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Full text of "The golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon"

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RANJIT SINGH : and the Sikh Barrier between 
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258460 



INTRODUCTION 



1.— Sources of Information. 

No official authority whatever attaches to this work, or to any statement in 
it. The Editor has received the most kind and valuable assistance from all 
those Indian officials who have charge of matters relating to Dignities and 
Titles ; but he is alone responsible for the contents of TJie Golden Book of 
India. Much of the information has been derived from the Princes, Noblemen, 
and Gentlemen whose names are included herein. 

The task of compiling this much-needed work has been of far greater 
difficulty than was expected. Some of the difficulty has been due to its 
novelty ; for among those who have sent information regarding themselves and 
their families, there has naturally been little uniformity in method or scale. 
This difficulty will, it is anticipated, soon disappear. But the chief difficulty 
has been owing to the fact that India stands alone among civilized nations in 
possessing no special Department, College, or Chancery, charged with the duty 
— a very necessary duty from the point of view alike of expediency and of 
national dignity — of recording and certifying national honours and titles, of 
regulating their conferment, and of controlling their devolution where hereditary. 
The Foreign Department of the Government of India, being that Department 
which has charge of the relations of the Paramount Power with the Feudatory 
States and their Rulers, naturally and properly directs so much of this business 
of State as cannot by any possibility be shirked. But the question of the very 
necessary establishment of a Heralds' College, or a Chancery of Dignities, has 
only once (in 1877) been seriously faced — and then its solution was postponed. 

The results of this neglect are already deplorable, and must ere long receive 
the attention of the Government of India. Indian titles are officially defined 
to be, either by grant from Government, i e. a new creation by Her Imperial 
Majesty the Queen Empress through her representative ; or "by descent, or 
by well-established usage." The Government alone can be the judge of the 
validity of claims, and of their relative strength, in the case of titles acquired 
by " descent " or by " well-established usage. And it is clear that this Royal 
Prerogative, to be properly used, ought to be exercised openly and publicly 
through the medium of a regular College or Chancery. It is, of course, true 
that the Foreign Department possesses a mass of more or less confidential 
information, and thoroughly efficient machinery, for deciding all questions 
of the kind, when such questions are submitted to, or pressed upon, the notice 
of Government. But when that is not the case, there seems to be no public 
authority or accessible record for any of the ordinary Indian titles, or for the 
genealogy of the families holding hereditary titles. Much confusion has already 
arisen from this, and more is likely to arise. In the Lower Provinces of Bengal 
alone, there are at this moment some hundreds of families possessing, and not 
uncommonly using, title* derived from extinct dynasties or from common 



viii INTRODUCTION 

repute, yet not hitherto recognized formally by the British Government ; and 
these, sometimes justly, but more frequently perhaps unjustly, are in this way 
placed in a false and invidious position. The State regulation of all these 
matters, in a plain and straightforward manner, would undoubtedly be hailed 
with pleasure in India by princes and people alike. 

In equal uncertainty is left, in many cases, the position of the descendants 
of ancient Indian royal and noble families ; as also that of the Nobles of 
Feudatory States, the subjects of ruling and mediatized princes. 

Then, too, there is endless confusion in the banners, badges, and devices 
that are borne, either by the custom of the country or by personal assumption, 
by various families and individuals. Tod's learned work on The Annals of 
Edjdsthdn 1 taught us long ago that badges and family emblems were as 
characteristic of Rajput chivalry as of the feudalism of Europe — appealing to 
similar sentiments, and similarly useful for historical and genealogical pur- 
poses. To this day hundreds of Chiefs and country gentlemen in Rajputana, 
in Central India, in Kathiawar, and in many other parts, use their ancestral 
devices in their seals or accompanying their signature. Thus every petty 
Thakur (as well as Chiefs of higher degree), from Oudh iu the East to the 
Western Sea, who can trace his descent from the proud Chauhan clan of 
Rajputs that gave the last Hindu Emperors to Delhi and Ajmir, still claims 
his ancestral right to the Chauhan santak, or device on seal and for signature, 
called the "Chakra." Figures of Hanumdn (the Monkey God), of the Sacred 
Peacock, and of the Sacred Garur or Eagle, take the place, in the heraldry of 
the East, of the lions, the leopards, and the fleur-de-lys of the more elaborate 
and artificial coat-armour of the West. The Iculcha, or "lucky chapdti" 
(biscuit), with the silver quatrefoils, on the green flag of the Nizam, the 
red oriflamme of the "Sun of the Hindus" (the Maharana of Udaipur), the 
falcon of Marwar, the Gangetic dolphin of Darbhanga, the white and green 
stripes of the late Sir Salar Jang, and many other hereditary devices and 
emblems, have long been and still are familiar in India. But there seems 
to be no authority by whom the use of such emblems is directed or controlled ; 
nor has the Government of India ever had the prudence to avail itself of the 
rich store of revenue that might easily, and indeed (from the historical and 
genealogical point of view) usefully, be raised from the fees and duties to be 
derived from the extended use of armorial bearings. It is hoped that the 
publication of this work may have some influence in inducing the Government 
of India to establish that very necessary institution, a Heralds' College or 
Chanceiy of Dignities, in connection with its Political Department — or, 
perhaps better, to petition Her Majesty to attach a duly-constituted Indian 
Department to the College of Arms in London under the Garter King of 
Arms. 

In the existing circumstances — it may be hoped only temporarily existing 
— described above, the Editor has felt constrained, very reluctantly in many 
cases, to decline to insert the particulars of any titles that have not been more 
or less formally recognized by the Government of India, except in about half-a- 
dozen very special cases, where there could not by any possibility be any doubt 
of the authenticity of the claims. For instance, in the case of the Raikat of 

i Colonel Tod says: — " The martial Rajpoots are not strangers to armorial bearings. . . . 
The great banner of Mewar exhibits a golden Sun on a crimson field ; those of the chiefs bear 
a Dagger. Amber idisplays the panchranga, or five-coloured flag. The lion rampant on an 
argent field is extinct with the State of Chanderi. In Europe these customs were not in- 
troduced till the period of the Crusades, and were copied from the Saracens ; while the use of 
them amongst the Rajpoot tribes can be traced to a period anterior to the war of Troy. In 
the Mahabharat, or Great War, twelve hundred years before Christ, we find the hero Bheesma 
exulting over his trophy, the banner of Arjoona, its field adorned with the figure of the Indian 
Hanumdn. These emblems had a religious reference amongst the Hindus, and were taken from 
their mythology, the origin of all devices.' — Annals of Rdjdsthdn, vol. i. pp. 123, 124. 



INTRODUCTION ix 

Baikanthpur, in the district of Jalpaiguri, Bengal, the title appears to be unique 
iu India — and there can be no doubt whatever that it has been borne by some- 
thing like twenty generations of hereditary kinsmen of the Rajas of Kuch 
Behar ; some account of this singularly interesting title has been inserted, 
though there is some reason to doubt whether it appears in any official list. 
And so, too, with a few well-known courtesy titles (see § 8 of this Introduction). 

2.— Method of Arrangement. 

After much thought and deliberation, it has been determined that, at least 

for the earlier editions of The Golden Book — which in many respects must 

necessarily have something of the nature of an experiment — the arrangement 

of the work shall be simply alphabetical. In future editions it is possible 

j that the volume may be divided into separate parts, distinguishing between 

Ruling Princes on the one hand, and Dignitaries and Titled Personages of 

British India on the other — or possibly distinguishing between Territorial 

f Titles and others. But the difficulties of classification would be exceedingly 

\ great in a large number of cases, and any attempt in that direction would 

I certainly greatly delay the appearance of the work. And, after all, even the 

most careful and accurate classification would, for practical purposes, be of very 

! little use ; for, as the next section of this Introduction will show, there is at 

: present no strict gradation of titles — and of some titles the relative values, 

1 strange as this may seem, are different in different parts of India. 

In India itself, the relative social importance of the various Dignitaries 
\ included in this work is well known, and any attempt further closely to define 
j precedence would be an invidious as well as unnecessary task. 

For European readers it may perhaps be sufficient to give very rough and 

I general analogies from the European system. For instance, the relative posi- 

j tion of such potentates as the Nizam of the Deccan or the Maharaja of Mysore 

to the Indian Empire may not unfitly be compared with that of the King of 

Saxony to the German Empire. The hereditary Maharajas, Rajas, and Nawabs 

of British India occupy a position very similar to that of the British Peerage at 

home ; while the holders of the lower titles may be compared with our Knights 

Bachelors, and the Knights and Companions of the Military Orders. Among 

the ruling chiefs, their comparative position and importance may also be 

; estimated by observing the area and population of their respective States, 

as compared with the smaller Kingdoms and Principalities of Central Europe. 

3.— Indian Titles : General. 

A list of one hundred and ninety-six different titles known to the Govern- 
ment of India has been compiled in the Indian Foreign Office. Even this long 
list can hardly be regarded as exhaustive, for it does not include many dynastic 
appellations which have come to be regarded in the light of titles, such as 
Gaekwdr, the dynastic name of the Maharajas of Baroda ; Sindhia, that of the 
Maharajas of Gwalior ; ffolkar, that of the Maharajas of Indore. Nor does it 
include such titles as that of Yuvardj or Jubardj (Youthful Raja), often applied 
(as lately in Manipur) to the heir to the Raj. And it is of course exclusive of 
the Military Orders of Knighthood. 

The majority of these titles are Hindu (derived chiefly from the Sanskrit 
language), or Muhammadan (derived chiefly from the Persian). The Burmese 
titles, though lengthy, are few in number ; while still fewer are Arakanese (or 
Magh), Thibetan, Afghan, Baluch, Somali, etc. Two distinguished Parsi 
families have received the English title of Baronet ; while one Madras family, 
the descendants of the old Nawabs of the Carnatic, has the English title of 
"Prince of Arcot," called also " Amir-i- Arcot. " The title of Prince is also 



x INTRODUCTION 

often given by courtesy as the English rendering of the title of "Shahzada," 
conferred by Her Majesty the Empress on certain descendants of the Tippu 
dynasty of Mysore, of the old kings of Oudh, and of former Amirs of 
Afghanistan. 

Some Indian titles are personal ; others have been recognized by Her 
Majesty as hereditary. It is intended in this work to distinguish those which 
are hereditary from those which are personal. 

In the list of one hundred and ninety-six titles mentioned above (which is 
given below in section 11 of this Introduction, with a glossary of their meanings 
where known), some are specific titles, analogous to the English "Duke," 
"Earl," etc. ; such are Mahdrdjd, Edjd, Naiodb. Some are descriptive titles, 
somewhat analogous to the "Defender of the Faith" borne by our Gracious 
Sovereign; such are Shamsher Jang ("The Sword of War"), a title borne 
by His Highness the Maharaja of Travancore, and Fath Jang, one of the 
many titles borne by His Highness the Nizam of the Deccan. Titles of the 
latter form are generally confined to a single personage or dynasty ; but a few 
are common to more than one State, as Lokendra (" Protector of the World") 
borne by the Chiefs of Dholpur and Datia. 



4. — Indian Titles : Ruling Chiefs. 

The normal or typical title of Chiefs or Nobles of Hindu descent is Edjd (in 
the feminine Rdni), or some of its numerous kindred forms. Some of the latter 
are Rdnd, Rao, Rdwal, Rdwat, Rai, Raikwdr, Raikbdr, Raikat. To these is 
added, to indicate excess of rank, the prefix Mahd ("Great"), as in Mahdrdjd, 
Mahdrdna, Mahdrao, Mahdrdj-Rdnd, etc. The afiix Bahadur ("Brave," 
1 * The Hero " ) is very commonly added (as an extra honorific) to all Indian 
titles, Muhammadan as well as Hindu, and is placed at the end of the name, 
much like the English " Esquire." Saheb is a somewhat similar affix, and is 
very commonly used as a courteous form of address ; when used as the supple- 
ment of a title it indicates a rank somewhat less than Bahddur, — thus Rao 
Bahddur and Khdn Bahddur are titles usually of rather more consideration 
than Rao Saheb or Khdn Saheb. Thdkur is also a frequently-used Hindu 
title. Some important feudatory Chiefs bear no other title, but it usually 
is of less consideration than Rdjd. 

Diwdn and Sarddr are titles very similar in character to that of Thdkur ; 

but they are common to Hindus and Muhammadans. 

P The normal or typical title of a Chief or a Noble of Muhammadan descent is 

i Naivdb (with Begam as its feminine form) ; usually with the honorific suffix of 

BaMdur, and in forms of courteous address with that of Saheb. The title of 

Shdhzdda (" King's Son ") is given to some descendants of the Tippu dynasty of 

Mysore, to some descendants of former Amirs of Kabul, and to some descendants 

of the old Kings of Oudh. Other Muhammadan titles — sometimes equivalent 

in consideration to Nawdb, but not always — are Wall, Sultdn, Amir, Mir, 

\ Mirza, Midn, Khdn; also Sarddr and Diwdn, which are common to Hindus 

and Muhammadans. 

Among the Ruling Chiefs there are some exceptional titles, due sometimes 
to differences of language, sometimes to other known causes, and sometimes of 
unknown origin. The first and greatest of all the Princes of the Empire is 
^ always known as the Nizam of the Deccan — a relic of the time when His High- 
, ness's ancestors were mediatized kings under the Emperor of Delhi. The title, 
though implying in itself fealty to an Imperial authority, is one of the highest 
dignity, and can hardly be translated by any European title less august than 
"king"; it is therefore a suitable title for the first mediatized prince under 
the Indian Empire, charged with the absolute rule over an area more than 



INTRODUCTION xi 

twice as large as that of Bavaria and Saxony combined, and a population 
greater than that of the two kingdoms named. 

Holkar and Sindhia are rather of the nature of dynastic names than of 
titles ; and the GaeJcwdr (the title of one of the greatest of the Ruling Chiefs) 
is of a similar nature, having been originally a caste name ; and all these three 
are relics of the Mahratta Empire J 

Among the exceptional titles due to difference of language may be noticed 
that of Jam, which is of Sindhi or Baluch origin ; there are two Jams of ruling 
rank in Kathiawar, and one in Baluchistan. The ruler of Spiti, an outlying 
Himalayan principality in the Punjab, is known as the Nono of Spiti — " Nono " 
being a Thibetan form. One of the Assamese Rajas is known as " the 
Bohmong " ; another simply as "the Mong Raja." Some of the Madras 
Chiefs have peculiar titles of local origin. Thus, the Maharaja of Calicut 
bears the historic title of "theZamorin" — probably a local corruption of the 
Malayalam Samundri, or "sea-king." The Maharaja of Puducotta is known 
as "the Tondiman"; and some other Madras Rajas are called "the Valiya 
Raja." Nine Feudatories (eight in the Bombay Presidency and one at Muscat 
in Arabia) bear the title of Sultdn. The descendants of the ancient chiefs of Sind 
are called Mirs ; the Chief of Afghanistan is called Amir. The Chief of Kalat 
in Baluchistan is both a Mir and a Wali, and has been created (like the Amir 
of Afghanistan) a Grand Commander of the Star of India. In the Aden 
territory, which is subordinate to the Bombay Government, some of the 
chiefs bear the title of Girad, which is of Somali origin ; others are known 
by the Arabic titles of Sultdn, Amir, and Shaikh. Some of the heads of 
Hindu religious bodies are hereditary feudal chiefs ; and their title is Mediant. 

All, or most of the titles mentioned above, though recognized by the 
British Government, have come down to us from earlier times. Her Majesty 
has, in a few very special cases, authorized a change of title among the 
Feudatories ; as, for instance, when a Thdkur Saheb has been "authorized to 
use the higher title of Mahdrdjd Bahddur. But, generally speaking, when 
it is wished to confer honour on a ruling prince, it is conferred, not by a change 
in the ancient title of chiefship, but by appointment to one or other of the 
classes of the orders of the Star of India or the Indian Empire — by the addition 
of descriptive titles — by an increase in the number of guns authorized for the 
salute, such increase being usually a personal one — or by the conferment of 
Honorary military rank in the Imperial army. 

5. — Titles Recognized, and Regularly Conferred by Her Majesty 
through the government of india. 

In British India there is now a well-established order and gradation of 
nobility ; in which creations and promotions are made by Her Gracious 
Majesty's representative, the Viceroy, just as similar creations and promotions 
are made in England. In the higher ranks of this nobility, an additional step 
or grade in each rank is made by the custom, unknown as yet in England, of 
making the creation or promotion in some cases personal, in others hereditary. 
But no rank below that of Raja for Hindus, or Nawab for Muhammadans, is 
now created hereditary. 

Rai (or Rao in Southern and Western India) for Hindus, and Khdn for 
Muhammadans, are the first or least considerable titles- conferred by the British 
Government. These, with or without the affix of Saheb, which adds to the 
dignity, are very commonly ex officio titles, held by the subordinate officers of 
civil departments*. Next above Rai Saheb, Rao Saheb, or Khdn Saheb comes 
the title Rai Bahddur, Rao Bahddur, or Khdn Bahddur ; and this is the title — 
though it has sometimes also been made simply an ex officio title — which is 
usually first conferred on. Indian gentlemen who, have distinguished themselves., 



xii INTRODUCTION 

by their munificence, by tlieir patriotism, or in any other way. Mai Bahadur 
is commonly used as the Hindu title in the Bengal Presidency, Mao Bahadur as 
that in the west and south of India, and Khan Bahadur for Muhammadans 
and Parsis ; and this rank seems exactly analogous to that of Knight Bachelor 
in England. 

Above this rank is the title of Mdjd (with the feminine Mdni) for Hindus, 
Nawdb (with the feminine Begam) for Muhammadans ; and this may be 
hereditary or personal — a remark which applies to all the higher ranks. 
Next higher is a Mdjd Baliddur, or a Nawdb Bahddur. Higher again, 
for Hindus, is the title of Maharaja, and above that is Mahdrdjd Bahddur. 
It is one of the many anomalies of the Indian system as at present 
existing, that there do not seem to be any Muhammadan analogies to these 
last two highest Hindu titles, so that a Nawdb Bahddur may be the equal 
either of a Mdjd Bahadur, or of a Mahdrdjd Bahddur, according to 
circumstance. These seem to be very analogous to the various steps in the . 
British Peerage. 

Parsis share with Muhammadans their lower titles. But where they have 
attained to higher rank than Khdn Bahddur, it has been indicated by 
appointment to one of the Military Orders, or by the conferment of British 
Knighthood, or (in two cases) by a British Baronetcy. 

The ordinary sequence of rank, then, in the aristocracy of British India, is 
indicated by the subjoined tables : — 

, Hindus. Muhammadans. 

Maharaja Bahadur. Nawab Bahadur. 

Maharaja. Nawab. 

Raja Bahadur. Khan Bahadur. 

Raja. Khan Saheb. 

Rai (or Rao) Bahadur. Khan. 
Rai (or Rao) Saheb. 
Rai (or Rao). 

The eldest son of a Maharaja or Raja is called a Maharajkumar (or 
Maharajkunwar), or Rajkumar (or Rajkunwar), or simply Kumar (or Kunwar) ; 
and these titles have in some cases been formally conferred by the Government. 
Nawdbzdda, or Midn, is the title given to the sons of Nawabs. 

Among the Barons of the Punjab there is a remarkable uniformity of 
title ; they are nearly all styled Sarddr or Sarddr Bahadur — and their sons 
are often styled Mian, though this is also an independent title, as is Diwdn 
also, in the Punjab. In Oudh and in the Central Provinces, on the other 
hand, there is the greatest diversity in the form of the territorial titles — 
Thdhur being the commonest title, but Mai is also frequent (and of far higher 
dignity than it seems to bear in some other provinces), and so are Mdjd, Diwdn, 
and Mao, 

6. — Burmese Titles. 

The chiefs of the Shan and other tribes on the frontiers of Burma have the 
titles (equivalent to Mdjd or Thdhur, or other Indian titles) either of Saivbwa, 
or Myoza, ov Ngwegunhmu. 

But the regular Burmese titles ordinarily conferred by the British Govern- 
ment are these : — 

(1) Ahmudan gaung Tazeik ya Min (meaning "Recipient of a Medal for 
Good Service"), indicated by the letters A.T.M. after the name — much as the 
Companionship of the Bath in England is indicated by the letters C.B. 

(2) Kyet thaye zaung shwe Salwe ya Min (meaning "Recipient of the Gold 
Chain of Honour "), indicated by the letters K.S.M. after the name. 



INTRODUCTION xiii 

(3) Thuya gaung ngwe Da ya Min (meaning "Recipient of the Silver Sword 
for Bravery "), indicated by the letters T.D.M. after the name. 

7.— Titles as Rewards for Learning. 

It remains to notice two Imperial titles of ancient origin, as indicating 
exceptional distinction in learning, that were revived on the auspicious 
occasion of Her Majesty's Jubilee. These are Mahdmahopddhydya for Hindus, 
and Shams-ul- Ulama for Muhammadans. It is noteworthy, as showing a wise 
regard for that reverence which great erudition has always commanded in the 
East, that holders of these titles, ranking equally among themselves according 
to date of creation, take rank directly after titular Rajas and Nawabs ; and thus 
the dignity is rendered somewhat analogous to the high dignity of a Privy 
Councillor in the United Kingdom. 

8. — Courtesy Titles. 

There are many titles habitually used in India — and a few have been 

admitted into this work — that are not substantive titles in the strictest sense of 

the term, but may best be described as courtesy titles. Of this nature is the 

title of ' ' Prince " in most cases — though not in the case of the Prince of Arcot, 

who enjoys a title specially conferred by the Sovereign. The title of "His 

1 Highness," conferred or recognized by the Queen Empress, belongs as of right 

• only to a limited number of the Feudatory Chiefs, and to a few of the Nobles of 

British India; but it is very generally conceded, as a matter of courtesy, to 

most of the Feudatory Chiefs and the greater Territorial Nobles. The title of 

i " His Excellency " has been specially granted to one or two Chiefs ; it is also 

< commonly used, as a matter of courtesy, in addressing the responsible Ministers 

* of the chief Feudatory States. 

r The owners of some great Zaminddris or estates, especially in Madras, are 
| sometimes styled Raja in common parlance, even when they have not received 
the title from the Sovereign. But there seems to be no authority for this ; nor 
— so far as is known to the Editor, and with the few exceptions above noted — 
is any name inserted in this work as that of a Raja, or as holding a similar title, 
unless recognized by the Government of India. 

Immemorial usage throughout India has conferred well-recognized courtesy 
titles on the heirs-apparent of the greater titles ; and in some cases on the 
second, third, fourth, and younger sons. There is at least one Raja whose 
eldest son bears the courtesy title of Kunwdr, the second son that of Diwdn, the 
third that of Thdkur, the fourth that of Ldl, and the fifth and younger sons 
that of Bdbu. It may here be noted that, in common use in Bengal, the title of 
Bdbu has degenerated — like the French Monsieur and the English Esquire — into 
a mere form of address ; but it belongs of right only to a very limited class— 
and particularly to the sons, not otherwise titled, of the greater titled personages. 
In Orissa, Chota Nagpur, and Central India, the eldest son of a Raja or Thakur 
frequently bears the title of Tikait or Tikaildo ; and sometimes (but rarely) the 
second son bears the title of Pothait or Pothaildo, and the third that of Ldl. 
But in most, probably in all, cases, the younger sons are styled Bdbu. In some 
of the Orissa Tributary Mahals, and in Manipur and in Hill Tipperah and else- 
where, the heir-apparent is styled Jubardj or Yuvardj. In some other parts he 
is called Diwdn ; while in the Punjab the heir-apparent of a territorial Sarddr 
is sometimes also called Sarddr, but more commonly he bears the title of 
Midn. 

The curious Marumakkatayam law of inheritance which prevails in 
Malabar and the extreme south of India — under which the succession is to the 
offspring of the female members of the family, among whom the next eldest to 

b * 



xiv INTRODUCTION 

the Raja is the heir-apparent — makes it very fitting that the rank of an heir- 
apparent, in those parts of India, should be marked by special titles. The heir- 
apparent to His Highness the Maharaja of Travancore is often called by 
Europeans the First Prince of Travancore ; but his proper courtesy title is " the 
El ay a Raja." The same title is borne by the heir-apparent to His Highness 
the Maharaja of Cochin. The heir-apparent to the Zamorin of Calicut bears, by 
courtesy, the interesting title of "The Eralpad." It will be seen that, under 
the Marumakkatayam law, no son of a Raja can ever be seen in the line of 
succession ; these receive the courtesy title of Achchhan. 

The colloquial use of the dynastic titles of Sindhia and Holkar may be 
illustrated by a somewhat similar Scottish usage, by which the actual Chief or 
Laird is colloquially known by the name of his estate. Mr. Cameron becomes 
" Lochiel " the moment he succeeds to the estate of that name ; so one of these 
young Princes becomes " Sindhia " the moment he succeeds to the Gwalior Raj, 
and the other becomes "Holkar" the moment he succeeds to the Indore 
Raj — the junior members of these ruling Houses using the title as their family 



9. — Armorial Bearings. 

The Editor has already pointed out, in an earlier section of this Introduction, 
the need that exists for the services of an Indian King of Arms and an Indian 
Heralds' College. Such an institution, provided due regard were paid to Indian 
sentiments and prejudices, would be immensely popular among the Chiefs and 
notables of India ; and a very considerable revenue might yearly be raised, with 
the greatest goodwill on the part of those who would pay it, from a moderate 
duty, similar to the one levied in the United Kingdom, on the authorized use 
of hereditary cognizances or armorial bearings. At present an Indian noble is 
justly proud of a cognizance that has been honourably borne for centuries by 
his ancestors, and would prefer to use it with full legal authority ; but it is 
doubtful whether he can do so at all, except by a most difficult and most 
unusual application to the Earl Marshal of England and the Garter King of 
Arms in London, for an authorized grant. So, too, with more modern adoptions 
of coat-armour ; these have been authorized by the College of Arms in London 
for the two Indian Baronets, and perhaps for a few more — but as a rule the 
modus operandi is unknown. 



10. — Ceremonies observed on the Installation of an Indian Noble. 

The Warrant conferring (or authorizing the hereditary succession to) a title 
is called a sanad — sometimes spelt "sunnud." It is signed, on behalf of Her 
Majesty the Empress, by His Excellency the Viceroy ; and bears the Official 
Seal of the Empire. 

It is usual — though there appears to be no invariable rule — for the local 
representative of Her Majesty, on the occasion of the installation or succession 
of a Chief or Noble, to present him with a khilat, and receive from him a nazar 
in return. "Khilat" literally means "a Dress of Honour." It usually 
consists of pieces of cloth not made up; but sometimes it consists of arms, 
jewels, or other valuables, without any article of attire, although in most cases 
a turban and shawl form part of the gift. Indeed, a complete khilat may 
include arms, or an elephant, or all of these together. The nazar (sometimes 
spelt nuzzur) must be of corresponding value to the khilat. 

In the case of a Maharaja Bahadur, or other noble of that rank, the khilat 
and sanad are presented, in full Darbdr, by the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, 



INTRODUCTION xv 

or other Chief Civil Officer of the Province ; or if they are unable to be present, 
by the Commissioner of the Division at the sudder-station (or capital). 

To the Darbar are invited all the civil and military officers available, also all 
the Indian notables and gentry of the neighbourhood. 

The chair of the Presiding Officer is placed in the middle, and that of the 
nobleman to be installed on his right. The brother, son, and any of the 
relatives of the nobleman who may be present, occupy places, according to their 
station, in the right-hand line. 

The chairs for all the public functionaries are placed, according to their rank, 
on the left hand of the Presiding Officer's chair. 

The local notables and gentry occupy chairs, also according to their rank, on 
the right hand of the Presiding Officer. 

A company of soldiers is drawn up in front of the stairs, as a Guard of 
Honour. 

On the arrival of the noble near the stairs, the Sarishtadar or Munshi of the 
Presiding Officer leads him to the audience. All functionaries, out of respect to 
him, rise from their chairs on the Chiefs reaching the Presiding Officer ; who 
then asks him to take his seat. All functionaries and Darbaris must have 
assembled and taken their seats before the Chiefs arrival. 

After a short conversation, the Presiding Officer orders his Munshi to take 
the Chief to an adjoining room, prepared previously for the purpose, where he is 
robed with the different parchas of the khilat except the pearl necklace. After 
this, he is again brought into the Darbar room, and stands in front of the 
Presiding Officer. The latter, rising from his seat with all the functionaries 
present, then ties the pearl necklace round the neck of the Chief. 

The Presiding Officer then orders the Munshi to read out the sanad. 
During the reading of the sanad the Presiding Officer and the functionaries 
resume their seats, while the Chief and the local notables and gentry rise. 

The Chief presents the usual nazardna of gold mohurs, and then all resume 
their seats. 

After a short pause, the Presiding Officer orders atr and pdn to be brought ; 
and standing up, serves out the same, first to the newly-installed Chief, and 
then to all the Indian notables and gentry present — the Munshi bringing up 
each one in turn to receive the atr and pdn. 

They all then take their leave, and the ceremony is at an end. 

The ceremony of the Installation of a Raja Bahadur, or titled personage of 
lower rank than a Maharaja Bahadur, is very similar to the one described above. 
But the Guard of Honour is not so large, and it is not necessary that the Chief 
Civil Officer of the Province should be present. Also the sarpech, pearl 
necklace, or whatever may compose the khilat, is handed by the Commissioner 
to the Collector or Assistant Collector of the district in which the Chiefs 
estates are situated, and he requests him to invest the Chief with it. 

A ceremonial similar to those described above is observed when a Knight 
Grand Commander, or a Knight Commander, or a Companion of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India, or of the Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire, is invested with the insignia of the Order by the representative of the 
Empress. 



INTRODUCTION 



11.— List of Indian Titles, with a Glossary of their 
Meanings 1 where recorded in the Foreign Office. 

Titles. Meaning. 

Achchhan Achchhan {Malay >alam), a father, used 

also as a title of respect, and in 
Malabar applied especially to the 
males of the Royal family who have 
no office or official rank in the State 
(Glos. of Indian Terms). 

Ahmudan gating Tazeik ya Min Recipient of a medal for good servke 
(A. T.M. after name) (Burmese). 

Ahsan Jang Excellent in war. 

Ajahat (Sar Deshmukh) . . . (Ajdhat, Persian Wajdhat), a title of 

honour to a Vicegerent or represent- 
ative, as one exhibiting the presence 
of a fully authorized deputy (Mar 
Diet.). 

Alijah (Sindhia) . . . .Of exalted dignity. 

Amin-ud-daula (Tonk) . . . Trustee of the State. 

Amir Prince, chief. 

Amir-ud-daula Sayyid-ul-MulkMumtaz A prince of the State, distinguished in 
Jang war. 

Amir-ul-Umara Chief of the nobles. 

Arbab ...... Lord. 

Asaf Jah (Nizam) . . . .An Asaf (Solomon's Wazir, according 

to the Muhammadans) in dignity. 

Azam. ...... Very great. 

Azam-ul-Umara (Baoni) . . . The greatest of the nobles. 

Azim-ul-Iktidar (Sindhia) . . . Most powerful. 

Bahadur Brave ; a hero ; at the end of a 

name a title = the English 
" Honourable." 

Bahadur Desai Desdi (Mar. ), ruler of a province. 

Bahadur Jang (Bhartpur) . . . Brave in war. 

Barar Bans (Faridkot) . . . Offspring of a Barar (a Jat tribe. The 

Raja of Faridkot is head of the 
tribe — Griffin). 

Barar Bans Sirmur (Nabha) . . Sirmur, sl crowned head. 

Begam (Bhopal. . See Nawab Begam) Lady ; queen ; title of Mughal ladies. 

Beglar Begi (Kalat) .... Lord of lords. The Governor of Shiraz 

holds this title in Persia. 

Bhup (Kuch Behar) .... Sovereign, king. 

Bohmong (Chief of the Regritsa (Arakanese) Head leader. 

Maghs) 

Brajendra (Bhartpur) . . . . Lord of Braj, an epithet of Krishna. 

Chaube . . . . . .A caste distinction. 

Chaudhri Head man of a village ; an honorific 

form of address. 

Chhatrapati Maharaj (Kolhapur) . . Lord of the umbrella. A king entitled 

to have an umbrella carried over 
him as a mark of dignity. 

Davar . . . . . .A just prince, a sovereign. 

1 Many of the " meanings " given in this Glossary are simply rough transla- 
tions of the Oriental honorifics. 



INTRODUCTION 



Titles. 



Deshmukh 



Diler Jang (Dholpur) 
Dinkar Rao 



Diwan 

Diwan Bahadur . 

Farzand-i-Arjumand Akidat Paiwand 

Daulat-i-Inglishia (Nabha) 
Farzand-i-Dilband Rashikhul-Iti-kad 

Daulat-i-Inglishia (Jind and Kapur- 

thala) 
Farzand-i-Dilpazir-i-Daulat-i-Inglishia 

(Rampur) 
Farzand- i- Khas- i -Daulat- i- Inglishia 

(Baroda, Patiala) 
Farzand- i -Saadat-i- Nishan-i-Hazrat-i- 

Kaisar-i-Hind (Faridkot) 

Fath Jang (Nizam) .... 

Fidwi-i-Hazrat-i-Malika-i-Muaz-zama-i 

-Rafi-ud-Darja-i-Inglistdn (Sindhia) 

Gambhir Rao 

Ghorpade. 

Girad. . . 

Hafiz-ul-Mulk (Bahawalpur) 

Heladi Naik Bahadur Desai Nadu- 

gauda. 
Himmat Bahadur 
Hisam-us-Saltanat (Sindhia) 
HizabrJang 

Ihtisham-ud-daula (Jaora) . 
Ihtisham-ul-Mulk 
Imad-ud-daula (Baoni) 
Indar (Kashmir) 
Jai Deo (Dholpur) 
Jalal-ud-daula (Dujana) 

Jam 

Jamadar .... 
Khan .... 



Khan Bahadur 
Khan Saheb. 
Khanzada . 



Kiritapati (Travancore) 

Kulashekhara (Travancore) 

Kumar or Kunwar 

Kyet thaye zaung shwe Salwe ya Min 

(K.S.M. after name) 
Lokendra (Dholpur, Datia) 

Mahant 

Maharaj Kumar 

Maharaj Rana (Dholpur, Jhalawar) . 



Meaning. 
An hereditary native officer under the 

former Governments (Marathi). 
Intrepid in war. 
Dinkar (Sanskrit), Day-maker, the sun. 

See Rao. 
A minister, a chief officer of State. 
See Diwan and Bahadur. 
Beloved and faithful son of the English 

Government. 
Beloved and trusty son of the English 

Government. 

Esteemed son of the English Govern- 
ment. 

Favourite son of the English Govern- 
ment. 

A son emblematical of the good 
auspices of Her Majesty the Empress 
of India. 

Victorious in battle. 

A servant of Her August Majesty the 
Queen of England, who is exalted 
in position. 

Sagacious chief. 

A Somali title, apparently = a chief. 
Guardian, preserver of the country. 



Brave champion. 

Sword of the State. 

Lion of battle. 

Pomp of the State. 

Pomp of the country. 

Pillar of the State. 

Indra. 

God of victory. 

Glory of the State. 

(Sindhi) Chief. 

Chief or leader. 

Lord, prince, title .of Muhammadan 

nobles. 
Brave lord. 

Son of a Khan. Title of some Musal- 
man chiefs settled in Pandu Mehvas. 

Possessor of a diadem. 

Head (Shekhara) of the race (Kulam). 

Prince, son of a Raja. 

Recipient of the Gold Chain of Honour 
(Burmese). 

Protector of the world. 

Head of a religious order. 

Son of a Maharaja. 

Supreme Rana or king. 



INTRODUCTION 



Titles. Meaning. 

Maharaja . . . . • . . Great Raja or king. 
Maharaja Bahadur. 

Maharaja Dhiraj or Maharaj-Adhiraj . Lord Paramount, king of kings. 
Maharaja-i-Rajagan .... King of kings. 

Maharana Great Rana or king. 

Maharana Dhiraj (Udaipur) . . Lord Paramount, king of kings. 

Maharani Great Rani or queen. 

Maharao Great Rao or chief. 

Maharao Bahadur (Kota). 

Maharao Raja (Alwar and Bnndi) . Supreme Raja or king. 

Maharawal Great Rawal or prince. 

Maharawal Bahadur. 

Maharawat (Partabgarh . . . Great Rawat'or prince. 

Mahendra Great Indra. " 

Majid-ud-daula Glorious in the State. 

Malanmat Madar. 

Malaz-ul-Ulama-ul-Fazila . . . Asylum of the learned and erudite. J 

Malik Master, proprietor. 

Malwandar (Nabha) .... Lord of wealth. 

Mani Sultan (Travancore) . . . The Sultan par excellence. Mani—a, 

jewel, a pearl. 
Mansur-i-Zaman (Sindhia, Patiala) . Victorious of the age. 
Mian Lord, Master, title of sons of Rajput 

princes. 
Mihin Sardar (Baoni) . . . Mihin, greater, greatest, elder-born. 

Mir ....... Chief, leader. 

Mirza . . . . . .A contraction of Amir Zada, ' ' nobly 

born." When affixed to a name, it 

signifies " Prince " ; when prefixed, 

simply "Mr." 
Mirza Bahadur. 
Mong Raja 
Muazzaz-ud-daula 
Mudabbir-ul-Mulk 
Muhtashim-i-Dauran (Sindhia) 
Mujahid-ul-Mulk 
Mukhlis-ud-daula (Bahawalpur) , 
Muktar-ul-Mulk (Sindhia) . 
Mulk .... 



Mumtaz-ud-daula 

Mumtaz-ul-Mulk 

Mushir-i-Khas . 

Mushir-ud-daula 

Mustakil Jang (Dujana) 

Mustakim Jang . 

Mutalik .... 

Muzaffar-ul-Mamalik (Nizam) 

Naik 

Nasrat Jang (Bahawalpur) 
Nawab .... 
Nawab Babi (Balasinor) 



Mong (Arakanese), a leader. 

Honoured of the State. 

Administrator orMinister of the country 

(The most) powerful of his age. 

Warrior (for the faith) of the country. 

Devoted servant of the State. 

Ruler of the country. 

Probably a misprint or corruption of 
Malik, a king. 

Distinguished in the State. 

Distinguished in the country. 

Privy counsellor, choicest counsellor. 

Counsellor of the State. 

Firm in battle. 

Loyal in battle. 

Mutlak, principal, supreme. 

Victorious over kingdoms. 

Nayak, leader, chief. 

Victorious in battle. 

Vicegerent. 

Bdbi, door-keeper. The founder of 
the family once held this post in the 
Mughal Court, and hence the title is 



INTRODUCTION 



Titles. 
Nawab Bahadur. 
Nawab Begam (Bhopal). 
Nizam-ud-daula (Nizam) . 
Nizam-ul-Mulk (Nizam) . 
Nono (Spiti) 

Padmanabha Dasa (Travancore 
Padwi .... 



Pancha- Hazar Mansabdar . 

Pant Pratinidhi 

Pant Sachiv 

Patang Rao 

Prince (Arcot). 

Rafi-ush-Shan (Sindhia) . 

Rai . . 

Rai Bahadur. 

Rai Ray an (Banswara) 

Rai Saheb. 

Rais-ud-daula (Dholpur) . 

Raj Rajendra (Jaipur) 

Raj Rajeshwar (Holkar), etc. 

Raj Saheb 

Raja .... 

Raja Bahadur. 

Raja Dhiraj 

Raja-i-Rajagan 

Rajeshwar. 

Rana .... 



Rani .... 
Rao .... 

Rao Bahadur. 
Rao Saheb. 

Rashid-ul-Mulk (Baoni) . 
Rawal .... 
Rawat .... 
Rukn-ud-daula (Bahawalpur) 
Rustam-i-Dauran (Nizam) 

Rustam Jang . 

Saheb-i-Jah (Baoni) 

Saif-ud-daula . 

Sar Desai 

Saramad - i- Rajaha - i -Bundelkhand 

(Orchha) 
Saramad - i - Rajaha - i - Hindustan 

(Jaipur) 

Sardar 

Sardar Bahadur. 
Saulat Jang (Tonk) 



Meaning. 



Regulator of the State. 
Administrator of the country. 
(Tibetan) Young nobleman. 
Servant of Vishnu (the lotus-navelled). 
Or Farm, clan title borne after their 

names by certain Mehvas Chiefs 

(Bombay Gazetteer). 
Noble holding a mansab or military 

rank of 5000 horse. 
Pratinidhi, a vicegerent ; title borne 

by a distinguished Maratha family. 
Sachiv, Minister, counsellor. 
From Patang, the sun, and Rao, prince. 

Of exalted dignity. 

(Prakrit Rai = Raja), Prince, chief. 

Rai of Rais, prince of princes. 

Ruler of the State. 

Lord of kings, king of kings. 

Rejeshwar, king of kings. 

Raj = Raja. 

King, prince. 

Paramount Raja, king of kings. 
Raja of Rajas. 



From Rajan ( = Raja) 
diminuti veness ). 

Title of a prince or 
among Rajputs. 

Queen, princess. 

King, prince, chief. 



+ Ka (expressing 
Raja, especially 



Director of the country. 
Prince, chief. 

Do. 
Pillar of the State. 
The Rustam (the most renowned 

Persian heroes) of his time. 
A Rustam in battle. 
Possessed of dignity. 
Sword of the State. 
Chief Desai or ruler of a province. 
Head of the Rajas of Bundelkhand. 

Head of the Rajas of Hindustan. 

Chief officer of rank. 

Fury of war. 



of 



INTRODUCTION 



Titles. 



Sawai 



Sawai Bahadur (Kutch). 

Sawai Rao. 

Sena Khas Khel (Gaekwar) 



Sena Pati .... 
Shahzada .... 
Shaikh .... 
Shaikh-ul-Mushaikh . 
Shamsher Bahadur (Baroda) 
Shamsher Jang (Travancore) 
Shams-ud-daula . 
Shiromani (Bikanir) . 
Shriman Maha Naik Nadgaud 

Nagnuriebirada Himori. 
Shuja-at Jang . 
Sipahdar-ul-Mulk (Dholpur) 
Sipar-i-Saltanat (Kashmir) 
Srinath (Sindhia) 
Sultan .... 
Thakur . 
Thakur Rawat. 
Thakur Saheb. 
Thakur Sena Rai. 

Thakurani 

Thuye gaung ngwe Da ya Min (T.D.M. 

after name) 

Umdat-ul-Mulk 

Umdat-ul-Umara (Sindhia) 
Vanji (Travancore) . 

Vishwasrao 

"Wachanath 

Wala Shikoh (Sindhia) . 

Wali(Kaldt) 

Walvi 



Wasava 

Wazir-ud-daula . 
Wazir-ul-Mulk (Tonk) 
Zamorin . 



Meaning. 
Literally, having the excess of a fourth; 
i.e. better than others by 25 per cent. 
A Hindu title. 



Chief of the army, commander of the 

army of the State. 
Army- Chief, General. 
Prince-Royal, prince. 
Chief. 

Doctor of doctors (of law). 
A mighty man of the sword. 
The sword of war. 
The sun of the State. 
The gem, the best (of). 



Brave in war. 

Commander of the army of the country. 

Shield of the Empire. 

Lord of Fortune. 

Prince, ruler. 

Chief, feudal noble. 



Female Thakur. 

Recipient of the Silver Sword for 

Braveiy (Burmese). 
Chosen of the State. 
Chosen from among the nobles. 
Dynastic name. 

From Vishwds, trust, and Rao, prince. 
Vachan-ndth, Lord of Speech. 
Of high dignity. 
Prince, governor. 
Or Valvi. Clan title borne after their 

names by certain Mehvas Chiefs 

{Bombay Gazetteer). 
Or Vasava. Do. 
Minister of the State. 

Do. 
Vernacular modification of Samundri, 

the sea king (Malayalam). 



NOTICE 

This Edition of The Golden Book of India contains the Birthday- 
Honours conferred in 1899. 

Communications relating to the Third Edition should be addressed to 

Sir ROPER LETHBRIDGE, K.C.I.E., 

c/o Messrs. Sampson Low, Marston & Co. 
St. Dunstan's House, 
Fetter Lane, 

LONDON, E.C. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Note. — The titles are in italics. 



ABAJI BALWANT BHISE, Rao Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on September 11, 1884. 
Residence : Bombay. 

ABBAS HUSAIN, Muhammad, Kasra 
Bakht Mirza Bahadur. See Mu- 
hammad. 

ABBAS KHAN, Shahbazurgkhel, Khan 
Saheb. Received the title on June 3, 
1899. Residence : Bannu, Punjab. 

ABDUL ALI, Khan Bahadur. The Khan 
Bahadur was born in 1863, and is a 
descendant of the old Nawabs of the 
Carnatic, being the son of Muazzaz- 
ud-daula, and grandson of his late 
Highness Azim Jah, first titular Prince 
of Arcot. He was granted the personal 
title of Khan Bahadur in 1876. Resi- 
dence : Madras. 

ABDUL ALI, Mir, Khan Bahadur, and 
Sarddr. The titles are personal, and 
were conferred, the first on January 
22, 1873, and the second on May 30, 
1891. Residence: Bombay. 

ABDUL ALI, Muhammad, Khan Baha- 
dur. See Muhammad. 

ABDUL ALI MULLA HIPT00LA MISRI, 

Shaikh, Khan Saheb. Received the 
title on June 3, 1899. Residence; 
Bombay. 

ABDUL BARI, Muhammad, Khan Baha- 
dur. See Muhammad. 

ABDUL FATEH,Maulavi, Sayyid, Khan 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1887. 
Residence : Nasik, Bombay. 

ABDUL FIROZ KHAN (of Savanur), 

Nawdb. The Nawab is the uncle of 
the ruling Nawdb of Savanur in the 
Dharwar district. The title is here- 
ditary. Residence: Dharwar, Bombay. 



ABDUL FIROZ KHAN, Khan Saheb. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on February 16, 1887, on the occasion 
of the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty. Residence : Bhusa- 
wal, Bombay. 

ABDUL GHAFUR, Maulavi, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Has been Deputy- 
Collector of Allahabad. Residence : 
Allahabad. 

ABDUL GHAFUR, Munshi, Khan Saheb. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898, 
for services in Military Works Depart- 
ment. Residence : Military Works 
Department, Simla. 

ABDUL GHAFUR KHAN, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on June 22, 1897. Residence : 
Survey of India, Calcutta. 

ABDUL GHAFUR KHAN (Khan of 
Teri), Khan Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on June 22, 1897. Residence : 
Teri, Kohat, Punjab. 

ABDUL GHANI, Maulavi, Khan Baha- 
dur. An Extra Assistant Commissioner 
of the Punjab. Created a Khan Baha- 
dur, as a personal distinction, January 
2, 1893. Residence: Faridabad, Pun- 
jab. 

ABDUL HAI, Maulavi, Shams-ul-Ulama. 
The title was conferred (for learning) 
on January 3, 1893. Residence : 
Calcutta. 

ABDUL HAKIM KHAN (of Peshawar), 

Khan Saheb. Granted the title, as a 
personal distinction, January 2, 1893, 
for eminent services at Gilgit. Resi- 
dence : Gilgit, Kashmir. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



AHWt H&KK, 'Shadlkh,, XJlcU Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 

1898. Residence: Pilibhit, North- 
western Provinces. 

ABDULHAKK, Maulavi (of Khairabad), 

Shams-ul-Ulama. The title was con- 
ferred (for learning) on February 16, 
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee 
of the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty. Residence ; Sitapur, Oudh. 

ABDUL HAMID, Maulavi, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on May 
26, 1894. Residence: Meerut, North- 
Western Provinces. 

ABDUL HAMID KHAN, Khan Bahadur. 
The title of Khan Saheb was conferred 
on June 22, 1897 ; and that of Khan 
Bahadur on January 1, 1899. Resi- 
dence : Malakand, Punjab Frontier. 

ABDUL HUSAIN KHAN, Mir (of 
Tando Mir), His Highness ; b. May 13, 
1850. The title is personal, and was 
conferred in recognition of his position 
as grandson of the Amir, who was the 
ruler of Sind at the time of the an- 
nexation. Residence: Hyderabad, Sind. 

ABDUL ISLAM BIN ADAM, Khan 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on May 1, 1880. Resi- 
dence : Nasik, Bombay. 

ABDUL JABBAR, Maulavi, C.I.E., 
Khan Bahadur. The Khan Bahadur 
is a Deputy Magistrate of the 24- 
Parganas at Calcutta, and having 
rendered excellent service in that 
capacity, received the title as a personal 
distinction on May 25, 1892. Created 
a CLE. on May 25, 1895. Residence : 
Calcutta. 

ABDUL J ALII, Muhammad, Maulavi, 
Shams-ul-Ulama. Received the title 
in recognition of his eminence in 
oriental learning, on June 22, 1897. 
Is Professor of Arabic in the Benares 
College. Residence: Benares, North- 
western Provinces. 

ABDUL JAMLL, Kazi, Khan Bahadur. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence : Bareilly, Oudh. 

ABDUL KADIR, Maulavi, Khan Saheb. 
The title was conferred on January 2, 

1899. Is Municipal Commissioner of 
Surat. Residence : Surat, Bombay. 

ABDUL KADIR, Shaikh, Khan Saheb. 
Received the title on January 2, 1899. 
Residence: Bombay. 



ABDUL KADIR, Subadar-Major, Khan 
Saheb. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Residence: Belgaum, 
Bombay. 

ABDUL KADIR KHAN, walad ALI 
AKBAR KHAN, Mir. The title is 
hereditary, the Mir being a representa- 
tive of one of theMirs or Chiefs of Sind 
at the time of the annexation. Resi- 
dence : Shikarpur, Sind. 

ABDUL KARIM, Munshi Hafir, C.I.E., 
C. V.O. Is Indian Secretary to Her 
Majesty the Queen, Empress of India. 
Created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire 
on May 25, 1895 ; and a Companion 
of the Royal Victorian Order, on May 
24, 1899. Residence : England. 

ABDUL KARIM, Shaikh Hafiz, C.I.E., 

Khan Bahadur; b. 1838. The title 
was conferred on May 24, 1884, for 
services rendered by his ancestors, and 
for his own acts of public generosity ; 
and he was created a Companion of 
the Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire, May 21, 1890. Residence: 
Meerut, North-Western Provinces. 

ABDUL KARIM KHAN SAHEB, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Residence : Madras. 

ABDUL LATIF AGHA JOHAR, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred by 
the Carnatic Nawab, and recognized 
by Government December 16, 1890. 
The Khan Bahadur also bears the 
Carnatic titles of Asad Jang Said-ul- 
daula. Residence: Arabia. 

ABDUL LATIF LONDE, Kazi, Shams-ul- 
Ulama. The title was conferred on 
January 2, 1888, for eminent oriental 
scholarship. Residence: Bombay. 

ABDUL MAHMUD KHAN, Khcln Baha- 
dur. Has done good service in the 
Medical Department, Bengal ; and 
received the title on January 1, 1891. 
Residence: Calcutta. 

ABDUL MAJID, Khan Bahadur. Is 
son of the Prince of Arcot; granted 
the title on June 22, 1897. Residence : 
Madras. 

ABDUL MAJID, Hakim Sayyid, KJidn 
Bahadur. Title conferred May 26, 
1894. Residence : Cuddapah, Madras. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



ABDUL MAJID, Maulavi, Khdn Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Is Honorary Magis- 
trate. Residence: Kangpur, Bengal. 

ABDUL MAJID KHAN, Khan Bahadur. 
Title conferred January 1, 1894. 
Residence : Pilibhit, North- Western 
Provinces. 

ABDUL MAJID KHAN, Khan Saheb. 
Received the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence: Nagpur, Central Provinces. 

ABDUL MAJID KHAN (of Delhi), 
Hazik-ul-Mulk. The title was con- 
ferred on May 21, 1898. Residence: 
Delhi, Punjab. 

ABDUL MAJID KHAN, Achakzai, Khan 
Saheb. Eeceived the title on June 22, 
1897. Residence: Gulistan, Baluchis- 
tan. 

ABDUL MAJID KHAN, Malik, Bazai, 
Khan Saheb. Received the title on 
January 1, 1898. Residence: Balu- 
chistan. 

ABDUL QUAYYUM KHAN, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on May 
21, 1898. Residence: Tirah, Punjab 
Frontier. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAHIM, Muhammad, 
Khdn Bahadur. Title conferred Janu- 
ary 21, 1892. Residence: Ghazipur, 
North- Western Provinces. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAHIM, Shaikh, 
Khdn Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on May 20, 1890, for good 
service in the Medical Department. 
Residence: Bengal. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAHIM HAKIM, 

Khdn Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on April 6, 1882. Residence : Bushire. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAHIM KHAN, 

Khdn Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1 , 1 87 7 . Residence : 
Bannu, Punjab. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAHMAN, Shaikh, 
Khdn Saheb. The title was conferred 
on June 22, 1897. Residence: Zhob, 
Baluchistan. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAHMAN, Khdn 
Bahddur. The Khan Bahadur was a 
Deputy Commissioner in the district 
of Shimoga, Mysore, under the govern- 
ment of His Highness the Maharaja 
of Mysore, and received the title on 
July 13, 1892. Residence: Bangalore, 
Mysore. 



ABDUL (ABDUR) RAHMAN, Khdn 
Bahddur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1896. Residence : Banga- 
lore, Mysore. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAHMAN, Haji 
Muhammad Kadwani, Khan Bahd- 
dur. Received the title on June 3, 
1899. Residence: Bombay. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAHMAN, Muham- 
mad, Khdn Bahddur. The title was 
conferred by the Nawab of the Car- 
natic, and recognized by the British 
Government on December 16, 1890. 
Residence: Madras. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAHMAN, Munshi, 
Khdn Saheb. Received the title on 
January 1, 1898. Residence: Rehli, 
Sagar, Central Provinces. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAHMAN, A. F. M„ 

Khdn Bahddur. Is judgeof theS.C.C, 
Calcutta. Received the title on May 
21,1898. Residence: Calcutta. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAHMAN KHAN, 

Khdn Bahddur. The title was con- 
ferred for services to Government in 
the Postal Department, on September 
28,1891. Residence: Hazar a, Punjab. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAUF, Maulavi, 
Shams-ul-Ulama. The title was con- 
ferred on May 20, 1890, for distinction 
in oriental learning. Residence: Patna, 
Bengal. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAUF KHAN 

Subadar-Major,^M» Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 1897, 
for eminent service in Border Military 
Police. Residence : Peshawar, Punjab. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAZAK BIN KAR- 
TAS, Khdn Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1899. Residence : 
Bombay. 

ABDUL (ABDUR) RAZZAK, Khdn 
BaMdur. The title was conferred on 
June 1, 1888, for distinguished medical 
service. Residence: Jeddah. 

ABDUL (ABDUS) SAMAD, Khdn Bahd- 
dur. The title was conferred on Feb- 
ruary 18, 1887. Residence: Indore, 
Central India. 

ABDUL (ABDUS) SAMAD, Hafiz Mu- 
hammad, Khdn Bahddur. The title 
was conferred by the Nawab of the 
Carnatic,and recognized by the Govern- 
ment on July 7, 1892. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



ABDUL (ABDUS) SUBHAN, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 30, 1891. Residence: Madura, 
Madras. 

ABDUL (ABDUS) SUBHAN CHAUDHRI, 

Sayyid, Naicdb. The title was con- 
ferred on January 3, 1893. Residence : 
Bogra, Bengal. 

ABDUL RAHEMAN, Shaikh, Khdn 
Saheb. The title was conferred on 
May 21, 1898. Residence: Karachi, 
Sind, Bombay. 

ABDULLA KHAN, Hafiz, Nawdb. The 
title is hereditary, and the Nawab 
Abdulla Khan was specially selected 
to succeed to it in August 1881. The 
title had been recognized July 30, 
1875. Residence: Dera Ismail Khan, 
Punjab. 

ABDULLA KHAN, Khdn Saheb. The 
title was conferred on February 16, 
1887. Residence: Sibi, Baluchistan. 

ABDULLA KHAN, Khdn BaMdur. 
The title of Khan Saheb was conferred 
on January 2, 1888, and that of Khan 
Bahadur on May 30, 1891. Residence : 
Ajmir, Bajputana. 

ABDULLA KHAN BAHADUR, Muham- 
mad, CLE. See Muhammad. 

ABDULALLY. See Abdul Ali. 
ABDUR. See Abdul. 
ABDUS. See Abdul. 

ABDUS-SALAM, KMn Bahadur. Re- 
ceived the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence : Thagi Department. 

ABDUS SUBHAN, Khdn Bahadur. See 
Abdul. 

ABDUS SUBHAN, Sayyid, Chaudhri, 

Nawdb. See Abdul. 

ABHAI CHARAN MITTER, Rat Baha- 
dur. See Mittar. 

ABID ALI BAHADUR, Kamr Kadr 
Mirza, Prince. This is the courtesy 
title of the late King of Oudh. Resi- 
dence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

ABINAS CHANDRA BANERJI, Rai 

Bahadur. See Banarji. 

ABUBAKR, Beari, Haji, Khdn Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 3, 1893. 
Residence: Mangalore, Madras. 

ABU SALEH, Muhammad, Maulavi 
Sayyid, Khdn Bahddur. Received the 
title January 1, 1892. Residence: 
Gaya, Bengal. 



ABU TALIB KHAN, Muhammad. See 
Muhammad Abu Talib Khan. 

ABUL ALI DARAGAH MIRZA BA- 
HADUR, Prince. This is the courtesy 
title of the twentieth son of the late 
King of Oudh. Residence: Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

ABUL KHAIR MUHAMMAD SIDDIQ, 

Maulavi, Sliams-ul-Ulama ; b. 1851. 
The title was conferred for eminence 
in oriental learning on January 1, 
1897. Residence: Nauhati, Bengal. 

ACHAL SINGH (of Kaimahra), Rdjd; 
b. June 15, 1880, and succeeded Rajd 
Narpat Singh in 1886. The title is 
hereditary. The Raja of Kaimahra 
represents the elder branch of the 
Jan war family, the Raja of Oel repre- 
senting the junior branch. His mother 
is the Rani Ranikunwar. Residence: 
Kheri, Oudh. 

ACHAYYAMMA GARU, Sri Aukitham, 
Rdni. The personal title was conferred 
on January 1, 1896. Residence: Viza- 
gapatam, Madras. 

ADAM YUSUFBHAI, Shaikh, Khdn 
Saheb. The title was conferred on 
January 2, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

ADARGANJ, Rai of. See Madho Parshad 
Singh. 

ADARJI JAMSHEDJI, Khdn Saheb. The 
title was conferred on October 20, 1885. 
Residence: Bombay. 

ADARJI S0RABJI, Khdn Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on January 2, 1899, for 
good service in the Customs Depart- 
ment. Residence: Zaila. 

ADINARAYANA AIYAR, Mutlur, Rao 
Bahddur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1896. Residence: Trichi- 
nopoly, Madras. 

ADITYA RAM BHATTACHARJI, Pan- 
dit, Mahdmapo'pddhydya. The title 
was conferred, for eminence in oriental 
learning, on June 22, 1897. The Pan- 
dit is Professor of Sanskrit in the Muir 
Central College, Allahabad. Resi- 
dence : Allahabad, North-Western Pro- 
vinces. 

AFGHANISTAN, His Highness the Amir 
of, G.C.B., G. C.S.I. A ruling chief. 
His Highness Sir Abdur Rahman 
Khan, G.C.S.I., Amir of Afghanistan, 
was born about the year 1843, and was 
placed on the throne by the British 
authorities on July 22, 1880. He is a 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



younger son of the late Amir Sher Ali 
Khan, Amir of Kabul, and lived for 
some years as an exile, but was brought 
back after the last Afghan war. The 
area of the State is about 270,000 
square miles ; its population about 
4,901,000, chiefly Muhammadans. His 
Highness was created a G. C.S.I, on 
April 28, 1885; and a G.C.B. on 
January 1, 1894. He is entitled to a 
salute of 21 guns ; and maintains a 
military force of 19,500 cavalry, 40,408 
infantry, and 210 guns. Residence: 
Kabul. 

AFRIDI KHAN, Malik, Khdn Saheb ; b. 
1830. Received the title on January 
1, 1897. Residence : Peshawar. 

AFSAR. See Afzar. 

AFZAL KHAN, Muhammad. See Mu- 
hammad. 

AFZAL KHAN, Sardar Muhammad, 
Nawdb. The Sardar received the per- 
sonal title of Nawab on January 1, 
1894. Residence: Dera Ismail Khan, 
Punjab. 

AFZAL KHAN, Lieutenant - Colonel 
Wazirzada Muhammad, C.S.I. , Nawdb. 
See Muhammad. 

AFZAR-I-JANG, Nawab, Major, CLE. 
See Muhammad Ali Bey. 

AGAR (REWA KANTHA), Thakur 
Gambhir Singh, Thdkur of. A ruling 
chief. Born about 1867 ; is a Muham- 
madan of Rajput descent. The area 
of the State is about 9 square miles ; 
its population consists chiefly of 
Bhils. Residence : Agar, Rewa Kantha, 
Bombay. 

AGHA. This is generally a prefix. See 
under the name that follows. 

AGHA AHMAD, Ispahan!, Khdn Baha- 
dur. Received the title on January 1, 
1890. Residence: Rangoon, Burma. 

AGHA KHAN, His Highness. See 
Sultan. 

AG0RI BARHAR, Rani of. See Bed 

Saran. 

AGRA BARKHERA (BHOFAL), Bal- 
want Singh, Thdkur of. A ruling 
chief. Thakur Balwant Singh is a 
Rajput Chief (Hindu), born about the 
year 1827. He succeeded to the title, 
which is hereditary, on July 9, 1859. 
The population of the State, which is 



situated in the Bhopal Agency, Cen- 
tral India, is about 4200, and consists 
chiefly of Hindus. Residence: Agra 
Barkhera, Bhopal, Central India. 

AGR0R, Khdn of. See Ali Gauhar Khan. 

AHFAY-UR-RAHIM, Muhammad, Khdn 
Saheb. Received the title on January 
1, 1898. Residence: Jabalpur, Central 
Provinces. 

AHMAD, Maulavi, Khdn Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 1, 1890 " for loyalty and public 
spirit." Residence: 70 Toltollah Lane, 
Calcutta, Bengal. 

AHMAD, Maulavi, Shams-ul-ulama. The 
title was conferred for learning, on 
May 30, 1891. Residence: Calcutta. 

AHMAD ALI, Khdn Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence: Berar. 

AHMAD ALI, Muhammad, Nawdb 
Bahadur. See Muhammad. 

AHMAD ALI KHAN, Khdn Bahadur. 
The Khan Bahadur has rendered good 
service on the Survey of India, and 
received the title as a personal dis- 
tinction on May 25, 1892. Residence : 
Calcutta. 

AHMAD BAKHSH, Shaikh, Khdn Ba- 
hadur; b. 1815. Son of Tir Bakhsh, 
who was in the service of the Raja of 
Nagpur; and whose ancestor, Malik 
Bal Lai, settled in the Fatehpur dis- 
trict in the reign of Shahab-ud-din 
Ghori. The Khan Bahadur served in 
the Bengal Light Cavalry from the 
year 1830 ; and took part in the cam- 
paign against the Bhils in 1832, and in 
the Afghan war in 1839. He went 
through the Kabul campaigns, and 
joined in the pursuit of Dost Mu- 
hammad. For his loyalty during the 
Mutiny he was rewarded with a khilat, 
a jdgir (grant of lands), and the title 
of Khan Bahadur, which was conferred 
on him January 1866. Residence: 
Fatehpur, North- Western Provinces. 

AHMAD BAKHSH KHAN, Nagar, 
Sardar Bahadur, Nawdb. The Sardar 
Bahadur, who is a pensioned Risaldar- 
Major in Her Majesty's Army, was 
given the hereditary title of Nawab 
for his loj r al services, on May 25, 1895. 
Residence : Hyderabad, Deccan. 



6 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



AHMAD GURIKAL, Manjeri, Khan 
BaMdur ; b. 1825. Granted the per- 
sonal title of Khan Bahadur for good 
service in the Madras Police, from 
which he retired on pension in 1888. 
Residence: Malabar, Madras Presi- 
dency. 

AHMAD HASAN KHAN, Nawdb Baha- 
dur. Son of the Nawab Kalb Ali 
Khan, and a grandson of the late Saa- 
dat Ali Khan, King of Oudh. The 
title is personal. Residence: Lucknow, 
Oudh. 

AHMAD HUSAIN KHAN (of Fatehpur 
Haswa), Khan BaMdur. Received 
the personal title of Khan Bahadur on 
June 3, 1893. Residence: Sehore, 
Central India. 

AHMAD HUSAIN KHAN, Nawdb (of 
Fatehpur) ;b. 1826. The title is heredi- 
tary. The family originally came 
from Teheran ; its founder, Sayyid 
Ikram-ud-din Ahmad, accompanied 
the Emperor Humayun on his return 
from Persia, took service under the 
Delhi emperors, and was appointed a 
mansabddr by the great Akbar. The 
Nawab has two sons— Ali Husain 
Khan and Bakar Husain Khan. Resi- 
dence: Bakarganj, Fatehpur, North- 
Western Provinces. 

AHMAD HUSAIN KHAN (of Pariawan), 
SHAIKH, Khan Bahadur; b. 1865; 
succeeded 1877. The title is heredi- 
tary, and was conferred December 4, 
1877, on Dost Muhammad of Pariawan, 
on account of his services in the 
Mutiny. The present Khan Bahadur 
is an Honorary Magistrate . Residence : 
Pariawan, Partabgarh, Oudh. 

AHMAD KHAN walad MUHAMMAD 
HASAN KHAN, Mir. The title is 
personal, as being that of a descendant 
of the ancient Mirs of Sind. Residence : 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

AHMAD KHAN, Jamadar, Khan Saheb. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on February 16, 1887, on the 
occasion of the Jubilee of the reign of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty. Residence: 
11th Bengal Lancers, India. 

AHMAD KHAN, Sayyid, CLE. Was 
created a Companion of the Most Emi- 
nent Order of the Indian Empire, 
January 1, 1888. Residence : 

AHMAD MOHI-UD-DIN, Khan Bahadur. 
Son of Ibruth Jang Bahadur, by a 



niece of the Hon. Sir Sharful Umra 
Bahadur, K.C.S.I. ; b. 1835 ; m. 1864, 
to the second daughter of His High- 
ness Nawab Zahir-ud-daula, G.C.S.I., 
second Prince of Arcot. Created Khan 
Bahadur, 1874. Residence: Mylapur 
and Adyar, Madras. 

AHMAD MUHI-UD-DIN, Khan Bahadur. 
The Khan Bahadur is a member of the 
Carnatic family, being a son-in-law of 
his late Highness Zahir-ud-daula, the 
second of the titular Princes of Arcot. 
He was born in 1842, and was granted 
the personal title in 1875. Residence : 
Madras. 

AHMAD NUR KHAN alias MANGAL 
KHAN, Khan Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on June 22, 1897 . Residence : 
Pilibhit, North- Western Provinces. 

AHMAD SHAH, Khan Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1894, 
Residence: Jalandhur, Punjab. 

AHMAD SHAH SAYYID (of Sardhana), 

Nawab; b. January 1, 1835. Succeeded 
in 1882. The family are Muswi or 
Mashadi Sayyids, descended from 
Hayat Ali Musa Raza, and originally 
residing at Paghman near Kabul. On 
account of services rendered to Alex- 
ander Barnes in his Kabul mission, 
and subsequently to the English in 
their retreat from Kabul, they were 
expelled from Kabul and settled at 
Sardhana. When the Mutiny occurred 
at Meerut, the head of the family, 
Sayyid Muhammad Jan Fishan, Khan 
Saheb, raised a body of horse, consist- 
ing of his followers and dependents, 
and officered by himself and his 
relatives ; accompanied General Wil- 
son's force to the Hindan ; was present 
in both actions, and thence to Delhi, 
where he remained with the head- 
quarters camp till the city was taken, 
when his men were employed to keep 
order in Delhi. For these eminent 
services the title of Nawab, with a 
suitable khilat, was conferred on him. 
And each of his successors has received 
the title of Nawab for life on succeed- 
ing to the estates. Residence: Sard- 
hana, North- Western Provinces. 

AHMAD YAR KHAN, Khan Bahadur. 
Received the title on May 25, 1892. 
Residence : Baluchistan. 

AHMED. See Ahmad. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



AHSANTJLLA, The Hon. Sir Khwaja, 
K.C.I.E., JVawdb Bahadur. Son and 
heir of the late Nawab (of Dacca) 
Kbwaja Sir Abdul Ghani, K.C.S.I. 
The Nawab Bahadur, who was born in 
1846, bas long managed the large 
family property, and has followed in 
the footsteps of his father, both as a 
liberal and enlightened landlord, and 
in his large public benefactions. He 
received the title of Nawab Bahadur 
on January 1, 1892 ; and was created 
a Knight Commander of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire 
on Junt 22, 1897, on the auspicious 
occasion of the Diamond Jubilee of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen 
Empress. His sons are Khwaja Hafiz- 
ulla Khm Bahadur and Khwaja 
Salimulla Khan Bahadur. He is a 
member of the Legislative Council of 
Bengal, aid belongs to many other 
public holies. Residence: Dacca, 
Bengal. 

AJAIGARH, Bundelkhand, His High- 
ness Maha*aja Sawai Sir Ranjor 
Singh Bahalur, K.C.I.E., Mahdrdjd 
of. A ruliig chief. His Highness 
was born on September 9, 1859. He is 
a Bundela Pajput, descended from the 
famous Mah,raja Chhatrasal of Panna 
(q.v.). Ajaifarh has an area of 802 
square mile, and a population of 
81,454, chiefh Hindus. His Highness, 
who was crested a Knight Commander 
of the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empie on January 1, 1897, is 
entitled to a salute of 11 guns, and 
maintains a mlitary force of 97 cavalry, 
544 infantry, aid 13 guns. The family 
motto is Radhir Ajai Wir (The 
Steadfast in Var is an Unconquered 
Hero). His Eghness has two sons — 
Raja Bahadur Bhopal Singh, aged 30 
years ; Diwan Senapati Jaipal Singh, 
aged 23 years Residence : Ajaigarh, 
Central India. 

A JIT SINGH (o Saliya), Rdjd. Suc- 
ceeded the late Raja Mahip Singh of 
Saliya in 1891. The title is hereditary, 
having been oiginally conferred by 
the Gond Rajalindi Shah of Garha- 
Mandla. Residace : Jabalpur, Central 
Provinces. 

AJRAUDA (Wesfern Malwa), Danlat 
Singh, Thdkur >/. A ruling chief. 
Thakur Daulat Sngh was born about 
the year 1835, nd succeeded to the 
title in 1859. le is a Rajput Chief 



(Hindu). Residence: Ajrauda, Central 
India. 

AJUDHYA, The Mahdrdjd of. See 
Partab. 

AKALGARH, Diiodn of. See Ram Chand. 

AKALKOT, SHAHAJI MALOJI, alias 
BABA SAHEB RAJE BHONSLE, Rdjd 
of. A ruling chief . Rao Saheb Mehrban 
Shahaji Maloji Raje Bhonsle, alias 
Baba Saheb, is the son of Maloji Raje; 
b. 1867. Is a descendant of the Bhonsle 
family . Educated at Rajaram College, 
Kolhapur. Married, 1881, Laxumibai 
Saheb, daughter of Dhaibar Killedar of 
Baroda, and grand-daughter of His 
Highness the late Maharaja Khanderao 
Bahadur Gaekwar of Baroda. Has 
two daughters, Guzra Raje and Pu- 
tala Raje, aged twelve and nine re- 
spectively. His accession took place 
in 1870 ; but being a minor the 
management of the State was in the 
hands of the British Government 
till 1891, when the administration 
of the State was made over to him. 
His step-grandmother is the Lady 
Kamaljabai Saheb, widow of Shahaji 
Raje II., alias Appa Saheb. The area 
of the State is about 498 square miles, 
and its population is about 58,040, 
chiefly Hindus, though there are nearly 
8000 Muhammadans. The chief main- 
tains a military force of 46 men and 7 
guns. Residence: Akalkot, Bombay. 

AKBAR All, Khan Saheb. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on March 
15, 1887. Residence: Satara, Bombay. 

AKBAR All, Mir, C.S.I. ,Khdn Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was originally 
conferred by His Highness the Nizam 
of the Deccan. The Khan Bahadur 
was created a Companion of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India, 
January 4, 1869. Residence : Hydera- 
bad, Deccan. 

AKBAR All, Shaikh, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 2, 1899. Residence : Ben- 
gal. 

AKBAR HUSAIN, Sayyid, Khdn Baha- 
dur. Received the title on May 21, 
1898. Is judge of S.C.C., Allahabad. 
Residence: Allahabad, North-Western 
Provinces. 

AKBAR KHAN, Muhammad. See Mu- 
hammad. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



AKHAI KUMAR SEN, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1897. Residence: Mulchar, Dacca, 
Bengal. 

AKHIL CHANDRA MUKHARJI, Rai 

Bahadur. Granted the title of Rai 
Bahadur, as a personal distinction, 
January 2, 1893. Residence: Calcutta. 

AKRAM HUSAIN, Muhammad Afsar- 
ul-Mulh Mirza Bahadur, Prince. The 
title is personal, being the courtesy- 
title of this nobleman as the twenty- 
second son of the late King of Oudh. 
Residence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

AKRAM KHAN, Sir Muhammad, 
K.C.S.I. (of Amb.), Nawdb Bahadur. 
See Muhammad. 

ALAM CHAND, Pandit, Rai Saheb. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. Residence: Bastar, Central Pro- 
vinces. 

ALAM KHAN, Khan Saheb. Received 
the title on May 21, 1898. Residence : 
Kotla Nihang, Ambala, Punjab. 

ALAM KHAN, Mir, Khan Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on September 5, 1883, for distinguished 
military service. The Khan Bahadur 
holds the high rank of Risaldar-Major 
in Her Majesty's Army. Residence: 
With 1st Punjab Cavalry. 

ALAM SHAH, Khan Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 1, 1894. Residence: 

ALAM SHAH, Sayyid, Khan Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on February 16, 1887, on the occasion 
of the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty. Residence: Lahore, 
Punjab. 

ALBEL SINGH (of Lidhran), Sardar; 
b. in 1824. The title is hereditary, 
and the Sardar is descended from 
Sardar Jai Singh, The family did 
good service during the Mutiny. 
Residence : Ludhiana, Punjab. 

ALBEL SINGH, Risaldar, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred as a personal 
distinction on January 8, 1875. Resi- 
dence : Ludhiana, Punjab. 

ALI AHMAD, Khan Bahadur. The 
Khan Bahadur, who is also styled 
Iktidar Jang Afsar-ud-daula, Rafat- 
ul-Mulk, derived his titles from the 
Carnatic Nawab ; and they were recog- 



nized by Government in December, 
1893. Residence: Madras. 

ALI AHMAD KHAN tvalad NASIR 
KHAN, Mir. The title is hereditary, 
and the Mir is descended from one of 
the Mirs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence : Shikarpur, 
Sind. 

ALI AHMAD KHAN, Maulavi Sayyid, 
Khan Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on May 26, 1894. Residence: 
Jabalpur, Central Provinces. 

ALI BAHADUR KHAN (of Saidpur), 

Raja. The Raja is a Chib Rajput of 
very ancient descent. Hi* ancestor, 
Chib Chand, and his descendants long 
ruled in the neighbourhood of Bhim- 
bar ; and one of the latter, Sadip 
Chand, adopted the Mahammadan 
faith in the Court of 1ne Emperor 
Babar, and was confirmed by that 
monarch in his possession, taking the 
name of Shadab Khan., The title is 
hereditary, and the Raja) son is named 
Ali Akbar Khan. Residence : Saidpur, 
Jhelum, Punjab. 

ALI BAKHSH KHAN *Ud AHMAD 
ALI KHAN, Mir. TH title is held 
for life, the Mir being ajdescendant of 
one of the Mirs of Sindat the time of 
the annexation. Residence : Shikarpur, 
Sind. 

ALI BAKHSH KHAN wdad FAZL MU- 
HAMMAD KHAN, Ml The title is 
held for life, the Mir beiig a descendant 
of one of the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at 
the time of the annexaion. Residence : 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

ALI BEG, Muhammal, Major. See 
Muhammad. 

ALI DOST SAHEB, Kkh Bahadur; b. 
1829. Was granted he personal title 
of Khan Bahadur onJanuary 1, 1878. 
Residence: Arcot, Moras. 

ALI DURKHANw«/a4 MAM BAKHSH 
KHAN, Mir. The title is held for 
life, the Mir being a descendant of 
one of the Mirs oj Chiefs of Sind 
at the time of thj annexation (see 
Khairpur). Residnce: Shikarpur, 
Sind. 

AH GAUHAR KHAI, Khan Bahadur. 
The title is persoal, and was con- 
ferred on June 9, 878. Is Khan of 
Agror. Residence JAgror, Punjab. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



All HASAN KHAN, Amir-ud-dauld 
Ihtisham-ul-Mulk, Bahadur, Shujdat 
Jang. The title is personal, and was 
originally conferred by the late Mu- 
hammad Ali Shah, formerly King of 
Oudh, in 1837. He is the grandson of 
the late Saadat Ali Khan, King of 
Oudh ; and his title was recognized 
December 4, 1877. Residence : Luck- 
now, Oudh. 

ALI HASAN KHAN walad IMAM 
BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. The title is 
held for life, as that of one of the 
descendants of the Mirs of Sind at the 
time of the annexation. Residence: 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

ALT HUSAIN KHAN, Shams-ud-dauld 
Mukhtar-ul-Mulk, Bahadur, Mustakim 
Jang. Is grandson of the late Saadat 
Ali Khan, Kiug of Oudh. His titles 
were originally conferred by the late 
Muhammad Ali Shah, King of Oudh ; 
and were recognized by Government, 
December 4, 1877. Residence: Luck- 
now, Oudh. 

ALI HUSAIN, Sardar Mirza Bahadur, 
Prince. The Prince is the fourteenth 
son of the late King of Oudh, and his 
title is a courtesy title, personal to 
himself. Residence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

ALI JAN, Khan Bahadur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on January 
1, 1890. Residence : Jaunpur, North- 
western Provinces. 

ALI KHAN, Mirza Muhammad, Khan 
Saheb. Received the title for services 
as Member of Council of the Tonk 
State, on May 21, 1898. Residence : 
Tonk, Rajputana. 

ALI KHAN, Sayyid, Nawdb. The title 
was conferred on February 16, 1887. 
The Nawdb had received the title of 
Khan Bahadur on January 1, 1877. 
Residence : Monghyr, Bengal. 

ALI MAD AD KHAN walad AHMAD 
KHAN, H. H. Mir, Mir; b. 1835. 
The first title is personal. The second 
title (Mir) is hereditary, as His High- 
ness is descended from the old Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind. Residence: Shikarpur, 
Sind. 

ALI MAZHAR SAHIB, Hafiz, Khdn 
Bahadur. Connected with the Carnatic 
family. "Was granted the personal title 
on June 1, 1888. Residence : Karur, 
Madras. 



All MUHAMMAD, Mirza. The title is 
hereditary. Is the son of Mirza Khusro 
Beg. Residence : Hyderabad, Sind. 

ALI MUHAMMAD SHAD, Sayyid, 
Khan Bahadur. Is a descendant of the 
same family as the Nawab Bahadur 
Vilayat Ali Khan, CLE. (q.v.) ; and 
was granted the title on January 1, 
1891, in consideration of his social 
position and learning. Residence: 
Patna, Bengal. 

ALI MURAD KHAN walad AHMAD 
KHAN, Mir; b. September 1, 1835. 
The title is hereditary, and the Mir is 
a son of the Mir Ahmad Khan of the 
Shahwani branch of the Talpur family, 
formerly Amirs of Sind. Residence : 
Hyderabad, Sind. 

ALI MURAD KHAN walad FATEH 
KHAN, Mir. The title is personal, 
and was continued for life in 1896. 
Residence : Hyderabad, Sind. 

ALI NAKI KHAN, Muhammad, Mirza 
Bahadur. See Muhammad. 

ALI NAWAB CHAUDHRI, Maulavi 
Muhammad, Khdn Bahadur. See 
Muhammad. 

ALI NAWAB CHAUDHRI, Maulavi 
Sayyid, Khdn Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on June 22, 1897. Residence : 
Tippera, Bengal. 

ALI NAWAZ KHAN walad GHULAM 
SHAH KHAN, Mir. The title is 
personal, the Mir being a descendant 
of one of the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at 
the time of the annexation. Residence : 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

ALI RAJA (of Cannanore), Rdjd. See 
Musa. 

ALIM KHAN, Jamadar, Khdn Saheb. 
The title was conferred on February 
16, 1887, for good military service. 
Residence : With 20th Bengal Infantry. 

ALIMUDDIN, Kazi, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1898. Is Tahsildar of Murwara. Re- 
sidence: Murwara, Jabalpur, Central 
Provinces. 

ALIPURA, Chhatarpati, C.S.I. , Rao Ba- 
hadur of. A ruling chief. The Rao 
of Alipura was born on August 29, 
1853, and succeeded to the Raj on 
November 3, 1871. He is a Rajput 
(Hindu) of the Parihar clan, and is 
descended from the Rao Mukund Singh, 



10 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



a Sarddr of Panna, whose grandson, 
Rao Pratap Singh, received a sanad 
from the British Government in 1808. 
The old title of the family was Sewai 
Rao ; but Rao only was used until the 
year 1877, when the additional title of 
Bahadur was granted as a personal dis- 
tinction at the Delhi Imperial Assem- 
blage, on the occasion of the Proclama- 
tion of Her Majesty as Empress of 
India. The area of the State is 69 
square miles; its population 14,891, 
chiefly Hindus. The Rao Bahadur was 
created a C.S.I, on February 15, 1887, 
on the occasion of the Jubilee of the 
reign of Her Most Gracious Majesty. 
He maintains a military force of 6 
cavalry, 277 infantry, and 3 guns. 
Residence : Alipura, Bundelkhand, 
Central India. 

ALIBAJPUR, Rana Partab Singh, Rdnd 
of. A ruling chief. He was born 
about the year 1881, and succeeded to 
the Raj on February 14, 1891. He is a 
Sisodiya Rajput, said to be descended 
from the family of His Highness the 
Mahdrdnd of Udaipur. The area of 
the State is 836 square miles; its 
population is 56,827, chiefly Hindus, 
but including nearly 19,000 Bhils. The 
Rana is entitled to a salute of 9 guns, 
and maintains a military force of 11 
cavalry, 169 infantry, and 7 guns. 
Residence : Alirdjpur, Bhopdwar, Cen- 
tral India. 

ALI-UD-DIN SAHEB, Maulavi Sayyid, 

Khan Saheb. Received the title on 
June 3, 1899. Residence: Bellary, 
Madras. 

ALLAH BAKHSH wafo^ALI BAKHSH, 

Mir ; b. October 1, 1865. The title is 
hereditary, the Mir being a son of Mir 
Ali Bakhsh of the Shahwani branch of 
the Talpur family, formerly Amirs of 
Sind. Residence: Hyderabad, Sind. 

ALLAH BAKHSH walad GHULAM 
HUSAIN KHAN, Mir. The title is 
hereditary, for the same reason as 
above. Residence : Shikdrpur, Sind. 

ALLAH BAKHSH, Munshi, Khan Baha- 
dur. Granted the title of Khan Baha- 
dur as a personal distinction, in promo- 
tion from that of Khan Saheb, January 
2, 1893. Residence : Rawalpindi, 
Punjab. 

ALLAH BAKHSH KHAN, Saddozai, 

Khan Saheb. The title was conferred 



on January 1, 1895. Residence: Dera 
Ghazi Khan, Punjab. 

ALLAH BAKHSH KHAN walad ALA- 
DITTA KHAN, Mir. The title has 
been continued for life. Residence: 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

ALLAH RAKHIO KHAN walad ALA- 
DITTA KHAN, Mir. The title has 
been continued for life. Residence: 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

ALLAH YAR KHAN, Karyal, Khdn 
Saheb. The title was conferred on May 
21, 1898. Residence : Shahpur, Punjab. 

ALLAHDAD KHAN, Nawdb. The title 
is hereditary, and the present Nawdb, 
in 1889, succeeded his father, Nawdb 
Sarfaraz Khan, C.S.I. Sarbuland 
Khan, the founder of the family, and 
the first Nawab of Mankerah, was an 
Afghan of the Saddozai, a ruling race 
of Kabul, and held the government 
of the Derajat under the Nawab of 
Multan. Subsequently he obtained, 
through the Kabul Government, pos- 
session of the Mankerah territory, 
and took up his residence at Bhakkar 
on the Indus. On his death in 1816 
he was succeeded by Hafiz Ahmad 
Khan, his daughter's son, who was 
the great-grandfather of the present 
Nawab. He was succeeded by his son, 
Shah Nawaz Khan, and in the latter's 
time, Ranjit Singh, after the conquest 
of Multan, besieged and took Manke- 
rah. A treaty was, however, sub- 
sequently concluded, by which the 
Nawdb was left in possession of a con- 
siderable territory. He was succeeded 
by his son, Nawdb Sarfardz Khan, and 
the latter by his son, the present 
Nawab. Residence: Dera Ismail Khdn, 
Punjab. 

ALLAHDAD KHAN walad AHMAD 
KHAN, Mir. The title is hereditary, 
the Mir being a Jdgirddr and a de- 
scendant of one of the Mirs or Chiefs 
of Sind at the time of the annexation. 
Residence : Hyderabad, Sind. 

ALLAHDAD KHAN, Raisani, Mir, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
February 16,1887. Residence: Khanak 
and Barkhan, Baluchistan. 

ALLAHYAR KHAN (Khan of Hangu), 

Khdn Bahadur. The title of Khdn 
Bahddur was conferred on January 1, 
1895. Residence: Kohdt, Punjab. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



11 



ALTAF HUSAIN, Miyan (of Muzaffar- 
nagar), Khan Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1891. Resi- 
dence: Peshawar, Punjab. 

ALUMAL TRIKAMDAS BHOJVANI, 

Rao Saheb, Rao Bahadur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on Febru- 
ary 1, 1889. Residence : Karachi, Sind. 

ALVA (REWA KANTHA), Thakur 
Rasul Khan, Thakur of. A ruling 
chief. Was born about the year 1875, 
and is a Muhammadan of Rajput 
descent. The area of the State is about 
3 square miles, and its population 
consists chiefly of aboriginal Bhils. 
Residence : Alva, Rewa Kantha, 
Bombay. 

ALWAR, His Highness the Maharaja 
Sawai of. His Highness the Maharaja 
is a minor, and only succeeded to 
the Raj in the year 1892, on the 
death of the late Maharaja, Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel His Highness the 
Maharaja Sawai Sir Mangal Singh 
Bahadur, G.C.S.I. He is a Rajput 
(Hindu) of the Naruka clan, and is 
descended from Pratap Singh, Rao of 
Macheri. The latter, on becoming 
Raja of Rajgarh, took the title of 
Rao Raja of Macheri ; and subse- 
quently, on bringing the whole of 
Alwar into subjection, he assumed the 
title of Maharao Raja, and proclaimed 
his independence in 1770 a.d. The 
family was an offshoot from the ruling 
family of Jaipur. The area of the State 
is 3024 square miles ; its population 
682,926, chiefly Hindus (but including 
more than 150,000 Muhammadans). 
His Highness is entitled to a salute of 
15 guns, and maintains a military 
force of 2189 cavalry, 3676 infantry, 
and 351 guns. The revenue of the 
State is Rs.2,658,972. Residence: 
Alwar, Rajputana. 

AMALA, Raja Ratan Singh, Raja of. 
A ruling chief. The Raja was born 
about the year 1841, and is of Bhil 
descent. The State, which is one of 
the Dang States, in Khandesh, is about 
119 square miles in area ; and its 
population, which consists chiefly of 
Bhils, Konknas, and other aboriginal 
tribes, is about 5300. Residence: 
Amala, Khandesh, Bombay. 

AMAN SINGH, Rao; b. August 14, 
1876. < The title is hereditary, and the 
traditional account of its origin is, that 



Raja Chhatarsal gave the village of 
Salaiyah in Pargana Panwari in dowry 
to Sabha Singh, Panwar Thakur, to 
whom the Raja's daughter was married, 
together with the title of Rao, which 
the family have ever since enjoyed. 
Rao Aman Singh's grandfather was 
Rao Nawal Singh. Residence : Ha- 
mirpur, North-Western Provinces. 

AMANAT FATIMA (of Basitnagar), 

Bey am. See Basitnagar. 

AMAR NATH, Babu, Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1896. 
Residence : Kashmir. 

AMAR NATH, Babu, Rai Saheb ; b. 
1849. Title conferred for good service 
on January 1, 1896. Residence: Nur 
Mahl, Jalandhar, Punjab. 

AMAR NATH, Diwan, Rai Saheb. Is 
Governor of Jammu. Received the 
title on May 21, 1898. Residence: 
Jammu, Punjab. 

AMAR SINGH, Rdjd Sir, K.C.S.I. Is 
Vice-President of the Jammu and 
Kashmir State Council. Was created 
a Knight Commander of the most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India on 
November 11, 1891. Residence : Srina- 
gar, Kashmir. 

AMAR SINGH, Rai. The title was con- 
ferred on August 30, 1859. Residence : 
Muzaffarnagar, North- Western Pro- 
vinces. 

AMAR SINGH (of Ramgarh), Mian. 
The title is hereditary. The family is 
of Rajput origin, and claims descent 
from Singar Chand Raja of Bilaspur 
(Kahlur). A descendant of Raja 
Singar Chand, named Khushal Singh, 
conquered Ramgarh and the adjoining 
territories, and built a fort at Ramgarh. 
Residence: Ramgarh, Ambala, Punjab. 

AMAR SINGH, Sarddr ; b. 1858. The 
title is hereditary. The family is 
of Jat origin, and is descended from 
Sardar Sujan Singh, who took posses- 
sion of Shahkot and ten neighbouring 
villages in 1759 on the decline of the 
Mughal Empire. His successors were 
reduced to submission by Sardar Fateh 
Singh Ahluwalia, and subsequently by 
the Maharaja Ran jit Singh of La- 
hore. Residence: Shahkot, Jalandhar, 
Punjab. 

AMAR SINGH (of Balloki), Sarddr. The 
title is hereditary. Residence : Jalan- 
dhar, Punjab. 



12 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



AMAR SINGH (of Naugaza), Sarddr. 

The title is hereditary. Residence : 

Jalandhar, Punjab. 
AMAKAVATI SHESHAYA SHASTRI, 

C.S.I. See Seshaya. 
AMB, Nawdb of. See Muhammad Akram 

Khan, Sir. 
AMB, Rdjd of. See Eaghunath Singh. 

AMBADAS SANTIR, Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on May 25, 1895. 
Residence: Wun, Berar. 

AMBAR SINGH, Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on September 28, 1894, 
for meritorious service as Subadar- 
Major in the 5th Bombay Infantry. 
Residence: Amritsar, Punjab. 

AMBIKA CHARAN RAI, Rai Bahadur; 
b. 1827, at Behala, near Calcutta; son 
of the late Babu Durga Prasad Bai. 
Is twelfth in descent from Raja Gajen- 
dranath Rai, who was a Minister in the 
Court of Delhi in the reign of the 
Emperor Jahangir. The family was 
settled at Anarpur near Dum-dum, 
but removed to Behala towards the 
close of the last century, on account of 
the Mahratta raids. The Rai Bahadur 
has taken an active and enlightened 
part in municipal affairs, especially in 
connection with the South Suburban 
Municipality, of which he has been the 
elected Chairman ever since the intro- 
duction of the elective system. He 
has four sons — Surendranath Rai,B.A., 
B.L., of the High Court, Calcutta; 
Satyendranath Rai ; Amarendranath 
Rai; Devendranath Rai. Residence: 
Behala, Bengal. 

AMETHI, Rdjd of. See Bhagwan Bakhsh 
Singh of Amethi. 

AMIN CHAND (of Bijwara), Sarddr 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1877. The Sardar Bahadur 
is of a Khatri family; his son is Ram 
Chand. Residence: Bijwara, Hoshiar- 
pur, Punjab. 

AMIN KHAN, Muhammad, Khan Khel, 

Khdn Bahadur. See Muhammad. 

AMIR AHMAD, Sayyid, Shams-ul- 
Vlama. The title was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, for eminent oriental 
scholarship. Residence: North-Western 
Provinces. 

AMIR ALI, The Hon. Sayyid, CLE. 
Is a Puisne Judge of the High Court 
of Calcutta. He was created a Com- 



panion of the Most Eminent Order of 
the Indian Empire, February 15, 1887, 
in recognition of his position as an 
eminent member of the Calcutta Bar. 
Belongs to a family that claims descent 
from the Prophet. Residence: Calcutta. 

AMIR All, Sayyid* Khdn Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1896. Residence: Ludhiana, Punjab. 

AMIR ALI KHAN walad FAZL MU- 
HAMMAD KHAN, Mir. The title 
has been continued for life, the Mir 
being a descendant of one of the Mirs 
or Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence : Shikarpur, 
Sind. 

AMIR BAKHSH, Khdn Bahadur. Re- 
ceived the title of Khan Saheb on 
January 1, 1894, and that of Khan 
Bahadur on January 1, 1896. Resi- 
dence: 

AMIR BAKHSH, Malik, Khdn Saheb. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence: Hazara, Punjab. 

AMIR HASAN KHAN, Sir Muhammad, 
of Mahmudabad , K. C I. E. , Rdjd, Khdn 
Bahadur. See Muhammad. 

AMIR HASAN, Sayyid, Khdn. The 
title is hereditary. Residence: Allaha- 
bad, North-Western Provinces. 

AMIR HUSAIN, Sayyid, CLE., Nawdb 
Bahadur. Was created a Companion 
of the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empire, January 1, 1888, and 
received the title of Nawab on January 
1, 1892, and that of Nawab Bahadur on 
May 21, 1898. Residence: Calcutta. 

AMIR KHAN, Khdn Saheb. Received 
the title on January 1, 1898. Resi- 
dence: Nagpur, Central Provinces. 

AMIR MUHAMMAD KHAN, Jamadar, 

Khdn Saheb. The title is personal, and 
was conferred February 16, 1887, on 
the occasion of the Jubilee of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty's reign, for 
military services. Residence: With 11th 
Bengal Lancers. 
AMIR SHAH, Khdn Bahddur. The 
Khan Bahadur received the title on 
May 25, 1892. Residence: Lahore, 
Punjab. 

AMJAD ALI, Maulavi Sayyid, Shams- 
ul-Ularna; b. 1853. The title was 
conferred, in recognition of high attain- 
ments in Arabic and Persian, on Janu- 
ary 1, 1897. Residence: Allahabad, 
North-Western Provinces. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



13 



AMJAD All, Sayyid, Sarddr Bahadur. 
Son of Sayyid Anwar Ali. The title 
was conferred for eminent services in 
the Mutiny. His son is Sayyid Kasim 
Ali, Honorary Magistrate of Delhi. 
Residence: Delhi, Punjab. 

AMLIYARA, Thakur Jalamsinghji 
Amarsinghji, Thakur of. A ruling 
chief. The Thakur, who is a Hindu 
of Koli (aboriginal) descent, was born 
about the year 1860, and succeeded to 
the gadi on April 23, 1876. The State 
(which is in Mahi Kantha, Bombay 
Presidency) contains an area of about 
157 square miles, and a population 
(chiefly Hindu) of 12,437. Residence: 
Amliyara, Mahi Kantha, Bombay. 

AMMEMBALA VENKATEAMANA 

POI, Rao Bahadur. Eeceived the title 
on June 3, 1899. Residence : Madras. 

AMODA, Rdwat of. See Jalam Singh. 

AMRIK SINGH, Chhachi, Sarddr; b. 
1836. The title is hereditary. Is son 
of Sardar Nehal Singh, who married 
the only daughter of Sardar Gurmukh 
Singh, and was allowed to take the 
name of Chhachi and to succeed to his 
father-in-law's jdgir. Sardar Nehal 
Singh did valuable service to Govern- 
ment in the rebellion of 1848 ; and for 
his loyalty in the time of the Mutiny 
received an additional jdgir. In 1857 
the present Sardar (then Amrik Singh, 
eldest son of Sardar Nehal Singh) 
raised a risala of mounted police and 
took them down to Oudh, where they 
did excellent service. Residence: 
Rawalpindi, Punjab. 

AMRIK SINGH, Hasanwalia, Sardar, 
Rai Bahadur. Granted the title of 
Rai Bahadur, as a personal distinction, 
January 2, 1893. Residence: Punjab. 

AMRITA LAL CHATTERJI, Rai Baha- 
dur. Received the title on May 21, 
1898. Was Subordinate Judge of Tir- 
hut. Residence: Tirhut, Bengal. 

AMRITA NATH MITTER, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on May 25, 
1895. Residence: Calcutta. 

AMTJLAK SHIVDAS, Rao Saheb. The 
title was conferred on February 16, 
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee of 
Her Majesty's reign. Residence : Ahma- 
dabad, Bombay. 

AN, Mating, Kyet thaye zanng Salwe 
yaMin.^ This Burmese title (See In- 
troduction, page xii) was conferred on 



January 1, 1898. Is Extra Assistant 
Commissioner of Bassein. Residence: 
Bassein, Burma. 

ANAND CHANDAR SEN, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on May 20, 1896. 
Residence: Bengal. 

ANAND RAO, Rao Saheb. Received the 
title on January 1, 1898. Residence: 
Umrer, Nagpur, Central Provinces. 

ANANDA CHARLU, Panappakkam, 
Vidia Vinodha Avargal, C.I.E., Rai 
Bahadur. The title was conferred as 
a personal distinction on February 16, 
1887. Created a CLE. on June 22, 
1897. Residence : Egmore, Madras. 

ANANDA GAJAPATI RAZ, Mahdrdja 
Sir P., G.G.I.E. See Vizianagram. 

ANAND AROYA MUDALIYAR, T., 

Janopacara Kirtha; b. 1884. Title 
conferred on his great-great-grand- 
father, T. Ramaswami Mudaliyar in 
1834, for having restored the ancient 
bridges at Sivasamudran. Residence: 
Mysore City. 

ANANDATONAI RAI, Rdjd Rai. This 
is one of the titles that appear not to 
have been formally recognized by 
Government. It was originally con- 
ferred for approved service by the 
Emperor of Delhi. The earliest Rajas 
were Raja Pratapaditya Rai and 
Raja Basanta Kumar Rai. Residence : 
Khulna, Bengal. 

ANANDI DD* , Rai Bahadur. The title 
is personal, and was conferred on May 
24, 1883. Residence: Indore, Central 
India. 

ANANDRAO RAMKRISHNA TAL- 
CHERKAR, Rao Bahadur. Received 
the title on May 21, 1898. Residence : 
Bombay. 

ANANTA CHARLU, P.O., Rao Bahadur. 
See Pananjeri. 

ANANTAMPLLLAI SINGARACHARI- 
YAR, Mandayam, Rao. The title was 
conferred on May 21, 1898. Residence : 
Madras. 

ANANTARAO PANTULU GARU, V., 

Biwdn Bahadur; b. 1854. Received 
the title on January 2, 1897. Resi- 
dence: Vizianagram, Madras. 

ANANTHA CHARULTJ, P., Rai Baha- 
dur. Granted the personal title on 
January 1, 1891. Residence: Madras. 



n 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



ANATH NATH MULLICK, Rai Baha- 
dur. Received the title on May 21, 
1898. Residence: Calcutta. 

ANAULA, Rdjd of. See Mahesh Partab 
Singh. 

ANKITAM ACHAYYAMMA, Rani Sri, 
Rani. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1896. Residence : Vizaga- 
patam, Madras. 

ANNAVARAPU PUNDARIKAKSHU- 
DU PANTULU, Rao Bahadur. See 
Pundarikakshudu. 

ANTAJI RAMCHANDRA JOGLIKAR, 

Rao Saheb. See Ramchandra. 

ANTONY, Maung Myook, Thuye gaung 
ngwe Da ya Min. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on January 
1, 1890. It means " Recipient of the 
Silver Sword for Bravery," and is in- 
dicated by the letters T.D.M. after the 
name. Residence: Legaing, Burma. 

ANWAR-UD-DIN, Muhammad, Khan 

Bahadur. See Muhammad. 

ANWAR-UL-HAK, Muhammad, Mau- 
lavi, Khan Bahadur. See Muhammad. 

APJI AMAR SINGH, Rao Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on February 
16, 1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee 
of Her Majesty's reign. Residence: 
Kotah, Rajputana. 

APPAJI GANESH DANDAKAR, Rao 

Saheb. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on May 30, 1891 . Residence : 
Thana, Bombay. 

APPAJI RAOJI, Rao Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
April 9, 1883. Residence: Sholapur, 
Bombay. 

APPU SASTRIYAR, S., Rao Bahadur; 
b. 1855. Was granted the personal 
title in 1889 for services to education. 
Residence : Kumbhakonam, Tanjore, 
Madras. 

ARBAB. A title. 

ARCOT, Prince of. See Muhammad 
Munawwar Ali, Khan Bahadur, Prince 
of Arcot. 

ARCOT, The Princess of, JVawdb. The 
title is a personal one, recognized in 
1886. Residence: Madras. 

ARCOT NARAYANSWAMI MUDA- 
LIYAR, Rai Bahadur. See Narayan 
Swami. 



ARCOT THOPPA TIRTJVENKATA- 
SWAMI MUDALIYAR, Rao Bahadur. 
See Thoppa. 

ARCOT WINTEL SRINIVASA RAO, 

Rao Saheb. See Wintel. 

ARDESAR DORABJI (of Ahmadabad), 

Khan Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on May 24, 1889. 
Residence: Ajmir. 

ARGAL, Raja of. See Sheoram Singh. 

ARJAN DAS, LALA, Rai Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on January 2, 1899. 
Residence: Punjab. 

ARJAN SINGH, Bhai, Sarddr Bahadur. 
The title was conferred as a personal 
distinction on January 1, 1898. Is an 
extra Assistant Commissioner. Resi- 
dence: Punjab. 

ARJUN SINGH (of Mukerian), Sarddr. 
The title is hereditary. The Sarddr 
succeeded the late Sardar Nidhan 
Singh in 1892. Residence : Hoshiarpur, 
Punjab. 

ARJUN SINGH (of Chahel), Sarddr 
Bahadur; b. 1845. Succeeded his 
father Sardar Joala Singh in 1852. 
The title of Sardar is hereditary ; that 
of Sarddr Bahadur was conferred as a 
personal distinction on January 1, 1894. 
The Sardar comes of a Chahel Jat 
family. Its founder, Katha Singh, was 
in the service of the Bhangi Sardars, 
who had taken possession of Lahore in 
1764 ; and his son Karm Singh, on 
the overthrow of the Bhangi chiefs, 
took service with the Maharaja Ranjit 
Singh, and ultimately became one of 
his most powerful Sardars. He was 
killed in the battle of Theri on the 
Yusufzai border; and his eldest son, 
Sarddr Gurmukh Singh, died of cholera 
at Kohat. Sarddr Jodla Singh, father 
of the present Sarddr, was at this time 
only four years old ; so the Mahdrdjd 
Ranjit Singh resumed many of the 
jdgirs of the family. Residence: 
Amritsar, Punjab. 

ARUR SINGH (of Naushahara Nangal), 
Sarddr. Of a Shergil Jat family. 
The title is hereditary; the founder 
of the family was Sarddr Mirza Singh, 
who joined the Kanahayya confede- 
racy. His son, Sasddr Kanh Singh, 
and his grandson, Sarddr Jassa Singh, 
were in the service of the Majithia 
Chief. Residence: Amritsar, Punjab. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



15 



ASAD KHAN, K.C.I.E., Sir, Sarddr. 
The title is hereditary, as the Sardar 
is the Chief of the Sarawan Brahuis. 
He was created a Companion of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire, on January 1, 1878, and a 
Knight Commander of the same Most 
Eminent Order, June 3, 1893. Resi- 
dence: Baluchistan. 

ASAD-ULLA KHAN, Nawdb. The title 
of Khan Bahadur was conferred on 
January 2, 1888, and that of Nawdb 
on January 1, 1895. Residence : Mee- 
rut, North- Western Provinces. 

ASDAR All KHAN, Khdn Bahadur. 
Is Assistant- Surgeon. Received the 
title on May 21, 1898. Residence: 
Bengal. 

ASGHAR ALI BEG, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. Residence: Survey Department, 
Calcutta. 

ASGHAR HUMAYUN JAH, Muham- 
mad, Mirza Bahadur, Prince. See 
Muhammad. 

ASGHAR REZA, Sayyid, Khdn Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on February 16, 1887, on the 
occasion of the celebration of the 
Jubilee of Her Majesty's reign. Is 
a prominent Zdmindar (landowner) of 
Krishnaganj in Purniah, Bengal. Resi- 
dence : Purniah, Bengal. 

ASHIK ALI KHAN, Muhammad, Khdn 
Bahadur. See Muhammad. 

ASHRAF ALI, Maulavi Mirza, Shams- 
ul-Ulama. See Mirza. 

ASHRAF-UD-DIN AHMAD, Sayyid, 

Khdn Bahadur. Mutawali of the 
Hughli Imambara. Created a Khan 
Bahadur, as a personal distinction, on 
January 2, 1893. Residence: Hughli, 
Bengal. 
ASHTI, Nawdb of. See Faujdar Khan. 

ASHUTOSH MITTRA, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 3, 
1893. Residence: Kashmir. 

ASHUTOSH NATH ROY (of Cossimba- 
zar), Raja. Received the title on May 
21, 1898. Residence: Cossimbazar, 
Murshidabad, Bengal. 

ASKOT, Rdjwdr of. See Pushkar Pal. 

ASLAM KHAN, Hon. Lieut-Col., CLE. 
See Muhammad Aslam Khan. 



ASMAN JAH BAHADUR, Mirza, 
Prince. The title is the courtesy 
title of the second son of the late King 
of Oudh. Residence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

ASOTHAR, Rdjd of. See Narpat Singh. 

ASSA NAND, Rai Saheb. Received the 
title on January 1, 1898. Residence: 
Military Works Department, Simla. 

ATA MUHAMMAD, Shaikh, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 24, 1889. Residence: Hodeida 
and Camaran. 

ATA MUHAMMAD KHAN, Subadar- 
Major, Khdn Bahadur. Received the 
title on May 21, 1898. Residence: 
Kurram, Punjab Frontier. 

ATA-ULLA KHAN, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Mirza, Sardar Bahadur, Rdjd. Re- 
ceived the title of Raja on September 
9, 1891. Was British Agent at Kabul. 
Residence : Wazirabad, Punjab. 

ATA-ULLA, Shaikh, Khdn Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence : Commissariat Department, 
Simla. 

ATA-UR-RAHMAN, Maulavi, Shams- 
ul-ulama. Received the title for 
eminent learning on June 3, 1898. 
Residence : Calcutta. 

ATHAR ALI, Munshi, Khdn Bahadur. 
Received the title on June 3, 1893. 
Residence: Lucknow, Oudh. 

ATHGARH, Raja Sri Karan Biswa- 
nath Biwarta Patnaik, Rdjd of. 
A ruling chief. The Raja, who is a 
Hindu of Kayasth descent, was born 
on August 12, 1851, and succeeded 
to the gadi on February 8, 1896. 
Descended from the Raja Niladri 
Deo Barman, who founded this 
State in very early times by con- 
quest; and twenty-eight generations 
have intervened between him and the 
present Raja. The State is one of 
the Orissa Tributary Mahals, Bengal ; 
its area is about 168 square miles, and 
its population (chiefly Hindus) is 
about 31,000. The Raja maintains a 
military force of 341 men. Residence : 
Athgarh, Orissa, Bengal. 

ATHMALIK, Maharaja Mahendra 
Deo Sawant, Mahdrdjd of. A ruling 
chief. The Maharaja, who is a Hindu 
of Kshatriya descent, was born about 
the year 1848, and succeeded to the 
gadi on February 4, 1877. This State 



16 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



is said to have been founded by one 
Pratap Deo, who, with seven other 
brothers of the Raja of Jaipur, came 
with their families on a pilgrimage to 
Puri. For some reason or other they 
had a quarrel with the Raja of Puri, 
by whom two of the brothers were put 
to death. The remaining five brothers 
fled for their lives to the hills, and 
settled at Bonai, of which they took 
possession, and of which one of the 
brothers was made Raja. The sister 
of this Raja of Bonai married Bal- 
bhadra Bhanj, a brother of the 
Keunjhar Raja, who, having plotted to 
dethrone his brother, was put to death 
by him. Balbhadra's wife fled to 
Bonai, and although the Raja of 
Keunjhar sent ambassadors there to 
bring her back, Pratap Deo refused to 
allow her to return, and went with her 
to Ramganj in Bod, where she gave 
birth to a son. At that time a 
Brahman named Gobardhan Deo was 
Raja of Bod, and as his only son was 
dead, he adopted Pratap Deo's nephew 
as his son and heir. At this time a 
Raja who was a Dom by caste was 
ruling on the north of the Mahanadi. 
Pratap Deo defeated him, and be- 
coming ruler of his dominions, founded 
a village and named it Pratap-pur 
after himself. The elevated plain 
across the Handpagarh is, to the 
present day, renowned as the garh of 
the Dom Raja; and a village called 
Pratap-pur still exists near it. Pratap 
Deo found a hand a (metal top) in a 
tank which he was excavating there, 
and gave the place and the State the 
name of Handpa. In course of time 
one of the chiefs who ruled after 
Pratap Deo divided the State into 
eight subdivisions, and placed a chief 
over each, with a view of bringing 
the aborigines into subjection. Hence 
the State changed its name from 
Handpa to Athmalik (" eight chiefs "). 
The State (which is one of the 
Orissa Tributary Mahals) has an area 
of 730 square miles. Its population, 
21,774, is chiefly Hindu ; ^ but there 
are more than 5000 aboriginal hill- 
men. The Maharaja has a military 
force of 360 men and one gun. Resi- 
dence : Athmalik, Orissa, Bengal. 

ATMA RAM, Rai Saheb. The title was 
conferred on June 22, 1897. Residence : 
Survey Department, Calcutta. 



ATMA SINGH (of Padhana), Sarddr. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on January 2, 1888. Residence : 
Lahore, Punjab. 

ATRA CHANDAPUR, Bdjd of. See 
Jagmohan Singh. 

ATRAULA, Rdjd of. See Mumtaz Ali 
Khan. 

ATTA-ULLAH, Shaikh, Khdn Saheb. 
See Ata-ulla. 

ATTAR SINGH (of Maloha), Sarddr. 
The title is hereditary, and the Sardar 
belongs to a Khatri family, descended 
from the Sardar Dyal Singh, whose 
sons were dispossessed of much of 
their territory by the Maharaja Ran jit 
Singh of Lahore. Residence : Maloha, 
Ambala, Punjab. 

AUKITHAM ACHAYAMMA GARU (of 
Vizagapatam), Rani. The title was 
conferred, as a personal distinction, on 
January 1, 1896. Residence : Vizaga- 
patam, Madras. 

AULAD HUSAIN, C.I.E., Khdn Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1877. Created a Com- 
panion of the Most Eminent Order of 
the Indian Empire, on January 1, 1882. 
Residence: Jabalpur, Central Pro- 
vinces. 

AUNDH, Shrinivas Parashuram, Pant 
Pratinidhi of. A ruling chief. The 
Pant Pratinidhi of Aundh, who is 
a Hindu Chief of Brahman descent, 
was born on November 27, 1833, and 
succeeded to the gadi on June 11, 1848. 
He was a Member of the Bombay 
Legislative Council from 1866 to 1868. 
He has four sons — Parashuram Rao, 
Gangadhar Rao, Bhawan Rao, and 
Bhagwant Rao. The State was for- 
merly a feudatory, of Satara; and 
this was indicated by the title Prati- 
nidhi, which meant "the likeness or 
representation of the Raja," and was 
conferred on the Pratinidhi Para- 
shuram Trimbak during the reign of 
Raja Rajaram Maharaj of Satara. 
The title of Pant was adopted by 
Parashuram Pratinidhi in 1846, on 
which occasion he paid a nazar of 
Rs.25,000 to the Raja of Satara. 
Residence : Aundh, Satara, Bombay. 

AUNG GYI, Maung, Kyet thaye zaung 
shwe Salwe ya Min. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on June 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



17 



1, 1888. It means " Recipient of the 
Gold Chain of Honour," and is indi- 
cated by the letters K.S.M. after the 
name. Residence : Ye-u, Burma. 

AUNG MIN, Mating, Thuye gaung ngwe 
Da ya Min. The title was conferred 
as a personal distinction on January 
1, 1894. Residence : Myotha, Burma. 

AUNG ZAN, Maung, Kyet thaye zaung 
shwe Salwe ya Min. The title {see 
above) was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence: Burma. 

AURANGZEB KHAN, Munshi, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 26, 1894. Residence: Jhelum, 
Punjab. 

AVCHAR, Naik Yeshwant Badal, Naik 
of. A ruling chief. The Naik, who 
is a Bhil (of aboriginal descent), 
was born about the year 1877. The 
area of the State (which is one of the 
Dang States in Khandesh, Bombay) 
is about 8 square miles, with a scanty 
population of about 500 Bhils. Resi- 
dence : Avchar, Khandesh, Bombay. 

AWA, Raj a of. See Balwant. 

AYIRANAZHE KOVDLAGAM PONNU 
UNNI, Raja. Is hereditary Raja of 
Walavanad, the title having been 
recognized on December 16, 1890. 
Succeeded the late Raja Rama Varma 
as head of this great Samarta family 
in 1892. Residence: Walavanad, Ma- 
dras. 

AYODHYANATH MISR SAMAVEDI, 
Pandit , Mahdmahopddhydya. The 
title is personal (entitling the holder 
to take rank in Darbar immediately 
after Rajas), and was conferred on 
January 1, 1890, for eminence in 
oriental scholarship. Residence: Mu- 
zaffarpur, Bengal. 

AYYASWAMI, PDLLAI, M., Rao Baha- 
dur. Received the title on June 1, 
1888. Residence: Cuddapah, Madras. 

AYYASWAMI SHASTRIYAR, B., Rai 

Bahadur. Received the title on Feb- 
ruary 16, 1887. Residence : Kumba- 
konam, Madras. 

AZAM. A prefix. 

AZAM SHAH, Raja. The title is heredi- 
tary. Residence: Nagpur, Central 
Provinces. 

AZHAR HUSAIN, Khan Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on May 25, 1895. 
Residence: Gauhatti, Assam. 



AZIM-UD-DIN SAYYID GHUIAM M0- 
HID-UD-DIN, Kazi Sayyid, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Residence: Poona. 

AZIM HUSAIN KHAN, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on July 30, 1886, for dis- 
tinguished military services. Resi- 
dence : With 5th Punjab Cavalry. 

AZIM KHAN, Kundi, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 20, 1890. Residence: Dera 
Ismail Khan, Punjab. 

AZIM KHAN, Muhammad, Arbab, Khdn 
Saheb. See Muhammad. 

AZIZ-UD-DIN, Khdn. The title was 
originally conferred by the Nawab of 
the Carnatic, and was recognized by 
Government on December 16, 1890. 
Residence: Madras. 

AZIZ-ULLA, Akhund(of Matare), Khdn 
Bahadur. The title of Khan Bahadur 
is personal, and was conferred on 
January 25, 1865. Residence: Hyder- 
abad, Sind. 

AZIZ MUHAMMAD KHAN, Khdn Sa- 
heb. Received the title on June 3, 
1899. Residence: Medical Depart- 
ment, India. 

AZMAT ALI KHAN, Muhammad (of 
Karnal), JVaicdb Bahadur; b. 1833. 
Is of a Jat family, claiming descent 
from King Naushirwan, who are 
styled Mandul Naushirwani. Mu- 
hamdi Khan, great-grandfather of 
Nawab Azmat Ali Khan, and his two 
brothers, were in the service of the 
Mahrattas at the head of 200 horse- 
men, and were rewarded by a grant of 
extensive lands in Muzaffarnagar and 
elsewhere. During the Mahratta war 
Muhamdi Khan aided the British 
forces, and at its close exchanged his 
lands in the Doab for the Pargana of 
Karnal, one-third of which descended 
to the ancestor of Nawab Azmat Ali 
Khdn. During the disturbances of 
1857, the Nawab Ahmad Ali Khan, 
father of the present Nawab, most 
loyally aided the Government with 
all his retainers, and his services were 
suitably recognized on the restoration 
of order. The present Nawab formally 
received that title in 1868, and the 
further addition of Bahadur on Janu- 
ary 1, 1891. Residences: Karnal, Pun- 
jab; and Jaroda, Muzaffarnagar, 
North-Western Provinces. 



18 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



BA, Mating, Myook, Ahmudan gaung 
Tazeik ya Min. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1895. It is indi- 
cated by the letters A. T. M. after the 
name. Residence : Minbu, Burma. 

BA BWA, Mating, Myook, Ahmudan 
gaung Tazeik ya Min. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1892. It is 
indicated by the letters A. T. M. after 
the name. Residence : Thongwa, 
Burma. 

BA TU, Maung, Kyet thaye zaung shwe 
Salwe ya Min. The title was conferred 
on February 16, 1887. It is indicated by 
the letters K. S. M. after the name. 
Residence : Henzada, Burma. 

BA U, Manng, Thuye gaung ngwe Da ya 
Min. The title was conferred on Feb- 
ruary 16, 1887. It is indicated by the 
letters T. D. M. after the name. Resi- 
dence : Salwin, Burma. 

BA WA, Manng, Kyet thaye zaung shwe 
Salwe ya Min. The title was conferred 
on May 29, 1886. It is indicated by the 
letters K. S. M. after the name. 
Residence : Rangoon, Burma. 

BABA. A prefix. 

BABA KHEM SINGH BEDI, Sir, 
K.C.I.E. Was created a Companion 
of the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empire, January 1, 1897, and 
a Knight Commander of the same on 
January 1, 1898. Residence: Kallar, 
Punjab. 

BABHNIPAIR, Rdjd of. See Lob Singh. 

B ABU. A prefix. 

BABU AMAR NATH, Rai Saheb. See 
Amar. 

BABURAO BHALCHANDRA ONKAR, 

Rao Bahadur. Received the title on 
May 21, 1898. Residence: Poona, 
Bombay. 

BACHITTAR SINGH (of Shahabad), 

Sarddr. The title is hereditary. Resi- 
dence : Ambala, Punjab. 

BABAN SINGH (of Malaudh), Sarddr. 
The title is hereditary, the Sardars of 
Malaudh (like those of Bhadaur) being 
descendants of Phul, and therefore of 
the same stock with the Phulkian 
Chiefs of Patiala, Jind, and Nabha. 
The family is Jat Sidhu, and conquered 
the district of Malaudh from the 
Afghans of Maler Kotla in 1 754. Sardar 



Badan Singh's father was Sardar Mit 
Singh, who, with his brother Fateh 
Singh, did good service during the war 
of 1845-46, supplying fifty horsemen, 
and himself fighting in person at the 
battles of Mudki and Firuzshahr. In 
1857 he showed conspicuous loyalty, 
being always ready with men and 
money to assist the Government; he 
received as a reward the remission of 
a year's commutation money, while 
one-sixteenth of the whole sum was 
excused in perpetuity. In 1872, when 
Malaudh was attacked by the Kukas, 
Sarddr Badan Singh was badly wounded 
by the rebels. Residence : Malaudh, 
Ludhiana, Punjab. 

BADI-UD-DIN, Khwaja, Khan Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on February 
24, 1882. Residence : Buldana, Barar. 

BADLAPUR, Rdjd of. See Shankar Dat 
Dube. 

BADR-UD-DIN HAIDAR, Manlavi, 

Khan Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on May 20, 1896. Residence.- Calcutta. 

BADR-TJD-DIN, Muhammad, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on Janu- 
ary 1, 1894. Residence : Mysore. 

BADRI DAS, Mnkim, Rai Bahadur; 
b. 1833. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1877, on the occasion of the 
celebration of the Proclamation of Her 
Majesty as Empress of India. Resi- 
dence: Calcutta, Bengal. 

BADRI DAT JOSHI, Pandit, Rai Baha- 
dur; b. October 4, 1830. The title 
was conferred on February 16, 1887, 
on the occasion of the Jubilee of the 
reign of Her Most Gracious Majesty. 
The Rai Bahadur's ancestors held the 
office of Minister of Kumaon in the 
time of the Chand and Gurkha Raj. 
Residence : Almora, North- Western 
Provinces. 

BADRI PARSHAD, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence : Shahj ahanpur, North- West- 
ern Provinces. 

BADU RAMASWAMI NAYUDU, Rao 

Bahadur. See Ramaswami. 

BAGHAL, Raja Dhyan Singh, Rdjd of. 
A ruling chief ; b. about 1841. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi July 26, 1878. 
Belongs to a Puar Rajput (Hindu) 
family, descended from Ujjab De, who 
came from Ujjain, and conquered 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



19 



Baghal at an unknown date. The State 
was overrun by the Gurkhas from 
Nepal between 1803 and 1815, but 
after their expulsion in the latter year, 
the Puar chief (about twenty-fifth in 
descent from Uj jab De) was recognized 
by Government. Kishan Singh, who 
had been raised to the rank of Raja 
in 1875, died on July 23, 1877, and was 
succeeded by his infant son, Raja Moti 
Singh ; but the latter also died on 
October 12, 1877, when the present 
Kaja, a collateral descendant of Ujjab 
De, succeeded. The area of the State 
(which is one of the Simla Hill States) 
is about 124 square miles ; its popula- 
tion 20,633, chiefly Hindus. The Raja 
maintains a military force of 150 
infantry and 1 gun. Residence: Baghal, 
Punjab. 

BAGHAL SINGH, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on May 24, 1883. 
Residence : Sialkot, Punjab. 

BAGHAT, Rana Dalip Singh, CLE., 
Rand of A ruling chief ; b. 1860. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi on January 31, 1862. 
Belongs to a Rajput family, the an- 
cestor of whom came fromDorar Nagri 
in the Deccan, arid acquired possession 
of the State by conquest. During the 
Gurkha wars (1803-15) the conduct of 
the then chief, Rana Mohindar Singh, 
had been unfriendly ; so on the expul- 
sion of the Gurkhas, three-fourths of 
the Baghat State was sold to Patiala 
for Rs.130,000 and the remaining 
fourth was granted to Rand Mohindar 
Singh and his heirs. He died without 
issue on July 11, 1839, and the State 
was at first treated as lapsed ; but in 
1842 Lord Ellenborough restored it to 
Rana Bije Singh, brother of Mohindar 
Singh. He died in January 1849, leav- 
ing no direct heir, and the State was 
at first again treated as lapsed ; but in 

1861 Lord Canning restored it, for good 
and loyal conduct, to Umaid Singh, a 
cousin of the late Rana. But before 
the sanad conferring the grant could 
be prepared, Umaid Singh died, and 
his last request was that his son Dalip 
Singh might succeed him. In January 

1862 a sanad was granted to Rana Dalip 
Singh. The area of the State (which 
is one of the Simla Hill States) is about 
60 square miles ; its population 8339, 
chiefly Hindus. The Rana was created 
a Companion of the Most Eminent 
Orderof the Indian Empire on January 



1, 1896. He maintains a military force 
of 25 soldiers. Residence: Baghat, 
Punjab. 

BAGLI, Thakur Raghunath Singh, 
Thdkurof. A ruling chief ; b. 1860, and 
succeeded to the gadi in January 1869. 
The Thakur is descended from a Rahtor 
Rajput family (Hindu). The State is 
enclosed within that of Gwalior, so 
that its exact area is not known. Its 
population is 14,645, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence: Bagli, Indore, Central 
India. 

BAGNI, Ajahat Sir JDeshmvkh. See 
Ramchandra Narayan Mantri. 

BAHA-UD-DIN, Malik, Khan Saheb. 
Received the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence : Nao Hissar, Quetta, Balu- 
chistan. 

BAHA-UD-DIN, Shekh, Nawdb-i-Amb, 
CLE. The Shekh is Vazir of His 
Highness the Nawab of Junagarh; 
and was created a Companion of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire on June 3, 1893. Residence : 
Junagarh, Kathiawar, Bombay. 

BAHADUR ALI KHAN, Nawdb Baha- 
dur. The Nawab Bahadur is the son 
of the Nawdb Amir Ali Khan, who was 
thegrandsonof His late Majesty Shujd- 
ud-daula, King of Oudh. Residence: 
Lucknow, Oudh. 

BAHADUR KHAN, Khan Saheb. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1892. 
Residence : Thang, Punjab. 

B AH ADURNAGAR, Raja of. See Sarf araz 
Begam. 

BAHADUR SINGH, Thakur, Rao Saheb, 
CLE. See Masuda, Thakur of. 

BAHADUR SINGH (of Sarekha), Thd- 
kur. See Sarekha, Thakur of. 

BAHAR MAL, Rao. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India. Residence: Merwara. 

BAHAWALPUR, His Highness Rukn- 
ud-Daula Nasrat Jang Hafiz-ul-Mulk 
Mukhlis-ud-Daula Nawab Sir Sadik 
Muhammad Khan Bahadur, G.CS.L, 
Nawdb of. A ruling chief ; b. in 
1862. Succeeded to the gadi in 1866. 
Belongs to a Daudputra (Muhammadan) 
family, whose ancestor came from Sind 
about the middle of the eighteenth 



20 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



century. Muhammad Sadik Khan was 
Governor of Bahawalpur under the 
Sikh Government; and the chiefs of 
his clan retained virtual independence 
till his second son, the Nawab Bahawal 
Khan I., reduced the whole tribe, 
and consolidated his power. By the 
treaties of Lahore between the British 
Government and the Maharaja Kanjit 
Singh, the latter was confined to the 
right bank of the Satlej ; and thereby 
Bahawalpur was protected from the 
Sikhs. The Nawab rendered faithful 
assistance to the Government in the 
first Afghan war ; and during the siege 
of Multan the troops of Bahawal Khan 
III. co-operated with Sir Herbert 
Edwardes. Bahawal Khan III. was 
succeeded by his younger son, Saadat 
Yar Khan ; but the latter was subse- 
quently deposed by his elder brother, 
Haji Khan, who after his victory as- 
sumed the name of Fateh Muhammad 
Khan. He died in 1858, and was suc- 
ceeded by his son, who assumed the 
name of Bahawal Khan IV. He had 
tof ace some serious rebellions, and died 
suddenly in 1866, leaving his son, the 
present Nawab, a boy of only four years 
old, in a difficult and dangerous position. 
It was resolved, however, by the Para- 
mount Power, that the young Nawab 
should be supported ; and during his 
minority the administration was placed 
in British hands, native officers being 
appointed, so that there might be no 
break in continuity of system on the 
Nawab's coming of age. Since then 
vast improvements have been made in 
the irrigation system of the country, 
which depends upon inundation canals 
for the greater part of its cultivation. 
Existing works have been entirely re- 
modelled, and new canals constructed 
in several parts of the territory, the 
result of which is that the revenues 
have nearly doubled . Courts of Justice 
have been established, under the general 
control of a Chief Court, presided over 
by three native gentlemen, and are 
highly popular. A system of Public 
Instruction, comprising primary, 
middle, and superior education, has 
been set on foot ; a central jail has 
been built, and the prison system 
greatly improved. Three new towns 
have been founded. A stud farm for 
improving the breed of horses has been 
placed under the scientific supervision 
of a trained Forest Conservator. The 



area of the State is 17,285 square 
miles; its population is 573,494, chiefly 
Muhammadans, with 91,272 Hindus. 
His Highness the Nawab Bahadur 
maintains a military force of 443 cavalry, 
1352 infantry, and 11 guns, and is en- 
titled to a salute of 17 guns. He was 
created a Knight Grand Commander 
of the Most Exalted Order of the Star 
of India, November 16, 1880. Resi- 
dences : The Palace, Bahawalpur, Pun- 
jab ; Bahawalpur House, Lahore. 

BAHRAM SHAH, Muhammad (of 

Rassapagla), Shdhzdda. See Muham- 
mad Bahram Sbah. 

BAI (INDORE), Thakur Manrup Singh, 
Thdkurof. A ruling chief. The Thakur 
is descended from a Rajput (Hindu) 
family, and succeeded to the gadi in 
1880. Residence: Bai, Indore, Central 
India. 

BAIDYA. See also Boydo. 

BAIDYANATH PANDIT, Raja Bahadur. 
The title of Rai Bahadur was conferred 
on January 1, 1877, that of Raja on 
January 1, 1889, and that of Raja 
Bahadur on January 1, 1898. Resi- 
dence : Cuttack, Bengal. 

BAIJNATH SINGH, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1892. 
Residence : Gaya, Bengal. 

BAIJ NATH SAHAY, Rai Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Mirzapur, North- Western 
Provinces. 

BAIJ NATH, Lala, Rai Bahadur. Re- 
ceived the title for eminent services as 
a Sub- Judge, on May 21, 1898. Resi- 
dence : North-Western Provinces. 

BAIKANTHA NATH BASU, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on Janu- 
ary 1, 1894. Residence : Calcutta. 

BAIKANTHA NATH DE, Rdjd Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on Janu- 
ary 1, 1889. Residence: Balasor, 
Bengal. 

BAIKANTHPUR, Raikat Fanindra Deb, 

Raikat of. This is one of those custom- 
ary titles (of which there are many, 
especially in Bengal) which have never 
been officially recognized by Govern- 
ment, and which consequently must, 
for the present, be regarded as only 
courtesy titles. The family is said to 
be descended from a brother of the 
founder of the Kuch Behar Raj ; and 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



21 



the title "Kaikat," which is of high 
antiquity, has been held to indicate 
that the early Raikats of Baikanthpur 
were Prime Ministers and Com- 
manders-in-Chief of the Kamrup king- 
dom, of which Kuch Behar was an 
important part. The present Raikat 
is stated to be the twentieth in succes- 
sion who has inherited the title ; and 
during the last Bhutan war the family 
rendered good service to Government. 
Residence : Baikanthpur, Jalpaiguri, 
Bengal. 

BAIKUNTA NARAYAN SINGH, Rdjd. 
This is one of the titles that appear 
never to have been formally recognized 
by Government. The Raja is the 
Zaminddr of Tundi in Manbhum. The 
family claims to be of Surya Vansa 
Rajput descent, and to have come from 
Ajudhya. They have the following 
system of titles for the various members 
of the family of the Zaminddr or pro- 
prietor of the Rdj. For the head of 
the family, Rdjd ; for his wife, Rdni. 

1st son . . . Tikait. 

2nd son . . . Kumar. 

3rd son . . . Thakur. 

4th son . . . Nunu. 

5th and younger sons . Babu 

1st son's 1st son . . Thakur. 
„ „ 2nd son . . Kumar. 
„ „ 3rd son . . Nunu. 

For a similar system prevailing in the 
Nawagarh family, see under Banwari 
Lai Singh, Raja. Residence: Tundi, 
Manbhum, Bengal. 

BAISNI (of Khimsipur), Thakurain. 
The title of Rao is nereditary in this 
lady's family. Residence: Farrukha- 
bad, North-Western Provinces. 

BAJANA, Malek Nasib Khanji Dariya 
Khanji, Tdlukddr of. A ruling chief ; 
b. May 14, 1820. Succeeded to the 
gadi April 23, 1841. Descended from 
a family of Jat Musalmans ; is usually 
styled " Malek Shri . " His son is named 
Jiwan Khan. The area of the State 
is 183 square miles ; its population 
15,877, partly Hindu, partly Muham- 
madan. The Malek Shri maintains a 
military force of 60 cavalry and 230 
infantry. Residence : Bajana, Kathia- 
war, Bombay. 



BAKAR All, Muhammad, Mir. 
Muhammad. 



See 



BAKAR ALI KHAN, Muhammad (of 
Kunwa Khera), Nawdb. See Muham- 
mad. 

BAKAR ALI KHAN, Sayyid, CLE. 
Was created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
January 1, 1883. Residence : 

BAKAR MIRZA, Mirza Bahadur. The 
Mirza Bahadur is a son of the Nawab 
Mumtaz-ud-daula, who was a grandson 
of His late Majesty Muhammad Ali 
Shah, King of Oudh. Residence: 
Oudh. 

BAKHSHI KHOMAN SINGH (of In- 
dore), C.S.I. Was created a Com- 
panion of the Most Exalted Order of 
the Star of India, January 1, 1877, on 
the occasion of the Proclamation of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty as Empress 
of India. Residence : Indore, Central 
India. 

BAKHSHI PARAMANAND, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on Janu- 
ary 1, 1895, for services rendered to 
the Kashmir State. Residence : Ra- 
walpindi, Punjab. 

BAKHSHISH SINGH, Sindhanwalia, 
Sarddr. The Sardar succeeded Sar- 
dar Shamsher Singh (who had 
adopted him as a scion of the same 
family, with the consent of Govern- 
ment) on the death of the latter 
in 1873. The Sindhanwalia family, 
Jats of the Sansi tribe, is the acknow- 
ledged head of all Sikh families between 
the Bias and the Indus; and is de- 
scended from the same stock as the 
late Maharaja Ranjit Singh of Lahore. 
The common ancestor, Budh Singh, 
had two sons, Chanda Singh and Jodh 
Singh; the latter was the forefather 
of the late Royal family of Lahore, 
while from the former descended Sarddr 
Shamsher Singh and the Sindhanwalia 
family . On the occasion of the rebellion 
of Diwan Mul Raj, Sardar Shamsher 
Singh remained faithful to the British 
Government, and in December 1846 he 
was appointed a member of the Council 
of Regency. On the final annexation 
of the Punjab his jdgirs were continued 
to him for life, and in 1862 he was 
appointed an Honorary Magistrate, 
and was permitted to adopt the present 
Sardar, a large portion of his jdgirs to 
descend in perpetuity, and the title to 
be hereditary. Residence : Raja Sansi, 
Amritsar, Punjab. 



22 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



BAKHSHISH SINGH, Kunwdr. The 

title is personal. Residence.: Lahore, 
Punjab. 

BAKHTAWAR SINGH (of Kathgarh), 

Sarcldr. The title of Sardar is heredi- 
tary in the Kathgarh family. Residence: 
Hoshiarpur, Punjab. 

BAKHTAWAR SINGH, Pancholi, Rai 
Bahadur. Is a Court Official of the 
Mewjir State (Udaipur), Rajputana. 
Received the title as a personal dis- 
tinction on May 25, 1892. Residence : 
Udaipur, Rajputana. 

BAKHTGARH (Bhopawar), Thakur 
Partab Singh, Thakur of. A ruling 
chief. The Thakur was born in 1863, 
and succeeded to the gadi in 1869. He 
is descended from a Rajput (Hindu) 
family. The population of the State 
is 8258, chiefly Hindus. Residence : 
Bakhtgarh, Bhopawar, Central India. 

BAKHTIYAR SHAH, Muhammad, 
Sahebzada, CLE., Prince. The title 
is a courtesy one. His father, Prince 
Anwar Shah, was a member of the 
Tippu family of Mysore, and grandson 
of Tippu Sultan. Created a CLE. on 
January 1, 1898. Residence : Calcutta. 

BAL GANGADHAR SATHE, Rao Baha- 
dur. Received the title on May 21, 
1898. Residence: Poona, Bombay. 

BAL MUKAND, Rai, Rai Bahadur; b. 
November 5, 1834. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on February 
16, 1887, the Rai Bahadur having 
received a Certificate of Honour at the 
Imperial Assemblage at Delhi in 1877. 
His ancestors (who were Khattris) 
came from the Punjab about 300 years 
ago, and became merchants at Agra. 
He did good service in the Mutiny of 
1857, by saving some of the records of 
the Agra Board of Revenue ; and in 
1866 was appointed a permanent 
Deputy Collector. Residence: Agra, 
North-Western Provinces. 

BALA KHAN alias DARA SHIKOH, 

Khan Bahadur. See Dara Shikoh. 

BALA PARSHAD, Pandit, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on February 
16, 1887. The Rai Bahadur's brothers 
are Pandit Manik Parshad of Indore, 
b. 1851, and Pandit Kalika Parshad, 
b. 1857. Residence: Jabalpur, Central 
Provinces. 



BALA PERSHAD, Lala, Rao Saheb. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Is Kamdar of Jigni. Residence : Jigni, 
Central India. 

BALA SHASTRI AGASE, Mahdmahopd- 
dhydya. The title was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, in recognition of 
eminence in oriental scholarship. 
Residence : Ratnagiri, Bombay. 

BALABHAI MANCHARAM, Rao Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on Janu- 
ary 4, 1896. Residence : Baroda. 

BALAJI KRISHNA BENDIGERI, Rao 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 29, 1886. Residence: Belgaum, 
Bombay. 

BALASINOR, Nawab Munawar Khanji, 
Babi of. A ruling chief; b. 1844. 
Succeeded his father, Nawab Jorawar 
Khanji Babi, in November 1882. This 
family is Pathan (Muhammadan), 
claiming descent from Sher Khanji 
Babi, son of Bahadur Khanji Babi, 
a distinguished officer in the imperial 
Service of Delhi. The area of the 
State is 189 square miles ; its popula- 
tion 46,328, chiefly Hindus. The Na- 
wab Babi maintains a military force 
of 60 cavalry, 177 infantry, and 5 guns, 
and is entitled to a salute of 9 guns. 
Residence: Balasinor, Rewa Kantha, 
Bombay. 

BALAVADRA PRASAD DAS, Rdjkumdr 
Bairiganjon Bhuyan Mahdpiatra. This 
is one of the titles that seem never to 
have been formally recognized by the 
Government. The family belongs to 
the Ganga Vansa, the ancient race 
of the Gajapati kings of Orissa, from 
whom the title was derived. The Raj- 
kumar has done good service by pro- 
viding elephants for Government in 
time of war. His eldest son, whose 
name is Umakanta Das Mahapatra, 
bears the title of Tikait Bdbu ; the 
younger sons — Bisambhar Das, Nityan- 
anda Das, Sachidananda Das, Achu- 
tananda Das — are all styled Bdbu. 
Residence : Balasor, Orissa. 

BALBAHADUR SINGH, Raja. The 
title is hereditary, and was conferred 
on January 1, 1886. Residence: 
Rajgarh, Central India. 

BALBIR SINGH (of Kattahr), Rdjd. 
The title is hereditary. Residence: 
Kangra, Punjab. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



BALDEO SINGH (of Raipur), Rao. The 
title is hereditary in the Raipur family. 
Residence : Ambala, Punjab. 

BALIKRAM, Rao Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on April 1, 1881. Resi- 
dence: Buldana, Berar. 

BALKISHAN. See Balkrishna. 

BALKRISHNA, Pandit, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence : Kangra, Punjab. 

BALKRISHNA BHIVAJI, Rao Saheb. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence: Bombay. 

BALKRISHNA KASHINATH JOSHI, 

Rao Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on January 1, 1896. Residence : Berar. 

BALKRISHNA RAMCHANDRA TIP- 

NIS, Rao Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on May 20, 1896. Residence: 
Bombay. 

BALKRISHNA SAYANNA, Rao Saheb. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1894. Residence: Poona. 

BALLABH DAS, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on February 3, 1883. 
Residence: Jabalpur, Central Pro- 
vinces. 

BALMTJKUND DAS, Munshi (of Agra), 
Bixcdn Bahadur. The title of Rao 
Bahadur was conferred on May 25, 
1895 ; and that of Diwan Bahadur on 
June 3, 1899. Residence: Alwar, 
Rajputana. 

BALMUKAND, Munshi, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Gwalior, Central India. 

BALRAMPUR, Rdjd of. See Bhagwati 
Prasad Singh. 

BALSAN, Rana Bir Singh, Rand of. A 
ruling chief ; b. 1860. Succeeded to 
the gadi November 17, 1884. Belongs to 
a Rajput (Hindu) family, his ancestor, 
Alak Singh, the founder of the family, 
having been a scion of the ruling House 
of Sirmur. The Chiefs of Balsan 
were feudatories of Sirmur till 1815, 
when a sanad was granted by the 
British Government. Bhup Singh, 
the grandfather and predecessor of the 
present Chief, did good service in the 
Mutiny of 1857, and was rewarded with 
the title of Rana. His son, the Kun- 
war Govardhan Singh, predeceased 
him; so he was succeeded by his 
grandson, the present Rana. The area 



of the State (which is one of the Simla 
Hill States) is 51 miles ; its population 
is 5190, chiefly Hindus. The Rana 
maintains a military force of 50 infan- 
try. Residence: Balsan, Punjab. 

BALTICH KHAN, Sarddr. The title is 
hereditary. Residence : Baluchistan. 

BALWANT RAO (of Karwi), Srimant 
Rao ; b. 1828. The title is hereditary. 
Is a Mahratta Brahman, the grandson 
by adoption of Venaik Rao, who was 
the son of Amrit Rao, brother of the 
last Peshwa, Baji Rao. His two uncles 
joined in the rebellion of 1857, and 
their estates were confiscated, and 
themselves deported. But Balwant 
Rao proved his loyalty, and is now the 
head of the family at Karwi. He has 
adopted a son, Moreshwar Rao, born 
August 17, 1872. Residence: Karwi, 
North Western-Provinces. 

BALWANT RAO BHUSKUTE, Rao Saheb. 
The title was conferred on May 20, 
1890. Residence : Burhanpur, Central 
Provinces. 

BALWANT RAO G0PAL JAVDEKAR, 

Rao Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on January 31, 1883. Residence: 
Indore. 

BALWANT SINGH (of Awa), CLE., 
Rdjd. The title of Raja has been 
hereditary in this family from ancient 
times, the tradition being that it was 
originally conferred by the Maharaja 
of Udaipur. The Rajas of Awa are 
Jadon Rajputs, and did good service 
to the British power in the Mahratta 
wars and in the time of the Mutiny. 
The Raja was created a CLE. on 
January 1, 1898. Residence: Awa, 
Etah, North- Western Provinces. 

BALWANT SINGH (of Bir Chima), Sar- 
ddr. The title is hereditary, the Sar- 
dar being the head of the younger 
branch of the Phulkian family of Ma- 
laudh (see Badan Singh, Sardar), 
descended from Phul, the common 
ancestor of the Houses of Patiala. 
Jind, Nabha, and Bhadaur. He is the 
son of the late Sardar Hakikat Singh 
of Bir. On the death of his brother, 
Ranjit Singh, he succeeded to the Bir 
estate, having before held that of 
Chima only. He is an Honorary 
Magistrate, and did excellent service in 
the troubled times of 1857 . Residence : 
Ludhiana, Punjab. 



21 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



BALWANT SINGH (of Botala), Sarddr. 
The title is hereditary, the Sarddr being 
a descendant of Dhanna Singh, who 
was an associate of Sarddr Jodh Singh, 
great-grandfather of Maharaja Ran- 
jit Singh. Residence: Gujranwala, 
Punjab. 

BALWANT SINGH (of Rangarh Nan- 
gal), Sarddr. The title is hereditary, 
the Sarddr being descended from a 
Rajput family whose ancestor came 
originally from Bikanir, and founded 
Rangarh Nangal in the Gurddspur 
district, Punjab. Sarddr Karam Singh 
was the head of the family in the time 
of the Mahdrdjd Ran jit Singh ; and 
when the latter seized Lahore and 
Amritsar, Karam Singh gave in his 
allegiance. His grandson, Sarddr 
Argan Singh, served in the battle of 
Sobraon. The late Rdjd of Nabha 
was a second cousin of Sarddr Balwant 
Singh, as Sarddr Argan Singh's sister 
married Rdjd Devindra Singh, Chief 
of Ndbha. Residence : Gurdaspur, 
Punjab. 

BALWANT SINGH (of Barehta), Thd- 
kur ; b. 1836. The title is hereditary, 
the ancestors of the Thakur having 
been in the Narsinghpur district from 
time immemorial, and long known 
for their loyalty; it was originally 
conferred by one of the ancient Gond 
Rdjds of Mandla. Belongs to a Raj 
Gond family ; his son is named Barilol 
Singh. Residence : Barehta, Narsingh- 
pur, Central Provinces. 

BALWANT SINGH (of Piprasar), Rdjd. 
The title is hereditary, the Rdjd being 
the son of the Rdjd Anrudh Singh, and 
descended from Debi Singh, Rdjd of 
Orchha. Residence : Sdgar, Central 
Provinces. 

BAMANBOR, The Grief of. A ruling 
chief. The area of the State is 12 
square miles, with a population of 987. 
Residence : Bamanbor, Kdthidwdr, 
Bombay. 

BAMANJI JAMASPJI DASTUR, CLE. 

Created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire on 
January 1, 1879. Residence : Poona, 
Bombay. 

BAMBO KHAN, Jam. See Bhambo 
Khdn, Jam. 

BAMRA, Raja Sir Sudhal Deo, K. C.I.E., 
Rdjd of. A ruling chief ; b. about 



1849. Succeeded to the gadi on May 
12, 1869. Is descended from a Ganga- 
bansi Rdjput family, from the same 
stock as that of the Gajpati Rdjds of 
Puri in Orissa, which acquired the 
Bamra territory by conquest in early 
times. He was created a Companion 
of the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empire, January 1, 1889 ; and 
a Knight Commander on January 1, 
1895. The Rdja's son, Sachidanand, 
bears the courtesy title of Tikait Babu. 
The area of the State is 1988 square 
miles; and its population is 81,286, 
many Hindus, but with over 50,000 
belonging to Abor (aboriginal) tribes. 
Residence : Bamra, Central Provinces. 

BAN BIHARI KAPUR, Lala, Rdjd. See 
Bun. 

BANAMALI CHAKRAVARTTI, Eai 
Saheb. See Bonomally. 

BANAMALI RAI, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on May 26, 1894. 
Residence : Pabna, Bengal. 

BANARJI, Abinas Chandra, Rai Baha- 
dur : b. 1846. Son of Babu Navin 
Chandra Banarji of Bali in Howrah, 
Bengal. Received the title onFebruary 
16, 1887. Is Chairman of Bali Munici- 
pality. Residence : Howrah, Bengal. 

BANDI, Rdjd of. See Padmanand Singh. 

BANDOJI JANARDHAN CHAUBAL, 

Rao Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on May 21, 1898. Residence : Berar. 

BANDYOPADHYAYA. See Banarji. 

BANERJI. See Banarji. 

BANGAL KHAN, Jogizai, Sarddr Baha- 
dur. Received the title on June 22, 
1897. Residence: Zhob, Baluchistan. 

BANGANAPALE, Nawab Sayyid Fath 
Ali Khan Bahadur, C.S.I., Nawdb of. 
A ruling chief; b. July 10, 1848. 
Succeeded to the gadi in 1868. Is a 
Shiah Muhammadan, and a Sayyid (or 
descendant of the Prophet). He was 
created a Companion of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India, 
January 1, 1877, on the occasion of 
the Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India. The 
family held an ancient title, Jdgirddr 
of Banganapale; the title of Nawdb 
was conferred in 1876. His son is 
named Sayyid Gulam Ali Khdn. The 
area of the State is 166 square miles ; 
its population 30,754, chiefly Hindus, 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



25 



the Muhammadans being 5952. The 
Chief has a salute of 6 guns. Resi- 
dence : Banganapale, Madras. 

BANIYAD HASAN, Mir (of Kadirpur), 
Khan Bahadur. See Mir. 

BANKIM CHANDRA MOZOOMDAR, 
RaiSaheb. The title was conferred on 
May 21, 1898. Residence: Angul, 



BANSDA, Maharawal Shri Pratapsin- 
ghji Gulabsinghji, Rdjd of. A ruling 
chief ; b. December 6, 1863 ; succeeded 
to the gadi on March 6, 1876. The 
family is Solanki Rdiput (Hindu), and 
is styled " Yansdia " ; it is descended 
from a chieftain of ancient times named 
Muldeoji. The area of the State is 215 
square miles ; its population is 34,908, 
chiefly Hindus. The Maharawal 
maintains a military force of 24 
cavalry, 111 infantry, and 1 gun, and 
is entitled to a salute of 9 guns. 
Residence: Bansda, Surat, Bombay. 

BANSI, Rdjd of. See Ram Singh. 

BANSI DHAR, Rai Bahadur. Received 
the title on January 1, 1898. Resi- 
dence : Alipura, Central India. 

BANSPAT SINGH (of Bara), Rdjd; b. 
1834. The title was conferred on 
November 30, 1858, for eminent 
services rendered during the Mutiny, 
the Raja having loyally supported the 
police, escorted the revenue-collections 
during the disturbances, and proceeded 
in December 1857 with 1000 followers 
to rid Pargana Khairagarh of a formid- 
able band of rebels who had gathered 
there. Is descended from the same 
ancestry as His Highness the Maha- 
raja of Rewah, and belongs to a Baghel 
Rajput family. Residence: Bara, 
Allahabad, North- Western Provinces. 

BANS WARA, His Highness Rai-i-rayan 
Maharawal Sri Lachman Singh Baha- 
dur, Maharawal of. A ruling chief; 
b. January 30, 1838. Succeeded to 
the gadi in 1842. Is a descendant 
(through the Maharawal Udai Singh 
of Dungarpur, q.v.) of the Maharanas 
of Udaipur ("Children of the Sun"), 
and consequently a Sisodiya Rajput. 
Udai Singh, Maharawal of Dungarpur, 
gave the territory of Banswara to his 
younger son Jagmal Singh, with the 
title of Maharawal. The area of the 
State (including that of its feudatory 
Kusalgarh) is about 1500 square 
miles; its population 175,145, chiefly 



Hindus, but with about 50,000 Bhils 
(aboriginal). The Maharawal main- 
tains a military force of 640 cavalry, 
783 infantry, and 14 guns. His High- 
ness is entitled to a salute of 15 guns. 
His son is the Maharaj-Kunwar 
Sambhu Singh Bahadur. Residence : 
Banswara, Rajputana. 

BANTWA (GIDAR), Samat Khan Babi, 
Khan of. A ruling chief; b. 1854. 
Descended from a Pathan (Muhamma- 
dan) family. Residence: Gidar, Ka- 
thiawar, Bombay. 

BANTWA (MANA WAD AR), Khan Shri 
Fatheh-ud-din Khanji, Khan of A 
ruling chief; b. 1835. Succeeded to 
the gadi on March 28, 1888. There are 
now four divisions of the Bantwa State ; 
the united area is 221 square miles, 
the united population 38,517, chiefly 
Hindus. The Chief of Bantwa has the 
title of Khan Shri ; his family name is 
Babi. Residence: Manawadar, Kathia- 
war, Bombay. 

BANWARI ANANDA DEB, Mahdrdj 
Kumar. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on the Mahdrdj Kumar as 
the adopted son of the late Mahdraj 
Jagatindra Banwdri Govinda Bahadur 
of Banwaribad, who rendered good 
service during the famine of 1866-67. 
The Maharajd Jagatindra's father, Ni- 
tyananda, received from the old Mu- 
ghal Government the title of " Azimat- 
ullah Amirul-Mulk Jagatindra Danish- 
nanda Sipahdar Jang Bahadur." Re- 
sidence : Murshidabad, Bengal. 

BANWARI LAL SINGH, Rdjd. This is 
one of the titles that appear never to 
have been formally recognized by 
Government. The family claims that 
its ancestor came from Baghelkhand, 

. and set up the Raj of Palganj in Haza- 
ribagh; and that a branch of this 
family obtained the Zaminddri of 
Nawagarh in Manbhum, part of which 
is held by the present Rdjd, part by 
Thdkur Giridhdri Singh, and part by 
the Thakurdni, widow of Thdkur Bhold 
Prasdd Singh. In Rdjd Banwdri Ldl 
Singh's branch of the family the 
following titles are held: — by the 
head, Rdjd ; by his wife, Rani ; by the 
eldest son, Tikait ; by the second son, 
Kumar; by the third son, Thdkur; 
by the fourth son, Nunu ; by the fifth 
and younger sons, Bdbu. Residence : 
Nawagarh, Mdnbhum, Bengal. 



26 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



BANYIN, Kun Saw, Myoza of. A ruling 
chief. The Myoza is one of the Shan 
Chiefs, and rules over a State of about 
230 square miles. Residence : Banyin, 
Shan States, Burma. 

BAONI, His Highness the Nawdb Ba- 
hadur of. A ruling chief; b. 1863. 
Succeeded to the gadi on October 5, 
1883. He is descended from a Pathan 
(Muhammadan) family of Bundelk- 
hand, and his full titles are — "His 
Highness Azam-ul-Umara, Fakhr-ud- 
daula, Main-ul-Mulk, Saheb-i-Jah, Mi- 
hin Sardar, Nawab Muhammad Hasan 
Khan Bahadur, Zafar Jang." His an- 
cestor, the Nawab Ghazi-ud-din Khan, 
at one time Minister at the Imperial 
Court of the Mughals, was grandson of 
Asaf Jah, Nizam of Hyderabad, and 
was also connected with the family of 
the Nawab Vazir of Oudh. He ob- 
tained a grant of fifty-two villages from 
the Peshwa in Bundelkhand. His son, 
the Nawab Vazir-ud-daula Khan, was 
recognized as Chief by the British 
Government. The grandson of the 
latter was the Nawab Muhammad 
Mehdi Hasan Khan, the father of the 
present Nawab. The family banner 
was displayed at the Imperial Assem- 
blage at Delhi in 1877, with the motto, 
"The authority is God's, and the 
country is God's." The area of the 
State is about 117 square miles; its 
population is 17,055, chiefly Hindus, 
but with 2342 Muhammadans. The 
Nawdb Bahadur maintains a military 
force of 9 cavalry, 185 infantry, and 
2 guns. He is entitled to a salute of 
11 guns. Residence : Baoni, Bundel- 
khand, Central India. 

BAPU DEVA SHASTRI, CLE., Mahd- 
mahopddhydya ; b. November 1,1821. 
The title was conferred on February 
16, 1887, in consideration of eminence 
as an oriental scholar. Is a Fellow 
of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 
of the Koyal Asiatic Society, and of 
the Calcutta and Allahabad Uni- 
versities. Is the author of many 
works on Sanskrit literature and 
mathematics ; and in 1878 was created 
a Companion of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire. Resi- 
dence : Benares, North- Western Pro- 
vinces. 

BAPU MIYAN SHER MIYAN, Khan 
Saheb. The title was conferred on 



January 1,1896. Residence: Dholka, 
Bombay. 

BAPU RAO DADA, Rao Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Nagpur, Central Provinces. 

BAPU RAO PATWARDHAN, Pandit, 

Rao Bahadur. The title of Rao Saheb 
was conferred on June 1, 1888 ; and 
that of Rao Bahadur on January 1, 
1895. Residence: Nagpur, Central 
Provinces. 

BAPUMIA SHERMIA, Khan Saheb. 
See Bapu. 

BARA, Raj a of. See Banspat Singh. 

BARAMBA, Raja Bisambhar Birbar 
Mangraj Mahapattar, Rdjd of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1880. Succeeded to 
the yadi on July 15, 1881. The 
Raja is descended from a Kshatriya 
(Hindu) family. The history of the 
Baramba State commences from the 
year 1305 A.D., with Hatakeshwar 
Raut. The area of the State (which 
is one of the Orissa Tributary Mahals) 
is about 134 square miles ; its popu- 
lation 29,772, chiefly Hindus, but with 
over 3000 belonging to aboriginal 
tribes. The Raja maintains a military 
force of 709 infantry and 3 guns. The 
family emblem is a leopard. Residence : 
Baramba, Orissa. 

BARAUNDHA, Raja Thaknr Prasad 
Singh, Rdjd Bahadur of. A ruling 
chief ; b. 1847. Succeeded to the gadi 
on August 18, 1886. Is a Raghubansi 
Rajput, descended from a family of 
the highest antiquity in Central India. 
Thirty-four generations are said to 
have ruled at Rusin in the Banda 
district ; then four more at Birgarh in 
the territory still belonging to the 
family ; four more at Murfa, partly in 
Banda and partly in this territory. 
Then the Raja Mohan Singh came to 
Baraundha, and ruled there, and ob- 
tained a sanad from the British Govern- 
ment in 1807. His son ruled at Pa- 
turkuchar, and two more generations. 
Then the Raja Ragbirdayal, father of 
the present Raja, ruled partly at 
Paturkuchar, partly at Baraundha, and 
received the additional title of " Baha- 
dur " on the occasion of the Imperial 
Assemblage at Delhi in 1877. The 
area of the State is 239 square miles ; 
its population is 17,283, chiefly Hindus. 
The Raja Bahadur maintains a military 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



27 



force of 15 cavalry, 75 infantry, and 6 
guns, and is entitled to a salute of 9 
guns. Residence : Baraundha, Bun- 
delkhand, Central India. 

B AUDI A, Rao of. See Barra. 

BAREH, See Bhareh. 

BARHA, Rdjd of. See Murdhan Sah. 

BARHARU, Kotwal of Bir, Rat Saheb. 
The Kotwal received the title of Rai 
Saheb on January 1, 1895. Residence : 
Kangra, Punjab. 

BARHPURA, Rao Bahadur of. See 
Himanchal Singh. 

BARIYA, Maharawal Shri Mansinghji, 
Rdjd of. A ruling chief ; b. October 4, 
1855. Succeeded to the gadi on March 
5, 1864. Descended (like the Chiefs of 
Chhota Udaipur) from a Chauhan 
Rajput (Hindu) family, sprung from 
Patai Rdwal, the last Chauhan Chief 
of Champanir. The area of the State 
is 873 square miles ; its population is 
66,822, chiefly Hindus. The Mahara- 
wal maintains a military force of 38 
cavalry, 250 infantry, and 3 guns, and 
entitled to a salute of 9 guns. Resi- 
dence: Bariya, Rewa Kantha, Bombay. 

BARJORJI DORABJI PATEL, Khan 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on May 24, 1889. Resi- 
dence : Quetta, Baluchistan. 

BARJORJI RTJSTAMJI, Mistry, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on May 20, 1890. Resi- 
dence : Bombay. 

BARKAT ALI KHAN, Muhammad, 

Khdn Bahadur. See Muhammad. 

BARODA, His Highness Maharaja 
Sayaji Rao III., G.C.S.I., Maharaja 
Gaekwdr of. A ruling chief, and one 
of the Premier Princes of the Empire ; 
b. March 17, 1863. Succeeded to the 
gadi on May 27, 1875. The Gaekwar's 
full titles are — His Highness Farzand- 
i-Khas-i-Daulat-i-Inglishia Maharaja 
Sayaji Rao Gaekwdr Sena Khas Khel 
Shamsher Bahadur, Knight Grand 
Commander of the Most Exalted 
Order of the Star of India. He is 
the descendant of the famous Mahratta 
leader, Damaji Gaekwar, who obtained 
from the Shahu Raja of Satara the 
title of Shamsher Bahadur for his 
bravery at the battle of Ballapur, 
fought against the Imperial forces of 
Delhi at the close of the 17th century. 



Damaji Gaekwar died in 1721, and 
was succeeded by his nephew and 
adopted son Pilaji Gaekwdr, who 
obtained from the Shahu Raja the 
additional title of Send Khas Khel (see 
Introduction, I 11) on the conclusion 
of the wars with the Peshwa. Pilaji 
was assassinated in 1731, and was 
succeeded by his son Damaji II., who, 
during a period of about forty years 
of almost incessant warfare, played 
a most prominent part in the history 
of India, and firmly established the 
Gaekwari power throughout Gujarat 
and the neighbouring districts of 
Western India. In 1732, the same 
year in which his father was murdered 
by a Mughal emissary, he reconquered 
the capital of Gujarat, Baroda, from 
the Mughal Viceroy; and that city 
has been the capital of the Gaekwars 
ever since. He commanded a division 
at the great and decisive battle of 
Panipat in 1761. He invaded Kathia- 
war, and forced many of its princes 
to pay him tribute ; he conquered the 
ancient city of Anhalwara Patan, and 
also Ahmadabad, the old capital of 
Gujarat. After his death, his two 
sons Govind Rao and Fatheh Singh 
became Gaekwars in succession; and 
the latter was succeeded by Ananda 
Rao, a son of Govind Rao Gaekwdr. 
In 1803 a treaty was concluded with 
the British Power, under which a 
British Resident was appointed to the 
Court of Baroda, and provision was 
made for the maintenance of a strong 
subsidiary force. Ananda Rao was 
succeeded by Sayaji Rao I., whose 
reign was long and on the whole 
prosperous; and he was followed by 
three of his sons in turn, Ganpat Rao 
Gaekwar, Khande Rao Gaekwar, and 
Mulhar Rao Gaekwdr. His Highness 
Khande Rao Gaekwdr rendered loyal 
service to the Government at the time 
of the Mutiny But the rule of his 
successor was disgraced by misgovern- 
ment; and it terminated in his de- 
position under painful circumstances. 

The reign of the Mahdrdjd Gaekwdr 
Sayaji III. has been one of progress 
and prosperity. For His Highness 
himself, it has not been without the 
deep shadows of domestic bereave- 
ment; for in April 1885 he lost his 
first wife, Her Highness the Mahdrdni 
Chimnabdi, niece of the Princess of 
Tanjore, whom he had married in 



28 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



1880, and who had borne him three 
children — two daughters, who had 
died during the lifetime of their 
mother, and a son and heir named 
Fatheh Singh Rao, who has happily 
survived. In December 1885 His 
Highness took as his second wife a 
Princess of the House of Dewas in 
Central India, Her Highness Chimna- 
bai, the present Maharani, who was 
invested by Her Most Gracious Majesty 
the Queen Empress with the insignia 
of the Imperial Order of the Crown 
of India in 1892. Of this marriage 
there has been issue two sons, named 
Jaisingh Rao and Sivaji Rao respec- 
tively, and a Princess named Indira 
Raja. 

In 1875 the Gaekwar, attended by 
Sir Madhava Rao and the chief officers 
of the State, went to Bombay to meet 
His Royal Highness the Prince of 
"Wales ; and shortly afterwards was 
honoured by a visit of His Royal 
Highness to the capital of Baroda, 
where the auspicious event was 
celebrated by the most magnificent 
hospitalities. On January 1, 1877, 
His Highness, on the invitation of 
H.E. the Viceroy, attended the Im- 
perial Assembly at Delhi to celebrate 
the Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty the Queen as Empress of 
India, and on that occasion was in- 
vested with the title of Farzand-i-Khds- 
i-Daulat-i-Inglishia by Lord Lytton 
as the representative of the Empress. 
On December 5, 1887, His Highness 
having previously received the honour 
of Knighthood, was personally invested 
by the Queen Empress with the in- 
signia of a Grand Commander of the 
Most Exalted Order of the Star of 
India. 

The State is one of the largest, 
richest, most populous, and most 
advanced in India. It contains an 
area of 8570 square miles. Its popula- 
tion is about 2,185,005, chiefly Hindus ; 
but there are 174,980 Muhammadans, 
46,718 Jains, and 8118 Parsis. The 
revenue of the State is about 
Rs. 15,300,000 per annum (at par 
£1,530,000). In area the State of 
Baroda is considerably larger than 
either Saxony or Wiirtemberg: its 
population is greater than that of 
Greece, and not much less than that 
of Switzerland. The Maharaja Gae- 
kwar maintains a military force of 



3562 cavalry and 4988 infantry, with 
38 guns. His Highness is entitled to 
a salute of 21 guns. The family 
colour is that red which is called 
Bhagwd, the colour of the red earth of 
the Mahabaleshwar hills. Residence: 
Baroda, Western India. 

BARODA or SHE0PUR (GWALI0R), 
Raja Bijai Singh, Rdjd of. A ruling 
chief; b. 1862. Succeeded to the gadi 
on September 27, 1865. Is a Kshatri 
Gaur (Hindu). The area of the State 
is 150 square miles; its population 
9000, chiefly Hindus. The Raja main- 
tains a military force of 50 cavalry, 
400 infantry, and 5 guns. Residence : 
Baroda, Gwalior, Central India. 

BARRA or BARDIA, Rao Daukal Singh, 
Rao of. A ruling chief; b. 1850. 
Succeeded to the gadi on August 25, 
1865. Is of a Rajput (Hindu) family. 
The population of the State is about 
650, chiefly Hindus. Residence: Barra, 
Western Malwa, Central India. 

BARU VENKATA RAMANARASU 
PANTULU, Rai Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1892. 
The Rai Bahadur is a Tahsildar of 
Vizagapatam. Residence: Vizagapa- 
tam, Madras. 

BARWANI (BH0PAWAR), Rana Ran- 
jit Singh, Rdnd of. A ruling chief; 
b. 1888. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor on December 14, 1894. Is a 
Sisodiya Rajput, akin to the ruling 
House of Udaipur. The area of the 
State is 1362 square miles ; its popula- 
tion 56,445, chiefly Hindus, with 8605 
belonging to aboriginal tribes. The 
Rana maintains a military force of 17 
cavalry, 225 infantry, and 9 guns. He 
is entitled to a salute of 9 guns. Re- 
sidence : Barwani, Central India. 

BARWARA, Thdkur of. See Hanuman 
Singh. 

BARWARI, Rdjd of See Surendra Na- 
rayan Singh. 

BASANT SINGH, Bhai, Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on May 25, 1895. 
Residence. Baluchistan. 

BASANTA SINGH, Chaudhri, Rai Ba- 
hadur. Granted the title, as a personal 
distinction, January 2, 1893. Is a land- 
holder in the Bijnor district, North- 
western Provinces. Residence: Bijnor, 
North- Western Provinces. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



29 



BASAWA SINGH (of Laroa), Sarddr. 
The title is hereditary. Residence: 
Jalandhar, Punjab. 

BASHAHR, Raja Shamsher, Singh, 
Rdjd of. A ruling chief; b. 1839. 
Succeeded to the gadi in 1849. Be- 
longs to a Rajput (Hindu) family 
claiming descent, through 120 gener- 
ations, from Sri Krishna. Between 
1803 and 1815 Bashahr was overrun 
by the Gurkhas; but on their expulsion 
in the latter year, the British Govern- 
ment granted, a sanad to the Raja, 
confirming him in the possession of 
all his territories, except Rawani, 
which was given to Keonthal. The 
area of the State (which is one of the 
Simla Hill States) is 3257 square 
miles ; its population is 64,345, chiefly 
Hindus. The Raja has a son named 
Tika Raghunath Singh. He maintains 
a military force of 100 infantry and 2 
guns. Residence : Bashahr, Punjab. 

BASHIR AHMAD, Khan Bahadur; b. 
1860. Is the son-in-law of His late 
Highness Prince Intizam-ul-Mulk, 
third Prince of Arcot. Granted the 
title as a personal distinction in 1887. 
Residence: Madras. 

BASHYAM AIYANGAR, Venbakam, 
C.I. E.,Diwdn Bahadur. The title of Rai 
Bahadur was conferred as a personal 
distinction on February 16, 1887, and 
that of Diwan Bahadur on May 25, 
1895. Created a CLE. on May 25, 
1895. Residence: Madras. 

BASITNAGAR, Amanat Fatima, Begum 
of; b. 1832. Is the widow of the 
Nawab Dost Ali Khan of Basitnagar, 
who was succeeded on his death in 
1864 by the Nawab Husain Ali Khan. 
On the death of the latter in 1871 the 
Begum succeeded to the title and 
estates. The family is of Pathan 
origin, and is descended from Kildar 
Khan, third son of the Nawab Diler 
Khan of Shahabad. The latter was 
a distinguished Afgh&n officer under 
the Emperor Aurangzeb, who sent him 
to Shahabad to punish the Pande 
Panwar Brahmans, who had plundered 
a convoy of Imperial treasure on its 
way from Khairabad to Delhi. He 
slew all the bandits, and was granted 
their extensive possessions in jdgir, 
with the titles of Nawab and Haft 



Hazdri, or commander of seven thou- 
sand. He founded the city of Shaha- 
bad, and built the great fort known 
as the Bari Deohri ; and his descend- 
ants held the grants rent free till 
Saadat Ali Khan resumed them. The 
title of Nawab was recognized by 
Government as hereditary in 1864. 
Residence : Shahabad, Hardoi, Oudh. 

BAS0DA (BH0PAL), Nawab Muham- 
mad Haidar Ali Khan, Nawdb of. A 
ruling chief ; b. 1856. Succeeded to 
the gadi in October 1897. The Nawab 
is a Pathan (Muhammadan) descended 
from the Nawab Dalel Kh&n, founder 
of the Kurwai State (q.v.). The area 
of the State is about 22 square miles ; 
its population 7772, chiefly Hindus, 
but with 1454 Muhammadans. Re- 
sidence: Basoda, Bhopal, Central 
India. 

BASTAR, Raja Bhairam Deo, Rdjd of. 
A ruling chief; b. May 21, 1839. 
Succeeded to the gadi August 27, 1853. 
Belongs to an ancient Rajput family 
of high caste, whose founder, Kakati 
Partabrudra, came from Warangal in 
the Deccan, and settled at Bastar 
about the beginning of the 14th 
century. The area of the State is 
13,062 square miles ; its population 
196,248, of whom over 36,000 belong 
to Gond, Bhil, and other aboriginal 
tribes, the rest being chiefly Hindus. 
Residence : Jagdalpur, Bastar, Central 
Provinces. 

BASTI, Raja Patesri Partab Narayan 
Singh, Rdjd of; b. August 8, 1870. 
Succeeded the late Raja Mahesh Sitla 
Bakhsh Singh on May 5, 1890. The 
title is hereditary, the Rajds of Basti 
belonging to a Kshattriya family claim- 
ing descent from a scion of the ancient 
Rajds of Kalhans. The founder of 
the latter family was Sej, who, with 
Tej his brother, in the 14th century, 
came to Oudh and conquered the 
territories of the Dom Rdjd of Gonda. 
Tenth in descent from Sej was Rajd 
Achal Singh, who granted Basti to his 
cousin, ancestor of the present Raja. 
Residence : Basti, North-Western Pro- 
vinces. 

BAW, Maung Hlaing, Ngwegunhmu of. 
A ruling chief. The Ngwegunhmu 
is one of the Shan Chiefs, and rules 
over a State of about 350 square miles. 
Residence : Baw, Shan States, Burma. 



30 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



BAWNIN, Saw Kin, Myoza of. A ruling 
chief. The Myoza is one of the Shan 
Chiefs, and rules over a State of 30 
square miles. Residence : Bawnin, 
Shan States, Burma. 

BAWZAING, Maung Kya Ywet, Ngwe- 
gunhmuof. A ruling chief . TheNgwe- 
gunhmu is one of the Shan Chiefs, and 
rules over a State of 20 square miles. 
Residence: Bawzaing, Shan States, 
Burma. 

BECHARDAS VEHARIDAS, Desai, 

Sarddr, Rao Bahadur ; b. February 26, 
1844. President of the Municipal 
Committee, Nadiad, from 1886 to 1889 ; 
received the title of " Rao Bahadur " 
from Government in 1887 ; elected a 
Member of the Legislative Council, 
Bomba, in 1888 ; and granted the title 
of " Sarddr " in the same year. Resi- 
dence : Kaira, Bombay. 

BED SARAN KUNWAR (of Agori 
Barhar), Rani; b. 1851. The title is 
hereditary, the Chandel Rajas of Ba- 
rhar being descended, it is said, from 
Pari Mai and Bari Mai of Mahoba in 
Bundelkhand, who some hundreds of 
years ago took service with Raja 
Madan of the Baland family of the 
Kharwdr tribe, and after killing him, 
divided his country and founded the 
three principalities of Barhar, Bijai- 
garh, and Bardi, in Rewah. The Raja 
Kesho Saran Sah, died without issue 
in 1871, leaving his widow, the present 
Rani, in possession of the estates for 
her life. Her heir is Babu Jagannath 
Prasad Singh of Jamgaon, and is about 
41 years of age. Residence: Rajpur, 
Mirzapur, North-Western Provinces. 

BEDLA, Rao of. See Karan Singh. 

BEHARI. See Bihari. 

BEHRAMJI DADABHAI, Khdn Ba- 
hadur; b. October 23, 1831. The 
Khan Bahadur's name is also some- 
times spelt Byramjee Dadabhoy. The 
title was conferred on April 3, 1880, 
as a personal distinction, in recognition 
of highly meritorious service in many 
important and responsible public offices. 
The Khdn Bahadur is the eldest son 
of the late Khan Saheb Ddddbhdi 
Shapurji, an eminent public servant, 
who had received a sherpao (or " Dress 
of Honour") from the Bombay Govern- 
ment in 1837, and the title of Khan 
Saheb in 1847. Educated at Thanna, 



and Surat, and Elphinstone College, 
Bombay. Entered the Government 
Service in 1853, and having dis- 
tinguished himself in various civil 
capacities, was specially selected in 
1865 to succeed Colonel Dunsterville 
as Deputy Registrar-General and Re- 
gistrar of Bombay — being the first 
gentleman of Indian birth ever ap- 
pointed to fill that high office. Ap- 
pointed J. P. in 1869 ; in 1872 a Dele- 
gate of the Parsi Chief Matrimonial 
Court in Bombay; in 1879 acted as 
Inspector-General of Registration ; in 
1878, and again in 1880, elected a 
Member of the Municipal Corporation 
of the City of Bombay ; and served 
in many other public offices "with 
credit to himself and advantage to the 
public," as testified by the Bombay 
Government when in 1880 he was re- 
commended for the title of Khdn 
Bahddur. He was married, February 
1848, to Baie Sonabaie, eldest daughter 
of Khdn Saheb Cowashaw Sorabshaw 
Taleiyarkhan of Surat ; and has issue. 
His sons are — (1) Jehangeer Byramjee 
Dadabhoy, born 1864, married 1885 
to Khorsetbanu Hormusjee Pestonjee 
Cama; and (2) Manikji Behramji 
Ddddbhdi, born 1865, barrister-at-law 
of the Middle Temple 1887, J.P. for 
Bombay 1888, Municipal Councillor 
for Bombay 1889; married 1884 to 
Jerbanu Ddddbhdi Pdlanji Bhedwdr. 
His daughters are (1) Awabaie, born 
1851, married 1865 to Ardasir Cursetji 
Ghandie, who died in 1874 ; (2) Dhan- 
baiji, born 1859, married 1877 to Dhan- 
jibhoy Nasirwdnji Ghista; (3) Phero- 
zebaie, born 1861, married 1877 to 
Framji Cursetji Rustamji Thdndwdld. 
His brothers are — (1) Cowashaw Dada- 
bhoy, born 1845, married 1865 to Jer- 
baie Bargorji Hadda"; (2) Cursetjee 
Dadabhoy, born 1850, married 1886 to 
Gulbaie Jamsetjee Seendwdld. Re- 
sidence: Foras Road, Byculla, Bom- 
bay. 

BEHRAMJI JEHANGIRJI RAJ KOT- 
WALA, Khdn Bahddur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on May 
24, 1889, in recognition of his public 
services. The Khdn Bahddur"s name 
is also sometimes spelt Byramjee (or 
Byramji) Jehanghirji Rajkotwdla. Is 
a Delegate of the Parsi Matrimonial 
Court at Kardchi, and Member of the 
Sindh Sabha; was Honorary Special 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



31 



Magistrate at Nasik and Karachi from 
1869 to 1890; acted as Chairman of 
the Nasik Municipality in 1880 and 
1883. Residence: Karachi, Sind. 

BELASAR PARIDA, Sdmant Rai. This 
is one of the titles that appear not to 
have been formally recognized by 
Government. It was originally ob- 
tained from one of the old Rajas of 
Kujung. Residence : Cuttack, Orissa. 

BELI RAM, Rai Bahadur. Granted the 
title, as a personal distinction, January 
2, 1893. Residence : Batala, Punjab. 

BELKHERA (MATANPUR), TMkur of. 
See Purandhar Singh. 

BENARES, His Highness Sir PRABHU 
NARAYAN SINGH, G.C.I.E., Maha- 
raja Bahadur of; b. November 26, 
1855. Succeeded June 13, 1889; has 
issue — Kunwar Aditya Narayan Singh, 
born November 6, 1875. The family are 
Brahmans of the Bhuinhar clan, and 
their traditions go back to the year 
1000, when a Brahman ascetic of 
Utaria, a village near Benares, foretold 
the succession of his posterity to the 
dominions then governed by a Hindu 
Raja. Some centuries later, in the 
decay of the Mughal Empire, some of 
the family who attempted to assert a 
turbulent independence were severely 
chastised by one of the lieutenants of 
the Emperor Farrukhsiyar. In the 
succeeding reign Mausa Ram, the 
eldest brother of the branch occupying 
the ancient seat of the family in 
Utaria, rose to great favour with the 
Governor of Benares under the Nawab 
Vazir of Oudh. On the death of 
Mausa Ram in 1739 his son Balwant 
Singh sent an offering to Delhi, and 
received from the Emperor his con- 
firmation in the government of the 
Jaunpur, Benares, and Chunar dis- 
tricts, with the possession in his own 
right of four Parganas, and the title 
of Raja Bahadur, which the family 
has held as an hereditary title ever 
since. In 1763, when the Emperor and 
the Nawab Vazir of Oudh marched 
eastward to expel the British from 
Bengal, Raja Balwant Singh was com- 
pelled to join them, but his troops 
took no part in the battle of Baksar, 
being stationed on the other side of 
the Ganges, and when he fled to one 
of his hill fortresses he was called back 
to receive confirmation of his posses- 



sions under the British Power. On the 
death of Balwant Singh in 1770 the 
Nawab Vazir of Oudh desired to seize 
the Benares territory, but the British 
Government compelled him to recog- 
nize Chait Singh, the son of Balwant 
Singh, as Raja under the British 
suzerainty, and by the treaty of 1775 
the territory was finally declared 
British. The differences between Raja 
Chait Singh and the Calcutta Govern- 
ment under Warren Hastings are 
historically famous, as they became 
the subject of one of the articles of 
the impeachment that was framed 
against the great Governor-General. 
The Raja was deprived of his govern- 
ment, which was given on conditions 
to his nephew, Raja Mahip Narayan, 
son of Balwant Singh's daughter, and 
he died in exile at Gwalior under the 
protection of the Maharaja Sindhia. 
Raja Mahip Narayan died in 1795, and 
was succeeded by his son Udit Narayan 
Singh; and the latter in 1835 by his 
nephew and adopted son, Raja Ishri 
Parshad Narayan Singh Bahadur, who 
for his loyal services at the time of 
the Mutiny, received in 1859 the title 
of Maharaja Bahadur as a personal 
distinction. On January 1, 1877, on 
the occasion of the Proclamation of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty as Empress 
of India, the Maharaja Bahadur was 
created a Knight Grand Commander 
of the Most Exalted Order of the Star 
of India ; and on his death in 1889 he 
was succeeded by his nephew and 
adopted son, the present Raja. On 
February 8, 1889, the late Maharaja 
Bahadur had been granted the privilege, 
as a personal distinction, of being 
addressed as " His Highness," and in 
September of that year the present 
Raja was granted the same privilege, 
with the title of Maharaja Bahadur, 
also as personal distinctions. The 
Maharaja was created a Knight Grand 
Commander of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire on Janu- 
ary 1, 1898. His Highness has been 
exempted from personal appearance in 
the Civil Courts, and has been assured 
by sanad, that, in the case of failure of 
natural heirs, the Government will 
permit and confirm any adoption of a 
successor made by himself or any 
future Raja that may be in accordance 
with Hindu law and the customs of his 
family. He is entitled to a salute of 



32 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



13 guns. Residences : Ramnagar, Be- 
nares; Chakya, Mirzapur. 

BENI MADHAB BANEBJI, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on Janu- 
ary 1, 1894. Residence: Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

BENI MADHO, Rai Bahadur. Eeceived 
the title, for services as Secretary of 
the local Famine Committee, on May 
21, 1898. Residence : Sehore, Bhopal, 
Central India. 

BENJAMIN, Elijah, Khan Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence : Sukkur, Sind, Bombay. 

BENKAT RAO. See Vyankat Rao. 

BEONA, Raja of. See Gobind Singh. 

BEPIN. See Bipin. 

BERI (BUNDELKHAND), Rao Bijai 

Singh, Jdyirddr of. A ruling chief; 
b. February 14, 1848. Succeeded to 
the yadi on March 18, 1862. Is a Puar 
Rajput, descended from Acharjya, who 
married a daughter of the Maharaja 
Jagat Raj, son of the Maharaja 
Chhatarsal of Jaitpur, and received 
the jdgir of Beri. He was succeeded 
by his son, Khuman Singh, whose son, 
Jugal Prasad, received a sanad from 
the British Government. His grand- 
son, Bishnath Singh, adopted the 
present Jagirdar, who is a descendant 
from the Maharaja Jagat Raj by a 
collateral line. The title is hereditary; 
the Jagirdars have sometimes been 
styled Sawai Rao, from their ancestor 
Jagat Raj. The present Rao's son is 
Kunwar Bahadur Noni Raghuraj 
Singh. The State has an area of about 
28 square miles, and a population of 
about 5000, chiefly Hindus. The Rao 
maintains a military force of 10 cavalry, 
66 infantry, and two guns. Residence : 
Beri, Bundelkhand, Central India. 

BEYPORE, Valiya Raja of. See Rama 
Varma Raja, Raja. 

BEZONJI DADABHAI, Khan Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1898. Residence •' Nagpur, Central 
Provinces. 

BHABAR, The Chief of. A ruling chief. 
The area of the State is 80 square 
miles; its population is 7222. Resi- 
dence : Bhabar, Palanpur, Bombay. 

BHADARVA, Rana Fat eh Singh Sardar 
Singh, Rand of. A ruling chief ; b. 



about 1850. Succeeded to the yadi on 
January 26, 1888. The area of the State 
is 27 square miles; its population 
9185. Residence: Bhadarva, Rewa 
Kantha, Bombay. 

BHADAURA (GUNA), Raja Madho 

Singh, Rdjd of. A ruling chief; b. 
1876. Succeeded to the gadi on May 
10, 1883. The Raja is descended from 
a Sisodhiya Rajput (Hindu) family. 
The State has a population of about 
4000, chiefly Hindus. Residence: Bha- 
daura, Guna, Central India. 

BHADAWAR, Maharaja of. See Ma- 
hendra Mahendra Singh. 

BHADRI, Rai of. See Rai Krishna 
Prasad Singh. 

BHADVA, Jareja Bhav Singhji, Chief 
of. A ruling chief; b. about 1826. 
Succeeded to the yadi in 1843. The 
area of the State is 7 square miles ; 
its population 1231, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence : Bhadva, Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay. 

BHAG RAM, Pandit (of Jalandhar), 
C.I.E., Rai Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on August 11, 1885. Created 
a CLE. on January 1, 1897. Residence: 
Kashmir. 

BHAG SINGH (of Sikandra), Sardar. 
Descended from Dargaha Singh, who 
acquired a considerable territory by 
conquest in 1759 a.d. His possessions 
were subsequently reduced by other 
Sikh Sardars. He had four sons, of 
whom the third, Sardar Agar Singh, 
was the father of Sardar Bhag Singh. 
The Sardar has a son, named Jowahir 
Singh. The title is hereditary. Resi- 
dence : Ambala, Punjab. 

BHAGA SINGH, Dharmsinghwala, Sar- 
dar. The title of Sardar is hereditary 
in this family. Residence : Firozpur, 
Punjab. 

BHAGABATTI CHARAN CHATTERJI, 

Rai Saheb. The title was conferred 
on January 1, 1894. Residence : Bar- 
rackpore, Bengal. 

BHAGAT SINGH, Sarddr Bahadur; b. 
1846. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on April 19, 1886, in recogni- 
tion of eminent services in the Depart- 
ment of Public Works, Rajputana. 
Claims descent from an ancient Ksha- 
triya family of Sikh Sardars, of the 
"Party of Raja Sahibsingh," settled 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



in the district of Gujrat, Punjab. The 
Sardar Bahadur has four sons living — 
Sardar Krishna Singh Kapur (barrister- 
at-law of the Middle Temple, 1887), 
Lahore ; Sardar Vishnu Singh Kapur 
(of the Royal Agricultural College, 
Cirencester, and of the Middle Tem- 
ple) ; Govind Singh ; Hari Singh. Resi- 
dence : Kapur Mahil, Gujrat, Punjab. 

BHAGAT SINGH (of Kapurthala), 
Sardar, C. I. E. The Sardar was created 
a Companion of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire, January 
1, 1890. Residence : Kapurthala. 

BHAGAVAT DAYAL SINGH BAHA- 
DUR,Thakurai, Rdjd. The title of Rai 
Bahadur was conferred on January 3, 
1893 ; and that of Rdjd on January 1, 
1898. Residence: Chainpur, Palamau, 
Bengal. 

BHAGWAN BAKHSH (of Pokhra An- 
sari), Rdjd; b. September 1, 1872. 
The title is hereditary, and was recog- 
nized as such, December 4, 1877, when 
the Raja succeeded his father, Raja 
Umrao Singh, as a minor. The family 
is a younger branch of the Amethia 
Chattris (see Rameshwar Bakhsh Singh, 
Raja of Amethi), descended from 
Prithvi Chand, Raja of Kalinjar. 
His descendant, Jamdhor Singh, had 
three sons, of whom the third was 
Ram Singh, who, on the division of 
the estates, took Pokhra Ansari, with 
the title of Rao. It is said that his 
great-grandson, Rao Kalian Singh, 
saluted a celebrated fakir with the 
respectful address of Bandagi Mian, 
and the grateful saint responded with 
a blessing on the " Raja," whence the 
title was ever afterwards borne by this 
branch, who are known as the " Ban- 
dagi Mian Amethias." A descendant, 
Rao Amar Singh, endeavoured to assert 
his independence in the time of Shuja- 
ud-daula, after the latter had been 
defeated by the English ; but he was 
subsequently defeated and slain by 
the Nawab's forces. His son, Madho 
Singh, ultimately regained most of his 
possessions. After his death, the 
property saw many changes, and at last 
fell into the hands of Raja Sahajram 
Bakhsh. He was followed by Raja 
Umrao Singh, the father of the present 
Raja. Residence: Rowni, Haidargarh, 
Bara Banki, Oudh. 

BHAGWAN BAKHSH SINGH (of 

AmetM), Rdjd. The title is hereditary, 



and was recognized December 4, 1877. 
The present Raja succeeded Raja 
Madho Singh in 1891. Residence : 
Sultanpur, Oudh. 

BHAGWAN DAS, Lala, Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on May 20, 1896. 
Residence : Hoshiarpur, Punjab. 

BHAGWAN DAS, Lala, Peshawaria, 
Rai Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on May 30, 1891. 

BHAGWAN SINGH, Sardar Bahadur; 
b. 1834. Belongs to a Jat family, 
whose founder, Sardar Ram Singh, 
acquired the territory of Buner and 
other districts in 1751 a.d. The family 
appear to have done good service 
during the Gurkha campaign, the 
first Sikh war, and lastly during the 
Mutiny in 1857. For the latter service 
they received as a reward the remission 
of a year's commutation tax, and one- 
sixteenth of the whole has been excused 
in perpetuity. The Sardar Bhagwan 
Singh, whose title of Sardar is heredi- 
tary, is an Honorary Magistrate in the 
Ambala district ; and on January 1, 
1890, received the title of Sardar 
Bahadur as a personal distinction. His 
son is named Brijandar Singh. Resi- 
dence : Sohana Bedwan, Ambala, Pun- 
jab. 

BHAGWAN SINGH, Subadar-Major, 
Rai Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on January 1, 1892. Residence: Man- 
dalay, Burma. 

BHAG WANPUK, Rdjd of. See Surajbhan 
Singh. 

BHAGWAT,D. V., Rao Saheb. Received 
the title on January 2, 1899. Residence : 
Akola, Berar. 

BHAG WAT MAHANTI, Rai Bahadur; 
b. March 3, 1821 ; son of Jugal Ma- 
hanti, belonging to a family of Karan 
or Utkal Kayasthas. Entered the 
service of the Government of Bengal 
in the year 1839, and served for more 
than fifty years in a large number 
of offices with ability and fidelity, 
retiring on pension in 1891. In 1870 
he received a gold watch and chain 
from the Bengal Government, in 
recognition of M his long and valuable 
services," as well as in consideration 
of "his successful exertions during 
the famine of 1866 " ; and in 1886 the 
title of Rai Bahadur was conferred 
upon him as a personal distinction, 

r> 



34 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



The Kai Bahadur has seven sons — 
Ramkrishna Mahanti, Jaikrishna Ma- 
hanti, Bhuvaneshwar Mahanti, Nanda- 
kishor Mahanti, Govindacharan Ma- 
hanti, Paramanand Mahanti, and 
Sadanand Mahanti. Residence : Pom- 
palo, Kothdesh, Puri, Orissa. 

BHAGWATI PRASAD SINGH (of 

Balrampur), Rdjd. The title is heredi- 
tary. The present Raja succeeded 
the late Maharani in 1896. Residence : 
Gonda, Oudh. 

BHAGYAKUL, Rdjd of. See Srindth 
Rai. 

BHAI.— A prefix. 

BHAIRON SINGH (of Maslai), Rao; 
b. March 22, 1855. The title is heredi- 
tary ; and is said to have been originally 
received from Gori Shah, Badshah. 
In 1820 the then Bao received a sanad 
from Sir John Malcolm. The Rao 
has a son, named Omar Singh. Resi- 
dence : Nimar, Central Provinces. 

BHAISAKHO, Bhumia of. See Ghari. 

BHAISATJNDA (BUNDELKHAND), 
Chaube Chhatarsal Prasad, Jdgirdar 
of. A ruling chief. The Jdgirdar is 
of a Chaube Brahman (Hindu) family, 
descended from Ram Krishna Chaube, 
Killadar of Kalinjar (see Paldeo), and 
was born about the year 1878. He 
succeeded to the gadi on January 16, 
1886. The area of the State is 12 
square miles; its population over 
4000, chiefly Hindus. The Jagirdar's 
great-grandfather, Newal Kisor, was 
third son of Ram Krishna Chaube, 
referred to above ; and received a 
sanad, from the British Government. 
The Jagirdar maintains a force of 
52 soldiers. Residence : Bhaisaunda, 
Bundelkhand, Central India. 

BHAISOLA or DOTRIA (BH0PA- 
WAR), Thakur Bhim Singh, Thdkur 
of. A ruling chief. The Thakur is 
descended from a Rajput (Hindu) 
family ; and was born about the year 
1821. Succeeded to the gadi in the 
year 1842. The population of the 
State is nearly 3000. Residence : Bhai- 
sola, Bhopawar, Central India. 

BHAIYA. See Bhaya. 

BHAJJI, Rana Durga Singh, Rdnd of. 
A ruling chief; b. 1842. Succeeded 
to the gadi on November 18, 1875. 
Belongs to a Rajput family, whose 



founder in early times came from 
Kangra, and acquired the State (which 
is one of the Simla Hill States) by 
conquest. It was overrun by the 
Gurkhas between 1803 and 1815 ; and 
after their expulsion was confirmed 
in the possession of the Rana by a 
sanad from the British Government, 
dated September 4, 1815. Its area is 
94 square miles; population 12,106, 
chiefly Hindus. The chief maintains 
a military force of 60 infantry and 1 
gun. Residence : Bhajji, Punjab. 

BHALUSNA, Thakur Mulsinghji, Thd- 
kur of. A ruling chief ; b. about 
1852 ; is descended from a Koli (Hindu) 
family. Residence: Bhalusna, Mahi 
Kantna, Bombay. 

BHAMB0 KHAN, Jam; b. 1835. The 
title is hereditary, having been origin- 
ally conferred on the Jam's ancestor, 
Saispal, when converted to Muham- 
madanism by Sayyid Jalal-ud-din. 
The Jam has two sons — Khan Mu- 
hammad Alam Khan and Gulam Ali 
Khan; they bear the titles of Mian 
and Khan respectively. The Jam is a 
considerable Jdgirdar in the district 
of Shikarpur. Residence: Shikarpur, 
Sind. 

BHAMGARH, Rao of. See Ram Singh. 

BHAN PARTAB (of Imjhira), Rdjd 
Bahadur. The title is hereditary; 
and was conferred on July 18, 1858, on 
Raja Surat Singh Bahadur (cousin of 
the present Raja), who was con- 
spicuous for his loyalty, and for the 
brave resistance he and his followers 
offered to the rebels, in the Mutiny of 
1857. Belongs to a Lodhi family, 
whose ancestors had in early times the 
title of Thakur, and have been settled 
in the Narsinghpur district from time 
immemorial. In 1835 the title of Rao 
was conferred on Surat Singh (after- 
wards Raja Bahadur) by the Raja of 
Delehri. When Raja Surat Singh 
died in 1870, the succession of his 
uncle, Rdjd Manbodh Singh Bahddur, 
was recognized by the Government. 
He was appointed an Honorary Magis- 
trate ; and on his death was succeeded 
by his only son, the present Rdjd 
Bahddur. Residence : Narsinghpur, 
Central Provinces. 

BHANDARKAR, Ramkrishna Gopal, 
CLE. See Ramkrishna. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



35 



BHANDRA, Rdjd of. See Bhopal Singh. 

BHANUDAS NAIDU, Rai Saheb. Ke- 
ceived the title on January 1, 1898. 
Is an Honorary Magistrate. Residence : 
Kampti, Central Provinces. 

BHAO SINGH (of Piparia), Thdkur; 
b. 1858. The title is hereditary. The 
Thakur succeeded his father, Thdkur 
Bhagwan Singh. Residence: Piparia, 
Jabalpur, Central Provinces. 

BHARADPURA (BHOPAWAR), Bhu- 
mia Udai Singh, Chief of. A ruling 
chief. The chief is a Bhilala, born 
about 1848 ; succeeded to the gadi in 
1858. The population of the State is 
1724, chiefly Hindus. Residence: 
Bharadpura, Bhopawar, Central India. 

BHARAT SINGH, Manki. This is one 
of the titles that appear never to 
have been formally recognized by the 
Government. The Manki has a son 
named Jagannath Singh, who bears 
the title of Babu. Residence: Man- 
bhum, Bengal. 

BHARAWAN, Rdjd of. See Madho 
Singh. 

BHAREH, Rdjd of. See Rup Sinha. 

BHARGO RAO, Rao Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1893. 
Residence : Central Provinces. 

BHARRAI, Rao Sdheb of. See Malkhan 
Singh and Gajraj Singh. 

BHARTPUR, His Highness Maharaja 
Birjindar Sawai Sir Jaswant Singh 
Bahadur, Bahadur Jang, G.C.S.I., 
Mahdrdjd of. A ruling chief; b. 
1815. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor in 1853; invested with full 
powers March 4, 1871. Is of a Jat 
(Hindu) family, descended from Bal- 
chand, who founded the Bhartpur 
State about the beginning of the 18th 
century. The fifteenth in descent 
from Balchand was the Maharaja 
Brig Singh, and seven generations 
further comes His Highness the present 
Maharaja. The banner of this chief 
is coloured red; its motto is, Sri 
Lachmanji Sahai. His son is the 
Kunwarji Ram Singh Bahadur. The 
area of the State is about 1974 square 
miles ; its population 645,540, chiefly 
Hindus, but with 105,666 Muham- 
madans and 4499 Jains. His Highness 
maintains a military force of 1647 
cavalry, 8207 infantry, and 54 guns. 



He is entitled to a salute of 15 guns, 
and 2 guns more as a personal dis- 
tinction. Residence: Bhartpur, Raj- 
putana. 

BHASKARA, Rdjd. See Ramnad. 

BHASKERAO BALKRISHNA PITALE 
(of Baroda), Rao Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on June 22, 1897. Is 
Darbar Vakil for Baroda State. Resi- 
dence : Bombay. 

BHATGAON, Rdjd of. See Kunjal Singh. 

BHATKHERI, Rawat Sheo Singh, 

Rdwat of. A ruling chief. The Rawat 
is a Chandrawat Rajput (Hindu), born 
about the year 1842. Succeeded to 
the gadi in 1861. The population of 
the State is 2234, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence: Bhatkheri, Western Malwa, 
Central India. 

BHAUNAGAR, His Highness Maha- 
raja Bhausinghji, Thdkur of. A 
ruling chief ; b. April 26, 1875. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi on the death of 
his father, the late Maharaja Sir 
Takhtsinghji Jaswatsinghji, G.C.S.I. 
Any account of the predecessors of 
His Highness would cover the history 
of the illustrious tribe or clan of the 
Gohel Rajputs of Kathiawar, of whom 
he is the chief, and after whom the 
eastern part of the province of 
Kathiawar is called Gohelwad. The 
Gohels claim to be descended from 
the celebrated Pandavs, who belonged 
to the Lunar or Chandravansi race, 
and so trace their line from the cele- 
brated Shalivahan, the founder of the 
Shaka era, while Colonel Tod and 
others assert that the Gohels belong 
to the Solar race. The old family 
title of " Rawal " was earned (as 
appears at page 258 of Tod's Western- 
India) at the memorable battle of 
Chitor, fought with Ala-ud-din Khilji 
in 1303 a.d. There are evidences 
going as far back as 812 a.d. which 
show that the Gohels ruled in 
Saurashtra (Kathiawar) from a very 
remote period. On the fall of the 
Delhi Empire, when the Mahratta 
power gradually rose into importance, 
the capital of the State was at Sihor, 
with Bhausingji as ruler, at which 
time (1722-23 a.d.) an encounter with 
the Mahratta army took place near 
Sihor and resulted in the defeat of 
the Mahrattas. The struggle showed 
the weakness of the position of the 



36 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



capital, and Bhausingji chose the 
present site and founded the city of 
Bhaunagar, which he considered more 
secure. He died in 1764 a.d., and 
was succeeded by his son Akherajji. 
Akherajji assisted the Mahrattas 
against the Mughal Viceroy Momin- 
khan, and in 1771 assisted the British 
Government in reducing the pirate 
stronghold of Talaji. It was this ruler, 
too, who, at the request of the Resident 
at Baroda, gave shelter to Raghunath 
Rao Peshwa, then a refugee, sending 
him to Bombay in one of his own 
vessels. Akherajji died in 1772, and 
was succeeded by his son Wakhat- 
singhji. Wakhatsinghji largely ex- 
tended his dominions, was a wise 
ruler and intrepid soldier, and during 
his lifetime cultivated the friendship 
of the British then trading in Surat. 
He died in 1816, and was succeeded 
by his son Wajesinghji, who after a 
prosperous reign, extending over a 
period of thirty-six years, died in 
1852, and was succeeded by his grand- 
son Akherajji III., his son Bhausingji 
having died during his lifetime. Akhe- 
rajji III. died in 1854, and having 
no male issue was succeeded by his 
brother Jaswatsinghji, who died in 
1870, and was succeeded by his son 
Takhtsinghji. The latter effected 
great and rapid improvements in his 
dominions. Liberal in his charities, 
generous in his grants for the public 
good, he constructed over 120 miles 
of railway at an expense of over eighty 
lacs of rupees, intersected his State 
with roads, studded the country with 
important public works, beautified his 
capital with permanent buildings of a 
most ornamental character, instituted 
a State Council, and revised the State 
laws, civil and criminal. His loyalty 
to the British Crown was second to 
none in India, and, at a cost of over 
five lacs of rupees, he formed for 
Imperial service a regiment of Lancers 
— 350 strong — of men chiefly of his 
own clan, of which corps he was 
Honorary Colonel. The area of the 
State is 2860 square miles ; the popu- 
lation 464,671, and the annual gross 
revenue Rs.41,00,000. Arms: Gules, 
an eagle or displayed ; in chief on a 
canton of the second, a lion statant of 
the first. Crest: An Eastern galley 
argent t profile in full sail. Supporters : 
Two bulls argent rampant, service with 



bezant. Motto: j^pj ifiq ^^ c|TqT 

("Man proposes but God disposes") 
on a label azure. Residence : The Moti- 
bagh Palace, Bhaunagar. 

BHAUNAGRI, Sir M. M., K.C.I. E. See 
Mancherji Mehrwanji Bhaunagri, Sir, 
K.C.I.E. 

BHAURAI RANCHODRAI DESAI, Rao 

Saheb. Received the title on May 21, 

1898. Residence: Godhra, Bombay. 

BHAVNAGRI. See Mancherji. 

BHA WAL, Rdjd of. See Rajendra Nara- 
yan Rai. 

BHA WAL, Ram Singh, Seim of. A 
ruling chief ; b. about 1864. Succeeded 
to the gadi September 25, 1889. The 
Seim is a Khasi, and his State is 
situated in the Khasi and Jaintia 
Hills. Its population is about 555, 
chiefly Khasis and Christians. Resi- 
dence: Bhawal, Khasi and Jaintia 
Hills, Assam. 

BHAWANI PARSHAD, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Is Diwan of Bijawar State. Residence : 
Bijawar, Central India. 

BHAWANI PRIYA BARUANI (of 

Gauripur), Rdni. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1890. 
Residence : Goalpara, Assam. 

BHAYA.— A prefix. 

BHAYA MALL, Lala, Rai Bahadur. 
The title of Rai Saheb was conferred 
on January 1, 1895 ; and that of Rai 
Bahadur on June 3, 1899. Residence : 
Peshawar, Punjab. 

BHERI, Sarddr of. See Lai Singh. 

BHIK CHAND, Seth, Rai Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence : Quetta, Baluchistan. 

BHIKAJI AMUT CHAUBE, Rao Saheb. 
See Bhikhaji. 

BHIKAJI RATANJI RANA, Khdn 
Saheb. Received the title on June 3, 

1899. Residence: Bombay. 

BHIKAM NARAYAN SINGH (of Deo), 

Rdjd Bahadur. See Deo. 

BHIKHAJI AMUT CHAUBE, Rao Saheb. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on June 1, 1888, for eminent services 
in the Medical Department. Rest* 
dence : Baroda, Bombay. 

BHIKRA, Rao of. See Chet Singh. 



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37 



BHILODIA, Thakur Chhatrasinghji 
Raesinghji, Thdkur of. A ruling 
chief; b. in 1892. Succeeded to the 
gadi on November 10, 1893 (as a 
shareholder with one other). Belongs 
to a Chauhan Rajput family. The 
State has an area of 5 square miles, 
and a population of 2213. Residence : 
Bhilodia, Rewa Kantha, Bombay. 

BHIMACHAEYA BIN RAMBHAT 
ZALFIKAR, Mahdmahopddhydya. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 2, 1888, for eminent scholar- 
ship and oriental learning. Residence : 
Bombay. 

BHIMJIBHAI RUSTAMJI ASHBUR- 
NER, Khdn Saheb. Received the title 
on June 3, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

BHINAI, Rdjd Bahadur of. See Mangal 
Singh. 

BHINGA, Rdjd of. See Udai Partab 
Singh. 

BHOAR, Thdkur of. See Krishna Singh, 
Pandit. 

BHOJAKHERI, Rao Bhawani Singh, 
Rao of. A ruling chief. The Rao is 
descended from a Rajput (Hindu) 
family, and was born about the year 
1858 ; succeeded to the gadi on De- 
cember 9, 1879. The population of 
his State is about 250, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence : Bhojakheri, Western Mal- 
wa, Central India. 

BHOLA MISR, Rai Bahadur. The title 
is personal, and was conferred on 
January 1, 1894. Residence: Bengal. 

BHOLA RAM, Rai Bahadur. The title 
is personal, and was conferred on May 
1, 1898. Residence: Military Works 
Department, Simla. 

BHOPAL, Her Highness Nawab Shah 
Jahan Begum, G.C.S.I., C.I., Begum 
of. A ruling princess. Her Highness 
the Nawab Shah Jahan Begum is the 
seventh in lineal descent from the 
famous Dost Muhammad Khan, 
founder of the Bhopal dynasty; was 
born July 3, 1838, and succeeded to 
the gadi on November 16, 1868. Dost 
Muhammad was an Afghan officer in 
the service of Aurangzeb, who took 
advantage of the weakness of the 
Mughals after the death of that 
Emperor to establish his independent 
authority in Bhopal and the neighbour- 



ing districts. The State of Bhopal 
has usually been on the friendliest 
terms with the British authorities. 
In 1778, on the occasion of General 
Goddard's march across India ; in 1809, 
at the time of General Close's expedi- 
tion ; and again in 1817, at the com- 
mencement of thePindari war, Bhopal 
did good service to the British Power. 
An interesting feature in Bhopal 
history has been the fact that the 
Princesses of the ruling family have 
very frequently taken the most promi- 
nent part in the administration of the 
State. Kudsia Begum was succeeded 
in 1837 by her son-in-law, the Nawab 
Jahangir Muhammad ; and the latter, 
on his death in 1844, was succeeded by 
his widow, her late Highness Sikandar 
Begum, mother of the ruling Princess, 
who was succeeded by the latter in 
1868. The first husband of Her High- 
ness the Nawab Shah Jahan Begum 
died in 1867, leaving one daughter, the 
Nawab Sultan Jahan Begum; the 
latter has been acknowledged as Her 
Highness's heir-apparent. Her High- 
ness was created in 1872, in recognition 
of her high administrative qualities, a 
Grand Commander of the Most Exalted 
Order of the Star of India ; and has 
subsequently been appointed by Her 
Most Gracious Majesty the Empress to 
the Order of the Crown of India. In 
1871 she contracted a second marriage 
with the Maulavi Muhammad Sadik 
Husain, Nawab Consort, a descendant 
of a noble family of Bokhara. The 
heir-apparent, the Nawab Sultan Ja- 
han Begum, was married in 1874 to 
Ahmad Ali Khdn, a member of the 
Afghan clan, the Mirazai Khel, from 
which the Bhopal family is descended. 
The area of the State is 6872 square 
miles; its population is nearly a 
million, chiefly Hindus, but including 
over 80,000 Muhammadans, 6000 
Jains, and about 120,000 belonging to 
aboriginal tribes. Her Highness the 
Nawab Begum maintains a military 
force of 803 cavalry, 2030 infantry, and 
69 guns ; and is entitled to a salute of 
19 guns, with 2 guns more within the 
limits of the Bhopal territory. Arms: 
Vert, a tower or within twelve musk 
blossoms proper in bordure. Crest : 
A sheaf of arrows charged with a lily 
argent. Supporters: Mahsir (fish), 
proper. Motto : JVasr Minullah. Re- 
sidence : Bhopal, Central India. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



BHOPAL SINGH (of Bhandra), Rdjd; 
b. April 28, 1870. Succeeded the late 
Raja Aman Singh on December 7, 
1896. The title is hereditary, and 
was originally derived from Raja, 
Nizam Shah of Mandla. Residence: 
Bhandra, Jabalpur, Central Provinces. 

BHOPAL SINGH (of Urni Piparia), 
Thdkur; b. 1827. The title is heredi- 
tary, having been originally derived 
from the Gond Rajas of Mandla. Is 
descended from a Rajput family of the 
Kshatriya tribe, clan Chandra-Bansi- 
Tomar (or Tomar of the Lunar race). 
This family claims to be descended 
from Raja Anang Pal, who reigned at 
Delhi in 1193 a.d. After the subver- 
sion of the Tomar dynasty, the family 
is said to have migrated to the Gwa- 
lior and Jhansi territories, where some 
of its branches remain. Two brothers 
of this family, Bisram Singh and 
Narwar Singh, were called in by the 
Gond Raja of Mandla, and provided 
with military appointments. They 
captured the fort of Ajaigarh and 
subdued the country round Mandla 
and Kurai ; and were rewarded with 
the tdhika Sainkhera. In 1842 the 
Thakur Bhopal Singh, with his father 
and brother, captured a rebel, and were 
rewarded by Government with the 
village of Pat Ras. Rendered good 
service in the time of the Mutiny, and 
was rewarded with a money grant and 
a parwdna. In 1867 the Thakur was 
made an Honorary Magistrate. Re- 
sidence : Piparia, Narsinghpur, Central 
Provinces. 

BHOR, Sankar Rao Chimnaji, Pant 
Sachiv of. A ruling chief; b. 1854. 
Succeeded to the gadi February 12, 
1871. Is a Brahman (Hindu); the 
Pant Sachiv was one of the eight 
hereditary Ministers of the old Mah- 
ratta Empire. The present Pant 
Sachiv is the natural heir of Chimnaji 
Pandit, the late Pant Sachiv ; who 
was adopted by Raghunathrao on pay- 
ment of nazars to the Raja of Satara 
and to the British Government. The 
area of the State is 1491 square miles, 
and its population 145,876, chiefly 
Hindus. Residence: Bhor, Poona,< 
Bombay. 

BHOTE KHAN LALKHAN, Khdn Saheb. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on June 1, 1888. Residence: Kham- 
gaon, Berar. 



BHOWNAGGREE. See Bhaunagri. 

BHUBAN MOHAN RAH A, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1894. Residence : Dacca, Bengal. 

BHUBAN MOHAN RAI, Rdjd. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. The Raja is the son and suc- 
cessor of the late Raja Haris Chandra, 
who was the chief of the Chakma 
clan in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
and who rendered good service in the 
Lushai Expedition of 1871-72, by 
supplying coolies, boats, etc. Resi- 
dence : Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bengal. 

BHUGANGA BHUSAN RAI, Rdjd Rai. 
This is one of the titles that appear 
never to have been formally recognized 
by Government. It was conferred by 
the Emperor of Delhi for approved 
service, the earliest Rajas being Raja 
Pratapaditya Rai and Raja Basanta 
Kumar Rai. Residence : Khulna, 
Bengal. 

BHUP INDRA BAHADUR SINGH (of 

Kantit), Rdjd. See Kantit. 

BHUP INDRA BIKRAMA SINGH, CLE. 

(of Piyagpur), Rdjd. See Piyagpur. 

BHUP SINGH, Bagga (of Dabanwala), 

Sarddr; b. 1836. The title is heredi- 
tary. Belongs to the Bagga (Jat) 
family, formerly of great wealth and 
power in the Gurdaspur district. De- 
scended from Sardar Amar Singh, who 
overran the greater part of the district. 
His son and successor, Sarddr Bhag 
Singh, survived his father only three 
years ; and on his death his cousin 
Budh Singh took possession of the 
estates, to the exclusion of Bhag 
Singh's son, Hari Singh. But Budh 
Singh was deprived of his possessions 
by the Maharaja Ranjit Singh. Sub- 
sequently the Lahore Darbar assigned 
a jdgir to Hari Singh, who was the 
father of the present Sarddr. Resi- 
dence: Gurdaspur, Punjab. 

BHUPENDRA. See also Bhup Indra. 

BHUPENDRA NARAYAN RAI (of 

Madhavapassa), Rdjd. This is one of 
the titles that appear not to have been 
formally recognized by Government. 
The family at one time possessed three 
farmdns of the time of the Emperor 
Muhammad Shah, bearing the seal of 
the Nawab Murshid Kuli Khan, con- 
firming Udai Narayan Rai in the 
Zaminddri of Chandradip, Bakarganj. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



CO 



Residence : Madhavapassa, Bakarganj, 
Bengal. 

BHUPENDBADEB RAI, Rdjd Rai and 
Mahdsai. This is a title that appears 
not to have been formally recognized 
by Government, The family claims to 
have received it from the Emperor 
Aurangzeb in the year 1090 Hijrah; 
and states that the original sanad was 
in their possession up to the time of 
the Imperial Assemblage at Delhi, in 
1877. Residence: Bansberia, Hooghly, 
Bengal. 

BHURAYA JUL! AY A, Rai Bahadur; b. 
February 13, 1857 ; received the title 
on January 1, 1897. Residence : Poona. 

BHUTAN, His Highness Sangay Dorji, 
Deb Mjd of. A ruling chief. His 
Highness the Deb Raja is a Buddhist 
by religion, and a Thibetan by race. 
He sutceeded to the gadi on August 
23, 1885. The area 'of the State is 
about 20,000 square miles ; its popula- 
tion is estimated at 200,000, chiefly 
Buddhists. Residence: Bhutan. 

BHUTNATH DE, Rai Bahddur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
June 1, 1888. Residence: Raipur, 
Centra! Provinces. 

BHYA. SeeBhaya. 

BHYS0NDA. See Bhaisaunda. 

BICHH10D I., Thakur Ratan Singh, 
Thdkutof. A ruling chief . The Tha- 
kur is descended from a Rajput 
(Hindi) family; was born about the 
year 1360, and succeeded to the gadi 
on April 17, 1874. The population of 
his State is about 366, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence : Bichhrod, Western Malwa, 
Central India. 

BICHHROD II., Thakur Madho Singh, 
ThdJiur of. A ruling chief. The Tha- 
kur is descended from a Rajput (Hindu) 
family ; was born about the year 1847, 
and succeeded to the gadi in 1878. Re- 
sidence: Bichhrod, Western Malwa, 
Central India. 

BICHU SINGH, Thakur, CLE. The 
title of CLE. was conferred on May 24, 
1883. Residence: Dholpur, Rajputana. 

BIDH00. See Bidhu. 

BIDHU BHUSAN BANERJI, Rai Saheb. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. Residence: Public Works De- 
partment, Simla. 



BIHARI LAI, Seth, Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence : Hoshangabad, Central Pro- 
vinces. 

BIHARI LAL BARICK, Babu, Rai Ba- 
hddur. Is a Gayawal of Gaya. Received 
the title on January 2, 1899. Resi- 
dence : Gaya, Bengal. 

BIHARI LAL KHAZANCHI, Rao Bahd- 
dur. The title of Rao Saheb was con- 
ferred on June 1, 1888 ; and that of 
Rao Bahddur on May 20, 1896. Resi- 
dence : Jabalpur, Central Provinces. 

BIHAT, Rao Mahum Singh, Jdgirddr of. 
A ruling chief. The Rao is descended 
from an ancient Bundela Rajput 
(Hindu) family, a collateral branch of 
that which rules at Orchha. He was 
born on November 16, 1858, and 
succeeded to the gadi on April 9, 1872. 
Arjun Pal, who ruled at Mahoni, was 
the common ancestor of the Orchha 
and Bihat families — his third son, 
Dya Pal, settling at Etaura, and sub- 
sequent generations occupying Gurha 
in Bihat State, and finally Bihat itself. 
Aperbal Singh, Chief of Bihat, ob- 
tained a sanad from the British 
Government in 1807. The area of 
the State is about 13 square miles ; 
its population 4704, chiefly Hindus. 
The Rao maintains a military force of 
5 cavalry, 75 infantry, and 1 gun. 
Residence: Bihat, Bundelkhand, Cen- 
tral India. 

BIH0RA, Thakur Sardarbawa, Thakur 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1854. Area of 
State is rather under 1 square mile ; 
its population is chiefly Bhil (ab- 
original). The Thakur belongs to a 
Rajput (Muhammadan) family. Re- 
sidence : Bihora, Rewa Kantha, Bom- 
bay. 

BIJA, Thakur Ude ClMmdL,Thdkur of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1829. Succeeded to 
the gadi 1841. Belongs to a Rajput 
family (Hindu), whose founder, Garab 
Chand, came from Ujjain in early 
times and conquered this territory. It 
was overrun by the Gurkhas between 
1803 and 1815 ; but when they were 
expelled by the British in the latter 
year, the Thakur was confirmed in 
possession by a sanad, on conditions of 
feudal service. The State (which is 
one of the Simla Hill States) has an 
area of 4 square miles, and a popula- 
tion of 1158, chiefly Hindus. The 



40 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Thakur maintains a military force of 
10 men. Residence : Bija, Punjab. 

BUM BAHADUR (of Chichli), Rdjd; 
b. 1849. Succeeded his father, Raja 
Nizam Singh, in 1871. The title is 
hereditary ; and was originally con- 
ferred by the Gond Kaja of Mandla, 
dating so far back, it is said, as 921 
A.D. The sanad has been destroyed 
by age. In 1808 a flag, a staff, a belt, 
and a drum were bestowed on Raja 
Sangram Shah by the late Nawab 
Sidak Ali, Subahdar of the Nagpur 
Raja, for the capture of a famous rebel 
named Mir Khan. The family were 
settled at Fatehpur in Hoshangabad 
until 1227 ; when Pahar Singh, the 
younger son of Raja Bariya Singh of 
Fatehpur, came to Chichli and Sangal. 
The present Raja's father, Raja Nizam 
Singh, rendered good service to Govern- 
ment in the time of the Mutiny in 
1857 ; and received, in consideration 
thereof, a sanad of loyalty, dated 
September 19, 1859, together with a 
sword of honour and a money grant. 
He was also made an Honorary Magis- 
trate. The Raja Bijai Bahadur has a 
son whose name is Lai Saheb. The 
family banner is a yellow flag or 
pitambar, with chauri and staff; the 
motto on the Raja's seal is Sado Sahai 
Narsingh, Nizam Singh Sut Bijai Ba- 
hadur Singh, which is " May the god 
Narsingh always help Bijai Bahadur 
Singh, son of Nizam Singh." Resi- 
dence: Narsinghpur, Central Pro- 
vinces. 

BIJAI BAHADUR SINGH (of Bijai- 

garh), Rdjd ; b. 1844. Succeeded to 
the Raj on May 11, 1895. The title 
is an ancient one, and is hereditary. 
Residence : Mirzapur, North-Western 
Provinces. 

BIJAI CHAND MAHTAB, Mahdrdj- 
Kumdr. See Burdwan. 

BIJAIGARH, Rdjd of. See Bijai Baha- 
dur Singh. 

BIJA WAR, His Highness Maharaja 
Sawai Bhan Fartab Singh Bahadur, 
Mahdrdjd of. A ruling chief; b. 
December 24, 1842. Succeeded to the 
gadi November 23, 1847. His Highness 
the Chief of Bija war, like those of 
Charkhari and Ajaigarh, is descended 
from Jagat Raj, the second son of the 
Maharaja Chhatarsal; and the Bijawar 
territory is a portion of that which 



was ruled by his great ancestor. The 
second son of Jagat Ra j was Birsinghdeo 
of Bijawar ; and the son of the latter, 
named Kesri Singh, obtained a sanad 
from the British Government in 1811. 
The great-grandson of the last-named 
is the present Maharaja Bahadur. The 
area of the State is about 974 square 
miles; its population 113,285, chiefly 
Hindus, but with 2405 Muhammadans 
and 2506 Jains. His Highness main- 
tains a military force of 100 cavalry, 
1000 infantry, and 13 guns; and is 
entitled to a salute of 11 guns. The 
family is Bundela Rajput (Hindu) ; its 
motto is Agnipratdp Vishicestia (Hindi, 
meaning "As lire resplendent, the Lord 
of the World ") ; and its banner was 
unfurled at the Delhi Imperial As- 
semblage in 1877. Residence, Bijawar, 
Bundelkhand, Central India, 

BUNA, Diwan Makund Singh, Jdgirddr 
of. A ruling chief. Is a iu ember of 
the Hashtbhaiya family {see Dhurwai), 
who are Bundela Rajputs, the State 
being an offshoot of that of Orchha 
(q.v.); b. January 1838. Sueceeded to 
the gadi in 1850. Diwan Savant Singh 
of Bijna was the second son of Diwan 
Rai Singh, the common ancestor of 
the Hashtbhaiya. Sawanfc Singh's 
grandson, Surjun Singh, obtained a 
sanad from the British Government 
in 1823 ; and his grandson :s the pre- 
sent chief. The area of the State is 
27 square miles; its population 2084, 
chiefly Hindus. The chief maintains 
a military force of 4 cavalry, 30 
infantry, and 2 guns. Residence; 
Bijna, Bundelkhand, Central India. 

BUNI, Rani of. Is the widow of the 
late Raja Kumud Narayan Bhup of 
Bijni, and is in possession of ihe Bijni 
estates. The Bijni family is descended 
from a younger son of one of the 
Rajas of Kuch Behar (q.v.) Resid- 
ence : Bijni, Goalpara, Assam. 

BIKANIR, His Highness Maharaja 
Raj Rajeshwar Siroman Sri Gangt 
Singh Bahadur, Maharaja of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1879. Succeeded to 
the gadi August 19, 1887. Is a Rahtor 
Rajput, descended from Bika Singh, 
the founder of Bikanir, who was the 
sixth son of Rao Jodha, Chief of 
Jodhpur {q.v.), claiming descent from 
Umalrai, fifty-sixth in descent from 
Rama. The title was confirmed to 
the family, in the person of the 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



41 



Maharaja Guj Singh, by the Emperor 
Ahmad Shah of Delhi in 1752 a.d. 
The Bikanir flag is yellow and red— 
the former representing Lakshmi- 
ndrdyan, and the latter Devi. The 
area of the State is 22,340 square 
miles; its population 509,021, chiefly 
Hindus, but with over 50,000 Muham- 
madans and 21,000 Jains. His High- 
ness maintains a military force of 400 
cavalry, 564 infantry, and 91 guns. 
He is entitled to a salute of 17 guns. 
Residence : Bikanir, Rajputana. 

BILASPUR, Rdjd of. See Kahlur. 

BDLASPUR, Atraula, Rdjd of. See 
Mumtaz Ali Khan. 

BILAUDA, Thakur Samrat Singh, 
Thdkur of. A ruling chief; b. about 
1872. Succeeded to the gadi as a minor 
in 1878. Is descended from a Rajput 
(Hindu) family. The population of 
the State is about 276, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence: Bilauda, Western Malwa, 
Central India. 

BILBARI, Mhosha walad Vaghu, Chief 
of. A ruling chief ; b. about 1860. 
Is descended from a Puar family. 
The State is one of the numerous 
Dang States in Khandesh ; its area is 
under 2 square miles, and its population 
about 1418, chiefly Bhils (aborigines). 
Residence: Bilbari, Khandesh, Bombay. 

BILEHRA, Rdjd of. See Hanumant 
Singh. 

BIL0D, The Khan of. A ruling chief. 
This State is in Western Malwa, 
Central India, and the succession to 
the gadi was undecided at the time 
when information was obtained in 
1891. The population is about 600, 
partly Hindus, partly Muhammadan ; 
the ruling family is Muhammadan. 
Residence : Bilod, Central India. 

BINAYA KRISHNA DEB, Rdjd. The 
title was conferred on May 25, 1895. 
Residence: Calcutta, BeD gal. 

BINDA PARSHAD, Rai. The title was 
conferred on June 3, 1893. Residence : 
Allahabad, North- Western Provinces. 

BIPIN BIHARI B0SE (or BASU), Rai 

Bahadur. Received the title on Janu- 
ary 2, 1899. Residence : Hatwa, 
Bengal. 

BIPIN BIHARI CHAKRAVARTTI, Rai 

Bahadur, Received the title on Janu- 



ary 1, 1898. Residence: Bara Banki, 
Oudh. 

BIPIN KRISHNA BASU (BOSE), 
C.I.E., Rai Bahadur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on June 
1, 1888. Created a CLE. on January 
1, 1898. Residence: Nagpur, Central 
Provinces. 

BHfc BIKRAMA SINGH, Kunwar, Lieu- 
tenant, CLE. The Kunwar, who is 
Commandant of the Sirmur Imperial 
Service Infantry, was created a C.I.E. 
on May 21, 1898. Residence : Sirmur. 

BIRSHAMSHER JANG, Rana Bahadur, 
G.C.S.I., MaMrdjd Sir. Prime 
Minister of Nepal. His Excellency 
the Prime Minister of Nepal was, on 
May 25, 1892, created a Knight Com- 
mander of the Most Exalted Order of 
the Star of India; and on June 22, 
1897, on the auspicious occasion of the 
Diamond Jubilee of Her Majesty the 
Queen Empress, he was promoted to 
be a Knight Grand Commander of 
the same Most Exalted Order. Resid- 
ence : Khatmandu, Nepal. 

BIRA SINGHA NARAYAN RAI (of 

Madhavapassa), Rdjd. This is one 
of the titles that appear not to have 
been formally recognized by Govern- 
ment. The family at one time pos- 
sessed three farmdns of the time of 
the Emperor Muhammad Shah, bearing 
the seal of the Nawab Murshid Kuli 
Khan, confirming Udai Narayan Rai 
in the Zaminddri of Chandradip, 
Bakarganj. Residence : Madhavapassa, 
Bakarganj, Bengal. 

BIRESHWAR CHATTERJI, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897, for eminent services as 
Inspector of Schools. Residence: 
Hazaribagh, Bengal. 

BIRESHWAR DATT, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on February 16, 1887. Residence: 
Jabalpur, Central Provinces. 

BIRSINGHPUR, Rdjd of. See Ramesh- 
war Bakhsh Singh. 

BISAMBHAR BIRBAR MANGRAJ 
MAHAPATTAR, Rdjd of Baramba. 
See Baramba. 

BISHAMBHAR NATH, Lala, Rai Saheb. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. Residence: Commissariat De- 
partment, Simla. 



42 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



BISHAMBHAR NATH, Munshi, Bai 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Besidence : Buland- 
shahr, North- Western Provinces. 

BISHAN CHANDRA DATTA, Bai 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 25, 1892. Besidence : Bongong, 



BISHAN DAS, Lala, Bai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1896. 
The Rai Saheb is Wazir-i-Wizarat of 
Ladakh. Besidence: Ladakh. 

BISHAN DAS, Lala, Bai Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on June 3, 1899. 
Besidence : North-Western Railway. 

BISHAN DATT (of Murwara), Thdkur; 
b. 1831. The title is hereditary. The 
tdluka was given to the family of 
Anrudh Singh Baldeo Sahai by Raja 
Nizam Shah of Mandla about 1743. 
Besidence: Murwara, Jabalpur, Central 
Provinces. 

BISHAN LAL, Pandit, Bao Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on May 25, 
1892. Besidence: Bhartpur,Rajputana. 

BISHAN SARUP, Munshi, Bai Bahadur. 
The title of Rai was conferred on 
January 1, 1877 ; and that of Rai 
Bahadur on May 24, 1889. Besidence : 
Kekri, Ajmir. 

BISHAN SINGH (of Bheri), Sarddr. 
The title is hereditary. The Sardar 
belongs to a Jat family, descended 
from Sardar Mahtab Singh, Miran 
Kotia, a Sikh chief famous for his 
prowess, who lived in 1761 a.d. His 
son, Sardar Rai Singh, acquired by 
conquest some villages in the Ambala 
district more than a century ago. 
Besidence : Bheri, Ludhiana, Punjab. 

BISHAN SINGH (of Nabha), Diwdn, 
C.I.E. The Diwan was created a 
Companion of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire on January 
1, 1890, for distinguished services to 
the State of Nabha in the Punjab. 
Besidence: Nabha, Punjab. 

BISHEN LAL SINGH (of Kendi), Bdjd. 
This is one of the titles that have not 
been formally recognized by Govern- 
ment. The family is descended from 
Raja Nabir Singh, who was Zaminddr 
of Kendi, in the Hazaribagh district, 
at the commencement of the 18th 
century. The Raja has a son, named 
Jswar Pras&d Singh, who bears the 



courtesy title of Tikai. Besidence ; 
Hazaribagh, Bengal. 

BISHESHWAR BAKHSH SINGH, Bai. 

The title is hereditary. Besidence : 
Jaunpur, North- Western Provinces. 

BISHESHWAR BAKHSH SINGH, Bai. 

The title is hereditary. Besidence : 
Partabgarh, Oudh. 

BISHESHWAR NATH, Pandit, Bai 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 20, 1896, for good service in 
respect to State Railways. Besidence : 
Calcutta. 

BISHNATH SINGH (of Katra Balk- 
hera), Thdkur. The title is hereditary, 
having been originally conferred by 
Raja Nizam Shah, Gond Raja of 
Mandla. Besidence: Jabalpur, Central 
Provinces. 

BISHNU CHANDRA DATTA, Bai 

Bahadur. Has rendered good service 
as Deputy Postmaster-General, Eastern 
Bengal, and received the title as a 
personal distinction on May 25, 1892. 
Besidence : Dacca, Bengal. 

BISHUN NARAYAN (of Sidli), Bdjd. 
The title is hereditary, and was con- 
ferred on August 14, 1868. Is the son 
of the late Raja Gauri Narayan, 
descended from a family said to be 
descended from the ancestors of the 
Maharaja of Kuch Behar. The 
founder received a jdgir from the 
Raja of Kuch Behar ; his descendants 
subsequently became subjects of the 
Mughal Empire, and in 1765 came 
under British rule. They were under 
Bhutiya control for some time, and 
reverted to British control after the 
Bhutan war in 1865. Besidence : 
Goalpara, Assam. 

BISHUNATH SINGH," Bao; b. Sep- 
tember 15, 1870. Succeeded his father 
on October 1, 1888. The title is 
hereditary, and is said to have been 
conferred orginally on Raghubar 
Singh, Thakur, father of RaoBishunath 
Singh, by Raja Gyan Chand. Besid- 
ence : Cawnpur, North- Western Pro- 
vinces. 

BITHAR, Bdjd of. See Sheonath Singh. 

BOBBILI, Bdjd of. See Venkatasveta 
Chala-pathi Ranga Rao, Ravu, Bdjd. 

BOD, Raja Jogindra Deo, Bdjd of. A 
ruling chief; b. about 1857. Succeeded 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



43 



to the gadi on October 5, 1879. 
Belongs to a Kshatriya (Hindu) family, 
founded by Ganda Mardan Deo, 
seventy generations back. The title 
of Raja has been enjoyed since the 
time of the Mahratta rule ; it was 
formally recognized by the British 
Government on May 21, 1874, in the 
lifetime of the late Raja Pitambar Deo, 
father of the present Raja. The 
eldest son of the ruling Raja is called 
the Jubaraj ; the younger sons Babus. 
It is said that the Rajas of Bod have 
always been famous for their loyalty 
to the Emperors of India who were in 
power from time to time. Formerly 
there was a main route through this 
State to the Central and Western 
Provinces, and whenever any persons 
duly accredited by the Muhammadan 
or Mahratta rulers passed over it, the 
Rajas of Bod used to render them every 
assistance, and thus earned their 
favour. When Raja Pratap Deb was 
the ruler, certain officers of the 
Muhammadan Emperor were passing 
through this State with troops en 
route to Puri. Some of the troops 
having caught fever it was necessary 
for them to halt there for about a 
month, during which time the Raja 
treated them very hospitably, and 
gained their good opinion. On their 
reporting the facts to the Emperor, 
the title of " Swasti Sri Derlakhya 
Dumbadhipati Jharkhund Mandales- 
war" was conferred upon the then 
Raja. This title continued till the 
time of Raja Banamali Deb, when 
certain Mahratta officers went to 
Sonpur to realize peshkash, and com- 
mitted much violence. The people of 
Sonpur formed a conspiracy to kill 
the officers, who fled to Bod for 
refuge. The Sonpur people continued 
their pursuit up to Bod, where the 
Raja took them prisoners and sent 
them to Nagpur. This conduct of 
the chief very much pleased the 
Mahratta ruler, who conferred the 
title of " Swasti Sri Prabalapratapa- 
ditya Parutapa Danasampanna Jhark- 
hand Badshah " on the Raja. This 
title was subsequently abbreviated to 
" Jharkhand Paichha " ; and in con- 
sideration of the above, the Raja was 
once for all exempted from paying 
peshkash to the Mughal and Mahratta 
rulers. The area of the State (which 
is one of those known as the Orissa 



Tributary Mahals) is about 2064 
square miles ; its population 130,103, 
chiefly Hindus, but over 37,000 be- 
longing to aboriginal tribes. The 
Raja maintains a military force of 
592 infantry and 2 guns. Residence : 
Bod, Orissa. 

B0DD00. See Badu. 

B0G0LA NAND MUKARJI, Rai Baha- 
dur. Received the title on January 
2, 1899. Residence: Murshidabad, 
Bengal. 

B0IDY0. See Baidya. 

BOLAICHAND PAIN, Shri, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence : Telegraph Department, 
Simla. 

B0LAK CHAND, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1894. 
Residence : Arrah, Bengal. 

B0LANDRA, Thakur Salamsinghji, 

Thdkur of. A ruling chief ; b. about 
1865. Is descended from a Rajput 
(Hindu) family. The area of the State 
is about 14 square miles ; its population 
about 873, chiefly Hindus. Residence : 
Bolandra, Mahi Kantha, Bombay. 

B0LIHAR, Rdjd Bahadur of. See Kris- 
ten dr a Rai. 

BOMANJI BYRAMJI PATELL, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

BOMANJI S0HRABJI, Khan Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India. Residence: Poona, Bombay. 

B0NAI, Raja Indar Deo Bahadur, Rdjd 
of. A ruling chief; b. about 1836. 
Succeeded to the gadi on September 
12, 1876. Rendered good service to 
the Government during the Keonjhar 
disturbances in 1867-68. Is descended 
from a Kshatriya (Hindu) family, who 
call themselves Kodam Bangsa, because 
the progenitor of the race was born 
under a kodam tree. The infant, it is 
said, was abandoned, and was in danger 
of falling into the hands of the enemy, 
when a peacock swallowed it, and kept 
it in his craw until the danger was 
over ; and in gratitude the family 
adopted the peacock as its crest. The 
title of Tikait is the courtesy title of 
the heir-apparent ; that of Potait is 



44 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



borne by the second son, that of Ldl 
by the third son, and Bdbu by the 
younger sons, if any. The Rajd Bahd- 
dur has the following sons — Tikait 
Nilambar Deo, Potait Bishambar Deo, 
Ldl Hari Krishna Deo. The area of 
the State (which is one of the Chota 
N&gpur Tributary Mahals) is about 
1297 square miles; its population 
24,026, chiefly Hindus. Residence: 
Bonai, Chota Nagpur, Bengal. 

BONOMALLY CHUCKERBUTTY, Rai 

Saheb. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Is Superintendent 
of the Toshakhana of the Government 
of India. Residence; Calcutta. 

BOOTA SINGH, Rai Bahadur. Received 
the title on January 2, 1899 . Residence : 
Rawal Pindi, Punjab. 

BORKHERA, Thakur Amar Singh, 
Thdkur of. A ruling chief. The 
Thakur is descended from a R&jput 
(Hindu) family. Residence: Borkhera, 
Indore, Central India. 

BORKHERA (WESTERN MALWA), 
Thakur Bhairon Singh, Thdkur of. 
A ruling chief ; h. about the year 1858. 
Succeeded to the aadi in 1873. The 
population of the State is about 1000, 
partly Hindus, partly Muhammadans. 
Residence : Borkhera, Western Malwa, 
Central India. 

B0YD0 NATH DEY, Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence : Punjab Frontier. 

BRAHMA MOHAN MALLIK, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on May 
25,1895. Residence: Hughli, Bengal. 

BRAHMA NARAYAN SINGH, Thdkur. 

This is one of the titles that appear 
not to have been officially recognized. 
The Thakur's sons all bear the courtesy 
title of Bdbu. Residence : Manbhum, 
Bengal. 

BRAJA GOPAL SINGH, Rdjd. This is 
one of the titles that have never been 
formally recognized by Government. 
The Raja's elder son is styled Tikait ; 
his name is Madan Mohan Singh, and 
the younger, whose name is Sarat 
Chandra Singh, has the title of Hikim. 
Residence : Manbhum, Bengal, 

BRAJA KISHOR SINGH, Rdjd. This 
is one of the titles that appear never 
to have been officially recognized by 
Qrovernment. The family claims to be 



of Rajput descent. The Raja's eldest 
son, named Ramkanai Singh, bears the 
courtesy title of Jubardj ; the second, 
named Syamsandar Singh, bears that 
of Hikim ; the third is styled Kumar. 
In this family no name is given to a 
son till he attains the age of twelve 
years. The younger sons of the Rajd, 
below the third, are styled Bdbu, 
except the fourth, who sometimes has 
the courtesy title of Bara Thdkur. 
Residence : Barabhum, Manbhum, 
Bengal. 

BRAMHANANDMAL,Pa?A;-ifcu. This 
is one of the titles that appear not 
to have been formally recognized by 
Government. It was originally con- 
ferred by one of the old Rajas of 
Kujung. Residence : Cuttack, Orissa. 

BRIGLAL SINGH, Subadar, Bahadur. 
See Brij Lai Singh. 

BRIJ BHUKAN LAL, Rai Bahadur ; b. 
1820. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on May 24, 1882, the Rai 
Bahadur having held many important 
public offices, having retired on pension 
in 1872, and having been granted a 
medal by Government at the Imperial 
Assemblage of Delhi on January 1, 
1877, on the occasion of the Proclama- 
tion of Her Most Gracious Majesty as 
Empress of India. Is an Honorary 
Magistrate of Lucknow ; one of the 
founders of the Jubilee High School, 
Lucknow ; President of the Kayastha 
Sadar Sabha of India, 1888; and 
Secretary to the Trustees of the Hu- 
sainabad Endowment. Has borne for 
many years a high character for loyalty 
and benevolence. His son is named 
Ananda Prasad, born 1846 ; his grand- 
son, Bansi Dhar, born 1874 ; his great- 
grandson, Manohar - Lai, born 1891. 
Residence : Lucknow, Oudh. 

BRIJ LAL GHOSH, Rai Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
October 8, 1879. Residence : Lahore, 
Punjab. 

BRIJ LAL SINGH, Subadar, Bahadur. 
Received the title of Bahadur on July 
4, 1896. Residence : Hingoli, Deccan. 

BRIJ MOHAN DEO, Rdjd; b. May 15, 
1896. Succeeded the late Raja Raghu 
Kesari Deo on October 21, 1897. Resi- 
dence : Bhowani Patna, Kalahandi 
State, Central Provinces, 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



45 



BRIJ MOHAN LAL, Rat Bahadur. Re- 
ceived the title on June 3, 1899. Resi- 
dence : Assam. 

BBITTO, Salvador Felin, Rao Saheb. 
The title was conferred on May 20, 
1896. Residence : South Canara, Mad- 
ras. 

BUDDHA KHAN, Khan. The title is 
personal and was conferred on January 

1, 1877, on the occasion of the Pro- 
clamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India. Resi- 
dence : Hathan, Merwara. 

BUDDHA VARAPU NARAYANAMUR- 
THI PANTULU, Rao BaMdur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1898. 
Is a Deputy-Collector. Residence: 
Madras Presidency. 

BUDH SINGH DUDHURIA, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 2, 1888. Is a 
brother of the Rai Bishan Chand 
Dudhuria Bahadur (q.v.). Residence: 
Murshidabad, Bengal. 

BUDHO KHAN walad MUHAMMAD 
ALI KHAN, Mir. The title is heredi- 
tary, the Mir being a descendant of 
one of the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at 
the time of the annexation. Residence : 
Hyderabad, Sind. 

BULAKA SINGH, Sarddr. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on January 

2, 1888. Residence : Lahore, Punjab. 

BULAND JAH. See Muhammad Askari. 

BUN BEHARI KAPUR (of Burdwan), 

Rdjd; b. November 11, 1853. Title 
of Raja conferred, as a personal dis- 
tinction, January 2, 1893; adopted by 
the third brother of the late Maharaja 
Adhiraj Mahtab Chand Bahadur of 
Burdwan on August 31, 1856. Ap- 
pointed Bncdn-i-Rdj of Burdwan in 
1877, and Vice-President of the Burd- 
wan Raj Council in 1879. At the Im- 
perial Assemblage of Delhi on January 
1 , 1877, on the occasion of the Proclama- 
tion of Her Most Gracious Majesty as 
Empress of India, received a Certificate 
of Honour, was appointed Honorary 
Magistrate, and Member of the District 
Board of Burdwan ; and on January 
23, 1885, a Member of the Bengal 
Legislative Council. Appointed Joint 
Manager, Burdwan Raj estate, 1885, 
and sole Manager in 1891 ; and has 
rendered admirable services to the 
Burdwan Raj and to the country for 



many years past. He is the natural 
father of the present Maharaj-Kumar 
of Burdwan (who is still a minor) ; a 
brother-in-law of the late Maharaja 
Aftab Chand Bahadur, and a nephew 
of His Highness the late Maharaja 
Mahtab Chand Bahadurof Burdwan. 
Crest : A horse's head, erased, proper. 
Residence : The Bonabas, Burdwan. 
BUNDI, His Highness Maharao Raja Sir 
Raghubir Singh Bahadur, K.C.S.I., 
K.C.I.E., Maharao Rdjd of ; b. about 
1868. Succeeded to the gadi March 
28, 1889. Is a Chauhan (Hara) Rajput 
(Hindu), descended from Rao Deo 
Singh, son of Rao Bakht Singh Deoji, 
who founded the State of Bundi about 
the year 1242 a.d. The flag of the 
family is coloured yellow, with the 
motto Sri Rangesh Bhagt Bundesh Ram 
Singhe, meamng "Raja Ram Singh, 
ruler of Bundi, is a believer in Rag- 
hunathji." The State is situated in 
that part of Rajputana known as the 
Haraoti and Tonk Agency. Its area 
is 2300 square miles ; its population 
about 254,701, chiefly Hindus, but 
with 9477 Muhammadans and 3101 
Jains. His Highness was created a 
K.C.I.E. on January 1, 1894, and a 
K.C.S.I. on January 1, 1897. He 
maintains a military force of 446 
cavalry, 1835 infantry, and 144 guns, 
and is entitled to a salute of 17 guns. 
Residence : Bundi, Rajputana. 

BUNYAD HASAN, Mir, Khan Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1898. Residence : Bara Banki, Oudh. 

BURDWAN, Maharaj-Kumar Bijai 
Chand Mahtab, Mahdrdj-Kumdr of ; 
b. October 19, 1881. Succeeded the 
late Maharaja Aftab Chand Mahtab 
Bahadur, Maharaja of Burdwan. 
Belongs to a Kapur Kshatriya family 
of Kotli in Lahore, Punjab, whence 
Abu Rai, the founder of the Burdwan 
Raj family, migrated to Bengal. Was 
adopted by the late Maharaja, and is 
the son of Raja Bun Behari Kapur of 
Burdwan (q.v.), a scion of the same 
family, who is also the guardian and 
manager of the large estates of the 
young Maharaj-Kumar. Abu Rai 
Kapur settled in district Burdwan, 
and in 1657 a.d. was appointed Chau- 
dhri and Kotwal of Rekabi Bazar, etc., 
under the Fauzdar of Chakld Burdwan. 
He was succeeded by Babu Rai, who 
owned Pargand Burdwan and three 



46 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



other estates, and also succeeded his 
father as Chaudhri. Then followed in 
succession his son Gyaneshyam Rai, 
and his grandson Krishna Rama Rai ; 
the latter received & farmdn from the 
Emperor Aurangzeb, dated 24th 
Rabiwal Akhir, in the thirty-eighth 
year of his reign (1695 A.D.), confirming 
him as Zamindar and Chaudhri of 
Burdwan. Succeeded by his son 
Jagat Rama Rai, who received a 
similar farmdn from the Emperor 
Aurangzeb, dated 5 th Jamadiwal Awol, 
in the forty-third year of his reign 
(1700 a.d.) ; and again his son, Kirti 
Chandra Rai, who succeeded, received 
a similar farmdn from the same 
Emperor, dated 20th Sawab, in the 
forty-eighth year of his reign (1705 
a.d.), mentioning him as Zamindar 
and Chaudhri of forty-nine Mahals in 
Pare/and Burdwan. Kirti Chandra 
Rai received a second farmdn from the 
Emperor Muhammad Shah, adding 
some Mahals, in the year 1736 a.d. 
He was succeeded by his son Chitra Sen 
Rai, who in the twenty-first year of 
the reign of the Emperor Muhammad 
Shah (1740 a.d.), received a farmdn 
recognizing him as Zamindar of Chakld 
Burdwan, and giving him the title of 
Raja. He was succeeded by his cousin, 
the nephew of Kirti Chandra, Raja 
Tilak Chandra Rai ; who received a 
sanad from the Emperor Ahmad Shah, 
dated 7th Rajab, in the seventh year 
of his reign (1753 a.d.), confirming 
him as Raja of Burdwan, etc. In 1765 
he received another sanad, from the 
Emperor Shah Alam, granting an 
increase of the Zaminddri, and the 
additional title of Bahadur , and about 
the same time the same Emperor wrote 
him a friendly letter, intimating his 
creation as Raja Bahadur, and also as 
a Commander of 4000 infantry. To 
this, in the official /armom that followed, 
was added also the command of 2000 
cavalry ; and lastly, in the ninth year 
of the Emperor Shah Alam (1768 a.d.), 
he received from the Commander-in- 
Chief, by order of the Emperor, a, sanad 
conferring the title of Maharaja Adhi- 
raj, and making him a Commander of 
5000 infantry and 3000 cavalry, with 
authority for guns, bands, nakara, etc. 
He was succeeded by his son, the 
Maharaja Tej Chandra Rai, who, in 
1771 a.d., received a similar sanad to 
the last-named. He was succeeded by 



his adopted son, Maharaja Mahtab 
Chand, who, in 1833 a.d., received a 
farmdn from Lord William Bentinck, 
Governor-General, confirming him in 
the title of Maharaja Adhiraj Bahadur. 
In 1868 he obtained for himself and his 
descendants the licence of Her Majesty 
to bear the arms and supporters de- 
scribed below ; and at the Imperial As- 
semblage at Delhi on January 1, 1877, 
on the occasion of the Proclamation 
of Her Most Gracious Majesty as 
Empress of India, he was granted, as 
a personal distinction, the right to 
receive a salute of 13 guns. He managed 
his great estates with so much success 
that they became some of the most 
prosperous in Bengal ; and at the time 
of the Santal Rebellion in 1855, and 
again during the troubles of the Mutiny, 
the Maharaja did everything in his 
power to strengthen the hands of the 
Government, by placing elephants and 
bullock-carts at the disposal of the 
authorities, and by keeping open the 
communications in the neighbouring 
districts. On his death in 1879 he was 
succeeded by his adopted son, the late 
Maharaja Aftab Chand Mahtab, who, 
on attaining his majority in 1881, was 
installed at the Palace, Burdwan, in 
all his father's honours and possessions. 
He died prematurely in 1888, and was 
succeeded by his adopted son, the 
present Maharaj-Kumar, who is still a 
minor. The family colour is dark blue 
with scarlet facings. The arms are 
azure, an ancient Hindustani shield 
proper, between in chief a crescent 
argent and in base two swords in saltire, 
points downwards, also proper. The 
crest is an iron-gray horse's head, 
couped, around the neck a riband azure, 
and pendent therefrom an escutcheon 
of the last, charged with a lotus-flower 
proper. The supporters are, on either 
side an iron-gray horse regardant, 
around the neck a riband gules, and 
pendent therefrom an escutcheon of 
the last, charged with a lotus- flower 
proper. Residences: The Palace, Burd- 
wan, Bengal; Mahtab Manzil, and 
Dilaram, and Dar-ul-Bahr (Dilkusha 
Gardens), Burdwan ; The Rajbati, 
Chinsurah, Bengal; The Rajbati, 
Kalna, Bengal; The Aftab House, 
Alipur, Calcutta ; The Rosebank, Dar- 
jiling; The Retreat, Kurseong, Bengal; 
and other residences at Bhagalpur, 
Benares, Cawnpur, and Agra. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Al 



BURHAN-UD-DIN-KHAN, Fakir Say- 
yid (of Lahore), Khan Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 22, 1888. Residence: Bhopal, 
Central India. 

BTJTA MALL, Rai Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1894. 
Residence : Lahore, Punjab. 

BTJTA SINGH, Rai Bahadur. See Boota. 

BTA GALE, Maung, Ahmudan gating 
Tazeik-ya Min. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1889. 
It means " Recipient of the Medal of 
Honour for Good Service," and is indi- 
cated by the letters A.T.M. after the 
name. Residence : Pegu, Burma. 

BYRAMJEE DADABHOY, Khan Baha- 
dur. See Behramji Dadabhai, Khan 
Bahadur. 

BYRAMJI SORABJI CARDMASTER, 

Khan Saheb. Received the title on 
May 21, 1898. Residence: Ahmadnagar, 
Bombay. 

CALICUT, Raja Kizhakke Kovilagam 
Mana Vikrama Bahadur, Zamorin of; 
b. 1832. Succeeded to the gadi on the 
decease of the late Zamorin, the 
Maharaja Sir Mana Vikrama Baha- 
dur, K. C.S.I. The present Zamorin 
is believed to be the 120th in descent 
from the founder of the family, who 
derived his title from Cheraman 
Perumal, the last Emperor of Malabar. 
The tradition is that there were two 
youths of the Eradi caste from Pum- 
thura, near Erode, who rendered 
Cheraman Perumal, the last Emperor 
of Malabar, signal service in subduing 
the stronghold of an eastern invader, 
the Chola King of Choladesh. When 
Cheraman Perumal became a Buddhist 
in 352 a.d., and retired from political 
life, dividing his empire of Malabar 
among his eighteen feudatories, it 
chanced that these two youths were 
absent on a pilgrimage to Benares, so 
they were overlooked in the distribu- 
tion of territory. At the last moment 
they returned, and were presented by 
the Emperor with his Imperial sword, 
and a small piece of land called Koko- 
rikot — whence the modern Calicut — 
Cheraman Perumal bidding them win 
what more they wanted with the sword. 
Accordingly, when Vasco da Gama 
arrived at Calicut in 1498, he found 
the descendant of one of these youths, 



the Zamorin of Calicut, ruling over the 
greater part of South Malabar. From 
that time the Zamorins were mainly 
engaged in wars with the Rajas of 
Cochin and their allies, the Portuguese. 
The family follows the well-known 
Marumaklcatayam law of inheritance, 
by which the succession is always to 
the offspring of its female members 
only ; among these the next eldest 
male to the Zamorin is the heir-ap- 
parent. In 1766 the then Zamorin, 
being beleaguered by Haidar Ali of 
Mysore, set fire to his palace, and 
voluntarily perished in the flames. 
Thenceforward the Zamorins were 
(with short intervals of attempts at 
rebellion) the subjects of Haidar and 
Tippu, until the Calicut territory was 
ceded to the English by the treaty with 
Tippu in 1792. The late Zamorin was 
appointed a Fellow of the Madras 
University in 1882, created a Maharaja 
Bahadur in 1878, and a Knight Com- 
mander of the Most Exalted Order of 
the Star of India on May 25, 1892. He 
died shortly afterwards, and was suc- 
ceeded by the present Zamorin. The 
heir-apparent of the Zamorin under 
the Marumakkatayam law bears the 
interesting courtesy-title of "The 
Eralpad." Residence: Calicut, Malabar 
District, Madras. 

CAMALESHWARI. See Kamaleshwari. 

CAMBAY, His Highness Nawab Jafar 
Ali Khan Saheb Bahadur, Naxoab of. 
A ruling chief; b. in the year 1848. 
Succeeded to the gadi June 11, 1880. 
Belongs to a Mughal (Shiah Muham- 
madan) family, descended from Mirza 
Jafar Nizam-ud-daula, who married 
the daughter of Momin Khan Dehlami, 
agent for Surat and Cambay. The 
Nawab at the time of the Treaty of 
Bassein in 1802 was Fateh Ali Khan, 
who was succeeded by his brother 
Bandeh Ali Khan, and the latter by 
his nephew, the Nawab Husain Yar 
Khan, father of the present Nawab. 
The full title of His Highness is Sardar 
Nawab Najib-ud-daula, Mumtaz-ul- 
Mulk, Munim Khan Bahadur, Dilawar 
Jang Dawe Ekbalu, His Highness Jafar 
Ali Khan Saheb Bahadur, Nawab of 
Cambay. His Highness married in 
1876 the Bibi Gauhar Khanum Saheb, 
and in 1882 the Bibi Khurshid Jahan 
Begum. The area of the State is about 



48 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



350 square miles ; its population about 
86,000, chiefly Hindus, with about 
12,000 Muhammadans. The Nawab 
maintains a military force of 36 cavalry, 
496 infantry, and 12 guns, and is 
entitled to a salute of 11 guns. Resi- 
dence : Cambay, Kaira, Bombay. 

CANNAN0RE, Ali Raja, Sultan of. See 
Musa. 

CARSEDJEE. See Kharsedji. 

CASHINATH. See Kashi. 

CASHMERE, His Highness the Maharaja 
Bahadur of. See Jammu and Kash- 
mir. 

CHADCHAT, Thdlcur of. See Santalpur 
and Chadchat, Thdlcur of. 

CHAIT. SeeChet. 

CHAKUR KHAN toalad AHMAD ALI 
KHAN, Mir. The title of Mir has 
been continued by the Government for 
life. Residence : Shikarpur, Sind. 

GHAMBA, His Highness Raja Sham 
Singh, Rdjd of. A ruling chief ; b. in 
1866. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor in 1873. Belongs to a Rajput 
(Hindu) family, descended from the 
Raja Sail, who in very early times 
came from Marwar to Chamba. In 
1846 the State came into the possession 
of the British Government after the 
first Sikh war, and a part of it was 
made over to the Maharaja Golab 
Singh of Jammu and Kashmir. Sub- 
sequently, however, by an arrangement 
made with the latter in 1847, Chamba 
came again entirely under British 
control, and it was assigned to the then 
Raja, Raja Sri Singh, and his heirs. 
On his death in 1870 he was succeeded 
by his brother, Raja Gopal Singh, who 
abdicated in 1873, and was succeeded 
by the present Raja. In 1854 the 
sanitarium of Dalhousie was sur- 
rendered to the Government by the 
Raja of Chamba, in consideration of 
the remission of part of the yearly 
tribute, and in 1867 the cantonments 
of Bakloh and Balun. The area of 
the State, which is very mountainous, 
being situated in the Himalayas, on 
the frontiers of Kashmir, is about 3092 
square miles ; its population 115,773, 
chiefly Hindus, but including 6859 
Muhammadans. The Raja maintains 
a military force of 12 cavalry, 200 
infantry, and 3 guns, and is entitled 



to a salute of 11 guns. Residence : 
Chamba, Punjab. 

CHAMPA LAL, Seth, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 

1897. Residence: Beawar, Rajputana. 

CHAND MAL, Seth, Rai. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on January 
1, 1877, on the occasion of the Pro- 
clamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India. Resi- 
dence : Ajmir, Rajputana. 

CHANDAR SHIKHAR (of Sissaindi), 

Rdjd ; b. October 29, 1860. Succeeded 
the Raja Kashi Prasad in 1873. Be- 
longs to a Tiwari Brahman family, on 
whom the title of Raja was conferred 
by King Amjad Ali Shah of Oudh, and 
it was recognized as hereditary by the 
British Government in 1877. Raja 
Kashi Prasad was consistently loyal 
during the Mutiny, and gave great 
assistance to British officers. He was 
specially mentioned in Lord Canning's 
Proclamation of March 1858 as one of 
the six loyal Oudh Talukdars, and was 
granted large estates as a reward. 
Residence: Sissaindi, Lucknow, Oudh. 

CHANDASINGH KANSINGH SHA- 
HANI, Rao Bahadur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on May 
20, 1890. Residence: Hyderabad, 
Sind. 

CHANDRA KANTA TARKALANKAR, 

Mahdmahopddkydya. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on Feb- 
ruary 16, 1887, in recognition of emin- 
ence in oriental learning. Residence : 
Mymensingh, Bengal. 

CHANDRA KUMAR DUTT (or Datta), 

Rai Bahadur. Received the title on 
June 3, 1899. Residence: Bakarganj, 
Bengal. 

CHANDRA KUMAR RAI, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Is Zamindar of Dalai Bazar. Residence : 
Dalai Bazar, Noakhali, Bengal. 

CHANDRA NATH MITTRA, Rai Baha- 
dur. Received the title on January 1, 

1898. Was formerly Superintendent 
of the Government Press, Lahore. 
Residence : Lahore, Punjab. 

CHANDRA SIKHAR SINHA HARI 
CHANDANA MAHAPATRA SAMA- 
NTA, Mahdmahopddhydya. The title 
is personal, and was conferred on June 
3, 1893, in recognition of eminence in 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



40 



oriental learning. Residence : Khand- 
para, Bengal. 

CHANDRABHAN BAM SINGH, Rao 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 26, 1894. Residence: Kutch, 
Madras. 

CHANDULAL MATHURADAS, Rao 

Saheb. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1895. Residence: Kutch, 
Bombay. 

CHANG BHAKAR, Bhaya Mahabir 
Singh Deo, Bhaya of. A ruling chief ; 
b. April; 15, 1879. Succeeded to the 
gadi June 17, 1897. Belongs to a 
Rajput (Hindu) family, that is a 
collateral branch of the Korea Chauhan 
Rajputs, descended from Jorawal 
Singh, a younger step-brother of Raja 
Garib Singh of Korea. The State is 
one of those known as the Chota 
Nagpur Tributary Mahals. Its area is 
about 906 square miles, and its popu- 
lation about 13,466, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence : Chang Bhakar, Chota 
Nagpur, Bengal. 

CHARKHARI, His Highness Maharaj- 
Adhiraj Sipadar-ul-Mulk Mulkhan 
Singh Bahadur, Maharaja of. A rul- 
ing chief; b. January 1872. Succeeded 
to the gadi July 10, 1880. Belongs to 
the famous Bundela Rajput family 
founded by Bir Singh in the 13th 
century, who first took the clan name 
of Bundela, and from whom are de- 
scended a very large number of cele- 
brities in Central Indian history, in- 
cluding the royal families of Orchha, 
Panna, Dattia, Ajaigarh, Charkhari, 
Bijawar, Sarila, Jigni, Jaso, Lughasi. 
One of these descendants, the Maha- 
raja Chhatarsal, acquired the sove- 
reignty of Eastern and Northern 
Bundelkhand. Being hard pressed 
by the Mahrattas, he adopted the 
Peshwa as one of his sons, who thus 
obtained one-third of his dominions, 
including Sagar, Kalpi, etc. His eldest 
son inherited Panna, while from the 
second son, Jagat Raj, descended the 
Chiefs of Ajaigarh, Charkhari, Bija- 
war, and Sarila. The son of Jagat 
Raj was Kirat Singh ; and the grand- 
son of the latter, the Maharaja Vikra- 
maditya of Charkhari, received a sanad 
from the British Government in 1804. 
His grandson was the Maharaja Jai 
Singh, who attended the Imperial As- 
semblage at Delhi in January 1877, 



and in celebration of the Proclamation 
of Her Gracious Majesty as Empress 
of India received the additional title 
of Sipadar-ul-Mulk. His son is the 
present Maharaja, who succeeded as 
a minor in 1880, attained his majority 
in January 1892, and assumed the 
Government of his State at a grand 
Darbar held at Charkhari on Novem- 
ber 10, 1892. At this Darbar were 
present, besides the Maharaja and the 
young Raja of Sarila, all the principal 
jagirdars, thakurs, and officials of the 
State, numbering more than a hundred. 
The area of the State is 788 square 
miles ; its population about 143,000, 
chiefly Hindus, with 6000 Muhamma- 
dans. The motto of the family is 
Singhasanesho ran Vijayi (" The Master 
of the Throne is the Victorious in 
War"). The Maharaja maintains a 
military force of 188 cavalry, 1552 
infantry, and 42 guns, and is entitled 
to a salute of 11 guns. Residence: 
Charkhari, Central India. 

CHATAR. See Chhatar. 

CHAUBE. See Chowbe. 

CHAUMA, Thdkur of. See Gobind 
Singh, Thakur. 

CHAVAN, Dr. V. P., Rao Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on January 2, 1899. 
Residence: Bombay. 

CHEIK, Maung, Ahmudan gaung Tazeik 
ya Min. This Burmese title (on which, 
see Introduction, page xii) was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1895. Residence : 
Toungoo, Burma. 

CHENTSAL RAO, P., C.I.E.; b. 1832. 
Sarishtadar of the Madras Revenue 
Board, 1872; Fellow of the Madras 
University, 1875; Superintendent of 
Stamps and Stationery, 1882; Member 
of the Legislative Council of Fort St. 
George, 1887, and of the Governor- 
General's Council, 1892; cr. CLE., 
1887. Residence: Madras. 

CHEPPUDHtA S0MIAH, Rai Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 

1892. Residence : Mercara, Kurg. 

CHEPPUDIRA THIMURIAH, Rai Ba- 
hddur. Is the Subahdar of the Ye- 
denalknad, Kurg, and received the 
title as a personal distinction on May 
25, 1892. Residence : Mercara, Kurg. 



50 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



CHERRA, Hajan Manik, Seim of A 
ruling chief; ft. about 1833. Succeeded 
to the gadi May 24, 1875. The chief 
and his people (said to number about 
9000) are Khasis. This is one of the 
Khasi and Jaintia Hill States. Re- 
sidence: Cherra, Khasi Hills, Assam. 

CHET SINGH (of Bhikra), Rao; b. April 
15, 1851. The title is hereditary, and 
has long been recognized. The family 
are Sengar Rajputs, descended from 
the Rajas of Rura in Etawah. The 
Rao has a son and heir, named Lala 
Tej Singh, born October 8, 1866. Re- 
sidence: Bhikra, Etawah, North- 
western Provinces. 

CHETAN SHAH, Khan Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 1, 1877, on the occasion 
of the Proclamation of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty as Empress of India. 
Residence : Shdhpur, Punjab. 

CHHALIAR, Rawal Chhatrasinghji, 
Rdwal of. A ruling chief; b. about 
the year 1863. Succeeded to the gadi 
June 21, 1888. Belongs to a Rajput 
(Hindu) family, which pays a tribute 
to the Gaekwar of Baroda, as well as 
to the Paramount Power. The area 
of the State is about 9 square miles. 
Residence: Chhaliar, Rewd Kantha, 
Bombay. 

CHHATAR. tfeeChhatra. 

CHHATAR SAL, Thakur of Mangalgarh, 
Rai Bahadur. The title of Rai Baha- 
dur was conferred on the Thakur of 
Mangalgarh as a personal distinction 
on May 20, 1896. Residence : Bhopal, 
Central India. 

CHHATARPUR, His Highness Maha- 
raja Vishwanath Singh Bahadur, 
Mahdrdjd of. A ruling chief; b. 
August 29, 1866. Succeeded to the 
gadi November 14, 1866. Belongs to 
a Puar Rajput (Hindu) family; de- 
scended from the Sarddr Soneh Sah, 
a Sarddr of the Panna Raj, who was 
in military possession of the Chha- 
tarpur jdgir when the British acquired 
Bundelkhand. He was granted a 
sanad by the British Government in 
1806, and was succeeded by his son, 
the Raja Partab Singh. The grand- 
nephew of the latter was the Rdjd 
Jagat Raj, the father of the present 
Raja, who received the title of Maha- 
raja as a personal distinction on May 



25, 1895. The family motto is Agni 
pratdp Vishweshah ("As fire resplen- 
dent, Lord of the World "). The area 
of the State is 1169 square miles ; its 
population about 167,700, chiefly 
Hindus, with about 5500 Muhamma- 
dans and 749 Jains. The Maharaja 
maintains a military force of 39 
cavalry, 814 infantry, and 39 guns, 
and is entitled to a salute of 11 guns. 
Residence : Chhatarpur, Bundelkhand, 
Central India. 

CHHATRA KUNWAI (of Amgaon), 
Rdjd. The title is hereditary, and was 
originally derived from Rdjd Hindi 
Shah of Garha-Mandla. The family 
is Lodhi. Residence: Jabalpur, Central 
Provinces. 

CHHATRA SINGH, Subaddr- Major, 
Rai Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on June 24, 1887, 
for eminent military service. Re- 
sidence: Burma. 

CHHEDI LAL, Lala, Rat Bahddur. The 
title is personal, and was bestowed on 
June 1, 1888. The Rai Bahadur's 
grandfather, Lala Sadasukh, was a 
wealthy grain and cotton merchant in 
Cawnpur. Residence: Cawnpur, North- 
western Provinces. 

CHH0TA BARKHERA, Bhumia Mugat 
Singh, Bhumia of. A ruling chief; 
b. 1865. Succeeded to the gadi Sep- 
tember 14, 1889. Is descended from 
a Bhilala family. The population of 
the State is about 125, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence: Chhota Barkhera, Bhopa- 
war, Central India. 

CHHOTA UDAIPUR, Maharawal Shri 
Fattehsinghji, Maharawal of. A rul- 
ing chief; b. October 22, 1884. Suc- 
ceeded the late Maharawal Motisin- 
ghji on February 29, 1895. Belongs 
to a Chauhan Rajput (Hindu) family ; 
descended from the famous Patai 
Rawal, the last Chauhan Chief of 
Champaner, from whom also descend 
the Chiefs of Baria. When Cham- 
paner was captured by the Muham- 
madans under Muhammad Begar in 
1484, the Chauhans moved to Chhota 
Udaipur and to Baria. The Rdjd 
Jitsinghji, grandfather of the present 
Mahdrdwdl, bravely resisted Tantia 
Topi during the Mutiny of 1857 ; and 
the latter was defeated by General 
Parke when encamped before the town 
of Chhota Udaipur. The family at 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



51 



one time occupied a fort at Mohan ; it 
pays tribute to the Gaekwar of Ba- 
roda. The area of the State is about 
873 square miles ; its population about 
71,000, chiefly Bhils or Kolis or other 
aboriginal tribes. The Maharawal 
maintains a military force of 50 cavalry, 
256 infantry, and 4 guns; and is en- 
titled to a salute of 9 guns. Residence: 
Chhota Udaipur, Rewa Kantha, Bom- 
bay. 
CHIKLI, Guman Singh, Chief of. A 
ruling chief; b. about the year 1864. 
Succeeded to the gadi November 1, 
1888. Is a Muhammadan, but de- 
scended from a Wasava Bhil (ab- 
original) family. The area of the State 
is about 200 square miles ; its popula- 
tion about 1444, chiefly (aboriginal) 
Bhils. Residence: Chikli, Khandesh, 
Bombay. 

CHIKTIABAE, Bhumia Umed Singh, 
Bhumia of. A ruling chief ; b. about 
1845. Succeeded to the gadi in 1864. 
The population of the State is about 
415, chiefly Hindus. Residence : Chik- 
tiabar, Bhopawar, Central India. 

CHIKURDE, Deshmukh of. See Vithal- 
rao. 

CHINCHLI, Naik Jinmya naiad Gudad 
Bhavan, Chief of. A ruling chief. 
The State is also called Dang Chinch- 
ligadad, being one of the numerous 
Dang States in Khandesh; and the 
Chief or Naik, sometimes called Zimna 
walad Bhawan, is a minor and un- 
married ; belongs to an aboriginal Bhil 
tribe. The area of the State is about 
27 square miles; and its population 
about 1668. Residence: Chinchli, Khan- 
desh, Bombay. 

CHINGACHUN VITTIL G0PALAN 
NAYAR, Rao Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1894. 
Residence: Madura, Madras. 

CHINTAMANI DE, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on June 3, 1893. 
Residence: Howrah, Bengal. 

CHHIAKAL, Kerala Varma Raja, Va- 
liya Rdjd of; b. 1849. Is the head of 
one of the branches of the Kolattiri 
House, the Raja of Kolattiri having 
been one of those ?chief tains among 
whom Cheraman Perumal, Emperor 
of Malabar, divided his dominions 
when he became a Buddhist and re- 
tired from the world in 352 a.d. In 
1734 the Chirakal Raja was acknow- 



ledged by all members of the Kolattiri 
House as the head of the family, and 
was entrusted with the administra- 
tion. The Raja at the time of Tippu's 
invasion in 1789 was named Rama 
Yarma, and he committed suicide 
to avoid falling into the hands of the 
conqueror. A prince, who took refuge 
in the jungles until the English ob- 
tained possession of the country, was 
recognized by them in 1795 as R&ja. 
The family, like that of the Zamorin 
of Calicut and other Chiefs of Mala- 
bar, follows the Marumakkatayam 
law of inheritance, by which the suc- 
cession is to the offspring of its female 
members, among whom the next eldest 
male after the Raja is his heir-appar- 
ent. The late Valiya Raja of Chirakal 
was called Rajaha Raja, and he was 
succeeded by the present Valiya Raja 
under the Marumakkatayam law. He 
receives an allowance from Govern- 
ment, in compensation for the estate 
that belonged to his ancestors. Re- 
sidence : Malabar, Madras. 

CHDRODA, Devi Singh, Chief of A 
ruling chief. This chief is of a Rajput 
(Hindu) family. His State contains 
an area of about 1 square mile, with 
a population of 241, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence : Chiroda, Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay. 

CHITARI, JVawdb of. See Muhammad 
Mahmud Ali Khan. 

CHITNAVIS, Gangadhar Rao Madhao, 
The Hon., CLE. See Gangadhar. 

CHITPAL SINGH (of Nurpur Chitpal- 
garh), Rdjd : b. August 7, 1847. Suc- 
ceeded his father as Raja in 1852. 
The title is hereditary, and was so 
recognized on May 9, 1866. The Raja 
represents one of the chief families 
of the ancient Sombansi race, and is 
the most direct descendant of the 
great Raja of Partabgarh. The Raja 
Duniapat, who possessed Partabgarh, 
was succeeded by his widow, the Tha- 
kurain Kusal Kunwar, who adopted 
Shiuratan Singh of Karain and Tar- 
wal. His son was the Raja Dhir 
Singh of Chitpalgarh ; and the grand- 
son of the latter is the present Raja, 
who was educated at the Partabgarh 
High School, was appointed to the 
Statutory Civil Service in 1881, and 
is now an Assistant Commissioner in 
Oudh. Residence: Partabgarh, Oudh. 



52 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



CHITRADHAR MISRA, Pandit, Mahd- 
mahopddhydya. Received the title on 
June 3, 1899. Residence: Darbhanga, 
Bengal. 

CHOBEY RADHA CHARAN, Rai Ba- 
hadur. See Radha. 

CHORANGLA, Rawal Ramsinghji, Rd- 
wal of. A ruling chief; b. about the 
year 1846, of a Rajput (Hindu) family. 
His State contains an area of nearly 
4 square miles, and a population of 
about 1300, chiefly Hindus. Residence : 
Chorangla, Rewa Kantha, Bombay. 

CHOTA LAL SIJWAR, CLE. Was 

created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
January 1, 1884. 

CHOTA NAGPUR, Mahdrdjd of. See 
Pratap Udit Nath Sahai Deo, Maha- 
raja. 

CHOTA NAGPTJR. See Chutia N&gpur. 

CHOWBE RAGHUNATH Das, Rai Ba- 
hadur. See Raghunath. 

CHUIKADAN, Mahant of. See Kondka. 

CHUMPA. See Champa. 

CHUNDER. See Chandra. 

CHUNTLAL BOSE (or Basu), Rai Baha- 
dur. Received the title on January 2, 
1899. Is an eminent Professor of the 
Medical College, Calcutta. Residence: 
Calcutta. 

CHUNILAL SERAOGI, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred, as a personal 
distinction, on June 22, 1897. Re- 
sidence : Dibrugarh, Assam. 

CHUNTLAL VENILAL, C.I.E. Rao Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on February 16, 1887. 
Created a CLE. on May 20, 1896. 
Residence: Broach, Bombay. 

CHURA, Thakur Becharsinghji Raisin- 
ghji, Thakur of. A ruling chief; 
b. February 9, 1840. Succeeded to the 
yadi January 1, 1844; is a scion of the 
Wadhwan family, being a Jhala Raj- 
put, and thus connected in race with 
the ruling Houses of Wankaner and 
Dhrangadra. The present Thakur has 
a son and heir, named Kumar Madha- 
vasinghji. Residence: Chura, Kathia- 
war, Bombay. 

CHUTIA NAGPUR, Mahdrdjd of. See 
Pratap Udit Nath Sahai Deo, Mahd- 
rdjd. 



COCHIN, His Highness Raja Sir Sri 
Rama Varma, K. C.S.I. Rdjd of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1852. Succeeded to 
the yadi in 1895. Belongs to a Hindu 
family of pure Kshatriya blood, claim- 
ing descent (with the Royal House of 
Travancore) from the ancient Chiefs 
who ruled from Gokura in North 
Kanara to the southernmost point of 
India. In the time of Haidar Ali in 
Maisur, the Raja of Cochin was tri- 
butary to that potentate ; but in 1798 
he signed a treaty, acknowledging him- 
self tributary to the British Power. 
The predecessor of the present Raja 
was His Highness the Raja Sir Vira 
Kerala Yarma, K.C.I.E. His High- 
ness the present Raja was created a 
Knight Commander of the Most Ex- 
alted Order of the Star of India on 
June 22, 1897, on the auspicious oc- 
casion of the Diamond Jubilee of Her 
Majesty the Queen Empress. The 
armorial bearings of the family are a 
palanquin with umbrella, lamp, and 
conch or chank-shell. The heir-ap- 
parent, who always bears the courtesy 
title of the " Elaya Raja," is Raja Vira 
Kerala Varma, born in 1854. The 
area of the State is 1361 square miles; 
its population about 600,000, chiefly 
Hindus, with about 33,000 Muham- 
madans and 136,000 Christians. His 
Highness maintains a military force 
of 16 cavalry, 327 infantry, and 4 guns, 
and is entitled to a salute (hereditary) 
of 17 guns. Residence: Tripuntora, 
Ernakolam, Southern India. 

C00CH BEHAR, Mahdrdjd of. See 
Kuch Behar. 

C0WASJEE. See Kawasji. 

CUDDALORE VENK0BA CHARIYAR, 

Diwdn Bahadur. See^ Venkoba. 

CUMARASWAMI. See Kumaraswami. 

CURSETJEE. See Kharsedji. 

CUTCH, His Highness the Rao of. See 
Kutch. 

DASHA, Motamia Gulabmia, Mian of. 
A ruling chief; b. July 21, 1868. 
Succeeded to the yadi July 6, 1893. 
Is one of the Gaekwar's tributaries. 
Belongs to a family claiming descent 
from the Jhala Rajputs of Halwar 
in Kathiawar; his ancestor, Hari 
Singh ji, who was in the service of 
Shah Mahmud Begara of GujarAt, 
became a Musalman in 1483. The area 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



53 



of the State is about 99 square miles ; 
its population is 1922, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence: Dabha, Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay. 

DABIR, Bhumia of. See Jamnia. 

DABRI, Thakur Parbat Singh, Thakur 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1878. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi as a minor in 1885. 
Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family. 
Residence: Dabri, "Western Malwa, 
Central India. 

DAD MUHAMMAD KHAN, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India. Residence : Dadu Dero, Sind. 

DADA MATHOJI SHELKE, Rao Saheb. 
Received the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence : Poona, Bombay. 

DADABHAI HORMUSJI DUBASH, 

Khan Bahadur. The Khan Bahadur 
received the title, as a personal dis- 
tinction, on May 25, 1892. Residence : 
Bombay. 

DADABHAI PALANJI, Khan Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on April 21, 1882. Residence: 
Poona, Bombay. 

DADHALYA, Thakur Jaswant Singhji, 
Thakur of. A ruling chief; b. 1830. 
Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family 
that came originally from Udaipur. 
His ancestor Vikaji was in the service 
of Kalyan Mai, Rao of Idar, from 
whom he obtained the grant of Dad- 
halya in 1674; is tributary to the 
Gaekwar and to Idar. The area of 
the State is 72 square miles ; its 
population 3877, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence: Dadhalya, Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay. 

DADOBA SAKHARAM SHIRVALKAR, 

Rao Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on January 1, 1892. Residence: Poona, 
Bombay. 

DADU GULAB SINGH, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Seoni, Central Provinces. 

DAFLAPUR, Chief of. See Jath. 

DAJI GOVIND GUPTE, Rao Bahddur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on February 28, 1883. Residence: 
Thana, Bombay. 



DAJI NILKANTH NAGARKAR, Rao 

Bahddur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1877. 
Residence : Poona, Bombay. 

DAJI RAM CHANDRA, Rai Saheb. 
The title was conferred on May 25, 
1895. Residence: Nagpur, Central 
Provinces. 

DAKHINESHWAR MAIIA, Kumar. 
The title was conferred on June 3, 
1893. Residence : Siarsol, Bengal. 

DAL CHAND (of Sahanpur), Rai; b. 
October 1827. The title is hereditary. 
Is the representative of a Jat family 
of ancient origin, who came from 
Jind in the middle of the 16th cen- 
tury. A scion of this family, named 
Muchh Padarath, founded the town 
of Nagal on the Ganges; and rising 
to high favour with Prince Salim 
(afterwards the Emperor Jahangir) in 
the Court of the Emperor Akbar, 
obtained a Dress of Honour, the title 
of Rai, and the grant of the territory 
between Nagal and Barhapura. The 
Rai Tapraj Singh, grandfather of the 
present Rai, was a man of great in- 
fluence. The Rai has four sons — 
Partab Singh, Harbans Singh, Jagat 
Singh, and Bharat Singh. Residence : 
Sahanpur, Bijnaur, North-Western 
Provinces. 

DAL SINGH (of Nihil), Rao; b. 1842. 
Succeeded his father, Rao Jetsingh, in 
1884. The title is hereditary. Be- 
longs to a family of Katehria Rajputs, 
claiming descent from Rao Hari Singh, 
who, in the 16th century, settled in 
Gola Raipur on the river Khanant. 
A farmdn of the Emperor Shah Jahan, 
dated 1645, conferred the Zaminddri 
of Gola on Vikrama Singh, a descend- 
ant of Rao Hari Singh, and subse- 
quently the family removed to Nahil. 
They had many struggles with the 
Pathans during the 17th and 18th 
centuries, in the course of which, on 
one occasion, the Rao Gopal Singh, 
Katehria, Thakur of Nahil, was slain 
in an engagement, leaving only a 
widow and two infant sons as the sole 
representatives of the family. Rao 
Jetsingh, father of the present Rao, 
did good service in the Mutiny, 
defending the town of Pawayan when 
the Maulavi Ahmadullah Shah be- 
sieged it in 1857 ; and he also supplied 
provisions to the British forces on 



54 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



their arrival in the district. The Rao 
Dal Singh has three sons — Bechu 
Singh, Jagannath Singh, and Sardan 
Singh. Residence : Nahil, Shahjahan- 
pur, North- Western Provinces. 

DALIP SINGH, CLE. (of Baghat), 

Rand. See Baghat. 

DALISNA, Thakur Daulat Singh, Thd- 
kur of. A ruling chief; b. 1857. 
Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family. 
The population of the State is 765. 
Residence: Dalisna, Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay. 

DALPATRAM DAYABHAI, CLE. Was 
created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
on June 6, 1885. Residence : Bombay. 

DALPATRAM PRANJIVAN KHAKAR, 

Rao Saheb; b. at Diu on November 
1, 1835. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on February 16, 1887. 
Was educated at the Elphinstone 
College, Bombay, where he took high 
honours. Appointed to the Bombay 
Education Service, 1859 ; greatly dis- 
tinguished himself as Educational 
Inspector of Kutch, as tutor to His 
Highness the Rao of Kutch, and in 
other ways. Has written and edited 
many important works. Retired on 
pension in 1866 ; and in 1887 received 
the title in honour of the Jubilee of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty's reign. 
Is a Member of the Managing Com- 
mittee of the Seth Gokuldas Tejpal 
Charities, and a Trustee of the same ; 
also a Member of the Bombay Branch 
of the Royal Asiatic Society, and 
other learned societies. The Rao 
Saheb married, 1859, Devkorbai, 
daughter of Meghji Jadavji, physician 
of Bhaunagar,and has a son, Mazaulal, 
born November 11, 1870. He is a 
Brahma-Kshatriya by caste, and be- 
longs to a family long settled in the 
Portuguese dominions in Western 
India. Residence : 10 Cowasji Patel's 
Tank Road, Bombay. 

DAMARA KUMARA MADDU VENKA- 
TAPPA NAYUDU BAHADUR GARTJ 
(of Kalahasti), Rdjd. See Kalahasti. 

DAMODAR DAS, Rai Bahadur. An 
Honorary Magistrate of Bareilly. 
Granted the title, as a personal dis- 
tinction, January 2, 1893. Residence : 
Bareilly, North- Western Provinces. 



DAMODAR MAYARAM, Rao Saheb. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on May 20, 1890. Residence: 
Surat, Bombay. 

DAMODAR SASTRI, Pandit, Mahdma- 
hopddhydya. Received the title on 
June 3, 1899 ; it entitles him to rank 
in Darbar immediately after titular 
Rajas. Is Professor of Sanskrit in 
Benares College. Residence: Benares. 

DAMODAR VIJAYARANGAM MUDA- 
LIYAR, Rao Saheb. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1898. Resi- 
dence : Poona, Bombay. 

DANAKOTI MUDALTYAR, A., Rai 

Bahadur; b. 1852. A landowner in 
Madras, and Member of the Madras 
Municipal Commission, 1885. Granted 
the personal title of Rai Bahadur, 
1887. Residence: Madras. 

DANTA, Maharana Jaswantsinghji 
Harisinghji, Mahdrdnd of. A ruling 
chief ; b. October 14, 1850. Succeeded 
to the gadi December 1, 1876. Is 
tributary to the Gaekwar and to Idar. 
Belongs to a very ancient family of 
Pramara Rajputs, who are said to 
have come from Ujjain, and to have 
settled in Sind in the year 809 a.d. 
The area of the State is 2300 square 
miles; its population about 18,000. 
The Maharana maintains a military 
force of 70 cavalry and 67 infantry. 
Residence: Danta, Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay. 

DARA SHIK0H, alias BALA KHAN, 
Khdn Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on June 22, 1897. Residence: 
Pilibhit, North- Western Provinces. 

DARAB PESH0TAN SATJJANA, Das- 

tur, Shams-ul-Ulama. Received the 
title on June 3, 1899r Is Parsi High- 
Priest. Residence: Bombay. 

DARASHA RATANJI CHICHGAR, 

Khdn Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1899. Residence : 
Bombay. 
DARBHANGA, Maharaja Rameshwar 
Singh Bahadur, Mahdrdjd of. One 
of the Premier Nobles of British 
India; b. January 16, 1860. Suc- 
ceeded to the f/adi on the death of 
his elder brother, the late Maharaja 
Lachhmeswar Singh Bahadur, on 
December 17, 1898. In the great 
Bengal famine of 1873-74, the late 
Maharaja expended nearly £300,000 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



55 



in charitable relief; and the family has 
since then always taken the foremost 
part in every public philanthropic 
work in Bengal, and indeed in every 
part of the Empire — to which its vast 
revenues have been largely devoted. 
Belongs to an ancient Rajput family, 
whose ancestor, Mahesh Thakur, ob- 
tained the title of Raja, and the grant 
of the Darbhanga Raj, from the Mug- 
hal Emperor of Delhi, Akbar the 
Great, early in the 16th century. Ma- 
hesh Thakur died in the year 1558 
a.d., leaving five sons — Ram Chandra 
Thakur, Gopal Thakur, Achit Thakur, 
Parmanand Thakur, and Subhankar 
Thakur. Some of the elder sons 
succeeded in turn to the Raj, but they 
all died without issue, and the family 
was continued in the line of the 
youngest son, the Raja Subhankar 
Thakur. He died in 1607, leaving six 
sons. Of these the eldest, Puru- 
shottam, succeeded to the Raj ; and 
on his death in 1642 was succeeded by 
his brother, Sundar Thakur. He held 
the Raj for twenty years, and dying 
in 1662 was succeeded by his eldest 
son, Mahinath Thakur. The latter 
died in 1684 without issue, and was 
succeeded by his brother, Nirpat Tha- 
kur, who ruled till 1700 a.d., when he 
died, and was succeeded by his son 
the great Raja Raghu Singh. He ob- 
tained the confirmation of the heredi- 
tary title of Raja through the Nawab 
Mahabat Jang, who was at that time 
Mughal Subahdar of Behar. He also 
obtained from the Mughal Govern- 
ment the grant of the lease of the 
whole of the Sarkdr Tirhut — including 
the modern districts of Muzaffarpur 
and Darbhanga — on the payment to 
Government of an annual revenue of 
Rs.100,000. The enormous value, in 
those early times, of this grant may 
be gathered from the fact that in 1685 
a.d. the revenue of Sarkdr Tirhut was 
officially returned at Rs.769,287. At 
one time, during the administration 
of the Raja Raghu Singh, the Nawab 
Subahdar, jealous of the vast wealth 
accumulated by the Raja, seized his 
property and carried off his family as 
prisoners to Patna, the Raja himself 
only preserving his liberty by prompt 
flight. Subsequently, however, he 
was restored to favour, and received 
large grants from the Mughal Govern- 
ment, on condition that he should 



" do justice, relieve distress, and put 
the country in a flourishing condition." 
These stipulations have been liberally 
fulfilled by Raja Raghu's descendants 
and successors in the Raj. This Raja 
built a large mud fort at Bhawara, 
near Madhubani, the ruins of which 
still remain there, and the family 
resided there for the next half-century. 
He died in 1736, and was succeeded by 
his son, the Raja Bishnu Singh. The 
latter died without issue in 1740, and 
was succeeded by his brother, the Raja 
Narendra Singh, who received large 
grants from the Nawab Subahdar Ali 
Vardi Khan, on condition of his engag- 
ing for the revenue, and supporting 
the interests of the Mughal Govern- 
ment. The Raja Narendra Singh died 
without issue in 1760 ; but he adopted 
Pratap Singh, the great-great-grandson 
of Narayan Thakur, younger brother 
of the Raja Sundar Thakur, and son 
of the Raja Subhankar Thakur men- 
tioned above. Raja Pratap Singh 
determined to remove the family resi- 
dence from the fort of Bhawara ; and 
he built a new Rajbari at Darbhanga, 
to which he removed in 1762, and it 
has been the seat of the family ever 
since. Raja Pratap Singh died in 
1776, and was succeeded by his brother, 
the Raja Madhu Singh. In that year 
the Raja received from Shah Alam, 
the Mughal Emperor of Delhi, the 
grant of Dharmpur, in the district of 
Purniah. The Raja Madhu Singh, 
during a long administration of thirty- 
two years, had frequent disputes with 
the Calcutta Government in regard to 
the revenue payments and the extent 
of his rights over the land. These 
disputes at one time became so acute 
that the settlement was made with 
others; but ultimately he obtained 
from the Board of Revenue the re- 
storation of his estates. The Raja 
Madhu died in 1808, leaving five sons 
— Kishan Singh, who died without 
issue; Chhatar Singh, who succeeded 
him, and three others. Chhatar Singh 
is the first of the Darbhanga Rajas 
who is recorded to have held the 
higher title of Maharaja Bahadur, 
though it is probable that it had also 
been held by some at least of his 
ancestors. The Maharaja Chhatar 
Singh, who succeeded to the gadi in 
1808, lived till 1839; when, on the 
ground of old age, he made over his 



5<5 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



estates and the title to his elder sou 
Rudra Singh — giving to his younger 
son, Bisdeo Singh, for maintenance, 
the Raj villages in Jarail, four houses, 
two elephants, and apartments in the 
Darbhanga Palace. He asked to have 
Kudra Singh's name entered in the 
Bengal Revenue Roll, and died a few 
days afterwards. These arrangements 
led to extensive litigation, as the 
younger son claimed a large share of 
the estates. Ultimately the High 
Court decided that the law of inherit- 
ance in this family must follow the 
family custom, and not the ordinary 
Hindu law ; and by the family custom 
(or Kuldchdr) the eldest son succeeds 
to the Raj, the younger obtaining 
sufficient properties in land for their 
maintenance, which lands (as under 
feudal tenure) revert to the Raj on 
failure of male issue. The Maharaja 
Rudra Singh died in 1850, leaving 
four sons — Maheshwar Singh (who 
succeeded him), Ganeshwar Singh, 
Nitreshwar Singh, and Gopeshwar 
Singh. For ten years the Maharaja 
Maheshwar Singh held the Raj. He 
died on October 20, 1860, leaving two 
sons, the late Maharaja Bahadur, 
Lachhmeswar Singh, who succeeded 
him, and the present Maharaja Baha- 
dur Rameshwar Singh. 

The late Maharaja Lachhmeswar 
Singh Bahadur, and the present Maha- 
raja Bahadur, were under the guardian- 
ship of the Court of "Wards during 
their minority; and had the great 
advantage of having, as tutor, a very 
able and sympathetic English gentle- 
man, Mr. Chester Macnaghten, whose 
capacity for this work was so marked 
that he was afterwards selected by the 
Government for the Principalship of 
the Rajkumar College at Rajkot, in 
Kathiawar, for the Princes and Chiefs 
of Western India. After the late 
Maharaja attained his majority he 
entirely devoted himself to the public 
duties of his position as one of the 
greatest nobles of British India. He 
long served as a Member of the 
Legislative Council of the Viceroy, 
and took a leading part in the debates 
of that body. During the lengthened 
discussions on the important Bengal 
Tenancy Bill, he acted (in conjunction 
at first with the lamented patriot, 
Kristodas Pal, and subsequently with 
the Raja Piari Mohan Mukharji, 



C.S.I.) as the representative of the 
landowners of Bengal and Behar; 
and received warm recognition of the 
ability and moderation he brought to 
bear on this and other questions from 
successive Viceroys. To the public 
at large he was best known as one of 
the most munificent of living philan- 
thropists. In addition to the £300,000 
expended in charitable relief during 
the Bengal famine of 1873-74, in every 
time of scarcity the late Maharaja's 
arrangements for meeting it were on 
a splendid scale, and were in many 
cases the models for the Government 
measures. He built, and entirely 
supported, a first-class Dispensary at 
Darbhanga, which cost £3400; a similar 
one at Kharakpur, which cost £3500 ; 
and largely contributed to many others. 
He built an Anglo-vernacular school 
at a cost of £1490, which he main- 
tained, as well as nearly thirty ver- 
nacular schools of different grades ; 
and subsidized a much larger number 
of educational institutions. He con- 
structed hundreds of miles of roads in 
various parts of the Raj, planting 
them with tens of thousands of trees 
for the comfort of travellers. He 
constructed iron bridges over all the 
navigable rivers of the Raj, and com- 
pleted an elaborate system of irriga- 
tion works, for prevention of famine. 
In carrying out his duties as one of 
the largest landowners of India he 
had the advantage of the assistance 
of several very able English managers 
in succession, specially selected with 
the approval of the Government — in- 
cluding Colonel Money, of the Staff 
Corps, Mr. G. W. Llewhellin and Mr. 
Henry Bell, formerly of the Bengal 
Civil Service. With the aid of these 
gentlemen and others', the Darbhanga 
Raj has attained the proud position 
of being regarded as the model for 
good and benevolent management. 
The late Maharaja devoted special 
attention to all agricultural improve- 
ments, and especially to improvements 
in the breeds of horses and cattle in 
Behar. He was a liberal patron of 
the turf, and was the owner of the 
largest and most valuable racing stud 
in India, under experienced English 
trainers; and he was also a keen 
sportsman and a first-rate whip, his 
jungles on the Nepal frontier affording 
some of the best sport in the country. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



57 



The new Palace at Darbhanga, with 
its immense stables, its botanical and 
zoological gardens, and its many 
beautiful surroundings, is well known 
in England by the sketches that have 
appeared in the London illustrated 
papers. Most of the late Maharaja's 
munificence was devoted to objects of 
charity pure and simple, such as 
famine relief, medical aid, and the 
like. But he also contributed very 
largely to objects of general public 
utility — as, for instance, in the gift 
of Rs.50,000 to the funds of the 
Imperial Institute. In celebration of 
Her Majesty's Jubilee he remitted a 
large portion of the rents of all his 
tenants for the year 1887. It was 
computed that during his possession 
of the Raj an aggregate sum of some- 
thing like two millions sterling was 
expended on charities, works of public 
utility, and charitable remissions of 
rent. On the occasion of the Jubilee 
of the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty the late Maharaja Bahadur 
was created a Knight Commander of 
the Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire; and in 1897, His Highness 
was created a Knight Grand Com- 
mander of the same Most Eminent 
Order. The present Maharaja Baha- 
dur attained his majority in 1878, 
when he was nominated to the Bengal 
Civil Service, and served with much 
credit successively as Assistant-Magis- 
trate of Darbhanga, of Chhapra, and 
of Bhagalpur, when he retired from 
the Service. In 1886 he was created 
a Raja Bahadur in recognition of his 
high rank and position, was exempted 
from personal attendance in the Civil 
Courts, and appointed a Member of 
the Legislative Council of Bengal. 
Since his accession to the Raj in 
December 1897, he has been granted 
the title of Maharaja Bahadur. The 
family cognizance is the Gangetic 
dolphin or sacred fish of the Hindus. 
The Darbhanga Raj comprises large 
portions of the modern districts of 
Darbhanga, Muzaffarpur, Monghyr, 
Purniah, and Bhagalpur. The capital, 
Darbhanga, is the civil station of the 
district of the same name; it is a 
large and thriving town, with a 
population (by the census of 1881) of 
65,955, chiefly Hindus. Residence: 
Darbhanga, Tirhut, Bengal. 



DARGAHI LAL, Rai Bahadur; b. Novem- 
ber 21, 1816. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 2, 
1888, in recognition of eminent public 
services as a Municipal Commissioner 
of Cawnpur since 1862, and an Hon- 
orary Magistrate since 1879. The Rai 
Bahadur is a Kayasth by caste, and is 
a native of Bilgram in the Hardoi 
district ; but has practised as a Pleader 
at Cawnpur since 1842. Residence: 
Cawnpur, North- Western Provinces. 

DARIA KHERI, Thakur Onkar Singh, 
Thdkur of. A ruling chief; b. 1861. 
Succeeded to the gadi April 9, 1888. 
Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family ; 
the predecessor of the present Thakur 
was Thakur Ranjit Singh. The area 
of the State is about 6 square miles ; 
its population about 616. Residence: 
Daria Kheri, Bhopal, Central India. 

DARKUTI, Rana Ram Saran Singh, 
Rand of. A ruling chief; b. 1843. 
Succeeded to the gadi on October 15, 
1883. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) 
family, whose founder came from 
Marwar at an unknown date and 
settled in the Simla Hills. Twenty- 
three generations bore rule; and the 
father of the present chief was the 
Rana Ram Singh, who succeeded to 
the gadi in 1856. The Gurkhas over- 
ran this State, with others in the 
Simla Hills ; and when they were 
expelled by the British in 1815 the 
then Rand was confirmed in possession. 
The area of the State is about 4 
square miles ; its population 590, 
chiefly Hindus. The Rana maintains 
a military force of 10 infantry. Resi- 
dence : Darkuti, Simla Hills, Punjab. 

DARRI, Sawai of. See Janjit. 

DARYA KHAN, Khan Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
April 10, 1867. Residence: Hyder- 
abad, Sind. 

DARYAO SINGH (of Ghat Piparia), 
Thdkur; b. 1831. The title is heredi- 
tary, and was originally conferred by 
the Mughal Emperors of Delhi. The 
ancestors of the Thakur obtained Ghat 
Piparia in jdgir from the former 
Government of Sagar. Residence: 
Sagar, Central Provinces. 

DASPALLA, Raja Narayan Deo Bhanj, 
Raja of. A ruling chief ; b. 1860 ; 
succeeded to the gadi July 28, 1897. 



58 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Belongs to a Kshatriya (Hindu) family, 
said to be of the Solar race ; descended 
from a younger son of the Raja 
Narayan Bhanj of Bod (q.v.). The 
title of Raja has been enjoyed by the 
head of the family since the time of 
the Mahrattas; and was formally 
conferred by the British Government, 
May 21, 1874. The cognizance of the 
family is a peacock with tail spread. 
The area of the State, which is one of 
the Orissa Tributary Mahals, is about 
568 square miles ; its population about 
42,000, chiefly Hindus, but including 
about 13,000 Kandhs and other ab- 
original tribesmen. The Raja main- 
tains a force of 343 infantry and 8 
guns. Residence : Daspalla, Orissa, 
Bengal. 

DATANA, Thakur Bhawani Singh, 
Thdkur of. A ruling chief; b. 18t>4 ; 
succeeded to the gadi December 10, 
1880. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) 
family. Residence: Datana, Western 
Malwa, Central India. 

DATARPUR, Mian of. See Surma Ohand . 

DATIA, His Highness Maharaja Sir 
Lokindar Bhawani Singh Bahadur, 
K.C.S.I., Maharaja of. A ruling 
chief; b. August 13, 1854. Succeeded 
to the gadi November 20, 1857. 
Belongs to the great Bundela Rajput 
family descended from Bir Singh, who 
took the clan name of Bundela, and 
settled in Bundelkhand in the 13th 
century ; and from whom are descended 
the ruling families of Orchha, Datia, 
Panna, Ajaigarh, Charkhari, Bijawar, 
Sarila, etc. In the time of the 
Emperors Akbar and Jahangir, the 
Maharaja Bir Singh Deo was ruler of 
Orchha ; and his second son, Bhagwan 
Rai, became ruler of Datia. The 
State came under British control, with 
other territories in Bundelkhand, by 
the Treaty of Bassein, concluded with 
the Peshwa in 1802. The Raja 
Parichhat of Datia, whose first treaty 
with the British Government is dated 
1804, sided with the British throughout 
the subsequent wars with the Mah- 
rattas ; and was rewarded in 1817, on 
the deposition of the Peshwa, by a 
new treaty and enlarged territories. 
His adopted son was the Raja Bijai 
Bahadur of Datia ; and the adopted 
son of the latter is the present chief, 
whose succession was disputed by 
Arjun Singh (an illegitimate son of 



the Raja Bijai Bahadur), but was 
enforced by British troops. The 
ancient title of the family was 
Maharaja Rao Raja. In 1865 the 
Government recognized the title of 
Maharaja as hereditary ; and on 
January 1, 1877, at the Imperial 
Assemblage at Delhi, in honour of the 
Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India, the title 
of Lokindar was added. The motto 
of the family is Wir dalap Sharandah 
(" Lord of the Brave Army, Giver of 
Refuge "). His Highness was created 
a Knight Commander of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India on 
January 1, 1898. The area of the 
State is about 836 square miles ; its 
population about 183,000, chiefly 
Hindus, but including some 9000 
Muhammadans. His Highness the 
Maharaja maintains a military force 
of 945 cavalry, 5203 infantry, and 124 
guns ; and is entitled to a salute of 
15 guns. Residence : Datia, Bundel- 
khand, Central India. 

DATTA. ffeeDtttt 

DATU GANESH SABNIS, Rao Saheb. 
Received the title on January 2, 1899, 
for good service in the Medical De- 
partment. Residence : Bombay. 

DAUDBHAI IRAHIM, Khan Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on May 21, 
1898. Residence : Surat, Bombay. 

DAUDBHAI MUSABHAI, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Residence : Bombay. 

DAULAT CHANDRA RAI, Kumar. 
The title was conferred on June 3, 
1893. Residence: 24 Parganas, Ben- 
gal. 

DAULAT RAM, CLE." Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 1, 1883. Created a CLE. 
on June 22, 1897. Residence : Jaland- 
har, Punjab. 

DAULAT SHAH, Lala, Rai Saheb; b. 
1844 ; received the title on January 1, 
1897. Residence : Gujrat, Punjab. 

DAULATRAI SAMPATRAI, Munshi, 
Rao Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on February 16, 
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee of 
the reign of Her Most Gracious Majesty. 
Residence : Surat, Bombay. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



59 



DAURAN KHAN, Mir, Kurd, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Residence: Balu- 
chistan. 

DAVID SOLOMAN, Khan Saheb. See 
Soloman. 

DAYA KISHAN, Rai; b. December 5, 
1842. The title is hereditary. Is the 
son of Rai Hingan Lai, Kayasth, 
formerly Tahsildar of Dehra Dun; 
who had a jdgir and the honorary 
title of Deputy Magistrate and Col- 
lector conferred on him on August 4, 
1858, for special services rendered to 
the Government during the Mutiny in 
the Jaunpur district. The Rai has a 
son and heir named Madan Makund, 
born February 25, 1865. Residence: 
Jaunpur, North- Western Provinces. 

DAYABHAI KALIANJI DESAI, Rao 

Saheb. Received the title on June 3, 
1899. Residence : Bombay. 

DAYAL CHANDRA SHOM, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on May 26, 
1894. Residence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

DAYAL SINGH (of Majithia), Sarddr; 
h. 1848 a.d. The title is hereditary, 
derived originally from the Sikh 
Government, and confirmed by the 
British Government. The family is 
of the Shergil Jat tribe. The great- 
grandfather of Sardar Dayal Singh, 
who was named Jodh Singh, was 
a feudal retainer of Sardar Amar 
Singh Bagga, who possessed a large 
territory in the district now called 
Gurdaspur, and held a considerable 
jdgir. He died in 1788. His only 
son, Sardar Desa Singh, remained in 
the service of the Bagga Sardars till 
1809. He entered the service of the 
Maharaja Ranjit Singh on the reduc- 
tion of the Bagga Sardars, and 
accompanied the Maharaja in his 
famous expedition to Kangra. After 
the expulsion of the Gurkhas he was 
appointed Governor of the Hill States. 
He continued to perform valuable 
service ; and with his son, Sardar 
Lahna Singh, received extensive grants 
from Ranjit Singh. He died in 1832, 
and was succeeded in all his estates 
and honours by Sardar Lahna Singh, 
father of the present Sardar, who 
received charge of the hill territory 
between the Ravi and the Sutlej. 
He proved a most capable Governor, 
but on the rise of Raja Hira Singh to 



power, he left the Punjab for a 
pilgrimage, to avoid the enmity of 
Pandit Jalla. After the close of the 
Sutlej campaign he returned to Lahore 
at the invitation of the Council and 
the Resident, and consented to join 
the Council. Subsequently, however, 
foreseeing further troubles, he deter- 
mined to leave the Punjab, and in 
January 1848 he left for Benares, 
where he died. He was a skilful 
mechanist and an original inventor, 
and greatly improved the Sikh 
ordnance. Residence: Majithia, Am- 
ritsar, Punjab. 

DAYAL SINGH (of Vadala), Sorter. 

The title is hereditary. Residence: 
Sialkot, Punjab. 

DAYAL SINGH, Gyani, Sarddr Bahadur. 
The title was conferred, as a personal 
distinction, on May 21, 1898, for 
services in the Thagi Department. 
Residence : Thagi Department. 

DAYALGARH, Sarddr of. See Saheb 
Singh ; see also Sundar Singh. 

DAYA WANT KUAR (of Kaimahra), 

Rani; b. 1848. Succeeded her son, the 
late Raja Achal Singh, on April 22, 
1896. The title is hereditary, the 
Rajas of Kaimabra belonging to the 
great Chauhan clan of Rajputs, and 
representing the elder branch of the 
Janwar family, the Rajas of Oel (q.v.) 
representing the junior branch. Re- 
sidence : Kaimahra, Kheri, Oudh. 

DAYEM HAKIM ABDULLA SHAH, 
Hakim Muhammad, Khdn Bahadur. 
See Muhammad. 

DEBI. See also Devi. 

DEBI PARSHAD, Rai. The title is 
personal ; was originally conferred by 
the Carnatic Nawab, and recognized 
December 1890. Residence: Hydera- 
bad, Deccan. 

DEBI PARSHAD, Rai Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 1, 1890. Residence: 
Bhandara, Central Provinces. 

DEBI PERSHAD, Lala, Rai Saheb. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Allahabad, North- Western 
Provinces. 

DEBI SINGH (of Rajwara), Rao; b. 
1860. The title is hereditary, and 
has come down from ancient times. 
The family is Bundela Rajput, and is 



60 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



a branch of that of the Rajas of 
Chanderi. Residence : Rajwara, Lalit- 
pur, North- Western Provinces. 

DEBI SINGH, Chaudhri (of Asaura), 

Rai Bahadur; b. September 4, 1839. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on December 1, 1888, for the Chaudhri's 
services in connection with the im- 
provement of agriculture. Residence : 
Meerut, North-Western Provinces. 

DEDHROTA, Thakur Punjaji, Thdiur 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1850. Belongs 
to a Koli (aboriginal) family. The 
area of the State is about 10 square 
miles ; its population about 1100. 
Residence: Dedhrota, Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay. 

DELHI SINGH (of Lakhnadon), Thakur. 
The title is hereditary, the Thakur 
being the representative of one of 
the ancient Chiefs of Seoni. Residence : 
Seoni, Central Provinces. 

DEO, Raja Bhikam Narayan Singh 
Bahadur, Raja of. Succeeded his 
father, the late Maharaja Sir Joy Pra- 
kash Singh Bahadur of Deo, K.C.S.I., 
in 1881. Belongs to a Sesodiya Rajput 
family, and claims to be descended 
from the ancestors of His Highness 
the Maharana of TJdaipur, through 
Raja Rai Bhan Singh Bahadur. The 
Raja Fatheh Narayan Singh, in 1782, 
and again in 1804, was rewarded by 
Government for his services with a 
grant of land and other honours. 
He was succeeded by his son, Ganesam 
Singh, who in 1816 was similarly 
rewarded with the grant of a Zamin- 
ddri ; and the son of the latter, Babu 
Manti Bhan Singh, rendered excellent 
service in theKol insurrection of 1831. 
Manti Bhan Singh was succeeded by 
his son, Joy Prakash Singh, who was 
conspicuous for his loyalty and faithful 
services during the Mutiny in 1857 ; 
and for his laudable exertions in 
keeping this part of the district in 
order, and in quelling the insurrection 
in the Chutia Nagpur division, he 
was at first honoured with the title of 
Maharaja Bahadur, and then in 1866 
created a Knight Commander of the 
Most Exalted Order of the Star of 
India. His only son is the present 
Raja Bahadur. Residence: Gya, 
Bengal. 

DEO DATT PANDE, Rai Bahadur; b. 
1852. Received the title, for meri- 



torious service in the Medical Depart- 
ment, on July 2, 1896. Residence: 
Sultanpur, Oudh. 

DEO RAO VINAYAK, Rao Saheb. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
June 1, 1888. Residence: Akola, 
Berar. 

DEODAR, Waghela Anandsingh Chan- 
daji, Thakur of. A ruling chief; b. 
1843; succeeded to the gadi in 1888. 
Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family. 
Residence : Deodar, Palanpur, Bombay. 

DEODAR, Waghela Dewaji Chandaji, 
Thakur of. A ruling chief; b. 1837. 
Succeeded to the gadi in 1 888 . Belongs 
to a Rajput (Hindu) family. Resid- 
ence: Deodar, Palanpur, Bombay. 

DEODAR, Waghela Gambhir Singh, 
Thakur of. A ruling chief ; b. 1834. 
Succeeded to the gadi April 1, 1890. 
Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family. 
Residence : Deodar, Palanpur, Bombay. 

DEODAR, Waghela Sardar Singh, 
Thakur of. A ruling chief ; b. 1853. 
Succeeded to the gadi April 1, 1890. 
Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family. 
Residence: Deodar, Palanpur, Bombay. 

DE0R, Rdjd of. See Raghuji Rao. 

DE0RA0 JAY KRISHNA, Rao Bahadur. 
Is Extra Assistant Commissioner in 
Berar. Received the title on January 
2, 1899. Residence : Berar. 

DERA, Rdjd of. See Rudr Partab Sah. 

DERBHAVTI, Raja Bhonrao Ratnu, 

Raja of. A ruling chief ; b. 1870. 
The chief belongs to a Bhil (aboriginal) 
family. The State, which is one of 
the Dang States in Khandesh, contains 
an area of about 76 square miles, and 
a population of nearly 5000, chiefly 
Bhils and Konknas (aboriginal tribes). 
Residence : Derbhavti, Khandesh, 
Bombay. 

DER0L, Thakur Ramsinghji, Thakur of. 
A ruling chief ; b. 1853. Belongs to a 
Koli (aboriginal) family. The area of 
the State is about 10 square miles ; 
its population is 1224, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence: Derol, Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay. 

DEVALIA, Thakur of. See Agar. 

DEVARAKOTA, Srimant Rdjd of. See 
Yarlagadda. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



61 



DEVENDRA NATH SAHAI DEO, 

Thcikur. The title is hereditary, and 
was originally conferred by the 
Mahdrdjd of Chota Ndgpur, and con- 
firmed on December 23, 1872. The 
family is a younger branch of that of 
the Rdjds of Chota Nagpur, and is 
said to be descended from the pandrik 
nag or sacred Serpent ; its cognizance 
or crest is a cobra with a human face 
under the expanded hood. Residence : 
Lohardaga, Bengal. 

DEVI PERSHAD, Munshl, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Is a Magistrate of Rewa. Residence: 
Rewa, Central India. 

DEWAIR, Thdkur Rdwat of See Hira, 
Rawat. 

DEWAS, His Highness Raja Krishnaji 
Rao Puar, Rdjd of {Senior Branch). 
" Bdbd Saheb." A ruling chief; b. 
November 1849 ; succeeded to the 
gadi March 18, 1861. Belongs, with 
His Highness the Raja of Dewds of 
the Junior Branch (who is called the 
"Dddd Saheb"), to a Puar Rajput 
family, descended from a common 
ancestor with the Rdjd of Dhar. The 
Raja Kaluji had two sons, Tukaji and 
Jiwaji, and these sons received from 
Baji Rao Peshwa the grant of the 
Dewas State in common — the de- 
scendants of Raja Tukaji being known 
as the Senior Branch or "Bdbd 
Saheb." Tukaji was succeeded by 
Krishnaji, and the latter by Tukaji 
II., who adopted Rukmangad Rao, 
commonly known as Khasi Saheb. 
He succeeded Tukaji II. in 1824 ; and, 
dying in 1860, was succeeded by his 
adopted son, the present chief. The 
two Rajas of Dewas, Senior Branch 
and Junior Branch (or Bdbd Saheb 
and Dddd Saheb), reside in different 
palaces in the same town of Dewds; 
but the rule of each chief is distinct 
within his own limits. Both chiefs 
rendered good service during the 
Mutiny. The area of the territories 
under the rule of the Bdbd Saheb is 
155 square miles ; population about 
73,940, chiefly Hindus, but including 
nearly 8000 Muhammadans. His 
Highness the Rdjd maintains a military 
force of 70 cavalry, 594 infantry, and 

14 guns ; and is entitled to a salute of 

15 guns. Residence: Dewds, Indore, 
Central India. 



DEWAS, His Highness Raja Narayan 
Rao Puar, Rdjd of (Junior Branch). 
" Dddd Saheb." A ruling chief; b. 
December 20, 1860. Succeeded to the 
gadi August 8, 1864. Belongs, with 
His Highness the Rdjd of Dewds of 
the Senior Branch (who is called the 
"Bdbd Saheb"), to a Puar Rdjput 
family, descended from a common 
ancestor with the Rdjd of Dhdr. The 
Rdjd Kaluji had two sons, Tukaji and 
Jiwaji, and these sons received from 
Bdji Rao Peshwd the grant of the 
Dewds State in common — the de- 
scendants of Rdjd Jiwaji being known 
as the Junior Branch or " Dddd Saheb." 
Jiwaji adopted Anand Rao Pudr, who, 
in 1837, adopted Haibat Rao, who 
succeeded him. The latter died in 
1864 and was succeeded by his son, the 
present Rdjd. The two Rdjds of De- 
was, Senior Branch and Junior 
Branch (or Bdbd Saheb and Dddd Sa- 
heb), reside in different palaces in the 
same town of Dewds, but the rule of 
each chief is distinct within his own 
limits. Both chiefs rendered good 
service during the Mutiny. The area 
of the territories under the rule of 
the Dddd Saheb is 134 square miles ; 
population 68,222, chiefly Hindus, but 
including nearly 7000 Muhammadans. 
His Highness the Rdjd maintains a 
military force of 79 cavalry, 166 in- 
fantry, and 6 guns, and is entitled to a 
salute of 15 guns. Residence: Dewds, 
Indore, Central India. 

DEWJI, ODHARJI CHOTANEE, Rao 
Saheb. Received the title on May 21, 
1898. Residence: Bombay. 

DEY, Kanny Lall, G.I.E., Rai Bahadur. 
See Kanhai Lai De. 

DHABLA DHIR and KAKARKHERI, 
Thakur Chand Singh, Thdkur of. A 
ruling chief; b. about 1836. Succeeded 
to the gadi in 1871. Belongs to a 
Rdjput (Hindu) family. The State, 
which is in the Bhopdl Agency, con- 
tains an area of about 10 square miles, 
and an estimated population of about 
1000, chiefly Hindus. Residence : Shu- 
jdwalpur, Bhopdl, Central India. 

DHABLA GHOSI, Thakur Gopal Singh, 
Thdkur of. A ruling chief ; b. about 
1820. Succeeded to the gadi in 1854. 
The population of his State (which is 
in the Bhopdl Agency) is about 400, 
chiefly Hindus. Residence: Shuja- 
walpur, Bhopdl, Central India. 



62 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



DHAKJT KASHINATHJI, Rao Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 20, 1890. Residence : Poona, 
Bombay. 

DHAMASIA, Thakur Kalubawa, Thd- 
kur of. A ruling chief; b. 1834. 
Belongs to a Rdjput (Muhammadan) 
family. The area of the State is 
about 5 miles ; its population is chiefly 
Bhil (aborigines) . Residence : Dha- 
masia, Rewd Kantha, Bombay. 

DHAMI, Rana Fateh Singh, Rand of. A 
ruling chief ; b. 1855. Succeeded to 
the yadi January 26, 1870. Belongs to 
a Rajput (Hindu) family, whose 
founder, on the invasion of India by 
Shahab-ud-din Ghori in the 14th cen- 
tury, fled from Rdjpura in the Ambdla 
district, and conquered the territory 
ofDhami. The State was formerly a 
feudatory of Bilaspur, but was made 
directly dependent on the British 
Power on the expulsion of the Gurkhas 
by the latter in 181 5. The sanad 
recognizing the Rand is dated Sep- 
tember 4, 1815. The present Rana 
succeeded the Rana Govardhan Singh 
in 1870. The area of the State is 29 
square miles ; its population about 
3300, chiefly Hindus . The Rana main- 
tains a military force of 60 infantry. 
Residence: Dhami, Simla Hills, Punjab. 

DHANAKOTI MUDALIYAR, Rai Baha- 
dur. See Danakoti. 

DHANAKOTI RAJU, W.E., Rao Baha- 
dur. See Danakoti. 

DHANAURA, Sarddr of. See Ujjal 
Singh. 

DHANDH0WAL, Sarddr of See Mit 
Singh ; see also Partab Singh, Panjab 
Singh, and Sher Singh. 

DHANGA0N, Rdwat of. See Sarddr 
Singh. 

DH AN JIBHAI FAKIR JI COMMODORE, 
C.I.E., Khdn Bahadur. Created a 
Khan Bahadur as a personal distinc- 
tion, January 2, 1893 ; and received 
the CLE. on January 1, 1899. Resid- 
ence : Rawal Pindi, Punjab. 

DHANJISHA HORMASJI, Khdn Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on February 16, 1887. Resi- 
dence : Kathiawar, Bombay. 

DHANPAT RAI, Rdjd. The title is 
personal, and was recognized on 
December 9, 1864. Residence: Luck- 
now, Oudh. 



DHANPAT RAI, Rai Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of Her Majesty's reign. 
Residence : Peshawar, Punjab. 

DHANPAT RAI, C.I.E., Rai Bahadur, 
Sarddr Bahadur. The Sarddr Bahadur 
is Superintendent of the famous Jaipur 
Imperial Service Transport Corps, and 
was created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire 
on January 1, 1899. Residence: Jaipur, 
Rajputdna. 

DHAR, His Highness Raja Udaji Rao 
Baba Saheb Puar, Rdjd of. A ruling 
chief. Belongs (with their Highnesses 
the Rdjds of Dewds, Senior and Junior 
Branch) to the great Pudr Rdjput 
(Hindu) family, said to be descended 
from the famous Hindu legendary 
heroes, King Vikramdditya and Rdjd 
Bhoj. Rdjd Bhoj is said to have been 
the first Pudr to come to Dhdr. About 
the year 1730 Anand Rao Pudr, Rdjd 
of Dhdr, was acknowledged by the 
Peshwd, Bdji Rao, to be the head of 
the Pudrs. One of the great historical 
Princesses of India, celebrated for her 
courage and abilities, and the deter- 
mination with which she resisted the 
attacks of Sindhia and Holkar, was 
the Rdni Mind Bai, widow of Anand 
Rao II., who was the great-grandson 
of his namesake. The Rani was suc- 
ceeded by her adopted son, Rdjd 
Rdmchandra Pudr, who adopted 
Jeswant Rao, the half-brother of the 
present Rdjd. Rdjd Jeswant Rao died 
in 1857, and the State was confiscated 
for rebellion during the Mutiny, but it 
was restored in 1864 to the present 
Rdjd, who was then a minor. The 
title of Viswas Rao (" Faithful ") is said 
to have been conferred on this family 
by the Mahdrdjds of Sdtdra, as the 
descendants of Sivaji and the heads of 
the Mahratta Empire, but it has not 
been recognized in recent years. The 
area of the State is about 1740 
square miles, and it has many feuda- 
tories. The population is about 148,000, 
chiefly Hindus, but including about 
12,000 Muhammadans and about 19,000 
aborigines . The late Rdjd was granted 
the title of Mahdrdjd as a personal 
distinction, and created a Companion 
of the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empire, January 1, 1883; he 
had been created a Knight Commander 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



63 



of the Most Exalted Order of the Star 
of India on January 1, 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India. His Highness maintains a 
military force of 367 cavalry, 1249 
infantry, and 5 guns ; and is entitled 
to a salute of 15 guns. Residence: 
Dhar, Bhopawar, Central India. 

DHARAM NARAYAN, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 2, 1888. Residence : Am- 
bala, Punjab. 

DHARAM NARAYAN PANDIT, CLE., 

Rai Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on February 15, 
1860. Residence: Indore, Central India. 

DHARAM SINGH (of Bichuri), Sardar; 
b. 1857. The title is hereditary. 
Belongs to a Jat family, of Manjha, 
Punjab. Sardar Dargaha Singh ac- 
quired considerable territory by con- 
quest in 1759 A.D., but his descendants 
were deprived of the largest portion of 
their estates by the Maharaja Ranjit 
Singh. The grandson of the Sardar 
Dargaha Singh was Sarddr Dewa 
Singh, who was the father of the 
present Sarddr. Residence: Bichuri, 
Jalandhar, Punjab". 

DHARAMPUR, His Highness Maha- 
rana Shri Narayandevji Ramdevji, 
Rdjd of; b. September 3, 1840. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi January 20, 1860. 
Belongs to the Solar race of Udaipur, 
and is consequently a Sesodiya Rajput. 
His Highness's ancestors have borne 
the title of Maharana from time 
immemorial. They were the Rajas of 
the Surat district when the British 
first came to the country, and have 
always been recognized by the Para- 
mount Power. His Highness has four 
sons— Shri Dharamdevji, Shri Mohan- 
devji, Shri Haridevji, and Shri Bal- 
devji. His banner bears a golden- 
yellow sun in the centre of the field, 
in virtue of his descent from " the Sun 
of the Hindus," the Udaipur Chief. 
Has two grandsons, also several 
daughters and grand-daughters ; and 
has received a sanad guaranteeing him 
the privilege of adoption. The area of 
the State is 794 square miles; its 
population about 102,000, chiefly 
Hindus. His Highness maintains a 
military force of 40 cavalry, 171 
infantry, and 4 guns, and is entitled 



to a salute of 9 guns. Residence ; 
Dharampur, Surat, Bombay. 

DHARAMPURA, Thdkur of. See Sheo- 
lal Singh. 

DHARI, Thakur Raesinghji Shiva- 
singhj i, Thdkur of. A ruling chief ; b. 
1862. Succeeded to a fifth share of this 
State on August 5, 1893. Belongs to 
a Solankhya Rajput family. The 
State has an area of 3 square miles, 
and a population of 1301. Residence : 
Dhari, Rewa Kantha, Bombay. 

DHARM RAJ SINGH, Thakur, Rao; b. 
March 26, 1874. Succeeded his father, 
the late Rao Lai Singh, on October 18, 
1897. The title is hereditary. Is 
descended from the Raja Sheoraj Deo, 
who in the year 1393 of the Samvat 
era came from Kanauj to Shiurajpur 
in the Cawnpur district. Residence : 
Sipai, Cawnpur, North-Western Pro- 
vinces. 

DHARMA RAO NAYADU, Rednam, Rao 

Bahadur, and Biwdn Bahadur; b. 
1857. Appointed Deputy Collector in 
1869 ; Assistant Commissioner of Salt 
Revenue in 1880 ; granted the personal 
title of Rao Bahadur in 1890 ; and that 
of Diwan Bahadur on January 1, 1896. 
Residence : Cocanada, Godavari Dis- 
trict, Madras. 

DHARMRAJ KUNWAR (of Parhat and 
Rajabazar), Rani; b. 1854. Succeeded 
her late husband, the Raja Mahesh 
Narayan of Rajabazar, on October 11, 
1878. The family are Raghubansi 
Rajputs, whose founder came from 
Kaliangarh Sawain, and acquired the 
territories of Rajabazar. The neigh- 
bouring Rajas conferred the title of 
Raja by tilak some 200 or 300 years 
ago, and the late Raja was the seventh 
who had borne the title. He was 
Raja of Parhat, in the district of 
Partabgarh, Oudh, as well as of Raja- 
bazar, and was an Honorary Magis- 
trate both in Oudh and in the North- 
Western Provinces. Residence : Raja- 
bazar, Garwara, Jaunpur District, 
North- Western Provinces. 

DHARNANDA, Thakur Bhim Singh, 
Thdkur of. A ruling chief; b. 1859. 
Succeeded to the gadi in December 
1887. Belongs to a Chauhan Rajput 
(Hindu) family, descended from Tha- 
kur Chhatar Sal, who was recognized 
by the British Government in 1843. 



64 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



The population of the State is ahout 
5000, chiefly Hindus. Residence: Dhar- 
nanda, Gwalior, Central India. 

DHARUP SINGH (of Maniwara), Rao 

Saheb. The title is hereditary. The 
ancestor of this family, Rao Kehdri 
Singh, did good service with Sultan 
Muhammad, Nawab of Rahatgarh^ in 
return for which he received the title 
and considerable grants. The father 
of the present Rao Saheb was the Rao 
Jag Raj Singh. Residence: Maniwara, 
Sagar, Central Provinces. 

DHAUKAL SINGH, Sarddr Balmdur ; 
b. 1836. Received the title on June 
28, 1889, for conspicuous gallantry in 
the Afghan "War. Residence : Jaunpur, 
North- Western Provinces. 

DHENKANAL, Raja Sura Pratap Ma- 
hindra Bahadur, Rdjd of. A ruling 
chief ; b. 1884. Succeeded to the gadi 
as a minor August 29, 1885. The 
family are Kshatriya Hindus, and 
were anciently feudatories of the old 
Rajas of Orissa ; said to have been 
founded by Harihar Samant Singhar, 
who established himself in Dhenkanal 
after killing the aboriginal Raja 
Dhenka, from whom the State derives 
its modern name. The titles of Sa- 
mant, Singhar, Brahmarbar were con- 
ferred on'the family by the old Rajas 
of Orissa. Subsequently the title of 
Mahindra Bahadur was conferred by 
the Mahrattas, who also recognized the 
title of Raja, which finally was con- 
ferred on the predecessor of the pre- 
sent chief by the Government of India 
in 1874. The family crest and seal is 
the minaketana, a flag bearing the 
emblem of the sacred fish. The area 
of the State, which is one of the Orissa 
Tributary Mahals, is 1463 square 
miles; its population about 208,316, 
chiefly Hindus, but including about 
80,000 Savars and other aboriginal 
tribesmen. The Raja maintains a 
military force of 343 infantry and 8 
guns. Residence: Dhenkanal, Orissa, 
Bengal. 

DHIRAJ LAL, Munshi, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1896. Residence: Aligarh, North- 
Western Provinces. 

DHIYAN SINGH, Chaudhri, Rai Bahd- 
dur. The title was conferred on Janu- 
ary 1, 1894. Residence : Moradabad, 
North-Western Provinces. 



DH0LPUR, His Highness the Mahdrdj 
Rdnd of. A ruling chief ; b. 1862. 
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor 
February 9, 1873. The full titles of 
this chief are — Major His Highness 
Rais-ud-daula Sipahdar-ul-Mulk, Ma- 
haraj-Adhiraj Sri Sawai, Mahdrdj 
Rand Nihal Singh, Lokindar Baha- 
dur, Diler Jang, Jai Deo. Belongs 
to a Jat (Hindu) family, which 
traces its pedigree back to the 11th 
century, when it held lands under the 
Puar Kings of Delhi. In later times 
it acquired territory on the banks of 
the Chambal, and was powerful in the 
18th century, when the Rdnd of Gohad, 
ancestor of the present Maharaj Rand, 
joined the British troops in the Mah- 
ratta war in 1779. The title of Rand 
had been recognized by the Emperor 
Sikandar Lodi of Delhi, but in 1779 the 
British recognized the Rdnd as Mahd- 
rdj Rdnd. In 1805 Lord Cornwallis 
granted Gohad to Sindhia, and in ex- 
change granted to the Mahdrdj Rdnd 
Kirat Singh (ancestor of the present 
chief) the territories of Dholpur, Bdri, 
and Rdjdkhera. Kirat Singh was suc- 
ceeded by Bhagwant Singh, who 
showed great loyalty during the 
Mutiny of 1857, and was created a 
Knight Commander of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India. 
His son married a daughter of the late 
Rdjd of Patidld, but died before his 
father, leaving a son and heir, the 
present Mahdrdj Rdnd, who succeeded 
his grandfather in 1873. The area of 
the State is 1200 square miles ; its popu- 
lation about 250,000, chiefly Hindus, 
but including 18,000 Muhammadans 
and 2500 Jains. The Mahdrdj Rand 
maintains a military force of 139 
cavalry, 1588 infantry, and 32 guns. 
His Highness is an Honorary Major in 
the British army, and is entitled to a 
salute of 15 guns. The family colour 
was azure, but in an encounter towards 
the end of the last century the then 
chief captured from the Thdkurs of 
Bamraoli a golden-yellow flag, with 
a figure of Hanumdn (the monkey-god) 
in the centre of the field, and this has 
been subsequently adopted as the 
family cognizance. Arms : Or, a 
" Hanumdn " gules, on a chief azure a 
sword between two towers or. Sup- 
porters : Two Rajput warriors in full 
armour. Crest : A " Narsinghji " (man- 
lion) proper. Motto: Mitra Mitra, 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



65 



Amitra Amitra (" Sure friend, sure 
foe"). Residence: Dholpur, Rajputana. 

DHOLU, M. R., CLE., Khan Bahddur. 
See Mancherji. 

DHONDIBA HANUMANTRAO BARDE, 

Rao Bahadur. Received the title on 
January 2, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

DHRANGADRA, His Highness Sir Man- 
singhji Ranmalsinghji, K.C.S.I., Rdj 
Saheb of. A ruling chief ; b. January 
11, 1837. Succeeded to the gadi on 
the death of his father, his late High- 
ness the Raj Saheb Ranmalsinghji, 
K.C.S.I., on October 28, 1869. Is the 
head of the Jhala Rajputs, and the 
chief of this family has consequently 
long held the title of Raj Saheb, while 
the title of " Maharana " is commonly 
used by the Jhala clansmen of their 
chief, and it is also commonly used as 
the vernacular equivalent of " His 
Highness," the title conferred by the 
Queen Empress. The JMla Rajputs 
are said to have entered Kathiawar 
from Sind in the 8th century a.d., and 
the founder of this dynasty is stated to 
have been Harapal Devji, who obtained 
from the Solankhi Rajput Chief of 
Patan the grant of the district sub- 
sequently known as Jhalawar in 
Kathiawar. It may be noted that the 
State of Jhalawar in Rajputana was 
founded in the beginning of the 18th 
century a.d. by Jhala emigrants from 
Kathiawar. His Highness's ancestors 
— from whom also descend the chiefs 
of Wankaner, Limri, Wadhwan, 
Chura, Sayla, and Than-Lakhtar — 
were settled first at Patri in Ahmada- 
bad ; then at Halwad in Kathiawar ; 
and finally at Dhrangadra. Sir 
Mansinghji has been distinguished for 
the enlightened character of his 
administration, especially in the 
matters of public instruction and 
internal communications. He has 
established an efficient girls' school at 
Dhrangadra, and many good schools 
throughout the State ; and has con- 
structed many good roads, and other 
public works. To commemorate the 
visit of His Royal Highness the Duke 
of Edinburgh to Bombay in 1870, His 
Highness contributed a large sum 
towards the erection of a Dharmsdla 
at Rajkot ; and his loyalty was still 
more conspicuously displayed on the 
occasion of the landing of His Royal 



Highness the Prince of Wales at 
Bombay in 1875, which was celebrated 
by the erection and endowment of the 
Albert Edward Hospital at Dhranga- 
dra. His Highness was prevented by 
serious illness from attending the 
Imperial Assemblage at Delhi on the 
Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India, but he 
was on that occasion created a Knight 
Commander of the Most Exalted Order 
of the Star of India, and received the 
addition of four guns to his salute 
as a personal distinction. When he 
was presented with the insignia of 
the Star of India, at the same time as 
His Highness the Jam of Nauanagar, 
the Political Agent, speaking for the 
Government, said : " His Highness the 
Raj Saheb of Dhrangadra commands 
respect as the head, both of the Jhala 
tribe and of a ruling house second to 
none in domestic virtue. He now 
accedes to the honours enjoyed by his 
father, Sir Ranmalsinghji, the worthy 
son of a worthy sire. The decorations 
granted to these princes are the natural 
ornaments of exalted hereditary rank." 
Much sympathy was felt for His 
Highness when, in 1879, he lost his 
eldest son and heir, the late Rajkumar 
Jaswantsinghji, whose son (the grand- 
son of the present chief) is now the 
heir-apparent to the gadi. The area 
of the State is 1156 square miles; its 
population about 100,000, chiefly 
Hindus, but including about 6000 
Muhammadans. The Raj Saheb main- 
tains a military force of 103 cavalry, 
470 infantry, and 9 guns, and is 
entitled to a salute of 15 guns. Resid- 
ence : Dhrangadra, Kathiawar. 

DHR0L, Thakur Saheb Harisinghji 
Jaisinghji, Thakur Saheb of. A ruling 
chief ; b. 1846. Succeeded his father, 
the late Thakur Saheb Jesinghji, 
October 26, 1886. Is a Jareja Rajput, 
descended from a brother of Jam 
Rawal, the first Jam of Nauanagar, 
who founded that State in 1542 a.d. ; 
and the family is also the same as that 
of His Highness the Maharao Raja of 
Kutch. The area of the State is about 
283 square miles ; its population is 
about 22,000, chiefly Hindus, but 
including nearly 3000 Muhammadans. 
The Thakur Saheb maintains a military 
force of 25 cavalry, 285 infantry, ancl 
6 guns, and is entitled to a salute of 



66 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



9 guns. Residence: Dhrol, Kathia- 
war, Bombay. 

DHUKLE, Govindrao M., Rao Saheb. 
Received the title on January 2, 1899. 
Residence : Bombay. 

DHULATIA, Thakur Fateh Singh, Tha- 
kur of. A ruling chief ; b. about 1866. 
Succeeded to the gadi in 1872. Belongs 
to a Rajput (Hindu) family. Resid- 
ence; Dhulatia, Western Malwa, 
Central India. 

DHURWAI, Diwan Ranjor Singh, Jdgir- 
ddr of. A ruling chief ; b. about 
1833. Succeeded to the gadi January 
14, 1851 . Belongs to a Bundela Rajput 
(Hindu) family, descended from the 
Raja Bir Singh Deo of Orchha. The 
area of the State, which is one of the 
Hashtbhai jdgirs, is about 18 square 
miles ; its population is about 1600, 
chiefly Hindus. The Jagirdar main- 
tains a military force of 10 cavalry, 
100 infantry, and 3 guns. Residence : 
Dhurwai, Bundelkhand, Central 
India. 

DHYAN SINGH, Chaudhri, Rai Baha- 
dur. See Dhiyan. 

DIDAR HUSAIN, Khan Saheb. Received 
the title on June 3, 1899. Is Vakil of 
Orchha. Residence: Orchha, Central 
India. 

DHAWAR HUSAIN AHMAD, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 26, 1894. Residence: Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

DILAWAR SINGH (of Tilokpur), Mian. 
The title is hereditary. Residence: 
Kangra, Punjab. 

DILBAGH RAI, Lala, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on May 25, 
1895. Residence : Gujrat, Punjab. 

DILEHRI, Rani of. See Tara Moti. 

DIN MUHAMMAD, Shaikh, Khan Sa- 
heb ; b. 1843 ; received the title on 
January 1, 1897. Residence: Lahore. 

DINA NATH, Pandit, Rai Bahadur. 
Granted the title, as a personal distinc- 
tion, January 2, 1893, for eminent 
service in the Police. Residence: Sagar, 
Central Provinces. 

DINA NATH SEN, Rai Saheb. The title 
was conferred on May 20, 1896, for 
distinguished service in the Education 
Department. Residence: Calcutta. 



DINBANDHU PATNAIK, Rai Saheb. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Is Diwan of Sonpur. Residence : Son- 
pur, Central Provinces. 

DINENDRA NARAYAN RAI, Kumar. 
Honorary Magistrate and Municipal 
Commissioner of Calcutta. Granted 
the title of Kumar, as a personal dis- 
tinction, January 2, 1893. Residence : 
Calcutta. 

DINKAR LAXIM0N GADGIL, Rao Sa- 
heb. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Residence: Belgaum, 
Bombay. 

DINKAR, Raghunath Rao, Rdje Ma- 
shir-i-Khds Bahadur. See Raghunath. 

DINSHA D0SABHAI G0RWALA, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred as 
a personal distinction on January 1, 
1894. Residence : Mhow, Central India. 

DINSHA D0SABHAI KHAMBATTA, 

Khan Bahadur. The title of Khan 
Saheb was conferred on August 18, 
1881, and that of Khan Bahadur on 
January 1, 1891. Residence: Disa, 
Bombay. 

DINSHA, Edalji, CLE. See Edalji. 

DIP SINGH, Thakur, Rai Bahadur. The 
Thakur is the Commandant of the 
Bikanir Imperial Service Camel Corps, 
and received the title of Rai Bahadur 
on May 20, 1896. Residence : Bikanir, 
Rajputana. 

DIR, Khan of. See Muhammad Sharif 
Khan. 

DIRGUJ DEO, Bhaiya, Rai Bahadur. 
Is Zamindar of Untari. Received the 
title on January 2, 1899. Residence: 
Untari, Palamau, Bengal. 

DTWAN.— A prefix. - 

DIWAN CHAND, Rai; b. 1835. The 
only son of Diwan Ganpat Rai, who 
was in favour with the Maharaja 
Ranjit Singh, appointed by him tutor 
of his grandson, and rewarded by the 
grant of a jdgir and the appointment 
of Hazumavis. Descended from a 
family whose ancestor, Gaggan Mai, 
was distinguished, in the time of the 
Emperor Akbar, as the founder of 
Ghartal in Sialkot, and obtained the 
title of Malik. His grandsons, Diwan 
Ramji Mai and Shamji Mai, earned 
the title of Diwan in the time of the 
Emperor Aurangzeb ; Ramji Mai was 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



67 



appointed Hazurnavis, and Shamji 
obtained a command in the Kabul 
army. The family left Ghartal for 
Jammu, and subsequently for Dera 
Nanak ; but Diwan Nand Gopal, the 
grandfather of Rai Diwan Chand, 
returned to the ancestral home. His 
son was Diwan Ganpat Rai mentioned 
above, who was appointed by the 
Maharaja Sher Singh officer in charge 
of the magazines. He was a brave 
soldier, and fought in the battles of 
Peshawar, Multan, and Dera Ismail 
Khan ; and throughout the rebellions 
of 1847 and 1848 attached himself to 
the British Resident. The Rai Diwan 
Chand was for some time Tahsildar of 
Roras in Wazirabad ; has subsequently 
been an able and successful journalist 
and author, as well as distinguished 
in municipal and university work, and 
is Vice-Presideut of the Punjab Press 
Association. Received the title on 
May 20, 1890. Has two sons, Munshi 
Brij Lai and Munshi Gayan Chand. 
Residence : Sialkot, Punjab. 

DIWAN CHAND, Pandit, Rai Saheb. 
Received the title on January 1, 1892. 
Residence: Shahpur, Punjab. 

DIWAN JAMIAT RAI, Rai Saheb. See 
Jamiat. 

DIWAN JOWAHIR MAL, Diwan Ba- 
hadur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Is Honorary Magis- 
trate of Bhera. Residence: Bhera, 
Shahpur, Punjab. 

DIWAN MUHAMMAD, Sayyid, Khdn 
Saheb. Granted the title, as a personal 
distinction, January 2, 1893, for emin- 
ent services in the post of Mir Munshi 
of the British Agency at Kabul. Re- 
sidence : Kharar, Ambala, Punjab. 

DODA KHAN, Mulk. The title is here- 
ditary. Residence: Sind. 

DOMELI, Raja of. See Raushan Khan. 

DOSABHAI FRAMJI KARAKA, C.S.I. 
A distinguished citizen and official of 
Bombay, late Collector of Bombay and 
Chairman of the Justices. Created a 
Companion of the Most Exalted Order 
of the Star of India on January 1, 
1877, on the occasion of the Proclam- 
ation of Her Most Gracious Majesty 
as Empress of India. Residence: Bom- 
bay. 

DOSABHAI PESTANJI, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 



on February 16, 1887, on the occasion 
of the Jubilee of the reign of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty. Residence: 
Surat, Bombay. 

DOST ALI KHAN, Nawab. The title 
is personal. Residence : Tajpur, Sind. 

DOTRIA. See Bhaisola. 

DUDHPUR, Thakur Anupbawa Dada- 
bawa, Thakur of. A ruling chief ; b. 
1878. Succeeded to the gadi No- 
vember 18, 1888. Belongs to a Rajput 
(Muhammadan) family. Residence : 
Dudhpur, Rewa Kantha, Bombay. 

DUGRI, Mian Khuda Baksh, Mian of. 
A ruling chief; b. about 1854. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi December 5, 1883. 
Belongs to a Pindari (Muhammadan) 
family. Residence: Dugri, Bhopal, 
Central India. 

DTJJANA, JalaUid-Daula Nawab Mu- 
hammad Muffitaz Ali Khan Bahadur 
Mustakil Jang, Nawab of. A ruling 
cbief ; b. 1864. Succeeded to the gadi 
October 15, 1879, on the death of the 
late Nawab Muhammad Saadat Ali 
Khan. The Nawab belongs to an 
Afghan (Muhammadan) family, whose 
founder, Abdus Samand Khdn, with 
his sons, obtained the grant of large 
estates from Lord Lake as a reward 
for service rendered. The tenure was 
made hereditary, and other territories 
added, by a sanad dated May 4, 1806. 
The Nawab Abdus Samand Khan was 
succeeded by his son Dunde Khan, 
and he by the Nawab Hasan Ali 
Khan, who was the father of the 
late Nawab Muhammad Saadat Ali 
Khan. The area of the State is 89 
square miles ; its population 23,416, 
chiefly Hindus, but including nearly 
6000 Muhammadans. The Nawdb 
maintains a military force of 25 
cavalry and 140 infantry. Residence : 
Dujana, Rohtak, Punjab. 

DUKHA M0CHIN JHA, Mahdmahopd- 
dhydya. Received the title, for emin- 
ence in oriental learning, on January 
1, 1897. Residence: Pilokbar, Dar- 
bhanga, BeDgal. 

DTJLABJI D. VED, Rao Bahadur. Re- 
ceived the title on May 21, 1898. Is 
Chief Minister of Palanpur. Residence : 
Palanpur, Bombay. 

DULAL CHANDRA DEB, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 2, 



6B 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF 1N£>1A 



1890. Is Government Pleader, Sylhet. 
Residence: Sylhet, Bengal. 

DTJLAM SINGH (of Piparia), Thakur; 
b. 1850. The title is hereditary. The 
Thdkur is a grandson of Thakur Ananta 
Singh, who was a brother of Thakur 
Prithi Singh, the father of Thakur 
Drug Singh of Sarekha (see Sarekha). 
The title was originally derived from 
the Gond Rajas of Mandla. Residence : 
Seoni, Central Provinces* 
DUN, Maung, Myothugyi, Thuye gauna 
ngwe Da ya Min. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on May 20, 1 890. It 
means " Recipient of the Silver Sword 
for Bravery," and is indicated by the 
letters T.D.M. after the name. Re- 
sidence: Katha, Burma. 
DUNGARPUR, His Highness Mahara- 
wal Udai Singh Bahadur, Maharawal 
of. A ruling chief ; b. May 22, 1839. 
Succeeded to the gadi September 28, 
1846. Is a Sesodia Rajput, descended 
from a branch of the ruling family of 
Udaipur, the "Sun of the Hindus." 
The Maharawals of Dungarpur were 
tributary, from time to time, to the 
Mughal Emperors of Delhi and to the 
Mahrattas; from whom they were 
finally rescued by the British Power, 
a treaty being concluded iu 1818. The 
Bhils were reduced to submission; 
and iu 1825 the Mahar&wal Jaswant 
Singh, being found incompetent, was 
deposed by the Government, and his 
adopted son Dalpat Singh, second son 
of the Chief of Partabgarh, appointed 
to succeed. Subsequently the Maha- 
rawal Dalpat Singh succeeded to the 
gadi of Partabgarh; so the British 
Government permitted him to adopt 
the present Maharawal (then a minor) 
to succeed him in Dungarpur. The 
Maharawal has a son and heir, the 
Maharaj Kunwar Khuman Singh. The 
distinctive family colour is red. The 
area of the State is about 1000 square 
miles; its population about 154,000, 
chiefly Hindus, but including 3609 
Muhammadansand 67,000 Bhils (abori- 
gines). His Highness the Maharawal 
maintains a military force of 251 
cavalry, 535 infantry, and 8 guns ; and 
is entitled to a salute of 15 guns. 
Residence : Dungarpur, Rajputana. 

DUNJ SHETAN (of Spiti), Nono of 
Spiti. The title is hereditary, the 
Nono being the descendant of the 



Tibetan Chiefs, formerly feudatories 
of Ladakh in Tibet. Since the con- 
clusion of the first Sikh war in 1846, 
Spiti has been an outlying subdivision 
of the Himalayan district of Kangra* 
Punjab; and is administered by 
British officials with the aid of the 
Nono, who is an Honorary Magistrate. 
The population of the valley— which 
is covered by deep snow every year 
from December to April— is hardly 
3000, almost entirely Tibetan in race. 
Residence : Spiti, Kangra, Punjab. 

DUE MUHAMMAD KHAN, Khagwani, 

Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on March 11, 1859. 
Residence : Dera Ismail Khan, Punjab, 

DURBHUNGA. See Darbhanga. 
DURGA CHARAN CHAKRAVARTI, 

Rai Saheb. The title was conferred on 
January 1,1895. Residence: Hughli, 
Bengal. 
DURGA CHARAN LAHA, CLE., Ma- 
haraja; b. November 23, 1822. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
May 30, 1891. The Maharaja, whose 
family name is more commonly spelt 
" Law," was born at Chinsurah ; edu- 
cated at the Hindu College, Calcutta ; 
senior partner of the firm of Messrs. 
Prawn Kissen Law and Company, and 
a Zamindar ; appointed Justice of the 
Peace and Honorary Presidency Magis- 
trate ; first native Member of the Port 
Commission; Member of the Bengal 
Legislative Council, 1874 ; Member of 
the Senate of the Calcutta University ; 
elected a Governor of the Mayo Hos- 
pital April 11, 1878; Member of the 
Imperial Legislative Council 1882 ; 
Commissioner for the Reduction of 
Public Debt February 1882; Sheriff 
1882 ; made a Companion of the Indian 
Empire May 24, 1884; President of 
the British Indian Association in 1885 
and 1888 ; the title of Raja was con- 
ferred in 1887; again appointed a 
Member of the Imperial Legislative 
Council 1888; the title of Maharaja 
conferred in 1891; and exempted from 
personal attendance in Civil Courts 
January 27, 1892. The Maharaja has 
two sons— the Maharaj-Kumar Kristo 
Dass Law, born February 24, 1849; 
and Maharaj-Kumar Rishee Kesh 
Law, born May 4, 1852, both Honorary 
Presidency Magistrates. Residence: 2 
Cornwallis Street, Calcutta. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



69 



DURGA GATI BANARJI, CLE., Rai 
Bahddut. Is a distinguished member 
of the TJncovenanted Civil Service. 
Obtained the title on January 1, 1891, 
" for good work as Personal Assistant 
to the Commissioners of the Patna 
and Presidency Divisions, and as 
Collector of Stamp Eevenue and 
Superintendent of Excise Revenue, 
Calcutta." Created a CLE. on Janu- 
ary 1, 1895. Residence : Calcutta. 

DURGA PARSHAD, Babu, Rai Baha- 
dur; b. October 12, 1847. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1894. Re- 
sidence: Farukhabad, North- Western 
Provinces. 

DURGA PARSHAD, Lala, Rai Saheb. 
The title was conferred on May 21, 
1898, Residence: Punjab. 

DURGA PRASAD, Pandit, Mahdmaho- 
pddhydya. The title was conferred, 
as a personal distinction, on May 25, 
1892, in recognition of his eminence 
as an oriental scholar. Residence: Jai- 
pur, Rajputana. 

DURGA SINGH, Thakur, Rai Saheb. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence ; Bara Banki, Oudh. 

DURRA KHAN, Mir, Gitchki, Khdn 
Saheb. Received the title on January 
2, 1899. Residence : 

DUTT, Romesh Chunder, CL.E. See 
Romesh. 

DWARIKA NATH BHATTACHARJI, 

Rai Bahddur. The title was conferred 
on January 1, 1894. Residence : Na- 
diya, Bengal. 

DWARKA NATH DUTT, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence : Bakarganj, Bengal. 

DWARKA NATH SHEOPURI, Rai 

Saheb. Received the title on January 
2, 1899. Residence : Gwalior, Central 
India. 

DWARKA NATH SIRCAR, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1899. 
Is District Engineer of Nadiya, Ben- 
gal. Residence : Kishnaghur, Bengal. 

DWARKA SINGH. Pandit, Rai Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. Residence : Bareilly, North- 
Western Provinces. 

DWARKA TEWARI, Subahdar, Rai 
Bahadur, The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January l f 1890. 



The Rai Bahadur is an officer of the 
Nepal Residency Escort. Residence: 
Nepal. 

DWE, Maung, Ahmudan gaunr/ Tazeik 
ya Min. This Burmese title (see 
Introduction) was conferred on May 
26, 1894. Residence; Taungdwin, 
Burma. 

DYAL. SeeDayal. 

EDAIJI DINSHAH, CLE. Was created 
a CLE. on January 1, 1899. Resid- 
ence : Karachi, Bombay. 

EDALJI DOSABHAI, Khdn Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on May 26, 
1894. Residence: Ahmadabad, Bom- 
bay. 

EDALJI PESTANJI, Khdn Bahddur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on February 24, 1875. Resid- 
ence : Mhow, Central India. 

EDALJI SORABJI CHENOY, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Residence : Secundera- 
bad, DeccaU. 

EDAVALATH KAKAT KRISHNAN, 

Biwdn Bahddur. See Kakat. 

EKA, Rdjd of. See Narotam Singh. 
ELAHI. See Ilahi. 

ELAYA RAJA, The. See Travancore, 

Maharaja of ; also see Cochin, Rdjd of. 

ELIJAH BENJAMIN. See Benjamin. 

ELIJAH JACOB, Khdn Saheb. See 
Jacob. 

ELLAPA BALARAM, Rao Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on May 21, 
1898. Residence: Bombay. 

ESSA JI, Samuel, Khdn Bahddur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1899. 
Residence : Bombay. 

ETIRAJULU PILLAI, Mount, Rao 
Bahddur. The title was conferred 
on January 1, 1894. Residence: 
Bezwada, Madras. 

PAGHFUR MIRZA, Mirza Bahddur. 
Is the son-in-law of the late Wajid 
Ali Shah, King of Oudh. Son of 
Nawab Mumtaz-ud-daula, son of 
Asghar Ali Khan, eldest son of 
Muhammad Ali Shah, third King of 
Oudh. On the death of the latter he 
was succeeded by his second son, 
Amjad Ali Shah, though the Nawab 
Mumta3-ud^d&ul4j the son of the 



70 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



eldest son, was alive. Mumtaz-ud- 
daula married Zinat-un-Nissa, the 
daughter of Malika Zamani, one of 
the consorts of Nasir-ud-din Haidar, 
second king. Residence : Oudh. 

FAIZ ALI KHAN BAHADUR (of Kotah), 
Nawab Sir, K. C.S.I. The Nawab 
Bahadur was created a Knight Com- 
mander of the Most Exalted Order of 
the Star of India, December 31, 1875. 
Residence : Kotah, Rajputana. 

FAIZ MUHAMMAD KAZI, Khan 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on April 12, 1876. 
Residence : Karachi, Sind. 

FAIZ-UN-NISA, Chaudhrain, Ndwdb 
Sahiba. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on May 24, 1889. The 
Nawab Sahiba is a lady belonging to 
the Homnabad family. Residence: 
Tipperah, Bengal. 

FAKHR-UD-DIN HAIDAR ALI KHAN, 
Sayyid, Nawab Intikhab-ud-dauld. Is 
a grandson of the late Wajid Ali 
Shah, King of Oudh, being the son of 
the Nawab Azmat-ud-daula, who 
married one of the King's daughters. 
The title was granted to Azmat-ud- 
daula by King "Wajid Ali Shah in 
1849. Residence: Oudh. 

FAKIR. — Often a mere prefix. 

FAKIR CHAND, Lala, Rai Saheb ; b. 
August, 1859 ; received the title on 
January 1, 1897. Residence: Batala, 
Gurdaspur, Punjab. 

FAKIRJI JIWAJI, Khan Bahadur. 
The title of Khan Saheb was conferred 
on February 3, 1882, and that of Khan 
Bahadur on January 1, 1899. Resid- 
ence : Bombay. 

FARDUNJI PESTANJI, Khan Saheb. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on October 8, 1874. Residence : Poona, 
Bombay. 

FARID KHAN, Arbab, Khan Bahadur. 
The Arbab received the title of Khan 
Saheb on January 1, 1898, for services 
on the Hazara Border; and that of 
Khan Bahadur on January 1, 1899. 
Residence : Hazara, Punjab. . 

FARID- UD-DIN, Maulavi, Sayyid, Khan 
Bahadur; b. September 1827. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty, for distinguished 



service as a Judge. The family traces 
its descent from Sayyid Abdul Khair, 
of Khursan, who settled in Kara, 
district Allahabad, in the year 1300. 
The Khan Bahadur's ancestors received 
muafi grants from the Mughal Emperors 
for their ability and learning. Resid- 
ence : Agra, North- Western Provinces. 

FARID-UD-DIN, Muhammad, Khan 
Saheb. Received the title on January 
2, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

FARIDKOT, His Highness the Rdjd 
Bahadur of. A ruling chief; b. 1842. 
Succeeded to the gadi April 22, 1874. 
His full titles are — His Highness 
Farzand -i-Saadat -i-Nishan -i-Hazrat-i- 
Kaisar-i-Hind Barar Bans Raja Bikrani 
Singh Bahadur, Raja Bahadur of 
Faridkot. Is the head of the Barar 
Jat tribe of Sikhs, the family tracing 
their origin from Barar, seventeenth 
in descent from Jesal, the founder of 
the Jesalmir State, and the ancestor 
of the Sidhu and other illustrious Jat 
clans. A descendant of Barar's, 
named Ballan, rose to eminence in the 
time of the Emperor Akbar. His 
nephew built Kot-Kapura, a fort 
about six miles south of the town of 
Faridkot; and a descendant named 
Sardar Hamir Singh became indepen- 
dent Chief of Faridkot in 1782. In 
1808 Faridkot submitted to the Maha- 
raja Ranjit Singh, and the territory 
was granted to Diwan Mokam Chand, 
the Lahore General. But when in 
1808-9 the British Government de- 
manded from the Maharaja the 
surrender of his conquests on the left 
bank of the Sutlej, Faridkot was 
given back to its ancient possessors ; 
and in 1845, when the first Sikh war 
broke out, the Sardar Pahar Singh of 
Faridkot attached himself to the 
English, using his utmost exertions to 
collect supplies and carriage, and 
furnishing guides for the army. Pahar 
Singh received as his reward the title 
of Raja,togetherwithhalf the territory 
confiscated from the Raja of Nabha, 
and in this obtained possession once 
more of Kot-Kapura, the ancestral 
seat of his family. He was succeeded 
by his son, the Raja "Wazir Singh, 
who joined the English in the second 
Sikh war, and greatly distinguished 
himself during the Mutiny of 1857 by 
seizing mutineers, guarding the ferries 
over the Sutlej, and attacking a 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



71 



notorious rebel named Sham Das, 
whose village he destroyed. His 
troops served with credit under General 
Van Cortlandt in Sirsa and elsewhere. 
For these services Raja Wazir Singh 
received the additional titles of " Bardr 
Bans Raja Saheb Bahadur," a khilat 
of increased value, and a salute of 11 
guns. He was also exempted from 
the service of ten horsemen, which he 
had previously had to provide ; and in 
1862 he received a sanad conferring 
the right of adoption. The present 
Raja has given up excise and transit 
duties in exchange for compensation. 
The area of the State is 612 square 
miles ; its population 97,034, of whom 
40,182 are Sikhs, 27,463 are Hindus, 
and 29,035 are Muhammadans. His 
Highness maintains a military force 
of 70 cavalry, 300 infantry, and 6 
guns ; and is entitled to a salute of 
11 guns. Residence: Faridkot, Punjab. 

FARRUKH MUHAMMAD TAKI ALI, 
Mirza Bahadur. Is the grandson of 
the late Amjad Ali Shah, fourth King 
of Oudh, being the son of Mirza Dara 
Sitwat. The title was conferred by 
King Muhammad Ali Shah on Prince 
Dara Sitwat in 1838. Residence : Oudh. 

FARRUKH SIYAR, Shdhzdda. Is a 
descendant of Shah Shuja, the King 
of Kabul, who was restored to the 
throne of Afghanistan by the British. 
The title is a personal one, and was 
recognized February 4, 1853. Resid- 
ence : Ludhiana, Punjab. 

FARZAND AHMAD, Maulavi, Kazi, 
Khan Bahadur; b. 1868. Received 
the title on January 1, 1897. Resid- 
ence : Gaya, Bengal. 

FATEH ALI KHAN (of Nawabgani), 

Nawab; b. 1862. Succeeded to the 
title on November 19, 1896. Is the 
nephew of Sir Nawazish Ali Khan, 
K.C.I.E., Nawab (q.v.). Residence: 
Bahraich. 
FATEH ALI KHAN, Subadar-Major (of 
Nabha), Khan Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on May 25, 1895. 
Residence : Burma. 

FATEH ALI SHAH, Sayyid, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
June 3, 1893. Residence : Lahore, 
Punjab. 

FATEH CHAND,Dr. M.B.,Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence: Punjab. 



FATEH KHAN walad ABBAS ALI 
KHAN, Mir. The title is hereditary, 
the Mir being a descendant of one of 
the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the time 
of the annexation. Residence : Sind. 

FATEH KHAN, Mir. The title is 
hereditary, the Mir being a descendant 
of one of the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at 
the time of the annexation. Residence: 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

FATEH KHAN, Nawab. The title is 
personal ; a courtesy title. Residence : 
Hala, Sind. 

FATEH KHAN, Haji, walad Sher Mu- 
hammad Khan, His Highness. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
November 10, 1877, His Highness 
being a descendant of the Amir who 
was ruling at the time of the conquest. 
Residence: Hyderabad, Sind. 

FATEH KHAN, Khan. The title is 
hereditary, and was conferred on 
January 1, 1877. The Khan is Khan 
of Chang. Residence: Chang, Mer- 
wara. 

FATEH MUHAMMAD, Mian, Makwal, 
Khan Saheb. Received the title on 
May 21, 1898. Residence : Dera Ghazi 
Khan, Punjab. 

FATEH SINGH (of Guda), Sarddr. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1891. Residence: Karnal, Punjab. 

FATEH SINGH (of Pawayan), Rdjd; 
b. October 10, 1858. The title is 
hereditary, and the present Raja 
succeeded his adoptive father on 
May 17, 1889. Belongs to a family of 
Gaur Rajputs, who first came into 
the district of Shahjahanpur to help 
the Rani of Nahil against the Pathans. 
Udhai Singh, the leader of the second 
expedition, founded the town of 
Pawayan. At the time of the cession 
in 1802 the great-grandson of Udhai 
Singh, named Raja Raghunath Singh, 
was Raja of Pawayan, and he was 
confirmed in his possessions by Mr. 
Wellesley, the Deputy Governor. He 
was succeeded in 1825 by his widow 
the Rani ; and the latter, having 
adopted Rdjd Jagannath Singh (the 
uncle and adoptive father of the 
present Raja), died in 1850. The 
Rdjd is an Honorary Magistrate. 
Residence : Shdhjahdnpur, North- 
Western Provinces. 



72 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



FATEH SINGH (of Thehpur), Sarcldr ; 
b. 1823. The title is hereditary. 
Descended from Sardar Milka Singh, 
who was one of the most powerful of 
the Sikh chiefs during the latter half 
of the last century. He died in 1804, 
and his son, Sardar Jiwan Singh, died 
the next year. The Maharaja Ran jit 
Singh then seized the largest portion 
of the estate, giving Sardar Anand 
Singh, the son and heir of Jiwan 
Singh, jdgirs in Firozpur district. 
Sardar Anand Singh died in 1831, 
leaving his only son, the present 
Sardar, a minor of eight years of age. 
On the annexation of the Punjab the 
Sardar's personal jdgir was confirmed 
to him for life — one quarter to descend 
to his son, who is named Shamsher 
Singh, born in 1843. Residence : 
Thehpur, Lahore, Punjab. 

FATEH-UD-DIN, Shaikh, Khdn Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1894. Residence : Calcutta. 

FATEHPUR, Rdjd of. See Takhat 
Singh. 

FATEHPUR, Rdni of. See Ratan Kuar ; 
see also Umed Kuar. 

FATEHYAB KHAN, Muhammad, Khdn 
Bahddur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1895. Residence : Rampur, 
North- Western Provinces. 

FATH All, Nawdb, C.S.I. See Ban- 
ganapale, Nawdb of. 

FAUJDAR KHAN (of Ashti), Nawdb; 
b. about 1825. The title is hereditary. 
The Nawab is the son of Nawdb 
Hatam Khdn; and is descended in a 
direct line from the Afghan chief, 
Muhammad Khan Niazi, to whom 
Ashti was granted as a jdyir by the 
Emperor Jahangir of Delhi. The 
title of Nawab was conferred by the 
Emperor Shah Jahan, and has been 
recognized by the British Government. 
The Nawab has a son and heir named 
Hatam Khan. Residence: Ashti, 
Wardha, Central Provinces. 

FAYYAZ ALI KHAN, Muhammad (of 
Pahasu), Mumtdz-ud-daula Nawdb. 
See Muhammad Fayyaz Ali Khan. 

FAZALULLAH LUTFULLAH, Khdn Ba- 
hddur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1899. Residence ; Bombay. 

FAZL AHMAD, Khdn Saheb. Received 
the title on May 21, 1898. Residence : 
Karachi, Sind, Bombay. 



FAZL DIN, Munshi, Khdn Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on May 20, 
1896. Residence : Chenab, Punjab. 

FAZL HAKK KHAN, Khdn Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1894. Residence : Peshawar, Punjab. 

FAZL HUSAIN KHAN walad SOHRAB 
KHAN, Mir. The title has been 
continued for life, the Mir being a 
descendant of one of the Mirs who were 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence: Shikarpur, 
Sind. 

FAZL IMAM SAYYID, Khdn Bahddur. 
The title is personal ; and was con- 
ferred on February 16, 1887, on the 
occasion of the Jubilee of the reign of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty. Resi- 
dence : Patna, Bengal. 

FAZL-I-RABBI, Khwandkliar, Khdn 
Bahddur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1896. Residence: Mur- 
shidabad, Bengal. 

FAZL KARIM KHAN, Khdn Saheb. 
The title was conferred on May 30, 
1891. Residence : Jalandhar, Punjab. 

FAZL-ULLA, Muhammad, Khdn Baha- 
dur. See Muhammad Fazl-ulla. 

FAZULBHAI VISRAM, CLE. Created 
a CLE. on January 1, 1895. Resi- 
dence : Bombay. 

FIROZ KHAN (of Barl), Rdjd. The 
title is hereditary. The Raja is a 
Gakkar chief, son of Raja Ali Gauhar 
Khan . The Gakkars trace their descent 
from Kai Gohar, a native of Ispahan in 
Persia, whose son, Sultan Kaia, is said 
to have conquered Badakshan and part 
of Tibet. They were settled in the 
Punjab about 300 a*d. ; and their 
conquest of Kashmir, and their resist- 
ance to the Emperor Babar, are 
historical events. The Raja has two 
sons, named Sher Ahmad Khan and 
Gauhar Rahman. Residence : Hazara, 
Punjab. 

FRAMJI, Dosabhai, C.S.I. See Dosa- 
bhai. 

FRAMJI ARDESAR, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 24, 1888. Residence : Ahmed- 
nagar, Bombay. 

FRAMJI COWASJI, Khdn Saheb. The 
title was granted June 22, 1897. Resi- 
dence: Baroda, 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



73 



FRAM JI NASARVANJI SANTUK, A*Mrc 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1894. Residence: Abu, 
Rajputana. 

FRAMROZ ARDESIR MOOS, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 21, 1898. Residence : Bombay. 

FURZUND. See Farzand. 

GABAT, Thakur Amarsinghji, Thdkur 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1851. Succeeded 
to the gadi February 3, 1898; is a 
tributary to Idar, and belongs to a 
Makwana Thakura family. The State 
has an area of 22 square miles ; and 
a population of 1430, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence : Gabat, Mahi Kantha, Bom- 
bay. 

GABBAR SINGH (of Kundamardhan- 
garh), Rao. The title is hereditary, 
and was originally conferred by Raja 
Bikram Shah, Gond Raja of Mandla. 
The family is said to be descended 
from Shiani Shah Rao, who first bore 
the title of Rao. Residence: Jabalpur, 
Central Provinces. 

GAD, Thdkur of. See Garh. 

GADHI,RajaUmar Singh waladVevr&o, 
Rdjd of. A ruling chief; b. 1868. 
Succeeded to the gadi October 6, 1886. 
The area of the State, which is one of 
the Dang States of Khandesh, is 170 
square miles ; its population 6309, 
chiefly Bhils, Konknas, and other 
aboriginal tribes. Residence: Gadhi, 
Khandesh, Bombay. 

GADHKA, Azam Jadeja Shivsinghji 
Govindji, Tdlukddr of. A ruling chief; 
b. 1869. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor, November 26, 1870. Belongs 
to a Rajput (Hindu) family. The area 
of the State is 23 square miles; its 
population 2252, chiefly Hindus. Resi- 
dence : Gadhka, Kathiawar, Bombay. 

GAGAN CHANDAR RAI (of Baraset), 

Rai Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on June 3, 1893. Residence: Ghazipur, 
North- Western Provinces. 

GAGAR MAL, Lala, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on February 16, 
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty's reign, as 
a personal distinction. Residence : 
Amritsar, Punjab. 

GAJAPATI RAO, Q.TX.,Mahdrdjd, CLE.; 
p f December 2, 1828. Js a scion of the 



ancient Goday family of Vizagapatam 
in the Northern Circars, Madras 
Presidency, andZamindarof Ankapalle 
and other estates. Educated in the 
Hindu College, Calcutta. Was a 
Member of the Madras Legislative 
Council from 1868 to 1884; and a 
Fellow of the University of Madras. 
The title of Raja was conferred upon 
him in 1881 ; the Companionship of 
the Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire in 1892 ; and the title of 
Maharaia on May 21, 1898. Has 
established and maintains several 
schools ; presented the statue of Her 
Majesty the Queen Empress of India 
to the city of Madras in honour of Her 
Majesty's Jubilee in 1887 ; and has 
given large donations to many public 
objects. Has received from His Holi- 
ness the Pope Leo XIII. through his 
Delegate Apostolic in East Indies, in 
1891, a mosaic picture as a mark of 
appreciation of his kindness shown to 
the Catholics of Vizagapatam. The 
Raja's grandfather, Sri Goday Jaga 
Rao, distinguished himself in^ the 
service of Government about the middle 
of the 18th century. It was pi him 
that the Honourable Court of Directors 
in a communication to the Government 
of Fort Saint George, dated April 17, 
1789, wrote I " We concur in the 
acknowledgment your Government 
have rendered of the zeal for our 
interests manifested on various 
occasions by Goday Jugga Row." Sri 
Jaga Rao was succeeded by his son Sri 
Goday Soorya Narayan Rao, father of 
the Raja ; born 1792, died 1853. Lord 
Connemara, when publicly compli- 
menting the Raja on his presentation 
of the statue of the Queen Empress to 
the city of Madras, said of this 
gentleman I ' ' The Raja's father, Goday 
Soorya Narayan Rao, followed in the 
footsteps of his father, founded various 
charitable institutions, and during the 
famine of 1833 fed a large number of 
poor in the neighbourhood of Nellore. 
He also contributed largely to various 
public works." The Raja's crest is a 
rising sun over a Hindu device, with 
the motto, " I desire the Light," in 
Sanskrit and Latin. Residences : The 
Mahal, Vizagapatam; and The Mansion, 
Madras. 

GAJINDAR SINGH (of Majithia), 
Sarddr. The title is hereditary. Be- 



7-1 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



longs to the same family of the Shergil 
Jat tribe as his first cousin the Sardar 
Dayal Singh of Majithia (see Dayal 
Singh), both Sardars being grandsons 
of Sardar Disa Singh. The father of 
Sardar Gajindar Singh was Sardar 
Ranjodh Singh, half-brother of Sardar 
Lahna Singh, being the son of Sardar 
Disa Singh by another mother. He 
was a General in the Sikh army. 
Residence: Amritsar, Punjab. 

GA JRAJ SINGH, Thakur, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 2, 1899. 
Is an Extra Assistant Commissioner in 
the Central Provinces. Residence: 
Central Provinces. 

GA JRA J SINGH (of Bharrai) , Rao Saheb; 
b. 1865. Is the younger brother of 
Rao Saheb Malkhan Singh (q.v.) ; 
they succeeded on the death of their 
father, the late Rao Saheb Hindupat, 
on September 9, 1896. Residence: 
Bharrai, Sagar, Central Provinces. 

GALE MAUNG, Kyet thaye zauny shwe 
Salwe ya Min. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1889. 
It means "Recipient of the Gold 
Chain of Honour," and is indicated by 
the letters K.S.M. after the name. 
Residence : Tavoy, Burma. 

GANDA SINGH(of Dhiru Majra), Sardar. 
The title is hereditary. The Sardar 
is the present head of the Dhiru Majra 
Sardars, who come of a Jat family. 
He has taken great interest in edu- 
cational matters. Residence: Dhiru 
Majra, Ludhiana, Punjab. 

GANDA SINGH, C.S. /., Sardar Bahddur. 
The Sardar has been created a Com- 
panion of the Most Exalted Order of 
the Star of India, and was promoted to 
be a Sardar Bahadur on May 26, 1894. 
Residence : Patiala, Punjab. 

GANESH BALKRISHNA HANCHINAL, 

Azam. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on November 26, 1883. Resi- 
dence : Belgaum, Bombay. 

GANESH GAmADKAB,, Rao Saheb. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 1, 1890. Residence: Mahi 
Kantha, Bombay. 

GANESH GOVIND, Rao Bahddur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
October 17, 1884. Residence: Poona, 
Bombay. 

GANESH NILKANT NADKARNI, Rao 



Saheb. Received the title on May 21, 
1898. Residence : Bombay. 

GANESH PANDURANG WAIDYA, 

Rao Bahddur. The title was conferred 
on May 21, 1898. Residence : Nasik, 
Bombay. 

GANESH PERSHAD SINGH, Thakur, 
Rai Bahadur. Received the title on 
January 2, 1899, for good service in the 
Police Department. Residence : Luck- 
now, Oudh. 

GANESH SITARAM SHASTRI, Sar 

Subah, Rao Bahddtir. The title was 
conferred on February 16, 1887, on the 
occasion of the Jubilee of the reign of 
Her Majesty the Queen Empress, as a 
personal distinction. Residence : Ba- 
roda. 

GANESH VENKATESH JOSHI, Rao 
Bahddur. Received the title on May 
21, 1898. Residence : Sholapur, Bom- 
bay. 

GANGA CHARAN DAS, Rai Bahddur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 24, 1883. Residence : Indore, 
Central India. 

GANGA PARSHAD SINGH, Rai Bahd- 
dur'. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on July 6, 1888. Residence : 
Darbhanga, Bengal. 

GANGA PERSHAD, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Rewa, Central India. 

GANGA RAM, Rai Bahadur. Received 
the title on June 22, 1897. Residence : 
Kunjah, Gujrat, Punjab. 

GANGA RAM, Lala, Rai Bahddur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1895. 
Residence : Lahore, Punjab. 

GANGA RAM, Munshi, Rai Bahddur. 
Received the title on June 22, 1897. 
Was formerly an Extra Assistant Com- 
missioner in the Punjab. Residence : 
Punjab. 

GANGA SINGH, Rai Saheb. Received 
the title on January 1, 1898. Is 
Officiating Extra Assistant Commis- 
sioner. Residence: Raipur, Central 
Provinces. 

GANGA SINGH, Rai Bahddur. The 
title was conferred on June 3, 1893. 
Residence : Benares, North-Western 
Provinces, 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



75 



GANGADHAR RAO MADHAV CHIT- 
NAVIS, The Hon., CLE. A member 
of the Viceroy's Legislative Council ; 
was created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire 
on May 25, 1895. Residence : Nagpur, 
Central Provinces. 

GANGADHAR SHASTRI, Mahdmdhopd- 
dhydya. The title was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of Her Majesty's reign, in 
recognition of his eminence in oriental 
learning. Residence : Benares, North- 
Western Provinces. 

GANGAJI RAMJI, Rao Saheb. The title 
is persona], and was conferred on Janu- 
ary 1, 1890. Residence : Aden. 

G ANGPUR, Raja Raghunath Sikhar Deo , 
Rdjd of. A ruling chief ; b. 1849. 
Succeeded to the gadi November 28, 
1858. Belongs to a Kshatriya (Hindu) 
family, known as the Sikhar family of 
Sikharpur or Pachete in Manbhum. 
The Raja's eldest son and heir bears 
the title of Tikait, and is named Tikait 
Harinath Sikhar Deo. The area of 
the State, which is one of the Chota 
Nagpur Tributary Mahals, is 2484 
square miles ; its population 107,985, 
chiefly Hindus. Residence : Gangpur, 
Chota Nagpur, Bengal. 

GANGSHA BAPU (of Palasgarh), Rao 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 21, 1898. Residence: Chanda, 
Central Provinces. 

GANGWAI, Rdjd of. See Hukm Singh. 

GANGWAL, Rdjd of. See Suraj Pargas 
Singh. 

GANPAT BABJI SAHASRABUDHE, 

Rao Saheb. The title was conferred 
on June 22, 1897. Residence : Hyder- 
abad, Deccan. 

GANPAT RAI (of Deri Ghazi Khan, 
Punjab), C.I.E., Diwdn. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on May 
24, 1883. The Diwan, for eminent 
services rendered to Government as an 
Extra Assistant Commissioner in 
Baluchistan, was created a Companion 
of the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empire on May 25, 1892. Resi- 
dence: Baluchistan. 

GANPAT RAO (of Jaisinghnagar),.Ka0; 
b. 1845. The title is hereditary, and 
was originally conferred by the old 
Mahratta Government, The ancestors 



of this family were a branch of that of 
the ancient rulers of Sagar. The Rao 
has a son and heir, named Narayan 
Rao. Residence: Jaisinghpur, Sagar, 
Central Provinces. 

GANPAT RAO AMRITRAO MANKAR, 

Rao Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on May 30, 1896. Residence : Bombay. 

GANPAT SINGH, Rai Bahadur. Re- 
ceived the title on January 1, 1898. Is 
the Zaminddr of Harawat. Residence : 
Harawat, Bhagalpur, Bengal. - 

GANPATRAO M0R0BA PITALE, Rao 

Saheb. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 31, 1870. Resi- 
dence : Bombay. 

GANPATRAO RAMCHANDAR, Rao 

Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on October 31, 1879. 
Residence : Ujjain, Central India. 

GANU NAIDU, Rao Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1892. 
Residence : Bombay. 

GARAB SINGH (of Nandsa), Thdkur. 
The title is hereditary, having been 
originally conferred by the Rajas of 
Deogarh. The Thakur is Jagirdar of 
Pachmari, and his jdgir was originally 
held by a family of Mowasses of Kor- 
kors, the hereditary guardians of the 
Cave of Mahadeo, in the Pachmari 
Hills. Residence: Nandsa, Hoshanga- 
bad, Central Provinces. 

GARH, Thakur Chandrasinghji, Thdkur 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1866. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi November 10, 
1884. Belongs to a Chauhan Rajput 
(Hindu) family, descended from a 
younger brother of one of the an- 
cestors of the Chief of Chhota Udai- 
pur, to whom the Thakur of Garh is 
tributary. The State, which is the 
largest in the Sankhera Mehvas, 
contains an area of 134 square miles ; 
its population is almost entirely Bhil 
(aboriginal). Residence: Garh, Rewa 
Kantha, Bombay. 

GARHA, Raja Balbhadar Singh, Rdjd 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1870. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi April 7, 1881. 
Belongs to a Chauhan Rajput (Hindu) 
family. The State is feudatory to 
Gwalior, and was formerly a portion 
of the Rajhugarh jdgir. Its name is 
sometimes spelt Gharra. Its popula- 
tion is about 9500. Residence: Garha, 
Guna, Central India. 



7G 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



GARHI, Thakur of, Rai Bahadur. See 
Mangal Singh. 

GARHWAL, Rdjd of. See Tehri. 

GARRAULI, Diwan Bahadur Chandra 
Bhan Singh, Jdgirddr of. A ruling 
chief; b. 1884. Succeeded to the 
gadi as a minor March 16, 1885. 
Belongs to the Bundela Rajput 
(Hindu) family, of the Orchha stock 
that has given rulers to so many States 
of Central India (see Panna, Ajaigarh, 
Datia, Charkhari, Bijawar, Sarila, 
Jigni, Jaso, Lughasi, etc). Man Singh, 
the younger grandson of Rudra Pratap 
(founder of Orchha), was the founder 
of the Satgharia branch of this family, 
from which descends the Garrauli 
Chiefs. Diwan Gopal Singh obtained 
a sanad, from the British Government 
in 1812. He was succeeded by his 
so , Diwan Parichhat, on whom the 
additional title of Bahadur was con- 
ferred, October 17, 1844. The area 
of the State is 25 square miles ; its 
population 4976, chiefly Hindus. The 
Diwan Bahadur maintains a military 
force of 2 cavalry, 56 infantry, and 
4 guns. Residence : Garrauli, Bundel- 
khand, Central India. 

GAUHAR KHAN, Mian, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 

1897. Residence: Quetta. 

GAUNG, U„ C.S.I. See U. 

GAUR CHANDER MAN SINGH HARI 
CHANDAN MURDRAJ BHRAMAR- 
BAR RAI (of Parikud), Rdjd Baha- 
dur; b. November 1850. The title of 
Raja is hereditary, and the present 
Raja succeeded to the f/adi on the 
death of his father, Raja Chandra 
Sikhar Man Singh, in 1872. He was 
granted the title of Raja Bahadur as 
a personal distinction on January 1, 

1898. Belongs to an ancient family, 
whose founder was the Raja Jadu 
Raj. He possessed Parikud and other 
territory in the time of the Mughals. 
He fought against the Subahdar of 
the province on behalf of the Nawab 
Parasuramraj Pandit, and defeated 
him, receiving large grants of territory 
from the Nawab as his reward. To- 
wards the close of the Mahratta rule 
the Raja Harisebak of Parikud was 
defeated by the Raja of Khurdah, and 
lost most of his possessions. Raja 
Chandra Sikhar Man Singh, pre- 
decessor of the present Raja, showed 



great liberality in the time of the 
Orissa famine of 1866, and was created 
a Companion of the Most Exalted 
Order of the Star of India. Residence ; 
Parikud, Puri, Orissa, Bengal. 

GAURHARI RAI, Rai Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
April 7, 1884. Residence: Midnapur, 
Bengal. 

GAURIHAR, Rao Shamle Prasad Baha- 
dur, Jdgirddr of. A ruling chief; b. 
1859. Succeeded to the gadi on the 
death of the late Rao Gajadhar Pra- 
sad, November 14, 1887. Belongs 
to a Brahman (Hindu) family, that 
held the title of "Sawai Rajdhar" 
from ancient times. At the beginning 
of the present century Rajdhar Rajl 
Ram, the head of the family, was a 
Sardar of the Banda-Ajaigarh State, 
and Governor of its fort of Bhuragarh 
at Banda. He became a leader of 
note, and in 1807 was granted the 
Gaurihar jdgir by the British Govern- 
ment. His son, Rajdhar Rudra Pra- 
tap, did excellent service, and incurred 
great personal loss at Banda. For 
this the Government conferred on 
him, in the Cawnpur Darbar of 1859, 
the title of Rao Bahadur, a khilat, and 
the right of adoption. The area of 
the State is 72 square miles; its 
population is 10,691, chiefly Hindus. 
The chief maintains a military force 
of 43 cavalry, 198 infantry, and 6 
guns. Residence: Gaurihar, Bundel- 
khand, Central India. 

GAVRIDAD, Azam Jadeja Pratap- 
singhji Meruji, Tdluhddr of. A ruling 
chief; b. 1839. Succeeded to the 
gadi in 1855. Belongs to a Rajput 
(Hindu) family. The State, which 
was the original seat of the Chiefs of 
Palitana, has an area of 27 square 
miles ; and a population of 2381, 
chiefly Hindus. The Talukdar main- 
tains a military force of 11 cavalry, 
19 infantry, 2 guns. Residence : Gavri- 
dad, Kathiawar, Bombay. 

GAWHALI, Chief of. See Raysinghpur. 

GAYA PARSHAD (of Pindarna), Tha- 
kur ; b. 1852. The title is hereditary, 
having been originally conferred by 
Raja Mardan Singh of Garhakota. 
An ancestor of the family, named 
Rawat Parshad, saved the life of the 
Raja Mardan Singh from the Raja of 
Tehri, and obtained from him a sanad 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



77 



btx copper-plate, granting him lands 
and the title of Thdkur. He has one 
son, Thakur Bhairao Parshad, Resi- 
dence : Pindarna, Sagar, Central Pro- 
vinces. 

GEROLI, Diwdn Bahadur of See Gar- 
rauli. 

GHAMAJI BALAJI RUKARE, Bao 
Saheb. Received the title on January 
2, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

GHAMANDI LAL, Lala, Bat Saheb. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. Residence: Simla. 

GHANASHAM. See Ghansham. 

GHANAULI, Sarddr of. See Uttam 
Singh. 

GHANSHAM NILKANT NADKARNI, 

Rao Bahadur. Received the title on 
June 3, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

GHANSHAM SINGH (of Mursan), Rdjd 
Bahadur \ 6.1851. The title is heredi- 
tary, and having long been recognized 
by Government, was formally con- 
ferred on December 3, 1859, for the 
excellent services of the Raja Tikam 
Singh, grandfather of the present 
Raja, during the Mutiny of 1857. 
The Raja comes of a family of Baisni 
Jats, having a common ancestor with 
the Rdja Har Nar&yan Singh of 
Hathras in Aligarh — a Jat Chief, by 
name Makhan, who came from Rdjpu- 
tana and settled in the neighbourhood 
of Mursan. His great-grandson, Tha- 
kur Nand Ram, died in 1696, leaving 
fourteen sons, of whom one was named 
Zulkaran. The latter left a son 
named Khusal Singh, who obtained 
lands from the favour of the Naw&b 
Vazir of Oudh, Saadat Khan. He 
died in 1749, and was succeeded by 
his son Phup Singh, who largely 
increased the family estates, and 
assumed the title of Raja. His son 
Bhagwant Singh succeeded in 1798, 
and also increased the estates, and 
was granted a jdgir by the British 
Government for good services per- 
formed in Lord Lake's campaign. He 
died in 1823, and was succeeded by 
Raja Tikam Singh, of whom above. 
Raja Tikam Singh was also created a 
Companion of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire. He died 
in 1878, and was succeeded by his 
grandson, the present Raja, who is 
an Honorary Magistrate. Residence; 



Mursan, Aligarh, North- Western Pro- 
vinces. 

GHARI, Bhumia Nahar Singh, Bhumia 
of. A ruling chief; /;. about 1839. 
Succeeded to the gadi in 1864, Be- 
longs to a Bhilala family. The State 
is also called Bhaisakho; its popula- 
tion is about 980. Residence: Ghari, 
Bhopawar, Central India. 

GHARRA, Rdjd of. See Garha. 

GHARWARA, Thakur Latkan Singh, 

Thdkur of; b. 1878. Succeeded the 
late Thakur Ujyar Singh on September 
8, 1895. The title is hereditary, the 
Thakur being the head of a Raj-Gond 
family. Residence: Gharwara, Seoni, 
Central Provinces. 

GHAT PIPARIA, Thdkur of. See Hindu- 
pat. 

GHATAKHERI, Thdkur of. See Khu- 
man Singh. 

GHAUS SHAH KADARI, Khdn Bahd- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1877, in 
celebration of the assumption of the 
Imperial title by Her Most Gracious 
Majesty the Queen Empress. Resi- 
dence : Kadar, Mysore. 

GHAUSIA BEGAM, tfawdb. Is the 
half-sister of his late Highness Mu- 
hammad Ghaus, the last of the titular 
Nawabs of the Carnatic. Was granted 
the personal title of Nawab in 1822. 
Residence : Madras. 

GHAYAS-UD-DIN, Muhammad, Khdn 
Bahadur. See Muhammad Ghayas- 
ud-din. 

GHAYAS-UD-DIN ALI KHAN, Diwan, 

Shaikh-ul-Mushaikh. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on January 
1, 1877, on the occasion of the Pro- 
clamation of Her Maiesty as Empress 
of India. Residence : Ajmir. 

GHAYAS-UD-DIN JALAL - UD - DIN, 
Kazi, Mir, Khdn Saheb. Granted the 
title, as a personal distinction, Janu- 
ary 2, 1893. Residence : Nasik, Bom- 
bay. 

GHAZANFAR ALI, Mir, Khdn. A 
member of the Carnatic family. The 
title is a personal one ; and, having 
been originally conferred by the Nawab 
of the Carnatic, was recognized 1890 
Residence: Madras. 



78 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



GHAZI KHAN, Lehri, Sardar, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 25, 1895. Residence : Sibi, Balu- 
chistan. 

GHELLABHAI HARIDAS, Rai Baha- 
dur. Keceived the title on January 
1, 1898. Residence : Bombay. 

GHOLAM. SeeGhvlim. 

GHORAM KHAN, Rind, Khan Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on February 21, 1884. Resi- 
dence: Karachi, Sind. 

GHORASAR, ThakurDada Saheb Suraj- 
malji, Thdkur of. A ruling chief; b. 
1869. Succeeded to the gadi January 
5, 1883. Belongs to a Dabbi Rajput 
(Hindu) family. Is tributary to the 
Gaekwar. The area of the State is 
40 square miles ; its population 8400, 
chiefly Hindus. Residence: Ghorasar, 
Mahi Kantha, Bombay. 

GHORIWAHA, Sarddr of. See Jamiat 
Singh. 

GHOSE SHAH KHADRI, Khan Baha- 
dur. See Ghaus. 

GHULAM AHMAD, Khan Bahadur 
Kasim Jang. The title, having been 
originally conferred by the Nawab 
of the Carnatic, was recognized in 
1890. Residence: Madras. 

GHTJLAM AHMAD, Mirza, CLE. Was 
created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
May 24, 1881. Residence: 

GHULAM AHMAD KHAN, Munshi, 
Khan Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred May 25, 1895. Residence: 
Jalandhar, Punjab. 

GHULAM AHMAD KHAN, Sahebzada, 
Nawdb. The title was conferred May 
25, 1895, for services on the Council 
of Regency of the Gwalior State. 
Residence : Gwalior, Central India. 

GHULAM AHMAD-ULLA, Khdn. The 
title, having been originally conferred 
by the Nawab of the Carnatic, was 
recognized 1890. Is styled Muhammad 
Khair-ulla Khdn. Residence: Madras. 

GHULAM AKBAR KHAN walad HU- 
SAIN BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. The 
title is hereditary, the Mir being a 
descendant of one of the Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 



annexation. Residence : Hyderabad, 
Sind. 

GHULAM ALI KHAN walad GHULAM 
SHAH KHAN, Mir. The title is 
hereditary, the Mir being a descendant 
of one of the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind 
at the time of the annexation. Resi- 
dence: Shikarpur, Sind. 

GHULAM ALI KHAN walad KHAN 
MUHAMMAD, Mir. The title has 
been continued for life, the Mir being 
a descendant of one of the Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence : Hyderabad, 
Sind. 

GHULAM ALI KHAN walad ZULFIKAR 
KHAN, Mir. The title has been con- 
tinued for life, the Mir being a de- 
scendant of the Talpur Mirs, who 
were ruling in Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence : Hyderabad, 
Sind. 

GHULAM FARID, Mian, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on May 30, 
1891. Residence : Batala, Punjab. 

GHULAM GHAUS, Munshi Khwaja, 

Khdn Bahadur Zulkadr ; b. 1822. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
June 6, 1885. Belongs to a family 
that left Kashmir towards the close 
of the Durrani dynasty on the occasion 
of a political outbreak, and removing 
to Tibet, engaged in commerce at 
Lhassa ; but subsequently migrated to 
Nepal, and finally settled at Benares. 
Khwaja Ghulam Ghaus succeeded his 
uncle as Mir Munshi to Government, 
and held that post till his retirement 
in 1 885 . Rendered loyal service during 
the Mutiny of 1857, for which a sanad 
and khilat were conferred upon him. 
Residence : Allahabad, North -Western 
Provinces. 

GHULAM GHAUS. See Ghulam Mu- 
hammad Ghaus. 

GHULAM HAIDAR KHAN, Achakzai, 
Khdn Bahadur. The title of Khan 
Saheb was conferred on May 20, 1896 ; 
and that of Khan Bahadur on January 
1, 1899. Residence: Gulistan, Balu- 
chistan. 

GHULAM HAIDAR KHAN walad MU- 
HAMMAD KHAN, Mir. The title is 
hereditary, the Mir being a descendant 
of one of the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind 
at the time of the annexation. Resi- 
dence: Sind. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



79 



GHULAM HASAN, Shaikh, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 2, 1888. Resi- 
dence : Amritsar, Punjab. 

GHULAM HASAN KHAN walad IMAM 
BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. The title 
has been continued for life, the Mir 
being a descendant of one of the Mirs 
or Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence : Shikarpur, 
Sind. 

GHULAM HASAN ROGAY, Khan Saheb. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence: Bombay. 

GHULAM HUSAIN (JATI), Mulk ; h. 
about 1847. The title is hereditary, 
the tradition being that it was first 
conferred by Sultan Murad Khan, son 
of Sultan Muhammad Khan of Con- 
stantinople. There is also a sanad 
from Muhammad Shah, Emperor of 
Delhi. Belongs to a Jat (Muhamma- 
dan) family. Residence: Karachi, Sind. 

GHULAM HUSAIN SAHEB, Khan Sa- 
heb. Received the title on June 3, 
1899. Residence : Vellore, North Arcot, 
Madras. 

GHULAM JLLANI, Khan. The title, 
originally conferred by the Nawab of 
the Carnatic, was recognized in 1890. 
Residence: Madras. 

GHULAM KADLR KHAN, Khan Baha- 
dur. Is Superintendent of the Mak- 
sudangarh State, Central India. Re- 
ceived the title on January 1, 1899. 
Residence : Maksudangarh, Central 
India. 

GHULAM KADIR KHAN walad KHAIR 
MUHAMMAD KHAN, Mir. The 
title has been continued for life, the 
Mir being a descendant of one of the 
Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the time of 
the annexation. Residence : Shikar- 
pur, Sind. 

GHULAM KADLR KHAN walad KHAN 
MUHAMMAD KHAN, Jf*'r. The title 
is hereditary, the Mir being a de- 
scendant of one of the Mirs or Chiefs 
of Sind at the time of the annexation. 
Residence: Shikarpur, Sind. 

GHULAM KADIR KHAN (of Kharja, 
Bulandshahr), Khan Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 20, 1890. Residence : Gwalior, 
Central India. 



GHULAM KASIM KHAN, Kati Khel 
(of Tank), Nawab. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on October 6, 
1882, on succession to the Chiefship 
of Tank. Residence : Dera Ismail Khan, 
Punjab. 

GHULAM KUTAB-UD-DIN, Nawdb. The 
title, which is hereditary, was con- 
ferred on December 5, 1864. Is Nawab 
of Mamdot. Residence: Mamdot, 
Punjab. 

GHULAM MAHMUD, Khan. The title 
is a personal one, and having been 
originally conferred by the Nawab of 
the Carnatic, was recognized in 1890. 
Is styled Niamat Khan. Residence: 
Madras. 

GHULAM MOHI-UD-DIN SAHEB, 

Khan Bahadur. The title is a per- 
sonal one, and was conferred on 
September 28, 1885. Residence : Tan- 
jore, Madras. 

GHULAM MOHIDEEN SAYYID AB- 
DUL GHAFUR SAHEB, Khan Saheb. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Perambalur, Madras. 

GHULAM MUHAMMAD, Khan Baha- 
dur. Is son of the Prince of Arcot. 
Granted the title on June 22, 1897. 
Residence: Madras. 

GHULAM MUHAMMAD, Khan Saheb. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. Residence: Madras. 

GHULAM MUHAMMAD, Haji, Khan 
Bahadur Ghalib Jane/ Sharf-xid-dauld. 
The title is a personal one, and having 
been originally conferred by the Nawab 
of the Carnatic, was recognized in 
1890. Residence: Madras. 

GHULAM MUHAMMAD, Haji, Khan 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on April 3, 1884. Re- 
sidence: Bombay. 

GHULAM MUHAMMAD GHAUS, Na- 
wab; b. 1861. Is son of Muazzaz-ud- 
daula, and grandson of his late High- 
ness Azim Jah, the first of the titular 
Princes of Arcot. Granted the title 
of Khan Bahadur in 1876; and that 
of Nawab on June 3, 1899. Residence: 
Madras. 

GHULAM MUHAMMAD HAIDAR SA- 
HEB, Khan Bahadur; b. 1834. Ren- 
dered eminent service in the Madras 
Police, for which he received the title 
as a personal distinction in 1887. Re- 



80 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



tired on pension in 1890. Residence: 
Karur, Coimbatore, Madras. 

GHULAM MUHAMMAD HASAN, Kazi, 

Khan Saheb. The title was conferred 
on January 1, 1898. Residence : Delhi, 
Punjab. 

GHULAM MUHAMMAD HASAN All, 

Khan Bahadur; b. 1850. Son of Sardar 
Jang. Granted the title of Khan Ba- 
hadur as a personal distinction in 1883. 
Residence: Madras. 

GHULAM MUHAMMAD KHAN, Mun- 
shi, Khan Bahadur; b. 1855. Re- 
ceived the title on January 1, 1897. 
Residence: Dera Ismail Khan, Punjab. 

GHULAM MUHAMMAD KHAN walad 
RUSTAM KHAN, Mir. The title has 
been continued for life, the Mir being 
a descendant of the Talpur Mirs, who 
were ruling in Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence : Hyderabad, 
Sind. 

GHULAM MUHI-UD-DIN, Khan Baha- 
dur; b. 1852. Granted the personal 
title of Khan Bahadur in 1885, f or'good 
service in the Railway Department, 
Residence : Tanjore, India. 

GHULAM MUHI-UD-DIN, Khan Baha- 
dur. Is son of the Prince of Arcot. 
Granted the title on June 22, 1897. 
Residence: Madras. 

GHULAM MURTAZA, Sardar. The title 
is hereditary, Residence: Baluchistan. 

GHULAM NABI ALI, Khan Bahadur 
Nasir Jang. The title is a personal 
one, and having been conferred origin- 
ally by the Nawab of the Carnatic, was 
recognized in 1890. Is a member of 
the Carnatic family. Residence ; Ma- 
dras. 

GHULAM NABI KHAN walad IMAM 
BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. The title has 
been continued for life. The Mir is a 
descendant of one of the Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence : Shikarpur, 
Sind. 

GHULAM NAJAF KHAN walad IMAM 
BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. The title has 
been continued for life. The Mir is 
a descendant of one of the Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind at the time _ of the 
annexation. Residence : Shikarpur, 
Sind. 



GHULAM RASUL, Chaudhri, Khan Sa- 
heb. Received the title on January 
1, 1898. Is an Honorary Magistrate. 

Residence : Sialkot, Punjab. 

GHULAM RASUL, Miyan, Khan Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1890. Resid- 
ence : Peshawar, Punjab. 

GHULAM RASUL KHAN, Sarai, Jatoi, 
Khan Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on May 20, 1896. Residence: 
Hyderabad, Sind. 

GHULAM RASUL SAHEB, Maulavi 
Haji, Shams-ul- Ulama. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1898. Re- 
sidence: Madras. 

GHULAM RAZA SAHEB, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on June 
22, 1897. Residence : Madras. 

GHULAM SADIK KHAN, Subahdar- 
Major, Khan Bahdd,ur. Received the 
title on January 8, 1899. Residence: 
Kohat. 

GHULAM SARWAR, Khan Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence : Peshawar, Punjab. 

GHULAM SHAH KHAN walad KHAN 
MUHAMMAD KHAN, Mir. The title 
has been continued for life. The Mir 
is a descendant of one of the Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence: Hyderabad, 
Sind. 

GHULAM SULTAN MUHI-UD-DIN. See 
Sultan Muhi-ud-din. 

GHULAM-ULLA KHAN walad GHU- 
LAM MUSTAFA KHAN, Mir. The 
title is hereditary. The Mir is a 
descendant of one of the Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence,: Hyderabad, 
Sind. 

GHUND, Chief of. Is a feudatory of 
the Raja of Keonthal (q.v.), and rules 
over one of the Simla Hill States. 
Residence: Ghund, Simla Hills, Punjab. 

GIDHAUR, Maharaja Sir Ravaneshwar 
Prasad Singh Bahadur, K. CLE. , Ma- 
haraja Bahadur of; b. 1859. Belongs 
to a'Kshatriya family of the Chandra 
Vansi or Lunar sept, whose founder 
was Bir Vikram Singh. His ancestors 
had come from Mahoba in Bundel- 
khand, and settled at Bardi in Rewah, 
and he was the younger brother of 
the Raja of Bardi. From him the 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



81 



ninth in descent is said to have built 
the temple of Baidyanath. Raja 
Dalar Singh, fourteenth Raja, is stated 
to have received a farmdn from the 
Emperor Shah Jahan in 1651. Raja 
Gopal Singh was recognized by the 
British Government; and his grand- 
son was the well-known Sir Jaimangal 
Singh Bahadur, K.C.S.I., on whom 
the title of Maharaja Bahadur was 
conferred for his eminent services 
during the Santal insurrection and the 
Mutiny of 1857. On January 1, 1877, 
on the occasion of the Proclamation 
of Her Most Gracious Majesty as 
Empress of India, Sir Jaimangal Singh 
received the hereditary title of Maha- 
raja Bahadur. He was succeeded by 
his son, Maharaja Shiva Prasad Singh 
Bahadur; and the latter by his son, 
the present Maharaja Bahadur, who 
is well known for his benevolence and 
loyalty. Educated in Sanskrit, Per- 
sian, Hindi, and English; married in 
1885, and has a son and heir, born in 
1890. Received a khilat from the 
Lieutenant-Governor of Bengal on 
succeeding to the title, also the privi- 
lege of exemption from attendance in 
Civil Courts, was created a Knight 
Commander of the Most Eminent Order 
of the Indian Empire on May 25, 1895. 
The family cognizance is a trisul, or 
trident of Siva. Residence : Gidhaur, 
Bengal. 

GIRDHAR MAHADEV NAGARKAR, 

Rao Saheb. The title was conferred 
on January 1, 1894. Residence: Poona, 
Bombay. 

GIRDHARLAL ULATRAM, Rao Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on December 27, 1872. Re- 
sidence: Ahmadabad, Bombay. 

GIRIAPA TIMAPA DESAI , Heladi 
Naik Bahddu r Dtsai Nadugauda. The 
title is hereditary. Residence : Bel- 
gaum, Bombay. 

GIRIJA NANDAN SINGH, Kumar; b. 
January 4, 1875. Is the eldest son of 
the late Raja Deo Mandan Singh, and 
cousin of the Raja of Seohar. Resid- 
ence : Seohar, Muzaffarpur, Bengal. 

GIRIJA NATH RAI (of Dinajpur), Ma- 
haraja. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on May 24, 1884. Is the 
son of the late Maharani Sham Mohini 
of Dinajpur ; and belongs to a family 
settled in the Dinajpur district since 



the time of Akbar, at which time 
one of its ancestors, named Srimanta 
Datta, was Zamindar of Dinajpur. 
His daughter married Hari Ram Rai, 
who had been Diwan to the Zamindar 
of Idrakpur. The son of this marriage 
was Suka Deb Rai, who died in 1677. 
His son, Raja Jai Deb, was Raja of 
Dinajpur from 1677 to 1682 ; and was 
succeeded by his brother, Raja Pran- 
nath, from 1682 to 1723, who adopted 
a young relative named Ram Nath, 
who succeeded to the Raj, and died 
in 1760. A grandson of the latter by 
adoption, named Radha Nath, was 
Raja from 1780 to 1801; at his ac- 
cession he owned the greater part of 
the three districts of Dinajpur, Maldah, 
and Bogra, but after the Decennial 
Settlement the bulk of the estate was 
sold for arrears of revenue. His 
grandson was the Raja Tarak Nath, 
1840 to 1865, husband of the late 
Maharani Sham Mohini, and adoptive 
father of the present Raja. The title 
of Maharani was formally conferred 
on that lady in 1875, for her eminent 
benevolence during the great famine 
of 1873. Residence: Dinajpur, Bengal. 

GIRINDRA NATH MUKHARJI, Rai 

Saheb. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Residence : Transport 
Department, Simla. 

GHilSH CHANDAR DAS, Red Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on April 2, 1874, for eminent 
public services. Residence : Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

GHtlSH CHANDAR RAI, Raja. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
May 24, 1889, for eminent public 
services. Residence: Nalthoba, Bengal. 

GIRISH CHANDAR RAI (of Rainagar), 
Raja. The title of Rai Bahadur was 
conferred on May 25, 1895 ; and that 
of Raja on May 21, 1898. Residence : 
Sylhet, Assam. 

G0BUH). See also Govind. 

G0BIND JAS, Lala, Rai Bahadur; b. 
1856. Received the title on January 
1, 1898. Residence: Saharanpur, 
North-Western Provinces. 

G0BIND LAL, Lala, Rai Bahadur; b. 
1856. Received the title on January 
1, 1898. Residence: Saharanpur, 
JTorth- Western Province*. 

G 



82 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



GOBIND LAL, Lala, Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence: Military Works Depart- 
ment, Simla. 

GOBIND PARSHAD SINGH, Thakurai 
(of Banka), Rai Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on May 20, 1896. Re- 
sidence : Palamau, Bengal. 

GOBIND RAO NARAYAN, Rao. The 
title is hereditary. Residence : Alla- 
habad, North-Western Provinces. 

GOBIND SAHAI, Diwdn. The title is 
hereditary. Residence : Gujranwala, 
Punjab. 

GOBIND SINGH (of Beona), Rdjd ; b. 
November 29, 1872. The title is here- 
ditary; and is stated by the family 
to have been obtained in the year 
1746 from the Mahrattas, after the 
defeat of the Bundelas by the com- 
bined forces of the Peshwa and Nawab 
Khan Bangash of Farrukhabad. Be- 
longs to a Bundela Rajput family, and 
is the son of the late Raja Parachat, 
who died on March 3, 1878. Resid- 
ence: Jalaun, North- Western Pro- 
vinces. 

GOBIND SINGH, THAKTJR (of Cha- 
uma), Rao Bahadur. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on January 
1, 1889. Residence : Jaipur, Rajput- 
ana. 

GOBRA, Rdjd of. See Khet Singh. 

GODE NARAYAN GAJAPATI RAO, 

Rdjd. See Gajapati. 

GOGAN. See Gagan. 

GOGAN CHANDRA RAI, Rai Bahadur. 
Granted the title of Rai Bahadur, as 
a personal distinction, for eminent 
services rendered in the Benares Opium 
Department, January 2, 1893. Resi- 
dence: Benares, North- Western Pro- 
vinces. 

GOKAL. &*Gokul. 

GOKAL DAS, Seth, Rdjd. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on January 
1, 1889. The Raja had been created 
a Rao Saheb in 1867, on account of 
his liberal contributions towards the 
erection of the Jabalpur Town Hall. 
His father was Seth Kushal Chand, a 
wealthy banker of Jabalpur, who 
rendered good services during the 
Mutiny in 1857; a gold medal was 
presented to him by the Government 



for his liberal help in fitting out the 
Madras Column. Residence : Jabalpur, 
Central Provinces. 

GOKAL NARAYAN, Rai ; b. 1842. The 
title is hereditary, having been origin- 
ally conferred by the Nawab Shuja- 
ud-daula Bahadur on an ancestor of 
the family named Lachmi Narayan, 
Khattri, who was Daroga of the palaces 
of the Begam. The Rai's father 
was the Rai Baldeo Narayan, alias 
Chotu Lai. The Rai is also known by 
the name of Chotu Lai ; he has three 
sons — Babu Kesri Narayan, Mahabir 
Narayan, and Badri Narayan. Resi- 
dence : Allahabad, North- Western 
Provinces. 

GOKUL. See Gokal. 

GOKUL CHAND, Rai Bahddur. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence: Faizabad, Oudh. 

GOKUL CHAND, Lala, Rai Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1891. Residence: Guj rat, Punjab. 

GOKUL CHANDRA SINGHI, Rai Ba- 
hadur; b. 1825. Son of the late Babu 
Uma Charan Singhi, of Khishma, 

' Nadiya, Bengal. Has rendered good 
service in the Small Arms Ammunition 
Factory at Dum-Dum, and received 
the title on January 1, 1891, in recog- 
nition thereof. Belongs to a Kayastha 
family descended from Rai Lakshman 
Singha of Chaula, who was the Gushti- 
pati or " Chief of the Clan " among 
the Maulik Kayasthas. Muralidhar 
Singha first settled in Khishma in the 
beginning of the 17 th century ; and it 
is stated that Raja Kali Prasanna 
Singha of Calcutta, translator of the 
Mahabharata, is a lineal descendant of 
this family. The Rai Bahadur married 
a daughter of the late Babu Chandra 
Nath Mustafi, Zamindar of Ula in 
Nadiya District, whose ancestors are 
stated to have held the post of Ac- 
countant-General under the Nawab Na- 
zims of Bengal. The Rai Bahadur has 
three sons — Anukul Chandra Singha, 
born 1865 ; Bankim Chandra Singha, 
born 1870 ; Atul Chandra Singha, born 
1875. His eldest son, Satis Chandra 
Singha, is deceased ; but has left a son 
and heir, Probodh Chandra Singha, 
born 1881. Residences: Dum-Dum, 
near Calcutta ; 173 Cornwallis Street, 
Calcutta; Khishma, Nadiya District, 
Bengal. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



83 



GOLAK CHANDAR OHAUDHRI, Rai 

Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1877, on 
the occasion of the Proclamation of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty as Empress 
of India. Residence: Chittagong, 
Bengal. 

GOLAM QUASSIM, Manlavi, Khan 
Bahddur. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Residence; Basirhat, 
Bengal. 

GOND RAJA, The. See Earn Sha, Raja. 

GONDAL, His Highness Thakur Saheb 
Sir Bhagwatsinghji Sagramji, 
G.C.I.E., Thakur Saheb of. A ruling 
chief; I. October 24, 1865. Succeeded 
to the gadi December 14, 1869, as a 
minor. Belongs to a Jareja Rajput 
(Hindu) family, tracing its origin to 
the renowned Krishna; descended 
from the Nawanagar-Rajkot family ; 
is a Kumbhani, being a descendant of 
Kumbhoji I., founder of the Gondal 
dynasty ; was only four years old when 
he succeeded his father, who died in 
1899, when on a visit to Bombay. The 
following is a brief summary of the 
history of this ruling family : (1) Kum- 
bhoji I. , founder of the Gondal dynasty, 
1634-49 a.d. Succeeded by his son 
(2) Sagramji I., 1649-1714 a.d. Suc- 
ceeded by his son (3) Haloji, 1714-53. 
Succeeded by his son (4) Kumbhoji 
II., 1753-90 a.d. ; was a most powerful 
chief ; was both a warrior and a states- 
man, and aggrandized his possessions 
by conquest and statecraft. Suc- 
ceeded by his grandson (5) Mulaji, 
1790-92 a.d. Succeeded by his son 
(6) Dajibhai, 1792-1800 a.d. ; who was 
a patron of letters, and was especially 
fond of poetry. Succeeded by his 
uncle (7) t Devaji, 1800-12 a.d., a 
brave soldier and a wise ruler. Suc- 
ceeded by his five sons one after an- 
other— (8) Nathuji, 1812-14 a.d. ; (9) 
Kanuji, 1814-21 a.d. ; (10) Chandra 
Sinhji, 1821^1 a.d. ; (11) Bhanabhai, 
1841-51 a.d. ; (12) Sagramji II., 1851- 
69 a.d. The last was a quiet and pious 
chief. Succeeded by his son, the 
present Thakur Saheb. During his 
minority the State was at first ad- 
ministered direct by the British 
Government, but afterwards a Joint 
Administration was introduced. He 
was educated at the Rajkot Rajkumar 
College and also at the Edinburgh 



University. His College career has 
been reported to be eminently success- 
ful; in order to give the finishing 
touch to his education, he undertook 
a voyage to Europe in 1883, in the 
company of Major (now Colonel) 
Hancock ; returned after six months ; 
published an account of his tour under 
the title Journal of a Visit to England 
in 1883; was associated with Major 
(now Colonel) Nutt in the adminis- 
trative business of his State, and as- 
sumed sole charge on August 24, 1884. 
The reply made by him on the occasion 
of his installation to the address of 
the Political Agent, Colonel West, was 
pronounced by Government to be 
highly creditable to him, both as re- 
gards the tone and the matter of it, 
showing "good feeling and good taste, 
and his description of his duties as a 
ruler evinces a sound and clear judg- 
ment." Three years after his instal- 
lation the Thakur Saheb was publicly 
complimented by the Governor, Lord 
Reay, in the following words : "Thakur 
Saheb, though you have only been 
three years on the gadi, I believe you 
have acted up to the pledges you then 
gave." Nominated a Fellow of the 
Bombay University ; and a Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Deccan Education Society 
at Poona. Having been imbued with 
a love of science, he again proceeded 
to Scotland in 1886, to reside for a 
time at the Edinburgh University, 
which, in appreciation of his " exem- 
plary quest of knowledge," conferred 
on him the honorary degree of LL.D. 
in 1887. The same year he was re- 
quested to be a member of the depu- 
tation from the Kathiawar Chiefs that 
waited on Her Majesty the Queen 
Empress at the time of the celebration 
of Her Most Gracious Majesty's 
Jubilee; and on that occasion was 
made a K.C.I. E. Returned to India 
in August 1887. Takes a keen interest 
in the administrative business of the 
State, and is a joint-proprietor of the 
" Bhaunagar-Gondal " and "Gondal- 
Porbandar " railways, in which concerns 
he has invested about £500,000. Be- 
sides railways, the territory has many 
macadamized roads, schools, hospitals, 
municipalities, rest-houses, infirmary, 
post and telegraph offices, courts of 
justice, and other appliances of an 
improved administration. Owing to 
the excellence of his administration 



84 



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the British Government was pleased 
to raise Gondal from the rank of a 
second-class to that of a first-class 
State in Kathiawar. In 1889 his wife 
— daughter of His Highness the 
Maharana of Dharampur— being taken 
very ill, the doctors advised her to go 
to England for a change, and His 
Highness was obliged to take her there 
for the benefit of her health. This is 
the first instance of a Rajput consort 
of a ruling chief ever venturing to 
overcome her caste prejudices. Her 
Highness was received by Her Most 
Gracious Majesty the Queen Empress, 
and personally invested with the Im- 
perial Order of the Crown of India; 
and on June 22, 1897, on the auspicious 
occasion of the Diamond Jubilee of 
, Her Majesty, His Highness was created 
' a Knight Grand Commander of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire. The Thakur Saheb has con- 
tributed numerous donations to de- 
serving public institutions ; has relieved 
his subjects of the burden of many 
obnoxious taxes, and remitted a vast 
amount of debt which his people owed 
him. His subjects, in return, have 
I voted him a statue by public sub- 
| scription. Arms. — A belt and sword 
with the word "Gondal" at the top. 
Motto. — (Sanskrit) Sajy am cha Satyam, 
in Devanagari character, meaning 
"Ready and True." His Highness's 
sons are — Kumar Shri Bhojraj, heir- 
apparent, born 1883 ; is being educated 
in Edinburgh. Kumar Shri Bhupat 
Sinhje, born 1888 ; is in England with 
his parents. Residence: Gondal, Ka- 
thiawar, Bombay. 

GOPAL BALWANTNENE, Rao Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on May 20, 
1896. Residence: Bombay. 

GOPAL CHANDAR MUKHARJI, Rai 

Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1889. 
Residence : Calcutta. 

GOPAL CHANDRA MUKHARJI, Rai 

Bahadur. Has rendered good service 
as Chairman of the Kasipur-Chitpur 
Municipality, Calcutta; and received 
the title as a personal distinction on 
May 25, 1892. Residence: Calcutta. 

GOPAL DAS, Rai Bahadur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on May 
24, 1884. Residence : Lahore, Punjab. 



GOPAL DAS KUSALDAS, Rao Saheb. 
See Gopaldas. 

GOPAL HARI MULLICK, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence: Bogra, Bengal. 

GOPAL LAL ROY, Mahdrdj Kumar; b. 
1887. Received the title on the death 
of his father, the late Maharaja Govind 
Lai Roy Bahadur, in 1897. Residence : 
Tajhat, Rangpur, Bengal. 

GOPAL RAM, Rai Bahadur. Received 
the title on January 1, 1898. Resi- 
dence : Gwalior, Central India. 

GOPAL RAO (of Rehli), Rao. The title 
is hereditary. Is the son of the late 
Rao Kishen Rao and descended from 
Govind Pandit, who came to Sagar 
with the Mahratta ruler from Puna, 
and being a relative of the latter, was 
made Mdmlatddr of Rehli. Residence : 
Sagar, Central Provinces. 

GOPAL RAO (of Sagar), Rao and Potddr; 
b. 1859. Succeeded his father, the late 
Rao Madho Rao, on February 16, 1895. 
The title is hereditary, having been 
originally conferred by the old Mah- 
ratta Government of Sagar. The Rao's 
great-grandfather, a Mahratta Brah- 
man, was an important Officer of that 
Government; and he was succeeded 
by his son, the Rao Lachhman Rao, 
Mamlatdar of Narsinghpur, and re- 
ceived a political pension from the 
British Government on the cession. 
He was succeeded by his widow, the 
Mussumat Parvati Bai, who adopted 
the late Rao Madho Rao. Residence : 
Sagar, Central Provinces. 

GOPAL RAO SHIVDEO (of Malegaon), 
Rao Bahadur; b. June 29, 1843. The 
title is hereditary, having been origin- 
ally conferred by the Peshwa. The 
Rao Bahadur's mother enjoys a pension 
from the Government. The Rao Ba- 
hadur is known as the Raja of 
Malegaon. Residence : Nasik, Bombay. 

GOPAL SINGHI, Rao Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1894. 
Residence; Bhamo, Burma. 

GOPAL VISHWAS RAO, Pandit, Rao 

Bahadur. Is Minister of the Dhar 
State. Received the title on January 
2, 1899. Residence: Dhar, Central 
India. 

GOPALA CHARI, Sarukkai, Biwdn 
Bahadur, Js Acting Judge of Cud- 



THE GOLDEN BOOK. OF INDIA 



85 



dapah ; received the title on January 
2, 1899. Residence: Cuddapah, Madras. 

GOP ALA CHARIYA KRADKAR, Mahd- 
mahopddhydya. The title is a personal 
one, and was conferred on February 
16, 1887, in recognition of his eminence 
in oriental learning. Residence : Gwa- 
lior, Central India. 

GOPALA, P., Rao, Rao Bahadur; b. 
1856. Member of the Berhampur 
Municipal Council, 1884 ; Chairman, 
1887. Granted the title as a personal 
distinction in 1891 for his eminent 
municipal services. Residence: Ber- 
hampur, Ganjam, Madras. 

GOPALDAS KHUSALDAS, Rao Saheb. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence: Bombay. 

GOPALJI STJRBHAI DESAI, Rao Baha- 
dur ; b. June 24, 1832. The title was 
conferred on January 13, 1882, as a 
personal distinction, for eminent public 
services in the Educational Service, 
which extended from 1853 to 1892. 
Is a son of Desai Surbhai Dayalji of 
Puni, Surat, an important Zaminddr 
in that district. Received the title of 
Rao Saheb in 1864; and the sanad 
conferring the title of Rao Bahadur in 
1882 was delivered to him in full 
Durbar by the political agent at 
Bhaunagar. Has received the thanks 
of Government for his services (in 
conjunction with his father) in bring- 
ing about the settlement of Wattans 
in Surat; also in connection with 
archaeological researches in Kathiawar, 
and with the settlement of the word- 
ing of the " Fashzamin " bonds entered 
into by the Kathiawar Chiefs. Ap- 
pointed Fellow of the Bombay Uni- 
versity, 1885; Educational Inspector, 
Northern Division, Bombay Presi- 
dency, 1885. Is President of the 
Kathiawar General Library, Rajkot ; a 
Life Member of the East India Associa- 
tion, and of the Gujarat Vernacular 
Society. Residence : Surat, Bombay. 

GOPALPURA, Rao of. See Sheodarshan 
Singh. 

GOPI MAL, Rai. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on May 31, 1871. 
Residence : Firozpur, Punjab. 

GOSAIN.— A prefix. 

GOTARDI, Thakur Punjabhai Ratan- 
sang, Thakur of; b. 1859. Succeeded 



to a share of this State in 1893. The 
State has an area of two square miles ; 
population 616, chiefly aboriginal 
(Kolis). Residence: Gotardi, Rewa 
Kantha, Bombay. 

GOVARDHAN SINGH (of Ramgarh), 
Mian. The title is hereditary in this 
branch of the family. The head of 
another branch of the same family is 
Sardar Ranjit Singh (q.v.), who holds 
the hereditary title of Sardar. De- 
scended from a Rajput family, whose 
great ancestor was Raja Singar Chand, 
Raja of Bilaspur (Kahlur). His 
younger son was Kalal Chand, tenth 
in descent from whom was Surat Singh, 
whose four sons, with their retainers, 
aided the Raja of Nahan to conquer 
Such&war, Ramgarh, and other terri- 
tories, and received Ramgarh as their 
share. Sardar Kushal Singh was the 
only one of the four who left any 
children. He built the fort at Ram- 
garh ; and his grandson, Gopal Singh, 
was the grandfather of Mian Govard- 
han Singh. Residence: Ambala. 
Punjab. 

GOVIND. See also Gobind. 

GOVIND GOPAL UCHGAONKAR, Rao 

Saheb. Received the title on January 
2, 1899, for municipal services at Bel- 
gaum. Residence : Belgaum, Bombay 

GOVIND JAS, Lala, Rai Bahadur. Re- 
ceived the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence: Hardwar, North-Western 
Provinces. 

GOVIND RAMCHANDRA KHANDE- 
KAR, Rao Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on May 26, 1894. Residence : 
Ajmere, Rajputana. 

GOVIND RANADE, Mahadeo, CLE. 

See Mahadeo. 

GOVIND RAO (of Jaisinghnagar), Rao; 
b. 1841. _ The title is hereditary, having 
been originally conferred by the old 
Mahratta Government, and subse- 
quently recognized by the Government 
of India. The Rao, like his kinsmen, 
Rao Ganpat Rao (q.v.) and Rao Ram 
Chand Rao of Jaisinghnagar, is de- 
scended from ancestors who were con- 
nected with the former rulers of Sagar ; 
and to one of them, named Rao Ganpat 
Rao, the pare/and of Jaisinghnagar was 
made over as its talukdar. Residence : 
Sagar, Central Provinces. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



GOVIND VENKOJI KHOT, Rao Saheb. 
Received the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence : Amraoti, Berar. 

GOVIND RAO (of Rehli), Rao. The title 
is hereditary. Is a younger brother of 
Rao Gopal Rao of Rehli (q.v.). 
Residence: Rehli, Sagar, Central 
Provinces. 

GOVIND RAO RAMCHANDRA GARUD, 

Rao Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 
1887. Residence; Dhulia, Bombay. 

GOVIND SAKARAM HOSUR, Rao 

Saheb ; granted the title, as a personal 
distinction, on January 2, 1893, for 
eminent municipal services. Is Vice- 
President of the Saundatti Munici- 
pality, Bombay. Residence : Saundatti, 
Belgauni, Bombay. 

GOVIND SASTRI, Mahdmahopddhydya. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1899. Residence: Sanskrit College, 
Calcutta. 

GRISH. SeeGirish. 

GUDA, Sarddr of. See Fateh Singh. 

GUL HASAN KHAN, Khan Bahadur: 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on January 1,1877. Residence: 
Hyderabad, Sind. 

GUL HASAN KHAN walad WALI 
MUHAMMAD KHAN, Mir. The 
title has been continued for life, the 
Mir being a representative of one of 
the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the time 
of the annexation. Residence : Shi- 
karpur, Sind. 

GULAB DAS PARSHOTAMDAS, Rao 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 21, 1898. Residence: Surat, 
Bombay. 

GULAB SINGH, Munshi, Rai Saheb; 
b. February 19, 1850. Received the 
title on June 22, 1897. Residence: 
Lahore, Punjab. 

GULAB SINGH (of Bina), Rao. The 
title is hereditary. Residence : Sagar, 
Central Provinces. 

GULAB SINGH (of Meanoni), Rao 

Saheb. The title is hereditary. Resi- 
dence : Sagar, Central Provinces. 

GULAM. SeeQhxA&m. 



GULER, Rdjd of. See Jai Singh. 

GUR SAHAI MALL, Lala, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1890. Resi- 
dence: Punjab. 

GURDIT SINGH (of Lahore), Sarddr. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 1, 1892. Residence: 
Indore, Central India. 

GURNAM SINGH, Sarddr Bahadur. 
The Sardar is the Commandant of the 
Imperial Service Infantry of the 
Jind State, and received the title of 
Sardar Bahadur on June 22, 1897. 
Residence : Jind, Punjab. 

GURSARAN DAS, Lala, Rai Bahddur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1890. Resi- 
dence ; Saharanpur, North-Western 
Provinces. 

GURU.— Often a mere prefix, 

GURU CHAR AN DAS GUPTA, Rai 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Is Assistant-Surgeon, 
A.M.D. Residence: Port Blair, An- 
daman Islands. 

GURU PRASAD, Pandit (of Benares), 
Mahdmahopddhydya. The title is a 
personal one, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, in recognition of 
his eminence in oriental learning. 
Residence: Lahore, Punjab. 

GWALIOR, His Highness the Mahdrdjd 
Sindhia of , G. C.S.I. A ruling chief; 
b. 1877. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor July 3, 1886. Is the head of 
the great Mahratta House of Sindhia. 
Full title is — " His Highness Mukht&r- 
ul-Mulk, Azim-ul-Iktidar Rafi-ush- 
Shan Wala Shikoh Muhtashaim-i- 
Dauran, Umdat-ul»Umara, Maharaj- 
Adhiraj Alijah Hisam-us*Saltanat 
Maharaja Sir Madho Rao Sindhia 
Bahadur Srinath Mansur-i-Zaman, 
Fidwi-i-Hazrat-i-Malika-i-Muaz-zama 
i-Rafl-ud-Darja-i-Inglistan," Knight 
Grand Commander of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India. 
His Highness, who rules over an area 
about equal to that of Holland, 
Belgium, and Saxony combined, and 
over a population more numerous than 
that of Switzerland or of Greece, is 
descended from the famous Ranoji 
Sindhia, the son of a Dekhani pdtel, 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



who became a member of the house- 
hold of the Peshwa Balaji Rao, and 
subsequently a successful commander 
of the Peshwa's cavalry. Ranoji 
Sindhia was succeeded by his second 
son, Mahadaji Sindhia, who was one 
of the greatest soldiers and cleverest 
statesmen ever produced by India. 
He greatly distinguished himself at 
the battle of Panipat in 1761; and, 
taught by that disaster, he disciplined 
and strongly organized his army, 
chiefly under French officers, and 
in this way, though nominally still a 
servant of the Peshwa, he became in 
1764 really the ruler of Hindustan. 
He died in 1794, and was succeeded by 
his grand-nephew, Daulat Rao Sindhia, 
whose reign of over thirty years is 
part of the history of India. The 
battles of Assaye, won by Sir Arthur 
Wellesley (afterwards Duke of 
Wellington) in 1803, and of Laswari, 
won by General Lord Lake, in 1804, 
the Treaty of Sarji Anjangaon in 1805, 
and the Pindari war in 1817 are im- 
portant landmarks in the career of 
Daulat Rao Sindhia. On his death he 
commended his State and his younger 
widow, the famous Baiza Bai, to the 
care of the British Government. 
Jhankuji Sindhia subsequently suc- 
ceeded to the gadi by adoption, 
marrying the grand-daughter of Baiza 
Bai, who was at first regent of the 
State, Family dissension, however, 
ensued ; Baiza Bai had to leave 
Gwalior in 3833, and Jhankuji Sindhia 
died without issue in 1843. His 
widow adopted a young scion of 
the Sindhia family, who succeeded 
under the title of Jaiaji Rao Sindhia. 
He displayed great courage and loyalty 
during the Mutiny of 1857, when his 
army revolted to the mutineers, and 
he himself and his Minister, Sir 
Dinkar Rao, were compelled to flee to 
Agra. He was restored and brought 
back to Gwalior by Sir Hugh Rose on 
June 19, 1858, and received many 
great and well-deserved honours 
during the rest of his long reign. He 
obtained the right of adoption, 
numerous titles, extensive grants of 
additional territory, and an increase 
to his army ; and became successively 
an Honorary General in the British 
Army, a Knight Grand Cross of the 
Bath, a Knight Grand Commander of 
the Star of India, and a Companion of 



the Indian Empire. The present 
Maharaja, Madho Rao Sindhia Ba- 
hadur, succeeded as a minor in 1886. 
The family colour, famous on so many 
battlefields, is bhagwd, orange or brick- 
red, the flag of that colour bearing on 
its field the representation of a 
serpent holding the sun and moon in 
its coils — referring to a legend that 
Ranoji Sindhia, when an infant, was 
sheltered from the heat of the sun by 
the expanded hood of a cobra. The 
area of the State is 29,046 square 
miles ; its population 3,030,743, chiefly 
Hindus, but including more than 
160,000 Muhammadans, 12,000 Jains, 
and 167,000 aborigines of various 
tribes. The Maharaja was created a 
Knight Grand Commander of the 
Most Exalted Order of the Star of 
India on May 25, 1895. He main- 
tains a military force of 5504 cavalry, 
11,040 infantry, and 48 guns. His 
Highness is entitled to a salute of 19 
guns, and within the limits of Gwalior 
territory to a salute of 21 guns. 
Residence : Gwalior, Central India. 

HABIB KHAN, Sdrddr Bahadur. f The 
title is personal. Residence : Peshawar, 
Punjab. 

HACHAEA0 AKBAT HARIHAR, Rao 

Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on May 24, 1889. 
Residence : Belgaum, Bombay. 

HAD0L, Thakur of. See Harol. 

HAFIZ.— Often a mere prefix. 

HAFIZ ABDUL KARIM, Shaikh, Khan 
Bahadur. See Abdul Karini. 

HAFIZ ABDULLA KHAN, Nawdb, See 

Abdulla. 
HAFIZ MUHAMMAD ABDUL (AB- 

DUS) SAM AD, Khan Bahadur. See 

Abdul. 

HAIBATRAO MALHAR, Deshpande, 

Rao Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on June 22, 1897. Residence : Shola- 
pur, Bombay. 

HAIDAR SHAH, Sayyid, Khan Ba- 
hadur. The title was conferred on 
June 3, 1893. Residence : 

HAJL— A prefix. 

HAJI SAJAN LAL. See Sajan. 

HAJI USMAN. See Usman. 



88 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



HAKIM KHAN, Malik, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on June 1, 1888. Residence : 
Shahpur, Punjab. 

HAKK NAWAZ KHAN, Sikander Khel, 

Khdn Saheb ; b. 1854. Eeceived the 
title on January 1, 1897. Residence: 
Bannu, Punjab. 

HAKK NAWAZ KHAN, CLE (of 
Dera Ismail Khan, Punjab), Khdn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 8, 1885. Created a Companion 
of the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empire, for distinguished 
service on the Baluch-Afghan 
Boundary Commission, January 1, 
1895. Residence: Baluchistan. 

HALARI SHAMANA, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on May 18, 1885. Residence: 
Mercara, Coorg. 

HALDAUR, Rdjd Bahadur of. See 
Maharaj Singh. 

HALDI, Rdjd of. See Thakur Parshad. 

HALERI. &*Halari. 

HAMAIL KHAN, Subadar, Bahadur, 
Sarddr Bahadur; h. 1822. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1877. 
Residence : Ghazipur, North-Western 
Provinces. 

HAMID All KHAN, Nawdb. See 
Rampur. 

HAMID BAKHSH, Maulavi, Khdn 
Bahadur ; b. 1847. Received the title 
on January 1, 1898. Residence: 
Budaun, North-Western Provinces. 

HAMID HUSAIN, Maulavi Sayyid, 
Sliams-ul-Ulama. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on February 16, 
1887, on the occasion of the celebration 
of the Jubilee of Her Majesty's reign. 
Residence : North- Western Provinces 
and Oudh. 

HAMID-ULLA, Sayyid Muhammad, 
Khdn Bahadur. See Muhammad 
Hamid-ulla. 

HAMID-UZ-ZAFAR KHAN, Munshi, 
Khdn Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1896. Residence: 
Rampur, North-Western Provinces. 

HAMIR SINGH (of Bayeri), Thakur 
Sawai^ Rai ; b. 1838. The title is 
hereditary, but its origin is not known. 
Is a Korkars Girassia Chief. Ren- 
dered assistance to the Magistrate of 



Harda during the Mutiny of 1857, for 
which he received a khilat. Has two 
sons — Thakur Umrao Singh and 
Thakur Sardar Singh. Residence: 
Hoshangabad, Central Provinces. 

HAMIR SINGH (of Pali), Rao; b. 1823. 
The title is hereditary. This Bundela 
Chief belongs to the family of the 
ex-Raja of Banpur, whose estates 
were confiscated after the Mutiny of 
1857. His son and heir is Nirbhai 
Singh, aged thirty-six years. Resi- 
dence: Banpur, Lalitpur, North- 
western Provinces. 

HANMANT RAM RAMCHANDRA, 
Seth, Rai Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on October 5, 1897. Resi- 
dence : Indore, Central India. 

HANUMAN PARSHAD, Pande, Rai 
Bahadur. Received the title on Jan- 
uary 1, 1895. Residence: Bijeragho- 
garh, Jabalpur, Central Provinces. 

HANUMAN SINGH (of Barwara), 
Thakur ; b. 1841. The title is here- 
ditary, having been originally conferred 
on his ancestors by the Gond Raja of 
Mandla, Raja Nizam Shah, Is an 
Honorary Magistrate of Jabalpur 
district. Residence: Jabalpur, Cen- 
tral Provinces. 

HANUMANT SINGH (of Bilehra), Rdjd ; 
b. 1895. Succeeded to the (jadi as a 
minor on the death of his father, the 
late Raja Khilawan Singh, on August 
24,1897. Residence: Bilehra, Sagar, 
Central Provinces. 

HAPA, Thakur Wakhatsinghji, Thakur 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1877. Suc- 
ceeded to the yadi August 4, 1889. 
Belongs to a Koli (Hindu) family. Is 
at present a minor, and the State 
under the management of the Mahi 
Kantha Agency. The late Thakur 
was named Madhusinghji, and his 
widow, the Thakurani Surajbai, is 
living. The State contains an area of 
79 square miles, and a population of 
1546, chiefly Hindus. Residence : Hapa, 
Mahi Kantha, Bombay. 

HAR CHARAN, Misr, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on June 22, 1897. Residence : Bareilly, 
North- Western Provinces. 

HAR NARAYAN, Lala, Rai Saheb. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 1, 1894. Residence: Gugran- 
wala, Punjab. 



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89 



HAR RATAN SINGH (of Majhgawan), 
Rdjd. The title was conferred on May 
26, 1894. Residence : Gonda, Oudh. 

HAKA PRASAD SASTRI, Pandit, Ma- 
hdmahopddhydya. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1898. 

HARAHA, Rdjd of. See Narendra Ba- 
hadur Singh. 

HARAN CHANDRA MUKERJI, Bai 
Saheb. Received the title on January 
2, 1899. Besidence : Calcutta. 

HARBALLABH NARAYAN SINGH, 
CLE. (of Sonbarsa), Mahdrdjd Baha- 
dur ; b. June 7, 1846. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on Janu- 
ary 1, 1898. The Maharaja had 
received the title of Raja in 1875 for 
eminent services rendered during the 
famine of 1873-74, and had been granted 
the title of Raja Bahadur on January 
1, 1877, on the occasion of the Pro- 
clamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India, and that 
of Maharaja on January 2, 1888. 
Created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
January 2, 1893. The family cogniz- 
ance is a flag, bearing on it the figure 
of an elephant. Besidence : Bhagalpur, 
Bengal. 

HARBANS RAI (of Hatri), Bdjd; b. 
April 7, 1835. The title is hereditary, 
and is said to have been first conferred 
by a Muhammadan King, in 1494-95, 
on the Raja Sahal Shah of Bakhti- 
yargarh. Succeeded the late Raja on 
May 8, 1848. Rendered good service 
to Government during the Mutiny of 
1857. Has two sons, of whom the 
elder enjoys the title of Diwan — Diwan 
Kishori Singh and Bhan Partab Singh. 
Besidence : Damoh, Central Provinces. 

HARBANS SINGH, Bdjd ; b. 1846. The 
title is hereditary, the Raja being the 
brother and the adopted son of the 
famous Sardar Tej Singh, who was 
Commander-in-Chief of the Sikhs in 
the first Sikh war, subsequently ap- 
pointed President of the Council of 
Regency, and on August 7, 1847, created 
Raja of Sialkot. Throughout the 
rebellion of 1848-49 the Raja Tej Singh 
remained faithful to the Government, 
and on the annexation of the Punjab 
the jdgirs of himself and his cousin, 
Sardar Bhagwan Singh, son of Jama- 
dar Khushal Singh, were confirmed for 



life. Raja Tej Singh rendered excel- 
lent service by raising horsemen during 
the Mutiny of 1857, and as a reward, 
in 1862, two-thirds of his jdgir was 
granted in perpetuity, and he received 
a sanad authorizing him to adopt an 
heir. He died in December 1862, 
having adopted his brother, the Raja 
Harbans Singh, who now enjoys the 
title and estate. Besidence: Lahore, 
Punjab. 

HARBANS SINGH (of Kandaula), Sar- 
dar. The title is hereditary, the Sar- 
dar belonging to the same family as 
those of the Sardars Tara Singh of 
Manauli, Uttam Singh of Ghanauli, 
and other Sardars of the Ambala 
division. The founder of the family 
was Sardar Khushal Singh, who 
achieved conquests in the Manjha, and 
took possession of the town of Jalan- 
dhar. In 1756 a.d. he had large Cis- 
Sutlej possessions; they were subse- 
quently wrested from the family by 
the Maharaja Ranjit Singh of Lahore, 
but ultimately came under British 
control with the other Cis-Sutlej terri- 
tories. Sardar Dayal Singh, the 
grandson of Sardar Khushal Singh, 
succeeded to the Kandaula estates, and 
his grandson is the present Sardar. 
For services during the Mutiny of 
1857 the Sardars of this loyal family 
received large remissions from the 
Government. Besidence : Kandaula, 
Ambala, Punjab. 

HARDERAM ANUPRAM MUNSHI, Bao 

Saheb. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on December 18, 1888. Be- 
sidence: Bombay. 

HARDHIAN SINGH, Bai Bahadur. 
Granted the title, as a personal dis- 
tinction, January 2, 1893. Is an 
Honorary Magistrate of Delhi. Besi- 
dence: Delhi, North-Western Pro- 



HARDHYAN SINGH, Bai Bahadur. See 
Hardhian Singh. 

HARDIT SINGH (of Dayalgarh), Sar- 
dar. The title is hereditary. Besid- 



Ambala, Punjab. 



HARDIT SINGH, Roza, Sardar. The 
title is hereditary ; and Sardar Hardit 
Singh succeeded his father, the brave 
and loyal Sardar Kahan Singh, in June 
1864. Sardar Kahan Singh was the 
grandson of Tek Singh, who was in the 



90 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



service of the Bhangi Sardars of La- 
hore, and received from them the grant 
of the village Nodhpur. Kahan Singh 
entered the service of the Maharaja 
Ran jit Singh in 1822 ; and, on the 
recommendation of General Ventura, 
was appointed Commandant in the 
Life Guards, served with his regiment 
in Kulu, Mandi, and elsewhere, and 
being severely wounded in the attack 
on Raja Suchet Singh, was promoted 
to be Colonel, with large emoluments. 
He fought on the Sikh side in the 
battles of Sobraon and Firuzshahr. 
After the annexation Colonel Kahan 
Singh lost his jdgirs, but was granted 
a peusion by the British Government. 
When the Mutiny broke out in 1857 
he was one of the first chiefs selected 
for service by Sir John Lawrence, and, 
starting at once for Delhi with fifty- 
three of his retainers, he served with 
the Guides till the fall of the city, 
being again severely wounded in one 
of the rebel sallies. For these services 
he received substantial rewards from 
the Government, including the re-grant 
of some of his old Sikh jdyirs. Resid- 
ence : Lahore, Punjab. 

HABDOI, Rdjd of. See Narand Singh. 

HARI APPAJI, Rao Bahadur. The title 
is personal, and was conferred on 
Januarj' 2, 1888. Residence : Baroda. 

HARI BALLABH BOSE (Basu), Rai 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 20, 1896. Residence: Cuttack, 



HARI CHAND, Rai Bahddur. The title 
was conferred on May 20, 1896. Resi- 
dence : Multan, Punjab. 

HARI CHAND (of Bhabaur), Rai. The 
title is hereditary. The Bai belongs 
to the same family as that of the Rajas 
of Kangra, Jaswan, Goler, Siba, Da- 
tarpur, etc. ; being descended from 
Raja Pirthi Chand, son of Raja, Beni 
Chand. The Rai Karm Chand, in the 
time of the Maharaja Ranjit Singh, 
held a laxgejdgir in this district ; and 
his grandson, Rai Ratan Chand, died 
October 24, 1884, and was succeeded 
by his son, the present Rai. Residence : 
Bhabaur, Hoshiarpur, Punjab. 

HARI CHAND (of Lahaiil) , Thdkur, The 
title is hereditary. Residence: Lahaul, 
Kangra, Punjab. 



HARI CHAND YAJOJI, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 1, 1877- Residence : Bom- 
bay. 

HARI CHARAN SARMA, Rai Bahddur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on October 3, 1872. Residence : Cachar, 
Assam. 

HARI KRISHAN PANT, Rai Saheb. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Unao, Oudh. 

HARI MOHAN SANDYAL, Rai Saheb. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 1, 1894. Residence: Na- 
diya, Bengal. 

HARI NARAYAN KALE, Rao Bahddur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 1, 1877. Residence : Rat- 
nagiri, Bombay. 

HARI RAJ SINGH (of Kashipur), Rdjd; 
b. 1857. The title is hereditary. Be- 
longs to a family connected with that 
of the Chand Rajas of Kumaun, being 
descended from Pahar Singh, a 
younger son of Raja Baz Bahadur 
Singh, Raja of Kumaun from 1638 to 
1678. In the time of Raja Dip Chand 
of Kumaun (1748-77), Mohan Singh, 
grandson of Pahar Singh, became 
Bakshi or head of the army. He 
eventually seized and imprisoned Raja 
Dip Chand, and, on the death of the 
latter in prison in 1777, proclaimed 
himself Ra ja under the title of Mohan 
Chand, He himself was killed in 1788 
by Harak Deb Toshi, who again was 
driven out by Lai Singh, brother of 
Mohan Singh, with the aid of Faiz- 
ullah Khan of Rampur. Mahendra 
Singh, son of Mohan Singh, was 
installed as Raja by Lai Singh, who 
claimed for him the protection of the 
Nawab of Oudh, as recognized owner 
of the Tarai. In 1790, however, the 
Gurkhalis from Kathmandu invaded 
Kumaun and defeated the forces of 
Mahendra Singh, who fled with his 
uncle, Lai Singh, to Kota, and fixed 
upon Kilpuri as his headquarters, 
where he endeavoured to enlist troops 
for an attack upon Kumaun. Hearing 
this, the Gurkhali general, Amar 
Singh Thapa, marched on Kilpuri and 
thus deprived the Kumaunis of their 
only rallying-point. Mahendra Singh 
and his partisans, deprived of every 
acre that they could lay claim to, fled 
to the Oudh Subahdar, and represent- 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



81 



ing that the tract from which the 
Gurkhalis had ousted them formed a 
part of the Tarai, which of right 
belonged to the Nawab, requested his 
aid in recovering it from the Gurkhalis. 
A war with Nepal would probably have 
resulted had not the good offices of 
Mr. Cherry promoted an understand- 
ing, by which the Gurkhalis agreed to 
yield up all pretensions to the low 
country. At the same time provision 
was made for the retention by the 
exiled family of some doubtful tenure 
of a portion of the Tarai for their 
subsistence. Mahendra Singh retired 
first to Rudrapur and then to Kilpuri, 
but, owing to bad management, this 
Pargana was reduced to a swamp, and 
was rendered so unhealthy that on the 
petition of the representatives of the 
family to the British Government, it 
was exchanged for the confirmation of 
possession in taluqa Chachait in the 
Pilibhit district. Kunwar Partab 
Singh, son of Mahendra Singh, sued 
his uncle, Lai Singh, for a share in 
Chachait, but his claim was dismissed. 
He then petitioned the Government, 
who gave him Rs. 250 per mensem in 
1820, Partab Singh's claim to Bazpur 
was also negatived. Lai Singh had 
held possession as head of the family 
and retained it. Guman Singh, son 
of Raja Lai Singh, received a sanad 
from the British Government in 1828, 
as Raja, His son, Raja Shiuraj Singh, 
C.S.I., rendered good service during 
the Mutiny of 1857, and was rewarded 
with the Order of the Star of India, 
and with an increased grant. He died 
in October 1886 ; and was succeeded 
by his son, the present Raja, who 
married a daughter of Kupendra 
Bikram Singh of Nepal, and has a son 
named Kunwar Udai Raj Singh. The 
Raja is an Honorary Magistrate. Re- 
sidence : Kashipur, Tarai, North- 
Western Provinces. 
HARI RAO, Sakharama, Rao Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. Residence: Madras. 

HARI RAOJI CHIPLUNKAR, Rao Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 2, 1888. Resid- 
ence: Poona, Bombay. 

HARI SINGH, Sarddr, The title is 
hereditary, Js one of the Sikh Sardars 
of the Ludbiaua district, Punjab. 
Residence : Ludhiana, Punjab. 



HARI SINGH (of Akalgarh), Diwdn. 
The title is hereditary. Residence; 
Gujranwala, Punjab. 

HARI SINGH (of Nadaun) , Mian. The 
title is hereditary. The Mian is a 
brother of Raja Amar Chand of Na- 
daun, and a younger son of the Raja 
Sir Jodhbir Singh, brother-in-law of 
the Maharaja Ran jit Singh of Lahore, 
who died in 1873. The Mian is an 
Extra Assistant Commissioner of the 
Punjab. Residence : Nadaun, Kangra, 
Punjab. 

HARI SINGH (of Pindit Lala), Sarddr. 
The title is hereditary. The Sardar 
is one of the Sardars of the Gujrat 
district, Punjab. Residence : Gujrat, 
Punjab. 

HARI SINGH, Babu, Sarddr. The title 
was conferred on June 22, 1897, for 
eminent services as an Inspector of 
Schools in the Punjab. Residence: 
Punjab. 

HARIHAR SHASTRI DRAVIDA, Mahd- 
mahvpddhydya. The title is a personal 
one, and was conferred on February 16, 
1887, in recognition of his eminence 
in oriental learning. It entitles him 
to take rank in Darbar immediately 
after titular Rajas. Residence; Indore, 
Central India. 

HARIHAR SINGH, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1894. 
Residence: Sambalpur, Central Pro- 
vinces. 

HARIHARA SUBBARAYA AIYAR, 

Avergal, Diwdn Bahadur; b. 1842. 
Received the title on January 2, 1897. 
Residence: Madura, Madras. 

HARILAL AMBASHANKAR, Rao Saheb. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 1, 1879. Residence ; Surat, 
Bombay. 

HARINDAR SINGH (of Kandaula), 

Sarddr. The title is hereditary ; the 
Sard&r belongs to the same family as 
those of the Sardars Tara Singh of 
Manauli, Uttam Singh of Ghanauli, 
and other Sardars of the Ambala 
division. For an account of the Kan- 
daula branch of this family, see Harbans 
Singh (of Kandaula), Sardar. The 
Sardar is a grandson of Sardar Dayal 
Singh of Kandaula, Residence : Kan- 
daula, Ambala, Punjab. 



92 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



HARNAM CHANDAR, Seth, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on May 
26, 1894. Residence: North- Western 
Provinces. 

HARNAM SINGH, Sir Ahluwalia, 
K.C.I.E., Kunwdr ; b. January 19, 
1851. Is a son of his late Highness 
the Raja Sir Randhir Singh, G.C.S.I., 
of Kapurthala, and only brother of the 
late Raja Kharak Singh of Kapurthala, 
and uncle of the present Raja of Ka- 
purthala (q.v.). "Was created a Com- 
panion of the Most Eminent Order of 
the Indian Empire on January 1, 1885, 
and a Knight Commander on Janu- 
ary 1, 1899. Residence: Kapurthala, 
Punjab. 

HARNAM SINGH (of Xharar), Sarddr; 
b. 1857. The title is hereditary. Be- 
longs to a Khatri family, whose ancestor, 
Sardar Dayal Singh, took possession 
of considerable territory in the Hoshi- 
arpur, Firozpur, and Ambala districts. 
His sons were deprived of much of 
their land by the Maharaja Ranjit 
Singh; but the eldest, named Sardar 
Dharm Singh, secured some lands in 
Kharar, Ambala district. His grand- 
son, Sardar Ganda Singh, rendered 
excellent services during the Mutiny 
of 1857, and received a khilat from 
the Government in acknowledgment 
thereof. He died at Patiala about the 
year 1876, and was succeeded by his 
son, the present Sardar. Residence: 
Ambala, Punjab. 

HARNAM SINGH (of Moron), Sarddr; 
b. 1861. The title is hereditary. Be- 
longs to a Jat family, that came origin- 
ally from Varpal, in the Amritsar 
district. About 1759 Sardar Salig 
Singh obtained possession of territory 
around Moron. The family fell under 
the power of the Maharaja Sher 
Singh ; but when the Jalandhar doab 
was ceded to the British after the first 
Sikh war, a considerable jagiv was 
confirmed to the head of the family in 
perpetuity, and is now enjoyed by 
Sardar Harnam Singh. Residence: 
Jalandhar, Punjab. 

HARNAM SINGH (of Mukerian), Sar- 
ddr. Succeeded the late Sardar Bur 
Singh, Sarddr Bahadur, of Mukerian, 
in 1892. The title of Sardar is here- 
ditary. Residence : Mukerian, Hoshi- 
arpur, Punjab. 



HAROL, Thakur Jawansinghji, Thdkur 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1883. Succeeded 
to the gadi March 22, 1888. Belongs 
to a Thakerda (Hindu) family. The 
State contains a population of nearly 
3000, chiefly Hindus. Its name is also 
spelt Hadol. Residence : Harol, Mahi 
Kantha, Bombay. 

HARSA SINGH (of Mughal Chak), 
Sarddr. The title is hereditary. Be- 
longs to an ancient Sikh family, 
famous for the conspicuous bravery of 
its members. Sardar Anup Singh, 
of Probyn's Horse, was one of the 
most distinguished officers in the army 
throughout the Mutiny campaigns of 
1857, 1858, and 1859. He was present 
at the fall of Delhi, at the capture of 
Lucknow, and on many other great 
occasions ; was four times wounded, 
and had three horses wounded under 
him. He also fought with great 
distinction in the China campaign in 
1860, and subsequently in the dis- 
turbances on the North-west frontier. 
He twice received the Order of Yalour 
for bravery in the field. In 1876 he 
accompanied His Royal Highness the 
Prince of Wales to England, and was 
honoured with the marked approval 
of Her Most Gracious Majesty the 
Queen Empress and the Royal Family. 
He died in 1885, amid universal 
expressions of regret, and was suc- 
ceeded by the present Sardar. Resid- 
ence: Mughal Chak, Gujiranwala, 
Punjab. 

HASAN ALI walad MUHAMMAD 
AISAN, Alidn Bahadur. The title is 
persona], and was conferred on June 
1, 1888. Residence : Karachi, Sind. 

HASAN ALI walad MUHAMMAD 
KHAN, Mir. The title- is hereditary, 
the Mir being a representative of one 
of the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the 
time of the annexation. Residence : 
Sind. 

HASAN ALI, Muhammad. See Mu- 
hammad. 

HASAN ALI BEY EFFENDI, Khan 
Bahadur. Is a leading member of 
the Karachi Bar, and was in 1886 
appointed Consul for Turkey by His 
Imperial Majesty the Sultan. Pre- 
sident of the Sind Branch of the 
Central National Muhammadan As- 
sociation, 1884 ; also President of the 
Karachi Madrasa Board, managing 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



93 



the Karachi Muhammadan College, 
which has an endowment fund of 
about six lakhs of rupees. Residence : 
Karachi, Bombay. 

HASAN ALI KHAN, Mirza, CLE., 

Nawdb. The title is hereditary. The 
Nawab was created a Companion of 
the Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire on February 5, 1881. Resid- 
ence : Baluchistan. 

HASAN ALI KHAN, Mir Muhammad, 
CLE. , His Highness. See Muhammad. 

HASAN ALI KHAN BAHADUR, 
Mahabat Jang, Nawab Sir, K.C.I.E. 
See Murshidabad. 

HASAN ALI MULLA HAKIMJI, Khan 
Saheb. Received the title on June 3, 
1899. Residence: Bombay. 

HASAN AZAD, Maulavi Muhammad. 

See Muhammad. 

HASAN BAKHSH, Sayyid, Khan Baha- 
dur. See Sayyid. 

HASAN KHAN, Khan Saheb. The title 
was conferred on May 25, 1892. Re- 
sidence : Gujranwala, Punjab. 

HASAN KHAN, Muhammad. See Mu- 
hammad. 

HASAN RAZA SAHEB, Maulavi, Say- 
yid, Shams-ul-Ulama. The title was 
conferred on May 21, 1898. Residence : 
Madras. 

HASANALI. See Hasan Ali. 

HASANPUR, Raja of. See Mehdi Ali 
Khan, Muhammad, Raja. 

HASHIM KHAN, Muhammad, Mir, 
Sardar Bahadur. See Muhammad. 

HATI SINGH (of Chandgarh), Rao; b. 
September 5, 1844. The title is 
hereditary, and is said to have been 
originally conferred by Gori Shah 
Padishah. The family is descended 
from Prithi Singh, who was eleventh 
in descent from the famous Bhoj Raj. 
Residence : Nimar, Central Provinces. 

HATNAPUR, Rdjd of. See Ran jit Singh. 

HATRI, Rdjd of. See Harbans Rai. 

HATWA, Maharaja-Kumar Guru Ma- 
hadeo Laran Prasad Sahi, Mahdrdj- 
Kumdr of; b. July 19, 1893. Belongs 
to a Baghochhia Brahman family, 
that claims to have been settled as 
Rajas in the district of Saran for 
102 generations, The patronymic of 



the earlier Rajas was u Sen " ; this in 
the sixteenth descent was changed to 
" Singh," in the eighty-third to " Mai," 
and in the eighty-seventh to " Sahi." 
The traditions of the family state 
that the title of Maharaja was con- 
ferred on the eighty-sixth in this hue, 
the Maharaja Kalyan Mai, and that of 
Maharaja Bahadur on the eighty- 
seventh, the Maharaja Isham Karan 
Sahi Bahadur, both by the Emperor 
of Delhi. In the time of Akbar it is 
said that the Maharaja Jubraj Sahi 
Bahadur obtained possession of Par- 
gana Sipa by killing the Muhammad 
Chief Kabul Muhammad, probably 
one of those Muhammadan Chiefs 
who had rebelled against the Imperial 
authority in Southern Behar. Four 
generations later the Maharaja Sardar 
Sahi invaded the Majauli Raj, and 
destroyed their garh or fort, and 
imposed as terms of peace on the 
Chief of Majauli the condition that 
he and his descendants were not to 
display their nishans and dunkas (flags 
and drums) till these should be retaken 
from the Hasipur (or Hatwa) Rajas. 
The eldest son of the Maharaja Sardar 
Sahi died before his father ; he was 
succeeded by the second son, the 
Maharaja Fateh Sahi Bahadur, who 
was a rebel against the British Govern- 
ment in 1767, in the time of "Warren 
Hastings, and ultimately fled to the 
Gorakhpur jungles. His cousin, Babu 
Bassant Sahi, displayed his loyalty by- 
assisting the Government with his 
retainers, and doing all in his power 
to arrest Fateh Sahi. But in 1775 he 
was surprised by the rebel and killed, 
and his widow ascended the funeral 
pyre, and was burnt with her husband's 
head on her lap. Bassant Sahi's son, 
Babu Mahes Datt Sahi, followed in 
his father's footsteps, and the Gov- 
ernment was about to proclaim him 
the rightful successor of the rebel 
Fateh Sahi when he died, leaving a 
son, Babu — afterwards Maharaja — 
Chhatardhari Sahi. In 1790, when 
the Decennial Settlement was in 
contemplation, Lord Cornwallis, after 
inquiring into all the facts and the 
usages of the family, granted to the 
latter the estates of Fateh Sahi ; and 
in 1837 the title of Maharaja Bahadur 
was conferred upon him. This title 
was renewed in October 1858 in favour 
of the Maharajd Rajendar Partab 



94 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Sahi, and by the sanad of August 31, 
1874, in favour of the late Maharaja 
Bahadur. At the time of the Santal 
insurrection, and again during the 
Mutiny of 1857, the Maharaja 
Chhatardhari Sahi Bahadur rendered 
most valuable services to the Govern- 
ment, and was rewarded at the close 
of the Mutiny with the grant of a 
portion of the confiscated estates of 
the rebel Kunwar Singh. He was 
succeeded by his great-grandson, the 
Maharaja Rajendra Partab Sahi Baha- 
dur, who died in 1871, leaving a minor 
son, the late Maharaja Sir Krishna 
Partab Sahi. The latter attained his 
majority and was installed on the 
gadi on August 31, 1874. He received 
a medal of distinction at the Imperial 
Assemblage at Delhi in 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India, and in 1889 he was created a 
Knight Commander of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire. 
He died in 1896, and was succeeded 
by the present Maharaj - Kumar. 
The family cognizance consists of a 
shield between two swords, with 
tigers as supporters, and underneath 

is the motto — V*nF!'WTs-l<<JTn " 

Residence : Hatwa, Saran, Bengal. 

HAYAT KHAN, Muhammad, Khan, 
C.S.I.y Naicdb. See Muhammad. 

HAZARA SINGH, Rai BaMdur. The 
title was conferred on January 21, 
1896. Is Commandant of a Mountain 
Battery in the Imperial Service Troops. 
Residence : Kashmir. 

HAZARI LAL, Rai Saheb. The title 
was conferred on June 3, 1893. Resid- 
ence: Ajmer, Rajputana. 

HAZURA SINGH, Subahdar, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on March 25, 1880. Resid- 
ence : Rewa, Central India. 

HEM CHANDRA SARKAR, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1894. Residence: Moni- 
rampur, Bengal. 

HET NAND LAL, Gosain, Rai Saheb. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1898. Is an Honorary Magistrate. 
Residence : Dera Ismail Khan, Punjab 

HET RAM, Pandit, CLE. Created a 
CLE. on January 1, 1884. Residence 
Bareilly, North- Western Provinces. 



HETAMPUR, Rdjd of. See Ram Ranjan 
Chakravartti. 

HILL TIPPERAH, Rdjd of. See Tip- 
perah. 

HIMANCHAL SINGH (of Barhpura), 

Rao Bahadur: b. February 20, 1867. 
Succeeded his father, the late Rao 
Umrao Singh Bahadur, in 1889. The 
title, which is hereditary, is of ancient 
origin, having been originally conferred 
by Prithiraj, last Hindu Emperor of 
Delhi. Residence : Etawah, North- 
Western Provinces. 

HIMANCHAL SINGH (of Kuarpur), 

Thdkur. The title, which is hereditary, 
is of ancient origin. Residence: Ja- 
balpur, Central Provinces. 

HIMMAT SINGH (of Katra Balkhera), 
Thdkur. The title is hereditary. 
Residence: Katra Balkhera, Jabalpur, 
Central Provinces. 

HIMMATLAL DHIRAJIRAM, Rao 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
June 3, 1893. Residence : Ahmadabad, 
Bombay. 

HIMMODH, Thdkur of. See Sita Prasad. 

HINDOL, Raja Janardan Mardraj 
Jagder, Rdjd of. A ruling chief ; b. 
1885. Succeeded to the qadi July 18, 
1877. The title of Raja has always 
been enjoyed by the head of this 
family since Mahratta times, and was 
formally recognized by Government in 
1874. The State was founded by two 
brothers named Lakshman Mahratta 
and Bharat Mahratta, scions of the 
family of the Khemdi Raja in Ganjam. 
The present Raja, who succeeded his 
brother, Raja Fakir Singh Mardraj 
Jagdeb, is stated to be twenty-fifth in 
succession from them. His father 
was Raja Ishwar Singh Mardraj 
Jagdeb. The family cognizance is a 
dagger. The area of the State is 312 
miles; its population 33,802, chiefly 
Hindus. The Raja, maintains a mili- 
tary force of 148 infantry and 2 guns. 
The State is one of the Orissa Tributary 
Mahals. Residence: Hindol, Orissa, 
Bengal. 

HINDUPAT (of Ghat Piparia), Thdkur. 
The title is hereditary. The present 
Thakur is the son of the late Thakur 
Orjuri Singh. The family is de- 
scended from ancestors who obtained 
the village of Ghat Piparia, with the 
title of Thdkur, from the old Mahratta 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



95 



Government of Sagar. Residence: 
Ghat Piparia, Sagar, Central Provinces. 

HINDUR (NALAGARH), Raja Isri 
Singh, Rdjd of. A ruling chief; b. 
1832. Succeeded to the gadi December 
16, 1876. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) 
family, whose founder was named Aji 
Singh, and the present Raja is twenty- 
fifth in succession from him. The 
State was overrun by the Gurkhas, 
but they were expelled by the British 
forces in 1815-16, and in that year the 
Raja received a sanad confirming him 
in the possession of all his territory 
except the fort of Malaun, for which 
the Thdkuri of Barauli was substituted. 
Subsequently, in 1846, the fort was 
restored to him. The area of the 
State is 249 square miles | its popula- 
tion is 53,373, chiefly Hindus, but 
including 7201 Muhammadans. The 
Raja maintains a military force of 
375 infantry and 4 guns. Residence : 
Hindur, Punjab. 

HIRA, Rawat (of Dewair), Thdkur 
Rdwat. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1877, as a personal distinc- 
tion, on the occasion of the Proclama- 
tion of Her Most Gracious Majesty 
as Empress of India. Residence: 
Merwara. 

HIRA SAHEB LAL RAMANAJ PAR- 
SAD SINGH, C.I.E. See Lai. 

HIRA SINGH, Rai BaMdur. The title 
is personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty, for eminent official 
services in the Survey. Residence: 
Survey of India. 

HIRA SINGH, Rai Saheb. Received 
the title on January 1, 1898. Resid- 
ence : Bikaner, Rajputana. 

HIRA SINGH, Ahluwalia, Sarddr 
Bahadur ; b. March 3, 1847. Received 
the title of Sardar on May 25, 1892, 
aud was promoted to be Sardar 
Bahadur on January 1, 1896. Resid- 
ence: Ajmer, Rajputana. 

HIRA SINGH, Man (of Manawala), 
Sarddr. The title is hereditary. 
Belongs to a Man Jat family, de- 
scended from Sardar Sar ja Singh, whose 
grandson, Colonel Budh Singh, Man, 
served throughout the Sutlej cam- 
paign, and after its close was sent 
with the Sher Singh brigade to assist 



the Maharajd Gulab Singh to subdue 
the rebellion in Kashmir. The Colonel 
rendered excellent service in this 
campaign, and also throughout the 
Multan rebellion (or second Sikh war), 
in which he was severely wounded 
when fighting gallantly under Major 
Nicholson against the rebels in the 
Margalla Pass. On the annexation 
he was rewarded with extensive lands. 
On his death he was succeeded by his 
son, the present Sarddr. Residence: 
Amritsar, Punjab. 

HIRANAND KHEMSINGH, Rao Baha- 
dur. Received the title on May 21, 
1898. Residence : Sind, Bombay. 

HIRANYAGARBHAYAJI RAVIKULA 
MUTHUVIJAYA RAGUNATHA 
BHASKARA (Zamindar of Ramnad), 
Rdjd and Setupati. See Rdmnad, 
Raja of. 

HIRAPUR, Thdkur of. See Nihal Singh. 

HIRAPUR, Rao Chhatar Singh, Rao of. 
A ruling chief ; b. 1821 ; succeeded 
to the gadi on May 1, 1841. Belongs to 
a Rajput (Hindu) family. The popu- 
lation of the State is 963, chiefly 
Hindus. Residence : Hirapur, Bhopal, 
Central India. 

HISSAM-UD-DIN, Shaikh, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1891. Residence: Secun- 
derabad, Hyderabad. 

HITTTJ RAM, CLE., Rai Bahadur; b. 
1842. Has long been a distinguished 
political officer on the frontier of 
Baluchistan and Afghanistan, having 
entered the service in 1859, when he 
received a reward for preparing a 
" History of Dera Ghazi Khan District 
and Frontier." Appointed to special 
duty for Kalat in 1875 ; accompanied 
Sir Robert Sandeman on two missions 
to Kalat, and received a khilat in 1877 
for his services thereon, also the title 
of Rai. Appointed Extra Assistant 
Commissioner of the Punjab in 1879 ; 
and in same year received a khilat at 
the Kalat Darbar, and was placed in 
charge of Sibi district. Received the 
title of Rai Bahadur as a personal 
distinction on April 20, 1881, having 
served in the Political Department 
throughout the Afghan war of 1880-1, 
with medal. In the same year he 
received a jdgir, and in 1882 was 
created a Companion of the Most 



96 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Eminent Order of the Indian Empire. 
Was in charge of arrangements for 
supplies, etc., for the Afghan Boundary 
Commission, 1884, across the Baluch 
Desert ; and received the thanks of 
Government for the same. Was on 
special duty in the Bolan Pass, in the 
military preparations for the expected 
outbreak of hostilities between Eng- 
land and Russia, March 1884 to No- 
vember 1885. Deputed to hold charge 
of Las Bela State on the death of the 
Jam in 1889, pending installation of 
successor ; and was on special duty 
with Sir R. Sandeman in 1889-91, and 
specially commended. Residence: Sibi, 
Baluchistan. 

HKUN LAI (Sawbwa of Lai Hka), Kyet 
thaye zaung shwe Sahoe ya Min. The 
title was conferred on May 21, 1898. 
It is indicated by the letters K.S.M. 
after the name, and means " Recipient 
of the Gold Chain of Honour." Resi- 
dence : Lai Hka, Shan States, Burma. 

HKUN LU KWAN, Ahmudan gaung 
Tazeik ya Min. Is Heng of Kokang 
in North Hsen Wi in the Northern 
Shan States. The title is personal, 
and was conferred June 22, 1897. It 
means "Recipient of the Medal of 
Honour for Good Service," and is 
indicated by the letters A.T.M. after 
the name. Residence : Northern Shan 
States, Burma. 

HKUN SAING, CLE. See Hsi Paw. 

HKUN SAN TON HON, Kyet thaye zaung 
shwe Salwe ya Min, Is Sawbwa of 
North Hsen Wi in the Northern Shan 
States. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. It means " Recipient of 
the Gold Chain of Honour," and is 
indicated by the letters K.S.M. after 
the name. Residence : Northern Shan 
States, Burma. 

HLAING, Maung (Shwedabo of Baw), 

Thuye gaung ngwe Da ya Min. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
June 1, 1888. It means " Recipient of 
the Silver Sword for Bravery," and is 
indicated by the letters T.D.M. after 
the name. Residence : Shan State of 
Baw, Burma. 

HMAT, Maung, Ahmudan gaung Tazeik 
ya Min. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1894. It 
means "Recipient of the Medal of 
Honour for Good Service," and is 



indicated by the letters A.T.M. after 
the name. Residence : Mogok, Burma. 

HMU, Maung, Ahmudan gaung Tazeik 
ya Min. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1894. This 
Burmese title is indicated by the 
letters A.T.M. after the name. Resi- 
dence : Prome, Burma. 

HOLKAB, His Highness the Maharaja 
Bahadur {of Indore). See Indore. 

HOPON, Kun Wara, Myoza of. A 
ruling chief. The area of the State, 
which is one of the Shan States on the 
frontier of Burma, is about 400 square 
miles. Residence: Hopon, Burma. 

HORMASJI ADARJI PATEL, Khan 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on June 1, 1888. Resi- 
dence: Surat, Bombay. 

HOSHANGJI JAMASPJI, Dastur, Khan 
Bahadur, Shams-ul-Ulama. These titles 
are personal ; the first was conferred 
on January 1, 1878, and the second on 
January 1, 1890. The title of Shams- 
ul- TJlama entitles the Khan Bahadur — 
who is also a " Dastur," or High Priest 
of the Parsis of the Deccan — to take 
rank in Darbar immediately after 
titular Nawabs. The Dastur Jamas- 
passa family are descended from As- 
saji. The last Dastur of that family, 
the Dastur Nasarwanji Jamaspji, Khan 
Bahadur, rendered valuable services 
to Government during the time of the 
Mutiny; and received the title of 
Khan Bahadur as a reward for them 
in 1868. The title of Shams-ul-Ulama 
was conferred on Dastur Hoshangji 
Jamaspji in recognition of his emin- 
ence in oriental learning. Residence : 
Poona, Bombay. 

HSENWI, Chief of. S'ee Saw Naw 
Maing ; see also Hkun San Ton Hon. 

HSI PAW, Hkun Saing, CLE., Sawbwa 
of. A ruling chief. The area of the 
State, which is one of the Northern 
Shan States on the frontier of Burma, 
is about 4000 square miles. The Saw- 
bwa was created a Companion of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire, for loyalty and good service, 
on July 1, 1895. Residence: Hsi Paw, 
Burma. 

HUCHRA0. See Hacharao. 
HUKM SINGH (of Gangwai), .Rq/a. The 
title is hereditary. The Raj& succeeded 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



97 



to it on September 19, 1859. Resi- 
dence: Narsinghpur, Central Provinces. 

HUKM SINGH, Sodhi (of Firozpur), Rai 
Bahadur and Diwdn Bahadur. The 
first title was conferred oh January 3, 
1893, and the second on January 1, 
1896. Residence: Bikanir, Rajputana. 

HUMAYUN BEG, Khan Bahddur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1898. 
Is "Wazir of Hunza. Residence : Hunza, 
Kashmir. 

HURDAOLAL MUGATLAL MUNSHI, 

Rao Saheb. The title was conferred 
on June 22, 1897. Residence : Bombay. 

HUSAIN ALI KHAN walad ALA- 
DITTA KHAN, Mir. The title has 
been continued for life. Residence: 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

HUSAIN ALI KHAN, Muhammad, 

Sarddr Bahddur. See Muhammad. 

HUSAIN KHAN, Arbab, Khan Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on May 20, 
1896. Residence: North-Western Fron- 
tier, Punjab. 

HUSAIN KHAN, Muhammad, Khan 

Bahddur. See Muhammad. 

HUSAIN KHAN, Subadar Muhammad, 

Khan Bahadur. See Muhammad. 

HUSSAN. See Hasan. 
HUTWA. See Hatwa. 

HYDERABAD (or. The Deccan), His 

Highness the Nizam of, G.C.S.I. A 
ruling chief, and the Premier Prince 
of the Indian Empire ; b. August 18, 
1866. Succeeded to the masnad as a 
minor, on the; death of his father, his 
late Highness the Nizam Afzul-ud- 
daula, February 26, 1869. The Nizam's 
full titles are — His Highness Asaf Jah, 
Muzaffar-ul-Mamalik, Rustam-i-Dau- 
ran, Arastu-i-Zaman, Nizam-ul-Mulk, 
Nizam-ud-daula, Nawab Mir Sir Mah- 
bub Ali Khan Bahadur, Fath Jang, 
Knight Grand Commander of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India. 
Belongs to a family of the highest 
antiquity and importance among Mu- 
hammadan rulers, being lineally de- 
scended from the first Khalif, Abu 
Bakr, the successor of the Prophet. 
His descendant, after a long line of 
intervening generations, was the 
Turkoman Chief named Ghazi-ud-din, 
one of the greatest of the Generals of 
the Emperor Aurangzeb, who was the 



hero of the capture of Bijapur in 1686 
a.d. ; he was largely concerned in the 
overthrow both of that kingdom and 
of the Golkonda dynasty, and in the 
establishment of the Mughal power in 
the Deccan, which then became a 
subah (or province) of the Mughal 
Empire of Delhi. His son and suc- 
cessor was Chin Kulij Khan, 1 better 
known as the great Asaf Jah, the real 
founder of the Hyderabad dynasty. 
He was born in 1644 ; and in 1713 was 
appointed Subahddr or Viceroy of the 
Deccan by the Emperor Farukh Siyar, 
with the title of Nizam-ul-Mulk (Ad- 
ministrator of the Country), which 
has ever since been retained by his 
descendants. He reigned till 1748 > 
attaining the great age of 104; and 
throughout this lengthened career, 
with occasional vicissitudes of fortune, 
he continually increased his power 
during the days of the declining vigour 
of the Mughal Empire. The dynasty, 
thus established as the greatest native 
Power in the Indian Peninsula, has 
been almost uniformly closely attached 

1 Kulij or Qidij — sometimes spelt Chillich — 
is the Turki word for swwrd : and Kulij Khan, 
as a title, bears the same meaning as the 
Persian Shamsher Khan. On the title of Asaf 
Jah, subsequently borne by the Nawab Chin 
Kulij Khan and his descendants, the learned 
Professor Blochmann gives this note : "Asaf 
was the name of the Vazir of Solomon, who 
like his master is proverbial in the East for 
wisdom. During the reign of Akbar three 
grandees received this title. Badaoni, to avoid 
confusion, numbers them Asaf Khan I., II., 
and III. . . . Jahangir conferred the title of 
Asaf Khan (IV.) on Abul Hasan, elder brother 
of the Empress Nur Jahan, and father of the 
Empress Mumtaz Mahal (or Taj Bibi, Shah- 
jahan's wife), whose mother was a daughter 
of Asaf Khan II. During the reign of Shah- 
jahan, when titles containing the word Dauld 
were revived, Asaf Khan was changed to Asaf- 
ud-daula; and this title was conferred on 
Asaf-ud-daula Jumlat-ul-Mulk Asad Jang, a 
relation of Asaf Khan IV. Under Ahmad 
Shah, lastly, we find Asaf-ud-daula Amir-ul- 
Mamalik, whose name, like that of his father, 
Nizam-ul-Mulk Asaf Jah, occurs so often in 
later Indian history." As the ancient titles 
of the Mughal Empire are retained among the 
nobles of the Deccan, and are still conferred 
by His Highness the Nizam, it may here be 
noted that in ascending order they contain 
the words Jang, Dauld, Mulk, and Umara or 
Jah. Titles containing the words Jah or 
Umara may be compared with English Dukes 
or Marquesses; those containing Mulk with 
English Earls; those containing Dauld vrith 
Viscounts ; and those containing Jang with 
Barons. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



to the British Power in India, and has 
consequently obtained from English 
writers the style of "Our faithful 
ally the Nizam." At all the most 
critical periods in the history of the 
Indian Empire — in the Mysore wars, 
in the Mahratta wars, during the 
Mutiny of 1857, and recently when 
Russian invasion seemed probable — 
the Nizam of the day has always 
rendered invaluable help. Of Asaf 
Jah, the founder of the dynasty, an 
English writer thus speaks : — 

" Content, however, with actual sovereignty, 
he never assumed its title and insignia. The 
family, indeed, to the last professed subordin- 
ation to the Court of Delhi, and the Nizam's 
successors continued to be formally confirmed 
by mandates from the Mogul Emperors. The 
immunity enjoyed by Nizam-ool-Moolk, in a 
practical surrender of the Deccan to his rule, 
appears to have been merely due to his essen- 
tial importance as the only available check to 
the growing power and harassing incursions 
of the Mahrattas — a constant source of dis- 
turbance and alarm to his titular master. The 
evening of his eventful life, whose span is said 
to have exceeded a century, was spent by the 
first Nizam with singular retention of extra- 
ordinary physical and mental faculties, in his 
so strangely gained principality, when death 
closed in 1748 a career remarkable and pro- 
minent in a stirring and productive time. 
Impartial estimates of his character can 
hardly begrudge his descendants a pride in 
the founder of their name and renown, for his 
politic compass and tenacious hold of inde- 
pendent power were unstained by treachery 
or cruelty, and the later annals of the family 
are similarly clear of the grosser incidents of 
conquests. He left them, too, an example 
of equanimity undaunted in adversity and 
superior to elation by success." i 

After the death of the aged Nizam-ul- 
Mulk the throne of the Deccan was long 
and fiercely contended for, with varying 
fortunes, by his grandson Muzaffar Jang, 
and his sons (uncles of Muzaffar Jang), 
known as Ghazi-ud-din, Nasir Jang, Sala- 
bat Jang, and Nizam Ali. Involved in 
these wars were also the English and 
French forces in the Carnatic, and the 
armies of the Mahrattas and of the 
Nawabs of Arcot. It was the Nizam 
Salabat Jang who finally adopted the 
city of Hyderabad, on the river Musi, as 
his capital ; its ancient name was Bhag- 
nagar, and it had been founded in 1585 

1 Quoted in the learned and voluminous 
History of Hyderabad Affairs, compiled for 
private circulation in 1883 by the Maulavi 
Sayyid Mehdi Ali, Nawab Mohsin-ul-Mulk, 
Secretary to the Government of His Highness 
the Nizam. 



by Muhammad Kutb Shah, King of Gol- 
konda. In 1761 Salabat Jang was de- 
throned by his brother Nizam Ali, who 
put him to death in 1763, and reigned 
till 1803 — playing a prominent part 
during the whole of that period in the 
incessant wars with the English, the 
Mahrattas, and the Sultans of Mysore, 
Haidar and Tippu. The first treaty 
between the British Power and the 
Nizam was concluded in 1766, followed 
by great and permanent treaties in 1798 
and 1800. In accordance with these 
engagements, after the defeats of the 
Mahrattas at Laswari and Assaye, the 
Nizam received large accessions of ter- 
ritory, including the great and rich pro- 
vince of Berar ; and similarly after the 
conquest of Tippu the Nizam shared in 
the division of territory. Nizam Ali 
died in 1803, and was succeeded by his 
son, the Nizam Sikandar Jah, who was 
served in turn by three famous Prime 
Ministers, Mir Alam, Munir-ul-Mulk, 
and the Raja Chandu LAI. In 1829 
Sikandar Jah was succeeded by his son, 
the Nizam Nasir-ud-daula, who reigned 
till 1857. He had no great liking for 
affairs of State, which he left largely to 
the care of his Prime Minister, the 
Nawab Suraj-ul-Mulk, who died in 1853, 
when the Nizam appointed his nephew, 
the well-known Sir Salar Jang, to suc- 
ceed him in the office of Minister. 
Nasir-ud-daula is described as having " a 
gracious disposition to private charity, 
and with much bountiful kindness to his 
dependants." He died in May 1857, just 
before the outbreak of the Mutiny, and 
was succeeded by his late Highness the 
Nizam Afzul-ud-daula, father of the 
present Nizam. 

The loyalty of the late Nizam and his 
troops during the crisis ®f 1857 has been 
well commemorated by an English writer 
in the following words : — 



" When, on the 17th of July in that memor- 
able year, after a frantic promulgation of 
Jihad or Holy War on the part of the indi- 
genous Muhammadans of both Southern and 
Northern India, the Rohillas attacked the 
Residency, and were repulsed by troops under 
the command of the late Colonel Briggs, had 
the Nizam, untried as he then was, aided the 
movement, or even openly avowed sympathy 
with the mutineers, there can be no doubt 
that any success at Hyderabad would have 
proved a signal for revolt to the bigoted and 
fanatic Muhammadan population, not only 
there, but in all Central, Western, and Southern 
India, and that our terrible straits elsewhere 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



99 



would have been multiplied and sorely ag- 
gravated. For we had at the time but one 
European corps at Secunderabad, the military 
station, and camped at Trimulgherry, about 
two miles from the central arsenal, which 
must have been left in the charge of native 
soldiers if attacked from the capital. . . . But 
the Nizam was firm in his alliance, attracting 
to our side all that was respectable in his 
Court and capital. The traditions of the 
family also, and old memories of rescue from 
the Mahrattas, were with us, and not ineffi- 
cacious in our hour of need. 

"And now for the behaviour of the Hydera- 
bad contingent. In this force, recollect, are 
thousands of the same caste as those whose 
relatives elsewhere were murdering their 
officers, or marching towards the Mogul 
standard at Delhi. From these came emis- 
saries, not only to their brethren of the con- 
tingent, with letters and personal entreaties 
to join, but to the Court itself. The greater 
portion of the contingent was presently 
ordered into the field, and a brigade of all 
arms was pushed into Central India, where 
they fought, under Sir Hugh Rose, with 
bravery and endurance unsurpassed by any 
corps in the Service. With only eighteen 
hours' warning, i. e. receiving their orders at 
seven in the morning, and starting at midnight 
of the same day, these troops took the field, 
and were absent from their homes for fifteen 
months, remaining the whole of that time 
under canvas, leaving their own fertile plain 
of the Deccan behind them, until, after fight- 
ing their way inch by inch, they bathed in the 
holy river at Calpee, after a signal victory 
obtained over the rebels at that place. In- 
stancing a few of their exploits, I may mention 
that at Mehidpoor, the seat of former triumph 
to the contingent, when they formed a part of 
Sir John Malcolm's army in 1817, they arrived, 
after a forced march of sixty miles, in time to 
rescue an English lady ; and finding that the 
enemy, consisting of the Mehidpoor con- 
tingent and the escaped garrison of Dhar, had 
made away with the Mehidpoor battery and 
arsenal stores, they immediately, after de- 
spatching Mrs. Timmins to the camp of the 
Bombay column, rattled off in pursuit, the 
enemy having got several hours' start of them. 
They overtook the rascals late in the after- 
noon, about twelve miles distant from Mehid- 
poor, charged, and captured both battery and 
stores, cutting up a large number of mutin- 
eers, and severing at a blow, from the enemy, 
most important means of offence and defence, 
which a week later would assuredly hive been 
in position and used against us when the great 
battle, which lasted throughout four days, was 
fought at Mundessoor. The troops, especially 
the native portion, lived almost entirely on 
parched grain collected from the fields in the 
neighbourhood, and immediately submitted to 
the process of hand manipulation over the 
fire. It is not my intention to trace here the 
further exploits of the Hyderabad contingent 
troops, beyond noticing the fact of their rapid 
journeys in advance of the main columns they 
accompanied, returning only to headquarters 
when a general action was to be fought, On 



the thousands of miles marched by the cavalry 
of this force, accompanied often by the infantry 
and artillery, I need not dwell. Sir Hugh 
Rose termed these troops 'the wings of my 
army.' With the restoration of peace came 
full time for recognizing the Nizam's fidelity 
and active aid. Presents to the value of 
£10,000 were made to His Highness, and the 
Star of India was conferred on him. The 
territory transferred in '53 to our management 
was now yielding more than the requisite 
revenue, and a new arrangement was accord- 
ingly proposed, under which, in 1860, districts 
of the value of 13 lacs were restored to the 
Nizam, together with a transfer of the princi- 
pality of Shorapoor, whose Rajah had been 
seduced into the rebellion of the Southern 
Mahratta country. This acquisition affords 
an annual surplus of £15,000. We also 
remitted the entire debt." 

The Nizam Afzul-ud-daula, G.C.S.I., 
died in 1869, and was succeeded by his 
son, the present Nizam, who has fol- 
lowed all the best traditions of his 
ancestors, and has demonstrated his at- 
tachment to the Empire in even more 
striking fashion. In 1885 he offered to 
send troops to aid the Government in 
Egypt ; and in the same year, when there 
was a menace of Russian aggression on 
the Afghan frontier, he repeated the 
generous offer. But it was in 1887, in 
the year of the Jubilee of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty's reign, that His High- 
ness gave the most signal proof of his 
princely loyalty. In August of that year 
His Highness wrote the following most 
remarkable and patriotic letter to the 
Viceroy of India ; — 

"Hyderabad, August 26. 
"My Friend, — No inhabitant can be in- 
different to the persistent advance of another 
great military power towards India; to the 
necessity that exists for putting the frontier 
in a proper state of defence ; and to the burden 
it imposes on those charged with its safety 
and the care of the Empire. All who have the 
welfare of India at heart are bound to consider 
what should be done, and to show they are 
heartily in sympathy with those who are en- 
deavouring to place the frontier in a proper 
state of defence, so as to ward off all danger 
from our hearths and homes. The Princes of 
India have not been blind to the movement of 
events. We realize the financial responsibility 
the present state of affairs imposes on the 
Indian Exchequer. It seems to me that the 
time has arrived for showing in some open 
manner that India is united on this question, 
and for that reason I write now to sponta- 
neously offer to the Imperial Government a 
contribution from the Hyderabad State of 
twenty lakhs annually for three years, for the 
exclusive purpose of Indian frontier defence. 
This is my offer in time of peace. At ft later 



100 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



stage you can count upon my sword.~Your 
sincere friend, 

" Mir Mahbub Ali Khan." 

The effect of this letter on public 
opinion throughout the world was very 
great. Her Most Gracious Majesty the 
Queen Empress was pleased to express 
her warm appreciation of the loyal 
action of His Highness in the following 
letter, by His Excellency the Viceroy's 
hand : — 

" Simla, October 7. 

" My Friend, — I have received from Colonel 
Marshall your letter of the 26th of August, and 
send this reply by his hands. It is difficult 
for me to express in fitting terms my sense of 
the ready loyalty and goodwill which have 
prompted your Highness to come forward at 
this time with so generous an offer, emanating 
as it does from the head of one of the largest 
and most important States in India. It is 
indeed a striking proof of the friendly feelings 
entertained towards Her Majesty and the 
British Government by the Princes of the 
Empire; and I had the greatest satisfaction 
in acquainting the Queen Empress with the 
contents of your Highness's kharita. There is 
no doubt that the advance of a great military 
power towards the borders of India has imposed 
on the Government the obligation of taking 
those precautions for the defence of our frontier 
which are adopted by all nations on becoming 
conterminous with each other, no matter how 
friendly their existing relations. This duty 
undoubtedly has considerably added, and will 
continue to add for some time, to the expendi- 
ture of the Government of India ; and it is a con- 
vincing proof both of your Highness's states- 
manlike capacity as well as of your generosity 
that you should have been the first among the 
Princes of India to recognize the principle 
that the Native States are as much interested 
as the rest of the Indian population in assisting 
the Government to take whatever measures 
may be necessary to preserve the borders of 
the Empire from any dangers which may arise 
from external complications. Again thanking 
your Highness in the name of my Government, 
as well as in the name of Her Majesty and the 
Government of England, for the noble example 
which you have set,— I remain, my friend, 
yours sincerely, " Dufferin." 

And the appreciation of the people of 
England of the friendly action of the 
First Prince of the Indian Empire was 
aptly expressed in the following leading 
article in the Times : — 

"This is an intimation which no one can 
misinterpret, that the great Native Courts, 
who are outside the red line of British ad- 
ministration, have been alive to th« incessant 
encroachments of Kussia in the direction of 
India, and now perceive that this advance 
constitutes a danger for them as well as for 
us. We believe that feeling is shared by every 



potentate, great or small, from Travancore to 
Cashmere, yet it has remained voiceless, not 
for want of will, but rather of knowledge as to 
how and when to speak. With remarkable 
acumen the Nizam has not only seen that the 
time has come, but he has chosen the very 
best and the most original mode of giving 
vent to the pent-up feeling of a large section 
of the Indian population. In time of war and 
invasion, or, indeed, of any military operations 
beyond the frontier, the rulers of the Native 
States would be compelled to play a certain 
part, and we should receive, as we have received 
before, the offer of their military contingents. 
But we are fortunately not in any imminent 
risk of war or invasion, although we have 
sanctioned an expenditure of some ten millions 
sterling on frontier defence, and it is this 
which makes the Nizam's princely gift all 
the more gratifying and significant. There is 
absolutely no precedent in Indian history for 
the Nizam taking this step in time of peace, 
nor, indeed, for any Native Court admitting 
the least responsibility in regard to the financial 
embarrassments of the Central Government, 
even if caused by expenditure on objects from 
which that Court derives a direct benefit. The 
action of the Nizam, magnificent in itself, is 
enhanced by all the attendant circumstances. 
It is quite unexpected, the step having been 
taken by the Nizam entirely on his own 
initiative. . . . We can assure His Highness 
that his generous friendship will wake a re- 
sponsive feeling in the breasts of the British 
people, not merely for the noble proportions 
of his contribution to frontier defence, but for 
the loyal feelings which inspired him to place 
on unmistakable record before the world the 
unanimity of opinion in India on the subjects 
of English rule and Russian aggression. The 
Nizam's act cannot fail to arouse our en- 
thusiasm at the same time that it furnishes a 
uniquecompliment to our authority and power. 
"The impression produced by the Nizam's 
letter will not be limited to India or this 
country, although its full effect will be felt 
most in the Peninsula of Hindostan, where 
the ruler of Hyderabad speaks as the great 
political chief among the fifty million Ma- 
homedans of the Empire. The great service 
which he has rendered our Government and 
cause is that, at a moment when even the 
suspicion of compulsion could not exist, he 
has come forward with the frank declaration 
that in his opinion every ruler and native of 
India has a common interest in the security of 
the country against external attack. In doing 
this he has not only committed his own person 
and dynasty to a policy of implacable hostility 
to a foreign invader, but he has set all the 
feudatories of the Indian Empire a splendid 
example. If any other Indian chief had taken 
this step the deed would have been in a per- 
sonal sense quite as gratifying, but it would 
not have possessed the same political signi- 
ficance. When an Indian Mahomedan talks 
of the secular power of Islam, his expressed 
thought may be for the Sultan as Caliph, but 
his real conviction is that for him personally 
the Nizam is quite as important a personage. 
The Nizam has spoken not only ' as the oldest 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



101 



ally of the English in India,' but as the fore- 
most Mahomedan potentate in our quarter of 
Asia. He is an infinitely greater prince, tested 
by his revenue, the number of his subjects, 
and his own personal enlightenment and that 
of his Government, than the Ameer of Bokhara, 
who is termed the Head of Islam in Central 
Asia. . . . The silly stories which those ad- 
venturers who wish to make a livelihood out 
of Russian credulity have been circulating 
about English oppression in India, and especi- 
ally at the expense of Mahomedans, have now 
received the clearest possible refutations at 
the hands of the most representative Mahome- 
dan prince in the Peninsula. The Nizam's 
letter is also important as putting an end to 
all possible ambiguity as to the cordial re- 
lations and good understanding subsisting 
between the Central Government and the chief 
feudatories of India. A great deal too much 
notice has been paid to alleged disaffection at 
native courts ana capitals, instigated by out- 
side intriguers ; and the armies and the social 
state of Native States, kept up in conformity 
with written treaty, may perhaps have been 
scanned with too closely critical an eye under 
the sudden perception of what might be a 
concealed danger. The Nizam's letter annihi- 
lates such petty and personal criticism. It is 
impossible after this to suspect Hyderabad of 
being less staunch in the cause of defending 
India than ourselves ; and when the greatest 
and most powerful of Indian States is thus 
outspoken we may feel sure that the rest will 
not lag far behind. The Nizam has been good 
enough to take the most effectual steps to 
shatter the pleasing belief of Russian com- 
manders and some Continental critics, that 
when the Czar's armies move towards the 
Indus the discontented princes and peoples, 
alienated by the greed and tyranny of England, 
will rise to welcome them as deliverers, so 
that the contest will be virtually over before 
the first shot is fired. . . . The present Nizam 
has bettered his predecessor's example. He 
has anticipated the crisis which may be before 
that country, and he declares in the most 
emphatic and unequivocal manner that if the 
fatal hour comes he will be with us, and that 
'England can count on his sword.' This we 
never doubted, but what is as surprising as it 
is welcome is that he has discovered the very 
best way to convince the world that his words 
are sincere, and not mere lip service. It would 
be futile to talk of making the Nizam some 
adequate return, for there is no repaying such 
generosity and cordiality as he has shown. 
But we cannot do less than admit that he 
acquires an additional claim on our confidence 
and consideration by conferring an inestimable 
service on the whole of the Empire, and one 
which no one but he, as the first of Indian 
princes, and the greatest magnate in alliance 
with the Crown, could have rendered with the 
same effect. British politicians can learn from 
his action the moral that British authority in 
India is both popular and useful, and at the 
same time that the menace from Russia is 
regarded by the responsible representatives of 
the Peninsula as a real and growing danger. 
In the union of those who will suffer from it 



is to be found absbiutesecufity, both now and 
in the future, and the Nizam has shown that 
this union exists." 

In November 1892 the Marquess of 
Lansdowne visited His Highness's capital 
in State, as Viceroy of India ; and was 
entertained at dinner by the Nizam, who 
took the opportunity, when proposing 
the health of his distinguished guest, to 
reiterate his sentiments of loyalty and 
friendliness in the following words : — 

"The historical friendship that has existed 
between my State and the British Government 
has not been confined to mere mellifluous 
words, but has been tested by deeds — deeds 
in which the best blood of Hyderabad was 
shed in defence of British interests, deeds in 
which British blood was spilt in defending the 
throne of a faithful ally. This friendship is 
a most precious legacy left to me by my 
ancestors, which I am not only most anxious 
to maintain but to increase by continuous 
deeds of loyal amity." 

And the speech of the Viceroy recipro- 
cated these sentiments ; the following is 
an extract from it : — 

"His Highness the Nizam rules over an 
area of 100,000 square miles and a population 
of over eleven millions of human beings. It 
is perhaps instructive, in order to give a correct 
idea of the importance of the State, to recall 
the fact that its population is about five times 
that of Denmark, considerably more than ' 
double the population of the Netherlands, of 
Norway, Sweden, and of Turkey in Europe, 
while it is also considerably more than double 
that of the great island Continent of Australia 
and of that vast Dominion of Canada in which 
I had for some years the honour of representing 
Her Majesty. His Highness's territories com- 
prise some of the richest in natural resources 
of any in India, and it is not too much to say 
that given a Government founded upon justice 
and personal security, there is no reason why 
the State should not be what His Highness, I 
am sure, desires it to be, an example to the 
rest. And I may add that there is no ruler 
whom, upon personal grounds, the Govern- 
ment of India is more desirous of supporting 
and encouraging in the discharge of his onerous 
duties than His Highness the Nizam. 

' ! I have had the advantage of meeting several 
of those who have had official relations with 
him, and they are all agreed in bearing witness 
to the personal qualities which have attracted 
to him the sympathy and goodwill of those 
with whom he has been brought into contact. 
It is satisfactory to know that he has on more 
than one occasion shown by his acts that he 
is sincerely anxious to do his duty as the ruler 
of this important State. I may refer in illus- 
tration of my meaning to the liberality with 
which the support of the State has been given 
to such useful measures as the improvement 
of the water-supply of Secunderabad, and to 
the public spirit shown by His Highness 
in connection with the appointment of the 



102 



THE« GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Chloroform Commission, ably presided over 
by Surgeon-Lieuteuant-Colonel Lawrie— an 
enquiry which has already produced scientific 
results of importance, and which shows that 
His Highness is prepared to recognize the 
claims of philanthropy transcending the limits 
of his own possessions." 

The progress of the State of Hyderabad 
under the rule of this brave and patriotic 
Prince has been most surprising, and is 
evident in every department of public 
affairs. In communication and means 
of locomotion, in education, in sanitation, 
in the administration of justice, police, and 
prisons, in finance, in revenue-adminis- 
tration and surveys, and in every other 
department, the most thorough reforms 
have been attempted with marked success. 
The recent increase in trade and manu- 
factures — cotton-spinning, cloth and silk 
weaving, shawl-making and the like — has 
been most marked. It is not too much 
to say that the Nizam is idolized by his 
people; on the occasion of his serious 
illness in 1884, the prayers in all the 
mosques, and the public anxiety through- 
out the State, reminded every one of the 
feeling evoked in England by the illness 
of the Prince of Wales. The Nizam has 
had the advantage of being served by 
many of the ablest and most experienced 
and successful Statesmen that India has 
produced, among whom the most pro- 
minent have been the late Sir Sahar Jang, 
the late Shams-ul-Umara, and the great 
Shamsiya family — the late Sir Asman Jah, 
Sir Kurshid Jah, and the present Prime 
Minister, Sir Vikar-ul-Umara. By the 
aid of these Ministers His Highness has 
developed his State by a great railway — 
which he opened in person on April 3, 1 886 ; 
he has established an extensive system 
of public instruction, based on the most 
perfect models, both for elementary and 
for secondary education ; he has purified 
the administration of justice, and put it 
on a par with that in British India ; he 
has repaired the neglect of centuries in 
the maintenance and construction of 
tanks and wells, and in the sanitation of 
the great cities of the State, and especially 
in the capital. He has introduced and 
largely carried out a scientific system of 
Revenue Survey, and safeguarded the 
rights of the poorer cultivators. The 
great central jail of Hyderabad, although 
it contains some of the most desperate 
criminals in India, is admirably arranged 
and administered, and is becoming a 
valuable centre for jail-manufactures. 



His Highness has cared for the medical 
wants of his female subjects by employing 
lady-doctors, establishing schools for the 
training of nurses, and by many similar 
benefactions. Some of the sons of the 
Hyderabad nobles are sent to England, 
at the cost of the State, to be educated. 
The Nizam has also established a system 
of famine-relief, for use in time of famine, 
based on the Report of Sir James Caird's 
Famine Commission, that may be com- 
pared with that of British India. In 
every way the progress attained, especi- 
ally of late, has been most remarkable 
and gratifying. 

The family banner of the Nizam is 
coloured yellow, and it bears in its centre 
a disc, which represents the "Lucky 
Chapati " of the first Nizam. This family 
cognizance took its origin in the following 
incident. When the first Nizam was 
departing to the wars in the Deccan, a 
holy man came forward to give his 
benediction to the hero of the faith, and 
presented him with a chapati as an 
emblem of good fortune ; this chapati 
the warrior carried with him as an amulet 
through all his successful campaigns, and 
his descendants have ever since borne 
the device called the kulcha on their 
banner. 

The Nizam rules his State in a con- 
stitutional manner, through the medium 
of a Prime Minister — His Excellency 
Sir Vikar-ul-Umara, K.C.I.E.— with a 
Council of State. His Highness has 
fixed days in the week when he transacts 
public business with the Council; and 
thrice a week the Prime Minister attends 
at the Palace, with all reports, financial 
statements, and other documents, there- 
by keeping the Nizam fully informed of 
the state of public affairs. His Highness 
is said to take a personal interest in all 
that goes on ; and indeed, for some time 
before the appointment of the last 
Prime Minister, he acted as his own 
Minister, with the aid of an English 
officer lent him by the Viceroy. He is 
a keen sportsman, and a proficient in all 
manly exercises, especially in that of 
tent-pegging, which is his great amuse- 
ment, and in which he is very expert. 

The area of the Nizam's dominions 
— including the Berars or Hyderabad 
Assigned Districts, which are temporarily 
administered by the British Government 
in trust for him — is about 98,000 square 
miles ; its population is nearly 13,000,000, 
chiefly Hindus, but with over a million 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



103 



Muhammadans. It is by far the largest, 
richest, and most populous of the feuda- 
tory States of India ; it is three times as 
large as Bavaria, and more than twice 
as populous. The Nizam maintains a 
military force of 6228 cavalry, 24,068 
infantry, and 35 guns; exclusive of the 
Prigah or Household Troops. His High- 
ness is entitled to a salute of 21 guns. 
Residence : Hyderabad, Deccan. 

HYDERSHA AMEDSHA MUNSHI, 

Khan Saheb. The title was conferred 
on June 22, 1897. Residence : Godhra, 
Bombay. 

IBA.D-ULLA, Muhammad, Khan Bahd- 
aur. See Muhammad. 

IBAHIM, Sayyid, Khan Bahadur. See 
Muhammad. 

IBRAHIM ALI, Sayyid, Khan Bahadur. 
Tie title was conferred on January 1, 
1898. Is Wazir of the Bahawalpur 
Stite. Residence: Bahawalpur, Punjab. 

IBRAHIM All, Muhammad Awali 
Martabat Mirza Bahadur, Prince. 
See Muhammad. 

IBRA3IM HAJI SUMAR PATEL, Haji, 

Khd% Saheb. Received the title on 
Jun< 3, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

IBRAIIM KHAN. See Muhammad 
Ibralim Khan. 

IBRAIIM SAYYID. See Muhammad 
Ibralim, Maulavi, Sayyid. 

IBRAR AHMAD, Kazi, Khan Bahddur. 
The ttle was conferred on May 25, 1895. 
Residence : Moradabad, North-Western 
Provhces. 

ICHHRl SINGH, Sarddr. The title is 
hereditary. Residence : Gujranwala, 
Punjtb. 

IDAR, His Highness Maharaja Sri Sir 
Kesrisinghji Jawansinghji, K.C.S.I., 
Maharaja of. A ruling chief; b. 1864. 
Succeeded to the yadi December 26, 
1868. Belongs to the great Rahtor 
Rajput (Hindu) family, said to spring 
from the second son of the legendary 
hero Rama, and therefore of the Solar 
race; of whom the principal Chief is 
His Highnessthe Maharaja of Jodhpur, 
and to which also belong the Chiefs of 
Bikanir and Kishangarh in Rajputana, 
and other important Princes. In 1729, 



when the famous Abhai Singh, Rahtor 
Raja of Jodhpur, was Subahdar of 
Guj arat under the Emperor Muhammad 
Shah, and his brother Bakht Singh 
Rahtor was the conqueror of Nagar, 
two other brothers, named Anand Singh 
Rahtor and Rai Singh Rahtor, estab- 
lished themselves at Idar by force of 
arms. The Peshwa and the Gaekwar 
soon despoiled the young State; and 
the Raja Sheo Singh Rahtor, son of 
Anand Singh, who died in 1791, was 
compelled to lose part of his territories, 
and to pay tribute to the Gaekwar. 
This tribute is still paid by the Chief 
of Idar, who in return receives tribute 
from some other minor States. Sheo 
Singh was succeeded by his sonBhawan 
Singh, who died shortly afterwards, 
leaving the (jadi to a minor son, the 
Raja Gambhirsinghji. The latter was 
succeeded by the Maharaja Jawan- 
singhji, K.C.S.I., who was a Member 
of the Legislative Council of Bombay, 
and died in 1868, leaving his son, the 
present Maharaja, as a minor. His 
Highness was educated at the Raj- 
kumar College at Indore. His State 
has an area of 2500 square miles ; and 
a population of 258,429, chiefly Hindus, 
but including 8700 Muhammadans and 
6266 Jains. The Mahara ja has obtained 
a sanad of adoption ; and was created 
a Knight Commander of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India on 
February 15, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty. His Highness main- 
tains a military force of 54 cavalry, 
100 infantry, and 21 guns, and is 
entitled to a salute of 15 guns. Resi- 
dence : Idar, Mahi Kantha, Bombay. 

IJAZ HUSAIN, Muhammad, Khadim-ul- 
Aima, Mirza Bahadur, Prince. See 
Muhammad. 

IJPURA, Thakur Gobar singly i, Thdkvr 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1850. Belongs 
to a Koli (aboriginal) family. His State 
has a population of about 392, chiefly 
Hindus. Residence: Ijpura, Mahi 
Kantha. 

IKDARIA. See Raipur Ikdaria. 

IKRAM-ULLA KHAN, Sayyid Muham- 
mad, Khan Bahddur. The title was 



conferred on June 3, 
Delhi, Punjab. 



J. Residence: 



104 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



ILAHI BAKHSH, Hafiz, Khdn BaMdur. 
The title was conferred on May 25, 
1895. Residence : Lahore, Punjab. 

ILAHI BAKHSH, Muhammad, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1891. Residence: Delhi, 
Punjab. 

ILAHI BAKHSH,Shaikh, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 24, 1889. Residence : Ajmir. 

ILOL, Thakur Wakhatsinghji Dip- 
singhji, Thakur. A ruling chief; b. 
1864. Succeeded to the gadi April 16, 
1866. Belongs to a Koli (Hindu) 
family; was educated at the Rajku- 
mar College, Rajkot. The State of 
Ilol is tributary to the Gaekwar, and 
also to Idar. Its area is 44 square 
miles ; its population is 5603, chiefly 
Hindus. Residence : Ilol, Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay. 

ILTIFAT HUSAIN, Mir, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 24, 1889. Residence : Baroda. 

IMAM BAKHSH walad SHER MU- 
HAMMAD KHAN (of Mirpur), Mir. 
The title is continued for life, the 
Mir being a representative of one 
of the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the 
time of the annexation. Residence : 
Hyderabad, Sind. 

IMAM BAKHSH (of Raikot), Rai. 
Belongs to a Ed j put Muhammadan 
family, that claims descent from the 
same stock as that of the ruling 
house of Jaisalmir. Its founder, Tulsi 
Ram, second son of Raja Dulchi Ram 
of Jaisalmir, is said to have become a 
convert to Islam in the year 1833. 
His descendants occupied Raikot till 
the death of Rani Bhagbari in 1852, 
when the territory lapsed to the British 
Government. Rai Imam Bakhsh is a 
distant relative of the late Rani, and 
has succeeded to her private estate. 
He has three sons, Amir Khan, Fateh 
Khan, and Faizulla Khan. Residence : 
Raikot, Ludhiana, Punjab. 

IMAM BAKHSH KHAN, Bozdar, Khdn 
Bahadur; b. 1834. The title was 
conferred on April 10, 1884, as a per- 
sonal distinction, in recognition of 
his eminent services in the Survey 
Department as an explorer of un- 
known tracts on the Frontier. He 
has done especially valuable work as 
an explorer in the Gilgit country, also 



in Zhob and the Ghumal country, and 
in the Shirani Hills. He has taken 
part also in exploring expeditions to 
the Vaziri country, to Buner, to Agror, 
Kandahar, and Kabul. He is a Member 
of the Municipal Committee of Dera 
Ghazi Khan ; and has received a khilaf 
and a chair in Darbar from the 
Government. Residence: Dera Ghazi 
Khan, Punjab. 

IMAM BAKHSH KHAN, Mazari, Sir, 
K.C.I.E., Mir, Nawdb. The first title 
(of Mir; is hereditary, the second (of 
Nawab) is personal, and was conferred 
on February 23, 1877, in recognition of 
his loyal and zealous services in S5r 
R. Sandeman's mission to Kal^t. 
Belongs to a Mazari Baluch famly 
that claims descent from Amir Hamza, 
the uncle of the Prophet, whose sen, 
Kul Charag, emigrated from Persiato 
Kalat, and settled in Kach *nd 
Makran. A descendant, Batil Kbin, 
received the title of " Mazar," mean- 
ing a lion in the Baluch language, on 
account of his gallantry in the battles 
with the Lashiris, and hence the mme 
of this Baluchi clan. Bahrain Khan, 
the father of Sir Imam Balhsh, 
received a sanad from the Mahiraja 
Ranjit Singh of Lahore. Durinj the 
Mutiny of 1857 Sir Imam Btkhsh 
gave conspicuous aid to the Govern- 
ment; and was created a Enight 
Commander of the Most Eninent 
Order of the Indian Empire, Mty 24, 
1888. He is an Honorary Magistrate 
of the first class, and one of tht most 
influential and loyal Chiefs m the 
Baluch frontier. His eldest son,aamed 
Bahram Khan, was born in 18«JV and 
has married the daughter ani only 
child of his cousin, Sher Muhatnmad, 
which marriage ensures* the "aman- 
ddrship, or headship of the clan, to 
Sir Imam Bakhsh's desceidants. 
Residence : Dera Ghazi Khan, Punjab. 

IMAM SHARIF, Khdn Bahddur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887. Residence : Survey 
of India. 

IMDAD ALI, Khdn Bahddur. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1895. 
Residence : Damoh, Central Provinces. 

IMDAD ALI KHAN walad TURAB All 
KHAN, Mir. The title is continued 
for life, the Mir being a representative 
of one of the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



106 



at the time of the annexation. Resi- 
dence: Sind. 

IMDAD IMAM, Maulavi, Sayyid, 
Shams-ul-Ulama. The title was con- 
ferred on May 24, 1889, as a personal 
distinction, in recognition of his 
eminence as an oriental scholar. Resi- 
dence: Patna, Bengal. 

IMLAI, JRdjd of. See Lala Saheb. 

INAYAT ALI KHAN walad MIR 
GHTJLAM SHAH, Mir. The title is 
hereditary, the Mir being a repre- 
sentative of the Mirs or Chiefs of 
Sind at the time of the annexation, 
Residence : Shikarpur, Sind. 

INAYAT ALI KHAN walad MIR 
GHTJLAM SHAH, Mir. The title has 
been continued for life, the Mir being 
a representative of one of the Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence : Hyderabad, 
Sind. 

INAYAT HUSAIN, Shaikh, Khan Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on November 25, 1870. Resi- 
dence: Hyderabad, Deccan. 

INAYAT HUSAIN KHAN, MunsM, 
Khan Bahadur; b. September 1834. 
Belongs to a Pathan family, and has 
been in service of the Government 
since 1850. During the Mutiny he 
rendered valuable services at the risk 
of his own life and property, and for 
these he has been rewarded with a 
grant, and on June 6, 1885, obtained 
the title of Khan Bahadur as a per- 
sonal distinction. Residence: Alla- 
habad, North-Western Provinces. 

INAYAT-ULLA KHAN, Khan Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on June 3, 1893. Residence: 
Hardoi, Oudh. 

INDAR DEO (of Akhrota), Rdjd. The 
title is hereditary. The family is of 
ancient Rajput origin. Its founder 
was Raja Ranjit Deo, Raja of Jammu, 
the son of Raja Darab Deo, who was 
the ancestor of the Maharajas of 
Jammu and Kashmir. Raja Indar 
Deo's grandfather was the ruling 
chief at Jammu, who was ejected by 
the Maharaja Ranjit Singh of Lahore 
when he conquered that territory. 
He is the son of the late Raja Raghbir 
Deo. Residence : Akhrota, Pathankot, 
Gurdaspur, Punjab. 



INDAR NARAYAN, Rai ; b. 1850. The 
title is hereditary, and was conferred 
on June 5, 1858. Belongs to a Brahman 
family of Kashmir. The late Pandit 
Rai Kishan Narayan was Settlement 
Deputy Collector of Sagar in the 
Central Provinces at the time of the 
Mutiny of 1857, and greatly dis- 
tinguished himself by his courage and 
fidelity, which were of the greatest 
value to the local authorities through- 
out the time of the disturbances. As 
a reward he received the hereditary 
title of Rai, with a grant of lands. 
On his death his son, the present Rai, 
who is a Subordinate Judge in the 
North-Western Provinces, inherited 
the title and estates. He was educated 
at Agra, and has two sons — Brij 
Narayan and Iqbal Narayan. Resi- 
dence : Cawnpur, North-Western 
Provinces. 

INDORE, His Highness Maharaj- 
Adhiraj Sir Shivaji Rao Holkar, 
Bahadur, G.C.S.I., Maharaja of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1860. Succeeded to 
the gadi on July 12, 1886. His 
Highness's full titles are — His High- 
ness Maharaj-Adhiraji Raj Rajesh- 
war Sawai Sir Shivaji Rao Holkar 
Bahadur, Knight Grand Commander 
of the Most Exalted Order of the Star 
of India. Holkar is the dynastic 
name of the Princes of this great 
Mahratta family, who have occupied 
a very conspicuous place in the 
history of India since the first half of 
the 18th century. It is derived from 
Hoi, the name of the village on the 
Nira river in the Deccan, where, in 
1693, was born Malhar Rao, the 
founder of the dynasty. It is an in- 
teresting fact in connection with the 
history of this Principality, that its 
administration has twice, at important 
periods, been in the hands of ladies of 
the family — once, most successfully, 
in those of the famous Ahalya Bai 
(1765-95), and once (less happily) in 
those of Tulsi Bai (1811-17). Malhar 
Rao adopted a military life in his early 
youth, and in the year 1724 entered 
the service of the Peshwa, from which 
time his rise was very rapid. Eight 
years later he had become the Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the Peshwa's 
armies, had conquered the Imperial 
Subahdar of Malwa, and had received, 
from the gratitude of the Peshwa, 



106 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



the territory of Indore, with most of 
the conquered territory. He continued 
to strengthen his position, and at the 
great battle of Panipat, in conjunction 
with Sindhia (see Gwalior, Maharaja 
of), he commanded one division of 
the Mahratta hosts. After that 
disaster he retired to Indore, and 
devoted himself to the development 
of this great Principality, which he 
left in 1765 to his grandson, a minor 
named Mali Rao Holkar, in a state of 
prosperity. The latter died in a few 
months ; and the administration was 
then assumed by his mother, Ahalya 
Bai, the daughter-in-law of the first 
Holkar. Aided by her Commander- 
in-Chief, Tukaji Rao Holkar, this 
clever and courageous lady ruled for 
thirty years, and left Indore, at her 
death in 1795, in a well-ordered and 
prosperous condition. Thereon much 
disorder ensued. At last Jeswant Rao 
Holkar, an illegitimate son of Tukaji, 
amid many vicissitudes of fortune, 
managed to maintain the position of 
the family. He defeated the combined 
armies of Sindhia and the Peshwa in 
1802, and took possession of the 
Peshwa's capital of Poona ; which, 
however, reverted to the Peshwa by 
British intervention after the Treaty 
of Bassein in the same year. Again, 
after the Treaty of Sarji Anjengaon, 
war ensued between Jeswant Rao 
Holkar and the Paramount Power, 
with varying fortune, till at length, in 
1805, Holkar was forced to surrender 
to Lord Lake, and sign a treaty on the 
banks of the river Bias in the Punjab. 
He died in 1811, leaving a minor son, 
Malhar Rao Holkar ; and the adminis- 
tration was carried on by Tulsi Bai, 
one of the concubines of the late 
Maharaja, as Queen Regent. She was 
murdered in 1817 by her own officers ; 
but the Indore army was defeated by 
the British forces at the battle of 
Mehidpur, and the Treaty of Mandesar 
followed in 1818, by which Malhar 
Rao Holkar became a feudatory Prince 
of the British Empire. He died in 
1833 without issue. Martand Rao 
Holkar was adopted as his successor, 
but was speedily deposed by his cousin, 
Hari Rao Holkar. The latter, dying 
in 1843 without issue, was succeeded 
by his adopted son, Kandi Rao, who 
died in 1844, and was succeeded by 
adoption by his late Highness the 



Maharaj-Adhiraj Tukaji Rao Holkar, 
father of the present Chief. Tukaji Rao 
was only eleven years old at the date of 
his accession, and was the second son 
of Bhao Holkar. In 1852 he attained 
his majority, and was invested with 
the full management of the State. 
In 1857 the Indore army mutinied, and 
besieged the British Resident, Sir 
Henry Durand, at Indore, who was 
exposed to much difficulty and danger 
in taking off the women and children 
to a place of safety at Bhopal. The 
Maharaja, however, remained loyal, 
and his rebellious troops soon after 
were forced to lay down their arms. 
The Maharaja subsequently received 
a sanad of adoption, an increased 
personal salute, and the rank of a 
Knight Grand Commander of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India. He 
died in 1886, and was succeeded by 
the present Maharaj-Adhiraj Bahadur. 
His Highness has visited England, 
and is known as a Prince of great 
enlightenment and ability. Like his 
illustrious father, he has received the 
rank of a Knight Grand Commander 
of the Most Exalted Order of the Star 
of India. The area of his State is 
8400 square miles ; its population 
about 1,055,000, chiefly Hindus, but 
including about 73,000 Muhammadans, 
and 86,000 belonging to various ab- 
original tribes. In size the State of 
Indore may be compared with the 
kingdoms of Saxony or Wiirtemburg, 
but is larger than either. In popula- 
tion it may be compared with the 
Grand Duchies of Hesse or Baden, 
being more populous than the former, 
and less so than the latter. His 
Highness maintains a military force 
of 3231 cavalry, 6128 infantry, and 65 
guns. He is entitled to a salute of 
21 guns within the limits of Indore 
territory, and 19 guns elsewhere. 
Residence : Indore, Central India. 

INDRA BIXRAMA SINGH (of Raipur 
Ikdaria, Itaunja), ,Rdjd; b. November 
21, 1864. The title is hereditary, having 
been assumed by Rai Dingar Deo, 
ancestor of the Raja, and having been 
recognized as hereditary by the Govern- 
ment in 1877. Belongs to a Puar 
Rajput (Hindu) family, of the Vasishta 
Gotra or clan, tracing their descent 
from Deo Ridh Rai, eighth son of 
Raja Rudra Sah of Dharanagar or 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



107 



Deogarh, who took service under the 
King of Delhi, and obtained from him 
important commands. The Rdjds have 
before their residence a large square 
stone, which they hold in almost 
sacred reverence. They say that they 
brought it from Delhi, and that it is 
the symbol of their right to the estates 
granted to them by the Emperors of 
Delhi. The late Rdjd Jagmohan Singh 
died in 1881, four months after attain- 
ing his majority, and was succeeded 
by his brother, the present Rdjd, then 
sixteen years old, as a minor under 
the Court of Wards. Educated at 
Canning College, Lucknow; attained 
his majority, and received possession 
of his estate on January 2, 1886. Resi- 
dence : Itaunja, Mahona, Lucknow, 
Oudh. 

INJHAR SINGH, Rao Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty. Residence : Chark- 
hdri, Central India. 

ISHAK HAJI ISA, Haji, Khdn Saheb. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence : Bombay. 

ISHAN CHANDRA MITTRA, Rat 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1892. Residence : Hughli, 
Bengal. 

ISHRI PARSHAD TEWARI, Rat. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
May 20, 1890. Residence: Central 
Provinces. 

ISHRI SINGH (of Nadaun), Mian. The 
title is hereditary. Is a near relative 
of the Rdjd Narindar Chand of Nadaun 
(q. v.), and a descendant of the Rdjd 
Sir Jodhbir Chand, K.C.S.I. Resi- 
dence : Kdngra, Punjab. 

ISHWAR CHANDRA MITTAR, Rai 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
June 3, 1893. Residence : Calcutta. 

ISHWAR CHANDRA SIL, Rai Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1892. Residence : Dacca, Bengal. 

ISHWAR DAS, Rai Bahddur, Rdjd 
Ddyawant; b. June 13, 1826. The 
titles are personal, and having been 
conferred by the Nawdb of the 
Carnatic, were recognized by the 
Government in 1890. His grandfather, 
the Rai Rdjd Makhan Lai Bahadur, 



and his father, Rai Rdjd Tikam 
Chand Bahddur, both successively held 
important posts under the Nawdbs of 
the Carnatic. Belongs to a Kayastha 
family, claiming descent from the 
famous Chitragupta. Has received the 
thanks of Government for his public 
services and his benevolence. His 
adopted son is named Lachmi Das. 
Residence: Madras. 

ISHWAR DAS, Pandit, Rai Bahddur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 24, 1889. Residence: Pesha- 
war, Punjab. 

ISHWAR LAL OCHHAVARAM, Rao 

Saheb. The title was conferred Janu- 
ary 1, 1895. Residence: Ahmadabad, 
Bombay. 

ISKHAN KHAN, Malik, Tarin, KUn 
Saheb. Received the title on June 3, 
1899. Residence: Peshin, Baluchistan. 

ISMAIL BEG AMIR BEG, Khdn Saheb. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence : Poona, Bombay. 

ISMAIL KHAN walad SALE KHAN, 
Khdn Saheb. The title was conferred 
on June 22, 1897. Residence : Kolaba, 
Bombay. 

ITAUNJA. See Raipur Ikdaria; see 
also Indra. 

ITHAR KHAN AIMAT KHAN, Khdn 
Saheb. Received the title on May 21, 
1898. Residence: Jalgaon, Bombay. 

JABRIA BHIL and JABRI, Mian Yusuf 
Muhammad, Mian of. A ruling chief; 
b. 1874. Succeeded to the gadi May 
10, 1888 as a minor. Belongs to a 
Pinddri (Muhammadan) family, de- 
scended from Rajdn Khdn, brother of 
the Pinddri leader Chitu. The State 
is tributary to Gwalior, and contains 
a population of about 1000, chiefly 
Hindus. Residence : Jabria Bhil, Bho- 
pdl, Central India. 

JACOB, Elijah, Khdn Saheb. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Jabalpur, Central Provinces. 

JADAB CHANDRA BARTJA. Rai Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on August 30, 1888. Re- 
sidence : Nowgong, Assam. 

JADAB CHANDRA DEB, Rai Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. Reside nee : Malda, Bengal. 

JADAV. See Jadab. 



108 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OP INDIA 



JADU. See Yadu. 

JADUNATH DEO (of Aul), Kumdr. Is 
the son of the late Raja Padmalabh 
Deo of Aul, who was born in 1830, 
succeeded to the gadi in 1840, and has 
recently died. Is descended from the 
ancient Royal family of Orissa. The 
Maharaja Makund Deo, the last Maha- 
raja of Orissa, was conquered by the 
Raja Man Singh {see Jodhpur) as 
Viceroy of the Mughal Emperor to- 
wards the close of the 16th century. 
When subsequently Ram Chandra 
Deo, belonging to another family, was 
proclaimed Maharaja of Orissa by the 
headmen of the country, his title was 
disputed by the two surviving sons of 
Makund Deo, of whom the elder was 
also called Ram Chandra Deo, and the 
disputes were finally settled by Raj 4 
Man Singh in 1580 A.B., who appointed 
Ram Chandra Deo, the son of Maha- 
raja, Makund Deo, to be Raja of Aul, 
and his brother to be Raja of Sar- 
ungar of Patiya, while the other 
Ram Chandra Deo was made Raja 
of Khurda. In 1803 the Raja of Aul 
acknowledged fealty to the British 
Government. Residence : Aul, Orissa, 
Bengal. 

JADUNATH HALDAR, Rai Bahadur; 
b. April 5, 1832. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on May 24, 1889. 
His great-grandfather was in the 
service of the Nawab of Murshidabad 
in Bengal, and was granted by him the 
appellation of Haldar, which his de- 
scendants retain as their family name. 
After the British conquest of Bengal 
he was appointed Tahsildar of Khas 
Mahal in Barrackpore. During the 
Mutiny the Rai Bahadur was a prisoner 
in the hands of the rebels for five 
months, and has subsequently ren- 
dered excellent service in the Police 
of the North-Western Provinces. Re- 
sidence : Allahabad, North- Western 
Provinces. 

JADUNATH MUKHARJI, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 22, 1876, "for liberality dis- 
played by him in various matters of 
public progress and improvement." 
Granted the title of Rai Bahadur, as 
a personal distinction, January 2, 1893. 
Residence : Haz^ribagh, Bengal. 

JAFAR ALI KHAN, CLE. Was 
created a Companion of the Most 



Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
June 25, 1887. Is an officer in Her 
Majesty's Army, with the rank of 
Risaldar. Residence: Caloutta. 

JAFAR All KHAN, Nawab Bahadur. 
The title is personal. Is the grandson 
of the late Amjad Ali Shah, King of 
Oudh, being the younger son of Nizam- 
ud-daula, who married a daughter of 
the King. Residence: Lucknow, Oudh. 

JAFAR ALI KHAN, Muhammad, Na- 
wab Bahadur. See Muhammad. 

JAFAR YUSUF, Khan Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence : Poona, Bombay. 

JAFARABAD, Chief of. See Janjira. 

JAGADINDRA NATH RAI (of Nator), 
Maharaja. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1877- 
Belongs to a Saritra Brahman family, 
who were eminent for many genera- 
tions as Maharajas of Nator, and at 
one time owned the greater portion of 
the Rajshahi district. It is stated 
that the title of Maharaja Bahadur 
was conferred on Ram Jiban Rai by 
the Emperor of Delhi, and another 
sanad from Delhi was conferred on his 
grandson, the Maharaja Ram Krishna 
Rai Bahadur of Nator. His son was 
the Maharaja Bisvanath Rai Bahadur 
of Nator, who is said by the family to 
have been granted a political pension 
by the British Government in 1806. 
His grandson was the Maharaja Go- 
bindanath Rai Bahadur of Nator, the 
(adoptive) father of the present Ma- 
haraja. Residence: Nator, Rajshahi, 
Bengal. 

JAGADISHWAR CHATTARJI, Rai Ba- 
hadur; b. March 17, 1846. The title 
is personal, and was ' conferred on 
January 2, 1888, for long and approved 
service in the Opium Department, in 
which he held an important position. 
Belongs to a Brahman family of 
Bengal. Residence: Benares, North- 
Western Provinces. 

JAGAMANPUR, Raja of. See Rup Sah. 

JAGAN PARSHAD, Munshi, Rai Ba- 
hadur. The title was conferred on 
May 26, 1894. Residence: Agra, North- 
western Provinces. 

JAGANNADHA CHETTIAR, P. K, Rao 

Bahadur. Received the title on Janu- 
ary 2, 1899. Is Tahsildar of Karnul, 
Madras. Residence : Karnul, Madras. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



109 



JAGANNADHA RAO, Valluri, Rai Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on February 16, 1887. Re- 
sidence : Vizianagram, Madras. 

JAGANNATH, Lala, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1896. 
Residence : Pilibhit, North-Western 
Provinces. 

JAGANNATH BARUA, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. Residence : Jorhat, Assam. 

JAGAT BAHADUR (of Umri), Rdjd; b. 
November 17, 1850. Succeeded to the 
gadi October 23, 1872. The title is 
hereditary. Is the senior represent- 
ative of the ancient Bilkhari (Rajput) 
Chiefs of Fort Bilkhar, the vast ruins 
of which remain to this day in the 
mauza of Agyapur; descended from 
Ghaibar Sah, fourth son of Jaswant, 
and great-grandson of Balbhaddar 
Dikhit, who built Fort Bilkhar after 
the fall of Kanauj. About 600 years ago 
one of his descendants, Raja Ram Deo, 
was the Bilkharia Chief of Patti and 
Fort Bilkhar, but was deposed by his 
son-in-law, Bariar Singh Bachgoti (see 
Madho Prasad Singh, Rai), who slew 
his son Dalpat Sah, and seized the 
fort, leaving only a few villages to 
the descendants of Raj 4 Ram Deo. 
The present Raja has a son and heir, 
named Lai Krishna Pal Singh. Re- 
sidence : Umri, Partabgarh, Oudh. 

JAGAT SINGH, CLE., Sarddr Baha- 
dur. The Sardar Bahadur Jagat 
Singh, Kalalwala, CLE., was formerly 
Subadar-Major, 29th jPunjab Infantry. 
He was created a Companion of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire on January 3, 1893. Residence : 
SiaTkot, Punjab. 

JAGAT SINGH (of Singhpur), Thdkur. 
The title is hereditary. Residence: 
Singhpur, Narsinghpur, Central Pro- 
vinces. 

JAGATJIT SINGH BAHADUR, His 
Highness Sir, Rdjd. See Kapurthala. 

JAGGAN. See Jagan. 

JAGJIWAN, Mehta (of Bhuj), Rai 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on May 26, 1894. Re- 
sidence : Jaisalmir, Rajputana. 

JAGJODH SINGH, Sarddr. The title 
is hereditary. Is the son of the late 
Kunwar Peshawara Singh of the La- 



hore family. Residences: Sialkot, 
Punjab; and Bahraich, Oudh. 

JAGJOT SINGH, Sarddr. See Jagjodh 
Singh. 

JAGMOHAN SINGH, CLE. (of Atra 
Chandapur), Rdjd; b. August 21, 
1841. Succeeded 1864. The title is 
hereditary. Belongs to the great 
Kanhpuria (Rajput) family (see Surpal 
Singh Bahadur, Raja of Tiloi), being 
descended from Raja Madan Singh of 
Simrauta, third son of Prasad Singh, 
who was seventh in descent from 
Kanh, the Kshatriya founder of Kanh- 
pur in the time of the great Manik 
Chand. The seventh in descent from 
Madan Singh was the Raja Mandhata 
Singh, who was in possession of 
Chandapur at the time of the conquest 
of Oudh by Saadat Khan. The Raja 
Shiudarshan Singh had half the estate 
confiscated at the time of the Mutiny in 
1857. His grandson, the present Raja, 
is an Honorary Magistrate, and re- 
ceived a Medal of Honour at the 
Imperial Assemblage at Delhi on 
January 1, 1877, on the occasion of 
the Proclamation of Her Most Graci- 
ous Majesty as Empress of India; and 
subsequently for good services he was 
created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire 
on January 1, 1891. Residence : Chan- 
dapur, Rai Bareli, Oudh. 

JAGODESHWAR CHATTERJI, Rai Ba- 
hadur. See Jagadishwar Chattarji. 

JAHANDAD KHAN (of Khanpur), Rdjd, 
Khdn Bahadur. The first title (Raja) 
is hereditary, and the second (Khan 
Bahadur) is personal, and was con- 
ferred on May 24, 1881. Belongs to 
a family of the Gakkar tribe, who 
overran Kashmir in early times, and 
were formidable opponents of the 
Emperor Babar. Is the son of Raja 
Haidar Bakhsh Khan; has acted as 
Extra Assistant Commissioner of the 
Punjab. His son and heir is named 
Fazaldad. Residence: Hazara, Punjab. 

JAHANGIRABAD, Rani of. See Zeb- 
un-nisa. 

JAI CHAND (of Lambagraon), Rdjd; b. 
1870. The title is hereditary, and was 
conferred on December 12, 1851. Be- 
longs to the Katoch family of Rajputs, 
and is head of the Kangra family. 
Raja Parmad Chand died childless in 
exile at Almora, and was succeeded by 



110 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



his relative, Raja Partab Chand, the 
father of the present Raja. Residence : 
Kangra, Punjab. 
JAI KISHAN DAS, C.S.I., Rdjd Ba- 
hadur. See Jaikishan. 

JAI SINGH (of Guler), Rdjd. The title 
is hereditary, and was conferred on 
February 28, 1878, the Raja being 
the brother of the late Raja Sham- 
sher Singh of Guler, and having pre- 
viously enjoyed the hereditary title 
of Mian. His son and heir is named 
Rughnath Singh. The family is con- 
nected with that of His Highness the 
Maharaja of Jammu and Kashmir by 
marriage. It is an offshoot of the 
families of Kangra and Lambagraon. 
Residence : Guler, Kangra, Punjab. 

JAI SINGH (of Kot Khai), Rdnd. The 
title is hereditary. Succeeded the late 
Rand Ram Saran Singh in 1892. Re- 
sidence: Simla, Punjab. 

JAI SINGH (of Siba), Rdjd. The title 
is personal, and was conferred on 
August 7, 1878. The Siba family is 
an offshoot of the Guler family (see 
Jai Singh, of Guler, Raja), which itself 
was an offshoot of that of Kangra. 
Is descended from Sibaru Chand, a 
younger son of the Raja of Guler, who 
conquered the Siba territory, calling 
it Siba after his own name. Raja Ram 
Singh, the last of the old hereditary 
Rajas of Siba, died without male issue 
in 1875. The territory lapsed to the 
Paramount Power, but as an act of 
favour to His Highness the Maharaja 
of Jammu and Kashmir, who is related 
to the family by marriage, the territory 
and title was continued to a scion of 
the family named Raj d Bije Singh. 
He died in 1878, and was succeeded 
by his son, the present Raja. Re- 
sidence : Siba, Kangra, Punjab. 

JAIBANS KTJNWAR (of Kaithola), 
Rdni; b. 1849. The title is heredi- 
tary. The Chief of Kaithola is the 
head of the great Kanhpuria family 
(see Surpal Singh), being the repre- 
sentative of Sahas, the eldest son 
of Kanh. From him a line of twenty 
descents from father to son ends in 
the late Raja Mahesh Bakhsh of Kai- 
thola, who died without male issue 
in 1881. The estates were under 
Government management for some 
time, and were then handed over to 
the present Rdni, the widow of the 



late Raja. Residence : Partabgarh, 
Oudh. 

JAIKISHAN DAS, C.S.I., Rdjd Bahadur; 
b. November 24, 1832. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on Janu- 
ary 18, 1860. Belongs to a family of 
Chaube Brahmans, who fled to Etah 
from Muttra in the reign of Ala-ud- 
din Ghori, because they had slain the 
Kazi of Muttra. Chaube Ghansham 
Das, having long been in Government 
service, and having retired on pension, 
in 1857 rendered most valuable aid to 
the Government, although blind and 
infirm; and ultimately was surprised 
and slain by the rebels at Kasganj. 
His brother, the present Rdjd Jai 
Kishan Dds Bahddur, had loyally sup- 
ported him, and was rewarded with 
the title and a grant of lands and 
other honours in 1860. He was created 
a Companion of the Most Exalted 
Order of the Star of India in 1870. 
Is a Fellow of the Allahabad Uni- 
versity, and Deputy Collector of Bare- 
illy. Residence : Moradabad, North- 
western Provinces. 

JAIKISHAN DAS, Lala, Rai Bahddur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 1, 1894. Residence: 
Kashmir. 

JAIPUR, His Highness Sir Madho 
Singh Bahadur, G.C.S.I., Mahdrdjd 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1861. As- 
cended the gadi as a minor September 
18, 1880, and was invested with full 
governing powers on attaining his 
majority in September 1882. Is the 
Chief of the famous Kachhwdha tribe 
of Rdjputs, descended from the le- 
gendary hero Rdma, and therefore of 
the Swryavansi or Solar race. Tod 
devotes a large part of his learned 
Annals of Rdjdsthdn to the history of 
this family, which, indeed, is no un- 
important part of the history of India. 
Tod says of the ruling familv of Jaipur 
(otherwise called Amber or Dhundar) : 
"A family which traces its lineage 
from Rama of Koshala, Nala of 
Nishida, and Dola the lover of Ma- 
roni, may be allowed 'the boast of 
heraldry'; and in remembrance of 
this descent, the Cushites [Kachhwd- 
ha] of India celebrate with great 
solemnity the annual feast of the sun, 
on which a stately car, called the 
Chariot of the Sun, Surf/a ratha, drawn 
by eight horses, is brought from the 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



111 



temple, and the descendant of Ramesa, 
ascending therein, perambulates his 
capital." The full title of the Maha- 
raja is — His Highness Saramad-i-Ra- 
jaha-i-Hindustan Raj Rajendra Sri 
Maharaj-Adhiraj Sawai Sir Madho 
Singh Bahadur, Knight Grand Com- 
mander of the Most Exalted Order 
of the Star of India (see Introduction, 
§ 11). From Rama, the hero of the 
Rdmdyana,the greatest of the legendary 
heroes of India, to Dhola Rao, the 
founder of the Jaipur State in 967 
A.D., there are enumerated 34 genera- 
tions; and from Dhola Rao to the 
present Maharaja, 106 generations. 
Early in the 11th century a descendant 
of Dhola Rao named Hamaji conquered 
Amber from the Minas, and fixed his 
court there ; and Amber remained the 
capital of the dynasty until the time 
of Jai Singh II., who transferred it to 
Jaipur in 1728. In the time of the 
Great Mughal, the Emperor Akbar, 
Raja Bhagwan Das of Jaipur was one 
of the first Princes of the Empire. 
Overcoming Rajput pride of race, he 
gave his daughter in marriage to the 
Emperor's son and heir, Prince Salim, 
afterwards the Emperor Jahangir, and 
was himself one of the greatest Im- 
perial commanders. But his adopted 
son and successor, the Raja Man 
Singh, was the most famous of all 
the Imperial generals. He and his 
Rajputs carried the arms of the Empire 
successfully into Orissa, Bengal, As- 
sam, and Kabul ; the chronicles of the 
age are full of the exploits of the 
brother-in-law of the Emperor, and he 
was successively Governor of Kabul, 
Bengal, Behar, and the Deccan. His 
nephew, the Raja Jai Singh, known as 
the Mirza Raja, was equally famous 
throughout the wars of Aurangzeb in 
the Deccan ; he it was who effected 
the capture of the famous Sivaji, 
founder of the Mahratta Power; and 
he is said to have fallen a victim to 
the jealousy of the Emperor, who 
caused his death by poison. Some 
generations later, in the time of the 
Emperor Muhammad Shah, the second 
Jai Singh was famous, not only as a 
warrior, but also as an astronomer. 
He built observatories at Jaipur (to 
which place he removed his capital 
from the hills of Amber, five miles 
off), Delhi, Benares, Muttra, and Uj- 
jain. After the death of the Raja Jai 



Singh II., the subsequent history of 
the family is much occupied with 
leagues with Udaipur and Jodhpur 
against the Imperial Power, with con- 
tests with Jodhpur for the honour of 
marrying a Princess of Udaipur, with 
Rajput rivalries and defections, and 
with Mahratta raids. In order to 
regain the privilege of marrying 
Princesses of the House of Udaipur 
— which honour they had forfeited by 
marrying a daughter to the Mughal 
Emperor — the Rajas of Jaipur agreed 
that the issue of the marriage with an 
Udaipur Princess should succeed to 
the Raj even before an elder brother 
by another Rani; and this promise, 
coupled with the rivalry of the Rajas 
of Jodhpur for the same privilege, 
produced endless troubles and dis- 
asters. In the time of the Raj 4 Jagat 
Singh, Amir Khan, the notorious 
Pindari leader (afterwards Nawab of 
Tonk), sided first with the Raja of 
Jaipur against Jodhpur, and then with 
the Raja of Jodhpur against Jaipur; 
and devastated each country in turn. 
At last, in 1818, the British Govern- 
ment intervened ; took the Jaipur 
State under its protection, and the 
Raja became one of the great feu- 
datories. The late Maharaja Sawai 
Ram Singh succeeded to the garli in 
1835. He rendered excellent service 
throughout the Mutiny of 1857, and 
again in the famine of 1868. As a 
reward, he twice received an increase 
to his salute ; he was created a Knight 
Grand Commander of the Most Ex- 
alted Order of the Star of India ; and 
on the occasion of the Imperial As- 
semblage at Delhi, and the Proclama- 
tion of Her Most Gracious Majesty as 
Empress of India, he was appointed a 
Councillor of the Empire, and received 
a suitable addition to his titles and 
territory. The banner of His High- 
ness that was unfurled at Delhi on 
that auspicious occasion was exceed- 
ingly interesting, as showing the close 
approximation of Rajput and Euro- 
pean heraldic devices ; for the Ra jput 
Pancharanga was properly rendered 
as " A Barry of 5 — yules, vert, argent, 
azure, or"; and the solar lineage of 
the Kachhwaha Prince was indicated 
by the device " In chief a Sun in its 
splendour." The late Maharaja died 
in 1880; and was succeeded by his 
adopted son, a scion of the Kachhwaha 



112 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



race, the present Maharajd. The area 
of the State is 14,465 square miles ; 
and its population 2,534,357, chiefly 
Hindus, but including more than 
170,000 Muhammadans and nearly 
60,000 Jains. Jaipur is therefore larger 
than either Holland or Belgium, and 
more populous than Greece. The Ma- 
hard j 4 maintains a military force of 
3578 cavalry, 16,099 infantry, and 281 
guns; and is entitled to a salute of 
19 guns (including 2 guns personal). 
There are many Rajput Chiefs who 
are feudatories of His Highness. 
Arms. — Barry of 5, gules, vert, argent, 
azure, or ; in chief a Sun in its splen- 
dour. Crest. — A kuchnar tree proper, 
bearing cinquefoils argent. Support- 
ers. — A tiger and a white horse. 
Motto. — "Jato Dharma Stato Jayo." 
Residence : Jaipur, Rajputana. 

JAIPUR, Maharaja Sri Vikrama Deo 
Garu (of Vizagapatam), Maharaja 
of. See Vikrama. 

JAISAIMIR, His Highness Maharawal 
Salivahan Bahadur, Maharawal of. 
A ruling chief; b. 1886. Succeeded 
to the gadi as a minor April 12, 1891. 
Is the Chief of the Jadu Bhatti Raj- 
puts, claiming direct descent from 
the divine Krishna, and undoubtedly 
boasting a lineage hardly less ancient 
than that of the great Maharana of 
Udaipur himself. The tribe takes its 
name from Bhati, who was its leader 
in very remote ages, when Settled in 
the Punjab; whence it appears to 
have been driven by conquerors from 
Ghazni, and to have gone to the oasis 
of the Great Indian Desert, which it 
has ever since inhabited. Deoraj, born 
in 836 a.d., was the first to take the 
title of Rawal, and he founded the 
city of Deorawal. One of his descend- 
ants, the Rawal Jaisal, founded the 
city of Jaisalmir, and built a strong 
fort there, about the year 1156 a.d. 
More than a century later, when Mul- 
raj II. was Rawal, Jaisalmir was cap- 
tured and sacked by the Moslem troops 
of the Emperor Ala-ud-din, in 1294 
a.d., after a siege that had lasted eight 
years; and this was the occasion of 
one of the great Sakas so famous in 
Rajput history— when Mulraj and 
his warriors, having slain all their 
women and children, cased themselves 
in armour, put on the saffron robe, 
bound the mor or nuptial crown on 



their heads, and then sword in hand 
sallied forth to die amid the slaugh- 
tered heaps of the foe. Again a similar 
disaster befell the city in 1306 a.d., 
not long after it had been repaired 
by the Rawal Dudu. Finally, in the 
reign of the Rawal Sabal Singh, the 
brave Bhattis were compelled to be- 
come feudatories of the Emperor Shah 
Jahan. Outlying provinces were sub- 
sequently wrested from them by the 
neighbouring States of Jodhpur and 
Bikanir; till at length in 1818, under 
the rule of the Rawal Mulraj, the 
State came under the protection and 
control of the British Power, and has 
enjoyed the blessings of peace. On 
the death of the Rawal Ranjit Singh, 
his younger brother, the late Mahara- 
wal Bairi Sal, succeeded to the gadi in 
1864; and he was succeeded in 1891 
by the present Maharawal. The area 
of Jaisalmir is 16,447 square miles; 
its population about 109,000, chiefly 
Hindus, but including about 28,000 
Muhammadans. In extent it may be 
compared with Switzerland or Hol- 
land; but is larger than either. His 
Highness maintains a military force of 
140 cavalry, 353 infantry, and 25 guns, 
and is entitled to a salute of 15 guns. 
Residence : Jaisalmir, Rajputana. 

JAISINGH RAO ANGRIA, Rao Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on May 24, 1889. Residence : 
Baroda. 

JAISINGHNAGAR, Rao of See Ganpat 
Rao ; also Govind Rao ; also Ram- 
chand Rao. 

JAKHNODA, Thdkur of. See Jiwan 
Singh. 

JALAL-UD-DIN KHAN, .Kazi, Khan 
Bahadur, CLE. An Extra Assis- 
tant Commissioner in Baluchistan. 
Granted the title of Khan Bahadur, 
as a personal distinction, on January 2, 
1893. Received the CLE. on June 3, 
1899. Residence : Quetta, Baluchistan. 

JALAL-UD-DIN, Maulavi, Shams-ul- 
Ulama. The title was conferred, for 
eminence in oriental learning, on 
January 1, 1891. Residence: Fatwa 
and Patna, Bengal. 

JALAM SINGH (of Amoda), Rdwat. 
The title is hereditary, and the 
present Rawat succeeded to the title 
and estates on the death of his father, 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



113 



the late Eawat Lakshmi Singh of 
Amoda. Belongs to a Tuar Rajput 
family, descended from Jet Singh. 
Residence: Amoda, Nimar, Central 
Provinces. 

JAIIA DEVANI, Jareja Mansinghji, 
Tdlukdcirof. A ruling chief ; b. 1852. 
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor 
December 31, 1868. Belongs to a 
Rajput (Hindu) family. The area 
of the State is about 36 square miles ; 
its population 2383, chiefly Hindus. 
The Talukdar maintains a military 
force of 4 cavalry and 35 infantry. 
Residence : Jalia Devani, Kathiawar, 
Bombay. 

JAM KHAN walad MUHAMMAD 
KHAN, Mir. The title is hereditary, 
the Mir being a representative of one 
of the Mirs who were Chiefs of Sind 
at the time of the annexation. Resi- 
dence : Hyderabad, Sind. 

JAMAL-UD-DIN, Fakir Sayyid, Khan 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1892. 
Residence : Lahore, Punjab. 

JAMASPJI, Bamanji, Dastur, CLE. 
See Bamanji. 

JAMBULINGAM MUDALIYAR, Karan- 
guli, Rao Bahadur. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on January 
1,1892. Residence: Cuddapah, Madras. 

JAMIAT RAI, Diwan, Rai Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on January 1, 1898, 
for services in the Bolan Pass. Resi- 
dence : Bolan Pass, Baluchistan. 

JAMIAT SINGH (of Ghoriwaha), Sar- 
dar. The title is hereditary, the Sar- 
dar being of a Jat family, descended 
from Sardar Sukha Singh, who in 
1759 established his power at Ghori- 
waha in the Hoshiarpur district. The 
family subsequently fell under the 
power of Maharaja Ranjit Singh of 
Lahore. Sukha Singh's grandson was 
the Sardar Partab Singh, father of 
the present Sardar. Residence : Ho- 
shiarpur, Punjab. 

JAMKHANDI, Ram Chandra Rao Gopal, 
Chief of. A ruling chief; b. 1834. 
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor 
November 18, 1840. The Chief of 
Jamkhandi also bears the name of 
Appa Saheb Patwardhan. Belongs to 
a Br&hman (Hindu) family. The area 
of his State is 492 square miles ; its 
population is 83,917, chiefly Hindus, 



but including 7628 Muhammadans. 
The Chief maintains a military force 
of 52 cavalry, 943 infantry, and 1 gun. 
Residence : Jamkhandi, Southern Mah- 
ratta Country, Bombay. 

JAMMU AND KASHMIR, Major- 
General His Highness Sir Partab 
Singh Indar Mahindar Bahadur Sipar- 
i-Saltanat, G.C.S.I., Maharaja of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1850. Succeeded to 
the gadi September 12, 1885. Is the 
son of the late Maharaja Ranbhir 
Singh, G.C.S.I. ; and grandson of the 
late Maharaja Ghulab Singh, the 
founder of the dynasty, who was 
constituted Feudatory Chief of the 
hill-territories east of the Indus and 
west of the Ravi (with certain specified 
exceptions) by the treaty of March 
1846, concluded after the close of the 
first Sikh war. Belongs to a Dogra 
or Jamwal Rajput family (Hindu) of 
ancient lineage, claiming descent from 
that of the former Rajas of Jammu. 
The Maharaja Ghulab Singh was the 
great-grandson of the Raja Dharab- 
deo ; and a grandson of the Mian 
Jorawar Singh, who was a brother 
of Raja Ranjit Deo. He began life 
as a cavalry soldier, and became a 
trusted officer under Maharaja Ranjit 
Singh of Lahore, who conferred on 
him the principality of Jammu. At 
the outbreak of the first Sikh war he 
had been elected Minister of the 
Khalsa, and was one of the most con- 
spicuous Sikh leaders ; and after the 
battle of Sobraon he negotiated a 
separate treaty with the British Power, 
by which he acquired the Feudal 
Chiefship of Jammu and Kashmir on 
payment of a sum of 75 lakhs of 
rupees. In the Mutiny of 1857 he 
rendered excellent service, and sent 
a contingent to Delhi. He died in 
August 1857, and was succeeded by 
his third and only surviving son, the 
late Maharaja Ranbhir Singh, G.C.S.I., 
who was a munificent patron of learn- 
ing, and did good service in connection 
with the British Mission to Yarkand. 
He had the distinguished honour of 
receiving His Royal Highness the 
Prince of Wales at Jammu in 1876; 
he also had his salute raised to 21 
guns, by the addition of 2 guns as a 
personal distinction. In January 1877, 
on the occasion of the Proclamation 
of Her Majesty as Empress of India, 
I 



114 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



he was gazetted a General in the 
Army and created a Councillor of the 
Empress. The Maharaja died on 
September 12, 1885, and was succeeded 
by his eldest son, the present Maha- 
raja, who was created a Knight Grand 
Commander of the Most Exalted 
Order of the Star of India on May 25, 
1892. The area of his State is 79,784 
square miles; and its population is 
about 1,500,000, including nearly a 
million Muhammadans, about half-a- 
million Hindus, and over 20,000 
Buddhists. In point of area, the 
State is more than double the com- 
bined area of Bavaria and Saxony, and 
equal to that of any three or four of 
the smaller European kingdoms put 
together. His Highness maintains a 
military force of about 8000 cavalry 
and infantry, and 288 guns; and is 
entitled to a salute of 21 guns within 
the limits of the State, and to one of 
19 guns in the rest of India. Resi- 
dence: Srinagar, Kashmir; and Jammu, 
Punjab. 

JAMNIA, Bhumia Hamir Singh, Bhumia 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1855. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi in 1863 as a minor. 
Belongs to a Bhilala family — the Bhi- 
lalas being reputed to spring from the 
intermarriage of Rajputs and Bhils. 
The founder of the family was Nadir 
Singh, a famous Bhumia of Jamnia. 
Residence: Kunjrod, Jamnia, Bhopa- 
war, Central India. 

JAMRAT HUSAIN KHAN, Maulavi, 
Khan Bahadur. Received the title 
on June 3, 1899. Residence: Police 
Department, Bengal. 

JAMSETJI. See Jejeebhoy; see also 
Jam shed ji. 

JAMSHEDJI DHANJIBHAI WADIA, 

Khan Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1877, 
on the occasion of the Proclamation 
of Her Most Gracious Majesty as 
Empress of India. Residence: Bom- 
bay. 

JAMSHEDJI FRAMJI PALKIWALA, 

Khan Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on May 24, 1883. 
Residence: Bombay. 

JAMSHEDJI H0RMASJI MASTER, 

Khan Saheb. Received the title on 
May 21, 1898. Residence: Karachi, 
Sind, Bombay. 



JAMSHEDJI RUSTAMJI, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on June 3, 1893. Residence : 
Mhow, Central India. 

JAMSHEDJI RUSTAMJI, Khan Saheb. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on August 18, 1881. Residence : 
Bombay. 

JAN KHAN, Malik, Khan Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on June 3, 
1893. Residence: Shahpur, Punjab. 

JAN MUHAMMAD NASIR-UD-DIN 
KHAN, Khan Saheb. Received the 
title on June 3, 1899. Residence: 
Medical Department, India. 

JAN MUHAMMAD WALI All MU- 
HAMMAD KHAN, Mir. The title is 
hereditary, the Mir being a represent- 
ative of one of the Mirs who were 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence: Sind. 

JANAK PRIYA, Rani. The title is 
hereditary, the Rani being the last 
surviving Rani of the late Raja Nara- 
yan Singh of Sambalpur. The Rajas 
of Sambalpur were Chauhan Rajputs 
of very ancient lineage. Balram Das 
Chauhan conquered Sambalpur about 
the year 1445 ; and left it to his elder 
son Raja Hirda Narayan, while his 
younger son became Raja of Sonpur 
(q.v.). The Chauhan device is the 
chakra — a circle with four tridents 
(trisul) as radii, pointing north, east, 
south, and west. The Rani uses this 
device on her seal, and for signature. 
Residence: Sambalpur, Central Pro- 



JANAKIBALLABH SEN (of Mahiganj), 

Raja. The title was conferred " for 
liberality and public spirit," on Janu- 
ary 1, 1891. Residence: Rangpur, 
Bengal. 

JANARDAN SINGH, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 
1896. Residence: Madras. 

JANG BAHADUR KHAN, CLE. (of 

Nanpara), Raja; b. 1845. The title 
is hereditary, and the Raja succeeded 
his father, the late Raja Munawar Ali 
Khan, in 1847. Belongs to a Pathan 
family, descended from Rasul Khan, 
Togh Pathan, a Risaldar in the service 
of the Emperor Shah Jahan, who in 
1632 sent him to Salonabad to coerce 
the Banjaras who had overrun the 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



115 



jagir of Salona Begam, the wife of 
Prince Dara. For his performance 
of this duty he received the grant of 
Nanpara. In 1763 his descendant 
Karam Khan of Nanpara obtained 
the title of Raja from the Nawab 
Shuja-ud-daula. The present Raja 
was created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire 
in 1886. He is an Honorary Magis- 
trate ; and has a son and heir named 
Muhammad Sadiq Khan, born 1870. 
Residence : Bahraich, Oudh. 
JANJIRA, Nawab Sir Sidi Ahmad Khan 
Sidi Ibrahim Khan, K.C.I.E., Nawab 
of. A ruling prince ; b. 1863. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi January 28, 1879. 
Belongs to an Abyssinian family of 
Sunni Muhammadans, claiming descent 
from Sidi Sarul Khan. The family 
were Abyssinian admirals of the fleet 
of the Muhammadan kings of Bij&pur, 
who in 1670 transferred their allegiance 
to the Emperor of Delhi, Aurangzeb. 
The Mahrattas often tried to conquer 
the island of Janjira ; but were always 
successfully resisted. The Nawab is 
also Chief of Jafarabad, a small 
State in Kathiawar. He was created 
a Knight Commander of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire 
on January 1, 1895. The area of the 
State is 324 square miles ; its popula- 
tion is 76,361, chiefly Hindus, but 
including 13,912 Muhammadans. The 
Nawab maintains a military force of 
310 infantry and 179 guns; and is 
entitled to a salute of 9 guns. Resi- 
dence: Janjira, Kolaba, Bombay. 

JANJIT, alias NANBI RAJA (of Darri), 
Sawai. The title is hereditary. Resi- 
dence : Sagar, Central Provinces. 

JANKI KTJNWAR (of Paraspur), Rani: 
!>. 1839. The title is hereditary ; the 
Rani succeeded her late husband, 
Raja Randhir Singh, on June 16, 1878. 
The head of the family is the chief 
of the six Thakurs of Chhedwara, 
famous for their turbulence in the 
times before the annexation of Oudh. 
They claim descent from the Kalhans 
Rajas of Khurasa, through Maharaj 
Singh, second son of Achal Narayan 
Singh. A descendant, named Newal 
Singh, obtained the title of Raja while 
on a visit to the Court at Delhi ; and 
it was recognized as hereditary in 
favour of the late Raja, Randhir 
Singh. The Rani's son and heir is 



Bikramajit Singh. Residence: Paras- 
pur, Gonda, Oudh. 

JANKI NATH, Pandit, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence : Rajputana-Malwa Railway. 

JANKI PARSHAD (of Pamakheri), 
Thdkur. The title is hereditary. Resi- 
dence : Sagar, Central Provinces. 

JANKI PARSHAD, Pandit, Rai Baha- 
dur. Is an Extra Assistant Com- 
missioner in the Punjab. Received 
the title on January 2, 1899. Resi- 
dence: Punjab. 

JANKI PERSHAD, Kamdar (of Datia), 
Rao Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on January 1, 1898. Residence : Datia, 
Central India. 

JANNAT HUSAIN KHAN, Maulavi, 

Khan Bahadur. Received the title on 
June 3, 1899. Residence : Bengal. 

JAORA, Major His Highness Ihtisham- 
Ud-Daula Nawab Muhammad Ismail 
Khan Bahadur Firoz Jang, Nawab of. 
A ruling chief; b. 1855. Succeeded 
to the gadi April 30, 1865, as a minor. 
Belongs to a Pathan (Muhammadan) 
family, descended from Nawab Gha- 
fur Khan, an Afghan of the Swati 
tribe, brother-in-law of the famous 
Amir Khan of Tonk, whom he repre- 
sented at Holkar's Court. After the 
battle of Mehidpur, Nawab Ghafur 
Khan, being in possession of this terri- 
tory as a grant from Holkar, was con- 
firmed by the British Government. 
The present Nawab has been appointed 
an Honorary Major in the British 
Army. The State, which is feudatory 
to Indore, has an area of 581 square 
miles ; and a population of 119,945, 
chiefly Hindus, but including 13,318 
Muhammadans and over 2000 Jains. 
His Highness maintains a military 
force of 63 cavalry, 177 infantry, and. 
15 guns, and is entitled to a salute of 
13 guns. Jaora,the capital of the State, 
is a station on the Rajputana-Malwa 
railway. The Nawab has a son and 
heir named Muhammad Sher Ali Khan. 
Residence: Jaora, Malwa, Central 
India. 

JASDAN, Khachar Ala Chela, C.S.T., 
Chief of. A ruling chief; b. 1833. 
Succeeded to the gadi in 1852. Be- 
longs to a Kathi (Hindu) family. The 
State, which is tributary to Baroda 
and Junagarh, contains an area of 



116 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



283 square miles, and a population of 
29,037, chiefly Hindus. The Chief, 
who was created a C.S.I, on June 22, 
1897, maintains a military force of 60 
cavalry, 354 infantry, and 5 guns. 
Residence : Jasdan, Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay. 

JASHPUR, Raja Pratap Narayan Singh 
Deo Bahadur, CLE., Rdjd of A 
ruling chief; b. 1822. Succeeded to 
the gadi October 24, 1845. Belongs 
to a Kshatriya (Rajput) family, form- 
erly feudatories of the Mahrattas of 
Ndgpur, that came under British con- 
trol in 1818. Rendered good service 
in the military operations in 1857 
against the mutineers and rebels in 
Udaipur and Palamau. Was created 
a Companion of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire, May 
21, 1890. The area of the State is 
1947 square miles; its population is 
90,240, chiefly Hindus. The Raja has 
a military force of 2 guns. Residence : 
Jashpur, Chota Nagpur, Bengal. 

JASMER SINGH, Sardar; b. 1848. The 
title is hereditary. Belongs to a Jat 
family, descended from Sardar Gur- 
bakhsh Singh, who acquired the terri- 
tory of Thol Thangor, in the Ambala 
district of the Punjab, by conquest 
in 1759 a.d. During the Sikh rebellion 
of 1848-49, and again in the Mutiny 
of 1857, this family rendered good 
service to Government, and were 
rewarded for the latter service. On 
the death of Sardar Jawahir Singh he 
was succeeded by his two sons, the 
present Sardars— Kishan Singh and 
Jasmer Singh of Thol Thangor. The 
Sardar Jasmer Singh has two sons— 
Ram Narayan Singh (born 1863) and 
Sheo Narayan Singh. Residence : Thol 
Thangor, Ambala, Punjab. 

JAS0, Diwan Jagatraj, Jagirdar, Diwdn 
of A ruling chief; b. 1860. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi July 7, 1889. Be- 
longs to the great Bundela Rajput 
family, descended from the founder 
of the Orchha State that has given 
ruling families to Panna, Datia, 
Ajaigarh, Charkhdri, and most of the 
other States of Bundelkhand . Bharti- 
chand, the founder of the Jaso State, 
was the fourth son of the Maharaja 
Chhatrasal; and his great-grandson, 
Diwan Murat Singh, received a sanad 
from the British Government in 1816. 
The Diwan Bhopal Singh received the 



additional title of Bahadur as a per- 
sonal distinction, at the Imperial 
Assemblage of Delhi on the occasion 
of the Proclamation of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty as Empress of India. 
The area of the State is 75 square 
miles; its population over 80,000, 
chiefly Hindus. The Diwdn maintains 
a military force of 2 horsemen, 60 
infantry, and 4 guns. Residence : Jaso, 
Bundelkhand, Central India. 

JASWANT RAI, Rai BaJuidur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of Her Majesty's reign, in 
consideration of eminent services in 
the Army Medical Department. Resi- 
dence : Shahpur, Punjab. 

JASWANT SINGH (of Nurpur), Rdjd; 
i. 1836. The title is hereditary. Nurpur 
is a hill principality to the west of 
Guler. The Raja belongs to a Rajput 
family, descended from Jit Pal, who 
came from Delhi about 700 years ago, 
and established himself at Pathankot. 
Subsequently the family removed to 
the hills ; and Nurpur became their 
capital in the time of Raja Basu, about 
the year 1640 a.d. At the time of the 
conquests of the Maharaja Ranjit 
Singh of Lahore, Raja Bir, father of 
the present Raja, was Raja of Nurpur. 
He endeavoured to resist Ranjit Singh ; 
but being compelled to take refuge in 
Chamba, was given up by the Raja of 
Chamba, and imprisoned in the for- 
tress of Gobindgarh. Subsequently he 
was ransomed by his brother-in-law, 
Sardar Charat Singh, for Rs. 85,000 ; 
and in 1846 raised the standard of 
revolt, besieged Nurpur, and died be- 
fore its walls. He was succeeded by 
the present Rdjd, who has received a 
large grant from the British Govern- 
ment. Residence: Nurpur, Kdngra, 
Punjab. 

JATH, Amritrao Rao Saheb Daphle, 
Jagirdar of. A ruling chief ; b. 1835. 
Succeeded to the gadi July 28, 1841, 
as a minor. Belongs to a Mahratta 
(Hindu) family. The late Jagirdar, 
Rdmrao, died in 1841 without issue; 
whereon his widow, Bhagirthibai, 
adopted Amritrao, the present Jdgirdar. 
The Daphle is also Chief of Kardsgi ; 
and the jdgir of Daphldpur (or Dafld- 
pur) is also really a part of this State, 
and will revert to it on the demise of 
the three widows of the late Chief. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



117 



The founder of the Jath State was the 
hereditary pat el, or headman, of 
Daflapur village. The area of the 
State is 884 square miles ; its popula- 
tion is 49,491, chiefly Hindus, hut 
including 2842 Muhammadans. Resi- 
dence : Jath, Bijapur, Bomhay. 

JAWAHIR LAL, Lala, Rai Saheb. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
May 20, 1890. Residence : India. 

JAWAHIR LAL, Pandit, Rai Bahadur ; 
b. 1856. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Is a Deputy-Col- 
lector. Residence: Jalaun, North- 
Western Provinces. 

JAWAHIR SINGH (of Garhwal), Rai 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 26, 1894. Residence: Azamgarh, 
North-Western Provinces. 

JAWAHIR SINGH (of Jhamari), Rao; 
b. 1845. The title is hereditary, hav- 
ing been originally granted by the 
Raja Mori Pahlodh of Chanderi, and 
subsequently confirmed under British 
rule. Residence: Jhamari, Sagar, 
Central Provinces. 

JAWASIA, Rawat Lai Singh, Rdwat of. 
A ruling chief ; b. 1858. Succeeded to 
the gadi in 1882. Belongs to a Rajput 
(Hindu) family. The population of 
the State is about 607, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence: Jawasia, Western Malwa, 
Central India. 

JAWHAR, Patangshah Vikramshah 
Mukni, Raja of. A ruling chief ; b. 
1855. Succeeded to the gadi June 29, 
1866, as a minor. Belongs to a Koli 
(Hindu) family, descended from Jaya 
Mukni, a freebooter who possessed 
himself of this territory about 1335, 
His son, Nim Shah, obtained the title 
of Raja from the Emperor of Delhi in 
the year 1341. The late Raja Yi- 
kramshah died in 1865 ; and his widow, 
the Rani Lakshmibai Saheb, adopted 
the present Raja, who was then called 
Malhar Rao, son of Madhavrao Dewrao 
Mukni, a descendant of Raja Krishna 
Shah, ninth Raja of Jawhar. The 
State has an area of 534 square miles, 
and a population of 48,556, chiefly 
Hindus. The Raja maintains a mili- 
tary force of 8 cavalry and 25 infantry. 
The family cognizance is an arrow, 
barbed, point downward. Residence: 
Jawhdr, Th&na, Bombay. 



JEHANGIR PESTANJI VAKIL, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 25, 1895. Residence : Ahmadabad, 
Bombay. 

JEHANGIR, Pestanji, CLE. See 
Pestanji. 

JEJEEBHOY, Sir Jamsetjee, Baronet, 
C.S.I. ; b. March 3, 1851. Succeeded 
his father, the late Sir Jamsetjee 
Jejeebhoy, second Baronet, in 1877, 
when (in accordance with the special 
Act of the Indian Legislature of 1860) 
he assumed the name of Jamsetjee 
Jejeebhoy in lieu of Manekjee Curset- 
jee. Is the third Baronet ; and has 
been created a Companion of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India. 
Is a merchant of the city of Bombay, 
a Magistrate and Member of the Legis- 
lative Council of Bombay. Belongs 
to a family that has long been regarded 
as the leaders of the Parsi community 
of Western India. The first Baronet, 
Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, K.C.B., of 
Bombay, was so created in 1857, in 
recognition of his unbounded munifi- 
cence, and public spirit, and of his 
undoubted loyalty. His very great 
wealth was used in promoting the 
good of others ; and the second Baronet, 
who died in 1877, also earned a similar 
reputation for benevolence and liber- 
ality. In 1860, the special Act of the 
Indian Legislature, referred to above, 
was passed with the sanction of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty, enacting that 
all future holders of the title, on suc- 
ceeding to it, shall relinquish their 
own names and assume those of the 
first Baronet. The present Baronet, 
in 1869, married Jerbai, daughter of 
Shapurji Dhanjibhai, Esq. ; and has a 
son and heir, Cursetjee,born November 
11, 1878. Sir Jamsetjee's brothers 
are: (1) Cowasjee Cursetjee, born 
November 25, 1852, married, in 1869, 
Gulbai Rustamji Wadia ; and (2) Jam- 
setjee Cursetjee, born 1860, married, 
1882, Awabai Shapurji Dhanjibhai. 
The family arms are azure, a sun 
rising above a representation of the 
Ghats (mountains near Bombay) in 
base, and in chief two bees volant, all 
proper. The crest is a mount vert, 
thereon a peacock amidst wheat, and 
in the beak an ear of wheat, all proper. 
Residence : Mazagon Castle, Bombay. 

JETPUR, Azam Vala Lakshman Meran, 
Tdlukdur of. A ruling chief; b. 



118 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



1849, Succeeded to the gadi September 
17, 1883. Jointly rules Jetpur with 
vseveral other Talukdars. The State is 
tributary to Baroda and Junagarh. 
Residence: Jetpur, Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay. 

JETPUR, Azam Vala Surag Ganga, 

Tdlnkddrof. A ruling chief ; b. 1799. 
Succeeded to the gadi September 1, 
1847. Joint-Talukdar of Jetpur With 
several others. Residence: Jetpur, 
Kathiawar, Bombay. 

JETPUR, Azam Vala Naja KalaDeodan, 

Tdlukddr of. A ruling chief ; b. 1865. 
Succeeded to the gadi June 14, 1890. 
Is joint-Talukdar of Jetpur with 
several others. Residence: Jetpur, 
Kathiawar, Bombay. 

JHA. See Dukha Mochin Jha. 

JHABUA, His Highness Raja Gopal 
Singh, Rdjd of. ,A ruling chief; b. 
February 22, 1841 ; succeeded to the 
gadi as a minor in October 1841. Be- 
longs to the great Rathor Rajput 
family of the Maharajas of Jodhpur, 
Idar, etc. The title of Raja was be- 
stowed on Kishan Das, a remote an- 
cestor of the present Raja, by Ala-ud- 
din, the Emperor of Delhi, as a reward 
for a successful campaign in Bengal, 
and for punishing the Bhil Chiefs of 
Jhabua, who had murdered an Imperial 
Viceroy of Gujarat. The State, which 
was at one time tributary to Indore, 
has an area of 1336 square miles ; and 
a population of 92,938, chiefly Hindus, 
but including nearly 50,000 belonging 
to the aboriginal Bhil and other tribes. 
The State flag is red. The Raja 
maintains a military force of 64 cavalry, 
253 infantry, and 4 guns ; and is en- 
titled to a salute of 11 guns. Resi- 
dence: Jhabua, Bhopawar, Central 
India. 

JHALARIA, Thdkur of. See Jhalera. 

JHALAWAR, His Highness Maharaj 
Rana 2alim Singh, Bahadur, Mahdrdj 
Rand of. A ruling chief ; b. 1864. 
Succeeded to the gadi June 24, 1876, 
as a minor. Is a Chief of the Jhala 
Rajputs, whose ancestors came from 
Jhala war in Kathiawar. In 1709 a.d. 
Bhao Singh, a younger son of the 
Chief of Halwad in Kathiawar, took 
some retainers with him and went to 
Delhi. His son Madhu Singh rose to 
high favour and rank in the service of 
tbe Mah£ra;ja of Kotah ; his sister was 



married to the heir, and his descend- 
ants thus acquired the title of Mama 
("maternal uncle") in Kotah. Ulti- 
mately, in 1838, a portion of the State 
of Kotah was cut off, with the consent 
of the Maharaja and of the British 
Government, and erected into the 
State of Jhala war, under one of Madhu 
Singh's descendants, Madan Singh, son 
of Zalim Singh, who had long been the 
successful administrator of Kotah. 
Madan Singh received the title of 
Maharaj Rana. His son, Prithi Singh, 
did good service during the Mutiny ; 
and was succeeded in 1876 by his 
adopted son, the present Maharaj 
Rana, as a minor. His Highness was 
educated at Mayo College, Ajmir ; 
and was invested with full powers of 
government on attaining his majority 
in 1884. The State has an area of 
2694 square miles, and a population 
of 340,488, chiefly Hindus, but includ- 
ing 20,863 Muhammadans. His High- 
ness maintains a military force of 403 
cavalry, 3873 infantry, and 94 guns, 
and is entitled to a salute of 15 guns. 
Residence : Jhalra Patan, Rajputana. 

JHALERA, Thakur Hatte Singh, Thd- 
kur of. A ruling chief ; b. 1858. 
Succeeded to the gadi May 22, 1884. 
This is a Girdsia State, connected with 
Gwalior. Residence : Jhalera, Bhopal, 
Central India. 

JHAMARI, Rao of. See Jawahir. 

JHAMAR0, Rao of. See Kaliyan Singh. 

JHANDA SINGH, Subadar-Major, Rai 
Bahddur. The title was conferred on 
June 3, 1893. Residence: Meiktila, 
Burma. 

JHARAULI, Sarddr Bahddur of. See 
Jwala Singh. * 

JHARI GHARKHADI, Naik Sukrona 
loalad Chambarya Reshma, Chief of. 
A ruling chief; b. 1850. Belongs to 
a Bhil (aboriginal) family. The State 
(which is one of the Dang States of 
Khandesh) has an area of 8 square 
miles, and a population of 167, chiefly 
Bhils. Residence: Jhari Gharkhadi, 
Khandesh, Bombay. 

JIGNI, Rao Lakshman Singh Bahadur, 

Rao of. A ruling chief; b. 1860. 
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor 
September 16, 1871. Belongs to the 
great Bundela Rajput family, des- 
cended from the founder of the Orchha. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



119 



State, which has given ruling families 
to Panna, Datia, Ajaigarh, Char- 
khari, Jaso, and most of the States of 
Bundelkhand. The founder of Jigni 
was the Rao Padam Singh, one of the 
sons of the great Maharaja Chhatarsal. 
His great-grandson was the Rao Prithi 
Singh, who received a sanad from the 
British Government in 1810. His 
grandson hy adoption (being adopted 
from the kindred ruling family of 
Panna) is the present Rao, who re- 
ceived the additional title of Bahadur 
at the Imperial Assemblage of Delhi, 
on the occasion of the Proclamation of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty as Empress 
of India. The area of the State is 22 
square miles; its population is 3427, 
chiefly Hindus. The Rao Bahadur 
maintains a military force of 47 in- 
fantry and 3 guns. Residence : Jigni, 
Bundelkhand, Central India. 

JIND, His Highness Farzand-i-Dilband 
Rasikh-ul-itikad Daulat-i-Inglishia 
Raja-i-Rajagan Raja Ranbhir Singh 
Bahadur, Rdjd Bahadur of. A ruling 
chief ; b. 1878. Succeeded to the gadi 
as a minor March 7, 1887. Belongs to 
the famous Phulkian family of Sidhu 
Jats, descended from Phul, the com- 
mon ancestor of the ruling families of 
Patiala, Jind, Nabha, and other Pun- 
jab States. Phul was twenty-ninth in 
descent from the Rawal Jaisal Singh, 
the head of the Jadu Bhati Rajputs, 
who founded Jaisalmar in 1156 a.d. 
A great-grandson of Phul, named 
Gajpat Singh, obtained the title of 
Raja of Jind from Shah Alam, 
Emperor of Delhi in 1772. His son, 
Raja Bhag Singh, aided Lord Lake in 
his pursuit of Holkar in 1805, and was 
accordingly confirmed by the British 
Government in his possessions. In 
1857 Raja Sarup Singh of Jind was 
the first to march against the mutineers 
of Delhi ; and he and his troops took 
a prominent part in the siege and 
capture of the city, for which services 
he received large extensions of his 
territory. He died in 1864, and was 
succeeded by his son, the Raj 4 Ragbir 
Singh, who was created a Knight 
Grand Commander of the Most Ex- 
alted Order of the Star of India ; and 
at the Imperial Assemblage at Delhi, 
January 1, 1877, on the occasion of 
the Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India, he was 



appointed a Councillor of the Empress. 
The present Raja succeeded in 1887. 
The area of his State is 1259 square 
miles ; and its population is 249,862, 
chiefly Hindus, but including 34,247 
Muhammadans and 4335 Sikhs. His 
Highness maintains a military force of 
379 cavalry, 1571 infantry, and 12 
guns, and is entitled to a salute of 
11 guns. Residence : Jind, Punjab. 

JIND WADO walad AMIR ALI KHAN, 

Mir. The title is hereditary, the Mir 
being a representative of one of the 
Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the time of 
the annexation. Residence: Shikarpur, 
Sind. 

JIT SINGH (of Maheru), Sarddr. The 
title is hereditary. Belongs to a Jat 
family, descended from Sardar Ramdas 
Singh and Sardar Gurdas Singh, two 
brothers, who took possession of 
Maheru at the time of the decline of 
the Mughal power. In 1799 a.d., 
when the Maharaja Ranjit Singh be- 
came all-powerful in the Punjab, 
Sardar Charat Singh of Maheru made 
his submission to him, and retained 
his possessions. His son, Sardar 
Jawahir Singh, succeeded, and was 
confirmed in eleven villages. But on 
his death, and the succession of Sardar 
Jaimal Singh, these were resumed 
with the exception of Maheru. The 
Sarddr Jaimal Singh did good service 
in the time of the Mutiny in 1857, and 
on his death was succeeded by the 
present Sardar. Residence: Maheru, 
Jalandhar, Punjab. 

JITMAN GURANG, Subadar-Major, 
Rai Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on May 25, 1895. Residence : Shillong, 
Assam. 

JIVANJI JAMSHEDJI MODI, Shams- 
ul-Ulama. The title was conferred 
for eminence in oriental learning on 
June 3, 1893. Residence : Bombay. 

JIWAN SINGH, C.S.I. (of Shahzadpur), 
Sarddr; b. 1860. The title is heredi- 
tary. Belongs to a Jat (Sindhu) 
family, descended from Sarddr Dip 
Singh, who was the Mahant of the 
" Damdama Saheb," or resting-place, 
which was the retreat of the Guru 
Govind Singh, the tenth and last Sikh 
Guru, after his defeat by the Imperial 
army of Delhi. A large number of 
Sikhs assembled around Dip Singh, 
who was ultimately slain in a battle 



120 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



with the Governor of Lahore. Dip ] 
Singh was succeeded by Sudha Singh, i 
who fell in a battle with the Governor 
of Jalandhar, and has always been 
known among the Sikhs as " Shahid," 
or the Martyr, which became a family 
name. His successor was Sardar Ka- 
ram Singh, who took possession of 
some territory in the Singhpura dis- 
trict, which, with the other Cis-Sutlej 
territories, came under British control 
in 1808-9. Sardar Sheo Kirpal Singh, 
Shahid, did good service in the time of 
the Mutiny of 1857, and was rewarded 
by Government; and his son is the 
present Sardar, who was created a 
Companion of the Most Exalted Order 
of the Star of India on January 1, 
1891. Residence: Shahzadpur, Am- 
bala, Punjab. 

JTWAN SINGH (of Atari), Sardar; b. 
1835. The title is hereditary. Be- 
longs to a Sidhu Jat (Rajput) family, 
descended from Kanh Chand. His 
great-grandson was the famous Sardar 
Sham Singh, whose daughter was be- 
trothed to the Prince Nau Nihal Singh, 
grandson of the Maharaja Ranjit 
Singh. When the Sikh army invaded 
the Cis-Sutlej territory, Sardar Sham 
Singh disapproved of the war, but be- 
ing reproached with his inaction he 
joined the camp, and fell in battle in 
1846. His sons were Sardar Thakur 
Singh and Sardar Kanh Singh, and 
after the annexation much of the 
family estate was confirmed to the 
latter. He died without issue in 
1872, and his estates were allowed to 
devolve on Sardar Ajit Singh, son of 
Sardar Thakur Singh, and a younger 
brother of the Sirdar Jiwan Singh. 
The latter is the eldest son of the late 
Sardar Thakur Singh. He has two 
sons, named Partab Singh and Changa 
Singh. Residence: Atari, Amritsar, 
Punjab. 

JIWAN SINGH, Thakur (of Jakhnoda), 
Rao Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on May 20, 1890. 
Residence : Alirajpur, Central India. 

JOB AT, Bana Indarjit Singh, Rand of. 
A ruling chief ; b. 1889. Succeeded to 
the gadi on August 14, 1894, as a 
minor. Belongs to the Rahtor tribe 
of Rajputs (Hindu) ; occupies a fort 
picturesquely situated on the summit 
of a steep rocky hill, shut in on three 



sides by forest-clad mountains, and 
overlooking the town of Jobat. The 
area of the State is 132 square miles ; 
its population 9387, chiefly Hindus, 
but including 3916 belonging to Bhil 
and other aboriginal tribes. The Rana 
maintains a military force of 5 cavalry 
and 44 infantry. Residence: Jobat, 
Bhopawar, Central India. 

JODHA SINHA (of Kakhauta), Rao; b. 
1838. The title is hereditary. The 
Rao belougs to an old Sengar family, 
who settled in Pargand Auraiya in 
Etawah. He has a son and heir, 
named Lala Guman Singh, born Febru- 
ary 27, 1870. Residence: Kakhauta, 
Etawah, North- Western Provinces. 

J0DHPUR, His Highness Raj Rajesh- 
war Maharaj-Adniraj Sard&r Singh 
Bahadur, G.CjS.I., MaMrdjd of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1880. Succeeded to 
the gadi October 24, 1895. Is the 
Chief of the great Rahtor tribe or 
clan of the Rajputs, claiming direct 
descent from the legendary hero Rama, 
and, like the Sesodias of Udaipur and 
the Kachhwahas of Jaipur, represent- 
ing the royal line of the Surya Vansa 
or Solar race. The proper name of 
the State, the capital of which is Jodh- 
pur (from the name of its founder), 
is Marwar — anciently Marusthdn, 
"the land of death," a term applied 
formerly not only to the country of 
Marwar, but to the whole of the great 
Indian Desert from the Sutlej to the 
Indian Ocean. Tod, in his learned 
Aninah of Rdjdsthdn, says of the 
family of the Jodhpur Maharaja — 
" It requires neither Bhat nor Bard 
to illustrate its nobility ; a series of 
splendid deeds which time cannot ob- 
literate has emblazoned the Rahtor 
name on the historical tablet. Where 
all these races have gained a place in 
the Temple of Fame it is almost in- 
vidious to select, but truth compels 
me to place the Rahtor with the 
Chauhan on the very pinnacle." In 
Tod's work the Annals of J f dried r 
occupy a place only second to those 
of Me war (or Udaipur), and present a 
most interesting view of feudalism in 
India. Even to the present day the 
feudal Thakurs of Rajputana — feuda- 
tories of their Highnesses the Maha- 
rana of Udaipur, the Maharajas of 
Jodhpur and Jaipur, and the other 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



121 



Princes of this territory — are nobles 
of high account and great local power. 
Up to 1194 a.d. the Rahtor family 
were rulers of the vast Empire of 
Kanauj. The famous Jai Chand was 
the last King of Kanauj, and his 
grandson, Sivaji, migrated westward 
to Marwar. Scions of the family be- 
came rulers of Bikanir and Kishangarh 
in Raj pu tana, of Idar and Ahmadnagar 
in Gujarat, and elsewhere. Mandor, 
the ancient capital of Marwar, was 
conquered by Rao Chanda, who was 
tenth in descent from Sivaji, about 
the year 1382 a.d. His grandson 
Jodh, the eldest of twenty-four sons 
of Kinmal, moved the capital from 
Mandor to Jodhpur 1459 a.d. After 
resisting the Emperor Babar, and the 
Afghan Sher Shah, Jodh ultimately 
had to submit to the Great Mughal, 
Akbar, and sent his son Udai Singh to 
take service at Delhi ; and ultimately 
Udai Singh's sister, the famous Jodh 
Bai, became the consort of the Mughal 
monarch. When Udai Singh's son, 
Raja Sur Singh, succeeded to the gadi 
of Jodhpur, he rose to high favour 
with his Imperial uncle, and was the 
general of Akbar's troops who added 
Gujarat and the Deccan to the Mughal 
Empire. His son, Raja Jaswant Singh, 
was the general whom the Emperor 
Shah Jahan sent against his rebellious 
son Aurangzeb, and was defeated by 
the latter. The successor of Jaswant 
Singh was a posthumous son, the 
famous Ajit Singh. In his time 
Aurangzeb in person attacked Rajpu- 
tana, sacked Jodhpur, and ordered the 
conversion of the Rajputs to Muham- 
madanism. But Ajit Singh formed a 
league with Udaipur and Jaipur, and 
the combined forces of the three great 
Rajput States held in check the armies 
of Aurangzeb. One stipulation of this 
league is famous, and was disastrous 
to Jodhpur and Jaipur by reason of 
the domestic feuds it caused. It was 
to the effect that the Jodhpur and 
Jaipur families, who had lost the 
privilege of marrying Princesses of 
Udaipur because they had given their 
own daughters to the Mughal Em- 
perors, should recover this privilege, 
on condition that the issue of any 
marriage with an Udaipur Princess 
should succeed to the Raj before all 
other children. Ajit Singh was mur- 
dered by his son Bakht Singh, and 



heavy troubles thereafter befell the 
Rahtor family. There was a long war 
between the Rajas of Jaipur and 
Jodhpur, who were rival suitors for 
the hand of a Princess of Udaipur. 
Amir Khan, the great Pindari leafier 
(afterwards Nawab of Tonk), took 
sides, first with Jaipur, then with 
Jodhpur, and plundered and utterly 
exhausted both States in turn. At 
last the British Government inter- 
vened, and by a treaty in 1818 Jodhpur 
became a feudatory of the Paramount 
Power. Raja Man Singh died in 1843, 
leaving no son, and the nobles and 
Court officials, with the consent of the 
British Government, elected Takht 
Singh, Raja of Ahmadnagar, a des- 
cendant of A jit Singh, to the vacant ^as/t . 
The Raja Takht Singh did good service 
during the Mutiny of 1857. He died 
in 1873, and was succeeded by the 
late Maharaja Sir Jaswant Singh, who 
was subsequently created a Grand 
Commander of the Most Exalted Order 
of the Star of India. The same ex- 
alted dignity, that of G.C.S.I., was 
conferred on the present Maharaja on 
June 22, 1897. The area of his State 
is 37,000 square miles ; its population 
is 1,750,403, chiefly Hindus, but in- 
cluding about 155,000 Muhammadans 
and about 172,000 Jains. In point of 
extent the Jodhpur State is larger 
than any of the smaller European 
States, and is somewhat larger than 
Bavaria and Saxony combined; in 
population it surpasses the Grand 
Duchy of Baden. The Maharaja 
maintains a military force of 3162 
cavalry, 3653 infantry, and 121 guns, 
and is entitled to a salute of 21 guns 
('including 4 guns personal). The 
family cognizance is the falcon, the 
sacred garur of the Solar Rajputs. The 
arms of His Highness were displayed 
on the banner presented to his prede- 
cessor by the Empress of India at the 
Imperial Assemblage of Delhi in 
January 1877, on the occasion of the 
Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress. Rexidemce : Jodh- 
pur, Rajputana. 

J0GESH CHANDRA CHATTARJI (of 
Annliya, Ranaghat,), Rai Bahddmr, 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on February 16, 1887, on the 
occasion of the Jubilee of Her Majesty's 
reign. Residence: Assam, 



122 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



JOGESHWAR CHANDRA CHANDRA, 

Rai Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on June 22, 1897. Residence: Cut- 
tack, Bengal. 

JOGINDRA CHANDRA MITTRA, Rai 

Bahddur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1895. 
Residence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

JOGINDRA KISHOR RAI CHANDHRI, 

Rai Bahddur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on May 25, 1895. 
Residence: Maimansingh, Bengal. 

JOGINDRA NATH MITTRA, Rai Ba- 
hddur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on June 3, 1893. Residence : 
Bengal. 

JOGINDRA NATH RAI (of Nator), 
Kumar. The title is personal. The 
Kumar is the son of the late Raja 
Anandanath Rai Bahddur, C.S.I. 
Residence: Rajshahi, Bengal. 

JORA MAL, Rai Saheh. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1892. Resi- 
dence : Delhi, Punjab. 

JOTINDRA KRISHNA DEB, Kumar. 
The Kumar holds this title as a per- 
sonal distinction, as the eldest sur- 
viving son of a Raja. Residence : 
Calcutta, Bengal. 

JOTINDRA MOHAN TAGOR, Sir, 

K.C.S.I. Mahdrdjd Bahddur. See 
Tagore. 

JOWAHIR MAL, Diwan, Diwan Bahd- 
dur. See Diwan. 

JOY GOBIND LAW, CLE. Created a 
CLE. on January 1, 1899. Residence: 
Calcutta. 

JUBBAL, Rana Padam Chand, Rand of. 
A ruling chief; b. 1861. Succeeded to 
the gadi as a minor March 17, 1877. 
Belongs to a Rahtor Rajput family 
{see Jodhpur), claiming descent from 
the ruling family of Sirmur, which 
preceded the present dynasty. Origin- 
ally tributary to Sirmur, this State 
(which is one of the Simla Hill States) 
was freed by the British after the 
conclusion of the Gurkha war, and the 
Rana, Puran Singh, received a sanad 
from Lord Lake in 1815. After great 
vicissitudes of fortune, Puran Singh 
(who had given up his State to the 
British Government) died in 1849, and 
it was then resolved to restore the 
State to his son, Rana Karm Chand. 
The Jatter died in 1877, and was suc- 



Rc- 



ceeded by his son, the present Rana. 
The area of the State is 257 square 
miles ; its population is 19,196, chiefly 
Hindus. The Rana maintains a military 
force of 50 infantry. Residence : Jubbal, 
Simla Hills, Punjab. 

JUGAL KISHOR, Rai Bahddur. 
ceived the title on January 1, 
Residence : Gwalior, Central India. 

JUGAL KISHOR, Rai Saheb. Received 
the title on January 1, 1898. Is dis- 
trict engineer of Hardoi. Residence: 
Hardoi, Oudh. 

JUGAL KISHOR, Lala> Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on May 21, 1898. 
Residence: Delhi, Punjab. 

JUJHAR SINGH JU DEO, Rao Bahddur 
Diwan, CLE. Created a Companion 
of the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empire on January 1, 1895. 
Residence : Charkhari, Central India. 

JUMKHA, Becharbha Baryal, Chief of. 
A niling chief; b. 1836. Belongs to 
an aboriginal tribe. Residence: Jum- 
kha, Rewa|Kantha, Bombay. 

JUMM00 AND CASHMERE, His High- 
ness the Maharaja Bahddur of. See 
Jammu and Kashmir. 

JUNAGARH, His Highness Sir Rasul 
Khanji Muhabat Khanji, K.CS.L, 
Nawab of, A ruling chief. Belongs 
to a Babi Pathan (Muhammadan) 
family. Is tenth in succession from 
Sher Khan Babi, the founder of the 
State, who about the year 1735 ex- 
pelled the Mughal Governor and estab- 
lished his own power. The Nawab 
Sir Muhabat Khanji, was created 
Knight Commander of the Most Ex- 
alted Order of the Star of India in 
1871. He died in 1882, and was suc- 
ceeded by his son, the late Nawab Sir 
Bahddur Khanji, who was invested 
with the insignia of a Knight Grand 
Commander of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire on 
November 20, 1890. His Highness 
the present Nawab was created a 
K.C.S.I. on January 1, 1899. The 
area of the State is 3279 square miles, 
and its population is 387,499, chiefly 
Hindus, but including 76,401 Muham- 
madans. His Highness maintains a 
military force of 251 cavalry, 1972 
infantry, and 66 guns, and is entitled 
to a salute of 11 guns. Residence: 
Junagarh, Kdthi&w&r ? Bombay 



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123 



JWALA PERSHAD, Rai Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 7, 1876. Residence: Ujjain, 
Central India. 

JWALA PERSHAD, Rai Bahadur; b. 
July 13, 1848. Received the title on 
January 1, 1898. Residence: Faru- 
khabad, North-Western Provinces. 

JWALA SINGH (of Jharauli), Sarddr 
Bahadur; b. 1846. The title of Sar- 
dar is hereditary, and the higher title 
of Sardar Bahadur was conferred as a 
personal distinction on May 25, 1892. 
Belongs to a Sindhu Jat (Rajput) 
family, descended from Dip Singh, the 
Mahant of the " Damdama Saheb," or 
resting-place of the Guru Govind Singh 
(see Jiwan Singh, Shahid, Sardar). 
His successor, Sudha Singh, falling in 
battle with the Governor of Jalandhar, 
the family have since been known by 
the name of Shahid ("Martyr"). 
Sarddr Jwala Singh Bahadur, son of 
Sardar Jit Singh of Jharauli, is the 
present head of the Jharauli Shahids. 
He has two sons, Devindar Singh and 
Mohindar Singh. Residence : Jharauli, 
Ambala, Punjab. 

JWALA SINGH (of Wazirabad), Sar- 
ddr ; b. 1822. The title is hereditary. 
The Sardar is the youngest son of the 
Sardar Ganda Singh, who was in at- 
tendance on the Maharaja Sher Singh 
when that prince was assassinated, 
and Was severely wounded in the en- 
deavour to defend him. Sardar Ganda 
Singh was killed at the battle of Firuz- 
shahr. Sardar Jwala Singh is an 
Honorary Magistrate. Residence : Guj- 
ranwala, Punjab. 

JYOTI PRASAD GARGA (of Maisadal), 
Rdjd. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1890, for his 
"liberality and public spirit." The 
Raja is the present representative of 
the Maisadal family. Their title of 
Raja is said to have been conferred by 
the old Nawabs of Bengal. The first 
Raja was the Raja Janardhan Upad- 
hyaya. Two ladies of this family at 
different periods — the Rani Janaki 
Devi and the Rani Mathura Devi — 
have been in charge of the Raj. The 
late Raja, Lakshman Prasad Garga of 
Maisadal, is recorded to have rendered 
good service during the Orissa famine 
of 1866. Residence : Maisadal, Midna- 
pur, Bengal, 



KABLL SHAH, Sayyifl, Khan Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 1, 1877, on the occasion of 
the Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India. Resi- 
dence : Thar and Parkar, Sind. 

KABIR-UD-DIN, Shaikh, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred as a 
personal distinction on May 20, 1896, 
for meritorious service in the Medical 
Department. Residence: Bengal. 

KACHESAR, Rao of See Umrao 
Singh. 

KACHI BARODA, Thakur Dalel Singh, 
Thakur of. A ruling chief ; b. 1839. 
Succeeded to the gadi 1864. The State 
is tributary to Dhar, to which it is 
adjacent, and contains a population of 
about 3000. Residence : Kachi Baroda, 
Bhopawar, Central India. 

KADATTANAD, Valiya Rdjd of. The 
title is hereditary, the present Raja 
being the twenty-eighth in descent. 
Belongs to a Samanda family, which 
originally held the rule over a district 
named Vatakumpuram. One of his 
ancestors was driven out of Vatakum- 
puram by the Zamorin of Calicut, and 
thenceforward the family ruled a dis- 
trict on the Malabar coast, extending 
originally from Mahe to Badagara, 
where the Raja now lives. This terri- 
tory is said to have been granted by 
the Cherakal Raja of Kolathiri. In 
1766 Haidar Ali of Mysore invaded the 
country, and the Raja took refuge with 
the East India Company's officers in 
Tellicheri ; and again, when the Sultan 
Tippu invaded the country, the Raja 
and his family took refuge with the 
Maharaja of Travancore. In 1792 the 
Raja entered into an agreement with 
the British Government to receive an 
annuity as compensation for the estates 
of his ancestors. Like the other Mala- 
bar Rajas, the family follows the Ma- 
rumakkatayam law of inheritance, by 
which the succession is with the off- 
spring of its female members, the next 
eldest male to the Raja being always 
his heir. Residence : Badagara, Mala- 
bar District, Madras. 

KADER PRASANNA LAHIRY, Rai 

Bahadur. See Kedar. 

KADIR BAKHSH BHATTE, Mian, 
Khdn Saheb. The Mian was granted 
the title of Khan Saheb as a personal 



124 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



distinction on January 1, 1894. Resi- 
dence : Gujranwala, Punjab. 

KADIR BAKHSH KHAN, Amdani, 

Khan Saheb. Received the title on 
January 2, 1899. Residence: Dera 
Ghazi Khan, Punjab. 

KADIR HUSAIN, Khan. The title is 
personal, and was originally conferred 
by the Nawab of the Carnatic, and 
recognized in 1890. Residence: Ma- 
dras. 

KADIR MOHI-UD-DIN, KMn Bahadur. 
The title is personal, it was conferred 
originally by the Nawab of the Car- 
natic, and recognized on December 16, 
1890. Residence : Madras. 

KADIR MOHI-UD-DIN SAHEB, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1877. Residence : Mysore. 

KADIR NAWAZ KHAN, Muhammad, 
Khan Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1891. Residence : 
Maunargudi, Madras. 

KADIR (SHAIKH) SHAIKH AB- 
DULLA, Khan Saheb. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1894. Resi- 
dence : Kirkee, Bombay. 

KADIRDAD KHAN GUL KHAN, CLE., 
Khan Bahadur. The Khan Bahadur 
is a Deputy Collector in Sind, and for 
his services to the State Was created a 
Companion of the Most Eminent Order 
of the Indian Empire on May 25, 1892. 
Residence : Sind. 

KAHLUR, His Highness Raja Bije 
Chand, Raja of. A ruling chief; b. 
1872. Succeeded to the gadi as a minor 
February 3, 1889. Belongs to a Rajput 
(Hindu) family, claiming descent from 
Argok, a Raja whose territory was 
situated in the Deccan. Harihar 
Chand, a descendant of Argok in the 
fourteenth generation, came on a 
pilgrimage to Jwalamukhi, a sacred 
place in the Kangra district of the 
Punjab ; he saw Jhandbhari, in the 
Hoshiarpur district, and, attracted by 
the place, conquered it and settled 
down there. One of Harihar Chand's 
sons conquered and took possession of 
the Chamba State (q.v.); another 
carved out a principality for himself in 
Kanidon ; while a third son, Bir Chand, 
founded the State of Kahlur or Bild- 
spur. From 1803 to 1815 the State 
was overrun by the Gurkhas, and after 



their expulsion it was confirmed to the 
then Raja by a sanad from the British 
Government, dated March 6, 1815. 
The Raja Hira Singh, predecessor of 
the present Raja, rendered good service 
during the Mutiny of 1857, and was 
rewarded with a salute of 11 guns. 
The area of the State (which is one of 
the Simla Hill States) is 448 square 
miles ; its population is 86,546, chiefly 
Hindus. The Raja maintains a mili- 
tary force of 40 cavalry, 620 infantry, 
and 11 guns, and is entitled to a salute 
of 11 guns. Residence: Kahlur, Simla 
Hills, Punjab. 

KAI KHUSRU BARJ0RJI COOPER, 

Khan Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred as a personal distinction on May 
20, 1896, for meritorious service in the 
Army Medical Department. Residence : 
Ahmadabad, Bombay. 

KAILASH CHANDAR BOSE (BASU), 

Rai Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on January 1, 1895. Residence: Cal- 
cutta, Bengal. 

KAILASH CHANDAR DAS, Rai Baha- 
dur. Received the title on June 3, 
1893. Residence : Faridpur, Bengal. 

KAILASH CHANDAR MUKHARJI, 

Rai Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1887, 
for " long and meritorious service in 
the Bengal Secretariat." Residence: 
20 Durjipara Street, Calcutta, Bengal. 

KAILASH CHANDRA SIR0MANI, 
Pandit, Mahdmahopddhydya. The 
title was conferred on May 20, 1896, 
for eminence in oriental learning. 
Residence: Benares, North-Western 
Provinces. 

KAIMAHRA, Rani of. f See Dayawant 
Kuar. 

KAIMORI, Rao of. See Kamal. 

KAISAR MIRZA, Nawab Bahadur. 
The title is personal, the Nawab Ba- 
hadur being the grandson of a daughter 
of the late Muhammad Ali Shah, King 
of Oudh. He is the son of the Nawab 
Abul Hasan Khan. Residence : Oudh. 

KAITHOLA, Rani of. See Jaibans 
Kunwar. 

KAKARBAI, Rao of. See Lachhman 
Singh. 

KAKARKHERI (BH0PAL), Thdkur of. 
See Dhabla Dhir. 



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125 



KAKAT KRISHNAN, Edavalath, Di : I 
wan Bahadur. Is Chairman of Muni- 
cipal Council of Tellicherry. Keceived 
title on January 1, 1899. Residence: 
Tellicherry, Madras. 

KAKHAUTA, Rao of See Jodha Sinha. 

KAKRALI, Ghaudhri. See Muhammad 
Azim. 

KALAHANDI, Rdjd of. See Karond. 

KALAHASTI, Kumara Maddu Venka- 
tappa, Rdjd of; b. 1850. Succeeded 
to the gadi on the death of his 
father, the Raja Damarakumara 
Maddu Yenkatappa Nayudu Bahadur 
Garu, C.S.I. Belongs to an ancient 
family that acquired importance in the 
15th century under the Government 
of the Rajas of Vijayanagar, and in- 
creased in consequence of the decline 
of that dynasty. Under the Muham- 
madan Government the head of the 
family held the position of aMansabddr 
of 5000 foot ; and a sanad granted hy 
the Emperor Aurangzeb of Delhi made 
the family directly subordinate to the 
Nawab of Arcot. An ancestor of the 
Raja was the local Naik who procured 
for the English from the Raja of 
Chandragiri the privilege of settling at 
Madras and of building a fort there ; 
and his father's name being Chenappa, 
he stipulated that the place should be 
called Chenappa-patnam. The late 
Raja received the Companionship of 
the Most Exalted Order of the Star of 
India from His Royal Highness the 
Prince of Wales, at the Darbar held 
at Calcutta on January 1, 1876. The 
family banner is the "Hanumadwa- 
jam," or flag bearing the device of 
Hanuman (the sacred monkey) in five 
colours. The Raja owns large estates 
in Nellore and North Arcot districts, 
Madras. Residence: Kalahasti, Nel- 
lore, Madras. 

KALALWALA, Sarddr of. See Raghbir 
Singh. 

KALANDAR KHAN, Haji (Gandapurof 
Madi), Khdn Saheb. Received the 
title on June 3, 1899. Residence : 
Dera Ismail Khan, Punjab. 

KALANDAR SHAH KHAN DARA- 
SHAH, Khdn Saheb. The title was 
conferred on June 3, 1893. Residence : 
Mahmudabad, Bombay. 

KALAT, His Highness Beglar Begi 
Mir Sir Mahmud, G.C.I.E., Waliof. 



A ruling chief. The title of Beglar 
Begi was conferred on one of His 
Highness 's ancestors, named Nasir 
Khan, by the great Persian invader 
Nadir Shah in 1739. Nasir Khan sub- 
sequently was embroiled in wars with 
the King of Kabul, Ahmad Shah 
Abdali, and later on became a trusted 
leader of that monarch's troops. Nasir 
Khdn died in extreme old age in 1795, 
and was succeeded by his son Mahmud 
Khan. In 1839, at the time of the 
first Afghan war, Mehrab Khan was 
the Wali of Kalat and ruler of Balu- 
chistan ; on account of his supposed 
treachery (which was afterwards dis- 
covered to have been falsely attributed 
to him by his Wazir), the town and 
fort of Kalat were stormed by General 
Willshire, and the unfortunate Meh- 
rab Khan was among the slain. In 
1841, however, his son Nasir Khan was 
reinstated by the British, whose army 
thereon evacuated the country ; and in 
1854 a treaty was concluded, stipulat- 
ing for the protection of the State by 
the British Power. Nash* Khan died 
in 1856, and was succeeded by his 
brother, the late Wali Sir Muhammad 
Khodadad Khan. His Highness had 
an interview with the Viceroy of India 
(Lord Lytton) in 1876 at Jacobabad, 
when the treaty of 1854 was renewed 
and extended ; and, with his great 
vassals, he attended the Imperial As- 
semblage at Delhi in 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Majesty as Empress of India, and was 
created a Knight Grand Commander 
of the Most Exalted Order of the Star 
of India. Throughout the Afghan war 
of 1878-79 the Wali rendered the most 
valuable aid to the Government — 
placing all the resources of his country 
at his disposal, and sending his son 
and heir-apparent to accompany the 
General in command of the army pass- 
ing through his territory. His High- 
ness the present Wali was created a 
Knight Grand Commander of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire 
on August 10, 1894. The area of the 
State is about 91,000 square miles ; its 
population is about 150,000, chiefly 
Muhammadans. His Highness main- 
tains a military force of 300 cavalry, 
1500 infantry, and 6 guns ; and is en- 
titled to a salute of 21 guns (including 
2 guns personal). Residence: Kalat, 
Baluchistan. 



126 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



KALATHI, Mating, Thuye gaung ngwe 
Da ya Min. This Burmese title 
(see Introduction) was conferred on 
January 1, 1894. Residence : Rangoon, 
Burma. 

KALB ALI KHAN, Mirza, Khan Baha- 
dur ; b. June 22, 1828. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on May 
24, 1889, for his" distinguished loyalty 
in the Mutiny and his good services." 
The Khan Bahadur was formerly Sub- 
Judge of Unao, and has had a long and 
distinguished service in the Judicial 
Department. Residence : Unao, Oudh. 

KALE, Maung, Myook, Kyet thaye 
zaung shive Salwe ya Min. This Bur- 
mese title (see Introduction) was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1895. Residence : 
Tharrawaddy, Burma. 

KALE KHAN, Major, Khan Bahadur. 
Late Governor of Gilgit. Granted the 
title of Khan Bahadur, as a personal 
distinction, January 2, 1893. Resi- 
dence : Gilgit, Kashmir. 

KALI BAORI, Bhumia Sher Sing, Bhu- 
mia of. A ruling chief ; b. 1859. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi in 1874. The 
Bhumia receives allowances both from 
Dhar and from Gwalior, on condition 
of preserving order in certain territory. 
The State contains about 1700 inhabit- 
ants, chiefly Hindus. The Chief be- 
longs to a Bhilala family. Residence : 
KaU Baori, Bhopatoar, Central India. 

KALI BHUSAN GHOSH, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1894. Residence : Barasat, Bengal. 

KALI CHARAN MISR, Raja; J.Sep- 
tember 20, 1 889. Succeeded on October 
7, 1895. This title is hereditary. De- 
scended from Raja Baij Nath Misr, 
who did good service in the Mutiny of 
1857. Residence: Bareilly, North- 
Western Provinces. 

KALI DAS CHAUDHRI, Rat 'Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on May 26, 
1894. Residence: Hoshangabad, Cen- 
tral Provinces. 

KALI KISHOR MUNSHI, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Is Zamindar of Sherpur. Residence: 
Sherpur, Bogra, Bengal. 

KALI KUMAR DE, Rai Bahadur. 
Granted the title of Rai Bahadur as a 
personal distinction, January 2, 1893, 
for eminent services in the Currency 
Department. Residence: Calcutta. 



KALI PRASANNA GHOSE, Rai Bahd- 
dur. The title was conferred on June 
22, 1897. Residence: Bhowal, Dacca, 
Bengal. 

KALI PRASANNA MUKHARJI, Rai 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 30, 1891, for eminent services in 
the Military Works Department. 
Residence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

KALI PRASANNA ROY, Rai Bahadur, 
Received the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence : Lahore, Punjab. 

KALIKA DAS DATT r Rai Bahadur; b. 
July 3, 1841. Son of the late Rai 
Golak Nath Datt, Educated at the 
Krishnagar and Presidency Colleges of 
the Calcutta University (B.A., 1860; 
B.L., 1861). Appointed to the Judicial 
Service in 1861, and became Diwan of 
the State of Kuch Behar in August 
1869. Was formally invested with 
insignia of office in 1870, and became 
Member of the Kuch Behar State 
Council. Has rendered long and 
meritorious service as Minister of the 
Kuch Behar State, and in recognition 
thereof was granted the title of Rai 
Bahadur on January 1, 1891. Has 
three sons — (1) Charu Chandra Datt, 
born June 16, 1876 ; (2) Atal Chandra 
Datt, born June 5, 1878 ; (3) Nirmal 
Chandra Datt, born January 23, 1881. 
Residences : The Dewankhana, Kuch 
Behar, Bengal ; Meral, Burdwan, 
Bengal ; and 4 Gangadhar Babu's Lane, 
Calcutta. 

KALIYAN SINGH (of Jhamaro), Rao; 

b. 1863. The title is hereditary, hav- 
ing been originally conferred by the 
old Mahratta Government of Deori, 
and subsequently recognized by the 
British Government. Residence : Jha- 
maro, Sagar, Central Provinces, 

KALIYAN SINGH, Rai Bahddur ; b. 
1840. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1895, for good services 
rendered in the management of the 
Magh Mela, Allahabad. Residence: 
Aligarh, North- Western Provinces. 

KALIYANA SUNDARAM CHETTIYAR, 
Chekkappa, Rao Bahadur, Diicdn 
Bahadur; b. 1837. The former title 
was conferred on June 1, 1888, and the 
latter on June 22, 1897 . Was appointed 
aDeputy-Collectorinl878. Residence: 
Cuddalore, Madras. 



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127 



ELALSIA, Sardar Banjit Singh, Sarddr 
of. A ruling chief; 5.1881. Succeeded 
to the gadi as a minor August 28, 
1886. Belongs to a Jat (Sikh) family, 
originally of Kalsia in the Lahore 
district, whose founder, Sarddr Gur- 
bakhsh Singh, conquered this territory 
in the last century. His son, Jodh 
Singh, was a brave and able man, who 
made considerable conquests in the 
neighbourhood of Ambala towards the 
close of the century. When the Cis- 
Sutlej States came under British 
protection, Sardar Jodh Singh followed 
the general example. His grandson, 
Sarddr Lahna Singh, was the grand- 
father of the present Sarddr. The 
area of the State is 169 square miles ; 
its population is 67,708, chiefly Hindus, 
but including 19,930 Muhammadans 
and 5923 Sikhs. The Sarddr maintains 
a military force of 48 cavalry, 181 
infantry, and 3 guns. Residence: 
Kalsia, Punjab. 

LA.LU KHEEA, Eao Umed Singh, Rao 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1830. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi 1843. The Rao 
belongs to a Rajput family, and his 
title is hereditary. The State contains 
a population of about 1000. Residence : 
Kalu Khera, Westei-n Mdlwd, Central 
India. 

CALUBA, Kumar Shri, CLE. See Ku- 
mdr. 

LALUBAWA BHUNSINGHJI, TkdJcur. 
See Rdmpura (Rewa Kantha). 

LALYAN. See Kaliyan. 

CAMADHIA, Mir Zulfikar Ali, Tdlukddr 
of. A ruling chief. Belongs to a 
Muhammadan family in the Gohelwar 
Prant, Kdthidwdr. The area of the 
State is 4 square miles ; its population 
about 772, chiefly Hindus. Residence : 
Kamadhia, Kdthidwdr, Bombay. 

CAMAL NARYA SINGH, Thakur fof 
Kaimori), Rao; b. 1871. Succeeded 
the late Rao Delan Singh on December 
2, 1896. The title is hereditary, hav- 
ing been originally conferred by the 
Rdj-Gond Rd jd Nizam Shah of Mandla. 
Residence : Kaimori, Jabalpur, Central 
Provinces. 

IAMALA PATI GH0SAL, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 1, 1889, for distinguished 
service in th e Bengal Police. Residence : 
Naihdti, Bengal. 



KAMALESHWARI PAESHAD SINGH, 

Rai Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on May 20, 1896. Residence: Monghyr, 
Bengal. 

KAMALPUR, Thakur Madan Singh, 
Thakur of. A ruling chief ; b. 1850. 
Succeeded to the gadi October 11, 
1881. Receives an allowance, in lieu 
of land rights, from Gwalior. Belongs 
to a Rdjput (Hindu) family. Residence : 
Kamalpur, Bhopdl, Central India. 

KAMBAKHSH HASAN MIRZA BAHA- 
DUE, Prince. The Prince is the tenth 
son of the late Wajid Ali Shdh, King 
of Oudh, and bears the title of Prince 
as a personal or courtesy title. Resi- 
dence: Calcutta, Bengal. 

KAMBAE KHAN icalad SHEE MU- 
HAMMAD KHAN, Mir. The title 
has been continued for life, as the Mir 
is the representative of one of the 
Mirs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence : Hyderabad, 
Sind. 

KAME KADK MIEZA. See Abid Ali 
Bahddur. 

KAMEAN SHAH, Raja; b. 1840. The 
title is hereditary, having been origin- 
ally conferred by the ancient Gond 
Rdjds of Deogarh and Ndgpur, and 
subsequently recognized by the British 
Government. Belongs to a family of 
Gond (aboriginal) origin, that is, a 
younger branch of the family of Rdjd 
Sulaimdn Shdh of Deogarh and 
Ndgpur. The family became Muham- 
madan about 200 years ago. In 1860 
the British Government confirmed his 
jdgirs in perpetuity to Rdjd Kdmrdn 
Shah, in consideration both of his own 
loyal services during the Mutiny, and 
of his father's good services previously 
rendered. The Rdjd is an Honorary 
Magistrate, and Member of the local 
Municipal and School Committees. 
He has two sons, named Kuar Omri 
Shdh and Kudr Sultdn Shah. Resi- 
dence : Ramangan, Hoshangabad, 
Central Provinces. 

KAMR-UD-DIN, Fakir, Khan Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on February 16, 1887, on the occasion 
of the Jubilee of Her Majesty's reign. 
Residence : Lahore, Punjab. 

KAME-UD-DIN HAIDAE, Muhammad, 

Mirza Bahadur. See Muhammad. 



128 



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KAMTA EAJAULA, Eao Eharat Par- 
shad, Jagirdar of. A ruling chief ; 
b. July 18, 1847. Succeeded to the 
gadi October 23, 1874. Belongs to a 
Kayastha (Hindu) family, descended 
from Sardar Ajudhya Parshad, an 
agent of the State of Charkhari (q.v.), 
who became an agent of the Kalinjar 
Chaubes, and obtained from them the 
jdgir of Kamta. His son, Rao Gopal 
Lai, received a sanad from the British 
Government, and dying in 1874, was 
succeeded by the present Jagirdar. 
The area of the State is 4 square 
miles; its population is about 1500, 
chiefly Hindus. The Jagirdar main- 
tains a military force of 15 infantry 
and 1 gun. He has sons, of whom the 
eldest is named Bhaya Ram Parshad. 
Residence: Kamta Raj aula, Bundel- 
khand, Central India. 

KANCHI KRISHNASWAMI RAO, 

JDiwdn Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on May 25, 1895. The Diwdn 
Bahadur is Chief Justice of the 
Travancore State. Residence : Tri van- 
drum, Travancore. 

KANDAULA, Sardar of. See Harbans 
Singh ; see also Harindar Singh. 

KANDHAI SINGH, Bahadur. See 
Khandhai. 

KANG, Sardar of. See Narayan Singh. 

KANGSEU, Myoza of. A ruling chief. 
This Chief rules over one of the Shan 
States, Burma. Residence: Kangseu, 
Shan States, Burma. 

KANHAILAL DE, CJ.E.,Rai Bahadur; 
b. September 24, 1831. The title of Rai 
Bahadur is personal, and was conferred 
on June 6, 1872, for distinguished 
medical services. The Rai Bahadur 
is a son of the late Radha Nath De, 
Rai Bahadur, and the name is very 
commonly spelt "Kanny Lall Dey." 
He was educated at the Medical 
College of Bengal, where he graduated 
with distinction in 1854, and in the 
same year was appointed to a Professor- 
ship of Chemistry in the Calcutta 
Medical College, and a Chemical Ex- 
aminer to Government. In 1862 he was 
appointed Professor of Chemistry in the 
Presidency College of the University 
of Calcutta, and from that time his 
honours — professional, scientific, and 
other — have been exceedingly numer- 
ous. He was appointed successively 



Member British Medical Association, 
1863 ; Honorary Member, Pharma- 
ceutical Society of Great Britain, 
1863 ; additional Chemical Examiner 
to Government, 1867-72 ; teacher of 
Chemistry and Medical Jurisprudence 
to the Vernacular Classes, Calcutta 
Medical College, 1869-84; Fellow of 
the University of Calcutta, 1870; 
Member Faculty of Medicine, Univer- 
sity of Calcutta, 1871 ; Rai Bahadur, 
1872; Justice of the Peace, 1872; 
Member Committee of the Economic 
Museum, 1874; Prof essor of Chemistry 
and Government Chemical Examiner, 
Calcutta Medical College, 1877-78; 
Municipal Commissioner, 1877-85 ; 
Member Central Committee for the 
Selection of the Vernacular Text- 
Books, 1887 ; Certificate of Honour in 
recognition of services to the State on 
the occasion of Her Majesty's assump- 
tion of the Imperial title, 1877 ; Ex- 
aminer in Medical Jurisprudence, 
1878; Fellow Chemical Society, London 
(F.C.S), 1880; Vice-President of the 
Calcutta Medical Society, 1881; Presid- 
ency Magistrate for Calcutta, 1881 ; 
Member of Committee and Juror at 
the Calcutta Exhibition of Indian 
Art Manufactures, 1881-82 ; Juror at 
the Jaipur Exhibition, 1883, also 
Calcutta International Exhibition, 
1883-84 ; created a Companion of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire, 1884 ; appointed Member of 
the Syndicate, Calcutta University, 
1886; Member District Charitable 
Society, Calcutta, 1886; Honorary 
Fellow College of Physicians, Phila- 
delphia, 1886. The Rai Bahadur is 
the author of treatises on chemistry, 
physics, and medical jurisprudence in 
Bengali. He has helped to develop 
the drug resources of India, and 
written an elaborate descriptive cata- 
logue of same. He represented India 
at the International Exhibition, Lon- 
don, 1862; Universal Exposition of 
Paris, 1867 and 1878 ; Vienna Univer- 
sal Exhibition, 1872; Melbourne Ex- 
hibition, 1880 ; Amsterdam Exhibition, 
1883 ; World's Industrial Cotton Cen- 
tennial Exposition, New Orleans, 
U.S.A., 1884-85; and Colonial and 
Indian Exhibition, 1886, for which he 
received certificates and medals, also 
thanks of the Government. The Rai 
Bahadur has a son, named Priyalal 
De (the name is very frequently spelt 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



129 



Preo Lall Dey), born July 24, 1855 ; a 
Fellow of the Chemical Society of 
London (F.C.S.), 1886; Presidency 
Magistrate for Calcutta, 1890. Resi- 
dences: 11 Beadon Street and 62 
Aheritola Street, Calcutta, Bengal. 

KANHAYA LAL, Rai Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
March 30, 1876. Residence: Lahore, 
Punjab. 

KANHAYA LAL, Rai Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 1, 1890. Residence: Jalan- 
dhar, Punjab. 

KANHYA LAL, Rai Bahadur. Received 
the title on January 1, 1897, for emin- 
ent services in the P.W.D. Residence : 
Dera Ghazi Khan, Punjab. 

KANT, Wun of. See Po Tok, Maung. 

KANKER, Maharaj-Adhiraj Narhar 
Deo, Maharaja of. A ruling chief; 
b. May 13, 1850. Succeeded to the yadi 
as a minor December 5, 1853. Be- 
longs to a very ancient Rajput family, 
whose ancestors, according to tradition, 
were raised to the yadi by a popular 
vote in very early times. During the 
dominion of the Haihai Vansi dynasty 
in Chhattisgarh the Kanker Zamindars 
were rich and prosperous. The area 
of the State is 639 square miles; its 
population is 63,610, chiefly Gonds 
(aboriginal tribe). Residence: Kanker, 
Raipur, Central Provinces. 

CANNANUR NARAYANA AIYAR, Rao 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Is a Deputy-Col- 
lector. Residence: Madras Presidency. 

CANNAYYA CHETTI, C. V., Rao Baha- 
dur; b. 1857. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on June 1, 1888, for 
eminent services to the State. Was 
elected a member of the Madras Muni- 
cipal Commission in 1885. Residence : 
Madras. 

CANNY LALL DEY, C.I.E., Rai Baha- 
dur. See Kanhai Lai De. 

[ANRANMAL CHANDANMAL, Rao 
Bahadur. Received the title on May 
21, 1898. Residence : Sind, Bombay. 

[ANSHI SINGH, Rai Saheb. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1896. 
Residence: Military Works Depart- 
ment, Simla. 



KANSI (Latawng of Kansi), Kyet thaye 
zaung shwe Salwe ya Min. This Bur- 
mese title, indicated by the letters 
K.S.M. after the name (see Introduc- 
tion), was conferred as a personal 
distinction on January 1, 1898. Resi- 
dence : Kansi, Burma. 

KANTARAWADI, Sawlawi, Myoza of. 
A ruling chief. The Myoza is the 
Chief of one of the Karen States in 
Eastern Karenni, Burma. The popu- 
lation consists chiefly of Karens. Resi- 
dence : Kantarawadi, Eastern Karenni, 
Burma. 

KANTI CHANDAR MUKHARJI, C.I.E., 

Rao Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on February 16, 
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee of 
the reigu of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty. The Rao Bahadur was created 
a Companion of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire on Janu- 
ary 1, 1891, for distinguished services 
as Diwan or Prime Minister of the 
State of Jaipur in Rajputana. Resi- 
dence : Jaipur, Rajputana. 

KANTIGYI, Chief of. A ruling chief. 
This Chief rules over one of the Shan 
States on the frontier of Burma. Its 
population consists almost entirely of 
Shans. Residence: Kantigyi, Shan 
States, Burma. 

KANTIT, Raja Bhup Indra Bahadur 
Singh, Rdjd of; b. 1863. As a minor 
succeeded his father, Raja Rajendra 
Bahadur Singh, in the year of his 
birth. Belongs to an ancient family 
of Gaharwar Rajputs, said to be a 
branch of that of the Rahtors of Kan- 
auj, and descended from Gudan Deo. 
In ancient times, for a long series of 
years it appears that there was a 
Gaharwar Raj of the Kan tit family, 
settled at Benares, and owning domains 
in Mirzapur district, south of the 
Ganges. In 1758 the Raja Vikrama- 
ditya Singh of Kantit was driven out 
by Balwant Singh, the first Raja of 
Benares (q.v.) ; but after the flight of 
Raja Chet Singh of Benares in 1781, 
Raja Govinda Singh, son of Raja 
Vikramaditya, recovered his posses- 
sions . He was succeeded by his nephew 
and adopted son, Ram Ghulam Singh, 
whose son was Raja Mahipal Singh ; 
and the latter in turn was succeeded 
by his son, Jagat Bahadur Singh. He 
died in 1850, leaving two minor sons, 
K 



130 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



of whom the elder, Raja Rajendra 
Bahadur Singh, succeeded his father, 
but hardly lived to attain his majority. 
On his death he was succeeded by the 
present Raja. Residence: Bijaipur, 
Mirzapur, North- Western Provinces. 

KAPHAS KUMARI (of Phulghar) , Mm. 
The title is hereditary. The Rani 
belongs to a very ancient Gond family, 
descended from the Chanda stock of 
Gond Rajas, 800 years ago. It is said 
that the title of Raja was conferred 
on an ancestor by one of the ancient 
Kings of Delhi, before the family left 
Chanda. Until recently the Phulghar 
Zamindari was classed as a Gurjhat 
feudatory State; but the late Raja 
Jagsai died without legitimate heirs 
in 1867, and the State lapsed into the 
form of a Zamindari, in the hands of 
the late Rani Sagan Kumari of Phul- 
ghar, who was the lawful wife of the 
Raja Prithi Singh. The Rani Sagan 
Kumari was more than seventy years 
of age when she succeeded to the 
estate, as she was born before the 
commencement of the present century ; 
she was succeeded by the present 
Rani. Residence: Phulghar, Sambal- 
pur, Central Provinces. 

KAPURCHAND, Seth, Rai Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Raipur, Central Provinces. 

KAPURTHALA, His Highness Sir Jagat- 
jit Singh Bahadur, K.C.S.I., Rdjd of. 
A ruling chief ; b. September '1872. 
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor on 
September 5, 1877. The Raja's full 
title is — His Highness Farzand-i-Dil- 
band Rasikhul-Itikad Daulat-i-In- 
glishia Raja-i-Rajagan Raja Sir 
Jagatjit Singh Bahadur, K.C.S.I. 
Belongs to a Jat Kalal (Sikh) family, 
well known under the distinguished 
name of Ahluwalia, from the village 
of Ahlu near Lahore. The Sardar 
Jassa Singh was one of the most 
conspicuous of the leaders who con- 
solidated the Sikh Power during the 
disorders and weakness of the Mughals, 
consequent on the invasions of Nadir 
Shah and Ahmad Shah Durani. He 
died without issue, and was succeeded 
by Sardar Bagh Singh, a descendant 
of his uncle. The Chiefs of Kapur- 
thala largely extended their territories 
and power ; and the name of Sardar 
Bagh Singh's successor, Sardar Fateh, 
Singh, was associated with that of the 



Maharaja Ranjit Singh in the first 
Sikh treaty concluded with the British 
Government. In 1826 Sardar Fateh 
Singh sought the protection of the 
British Power against Ranjit Singh ; 
but in the first Sikh war his troops 
fought against the British at the 
battle of Aliwal, and on this account 
his Cis-Sutlej territories were con- 
fiscated. In the second Sikh war his 
son Sardar Nihal Singh rendered 
good service ; and in recognition of it 
he was created a Raja in 1849. On 
the outbreak of the Mutiny in 1857, the 
Raja Sir Randhir Singh, G.C.S.I., of 
Kapurthala, volunteered the services 
of himself and all his followers. He 
strengthened the hold of Government 
in the Jalandhar Doab, and then 
volunteered to aid in the subjugation 
of the rebellious Province of Oudh. 
His offer was accepted, and accom- 
panied by his brother, the brave 
Sardar Bikrama Singh Bahadur, 
C.S.I. , he marched to Oudh at the 
head of 2000 horse and foot and four 
guns. This force fought no less than 
six actions with the rebels, with 
conspicuous valour on the part alike 
of the Chief, his brother, and his 
followers. They held most important 
positions — first at Bani to protect the 
Lucknow and Cawnpur road, and 
afterwards at Daryabad ; and captured 
ten guns from the rebels. The Kapur- 
thala troops remained in Oudh for a 
whole year ; and the Raja Sir Randhir 
Singh received as a reward for his 
loyalty and bravery large estates 
there, confiscated from the rebellious 
Rajas of Bhitauli, Baundi, and Ikauna, 
as well as a khilat of Rs. 10,000, and 
many other honours. In 1870 he set 
out to visit England, but unfortunately 
died at Aden on the way. He was 
succeeded by his son, the Raja Kharak 
Singh, father of the present Raja ; 
leaving also a younger son, the Kunwar 
Harnam Singh, CLE. (q.v.), and a 
daughter married to the Sardar Buta 
Singh of Sirnanwa. His Highness 
the present Raja was created a Knight 
Commander of the Most Exalted 
Order of the Star of India on June 22, 
1897, on the auspicious occasion of the 
Diamond Jubilee of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty the Queen Empress. The 
area of the State is 598 square miles ; 
its population is 252,617, chiefly Mu- 
hammadans, but including, 82,900 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



131 



Hindus and 26,493 Sikhs. In addition 
to this, the Oudh estates of His 
Highness have an area of 700 square 
miles, and a population of 253,000. 
The Raja maintains a military force 
of 197 cavalry, 829 infantry, and 13 
guns ; and is entitled to a salute of 11 
guns. Residences: Kapurthala,Punjab ; 
and Bhitaula, Baundi, and Ikauna, 
Oudh. 
KARA AHMAD. See Muhammad Jam 
Jah Ali. 

KARAM CHAND, Lala, Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1897. 
Residence : Srigovindpur, Gurdaspur, 
Punjab. 

KARAM DAD, Subadar, Khan Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1896. Residence : Kalat, Baluchistan. 

KARAM HUSAIN, Makhdum, Khan 
Saheb. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1896. Residence: Muzaf- 
fargarh, Punjab. 

KARAM HUSAIN walad ALI GAUHAR 
KHAN, Mir. The title has been 
continued for life, the Mir being a 
descendant of one of the Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation (see Khairpur). Residence : 
Shikarpur, Kind. 

KARAM KHAN, Mir. The title is 
hereditary, the Mir being a Jagirdar, 
and a descendant of one of the Mirs 
or Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation (see Khairpur) . Residence : 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

KARAMAT-ULLA, Muhammad, Khan 
Bahadur. See Muhammad. 

KARAMAT-ULLA KHAN, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on May 
25, 1895, for eminent services in 
the Medical Department. Residence : 
Bengal. 

KARAMDAD KHAN (of Pharwala), 
Rdjd. The title is hereditary, and the 
Raja succeeded his father in March 
1865, as the foremost of the Gakkar 
Chiefs of the Punjab. The Gakkars 
trace their descent from Kai Gohar, 
of Ispahan in Persia, whose son, 
Sultan Kaid, is said to have conquered 
Badakshan and a part of Tibet. For 
many hundreds of years the Gakkars 
were undoubtedly possessed of great 
power and a wide extent of territory ; 
they overran Kashmir in very early 
times, and traces of their occupation 



are still to be found in the north and 
west of that country. They are usually 
of the Shia sect of Muhammadans. 
When the Emperor Babar invaded 
India, Hati Khan was the Chief of 
the Gakkars; and in the Emperor's 
Autobiography there is a notice of his 
contest with that Chief. Babar 
marched against Pharwala — then, as 
now, the capital of the Gakkars — in 
1526 a.d., and captured it after a 
gallant resistance, Hati Khan making 
his escape from one gate of the town 
as Babar's troops entered by another. 
Sultan Mukarrab Khan was the last 
independent Gakkar Chief, and in his 
day the power of the Gakkars was 
very great. He defeated the Yusufzai 
Afghans and the Chief of the Khattaks, 
and captured Gujrat, overrunning the 
Chib country as far north as Bhimbar. 
He joined Ahmad Shah Durani on his 
several invasions of India, and was 
treated by that monarch with the 
greatest consideration, being confirmed 
in the possession of his large territories, 
which extended from the Chinab to 
the Indus. Mukarrab Khan was at 
last defeated by the powerful Sikh 
Chief, Sardar Gujar Singh, Bhangi, 
and compelled to retire across the 
Jhelum, giving up his possessions in 
the Chaj Doab. His power being thus 
broken, the rival Chiefs of his own 
tribe declared against him, and he 
was treacherously put to death. He 
left four sons, of whom the youngest 
was Sultan Shadman Khan, grand- 
father of the present Raja. The 
family were greatly impoverished, 
weakened, and stripped of most of 
their possessions, by the attacks first 
of Sardar Gujar Singh, and subse- 
quently of Anand Singh, Thipuria, 
grandson of the famous Sardar Milkha 
Singh of Rawal Pindi. In 1826 the 
family was conceded some proprietary 
rights in Pharwala, the ancient cradle 
and home of their race. Shadman 
Khan's eldest son was Hayat-ulla- 
Khan, who became Raja ; he rendered 
excellent service under Captain Abbott 
in 1848-49, and again during the 
Mutiny of 1857. He was succeeded 
by the present Raja in 1865. Resid- 
ence : Pharwala, Rawal Pindi, Punjab. 

KARAMDAD KHAN, Khan Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1896. Residence : Baluchistan. 



132 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



KARAMSI DAMJI, Rao Bahadur. Re- 
ceived the title on January 1, 1899. 
Residence: Bombay. 

KARAN SINGH, Rao. The title is here- 
ditary. Residence: Aligarh, North- 
western Provinces. 

KARAN SINGH, Rao (of Bedla), Rao 
Bahadur. The title of Rao Bahadur 
was conferred on the Rao of Bedla as 
a personal distinction on May 20, 1896. 
Residence : Mewar, Rajputana. 

KARAR HAIDAR, Khan Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1894. 
Residence : Bijnor, North- Western Pro- 
vinces. 

KARASGI, Chief of. See Jath. 

KARAULI, His Highness Maharaja 
Sir Bhanwar Pal Deo Bahadur Yadukul 
Chandra Bhal, G.C.I.E., Mahdrdjd of . 
A ruling chief ; b. 1862. Succeeded 
to the gadi August 14, 1886. Is the 
head of the great Jadun clan of 
Rajputs, who claim descent from 
Krishna, and are called the Chandra- 
vansi or Children of the Moon. The 
title of Maharaja has descended to 
them from the remotest antiquity. 
Probably the first historical personage 
in the pedigree is Bijai Pal, who built 
the fort of Biana in 995 a.d. Arjan 
Deo, in 1348 a.d., established the 
State, and founded the capital of 
Karauli in Rajputana. The Maharaja 
Dharm Pal became Maharaja of 
Karauli in 1644 a.d. ; and the present 
Maharaja Bahadur is ninth in succes- 
sion from Dharm Pal. The Maharaja 
Madan Pal rendered good service 
during the Mutiny of 1857, sending 
a body of his troops against the 
Kotah mutineers ; and for these ser- 
vices he received an addition of two 
guns to his salute as a personal dis- 
tinction, and was created a Knight 
Grand Commander of the Most Exalted 
Order of the Star of India. The area 
of the State is 1208 square miles ; its 
population is 148,670, chiefly Hindus, 
but including 8836 Muhammadans. 
His Highness was created a K.C.I.E. 
on January 1, 1894, and promoted to 
be a Knight Grand Commander of the 
Most Eminent Order on June 22, 1897, 
on the auspicious occasion of the 
Diamond Jubilee of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty the Queen Empress. He 
maintains a miltary force of 281 



cavalry, 1640 infantry, and 56 guns, 
and is entitled to a salute of 17 guns. 
The family banner is coloured yellow. 
Residence : Karauli, Rajputana. 

KARENNI, Western, Po Bya, Chief of 
A ruling chief. Po Bya is chief of 
one of the Karen States in Burma. 
Its population consists almost entirely 
of Karens. It has three feudatory 
dependencies — Bawlake, Kyetpogyi, 
and Naungpale. Residence: Western 
Karenni, Burma. 

KARIM KHAN, Sarddr Bahadur; b. 
1813. Belongs to a Pathan (Afghan) 
family settled in Unao, Oudh. He 
was distinguished for his bravery and 
loyalty during the Mutiny of 1857, 
when he held the military rank of 
Subahdar ; and in recognition thereof 
he received the title of Sardar Bahadur 
as a personal distinction, by a sanad 
dated September 18, 1860. Residence : 
Unao, Oudh. 

KARIM-UD-DIN AHMAD, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on May 20, 1890. Residence : 
Sirsa, North- Western Provinces. 

KARMIE, Raja of See Tenduk Pulger. 

KAR0DIA, Thakur Chain Singh, Thdkur 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1864. Succeeded 
to the gadi October 26, 1880. Belongs 
to a Rajput (Hindu) family. Resid- 
ence : Karodia, Indore, Central India. 

KAR0LI, Thakur Bhawansinghji, Thd- 
kur of A ruling chief ; b. 1856. 
Belongs to a Koli (aboriginal) family. 
The area of the State is 12 square 
miles; its population about 1500, 
chiefly Hindus. Residence : Karoli, 
Mahi Kantha, Bombay. 

KAROND, Raja Raghu Keshar Deo, 
Rdjd of. A ruling chief; b. 1871. 
Succeeded to the gadi April 7, 1881. 
Belongs to an ancient Rajput family 
of the Nagbansi (snake-race) clan — 
the cognizance of the Nagbansi clan 
is the sacred Serpent — descended on 
the female side from the original 
Gangabansi dynasty of Karond, and 
on the male side from the Rajas of 
Satrangarh in Chota Nagpur. The 
late R&ja, Udit Partab Deo, for his 
good services to Government, received 
the honour of a personal salute of 9 
guns, which was conferred on January 
1, 1877, on the occasion of the Pro- 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



133 



clamation of Her Most Gracious Majesty 
as Empress of India. The present 
Raja is thirty-first in descent from 
the founder of the dynasty. The area 
of the State is 3745 square miles, and 
its population is 224,548, chiefly Gonds 
(an aboriginal tribe). The Raja is 
entitled to a salute of 9 guns. Resid- 
ence : Karond, Sambalpur, Central 
Provinces. 

KARRAR HAIDAR, Khan Bahadur. 
See Karar. 

KARVETNAGAR, Rdjd of. See Kumara 
Venkata Perumal Raz, Rdjd. 

KARWAR, Rdjd of See Partab. 

KARWI, Srimant Rao of. See Balwant 
Rao. 

KASHI NATH BISWAS, Rai Bahddur ; 
b. October 1830. The title was con- 
ferred on February 16, 1887, on the 
occasion of the Jubilee of the reign 
of Her Most Gracious Majesty. The 
Rai Bahadur's great-grandfather was 
in the service of the Nawab Nazim of 
Bengal ; and his father and grandfather 
were employed under the Governor- 
General's agent at Benares. He entered 
the Judicial Service in 1856 ; became 
a first-grade Subordinate Judge in 
1875, and received a Silver Medal of 
Honour at the Imperial Assemblage at 
Delhi in January 1877, on the occasion 
of the Proclamation of Her Majesty 
as Empress of India. He received 
the title of Rai Bahadur in recognition 
of his long and meritorious services as 
a Judge. Residence: Benares, North- 
western Provinces. 

KASHI NATH SAMBHAJI MURKAR, 

Rao Sahcb. Received the title on 
January 2, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

KASHI PERSHAD, Rai Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on June 3, 1899. Is 
Vakil of Charkhari. Residence : 
Charkhari, Central India. 

KASHI RAO HOLKAR DADA SAHEB, 
Rao Sir (of Indore), K.C.S.I. Created 
a K.C.S.I. on October 23, 1875. Resid- 
ence : Indore, Central India. 

KASHINATH LAKSHMAN, Rao Baha- 
dur; b. July 16, 1833. The title was 
conferred on May 24, 1883, for long 
and distinguished service in the Police 
Department, in Khandesh, Bombay. 
The Rao Bahddur belongs to a Karhada 
Brahman family, and the son of Lak- 



shuman Krishna, of the Political 
Department and Police of Khandesh. 
Was invested with the title of Rao 
Bahadur at a Darbar held at Dhulia 
on June 15, 1883. In 1846 he married 
Ganga, the only daughter of the late 
Jagirdar of Waroda; and has issue 
four sons — (1) Martand, born July 30, 
1865, married Lakshmibai, daughter 
of Purushotam Pant Khandekar; (2) 
Waman, born July 27, 1867, married 
Jankibai, daughter of Prathad Pant 
Shahane, Mamlatdar of Tasgaon ; 
(3) Govinda, born August 28, 1871, 
married Gopikabai, daughter of Mad- 
hava Rao Khandekar Phadnis, late 
Mamlatdar of Satara; (4) Gopal, 
born June 24, 1878, married Rukhmini- 
bai, daughter of Narayan Rao Bho- 
patkar of Azvi. Residence : Jalgaon, 
Khandesh, Bombay. 

KASHIPUR, Rdjd of. See Hari Raj 
Singh. 

KASHIRAS SARVE, General, C.S.I. 
Sarddr Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on January 21, 1896. The 
General is Commander-in-Chief of the 
Forces of His Highness Maharaja 
Sindhia of Gwalior, and was created 
a Companion of the Most Exalted 
Order of the Star of India on the 
auspicious occasion of the Diamond 
Jubilee of Her Most Gracious Majesty 
the Queen Empress. Residence: 
Gwalior, Central India. 

KASHMIR, His Highness the Mahdrdjd 
Bahadur of. See Jammu and Kashmir 

KASIM ALI, Muhammad, Mirza Baha- 
dur. See Muhammad. 

KASIM ALI KHAN (of Pataudi), Khdn 
Bahddur. Received the title on Janu- 
ary 1, 1897. Residence: Pataudi, 
Punjab. 

KASIM HAJI MITHA, Khdn Bahddur, 
Sarddr. The title of Khdn Bahddur 
was conferred on January 1, 1896 ; 
and that of Sarddr on June 22, 1897. 
Residence : Bombay. 

KASIM HASAN KHAN, Khdn Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1895. Residence: Shdhjahdnpur, North- 
western Provinces. 

KASIM HUSAIN TAJ - UL - MULK 
MIRZA BAHADUR, Prince. The 
Prince is the ninth son of the late 
Wajid Ali Shah, King of Oudh; and 



134 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



accordingly bears this title as a personal 
or courtesy title. Residence : Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

KASSALPURA, Thakur Manaji, Thakur 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1823. Belongs 
to a Koli (aboriginal) family. The 
population of the State is about 400. 
Residence: Kassalpura, Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay. 

KASTUR CHAND, Seth, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on February 16, 1887, on the occasion 
of the Jubilee of the reign of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty. Residence: 
Kamthi, Central Provinces. 

KASTUR CHAND, Seth. The title is 
personal ; it was originally conferred 
by the Nawab of the Carnatic, and 
was recognized on December 16, 1890, 
by the British Government. Resi- 
dence : Jaipur, Madras. 

KATARI, Rdjd of. See Partab Bahadur 
Singh. 

KATEHRA, Rdjd Bahadur of. See 
Sardar Singh. 

KATHI, Chandra Singh Rahi Padri, 
Chief of. A ruling chief; b. 1866. 
Belongs to a Bhil (aboriginal) family. 
The area of the State, which is one of 
the Mewas States in Khandesh, is 
about 500 square miles ; its population 
rather over 10,000, chiefly Bhils. The 
Mewas Chiefs maintain a force of 
irregulars, called Sibandis, who collect 
the revenue, attend the Chiefs, and 
keep order on the frontier and perform 
other police duties under the Khandesh 
Superintendent of Police. Besides 
these irregulars, a considerable number 
of Bhil headmen, naiks, are bound, if 
called upon by their Chiefs, to furnish 
from 30 to 50 bowmen apiece. Resid- 
ence : Kathi, Khandesh, Bombay. 

KATHIWARA, Thakur Bahadur Singh, 
Thakur of. A ruling chief ; b. 1839. 
Succeeded to the gadi in 1865. Belongs 
to a Rajput (Hindu) family. The area 
of the State is 68 square miles ; its 
population is 2376, Hindus and Bhils. 
The Thakur maintains a military force 
of 39 infantry. Residence : Kathi wara, 
Bhopawar, Central India. 

KATIARI, Rani of. See Mahtab Kunwar. 

KAT0SAN, Thakur Parhatsinghji Adaji, 
Thakur of. A ruling chief ; b. Jan- 
uary 31, 1876. Succeeded to the gadi 



June 1, 1897. Belongs to a Makwanna 
Thakura (Hindu) family. The popu- 
lation of the State is about 1743. 
Residence : Katosan, Mahi Kantha, 
Bombay. 

KATRA BALKHERA, Thakur of. See 
Himmat Singh ; see also Sarnet Singh. 

KAUSIL KISH0R PARSHAD MALL (of 
Majhauli), Rdjd. See Majhauli. 

KAVASJI. See Kawasji. 

KAWARDHA, Thakur Rajpal Singh, 
Thakur of. A ruling chief ; b. Novem- 
ber 13, 1849. Succeeded to the gadi 
December 11, 1874. Belongs to a Raj 
Gond (aboriginal) family, claiming 
descent from Sham Chand, from whom 
the present Thakur is thirteenth in 
descent. His father was the Thakur 
Ram Singh of Pandaria. The area of 
the State is 887 square miles ; its 
population is 86,362, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence: Kawardha, Bilaspur, Cen- 
tral Provinces. 

KAWASJI DINSHA ADENWALA, 
CLE. Created a CLE. on May 26, 
1894. Residence: Bombay. 

KAWASJI E. PATEL, Khan Saheb. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence : Bombay. 

KAWASJI HATTI DARU, Khan Saheb. 
The title was conferred on January 1 , 
1896. Residence: Seoni, Central 
Provinces. 

KAWASJI H0RMASJI DADA CHARJI, 

Khan Saheb. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1889. 
Residence: Aden. 

KAWASJI JAMSHEDJI LALKAKA, 

KhdnBahcidur ; b. September 19, 1851. 
The title was conferred on February 
21,1884, for eminent services rendered 
to the State in the Postal Department. 
Belongs to a Parsi family, son of 
Jamshedji Dosabji Lalkaka. Is a 
Justice of the Peace, April 1881. Acted 
as Deputy-Postmaster General of the 
Central Provinces and Berar in 1889, 
and of Rajputana in 1890. Married, 
December 3, 1873, Manikbai, daughter 
of Nasarwanji Khurshidji Sabavala of 
Surat; and has issue two sons — 
Jahangir, b. May 29, 1875; and Kai- 
khushro, b. June 27, 1878. Residence : 
Ahmadabad, Bombay. 

KAWASJI KAIKHTJSRTJ JASSAWALA, 

Khan Saheb, The title is personal , and 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



135 



was conferred on May 24, 1889. Resi- 
dence: Aden. 

KAYATHA, Thakur Sheodan Singh, 
Thdkur of. A ruling chief; b. 1848. 
Succeeded to the gadi 1863. Belongs 
to a Rdjput (Hindu) family. Resi- 
dence : Kayatha, Indore, Central India. 

KAZI.— A prefix. 

KAZIM ALI, Mirza Bahadur. The 
Mirza Bahddur is the grandson of the 
late Muhammad Ali Shah, King of 
Oudh, hting a son of the Mirza Azim- 
us Shan Bahadur, son of that monarch. 
Residence: Oudh. 

KAZIM AH KHAN (1), Nawdb Bahadur. 
The NaWib Bahddur is a grandson 
of the late Muhammad Ali Shah, 
King of Oudh, being a son of the 
Nawab Nuazzam-ud-dauld Bahadur, 
by a daughter of that monarch. Resi- 
dence : Lucknow, Oudh. 

KAZIM All KHAN (2), Nawab Bahadur. 
The Nawab Bahadur is a great-grand- 
son of the late Saddat Ali Khan, King 
of Oudh, being a son of the Nawab 
Ikhtiar-ud-daula Bahadur, who was a 
grandson of that monarch. Residence : 
Lucknow, Oudh. 

EAZIM HUSAIN, Muhammad, Khur- 
shed Jah, Mirza Bahadur, Prince. See 
Muhammad. 

KAZIM HUSAIN KHAN, Muhammad (of 
Paintipur), Rdjd. See Muhammad. 

KEDAR NATH, Pandit, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1894. ^ Residence: Meerut, North- 
Western Provinces. 

KEDAR NATH CHATTARJI, Rai 

Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on June 6, 1885. Resi- 
dence : Bali, Bengal. 

KEDAR NATH KUNDU CHAUDHRI, 

Rai Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on May 24, 1884. 
Residence: Howrah, Bengal. 

KEDAR PRASSANNA LAHIRI, Rai 

Bahadur. Received the title on 
January 1, 1898. Is Zamindar of 
Kasimpur. Residence : Kasimpur, 
Rajshahi, Bengal. 



SINGH (of Khiva), Sarddr. 
The title is hereditary. Belongs to a 
Sikh family descended from the Sarddr 
Rai Maha Singh ; who, with his son, 
Sarddr Laha Singh, fell in battle in 



the service of Sardar Charat Singh, 
head of the Sikh misl or confederacy 
known as Sukarchakia, and grand- 
father of the Maharaja Ranjit Singh 
of Lahore. Sardar Amar Singh, son 
of Laha Singh, was taken into the 
service of Sardar Charat Singh, re- 
ceived a jdgir, and served with 
distinction under Charat Singh's son, 
Sarddr Daydl Singh, and under his 
grandson the Mahdrdjd. After his 
death his three sons, Sarddrs Fateh 
Singh, Daydl Singh, and Mohar 
Singh, rose into favour with the 
Mahdrdjd ; and the last especially dis- 
tinguished himself in an action with 
the Afghdns at Khiva in the Gujrat 
district. Mohar Singh subsequently 
retired to Benares, and the Mahdrdjd 
Ranjit Singh confiscated his jdgirs. 
His brother, Sarddr Daydl Singh 
(grandfather of the present Sarddr), 
fought in the battle of Attock, 1813, 
where he was severely wounded ; and 
he was again wounded in the expedition 
to Kashmir, for which he received some 
valuable jdgirs. He died in 1832 ; and 
his son, Sarddr Bishan Singh, died two 
years afterwards, leaving Kishan, a 
child of two years of age. Sarddr 
Kishan Singh was loyal in the time of 
the Multdn rebellion of 1848-49 ; and 
later, in the time of the Mutiny of 
1857, he rendered good service to 
Government, and was rewarded for it. 
He died in 1860, and Sarddr Kehar 
Singh is the surviving member of the 
family. He is also known as the 
Sarddr Nand Singh. Residence : 
Khiva, Gujrat District, Punjab. 

KENDA, Thdkur of. See Khenda ; see 
also Rdm Singh. 

KEONTHAL, Raja Balbir Sain, Rdjd of. 
A ruling chief ; b. 1852. Succeeded to 
the gadi August 23, 1882. Belongs to 
a very ancient Rdjput family, that 
bore the title of Rand from early times 
till 1857, when the title of Rdjd was 
conferred on Rdnd Sansar Sain for his 
services in the time of the Mutiny. 
After the expulsion of the Gurkhas a 
portion of the State was made over to 
the Mahdrdjd of Partidla, and the 
remainder was confirmed to the then 
Rand by a sanad of the British 
Government in 1815. He has six 
feudatory Chiefs subordinate to him, 
viz. the Chiefs of Thiog, Koti, Ghund, 
Kheri, Madhan, and Ratesh ; and of 



136 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



these the first four are tributaries. 
The area of the State is 112 square 
miles ; its population is 31,154, chiefly 
Hindus. The Raja maintains a mili- 
tary force of 108 infantry and 2 guns. 
Residence : Keonthal, Simla Hills, 
Punjab. 

KERALA VARMA RAJA, Rdjd. See 

Chirakal, Valiya Rdjd of. 

KERALA VARMA RAJA, Rdjd. See 
Kottayam, Valiya Rdjd of. 

KERALA VARMA VALIYA KOIL TAM- 
BURAN, C.S.I. Is the consort of Her 
Highness the Senior Rani of Travancore, 
was created a Companion of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India on 
May 25, 1895. Residence : Trivan- 
drum, Travancore. 

KEROWLEE, His Highness the Mahdrdjd 
of. See Karauli. 

KESARI. See Kishori. 

KESHAB KANTA SINGH, Rdjd; h. 
November 1852. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on February 2, 1861, 
the Raja being the grandson and 
representative of the late Raja 
Chandra Kanta Singh, the last reign- 
ing Raja of Assam. Belongs to the 
historical Ahom dynasty, who were 
rulers in Assam for many centuries, 
and are said to be originally Shans 
from Burma. The first Raja of the 
dynasty who adopted Hinduism is 
stated to have been Chuhum-Pha, who 
succeeded to the gadi in 1497 a.d. 
From him the fourth in succession, 
Raja Chutum-Hla, adopted the Hindu 
name of Jayadhajiya Singh ; and he 
was reigning at the time of the Mughal 
invasion by Mir Jumla under the orders 
of the Emperor Aurangzeb. The in- 
vasion was unsuccessful, and the Ahom 
Raja extended his frontier to Goal- 
para. The greatest of the dynasty 
was Raja Rudra Singh, who succeeded 
to the gadi in 1695 ; and in the next 
century their power decayed. Raja 
Gaurinath Singh was the titular Raja 
when the British first sent a force into 
Assam in 1792 to restore him after his 
expulsion by the Koch Raja of Darrang. 
Then followed an invasion of the 
Burmese, who ruled the country till 
the first Burmese war ; at the close of 
which Assam was ceded by Burma to 
the British Power. Raja Gaurinath 
Singh had been succeeded in title by 



his brother, Raja Chandra Kanta 
Singh ; and the grandson of the latter 
is the present Raja. The family 
cognizance is an Arowan (Royal 
Umbrella) and Sripus Kalki (Golden 
Head-dress). Residence : Gauhati, 
Assam. 

KESHAVRAO BHASKARJI, Rao Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India. Residence: Bombay. 

KESOBATI KUMARI, Musjamat, Rdni. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1898. Residence: Hemuie, Santal 
Parganas, Bengal. 

KESOWJI NATHU SAILOR, Rao 
Bahadur. Received the title on 
January 2, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

KESRI. See also Kishori. 

KESRI NARAYAN, Rai ; I. November 
24, 1864. Succeeded to the title on 
March 16, 1895. The title is heredit- 
ary, and of ancient origin. Residence : 
Allahabad. 

KESRI SINGH (of Lakhnadon), ThdAr. 
The title is hereditary, the Thaknr 
being the representative of one of tie 
ancient Chiefs of the Seoni district. 
Residence : Lakhnadon, Seoni, Centrd 
Provinces. 

KET, Maung, Kyet thaye zaung shnn 
Salwe ya Min. The title is personal 
and was conferred on June 1, 1888. Ii 
means "Recipient of the Gold 
Chain of Honour," and is indicated by 
the letters K.S.M. after the name. 
Residence : Yaw, Burma. 

KEUNJHAR, Maharaja Dhanurjai 
Narayan Bhanj Deo, Rdjd of. A 
ruling chief ; b. July 27, 1849 ; suc- 
ceeded to the gadi as a minor 
September 4, 1861. Belongs to a 
Rajput (Hindu) family, claiming 
descent from Joti Bhanj, a brother 
of Adi Bhanj, the founder of the 
Moharbhanj State (q.v.), thirty-four 
generations back. The following is 
the local tradition as to the way in 
which the Keunjhar Rajas got the 
patronymic of Bhanj, in which the 
State got the name of Keunjhar, and 
in which its borders were enlarged : — 
Jai Singh, a son of Man Singh, the 
Maharaja of Jaipur in Rajputana, 
came to visit the shrine of Jagannath 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



137 



in Puri. He married Padmavati, the 
daughter of the Gajapati King of 
Puri, Prattlpendra Deb, and received 
as her dowry the State of Hariharpur, 
which then comprised the two States 
of Moharbhanj and Keunjhar. Two 
sons were horn to him, the elder of 
whom was named Adi Singh and the 
younger Joti Singh. In Mauza 
Rarua in killa Hariharpur there was 
a petty Zamindar named Mayura 
Dhwaja in possession of five pirs. 
He was conquered by Prince Adi 
Singh, and deprived of his Zarnindari. 
The Gajapati King of Puri, hearing of 
the success of Prince Adi Singh, 
conferred on him the title of Bhanj. 
Since that time the title has been 
hereditary in the Moharbhanj and 
Keunjhar Rd,j families. Adi Singh on 
his accession to the gadi changed the 
name of Hariharpur into Moharbhanj, 
and in commemoration of his conquest 
of the territory of Mayura Dhwaja, 
called it and the villages comprised in 
it Adipur Pir, after his own name. 
Prior to his death, Jai Singh separated 
from his killa a portion of land which 
at present goes by the name of Ni jgarh 
zillah, and left it in possession of his 
younger son, Joti Bhanj. Thereupon 
the latter left Moharbhanj, and estab- 
lished a garh (fort) at Jotipur, where 
he dwelt. Subsequently he removed 
his headquarters to a place where 
there was a spring (Jhar) in an ebony 
(kendu) forest ; and since then the 
headquarters and the killa itself are 
called Khendu-Jhar or Keunjhar. 
Jotipur Garh, with its adjoining 
villages, was annexed to killa Keun- 
jhar and called Jotipur Pir. The 
boundaries of killa Keunjhar since its 
foundation by Joti Bhanj up to the 
reign of Govind Bhanj are laid down 
in the topographical maps which were 
prepared by Government between 
1850 and 1862. Govind Bhang being 
offended by some reason or other with 
his father, Trilochan Bhanj, retired to 
Puri and lived there He was ap- 
pointed Commander-in-Chief of the 
army of the Gajapati King of Puri, 
and gained a victory for him in the 
battle of Kanchi-Cavery in the 
Madras Presidency. Soon after, be- 
ing informed of his father's death, he 
got the permission of the Puri Raja 
to return home. Before his departure 
he obtained as a reward from the | 



Ra ja the ^ Zamindari of Athgarh, 
which adjoins the eastern border of the 
Keunjhar State, and on his return 
from Puri he was installed on the 
Keunjhar gadi. Since that date the 
zillah of Athgarh has remained an- 
nexed to killa Keunjhar. It is 
commonly known as Anandpur. In 
1794 a.d. Jainirdan Bhanj married 
Krishnapriya, the daughter of Man- 
ipal and grand-daughter of Arnapurna, 
the R&ni of Pal Lahera, and received 
as dowry the Zamindari of Pal Lahera. 
On the death of Krishnapriya in 1825, 
the petty Zamindars of Pal Lahera 
combined with the ryots of that 
State and opposed Janardan Bhanj 's 
possession of Pal Lahera. From 1794 
to 1825 the Raja of Keunjhar had 
full authority over P&l Lahera ; and 
though the latter was subsequently 
made independent, it still pays its 
tribute through the former. The title 
of Raja is hereditary in this family, 
and dates from the period of the 
Mahratta dominion in Orissa ; it was 
formally conferred by the British 
Government in 1874. The title of 
Maharaja was conferred on the 
present Chief as a personal distinc- 
tion, January 1, 1877, on the occasion 
of the Proclamation of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India. The cognizance of the family 
is a peacock with the tail spread. 
The area of the State, which is one of 
the Orissa Tributary Mahals, is 3096 
square miles ; its population is 215,612, 
chiefly Hindus, but including nearly 
20,000 belonging to various aboriginal 
tribes. The Mahar4ja maintains a 
military force of 2949 infantry and 32 
guns. Residence: Keunjhar, Oinssa, 
Bengal. 
KHACHAR ALA CHELA, C.S.T. Created 
a Companion of the Most Exalted 
Order of the Star of India on June 
22, 1897. Residence: Jasdan, Kathi- 
dwar, Bombay. 

KHADIJA BEGAM SAHIBA. Princess. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on March 11, 1866. Residence: 
Madras. 

KHAEtBAKHSH KHAN, Mir, Marri, 
Khan Bahadur. The Mir received the 
title of Khan Bahadur on May 20, 1896. 
Residence : Baluchistan. 

KHAIRA, Raja of. See Ramnarayan 
Singh, 



138 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



KHAIR-UN-NISA BEGAM, Her High- 
ness the Nawab. The title is personal ; 
it was originally conferred by the 
Nawab of the Carnatic, and recognized 
on December 16, 1890. Her Highness 
is the Shadi widow of His Highness 
the late Nawab Ghulam Muhammad 
Ghaus Khan, last titular Nawab of the 
Carnatic. Residence: Madras. 

KHAIRAGARH, Kamal Narayan Singh, 

Rdjd of. A ruling chief; b. 1879. 
Succeeded to the c/adi on the death of 
Lai Umrao Singh, February 19, 1891, 
and received the title of Rajd as a 
personal distinction on January 1, 1896. 
Belongs to a Kshatriya family that 
claims descent from the ancient Maha- 
rajas of Chutia Nagpur. On January 
1, 1898, the title of Raja was declared 
hereditary. The area of the State is 
941 square miles ; its population is 
86,000, chiefly Hindus. Residence: 
Khairagarh, Raipur, Central Provinces. 

KHAIRIGARH. Rani of. See Surat 
Kunwar. 

KHAIRPUR, His Highness Mir Sir Faiz 
Muhammed Khan, Talpur, G.C.I. E. } 
Mir of. A ruling chief. Has recently 
succeeded his father, the late Mir His 
Highness Sir Ali Murad Khan, Talpur. 
Is the representative of the historical 
Baluch family called Talpur, that con- 
quered Sind in 1783 a.d. In that year 
Mir Fateh AM Khan Talpur established 
himself as Rais of Sind ; and subse- 
quently his nephew, Mir Sohrab Khan 
Talpur, with his two sons, named 
respectively Mir Rustam and Ali Murad 
— the last-named being the late Mir 
of Khairpur — founded the Khairpur 
branch of the Talpur rulers of Sind. 
Mir Sohrab Khan gradually extended 
his dominions until they extended from 
the Jaisalmir Desert on the east to 
Kachh Gandava in Baluclustan on the 
west. In 1813 he ceased to pay tribute 
to Afghanistan, and in 1832 Khairpur 
was recognized as a separate State from 
the rest of Sind, in a treaty with the 
BritishPower. During the first Afghan 
war, when most of the Sind Mirs were 
believed to be hostile, the Mir Ali 
Murad Khan cordially supported the 
British policy. Consequently, when, 
after the close of that war, the victory 
of Miani (Meeanee) effected the con- 
quest of Sind, and the rest of Sind was 
annexed and incorporated in the British 
territory, the State of Khairpur re- 



tained its political existence as a 
feudatory of the Empire. In 1866 a 
sanad was granted to His Highness's 
predecessor, guaranteeing the succes- 
sion according to Muhammadan law. 
His Highness was created a Knight 
Grand Commander of the Most Emin- 
ent Order of the Indian Empire on 
June 22, 1897, on the auspicious oc- 
casion of the Diamond Jubilee of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty the Queen 
Empress. The area of the State is 
6109 square miles ; its population is 
129,153, chiefly Muhammadans, but 
including more than 26,000 Hindus. 
His Highness maintains a military 
force of 700 cavalry, 774 infantry, and 
32 guns, and is entitled to a salute of 
15 guns. Residence: Khairpur, Sind, 
Bombay. 

KHAJURGA0N, Rand of. See Shankar 
Bakhsh Singh ; see also Sheoraj Singh. 

KHAJURIA, Mian Karim Bakhsh, Midn 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1859. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi December 24, 1863. 
Belongs to a Pindari (Muhammadan) 
family. The population of the State 
is 467, chiefly Hindus. Residence: 
Khajuria, Bhopal, Central India. 

KHAKSIS, Rdjd of. See Raghunath. 

KHALAK SINGH (of Mohli), Thdkur. 
Succeeded his father, the late Thdkur 
Hamir Singh, in 1894. The title is 
hereditary, and was originally con- 
ferred by the Raja of Benares. Be- 
longs to the same family as the Rajas 
of Hatisi in Damoh district, Central 
Provinces. This branch of the family 
obtained the jdgir of Mohli from the 
former Government of Sagar. Resi- 
dence : Sagar, Central Provinces. 

KHALTHAUN, ThakurHargayan Singh, 
Thdkur of. A ruling chief; b. 1864. 
Succeeded to the gadi in 1883. Belongs 
to a Kshatriya Yadav (Hindu) family. 
The area of the State is 5 square miles ; 
its population is about 8000, chiefly 
Hindus. The Thakur maintains a 
military force of 15 cavalry and 50 
infantry. Residence : Khalthaun, 
Gwalior, Central India. 

KHAM HS0I, Ahmudan gaung Tazeik ya 
Min. This Burmese title {see Intro- 
duction) was conferred on May 30, 
1891. Residence: Mongye, Burma. 

KHAN BABA KHAN, Khdn Bahddvr. 
The title is personal, and was con- 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



139 



ferred on February 16, 1887, on the 
occasion of the Jubilee of Her Majesty's 
reign. Residence: Peshawar, Punjab. 

KHAN MUHAMMAD KHAN walad 
WALI MUHAMMAD KHAN, Mir. 
The title has been continued for life, the 
Mir being a representative of one of the 
Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the time of 
the annexation. Residence: Shikar- 
pur, Sind. 

KHANDERAO APPAJI, Gupte, Rao Sa- 

heb. The title is personal. Residence : 
Thand, Bombay. 

KHANDERAO SIDRAMAPA DESAI 
NADGAODA (of Kurbet), Shriman 
Maha Naik Nadgaoda Nagnuriebirada 
Himori. The title is hereditary, 
having been originally conferred by the 
Chief of Anigundi on an ancestor, for 
having cleared the jungles of Gokak of 
the bandits who frequented them — and 
having been recognized by the British 
Government. Belongs to a Mahratta 
(Hindu) family claiming descent from 
Jogi Nikumbi Naik, through a long 
series of generations. Khanderao 
Baba Saheb succeeded his father 
Sidramapa Balapa Desai. Residence: 
Belgaum, Bombay. 

KHANDERAO VISHWANATH RASTE, 

Rao Bahadur; b. 1845. The title of 
Rao Bahadur is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1877, at the 
Imperial Assemblage at Delhi, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Majesty as Empress of India — when 
he also received a Medal of Honour. 
Is also a First Class Sardar of the 
Deccan, and claims the hereditary 
rank of Sardar. Belongs to a Kon- 
kanasth Brahman family, resident 
from early times in Velneshwar, in the 
district of Ratnagiri ; originally the 
family name was "Gokhle," changed 
at a later date for " Raste." The 
founder of the family was named 
Ballah. His descendant Shamji Naik 
had three sons, who entered the service 
of the Shahu Raja of Sat&ra, in which 
they acquired important positions. 
The second of these, named Bhikaji, 
had a daughter married to the Peshwa 
Narayan Rao ; the eldest, named 
Haribaji Naik, was the ancestor of 
this family. His great-grandson, 
Khanderao Nilkant Raste, was ap- 
pointed to a military command by the 
celebrated Nana Farnavis under the 



Peshwa Mahadeo Rao Narayan ; he 
served with great success in many 
campaigns, and rose to high honours, 
with considerable grants of land. His 
son, Vishwasrao Khanderao, was a 
Sardar of the Deccan of the second 
class ; he was granted a pension by the 
Government in 1819, and was suc- 
ceeded by his son, the present title- 
holder. The Rao Bahadur was 
educated at the Poona College ; was a 
Member of the Bombay Legislative 
Council, 1884-86 ; is a Magistrate for 
Poona, and also for Kolaba, and a 
Justice of the Peace for the town and 
island of Bombay. Residence : Poona, 
Bombay. 

KHANDHAI SINGH, Subadar-Major, 
Bahadur. Received the title of Baha- 
dur on July 24, 1896. Residence : Ba- 
hadurpur, Rai Bareilly, North- Western 
Provinces. 

KHANDKAR FAZL-I-RABBI, Khan Ba- 
hadur. See Fazl-i-Rabbi, Khwandkhar. 

KHANDPARA, Raja Natobar Singh 
Mardraj Bhramarbar Rai, Raja of. 
A ruling chief ; b. 1837. Succeeded to 
the gadi February 28, 1867. Belongs 
to a Rajput (Hindu) family, claiming 
descent from a younger son of the 
Nayagarh family, seventy-one genera- 
tions ago. The RaVjii Raghunath 
Singh of Nayagarh had two sons. 
The elder son, Harihar Singh, became 
Raja of Nayagarh, and the younger, 
Jadunath Singh Mangraj, retained 
possession of four Garhs or forts, as 
his share, viz. Kadua, Ghuntsahi, 
Sardhapur, and Khedpada, all in Naya- 
garh. There was at that time a Chief 
ruling over a tract from Ogalpur to 
Harichandanpur in Khandpara. Him 
the said Mangraj defeated, and took 
possession of his territory. Gradually 
in course of time and by dint of arms, 
his son Pitabas Singh, his grandson 
Narayan Singh, and his great-grandson 
Balunkeswar Singh extended their 
dominions, and strengthened the State 
of Khandpara. The petty Chiefs who 
ruled within the jurisdiction of this 
State during these times, and their 
subjects, were savage aborigines. The 
Rajas of Khandpard defeated these 
petty Chiefs, gave education to the 
savages, cleared the jungle, formed 
villages and civilized the country. Up 
to the reign of Raja Narayan Singh 
Mangraj, Khandpara extended on the 



140 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



east up to Banki, on the west to Bala- 
ramprasad in Daspalla, on the north to 
Kantilo, and on the south up to Jogia- 
pali in Nayagarh. During the reign 
of Banamali Singh Mardraj Bhra- 
marbar Rai, son of Raja Balunkeswar 
Singh Mangraj, the Raja of Bod did 
not give the State to his adopted son 
Makund Deb Bhanj, whom he had 
brought from Moharbhanj, but gave it 
to another person whom he subse- 
quently adopted as his son. This gave 
offence to Makund Deb Bhanj, and he 
consequently sought help from the 
Raja of Khandpara, Banamali Singh 
Mardraj Bhramarbar Rai. This Bana- 
mali was a brave and powerful Raja, 
and expert in war. He engaged the 
Raja of Bod, and after defeating him 
made the said Makund Deb Bhanj 
Raja over a part of Bod territory, and 
gave the new State the name of 
Daspalla. Raja Jadunath Singh Man- 
graj, the founder of the Khandpara 
State, got the title of Mangraj from 
the Maharaja of Orissa, and it was 
enjoyed from this time down to 
Balunkeswar Singh. Banamali Singh, 
the son of Balunkeswar Singh, was a 
very powerful Chief, and defended the 
Maharaja of Orissa from the attacks 
of his enemies. The latter gave him 
as a reward the title of Bhai Mardraj 
Bhramarbar Rai, which has been 
enjoyed by successive Chiefs to the 
present day. During the reign of Raja 
Niladri Singh Mardraj Bhramarbar 
Rai, Raghuji Bhonsle, the Maharaja 
of Nagpur, gave the Raja a flag, which 
is still used., When Orissa was first 
conquered by the British Government, 
Raja Narsingha Singh Mardraj Bhra- 
marbar Rai gave assistance to the chief 
military officers of the British Govern- 
ment, and received an elephant and a 
cannon in recognition thereof. The 
present Raja is a son of the late Raja 
Krishna Chandra Singh Mardraj Bhra- 
marbar Rai ; and succeeded his brother, 
the late Kunja Vihari Singh Mardraj 
Bhramarbar Rai, who died without 
issue in 1867. The title of Raja is 
hereditary in the family, and dates 
from the period of the Mahratta 
dominion in Orissa; it was formally 
recognized by the British Government 
in 1874. The cognizance of the family 
is a tiger's head. The State, which is 
one of the Orissa Tributary Mahals, 
has an area of 244 square miles, and a 



population of 66,296, chiefly Hindus. 
The Raja maintains a military force of 
1085 infantry and 12 guns. Residence : 
Khandpara, Orissa, Bengal. 

KHANIADHANA, Raja Chhatar Singh, 
Jdgircldr of. A ruling chief ; b. 1863. 
Succeeded to the gadi December 13, 
1869. Belongs to the great Bundela 
(Rajput) family of Orchha, that has 
given ruling families to Panna, Datia, 
Ajaigarh, and most of the States of 
Bundelkhand. Amresh was a younger 
son of the Maharaja Udit Singh of 
Orchha, and received the territory of 
Khaniadhana as his portion. Much of 
this territory was taken away by the 
Mahrattas. Fourth in descent from 
Amresh was the Raja Guman Singh, 
who received a sanad from the British 
Government in 1863. Guman Singh 
died in 1869, and was succeeded by the 
present Jagirdar, who on January 1, 
1877, at the Imperial Assemblage at 
Delhi, on the occasion of the Pro- 
clamation of Her Majesty as Empress 
of India, received the title of Raja as 
a personal distinction. The area of the 
State is 84 square miles; its population 
is 13,494, chiefly Hindus. The Raja 
maintains a military force of 5 cavalry, 
65 infantry, and 2 guns. Residence: 
Khaniadhana, Bundelkhand, Central 
India. 

KHANPUR, Rdjd of. See Jahandad 
Khan. 

KHARAL, Mian Sursinghji Sardar- 
singhji, Mian of. A ruling chief ; b. 
1860. Succeeded to the gadi April 20, 
1884. Belongs to a Koli (Muhamma- 
dan) family. The area of the State is 
16 square miles ; its population 3189, 
chiefly Hindus. Residence: Kharal, 
Mahi Kantha, Bombay. * 

KHARAN, Sarddr of. See Naoroz Khan. 

KHARDA, Rdjd of. See Mukund Deb. 

KHARIAR, Thdknr of. See Padman 
Singh. 

KHARSEDJI RUSTAMJI THANA- 
WAIA, Khan Bahadur, CLE. Re- 
ceived the CLE. on June 3, 1899. Is 
Diwanof Ratlam. Residence: Ratlam, 
Central India. 

KHARSEDJI RUSTAMJI, Khan Bahd- 
dnr. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 



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141 



Majesty as Empress of India. Resi- 
dence : Baroda. 

KHARSIA, Thakur Balwant Singh, 
Thdlcur of. A ruling chief; b. 1855. 
Succeeded to the gadi September 26, 
1876. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) 
family. Residence : Kharsia, Bhopal, 
Central India. 

KHARSOWAN, Thakur Mahendra Na- 
rayan Singh Deo, Thakur of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1869. Succeeded his 
father, Thakur Raghunath Singh Deo, 
March 2, 1884, as a minor. Belongs to 
a Rajput (Hindu) family, descended 
from a younger son of the ancient 
Porahat family, that came into Orissa 
in very early times from Jodhpur in 
Rajputana. The title of Thakur was 
originally bestowed by the Raja of 
Porahat, and has been conferred on 
the Chief as a personal distinction. The 
State (which is one of the Chota 
Nagpur Tributary Mahals) has an area 
of 149 square miles, and a population 
of 31,051, chiefly Hindus. The Thakur 
has a military force of 3 guns. Resi- 
dence : Kharsowan, Singhbhum, Chota 
Nagpur, Bengal. 

KHEM SINGH, Bedi, The Hon. Baba 
Sir, K.C.I.E. See Baba. 

KHEMCHAND, Tahilrdm, CLE. See 
Tahilram. 

KHENDA, Thakur of. See Rani Singh. 

KHERAWARA, Thakur Vajesinghji, 
Thakur of. A ruling chief; b. 1847. 
Belongs to a Koli (aboriginal) family. 
The area of his State is 27 square 
miles; its population is over 1300, 
chiefly Hindus. Residence: Kherawara, 
Mahi Kantha, Bombay. 

KHERI, Chief of. Is a feudatory of the 
Raja of Keonthal (q.v.), and rules over 
one of the Simla Hill States. Resi- 
dence : Kheri, Simla Hills, Punjab. 

KHERWASA, Thakur Partab Singh, 
Thakur of. A ruling chief; b. 1880. 
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor in 
1887. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) 
family. The population of the State is 
about 500, Hindus and Muhammadans. 
Residence: Kherwasa, "Western Malwa, 
Central India. 

KHET SINGH (of Gobra), Rdjd; b. 
February 4, 1842. The title is heredi- 
tary, having been originally conferred 
by one of the old Gond Rajas of Garha- 



Mandla, and confirmed by Government . 
Is a descendant of Raja Karan, and 
rendered good service in the campaigns 
that followed the Mutiny of 1857. 
Residence: Gobra, Damoh, Central 
Provinces. 

KHETTAR (KSHETTRA) CHANDAR 
ADITYA, Rai Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on May 25, 1892. Resi- 
dence : Bengal. 

KHETTAR (KSHETTRA) CHANDAR 
BANARJI, Rai Bahadur. The title 
is personal, and was conferred on 
December 6, 1884, for services rendered 
in the Public Works Department. 
Residence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

KHLANDA, Madan Singh, Chief of . A 
ruling chief ; b. 1880. Succeeded to 
the gadi as a minor December 27, 1889. 
The population of the State is about 
1100, chiefly Hindus. Residence: Khian- 
da, Guna, Central India. 

KHTLCHIPUR, Rao Bahadur Amar 

Singhji, Rao Bahadur of. A ruling 
chief ; b. 1834. Succeeded to the gadi 
November 27, 1868. Belongs to a 
Khichi Rajput (Hindu) family, de- 
scended from Durjan Sal, a Khichi 
Chief. The area of his State is about 
272 square miles ; its population 36,125, 
chiefly Hindus. The Rao Bahadur 
maintains a military force of 45 cavalry, 
202 infantry, and 2 guns ; and is 
entitled to a salute of 9 guns. The 
family has a white banner (with black 
silk tassel), bearing the effigy of Hanu- 
man, the monkey-god. The Rao Baha- 
dur's eldest son is named Lalji Bhawani 
Singh. Residence: Khilchipur, Bhopal, 
Central India. 
KHIMSIPUR, Rao of See Baisni, Tha- 
kurain. 

KHIRASRA, JarejaRaisinghji Jijibhai, 
Tdlukddr of. A ruling chief ; b. 1850. 
Succeeded to the gadi January 1, 1872. 
Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family. 
The area of his State is 13 square miles ; 
its population is 4377, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence : Khirasra, Kathiawar, Bom- 
bay. 

KHIR0DA PRASAD PAL, Rai Bahddxir; 
b. 1852. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1897, for liberality and 
public spirit. Residence : Sikandarpur, 
Hooghly, Bengal. 

KHITABAT KHAN. See Muhammad 
Ghaus, Shaikh. 



142 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



KHITISH (KSHITISH) CHANDAR RAI 

(of Nadiya), Maharaja Bahadur; b. 
April 16, 1868. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1890, as a per- 
sonal distinction, when the Maharaja 
Bahadur came of age after a long 
minority ; and it has been enjoyed by 
the Rajas of Nadiya (or Nuddea) for 
many generations, having been first 
conferred by the Emperor of Delhi on 
the Maharaja Rudra ten generations 
ago. Belongs to a Kulin Brahman 
family of the highest caste, claiming 
descent from the famous Bhatta Nara- 
yan, one of the five Brahman apostles 
whom King Adisur brought to Bengal 
from Kanauj. A far man bearing the 
seal and signature of the Emperor 
Alamgir is extant, in which the Raja 
Rudra is addressed as Raja. His 
great-grandson, the Maharaja Krishna 
Chandra Rai, received two farmdns 
from the Emperor Shah Alam, con- 
ferring on him the title of Maharaja. 
Since the establishment of British rule 
in Bengal each Raja of Nadiya in suc- 
cession has been created a Maharaja 
Bahadur. The late Maharaja Satis 
Chandra Rai Bahadur, Raja of Nadiya, 
was eminently loyal to the Govern- 
ment, and exceedingly liberal, especi- 
ally to his tenants and to educational 
institutions. He presented a beautiful 
park as the site for the Krishnagar 
State College of the Calcutta Uni- 
versity, at the town of Krishnagar, 
which is the capital of Nadiya ; and he 
subscribed largely to the funds, both 
for the building and for the endow- 
ment of that important institution. 
The present Maharaja Bahadur was 
his son by adoption, and has only 
recently (1890) attained his majority. 
Residence: Krishnagar, Nadiya, Bengal. 

KHIVA, Sarddr of. See Kehar Singh. 

KHOJANKHERA, Thakur Bakhtawar 
Singh, Thakur of. A ruling chief ; b. 
1860. Succeeded to the gadi in 1878. 
Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family. 
The population of the State is about 
500. Residence: Khojankhera,Western 
Malwa, Central India. 

KH0MAN SINGH, Bakhshi, C.S.I. See 
Bakhshi. 

KH0RY, A. .M M Khan Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of Her Majesty's reign. 
Residence : Mhow, Central India. 



KHUDA BAKHSH, Jamadar, Khan 
Saheb. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1896. Residence: The 
Somali Coast. 

KHUDA BAKHSH, Maulavi, Khan 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1883, as a 
reward for highly meritorious service 
as Government Pleader. Residence: 
Patna, Bengal. 

KHUDA BAKHSH, Shaikh, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1895. Residence : Amritsar, 
Punjab. 

KHUDA KAKHSH KHAN walad JAM 

NINDO, Mir. The title is hereditary, 
the Mir being the representative of 
one of the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at 
the time of the annexation. He is the 
only son of the Jam Nindo Khan, a 
member of the Sohrabani branch of 
the Talpur family. Residence: Hy- 
derabad, Sind. 

KHUDADAD KHAN, Khan Saheb. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 2, 1888. Residence: Sukkur, 
Sind. 

KHUDADAD KHAN, Kazi, Arbab, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Residence: Quetta, 
Baluchistan. 

KHUDADAD KHAN imlad KHAIR 
MUHAMMAD KHAN, Mir. The title 
has been continued for life, the Mir 
being the representative of one of the 
Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the time of 
the annexation. Residence: Shikar- 
pur, Sind. 

KHUDADAD KHAN RAZU KHAN, 

Khan Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1892. Residence: 
Karachi, Sind. 

KHUMAN SINGH (of Ghatakheri), 
Thakur. The title is hereditary. Rest' 
dence : Nimar, Central Provinces. 

KHURDA, Raja of. See Mukund Deb. 

KHURSHID JAH, Bahadur, K.C.I.E., 

Sir, JVawdb, Shams-ul-Umara, Amir-i- 
Kabir. One of the Premier Nobles of 
the Hyderabad State. The Nawab 
Bahadur, who was born about the 
year 1838, is the present representa- 
tive (with his brother, Sir Vikar- 
ul-Umara, q.v., and his late cousin, 
Sir Asman Jah) of the great and 
powerful Shamsiya family, the first 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



143 



among the noble families of Hydera- 
bad, which has been frequently con- 
nected by marriage with the Ruling 
House, and entrusted with the heredi- 
tary command of the Paigah or House- 
hold Troops of the Nizam. Descended 
from the famous captain, Shaikh Abul 
Khair Khan, Imam Jang, Shamsher 
Bahadur, who was a Mansabdar in 
Malwa under the Emperor Aurangzeb. 
He attached himself to the fortunes of 
the great Asaf Jah, the founder of 
the Hyderabad dynasty, under whose 
banner he rose to the highest com- 
mands. In 1745 he defeated a Mah- 
ratta force, and under the successors 
of Asaf Jah, the Nizams Nasir Jang 
and Salabat Jang, he continued his 
successful career. In 1752 he died at 
Burhanpur, and was succeeded by his 
son, Abul Fateh Khan Teg Jang, who 
became the first Noble of the Nizam 
Ali, obtaining the command of the 
Paiaak or Household Troops, immense 
territorial possessions, and the titles of 
Shams-ud-daula, Shams-ul-Mulk, and 
Shams-ul-Umara. He died in 1786, 
when campaigning in Panghul, and 
was succeeded by his son, who at the 
early age of four had received from 
the Nizam the titles of Ba-ud-din 
Khan, Imam Jang, Khurshid-ud-daula, 
and Khurshid-ul-Mulk. He succeeded 
to all the honours of his father, and 
became a famous scholar and savant, 
receiving at various times the titles of 
Teg Jang, Shams-ud-daula, Shams- 
ul-Mulk, Shams-ul-Umara Bahadur, 
and in 1827 the title of Amir-i- 
Kabir. In 1849 he became for a short 
time Prime Minister of Hyderabad. 
He died in 1862, leaving two sons, 
Umdat-ul-Mulk (who became Amir-i- 
Kabir) and Ikhtidar-ul-Mulk (who be- 
came Vikar-ul-Uinara). The former 
died in 1877, when the latter succeeded 
him in the family honours, and as Co- 
Regent of the State, adding the title 
of Amir-i-Kabir to that of Vikar-ul- 
Umara. He died in 1881, leaving two 
sons, the Nawab Sir Khurshid Jah 
Bahadur and the Nawab Sir Vikar-ul- 
Umara (Ikbal-ud-daula, Bahadur). Sir 
Khurshid was created a Knight Com- 
mander of the Most Eminent Order of 
the Indian Empire on February 16, 
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee 
of the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty; and he has held the offices 
of Member of the Council of Regency, 



and Member of the Council of State. 
The Nawab is a fine Persian and Urdu 
scholar, and has travelled in many 
parts of India. Like their late kinsman 
Sir Asman Jah, both Sir Khurshid Jah 
and his brother Sir Vikar-ul-Umara 
have shared the fortune of their an- 
cestor, in allying themselves in mar- 
riage with Princesses of the Royal 
House of Hyderabad. In his palace at 
Hyderabad are to be seen the sword 
and armour of his ancestor, Abul Fateh 
Khan Teg Jang, a warrior of great size 
and height. Residences: Hyderabad; 
Shams-ul-Umara's Baradari, Hyder- 
abad. 

KHUSHAL SINGH (of Eajaur), Rdjd; 
b. 1846. The title is hereditary ; the 
Raja being one of the Chiefs of the 
Chauhan Rajputs, and boasting a direct 
descent from Prithiraj, the last Chau- 
han Rajput Emperor of Delhi, whose 
romantic history is sung by every 
Hindu bard, and whose fall virtually 
transferred the sovereignty of India 
from the Hindus to the Muham- 
madans. Prithiraj perished in battle 
with Shahab-ud-din Ghori in 1193 a.d. 
Eighth in descent from him was the 
famous Bhoj Raj of Hansi, who re- 
conquered Ajmir, the old home of the 
Chauhan Rajputs — Prithiraj having 
been the son of a Chauhan Raja of 
Ajmir by a daughter of the Tomara 
Rajput Raja of Delhi, Anang Pal, and 
having been adopted by his maternal 
grandfather at Delhi. Fifth in descent 
from Bhoj Raj was Dhira Raj, who 
migrated from Hansi to Bilram; and 
fourth in descent from him was Sakit 
Deo, who founded Sakit, and whose 
descendants were the Chauhan Rajas 
of Sakit and Rajaur. His grandson, 
Bhupal Deo, had two sons, Yahani 
Sahai and Udaicharan; the latter 
founded the family of the Chauhan 
Rajas of Mainpuri, the former re- 
mained as Raja of Sakit and Rajaur. 
Seven generations later Raja Sawant 
Sen was driven out of these ancestral 
possessions by the army of Ibrahim 
Shah Lodi, Sultan of Delhi ; but after 
the subversion of the Lodi dynasty by 
the invasion of Babar and his Mughals, 
Sawant Sen's grandson, named Chakra 
Sen, was enabled to return 'to Sakit and 
Rajaur as a feudatory of the Mughal 
Emperor. Eight generations followed 
each other in peaceful possession of 



144 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



the Raj under the strong arm of the 
Mughals ; and Raja Hari Singh in the 
time of Aurangzeo was famous for his 
prowess, won many battles, and was 
high in the favour both of that 
Emperor and of his successors, the 
Emperors Farukhsiyar and Muham- 
mad Shah. But in the time of Hari 
Singh's son, Raj Singh, the country 
was given up to anarchy, and during 
this disturbed period Sakit was seized 
by the Nawab of Farukhabad, and was 
lost for ever to the Chauhan Rajas of 
Rajaur. Raj Singh's grandson was 
Raja Datta Singh; and the grandson 
of the latter was the late Raja Drigpal 
Singh, father of the present Raja. 
Raja Khushal Singh has two sons, 
Kunwar Lai Jagmohan Singh, born 
1873 ; and Kunwar Lai Dharm Singh, 
born 1883. Residence: Rajaur, Etah, 
North- Western Provinces. 

KHUSHAL SINGH, Subadar-Major, 

Rai Bahadur. The title was conferred 
for eminent military services on May 
25, 1894. Residence : Burma. 

KHUSHALRAI SARABHAI, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress 
of India. Residence: Ahmadabad, 
Bombay. 

KHWAJA— A prefix. 

KHYRIM, A., Khur Singh, Seim of. A 
. ruling chief ; b. 1843. Succeeded to 
the (jadi December 4, 1871. The Seim 
is Chief of one of the Khasi and 
Jaintia Hill States, the population of 
which is about 24,000, and consists of 
Khasis and Christian converts. Resi- 
dence : Khyrim, Khasi Hills, Assam. 

KINNU RAI, Rai Bahadur; b. 1829. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on June 6, 1885, in recognition 
of his loyal services during the time 
of the Mutiny in 1857, when he 
protected the Stud property of the 
Government at the risk of his own 
life. Residence: Ghdzipur, North- 
Western Provinces. 

KINWUN MINGYI MAUNG GATING, 
C.S.I. Created a C.S.I. on February 
16,1887. Residence: Burma. 

KIRALI, Cholu walad Apsingh Naik, 
Chief of. A ruling chief; b. 1861. 
Succeeded to the gadi November 1, 



1886. Belongs to a Bhil (aboriginal) 
family. The State (which is one of 
the Dang States of Khandesh) has an 
area of 12 square miles, and a popula- 
tion of 1671, chiefly Bhils. Residence^ 
Kirali, Khandesh, Bombay. 

KIRAT CHAND (of Lambagraon), Mian. 
The title is hereditary, the Mian 
being the brother of the late Raja 
Partab Chand of Lambagraon, and 
the uncle of the present Raja, Jai 
Chand (q.v.) of Lambagraon, who is 
the head of the great Katoch Rajput 
family of Kangra. The Mian is the 
younger son of Mian Rudra Chand of 
Lambagraon, who was the grandson of 
the Raja Tegh Chand of Kangra, and 
who became the head of the Kaugra 
family on the failure of the elder 
branch. Residence : Lambagraon, Kan- 
gra, Punjab. 

KIRPAL SINGH (of Dhin), Sardar; b. 
1836. The title is hereditary. The 
Sardar is the head of a Jat family of 
Sikhs, descended from Sardar Parsa 
Singh. The latter was the nephew 
and heir of Sardar Sham Singh, who 
at the time of the decline of the Mug- 
hal Empire came from the district of 
Amritsar, conquered the territory of 
Dhin in the Ambala district of the 
Punjab, and settled there. Parsa 
Singh's grandson was the Sarddr Ranjit 
Singh, who was slain by Kanh Singh, 
and who was succeeded by his son, the 
present Sarddr. Residence: Anibala, 
Punjab. 

KIRTI SAH (of Tehri), Raja. See Tehri. 

KISHAN. See Krishna. 

KISHAN DATT SINGH (of Oel), Rdjd; 
b. 1861. Succeeded his father, the late 
Raja of Oel, on October 18, 1879. 
The title is hereditary, having been 
originally conferred by the late King 
of Oudh in 1849, and recognized by 
the British Government in December 
1877. Belongs to the Janwar family 
of Kheri, Oudh, of which the elder 
branch is represented by the Raja 
Achal Singh (q.v .) of Kaimahra. But 
the late Rdjd of Oel, Rdjd Anrudh 
Singh, was recognized as the head of 
the Kheri Janwars on account of his 
great wealth and ability. The family 
were originally Chauhdn Rdjputs in 
the service of the Sayyids of Pihdni, 
having migrated from Rdjputdna in 
the sixteenth century. In the time of 



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145 



Sayyid Khurd, Jamni Khan Jan war 
became Chaudhri of Kheri in 1553 
a.d., with the right to levy a cess on 
all the lands in that Pargand. His 
descendants gradually increased their 
possessions, the Chaudhri Parbal Singh 
Janwar owning Oel, Kaimahra, and 
Khogi , and his descendant, the Rai 
Than Singh, of Oel, owning many 
more villages. In 1838 Rai Umrao 
Singh was the head of the family. 
The Rai Bakht Singh, grandfather of 
the late Raja Anrudh Singh, built a 
large and handsome temple at Oel. 
The Raja has a son and heir, named 
Kunwar Baldeo Singh. Residence: 
Oel, Kheri, Oudh. 

KISHAN KUMAR, Rai (of Sahespur), 
Rdjd; b. December 25, 1848. The title 
of Raja is personal, and was conferred 
on May 24, 1882, the family title 
being Rai. Belongs to a Kshatriya 
(Rajput) family, said to have come 
from the Punjab, and settled in the 
district of Moradabad, in the reign of 
the Emperor Muhammad Shah, by 
whom the title of Rai was conferred 
on its then head. On the cession of 
Rohilkhand, Rai Atma Ram, great- 
grandfather of the present Rdjd, was 
chakladdr of Bijnor, and subsequently 
he entered the service of the British 
Government. His grandson, the late 
Rai Pardaman Kishan, rendered good 
services during the Mutiny of 1857-58, 
assisting the British officers who had 
taken refuge at Naini Tal by sending 
them money and information. For 
these services he was rewarded with a 
grant of estates. The present Raja 
received a Medal of Honour at the 
Imperial Assemblage of Delhi on 
January 1, 1877, on the occasion of 
the Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India ; and a 
khilat at the Agra Darbar of February 
10, 1879. He is an Honorary Magis- 
trate. ?He has a son and heir, Kunwar 
Raj Kumar. Residence : Sahespur, 
Moradabad, North- Western Provinces. 

KISHAN KUNWAR (of Rdmpur), Rdni; 
b. September 1857. The title is here- 
ditary, the Raja of Rampur being the 
acknowledged head of the Rahtor Raj- 
puts in Northern India, and boasting 
direct descent from the famous Jai- 
chandra, the last Rahtor Rdjd of 
Kanauj, who was slain in 1191 A.D., 
when the Empire of Kanauj was sub- 



verted by Shahdb-ud-dinGhori. Their 
Highnesses the Mahdrdjds of Jodhpur 
and Bikanir (q.v .) are descended from 
the eldest son of Jaichandra, the 
former being the head of the whole 
Rdhtor clan ; and the Rdjd of Rdmpur 
is descended from his second son, who 
was named Jaipdl. Prajanpdl, the 
fifth in descent from Jaipdl, left 
Kanauj, and established himself at 
Khor, where the family remained for 
many generations . There Jaideo, four- 
teenth in descent from Jaipdl, was 
attacked by Altamsh, and driven out 
after a siege of twelve years. Eight 
generations later Karan Singh settled 
in the district of Budaun. His great- 
grandson, Rdjd Pratdp Rudra, received 
a grant of territory from the Nawab of 
Farukhabad for assisting him against 
the Rohillas; and subsequently the 
Rdjd Rdmsahai, twenty-eighth in de- 
scent from Jaipdl, established the 
family residence at Rdmpur in Etah, 
where it still remains. At the time of 
the cession of the territories of the 
Nawdb to the British, Nawdl Singh 
was the Rdjd of Rdmpur, and his 
grandson, the late Rajd Rdm Chandra 
Singh, was the husband of the present 
Rdni. He died on May 20, 1883, and 
was succeeded by his widow. The 
Rdni has a grandson and heir, named 
Ldl Jagmohan Singh, born in 1877. 
Residence: Azamnagar, Etah, North- 
western Provinces. 

KISHAN LAL, Pandit, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1895. Residence : Mustafabad, Punjab. 

KISHAN SINGH, Sarddr ; b. 1847. The 
title is hereditary. Belongs to a Jat 
(Sikh) family, descended from the 
Sarddr Gurbakhsh Singh, who acquired 
some territory in the Ambdla district 
by conquest in 1759 a.d. The repre- 
sentatives of the family rendered good 
service during the first Sikh war of 
1845-46, and also at the time of the 
Mutiny in 1857. Residence: Ambdla, 
Punjab. 

KISHAN SINGH (of Rai), Midn. The 
title is hereditary. Belongs to a Rdj- 
put family, descended from Rdjd Indar 
Singh, who ruled in Shdhpur in the 
Kdngra district. He married a daugh- 
ter of the Katoch Rdjd of Kdngra (see 
Jai Chand, Rdjd of Lambagraon, 
Kdngra), whither he fled when driven 
out of his territory by Rdjd Pirthi 
L 



146 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Singh ; and his grandson, Mian Ishri 
Singh, father of the present Mian, 
obtained a considerable jdgir from 
the Rajd Sansar Chand of Kangra, son 
of Raja Tegh Chand. Ishri Singh's 
sister was married to the Jammu 
Eaja, Dhian Singh. Residence: Rai, 
Kangra, Punjab. 

KISHAN SINGH, Milmyal, Rai Baha- 
dur; b. August 13, 1850. The title 
was conferred on December 12, 1884, 
in recognition of his remarkable 
services to the State, and to science, 
as an explorer in Nepal, Great Tibet, 
Mongolia, and elsewhere. Belongs to 
a Rajburah family of Rajputs long 
settled in Kum&un, who, during the 
rule of the Chands and Gurkhas 
there, held lease of the Parganas of 
Johar and Dhanpur. In 1812 his 
father, Deo Singh, procured the re- 
lease of two British subjects from 
Tibet. The Rai Bahadur has been 
deputed on exploration duty four 
times, and has received honours from 
the Royal Geographical Society, and 
the Geographical Society of France, as 
well as substantial rewards from the 
Government. Residence : Kumaun, 
North-Western Provinces. 

KISHANGARH, His Highness Maharaj- 
Adhiraj Sardul Singh Bahadur, 
G.C.I.E., Maharaja of. A ruling 
chief ; b. December 10, 1857. Succeeded 
to the (/add December 25, 1879. Is 
one of the Chiefs of the great R&htor 
clan of Rajputs (see Jodhpur), and 
belongs to the Kishansinghot sept or 
sub-clan, so called from Kishan Singh, 
who was the founder of this State and 
city, and was the second of the twelve 
sons of Raja Udai Singh of Jodhpur, 
nicknamed Mota Raja (the Fat Raja) 
by the Emperor Akbar. His Highness 
is a Hindu of the Ballabhkul Vaish- 
nava sect, and was the son and suc- 
cessor of the late Maharaja Pirthi 
Singh. He was married in 1870 a.d. 
to the eldest daughter of the Maharao 
Umed Singhji of Sirohi, and on 
January 1, 1892, was created a Knight 
Grand Commander of the Most Emin- 
ent Order of the Indian Empire. His 
Highness has only one son, the 
Maharaj-Kunwar Madan Singh, born 
November 2, 1884, who is now the 
heir-apparent, as in March 1880 the 
Maharaja had the sorrow of losing an 
elder son when only five years old. 



The Maharaja has two younger 
brothers — Maharaj Jawan Singhji, and 
Maharaj Raghunath Singhji. The 
families most nearly related to His 
Highness are the Rdjwin (or royal) 
family groups of Fatehgarh and 
Ralaota, which are, however, con- 
nected with him only in the seventh 
and eighth degrees of relationship 
respectively. As descendant of the 
Mota Raja\ Udai Singh of Jodhpur, 
the Maharaja has sub-clan relation- 
ship with the Chiefs of Jodhpur and 
Bikanir in Rdjputana; Ratlam, Jha- 
bua, Sailana, Sitamau, and other 
Rahtor Chiefs of Central India; and 
Idar in Gujarat. By marriage His High- 
ness is related to all the other great 
Rajput Houses, being himself the 
head of one of the greatest and most 
illustrious; viz. with the Sesodias of 
Udaipur and Partabgarh, with the 
Kachhwahas of Jaipur and Alwar, the 
Hara Houses of Bundi and Kotah, the 
Bhatis of Jaisalmir, and the Jhalds 
and Shekhawats. Among the more 
important of these matrimonial con- 
nections, which are interesting as 
illustrating the inter-marriages of the 
most illustrious Rajput Houses, may 
be mentioned the following : — 

With, the Sesodias of Udaipur (the family oj 
"The Sun of the Hindus"). 

1. His Highness's grandmother (widow of 
the Maharaja Mokham Singh of Kishan- 
garh) is a daughter of the Maharana Amar 
Singhji of Udaipur. 

2. His Highness's eldest sister is Dowager 
Maharani of Udaipur, being a widow of the 
late Maharana Sajan Singhji. 

3. His Highness's son and heir-apparent, 
the Maharaj -Kunwar Madan Singh, has been 
recently betrothed to the fourth daughter 
of His Highness the present Maharana 
Fateh Singhji. 

The Kachhwahas of Jaipur. 

His Highness's third sister is married to 
the present Maharaja Sawai Madho Singhji, 
Chief of Jaipur, and is the Maharjini of 
Jaipur. 

The KachModhas of Aliear. 

His Highness's second sister was married 
to the late lamented Maharaja Man gal 
Singhji, late Chief of Alwar, and was the 
(Pat) head Maharani of Alwar. 

The Haras of Bundi. 

1. The late Maharaja Ramsingh of Bundi's 
mother was a Kishangarh Princess. 

2. His Highness's niece, a daughter of 
Maharaj Jawan Singhji, has been recently 
betrothed to the younger brother of the 
present Maharaja of Bundi, 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



147 



The Jhdlds of Jhalawar. 

His Highness's fourth and youngest sister 
is married to the Maharaj Rana Zalim 
Singhji, present Chief of Jhalawar, and is 
the (Pat) head Maharani of Jhalawar. 

To the above may be added that His 
Highness's mother was a Princess of 
the" Rana wat" (Sesodia) clan, being a 
daughter of the late Raja Dhiraj Madho 
Singhji of Shahpura. In addition to the 
titles given above, formally recognized 
by the Government as belonging to the 
Maharaja of Kishangarh, His Highness 
also bears those of Vmdai Rajhai and 
Buland Makan. The area of the State 
is 724 square miles; its population is 
112,633, chiefly Hindus, but including 
8492 Muhammadans and 6295 Jains. 
The Maharaja maintains a military 
force of 499 cavalry, 2000 infantry, and 
51 guns ; and is entitled to a salute of 
15 guns. Arms. — Argent, three towers 
proper, two and one ; in chief a Barry of 
5 — gules, vert, argent, azure, or. [This is 
the Rajput Pancharanga ; see Jaipur.] 
Supporters. — Two horses. Crest. — A 
falcon rising, proper. [This is the sacred 
Garur, the cognizance of the Rahtor 
Rajputs; see Jodhpur.] Motto. — The 
Hindi words Niti Riti, meaning "Law 
and Usage." Residence: Kishangarh, 
Rajputana. 

KISHEN DAS, Sri, Rai Bahadur. See 
Sri Kishen Das. 

KISHEN SINGH, Bhai, Sarddr. Re- 
ceived the title on January 2, 1899. 
Residence : Kurram, Punjab Frontier. 

KISHOR SINGH (of Jhamari), Rao; 
b. 1840. The title is hereditary, and 
the Raos of Jhamari formerly held 
great possessions in the Sagar district. 
The title was originally conferred by 
the Raja Mori Pahludh of Chanderi, 
and has been recognized by the British 
Government. The Rao has two sons, 
the elder (who has the courtesy title 
of Diwan) being Diwan Parichhat Singh 
Jangjit, and the younger being Jujhar 
Singh. Residence: Jhamari, Sagar, 
Central Provinces. 

KISHORI. See also Kesri. 

KISHORI LAL (of Gurgaon), Rai 
Bahadur. The title was conferred as 
a personal distinction on January 1, 
1891. Residence: Rajputana and 
Malwa Railway, Bombay. 

KISHORI LAL (of Muzaffarnagar), Rai 

Bahadur. The title was conferred 



as a personal distinction on January 1, 
1892. Residence : Marwar, Rajputana. 

KISHUN. See Kishan. 

KIZHAKKE KOVILAGAM MANA 
VDXRAMA, Raja. See Calicut. 

KIZHAKKE MELEDATHDL KUNJI 
KOMBI ACHCHHAN (of Palghat), 

Valiya Rdjd. See Palghat. 

KODANDA RAO PANTULU, P., Rao 

Bahadur. See Pandurangi. 

KODE NARAYANASWAMI NAYUDU, 

Rai Bahadur; b. 1846. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty. Entered the 
Government service in 1874 ; has 
rendered good service both in the 
Central Provinces and in Madras. 
During the Rumpa and Gudiem dis- 
turbances, 1879-86, served with much 
distinction in the Madras Police, and 
again in the Golugonda Hill disturb- 
ances of 1891. Residence : Viziana- 
gram, Vizagapatam, Madras. 

KOIL TAMBURANG, C.S.L See Kerala. 

KOLHAPUR, His Highness Sir Shahu 
Chhatrapati Maharaj, G.C.S.I., Rdjd 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1875. Succeeded 
to the gadi as a minor on March 17, 1884. 
Is a descendant of the Mahratta family 
of Sivaji the Great, the founder of 
the Mahratta Empire, being descended 
from Raja Ram, his second son, and 
husband of the famous Tara Bai. 
Sivaji's elder son Sambhaji was taken 
prisoner by the Emperor Aurangzeb, 
and ultimately executed ; and his son 
Shahu was long detained in prison by 
the Mughals, but obtained his liberty 
in 1707, fixed his capital at Satara,and 
asserted his rights as the heir of his 
grandfather Sivaji. Meanwhile Raja 
Ram had died, and his widow, Tara 
Bai, a woman of great ability and 
courage, assumed the administration 
of Kolhapur in the name of her elder 
son Sivaji II., who was an idiot child 
of ten years, and proclaimed him 
Raja of the Mahrattas. The latter 
died in 1712, when his half-brother 
Sambhaji (son of Raja Ram by 
another wife) succeeded him, and 
removed Tara Bai from the adminis- 
tration. The contending claims of 



148 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Shahu, Raja of Sat&ra, and Sambhaji, 
Raja of Kolhapur, were at length 
settled in 1731, when precedence was 
surrendered to Satara, and the in- 
dependence of Kolhapur acknow- 
ledged. In 1811 a treaty with the 
British Power was concluded, by which 
Kolhapur became a feudatory ; and as 
the Raja remained faithful to the 
British cause in the war against the 
Peshwa in 1817, he received some 
additional territory. A descendant, 
Sivaji III., died in 1866, and on his 
deathbed was allowed to adopt his 
sister's son, Raja Ram. In 1870 Raja 
Ram visited Europe, and died at 
Florence on his return journey. His 
adopted son was Sivaji Maharaja 
Chhatrapati IV., who was made a 
Knight of the Most Exalted Order of 
the Star of India. He became insane, 
and the Government appointed a 
relative, the Chief of Kagal, as Regent. 
Sivaji IV.died in December 1883, and 
was succeeded, by adoption, by His 
Highness the present Raja, who was 
the eldest son of the Regent, and who 
was created a Knight Grand Com- 
mander of the Most Exalted Order of 
the Star of India on January 1, 1895. 
The area of the State is 2816 square 
miles, and its population is 800,189, 
chiefly Hindus, but including 33,022 
Muhammadans and 46,732 Jains. The 
Raja has eleven feudatory Chiefs 
subordinate to him, of whom the most 
important are those of Vithalgarh, 
Bavda, Kapshi, Kagal, Ichalkaranji 
Tor gal, and Datva. His Highness, 
with his feudatories, maintains a 
military force of 255 cavalry, 1902 
infantry, and 67 guns ; and is entitled 
to a salute of 19 guns. Residence: 
Kolhapur, Bombay. 

K0M0L. See Kamal. 

K0NDKA, Mahant Sham Kishor Das, 
Mahant of. A ruling chief ; b. 1838. 
Succeeded to the gadi December 13, 
1887. Belongs to a Bairagi (Hindu) 
family of Mahants, or Chief Priests, 
the regulations of his order permitting 
marriage. The area of the State is 
174 square miles ; its population is 
32,979, chiefly Hindus. Residence: 
Kondka, Raipur, Central Provinces. 

KOREA, Raja Pran Singh Deo, Rdjd of. 
A ruling chief ; b. 1857. Succeeded to 
the gadi April 4, 1864, as a minor. 



Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family, 
claiming descent from a Chauhan 
Rajput Chief named Dhawal Singh, 
who came to Korea from Rajputana 
about 600 years ago, and conquered 
the country. The title of Raja is 
hereditary in the family from early 
times, and was formally conferred by 
the British Government in 1875. 
The area of the State (which is one of 
the Chota Nagpur Tributary Mahals) 
is 1631 square miles, and its popu- 
lation is 29,846, chiefly Hindus. Resi- 
dence: Korea, Manbhum, Chota Nag- 
pur, Bengal. 

K0RI SIDHAULI, Rdjd of. See Rampdl 
Singh. 

K0T KHAI, Rand of. See Jai Singh. 

K0T SARANG, Rdjd of. See Muham- 
mad Khan. 

K0TAH, His Highness Maharao Umed 
Singh Bahadur, Maharao of. A ruling 
chief ; b. 1873. Succeeded to the gadi 
June 11, 1889. Like His Highness 
the Maharao Raja of Bundi, the 
Maharao is one of the Chiefs of the 
Hard sept of the great Chauhan clan 
of Rajputs — Kotah forming with Bundi 
the tract known for centuries as 
Haraoti, after the name of that sept. 
Is descended from Madhu Singh, the 
second son of the Rao Ratan of Bundi, 
who about the year 1625 a.d. was 
granted the feudatory Chiefship of 
Kotah and its dependencies, for his 
services to the Emperor JaMngir 
against his rebellious son, who after- 
wards became the Emperor Shah 
Jahan. Similar services to the latter 
Emperor were rendered by Madhu 
Singh's son and successor, Mokand 
Singh ; who, with three of his brothers, 
fell in a battle at U jjain* agaiust Shah 
Jahan's rebellious son, who afterwards 
became the Emperor Aurangzeb. 
Mokand Singh was succeeded by his 
son Jagat Singh. Early in the present 
century, Kotah, greatly weakened by 
intestine dissensions, was attacked by 
Jaipur and by the Mahrattas, to whom 
it became tributary. It was only 
saved from ruin by the extraordinary 
abilities of its great Minister, Zalim 
Singh, to whom the Maharao gave up 
the active task of ruling the State. 
During a Ministry of forty-five years 
Zalim Singh raised the State of Kotah 
to great prosperity. Ultimately, in 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



149 



1838, it was arranged that Zalim 
Singh's descendants should receive 
independent charge of a part of the 
State, as feudatories of the Empire, 
and this part became a separate 
Principality, under the name of Jhala- 
war (q. v. ). The late Maharao, Chhatra 
Sal Singh, succeeded his father in 
1866, and on his death in 1889 was 
succeeded by his adopted son, the 
present Maharao, as a minor. His 
Highness was a student in the Mayo 
College, Ajmir. The area of the 
State is 3797 square miles ; its popu- 
lation is 517,275, chiefly Hindus, 
but including 32,866 Muhammadans 
and 4750 Jains. His Highness main- 
tains a military force of 949 cavalry, 
5756 infantry, and 148 guns, and is 
entitled to a salute of 17 guns. The 
family banner is orange in colour, 
displaying a figure of the Garur or 
sacred falcon of the Hara Rajputs. 
Residence : Kotah, Rdjputdna. 

KOTAHA, Mir of. See Muhammad 
Bakar Ali. 

KOTHARIA, Jareja Jethiji, Tdlnkddr 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1828. Succeeded 
to the f/adi January 8, 1857. The 
State, which is tributary to the Nawdb 
of Jundgarh, has an area of 6 square 
miles, and a population of 2366, 
chiefly Hindus. The Chief maintains 
a military force of 4 cavalry and 38 
infantry. Residence : Kotharia, Ka- 
thiawar. 

KOTHI, Raja Bahadur Avadhendra 
Bahadur Singh, Rdjd of. A ruling 
chief ; b. 1870. Succeeded to the f/adi 
January 8, 1896. Belongs to a Baghel 
Rajput family (Hindu); succeeded 
the Raja Bahadur Bhagwat Bahadur 
Singh, whose father was Raja Ran 
Bahadur Singh ; and the family have 
been seated in Kothi for a great many 
years, and were confirmed in posses- 
sion by the British Government. The 
area of the State is 90 square miles ; 
its population is 18,386, chiefly Hindus. 
The Rdjd maintains a military force 
of 35 cavalry, 210 infantry, and 4 guns. 
Residence : Kothi, Baghelkhand, 
Central India. 

KOTHIDE, Bhumia Moti Singh, Bhumia 
of. A ruling chief ; />.1850. Succeeded 
to the gadi in 1860. Belongs to a 
Bhildla family. The population of 



the State is about 500. Residence: 
Kothide, Bhopdwar, Central India. 

K0TI, Chief of. Is a feudatory of the 
Rdjd of Keonthal (q.v.), and rules 
over one of the Simla Hill States. 
Residence : Koti, Simla Hills, Punjab. 

K0TRA SANGANI, Thakur Mulvaji 
Togaji, Thakur of. A ruling chief ; 
b. 1873. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor November 23, 1887. Belongs to 
a Jareja Rdjput family. The area of 
his State is 74 square miles ; its 
population is 8642, chiefly Hindus. 
The Thdkur maintains a military force 
of 8 cavalry, 142 infantry, and 4 
guns. Residence: Kotra Sangani, 
Kdthidwdr. 

K0TTAYAM, Kerala Varma Raja, 

Valiya Rdjd of; b. 1842. Belongs to 
a family that claims to be of Kshatriya 
origin, and to have come from the 
east and acquired sovereignty in 
Waindd. Subsequently they appear 
to have acquired some territory from 
the Rdjd of Chitrakal in Malabar, 
either by a gift or in war. On Haidar's 
invasion of Malabar the Rdjd and all 
his family fled to Travancore ; returned 
in 1782, but fled to Travancore a 
second time on Tippu's invasion in 
1789, and died there. The family, 
like that of the Zamorin of Calicut 
and other Chiefs of Malabar, follows 
the Marumakkatayam law of inherit- 
ance, by which the succession is to 
the offspring of its female members, 
among whom the next eldest male 
after the Rdjd is his heir-apparent. 
The late Valiya Rdjd of Kottayam 
was called Shangara Varma Rdjd, 
and he was succeeded by the present 
Valiya Rdjd under the Marumak- 
katayam law. He receives an allow- 
ance from Government in compensation 
for the estate that belonged to his 
ancestors. Residence : Malabar, Madras. 

K0TJRE KHAN, Jatoi, Khdn Bahadur. 
Honorary Magistrate of Muzaffargarh. 
Created a Khdn Bahddur, as a per- 
sonal distinction, January 2, 1893. 
Residence : Muzaffargarh, Punjab. 

KRIPA SHANKAR, Rat Saheb ; b. May 
20, 1848. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1897, for good service in 
the Education Department. Residence : 
Narsinghpur, Central Provinces. 



150 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



KRISHNA BAKHSH EAI, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Is Zamindar of Deogan. Residence : 
Deogan, Palamau, Bengal. 

KRISHNA CHANDAR RAI, Rai Ba- 
hadur; b. in 1823. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on July 16, 
1885, " for long and meritorious service 
under Government." The Rai Bahadur 
rendered excellent service as Deputy- 
Magistrate and Deputy-Collector of 
Diamond Harbour. Belongs to an 
old Baidya family, formerly of Mur- 
shidabad, now settled in the Dacca 
district, and known as the Baira Rais ; 
descended from Sri Chandra Rai, who 
served under the Nawab Shaista 
Khan, and received from him a khilat. 
Educated at Dacca College ; appointed 
to the service of the Government of 
Bengal in 1841. Is an Honorary 
Presidency Magistrate of Calcutta, 
Vice-President of the East Bengal 
Association, etc. He has five sons — 
Lalit Chandra Rai, physician, born 
1852 ; Vipina Chandra Rai, D.L., of 
the Judicial Service, born 1854 ; Hem 
Chandra Rai, M.A., B.L., born 1864 ; 
Sarat Chandra Rai, B.L., born 1867 ; 
Gnan Chandra Rai, B.A., born 1870. 
Residence : Baira, Manikganj, Dacca, 
Bengal. 

KRISHNA CHANDRA BANDOPAD- 
HYAYA (or BANERJI), ifoi Bahddur. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence : Calcutta. 

KRISHNA CHANDRA CHATTERJI, 

Rai Bahddur. The title was con- 
ferred on May 21, 1898. Residence: 
Maimansingh, Bengal. 

KRISHNA MOHAN MUKHARJI, Rai 
Bahddur. Received the title on June 
3, 1899, for eminent services in the 
Judicial Department. Residence : 
Hazaribagh, Bengal. 

KRISHNA NATH, Pandit, Nyayapan- 
chanana, Mahdmahopddhydya. The 
title was conferred, as a personal 
distinction, on May 24, 1892, in re- 
cognition of his eminence as a Sanskrit 
scholar. It entitles him to take rank 
in Darbar immediately after titular 
Rajas. The title Nydyapanchdnana 
is a literary title or degree, conferred 
by the learned Pandits of the Sanskrit 
University of Navadwipa or Nadiya, 
and refers to proficiency in the Nydya 



school of logic. Residence : Purbas- 
thali, Nadiya, Bengal. 

KRISHNA, Sir Narendra (Deb), 
K.C.I.E., Mahdrdjd Bahadur. See 
Narendra. 

KRISHNA PERTAP SINGH SAHI, 
K.C.I.E., Sir (of Hatwa), Mahdrdjd 
Bahddur. See Hatwa. 

KRISHNA PRASAD SINGH, Rai, Rai. 
See Rai. 

KRISHNA RAO JALRAM, Rao Bahddur. 
The title of Rao Saheb was conferred 
on May 25, 1895, and that of Rao 
Bahadur on June 3, 1899. Residence : 
Malegaon, Bombay. 

KRISHNA RAO MURLI, Rao Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on May 25, 
1895. Residence: Dewas, Central India. 

KRISHNA RAO BAPU SAHEB JADU, 
Sardar, Sir, K.C.I.E. The Sardar was 
created a Knight Commander of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire on May 25, 1895, for services 
as late President of the Council of 
Regency in Gwalior. Residence : Gwa- 
lior, Central India. 

KRISHNA SAH, Lala, Rai Bahddur; 
b. March 18, 1856. The title was con- 
ferred on January 2, 1888, as a personal 
distinction, in recognition of his services 
as an Honorary Magistrate and Member 
of the Municipal Commission of Naini- 
tal. Is the son of the late Lala Moti 
Ram Sah, the well-known banker, who 
rendered distinguished services to the 
Government in the time of the Mutiny 
in 1857, and received a handsome 
reward for them. Belongs to a Rajput 
family of the North-Western Provinces. 
Residence : Nainital, North-Western 
Provinces. 

KRISHNA SAHAI, Lala, Rai Bahddur; 
b. April 2, 1824. The title was con- 
ferred on January 2, 1888, as a personal 
distinction, in recognition of his services 
as an Honorary Magistrate and Member 
of the District Board of Meerut. The 
family has from time immemorial been 
bankers and landowners in the North- 
Western Provinces. Residence : Mee- 
rut, North-Western Provinces. 

KRISHNA SINGH, Pandit (Thakur of 
Bhoar), Mahdmahopddhydya. The title 
is a personal one, and was conferred 
on January 1, 1890, for eminence in 
oriental learning. It entitles him to 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



151 



take rank in Darbar immediately after 
titular Rajas. Residence: Bhoar, Mad- 
hubani, Darbhanga, Bengal. 

KRISHNAJI JAIRAM VILAIT, Rao 

Saheb. Received the title on May 21, 
1898. Residence : Nasik, Bombay. 

KRISHNAJI LAKSHMAN NALKAR, 
C.I.K, The Hon. A Member of the 
Viceroy's Legislative Council. Was 
created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
January 1, 1888. Residence: Calcutta. 

KRISHNAJI RAMCHANDRA GUR- 
WARE, Rao Saheb. Received the title 
on May 21, 1898. Is Honorary Magis- 
trate. Residence : Satara, Bombay. 

KRISHNALAL OCHHAVRAM, Rao 

Saheb. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on July 30, 1886. Residence : 
Ahmadabad, Bombay. 

KRISHNAMA CHARIYAR, Vembakam, 
Avargal, Rao Bahadur and Diwdn 
Bahadur. The title of Rao Bahadur 
was conferred'on January 1, 1891 ; and 
that of Diwan Bahadur on January 1, 
1898. Residence: Madras. 

KRISHNARAO MALHARRAO, Vish- 
wasraa. The title is hereditary. Resi- 
dence : Khandesh, Bombay. 

KRISHNARAO VINAYEK DHURAN- 
DHAR, Rao Bahadur. Received the 
title on January 2, 1899. Is Sanitary 
Commissioner of Baroda. Residence: 
Baroda. 

KRISHNASWAMI AIYAR, Appathu- 
rai, Rao Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1!895. Residence: 
Madras. 

KRISHNASWAMI AIYAR, Padur Sita- 
rama, Diwdn Bahdduf. The title was 
conferred on January 1/ 1894. Resi- 
dence : Bezwada, Madras. 

KRISHNASWAMI RAO, Kanchi, Diwdn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 25, 1895. Residence : Travancore, 
Madras. 

KRISTENDRA RAI (of Bolihar), Rdjd 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, as a personal dis- 
tinction, on the occasion of the Jubilee 
of the reign of Her Majesty. He had 
already received the title of Raja on 
February 23, 1880. He belongs to an 
old Kulin Brahman family, originally 
called Sanyal, and long settled at 



Bolihar in the district of Rajshahi, 
Bengal. Is descended from Ram Rai 
Sanyal, whose grandson was Ram 
Chandra Rai. His grandson was the 
Raja Rajendra Rai, whose adopted son 
was the Rdjd Shiva Prasad Rai, father 
of the present Raja Bahadur. He 
rendered good service to the Govern- 
ment during the scarcity of 1874. 
Residence : Bolihar, R&jshahi, Bengal. 

KRISTO CHANDAR GHOSH, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on June 1, 1888, for good 
service in the Opium Department. 
Residence : Bankipur, Bengal. 

KSHETTRA CHANDRA ADITYA, Rai 

Bahadur. See Khettar Chandar Aditya. 

KUARPUR, Thdlcur of. See Himanchal 
Singh. 

KUCH BEHAR, Lieut. -Colonel His High- 
ness Maharaja Sir Nripendra Nara- 
yan Bhup Bahadur, G.C.I.E., Mahd 
rdjd of. A ruling chief ; b. October 4, 
1862. Succeeded his father, the late 
Maharaja Narendra Narayan Bhup 
Bahadur, in August 1863. Belongs to 
a Kochi family that has held uninter- 
rupted sovereignty for the last 382 
years in this territory, since their first 
settlement in the plains ; from which 
family also descend the Bijni and 
Darung Houses of Assam, the Raikats 
of Baikanthpur (q.v.) in Jalpaiguri, 
and the Panga family in Rangpur. 
His Highness was educated, first, in the 
Wards Institute at Benares ; secondly, 
under the guardianship of Mr. H. St. 
J. Kneller, in the Bankipur College, 
Patna, and next as a Law Student 
in the Presidency College, Calcutta. 
During his minority the State rendered 
good service in the Bhutan war, 1863- 
65, for which two guns were presented 
to His Highness by the British Govern- 
ment. Was presented with medal and 
sword in 1877 at the Imperial Assem- 
blage at Delhi, on the occasion of the 
Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India. Married, 
in March 1878, the eldest daughter of 
the famous reformer, Keshub Chander 
Sen. Was sent to England the same 
year to complete his education, under 
the joint guardianship of Surgeon- 
Major (now Sir) Benjamin Simpson 
and Mr. Kneller. Returned to India 
in the spring of 1879, and was formally 
installed on his ancestral audi on 



152 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



November 8, 1883, by the Lieutenant- 
Governor of Bengal. The titles of 
Maharaja Bhup Bahadur were recog- 
nized as hereditary by the Government 
of India in 1885. His Highness was 
appointed Honorary Major in the 
British Army in the same year. He 
visited England in the Jubilee year 
1887, to take part in the rejoicings on 
the occasion of the Jubilee of the reign 
of Her Most Gracious Majesty, with 
the Maharani and children, and was 
invested with the Insignia of Grand 
Commander of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire by Her 
Most Gracious Majesty the Queen 
Empress herself, the Maharani being 
invested with the Imperial Order of 
the Crown of India in the same year. 
Was made Honorary Aide-de-camp to 
His Royal Highness the Prince of 
Wales, with the rank of Lieutenant- 
Colonel in the British Army. The 
Maharaja in 1888 established the 
Brahmo Somaj or the Reformed Church 
in the State of Kuch Behar. He 
founded the Victoria College for higher 
education therein, and granted a long 
term settlement of revenue to his 
subjects for thirty years, assessments 
being made on the most approved 
principles. His Highness established 
the India Club at Calcutta in 1882, 
founded Nripendra Narayan Hall at 
Jalpaiguri in 1883, and presented house 
and lands at Darjiling, wherewith the 
Lowis Jubilee Sanitarium was started 
at that station in 1887, and established 
the " Anandamayi Dharmasala " (alms- 
house) in 1889. The Maharaja's age 
is now thirty, and he has issue, four 
sons and two daughters. While in 
England in 1887 he received the dis- 
tinguished masonic honour of Past 
Grand Senior Warden of England at 
the hands of the Most Worshipful the 
Grand Master, made District Grand 
Master of Bengal in 1890, installed 
District Grand Mark Master of Bengal, 
1891. The area of the State is 1307 
square miles ; its population is 602,624, 
chiefly Hindus, but including 174,539 
Muhammadans. His Highness main- 
tains a military force of 9 cavalry, 176 
infantry, and 4 guns, and is entitled 
to a salute of 13 guns. The ancestral 
banner of the family displays a sword 
and a blade of grass (with which, 
according to tradition, one of the 
Maharaja's ancestors cut off the head 



of an enemy as an offering to the 
Goddess Kali). The supporters are a 
tiger and an elephant. The crest is a 
"Hanuman," holding a club in each 
hand. Residences: Kuch Behar, Bengal; 
Calcutta; Darjiling. 

KUDRAT AZIZ. See Muhammad Kudrat 
Aziz. 

KUDRUT-ULLA, Shaikh, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on October 12, 1860. Residence : Bir- 
bhum, Bengal. 

KULA NAND, Babu, Rai Bahddur; b. 
March 14, 1849. Received the title 
for services in the famine of 1896 
in Bundelkhand. Residence: Jalaun, 
North-Western Provinces. 

KUMAR.— A prefix. 

KUMAR SHRI KALUBA, CLE. Was 
created a CLE. on June 30, 1887. 
Residence: Kutch, Bombay. 

KUMARA VENKATA PERUMAL RAZ 

(of Karvetnagar), Raja. The title is 
hereditary, having been in the family 
from early times, and confirmed by the 
British Government in 1802. Is the 
son of the late Raja of Karvetnagar, 
Raja Kumara Bomma Raz. Belongs 
to a family that was called the Bomma 
Raz (or " Bomrauze ") family, that rose 
to power in the district of North Arcot 
about 200 years ago, in consequence of 
the decline of the Vijayanagar dynasty. 
The family cognizance is a white flag 
with the device of a boar on its field ; 
the family motto, borne on its seal, is 
Karvetnagar Venugopdlaswdmi Sahd- 
yam, meaning " May Venugopalaswami 
— the deity of Karvetnagar — assist." 
Residence : Karvetnagar, North Arcot, 
Madras. 

KUMARAPURAM SHESHADRI AI- 
YAR, Sir, K.C.SJ. See Sh'eshadri. 

KUMARASWAMI MURUGESAM PH- 
LAI, Rao Bahddur. Received the title 
on June 3, 1899. Residence : Madras. 

KUMHARSAIN, Rana Hira Singh, Rdnd 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1851. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi November 12, 1874. 
Belongs to a Rajput family, whose 
founder, Kirat Singh, came from Gaya 
about 1000 A. D., and acquired possession 
of the State by conquest. The State, 
formerly a feudatory of Bashahr, was 
taken under direct British protection 
after the expulsion of the Gurkhas in 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



153 



1815, by a sanad dated February 1816. 
Rana Kehr Singb died without issue 
in 1839, and in consideration of his 
early attachment to British interests 
during the Gurkha war, the Govern- 
ment confirmed the State to a collateral 
heir of the family named Rana Pritam 
Singh. His successor was the Rana 
Bhawani Singh, who was succeeded in 
1874 by the present Rana. The area 
of the State, which is one of the Simla 
Hill States, is 94 square miles; its 
population is 9515, chiefly Hindus. 
The Rana maintains a military force 
of 45 infantry and 1 gun. Residence : 
Kumharsain, Simla Hills, Punjab. 

KUMUD KRISHNA SINGH (of Susang), 

Maharaja. See Susang, Maharaja of. 

KUN HMON, Mating, Kyet thaye zaung 
since Salwe ya Mm; b. May 27, 1843. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1897, for good and meritorious service. 
It is indicated by the letters K.S.M. 
after the name. Residence: Ruby 
Mines, Burma. 

KUN KYI (SAWBWA), Kyet thaye 
zaung shwe Salwe ya Min. The title 
is personal, and was conferred on April 
17, 1890. It means " Recipient of the 
Gold Chain of Honour," and is indicated 
by the letters K.S.M. after the name. 
Residence : Mone, Burma. 

KUNATHAMAKOR NAGOJI RAO, Rao 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897, for distinguished service 
as an Inspector of Schools. Residence: 
Coimbatore, Madras. 

KUNHIAR, Thakur Tegh Singh, Thakur 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1836. Succeeded 
to the gadi in 1867. Belongs to a 
Rajput (Hindu) family; descended 
from Bhoj Deo, who in early times 
came from Jammu, and conquered this 
territory. The State was overrun by 
the Gurkhas at the beginning of the 
century ; but on their expulsion by the 
British in 1815, it was confirmed to 
Rao Puran Deo, the then Thakur, by 
a sanad dated September 4, 1815. The 
present Thakur succeeded Rao Kishan 
Singh on the death of the latter in 
1867. The area of the State is 9 square 
miles; its population is 1923, chiefly 
Hindus. The Thakur has a son named 
Shib Singh, and maintains a military 
force of 20 infantry. Residence : Kun- 
hiar, Simla Hills, Punjab. 



KUNJAL SINGH (of Bhatgaon), Raja. 
The title is hereditary. Belongs to a 
family descended from Jogi Rai, who 
was the Diwan of Kalyan Sai, Raja of 
Ratnapur. Residence: Bhatgaon, Bilas- 
pur, Central Provinces. 

KUNWA KHERA, Nawdb of. See Mu- 
hammad Bakar Ali Khan. 

KUNWAR.— A prefix. 

KUNWAR MUHAMMAD LUTF AH 
KHAN, Khan Bahadur; b. March 20, 
1844. Received the title on January 
1, 1894. Residence: Talibnagar, Ali- 
garh, North- Western Provinces. 

KUNWAR PERMANAND, Rai Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Is Government Pleader. Residence: 
Allahabad, North-Western Provinces. 

KURANDWAD (Senior Branch), CHIN- 
TAMAN RAO RAGHUNATH, alias 
BALA SAHEB PAT WARDHAN, Chief 
of. A ruling chief; b. February 14, 
1850. Succeeded to the gadi January 
25, 1876. Belongs to a Konkanasth 
Brahman (Hindu) family, claiming 
descent from Hari Rath, of Kotwadi. 
His descendant, Trimbak Rao of Kot- 
wadi in the Konkan, obtained Kurand- 
wad in indm, and was succeeded by his 
son, Nilkanta Rao, who received the 
saranjam and the title of Sardar from 
the Peshwa. The Chief has a son and 
heir named Bhalchandra Rao, with 
the title of " Anna Saheb." The area 
of the State, which is in the Southern 
Mahratta country, is 182 square miles ; 
its population is 35,187, chiefly Hindus, 
but including 3409 Muhammadans. The 
Chief maintains a military force of 10 
cavalry, 164 infantry, and 2 guns. 
There are three Chiefs of Kurandwad, 
all of the Patwardhan family, the Bala 
Saheb Patwardhan being the Chief of 
that division of the State that is known 
as " Kurandwad (senior branch)," — 
being rather a larger part; while the 
Bapu Saheb Patwardhan and the Daji 
Saheb Patwardhan are j ointly the Chiefs 
of that part that is known as " Kurand- 
wad (junior branch)." Residence : Ku- 
randwad, Southern Mahratta Country, 
Bombay. 

KURANDWAD (Junior Branch), GAN- 
PAT RAO RAGHUNATH, alias BAPU 
SAHEB PATWARDHAN, Chief of. 
A ruling chief ; b. 1839. Succeeded to 
the gadi April 5, 1854. Belongs to a 



154 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Konkanasth Brahman family (see Ku- 
randwad, senior branch). Shares the 
Chiefship of this State with the Daji 
Saheb Patwardhan. The State has an 
area of 114 square miles, and a popula- 
tion of 25,811, chiefly Hindus, hut 
including 2548 Muhammadans. The 
Chiefs maintain a military force of 12 
cavalry, 306 infantry, and 1 gun. Resi- 
dence : Kurandwad, Southern Mahratta 
Country, Bombay. 

KURANDWAD (Junior Branch), Harihar 
Rao Vinayak, alias DAJI SAHEB 
PATWARDHAN, Chief of A ruling 
chief ; b. 1852. Succeeded to the gadi 
as a minor April 5, 1854. Belongs to 
a Konkanasth Brahman (Hindu) family 
(see Kurandwad, senior branch). 
Shares the Chiefship of this State 
with the Bapu Saheb Patwardhan 
(vide svpra). Residence: Kurandwad, 
Southern Mahratta Country, Bombay. 

KURIMANIL VALLIAMANIA CHEY 
KETTI, Khan Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1898. Re- 
sidence: Madras. 

KURWAI, Nawab Muhammad Yakub 
Ali Khan, Nawab of. A ruling chief ; 
h. 1880. Succeeded to the gadi July 
1897. Belongs to a Pathan (Muham- 
maclan) family, descended from Nawab 
Dalel Khan, an Afghan leader. His 
descendant, the Nawab Muhammad 
Nazaf Khan, succeeded to the gadi 
in 1858. Having rendered good service 
to Government, and being without 
male issue, he was permitted to adopt 
his grandson, the son of his eldest 
daughter, who was the late Nawab 
Munawar Ali Khan. The family 
banner is green, bearing on its field 
a crescent. The area of the State is 
about 140 square miles ; its population 
is 24,631, chiefly Hindus, but including 
3609 Muhammadans. The Nawab 
maintains a military force of 12 
cavalry, 190 infantry, and 9 guns. 
Residence: Kurwai, Bhopal, Central 
India. 

KURWAR, Rdjd of. See Partab Ba- 
hadur Singh. 

KUSALPURA, Thdlcur of. See Kassal- 
pura. 

KUSHABA CHAPAJI KALE, Rao Ba- 
hadur. Received the title on Janu- 
ary 1, 1899. Residence: Bombay. 



KUTCH, His Highness Maharao Shri 
Mirza Raja Sawai Sir Khengarji, Ba- 
hadur, G.C.I.E., Rao of. A ruling 
chief; b. August 16, 1867. Succeeded 
to the gadi December 19, 1875. Is 
Chief of the Jareja Rajputs, who came 
to Kutch from Sind early in the 14th 
century, under the leadership of his 
ancestor, the Jam Lakha Phulani, son 
of Jara, from whom the clan takes its 
name. Lakha is said to have com- 
pleted the conquest of Kutch in the 
year 1320 a.d. His descendant, Khen- 
gar, when oidy a lad of fourteen, slew 
a Hon with his sword at a hunting 
party with the King of Ahmadabad, 
who was so much pleased with this 
feat that he conferred on the young 
prince the territory of Morvi, in the 
north of Kathiawar, with the title of 
Rao. After this the Rao Khengar 
succeeded in making himself the 
master of the whole of Kutch, with 
the city of Bhuj for his capital, in 
1548 a.d. Khengar's uncle, the Jam 
Eawal, fled to Kathiawar, and founded 
the State of Nawanagar, the rulers 
of which are still called Jams. The 
Rao Khengar I. was succeeded by Rao 
Bharmal L, during whose reign, from 
1585 to 1631 a.d., the government of 
Gujarat passed from the Kings of 
Ahmadabad to the Mughal Emperors. 
Bharmal , who was at the head of a 
large military force, visited the 
Emperor Jahangir in 1617, and re- 
ceived from him most costly presents, 
including his own horse, elephants, 
dagger, and a sword with diamond- 
mounted hilt. A descendant, Rao 
Lakhpatji, who reigned from 1741 to 
1760 a.d., set up a cannon-foundry, 
and introduced other manufactures 
from Europe by the aid of an ad- 
venturer named Ramsingh ^ and the 
mechanical skill and working in metals, 
for which the craftsmen of Kutch are 
still famous, date from this reign. In 
1809 the rulers of Kutch sought British 
help; the Rao Raidhan II. being on 
the gadi, but the administration of 
the State being carried on by a very 
powerful and ambitious Prime 
Minister named Fatheh Muhammad. 
A treaty was signed in that year, and 
again another in 1812. In 1813 both 
Fatheh Muhammad and the Rao died. 
The latter was succeeded by his son, 
Rao Bharmal II. ; but there was so 
much disorder in the State that the 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



155 



British Power was compelled to in- 
tervene, and to send troops into the 
Principality in 1816, and again in 
1818-19. On the latter occasion the 
Rao was deposed, and his son, the 
Rao Desalji II., succeeded as a minor, 
and ruled happily for more than forty 
years, till 1860. He took vigorous 
measures to suppress infanticide, sati 
(or the burning of widows on the 
funeral pile of their deceased hus- 
bands), and the trade in slaves. On 
the death of Rao Desalji in 1860, 
the Government of Bombay thus 
recorded the official appreciation of 
his career : " Marked by a love of 
truth and plain dealing, Rao Desalji 
was probably more than any one else 
in Kutch learned in the traditions and 
customs of the Province. He was a 
careful and painstaking judge, and a 
staunch and devoted ally of the 
British Government. With the help 
of a few Chiefs and Court servants he 
managed the whole business of the 
country, and by his knowledge of 
their character, friendly intercourse, 
and timely concessions, avoided any 
struggle with the Jareja chiefs." The 
"Jareja chiefs" referred to are the 
Bhdyad — brotherhood or frerage of 
the ruling family, being all descend- 
ants of the first Rao. The Rao 
Desalji II. was succeeded by his late 
Highness the Maharao Pragmalji, 
father of the present Rao. During 
the fifteen years of his rule, 1860 to 
1875, he showed himself anxious to 
improve the management of the State. 
He framed codes for the guidance of 
his officers in matters of civil and 
criminal justice, he undertook works 
of public usefulness, and introduced 
State systems of public instruction 
and of vaccination. In recognition of 
his excellent administration he was in 
1871 honoured with the title of Knight 
Grand Commander of the Star of India. 
Unlike his forefathers, none of whom 
left Kutch, he thrice visited Bombay 
— in 1870 to meet His Royal Highness 
the Duke of Edinburgh, in 1871 to 
take part in a Chapter of the Star of 
India, and in October 1875 to meet 
His Royal Highness the Prince of 
Wales. These happy visits are marked 
by important public works dedicated 
to their Royal Highnesses — the Albert 
Edward Breakwater and Harbour 
Works at Mandvi, which have cost 



over 12 lakhs of rupees, and the Alfred 
High School at Bhuj, the provincial 
centre of education ; and the establish- 
ment of two "Rao Shri Pragmalji 
Scholarships" in the Elphinstone 
College, and two in Sir Jamsetji Jijib- 
hai's School of Art, Bombay. His 
Highness Rao Pragmalji was described 
by the British authorities as "most 
enlightened and liberal," as well as a 
"loyal, consistent, and devoted friend" 
of the British Government. Rao 
Pragmalji built a palace at Bhuj at 
a cost of about Rs.2,000,000 ; con- 
structed the Pragsar Tank, which is 
an immense reservoir of rain-water 
in the Chadwa range of hills, and a 
causeway in the large Hamirsar tank ; 
he also built the Jail (Rs.79,509), the 
Hospital, the Horse and Elephant 
Stables (Rs.184,303), and the Schools 
at Bhuj and Mandvi ; remitted transit 
duties, and occasionally remitted im- 
port duties in times of scarcity or 
deficient rainfall. He ordered out 
cotton gins, and introduced screw 
presses, and finished the Bhuj-Mandvi 
road. He was a great sportsman, and 
killed many wild animals, including a 
number of panthers. The total ex- 
penditure on public works started 
during His Highness Rao Pragmalji's 
reign amounted to Rs.3,241,435. He 
was succeeded in 1876 by His High- 
ness the present Maharajd, Rao Khen- 
garji, who was described at that time 
by the British Political Agent as "a 
most promising boy of ten." In 1877 
Sir Richard Temple, as Governor of 
Bombay, visited the State, and com- 
plimented the young Prince on his 
general progress, and on the accuracy 
and ease with which he could converse 
in English — his education having been 
mainly in the hands of M. Chhotalal 
Tewakram and Captain J. W. Wray 
of the Staff Corps. He was admitted 
into the Council of Administration, at 
an unusually early age, in 1882; and 
on August 11, 1884, having attained 
his majority of eighteen years of age, 
he was invested with full powers of 
State. On November 14 of that year 
Sir James Fergusson, as Governor of 
Bombay, visited Bhuj, and held a 
grand Darbar for the purpose of 
formally installing His Highness, in 
the name of the Queen Empress, as 
Rao of Kutch. In the course of his 
speech on that occasion Sir James 



156 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Fergusson said : " I venture to augur 
very favourably of His Highness's 
reign. His natural intelligence has 
been well developed, his mind has 
been instructed by a liberal education, 
he possesses a complete knowledge of 
the circumstances and wants of his 
country and people, but more hopeful 
still are his disposition and character. 
The frequent opportunities which I 
have had of judging of them, as well 
as the unanimous testimony of those 
who have known him from childhood, 
convince me that he possesses a kind 
heart as well as a clear judgment, and 
cherishes a resolute adherence to the 
call of duty. These qualities are not 
unknown to his subjects, and they 
cannot fail to deepen their hereditary 
attachment to his family and person, 
which is so remarkable. It may indeed 
actuate him to deserve and reciprocate 
it. I doubt not that it will. I shall 
deem myself very ignorant of character 
if His Highness does not realize our 
best anticipations." 

On March 2, 1885, a Darbar was held 
at the Bhuj Palace for the investiture 
of His Highness with the hereditary 
distinction of "Sawai Bahadur," con- 
ferred on the rulers of Kutch by the 
British Government. In 1887 His 
Highness proceeded to England to 
represent the Princes of the Bombay 
Presidency on the occasion of the 
celebration of the Jubilee of the Queen 
Empress, and during his absence he 
entrusted his State to his Diwan, Rao 
Bahadur Motilal Lalbhai. Whilst in 
England His Highness was created a 
Knight Grand Commander of the 
Indian Empire. He takes a deep 
interest in education, and especially 
in the education of women. He 
founded a Sanskrit school or Pathshala, 
at a cost of Rs. 25,000, and named it 
after his mother. He also founded 
the Fergusson Museum and Library 
at Bhuj, an institution erected as 
a memorial of the Governorship of 
Sir James Fergusson. This last cost 
Rs.32,000. To encourage learning he has 
founded various scholarships of more 
or less importance, and has also in- 
augurated a fund from which deserving 
scholars desirous to study in England 
or America can obtain their expenses. 
Among the scholarships for females 
may be mentioned the one to Kutch 
females attending the Grant Medical 



College in Bombay, the " Kutch Barton 
Scholarship " to Kutch females attend- 
ing the Training College at Ahmadabad 
or Rajkot, scholarships for female as- 
sistant-teachers at Bhuj, the Rao Shri 
Khengarji scholarships, and one for 
girls attending the High School at 
Puna. For males the Rao has founded 
scholarships for Kutchis receiving 
scientific and technical education in 
England, for students receiving agri- 
cultural or other scientific education 
in India, for Kutchis attending the 
Veterinary College at Bombay, the 
Veterinary School at Puna and the 
College of Science at Puna ; also 
scholarships open to any citizen of 
Bombay attending the Ripon Technical 
School, Bombay; and further gives 
annual prizes for qualifying for auy 
professional function in connection 
with a mill, and for the work of a 
captain of a steamer. It should be 
mentioned that the scholarships for 
Kutchis resident in Bombay alone 
were established at a total cost of 
Rs.25,000. As a further stimulus to 
education, and especially with the 
object of encouraging native talent 
and spreading knowledge amongst the 
people, the Darbar annually com- 
missions competent persons to write 
essays on various subjects, and to 
translate standard English works into 
the Gujarati language. In the matter 
of public works considerable improve- 
ments have been effected witliin recent 
years in connection with the extension 
of roads, the pier and reclamation 
works, and the erection of new build- 
ings. Since the accession of His 
Highness to the gadi the expenditure 
incurred by the Darbar on works 
of public utility has amounted to 
Rs.6,624,672. Great attention is paid 
by His Highness to well-irrigation, 
which has been found by experience to 
be most suited to the peculiar require- 
ments of the Province, the rainfall 
being limited and precarious. Other 
means of irrigation have also been 
adopted. Under his guidance strenu- 
ous efforts have also been made in the 
direction of reclamation of waste land. 
In the course of the last fifteen years 
the number of acres of waste land 
brought under the plough amount to 
83,890, and fifteen new villages have 
been established. His Highness is a 
thorough sportsman, fond of pig-stick- 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



157 



ing, shooting, and all manly exercises. 
He is, moreover, a firm though con- 
ciliatory ruler, and is regarded hy his 
subjects with a deep and ardent at- 
tachment. He married the daughters 
of the Thakur Saheb of Sayla, and of 
the Rana Jalamsinghji, cousins of His 
Highness the Raj Saheb of Dhranga- 
dra, in Kathiawar (q.v.), on February 
19, 1884. The occasion of this marriage 
was remarkable for the substitution 
for the old custom of giving Fulekas 
(grand dinners and a nightly pro- 
cession, according to old practice) of 
a small Darbar, at which nazars were 
paid, which His Highness touched, and 
remitted to be utilized in furthering 
the cause of female education. His 
sons are named — Madhubha, otherwise 
called Vijayarajji, born September 2, 
1885 ; and Manubha, born September 
12, 1888. # 

His Highness's brother is named Ka- 
ransinghji, born in 1870, and educated 
at the Rajkumar College, Rajkot ; he 
visited England on the occasion of 
Her Majesty's Jubilee in 1887, and 
was then created a Companion of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire, and married a daughter of 
the House of Aramda, in Okha, Ka- 
thiawar, in March 1889. 

His Highness's sister was married to 
His Highness the Maharaja of Bikanir 
(q.v.), in Rajpatana. The State has an 
area of 6500 square miles, exclusive of 
the Runn of Kutch, which is about 9000 
square miles ; its population is 512,084, 
chiefly Hindus, but including 118,797 
Muhammadans and 66,663 Jains. His 
Highness maintains a military force of 
354 cavalry, 1412 inf antry,and 164 guns, 
and is entitled to a salute of 17 guns. 
Arms. — The coat-of-arms adopted by 
His Highness's family is most inter- 
esting, as illustrating oriental heraldry. 
The coat is shown in a document 
kindly supplied by the Kutch Darbar, 
and was described by His Excellency 
the Diwan of Kutch in 1876 in the 
following I words : — "(1) The Fort of 
Bhujia, which overlooks the capital of 
Bhuj. (2) The Moon, showing that 
the reigning family belongs to the 
Lunar dynasty. (3) The Crown, and 
the Jari Patha flag (with repre- 
sentations of the sun and the moon), 
emblematic of royalty. (4) The Mahi 
Muratab, a flag with a gold-fish at the 
top, presented to a former Rao of 



Kutch by an Emperor of Delhi. This 
is considered a valued present, and is 
carried in State in all ceremonials by 
sowaris on the back of an elephant. 
(5) The Trident of the family goddess, 
and old weapons of the family. (6) 
A Boat, showing that Kutch is a 
maritime Power. (7) Two Horsemen, 
representing Kutch as a horse-pro- 
ducing country, and showing specimens 
of her military retainers. (8) A Cow, 
representing the customary title of a 
native potentate. (9) A killed Tiger, 
indicating the great historical event 
from which the title of Rao was 
derived. (10) The Motto adopted by 
the family, showing the attributes by 
wbich the first Rao Khengar suc- 
ceeded in regaining his lost patri- 
mony." Residence : The Palace, Bhuj, 
Kutch, Western India. 

KUTHAR, Rana Jaichand, Rana of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1845. Succeeded to 
the yadi as a minor December 27, 
1848. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) 
family, claiming descent from Surat 
Chand, who came in early times from 
Kishtwar in Jammu, and conquered 
this territory. The State was overrun 
by the Gurkhas between 1803 and 
1815, and after their expulsion by the 
British was confirmed to the then 
Rana by a British sanad dated 
September 3, 1815. The area of the 
State (which is one of the Simla Hill 
States) is 19 miles square ; its popula- 
tion is 3648, chiefly Hindus. The 
Rand maintains a military force of 40 
infantry. Residence: Kuthar, Simla 
Hills, Punjab. 

KUTLAHR, Rdjd of. See Rampal. 

KUVARJI K0WASJI, Khan Bahadur; 
b. March 1, 1822. The title was con- 
ferred on February 16, 1887, as a 
personal distinction, on the occasion 
of the Jubilee of the reign of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty. Appointed to 
the service of the Bombay Government 
in 1840, and during a service of forty- 
six years held various important posts 
with credit to himself and advantage 
to the State. Retired in 1886 on a 
special pension, on account of his 
''long and highly meritorious services." 
Was appointed in the same year a 
Delegate in the Parsi District Matri- 
monial Court of Surat. Is " an 
Honorary Magistrate of the First 



158 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Class. Has a son named Pestanji 
Kuvarji Kowasji, born 1860. Resid- 
ence: Surat, Bombay. 

KUVERJI BHAIDAS, Rao Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence: Bulsar, Bombay. 

KYAING KAN, Kim Un, Myoza of. A 
ruling chief. This Chief is Myoza of 
one of the Shan States on the frontier 
of Burma. Its area is about 450 square 
miles ; its population chiefly consists 
of Shans. Residence: Kyaing Kan, 
Shan States, Burma. 

KYAING LUN, Kun Maung, Myoza of. 
A ruling chief. This Chief is Myoza 
of one of the Shan States on the 
frontier of Burma. Its area is about 
30 square miles ; its population almost 
entirely Shans. Residence: Kyaing 
Lun, Shan States, Burma. 

KYAING TON, Sawbwa of. A ruling 
chief. This Chief is the Sawbwa of 
one of the Shan States on the frontier 
of Burma. He has four feudatory 
chiefs tributary to him — those of 
Kyaing Thingyi, Maingthal, Thinaung, 
and Thin Nyut. The population con- 
sists chiefly of Shans, with a few Yins. 
Residence: Kyaing Ton, Shan States, 
Burma. 

KYAING YONGYI, Chief of. A ruling 
chief. Is Chief of one of the Shan 
States on the Burma frontier. Re- 
sidence : Kyaing Yongyi, Shan States, 
Burma. 

KYAUKKULEYWA, Maung Thaing, 
Ngwegunhmu of. A ruling chief. The 
Ngwegunhmu is Chief of one of the 
Shan States on the frontier of Burma. 
The area of the State is about 80 
square miles. Residence: Kyaukku- 
leywa, Shan States, Burma. 

KYAW GAUNG, Maung, Myothugyi, 

Thuye gaung ngwe Da ya Min. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
May 20, 1890. It means "Recipient 
of the Silver Sword for Bravery," and 
is indicated by the letters T.D.M. after 
the name. Residence : Ye-u, Burma. 

KYAW ZAW, Maung, Thuye gaung 
ngwe Da ya Min. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on February 16, 
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee 
of the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty. It means " Recipient of the 



Silver Sword for Bravery," and is in- 
dicated by the letters T.D.M. after the 
name. Residence : Pagan, Burma. 

KYE, Maung, Myook, Kyct thaye zaung 
shwe Salwe ya Min. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on May 20, 
1896. It means " Recipient of the 
Gold Chain of Honour," and is in- 
dicated by the letters K.S.M. after 
the name. Residence : Burma. 

KYETHI BANSAN, Kun Than, Myoza 
of. A ruling chief. The Myoza is 
Chief of one of the Shan States on 
the Burma frontier. The area of the 
State is about 300 square miles. Re- 
sidence : Kyethi Bansan, Shan States, 
Burma. 

KYM0RI. See Kaimori. 

KY0N, Maung Po, Ngiocgunhmu of A 
ruling chief. The Ngwegunhmu is 
Chief of one of the Shan States on 
the Burma frontier. The area of the 
State is about 15 square miles. Re- 
sidence : Kyon, Shan States, Burma. 

KYWE 0, Maung U, Kyet thaye zaung 
shwe Salwe ya Min. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on June 
6, 1885. It means " Recipient of the 
Gold Chain of Honour," and is in- 
dicated by the letters K.S.M. after the 
name. Residence: Rangoon, Burma. 

LACHHMAN. See Lakshman. 

LACHHMAN DAS, Seth, C.I.E., Raja. 
Was created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
May 26, 1886. The title of Raja was 
conferred as a personal distinction on 
June 22, 1897. Residence: Muttra, 
North- Western Provinces. 

LACHHMAN DAS, Thakur, Rai , Saheb. 
Received the title on January 2, 1897. 
Residence : Dir, Punjab Frontier. 

LACHHMAN DAS, Lala, Poplai, Rai 
Saheb. Received the title on January 
1, 1898. Is Extra Judicial Assistant 
Commissioner. Residence: Punjab. 

LACHHMAN DAS HAZARIKA, Rai 

Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on March 3, 1880. 
Residence: Lakhimpur, Assam. 

LACHHMAN SINGH, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 24, 1882. The Rai Bahadur 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



15! 



belongs to a family from Cawnpur, 
North-Western Provinces. Residence : 
Bombay. 

LACHHMAN SINGH (of Kakarbai), 
Rao. The title is an ancient hereditary 
one. The Rao Lachhman Singh was 
born about the year 1866, and suc- 
ceeded his father, the late Eao Udiajit, 
in 1890. This family of Bundela Tha- 
kurs is descended from Bharat Chand, 
grandson of Raja Malkhan of Orchha. 
The title of Rao is said to have been 
conferred on the great-grandfather of 
the present holder by the Maharaja of 
Panna. Arjun Singh, the Rao's grand- 
father, assisted in restoring order in 
the Garotha Tahsil towards the close 
of the Mutiny. Residence : Kakarbai, 
Jhansi, North-Western Provinces. 

LACHHMAN SINGH (of Wazirpur), 
Rdjd; b. October 19, 1826. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1877, as a 
personal distinction, at the Imperial 
Assemblage of Delhi, on the occasion 
of the Proclamation of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty as Empress of India. 
Belongs to a Rajput family of the 
Jadon clan, originally resident at Ka- 
remna in Ra jputana. About 130 years 
ago Karemna was burnt by the troops 
of the Raja of Macheri (Alwar) in his 
war with the Raja of Bhartpur ; and 
Kalyan Singh, the ancestor of Lachh- 
man Singh, took refuge in Bhartpur. 
His eldest son was appointed Fotehdar 
of Pargana Ruphas by the Raja of 
Bhartpur, but was subsequently 
poisoned ; and the younger son, Lachh- 
man Singh's grandfather, took service 
in Sindhia's army. He died at Aligarh 
a few months before the capture of 
that fortress by the British, and his 
sons removed to Agra. His grandson, 
the present Raja, entered the Govern- 
ment service in 1847, and for his 
services during the time of the Mutiny, 
and generally to the cause of educa- 
tion, he has received the title of Raja, 
a hhilat, and various grants. Resi- 
dence : Agra, North-Western Pro- 



LACHHMI. See also Lakshmi. 

LACHHMI PARSHAD, Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Harda, Hoshangabad, 
Central Provinces. 

LACHHMI PRASAD SINGH, Rai Baha- 
dur. Received the title on January 1, 



1898. Residence : Sakarpara, Monghyr, 
Bengal. 

LACHHMI SAHAI, Sarddr Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1894. Residence : Amritsar, Punjab. 

LACHHMINARAYAN SINGH, Deo (of 

Kera), Thdkur. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1877, as a personal 
distinction, on the occasion of the 
Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India. The 
Thakur is one of the representatives 
of the great Porahat family, from 
which are descended the feudatory 
Chiefs of Serikala and Kharsawan, and 
other Chota Nagpur Chiefs in the dis- 
trict of Singbhum. Residence: Kera 
Singbhum, Bengal. 

LACHHMIYA NAYUDU, Kamalapu- 
ram, Rao Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1895. Resi- 
dence : Bangalore. 

LAIHNA. See Lehna. 

LAKHAN SINGH, Thakur, Rao Bahadur. 
The Thakur was granted the title of 
Rao Bahadur as a personal distinction 
on January 1, 1878. Residence: Ba- 
reilly, North-Western Provinces. 

LAKHMICHAND, Pandit, Rai Bahadur. 

Received the title on January 1, 1898. 

Residence : Damoh, Central Provinces. 
LAKHNADON, Thdkur of. See Delhi 

Singh ; see also Kesri Singh. 

LAKHPAT RAI, Rai; b. 1825. The 
title was conferred on October 8, 1875, 
as a personal distinction, in recogni- 
tion of the Rai's exertions in improving 
the city of Peshawar. He belongs to 
a Kshatriya family, and is the son of 
the late Diwan Bhawani Das, who 
held the responsible and important 
office of Baftri in Peshawar during 
the Durani and Sikh rule. The Rai is 
an Honorary Magistrate and a member 
of the Municipal Committee of Pesha- 
war. Residence : Peshawar, Punjab. 

LAKSHMAN BHIKAJI WAKHAR- 
KAR, Rao Saheb. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1895. Residence : 
Khandesh, Bombay. 

LAKSHMAN JAGANNATH, Biwdn 
Bahadur; b. August 15, 1835. The 
title was conferred on February 16, 
1887, as a personal distinction, on 
the occasion of the Jubilee of Her 
Majesty's reign. Belongs to a Chan- 



160 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



draseniya Kayastha Prabhu family ; 
second son of Jagannath Baji Rao, 
Mamlatdar in Khandesh. Prior to 
his appointment as Prime Minister of 
the Baroda State he had rendered long 
and meritorious services to the Bom- 
bay Government ; and while Deputy 
Collector of Sholapur endeared him- 
self to the people to such an extent 
that they called their market after his 
name, "Lakshmanpet." In 1874 he 
became Assistant Revenue Commis- 
sioner of the Northern Division of the 
Bombay Presidency, and shortly 
afterwards was invited to aid Mr. 
Dadabhai Naoroji (subsequently M.P. 
for Central Finsbury) in the adminis- 
tration of Baroda. He became, first, 
Subahdar of the Naosari district, then 
head of the Revenue Department in 
.1883, and finally in 1886 Diwan or 
Prime Minister of the State. He re- 
tired in 1890 with a pension from the 
British Government, and handsome 
allowances from the Gaekwar. He 
married Bai Sitabai, and has issue 
six daughters — Gujabai, Chandrabai, 
Chingubai, Dhakubai, Naobai, and 
Sundrabai. Residence: Narayan Pet, 
Poona, Bombay. 

LAKSHMAN JIVAJI TILVE, Rao Sa- 

heb. Granted the title, as a personal 
distinction, January 2, 1893, for emi- 
nent services in the Postal Department. 
Residence : Ahmedabad, Bombay. 

LAKSHMAN SINGH MATHURA 
SINGH, Rao Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1891. Resi- 
dence : Poona, Bombay. 

LAKSHMI CHAND, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1894. 
Residence : Karnal, Punjab. 

LAKSHMI CHELLAYA (of Bobbili). 

See Venkatasveta Chalapathi Ranga 
Rao, Ravu, Raja. 
LAKSHMI KUMARA SHATAKOPA 
CHARIAR, Mahdmahopddhydya. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 
1898, for eminence in oriental learning. 
Residence: Cochin, Madras. 

LAKSHMI SHANKAR MISRA PANDIT, 

Rai Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1890. 
Residence : Benares, North-Western 
Provinces. 
LAKSHMILAL DAULATRAI, Rao Sa- 
heb. Granted the title, as a personal 
distinction, January 2, 1893, for emi- 



nent services in the Baroda Residency. 
Residence : Baroda. 

LAL BEG, Khdn Saheb. Granted the 
title, as a personal distinction, January 
2, 1893, for eminent magisterial ser- 
vices in the Ganjam Hill Tracts, 
Madras. Residence: Russell Konda, 
Madras. 

LAL BIHARI LAL, Rai Bahadur. Re- 
ceived the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Sutna, Central India. 

LAL MADHAVA MUKARJI, Rai Ba- 
hadur ; b. in 1841. Belongs to a Ku- 
lin Brahman family, and is the son of 
Ishwar Chandra Mukarji, an old and 
much-respected merchant of Calcutta. 
Educated at the Free Church College 
of the Calcutta University ; and sub- 
sequently graduated at the Calcutta 
Medical College. During the great 
Orissa famine of 1886 he was appointed 
Medical Officer in charge of the famine 
Itospitals that were opened at Chitpore 
and Sealdah for the relief of the 
famine-stricken. His good services 
there were duly acknowledged by the 
Government of Bengal. He then 
successively held the appointments of 
House Surgeon of the Calcutta Oph- 
thalmic Hospital for thirteen years, 
and teacher of Ophthalmic Medicine 
and Surgery in the Campbell School for 
three years. He has taken a very 
prominent place among the great 
oculists of the world, and was deputed 
by the Government of India to Rajpu- 
tana, to attend upon His Highness 
the Maharaja of Jaipur, whose eye- 
sight he successfully restored. He 
translated into Bengali the English 
text-book on the Diseases of the Eye, 
by Dr. Macnamara, which has been 
highly eulogized by the most com- 
petent authorities. In 1879 he was 
elected a Municipal Commissioner for 
the town of Calcutta, and has been 
re-elected in many subsequent elec- 
tions. Has been several times Mem- 
ber of the Town Council of Calcutta. 
Was appointed a Fellow of the Cal- 
cutta University in 1881, and in 1890 
became a Member of the Syndicate. 
He is an elected Member of the Council 
of the Calcutta Bethune Society ; of 
the Calcutta Health Society ; and of 
the India Club. He is a Justice of 
the Peace for the town of Calcutta. 
He is the first native gentleman who 
has been honoured with the President- 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



161 



ship of the Calcutta Medical Society. 
He is also the President and Honorary 
Lecturer of Ophthalmic Medicine and 
Surgery in the Calcutta Medical 
School. When Her Majesty the Em- 
press,in recognition of his distinguished 
medical services, was pleased to confer 
upon him the title of Rai Bahadur, 
the Government of India also pre- 
sented him with a handsome sword 
and a richly-embroidered sword-belt. 
Residence: Calcutta. 

LAL MADHUB MOOKERJEE, Rai Ba- 
hadur. See Lai Madhava Mukarji. 

LAL MUHAMMAD, Shaikh, Khdn Sa- 
heb. Received the title on January 2, 
1899. Residence : Baroda, Bombay. 

LAL MUHAMMAD KHAN, Achakzai, 
Khdn Saheb. Received the title on 
May 21, 1898. Residence: Gulistan, 
Baluchistan. 

LAL PERTAB SINGH, Rao Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1898. Is Assistant Diwan of Rewa. 
Residence : Rewa, Central India. 

LAL RAGHURAJ SINGH (of Pandaria), 
Thdkur. The title is hereditary. The 
founder of the family was Sham 
Chand ; and the late Thakur Gajapal 
Singh was thirteenth in succession. 
He was the younger brother of the 
Thdkur Rajpal Singh, feudatory Chief 
of Kawardha (q.v.). Thakur Gajapal 
Singh has been recently succeeded, at 
Pandaria, by Thakur Lai Raghuraj 
Singh. Residence : Pandaria, Bilaspur, 
Central Provinces. 

LAL RAMANAJ PARSAD SINGH, Hira 
Saheb, CLE. Was created a CLE. 
on June 1, 1888. Residence: Rewa, 
Central India. 

LAL SINGH, Rai Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on May 25, 1895. Resi- 
dence : Naiui Tal, North-Western Pro- 
vinces. 

LAL SINGH (of Bheri), Sarddr. The 
title is hereditary. The Sarddr is 
the cousin of Sarddr Bishan Singh 
(q.v.) of Bheri, in the district of Lu- 
dhiana, Punjab. Belongs to a Jat 
(Sikh) family, descended from Sardar 
Mahtab Singh, Miran Kotia, a Sikh 
Chief, well known for his prowess, 
who flourished about the year 1761 
a.d. ^ His son, Sarddr Rai Singh, 
acquired by conquest some territory in 
the Ambala district more than a cen- 



tury ago. The family came under 
British protection, with the other Cis- 
Sutlej Chiefs, after the first Sikh war. 
Sarddr Ratan Singh succeeded his 
father, Rai Singh ; and his grandsons 
are the Sarddrs Bishan Singh (son of 
Sarddr Sarmukh Singh) and Ldl Singh 
(son of Sarddr Gurmukh Singh) of 
Bheri. Residence : Bheri, Ludhidna, 
Punjab. 

LAL SINGH (of Talwandi), Sarddr; b. 
1822. The title is hereditary. The 
Sarddr is the grandson of the Sarddr 
Dal Singh Naharna, who was adopted 
by the widow of the great Sarddr 
Fateh Sing, Kdlidnwdla, and inherited 
his large possessions. He died in 1823, 
and was succeeded by his eldest son, 
Sarddr Atar Singh, who, about the 
year 1846, received a seat in the Coun- 
cil of Regency, which he retained until 
the annexation of the Punjab. On 
the occasion of the outbreak at Multdn, 
Sarddr Atar Singh joined the British 
under Major Edwardes. His son, the 
present Sarddr Lai Singh, was at first 
carried off by the troops, but after- 
wards escaped, and joined the same 
side. Sarddr Atar Singh died in 1851, 
and was succeeded by the present 
Sarddr. Residence: Talwandi, Am- 
ritsar, Punjab. 

LALA GOVIND JAS, Rai Bahadur. See 
Govind. 

LALA SAHEB (of Imlai), Rdjd; b. 1862. 
The title is hereditary. Belongs to a 
Rdj Gond (aboriginal) family, whose 
ancestors came from Dhamda to 
Mandla, and obtained some jdgirs from 
Sheo Rdj Rai, the Gond Rdjd of 
Mandla, because they were caste-fel- 
lows of the Rdjd. This was in 1624 
a.d., and the family have been settled 
at Imlai in the Jabalpur district ever 
since. One of their ancestors married 
a daughter of the Rdjput house of 
Ratanpur. Residence: Jabalpur, Cen- 
tral Provinces. 

LALA SUNDAE LAL, Rai Saheb. See 
Sundar. 

LALCHAND KEVABRAM, Rao Saheb. 
On retirement from the public service, 
the Rao Saheb was permitted to re- 
tain this title. Residence : Shikdrpur, 
Sind. 

LALGARH, Diwan Hari Singh, Biwdn 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1877. Succeeded 
to the gadi as a minor December 22, 
M 



162 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



1888. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) 
family. The State contains a popula- 
tion of about 2500, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence: Lalgarh, Western Malwa, 
Central India. 

LALIT MOHAN SINGH, Rai Bahadur. 
The Rai Bahadur has rendered good 
service as an Honorary Magistrate, 
and as Vice-Chairman of the District 
Board of Hughli, Bengal. Received 
the title as a personal distinction on 
May 25, 1892. Residence: Hughli, 
Bengal. 

IALJI PURSHOTAM RAI, Rao Baha- 
dur, Biwdn Bahadur. Both these 
titles are personal. The former was 
conferred on December 15, 1881. The 
second title, that of Diwan Bahadur, 
was conferred on May 25, 1892, for 
good service as an assistant to the 
Resident at Baroda. Residence: Ba- 
roda. 

LALJI WALJI SETH, Khan Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on May 21, 
1898. Residence: Madras. 

LALLTJ LACHHMAN SINGH, Rao Ba- 
hddur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on May 24, 1869. Residence : 
Dholpur, Rajputaua. 

LALTA PERSHAD, Lala, Rai Bahddur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Pilibhit, North- Western 
Provinces. 

LALUBHAI NANDLAL, Rao Bahddur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on February 3, 1886. Residence: 
Ahmadabad, Bombay. 

LAMA.— A title. 

LAMBAGRAON, Mian of. See Kirat 
Chand. 

LAMBAGRAON, Raid of. See Jai 
Chand. 9 J 

LANGRIN, U., Bor Sing, Seim of. A 
ruling chief ; b. 1850. Succeeded to the 
gadi September 23, 1874. The popula- 
tion of the State (which is one of the 
Khasi and Jaintia Hill States, Assam) 
is about _ 1200, and consists of Khasis 
and Christians. Residence: Langrin, 
Khasi Hills, Assam. 

LANKA KRISHNA AIYANGAR, Rao 

Bahddur. The title was conferred on 
May 25, 1892. Residence: Srirangam, 
Madras. 



LAS BELA, Jam of. A ruling chief. 
Succeeded to the gadi January 14, 
1896. The Jam was formerly a feu- 
datory of the Wali of Kalat, but 
has now the direct protection of the 
British Government, through the 
Governor-General's Agent for Balu- 
chistan. The area of the State is 
about 8500 square miles, and its popu- 
lation about 56,000, chiefly Muham- 
madans. The Jam maintains a mili- 
tary force of 33 cavalry, 276 infantry, 
and 4 guns, and is entitled to a salute 
of 9 guns as a personal distinction. 
Residence : Las Bela, Baluchistan. 

LATARIA BHA0 (of Kamtha), Rao Ba- 
hadur. The title was conferred on 
May 20, 1896. Residence : Bhandara, 
Central Provinces. 

LATHI, Thakur Sursinghji Takat- 
singhji, Thakur of. A ruling chief ; 
b. 1875. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor November 4, 1878. Belongs to 
a Gohel Rajput (Hindu) family, which 
claim to be Suryavansi (of the Solar 
race), as descendants of the legendary 
hero Rama. The Gohel sept of Raj- 
puts are said to have occupied a part 
of Marwar for twenty generations, 
until they were expelled by the Rah- 
tors {see Jodhpur) at the end of the 
12th century. Thence, under their 
Chief, Sejak, they migrated to K&thia- 
war, about the year 1260, and are at 
present represented in Kathiawar by 
the ruling families of Bhaunagar, Raj- 
pipla, Palitana, and Lathi. The 
founder of the Lathi State was Sa- 
rangji, second son of Sejak, whose 
eldest son became the ancestor of the 
Chiefs of Bhaunagar, whilst the third 
son was the ancestor of the Chiefs of 
Palitana. One of the Thakurs of 
Lawa married his daughter to Damaji 
Gaekwar, the great ancestor of the 
Gaekwars of Baroda; and gave the 
estate of Damnagar as a dowry, being 
in return exempted personally from 
tribute. The State is tributary both 
to Baroda and to Junagarh ; and in 
addition to the tribute the Chief of 
Lawa annually offers a horse to the 
Gaekwar of Baroda, probably in com- 
memoration of the relationship be- 
tween the families. The town of 
Lathi, which is the capital, is now a 
station on the Bhaunagar-Gondal rail- 
way ; it has the palace of the Thakur, 
a Dharmsdla, a good Dispensary, Post 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



163 



and Telegraph Office, and the Lathi 
Anglo- Vernacular School. The area 
of the State is 42 square miles ; its 
population 6804, chiefly Hindus. The 
Chief maintains a military force of 12 
cavalry, 25 infantry, and 10 guns. 
Residence: Lathi, Kdthidwdr, Bom- 
hay. 

LATIF HUSAIN KHAN walad IMAM 
BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. The title has 
been continued for life, the Mir being 
a representative of one of the Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the an- 
nexation (see Khairpur). Residence : 
Shikdrpur, Sind. 

LAW YAN, Mating, Kyet thaye zaung 
shwe Salwe ya Min. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on Feb- 
ruary 16, 1887, on the occasion of the 
Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty. It means " Re- 
cipient of the Gold Chain of Honour," 
and is indicated by the letters K.S.M. 
after the name. Residence : Mandalay, 
Burma. 

LAWA, Thakur Dhirat Singh, Thakur 
of. A ruling chief. The Thdkur be- 
longs to the Kachhwdha Rajput family 
— that is, the ruling family of Jaipur 
(g.v.), the State having originally 
belonged to Jaipur, and having been 
granted by the Maharaja of Jaipur to 
one of the scions of his family. It 
was conquered by the Pinddri leader, 
Amir Khan, in the course of his 
Jaipur and Jodhpur campaigns, and 
the Thdkur of Lawa then became a 
feudatory of Amir Khan's State of 
Tonk. In 1867, however, this con- 
nection was terminated, and Lawa 
came under the direct protection of 
the British Government. The area 
of the State is 18 square miles ; its 
population is 2682, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence : Lawa, Rdjputdna. 

LAXAMAN. See Lakshman. 

LAXMI. See Lakshmi. 

LAXUMAN JAGANNATHJI, Vaidya, 
Diwd n Bahadur. See Lakshman Jagan- 
nath. 

LE BUN YTJ, Kyet thaye zaung since 
Salwe ya Min. Granted the title, as 
a personal distinction, January 3, 
1893. It is indicated by tbe letters 
K.S.M. after the name, and means 
"Recipient of the Gold Chain of 
Honour." Residence: Rangoon, Burma. 



LEE BOON YEW. See Le Bun Yu. 

LEE KIM SENG, Ahmudan gaung Tazeik 
ya Min. Granted the title, as a per- 
sonal distinction, on January 1, 1891. 
It is indicated by the letters A.T.M. 
after the name, and means " Recipient 
of a Medal for Good Service." Resi- 
dence : Rangoon, Burma. 

LEGYA, Ktin Le, Sawbwa of. A ruling 
chief. The Sawbwa is Chief of one 
of the Shan States on the Burma 
frontier, the area of which is about 
1000 square miles. The population 
consists almost entirely of Shans. 
Residence : Legya, Burma. 

LEHNA SINGH (of Manasawal), Rdnd; 
b. 1801. The title is hereditary. Be- 
longs to a very ancient Rajput family, 
that claims to be descended from the 
legendary hero Krishna, through Basu 
Chand, who is said to have taken 
possession of G arhmuktesar, and to 
have reigned there about 2000 years 
ago. His descendant, Jodh Chand, 
with three brothers, is said to have 
visited Jwalamukh on a pilgrimage, 
and on that occasion to have taken 
possession of Manasawal and the sur- 
rounding territory in the Hoshidrpur 
district. Rdnd Chigar Chand, thirty- 
third in descent from Basu Chand, 
made his submission to the Mahdrdjd 
Ranjit Singh, and is said to have been 
confirmed by him in some of his lands. 
The Rdnd has four sons — Opindar 
Singh, Madho Singh, Jandrdhan, and 
another. Residence: Manasawal, Ho- 
shidrpur, Punjab. 

LIAKAT HUSAIN, Khan Bahddur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 20, 1890. Residence : Meerut, 
North-Western Provinces. 

LIDHBAN, Sarddr of. See Mahtab 
Singh; also Albel Singh; also Saheb 
Singh ; also Sheonarayan Singh ; also 
Sher Singh. 

LIKHI, Thakur Jaswant Singhji, Thd- 
kur of . A ruling chief; b. 1886. Has 
recently succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor. Belongs to a Koli (aboriginal) 
family. The area of the State is 30 
square miles; its population is 1307, 
chiefly Hindus. Residence: Likhi, 
Mdhi Kantha, Bombay. 

LIMBAJI BA0 TUKAJI BA0, Rao 

Saheb. The title is personal, and was 



164 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



conferred on May 4, 1885. Residence , 
Bijapur, Bombay. 

LIMBDI, Thdkur Saheb of. See Limri. 



LIMRI, Thakur Saheb Sir Jaswant- 
singhji Fatehsinghji, K.C.I.E., Thd- 
kur Saheb of. A ruling chief ; b. May 
23, 1859. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor January 30, 1862. Belongs to 
a Jhala Rajput (Hindu) family, 
claiming a common descent with the 
Chief of Dhrangadra from Harpaldev, 
who came from the north in very early 
times, and established himself in that 
part of Kathiawar called Jhalawar 
from the name of his sept. The 
present Chief, who succeeded his 
father, the Thakur Saheb Fatehsinghji, 
was educated at the Rajkumar College, 
Rajkot, and finished his education by 
visiting England in company with the 
Principal of that College. He attained 
his majority in 1877, and on August 
1 of that year was installed as ruler. 
In 1884 the Government of Bombay, 
in recognition of the ability and in- 
dustry with which he conducted the 
administration of his State, appointed 
him a Member of the Legislative 
Council of Bombay. In 1887 he was 
selected as one of the representatives 
of the Princes of Western India to 
present their loyal congratulations to 
the Queen Empress on the auspicious 
occasion of the Jubilee of Her Majesty's 
reign ; and on that occasion he had 
the honour of receiving from the 
Empress in person the insignia of a 
Knight Commander of the Most Emin- 
ent Order of the Indian Empire. He 
extended his tour to all the chief 
places of interest in the United King- 
dom, in Canada, and in the United 
States ; and was the guest successively 
of the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, of 
the Viceroy of the Canadian Dominion, 
and of the President of the United 
States. He has the reputation of being 
a most able and painstaking ruler, and 
has received high acknowledgment _ of 
his ability and success from successive 
Governors of Bombay. The area of 
the State is 344 square miles; its 
population is about 43,000, chiefly 
Hindus, but including more than 4600 
Muhammadans. The Thakur Saheb 
maintains a military force of 35 cavalry, 
174 infantry, and 28 guns, and is en- 
titled to a salute of 9 guns. Resi- 



dence : Limri (or Limbdi), Kathiawar, 
Bombay. 
LIN, Mating, Myook, Ahmudan gaung 
Tazeik ya Min. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1891. It is in- 
dicated by the letters A.T.M. after the 
name, and means " Recipient of a Medal 
for Good Service." 



L0GHASSI, Rao Bahadur of. 
hasi. 



See Lug- 



L0HARTJ, The Hon. Nawab Sir Amir- 
Ud-Din Ahmad Khan Bahadur, Fa- 
khar-Ud-Daula, K.C.I.E., Nawab of. 
A ruling chief; b. 1859. Succeeded 
to the gadi October 31, 1884. Belongs 
to an Afghan (Muhammadan) family, 
descended from Ahmad Bakhsh Khan, 
who was employed by the Raja of 
Alwar in the negotiation with Lord 
Lake in 1806. In recognition of his 
services he received Loharu from the 
Raja, and the feudal possession of 
Firuzpur from the British Government. 
His son, Shams-ud-din Khan, suc- 
ceeded him, but was executed at Delhi 
in 1835 for compassing the murder of 
the British Resident at Delhi. In 
consequence of this Firuzpur was 
confiscated; but Loharu was subse- 
quently restored to the brothers of 
the Chief, who had no share in his 
guilt, Amin-ud-din Khan and Zia-ud- 
din Khan ; and Amin-ud-din was the 
great-grandfather of the present Na- 
wab. The title of Nawab was restored 
to the family, in 1866, as a personal 
distinction ; and in 1874 it was con- 
ferred on the Chief in recognition 
of good administration. Created a 
Knight Commander of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
June 22, 1897. Has been a Member 
of the Legislative Council of the 
Viceroy. The area of the State is 226 
square miles ; its population is 18,754, 
chiefly Hindus, but including 1517 
Muhammadans. The Nawab maintains 
a military force of 94 men. Residence : 
Loharu, Hissar, Punjab. 

LOK SINGH (of Babhnipair), Rdjd. 
Succeeded the late Raja Udai Narayan 
Singh of Babhnipair in 1892. The 
title is hereditary. The Raja is the 
head of the only legitimate family of 
descendants from the old Kalhans 
Rajas of Khurasa, whose raj extended 
from Hisampur in Bahraich far into 
the Gorakhpur district. Their an- 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



165 



cestor, Sahaj Sah, who traced his 
descent from the great King Jura- 
sindhu of Behar, is said to have come 
from Rajputana in the 14th century, 
and to have taken service with his 
friend, Malik Ain-ud-din, who ruled 
the south of Oudh from Karra Manik- 
pur. That officer found him and his 
band of Rajput soldiers useful in 
suppressing the internal disorders of 
the province, and assigned him in 
jdgir the trans-Gogra district, after- 
wards known as Khurasa, where he 
settled after expelling the Doms. 
Tradition says that the Dom Raja, 
struck by the beauty of one of the 
daughters of the Chhattri, demanded 
her in marriage. The Kalhans Raja 
dissembled his rage at the indignity 
offered him, and pretended to comply, 
but when the Dom came with his 
followers to claim his bride, plied 
them with strong drink till they were 
insensible and then murdered them. 
In the 16th century, seventh in suc- 
cession from Sahaj Sah, was Achal 
Narayan Singh, the last of the dynasty, 
whose fall is related in a well-known 
legend. He carried off to his fort of 
Lurhiaghat near Khurasa the daughter 
of Ratan Pande, a small Brahman 
zamindar. The outraged father sat 
for 21 days under a tamarind tree 
at the door of the ravisher, refusing 
meat and drink till death put an end 
to his sufferings. Before his spirit 
fled, he pronounced a curse of utter 
extinction on the family of his 
oppressor, modifying it only in favour 
of the offspring of the younger Rani, 
who alone had endeavoured to make 
him break his fast, and to whom he 
promised that her descendants (the 
present Rajas of Babhnipair) should 
succeed to a small Raj, but that as 
his eyes had fallen out from hunger, 
so should they also be blind. The 
curse has only been partially ful- 
filled, as though there have been one 
or two blind Rajas of Babhnipair, the 
majority of them have been unaffected 
in their eyesight. The avenging ghost 
of the Brahman obtained the aid of 
the river Sarju. A lofty wave rusbed 
up from that river, overthrew the 
Raja's fortress of Lurhiaghat, and 
left not a member of his household 
alive. The Rani had fled, on the 
Brahman's advice, to her father's home 
in Rasulpur Ghaus, where the posthu- 



mous son of Achal Narayan Singh, 
Bhing Singh, the ancestor of the 
present Raja, was shortly born. He 
possessed himself, when he grew up, 
of a small principality, including 
Babhnipair and Burhapara in Gonda, 
and Rasulpur Ghaus in Basti. He was, 
however, stripped of the Burhapara 
Pargana by Alawal Khan, the aggres- 
sive leader of the Pathans of Atraula, 
who after a long struggle finally ex- 
pelled the Kalhans. For five genera- 
tions the direct lineal descendants of 
the last Raja of Khurasa held the 
combined Parganas of Babhnipair and 
Rasulpur Ghaus. Sixth in descent 
from Bhing Singh was -Madhukar 
Singh, whose sons, Raj Singh and 
Himmat Singh, divided the inheritance, 
the former taking Rasulpur Ghaus 
with the title of Raja, the latter, as 
Babu, Babhnipair. The grandson of 
Raj Singh, Kesri Singh, was killed in 
battle by the Raja of Bansi, who 
forcibly possessed himself of the 
Pargana of Rasulpur Ghaus. The 
murdered man left an infant son, 
Shuja Singh, who was adopted by his 
cousin, the childless Babu Rani Singh 
of Babhnipair, and transferred the 
title of Rdja to the holder of that 
estate. His son, Abdhut Singh, held 
the Raj till 1821, and was succeeded 
by the blind Raja Jai Singh, who died 
only a few years before the annexation. 
On the reoccupation of Oudh the 
estate was settled with Rani Sarfaraz 
Kumar, widow of Indrajit Singh, who 
had an infant son, the present Raja. 
In 1867 the estates were taken under 
management of the Court of "Wards. 
Raja Udhai Narayan Singh was 
educated at Canning College, and 
received possession of the estates in 
1873. He has issue, two daughters. 
Residence : Babhnipair, Gonda, Oudh. 

LORINDA MAL, Rai Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 2, 1888. Residence: Pesha- 
war, Punjab. 

LU NAING, Maung, Tlmye gaung ngwe 
Da ya Min. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on May 20, 1896. It 
means " Recipient of the Silver Sword 
for Bravery," and is indicated by the 
letters T.D.M. after the name. Resi- 
dence : Burma. 

LUCHMI. Seelaahhmi. 



166 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



LUGHASI, Rao Bahadur Khet Singh, 
Rao Bahadur of. A ruling chief; b. 
July 21, 1856. Succeeded to the gadi 
January 3, 1872. Belongs to the 
great Bundela Rajput (Hindu) family 
of the Orchha House, from which are 
descended the ruling families of Panna, 
Datia, Ajaigarh, and most of the 
other States of Bundelkhand ; all 
tracing their lineage from the same 
eponymous hero, Bir Singh, who first 
adopted the clan name of Bundela. 
His descendant, the Maharaja Chhat- 
rasal, possessed large territories in 
Bundelkhand ; and is famous for having 
called in the aid of the Mahrattas 
against the Mughal Power, and having 
adopted the Peshwa as one of his sons, 
who thereby acquired a third of his 
dominions, and a footing in Bundel- 
khand. Chhatrasal's eldest son, Hardi 
Sah, succeeded him at Panna ; and he 
had two sons, the elder of whom 
became Raja of Panna, while the 
younger, Salim Singh, became Diwan 
of Lughasi. His son, the Diwan 
Dhiraj Singh, received a sanad from 
the British Government in 1808. Three 
generations have intervened between 
Dhiraj Singh and the present Chief. 
In 1857 the Diwan Sardar Singh of 
Lughasi was loyal to the Government 
during the time of the Mutiny, though 
half the villages of the State were 
laid waste by the rebels in consequence 
of his fidelity. As a reward for these 
services, the Diwan received the 
hereditary title of Rao Bahadur at 
the Cawnpur Darbar of 1859, together 
with a khilat, a valuable jdgir, and a 
sanad, authorizing the privilege of 
adoption. The present Rao Bahadur 
is grandson of Sardar Singh. The 
area of the State is 47 square miles ; 
its population 6519, chiefly Hindus. 
The Rao Bahadur maintains a military 
force of 6 cavalry, 78 infantry, and 7 
guns. Residence: Lughasi, Bundel- 
khand, Central India. 

LUNAWARA, Maharana Shri Sir Wa- 
khatsinghji Dalelsinghji, K.C.I.E., 
Rdjd of. A ruling chief; b. August 
11, 1860. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor October 7, 1867. Belongs to 
the family of the great Solanki clan 
of Rajputs, claiming descent from 
Sidraj Jaisingh, the ruler of Anhal- 
wara Patan and Gujarat. The Maha- 
rana's ancestors are said to have 



established themselves as Chiefs of 
Virpur in 1225 a.d. ; and in 1434 a.d. 
Rana Bhimsinghji removed to Luna- 
wara across the Mahi. The State was 
tributary both to Baroda and to 
Gwalior ; but the rights of the latter 
were transferred to the British Govern- 
ment in 1861. The Maharana was 
educated at the Rajkumar College, 
Rajkot, and was installed as ruler in 
August 1880 on attaining his majority. 
He was created a Knight Commander 
of the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empire, May 25, 1889. The 
area of the State is 388 square miles ; 
its population about 76,000, chiefly 
Hindus, but including over 3000 Mu- 
hammadans. The Maharana maintains 
a military force of 201 cavalry, 295 
infantry, and 40 guns, and is entitled 
to a salute of 9 guns. Residence: 
Lunawara, Rewa Kantha, Bombay. 

LUTF All KHAN, Kunwar Muham- 
mad, Khan Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1894, as a 
personal distinction. Residence : Ali- 
garh, North-Western Provinces. 

LUFT ALI KHAN walad ALADITTA 
KHAN, Mir. The title has been 
continued for life, the Mir being the 
representative of one of the Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation. Residence : Shikarpur, 
Sind. 

LUFT-ULLA, Maulavi Hafiz Muham- 
mad, Shams-al-Ulama. See Muham- 
mad. 

LWE-E, Maung Kyi, Ngwegunhmu of. 
A ruling chief. The Ngwegunhmu is 
Chief of one of the Shan States on the 
Burma frontier, which has an area of 
about 30 square miles. Its population 
consists almost entirely of Shans. 
Residence: Lwe-e, Shan States, Burma. 

LWEL0N, Maung Kan Chok, Myoza of. 
A ruling chief. The Myoza is Chief 
of one of the Shan States on the 
Burma frontier ; its area is about 400 
square miles. The population consists 
almost entirely of Shans. Residence: 
Lwelon, Shan States, Burma. 

LWEMAW, Maung Shwe Pyi, Ngwe- 
gunhmu of. A ruling chief. The 
Ngwegunhmu is Chief of one of the 
Shan States on the Burma frontier, 
the area of which is about 25 square 
miles. The population consists almost 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



167 



entirely of Shans. Residence: Lwe- 
maw, Shan States, Burma. 

MADAN GOPAL, Lala, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred, as a personal 
distinction, on January 1, 1896. Resi- 
dence : Lahore, Punjab. 

MADAN MOHAN BAISAK, Rai Baha- 
dur. Granted the title of Rai Baha- 
dur, as a personal distinction, January 
2, 1893, for eminent services in the 
Postal Department. Residence: Cal- 
cutta. 

MADANPUR, Thdkur of. See Saheh 
Lai. 

MADHAB. SeeMadhav. 

MADHAB CHANDAR RAI, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on May 
25, 1895. Residence : Naihati, Bengal. 

MADHAN, Chief of. Is a feudatory of 
the Raja of Keonthal (q.v.), and rules 
over one of the Simla Hill States. 
Residence : Madhan, Simla Hills, Pun- 
jab. 

MADHAV CHANDRA BARDHAI, Rai 

Bahadur. Received the title on Janu- 
ary 1, 1898. Is an Extra Assistant 
Commissioner. Residence: Assam. 

MADHAVRAO BAJI, Rao Bahadur. 
Received the title on May 21, 1898. 
Is Commandant of H. H. the Gaek- 
war's Light Field Battery. Residence : 
Baroda, Bombay. 

MADHAVRAO MALHARRAO (of 

Nagar), Vishwasrao. The title is 
hereditary. Residence : Khandesh, 
Bombay. 

MADHAVRAO SOMAJI MORE, Rao 

Bahadur. See Mahadavrao Somji 
More. 

MADHO PRASAD SINGH (of Adhar- 

ganj), Rai; b. October 11, 1847. The 
title is hereditary, the Rai being the 
representative of the great Bachgoti 
sept of Rajputs, sprung from the ancient 
and illustrious family of the Chauhan 
Rajputs of Mainpuri (q.v.). The sept 
having incurred the excessive wrath of 
the Emperor Ala-ud-din of Delhi, who 
vowed its extermination, the survivors 
emigrated, and for safety's sake adopted 
the name of Vasishtagoti (contracted 
into Batasgoti and ultimately Bach- 
goti), from the saint who called forth 
their ancestor (the Aynikula) from the 
fire to defend the Munis of Mount 
Abu against the demons. The Chief, 



Bariar Singh, descendant of Chahir 
Deo, Prithvi Raj's brother, left Sam- 
bhalgarh, and wandering eastward, 
settled about 1248 a.d. in Sultanpur, 
Oudh. He married the daughter of 
Raja Ram Deo, Bhilkaria, Chief of 
Patti, became chief military officer 
under the Raja, and ultimately dis- 
possessed his brother-in-law, and seized 
the territory. His descendant, Bodh 
Singh, received the title of Rai from 
the Hasanpur Raja of Sultanpur, and 
aiding the Nawab Shuja-ud-daula in 
his war against the British, was de- 
feated with him at the battle of 
Baksar in 1775 a.d. His grandson, 
Rai Mihrban Singh, was driven into 
exile by the Nawab, and his fort of 
Kot Bhilkar was sacked by the latter 
about the year 1780. His three sons, 
who in turn succeeded, gradually re- 
acquired much of the family property. 
The youngest, Rai Sitla Bakhsh, was 
succeeded by his eldest son, Rai Kalka 
Bakhsh Singh ; and the latter by his 
brother, the present Rai, on November 
23, 1857. He is an Honorary Magis- 
trate and an Assistant Collector. 
Residence : Dalippur, Partabgarh, 
Oudh. 
MADHO RAM, Lala, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1898. 
Residence: Cawnpore, North-Western 
Provinces. 

MADHO SINGH, Rai Bahadur; b. 1821. 
The title was conferred on May 24, 
1883, as a personal distinction. Be- 
longs to a Kshatriya family of the Bais 
clau, whose ancestors nine generations 
ago came from Baiswara in Oudh, and 
settled in the Jaunpur district. The 
Rai Bahadur rendered valuable service 
during the time of the Mutiny in 1857, 
and from the first boldly took the 
side of the Government. He rendered 
every assistance to Government, and 
protected the lives and property of 
several indigo-planters; for these 
services he received a sanad and a 
grant of land, and subsequently the 
title of Rai Bahadur. Residence : 
Jaunpur, North-Western Provinces. 

MADHO SINGH (of Bharawan), Raja, 
b. 1852. Succeeded the late Raja 
Randhir Singh in 1889, the title being 
hereditary. Belongs to a Kshatriya 
family of the Bais clan, this family 
being an offshoot of the Bais of 
Daundia Khera. Raja Mardan Singh 



168 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



in 1857 gave shelter to some fugitives 
from Sitapur, and after the recapture 
of Lucknow made himself useful in 
restoring order in the Sandila tahsil. 
He was consequently rewarded with a 
khilat, and a grant of some confiscated 
estates. He was succeeded by Raja 
Randhir Singh, the predecessor of the 
present Rajii. Residence: Bharawan, 
Hardoi, Oudh. 

MADHO SINGH, Thakur, Rao Saheb. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1877, as a personal distinction, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India. Residence: Kharwa, Central 
Provinces. 

MADHU SUDAN CHAUDHBI, Rai Ba- 

hddur. Received the title on June 3, 
1899, for eminent services in the Police 
Department. Residence: Bengal. 

MADHU SUDAN SMRITIRATNA, Pan- 
dit , Mahdmahopddhydya. The title was 
conferred, for eminence in oriental 
learning, on January 1, 1895. Residence : 
Nadiya, Bengal. 

MAGANLAL JAICHAND, Rao Saheb; 
b. December 1, 1848. Received the 
title on May 26, 1897. Residence: 
Mahuda, Kaira, Bombay. 

MAGORI, Thakur Himatsinghji, TJidkur 
of. A ruling chief; b. March 1, 1832; 
succeeded to the gadi as a minor on 
the death of his father, the late Thakur 
Fatehsinghji, February 2, 1835. The 
Thakur belongs to the illustrious 
family of the chiefs of the Rahtor 
clan of Rajputs, claiming descent from 
the legendary hero Rama, and the 
ancient Rahtor Emperors of Kanauj 
of the Suryavansa or Solar race, 
through the House of Idar; the 
founder of the Magori family, Ratan- 
singhji, having been a younger son of 
a Rawal of Malpur (q.v.), who was 
descended from a younger son of one 
of the ancient Raos of Idar (q.v.), who 
in turn was descended from the second 
son of the last Rahtor sovereign of 
Kanauj. Certain payments called 
kichri are made annually by this State 
to Idar. The Thakur has two sons, 
Kunwars Mokhamsinghji and Daulat- 
singhji. The area of the State is 75 
square miles ; its population 3076, 
chiefly Hindus. Residence: Magori, 
Mahi Kantha, Bombay. 



MAHA SINGH (of Kharsal), Sarddr; b. 
1849. The title is hereditary. The 
Sarddr Maha Singh belongs to a Gond 
(aboriginal) family, claiming descent 
from Urdhabo Gond, a soldier of for- 
tune who came from Garha-Mandla, 
and settled in Sambalpur, acquiring a 
jdgir for military services from the 
reigning Raja of Sambalpur. The 
head of this family uses the Gond 
device as a signature. Residence: 
Kharsal, Sambalpur, Central Provinces. 

MAHABIR PARSHAD NARAYAN 
SINGH, Thakur, Rai Bahadur. The 
Thakur was granted the title of Rai 
Bahadur as a personal distinction on 
January 1, 1891. Residence: Allaha- 
bad, North- Western Provinces. 

MAHABIR PRASHAD SAH, Rdi Ba- 

hddur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on September 10, 1875, for 
his liberality during the famine of 
1873-74, and in recognition of the good 
services of his family to the Govern- 
ment. Residence: Saran, Bengal. 

MAHABIR SINGH DEO, Bhaya. See 
Chang Bhakar. 

MAHADAJI BALLAL LAGHATE, Rao 

Saheb. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1890. Resi- 
dence: Bombay. 

MAHADAVRAO SOMJI MORE, Rao 

Bahadur. Granted the title, as a 
personal distinction for good service 
in the Salt Department, on January 
2,1893. Residence: Ratnagiri, Bombay. 

MAHADEO GOVIND RANADE, CLE., 
Rao Bahadur. "Was created a Com- 
panion of the Most Eminent Order of 
the Indian Empire February 15, 1887, 
on the occasion of the Jubilee of the 
reign of Her Most Gracious Majesty. 
Residence: Bombay. , 

MAHADEO K. KUMTHEKAR, Rao Ba- 
hadur. Received the title of Rao 
Saheb on May 21, 1898, and that of 
Rao Bahadur on June 3, 1899. Resi- 
dence : Poona, Bombay. 

MAHARAJ. — Generally a prefix. 

MAHARAJ NARAYAN, Pandit, Siva- 
puri, Rai Bahadur. Received the title 
on June 22, 1897. Residence : Benares, 
North- Western Provinces. 

MAHARAJ SINGH (of Haldaur), Rdjd 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1878. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



169 



Residence : Bijnaur, North-Western 
Provinces. 

MAHARAJ SINGH (of Patan), Rao. 
The title is hereditary, having been 
originally conferred by the Mughal 
Emperor of Delhi, through the Subah- 
dar Ghairdt Khan, for good services 
in capturing the fortress of Dhamoni. 
Belongs to the same family as that of 
the Kao Bhopal Singh of Sehora, in 
Sagar district. The Kao Maharaj Singh 
is the son of the late Rao Khuman 
Singh of Patan, whom he succeeded. 
Residence: Patan, Sagar, Central 
Provinces. 

MAHARAJ SINGH, Thakur, Rai Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on May 20, 1890. Residence : 
Sagar, Central Provinces. 

MAHARAJ THUMMON SINGH 
HAZARI, Rao Saheb. See Thummon. 

MAHARAM, Kison Singh. Seim of. A 
ruling chief ; b. 1859. Succeeded to the 
gadi December 15, 1877. The Seim is 
the Chief of one of the Khasi and 
Jaintia Hill States, under the Chief 
Commissioner of Assam ; its population 
is 7591, consisting chiefly of Khdsis 
and Christians. Residence : Maharam, 
Khasi Hills, Assam. 

MAHDAUNA, Rdjd of. See Partab 
Nardyan Singh. 

MAHENDRA LAL SIRCAR, CLE. Was 
created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
January 1, 1883. Residence : Calcutta. 

MAHENDRA MAHENDRA SINGH, 
Raia (of Bhadawar), CLE., Maha- 
raja; b. September 26, 1835. The 
title of Maharaja is personal, and was 
conferred on July 25, 1881, but the 
title of Rdjd of Bhadawar is heredi- 
tary, and the Maharaja is the present 
head and representative of one of the 
greatest and most powerful his- 
torical families of the North-Western 
Provinces. He is the Chief of the 
Bhadauriya sept of the illustrious 
Chauhdn clan of Rajputs ; has married 
a sister of the Raja of Mainpuri, 
who is the Chief of all the Chauhans, 
and has a son and heir, Maharaj- 
kumar Mahendra Sumrat Singh, 
born October 11, 1875. The Maha- 
raja has been exempted from 
personal appearance in the Civil 
Courts, and (together with his re- 



tainers) from the operation of certain 
provisions of the Arms Act. He was 
created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
May 30, 1891. Achal Deo was the 
ancestor of the Bhadawar family at 
the time of Timur's invasion, and 
he appears to have given the name of 
Bhadauriya to his sept of Rajputs, 
from the village of Bhadaura, on the 
right bank of the Jumna, in the Agra 
district. In the time of the Emperor 
Akbar, Rajao Rawut, then the head 
of the family, slew a famous Meo free- 
booter named Haitu, and obtained 
great honours and rewards from the 
Great Mughal, including the title of 
"Mahendra," Lord of the Earth. In 
the Ain-i-Akbari of Abul Fazl, the 
grandson of Rajao Rawat is entered 
as a mansabddr of 500, with the title 
of Raja. At the Court of the Emperor 
Shah Jahan, the Raja Padam Singh, 
Bhadauriya, was a mansabddr of 1500. 
Azam Shah, the son of Aurangzeb, 
and the Emperor Muhammad Shah, 
granted sanads to the family, copies 
of which are in existence. During the 
palmy days of the Mughal Empire the 
Raja of Bhadawar was reckoned, with 
the Rajas of Jaipur, Jodhpur, and 
Bundi, as one of the four Hindu 
"Pillars of the Empire"; and the 
history of the family is full and inter- 
esting. In the time of Lord Lake's 
campaigns against the Mahrattas, and 
subsequently, the Rajas of Bhadawar 
rendered valuable aid ,to the British 
arms. The late Raja Samait Singh, 
who died without issue in 1840, was 
the son of Raja Partab Singh; and 
the present Maharaja was the adopted 
son of Rdjd Samait Singh, and suc- 
ceeded him. The Mahdrdjd " showed 
conspicuous zeal and loyalty" during 
the period of the Mutiny of 1857 ; his 
levies barred the way of the mutineers 
through his territories, and success- 
fully guarded the ghats of the Chambal 
and Jumna. Residence: Naugaon, 
Agra District, North- Western Pro- 



MAHENDRA NATH CHATTARJI, Rai 

Saheb. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1892. Residence: Bengal. 

MAHENDRA NATH CHATTERJEE, 

Rai Saheb. Received the title on 
January 2, 1899. Residence: Bengal. 



170 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



MAHENDRA NATH GUPTA, Eat Ba- 
hadur. Is an Assistant-Surgeon in 
the Army Medical Department. Re- 
ceived the title on June 22, 1897. 
Residence: Calcutta. 

MAHENDRA NATH GUPTA, Bat Ba- 
hadur. Received the title on January 
1, 1898. Is a Deputy Magistrate. 
Besidence: Bengal. 

MAHENDRA NATH OHDEDAR, Bat 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 21, 1892. Besidence : Allaha- 
bad, North- Western Provinces. 

MAHESH CHANDRA NYAYARATNA, 
CLE. , Mahdmahopddhydya. The title 
of Mahamahopadhyaya was conferred 
as a personal distinction on February 
16, 1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee 
of the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty, lor eminence in oriental 
learning. It entitles him to take rank 
in Darbar immediately after titular 
Rajas. The Mahamahopadhyaya, who 
is one of the most distinguished 
Sanskrit scholars in India, belongs to 
a Kulin Brahman family of the highest 
rank, the Bhattacharyya family of 
Narit, which has long been distin- 
guished for the zealous cultivation of 
Sanskrit learning, and the number of 
learned Pandits it has produced. His 
father, Harinarayana Tarkasiddhanta, 
and his two uncles, Guruprasada Tar- 
kapanchanana and Thakurdasa Clmra- 
mani, were eminent Pandits. He 
married, in the year 1848, the daughter 
of Pandit Ram Chand Tarkabagis of 
Sonagachi, in the Jehanabad sub- 
division of the district of Hugli. He 
has a brother, Pandit Madhabchandra 
Sarbabhauma, Sabha Pandit of Mai- 
sadal Raj. He has a daughter and 
three sons — Manmathanath Vidya- 
ratna, M.A. (of the Financial Depart- 
ment of the Government of India), 
born April 1863 ; Munindranath Bhat- 
tacharyya, M.A., B.L. (Yakil of the 
High Court of Calcutta), born February 
1868 ; andMahimanath Bhattacharyya, 
B .A., born April 1870. He was created 
a Companion of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire, May 24, 
1881 ; and the estimation in which he 
is held by Indian scholars is marked 
by his title of " Nyayaratna." He 
succeeded, after an interval, Professor 
E. B. Cowell (now Professor of Sanskrit 
in the University of Cambridge) as 
Principal of the Sanskrit College of 



Calcutta. During the tenure of the 
Principalship he has taken the initi- 
ative in the institution, by the Govern- 
ment of Bengal, of an examination, 
called the Sanskrit Title Examination, 
for the conferment of titles on meri- 
torious students of special departments 
of Sanskrit learning. To this examin- 
ation are admitted students from indi- 
genous institutions (called Chatuspathis 
or Tols) as well as from the special 
classes that have been organized in 
connection with the Sanskrit College. 
The Title Examination has been the 
means of stimulating in some measure, 
all over Bengal, the rather waning 
zeal for the cultivation of Sanskrit 
learning. The titles given — Nyaya- 
ratna, Vtdydratna, etc. — are those of 
the ancient Sanskrit Pandits in the 
Universities of Nadiya, Benares, and 
elsewhere. He has edited, with copious 
Notes, the Kdvya Prakds ; also the 
Mimdnsd Darsana, and the Black 
Yajur Veda. He has written many 
pamphlets, such as Bemarks on Bayd- 
nanda SarasvaWs Veda-Bhdshya, Tula- 
sidhdrana Mimdnsd, The Authorship 
of Mrichchhakatika, Lupta Savivatsara. 
He has done much for the general 
encouragement of Sanskrit learning; 
and also, by pecuniary help and other- 
wise, in furtherance of famine-relief, 
the promotion of education, and the 
opening out of means of communica- 
tion. He maintains a secondary school 
(a High Anglo-Sanskrit School) at his 
native village of Narit; and he has 
not only greatly improved the roads 
in and near about this village, but has 
taken a leading part in the opening 
out of good roads and tramways in his 
native District. The Mahamahopad- 
hyaya is a Member of the Bengal 
Asiatic Society, the Indian Association 
for the Cultivation of Science, the 
Calcutta University, the Board of* 
Examiners, the Central Text Book 
Committee of Bengal, the Behar 
Sanskrit Samaj, and the Anthropo- 
logical Society of Bombay ; and he has 
lately been elected a Foreign Member 
of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences 
at Buda-Pesth. He is also Joint- 
Secretary of the Hindu Hostel Com- 
mittee, a Member of the Bethuen 
(Girls') College Committee, and a 
Visitor of the Government Engineer- 
ing College at Sibpur in the neigh- 
bourhood of Calcutta. Besidence : 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OP INDIA 



171 



Calcutta; Narit, Amta, Howrah; and 
Benares. 

MAHESH PARTAB SINGH (of Anaula), 
Rdjd; b. January 25, 1824. Succeeded 
to the Raj on March 23, 1890, the 
title heing hereditary on the death of 
his father, the late Raja Rudr Partab 
Singh. Belongs to a Sarnet Rajput 
family, descended from the same an- 
cestors as those of the TMkur of 
Bansi. Residence : Anaula, Gorakhpur, 
North-Western Provinces. 

MAHESHWAR PRASAD SINGH, Ma- 

hdraj-kumdr Rao. Is the brother of 
the Maharaja Bahadur of Gidhaur in 
Bengal. Educated in Sanskrit, Persian, 
Hindi, and English. Residence : Gid- 
haur, Bengal. 

MAHIGANJ, Rdjd of. See Janaki 
Ballabh Sen. 

MAHIMA RANJAN RAI CHAUDHRI, 

Rdjd; b. February 3, 1853. The title 
was conferred on February 16, 1887, 
as a personal distinction, on the occa- 
sion of the Jubilee of the reign of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty. The 
Raja is the son of the late Babu 
Sambhu Chandra Rai Chaudhri. Be- 
longs to the Chaudhri family of Ka- 
kina, Rangpur, whose ancestors first 
settled in the district in the reign of 
Charles I., at which period RamaNath 
Chaki was in the service of the Raja 
of Kuch Behar. His son, Raghu Ram, 
became the Sendpati or Commander-in- 
Chiet of the Kuch Behar forces. His 
son, Ram Narayan, became the first 
Zamindar of Kakina under the Mughals 
when they gained possession of Rangpur 
in 1687, and obtained the title of Chau- 
dhri ; he died in 1710. His son, Raja 
Rai Chaudhri, and his grandson, Rudra 
Rai Chaudhri, followed in succession ; 
the latter died in 1768, shortly after 
the passing of Rangpur into British 
possession. His son, Rasik Rai Chau- 
dhri, died in 1770, leaving a minor son 
and heir; his widow, Alaknanda 
Chaudhurani, successfully adminis- 
tered the Zamindari until her son, 
Ram Rudra Rai Chaudhri, succeeded 
in 1784. The latter, who was distin- 
guished as a philanthropist and scholar, 
died in 1820, and was succeeded in 
turn by his eldest son and grandson ; 
the latter dying without issue in 1850 
was followed by his cousin, Sambhu 
Chandra Rai Chaudhri (son of Ram 



Rudra's younger son), mentioned above 
as the father of the present Raja. 
He was renowned as a Vedanta scholar, 
and a friend to Sanskrit learning ; he 
founded a Bengali press, and kept a 
number of Pandits engaged in trans- 
lating Sanskrit works into Persian, 
and vice versd. His son, the present 
Raja, educated at Rangpur School, 
succeeded to the estate as a minor ; 
attained his majority in 1871. Has 
founded several schools and charitable 
institutions ; is a poet, author, and 
speaker on religious and political sub- 
jects, and a composer of many national 
songs. He married in 1868 Man Mo- 
hini Rai Chaudhurani, and has issue 
a son, Kumar Mahendra Ranjan Rai 
Chaudhri, born September 19, 1874. 
The family crest is an angel, volant, 
proper; the motto — Nisi Dominus 
frustra. Residences : Rajbari, Kakina ; 
Rangpur, Benares. 

MAHLOG, Thakur Raghnath Chand, 
Rdnd of. A ruling chief; b. 1861. 
Succeeded to the gadi May 16, 1880. 
The Thakur was granted the title of 
Rana as a personal distinction on 
January 1, 1898. Belongs to a Rajput 
(Hindu) family, claiming descent from 
the Rajput Chief Rana Hari Chand, 
who in early times came on a pilgrim- 
age, conquered the country, and 
founded the State of Mahlog. The 
Gurkhas overran the district between 
1803 and 1815 ; and on their expulsion 
in the latter year by the British Power, 
the Thakur was confirmed in the 
possession of his State by a sanad from 
the British Government, dated Sep- 
tember 4, 1815. Thirty-four genera- 
tions of chiefs intervened between 
Rana Hari Chand and the late Thakur 
Dalip Chand, who succeeded to the gadi 
in 1849, and died in 1880. Mahlog is 
one of the Simla Hill States, and its 
area is 53 square miles ; its popula- 
tion about 9169, chiefly Hindus. The 
Rand maintains a military force of 
30 men. Residence : Mahlog, Simla 
Hills, Punjab. 

MAHMUD All KHAN, Muhammad (of 
Chitari), Naxodb, Khdn Bahadur. See 
Muhammad. 

MAHMUD HASAN KHAN, Munshi, 
Khdn Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on June 22, 1897. Residence : 
Akbarpur, Cawnpore, North-Western 
Provinces. 



172 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



MAHMUD JUANI, Shaikh, Shams-ul- 
Ulama. The title is a personal one, 
and was conferred on February 16, 
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee of 
the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty, for eminence in oriental 
learning. It entitles him to take rank 
in Darbar immediately after titular 
Nawabs. Residence: Calcutta, Bengal. 

MAHMUD KHAN, Mir (of Kalat) , CLE. 
Was created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
January 1, 1878. Residence: Kalat, 
Baluchistan. 

MAHMUDABAD, Raja of. See Muham- 
mad Amir Hasan Khan. 

MAHOMED. See Muhammad. 

MAHOMEDBHAI IBRAHIM, Khdn Ba- 
hadur. Received the title of Khan 
Saheb on May 21, 1896, and that of 
Khan Bahadur on January 1, 1899. 
Residence : Bombay. 

MAHOMET. See Muhammad. 

MAHSTJD HASAN KHAN, Munshi, 
Khdn Bahadur. Beceived the title on 
January 1, 1899. Residence : Karbal, 
Mainpuri, North- Western Provinces. 

MAHTAB KUNWAR (of Katiari), Rani. 
The title of Raja was conferred, as a 
personal distinction, on the late Raja 
Tilak Singh of Katiari, in the district 
of Hardoi, Ouclh, on April 23, 1878. 
The Raja has recently died, and his 
widow, the Rani, has succeeded him. 
Residence : Katiari, Hardoi, Oudh. 

MAHTAB SHAH, Khdn Saheb; b. 1868. 
Received the title on January 1, 1897. 
Residence : Lahore, Punjab. 

MAHTAB SINGH, Subadar-Major, Rai 
Bahadur. The title was conferred for 
eminent Police service, on May 20, 
1896. Residence : Upper Burma. 

MAHTAB SINGH (of Lidhran), Sarddr. 
The title is hereditary, the Sardar 
being a descendant of Sardar Jai Singh, 
who joined the Nishanwala misl or 
confederacy which opposed Zain Khan, 
the Governor of Sirhind, who was slain 
in battle. Sardar Jai Singh obtaiued 
considerable territories in Lidhran, 
Ludhiana, and in Kharar, Ambala, 
about 1759 a.d. On the invasion of 
Ahmad Shah Durani he fled to the 
hills, and lost some of his Ambala 
possessions, which before his return 
had fallen into the hands of the 



Maharaja of Patiala. He was suc- 
ceeded by his only son, Sardar Charat 
Singh, who had three wives, by each 
of whom he had children, who suc- 
ceeded to his estate in accordance with 
the rule of Chanda Vanda, which is the 
custom of this family. Sardar Mahtab 
Singh is the son of the Sardar Budh 
Singh, who was born in 1812, and 
rendered excellent service to Govern- 
ment during the Mutiny of 1857, for 
which he received a suitable reward. 
Residence : Lidhran, Ludhiana, Pun- 
jab. 

MAHTAB SINGH (of Piplod), Rand. 
Succeeded the late Rana Amed Singh 
in 1892. The family claims descent 
from the famous Chauhan Rajputs of 
Ajmir. The title is hereditary. 
Residence: Piplod, Nimar, Central 
Provinces. 

MAHULI, Raid of. See Narendra Baha- 
dur Pal. 

MAIHAR, Raja Raghbir Singh, Rdjd of. 
A ruling chief ; b. 1843. Succeeded to 
the gadi as a minor in 1852. Belongs 
to a Jogi (mendicant ascetic) family of 
Hindus ; descended from Beni Hazuri, 
who was in the service of the Bundela 
Raja of Panna, and ultimately obtained 
from his master the jdgir of Maihar, 
with the title of Rais. When Baghel- 
khand became British territory by the 
Treaty of Bassein in 1802, Durjan 
Singh, the youngest son of Beni Hazuri, 
was in possession of Maihar, and he 
was confirmed by the British Govern- 
ment. The grandfather of the present 
Raja was the grandson of Durjan 
Singh. The Raja Raghbir Singh ob- 
tained the title of Raja, in place of 
the older title of Rais, on February 14, 
1869 ; he has a son and heir, named 
Jadbir Singh. The area of the State 
is 400 square miles : its population is 
71,709, chiefly Hindus, but including 
more than 10,000 belonging to ab- 
original tribes. The Raja maintains a 
military force of 8 cavalry, 227 infantry, 
and 7 guns, and is entitled to a salute 
of 9 guns. Residence : Maihar, Baghel- 
khand, Central India. 

MAIL0G, Rand of. See Mahlog. 

MAING KAING, Kun Hmon, Myoza of. 
A ruling chief. The Myoza is Chief of 
one of the Shan States on the Burma 
frontier, which has an area of about 
800 square miles, and a population 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



173 



consisting almost entirely of Shans. 
Residence: Maing Kaing, Shan States, 
Burma. 

MAING NAUNG, Kun Tun, Myoza of. 
A ruling chief. The Myoza is Chief of 
one of the Shan States on the Burma 
frontier, which has an area of ahout 
900 square miles, and a population 
consisting mainly of Shans, with a few 
Yins. Residence : Maing Naung, Shan 
States, Burma. 

MAING PAN, Kun Hlaing, Sawbwa of. 
A ruling chief. The Sawbwa is Chief 
of one of the Shan States on the Burma 
frontier. This State has four consider- 
able feudatory States on the other 
side of the Salwin river, named Maing 
Han, Maing Sut, Maing Ta, and Maiug 
Tun. Including these its area is about 
3000 square miles, and most of the 
Sawbwa's subjects are Shans. Resi- 
dence : Maing Pan, Shan States, 
Burma. 

MAING PUN, Kun Ti, Sawhwa of. A 
ruling chief. The Sawbwa is Chief of 
one of the Shan States on the Burma 
frontier, which has an area of about 
800 square miles, and a population 
consisting mainly of Shans. Residence : 
Maing Pun, Shan States, Burma. 

MAING SEIK, Kun Pwin, Myoza of. 
A ruling chief. The Myoza is Chief of 
one of the Shan States on the Burma 
frontier, which has an area of about 
4000 square miles (more than three- 
fourths as large as the kingdom of 
Saxony), and a population consisting 
almost entirely of Shans. Residence: 
Maing Seik, Shan States, Burma. 

MAING SHU, Kun Maha, Myoza of. A 
ruling chief. The Myoza 'is Chief of 
one of the Shan States on the Burma 
frontier, which has an area of about 100 
square miles, and a population con- 
sisting mainly of Shans, with a good 
many Yins. Residence: Maing Shu, 
Shan States, Burma. 

MAING SIN, Kun Kyaw, Myoza of. A 
ruling chief. The Myoza is Chief of 
one of the Shan States on the Burma 
frontier, which has an area of about 
50 square miles, and a population 
consisting largely of Shans, with some 
Yins. Residence: Maing Sin, Shan 
States, Burma. 

MAINPURI, Rdjd of. See Rampartab 
Singh of Mainpuri, Rdjd. 



MAISADAL, Rdjd of. See Jyoti Prasad 
Garga. 

MAJHAUU, Kausil Kishor Parshad 
Mall Bahadur, Rdjd of. The Raja 
succeeded the late Raja Udai Narayan 
Mall of Majhauli in 1891. He is the 
Chief of the great Bisen clan of 
Rajputs in the Gorakhpur district, 
claiming descent from the famous 
ascetic Mayar Bhat. The latter, by 
one of his wives, a Surajbansi Raj- 
putni named Surajprabha, had a son, 
Biswa or Bisu Sen, who was the great 
ancestor of the Bisen clan. After him 
there were 79 generations of Rajas, 
all of whom were styled Sen. The 
80th Raja, Hardeo Sen, obtained the 
title of Mall on account of his bravery 
from one of the Delhi Emperors. 
Then followed 23 generations, to Bodh 
Mall, who succeeded in 1564 a.d., and 
is said to have been arrested for arrears 
of revenue by order of the Emperor 
Akbar. "When the British Govern- 
ment took the district, the Raja was 
Ajit Mall, who was Chief from 1753 to 
1806. The late Raja, Udai Narayan 
Mall, succeeded Raja Tej Mall in 1843, 
and died in 1891. Residence : Majhauli, 
Gorakhpur, North-Western Provinces. 

MAJHGAWAN, Rdjd of. tfeeHarRatan 
Singh. 

MAJITHIA, Sarddr of. See Umrao 
Singh. 

MAKAT SINGH, Rao; b. 1832. The 
title is hereditary, having been origin- 
ally conferred on the Thakur ancestors 
of the Rao Makat Singh by the Raja 
Gyan Chand, and having long been 
recognized. The Rao has two grand- 
sons — Lai Singh, born June 28, 1869 ; 
and Ladan Singh, born April 2, 1874. 
Residence : Cawnpur, North- Western 
Provinces. 

MAKHAN KUMARI, Thakurani, Rdni. 
The title was granted on January 1, 
1898. Residence : Lachhmipur, Bha- 
galpur, Bengal. 

MAKHDUM.— A title when followed by 
two names. 

MAKRAI, Raja Bharat Sah, Rdjd of. 
A ruling chief; b. 1846. Succeeded 
to the gadi December 5, 1866. Belongs 
to a very ancient Gond (aboriginal) 
family, in which the title of " Rajd 
Hatiya Rai," originally conferred by 
the Emperor of Delhi, has been held 



174 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



from time immemorial. The Raja is 
entitled to be attended by a red- 
coloured flag as a banner, and a dhanka 
or drum. The State has an area of 
155 square miles ; and a population of 
16,764, chiefly Hindus. Residence : 
Makrai, Hoshangabad, Central Pro- 
vinces. 

MAKSUDANGARH, Raja Raghunath 
Singh, Rdjd of A ruling chief; 
b. 1849. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor in November 1865. Belongs to 
a Khichi Rajput (Hindu) family, 
claiming descent from Raja Durjan 
Sal, an ancient Khichi chief of the 
Rajputs. The State is a feudatory of 
Gwalior ; its population is about 12,000, 
chiefly Hindus. Residence : Maksudan- 
garh, Bhopal, Central India. 

MALAISOHMAT, TJ Lat Singh, Seim of. 
A ruling chief; b. 1889. Succeeded to 
the gadi April 10, 1890. The Seim is 
Chief of one of the Khasi and Jaintia 
Hill States, under the Chief Com- 
missioner of Assam ; its population is 
about 450, consisting chiefly of Khasis 
and Christian converts. Residence : 
Malaisohmat, Khasi Hills, Assam. 

MALAK, RAJ, Babu (of Kartarpur, 
Punjab), Rai Saheb. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on May 20, 
1890. Residence: Bombay. 

MALAUDH, Sarddr of. See Sundar 
Singh. 

MALEGA0N, Rdjd Bahadur of. See 
Gopal Rao Shivdeo. 

MALER K0TLA, His Highness Nawab 
Muhammad Ibrahim Ali Khan Ba- 
hadur, Naicdb Bahadur of. A ruling 
chief ; b. 1858. Succeeded to the gadi 
July 16, 1871. Belongs to an Afghan 
family, whose ancestor, Shaikh Sadr- 
ud-din, came from Kabul about the 
end of the 15th century, and obtained 
in marriage a daughter of the Afghan 
Emperor of DelLi, with a territory in 
the province of Sirhind as her dowry. 
Fifth in descent from him was Bazid 
Khan, who obtained the title of Nawab 
irom the Emperor Alamgir,and founded 
the town of Maler Kotla in 1657 a.d. 
The State gradually became inde- 
pendent during the decay of the Im- 
perial power of Delhi in the 18th 
century, but being under Afghan and 
Muhammadan rulers, it was frequently 



involved in feucls with its Sikh neigh- 
bours, and especially with the power- 
ful Chiefs of Patiala. In 1732 the 
Nawab Jamal Khan aided the Im- 
perialist troops against Rdjd Ala Singh 
of Patiala ; and again in 1761 the 
same Nawab aided the forces of Ahmad 
Shah Durani against the Sikhs. Jamal 
Khan's son, however, the Nawab 
Bhikan Khan, experienced the venge- 
ance of the Sikhs ; and being hard 
pressed by the forces of the Raja 
Amar Singh of Patiala, was forced to 
sign a treaty, under which peace 
ensued for many years. In 1787 the 
Rajd of Patiala aided the Nawab 
of Maler Kotla against the Sikh Sardar 
of Bhadaur. In 1794 a combination 
of Sikh Sardars attacked Maler Kotla 
under the Bedi Saheb Singh, a de- 
scendant of the great Sikh Guru, Baba 
Nanak. The Nawab was besieged in 
Maler Kotla, and reduced to ex- 
tremities, when he was saved from 
destruction by the intervention of the 
Raja of Patiala. In General Lake's 
campaigns against the Mahrattas, the 
Nawab of Maler Kotla joined the 
British army with all his followers, 
and in 1809 was taken under British 
protection, and guaranteed against the 
encroachments of the Maharaja Ranjit 
Singh of Lahore. The late Nawab, 
Sikandar Ali Khan, in 1862, obtained 
the assurance of the British Govern- 
ment that any succession in accordance 
with Muhammadan law would be 
respected; and accordingly, when he 
died without issue in 1871, he was 
succeeded by the present Nawab, the 
heir of a collateral branch of the 
family. The area of the State is 164 
square miles ; its population is about 
71,000, of whom the Sikhs number 
about 28,000, the Muhammadans about 
24,000, and the Hindus about 16,000. 
The Nawab enjoys the title of " His 
Highness" as a personal distinction. 
He maintains a military force of 60 
cavalry, 228 infantry, and 6 guns, 
and is entitled to a salute of 11 guns, 
including 2 guns which were added to 
the salute as a personal distinction on 
January 1, 1877, on the occasion of 
the Proclamation of Her Majesty as 
Empress of India. Residence: Maler 
Kotla, Punjab. 

MALHAJINI, Rdjd of. See Parbal Partab 
Singh. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



175 



MALHAR RAO, Ingli, Rao; I. 1827. 
The title is hereditary, the family 
having heen the rulers of Jabalpur 
district during the time of the Mah- 
ratta Government. The Rao possesses 
a sanad of the time of the Emperor 
Shah Alam, which styles his ancestor 
Raja Ambaji Bahadur Ingli, and shows 
that at a Darbar held by the Emperor 
Shah Alam a very high position was 
conferred on this family, and the 
management of several tdlukas en- 
trusted to them. Rao Gangddhar 
Ingli, father of the present Rao, was 
ruler of Jabalpur under the Mahratta 
Government. Residence : Jabalpur, 
Central Provinces. 

MALIA, Thakur Modhji Mulvaji, Thdkur 
of. A ruling chief; b. July 1, 1846. 
Succeeded to the gadi June 23, 1875. 
Belongs to the great Jareja Rajput 
(Hindu) family which has given ruling 
Houses to Kutch, Nawanagar, and 
Morvi ; the Malia family being an 
offshoot of the Morvi branch. The 
Thakur has a son and heir named 
Raisinghji. The area of the State is 
102 square miles ; its population 11,224, 
chiefly Hindus. The Thdkur main- 
tains a military force of 25 cavalry, 
49 infantry, and 1 gun. Residence : 
Malia, Kdthidwdr, Bombay. 

MALIK— A prefix. 

MALLR, Jam of. See Murad Ali. 

MALKHAN SINGH (of Bharrai), Rao 
Saheb; b. 1862. Succeeded to the 
gadi on the death of his father, the 
late Rao Saheb Hindupat of Bharrai, 
on September 9, 1896. The title is 
hereditary, and was originally con- 
ferred on Rati Rao by the old Mahratta 
Government of Deori. Residence: 
Bharrai, Sdgar, Central Provinces. 

MALKHORDA, Thdkur of. See Richhpal 
Singh. 

MALLANPUR, Rdjd of. See Maneshwar 
Bakhsh Singh. 

MALLIEM, Hain Manik, Seim of. A 
ruling chief: b. 1843. Succeeded to 
the gadi December. 16, 1868. The 
Seim is Chief of one of the Khasi and 
Jaintia Hill States, under the Chief 
Commissioner of Assam ; its population 
is 12,338, consisting chiefly of Khasis 
and Christian converts. Residence: 
Malliem (or Mylliem), Khasi Hills, 



MALPUR, Rawal Dipsinghji Sheo- 
singhji, Rdwal of. A ruling chief ; b. 
1863. Succeeded to the gadi April 12, 
1882, on the death of his father, the late 
Rdwal Sheosinghji Khumdnsinghji. 
The Rdwal belongs to the illustrious 
family of the Chiefs of the Rdhtor clan 
of Rajputs, claiming descent from the 
legendary hero Rdma and the ancient 
Rdhtor Emperors of Kanauj of the 
Suryavansa or Solar race, through the 
ancient Raos of Idar. The Rdwal is 
the direct descendant of Rdwal Viraj- 
mal, the founder of the Malpur State, 
who was the younger son of Kirath- 
singhji, eighth Rao of Idar. The area 
of the State, which is tributary to 
Baroda, and pays kichri to Idar, is 324 
square miles; its population is 14,009, 
chiefly Hindus. Residence: Mdlpur, 
Mdhi Kdntha, Bombay. 

MAMDOT,_iVrtwaZ> of. See Ghulam Ku- 
tab-ud-din. 

MAN, Maung, Thuye gating ngwe Da ya 
Mia. The title (which is indicated by 
the letters T.D.M. after the name) is 
personal, and was conferred on May 
20, 1890. It means " Recipient of the 
Silver Sword for Bravery." Residence : 
Prome, Burma. 

MAN SINGH, CLE., Sarddr Bahadur. 
Was created a Companion of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire, January 1, 1886. Residence: 
Punjab. 

MAN SINGH (of Mokal), Sarddr. The 
title is hereditary. Residence : Lahore, 
Punjab. 

MAN SINGH (of Sarwan), Rao Bahddnr, 
The titJe is personal, and was conferred 
onOctober 31,1879. Residence: Ratldm, 
Central India. 

MAN SINGH, Thakur, Rai Bahadur. 
The title of Rai Bahadur is personal, 
and was conferred on March 12, 1875, 
in recognition of the excellent services 
rendered by the Thdkur in the famine 
of 1873-74. Residence : Sukpur, Bha- 
galpur, Bengal. 

M ANA SINGH (of Mokal) , Sarddr. The 
title is hereditary. The Sarddr is the 
head of the Mokal family of Sindhu 
Jats, whose ancestors rose to consider- 
able power and importance during the 
reign of the Mahdrdjd Ran jit Singh. 
Sarddh Bela Singh (cousin of Sar- 
ddh Kdhan Singh, Mdna Singh's 



176 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



father), with his son Surjan Singh, 
fought on the Sikh side at the 
hattles of Mudki, Firuzshahr, and 
Sobraon; and Bela Singh, severely 
wounded at Sobraon, was drowned in 
the Sutlej in the vain attempt to ford 
the river after the bridge of boats had 
been broken down. In 1858 Sardar 
Mana Singh was appointed an officer 
of the 5th Banda Military Police, and 
in September he greatly distinguished 
himself by the gallantry with which 
he led his troop against very superior 
numbers of the enemy — when he was 
wounded in the head, and his horse 
was wounded under him. On his re- 
tirement in 1861 he was made Honorary 
Police Magistrate of twenty-eight 
villages in the neighbourhood of his 
ancestral seat of Mokal, and in 1862 
received a considerable grant of land. 
He has three sons— (1) Narayan Singh, 
born 1849; (2) Partab Singh, born 
1852 ; (3) Lai Singh, born 1855. Resi- 
dence : Mokal, Lahore, Punjab. 

MANA VIKRAMA RAJA, Raja, The 
Eralpad; b. 1832. "The Eralpad" 
is the courtesy title borne by the 
heir-apparent to the Zamorin, or 
First Raja of Calicut, under the 
Marumakkatayam law of inheritance, 
by which the succession goes to the 
offspring of the female members of 
the family, amongst whom the eldest 
male is the heir-apparent. The Eralpad 
bears also the title of Second Raja of 
Calicut {see Calicut). Residence : Cali- 
cut, Malabar District, Madras. 

MANASAWAL, Rdnd of. See Lehna 

Singh. 
MANAWALA, Sardar of. See Hira 

Singh. 

MANCHERJI KAWASJI MARZBAN, 

C.I.E., Khan Bahadur; b. July 7, 
1839. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1877, as a personal distinc- 
tion, on the occasion of the Proclama- 
tion of Her Most Gracious Majesty as 
Empress of India. A respected member 
of the Parsi community, the Khan 
Bahadur was educated at the Elphin- 
stone High School, the Poona College, 
and the Poona School of Engineering. 
Has rendered distinguished service in 
the Public Works Department of 
Bombay, is a C.E., and the Executive 
Engineer of the Presidency City of 
Bombay, in recognition whereof he 



has been created a Companion of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire, as well as Khan Bahadur. Is 
a J. P. of Bombay ; Fellow of the Bom- 
bay University ; an Associate Member of 
the Institute of Civil Engineering, and 
a Fellow of the Royal Institute of 
British Architects. Was elected Pre- 
sident of the Municipal Corporation of 
the City of Bombay in April 1890. 
Married Gulbai, daughter of Danaji 
Kueeoji, Mirza; and has issue a son, 
named Murzban, born August 15, 1858, 
and a daughter, Mithibai, married to 
Jehangir D. Mugasett, Esq., of Calicut. 
Residence: Bombay. 

MANCHERJI MEHRWANJI BHAU- 
NAGRI, Sir, K.C.I.E., M.P. Is Mem- 
ber of Parliament for the North-East 
Division of Bethnal Green, London. 
Has acted as the representative of His 
Highness the Maharaja of Bhaunagar 
on many important occasions in Eng- 
land ; and was created a Companion 
of the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empire, June 28, 1886, for his 
distinguished services both to the 
State of Bhaunagar and to the Indian 
Empire, and a K.C.I.E. on June 22, 
1897. Is a Member of Council of the 
National Indian Association and of 
other public bodies. Residence : 3 
Cromwell Crescent, London, S.W. ; 
Bhaunagar, Kathiawar, Bombay ; and 
Carlton Club, London. 

MANCHERJI RUSTAMJI DHOLU, 

C.I.E., Khan Bahadur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on June 
1, 1888. Created a CLE. on June 22, 
1897. Residence: Aden. 
MANDA, Rdjd of. See Rampartab Singh. 

MANDAWAL, Rawat Kesri Singh, 

Rdwat of. A ruling chief ; b. 1858. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi as a minor in 1861. 
Belongs to a Doria Rajput (Hindu) 
family. The population of the State 
is about 2000. Residence : Mandawal, 
Western Malwa, Central India. 

MANDAYAM ANANTAMPILLAI SIN- 
GARACHARIYAR, Rao Bahadur. See 
Anantampillai . 

MANDHATA, Rao of. See Yashwant 
Singh. 

MANDHATA, Thakur Piar Singh, Thd- 
kur of; b. 1883. Succeeded to the gadi 
on the death of the late Thakur Moti 
Singh on May 13, 1895. The founder 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



177 



of the family was the Thakur Chhatar 
Singh. Residence: Mandhata, Nimar, 
Central Provinces. 

MANDI, His Highness Raja Bije Sain 
Bahadur, Rdjd of. A ruling chief ; b. 
1846. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor January 26, 1851. Belongs to a 
Rajput (Hindu) family of the Chan- 
dravansi or Lunar race, whose succes- 
sive Rajas ruled from the earliest ages 
over the combined States of Suket and 
Mandi, until the year 1200 a.d. About 
that time the reigning Chief of Suket, 
named Sahu Sain, quarrelled with his 
younger brother ; the latter left Suket 
to seek his fortunes elsewhere, and 
his descendant, Ajbar Sain, founded 
the town of Mandi, and was the first 
Raja of this State. At the time of 
the Gurkha invasion in 1803, Isri Sain 
was the Raja of Mandi ; he submitted 
to the invaders on condition of being 
left unmolested. After the expulsion 
of the Gurkhas by the British Power 
in 1815, Mandi came under the control 
of the Superintendent of the Hill 
States appointed by the Sikh Govern- 
ment of Lahore, and it suffered greatly 
from the turbulence of the Sikh army 
after the death of the Maharaja 
Ran jit Singh in 1839. General Ven- 
tura, the Sikh commander, invaded 
the State, and reduced the celebrated 
fort of Kamlagarh, and the Raja in 
vain besought the aid of the British. 
But at last, about the time of the first 
Sikh war, the British Government 
consented to intervene. In February 
1846 the Rdjd Balbir Sain formally 
tendered his allegiance. By the treaty 
of March 1846 with the Sikhs, Mandi 
with the whole of the Jalandhar Doab 
was ceded to the British Government ; 
and Raja Balbir Sain in October of 
the same year received a sanad, con- 
firming him in his possessions under 
conditions of feudal service. Balbir 
Sain died in 1851, and was succeeded 
by his son, the present Raja, then a 
minor. According to the traditions of 
the country there were at one time no 
fewer than 300 fortresses in this State ; 
but of these only about ten now exist 
in any preservation — the most famous 
being the hill-fort of Kamlagarh 
mentioned above. The area of the 
State is 1125 square miles ; its popula- 
tion is about 140,000, chiefly Hindus, 
but including more than 2000 Muham- 



madans. The Raja Bahadur maintains 
a military force of 25 cavalry, 1600 
infantry, and 10 guns ; and is entitled 
to a salute of 11 guns. Residence: 
Mandi, Punjab. 

MANDVA, Rana Jitsinghji, Rand of 
A ruling chief ; b. 1877. Succeeded to 
the gadi as a minor September 13, 
1890. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) 
family. The area of the State is 7 
square miles. 'Residence: Mandva, 
Rewa Kantha, Bombay. 

MANEKCHAND KAPURCHAND, Rao 
Bahadur. Received the title January 
1, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

MANEKJI JAMSETJI CHANDANA, 

Khan Sahcb. Received the title on 
June 3, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

MANEKJI KAVASJI D0TIVALA, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 3, 1893. Residence: Poona, 
Bombay. 

MANEKJI KHARSIDJI NARIMAN, 

Khan Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1889. Residence : 
Bombay. 

MANEPANDA MTJTANNAH, Rai Baha- 
dur. Received the title on June 3, 
1899. Residence: Madras. 

MANESHWAR BAKHSH SINGH (of 
Mallanpur), Rdjd; b. 1850. The 
title of the family having been origin- 
ally Rao, that of Raja was recognized 
as hereditary in 1864, when the present 
Raja succeeded to it as a minor. 
Belongs to a Raikwar family, de- 
scended from the Raikwars of Baundi 
(see Sarabjit Singh, Raja). The founder 
of this branch of the family was 
Ratan Singh. About the year 1580 
a.d. the family acquired considerable 
possessions in the Sitapur district, 
and subsequently extended their 
territory into the districts of Kheri 
and Bahraich. Raja Maneshwar 
Bakhsh Singh, Raikwar, was educated 
at Benares and Lucknow under the 
Court of Wards, by whom his estates 
were managed for many years. He is 
an Honorary Magistrate, and has a son 
and heir, Kunwar Debi Bakhsh Singh. 
Residence : Mallanpur, Kheri, Oudh. 

MANGAL KHAN, Rana Jit Singh, Rand 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1830. Succeeded 
to the gadi as a minor November 9, 
1844. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) 



178 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



family. The State was anciently a 
feudatory of Kahlur (q.v .) ; but after 
the expulsion of the Gurkhas, who had 
overrun it from 1803 to 1815, by the 
British Power, the latter declared 
Mangal to be dependent only on the 
British Government. The sanad of 
the latter is dated December 20, 1815. 
The Rand has a son and heir, named 
Tilok Singh. The area of the State, 
which is one of the Simla Hill States, 
is 13 square miles; its population is 
1060, chiefly Hindus. The Rana 
maintains a military force of 25 men. 
Residence : Mangal, Simla Hills, Punjab. 
MANGAL KHAN, alias AHMAD NUR 
KHAN, Khan Bahadur. See Ahmad 
Nur Khan. 

MANGAL SAIN, Babu, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1896. Residence : Ludhiana, Punjab. 

MANGAL SINGH, CLE. (of Bhinai), 
Raja Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on January 1, 1877, as a personal 
distinction, on the occasion of the 
Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India. Resid- 
ence: Ajmir. 

MANGAL SINGH, Thakur (of GarM), 
CLE., Rai Bahadur. The title of 
Rai Bahadur was conferred on January 
1, 1877, on the occasion of the Pro- 
clamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India. The 
Thakur was created a C.I.E. on January 
1, 1899. Residence : Alwar, Rajputana. 

MANGALGARH , Thakur of. See Chhatar 
Sal, Thakur. 

MANGESH ANAJI, Rao Saheb ; b. 
September 30, 1853. Received the 
title November 22, 1897. Residence: 
Belgaum, Bombay. 

MANGESH ANNAJI, Rao Saheb. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence: Belgaum, Bombay. 

MANGI LAL, Seth, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred, as a personal 
distinction, on May 25, 1895. Resid- 
ence: Mathura, North-Western Pro- 
vinces. 

MANI LAL BANERJI, Rai Bahadur. 

The title was conferred on May 21, 

1898. Residence : Calcutta. 
MANI LAL NAHAR, Rai Bahadur. 

Received the title on May 21, 1898. 

Residence: Azimganj, Murshidabad. 

Bengal. 



MANIBHAI JASBHAI, Diwan Baha- 
dur, His Excellency. Prime Minister 
of Baroda; b. 1844. The title of 
Diwan Bahadur was conferred, as a 
personal distinction, on October 30, 
1884. His Excellency has rendered 
valuable service to His Highness the 
Gaekwar, to His Highness the Rao of 
Kutch, and in other States of Western 
India. Belongs to a Vadnagra Nagar 
Brahman family of Nariad in Gujarat. 
In 1870 he was invited by His Highness 
the Nawab of Junagadh to a seat in 
his Council ; and becoming Chief 
Justice of that State, he introduced 
important reforms in the Judicial and 
Police Department. Between 1872 
and 1876 he rendered admirable service 
as native assistant to the Resident, 
first at Palanpur, and then at Baroda, 
and on September 25, 1875, at a public 
Darbar held at Baroda, the title of Rao 
Bahadur was conferred on him, to- 
gether with a valuable khilat. In May 
1876 Mr. Manibhai was appointed 
Diwan of Kutch, at the express desire 
of his late Highness the Maharaja 
Pragmalji, then Rao of Kutch. Here 
he introduced great and most beneficial 
reforms in all departments, especially 
in the collection of the revenue, and in 
education and sanitation ; and his tact 
and judgment largely contributed to 
the settlement of a long-standing 
dispute as to jurisdiction between the 
Rao and his feudatories of the Royal 
House, the Bhayad. In 1884 he 
obtained the title of Diwan Bahadur, 
with a valuable khilat. With a short 
interval, during which he returned to 
the Baroda Service, he administered 
the government of Kutch until the 
close of 1885, and on again returning 
to Baroda, he received very substantial 
recognition of the value of his services 
from His Highness the present Rao of 
Kutch. For more than four years, he 
was at the head of various departments 
in Baroda, and in May 1890 the 
Maharaja Gaekwar appointed him 
Diwan or Prime Minister of that great 
State. In Baroda his administration 
has been thoroughly successful, and 
he has also published some important 
works in Gujarati and English. He 
has issue, three daughters and two 
sons — Motibhai (of the University of 
Bombay), aged about twenty-nine; 
and Hirabhai, aged about twenty. 
Residence : Petlad, Baroda State. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK Ofl INDIA 



179 



MANIKCHARI, Rdjd of. See Niephrod- 
syne. 

MANIKJI KAWASJI DOTIVALA, Khan 
Bahadur. See Manekji. 

MANIPUR, Raja Chura Chand, Rdjd of. 
A ruling chief ; b. 1886. Succeeded to 
the gadi September 18, 1891. Belongs 
to a Kshdtriya (Hindu) family, de- 
scended from Raja Churai Romba, 
who obtained the Raj about the 
beginning of the 18th century. His 
adopted son (formerly named Pam- 
heiba) was the Raja Gharib Nawaz, 
who made several successful invasions 
of Burma. In the time of his grandson, 
the Raja Jai Singh {alias Ching Tung 
Romba), the Burmese invaded Mani- 
pur ; the Raja was compelled to seek 
British aid, and a treaty was concluded 
in 1762. Again in 1824, in the reign 
of the Raja Gambhir Singh, the State 
was overrun by the Burmese, but 
the latter were at length expelled by 
the aid of British levies, and when 
peace was concluded in 1826 Gambhir 
Singh was able to extend his boundaries 
by the inclusion of the Kubo valley. 
The latter territory was, however, 
restored to Burma in 1834. In that 
year the Raja Gambhir Singh died, 
and the State subsequently has suffered 
much from internal dissensions and 
frequent changes of rulers. These 
disorders at length became unendurable, 
and in 1890 the Government of India 
resolved to put an end to them. The 
first attempt to intervene was dis- 
astrous, as it was attended by the 
massacre of a considerable British 
force, including some high officers of 
State. The outrage was immediately 
followed by condign punishment, and 
all those who were responsible for the 
massacre were either hanged or other- 
wise rigorously dealt with. In this 
State the Prince next in succession to 
the gadi has the courtesy title of 
Yuvardj or Jubardj, and the next in 
dignity to him is called the Sendpati 
(sometimes spelt " Senaputty "). On 
the deposition of the late Raja — who 
had enjoyed the title of Maharaja as 
a personal distinction — these persons 
were found to have been implicated in 
the recent outrages, and were punished 
accordingly. The State had technically 
lapsed, on account of the rebellion, 
but it was resolved to select a youthful 
Raja from among the descendants of 



the ruling family, and to continue the 
political existence of Manipur as a 
feudatory State, and thereupon the 
present Raja was placed on the gadi. 
The State has an area of about 8000 
square miles, and a population estim- 
ated at about 220,000, chiefly Hindus, 
but including about 4881 Muham- 
madans, and 85,288 belonging to various 
Hill tribes. Residence: Manipur, 
Assam. 

MANTWARA, Rao Saheb of. See Dharup 
Singh ; see also Sarup Singh. 

MANMATHA NATH MITRA, Rai 

Bahadur ; b. 1868. Received the title 
on January 1, 1897. Residence: Cal- 
cutta. 

MANNU LAL, Lala, Rai Bahadur; b. 
1836. Granted the title for meritorious 
services on January 1, 1897. Resi- 
dence: Delhi. 

MAN0HAR SINGH (of Pathrala), 
Sarddr; b. 1839. The title is here- 
ditary. Sarddr Diwan Singh, grand- 
father of the present Sardar, and son 
of Sarddr Sohel Singh, about the year 
1759 a.d. conquered^ certain territory 
in the Jalandhar district. His brother- 
in-law, Sarddr Baghel Singh, was also 
a celebrated Sikh leader of those days. 
When the Maharaja Ranjit Singh 
conquered the Jalandhar Doab, he 
deprived the family of much of their 
possessions. One of the sons of Sardar 
Diwan Singh was the late Sarddr 
Fateh Singh, father of the present 
Sarddr. Sarddr Manohar Singh has 
two sons — Sarddr Sundar Singh and 
Sarddr Dasaundha Singh. Residence : 
Pathrdla, Jdlandhar, Punjab. 

MANSA, Rawal Shri Takntsinghji, 
Rdwal of. A ruling chief; b. 1877. 
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor May 
18, 1889. Belongs to a Chaura Rajput 
(Hiudu) family, whose founder, Rdwal 
Sursinghji, a scion of the ancient 
Chaura Rdjput dynasty that reigned 
at Anhilwdra Patan, 746 to 942 a.d., 
appears to have obtained an assignment 
of territory at Mansa on the downfall 
of the Anhilwdra Patan dynasty. The 
late Rdwal of Mansa, Rdjsinghji 
Bhimsinghji, was fourteenth in de- 
scent from Sursinghji. The area of 
the State is 73 square miles; its 
population is 13,299, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence: Mdnsa, Mdhi Kantha, 
Bombay. 



180 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OP INDIA 



MANSHARAM walad WATANMAL, 
Rao Saheb. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 14, 1888. 
Residence: Sehwan, Sind. 

MANSUKH RAI, Rai Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on May 21, 1898. 
Residence : Berar. 

MANUJI RAGHUJI, Rao Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence : Bombay. 

MAOIONG, Jit Singh, Seim of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1842. Succeeded to 
the gadi August 27, 1867. The Seim 
is Chief of one of the Khasi and Jaintia 
Hill States, under the Chief Commis- 
sioner of Assam ; its population is 
1646, consisting chiefly of Khasis and 
Christian converts. Residence : Maoi- 
ong, Khasi Hills, Assam. 

MAOSANRAM, Sam Burai, Ami of. A 
ruling chief ; b. 1877. Succeeded to 
the gadi as a minor March 28, 1890. 
The Seim is Chief of one of the Khasi 
and Jaintia Hill States, under the 
Chief Commissioner of Assam ; its 
population is 1104, consisting chiefly 
of Khasis and Christian converts. 
Residence: Maosanrani, Khasi Hills, 
Assam. 

MARDAN SINGH (of Pindarna) , Thdkur; 
b. 1854. The title is hereditary, having 
been originally granted by the Raja 
Mardan Singh of Garha-Mandha to 
an ancestor of this family named the 
Rawat Parshad, who had saved his 
(the Raja's) life from the Raja of 
Tehri. Belongs to the same family as 
that of the Thakur Gaya Parshad of 
Sagar. Residence: Pindarna, Sagar, 
Central Provinces. 

MARH PIPARIA, Rao of. See Sultan 
Singh. 

MARIAO, Burom, Seim of. A ruling 
chief ; b. 1863. Succeeded to the gadi 
May 5, 1888. The Seim is Chief of 
one of the Khasi and Jaintia Hill 
States, under the Chief Commissioner 
of Assam ; its popidation is 3669, con- 
sisting chiefly of Khasis and Christian 
converts. Residence : Mariao, Khasi 
Hills, Assam. 

MAROTIRAO BHUJANGRAO, Rao 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 30, 1891. Residence: Ahmadnagar, 
Bombay. 

MARTAND WAMAN SHOTRYA, Rao 
Baliddur. The title is personal, and 



was conferred on February 16, 1887. 
Residence : Baroda, Bombay. 

MARWAR, His Highness the Maharaja 
of. See Jodhpur. 

MARZBAN, Mancherji Kawasji, CLE. 

See Mancherji. 

MASUD All MIRZA BAHADUR, 

Prince. The Prince is the twelfth son 
of the late King of Oudh, and bears 
the title as the courtesy title of his 
high rank. Residence: Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

MASUDA, Rao Saheb Singh Saheb, 
CLE., Tluikur of. The title of Rao 
Saheb was conferred on January 1, 
1877, on the occasion of the Pro- 
clamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India. The 
Thdkur was created a Companion of 
the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empire, June 3, 1893. Resi- 
dence : Masuda, Ajmir, Raj pu tana. 

MASUKHRAM MULJI, Rao Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1891. Residence: Ahmedabad, Bombay. 

MAT A DIN, Rai Bahadur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on January 
1, 1890. The Rai Bahadur has 
rendered long and meritorious services 
to Government in the Judicial Depart- 
ment, and was for some time Sub- 
ordinate Judge of Muzaffarpur. Resi- 
dence: Patna, Bengal. 

MATANPUR (Belkhera), Thdkur of. See 
Purandhar Singh. 

MATH0JI SHELKE, Dada, Rao Saheb. 
See Dada. 

MATHTJRA DAS, Rai Saheb. Granted 
the title May 25, 1892. Residence : 
Military Works Department, Simla. 

MATHURA MOHAN MUKHARJI, Rai 

Saheb. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1S95. Residence: Allaha- 
bad, North-Western Provinces. 

MATHUSAMI ATYAR NATARAJAI- 
YAR, Rao Bahadur. Is District 
Registrar, Tanjore. Received the title 
on January 2, 1899. Residence: Tanjore, 
Madras. 

MATHWAR, Rana Ranjit Singh, Rand 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1861. Succeeded 
to the gadi as a minor in 1865. Be- 
longs to a Bhilala family. The area 
of the State is about 140 square miles ; 
its population is about 2630, chiefly 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



181 



Hindus. Residence : Mathwdr, Bhopd- 
war, Central India. 

MATJKME, Kim Hmon, Sawbwa of A 
ruling chief. The Sawbwa is Chief of 
one of the Shan States on the Burma 
frontier, which has an area of about 
2500 square miles, and a population 
consisting almost entirely of Shans, 
but with some Yins. Residence : 
Maukme, Shan States, Burma. 

MAULA BAKHSH, Munshi, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
June 3, 1893. Residence : Khorasan. 

MAULADAD KHAN walad WALIDAD 
KHAN, Mir. The title is hereditary, 
the Mir being the representative of 
one of the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at 
the time of the annexation (see Khair- 
pur). Residence : Shikarpur, Sind. 

MAULA VI. — A prefix (Muhammadan). 

MAULVI. See Maulavi. 

MATING.— A (Burmese) prefix. 

MAUNG MAN, Kun Wa, Myoza of. A 
ruling chief. The Myoza is Chief of 
one of the Shan States on the Burma 
frontier, which has an area of 25 
square miles, and a population consist- 
ing almost entirely of Shans, but with 
some Yins. Residence : Maung Man, 
Shan States, Burma. 

MAYA DAS, Rai Bahadur. The title 
of Kai was conferred on February 16, 
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee 
of the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty ; and that of B.ai Bahadur on 
May 26, 1894. Residence: Firozpur, 
Punjab. 

MAYA DAS, Lala, Salmi, Rai Saheh. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence : Rawal Pindi, Punjab. 

MAYARAM SHAMBHUNATH, Rao 

Saheb. The title was conferred on 
June 28, 1878. Residence: Surat, 
Bombay. 

MAZHAR All KHAN, Mian, Khan 
Bahadur. The Mian received the title 
of Khan Bahadur on May 26, 1894. 
Residence : Kurwai, Central India. 

MEDAM STJBBANNA CHETTIAR, Rao 
Bahadur. Is Councillor of Karnul, 
Madras. Received the title on January 
2, 1899. Residence : Karnul, Madras. 

MEDINI PARSHAD, Babn, Rai Ba- 
hddur. The Babu received the title of 



Rai Bahadur on June 3, 1893. Resi- 
dence : Monghyr, Bengal. 

MEGHRAJ KOTHARI, alias MEGHRAJ 
OSWAL (of Murshidabad, Bengal), 
Rai Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on October 8, 1867, 
for services rendered to Government 
during the Bhutan war. Residences : 
Goalpara, Assam ; and Azamganj, 
Murshidabad. 

MEHDI All, Nawdb Mohsin-ul-Mulk. 
The Nawdb was formerly Secretary to 
the Government of His Highness the 
Nizam of the Deccan. For distin- 
guished services to that Government 
His Highness was pleased to confer 
on him the title of Nawdb Mohsin-ul- 
Mulk. The Nawdb has occupied some 
of the most responsible posts in the 
State of Hyderabad, in whose service 
also he has visited Europe, with his 
colleague the Nawdb Mehdi Hasan, 
Fateh Nawdz Jang Bahddur, and re- 
ceived the high acknowledgments 
both of His Highness the Nizdm and 
of the British Government. Residence : 
Hyderabad, Deccan. 

MEHDI ALI KHAN, Naicdb Bahddur. 
The title is personal, the Nawdb Baha- 
dur being the son of Nawdb Jafar 
Ali Khdn, who was the grandson of a 
daughter of Saddat Khdn, Burhdn-ul- 
Mulk, King of Oudh. The Nawdb 
Bahddur is an Honorary Magistrate in 
Oudh. Residence: Oudh. 

MEHDI ALI KHAN, Muhammad (of 
Hasanpur), Rdjd. The title is here- 
ditary, the Rdjd being the head of the 
Musalmdn branch of the great Bachgoti 
clan, and one of the most important 
Chiefs in Southern Oudh. For an ac- 
count of the Hindu branch of this clan, 
see the articles on Madho Parshad 
Singh, Rai of Adharganj, and Partdb 
Bahddur Singh, Rdjd of Kurwdr. Jura 
Rae, great-grandson of Bariar Singh, 
had three sons, of whom Pirthipat 
Singh founded the Kurwar branch and 
Jai Chand was the ancestor of the great 
Hasanpur branch. Tilok Chand, son 
of Jai Chand, according to tradition, 
fell a prisoner into the Emperor Bd- 
bar's hands, and to regain his liberty 
adopted the Musalmdn faith, his name 
being changed to Tdtar Khdn ; with 
the name he received the title of Khdn 
Bahddur or Khdn-i-Azam, from which 
his sons adopted the name of Khanza- 



182 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



das. The most famous of his descend- 
ants is his grandson, Hasan Khan, the 
founder of the village of Hasanpur 
and the favourite courtier of King 
Sher Shah, who visited Hasanpur, or 
Narwal as it was then called. Sher 
Shah delegated to Hasan Khan the 
power of conferring the title of Raja 
on whom he pleased within the limits 
of Banouhda: no assumption of a 
taluqa in Eastern Oudh was complete 
without investiture by homage to him. 
He collected allies and a large army 
to settle with the Chief of Rewa a 
question of precedence, but the latter 
shirked the conflict and failed to appear 
at the rendezvous. Hasan Khan died 
at Hasanpur and was buried in the 
family mausoleum to the west of that 
town. Ismail Khan, fourth in descent 
from Hasan Khan, is noted for his 
feud with his half-brother, Hyat Khan 
of Maniarpur, whom he eventually 
killed. His grandson continued the 
feud and seized from the Maniarpur 
family the Kanait estate, comprising 
twelve villages, the names of which he 
changed to Shahpur. The sons of 
Hyat Khan determined to avenge their 
father's death, and stealing into Za- 
bardast Khan's fort at night found him 
sleeping alone. Instead of killing 
him, they took up his turban, sword 
and slippers, and left their own instead 
to show how far he had been in their 
power. This incident led to a recon- 
ciliation and the recognition by Za- 
bardast Khan of the separate Maniar- 
pur estate. Roshan Ali Khan suc- 
ceeded his father, Zabardast Khan, 
and rashly opposed the Nawdb (Saf dar 
Jang), by whom he was killed in battle. 
The estates were held in direct 
management until 1809, when Ashraf 
Ali obtained possession of them. He 
was succeeded ten years later by his 
son, Husain Ali, who took an active 
part against the English during the 
Mutiny : he commanded the infantry 
of the rebel army at the battle of 
Sultanpur (March 22, 1858), in which 
his son was killed. Under the terms 
of the general amnesty he was main- 
tained in possession of his estates on 
the reoccupation of Oudh, and died in 
November 1860, being succeeded by 
his brother, Khairat Ali. Raja Mu- 
hammad Ali succeeded his father, 
Khairat Ali, in 1869. He was an 
Honorary Magistrate pf the third class, 



He was succeeded by the present Rdjd 
in 1896. 

MEHDI HASAN, Nawdb Fateh Nawaz 
Jang Bahadur. The Nawab Bahadur 
was formerly Home Secretary to the 
Government of His Highness the 
Nizam of the Deccan, having been 
promoted to that office from the high 
and responsible post of Chief Justice 
of Hyderabad. For distinguished 
services to that Government His 
Highness was pleased to confer on him 
the title of Nawdb Fateh Nawaz Jang 
Bahadur. The Nawab is well known 
as a powerful writer in the Times and 
other organs of public opinion, and in 
the service of the State of Hyderabad 
he visited Europe, with his colleague 
the Nawab Mehdi Ali Mohsin-ul-Mulk, 
and received the high acknowledg- 
ments both of His Highness the Nizam 
and of the British Government. Resi- 
dence : Hyderabad, Deccan. 

MEHDI HASAN KHAN, Nawdb Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, the Nawab 
Bahadur being the son of Ikhtiar-ud- 
daula, grandson of Saddat Ali Khan, 
King of Oudh. Residence : Sultanpur, 
Oudh. 

MEHDI HASAN KHAN, Mirza, Nawdb 
Bahadur. The title is personal, the 
Nawab Bahadur having married the 
daughter of a daughter of the late 
Muhammad Ali Shah, King of Oudh. 
The Nawab Bahadur is the son of 
Mirza Ali Jah Bahadur. Residence : 
Sultanpur, Oudh. 

MEHDI HUSAIN KHAN, Nawdb Ba- 
hadur. The Nawab Bahadur is the 
son of Mirza Wala Jah Bahadur, and 
holds this courtesy title as a descendant 
of one of the Kings of Oudh. The 
Mirza "Wala Jah Bahadur's grand- 
father was the grandson of the son of 
one of the daughters of Saadat Khan, 
Burhan-ul-Mulk, King of Oudh. Resi- 
dence : Sultanpur, Oudh. 

MEHER HOSHANG DASTUR, Khdn 
Bahadur. Received the title of Khan 
Saheb on May 21, 1898 ; and that of 
Khan Bahadur on June 3, 1899. Resi- 
dence: Poona, Bombay. 

MEHR NAJAF KHAN, Muhammad, 

Mir. See Muhammad Najaf Khdn. 

MEHR SINGH, Chhachi, Sarddr; b. 
1857. The title is hereditary, the 
Sarddr being the head of a Kohlj 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



183 



Kshatriya family, whose ancestor, 
Sardar Tehil Singh, came long ago 
from Bhatneo, settled at Salargarh in 
Chhach in the Rawal Pindi district of 
the Punjab, and made considerable 
conquests. A descendant of Sardar 
Tehil Singh, named Sardar Jiwan 
Singh, entered the service of the Ma- 
haraja Ranjit Singh of Lahore ; served 
with credit at Bannu, Tank, Mitha 
Tiwana, and elsewhere ; and for eight 
years was stationed at Dera Ismail 
Khan. During the rebellion of 1848 
Sardar Jiwan Sing, with his son Sardar 
Gurdit Singh (father of the present 
Sardar), rendered excellent service to 
the Government ; they joined Lieu- 
tenant (afterwards Sir Herbert) Ed- 
wardes, and served under him to the 
end of the war. Sardar Jiwan Singh 
died in 1852, and was succeeded by 
his son Sardar Gurdit Singh, who 
again rendered admirable service to 
the Government during the Mutiny of 
1857. He was succeeded by his eldest 
son, the present Sardar. Residence: 
Jhelum, Punjab. 
MEHR-ULLA KHAN, Sardar, JVawdb. 
The title of Nawab is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1890. 
Residence : Baluchistan. 

MEHRAN KHAN, Khdn Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on May 24, 1889. Residence: 
Thai, Sind. 

MEHRBAN-I-DOSTAN SRI HARI HA- 
RA MARDARAJA DEVU GARU, Sa- 

heb ( of Kallikota and Attagada), Rdjd. 
Received the title of Raja as a personal 
distinction on May 21, 1898. Resi- 
dence: Ganjam, Madras. 

MEHRJIBHAI KUVARJI TARAPUR- 
WALA (of Kolhapur), CLE. Was 
created a Companion of the Most Emi- 
nent Order of the Indian Empire, May 
24, 1888. Residence: Bombay. 

MEHTA, Phirozshah Merwanji, CLE. 
See Phirozshah. 

MEHTA, Rustamji Dhanjibhai, CLE. 

See Rustamji. 

MEHTA PANNA LALJI, Rai, CLE. 
"Was created a CLE. on January 1, 

1887. Residence : Rajputana. 

MEHTAB SINGH, Subadar-Major (of 
Ludhiana), Rai Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on July 27, 1896. Resi- 
dence: Burma. 



MENGNI, Jareja Madhavasinghji Man- 
singhji, Tdlukddr of. A ruling chief ; 
b. 1847. Succeeded to the gadi Septem- 
ber 12, 1864. Belongs to a Rajput 
(Hindu) family. The area of the State 
is 34 square miles; its population is 
3454, chiefly Hindus. The Talukdar 
maintains a military force of 22 in- 
fantry and 3 guns. Residence : Mengni, 
Kathiawar, Bombay. 

METHARAM HARI SINGH, Rao Sa- 

heb. Received the title on May 21, 
1898. Residence: Sind. 

MEWAR, His Highness the Mahdrdnd 
of. See Udaipur. 

MIAN.— A prefix. 

MIHAN SINGH, Bhai, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1891. Residence: Lahore, Punjab. 

MIHAR CHAND, Lala, Rai Bahadur. 
Granted the title May 30, 1891. Resi- 
dence : Amritsar, Punjab. 

MIR. — Generally a prefix. 

MIR BANIYAD HASAN (of Kadirpnr), 

Khdn Bahadur ; b. 1861. Received the 
title on January 1, 1898. Residence : 
Bara Banki, Oudh. 

MIR DURRA KHAN, Khdn Saheb. See 
Durra. 

MIR NASIR ALI, Khdn Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence : Northern India Salt De- 
partment. 

MIR ROSHAN ALI ASAD AH, Khdn 
Saheb. See Raushan. 

MIR SHAMS SHAH, Khdn Bahadur. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence : Kalat, Baluchistan. 

MIR WAZIR ALI, Khdn Bahadur. The 
Khdn Bahadur is an Honorary Magis- 
trate of Lucknow ; and for his public 
services received the title as a personal 
distinction on May 25, 1892. Resi- 
dence: Lucknow, Oudh. 

MIRA BAKHSH, Khdn Saheb. The 
title was conferred on May 20, 1896. 

Residence : 

MIRAJ (Senior Branch), Gangadhar 
Rao Ganpat, alias BALA SAHEB 
PATWARDHAN, Chief of. A ruling 
chief ; b. 1866. Succeeded to the gadi 
as a minor June 6, 1875. Belongs to 
the Patwardhan (Brahman) family, to 
whose ancestor, Govind Hari Patwar- 
dhan, the grant of the Miraj State, 



184 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



with the title of Sardar, was made by 
the Peshwa Madhava Eao in 1764 a.d. 
In 1820 the State was divided into 
four shares, of which two lapsed in 
1842 and 1845 respectively. Of the 
two that remain as feudatory States, 
the present Chief of the senior branch 
was educated at the Rajkumar College, 
Indore, and ranks as a First-Class 
Sardar in the Southern Mahratta 
country. The area of the State is 320 
square miles ; its population is 69,732, 
chiefly Hindus, but including 7473 
Muhammadans. The Chief maintains 
a military force of 51 cavalry, 494 in- 
fantry, and 7 guns. Residence : Miraj, 
Southern Mahratta Country, Bombay. 

MIRAJ (Junior Branch), Lakshman 
Rao Harihar, alias ANNA SAHEB 
PATWARDHAN, Chief of . A ruling 
chief. Is the son of the late Hari- 
har Rao Dada Saheb, who was born 
in 1833, and succeeded to the gadi 
February 5, 1876. Belongs to' the 
Patwardhan (Brahman) family, to 
whose ancestor, Govind Hari Patwar- 
dhan, the Peshwa Madhava Rao in 1764 
a.d. granted the Miraj State with the 
title of Sardar. In 1820 the State 
was divided into four shares, of which 
two lapsed in 1842 and 1845 respec- 
tively. Of the two that remain as 
feudatory States, the present Chief of 
the junior branch is the grandson of 
the late Lakshman Rao Anna Saheb, 
who was the grandson of Gangadhar 
Rao Govind, son of the above-men- 
tioned Govind Hari Patwardhan, 
founder of the State. The family 
banner is known as bhagwajhenda, and 
is an ensign of a red colour ; and the 
Chief is entitled to be attended by 
danka (kettledrums), pdlki (State pa- 
lanquin), lagi (flags), and other marks 
of dignity. The area of the State is 
207 square miles ; its population is 
30,541, chiefly Hindus, but including 
1667 Muhammadans. The Chief main- 
tains a military force of 25 cavalry, 253 
infantry, and 5 guns. Residence : Miraj, 
Southern Mahratta Country, Bombay. 

MIRZA. — Generally a prefix or affix. 

MIRZA ASHRAF ALI, Maulavi, Shams- 
ul-Ulama. The title was conferred 
on January 1, 1898. Residence : Presi- 
dency College, Calcutta. 

MISR.— A prefix. 

MIT SINGH (of Dhandwal), Sardar. 
The title is hereditary, the Sardar 



being descended from a Jat leader, 
Sardar Man Singh, who conquered the 
territory of Dhandwal, in the district 
of Hoshi&rpur, about the year 1759 
A.D. Residence : Jalandhar, Punjab. 

MITRA, A., Rai Bahadur. See Ashutosh. 

MITRA, Surendra Nath, Rai Bahadur. 
See Surendra. 

MITTAR, Abhai Charan, Rai Bahadur. 
The Rai Bahadur is a descendant of 
the Mittar (Mitra or Mitter) family of 
Charimandel in Vikrampur, Dacca ; b. 
May 12, 1839. Has done good service 
in the various Lushai expeditions, and 
was rewarded with the title on January 
1, 1891. Residence: Chittagong Hill 
Tract. 

MOB YE, Kun Yan, Sawbwa of. A 
ruling chief. The Sawbwa is Chief of 
one of the Shan States on the Burma 
frontier, which has an area of about 
1000 square miles, and a population 
consisting almost entirely of Shans. 
Residence: Mobye, Shan States, 
Burma. 

M0HAMEDGARH. See Muhammad- 
garh. 

MOHAN LAL, Rai Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1897. 
Residence: Bareilly, North - Western 
Provinces. 

MOHAN LAL, Rai Saheb ; b. March 31, 
1853. Received the title on January 
1, 1897. Residence : Jabalpur, Central 
Provinces. 

MOHAN LAL, Sah, Rai Bahadur ; b. 1841 . 
The title was conferred on February 
16, 1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee 
of the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty, in recognition of his loyalty 
during the Mutiny of 1857, and of his 
eminent services on the local and 
District Boards. He belongs to an 
important Brahman family long 
settled in the district of Agra. Resi- 
dence : Agra, North- Western Provinces. 

MOHAN LAL, Seth (of Renda), Rai 
Saheb. The title was conferred on 
May 20, 1896. Residence: Sagar, 
Central Provinces. 

MOHAN SINGH (of Mohli), Thdkur. 
Succeeded his father, the late Thdkur 
Hamir Singh, 1894. See Khalak Singh. 
The title is hereditary. Residence: 
Sagar, Central Provinces, 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



185 



MOHANPUB, Thakur Eimmatsinghji, 
Thdkur of. A ruling chief; b. 1876. 
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor 
October 6, 1882. Belongs to a Puar 
Rajput (Hindu) family, claiming 
descent from the ancient Eaos of 
Chandrawati near Mount Abu in Raj- 
patana. Jaspal, the founder of this 
branch of the family, moved from 
Chandrawati to Harol in Mahi Kantha 
in 1226 a.d. Thirteen generations 
later Thakur Prithwi Raj moved to 
Ghorwaro. The late Thakur, Umed- 
singhji Daulatsinghji, was born in 
1854, succeeded to the gadi in 1875, 
and died in 1882. The area of the 
State is 560 square miles ; its popu- 
lation is 14,677, chiefly Hindus. It is 
tributary to Baroda, and pays Tcichri 
to Idar. Residence : Mohanpur, Mahi 
Kantha, Bombay. 

MOHARBHANJ, Raja Sriram Chandra 
Bhanj Deo, Edjd of. A ruling chief; 
b. 1872. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor May 29, 1882. Belongs to a 
Kshatriya (Hindu) family, claiming 
descent from Adhi Bhanj, said to have 
been a Kachhwaha Rajput, and a con- 
nection of the then Raja of Jaipur. 
Adhi Bhanj is believed to have come 
from Ra jputana into Orissa about 2000 
years ago, and gradually to have estab- 
lished his authority over the country 
between the Subarnarekha river and 
the borders of Dhenkanal. Subse- 
quently a member of the Moharbhanj 
family named Joti Bhanj established 
himself in the southern part of this 
territory as Raja of Keunjhar, and 
Adhi Bhanj retained the country 
between the Subarnarekha and Bai- 
tarani rivers, which is Moharbhanj 
proper. Thirty-nine generations of 
Rajas intervened between Adhi Bhanj 
and the late Raja, Krishna Chandra 
Bhanj Deo, who was granted the title 
of Maharaja, as a personal distinction, 
on January 1, 1877, on the occasion 
of the Proclamation of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India — as also his grandfather, the 
Raja Jadunath Bhanj Deo, had many 
years before been granted the same 
personal distinction for his services in 
queUing a rebellion in the Kolhan. 
The eldest son and heir-apparent of 
the Raja in this State is entitled to 
the courtesy title of " Tikait Babu"; 
and the family cognizance is the 
sacred peacock with tail spread. The 



area of the State, which is one of the 
Orissa Tributary Mahals, is 4243 
square miles ; its population is 385,737i 
nearly equally divided between Hindus 
and aboriginal tribesmen. The Raja 
maintains a military force of 512 
infantry and 11 guns. Residence: 
Moharbhanj, Orissa, Bengal. 

MOHENDRA. See Mahendra. 

MOHINI MOHAN BARDHAN, Rai Ba- 
hadur. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Residence: Tippera, 
Bengal. 

MOHLI, Thdkur of. See Khalak Singh; 
see also Mohan Singh. 

MOHSIN ALI KHAN walad TURAB 
ALI KHAN, Mir. The title of Mir 
has been continued for life, the Mir 
representing one of the Mirs or Chiefs 
of Sind at the time of the annexation. 
Residence : Hyderabad, Sind. 

MOIN-UD-DIN KHAN BAHADUR, the 
Nawab, Sahebzddd; b. 1890. Is the son 
and heir of the late Nawab Bahadur 
His Excellency Sir Asman Jah, for 
some years Prime Minister of His 
Highness the Nizam. Is the head of 
one branch of the great Shamsiya 
family, the Premier Nobles of Hyder- 
abad {see Yikar-ul-Umra ; and see also 
Khurshid Jah). Residence: Hyderabad, 
Deccan. 

M0KAL, Sarddr of. See Man Singh. 

MOMEIK, Kun Maung, Sawbwa of. A 
ruling chief ; b. 1883. The Sawbwa is 
Chief of one of the Shan States, on 
the Burma frontier. Succeeded re- 
cently to the chiefship as a minor, 
and during his minority the State is 
administered by the Chief Commis- 
sioner of Burma. The area of the 
State is about 2100 square miles; its 
population consists almost entirely of 
Shans. Residence : Momeik, Shan 
States, Burma. 

MONE, Kun Kyi, K.S.M., Sawbwa of 
A ruling chief. The Sawbwa has received 
from the Viceroy, as representing Her 
Majesty the Empress, the honour of 
K.S.M. {Kyet thaye zaung shwe Salwe 
ya Min, meaning "Recipient of the 
Gold Chain of Honour"), for the good 
services rendered by him to the Im- 
perial officers, and his good adminis- 
tration. He is the Chief of one of 
the most important of the Shan States 
of Burma, which, with its feudatory 
Kyaing Ton, has an area of about 300Q 



186 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



square miles, and a population con- 
sisting almost entirely of Shans. Re- 
sidence : Mone, Shan States, Burmah. 

MONEY. See Mani. 

MONG RAJA. See Niephrodsyne. 

MOOS, A.S., Khan Saheb. Received the 
title on June 3, 1899. Residence: 
Bombay. 

MORADABAD, Raja Bahadur of. See 
Jaikishan. 

MORAR RAO KSHIRSAGAR, Rao Saheb. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1892. Residence : Bombay. 

MORESHWAR RAO, Rao Saheb. The 
title is hereditary, the Rao Saheb 
being the descendant and represent- 
ative of Rao Vinayek Rao, who was 
the Prime Minister of the old Mahratta 
Government of Sagar. He had origin- 
ally come from the Deccan, and having 
been appointed a Mamlatdar by the 
Mahratta Government, ultimately rose 
to be Prime Minister. The family 
also held the title of Subadar under 
the Mahrattas. The late Rao Saheb 
Kishan Bao was born in 1824, and 
was an Honorary Magistrate. He died 
recently, and was succeeded by his son, 
the present Rao Saheb. Residence: 
Sagar, Central Provinces. 

MORO GOPAL PANDHARI, Rao Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on May 24, 1883. Resid- 
ence : Poona, Bombay. 

MORO KRISHNA DABHOLKAR, Rao 
Saheb. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on May 24, 1882. Residence: 
Ahmadnagar, Bombay. 

MOROBA KESHRI NATH SENJIT, Rao 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 2, 1888. 
Residence : Bombay. 

MORVI, His Highness Thakur Saheb 
Sir Waghji Ravaji, G.C.I.E., Thdkur 
Saheb of. A ruling chief ; b. April 17, 
1858. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor February 17, 1870. Belongs to 
the illustrious Jareja Rajput (Hindu) 
family, that has also given ruling 
Houses to Kutch, Nawanagar, Malia, 
and other States ; the Thakur Saheb 
of Morvi is also Jagirdar of Amerdi, 
in Kutch, which possesses a port named 
Jangi. He was educated at the Raj- 
kumar College, has visited Europe, 
and administers the affairs of his State 
in person. The State, which is tri- 



butary to Baroda and Junagarh, has 
an area of 821 miles ; and a population 
of 89,964, chiefly Hindus, but including 
11,942 Muhammadans. His Highness, 
who was created a Knight Grand Com- 
mander of the Most Eminent Order of 
the Indian Empire on July 31, 1897, 
maintains a military force of 121 
cavalry, 1155 infantry, and 7 guns, and 
is entitled to a salute of 11 guns. 
Residence: Morvi, Kathiawar, Bombay. 

MORWARA, Thdkur of. See Tharad and 
Morwara. 

MOTA BARKHERA, Bhnmia Bharat 
Singh, Bhumia of. A ruling chief ; b. 
1835. Belongs to a Bhilala family; 
the Bhilalas are generally accounted 
aboriginal, but according to some ac- 
counts are the descendants of inter- 
marriages between Rajputs (Hindu) 
and Bhils (aboriginal). The popula- 
tion of the State is about 4000. Re- 
sidence: Mota Barkhera, Bhopawar, 
Central India. 

MOTA KOTHARNA, Thaknr Parbat- 
singhji, Thdkur of. A ruling chief; 
b. December 1, 1848. Succeeded to the 
gadi on the death of his father, the 
late Thdkur Hiraji, November 6, 1864. 
The Thakur claims to be descended 
from the great Chauhan clan of Raj- 
puts. The State has a population of 
595, chiefly Hindus. Residence : Mota 
Kotharna, Mahi Kantha, Bombay. 

MOTIRAM RAJARAM VAKIL, Rao 

Bahadur. The title was conferred on 

May 25, 1895. Residence: Surat, 
Bombay. 

MRA U. "ULAVTHQ^Ahmudan gaung Tazeik 
ya Min. The title was conferred, as 
a personal distinction, on January 2, 
1893. It is indicated by the letters 
A.T.M. after the name, and means 
"Recipient of the Medal for Good 
Service." The Maung is Extra As- 
sistant Commissioner and Akunwan 
of Akyab, Burma. Residence : Akyab, 
Burma. 

MUAZZIM HUSAIN, Sayyid, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on February 16, 1887, as a personal 
distinction, on the occasion of the 
Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty. Residence: Barisal, 
Bengal. 

MUBARAK KHAN walad GHULAM 

SHAH KHAN, Mir. The title is 

I hereditary, the Mir being the repre- 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



187 



sentative of one of the Mirs or Chiefs 
of Sind at the time of the annexation 
(see Khairpur). Residence : Hydera- 
bad, Sind. 
MUDALIYAR, Sir S. Savalai Rama- 
swami, Knight, C.I.E., Rdjd. See 
Ramaswaini. 

MUDHOL, Vyankat Rao Balwant Rao 
Raje Ghorpare, alias BALA SAHEB, 
Chief of. A ruling chief ; b. April 9, 
1861. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor March 27, 1862. Belongs to 
the Bhonsle-Ghorpare family, which, 
though Mahratta, claims descent from 
Chob Rao, said to have been a son of 
the Maharana of Udaipur, who came 
to the Deccan in very early times, 
and obtained from the King of Bijapur 
the territory of Mudhol with the title 
of Raja. The family is also said to 
have a common ancestor with Sivaji 
the Great, the founder of the Mahratta 
Empire. The second family name of 
Ghorpare is said to have been given 
because one its ancestors managed to 
scale a fort previously deemed im- 
pregnable, by attaching a cord to the 
body of a ghorpad or iguana, and 
thereby drawing himself up. The 
family banner is called the " Bahuta," 
and is a triangular flag or ensign of 
three colours — white, black, and green. 
The Chiefs of Mudhol fought against 
Sivaji, but ultimately took military 
service under the Peshwas. Yyankat 
Rao I., the grandfather of the present 
Chief, became a feudatory of the 
British Power. He died in 1854, and 
was succeeded by his son, Balwant 
Rao, who died in 1862, and was suc- 
ceeded by his son, the present Chief. 
He holds the rank of a First Class 
Sardar of the Southern Mahratta 
Country. His State has an area of 
362 square miles, and a population of 
52,163, chiefly Hindus, but including 
3710Muhammadans. The Chief main- 
tains a military force of 20 cavalry, 
387 infantry, and 1 gun. Residence: 
Mudhol, Southern Mahratta Country, 
Bombay. 

MUHABBAT KHAN (of Torn), Klidn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 20, 1896. Residence: Peshawar, 
Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD. A very general preno- 
men among Muhammadans. See under 
the name that follows it, when there 
is no entry under " Muhammad," 



MUHAMMAD ABBAS, MIrza, Nawab 
Bahadur. The title is personal. The 
Nawab Bahadur enjoys it as the 
husband of a grand-daughter of the 
late Saadat Ali Khan, King of Oudh. 
He is the son of the Nawab Sharik- 
ud-daula. Residence : Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD ABBAS, Mufti Mir, 
Shams-ul-Ulama. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on February 
16, 1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee 
of the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty, for eminence in oriental 
learning. It entitles him to take rank 
in Darbar immediately after titular 
Nawabs. Residence : Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD ABBAS HUSALN KASRA 
BAKHT MIRZA BAHADUR, Prince. 
The title is personal, and is the 
courtesy title of the Prince, as twenty- 
fourth son of the late King of Oudh. 
See also Abbas. Residence: Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD ABDUL All, Khan Ba- 
hadur; b. 1858. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on March 30, 
1876, the Khan Bahadur being a son 
of Rashid-ud-daula, half-brother of 
his late Highness Azim Jah, the first 
of the titular Princes of Arcot. Re- 
sidence: Madras. 

MUHAMMAD ABDUL BARI, Khan 
Bahadur; b. 1858. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on March 30, 
1876, the Khan Bahadur being a 
grandson of Rashid-ud-daula, half- 
brother of his late Highness Azim 
Jah, the first of the titular Princes of 
Arcot. Residence: Madras. 

MUHAMMAD ABDUL JALIL, Maulavi, 

Shams-ul-Ulama. See Abdul. 

MUHAMMAD ABDUL (ABDUR) RA- 
HIM, Khan Bahadur. See Abdul 
(Abdur) Rahim. 

MUHAMMAD ABDUL WAHAB SA- 
HEB, Khan Bahadur. Received the 
title on January 1, 1899. Residence : 
Madras. 

MUHAMMAD ABDULLA KHAN BA- 
HADUR, Isakhel, CLE. Created a 
CLE. on January 1, 1898. Residence : 
Bannu, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD ABDUR RAHMAN, Khan 
Bahadur. See Abdur Rahman. 

MUHAMMAD ABU TALIB KHAN, 

Majid-ud-dauld Mumtdz-ul-Mulk Ba- 



188 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



hddur, Rustam Jang. The title is 
personal; it was originally conferred 
in 1838 by the late Muhammad Ali 
Shah, King of Oudh, and has been 
recognized by Government. Has mar- 
ried the grand-daughter of the late 
Muhammad Ali Shah, King of Oudh ; 
and is the son of the Nawdb Hashmat- 
ud-daula. Residence : Lucknow, Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD AFZAL KHAN, Sardar, 

Nawdb. See Afzal. 

MUHAMMAD AFZAL KHAN, Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Wazirzada, C.S.I., 
Nawdb. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on October 8, 1886. 
The Nawdb had received the title of 
Khan Bahadur on August 3, 1874, 
and was created a Companion of the 
Most Exalted Order of the Star of 
India, May 24, 1881. Residence : 
Peshawar, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD AHFAZ-UR-RAHIM, 

Khdn Saheb. See Ahfaz. 

MUHAMMAD AHMAD ALI, Nawdb 
Bahadur. The title is personal, the 
Nawdb Bahadur being the son of 
Mirza Jalil-us-Shan, grandson of the 
late Muhammad Ali Shah, King of 
Oudh. Residence: Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD AKBAE KHAN, Jogizai, 

Sarddr Bahadur. Received the title 
on June 22, 1897. Residence: Zhob, 
Baluchistan. 

MUHAMMAD AKBAR KHAN, Orakzai, 

Khdn Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on May 24, 1881. 
The Khan Bahadur belongs to an 
Afghan family of the Orakzai clan. 
Residence : Peshawar, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD AKBAR KHAN (of Jam- 
nm), Wazir-i-Wazarat, Khdn Baha- 
dur. Received the title of Khan 
Saheb on June 22, 1897 ; and that of 
Khan Bahadur on January 1, 1899. 
Residence: Gilgit. 

MUHAMMAD AKRAM HUSAIN 
AFSAR-UL-MULK MIRZA BAHA- 
DUR, Prince. See Akram. 

MUHAMMAD AKRAM KHAN, Sir, 
K.C.S.I. (of Amb), Nawdb Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on September 25, 1868. The 
Nawab Bahadur is Chief of Amb, on 
the right bank of the Indus, where he 
and his ancestors have long been in- 
dependent. He also holds Western 



Tanawal, in the Hazara district, from 
the British Government. Belongs to 
a Pathan (Muhammadan) family ; and 
his father, Jahandad Khan, son of 
Painde Khdn, was a loyal Chief, who 
rendered good service in the time of 
the Mutiny in 1857. The Nawab 
Bahadur Sir Muhammad Akram Khan 
showed active and gallant conduct in 
the field, fighting on the side of the 
British Government, and rendered 
effective aid during the disturbances 
in Agror on the Hazara frontier. In 
recognition of these services he was 
created a Companion of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India, 
and given the title of Nawab in 1868 ; 
and subsequently he has received the 
higher title of Nawab Bahadur, and 
been promoted to be a Knight Com- 
mander of the same Most Exalted 
Order. Residence : Hazara, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD ALI, Khdn Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 1, 1877, on the occasion of the 
Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India. Best' 
dence: Bangalore, Mysore. 

MUHAMMAD ALI, Mirza Bahadur. 
The title is personal, the Mirza Baha- 
dur being a son of Rafi-us-Shan Mirza 
Muhammad Naki Ali Bahadur, and 
grandson of the late Muhammad Ali 
Shah, third King of Oudh. Residence : 
Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD ALI, Mirza, Bedar Bakht 
Bahadur. The title is personal, the 
Mirza being a descendant of the Oudh 
family. Residence : Lucknow, Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD ALI, T., Khdn Bahadur. 
Granted the title of Khan Bahadur, in 
promotion from that of Khdn Saheb, 
as a personal distinction, January 
2, 1893. Residence : Madras. 

MUHAMMAD ALI BEG, Nawab Afsar- 
i-Jang, Afsar-ud-Daula, C.I. E., Major. 
Is Commandant of the Hyderabad 
Imperial Service Lancers. Created a 
Companion of the Most Eminent Order 
of the Indian Empire on June 22, 1897, 
on the auspicious occasion of the 
Diamond Jubilee of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty the Queen Empress. Resi- 
dence : Hyderabad, Deccan. 

MUHAMMAD All KHAN, Nawdb. The 
title is hereditary. Residence; Sehwan, 
Sind, 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



189 



MUHAMMAD ALI KHAN, Nawab 
j Bahadur. The Nawab Bahadur bears 
this courtesy title as the grandson of 
the late Amjad Ali Shah, fourth King 
of Oudh. The Nawab Bahadur's father 
was the Nizam-ud-daula, who married 
the daughter of that monarch. Resi- 
dence: Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD ALI KHAN (of Kunj- 
pura), Natodb. The title is hereditary, 
the Nawab being the descendant of a 
Pathan family founded by the Nawab 
Nijabat Khan about the close of the 
last century. He came from Kandahar 
with a following of free-lances, and 
ultimately established himself at Kunj- 
pura. He aided the invader Nadir 
Shah, and obtained from that Emperor 
the title of Nawab. In 1808-9 the 
Chief of Kunjpura, with the other 
Cis-Sutlej States, came under British 
protection. In the rearrangements 
after the second Sikh war, in 1849, 
Kunjpura became British territory, 
and its Chief was invested with Magis- 
terial power. The Nawab Muhammad 
Rahmat Khan, great-grandson of the 
Nawab Muhammad Nijabat Khan, 
left four sons, of whom the eldest died 
without issue; and the second, the 
Nawab Gholam Ali Khan, who suc- 
ceeded him, was the father of the 
present Nawab. The latter has a son 
and heir named Muhammad Ahmad 
Ali Khan. Residence: Kunjpura, 
Karnal, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD AH KHAN (of Jahan- 
girabad), Khan Bahadur, Nawab. 
The title of Khan Bahadur was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1891 ; and that 
of Nawab on May 25, 1895. Resi- 
dence: Bulandshahr, North-Western 
Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD ALI KHAN (of Chitari). 
See Muhammad Mahmud Ali Khan. 

MUHAMMAD ALI KHAN, Mirza, Khan 
Saheb. See AM. 

MUHAMMAD ALI MIRZA BAHADUR, 
Prince. The title is personal, being 
the courtesy title held by the Prince 
as the eleventh son of the late King 
of Oudh. Residence: Calcutta, Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD ALI NAKI KHAN, Mirza 
Bahadur. The title is personal, the 
Mirza Bahadur being the son of the 
Nawab Imam Ali Khan, who was the 
grandson of the late Shuja-ud-daula, 
King of Oudh. Residence : Oudh. 



MUHAMMAD ALI NAWAB CHAU- 
DHRI, Maulavi, Khan Bahadur; b. 
1858. Received the title on June 22, 
1897. 

MUHAMMAD AMIN, Shams-ul-Ulama. 
The title was conferred on May 21, 
1898. Is Extra-Assistant Commis- 
sioner. Residence : Central Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD AMLN KHAN, KhanKel, 

Khan Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on March 27, 1880. 
Residence : Kohat, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD AMIR, Sayyid, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on May 20, 1890. Resi- 
dence : Karnal, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD AMIR HASAN KHAN, 
Sir, K.C.I.E. (of Mahmudabad), Rdjd, 
Khdn Bahadur; b. 1849. Succeeded his 
father, the Raja Nawab Ali Khan, in 
1858. These titles are hereditary, and 
were conferred by the British Govern- 
ment on December 4, 1877, May 24, 
1883, and March 5, 1884, having been 
originally derived, with other honours, 
from the Mughal Emperors of Delhi 
and from the Kings of Oudh. The 
Raja of Mahmudabad is also en- 
titled to be addressed as " Amir-ud- 
daula, Sayyid-ul-Mulk, Mumtaz Jang," 
a distinction proposed for him by Sir 
Henry Davies when Chief Commis- 
sioner of Oudh, as a special mark of 
recognition of his public services. The 
Raja is the first cousin of the Raja of 
Paintepur, and though belonging by 
birth to the younger branch of the 
family, is the head of the elder branch 
by adoption. The family is Shaikh 
Sidiki ; but they are usually called 
Khanzadas, because at some remote 
period the title of Khan was bestowed 
on one of their ancestors. The founder 
of the family was Shaikh Nathu, who 
about 1360 a.d. was employed by the 
King of Delhi against the Bhars, and 
was rewarded for his services by the 
grant of large estates in Fatehpur. 
His descendant, Daud Khdn, being a 
General in the Delhi army, was created 
a Nawab, and Daud's grandson, the 
Nawab Bazid Khan, obtained the 
additional titles of Bahadur, Muzaffar 
Jang, and some others. The Nawab 
Daud Khan's son, Mahmud, founded 
the town of Mahmudabad about 1677, 
and it has ever since remained the 
seat of the family. He was Imperial 



190 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Governor of Jaunpur, and died at 
that place. A descendant, the Nawab 
Muhammad Imam Khan, divided his 
estates between his two sons; the 
elder, the Nawab Muhammad Ikram 
Khan, retained Mahmudabad, while 
the younger, Maghar Ali Kb an, ob- 
tained Belahra, and became the an- 
cestor of the Raj&s of Paintepur and 
Belahra. Muhammad Ikram Khan's 
two sons, Safaraz Ali Khan and Musa- 
hib Ali Khan, both died without issue ; 
the widow of the latter, who suc- 
ceeded him in 1810, was at the head 
of the Mahmudabad estate till 1838, 
when she died, having adopted a 
cousin from the Belahra side, named 
Nawab Ali. The latter was an able 
man, who greatly increased the estate ; 
he was also a distinguished scholar 
and poet. He died in 1858, and was 
succeeded by his only son, the present 
Raja, who was a minor under the 
Court of Wards till 1867. Educated 
at Sitapur School, Benares College, 
and Canning College, Lucknow. In 
1871 he was elected Vice-President of 
the British Indian Association, and 
has since been President of that im- 
portant body. At the great Darbar 
held by the late Lord Lawrence in 
Lucknow, he was presented with a 
Sword of Honour, and on January 2, 
1893, was created a Knight Commander 
of the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empire. He is an Honorary 
Magistrate, and has the powers of an 
Assistant Collector. He has a son and 
heir, named Ali Muhammad Kh&n, 
born 1881. Residence: Mahmudabad, 
Sitapur, Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD ANWAR, Khdn Bahadur. 
Is son of the Prince of Arcot. Granted 
the title on June 22, 1897. Residence: 
Madras. 

MUHAMMAD ANWAR-UD-DIN, Khdn 
Bahadur; b. 1849. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on March 30, 
1876, the Khan Bahadur being one of 
the sons of Rashid-ud-dauld, half- 
brother of his late Highness Azim 
Jah, the first of the titular Princes of 
Arcot. Residence: Madras. 

MUHAMMAD ANWAR-UL-HAK, Mau- 
lavi, Khdn Bahadur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on May 
20, 1890. Residence : Abu, Rajputana. 



MUHAMMAD ASGHAR An, Mirza 
Bahadur. The title is personal, the 
Mirza Bahadur being the son of the 
Mirza Khurram Bakht, and grandson 
of the late Muhammad Ali Shah, King 
of Oudh. Residence : Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD ASGHAR HUMAYUN 
JAH MIRZA BAHADUR, Prince. 
The title is personal, being the courtesy 
title of the sons of his late Majesty 
the King of Oudh. The Prince is the 
sixteenth son. Residence: Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD ASHIK ALI KHAN, 

Khdn Bahadur. Is an Assistant 
Superintendent of Port Blair. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence : Port Blair, Andaman Isles. 

MUHAMMAD ASKARI, Mirza Bahadur. 
The Mirza Bahadur enjoys this title 
as a personal distinction, as being the 
son of Prince Rafi-uz-Shan Mirza 
Muhammad Naki Ali Bahadur, and 
grandson of his late Majesty Muham- 
mad Ali Shah, King of Oudh. Resi- 
dence: Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD ASKARI BULAND JAH 
MIRZA BAHADUR, Prince. The title 
is personal, being the courtesy title 
enjoyed by this nobleman as seventh 
son of the late King of Oudh. Resi- 
dence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD ASLAM KHAN, CLE., 

Lieut. -Colonel, Sarddr Bahadur, JVa- 
wdb. The title of Sardar Bahadur is 
personal, and was conferred on Octo- 
ber 22, 1881 ; that of Nawab on Jan- 
uary 1, 1899. Was created a Com- 
panion of the Most Eminent Order of 
the Indian Empire, 15th February, 
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee 
of the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty. Residence: Peshawar, Pun- 
jab. 

MUHAMMAD ASLAM KHAN, Kazi, 
C.M.G. Has been created a Com- 
panion of the Most Distinguished 
Order of St. Michael and St. George. 

MUHAMMAD AZIM (of Kakrali), 

Chaudhri; b. 1853. Succeeded his 
father, the late Raja Khaslat Husain, 
in 1882. The title of Chaudhri is 
hereditary, having been so under the 
old Government of Oudh, and so 
recognized by the British Government 
in 1877. The head of the family was, 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



191 



before the annexation of Oudh, Cha- 
kladdr or Chaudhri of Sandila. The 
present Chaudhri's grandfather, Chau- 
dhri Hashmat Ali, was well spoken of 
by Sir William Sleeman in his account 
of Oudh. He at first took part 
against the Government in the Mutiny 
of 1857, and was a noted and active 
rebel leader, frequently engaged with 
the British troops, and acting as 
Nazim of Hardoi and the neighbouring 
districts. He had, however, the repu- 
tation of being an honourable enemy, 
never guilty of any cruelties ; and 
early in 1858 he tendered his submis- 
sion, and became as active on the side 
of the Government, being engaged in 
many actions against the rebels. For 
these services he received a Jchilat and 
a grant of land. He was succeeded 
by his son, Chaudhri Khaslat Husain, 
who was an Honorary Magistrate and 
Assistant Collector, Secretary to the 
Aujuman-i-Hind of Oudh, and, shortly 
before his death, was given the rank 
of Raja as a personal distinction. 
The present Chaudhri is an Honorary 
Magistrate ; he has a son and heir, 
named Muhammad Jan, born 1867. 
Residence: Hardoi, Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD AZIM, Munshi, Khan 
Saheb. Is an Extra Assistant Com- 
missioner, Punjab. Received the title 
on January 2, 1899. Residence : Pun- 
jab. 

MUHAMMAD AZIM KHAN, Arbab, 
Khan Saheb. The Arbab was created 
a Khan Saheb on June 22, 1897. Resi- 
dence : Kotla, Peshawar, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD AZMAT ALI KHAN. 

See Azmat Ali Khan. 

MUHAMMAD BABAR MIRZA BAHA- 
DUR, Prince. The title is personal, 
being the courtesy title enjoyed by the 
Prince as the sixth son of the late 
King of Oudh. Residence: Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD BADR-UD-DIN, Khan 
Bahadur. See Badr-ud-din. 

MUHAMMAD BAKAR xcalad AHMAD 
KHAN, Mir. The title is hereditary, 
the Mir being the representative of 
one of the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at 
the time of the annexation {see Khair- 
pur). Residence: Shikarpur, Sind. 

MUHAMMAD BAKAR All (of Ko- 

taha), Mir. The title is hereditary ; 



the Mir belonging to a Sayyid (Mu- 
hammadan) family, claiming descent 
from Kasim Ali Khan, who was the 
Physician to the Imperial Court at 
Delhi, and acquired the Kotaha terri- 
tory in the last century in the following 
circumstances. The ruler of Kotaha 
was a Rajput Raja named Dup Chand, 
a feudatory of the Raja of Sirmur. 
Being expelled by the Sirmur Raja, 
he repaired to Delhi to get assistance 
from the Emperor, and having given 
one of his daughters to the Imperial 
zandna, and forced his son to embrace 
Islam, he obtained some troops to re- 
instate him. The force was accom- 
panied by the Imperial Physician, 
Kasim Ali Khan, as Political Agent. 
Both the Raja Dup Chand and his 
son, Fil Murad, died without issue, so 
Kasim Ali Khan then established him- 
self in their place at Kotaha. His 
grandson, Mir Muhammad Jafar Ali 
Khan, obtained from General Ochter- 
lony, after the expulsion of the Gur- 
khas in 1815, the grant of the jdgir of 
Kotaha. During the Mutiny of 1857 
the Mir Muhammad Akbar Ali Khan 
was suspected of sympathizing with 
the rebels, and his fort at Kotaha was 
destroyed. Again, in 1864, the fort 
was rebuilt, contrary to the orders of 
Government ; it was again destroyed, 
and the Mir banished. He died in 
exile, and his grandson, the present 
Mir, was reinstated in his estates. He 
has two sons— Sayyid Muhammad 
and Muhammad Jafar Ali. Residence: 
Kotaha, Ambala, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD BAKAR An KHAN (of 

Kunwa Khera), Nawab ; b. 1851. Suc- 
ceeded his father, the late Nawab 
Amjad Ali Khan, in 1875. The title 
is hereditary, having been originally 
conferred by the King of Oudh, Mu- 
hammad Ali Shah, on an ancestor of 
the present Nawab, and recognized by 
the British Government in 1877. The 
Nawab is descended from Khwaja 
Safi, a Kashmiri noble who took service 
with Asaf-ud-daula, fifth King of 
Oudh. Khwaja Safi's son, Hakim 
Mehndi, was Nazim of Muhamdi and 
Khairabad from 1799 to 1819; Prime 
Minister to Nasir-ud-din Haidar from 
1830 to 1832, and to Muhammad Ali 
Shah in 1837. As Chakladdr he made 
the district a garden, constructed 
numerous public works, and gained the 



192 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



universal respect and affection of the 
people. He died December 24, 1837, 
and left a portion of his vast property 
to his brother's son, Ahmad Ali, Nawao 
Munawar-ud-daula, who was the Prime 
Minister of the King Muhammad AH 
Shah, and himself connected by mar- 
riage with the King's family. The 
latter was succeeded by his son, Nawab 
Ashraf-ud-daula, Amjad Ali Khan, who 
was a General in the army of the 
King of Oudh. He was succeeded 
by his son, the present Nawab, in 1875. 
Residence: Kunwa Khera, Sitapur, 
Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD BAKHTIYAR SHAH, 
Sahebzdda, CLE. See Bakhtiyar. 

MUHAMMAD BARKAT ALI KHAN, 

Khan Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on May 29, 1868, for dis- 
tinguished military and police services. 
Belongs to a Pathan family, descended 
from Muhammad Sahab Khan, who 
followed the Nawdb Bahadur Khan 
from Peshawar into India. The Khan 
Bahadur's father, Muhammad Arif 
Khan, was the son of Abdulla Khan, 
alias Buddu Khan ; he entered the 
service of the British Government, 
and on retirement on pension received 
a grant of land. The Khan Bahadur 
entered the service of the British 
Government in 1847, and rendered 
good service as a police officer in the 
Hoshiarpur district. In 1848 he was 
severely wounded in the fight at the 
Amb Bagh in the Jashwan Dan ; where, 
under the orders of Lord Lawrence, 
then Commissioner of the Trans-Sutlej 
States, he gallantly showed the way 
up the hill to attack the insurgents 
posted on the top. Subsequently he 
became Risaldar of the Mounted Police 
at Amritsar, and assisted in the capture 
of the 26th Native Infantry mutineers. 
In 1860 he was appointed Tahsildar of 
Lahore, and distinguished himself by 
his exertions in the cholera epidemic 
at Lahore in 1867 ; and subsequently 
in raising mules and muleteers for 
service in Abyssinia. Appointed Extra 
Assistant Commissioner of Lahore ; 
and has received the thanks of the 
Government of India and of the Pun- 
jab for his valuable political services. 
He is a Member of the Senate of the 
Punjab University, and has a son and 
heir, named Bashir Ali Khan. Resi- 
dence : Lahore, Punjab. 



MUHAMMAD DAYEM HAKIM AB- 
DULLA SHAH, Hakim, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1899. Residence: Bombay. 

MUHAMMAD FARID-UD-DIN, Khan 
Sahcb. See Farid. 

MUHAMMAD FATEHYAB KHAN, 

Khan Bahadur. See Fatehyab. 

MUHAMMAD FAYYAZ ALI KHAN (of 
Pahasu), Mumtaz-ud-dauld, Nawdb ; b. 
1856. The titles are hereditary, and 
were conferred on September 9, 1870, 
and July 12, 1881. Succeeded his father, 
the late Sir Muhammad Faiz Ali Khan, 
K.C.S.I., in 1894 ; the latter had been 
created a Knight Commander of the 
Most Exalted Order of the Star of 
India on January 28, 1876. Belongs to 
an ancient Musalman Rajput family, 
whose ancestors were Badgujars who 
settled in the Bulandshahr district 
about 1185 a.d. Partab Singh was 
invited by Prithviraj, the last Chau- 
han Emperor of Delhi, to assist him 
against the Chandels; and he subse- 
quently settled at Pahasu, where the 
family have ever since been seated. 
He received a large territory as the 
dowry of his wife, the daughter of 
the Dor Raja of Kol. Eleventh in 
descent from him was L41 Singh, a 
favourite of the Emperor Akbar, who 
received from the Emperor the title 
of Lai Khan ; hence this branch of 
the family is called Lalkhani. Dur- 
ing the reign of Aurangzeb, the family 
became Musalmans, and in 1774 the 
Emperor Shah Alam granted a large 
estate to Nahar Ali Khan. He and 
his nephew, Dundi Khan, opposed the 
British in the Mahratta war in 1803, 
and lost their estates. Dundi Khan 
was pardoned, but again rebelling, his 
estates were given to Mardan Ali 
Khan, another nephew of Nahar Ali 
Khan, who had been faithful to the 
British cause. His large territories 
were divided among his five sons ; one 
of them, the late Murad Ali Khan, was 
the grandfather of the present Nawab 
of Pahasu. Murad Ali and his son, 
Sir Faiz Ali, behaved with conspicuous 
loyalty and bravery throughout the 
Mutiny of 1857. The latter was Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the Jaipur troops, 
and rendered most valuable services, 
and was rewarded with a khilat, an 
extensive grant of lands, and the 
various honours already noted. He 



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193 



had distinguished himself as the Prime 
Minister of the State of Jaipur, and 
also as the Superintendent of the 
State of Kotah ; he was also a Fellow 
of the Allahahad University, and was 
exempted from personal appearance 
in the Civil Courts. Residence: Pa- 
hasu, Bulandshahr, North-Western 
Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD FAZL-ULLA, Khdn Ba- 
hadur; b. 1868. The title was con- 
ferred on October 8, 1875, as a personal 
distinction, in recognition of his posi- 
tion as son of his late Highness Zahir- 
ud-daula, the second of the titular 
Princes of Arcot. Residence: Madras. 

MUHAMMAD GHAUS, Khdn Saheb. 
The title was conferred by the Nawab 
of the Carnatic, and recognized on 
January 1, 1891. Residence : Madras. 

MUHAMMAD GHAUS, Haji, Khdn Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal ; it was 
conferred by the Nawab of the Car- 
natic, and recognized on December 16, 
1890. Is also styled Intizam Khdn 
Bahadur. Residence: Madras. 

MUHAMMAD GHAYAS-UD-DIN, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1889. 
Residence : Thagi and Dakaiti Depart- 
ment, Simla. 

MUHAMMAD HAMp, Khdn Bahadur; 
h. 1850. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 20, 1883, in re- 
cognition of his position as the son of 
the Nawab Ahmad-un-Nisa Begam, 
daughter of the Nawab Azim-un-Nisa 
Begam, and grand-daughter of his late 
Highness Nawab Azim-ud-daula, pen- 
ultimate Nawab of the Carnatic. Resi- 
dence: Madras. 

MUHAMMAD HAMID BAKHSH, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Residence : Budaun, 
North Western-Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD HAMID-ULLA, Sayyid, 
Khdn Bahadur. The title is personal ; 
it was conferred by the Nawab of the 
Carnatic, and recognized on December 
16, 1890. Residence: Hyderabad, 
Deccan. 

MUHAMMAD HASAN, Haji, Khdn Ba- 
hddur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on February 23, 1888. Resi- 
dence : Kermanshah, Persia. 



MUHAMMAD HASAN, Sardar Mir, 
Gitchki (of Sami), Khdn Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1899. 
Residence: Sami. 

MUHAMMAD HASAN All, Mirza Ba- 
hadur, Sulaimdn Kadr. The title is 
personal, being the courtesy title of 
the Mirza Bahadur as a son of the 
late Amjad Ali Khan, fourth King of 
Oudh. Residence : Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD HASAN All, Mirza Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, as the 
courtesy title of a grandson of the late 
Muhammad Ali Shah, third King of 
Oudh. The Mirza Bahadur's father 
was Mirza Khurram Bakht. Residence : 
Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD HASAN AH, Mirza Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, as the 
courtesy title of a grandson of the late 
Muhammad Ali Shah, third King of 
Oudh. The Mirza Bahadur's father 
was Mirza Azim-us-Shan. Residence: 
Lucknow, Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD HASAN ALI KHAN 
walad MUHAMMAD NASHt KHAN 
C.I.E., His Highness Mir; b. August 
14, 1824. Is the son of his late High- 
ness Mir Nasir Khdn, Talpur, of Sind, 
who was born in 1802 ; became one of 
the ruling Mirs or Princes of Sind in 
1833, and died in 1845, two years after 
the annexation of that Province. He 
was succeeded by His Highness the 
present Mir, who was born in the 
Fort of Hyderabad, and is now a 
political pensioner, living in his own 
village, about three miles from Hydera- 
bad, the ancient capital of the Amirs 
of Sind. Before the annexation the 
Sindi title of the Mir Nasir Khan was 
" Sarkar Faiz Asar " ; and that of the 
present Mir was " Sarkar Rafiatmadar." 
His Highness was created a Com- 
panion of the Most Eminent Order of 
the Indian Empire on May 24, 1894. 
Residence : Hyderabad, Sind. 

MUHAMMAD HASAN AZAD, Maulavi, 
Shams-ul- TJlama . The title is personal, 
and was conferred on February 16, 
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee 
of the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty, for eminence in oriental 
learning. It entitles him to take rank 
in Darbar immediately after titular 
Nawabs. Residence : Delhi, Punjab. 
O 



194 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



MUHAMMAD HASAN KHAN, Mirza 
Bahadur. The title is personal, as the 
courtesy title of a son-in-law of the son 
of the late Muhammad Ali Shah, third 
King of Oudh. The Mirza Bahadur's 
father was Mirza Muhammad Jafar 
Khan. Residence: Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD HASAN KHAN, Mirza 
Bahadur. The title is personal, as the 
courtesy title of a great-grandson of 
the late Shu ja-ud-daula, King of Oudh. 
The Mirza Bahadur's father was the 
Nawab Hasan Ali Khan, grandson of 
that monarch. Residence : Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD HASAN KHAN walad 
IMAM BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. The 
title has been continued for life, the 
Mir being the representative of one of 
the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the time 
of the annexation (see Khairpur). 
Residence : Shikarpur, Sind. 

MUHAMMAD HASAN KHAN BAHA- 
DUR, Khalifa Sayyid, CLE., Wazir- 
ud-dauld Mudabbir-ul-Mulk. The title 
was conferred on January 20, 1883, as 
a personal distinction, for eminent 
services rendered to the State of Pa- 
tiala, and to the Empire. His Excel- 
lency is the Prime Minister of the 
State of Patiala ; and was created a 
Companion of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire, January 
1, 1886. Residence : Patiala, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD HASHIM AKHTAR JAH, 
Mirza Bahadur, Prince. The title is 
personal, as the courtesy title of the 
twenty-first son of his late Majesty 
the King of Oudh. Residence: Cal- 
cutta, Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD HASHIM KHAN, Mir, 
Sarddr Bahadur; b. 1821. The title 
was conferred on May 1, 1880. The 
Sardar Bahadur is a Risaldar-Major 
in Her Majesty's Army. Residence: 
Sitapur, Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD HUSAIN, Khan Bahadur. 
Received the title on January 1, 1895. 
Residence: Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD HUSAIN, Khalifa Sayyid, 

Mushir-ud-dauld, Mumtaz-ul-Mulk, 
Khan Bahadur. The title of Khan 
Bahadur was conferred on May 24, 
1889, as a personal distinction, for 
good services rendered to the State of 
Patiala and to the Empire; and the 
other titles were similarly conferred, 
January 20, 1883. Is the Foreign 



Minister of the State of Patiala. 
Residence : Patiala, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD HUSAIN, Maulavi, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 20, 1896, for good services as 
Diwan of the Khairagarh State. Resi- 
dence : Khairagarh, Central Pro- 
vinces. 

MUHAMMAD HUSAIN, Maulavi, Khan 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Residence : Allahabad. 

MUHAMMAD HUSAIN, Maulavi, Khdn 
Saheb ; b. 1859. Received the title on 
January 1, 1897. Residence : Rohtak, 
Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD HUSAIN, Shaikh, As- 
sistant-Surgeon, Khdn Bahadur. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1898. 
Is H. B. M. Vice-Consul at Jeddah. 

Residence : Jeddah, Arabia. 

MUHAMMAD HUSAIN ALI KHAN, 

Sarddr Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on January 5, 1868. The 
Sardar Bahadur is a Risaldar-Major 
in Her Majesty's Army. Residence : 
Aligarh, North-Western Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD HUSAIN B AKR KAMYA , 
Mirza Bahadur, Prince. The title 
is personal, as the courtesy title of 
the nineteenth son of his late Majesty 
the King of Oudh. Residence: Cal- 
cutta, Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD HUSAIN KHAN, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1886, for 
good services rendered in the Army 
Medical Department as Assistant 
Surgeon. Residence: Lahore, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD HUSAIN KHAN, Subah- 
dar, Khdn Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on February 16, 1887, as a 
personal distinction, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty, in recognition of 
good military services as an officer of 
the Second Sikhs. Residence: 2nd 
Sikh Infantry. 

MUHAMMAD HYAT KHAN, Khan 
C.8.I., Nawdb. Received the title of 
Nawab, as a personal distinction, on 
January 1, 1889. Is a Divisional 
Judge. Residence: Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD IBAD-ULLA, Khdn Bahd- 
dur ; b. 1839. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on October 8, 1875, 
in recognition of his position as son 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



195 



of His Highness Zahir-ud-dauld, the 
second of the titular Princes of Arcot. 
Residence: Madras. 

MUHAMMAD IBAD-ULLA, Khdn Baha- 
dur; b. 1837. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on March 30, 1876, 
in recognition of his position as son of 
Rashid-ud-dauld, half-brother of his 
late Highness Azim Jah, the first of 
the titular Princes of Arcot. Resi- 
dence: Madras. 

MUHAMMAD IBRAHIM, Sayyid, Khan 
Bahadur; b. 1856. The title was 
conferred on June 1, 1888, as a personal 
distinction. Belongs to a Muham- 
madan family, whose ancestor, Kazi 
Fakhr-ud-din, settled in Jaunpur in 
the time of the Mughals. For im- 
portant services rendered during the 
Mutiny of 1857, Hdji Imam Bakhsh, 
grandfather of the Khan Bahadur, 
received a Tchilat and a considerable 
grant of land. The Khan Bahadur is 
an Honorary Magistrate. Residence : 
Jaunpur, North-Western Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD IBRAHIM AH AWALI 
MARTABAT, Mirza Bahadur, Prince. 
The title is personal, as the courtesy 
title of the eighth son of his late 
Majesty the King of Oudh. Resi- 
dence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD IBRAHIM KHAN, Khan 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on August 3, 1874. 
Residence : Peshawar, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD IJAZ HUSAIN KHADIM- 
UL-AIMA, Mirza Bahadur, Prince. 
The title is personal, as the courtesy 
title of the twenty-third son of his 
late Majesty the King of Oudh. Resi- 
dence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD IKRAM-ULLA KHAN, 
Sayyid, Khan Bahadur. See Ikram. 

MUHAMMAD IIAHI BAKHSH, Khdn 

Bahadur. See Ildhi. 

MUHAMMAD ISMAIL SAHEB, Mirza, 
Khan Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1890. 
Residence: Madras. 

MUHAMMAD JAFAR All KHAN, 

Nawdb Bahadur. The title is personal, 
being the courtesy title of a grandson 
of the late Muhammad Ali Shah, 
third King of Oudh. The Nawdb 
Bahadur is the son of the lateMuazzam- 



ud-daula, who married a daughter of 
that monarch. Residence: Lucknow, 
Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD JALAL, Mirza Bahadur, 
Prince. The title is personal, being 
the courtesy title of the fifth son of 
the late King of Oudh. Residence: 
Calcutta, Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD JAM JAH All KARA 
AHMAD, Mirza Bahadur, Prince. 
The title is personal, being the cour- 
tesy title of the third son of the late 
King of Oudh. Residence: Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD JOGI, Mirza Bahadur, 
Prince. The title is personal, being 
the courtesy title of the fourth son of 
the late King of Oudh. Residence: 
Calcutta, Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD KADLR NAWAZ KHAN, 

Khan Bahadur. See Kadir Nawaz 
Khan. 

MUHAMMAD KAMR-UD-DIN HAI- 
DAR, Mirza Bahadur. The title is 
personal, being the courtesy title of a 
grandson of Amjad Ali Shah, fourth 
King of Oudh. The Mirza Bahadur's 
father was Mirza Mustafa Ali Haidar, 
son of that monarch. Residence: 
Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD KARAMAT-ULLA, Khdn 
Bahadur; b. 1870. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on October 
8, 1875, in recognition of his position 
as a son of his late Highness Zahir- 
ud-dauld, the second of the titular 
Princes of Arcot. Residence : Madras. 

MUHAMMAD KASIM All, Mirza Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, being 
the courtesy title of a grandson of the 
late Muhammad Ali Shah, third King 
of Oudh. The Mirza Bahadur is the 
son of Rafi-u-Shdn Mirza Muhammad 
Naki Ali Bahadur, one of the surviving 
sons of that monarch. Residence: 
Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD KAZIM HUSAIN, Khur- 
shed Jah, Mirza Bahadur, Prince. 
The title is personal, being the courtesy 
title of the eighteenth son of the late 
King of Oudh. Residence: Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD KAZIM HUSAIN KHAN 

(of Paintipur), Rdjd ; b. 1852. Suc- 
ceeded his father, Rdjd Ibad Ali Khdn, 



196 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



in 1870. The title is hereditary, 
having been originally conferred on 
Ibad Ali Khan in 1853 by the King of 
Oudh, and subsequently recognized by 
the British Government in 1877. Be- 
longs to the Shaikh Sadiki family 
known as Khanzadas, and is the first 
cousin of the Raja of Mahmudabad. 
For the family history down to the 
time of Muhammad Imam Khan, see 
the account given of this family under 
the heading " Muhammad Amir Hasan 
Khan, Raja of Mahmudabad." When 
Muhammad Imam Khan divided his 
estates, the younger son, Mazhar Ali 
Khan, received Belahra in Bara Banki 
as his portion ; and his grandson, the 
late Raja Ibad Ali Khan (father of 
the present Raja of Paintipur), also 
acquired Paintipur, and became 
Raja of Paintipur as well as Belahra. 
The Raja has a son and heir, born in 
1889. Residence: Paintipur, Sitapur, 
Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD KHAN (of Kot Sarang), 
Edjd. The title is hereditary, the 
R&ja being the head of the Janjoah 
Rajput family of Kot Sarang. The 
Janjoah tribe of Rajputs were in early 
ages very powerful. They were settled 
near the Salt Range, but having be- 
come divided among themselves, they 
were dispossessed of much of their 
territory by the Gakkars (see Karamdad 
Khan Gakkar, Raja of Pharwala), and 
by the Awans. Raja Sarang was the 
founder of the Kot Sarang family. 
He built the fort called Kot Sarang 
after his name, and was celebrated for 
his valour, and was ultimately slain 
in a fight with the Afghans near 
Makhad. The sixth in descent from 
him was Raja Fateh Khan, father of 
the present Raja, who was also a dis- 
tinguished Chief. The family were 
dispossessed by the Awans, but were 
subsequently granted some land by the 
Sardar Dhanna Singh Malwai, a 
General of the Mahajara Ranjit Singh 
of Lahore. Raja Muhammad Khan 
has three sons — Ahmad Khan, Sardar 
Khan, and Aziz Khan. Residence: 
Jhelum, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD KHAN, Sardar Bahddur. 
The title was conferred in 1857, as a 
personal distinction, in recognition of 
his services during the Mutiny cam- 
paigns, and his conspicuous bravery as 
an officer of the distinguished Corps 



of Guides. He retired as a Risaldar- 
Major on a special pension in 1871, and 
received a grant of land in the district 
of Peshawar. He is an Honorary 
Magistrate of Peshawar. The Sardar 
Bahadur has three sons — Yusaf Ah, 
Sabz Ali, and a third (still a minor). 
Residence: Peshawar, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD KHAN (S1KANDAB 
KHAN), Dehlvi, Khan Bahddur. The 
title was conferred on February 16, 
1887, as a personal distinction, on the 
occasion of the Jubilee of the reign of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty. Resi- 
dence : Thana, Bombay. 

MUHAMMAD KHAN, Haji, Nawdb. 
The title was conferred on February 
16, 1887, as a personal distinction, 
on the occasion of the Jubilee of the 
reign of Her Most Gracious Majesty. 
Residence : Dera Ghazi Khan, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD KHAN, Khwaja (of 
Hoti), Khdn Bahddur. The title was 
conferred as a personal distinction on 
May 20, 1896. Residence: Peshawar, 
Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD KHAN, Malik, Khan 
Bahddur. Received the title on June 
3, 1899. Residence: Tiwana, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD KHAN, Munshi, Khan 
Bahddur. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Residence: Merwara, 
Rajputana. 

MUHAMMAD KHAN, Wall, Khan 
Bahddur. See Wali. 

MUHAMMAD KUDRAT AZIZ, Khdn 
Bahddur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on October 8, 1875, in 
recognition of his position as son-in- 
law of his late Highness Zahir-ud- 
daula, the second of the titular Princes 
of Arcot. Residence : Madras. 

MUHAMMAD LATIF, Sayyid, Khdn 
Bahddur, Shams-ul-Ulama, Received 
the title of Khan Bahadur on May 25, 
1892, and that of Shams-ul-Ulama on 
June 22, 1897, in recognition of emin- 
ent public services rendered as Extra 
Judicial Assistant Commissioner. Re- 
sidence: Lahore, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD LUTF ALI KHAN, Kun- 
war, Khdn Bahddur. See Lutf. 

MUHAMMAD LUTF-ULLA, MAULAVI 
HAFIZ, Shams-ul-Ulama. This title 
is personal, and was conferred on 



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197 



February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of the reign of Her Moat 
Gracious Majesty, for eminence in 
oriental learning. It entitles him to 
take rank in Darbar immediately after 
titular Nawabs. Residence : Madras. 

MUHAMMAD MAHMUD, Khdn Ba- 
hddur; b. 1845. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 20, 
1883, in recognition of his position as 
son of the Nawab Ahmad-un-Nisa 
Begam, the daughter of Nawab Azim- 
un-Nisa Begam, and grand-daughter 
of his late Highness Nawab Azim- 
ud-daula, penultimate Nawab of the 
Carnatic. Residence: Madras. 

MUHAMMAD MAHMUD All KHAN 

(of Chitari), Nawab, Khdn Bahddur; 
b. October 9, 1826. The Nawab be- 
longs to the same Musalman Rajput 
family as the Nawab Sir Muhammad 
Faiz Ali Khan, K.C.S.I., of Pahasu, 
who is his nephew; and the family 
history down to the time of the Nawab 
Mardan Ali Khan, father of this Na- 
wab, is given under that heading. 
When the estates of the Nawab Mardan 
Ali Khan were divided among his sons, 
Chitari came to Muhammad Mahmud 
Ali Khan. He rendered good services 
during the Mutiny of 1857, and as a 
reward, on September 16, 1859, he 
received the title of Khan Bahadur 
as a personal distinction, with a khilat 
and a grant of lands in Bulandshahr 
district. At the Imperial Assemblage 
at Delhi on January 1, 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India, the title of Nawab was conferred 
on him, as a personal distinction for 
life, and declared hereditary, January 
2, 1893. Residence: Bulandshahr, 
North- Western Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD MAJID MIBZA, Mirza. 
The title is personal, being the courtesy 
title of a grandson of the late Amjad 
Ali Shah, fourth King of Oudh. The 
Mirza is the son of the Mirza Muham- 
mad Hasan Ali, Sulaiman Kadr (q.v.), 
who is the surviving son of that 
monarch. Residence: Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD MEHDI All KHAN (of 
Hasanpur), Raja. See Mehdi Ali 
Khan, Muhammad. 

MUHAMMAD MOHSIN, Sayyid, Khdn 
Bahadur, Zul-Kadr; b. 1832. The 



title is hereditary, and was conferred 
on September 10, 1861, on the father 
of the present Khdn Bahadur, the 
Sayyid Muhammad Nasir Ali Khan. 
He was the Deputy Collector of Alla- 
habad at the time of the Mutiny in 
1857, and rendered loyal services to 
the Government. He separated him- 
self from the rebels, and assisted the 
garrison in the Allahabad Fort by 
communicating information, furnishing 
supplies, and offering money. In re- 
cognition of these services he received 
a khilat, the grant of some confiscated 
estates, and the hereditary title of 
Khan Bahadur, Zul-Kadr. His son, 
the present Khdn Bahadur, Zul-Kadr, 
succeeded on the death of Nasir Ali 
Khan, and has been appointed a De- 
puty Collector of the North- Western 
Provinces. He has a son and heir, 
the Sayyid Muhammad Ahsan, born 
August 22, 1869. Residence : Jaunpur, 
North- Western Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD MUHSIN. See Muham- 
mad Mohsin. 

MUHAMMAD MUNAWAB AM, Sir, 

Khdn Bahddur, Prince of Arcot ; b. 
1859. Succeeded the late Amir-i- 
Arcot (Prince of Arcot) in 1889, and 
ranks as the first noble of the Carnatic. 
Is the representative of the former 
Musalman dynasty of the Nawabs of 
the Carnatic, descendants of the 
famous Anwar -ud- din, who was 
created Nawab of the Carnatic by 
the Nizam of the Deccan. His son 
was the Nawab Muhammad Ali Khan, 
Walajah Nawab of the Carnatic, who 
was supported on the masnad of Arcot 
by the exploits of Clive against the 
French under Dupleix. His grandson 
was the Nawab Azim-ud-daula, titular 
Nawab of the Carnatic, whose son was 
his late Highness Prince Azim Jah, 
first Prince of Arcot, who was granted 
the latter title by Her Majesty's letters 
patent, dated August 2, 1870. He was 
succeeded by his late Highness Zahir- 
ud-daula, second Prince of Arcot, 
whose full titles, according to local 
usage, may here be recited — His High- 
ness Azim Jah Umdat-ul-Umara, Amir- 
ul-Umara, Siraj-ul-Umara, Madar-ul- 
Mulk, Umdat-ul-Mulk, Azim-ud-daula, 
Asad-ud-daula-al-Ingl iz Zahir-ud-dau- 
la, Muhammad Ah Khan, Muhammad 
Badi-ullah Khan Bahadur, Zulfikar 
Jang, Fitrat Jang, Sipahsalar, Prince 



198 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



of Arcot. The present Prince of Arcot 
is the son of Muazzaz-ud daula Khan 
Bah&dur, and grandson of his late 
Highness Azim Jah, first Prince of 
Arcot. He was granted the title of 
Khan Bahadur, March 3, 1876, and 
succeeded as Prince of Arcot in 1889. 
Created a Knight Commander of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire on June 22, 1897, on the 
auspicious occasion of the Diamond 
Juhilee of Her Most Gracious Majesty 
the Queen Empress. And on the same 
occasion, four sons of the Prince, 
Ghulam Muhammad, Abdul Majid, 
Muhammad Anwar, and Ghulam 
Muhi-ud-din (q.v.) were granted the 
title of Khan Bahadur. Residence: 
Amir-Mah&l, Madras. 

MUHAMMAD MUNIR SAHEB, Khdn 
Saheb. See Munir. 

MUHAMMAD MURGAY, Kazi, Khan 
Saheb. Received the title on June 3, 
1899. Residence : Bombay. 

MUHAMMAD MURID walad MUHAM- 
MAD WARIS, Khan Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Residence: Hyderabad, 
Sind. 

MUHAMMAD MUSTAFA, Say yid, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Is Deputy-Collector 
of Allahabad. Residence : Allahabad, 
North-Western Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD NABI, Khdn Saheb. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion 
of the Jubilee of the reign of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty. Residence: 
Calcutta. 

MUHAMMAD NAIYIM, Maulavi, 
Shams-ul-Ulama ; b. November 20, 
1834. This title is personal, and was 
conferred on February 16, 1887, on the 
occasion of the Jubilee of the reign 
of Her Most Gracious Majesty, for 
eminence in oriental learning. It 
entitles him to take rank in Darbar 
immediately after titular Nawabs. 
Belongs to the family of Khwaja Abu 
Ismail Abdulla, Anseri, known as the 
Khwaja Pir of Herat. The family 
was held in great esteem and respect 
by the Mughal Emperors of Delhi. 
Residence : Lucknow, Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD NAJAF KHAN walad 
IMAM BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. The 



title has been continued for life, the 
Mir being a representative of one of 
the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the time 
of the annexation {see Khairpur). 
Residence : Shikarpur, Sind. 

MUHAMMAD NAKI ALI DILAWAR 
JAH, Mirza Bahadur, Prince. The 
title is personal, being the courtesy 
title of the seventeenth son of the late 
King of Oudh. Residence: Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD NIZAM-UD-DIN, Khdn 
Bahadur; b. 1840. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on October 
8, 1875, in recognition of his position 
as son-in-law of his late Highness 
Zahir-ud-daula, the second of the 
titular Princes of Arcot. Residence: 
Madras. 

MUHAMMAD RABNAWAZ KHAN, 
Alizai, Nawab. The title is here- 
ditary. The father of the present 
Nawab was the Nawab Fau jdar Khan, 
who rendered good services during 
the Multan campaign of 1848 under 
Lieutenant (subsequently Sir Herbert) 
Edwardes. For these services he re- 
ceived the title of Khan Bahadur, as 
a personal distinction, and a valuable 
jdgir. He also rendered good service 
during the Sheorani and Kasrani ex- 
peditions. In 1854 he was deputed 
as Envoy to the Court of Kabul ; and 
in 1856, after the conclusion of the 
treaty with the Amir of Kabul, Lord 
Dalhousie conferred on him the per- 
sonal title of Nawab. In 1857 the 
Nawdb went to Kabul again, where 
he remained till March 1859. He 
received various further honours and 
rewards for his remarkable services ; 
and in 1875 the title of Nawab was 
made hereditary, and all his jdgirs 
were made perpetual jdgirs. He died 
in 1875, and was succeeded by his son, 
the present Nawab. The Nawab Mu- 
hammad Eabnawaz Khan has three 
sons — Mahmud Khan, born 1857 ; 
Aladad Khan, born 1862; Hakdad 
Khan, born 1876. Residence: Dera 
Ismail Khan, Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD RAHMAT-ULLA, Khdn 
Bahadur; b. 1862. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on October 
8, 1875, in recognition of his position 
as son of his late Highness Zahir-ud- 
daula, the second of the titular Princes 
of Arcot. Residence: Madras. 



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199 



MUHAMMAD RAHMAT-ULLA BEG, 
Mirza, Khan Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on June 3, 1893. Residence : 
Benares, North- Western Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD RASHID-UD-DIN KHAN 

(of Delhi), Khan Bahadur. The title 
is personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty. Residence : Kar- 
auli, Rajputana. 

MUHAMMAD RAUSHAN All, Khan 
Bahadur, Firoz Jang. The title is 
personal; it was originally conferred 
by the Nawab of the Carnatic, and 
recognized on December 16, 1890. 
Residence : Madras. 

MUHAMMAD REZA All SULTAN, 
Mirza Bahadur, Prince. The title is 
personal, being the courtesy title of 
the thirteenth son of his late Majesty 
the King of Oudh. Residence: Cal- 
cutta, Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD SADIK, Munsni, Khan 
Bahadur; b. July 13, 1833. Belongs 
to a Kamboh (Musalman) family, 
claiming descent from the Nawab 
Asad Khan, who settled at Meerut 
three centuries ago, and was Wazir in 
the time of the Mughal Emperors. 
His father, Haji Muhammad Mumtaz 
Ali Kaan, served the Government as 
a Tahsildar and Honorary Magistrate. 
He las been a Deputy Magistrate in 
the Irrigation Department. Received 
a satad in Darbar from Lord Canning, 
and a khilat for loyal services during 
the Mutiny in 1857 ; also a Certificate 
of Honour at the Imperial Assemblage 
of Delhi on January 1, 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India ; and the title of Khan Bahadur 
on February 16, 1887, on the occasion 
of the Jubilee of Her Majesty's reign. 
Residence : Meerut, North-Western 
Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD SADIK ALI KHAN, Na- 
wab Bahadur. The title is personal, 
being the courtesy title of a grandson 
of his late Majesty Muhammad Ali 
Shah, third King of Oudh. The 
Nawab Bahadur's father was the 
Nawab Muazzam-ud-daula, who mar- 
ried a daughter of that monarch. Re- 
sidence : Lucknow, Oudh. 



MUHAMMAD SAIYAD. See Muham- 
mad Sayyid. 

MUHAMMAD SAKHAWAT HUSAIN, 

Khan Bahadur. See Sakhawat. 

MUHAMMAD SALAMAT KHAN, Raja; 
b. 1835. The title is hereditary. Be- 
longs to a family descended from 
Chandra Singh, Gautam, of Mehnagar 
in Nizdmabad. He had two sons, 
Sagar and Abhiman. The latter be- 
came a Muhammadan and an eunuch ; 
took the name of Daulat, entered the 
Imperial service of Delhi, rose to be 
Wazir of the Household, and in 1612 
A.D. was appointed Faujdar of Jaun- 
pur. His nephew Harbans, sou of 
Sagar, assumed the title of Raja. 
The grandson of Harbans, named 
Bikramajit, married a Muhammadan 
wife, and had two sons, named Azam 
and Azmat. Azam founded the town 
of Azamgarh in 1665, and built the 
fort there, which became the residence 
of the family. Azmat was killed by 
the Imperial troops about 1688 for 
failure to pay revenue, and was suc- 
ceeded by his two sons in turn, Ikram 
and Mahabat. The latter was im- 
prisoned by the Nawab Vaeir for 
refusing to pay revenue, and died in 
confinement about the year 1731. 
His son Iradat, alias Akbar Shah, 
was succeeded in 1756 by his son, 
Jahan Khan, who was slain in 1761 
in a quarrel with the Nawab Vazir's 
agent. After the defeat of the Nawab 
Vazir by the British forces at Baksar, 
a cousin of Jahan Khan, named Azam 
Khan, established himself in the Raj, 
and retained it till his death in 1771. 
His widow adopted a son named Nadir 
Khan, who appears to have been a 
claimant of the Raj. He died in 1826, 
and was succeeded as claimant by his 
eldest son, Mubarak. The latter died 
in 1858, and was succeeded by his son, 
the present Raja, whose claim to the 
Raj was at last allowed by the 
Government in 1866. The Raja is an 
Honorary Magistrate. His heir-pre- 
sumptive is his brother, Babu Mu- 
hammad Khalik Khan, born in 
February 1849. Residence: Azamgarh, 
North- Western Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD SALAM-ULLA KHAN, 

Khan Bahadur, Nawab ; b. February 9, 
1859. The title of Khan Bahadur was 
conferred on June 1, 1888, and that of 



200 



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Nawab on May 29, 1891, as personal 
distinctions, in recognition of his 
services and those of his family to the 
Government. Belongs to a Shirani 
Pathan family of Dewalghat, Buldana 
district, Berar. His grandfather, Mu- 
hammad Rahim Khan, received a,jdgir 
for his services rendered to General 
Sir Arthur Wellesley (afterwards Duke 
of Wellington) in the campaign of 
Assai (Assaye), 1803 a.d. Muhammad 
Rahim Khan's son was Muhammad 
Bismillah Khan, father of the present 
Nawab, who is the jdgirddr and 
Magistrate of Dewalghat. The Na- 
wab has two sons — Muhammad Nur- 
ulla Khan and Muhammad Aziz-ulla 
Khan ; and three daughters, Mohr-un- 
Nisa, Budr-un-Nisa, and Shams-un- 
Nisa. Residence : Dewalghat, Buldana, 
Berar. 

MUHAMMAD SALEH JAFAR, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1891. 
Residence: Aden. 

MUHAMMAD SAMI-ULLAH KHAN, 
G.M.G. Has been created a Com- 
panion of the Most Distinguished 
Order of St. Michael and St. George. 
Residence : 

MUHAMMAD SAYYID BAKHT, alias 
PIYARI SAHEB, Mirza. The title 
is personal, as the courtesy title of 
one of the great-grandsons of the 
Prince Mirza Jahandar Shah, the heir- 
apparent of the Emperor Shah Alam, 
the last independent Mughal Emperor 
of Delhi. The Prince, having incurred 
the displeasure of his father the 
Emperor, fled from Delhi to Lucknow. 
Subsequently, in 1788 A.D.,he removed 
to Benares, to reside under the pro- 
tection of the British Government. 
There the Palace on the river-side, 
called the Shiwala, was given by Mr. 
Duncan, the British Resident, as a 
residence for the Prince, and the 
family have lived there ever since 
as political pensioners. One of the 
Prince's grandsons, Mirza Mahmud 
Jan, was the father of Mirza Muham- 
mad Sayyid Bakht. Residence: Be- 
nares, North-Western Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD SHAH SAYYID, Subah- 
dar, Khdn Bahddur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on Febru- 
ary 16, 1887, on the occasion of the 
Jabilee of the reign of Her Most 



Gracious Majesty, for distinguished 
services as an officer of the 20th Ben- 
gal Infantry. Residence : 20th Bengal 
Infantry. 

MUHAMMAD SHAMS-UD-DIN HAI- 
DAR, Mirza Bahddur. The title is 
personal, being the courtesy title of a 
grandson of his late Majesty Amjad 
Ali Shah, fourth King of Oudh. The 
Mirza Bahadur's father was the Mirza 
Mustafa Ali Haidar, son of that mon- 
arch. Residence: Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD SHARIF, Vellore, Khdn 
Bahddur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1891. Residence: Madras. 

MUHAMMAD SHARIF KHAN (Khan 
of Dir), Nawdb. The Khan of Dir 
received the title of Nawab on June 
22, 1897. Residence: Dir, Punjab 
Frontier. 

MUHAMMAD SIBGHAT-ULLA, Niga- 
rish Khdn Bahddur Ihtisham Jang 
Ihtisham-ud-daula. The title is per- 
sonal ; it was conferred by the Nawab 
of the Carnatic, and recognized on 
December 16, 1890. Residence: Ma- 
dras. 

MUHAMMAD SULTAN SAHIB, Khdn 
Saheb. See Sultan. 

MUHAMMAD SURAJA JAH, Mirza. 
See Suraya Jah. 

MUHAMMAD TAKI, Khdn Saheb, The 
title was conferred on May 26, 1894. 
Residence : Harda, Central Provbces. 

MUHAMMAD TAKI All, Mirza. The 
title is personal, being the courtesy 
title of a grandson of his late Majesty 
Amjad AH Shah, fourth King of Oudh. 
The Mirza's father is the Mirza Mu- 
hammad Hasan Ali Bahadur, Sulai- 
man Kadr (q.v.), the only surviving 
son of that monarch. Residence: 
Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD TAKI KHAN, Mirza, 
Khdn Bahddur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on February 16, 
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee of 
the reign of Her Most Gracious Ma- 
jesty. Residence: Kandahar. 

MUHAMMAD UBEIDULLA, Matilavi, 
Kazi, Shams-ul-Ulama. See Ubai- 
dullah. 

MUHAMMAD USMAN KHAN, Sarddr 
Bahddur. The Sardar Bahadur is a Su- 
bahdar-Major in Her Majesty's Army, 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



201 



attached to the Body-guard of His 
Excellency the Governor of Madras; 
and has been appointed A.D.C. to His 
Excellency. Residence: Madras. 

MUHAMMAD USMAN KHAN, Khan 
Khel, Khdn Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on March 9, 1881, as a per- 
sonal distinction. Residence : Kohat, 
Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD WAZIR-UD-DIN, Haii 
Shaikh, Khan Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1894. 
Residence : Agra, North- Western Pro- 
vinces. 

MUHAMMAD YUSUF, Khan Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on June 6, 
1885, as a personal distinction, in re- 
cognition of his position as an eminent 
member of the Bar of the Calcutta 
High Court. Residence: Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD YUSUF All KHAN, 
Maulavi, Khan Saheb. Received the 
title, for eminent services in the 
Educational Department, on January 
1, 1897. Residence: Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD ZAKAB All, Khdn Ba- 
hddur. The title is personal ; it was 
originally conferred by the Nawab 
of the Carnatic, and recognized on 
December 16, 1890. The Khan Ba- 
hadur is also styled Mutamid Khan 
Bahadur. Residence: Madras. 

MUHAMMADBHAI. See Mahomed- 
bhai. 

MUHAMMADGARH, Nawab Muham- 
mad Hatim Kuli Khan, Nawab of A 
ruling chief; b. 1866. Succeeded to 
the gadi October 1897. Belongs to 
an Afghan (Muhammadan) family, 
descended from Dalel Khan, founder 
of the State of Kurwai (q.v.), of which 
the Muhammadgarh State is an off- 
shoot. The Nawab's eldest son bears 
the title of Mian. The area of the 
State is 27 square miles ; its popula- 
tion is about 5300, chiefly Hindus, but 
including about 900 Muhammadans. 
Residence: Muhammadgarh, Bhopal, 
Central India. 

MUHI-UD-DIN SHARIF, Khdn Bahd- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1878. Resi- 
dence: Madras. 

MUHIUJI NARSUJI, Rao Saheb. The 
title was conferred on January 2, 1899. 
Residence: Bombay. 



MUKERIAN, Sarddr of. See Prem 
Singh. 

MUKTAGACHI, Rdjd of. See Surja 
Kant Acharji. 

MUKUND BALKRISHAN BUTI, Rai 

Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on February 16, 1887, 
on the occasion of the Jubilee of the 
reign of Her Most Gracious Majesty. 
Residence : Nagpur, Central Provinces. 

MUKUND DEB (of Khurdah), Rdjd. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on March 29, 1884. The Raja is the 
present representative of the ancient 
Gangavansa dynasty of Kings of Orissa. 
Residence: Puri, Bengal. 

MUKUND LAL BURMAN, Babu, Rai 
Bahadur. Is Zamindar of Saidabad 
in Murshidabad, Bengal. Received 
the title on January 2, 1899. Residence : 
Saidabad, Murshidabad, Bengal. 

MUKUNDRAI MANIRAI, Rao Bahddur. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on June 9, 1884. Residence: 
Surat, Bombay. 

MULCHAND S0NI, Rao Bahddur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
January 20, 1882. Residence: Ajmir. 

MULI, Parmar Sartansinghji Rama- 
bhai, Thdkur of. A ruling chief; b. 
April 12, 1834. Succeeded to the gadi 
June 29, 1870. Belongs to a family 
claiming descent from the great Pra- 
mara (Parmar) clan of Rajputs, the 
Thakur being, it is said, the only Pra- 
mara Chief in Western India, and 
almost the only surviving Chief of 
that great clan. The Pramaras were 
one of the four divisions of the Agni- 
kulas, or " Sons of Fire," of the heroic 
ages in India— the other three being 
the Solanki, the Chauhan, and the 
Purihara. Tod says of them in his 
learned Annals ofRdjdsthdn : ' ' Though 
the Pramara family never equalled in 
wealth the famed Solanki princes of 
Anhilwara, or shone with such lustre 
as the Chauhan [of Ajmir and Delhi], 
it attained a wider range and an earlier 
consolidation of power than either." 
The great Chandragupta, the Sandra- 
cottus of the Greeks, was probably a 
Pramara Rajput, and the last Pramara 
King of Chitor was conquered by the 
Gehlots, probably in 714 a.d. The 
Thdkur is known in Kathiawar by the 
title of " Parmar Shri." The area of 



202 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



his State is 133 square miles; its 
population is 19,832, chiefly Hindus. 
He maintains a military force of 79 
cavalry and 230 infantry. Residence : 
Muli, Kdthidwdr, Bombay. 

MTJLJI NARAYAN, Rao Saheh. Re- 
ceived the title on June 3, 1899. Resi- 
dence ; Bombay. 

MULTHAN, Thakur Dalpat Singh, Thd- 
kur of. A ruling chief ; b. 1838. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi as a minor in 1849. 
The Thakur belongs to a Rdjput 
(Hindu) family. The population of 
his State is about 9000, chiefly Hindus. 
Residence: Multhan, Bhopdwar, Cen- 
tral India. 

MUMTAZ All KHAN (of Bilaspur, 
Atraula), Rdjd; b. October 6, 1865. 
The title is hereditary; the original 
title of Malik was exchanged for that 
of Rdjd by Adam Khan about the year 
1650, and the latter title was recog- 
nized by the British Government as 
hereditary in 1879. Belongs to a very 
ancient Pathan family, claiming 
descent from Khalid, son of Walid, the 
uncle of the Prophet. Its founder in 
Atraula was Ali Khan of Manota, in 
the district of Muzaffarnagar. He 
accompanied the Emperor Humayun 
in his expedition to Gujarat, where he 
incurred the Emperor's displeasure by 
conniving at the escape of the Raja of 
Bikanir from a beleaguered fort. 
Threatened with death, he openly re- 
belled, and joined the old Afghan party 
of Sher Shah, by whom Humayun was 
for a time driven into exile. Ah Khan 
then seized the Raj of Nagar in Basti ; 
from which, after ten years, he was 
driven by a rising of the Hindus under 
the son of the former Rdjd. He then 
encamped before Atraula; and after 
two years' siege he slew the Rajput 
Prince of that place, and in the year 
1552 established the Raj, which is still 
held by his descendants. He refused 
to submit to the restored Emperor 
Humdyun, or to his son, Akbar the 
Great. But in 1571 his only son, She- 
khan Khdn, tendered his submission 
to Akbar's Viceroy in Oudh, and 
promised to bring in his father's head 
if he were furnished with a sufficient 
number of troops. The unnatural 
battle was fought at Sarai in Pargand 
Saadullanagar ; the son was victorious, 
and kept his word by having his 



father's head cut off and embalmed, 
and he presented it in person at Delhi, 
where it was placed as a trophy on the 
Ajmir Gate. As his reward he re- 
ceived the title of Shri Khdn Azam 
Masnad Ali, which is still used in their 
signatures by the chieftains of this 
family. Shekhan Khdn was allowed 
to return to Atraula with his father's 
head and a grant of the Zaminddri ; 
he raised a handsome tomb over the 
remains of his parent, and ruled in 
Atraula for twenty years. His son, 
Daud Khdn, engaged in a feud with 
the Jan war Rdjd of Bhinga (q.v.) ; and 
it is said that he was such a powerful 
archer that an arrow shot by him into 
the gateway of the Bhinga fort was so 
deeply buried that it was never ex- 
tracted till the time of the Mutiny of 
1857, when it was dug out by Mendu 
Khdn, a General of the rebellious Be- 
gam of Oudh. Daud Khdn's son, 
Adam Khdn, was the first Chief of the 
family to exchange the title of Mdlik 
for that of Rdjd. His descendants in 
later generations have been engaged in 
frequent bloody feuds with their 
neighbours, the Rdjds of Balrdmpur 
(q.v.) and Bdnsi. The late Rdjd, 
Umrao Khdn, who died in 1858, had 
been engaged for many years in a 
desultory border warfare with the 
Chief of Balrdmpur, before the estab- 
lishment of the British rule in Oudh. 
His son, who succeeded as a minor, 
was induced to join the rebels, and the 
rebel Begam of Oudh promised him a 
share of the possessions of the loyal 
Chief of Balrdmpur. He died, how- 
ever, in 1865, leaving no male issue; 
but the present Rdjd was born as a 
posthumous son on October 6th of that 
year. The Government decided that 
he should succeed to his father's 
estates, which were under the manage- 
ment of the Court of Wards from 
1865 to 1866. The Rdjd has married 
a daughter of the Rdjd Jang Bahddur 
Khdn of Nanpara (q.v.). Residence : 
Atraula, Gonda, Oudh. 

MUMTAZ ALI KHAN, Munshi, Khdn 
Bahddur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1894. Residence: Gonda, 
Oudh. 

MUNAWAR ALI, Muhammad, Khdn 
Bahadur, Prince of Arcot. See Mu- 
hammad Munawar Ah. 



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203 



MUNIR SAHEB, Muhammad, Khan 
Saheb. Is secretary to the Anjuman- 
i-Mafid-i-ahla-i-Islam. Received the 
title on January 2, 1899. Residence : 
Madras. 

MUNISWAMI MUDALIYAR, Arkadu, 
Rao Bahadur. The title was conferred 
on May 25, 1892. Residence : Chen- 
galpat, Madras. 

MUNISWAMY PILLAI, Peter, Rao 
Saheb. Received the title on May 21, 
1898. Residence: Madras. 

MUNNA LAL, Rai. The title is per- 
sonal, and was recognized in 1886. 
Residence : Ludhiana, Punjab. 

MUNNA LAL DUBE, Rai Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on May 21, 1898. 
Residence: Jabalpur, Central Pro- 
vinces. 

MUNRAM SINGH, Rai Bahadur; b. 
December 18, 1842. Received the title 
for distinguished military service on 
January 1, 1897. Residence: Mura- 
dabad, Rohilkhand. 

MUNSHL— A prefix. 

MURAD ALI (of Malir), Jam; b. Oc- 
tober 1857. The title is hereditary ; 
the present Jam succeeded as a minor 
in September 1866. The Jam is the 
Chief of the Jokia clan of Baluchis. 
Residence : Karachi, Sind. 

MURALI. See Murli. 

MURARMAU, Rdjd of. See Sheopal 
Singh. 

MURDHAN SAH (of Barha), Rdjd. 
The title is hereditary. Residence: 
Narsinghpur, Central Provinces. 

MURID AHMAD KHAN walad NASIR 
KHAN, Mir. The title has been con- 
tinued for life, the Mir being the re- 
presentative of one of the Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation {see Khairpur). Residence: 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

MURED ALI, Kazi, Khan Bahadur; b. 
January 7, 1830. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on April 16, 1869. 
His great-grandfather, Muhammad 
Harun, came from Herat and settled 
in Hala, Sind, at the time when Jam 
Sams was ruler of Sind. His father 
was Muhammad Hayat. The Khan 
Bahadur has a son, named Muhammad 
Arif . Residence : Hyderabad, Sind. 



MURID HAIDAR KHAN walad IMAM 
BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. The title has 
been continued for life, the Mir being 
the representative of one of the Mirs 
or Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation (see Khairpur). Residence : 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

MURID KHAN, Mulk or Malik; b. 
about the year 1851. The title is 
hereditary; the Malik has sanads of 
the Emperors Aurangzeb and Muham- 
mad Shah in which this title is used. 
Is the Chief of the Kalmati clan, which 
is a branch of the Rind Baluchis. Resi- 
dence : Karachi, Sind. 

MURLI DHAR, Lala, Rai Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on January 2, 1899. 
Residence : Ambala, Punjab. 

MURLI MANOHAR, Rai Bahadur; b. 
1821. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on August 16, 1882, for 
services rendered to Government dur- 
ing the Mutiny and in the Bhutan war. 
Belongs to a Kshatriya family. Is an 
Honorary Magistrate. Residence : 
Lucknow, Oudh. 

MURSAN, Rdjd of. See Ghansham 
Singh. 

MURSHEOABAD, Nawab Sir Sayyid 
Hasan All Khan Bahadur, Muhabat 
Jang, G.C.I.E., Nawdb Bahadur of; 
b. August 25, 1846. The Nawab Ba- 
hadur's full titles are — Ihtisham-ul- 
Mulk, Rais-ud-Daula, Amir-ul-Umara, 
Nawab Sir Sayyid Hasan Ali Khan 
Bahadur, Muhabat Jang, G.C.I.E., Na- 
wdb Bahadur of Murshidabad. Is the 
eldest son of the late Muntazim-ul- 
Mulk, Mohsin-ud-Daula, Faridun Jah, 
Nawab Sayyid Mansur Ali Khan Ba- 
hadur, Nussat Jang, last titular Nawab 
Nazim and Subahdar of Bengal, Behar, 
and Orissa. The late Nawab Nazim 
resigned his position and titles on 
November 1, 1880. His eldest son, 
the present Nawab, received the here- 
ditary title of Nawab Bahadur of 
Murshidabad by a sanad, dated Feb- 
ruary 17, 1882. In February 1887 he 
received the dignity of Knight Com- 
mander of the Most Eminent Order of 
the Indian Empire, and was promoted 
to be a Knight Grand Commander of 
the same Most Eminent Order in May 
1890. In May 1887 he was granted 
the khilat or style of Ihtisham-ul-Mulk, 
Rais-ud-Daula, Amir-ul-Umara, Na- 
wdb Sir Sayyid Hasan Ali Khan Ba- 



204 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



hadur, Muhabat Jang. On March 12, 
1891, by an Indenture entered into 
between the Secretary of State for 
India in Council and himself, the Na- 
wab Bahadur confirmed the act of his 
father of November 1, 1880 ; and re- 
ceived in return a fixed hereditary 
position, with a settled income, and 
with the family estates in the districts 
of Murshidabad, Calcutta, Midnapur, 
Dacca, Maldah, Purneah, Patna, Rang- 
pur, Hughli, Rajsbahi, Birbhum, and 
the Santal-Parganas attached to the 
title of Nawab Bahadur in tail male. 
This arrangement was confirmed and 
validated by the Council of His Ex- 
cellency the Viceroy and Governor- 
General, by Act XV. of 1891, passed 
on March 21, 1891. This arrangement 
confirmed to the Nawab Bahadur the 
rank and dignity of Premier Noble of 
the Provinces under the Lieutenant- 
Governor of Bengal, with the heredit- 
ary title, in addition to that of Nawab 
Bahadur of Murshidabad, of Amir-ul- 
Umara. The Nawab Bahadur has 
five sons — (1) Asaf Kadr Sayyid Wasif 
Ali Mirza, born January 7, 1875 ; (2) 
Iskandar Kadr Sayyid Nasir Ali Mirza, 
born March 15, 1876 ; (3) Sayyid Asaf 
Ali Mirza, bom April 26, 1881; (4) 
Sayyid Yakub Ali Mirza, born June 
9, 1883 ; (5) Sayyid Mohsin Ali Mirza, 
born November 18, 1885. The family 
arms adopted by the Nawab are — 
argent, a dolphin proper above a cheval 
regardant, also proper. Below the 
shield the monogram N.B.M. The 
supporters are the lion and the uni- 
corn. The crest is a Zulfikdr (sword 
of theKhalif Ali) proper. The motto 
is " Nil Desperandum." The Nawab 
Bahadur is descended both from the 
Prophet and also from Ali, the cousin 
and successor of the Prophet, who was 
married to Fatima, the Prophet's 
daughter. Hasan, eldest son of Ali, 
left a son, Hasan Massanna, who mar- 
ried Fatima Soghra, daughter of Hus- 
sain Ali's youngest son. One branch 
of the descendants of this marriage 
has held for several centuries, and still 
holds, the office of Grand Sharif of 
Mecca. A grandson of Hasan Mas- 
sanna and Fatima Soghra was called 
Ibrahim Taha-Tahaie ("the pure," 
" the unsullied ") ; and from this Ibra- 
him are derived the Murshidabad 
family. His descendants were for 
some time rulers of the province of 



Yemen in Arabia. Subsequently a 
descendant, Sayyid Husain Najafi, was 
key-holder to the tomb of Ali at Na- 
jaf ; and his grandson was Mir Jafar, 
who became, on the fall of Nawab 
Suraj-ud-Daula, Nawab Nazim of 
Bengal, Behar, and Orissa. The 
grandfather of Mir Jafar had married 
a niece of the Emperor Aurangzeb. 
One of his uncles, Najafi Khan, was 
Governor of the fortress of Gwalior ; 
and another, Najaf Khan, was Subah- 
dar of Cuttack. Mir Jafar himself 
was at first Commander-in-Chief to 
the Nawab Nazim Ali Vardi Khan, 
whose sister, the Nawab Shah Kha- 
num, he married. The Nawab Ali 
Vardi Khan became Subahdar in 1740, 
and was succeeded by his grandson 
Nawab Suraj-ud-Daula in 1756. He 
was succeeded, by Mir Jafar, brother- 
in-law of Ali Vardi Khan, after the 
victory at Plassey in 1757. In 1760 
he was set aside for a short time in 
favour of his son-in-law, Mir Kasim, 
but again came into power after a few 
months, and continued on the Masnad 
till 1765, when he was succeeded by 
his son, Najm-ud-Daula. Mir Najm 
was succeeded in 1766 by his brother, 
Nawab Saif-ud-Daula, and he by an- 
other brother, Mubarak-ud-Daula, a 
minor son of Mir Jafar, in 1770. Mu- 
barak-ud-Daula was succeeded by his 
son, Nasir-ul-Mulk, in 1793, and this 
Nawab by his son, Ali Jah, in 1810. 
Ali Jah was followed by his brother, 
Wala Jah, in 1821 ; and Wala Jah by 
his son, Humayun Jah, in 1825. This 
Prince was succeeded in 1838 by his 
son, the late Faridun Jah Sayyid Man- 
sur Ali, the father of the present Na- 
wab, who was the last Nawab Nazim 
of Bengal, Behar, and Orissa. The 
grandfather of the present Nawab 
Bahadur received from His Majesty 
King William IV. a full-length por- 
trait of His Majesty, and the dignity 
of the Grand Cross of the Royal 
Hanoverian Guelphic Order with 
the Insignia. The portrait of His 
Majesty is one of the chief orna- 
ments at the Palace at Murshidabad. 
Residence: The Palace, Murshidabad, 
Bengal. 

MTJRTAZA HUSAIN (of Bhilwal). See 
Mustafa Husain. 

MTJRWARA , Thdkur of. See Ram Datt. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



205 



MUSA, Ali Raja, Sultan (of Cannanore), 
Raja ; b. 1830. The title is hereditary, 
the Raja of Cannanore being the 
representative of the old Moplah Ali 
R&jas or Sea-Kings of Malabar and 
the adjacent islands. Belongs to a 
Moplah (Muhammadan) family, said 
to have been founded by Mamali 
Kidavi, a Musalman Minister of the 
Kolathiii Raja of Malabar, who was 
appointed the "Ali Raja" — or Sea- 
King of the Laccadives and adjacent 
islands — by the Cherakal Raja, who 
assigned him a residence at Cannanore. 
It is remarkable that the family, 
though Muhammadans, follow the 
Marumakkatayam law of inheritance 
general among the Hindu Rajas of 
Malabar, under which the succession 
is with the offspring of its female 
members, amongst whom the next 
eldest male is always the heir-apparent. 
The present Sultan Ali Ra ja succeeded 
his predecessor under this law on 
November 15, 1870. The agreement 
of 1796, by which the family came 
under British control, was signed by 
the Bibi, a female member of the 
family. Residence: Malabar, Madras. 

MUSSAMAT— A prefix. 

MUSTAFA HUSAIN (of Bhilwal), 
Chaudhri; b. October 31, 1849. The 
title is hereditary, having been so since 
the time of the Emperor Shah Jahan 
in 1616 a.d., and recognized by the 
British Government in 1877. Belongs 
to a Musalman family whose ancestors, 
Khwaja Bahram and Khwaja Nizam, 
accompanied the Sayyid Salar to 
Oudh, and settled at Subeha. In 1616 
a.d. Shaikh Nasir was appointed 
Chaudhri of Subeha by the Empress 
Shah Jaham. In 1792 Chaudhri 
Imam Bakhsh largely increased the 
possessions of the family. In 1860, 
Chaudhri Sarfaraz Ahmad, who had 
succeeded his father-in-law Chaudhri 
Lutf-ulla, was invested with the special 
powers of an Assistant Collector. On 
his death there was protracted litiga- 
tion as to the succession ; ultimately 
the estates were divided between the 
widow of Sarafaz Ahmad, Mussamat 
Bichan-un-Nisa, and the present Chau- 
dhri, who is the nephew of the late 
Chaudhri. He has a son and heir 
named Mujtaba Husain, born in 1874. 
Residence : Subeha, Bara Banki, Oudh. 



MUSTAFABAD, Sarddr of. See Tilak 
Singh. 

MUSTAMH) KHAN BAHADUR. See 

Muhammad Zakar Ali. 

MUTHUSWAMI AIYAR, T., CLE.; b. 
1832. Created a Companion of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire, 1878, in recognition of his 
distinguished services in the Judicial 
Service. Was appointed a Deputy 
Collector in 1859; Principal Sadr 
Amin, 1865 ; Police Magistrate, 1868 ; 
Judge of the Court of Small Causes, 
1871; Fellow of the Madras Uni- 
versity, 1872; Puisne Judge of the 
Madras High Court of Judicature, 
1883. Is a B.L. of Madras University. 
Residence: Madras. 

MUTHUSWAMI PILLAI, C, Rao Saheb. 
The title is personal, and was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1890. Residence : 
Madras. 

MUTLUR. See Adinarayana. 

MUZAFFAR BAKHT, Mirza. The title 
is personal, as the courtesy title of one 
of the great-grandsons of the Prince 
Mirza Jahandar Shah, the heir-ap- 
parent of the Emperor Shah Alam, the 
last independent Mughal Emperor of 
Delhi. For the family history, see the 
account under the heading "Muham- 
mad Sayyid Bakht, Mirza." The 
Mirza Muzaffar Bakht is a first cousin 
of Mirza Muhammad Sayyid Bakht, 
being the elder son of Zafar Bakht, 
who was the brother of Mahmud Jan. 
Residence : Benares, North-Western 
Provinces. 

MUZAFFAR HUSAIN KHAN icalad 
IMAM BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. The 
title has been continued for life, the 
Mir being the representative of one of 
the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the time 
of the annexation (see Khairpur). 
Residence : Shikarpur, Sind. 

MUZAFFAR KHAN, Sarddr Bahadur, 
C.I.E. Was created a Companion of 
the Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire for distinguished military 
services on June 1, 1888. Holds the 
rank of Risaldar-Major in Her Majesty's 
Army. Residence: Hyderabad, Deccan. 

MUZAFFAR KHAN, Kazi, Khan Saheb. 
Received the title on January 2, 1899. 
Residence : Lower Zhob. 



206 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



MUZAFFAR. KHAN, Waliwal, Mar- 
wal (Malik of Wall), Khan Saheb. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. Residence: Wali,Bannu, Punjab. 

MTJZHAR ALI, Khan Saheb. Received 
the title on January 2, 1899, for good 
service in the Customs Department. 
Residence: Berbera. 

MY AT PIT, Maung, Ahmudan gaung 
Tazeik ya Min. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on May 24, 1889. 
It means " Recipient of the Medal of 
Honour," and is indicated by the 
letters A.T.M. after the name. Resi- 
dence: Tharrawadi, Burma. 

MY AT SAN, Maung, Ahmudan gaung 
Tazeik ya Min. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1891. 
It means " Recipient of the Medal of 
Honour," and is indicated by the 
letters A.T.M. after the name. Resi- 
dence : Rangoon, Burma. 

MY AT THA, Mating, Thuye gaung 
ngwe Da ya Min. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1892. 
It means " Recipient of the Silver 
Sword for Bravery," and is indicated 
by the letters T.D.M. after the name. 
Residence : Myingyan, Burma. 

MY AT THA GYAW, Mating, Myook, 

Thuye gaung ngwe Da ya Min. The 
title (see above) was conferred on 
January 1, 1898. Residence : Mogaung, 
Myitkyina, Burma. 

MYAT TUN AUNG, Maung, Thuye 
gaung ngxoe Da ya Min. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on June 
1, 1888. It means " Recipient of the 
Silver Sword for Bravery," and is in- 
dicated by the letters T.D.M. after the 
name. Residence: Chindwin, Burma. 

MYLLIEM, Seim of. See Malliem. 

MYO, Maung, Ahmudan gaung Tazeik ya 
Min. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1890. It 
means " Recipient of the Medal of 
Honour," ana is indicated by the 
letters A.T.M. after the name. Resi- 
dence : Rangoon, Burma. 

MYSORE, His Highness Maharaja Kri- 
shnaraja Wadiar Bahadur, Mahdrdjd 
of. A ruling chief, and one of the 



Premier Princes of the Empire ; b. June 
4, 1884. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor on the decease of his late dis- 
tinguished father, the Maharaja Sir Cha- 
marajendra Wadiar Bahadur, G.C.S.I. 
Belongs to a Rajput (Kshatriya Hindu) 
family, whose ancestors came to the 
south in very early times from Dwarka 
in Kathiawar. Of these, two brothers, 
named Vijayaraj and Krishnaraj, appear 
to have settled in the Ashtagrain 
division of the Mysore dominions to- 
wards the close of the 14th century; 
and one of them married the daughter 
of the local palegdr or Baron of the 
village of Hadanaru, and by this means 
established his rule in those parts. One 
of his descendants, named Yedu Raya, 
ruled over Mysore from 1399 a.d. to 
1422, and was then succeeded by his 
son. Here Bettud Chamraj. The grand- 
son of the latter was a Raja named 
Here (or Arberal) Chamraj — arberal 
meaning six-fngered, in allusion to a 
physical peculiarity ; and the six-fingered 
Raja's son was Here Bettud Chamraj 
II., in whose time the fort of Mysore 
was built on the site of a village formerly 
called Puragere, and was given the 
name of Mahesh-uru, Buffalo-town, from 
Mahesh-asura, the buffalo-headed demon 
destroyed by the goddess Kali. These 
Rajas were called Wadidrs or Wodeydrs 
of Mysore — Wodeydr being a plural or 
honorific form of Odeya. Kanarese for 
" lord." 

Here Bettud Chamraj was succeeded 
by his two sons in turn. The younger, 
Bole Chamraj, is said to have been 
named Dole, or The Da Id, because he had 
been made bald by a stroke of lightning. 
His grandson, Raj Wadiar, ninth Raja 
of Mysore, was the greatest and most 
successful of all these early Wadiars. 
He reigned from 1578 to 1616; and in 
the year 1609-10 he seized the strong 
fortress of Seriugapatam, formerly held 
by a lieutenant of the Kings of Vijaya- 
nagar. The great Hindu kingdom of 
Vijayanagar on the Tungabhadra had 
previously, in 1588, been subverted by 
the alliance of the Muhammadan Chiefs 
of the Deccan, and the descendants of 
the Vijayanagar dynasty had taken 
refuge at Penuakonda, where the family 
ultimately became extinct ; so that Raj 
Wadiar of Mysore and his descendants, 
having obtained possession of the im- 
portant strategical position of Seringa- 
patam, rapidly increased their power and 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



207 



extended their dominions. This process 
of aggrandizement continued down to 
the time of the R&j& Dodda Krishnar&j, 
who reigned from 1713 to 1730. His 
adopted son was Hadinente Tingal 
Chamraj, who died in 1733, and was 
succeeded by his adopted son, Chikka 
Krishnaraj — Chikka means " Junior," or 
«• The Less." The long reign of Chikka 
Krishnaraj, from 1734 to 1765, was 
hardly more than nominal, for during 
this period the famous Muhammadan 
Haidar Ali rose to power, and ultimately 
became the sovereign of Mysore, retain- 
ing the Mahar&jd as a puppet-prince. 
Haidar's splendid military powers, and 
those of his even more famous son, Tippu 
Sultan, immensely increased the Mysore 
dominions, and made the State the 
greatest in Southern India, and its 
rulers the most formidable potentates in 
the whole country. Of the Mahar&ja 
Chikka Krishnaraj 's two sons, who 
nominally succeeded him, one was 
strangled by orders of the Sultan, and 
the other died childless. Haidar then, 
in order to retain the shadow of a Hindu 
dynasty, permitted the third wife of 
Chikka Krishnaraj to adopt a young 
kinsman named Chamraj. Not long 
before the fall of Tippu and the conquest 
of Seringapatam by the British in 1799, 
Chamraj had died in captivity ; and 
when the British Government resolved 
that Mysore should revert to the control 
of the family of its ancient rulers, an 
infant son of Chamraj, by name Krish- 
naraj, was placed on the gadi. During 
the minority of the Maharajd Krishnaraj, 
from 1799 to 1810, the State was success- 
fully administered by a Diw&n or Prime 
Minister, the famous Purnaiya, a Brah- 
man statesman of great ability. The 
affairs of the State, however, fell into 
disorder after the retirement of Pur- 
naiya ; and the misgovernment of the 
Mahaj&rd Krishnaraj terminated by the 
British Government assuming the direct 
administration of the country in 1831, 
retaining the Mah&r&jd as the titular 
sovereign. On June 18, 1865, the late 
Mahar&jd adopted as a son and successor 
the young prince, the late MaMrajd 
Ch&ma Rajendra Wadia>, who was the 
third son of Chikka Krishna Araso, a 
scion of the Bettada Kote branch of the 
royal house. The adoption was sanctioned 
by the Government of India in April 1867 ; 
and on the death of the Maharaja Krish- 
naraj in 1868 the late Maharaja was duly 



installed in his place as titular sovereign. 
The young MaharaVja proved himself in 
every way so deserving of the position 
that in 1881 it was resolved that the 
sovereign power should be restored to 
the sovereign title, and on March 
25 in that year the "Rendition" — the 
term has become historical — was carried 
out by the installation of the Maharajd 
as a Ruling Chief, when the British 
Chief Commissioner handed over his 
office to the Diw&n or Prime Minister of 
His Highness. 

The subsequent history of the Mahd- 
r&j&'s rule — and since His Highness's 
lamented death, that of Her Highness 
the Mahar&ni-Regent, C.L, acting for 
the youthful Maharajii, and aided by 
the able Prime Minister, His Excellency 
Sir Sheshadri Iyar, K.C.S.I., who had so 
long possessed the confidence of the late 
Mah&raj& — abundantly justified the 
" Rendition." The good administration 
of the country, which had been firmly 
established under the rule of Sir Mark 
Cubbon and his successors as Chief Com- 
missioners of Mysore, has been main- 
tained and improved. Notwithstanding 
that the State has been devastated by 
one of the most terrible famines ever 
known — that of 1877-78 — and by several 
very serious droughts, its general ad- 
vance in prosperity under the Mah&raja's 
rule has been marvellous. His Highness 
had the advantage of being assisted by 
several Indian statesmen of the first 
rank and the highest abilities ; the place 
of the late Diwan, Mr. Rangacharlu — 
who was himself an administrator of no 
mean power — having been taken, very 
fortunately , by His Excellency the present 
Prime Minister, Sir K. Sheshadri Iyar, 
K.C.S.I. (q.v.), by whose aid the Maha- 
raja attained an administrative success 
not surpassed in any part of the Indian 
Empire, British as well as feudatory. 

In all the ordinary duties of an Indian 
Government — in the administration of 
justice, in the collection and expenditure 
of the revenue, in the protection afforded 
to life and property, in public instruc- 
tion, in sanitation, in public works — it 
is admitted that the Government of 
Mysore can compare not unfavourably 
with that of the Provinces under 
direct British rule. In some highly im- 
portant respects — in the development of 
communications, in female education, in 
precautions against famine, in the en- 
couragement of mining and other in- 



208 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



dustries, and in the fostering of habits of 
local self-government among the people 
— it is held by many (and apparently 
with some reason) that the State of My- 
sore is ahead of most of the rest of India. 
The famous school at Mysore city that 
is known as " Her Highness the Ma- 
harani's High-Caste Girls' School" — in 
which 400 girls belonging to the families 
of highest caste in Mysore receive a 
liberal education, largely from Professors 
of their own sex and rank in life — un- 
doubtedly represents by far the most 
successful attempt that India has seen 
to put the ladies of India on the same 
intellectual level with their husbands 
and brothers. The success of the gold- 
mining of Kolar is perhaps due as much 
to the wise and liberal laws which regu- 
late it as to the richness of the district 
in the precious metal ; while the Princi- 
pality is being opened out in every 
direction by railways under State con- 
trol or with State encouragement. The 
expenditure on railways in this State in 
the year 1891 was nearly 3,000,000 rupees. 
In regard to local self-government, the 
"Representative Assembly of Mysore," 
with which the Diwan every year takes 
counsel, which was instituted some years 
ago as a body nominated by the Maha- 
raja, was in 1890 made elective, and 
the Prime Minister in his Address to 
the Assembly in 1891, thus commented 
on the results of the change: — 



" By command of His Highness the Maha- 
raja, I have much pleasure in welcoming you 
to this Assembly, which meets here to-day for 
the first time under the election system 
sanctioned last year. You come here as the 
duly elected Representatives of the Agri- 
cultural, the Industrial, and the Commercial 
interests of the State. Last year, when His 
Highness was pleased to grant the valued 
privilege of election, he was not without some 
misgiving as to how the experiment would 
succeed ; but it is most gratifying to His 
Highness that, though unused to the system, 
the electoral body has been able, in the very 
first year of its existence, to exercise the 
privilege with so much judgment and sense of 
responsibility as to send to this Assembly 
men in every way qualified to speak on their 
behalf. That men representing the capital, 
the industry, and the intellect of the country 
should have already taken so much interest 
in the working of the scheme augurs well for 
the future of the Institution. His Highness 
asks me to take this opportunity publicly to 
acknowledge the expressions of warm grati- 
tude which have reached him from all sides 
for the privilege of election granted last 
year." 



But it is in measures for the prevention 
and the relief of famines that tbe Govern- 
ment of Mysore has earned its best and 
most enduring laurels, in a reputation 
for prudent and far-sighted philanthropy. 
Those measures were described fairly 
and minutely by the Prime Minister in 
his Address to the Representative As- 
sembly on October 4, 1892, in the follow- 
ing words : — 

" Before I proceed to take up the various 
departments of the State, you will naturally 
expect me to say a few words regarding the 
severe drought through which the whole of 
the Province, with the small exception of our 
Malnad Taluks, has recently passed. In the 
Maidan parts of the Mysore and Hassan dis- 
tricts the south-west monsoon was so scanty 
and precarious that the early dry crops were 
completely lost, except in a few scattered 
favourable situations. The northern and 
eastern districts did not get any of the early 
rains, and had in consequence to defer the 
preparation of land for cultivation much be- 
yond the usual season. A few showers which 
came later on permitted of the sowing of the 
ordinary dry crops in most taluks. These 
soon began to fade from insufficient moisture. 
The rain which fell towards the end of Septem- 
ber raised hopes of a favourable change in the 
season. But by November it was evident that 
the north-east monsoon too had failed, and 
that the general out-turn of dry crops would 
not be much above a four-anna average in 
most taluks. The tanks had received no 
water, and wet cultivation under them could 
not be attempted. The failure of fodder was 
widespread, and altogether there was every 
indication of an impending distress of a very 
aggravated type, and towards the end of 
November the price of food grains began to 
rise rapidly, owing both to the local failure of 
crops and to large exports to neighbouring 
Madras districts. In the beginning of Decem- 
ber, by command of His Higlmess the Maha- 
raja, I started on a tour through the worst 
taluks of the districts of Mysore, Tumkur, 
Chitaldroog, Kolar, and Bangalore. My im- 
mediate object was not only to ascertain by 
personal observation the actual condition of 
the country and the requirements of the 
people, but also to organize the relief measures 
required for the different tracts, and chiefly to 
inspire the people with confidence alike in 
the famine policy of the Government and in 
the method proposed for carrying it out. One 
of the first things to attract my attention was 
the insufficient supply of food grains at the 
various local markets. It was evident that 
owners were holding back their stocks, partly 
in expectation of a further rise in price and 
partly from fear of thefts and robberies, — 
so fruitful a source of waste and loss during 
the previous famine. I accordingly lost no 
time in arranging for due police protection of 
grain in transit and at places of storage, and 
for their safe and ready consignment by the 
railway. Local merchants were duly apprised 
of the preparedness of the Government to meet 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



any local insufficiency by import of grain from 
outside the Province, while at the same time 
the prices of food grains obtaining at the 
several weekly santes or markets in the 
interior were ascertained and regularly pub- 
lished as a stimulus to local trade. These 
measures tended to make prices more uniform 
and steady throughout the Province, and 
there was heard afterwards no complaint of 
insufficient supply at any local market. 
Another matter which I found necessary 
to impress upon local officers early in my 
tour was the need of the greatest economy 
in the use of the available supply of water 
in tanks. With the object of raising quick- 
growing dry crops likely to yield an early 
supply of food and fodder, tank-beds 
which were fast becoming dry were ordered 
to be leased for cultivation on very 
favourable terms. About 10,500 acres of 
tank-bed were thus brought under cultivation. 
The crops raised were generally Bengal-gram 
and jolam. In the Tumkur district, where 
the cultivation was timely and extensive, the 
aggregate value of the crops thus raised is 
estimated at over Rs.90,000. In the other 
districts this class of cultivation was not 
nearly so successful. To meet the serious 
want of fodder which was apprehended, all 
State forests and plantations, as well as a 
large number of Amrut Mahal Kavals, were 
thrown open for the free use of the raiyats' 
cattle, without any restrictions as to the 
taluks or districts from which they might 
come. The total area of grazing land thus 
made available to the public was 1600 square 
miles, and it is reported to have been used for 
grazing nearly 519, 000 head of cattle. Raiyats 
were also further permitted to cut and remove 
tender date-leaves for use as fodder, a privi- 
lege which was eagerly availed of in most 
taluks of Tumkur and Chitaldroog. In de- 
vising our scheme of Relief Works my chief 
aim was to afford the poorer agriculturists, 
the landless field labourers, the Holiyars, the 
Madigars, etc., the means of earning a 
sufficient livelihood near their own homes. 
It was believed they and their families could 
live upon comparatively small wages if these 
could be earned near their own villages, for 
in such a case they would be able to return to 
their homes at the end of each day's work, 
take care of the infirm and young dependent 
upon them, look after their cattle and 
other property, and receive from their 
neighbours any additional help they might 
require. With this object in view, every 
affected taluk was divided into a number 
of small circles, and for execution within 
each such circle some suitable work or 
works were selected, so as to leave no in- 
habited "village without the means of earning 
fair wages, within a radius of three or four 
miles. The works tlms selected were ' minor 
tanks,' whether yielding revenue or not. The 
improvement of such tanks was of such vital 
importance to the villagers as a body that 
there was every guarantee that the grants 
given for it would be properly applied, and 
some good return shown for the money spent. 
To meet the rare cases in which such minor 
tanks were not available, as also to provide 



work near villages after completion of the 
tanks taken up, a programme of works of a 
supplementary character was got ready. 
These works were also of special local utility, 
such as improvement of village sanitation, 
planting of topes in villages and round the 
fringe of the waterspread of the bigger tanks, 
etc. Such, in brief outline, was the scheme 
of relief upon which His Highness's Govern- 
ment chiefly relied. Its execution was en- 
trusted to the hereditary village Patel, for it 
was deemed safer to rely upon the autonomy 
of the village than upon paid agency from out- 
side. A system of periodical inspection and 
general control by the Shekdar and Amildar 
was established, and wide discretion given to 
district officers as regards the details of ex- 
ecution, with due regard to local circum- 
stances. I am able to bear testimony to the 
fact that the entire Executive, from the Patel 
to the District Officer, showed themselves 
fully equal to the high responsibility thus 
placed upon them, and that the scheme of 
relief planned was carried out with complete 
success in every affected part. Besides the 
regular relief works, but under the same 
agency and serving the same object as those 
works, were the drinking-water wells, for 
which a total grant of Rs. 138, 000 (chiefly 
from local funds) had been sanctioned. 
There were in hand 850 such wells, prin- 
cipally new wells undertaken wherever 
most needed, besides a number of old 
wells which required deepening. They 
were all works of permanent utility, but 
were of special immediate value, owing to the 
scarcity of good drinking water which existed 
in most places. In addition to works under 
direct Government agency, the employment 
of local labour on private works on a large 
scale was established by the grant of Govern- 
ment loans to landholders for special per- 
manent improvement of their lands. The 
most important of this class of works were 
the irrigation wells under the scheme I de- 
scribed to you last year. The working of the 
scheme in each of the districts of Kolar, 
Tumkur, Chitaldroog, and Bangalore was 
entrusted to a special officer in subordination 
to the Deputy Commissioner, and the distrust 
which raiyats at first evinced towards a new 
measure of this kind soon gave place to an 
eager desire to secure the loans. The number 
of applications received was so numerous 
that the grants had to be confined to localities 
where provision for employment of labour 
was most needed. The loans sanctioned 
aggregated Rs. 280, 000 for 917 kapile and 530 
yatam wells, calculated to irrigate 5252 acres. 
Another important class of works for which 
Government loans were given was the con- 
struction and repair of Saguvali kattes. The 
restriction placed upon the construction and 
improvement of these kattes by an order of 1873 
was felt as a great hardship, especially in the 
Chitaldroog district, where much of the dry 
cultivation depends upon the retention of 
moisture under these kattes. That order was 
accordingly withdrawn, and special encourage- 
ment afforded for the construction and im- 
provement of these most useful private works 
by a system of Government loans. During 
P 



210 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



the past season loans to the extent of Rs.21,175 
were sanctioned for 251 such works, which 
when completed will benefit 5069 acres. A 
few loans were granted also to enable Inam- 
dars to repair their tanks. Of works referred 
to above, both Government and private, 
about 2900 were in actual execution in the 
affected tracts. They had the effect of keeping 
the people employed near their own homes, 
and their sufficiency for purposes of relief is 
proved by the fact that nearly 2400 of them 
could not be completed during the past 
season. We have found them far more effec- 
tive for real relief than large central works 
under professional agency. Our main anxiety 
was to avoid the necessity for concentrating 
large numbers upon distant works, for previous 
experience had shown that in the earlier stages 
of famine the people can never be induced to 
leave their homes in quest of employment on 
distant works, not because they are not in 
need of employment, but because they are 
bound to their homes by ties they are unable 
to sever. It is well known that before their 
cattle are lost, and the weaker members have 
died, and themselves reduced to a famished 
condition, the people do not quit their homes, 
and when eventually compelled to take this 
step they are so demoralized that they are 
more likely to wander about aimlessly than 
to settle down on distant works under a 
strange agency. We had, however, ready at 
hand a programme of D.P.W. Relief Works 
for possible resort in the event of the distress 
being unusually prolonged. But happily we 
had no occasion to do more in this direction 
than expand the ordinary Public Works in 
some of the affected tracts. Besides placing 
the means of earning wages within the ready 
reach of the general population, we adopted 
several measures for the relief of special 
classes. The most important among them 
were the weavers, the demand for whose 
manufactures had all but disappeared owing 
to the high prices of grain which prevailed. 
After much consideration of alternative 
measures, the Government eventually adopted 
the system of purchase proposed by Mr. 
Madhava Rao for the Bangalore district. 
Under this system the Government made 
advances of money to local Sahukars of stand- 
ing for purchasing on behalf of Government 
the entire produce of the looms at the market 
value, to be resold when the demand became 
re-established. The Sahukars were paid a 
small commission, and in return they 
guaranteed the full recoupment of the advances 
made. This system was the means of afford- 
ing efficient relief to the industrious weaving 
class, always the first to suffer on every 
occasion of widespread scarcity and high 
prices. It was in operation at Bangalore, 
Dodballapur, Anekal, Kolar, Melkote, Molkal- 
muru, and other weaving centres. The ad- 
vances made amounted to Rs, 85,300, including 
commission and other charges. A sum of 
Rs.34,580 has already been recovered by the 
resale of cloths purchased, and the balance is 
under process of realization. The final net 
expenditure is expected to be trifling com- 
pared with the large numbers relieved. In 
Bangalore city alone the relief thus given 



extended to 4000 looms with 10,000 weavers. 
Another class for whom special relief was 
found necessary were the minor village ser- 
vants — the Madiga, the Toti, the Talavar, 
etc. The contributions from villagers oh 
which they generally subsist cease during 
every season of a general failure of crops. 
Eight hundred and fifty-one of them, employed 
in watching Ukkads or Police outposts and 
doing quasi Police duties, were paid a monthly 
salary of Rs.3 each as a temporary measure, 
which has to be continued till the next 
harvest. Others not so employed were paid 
wages as work-overseers, gangmen, etc., on 
relief works under execution. A number of 
Holeyars and Madigars were given employ- 
ment in the collection of Tangadi bark in the 
Kolar district, and of bamboos lor the 
Government depots in that and the My- 
sore district. Compensation for dearness of 
gram had to be given to the Silledars, 
amounting up to the end of June to over 
Rs.8000. It will probably have to be con- 
tinued till the next gram harvest. A moiety 
of the Potgi allowances of village officers was 
ordered to be paid on application before the 
date on which they are payable. With the 
arrangements made for the relief of general 
and special classes, gratuitous relief was 
found to be unnecessary, except to a very 
insignificant extent. Further relief was given 
by the remission of one-half of the assessment 
on all wet lands under tanks which lay waste 
or could only be culivated with dry crops, 
and one-half of the quit-rent on all Service 
Inam lands of the minor village servants, and 
the Mohatarfa house-tax of the poorer landless 
classes. The total of remissions thus given 
amounts to about four lakhs. Besides this, 
six lakhs of revenue had to be postponed, and 
much of this will have to be remitted 
eventually." 

The area of the State is 24,709 square 
miles, which is more than double the 
combined area of Switzerland and Saxony. 
Its population is 4,186,188, chiefly 
Hindus, but including 200,484 Muham- 
madans and 29,249 Christians, which is 
more than double the population of 
Norway, and about equal to that of 
Portugal. His Highness the Maharaja 
maintains a military force of 1173 
cavalry, 3425 infantry, and 10 guns, 
besides an Imperial Service Corps for 
the special service of frontier defence. 
His Highness is entitled to a salute of 
21 guns. 

The arms displayed on the banner of 
the Maharaja of Mysore, which was 
unfurled at the Imperial Assemblage at 
Delhi, January 1, 1877, on the occasion 
of the Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India, were — 
Arms. — Murrey (the Indian Bhagwd) % 
a garur berunda (sacred double-headed 
eagle) displayed aryeut, beaked and 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



211 



armed or. Crest. — 'A lion passant, carry- 
ing an antelope's head, all proper. 
Supporters.— Satvas (yali), elephant- 
headed tigers, sable, armed and unguled 
or. Residences : The Palace, Mysore ; 
The Palace, Bangalore ; Utakamand, etc. 

NABA. See Nava. 

NABHA, His Highness Farzand-i- 
Arjumand Akidat Paiwand Daulat-i- 
Inglishia Barar Bans Sarmur Raja 
Sir Hira Singh, Maiwandar Bahadur, 
G.C.S.I., Rdjd of. A ruling chief ; b. 
1843. Succeeded to the gadi June 9, 
1871. Belongs to the great Sidhu Jat 
family, known as the Phulkian family, 
from its founder Phul; which has 
given ruling families to Patiala, Jind, 
Nabha Bhadaur, and other Punjab 
States. The Raja of Nabha is de- 
scended from Tiloka, the eldest son of 
Phul ; whose great-grandson, Hamir 
Singh, founded the town of Nabha in 
1755 a.d. He joined the Sikh Chiefs 
in the great battle of Sirhind, when 
Zain Khan, the Muhammadan Viceroy, 
was slain, and established a mint at 
Nabha, as a mark of independence. 
In 1808-9 the State came under 
British control, in the time of Rajd 
Jaswant Singh; but his son, Raja 
Devendra Singh, neglected to furnish 
supplies to the British troops during 
the first Sikh war in 1845, and was 
consequently deposed, pensioned, and 
his son, Raja Bharpur Singh, installed 
in his place. During the Mutiny of 
1857 Raja Bharpur Singh rendered 
most valuable services, and was re- 
warded with a large increase of 
territories. He was succeeded by his 
brother, Raja Bhagwan Singh, who 
died without issue in 1871. By the 
sanad of May 5, 1860, it had been 
provided that if either of the three 
great Phulkian Princes (Patiala, Jind, 
Nabha) died without heirs, a successor 
to his Raj should be chosen by the 
other two Chiefs from among the 
descendants of Phul; consequently, 
on the death of Raja Bhagwan Singh 
in 1871, the present Raja, Hira Singh 
(then a jdgirddr of Jind, but a scion 
of the family of Tiloka), was selected 
and placed on the gadi. He has been 
created a Knight Grand Commander 
of the Most Exalted Order of the Star 
of India, and granted the privilege of 
adoption. On the occasion of the 



Proclamation of Har Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of Iudia in 1877, 
he was granted an addition to his 
titles, and an increase of his salute 
from 11 to 13 guns, as a personal 
distinction. The area of the State is 
928 square miles ; its population 
261,824, chiefly Hindus, but including 
77,682 Sikhs and 50, 178 Muhammadans. 
His Highness maintains a military 
force of 366 cavalry, 1253 infantry, 
and 18 guns, and is entitled to a 
salute of 15 guns (including 4 personal 
guns). Residence : Nabha, Punjab. 

NABHULAL NANHALAL, Rao Saheb. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on June 9, 1883. Residence : Ahmada- 
bad, Bombay. 

NABI BAKHSH KHAN walad SHER 
MUHAMMAD (of Nurpur), J^r. The 
title has been continued for life, the 
Mir being the representative of one of 
the Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the time 
of the annexation (see Khairpur). 
Residence : Hyderabad, Sind. 

NADADUR. See Nadathur. 

NADATHUR SALAGOPACHARIAR, 

Mahdmahopddhydya. The title was 
conferred for eminence in Oriental 
learning on May 21, 1898. Residence : 
Kumbhakonam, Madras. 

NADATHUR SRIMAT SUNDRA RAJA- 
GHARIAR, Mahdmahopddhydya. The 
title was conferred for eminence in 
Oriental learning, on June 22, 1897. 
Residence : Srirangam, Trichinopoly, 
Madras. 

NADATHUR SRIRANGACHARYA 

SWAMI, Mahdmahopddhydya. Re- 
ceived the title for eminence in oriental 
learning, on June 3, 1899. Residence : 
Madras. 

NADAUN, Rdjd of. See Narindar Chand. 

NADAUN, Mian of. See Ishri Singh; 
see also Pirthi Singh, and also Sher 
Singh. 

NADIR BAKHT, Mirza. The title is 
personal, being the courtesy title of a 
descendant of Prince Mirza Jahandar 
Shah, heir-apparent to Shah Alam, 
the last independent Mughal Emperor 
of Delhi. The Mirza is a brother of 
the Mirza Muzaffar Bakht (q.v.), and 
they are both first cousins of Mirza 
Muhammad Sayyid Bakht, under the 



212 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



heading of whose name will be found 
an account of the descent of this 
family, who have lived peacefully at 
Benares under the protection of the 
British Power since 1788. The Mirza 
is one of the sons of the late Mirza 
Zafar Bakht. Residence: Benares, 
North-Western Provinces. 

NADIYA, Mahdrdjd Bahadur of. See 
Khitish. 

NAGOD, Raja Jadubind Singh, Rdjd of. 
A ruling chief ; b. December 30, 1855. 
Succeeded to the gadi June 12, 1874. 
Belongs to a Pharihar Rajput family, 
which has, through many vicissitudes, 
ruled at Nagod for the last 900 years. 
The State was at one time feudatory 
to Panna; but in 1809 the Raja Lai 
Sheoraj Singh obtained a sanad direct 
from the British Government. He 
was succeeded in 1818 by his son, 
Raj& Balbhadra Singh, who was 
deposed in 1831, his son, Raghubind, 
succeeding as a minor. Raja Raghu- 
bind Singh rendered good service 
during the Mutiny of 1857, and was 
rewarded by the grant of exteuded 
territories, the right of adoption, and 
the honour of a salute. He died in 
1874, and was succeeded by his son, 
the present Raja. The State has an 
area of 450 square miles, and a 
population of 79,629, chiefly Hindus, 
but including 7965 belonging to ab- 
original tribes. The Raja maintains a 
military force of 6 cavalry, 116 infantry, 
and 4 guns, and is entitled to a salute 

• of 9 guns. The banner of the family 
is yellow, bearing a trisul or sacred 
trident on the field ; with a Hindi 
motto, meaning "Faithful in perilous 
times." Residence: Nagod, Baghel- 
khand, Central India. 

NAGOJI RAO, Kunathamakor, Rao 
Bahddur. See Kunathamakor. 

NAHAN, His Highness the Rdjd of. 
See Sirmur. 

NAHIL, Rao of. See Dal Singh. 

NAIGAON, Rdjd of. See Umrao Singh. 

NAIGAON RIBAI, Thakurain Larai 
Dulaya, Jdgirddrin of. A ruling 
chief; b. 1839. Succeeded to the 
gadi on the death of her late husband, 
Kunwar Jagat Singh, October 28, 1867. 
Belongs to a Dawa Ahir family. 
Lachman Singh, father of the late 
Thakur, was originally a Sardar of 



Jaitpur, but having possessed himself 
of the territory of Naigaon Ribai, he 
received a sanad from the British 
Government in 1807, confirming him 
in the possession. He died in 1808, 
and was succeeded by his son, the 
late Kunwar Jagat Singh. The area 
of the State is about 8 square miles ; 
its population 3365, chiefly Hindus. 
The Thakurain maintains a military 
force of 6 cavalry, 51 infantry, and 1 
gun. Residence : Naigaon Ribai, Bun- 
delkhand, Central India. 

NAIGAWAN. See Naigaon. 

NAJAF All KHAN walad ALI AKBAR 
KHAN, Mir. The title has been con- 
tinued for life, the Mir being the 
representative of one of the Mirs or 
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation (see Khairpur). Residence: 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

NAJAF KHAN, Muhammad, walad 
IMAM BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. See 
Muhammad. 

NAJM-UD-DIN HTJSAIN, Khdn Baha- 
dur; b. 1852. The title was conferred 
on October 8, 1875, as a personal dis- 
tinction, in recognition of his position 
as son-in-law of his late Highness 
Zahir-ud-daula, the second of the 
titular Princes of Arcot. Residence: 
Conjeveram, Madras. 

NAJM-UD-DIN HUSAIN, Sayyid, Khdn 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1890. 
Residence : Rai Bareli, Oudh. 

NAKI All, Muhammad Dilawar, Jah, 
Mirza Bahadur, Prince. See Mu- 
hammad. 

NAKI All KHAN, Majid-ud-dauld. 
The title is personal, being the courtesy 
title of a son of a grand-daughter of 
the late Muhammad Ali Shah, King 
of Oudh. Residence : Oudh. 

NALAGARH, Rdjd of. See Hindur. 

NALDANGA, Raja Pramada Bhusan 
Deb Rai, Rdjd of ; b. December 22, 
1858. Succeeded his father, Raja Indu 
Bhusan Deb Rai, ninth Raja of 
Naldanga, in 1871, as a minor. Belongs 
to a family claiming descent from 
Vishnu Das Hazra, who was settled 
in Jessore district, Bengal, in the 
beginning of the 16fch century. His 
son, Srimanta Rai, is said to have 
distinguished himself by slaying a 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



213 



rebel Pathan Chief, and to have 
obtained for this service from the 
Subahdar of Bengal a jdgir and the 
title of "Ranabir Khan." Three 
generations later Chandi Charan Deb 
Rai, who died in 1656 A.D., slew the 
Raja Kedareswar, and consequently 
obtained the title of Raja from the 
Emperor Shah Jahan. His successor, 
Indra Narayan, second Raja, built a 
great many Hindu temples, which are 
still in existence. The third Raja, 
Surya Narayan Deb Rai, died in 1698 
A.d. ; the fourth, Rain Deb Rai, in 
1746 A.D. ; and the fifth, Krishna Deb 
Rai, in 1788 a.d. The late Raja, Indu 
Bhusan Deb Rai, was born in 1836, 
and enjoyed the estate as ninth Raja 
from 1854 to 1871. The present Raja 
came of age in December 1879, and 
received the title, as a personal dis- 
tinction, on June 26, 1885. He has 
established scholarships for Sanskrit 
learning, and medals for female 
education, for which he has received 
the thanks of Government. He also 
founded and maintained a "Higher 
Class English School," and a Dispensary. 
Has been appointed Member of the 
District Board, Jessore ; and elected a 
Member of the British Indian Associa- 
tion. Has two sons — Pannaga Bhusan 
Deb Rai, born 1882; Mriganka Bhusan 
Deb Rai, born 1889. The family arms 
are — argent, a crescent moon proper, in 
chief a trident between two cross- 
swords proper. Residence : " Hazra 
Asrama," Naldanga, Jessore, Bengal. 

NALE, Lashkari Kanha Padvi, Chief 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1860. Succeeded 
to the gadi as a minor in 1872. The 
area of the State, which is one of the 
Mewas States of Khandesh, is 30 
square miles; its population about 
300, chiefly Bhils (aborigines), to 
which tribe also the Chief belongs. 
Residence : Nale, Khandesh, Bombay. 

NALINAKSHA BASU (BOSE), Rai 
Bahadur. The title was conferred on 
May 20, 1890, as a personal distinction, 
in recognition of eminent services as 
an Honorary Magistrate, and as 
Chairman of the Burdwan Munici- 
pality. Residence : Burdwan, Bengal. 

NAM NARAYAN SINGH (of Ramgarh), 
Rdjd. The title was conferred on 
May 24, 1889, as a personal distinction, 
in recognition of the Raja's position 



as the present representative of the 
Ramgarh Rajas. Residence: Ramgarh, 
Hazaribagh, Bengal. 

NANA BHAYA SAHEB {alias RAM 
KRISHNA ABAJI), Rao Bahadur. 
See Ram Krishna. 

NANA M0R0BA, Rao. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on No- 
vember 1, 1859. Residence : Ahmada- 
bad, Bombay. 

NANABHAI KAVASJI, Khan Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 20, 1890. Residence: Bombay. 

NANABHAI M0R0BA, Rao Saheb. 
Received the title on January 2, 1899. 
Residence: Bombay. 

NANAK BAKHSH, Lala, Rai Bahadur ; 
b. 1836; is Motamidof the Patiala 
State. Residence : Patiala, Punjab. 

NANAK BAKHSH, Shaikh, Khan Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on May 30, 1891. Residence : 
Lahore, Punjab. 

NANAK CHAND, Chaudhri, Rai Saheb. 
The title was conferred on May 25, 
1892, as a personal distinction. Resi- 
dence : Saharanpur, North-Western 
Provinces. 

NANAK CHAND, Lala, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on June 1, 1888. Residence: Raj- 
putana. 

NAND KISH0R, Lala, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 26, 1894. Residence: Sagar, 
Central Provinces. 

NAND LAL, Pandit, Rai Saheb. Re- 
ceived the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence : Baluchistan. 

NAND LAL KADL, Pandit, Rai Saheb. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 

1897. Residence: Kashmir. 

NAND RAM, Rai Saheb. Received the 
title on June 3, 1899. Residence: 
Punjab. 

NAND SINGH (of Khiva), Sarddr. See 
Kehar Singh. 

NANDA G0PAL BANERJI, Rai Baha- 
dur. Received the title on May 21, 

1898. Residence : Manbhum, Bengal. 

NANDGA0N, Raja Balram T>a.s i Mahant 
of. A ruling chief. Title of Raja 
Bahadur conferred, as a personal 
distinction, January 2, 1893; b. 1866, 



214 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Succeeded to the gadi as a minor 
November 4, 1883. Belongs to a 
Bairagi (Hindu of the Ascetic Mendi- 
cant caste, but of an order that is 
allowed by its rules to marry) family, 
and has received the title of Raja as 
a personal distinction. The feudal 
tenure of this State was originally 
conferred by the Mahratta Raja of 
Nagpur on his family priest, and the 
title of Mahant has been recognized 
by the British Government. The late 
Chief, Mahant Ghazi Das, was an 
able and energetic ruler, and was 
succeeded in 1883 by his son, the 
present Mahant. The area of the 
State is 155 square miles ; its popula- 
tion is 16,764, chiefly Hindus. Resi- 
dence: Nandgaon, Raipur, Central 
Provinces. 
NANDSHANKAR TUUASHANKAR, 
Rao Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1877, 
on the occasion of the Proclamation of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty as Empress 
of India. Residence: Surat, Bombay. 

NANGAON, Thakur, Zalim Singh, 
Thdkur of. A ruling chief; b. 1815. 
Succeeded to the gadi in 1833. Belongs 
to a Rajput (Hindu) family. Resi- 
dence : Nangaon, "Western Malwa, Cen- 
tral India. 

NANKE, Maung Kun Kye, Ngwegunhmu 
of. A ruling chief. The Ngwegunhmu 
is Chief of one of the Shan States of 
the Burma frontier, which has an 
area of about 80 square miles, and a 
population consisting chiefly of Shans. 
Residence: Nanke, Shan States, Burma. 

NANKOK, Kun Ion, Myoza of. A 
ruling chief. The Myoza is Chief of 
one of the Shan States, Burma, having 
an area of about 40 square miles, and 
a population consisting chiefly of Shans. 
Residence: Nankok, Shan States, 
Burma. 

NANKON, Maung Pyan, Ngwegunhmu 
of. A ruling chief . The Ngwegunhmu 
is the Chief of one of the Shan States, 
Burma, with an area of about 12 
square miles, and a population con- 
sisting chiefly of Shans. Residence: 
Nankon, Shan States, Burma. 

NANPABA, Rdjdof See Jang Bahadur, 

CLE. (of Nanpara), Rdjd. 
NANTOK, Maung Kun Pu, Ngwegunhmu 

of. A ruling chief . The Ngwegunhmu 



is Chief of one of the Shan States, 
Burma; which has an area of about 
30 square miles, and a population 
consisting chiefly of Shans. Residence : 
Nantok, Shan States, Burma. 

NANTJ AIYAR BALAKRISHNA, Rao 

Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1894. 
Residence : Pudukotta, Madras. 

NA0R0JI MANIKJI WADIA, CLE. 

Was created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, 
January 2, 1893. Residence : Bombay. 

NA0R0JI NASIRWANJI WADIA, 
CLE. Was created a Companion of 
the Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire, May 25, 1889. Has received 
from Her Majesty, through the Garter 
King of Arms, a grant of arms. Arms. — 
Azure, on a f esse or, in chief an anvil of 
the last encircled by two branches of the 
cotton-tree, slipped, and in base a ship 
under sail at sea, all proper; a rose, 
gules barbed and seeded between two 
bees volant of the third. Crest. — In 
front of a sun rising a cubit-arm erect, 
proper, vested above the elbow, argent, 
holding a double-headed hammer, also 
proper. Residence: Bombay. 

NA0R0JI PESTANJI, Vakil, Khan 
Bahadur, CL.E. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 2, 1888. 
The Khan Bahadur was created a 
Companion of the Most Eminent Order 
of the Indian Empire on January 1, 
1897. Residence: Ahmadabad, Bom- 
bay. 

NA0R0Z KHAN, Sardar, Sir (of 
Kharan), K.CI.E. Was created a 
Knight Commander of the Most Emin- 
ent Order of the Indian Empire, May 
24, 1888. Residence : Kharan. 

NARAIN. See Narayan. 

NARAJOL, Rdjd of See Narendra Lai 
Khan. 

NARAND SINGH (of Hardoi), Rdjd; h. 
December 7, 1858. The title is heredi- 
tary, and very ancient. The present 
Raja inherited it on May 1, 1890. 
Residence: Hardoi, Jalaun, North- 
western Provinces. 

NARASIM AIYANGAR, A., Rai Bahd- 
dur. The title was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, as a personal dis- 
tinction, on the occasion of the Jubilee 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



215 



of the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty. Belongs to a distinguished 
Brahman family, and is famous for 
the eminent services he has rendered 
to the cause of Indian education. 
Under the sanction and encouragement 
of His Highness the late Maharaja, 
and of Her Highness the Maharani 
Regent of Mysore, the Rai Bahadur 
has elaborated a plan for the higher 
education of the women of the upper 
classes of Mysore which has been 
remarkably successful, and in accord- 
ance with this plan Her Highness the 
Maharani's High Caste Girls' School 
of Mysore is effecting almost a revolu- 
tion in the standard of education 
among the ladies of that province. 
Residence: Mysore. 

NARAYAN BALI (of Rampur), Rai 
and Rai Bahadur. See Ranipur, Rai 
of- 

NARAYAN BALWANT BHISE, Rao 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on February 10, 1882. 
Residence: Bombay. 

NARAYAN BHAI DUNDEKAR, Rao 
Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on January 1, 1877, on 
the occasion of the Proclamation of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty as Empress 
of India. Residence : Berar. 

NARAYAN DAS, Munshi, Rai Baha- 
dur; b. August 22, 1836. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1886, 
as a personal distinction, for long 
and meritorious services rendered to 
Government, dating from 1855. Be- 
longs to an Agarwala family that 
originally came from Alwar in Raj- 
putana, and settled at Agra. The Rai 
Bahadur is Judge of the Small Cause 
Court of Lucknow. Residence : Luck- 
now, Oudh. 
NARAYAN DHANAJIRAO THORAT, 
JDinkar Rao. The title is hereditary. 
Belongs to a family claircing descent 
from Maha Saji Rao. His descendant, 
Krishna Rao, received -,he title of 
Dinkar Rao from the Baba Saheb, 
Maharaja of Satara. Th3 family cog- 
nizance or crest is a talvdr or Indian 
sword, point to the left, edge upward. 
The father of the presem Dinkar Rao 
was named Dhanaji Tlorat, Dinkar 
Rao. Retidence : Satara. Bombay. 

NARAYAN KRISHNA (oi Narayanrao 
Krishnarao), Rao Saheb. The title is 



personal and was conferred on May 24, 
1883. Residence : Poona, Bombay. 

NARAYAN MEGHAJI LOKHANDE, 

Rao Bahadur. The title was conferred, 
as a personal distinction, on January 1, 
1896. Residence: Bombay. 

NARAYAN PANDURANG BANAVAL- 
EAR, Rao Bahadur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on May 
10, 1884. Residence : Poona, Bombay. 

NARAYAN RAGHUNATH G0RAK- 
SHAEAR, Rao Saheb. Received the 
title on January 2, 1899. Residence : 
Bombay. 

NARAYAN RAJARAM MULE, Rao 
Saheb. The title was conferred on 
June 22, 1897. Residence: Barsi, 
Sholapur, Bombay. 

NARAYAN RAO, Rao Saheb. The title 
is hereditary, the Rao Saheb being 
descended from the old Mahratta 
rulers of Sagar. Ganpat Rao was the 
founder of this branch of the family. 
Residence : Sagar, Central Provinces. 

NARAYAN RAO, R., Rao Saheb. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty. Residence: Wardha, 
Central Provinces. 

NARAYAN RAO TJRF NANA SAHEB 
GHORPADE (of Datwad), Amir-ul- 
Umara Ghorpade Malanmat Madar, 
Sendpati. The title is hereditary, the 
Ghorpade being the descendant and 
representative of Maloji Rao Ghorpade, 
who obtained these titles, including 
that of " Senapati," or Commander-in- 
Chief, from the Maharaja of Kolhapur. 
At the time of the Mahratta war the 
Ghorpade aided the British against 
the Peshwa, and consequently his 
honours were declared hereditary by 
the British Government. Narayan 
Rao is the son of the late Amir-ul- 
Umara Ghorpade, Ram Chandra Rao. 
Residence : Belgaum, Bombay. 

NARAYAN (RAGHUNATH) SHASTRI 
GOKHLE, Mahdmahopddhydya. This 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty, for eminence in 
oriental languages. It entitles him to 
take rank in Darbar immediately after 
titular Rajas. Residence: Kolhapur, 
Bombay. 



216 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



NARAYAN SINGH, Kunwdr. The title 
is personal, being the courtesy title of 
a son of the late Maharaja Sher Singh. 
Residence: Lahore, Punjab. 

NARAYAN SINGH, Sarddr Bahadur. 
The Sarddr is Commandant of the Im- 
perial Service Infantry of the Kapur- 
thala State ; and received the title of 
Sardar Bahadur on June 22, 1897. 
Residence : Kapurthald, Punjab. 

NARAYAN SINGH (of Kang), Sarddr. 
The title is hereditary. The Sardar 
is descended from Sardar Gaur Singh, 
who, with his two brothers, the Sardars 
Dargaha Singh and Dharm Singh, took 
possession of Kang and the surround- 
ing territory on the decline of the 
Mughal Empire in the last century. 
Sardar Gaur Singh's son was Sarddr 
Hari Singh, whose grandson, Sarddr 
Bhup Singh, was the father of the 
present Sardar. Residence : Jalandhar, 
Punjab. 

NARAYAN SINGH, Mian, Rai Baha- 
dur. The Mian has rendered good 
service in the Police of the Punjab, 
and received the title of Rai Bahadur 
as a personal distinction on May 25, 
1892. Residence : Rohtak, Punjab. 

NARAYAN SINGH, Thakur, Rao Bahd- 
dur, Rdjd. See Thakur. 

NARAYAN SWAMI MUDALIYAR, 
Arcot, Rai Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1877. Resi- 
dence : Bangalore, Mysore. 

NARAYAN TRIMBAK WAIDYA, Rao 

Bahadur. Received the title of Rao 
Saheb on May 21, 1898, and that of 
Rao Bahadur on June 3, 1899. Resi- 
dence: Bombay. 

NARAYAN VASUDEO BARVE, Rao 

Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on February 24, 1885. 
Residence : Ratnagiri, Bombay. 

NARAYAN VISHNU BAPAT, Rao 

Bahadur. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on May 24, 1889. Resi- 
dence: Bombay. 

NARAYANA AIYAR, K. Rao Bahadur. 
See Kannanur. 

NARAYANAMTJRTHI PANTULU, B. 

Rao Bahadur. See Buddhavarapu. 

NARAYANASWAMI MUDALIYAR, 

Arcot, Rai Bahadur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on January 



1, 1877, on the occasion of the Pro- 
clamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India. The 
Rai Bahadur belongs to a family of 
Arcot, Madras. Residence : Bangalore, 
Mysore. 

NARAYANASWAMI PILLAI, Tiruva- 
lur (of Madras), Rao Saheb. The title 
is personal, and was conferred on 
May 25, 1892. Residence: Bangalore, 
Mysore. 

NARAYANRAO APPAJI VAD, Rao 

Bahadur. The title is personal and 
was conferred on June 29, 1886. 
Residence: Nasik, Bombay. 

NARAYANRAO BHIKAJI, Rao Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on February 16, 1887, on the 
occasion of the Jubilee of the reign of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty. Resi- 
dence : Jhabua, Central India. 

NARAYANRAO RAMNAVA UDEA- 
VAR, Rao Saheb. The title is per- 
sonal and was conferred on January 
1, 1894. Residence: North Kanara, 
Bombay. 

NARAYANRAO TRIMBAK, Rao Bahd- 
dur. The title is hereditary. Resi- 
dence: Nisik, Bombay. 

NARAYANRAOJI NISAL, Rao Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on October 19, 1885. Resi- 
dence : Ahmadnagar, Bombay. 

NARBHE1AM RAGHUNATH DAS, 

Rao Saheb. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on February 16, 1887, 
on the cccasion of the Jubilee of the 
reign of Her Most Gracious Majesty. 
Residence : Ahmadabad, Bombay. 

NARENDSA BAHADUR PAL (of 

Mahuli), Rdjd ; b. June 30, 1867. The 
title is ancient and hereditary, the 
Raja beiig the head of the important 
Surajbans family of Mahuli. Resi- 
dence: Mahuli, Basti, North-Western 
Provinces. 

NARENDRi. BAHADUR SINGH (of 

Haraha), ttdjd ; b. April 27, 1851. The 
title is hereditary. Belongs to a Suraj- 
bans family that came from Kumaun 
about 350 pears ago and settled first at 
Faizabad. Bisram Singh was the 
founder of the family ; eighth in 
descent fr&rn him was Raja Lachmi 
Narayan Singh of Haraha. Eight 
generations later was Rdjd Chattarpat 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



217 



Singh, who died in 1859, and was 
succeeded by his son, the present Rdjd. 
The Raja has a son and heir, named 
Rahuraj Singh, born 1877. Resi- 
dence : Ranikatra, Pargand Daryabad, 
Bard Banki, Oudh. 

NARENDRA KRISHNA (DEB), Sir, 
K.C.I.E., Maharaja Bahadur; b. 
October 10, 1822. Belongs to the Sobha 
Bazar family of Calcutta, whose 
ancestors are said to have enjoyed 
honours conferred by the Mughal 
Emperors and the Nawabs of Bengal, 
Behar, and Orissa. The founder of 
the family was the Maharaja Nava 
Krishna, who obtained a medal from 
Lord Clive, and the title of Maharaja 
Bahadur, for his services during the 
war with the Nawab Suraj-ud-daula 
and the establishment of the British 
Power in Bengal after the battle of 
Plassey. He was famous for his 
munificence. Amongst other works of 
benefit to the public he constructed a 
good road from Diamond Harbour to 
Kalpi, a distance of eight miles. 
Despairing of having any male issue, 
he adopted one of his nephews, the 
Raja Gopi Mohan Deb {see Rajendra 
Narayan Deb, Raja Bahadur), but 
subsequently a son was born to him, 
the Raja Raj Krishna Deb Bahadur 
(father of the present Maharaja), and 
he consequently divided his estates 
between his own son and his adopted 
son. Raja Raj Krishna Deb Bahadur 
died at the age of forty-two, leaving 
eight sons, of whom the Maharaja Sir 
Narendra is the only surviving one. 
Sir Narendra was educated at the 
Hindu College; served the Govern- 
ment as a Deputy Magistrate for about 
nine years, from 1844 to 1853, in which 
capacity he earned a solid reputation, 
and on his retirement began his public 
life as a Municipal Commissioner, a 
Justice of the Peace, and a leading 
Member of the British Indian Associa- 
tion — of which important body he has 
been thrice unanimously elected Presi- 
dent. During the Viceroyalty of Lord 
Northbrook he was formally gazetted 
a Raja, having long held that title by 
courtesy ; and he was also appointed a 
Member of the Imperial Legislative 
Council of India, in which he attained 
a distinguished position. On the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of 



India he was invited to attend the 
Imperial Assemblage at Delhi, and 
then was granted the title of Mahara ja 
as a personal distinction. Subse- 
quently he has been created a Knight 
Commander of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire, and has 
occupied a great many posts of dignity 
and public usefulness. He has a son 
and heir, Kumar Gopendra Krishna 
Bahadur, M.A., B.L., a Member of the 
Statutory Civil Service of Bengal, and 
Joint-Magistrate of Sealdah, and 
several other sons. Residence: Cal- 
cutta, Bengal. 

NARENDRA LAL KHAN (of Narajol), 
Raja. The title was conferred, as a 
personal distinction, on May 25, 1895. 
Residence : Midnapur, Bengal. 

NARHAT, Rao of. See Pahar Singh. 

NARINDAR CHAND (of Nadaun), Rdjd. 
The title is hereditary. The Raja 
succeeded his father, the late Raja 
Amar Chand of Nadaun, in 1890. The 
family is of Rajput (Katoch) origin. 
The grandfather of the Raja was Sir 
Jodhbir Singh, brother-in-law of the 
Mahdrdjd Ranjit Singh of Lahore. 
Residence : Nadaun, Kangra, Punjab. 

NARINDAR NATH, Diwdn. The title 
is hereditary. Residence: Lahore, 
Punjab. 

NARINDAR SINGH, Sarddr Bahadur. 
The title of Sardar is hereditary, and 
the personal title of Sarddr Bahadur 
was conferred on May 25, 1892. Resi- 
dence : Lahore, Punjab. 

NARINJAN NATH, Kunwdr. The title 
is hereditary. Residence: Lahore, 
Punjab. 

NAROTAM SINGH (of Eka), Rdjd; b. 
1835. The title is hereditary. Belongs 
to the illustrious Chauhan clan of 
Rajputs, being an offshoot of the 
Partapner House, and consequently 
a descendant of Prithvi Rdjd, last 
Chauhdn Emperor of Delhi and Ajmir. 
The father of the present Rdjd, Hira 
Singh, succeeded to the Rdj in 1862 
a.d. ; he died in 1876, and was succeeded 
by the present Rdjd. The latter has a 
son named Ldl Singh. Residence : Eka, 
Mainpuri, North-Western Provinces. 

NARPAT SINGH (of Asothar), Rdjd; 
b. June 10, 1869. The title ishereditary, 



218 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



the Ra ja of Asothar being a descendant 
of Deogaj Singh, who came from 
Khichhidara or Raghugarh in Central 
India in 1543, and married the daughter 
of the Raja of Aijhi, to whose posses- 
sions he succeeded. The late Raja 
Lachhman Prasad Singh was an 
Honorary Magistrate ; on his death in 
1891 he was succeeded by Raja Narpat 
Singh. Residence: Asothar, Fatehpur, 
North-Western Provinces. 

NARSILAL REVADAS, Rao Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on January 1,1891. Residence: Ahmad- 
abad, Bombay. 

NARSINGH DAS LALA, Rai Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 25, 1895. Residence : Jammu. 

NARSINGH DATT, Rai Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
May 26, 1894. Residence: Howrah, 
Bengal. 

NARSINGHGARH, His Highness Raja 
Mahtab Singh, Rdjd of A ruling 
chief ; b. 1839. Succeeded to the gadi 
June 28, 1890. Belongs to an Umat 
Rajput (Hindu) family, descended 
from Ajab Singh, who was Minister 
to the Rawat of Rajgarh. His son, 
Parasa Ram, succeeded him as Minister 
in 1660 A.D., and ultimately compelled 
the Rawat, in 1681, to share his 
dominions with him — thereby founding 
the State of Narsinghgarh, which is 
at present tributary to Indore. Raja 
Partab Singh, father of the present 
Raja, succeeded in 1875, his father in 
1872 having received from the British 
Government that hereditary title. 
The family banner is white with a 
scarlet bordure, bearing in the centre 
the effigy of Hanuman, the monkey- 
god. The area of the State is 623 
square miles; its population 112,427, 
chiefly Hindus, but including about 
5000 Muhammadans, and 6000 belong- 
ing to aboriginal tribes. His Highness 
maintains a military force of 318 
cavalry, 450 infantry, and 16 guns, and 
is entitled to a salute of 11 guns. 
Residence : Narsinghgarh, Bhopal, 
Central India. 

NARSINGHPUR, Raja Sadhn Charan 
Man Singh Hari Chandan, Raja of. 
A ruling chief ; b. 1883. Succeeded to 
the gadi as a minor December 4, 1884. 
Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family, 



of whom there have been twenty-three 
generations of Rajas in Narsinghpur 
since the time when its founder, 
Dharma Raja, ousted the aboriginal 
headmen and assumed the govern- 
ment. For the last nine generations 
son has succeeded father, each bearing 
the styles and titles of "Man Singh 
Hari Chandan Mahapatra," in addition 
to the hereditary title of Raja, which 
was formally confirmed by the British 
Government in 1874. The family 
cognizance is a scorpion. The area of 
the State, which is one of the Orissa 
Tributary Mahals, is 199 square miles ; 
its population is 32,583, chiefly Hindus. 
The Raja maintains a military force 
of 184 infantry. Residence : Kila 
Narsinghpur, Orissa, Bengal. 

NARSIRAM VAJERAM, Rao Bahadur. 
The title is personal, and was conferred 
on June 1, 1888. Residence: Kaira, 
Bombay. 

NARSU RAM CHANDRA G0DE0LE, 

Rao Saheb; b. May 16, 1842. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
August 11, 1881. The Rao Saheb 
was educated at Satara, and at the 
Science College, Poona ; and thence 
was appointed to the Public Works 
Department of Bombay in 1861. From 
1857 to 1887 he was Secretary and 
Engineer to the Poona City Municipal 
Corporation ; and from 1887 to 1889 
Executive Officer to the Poona Canton- 
ment Fund. He is now Member of the 
Poona Municipal Corporation, and an 
Honorary Magistrate, as well as 
member of many local Committees. 
He has two sons — Ananta, born 1864 ; 
and Krishna, born 1874. Residence: 
Poona, Bombay. 

NARUK0T, Dipsingh Jagatsingh, Chief 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1841. Belongs 
to a Koli (aboriginal) family. The 
area of the State is 143 square miles ; 
its population is 6440, chiefly Hindus. 
It is tributary to Baroda. Residence : 
Jhotwar, Gujarat, Bombay. 

NARWAR, Rao Raghunath Singh, Rao 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1863. Succeeded 
to the gadi June 12, 1882. Belongs to 
a Jhala Rajput (Hindu) family. The 
population of this State is about 2000, 
chiefly Hindus. Residence : Narwar, 
Western Malw&, Central India. 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



219 



NASARVANJI HORMASJI CHOKSY, 

Khan Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence: Bombay. 

NASARVANJI KHARSEDJI, Khan Ba- 
hadur. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India. Residence: Ahmadnagar, Bom- 
bay. 

NASARVANJI SHERIADJI GINVALA, 
Khan Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1894. 
Residence : Broach, Bombay. 

NASHIPUR, Rdjd Bahadur of. See 
Ranajit Sinha. 

NASIR ALI, Mir, Khan Bahadur. See 
Mir Nasir AH. 

NASIR All KHAN, Mir, Khan Baha- 
dur; b. 1848. Received the title on 
June 22, 1897. Residence : Delhi. 

NASIR-UD-DIN AHMAD, Maulavi 
Sayyid, Khan Bahadur. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on January 
1, 1895. Residence : Bihar, Bengal. 

NASIR-UD-DIN KHAN, Khan Saheb. 
Received the title on June 3, 1899. 
Residence: Medical Department, India. 

NASIR-UD-DIN MIRZA, Nawdb Baha- 
dur. The title is personal, being the 
courtesy title of a great-grandson of 
his late Majesty Muhammad Ali 
Shah, King of Oudh. He is a son of 
Sulaiman Mirza, grandson of that 
monarch. Residence: Oudh. 

NASRAT All, Chaudhri, Khan Baha- 
dur; b. August 18, 1849. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on Janu- 
ary 2, 1888. Belongs to a family 
claiming descent from the first Khalif . 
His ancestors held high offices under 
the former Governments of Oudh. He 
is a nephew of Muhammad Azim (q.v.), 
hereditary Chaudhri of Kakrali in 
Hardoi district, Oudh. Chaudhri 
Nasrat Ali, Khan Bahadur, rendered 
valuable service to Government in 
connection with the preparation of the 
Oudh Rent Act. He is an Honorary 
Magistrate, and Assistant Secretary of 
the British Indian Association. Resi- 
dence : Lucknow, Oudh. 

NASRAT ALI KHAN walad IMAM 
BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. The title has 
been continued for life, the Mir being 



the representative of one of the Mirs 
or Chiefs of Sind at the time of the 
annexation (see Khairpur). Residence : 
Shikarpur, Sind. 

NASWADI, Thakur Mansinghji, Thakur 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1880. Belongs 
to a Rajput (Hindu) family. The 
State, which is tributary to Baroda, 
has an area of about 8 square miles. 
The Thakur is still a minor. Resi- 
dence : Naswadi, Rewa Kantha, Bom- 
bay. 

NATHAN SINGH, Chaudhri, Rai Saheb. 
The title of Rai Saheb was conferred 
on the Chaudhri as a personal distinc- 
tion on January 1, 1892. Residence: 
Sonepat, Punjab. 

NATHI MAL. See Nathu Mall. 

NATHU BAPUJI, Rao Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 
August 13, 1881. Residence : Ahmad- 
nagar, Bombay. 

NATHU MALL, Lala, Rai Bahddur. 
The title was conferred on January 
1, 1896. Residence: Khurja, North- 
Western Provinces. 

NATHU RAM, Lala, Rai Saheb. Received 
the title on January 2, 1899. Resi- 
dence : North-Western Provinces. 

NATHU RAM, Seth, Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on May 25, 1895. 
Residence : Harda, Central Provinces. 

NATHU SINGH, Sarddr Bahddur. The 
Sardar is Commandant of the Imperial 
Service Infantry of the Alwar State, 
and received the title of Sardar Bahd- 
dur on June 22, 1897. Residence: 
Alwar, Rajput&na. 

NATOR, Kumar of. See Jogindra Nath 
Rai. 

NAULANA, Thakur Pirtbi Singh, Thd- 
kur of. A ruling chief ; b. 1877. Suc- 
ceeded to the yadi as a minor in 1884. 
Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family. 
The population of the State is about 
407, chiefly Hindus. Residence : Nau- 
lana, Western Malwa, Central India. 

NAURANG KHAN, Khan Bahddur. The 
title was conferred on March 11, 1859, 
as a personal distinction, for very 
distinguished services during the 
Multan rebellion and the Mutiny of 
1857. Belongs to the Gandapur 
(Afghan) family of Kulachi in the 
Dera Ismail Khan district of the 



220 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Punjab. He raised 50 horse and 100 
foot for service in the Multan campaign, 
and was desperately wounded at that 
time. At the close of the campaign 
he joined the Police, retiring on a 
pension after three years, but con- 
tinued to volunteer for service on the 
frontier, and his son, Muhammad 
Zaman Khan, was killed in this service. 
When the Mutiny broke out in 1857 
he raised 600 men, and leaving 200 
foot with the Deputy Commissioner 
of Dera Ismail Khan, he joined Sir 
Herbert Edwardes with the residue at 
Peshawar, and marched at the head of 
these followers into Hindustan. He 
was engaged in the actions against the 
rebels at Jhelum, Delhi, Najafgarh, 
and elsewhere, and on one occasion 
saved Lieutenant Lind's life by killing 
a Sepoy who was about to bayonet that 
officer when dismounted. For these 
services he received a jdgir in per- 
petuity, and the title of Khan Baha- 
dur. His son, Muhammad Zaman 
Khan, mentioned above, left a son 
named Bakhtiyar Khan. Another son, 
Mehardil Khan, has three sons — Faiz 
Muhammad Khan, born 1862 ; Sayyid 
Muhammad Khan, born 1864; 
Abdulla Khan, born 1866. A third 
son, Sarfaraz Khan, Risaldar, has two 
sons — Gulzar Khan and Kunidad 
Khan. A fourth son, Sikandar Khan, 
has a son named Samandar Khan. 
Residence : Kulachi, Dera Ismail Khan, 
Punjab. 

NATJR0Z. See Naoroz. 

NAVA G0PAL SARKAR, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred as a personal 
distinction on January 1, 1894. Resi- 
dence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

NAVA KISH0R SEN, Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred as a personal dis- 
tinction, on June 22, 1897. Residence : 
Surma Valley, Assam. 

NAVA KRISHNA RAI, Rai Saheb. The 
title was conferred on January 1, 1896, 
as a personal distinction. Residence : 
Bengal. 

NAVALPUR, Phulsingh Lashkari Padvi, 
Chief of. A ruling chief; b. 1867. 
Succeeded to the gadi in 1876 as a 
minor. The State, which is one of the 
Mewas States of Khandesh, has an 
area of 20 square miles, and a popula- 
tion of 180, chiefly Bhils (aborigines) ; 



to which tribe also the Chief belongs. 
Residence : Navalpur, Khandesh, Bom- 
bay. 

NAVIN. &*Nobin. 

NAVROJI BEHRAMJI SANTUK, Khdn 
Saheb. Received the title on January 
2, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

NAWAB An SHAH, Khdn Saheb. The 
title was conferred on June 22, 1897. 
Residence: Nimar, Central Provinces. 

NAWAB-I-AMB, Shaikh Baha-ud-din, 
CLE. See Baha-ud-din. 

NAWAB JAN, Maulavi, Khdn Saheb. 
The title was conferred on July 6, 
1887, as a personal distinction, for 
valuable services rendered to Govern- 
ment in the Foreign Department. 
Residence : Calcutta, Bengal. 

NAWAB MIRZA, Bahadur. The title 
is personal, being the courtesy title of 
a grandson of his late Majesty Mu- 
hammad Ali Shah, third King of 
Oudh. Is the son of Mirza Humayun 
Bakht, who was a son of that monarch. 
Residence- Oudh. 

NAWANAGAR, His Highness Jam Shri 
Sir Vibhaji Ranmalji, K.C.S.I., Jam 
Saheb of. A ruling chief; b. May 8, 
1827. Succeeded to the gadi February 
22, 1852. Belongs to the illustrious Ja- 
reja Rajput family that has given ruling 
families to Kutch, Dhrol, Rajkot, and 
other States of Western India. Jam 
Rawal, said to have been the elder 
brother of the then Jam of Kutch, 
emigrated from Kutch and established 
himself at Nawanagar in 1535. In 
1788 the great fort of Nawanagar was 
constructed under the orders of one of 
Jam Rawal's descendants, the Jam 
Jasaji. The latter died in 1814 with- 
out male heirs ; and his widow, the 
Rani Achuba, adopted Ranmalji, who 
became the Jam Ranmalji, and was 
the father of the present Jam. The 
Jam Ranmalji was a popular ruler, 
and distinguished himself by the 
ability with which he saved his people 
from the horrors of the famines of 1834, 
1839, and 1846. He was also a famous 
sportsman and lion-killer. The pre- 
sent Jam is equally distinguished as a 
sportsman, but he has also earned a 
great reputation as an administrator, 
especially in the departments of educa- 
tion and public works. He has also 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



221 



greatly improved the system of 
revenue-collection, and the administra- 
tion of justice within his State. On the 
ocoasion of the visit to India of His 
Royal Highness the Duke of Edin- 
burgh, the Jam went to Bombay to 
take part in his reception. Similarly, 
in 1875, His Highness had the honour 
of being one of those Princes of 
Western India who first received His 
Royal Highness the Prince of "Wales 
on the occasion of his memorable visit 
to India in the winter of 1875-76. In 
1877 the Jam was an invited and 
honoured guest at the Imperial assem- 
blage at Delhi, on the occasion of the 
Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India ; and he 
then had the honour of receiving an 
addition of four guns to his salute, as 
a personal distinction. On January 1, 
1878, he was created a Knight Com- 
mander of the Most Exalted Order of 
the Star of India. He has a son and 
heir, born about the year 1884. The 
State has an area of 3791 square miles, 
and a population of 316,147, chiefly 
Hindus, but including about 50,000 
Muhammadans. His Highness main- 
tains a military force of 191 cavalry, 
3060 infantry, and 117 guns, and is 
entitled to a salute of 15 guns, including 
a personal salute of 4 guns. Residence : 
Nawanagar, Kathiawar, Bombay. 

NAWAZISHALI KHAN, Sir, K.C.I.E. 
(of Nawabganj), Aliabad, Nawab ; b. 
1828. The title was conferred on May 
21, 1866, as a personal distinction, in 
recognition of his position, and of the 
great public services of his distinguished 
father, the Nawab Ali Raza Khan 
Bahadur, and of himself. Belongs to 
a Quazilbash or Kazilbash family of 
high rank in Afghanistan ; descended 
from Sardar Ali Khan, who came from 
the province of Sherwan on the west 
coast of the Caspian Sea, with Nadir 
Shah, when the latter invaded India. 
On his return Sardar Ali Khan was 
appointed Governor of Kandahar. He 
obtained the district of Hazara, north 
of Kandahar, on the accession of 
Ahmad Shah Durani, whom he accom- 
panied in his last invasion of India, 
and by whose instigation he was 
assassinated. His son, Hidayat Khan, 
accompanied Shah Zaman to Lahore 
in 1797. When the British army 
brought back Shah Shuja to Kabul in 



1839, Hidayat Khan's son, Ali Raza 
Khan, who was living on his estate, 
was appointed Chief Agent of the 
Commissariat Department. During 
the disasters that followed he remained 
faithful to British interests ; and it 
was mainly by his aid that the British 
prisoners were ultimately enabled to 
make their escape and join the relieving 
army of General Pollock. He accom- 
panied the British forces to India on 
the evacution of Afghanistan; and 
his estate was confiscated by Mu- 
hammad Akbar Khan, in consequence 
of which he received a British pension. 
During the Sutlej campaign he joined 
the British camp with his brothers and 
60 horsemen of his tribe ; and during 
the rebellion of 1848-49 furnished 100 
horsemen for active service. In 1857 
Ali Raza Khan voluntarily raised a 
troop of horse and sent it to Delhi at 
his own expense, mortgaging for the 
purpose his house and property at 
Lahore; this troop formed part of 
Hodson's Horse, and served with 
conspicuous gallantry throughout the 
Mutiny campaigns. Lieutenant- 
Colonel H. D. Daly, when commandant 
of Hodson's Horse, wrote of him in 
February 1859 : " He has served 
throughout the war, and on all occa- 
sions has been conspicuous for chivalric 
valour. . . . His gallantry has won for 
him the First Class of the Order of 
Merit. ... A braver soldier never 
took the field." As a reward he 
received a large grant of lands in 
Oudh, with the title of Nawab 
conferred in 1864; and this, on his 
death in 1866, was continued to his 
son, the Nawab Nawazish Ali Khan. 
The family have also received a grant 
of lands in Lahore district in the Pun- 
jab. The Nawab was made an 
Honorary Assistant Commissioner of 
the Punjab on January 1, 1877, on the 
occasion of the Proclamation of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of 
India, and he was for some time a 
Member of the Imperial Legislative 
Council of India. On June 1, 1888, he 
was created a Knight Commander of 
the Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire. He has taken a prominent 
part in the foundation of the Punjab 
University, and in all important works 
of public utility or benevolence in that 
Province. Residences: Bahraich, Oudh; 
and Lahore, Punjab. 



222 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



NAYAGARH, Raja Raghunath Singh 
Mandhata, Rdjd of. A ruling chief. 
Succeeded to the gadi March 2, 
1890. Belongs to the Rajput (Hindu) 
family, of whom there have been 
twenty-two generations of Rajas in 
Nayagarh since the time when its 
founder, Surjya Mani Singh, a scion of 
the family of the Rajas of Rewah, 
established himself there. The family 
obtained at various times from the 
Rajas of Puri the titles of " Champati 
Singh Mangraj" and "Mandhata." 
The late Raja, Ladhu Kishor Singh 
Mandhata, was born about 1843, and 
succeeded to the gadi September 20, 
1851. The family cognizance or crest 
is a tiger's head. The area of the State, 
which is one of the Orissa Tributary 
Mahals, is 588 square miles ; its popu- 
lation is 114,622, chiefly Hindus. The 
Raja maintains a military force of 
741 men and 9 guns. Residence: Kila 
Nayagarh, Orissa, Bengal. 

NAZAR MUHAMMAD KHAN, Mau- 
lavi, Khan Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1898. Is 
Deputy-Collector of Banda. Resi- 
dence: Banda, North- Western Pro- 
vinces. 

NAZIM NATJ NAHAL SINGH, Rat Ba- 
hadur. Received the title on January 

1. 1898. Residence : Ajaigarh, Central 
India. 

NAZIR AHMAD, Maulavi Shaikh, 
Shams-ul-Ulama. Received the title 
on June 22, 1897. Residence: Delhi, 
Punjab. 

NAZIR All, Khan Bahadur; b. 1842. 
The title was conferred on October 8, 
1875, as a personal distinction, in 
recognition of his position as son-in- 
law of his late Highness Zahir-ud- 
daula, the second of the titular Princes 
of Arcot. Residence \ Madras. 

NAZIR HUSAIN, Maulavi, Sayyid, 
Shams-ul-Ulama. Received the title 
on June 22, 1897. Residence: Delhi. 

NAZIR HUSAIN KHAN, Hakim, Khan 
Bahddur. Received the title on June 

3. 1899. Residence : Lucknow, Oudh. 

NE DUN, Maung, Kyet thaye zaung 
shwe Salwe ya Min. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred on January 
1, 1889. It is indicated by the letters 
K.S.M after the name, and means 



"Recipient of the Gold Chain of 
Honour." Residence : Prome, Burma. 

NEPAL, His Highness Maharaj-Ad- 
hiraj Prithvi Bir Bikram Jang Baha- 
dur Sah Saheb Bahadur Shamsher 
Jang, Maharaja of. A ruling chief ; 
b. 1875. Succeeded to the gadi as a 
minor May 17, 1881. The ruling race 
of Nepal is the Gurkha, which also 
furnishes some of the best officers of 
the Indian army. The family of the 
Maharaja is said to be of Sisodiya 
Rajput descent, claiming descent from 
the Raja Prithvi Narayan, who died 
in the year 1771 a.d., about three years 
after the complete conquest of Nepal 
by his Gurkha troops. One of his 
descendants, in the time of Warren 
Hastings, about the year 1790, invaded 
Tibet on two occasions, and brought 
back great booty, but the Emperor of 
China, as Suzerain of Tibet, sent a 
large army into Nepal in 1792, that 
advanced within 26 miles of the 
capital, Khatmandu, and forced the 
Nepalese to conclude a treaty of sub- 
mission. Subsequently, between the 
years 1803 and 1815, the Gurkhas of 
Nepal, notwithstanding great internal 
dissensions, overran the Cis-Sutlej 
territory of the Punjab and the Simla 
Hill States, but in 1814 the British 
intervened, expelled the Gurkhas from 
the Punjab territories in 1815, and in 
1816 a treaty was signed, which trans- 
ferred the control both of those terri- 
tories and of Kumaun, the Dehra Dun, 
and the other outlying districts, to 
the British Power. The late Prime 
Minister of Nepal, Sir Jang Bahadur, 
G.C.B., G.C.S.I., was well known in 
England, and was the virtual ruler of 
Nepal from 1846 to the time of his 
death in 1877. He rendered good 
services in the Mutiny of 1857 by send- 
ing Gurkha troops, who gave material 
help in the reduction of the rebellious 
province of Oudh. The State has an 
area of 54,000 square miles, consisting 
of sub-Himalayan valleys and moun- 
tain-ranges. Its population is estimated 
at 2,000,000 and upwards. The Maha- 
raja maintains a military force of 
54 cavalry, 48,200 infantry, and 920 
guns ; and is entitled to a salute of 21 
guns. Residence : Khatmandu, Nepal. 

NI, Maung, Ahmudan gaung Tazeik ya 
Min. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on January 1, 1890. It is 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



223 



indicated by the letters A.T.M. after 
the name, and means "Recipient of 
the Medal for Good Service." Resi- 
dence: Mandalay, Burma. 

NIAMAT KHAN. See Ghulam Muham- 
mad. 

NIAMAT-ULLA KHAN (of Renin), Raja. 
The title was conferred on August 1, 
1879, as a personal distinction. Belongs 
to a Rajput family, who for many 
generations were Rajas of Rajauri, in 
the territory now called Jammu, and 
belonging to His Highness the Maha- 
raja of Jammu and Kashmir. The 
late Raja, Hamid-ulla Kh&n, was 
driven out of the Raj of Rajauri by 
the late Chief of Jammu ; and he sub- 
sequently settled at Rehlu in the 
Kangra district, receiving an annual 
allowance from the Jammu Govern- 
ment in compensation for the loss of 
his estate. Though no longer Raja of 
Rajauri, the personal title of Raja was 
conferred upon him by the British 
Government for his services during 
the time of the Mutiny in 1857, and 
he was appointed an Honorary Assist- 
ant Commissioner of the Punjab. He 
was succeeded by his eldest son, the 
present Raja. Residence : Rehlu, Kan- 
gra, Punjab. 

NIEPHRODSYNE (of Manikchari), 
Mong Raja. The title is hereditary. 
The present Mong Raj 4 has recently 
succeeded to the gadi. His predecessor 
was the Mong Raja Narabadi,who was 
born about the year 1848, and suc- 
ceeded his father, the Mong Raja 
Keojosine, in 1869. The family are 
the hereditary Chief of the Palangtha 
clan of Hill Burmese, sometimes called 
Maghs (Mugs) or Arakanese — who 
occupy the northern portion of the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts. The founder 
of the family was named Khedu, and 
he was originally the Babaing or 
Sardar of a number of villages. His 
descendant was Konjai, the grand- 
father of the late Mong Raja Nara- 
badi. The latter did good service to 
the Government in the first Lushai 
war, by supplying coolies, boats, etc., 
and tbe hereditary title of Mong Raja 
has been confirmed to the family. 
Residence: Manikchari, Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, Bengal. 
NIHAL CHAND, Rai Bahadur. The 
title is personal, and was conferred 
on May 25, 1892. Residence : 



NIHAL CHAND, Lala, Rai Bahadur; b. 
1846. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on May 25, 1895. Residence : 
Muzaffarnagar, North-Western Pro- 
vinces. 

NIHAL SINGH, Sardar Bahadur, General. 
Is Adjutant-General of the forces of 
H.H. the Maharaja of Jammu and 
Kashmir. Received the title on June 
22, 1897. Residence : Srinagar, Kashmir. 

NIHAL SINGH (of Hirapur), Thdkur. 
The title is hereditary. Residence: 
Hirapur, Narsinghpur, Central Pro- 
vinces. 

NIHAL SINGH (of Shahkot), Sardar. 
The title is hereditary. The Sardar is 
the younger brother of the late Sardar 
Bakhsh Singh, father of Sardar Amar 
Singh of Shahkot, under whose name 
has been given some account of this 
family. Their ancestor, Sardar Sujan 
Singh, son of Amrika, took possession 
of Shahkot and the neighbouring ter- 
ritory in 1759 a.d., on the decline of 
the Mughal Power. The family sub- 
sequently came under the power of 
the Maharaja Ranjit Singh of Lahore. 
The Sardar is the son of the late 
Sardar Kharak Singh, who was one of 
the grandsons of Sardar Sujan Singh. 
He has a son and heir, named Sundar 
Singh. Residence: Shahkot, Jalandhar, 
Punjab. 

NIHAL SINGH, Bhai, Sardar Bahadur. 
The title was conferred as a personal 
distinction on May 25, 1895. Resi- 
dence: Ambala, Punjab. 

NIJABAT HUSAIN, Maulavi Sayyid, 
Khan Saheb. Received the title on 
May 21, 1898. Residence: Deogarh, 
Bengal. 

NILGIRI, Raja Krishna Chandra Mar- 
draj Hari Chandan, Rdjd of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1827. Succeeded to 
the gadi as a minor November 22, 
1832. Belongs to a Kshatriya (Hindu) 
family, claiming descent from Narayan 
Singh Bhujang Mandhata Birat Basant 
Hari Chandan, a scion of the reigning 
House of Chota Nagpur, who married 
a daughter of Raja Pratap Rudra Deb, 
Raja of Orissa, about the commence- 
ment of the fifteenth century, and 
founded the Nilgiri Raj. From him 
the present Raja is twenty-fifth in 
descent ; nearly every successive Raja 
bearing the style and titles of Mardraj 



224 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



Hari Chandan, as well as that of Raja, 
which was formally recognized by the 
British Government in 1874. The 
family cognizance is a karaila flower. 
The area of the State, which is one of 
the Orissa Tributary Mahals, is 278 
square miles ; its population is 50,972, 
chiefly Hindus, but including 6366 
members of various aboriginal tribes, 
mostly Bhumij. The Raja maintains 
a military force of 177 infantry. Resi- 
dence : Nilgiri, Orissa, Bengal. 

NILKANTH GOVIND GOKHALE, Rao 

Saheb. The title is personal, and was 
conferred on February 16, 1887, on the 
occasion of the Jubilee of the reign of 
Her Most Gracious Majesty. Resi- 
dence : Miraj, Bombay. 

NILKANTH JANARDAN KIRTANE, 

Rao Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on October 31, 1879. 
Residence : Dewas, Central India. 

NILMANI MUKERJI, Mahdmahopdd- 
hydya. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1898, for eminence in 
Oriental learning. Is Principal of 
Sanskrit College. Residence : Sanskrit 
College, Calcutta. 

NILMANI SINGH DEO (of Pachete), 
Rdjd; b. about 1807. The title is 
personal, and was conferred on Novem- 
ber 22, 1861. The Rajas of Pachete 
in Manbhum, Chota Nagpur, Bengal, 
belong to a family descended from a 
Rajput foundling, who is said to have 
been suckled by a cow on the Kapila 
Hill near Jhalda, on the western 
boundary of the district of Manbhum. 
The present Raja is fifty-ninth in 
descent, and succeeded to the estate 
on the death of his father, the late 
Raja Garur Narayan Singh. He has 
several sons, of whom the eldest and 
heir-apparent is the Kumar Hari 
Narayan Singh, born about 1849. 
Residence : Manbhum, Bengal. 

NIMKHERA, Bhumia Dariyao Singh, 
Bhumia of. A ruling chief; b. 1861. 
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor in 
1864. Belongs to a Bhilala family. 
The population of the State is about 
4600, chiefly Hindus. The Bhumia 
maintains a military force of 2 cavalry 
and 28 infantry. The State is tribu- 
tary to Dhar; and the Bhumia is 
responsible for the police of the road 
between Dhar and Sultanpur. Resi- 
dence : Tirla, Bhopawar, Central India. 



NIRBHE SINGH MANDLOI (of Shoh- 

pur), Rao Saheb. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1892. Residence : 
Hoshangabad, Central Provinces. 

NIRPAT SINGH DANGE (of Rehli), 
Rai Saheb. The title was conferred on 
May 20, 1896. Residence: Sagar, 
Central Provinces. 

NISAR HUSAIN, Sayyid, Khdn Saheb. 
Received the title on January 2, 1899. 
Residence: Bombay. 

NITAI CHAND CHATTARJI, Rai Baha- 
dur. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1894. Residence : Calcutta, 
Bengal. 

NTZAM-UD-DIN. See Muhammad Nizam- 
ud-din. 

NIZAM-UD-DIN AHMAD, Khdn Baha- 
dur, Munfiz Jang. The title is per- 
sonal, and was conferred by the Nawab 
of the Carnatic, and recognized on 
December 16, 1890. The Khan Baha- 
dur was one of the Chief Officers of 
the last Nawab of the Carnatic. Resi- 
dence: Madras. 

N0BIN CHANDRA CHAKRAVARTTI, 

Rai Bahadur. Received the title on 
January 1, 1898. Is Assistant-Surgeon 
and Lecturer in the Medical College 
of Agra. Residence : Agra, North- 
western Provinces. 

N0B0. See Nava. 

N0B0 S0PH0H, U. Kson, Seim of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1847. Succeeded to 
the gadi July 30, 1870. The population 
of the State, which is one of the Khasi 
and Jaintia Hill States, is about 840, 
consisting of Khasis and Christian 
converts. Residence: Nobo Sophoh, 
Khasi Hills, Assam. 

N0NGKHLA0, Kine Singh, Seim of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1843. Succeeded to 
the gadi March 16, 1876. Belongs to 
a Khasi (Christian) family. The popu- 
lation of the State, which is one of 
the Khasi and Jaintia Hill States, is 
about 7368, consisting chiefly of Khasis 
and Christians. Residence: Nongkhlao, 
Khasi Hills, Assam. 

NONGSPUNG, U. Parba, Seim of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1860. Succeeded to 
the gadi November 11, 1885. Belongs 
to a Khasi (Christian) family. The 
population of the State, which is one 
of the Khasi and Jaintia Hill States, 
is about 1506, consisting of Khasis 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



225 



and Christians. Residence: Nongs- 
pung, Khasi Hills, Assam. 

NONGSTOIN, M. Singh, Scim of. A 
ruling chief; b. 1844. Succeeded to 
the gadi May 15, 1860. Belongs to a 
Khasi family. The population of the 
State, which is one of the Khasi and 
Jaintia Hill States, is 8472, consisting 
of Khasis and Christians. Residence : 
Nongstoin, Khasi Hills, Assam. 

NONITRAM, Lala, Red Saheb. The title 
was conferred on June 22, 1897. Resi- 
dence: Punjab. 

NRITYA GOPAL BOSE, Rax Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on June 22, 
1897. Residence: Calcutta. 

NUR MUHAMMAD KHAN, Mir, walad 
MUHAMMAD HUSAIN All KHAN, 

His Highness. The title is personal, and 
was conferred on December 24, 1878, 
in recognition of His Highness's posi- 
tion as the representative of one of the 
ruling Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the 
time of the annexation (see Khairpur). 
Residence : Hyderabad, Sind. 

NURPUR, Rdjd of. See Jaswant Singh. 

NURPUR CHITPALGARH, Rdjd of. See 
Chitpal Singh. 

NUSRAT All, Chaudhri, Khan Bahadur. 
See Nasrat. 

NUSSERWANJEE. See Nasarvanji. 

NYAUNGYWE, Saw On, K.S.M.,Sawbwa 
of. A ruling chief. The Sawbwa is 
the Chief of one of the Shan States, 
Burma, and has received the honour 
of K.S.M. (Kyet thaye zaung shwe 
Salwe ya Min, see Introduction ; mean- 
ing "Recipient of the Gold Chain 
of Honour ") from Her Most Gracious 
Majesty the Empress. The State of 
Nyaungywe has four feudatories — 
Inleywa, Kyanktal, Letthet, and Thig- 
yit; and, including these dependencies, 
its area is about 2500 square miles. 
The population consists chiefly of 
Shans. Residence : Nyaungywe, Shan 
States, Burma. 

NYAYARATNA, Mahesh Chandra, 
CLE. See Mahesh. 

OBAIDULLAH, Kazi Muhammad, 

Shams-ul-Vlama. See Ubaidulla. 

0BH0Y. See Abhai. 

OEL, Rdjd of See Kishan Datt Singh. 

OKHIL. See&khW. 



0KH0Y. 
OMRITA. 



See Akhai. 
See Amrita. 



ON GAING, Maung, Ahmudan gating 
Tazeik ya Min. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on May 25, 1892. 
It is indicated by the letters A.T.M. 
after the name, and means "The 
Recipient of the Medal for Good 
Service." Residence : Prome, Burma. 

ON TUE, Maung, Myook, Ahmudan 
gaung Tazeik ya Min. Is Township 
Officer. The title (see above) was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1898. Residence : 
Mahlaing, Meiktila, Burma. 

ONKAR DAS, Lala, Rai Bahadur. Re- 
ceived the title on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Seoni, Central Provinces. 

00MER. See Umar. 

ORCHHA, His Highness Saramad-I- 
Raj aha-I-Bundel-Khand, Maharaj a 
Mahindra Sawai Sir Pratap Singh 
Bahadur, K.C.I.E., Mahdrdjd of A 
ruling chief; b. 1854. Succeeded to 
the gadi March 15, 1874. Is the head 
of the great Bundela family of Garh- 
war Rajputs, which has given ruling 
families to Panna, Datia, Ajaigarh, 
Charkhari, Bijawar, Sarila, Jigni, Jaso, 
Lughasi, and other Chiefships of Bun- 
delkhand. In legendary times the 
Garhwar Rajputs were ruling at Be- 
nares ; and on the subversion of that 
throne by the Musalmans, Hem Kurn, 
surnamed Pancham, migrated west- 
ward. His son, Bir Singh, took the 
clan name of Bundela, by which his 
family and the country of Bundel- 
khand has ever since been known, and 
settled at Mau Mahoni in the north- 
west of that Province in the 13th 
century a.d. The family extended its 
possession southward during the next 
hundred years, and a descendant 
named Sanpal took possession of 
Korar, east of Jhansi, in the 14th 
century. In 1532 a.d. Rudra Pratab, 
then the chief of the Bundelas, 
founded Orchha. From his younger 
son, Udyajit, sprang the many families 
of the Eastern Bundelas (Panna, Ajai- 
garh, etc.) ; whilst Matkur Sab., the 
elder son, was the ancestor of the 
Chiefs of Orchha, Dattia, and other 
Western States. His son, the Raja 
Bir Singh Deo, was famous in the 
reigns of the Emperors Akbar and 
Jahangir, and was the founder of 
many great public works Orchha was 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



the only State of Bundelkhand that 
did not fall under the power of the 
Peshwas, though the Mahrattas suc- 
ceeded in dismembering it, by con- 
quering Jhansi and forming it into a 
new and ultimately a powerful State. 
When Bundelkhand passed under 
British control, Raja Vikramaditya 
Mahendra was the Chief of Orchha, 
and by the treaty of 1812 he became a 
feudatory of the British Power. He 
died in 1834, and, after some disputes, 
was succeeded by Sujan Singh. On 
the death of the latter his widow 
adopted Hamir Singh, a descendant of 
the same family, and he was suc- 
ceeded in 1874 by his younger brother, 
the present Maharaja. In 1882 His 
Highness received the additional title 
of Sawai ; and on January 1, 1894, was 
created a K.C.I.E. The area of the 
State is 1933 square miles ; its popu- 
lation 311,514, chiefly Hindus, but in- 
cluding 9560 Muhammadans and 7233 
Jains. His Highness maintains a 
military force of 350 cavalry, 4400 
infantry, and 90 guns ; and is entitled 
to a salute of 17 guns (including 2 
guns personal). Residence: Tehri, 
Bundelkhand, Central India. 

OTTTJR VASAVA MEN0N, Rao Baha- 
dur. Received the title on January 2, 
1899, for good service in the Police 
Department. Residence: Madras. 

0YARAT CHANDU MEN0N, Rao Baha- 
dur. Received the title on January 2, 
1899. Is Sub-Judge, Madras. Resi- 
dence: Madras. 

PACHETE, Raja of. See Nilmani Singh 
Deo. 

PADAKAN0LA RAMA RAO, Rao Baha- 
dur. See Rama. 

PADMAN SINGH, Thakur (of Khariar), 
Raja. The title was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, as a personal dis- 
tinction, on the occasion of the Jubilee 
of the reign of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty. Residence: Khariar, Raipur, 
Central Provinces. 

PADMANANS DINGH (of Baneli),i?a;a. 
The title was conferred on January 
2, 1888, as a personal distinction, on 
his succeeding his father, the late 
Raja Lila Nanda Singh Bahadur. The 
great-grandfather of the present Raja, 
Dular Singh, reoeived the title of Raja 
Bahadur for services rendered to the 



British Government in the Nepal war. 
Raja Dular Singh died in 1821, and 
the title was continued to his son, 
Raja Bidya Nanda Singh. The latter 
died in 1851, and the title was in like 
manner continued to his son, Raja 
Lila Nanda Singh, the father of the 
present Raja, as a personal distinction. 
Residence : Purniah, Bengal. 

PADRAUNA, Rai Udit Narayan, Rai of, 
Rdjd of; b. November 24, 1855. The 
ancient title of Rai is hereditary, that 
of Raja was conferred as a personal 
distinction on June 22, 1897. The 
Raja belongs to a family of Kurmis 
claiming descent from the celebrated 
Mayyura Misra, being thus connected 
with the families of the Rajas of 
Majhauli and Tamkuhi (q.v.). Rai 
Isri Partab rendered good service 
in the Mutiny, and was an Honorary 
Magistrate for ten years before his 
death, when he was succeeded by his 
son, the late Rai Madan Gopal. The 
present Rai, now Raja, succeeded Rai 
Madan Gopal on December 16, 1890. 
Residence : Padrauna, Gorakhpur, 
North-Western Provinces. 

PAGADALA KAVERIPAKAM JAGAN- 
NADHA CHETTIAR, Rao Bahadur. 
See Jagannadha. 

PAHAR SINGH (of Narhat), Rao; b. 
1854. The title is hereditary. The 
Rao is descended from the illustrious 
family of the Bundela Rajputs that 
has given its name to the Province of 
Bundelkhand, and ruling Houses to 
most of the States of Bundelkhand, 
including Orchha, Panna, Datia, etc. 
(q.v.). The Narhat family is an off- 
shoot of that of the Raja Sardar Singh 
Bahadur of Katehra (q.v.). In 1851 
Rao Bakht Bali, father of the present 
Rao, was in possession of the estate. 
Residence: Narhat, Lalitpur, North- 
western Provinces. 

PAHARI BANKA, Diwan Mihrban 
Singh, JDiwdn of. A ruling chief. 
Succeeded to the gadi November 14, 
1890. Belongs to the great Bundela 
Rajput family, the head of which is 
the Maharaja of Orchha (q.v.). Rai 
Singh, a descendant of the youngest 
son of Bir Singh Deo, held from his 
kinsman, the Chief of Orchha, the 
Buragaon jagir, and this he divided 
among his eight sons — whence the 
States so formed were called the 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



227 



Hashtbhdya jdgirs, or "Appanages of 
the eight brothers." Only four of 
these now exist — Dhurwai, Bijna, Tori, 
and last Pahari Banka, which was 
given to Umed Singh, the youngest 
son of Rai Singh. His great-grandson, 
the Diwan Ishri Singh, obtained a 
sanad from the British Government in 
1823 confirming him in the possession 
of this State. He was succeeded by 
the Diwan Bijai Bahadur, who was 
in turn followed by the late Diwan 
Piyariju, father of the present Diwan. 
The area of the State is about 5 square 
miles; its population is 1094, chiefly 
Hindus. The Diwan maintains a mili- 
tary force of 20 men. Residence: 
Pahari Banka, Bundelkhand, Central 
India. 

PAHASU, Munitdz-ud-daula, Nawab of. 
See Muhammad Fayyaz Ali Khan. 

PAHRA, Chaube Radho Charan, Jdgir- 
ddr of. A ruling chief; b. August 17, 
1856; succeeded to the gadi January 
14, 1868. Belongs to a Chaube Brah- 
man Hindu family, claiming descent 
from Ram Krishna Chaube, Kildddr 
(Governor of the Fortress) of Kalinjar, 
from whom descend also the other 
three branches of "the Kalinjar 
ChaubSs," viz. the Chiefs of Paldeo, 
Taraon, and Bhaisaunda (q.v.). His 
son, Salig Ram, received a sanad from 
the British Government, confirming 
him in the possession of Pahra. His 
great-grandson is the present Jdgirddr. 
The area of the State is 10 square 
miles; its population is 4016, chiefly 
Hindus. The Chief maintains a mili- 
tary force of 12 cavalry, 100 infantry, 
and 2 guns. Residence : Pahra, Bun- 
delkhand, Central India. 

PAINTIPUR, Rdjd of. See Muhammad 
Kazim Husain Khan. 

PAKALA G0PALA RAO, Rao Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1891. Residence: Barhampur, Madras. 

PAL, Jareja Ratan Singh, Tdlukddr of. 
A ruling : chief ; b. 1841. succeeded to 
the gadi October 25, 1879. Belongs to 
a Rajput (Hindu) family, of the Jareja 
clan. The State, which is tributary to 
Baroda and Junagarh, has an area of 
21 square miles, and a population of 
1214, chiefly Hindus. The Talukdar 
maintains a military force of 2 cavalry 
and 16 infantry. Residence : Pal, 
Kathiawar, Bombay. 



PAL LAHARA, Raja Ganeshwar Pal, 
Rdjd of A ruling chief; b. 1884. 
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor, 
August 30, 1888. Belongs to a Ksha- 
triya (Rajput Hindu) family, claiming 
descent from Raja Santosh Pal, alias 
Pat Ganeshwar Pal. Twenty-two 
generations have intervened, in regular 
descent from father to son, between 
the founder of the family and the pre- 
sent Raja, each Raja receiving altern- 
ately either the style of " Pat Ganesh- 
war Pal" or "Pat Muni Pal." The 
late Raja, Chintamani Pal, was styled 
" Pat Muni Pal." He succeeded to 
the gadi^ in 1860. The State had for 
a long time been included in that of 
Keunjhar, the Raja having been 
treated as a feudatory of Keunjhar. 
But this caused many feuds, and Pal 
Laharawas at length declared a British 
feudatory, independent of Keunjhar. 
The late Pat Muni Pal rendered dis- 
tinguished services during the opera- 
tions for the suppression of the Keun- 
jhar rebellion in 1867-68, and received 
as a reward the title of Raja Bahadur 
as a personal distinction. He died in 
1888, and was succeeded by the pre- 
sent Raja, styled in turn Pat Ganesh- 
war Pal. The family cognizance or 
crest is the cobra or hooded snake. 
The area of the State, which is one of 
the Orissa Tributary Mahals, is 452 
square miles ; its population is 14,887, 
chiefly Hindus. The Raja maintains 
a military force of 94 infantry. Resi- 
dence : Pal Lahara, Orissa, Bengal. 

PALAJ, Thakur Danlat Singh, Thdkur 
of. A ruling chief ; 6.1878. Succeeded 
to the gadi as a minor. The State 
has a population of 1701. The Thakur 
belongs to a Koli (aboriginal) family. 
Residence: Palaj, Mahi Kantha, Bom- 
bay. 

PALANJI ADARJI MISTRI, Khdn Ba- 
hadur. Received the title on June 3, 
1899. Residence : Karachi, Bombay. 

PALANJI HORMUSJI DADACHANJI, 

Khdn Bahadur. The title was con- 
ferred on January 1, 1898. Is an 
Assistant-Surgeon. Residence: Bom- 
bay. 

PALANJI PEST0NJI RAGHINA, Khdn 
Saheb. The title was conferred on 
January 2, 1899. Residence : Bombay. 

PALANJI RATANJI, Khdn Saheb. The 
title is personal, and was conferred on 



228 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



August 18, 1881. Residence; Surat, 
Bombay. 
PALANPUR, His Highness Sir Sher 
Muhammad Khan, Lohani, G.C.I.E., 
Diwdn of. A ruling chief; b. 1852. 
Succeeded to the yadi September 19, 
1877. Belongs to the Afghan family 
of the Lohani clan, whose an- 
cestors occupied Behar in the time 
of the Emperor Humayun. Ghazni 
Khan, the Chief, obtained the title of 
Diwan from the Emperor Akbar in 
1597, for successfully repelling an in- 
vasion of Afghans, and he was also 
made Governor of Lahore. His de- 
scendant in 1682 received the province 
of Jhalod (including Palanpur, Disa, 
and other districts) from the Emperor 
Aurangzeb ; but in 1698 his successor 
was driven westward by the Rahtor 
Rajputs of Marwar, and settled in 
Palanpur, where the family has ever 
since remained. In 1809 the State 
came under British control. In 1812 
the Diwan Firoz Khan was murdered 
by his Sindi guards ; his son, Diwan 
Fateh Singh, was reinstated by British 
troops under General Holmes, but was 
ultimately removed from the chief ship 
for maladministration. The late Diwan 
Zorawar Khan was granted the addi- 
tional title of " His Excellency " ; he 
succeeded to the gadi in 1854, and 
dying in 1877 was succeeded by his 
son, the present Diwan. The family 
banner is crimson, with a bordure vert . 
The area of the State is 3150 square 
miles, with a population of 236,461, 
chiefly Hindus, but including 27,256 
Muhammadans. His Highness the 
Diwan maintains a military force of 
294 cavalry, 697 infantry, and 80 guns, 
and is entitled to a salute of 11 guns. 
Created a Knight Commander of the 
Most Eminent Order of the Indian 
Empire, January 2, 1893 ; and a Knight 
Grand Commander, January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Palanpur, Bombay. 

PALASNI, Thakur Indra Singhji, Thdkur 
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1885. Succeeded 
the late Thdkur Jitsinghji on Sep- 
tember 28, 1896. Belongs to a Rajput 
(Hindu) family. The area of the 
State, which is tributary to Baroda, is 
about 6 square miles. Residence: 
Palasni, Rewa Kantha, Bombay. 

PALASVIHIR, Naik Nawsa walad 
FIRIA, Chief of. A ruling chief ; b. 
1830. Belongs to a Bhil (aboriginal 



tribe) family. The area of the State, 
which is one of the Dang States of 
Khandesh, is about 2 square miles ; 
its population about 220, chiefly Bhils. 
Residence : Palasvihir, Khandesh, 
Bombay. 

PALDE0, Rao Chaube Anradh Singh, 
Jdgirddr of. A ruling chief ; b. 
October 18, 1837. Succeeded to the 
gadi April 2, 1874. Belongs to the 
Chaube Brahman family, known as 
the "Kalinjar Chaube Jagirdars," of 
whom there are now four ruling chiefs 
— those of Paldeo, Taraon, Bhaisaunda, 
and Pahra (q.v.). Descended from 
Chaube Ram Krishna, who was kildddr 
(Governor of the Fortress) of the 
ancient and famous fort of Kalinjar 
under the Chief of Panna. His sons 
successfully defended the fort against 
Ali Bahadur, who died in the attempt 
to take it. At a later period the 
family held the fort for some time 
against British troops ; but ultimately 
they came to terms, and received 
Kalinjar and some territory around it 
as &jdgir. Subsequently the Govern- 
ment resumed the fort of Kalinjar, 
giving the four brothers of the Chaube 
family the four States named above, 
as feudatory jdgirs, in exchange. Thus 
Baldeo Singh became the first Jagirdar 
of Paldeo, and his son, Dariao Singh, 
received a sanad from the British 
Government. The present Jagirdar is 
fifth in descent from him ; and at the 
Imperial Assemblage of Delhi in 
January 1877, on the occasion of the 
Proclamation of Her Most Gracious 
Majesty as Empress of India, he re- 
ceived the title of Rao as a personal 
distinction. The area of the State is 
28 square miles ; its population is 8824, 
chiefly Hindus. The Rao maintains 
a military force of 10 cavalry, 200 
infantry, and 3 guns. Residence : 
Paldeo, Bundelkhand, Central India. 

PALGHAT IYYENAR KTJTTI PHLAI 
CHINNASWAMI PILLAI, Rao Baha- 
dur. Received the title on May 21, 
1898. Residence: Palghat, Malabar, 
Madras. 

PALI, Rao of. See Hamir Singh . 

PALITANA, Thakur Saheb Sir Man- 
singhji Sursinghji, K. C.S.I. , Thdkur 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1863. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi November 24, 1885. 
Belongs to the same family of Gohel 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



229 



Rajputs as that of His Highness the 
Maharaja of Bhaunagar; descended 
from ancestors who were driven out 
of Marwar in Rajputana by the 
Rahtors in the 12th century. The 
late Thakur Saheb Sursinghji suc- 
ceeded to the gadi on June 1, 1860, 
and dying in 1885, was succeeded by 
his eldest son, the present Thakur. 
The State is famous for the greatest 
of all the sacred hills of the Jains, 
Satrunjaya, which is covered with a 
large number of magnificent Jain 
temples. The area of the State is 
289 square miles; its population is 
49,271, chiefly Hindus, but including 
3581 Muhammadans. The Thakur 
Saheb was created a Knight Com- 
mander of the Most Exalted Order of 
the Star of India on January 1, 1896. 
He maintains a military force of 74 
cavalry, 401 infantry, and 7 guns, and 
is entitled to a salute of 9 guns. 
Residence : Palitana, Kathiawar, 
Bombay. 

PALLANJI. tittPtianjL 

PAIXI CHENTSAL RAO PANTULU, 
CLE. See Chentsal. 

PALLONJI. See Palanji. 

PAMAKHERI, Thakur of. See Janki. 

PAMPAPATI SASTRIYAR, Ganka- 
lapur, Rao Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on June 3, 1893. Residence : 
Cuddapah, Madras. 

PAN BYTJ, Maung, Myook, Kyet thaye 
zaung shwe Salwe ya Min. This 
Burmese title (see Introduction) was 
conferred on May 30, 1891 . Residence : 
Ye-u, Burma. 

PANANJERI CALAPPA ANANTA 
CHARLTJ, Rao Bahadur. The title 
was conferred on January 1, 1898. 
Residence : Bellary, Madras. 

PANAPPAKKAM ANANDA CHARLTJ, 
CLE. See Ananda Charlu. 

PANCHAM SINGH, Rao; b. May 31, 
1860. The title is hereditary. Be- 
longs to a Bundela Rajput family; 
descended from Partabju, who in early 
times founded the village of Swasa in 
Panwari, and obtained from the Raja 
Jagat Raj of Jaitpur (son of the 
Bundela Maharaja Chhatarsal — see 
A jaigarh) a grant of the village with 
the title of Rao. The Rao has a I 
son and heir, named Bhopal Singh. I 



Residence: Swasa, Panwari, Hamirpur, 
North-Western Provinces. 

PANCHANPTJR, Rao of. See Raghunath 

Singh. 
PANDARIA, Tlidkur of. See Lai Rag- 

huraj Singh. 

PANDE, Deo Datt, R«i Bahadur. See 
Deo. 

PANDE HANUMAN PARSHAD, Rai 

Bahadur. See Hanuman. 

PANDIT.— A prefix. 

PANDURANG RAO TANTIA GORE, 

Rai Bahadur. The title is personal, 
and was conferred on January 1, 1878. 
Residence: Dewas, Central India. 

PANDURANGI KODANDA RAO PAN- 
TULU, Rao Bahadur. The title was 
conferred on January 1, 1898. Resi- 
dence : Vizagapatam, Madras. 

PANGANUR, Sugatur Yimmidi Sankara 
Payal Yesunath, Bahadur, CLE., 
Zaminddr of; h. January 1, 1830. 
Succeeded as Zaminddr of Panganur 
on July 6, 1847. His ancestor in the 
15th century held the village of 
Sugatur under the Rajas of Vijaya- 
nagar. Later on the family founded 
the town of Kolar in Mysore, now 
famous for its gold mines, and acquired 
considerable territory in that neigh- 
bourhood. In the 16th century two 
brothers divided the estates between 
them; and by this partition the an- 
cestor of the present Zaminddr acquired 
Kolar and Sugatur. Later on the 
family extended its influence in the 
direction of Cuddapah (Kadapa), and 
Panganur was seized and fortified, and 
this and other acquisitions were held 
under the Nawabs of Cuddapah. In 
1757 a.d. the Mahrattas overran the 
Zaminddri, half of which was ceded 
to them. The Zaminddr subsequently 
became subject to Haidar Ali of My- 
sore, and passed under British control 
on the conquest of that dynasty. The 
Zaminddr has two sons — Ra je Sugatur 
Yimmidi Vira Basavanna Payal Ye- 
sunath Bahadur Varu, and Raje 
Sugatur Yimmidi Kumara Chikkara 
Payal Yesunath Bahadur Varu. The 
family banner bears the device of a 
bull. The Zaminddr was created a 
Companion of the Most Eminent 
Order of the Indian Empire on 
January 1,1884. Residence: Panganur, 
North Arcot, Madras, 



230 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



PANJAB SINGH (of Dhandhowal), 
Sarddr. The title is hereditary. The 
Sardar is brother of Sardar Partab 
Singh of Dhandhowal (q.v.) ; belongs to 
a Jat family of Sikhs, whose founder, 
Sardar Man Singh, conquered territory 
on both sides of the Sutlej in the year 
1759 a.d. His son, Sardar Joga Singh, 
was succeeded in turn by his son, 
Sardar Chanda Singh, the father of 
the Sardars Partab Singh, Panjab 
Singh, and Sher Singh, all of Dhandho- 
wal. Residence: Dhandhowal, Hoshiar- 
pur, Punjab. 

PANNA, His Highness Maharaja Ma- 
hindra Sir Rudra Pratap Singh Ma- 
hindra Bahadur, K.C.S.I., Mahdrdjd 
of. A ruling chief ; b. July 10, 1848. 
Succeeded to the gadi June 9, 1870. 
Belongs to the great Bundela Rajput 
family, of which His Highness the 
Maharaja of Orchha (g.v.) is the senior 
representative, and of which junior 
branches are the ruling families in 
Datia, Garrauli, Lughasi (q.v.), and 
many other States in Bundelkhand, 
which Province takes its name from 
this clan. The Panna House is de- 
scended from Udyajit, younger son of 
Rudra Partab, the Bundela founder 
of the Orchha State. Udyajit's grand- 
son, Champat Rai, made himself in- 
dependent both of Orchha and of the 
Musalmans ; and his son the Maharaja 
Chhatrasal, acquired very extensive 
dominions in Eastern and Northern 
Bundelkhand. His eldest son, Hardi 
Sah, became Chief of Panna, while his 
second son was the ancestor of the 
Chiefs of Ajaigarh, Charkhari, Bija- 
war, and Sarila ; his third son was the 
ancestor of the Jigni family, and his 
fourth son the ancestor of the Jasu 
Chiefs. Hardi Sah's son was named 
Sobha Singh, and under his rule and 
that of his two successors the power 
and extent of the State were di- 
minished by frequent wars, and the 
setting-up of independent chieftain- 
ships within its borders. The great- 
grandson of Sobha Singh was named 
Kishor Singh, and he obtained a sanad 
from the British Government in 1807. 
The late Maharaja rendered valuable 
services during the Mutiny of 1857, 
in reward for which he obtained a 
hand pome khilat, the privilege of 
adoption, and a personal salute of 13 
guns. The present Mah&raja succeeded 



in 1870, and in 1876 was invested with 
the insignia of a Knight Commander 
of the Most Exalted Order of the Star 
of India by His Royal Highness the 
Prince of Wales. The area of the 
State is 2568 square miles ; its popu- 
lation is 227,306, chiefly Hindus, but 
including 5989 Muhammadans and 
16,690 belonging to various aboriginal 
tribes. It is famous as producing the 
largest supply of diamonds of any 
district in India in modern times. His 
Highness maintains a military force of 
165 cavalry, 1157 infantry, 36 guns, 
and is entitled to a salute of 13 guns 
(including 2 guns personal). Resi- 
dence: Panna, Bundelkhand, Central 
India. 



PANNA IAL, Mehta, CLE., Rai, His 
Excellency. Prime Minister of Udai- 
pur ; b. August 1843. The title of Rai 
was conferred on January 1, 1877, as 
a personal distinction, on the occasion 
of the Proclamation of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty as Empress of India. 
The title of "His Excellency" is 
the courtesy title of the Rai as Prime 
Minister of the State of Udaipur, 
Rajputana. Belongs to a family that 
long occupied a position of influence 
in Bikanir, Rajputana, and that first 
acquired the designation of " Mehta " 
from an ancestor, Kuram Chand be- 
coming some centuries ago Prime 
Minister of the State of Bikanir. 
Kuram Chand, Mehta, also received a 
jdgir and honours from the Emperor 
of Delhi. Towards the end of the 
16th century a grandson of Kuram 
Chand, Mehta, moved to Udaipur, and 
settled there; and his descendants, 
Agarji Mehta and Hunsraji Mehta, 
rose to high office under the Maharana 
Ari Singhji in 1762 a.d., receiving 
charge of the fort and the district of 
Mandalgarh in Mewar. Three of the 
descendants of Agarji Mehta have 
been Prime Ministers of Udaipur be- 
fore the present Rai, namely, Devi 
Chand, Sher Singh, and Gokul Chand. 
The Mehta Murali Dhar, father of the 
Rai, died in 1886. The Rai was 
created a Companion of the Most 
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire 
in 1887. In 1858 he married the 
daughter of Rai Chhagan Lai, and 
has issue, a son and heir, Kunwar 
Fateh Lai Mehta, born 1868, and 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



231 



educated at the Ajmir College. Resi- 
dence : TJdaipur, Rajputana. 

PANTH HPLODA, Narayan Rao Ja- 
nardhan, Chief of. A ruling chief; 
b. 1869, Succeeded to the gadi in 
1887. Belongs to a Deccan Brahman 
family, and is a co-sharer in the Chief- 
ship of tlis State with Pandit Gopal 
Rao Narajan. The population of the 
State is 4086, chiefly Hindus. Resi- 
dence: Panfch Piploda, Western Malwa, 
Central Inda. 

PANTH PIPLODA, Pandit Gopal Rao 
Narayan, Oiief of. A ruling chief ; 
b. 1838. Sieceeded to the gadi as a 
minor in 1840. Belongs to a Deccan 
Brahman family, and is a co-sharer in 
the Chiefslip of this State with 
Narayan Rao Janardhan. The popu- 
lation of tie State is 4086, chiefly 
Hindus. Residence: Panth Piploda, 
Western Milwa, Central India. 

PARAN CHANDRA BOSE, Rai Bahd- 
dw\ Has rendered good service as 
Hmorary Magistrate of the Manik- 
tala Municipal Bench in the Twenty- 
Pirganas. Received the title as a 
personal distinction, May 25, 1892. 
Residence : Calcutta. 

P/RAPANAD, Valiya Rdjd of. See 
Raja Raja Varma Raja, Rdjd. 

P1RASPUR, Rdni of. See Janki. 

IARATJR, Rdjd of. SeeTh&knr Narayan 
Singh. 

PARBAL PARTAB SINGH (of Malha- 
jini), Rdjd; b. August 20, 1867. The 
title is hereditary. The Raja is Chief 
of the Parihar clan of Rajputs; de- 
scended from Mahip Singh, who came 
from Jagni near Mahoba, and settled 
in the district of Etawah about 
seventy-five years ago. The Parihars 
are a small clan of Rajputs, occupying 
the lands between the rivers Kuari 
and Chambal, which under the name 
Parihara formed a portion of Sarkar 
Trichh in the time of the Emperor 
Akbar. They were notorious for their 
lawless character, and for harbouring 
gangs of Thags and Dakaits. Their 
great ancestor was Bilan Deo, from 
whom the seventh in descent was 
Nahar Deo. On the defeat of Anang 
Pal of Delhi in the 11th century the 
Chief of the Parihars, Sumit Rai, fled 
to the wild region of the Panchnadi 
and colonized it, giving it the name 



Parihara. Raja Mahipat Singh, who 
died about 1857, was succeeded by his 
son, Raja Bijai Singh, who married 
a daughter of the Raja, of Bhinga. 
He died in 1867, and was succeeded 
by his son, the present Raja, then a 
minor, the estate being under the 
Court of Wards till 1888. The Raja 
was educated at the Etawah High 
• School. He married the second daugh- 
ter of the Raja Sheopal Singh (q.v.) 
of Murarmau, in the Rai Bareli district 
of Oudh, the Chief of the Bais Tilok- 
chandi clan. The title of Raja was 
recognized as hereditary in 1889. Re- 
sidence: Malhajini, Etawah, North- 
western Provinces. 

PARBHTJDAS KISHANDAS MODI, Rao 
Bahadur ; b. October 4, 1831. The 
title was conferred on June 26, 1884, 
as a personal distinction, for long and 
meritorious service in the Government 
Service, in which he attained to the 
rank of Acting Assistant Accountant- 
General of Bombay. He entered the 
Service in April 1851, and retired with 
a good-service pension in April 1888, 
having greatly distinguished himself. 
The Rao Bahadur has been thrice 
married — (1) in March 1848, to Jam- 
nabai, daughter of Kasidas Ramdas, 
Esq., of Surat ; she died in 1859 : (2) 
in February 1865, to Jamnabai, daugh- 
ter of Gaurdhandas Premanand, Esq., 
of Baroda; she died in 1877: (3) in 
March 1878, to Prankorbai, daughter 
of Vithaldas Farukhsiyardas, Esq., 
of Dharangaon, Khandesh. The Rao 
Bahadur has adopted (in May 1866) 
a son, named Nagindas Parbhudas 
Kishandas Modi, born in 1878. The 
Rao Bahadur belongs to a Jadavbansi 
Hallai Bhattia family, and was edu- 
cated at Surat. He was appointed a 
Justice of the Peace for Bombay in 
1890. Residence: Bombay. 

PARDUMAN SINGH (of Ramgarh), 
Mian Sarddr Bahadur. The title is 
hereditary, the Mian being the eldest 
son of Sardar Ran jit Singh of Ramgarh 
in the Ambala district. Belongs to a 
Rajput family, claiming immediate 
descent from the Rajas of Kahlur 
(q.v.) or Bilaspur. Rajd Singar Chand, 
Raja of Bilaspur, had two sons, the 
elder of whom, Megh Chand, inherited 
his father's Raj, while the younger, 
Kalal Chand, was the ancestor of the 
Ramgarh Sarda>s. Tenth in descent 



232 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



from him was Surat Singh, whose son, 
Khusal Singh, with three brothers, 
joined the N&han R&jd in making 
large conquests, out of which they 
were permitted to retain Ramgarh. 
The three brothers died without issue. 
Khusal Singh built a fort at Ram- 
garh, and his two sons, the Sardars 
Maldeo Singh and Narayan Das 
Singh, on his death divided his lands 
between them. One of the grandsons 
of Sard&r Maldeo Singh was Sard&r 
Ranjit Singh of Ramgarh, who was 
a jdgirddr Magistrate in the Amb&la 
district, and father of Mian Parduman 
Singh. The Mian received the per- 
sonal title of Sardar Bahadur on 
May 25, 1895. Residence: R&mgarh, 
Amb&la, Punjab. 

PARENDA, Rdjd of. See Sheopras&d 
Singh. 

PARHAT, Rani of. See Dharmr&j Kun- 
war. 

PARIKUD, Rdjd of. See Gaur Chander. 

PARKHALI, Sarddr of. See Sheonara- 
yan Singh. 

PARMANAND. See also Kunwdr Per- 
manand. 

PARMANAND, Bakhshi, Rai Bahadur. 
The title was conferred on January 1, 
1895. Residence : Sagri, Punjab. 

PARON, Raja Gajandhar Singh, Rdjd 
of. A ruling chief; b. 1869. Suc- 
ceeded to the gadi as a minor 
December 31, 1882. Belongs to the 
illustrious family of the Chiefs of 
the great Kachhw&ha clan of Rajputs, 
from which springs the family of His 
Highness the Maharajd of Jaipur, 
claiming descent from the second son 
of the legendary Solar hero, Rama, 
and from the ancient Hindu Emperors 
of Ajudhya of the Surjya Vansa or 
Solar dynasty. According to the Raj- 
put chronicles the seventy-second in 
descent from Rama was the Raja 
Nala, the hero of the famous Sanskrit 
poem of Ndla and Ddmdydnti, who 
migrated westward (possibly in the 
3rd century), and founded the city of 
Narwar and the kingdom (renowned 
in classical story) of Nishidha. One 
of the sons of Sora Singh, Thakur of 
Narwar, thirty-third in descent from 
Raja Nala, was Dhola Rai, who became 
the founder of the great State of 



Dhundar in Rajputana, betcer known 
as Jaipur. The Kachhwaha Thakurs 
of Narw&r, however, with an experi- 
ence probably unique in Indian history, 
seemed to have continued in possession 
of that place from the semi-legendary 
times of the Rajd Ndla, through all 
the vicissitudes of the Hindu, Pathan, 
and Mughal periods of lomination, 
right down to the time cf the Mah- 
rattas. At the commencement of the 
present century the Thikur Madhu 
Singh, of the line of Mia, was still 
in possession of Narwa.% his family 
having held it during tie lapse of at 
least fifteen centuries. But at last 
Madhu Singh was drivenDut by Daulat 
Rao Sindhia, and revenged himself by 
continually raiding and plundering in 
the territory of Gwalor. In 1818 
Madhu Singh was taken under British 
protection, and granted the State of 
Paron as a feudatory ol Gwalior, on 
condition of protecting the Gwalior 
territory from robbers. In 1857 Mad- 
hu Singh's successor, Raja Man Singh, 
at first joined the mutineers, but in 
1859 he surrendered, under pronise 
of being amnestied. Subsequentlyhe 
rendered valuable service to tie 
Government in connection with tie 
capture of Tantia Topi, and wis 
granted an increase of territory, wifi 
a pension. In 1883 Raja Man Singi 
died, and was succeeded by his son 
the present Raja, then a minor. Tht 
population of the State is 7328, chiefly 
Hindus ; it contains about thirty-four 
villages, of which the town of Paron 
is the chief. Residence : Paron, Guna, 
Central India. 

PARTAB. SeePratap. 

PARTAB BAHADUR SINGH (of Ka- 

tari), Rdjd; b. March 10, 1874. The 
title is hereditary, having been so 
recognized in 1864. Belongs to the 
important Kanhpuria family of Raj- 
puts, of whom the Raja Surpal Singh 
Bahadur (q.v.) is the chief. The great 
ancestor of the Kanhpurias was Kanh, 
from whose second son, Rahas, was 
descended Balbhaddar Singh, the pro- 
genitor of the Rajas of Katari. The 
late Rajd Sarn&m Singh died childless 
in February 1869, leaving the estate 
to his widow, Rani Harnath Kunwar, 
for life, with power to nominate an 
heir. She died on May 5, 1886, having 
left the estate to the present Rajd, who 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



233 



was one of the nearest male relatives 
of R&jd Sarnam Singh, heing a de- 
scendant of Barwand Singh, Rajd 
Sarnam Singh's uncle. Residence : 
Katari, Sultanpur, Oudh. 

PARTAB BAHADUR SINGH (of Ti- 

raul), Rdjd. Succeeded to the title 
in 1889. The title was conferred on 
January 1, 1877, as a personal dis- 
tinction, on the present Raja's grand- 
father, the late Raja Ajit Singh of 
Tiraul, in recognition of his signal 
services during the Mutiny of 1857; 
and in 1888 the personal title was 
ordered to be for two generations, i.e. 
for the Raja Ajit Singh and his suc- 
cessor. Belongs to the very ancient 
Sombansi Rajput family of the old 
Rajas of Partabgarh, being descended 
from Sujan Sah, a younger son of the 
Raja Sangram Sah of Partabgarh. 
During the Mutiny of 1857, when the 
Raja Gulab Singh of Tiraul refused to 
receive the fugitives from Sultanpur, 
his nephew, Ajit Singh, then of Mal- 
lupur, took them into his fort, pro- 
tected them for many days, and then 
escorted them himself, with as many 
followers as he could command, to 
Allahabad. For this his house and 
property were sacked by the rebels, 
and he had to flee from Oudh. He 
continued loyally to render good 
services throughout the period of the 
disturbances, and at the restoration of 
order received all the Tiraul estates, 
with a khilat, and ultimately with the 
title of Rajd. He was an Honorary 
Magistrate, and had the powers of an 
Assistant Collector. He died in 1889, 
and was succeeded (under the orders 
of 1888) by his grandson, the present 
Rajd, whose title, on January 1, 
1898, was made hereditary. Residence : 
Tiraul, Partabgarh, Oudh. 

PARTAB BAHADUR SINGH (of Kar- 

war), Rdjd; b. August 31, 1876. The 
title is hereditary, having been so re- 
cognized in December 1864. The Raja 
is the chief representative of the great 
Hindu Bachgoti sept of the illustrious 
Chauhan clan of Rajputs, claiming 
descent from Chahir Deo, brother of 
the renowned Prithvi Raj, last Chauhan 
Emperor of Delhi and Ajmir. His 
descendant, Bariar Singh, fled from 
the wrath of the Emperor Ala-ud- 
din Khilji, and, wandering eastward, 
settled in the Sultanpur district. He 



married the daughter of R£j& Ram 
Deo, the Bilkharia Raja of Patti, and 
ultimately ousting his brother-in-law, 
seized the estate and the famous fort 
of Kot Bilkhar. He was succeeded at 
Kot Bilkhar by his youngest son, Raj 
Singh, who had three sons, of whom 
the second, Rup Singh, became the 
ancestor of the Hindu Bachgoti Rajas 
of Karwar and of the Musalman 
Bachgoti Rajas of Hasanpur {see 
Mehdi Ali Khan, Raja of Hasan- 
pur). The late Raja Madho Pratab 
Singh of Karwar died without heirs, 
and left the estate to his widow, Rani 
Kishnath Kunwar. She adopted the 
present Raja, and left him the estate 
on her death in June 1885. He is a 
minor, the estate being under the 
Court of Wards, and is being educated 
at the Wards' College, Agra. Resi- 
dence: Sultanpur, Oudh. 

PARTAB CHAND, Rai Bahadur. Is an 
eminent banker of Allahabad. Re- 
ceived the title as a personal distinction 
on May 25, 1892. Residence : Allaha- 
bad, North- Western Provinces. 

PARTAB NARAYAN SINGH, Sir, 
K.C.I.E. (of Ajudhya), The Hon. 
Mahdrdjd; b. Juljr 13, 1855. Was 
formerly known as the Rajd of 
Mahdauna, the title of Raja being 
hereditary. The title of Maharaja 
is personal, and was conferred on 
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of 
the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty. The Maharaja is 
the grandson and successor of the 
famous Maharajd, Man Singh of 
Mahdauna, one of the most pro- 
minent of the Oudh Talukdars during 
the Mutiny of 1857. Belongs to a 
Sankaldip (or Ceylon) Brahman 
family, whose founder, Sad&sukh 
Pathak, was Chaudhri of Bhojpur. 
His great-grandson, Bakhtawar Singh, 
commenced life as a trooper in the 
8th Light Cavalry. He attracted, 
when on leave at Lucknow, the notice 
of the Nawab Saadat Ali Khan, who 
obtained his discharge, and appointed 
him a jamaddr, and afterwards a 
risalddr. He was still further ad- 
vanced by the succeeding Kings of 
Oudh, and a farmdn of King Muham- 
mad Ali Shah conferred upon him the 
Raj of Mahdauna, with the title of 
Rajd and the rank of premier Raja 
in Oudh. He was the King's Muh- 



234 



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA 



temin, or Quartermaster-General of 
the Resident's camp, and in 1849 ac- 
companied Sir William Sleeman on 
his memorable tour through Oudh. 
Raja Bakhtdwar Singh's younger 
brother, Darshan Singh, was in 1827 
appointed Ndzim of Sultanpur and 
Faizabad, with the -titles of Raja 
Bahadur and Saltanat Bahadur. Dar- 
shan Singh died in 1844, and in 1845 
his youngest son, the late Maharaja 
Mdn Singh (mentioned above, the 
grandfather of the present Mahdrdjd), 
was appointed Ndzim of Daryabad, 
Rudauli, and Sultanpur. He obtained 
from the King of Oudh the title of 
Rdjd Bahadur for capturing a revenue 
defaulter of Surdjpur, and that of 
Saltanat Bahadur for arresting a 
notorious bandit. Sleeman narrates 
at length how Rdjd Man Singh "re- 
moved" Harpal Singh, Gargbansi of 
Maniarpur, for which feat he was 
known as Kaim Jang ("Steadfast in 
war"). In 1855 Raja Bakhtdwar 
Singh died childless, leaving his large 
estates to his nephew and adopted son, 
Raja Man Singh. After the annexation 
Rdjd Mdn Singh was deprived of his 
estate as a defaulter in the payment 
of the revenue. During the Mutiny 
he saved the lives of a very large 
number of European refugees, and 
though at first for a time he took 
part with the rebels, he subsequently 
strenuously assisted the Government 
in the suppression of the Mutiny and 
the restoration of order. For these 
services he obtained the title of 
Maharaja Bahadur, and the grant of 
the extensive confiscated estates of 
the Raja of Gonda. In