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Full text of "The good cheer cook book"


500K-i^0GK. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 

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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



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good (ReeF @ok gook 



THE LADIES HID SOCIETY, 



EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 



CHIPPEWA FALLS, WISCONSIN. 



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"It is arrant folly, all this^ ibhlii ti j iTuil quiddling over the final vau.se 
of our race and the true object of life. Nature has indicated this so 
plainly that he is the blindest of fools who cannot understand. There is 
but one theoi y to which Nature holds the human race inflexibly and that 
is eating. She foroives neglect of everything hut of food and sauce. She 
fo7-ces man to eat that he may lice. She plainly intends that he shall live, 
flint he may ent." 



HERALD PRINT, 
Chippewa Fai.ls, Wisconsin. 

1880, 






Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1889, by 

THE LADIES AID SOCIETY, Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, 

In the office of the Librarian ol Congress in Washington. 



DEDICATE 

"TF-II^ CrCDCDPI I3CDCDV^ 

TO. 



Wl^en ir)e dally cry rin^s 1r)rou^9 1r)e l^ouseQold, 
" WHAT SHALL WE HAVE FOR DINNER ?" 



HOPE THEY MAY FIND AN ANSWER 
IN THESE PAGES, 



" Xdir, good iliijf'.ttioii irail on (iiipftile. tiiiil lifiiltli nti holJi. 



r= F=? e: F^ ^2^ cz ^ 



jN .sending this Book out npou the 'teuder mercies" of the 
■*■ world, we do not cluliii perfection, neither do Ave intend it 
Hs a primarj' department for those new in the iirt of cooking, 
bnt rather look to the veterans in the culinary ranks for appre- 
ciation and support. 

During long years of work for church and charity, when all 
other resources have failed to reimburse our depleted treasury, a 
good, well-cooked dinner or supper has never failed to bring us 
in money and compliments. 

This knowledge has given us courage to publish our receipts 
in book form. 

Good Cooking Puijn. A well-cooked meal will often do 
more missionarj* woi'k in a hearty, restless family, than a dozen 
lectures. This volume contains the receipts we have used for 
years, Mith a few more from friends and acquaintances. 

They are to us as old friends — the "tried and true" — for they 
have all been well tested. 

They have figured at County Fairs, Bazaars, Banquets, 
Lunches, Charity Balls, Dinners, Suppers, etc., etc., and are now 
our paying mine from aa hich we frequently declare a dividend. 

We .send them forth as a white jnilestone on the pathwaj' 
leading us to success in our past efforts, looking to the sale of 
this Book f<n- greater success in all works of charitj'' for the 
future. 

LADIES OF THE AID SOCIETY, 

Chippewa Falls, Wis. 



]MC3~ric3E: 



The figures before a receipt do not indicate tliat one receipt 
is any better than another, but are merely placed before them 
for convenience in reference. 



Here is bread which streugthens man's heart, 
And therefore called the staff of life. 

— PSAIiM CIV. 

YEAST, BREAD, ROLLS, GEMS, ETC. 



YEAST. 

Always use the best flour, always sift it; use fresh 
yeast ; never forget the salt. Spend all the time and 
strength you can upon the kneading of the bread, and 
your bread will be good and light. 

POTATO YEAST— No. 1. 

Ten large grated potatoes, one quart of boiling 
water, two tablespoonfuls of salt, one-half cupful of 
sugar, one small handful of hops boiled in a quart of 
water, strain the hop water into the other mixture, 
boil hard five minutes ; when cool, add one yeast cake 
or a cupful of good yeast. 

Mrs. L. C. Stanley. 

POTATO YEAST— No. 2. 

One cupful of liops in two quarts of hot water. Put 
on the stove to boil; while boiling, grate six large 
potatoes, add one cupful of sugar, one-half cupful 
of salt, one tablespoonful of ginger, strain the boiHng 
hop water on the mixture, stirring all the time until it 
thickens, let it boil up once or twice ; remove from 
the fire, and when cool (not cold), add a generous cupful 



8 TIfE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

of good yeast; after rising twenty-four hours, put away 
in a cool place in a stone jar. 

Mrs. a. S. Stiles. 

POTATO YEAST— No. 3. 

Four large potatoes, pare, boil and mash them, add 
four tablespoonfuls of white sugar, one tablesjioonful of 
ginger, one tablespoon ful of salt and two cupfuls of 
flour; pour over this mixture one and one-half pints 
of boiling water, and Ijeat the ingredients until all the 
lamps disappear; when cool, add a cupful of good 
yeast; when light, put in stone or glass jars and keep 
in a cool place. Mrs. A. J. Cady, 

Rockford, 111. 



BROWN BREAD, BISCUITS, ETC. 

If you have a small family, or wish to have your 
brown bread look very pretty, and appetizing, steam it 
in one pound baking powder cans. The slices are then a 
pretty and convenient size to cut on table or before 
sending to the table. Every housekeeper has a quan- 
tity of these cans about the premises. If your family 
is small, one of these little loaves is just the thing you 
need, for brown bread is never good cold, and loses its 
best points when steamed over. 

BROWN BREAD— No. 1. 

One and one-half cupfuls of corn njeal, one cupful 

of flour (wheat), one-half cupful of graham flour, one 

cupful of sweet milk, one cupful of sour milk, one-half 

cupful of molasses, two eggs, a little salt, one teaspoon- 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 9 

ful of soda, steam three hours or set the pail contain- 
ing the mixture in a kettle of cold water, and after it 
begins to boil do not let it cease boiling for three hours. 

Mrs. H. H. Todd. 

BROWN BREAD— No. 2 (Celebrated). 

Three cupfuls of sour milk, three-quarter cupful of 

molasses, three cupfuls of corn meal, 1 cupful of wheat 

flour, one-half cupful of graham, two teaspoonfuls of 

saleratus, a little salt ; steam three and one-half hours. 

Mrs. a. S. Stiles. 

BROWN BREAD— No. 3. 

One cupful of sweet milk, two of sour, three of corn 
meal, two cupfuls of wheat flour, one cupful of molasses, 
one teaspoonful of soda ; steam three hours. 

Mrs. F. C. Web]5. 

BROWN BREAD— No. 4. 
Two cupfuls of sweet milk, one of sour, one cupful 
of molasses, one cupful of wheat flour, one of graham, 
one heaping cupful of corn meal, two teaspoonfuls of 
soda, one of salt : steam four hours. 

Mrs. W. R. Hoyt. 

BISCUIT (Raised)— No. 2. 
One quart of warm milk, one-half cupful of yeast, 
flour to make a stiff batter, two eggs beaten light, piece 
of butter size of an egg, one-half cupful of sugar; mix 
up stiff and set to rise second time ; make out into 
biscuit, and when light again, bake. 

Mrs. Pische, 

Eau Claire. Wis. 



10 IHE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

BROWN CORN BREAD (Raised). 
Two cupfuls of corn meal scalded with enough Ijoil- 
ing water to wet through thoroughly, one-half cupful of 
New Orleans molasses; when cool add one and one-half 
cupfuls of hop yeast bread sponge and a little salt; 
stir and put to rise; when light add wheat flour enough 
to knead in a loaf; let it rise again and bake an hour 
and a quarter. Dewayne Gilbert. 

BISCUIT (Raised)— No. 1. 
Scald one pint of sweet milk, add butter the size of 
an egg; let it cool, then add one teacupful of yeast. Put 
two quarts of flour in a dish, pour the milk, yeast and 
butter in the center of the flour and let it stand over 
night, without stirring any of the flour in. Next morn- 
ing stir enough of the flour in to make a sponge ; when 
light, mix in the rest of the flour and more if needed to 
knead into a loaf; when light again, make into biscuit. 

Mrs. H. H. Todd. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

One cupful of r^'^e meal, one of fine corn meal, one- 
half cupful of flour, one teaspoonful of salt, one-half tea- 
spoonful of soda, one-third cupful of molasses, one and 
one-half of sweet milk ; steam three hours. 

Milwaukee Cooking School. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 

One C[uart of flour, three heaping teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, one even teaspoonful of salt; sift all 
together five or six times, then rub two tablespoonfuls 
of butter thoroughly into the flour ; mix very soft with 



1 HE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK 11 

inilk or water (milk is the best), knead as little as 
possible ; roll out and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. xA.. Hoffman. 

coleman bannock. 

One quart of milk, one pint of corn meal, one-half 
pint of flour, three eggs, two teaspoon fuls of baking 
powder, one of salt, one tablespoonful of butter, two of 
sugar, bake half an hour. 

Mrs. Washington Coleman, 

Bay City, Mich. 

COEN MEAL PUFFS. 

Four tablespoon fuls of corn meal scalded soft, one 
large spoonful of butter put cold in the hot meal, one 
coffee cupful of flour, two eggs beaten well, one scant 
cupiul of milk, a little salt. Bake in gem tins twenty- 
five minutes. Miss Hattie Whitney, 

(ireen Bay, Wis. 

FEENCH ROLLS. 

One quart of flour, four tablespoon fuls shortening,, 
four tablespoon fuls of .sugar, one cupful of sweet milk, 
two-thirds cupful of yeast. Mix the sponge in the morn- 
ing, and when light, make it into a loaf; let it rise and 
about two hours before using, roll out about half an 
inch thick, cut in three inch squares, butter, and turn 
over three cornered ; let them rise and bake a light 
brown. These are veiy nice. Mrs. T. M. Cary. 

GRAHAM BREAD— No. 1. 
Two and one-half cupfuls of sour milk, one cupful 
of brown sugar, or a little molasses, four cupfuls ot^ 



12 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

graham flour, two ciipfuls of white flour, two teaspoon- 
fuls of soda, a little salt ; this makes two loaves. Steam 
one hour. Mrs. W. G. Yates, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 

GKAHAM BEEAD— No, 2. 

Three cupfuls of sour milk, one-half cupful of brown 
sugar, two teaspoonfuls of soda, one-half cupful of wheat 
flour, add graham flour until you can stir conveniently 
with a spoon ; bake as soon as mixed. 

Mrs. a. 8. Stiles. 

GKAHAM BREAD— No. 3. 

One pint of warm milk, two-thirds cupful of yeast, 
teaspoonful of salt, flour enough to make a sponge ; let 
it rise over night ; in the morning, add two well-beaten 
€ggs and a little sugar, stir in graham flour until you 
have a thick batter; put in two tins; let it rise again; 
bake slowly. Mrs. A. Hoffman. 

GRAHAM GEMS— No. 1. 

Two cupfuls of sour milk, two tablespoonfuls of 
brown sugar, a little salt, two even spoonfuls of soda, 
graham flour to make a medium stiff batter. 

Mrs. W. R. Hoyt. 

GRAHAM GEMS— No. 2. 

One pint of sweet milk, one ^i^^ well beaten, a little 
salt, graham flour stirred in until the batter will drop 
from the spoon nicely, heat and butter the gem-pans 
before dropping in the dough; bake in a hot oven 
twentv minutes. Mrs. A. S. Stiles. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 13 

GEAHAM GEMS— No. 3. 
One cupful of graliam flour, one cupful of wheat 
flour, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, a little salt, one cup- 
ful of sweet milk, one egg beaten well, two teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder ; bake in a hot oven twenty minutes. 

Mrs. E. Seymour. 

JOHNNY CAKE— No. 1. 

One egg, one and one-half cupfuls of sour milk, one- 
half cupful of flour, one-fourth cupful of shortening, 
one-fourth cupful of sugar, one teaspoonful of soda, a 
little salt, one and one-half cupfuls of corn meal. 

Mrs. J. RuMSEY. 

JOHNNY CAKE— No. 2. 

One cupful of sour milk, one-half cupful of cream, 
one-fourth cupful of sugar, one egg, one teaspoonful of 
soda, a little salt, corn meal to make a medium stiff 
batter. Mrs. J. M. Bingham. 

JOHNNY CAKE— No. 3. 
Two cupfuls of corn meal, one cupful of wheat flour, 
three eggs, two and one-half cupfuls of sour milk, one 
tablespoonful of melted lard, two of white sugar (if you 
like it sweet), one teaspoonlul of soda, one teaspoonful 
of salt ; beat the whites and yolks separately, put the 
soda into the dry flour and meal and wet up gradually 
with the milk ; add the other ingredients, and lastly the 
whites of the eggs ; beat very thoroughly ; bake in a 
quick oven. Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 

MILK BREAD. 

One pint scalded milk, one tablespoonful each of but- 
ter and sugar, one-half cupful of yeast, stir in three cup- 



14 THE (JOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

fuls of flour, beat well, let it stand three hours, add three 
cupfuls more of flour, knead again thoroughly, let it 
rise, make into loaves and when light bake. 

MUFFINS~NO. 1. 

One pint flour, one cupful of sweet milk, one egg, 
three tablespoonfuls of sugar, three of butter, three even 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 

Mrs. V. W. Bayless, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

MUFFINS— No. 2. 

One pint sweet milk, three tablespoonfuls of melted 
butter, one teaspoonful of salt, three of baking powder, 
flour for a medium batter. Mrs. J. Rumsey. 

MUFFINS— No. 3. 

One cupful of sweet milk, two tablespoonfuls of 
melted butter, two eggs, two tablespoonfuls of corn 
meal, one and one-fourth cupfuls of flour, two tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder ; bake in gem tins. 

Mrs. T. J. Cunningham. 

MUFFINS— No. 4. 

One pint of sweet milk, three eggs, one cupful of 
flour, a little salt. Miss Belle Walrath. 

OAT MEAL GEMS. 

One cupful of oat meal, soaked in water, one cupful 
of sour milk, one cupful of Avheat flour, one teaspoonful 
of soda ; bake in hot gem tins. 

Mrs. R. D. Whittemore. 

OAT MEAL BREAD (Celebrated). 
Cook oat meal mush the same as for the table, use 



■JHK GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 15 

about a quart after it is cooked, add a piece of butter 
the size of an egg, two tablespoon fuls of sugar, and mix 
at noon. At night, put in three tablespoonfuls of yeast 
and flour as stiff as you can stir with a spoon ; before 
you leave it for the night, stir in more flour. In the 
morning do not hiead but form into loaves, let it rise, 
and just before you bake it put butter over the top. 

Mrs. Mary Richardson. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

Rub one-half tablespoonful of butter and the same of 
lard into two quarts of sifted flour, make a hole or well 
in the middle of the flour, pour in one pint of cold 
boiled milk, one-half cupful of yeast, one fourth cupful of 
sugar and a little salt. Do not stir but let it stand over 
night. Next morning, stir up, knead and let rise until 
near tea-time ; roll out and cut with biscuit cutter. 
Put a little melted butter on one-half, and lap nearly 
over the other half. Place al^out three-fourths of an 
inch apart in the pan, and bake quickly. 

PUFFET. 

Three teacupfuls of flour; butter, size of an egg, 
one and one-half teacupfuls of sugar, two teaspoonfuls 
of cream of tartar. Rub all together ; add one teacup- 
ful of sweet milk, one teaspoonful of soda, two eggs. 
Bake in a flat tin or pie plate. To be eaten warm 
for tea. Mrs. A. J. Cady. 

RYE BREAD. 

Set it as you do wheat bread, using wheat flour; 
mix as stiff as you can get it with rye meal, add cara- 



16 r/lE CrOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

way seed and a good pinch of salt, knead it well and 
bake when light. Mrs. Hiis[melsbach. 

SALT EISING BKEAD (By request). 

Yeast. Put tablespoonful of corn meal in a cup, ]>oui' 
over it half cupful of hot scalded sweet milk, and set it 
in a warm place to rise (if it can be kept warm dur- 
ing the night, set the evening before; if not, mix in tlie 
early morning), take one-half pint of warm water in 
pint bowl, half teaspoonful of salt, thicken with flour, 
about like cake batter, stir in the yeast, let rise an 
hour, have ready a pan of tiour. For two medium- 
sized loaves, take one pint of warm water (if water is 
hot, without scalding the flour, the better the bread 
will be), stir water into the flour with the above prepara- 
tions, beat well, but do not make too tliick ; sprinkle 
with flour, cover and set in a warm place to rise ; when 
light, mix as little as possible and form into smooth 
loaves; have the tins half- full; when risen to the 
top it is ready to bake. If your oven is just right, it 
will bake in half an hour. Mrs. Mary Richardson. 

SODA SCONES (Scotch). 

Two breakfast cupfuls of flour, half teaspoonful of 
salt, half teaspoonful of tartaric acid, three teaspoonfuls 
carbonate of soda. Mix all these things with a large 
breakfast cupful of buttermilk. Put large handful of 
flour on board, roll paste upon it; sprinkle flour on 
top and roll out one-half inch thick. Put on a hot 
griddle and bake each side five minutes, after cutting 
into square or circular pieces. 

Miss Christie McDougall. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 17 

WAFFLES— No. 1. 

One quart of tlour, two coffee cupfuls of sweet milk, 
rub two teaspoonfuls of butter and two of baking 
powder into the flour, add a teaspoonful of salt, beat 
the yolks of four eggs very light and mix with the 
milk, next add the flour, and lastly the whites of the 
eggs which have been beaten to a stiff froth. 

Mrs. F. C. Webb. 

WAFFLES— No. 2. 

One pint of milk, three tablespoonfuls of butter, a 
teaspoonful of salt, three teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Make your batter a little thicker than for pancakes. 

MkS. J. RUMSEY. 
WAFFLES— No. 3. 

One pint of sour milk, three tablespoonfuls of 
melted butter, three eggs, one teaspoonful of soda, a 
little salt, flour to make a batter little thicker than for 
griddlecakes. Mrs. A. S. Stiles. 

WHOLE WHEAT BEEAD. 

One pint of milk, scalded and cooled, two table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, one-half 
cupful of yeast, five cupfuls of whole wheat flour. 

WHEAT GEMS. 

Mix one teaspoonful of baking powder and a little 
salt in one pint of Hour, add one cupful of sweet milk, 
a piece of butter half the size of an q^^^., the yolks of 
two eggs, well beaten, and lastly the whites of the eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth. Bake at once in a quick oven. 

Mrs. F. C. Webb. 



18 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 19 



2{} MEMORANDA. 



M/uMORAiXDA. 



21 



22 MEMORANDA. 



Ephraim is a cake not turned. 

— HosEA, Chap. vii. 

GRIDDLE CAKES, FRITTERS, MUSH, ETC. 



GRIDDLE CAKES. 
BUCKWHEAT CAKES— No. 1. 

Pour boiling water over one-half cupful of corn 
meal, put this in two cupfuls each of flour and buck- 
wheat, mix with a quart of warm water, add one-half 
cupful of yeast, beat hard ten minutes ; set to rise in a 
warm place. In the morning, beat well and set to rise 
again before you bake them. Save a coffee cupful of 
batter for the next morning, when you will have to add 

a teaspoon ful of soda. 

Miss Hattie Whitney. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES— No. 2. 

Warm one pint of sweet milk and one pint of 
water, put half of this mixture in a stone crock, add 
five teacupfuls of buckwheat flour, beat until smooth, 
add the rest of the milk and water and a teacupful of 
yeast. Some put in a cupful of wheat flour. 

Miss S. A. Melching. 

BREAD CRUMB PANCAKES. 

One pint stale bread crumbs (not dried), one pint of 
scalded milk, one tablespoonful of butter ; pour the hot 
milk over the crumbs, add the butter, and soak over 



24 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

night; rub through a squash strainer and add two eggs, 
one cupful of flour, one-half teaspoonful of salt, two of 
baking powder, and if necessary thin with cold milk ; 
bake slowly. 

COKN MEAL CAKES. 

One cupful of milk, one of w^ater, one-half cupful of 
yeast, salt, corn meal and flour (use twice as much corn 
meal as you do of flour), make a sponge about as stiff as 
bread sponge, let it rise over night; in the morning, 
add two well beaten eggs and a little soda; bake on a 
liot griddle. Mrs. F. M. Buzzell. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

Heat a pint of sweet milk, add two heaping 
teaspoonfuls of butter, let it melt, then add a pint of cold 
milk, the well-beaten yolks of four eggs, a little salt, 
four tablespoonfuls of potato yeast, and sufficient flour 
to make a stiff batter; set in a warm place to rise; let 
it stand three or four hours or over night; add the 
whites beaten to a stiff froth just before you bake. 

GRAHAM GEIDDLE CAKES. 

One pint of milk scalded and cooled, one cupful of 
whole wheat flour, one cupful of white flour, one-fourth 
cupful of liquid yeast; let it rise over night; in the 
morning, add half a teaspoonful of salt, one table- 
spoonful of molasses, one saltspoonful of soda ; if too 
thick, add a little warm water. 

POTATO PANCAKES. 

Grate twelve good-sized potatoes and let them stand 
a few minutes, dip off the water which rises to the 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 25 

top and add the yolks of four eggs well beaten, one 
tablespoonful of flour and a little salt ; lastly, the 
whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth. As the 
mixture is quite stiff, it will be necessary to flatten the 
cakes on the griddle. More grease must be used in 
frying them than fi^r ordinary griddle cakes. 

Mrs. T. J. Cunningham. 

WHEAT BATTER CAKES. 

One quart of sour milk, one of wheat flour, 
three eggs beaten separately, a tablespoonful of melted 
butter, two level teaspoonfuls of soda. Put the soda 
in the flour, mix it in well, and then add the flour to 
the milk ; add the whites of the eggs just before baking 
on griddle. Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 



FRITTERS. 
FRITTER BATTER FOR OYSTERS, CLAMS AND TRIPE. 

One-half a cupful of milk or water, yolks of two 
well-beaten eggs, one tablespoonful of olive oil, a good 
pinch of salt, one cupful of flour, one tablespoonful of 
lemon juice ; and lastly, the white of the eggs beaten to 
a stiff" froth. This batter will keep several days. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Core and pare apples but do not break them ; cut 
them in slices about a third of an inch in thickness, 
leaving the opening in the center; sprinkle with sugar, 
lemon and spice, dip in fritter batter and fry in hot lard, 
drain as you take from the fat and sprinkle with soft 
sugar. For your batter, use the yokes of two well-beaten 



26 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

eggs, a teaspooiiful of sugar, one-half a cupful of milk, a 
little salt and one cupful of flour; add the whites of the 
eggs the last thing and have them beaten to a stiff 
froth. Mrs. R. F. Wilson, 

Eau Claire, Wis. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

One can of corn, one and one-half cupfuls of milk, 
one egg, one tablespoonful of sugar, one heaping cupful 
of flour, one heaping teaspoonful of baking powder ; salt 
and pepper ; fry in a frying-pan with butter. One 
tablespoonful of the batter makes a good-sized fritter. 

Miss Ida Z. Palmer. 

QUEEN FRITTERS. 

One * pint of water, four ounces of butter, eight 
ounces of flour ; put water in sauce pan, and when it 
boils, put the flour in all at one time, and stir and beat 
till it is a smooth and well-cooked mass. Take off and 
let cool for ten minutes. Add, one at a time, ten eggs, 
which beat into the mixture till absorbed (do not beat 
eggs before adding to the paste) add at the last, a trifle 
of salt unless the butter is salt. Fry in spoonfuls, 
dropped into plenty of lard. Half of this quantity is 
sufficient for an ordinary family. Do not use soda or 
baking powder. Mrs. Miller, 

Spooner, Wis. 

SPANISH FRITTERS. 

One-half pint of water, three ounces of butter, two 
ounces of sugar ; boil these together a couple of min- 
utes, throw in five ounces of flour, beat till smooth, let 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 27 

it cool a little, then add four eggs — one at a time — beat 
them in smoothly ; lastl3',add a teaspoonful of vanilla ; 
fry slowly in plenty of lard, like doughnuts; add 
powdered sugar before serving. This is a dessert suffi- 
cient for a large family. ^Irs. Chas. White, 

Green Bay, Wis. 



We cniltivate literature upon a little oatmeal. 

— Sydney Smith. 

MUSH. 
COKNMEAL MUSH. 
One quart of boiling water, one pint of corn meal, 
one tablespoonful of flour, one pint of cold milk (mush 
will brown better in frying if you use all milk), put 
one quart of water on to boil, mix as smoothly as pos- 
sible the corn meal, flour and salt with the milk ; stir 
this slowly with the boiling water. Eat hot with cream^ 
or cut in slices when perfectly cold, and fry in butter. 
You can use water instead of milk if you cannot get 
the milk. 

OATMEAL MUSH. 

One cupful of oatmeal, a teaspoonful of salt, one 
even quart of boiling water ; put the meal and salt in 
the top of a double boiler, add the boiling water, take 
it out of the lower boiler and let it cook rapidly on the 
stove five or ten minutes, stirring occasionally, set 
back into the boiler again, and let it cook about an 
hour; just before you remove it from the fire, stir it 



28 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 



up SO that the steam may escape, and it also makes it 
dryer. 

WHOLE WHEAT MUSH. 

Five cupfuls of boiling water, one cupful of whole 
wheat flour, a little salt. Boil five hours. 




MEMORANDA. 29 



30 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 31 



32 MKMORAjNDA. 



And then to breakfast, with 

What appetite you have. 

—Henry VIII. 

BREAKFAST AND TEA DISHES. 



Croquettes should always be rolled in the cracker or 
bread crumbs first, then in egg and so on, as often as the 
rule requires. 

If you bake rice once you will never boil it again. 
It comes from the oven, delicious, appetizing food ; from 
the water, a sticky, tasteless substance. 

Do not chop hash too fine. It makes it soft and 
mushy. There is a happy medium about the size of a 
small white bean. Hash is much nicer baked in the 
oven. 

BEEAKFAST DISH. 
(For a cold morning.) 

Take large green '' bell peppers," cut off the tops 
and remove the seeds. Fill with chopped veal and 
crumbs, season and prepare the same as for croquettes ; 
put a few crumbs on top of each and bake in oven. 
They look very pretty and are delicious to the taste. 

Mrs. Wm. O'Neil. 

baked hash. 

Remove all surplus fat and bits of gristle from 
boiled corned beef, chop fine; to one-third corned beef 
add two-thirds of chopped cold, boiled potatoes, and a 



34 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

small onion if you like ; season with pepper and salt, 
place in an earthen dish, dredge a little flour over it, 
pour in at the sides water enough to come up nearly level 
with top of hash ; bake one hour in oven ; when nearly 
done, add a piece of butter; stir through the hash. 

Mrs. T. M. Gary. 

BKEAKFAST HASH. 
Chop cold, corned beef into cubes; add one-third 
of cold, boiled potatoes, cut into the salne size ; put in 
one raM' onion, chopped fine, enough butter to keep 
perfectly moist; then fry until brown. 

''Long Lake Delicacy." 

BEOWN STEW. 

Take any scraps of cold meat, cut into dice, brown 
with one tablespoonful of butter and two of flour, salt 
and pepper to the taste, flavor with onions if liked, 
then stir in water until a thick gravy is formed, and 
serve hot. Mrs. H. H. Hurd. 

BAKED RICE. 

Wash a cupful of rice, put it in a pudding dish that 
will hold a quart of milk or more, add a little salt and 
a piece of butter, put in the oven and bake until the 
milk is all absorbed into the rice (about three quarters 
of an hour). Do not let it cook dr3\ You can eat 
cream and sugar on it, or serve as a vegetable with 
meats. Mrs. G. G. Ginty. 

CHICKEN CEOQUETTES— No. 1. 

The meat of a well boiled chicken, chopped fine 
and seasoned witii pepper and salt, mix with it a 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 35 

quarter as much cracker crumbs, make into balls with 
two tablespoonfuls melted butter and a little of the 
broth, roll in cracker crumbs, and then in beaten ^g'g^ 
then in cracker crumbs again ; fry in hot lard like fried 
cakes. Mrs. E. M. Miles. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES— No. 2. 

Chop very fine the meat of two chickens, season 
with pepper, salt and one-half of a saltspoonful of 
grated nutmeg, a tablespoon ful of parsley, melt in a 
stew-pan six ounces of butter, cook half an onion in it 
a short time, take out the onion, add two even table- 
spoonfuls of flour and a pint of the broth the chicken 
was boiled in, add a gill of sweet cream, let it boil up, 
add the chicken, stir well, put away in a dish to cool. 
Form into oval balls, roll in beaten yolks of eggs and 
cracker dust; fry in hot lard. Do not think it too 
thin when put away to cool, as cooling hardens them, 
and they can be easily moulded. They are not nice if 
too stiff. Veal can be used instead of chicken ; about 
a cjuart of chopped veal would be equal to the chicken. 

Mrs. Wm. O'Neill. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES— No. 3. 

One large chicken, one-quarter pound of butter, one- 
quarter pint of sw^eet cream, three tablespoonfuls of 
flour; salt, pepper, the juice of a lemon, and one dozen 
mushrooms chopped fine ; cut your chicken like dice ; 
melt the butter, put in flour, add the cream, boil for a 
few minutes, and if too thick add a little broth to thin 
it, put in chicken, mushrooms and lemon juice, one- 
half gill of Madeira wine, and spread on platter to cool ; 



36 THE GOOD CHliKR COOK BOOK. 

when cold, cut in small pieces, roll in egg and bread 
crumbs and fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. a. J. McGiLVKAY. 

ESCALLOPED CHEESE. 

Three eggs beaten separately, one cupful of bread 
crumbs soaked in two cups of milk ; one teacupful of 
grated cheese ; a little salt : bake half an hour. 

Mrs. J. C. Mitchell, 

Chicago, 111. 

EGG GEMS. 
Mix together any kind of cold meats, chopped fine. 
with an equal quantity of bread crumbs, season with 
salt, pepper, butter and a little milk, fill some buttered 
gem pans with the mixture, then carefully break an 
<dg^ on the top of each, sprinkle cracker crumbs, salt 
and pepper over the top, bake eight minutes. A little 
grated cheese may be added to the cracker, if desired. 

Mrs. T. W. Martin. 

EGG EOLLS. 

Six eggs, well beaten, one pint of milk, salt, five 
even tablespoon fuls of flour, grease the griddle, pour 
over thin, brown on one side, cut in lengths, and roll 
each piece up on the griddle. 

Mrs. S. J. YuNDT. 

EGG VERMICELLI. 

Toast four slices of bread, boil three eggs twenty 
minutes, one pint of boiling milk, one-half teaspoonful 
of salt, one-fourth teaspoonful of pepper, two table- 
spoonfuls of butter, two heaping tablespoon fuls of 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK-BOOK. 37 

flour, mix all together and cook, put whites of eggs 
through a fruit press, mix with the other ingredients 
and pour over the toast, pat yolks through the press 
and garnish the top. 

EGGS (Baked). 
Beat the whites of six eggs until stiff and dry, 
form them into a mound on a platter, make six little 
nests in the mound, drop the yolks into them without 
breaking. Put salt, pepper and butter on each. Then 
brown over in a very hot oven. Cooking School. 

EGGS (Deviled)— No. 1. 
Boil hard six eggs, remove the shells and halve 
each egg, slipping the yolks into a bowl. Prepare a 
dressing for them as follows: Two tablespoonfuls of 
melted butter, two of vinegar, one of sugar, one small 
tea.spoonful of French mustard, salt and pepper, add the 
yolks, rub all together until free from lumps, make into 
balls and replace in the whites, cut off the end of the 
egg so that it will stand upon the platter ; garnish with 
parsley. Mrs. H. Darland, 

Newark, N. Y. 

EGGS (Deviled)— No. 2. 
Boil twelve eggs fifteen minutes, cut lengthwise, 
take out yolks and mash them, add to them one 
tablespoonful of olive oil or butter, one teaspoonful of 
French mustard, two heaping tablespoonfuls of finely 
chopped ham ; salt and pepper to taste. Rub all 
together. Fill the whites with this mixture, and serve 
for tea or lunch. 



38 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

EGGS (Boiled "to the Queen's Taste"). 
Have the water boiling, put in the eggs and set the 
kettle on the back of the stove for five minutes. 

Dr. Chakles A. Hayes. 

FKENCH TOAST. 

Put one quart of milk in a double boiler, add two 
eggs well beaten, a little salt and a small piece of but- 
ter, dip slices of bread in the milk and fry in butter 
on a hot griddle until brown, place on a platter ; boil 
milk until it thickens, and pour over tht! toast ; if it 
does not thicken enough, add a little flour. 

Mrs. \. W. Bayless, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

FEIED CKEAM. 

One-half pound flour, six eggs, mix well together, 
dilute in one quart of milk, salt, flavor with lemon or 
vanilla, put on fire and stir fifteen minutes, add four 
ounces of sugar, yolks of four eggs ; spread on platter to 
get cold ; cut in squares, roll in egg and bread crumbs, 
fry in hot lard. Mrs. A. J. McGilvray. 

GREEN CORN BREAKFAST CAKES. 

Take one dozen ears of corn, quite well matured, 
grate, add two tablespoonfuls of flour, one cupful of 
milk, and three eggs, the whole to be mixed together 
and beaten to a batter; salt to taste; bake like 
griddle cakes. They should be sent to the table as fast 
as baked. This is delicious, and if once tried, will 
become a favorite. Mrs. H. H. Todd. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 39 

HARRISON CREAM TOAST. 

Melt ill one pint of morning's milk one large table- 
spoonful of butter, one teaspoonful of flour, stir it 
smooth in a little of the milk, two eggs beaten sep- 
arately; heat, but not boil milk and eggs, or it will 
curdle and loose the appearance of cream ; add salt ; 
when hot, dip the toast and pour the remainder over 
it ; serve hot. Mrs. H. H. Todd. 

HOMINY CROQUETTES. 

Warm a pint of cooked hominy in one or two table- 
spoonfuls of hot milk ; add the beaten yolk of one egg, 
and salt to taste, cool, shape, roll in beaten egg and 
crumbs, and fry. Mrs. Judson. 

MACARONI— No. 1. 

Five tablespoon fuls of grated cheese, one of flour, 
one of butter, one Qgg., one-lialf a cupful of cream ; salt 
and pepper; put over the lire and stir until the cheese 
is dissolved. Boil some macaroni in salted water about 
fifteen minutes, drain off the water, put milk over i^ 
and boil again for a few minutes ; stir all together and 
bake half an hour. 

Mrs. a. J. McGilvray. 

MACARONI— No. 2. 

Boil macaroni in milk and water until soft and well 
swollen out. Put a layer in a shallow baking dish, 
salt and pepper it, cut small slices of cheese over it, 
with small pieces of butter ; repeat this until the dish is 
full. Put milk and water in until it comes up so 



40 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

tliat you can see it on the sides of the dish, beat an '^i^'g 
and pour over the top and bake until it is dry enough 
to look and taste well. Mrs. G. C. Ginty. 

MACARONI— No. 3. 

Break one-half a pound of macaroni into inch 
lengths, boil in water slightly salted until tender, 
drcxin, put nearly one-half a cupful of cream into a 
saucepan, scald, and salt to taste, add one-half a table- 
spoonful of butter, then the macaroni, and heat. Put 
two tablespoonfuls of cream into a small saucepan, heat, 
stir in a tablespoon ful of butter, a little pepper, table- 
spoonful of flour wet with cold milk, four tablespoon- 
fuls of grated cheese ; when this is dissolved, add one 
beaten egg. Pour the macaroni into a baking dish and 
cover with the cheese mixture. Strew the top with 
fine bread crumbs and brown quickly. 

Mrs. Emma Miller, 

Beatrice, Neb. 

MACAEONI CEOQUETTES. 

One pint cold boiled macaroni chopped fine, heat 
and moisten with a little white sauce (found in " Catchups 
and Sauces " in this book), add the beaten yolk of one 
egg, two table spoonfuls of grated cheese, salt and 
pepper to taste; cool, make into balls, roll in crumbs, 
then in ^gg, then in crumbs again ; fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. S. J. YuNDT. 

OMELET (Plain). 

Nine eggs, three tablespoonfuls of butter, one-half 
cupful of flour, one small cupful of milk, salt and 
pepper to taste, beat the yolks light, mix baking 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 41 

powder size of a pea in the flour; beat the whites very 
stiff and pour the mixture over them, not mixing them 
together but dipping from top to bottom ; put a spoon- 
ful in a hot buttered pan, and as it browns roll over 
and over. Serve immediately. 

Mrs. J. W. Squires. 

OMELET (Delicate). 
The yolks of six eggs and whites of three, one 
tablespoonful of flour, dissolved in a cup of sw^eet milk, 
a little salt, beat the yolks well and mix with the 
milk, melt a tablespoonful of butter in a pan, pour in 
the mixture and bake in a hot oven ; when it puffs 
up, pour over it the remaining three whites well beaten: 
return it to the oven and let it bake a delicate brown. 
Serve hot. Mrs. E. Patton. 

OMELET (Frencli). 
One cupful of boiling milk, one tablespoonful of 
butter, put this on one cupful of bread crumbs (crumbs 
must be light), add salt, pepper and the yolks of six 
eggs, well beaten, mix thoroughly, and, lastly, add the 
six whites, beaten to a stiff froth. Have your pan hot, 
and grease well with butter. Bake ten minutes. 

Mrs. C. p. Barker. 

OMELET (Slaamrock). 
Take seven eggs, one small teacupful of milk, mix 
one teaspoonful of flour, one-half teaspoonful of salt ; 
beat the yolks, salt and flour together ; then add the 
milk ; beat the whites to a stiff froth ; have ready a hot 
pan ; put in a lump of butter size of an acorn ; add the 



42 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

whites to the yolks ; pour into the pan ; watch care- 
fully. When done, fold over and serve in a hot dish. 

Mrs. Kyle. 

POTATO KOLLS. 

One dozen good-sized potatoes, boiled and mashed, 
add the yolks of two well-beaten eggs, one large table- 
spoonful of cream, two tablespoonfuls of butter, one- 
half tablespoonful of salt, spoonful of nutmeg; beat 
thoroughly ; let the mixture cool ; make in rolls flat- 
tened at each end ; dip in egg, then in cracker dust ; frj- 
brown in hot lard. Mrs. Wm. O'Neil. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 
Boil, without stirring, a cup of rice until tender ; 
while warm, add two well-beaten eggs and a small piece 
of butter ; make into rolls and dip into either cracker 
crumbs or flour, and fry in lard. Miss Wilson, 

Menomonee, Wis. 

SUNDAY MORNING DISH. 

Make a kettle of corn-meal mush on Saturday, 
Sunday morning cut in nice square slices, roll in egg, 
then in cracker crumbs, fry rich brown. 

Mrs. McCluer, 

Stillwater, Minn. 

SHEPHERD'S PIE. 

Cold meat, chopped up and seasoned properly, put 
into a pudding dish ; moisten the meat with hot water ; 
put a layer of mashed potatoes over meat about two 
inches thick ; put a little butter on potatoes and bake. 

Mrs. Kyle. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 43 

TEA DISH. 

Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter in a frying pan, 
add one teaspoonful of flour and stir until smooth, then 
add one cupful of water, or stock if you have it, season 
with salt and pepper ; when it boils, add one quart of 
coarsely chopped cold veal ; let this heat thoroughly, 
then serve it on slices of nicely browned toast. A 
poached egg may be put on the center of each slice if 
wished. Mrs. Wm. O'Neil. 

VEAL CKOQUETTES. 

Chop cold veal fine, season highly with salt, pepper, 
a little cayenne, onion juice, celery salt and parsley. 
Moisten with beaten egg and white sauce (found in 
" Catchups and Sauces " in this book), shape in rolls, 
roll in tine bread crumbs, then in Qgg, in crumbs 
again, and fry in hot lard. Cooking School. 

VEAL SUPPER DISH. 

Take a shank of veal and boil it until the flesh 
drops off, chop into inch squares, boil the water the 
veal cooks in to a jelly and cool it; boil six eggs hard ; 
slice them and line a dish ; put the meat into the dish 
and pour the jelly over and set on ice. When you serve, 
turn the form out on a platter and garnish with celery 
leaves. Season it to taste when you take it from the pot. 

"Aunty Kyle." 

welsh rarebit. 

Grate one-quarter pound of rich cheese, moisten with 
one-half cupful of warm water, and same quantity of 
milk, add one well-beaten egg, piece of butter the 



44 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 



size of an egg, put in a pan and boil tliree minutes, 
then add a teaspoonful of mustard and a dash of cay- 
enne pepper. Have ready some buttered toast moist- 
ened with hot water. Pour the cheese over it and serve 
while hot. 




MEMORANDA. 45 



46 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. ^^ 



48 MEMORANDA. 



Wouldst thou botli eat thy cake and have it ? 

— Herbert. 

CAKES AND FROSTINGS. 



In making fruit cake, do not chop citron but cut 
crosswise of the melon-shaped pieces, in long, thin 
slices ; put a layer of the dough (containing all the 
other fruit) in your pan and lay around pieces of the 
citron about an inch from the sides of the pan, and so 
on until you have used the required quantity. This 
prevents it from burning on the bottom and sides of 
the pan, makes it smooth for the icing, and, when you 
cut your cake, cuts the citron just right. If you have 
a large fruit cake to bake, make a dough of graham 
flour and water, put this half an inch thick in the 
bottom of your pan, put a greased paper over it and 
then put in the cake dough; this prevents burning on the 
bottom, for a large cake has to be in the oven so long 
it is almost impossible to keep it from burning. 

Bake cookies on the dripper turned " up side 
down," and they will not burn. 

ALMOND CKEAM CAKE. 

Two cupfuls of pulverized sugar, one-quarter cupful 
of butter, one cupful of sweet milk, three cupfuls of 
flour, two and one-half teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
whites of four eggs beaten very light, one-half tea- 



50 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

spoonful of vanilla, bake in four layers, whip one cup- 
ful of sweet cream to a froth, stirring gradually into it 
half a cupful of pulverized sugar, a few drops of vanilla, 
one pound of almonds, blanched and chopped fine ; 
spread thickly between layers; frost top and sides. 

Mrs. J. RuMSEY. 

ALMOND CUSTARD CAKE-No. 1. 

Three cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, one 
cupful of sour milk (loppered), one teaspoonful of soda, 
five eggs, four cupfuls of flour; bake in layers, and put 
together with the custard used in "Almond Custard 
Cake— No. 2." 

ALMOND CUSTARD CAKE— No. 2. 

One-half cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, 
one-half cupful of sweet milk, two and one-half cup- 
fuls of flour, five eggs, two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder. 

Custard. — Two eggs, one tablespoonful of corn 
starch, one pint of milk, make very sweet, one pound 
of almonds, blanched and chopped fine; cook the 
custard until thick, add the almonds, and spread 
between layers. Mes. H. J. Goddard. 

ANGELS' FOOD. 
Use the whites of eleven eggs, one and one-half 
tumblerfuls of sifted granulated sugar, one tumblerful of 
sifted flour, one teaspoonful of vanilla, one teaspoonful 
of cream of tartar, sift the flour four times, add the cream 
of tartar and sift again, measure it before adding the 
cream of tartar, sift the sugar and measure it, beat the 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 51 

eggs to a stiff' froth on a large platter; on the same 
platter, add the sugar lightl}^ then the flour very 
gently, then the vanilla ; do not stop beating until you 
put it in the pan to bake; bake forty minutes in a 
moderate oven ; try with a straw ; do not open the oven 
until the cake has been in fifteen minutes ; turn the 
pan upside down to cool. When cold, use a knife to 
loosen around the sides if it does not drop out before. 
Never grease the pan ; the tumbler for measuring must 
hold two and one-fourth gills; the pan should have 
feet at the top to prevent the cake touching when 
turned to cool. Mrs. Hiram Allen, 

Bradford, Pa. 

"AUNTY BEALL'S" SPONGE CAKE. 

Eight eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, two 
tumblerfuls of sugar, two tumblerfuls of flour, flavor 
with lemon ; bake in a sheet. Beat the whites to a stifle 
froth, add the yolks to the whites which have been 
previously beaten very light, stir in slowly the sugar, 
and lastly the flour ; put together as quickly as possible ; 
do not beat; bake in a moderate oven. Make this cake 
on a large platter. 

BANANA CAKE. 

Two teacupfuls of sugar, scant half-cupful of butter, 
four eggs, three cupfuls of flour, one cupful of sweet 
milk, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, cream, butter 
and sugar together, and beat whites of eggs to a stiff 
froth, bake in layers, then make a plain frosting and 
spread between layers. Slice bananas thin and 



52 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

spread them over the frosting so that each shce will 
touch the other ; finish the cake with a plain frosting. 

Mrs. A.J. Bate. 

BLACK CAKE. 
Three cupfuls of sugar, one and one-half cupfuls of 
butter, one cupful of molasses, five eggs, one tablespoon- 
ful of cloves, two tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, two of 
nutmeg, a wine glass of wine or brandy, one teaspoon- 
ful of soda, one pound of flour, two pounds of fruit. 

Mrs. James Comerford. 

BLITZKUCHEN, OK LIGHTNING CAKE. 

Nine ounces of butter, nine ounces of sugar, nine 
ounces of flour, four whole eggs, clear the butter (that 
is, just melt it, then pour off" top so that no salt remains 
in it) ; then add sugar, eggs and flour ; spread in large 
bread pans very thin. Put chopped almonds, sugar 
and cinnamon on top, and bake till a very light brown, 
then cut in diamonds. Mrs. Himmelsbach. 

BREAD CAKE— No. 1. 

One-half pound of almonds, chopped fine, yolks of 
twelve eggs, three-fourths pound of pulverized sugar, 
grated rind of onelemoc, one teaspoonful of cloves, one 
teaspoonful of cinnamon, one-fourth pound of pulver- 
ized dry bread, one teaspoonful of baking powder, add 
whites of twelve eggs, beaten to stiff" froth, and almonds 
when ready to put in oven ; bake very slowly. 

Mrs. Himmelsbach. 

BREAD CAKE— No. 2. 

One teacupful of bread sponge, two-thirds cupful of 
butter, one and one-half cupfuls of sugar, two eggs, one 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 53 

teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, one- 
half teaspoonful of cloves, two cupfuls of flour, one 
cupful of stoned raisins ; let it rise half an hour, and 
bake in a slow oven. Mes. H. H. Todd. 

BRIDE'S CAKE. 

Whites of sixteen eggs, four cupfuls of pulverized 
sugar, one scant cupful of butter, one cupful of sweet 
milk, five cupfuls of flour, three teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, flavor with lemon or almond; just before 
baking, add a tablespoonful of brandy, cream the 
butter and sugar, add the milk, then half the flour, 
then a portion of the whites of the eggs, beaten to a 
high froth, then more flour and the rest of the eggs ; get 
together as quickly as possible and do not beat the 
mixture. Bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. R. F. Wilson, 

Eau Claire, Wis. 

BURNETT CAKE. 

One and one-half cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful 
of butter, one cupful of sweet milk, whites of four eggs 
and yolks of three, three cupfuls of flour, three tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder ; bake in dripping pan, sift 
one-half cupful of sugar over top before baking ; flavor 
with lemon. Mrs. T. W. Martin. 

CARAMEL CAKE— No. 1. 

One cupful of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, one- 
half cupful of sweet milk, whites of four eggs, two cup- 
fuls of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 

Caramel for the Top. — Six heaping tablespoonfuls of 



54 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

grated chocolate, two eggs, one cupful of brown sugar, 
one teaspoon ful of vanilla, scant one-half cup of sweet 
milk; mix together and stir while boiling until thick. 

Miss Fanny Ginty. 

CARAMEL CAKE— No. 2. 

One cupful of sugar, one and one-half cupfuls of 
flour, two eggs, one-half cupful of sweet milk, butter 
size of an egg, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 

Frosting. — Take one cupful of brown sugar, one-half 
cake sweet chocolate, one-half cupful sweet milk, 
butter size of an egg, two teaspoonfuls of vanilla, mix 
thoroughly and cook as syrup ; let it cool and spread 
on cake as soon as taken from the oven. 

Mrs. J. COMERFORD. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE— No. 1. 

Whites of four eggs, one cupful of sugar, one-half 
cupful of butter, one and one-half cupfuls of flour, one- 
half cupful of sweet milk, one and one-half teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder ; beat the butter and sugar until light, 
add the milk, then the flour and beaten whites ; when 
well beaten, divide in equal parts, into one-half grate one- 
half cake sweet chocolate ; bake in layers ; put together 
with boiled frosting or custard ; alternate white and dark 
layers. 

Custard. — Add one-half tablespoonful of butter to 
one cupful of milk, let it come to a boil, stir one %gg 
beaten with one-half cupful of sugar and one teaspoon- 
ful of corn starch into the milk ; flavor with vanilla or 
lemon. Mrs. T. M. Gary. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 55 

CHOCOLATE CAKE— No. 2. 

One cupful of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, one- 
half cupful of milk, two cupfuls of flour, two eggs, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder ; bake in thin layers. 

For the Jelly. — Grate one-half cake of sweet choco- 
late, one-half cupful of sweet milk, yolk of one egg, one 
teaspoonful of vanilla, one cupful of sugar, boil until 
stiff like jelly ; when cold, spread between the layers ; the 
jelly should be made first. Mrs. Himmelsbach. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE— No. 3. 

The whites of three eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, one 
teacupful of sugar, one-half cupful of sweet milk, one- 
fourth cupful of butter, one heaping teaspoonful of bak- 
ing powder, one coft'eecupful of flour ; flavor with one- 
half teaspoonful of lemon and vanilla each ;. bake in 
square tins. 

Frosting. — Take a small cupful of granulated sugar 
and wet it with five teaspoonfuls of water ; let it boil ; 
while boiling, put in one teaspoonful of vinegar; boil 
until clear and ropy, then pour it over the white of one 
Qg'g, beaten to a stiff froth, and then stir in one-fourth 
cake of Baker's Chocolate, grated ; beat until nearly cold, 
and spread over the cake ; then make a white frosting, 
same as above, leaving out the chocolate ; flavor with a 
few drops each of lemon and vanilla, and spread on the 
chocolate frosting. Mrs. B. E. Ried. 

CIRCLE CAKE. 

One egg, one cupful of sugar, two cupfuls of flour, 
one-third cupful of butter, one-half cupful of sweet milk, 
one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, one-half teaspoon- 



56 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

fill of soda, or two even teaspoonfuls of baking powder ; 
flavor with rose or lemon. Mrs. R. B. Clark, 

COCOANUT BAE. 

Bake a white cake in a dripper ; when cold, cut in 
squares a pretty size for the cake basket, have ready a 
good supply of frosting made with pulverized sugar 
(boiled will not do, as it hardens before you can use it) ; 
pour a box of grated cocoanut into a shallow dish, take 
a square of the cake on a fork, and with a spoon, cover it 
on all sides with the frosting; then roll in the cocoanut 
until it is covered. Put near the fire to dry; when dry 
fill your cake basket with the bars. After you have 
made two or three you will have no trouble ; this is a 
fussy cake to make, but is so delicious and looks so 
pretty after it is made, you can afford to make it on 
grand occasions. Mrs. Leslie Willson, 

Eau Claire, Wis. 
COCOANUT CAKE. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, one-half 
cupful of sweet milk, three cupfuls of sifted flour, three 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, five eggs. 

Frosting for Layers and Top. — Whites of three eggs, 
one cupful of pulverized sugar, one cupful of cocoanut. 

Mrs. H. J. GoDDARD. 

COCOANUT JUMBLES. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, two eggs, 
three cupfuls of flour, small teaspoonful of soda, one 
grated cocoanut or one cupful of prepared cocoanut. 
Miss Etta Gary, 

Binghampton, N. Y. 



'/■///; GOOD CHKKK COOK BOOK. 57 

COCOANUT MACAROONS. 

Beat the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth, add one- 
half pound of sugar, one-half pound of grated cocoanut, 
beat until stiff enough to form in little balls the size of 
a nutmeg, dip the finger in cold water, and smooth them 
into any form you like ; bake slowly on a greased paper 
for three-quarters of an hour. 

COCOANUT COOKIES. 

One and one-half cupfuls of sugar, three-fourths cup- 
ful of butter, one-half cupful of sw^eet milk, two eggs, 
one cupful of grated cocoanut, one-half teaspoonful of 
soda, one teaspoonful of vanilla, flour enough to make 
as soft as possible, and roll out ; bake in a hot oven. 

Mrs. L. H. Gushing. 

COCOANUT POUND CAKE. 
Two cupfuls of pulverized sugar, two-thirds cupful 
of butter, one cupful of sweet milk, one-half cupful 
of corn starch, two and one-half cupfuls of flour, whites 
of five eggs, one and one-half teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, one cupful of cocoanut ; flavor. 

Mrs. H. L. Cruttenden, 

North field, Minn. 

COFFEE CAKE— No. 1. 

Four cupfuls of flour, one cupful of butter, one cup- 
ful of coffee prepared as for table, one cupful of molasses, 
one cupful of brown sugar, one pound raisins, two eggs, 
one teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoonful of spices of all 
kinds. Mrs. A. S. Stiles. 

COFFEE CAKE— No. 2. 

Two cupfuls of brown sugar, two small cupfuls of 



58 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

butter, one cupful of molasses, one cupful of strong 
coffee (cold), five cupfuls flour, one pound of raisins, one 
pound of currents, one-quarter pound of citron, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, one tablespoonful of cloves, one table- 
spoonful of cinnamon, one tablespoonful of ground 
coffee, one nutmeg, one wine glassful of wine, four eggs. 

COOKIES. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, one-half 
cupful of sour milk, two eggs, one-half teaspoonful of 
soda ; flavor with lemon ; sift sugar over the top before 
baking. Mrs. H. H. Todd. 

CREAM CAKE. 

One cupful of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, one- 
half cupful of sweet milk, one-half cupful of corn 
starch, one and one-half cupfuls of fiour, one teaspoon- 
ful of baking powder, whites of four eggs. 

Cream. — Whip one cupful of sweet cream, add 
sugar and flavoring to taste, and spread between layers, 
or make a boiled frosting, and first spread between each 
layer, then the cream. It will keep better with the 
frosting, but is better without if eaten fresh. 

Mrs. F. T. Condit. 
cream cookies. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, one 
cupful of sour cream, two eggs well beaten, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, stir the butter and sugar to a cream, 
a little salt ; flavor to taste. Mrs. J. Rumsey. 

CREAM GINGER CAKE. 

One cupful of sour cream, one cupful of molasses, 
one ^gg, a little salt, one teaspoonful of ginger, one 



IIIE iiOO/) CUKF.R COOK BOOK. 59 

teaspoonful of soda, cinnamon if you like ; no rule for 
fiour ; make as soft as can be and not fall. 

Mrs. H. H. Todd. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

Boil in half a pint of water three-quarters cupful of 
butter, stir in one and three-quarters cupfuls of flour, 
take from the fire and put into a large bowl and stir in 
five eggs, one at a time, without beating, add one-half 
teaspoonful of soda. Drop in small bits about a table- 
spoonful on a greased paper in a dripping pan ; bake 
in a quick oven. 

Filling. — One quart of milk, five eggs, one and 
one-half cupfuls of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of corn 
starch, flavor with vanilla. When cakes are cool cut 
open and fill. Miss Angie Wilson, 

Menomonie, Wis. 

CRULLERS— No. 1. 

Dissolve a teaspoonful of soda in four tablespoonfuls 
of milk, four tablespoonfuls of melted butter, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, beat four eggs with six heaping table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, add half a nutmeg. These will keep 
for weeks if put in a jar and covered. Omitting the salt 
will keep them from being brittle. 

Miss J. E. Dickinson. 

CRULLERS— No. 2. 

Five tablespoonfuls of sugar, five tablespoonfuls of 
sweet cream, three teaspoon fuls of alcohol, two tea- 
spoonfuls baking powder, add flour, roll out thin as pie 
crust, and fry as doughnuts. Mrs. Piper, 

Eau Claire, Wis. 



60 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

CUSTAED CAKE No. 1. 

One cupful of sugar, one-half cupful of butter (scant), 
whites of four eggs, one-half cupful of sweet milk, one 
heaping teaspoonful of baking powder, one a,nd one- 
half cupfuls of flour. 

Custard for Cake. — One and one-half cupfuls of milk, 
yolks of four eggs, one tablespoonful of corn starch, 
one-half cupful of sugar, a pinch of salt ; cook until 
thick ; flavor with lemon, vanilla or chocolate. 

Mrs. W. Irvine. 

CUSTAED CAKE No. 2. 

One cupful of sugar, one and one-third cupfuls of 
flour, three eggs, one heaping teaspoonful of baking 
powder, one tablespoonful of water, bake in round tins, 
cut in two and spread between and on the top a custard 
made as follows : One pint of sweet milk, one cupful 
of white sugar, two tablespoonfuls of corn starch, two eggs; 
beat thoroughly the sugar, eggs and corn starch ; stir 
into the boiling milk ; add butter the size of an egg, 
three teaspoonfuls of vanilla ; cook until thick. The 
white of one egg can be saved to frost the top. 

Mrs. a. Hoffman. 

DAEK CHOCOLATE CAKE— No. 1. 

Cream one-half cupful of butter, gradually add one 
and one-half cupfuls of sugar, grate one-quarter of a 
cake of Baker's Chocolate, add five more tablespoonfuls 
of sugar and three tablespoonfuls of boiling water, put 
on the stove and stir until smooth and glossy, then add 
it to the beaten butter and sugar ; add the beaten yolks 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 61 

of three eggs, one-half cupful of milk, one and three- 
quarters cupfuls of fiour, in which one teaspoonful of 
cream of tartar and one-half teaspoonful of soda have 
been thoroughly mixed ; add the whites of three 
eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, bake twenty minutes in a 
moderate oven. Put together with "Chocolate Frosting 
No. 2." English walnuts, chopped fine and sprinkled on 
the frosting between the layers, is very nice. 

Mrs. J. W. Squires. 

DAKK CHOCOLATE CAKE— No. 2. 

One cupful of sugar, one tablespoonful of butter, one 
cupful of milk, two cupfuls of flour, two eggs beaten 
separately, two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
one-quarter cake Baker's Chocolate grated in a small 
half cupful of milk (this in addition to the cupful 
of milk), boil in a basin, set in hot water until like a 
paste, then add one cupful of sugar, yolk of one ^gg, 
two teaspoonfuls of vanilla ; let it cool slightly and stir 
into the cake ; bake in four la3^ers and put together with 
any chocolate frosting. Mrs. Whitney, 

Green Bay. 

DARK CHOCOLATE CAKE— No. 3. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, one- 
half cupful of thick sour milk, three eggs, one-half 
teaspoonful of soda, one-fourth of a cake of Baker's 
chocolate dissolved in one-half cupful of hot water, one 
and one-half teaspoonfuls of vanilla, a little salt, two 
cupfuls of flour; bake in a loaf forty minutes. 

Mrs. Wm. O'Neil. 



62 THE GOOD CHEER COOK 7W0A'. 

DELICATE CAKE— No. 1. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, 
whites of six eggs beaten to a stiff froth, three-fourths 
cupful of sweet milk, three cupfuls of flour, two tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder or one teaspoonful of 
cream of tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda ; flavor 
with lemon or almond. Mrs. A. J. Cady. 

DELICATE CAKE— No. 2. 

One cupful of butter, three cupfuls of sugar, whites 
of ten eggs, four and one-half cupfuls of flour, one 
cupful sweet cream, three teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder; flavor. Mrs. Peter Leonard, 

Fifield, Wis. 

DOUGHNUTS. 
One-half cupful of yeast, or a good yeast cake, one 
cupful of lard, three cupfuls of sweet milk, two cupfuls 
of sugar, if you want them quite sweet a little more 
sugar, four eggs, one teaspoonful of soda, nutmeg and 
cinnamon ; warm milk, lard and sugar together, make 
sponge in the afternoon, put eggs and soda in when 
you knead it up at night; cut them out in the morning 
and let them rise again on a board near the fire. Keep 
warm all the time. Mrs. S. F. Gary, 

Binghamton, N. Y. 

DOLLY VARDEN CAKE. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, two-thirds cupful of butter, 
one cupful of sweet milk, three cupfuls of flour, three 
eggs, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, flavor with 
lemon, bake half in jelly tins; to the remainder add 
one tablespoonful of molasses, oneteacupful of chopped 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 63 

raisins, one-half cupful of citron, one teaspoonful each 
of cinnamon and cloves. Bake same as white cake and 
put together with frosting, alternating dark and light. 
Mrs. D. G. Purman, 

Washington, D. C. 

ENGLISH NUT CAKE WITH RAISINS. 
Two cupfals of brown sugar, one-half cupful of butter, 
one scant cupful of sour milk, yolks of five eggs, two 
cupfuls of flour, one teaspoonful of soda, two teaspoon- 
fuls of cinnamon, one teaspoonful of cloves, one-half 
nutmeg, one pound of stoned raisins, one pound of 
English walnuts, one teaspoonful of brandy ; save 
twenty-four halves for top, chop the rest and put in 
cake. Mrs. T. J. Cunningham. 

FIG CAKE— No. 1. 

One cupful of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, one- 
half cupful of sweet milk, one-half cupful of corn 
starch, one and one-half cupfuls of flour, one teaspoon- 
ful of baking powder, whites of four eggs. 

Filling. — One pound of figs cut in pieces, two-thirds 
cupful of sugar, water enough to stew. 

Mrs. F. T. Condit. 

FIG CAKE— No. 2. 

Two teacupfuls of sugar rolled fine, one scant, 
half teacupful of butter, cream the sugar and butter 
together, four eggs beaten separately, one cupful of 
sweet milk, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, three 
cupfuls of flour sifted. 

Filling. — One pound of figs, one-half cupful of 



64 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

sugar, one cupful of water, white of one egg, one tea- 
spoonful of vanilla. Let the sugar and water boil 
until clear, then drop in the figs and boil until tender 
enough to mash ; remove from the fire and cool a little 
after mashing; stir in the egg slightly beaten, then the 
vanilla, and spread between layers and frost. 

Mrs. a. J. Bate. 

FIG CAKE— No. 3. 

Beat the yolks of three eggs with not quite two 
cupfuls of sugar, then add four tablespoonfuls of melted 
butter, two-thirds cupful of sweet milk, whites of three 
eggs beaten to a stiff froth, and lastly two cupfuls of 
flour, and two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. This 
quantity will make two cakes. 

Fig paste for cake. — One pound of raisins, one 
pound of almonds, three-quarters pound of figs, one-half 
pound of citron ; blanch the almonds by pouring hot 
water over them ; chop fine and moisten with brandy or 
wine ; it will require a good-sized cupful ; place between 
layers, first frosting, then fig paste alternately. 

Mrs. Daisy Grossman. 

FRIED cakes— No. 1. 

One cupful of sugar, two eggs, one cupful of sour 
milk, two teaspoonfuls of soda, two and one-half table- 
spoonfuls of butter, salt and nutmeg; mix soft as 
possible. Mrs. Himmelsba(jh, 

FRIED CAKES— No. 2. 

Three eggs, three tablespoonfuls of butter, one cup- 
ful of sugar, one cupful of sweet milk, two teaspoonfuls 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK 65 

of baking powder, cinnamon or nutmeg to flavor, mix 
just stiff enough to roll out nicely. 

Mrs. Culver, 

Bay City, Mich. 

FRIED CAKES— No. 3. 

Two eggs, one cupful of sour cream, one cupful of 
sour milk, one cupful of sugar, a little salt, one teaspoon- 
ful of soda, a little cream tartar if the milk is not 
very sour, cinnamon or nutmeg to flavor. 

Mrs. J. COMERFORD. 
FRIED CAKES— No. 4. 

One cupful of sugar, one cupful of sweet milk, six 
tablespoonfuls of melted butter, three teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder. Mix soft ; let the sugar and milk stand 
together twenty minutes ; flavor with nutmeg. 

Mrs. W. L. Pierce. 

FRENCH CAKE. 

Cream two cupfuls of sugar and half a cupful of 
butter, add one cupful of sweet milk, three eggs, yolks 
and whites beaten separately, sift two tablespoonfuls of 
baking powder in three cupfuls of flour; flavor to suit; 
use as a plain or layer cake. 

Mrs. Emma Miller, 

Nebraska. 

FRUIT CAKE FOR A WEDDING. 

One and one-half pounds of butter, one and three- 
quarter pounds of sugar, half brown and half white, 
two pounds of eggs, well beaten, four pounds of raisins, 
seeded and chopped, five pounds of English currants, 



66 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

two pounds of citron, cut fine, two pounds of sifted 
flour, two nutmegs, as much mace in bulk, one gill to 
one-half pint of alcohol, into which drop fifteen drops 
of oil of lemon ; weigh your butter, cut it in pieces 
and put where it will soften (not melt), stir the butter 
to a cream, add the sugar and stir until white, beat the 
yolks of the eggs and add to the butter and sugar. 
Meanwhile, another person should beat the whites to a 
stiff froth and put them in, then add the spices and 
flour, and last of all the fruit (except citron) ; put the 
citron in three la3^ers, one near the bottom, one 
about the middle, and the last layer near the top of the 
cake. As you lay it in, dip a spoon in cold water and 
smooth over the cake to make it even for the cit- 
ron. This will make two very large or four good-sized 
cakes. Bake from three to four hours slowly. It is 
better to have the baker bake them for you in a brick 
oven. The cake will keep years. 

Mks. E. D. Stanley. 

FRUIT CAKE— No. 1. 

Twelve eggs, one pound of butter, one pound of 
brown sugar, one pound of sifted flour, one-half cupful 
of black molasses, three pounds of stoned raisins, three 
pounds of currants, one pound of citron, one-half cup- 
ful of brandy, one and one-half pounds of almonds, one 
tablespoonful of cloves, two of cinnamon and allspice, 
one-half teaspoonful of soda, grated rind and juice of 
one lemon, one nutmeg; beat yolks, butter and sugar 
together, whites to a stiff froth, and add alternately 
with flour, then spices and fruit; put in a pan a layer of 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 67 

dough ; add citron as in receipt for " Wedding Cake " ; 
bake slowly and evenly four hours or longer. 

Mrs. p. Leonard, 

Fifield, Wis. 

FRUIT CAKE— No. 2. 

One cupful of sugar, one cupful of molasses, two cup- 
fuls of flour, one-half cupful of butter, one-half cupful 
of sour cream, three eggs, one-half teaspoonful of soda, 
three pounds of stoned raisins, one pound of citron, one 
pound of tigs, one pound of currants, one-half pound of 
almonds (shelled), one gill of wine, one gill of brandy, 
one orange, two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, one teaspoon- 
ful of cloves, one teaspoonful of mace, two nutmegs, a 
little salt. Mrs. H. L. Cruttenden, 

Northfield, Minn. 

FEUIT CAKE— No. 3. 

One cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, one cup- 
ful of sour milk, one cupful of New Orleans molasses, 
three cupfuls of flour, one teaspoonful of soda, one tea- 
spoonful of cloves, two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, one 
pound of raisins, one pound of currants, one-half pound 
of citron, one-half cupful of nuts, one teaspoonful of 
vanilla. Mrs. A. Hoffman. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

One cupful of butter, one teacupful of sugar, two 
cupfuls of molasses, one teaspoonful of grated alum, 
one teaspoonful of ginger, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, 
four teaspoonfuls of soda, one cupful of boiling water. 
Take half of the water to dissolve the soda and half for 
the alum, mix soft and let them stand for two hours, 



68 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

then roll out about one-quarter of an inch thick, adding 
more flour if needed ; do not cut out with a cake cutter, 
but in long strips, crease them with a knife in squares 
and cut apart after baking. These are very nice if made 
as directed. Mrs. T. M. Gary. 

GINGER SNAPS— No. 1. 
One cupful of molasses, one-half cupful of butter, 
one tablespoonful of soda dissolved in one tablespoon- 
ful of hot water, one tablespoonful of ginger and 
cinnamon. Mrs. Herbert Barker. 

GINGER SNAPS— No. 2. 

One cupful of butter, one cupful of brown sugar, 
one cupful of molasses, two small tablespoon fuls of gin- 
ger, one even tablespoonful of soda, one tablespoonful 
of cinnamon, one egg, stir all together and let it just 
come to a boil, flour enough to roll very thin, and bake 
in a hot oven. Mrs. Wm. Irvine. 

GINGER SNAPS— No. 3. 

One cupful of butter, or part lard, one cupful of 
molasses, one cupful of sugar, one teaspoonful of cinna- 
mon, one teaspoonful of ginger, two teaspoonfuls of 
soda, one egg beaten separately, flour enough to roll 
thin. Mrs. T. M. Cary. 

GINGER SNAPS— No. 4. 

One cupful of butter, one cupful of sugar, one cup- 
ful of molasses, one tablespoonful of ginger, one table- 
spoonful of cinnamon, two teaspoonfuls of soda, flour 
enough to roll thin. Mrs. W. L. Pierce. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 69 

GINGEE SNAPS— No. 5. 
Two cupfuls of molasses, one cupful of brown sugar, 
one-half cupful of butter, one-half cupful of lard, one 
heaping tablespoonful of ginger, three tablespoonfuls 
of water, one good teaspoon ful of saleratus, one tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon ; boil all together five minutes, 
then cool and add flour until stiff enough to roll well. 

Mrs. Porter, 

Baraboo, Wis. 

GINGER CUP CAKE. 

Three cupfuls of flour, one cupful of sugar, one 
cupful of molasses, one cupful of butter, one cupful of 
sweet milk, three eggs, one tablespoonful of ginger, one 
tablespoonful of cinnamon, one teaspoonful of soda. 
Heating the molasses improves the cake. 

Mrs. M. S. Bailey. 

GOLD AND SILVER JELLY CAKE. 

White part : Two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of 
butter, one and one-half cupfuls of flower, whites of 
eight eggs, one teaspoonful of lemon. Yellow part : 
Two cupfuls of sugar, two-thirds cupful of butter, one 
and one-half cupfuls of flour, yolks of eight eggs. Put 
together in alternate layers with jelly. 

Mrs. Comerford. 

gold cake. 
Yolks of four eggs, one cupful of sugar, one-half 
cupful of butter, one-half cupful of sweet milk, two 
cupfuls of flour, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, 
one-half of soda. Mrs. Joel Pound. 



70 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

GROOM'S CAKE. 

One pound of butter, one pound of brown sugar, 
one pound of stoned raisins, one pound of currants, 
one and one-quarter pounds of flour, one and one-half 
pounds of chopped figs, one and one-half pounds of 
chopped blanched almonds, one pound of citron sliced 
very thin, eight eggs, one-half cup of molasses, one- 
half cup of sweet milk, three teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, one nutmeg, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, 
one-half teaspoonful of cloves, two teaspoonfuls of 
lemon extract, two teaspoonfuls of vanilla, one-half 
teacup of brandy, cream the butter and sugar, add 
the eggs, well-beaten, put the baking powder in the 
flour, then rub the fruit in the flour, mix all well in a 
large dish stirring the spices into the mixture ; 
add tlie brandy the last thing before baking. When 
you wish it extra nice, use a thin icing, then a layer 
of macaroons, then ice again, generously. It is a good 
plan to get the baker to bake this cake in a brick oven. 

Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 
hash cake. 

One and one-half cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful 
of butter, one and one-half cupfuls of flour, one-half cup- 
ful of corn starch, one teaspoonful of baking powder, 
whites of six eggs. For filling : One cupful of raisins, 
one cupful of chopped hickory nuts, one-half cupful of 
currants, mix together with boiled icing, put on top and 
between layers. You can use figs and almonds if you 
wish. Mrs. Waters. 

HICKORY NUT CAKE. 

Cream two-thirds cupful of butter, with two cupfuls 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 71 

of sugar, add one cupful of milk, three even cupfuls of 
flour, three eggs, beaten separately, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, one and one-half cupfuls of nuts, 
sliced fine, flavor with almond or vanilla. This is nice 
made in a loaf, or baked in dripper, with twenty-four 
halves saved for top. Frost and cut in squares. 

Mrs. T. J. Cunningham. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

One cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, whites 
of eight eggs, one cupful of sweet milk, two cupfuls of 
flour, one cupful of corn starch, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder. 

Icing. — Whites of four eggs, four cupfuls of sugar, 
boil sugar in a little water until it begins to candy, 
pour this into the beaten whites and beat to a cream, 
add one teaspoonful of citric-acid to the frosting. 

Mrs. M. S. Bailey. 

KISSES. 

Beat the whites of four eggs to a stiff froth, add 
three-quarters pound of sugar, flavor with lemon, butter 
your paper, drop the mixture — a small teaspoonful in 
a place — bake in a very moderate oven until the tops 
are hardened, slip them off carefully with a knife. 

LEMON CAKE— No. 1. 

One-half cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, two 
and one-half cupfuls of flour, one-half cupful of corn 
starch, one cupful of sweet milk, six eggs, whites only, 
two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 

Filling. — Grated rind and juice of two lemons, two 



72 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

eggs, one and one-half cupfuls of sugar, stir steadily- 
over the fire until it thickens. When cold, spread 
between the layers. Mrs. Culver, 

Bay City, Mich. 
LEMON CAKE- -No. 2. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, two and one-half cupfuls of 
flour, one-half cupful of sweet milk, six tablespoonfuls 
of melted butter, six eggs, one teaspoon ful of cream of 
tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda. 

Lemon Jelly. — The juice and grated rind of three 
lemons, two and one-half cupfuls of sugar, nearly half 
cupful of butter, six eggs ; beat well together and scald 
until thick, and spread between layers. This makes a 
very large cake. Mrs. John Rumsey. 

LOAF CAKE. 

One cupful of butter beaten together with two cup- 
fuls of sugar; add four eggs beaten separately, one 
teaspoonful of soda dissolved in one cupful of milk, two 
teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar mixed in three cupfuls 
of flour; flavor; beat well. This makes two loaves. 
Excellent. Mrs. L. H. Cushing. 

LONG LAKE DOUGHNUTS. 

One cupful of sweet milk, warmed with a piece of 
butter the size of an egg, three eggs beaten separately, 
one-half cupful of yeast, flour to make stiff" enough to 
drop from the spoon. Let rise over night ; in the morn- 
ing drop the batter from the spoon on a well-floured 
board ; let them rise half an hour, then fry in hot lard. 
When done, roll in sugar and cinnamon mixed together. 

Mrs. Hollon Richardson. 



THE GOOD CHKER COOK BOOK. 73 

MACAKOONS— No. 1. 

Whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff froth, one-half 
pound of cocoanut, one-half pound of rolled and sifted 
crackers, one teaspoonful of bitter almond, bake on a 
greased paper. 

MACAROONS— No. 2. 

One cupful of hickory nut meats pounded tine, one 
cupful of sugar, one and one-half eggs, two tablespoon- 
fuls of tiour. 

MAEBLE CAKE— No. 1. 

For the white : One-half cupful of butter, one and 
one-half cupfuls of white sugar, one-half cupful of 
sweet milk, two and one-half cupfuls of flour, whites of 
four eggs, one-half teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoonful 
of cream of tartar. For the dark : One cupful of brown 
sugar, one-half cupful of butter, one-half cupful of 
molasses, one-half cupful of sweet milk, two and one- 
half cupfuls of flour, yolks of four eggs, one-half tea- 
spoonful of soda, one teaspoonful cream of tartar. 

Mrs. a. Hoffman. 

MARBLE CAKE— No. 2. 

Three-quarters pound of butter, one pound of flour, 
one pound of sugar, the whites of twent}'- eggs ; mix in 
the usual way ; take out one teacupful of the batter, 
mix well in it a tablespoonful each of ginger, nutmeg, 
cinnamon and allspice, teaspoonful each of mace and 
cloves. Put about half of the white batter into the cake 
pan, then put in the dark batter, then the rest of the 
white and bake. Mrs. S. W. Chinn. 



74 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

MIKADO CAKE. 

One-half cupful of butter, one cupful of pulverized 
sugar, one-half cupful of water, one cupful of flour 
(measured before sifting), one-half cupful of corn starch, 
one teaspoonful of soda, two teaspoonfuls of cream of 
tartar, whites of four eggs. Cream the butter and sugar, 
add the water, then the corn starch and flour sifted 
with the soda and cream of tartar, and lastly the whites 
of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth, and stirred in lightly. 
Bake in three layers. For the filling: One cup- 
ful of raisins, chopped fine, one-half cupful of hickory- 
nut meats, chopped fine, yolks of three eggs, a pinch of 
salt, one cupful of sugar, and about one-third of a cupful 
of water; boil sugar and water until syrup threads, then 
pour it over the beaten yolks and the other ingredients, 
stirring well. Be sure that the raisins are plump and 
good quality. Mrs. T. L. Halbert, 

Montana. 

MOLASSES COOKIES. 

One cupful of molasses, one cupful of sugar, one 
egg, one cupful of butter, one tablespoonful of vinegar, 
one tablespoonful of soda, seven cups of flour. 

Mrs. James Comerford. 

MOLASSES FEUIT CAKE. 

One cupful of butter, one cupful of brown sugar, 
one cupful of sweet milk, three-fourths of a cupful of 
molasses, three cupfuls of flour, four eggs, one and one- 
half teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, one teaspoonful of 
soda, two pounds of currants or raisins, chopped, one- 
third of a nutmeg, a little brandy ; bake slowly. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Patton. 



■JHE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 75 

MOTHEK'S LITTLE CAKES. 
One and one-half cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful 
of butter, two eggs, three-quarters cupful of sour milk, 
one and one-half cupfuls of chopped raisins, one-half 
teaspoonful of soda, two cupfuls of flour before sifting, 
bake in gem tins. Mrs. R. B. Clark. 

MOUNTAIN CAKE. 
One cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, one cup- 
ful of sour cream, four cupfuls of flour, six eggs, one 
teaspoonful of soda, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. 

Mrs. Himmelsbach. 

NEAPOLITAN CAKE. 

Black part : One cupful of butter, two cupfuls of 
brown sugar, one cupful of molasses, one cupful of 
strong coffee, four and one-half cupfuls of sifted flour, 
four eggs, two teaspoonfuls of soda, two teaspoonfuls of 
cinnamon, two teaspoonfuls of cloves, one teaspoonful of 
mace, one pound of raisins, one pound of currants, one- 
fourth pound of citron ; bake the cake in round pans 
with straight sides ; the loaves should be one and one- 
half inches in thickness after baked. White part : 
Whites of eight eggs, two cupfuls of sugar, two cupfuls 
of sifted flour, one cupful of corn starch, one cupful of 
butter, one cupful of milk, two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, flavor slightly with bitter almonds, bake in 
same pans as black cake. This makes two cakes. After 
the cake is cold, each black cake should be spread with 
a thick coating of lemon and sugar made as follows : 
Frosting : White of one egg thoroughly beaten, the 
grated rnid of two and the juice of three lemons, and 



76 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

powdered sugar enough to make a thick frosting ; then 
lay each wliite loaf upon each black one and frost as 
you would any other cake, being particular to use no 
other flavoring than lemon. 

Mrs. T. J. Cunningham. 

NUT CAKE, OK WHITE FKUIT CAKE. 

Three-fourths of a cupful of butter, two cupfuls of 
sugar, one cupful of sweet milk, two and one-half cup- 
fuls of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, four 
eggs, beaten separately, one-half cupful of corn starch, 
or one-half cupful more of flour, mixed with the 
baking powder, one cupful of stoned raisins, one 
cupful of walnuts, one-fourth pound of citron, flavor 
with almond ; bake slowl}'^ in a deep tin one hour. In 
putting in raisins and nuts, mix with a little flour 
to prevent them from falling to the bottom. 

Mrs. a. J. McGiLVRAY. 

ORANGE CAKE— No. 1. 

One cupful of sugar, one and one-half cupfuls of 
flour, two eggs, one-half cupful of sweet milk, butter 
size of an ^gg, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 

Filling. — One-half cupful of water, small half-cupful 
of sugar, butter the size of a hickory nut, two eggs, the 
white of one saved for frosting, small teaspoonful of 
corn starch. Mix the sugar and corn starch together, beat 
the yolks and add to the sugar and the grated rind of 
the orange, add the hot water and butter, and cook 
until it thickens; when done, add the juice of the 
orange, and the beaten white of the egg. 

Mrs. J. W. Squires. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 77 

OKANGE CAKE— No. 2. 

One cupful of melted butter, three cupfuls of 
sugar, four and one-half cupfuls of flour, one cupful of 
milk, one teaspoonful of soda, two cream of tartar, six 
eggs ; separate the eggs. 

Filling. — One pound of sugar, whites of four eggs, 
the rind and juice of two oranges; save enough of the 
icing for the top before putting in the orange ; let the 
cake get partly cold before puttnig together. 

Mrs. John Rumsey. 

ORANGE CAKE— No. .3. 

Two small cupfuls of flour, two small cupfuls of 
sugar, small half-cupful of water, j^olks of four eggs 
and whites of two, juice and grated rind of one orange, 
two teaspoonfuls of baking powder ; bake in layers and 
put together with any orange filling. 

Mrs. John Robinson, 

Green Bay, Wis. 

PINEAPPLE CAKE. 

One cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, three of 
flour, four eggs, one cupful of milk, three scant tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, leave out the white of one 
^g'g for the iceing, bake in layers and spread grated 
pineapple between, take the pineapple out with a 
spoon and do not use all of the juice; ice the top and 
sides with boiled iceing. Mrs. C. P. Barker. 

PORK CAKE. 

One cupful of pork chopped fine, one cupful of boil- 
ing water poured over it, two cupfuls of sugar, one 



78 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

6gg) one teaspoonful of soda, three cupfuls of tlour, one 
teaspoonful of cloves, two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, 
one teaspoonful of allspice, as much fruit as you like ; 
is better the older it is, if kept moist. 

Mrs. W. H. Howieson. 

POUND CAKE. 

One pound of butter, one pound of sugar, one pound 
of fiour, ten eggs; flavor with almond. This cake is 
improved by two tablespoon fu Is of sweet cream. 

Mrs. T. H. Grist. 

PRINCE OF WALES. 

Dark part: One cupful of brown sugar, one-half 
cupful of butter, one-half cupful of sour milk, two 
cupfuls of flour, one cupful of chopped raisins, one 
teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little warm water, 
one tablespoonful of molasses, yolks of three eggs, one 
teaspoonful of cinnamon, one-half teaspoonful of cloves, 
one nutmeg. White part : One cupful of flour, one- 
half cupful of corn starch, one-half cupful of sweet 
milk, one-half cupful of butter, one cupful of white 
sugar, one large teaspoonful of baking powder, whites 
of three eggs. Bake in layers, and put together with 
iceing. Mrs. Piper, 

Eau Claire, Wis. 

PRUNE CAKE. 

One and one-half cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of 
milk, one-half cupful of butter, three small teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder, whites of three eggs, nearly three 
cupfuls of flour. Bake in two or three layers. 

Filling. — One-half pound fresh prunes, one-half 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 79 

pound of seeded raisins, nearly one-half pound of figs. 
Steam the prunes so you can remove the pits; chop all 
together ; add the pulp and rind of a lemon, two table- 
spoonfuls of sugar beaten with the yolks of three eggs ; 
let this warm in a steamer so it will stick together, then 
spread between the layers and frost the top. 

Mrs. H. Oakland, 

New Jersey. 

QUEEN'S CAKE. 

One cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, four 
and one-half or five cupfuls of flour (sometimes flour 
varies), three eggs, three tablespoonfuls of sour milk, 
one teaspoonful of soda. Stir as little as possible ; roll 
out and cut into thin cakes, brush over with beaten egg, 
and bake quickly. Mrs. F. C. Arms, 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

KAISIN CAKE. 

One cupful of butter, one cupful of molasses, one 
cupful of sour milk, two cupfuls of sugar, six cupfuls 
of flour, one cupful of raisins, one teaspoonful of soda, 
three eggs, cloves, nutmeg and cinnamon to taste. 

Mrs. T. M. Gary. 

EOLL JELLY CAKE. 

Five eggs, two cupfuls of sugar, two cupfuls of flour, 
one-half cupful of milk, two teaspoonfuls of cream of 
tartar, one teaspoonful of soda. Bake in square tins, 
spread with jelly, and roll while warm. This makes 
four rolls. Mrs. John Rumsey. 

SAND TARTS. 

Two-thirds teacupful of butter, one and one-half 



80 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

teacupfuls of sugar, two eggs, one-half teaspoonful of 
soda, three teaspoonfuls of water, flour to make stiff 
enough to roll thin ; brush the tops with the white of 
an egg, and sprinkle on sugar. Will keep four months. 

Mrs. H. H. Todd. 

SILVER CAKE. 

Four eggs, beaten separately, seven tablespoonfuls of 
melted butter, three and one-half cupfuls of flour, two 
cupfuls of sugar, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, 
one of soda. Mrs. Joel Pound. 

SIX MONTHS' CAKE. 

One and one-half cupfuls of butter, two cupfuls of 
sugar, one cupful of molasses, one cupful of sweet milk, 
four eggs, five cupfuls of flour, one teaspoonful of soda, 
one nutmeg, two cupfuls of raisins, two cupfuls of citron. 
This makes two long bars. 

Mrs. T. R. Morgan, 

Binghamton, N. Y. 

SNOW CAKE— No. 1. 
Three-fourths cupful of butter, two cupfuls of 
sugar, one cupful of milk, one-half cupful of corn 
starch, two and one-half cupfuls of flour, one and one- 
half teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Mix flour, corn 
starch and baking powder together; add to the butter 
and sugar alternately with the milk; lastly add the 
whites of seven eggs; flavor to taste. Never fails to be 
good. Mrs. Wm. Irvine. 

SNOW CAKE— No. 2. 

One-half teacupful of butter, one cupful of sugar. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 81 

one and one-half cupfuls of flour, one-half cupful of 
sweet milk, whites of four eggs, one teaspoonful of 
baking powder; flavor with lemon. This is very 
nice baked in a loaf, cut in two and put together with 
boiled icing, and freshly grated cocoanut. 

Mrs. H. F. Robinson. 

SNOW-FLAKE CAKE. 

Whites of ten eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, one and 
one-half gobletfuls of sifted flour, one gobletful of pul- 
verized sugar, one-half teaspoonful of cream of tar- 
tar. Mix the sugar, flour and cream of tartar together 
lightly, stir in the beaten whites ; flavor with lemon ; 
bake in a slow oven. It is ver}^ nice if baked properly. 

Mrs. W. L. Pierce. 

soft gingek bread— no. 1. 

Two cupfuls of molasses, one cupful of sugar, one 
cupful of butter, one cupful of sweet milk, four eggs, 
two tablespoonfuls of ginger, nutmeg, four cupfuls of 
flour, full measure, mixed with three teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder. Bake in small tins. Excellent eaten 
warm. Mrs. H. H. Todd. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD— No. 2. 

One cupful of molasses, one-half cupful of lard or 
butter, one tablespoonful of ginger, one-half cupful of 
boiling w^ater, one teaspoonful of soda. 

Mrs. J. E. Dickinson. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD— No. 3. 

One coffeecupful of molasses (New Orleans), one 
teacupful of light brown sugar, one teacupful of sour 



82 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

cream, four teaciipfuls of sifted flour, three tablespoon fuls 
of melted butter, one tablespoonful of ginger, one tea- 
spoonful of lemon extract, one teaspoonful of salt, two 
eggs, one-third cupful of sour milk, one teaspoonful of 
soda ; bake in a small dripping pan in a moderate oven. 

Mes. L. C. Stanley. 

SPICE CAKE— No. 1. 
One coffee cupful of brown sugar, one tablespoonful 
of butter, one cupful of sour cream, two eggs, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, two cupfuls of sifted flour, one cupful 
of chopped raisins, one tablespoonful of cloves, cinnamon 
and nutmeg each, Mrs. Wm. Irvine. 

SPICE CAKE— No. 2. 

One cupful of sugar, two eggs, one- half cupful of 
sweet milk, one-half cupful of molasses, one-half cupful 
of butter, one teaspoonlul each of cinnamon, cloves, nut- 
meg and allspice, one and one-half teaspoonfuls of 
baKing powder, two and one-half cupfuls of flour. Make 
boiled irosting and stir in one cupful of seeded and 
chopped raisins; flavor with one-half teaspoonful of 
vanilla. 

This cake is much nicer when made in three layers ; 
use the same frosting to put between the layers. 

Miss Briggs. 

Milwaukee. 

SPONGE CAKE— No. 1. 

Four eggs, the white of one saved for frosting, beat 
thoroughly, two coffeecupfuls of sugar, two cofleecupfuls 
of flour (after it is sifted), four teaspoonfuls of baking 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 83 

powder mixed with the flour, one cupful of boiling water 
the last thing before putting into the oven ; bake 
immediately. This is very nice baked in layers with 
custard between. 

Mrs. H. L. Ckuttenden, 

North field, Minn. 

SPONGE CAKE— No. 2. 
The yolks of four eggs, beaten with one even cupful 
of sugar ten minutes, one even cupful of flour, one-half 
teaspoonful of baking powder, and lastly add beaten 
whites of four eggs. Mrs. F. T. Condit. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

Make a crust as you would for baking powder bis- 
cuits, only use more shortening, divide your dough, 
roll out half of it and put in your pan, melt some 
butter and spread over the top, roll out the other half 
and put in the pan ; when your cake is done the top 
half will slip from the other if you have buttered it 
sufficiently ; spread with more butter, have your ber- 
ries mashed and sweetened, put them between the cakes 
and return to the oven a few minutes ; pour cream 
over just before serving, or have cream on the table 
and use when you serve. 

SUGAR COOKIES— No. 1. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one and two-thirds cupfuls of 
butter, four eggs beaten separately, one teaspoonful of 
soda, two of cream of tartar, very small half cupful of 
milk, one teaspoonful of vanilla; mix soft; roll thin. 

Mrs. L. F. Martin. 



84 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

SUGAE COOKIES— No. 2. 
Two cupfuls of granulated sugar, one cupful of butter, 
two eggs, two small teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, one 
teaspoonful of soda, two large tablespoonfuls of sweet 
milk, little nutmeg ; mix as soft as you can and roll 
thin. Mrs. Wm. Irvine. 

SUGAE COOKIES— No. 3. 

One and one-half cupfuls of sugar, three-quarters 
cupful of butter, three eggs, one-half cupful of sour 
milk, one-half teaspoonful of soda ; flavor with nutmeg, 
roll thin, sprinkle with sugar, and bake. 

Annie T. Peterson. 

sunshine cake. 
Yolks of eleven eggs, two cupfuls of sugar, one cup- 
ful of butter, scant the butter, one cupful of milk, one 
teaspoonful of cream of tartar, one-half a teaspoonful of 
soda, three cupfuls of flour. Flavor with vanilla. Three 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder may be used instead of 
the soda and cream of tartar ; use with angels' food. 

Mrs. Hiram Allen, 

Bradford, Pa. 

TAPIOCA CAKE. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, two-thirds cupful of butter, 
one cupful of sweet milk, two cupfuls of flour, one 
cupful of corn starch, whites of six eggs, one and one- 
half teaspoonfuls of baking powder; bake in layers. 

Filling for the above. — Five tablespoonfuls of tapioca 
soaked in water enough to cover, steam in the same 
water, adding more water when required, two-thirds cup- 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 85 

ful of sugar filled up with pink sugar sand; flavor 
with vanilla and spread between layers. 

Mrs. J. C. Mitchell, 

Chicago. 

VERMONT CUEEANT CAKE. 

One and one-half cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful 
of butter (scant), one-half cupful of sweet milk, two 
eggs, two cupfuls of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, one cupful of currants. 

Mrs. H. L. Cruttenden, 

Northfield, Minn. 

VICTOEIA CAKE. 

Stir together to a cream, one and one-half cupfuls 
of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, then add one-half 
cupful of sweet milk, sift one and one-half cupfuls of 
flour, one-half cupful of corn starch, one teaspoonful of 
baking powder together ; add the beaten whites of six 
eggs, flavor, bake in layers and put frost between and 
on top. This is very nice to use for any layer cake. 

Mrs. Will Squires. 

"wandering jews." 
One and one-half cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of 
butter, two cupfuls of fruit, one-half teaspoonful of soda, 
one teaspoonful of cloves, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, 
one-half of a nutmeg, three eggs. Bake as cookies. 

Mrs. Herbert Barker. 

WALNUT CAKE— No. 1. 

Two cupfuls of brown sugar, one-half cupful of 
butter, one cupful of sour milk, yolks of five eggs, one- 



86 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

half teaspoonful of soda put in the milk, two cupfuls of 
flour, one pound of stoned raisins, one pound of English 
walnuts, one tablespoonful of brandy, one teaspoonful 
of cloves, one-half nutmeg; bake in dripper. Save 
twenty-four halves for the top ; frost with boiled frost- 
ing and put nuts on top; chop nuts and raisins, and 
put in the flour. Miss Fannie Ginty. 

WALNUT CAKE— No. 2. 

Two cupfuls of brown sugar, one-half cupful of 
butter, large measure, one cupful of sour milk, scant 
measure, yolks of five eggs, one teaspoonful of soda, 
two cupfuls of flour, one pound of stoned raisins, 
one pound of English walnuts, a little brandy or flavor- 
ing (extract of rose is very nice for this). Save twenty- 
four whole nuts for the top ; break the rest fine into the 
cake ; one-half teaspoonful of cloves and nutmeg. This 
will make three dark laj'^ers. 

AVhite Layers. — Two cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful 
of butter, whites of four eggs, well beaten, one cupful of 
sweet milk, three cupfuls of flour, three small teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder. This will make three layers. Also 
iise boiled frosting between laj^ers and for the top, made 
as follows : whites of two eggs well beaten, one and three- 
fourths cupfuls of pulverized or granulated sugar, 
water enough to dissolve the sugar, boil until it is ropy, 
when tried in cold water but not brittle, then stir it 
into the eggs gradually and beat until cold ; put on the 
cake when it and the frosting is cold. This requires no 
flavoring with the nuts. Nice for company, as it cuts 
into so many pieces. Mrs. F. T. Condit. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 87 

WHITE LAYER CAKE. 

One and one-balf cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful 
of butter, one cupful of sweet milk, two cupfuls of 
flour, whites of lour eggs, three teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, put together with milk frosting as follows 
Two cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of sweet milk 
boil from three to five minutes or until it will cream 
beat until cool or put together with boiled frosting and 
fresh grated cocoanut. Mes. George B. Early. 

WHITE SPONGE CAKE— No. 1. 

One and one-half tumblerfuls of sugar, one tumbler- 
ful of flour, whites of eight eggs, two-thirds of a tea- 
spoonful of cream of tartar. 

WHITE SPONGE CAKE-No. 2. 

Whites of ten eggs, one and one-half cupfuls of 
sugar, one cupful of flour, one teaspoonful of cream of 
tartar. 

YELLOW SPONGE CAKE. 
Yolks of ten eggs, one cupful of sugar, one cupful 
of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder (piece 
of butter the size of a hickory nut improves it), sift the 
sugar, flour and baking powder into the eggs when 
well beaten, stirring all the time. A rose geranium leaf 
in the pan before putting in the cake gives it a good 
flavor; also in the white sponge cake. 

Mrs. J. RuMSEY. 



FROSTINGS AND FILLINGS FOR CAKES. 
BOILED FROSTING— No. 1. 

One teacupful of granulated sugar, whites of two 
eggs, four tablespoonfuls of water on the sugar; boil 



88 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

until brittle when dropped in water, beat the whites to 
a stiff' froth and pour the sugar slowly over the eggs, 
beating all the time until cold ; flavor. 

Mrs. L. H. Gushing. 

BOILED TEOSTING— No. 2. 

One cupful of sugar, four tablespoonfuls of water ; 
boil until it hairs ;. have ready the well-beaten white of 
an egg; pour over the hot sugar and water, slowly 
beating all the time. Mrs. Geo. G. Ginty. 

BROWN SUGAE FROSTING. 

Three-fourths pound of No. 2 Muscovado sugar, 
three-fourths cupful of cream or milk, butter size of a 
hickory nut, put the ingredients together and boil 
until it will harden in cold water, then beat until cold 
enough to spread. Mrs. R. B. Glark. 

CARAMEL FILLING. 

One cupful of maple sugar, one-half cupful of white 
sugar, one-half cupful of cream ; boil until it threads, 
then stir until it is cool ; add one teaspoonful of vanilla, 
and spread on cake. Miss Briggs, 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING— No. 1. 

Five tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate, one Qgg, 
one cupful of sugar, one-half cupful of cream ; beat the 
egg separately ; stir all together and cook imtil a thick 
syrup, stirring until cold enough to put on cake. 

Mrs. a. J. McGilvray. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 89 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING— No. 2. 

Whites of two eggs, one and one-half cupfuls of 
powdered sugar, six tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate, 
one teaspoonful of vanilla ; put the chocolate and six 
tablespoonfuls of the sugar in a sauce pan with two 
spoonfuls of hot water ; stir over a hot fire until smooth 
and glossy ; have ready the whites beaten to a st'iff froth, 
and add all the sugar and the chocolate; stir well 
together and spread on the cake. Ed. Gary. 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING— No. 3. 

One cupful of brown sugar, one-half cake of sweet 

chocolate, one-half cupful of sweet milk, butter size of 

an egg, two teaspoonfuls of vanilla ; mix thoroughly 

and cook as syrup ; let it cool and spread on cake as 

soon as taken from the oven. 

Mrs. Comerford. 

custaed for orange cake. 
One and one-half cupfuls of sugar, whites of two 
eggs, juice of two oranges and grated rind of one, mix 
the sugar and the juice of the oranges together; if 
not juice enough to dissolve the sugar, add water; 
boil briskly until it ropes or threads when dropped 
from the end of the spoon, pour it over the beaten 
whites of the eggs as in boiled frosting ; add the grated 
rind ; when cool, put between any white layer cake. 

Mrs. Waters. 

fig paste for cake. 
Two cupfuls of sugar with just enough water to 
dissolve, boil till quite a thick syrup, then add while hot 



90 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

the whites of two eggs beaten very stiff, chop one pound 
of figs very fine, and stir into egg and syrup. 

FILLING FOR LAYER CAKE. 

One cupful of raisins, seeded and chopped, one cup- 
ful of almonds chopped, one cupful of figs chopped, 
mix all t.ogether and spread on boiled frosting between 
layers. 

LEMON FILLING FOR CAKE. 

One lemon grated, one cupful of sugar, yolks of two 
eggs, boil and let cool, mix with the whites of two eggs 
well beaten. 

LEMON STOCK. 

Four lemons, four eggs, one and one-half pounds of 
white sugar, one-half pound of butter ; grate the rind 
and squeeze the juice of the lemons into a basin; put 
these two ingredients into a lined sauce pan with the 
sugar and butter. When all are nicely melted, beat the 
eggs well and add them to it ; boil for about five 
minutes. Be sure you don't let the other ingredients 
boil before you add the eggs or it will be spoiled ; put 
in cans and cover closely. It is ready at any time for 
lemon cake, to spread between layers. Will keep good 
one year. Mrs. L. H. Gushing. 

MAPLE SUGAR FROSTING. 

Two-thirds cupful of maple sugar, cook to a thick 
syrup, pour over the beaten w,hiteof an Q^g. Beat until 
cold ; no flavoring. Mrs. W. E. McCord. 

MILK FROSTING. 

One and one-half cupfuls of granulated sugar, one- 



rHE GOOD CHEEM COOK BOOK. 91 

half cupful of milk ; boil about five minutes slowly or 
until it will string from the spoon ; then pour in a deep 
earthen dish and stir with a silver spoon until it is of 
the right consistency to spread over the cake. Just 
before you put it over the cake, add one-half teaspoon- 
ful of flavoring. Mrs. M. S. Bailey. 

RAISIN FROSTING. 
Make boiled frosting and stir in one cupful of seeded 
and chopped raisins ; flavor with one-half teaspoonful of 
vanilla. Miss Briggs. 

RAISIN MASH FOE LAYER CAKES. 

One cupful of raisins seeded and chopped, one-half 
pound of pulverized sugar, whites of three eggs, beaten 
to a stiff froth ; mix all together and spread on cakes. 




92 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 93 



94 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 95 



9G 



MEMORANDA. 



"The Proof of the Pudding Lies in the Eating." 
PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. 



ALMOND PUDDING. 

Put over the fire one quart of milk, one cupful of 
white sugar, one cupful of almonds, blanched and 
chopped very fine (one pound of hard shelled almonds 
will make one cupful) ; when read}^ to boil, add one cup- 
ful of common starch dissolved in a little cold milk, let 
the whole boil three minutes, take from stove and stir 
in immediately the whites of seven eggs beaten to a 
stiff froth, turn into molds and put away until wanted. 
To be eaten cold with wine and jelly. Beat the jelly 
and thin it with wine. This pudding will keep several 
days in cool weather. Mrs. A. E. Comerford. 

APPLE PUDDING— No. 1. 

Make a nice rich biscuit dough and roll out about 
half an inch thick, line a pudding dish with the 
same, then a layer of apples, bits of butter, sugar and 
nutmeg, then a layer of dough, then of apples, etc., and 
lastly of dough ; steam two and one-half hours. 

Miss Mary E. Bate, 

Drywood, Wis. 

APPLE PUDDING— No. 2. 

Peel and slice sour apples, put a layer in your dish, 
sprinkle sugar, a little cinnamon, and put small 



28 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

pieces of butter over them ; then put a layer of bread 
crumbs, another of apples, and so on until your dish is 
filled; bake until apples are done. Serve with whipped 
cream. Mrs. ^I. S. Bailey. 

APPLE TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

To one-half teacupful of tapioca, add one and one- 
half pints of cold water; let it stand on stove until 
cooked clear (stirring to prevent burning), remove, 
sweeten and flavor with nutmeg and one wine glassful 
of wine, pour the tapioca into a deep dish, in which 
have been placed six or eight pared and cored apples; 
bake until apples are done and serve cold with cream. 

Mrs. D. G. Coleman, 

BIRD'S NEST PUDDING. 

Put the apples pared and cored in a deep dish buttered, 
fill the center of the apple with butter, sugar and cinna- 
mon. Put in oven and bake until nearly done, then pour 
over the apples a batter made of one quart of milk, eight 
tablespoonfuls of flour and eight eggs, finish the baking 
and eat with wine sauce or sugar and cream. 

BEOWN BATTER PUDDING. 

One capful of molasses, one cupful of sweet milk, 
three cupfuls of sifted flour, one cupful of raisins, one 
of currants, two eggs, a small piece of butter, a little 
nutmeg and salt, one-half teaspoonful of soda. Boil in 
a tin mold well-greased ; the batter must not quite fill the 
mold, and the water in the kettle must not quite reach 
the top of the mold; boil three hours without stopping. 

8auce. — One cu])ful of sugar, three-fourths of a cup- 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 99 

ful of butter, one pint of boiling water ; beat the butter 
and sugar together to a foam, then add boiHng water ; 
flavor with lemon or vanilla. Mrs. T. M. Gary. 

BATTER PUDDING. 

Four eggs, eight tablespoonfuls of flour, one pint of 
sweet milk, a little salt, add one teaspoonful of baking 
powder. Steam one hour. 

BOILED EICE. 

Boil one cupful of rice until quite soft, sweeten with 
sugar and pile up on a dish, spot it with lumps of 
jelly, beat the whites of three eggs with a little sugar, 
flavor with lemon or vanilla, and pour over the rice. 

Mrs. 0. Holt. 

COTTAGE PUDDING— No. L 
One cupful of sugar,one-half cupful of butter,one-half 
cupful of sweet milk, two eggs, one and one-half tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, two even cupfuls of flour, 
and flavor with lemon. Bake. To be eaten warm, with 
liquid sauce. 

COTTAGE PUDDING— No. 2. 
One cupful of milk, two of flour, three teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder, two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, 
one egg, one small cupful of sugar. Steam three-fourths 
of an hour, and serve with the following sauce : One cup- 
ful of powdered sugar, one-half cupful of butter, beat to 
a cream, add a wineglassful of wine or brandy, stir 
thoroughly and put in sauce-tureen ; pour in boiling 
water slowly. The sauce will look like cream, and foam. 

Mrs. W. LeClerc. 



100 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING— No. 1. 
Let one pint of milk come to the boiling point ; add 
one-half cupful of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of grated 
chocolate, one large tablespoonful of corn starch ; boil 
until thick ; pour into a mold and place on ice ; flavor 
with vanilla. Serve with cream and sugar. 

Mrs. F. C. Webb. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING— No. 2. 

One quart of milk, ten tablespoonfuls of grated 
bread crumbs, four tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate, 
one cupful of sugar, four eggs (whites of two reserved 
for frosting), small piece of butter. Scald milk, bread, 
sugar, butter and chocolate together ; take from fire and 
add eggs well beaten ; bake one-half hour or more; beat 
the whites to a froth and add two tablespoonfuls of 
powdered sugar. Spread on top, put in oven, and 
brown slightly. Serve cold. 

Mks. H. L. Cruttenden, 

Northfield, Minn. 
CORN PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, one dozen ears of sweet corn. 
Cut the grains of corn half off and pound them well in 
chopping bowl ; scrape the remainder from the cob and 
stir the whole well in the milk ; add one teaspoonful of 
salt, one-half teaspoonful of black pepper, one-half 
teaspoonful of grated nutmeg, two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, one-fourth pound of butter. Bake slowly for 
four hours. Mrs. C. Coleman. 

CREAM TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Soak three tablespoonfuls of tapioca in water over 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 101 

night, then boil in one quart of milk half an hour, beat 
the yolks of four eggs with one cupful of sugar, add 
three tablespoonfuls of cocoanut, boil ten minutes longer, 
pour into a pudding dish, beat the whites of four eggs 
to a stiff froth with three tablespoonfuls of sugar^ put 
over top and sprinkle with cocoanut ; bake five min- 
utes; eat cold. Mrs. F. C. Webb. 

COOPERSTOWN PUDDING. 

Mix three tablespoonfuls of flour, with one of corn- 
starch in a little milk and stir into one pint of boiling 
milk ; let it cool a little ; add a little salt, four eggs 
(whites and yolks beaten separately), butter the size of 
an Qgg ; bake in pudding dish in a pan of water ; eat 
with sauce. Mrs. Daisy Grossman. 

CREAM PIE. 

For the cake, take butter the size of an Qgg, one cup- 
ful of sugar, two eggs, one-third cupful of milk, two 
cupfuls of flour, two teaspoon fuls of baking pow^der ; 
bake in two tins for two pies. For the cream, take one 
pint of milk (taking out enough to wet one-half cupful 
of flour), boiled with two-thirds cupful of sugar and 
yolks of two eggs, add the flour to milk and boil three 
]ninutes ; when cold, flavor with lemon or vanilla, and 
spread between upper and lower crusts of each pie after 
cutting them smoothly apart. To be eaten with whipped 
cream. Mrs. M. S. Bailey. 

CHOCOLATE CORN STARCH. 

Pour one pint of boiling milk over twelve table- 
spoonfuls of grated chocolate, add three tablespoonfuls 



102 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

of corn starch, three eggs well-beaten, one pint of cold 
milk, three tablespoonfuls of sugar, and one teaspoonful 
of vanilla to the melted chocolate ; boil all together one 
minute, stirring briskly. Poui" into molds and serve 
cold, with cream. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Fill a medium sized pudding dish two-thirds full of 
sliced apples ; cover closely and bake. When done, beat 
together the yolks of three eggs, one cupful of sugar, 
juice of one lemon, one teaspoonful of flour; add to 
this after it is well mixed the beaten whites, then pour 
over the apples and bake fifteen minutes. To be eaten 
with cream. JNIrs. Moses. 

DELMONICO PUDDING. 

Yolks of four eggs, one quart of milk, slightly 
sweetened, three tablespoonfuls of corn starch, bake ten 
minutes, beat the whites of the four eggs to a stiff froth, 
add one tablespoonful of powdered sugar to each egg. 
After the pudding has baked ten minutes, spread jelly 
over it, and on this the beaten whites of the eggs ; set in 
the oven again, and bake until a light brown. 

Mrs. D. G. Coleman. 

escalloped apples. 
A layer of chopped apples, a layer ot toasted bread 
crumbs, a layer of suet chopped. Fill the dish, cover 
with milk and bake, eat with hard sauce made as fol- 
lows : One-half cupful of butter, one cupful of sugar, 
one teaspoonful of vanilla, one teaspoonful of lemon, one 
tablespoonful of vinegar. Mrs. Clara Mitchell, 

Chicago, 111. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 103 

ENGLISH PUDDING. 
One pound of suet, two pounds of raisins, one 
pound of currants, one-half pound of blanched 
almonds chopped, one cupful of molasses, three eggs, 
three teaspoonfuls of mixed spices. Mix with flour and 
grated bread crumbs to the consistency of pound fruit 
cake ; steam four hours. 

For Sauce. — One cupful of sugar, two tablespoonfuls 
of flour rubbed with one tablespoonful of butter, one pint 
of hot water, one pint of chopped butternut meats. 

Mrs. Searles, 

Stillwater, Minn. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

One-half cupful of sour milk, one cupful of butter, 
one cupful of suet chopped, eleven eggs, two and one- 
half cupfuls of brown sugar, one slice of citron cut in 
fine pieces, one gill of brandy, two teaspoonfuls of cin- 
namon, two of cloves, one-half teaspoonful of pepper, 
one of soda, two of cream of tartar. Stir in flour until 
it makes a stiff batter ; boil or steam six hours. 

Sauce. — One gill of brandy, one cupful of sugar, 
one-half cupful of butter, one grated nutmeg, one 
pint of boiling water, thicken with flour. 

Mrs. L. H. Cl'shing. 

english cheistmas pudding. 
(This is the old English plum pudding.) One 
pound of sugar, one pound of raisins, one pound of 
currants, one pound of suet, one pound of bread 
crumbs (powdered fine), one-half ounce of mixed 
spice, six eggs, one-fourth pound of mixed peel 



104 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

(take fresh lemon and orange peel grated and then 
mix), sufficient flour to bind the whole together with 
one-half pint of old ale or milk. Put it in a bag in 
boiling water and keep it boiling hard for four hours, 
make a sauce of wine, browned flour, butter, sugar 
and water and boil it. To use half of this receipt 
makes a good sized pudding. 

Mrts. Daisy Grossman. 

EASTEE EGG PUDDING. 

Make a mold of wine or lemon jelly in a round, 
shallow dish or pan the day before you want to use it. 
Take the rind of three or four oranges, cut them into 
shreds or straws, preserve them in sugar and water 
(that is, boil them in it until they lose all the bitter 
taste and are like preserves). Put this away to use next 
day with your jelly. Take a dozen or more eggs, make 
a small hole in the top, pour out the contents of the 
shells, and rinse them out tlioroughly with cold water, 
set the shells into a pan of bran or corn meal and fill 
them up through the small hole in the top with gela- 
tine " blanc mange." INhike your "blanc mange" and 
dip out portions of it into cups or bowls ; into some stir 
a little grape jelly, into another chocolate, into another 
a few drops of cochineal. The grape jelly will give 
yon blue eggs; chocolate, brown; cochineal, pink, etc. 
Fill the shells with these mixtures and set away for 
use next morning. When you wish to serve the pud- 
ding, turn out the jelly upon a deep platter, put your 
orange straws on for a nest, peel the blanc mange 
eggs, rinse them quickly in very cold water, place in 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 105 

tlie nest and around the form of jelly. Eat with sugar 
and cream. Serve a piece of the jelly, a few orange 
straws and an Q,g^, or two on each plate; dust with 
sugar and pour cream over the whole. 

Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 

EGG PUDDING. 

One cjuart of milk, six eggs, six tablespoonfuls of 
flour, a little salt, yolks and whites of eggs beaten 
separately ; mix the flour w^th the yolks of eggs, heat 
the milk to boiling, then pour it on the eggs and flour, 
and lastly stir in the whites ; beat well, and bake one- 
half hour. Mrs. H. H. Todd. 

FARINA PUDDING. 

One cupful of boiling water, sift in farina while 
boiling until a thick paste, take it from the fire and 
stir a few moments quite fast, then add one tablespoon- 
ful of hard butter, two eggs and a little nutmeg ; butter 
the dish and pour this in with two cupfuls of milk ; 
bake until done; serve cold with cream. 

GENESEE PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, one cupful of boiled rice, six 
eggs, one-half cupful of sugar, save the whites of three 
eggs and beat with one-half cupful of sugar to put on 
top. While it is warm, stir the rice, eggs and sugar into 
the milk; cook over a kettle of water like custard. To 
be eaten cold. Mrs. G. I. Brooks, 

Bloomer, Wis. 

GERMAN TRIFLE. 

Put a pint of strawberries, or any other fresh fruit. 



106 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

in the bottom of a glass dish ; sugar the fruit, put over 
it a layer of macaroons and pour over it a custard made 
of a quart of milk and the yolks of eight eggs beaten. 
Sweeten to taste; when cold place on top the whites 
of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth, with a little sugar, 
or whip cream to a froth. The whites of eggs may be 
ornamented b}^ beating currant jelly with part of it, and 
putting it in alternate hills of white and pink. 

Mrs. O. Holt. 

HO^VAKD PUDDING. 

One Cjuart of milk ; while that is boiling mix four 
tablespoonfuls of flour with cold milk until free from 
lumps ; when the milk is boiling, stir the flour in with 
one cupful of sugar and one-half cupful of butter. 
When all is well mixed, take off and let cool, then add 
six eggs, one teaspoonful of lemon, and one cupful of 
raisins. Bake in deep dish two hours. 

Mrs. Searles, 

Stillwater, Minn. 

INDIAN MEAL PUDDING— No. 1. 

One quart of sweet milk, one large tablespoonful of 
butter, four eggs, well-beaten, one cupful of corn meal, 
one cupful of sugar, scald milk and stir in the meal 
when boiling. When cool add the rest, and bake. 

Mrs. H. H. Todd. 

INDIAN MEAL PUDDING— No. 2. 

Boil one quart of sweet milk, mix in it two and one- 
half gills of corn meal very smoothly, seven eggs 
well-beaten, one gill of molasses and a good piece of 
butter. Bake two hours. Virginia Cook Book. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 107 

JOHN'S DELIGHT. 

One cupful of bread crumbs, one-quarter cupful of 
chopped suet, one-fourth cupful of molasses, one egg, 
one-half cupful of seeded raisins, one-half cupful of 
sweet milk, with one-fourth teaspoonful of soda dissolved 
in it, one-fourth teaspoonful of cloves, one-half tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon. Boil one hour. 

Sauce. — Beat one-fourth cupful of butter to a cream,, 
add one cupful of granulated sugar, and stir until it is 
white and foaming. Just before serving, pour on it one- 
third cupful of boiling water and stir a moment ; flavor 
with wine or anything you prefer. Miss E. A. C. 

LEMON EICE PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, one heaping cupful of boiled 
rice, two cupfuls of sugar, five eggs, two lemons, grate 
rind and juice of one lemon, put into pudding with one 
cupful of sugar, yolks of five eggs and white of one. 
Bake one-half hour. 

For Frosting. — Beat the four remaining whites stifif'; 
add one cupful of sugar and juice of one lemon ; 
spread over the pudding when baked, and brown 
slightly in the oven. Serve cold. Mrs. T. M. Gary. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

One cupful of sugar, butter the size of an ^g'g, one 
lemon, two eggs, six small crackers (powdered), nearly 
a pint of milk ; beat butter and sugar together ; add 
juice and grated rind of lemon, then eggs and crackers, 
lastly milk. Bake half an hour. 

Mrs. a. Hoffman. 



108 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK'. 
LEMON PUFFS. 

One pint of sweet milk, five tablespoon fuls of fiour, 
one tablespoonful of melted butter, six eggs, leaving out 
whites of three. Bake in buttered earthen cups half 
filled, twent}'- minutes. 

Sauce. — One large cupful of sugar, one-half cupful of 
butter, one o.^,^, one lemon, all of the juice and one-half 
of the grated peel, one small nutmeg, three tablespoon- 
fuls of boiling water ; cream the butter and sugar, stir in 
the Q.gg whipped light, the lemon and nutmeg, beat ten 
minutes, add (spoonful at a time) the boiling water. 
Place the bowl in top of teakettle, which must be kept 
boiling until the steam heats the sauce very hot, but 
not boiling ; stir constantly. 

Do not wash your cups, but wipe w^ith a coarse 
cloth, keep them for these puffs. 

Mrs. H. 0. Crane, 

Green Bay, Wis. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

Four eggs, the weight of three in Indian meal, one- 
half pound of sugar, one-fourth pound of butter, one 
lemon grated, one small teacupful of sweet milk, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted in with the meal ; 
stir butter and sugar to a cream; beat eggs separately, 
then add lemon and meal ; bake one hour. Serve with 
sugar and cream. 

NOTTINGHAM PUDDING. 

One pint of milk, two eggs well beaten, one scant 
pint of flour, a little salt. Place apples, pared and cored. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK 109 

ill a pudding dish ; pour batter over them and bake 
one hour. Eat with a sauce. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 
Peel and shce six oranges and sprinkle over them one 
cupful of white sugar. Let stand tw^o or three hours ; 
put a pint of milk in a tin pail and set in a kettle of hot 
water until it comes to a boil. Beat the yolks of three 
eggs with three tablespoonfuls of sugar and one of corn 
starch ; pour this in the hot milk and cook until thick. 
When cool, pour this on your oranges in your serving 
dish, and stir together ; beat the whites of the eggs to a 
stiff froth, add three teaspoonfuls of powdered sugar, 
pour over the pudding, set in the oven in a dish of 
cold water until it is slightly browned over the top ; to 
be eaten cold. Prepare a pudding in the same way and 
use canned peaches instead of oranges, and it is very 
nice. Mrs. J. Rumsey. 

PUFF PUDDING— No. 1. 

One cupful of sweet milk, thirteen tablespoonfuls of 
flour, four eggs ; stir the yolks of the eggs into the milk ; 
add the flour, beat the whites of the eggs separately 
and add them last. Sauce. — Butter, sugar and lemon 
beaten very light. Bake. Mrs. Daisy Grossman. 

PUFF PUDDING— No. 2. 

One cupful of milk, one cupful of flour, one egg, a 
little salt, bake in cups. Eat with sweetened cream. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

Pour a cupful of milk over one pound of fine 
bread crumbs, and let it stand half an hour ; then beat 



110 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

in four ounces of sugar, one-half pound of suet 
chopped fine, one-half pound of chopped raisins, one- 
half teacupful of grated lemon peel. Beat all well, with 
four eggs, and boil five hours. Mrs. L. H. Gushing. 

PINEAPPLE PUDDING. 

Prepare ripe pineapple by grating it very fine, make 
a custard Avith cream and egg, heat the custard over 
steam until sufficiently hot to congeal the cream (having 
drained the pineapple free from juice and sweetened it 
one hour before it will be ready to mix with the cream). 
Pour in a dish that has been heated, a layer of the 
cream, then a layer of the pineapple until the whole 
is in the dish ; beat sweet cream stiff, sweeten very 
sweet, and just before the dessert is served add the juice 
of the fruit, and pile the beaten cream on top. Care 
must be taken or the custard and cream will get sour. 
Cocoanut pudding can be made in the same way. 

Mrs. Daisy Grossman. 

queen of puddings. 
One pint of bread or cake crumbs, one quart of 
milk, one cupful of sugar, yolks of four eggs, grated 
rind of a lemon, butter the size of an egg. When 
baked, beat the whites of four eggs to a stifle froth, add 
one cupful of sugar and juice of the lemon, spread on 
the pudding, jelly or jam, then the frosting, and bake a 
delicate brown. 

QUICK PUDDING. 

Soften any kind of light cake with sweet cream or 
rich milk, heated and poured on hot, make a rich 
boiled custard and pour it over the cake and cream 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. Ill 

while hot, and beat the whole together well ; flavor the 
same as cake, with lemon or vanilla. It can be eaten hot 
or cold. Use a sauce of butter and sugar beaten together 
until light. The pudding should be as thick as baked 
custard.. 

RICE PUDDING— No. 1. 
One-half cupful of rice (not cooked), one cupful of 
sugar, three pints of milk, one-half teaspoonful of salt, 
one cupful of raisins ; mix all together and bake in a 
slow oven, stirring occasionally. To be eaten hot or 
cold. Season with nutmeg. Mks. A. Hoffman. 

RICE PUDDING— No. 2. 

One cupful of rice, one quart of milk (swell the 
rice), then mix with milk, add two eggs, one-half cup- 
ful of butter, sugar, spice and raisins without rule ; bake. 

RICE MERINGUE. 
One cupful of rice boiled tender. When cool, add the 
yolks of three eggs, one tablespoonful of sugar, one cup- 
ful of sweet cream, a little salt, the rind of one lemon 
grated. Bake in oven. Beat the whites of the three 
eggs to a froth, add one and one-half cupfuls of sugar 
and the juice of one lemon ; pour on top and brown. 

Mrs. a. E. Comerford. 

steamed bread pudding. 
One bowl of bread crumbs, one cupful of cold 
water, one of molasses, one of flour, one of raisins and 
citron mixed, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, one tea- 
spoonful of soda ; steam one hour. 

Mrs. V. W. Bayless, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



112 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 
STEAMED PUDDING. 

One cupful of sugar, one cupful of flour, four eggs, 
small teaspoon ful of soda, two of cream of tartar. Beat 
eggs and sugar together. Put soda in half of flour and 
tartar in remainder. Will steam in half an hour. 

STEAMED FLOUR PUDDING. 
One pint of flour, one and one-half cupfuls of sweet 
milk, three eggs, a little salt, two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder ; steam three-fourths of an hour. Serve with 
hard sauce. Susie C 

SWEDISH PUDDING. 

One-half pound of flour, scant one-half pound of 
butter, one-half pound of sugar, eight eggs, a little salt; 
rub sugar and butter to a cream, add yolks, well beaten, 
then salt and flour, and lastly, whites of eggs, beaten to 
a stiff" froth. Put the batter in cups and steam in a 
steamer one-half hour. Serve hot with strawberry sauce. 

Sauce. — Scant one-half cupful of butter, one cupful 
of sugar, beaten white of one egg, one cupful of mashed 
strawberries; rub butter and sugar to a cream, add 
beaten white of egg, then strawberries, thoroughly 
mashed. Mrs. Searls, 

Stillwater, Minn. 

SUET PUDDING— No. 1. 

One teacupful of molasses (New Orleans) one of 
sweet milk, one of chopped suet, three and one-half 
cupfuls of flour, one and one-half of raisins, one teaspoon- 
ful of soda, one and one-half of cinnamon, a little salt. 
Steam three hours. 

Sauce.— One-half cupful of butter, creamed, with one 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 113 

cupful of sugar, then add five tablespoonfuls of boiling 
water (one at a time) ; flavor with vanilla or brandy. 

Miss Nellie Briggs, 

Milwaukee. 

SUET PUDDING— No. 2. 

One cupful of chopped suet, one of sour milk, one 
of molasses, one egg, three and one-half cupfuls of 
flour, one teaspoonful of soda, fruit and spice to taste. 
Steam three hours. 

SNOW pudding. 

One-third of a box of gelatine dissolved in one 
pint of boiling water (soak the gelatine a few moments 
in a little cold w^ater), add two teacupfuls of sugar, 
put on ice until cold, then stir in the juice of two 
lemons and whites of two eggs well beaten ; place in 
a mold until hard. This is to be eaten wath a custard 
made by using the yolks of two eggs and one whole 
one, to one pint of milk ; sugar to taste ; flavor wnth 
vanilla; boil until thick. Serve when cold. 

Mrs. B. E. Reid. 

SPONGE PUDDING— No. 1. 
One cupful of flour boiled in one pint of milk, 
two-thirds cupful of sugar, butter the size of a small 
egg, five eggs beaten separately ; mix the flour smoothly 
in the milk, and set the vessel in boiling water, stir- 
ring it until it seems sufficiently cooked. Beat the 
yolks, add sugar, butter, a little salt, and the whites of 
the eggs. Bake in a pan set in hot water, one hour. 
Eat when hot, with brandy or wine sauce. 

Kate E. Wilson, 

Winona, Minn, 



114 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

SPONGE PUDDING— No. 2. 

Four tablespoon fuls (well rounded) of flour, two 
tablespoonfulsof sugar (well heaped), one pint of milk; 
boil all together, add butter the size of an Qg^^, and six 
eggs beaten separately, stir all together well and bake 
in a pudding dish set in a pan of hot water, one hour. 
Sauce. — Stir to a cream, one cupful of sugar, one-half 
cupful of butter, add by tablespoonfuls one-half cupful 
of wine. Mrs. Wm. E. Tallmadge. 

SPONGE PUDDING— No. 3. 

One-half cupful of flour, one-quarter cupful of 
sugar, one-quarter cupful of butter, six eggs, one pint 
of milk ; heat the milk to boiling, then add flour, sugar 
and yolks of eggs, well beaten together ; remove from 
stove and add butter; lastly just before putting into 
pudding dish, stir in lightly the whites of eggs, beaten 
to a stiff froth. Set in a pan of hot water and bake 
three-quarters of an hour. To be eaten with wine sauce. 

Mrs. B. E. Reid. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING— No. 1. 

Five tablespoonfuls of tapioca, one quart of milk, 
four eggs, eight tablespoonfuls of sugar; soak the 
tapioca in water two hours, beat the yolks of the eggs 
and sugar together, boil the milk, stir in the yolks of 
the eggs and sugar while boiling, then the tapioca, and 
stir until it begins to cream. Take out of the steamer 
into your baking dish, and flavor; set the baking dish 
into pan of hot water and bake twenty minutes ; stir 
once while baking, beat the whites of the eggs with four 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 115 

tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar and spread over the 
top. Return to the oven a few moments. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING— No. 2. 

One quart of milk, four eggs, two tablespoonfuls 
of tapioca soaked one hour in cold water ; sugar and 
vanilla to taste. Boil the milk and add a little salt, 
then stir in tapioca, sugar, yolks of eggs and vanilla ; 
mix well and bake. Beat whites of eggs and a little 
sugar, and put on top. Bake to a light brown. Good 
eaten hot or cold. Mrs. G. I. Brooks, 

Bloomer, Wis. 

TAPIOCA PEACH PUDDING. 

Soak tapioca over night and in the morning boil 
until it is perfectly clear, adding more water from time 
to time as needed. Slice five nice peaches with a silver 
knife and sprinkle liberalh^ with sugar. Take the 
tapioca from the stove, and stir the peaches into it. Eat 
cold with sugar and cream. Polly M. 

TAYLOR PUDDING. 

One cupful of molasses, one of milk, three-fourths 
cupful of butter, six of flour, three eggs, two heaping 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder ; steam three hours. 

Sauce. — One cupful of butter creamed with two cup- 
fuls of sugar, yolks of two eggs beaten very light, one 
cupful of boiling water. Just before serving put in the 
whites of eggs well beaten ; flavor to taste. 

Mrs. J. C. Mitchell, 

Chicago, 111. 



116 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 
TROY PUDDING. 

One cupful of warm molasses, one cupful of sour 
milk, one teaspoonful of soda in milk, one cupful of 
suet, chopped fine, three and one-half cupfuls of flour, 
one cupful of raisins, chopped fine, one wine-glassful of 
brandy or wine, a little salt, one teaspoonful of cinna- 
mon ; steam three hours. 

Sauce. — One tablespoonful of corn starch, made 
smooth in cold w^ater; add one-half pint of boiling 
water, one cupful of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, 
yolk of one ^gg, well beaten, nutmeg, and wine or 
brandy. 

TRIFLE. 

Put in your pudding dish a layer of cake (pieces of 
all kinds can be used) then a layer of blackberr}^ jam, 
then a layer of cake and so on until your dish is filled ; 
put a few drops of brandy over it to flavor. To be 
eaten with whipped cream. 

TIP-TOP PUDDING. 

One pint of bread crumbs, one quart of milk, one 
cupful of sugar, the grated peel of one lemon, yolks of 
four eggs. Bake. When done, spread fresh strawberries 
over the top (or if not in season for them use a cupful 
of preserved raspberries), put over this a nit-ringue 
made of the whites of the eggs, a cupful of sugar and the 
juice of the lemon. Return it to the oven to color ; let 
it partly cool and serve it with rich cream. 

WHOLE WHEAT PUDDING. 
Two cupfuls of whole wheat flour (or sifted graham 
flour), one-half cupful of sweet milk, one-half cupful 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 117 

of molasses, one cupful of raisins, one-half teaspoonful 
of soda, one-half teaspoonful of salt; steam two and 
one-half hours. 

Sauce. — Whites of two eggs, one cupful of sugar, 
one cupful of boiling milk, juice of one lemon. 

Mrs. Walrath, 

Cooking School. 

WASHINGTON PIE. 

One cupful of sugar, one-half cupful sweet milk, 
one-half cupful of butter, one egg, one teaspoonful 
of cream of tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda, 
one and one-half cupfuls of flour; bake in two tins. 
For custard, take one cupful of milk or cream, one-half 
cupful of sugar, one egg, one tablespoonful of corn 
starch. Beat sugar, egg and corn starch together, and 
stir into the boiling milk and cook until thick ; flavor 
to taste. Mrs. L. B. Cruttenden, 

Cooperstown, N. Y. 



PUDDING SAUCES. 
WINE SAUCE— No. 1. 
Rub to a cream one cupful of sugar and one-half 
cupful of butter, then stir in by teaspoonfuls one-half 
cupful of wine ; set in a dish of hot water to dissolve. 

Mrs. B. E. Reid. 

WINE SAUCE— No. 2. 

Take a lump of butter the size of an egg, and two 
tablespoonfuls of corn starch. Melt the butter and stir in 



118 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

the corn starch and add it to one pint of boiling water, 
one cupful of sugar, nutmeg, and wine or brandy to 
taste. Mrs. Daisy Grossman. 

NICE PUDDING SAUCE. 

Three eggs and the white of one additional, one 
heaping cupful of sugar, beat eggs and sugar well 
together, take one cupful of boiling water and a piece 
of butter the size of an egg, let the butter melt in the 
water by setting it in the top of the teakettle. Just as 
you serve the sauce pour the liquid on to the sugar and 
eggs, stirring briskly ; flavor to taste. 

GOLDEN PUDDING SAUCE. 

Take the yolks of three eggs, stir in one-half cup- 
ful of sugar, pour this into a pint of boiling milk, 
flavor with lemon, and set in a cool place. 

Miss Mary E. Bate, 

Drywood, Wis. 

FOAM SAUCE. 

One cupful of sugar, two-thirds cupful of butter, one 
tablespoon ful of flour. Put it over the fire and stir in 
three gills of boiling Avater and one small teaspoonful 
of soda : flavor to taste. Mrs. IT. H. Todd. 

PUDDING SAUCE— No. 1. 

Two cupfuls of powdered sugar, one cupful of but- 
ter, wine glass of wine, two eggs; beat all together one- 
half hour, and scald, not boil. 

PUDDING SAUCE— No. 2. 

Take two eggs, separate, and into the yolks put one- 
half cupful of white sugar. Beat very light, add three 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 119 

tablespoon fills of boiling water and beat again ; flavor 
to taste ; lastly, add the whites beaten to a stiff froth, 
and stir until ready to serve. 

Mrs. C. ]M. Youmans, 

Winona, Minn. 

FOAMING SAUCE. 

Whites of two eggs, one cupful of sugar, one cupful 
of boiling milk, juice of one lemon. 

EGG SAUCE. 

Beat eggs, yolks and whites together thoroughly, 
until smooth and creamy : sweeten to taste, and flavor 
with nutmeg, wine, or any way you choose. This 
makes a nice sauce to eat on any pudding. 

Mrs. J. O. Ferris. 



"AULD LANG SYNE.'- 

A pudding receipt taken from "The Virginia House- 
wife, or, Methodical Cook," published by Mrs. IMary 
Randolph in 1831. Mrs. S. W. Chinn has a copy of 
this quaint book, from which this receipt was taken : 

BOILED INDIAN MEAIi PTTDDING. 

Mix one quart of corn meal with three quarts of 
milk — take care it be not lumpy — add three eggs and a 
gill of molasses. It must be put on at sunrise to eat at 
three o'clock. The great art in this pudding is tying 
the bag properly, as the meal swells very much. 



120 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 



121 



122 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 12:^ 



124 MEMORANDA. 



Patience is bitter, but its fruits are sweet. 

— Old Proverb. 

ICE CREAM, ICES, CREAMS, CUSTARDS, 
JELLIES, ETC. 



ICE CREAM. 
ICE CREAM— No. 1. 

Two quarts of milk, one quart of cream, eight eggs, 
four teacupfuls of sugar, four tablespoon fuls of vanilla ; 
beat eggs and sugar together (whites separately) ; steam 
the milk, add sugar and eggs, and let boil ; then strain ; 
let cool, and then add the cream whipped, and vanilla : 
then freeze. Mrs. L. C. Stanley. 

ICE CREAM— No. 2. 

Three pints of milk, one quart of cream, eight 
eggs, two teaspoonfuls of vanilla, three cupfuls of 
sugar ; let the milk come to a boil, stir in the sugar and 
yolks of eggs beaten well together ; as soon as eggs are 
scalded take from the fire before it becomes thick ; stir 
in the whites well beaten ; when cold, add vanilla and 
small teaspoonful of salt ; when half-frozen, add 
whipped cream. Mrs. M. S. Bailey. 

ICE CEEAM— No. .3. 
Two quarts of rich cream, one pint of white sugar, 
whites of five eggs, well beaten ; flavor to taste ; freeze. 

Miss Wilson, 

Menomonie, Wis. 



126 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

ICE CREAM— No. 4. 
Five pints of milk, five pints of cream, four and 
one-half cupfuls of sugar, ^Yhites of three eggs, two 
tablespoonfuls of gelatine dissolved in a little of the 
milk, four teaspoonfuls of vanilla, one even teaspoonful 
of salt ; whip the cream, beat whites of eggs to a stiff 
froth, mix all together and freeze. 

Mrs. a. Hoffman. 

JCE CEEAM— No. 5. 
(jne quart of cream, one cupful of sugar, nearly one 
teaspoonful of vanilla; freeze. 

Mrs. G. Tabor Thompson, 

Eau Claire, Wis. 

ICE CREAM— No. 6. 

One quart of milk, one cupful of sugar, two table- 
spoonfuls of flour, one saltspoonful of salt, two eggs, 
one f)uart of cream, one-half to one cupful of sugar, 
one tablespoonful of flavoring; boil the milk; mix the 
sugar, flour and salt ; add the eggs and beat all together ; 
add the boiling milk, and when well mixed turn into 
double boiler, and cook twenty minutes, stirring con- 
stantly until smooth, after that occasionally ; when cold, 
add cream, flavoring and sugar; make quite sweet. 

May Willia^is. 

CHIPPEWA ICE CREAM. 

Two quarts of cream, two quarts of milk, two 
pounds of sugar ; stir tlie sugar in the milk, add the 
cream ; flavor to taste with vanilla ; put in freezer, add 
tlie beaten white of one Q^%\ then freeze. 

"" Mrs. John W. Squires. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 127 

CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM. 

To three pints of cream take one pint of new milk, 
two eggs, one teacupful of grated chocolate, two coffeecup- 
fuls of powdered sugar, one teaspoonful of corn starch, 
and one of extract of vanilla ; beat the eggs ; stir them 
in the milk ; add the corn starch and sugar ; let them 
come to a boil ; take them quickly from the fire ; stir 
it all the time ; when perfectly smooth, mix it with the 
eggs and milk ; then add the cream and vanilla ; if 
not sweet enough add more sugar ; when cold, put in 
the freezer. 

GEEEN MOUNTAIN ICE CEEAM. 

To make three gallons of ice cream use the follow- 
ing : Five quarts of good milk, two and one-half quarts 
good thick cream, six pounds of granulated sugar, ten 
tablespoonfuls of the finest corn starch, six ounces of 
pure extract of vanilla. 

Formula. — Boil milk twelve minutes in tin pail set 
into kettle of boiling water; now stir in corn starch and 
continue boiling six minutes ; remove and stir until 
cold ; next whip the cream until all lumps are out and 
it is perfectly smooth ; put cream and cooked milk in 
freezer and stir thoroughly ; then add sugar and stir 
until all is dissolved. Then flavor and it is ready to 
freeze. F. P. Hunt. 

PINEAPPLE ICE CREAM. 
One quart of cream, one and one-quarter pounds of 
white sugar, one large pineapple, chop the pineapple 
and mix with the sugar; let this stand in a covered 
dish several hours ; strain and stir into the cream slowly 
and freeze at once. Mrs. Daisy Grossman. 



128 THE aOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

ICES. 
LEMON ICE— No. 1. 
Three pounds of sugar, two quarts of water; boil 
sugar and water until clear, then cool; add the juice of 
six lemons and three oranges to the syrup ; when half 
frozen add the whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth ; 
then freeze hard. Mrs. J. C. Outhwaite, 

Depere, Wis. 

LEMON ICE— No. 2. 

One quart of water, one pint of sugar, juice of six 
lemons ; mix all together and strain ; then freeze. 

LEMON ICE— No. 3. 

Make a quart of nice lemonade, sweeter than to 
drink ; add two grated oranges ; strain and freeze. 

Mrs. L. H. Gushing. 

OEANGE ICE. 

One quart of water, one quart of sugar, juice of four 
oranges and two lemons ; strain and freeze. 

Mrs. R. B. Clark. 

PINEAPPLE ICE— No. 1. 

One can of grated pineapple, one pint of sugar, one 
pint of water ; pour over the sugar and let it dissolve ; 
strain and freeze. Mrs. R. B. Clark. 

PINEAPPLE ICE— No. 2. 

To one quart of grated pineapple, add one and one- 
fourth pound of sugar and one pint of water ; beat the 
whites of two eggs to a stiff froth ; add the above to the 
eggs little by little, beating well to make them mix ; 
strain and freeze. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 129 

PEACH ICE. 

One can or twelve large peaches, two coffeecupfuls 
of sugar, one pint of cold water, whites of three eggs, 
beaten to a froth ; slice the peaches and stir all the 
ingredients together and freeze in form. Should be 
made night before using in order to freeze. 

Miss Louisa Smith, 

Ottawa, Out. 

LEMON SHERBET— No. 1. 

One tablespoonful of gelatine, one quart of water, 
one pint of sugar, one tablespoonful sherry wine, juice 
of two oranges, juice of four lemons, grated rind of two 
lemons and oil of two lemons; strain and freeze. 

Mrs. Walrath, 

Cooking School. 

LEMON SHEEBET— No. 2. 

One gallon of water, juice of one dozen lemons, the 
whites of eight eggs slightly beaten ; sugar to taste ; 
beat well and freeze. Miss Wilson, 

Menomonie, Wis. 
ORANGE SHERBET. 

One tablespoonful gelatine, one and one-half cupfuls 
of cold water, one and one-half cupfuls ol boiling water, 
one cupful of sugar, six oranges or one pint of juice, 
one-fourth teaspoonful of vanilla ; dissolve the gelatine 
in the boiling water ; mix all together ; strain and 
freeze. 

FROZEN APRICOTS. 

One can of apricots, a generous pint of sugar, one 
quart of water, one pint of whipped cream ; cut the 



130 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

apricots into small pieces ; add sugar and water, and 
freeze ; when nearly frozen, add the cream. 



CREAMS. 
AMEEICAN CREAM. 

One-half of one-ounce package of Cox's gelatine 
put into one quart of cold milk ; put in a tin pail ; 
set pail in a kettle of cold water, and set kettle on 
stove ; when the water has boiled two minutes, stir in 
the yolks of four eggs that have been beaten with four 
tablespoonfuls of sugar; then let remain in boiling 
water five minutes longer ; meanwhile the whites of 
the eggs should be beaten to a stiff froth, and four 
tablespoonfuls of sugar added a^ter ihey are stiff. Take 
the mixture from the stove, stir in whites of eggs, flavor 
with one teaspoonful of vanilla and one-half teaspoonful 
of lemon ; put in mold ; set in cold place. Serve with 
whipped cream. Best made the day before using. 

Galloway House, 

Eau Claire, Wis. 

BRANDY CREAM. 

Heat boiling hot one quart of good rich cream, from 
previous night's milking; have ready three thoroughly 
beaten eggs; take the cream from the fire and stir 
in the eggs ; dissolve loaf sugar, to suit taste, in one- 
half pint of French brandy ; when cream is cold, stir 
in brandy and sugar ; beat well and serve in glasses. 

Miss Wilson, 

Menomonie, Wis. 

CHOCOLATE CREAM. 

One quart of milk, four tablespoonfuls of chocolate 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 131 

(that flavored in the vanilla, if you can get it), three" 
quarter cupfuls of sugar, six eggs, one pint of whipped 
cream, a saltspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of extract 
of vanilla, a bit of soda. Heat the milk in a farina 
kettle with the soda and salt, wet up the chocolate with 
a little cold milk and stir it in ; stir constantly until 
the chocolate is dissolved; beat eggs and sugar to- 
gether in a bowl, pour the hot milk and chocolate on 
them, mix thoroughly and return to the fire, stirring 
well; when it is thickened nicely, pour it out, flavor 
and set away to get cold. Serve with whipped cream 
sweetened with pulverized sugar. 

ITALIAN CKEAM. 

Sift three tablespoonfuls of ground rice, add it to 
two of powdered sugar and mix it smoothly with two 
of rose water, then stir in gradually a pint of cream and 
stir the whole over a gentle fire until of a proper 
thickness. Serve cold. Mrs. O. S. Holt, 

Rush Centre, Kansas. 

MANIOC CEEAM. 

One pint of sweet milk boiled, soak one-half tea- 
cupful of manioc in cold water about half an hour, 
take two eggs, beat yolks, sweeten to taste, then stir 
5'^olks and sugar and manioc into the boiling milk ; 
when thoroughly scalded remove from the fire and 
flavor to taste ; then stir in the beaten whites of eggs. 
Serve cold with whipped cream. Mrs. W. Caswell. 

RASPBERRY CREAM BLANC MANGE. 

Take the juice of one pound of berries (strawberries 
or raspberries), mixed with a good deal of sugar, a 



132 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

cofFeecupful of cream, one ounce of gelatine, dissolved 
in a little hot water, and when luke-warni add it to the 
juice ; then add the cream ; stir very little ; pour into a 
mold, and set on ice for two hours. 

SPANISH CREAM. 

One-half box of gelatine, three-fourths pound of 
white sugar, one pint of milk, one-half cupful of water, 
three pints of cream, three eggs ; dissolve gelatine in 
cold water; wlnp cream; beat eggs and sugar; pour 
the milk and gelatine alternately over eggs and sugar ; 
stir cream in lightly ; stir often while stiffening on ice ; 
flavor with vanilla. Miss AVilson, 

Menomonie, Wis. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 

Two tablespoonfuls of tapioca soaked in milk over 
night ; boil one quart of milk ; add tapioca ; add one 
cupful of sugar, beaten thoroughly with the yolks of 
three eggs ; let it come to a boil ; remove from fire ; 
then add one teaspoonful of vanilla and the beaten 
whites of eggs ; stir occasionally while cooling. Serve 
cold. Mrs. Wm. Irvine. 

VELVET CREAM. 

One-half box of Nelson gelatine, one and one-half 
cupfuls of sherry wine, one lemon, grated rind and 
juice, one and one-half cupfuls of sugar, one and one- 
half pints of cream ; soak the gelatine in the wine, 
add the lemon and sugar ; heat all together until the 
gelatine is dissolved ; strain, and set away to cool ; 
when nearly cold (but before it begins to stiffen), add 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 133 

the cream ; beat until nearly stiff enough to drop from 
the spoon ; pour into molds and set on ice until as 
stiff as Blanc Mange. Cooking School. 

WINE CREAM BLANC MANGE. 

One pint of rich cream, one cupful of sugar, one 
teaspoonful of vanilla, two wineglassfuls of sherry wine, 
one-half box of gelatine ; dissolve gelatine in wine and 
whip the cream, add sugar and flavoring, and pour the 
wine slowly over the cream. Serve cold. 

Mrs. Wm. O'Neil. 



CUSTARDS. 
BAKED CUSTAED. 

Scald, but not boil, one quart of milk ; add, by 
degrees, the beaten yolks of four eggs, and eight 
tablespoonfuls of sugar; when Avell mixed, add the 
whites of the eggs beaten to a froth ; flavor with nut- 
meg, and pour into a deep dish or cups. Set these in a 
pan of hot water, and bake until Arm. 

Mrs. a. Hoffman. 

BANANA CHARLOTTE. 

This is simple and refreshing. The sides of a quart 
mold are to be lined with sponge cake and the bottom 
of the mold with thin slices of banana ; fill the mold 
with stiff whipped cream ; set it aside in the ice-box 
until wanted. Remove carefully from the mold and 
serve. 

CHAMPAGNE AMBROSIA. 

Put a layer of sliced oranges in a dish, sprinkle a 
little sugar over them ; then a layer of sliced bananas. 



134 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

sprinkle with sugar; tlieii spread a layer of cocoanut; 
repeat until disli is filled. Just before serving, pour a pint 
bottle of champagne over all. Mrs. G. C. Ginty. 

CHARLOTTE EUSSE. 

Dissolve one ounce of Cox's gelatine in one pint of 
Avarm milk ; beat four eggs very light and add them to 
one pound of white sugar, whicli has previously been 
flavored with vanilla ; when the milk containing the 
gelatine is cool, add to the other mixture. Have ready 
three pints of whipped cream and add the above to it ; 
stir until it is well thickened, and cool in forms or in a 
large glass or fancy dish. If you choose you can line 
your dish with lady fingers or put macaroons in layers 
through it. Half of this is enough for any ordinary 
occasion. Cox's gelatine is the best for Charlotte Russe. 
A box of this gelatine contains one and one-half ounces. 
Take two-thirds of a box for this receipt. 

Mrs. G. C. Ginty. 

COFFEE JELLY. 

One package Cox's gelatine, soak two hours in large 
cupful of cold water, two cupfuls strong clear coffee, two 
of sugar, two of boiling water; put soaked gelatine 
and sugar together, cover closely half an hour ; pour 
on boiling water ; stir well ; add coffee ; strain and put 
into mold. Serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. H. Oakland, 

Newark, N. Y. 

FLOATING ISLAND. 

One quart of milk, six eggs, two-thirds cupful of 
sugar, one teaspoonful of lemon extract. Scald the 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 135 

milk, and add a little salt ; then beat the whites of eggs 
to a stiff froth, and lay it on the scalded milk m spoon- 
fuls ; let them stand a few moments to cook ; then lay- 
on a plate ; after which add sugar, yolks and lemon to 
the milk ; stir well together until scalded ; then turn 
into a dish, and lay the whites of eggs on top. 

LEMON JELLY. 

One box of gelatine, two cupfuls of sugar, one quart 
of water, six lemons. A piece of stick cinnamon im- 
proves the flavor ; put in while gelatine is dissolving. 
Dissolve the gelatine in the water; add sugar and 
lemons; heat until all is dissolved ; strain. Put into a 
mold. Mrs. G. Tabor Thompson, 

Eau Claire, Wis. 

MANIOC JELLY. 

One cupful of manioc, soaked one-half hour in 
cold water ; then add another pint of cold water ; set 
over the stove and let boil until clear. Flavor and put 
in molds to cool. Serve with cream and sugar. 

Mrs. W. Caswell. 

OBANGE CHAKLOTTE. 

One-third of a box of gelatine, one-third cupful of 
cold water, one-third cupful of boiling water, one cup- 
ful of sugar, juice of one lemon, one cupful of orange 
juice and pulp, whites of three eggs ; line the mold 
with sections of orange or lady fingers ; soak gelatine 
in cold water until soft, pour on boiling water, add 
sugar, and lemon juice strained; then add the orange 
juice and a little grated rind and the pulp ; cool in a 



136 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

pan of ice- water; beat whites stiff'; when orange jelly 
begins to harden, beat until light; add whites and beat 
until stiff enough to drop ; pour into a mold when 
cold. Eat with whipped cream. 

Mrs. E. Funke, 

Oconto, Wis. 

ORANGE CUSTARD. 

Juice of six oranges, strained, and sweetened to 
taste ; heat it over a slow fire until the sugar is dis- 
solved; take off the scum. When nearly cold, add the 
yolks of six eggs well beaten, and one pint of cream or 
milk. Return to the fire, and stir until it thickens. 
Pour into glasses, and serve cold. 

Mrs. Datsy Grossman. 

ORANGE JELLY. 

Pare and slice eight oranges, sprinkle over a little 
sugar ; take one-half package of gelatine, pour over it 
a little cold water ; when swollen, add one pint of boil, 
ing water and juice of two lemons and two cupfuls of 
sugar. Pour this over the oranges, and set away to cool- 

Mrs. W. G. Yates, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 

TAPIOCA JELLY. 

One cupful of tajjioca, four cupfuls of water ; let it 
stand over night ; in the morning add one cupful of 
sugar. Bake until clear like starch ; then add one-lialf 
cupful of currants or cranberries, well beaten in. Eat 
cold, with or without dressing. Cream and sugar is 
very nice. Mrs. H. Darland, 

Newark, N. Y. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 137 

WINE JELLY. 

One box of Nelson's gelatine,, one pint of cold 
water. After the gelatine is dissolved, pour over it one 
pint of port, sherry or Maderia wine ; add two even 
pints of boiling water, one large cupful of sugar, a little 
stick cinnamon, and the juice of two or three lemons. 
Let it heat through thoroughly ; take from the fire, and 
strain into molds, or one large dish. Cut up into 
squares with a knife if you serve it in a large dish 
or in little glasses. Mrs. G. C. Ginty. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 
APPLE MEEINGUE. 
Pare and core six apples; take one tablespoonful 
of water, one cupful of pulverized sugar, juice and 
grated rind of one lemon ; fill the cavity made by the 
core with the above mixture ; add a little butter to each 
apple. Cover the apples with the meringue (made of the 
beaten whites of three eggs, and three heaping tea- 
spoonfuls of pulverized sugar, well beaten together); 
put in the oven and brown. When cold, serve with 
whipped cream. 

APPLE FLOAT— No. 1. 

Steam apples and put them through the fruit press, 
and when cold sweeten to taste ; add the white of an 
egg, beaten to a stiff froth. Whip all together, and eat 
with sweet cream. Mrs. G. C. Ginty. 

APPLE FLOAT— No. 2. 

To one quart of apples stewed and well mashed, 



138 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

add the whites of three eggs, well beaten, and four heap- 
ing tablespoon fills of sugar. Beat together for fifteen 
minutes, and eat with sweet cream and nutmeg. 

Mrs. M. S. Bailf.y. 

ORANGE FLOAT. 

Mix one quart of water, juice and pulp of two lem- 
ons, one coffeecupful of sugar ; boil until sugar is dis- 
solved ; strain, and again bring to a boil ; add four 
tablespoonfuls of corn starch, mixed in a little cold 
water. Stir and boil fifteen minutes. When cold, pour 
it over four or five sliced oranges and one can of pine- 
apple, or any other fruit you like. Spread over the top 
the beaten whites of three eggs ; sweeten and flavor with 
a few drops of vanilla, and over the top of the eggs 
spread thick, sweet cream, whipped to a froth. 

Mrs. M. S. Bailey. 

PEUNE SOUFFLE. 

One-half pound of French prunes, whites of six 
eggs, twelve tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar ; steam 
prunes until tender; chop fine; beat whites of eggs to a 
firm froth ; stir in sugar ; stir in very lightly chopped 
prunes. Bake in a quick oven five or ten minutes, and 
serve at once, with whipped cream. 

Mrs. H. Darland, 

Newark, N. Y. 

RICE IMPERIAL. 

One teacupful of rice, with enough milk to boil it 
soft; add sugar and vanilla to taste, and boil until well 
cooked; then add whites of three eggs well beaten, and 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 139 

let it stand until quite cold. Put half a package of Cox's 
gelatine to soak in a very little water. When well dis- 
solved, mix all together the rice, gelatine, a large coffee- 
cupful of whipped cream, some sliced citron, and rais- 
ins, or candied cherries, and put in a mould and stand 
on ice three hours. Serve with a rich custard or cream. 



lii. %.ij^^ , 




140 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 141 



142 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 143 



IM MEMORANDA. 



Who can cloy the hungry edge of appetite 
By base imagination of a feast ? 

ElCHAKD II. 

PIES. 



PIE PASTE— No. 1. 

Three cupfuls of flour, one cupful of lard, one-half 
cupful of ice water; mix lard in flour with a knife; add 
water; mix as little as possible : roll thin. 

PIE PASTE— No. 2. 

One pound of the best butter, one pound of flour, 
one teaspoonful of salt, one cupful of ice water. By 
measure, use one quart of flour and one pint of butter. 

PIE PASTE— No. 3. 

One quart of flour, one-half pound of lard, sweet and 
firm, one-half pound of butter, one small teacupful of 
ice water. 

FEENCH PUFF PASTE. 

One pound of flour, three-fourths pound of butter, 
one egg (use the yolk only), ice water ; chop half the 
butter into the flour; stir the beaten egg into half a 
cupful of ice-water, and work the flour into a stiff 
dough ; roll out thin ; baste with one-third the remain- 
ing butter, fold closely, roll out again, and so on until 
the butter is used up. Roll very thin, and set the last 
folded roll in a very cold place ten or fifteen minutes 



14G THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

before making out the crust ; wash with beaten egg 
while hot. Tliis paste is very nice for oyster-/)afe.s, as 
well as fruit pies. 

APPLE CUSTARD PIE. 

One cupful of very tart apples, stewed and sifted, 
one cupful of sugar, two-thirds cupful of milk, two eggs, 
one tablespoonful of butter ; flavor with lemon or nut- 
meg ; frost or not, as you please ; one crust. A very 
nice flavoring for this pie, or a custard pie, is to take 
the peel of an orange, boil it in salt and water while you 
are preparing the pie; then takeout, mash \ery fine, 
and add to the pie. 

CRACKER PIE. 

One teacupful of cracker crumbs, broken rather 
coarse, two teacupfuls of boiling water, one and one-half 
cupfuls of sugar, and the juice and rind of one large 
lemon. Bake with two crusts. 

CREAM PIE— No. 1. 

Cover a pie-plate with rich crust, sift over the crust 
a thin layer of flour, cover the flour with sugar ; then 
add cream and sprinkle cocoanut over all ; repeat flour, 
sugar and cream. Bake. Grated lemon peel can be 
used instead of cocoanut for flavoring. 

Mrs. J. E. Dickinson. 

CREAM PIE— No. 2. 

One egg, three tablespoonfuls of sugar, one pint of 
milk, large tablespoonful of flour ; boil ; flavor when 
cool and put in a baked pie shell ; or use two yolks, 
frosting with whites. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK 147 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

Two cupfulsof milk, one-half cupful of sugar, three 
eggs (two whites reserved), two tablespoonfuls of choco- 
late, boiled in milk ; add sugar, salt, eggs ; pour in the 
crust and bake ; whip the two whites stiff with three 
tablespoonfuls of sugar; flavor with vanilla. 

COCOANUT PIE— No. 1. 

Put one teacupful of cocoanut into a coffeecup and 
fill it with sweet milk. Heat to boiling in a double 
boiler two teacupfuls of sweet milk ; stir in two table- 
spoonfuls of flour, previously dissolved in a little of the 
cold milk ; add butter one-half the size of an egg. When 
cool, add five eggs beaten with one cupful of sugar, and 
enough more milk to fill the pie ; bake. This will make 
one large or two small pies. 

Mrs. O. p. Smith, 

Beloit, Wis. 

COCOANUT PIE— No. 2. 

Half a grated cocoanut, four tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, four eggs; add milk as for custard pie, and 
frost. Or, one pint of milk, two eggs, one-half cupful 
of prepared cocoanut; sweeten to taste; little salt. 

FEUIT PIE. 

Two cupfuls of sweet cream, one cupful of sugar, 
one cupful of chopped raisins, four eggs, reserving 
whites of three for frosting. 

LEMON PIE— No. 1. 
Juice and grated rind of one lemon, one small po- 
tato grated, one cupful of sugar, one cupful of water, 



148 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

three tablespooiifuls of Hour, three eggs, reserving 
whites of two for frosting. Mrs. G. C. Ginty. 

LEMON PIE— No. 2. 

Shoe one lemon fine into a cup, after removing the 
peel; then fill the cup with water; add one cupful of 
sugar, and one tablespoonful of corn starch. Bake 
with two crusts. Mrs. A. Hoffman. 

LEMON PIE— No. 3. 

Grated rind of two lemons, one cupful of sugar, 
four eggs (reserving the whites of two), butter the size 
of an Q%^\ beat all to a cream, add lemon juice, and 
bake. Beat whites to a stiff froth, add three spoonfuls 
of sugar and spread on top ; return to oven and brown 
lightly. Mrs. L. H. Gushing. 

LEMON PIE— No. 4. 

The juice and rind of one lemon, one cupful of 
sugar, yolks of three eggs, one tablespoonful of butter, 
one of corn starch, one cupful of hot water ; cook all 
together, bake crust, fill with the custard, and frost. 
Flour can be used instead of corn starch, if preferred. 

Mrs. a. Hoffman. 

LEMON TAKTS. 

Two lemons, two cupfuls of sugar, one of raisins, 
two of water, three tablespoonfuls of flour, a little salt ; 
prepare lemons as for pies; seed and chop raisins; mix 
all together and boil ; place a crust in tart tins ; fill with 
mixture and bake. 

Tart Grust. — One cupful of lard, one tables] )Oonful 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 149 

of white sugar, white of one egg, three tablespoon fuls 
of water ; mix very lightly as for pie crust. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

One teacupful of grated bread or cracker crumbs, 
one teacupful of raisins, one and one-half teacupfuls of 
brown sugar, one-half teacupful each of molasses and 
vinegar, three cupfuls of hot water, butter size of an 
egg; spice to taste. Three pies. The syrup left from 
sweet crabapple or peach pickles is nice to use for these 
pies. Mrs. H. H. Todd. 

MINCE MEAT— No. 1. 

Five pintbowlfuls minced meat, one-half tongue, one 
piutbowlful of suet, ten pintbowlfuls of apples, four 
pintbowlfuls of boiled cider, one pintbowlful of vine- 
gar, two pintbowlfuls of New Orleai:s molasses, four 
pintbowlfuls of sugar, four lemons, juice and rind, three 
tablespoon fuls of cinnamon, two tablespoon fuls of all- 
spice, one tablespoonful of cloves, one nutmeg, one heap- 
ing tablespoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of pepper, three 
pounds of stoned raisins, three pounds of currants, one 
pound of citron, one cupful of brandy. If not moist 
enough, add water in which the meat was boiled. When 
baking, add a good teaspooniul of butter to each pie. 

Mrs. T. J. Cunningham. 

MINCE MEAT— No. 2. 

Take five pounds of lean meat, boil, chop fine, with 
three pounds of suet ; seed four pounds of raisins, pick 
and wash four pounds of dried currents, slice a pound 
of citron, chop four quarts of apples ; put in a sauce 



150 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

pan, with a tablespoonful each of ground cinnamon and 
nutmeg, a teaspoonful each of ground cloves, allspice, 
ginger and white pepper, with the juice of two lemons 
and two and one-half pounds of sugar; pour overall 
one and one-half quarts of cider, one pint of molasses 
and a teacupful of melted butter ; let come to a boil ; 
bake in a rich crust. Mrs. E. C. McCohd. 

MINCE MEAT— No. 3. 

Two bowlfuls of lean meat, four bowlfuls of apples, 
one bowlful of suet, one bowlful of currants, two bowl- 
fuls of raisins, four bowlfuls of sugar, one bowlful of 
molasses, one bowlful of vinegar, one bowllul of boiled 
cider, one pound of citron, one nutmeg, three table- 
spoonfuls of cinnamon, two tablespoonfuls of cloves, 
one tablespoonful of allspice, three tablespoonfuls of 
salt, juice of two lemons. Boil all together. 

Mrs. Will Squires. 

MINCE MEAT— No. 4. 

Six pints of meat, chopped fine, twelve pints of 
apples, seven pints of vinegar, two pints of molasses, 
twelve pints of sugar, six pints of raisins, four pints of 
English currants, one-half cupful of brandy, two pints of 
suet or one pint of butter, two nutmegs, twenty table- 
spoonfuls of cinnamon ; ten tablespoonfuls of cloves, 
ten tablespoonfuls of allspice. This will make five 
gallons. Mrs. A. Hofkmax. 

MOLASSES APPLE PIE— (Yankee). 

Slice tart-apples thin, sweeten with half New Orleans 
molasses and half brown sugar (about one-half cupful 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 151 

of molasses), a little butter, cinnamon, a pinch of 
salt, a teaspoonful of water and enough flour sprinkled 
over to thicken the juice ; tuck the crust under very 
snugly and bake slowly at first. It takes longer to 
bake than with all sugar. 

Mk8. F. a. a. Robertson. 

ORANGE PIE— No. 1. 
Beat to a cream a teacupful of powdered sugar and 
one tablespoonful of butter, add beaten yolks of three 
eggs, then the juice and rind of two oranges, one tea- 
spoonful of cornstarch ; beat all together ; lastly, stir in 
lightly the whites beaten to a stitt' froth. Bake with 
one crust. Mrs. F. C. Ahms. 

ORANGE PIE— No. 2. 

Milk for one pie, three eggs, one-half cupful of 
sugar, one tablespoonful of .corn starch (large), one 
orange ; save the whites for the top of the pie ; beat the 
yolks of eggs ; put in the one-half cupful of sugar and 
the juice and grated rind of orange ; put the milk on 
the stove with the corn starch ; let it come to a boil, then 
add it to eggs, sugar, and orange. Bake with one crust. 

Mrs. B. D. \\\.yj^. 

PIE-PLANT PIE— No. 1. 

Stew the pie-plant, sweeten, add grated rind and 
juice of one lemon and yolks of two eggs. Rake and 
frost like lemon pie. 

PIE-PLANT PIE— No. 2. 

Mix one-half teacupful of white sugar and one 
heaping teaspoonful of flour together; sprinkle over 



152 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

undercrust ; then add the pie-plant, cut up fine ; 
sprinkle over this another one-half teaeupful of sugar 
and heaping teaspoonful of flour. Bake in a slow oven 
three quarters of an hour. Mrs. M. A. Lysaght. 

PIE-PLANT PIE— No. 3. 

Cut up your pie-plant, ])Our boiling water over it 
and let stand while you are preparing the crust; then 
pour off the water, and to each pie put one cupful of 
sugar, with an egg beaten in ; add a piece of butter. 

Mrs. a. J. Bate. 

PEACH CUSTAED PIE. 

Use one crust, halve the peaches and turn hollow 
side up; sweeten, beat together one ^^,g, one tablespoon- 
ful sugar, pinch of salt, and add cream or milk enough 
to cover peaches. Bake. Canned peaches can be used. 

Miss Jennie Lysaght. 

EAISIN PIE— No. 1. 

One-half cupful of raisins, seeded and chopped, one 
cupful of water, one cupful of sugar, one small table- 
spoonful of corn starch, yolks of two eggs, well beaten, 
grated rind of one lemon ; boil, and afterwards add the 
juice of the lemon. Bake the crust first and fill ; then 
put the whites of the eggs on top, after being well 
beaten with three spoonfuls of sugar; brown nicely. 

RAISIN PIE— No. 2. 

One cupful of raisins, cook as dried apples, one 
cracker, rolled fine, one cupful of sugar, for one pie ; 
grate the rind and use the juice of one lemon for two 
pies. Mrs. C. P. Barker. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 153 

RIPE CURRANT PIE. 

One cupful of ripe currants, mashed, one of sugar, 
two tablespoon fuls of water, one of flour, beaten with 
yolks of two eggs; bake; frost the top with beaten 
whites of the eggs and two tablespoonfuls of powdered 
sugar, and brown in oven. 

RASPBERRY PIE. 

Open a can of raspberries, drain oft' two-thirds of 
the juice and put the remaining juice and berries into 
a plate lined with pie crust; sprinkle flour over the top, 
also little pieces of butter ; put on your top crust and 
bake. When you can get black raspberries in the sum- 
mer, put a bowlful of them in a crust, with a little sugar, 
and treat the same way. Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 

SQUASH OR PUMPKIN PIE. 
Two teacupfuls of boiled squash, one teacupful of 
brown sugar, three teacupfuls of sweet milk, three eggs, 
one tablespoonful of melted butter, one tablespoonful of 
cinnamon, ginger or nutmeg, as preferred ; little salt. 
Makes two pies. 

SOUR CREAM PIE. 

One cupful of sweet or sour cream, two cupfuls of 
sugar, one cupful of raisins chopped and seeded, one 
egg, juice of one lemon — vinegar can be used instead. 
Bake with two crusts. Mrs. J. 0. Ferris. 



154 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 155 



156 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 157 



158 MEMORANDA. 



Come, give us n taste of your quality. 

— HamxiET, Act iv. 

PICKLES. 



How earnest thou in this pickle ? — Tempest. 
A great deal depends upon the vinegar in making 
pickles — buy the best cider vinegar the market affords. 
If your pickles show a white scum on the top, take 
them out of the jar, pick out the soft ones, wash the 
hard ones in cold water, and scald fresh vinegar and 
pour over them. If a chopped pickle shows a white 
scum, set the jar in water and thoroughly scald, by 
letting it stand for several hours in the scalding water 
on the stove. You may be able to save it, but if 
you have been made the dupe of patent vinegar, you 
will have to throw your pickle away. 

CUCUMBEE PICKLES— No. 1. 

To a gallon of water add one cupful of salt ; make 
it scalding hot, and pour over the cucumbers ; strain 
off. Next day scald again, and pour over the cucumb- 
ers. Do this nine mornings. Wash the cucumbers; 
take enough vinegar to cover them ; heat with spices 
to a boiling heat, and pour over the pickles. Lay sliced 
onions on top. if you like the flavor. 

Mrs. J. C. OuTHWAiTE, 

Depere, Wis. 



16(1 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 
CHOW CHOW— No. 1. 

One peck of green tomatoes, twelve large green 
cucumbers, six onions, two large heads of cabbage, six 
green peppers, two quarts of vinegar, three pounds of 
brown sugar, two ounces of white mustard seed, two 
tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, one of cloves. Chop the 
tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, peppers and cabbage fine ; 
put them in a jar and mix with them a pint of salt; 
let them stand over night ; in the morning, drain 
thoroughly ; put the vinegar, sugar and spices into a 
porcelain kettle and let them come to a boil ; pour 
over the pickles ; add a few bits of horseradish ; cover 
with horseradish leaves, and place a plate on top to 
weigh the pickles down. Mrs. J. M. Bingham. 

CHOW CHOW— No. 2. 

One gallon of best cider-vinegar, one-lialf pound of 
ground mustard, two large heads of cauliflower, picked 
apart, and soaked in salt and water (strong) over night, 
two quarts of small white onions, forty small cucum- 
bers, cut in rings, one teaspoonful of curry powder ; 
boil the vegetables in the vinegar and spices until 
tender; then skim out: boil the liquor down and pour 
over the pickles. Miss Wilson, 

Menomonie, Wis. 

CHOPPED PICKLES. 

One-half cupful of ripe tomatoes, chopped fine, two 
roots of horseradish, one cupful of salt, one cupful of 
white mustard seed, two tablespoonfuls of black pepper, 
two of red, five celery stalks, cut fine, three large onions. 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. Ifil 

a teaspoonful of mace, one of cloves, two of ciniiamoii, 
a teacupful of sugar, one quart of cider vinegar. 

Mrs. B. Himmelsbach. 

cucumber salad. 

One dozen large ripe cucumbers, pare and chop 
(taking out the seeds first) the size of a small bean, 
chop also twelve large white onions, six large red 
peppers, add a quarter of a pound of white mustard 
seed and the same of black, one gill of celery seed, one 
teacupful of salt ; mix all together ; hang up in a bag and 
let it drain for twenty-four hours ; put in a jar and cover 
with cold vinegar. If you live away from market and 
cannot get celery, a small teacupful of this pickle mixed 
with meat or fish salad makes it very nice. 

Mrs. G. C. Ginty. 

ENGLISH MUSTARD PICKLE. 

Equal portions of white cauliflower, very young 
green beans, small cucumbers, and small white onions, 
a few pieces of horseradish, and two or three red 
peppers ; each must be boiled until tender (but not boiled 
together), in salt water, not long enough to become soft. 
Take one pound of Coleman's Imported English 
Mustard and three or four quarts of vinegar, add a table- 
spoonful of sugar; boil in a porcelain kettle; put the 
cauliflower, beans and other ingredients in and let them 
boil a few minutes ; skim them out ; pour the vinegar, 
mustard, etc., over them, and put in air-tight jars. 
Mrs. H. H. Brown, 

Menomonie, Wis. 



H\-2 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

GKEEN TOMATO PICKLE. 
Slice one peck of green tomatoes thin, and six 
onions; strew one cupful of salt over them, and let them 
stand over night; then drain. Take one quart of vine- 
gar, two quarts of water; boil pickles in the mixture 
ten minutes. Then drain again. Take two quarts of 
vinegar, two pounds of brown sugar, two even table- 
spoonfuls of ground cloves, mustard and cinnamon, 
one teaspoonful of ginger, one-quarter teaspoonful of red 
pepper. Put all together and boil fifteen minutes. 

Mrs. C. H. Smith. 

mustard pickle. 
Separate cauliflower into nice little sprigs; put it 
into salt brine (strong enough to hold up an egg). Let 
it remain in the brine three days; take it from the 
brine and let it stand one day in fresh water. Do the 
same to as many white onions as you wish to pickle 
with it. To one gallon of vinegar add two pounds of 
brown sugar, and let them come to a boil ; stir in one 
and one-half pounds of good mustard, previously made 
with cold vinegar. Place a layer of the cauliflower and 
onions in ajar; sprinkle them with whole allspice and 
pepper corns. Do this until the cauliflower and onions 
are all in ; then pour over the boiling vinegar and 
mustard. Mrs. B. Himmelsbach. 

PEACH PICKLE— No. 1. 

Three pints of brown sugar to one gallon of vinegar ; 

throw in a few cloves and pieces of stick cinnamon, and 

a few berries of allspice ; let come to boil ; put in the 

peaches and boil them until you can pierce with a straw. 



J'HE GOOD CHEEK COOK JiOOK. 163 

Put them in a jar, pour over the syrup and cover closely. 
Steam crabapples and use the same syrup to pickle 
them. Mrs. L. C. Stanley. 

PICKLED PEACHES— No. 2. 

Eight pounds of peaches, four pounds of white sugar, 
one quart of water, one cupful of vinegar, one small 
handful of stick cinnamon, half as many whole cloves; 
heat the vinegar, water and sugar, and skim ; put in 
the spices, pare the peaches and put a few at a time into 
the liquor; cook until tender. Put them into Mason 
jars. Peaches can be taken from the liquor carefully 
and put into the jars : fill the jars with the hot liquor, 
and seal. Mrs. A. Hoffman. 

PICKLED PEACHES— No. 3. 

Seven pounds of fruit, five of sugar, one of allspice 
and cinnamon (tied in a bag and put in the vinegar), 
one quart of vinegar ; stick a few cloves in each peach 
and lay in a jar ; boil the sugar, vinegar and spices and 
pour over the fruit while hot, three mornings in sue- 
cession. Mrs. R. D. Whittemore. 

PICKLED CUCUMBERS— No. 2. 

Wash and put into a stone jar ; prepare a weak 
brine to cover them ; heat in a brass kettle and pour 
over them ; the next morning, drain off the brine and 
heat again, skimming it when it comes to the boiling 
point, and pour over cucumbers hot ; continue to do 
this seven mornings, then rince off the pickles in clear 
water, wipe them and pack in a jar ; throw over the top 
of them a few pieces of horseradish, cinnamon, cloves 



164 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

and green peppers; pour over the wliole some good 
cidar vinegar heated to a boiling point. 

Mrs. a. Hoffman. 

PICKLED PEPPEKS. 

Take large green peppers, cut off the tops and 
remove the seeds ; soak the peppers in strong salt and 
water over night ; chop and season cabbage with salt 
and pepper ; stuff the peppers with this ; sew the tops of 
the peppers on ; boil in vinegar until tender ; put in a 
jar and cover with cold vinegar, adding a few pieces of 
horseradish. Mrs. A. Hoffman. 

PICCADILLI. 

One peck of green tomatoes, sliced thin, put in a 
jar in layers, with salt freely sprinkled over each layer ; 
let it stand over night; twelve large onions, sliced thin : 
drain the tomatoes dry by squeezing the brine out 
with your hands; have ready all kinds of spices mixed, 
also a teacupful of black and one of white mustard 
seed, and two pounds of brown sugar ; place a layer of 
the tomatoes in a porcelain kettle or a large tin utensil, 
then a layer of onions ; over this a generous sprinkling 
of the mustard seed and spices; then sugar; repeat 
until your tomatoes and onions are used ; pour over the 
best vinegar you can procure, and let it boil slowly half 
a day. This pickle will keep through cold and heat ; 
nothing spoils it, if the vinegar is good. 

Mrs. T. Ten Eyck, 

Chicago, 111. 

SWEET CUCUMBER PICKLE— No. 1. 
Take large green cucumbers, pare them and take 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 165 

out the seeds with a silver spoon. Cut in large squares 
and boil in vinegar enough to cover until tender 
enough to pierce with a fork. Drain and put in a jar. 
To three pounds of cucumber make a syrup of one 
quart of vinegar, one pound of sugar, a few small 
pieces of cinnamon, a little mace, cloves and ginger 
root (tie the spices in a cloth). Heat the vinegar and 
spices and pour over the cucumbers. Repeat this five 
or six mornings. The last time put in glass jars and 
cover air tight. Mrs. H. H. Brown, 

Menomonie, Wis. 

SWEET PICKLE PLUMS. 

Five pounds of sugar, one pint of vinegar to seven 
pounds of plums, one tablespoonful of ground cinna- 
mon, one teaspoonful of cloves and allspice. Boil all 
together until fruit is sufficiently cooked. 

Mrs. a. Hoffman, 
sweet cucumber pickle -no. 2. 

Take cucumbers when fully ripe ; pare them, cut 
lengthwise, and take out the seeds ; put them into weak 
brine over night; in the morning, drain them. Boil 
tender in weak vinegar ; drain again and put in jars. 
Turn over them a syrup (hot), made as follows : Allow 
to each pound of pickles, one-half pound of sugar, one- 
half cupful of vinegar; boil the vinegar and sugar a 
few minutes; add any spices you may like. Let boil, 
and skim well. Mrs. B. Himmelsbach. 

YELLOW PICKLE (Excellent). 

Four quarts of sharp cider vinegar, four ounces of 
ground mustard (yellow), one ounce of white mustard, 



166 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

one ounce of bruised mace, one-half teaspoonfui of 
ground cloves, one ounce of bruised ginger, three sticks 
of horseradish sliced, two ounces tumeric, tied in a bag, 
one teacupful of salt. The spices,without the tumeric, to 
be boiled in the vinegar a quarter of an hour. When 
cold, throw in the bag of tumeric. Make this pickle, and 
as vegetables come in season, throw them in, stirring 
from the bottom. It will keep for months. Use small 
string beans, onions, tiny ears of corn, beets, cauliflower, 
green tomatoes, cucumbers, etc. 

Miss Grace Howe, 

Kenosha, Wis. 




MEMORANDA. 1K7 



168 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORA NDA . 169 



170 MEMOl^ANDA. 



Variety's the spice of life, 
That gives it all its flavor. 

— COWPER. 



CATCHUPS AND SAUCES FOR MEATS, FISH 
AND VEGETABLES. 



It is best to cook all sauces in a vessel set within a 
larger one of hot water, or use a " double boiler ; " bot- 
tle and seal tomato catchup while hot, and it will not 
work ; be sure to boil it until the water has cooked well 
out of the tomatoes. 

CAPER SAUCE (For Boiled Mutton). 
One cupful of the liquor in which the meat has been 
boiled, two teaspoonfuls of flour rubbed smooth in a 
little water, salt to taste, two tablespoonfuls of butter, 
about two dozen capers or green nasturtium seeds; heat 
the liquor to boiling and skim before stirring in the 
flour, which must be perfectly free from lumps, and 
rubbed smooth in cold water; stir until the sauce 
thickens evenly; when it has boiled a minute, add the 
butter, a little bit at a time, stirring constantl}'^ ; salt it 
and drop in the capers ; let it boil up once and turn in 
your sauce-boat. J. W. Squires. 

CELERY SAUCE (For Boiled Turkey). 
One pint best part of celery, cut very fine ; cook in 
boiling salted water until tender; drain very dry; add 



172 THE GOOD CHEER COOK' BOOK. 

enough hot water to that in which the celery was cooked 
to make a pint ; use this to make a good drawn butter 
into which put your cooked celery and seasoning. 

CHILI SAUCE— No. 1. 

Twenty-four large ripe tomatoes, six green peppers, 
four onions, three tablespoonfuls of salt, eight table- 
spoonfuls of brown sugar, six teacupfuls of vinegar; 
chop the peppers and onions very fine ; peel the toma- 
toes and cut very small. Add one teaspoon ful of 
cloves, one teaspoonful of allspice, and two teaspoonfuls 
of cinnamon. Put in a kettle and boil gently an hour. 

CHILI SAUCE— No. 2. 

Eighteen large ripe cucumbers, one onion, two small 
red peppers; chop tine ; mix and add four cupfuls of 
vinegar, two tablespoonfuls of salt, two teaspoonfuls of 
ginger, four tablespoonfuls of sugar, two teaspoonfuls 
each of cinnamon, cloves and allspice, one teaspoonful 
of nutmeg. Miss Wilson, 

Menomonie, Wis. 

CUCUMBEK CATCHUP. 

Twelve large green cucumbers and three onions, 
grated fine; press the pulp as dry as possible in a thin 
cloth ; add pepper and salt to taste ; pour on vinegar 
until as thick as horseradish prepared for table use. 
Seal tight. This catchup, brought out on a winter's 
day, will prove very appetizing, and perfume the room 
like fresh cucumbers. 

Mrs. H. O. Crane, 

Green Bay, Wis. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 173 

DRAWN BUTTER (For Fisli, Cabbage or Cauliflower). 
One heaping tablespoonful of butter rubbed into 
two heaping teaspoonfuls of flour. Set in a pan of hot 
water ; keep stirring, and when it warms, season with 
salt and pepper, and pour over it slowly a teacupful of 
boiling water. Mix with milk for puddings, and water 
for vegetables, fish or meats. Boil one minute. To 
make this richer, pour it boiling hot into the yolks of 
two well-beaten eggs. Just before serving, stir and serve 
it at once. Mrs. G. C. Ginty. 

HORSERADISH SAUCE (Hot for Beef). 
Four tablespoonfuls of grated horseradish, four of 
powdered cracker, one-half cupful of cream, one tea- 
spoonful of powdered sugar, a little salt, one-half salt- 
spoonful of pepper, one even teaspoonful of made mus- 
tard, two tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Mix all together and 
heat in a vessel over hot water. Marion Harland. 

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE (For Baked or Boiled Fish). 
One-half cupful of butter, yolks of two eggs, juice 
of half a lemon, one-half cupful of boiling water, salt- 
spoonful of salt, one-quarter saltspoonful of cayenne 
pepper. Rub the butter to a cream ; add the j^olks one 
at a time and beat well ; then the lemon juice, salt and 
pepper. Just before serving, add the boiling water and 
stir rapidly until it thickens like custard. Pour the 
sauce around the fish. Mrs. Parloa. 

MAITRE DE HOTEL BUTTER (For Beefsteak). 
One quarter cup of butter, one-half teaspoonful of 
salt, one-half of pepper, one tablespoonful of chopped 



174 THE GOOD CHEER COOK JWOK. 

parsley, one of lemon juice ; rub the butter to a cream ; 
add the other ingredients and spread on hot beafsteak. 
You may add a little onion juice if you like. 

Cooking School. 

MINT SAUCE. 

One cupful of fresh chopped mint, one-quarter cup- 
ful of sugar, one-half cupful of vinegar; use only the 
leaves and tender tips of the mint; let it stand an hour 
before serving. This is very nice with roast lamb. 

Cooking School. 

MUSHKOOM SAUCE— No. 1. 

Half a canful of mushrooms, boiled and chopped, 
a cupful of good meat gravy strained over them ; stew 
five minutes; thicken with browned flour and season 
well. M. N. 

MUSHROOM SAUCE— No. 2. 

One canful of mushrooms, chopped fine, one pint 
of cream, butter the size of an egg, salt, pepper and 
lemon juice ; thicken with browned flour and cook until 
thick. Mrs. A. J. McGilvray. 

RAW TOMATO CATCHUP. 

One-half peck of ripe tomatoes, skinned and chopped 
fine, two roots of horseradish grated, one teacupful of salt, 
one teacupful of black and white mustard seed mixed, 
two tablespoonfuls of black pepper, two red peppers, 
chopped fine, three stalks of celery, and one cupful of 
onions chopped fine, one teaspoonful each of powdered 
cloves, mace and cinnamon, one cupful of brown sugar, 
one quart of vinegar. Fit for use immediately. 
Miss Hattie Whitney, 

Green Bav, Wis. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 175 

SPICED CURRANTS (To be eaten with Meats). 

Eleven pounds of currants, one pint of vinegar, eight 

pounds of sugar, nine teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, six of 

cloves, four of allspice, one of mace, one small nutmeg. 

Boil until thick, and put into glasses like jelly. 

TOMATO CATCHUP— No. 1. 

To one gallon of cooked tomato juice and pulp, after 
it has been put through a sieve, add four tablespoonfuls 
of salt, two of black pepper, one of chopped green pep- 
pers, three of cinnamon, two of ground mustard, and 
one of cloves, one quart of vinegar. Boil until thick, 
and bottle at once. Mrs. A. Hoffisian. 

TOMATO CATCHUP— No. 2. 

Cook one-half bushel of tomatoes thoroughly, rub 
through a sieve and boil to a jelly. To each gallon of 
the jelly add one pint of vinegar (scant), four table- 
spoonfuls of salt, four of black pepper, four of cinna- 
mon, three of cloves, one-half teaspoonful of cayenne 
pepper, one-quarter cupful of mustard. Boil one hour. 
Bottle while hot, and seal with beeswax, rosin, etc. 

Mrs. C. p. Barker. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

One-half can tomatoes, one cupful of water, two 
allspice berries, two pepper corns, two cloves, a sprig 
of parsley, one tablespoonful of chopped onion, one of 
butter, one heaping tablespoonful of corn starch. Salt 
and pepper to taste. Put the tomatoes, water, spices 
and parsley on to boil in a granite sauce-pan ; fry the 
onions in the butter until yellow ; add the corn starch. 



176 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

and stir all into the tomato ; simmer ten minutes ; add 
salt, pepper and a little cayenne. Strain sauce over 
boiled meat or fish. 

WHITE SAUCE (For Croquettes, Meat or Fish). 
One pint of hot cream, two even tablespoonfuls of 
butter, four heaping tablespoonfuls of flour ; season to 
taste with salt, pepper and a few grains of cayenne; 
add one-quarter teaspoonful of celery salt. Scald the 
cream ; melt the butter, and add to it the dry flour ; 
mix well ; add part of the cream and stir until it 
thickens ; add more cream, and when boiling and per- 
fectly smooth add the rest of the cream (the sauce 
should be very thick, almost like a drop batter). Add 
the seasoning, and mix while hot with meat or fish. If 
this sauce is used for croquettes, a beaten %g^ may be 
added to it. Milk may be used instead of cream by 
adding more butter. Cooking School. 



MEMORANDA. Yil 



178 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 179 



180 MEMORANDA. 



SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS. 



Salads are a religion. Time, which destroys creeds, rounds 
and mellows into ripe completeness the art of compounding this 
dish for the gods. The ability of skillfully and artistically con- 
cocting a salad argues a mental perfection beside which all mere 
moral excellence sinks into insignificance. To mix a salad is a 
solemn rite ; a ceremony only to be undertaken with deliberation, 
gravity and reverence. He who has once made a good salad, 
neither clotting nor bruising the herbs — ^who has been betrayed 
into no mixture therewith of fish, flesh or fowl, degrading the 
whole to the vulgar level of a mongrel mayonnaise— who has 
added exactly the proper dash of white wine, and served it cool, 
piquant, green, fragrant, crackling, appealing to all five senses 
at once, has achieved the triumph of being and has nobly vindi- 
cated his claim to existence. 

— Ario Bates. 

SALADS. 

A salad to be good must be cold when served. When 
oil is used, the dressing requires a great deal of mixing 
or blending. When the boiled dressings are used, have 
them perfectly smooth, which can be done by constant 
stirring when on the fire ; do not add the eggs when the 
other ingredients are on the verge of boiling, but stir them 
in when the mixture is warm and keep stirring until 
they come to a boiling heat, when the dressing will be 
thick enough to remove from the fire. When lettuce 
is used, wash it in ice water, break it apart and drain it 
on a fine sieve, or stretch a piece of cheese cloth over 



182 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

something handy, and drain it on that, taking care to 
keep it cool. 

The salad receipts given here will give perfect 
satisfaction if made according to rule. They have 
been served to hundreds of people by the ladies who 
gave them to this book, and have virtually paid off 
debts, helped build a parsonage, and been the very root 
and foundation of many good works. 

CHICKEN SALAD— No. 1. f Enough i'or a Party.) 

Take as much celery as chicken ; pick the chicken 
up in sm.all pieces; cut the celery about as large as a 
white bean ; set on the ice until you need it ; then mix 
together ard salt and pepper it. Pour over the following 
dressing which has been made long enough to be 
perfectly cold : Yolks of eight eggs, one cupful of 
butter, two cupfuls of vinegar, one-fourth of a cupful 
of sugar, one tablespoonful of made mustard, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, one of black pepper, and a pinch of 
red pepper, one large cupful of sweet cream. (Half 
this receipt will do for family use.) Put your vinegar, 
butter, salt, pepper and sugar on the stove to heat ; 
when warm stir in the yolks of the eggs which have been 
previously well beaten; stir until the mixture boils or 
thickens to the consistency of custard ; set away to 
cool, and when perfectly cool add the mustard and 
cream . You can use more crea m . 

CHICKEN SALAD— No. 2. 

One quart of chicken, shredded as fine as you like ; 
season to taste with salt and pepper ; one quart of celery 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 183 

cut in small pieces, three or four hard boiled eggs sliced 
very fine ; mix lightly together, and put where it will 
keep cold until time for serving. Then mix with it the 
following dressing, and garnish with parsley, delicate 
celery leaves, slices of hard boiled eggs, or lemons 
sliced very thin : 

Dressing. — Yolks of four eggs, three tablespoon fuls 
of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, one-half teaspoonful 
of pepper, one teaspoonful of ground mustard, four 
tablespoon fuls of vinegar ; mix together and heat in a 
basin set in a kettle of boiling water ; stir constantly 
until it thickens ; remove from the fire ; stir into it one 
tablespoonful of butter, and five tablespoonfuls of 
lemon juice. When cold, thin this dressing with 
sweet cream to a proper consistency, and mix with 
the chicken. Mrs. A. Hoffman. 

CHICKEN SALAD— No. 3. 

Equal parts of chicken and celery, cut into small 
pieces with a knife (string the celery before using). 
Make the following dressing and mix with it : 

Dressing. — One-half cupful of vinegar, one-half 
teaspoonful of dry mustard, a pinch of cayenne, one 
tablespoonful of butter, one of sugar, a teaspoonful of 
salt ; mix all together and heat ; when warm, add two 
well beaten eggs ; stir them in slowly, and when thick, 
put away to cool. When cold, add one-half cupful of 
whipped cream and the juice of one or two lemons. 
If you do not use it at once, do not add the cream and 
lemon until you serve the salad. Mrs. C. E. Toby, 

Eau Claire, Wis. 



184 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 
CABBAGE SALAD— No. 1. 

Slice the cabbage fine, and for one small bead make 
tbe following dressing : Yolks of three eggs, three 
tablespoonfuls of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, one-half 
teaspoonful of pepper, one teaspoonful of ground mus- 
tard, eight tablespoonfuls of vinegar ; beat all together. 
Put in a basin ; set in a kettle of boiling water ; stir con- 
stantly until it thickens; remove from fire; add a 
heaping tablespoonful of butter, and when cold, thin 
with sweet cream, and pour over and mix with the 
cabbage. Mrs. G. Tabor Thompson, 

Eau Claire, Wis. 

CABBAGE SALAD— No. 2. 

Chop your cabbage. Make a dressing as follows: 
One-half cupful of vinegar, a small piece of butter, one 
egg, two teaspoonfuls of sugar, four teaspoonfuls of 
milk, a little salt; set the vinegar on to boil, and when 
boiling, stir in the other ingredients. When thick, pour 
over the cabbage. Mrs. Will Talmadge. 

CELERY SALAD. 
Cut your celery into bits half an inch long and set 
on ice while you prepare your dressing. Take four 
hard boiled eggs (yolks only), one raw egg well beaten, 
one teaspoonful of salt, one-half saltspoonful of cayenne 
pepper, one teaspoonful of white sugar, one tablespoon- 
ful of salad oil, two teaspoonfuls of made mustard, one 
small teacupful of vinegar. Rub the yolks of the eggs 
to a smooth paste, adding by degrees the salt, pepper, 
sugar, mustard and oil. Beat the raw egg to a froth 
and stir it in ; add the vinegar. This dressing must 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 185 

be cold when you pour it over the celery. If hot 
weather when you make it, stir a lump of ice in it for 
a few minutes : remove and pour at once over your 
salad. 

CUCUMBEK SALAD. 

Place crisp lettuce heads in the bottom of a salad 
dish, next a thick layer of sliced cucumbers (have the 
cucumbers in ice water some time before you need 
them), over this a layer of ripe tomatoes cut very thin. 
Pour over all a French or Mayonnaise dressing and set 
on ice until it is served. This is a nice relish when you 
serve a dinner in courses. 

GEKMAN SALAD. 

Chop up six boiled potatoes, two red beets (boiled), 
one raw onion, two heads of celer}'^, two apples, a small 
piece of salt salmon or herring. Dress with vinegar, 
pepper, oil and mustard ; garnish your dish with lettuce 
leaves. Mrs. Himmelsbach. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Half as much celery as lobster, cut in squares about 
the size of a bean. Save out the red claws or coral 
part to garnish your dish. When you take your lobster 
from the can, drain it as dry as possible before using; 
add the whites of four hard boiled eggs, chopped, and 
put the yolks through the ricer to garnish the top after 
the salad is all ready to serve. This receipt refers to 
canned lobster, as we cannot obtain the fresh in our 
home market. Use salad dressing No. 1 (boiled) to mix 
with. Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 



186 TlIK GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 
MEDLEY SALAD. - 

()ne cupful of salmon cut in squares, one-half cup- 
ful of lobster cut the same, three hard boiled eggs; slice 
the whites of the eggs into the salmon and lobster, add 
one cupful of finely cut celery and one cupful of shred- 
ded lettuce ; put the yolks of the eggs through the ricer 
to garnish the top. Use any of the dressings you may 
choose. 

POTATO SALAD— No. 1. 

Take cold boiled potatoes, hard boiled eggs and a 
raw onion ; pack in a dish a layer of the potatoes sliced 
thin, next the onion chipped fine, then the eggs sliced. 
Pour over each layer a little of the following dressing : 
Salad oil one-half a gill, vinegar one-half a gill, one 
teaspoon ful of mustard, one-half a teaspoonful of pepper, 
one of salt. Boil eight eggs for an ordinary salad. 

Mrs. L. B. Cruttenden. 

POTATO SALAD -No. 2. 

Eight boiled potatoes cut in small squares, one onion 
cut fine, six hard boiled eggs cut in small bits ; add a 
little celery, if you like ; use French or boiled dressing, 
or take the yolks of four hard boiled eggs and blend 
them smooth with a half cupful of melted butter, a 
teaspoonful of made mustard, a little salt and pepper, 
a little vinegar, and cream to thin it to the proper 
consistency. 

SALMON SALAD. 

One can of fresh salmon, two large heads of lettuce. 
Drain all the oil from the salmon and shred it up in 



THK GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 187 

small pieces. Pick the lettuce up, and with a fork mix 
the fish with it, adding three hard boiled eggs which 
have been chopped. Pour over it a dressing made as 
follows : 

Yolks of two eggs well beaten, a little salt and 
pepper to taste, one teaspoonful of sugar, two of made 
mustard, one tablespoonful of butter, a pinch of red 
pepper; stir into this mixture three tablespoon fuls of 
vinegar ; set in a kettle of hot water and stir until it 
thickens. When perfectly cold, thin with cream and 
pour over the salmon and lettuce. Place rings of hard 
boiled egg over the top, and serve. 

Fish salads are pretty served in nests of lettuce 
leaves or in shells, which you can buy at the crockery 
stores. Mrs. Geo. C. Gintv. 

SHRIMP SALAD. 

Wash the shrimps in cold water thoroughly, break 
up with a fork into small bits ; cut into squares four 
medium-sized cucumber pickles ; chop fine the whites 
of two hard boiled eggs, cream the yolks with melted 
butter the size of a large egg ; mix with the shrimps, 
pickles, eggs and whites of eggs. Make as wet as you 
desire with the following dressing : One cupful of 
vinegar, a tablespoonful of mustard, teaspoonful of salt, 
a little pepper, butter the size of a large o^gg, two eggs; 
heat the vinegar and other ingredients, and when warm, 
add the beaten eggs ; stir gently until it thickens. Many 
like it without the first dressing. 

Mrs. T. J. Cl NNIMGHAM. 



188 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

TOMATO SALAD. 

Make a thick bed of crisp lettuce leaves on a good- 
sized platter ; cut nice, large, red tomatoes in thick slices ; 
pepper, salt and lay on top of the lettuce ; place on the 
ice. Just before serving, pour over the top either French 
or mayonnaise dressing, or the dressing used in chicken 
salad No. 1. When you serve, cut down through the 
lettuce and have some of it and a good slice of the 
tomato on each plate. This is a pretty looking salad 
and is nice for a dinner course. Do not have your 
dressing thin. Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 



SALAD DRESSINGS. 
BOILED DRESSING— No. L 

Yolks of eight eggs, a cupful of butter, two of 
vinegai', quarter cupful of sugar, one teaspoonful of 
salt, one of black pepper, one tablespoon ful of made 
mustard, a pinch of red pepper, one large cupful of 
cream. (Half this receipt will do for ordinary occa- 
sions.) Beat the yolks of the eggs very light ; place the 
other ingredients (except the cream and mustard) on the 
stove to heat; when warm, add the eggs, stirring 
constantly until it comes to a boil, wlien it will be a 
smooth, thick custard. When cold, add the mustard 
and cream. 

BOILED DRESSING— No. 2. 

Yolks of three eggs well beaten, one teaspoonful of 
mustard, two teaspoonfuls of salt, one-fourth saltspoon- 
ful of cayenne, two tablespoon fuls of sugar, two table- 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 189 

spoonfuls of melted butter or oil, one cupful of cream 
or milk, half-cupful of hot vinegar, whites of three 
eggs beaten stiff; cook in the double boiler until it 
thickens like soft custard ; stir well. If you keep it in 
a cool place it will be good for two weeks. This is nice 
for boiled cabbage, cauliflower, etc. 

Mrs. Walrath, 

Cooking School. 

BOILED DEESSING— No. 3. (For Cold SlaAv.) 
Boil half a cupful of vinegar with two teaspoonfuls 
of sugar ; add a little salt, pepper and mustard, if you 
like ; rub a quarter of a cupful of butter to a cream, 
with one heaping teaspoonful of flour, and pour the 
boiling vinegar on it. Cook four or five minutes, 
and then pour the entire mixture over a well-beaten 
egg (the yolk only); turn this over one good pint of 
red or white chopped cabbage, and set away to cool. 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

Three tablespoon fuls of olive oil, saltspoonful of salt, 
half a one of pepper, one-quarter teaspoonful of onion 
juice, one tablespoonful of vinegar; add the oil last, 
stirring constantly, and a little of it at a time. You 
can take lemon juice instead of the vinegar and add a 
teaspoonful of made mustard if you like. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

One teaspoonful of mustard, one of powdered sugar, 
one-half saltspoonful of salt, a pinch of cayenne pepper, 
yolks of two raw eggs, one pint of olive oil, two table- 
spoonfuls of vinegar, two of lemon juice : mix the first 



190 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

four ingredients in a small bowl ; add the eggs ; stir 
well ; add the oil, a few drops at a time, stirring con- 
stantly with a fork until it thickens. Do not try to stir 
it all in at once, but very gradually. When the dress- 
ing becomes thick, thin it with a little lemon ; then 
add more oil and lemon alternately, and lastly add the 
vinegar. Should the egg not thicken quickly, one-half 
teaspoonful of the unbeaten white of an Qgg or a few 
drops of vinegar will often have the desired effect, and 
also keep it smooth. Just before you use it, add one- 
half cupful of whipped cream. Never mix the mayon- 
naise dressing with the meat or fish until ready to serve, 
and then leave half of it to pour over the top. 

SALAD DRESSING THAT WILL KEEP. 

One scant half cupful of mustard ; one tablespoon- 
ful of sugar ; mix together with a little hot water ; beat 
the yolks of eighteen eggs with a pinch of red pepper, 
and five teaspoon fuls of salt; add the mustard, eight 
tablespoonfuls of olive oil, one and one-half cupfuls of 
butter, melted, one and one-half cupfuls of vinegar, 
juice of two small lemons. Make in an earthen dish 
and stir constantly lest it separate ; put in a glass jar 
with a screw top. When you use, add one quart of 
whipped cream. The above is enough dressing for 
four large year-old chickens. 

Miss Hattie Whitney, 

Green Bay, Wis. 

SALMON SALAD DRESSING. 

Yolks of two eggs, well beaten, a teaspoonful of salt 
and black pepper each, two teaspoonfuls of white 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 191 

sugar, two teaspoonfuls of made mustard, one table- 
spoonful of butter. Stir into this mixture four table- 
spoonfuls of best vinegar. Put the dressing into a bowl 
and set in a kettle of hot water ; stir until it thickens ; 
when cold, thin with cream. 

Mrs. Will T.a.lmadgk. 




192 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 193 



194 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 195 



196 MEMORANDA. 



"For I, who hold Sage Homer's rule the best. 
Welcome the coming, speed, the pai-tlng giiest." 

RELISHES AND HINTS FOR THE TABLE. 



CHEESE STICKS. 

These are used as a relish. Roll puff paste thin ; 
sprinkle with grated cheese ; fold, roll out and sprinkle 
again ; repeat this several times. Place on the ice to 
harden. When cold, roll into rectangular shape, one- 
eighth of an inch thick. Place on a dripper, bottom side 
up, and with a knife dipped in hot water, cut into 
strips four or five inches long, and less than a quarter 
of an inch wide. Bake and serve piled cob-house 
fashion. These are nice for a lunch party. 

SALTED ALMONDS. 

Blanch the almonds ; have ready a pan of fine hot 
salt, and, while wet, drop the nuts in the hot salt. Take 
them out and place in a dripper, with a paper on the 
bottom. Set in the oven and brown ; watch them 
closely, and take from the oven as fast as they turn a 
light brown. Use for a relish, as you would olives. 

Mrs. B. E. Reid. 

Hard boiled eggs put through a ricer make a pretty 
garnish for salads, fish, etc. Shake gently over the 
top as they come from the ricer. 



198 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

A PRETTY WAY TO SERVE FRIED OYSTERS. 

Bake a square loaf of bread, a little longer than 
usual, so as to have a good brown crust; stand on end 
and cut off the top; take the inside all out; till up 
with fried oysters. Stand it on a pretty plate, tie a 
bright ribbon around the center; put the top on to 
keep them warm, and set the loaf on the table before 
the hostess who will serve them from the loaf, with a 
silver oyster fork. Very nice for a lunch party. 

TO SERVE OLIVES. 

Olives are much more appetizing served in little 
dishes of pounded ice. 

In serving an "Orange Charlotte" or a mold of 
Blanc Mange, make two or three orange baskets ; fill 
them with different colored jellies, and garnish the 
dish with them, by putting one at each end and on 
either side of the mold or form. Tie a bright ribbon 
on the handles of the baskets. To make the orange 
basket, you cut away half the orange, leaving a strip of 
the skin about half an inch wide for the handle. 
Remove the pulp from the other half orange, and the 
strip of skin across the top and you have the basket. 
Pink it around with the scissors, and tie a bright 
ribbon on the handle. You can make orange jelly of 
the pulp if you use many of the oranges at one time. 

MOCK ORANGES. 

Cut off the ends of oranges, remove the pulp with- 
out breaking the skin, fill the skins with Charlotte 
Russe or wine or lemon jelly ; set in a pan of ice until 
time to serve. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK 199 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

To serve Charlotte Russe — Buy little fancy baskets at 
the confectioner's or line old-fashioned tumblers with 
lady-fingers ; fill half full of Charlotte Russe and 
when cold, turn out. Place the forms on pretty little 
plates and serve with cake. 

OYSTERS. TURBOT OR FISH SALADS. 

To serve scolloped oysters, turbot or fish salads — Use 
oyster shells nicely cleaned, or shells that you can buy 
for the purpose at any large store where such things 
are sold. 

In the summer season, fish salads are ver}' pretty 
served in nests of lettuce leaves. You can make the 
nests very readiW by using what is known as " head 
lettuce." 

A bouquet should always brighten the table in 
summer, and if you can afford it, in the winter season 
as well. 

Serve Saratoga chips in fancy paper baskets, which 
you can make or buy. 

TO CHRYSTALLIZE FRUIT. 

Pour a cupful of boiling water over a cupful of 
granulated sugar, and let the mixture boil slowly, with- 
out stirring, one-half hour. Dip a skewer into the syrup 
and then in cold water. If the thread formed break off 
brittle, the syrup is ready. Keep your syrup in a bowl 
set in a pan of hot water, while you arousing it. Cher- 
ries, English walnuts, currants and sections of orange 
are pretty prepared in this way for table ornamentation. 



•200 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 
CHEESE CRACKEKS. 

Take large round milk crackers, butter them ; put 
them on a buttered paper in a dripper ; put on each 
grated cheese about an inch thick, and a teaspoonful of 
cream. Set in a slow oven. Let them remain until 
the cracker consumes the cheese, and they are a light 
brown. Nice to serve with lettuce for lunch. 

Mrs. Wm. O'Neil. 

A pretty way to send oranges to the table is to cut 
the rind from the ends and leave a strip round the 
middle, then open, leaving the sections on the strip of 
peel. 

CHANTILLY RASKETS. 

Dip the edges of soft flexible macaroons in syrup 
prepared as for crystallized fruit and make little l^askets ; 
fill with candy, jelly, fruit, etc. Use for ornamenting 
your table. 

Serve raw oysters in a cake of ice ; cut with a 
chissel and hammer a pretty block, and with a hot 
flat-ron, melt a place in the center; lay the oysters in ; 
set the block of ice on a platter and send to the table. 

TO (lARNISH WITH COLORED EGGS. 
To garnish a dish of molded jelly, a form of Char- 
lotte Russe or Russian cream, turn the form out on a 
fancy platter or in a pretty dish, lay around it eggs 
made of gelatine Blanc Mange and colored. To make 
the eggs : Break a hole in the end of an Qgg and let 
the contents of the shell run out as thoroughly as 
possible ; rinse out the shell with cold water, and as 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 201 

fast as you get them ready, set in a pan of bran or 
cornmeal ; make your Blanc Mange and dip out por- 
tions of it into bowls, leaving some for white eggs ; stir 
a little grape jelly into one of the bowls and you have 
the material for blue eggs; in another chocolate and 
you have brown eggs; in another cochineal (a few 
drops) and you have pink eggs. Fill up the empty 
shells with these mixtures and set away to cool. When 
cold, peel the shells off, rinse the Blanc Mange eggs in 
very cold water and use to garnish your dish. It is 
better to make the eggs the day before you want to 
use them. 

Nasturtium blossoms make a beautiful garnish for a 
dish, and as they are edible it makes no difference if 
one drops into the salad or whatever you are serving. 

Horseradish is very nice mixed with cream and 
vinegar. Mix slowly. 



202 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 203 



204 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 205 



206 MEMORANDA. 



" He who can endure a tasteless soup is capable of construct- 
ing a universe without light. " 

SOUPS. 



If you thicken a soup with flour or corn starch, 
always let it boil five or ten minutes after the thicken- 
ing is in, to prevent the raw taste, which spoils a soup. 

If you cannot get all the fat from the stock after it 
has jellied, wring a cloth out of hot water and wipe the 
top of the stock. 

If you put dumplings in a soup or on top of a stew, 
draw the soup or stew to the back of the stove, and, after 
you have covered the dumplings, leave them to cook 
and the soup or stew to simmer for twenty minutes 
before you raise the cover. Thickened soups should 
be the consistency of good cream. 

You can buy bay leaves and herbs that the soups 
require at drug stores. 

AMBER SOUP. 

Four pounds of shin beef, four pounds of knuckle 
of veal, or three pounds of fowl, four quarts of cold 
water, two ounces of lean ham or bacon, six whole cloves, 
six whole pepper corns, one tablespoonful of herbs, one 
tablespoonful of salt, three small onions, one carrot, one 
turnip, two stalks of celery, two sprigs of parsley, one salt- 
spoonful of celery seed. To clarify: Rind of one lemon, 
whites and shells of three eggs. 



208 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 
BOUILLON— No. 1. 

Four pounds of beef, two pounds of bone, two quarts 
of cold water, one tablespoonful of salt, four pepper 
corns, four cloves, one tablespoonful of herbs ; let boil 
until reduced to three pints. Set away in an earthen jar. 

BOUILLON— No. 2. 

Four pounds of beef from the middle of the round, 
two pounds of bone, two quarts of cold water, one table- 
spoonful of salt, a few pepper corns, three cloves, a little 
parsley; wipe the meat and bones; cut into small 
pieces ; add the water and heat slowly ; add the season- 
ing, and simmer four or five hours. Boil it down to 
three pints ; set it away to cool ; remove the fat from 
the top ; heat again, and add salt and pepper. Serve 
for lunch, or use for sick people needing strength. 

Mrs. J. W. Squires. 

BEAN SOUP. 

One cupful of beans ; parboil in soda water ; pour 
off water as soon as it boils, and add two quarts of cold 
water ; salt, pepper and butter to taste. Let cook slowly 
three or four hours. Instead of butter, salt pork may 
be added. Pea soup may be made in the same manner 
as the bean soup. 

BEEF SOUP. 

To a joint bone of beef add cold water, one quart 
to a pound ; boil slowly, and skim often. Boil three 
hours. Add one-half cupful of rice, one good-sized 
potato, one small onion ; chop one-half cupful of meat, 
and add with the vegetables. 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 209 

Boil two hours. Dry celery left from the table, and 
keep for seasoning soups. Mrs. A. Hoffman. 

CEEAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

The flesh of the chicken from which the stock is to 
be made should, with the exception of the breast, with 
the skin perfect as possible, be placed in the pot and 
removed as soon as tender. To each quart of stock, 
when strained and skimmed, add one ounce of rice, 
and let simmer three-fourths of an hour ; then add the 
breast of the chicken finely shredded, and a pint of 
cream thickened with flour; season to taste with 
pepper and salt ; let boil two minutes ; flavor with 
celery, and serve. 

CORN SOUP— No. 1. 

One pint of grated green corn, one quart of milk, 
one pint of hot water, one heaping tablespoonful of 
butter, one slice of onion. Cook the corn in the water 
thirty minutes. Let the milk and onions come to a 
boil. Have the flour and butter mixed together, and 
add a few tablespoonfuls of the boiling milk. When 
perfectly smooth, stir in the milk, and cook eight 
minutes. Take out the onion, and add the corn ; 
season to taste, and serve. 

CORN SOUP— No. 2. 

One can of corn cooked one hour ; then strain. Put 
one quart of milk on stove, season with butter, pepper, 
salt and a little celery salt. When the milk boils, put 



210 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

in soup dish with the strained corn. Have ready two 
eggs well beaten and stir in lightly. 

Nellie Briggs, 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

CHICKEN SOUP. 

Save the broth after boiling chickens, and to it add 
two onions thinly sliced ; boil twenty minutes ; season 
with salt and pepper ; add two beaten eggs, and serve. 

English Receipt. 

DUMPLINGS FOE SOUP— No. 1. 

Make the same dough you would for " Baking 
Powder Biscuit," with less shortening. Cut out with 
biscuit cutter. Cover and cook twenty minutes. 
Mrs. R. F. Wilson, 

Eau Claire, Wis. 

DUMPLINGS FOR SOUP— No. 2. 

One pint of flour, one teaspoonful of baking powder, 
one egg, butter size of a butternut, a little salt, milk 
enough to mix a stiff batter which will drop from a 
spoon. Boil twenty minutes. 

GREEN PEA SOUP— No. 1. 

Cover a can of green peas with hot water and boil 
with an onion until they will mash easil3^ The time 
will depend on the age of the peas, say from twenty 
to thirty minutes. Mash and add a pint of souj) stock ; 
cook together with two tablespoonfuls of butter and one 
of flour until smooth, but not brown ; add these to the 
peas with one cupful of milk and one of cream. Season 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 211 

with salt and pepper and let it boil up once ; add a cup 
of whipped cream before serving, if you have it. Three 
cupfuls of milk may be used instead of cream. Squares 
of bread to serve with above : Cut the bread in little 
squares and frv in hot lard until just browned. A little 
salt may be used if desired. Mes. R. B. Clarke. 

GREEN PEA 80UP— No. 2. 

One can of green peas warmed and rubbed through 
a puree strainer ; when nearly all rubbed through, pour 
one pint of hot milk through the strainer, to rinse 
off every part of the pulp. Put the pulp and milk on 
to boil, add more milk and cream if you have it, until 
you have the proper consistency, which will be about 
like cream; when boiling, thicken with one table- 
spoonful of butter, one-half tablespoonful of salt, one 
scant teaspoonful of sugar and a dash of white pepper. 
Serve with buttered crackers which have been browned 
in the oven. 

MUTTON BROTH. 

Allow a quart of water to each pound of meat and 
bone; break the bones and cut the meat into small 
pieces ; cover with cold water, and heat slowly ; add 
salt, pepper and a little turnip (and onion, if you like 
it) ; simmer until the meat is in shreds. Strain it, and 
when cool, take off the fat. To one quart of the broth, 
allow two tablespoon fuls of rice, washed and soaked 
half an hour. When the broth is boiling, add the rice. 
Simmer until the rice is cooked, and serve at once, 
while hot. English. 



212 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 
NOODLES FOE SOUP— No. 1. 

To one beaten egg, add as much flour as it will 
absorb, a little salt, and roll tliem as a wafer. Leave to 
dry three hours. Dust lightly with flour ; roll over 
into a large roll, slice thin from the ends. Shake out 
loosely ; put in the boiling soup, and boil rapidly ten 
minutes. Mrs. Wm. Squires. 

NOODLES FOE SOUP— No. 2. 

For every egg, one tablespoonful of milk, and a 
little salt ; work all the flour into it that you possibly 
can ; roll out ; spread with flour ; roll " over and over," 
and cut down in rings. Mrs. R. F. Wilson, 

Eau Claire, Wis. 

OYSTEE SOUP. 

One quart of oysters, one ditto sweet milk, one- 
fourth pound of butter. Set the milk on the stove, and 
let it come to a boil. After the oysters are cooked, add 
two tablespoonfuls of grated cracker ; pepper and salt 
to taste. It is better if you use cream instead of the 
milk. Mrs. L. H. Gushing. 

ONE DAY SOUP. 

Half a can of tomatoes, five or six cold boiled or 
baked potatoes, half an onion, one stalk of celery, or a 
few celery tops. Boil all together until the vegetables 
are very soft. Put through a colander, add pepper and 
salt, and a pinch of sugar. Just before serving, pour 
in one cup of hot milk with a pinch of soda dissolved 
in it ; sift over the top a few very dry bread crumbs. 

English Cook Book. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 213 

PEA SOUP -No. 1. 

Two cupfuls of peas soaked over night in cold water ; 
put into three quarts of cold water and set on the stove 
to boil ; add one small bay leaf, four onions cut fine, 
and fried in one-half a cupful of butter ; salt and pep- 
per to taste, and let it boil until well done. A little 
celery may be added if desired. 

Mrs. a. B. LaRocque. 

PEA SOUP— No. 2. 

Boil a piece of the shank of beef until it is tender ; 
have ready one pint of split peas which have been 
thoroughly cooked, mashed and put through a colan- 
der ; add them to the soup with two onions, sliced, one- 
half a teaspoonful of celery seed ; salt and pepper to 
taste. Boil all together for three-fourths of an hour. 

PEA SOUP (Split Peas). 

Four pounds of meat, one of split peas, four quarts 
of water. Boil together three or four hours adding 
more water if necessary. Season and strain for the 
table. 

STOCK FOR SOUP— No. 1. 

Take fresh, juicy, lean meat (bones and meat of 
about equal weight), put into cold water in the 
proportion of two half pints to each pound, salt 
slightly and set on the stove ; do not allow to boil for 
the first half hour ; simmer slowly, partly covered for 
four or five hours. Season at the last moment ; when 
the soup is cold, remove the fat ; the stock underneath 
will form a jelly, and in cool weather will keep a week. 



'2U THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

Chicken or turkey bones will add to the delicacy of the 
soup. Good soup can also be made by using the trim- 
mings of fresh meat, bits of cold cooked beef, or the 
bones of any meat or fowl. Just before dinner each 
day, it is only necessary to cut off some of the jelly 
and heat it ; it is ver}'' good with nothing additional, 
but one can have a change, by adding different flavor- 
ings, such as macaroni, vermicelli, tomatoes, or some 
other vegetable. 

STOCK FOE SOUP— No. 2. 

Three pounds of thin rib beef, one-half pound of 
liver ; put on to cook w'ith cold water. Let it come to 
a boiling point and skim very thoroughly ; add salt ; 
let it boil up gently, and skim again. Add one carrot, 
one turnip, a small piece of cabbage, one large onion 
(stick into it three or four cloves), one small bay leaf. 
Boil slowly until the meat is well done. Strain and 
put away for use. Anj^ kind of soup can be made from 
this stock. Mrs. A. B. LaRocque. 

SOUP STOCK (Browii).— No. 3. 
Six pounds hind shin of beef, six quarts of cold 
water, ten whole cloves, ten whole pepper corns, a bou- 
quet of herbs, one large tablespoonful of salt, three small 
onions, one carrot, one turnip, two stalks of celery, two 
sprigs of parsley. Wipe, and cut the meat and bones 
into small pieces. Put the marrow bones, half the meat 
and the cold water into the kettle. Soak half an hour 
before heating ; add the herbs and spices ; brown the 
onions and the remainder of the meat, and add them 
to the stock ; then the vegetables chopped fine. Sim- 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 215 

mer six or seven hours, and strain. This stock is good 
in tomato soup, or any kind you choose to use it for. 

Old Housekeeper. 

soup a la julienne. 
Three tablespoonfuls of butter, three sHces of salt 
pork cut in small squares. Put these ingredients in a 
kettle with two tablespoonfuls of nicely browned flour 
(be careful not to burn the flour in browning) ; add 
three quarts of boiling water, two carrots, four potatoes, 
a large turnip, a small piece of cabbage and two 
onions — all chopped or cut fine. Season with a little 
celery, parsley, a bay leaf, salt, black pepper, a pinch of 
cayenne and a small piece of garlic. Cook all together 
for two hours and a half with a slow fire. Any kind of 
meat broth or gravey may be added if desired, but it is 
good without. Mrs. A. B. LaUocque. 

TURKEY SOUP. 

Take the carcase of the turkey, leaving what dress- 
ing adheres to the bones, add three quarts of water and 
boil down to two; then strain carefull}'', leaving the 
soup to cool over night. When cool skim off the fat. 
While warming add one teaspoonful of cinnamon, one- 
half ditto of cloves and allspice, one-quarter ditto mace, 
and sufficient browned fiour to thicken a little. Just 
before serving add a sliced lemon and a hard boiled 
egg cut into small pieces. Old Housekeeper. 

TURTLE SOUP. 

Turn the turtle on his back, cut off the head so 
that the blood will all run out. Let it remain over 



216 7^HE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

night. Lay it on its back again, open it on the sides, 
take all tlie meat and eggs out and let them lay in 
water twenty-four hours. To make the soup : Boil the 
turtle meat in salt and water ; when about half cooked 
take out and put away to cool. Add to the broth two 
slices of salt pork cut in small pieces, two tablespoonfuls 
of flour, two of butter (browned nicely), one small bay 
leaf, three cloves, one onion (cut fine), a little pepper, 
nutmeg and parsley, the yolks of six hard boiled eggs 
(whole), a little lemon juice, cayenne, black pepper and 
salt. Cut the turtle meat in small squares and put in 
the broth again, boil until well done. Five minutes 
before serving add one can of mushrooms and a glass 
of sherry wine. Calf's head may be used in place of 
the turtle. Mrs. A. B. LaRocque. 

TOMATO SOUP— No. 1. 

One can of tomatoes cooked half an hour with a 
teaspoonful of sugar and soda the size of a pea. Put 
this through a fine sieve and add one pint of soup 
stock, which has been strained. Stick three or four 
cloves into half a large onion ; brown this in two table- 
spoonfuls of butter ; add this to the soup and boil one 
hour. Skim out the onion and cloves. Thicken with 
a tablespoon ful of flour ; boil five minutes or more after 
the thickening is in the soup. Put diamonds or little 
squares of buttered bread browned in the oven, in the 
bottom of your soup-tureen with a cupful of whipped 
cream ; pour the soup over and serve. 

Mrs. Wm. O'Neil. 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 217 

TOMATO SOUP— Xo. 2. 

Cut two carrots, two onions and three ounces of salt 
pork into small pieces ; add a sprig of parsley and fry 
slowly for fifteen minutes in three ounces of butter. 
Put in three tablespoonfuls of flour ; mix well ; add 
this to two cans of tomatoes and two quarts of veal 
broth ; season with salt and pepper. Cook slowly for 
one hour. Pass through a sieve ; boil again ; add two 
ounces of butter, a little fine sugar, and serve with small 
squares of bread fried in butter. 

Mrs. a. J. McGiLVRAY. 

TOMATO SOUP— No. 3. 

One can of tomatoes, one and one-half quarts of 
milk, one small teaspoonful of soda, flour to thicken, 
butter, pepper and salt to taste ; put the milk on the 
stove and when boiling, thicken ; at the same time have 
the tomatoes cooking with a little water added to them ; 
season them, add a little butter and just before serving 
add a very small teaspoonful of soda to the tomatoes ; 
pour quickly into the milk and strain while it is effer- 
vescing. Mrs. Frank Rotch, 

Bucoda, Wash. T. 

TOMATO SOUP— No. 4 

Cook tomatoes in usual manner ; when well cooked, 
add one-half teaspoonful of soda; stir well; then pour 
in one quart of new milk and let boil. Season same as 
oyster soup, J. R. Congdon. 

TOMATO SOUP— No. 5. 

One quart of tomatoes, one quart of milk, heated in 



218 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 



separate dishes ; when tomatoes come to a boil, add 
one-half a teaspoonful of soda and stir well ; skim and 
strain. Season with butter, pepper and salt to taste; 
when ready to serve, add the heated milk to tomatoes. 

Mrs. a. Hoffman. 




MEMORANDA. 219 



220 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 221 



222 MEMORANDA. 



Master, I marvel liow the Fishes live in the sea. 

—Pericles. 

FRESH FISH, SALT FISH, OYSTERS, ETC. 



After cleaning a fish be sure to wipe it dr}^ particu- 
larly if you intend to broil it. Broil on a greased wire 
broiler over clear coals, the fleshy side first, as the skin 
side burns easily. In soaking salt fish, soak in sour 
milk, skin side up, so that the salt may soak away from 
the fish. In baking a fish use as little moisture as 
possible and the fish will be dr}^ and flake off" in nice 
layers. To fry oysters successfully, have them dry 
before you begin operations. Drain, and lay on a cloth, 
with another cloth over them, to absorb moisture. Fry 
your fish in hot salt pork fat, if you want to have them 
delicious. 

BAKED FISH. 

Rub the fish inside and out with salt and pepper. 
Make a dry dressing of bread crumbs and seasoning the 
same as you would for poultry ; stuff" the fish and sew it 
up. Cut gashes two inches apart and lay in slices of 
salt pork. Dredge it w4th flour ; put in a dripper with 
meat drippings or butter and a little water. Bake from 
one to two hours, according to size of fish. 

Sauce. — One-half cupful of butter, yolks of two 
eggs, juice of half a lemon, saltspoonful of salt, one- 



224 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

quarter saltspoonful of cayenne pepper, two small cup- 
fuls of boiling water. Cook about five minutes, or until 
a little thicker than cream. Pour around fish and 
send to table. Mrs. Walrath, 

Cooking School. 

BAKED MUSKALLONCtE. 

Clean the fish nicely, leaving on both head and tail; 
wash it well in salted water, and wipe the inside very 
dry with a coarse towel. Make a dressing of dry bread 
crumbs, little pieces of butter, pepper, salt and chopped 
onions. Fill the fish as full as you can stuff it ; sew it 
up. Put a few thin slices of salt pork over the top ; 
place in a dripper, with a little water, and bake in the 
oven slowly until thoroughly cooked through. Add a 
very little water occasionally, to keep it from burning, 
but when it is ready to take from the fire, have it dry. 
This fish makes a very tempting appearance served on 
a large platter. "Saints' Rest," 

Long Lake, Wis. 

BOILED MUSKALLONCtE. 

Clean and dry your fish thoroughly. Sew it up in 
a cloth, and boil in salted water until psrfectly cooked. 
Roll it out on a large platter; cover the top with rings 
of hard boiled eggs. Serve with drawn butter, into 
which hard boiled eggs have been sliced. 

"Saints' Rest," 

Long Lake, Wis. 

broiled oysters. 
Dry large select oysters on a cloth ; then broil on a 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 225 

greased wire broiler for a minute ; have a little melted 
butter, pepper and salt ready ; pour over and serve. 

F. B. G. 

BROOK TROUT. 

Salt and pepper the fish inside and out (after they 
have been wiped very dry). Fry nice slices of salt 
pork; when crisp, take from the pan; keep hot to 
garnish your fish platter. Roll the trout in flour or 
corn meal, and fry in the hot pork fat until thoroughly 
cooked through and of a deep brown color. Put on a 
hot platter, with the slices of pork on the outer edge. 

Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 

CLAM CHOWDER— No. 1. 

Wash fifty clams thoroughly, and put in a kettle 
with a dipper of water. Boil enough to open ; save the 
brine ; cut the heads off the clams and chop fine ; fry 
to a nice brown a slice of salt pork cut up in little 
pieces. To a dipper of water add one and one-half bowl- 
fuls of sliced potatoes, one and one-half good-sized 
onions, pepper and salt. Let boil until tender; add a 
little more water, if needed ; then add the clams and 
liquor, one cupful of milk, the fried pork, and two pow- 
dered crackers; put the clams in before stirring the 
potatoes; take out the pieces of pork before serving. 
After all the ingredients are in, let it boil up once. 

Mrs. Hiram Allen, 

New Jersey. 

CLAM CHOWDER— No. 2. 

The clams used for this chowder should be " Soft 
Shell" or " Slim Necks " (never use " Quahaugs "). The 



22(3 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

proper kind are put up in cans on the coast of Maine, 
and may be purchased at any first-class grocery store. 
Of course, clams in the shell are better, but these serve 
the purpose nicely. Pare and slice thin one dozen fair- 
sized potatoes ; slice thin one pound of clean salt pork 
and place in an iron kettle over the fire until the fat is 
drawn ; remove the scraps ; to the fat add a layer of 
sliced potatoes, then one of clams, and one onion, chopped 
fine; when all are in, add one pint of water, salt and 
pepper. Boil until the potatoes are cooked ; then add 
one quart of milk and one-half a dozen common 
crackers split. Let this come a boil. Remove and 
serve. One can of clams will be sufficient. 

J. H. Grafton, 

Winona, Minn. 

CODFISH (Baked). 
Soak one pint of codfish picked up into shreds. 
After it has soaked a few hours, simmer it on the. stove 
until tender; drain off the water, make the fish as dry 
as possible, and add to it one pint of mashed potatoes, 
three eggs, well beaten, one pint of milk, a good lump 
of butter. Mix all together, and bake three-quarters of 
an hour. Mrs. Daisy Grossman. 

CODFISH balls. 

Take a large bowlful of picked up codfish which has 
simmered on the stove until perfectly tender, drain it 
very dry with your hands, or press with the back of an 
iron spoon ; put this into a bowlful and a half of hot 
mashed potatoes ; add one Q,g^ (not beaten), a piece of 
butter size of a small egg, pepper and salt, if it requires 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 227 

it ; mix up well, and roll into egg-shaped balls. Just 
before you fry, roll in flour ; have your lard very hot 
and as much as you would to fry cakes ; they will come 
to the top (if the lard is good), when you can roll them 
over with a fork to brown on the other side ; drain as 
you take them out, so the}' will not be greasy. 

Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 
codfish in cream. 
Pick the fish up fine, and let it simmer on the back 
of the stove two or three hours; pour off the water; 
add milk, a piece of butter, a couple of eggs well beaten, 
and a little flour stirred up in cold milk ; stir until the 
proper thickness, and serve with rings of hard boiled 
egg over the top (use cream instead of milk, if you 
have it, and not quite so much butter). 

Mrs. L. C. Stanley. 

cream loaf oysters. 
One loaf of bread, two tablespoon fuls of butter, one 
quart of cream, three tablespoonfuls of flour, one-half 
cupful of cold milk, three pints of oysters. Bake a loaf 
oi bread in a round two-quart basin ; when two or three 
days old cut out the heart of the bread, being careful 
not to break the crust. Rub the crumbs fine, and dry 
them for a few minutes in the oven. Fry three cup- 
fuls of them in two tablespoonfuls of butter. As soon 
as they begin to look golden or crisp, they are done (it 
takes about two minutes over a hot fire, stirring all the 
time). Put one quart of cream to boil ; when it boils, 
stir in three tablespoonfuls of flour, which has been 
mixed with the cold milk. Cook eight minutes; season 



228 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

well with salt and pepper. Put a layer of sauce into 
the loaf from which you took the crumbs, then a layer 
of oysters, pepper and salt ; then another layer of sauce 
and one of fried crumbs; continue this until the loaf is 
nearly full. Have the last layer a thick one of crumbs. 
Bake slowly half an hour. Garnish your dish around 
the loaf with celery sprigs and send to table. 

Mks. Grundy. 

ceea:v[ oysters. 
Put one quart of cream and fifty oysters in separate 
kettles to heat (oysters in their own liquor). Let them 
come to a boil ; when sufficiently cooked, skim ; take 
out of the liquid and keep hot. Put cream and liquid 
together; season to taste, and thicken with powdered 
cracker; when sufficiently thick, stir in oysters, and 
serve at once. Mrs. A. Hoffman. 

FISH A LA CREAME. 

In this case you make the sauce first, or while your 
fish is boiling. 

Cream Sauce. — One pint of hot cream, one heaping 
tablespoonful of butter, one heaping tablespoonful of 
flour, one-half teaspoonful of salt, one-half saltspoonful 
of pepper ; heat the cream over hot water ; put the but- 
ter in a granite saucepan, and stir until it melts and 
bubbles (do not brown it); add the dry flour and stir 
quickly, until well mixed ; add one-third of the cream ; 
let it boil, and stir in the rest of the cream gradually, 
to have it perfectly smooth ; then add salt and pepper. 

While you are making this sauce, have a white fish, 
weighing about four pounds, boiling or steaming until 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 229 

tender. Remove all the bones, and pick the fish up in 
small pieces. Take a platter, from whicli the fish is to 
be served, place on it first a layer of fish (salt and 
pepper it), then a layer of the cream sauce, until all the 
fish and sauce are used. Spread over the top a cupful 
of cracker crumbs, moistened with butter. Pin a strip 
of wet muslin around the edge of your platter ; set in a 
dripper of hot water, and bake until slightly brown. 

Mrs. Walrath, 

Cooking School. 

FRIED OYSTERS— No. 1. 

Wash the oysters, drain and season with salt and 
pepper; let them dry between two layers of cloth ; beat 
the eggs in which you dip them ; then roll them in 
cracker crumbs, and fry in hot lard or half lard and 
half butter; drain them as you take them out. If you 
have but a few to fry, roll them twice in the q^^^ and 
cracker; always have your cracker crumbs seasoned. 
If you have a large company to partake of the oysters, 
you can fry them the day before you need them ; have 
them in large dripping pans and put them in a vtry hot 
oven a few minutes before you serve. No one would 
know that they were not fried just before serving. 

Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 

FRIED OYSTERS— No. 2. 

Use the largest and best oysters ; lay them in rows 
upon a clean cloth and press another upon them to 
absorb the moisture ; have ready several beaten eggs, 
and in another dish some rolled crackers with pepper 
and salt. Heat enough butter in the frying-pan to 



230 J HE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

entirely cover the oysters ; dip the oysters first into but- 
ter, then into the cracker, rolling them over that they 
roay be well covered ; drop into the frying-pan and fry 
quickly to a light brown. Serve warm. I always boil 
my cooking butter and let it cool before using. 

Mrs. C. p. Barker. 

MACKEREL (Salt) BROILED. 

Soak in sour milk twenty-four hours, %ldn side up, 
and, after drying thoroughly, broil over a good bed of 
coals on a wire broiler. Spread butter over the top and 
set in the oven a minute for the butter to melt — or melt 
the butter and pour over the fish. 

OYSTER CREAM. 

Take a quart of milk, let it come to a boil, then drop 
in one pint of solid meat oysters, salt and pepper, stir 
gently until hot, but don't boil. Skim out the oysters 
into a hot earthen dish. Have ready one teacupful of 
oyster crackers, rolled, sifted and mixed with the yolks 
of three well-beaten eggs and just cold milk enough to 
stir smooth ; stir this into the milk with half cupful of 
butter, let it simmer and last of all stir in the whites of 
the three eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Place three or 
four oysters in each cup and fill a little more than half 
full of the cream. Serve as first course at a lunch » 
with a slice of bread. 

Mrs. Hannah Irwin, 

Green Bay, Wis. 

oyster fritters. 
Make a batter of the yolks of two eggs beaten well, 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 231 

half a cupful of milk or water, one tablespoon ful of 
olive oil, a good pinch of salt and one cupful of flour or 
more (have it almost as stiff as a drop batter) ; when 
ready to use add the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff 
froth. Boil the oysters until the liquor flows freely. 
Drain very dry. Use the liquor (if you like the fish 
taste) as part of the fluid for the batter. Dip each 
oyster in the batter and fry until brown in hot lard, or 
take two oysters to each fritter, as you may like them 
large. 

OYSTER ROYAL. 

One pint of new milk, a piece of butter the size of a 
large egg, pepper and salt to taste ; put three pints of 
oysters without their liquor in this, let it boil and 
thicken it with two tablespoonfuls of fiour. Serve on 
toast. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 

Cook a quart of oysters in their own liquor until 
plump or swelled ; skim out the oysters, add to the 
liquor one-half cupful of good cider vinegar ; when it 
boils up skim it and add eight whole pepper corns, 
eight allspice berries, eight cloves, a pinch of cayenne 
pepper and a teaspoonful of salt. Boil six minutes; 
pour over the oysters, and when cool seal up in glass 
jars. Keep in a cool dark place. They will keep a 
couple of weeks. Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Roll fine a dozen crackers ; have ready butter, 
pepper, salt and oysters ; grease a shallow dish with 



232 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

butter, sprinkle iti a layer of cracker crumbs, then a 
layer of oysters, salt, pepper, and small pieces of good 
butter; repeat this until your dish is filled having the 
last layer crumbs; wet with a liiih oyster juice or 
cream fraost of these dishes are spoiled by being wet or 
mushy). Bake half an hour. 

SCALLOPED SALMON. 

One can of salmon, drain all the juice or oil from it 
and mince fine ; one-half cupful of bread crumbs, one 
cupful of milk, boiled ; mix a tablespoonful of flour 
and two of butter together; paur the boiling milk over 
this and mike a paste stirring so that it will be 
smooth ; pour this over the salmon which should be in a 
shallow dish. Shake the bread crumbs over the top 
and bake in a moderate oven three quarters of an hour. 

Mrs. Wm. O'Niel. 

TURBOT. 

Boil whitefish about fifteen minutes, pick the meat 
up quite fine. 

Dressing. — One quart of sweet milk boil and add 
one-fourth pound of butter, salt, pepper and a few celery 
or parsley leaves chopped fine ; thicken with flour to 
consistency of thick cream ; put in buttered dish a layer 
of fish, then one of the dressing ; repeat until the dish 
is full; cover top layer with rolled crackers and bake 
half an hour. Mrs. Will Tallmadge. 

WHITEFISH (Broiled). 

Clean and wipe very dry; cut down lengthwise 
close to the back-bone so that you may lay the fish flat 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 233 

on the broiler ; broil on a wire broiler moving up and 
down often, that the fish may not burn ; have melted 
butter, pepper and salt ready to pour over the top. 
Serve at once. Always broil the flesh side first, the skin 
side just enough to crisp it ; garnish your dish with 
slices of broiled salt pork. Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 




234 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 235 



236 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 237 



238 MEMORANDA. 



Some hae meat that canna eat, 
And some would eat that want it ; 
But we hae meat, and we can eat, 
Sae let the Lord be thankit, 

— Burns. 

MEATS AND POULTRY. 



Use dry dressing for all poultry, fowls and game. 
Bread crumbs rubbed fine (chopping the crusts), season 
with salt, pepper and savory, onions, sage or anything 
you like, put little pieces of butter through the crumbs 
as you use them. The juices from the fowl will moisten 
the dressing sufficiently and it will not taste like paste. 

When you broil or fry salt pork, take it from the 
broiler or frying pan and dip it in sweet milk, return to 
the fire, repeat this occasionally until the pork is done. 
It makes it very sweet and delicate. 

We have not given the usual receipts in this depart- 
ment, but a few choice dishes, a little out of the general 
order of things, taking it for granted that our readers 
can roast, broil, bake, stew and fry in the usual conven- 
tional manner. 

A NICE "PICK-UP." 

Chop cold meat fine ; half fill a pudding-dish with 
boiled maccaroni, also chopped ; lay the meat next ; pour 
over it a cupful of drawn butter mixed with one-half 



240 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

cupful of strained tomato juice ; strew with bread crumbs 
and bake. Rice may be substituted for maccaroni. 

BEEF LOAF. 

Four pounds of raw beef, three-fourths pound of salt 
pork, chopped fine, three-fourths cupful of crackers, 
crushed fine, two eggs, four and one-half teaspoonfuls 
of salt, four teaspoonfuls of pepper, one tablespoonful of 
butter, three tablespoonfuls of milk. Work the mixture 
up well in a chopping tray, pack in a mold or pan, set 
in a dripping pan of hot water, bake one and one-quarter 
hours. Keep the pan full of boiling water. 

Mrs. W. E. Tallmadge. 

beefsteak loaf. 
Three pounds of round steak, chopped fine ; eleven 
soda crackers, rolled fine; six eggs, well beaten ; butter 
the size of two eggs, salt, pepper and savory to taste ; 
rub all together ; bake in a loaf or bar one and one-half 
hours. Make the day before you want it as it cuts 
down better in thin slices. Mrs. G. C. Ginty. 

BEEFSTEAK PUDDING. 

0]ie and one-half pounds of juicy round steak, cut 
in square pieces, take out all gristle and skin, leave a 
little fat, season highly with pepper and salt, make a 
suet crust, grease a quart bowl, roll the crust one-half 
an inch thick, lay in the bowl ; in this put your meat ; 
when full, pour in one-half cupful of water, lay the 
paste all over the top, leaving no cracks through which 
the gravy can boil out ; tie in a floured cloth ; boil two 
hours constantlv; when done remove the cloth, run 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 241 

a thin knife around the edge, and turn on a hot dish 
carefully. 

Suet Paste. — Chop one-half pound of the best suet 
ver}^ fine ; remove the fibers ; rub the suet into one 
pound of flour; add one teaspoonful of salt and mix it 
with one-half pint of ice water; roll, put on a little 
butter in flakes, rolling it in as usual. Some add one 
teaspoonful of baking powder. 

Mrs. M. Harvey, 

Hamilton, Ont. 

BOILED COENED BEEF. 

Soak over night if very salt, but if properly corned 
this is not necessary. Put in your kettle and cover 
well with hot water ; let it boil gently on the back of the 
stove, three hours to eight pounds of meat; be sure and 
not let it boil fast, as it hardens the meat. 

BOILED DINNER. 

Boil a piece of corned-beef and a small piece of salt 
pork, one hour ; change the water and boil again ; add 
one chicken, give the chicken two hours to boil if old, 
and one if young; put your vegetables in the same pot, 
giving each kind the time they require ; when done put 
the beef, pork and chicken on a platter and lay the 
vegetables around them . This makes a delicious dinner. 

BOILED LEG OF MUTTON. 

One tablespoonful of butter, one teaspoonful of 
onion juice ; put mutton in kettle, and cook ten 
minutes over a hot fire, in the butter and onion juice, 
turning frequently ; then cover with hot water ; put in 



242 THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 

slice of lemon, pepper and salt; cook two and one-half 
hours; serve with one cupful of tomato juice, teaspoon- 
ful of butter, teaspoonful of flour, tablespoonful of vine- 
gar, salt and pepper. Mks. L. J. Rusk. 

BROILED BEEFSTEAK AND MAITEE BUTTEE. 

Lay a thick tender steak upon a gridiron well 
greased with butter, over hot coals ; sear on one side, 
turn immediately and sear the other, and finish cook- 
ing, turning often. Spread on the hot beef steak a 
maitre sauce found in catchups and sauces in this book. 

CHICKEN GELATINE. 

Boil one chicken in a small quantity of water until 
tender, take it up and strain the liquor ; add to the 
liquor one-third package of gelatine ; after it is all dis- 
solved, put in the meat, not chopped, but picked up ; 
let it boil up ; season with salt, a little pepper, and turn 
into a mold to cool. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Joint the chicken, put in a kettle, cover with water, 
and boil until tender, then cut in small pieces, removing 
the bones, line a dish with pastry, made of six cupfuls of 
flour, one of lard, one cupful of water and one-half 
teaspoonful of salt; sprinkle some flour over the bottom 
crust ; place in the chicken ; sprinkle salt, pepjxn- and 
more flour over the top of chicken, also bits of butter ; 
pour as much gravy as necessary over the whole ; then 
spread on the remainder of the crust; put bits of butter 
over the top and bake one-half hour. 

Mrs. Wm. Maktin. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 243 

CORNED LEG OF MUTTON. 

Have your butcher put a leg of mutton in brine, 
for three days ; then boil until well done. This sliced 
cold, is very good for supper or lunch. 

DEVILED HAM. 

I pint of ham, chopped very fine, yolks of four hard 
boiled eggs; rub smooth as possible, with one-half cup- 
ful of olive oil or butter ; pepper and mustard to taste ; 
mix thoroughly with ham until it forms a paste, with 
two-thirds cupful of vinegar. Nice for sandwiches. 

DEVILED VEAL. 

Thick part of a leg of veal chopped fine, two slices 
of salt pork chopped fine, two slices of bread crumbed, 
three eggs, one pint of milk, pepper and salt. Bake two 
and one-half hours ; serve cold, cut in slices. 
Miss Marietta J. Gary, 

Binghamton, N. Y. 

ENGLISH HUNTER- S BEEF. 

A round of beef, twenty pounds from the hind-quar- 
ter. Place in large wooden bowl,one and one-half pound.s 
brown sugar, one pound salt, one ounce cinnamon, one 
ounce allspice, one ounce cloves, one ounce nutmeg, 
and one ounce saltpetre. Rub these ingredients into 
the meat and let it stand for three weeks, turning the 
meat every second day in the mixture. Wipe all 
spices off' place in a deep dripper, cover closely with 
paste made of flour and water, and bake in the oven 
four or five hours. Mrs. E. Pattgn. 



244 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

ENGLISH POT PIE OF BEEF. 

Take nearly two pounds of round stake, cut into 
finger lengths, flour lightly, put a three-quart iron 
sauce pan on the stove, when hot, drop in fat of steak. 
then the meat, let it fry very quickly, then peel medium 
sized carrot, onion and turnip, cut in small, regular 
sized pieces, drop them in sauce pan, stir around quickly 
and pour over two cupfuls of boiling water, season with 
teaspoonful of salt, one- fourth teaspoonful of pepper, 
cover tight, when it comes to the boil, set back on the 
stove and let simmer nearly two hours, then take a tea- 
cnpful of fine chopped suet, two scant cupfuls of flour, a 
level teaspoonful of salt, mix lightly in a bowl, make a 
hole in the center and pour in half a cupful of cold 
water, and mix with a knife, adding a few drops of 
water, to bind the crumbs, roll out quickly, an inch 
thick, and a little larger than lid of sauce pan, taste 
your gravy, to see if seasoned enough, lay the dough 
on top of meat and vegetables, place on the hottest part 
of stove a minute, then let simmer one hour; when 
done cut the crust like pie, and lay around the meat. 
Do not let it stop simmering or the crust will be heavy. 

Mrs. Bishop, 

New Jersey. 

FRESH MEAT GRIDDLES. 

Chop bits of any cold roast meat ; season with pepper 
and salt ; make a griddle batter ; put a spoonful on a 
well-buttered griddle ; then a spoonful of the chopped 
meat, and on this, another spoonful of the batter. When 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 245 

cooked on one side, turn ; when done, send to the table 
hot. They are nice for breakfast or lunch. 

Mrs. L. H. Gushing. 

FBICASSEED CHICKEN. 

Cut up chicken ; put on to boil in a little water ; 
season with salt and pepper ; cook till tender, taking 
care it does not boil dry, when done, pour on one pint 
of thick sweet cream, place in a hot dish, and serve. 

Mrs. F. M. Bitzzle. 

FRITTADILLA. 

One pint finely chopped roast beef, or scraps of cold 
meat of different kinds, one pint dry bread crumbs, one 
tablespoonful of onion, chopped fine ; soak bread crumbs 
in water, and squeeze dry in a cloth ; put a tablespoon- 
ful of butter in a spider ; melt it ; then put the onions 
in it two or three minutes ; then put in bread crumbs 
and meat. Heat all through, and mix all together, 
with two well-beaten eggs. Make into little cakes ; fry 
in butter till brown. Mrs. L. S. Searles, 

Stillwater, Minn. 

HAMBURG STEAK. 

One pound chopped lean steak, yolk of one egg two 
oyster crackers, pepper and salt to taste ; fry with a 
tablespoonful of butter and three drops of onion juice, 
to be made into little flat cakes before frying. 

KIDNEY STEW. 

Soak the kidneys two or three hours in salt and 
water, then stew till tender; slice very thin in small 



'246 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

pieces, and put in a stew pan, with three tablespoonfuls 
of butter, dredge in two tablespoonfuls of flour, then 
add one cupful of sw^eet cream and one cupful of the 
soup it was boiled in (strained) and chop or slice in 
small pieces one hard boiled egg and add with two 
tablespoonfuls of sherry wine. Serve. Use only the 
best part of the kidney. Mrs. Wm. O'Niel. 

MEAT PIE. 

Cut cold roast beef or veal in small pieces, an inch 
in size; put into stew-pan ; cover with water; add good- 
sized piece butter, one large onion cut fine ; season with 
pepper and salt ; boil until onion is tender ; thicken 
the gravy with flour. 

Paste for Meat Pie. — Make the same as for baking- 
powder biscuit, except adding more butter. 

Mrs. L. H. Gushing. 

.mock goose. 
I'ake two pounds of round steak, pound well, lay 
on table ; take small bowl of cold mashed potatoes, a 
small onion chopped very fine, pepper, salt, and a 
sprinkle of sage, and a small piece of butter: mix well 
together, spread on steak ; roll it up and fasten firm 
with string or skewers; put small pieces of salt pork 
around it and a little butter ; keep well basted, and 
bake two hours ; serve with nice brown gravy. 

Mrs. J. Kyle. 

MOCK SWEET BREADS. 

One pound of uncooked lean veal ; cook in salted 
water, with slice of onion ; then put it into cold water 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK 247 

to whiten it; make one cupful of white sauce (found in 
catchups and sauces in this book) ; season with salt, 
pepper nnd celery salt ; put the veal and one-half cupful 
of mushrooms into the sauce ; heat over boiling water ; 
cut the mushrooms into quarters ; take from fire wlien 
heated; add one teaspoonful of lemon juice and one 
well-beaten egg; garnish with potato. 

MUTTON PIES. 

A little more than one pound of lean mutton cut 
into small pieces; put into basin and sprinkle over it 
one teaspoonful salt, three-fourths teaspoonful of pep- 
per, and one-half teacupful of water, mix thoroughly. 

Paste. — One-fourth pound suet chopped fine, three- 
fourths teacupful of milk, put on to boil with the suet, 
add pinch of salt and good three-fourths pound flour, 
when milk and suet have boiled, .strain over flour and 
mix by hand, roll in thin pieces the thickness of your 
hand, press on the sides of a circular tin about three 
inches in diameter, fill with the meat, cover with a 
circular piece of the paste with a small hole cut in tlie 
center, brush over with milk and bake half an hour. 

Miss Christie McDougall. 

oyster dressing for turkey- or chicken. 
Place a quantity of stale bread crumbs in the oven ; 
when brown and crisp place on bread board ; roll fine 
with rolling-pin : add to the crumbs one pint of oysters, 
one-half cupful of butter, salt and pepper ; a little sage 
may be used, or a small onion. 

Mrs. Hiram Allen, 

New York. 



248 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 
PORK AND BEANS. 

One quart of beans, one pound of salt pork, one 
tablespoonful of molasses, one of salt, one teaspoonful 
of mustard, one-quarter teaspoonful of soda ; soak the 
beans over night, in the morning rinse in cold water, 
put on to boil in cold water with the pork ; let them 
boil fifteen minutes ; take from the fire and drain the 
beans in a colander ; rinse again in cold water ; put 
the pork in a dish with the beans read}^ for baking and 
mix the molasses, salt, mustard and soda with a quart 
of boiling water and pour over them ; bake ten hours ; 
add boiling water when required. This sounds like a 
great undertaking, but is not when one is about the 
kitchen, and they are so nice that it pays to use this 
receipt. Mrs. J. C. Outhwaite, 

Depere, Wis. 

POTTED LIVER. 

Boil beef and any kind of liver, until you can run a 
straw through it; remove all bits of fat and sinews; 
chop very fine. Then melt as much good butter as you 
can spare ; spices to taste ; pepper and salt. Pour hot 
over the liver; mix thoroughly together ; put in jar. 
This will keep a long time, and makes good sand- 
wiches. jMrs. M. Harvey, 

Hamilton, Ont. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Two chickens boiled in as little water as possible 
until tender : pick the meat from the bones, then put it 
back into the kettle, adding plenty of butter, pepper and 
salt; heat it thoroughly; slice hard boiled egg and 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 249 

place in the bottom of a dish ; pour it in hot, and place 
a weight upon it and put it away to cool. 

PEESSED MEAT. 

Boil a piece of fresh mutton, beef or veal, until per- 
fectly tender ; take out the bones and gristle ; chop 
fine; add salt and pepper; if very lean add butter. 
Pack it solid while warm, and slice when cold. 

Mrs. L. H. Gushing. 

eoart goose oe duck. 
Remove all the fat possible ; wash, and dry with a 
cloth the inside of the fowl for the dressing ; take cold 
mashed potatoes, a little onion chopped very tine, a 
sprinkling of sage, pepper, salt and a little butter ; mix 
well together ; stuff the inside, and also at the neck of 
the goose or duck ; sew all firmly up and tie in shape ; 
roast slowly for two or three hours, basting and turning 
often. Have the giblets stewed tender, chopped fine, 
and put in gravy. The fowls must be a rich brown 
and juicy. Mrs. E. Patton. 

EOAST SIELOIN. 

" There is one instant in the existence of roast sirloin 
when it is fit food for men, before which it is suited to 
carniverous beasts and after which it should be 
relegated to the mugwumps ; when the outside is crisp, 
and brown, and well done, and the inside is juicy, and 
red, and rare, the whole being as hot as a Puritan's 
holy rage at Anabaptists, and tender as his conscience. 
For this instant the roast is an epic ; before, it is tradi- 
tion, and after, it is prose." Old Receipt. 



•250 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 
EOAST VEAL AND TONGUE. 

Take a small leg of veal ; remove the large bones ; 
place a small pickled tongue, that has been boiled and 
skinned, in the space left by the removal of the bone; 
fasten firmly with skewers ; put salt and pepper on top, 
and a thin slice of salt pork ; roast two hours in oven ; 
slice horizontally when cold. Mrs. J. Kyle. 

ROLLED BEAFSTEAK. 

Take a slice of round steak an inch thick ; pound 
well ; season with salt and pepper ; then spread a 
dressing, the same as for turkey, on the top ; roll it up 
and fasten with twine ; plunge it in boiling water, to 
close the pores ; then place in covered dish and set in a 
kettle of hot water, boil for one hour ; then take out 
and put in dripping pan, laying slices of salt pork on 
top ; pour over it the juice boiled out, and bake one 
hour. This is delicious sliced cold. 

SCALLOPED TURKEY. 

Cut the turkey into small pieces; use a layer of 
this, with bits of dressing and a little gravy if you 
have it ; next a very thin layer of bread crumbs or 
rolled cracker, with a little butter ; then a layer of 
meat, dressing, etc. ; finish with bread crumbs. Should 
sufficient dressing be used, no other seasoning will be 
needed, otherwise salt and pepper must be used with 
each laj'er. Should it lack moisture, add a beaten Q^'g 
in a small cup of milk. Bake from thirty to forty-five 
minutes, according to size of dish and temperature of 
oven. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 251 

SCOTCH HOTCH-POTCH. 

Cut neck or breast of lamb in pieces, put in stew- 
pan, cover with water; add pepper and salt; stew half 
an hour ; add young onions, carrots, white turnips and 
potatoes; if necessary, add more water ; twenty minutes 
before serving, add one quart of green peas shelled. 

STEWED BEEFSTEAK. 

Two pounds of round steak, pound until tender ; 
cut in slices ; dredge with flour, pepper and salt, and 
roll in tight rolls ; lay in a stew pan with a few cloves, 
and a scrap of nutmeg ; cover with water, and stew 
three hours. Mrs. E. Patton. 

VEAL BIRDS. 

Slices of veal cut from the loin. Remove bones, 
skin and fat, pound it until it is one-fourth inch thick ; 
cut into pieces, four inches square ; take little pieces 
trimmed off, with pork and chop fine ; take one-half as 
much sifted cracker crumbs as you have meat ; season 
highly with salt, pepper, thyme, lemon, cayenne, and 
onion ; moisten wnth one egg beaten to the consistency 
of soap-suds or stock ; spread the mixture on each slice 
and roll over and fasten wnth tooth picks ; dredge with 
flour, fry in butter until a nice brown, then half cover 
with cream and simmer twenty minutes. Remove the 
picks ; serve on toast, after thickening the cream with 
flour. Mrs. Walrath, 

Cooking School. 

VEAL CHOPS FRIED. 

Dip the chops in beaten egg, then in hue cracker 



252 J HE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

crumbs ; season with pepper, salt and a little sifted sage ; 
fry the chop in hot lard for twenty minutes. They 
should be a rich brown. Mrs. Kyle. 

VEAL OMELET. 

Three pounds of veal chopped fine, one-half pound 
of salt pork chopped fine, four soda crackers rolled fine, 
one teacupful of sweet cream, seasoned with salt, pep- 
per, sage and thyme; mix all together; make in a 
loaf; bake three hours; baste often, at first with butter, 
then as it cooks use its own dripping. 

Mrs. J. C. Mitchell, 

Chicago, 111. 

VEAL POT-PIE. 

Take two or three pounds of veal (chicken may be 
used), place in a quart of cold water ; season with salt 
and pepper ; take nearly a quart of flour, make into 
biscuit, using baking powder ; when veal is tender drop 
in a large piece of butter ; put in biscuit ; cover tightly ; 
cook twenty minutes ; take veal and biscuit from kettle' 
and thicken gravj^ with flour ; pour over all and serve 
in a hot dish. Mrs. F. A. Reckard. 

BRINE FOE BEEF (Celebrated). 

One hundred pounds of meat : Six gallons of water, 
nine pounds of salt (half coarse), three pounds of brown 
sugar, one quart of molasses, three ounces of saltpeter, 
one ounce of pearl-ash : boil and skim. Pour over 
meat hot. Mrs. Daniel Whitney, 

Green Bay, Wis. 



MEMORANDA. 253 



254 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 25£ 



256 MEMORANDA. 



A dinner lubricates business. 

— Johnson. 

VEGETABLES. 



TO SERVE WITH DIFFERENT MEATS, GAME, POULTRY, 
FISH, ETC. 

With Roast Beef. — Potatoes, squash, boiled rice or 
macaroni, pickles, or any vegetables that are in season. 

With Roast Mutton. — Mashed potatoes, mashed 
turnips, boiled onions and currant jelly. 

With Roast Lamb. — Potatoes, green peas, turnips, 
string beans, corn, summer squash, mint sauce. 

With Roast Veal. — Maslied potatoes, spinach, pars- 
nips, asparagus, sweet potatoes, horseradish. 

With Roast Pork. — Potatoes, onions, squash or sweet 
potatoes, tomatoes, boiled rice and apple sauce. 

With Roast ^''enison. — Mashed potatoes, squash, 
onions, turnips and currant jelly. 

With Roast Turkey. — Potatoes, squash or sweet 
potatoes, onions, celery and cranberry sauce or jelly. 

With Roast Chicken. — Potatoes, onions, squash, or 
any green vegetable in season, celery and currant jelly. 

With Roast Goose. — Mashed potatoes, onions, squash, 
baked macaroni or boiled rice, apple sauce. 

With Roast Ducks. — Same as for goose. 

With Birds of all Kinds. — Potatoes, squash, onions, 
celery, macaroni and currant jelly. 



258 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

Witli Boiled Mutton. — Mashed potatoes, mashed 
turnips, baked macaroni, currant jelly. 

With Boiled Lamb. — Potatoes, green peas, aspara- 
gus, spinach, white turnips. 

With Boiled Corned Beef. — Potatoes, cabbage, pars- 
nips, beets and turnips. 

With Boiled Fowl. — Mashed potatoes, turnips, pars- 
nips, macaroni, currant jelly, oyster or celery sauce. 

With Boiled Turkey. — 03'ster or celery sauce, pota- 
toes, turnips, parsnips, lettuce and cranberry sauce. 

With Boiled Veal. — Mashed potatoes, spinach or 
dandelion, macaroni and cheese, horseradish. 

With Calfs' Head. — Potatoes, parsnips, dandelions 
or spinach, horseradish. 

With Beefsteak. — Potatoes, squash, tomatoes, or any 
vegetables that are in season. 

With Lamb or Mutton Chops. — Potatoes, both kinds, 
turnips, tomato sauce or lettuce, pickles. 

With Veal Steak. — Potatoes, both kinds, spinach or 
lettuce, horseradish. 

With Baked Fjsh. — Mashed potatoes, squash or 
sweet potatoes, lettuce, cranberry sauce. 

With Broiled or Fried Fish. — Potatoes, turnips, 
squash, tomato sauce, lemon or horseradish. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 259 



Serenely full, the epicure would say, 
Fate cannot harm me, I have dined to-daj-. 

— Sidney Smith. 

ASPAEAGUS. 
Wash clean ; cut off the white part, except a mere 
end ; j^ut into sUghtly salted boiling water, boil five 
minutes, pour off water, add more boiling hot ; boil till 
tender; then add butter, pepper and salt; just before 
serving stir in a thickening made of one teaspoonful of 
flour mixed up with cold milk. One-half cupful of 
cream improves it. Or, boil in salted water till tender ; 
season with butter, pepper and cream ; pour over nicely 
toasted bread. 

BAKED COKN. 

One can of corn, two beaten eggs, one tablespoon ful 
of sugar, butter, pepper and salt to taste ; one pint of 
milk, one tablespoonful of flour; bake half an hour. 

BEET GREENS. 

Look over carefully to see that no bugs or worms 
remain ; wash very clean, but do not separate roots 
from leaves ; fill dinner-pot half full of salted boiling 
water ; add beets ; boil three-quarters of an hour ; take 
out and drain so as to get out all the water. Dish, and 
dress with butter, pepper and salt, if needed. Serve hot, 
with vinegar. 

BEETS. 

Remove leaves, wash clean, and boil in plenty of 



260 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

water ; if young, two hours will boil them, if old four 
hours. Try with fork to see when tender. Take out, 
drop into a pan of cold water, and slip off the skin 
with the hands; slice, place in a dish, season with but- 
ter, pepper and salt; set over boiling water to heat 
thoroughly, and serve hot with or without vinegar. 
Or, after beets are boiled and skinned, mash with boiled 
potatoes, and season with butter, pepper and salt ; serve 
hot. 

BOILED CAULIFLOWER. 

Choose the close and white cauliflower ; trim off all 
outside leaves ; cut the flowers from the stalk and let 
them lie in salt and water for half an hour ; then put 
into boiling Avater, adding a little salt, and boil briskly 
for twenty minutes ; when tender, drain ; add milk and 
butter, or cream, a little pepper ; let come to a boil, and 
serve hot. 

BOILED CORN. 

Put the well-cleaned ears in salted boiling water ; 
boil an hour; take out of the water and send to table 
hot. To be eaten with butter, salt and pepper. 

BOILED DINNER. 

Wash a nice piece of corned beef and put in a din- 
ner-pot with just enough boiling water to cover it; boil 
slowly at least four hours ; if beets are old, put them in 
to boil when you do the meat ; put in other vegetables 
in the following order : Turnips cut in quarters require 
about two hours to boil ; cabbage cut in quarters one 
hour and a half; carrots and parsnips three-quarters of 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 261 

an hour; potatoes half an hour. Boil all together; 
when done, take up in separate dishes, and lastly the 
meat. Slice the carrots into a sauce-pan ; add half a 
cupful of cream or milk, a small piece of butter, salt 
and pepper ; let them come to a boil and serve hot. 
When the meat and beets have been put on to boil, 
clean the other vegetables and let them remain in cold 
water till needed. 

BOILED MACAEONI. 

Boil the macaroni in salted water until soft ; drain. 
Make a sauce of butter and bread crumbs warmed to- 
gether; when warm, stir in sweet cream or milk; pour 
this sauce on the macaroni while hot. 

Mrs. B. Himmelsbach. 

BOILED ONIONS. 
Peel and wash ; boil twenty minutes ; pour off water ; 
add boiling water, with a little salt ; let boil till quite 
tender ; add a cupful of milk, and boil ten minutes 
longer ; drain ; season with butter, pepper and salt, and 
a little cream, if you have it. 

CORN DODGERS. 
Twelve ears of corn, scraped ; one pint of cream, three 
eggs, small teaspoonful of saleratus, flour enough to 
thicken like batter cakes. If you have not cream, take 
milk and melted butter ; salt. Mrs. Ernst Funke, 

Oconto, Wis. 

CORN OYSTERS— No. 1. 

One cupful of flour, one-half cupful of butter, three 
tablespoonfuls of milk, two teaspoonfuls of salt, one- 



262 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

fourth teaspoonful of pepper, one pint of grated corn ; 
pour the corn on the flour, and beat well ; then add the 
other ingredients, and beat rapidly for three minutes ; 
have fat in the frying pan to the depth of about two 
inches; when smoking hot put in the batter by the 
spoonful, holding the spoon close to the fat, and the 
shape of the oyster will be good ; fr}^ about five 
minutes. 

CORN OYSTEES— No. 2. 

Six nice plump ears of sweet corn ; grate, beat one 
^gg^ add one tablespoonful each of flour and sweet 
milk ; stir into grated corn, drop the mixture, a spoon- 
ful in a place into hot lard, and fry brown. 

Mrs. a. J. Cady, 

Rockford, 111. 
CORN OYSTERS (Green)— No. 3. 
Six large ears corn grated, three eggs, three or four 
grated crackers, one-half cupful of milk, salt and 
pepper to taste. Fry on the pancake griddle with 
butter. Mrs. A. Hoffman. 

CORN OYSTERS— No. 4. 
One can of corn, two eggs, two tablespoonfuls of 
flour, two tablespoonfuls of sweet milk, salt and pepper 
to taste. Fry as batter cakes. Mrs. Waters. 

CREAMED CABBAGE. 

Slice as for cold slaw ; put in sauce-pan with water 
enough to keep from burning ; add pepper and salt, and 
a lump of butter; cover and cook till tender. Just 
before dishing up, add one cupful of cream. 



■J' HE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 263 

DANDELIONS. 

Cut off the leaves, pick over carefully, wash in 
several waters, put into boiling water, boil one hour, 
drain well, add salted boiling water and boil two hours ; 
when done, take up with a fork and drain ; melt butter 
and pour over them ; add more salt if needed or boil 
with a piece of salt pork, omitting the butter. 

DRIED CORN. 

Wash, and soak over night in cold water; when 
softened, cook five or ten minutes in water in which it 
was soaked, adding as soon as boiling, two tablespoon- 
fuls of butter, a little salt and pepper ; cream if desired. 

DUCHESS POTATOES. 

Five boiled potatoes, cold, five heaping dessert- 
spoonfuls of flour, one-half teaspoonful of baking 
powder, two eggs, a good half cupful of milk, a little 
salt ; grate the potatoes ; add lightly, stirring with a 
fork, other ingredients; drop from spoon into boiling 
lard ; fry until the balls are of a rich brown. They 
are very nice. Mrs. A. Hoffman. 

EGG PLANT. 

Peel, slice and boil until tender ; mash and season 
with pepper and salt ; roll crackers or dry bread and 
stir into it until very thick; make into patties; fry in 
hot lard or with a piece of salt pork. 

ESCALOPED CAULIFLOWER. 

Boil until tender, clip into clusters and pack into a 
buttered pudding-dish, stems downward ; beat a cupful 
of bread crumbs to a soft paste with two tablespoonfuls 



264 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

of melted butter, and three of cream or milk ; season 
with pepper and salt ; add a well beaten Qg^ and with 
this cover the cauliflower ; cover the dish closely and 
bake six minutes in a quick oven ; remove cover, and 
brown. Serve hot. 

ESCALOPED POTATOES. 

Peel; steam; when done, slice same as for frying. 
Butter an earthen dish and put in a layer of potatoes, 
and season with salt, pepper, butter and a bit of onion 
chopped fine ; sprinkle with a little flour ; continue this 
until the dish is filled ; let stand half an hour ; then 
pour over one cupful of milk. Bake thirty-five 
minutes. Mrs. W. Squires. 

ESCALOPED TOMATOES. 

Peel, and cut in slices rather thick; line a deep dish 
with the tomatoes and sprinkle bread crumbs thickly 
over them ; season with butter, pepper, salt and a 
little white sugar ; add another layer of tomatoes 
with the seasoning, and so on until the dish is full. 
Let the tomatoes be uppermost, with a bit of butter on 
each slice; dust with the breadcrumbs; cover the dish 
and let them bake for half an hour ; remove cover, and 
let them brown. 

FKIED CABBAGE. 

Cut the cabbage very fine ; have ready a frying-pan 
in which a slice or two of salt pork has been fried ; 
while it is smoking hot drop in the cabbage, stirring 
briskly until quite tender. After taken from the stove 
stir in one-half cupful of cream, and three tablespoon- 
fuls of vinegar. Send to table immediately. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 265 

FEIED HOMINY. 

Cut cold, boiled hominy in slices, and fry in butter 
until a nice brown. Serve with syrup, or butter and 
sugar. 

FRIED ONIONS. 

Peel and wash, cut in slices; boil half an hour; 
drain ; fry in butter or salt pork fat ; stir often ; season 
with pepper and salt. Serve hot. 

FRIED PARSNIPS. 

Wash, scrape, and cut lengthwise ; boil in slightly 
salted water till tender ; drain, and fry in butter. 
Parsnips are nice mashed and seasoned with butter, 
pepper and salt. 

GREEN CORN FRITTERS. 
Twelve ears of corn, grated ; four eggs, tablespoon- 
ful of butter, salt, very little flour ; fry like griddle 
cakes. 

GREEN PEAS. 
Shell and wash lightly. Cook half an hour in 
salted water ; add a lump of sugar unless fresh from the 
vines ; drain ; add cream, or milk and butter, pepper 
and salt. Let them remain on top of stove till the milk 
is hot; serve. Some stir in a thickening made of one 
teaspoonful of flour mixed up with cold milk. 

HOMINY. 

Soak two cupfuls of hominy in cold water over 
night; in the morning, put into rice boiler and let cook 
three or four hours; add water as needed. Salt just 



266 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

before taking from the stove. Serve with cream and 
sugar. 

KOHL-KABI. 

Peel, cut into sHces about half an inch thick ; 
cover with water and boil about two hours; drain, fry 
in butter like parsnips ; season with salt and pepper ; or 
mash and season. 

LIMA BEANS. 

Shell them ; wash in cold water. Boil them one 
hour ; when done drain off the water ; season with salt 
and pepper, cream or butter. Serve hot. 

Dried beans should be soaked over night, and 
boiled two hours or longer. Season the same as green 
beans. 

MASHED POTATO. 

Two cupfulsof mashed potato, two eggs well beaten, 
one tablespoonful of butter, one teaspoonful of salt, one- 
half cupful of boiling milk ; put in buttered pudding- 
dish, and bake in a quick oven thirty minutes, or until 
the top is browned. 

OKKA. 

Parboil till tender with a little salt in the water, 
then roll in meal and fry like fish. Or, stew an equal 
quantity of tomatoes and tender sliced okra ; stew in 
porcelain kettle fifteen or twenty minutes; season with 
butter, pepper and salt, and serve. 

PARSNIP CROQUETTES. 

Mash fine, cold, boiled parsnips. To six parsnips 
add one egg beaten light ; salt, pepper and flour enough 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 267 

to hold them together; form into small, flat cakes, and 
fry brown. Mrs. W. Squires. 

PAESNIP FKITTEKS. 

Boil five or six medium-sized parsnips till tender; 
mash very fine ; add one-half cupful of milk, two table- 
spoonfuls of melted butter, two eggs, three tablespoon- 
fuls of flour, and a little salt ; beat all together ; fry a 
delicate brown in hot drippings. Serve on a hot dish. 

POTATOES AND ONIONS. 

Pare and boil till done ; drain ; mash in the kettle 
until perfectly smooth ; add a cupful of cream or a 
generous lump of butter and a cupful of milk ; pepper 
and salt to taste ; mince a medium sized onion quite 
fine ; add to the potato and mix well ; cover closely, and 
let cook about ten minutes. R. B. Clark. 

POTATOES BAKED. 

Wash clean, wipe dry, put in a moderately hot oven 
in a baking pan, increasing heat until the skin becomes 
firm and of a light brown color. If the oven is kept at 
the proper temperature potatoes will bake in from thirty 
to forty minutes, according to size. Baked potatoes 
should be taken from the oven and served as soon 
as they are done. Potatoes baked with fowl or 
meat of any kind are very nice. Pare and parboil, 
then place in the pan containing the fowl or roast ; turn 
over when partly cooked so they may brown evenly. 
Peel cold baked patatoes ; slice into a frying-pan ; add 
cream, butter, pepper and salt ; set on the stove and 
let them come to a boil ; stir, and heat thoroughly. 



268 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

POTATOES BAKED IN MILK. 

Wash, peel and slice into cold water, and let them 
remain for half an hour ; put into pudding dish ; season 
with salt and pepper ; add milk enough to come nearly 
to the top of potatoes; put into oven and bake one 
hour ; take out and scatter bits of butter over the top 
and pour in half a cupful of cream ; return to oven for 
ten minutes. Serve in the dish they are baked in. 

POTATOES BOILED. 
To boil either pared or unpared potatoes, put them 
when prepared into slightly salted boiling water, and 
keep them boiling until tender enough to pierce easily 
with a fork, then drain ; sprinkle with salt; cover with a 
folded towel and set back on the range to dry off, and 
keep hot. If they have been boiled without paring, 
the skins can be removed l)efore sending them to the 
table. 

POTATO CROQUETTES. 

One pint of hot mashed potato, one tablespoonful of 
melted butter, one-half saltspoonful of white pepper, a 
speck of cayenne pepper, one-half saltspoonful of salt, 
one-half saltspoonful of celery salt, a few drops of onion 
juice, yolk of one egg ; mix all but the egg ; beat until 
very light ; when slightly cool, add the yolk and mix 
well. Rub through a sieve ; make into balls ; roll in 
fine bread crumbs, then dip in beaten egg, then roll in 
crumbs, and fry in hot lard. 

Miss May Williams, 

Whitewater, Wis. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK 269 

POTATOES FRIED RAW. 

Peel, wash, and cut in very thin slices, and put in 
frying-pan prepared with two tablespoon fuls of melted 
butter, and one of beef-drippings ; season with salt ; 
cover closely, and let thera fry about thirty minutes ; 
remove cover frequently and stir from the bottom with 
a knife to prevent burning. 

POTATOES MASHED. 

Pare and wash ; put them in boiling water with a 
little salt. When done, drain ; let them stand until 
perfectly dr}'-, then mash until smooth ; add milk or 
cream, small piece of butter, and more salt. Beat with 
a spoon until creamy and light. 

POTATO PUFFS— No. 1. 

To two cupfuls of cold, mashed potato, add two cup- 
fuls of sweet cream, two tablespoon fuls of melted butter, 
two well-beaten eggs and a little salt ; mix thoroughly 
and turn into a basin, and bake in a quick oven. 

Mes. Daisy Grossman. 

POTATO PUFFS— No. 2. 

Mash, while hot, boiled potatoes ; season well with 
butter, cream and salt ; beat until smooth and light ; 
while hot, shape into balls about the size of an egg ; have 
a tin sheet well buttered and place balls on it ; brush 
them over with a well beaten egg ; put in oven and 
brown ; when done, slip a knife under and slide them 
on to a hot platter ; garnish with parsley, and serve 
immediately. Mks. William Irvine. 



270 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

POTATOES WAEMED. 
Chop cold, boiled potatoes quite fine ; season with 
salt and pepper; put into a hot skillet in which a table- 
spoonful of butter has been melted ; pour in milk to 
nearly cover the potatoes ; then put the tongs on top of 
the stove ; set the skillet on the tongs ; cover closely, 
and let them warm slowly until well heated through. 
When ready to serve, put butter cut in small pieces over 
the top of potatoes and dish them up lightly. Do not 
stir them while cooking. Annie Shaver, 

New York. 

SALSIFY OK OYSTER PLANT. 

Wash and scrape the roots, dropping each into cold 
water as soon as it is cleaned ; exposure to the air 
blackens them. Cut in pieces an inch long; put into a 
saucepan with hot water enough to cover them, and 
stew until tender. Turn off nearly all the water, and 
add a cupful of cold milk. Stew ten minutes after this 
begins to boil ; put in butter cut into bits, and rolled in 
flour ; pepper and salt to taste. Boil up once and 
serve. A piece of salt codfish boiled with the salsify 
gives it more of an oyster flavor ; remove codfish before 
sending to the table. 

SALSIFY OR VEGETABLE OYSTER. 

Wash, scrape, and slice thin ; cook in water enough 
to cover it well, until done ; then add milk, butter, salt, 
pepper and rolled crackers, the same as for oyster 
soup. 

SOUR KRAUT. 
Wash the kraut thoroughly ; boil with a piece of 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 271 

fresh pork two or three hours; just before serving, 
sprinkle a Httle flour over it. Serve hot. 

Mrs. B. Himmelsbach. 

SPINACH. 

This receipt appKes to any "greens." Cook the 
spinach in enough salted boiling water to cover it ; 
when tender, place in colander and drain, and chop fine 
afterwards ; then fry it a few minutes, with a little but- 
ter, pepper and salt ; serve with .sliced hard boiled eggs 
on top. Served as a course, it is arranged as follows : 
Put a circle of thin slices of buttered toast (one slice for 
each person at the table) around the dish, on each slice 
put a cupful of spinach, neatly smoothed in shape ; 
press the half of a hard boiled Qgg into each pile of 
spinach, leaving the cut part of the egg uppermost. 

STEAMED CABBAGE. 

Cut the cabbage very fine. Take two tablespoonfuls 
of butter, same of lard, one cupful of vinegar and one 
cupful of water ; let come to a boil ; add cabbage sea- 
soned with pepper and salt ; cover closely ; boil very 
slowly for two or three hours. 

Mrs. B. Himmelsbach. 

STEWED CAKROTS. 

Cut the carrots lengthwise, and boil until perfectly 
tender ; when done, have ready a sauce-pan with two 
tablespoonfuls of butter, and small cupful of cream ; slice 
carrots into the pan ; add pepper and salt ; let them 
stew ten or fifteen minutes, stirring gentl}^ once or twice 
and serve in a vegetable dish. 



272 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 
STEWED CORN. 

Shave corn off the ear, being careful not to cut into 
the cob, to three pints of corn, add three tablespoon fuls 
of butter, salt and pepper, with just enough water to 
cover ; place in sauce pan ; cover and cook slovvl}' from 
one-half to three quarters of an hour ; stir with a spoon 
often, and if necessary add more water ; a few moments 
before it is done, add one-half cupful of sweet cream. 

STEAVED PARSNIPS. 
Wash, scrape, and cut into slices about one-half inch 
thick; put into a rice boiler; add one-half cupful of 
water; season with salt and pepper, a tablespoonful of 
melted butter ; cover closely, and let cook till tender. 
When ready to serve, add one-half cupful of sweet 
cream. 

STRING BEANS. 

String ; break or cut in pieces an inch long ; wash 
and boil in plenty of water about fifteen minutes; 
drain ; add more water and boil two hours ; just before 
taking up, add salt and pepper and half a pint of sweet 
cream. 

STUFFED POTATOES. 

Take a number of firm skin potatoes ; clean well 
and bake them ; when done, cut a piece off the end 
of each potato, scoop out as much of the inside as pos- 
sible without breaking the skins, mash it with cream 
and butter and a little salt; add the whites of three eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth ; fill up the skins with the paste 
and bake fifteen minutes. Mrs. A. Hoffman. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 273 

SUCCOTASH. 

Good succotash wants tender young corn. Take 
six good-sized ears, and remove the kernels with a 
sharp knife ; do not cut too deep, better not cut deep 
enough ; then scrape ; place over fire with water to cover 
and boil fifteen minutes. Have ready one pint of shelled 
lima beans, green ; wash ; cover with hot water ; let 
them stand two or three minutes ; drain, and add the 
beans to the corn ; boil one-half hour, or till the beans 
are well cooked ; season with butter, salt and pepper. 
A cupful of cream improves it. 

SUMMER SQUASH. 
Select the small crook-neck, those which are well 
grown but still tender enough to be penetrated by the 
thumb nail. Wash and put in a muslin bag ; boil till 
done from one-half to three-fourths of an hour ; squeeze 
and drain in the bag ; turn out, and add salt, butter 
and pepper to taste. The seeds and skins are good at 
this stage of growth and they should never be cooked 
after the seeds are hard. 

SWEET POTATOES. 

Wash clean and place in a kettle of boiling hot water 
and let boil twenty minutes; take out and place in 
dripping-pan and bake in a quick oven till done. Or 
pare and slice ; place them in a saucepan with a bit of 
butter, and sprinkle them with salt and barely cover 
them with water, covering them closely that they may 
steam quickly ; when soft all through, add sweet cream 
or a little more butter ; mash lightly, and they are ready 
to serve. 



274 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

TOMATOES BAKED. 
Pour boiling water over them and remove the skin ; 
cut them in small pieces ; season with salt and pepper ; 
put them in a pan with bread crumbs and pieces of 
butter ; cover closely, and bake three-quarters of an 
hour. When done, mash, and serve hot. 

TOMATOES EAW. 
Do not loosen the skins with scalding water, as it 
destroys the crispness and flavor, but pare with a sharp 
knife ; slice and lay in a glass dish ; make a seasoning 
of vinegar, salt and pepper, stirring a piece of ice 
around in it. Pour it over the tomatoes ; keep them 
ice cold until wanted. 

TOMATOES STEWED. 

Scald with boiling water and peel ; put them in a 
saucepan ; season with pepper, salt and butter ; let them 
cook half or three-quarters of an hour. A tablespoon- 
ful of sugar can be added, while boihng, if desired. 

TOMATO TOAST. 

Scald and peel nice fresh tomatoes, and stew till 
tender; season with butter, pepper, salt and a little 
sugar. Take as many slices of bread as needed for your 
family ; toast nicely ; butter and arrange in a deep dish 
with some of the tomato on each slice ; cover and serve 
at once. 

TOMATOES WITH MACAKONI. 
Break one-half pound of macaroni in short pieces ; 
cover with cold water and boil till tender— about three- 



THE GOOD CHEEK COOK BOOK. 275 

fourths of an hour. Have ready one pint of ripe tomato 
stewed till tender ; thicken with one heaping teaspoon- 
ful of flour rubbed smooth in a little water, and season 
with salt, pepper and two or three ounces of butter ; 
boil this sauce up once, and pour over the macaroni, 
which has been drained and arranged in a suitable dish. 

TUENIPS. 

Wash, peel, cut in thin slices and put in kettle with 
water enough to cover ; add a tablespoonful of sugar 
and boil until you can easily pierce them with a fork. 
Drain ; mash tine ; season with butter, pepper and salt. 

WILTED LETTUCE. 

Place in a vegetable dish lettuce that has been very 
carefully picked and washed each leaf by itself; cut 
across the dish four or five times, and sprinkle, with salt ; 
add a cupful of good vinegar and pour it boiling hot 
over the lettuce ; mix it well with a fork, and garnish 
with slices of hard boiled Qgg. 

WINTER SQUASH. 

Cut up ; take out inside ; put in the oven, and bake in 
the shell an hour ; serve in the shell, or scrape out ; 
mash ; season with butter, pepper and salt ; if too dry, 
add milk or cream. 



276 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 211 



'278 MKMORANnA. 



MEMORANDA. 



279 



'28(1 MEMORANDA. 



C ome, come ; good wine is a good, familiar creature, if it be 
well used. — Othello. 

DOMESTIC WINES. 



CURRANT WINE— No. 1. 
One gallon of currant juice, two of soft water. To 
each gallon of this mixture, add four pounds of brown 
sugar. Let it stand and ferment a week or ten days. 
Keep a jug of the mixture to fill up the keg with so 
that it may run over wdien it works. When through 
working, put a pint of whisky in the keg. After it has 
stood in the cellar a month or two, bottle. 

Mrs. T. J. Martin. 

CURRANT WINE (Black)— No. 2. 
Put black currants into a jar and mash them ; pour 
boiling water over them until covered ; set in a cool 
place twenty-four hours. Strain this mixture through 
a coarse cloth as dry as possible. To one gallon of 
juice add four pounds of sugar. Put into a jug or keg 
and let it stand until done fermenting. Add one-half 
sheet of isinglass to every three gallons. Cork tight, 
and bottle at Christmas time. Mrs. Waugh. 

CURRANT WINE— No. 3. 
For ten gallons of wine, take thirty pounds of cur- 



282 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

rants on the stems, thirty-five pounds of brown sugar, 
twenty-seven quarts of water; measure the water before 
commencing to mash the currants, and pour some over 
your hands to keep the juice cool ; strain the juice 
through a hair sieve or strong cloth ; pour the juice and 
the rest of the water upon the sugar ; stir it well and 
break all the lumps ; let the wine stand in the tub 
twenty-four hours in a moderate heat ; then put it in a 
barrel in the cellar. This quantity will produce suffi- 
cient to fill up the barrel, while it is fermenting. Keep 
the barrel open until the fermentation ceases and then 
fasten it up. To be bottled the same as grape wine. 

Mrs. S. J. YuNDT. 

CURRANT WINE— No. 4. 
Wash the currants. To one gallon of mashed 
currants add one of water. Let it stand three days in 
a stone jar ; stir occasionally. Squeeze the juice and 
fruit through a bag as for jelly. To every gallon of 
juice add three pounds of "C" coffee sugar. Let this 
mixture stand in a jar for two or three days and skim 
whenever the scum rises to the top. Put it in a liquor 
keg and stand it in the shed until fall. Shake it up 
every day. Take it to the cellar for the winter, and 
after it has stood two or three months, bottle, if you 
choose. Mrs. B. Himmelsbach. 

CHERRY BOUNCE. 

Half bushel of wild cherries, pounded and put in 
cheese cloth bags, five gallons of brandy, whisky, or 
New England rum. Let it stand three months ; add 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 283 

two gallons of water and five pounds of sugar. It will 
be fit for use in a week. 

Miss Hattie Whitney, 

Green Bay, Wis. 
GRAPE WINE. 
To every gallon of wine put three pounds and a 
half (3|) of sugar. To make ten gallons of wine, a 
large washtubful of grapes picked off the stems, which 
are to be well-mashed and squeezed, and then strained 
through a hair sieve to express all the juice. Mix the 
juice and sugar together, and measure it to see if it is 
ten gallons; if not, add more juice; or, failing in 
grapes, add water. An extra gallon is necessary to add 
in order to have ten gallons. Leave it in the tub in a 
moderate heat until fermentation has thoroughly com- 
menced ; then put it in the cask in the cellar with the 
bung out until fermentation ceases, when it is to be 
bunged up and left until the next spring, when it is to 
be drawn off and bottled. The extra gallon requires no 
more sugar. Brown sugar is to be used. 

GOOSEBERRY WINE. 

To each pound of ripe gooseberries allow one quart 
of water ; bruise the gooseberries ; then add the water ; 
let it stand (after stirring well) for twelve or fourteen 
hours, then strain it ; then add the sugar, as many 
pounds as you used quarts of water ; let it stand two 
days ; stir it often to dissolve sugar ; put it into the 
barrel, allowing it to go through the process of ferment- 
ing, and fill up the barrel as with currant wine. 

Mrs. S. J. YuNDT. 



284 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

MADEIRA WINE. 

To ten gallons of water add thirty pounds of moist 
sugar ; boil it half an hour and skim it clear ; when quite 
cold, put to every gallon a quart of ale ; let it stand to 
work two or three days in a tub ; then put it in the 
barrel with one pound of brown sugar candy, six 
pounds of raisins, one quart of brandy and a little 
isinglass; when it has done working, stoj^ it close and 
let it stand twelve months before bottling. N. B. — Be 
sure and not stop it down too soon. 

Mrs. S. J. YuNDT. 

RAISIN WINE. 

To one and one-fourth hundred-weight of raisins 
well picked and chopped, ^\xi eighteen gallons of water 
which has had six ounces of hops boiled in it for half 
an hour ; let it stand until it is luke-warm, then put in 
your raisins ; put it into a tub and let it work ten days 
stirring it well three or four times a day ; then strain it 
off through a sieve and press your raisins thoroughly ; 
turn it into your barrel ; let it stand for four months ; 
then add three pounds of sugar and one quart of brandy ; 
let it stand six or eight months. 

Miss Bowman, 

New Orleans. 



NOURISHING AND REFRESHING DRINKS. 
CHOCOLATE. 

Put one square of Baker's chocolate, two tablespoon- 
fuls of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of hot water and a 
pinch of salt in a porcelain saucepan and boil until 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 285 

smooth ; stir constantly ; add, gradually, one pint of 
boiling water and one of hot milk. Use all milk and 
two squares of the chocolate, if you wish it richer. 

Miss Lincoln. 

CHOCOLATE (Mexicau). 
Two cupfuls of milk and the same of water. Place 
in a porcelain kettle or tin utensil for boiling ; add the 
yolk of an Qgg beaten with two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar ; let it come to a boil ; then stir in half a cupful 
of Baker's chocolate, grated or scraped ; let it boil 
until it separates. Beat the white of an egg to a stiff 
froth and, when you serve, place a little on the top of 
each cup. Mrs. John A. McRea. 

CLARET CUP. 

Quarter of a bottle of claret, one pint of soda water, 
one lemon cut very thin, four tablespoonfuls of powdered 
sugar, quarter teaspoonful of grated nutmeg, half wine- 
glassful of brandy, one wineglassful of sherry wine. 
Half an hour before use, put in a large piece of ice to 
make it perfectly cool. Louise Smith, 

Ottowa, Ont. 

CREAM BEER. 

Two ounces of tartaric acid, two pounds of white 
sugar, the juice of one lemon; add three pints of water, 
and boil five minutes ; when nearly cold, add the 
whites of three eggs well beaten, with one-half cupful 
of flour, and one-half ounce of essence of wintergreen. 
Bottle and keep in a cool place. Take two tablespoon- 



286 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

fuls of this mixture in a tumblerful of water, and add 
one-fourth teaspoonful of soda. 

Mrs. J. E. Dickenson. 

EGG NOGG. 

Beat yolks and whites of six eggs ; stir the yolks into 
a quart of rich milk or thin cream ; add one-half pound 
of white sugar and a cupful of brandy or whisky ; lastly, 
stir in the well beaten whites of the eggs. 

If you wish to make an ^gg nogg for a sick person, 
beat up the yolk of one egg with a tablespoonful of 
sugar until it creams ; put this in a tumbler and pour 
over it a tablespoonful of wine or brandy ; fill up the 
tumbler with fresh milk and stir in the white of the 
egg beaten to a stiff froth. Pouring the wine or liquor 
on to the egg, cooks it and makes it more palatable for 
an invalid. J. W. Squires. 

NECTAR. 

Six pounds of sugar, four ounces of tartaric acid, 
two quarts of water; put this in a porcelain kettle and 
heat slowly ; just before it comes to a boil, take from 
the stove and stir in the whites of four well-beaten eggs ; 
strain and cool and flavor with lemon or vanilla. Kept 
on the ice in summer, this makes a ver}' refreshing 
beverage. Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 

POP. 

Put two ounces of cream of tartar into a jar with the 

juice and peel of two lemons and a few pieces of ginger 

root; pour over them seven quarts of boiling water; 

when cool, strain through a gauze sieve ; sweeten to 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 287 

taste, and add a large tablespoonful of fresh yeast; 
bottle and set by the fire all night. It will be fit for 
use next day. 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR— No. 1. 
Take a waterpailful of raspberries, turn them into 
a large stone crock and mash them ; cover with good 
cider vinegar; place near the stove for one day. 
Squeeze this mixture through a bag, and to each quart 
of this juice add one pint of water and five pounds of 
the best white sugar. Heat slowly until the sugar dis- 
solves, and then boil down until like syrup. Bottle 
while hot, and cover your corks w^ith sealing mixture, 
so that it will be air tight. This is a very refreshing 
drink and particularly so to invalids or persons with a 
fever. When you use it, put two tablespoonfuls in a 
tumbler and fill up with ice-cold water. 

Mrs. Geo. C. Ginty. 

raspberry vinegar— no. 2. 
To one quart of raspberries use one pint of vinegar. 
Let them stand twelve hours ; then squeeze and strain. 
To one pint of juice take one pound of loaf sugar. Boil 
on a slow fire three-quarters of an hour. When cool, 
bottle and seal. Drink in summer, about a dessert- 
spoonful to a glass of water. Very nice, 

Mrs. S. J. YuNDT. 



288 



MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 



289 



290 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 291 



292 MEMORANDA. 



Sweet, sweet, sweet poison for the age's tooth. 

—King John. 

CANDY. 



These receipts are all good and have shortened 
many a winter's evening, and Sunday afternoon for 
restless boys and girls who must have something brew- 
ing in order to be happy. Be careful not to burn your 
candy, and do not cook your caramels until they are 
biittle. They should be well done, but soft. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 
Three pounds of coffee A sugar, one-fourth poand of 
butter, one-half teaspoonful cream of tartar, eight drops 
of extract of lemon ; add as much cold water as will 
dissolve the sugar ; boil without stirring until it hairs, 
or is brittle when dropped into cold water; when done, 
add the flavoring. Cool on buttered plates. If you 
pull this candy it will be cream candy. Half of this 
receipt is enough for ordinary occasions. 

BUTTER TAFFY. 

Two cupfuls of light brown sugar, one cupful of 
cold water, four tablespoonfuls of vinegar, two of 
molasses, one-half tablespoonful of butter. Cook with- 
out stirring until it spins to a thread or hairs when 
dropped from a spoon. 



294 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

CEEAM CANDY. 

One pound of coffee A sugar and one cupful of 
water; boil over a very brisk fire. Try by dipping 
your finger and thumb first into cold water ; then into 
the boiling sugar, and back into cold water quickly ; 
when it will harden on your fingers it is done. Have 
ready a platter well-buttered ; turn on this to cool, but 
never scrape out your kettle ; when partly cool, add 
flavoring and beat with a knife as long as possible ; 
then stir with your hands and form into a long roll 
and cut. Work quickly or it will grain. 

Mrs, Herbert Barker. 

CHOCOLATE CAKAMELS— No. 1. 

Two cupfuls of brown sugar, one of molasses, one of 
chocolate, a piece of butter the size of an egg, one table- 
spoonful of cream; boil eight minutes. Butter your 
tins, pour in the caramels, and set to cool. When 
nearly cold, cut in squares with a sharp knife. 

Miss Fanny Ginty. 

chocolate caramels— no. 2. 
One cupful of molasses, two cupfuls of light brown 
sugar, one cupful of milk or cream, a piece of butter 
the size of an egg, one-half pound of chocolate, three 
teaspoonfuls of vanilla; boil one-half hour. Put the 
vanilla in when it is almost done. Stir constantly. 

V. M. 

MAPLE CREAMS. 

One-half as much water as maple sugar, cook with- 
out stirring, and when nearly done put in a small piece 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 295 

of butter ; try it in water and when it begins to harden 
take off and stir rapidly until it becomes a waxen sub- 
stance then roll in balls and put halves of English 
walnuts on either side. Miss Louise Smith. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

One quart of good molasses (not syrup), one-half 
cupful of vinegar, one cupful of sugar, butter size of an 
egg, one teaspoonful of saleratus ; dissolve the sugar in 
the vinegar ; pour into the molasses and boil, stirring 
frequently until it will harden when dropped into 
water ; then stir in the butter and soda (the latter dis- 
solved in warm water) ; flavor to taste ; stir it up well 
and pour into buttered plates or tins. As it cools, cut 
in squares for " taffy " or pull witli the tips of the 
fingers until white, and cut in sticks. 

Marion Harland. 

nut taffy. 

Four cupfuls of maple sugar ; one-half pint of water 
or enough to dissolve the sugar ; boil until it is brittle 
when dropped into water. Just before you take it from 
the fire add a tablespoonful of vinegar. Have hickory 
nut meats ready ; lay them on a buttered dish and pour 
the taffy over them. 

"OSCAR WILD" TAFFY. 

Three pints of sugar first put in, 

A shallow vessel made of tin, 

Of vinegar add half a cup. 

Of milk the same, then stir them up, 

A little piece of butter, which 



296 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

Will make your taffy taste quite rich. 
Now put this compound on to boil, 
(Don't stir it once, or it will spoil). 
When done, a buttered tin will hold 
Tlie tempting mixture until cold ; 
When hardened well, you then can send, 
A dainty piece to tempt a friend. 

Young America. 

SUGAR CANDY (Good for Little Folks). 
Six cupfuls of sugar, one of vinegar, one of water, 
a tablespoonful of butter put in at the last with one 
teaspoonful of saleratus dissolved in warm water. Boil 
without stirring half an hour, or until it crisps in cold 
water ; pull white ; flavor to taste. 

STICK CANDY. 

To one pound of coffee "A" sugar, add one cupful 
of water, and one-half teaspoonful of cream of tartar; 
boil over a brisk fire, and try by dropping a spoonful in 
cold water ; when brittle it is done. Do not stir while 
boiling, and do not scrape the kettle, or it will grain. 
Set where it will cool, and pull as long as possible. 
Form into sticks. Add flavoring while pulling. 

Mrs. Herbert Barker. 

WALNUT CREAMS. 

One cupful of walnuts chopped, two cupfuls of white 
sugar, one-half cupful of cold water; boil sugar and 
water without stirring, until it spins to a thread or 
hairs; flavor with vanilla. Set into cold water, and stir 
quickly until white. Then stir in the meats, and make 
into balls. Mrs. K. L. Ken yon. 



MEMORANDA. 297 



298 MEMORANDA. 



MEMORANDA. 



299 



300 MBIMORANDA. 



A King of shreds and patches. 

— Shakespeabe. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



A great many valuable receipts and useful hints 
will be found in this department. They come from the 
storehouses of our grandmothers, who found them in 
years of experience ; as well as from the young, on the 
frontiers of progress, who are constantly bringing in 
new ideas to make " smooth the rough places." 

One-fourth pound of white castile soap, four ounces 
of aqua ammonia, one ounce of ether, one ounce of alco- 
hol ; cut the soap in small bits and boil in one quart of 
water until dissolved ; when cold, add four quarts more 
of water and the other ingredients. This is especially 
good for cleaning dress goods, men's clothing, spots on 
carpets, etc. 

One pailful of boiling grease, six pailfuls of strong 
lye, five pailfuls of warm water ; stir well every day for 
one week, and your soft soap is made. 

Rub your zinc with kerosene. A little on a soft rag 
will make it look nicely. 

Use vinegar and water to clean the mica windows 
of your coal stove. 



302 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

A sure method to put out fire in pipes or chimneys : 
Wring an old piece of carpet out of cold water ; roll 
round the stove pipe where it goes into the chimney; 
keep wetting (two or three times) and it will put the 
fire out. 

French method of making fowl tender : After the 
fowl is stuffed and ready for the oven, roll it in a large 
sheet of soft paper; tie up closely with string; place in 
the oven one hour or half an hour, according to size ; 
when it is thoroughly heated through, remove the paper 
and roast the fowl. 

When you boil a ham do not boil it too long, but 
give it an hour in the oven after taking it from the pot 
It improves the flavor very much. 

You can buy '* Fruit Coloring " that will add 
greatly to fancy dishes, and it is perfectly harmless. 

Little wire baskets are now sold to fry oysters, 
croquetts, etc., in. 

A ricer is one of the necessar}^ kitchen utensils of 
the age. Buy one and you will never regret it. 

If you buy a double boiler you will wonder how 
you ever kept house without it. 

Wipe off your carpets occasionally with ammonia 
and water. It brightens them up, and drives away 
moths. 

Oxalic acid, dissolved in hot water, will clean paint 
from windows. 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 303 

Stone jars that have become unfit for use from any 
cause, can be purified by filling with fresh earth and 
allowing it to remain two or three weeks. 

Cotton batting is impervious to all life germs. Draw 
it carefully over a full jar of preserved fruit and it will 
prevent mould and fermentation. 

Red and black ants may be eflFectually driven away 
by using Persian Insect Powder, sprinkled wherever 
they intrude. 

A few trays of charcoal set in a damp cellar, will 
make the air pure and sweet, and if placed in a damp 
cellar where milk is kept, there will be no danger of the 
milk becoming tainted. 

By placing a dish containing a good-sized lump of 
unslacked lime in a refrigerator the moisture will be 
absorbed, so removing all danger from mould. 

Vinegar is better than ice for keeping fish. By 
putting a little vinegar on the fish it will keep per- 
fectly well even in hot weather. Fish is often 
improved in flavor under this treatment. 

To keep stockings from fading: Let them soak in 
hot salt and water until water is cold. Thoroughly 
rinse. 

To keep ice for a sick room : Tie a square of coarse 
white flannel over a pitcher, leaving a cup-shaped 
depression of the flannel in the pitcher. Put broken 
ice in the flannel and cover it tightly with a thicker 



304 THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 

flannel. The ice will keep all night, and the water 
may be poured off as wanted. 

A little pulverized charcoal will often sweeten a 
fowl that does not smell exactly sweet and yet is not 
bad. An onion placed in a fowl will do the same. 

When you bake a fruit pie, wet a strip of white mus- 
lin and pin around the edge of the plate when you put 
it in the oven and it will not boil over. 

When you wish a fine handkerchief to look like 
new after it is washed, wash it and while wet spread 
it out on a large pane of window glass ; when dry, it 
will fall off and need no ironing. 

Powdered alum will keep stove polish from burning 
off. Put in a little when you mix the polish. 

To chop suet : Sprinkle flour over it while chopping 
and it will not adhere to the knife. Freeze it in the 
winter and you will have no trouble. 

Mend lamps with melted alum. It is better than 
plaster of Paris. 

Take a strip of muslin ; hem it ; sew buttons on 
one side and fasten your collars and cuffs on when you 
hang them out to dry after washing. 

Half an ounce of ammonia, one of chloroform, 
half an ounce of oil of sassafras, one drachm of pul- 
verized borax. Mix and shake well. Then add one 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 305 

gallon of deodorized gasoline. This makes cleansing 
fluid. 

One pint of raw linseed oil, two ounces of spirits of 
wine, eight ounces of hest cider vinegar, one ounce of 
hutter of antimony, half an ounce of spirits of camphor, 
half an ounce of hartshorn. Rub on with old cotton 
flannel, and dry with the same. This is good furniture 
polish. 

Silver polish : One pint of water, sixteen ounces of 
Paris white, one ounce of ammonia. 

Tin polish : Sixteen ounces of pumice stone, four- 
teen ounces of muriatic acid, two pints of water. 

Mirrors should not be hung where the sun shines 
upon tliem. It ruins them in a short time. 

When you use gem tins and have not dough enougli 
to All every mold, All the others with water. 

Heat is a perfect disinfectant. If you have a pan, 
broiler, or any kitchen utensil that smells of fish, 
onions, etc., place the utensil in a hot oven for a few 
minutes alter washing it and all odor will disappear. 

To can fruit by use of salicylic acid : One-half ounce 
of salicylic acid ; one pound of white sugar ; one gallon 
of water. Mix acid and sugar together and dissolve with 
water. Put fruit in can or jar until full; then pour 
over the liquid, let settle one hour; then, if needed to 
cover fruit, pour over more licjuid and cover closely 
from the air. 



306 



THE GOOD CHEER COOK BOOK. 



It is a great trouble sometimes to prepare suet for a 
pudding when wanted. You can keep it two or more 
years by putting it in glass cans and pouring molasses 
over it. In the winter, flour will keep it. Set your 
bowl of suet in a corner of the flour bin, with flour 
over it. 



TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



Four saltspoout'uls of liquid, - - One teaspoonful. 

Four teaspoonluls of liquid, - - One tablespoonful. 

Three teaspoonfuls of dry material, - One tablespoonful. 

Four tablespoonfuls of liquid, 

One wine glassful, or one-lialf gill, or one-fourth cupful. 
Two gills, - - - One cupful, or one-half pint. 

Sixteen tablespoonfuls of liquid, - - One cupful. 

Twelve tablespoonfuls dry material - - One cupful. 

Eight heaping tablespoonfuls of dry material. - One cupful. 
Four cupfuls of Kquid, . . . - One quart. 

Four cupfuls of flour, - - One pound, or one quart. 

Two cupfuls of solid butter, - - - - One poimd. 

One-half cupful of butter, - - One-fourth pound. 

Two cupfuls of granulated sugar, - - . One jiound. 

Two and one-half cupfuls of powdered sugar, - One pound. 
Three cupfuls of meal, . - . . One pound. 

One pint of milk or water, - - - One pound. 

One pint of chopped meat packed solidly, - One pound. 

Nine large eggs, ten medium eggs, - - One pound. 

One round tablespoonful of butter, - - One ounce. 

One heaping tablespoonful of butter, - 

Two ounces, or one-fourth cupful. 
Butter the size of an egg, - Two ounces, or one-foiirth cupful. 
One heaping tablespoonful of sugar, - - One ounce. 

Two round tablespoonfuls of flour - - One ounce. 

Two round tablespoonfuls of coffee, - - One ounce. 

Two round tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, - One ounce. 
One tablespoonful of liquid, - - One-half ounce. 

One bottle of brandy, .... 

One and one-half cupfuls, or twenty-four tablespoonfuls. 
One small bottle Burnett's extract, 

- One-fourth cupful scant, or three tablesi^oonfuLs. 
One small bottle Burnett's extx'act, - Twelve teaspoonfuls. 
One flask of olive oil, . . . . 

One and one-third cupfuls. or twenty tablespoonfuls. 



TABLE OF PROPORTIONS. 



One scant measure of liquid to three full measures of flour, 
for bread. 

One scant measure of liquid to two full measures of flour, 
for muftins. 

One scant measure of liquid to one full measure of flour, for 
batters. 

One-lialf cupful of yeast or one-fourth ||compressed yeast 
cake, to one pint of liquid. 

One even teaspoonful of soda and two teaspoonfuls of cream 
of tartar to one quart of flour. 

Three heaping or tour even teaspoonfuls of baking powder 
to one quart of flour. 

One teaspoonful of soda to one pint of sour milk. 

One teaspoonful of soda to one cupful of molasses. 

One saltspoonful of salt to one quart of milk for custards. 

One teaspoonful of extract to one quart of custard. 

One saltspoonful of salt to one loaf of sponge cake. 

One teaspoonful of extract to one loaf of plain cake. 

One saltspoonful of spice to one loaf of plain cake. . 

One teaspoonful of salt to one quart of soup stock, or two 
quarts of flour. 

One saltspoonful of white pepper to one quart of soap stock. 

One teaspoonful of mixed herbs to one quart of soup stock. 

One tablespoonful of each chopped vegetable to one quart 
of soup stock. 

A speck of cayenne pepper is what you can take up on the 
point of a pen-knife or on a quarter inch square surface. 

A pinch of salt or spice is about a saltspoonful. 

A pinch of hops is one-fourth of a cupful. 



I^^r^^E::>c. 



Potato Yeast — No. 1 
Potato Yeast — No. 2 



YEAST, BREAD, ROLLS, GEMS, ETC. 

7 Potato Yeast— No. 3 

.. 7 



BROWN BBEAD, 



Brown Bread — No. 1 8 

Brown Bread — No. 2 9 

Brown Bread— No. 3 9 

licA\n Bread — No. 4 9 

Biscuit (raised) — No. 1 9 

Biscuit (raised)— No. 2. . . 10 

Brown Corn Bread 10 

Boston Brown Bread 10 

Baking Powder Biscuit. .. . 10 

Coleman Bannock 11 

Corn Meal Puffs 11 

French EoUs 11 

Graham Bread — No. 1. . . . 11 

Graham Bread — No. 2 12 

Graham Bread — No. 3 12 

Graham Gems — No. 1 12 

Graham Gems — No. 2 12 

Graham Gems — No. 3 13 

Johnny Cake — No. 1 13 



BISCUIT, ETC. 

Johnny Cake — No. 2 13 

Johnny Cake — No. 3 13 

Milk Bread 13 

Muffins— No. 1 U 

Muffins- No. 2 14 

Muffins— No. 3 14 

Muffins— No. 4 14 

Oat Meal Gems 14 

Oat Meal Bread 14 

Parker House Eolls 15 

Puffet 15 

Rye Bread 15 

Salt Rising Bread 16 

Soda Scones 16 

Waffles— No. 1 17 

Waffles— No. 2 17 

Waffles— No. 3 17 

Whole Wheat Bread. ..... 17 

Wheat Gems 17 



GRIDDLE CAKES, FRITTERS AND MUSH. 



Buckwheat Cakes — No. 1. . 23 

Buckwheat Cakes— No. 2.. 23 

Bread Crumb Pancakes ... 23 

Corn Meal Pancakes 24 



Flannel Cakes 24 

Graham Griddle Cakes. ... 24 

Potato Pancakes 24 

Wheat Batter Cakes 25 



310 



INDEX. 



FRITTEKS. 

Apple Fritters. 25 Queen Fritters 26 

Corn Fritters 26 Spanish Fritters 26 

Fritter Batter 25 



Corn Meal Mnsh 27 

Oat Meal Musli 27 



MUSH. 

Whole Wheat Mush 28 



BREAKFAST AND TEA DISHES. 



Baked Hash 33 

Baked Kice 34 

Breakfast Dish 33 

Brown Stew 34 

Chicken Croquettes — No.l, 34 

Chicken Croquettes — No. 2, 35 

Chicken Croqiiettes — ^No. 3, 35 

Eggs, Baked 37 

Eggs, Boiled 38 

Eggs, Deviled— No. 1 37 

Eggs, Deviled— No. 2 37 

Egg Gems 36 

Egg PtoUs 36 

Egg Vermicelli 36 

Escaloped Cheese 36 

French Toast 38 

Fried Cream 38 

Green Corn Breakfast 

Cakes 38 



Harrison Cream Toast 39 

Hash, Breakfast 34 

Hominy Croquettes 39 

Macaroni — No. 1 39 

Macaroni —No. 2 39 

Macaroni— No. 3 40 

Macaroni Croquettes 40 

Omelet, Delicate 41 

Omelet, French 41 

Omelet, Plain 40 

Omelet, Shamrock 41 

Potato Eolls 42 

Eice Croquettes 42 

Shepherd's Pie 42 

Sunday Morning Dish 42 

Tea Dish J3 

Veal Croquettes 43 

Veal Supper Dish 43 

Welsh Karebit 43 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS. 
LOAF CAKES. 

Angels" Food 50 Black Cake 52 

Bride's Cake 53 Blitzkuchen or Lightning 

Bread Cake— No. 1 52 Cake 52 

Bread Cake— No. 2 52 Burnett Cake 53 



INDEX. 



311 



Coffee Cake— No. 1 57 

Coffee Cake— No. 2 57 

Caramel Cake 53 

Chocolate Cake (Dark) 61 

Chocolate Cake 55 

Cocoanut Pound Cake 57 

Circle Cake 55 

Delicate Cake — No. 1 62 

Delicate Cake— No. 2 62 

English Nut Cake 63 

Fruit Cake for Wedding. . . 65 

Fruit Cake— No. 1 66 

Fruit Cake— No. 2 G7 

Fruit Cake — No. 3 67 

French Cake 65 

Gold Cake 69 

Groom's Cake 70 

Hickory Nut Cake 70 

Loaf Cake 72 

Marble Cake— No. 1 73 

Marble Cake— No. 2 73 

Molasses Fruit Cake 74 

Mother's Little Cakes 75 

LAYER 

Almond Custard — No. 1. . . 50 

Almond Custard— No. 2. . . 50 

Almond Cake 49 

Banana Cake 51 

Caramel Cake 54 

Chocolate— No. 1 (Dark). . . 60 

Chocolate— No. 2 (Dark). . . 61 

Chocolate Cake — No. 1. . . . 54 

Chocolate Cake — No. 2. . . . 55 

Cocoanut Cake 56 

Cream Cake 58 

Custard Cake— No. 1 60 

Custard Cake— No. 2 60 

Dolly Varden Cake 62 



Mountain Cake 

Nut or White Fruit Cake. . 

Pork Cake 

Pound Cake 

Eaisin Cake 

Six Months' Cake 

Spice Cake— No. 1 

Spice Cake— No. 2 

Sunshine Cake 

8now Cake — No. 1 

Snow Cake — No. 2 

Snowflake Cake 

Sponge Cake (White) No. 1, 
Sponge Cake (White) No. 2, 

Sponge Cake ( Yellow) 

Sponge Cake— No. 1 

Sponge Cake — No. 2 

Sponge Cake (Aunty 

Bealls) 

Silver Cake 

Vermont Currant Cake 

Walnut Cake 



CAKES. 

Fig Cake — No. 1. 
Fig Cake— No. 2. 
Fig Cake— No. 3. 



7a 

76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
82 
82 
84 
80 
80 
81 
87 
87 
87 
82 
83 

51 

80 
85 
85 



63 
63 
64 



Gold and Silver Jelly Cake 69 

Hash Cake 70 

Ice Cream Cake 71 

Lemon Cake — No. 1 71 

Lemon Cake — No. 2 72 

Mikado Cake 74 

Neapolitan Cake 75 

Orange Cake — No. 1 76 

Orange Cake— No. 2 77 

Orange Cake— No. 3 77 

Pineapple Cake 77 



312 



INDEX. 



Prince of Wales Cake 78 

Prune Cake 78 

Roll Jelly Cake 79 

Strawberrj- Short Cake ... 83 



Tapioca Cake 84 

Yietoria Cake 85 

Walnut Cake 8C) 

White Laj^er Cake 87 



Cocoanut Bars 5G 

Cocoanut Macaroons 57 

Cream Puffs 59 



Kisses 71 

Macaroons — No. 1 73 

Macaroons — No. 2 73 



FKOSTINGS AND FILLINGS. 



Brown Sugar Frosting 88 

Boiled Frosting — No. 1. . . . 87 

Boiled Frosting— No. 2 88 

Caramel Frosting 88 

Chocolate Frosting — No. 1, 88 

Chocolate Frosting — No. 2, 89 

Chocolate Frosting — No. 3, 89 

Custard for Orange Cake. . 89 



Fig Paste for Cake 

Filling for Layer Cake. 

Lemon Filling 

Lemon Stock 

Maple Sugar Frosting. . 
Milk Frosting 



89 
90 
90 
90 
90 
90 

Kaisin Frosting 91 

Eaisin Mash for Layer Cake 91 



GINGEE CAKES AND COOKIES. 

Cream Ginger Cake 58 Ginger Snaps — No. 4. 



Ginger Cup Cake 69 

Ginger Cookies 67 

Ginger Snaps — No. 1 68 

Ginger Snai)s— No. 2 68 

Ginger Snaps — No. 3 68 



. 68 

Ginger Snaps — No. 5 69 

Molasses Cookies 74 

Soft Ginger Bread— No. 1, 81 

Soft Ginger Bread— No. 2, 81 

Soft Ginger Bread— No. 3, 81 



STJGAK COOKIES. 



Cream Cookies 58 

Cookies 58 

Cocoanut Jumbles 56 

Cocoanut Cookies 57 

Sand Tarts 79 



Sugar Cookies — No. 1 83 

Sugar Cookies — No. 2 84 

Sugar Cookies — No. 3 84 

Queen's Cakes 79 

Wandering Jews 85 



DOUGHNUTS AND FKIED CAKES. 

Crullers— No. 1 59 Fried Cakes— No. 1 64 

Crullers- No. 2 59 Fried Cakes— No. 2 64 

Doughnuts 62 Fried Cakes — No. 3 65 

Doughnuts (Long Lake) ... 72 Fried Cakes — No. 4 65 



INDEX. 



313 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. 



Almond Pudding 97 

Apple Pudding 102 

Apple Pudding— No. 1 97 

Apple Pudding — No. 2 97 

Ajjple Tapioca Pudding. . . 98 

Batter Pudding 99 

Bird's Nest Pudding 98 

Boiled Kice Pudding 99 

Brown Batter Pudding. ... 88 
Cottage Pudding— No. 1.. . 99 
Cottage Pudding— No. 2.. . 99 
Chocolate Pudding— No. 1. 100 
Chocolate Pudding— No. 2, 100 
Chocolate Corn Starch Pud- 
ding 101 

Cooperstown Pudding 101 

Corn Pudding 100 

Cream Pie Pudding 101 

Cream Tapioca Pudding. . 100 

Delmonico Pudding 102 

Easter Egg Pudding 104 

Egg Pudding 105 

English Christmas Pudding 103 

English Pudding 103 

English Plum Pudding 103 

Escaloped Apple Pudding.. 102 

Farina Pudding 105 

Genesee Pudding 105 

German Triile Pudding. . . 105 

Howard Pudding 106 

IndianMeal Pudding— No. 1 106 
Indian Meal Pudding— No. 2 106 
Johns Delight Pudding. . . 107 
Lemon Pufts 108. 



Lemon Eice Pudding 107 

Lemon Pudding — No. 1. . . . 107 

Lemon Pudding — No. 2 108 

Nottingham Pudding 108 

Orange Pudding 109 

Pineapple Pudding 110 

Plum Pudding 109 

Puff Pudding— No. 1 109 

Puff Pudding— No. 2 109 

Queen of Pudding 110 

Quick' Pudding 110 

Kice Meringue Ill 

Eice Pudding— No. 1 Ill 

Eice Pudding— No. 2 Ill 

Snow Pudding 113 

Sponge Pudding — No. 1 . . . 113 
Sponge Pudding — No. 2. . . 114 
Sponge Pudding — No. 3. . . 114 
Steamed Bread Pudding. . Ill 
Steamed Flour Pudding.. . 112 

Steamed Pudding 112 

Suet Pudding— No. 1 112 

Suet Pudding— No. 2 113 

Swedish Pudding 112 

Tapioca Pudding — No. 1.. 114 
Tapioca Pudding— No. 2.. 115 
Tapioca Peach Pudding. . . 115 

Taylor Pudding 115 

Tip-Top Pudding 116 

Trifle Pudding 116 

Troy Pudding 116 

Washington Pie 117 

Whole Wheat Pudding 116 



PUDDING S.\tICES. 

"Auld Lang Syne" 119 Foam Sauce 118 

Egg Pudding Sauce 119 Foaming Sauce 119 



314 



INDEX. 



Golden Pudding Sauce 118 

NTice Pudding Sauce 118 

Pudding Sauce— No. 1 118 

Pudding Sauce— No. .2 118 



Strawberry Sauce 112 

Wine Sauce— No. 1 117 

Wine Sauce— No. 2 117 



ICE CREAM, ICES, C 

Api^le Mrringue 

Blanc Mange, Raspberry 

Cream 

Blanc Mange, Wine Cream. 

Cream, American 

Cream, Brandy 

Cream, Chocolate 

Cream, Italian 

Cream, Manioc . 

Cream, Spanish 

Cream, Tapioca 

Cream, Velvet 

Custard, Baked 

Custard, Orange 

Charlotte Ensse 

Champagne Ambrosia 

Charlotte, Banana 

Charlotte, Orange 

Frozen Apricots 

Floating Island 

Float — No. 1, Apple 

Float — No. 2, Apple 

Float, Orange 

Ice Cream — No. 1 

Ice Cream — No. 2 

Ice Cream— No. 3 



REA 
137 



131 
133 
130 
130 
130 
131 
131 
132 
132 
132 
133 
13G 
134 
133 
133 
135 
129 
134 
137 
137 
138 
125 
125 
125 



M3, CUSTARDS, JELLIES. 

Ice Cream — No. 4 12G 

Ice Cream — No. 5 126 

Ice Cream— No. 6 126 

Ice Cream, Chippewa 126 

Ice Cream, Chocolate 127 

Ice Ci'eam, Green Mount- 
ain 127 

Ice Cream, Pineapple 127 

Ice — No. 1, Lemon 128 

Ice — No. 2, Lemon 128 

Ice— No. 3, Lemon 128 

Ice, Orange 128 

Ice— No. 1, Pineapple 128 

Ice — No. 2, Pineapple 128 

Ice, Peach 129 

Jelly, Coffee 134 

Jelly, Orange 136 

Jelly, Lemon 135 

Jelly, Manioc 135 

Jelly, Tapioca 136 

Jelly, Wine 137 

Prune Souffle 138 

Rice, Imperial 138 

Sherbet — No. 1, Lemon. . . . 129 

Sherbet— No. 2, Lemon .... 129 

Sherbet, Orange 129 



PIES. 



Pie Paste— No. 1 145 

Pie Paste— No. 2 145 



Pie Paste— No. 3 145 

French Puff Paste 145 



INDEX. 



315 



Apple C!iistavd Pie 1-46 

Cracker Pie 146 

Cream Pie — No. 1 146 

Cream Pie — No. 2. 146 

Chocolate Pie 147 

Cocoanut Pie — No. 1 147 

Cocoanixt Pie— No. 2 147 

Fruit Pie 147 

Lemon Pie — No. 1 147 

Lemon Pie— No. 2 148 

Lemon Pie — No. 3 148 

Lemon Pie — No. 4 148 

Lemon Tarts 148 

Mock Mince Pie 149 

Mince Meat— No. 1 149 

Mince Meat— No. 2 149 



Mince Meat— No. 3 150 

Mince Meat— No. 4 150 

Molasses Apple Pie 150 

Orange Pie — No. 1 151 

Orange Pie— No. 2 151 

Pie-Plant Pie— No 1 151 

Pie-Plant Pie— No. 2 151 

Pie-Plant Pie— No. 3 152 

Peach Custard Pie 152 

Eaisin Pie— No. 1 152 

Kaisin Pie — No. 2 152 

Eipe Currant Pie 153 

Raspberry Pie 153 

Squash or Pumpkin Pie . . . 153 
Sour Cream Pie 153 



PICKLES. 



Chopped Pickles 160 

Chow Chow— No. 1 160 

Chow Chow— No. 2 160 

Cucumber Pickles — No. 1 . . 159 
Cucumber Pickles— No. 2. . 163 

Cucumber Salad 161 

English Mustard Pickle 161 

Green Tomato Pickle 162 

Mustard Pickle 162 

Peach Pickle— No. 1 162 



Peach Pickle— No. 2 163 

Peach Pickle— No. 3 16:'. 

Pickled Peppers 164 

Piccadilli 164 

Sweet Cucumber Pickles 

— No. 1 164 

Sweet Cucumber Pickles 

—No. 2 165 

Sweet Pickled Plums 165 

YelloAv Pickle 165 



CATCHUPS AND SAUCES FOR MEATS, FISH AND 
VEGETABLES. 



(.'aper Sauce 171 

Celery Saiice 171 

Chili Sauce— No. 1 172 

Chili Sauce— No. 2 172 

Cucumber Catchup 172 



Drawn Butter 173 

Horseradish Sauce 173 

Hollandaise Sauce 173 

Maitre d' Hotel Sauce 173 

Mint Sauce 174 



316 



INDEX. 



Mushroom Sauce — No. 1.. . 174 
Mushroom Sauce— No. 2.. . 174 

Raw Tomato Catchup 174 

Spiced Currants 175 



Tomato Catchup— No. 1 . . . 175 
Tomato Catchup — No. 2. . . 175 

Tomato Sauce 175 

White Sauce 17(i 



SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS. 

Cabbage Salad— No. 1 184 

Cabbage Salad— No. 2 184 

Celery Salad 184 

Chicken Salad— No. 1 182 

Chicken Salad — No. 2 182 

Chicken Salad— No. 3 183 

Cucumber Salad 185 

German Salad 185 



Lobster Salad 185 

Medley Salad 186 

Potato Salad— No. 1 186 

Potato Salad— No. 2 186 

Salmon Salad 186 

Shrimp Salad 187 

Tomato Salad 188 



SAIiAD DRESSINGS. 

Boiled Dressing — No. 1. . . . 188 Mayonnaise Dressing 189 



Boiled Dressing— No. 2. . . . 188 
Boiled Dressing— No. 3. . . . 189 
French Dressing 189 



Salad Dressing 190 

Salmon Salad Dressing. ... 190 



RELISHES AND HINTS FOR THE TABLE. 



Chantilly Baskets 200 

Cheese Sticks 197 

Cheese Crackers 200 

Hard Boiled Eggs 197 

Horseradish in Cream 201 

Mock Oranges 198 

Salted Almonds 197 

Saratoga Chips 199 

Table Bouquet , 199 

To Serve Fried Oysters. . . 198 
To Serve Orange Charlotte 198 



To Serve Olives 198 

To Chrystallize Fruit 199 

To Serve Oranges 200 

To Serve Eaw Oysters 200 

To Garnish with Colored 

Eggs 200 

To Garnish a Dish 201 

To Serve Fish Salads 199 

To Serve Scalloped Oysters 199 
To Serve Charlotte Russe, 199 



SOUPS. 

A la Julienne 215 Bean 208 

Amber 207 Beef 208 



INDEX. 



317 



Bouillou— No. 1 208 

Bouillon— No. 2 208 

CMckeu 210 

Cream of Celery 209 

Corn— No. 1 209 

Corn— No. 2 209 

Dumplings for Soup- -No. 1, 210 
Dumplings for Soup- -No. 2, 210 

Green Pea— No. 1 210 

Green Pea— No. 2 211 

Mutton Broth 211 

Noodles for Soup — No. 1 . . . 212 
Noodlesfor Soup— No. 2... 212 
Oyster 212 



One Day Soup 212 

Pea— No. 1 213 

Pea— No. 2 213 

Split Pea 213 

Stock for Soup — No. 1 213 

Stock for Soup— No. 2 214 

Stock for Soup— No. 3 214 

Tomato— No. 1 216 

Tomato— No. 2 217 

Tomato — No. 3 217 

Tomato — No. 4 217 

Tomato No. 5 217 

Turkey 215 

Turtle 215 



FRESH FISH, SALT FISH, OYSTERS, ETC. 



Brook Troiit 225 

Clam Cliowder— No. 1 225 

Clam Chowder— No. 2 225 

Codlish Balls 226 

Codfish, Baked 226 

Codfish and Cream 227 

Fish, a la Creme 228 

Fish, Baked 223 

Muskallonge, Baked 224 

Muskallonge, Boiled 224 

Mackerel, Broiled, Salt 230 

Oysters, Broiled 224 



Oysters, Cream 230 

Oysters, Creamed 228 

Oysters, Cream Loaf 227 

Oysters, Scalloped 231 

Oyster Fritters 230 

Oysters, Fried— No. 1 229 

Oysters, Fried— No. 2 229 

Oysters, Pickled 231 

Oyster Royal 231 

Salmon, Scalloped 232 

Turbot 232 

Whiteflsh, Broiled 232 



MEATS AND POULTRY. 



A Nice "Pick-up' 239 

Boiled Corned Beef 241 

Boiled Dinner 241 

Beefsteak Loaf 240 

Beef Loaf 240 

Beefsteak Pudding 240 



Broiled Beefsteak 242 

Beefsteak, RoUed 250 

Beef, English Hunters 243 

Beef, English Pot-Pie 244 

Beefsteak, Stewed 251 

Chicken Pie 242 



318 



INJ^EX. 



Cliickeu, Fricasseed 24:5 

Chicken, Gelatine 242 

Chicken, Pressed 248 

Deviled Ham 243 

Frittadilla 245 

Fresh Meat Griddles 244 

Hamburg Steak 245 

Kidney Stew 245 

Mutton Pies 247 

Mutton, Boiled Leg 241 

Mutton, Corned Leg 243 

Mock Goose 246 

Mock Sweet Breads 246 

Meat Pie 246 



Oyster Dressing 247 

Pressed Meat 249 

Potted Liver 248 

Pork and Beans 248 

Eoast Sirloin 249 

Roast Goose or Ducks 249 

Roast Veal and Tongue. . . . 250 

Scotch Hotch-Potch 251 

Turkey, Scalloped 250 

Veal Pot Pie 252 

Veal Chops, Fried 251 

Veal Omelet 252 

Veal, Deviled 243 

Veal Birds 251 



Brine for Beef ( Celebrated) 252 



TABLE: 

Showing the proper Vegetables to serve with Meats, Game, 
Poultry, Fish, Etc 257 



VEGETABLES. 



Asparagus 259 

Beans, Lima 266 

Beans, String 272 

Beets 259 

Beet Greens 259 

Boiled Dinner 260 

Carrots, Stewed 271 

Corn. Baked 259 

Corn, Boile<l 260 

Corn, Dried 263 

Corn, Stewed 272 

Corn Frittei-s 265 

Corn Oysters— No. 1 261 



Corn Oysters— No. 2 262 

Corn Oysters— No. 3 262 

Corn Oysters— No. 4 262 

Corn Dodgers 261 

Cabbage, Creamed 262 

Cabbage, Fried 264 

Cabbage, Steamed 271 

Cauliflower, Boiled 260 

Cauliflower, Escaloped . . . 26:! 

Dandelions 263 

Egg Plant 263 

Hominy 265 

Hominy, Fried 265 



INDEX. 



319 



Kraut, Sour 270 

KoM-Kabi 266 

Lettuce, Wilted 275 

Macaroni, Boiled 261 

Okra 266 

Onions, Boiled 261 

Onions, Fried 265 

Parsnip Croquettes. 266 

Parsnips, Fried 265 

Parsnip Fritters 267 

Parsnips, Stewed 272 

Peas, Green 265 

Potatoes and Onions 267 

Potatoes, Baked 267 

Potatoes, Baked in Milk ... 268 
Potatoes, Baked Mashed. . . 266 

Potatoes, Boiled 268 

Potatoes, Croquettes 268 

Potatoes, Ducliess 263 

Potatoes, Escaloped 264 



Potatoes, Fried Eaw 269 

Potatoes, Mashed 269 

Potatoes, Stuflted 272 

Potatoes, Sweet 273 

Potatoes, Warmed 270 

Potato Puffs— No. 1 269 

Potato Puffs— No. 2 269 

Salsify orVegetableOysters 270 

Salsify or oyster Plant 270 

Squash, Summer 273 

Squash, Winter 275 

Succotash 273 

Spinach 271 

Tomatoes, Baked 274 

Tomatoes, Escaloped 264 

Tomatoes with Macaroni. . 274 

Tomatoes, Raw. 274 

Tomatoes, Stewed 274 

Tomato Toast 274 

Turnips 275 



DOMESTIC WINES. 



Currant Wine— No. 1 281 

Cun-antWine—No.2 (Black) 281 

Currant Wine— No. 3 281 

Currant Wine— No. 4 282 

Cherry Bounce 282 



Grape Wine 283 

Gooseberry Wine 283 

Maderia Wine 284 

Kaisin Wine 284 



NOr RISKING AND REFRESHING DRINKS. 



Claret Cup 285 

Chocolate 284 

Chocolate (Mexican) 285 

Cream Beer 285 

EggNogg 286 



Nectar 286 

Pop 286 

Raspberry Vinegar — No. 1 . 287 
Raspberry Vinegar — Mo. 2. 287 



320 



fNDEX. 
CANDY. 



Butter Scotch 203 

Butter Tafify 293 

Cream Candy 294 

Chocolate Caramels — No. 1, 294 
Chocolate Caramels— No. 2, 294 
Molasses Candy 295 



Maple Creams 294 

NutTaflfy 295 

"Oscar Wild" Taffy 295 

Sugar Candy 29(5 

Stick Candy 290 

Walnut Creams 29(1 



MISCELLANEOUS, 



Table of Weights and 
Measures 307 



Table of Proportions.. 308 



c; 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS