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John S. Bailey &i Bro. 






Contractors and 






Engineers 






Building Construction 






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Excavation 






Sewers Paving 






Concrete "Work 






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Lansdale, Pa. Doylestown, Pa. 











THE GLEANER 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Founded by Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf in 1896 at 
FARM SCHOOL, PA. 



Prepares for practical, profitable farming in all its branches including: 

Farm Management Fruit Growing 

Dairying Vegetable Gardening 

Poultry Landscape Gardening 

Farm Machinery Bee Keeping 

Creamery Floriculture 

Its graduates are succeeding in every State in the Union and some of them 
are leaders in their line of work. 

The thirty-fourth term begins April 1, 1930. 

For ambitious, healthy, agriculture-loving boys between 16 and 21 years, 
a few scholarships remain to be allotted including free board and tuition. 



Sign and Send This Coupon Today 



Office of the Dean, The National Farm School, 
Farm School, Pa. 

Please send me full particulars of the free scholarships to 
be allotted in The National Farm School. 

1 am years old. 

Name 

Street 

City 



THE GLEANER 



Own a Doctor Taylor 

SOIL CULTURE BOOK 

New Edition of 650 Pages Just Issued 

Full Information About Farming Operations and Cattle Feeding 

Price $2.00 a Copy 



Write for Further Information 

GRANT WRIGHT 

527 Drexel Building Philadelphia, Penna. 



^VILCOX COAL COMPANY 

MINERS AND SHIPPERS 

Bituminous-Coke-Anthracite 
Gas Coal 

BULLETIN BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA 
C. E. Wilcox, President W. B. Corson, Vice-President 



Qompliments 
of the 

President 






^he Qleaner 

OHiciiil Organ of the Student ]Jody 

Entered at The Farm School Post Office as second class matter. 

Subscription, $2.00 per year. 






1 



VoL.XXXIIII 



3V- 



JU\E ISSUE, 192?)'' 






I'/ 



THE STAFF 



Business Manager 
Kenneth Coleman, '30 



Literary 
Joseph E. Berii.\n, '30 

Alumni 
Abr.\h.\m Rellis, '30 



Editor-in-Chief 
Milton Werrin 



DEPARTMENTS 

Campus News 
C.iRL Cohen, '31 

Athletics 
Theodore Kr.\use, '30 

Art 
WiLLL^M Fisher, '30 



Secretary 
Sidney Goldberg, '30 



Agriculture 
Bern.\rd G.\yil4N, '31 

Exchange 
S.iMUEL Marcus, '30 



FACULTY ADVISERS 
Mr. Paul McKown, Literary Adviser Mr. S.amuel B. Samuels, Business Adviser 



CONTENTS 



Alumni Greeting, President Allman 4 

The Fowl Play, A.,'32 5 

Mystery of the Air, J. A 7 

A Baseball Tragedy 10 

To The Alumni, Dean Goodling 11 

New York Chapter Notes 12 

Personals 12 

Leaves of Yesterd.ay 13 

Resume of Baseball Season 15 

Football Schedule 18 

Freshman-Junior Track Meet ; •. . . . 18 

Plowing, J. E. S 19 

Soil Fertility Studies, 0. A. S 21 

The Whiteface, H. C. T 23 

Agriculture, J. B 23 

Societies of N. F. S., C. C 25 

Assemblies 26 

New Member of Faculty 26 

Who's Who 27 

Cjvmpus Chatter 28 

Freshman-Junior Bouts 30 



I. 



4 



THE GLEANER 



zAlumni Qreetings From President Herbert T). zAllman 

JULY, 1929 

(^^^ HE Editorial Staff of the Farm School Gleaner, a most worthy 
m publication, offers its President an opportunity of extending a hearty 
welcome and cordial greeting to its graduates, in their Alumni edition. 
The Trustees of your School desire to encourage these annual gatherings on 
its campus and athletic neld, with the assurance that your comfort and enter- 
tainment will be hospitably supervised by our Dean, Faculty and students. 

A school or college is as strong as its Alumni, therefore, we encourage and 
foster the growing interest you show in your x\lma Mater. 

For several years it has been a pleasure, in conjunction with Dean Good- 
ling and "Sam", to visit and address your New York and Philadelphia 
Chapters, comprising a fine lot of successful men. While not all in agri- 
cultural pursuits, we are, nevertheless, proud of your records in other endeavors, 
especially because of the fact, that to a man, you volunteer the information 
that the Farm School gave you a training during your formative years, which 
made you what you are. This is heartening to the patrons and Trustees who 
make this institution possible. 

With the very many betterments now in evidence since your school days ; 
with the improved curriculum and larger faculty, greater acreage, improved 
farm machinery and the building up of a high-grade herd, it is our hope and 
desire, that more of our coming graduates will remain in some branch of 
agriculture, the fundamentals of your School. 

This is now your school, and you will, no doubt, be interested and grati- 
fied to learn that during the past five years our capital assets have increased 
three-fold. It is true we have a large deficit in our Maintenance Fund, which 
accumulates because we accept more boys than we should, owing to the 
growing pressure of so many worthy applicants. Our enrollment has been 
increased over 100 per cent. Last year we graduated 58 students, against 
our previous record of 32, all of whom have secured good jobs in the branch 
in which they majored. 

This School, as originally conceived by Dr. Krauskopf, is a Jewish 
educational philanthropy, encouraging Jewish boys particularly. It was the 
purpose of this man of great vision to discourage racial intolerance, therefore 
a proportion of non-Jewish boys has always been most welcome. 

Our 35-piece uniformed band, made possible through the generosity of 
some of our Board members, under the volunteer instruction given them by 
Philadelphia's outstanding Bandmaster, Lt. Frankel, will, I am sure, prove 
an entertaining innovation since your visit last year. 

We appreciate your support, asking for its continuance, and sincerely 
hope you and your famihes may spend an enjoyable and happy holiday 
with us 




The Fowl Vlay or The Mystery of The 
Missing' T^ullets 



By Puelock Sholmes 



/WAS hired by the National Farm 
School to solve the greatest mystery 
of all times in the history of this 
school. 

On the night of March 28, 1929, three 
innocent pullets, at the tender age of two 
months, were savagely abducted. There 
were no clues, no footprints, no blood- 
shed or any act of violence evident around 
the house. 

But Purlock always gets his man. 
Alter many sleepless nights, aimless 
wandering and much thinking, I have 
finally come to the conclusion that the 
poor pullets were really kidnapped and 
so with this thought in mind, I set out to 
find the culprit. 

Once more I inspected the place. 
Because of the dense grass, no clues could 
be gotten from footprints, but, aha! I 
got it; reaching into my secret pocket, I 
hurried'y extracted my magnifying glass 
and after changing mustachios, I began 
to examine the door knobs of all houses. 
On the knob of the house where the 
pullets were missing, I found some 
fingerprints. There were the prints — 
four very large fingers and one thumb. 
This, at least, proved to me that my 
victim was a human being. I must go 



about my work very carefully as this 
species of animal is exceedingly wise. 
I made a copy of the fingerprints and 
placed them in my blue book No. 2; and 
then the search was on. 

One day I entered the dining hall in 
the disguise of Frisky, the school mutt. 
Many morsels of food were thrown to me 
which I hurriedly gobbled up, in order 
to act my part. Every time I received a 
bit of bread, I would grab it with my 
teeth and run out of the building. There 
I looked for fingerprints. Six days 
passed without any luck and on the 
seventh day I rested, it being Sunday. 
But every dog has its day, and on Mon- 
day I had mine. Somebody threw me a 
slice of bread. I barked my thanks and 
scooted out of the building. I was 
rewarded. There on that slice of bread 
were the fingerprints corresponding to 
the ones I had copied at the poultry 
department. They were clearly imprinted 
with fingers wet with gravy. It was hard 
to make the comparison, but Purlock 
never fails. I went back and marked my 
man. The same evening I went to his 
room and accused him and after many 
hours of the third degree, of which I am 
a master, he pleaded guilty of having 



THE GLEANER 



abducted those poor little innocent, 
motherless pullets. 

And this was the sympathetic story he 
told to me after he had admitted his 
gi'ilt: 

"One beautiful sunny day, Scotch and 
myself were taking a walk through the 
fields, just admiring the wonderful scenery 
that spring had blessed us with. Our 
stroll happened to take us past the 
poultry department, and iust as we were 
sauntering by one of the houses, a great 
flutter took place, and glancing around, we 
saw three little pullets giving us the eye. 
We were shocked and walked right on 
paying no attention to those flirts. As 
we got about fifteen feet from the house, 
they set up a loud cackle which made us 
retrace our steps to learn what the trouble 
was. After watching them for a few 
minutes, we finally got the idea that they 
wanted to get out into the sunshine and 
the fresh air. Believing that we were 
benefitting the poultry department — for 
aiU growing chickens require sunlight, we 
let these three pullets out into the field 
and kept on our stroll. 

As all the new spring views were 
fascinating to us, we kept walking farther 
and farther. Finally the first bird of the 
season, a beautiful specimen, flew in our 
direction and alighted upon a rock. 

Scotch claimed it for his own and 
reached into his pocket for his salt 
.shaker (taking things out of the dining 
room, ha!) He had always been told 
that salt placed upon a bird's tail would 
prevent it from flying. Foolish youth! I 
hadn't the heart to tell him otherwise. 



But here is what happened. He reached 
into the wrong pocket and pulled out a 
pepper shaker. (I don't know what it 
was doing there.) After sprinkling as 
much pepper as possible on the bird and 
the rock, it flew away. Poor Scotch was 
heart-broken. But we continued our 
little walk. "When we got about 100 feet 
away from the rock we heard three loud 
crashes. Very quickly we turned about 
and to our surprise, saw the three little 
pullets lying beside the rock, — dead. 
This is what happened. They had fol- 
lowed us all the way, without us knowing 
it. When they had arrived at the rock, 
which the bird had alighted on, they 
started to smell at the pepper. At the 
flrst whiff), they had a violent attack of 
sneezing. They sneezed their heads 
against the rock and there they lay, stone 
dead. 

Compassion overcame us at the sight 
of this scene. We couldn't leave these 
poor bodies for the ravages of all the 
insects, parasites and meat-loving animals, 
so we decided to carry them with us for a 
proper burial. We picked them up. 
Their soft, warm and tender bodies 
aroused our cannibalistic instincts to the 
extent that we couldn't resist the thoughts 
of a magnificent roasted chicken. 

As it was growing darker and darker, 
we hurried away into the woods, where 
we built a good fire, cleaned the chickens 
and roasted them on a stick. They were 
delicious!" 

And now I am out for more mysteries 
lo solve. 

A. 



THE GLEANER 



3\lystery of The zAir 



(^TTJOl'" JENNINGS, dean of the 

m group of crack pilots of the Balti- 
morc-IMemphis route, exchanged 
jokes with a few of his fellow pilots as he 
climbed into his plane preparatory to 
taking off on his long hop to Memphis. 
"Pop" felt unusually gay tonight as he 
had just been granted a two weeks' fur- 
lough. As he settled back in his cockpit, 
he waved his hand cheerfully at his 
comrades and called "'contact" to the 
man at the prop. The man spun the 
prop and as "Pop" gave her the gun the 
plane moved swiftly across the field. .\ 
moment later she took the air with the 
grace and agility of a bird and was soon 
lost in the darkness. After a few more 
wise cracks, the group at the hangars dis- 
persed to their several quarters. 

Came the dawn and about 5:30 A. M. 
the jangling of the telephone rudely 
a.woke Superintendent Ed. Pickens, of the 
Baltimore-Memphis route, out of a sound 
sleep. He arose, yawned and stretched; 
then reached for the phone. "Hello," he 
called drowsily into the transmitter. 

"Hello, yourself!" shouted an excited 
voice at the other end. "Did that bullion 
leave Baltimore last night?" 

"Sure, it did," Ed replied, now more 
than half awake. 

"Well, it hasn't arrived yet," said the 
voice. 

"Give him time," counselled Pickens. 
"We've got our best man in that 'plane. 
Maybe he had some trouble. Call me 
back in an hour and let me know. " 

Dressing himself quicklj', he got to his 
office. With a route map before him he 
began to call up every town of any size 
on the route. He sent a hurry call to his 
office force and ordered, at the same time, 
bis pilots to the field. Likewise, he 



reported the matter to Wa.slungton and 
then Silt down to wait. 

In a short while he received a return 
call from a small town abbut 200 miles 
away. A plane was reported about a 
mile from town. Pickens didn't wait. 
He ran outside and ordered his pet ship. 
Half an hour later he was speeding south- 
ward at 100 miles an hour. By ten o'clock 
he was at the wreck. Although the plane 
WPS burned to a crisp, he knew it was 
Jennings'. The latter was nowhere about 
and neither was the bullion. He examined 
the ground about the wreck and found the 
tire and tail skid marks of another plane 
not far away. A terrible suspicion 
began to form in his mind, but he reso- 
lutely shook it off. He returned to town 
and after a bit of lunch, hurriedly downed, 
took off for Baltimore and reported to the 
Washington office. 

That evening Pickens was closeted with 
the Postmaster General and the head of 
the U. S. Secret Service. Outside, the 
motor of Pete Dudley's plane was being 
warmed up for his regular run. The men 
in the office were silent until the roar cf 
the motor had died away in the distance. 
Then they fell to discussing the matter. 
Pickens' story being told, they set to 
work to dope out a likely theory. The 
most plausible one, was that Jennings had 
landed the plane and then transferred the 
bullion to some plane which a confederate 
had waiting. After this he had set fire to 
the ship and departed in his accomplice's. 
Having settled this the two officials set 
out for Washington to put the proper 
machinery in motion. All this while, 
Pete Dudley sped onward through the 
night toward Memphis. 

About 12 o'clock, as Pickens was pre- 
paring for bed, the phone came to sudden 



THE G LEASER 



life. A man's voice at the other end 
informed him that Dudley's plane was 
down in flames about 2.5 miles from 
where Jennings' plane had been found. 
He gave orders that nothing should be 
touched until he got there. .Again his 
plane was wheeled out and by 3 o'clock 
he was at the wreck. He went over 
everything carefully by means of a flash- 
light and found things in a condition 
similar to Jennings' case. Neither Dud- 
ley nor the two pouches of registered mail 
which he carried were present. -And 
again, scarcely fifteen feet from the 
wreck, he found the marks of another 
plane. 

Without waiting to investigate further 
he started back for Baltimore, His 
former theory, was of necessity, dis- 
carded. His only conclusion was that a 
very clever gang of bandits was working 
on the route; and must have had some 
inside dope. Landing at Baltimore he. at 
once communicated his report to Wash- 
ington. 

II 

The next morning while Pickens was 
on the field, an armed plane landed and 
a well-set young fellow jumped out and 
strolled over leisurely to Pickens. He 
introduced himself as Richard Marcy, of 
the U. S. Secret Service. Pickens led 
him into his office and learned that 
Marcy was aware of Jennings' disappear- 
ance. "Mr. Pickens, Pop and I are the 
closest of friends. It was from him that 
I learned all I now know of aviation. 
I'll round up those crooks if it's the last 
thing I do! I believe this is an inside 
job. Tonight I intend flying the night 
run and want a regular mail plane. 
Furthermore, I want no one but myself 
to go near this plane. " 

Pickens, greatly impressed by Marcy 's 
enthusiasm and strength of purpose, 
nodded his assent. 



Marcy took in hand the plane Pickens 
assigned to him and gave it a minute 
examination. He then rolled it into a 
hangar and carefully locked it up. It 
being lunch time, he went off to snatch a 
bite. '\iVhile at lunch, he phoned Wash- 
ington to send down two (2) two-seater 
planes, armed. On his way back to 
Pickens' office, however, he noticed his 
hangar — unlocked! Walking casually 
around, he perceived a mechanic busy 
about his motor. Instant suspicion 
entered his mind and his hand went to 
the little automatic in his outside coat 
pocket. He stepped into the hangar. 

"What are you doing there .^" he asked, 
not very gently. 

"Mr. Pickens sent me over to look at 
your motor, '' came back the glib reply. 

"You're a liar and under arrest. Put 
your hands up!" commanded Marcy, 
drawing his automatic. "Xow march over 
to Pickens' office and we'll see whether 
you're right or not. " 

Pickens was astounded when the two 
entered his office but he took in the situa- 
tion at a glance and asked, "AMiat's the 
matter, Marcy .^" 

"l caught him fooling around my 
motor. He claims you ordered him to. " 

Pickens' face hardened at this and he 
said, "He's a clever liar, all right. Never 
saw him before. Do as you wish with 
him. " 

Turning to his prisoner, Marcy said, 
"If you come clean, you'll get off easy, if 
you don't, you and I will take a ride in 
that plane you doctored. We'll ride until 
something happens, and then — me for 
my parachute; but as for you, you'll be 
strapped in the cockpit!" 

His prisoner looked at him and jeer- 
ingly said, "G'wan, you've got nothing 
on me." 

"No? Well, we'll just take that little 
trip." 



THE OLE AXE It 



"Pickens, will you get me a para- 
chute?" To his captive, ''Come on now, 
step along to that plane and don't forget 
I've got you covered." 

They walked over to the plane and 
Marcy securely tied the mechanic into 
the forward mail compartment. Donning 
the parachute, he stopped into the cock- 
pit and called ''Contact" to the man at 
the prop. As he gave her the gvm, she 
gathered headway and moved swiftly 
across the field. The prisoner was white 
as a sheet and his lips began to move. As 
the plane left the ground, he broke down 
completely and turned pleadingly to 
Marcy. The latter smiled grimly and 
pancaked to the field. He untied his 
passenger and led him over to the office, 
" 1 thought you'd come across. Now tell 
us what you know!" 

In the office the mechanic made a com- 
plete confession. "I put a certain chemi- 
cal, whose formula is secret, into the 
motors. .A.fter two hours in the air, this 
causes all the moving parts to freeze 



solid. Every time a money plane left the 
field I would signal our own plane which is 
hidden about two miles from here. Our 
plane has a muffled exhaust. About two 
hours flight from here we have a ground 
crew of six men with a speedy car. Our 
ship follows the mail plane, unseen and 
unheard as our plane flies without lights, 
contrary to mail planes. As soon as the 
mail plane staggers, our plane flashes its 
lights as a signal to the ground crew, and 
then follows the mail plane down. The 
ground crew takes care of the pilot and 
they transfer him and the loot to our own 
plane which flies to our hideout, in turn. 
The ground crew then sets fire to the 
mail plane and rides away. " 

The confession over, Marcy said to 
Pickens, "I have a plan that 1 think will 
work. We'll let this fellow fly the mail 
plane and signal to his confederates. 
AVhen his confederates follow his plane 
we'll follow up the two of them. As soon 
as his friends show lights we'll force him 

(Cont'nued on page 29) 




10 



THE GLEANER 



^ "baseball tragedy 

(With apologies to K. C. B.) 



The Rival College teams 

Were having their yearly fight, and 

Both teams were equally 

Good, and 

Both were confident of Victory and 

Before the game was played, 

There were many bets made and. 

Among these bets was one 

Which deserves special mention for, 

The captain of Swisstown, 

Dick Carter, was told 

By his girl that 

If he would win the game. 

She would marry him ; and 

The game started, but 

Try as they might, both teams 

Could not score, and 

Both captains were playing 

With all the strength and 

Vigor they possessed. And 

The captain of the other team, 

Faraway College, 

Had also been promised 

By this same girl that. 

If he should win, she 

Would marry him. 

It looked like she wanted 

To make sure that. 

She'd get some one at least. And 

Anyway, the game continued and 

Each inning ended with 

Xo runs being scored. And 

The captains of the rival tean.s 

Glanced at their girl, who 

Had promised 



To marry them and. 

To each she gave the 

Same smile and 

Each tried harder to win. 

At last came 

The ninth inning and 

Dick Carter's team was 

Up at bat! and 

Three outs came 

In rapid succession and. 

Poor Dick glanced 

At his girl, but she 

Had turned away her head, and 

Then came Nick Merriwell's 

Team and 

There were two outs and 

Three men on base and 

Dick was up ; and 

Strike one! and 

Ball one ! and 

Two strikes and. 

Ball three and, now. 

We suppose you want 

To know whether he 

Struck out or not, but, — 

No one knows 

WTiether he would have or not ; 

For just as he struck 

At the ball 

A bee stung him 

On the neck and 

He dropped the bat, 

Just as the ball whizzed past and 

The game was ended. 

Spiller, Rosexzweig axd C. C. 



Girl's Father— "Well, I think I'll 
smoke a cigar and then go to bed. " 

Five-Minute Joe — "Here, have a cigar- 
ette. " 



Dean — "It's you Freshmen who make 
the school. " 

Freshmen — "What! Are we that 
bad.^" 




To THE Alumni : 



The Alumni Days of July 6th and 7th mark the third Annual meeting since 
my administration of the Farm School and I want, through the medium of the 
Gleaner, to express my appreciation of the cooperation and help given me by 
the Alumni Association. 

It is very encouraging to know that the Alumni are giving the School their 
whole-hearted support and it has been largely through their generous help 
that we have been able to make vast improvements in the school, as well as 
among our graduates in the field. 

Let me express to you my generous appreciation of your whole-hearted 
support and hope that the school can be of much benefit to you in reciproca- 
tion of what the Alumni have done for us. It is my earnest wish that we 
might have more alumni return on these annual home-coming days and par- 
ticipate in the general good time which those who have been attending these 
affairs, have had. 

Wishing you all a happy time during the 1929 Alumni Home Coming 
week, I am. 

Very sincerely yours, 

C. L. GooDLiNG,"©eo«. 



1-2 



THE GLEANER 



3\[ew York Qhapter 



The following is a record of our recent 
activities. 

On the 3rd of March we had a meeting 
which was attended by the Messrs. All- 
man, Goodling, Samuels and TN'ork. The 
purpose of this meeting was to discuss 
plans as to the best manner of holding 
the Graduates' interest in agricultural 
pursuits. Though no definite plans were 
made the meeting was a success because 
it served to bring about a better under- 
standing between the representatives of 
the Board, Faculty and our Alumni 
Body. 

In April we had another get-together. 
This time for amusement. We formed a 
party of 23 couples and attended a play 
which had been revived after 50 years of 
apparent death and had a grand time 
hissing the villain, cheering the heroine 
and bombarding the entire troupe with 
peanuts and frankfurters. After the 
show we went to a Xight Club for supper 
and dancing. The evening was a success 
— even financially — we made $12 profit. 

This will indicate to the students that 
we are in constant touch with each other 
— we meet frequently, take an active 
interest in the school's affairs and continue 
to grow in membership. 



PERSONALS 

David Flatt of the '25 Class returned 
from a successful "seed peddling" ex- 
pedition in time to attend our regular 
meeting on June 9th. 

Warren Rinenberg of the '25 Class was 
married on June 1st in Philadelphia 
and then remarried again in New York 
on June 16th — the Philadelphia ceremony 
evidently didn't count. 

J. Haikon is engaged to be married and 
"Hank" Hanchrow announces his forth- 
coming marriage in the fall of this year. 

William Shorr came down from 
Connecticut Agricultural College to 
attend our last meeting. He is in his 
senior term there. 

A committee has been formed to subdue 
"by gentle means or otherwise" the ov'er 
exuberance of Messrs. Semel and Piatt, 
roughnecks extraordinary on Alumni Day 
and permit the other alumni some rest 
and sleep. 

One of the features of our trip to the 
school wiU be the dedication of the 
Alumni Grand Stand to the memory of I. 
Stern's father. A bronze plaque will be 
hung. 

Harry Raben, 
yew York Cha'pter. 



Manny Silver is working at Freehold, 
N.J. 

News comes from Shteinshleifer, that 
he will be married before the end of the 
year. Well, we wish him good luck. 

Rickert, Strang and Rubenstein, came 
back to the school on "Big Day." 
Rubenstein joined Strang and Rosenberg 
out in Long Island, N. Y., and all seems 
to be going great. 

Weber is managing four greenhouses in 
Long Island. 



Applebaum and Fertik are working at 
Trexler's, Allentown, Penna. 

Brooks has returned to his beloved 
Boston and his " Bessie. " 

Meyers has given up his job in Norris- 
town, Penna., and Carl Jung has taken 
his place. 

Sam Price, '27, dropped in on "Big 
Day. " He is now in the Landscaping 
game where he is going good. 




HeabEfii of ©egterbap 



1902 

H. Rick, '01, has gone to Texas for the purpose of starting operations 
upon a new line of tobacco experiments. 



S. Kolinsky, '01, is now manager on a farm at West Chester, Penna. 



The Class of 1902 consists of six members: A. Xewman, J. Goldman, 
^Y. J. Serlin, C. S. Heller, L. A. Burd, M. Mitzman. 



1908 

The Editor's Reward 
What do you get for a]l this work? 

] was asked the other day. 
'"Oh, nothing at all but the thanks," 

"Our glory is our pay." 



I said. 



And straightway round the corner, came 
Some classmates on the run, 

And advancing towards my helpless self, 
Said, "Gee, this issue's bum." 



14 TBE GLEANER 



1918 
Nineteen "Grads" of Farm School have joined the army and many of 
them are seeing action on the other side. 



Prof. WilHam Herbert Bishop dies after 13 years of continuous useful and 
intelligent service to the National Farm School. 



1926 
Extra! (From the Daily Rake Off) 
Sunday School Section. The Ten Commandments, as given by the 
Prophets of Farm School: 

I. Thou shall not drink. — Faiher Samuels. 

n. Thou shaH not gamble. — Sky Tiloi Qampbell. 

III. Thou shall not swear. — Friar Qroman. 

IV. Deal not harshly with thy neighbors. — brother ■I\IcI(pivn. 

V. Six days shall thou labor, but on the seventh thou shalt labor also. 

— Trofit Turmell. 

VI. Honor thy Dean so that thy days may be long at Farm School. 

— F(ev. Ostrolenk. 
M^I. Praise not thy son for what he doesn't. — 'Pastor IQraft. 
VIII. Skip not thv details or thv week-ends will be missing. 

—T)eacon Siangel, H.'BfB. 



One of the outstanding facts of the National Farm School conference 
held at the Biltmore Hotel, New York, was the support shown by the "grads" 
of the school. 

From the "Daily Rake Off" (published every time there is some loose 
change around.) 

The "Weather 
TMiether it's cold or whether it's hot, we must have weather, whether or not. 



1912 
J. Taubenhaus. '04, is assistant Plant Pathologist at Delaware Agri- 
cultural College and Experiment Station. (Mr. Taubenhaus is now at the 
Texas Experiment Station.) 



S. Rudley, '08, is manager of a dairy farm at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

B. Osterlink, '07, is instructor of agriculture in ^Murray County High School. 



1913 
Karl H. Kohn, '13, is managing a cotton plantation near Little Rock, 
Arkansas. 

A. Wilkin, '13, is in the employ of a large horticulture concern near 
Baltimore, Md. 

{Continued on page 29) 




g WOLK ^^9 



Theo. Krause 



"Resume of "baseball Season 

M jl AR ■NI SCHOOL started its baseball season with a green team, com- 

ml posed of only two regulars, and a hard schedule. No pre-season 

boasts were made as to what we were going to do and how numerous 

the victories we were in for. ^Yhat might have been talk was put into action; 

the fellows plugged along and practiced seriously, and when the games camCj 

gave everything they had. 

They never lost heart. ^Yhen the breaks went against them they just 
fought harder, and the results of the season show it. That comeback in the 
eleventh inning of the Temple game was one of the finest exhibitions of plucki- 
ness witnessed in many a year on the Farm School diamond. 

Coach Samuels deserves a world of credit for instilling such fine spirit 
in the team. 

Only ten men succeeded in securing the coveted "F". They are: Broad- 
bent, Campbell, Wattman, Liskowitz, Caplan, Nicholson, Grisdale, Compton, 
Kleinman and Rudolph. 

Although a regular till injured in the Temple game. Werrin failed to get 
a letter, not ha^■ing played in sufficient games to earn one. 



SONG OF THE STAFF 

School papers are great inventions, 
The Schools get all the fame; 

The Printer — he gets all the cash, 
The Staff gets all the blame. 



M. W. — ''You used to say there was 
something about me you liked. " 

E. L. — "Yes, but you spent it all now. " 



"Give me your money or I'll blow 
your brains out," commanded the so- 
called "stick-up". 

The intended victim calmly laughed in 
a manner that showed he didn't care for 
either. He wps a Farm School Student. 



Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man 
— Farmer. 



16 



THE GLEANER 



FARMERS GIVE WAY TO WIL- 
LIAMSON IN THRILLING GAME 

In the most tense and interesting game 
of the season thus far. Farm School gave 
way to Wilhamson Trade, our beloved 
rivals, losing to the sad tune of 4-1. It 
was a great game, the only fault being 
that we lost it. 

Campbell pitched fine ball and with 
better support from the infield imidd 
have had another victory chalked up 
to his credit. E'aplan made several 
costly overthrows that allowed two runs 
to score. Poor coaching on third lost 
us several runs and a rally that mighthave 
won the game. E'leinman was con- 
spicuous for his hitting and led the batting 
punch. 



N. F. S. vs. BROWN PREP 

N. F. S. TAKES ONE FROM BROWN 

PREP 

In a rather dull and listless game the 
Aggies defeated Brown Prep, 15-7. The 
Prepsters drew first blood, scoring two 
runs in the 3rd inning. But the Farmers 
came back in the fourth, to collect seven 
runs, eight more being secured in the 6th, 
7th, and 8th innings. 

Campbell was not up to his usual form, 
allowing nine hits, a two-bagger and three 
triples. The team displayed plenty of 
hitting power though; everyone getting 
a hit. Broadbent's batting average for 
the game was .750. 

Forman, Brown Prep's shortstop, se- 
cured three hits, two being triples and 
one, a single. 



Williamson ab e h po a e 

Wilson 5 1116 

Kuhnsman 5 1 2 

Brown 4 3 2 2 

Heebner 5 3 

Slagle 3 110 

Palmer 4 12 15 

Warrell 4 13 

Farwell 3 10 

Traynor... 2 10 7 

Totals 35 4 8 27 IG 

N. F. S. AB H H PO A E 

Kleinman 4 12 2 

Compton 2 10 

Broadbent 3 17 2 

Campbell 10 12 

Wattman 4 11 1 

Werrin 2 2 1 

Nicholson 3 12 10 

Liskowitz 2 3 4 1 

Caplan 2 112 

Grisdale 10 

Totab 24 1 4 29 12 4 



Line-up : 

Brown Prep. ab r h po a e 

Kovel 4 2 2 

Forman 5 2 3 1 4 1 

A. Boardman 3 2 1110 

Tronto 4 116 1 

Stork 5 2 3 

Snyder 4 3 3 1 

Manger 4 2 2 1 

Marmon 4 2 

B. Boardman 3 2 1 

Totals 36 7 9 18 12 5 

N. F. S. ab R H PO A E 

Kleinman 5 1 

Compton 5 2 2 

Broadbent 4 2 3 8 

Campbell 5 2 2 2 3 1 

Wattman 5 2 2 12 

Werrin 3 12 

Nicholson 4 2 110 

Liskowitz 2 2 1 1 1 1 

Caplan 4 2 3 4 2 

Totals 37 15 14 27 8 4 



THE GLEANER 



17 



WHAT A GAME! 

Wliowl Talk about your close games! 
\ tifjlit fight! lltli inning. Temple at 
Bat. And three runs scored. Down, 
down, went the Farmers' hopes. But, 
you're never down until you're out — 
a famous Farm School Slogan. And to 
prove it, our boys came in for their half, 
gritted their teeth and scored four runs, 
and thereby saved a few hundred people 
from heart failure. 

Wattman started it by getting on base 
and by hook or by crook, everyone 
after that managed to get on. Then up to 
the plate stepped Ivleinman with that 
mighty club of his and lo and behold 
socked a beautiful triple which brought in 
the tying run. Compton then slapped 
another three bagger which ended the 
game in our favor. 



Temple ab r h po a e 

Stern 5 1 2 3 5 

S. Kaufman 5 1 2 7 5 

Fenelli 5 I 8 1 3 

Bleiber 5 2 16 12 

Gilbert 5 3 2 1 1 2 

Lewis 6 1 1 1 

T. Kaufman 4 1 1 1 

Stehely 4 14 10 

Croishin 5 1 1 3 

Totals 44 9 12 32 17 7 

N. F. S. 

Kleinman 5 2 3 2 1 

Compton 5 2 

Broadbent 5 9 1 

Campbell 6 1 2 1 

Wattman 2 1 12 1 

Werrin 1 1 1 

Grisdale 4 1110 

Nicholson 4 1 1 2 3 2 

Caplan 4 12 111 

Liskowitz 3 2 5 3 



39 10 11 33 9 



N. F. S. vs. N. .1. I. D. 

Continuing their winning streak, the 
boys from N. F. S. ended their season 
with a batting orgy, snowing the Mute.s 
under with 14 hits, counting for 21 runs. 
The final score was Aggies, 21 ; N.J.I.D., 2. 

Ivleinman, who has been hitting the 
ball all over lately, socked a homer which 
reached the far-famed Lasker Hall. Watt- 
man also clouted a homer which is his 
second of the season. 

The fielding was almost perfect, only 
one error being made during the entire 
game. Campbell held the opposition to 
six hits and fanned 13 men, which brings 
his strikeout total to 47 for five games. 
The Jerseyites were able to secure only 
two runs and these in the latter part of 
the game. 

Line-up : 

N. J. I. D. AB R H PO A E 

Seibel 3 1 1 

Godley 3 1 1 4 

Osmola 4 1 3 1 

Nicholas 3 1 10 1 1 

Gerami 4 2 2 1 

Varody 3 1 

Tankatis 4 2 

Snyder 3 18 2 2 

Pizzulo 3 10 10 2 

Totals 30 2 6 24 12 7 

N. F. S. AB R H PO A E 

Kleinman 5 4 3 1 

Compton 4 10 

Broadbent 2 4 14 

Campbell 3 3 2 2 

Wattman 5 3 3 14 2 

Edelman 

Grisdale 3 10 

Nicholson 4 12 2 2 1 

Liskowitz 5 2 1 3 4 

Caplan 4 2 2 1 

Totals 35 21 14 27 8 1 



THE GLEANER 



freshjVIEn-faculty game 

Avenging their defeats at the hands 
of the two previous classes the faculty 
came back with a crash and beat the 
freshies, 15-4. 

The game was chock full of thrills. 
A four bagger by Dutch Groman and 
several triples and doubles supplied plenty 
of excitement. Mr. Cook made some 
classy stops at shortstop, preventing 
runners from scoring, besides getting hits. 

Samuels, Weigel, Stangel and several 
others played a corking good game and 
were big factors in their team's victory. 

The Freshmen were a bit rattled and 
seemed to lack confidence. With a little 
more practice they will undoubtedly 
overcome this fault. 



FOOTB.ALL SCHEDLLE 

Gettysburg Military Academy — October 
5th. 

Central Evening High — Pending — Octo- 
ber 12th. 

Haverford College Fresh.— October 19th. 

Temple High School— October 26th. 

Drexel College Fresh. — November 2nd. 

Suscjuehanna University, J. V. — Novem- 
ber 9th. 

Open — November 16th. 

Brown Prep. — November 23rd. 

Williamscn Trade School— November 
28th. 
All games will be played at Farm 

School. 



F. M. Joe — "What kind of tobacco are 
you smoking, Charley?" 

Rudolph — 'T didn't ask him." 



Charlie (?) (after escorting "F"home) 
— "May, I have a kiss?" 
A'o annrer. 

■'May I have a kiss?" 
"What's the matter, are you deaf?" 
"No, but I think you're dumb." 



FRESHMAN- JUNIOR TRACK MEET 

The first Frosh-Junior track meet ever 
held at Farm School took place on Sun- 
day, June 9, 1929. The meet was a com- 
plete success. There were plenty of close 
events which kept the onlookers in a 
constant state of excitement. 

'Although the Frosh were the favorites 
before the meet, the Juniors came across 
with plenty of fight and speed to over- 
come the Freshmen onslaught. Through 
the sterling efforts of Phil Kleinman, the 
Juniors held the lead from the very be- 
ginning and never relinquished it through- 
out the meet. The results were: Juniors, 
55 ; Freshmen, 35. 

Results of the events : 

lOO-Yd. Dash — P. Kleinman, 1st; 2nd, Lazarow; 
3rd, Lichtenstein; 4th, Rohrbaugh. 

2M-Yd. Dash—lst, P. Kleinman; 2nd, Shindelman; 
3rd, Lazarow; 4th, Hoar. 

UO-Yd. Dash— 1st, Rohrbaugh; 2nd, Rosefeldt; 
3rd, Grisdale; 4th, Cranch. 

1-Mile Run— 1st, Zeider; 2nd, Raven; 3rd, Rose- 
feldt; 4th, Ring. 

Shut Put— 1st, P. Kleinman; 2nd, Hoar; 3rd, Gold- 
stein; 4th Tomar. 

Running Broad Jump — 1st, P. Kleinman; 2nd, 
Spivak; 3rd, Lichtenstein; 4th, Corr. 

Standing .Broad Jump — 1st, Barnack; 2nd, PhU. 
Kleinman; 3rd, Shindelman; 4th, Grisdale. 

High Jump — 1st, Goodman; 2nd, Tie between 
Spivak, Barnack, Shindleman and Moccia. One 
point was given to each team. 

SSO-Yd. Relay — Won by Juniors — P. Kleinman, 
Rohrbaugh, Goodman and Shindleman. Fresh- 
man team consisted of Lazarow, Silverberg, 
Lichtenstein and Raven. 



"I hear you're giving up tobacco, Mr. 
Craft." 

"Well, Seipp, I'm tapering off, like. 
I don't swaller the juice no more. " 



"Why do you call the baby, 'Bill'?" 
"He was born on the first of the month" 
— Bvffalo Express. 




£ wo^it '29 



J. E. Seipp, '30 



'blowing' 



ONE of the primary operations on 
the farm preparatory to the 
seeding of any crop is plowing, 
and since it is the first operation we will 
study this phase at the beginning. 

What is good plowing? That is a 
question that has created discussion wher- 
ever farmers or agriculture men gather. 

The first consideration in good plowing 
is the amount of granulation it is possible 
to achieve; the more granulation the 
better it is, particularly when it is to be 
seeded immediately after plowing. In 
the case of fall plowing where the soil has 
a tendency to puddle, too much granula- 
tion is a handicap. 

Another very important factor in good 
plowing is complete covering of trash, 
whether it be strong manure, corn stover, 
wheat stubble, weeds or sod from previous 
hay crop. This should be so completely 
buried that there will be no appearance of 
it on the surface. Much is to be gained 
when the trash is evenly mixed with the 
soil, but in the case of reducing virgin sod 
or other equally tough sod it is permissible 
to lay it down as a mat at the bottom of 
furrow slice. Now that we know what to 
do with the trash covering the soil the 
question arises as to the method of pro- 
cedure. 

This spring, here on the school fields. 



we had a considerable mat of corn stover 
and smart-weeds covering our present 
oat land, which were turned under by 
adjusting our rolling coulter with the 
horizonal axis over the point of the 
share, then the vertical axis was set so 
that the coulter would cut ^— inch— 3^— 
inch to the land side of the shin. To the 
base of the coulter standard was affixed a 
1.5— foot length of No. 9 smooth wire, 
passing to the mouldboard side of the 
plow. The purpose of the wire was to 
hold the trash to the surface of the 
furrow slice until the slice was inverted. 
The wire likewise furnished a breaking 
over point for the furrow slice, aiding the 
mouldboard in the inversion of the slice. 
A wire is used for each bottom, the loose 
ends are held back until the plows enter 
the ground, then the weight of the 
plowed furrow holds the wires tight and 
snug against the trash. We found that 
the wires gave us better results when used 
without jointers than with jointers ; it also 
plowed better than the older method of 
dragging a chain in front of the plows. 

When using the above method it is well 
to regidate the depth of the plow equal to 
half of the plow's width of bottom or a 
little deeper, since a plow will do its best 
work when cutting as deep as half its 
width at normal speed ; which is between 



20 



TEE GLEAN ER 



3— 3J4 miles per hour with tractor plows. 

Tn the case of the cover crop, sod or a 
thick mat of weeds, the wire is a help, 
only now the jointer must be used and set 
to go as deep as possible; the rolling 
coulter is set as for the other trash with 
one exception: that is in the depth. 
With sod the coulter should cut from 
three-quarters to the entire depth of 
furrow, whereas in the previous case the 
depth was controlled bj- the ability to 
mount the trash and not to catch and 
drag it. 

A vers' important factor in plowing 
under a rank growth of cover crop is not to 
run all over the standing crop, as it is 
almost impossible to plow it under clean 
when matted down in any direction except 
in the line of travel; therefore, it would 
be a good idea to roll the headlands the 
way they are to be plowed before turning 
upon them, thus making it possible to 
plow it clean. 

\Mien plowing a hard dry soil the 
hitch (the point of connection between 
the tractor and the plow) must be moved 
to the land when plowing deep to insure 
the first plow cutting a full furrow; in 
shallow plowing in hard soil the opposite 
takes place. The opposite takes place 
when in wet soil; there the tendency of 
the first plow is to throw too big a fur- 
row. One of the chief aims of a good 
plowman is to prevent a hard pan from 
forming due to plowing at the same 
depth year after year. This pan will 
become so hard that extra weight and 
good shares will be necessary to force the 
plows into it. Here at the school we 
have seen the cleat marks of the tractor 
which ploughed a particular field last 
year or in previous years. I am referring 
to our wet heavy fields at Xos. 6 and 7. 

A good plowman will be very careful to 
plow at the right time; when soil may be 
pressed together and then upon being 



rubbed between fingers will easily crum- 
ble; using plow adapted to soil, adjusted 
to run at even depth and parallel with 
ground, in a normal position and at a 
good plowing speed, keeping his fur- 
rows straight. Thus his work will be of 
even depth and width of furrow, with a 
smooth surface due to even and equal 
curvature of the furrows; with clean 
shallow dead and low even back furrows, 
his headlands, and the end of the furrows 
will be clean and straight. 

\\Tien we speak of plows the average 
person immediately thinks of the rnould- 
board plow, the plow that has been 
used extensively for many years; but 
today when we have the modern tractor 
doubling up on the niunber of plows and 
making a 2-3 or 4 plow unit the end has 
not been reached; rather it was the start 
of several innovations, such as the disc 
plow. This was brought about by a desire 
of the farmer to utilize all of his power 
that at the present time is going to waste. 

For example, the mouldboard plow 
utilizes draft in the following way: 
Moving plow 18 per cent; turning 
furrow slice 34 per cent; cutting furrow- 
slice 48 per cent. These figures coupled 
with the following tractor losses caused 
the engineer and farmer to consider some- 
thing new. 

100 % Brake 
H. Power 

Transmission loss 10-15 

Rolling resistance 20-6.5 

Lug loss 5-10 

Grade 0-50 

Delivered to drawbar 65-25 

The above figures have been compiled 
by J. Brownlee Davidson and Edgar V. 
Collins of Iowa State College in a paper 
submitted at a meeting of the Power and 
Machinery Division of the American 
Society of Agricultural Engineers. 

The disc plow consists of a number of 



THE (ILEAXER 



large discs independently mounted and 
adjustable, the entire outfit fitted with 
wheels. All of the discs are mounted the 
same way. 

Another construction similar to the 
disc plow is the Wheatland plow: the 
difference is in the use of smaller discs 
mounted on a common axis adjustable 
only at the ends. This type is being used 
in the Jersey truck region. 

Today, due to the reserve power of our 
tractor motors and the relatively low 
amount of useful drawbar pull, one 
plow manufacturer has utilized part of the 
tractor's power through the power take- 
off shaft by decreasing the power re- 
quired to move the mouldboard plow 
ahead through eliminating the curved 
mouldboard. In place of the conven- 
tional mouldboard is a vertical shaft with 



blades radiating horizontally from the 
shaft. These blades are ra])idly rotated 
with power from the power take-off shaft, 
thoroughly cutting into and pulverizing 
the furrow slice as it is lifted by the 
modified mouldboard. 

Once over, the soil is ready for the 
seed, thus saving many costly operations 
that we now perform. Due to its pul- 
verizing action this plow has been called 
the pulverator. 

There have been various experiments 
with plow substitutes such as slicing 
machines and scratchers but they have 
proved to be failures. The principal idea 
behind these experiments is to find a 
more efficient implement, one requiring less 
draft than the conventional plows now 
in use. 

Today tlie pulverator; tomorrow what? 



Waiter — "Would you like to drink. E'en. — "You sure have a trim little 

' Canada Dry ', Sir. " waist. " 

Gentleman — "I'd love to, but I'm only Ida — "You're right. Tliere's no get- 
here for a week. " ting around that. " 



Soil Fertility Studies on J^ansdale Silt Jj)am Soil 

f T 'HROUGH the efforts of Dean C. L. Goodling, soil experiments were 
m started last year at the National Farm School with the cooperation of 
the Pennsylvania State College Agricultural Experiment station. Prof. 
J. W. ^yhite of State College is working in conjunction with the National 
Farm School, the object of which is to determine the fertilizer requirements of 
Lansdale Silt Loam Soil, (1) In a rotation system of corn, wheat and mixed 
hay, (2) In a system of permanent pasture (a) Kentucky blue grass, (b) mixed 
grasses and legumes. 

The field plot experiments include HI 1-20 acre-plots (21x103.7 ft.). Three 
tiers of 25 plots each are included in the grain rotation designated as Allman 
field tiers I, II, and III. The pasture experiments include 36 plots arranged in 
two tiers of 18 plots each designated as Hirsch Field Tiers I and II. Last 
year the Allman Field Tier I was fertilized with varying amounts and combina- 
tions of N-P-K and seeded to corn, followed by winter wheat and grass in the 
fall. The corn results are well expressed in the tabulated form : 



ALLMAN EXPERIMENTAL FIELD 

Cut September 27-28. 



Yields of corn per acre Tier 1. Planted May 25 
Husked and weighed October 11-12, 1928. 



PLOT 


PLOT TREATMENT 


LBS. FODDER 
PER ACRE 


LBS. EARS 
PER ACRE 

14% 


EQUIV. BUS. 

GRAIN 
PER ACRE 


1. 


Check 


5420 


4966 


70. 


2. 


64P 50K-Control 


6160 


5356 


70.5 


3. 


64P 


4380 


4022 


57.5 


4. 


32P 25K 


4740 


4102 


58.6 


5. 


64P 50K 48N 


5460 


4836 


69.1 


6. 


64P 50K-Control 


6260 


5470 


78.1 


7. 


32P 25K-24N 


4680 


4128 


60.3 


8. 


6 Tons Manure 


4700 


4494 


64.2 


9. 


6 Tons Manure P 


6280 


5308 


75.8 


10. 


64P 50K-Control 


5780 


5438 


77.7 


11. 


64P 50K 8N 


6440 


5682 


81.2 


12. 


Check 


5320 


5046 


72.1 


13. 


64P 50K 16N 


6160 


5568 


79.6 


14. 


64P 50K-Control 


5640 


5242 


74.9 


15. 


48P 50K 48N 


6180 


4982 


71.2 


16. 


50K 48N 


6880 


5584 


79.8 


17. 


72P 50K 48N 


6980 


4884 


69.8 


18. 


64P 50K-Control 


5920 


5764 


82.3 


19. 


96P 50K 48N 


6020 


5144 


73.5 


20. 


64P 25K 48N 


6300 


5796 


82.8 


21. 


64P 48N 


5460 


4998 


71.4 


22. 


64P 50K-Control 


4720 


5014 


71.6 


23. 


64P 75K 48N 


5340 


6236 


89.1 


24. 


64P 50K-Control 


5020 


5340 


76.3 


25. 


Check 


4420 


4118 


58.8 



Tier II of Alman Field has been similarly fertilized this spring and planted 
to corn as Tier I of last year. Next year a complete rotation of grass, wheat 
and corn will be started. 

The results of the wheat thus far tend to bring out the following facts, 
although the results may vary after the wheat is harvested and weighed: 

(1) that the wheat seems to be lodged according to the amounts of applica- 
tion of nitrogen fertilizer (Sodium Nitrate). 

(2) that 6 tons of manure reinforced with 180 pounds of super phosphate 
shows a better color of foliage, larger heads and a greater yield per 
acre than a plot treated with 6 tons of manure only. 

(3) that potash fertilizer seems to be the limiting factor in this experiment, 
although all plots show the effect of the application of super phosphate. 

Since the work is incomplete no definite statements can be made as to the 
final results until after harvesting time. 



THE GLEANER 



23 



^he Whiteface 



wind a cold luokhuj place for a irce irliite- 

/rtCf, 

With nothing hut iiiij hide to shield Die. 

No place I can crairl in to keep me from 

bawlin'. 
No place for my mammy beside me. 

I can stand here and freeze in snow up to 

my knees. 
With the north wind I>lowin' below me. 
There's nothing to cheer me, no one to hear 

me. 
No one but my mammy to know me. 

I'm only a calf of a day and a half; 

No covering but the snoio cloud above me. 

None care a tinker for the blamed little 

slicker. 
No one but my mammy to love me. 



I'm crooned to sleep while the coyotes weep, 
The timber wolf whines behind me. 
When I am lo.st in the .slush or ujiderbrush. 
No one but my mammy to find me. 

I'm a wee whiteface brought to this places 
Where mountain lions linger to snatch me- 
The insects jight me and woodticks bite me. 
No one but my mammy to scratch me. 

Pride of the race is the white of my face. 
Men scramble and gamble to land me. 
With irons .some day they'll come this way. 
And, like my mammy, they'll brand me. 

They'll drive me away and feed me on hay. 
Cow punchers ivill cu.ss me and hiss me. 
Fill me with umter and lead me to slaughter. 
No one but my mammy to miss me. 

H. C. Tavis, '32. 



zA^riculture 



^^^^ HE Meeting will now come to 

M order. Ahem ! 

"Order please," yelled Joe 
Schvantz, "We want it should be quiet. 
Thank you. Let's hear from this guy 
'Moishe' on the department where 'fowl' 
deeds are done. Yeh! Moishe! Moishe!" 

"Well, guys it's this way: Due to the 
large amount of lumber in Gohahoka, 
we decided to help the starving Armenians 
by buying some lumber in order to build 
range houses. Of course, we started to 
work with a great deal of enthusiasm 
and after completing three, we were sure 
we knew how to build them and stopped. 
Having men like Mudolph Carcus in our 
department, we thought that we could 
carry these out to the field at Farm 
No. 3, but to our surprise, Mudolph 
strained himself while lifting a dozen 
eggs. Poor Dear! We also have done a 
few other minor things such as keeping 



egg production up to normal and disin- 
fecting. What! No questions? Is it a 
feet? 

"Now, my little playmates," said Joe 
Schvantz, "we will hear from the esteemed 
plant louse, I mean greenhouse man, 
Mr. Abdulah Beero. " 

Mr. Beero slowly rising and tugging 
at his left ear lobe, due to the fact that 
he is so closely related to the chicken 
family. 

"Due to the fact that such gallant women 
came before you, on this platform to strut 
their stuff, we, the greenhouse hoboes, 
have adorned the campus with beautiful 
flower beds. Just think of it and not 
costing you a red cent. For the con- 
venience of the fellows who like to send 
flowers home, we purchased new varie- 
ties of 'mums' so that flowers will be 
available all winter. Cast an eye (not 
too far) at the road side and gaze upon 



24 



THE GLEANER 



magnificent specimens of scarlet sage. 
Ain't it ni>f? Look who did it. No, No! 
not me, the little man behind me. Tango 
Benny, by name (not his fault) was the 
culprit. 'Take not my life for I want 
to go back to Russia to mine wife.' 
One more thing, my suffering comrades; 
we, the greenhouse squad, have com- 
pleted the prodigious task of changing 
beds in the lower house. Give the Kid 
a hand!" 

■'Now wasn't that a splendid report," 
chirped Jo Schvantz, "it surely does 
encourage me to go on. Oh yes, let's hear 
about the lawnmower pushers; the im- 
beciles that follow the horse around all 
day. " 

Of course the Dizzy Blond took the 
floor, because of his fluent speaking to 
such multitudes of critics. "Boish, it 
duz me gret plezure to kest mine ice on 
youse all. There is many tings to spoke 
about but here's mine story if you like 
it or not. Due to de feet that soft wood 
cuttings is now — yeh ! we are making 
them. Also we have made fifteen cold 
fremes in vich we planted evergreen 
sids. Not bed, eh? The campus is 
mowed weakly. 

Now ain't that nice? Our boss, the 
noted Herman Feisser, is surely giffing us 
the lowdown on everytink imeginable. 
Tenks." 

Well, well, how could a person speak 
so correctly. 

Doesn't your palate tickle, when you 
hear Horticulture mentioned. I always 
like to see you fellows enjoy yourselves. 
I'll therefore let Ooky talk on Strawberries 
and other stomach-disturbing products of 
"Hoeculture." Ooky, rising, barked out 
these words; "Strawberries, hot onions, 
'asparagrass, ' peas, etc., are very 
promising crops. We sprayed peaches 
and apples six times and expect heavy 
crops. PfuU legs with me boys, and you 



shall eat plenty of apples, when they 
get ripe providing you don't get caught. " 
Now, wasn't that short and snappy. 
We are therefore enabled to hear more 
of the other departmental rot. As I can 
faintly hear a tractor gurgling gas out, 
at No. 6, we will hear from the "Loose 
Nut". All together boys, 

"Nuts, screws, bolts, gears. 
We're the flunky engineers." 

Unaccustomed as I am to public speak- 
ing, I will endeavor to bring forth to 
your frank and open minds, a great tale 
that will be confined to a few words: 
After plowing the enormous sum of 180 
acres we found to our profound surprise 
that we had very few casualties. We have 
repaired all farm implements and also 
sharpened the mower knives for hay 
cutting. As a side job, we are taking 
care of No. 6 corn field. To our great 
accomplishments, I may add one thing. 
The fence lines of all the farms have been 
fixed and no doubt, will enclose all live- 
stock grazing. " 

The multitudes then roared and yelled 
for more, but the Schvantz quieted them, 
allowing Malaria to give a few slants 
on the dairy business. 

Playing softly on the piano. Malaria 
spoke to the tune of "Why are you 
Mean to Me," composed by members 
of the student council. 

"Disease has sprung up at our barns. 
Therefore, disinfecting is done every two 
weeks. We intend to build a new barn 
for calving cows. Due to insufiicient 
room the calving cows are kept at No. 6. 
Milk production is high and as a result, 
ice cream is quite often put on the 
tables in the dining room." This was 
followed by an encore, because the boys 
enjoyed the music muchly. 

Busy bees must have their say. "Why 
not have us get in a few words?" "All 
right, said Joe, " let's hear it. " 

{Continued on page 30) 




Qlass and Qlubs 



Formal Report of the Convention of — 

SOCIETIES OF THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



The Board of Executives headed by 
Buck Werrin, with Tomahawk Sam Mar- 
cus as right-hand man, report that affairs 
ran especially smoothly during the last 
period, orders being carried out almost 
to perfection. 

The Ways and Means Committee for- 
merly known as the Council, have seen to 
it that dance was put on for the benefit 
of the Society; which turned out to be a 
great success. It was called the Senior 
May Hop. Another affair like this may 
be expected soon. 

At the early morning session. The 
Horticultural Committee, headed by 
Chairman Broadbent, showed movies of 
"Rubber Plantation Developing", "Date 
Raising," and "Preserving Citrus Fruits 
Against Frost". One noted authority 
obtained by Mr. Purmell, spoke on the 
"Need of Cdoperative Organization". 
To the joy of all, k trip to a famous group 
of private gardens, to be taken June 22, 
was announced. 

The afternoon session was given over 
to the Poultry Committees. The Society 
owes thanks to Poultrymen Kaplan and 
Arnovitz and Chief Plain for bringing 
before it Mr. Dossin, Poultry Extension 



expert from Penn. State. This gentle- 
man discussed many interesting practices, 
in poultry raising, namely: Treatment 
with Nicotine Sulphate for lice; keeping 
away coccidia germ carriers; effect of 
different kinds of bedding in the spread of 
cocci diosis, and the efficiency of the con- 
finement treatment against worms. 

Many trips are planned and more meet- 
ings, at which prominent speakers will be 
present. 

The next morning found the members 
gathered around the nets back of Penn 
Hall, where the tennis notables, Werst, 
Rudolph, Rosenberg, Goldfarb and Gold- 
stein performed energetically. No pro- 
gram from their group was presented, the 
rain having broken up a recent meeting. 

Following this, the Band gave a con- 
cert beneath the "goal posts". It is 
going to add honor to National Farm 
School by competing with many other 
school bands at Perkasie, Penn., on June 
20. If their parading technique is 
polished off as it promises to be under the 
able direction of Lieutenant Frankel and 
Messrs. Liskowitz and Coleman, they 
may win a prize. 

The membership committee is pro- 



26 



THE GLEANER 



gressing well with the initiations. The 
Seniors are busy at their projects and 
night classes and therefore haven't had 
time for much else. The Juniors are soon 
to have class sweaters. They have taken 
good care of the incoming Freshmen. 

On the whole the Society is progressing 
wonderfully well, according to the closing 
address of the President of the Board of 
Executives. The next session is to be 
held in HONoluhc! Oh Boy! 

The Secretary, C. C. 



ation, he has acted as assistant manager 
of a cooperative association in Berks 
County and as supervising farmer on the 
P. O. S. of A. Farm at Chalfont, Pa. 



ASSEMBLIES PROVE TO BE 
SOURCE OF INTEREST 

Thanks to Mr. Fleming, assemblies 
every morning have been very interesting. 
Different current events were introduced 
and discussion was invited. This served 
to give variety to ordinary school routine 
by bringing us into contact with outside 
affairs. Some of the subjects selected 
by Mr. Fleming were, "The Future of 
Aviation", "Birds as Aids to the Farmer 
Against Insects", "The Harm of Radium 
Rays to Humans", "The Recent British 
Election", "The New Agriculture in the 
Southwest" and a humorous sketch, 
"Traffic Rules in the Orient." 

Query from a Freshman: 

"Mr. Coleman, will Mr. Fleming have 
his spring clothing deducted for staying 
away from School.'" 

NEW MEMBER OF FARM SCHOOL 
F\CULTY 

Since the beginning of operations this 
spring, we've had with us, Mr. E. A. 
Webster. Many of the fellows are, there- 
fore, already very well acquainted with 
him. Mr. Webster graduated from Penn- 
sylvania State College in 1926 in the 
course of Agricultural Economics, which 
includes Farm Management and economic 
problems of the farmer. Since his gradu- 



VARSITY CLtB 

At the last regular meeting of Farm 
School's most exclusive club the member- 
ship was increased 100 per cent because of 
the new baseball letter men. Mr. Stangel 
and Mr. Samuels gave stirring talks on 
what is expected of the new men. The 
meeting ended with the club adopting the 
word "Service" as their motto. You'll 
hear from us in the near future. 

Phil. Kleinman, Secretary. 

Helen — "My boy friend is a diamond 

cutter. " 

Anna — "Oh, in the jewelry business?" 
Helen — "No, not exactly; he cuts the 

grass on the baseball field." 



The height of absent-mindedness: The 
freshman, who, milking a cow, sat on a 
bucket and milked into a stool. 

Frances — "Did Abe show any bold- 
ness, when you were out in his car?" 

Mildred — "Heavens, no. I had to 
turn off the ignition myself and tell him 
there was something wrong. " 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
With this issue, the Gleaner Staff is 
initiating a new practice, one which is 
sure to meet with the approval of the 
student Body and add interest to the 
forthcoming Gleaners. In each number 
there will appear two pictures of fellow 
students, who are especially prominent in 
general campus activities and athletics. 
The men will be selected by vote of the 
entire staff. 

The Editor. 



THE GLEANER 



27 



WW^ ^f)o 





RUSSELL BROADBENT 

Russell Broadbent has been one of the mainstays 
of Farm School's baseball teams the last three years. 
He just finished a successful season as captain and 
first baseman of this year's team. 

"Russ" has not confined his athletic activities to 
ba.seball, but has given his all when called up to 
participate in basketball, during his first two years. 
He will be one of "Coach's" veterans on this year's 
team. Besides this, he was on the football squad of 
19-27. 

In scholastic and campus activities, his record is 
high. He is president of the Horticultural Club, 
Vice-President of the A. .\. Board, Historian of the 
Varsity Club, and one of Mr. Fiesser's most trusted 
and capable Landscape men. 

"Russ" came here after graduating from Torring" 
ton High School, Torrington, Connecticut. He was 
also a letter-man in baseball and in track, there. 

It would be hard to find anyone who hasn't been 
thrilled at his gritty smile and flashy, airtight play- 
ing at the "initial sack." 



MILTON WERRIN 

"Buck" Werrin has tasted the joys and griefs of 
office ever since coming to N. F. S. from the city of 
Philadelphia. He was class treasurer in his Fresh- 
man Year; president of his class in his .lunior Year, 
and is now chairman of his class and President of the 
Student Bodj'. 

With this latter office, he has automatically the 
leadership of the Senate and Student Council. 

Due to his friendliness and willingness to listen to 
argument he is popular with all the classes. Nor 
have his duties made him queer, for he's still a mem- 
ber of the "gang" in good standing. 

Buck's only venture into athletics was in 1927, 
when he made the football squad. 

His poultry project keeps him busy these days 
and under Mr. Plain's guidance, he is sure to make 
an expert poultryman. 



THE GLEAXER 



Qampus Qhatter 



Found in a Stiidenfs Diary: Wednesday, Club Meeting 

" To the Tune of Hausenpfefer." Thursday, F & F Ball Game. 

Sunday, Big Day. Friday, Chapel 

Monday, School, Saturday, Rain. 

Tuesday, Optimists Sunday, Track Meet. 

All ye Alumni Farmers, ire irish the same to You. 



XOT TO HATE AXT OXE FEEL SLIGHTED, WE HEREBY EXTER SOME OTHER COX- 
TEST AXTS FOR CAMPUS popularitt: 

Joe Ixtelligextsia, Joe Radish, Joe Bax'd, Joe Chapel, Joe Voice, Joe 
Cairo, Joe Texxis, Joe Notes, Joe Origixal, axd Joe GE^^rs. 

New DiscovEEiES will be peixted later. 



We wish to correct a mistaken impression on the part of the student body. The 
poo] to be erected near the hbrarj-, will not be for the use of any members of Homo 
Sapiens. 

No. that isn't the Farm School smithy; it's just the barnyardgolf eyithusiasis getting 
into their strides. 



Notice To Ambitious Freshmax 

Ha^T you SEEX the squad that carries the tricky flashlight IX OXE HAXD 
AXD the alarm clock IX THE OTHER.^ ThEy'rE MEMBERS OF THE "NiGHT WaTCH- 
MAX's" COURSE OFFERED BY ^Ir. PlaIX EACH SPRIX'G. ApPLICAXTS SEE PaUL 

Rabixowitz. 



To the Freshmen: 

The Gleaxer appreciates the efforts shown by the contributions received so 
far. Don't be discouraged if your work has not been used, but try again. After 
greater famiUarity with the school, your work should be correspondingly more valuable. 



At AT-Y-Y I I ROO OOM Op-p-pex 1 I 

Old grads u-ill hardly be able to recognize the old A. A. Store. It won't be long before 
there'll be dancing every evening as there are concerts, now, via the ether leaves, and it 
only needs tables and wire-backed chairs to make it an A-1, up-to-date Ice cream parlor. 
Novin and Rellis, proprietors and head waiter respectively, promise to see to it that all 
necessary improvements icill be made. 

The Height of Absext-^Iixdedxess 
RiXGiXG the luxch bell at 10:-10. Caxdidate for hoxors — TA^^s. 



Congratulations are due the Dairy Squad for their initiative in proposing to 
start a Dairy Club and Stock Judging Team. 



THE OLE AMIR 



29 



MYSTERY OF THE MR—iConHmudJrompageO) 



down with our guns. We'll have state 
police help us with the ground ciew. 
Also, we can rig up searchlights on our 
planes." 

Pickens agreed to the ])lan and as soon 
as the two other planes came from Wash- 
ington, their pilots likewise agreed to the 
arrangement. By 7:30 P. M. all prepara- 
tions were made and as it was already 
dark the mechanic was forced to give the 
signal to his confederate. He wps then 
taken back to the plane and buckled in. 
Marcy gave him this parting warning, 
"Jf I think you're playing us dirt, I'll 
come around and settle your hash with a 
few bursts from my guns." 

Marcy then started the ship on its 
journey. He waited until he saw a dark 
spot follow the mail plane. Then giving 
his plane the gun, he took the air, fol- 
lowed by his two comrades-in-arms. 
Marcy kept that dark spot before him at 
all times and kept glancing anxiously at 
his watch. At the end of about two 
hours' flight he saw the mail plane 
stagger and begin to lose altitude rapidly. 
The enemy plane showed its lights and 
darted after the falling mail plane. 
Showing their own lights, Marcy and his 
companions shot after him. A.s soon 
as they could get close enough, 
Marcy let him have a couple of tracers 



and motioned him to descend. He 
switched on his searchlight which made 
the scene as light as day. The bandit 
plane, seeing three armed planes against 
him, decided that discretion is the better 
part of va'or and he decided to descend. 
Marcy came down with him while his 
two friends stayed in the air. The state 
cops immediately grabbed the pilot of 
the bandit plane. They also made a 
clean sweep of the ground crew who were 
too bewildered to do anything but 
surrender. 

The mail plane had crashed badly and 
then burst into flames. The mechanic 
died in the wreck and he was the only 
casualty of the night. The men revealed 
their hideout from which was recovered 
the loot and the missing pilots who were 
still a little weak. 

A month later "Pop" Jennings sat 
joking with his fellow pilots while his 
plane was being loaded. A mechanic 
came over and told him everything was 
O. K. He arose with a grin, and sauntered 
over to his plane. Securely in, he yelled 
"Contact" and the mechanic spun the 
propeller. He gave her the gun and she 
darted across the field. A moment later 
he was in the sky headed southward. 
J. ARNO^^Tz, '30. 



LEAVES OF YESTERDAY— (C'o«/;«»f</ .from page 14) 



1915 
A. Miller, '08, is a member and 
general manager of the firm of A. 
Henderson Seed and Bulb House of 
Chicago. 

M. Goldman, '03, is director of 
the Morma Experiment Station. 

Fred. Weigle, '1-4, is manager of 
a poultry farm at Narvon, Pa. 



S. Rudley, '08, is assistant Sup- 
erintendent of School gardens of 
Philadelphia. 

1916 

The Truth 

Seniors (try) to lead the way. 
Juniors like to have the say. 
But Freshmen must obey. 



30 



THE GLEANER 



FRESHMAN-JUNIOR 
WRESTLING BOUTS 

De Wolfson, the shining star of the 
Juniors, was too much for the Freshmen. 
After eyeing each other for a minute and 
sparring around a bit, the upper classman 
secured a headlock and pinned the wild- 
cat on his back and kept him there for 
the three taps. No. 1 went to the high 
and mighty Juniors. 

The next bout proved more interesting. 
"Guts" Sezov (we'll have to call him 
that after his plucky exhibition) faced 
the freshman Captain, Raskin. The 
latter was by far the superior wrestler, 
but he was too well aware of the fact 
and it proved his downfall. He had 
Sezov on his back most of the time and 
while exchanging wisecracks with a 
spectator, was suddenly surprised to find 
Sezov on top with a "Crotch and Half 
Nelson", securely around him. That 
ended No. 2 and another one in favor of 
the Juniors. 

Junior Bing faced Freshman Rosefeld 
in the 135-lb. class. Neither knew much 
about the delicate art of wrestling and, 
after missing many opportunities to throw 
each other, the decision was handed to 
Bing. This made three straight wins. 

In the next match, Zeider, who cap- 
tained the boxing teams for the Juniors, 
so ably, opposed Newman, The .Arkansas 
Flash. The Flash appeared to be in a 
daze however, and was short work for 
Zeider. A half Nelson did the trick. 
Four in a row for upper classmen. 

Kaiser displayed unusual ability in 
stowing away Rosen, alias Gyp the Blood. 
Both are excellent wrestlers and neither 
seemed to have the advantage at first, 
but Gyp lessend his vigilance for a second 
and his goose was cooked. The Fresh- 
men seemed to have had an off-night. 
No. 5 for the Juniors. 

In the 165-lb. division, Goldstein of the 
Freshmen, faced Goodman. The fresh- 



man's wind gave out after a few minutes, 
however, and Goodman found little dif- 
ficulty in winning. Well, the Juniors 
were sweeping the stakes ! 

The last hope of the Freshmen rested 
upon Elsen and, considering that his 
opponent Cancelmo had a 25-lb. ad- 
vantage over him, it was a rather forlorn 
one. But the unexpected did occur 
and in about three minutes, Cancelmo 
was on his back calmly gazing at the 
stars. Three cheers for Elsen ! He saved 
the freshmen from everlasting disgrace. 



AGRICULTURE— (C'o«(t/iH^d/rom vage 2^) 

"Due to acid conditions of the soil, 
clover was not so hot. We are living 
down at No. 6 for the clover season, 
but to our sorrow and dismay, we also 
met the same soil conditions there. This, 
of course, tended to break down our 
colonies, so we begged Mr. Schmieder to 
import some Italian Queens, from the 
South. 



Bell 182 Keystone 19-D 

CHAS. B. MOYER 

30 East State Street 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

KELVINATOR 

Electrical Contracting 

Radio Equipment 

Automotive Electrical Equipment 



HOFFMAN, CROWN MFG. CO. 

Contractor to the Government 
615 Chestnut Street PHIL.IDELPHIA 



DRUGS 

The Store of Service and Quality 
SAMUEL B. PEAKCE 

DOYLESTOWN PeNNA. 



THE GLEANER 



AFTER SCHOOL WHAT ? 

You will undoubtedly continue in some form of farm work or other; but how 
about your plans five years hence? Your ambition should be a farm of your 
own, equipped with up-to-date implements, placing you in an independent 
position. It is imperative that you get the right sort of a start. That start 
cannot be better made than with the high grade farming implements of the 
INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY OF AMERICA. 

It matters not, wherever you go or whatever you want in farming imple- 
ments, tractors, or motor trucks, you can be assured of getting genuine satisfac- 
tion from the INTERNATIONAL line. 

THE INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY OF AMERICA, 
is an institution, having 92 branch houses in the United States and representa- 
tion the world over. Its sales and repair service is as direct, efficient and econom- 
ical as possible. Avail yourself of the opportunity now, or at any time, to 
secure information on the INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER LINE of 
farming implements. 

International Harvester Company of America 

Factor}' Branch— 2905 North 16th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Premier Feeds Produce the 
Most Profitable Results 



jSL^nufactured by 

Hespenheide & Thompson 

YORK, PEXXA. 



J. Earle Roberts 

SUCCESSOR TO 

EDWARD ROBERTS 

Established 1866 

WHOLESALE FRUITS 
AND VEGETABLES 

220 Dock Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Cohlman & Cutler 

INCORPORATED 

Overalls Shirts Frocl 

Pants Aprons 

and Specialties 



Southwest Corner 

28th and Fletcher Streets 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Bell Phone Doylestown S5-J 

Doylestown Tailoring Co. 

CLE.iXERS .\XD DTEBS 

S. E. POLONSKY. Prop. 
DOVLESTOWX PEXX.\. 



FRANK C. LEWIS 

Coal, Feed, Lumber and 
Building Material 

Phone 3S 
DOVLESTOW.V, PA. 



32 



THE GLEANER 




WESIBROOK PUBLISHING COMPANY 

5800 N. Mervine St. (Terminus Broad Street Subway) 



^he Gleaner 

IS ANOTHER SCHOOL 
MAGAZINE PRINTED BY 

Westbrook Publishing Co. 



./^'^v 



in a plant built and equipped 
for this class of work. C[Note 
the quality of paper, mono- 
type composition, and the 
high class make-up, presswork 
and binding. ((Our system 
of scheduling each periodical 
printed by us ensures prompt 
delivery. ((Now, more than 
ever, we emphasize our slogan : 




"\j<l/^ 



Tbhe 'Best V^or\ and Service, for 
the UYConey, Obtainable 



THE GLEANER 



33 



TARTAN BRAND 
Alfred Lowry & Bro. 

Philadelphia Penna. 



Compliments 

CHARLEY E. PRICE 

SWARTHMORE, Pa. 

Football Official Boxing Referee 



BREAD— ROLLS 
CRULLERS 

Quality and Service 

Moore Bread 
Company 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Compliments 
M. Klnc 

KING PRODUCTS CO. 



King Products Company 

136 LIBERTY STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

■ 8 8- 

"ROCO" "ROCO" 

Liquid Fibre Roof Cement Paint Specialists 



CAIERING BAXQUET ROOM 




BRUNNER'S RESTAURANT 




29 South Main- Street 




"For a Meal That's Real" 




Phone 326-R Doylestown. Pa. 





OUAKERTOWN WHOLESALE 
CONFECTIONERY COMPANY 

Bell Phone. Quakerlown 23 

Juniper and Sixth Streets 

QU.AKERTOWN, PA. 



WHOLESALE 
M EATCa)^b>|3l Sf^h^ k >Wl^[1^6 LT R Y 



402-404 N. Second Street 

Philadelphia 



"OUR BUSINESS 



34 



TEE GLEANER 



We Have a Complete Stock of High Grade 

DRAWING INSTRUMENTS AND SUPPLIES 



FOR ALL 

SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

SPECL-\L PRICES TO STUDENTS 



J. H. WEIL 6l CO. 

PHILADELPHLA, PA. 



1315 CHERRY STREET 



Balkan Oils and Greases 

ATLAS D. JONES 



SHORE'S MARKET HOUSE 

Fresh Fruit, Fancy Groceries, Vegetables 
Fish and Oysters 

FREE DELIVERY 

Bell Phone 71-J Willow Grove. P.\ 



Bell, Lombard 2503-04 Keystone, Main 2716 

JACOB H. SMITH & CO. 

Sea Food, Poultry, Game 

Supplying Hotels. Institutions, Ships, 

Our Business 

Dock St. Fish Market at the Delaware River 



"THE TOGGERY SHOP" 


Chas. a. Rowe 


Lenape Building 


DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



MEN WOMEN CHILDREN 

W. J. NYCE'S SHOE STORE 

"The Home of Nice Footwear" 

DOVLESTOWN, Pa. 



JUSTIN H. ELY 

Bicycles and Radio, Stationery and 
Legal Blanks, Sporting Goods 

Phone 38.J-W 
DOYLESTOWN, P.4. 



Doylestown Steam Laundry 

DOYLESTOWN, P.V. 

Call 245 J and Let Us Relieve You of 
Your Wash Day Worries 



ESTABLISHED 1898 

ZELNICKER st. louis 
WALTER A. ZELNICKER SUPPLY CO. 

Ch-amber of Commerce Bldg.. 511 Locust St. 
Long Distance— Just Say "L. D. 2. St. Louis." 



SAVE WITH 



ICE 



SAVE WITH 



Phone 26-M 



SAFE 

SURE 

SILENT 

ECONOMICAL 

G. E. WILLARD 

Manufacturer and Distributor 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



THE GLEANER 



35 



NEW STRAND THEATRE 

1 )oYi.i':s'rowx , Pennsylvania 

"THE HOME OF THE BEST PHOTOPLAYS" 

Performances Every Evening at 7 and 8:45 

Summer — Daylight Saving Time, 7:30 and 9:15 
Matinee on Mondays at 4 P. M. and Saturdays at 2:15 P. M. 

Summer — Mondays and Saturdays, 2:45 D. S. T. 
J. A. WODOCK, Manager 



Bell Phone 285-W 



DOVLESTOWN, PA. 



Sander's Photo Studio and Art Shop 



83 West State Street 



Photographs, Cameras, Films, Frames, Albums 
Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 



TWENTY-FOUR-HOUR SERVICE IN OUR FINISHING DEPARTMENT 




Each One of the 4 Jersey Ready 
to Eat Breakfast Foods 

are Delicious — Healthy — for Breakfast or 
Lunches — for Children and Grown-Ups. 
Jersey Corn Flakes Jersey Rice Flakes 
Jersey Bran Flakes Jersey (Rice) Jems 

JERSEY CEREAL COMPANY 
CEREAL, PA. 



Herridge and Herridge 

a— 10— 35 CENT STORES 

Stationery, School Supplies 

and General Lines 

CORNER OAKLAND AND MAIN £TS. 



YE OLDE FOUNTAIN HOUSE 

(1746) 

State and Main Sts. (Easton Highway) 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

George L. Regan 

European and Aimerican Plans 





DOYLESTOWN INN 

The Place to Eat 

18 West State Street 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Bell, Lombard 9360-1-2-3 

F. W. HOFFMAN & CO., Inc. 

brushes, brooms, mops 
general cleaning supplies 
Everything for the Janitor 

35-37 South 4th Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



36 



THE GLEANER 





OFFICIAL FARM SCHOOL JEWELERS 




HERFF^JONES 


CO, 




Incorporated 






MANUFACTURING JEWELERS AND STATIONERS | 


RALPH W. 


Indianapolis— Philadelphia 
POPE 


1530 Chestnut Street 


District Mc 


mager 


PHILADELPHIA 



MARKOVITZ BROTHERS 

Importers of 
HOSIERY UNDERWEAR NOTIONS 

321-323 Market Street Philadelphia. Fa. 



WILLIAM NEIS & SON 

MAKERS OF 

Superfine Soft Drinks 



MARTINO'S 

East End Barber Shop 

OPPOSITE STRAN'D THEATRE 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Keystone Telephone Bell Telephone 

Main 7588 Market 0222-3 

SYLVAN E. SOSTMAJTN 

Meats, Poultry and Provisions 

Hotels and Restaurants Supplied 

407-09 North Franklin St., Philadelphia 



J-pALDING 
ATHIETIC GC©D/- 
CCKCECT 
'■fi-' if FOR ANV /PCKT 



MVii 



f§ 



^!&<^ 



If/^^rn 



GEORGE SOMMER 
Dairy Products 

DOYLESTOWN, Pa. 



Stop Here on Your Way Home and Patronize 

"The Peoples Lunch Room" 

WILLOW GRO\'E, PA. 
OPEN ALL NIGHT 



THOMAS LYONS 

Watches, Clocks, Jewelry and Silverware 

Repairing a Specialty DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



I. BEDICHIMER & COMPANY 
Manufacturing Jewelers 

Southwest Corner 
Sansom -ANT) 12th Streets 
Established 1865 PHILADELPHIA 



COMPLIMEN'TS 
OF THE 

INTERSTATE STORES 
CORPORATION 

AUTO SUPPLIES — TreES 

B.4DIO — PAEVTS 

HARDWAKE 

4 EAST ST.-\TE STREET 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



A. SPRINTZ 

First Class Shoe Repairing and Slioe 
Sbining Parlor 

24 East State Street 

doylestown, 



CLYMER'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

BUCKS COUNTY'S LARGEST STORE 
The National Farm School Is One of Its Patrons 

Your Patronage Solicited 



R. L. CLYMER 



36-40 StATB S«IBET 



DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



F. D. HARTZEL'S SONS CO. 

Chalfont, Pa. 

Dealer In 

FLOVB, FEED, COAL, ETC. 



Dr. Wm. J. McEvoy 

OPTOMETBIST OPTICIAN 

IS East State Street 
Hours 9-S Tues. and Sat. Evenings Until 9 P.M. 



Nelson's Barber Shop 

SHAVING AND HAIB CUTTING 

Farm School Trade Solicited 

1 7 South Main Street, Doylestown, Pa. 

Neit to Henry Ely's Grocery Store 



W. C. FLECK & BRO., Inc. 

JENKINTOWN. PENNA. 
BABDWABE SPOBTIN6 GOODS 



This Ad Is Wortb $1.00 With a $10.00 
Clothing Purchase 

WM. P. ELY & SON 

Main and Court Streets 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Compliments of 








G. R. 


BARBER 






DRUGGIST 








Doylestown, 


Pa. 



Dr. Wesley Masslnger 
VETERINARIAN 

Chalfont Penna. 



J. A. Gardy Printhig Co. 

Stlttlonerj — ^PrlnUng— Adrertlslns 

28 W. State Street 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phones— Office, 369-J Home 372-R 



For Quality Home-Made Candles, Dellcloni 

Fresh Fruit Sundaes and Ice 

Cream Sodas 

Visit 

THE PALACE OF SWEETS 

Strand Tueatrb Buildins 



For Quality, Service and Square Deal 

THE REXALL STORE 

Stands First 

Victor Agents Eastman Kodak Agener 

Doylestown Drug Co. 

Cor. Main and Court Streets, Doylestown, Pa. 



H. B. ROSENBERGER CO. 

Coal, Feed, Lumber and Building Material 

phone 189 Doylestown, Pa. 



BUCKS COUNTY TRUST CO. 

Doylestown, Pa. 
Solicits Your Patronage