des griech.^. Jahrhunder 
ist Glätte an Stelle der Belfbtheit getreten. 
Hübsche >inlagen vor dem -:useum mit einm Cafe locken uns im Schatten s chcm 
Bäume uns niederzul^..sien und ein leichteF Lunch mit Sandwiches und Cafe wie 
kälten G<^ tränken einzunehmen. 



^f-r 



) 



Donnerstag 27 «August ; Heute habe ich ein i^unafahrt von 198 Km, geplant 
Unser erstes Ziel ist die alte Ltruskerstodt Tarquinia und ihre Necropole 
Ich bin 1957 das letae r al nit meiBBPK Tochter dort gewesen und habe im 
Tagebuch 1957( 3.21-27) |Wc.s wir dort gesehen »ausführlich beschrieben, 
i/ifir f in ien diesmal <fen iralazzo Vitelleschi mitten in einer gründlichen IVie- 
derherstelxung. .an hat ab:r die Hauptstucke cfer Sam^nlung provisorisch sicht- 
bar ,<emacht.So Kann Marianne w^nisgtens de« Sacrophag des ilcgistrats und 
einige Skulpturen sehen. Besond'^-reH Eindruck empfängt sie von ien mittelalter-l 
licn wirkenden Grabplatten ,aie sie im Stehen in ihrem Skizzenbuch ausge- 
zeichnet festzuhalten v«eiss,wa8 ien sehr bewunde e. 
Um Ja 12 versaminelt der Custode die anwesen^ien Besucher , die äL:e mit ihren Wage: 

hier sind, meist Italiner,zum /.ufbruch nach der Necropole » 
Wir haben damals mehr Gräber besucht, aber was er zeigt ist durchaus genügend 
eine gute Vorstellung zu vermitteln .SoWeit ich mich erinnere w ren es dies- 
mal :lomba della Caccia e iesca,'iomba della J,eone,Toraba del Tori — ich wunder 
mich,aasci er, im Geeensatz zu unserem damaligen Führer und trotz der Anwesen 

heit zweier Damen - auf die Stark obscenen Bil ..erhin. eist -- Tomba del Baro- 
ne, 'jomba ael Corsa et cavalli una schliesslich auch die Tomba degli Auguri. 
Die MalerelÄXElaxlKÄ enstanden z*,'-ischen 53C und 510 vor .hristi. 
Ich hoff e SBhr ,dass d-cr Neubau Jes iiuseums uie betternaltene Fresken des 
Tricliniuuis von 4lG v.Ch. und vieliicntaucn die Tomba di rolifemo mit dem 
reizenaen Kopf des Mädchens Vels^ vor weiterem :-icha>.en gesichert , sichtbar 
machenwird« Ich werae jedenfalls nicht verfehlen nach meiner Rückkunft mei- 
ner Begleiterin das hüböHhe Buch aus aer Piper Bucherei "Tarquinia'^ zuzusen- 
aen, dessen Heproductionen erstaunlich aen Cri^^inalen nahe kommen» 
Alle Italiener waren üdriKens zu uns von einer ganz Desonderen Kücksicht und 
Aufmerksamkeit, 'lan sient <iber,aas- bereits wieaer neue Gräber gelunaen sind 
wexG- aoer nocn nicht, ob die Aus -rabunt, lohnen wird« 

Vvir lunchen im kKtacMatraxl Trattoria Bersaglieri sehr or entlich.im Freien 
auf einer kleinen Terrasse. 

Hinab ins Tal. zu einer mitce j ^ulterlich wirkenden Stadt Tuscania .mit 'äij.en 
und Türmen, usserhalb die überbleibsei aes alten Tuscana,bezw.Toscanella. 
Die U ite öde Fläche Jer einsti^-en etruskischen Acropolis wird vom Dom San 
1-ietro beherrs cht , dessen aus dsm 8 und 11. Jahrhunue, t sta-amenden Apsiden '/;eit 
über dc'S Land schauen. Unsere Zeit erlaubt leider nicht zur Anhöhe hinauf zu 
fc hren. Vir be^nü^^en uns mit Besuch der näher liegenden Basilika Santa /l ag-fc^ion 
Sie geht , wie ich lese, auf das 8. Janrhundert zurück, stammt aber in der jetzi- 
gen i^orm aus dem 12. Jahrund<:;rt , wobei aöFr Teile des früheren Baus verwendet 
wurden, ir sehen es sofort an der fast unvermittelt in die Haupttorlünette 
versetzte , fast freiplatische Sitzraadonna und die fli^nkie -enden Apostelf urstei 
mit uen orientalisch anmutenaen Frucntcrnamenten .arunter. 
ochön ist aucii der ^Rückblick auf Tarquini a 's hochgelegne Stadtshiluette, 
mit bchlocs und ..urm. 

ir machen auch nicht in Viterbo halte ,sdindern fahren, am kleinen Lago di 
Vico vorbei, durch achöne vjälaer direkt nach Caprarol a , exn kl ines Stadtchen, 
an c:es5.en :.nietier,al e|^ uberrogenie , PäLäazzo Farnese liegt. 
Es iit bereits ^ unr vorbei; ro nat en wir rte:ienkkn,ob ^tbr noch itinlass finaenl 
würben, .vir haben aber ;luck.Drausoen ,oben am x^and der Terrasse, zu der wir em-l 
porsteigen , sitzt eine alte Frau; sie ruft auf unsere Bitte den Custoden her- 
bei, ler bereitwillig di Fuhrung übc-rnimmt. 

Cardinal Alessandro i?arnese,der A'effe des Papstes Faul 111(15^7-^9) r^ab 153o 
kKrazxx den .-uftrag Üb^r das fearterre iner Festung einen Palast zu erriebfti 
ten.Vignola löste die .lufgabe j.n einem Fünfeck und mit einem dsr grossartig- 
sten lalä'ote der Renaissance, im Inneren ist ein runter rtof,eine otonda mit 
Arkaden, in dessen Lanetten die Faläst der Farnese dargestellt sind. 



^6 



I 



c 



Auch die in die Hauptsäle hic^-nuf führende Treppe im grossartigen Treppen- 
naas von Tempesta geht in überaus elegantem irichwung in die ?:unde. 
Die Säle sind von den Zuccf.ros ais.5emalt. Themata die Gesahichte des Hauses 
Farnese nit Betonung der Glanzpunkte , wie die leirat eines Farnese mit der 
Tochter Karl V,der "Madame^" , mit einer Valois ,'vonzile ,i. ef f en mit Franz I 
Ein Saal zei,ft die Ansichten der Hauptschlösse'^ der Familie, ein anderer 
die damals bekannte Welt in Karten — Australien fehlt noch. — die Decke 
dazu mit d^n figarlich dar^':eEtellten Sternenbilrtern. 

Auf einigen f aminen ihoto6,die die Käume möbliert zeigen ,als Mr. and Mrs 
Meyer aus ;ashin-ton sieben Jahre immer 2 Monate hier wohnten.Als Clly 
und ich 20.9-1936 clen Palast besuchten , wurde die Linricntun/^ gerade weg- 
geräumt und ich erinne mich, wie vvir beide aber die Idee^ enjtsetzten im 
Piesensaal nit den Karteny\A/ie Mrs Meyer ,zuswhlafen,aen*.'ternennimrael über 

sich. 

Herrlüich der ßlick hinunter auf das malrische Städtchen ,v;eit aber das 

Land nach tutri »Civita Casteliana bis zu den Bergen cbs .ppenin. 

Gern hätte ich Kcrianne auch den hinter dem Palast ansteir^-enden Garten 

gezeifAt .Lei ler ist jetzt cazu eine oesonaere .rlaubnis nüti,,was ich nicht 

wusste. 19:^6 konnten wir ungehindert durch einen ^tilga.ten niit geschnitt 

nen Hecken durch einen parkartigen Teil hinauf zum palazzino hinaufwandei 

den 1625 Vignola anlegte. jbin gaiz besondre charmanter ßau mit einer Fül±e 

von pnac|t«s tischen ^A'asserspielentiLS strömt in weixenf ormigen liecken iawx 

abwärts , Putten fangen es in Schalen auf und Delphine speien es weiter 

hinunter. 

i'Vir verabschieden uns vom Custoden un:; der alten Frau, die inn herbeirief 

una aadurch cfen Besuch möglich mcichte. '^s hatls^e sich aich onne :ien iarten 

gelonnt . 

Unten --eitlich an ctem Pl^tz vor dem pal st ist ein kleine-; Cafe. Hier 

können wir das "Leben" beobc-chten . Um einen amerik nii:chen a^en drängen 

sich bewundernd Verwandte de^^ stolzen 3esitzers;:2-efolgt von z ei Bläsern 

tanzt ein herausgeputzter Alter gleichzeitig den Takt schlagend, ie aus 

einem de ;,ica Film, und sammelt von aen .achenden Umstehenden Abgaben ein. 

Von der Landschaft und .ten Wal ern,die A'ir neute durchfuhren , kann gar nicht] 

genug f-eschwirmt .veraen. Römische Landscnaft! 

Zum Dinner sind wir wieder aaheim auf der Hotelterriisse . 

Freitag 26, ugust : Oas 1 eale /«etter hält an. 

Zu Fusshmunter zur i iazza Barberini und Via Veneto,v*/o die meisten Flug- 
linien ihre Bureaas haben, um meine Flugret^ervationen Kontrollieren zu 
1 a y s e n : -K i r France, TW A . 

v\Jir lunchen in unserem Sotelgarten,wo man ausnehmend ang.^nehm sitzt. 
Abends sind Alex und nildred Lachman ,Qer zur /.eitder amerikanischen Bot- 
sc laft attachiert ist , unsere Gaste. oben auf der Terrasse .i.ach dem Cafe 
unten im Hotelgarten ,fänrt uns Ali noch in .:eine ,ohnung,Via bosio 2^, 
auf die er hit recnt stolz isttGanz modernes Haus, grosse Räume mit pracht 
vollen Kaminen und umlaufender Terrasse mit :ilick in die nahen grünen 
rnlaf>;en. n cen Vänden Ge nalle d r .ausfrau,aie von ihrer Be,f;abang zeugen. 



( ) 



die 



r. 



Grotten 



von St .1 eter , 



Samstag 29»AugB5t ; Ich zeiRe heute '-aritnne 
dxe Zu einem i-iu^eum des alten Peterdom -ewor..en xXÄBl,f r nich immer em- 
druc svoll sina. -nschliecsend ein kurzer -esuch oben in Uc s Riesenhaus 
selbst, das nar bei grossen Festen und gef ulJ t seine VvirKung ausübt. So 
wirht selbst die wunaerschöne lieta MicnelanggJ os alizu klein. 



47 



r» 



Piazza di San Pietr o ist dagegen e±n r-bsolutes Meisterwerk »Dank Berninis, 
aer 1657-03 die Colonnade von 6b aoris. hen ;:äuien ,mit dem Obeiiks von 
Neros Circus in .er Mitte , schuf . Ich f in te die Farbe d-s Tr^-vertin wird 
imuer schöner. 



imuer scnoner. ^ r u ^ttt 

±r haben eben indn ..rotten d.-s MosaiKportrait von Papst Johdn VII 
(7^5-717) gesehen. Vir fahren hinunter zum Forum anö gehen hinüber 
SanctaMaria Antigua, die des Papstes Ha uskapeiJe war. Man benutzte 
die bibJiothek,die dem Tempel des Augustus zugehörig war. Si< 



zur 
^nutzte dazu 

die üiD ' lotneKjOxe uem j.ciuijcx >jco nkx^,»«^>,v>^ „„j^w..-.-,, e e ^ 

interessante Fresken. dea im ti. Jah rhundert von Byzantisnischen Mönchen 
ausKefuhrt *uraen;man vermutet ,d..ss diese Mönche Byzanz in folge Jer 
ikonoclstipchen Unruhen verlas.-en und hier Asyl gelunden .ihre Kunst wex- 
t-r ausfuhren konnten, 'n einer Nische im Vorhof ein interessantes i-'.r- 
trait eines rztes mit langem ,veissem aart.der mit seinen langen Fingern 
.;n einen grossen Chirurgen (Frof Israel in ,5erlin; erinnert. dem xch 
Ollys wegen zu rosem "Dank verpflichtet bin. 
ünwext steht die i irche der Heili,en_Cogrna_un_^,DaaiianüS_.in uer ich ^ 
M ricnne -leich el^Tr der schönsten una fruhatens Mosaiken m Rom zeigen 
Kann aie °2b-:5C tnttanden sind. Die vom geistlichen oerextwi ixg ein, e- 
sc haltetet, e.v.riscne licnt bringt den FarbenKlanz und die ..anze Compo- 

s tion in ^er - ribuna und am xriu-aphoOften zur vollster Geltung. 

Lunch in einer kleiner Trattoria auf cer .naeren eite der Via I.aperiale 

Am Nachmittag kleines Shopping um aie Via Sistina und abends. wie immer. 

Dinner auf unser Terr^ASse. 

Sonntag 5Ü . Au, us t : Heute ist aler erste schwule 'lag. 
«Vir parken unteThalb de. Campidoglio . arianne muss doch die Reiter- 
statue M arc nur eis sehen. der Ibl-löl regierte. Ks ist für .nich eine der 
schönsten i<eiterstuen der .«lelt .besonders. wenn m..n sie von Seite betrach- 
tet ;tie oonne lässt Spuren aer alten Vergoldung aufleuchten. 
Diese Statue. die fruhervor dem j ateran Stand verdankt ihre Krhaltung dem 

Glauben, dass sie aen ersten christlichen Herrscher .Konstantin darstelle 
Sie wurde 15Jö hierher uberfanrt im .usammenh, ng ,mt Rrricntung der 
beiden Faläste die nach , dnhelangelos -ntwurfen erichtet vurde . Ihr 
StandT;unkt Konnte nicnt oesser gewählt werden. ,,.,.. 4. 4. 

Das Cap.toniniscne__us9um enthält nicht viel .wa. den i^esuch lonnt, trotz 
der Capitonitxhen Venus und eini-en anderen beraumten rfildwerken. 
Der Ko nservato.enpalast ist dagegen eines ausführlichen Gesuches wert. 

teit meinem letzten esuch vieles verändert , verbessert .Herrliche htrus- 
kische Sa^nnlung. viele ausgezeichnete Vasen, die schöne Bronzesammlung m 
neuen ^3en modern auf gestellt . Hi:r ist die Esquilinische Venus und 
eine anze rlucht scx.öner Hepräsentationsraume der Konservatoren. 
Reste de Jupiter Tempels .veiter freigelegt und im ;arten n ue Funde 

versammelt. . ^.^ rr. i--i-„„^ = 

Mit Hilfe eines gefälligen Schutz^nanns finden wir eine nette Irattoria 

Fanz inaer Nähe :Giovagnoli al Campidoglio. 

Nachmittag oe^annt es zu regnen, bo blei^.en *ir oin unseren . em tiichen 

naumen zu Haus. 
Montag 31.Au^mst : Marianne hat sich ine leichte Erkältung zugezogen 
und bleibt im Bett. I. h leiste inr Gesellschaft. 



(') 



^8 



( 



T\- 



( 



•ienstar 1 . .opt ember : Wieder schönes Wetter. 

- ir f'^hren hinaus zum Ic-tera n .der unerwarteter Weise heute geschloasen 
i = t -o tnu.-s ich mich oegnugen Marianne San Giovanni in Fönt e (Bgjgtisteriui 
die''laufkirche zu a-.i-en , die aas .loaell für -.lle späteren Bauten wurde, 
üixtue III nat sie t^C geRrunüet .w.s der römis hen Tr:-.dition wiaersprisht 
dass Kaiser Konstantinii hier getauft wurde ;wts breits yj7 geschah, 
•m S.Janrhundert fugte der iapst Hilarius die Oratorien bt. John der Taufe, 
und t.John der Kvangelist hinzu, die beide schöne Mosaiken enthalten, 
I. h schäaie micn beinahe zu gestenen.da^e wir unser nach_tes ^lel are 
Kir che S^.Cle,nen te nicht finden konnten .obwohl sie unweit det ^aterans ge 

Wir holen' das am Nachmittag nit dilfe eines Taxis nach. 
St Cl-mente ist nicht nur eine der best a-haltenen Basilika von Rom.sonderh 
ist besonaers interessant .ÄaxKweil hier drei .chichten übereinander vor- 
handen sind, die Grabungen freigeie^t ht.oen. x, t . „ 
"ie erste cnristliche ^osiiika .die auf der Stelle aiS Hauses vom heilig. 
Clemens -- J.Xacnfolger von S .I-eter .getötet um lOOfi - errichtet sein 
soll, wurde von .obert -,usiC8rd lOb^ foc:t vola ständig zerstört. 
•,uf ihren Ruinen errichtet llCö die jetzige Oberkirche .wobei aber manche 
Dekorationen der alten Kirche verwendet vuraen.o zei.-en z . : .die Amoonen 
das f/onogram des Papstes oohn VII. Schöner Cterleucnter .ebenso ^e die 
Geländer und der Fassboaen in Opus ^lexandrinum eingelegt . über der Con- 
fes^io in Baldachin b.uf "armorsäulen nit Cosmaten Decoration. aus der 
Zeit la=chalis -l(110fa).Die Mosaiken aus em 12. Jahrnundert liebe ich be- 
sonders^. Die Voute orin:.t den Glanz zur besonderen Geltung. , . , ^,.. . 
Die wie. er freigelegte ursrunglicheKirche ,tu der man aul btufen hinabst«i..,| 
jetzt U nterkirc he .-enannt.hat hoch interes ante F^erkencyclen die von 
;.x-schI7äI^7^^-;7ioden ^ammen«xi«xithhx=.b«xXK»xixK«x««««xk.KX 5.b^ 

9. Jahrhundert. ^Ur hat es ein Fresko besonaer. ^">«^^f •^^\^'^^"^"^^^f ^'"^1 
ernalten istjeine byzantinische i^adonna ,da.. Kina aufdem Schoes ,sta. rt 
den Beschauer mit übergrossen -ugen an. 

Noch einmal tiefer in die ürde.üie Treppe ist feucht.Hier Reste antiKer 
Gebäude.. .nschlie.send eine Mithras Kapelle mit BildA^s .ottes. 
Oben beim Eingang ist die Capeila di Santa Catarina ,die icn zum er.ten 
Mal onne Gerüste sehe. Die ,Vie .e»:.er Stellung ist vollenaet ....-, h«n.elt sich 
um Fresken .die von ,4asaccio (lif01-28)oder M.solino stammen sollen. 
Abends sindmr zum rv,nn.r. h.i .li T.achman in c^r Via Bosio.die ir .,chon 
von" neulich ä)end k'ennen.Ser.r gepflegte Tafel mit Licatern.-M.dchen be- 
dient , nette Gesellschaft. U.a.Krs.Dougl.s.aie .Viwe eine. Kunstnistorikers 
ein Funstlerehepaat;ich finae mich mit meinem Englisch so gut ab, als es 

IcrD;nutze die Gelegenheit Ali zu bitten.uns den «esuch *r Villa Medici 
undoer Villa die oagnaia (Lante) zu erfeLcntern ,WoS er verspricht und 

sicher durch Empfehlung ctr rfotsciiaft keine Schwierigkeit macht. 
Mittwo ch 2. September : Telephon von Ali, dass er den Kinl ss für die Villa 
Medicierhalten hat und wi^ verabre.ien uns dort ai tretten. 

Alessandro iedici,aeB sp=iteren f-pät Leo A. -rundunff 1 oui= X 

1Ö05 wurde die rcade:i.ie de France hierher verle.3 1 ,eine ..rundung Loui. X 



( ) 



^9 



hier können junge französishe Kun:tler,die mit Jem Prix de Home ausgezeich- 
net sind; sorgenlos ihrer Kunst säen widmen. 

Wir treffen Lachmans mit ihrer Tochter beim Concierge ;auf Vorweisung der 
Einfuhrung öffnet der Bewahrer das Gartentor links vom der Villa, von wo 
ansteiegend ein Weg hinauf zum Garten fuhrt. Leider beeinträchtigt ein 
Regenguss unseren Besuch erheblich. 

Der Garten ist in Renaissancecharakter angelegt; von Bii-chen eingefasst 
fuhren die lA'ege immer zu einem point de vue iiit einer antiken Fi,M:ur. 
Die Huckseite der Vill a öffnet sich zu einer hochgewolbten Loggia; die 
VJand ist mit -ntiken Reliefs eingelegt »darunter Platten, die bei derPeconst. 
,Ära Pacis fehlen. Am Ende eine Terrasse, ein Art Belvedere mit weiter 
Sicht liber den J-incio und den Borghese Garten;direkt darunter läuft die 
Via del xMura. 

Wir lunchen im Hotel, ''on Ma kommt Gabel '*Excellent" ie ist gut in N.y. 

wieder eingetroffen. 

Der Regen hat auf gehört . Mit Muhe finaen wir den Auto Club ,dei- t.e±n ^uar- 
tier^ fort vom Centrura^in ein abgelegnes Villenquartier verlegt hat. Nicht 
gerade praktisch , wenn man Benzinscheine kaufen will. 

Unser Aufenthalt nähert sich seinem Ende. Es waren wunderschöne harmonische 
Tage. Ich habe Marianne viel weniger zeigen können, als ich wollte. 
Dies Rom ist unerschöpflich^hoff entlich k nn der Aufenthalt wiederholt werc 
Niciit weit von unf:erem Hotelr^^mitten im engen Strassengewirr , liegt die 
grossartigste Brunnen Roms;er ist an cfer Rückseite des Palazzo ioli zwi- 
schen 17^2 und 1762 von Nicoio Salvi errichtet und der Schwung der ganzen 
Anlage macht es niir wahrscheinlich ,dass ein Entwurf Berninis zu GrunJe 
liegt. Der Name Fontana Trevi stammt von aen' drei ' Auslässen , die das klare 
Wsser in mächtigem .-)trom in dae Becken fuhren. Wir folgen oeralten Sitte, 
die angeblich Ruckkehr nach Rom verbürgen soll/und werfen rückwärts jeder 
eine Münze in das von -enschen dicht umlagerte B:-;Ssin. 

Heute abend sollen meine alten i^reunde S tefan und Erika Bach ankommen. 
Sie haben sichi^x Zimmer im Hotel -. e Villa , das in unserer Strasse wenige 
Schritte cbwärts i legt , reserviert . Als ich hinüber gehe, sie zu begrüssen, 
treffe ich sie bereits unten in der Hal±e und kann sie so gleich in mein 
Hotel mitnehmen, wo sie zum Dinner obenauf .ier Terrass e unsere Gäste sind 
und die Bekanntschaft mit Marianne vom letzten Jahr in Salzburg erneuern 
kennen. 

Donnerstag 3. September : Mein Neffe Ali nat oein Versp echen gehalten. Ein 
Bote der amerikani. chen "otschaft bringt ^ie versprochne Empfehlung für 
den Besuch der Villa di Bagnaia (Lante) . Der Betreuer der Villa bedauert 
ehr> uns nicht : elbst funren zu können, ab-r eine Karte empfiehlt uns dem 
dortigen Aufseher unu erlaubt uns aich zu photographieren ,was sonst verboten 
ist . 

Die Villa liegt unvveit Viterbos. Wetter leider trabe. Von aer Plaza des 
kleinen Ortes ßagnai« fuhrt ein Weg aufwärts direkt zum Eingang. 
Die Anlage ward begonnen um 1^77 f-r die Erzbischofe von Viterbo als Sommer 
sitz. Der Neffe des Papstes Leo X,Ottavio Riario ,KKkaf ixbeut den Aquaduct 
für uie vVasseranlage de. Parkes, ^hs heute hier zu aehen ist, geht auf den 
Kardinal GiotJ&nni i^rancesco Ganbarr a zurück, der hier um 15^0 die wesent- 
lichen -nlagen errichtet .Sem Name ähnB^'t dem "gambero" ,dea Krebs, den man 
an Grotten, wie Palazzinos als Wcpyentier angebracht findet. 

Papst Chigi verleiht den *^psitz l^tö an Herzog Ippolito Lante ; er bleibt in 
Familie dftÄ? dreihundert Jahre. 



50 



C 



( 



Der letzte Krieg hat die Villa erheblich nitgenommen; sie ging in Staats- 
besitz aber una wird wieaer he ge. teilt. So kann heute jeder den Park be- 
suchen, nur für den liesuch der C-sinos und zum i hotographieren ist eine 
besondere Erlaubnis not ig. 

Ein alterer sehr netter Mann,aer schon 6c Janre den Besitz betreut »nimmt 
unsere Einfuhrungskarte in Empfang und fahrt uns herum, setzt auch die 
Wasseropiele , soweit üie nicht a.aufen,in Betrieb, .-.mbesten gefällt uns 
von liesen die Fontana monu'nentale ..el F egaso in einer architektonischen 

Nische. Am , ber..hmstesten ist aie Eontöna <ö.m Mori in r^'itten eine- Stil- 

^'Ouaaröto'.' ) 
R-artcns: H^ihe vurupr 



ipr e von iegcrn ha^en einen Stern bektönten H'^-rg ,das 
Feretti (i apst Sixtus \/,^ i5'^-'!:>-i^90) .Die Gruppe wird dem 



Wappen ler 

Giovanni da Bologna zu.^ec chrieben. Oie " Tavola del Cc^rdinal e'' lisst an 
::;chloss Hei orunn bei oalzbnrg denken. Die sonstigen Wasif^eranlagen h: ben 
sich üffenDr^r C^prarola zum Vorbild genommen. 

'iF F lazina links oben wur^e l!p6t von Kar sinal Gcmbarra • rricntet .nit 
schorien^'stuckdecken von der Schule der Zuccari;der Kechte stammt aus 
jier Zeit aes Kardinals Montaldo , zwanzig Jahre später. 



//undervolle alte Baume ; ~iardino ae 



a 



uchessa o secreto 



f 



Von dem terr^sierten Garten weiter Blick über aie''Tavola del Cardinale 
und das '''.Quadrat© in die Ebne. 
Der befriedi ende ßesucn hat einen vveniger scnönen abschlUKS.i»4arianne 

stosst oei -:.er /-bfahrt einxK zu nah geparktes Motorrad um, was zu einer 

erhitzten Discussion fuhrt, die wir schliesslichdurch Abfahren abbrechen. 

Infolgaessen verzichten wir im Orte zu iunchen und holen das in einem 

gc^nz neue n iotel vor den Toren Roms nach. 

AbenJs haben 'vir das Abschiedsdinner auf unser Terrasse. Nachher gehe 

ich zu Bachs ninüber,um mir inr Hotel und ihren Raum anzusehen. Sie 

sind vom Hotel gar nicnt BHttzuckt. 

Das Wetter ...weint, 

i?'reitag 4*September lUn^er letzter lag ist wie ler von i^hönem vVetter be- 
günstigt. 

Erfefe mache ich nit riarianne Besorgungen für Kinder und Enkel, dann 
fahren wir hinunter zum Corso,wo im F^lazzo Regis ab I.September aas 
Mueeo Baracco (nur Dienstag und Pröiiiteg^«i5) wi' .er geöffnet ist. 
Der Senator Baracco ( + 191^) iiat mit i;ro sem Verständnis , dem (Tescnmc^ck 
seiner Zeit vorc.useilend , einejhbr vorragende/ kleine -ammlung antiker Plas- 
tik usammengebracht iMrYsiTKxjqRHäe Torsi griechischer und ^'truskischer 
Herkjnft.Aber auch Beispiele von Falmyra und selbst Mexico, ^.gypten. 
Lunch im Hotel. 

Ich wollte Marianne als Abschied von Rom den Blick von der Fassagiat a 
Ma^etit'a zeigen, A-ir hatten Bachs aufgefordert mit uns zu kommen. 
In ihrem'Wolseley Six Eight" hinauf zur Aqua Faola . l6l2Paul V errich- 
tete den grosfc-en Brunnen »dessen ^;asser vom Braciano See hergeleitet wird 
in Form einer LoKgia;den Marmor holte er sich (fe zu vom Nerva Forum und 
die Säulen von der Vorkalle des "alten" St. Feter l 

Ich 'A ollte auch gern meinen Freunaen den kleinen Tempietto von Bramante 
im Vorhof von San Fietro in ontorioa zeigen. 
Zu ^lle.^em kam es nicht. Stefan, mit iMarianne plaudernd ,uDersieht eine 



51 



L> 



eine Steinbank, die seinen vordere 



n 



otflugel so eindruckt ,dass das 



d unbeweglich wird. Mit Hilfe einer Brechstange , die 



rechte Vorderra 

Stefan im //erkzeugskasten hat^und an 



ter Beistand hilfesbereiter Beistände 



wir 

in 

ein 



d der Vorde rflugel soweit zu 



recntbyftbop-ren.dass das Auto wenit;;stens 



die Via Garibaldi hinabfahren kann, wo vo 



r aer Torta S.Pancracio ärc-b:, 



Grobschmied , der willig ist, den Schaden zu beheben, den Wagen wieder 
fahrtbereilz u machen, i^s soll zwei Stunden dauern. 

ß-ute Zufall will,dass nebendem Grobschind eine Irattoria mit netten 



Der 

Gaten ist , wo wir die VVa 



rtezeit beim Abendbrot angenehm verbringen 



Au 



f diese Weise klingt der missg 



lucKte AusflUi^- auf den Monte Janiculum 



noch gemütlich aus 



ee: am Tiber entlang 



0er Heimweg 
leicht zu finiien 

Samstag ^.September 



— zuerst I.ungo Tevere Farnesina - ist 



Die letzte Nacht. 

Mir wird der Abschiea v 



sie aich ungern 



Hein den Rückweg zu To 



on Marianne 3ch/ver;ich lasse 
chter und Enkel antreten, die siei»- 



Altaussee erwarten 



Ich weyde erj»t aufatmen,v^e 



nn 



icn aie Machricnt eriiiät 



das sie dort ^ut geland 



et ist 



( 



( 



52 



( ) 



b) Sic il Jen ,Cala brauen ,Apulien , Neapel , 



( 



Sam s tag 3» ^^^ptember ; Gleich nach der Abfahrt von 'arianne Nechansky 
ko.iimt mein Gepäck in B a c h s" ..olseley Six tighty '^ zur Abfahrt nach 
Suaen auf der Via Appia . In Terracin a Lunch in einen hyp-rrnodernen 
Pestausant ,dcinn vv iter an (fer Küste über Formia ,j^andragone ,Fo00Ouli 
nach Neapel . Wir haben für aie 2^3 kjü. fünft .Stunden gebraucht. 
Auf dem Kuckweg werden wir uns länger in Neapel aufhalten. Stefan hat 
dort an 23»<3epternber , eingeladen von der Universität , einen Vortrag zu 
halten, w^s xinRX die ursprünglicheK Veranla-sung aieser Reise war. 
vVir haben far den 19 «September Quartier im Hotel Royal an cfer Via Fartheno 
pe bestellt ; jetzt nehmen wir dort für einige stunden ein Zimmer • 
Stefan hat für uns Schif fscabinen bei der '^ TIRj^J^iJNIA ^' reserviert .Jetzt 
muss f^r .iie i.n -eisungen in Fahrkarten umtauschen; anschliessend wird das 
Auto in die SS Sardeni a um 7 Uhr verlaaen;Stefan fährt selbst die Rampe 
hinauf . A.nschliessend A bendbrot inj.t zwei jungen Professoren der Bioche- 
mischen Abteilung unten am V^asser bei Zia ( =:Tante)Teresa am Wasser 
und zurück zum Bot. 
Ö:30 g( hen wir an Bord. Der Comfort ist überraschend; -tefan und Eri 
haben eine C^bine ait Bad, ich selbst für mich ei lein eine, der ein Cabi- 
net cfe Toäl . tte r^igeS'-hlossen ist. 8:50 setzt sich (fes Schiff in Bewegung. 

Sonntag 6. 8^'ptember : Die überfahrt ..-ar ganz ruhig ;.^ut geschlafen. 
Ich bin zeitig auf und frühstücke im Restaurant ; dann stehe an der 
Rampe und freue 'üich,wie die Berge _S_I_C_I_I _I_E N *s in der Ferne 
umlagert von zartem Dunst erscheinen? 
vVir landen 8:30 in PALERMO . 

Das uto '.\ird schnell~&ü^gelcjaen und fahren zum Jolly Hotel ,//o Zimmer 
für uns reserviert sind, äe Lage ist wieder mit beonderem Ges chick. 
Es liegt am Forum Italic o , einer breiten Avenue am Wass' r dicht bei der 
Villa Giulia;ein grössei • r und luxurius r Typ ,al3 v;ir bisher kennen 
lernten. Gute Zimmer mit air condition und ßad kostet ca .^^^CSCL. 3 »^50() 
Sicher jetzt aas beste Staiathotel. Das grosse Luxushotel Mondello palace 
lieK't zu vjeit von d?r St. ot für einen kurzen Auf enthalt ,\wenn auch der vVeg 
nur 20 Minuten beträgt und ein '*/;!! day bus Shuttle service to city 
Center free of Charge" vorgesehen ist. 

Wir frühstücken noch einmal auf aer Terrasse des Hotels mit Blick auf 
das Meer, in aessen Hintergruna das Massiv des Monte Pellegrino erscheint. 
Dann gr hen wir gleich ai Besichtigung der Stadt; in unserem zeitbeschrank- 
tem Frograinm ist nur ein Tag vorgesehen. V-ir haben uns auf das Vesent- 
lichste zu öeschranken. 

Am Vasser entlang zur Porta Feiice ,die ihre Bezeichnung nach der Gattin 
dep xxiXfjpanischen Vicekonigs , Feiice Orsini o^kommen hat. 'in Barockbau 
von 1582 1 ,itet in eine der Haupta iern der Stc.idt ,deii Via Vit to re man uele 
("Toledo" kurz genannt] die sich mit der anderen Hr^utader ,der Via Maqu eda 

an den "Juattro Canti" schneidend , direkt zum palazzo Normanni , jetzt 

Parlament , fuhrt . 
Vor dem Pal ast die b umbest-jndene Piazza Vittoria. 
Bgonnen auf der sarasceni::chrn 'irundlage ,die er bei der Eroberung vorfand 



( t 



53 



' ) 



( ) 



baut Robert d 'Hautev ille ,spater"Guiscard ,der ^<^^l^^^^ ^^^^^^IJ^^ ^^^" J"'];^^^^^ 
artig 3 Schio^r;ir:i¥rs.ine Bruder, König Roger, die zwei Wilhelme und daan 
auchcfer aohah stau fe Friedrich 11 den Ausbau fortsetzen. C '^ 
Vom normannischen Dau ist aussen Aeni^./ übriggeblieben. Im Inneren vor 
allem die C^.pella Falatina .die . bnig Roger II in arobisch-normanniscnen 
Stil baut, dem Hl.Ietrus weint, mit dem farbigen Zaubf-r byzantischer Mosaiken 
verbindet (1132-11^0) .Letztes Tor fahrt in den Schlobshof äee: im 17.Jahra. 
erbauten Darockschlosses ,in aas die Kapelle, die früher von Säulengängen 
umgben v;ar,vol.lig einy;ebaut ist.Kechts die Treppe hinan. Trotzden ich in 
meiner Hirinnerun^r ge ässe Voi'steliungen hatte, oa.n ich beim Eintritt doch 
uberascht von diesem Glanz. ijs ist weifelios die schons .e ..chiosska- 
pelle cer Welt. Eine dreischif i i.^,e Basilika ,in Jer arabische Spitzbogen von 
zehn cJitiken Sauxen getragen '/e.den.Oie schon bemalte arabische Holzdecke 
ist Tixt A n Wänden durch StalaKtiten verbun .. n;umls^uf end eine kufiiche In- 
schrift. Hauptmosaiken im Chor un d in der Kuppel um die feierliche Gestalt 
^e Aeltenhersc err: gruppiert. Vi <ian V^änaen Scenen aus dem alten Testament 
und I -ben Christi. Neben d?r aus kostbaren "^ teriö.l zusc mmengeFetzten F nzel 
ein kostbar sculptierter Oster lemchter! Grosse Wirkung geht auch von den 
wei^-^sen Marmorplatten aus, die unten die .ände bedecken uii von Ban ^orn 
farbif-enMar normosaik in geometrishcer Musterung gf-kront werden. 
Von cen Arkaden ctes zweiten tockwerks f.hrt eine Tur in die so^. Stanza dl 
Pugf/ iero »deien Dekor tion nach cfera eben Gesehnen keiben grossen Einaruck 

m cht. 

Die Kirche S.Giovanni degli Eremiti ist so nah, da. -~ wir zu Fuss hinüber 
gehen, ine uer alte.-ten Kirchebauten dsr Norm-mnen unter Benutzung einer 
Mosch- e(ll62) .Die fünf Kuppeln betonen den orientalischen Charaktc-r 
Pest eines Kreuzganges u.nechlies.st einen reizenden Garten Die Normannen 
benutzten dies heute so T^alrische rleckchends B^-gräbnisplatz für ihre Hof- 
leute . 

Zurück zum lalast und ziät aisc hliesi:enüen mit dem Jralast verbundenen befes- 
titzten Stadttor von l^bO,das im l6.J hrhunaert oarock umgestaltet , nun 
Porta Nuova heisst.Hier setzt sich aie Via Vittore Emanuel fort und fuhrt 

hinaus nach onreale. 

»HÄxSsrxHDie Bezeichnung Via Vittore Err^enuele wira kaum b^^nuzt .km ßebräucfth 
licheten ist "Cor^O'' o -er "j oleao " nach dfm^^ani;:. hen Vicekonig Doli i edro 
de Toledo, ^er di>tse Stras e einlegte. 

An inr lie^t auch dr:r Dom, von dem die C tseite noch an uieisten den alten 
CharaKter bfwai.rt hat ; Bbi^ Bl innen ist er völlig ve^iorbrn Aorden;ans 
interessieren nur die KonigFgräber . Hi' r ruhen untfr tempelf örmii-en 
Baldachinen maJF. tatische I-orphyr^sacrophage - önig Rogeri + 115^) , seine 
Tochter Constanze und ihr Gatte der Kohenstauf enkaiser Heinrich Vl(+1197>^ 
von dessen Grausamkeiten ich zuerst in dem Buch von Georgina Massen 
C^Iife Frederic 11)1 ^s und ihr grosser Sohn , Friedrich II (-fl2^C) der uns 
mneschlichan meisten interessiert und des; en Spuren wir in /ipulien folgen 
wol] en. 

Obwohl der Besuch des -.Hseo Ni-tionale vielleicht für meine Freunde wichtiger 
wäre, will ich, weil es zweifelhaft ist, ob unsere Zeit dafür ausreicht , jeden 
falli das mir noch unbekannte , neue '"useum ^' Galle ia Nationale di Sicily 

" /IJ,iormannen gründen um 1020 in ünteritalien christlichen St. at nach verxrei 

^ ^^ Moslims...obprt Guiscard erobert .-anze unteritalienische Festilnd 

iar3t mit HErzo tum Apulien belehnt . Bruder r:oger erobert r.icilien^ 
vom PaT:st in Palerrncb zum \orvU von Neapel und Sicili en gekrönt. 
Inm folgt eiji z-veiter Sohn ilhelrr?'*der 
Sohn wiihelraj''der Gute", der 11Ö9 stirbt 

dif^rri HOHKNSTAT'x^-'N Heinrich VI , Sohn Barbarossas zur Ehe gegeben ;er beanspruch 
Krone, eicilianer erklären sich für MxHfgg^xyisRTankred von Lecce , natürlicher 
.^-ohn »oFers. Heinrich besiegt ihn , wieseinen Sohn Wilhelm III. Stirbt 1197 m 




rird ■'VQJ 



Schlechte(115^-lbb)»»,dann dessen 

. ilhelm II h-tseine Tante Constan 

■1 



5^^ 



'' ) 



( 



Die Galierie giot einen Überblick uoer Malei-ei und Plastik in Sicilien 
vom 13,bis lÖ. Jahrhunaert und ist im Palazzo Abüatelli untergebracht. 

XiiKiÄJt Er ist 1^95 erbaut mit Zinnenturm und merkwürdig ausgestalte^ten 
gotischen Portal . Eine zeitlane^Y^^ ®^^ Nonnenkloster in ihm unterge- 

brahct und als ich ihn zuletzt sah, war er zieJilich in Verfall.hr steht 
nicht weit von unserem Hotel in d^^r engen Via Alloro ^,soll im Kriege 
sehr gelitten haoen und wurde nahh dem l^riege fon u er Regierung seiner 
neuen Bestimiviung angepasst.So hat aian z.B. in aie eherrirlige Klosterkirche 
eine Decke eingeschoben, so dass man ausgezeichnte über icht über das 
vom Falazzo c claf an i ubertrcigne Riesenf resco "Triu mph des Todes " von 
einem unbek^^nnten Künstler aus I^'lan.aern bekommt. Aus Klöstern und Kirchen 
sind frühe Fresken übertragen , grosse ge.nalte Krmcifixe aes XIII Jh.! 
Von Jan Gossart, nach eineoi Geburtsort i^aubeuge Mabus e genannt,- ein« un- 
gewölinlich reizvoller Flafa';el^/ltar von 1^1 1 : Auf öo.r Mitteltafel sitzt 
Maria )^it viem Kinde auf dem übe reich in spütgotäschen Geschmack ver- 
zierten Thron. Sin Kinderengel bringt dem Christusknaben ein Stiefmütter- 
chen, während f nf andere Kin erengel musicieren. Durch die r. ckwärtigen 
Öffnungen des Thrones blickt man auf eine Landschaft init einem prächti- 
gen Renaisc-anceschloss. Von Antonello da Messina (1^30-79) eine Verkün- 
dit^ung und feine Portraitkbpf e . 
Die Plastik ist durch irortraitbasten des 



Franceso Laurana vertreten. 



Ar stammte aus Istrien und lebte 1^6ö-71 in Palermo .Seine äusserst 
reizvolle Büste der Eleonore von Aragon dient mit Recht als Plakat für 
die z.Z.hier staitf inaen-ien ochonheitskonkurrenz. Von Gagini sind 
schone Madonnenstatuen von l!pl6 una 1310 ausge. teilt. 

Bei der Neuherrichtung aes M^^^^eums sind auf das geschmackvollste Archi- 
tekturteile alter lalaste .niteingeoaut . 
hin wirklich grosser ^enussl 

Nach leoi Lunch im Hotel versuchen wir unr er Gluck im Museo Nazion le 
d^as leider , wie wir feststellen »bereits um 3 Dhr eine Pforten schliesst» 
Sehr. >ue, ich ho.tte gern meinen Freunden vor all m die Metopen von Selinuntt,'^ 
gezeigt, eine Stadt, die bdö v .Ch. gegründet und 4oy v.Ch. zerstört , einen 
interessanten Uöerblick über die BntwicKlung Jer hei enischen Skulptur 
von ihren Anfängen bis nahe an ihre Blüte, bietet. 

Von den : ntiken dronzen erinnere ich mich oe onaers eines Bronzewidders . 
Fr stand mit einem z^eiten am Fin*>:ang des Hafens von Syracus;ein byzan- 
tinischer Stattahlter nahm sie dort fort;spater kamen sie ins Schloss 
von Palermo ,ao sie der Volkswut zum C pf er fiel en; glücklicherweise konn- 
te oer eine wip \er heip^estellt werben. 

Wir verwenden die "^^ewonnene" Zeit zu einem Stadtbu-nmel . Wenn man sich 
auf den Corse beschrankt ,oekommt inan ein ganz falsches Bild der Stadt 
Die Via Maqueda durchquert die Stadt von IVestn aach Osten, führt über 
die Piazza Verii mit gern Teatro i^assrnmo undsetzt sich verbreiternd in 

der Via de la Liberte ,aie das m o .-:rne Viertel durchquert , fort . Schöne 
Grun^nla^ren .nit Cafes . Mo jerne Geochaftshaus'-r mit eleganten Laden 
Kri hat ihre Sonnenbrille , ich meinen ochuhanziefeer verloren. Beides wird 
ersetzt , wobei J.er . cnuhanzieher mit einem Comp, inient mir üb reicht wira. 
Gutej Dinner im Hotel,.vo gro. ..es Leben. 



V ) 




() 



( 



55 

Montag V.September : Stefan hat entdeckt ,dass Monreale jetzt durch eine 

diroKte c.trac. e mit S gesta über ^^Icamo verbunden ist,beiae Besuche 
z iisparend vereint weraen können. 

Bevor wir aufbrechen gehe icn hinuöer nach .^r Villa Guilia ,die von unseren: 
Hotel nur durch die Via Lincoln getrennt ist. 1777 ün,,ele.,t und von Goethe, 
oer ADril 17Ö7 hier .var,sehr bewundert .Su der Zeit des Jahr^-^s standen 
sicher die Orangen ,Citronen etc . inschönster Blüte. Jetzt im Herb.-^t m cht 
Et trotz vieler exotischen pflanzen mit seinen altmodi.xhen Pavil ons , 
an aenen üb-rai aie FaFbe aboröckelt , inen etwr^s mel. ancholischen indruck. 
-er Weg hinaus nach Monreale geht durch die Porta Nuova n-ben dem Falazzo 
ßea.le. v'ir verziehen auf Besuch ier sr^rlichen Überreste er Cuba, einer 

Festhält e ,aii~^;iThIlm II H^C in -litten eines künstlichen Sees eroaute, 
die ich bei .noinf.m ersten ßaf enthalt 1901 — wir weihten d m:.ls aie Villa 
Ipiea ein -- beachte »bbsneo auf k d?n Convento dei C--.ppucin i mit aem uner- 
auic^aichen Anblick .er .r^eiheweis ^n die .Vand Irbnacn Gerippe ;vohIh<.b-n .er 

P^lerraitaner . . ^ . -n 

AM±xi^giBxJEgyxte±xHiäfxKKkBHggJ<MigfxsxgKMKXxBi±g)B::atMfxaggxbdaxisx3CxriBSyX 

xKg±itia^HxgkxaggtkExMi^agxsgHgas[tgxVHg;ggB±ggHxatHKxxg±t5{xxxaxx£>exxäixxi5^(ic±xtexn 
liklxMxieHxsxxHrxitsKgiigxxgrxitixkHXäiiigxggxxHXKrt^MHtRXJ^gÄraniütxxRxgiRgr 

H»>i*iÄJ^iHxxÄiKxxixKxatiÄXiigiii«gxiiii/ jic2xiikxziaMKk:zHg . 

/.m FUSS (l^r Höhe von -.onreaie La Rocca mit wunderbarem RücKblick hinunter 
in aie Conca d'Cro , uf lalermo una uen Golf. 

vVir p.rken auf dem Platz vor der Kathedrale vo n - onreale ;S. Maria La Nuova 
"-'ilhelm II hat il7^ hiex eine Ben jeiKtdinerDitei gegranaet und dazu diese 
Kathedrale (1174-Ö9) . Sie sollte als Graoe. kirche seiner Familie dienen 
Erwar de. letzte le.r^itime König aus J^em Hause Hauteville. k.ur Ausschmückung 
lies er Scharen von Künstlern aus der ganzen »A/elt anwerben. 
ÄMSSBHxzwHijrrachtvoll das Porta l; Bronzetüren von Bonanus Civis Pisanus 
mit keliets aus d^r Geschiente mit öeischriften im ältesten Italienisch 
(llbb) .Umrandung M-rmor hoechst reizvoll ornamentiert im arabisch nor- 

mr^nnit :jhen Stil. 

Eingant^auf Gfer linken Seite, Der Innenraum ein überwalti enier Eindruck! 
Wie in'der Palatina unten wei: ee M rmorplatten mit geometrischen Formen 
in farbi:;em Mosaik darüber, r-onst der Piecenraum ringsum ait den umfang- 
reichsten Goldmosaiken ^'icilians (6,350 qm.) bedeckt. 

Weites helles von einer Holzdecke überspanntes Langhaus; mächtiges vom Pmgan^ 
kaum wahrne^-rnbares/^uerschiff ,ancfen sich^Sls by zantini.-chen Zentralraum 
gebilte!e^-^(^8oii?l7 Granitsaulen tragen die überwände des Mittelschiffs. 
Blick SDf 03 t von den ,'iosaiken des Chors angzogen, die w hrscheinlich von 
.byzantinischen Kün^tl rn gearbeitet sind. Kolossales ^rustbild aes ^rlosers 
grossartig schön. In einer Hand aas rfuch,.ie anaere erHBben. Darunter die 
thronende .Madonna nit cem Kinae zwischen den bellen ^rzengeln. 
An aen beitenwanaen Darstellung cxus dem Leben Christi, aus dem alten Testa- 
ment und aus aem Leben cter Apostel. Darstellung erinnert in vielem an ahn- 

iiches,vvas wir in Is.tanbul sahen, (vollendet llöl) 

Die Linneitlichkeit nur ai einer Stelle unterbrochen., inks vom Altar ein 

Öarockaltar und ein Crucifix. 

Von der Benediktinerabtei ist nur der Kreuzgan g erhalten. Der herrlichste 
Zauber, arten aer nomannisch siciliscnen Bc.u und Schmuckkunst .Seine klare 
. ,..;^chonheit s nuäelt sich an aem offnen Brunnenheus der Südwestecke . — - 



( ) 



56 



v<» 



( 



( ) 



des Konte Peilej^rino in seiner 



Es ist sicher der S'.;hönßte italienisch-romanischen i^.tils des XII Jh, , 
dem ich nur Kruzgang von i^ioissac im französisch-romanischen Stil 
(cf.S.ll :t.Fierre)zam Veigleich gegenüberstellen kc?nn.?'en ganzen Hof 
urazihen zi. rliche ,auf je 2 Marmorsault-n rmr^enae Spitzbo en,dazu an aenKx| 
>jcicen SHLul.rnbun -el von je ^ ;:aulen. Allejsind nit den reich ten farbigen 
Mustern eingelegt , die Kapitale alle verschie enDSa sind: der König, der 
den Dom der Mattergottes -Ib -NeiJ^abe überreich^ ; odr bei Zweiteilung 

eines Oopuelkapitals die Glieaerung einey Scene aus det- Verkündi ';ung 
benutzt. Aber la sinä aich Gauklerscenen und dn den Schäften aer Hcksäulen 
den antiken Kröten nachgebildete iutten,die sich zwischen ..^einranken miti 
Fabeltieren jagen und hascnen. 

Auf der Weitem föhrt haoen wir das Massiv 

cnarc^teristischen Form vor uns. Goethe nannte es "das schönste Vorge- 
birge der /;elt" und ich bin 1901 seinem ^^eispiel gefol^^t zu Fuss den^ 
ßerl^ hinauf bis zur v^rotte aer xHeiligen Kosalie zu vvandern. Die Heilige 
war iiahcer Legende eine i\;ic:ite Konig vVilnelm II, es Guten, die sich 
hierheraus Frömmxgleit in bluhenuer Jugend zur achezogen haben soll ( -»-J 170) 
Ohre Gebein n-ch Pal;:raio aberfuhrt soll die £fadt von der lest befreiht 
heben und machte sie aüiB Schutzheili.c^^.e aer Stadt verehrt. 
^e±ne Ze±t auch nur einen Blick auf en trand von :1ondello und das Mondell 
Fülace zuwerfen, ls . eht noch W^eten den direkten A'eg nach Al.ca-*ß und 
weiter in die ßerge hinein. 

Schon°weitemsieht man auf einsamer Höhe den Umriss eines Tempels. 
Steil ber.p:an zu einem I arkplatz , von dem ein steiler Fusspfad zwischen 
Agaven zum Tempel von Segest a fahrt. 

Er gehörte zur Staä^ Segesta , •■ ine ler ältesten Städte der Insel, elymä- 
ischei^, nicht p:;riechis^;nen Lrspnungs ,mit Ableitung von den Trojanern. 
Gebaut in cfer zweiten Hälfte des 5.J'^.v.Ch. war nie vollendet, so ist der 
Kranz aer 36 dorischen Säulen ohne ' anneluren »die noch Gebalk und Giebel 
trafen. Die Se.es Lanerfc-ieTen einst die Karthager z r Hilfe p:e:en ihre 
..ViJerSrMjijer,die Selinunter ;4ü9 wurde .nit Kartha- ischer Hilfe ^elinunfeC/ 
zerstört. Als sie selbst im ersten puni.-.nien Kriege s±» sich aif Seiten 
aer Hömer stellten »bereiteten die Karthager ihnen dasselbe Schicksal. 
Das Theater .uf dem :\onte Varvaro gegenüber , zu dem ein be..ch//CTlicner 

Fusspfad fuhrt, und die-.er Tempel sind die einzigen Zeugen ihrer Kxisten 
von cfer Staat, die bufdem gegenuberj legenaen Hagel lag. 

Aber auch unvollendet gehört de Tempel zu dsn oesterh Itenen von Sicilie 
und macht in dieser Einsamkeit auf nrgeshöhe durch seine einfachen gross- 
artigen Linien einen tiefen rJindruck. Herrlicher w iter riiiick! 
Wir fahren hinunter zum Gffiif von Cc^stelamara ,wo wir in Bolestrate , in aem 

Hof eines Frivathauses mit Blick auf s : eer^ e n ebsnso primitives , wie amü- 
santes Lunch "im Femilienkreis" hatoen. 
Auf direktem ' eg nach Palermo, wo wir s-regen 5 ^'^^r eintreffen, 
Noch einmal in iie Hauptstrossen der :tadt. Jause in der Via Maqueda,wo 
Stefan aich Gelegenheit, finaet seiner Hilrne zu o-gänzen. 

In den Anlagan um das T e^ro '-Inssii o^-^denke ich cferan ,aass ich an 27, ^^ärz 
19G1 die gros-e Chance hatte »luccini selbst seine '»Tosca'» diri.^ieren zu 
sehen. Prachtvolles Riesenthe-ter . rh es woiil die l-re ..iere war? 
In Jem anderen Theater der Stadt findet heute Wahl der chöm.eitsköni gin 



s :att;dieserhalb heute Deim ^inner im '^^sssaal gro-se Bewegung 
lieh Versuche der ''ahlbeeinf iussung. 



,vt rraut- 



1) Besuchten die grocsartigen Ruinen von Selinunt aiit 011^ und iMarianne 
31Marz 1928 

2) l^tro FißsiT-O -'fi 2Ö.Marz 1V2Ö . uccinis '»Turandot". 



57 



I 



I 



DJBBstaR 8. September ; Die beiden Tage in Palermo und I..;me,ebung waren von 

bchönlieit erfüllt und sehr bef riedi Tend.XScJxade ,dass nicht noch ein 
dritter Tag zur Verfügung ,dc^fr Bild zu vervol ! ständiu!-en. 

Ich frustucke auf cfer Terrasse mit 31ick überdie Marina auf das blaue 
Meer.Naciiher sitze ich in der lialle , Bachs erw.rtrnd. ün.veit eine auffal- 
lend schöne Frau ^nit einem Cavalier. ^a bemerke ich,daes viele -^eki-nnte 
geatulieren kommrn und ais auch noch eine grosse silberne Vase gezeigt 
wird,zeiflF ich nicht nehr,dass ich -ie gee.ten gewählte Schönheitskönigin, 
eine ' 'ienerin, vor mir habe, ^-iit Vv'ahldui ch:-us einverstc^nden ;Chärmc.nt I 

Aufbruch 9 Uhr. Un^er üotel an d?r :.trasse ,di^ , dicht an der Fdste des 
Golfs von Ter:nini Interese »direkt nach CEF ALU fuhrt 
Bei cfer /nfahrt schöner rilickaif Stydt una .en uber»aKenden Dom zu l^üssen 
ües gew^.ltiaen j^^elsenhauptes ,das der griechischen £tadt ihren Namen g^ b . 
H±r parken vor aem Jelly dotel und gehen zum Domplatz. 

D^r " Oom San pietro wirsä.^teht erhöht axf einer Plattform, zu aer stufen hinan 
hinanfahren. Diei FassadewiEti n ch dsn Vorbildern normanniicher Kirchenbauten 
der iMorman.ie und England (. Wilhelm der Eroberer -.St .btienne zu Caen) 
von zwei mächtik-en vier.-tockigen Tarmen ve -bunden durch einen Portikas 
zischen ihnen . hjr vurue b esonnen lljJ- als GrabesKir.he des Gescnlcntes 
der Hauteville von Roger II, der e i.n Jahr zuvor vom lapste zum König von 
Neapel und icilien gekrönt worden warD-r Bau ging nur langsam vorwärts 
blieb nach dem Tode des Stifters liegen. Die Fassade stammt erst von 12^0. 
Inzwischen beginnt der letzte de... Ges/iichctes , .vie wir g sehen n ben,117^ 
eine andere Grab .skir. he ,aie Kathedrale von -onreale ,die gereits liB^ 
vollendet ist, sich aber die Mosaiken im Chor von Cefalu,die ll ^( 

wc.rrn,als Vorbild nahm. 

Und diese '"osaiken »besonaers das Bild Christi, sind es, die den Besuch zum 

Erlebnis machen. Der Stil ist noch rein byzantinic-ch aus.efa.rt von einem 

grossen Kunstler. ''ie yi,mr wundervoll auabalanziert durch das Gegenspiel 

"er beiden Hände: Die Fechte erhoben in stürmischer Geste ,die den blauen 

Kcntel zur S ite reic-^send d:.s golddurchwirkte Gewmd enth^xllt , während die 

linke unbewegt, ein -.u h umfassend, es dem Beschauer entgegen hält. 

Das Gesicht mit Vollbart von ernster Schönheit entspricht genau dem Bild 

Gottes, wie die 1 osticonovlascen es darge.-tel. t ^-is en wollteniChrist als 

Konxg voll von Energie, der i antokrator ,df r '/eltenherrscher. 

Das Grossenv-rhältnis der halofi:.ur zur Jungfrau MxrÄRiHr in ganzer Figur 

ipt entsprechend ub-rwaltiv:end gestaltet. 

Die oungfrau steht in anbetender Hiatung.Inr nahen in Kai' r iicher Tracht 

mit kaiserlichen >jmbleraen die Erzengel, um aer Him-.elköni^an ,wie Prinzen 

ihi'em Ear.^;ten,^u huldigen. 

Zur .ck zum Jolly Hote l, in .t.-.en Vorgarten wir uner^n Expr-sso nehmen, 
zufrieden das ..anstlerisch bedeutendste Werk de- Scna.fens byzantinischer 
Mosaizisten .uf siziliochem '^ouen m uns aufnehmen zu können. 

iV-r bl iben a^i Meer bis Kurz vor Stefano ^i Cam -tra,dann geht es nach 
Süden durch bergige Land, ch ft über Mistretta nach Nic^osia , o wir in 

kleiner Trattoria lunchen. .ilie Gegendvoll ^^^"^^^^'^^''^'^''^ »Kisi.pv,i^pn^^»'^ 
Unser nacnctes Ziel ist ein aolchet Felsenne.st ,das seinSft CSfetfÖ lovanni 
aur^^^Bk in seine Ite Bezeichung ENN A zuruckgewoad-lt hat. 



iUiwkk^t 



f 

i 



57 



1 



l 



Enna liegt auf einem etw. lOCO m. hohen Berggipfel. ir halten an dpr 
Pi&zza ,von d iren Aussichtsterra.se ein weiter Blick sich bietet, wohl 
einer der umfassendsten Siciliens .Mc n steht et, a im ittelpunkt der 
Insel: "■''nna der Nabel Siciliens'* . Die Staat streckt sich entlang des 
iJergipf eis. Hechfefe aüfj-d m vorsi±i^Hen Felsen eine ßurganlage oder das 
v/a^; von aer alten rief eöti^un.^ abri>i geblieben ist. Darin ein massiver 
achteciciger Turm, 1er auf i^^riedrich II von .ohenstaufe n zurückgehen 'nag. 
r^s ist b ^r<.a nt ,da^ ö aer Konig hierher sich zurückzuziehen liebfe*,ura der 
hitze zu entgehen , denn selbst im nugust sind hier oiDen aie Wachte kühl 
Ausberaem uote der .• latz m meiner wilden ochbnneit und klassischen 
jilrinnerungen einen besonderen Reiz auf ihn aus. 
].an_: vor den Griechen sassen hä r oben aie bikeler;iJir Kult der Demeter- 
Kor e hatte nier seinen .lauptsitz. Die Lage macnt es scheinbar uneinnehm- 
bar.Undso war es haupts :icniich durch Verrat, dass es den iiesitzer v/echselte>J 
Djonys von Syracus , Karthager , Romer ,schliesllich aich Ö59 die Sarazenen ,aCi.- 
die mannliche Bevölkerung niedermachte n,die durch ihre Schönheit berühm- 
ten iirauer^bis nach ^agd -d in die harems versendeten. 

Ich habe Inder Schule lie -.nklaeerdäBn de.s CicipoH gegen den Frocunsul 
Verres gel«en,in denen u.a. die fruchtbare umgeoung mit Bächen , Seen ,'Väldern| 
gepriesen wird. Das ist,wo*.l hauptsächlich durch die Schwefelgewinnung 
in aer Üm,orebung , nicht .:enr fall. Man blickt hinein in eine wilde :.andschaft| 
mit kahlen Felskegeln. Auf ae.n nachstgel egnen^ höecnt :nalerisch üo :rragt 
von einer Kathedrale/ Calascibetta . 

Leider fehlt heute ein wesentlicher i-.ffekt; Der Ätna mit t einem Schneegip- 
fel bleibt ven A'olken verhüllt und bc^ld treibt uns sogar ein Re.eenguss 

in aas an die lerrasie aasc/tossende uasthaus zu eine n Ji,xpresso. 
Zu ^em heutigen i'lrnst der landscnaft pa-st diec Ite griechische Sage 
die mit dem kleinen See lergusa ,an OE^m uns unserer '.Veg n^-ch Siiden vorbei- 
f^,nrt^zus ^imenhiiniS't .Hier soll aer iiJingang in die Unterwe lt sein, an dem 
die xocriter ^Ue aeters von irluto entfahrt \A^urje.Dies die Grundlage für 

Llemsiriischen Feste ,die in Griichenland solche Bedeutung gewinnen soll- 
ten (cf.dcizu Igb. Griechenland 19!?!? |S, 112-115; 

Von hier ist es nicht menr alj. zuweit zu unsere n heutigen Endziel ,dem 
Kleinen Städtchen jriazza •rm^nira ,Vv'p wiederein gutes Joly Hotel far 
uns reserviert hat. i.eiuer ist h-ute MarKt mit reciit geciuschvollem 
Treioem ,bei cfem die Kandier sich tKiXHXf..uchischon des modernen Lautspre- 
chers bedienen, um ihre ar- anzupreisen, was meine Freunde recht stört, 
so hat meine Schwerhörigkeit aich einmal sein Gutes! 

MitrwQch 9»Septernber : Der Zweck unserer hiesigen Aufenthaltes ist der 
Besuch der Villa Romana di Casale . 

Durch '^ald in ein enge: Tal , rundherum von Hligeln eingeschlossen. Hier hat 
sich der '/ aiser Maxitüimianus Hgkul e us um 3C n.C h.für sich urd die kai- 
serlicne r^amilae ein Jagdschloss geschaffen. OAeit ich feststellen konn- 
te Wer seine Hauptstadt Mediolanura(Mc-iland) , er selbst ein A^af fengefährte des 
Caesar Constantius Clorus in Afrik, Germanien und Britannien. 
Von der Villa ist bisher nur der ftionumentale Mittelteil ausp:egraben,* mit 
' nem seltenen Reichtum an Mosaikfussböden ,von denen bisher 3,50C qm. 



. u s ife -'' r::^b en sind. Zu ihrem -chutz hat man darüber Plastik vände und 
Dacher errichtet , die wie Glas wirken und gleihzeitig dur h ihre Gestal- 
tung arcnitektonische Vorstellungen vermitteln. 

DiewLrklicne F^eilegung durch die Regierung hat erst 195c begonnen. Der 
— eigentliche Palastteil i5:t bereits sichtbar u^emacht. 



5rt 



( 



Die Tnemata der Mosaiken sind vielfach dem Z.veck des fiaus.s angepasst: 
Der Jagd! Wildschweinja d ,aber auch Jai^d auf '-irosswild in Alrica zur 
Verse niflung nacln Italien. In i itten }-ortrait des Kais<ä,r.s ziwschen zwei 
Schildträgern, ''les voraliem auf dem l&n^jen 'Vandelgang vor der so.- .Basilika ^: 
dem otficiellen Hjinpfangsraum. In kleineren Räume viefach ^Tarierter 0' r- 
jrtellunp-:en von ornamental verwandten Tieren etc. xaax^KkxHHitxxtRRxxxt Qurch 
Aobildun?^ bekannt gevoraen der gro- : e Mosaikfussboaen mit den "Bikini- 
Mädchen" Vielleicht haben sie der neuen entblössenden Bademode als Vor 
bild gedient. Hier han lelt e& sich um 10 Mädchen in zwei Zonen ubereinande; 
die auf Kasenboaen sich gymna<= tischen üöubgen nmg .ben^ bekleidet Miit kurzen 
Lendentuch und mit den ßu&en eng umschnurenuen Bindern. Diese Bil^-ler wurder 
im 4.ciahrnun iert aber ein rein geometri^i. hes ''luster gelegt. 
Moderner Comfort: Badeanal^-.en von unten Deneizt und Toiletten ;iit dauernd 
flies 'endem .as&er. 

Ein gut unerrichter Aufseher macnt dfen Besuch besonders instruktiv, -eim 
Ausgang ist ein ge^rüCXter _^ ahrer von Gino Vinicio Gentili aus dem Janre 
1955 z.ir k'eiteren Informierung erhältlich. 

Der direkte Weg geht von liazza 4rjienira nach Syracus aber Viccini , Solarini 
Floridia. i^±r sind ihm nur bis Vicini gefolgt , einer besonaers malriscnen 
ßergstadt mit .ßarockkirchen und Zeichen ^rossser Armut. Wir irustucken 



im ersten Stock ein-r 



^■ 



elunke, wohin ;nan uns ols einzige '^'Möglichkeit hin- 



iveist. immerhin ist es Stefan ein Trost, %ii dem Ort zu rein, wo sich tatsäch- 
lich die Tragödie abgespielt hat, die Magaagni in einer"Cavallria "Rusticana. 
(Eitterlic akeit aif dem jande!ilÖ9C) durcn seine Musik zu einem der grössten 
Ol ernerf olge er IS'euzeit gemacht hat. 

Richcärd Züricher in seinem rtikel ^ber ^.icilien in ier veltwoche (29*5 -5 ^ 
'* A'irwiü.en aen ub'-raus lohnenden :jrf*:/ieg aber Ragu^ a ,M o^ic a und Noto./^lle 
diese drei S+adtesLnd nachdem rrdbeben von l693 wie .ex' aufgebaut worden, 
nach elenii Flan,dei' stets dae besten individuellen Lösung ^'aum gewahrt. 
So b' sitzt bei .;lx'-r Verwandsjhaf t jede dieser drei Städte ihre eigne 
Physiognomie ; in der Unterstadt von Ragusa sind platzbeherrscbende Kirchen 
deren Fronten in reichen Turmbfuten gipfeln, in ^odica beherrscht eine 
ähnlich ge;r3talt-re i<irche den oberen Rand der in einer Schlucht aigelegten 
Stadt. In Ncto ab<^' reihen sich büiinenmä^ sig gestaltete il^tzc- mit Kirche 
über höh« rreitreppen und eitlichcn Palästen in einer ..eise,aer schon 
die ünwir-r.lichkeit einer Theaterscenerie ei, en ist. 

Bereits von wodica fanrt man durch die Üaine von Mandelbäumen ,-ran^_en und 
Zitronen, die far däe naturgesegnete Küstengebiete Siciliens kennzeichnend 
sind und die uns nun bis Taormiaa begleiten werden." 
-vir fanaen aie ocbw^-iraerige Schilderung etw. s übertrieben und ich meine, 
vv.ir lätten ciie Zeit besser in oyr-.cus verv/enden Können, wohin wir nun so 
spät an • achmittag aikamen ,das6 nicnts mehr vorzuneh.nen war. 

In ÄÄÄSä^ 1^1 i^A^C^U^i werden ; ir im Hotel Villa Foliti erwart et, wo sehe 
ne Zimmer mit Bau für uns bereit stenen. Vom ./immeraus scnauen wir direkt 
hinunter in die Latomia del Cap}ucini ,weit hinaus aber die Stadt und Ha- 
fen. Das f^iotel ist altmouiscn und im Umbau be rri t i en ,aber dochearstklassig 
im bv..sten Stil. Leider können wir z.Z. nicht im H&use e.ssen. Man empfiehlt 
bt-staurant Bandier a ,dc. s unten in der Stadt nahe der Piazza Pancali an ei- 
nem kleinen l' anal , Dapsena BarsenaC/ liegt , der . orto Ficoüo und I orto Grande 
verbindet, ir speisen angenehm am .Vc^sser auf einer Terrasse in guter "''uft. 



c> 



( 



Du; 



59 

., jiinersta^ 10. September : Icn musste heute Nacht bei cteixi starben Gewitter 
una ien Regengüssen dar' n denken ,dass ich z ra dritten al in Syracus und 
in ler "Casa Politi" , wi'^ siecfern.ls hiess ,Din: April 19C1, April 192Ö 
Und jealpYemige Tage 'nit Genu.ss der St, at und Umgebung gewidmet habe. 
Eri und Stefan v ol.i. en heute noch unD> dingt nach Taormina //eiter aimi endlich 
zur reinen Erholun^l^ommen; ich kann es den Beiden, die im tä^i'Üchen Leben so 
angestrengt sind, nicht verdenken. So wird die Zeit zur Besichtigung der 
Stadt sehr oe. schränkt sein. 

Das Gewitter hat dio Atmosphäre :iereini^:t. ir fahren hinunter in die heutige 
Stadt, die sic.iaii einen kleinen Teil aer antiken Ansxedlung beschränkt , auf 

die l ^rel i rtygia . 

Der Domplatz i.-t von m== Irischen Barockfassaden umg^^^ben 

Her ^^^^ölTseine Fassade erst nach dem rdbeben von I695 bekommen. Die antiken 
Säulen" 11 it i''apitäl<^n des inervatempeJ s sind ite ihn hineing^baut . 
ÄrC^iidffi?%^'*S/enuber "I ;i r ,1 riir H^rrv^n"^.! --^^ löai archäologischen Museum , auf 
des-en deaaca wir lei'ie raus Zeitmangel verziähten nu.sen. Icn hätte meinen 
Freunden .^ern wenigstens die Venus Anadyomene-Ciiit ihrem )el''hini ezei-t, 
aeren .-»ückseite die Venus Kaljpj^gos weit an vollendeter 3ch*6n^eit übertrifft. 
Fin griechiches urininal des ;>. Janrhunderts. Dann hätte icnsie gern einen 
Blick auf die herrlichen fjrieciiis'.hen-sicilanischen Goldmünzen wei'fen lassen, 
eine oamnilung ,die >chwer zu übertreffen i t. 

Note-earunG,en beschränken wir uns in aer Alts tadt auf Besuch des mphit heäteer; 
einer römitchen Anlage aas der Zeit des HUgustus,aaf aas Griechisch ejrh^s^i^ e r 
vom l^.Ju.v.Cn. , eines der ^.rossten der alten Aelt,von dessen nohe -nan einen 
herrlichen Blick suf Stcdt und L-.no.schaft hat. Und schr.uen natürlich aach in 
Latomia dei laradiso niit dem scg,nhr des Dionysos. Allie arei sind jetzt in 

hübsche nia-'en ^-eoettet. 
Auf die sehr interessante FestunK anläge h^itte aanlschliesslich verzichten 
können;das Fort Euryelos lie^^'t zLerulich v^it^drau.sen.A bei/um die I lylle ier 
Kyane ^^uelle 11t ihren von Fapyrusstaudenjangefas .tn Ufern ist es jammer- 
schade .Man sLert ,A'--nn -lan am ^nde aer iootfahrt sie •- rreicnt ,klar .as 
•'kornblaue ' asMer aus der Tiefe drängen, f^erist 
M n den TRaub aer } roserpina versetzt hc.ti^JUmi 

aie icnd^m :-otte entgen-v-rf ,um ihre Herrin zuachUt.en. Zur Strafe wiarie 
die Nympfe m diese -jel.' verwandelt. 
Jt caft^be helped! 
So drenen wir zum Ausgang aer Stadt Dichtung Cctani^^ »halten aber, weil geraö 

am vVes:e lien;t/ noch bei der Kirche S.Giovanri . 

Auf uneer sc.elien öffnet ein Mönch, ier die Fuhring ab rnimmt . 

Von en alten irchen ict Aenig erhalten; von der aas dsm V'.Jh.nur die Apsis 

in ■:^ua-.ern,vonder nittelaltcrlichen irche nur aid Westwand mit dem auf- 

lajiena Radf enster .Tr ep] en f^nr-n ninab zur Krypta aes Ri.Marcian.^ 

Interessant sind die aus.:?;eaehnten K atakombe n , in aenen ich,sowr-it ich mich 

erinnere , noch nie v^aFK. li^igenartige Rundsaie aas jem iV bis VII Janrhundert. 

im unaoer ehbaren Gewirr aer ^3inQe. oll an Geräumigkeit, die rcnischen 

Kata.rombcn weit abertref len ,alxeraings von aer Wanadecoration ist wenig 

erhalten. 

Weiter nach €btania durch auf^ll; nd arme Gee^enden.Derr Alna zeigt sich nicfct 
Catqnia macht sofort a^n indrack eine, recht oetriebsanen Sta.t,iie oflenba; 
zu recht das'*' Mailana des Badens 'heisst .Aucn 4Lese otc dt i^t nachdem Fi^l^eben 
von 1^9:^ neu angelegt. 




me, zw-^ite btelle ,wojJin 
phe and. , ,. 
^Dienerin der ^ ore , 



( ) 



6g 



( ; 



( 



Wir fahren gleich zum Oorn£icjbz ,dem Mit i elpankt j.er Stadt .Auf diesem Platz 
ein Brunnen m.t einem antiken h:iefcinten aus Lava,jer einen ägyptischen 
Granitübr.lisKen trägt ; aiente vei nutlich als ;/.eta in einer Rennbahn und ist 
in das appen von C-^tanic- überge.^, ngen. 

Der :üm ist Oit zer.-tort v^orden; vom urspr.-.n^s'lichen Bc-u Konif l^oger I 1091 
wenig~erhülten;er vörw.nate als •^i&tc^rfcdl iie Steine vom antiken -Theater. 
Die Barockfaisaae von /acc.rini (173t>)inach dessen tlan die Stadt nach 
dem c^rdbeben von i693 wieder aufgbaut wurde. Auch er verwandt Material vom 
antiken Theater; die Granit säulen m der Fassade stammen von dort. 
iLS muss heute ein Fest sein,aenn die Menschen strömen mit Blumen in den Dom*, 
es ist ao voll,da3o wir zur Kapelle der KLa^cathe nicht vordringen können. 
ün:riittelbar davor singen eine '-.ruppe von Frauen fromme Lieder »wahrend le- 
bende lauben hin und her flattern.! Hübscher 'nblick. Konnte nicht feststellen 
wwinibt der hübsche .:3rauch zusamrnenhanFTlim Leben der Heiligen. 

Wir lunchen im R estaurant MäKXäitMIII Gemarino an dsr Piazza Manganexli ,aas man 
uns empfohlen hat . "^-utsch q}rec j.ender Kellner, ^er uns gut bcdiett. 

An der Küste Y;eiter nach Noraeji.'Auf der strecke endet dicht bei der Str^-^sse 
ein unheimlich shwaiz erstarrter Lavastrom von einem der letzten Ausbrüche des 
Ätna, der vor einem ^ irchlein ,das von Betendenangefullt war, halt machte. Ein 

richtiges "Wunder". 

Hinter der Eisenbahnstation Giardini führt die Strasse in grossen steilen 
Kehren hinauf zu dem 20L Mt ter hbner auf einer Klipi e liegenden TAORMINA 
Vor eintritt in die Stadt l&g?^ das Hotel erstelle a Aare , wo w^r,a.i.öTIY 

und M:.rianne , vom b.-l4 April 192o wohnten. Pief .Glc.sers hatten es uns 
empfohlen und seine Lage , besonders .enn man im tieferen Anbau Zimmer mit 
Balkon nach zwei .eiten und lerratse direkt am Felsenabsturz hatt*^ entscna- 
di^te uns für viele Mängel im Comfort und Verpflegang.]i.s scheint nicht mehr 

zu existieren. 

ibinfahrt in die Ttadtdirch die Lorta ilessin a in diBengen Coree,der das Stadt- 
chen durchzieht und hinter der Piazza del Duo?no i-iinunter zur Piazza San 
Domenico yhn ^^aerjunser Hotel, aas Domenico palace liegt. 

xr fahren in den ersten Haue . umschlossenen liof p.^o wir parken.Daran ^chliesst 
sich K±Äk ein Kreuzgang aus aem l6. Jahrhundert jglassumscnlos^en mit blühen- 
den Palmen und L:j.egstühlen in 'litten. 

ie KlQEterkirche und ein früherer ireuzgang .^vurde ^grösstenteils /.erstört 
1943 durch Bomben, die iem deutschen Hauptqur^rtier ..alten ; auch aer in 
ein hotel verwandelte Convent,wo ic n und meine Eltern vom 2.-5.Ap^il 19C1 
wonnten, hatte gelitten. avon ist nichts nenr ai be.'erken. s Hotel, das 
wirsDiion damals be-vun. erten ,ist scnöner ,als je. Ein Anbem bietet Zimmer 
mit ßad und abgeschlossener Loggia. 

In diesem hatte ich für neine Freunde und mich Zimner bestellt. Meines ist 
^15, das "Doppelzimmer von Bachs anscnlieseend. Un-er Blick geht aber den 

Garten hinaus zur See. 

Beim Kundgang f in!>en wir rosse Ȋusserst gescLmackvolle Gesei:; seh- ftsrauine 
mit euten Antii-en izeschmo.ckt . )er Speisesaal nach dem Garten und dem ! leere 
zu. Lssen und Bedienung ocsonaers gut* 

Kurz: Pas ehemalige -lostei ist zu einer idealen A.usruhstatte geworaen , abge- 
schlossen vom der Unruhe des starken l?re ndenverkenrs dr. ussen und mit allem 
Gomlort,den man sich nur v/ünschen kann. Auch £ri,wie Stefan -ind zufrieden 
"meinem Hc.t,hiLer abzusteigen »gefolgt zu sein »obwohl es naturlich nicht billig 
ist. (14 n- füll boÄifd) .btefan hat es in einer witzigen Vergleichstabel. e als 
"tne K:en«tleman* s choice" Gezeichnet. 



$$ 







gBicMgyxtKic Freitag 11 .September : Schöner :orgen , friinstucke auf meiner 
Loggia und freue mich des Blickes. 



( 



B's wollen ihren ^agen wieder von der 



rchrarime^^^ie die Steinbank 
tKrxYEXxxfiwiHJjRHxixxxHn und 



bei der 
Aqua Paola in Rom ihm zugefugt hat »wxÄ^KrxYEXxxSwlHaRHxixxxHn und fahren 
zu einer ihnen empfoiilnen Autoreperatujbwerkstätte ,die sadjich von Giardi- 
ni liegt. Ich entdecke, ob und wie sich der Corso von Taor aina verändert 
hüt.Ich k.nn zu ihm gel..ngen,ohne die Tj^epcen zu benutzen .Auf diesem 
vve^^e Blick aif u en gotio> hu-n Palast Stefan o, bea stehe ich aisserhalb det 
Tores Catania:^wHaut pinem Platz ,cv.ufd(^m ein g.nz modernes Postgebäude ex- 
richtet ist. -er C orso hat die Unzahl kleiner Läden behalten. HinzugeVomrien 
kleine Cafes, kl- ine rinosjein moiernes J- notoge^schaf t grosseren Ausmasses 
un.i ein I^eubau der Sicil-.ni.schen Bank, wo ich Traveller Cnecks wechsle. 
In aer Mitte etwa steht die Kath- drde mit einem Brunnen davor. Der frei 
llatz mit weiter Sicht jIs Cafe Genutzt .Viele Architekturreete aus dem 
Mittelalter ,z.t. in Hotels verbaut. Am Ende ..es Cursos der i alaz zo Corvaj a 
von 146g Tiit interessantem xur una Zinnen. 

htark verändert und t ir nich besonaers unangenehm , aer . ro -se Autoverkenr 
besonders der Tourenautos »deren Breite mich ge^^^n aie //and zwingt, die 
Masse Mensch'^und die eltsprechend her bgesetzte q)uaJitat ..er "An ienken.re- 
schAfte". Selbst die Kleinen iisel in Kera ik,die Olly so ^-rn h.tte und 
von dem wir einfex^ mplar zum Andentven iriitnah.iien,ist zur groben yaiorikware 

geworden. 

Gutes Lunch mit B's. Nachmittag vertiefe ich mich ^n Georgina Massen' s 

"Frf-deric II of noh^-nstaufen ,a Life" jaute Vorbereitung MMffdr unsere R 

Fahrt m sein eliebtes Apulien . Zv.ischen der Lektare Blick von meiner 

LofT.ffia auf die blaue See. Sundervoll. 

Beim '"'inner empfindet Tian die discrete Betreuunp vom Tberkellner bis zu 

. en uns zugeteilten Kellnern aufs angenehmste. -xpres-O nacnher im .^n- 

sc liesenden grossen Saal, wo man aie Mitgät>te mehr im ^iinzelnen wahrneh- 

kdnn.Gute Geselle haft. 

S amstag 12 .S ^/3J^ : '>i ^^^ ..tefan fahren hinab zum Baden bei der Isola Bel- 
la. 'Vun .erbares Vetter. Ich geniesse den Gart en. des notels. ^.ugang von 

dem glässsumscriloGsenen Kreuzgang .T-reppe hinab in den alxtesten Teil 
wo inden langen Gangen noch deutlich die uBcprunglichen xonchszelien eri 
kennbar sind.Oirekt vor dem i'>onveBt laägt ler gros^^e Garten, der sich bis 
zur ^ Iskante erstreckt, überall bequeme Sitzgelegenheiten. Reichtum 
an 1 flanzeniGrapeiruit und .tändeln, Apfelsi-^en ... S^.lbst in dieser Jah- 
reszeit ein farbiges Blähen, wohin das /uge blickt. Dazu di. Sicht in die 

i-erne hin Soer zum griecnischen The ter , hinaus aif o'as blaujRX Meer 

Dazu p3s:--t eine Kleine Bronceplatte ,die ich zufällig ente jecke.t^in dank- 
barer Besucher widmet einige Zeilen aer Geliebten in -rinn -rung der Stun- 
den, die er mit inr in dieem Paradies verbringcvn durfte, 
isic^cnmittag lassen wir uns vom alten Gärtner herumfahren , nachdem B*6 
recht befri aigt vom Backen zurück sind und wir geluncnt haben. 
Jause auf dem Platz vor Jer Kathedrale. 

Nach *m Dinner gehen a;eine Freunde noch hinauf ^^in den S'orsojwo in den 
offnen Cafes uberoll Musik und grosser "s^triebi'von dem wir in unserem 
^Kloster' nichts merken. 



( ) 



62 







( 



bonntag Ij.fipptl): Vunde wetter hält an. >ahre mit B*s hinunter zum Bade n, 
um~tiir erT Bade betrieb anzusehen, oin ja leiaer zum Zuschauen verurteilt. 
c:ehr hübsch der :itrand beider Jsola Bella . Sonne brennt stark. 
Nachmittag kleiner Spazier ^.^ng nit hri zum Hotel Rxcelsior , aas zqar auch 
unschöner age,aber venachl ^ssigten i^indruck macht. Schön er i avillon auf 
demw.'it vorsrringenvien Vorgebirge, dahinter äusserst reizvolle VilJen. 
Nach i'xpres&o auf Piazza , ntonio hillt mir Eri beim Einkauf von Geschenken, 
die , arianne ^iiich gebeten hat noch von der Reise für verscniedene Personen 
mitzubringen, '^ank ihrer iiilfe finae überraschend c^^eschmacKVolle Sei ientu- 
c -er,aie in Como gedruckt .verden. 

Mo ntag l^.Septeiiiber : Ich hatte meinen freunden von dem äu5:serst reizvollen 
Ausflug zum ^i*rNA erzühlt ,bei cfem wir die ©starrte Lava nochw^rm vom letzten 
Ausbruch fdnden (Autotour Taor'nina-Gierdini-7rancavilla-P ndazzo.CTgb. VI , 
S.61.1923K Ich ver.tfhe vollkommen »dass Sie An die., er Sonne im Meer zu baden 

vorziehen. 
Ich b6n I920 ohne Schwierigkeit cfen d:eilen Weg hinauf nach ■' ola zu den Ruinen 
des Kastells -ew^n lert ,ura die überaus .'-rossartige Aussicht zu geniessen^ 
Heute n;<ch 31 Jahren bedeutet f^s einen ntschluss für mich, zu Fuss zum 
Griechischen T neate rzu gehen. Ich muss Jen p; nzen Gorso hinauf bis zur liaz 
za Vitt*". pimanuele ,dann die Via Te.'^tro Greco, bevor ich mein Ziel erreiche. 
Wenn ichouch seine Lage in guter :-rinn rung haoe,ich oin doch froh es wie- 
derzusehen; ohne diesen Besuch ist aer Auff hthait hier unvollständig. 
Und die Schonneit uoertrifft selost hochgestellte Erwartungen. Diese läge ist 
exnzii^.artig;kein Theater Inder ^griechischen >,elt,und ich k. nne die neisten, 
bietet einen solchen :^lick. 
Ich lilimme bis zur obersten Peine. Im ooeroten Rundgang sind ]>6 Nischen , deren 

ZwecK nicnt klar ist .i'iirab-r, einen aus.^rezeicnnten sc^-utti en Sitz verschafft 

in Kune ' ,, . . ... r, ' ±. 
von dem aus ich (ie .^unisicht j.,eniesben Aann. Vor aiir aas aus ro iiscn^r z^eit 

sta njfienaex Bahnengebaude ,das zum Gluck in der j'itte eine riesi,:e Lucke hat. 
:'urch diese LuCke sehe ich die bucntenreiche Kaste sich buchtenreich weithin 
erstrecken. Links d^von dehnt sich die m orizont verschwindende tiefblaue 
Flüche de.^ ".eeres aus und azwi chen kann ich den weissen Schaumgurtel der 
Branjung verfolgen. Rechts sehe die .eb^Lude unseres ;iotels,aes ':omenico Fa- 
iace,una weit darüber aie langas m und stetig auistei^ende I inie des Ätna, 
dessen Gipfel leider wied r in ./olken gehüllt ist. 

Beim letzten niersein Wc^r Jer Gipfel ifirei und nit leuchtendem : chnee bedeckt 
Dal'ixraber war der 'indruck stark benindert durch die Zimmerleute , aie bei 
t-rricutung der Buhne für die Festspiele im Mai Wc-ren und durch viale Freude, 
tie wctil daoei sein .vollten , v/enn Mu-solini lit Jem ^'önig hierher kamen, 
Mon kann eben nicht alJ^s haben. 

loa tr.-te über die Möuer hint-r ±t .ind schrie nun die aidere . eite mit Gap 
c-^. Andrea und der Jsola Bella. 

">chv;ere Tl*ennung. Ich werde dieser' ßild nicht noch inmal geniessen können. 
Anierseits iron,;as& es meine Beine noch einmal schafften. 

Dies ist auch zugleich der A^urdige Abschluss von !? wundervollen Ruhetagen und 
ich freue 'iich,d.ss auch meine Freunde diese Tage restlos . enossen haben. 
Ourch reicnliche Ti ink ;el .er las en wir clas lerson^l unsere Zufriedenheit 
miternp linden. 



63 



• 






CALABPIEN^ArU" IEN> 

Diens tag 1^. Sept e mber ; SchönevS Wetter hältan. ^b 8 Uhr ;hinunter zur 
Küste und weiter nach Norden. In Messina f in i^n wir rstaunlich moderne 
Eafenanlagen (die alten wurden vermutlich im letzten Krieg zerstört). 
Unc er Auto fahrt in eine moderne Fähre, die die otrö ungen dr-r Scilla und 
Charyois nici.t zu scheuen hat. Ab 11:^5 hinüber — nicrit nach T^egRio -- 
nach dm etwas nördlicher gele,q;nen Villa o .Giovanni , wo un-ser Auto auf 
aen Rodens Calabriensjaue; ;esc nif f t wird. 

nntlangher CalabrioChen Ka.-:t e nach rioraen mit Blick a f den Golf von ^oia. 
Hinauf ins Gebirge, .^.m bhan.: Nicastro D:jruber ein zerstörtes Normannen- 
Lchloss. . ier wurde der älteste Sohn Kaiser Friedrich II ^aev deutbche 
König Heinrich VII, der sich gegen ainen Vater empört hatte ».gefangen ge- 
halten. Er wusste nicht, dass sein Vater ihn Degnaaigen wollte, als er aus 
dem bchloas einem ihm unbe/.aanten Ziel zu.^efunrt vvurde.^^us Furcht in 
ein .cnlimmeret iefangnis überfuhrt zu werden »stürzte er sich uiit seinem 
Pferd über eine Klippe in einen Fluss,woa:* ertrank. (Lr ist in Cos nza oe- 
graoen,wowLr neate abend sein wefden. 

Lrstaunlicherweise hat ao^ar iMicastro sein oolly xot el ,wo vdrauf s ange- 
nehmste Tee trinken. 

Dann gei.t es, wie Stefan sagt, auf der kurvenreichsten Strasse seines Lebent^ 
weiter hinauf über IcCO Meter hohe i-^sse. überrage l-iend die reiche Land- 
schaft und was das erst, unldäiaste in diesem sonst so abgehol zten Lande 
ist , unübersehbare vvälder echter Kastanien. Oas wir dabei weite wunder- 
oare dienten i^eniessen können, ist weniger über öscnend. Oie Strasse i.st 
aorigens aurw-ezeichnet . 

Gegen 6 Uhr sind ir in CÖSSKZA . ausgezeichnetes Jolly Hotel , natürlich , 
wie immer ,Zimraer mit Baa~züm*"v rnunfti^en preis von Tire 2 ^2'^7 was etwa 
S 3.5(^ entspricht. D-r Ort liegt uoerra^^t von einem Hügel, der die Flusse 
Crati und öutento vor ihrem Zusammenfluss trennt . "Fluss'* ist im Augen- 
blick eine etw&s übertriebne Bezeichnung; im Autenblicg: sind es ziemlich 
jamnerliche ^assercnen;^ rauen waschen im Voraergrund. Im Hintergrund die 
lonte Alerico , deren N-^men daran erinnert ,dass hier der /;est,%otenkönig 
Alarich starb im degrif f ,nach llänaerung Moms,nach Sicilien überzusetzen, 
'ie Sage berichtet ,das^ er im Fluss nit seinen Schätzen beigep.etzt wurde. 
A'ir lernten in cer Schule auswendig:'» Nicntlichan Busento lispelt bei 
Cosenza dumpfe Lieber '' und da bin ich nun. 

Mittwoch l6.September : Her lieber i-iorgen.Im Hintergrund der 3rücke,die voi 
meinem lOteli enster ,zart bl:Auende berge. Grosse Neusiedlungen jüpy ige Ldsch 
Am Golf von TAranto entlang zur gleichnamigen Staat ,schun an Wasser 
gelegen. Sie zeflällt in zwei Teile. Die Altstadt(Cita)nimmt die Akropolis 
der aritikkn Sta. t ein und lügt nerrlichsuf einem Felsen am Meer, von enger 
Strassen durchzogen. Hier im Straseengewirr fragen wir uns zum Dom Äurch. 
Der Dom S.Cataldo wurde im IX Jh . gee^rünaet und wurae vor kurzem seiner 
Barockzutaten ent jckleiaet . Oas Innere wirÄt daster »schöne Säulen und Kapi- 
tale bleiben in Erinnerung, -ehr eindrucksvoll die Krypta . Sie wirkt 
frahchriätlichiwucntige Säulen mit Deckplatten tragen ie schweren scixmucl 
loren Gewölbe. — m Südenele ein malriscnes Kastell nit wuci.tigen Rund- 
turmen aus der Ara^onier .Es liegt neben der Drehbrücke , :>ie nach der Neu- 
stadt fahrt und aif die die Tarenter sehr stolz sind. 



6k 



f 



i 



Die Neustadt dehnt sich mit ihren modernen Neubauten entlang des weiten 
Golfes von Tarent .Hier liegt auch unser ganz modernes Jolly Hotel , wo wir 
wieder gut aufgehoben sind. Aus meinem