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Full text of "Good things to eat"

Good Things to Eat 



sBTj 



The Ladies of 

First Presbyterian Cfourcti 

Huh Vinson, Kaiiiftf 






Copyright N° 

COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT. 



#oob fttmg* to €at 




Use 



Queen of Kansas 
Flour 




HUTCHI NSON 
PRODUCE 
COMPANY 



HUTCHINSON, KANSAS 

YOUR PARTY WILL BE A SUCCESS 

If you insist on having the R.-S. Brand of 

Donita Chocolates 

Bigarreaux Cherries 

Salted Almonds 

and Mint Cream Patties 

Ask your grocer for the 4X Powdered Sugar sold by us. 

It never gets lumpy, and will make your 

cake icing a sure success. 



Richards-Scheble Candy Co. 

Manufacturing Confectioners, Hutchinson. 



UST WITHOUT DUST 



• •; 



3-in-One collects every atom of dust. Not a speck flies around. Feather 
dusters stir up and scatter dirt all over the house. Ordinary dry dust 
cloths catch only part of the dirt and scatter the balance on the floor. 
The 3-in-One way is the dustless way — the clean, sanitary way. Do this: 

Put a little 3-in-One on some cheese cloth. Wipe your piano, dining 
table, mantel — anything that needs dusting. Then look at the cloth 
— every particle of dust has collected on it. 3-in-One is absolutely 
free from grease or acid. It leaves no residue to rub off on your clothes 
— never stains or discolors the finest wood-work. No unpleasant odor. 

3-in-One dusting ia cheapest dusting. You can buy a 
bottle for a dime that will last a long time. But the % Pint for % 
Dollar New Household Size is the most economical. 

TEST 3-tN-ONE FREE. Write today for a generous free sample, 
and the 3-in-One Dictionary that is so helpful to housekeepers. Both 
free to you. Sold at all good stores in three size bottles: 10c, 25c 
and new 50c size. Also Handy Oil Can, 3% oz. 25c. 

3-IN-ONE OIL COMPANY 

BROADWAY NEW YORK 



fiS^SSSEs^Bse 



rrri ■ 



Be Oil Wise -Get 5Qc Size 



You'll get as much 3-in-One as if you bought 8 of the 10c bottles. And 3-in-One never 
loses its quality — never thickens, gums or turns rancid. Always sweet, fresh and good. 

3-in-One has for 16 years been the leading Household Oil— Lubricating, Cleaning 
and Polishing, and Preventing Rust. 

Use for oiling sewing machines, bicycles, talking machines, guns, reels, locks, clocks, etc. Use for clean- 
ing and polishing fine pianos, tables, chairs, any furniture. Use for preventing rust on any metal surface. 



PR ET On receipt of your 
rRtE - dealer-t name we 
will aend you free of cost a 
(enerous sample bottle and 
the raluable J-in-One Dic- 
tionary. Try this good oil at 
•ur expense. 



3-in-One ia Sold at all Good Hardware, Drug, Grocery and Central Store* 

3-IN-ONE OIL COMPANY 



BROADWAY 



NEW YORK 




THE BASIS OF GOOD FLOUR IS 
— GOOD WHEAT = = 



IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 



EMPRESS 
FLOUR 



Nothing but the pick of fine, 
plump, healthy wheat is ever 
used. That's our first consider- 
ation and care. Expert millers 
and a model mill do the rest. 
EMPRESS is without an equal 
for Bread, Cakes and Pastries. 



The Mills of Larabee 

Hutchinson, Kansas 



GERMAN METHODS EMPLOYED 



ESTABLISHED 1838 




HARNESS OIL 



Orriigt Top DrtMlog 




HOOF DRESSING 




The very best article of It* kind. Unequalled 
for use by both manufacturer and owner of 
harness. Is used by nearly all flames* 
Manufacturers In the world. 



FRANK MILLER'S 
HARNESS DRESSING 

to Bins. K;jt W, iifllti, rir in. 
tnitiui Fir., turf tsiitcaa. He. 



,.J f ~/:tl,/., 



FUTUPlN OKS.KtCSJ BARRELS. 
KAMCFACTDBED BT' 

The Frank Miller Company, 

NEW YORK. 




I X. L. HARNESS OIL 







HARNESS SOAP ^ 



Beware of Imltiiionsana all articles t&at are «wl5 
as heloj as good as 

-FRANK MILLER'S" 

Ssppty you. Cuitomsr with ihf BEST* sad hold bis tr*d6 





FOR BLACK SHOES 
CROWN SHOE DRESSING 

FOR RUSSET SHOES 

GEM RUSSET 

COMBINATION 

FOR WHITE SHOES 
TUXEDO CREAM 



m 6*&t\ 



li sp 



j.' ml 






Champion Interchangeable 

Gas and Coal Range. 




Burns cither coal or gas or 
both at the same time. 

We have them in three 
grades: $45.00, $60.00, and 
$65.00. 

Every stove guaranteed to 
give satisfaction. 

Over two hundred of them 
now in use in Hutchinson. 



HAN LIN 

Hardware Co., 

109 North Main. 



The Home of the 



Famous McDougal Kitchen Cabinet 



Special Features. 

Cooling cupboard 
base. 

All metal sifter 
flour bin — remov- 
able. 

Swinging Glass 
Sugar Bin. 
Metal faced shelf 
for cereal jars in 
top. 

White Enamel 
Linings. 



Description. 

The Top — is equipped with a sifter flour bin 
made entirely of metal and instantly removable. 
Has swinging glass sugar bin — metal faced shelf 
for cereal jars — 7-piece set glass cereal and spice 
jars — ample sized china closet with extra shelf 
— extract bottle rack — daily reminder, etc. 

The Base — has full sliding nickel-plated table 
top 42x28 inches in size. Is raised up on san- 
itary legs with copper ferrules and ball-bearing 
casters. Has sliding wire shelf in large, roomy 
utensil cupboard — extra wide linen drawer — cut- 
lery drawer — cooling cupboard with metal bread 
and cake box and sanitary wire sliding shelves — 
molding board — towel and utensil rack on door. 



CALL FOR DEMONSTRATION. 

Bauer Furniture Co., 8-10 N. Main 



IN THIS WARj ON FLIES 




THE GREATEST HELP IS 

TANGLEFOOT 

THE SANITARY, NON-POISONOUS 



FLY DESTROYER 



MORTONS SALT 




MORTON'S SALT is Free-Running. It contains no dust or powder ; 
the crystals are even-sized, and have full 
strength and excellent flavor. The pack- 
age is damp-tight and dust-proof, and the 
pouring-spout is easy to use and prevents 
loss and "muss." These facts make 
Morton's Salt the best to use on table 
and for cooking. 

MORTON SALT CO. 

HUTCHINSON, KANSAS. 




Oknb Swings tn iEat 




PUBLISHED BY THE 



Sixth Division of the Ladies Society 

First Presbyterian Church 

Hutchinson, Kansas 

1913 



■m** 
$&>, 



Copyright 1913, by 

Sixth Division of the Ladies Society, First Presbyterian Church, 

Hutchinson, Kansas. 



A35718 6 



PREFACE. 



We may live without poetry, music, and art ; 
We may live without conscience, and live without heart; 
We may live without friends; we may live without books; 
But civilized man cannot live without cooks." 



The Ladies of the Sixth Division present this book to 
their friends and the general public, with the sincere wish 
that it may prove a pleasure and help to the busy house- 
wife. Appreciating the interest shown and the support 
given us, we thank all who have so generously contributed 
the recipes ; also those who have kindly taken space for 
advertising, and for their prompt responses. 



10 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 



TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



4 saltspoons of liquid 1 teaspoonful. 

4 teaspoons of liquid 1 tablespoonful. 

3 teaspoons dry material 1 tablespoonful. 

4 tablespoons liquor 1 wineglass. 

4 tablespoons liquor \ gill. 

4 tablespoons liquor \ cup. 

2 gills ! 1 cup or | pint. 

16 tablespoons of liquid 1 cup. 

12 tablespoons dry material :1 cup. 

8 heaping tablespoons of dry material. ... 1 cup. 

4 cups liquid 1 quart. 

4 cups flour 1 lb. or 1 quart. 

2 cups solid butter 1 lb. 

\ cup butter \ lb. 

2 cups granulated sugar 1 lb. 

2.\ cups powdered sugar 1 lb. 

3 cups meal 1 lb. 

1 pint milk or water 1 lb. 

1 pint chopped meat, packed solidly 1 lb. 

9 large or 10 medium eggs 1 lb. 

1 round tablespoon butter 1 ounce. 

1 heaping tablespoon butter 2 oz. or \ cup. 

Butter size of egg 2 oz. or \ cup. 

1 heaping tablespoon sugar 1 ounce. 

2 round tablespoons flour 1 ounce. 

2 round tablespoons coffee 1 ounce. 

2 round tablespoons powdered sugar 1 ounce. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 11 



QUANTITIES NEEDED IN SERVING. 



SALMON 

1-lb. can in scallop will serve eight people. 

TURKEY 

Allow 1 lb. to each person. 

PORK ■ 

h lb. loin for each person. 

HAM 

One 10-Ib. ham, hot, will serve '20 persons. Cold will 
serve -40 persons. 

MEAT LOAF 

8 lbs. veal or beef, allowing 6 large crackers to each 
pound of meat, will serve 50 persons. 

CHICKEN 

8 lbs. pressed will serve 25 to 30 persons. 
!) lbs. in turbot will serve 20 persons. 
One 3-lb. chicken with equal quantity of celery will 
serve 12 persons. 

OYSTERS 

1 quart in scallop will serve 15 to 20 people. 

TIMBALLS AND PATTIES 

1 pint oysters or meal and 1 pint cream sauce, served 
in shells, will serve from 20 to 25 persons. 



12 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 

SHERBETS 

1 gallon will serve from 20 to 25 persons. 

ICE-CREAM 

1 quart brick ice-cream will serve 8 persons. 
1 quart bulk ice-cream will serve 6 persons. 

PUNCH 

1 quart will serve 10, in punch glasses. 

1 quart will serve 5 persons, in 8-oz. glasses. 

BOUILLON 

1 quart will serve from 6 to 8 persons. 

COFFEE 

Allow 1 lb. for 30 persons. 

Allow 1 lb. for 40 persons when made in urn. 

WHIPPED CREAM 

There are from 20 to 25 tablespoons in 1 quart. 

POTATO CHIPS 

1 lb. will serve 20 persons. 

CREAM 

Allow 1 quart for 25 cups of coffee. 

OLIVES 

1 quart will serve 25 persons. 

PICKLES 

1 quart will serve 25 persons. 

PEAS 

1 can will serve from 6 to 8 persons. 
1 quart of finished product is enough to serve 6 or 8 
persons. 



#ooo things; to Cat 

Soups 

BEEF SOUP 

4 lbs. beef. 4 whole onions. 

4 whole cloves. 1 carrot. 

3 slices of cabbage. 4 potatoes. 

2 tomatoes. Salt and pepper. 

Boil four hours any preferred cut of beef, seasoned 
with salt and pepper to taste. Forty minutes before serv- 
ing, add onions, cloves, sliced carrot, and cabbage sliced 
through the heart and left in quarters. Twenty minutes 
before serving, add potatoes and onions. Watch carefully, 
and all vegetables except tomatoes can be taken up whole. 

Mrs. T. C. Smith. 

CLAM CHOWDER 

3 slices of bacon. 1 onion. 

1 tablespoon of flour. 1 quart water. 

2 potatoes. 1 pint milk. 

1 can clams. 

Mince the bacon and fry out ; add onion and cook till 
brown ; stir in flour, and when well mixed add quart of 
water. Add potatoes diced, and cook till tender, adding 
more water if necessary. When the potatoes are done, add 
the milk and juice of clams. Just before serving, add the 

(13) 



14 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

minced clams and let it boil up once. Season to taste, and 
serve. Mrs. Chas. Greenlee. 

CHILE SOUP 

1 lb. hamburger. Small piece of suet. 

1 pint tomatoes. 2 large onions. 

2 chile peppers. 1 pint chile beans. 

Salt and pepper. 

Chop onions. Cook all four or five hours. This makes 
one gallon. Mrs. R. C. Whiteside. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

6 small stalks of celery. 1 pint water. 

| cup tomatoes. Pinch of soda. 

2 level teaspoons cornstarch. 1 pint boiling milk. 
1 tablespoon butter. 

Cook celery in water for 30 or 40 minutes. Mash and 
strain. Cook tomatoes with pinch of soda. Strain. Mix 
cornstarch with a little milk ; add to boiling milk and let 
cook 10 minutes. Add strained celery, then tomatoes and 
butter. Season with salt and pepper. Ruth Astle. 

CREAM OF CORN SOUP 

1 can corn 2 cups cold water. 

1 quart milk. 2 tablespoons sugar and 2 
8 tablespoons cream tablespoons flour — mixed. 

1 teaspoon salt.. Tiny bit of red pepper. 

Cook one hour in double boiler. Strain, and add eight 
tablespoons cream. Put back on stove till ready to serve. 
Serve with small piece of butter in each cup. 

For a fancy dish, add popcorn as it is served. 

Mrs. F. P. Hettinger. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK ROOK 15 

CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP 

1 can tomatoes. 1 quart water. 

1 teaspoon salt. 1 large onion. 
Pepper. | stalk celery. 

2 tablespoons flour. 2 tablespoons butter, melted. 

Cook sliced onions and celery with tomatoes and water 
for 30 minutes ; add flour mixed with melted butter and 
cook until creamy. Rub through vegetable strainer; add 
salt and pepper. 

This will serve 8 or 10 people, and may be prepared 
while getting a meal. Mrs. H. T. Igou. 

TOMATO SOUP 

1 quart tomatoes. ^ teaspoon soda. 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 quart sweet milk. 
6 large crackers. Salt and pepper. 

Strain tomatoes ; place over fire and let come to a boil ; 
add soda. Then butter and milk, crackers rolled fine. 
Season with salt and pepper. Mrs. R. C. Whiteside. 

TOMATO SOUP 

1 quart tomatoes. 1 quart water. Celery and onions. 

Cook tomatoes, water and onions and celery. When 
done, strain, and thicken with flour. Season with butter, 
salt and pepper. Mrs. Slavens. 

SALMON SOUP 

1 can salmon. 1 quart water. 

1 quart milk. 1 tablespoon butter. 

White pepper. Salt. 

Simmer the salmon in water for two hours ; then run 



L6 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



through a sieve and add milk heated, butter, pepper and 
salt to taste. Serve with hot roasted crackers, or thicken 
with a little flour made smooth in a little sweet milk. This 
is nice to serve for a pink luncheon. 

Mrs. Laura A. Sinclair. 



NOODLES 

1 egg. 1 eggshell full of water. 

Make very stiff. Roll thin and let dry. Cut. 



Salt. 



Mrs. F. E. Larson. 



O 



a 



FAULTLESS 

^STARCH iff 



^.STARCH.* 

FOR 5HIRT5.C0LL AR5,CUFF5,AND FINE LINEN. 



Fish 



TABLE FOR COOKING FISH. 

Fish, 6 to 8 lbs. long and thin, baked 2 hours. 

Fish, 4 to 6 lbs. short and thick, baked 2 hours. 

Fish, fried 30 minutes. 

BAKED FISH 

Clean, rinse and rub dry any fish weighing three or four 
pounds. Rub inside and out with salt ; stuff with dress- 
ing made as for turkey, only drier. Sew or tie it up and 
place on buttered plank or tin ; then in baker. Dredge 
with flour and lay over fish a few thin slices of pork or bits 
of butter, and bake an hour and half, basting occasionally. 

Mrs. D. E. Richards. 

DRESSING FOR FISH 

§ cup of cracker crumbs. J teaspoon salt. 

| cup stale bread crumbs. § teaspoon pepper, 
j cup butter. A few drops onion juice. 

j cup of hot water. 

Mix ingredients in order given. Olive Morgan. 

FISH BAKED WITH TOMATO SAUCE. 

Wash a medium-sized fish ; dry well. Dip in egg, roll in 
cracker-crumbs. Dip again in egg and roll in crumbs. 
Place in buttered pan. Take one quart of tomatoes with 

(17) 



IS GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

a small onion, two cloves, a dash of red pepper, salt to 
taste. Cook down to about half and rub through a bowl 
sieve. Pour hot over fish, placing bits of butter on top, 
and bake in moderate oven. Baste often, using a little 
water if necessary. Mrs. J. F. Corrigan. 

STEAMED SALMON 

Butter a small dish and fill it with alternate layers of 
minced salmon and bread-crumbs; each layer sprinkled 
with bits of butter, salt and pepper; beat one egg lightly ; 
add to it half-cup of milk, and pour over, the salmon ; 
steam half-hour. When ready to serve, carefully turn the 
mold on a hot platter and pour over it a cream sauce as 
follows : 

1 tablespoon butter melted and browned. Into this stir 
1 tablespoon flour; add 1 cup rich milk and oil from 
salmon. Season with salt and pepper; cook until thick. 

Mrs. A. AY. McCandless. 

SALMON AND PEAS 

1 can salmon. 1 can peas. 

1 pint sweet milk. 2 large tablespoons butter. 

2 level tablespoons flour. 

Remove paper from can salmon. Make several holes in 
end of can, drain liquor ; put in boiling water, perforated 
side down ; cover, and boil fifteen minutes. Heat peas in 
their own juice; drain. Make white sauce of milk, butter 
and flour ; add peas ; put salmon in center of platter, pour- 
ing peas around it. Mrs. Ed. L. Teed. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH cook BOOK 19 

SALMON LOAF 

1 can salmon. 3 eggs. 

1 cup bread-crumbs. 4 teaspoons butter. 

4 tablespoons milk. 1 teaspoon salt. 

\ teaspoon pepper. 

Cut salmon fine. Beat eggs to a cream ; mix well with 
other ingredients, and steam in buttered vessel one and 
one-half hours. Serve with following sauce : 

1 cup milk. 1 tablespoon flour. 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 tablespoon catsup. 

1 beaten egg. Liquor of salmon. 

A little parsley. 

Cook all but egg for ten minutes ; then add egg and 
cook one minute. Mrs. A. D. Raffing ton. 

SALMON LOAF 

1 cup milk. 1 tablespoon flour. 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 can salmon. 

3 eggs. 

Melt butter, stir in flour, add milk slowly, and cook till 
thick and smooth ; add salmon, mix well, season, add well- 
beaten eggs. Butter baking-dish, add above mixture, and 
bake in pan of water* forty-five minutes. 

Mrs. Hugh T. Kerr, 

Chicago, 111. 

SALMON AND TOMATO— ESCALLOPED 

1 can salmon. 1 can tomatoes. 

Place salmon in center of baking-dish ; pour around it 
the tomatoes, well seasoned with butter, salt and pepper. 



20 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

Cover one inch thick with bread-crumbs well seasoned with 
melted butter. Bake in moderate oven 30 to 40 minutes. 
Serve hot. Emily Hall. 

ESCALLOPED FISH 

Take any kind of fish ; skin and flake it. Make a sauce 
of—. 
1 pint milk. 1 tablespoon butter. 2 tablespoons flour. 

Melt the butter, stir in the flour, and cook slowly. Stir 
in the milk so it will not lump. Add salt and pepper to 
taste ; also a tiny bit of paprika and half-teaspoon grated 
onion. 

Butter a dish and put in layer of fish and sauce alter- 
nately ; sprinkle with bread-crumbs and bits of butter, and 
bake not to exceed half-hour. Mrs. J. L. Penney. 

FISH TURBOT 

For one pound or 2 cups of any cooked or canned fish. 
Make a cream sauce of — 

1 pint milk. 2 tablespoons butter. 

2 tablespoons flour. Dash of paprika. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 

When sauce has cooled some, stir in the fish, which has 
previously been flaked with a fork. Have scallop pan or 
ramkins buttered and a few cracker-crumbs in bottom. 
Pour in mixture, sprinkle with a few cracker-crumbs on 
top, and bake. Mrs. D. E. Richards. 

TO FRY HALIBUT 

Cut halibut one and one-half inches thick, and place in 
salt water one hour before cooking. Dry, and dip in flour, 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 21 

then in beaten egg, and fry in very deep fat until brown on 
both sides; cover, then plaee on a very low burner for ten 
minutes. Marie Madden. 

SALMON ON TOAST 

To one can of salmon use one pint of milk, two table- 
spoons of flour and a tablespoon of butter, salt and ]>epper 
to taste. When the milk is almost to the boiling point 
add flour mixed with a little cold milk and seasoning. Let 
it boil up, then put in the salmon, previously picked to 
pieces with skin and bone removed. Let boil up again, 
and pour over platter of toast. 

SHRIMP WIGGLE 

4 tablespoons butter. 3. tablespoons flour. 

\ teaspoon salt. f teaspoon pepper. 

\\ cup milk. 1 can shrimps. 

1 can peas. 

Put butter in pan, and melt ; mix flour, salt and pepper ; 
add to melted butter, pour milk on slowly, and cook until 
smooth. When done, add shrimps, cut in small dice ; add 
peas which have been drained from liquor and thoroughly 
rinsed. Serve on hot crackers or toast. 

Mrs. Ed. L. Teed. 

BROILED OYSTERS 

Place a small lump of butter in smoking-hot spider. 
Sear the oysters in this on each side, turning until brown. 
Then place on buttered toast. Broil not more than half 
a dozen at a time, as the liquor in the oysters will cause 
them to stew rather than brown. Sprinkle with salt just 
before serving. Mrs. F. H. Carpenter. 



22 (100D THINGS TO EAT 

FRIED OYSTERS 

Put plenty of butter in frying-pan and let it get hot be- 
fore you begin frying. Beat up well as many eggs as you 
judge you will need. Dip the oysters therein one by one ; 
then roll them very lightly in cracker-crumbs; then drop 
them in hot butter. They will brown nicely before the 
oysters cook too much. Clara Buckland. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS 

Into a buttered scallop-pan put a layer of oysters, salt 
and pepper ; cover with layer of mixed cracker-crumbs 
and bread-crumbs. Put on lumps of butter; moisten with 
milk. Repeat until pan is full. If there is any liquor on 
the oysters, put it in the milk used for moistening the top 
layer. Mrs. Ruth Taylor. 

OYSTER CUTLETS 

\ cup macaroni, broken fine. 1 pint oysters. 

2| teaspoons flour. \ cup milk. 

\ cup oyster liquid. 

Cook oysters and macaroni until done. Salt and chop 
fine ; make a sauce of flour, milk and oyster liquid ; season 
with red pepper or pimentoes, salt, nutmeg; stir all to- 
gether; when cool, mould into cutlets, bread and fry. 

Mrs. Anna B. Grimes. 

OYSTER POT PIE 

Take one quart oysters and scald in their own liquid. 
Let come to a boil and skim. Take out oysters and set 
aside in a warm place. To the liquid add 1 pint water 
1 tablespoon butter, salt and pepper to taste, and 1 tea- 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 23 



spoon Hour to thicken. Take light biscuit dough and roll 
out twice the thickness of pie-crust. Cut in squares (an 
inch). Drop into boiling liquor. Cover, and boil 40 min- 
utes. Stir in oysters and serve in a covered dish at once. 

Mrs. T. Si.m.ms. 

CREAMED OYSTERS 

One pint oysters parboiled in a little water until plump. 
Drain ; add enough milk to liquid to make two cups. Rub 
together 3 tablespoons butter, \\ tablespoons flour; pour 
liquid over gradually; cook until creamy; season with 
salt, pepper, and a dash of red pepper. Drop in oysters. 
Pour over thin slices of toast. Serve at once. 

Mrs. L. N. Lockwood. 
OYSTER COCKTAIL 

Mix together, 6 tablespoons tomato catsup. 

^ tablespoon Worcestershire sauce. 
1 tablespoon lemon juice. 
A pinch of salt. 
Sprinkle of paprika. 
12 drops of tobasco sauce. 
Use over cold-chilled small oysters. 

Mrs. J. L. Penney. 



Poultry and Game 

TABLE FOR COOKING POULTRY AND GAME. 

Turkey weighing 10 lbs 3 hours. 

Chicken weighing 3 to 4 lbs H to 2 hours. 

Goose weighing 8 lbs 3 hours. 

Tame duck, large 2 hours. 

Wild duck 1 hour. 

Small birds 30 minutes. 

CHICKEN A LA KING 

Take the white or both meat of a chicken which has 
first been boiled till tender, and cut into dice and put into 
a saucepan. Put on stove, and moisten with hot cream ; 
add one whole red pepper cut into pieces, pinch of salt and 
pepper, and let simmer for about fifteen minutes. Remove 
the saucepan to side of stove ; beat the yolk of an egg 
and mix with cream, but do not allow to come to boil. 
Add a piece of butter, and serve very hot on fresh-made 
toast. Mrs. H. A. Lloyd, Lawton, Okla. 

BAKED CHICKEN WITH MUSHROOMS 

Stew one chicken until very tender ; remove from bones, 
cut in small bits ; add to chicken ^ lb. canned mushooms, 
1 cup bread-crumbs (bread should be toasted before 
ground), salt, pepper, butter size of egg. Add broth from 
chicken. If not moist enough, add milk. Bake in casser- 
ole. Mrs. H. T. Igou. 

(24) 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 

CREAMED CHICKEN 

Slow a chicken until tender and allow it to remain in 
the liquor until cold. Skim the fat from the top of the 
liquor and pick the meat from the hones, shredding quite 
fine. Melt a tablespoon of butter in a frying-pan and stir 
into it two tablespoons of flour. Cook several minutes, 
but do not allow it to brown. Heat together one pint of 
the chicken stock and one pint of sweet cream. When the 
boiling point is reached, pour slowly upon the butter and 
flour and stir until smooth. Season with salt and pepper. 
Stir in the shredded chicken ; let it boil up once, and serve. 
Additional seasoning of minced parsley may be used. 

Mrs E. E. Ellsworth. 
MARYLAND CHICKEN 

This is a delicious way to cook a young chicken : Cut it 
up, dust the pieces with salt and pepper, dip in egg, then 
in crumbs, and put into a dripping-pan with a generous 
lump of butter on each piece. Cover with another pan, 
and cook in a moderate oven till tender, basting often 
with melted butter. When chicken is tender, take off pan 
which covers it and let brown in oven. 

Make cream sauce and add it to the crumbs and drip- 
pings which will be found under the chicken, together with 
a grating of nutmeg and a little chopped parsley. 

Pork chops parboiled, then cooked this way, are de- 
licious. Mrs. F. H. Stallman. 

PANNED CHICKEN 

Take young spring chickens and split down the back ; 
spread out in pan. Salt, pepper, and dot generously with 
butter, and sprinkle with flour. Cook until done. Take 



26 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

chicken out and thicken liquor for gravy. This is espe- 
cially nice for young chickens which are somewhat too 
large to fry. Mrs. L. A. Pennington. 

PRESSED CHICKEN 

Cut up a chicken as for frying ; boil gently until the 
meat falls from the bones. Pick off the meat, chop fine, 
and season with pepper and salt. Butter a mold and put 
in chopped chicken. A very pretty effect may be had by 
placing the light and dark meat, using two molds and serv- 
ing the slices cut in different shapes. Boil the broth down 
with one teaspoon gelatine until there is only one cup of 
broth; then pour over the chicken until it sinks through, 
forming a jelly around it. Mrs. S. G. Hill. 

CHICKEN PIE 

Cook chicken, bone, and season ; have about H pints 
stock left. 

Sauce — 3 tablespoons flour. - 1 cup milk. 

3 tablespoons butler. Salt if needed. 

1| pints stock. 

Batter- — 1 egg. l 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

L 2 tablespoons butter. -2 cups milk, or enough to 

1 teaspoon salt. make like pancake bat- 

c 2 cups flour. tcr. 

Put chicken in baking-dish, pour half the sauce over it 
and place in oven to heat while making the batter. Pour 
batter over all, and bake about twenty minutes or until 
done, and serve with other half of sauce. 

Mrs. A. W. McCandless. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN < III !l< II COOK li(H)K .'7 



SMOTHERED CHICKEN 

Take a nice well-dressed chicken and cu1 open on the 
back; place it in a deep pan, salt and pepper well; then 
sift on flour to almost cover it. Slice a tomato, lay it on 
the chicken, spread a cup of butter and lard mixed on it, 
and pour on two pints of boiling water. Put in the oven 
and with a deep pan cover closely to keep in the steam. 
When tender remove the cover and let brown nicely, then 
it is ready for the table. Mrs. J. W. Brady. 

CHICKEN TURBOT 

One chicken cooked tender ; cut fine as for salad ; add 
one can mushrooms; put in pan and pour over dressing 
made of c 2 tablespoons butter, L 2 tablespoons flour, 1 pint 
milk or part milk, and part chicken stock. Sprinkle with 
cracker-crumbs and pieces of butter. Bake one half-hour. 
Three chickens will serve twenty people. 

Mrs. W. H. Cool. 

CHICKEN OR TURKEY DRESSING 

First stew the giblets until tender. Then cut into small 
pieces. Toast bread, cut up fine, until light brown. Add 
1 teaspoon sugar, salt to taste, dash of black pepper, butter 
size of egg; then add broth and giblets, enough io make 
quite moist. To 2 quarts of bread add three well-beaten 
eggs ; stir very gently. Sage may be added if desired. 

Mrs. A. D. Krous. 

TURKEY AND DRESSING 

Have turkey prepared in usual manner, but do not salt. 

For dressing, use baker's bread with little crust. Rub into 



28 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

fine crumbs ; season with salt, pepper, and generous amount 
of melted butter; onion or sage may be used if preferred, 
but boiled bits of celery with* or without oysters is much 
finer. 

Put dressing in turkey without wetting with a spoon, 
and shake down well. With small wooden toothpicks pin 
cloth over opening. Skewer wings and joints into place, 
and put into open pan without water. Have oven hot 
enough that a gentle frying may be heard. A medium- 
sized turkey will be cooked in two hours, and will be roasted 
and not boiled. If desired, baste the last hour with salt 
water in which celery was boiled. This is not necessary if 
fire is kept moderate. Mrs. Chas. E. Hall. 

WILD DUCK 

To two ducks take 1 pint water, 1 onion, 2 tablespoons 
vinegar, and parboil from one half to three-quarters hour, 
in roaster you intend to roast in ; then remove, and cover 
breasts with bits of bacon cut thin. Turn breast down in 
pan and roast in hot oven for half an hour. Just before 
taking out, season with salt and pepper. Can be stuffed 
with a dressing if preferred. If not, split open on back. 

Margaret Collingwood, 

Plains, Kans. 



Meats 



TABLE FOR COOKING MEATS. 

Beef, rare 10 to 15 minutes per lb. 

Beef, well done 20 to 25 

Mutton 20 to 25 

Lamb 20 to 25 

Veal, well done 30 

Pork, well done 30 

BEEFSTEAK AND ONIONS 

This very popular dish necessitates the use of a frying- 
pan upon which to put the steak with a little suet; add 
sliced onions which have been previously prepared by drop- 
ping into cold water ; season with salt and pepper, and cover 
tightly before putting upon the fire. 

ONION SAUCE FOP BEEFSTEAK. 

Peel a cup of onions ; slice them into a frying-pan with 
a heaping tablespoon of butter, and fry them brown ; 
then add a pint of any good gravy or sauce, and salt and 
pepper. Serve on above recipe. Ruth Astle. 

BEEFSTEAK WITH TOMATOES 

Put in hot skillet a floured beefsteak ; when about done, 
empty one can of tomatoes, and let cook. Salt and flavor. 

Mrs. Lauderdale. 

(29) 



30 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

BROILED ROUND STEAK 

Put one pound steak through grinder, then mix thor- 
oughly with half as much thick cream. Season highly 
with salt and pepper. Spread flat in pie-tin about one 
inch thick. Put melted butter over top, and sprinkle 
with flour. Bake under the blaze about twenty minutes. 

Mrs. James Lee Dick. 

ROUND STEAK STEAMED 

Buy round steak an inch thick ; cut in pieces about two 
inches wide and three long. Dip in beaten egg and then 
in rolled bread-crumbs which have been salted and pep- 
pered well. Have a skillet very hot, and brown these 
pieces in drippings. Place the meat in a pan, then make 
a milk gravy in skillet and pour over the meat. Place in 
pan in a steamer and steam three hours. Serve with gravy 
poured over the meat. Where a tireless cooker is used, 
steam five hours. Mrs. Geo. T. McCandless. 

SWISS STEAK 

Take a round steak and pound into it with hammer one 
cup of flour to each three pounds of meat. Salt and pepper, 
and brown quickly in buttered pan. Cover with water, 
and bake in oven until tender. Jessie B. Irwin. 

SPANISH HASH 

1 cup cold roast beef. 4 cold boiled potatoes. 

1 egg. 2 small onions. 

1 cup canned tomatoes. 1 green pepper. 

3 drops tobasco sauce. Pepper and salt. 

Chop together cold potatoes, onions and green pepper ; 
then add cup chopped roast beef ; tomatoes, and season 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 31 

with pepper, salt and tobasco sauce; add one egg. Drop 
by spoonfuls into muffin-pans. Hake in hot oven, and 
serve with tomato sauce. 

Tomato Sauce : 

\ can tomatoes. 1 bay leaf. 

1 stalk celery. l 2 tablespoons butter. 

1 small onion. v 2 tablespoons flour. 

■■2 sprigs parsley. Salt and pepper. 

Cook tomatoes, celery, onion, parsley and bay leaf 
twenty-five minutes; strain, and return to double boiler; 
cream, butter and flour together; add them to previous 
mixture; then add salt and pepper. Yse one can toma- 
toes between hash and sauce. Have the butter hot or 
melted, then cream in the flour. This makes no lumps in 
the sauce. Mrs. C. F. Little. 

COLLEGE HASH 

'■i lbs cooked meat, ground. C onions chopped fine. 

3 or 4 large potatoes chopped fine. 1 pint of water. 

Mix, and sprinkle in a few bread-crumbs ; season with 
salt and pepper ; bake in a quick oven. Mrs. Pile. 

BARBECUED HAM 

Soak thin slices ham one hour in lukewarm water ; 
drain; wipe, and cook in hot frying-pan until slightly 
browned. Remove to serving dish, and add to fat in pan 
.'3 tablespoons vinegar mixed with Ik teaspoons mustard, 
| teaspoon sugar and § teaspoon paprika. When thoroughly 
heated, pour over ham and serve at once. 

Olive Morgan. 



32 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



BAKED HAM 

One Wolff ham ; soak all night in cold water. In the 
morning put on to boil in cold water ; if quite salty, change 
water. Boil until almost tender. Then take off thick 
outer skin, spread brown sugar about one-fourth inch thick 
all over ham. Roll a box of crackers quite fine and spread 
over sugar. Put in turkey pan, adding one half-cup vine- 
gar, half-cup hot water. Bake until tender and golden 
brown. It will take from one-half to three-quarters hour 
to bake same. Mrs. B. Nussbaum. 

(Contributed by Mrs. D. E. Richards.) 

BOILED AND BAKED HAM OR SMOKED TONGUE. 

Soak over night and boil until tender, trying with a 
silver fork. During the last hour of boiling, throw off 
water three times. Then add the following, with just 
enough water to cover ham : 

1 pint vinegar. 1| cups brown sugar. 

1 teaspoon ground cloves. 1 teaspoon allspice. 
1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

Spices tied in muslin sack. Boil slowly one hour, adding 
more water as needed to keep it covered. Then put ham 
in baking-pan and bake one hour, basting with the" last 
liquor in which it was boiled. Lastly, skin, and while hot 
pack the fat with bread-crumbs and powdered sugar, and 
brown in oven. Mrs. F. P. Hettinger. 

SCALLOPED HAM AND POTATOES 

Peel and slice potatoes as for frying ; butter a baking- 
dish, put a layer potatoes in it with a very little salt, pep- 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 33 

per, a little butter and flour. Over this place a rather 
thick slice of ham. Then another layer of potatoes as 
before, and nearly cover with rick milk. Cook very slowly 
for about two hours or until done. 

Mrs. Bess Harper Sherwood, 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

BAKED HAM 

A slice of ham three-fourths inch thick. Place in a pan, 
and rub over it a little onion juice, or mustard if preferred, 
and a tiny bit of red pepper; then pour over it one pint 
milk, and bake one hour. Mrs. F. P. Hettinger. 

BAKED HAM WITH CIDER SAUCE 

Take a ham weighing 8 or 9 lbs., scrape and scrub the 
outside, rinse well, and put in large kettle; cover with 
cold water, and place over the fire. When it reaches the 
boiling point, skim well ; then push back where it will 
simmer slowly for two hours ; take from the fire and cool 
in liquor in which it has been boiled ; when ready to bake, 
peel off the skin ; place in baking-pan and bake in mod- 
erate oven for two hours, basting frequently with cider, 
two tablespoons at a time. A cupful will answ T er, as after 
that there will be plenty of drippings to use in the basting. 
Just before removing from the oven, take a cup of finely 
rolled stale bread-crumbs, mix with two teaspoons brown 
sugar and level one of dry mustard. Moisten to paste 
with cider; spread over the ham and return to oven, with 
a few cloves stuck in, to brown. Serve with cider sauce. 

Vida McKee, 

Kansas City, Mo. 



34 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

LIVER EN CASSEROLE 

1 lb. fresh calf liver. 6 slices^bacon. 

2 slices onions. 1 diced potato. 

Wash the liver, flour, season with salt, pepper, and lemon 
juice. Fry bacon till crisp ; remove, and brown onions 
and potatoes in the fat. Lay the liver in casserole ; place 
bacon over it ; add potatoes and onions, and enough boil- 
ing water to cover. Bake slowly in moderate oven one 
and one-half hours. A cup of tomatoes may be added 
to contents of casserole, or serve with tomatoes. 

Mrs. Alma Sawyer, 

Kansas City, Mo. 
MEAT BALLS 

Round steak \ inch thick. Sausage. 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 tablespoon flour. 

Cut steak in squares, and place in center of each square 
one teaspoon of sausage ; fold corners, and fasten with 
toothpicks. Rub butter and flour together till smooth ; 
then pour on boiling water to make a gravy, which is not 
too thick, as it thickens in cooking. Drop meat rolls 
which have been rolled in flour into the boiling gravy, and 
allow them to boil briskly for ten minutes. Season with 
salt and pepper and push to back of stove, where they will 
simmer for about six hours. Mrs. Fay Hughes. 

MEXICAN DISH 

Heat one tablespoon butter or drippings in skillet. Brown 
round steak in this. Take out, and cut two tomatoes, 
two peppers and two onions into the drippings ; let them 
cook a few minutes, and add steak ; cover tight, and cook 
one hour. Mrs. Pet Nation. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 35 

MACARONI AND CHIPPED BEEF 

1 cup macaroni. j lb. chipped beef. 

Cook macaroni in boiling water until tender; drain in 
cold water. Soak beef for ten minutes in cold water ; 
drain. Place the macaroni and beef in a baking-dish in 
alternate layers. Cover with white sauce; put buttered 
bread-crumbs on top. Bake until nicely browned. 

Adeline B. Stratton. 

VEGETABLE LOAF 

If lbs. round steak. 1 lb. lean pork. 

1 cup bread or cracker-crumbs. 1 pint tomatoes. 
1 small bunch celery. 1§ teaspoons salt. 

1 teaspoon pepper. 

Run all through meat-grinder ; add one cup sweet milk. 
Bake as any meat loaf. Mrs. Pet Nation. 

VEAL LOAF 

4 lbs. veal. 4 eggs. 

1| cups crackers. 1 cup milk. 

1 15-cent can of pimentoes. 1 lb. English walnuts. 

1 pint olives. Salt and pepper. 

Chop pimentoes, walnuts and olives. Bake as any loaf. 

Mrs. Anna B. Grimes. 

VEAL LOAF 

H lbs. veal. f lb. salt pork. 

2 crackers. 1 teaspoon salt. 
2'eggs. 1| cups sweet milk. 

Butter size of an egg. 

Mix all well together, and bake. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Brown. 



36 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

VEAL LOAF 

3| lbs. veal. ^ lb. cured ham. 

3 eggs well beaten. 1 tablespoon pepper. 

1 tablespoon salt. \ tablespoon grated nutmeg. 

4 rolled crackers. \ cup milk. 

Butter size of an egg. 

Mix these together, and bake in a loaf with little cracker- 
dust over the top ; add enough water to keep it moist while 
baking. Mrs. John C. Krous. 

BEEF LOAF 

3 lbs. round beef. \ lb. salt pork. 

1 tablespoon salt. 1 teaspoon pepper. 

Dash of paprika. 10 tablespoons bread or 

3 tablespoons milk or cream. cracker-crumbs. 

2 eggs. 

Put meat through grinder; mix thoroughly with other 
ingredients ; adding well-beaten eggs last. Form into loaf ; 
place in baking-pan ; sprinkle top of loaf with crumbs and 
bits of butter ; pour over loaf one half-pint boiling water 
and bake nearly two hours. When done, carefully remove 
from pan and garnish with parsley. Serve with thick 
gravy made from liquid remaining in pan. 

Elizabeth Stallman. 
BEEF LOAF 

1 lb. round of beef, ground. 6 square soda crackers, 
1 pint sweet milk. ground. 

Salt and pepper. 

Mix meat and crackers ; add milk and seasoning ; make 
into loaf, putting rolled crackers and bits of butter on the 
top. Pour water in pan, basting often. Bake one hour in 
moderate oven. Mrs. Eliza M. Schermerhorn. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 37 

MEAT LOAF 

5 cups veal. 1 cup beef. 

2 eggs. 1 cup cracker-crumbs. 

1 cup mashed potatoes. 1 teaspoon black pepper. 

Salt to taste. 

Boil a veal shank and one pound beef until tender. 
Grind and measure as directed. .Mix all with broth from 
meat, form in a loaf, place in a pan, pour some of the broth 
around loaf, bake in moderate oven from 30 to 45 minutes, 
basting frequently. This amount will serve eight people. 
Good hot or cold. Mrs. Nora Hardy. 



PRESSED MEAT LOAF 

Boil and grind — 
2 lbs. round steak. 1 lb. pork chops. 

Add — 1 teaspoon salt. 1 teaspoon pepper. 

1 teaspoon celery h cup cracker-crumbs, 

seed. 

In the meat broth dissolve one teaspoon gelatine ; add 
to above, and press. Mrs. J. H. Harper. 



PRESSED VEAL 

4 lbs. veal. 1 cup of licpior. 

1 small cup butter. 1 tablespoon pepper. 

1 egg. 

Place veal in pot ; cover with water ; stew slowly until 
the meat drops from the bone. Take out, and chop it; 
let the licpior boil down until there is one cupful ; put in 
butter, pepper, and egg beaten ; stir this through the meat ; 
have hard-boiled eggs ; lay in mold, and press in the meat. 

Mrs. N. T. Stewart. 



38 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

PRESSED VEAL LOAF 

lh lbs. chuck veal. 1 lb. salt pork. 

1 tablespoon gelatine. 2 cups meat stock. 

4 hard-boiled eggs. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Boil meat until tender; drain, and put through meat- 
chopper. Dissolve gelatine in a little cold water ; then 
in hot meat stock. Now mix stock and meat and put half 
in a long narrow pan. Lay the eggs through the center, 
end to end ; press the remaining meat over and around ; 
put in cool place, and serve when cold. 

Mrs . Morrison Brown. 
NUT LOAF 

1 cup pecans. 2 cups bread-crumbs. 

1 teaspoon salt. A little pepper. 

1 tablespoon tomato catsup. 1 teaspoon onion juice. 
§ cup melted butter. \ cup hot water. 

1 egg. 

Bake one hour. First half-hour, uncovered, last half, 
covered. Junia M. Scheble. 

BEAN LOAF 

2 cups Lima beans. 2 cups bread-crumbs. 

1 cup peanuts, chopped fine. 

Soak beans over night ; cook in fresh water until tender ; 
press through colander, and mix with crumbs and nuts; 
season with salt, pepper, and onion juice ; shape in well- 
buttered pan ; brush with beaten egg. Bake one half- 
hour. Mrs. Laura A. Sinclair. 

LEFT-OVER LAMB 

Put through the chopper scraps of any left-over lamb; 
season ; add chopped green pepper. Heat in butter. Make 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 39 

a rich cream gravy, seasoned with sail and paprika; add 
the gravy to the land), and serve on toast. 

Mrs. Garland Craig. 

ROAST LEG OF LAMB 

Wash and wipe dry a leg of land) ; then lard it well, 
and rub in a handful of salt. Cut slashes into the meat 
and insert slices of onion. Place in covered roaster and 
put in very hot oven for fifteen to twenty minutes. Then 
turn fire very low and cook for one and a half to two hours, 
according to size. Serve with mint sauce. 

Mayme Prigg Burris, 

Chicago, 111. 



POT ROAST WITH BROWN POTATOES, GRAVY 
AND MACARONI 

Put roast on in iron kettle with a little hot water, letting 
it cook down until the meat is thoroughly browned, turn- 
ing often until meat is browned on both sides ; then add 
hot water ; season well with salt and black pepper. Be 
sure to keep plenty of liquid on the roast. 

Put macaroni on in separate kettle, cooking it about 
thirty minutes in clear water; remove, and put macaroni 
in colander; blanch by pouring cold water over it, and 
let it drain. About thirty minutes before the roast is 
done, put macaroni back in its kettle and take enough 
meat juice from kettle to cover the macaroni ; let it cook 
until the roast is done. Pare small potatoes and put in 
kettle with the meat, cooking until tender. Lift roast and 
potatoes, and make thickened brown gravy. 

Mrs. O. A. Petersox. 



40 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

BROWN STEW WITH DUMPLINGS 

Cut thick round steak into small pieces. Put half into 
hot frying-pan ; brown both sides well ; pour half-pint 
boiling water over meat, and turn contents into kettle 
containing remaining half meat ; cook slowly till tender ; 
add salt, pepper and dumplings. Cook half-hour. 

Dumplings : 

1 pint flour. 1 rounding teaspoon baking 

2 level tablespoon lard. powder. 

Milk to make stiff dough. 

Roll, cut into squares ; add to stew, cook slowly half- 
hour. Mrs. G. N. Faris. 

POT-PIE DUMPLINGS 

1 egg. | teaspoon salt. | cup milk. 
Mix \\ teaspoons baking powder in one pint flour; add 

to rest with spoon dipped in cold water just before drop- 
ping in kettle. Mrs. F. E. Larson. 

DRESSING FOR PORK 

3 large onions, parboiled and chopped. 

2 cups of fine bread-crumbs. 

2 tablespoons powdered sage. 

2 tablespoons melted butter or pork fat. 

Salt and pepper. Mrs. Lauderdale. 

DUTCH DUMPLINGS 

3 cups mashed potatoes. 1| cups bread soaked in 

2 heaping cooking-spoons flour. water ; fry in water un- 

3 eggs. til every" bit of water is 
1 level teaspoon ginger. out. 

Mix ; roll in small balls size of lemon ; cook in open 
kettle of boiling salt water fifteen minutes. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 41 

For dressing : Fry large onion in butter and some water; 
thicken with flour, and pour over dumplings. 

Mrs. Delos Smith. 

SPARERIBS AND SAUERKRAUT 

1 lb. sauerkraut. 2^ lbs. spareribs. 

Wash sauerkraut, place in kettle, lay spareribs on top, 
season with salt and pepper, cover with boiling water; 
cook until meat is tender., Remove ribs and brown in 
quick oven; drain kraut, and serve. 

SULTZ (a German recipe) 

2 pigs feet. 1 veal shank. 

3 lbs. beef (neck or shoulder). 2 lemons, juice. 

1 teaspoon black pepper. 1 teaspoon caraway seed. 

^ teaspoon cayenne pepper. 

Boil meats until very tender; grind fine, and salt to 
taste ; mix with other seasoning and stir into some of the 
hot broth ; then pack in bowl, and cool ; slice cold, and 
serve for luncheon. This amount makes about one gallon. 

Mrs. Noah Hardy. 

TO BOIL BEEF TONGUE 

Soak tongue in cold water and salt thirty minutes; 
wash and scrape; rinse thoroughly. Place in kettle and 
cover with boiling water, and let cook for thirty minutes. 
Add seasoning of salt and pepper; boil slowly from two 
to three hours or until tender. Let it become thoroughly 
cold before skinning. 



42 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

TONGUE WITH OLIVES CASSEROLE 

2 tablespoons butter. 2 tablespoon flour. 

1 pint stock. 2 cups diced tongue. 

I dozen stoned olives. 1 tablespoon kitchen bouquet. 

Brown butter ; add flour, rub smooth, pour in stock, 
and stir until smooth. Put tongue in casserole ; pour 
stock over this ; season with salt and pepper ; add olives 
and kitchen bouquet ; cover, and cook thirty minutes. 

Lucy E. Leidigh. 

BRAIZED BEEF TONGUE 

1 beef tongue. ^ dozen whole cloves. 

Lump of butter. 1 onion. 

1 potato. 1 turnip. 
1 carrot. 

Wash tongue thoroughly ; cook till tender ; let cool, 
and peel. Roll in flour; stick cloves into it. Place but- 
ter in baking-dish, and brown ; add vegetables sliced, and 
let brown ; remove vegetables, and put tongue in the dish, 
brown slightly, turning often ; add vegetables and water ; 
bake and brown. Serve either hot or cold. Brown gravy 
may be served if hot. Nelle Hoagland. 



VEAL BIRDS 

Cut thin slices of veal. Remove skin and fat. Pound 
until quarter-inch thick. Cut into strips 2| inches long 
by \\ inches wide. Chop a tiny piece of salt pork, crumb 
some crackers, season with salt and pepper and cayenne ; 
moisten with beaten egg and hot water. Spread each 
piece of veal with layer of mixture. Roll, and fasten with 
toothpicks. Dredge with flour, and fry in butter until 



FIRST PRESB] II 7,7.1. V CHURCH COOK HOOK 13 

crisp and brown, ("over with thin white sauce; cook 
twenty minutes or till tender. Serve on toast. 

Mildred Faris. 

VEAL STEAK 

Cut in pieces for serving a veal steak about one inch 
thick. Dip each piece in beaten egg, then in bread-crumbs. 
Brown on both sides in hot fat ; then pour into the frying- 
pan milk almost to cover veal. Cover, and bake in slow 
oven one hour. Remove cover last fifteen minutes. One 
pound of lean, boneless veal will serve four. 

Mrs. Garlaxd Craig. 

A WINTER BREAKFAST DISH 

Boil a lean piece of pork in plenty of water until meat 
falls from bones. Shred meat, return to water in which 
it was boiled; season highly with salt, pepper and sage. 
While boiling, stir in enough corn-meal to make consistency 
of mush. Cook slowly but very thoroughly. Pour into 
molds. When cold, slice, roll in flour, and fry to a light 
brown. Serve with maple syrup. 

Mrs. Charles Hood. 

To make tough meat and chicken tender and cook sooner, 
pour a tablespoon vinegar over meat after it has been cook- 
ing a while. Mrs. A. D. Raffingtox. 

MAITRE DE HOTEL BUTTER 

One of the most useful things a housewife can keep in 
her refrigerator is a pot of "Maitre de hotel" butter. 

Into a large earthen bowl put one cup of butter packed 
solidly ; beat it to a cream as if preparing it for cake. 



44 GOOD THIXGS TO EAT 

Add— 

1 teaspoon salt. \ teaspoon white pepper. 

2 tablespoons finely chopped 2 tablespoons lemon juice, 
parsley. 

Mix these ingredients well with the butter; but do not 
beat again. Pack it in a fruit can, sealing as tightly as if 
it were fruit. 

A tablespoon of "Maitre de hotel" butter spread on 
beefsteak, veal cutlets, lamb chops, boiled fish or plain 
boiled potatoes, adds largely to the flavor and improves 
many a homely dish when there is no time to make a sauce. 

• Mrs. Laura A. Sinclair. 



Sauces for Meats 

SAUCE 

3 egg yolks. ^ tumbler of acid jelly. 

2 heaping tablespoons 1 tablespoon mustard. 

brown sugar. \ cup butter. 

1 glass vinegar. Salt. 
Cayenne pepper. 

Beat the jelly into the egg yolks ; add sugar. Mix mus- 
tard with just enough vinegar to make a smooth paste; 
then add rest of vinegar and other ingredients. Beat all 
together thoroughly, and boil until thick and smooth. 
Serve with cold meats. Mint may be used instead of mus- 
tard to serve with lamb. Mrs. Chas. Hood. 

MINT SAUCE 

\ cup sugar. 1 cup fresh mint. \ cup vinegar. 

Strip the mint free from the tough leaves and stalks ; 

chop it slightly, wash and put in the vinegar. Melt the 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAX CHURCH COOK BOOK 45 



sugar in a tablespoonful boiling water ; add it to the sauce, 
and serve cold with roast lamb. Mrs. J. C. Petro. 

MEAT SAUCE 

2 onions. 1 tablespoon butter. 

1 tablespoon flour (level). \ pint water, 
f cup tomato juice. 

Slice onions and brown in butter ; stir in the flour ; add 
water and tomato juice; season with salt and pepper; 
let it simmer 15 minutes. Use as dressing for Hamburg 
steak or to warm cold meats in. Mrs. E. S. Handy. 



Croquettes 



CHICKEN OR VEAL CROQUETTES 

2 cups boiled chicken or 1 teaspoon salt. 

veal chopped. \ teaspoon celery salt. 

1 teaspoon parsley, chopped. 1 teaspoon lemon juice. 
1 teaspoon onion, chopped. 1 salt spoon white pepper. 

\ salt spoon cayenne pepper. 
Sauce — 1 tablespoon butter. 1 tablespoon corn-starch. 
1 cup hot milk. 

Mix butter and corn-starch ; stir in slowly the hot milk, 
and cook until thick ; then stir in chicken mixture and 
sauce together. When cooled make into balls, roll in 
bread-crumbs, dip in egg, and roll in bread-crumbs again. 
Fry in hot fat. These may be prepared the day before 
wanted and put in cool place. Mrs. L. G. Dupler. 

DORMES (Left-overs) 

1 lb. cold meat (any kind). \ lb. beef suet. 

\ lb. rice, well boiled. 

Chop meat and suet small ; season with salt and pepper 
and a little onion juice. Mix all well together and make 
into flat cakes. Dip them in egg and fry a light brown- 
Serve with a good gravy. Mrs. J. B. Mackay. 

MEAT BALLS 

2 lbs. shoulder steak. 1 onion. 

1 quart can tomatoes. 2 bay leaves. 

Chop steak and onion ; season with parsley, salt and 

(46) 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK ROOK 47 

pepper. Mold into balls, and fry brown. Cook tomatoes, 
bay leaves, salt and pepper for a few minutes; then strain 
over the meat balls; stew all slowly twenty minutes. 

Mrs. Florence Smith. 
RICE PATTIES 

2 teacups cold boiled rice. 3 eggs. 

\ cup milk. Salt to taste. 

Beat eggs well, add rice ; then add milk and salt. Beat 
well. Thicken with cracker-crumbs. Shape with the 
hands, and fry like potato cakes. They cook very quickly 
and burn easily. Mrs. A. M. Buser. 

SAUSAGE-MEAT BALLS 

Add to sausage-meat half its bulk in stale bread or 
crackers moistened with milk, one beaten egg, and a little 
salt. Form in cakes, and fry carefully. Make beef balls 
in the same way, adding a little melted butter to the 
chopped-meat left-overs. Lida McCarroll. 

SALMON CROQUETTES 

1 pint chopped salmon. 1 pint mashed potatoes. 

1 well-beaten egg. 1 teaspoon salt (level). 

1 salt spoon pepper. \ cup fine bread-crumbs. 

Beat all together ; form into balls ; roll in cracker- 
crumbs ; dip in beaten egg ; again in cracker-crumbs, and 
fry in hot fat until brown. Mrs. J. L. Penney. 

SALMON CROQUETTES 

1 pint cracker-crumbs. 2 eggs. 

1 large can salmon. Salt and pepper. 

Mix together and cook five minutes in one pint boiling 
milk, stirring gently. As soon as cool enough, form into 



48 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

small molds and roll in cracker-crumbs ; then fry in lard 
same as doughnuts. Mrs. John Brehm. 

SALMON CROQUETTES 

1 cup salmon. 1 cup cooked rice. 

Roll in egg, then in cracker-crumbs, and fry in hot lard. 
Mrs. Lucile Prigg Eichhorn, 

Miles City, Montana. 
VEGETABLE CROQUETTES 

1 cup boiled rice. 2 large tomatoes cut in small pieces. 
\ cup pecans, chipped. 1 egg. A little flour. 

Roll in egg and bread-crumbs, and fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. James Lee E^ick. 



Vegetables 



VEGETABLES TO SERVE WITH DIFFERENT MEATS 

With Roast Beef — Potatoes, squash, boiled rice, maca- 
roni, turnips, onions, cauliflower. 

With Roast Mutton Mashed potatoes, turnips, boiled 
onions, currant jelly. 

With Roast Lamb — Potatoes, green peas, turnips, string 
beans, corn, summer squash, mint sauce. 

With "Roast Veal — Mashed potatoes, spinach, parsnips, 
asparagus, sweet potatoes, horse radish. 

With Roast Pork — Potatoes, onions, squash, sweet po- 
tatoes, tomatoes, boiled rice, apple sauce. 

With Roast Turkey — Potatoes, squash, onions, sweet 
potatoes, celery, cranberry sauce. 

With Roast Chicken — Potatoes, onions, squash, celery, 
currant jelly. 

With Roast Goose — Mashed potatoes, onion, squash, 
baked macaroni, boiled rice, apple sauce. 

With Roast Duck — Same as with Goose. 

With Birds of all kinds — Potatoes, squash, onions, celery, 
macaroni, currant jelly. 

With Boiled Mutton— Mashed potatoes, turnips, baked 
macaroni, currant jelly. 

With Boiled Lamb — Potatoes, green peas, spinach, as- 
paragus, turnips. 

With Boiled Corn Beef — Potatoes, cabbage, parsnips, 
beets, turnips. 

(49) 



50 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

TABLE FOR COOKING VEGETABLES 

Asparagus 20 to 30 minutes. 

Beets 1 to 2 hours. 

Beans, string, boiled 1 to 2 hours. 

Beans, shell, boiled 1 to 2 hours. 

Beans, shell, baked 4 to six hours. 

Corn, green, boiled 10 to 15 minutes. 

Cabbage 20 minutes to 2 hours. 

Cauliflower 30 minutes. 

Carrots 1 hour. 

Macaroni 20 minutes. 

Onions 1 to 2 hours. 

Peas. .' 30 to 40 minutes. 

Potatoes, boiled 30 minutes. 

Potatoes, baked 45 minutes to 1 hour. 

Potatoes, sweet, boiled. . 45 minutes. 

Potatoes, sweet, baked 1 hour. 

Parsnips 1 hour. 

Spinach 20 to 30 minutes. 

Squash, boiled 30 minutes. 

Squash, baked 1 hour. 

Tomatoes, fresh 30 minutes. 

Turnips 45 minutes to 1 hour. 



ASPARAGUS WITH EGGS 

Boil asparagus until tender, then place in buttered bak- 
ing-dish ; season lightly with salt, pepper, and a pinch of 
nutmeg. Beat the yolks of four eggs until light. Add 2 
tablespoons cream, 2 level tablespoons butter, a little more 
seasoning ; the whites of the eggs beaten to a froth. Pour 
over the asparagus ; set in a hot oven and bake until eggs 
are set. Miss Zoa R. Chase. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOR 51 

ASPARAGUS SHORTCAKE 

Sauce : 
\ cup flour. \ teaspoon salt. 

2 cup butter. Asparagus. 

Eggs. 

Make biscuit dough for shortcake. Bake in pie-tins. 
Split when done, and spread each half with butter. Make 
a drawn butter sauce of the flour, salt, butter and the 
asparagus liquid; add the cooked asparagus cut in inch 
lengths. Pour part of the sauce over one layer of the cake; 
set the second layer in place, and pour over this the rest of 
the sauce. Garnish with hard-boiled eggs cut in quarters. 
Serve hot. Mrs. Garland Craig. 

TOMATOES ON TOAST 

To half a can of tomatoes add about half as much water ; 
season with salt, pepper, and a good lump of butter. Let 
cook for ten or fifteen minutes ; thicken with 2 tablespoons 
flour mixed with water to the consistency of cream. When 
this boils up, pour on slices of buttered toast on a platter. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS WITH TOMATO SAUCE 

Two quarts beans washed and soaked in cold water over 
night ; drain, cover with cold water, and let come to a 
boil very slowly. Repeat twice, adding 1 teaspoon of 
soda the last time. Slow boiling is the secret of whole 
beans. 

Place 1 lb. salt pork in a pan. Pour over it the drained 
beans and following tomato sauce, adding water when 
necessary, but letting it get low toward the last of the bak- 
ing. Bake three hours. 



52 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

Tomato Sauce : 

1 qt. tomato juice. 1 good-sized onions. 

4 peppercorns. 2 tablespoons N. O. molasses. 

1 tablespoon mustard. 1 tablespoon salt. 

Boil together, and strain. 

This will serve a company of fifty. 

Mrs. J. W. Brehm. 

MOTHER'S BAKED BEANS 

1 qt. navy beans. h, lb. salt pork. 

1 teaspoon salt. | teaspoon mustard. 

2 teaspoons molasses. 

Pick over beans, and soak over night. In morning, put 
on back of stove and cover with boiling water. Parboil 
one half-hour, and drain. Rinse well in cold water, (lash- 
pork across the top. Place in bean-pot. Put in beans. 
Dissolve mustard, salt and molasses in hot water, and pour 
over beans. Fill the pot with hot water. Bake in mod- 
erate oven six hours, keeping plenty of water on as it 
cooks away, until nearly done, then let it cook away. 

Mrs. Wm. R. Pennington. 

LIMA BEANS 

1 cup Lima beans. 2 tablespoons butter. 

Sauce : 

1^ tablespoons butter. 1^ tablespoons chopped 

1| tablespoons flour. onion. 

Salt and pepper. 1 cup tomatoes. 

Soak beans over night ; drain, and cook in boiling salted 
water until soft. Put in saucepan with the butter. and 
cook, stirring occasionally until brown. Then pour over 
the above sauce. Cook the butter with finely chopped 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN ri/!l{< II cook HOOK 53 



onion for two minutes, stirring constantly ; add flour, and 
stir until well browned; then pour gradually while stirring 
constantly the stewed and strained tomatoes ; bring to boil- 
ing point, and season with salt and pepper. 

Mrs. Cora Mr Lain. 

STEWED PINTO BEANS 

1 pint Mexican or Pinto \ lb. salt pork, 

beans.. Pinch of soda. 

Cook beans in the soda water until skins slip; drain, 
and rinse in cold water. Cut pork into small pieces ; fry 
a nice brown. Cover beans with water; add pork and 
fryings, and stew until tender; season to taste. 

Mrs. Ed. L. Teed. 
BEANS A LA SPANISH 

3 cups navy beans. 4 or 5 onions. 

1 quart tomatoes. 20 chiles. 

Red pepper and salt. 

Soak beans over night ; cook until tender. Half an 
hour before wanted, cut onions fine and fry brown. Add 
tomatoes, and season well with red pepper, chiles, and 
salt. Stew all together ; add the beans that have been 
cooked almost dry, and cook again a few minutes. 

Mrs. Mary Waite. 

STRING BEANS AND ONIONS 

Place on stove in cold water, one and a half pounds of 
green or wax beans ; when boiling, add a pinch of soda. 
Drain, and place in fresh boiling water with four strips of 
bacon cut in small pieces ; salt and pepper to taste. An 
hour before serving, add four or five medium-sized onions. 

Mus. F. J. Corrigan. 



54 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

SUGARED BEETS 

4 hot boiled beets. 3 tablespoons butter. 

1| tablespoons sugar. ^ teaspoon salt. 

Cut beets in quarter-inch slices, add butter, sugar and 
salt. Reheat for serving. Olive Morgan. 

CAULIFLOWER AU GRATIN 

.1 firm cauliflower. 2 tablespoons butter. 

1 cup grated cheese. 

Separate and wash cauliflower ; boil until tender in 
salted water. Drain, and mix with cream sauce as follows : 
Melt the butter in a pan, stir in as much flour as it will 
take up ; when smooth, add enough milk to make a rather 
thin cream sauce ; then add cheese, a little salt and dash 
of paprika. Put all in baking-dish; cover with crumbs; 
and brown in hot oven. Mayme Prigg Burris, 

Chicago, 111. 
CREAMED CABBAGE 

1 medium-sized head of 1 teaspoon of sugar, 
cabbage, shredded. | teaspoon salt. 

Small quantity of pepper. Lump of butter size of egg. 
Heaping tablespoon flour. § pint milk. 
\ pint boiling water. 

Let cook briskly for thirty minutes. Stir occasionally. 

Mrs. M. Hayes. 
CREAMED CABBAGE 

2 egg yolks. 1 cup cream. 

\ cup sugar. \ cup vinegar. 

Butter size of egg. Salt, and a little cayenne 

pepper. 

Beat all except cream together well, diluting the vinegar 
if very strong. Put this mixture into a saucepan and stir 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 55 

until it l)oils. Then stir in cream, let boil, and pour over 
the chopped cabbage while hot. Mrs. Botkin. 

BAKED CORN 

One can of corn. 1 pint milk. 

2 eggs. Butter size of egg. 

1 pint cracker-crumbs. 1 tablespoon sugar. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 

Stir together, and hake until brown. 

Mrs. P. P. Lorimer. 

PIMENTO CORN PUDDING 

One can corn. One-half cup milk 

One teaspoon sugar. One-half can pimentoes. 

One teaspoon salt. One-half cup cracker-crumbs. 

Two tablespoons butter. Two eggs. 

Chop pimentoes, beat eggs, mix all together, putting- 
cracker over top ; bake twenty minutes. 

Mrs. S. M. Johns. 
ESCALLOPED CORN 

1 can corn. U cups milk. 

Butter size of egg. 1 teaspoon corn-starch. 

3 eggs. • <&\ tablespoons sugar. 

Beat together yolks of eggs,, butter, sugar and corn- 
starch. Then add corn and milk; whites of eggs, beaten 
well, stirred in last. Bake thirty minutes in slow oven. 

This serves eight or nine, and this recipe may be easily 
divided in thirds for small family. 

Edith R. Weltmer. 
CORN OYSTERS 

1 cup canned corn. 1 egg. { cup flour. 

Add to the corn the egg and flour; season highly with 



56 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



salt and pepper. Drop by spoonfuls, and fry on well- 
greased griddle. Mrs. C. L. Colladay. 



PUFF PASTE 

2 cups flour. 1 cup milk. 

\ teaspoon salt. 2 heaping teaspoons baking 

powder. 
Good for egg plant or oysters. 

Mrs. E. E. Ellsworth. 
FRIED EGG PLANT 

1 egg plant. 2 eggs. 

4 tablespoons cold water. Pinch of salt. 
Flour to make a thin batter. 

Slice egg plant in quarter-inch slices. Peel. Lay in 
salt water for one hour. Drain, and dry in cloth. Dip in 
batter, and fry in hot fat. 

FRIED EGG PLANT 

Peel, and cut in half-inch slices ; sprinkle them with salt 
and pepper ; pile them on a plate and place a weight over 
them ; tipping the plate a little, leaving them for an hour 
or more to drain the juice away ; roll each- slice in seasoned 
flour, and fry crisp in plenty of butter and lard. 

Mrs. Rella Kearney. 

MACARONI AND NUTS 

Cook macaroni till tender. Put layer of macaroni in 
bottom of buttered baking-dish, cover with layer of coarsely 
chopped nuts; sprinkle with salt. Repeat until dish is 
full. Pour over all white sauce, sprinkle with crumbs, and 
bake half-hour. Mrs. Alma Sawyer, 

Kansas City, Mo. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 57 

MACEDONIA 

1 can peas. 1 pint turnips. 1 pint carrots. 

Dice turnips and carrots, and cook separately until ten- 
der, in sailed water. Heat peas; drain each, and put to- 
gether. Have ready rich cream sauce; add vegetables to 
this, and serve hot. Mrs. Cabr W. Taylor. 

ESCALLOPED ONIONS 

Boil onions whole, or if large, quarter them. Put in 
shallow pan, season, cover with milk, add buttered bread- 
crumbs, and bake brown. Mrs. S. J. Rawlings. 

BAKED PEPPERS 

Take as many sweet peppers as needed, cut off tops, re- 
move seeds, and fill with the following mixture: 

Take any bits of cold meat or chicken, chop, and season 
with salt, pepper and chopped onion ; mix with bread- 
crumbs ; moisten with juice of tomatoes, adding a little of 
the pulp; fill peppers, set in pan with water; cover, and 
bake 30 minutes. Mrs. L. G. Dupler. 

STUFFED PEPPERS 

Stuff peppers with cooked macaroni mixed with tomato, 
and sprinkle cheese over top. Bake half-hour. 

POTATO CAKES 

3 medium-sized potatoes. 2 eggs. 

\ teaspoon baking powder. 1 teaspoon flour. 

Grate the potatoes and add eggs, pinch of salt, baking 
powder and flour. Stir well, and bake on griddle with a 
little more grease than for pancakes. Also bake a little 
longer. Mrs. Kate Young. 



58 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

POTATOES AND CHEESE 

Cut a slice from top of baked potatoes. Scoop out the 
potato, being careful not to break the skin ; mash ; add 
generously, thick, sweet cream ; salt to taste, one spoonful 
grated cheese to each potato. Beat very light. Fill skin, 
sprinkle grated cheese over the top ; set in oven to brown. 
If sufficiently beaten they will puff up beautifully. 

Mrs. S. A. Astle. 
E SCALLOPED POTATOES 

Slice raw potatoes very thin; roll cup crackers; grate a 
cup of cheese. Place alternate layers in a baking-dish with 
pieces of butter; salt and pepper to taste, and cover with 
sweet cream or milk. Bake one hour in moderate oven. 

Mrs. C. M. Branch. 

HASHED BROWN POTATOES 

Chop cold boiled potatoes medium fine. Season with 
sail, pepper, parsley, onion juice. Add cream (about one 
large tablespoonful to one cup chopped potato) and equal 
amount of melted butter. Melt butter or bacon fat in 
skillet. Put potato mixture into skillet, spreading evenly 
over bottom. Heat slowly. When lightly browned,' slip 
knife under and fold over as you would an omelet. Turn 
out on hot platter. Delicious if properly seasoned and 
carefully browned. Mrs. Howard Lewis. 

POTATOES IN HALF SHELL 

1 potato baked. 1 teaspoon butter. 

\ tablespoon milk. Salt. 

Pepper. ', egg. 

Cut a slice from top of potato. Scoop out inside, and 
mash with fork. Add melted butter, milk, salt and pepper; 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 59 



add beaten yolk. Mix well. Add beaten white. Put 
hack in oven, and brown. Marjorie Keys. 

MASHED SWEET POTATOES 

Pare and boil potatoes until soft. Mash with cream, 
butter, salt and pepper, same as mashed Irish ptoatoes. 

Mrs. C. M. Branch. 

GLAZED SWEET POTATOES 

Cook medium-sized potatoes ten minutes in boiling salted 
water. Drain, cut in halves lengthwise, and put in buttered 
pan. Make a syrup by boiling three minutes, one half- 
cup sugar and 4 tablespoons water. Adel 3 tablespoons 
butter. Brush potatoes with syrup and hake 15 minutes. 
Hasting twice with remaining syrup. Mrs. J. W. Brady. 

PANNED POTATOES 

Select small or medium-sized potatoes of uniform size. 
Pare, place in baking-dish and sprinkle with salt and pep- 
per. On each one place a small piece of lard and bake in 
oven from thirty to forty minutes. They should be well 
browned as if roasted with meat, while the inside will be 
light and mealy as a baked potato. 

Mrs. ("has. Greenlee. 

WHOLE POTATOES 

Peel medium small potatoes, selecting those as nearly 
the same size as possible. Have a kettle of hot fat ready, 
and after wiping dry, put the potatoes in, and cook about 
twenty minutes. Do not have the fat too hot or the po- 
tatoes will be too brown. They should be a golden brown 
outside and mealy white inside. Mrs. J. L. Penney 



60 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

HOPPING JOHN 

1 can tomatoes. 1| cups boiled rice. 

I lb. bacon. Red pepper. 

Sugar. Salt. 

Cook tomatoes and boiled rice slowly for half an hour, 
or until thick. Cut bacon in tiny cubes, and brown in 
oven. Season highly with pepper, sugar and a little salt, 
and cook half an hour longer. Mrs. James Lee Dick. 

MEXICAN RICE 

1 large cup of rice. 4 large green peppers. 

6 ripe tomatoes (medium 1 red pepper. 
size). 4 slices of bacon. 

Salt. 

Put rice in cold water, and boil 15 minutes. Grind 
peppers and tomatoes ; salt to taste. Fry bacon crisp ; 
add to rice with drippings; add other ingredients; pour 
in bake-dishes and bake 20 minutes. 

Mrs. O. F. Wright. 
(Contributed by Mrs. D. E. Richards.) 

SPAGHETTI (Italian recipe) 

1 lb. spaghetti (broken). 

| lb. imported Swiss cheese (grated). 

1 medium-sized onion, chopped. 

1 qt. tomatoes (cooked and strained). 

Butter size of egg. 

Cook spaghetti twenty minutes in two gallons salted 
boiling water; drain. Simmer onion in butter twenty 
minutes (not brown), drain butter font onion; add cheese 
and butter to spaghetti; pour tomatoes over; salt and 
pepper to taste. Bake twenty minutes. 

Mrs. Ed. L. Teed. 



FIRST PRESBYTERUX < IIVRCH moK BOOK 61 



RED KIDNEY BEANS AND SPAGHETTI 

1 small can red kidney 1 cup spaghetti. 

beans. 2 tablespoons mi need onion. 

L 2 tablespoons bacon fat. \ cup tomato juice. 

Heat beans with a little salt. Cook spaghetti until ten- 
der. Make a sauce, cooking the onions in bacon fat, add- 
ing flour to thicken, and tomato juice last. Season well ; 
add to spaghetti. Pour beans (which should be dry) on 
platter ; surround with spaghetti. 

Adeline B. Stratton. 

SPINACH OR GREENS 

(Turnip, beet tops, lambs quarter, dandelions, etc.) 
Pick over and wash throughly one half-peck. Boil in 
salted water until tender. Drain, chop ; add butter, salt 
and pepper. Reheat ; add cream if you like, or serve with 
lemon or vinegar. May be reheated with bacon-fat dress- 
ing, made by frying one-fourth lb. salt pork, bacon or ham 
cut in dice until a light brown ; to which is added 2 table- 
spoons of vinegar. Remove the bits of meat if they are 
objectionable. 

Spinach may be served cold as a salad with any good 
salad dressing. Mrs. Jacob W. Brehm. 

ESCALLOPED TOMATO AND CHEESE 

Put a layer of crumbs in a buttered baking-dish ; cover 
with bits of tomato ; then a layer of crumbs followed by 
grated cheese. Continue until dish is full. Make a drawn 
buttered sauce of 2 tablespoons each of butter and flour. 
Cook with one cup hot water and season with salt and 
pepper. Pour over the whole this hot sauce and bake in 
moderate oven until brown. Lulu Stallman. 



62 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

ESCALLOPED TOMATOES 

| <np butter. 1 can tomatoes. 

1 teaspoon salt. % cups crumbs. 

Pepper. 

Put the tomatoes on to simmer; boil the juice pretty 
well out ; crumb bread ; melt butter and add pepper and 
salt; put the crumbs into the butter; butter bake-dish. 
In bottom of bake-dish put half the tomatoes, half the 
crumbs, then other half of tomatoes and the last half of 
the crumbs. Put in oven, and brown. Nellie Nelson. 

STUFFED TOMATOES, BAKED 

G medium-sized tomatoes. 1 cup bread crumbs. 
1 small onion. 1 tablespoon butter. 

Peel tomatoes ; remove center ; chop with onion ; add 
bread-crumbs, salt and pepper ; fill tomatoes with dress- 
ing. Place bits of butter on top. Put in buttered pan, 
and bake half an hour. Mrs. Ed. L. Teed. 



Fritters 

APPLE FRITTERS 

1 egg. h cup sweet milk. 

I cup flour. 2 large apples, chopped fine. 

Just before frying, add 1 teaspoon baking powder. Drop 
by spoonfuls into hot lard. Mrs. F. F. Prigg. 

GREEN CORN FRITTERS 

1 pint grated green corn. 3 eggs. 

"i tablespoons of cream. 1 tablespoon melted butter. 

1 teaspoon baking powder. 1 teaspoon salt. 

Flour. 

Beat the eggs well ; add the corn and cream by degrees ; 
add butter, and thicken with enough flour to hold them 
together, adding the baking powder to the flour. Fry in 
butter and lard mixed until a light brown. 

Emma Justice Pennington. 

EGG PLANT FRITTERS 

1 good-sized egg plant. 1 cup rich milk. 

Good-sized lump of butter. Salt and pepper. 

Peel egg plant and cut into small pieces. Boil until ten- 
der in salted water; drain, and mash as you would pota- 
toes. Add butter, milk, salt and pepper, and enough fine 
cracker-crumbs to make batter thick enough to drop well 
from spoon. Fry in hot butter and lard until a golden 
brown. Mrs. D. E. Richards. 

(63) 



64 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

PLAIN FRITTERS 

2 cups flour. 1 heaping teaspoon baking 

Pinch of salt. powder. 

1 egg. 1 tablespoon melted butter. 

1 tablespoon Karo syrup. 

Sift flour, salt and baking powder together ; stir in the 
egg well broken but not beaten ; add syrup, butter and 
milk enough to make a drop dough. Drop in hot lard and 
turn often to brown evenly. Serve with sugar syrup or 
any desired. 

For fruit fritters, drop pieces of fruit into batter singly, 
or it may be chopped fine and mixed through the batter. 
If fruit is tart, add a little more Karo syrup. If fruit is 
chopped, add a little more flour to take up the juice. Part 
corn-starch may be used if preferred. 

Mrs. C. M. Branch. 
RICE FRITTERS 

1 cup cold rice, mashed. 1 cup sweet milk. 

c 2 eggs. 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

If cups flour. 

Mix soft, and fry in hot lard. Mrs. M. J. Miles. 



Salads 



BEAN CELERY SALAD 

1 pint can baked beans. 4 tablespoons celery. 

2 tablespoons onion. Olives. 

Mix beans, celery cut fine, and onions chopped, with any 
good salad dressing or mayonnaise. Arrange in mound in 
salad bowl ; garnish with lettuce leaves and pitted quar- 
tered olives. Adeline B. Stratton. 



CHEESE SALAD 

1 cup cheese, grated. 1 cup English walnuts, 

I box of pimentoes, cut fine. chopped fine. 

Mix with whipped cream and mayonnaise. Serve on 
shredded lettuce leaves. Mrs. F. O. Gary. 



CHERRY SALAD 

1 can white cherries, seeded. 

1 cup marshmallows, cut in squares. 

1 cup English walnuts, chopped fine. 

Mix with whipped cream and mayonnaise dressing. Serv( 
on shredded lettuce leaves. Mrs. F. O. Gary. 



(65) 



ipipmoutf) &ock (Gelatine Specialties? for Bes&erte 



A FAVORITE DESSERT 



Plymouth Rock 

Phosphated, Granulated 
White and Pink 

GELATINE 

Plymouth Rock 

Plain Granulated Gelatine 

Of the same high grade of excellence as our 

PHOSPHATED Gelatine, without 

the PHOSPHATE. 



10 cents per package. 



EVERYBODY LIKES IT ' 

Plymouth Rock 

Coffee Jelly Compound 

Just add a pint of boiling water. 10 cents per package 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 67 

CHICKEN AND TOMATO SALAD 

1 can tomatoes. \ box of gelatine. 

Onion. Parsley. 

Salt. Pepper (black and cayenne). 

Nuts. Lettuce. 

Mayonnaise. Left-over chicken or veal. 

Season the tomatoes with onion, chopped parsley; salt 
and pepper to taste; cook and stir for one half-hour. 
Strain through a fine sieve, return to the stove, add the 
gelatine, previously soaking in one half-cup cold water. 
Stir in the chicken or veal cut in small pieces, and stand in 
a mold to harden. Serve on lettuce with mayonnaise and 
whipped cream. Sprinkle with chopped nuts. 

Mrs. Alexander. 
CHICKEN SALAD 

1 chicken. Celery. 

Salt and pepper. Mayonnaise, one pint, 

(ream, one pint or more. 

Cook chicken tender and clip fine. Add a third more 
celery, cut fine, than chicken. Season with salt and pepper, 
and mix well. Add whipped cream to mayonnaise, stirring 
as little as possible, and add to chicken. English walnuts 
and marshmallows can be added if desired. 

Mrs. H. G. Welsh. 

COCOANUT SALAD 

\ cocoanut. 2 apples. 

1 cup celery. 2 tablespoons onion. 

1 tablespoon parsley. Canned red peppers. 

Grate the cocoanut ; cut the apples in small pieces ; cut 
celery fine ; chop the parsley ; add the ground red peppers ; 
serve on shredded lettuce with a little cocoanut on top. 



68 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

Dressing : 

4 eggs, yolks. 4 teaspoons yellow mustard 
1 tablespoon flour. (small). 

4 tablespoons sugar. 1 cup milk. 

^ cup vinegar. Butter size of an egg. 

Let come to a boil, stirring constantly. 

Mrs. A. C. Hoagland. 

CUCUMBER AND PINEAPPLE SALAD 

^ package Knox gelatine. 1 cup boiling water. 

h cup sugar. 1 cucumber. 

2| cups pineapple juice. ^ cup lemon juice. 

Soak gelatine in cold water to cover ; add boiling water ; 
when dissolved, add sugar, cucumber peeled and put 
through the grinder, and juice of canned pineapple and 
lemon juice. When thoroughly mixed, strain into bowl 
and stir occasionally while cooling. Before it begins to 
set, pour into small cups or molds. When ready to serve, 
turn on lettuce leaf. A pretty salad for luncheons. 

Mrs. L. H. Rogers, 



Redlands, Cal. 



CUCUMBER CANOES 



Cucumbers. 1 cup chopped mixed nuts. 

2 spoons minced parsley. 1 spoon grated onion. 



M 



avonnaise. 



Cut fresh cucumbers in half, lengthwise; scoop out the 
inside carefully, leaving a neat, firm boat ; put boat on 
the ice. Cut cucumber meat and soak one hour in salted 
ice-water; drain, dry ; mix with nuts, parsley, onion, and 
mayonnaise; fill boats, lay in bed of nasturtium flowers 
and leaves, and serve very cold. Mrs. S. A. Astle. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 69 

DATE, NUT AND PINEAPPLE SALAD 

1 cup stoned dates. 8 slices pineapple. 

1 cup walnut meats. 1 stalk celery. 

.'5 apples. | lb. white grapes. 

Chop dates, apples, celery, nuts, and cut grapes in halves. 
Mix with mayonnaise dressing. On lettuce leaves place 
a slice of pineapple and the mixture on the top. Serve 
very cold. Helen E. Miner. 



EGG SALAD 

Boil eggs until hard. Chop yolks and whites together, 
not very fine. Roll crackers, not very fine. Use one egg 
and two small crackers for each person. Moisten with 
mayonnaise dressing and whipped cream. In season, a 
little chopped cucumber added just before serving, adds a" 
pleasant flavor. Mrs. 0. A. Peterson. 

FRUIT SALAD 

l 2 cans sliced pineapple. L 2 cans white cherries. 

1 lb. marsh mallows. 1 lb. English walnuts. 

Cut in small pieces, and mix with mayonnaise dressing. 

Mrs. A. Randolph Sievert. 

FRUIT SALAD 

1 can white cherries. 1 lb. English walnuts. 

1 can pineapple. h dozen bananas. 

I dozen oranges. 

Sweeten to taste just before serving. Put over top a 
mild mayonnaise dressing, not too tart. This serves :>-2 
people. Mrs. E. C. Aspey. 



70 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

LOBSTER SALAD 

6 eggs. 5-lb. can lobster. 

1 teaspoon onion. -4 tablespoons celery. 

Salt. Stuffed olives. 

Boil eggs thirty minutes ; place in cold water until cold. 
Mince the lobster, add onion and celery, chopped fine ; 
dice eggs ; salt to taste ; add salad dressing ; garnish with 
olives. Mrs. H. T. Igou. 

MACEDOINE SALAD 

1 cup macaroni. 1 cucumber. 

1 cup peanuts. 2 carrots. 

1 cup celery. 2 sweet peppers. 
Cook macaroni in salt water. 

. Dressing : 

2 eggs. 1 tablespoon flour. 
| cup of sugar. 1 teaspoon salt. 

1 tablespoon mustard. 1 pepper. 

1 pint vinegar. Lump of butter. 

Stir sugar, mustard, flour, pepper and salt together. Add 
the beaten eggs. Add one pint boiling vinegar with lump 
of butter ; cook in double boiler fifteen minutes. For 
every quart of salad, one cup of dressing with half-pint of 
whipped cream. Mrs. Fannie I. Shaffer. 

ORANGE BASKETS 

Cut out piece of each side of orange cup, leaving strip 
for handle over the top; take out the pulp, mix with 
chopped pineapple a sprinkle of blanched almonds; three 
candied cherries to each orange; sweeten to taste; fill 
shells; put on spoonful of whipped cream. Pierce a hole 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 71 

through handle and run stems of two or three violets. 
Serve cold. Mrs. S. A. ASTLE. 

PINEAPPLE SALAD 

1 box lemon Jello. 2 eggs, whites. 

1 cup cream, large. 1 cup powdered sugar, heap- 

1 15-cent can grated pine- ing. 
apple. 

Dissolve jello in a cup of boiling water ; let cool. Beat 
whites of egg stiff ; whip cream, add eggs and sugar to 
cream ; then add Jello. Let stand five minutes ; then add 
pineapple. Set on ice till ready to serve. 

Mrs. Lincoln Davis. 
PINEAPPLE SALAD 

Take a slice of pineapple, canned pref erred ; in the cen- 
ter place a ball of cream cheese or Neufchatel cheese rolled 
in chopped nuts. Over this place a tablespoonful of may- 
onnaise dressing and garnish with Marachino cherries. 
Serve on bed of lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. Garland Craig. 

PICKLED JELLY 

1 cup vinegar. 1 cup sugar (brown). 

L 2 cups water. m - 80 to 100 cloves. 

20 small sweet cucumber Gelatine, 
pickles. 

Boil vinegar, sugar, water and cloves to a syrup. Dis- 
solve one box PLYMOUTH ROCK GELATINE in one 
pint cold water. Pour vinegar mixture into quart meas- 
ure and fill with boiling water. Pour into gelatine ; strain ; 
when beginning to harden, add cucumbers sliced very thin. 

Mrs. F. E. Larson. 



72 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

PIMENTO SALAD 

\ package gelatine. \ cup vinegar. 

\ cup sugar. 1 lemon (juice). 

1 pint boiling water, scant.- 1 teaspoon salt. 

2 cups celery. 1 cup cabbage. 

\ can sweet red peppers (or one 15c. can). 

Dissolve gelatine in half-cup cold water two minutes ; 
add vinegar, lemon juice, boiling water, sugar and salt; 
strain, and when it begins to jell, add cabbage finely 
shredded and celery cut fine. Serve on lettuce leaves with 
mayonnaise, or cut in squares. Very nice with pressed 
chicken. Mrs. Ryker. 

POINSETTIA SALAD 

" Around the outer edge of one thick slice of canned pine- 
apple, arrange pimento cut in shape of poinsettia leaves. 
Place the salad dressing in the center. 

Lelia M. Saunders. 
POTATO SALAD 

Dressing : 
2 eggs. \ cup butter. 

2 level teaspoons salt. 1 level teaspoon flour. 

1 tablespoon sugar. 1 teaspoon Coleman's mus*- 

\ teaspoon black pepper. tard. 

1 small cup vinegar. 1 pint or more of whipped 

cream. 

Cut cold boiled potatoes in small dice and add finely 
minced onions to taste. Put on to heat the vinegar ; beat 
eggs well ; add butter, salt, flour, sugar, mustard and pep- 
per. Beat all together until foamy ; stir in vinegar slowly, 
and let it heat until thick, but do not let it boil. When 
cool, add the cream and mix thoroughly with the potatoes. 

Mrs. J. L. Penney. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURt H COOK HOOK 73 

PRUNE SALAD 

Take large choice prunes and soak over night. Stew 
slowly, and remove seeds. Then put half an English wal- 
nut kernel in each one, and put on a lettuce leaf and serve 
with mayonnaise dressing. Mrs. Slavens. 

SALAD REVE 

2 tablespoons gelatine. \ pint tomato juice. 

1 onion. ■ 1 dill pickle. 

1 cup Spanish pimentoes. 

Soak gelatine in a little water for five minutes; pour 
boiling tomato juice over gelatine, and stir until dissolved. 
Chop pickle, onion and pimentoes fine; add to tomatoes, 
and pour in molds ; place on ice to harden. Serve on 
lettuce or parsley leaves with mayonnaise. 

Mrs. L. T. Bostick. 

SPRING SALAD 

Lettuce. Onions. Radishes. 

Bacon. Vinegar. Salt. Sugar. 

Shred the lettuce and cut fine a few spring onions and 
radishes, and place over the lettuce ; salt slightly. Fry 
a few pieces of bacon cut in bits to a crisp brown ; then 
add a little weakened vinegar and a pinch of sugar and 
pour over vegetables when cool enough so as not to wilt 
lettuce. Mrs. Marguerite Tyler. 

SWEETBREAD SALAD 

Soak sweetbreads in salt water. Boil ten minutes, and 
drain. Season with salt and pepper and onion juice. 
Place in pan with cup of stock and roast 40 minutes, bast- 
ing with butter. 



74 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

Cut in cubes ; dress with oil and lemon juice. Mix 
with celery, garnish with stoned olives and serve with head 
lettuce and mayonnaise. Lucy Leidigh. 

SALMON SALAD 

1 can salmon. h cup chopped celery. 

| cup chopped sour pickles. 2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped 

fine. 

Mix with salad dressing and slice the eggs on top ; use 
celery seed when celery is not in season. 

Miss Grace Marie Hill. 

TOMATO SALAD 

Soak one envelope of PLYMOUTH ROCK PHOS- 
PHATED GRANULATED GELATINE three to five 
minutes in one cup of the juice from a quart can of best 
brand of tomatoes ; add one cup of boiling juice to dissolve 
it ; then the rest of the can, solid and liquid. Add a little 
green pepper sliced very thin or a bit of parsley or other 
green vegetable. Pour all into a mould and set oh ice to 
harden. Serve in squares on lettuce leaves with a pinch 
of salt and mayonnaise dressing. If preferred sweet, use 
sugar to taste. 

TOMATO JELLY 

1 envelope of Knox sparkling \ onion. 

gelatine. Pinch of pepper and salt. 

1 can tomatoes. 1 teaspoon sugar. 

Soak gelatine in dne half-cup of cold water five minutes; 
;id(l one pint boiling water, and strain. Season tomatoes 
with sugar, salt, pepper, and onion chopped fine. Boil 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 75 

fifteen minutes, and strain. When gelatine Is cool, ;i<l<l 
tomatoes, and chill. Cut in squares, serve on lettuce 
leaves. Mrs. Eva Dukelow. 

TOMATO AND PINEAPPLE SALAD 
Tomato. Pineapple. Almonds. 

Select tomatoes of uniform size ; scald and peel. Scoop 
out inside; cut sliced pineapple into cubes; blanch al- 
monds and cut into narrow strips, using one-third nuts 
to two-thirds pineapple. Mix with mayonnaise and fill 
tomatoes. Mrs. J. H. Garrison. 

TUTTI-FRUTTI SALAD 

| 11). English walnuts. 1 lb. white grapes. 

S bananas. 5 oranges. 

(> pineapple rings (canned). 1 cup pitted red cherries. 

Wash and cut in two, large firm white grapes ; remove 
seeds; slice bananas very fine; divide oranges into lobes; 
cut pineapples in small pieces ; add the red cherries and 
nut meats, and moisten very thoroughly with a dressing 
made of two-thirds of whipped cream and one-third may- 
onnaise. The dressing should cover each piece with a 
heavy creamy coating. Serve on lettuce hearts. 

Mrs. Ida Gary Johnsox. 
WHITE GRAPE SALAD 

| lb. white grapes. f lb. English walnuts. 

1 bunch celery. » 3 large apples. 

Salt. 

< nt grapes, nuts and celery into small pieces. Cut apples 
medium fine; add salt to taste, and enough salad dressing 
to moisten well, and mix lightly with fork. Serve on let- 
tuce leaf. Mrs. \Y. A. Scothorn. 



76 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

SALAD COMBINATIONS 
Left-Overs : 

With a simple boiled salad dressing at hand, the summer 
larder is usually well enough stocked with cooked left- 
over vegetables to supply a salad. All sorts of combina- 
tions, such as 

Potatoes and beets. 

.Peas, string beans, and cauliflower. 

New cabbage and tomatoes. 

Lima beans and peppers. 

Corn and tomatoes. 

Lima beans and onions. 

Tomatoes, carrots and peas. 

Turnips and onions. 

Potatoes and turnips. 

Other Salad Combinations : 

Shredded lettuce and sliced green onions. 

Hard-boiled eggs quartered lengthwise and new tomatoes 
quartered on lettuce leaf. 

Sliced onions, radishes, cucumbers, and lettuce. 

Shredded cabbage and nuts. 

Apples, celery, nuts. 

Small bits of meats, ground, mixed with any left-over 
vegetable and mayonnaise. 

Minced salmon or fish, onions, lettuce, potato, celery, 
string beans and mayonnaise. 

Pineapple, nuts, mayonnaise and cherries or preserves 
on to]). 

Nuts improve almost any salad. 



Salad Dressings 

CREAM DRESSING 

\ tablespoon salt. L 2h tablespoons melted butter. 

\ tablespoon mustard. , f cup cream. 

\ tablespoon sugar. \ cup vinegar. 

1 egg slightly beaten. 

Mix ingredients in order given, adding vinegar very 
slowly. Cook over boiling water, stirring constantly until 
mixture thickens ; strain and cool. Olive Morgan. 

DRESSING 

1 cup sour cream. 4 eggs (yolks). 

h cup vinegar. L 2 tablespoons sugar. 

1 level tablespoon flour. 1 teaspoon celery seed. 
Salt and pepper. 

Cook cream and yolks of eggs. In another pan cook 
vinegar, salt, pepper, sugar, flour and celery seed until 
thickened, then add cooked cream and eggs ; cook until 
the consistency of thick cream. Grace Marie Hill. 

LEMON SALAD DRESSING 

1 cup milk or cream. 2 tablespoons butter. 

1 teaspoon sugar. 2 tablespoons flour. 

1 cup whipped cream. 4 tablespoons lemon juice. 

Melt butter, stir in flour, then pour in milk; cook until 
thick and smooth. When cold, add lemon juice, sugar, 
and a little salt. Just before using, stir in whipped cream. 
This amount of dressing is sufficient for three cups fruit. 

Mas. W. R. Bennett. 

(77) 



78 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

MAYONNAISE 

4 eggs (yolks) or 2 whole 2 tablespoons sugar, 
eggs. 1 small teaspoon salt. 

1 heaping tablespoon flour. Dash red pepper. 

1 small teaspoon mustard. 1 cup vinegar (diluted). 

1 cup milk. 

Cook until thick. As you use it, add a little cream, 
either sweet or sour. Margaret McCandless. 

MAYONNAISE 

5 teaspoon sugar. h teaspoon mustard. 

1 level teaspoon salt. A little white pepper. 

A little paprika. 2 eggs (yolks). 

Oil and lemon juice. 

Before beginning the dressing, have everything necessary 
at hand, and thoroughly chilled. Place in a soup plate 
sugar, mustard, salt, pepper, and paprika. Mix well, then 
break in the yolks of eggs. Stir with a silver fork, mixing 
all carefully ; then begin to add the oil, a few drops at a 
time ; as it becomes thick, add a drop or two of lemon 
juice. The oil may now be added more rapidly, alter- 
nately with a few drops of acid. Two eggs will easily take 
a pint of oil, and it will require about two tablespoons of 
acid, either lemon juice or vinegar. 

Mrs. Charles Greenlee. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING 

5 egg yolks. 2 tablespoons sugar. 

1 level tablespoon flour. 1 teaspoon mustard. 

\ teaspoon salt. Butter size of walnut. 

\ cup vinegar. \ cup water. 

Water and vinegar should be heated before mixing with 
other ingredients. Makes about one pint. 

Mrs. Albert Briggs. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 79 

MRS. IRWIN'S SALAD DRESSING 

s eggs (yolks). \ cup butter. 

2 heaping tablespoons sugar. I teaspoon salt. 
1 heaping teaspoon mustard. \h cups vinegar. 

Pepper. 

Beat to a cream. Add vinegar, heated. Stir over fire 
until it bubbles. Do not boil. If not smooth, beat with 
egg-beater. Add whipped cream, sour or sweet, when 
serving. Will keep for two weeks. 

Mrs. Howard Lewis. 
SWEET SALAD DRESSING 

3 eggs or 6 yolks. 1 tablespoon sugar. 

1 level tablespoon flour. 1-quart can pineapple juice. 

Cook as for mayonnaise, and add whipped cream. 

Mrs. Pet Nation. 



Eggs and Cheese 

When boiling eggs hard, to keep yolks from turning 
black place them in boiling water and boil for ten minutes. 

Mrs. J. B. Lyall. 

LIQUID FOR PRESERVING EGGS 

1 pint fresh-slacked lime. \ pint salt. 3 gallons water. 

Pour water over lime, using the pint after it is thoroughly 
slacked. Let mixture stand until well dissolved. Pour in 
jar, adding eggs as desired ; when jar is full, cover, and 
keep in cool place. Mrs. J.H. Harper. 

CHEESE BALLS " 

1^ cups grated cheese. | tablespoon salt. 

Dash of tobasco or red 3 whites of eggs beaten stiff, 

pepper. V> tablespoons flour. 

Mix all, and form into soft balls ; roll in cracker-crumbs 
and fry quickly in hot lard. Xelle Hoagland. 

CHEESE BALLS 

1 cup grated cheese. Whites of .'5 eggs well beaten. 

A little bit of red pepper. \ teaspoon salt. 

Let stand after mixing lo minutes. Make into balls 
the size of a walnut ; fry in dee]) fat until golden brown. 

Mrs. X. T. Stewart. 

(83) 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN curat II COOK BOOR 81 



CHEESE CUSTARD 



1 cup cracker-crumbs. 2 cups sweet milk. 

1 cup grated cheese. Little salt, red pepper and 



mus 



tard. 



Soak crumbs in milk, add cheese, seasoning, and yolks of 
eggs well beaten, and lastly the stiffly beaten whites of 
eggs. Bake 20 minutes, in moderate oven. 

Edith R. Weltmer. 
COTTAGE CHEESE 

Take a crock of fresh clabber, set in oven or on back of 
stove until blood-warm; pour carefully into a cheese-cloth 
bag, and hang in a cool place to drip ; when thoroughly 
drained, empty contents of bag in a bowl; mash to a 
smooth paste, add salt, and thin with sweet cream. 

CHEESE DREAMS 

Slice bread very thin. Place between slices a layer of 
cheese and fry to a golden brown on both sides in plenty of 
butter. Serve hot. Mrs. F. P. Hettinger. 

CHEESE FONDU 

1 cup bread crumbs. 2 cups milk. 

3 eggs. 1 teaspoon melted butter. 

Salt and pepper to taste. c 2 cups grated cheese. 

Soak crumbs in milk ; add eggs beaten lightly, butter, 
salt and pepper, and last add cheese. Mix all together, 
and bake until brown and the consistency of custard. 

Mrs. O. A. Peterson. 
CHEESE PUDDING 

Remove crusts from bread, cut in slices, spread lightly 
with butter, cut in small squares. Put in baking-pan a 



82 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

layer of bread, then a layer of grated cream cheese. Have 
several layers. To a quart pan use 1 pint milk. Add 2 
well-beaten eggs to milk. Season with salt and pepper 
and pour over ingredients. Bake half-hour in moderate 
oven. Nelle Hoagland. 

CHEESE PUDDING 

Butter 3 thin slices stale bread. Let soak in custard of : 

1 pint milk. 3 eggs. 1 dust cayenne. 

Soak half-hour. Put bread in pudding-pan, with thin 
slices of cheese between each. Pour over the custard and 
put grated cheese on top. Set pan in another of hot water 
Bake until custard is set. Serve hot. Mrs. T. C. Smith. 

RICE AND CHEESE 

Boil half-cup of thoroughly washed rice in salted water ; 
cook until soft. Place a layer of cooked rice in baking- 
pan ; on this a layer of grated cheese, some bits of butter, 
salt and pepper; then more rice, and so on until the dish 
is full. Pour milk or cream over it until nearly comes to 
the top, then spread a layer of cracker or bread-crumbs 
over the top with bits of butter, and bake about a half- 
hour. Serve in baking-pan. 

Mrs. Geo. T. McCandless. 

CHEESE SOUFFLE 

1 lump butter. 1 cup milk. 

2 tablespoons flour. 4 tablespoons grated cheese. 
5 eggs beaten light. Seasoning. 

Stir butter and flour ; add milk and cheese. Then eggs ; 
cook until thick. Pour in buttered baking-dish and bake 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK ROOK 83 

twenty minutes. Don't put on top of dish, as it will fall. 
Serve at once. Lucy E.Leidigh. 

BREAD AND CHEESE SOUFFLE 

1 cup bread-crumbs. 2 cups milk. 

3 eggs. 1 tablespoon melted butter. 

1 cup grated cheese. Salt and pepper. 

Soak crumbs in milk, and beat to a smooth paste; add 
the well-beaten yolks of egg ; butter, salt and pepper to 
taste; add cheese, and lastly the stiffly beaten whites of 
eggs. Bake in a quick oven fifteen minutes. 

Mrs. Chas. Greenlee. 
CHEESE STRAWS 

1 cup grated cheese. 2 cups flour. 

1 tablespoon butter. 

Milk enough to roll out thin, and cut in quarter-inch 
strips, 5 inches long. Bake in hot oven. 

Mrs. Fannie I. Shaffer. 
CHEESE STRAWS 

1 cup flour. 4 tablespoons melted butter. 

1 cup grated cheese. 3 tablespoons ice-water. 

1 teaspoon salt. Dash cayenne pepper. 

Mix all together with a fork, roll quarter of an inch 
thick, cut in narrow strips, and bake in a hot oven. 

Mrs. T. Sv.mns. 
WELSH RAREBIT 

I cup milk. 1 cup cheese cut in dice. 

1 egg. 1 tablespoon butter. 

Salt. A little mustard and paprika. 

Bring milk to boil; put in cheese; stir until melted; 
add egg and seasoning; stir until creamy. Pour over 
toasted buttered crackers. Olive R. Rankin. 



84 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

>> 
WELSH RAREBIT 

Select fresh American cheese ; use piece the size of a 
teacup, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 tablespoon of butter, a little 
red pepper, 1 egg - , scant half-teaspoon mustard, and 2 soda 
crackers. 

Directions : Roll the crackers, beat the egg, cut the 
cheese in small pieces, place in pan with milk, add the 
beaten egg, butter, mustard and pepper ; stir in the rolled 
crackers gradually. Place on the fire, and stir until it is 
thoroughly melted. Serve on toast or crackers. 

Gladys Cochrane. 
BAKED EGGS 

Pour one cup of sweet milk into a pan about one and 
one-half inches deep ; into the milk break eight eggs (whole 
as for poached eggs) ; salt, pepper and butter. Bake in 
oven about fifteen minutes. This is an excellent breakfast 
dish. Mrs. A. E. Elliott. 

BAKED EGGS WITH CHEESE 

Melt medium-sized lump of butter in baking-dish; cover 
this with grated or thinly sliced cheese. Break number of 
eggs desired on this, being careful not to break the yolks. 
Season with paprika and salt ; cover over with cream and 
another layer of cheese, and bake in a moderate oven fif- 
teen or twenty minutes. Mrs. 0. A. Peterson. 

CREAMED EGGS ON TOAST 

Make a cream dressing of half-pint of milk, 1 tablespoon 
of Hour. 1 tablespoon of butter; salt, pepper, and paprika. 

Add to this, sliced hard-boiled eggs, and pour on buttered 
toast. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 85 

GOLDEN-ROD EGGS 

\ dozen eggs, hard-boiled. 

White Sauce : 
1 heaping tablespoon butter. 1 \ level tablespoons flour. 

Milk to make a thin sauce. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Boil eggs for half-hour; cut up fine the whites in the 
cream sauce. Pour the same over buttered toast and add 
the yolks of eggs crushed through a ricer. 

Mrs. Garland Craig. 
EGG OMELET 

Four eggs, or an egg to each person served. Salt and 
tablespoon of flour; stir until smooth. Put one large 
tablespoon butter .in saucepan, and when hot pour in ome- 
let. Do not stir and do not get too hot. Brown in the 
oven. Mrs. L. P. Ballard. 

OMELET 

Separate 4 -eggs. Beat yolks with salt and pepper, and 
two tablespoons milk for each yolk, and add to stiffly 
beaten whites. Turn into well-buttered pan, and cook on 
top of stove, loosening edges with a knife until omelet is 
set. Then put on top grate of oven to brown lightly. 
Roll out on platter. Cooked peas, asparagus tips or minced 
boiled ham may be sprinkled over just before turning out. 

Mrs. V. M. Wiley. 
ESCALLOPED EGGS 

Slice 12 hard-boiled eggs. Cover the bottom of a 
baking-dish with cracker-crumbs ; add a layer of eggs, 
then bits of butter, pepper, and salt. Fill the dish with 
the alternate layers, sprinkle a little grated cheese over 
the top, and wet the whole with milk. Bake half-hour 
in rather slow oven. Lizzie Wilson. 



86 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

SHIRRED EGGS 

1 egg. J cup bread-crumbs. 

Salt. ^ tablespoon butter. 

Pepper. 

Butter the crumbs and line buttered bake-dish with 
them. Drop in the whole egg. Salt and pepper it. Then 
put the remaining crumbs on top. Put in oven, and bake 
until white is set and the crumbs brown. 

Mary Williams. 
EGG VERMICELLI 

3 eggs. 1 cup milk. 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 tablespoon flour. 

1 teaspoon salt. Dash of pepper. 

Boil the eggs half an hour ; remove the yolks, and chop 
the whites fine. Then make a sauce of the milk heated 
and thickened with the butter and flour. Toast four or 
five slices . of bread and cut' in small squares. Have a 
platter hot, and keep it over hot water while preparing. 
Stir the chopped whites into the sauce and pour over the* 
toast on the platter. Rub the yolks through a fine strainer 
over the whole. Stella Gabrielson. 



Bread, Bolls, Biscuit, etc. 

BREAD 

Good bread depends upon the quality of the ingredients 
and the care bestowed upon their use. It does not depend 
upon the method necessarily, for one can have good bread 
and follow any one of a number of methods. The house- 
wife should know, however, the effect of each different 
method, and follow that one that produces the effect de- 
sired. Generally speaking, the shorter the process from 
beginning to end the better the flavor will be, and the longer 
the process is drawn out the less flavor the product will 
have, but as a rule the finer the texture will become. 

The necessary ingredients are : flour, liquid, yeast, salt, 
and sugar; but to these shortening is usually added. 
Flour that is best for bread does not make the best pastry, 
or quick breads. Good bread flour is made from wheat 
not less than six or eight weeks old ; it is gritty to the 
taste and touch, and will not keep the shape of the closed 
hand ; it has a creamy yellow color and a high gluten con- 
tent. This gluten must be elastic in quality. The liquid 
used should be good of its kind. If sweet milk is used it 
should be pure and sweet, and not full of impurities pro- 
ducing foreign flavors and odors. The yeast used should 
be of a pure culture, and should be kept pure and not con- 
taminated by bacteria or molds, for these germs produce 
flavors and changes that are undesirable in bread. Salt 

(87) 



Avoid Your Baking Troubles 
By Using 



LEE 



BAKING POWDER 

Ninety per cent of all baking 
troubles are caused by weak or 
one-sided baking powders. LEE 
Baking Powder will make your 
cakes light, fine-grained and whole- 
some. It is five and one-half per 
cent more efficient and twenty- 
two and one-half per cent more 
healthful than some powders sold 
at double the price. 



Ask Your Grocer for 

Lee Baking Powder 



Full Pound Cans 25 Cents 



FIRST PliESHYTEHUX CIII'IU'II COOK HOOK 



and sugar both affect the art ion of the yeast in a favorable 
way, that is, in activity, texture, and volume of finished 
loaf. Shortening should be sweet, and should be used in 
moderation, as too much makes a heavy dough and re- 
tards the action of the yeast. Given good ingredients, 
the best of their kind, and if they are not mixed and tended 
with good care the bread will yet be a failure. 

The temperature must be guarded, from 75 degrees 
Fahr. to 95 degrees Fahr. being best for the growth of the 
yeast. The fermentation of the dough must be watched 
and checked at the proper time. In the baking, the tem- 
perature of the oven for a single loaf should be 380 degrees 
Fahr. to begin with and increased to 400 degrees Fahr. 
Where several loaves are placed in the oven at the same 
time, the oven may be 400 degrees Fahr. to begin baking. 
A practical test is that white paper turns yellow in three 
minutes when the oven is hot enough for bread. 

The time of baking should be divided into quarters. 
In the first quarter the bread should complete rising, but 
not brown. During the next two quarters with increase 
of temperature, it should be baked and brown. In the last 
quarter, lower the temperature again so that it will be 
thoroughly baked but not burned. When finished, the 
characteristics should be as follows : 

Shade. — A beautiful golden brown. 

Evenness. — Entire surface should be the same shade. 

Surface. — Should be smooth and free from wrinkles. 
The sides of the loaf should not be broken just above the 
top of the pan, showing that the crust was formed too 
soon. 

Shape. — Should be regular, and in such proportions that 
the center of the loaf can be thoroughly baked. 

Thoroughness of Baking. — It should spring back to 
original shape after compression. 



90 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

Quality. — Should have the velvety feeling of an angel- 
food cake — a waxy feeling, rather than a horny one. Should 
not crumble. 

Fineness. — The holes should be about the size of the 
head of a common pin. 

Evenness. — All the holes should be of the same size 
from the bottom crust to the upper one from side to side. 

Color. — A* creamy white. 

Sweetness. — Refers to the. natural sweetness of the 
sound wheat berries, as opposed to acid or other bad yeast, 
over-fermentation, or other germ action. 

Flavor. — Refers to the amount of sweetness or salt or 
something that has been put into the loaf of bread to pro- 
duce a pleasurable sensation. 

(By Frances L. Brown, Head of the Department of Home Eco- 
nomics, Extension Division, K. S. A. C.) 

BREAD 

2§ cups of milk (sweet or ^ cup lukewarm water. 

sour). 1 cake yeast. 

l 2 tablespoons of lard. 2 tablespoons sugar. 

1| teaspoons salt. 

Scald milk well ; when cool, add the yeast, dissolved in 
water; also salt, sugar, and lard. Mix to thin batter with 
flour. Set in a warm place over night. Mix stiff in the 
morning. Stand until double in size. Form into two 
loaves. If water is used instead of milk, use more lard. 

Lucy E. Leidigh. 
QUICK-RISING BREAD 

The Yeast : 
3 medium potatoes. 1 cake yeast. 

| cup of sugar. 1 pint of water. 

Boil potatoes, and mash smooth with sugar; return to 
water in which potatoes were boiled. Soak yeast in half- 
cup water and add to above mixture; also pint of water. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 01 

Put into a jar, and cover until fermented ; then seal and 
put in cool place. 

The Bread : 
2^ quarts of flour. f cup of sugar. 

3 cups of water. { cup of salt. 

1 tablespoon of lard. 1 cup of yeast. 

Sift flour and other ingredients ; mix the dough stiff and 
knead until smooth, adding more flour if necessary. When 
it has risen to twice* its original size, make into loaves and 
allow to rise that much again. Bake one hour. 

Mrs. C. D. Wood, 

Elmdale, Kansas. 
WHITE BREAD 

3 large potatoes. 3 pints of water. 

1 large tablespoon flour. § cup of sugar. 

1 cake of yeast. 

Boil potatoes until soft, pour water from potatoes over 
flour, mash potatoes, add to flour, and water and sugar. 
Soak yeast. When above mixture is cool, add yeast and 
let stand until morning. Add water and let rise, mix stiff 
and smooth with flour ; let rise to half size larger ; work 
down ; let rise again ; then knead out in loaves ; let rise, 
and bake in moderate oven three-quarters of hour. 

Mrs. J. H. Hulce. 
HEALTH FOOD BREAD 

1 cup warm mush (graham 1 teaspoon of butter. 

or cereal). \ cup brown sugar. 

1 cake yeast. \ teaspoon salt. 

\ cup lukewarm water. | cup stoned dates or 
f cup English walnuts, raisins. 

chopped. 

Mix mush, sugar, salt and butter; add yeast cake dis- 
solved in water, and enough flour to knead. Cover, and 



92 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

let rise till light ; then knead in dates and nuts. Shape, 
and place in greased pan. Cover, let rise, and bake in 
moderate oven 50 minutes. Lucy E. Leidigh. 

BROWN BREAD 

2 cups sweet milk. 2 tablespoons molasses. 

\ cup brown sugar. 2 cups graham flour. 

1 cup white flour. 1 teaspoon soda. 

Steam about two hours, and then set in oven about ten 
minutes. Mrs. J. H. Miller, 

Topeka, Kansas. 
BROWN BREAD 

1 cup sour milk. 1 cup corn-meal. 

1 cup sweet milk. 1 teaspoon soda. 

1 cup sorghum. Large pinch salt. 

1 pint graham flour. 

Mix well, making batter stiff. Steam three and half 
hours ; dry in oven. Mrs. J. E. Clickner. 

BAKED BROWN BREAD 

1 cup graham flour. \ cup sugar. 

\ cup corn-meal. \ cup flour. 

\ cup raisins. 1 tablespoon lard. 

Pinch salt. 1 cup sour milk. 

1 teaspoon soda. 
Bake in slow oven one hour. Mrs. C. T. Taylor. 

PENNSYLVANIA BROWN BREAD 

1 cup molasses. 1 cup sugar. 

1 cup raisins. 2 teaspoons melted butter. 

1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon soda. 

\\ cups sour milk. \\ cups sweet milk. 

2 cups graham flour. 2 cups white flour. 

2 cups corn- meal. 

Steam two hours. Then set in oven a few minutes. 

Mrs. J. S. Blayney. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 93 

GRAHAM BREAD 

2 cups white flour. 2 cups graham flour, 
f cup sugar. h teaspoon salt. 

3 heaping teaspoons baking Milk. 

powder. 

Stir together, and add milk to make stiff batter. Bake 
in loaf in moderate oven for 4,5 minutes. 

Mrs. 0. A. Peterson. 
GRAHAM BREAD 

^ pint graham flour. \ pint white flour. 

1 teaspoon salt. 1 teaspoon soda (small). 

2 tablespoons sugar. 1 cup sour milk. 

1 egg. 

Sift together dry ingredients, add milk and egg. Melt 
in baking-pan lump of butter the size of walnut. Add to 
batter. Bake 30 minutes in moderate oven. 

Mrs. J. H. Harper. 
DATE LOAF 

3 cups flour. 1 yeast cake (compressed). 
\ cup butter. \ cup milk. 

\ teaspoon salt. 2 eggs. 

1 cup chopped dates. 

Heat milk and butter; cool. Pour on flour and dates. 
Add eggs. Knead, let rise, and bake three-fourths hour. 
Whole-wheat flour may be used if desired. 

Helen E. Mixer. 
NUT BREAD 

2 eggs. f cup of sugar. 

3 cups of flour (scant). 2 cups of milk. 

1 cup of nut-meats. 3 teaspoons of baking 

\ teaspoon of salt. powder. 

Place in oven immediately and bake three : quarters of an 
hour. Mrs. K. E. Sentney. 



94 



GOOD THINGS; TO EAT 



NUT BREAD 

4 cups flour. 

1 teaspoon salt. 

2 cups milk. 
1 cup English walnuts. 

Mix, and let stand twenty minutes to rise, then bake in 
slow oven for forty-five minutes. Makes two loaves of 
bread. Mrs. E. S. Handy. 



5 cup sugar. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 
1 cup raisins and currants 
mixed. 



SOUR MILK NUT BREAD 



1 cup of light-brown sugar. 
1 teaspoon soda. 

1 cup of raisins. 

2 cups of graham flour. 
\ cup of wheat flour. 

RAISIN BREAD 



2 cups of sour milk. 
1 teaspoon of salt. 

1 cup of English walnuts 
(chopped) . 

2 eggs. 

Mrs. N. B. Sawyer. 



1 quart white flour. 
1 teaspoon salt. 



3 teaspoons baking powder. 
\ package seeded raisins. 
1 pint sweet milk. 

Sift flour well with powder and salt, pull raisins apart, 
drop into dry flour, mix well. Wet with milk to the con- 
sistency of biscuit dough, mold into loaf; place in well- 
greased bread tin ; let rise five minutes. Bake in moderate 
oven 45 minutes. (This is better than cake.) 

Mrs. W. F. Daggett, 
South Pasadena, Calif. 
PRIZE RAISIN BREAD 



lTcake of yeast. 
\\ cups of potato water 
1 rounded tablespoon 
Cottolene. 



2 cups of raisins. 
2 cups sweet milk. 
."» tablespoons sugar. 
1 tablespoon salt. 

Soak the yeast in potato water; mix in enough flour to 
make a stiff batter. Let stand over night. In the morn- 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 95 

ing scald the milk and add the sugar, salt and cottolene. 
When milk is lukewarm, mix with yeast, and add enough 
flour to make a stiff hatter; heat about ten minutes; let 
rise. When sufficiently risen, add seeded raisins, mix, add 
more flour, ami knead until dough is smooth. Let rise. 
Make into loaves and hake one hour. When baked, wet 
top of loaves with sugar and hot water to prevent the crust 
becoming too hard. 

CORN BREAD 

1 cup of corn-meal. 2 eggs. 

1 cup of flour. 2 tablespoons of melted butter. 

1 cup of sweet milk. 2 tablespoons of sugar. 

2 teaspoqns baking powder. Salt to taste. 

Mrs. C. B. Winslow. 
JOHNNY CAKE 

1 cup sugar. h cup butter. 

3 eggs. 1 tablespoon molasses. 

f cup milk. 2 teaspoons baking powder 

1 cup flour. (rounded). 

1 cup corn- meal. 

Bake three-quarters of an hour, slowly. 

Mrs. James Lee Dick. 

BUTTERMILK CORN BREAD 

3 eggs. 2 cups corn-meal. 

1 teaspoon salt. 1 pint buttermilk. 

2 teaspoons soda. 1 tablespoon sugar. 

Beat yolk of eggs, add buttermilk, sugar and corn-meal 
sifted with salt and soda. Last of all, fold in the whites of 
eggs beaten very stiff, and hake in a steady oven in small 
pans or muffin-tins. Elizabeth Stallman. 



96 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

SULPHUR SPRINGS SPOON BREAD 

1 cup corn-meal. 2 eggs. 

3 cups boiling water. 1 teaspoon salt. 

3 cups buttermilk or sour 1 teaspoon soda. 
milk. 2 teaspoons butter. 

Scald corn-meal with boiling water, add eggs, salt, soda, 
buttermilk, and melted butter. Bake slowly two hours 
or more in deep earthen dish. Serve with spoon. 

Mrs. Alma Sawyek, 

Kansas City. Mo. 

VIRGINIA SPOON BREAD 

1 pint corn-meal. 2 eggs. 

1 tablespoon butter. Salt. 

Milk. 

« 

Pour, and stir sufficient boiling water over corn-meal to 
make a smooth mush ; add sweet milk to make as thin as 
batter-cakes; add eggs well beaten, butter melted, and 
salt to taste. Bake in well-buttered hot pudding-pan 
forty-five minutes, and serve with spoon. Emily Hall. 

BUNS 

4| pints of bread sponge. Whites of (5 eggs, beaten stiff. 
3 tablespoons of lard. 3 pints of sweet milk, slightly 

1^ cups of sugar. warmed. 

2 tablespoons of salt. 

Mix all together with flour enough for batter. Let rise. 
Mix to a soft dough. Let rise, and work down. Let rise 
again, and work out in greased pari. Bake in quick oven. 
This makes 12 dozen buns. Mrs. E. A. Taylor. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK ROOK 97 

EASTER BUNS 

2 cups of sugar. 2 cups of milk. 

1 cup of butter. 1 cup of yeast, or 

1 cup currants. 1 compressed yeast cake. 

Rub sugar and butter together, add milk and yeast and 
flour enough to make stiff batter. Let stand in a warm 
place until light ; then add currants and flour enough to 
make thick, as for biscuit. Shape, and put in pans in which 
they are to be baked, and let stand two or three hours. 
Bake forty minutes in moderate oven. It is always best 
to set the sponge at night, for they will then be ready to 
bake the following forenoon. If they are wanted for tea, 
they must be set early in the morning. If they are wanted 
for Easter morning, prepare the noon before, and just be- 
fore bedtime put into tins and cover in the ice-chest over 
night. Early in the morning put in a warm place. After 
baking, frost with whites of two eggs well beaten and stiff- 
ened with pulverized sugar. Mrs. Daykin, 



Phoenix, Ariz. 



CORN ROLLS 



1| cups flour. 1 tablespoon sugar, 

f cup corn-meal. 2 tablespoons butter. 

4 teaspoons baking powder. 1 egg. 

\ teaspoon salt. § cup milk. 

Mix dry ingredients, and sift. Chop butter, beat egg, 
and add a half-cup of milk. Make a soft dough that can 
be handled. Add more milk if necessary. Turn on board 
and roll half-inch thick. Cut, and form into rolls with a 
bit of butter in center. Rub tops with milk. Bake in hot 
oven 15 minutes. Mrs. F. P. Hettinger. 



98 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

CINNAMON ROLLS 

1 cup of milk, scalded and cooled. 1 teaspoon salt. 

1 level tablespoon lard. 1 cake Fleishman yeast 

1 level tablespoon butter. dissolved in cup 

2 level tablespoons sugar. water. 

Take the milk just warm, add all the ingredients, beat, 
and gradually add flour till a soft dough ; beat with a spoon, 
and leave all night. Flour the board, roll the dough to 
one-fourth inch thick.. Spread with melted butter or lard, 
and cover with sugar in which cinnamon has been mixed. 
Roll the dough like jelly roll, and cut in slices one-half inch 
thick. Set in pan till light. Bake. When cool, ice with 
pulverized sugar made smooth with boiling water. 

Mrs. Florence Smith. 

ROLLS 

1 pt. of sweet milk. Pinch of salt. 

1 rounding tablespoon of ^ cake of yeast. 

lard. 2 tablespoons of sugar. 

Place milk, sugar, salt and lard on back of stove until 
lard is melted. When cool, add yeast, mix hard, let rise, 
and mould down often during the day. About an hour be- 
fore baking, roll out into shape and place in pan so they do 
not touch each other. Mrs. W. R. Bennett. 



BAKING-POWDER ROLLS 

2 cups of flour. 2 level teaspoons baking 

\ cup of butter. powder. 

| cup of milk. 1 egg. 

Rub the butter into flour. Mix egg, well beaten, with 
milk. Roll, and cut in squares with a floured knife. Brush 



FIRST PRESBYTER I AX CHURCH COOK HOOK 99 



over with sugar dissolved in enough water to make it spread, 
and bake in quick oven. Mrs. Frank Fakis, 

Guymon, Okla. 

LIGHT ROLLS 

1 quart flour. 1 teaspoon salt. 

1 tablespoon butter or lard. \ cup liquid yeast, or 

1 tablespoon sugar. 1 cup soft sponge. 

1 pint sweet milk. 

Sift flour in crock. Make hole in middle, put in lard, 
sugar, salt. Pour in half-cup boiling water to melt lard. 
Add the milk and yeast. Stir well. When very light, add 
enough flour to mix stiff. Let rise, then mould into rolls. 
Let rise, and bake quickly. Mrs. S. E. Ardery. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS 

2 cups milk. 3 tablespoons sugar. 
2 cups sponge. 2 eggs, whites only. 
2 tablespoons lard. Salt. 

1 tablespoon butter. 

At noon make sponge with half yeast cake, flour and 
water. In the evening, scald the milk, lard, butter and 
sugar. When lukewarm, add sponge and flour to make 
batter. In the morning add whites of eggs. Add flour to 
make soft dough. Knead well. Let rise. Knead down 
once. Roll out half-inch thick, cut with large biscuit- 
cutter. Spread half with softened butter, fold over, 
stretching through center and pinching fold. Place very 
far apart in pans. Let rise very light (H or 2 hours). 
Bake 15 minutes in moderate oven. Glaze crust with 
butter, sugar, and a very little warm milk. Makes three 
dozen rolls. Lida McCarroll. 



100 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

VIENNA ROLLS 

1 cup of milk. 1 tablespoon butter. 
3 or 4 cups flour. \ tablespoon sugar. 
| teaspoon salt. 1 egg. 

| cup of yeast. 

Add butter to the hot milk, let cool to lukewarm, add 
sugar, salt, beaten egg to yeast. Add flour to make a thin 
batter. Let rise, and mix stiff. Let rise again, roll in thin 
sheets, cut in squares, and roll or fold. Edna Shunk. 

BISCUITS 

2 cups flour. f to 1 cup milk. 

2 tablespoons lard. 2 heaping teaspoons baking 

\ teaspoon salt. powder. 

Mix and sift the dry ingredients, and" sift again. Add 
the lard and the milk. Lightly flour the board, and roll 
about half-inch thick. Bake in a hot oven from 10 to 12 
minutes. Nellie Nelson. 

BISCUITS FOR TWO 

1 cup of sifted flour. 1 small teaspoon of lard. 

1 heaping teaspoon baking \ cup of sweet milk, 
powder. Pinch of salt. 

Mrs. I. N. Koons. 

BEATEN BISCUITS 

1 quart flour. 1 small teaspoon lard. Pinch salt. 

Sweet milk sufficient to make a stiff dough. Beat until 
dough is light and blisters. Roll thin and stick each bis- 
cuit with a fork. Bake in a rather hot oven. 

Mrs. J. W. Wood. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 101 

SODA BISCUITS. 

2 cups of flour. 1 teaspoon soda. 

1 teaspoon baking powder. 1 tablespoon lard. 
1 cup of sour milk. 

Mix well the dry ingredients and lard ; add milk. Knead 
very little; roll an inch thick ; cut. Bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. L. G. Dupler. 

BRAN MUFFINS 

1 cup bran. \ cup corn-meal. 

\ cup of white flour. 1 tablespoon molasses. 

1 tablespoon drippings. 1 teaspoon salt. 

1 cup buttermilk. 1 level teaspoon soda. 

Dissolve soda in milk. Mix all dry ingredients together 
and pour on the liquid ingredients. Bake in very hot muf- 
fin-pans about 25 minutes. Mrs. C. H. Sweetser. 



BREAKFAST MUFFINS 

2 eggs beaten separately. 2 tablespoons sugar. 

2 tablespoons melted butter. \ pint sweet milk. 

1 pint flour. 1| teaspoons baking powder. 

Mrs. Frank Faris, 

Guymon, Okla. 

BLUEBERRY MUFFINS 

Butter size of egg. 2 eggs. 

| cup sugar. 1 cup milk. 

3 scant cups flour. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 



cups berries dredged in part of flour. 



Fold berries in very carefully at the last. 

Mrs. D. E. Richards. 



102 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

MUFFINS 

2 cups flour. 2 heaping teaspoons baking 

1 cup milk. powder. 

2 tablespoons sugar. \ teaspoon salt. 

2 eggs. 2 tablespoons butter. 

Beat whites of eggs, add yolks. Sift dry ingredients to- 
gether and lay over egg without stirring. Pour in butter 
melted, and lastly the milk ; stir all lightly together with- 
out beating, and bake at once. Mrs. V. M. Wiley. 

CORN-MEAL MUFFINS 

\ cup butter. 2 cups flour. 

2 eggs. 1 cup sweet milk. 

1 cup corn-meal. 4 teaspoons level, baking 

| teaspoon salt. powder. 

f cup sugar. 

Sift sugar three times. Beat butter to a cream ; add 
sugar and other ingredients, stirring in flour and milk al- 
ternately. Mrs. R. A. Nelson. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS 

1 cup graham flour. 1 cup milk. 

1 cup white flour. 1 egg. 

| teaspoon salt. \ cup of sugar. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. Lump of butter size of egg. 

Cream butter and sugar. Beat well ; bake quickly in 
well-greased gem-pans. Mrs. Chas. Hood. 

OATMEAL MUFFINS 

1 cup cold cooked oatmeal. \\ cups flour. 

4 teaspoons baking powder, 1 egg. 

level. \ teaspoon sugar. 

Salt. Milk. 

Beat egg, mix flour and oatmeal, wet to a rather stiff 
batter with milk. Grace Eastman. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 103 

GRIDDLE CAKES 

2 cups flour. 1 egg. 

lh rounding teaspoons bak- L 2 cups milk. 

ing powder. [ teaspoon salt. 

1 tablespoon melted butter. 2 tablespoons sugar. 

Sift together the flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. 
Beat egg, add milk, and pour slowly upon the first mixture. 
Beat thoroughly and add butter. 

Graham flour cakes can be made as above, substituting 
graham for wheat flour. Minnie Brady. 

WAFFLES 

2 cups of flour. | teaspoon of salt. 

1| cups of milk. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

3 eggs. 1 tablespoon melted butter. 

Beat yolks of eggs ; add to them the milk. Then stir 
in the flour and butter. Beat hard for a few minutes, and 
stir in baking powder and stiffly beaten whites of eggs. 
Have waffle-irons very hot, and grease well each time be- 
fore filling. This recipe makes seven waffles. 

Beth L. Buser. 

FIVE-MINUTE WAFFLES 

c 2 eggs. 1 dessert spoon of sugar. 

1 pint sour milk. 1 teaspoon of salt. 

1 pint flour. 3 tablespoons butter and 
1 handful meal. lard, mixed. 

Break eggs in bowl ; pour sour milk over these ; fold in 
flour and meal, sugar and salt. When slightly mixed, add 
shortening. Just before baking, add soda according to 
acidity of milk (about one teaspoon). Put soda on top of 
batter, drop a few drops of cold water to dissolve it, and 



104 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

beat in quickly. Have irons hot, and grease slightly for 
first waffle. Mrs. G. T. Lee. 

CORN-MEAL MUSH 

1^ quarts corn-meal. 2 tablespoons salt. 

4 quarts boiling water. 

Wet the meal with one quart boiling water, then turn 
in meal quickly and stir vigorously until it boils up well. 
Cook slowly fifteen minutes. Mrs. F. P. Hettinger. 

FRENCH FRIED TOAST 

1 pint milk. 2 eggs. Pinch of salt. 

Beat egg well, add salt and milk. Dip into this slices 
of bread, and fry brown in butter. Serve with butter and 
syrup. Mrs. John C. Krous. 

CIDER TOAST 

For five or six people prepare bread same as for "cream 
toast." Butter well and keep warm. 

For the Sauce : 
1| pints sweet cider | pint water. 

1 cup sugar (scant, or more if desired). 

Allow this to come to a boil. Stir in one rounded (not 
heaping) tablespoon corn-starch well dissolved in a little 
cold water. Let boil two or three minutes. 

With a fork dip each piece buttered toast into the cider. 
Then place on platter, when the sauce should be poured 
over each. A gentle sifting of cinnamon before serving 
adds much to taste. Elizabeth Bigger. 



Sandwiches 

Butter beaten to a cream is much nicer in sandwiches, 
and much easier to spread, than softened butter. 

Boston brown bread cut thin and spread with mayon- 
naise on one piece and beaten butter on the other, with 
thin slices of cucumber between make an excellent sand- 
wich to serve with fish or oysters. 

Thin slices of onion with mayonnaise between white 
bread and butter make an appetizing sandwich. 

Nuts and dates or raisins ground and thoroughly mixed 
make a good sandwich filling. 

SANDWICH FILLING 

Cream one-third lb. of butter and one-half lb. of cheese. 
Add one 10-cent bottle of stuffed olives. 

Lelia M. Saunders. 
GOLF SANDWICH 

Take any left-overs of boiled or fried ham. Put through 
the grinder and then stew in a little water to moisten. 
Have buttered toast ready ; then spread a piece with the 
ham ; then another slice of buttered toast, and on this 
place a poached egg. Serve at once. 

Mrs. D. E. Richards. 

HAM-AND-EGG SANDWICH 

Boil two eggs hard. Mix the yolks with a cupful of 
ground boiled ham ; moisten with mayonnaise and spread 
between slices of bread and butter. 

(105) 



106 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

HOT CHICKEN SANDWICHES 

On a slice of toast place slices of chicken or the chicken 
picked from the bones ; then another slice of toast and 
more chicken, and pour over the whole a good rich cream 
chicken gravy. 

HOT CHICKEN SANDWICH 

Moisten finely ground chicken with a thick cream sauce. 
Spread between two slices of buttered bread, lightly toasted 
if preferred. If half stock and half milk is used in making 
the sauce, it is an improvement. Part chicken and veal, 
or any combination of meats, may be used. 

Mrs. Charles A. Greenlee. 

SANDWICH MEDIUM 

4 large sour pickles. 3 hard-boiled eggs. 

1 can pimentoes, 15c. size. A little meat and nuts, if de- 
Salt to taste. sired. 

Grind eggs, pickles and pimentoes ; add the same amount 
of butter which you would use on the bread ; then add 
mayonnaise as needed, putting in all the juice from pickles. 
Spread on bread. This amount will make 30 to 40 sand- 
wiches. Mrs. Elward. 

NUT AND JELLY SANDWICHES 

Use any nuts you may have, the more kinds the better. 
Grind or shave fine ; mix with currant jelly, and spread 
between thin slices of bread and butter. 

PEANUT SANDWICH FILLING 

Grind roasted peanuts in food-chopper; salt slightly, 
and mix with mayonnaise dressing made smooth with 
cream or rich milk to taste. Mrs. A. D. Raffington. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH t'OOK BOOR 107 



PIMENTO SANDWICHES 

To one cake of cream cheese add 12 stuffed olives which 
have been chopped fine ; mix thoroughly and spread on one 
slice of the sandwich, using beaten butter on the other. 
Press firmly together and trim. 

SANDWICH 

Cut bread round ; put in slice of tomato, green pepper 
chopped fine, and grated cheese. On top, slice of bacon, 
and broil. Lucy E. Leidigh. 

STRIPED SANDWICHES 

Cut a number of both white and brown bread slices 
nearly one-half inch thick ; butter liberally and stack to- 
gether five slices, first a brown, white, etc., pressing to- 
gether firmly so they will hold. Slice down through this 
stack, making the thickness wished for the sandwiches. 
The result is an exceedingly eatable and pretty sandwich, 
which may be trimmed into any shape. 

Mrs. W. P. Kinkle. 



EVERY ONE GUARANTEED. 




SAVES MILES OF STEPS. 

You will have good luck with 
that cake if you make it on a 

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Kitchen Cabinet and bake it 
on a Peninsular Range. We 
are sole agents in Hutchinson 



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3Ava Miles of •Steps 



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Furniture Co. 

Complete Housefurnishers. 



We Cater to the Needs of the Housewife. 
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OUR MOTTO: 
WHAT YOU WANT— WHEN YOU WANT IT 

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Phone 2410 



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Model Steam Laundrjr 

A GOOD PLACE TO HAVE YOUR LAUNDRY 
WORK DONE PROPERLY. 

We also do Dry Cleaning as it should be done. 
Phones 44—2044. J. J. BOEHM 85 CO. 



Cak 



es 



There are two kinds of cake — cup or butter cakes, and 
sponge cakes. Cup or butter cakes contain butter or 
other shortening. Sponge cakes do not contain shortening. 
Cup or butter cakes are leavened by baking powder or by 
some other leavening agent of that kind, while sponge 
cakes are leavened by the expansion of air imprisoned in 
the cells of the egg whites or yolks, which are beaten in 
order to hold this air. When cream of tartar is used in 
sponge cakes it is in order that the whites may be tough- 
ened by its use so that they will the better hold the air. 
Cup or butter cakes require a hotter oven than do sponge 
cakes. Each kind, however, permits of an almost endless 
number of variations. 

In cake-making only the best materials should be used, 
and the materials and utensils necessary should be gotten 
ready at hand before the work is begun. The best flour 
to use for cakes is a starchy flour called pastry flour. This 
flour should be sifted once before being measured out, and 
if for a cup cake sift it several times with baking powder, 
before using. The pans should be greased for a butter 
cake and lined with greased paper if one is very particular, 
and this greased paper is then dusted lightly with flour. 
See that the oven is ready. For a cup cake the heat should 
be sufficient if white paper turns deep yellow in five min- 
utes ; if for a sponge cake the paper should turn a faint 
yellow in five minutes. 

(109) 



110 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

To mix a sponge cake : Separate the yolks and whites 
of the eggs, beat the yolks until thick and add the sugar 
gradually, beating it in. Then add the flavoring. Beat 
the whites fine and dry, and cut and fold them in. Sift 
the flour several times, and fold it in at the last. Never 
stir a sponge cake. 

To mix a butter cake : Cream the butter (if it is hard, 
warm it a little, or stir it until it is soft), add the sugar 
slowly.. The sugar should be well creamed with the but- 
ter before proceeding. (If the sugar is not well creamed 
in a butter cake, or if coarse in a sponge cake, the texture 
of the cake will be coarse and the crust rough. To pre- 
vent this, roll or crush the sugar with a rolling-pin before 
using it.) Then add the yolks of the eggs well beaten, 
then the flavoring. Mix and sift the flour and baking pow- 
der several times, and add it to the mixture alternately 
with the milk. Lastly, fold in the egg whites, beaten 
stiff. Do not stir after the whites are added. 

In baking, divide the time into fourths, as for bread : 
1st quarter, to allow cake to rise; 2nd quarter, to allow 
cake to brown ; 3rd quarter, to allow cake to continue to 
brown while cooking ; 4th quarter, to turn dark brown and 
shrink from sides of pan. 

When the cake is done, take from the oven and invert 
the pan upon a wire rack. In frosting a cake, if the frost- 
ing is cooked it may be applied either when the cake is hot 
or cold, but it is better with raw frosting to put it on while 
the cake is still warm. The frosting should become a part 
of the cake, and neither run nor crack off. When finished 
and the cake is cut in slices, it should show in an unbroken 
strip the width of the thickness of the slice. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 111 

The completed cake, whether frosted or not, should show 
these characteristics : 

The color, if unfrosted, should be brown; if frosted, 
should be a representative color. 

The shade should be uniform over entire surface. 

The surface should be smooth, free from wrinkles and 
breaks, crust should be firm. 

The shape should be regular, and in such proportions 
that the center of the loaf can be thoroughly baked. 

The cake should spring back after compression ; should 
not be sticky, nor like dough. 

The crumb should feel like velvet. 

The cake should be so tender as to be very readily 
broken or pulled apart. 

The cake should feel light in the hand, not heavy. 

The holes should be like pin-heads or less. 

The holes should be uniform in size throughout the cake. 

Color should be characteristic of kind of cake. 

Sweetness refers to natural state of materials used. 

Flavor refers to combination of materials used and their 
proportions. 

(By Frances L. Brown, head of the Department of Home Economics, 
Extension Division, K. S. A. C.) 

ANGEL FOOD CAKE 

H tumblers of sugar. 12 eggs, whites. 

1 tumbler of flour. \ teaspoon of salt. 

1 level teaspoon of cream Flavoring, 
tartar. 

Sift the first three ingredients together several times, 
and add gradually to well-beaten whites of eggs. The salt 
should be added to the eggs before beating them. Vanilla 
to taste. Bake in an ungreased pan for one hour in a very 
slow oven. Mrs. Pet Nation. 

M uuoitiE Graves. 



112 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

ANGEL FOOD CAKE 

9 large fresh eggs, whites, or \ teaspoon of cream tartar. 

10 small egg whites. Pinch of salt. 
\\ cups of sifted sugar. Flavoring. 

1 cup of flour. 

Add cream of tartar and salt to eggs before beating. Sift 
flour four or five times. Beat the eggs about half, add 
sugar gradually till all is used, then add sifted flour in same 
manner ; add flavoring. Put in pan that has not been 
greased. Bake thirty-five minutes. 

Mrs. Kate E. Gathers. 

LAYER ANGEL FOOD 

1| tumberfuls of granulated sugar. Pinch of salt. 

1 tumberful of flour. 11 egg whites. 

1 teaspoon of cream tartar. Flavoring. 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 

Sift the first five ingredients all together seven times, 
then add the beaten whites of eggs, flavoring to taste, and 
bake in three layers. 

Seafoam Filling : 

2 teaspoons of gelatine. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 
\\ pts. of whipped cream. 3 egg whites. 

1 cup of sugar. 

Cover the gelatine with cold .water, then set the cup in 
warm water to dissolve the gelatine. Whip the cream very 
stiff. Stir into the cream the sugar, then add the gelatine, 
stirring briskly to keep from curdling. Add the vanilla, 
and lastly the beaten egg whites. Stir until cool enough 
to spread, then spread nearly one-half an inch thick. 

Josephine Dixon. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 



113 



MOCK ANGEL FOOD 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup of sweet milk. 

1 cup of flour. 3 teaspoons of baking powder. 

Pinch of salt. ;> egg whites. 

Flavoring. 

Sift flour, sugar, salt and baking powder four times. 
Bring- milk almost to a boil, stir in flour, sugar, salt and 
baking powder, and beat well. Beat vanilla with whites 
of eggs, fold in cake and bake in a moderate oven twenty 
minutes. Mrs. J. D. Hanna. 



APPLE CAKE 

\\ cups of sugar, 
f cup of butter. 
| cup of sour milk. 
1 teaspoon of soda. 
.'] egg yolks. 
k i egg whites. 
1 teaspoonful of vanilla. 
L 2 cups of chopped apples. 
h cup of En 



| cup of small raisins. 
• 1 teaspoonful of cinnamon. 
n 1 teaspoonful of allspice. 
| teaspoonful of cloves. 
1 teaspoonful of nutmeg. 
A pinch of ginger. 
A pinch of salt. 
L 2h cups of flour. 
>lish walnuts, chopped. 



Beat the eggs separately. Apples should be good cook- 
ing apples, not chopped too fine. Bake in a moderate oven 
an hour. Imogene Pollock. 



APPLE FRUIT CAKE 

1 cup of butter. 

1 cup of sugar. 

1 even teaspoonful of ginger. 

1 or 2 cups of raisins. 

3 cups of chopped apples. 

2 cups of molasses. 



1 heaping teaspoonful of 

cinnamon. 
1 cup of sour milk. 
<H\ cups of flour. 

1 teaspoonful of soda. 

2 eggs. 



In place of sour milk one may use buttermilk. Stew 



114 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



the chopped apples in the molasses mixed with the upper 
portion. Mrs. Will Symns. 

Mrs. Cory. 

APPLESAUCE CAKE 

1 cup of sugar. 1 teaspoon of soda. 

| cup of butter. 1 teaspoon of baking powder. 

2 cups of flour. 1 teaspoon of cinnamon. 
1 cup of apple sauce. \ teaspoon of cloves. 

1 cup of raisins. \ teaspoon of mace. 

| cup of nuts. 

Sugar may be either brown or white. Mix the soda in 
the sauce, the baking powder in the flour. Bake in a loaf. 

Mrs. C. S. Colladay. 



BLACK GEORGE CAKE 

3 tablespoons of sugar. 
2| tablespoons of butter. 
1 cup molasses. 
2| cups of flour 



1 egg yolk. 

1 tablespoon of cinnamon. 
1 teaspoon of cloves. 
1 cup of boiling water. 



2 teaspoons of baking powder 

Cream the sugar and butter, then add the other ingre- 
dients, the boiling water lastly. Mrs. Lauderdale. . 



BREAD CAKE 

1^ cups of bread sponge. 
1 cup of sugar. 
\ cup of butter. 
1 cup of raisins. 

1 cup of nuts. 

Let rise one hour and bake one hour. 

Mrs. Noah Hardy. 



1 egg. 

1 teaspoon soda. 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

1 cup of flour. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 115 

A NEW BROWN CAKE 

2 cups of sugar. :> cups of sifted flour. 

h cup of lard. \ teaspoon of cinnamon. 

4 egg yolks. \ teaspoon of cloves. 

2 egg whites. | teaspoon of allspice. 

1 cup of sour milk. 1 teaspoon of soda. 

Pinch of salt. 

Cream together the sugar, lard, eggs and salt till flaky. 
Add the soda in the flour. 

Icing : 

1 cup of sugar. 1 cup of ground raisins. 

4 teaspoons of water. 1 cup of chopped English 

2 eggs, whites. walnuts. 

Boil the sugar and water and add to the well-beaten 
whites. When cool enough to spread, add the raisins and 
nuts. Mrs. W. H. Mast. 

BURNT-CARAMEL CAKE 

1| cups sugar. 1 teaspoon of vanilla. 

| cup of butter. 3 teaspoons of burnt caramel. 

1 cup of cold water. h cup of flour. 
2f cups of flour. 2 egg whites. 

2 eggs, yolks. 2 teaspoons of baking powder. 

Beat the first seven ingredients about 5 minutes, then 
add the one half cup of flour, baking powder and egg whites. 

Filling : 
2 egg whites. 2 teaspoons of burnt caramel. 

1 cup of sugar. 1 teaspoon of vanilla. 

2 tablespoons of water. 

Boil the first three ingredients until it threads,, then add 
the burnt caramel and vanilla. Cook in a double boiler, 
for the whites of eggs make it very easy to burn. 

Helen Hubbard. 



116 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

BURNT-SUGAR CAKE 

H cups of sugar. 2 cups of flour. 

1 scant cup of butter. 1 teaspoon of vanilla. 

1 cup of cold water. \ cup of flour. 

6 tablespoons of burnt 2 teaspoons of baking 

sugar. powder. 

2 egg yolks. 2 egg whites. 

Beat the first six ingredients five minutes, then add the 
vanilla, half a cup of flour, the baking powder in the flour 
and beaten egg whites. 

Icing : 

1 cup of sugar. 2 egg whites. 

| cup of water. 2 tablespoons of burnt sugar. 

Boil the sugar and water till it threads; add the beaten 
whites of eggs and burnt sugar. 

To burn the sugar, put one cup of sugar in a pan and 
stir till burned ; add ^ cup of boiling water. 

Mrs. Harry Elbrader. 

BURNT- SUGAR CAKE 

\ cup of butter. 3 teaspoons burnt-sugar 

\\ cups of sugar. syrup. 

2 eggs. 2| cups of flour. 

1 cup of lukewarm water. 2 heaping teaspoons baking 

powder. 

Cream the butter and sugar ; add yolks of eggs ; beat in 
gradually the warm water and two level cups of flour ; beat 
five minutes ; add beaten whites of eggs, and remainder of 
flour with baking powder, and burnt-sugar syrup. Bake. 

Frosting : 
\\ cups of sugar. 2 egg whites. 

A pinch of cream tartar. 2 or 3 teaspoons of burnt- 

\ cup of hot water. sugar syrup. 

Boil the first three ingredients till the syrup threads, then 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 117 

pour over the beaten whites. When cold, add the burnt- 
sugar syrup. 

To make the burnt-sugar syrup, put one-fourth of a cup 
of granulated sugar in a pan on the stove and stir till it 
melts and becomes dark brown. Then add a little water, 
and boil to a syrup. Mrs. V. M. Wiley. 

CREAM CAKE 

2 eggs. 2 cups flour. 

1 cup sugar. 1 teaspoonful of cream of 

1 cup cream. tartar. 

1 teaspoonful of soda. 

Mrs. Martha Springer. 
SOUR CREAM CAKE 

1 cup thick sour cream. \ teaspoon salt. 

1 cup sugar. 1 level teaspoon soda. 

2 cups sifted flour. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

1 egg. 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

Dissolve the soda in a little water. 

Mrs. J. H. Garrison. 

SOUR CREAM CHOCOLATE CAKE 

2 squares of chocolate. Pinch of salt. 

1 cup of sour cream. 1 large cup of flour. 

3 eggs. 1 teaspoon of soda. 
1^ cups of sugar. 1 teaspoon of vanilla. 

Melt the chocolate in one-half of the sour cream. Beat 
together the yolks of the eggs, the sugar, and other half of 
sour cream. Add the salt, flour, soda, and vanilla, finally 
the beaten whites of the eggs. Bake in square pan, and 
when cold pour over it boiled frosting. 



118 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

Frosting : 
1 cup of sugar. 1 egg white. 

1 cup of water. \ teaspoon of cream of tartar. 

Boil the sugar and water till it threads. Beat the egg 
whites, add the cream of tartar. Pour syrup over the egg 
white slowly and whip light. Put on the cake. 

Mrs. S. F. Raff. 
Miss Zoa Chase. 

SPANISH CHOCOLATE CAKE 

1 cup sugar. \\ squares of chocolate. 

1 heaping tablespoon of \ cup of sweet milk. 

Cottolene (salt). 1 teaspoon of vanilla. 

1 egg yolk. 1| cups of flour. 

1 cup of sweet milk. 1 teaspoon soda. 

Dissolve the soda in the milk. Melt the chocolate in 
the milk, and add while hot. Mrs. Philip Emmert. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE 

2 cups of brown sugar. 2 squares of chocolate. 
| cup of butter. \ cup of boiling water. 

2 eggs. 2 cups of flour. 

\ cup of sour milk. 1 teaspoon of vanilla. 

1 teaspoon of soda. 

Blend the sugar and butter. Beat eggs separately. Add 
soda to the sour milk. Add the chocolate to the boiling 
water and let cool before adding to the mixture. 

Mrs. John Brehm. 
CHOCOLATE FUDGE CAKE 

| cup of melted crisco. \ cup of flour. 

1 cup granulated sugar. \ teaspoon salt. 

3 squares or 3 oz. bitter 1 teaspoon of vanilla, 
chocolate. 1 cupful of chopped nuts. 

2 eggs. 

Use level measurements ; with the exception of the flour 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 119 

use lull measure. Put ingredients together in order named, 
and beat thoroughly before adding nuts. Spread three- 
I mirths of an inch thick in greased pan. Bake in moderate 
oven twenty minutes. Cut in squares while warm. Be 
careful when removing from pan; it is so rich it breaks 
easily. Mrs. Belle Q. Kyger, 

Blackwell, Okla. 

CHOCOLATE MARBLE CAKE 

2 cups sugar. Whites of 5 eggs. 

1 cup butter. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

1 cup milk. ^ cup grated chocolate. 
3| cups flour. 

Cream sugar and butter, then add milk, flour, eggs and 
baking powder. Take half the batter and add chocolate 
after it has been dissolved in boiling water. Flavor the 
white with lemon and the dark with vanilla. Drop in pan 
like marble cake. 

Angel food cake-pan is the best kind of a pan to use for 
this cake. Margaret McCandless. 



COCOA CAKE 

1 cup sugar. 2 tablespoons cocoa, dissolved 
h cup butter. in \ cup boiling water. 

2 cups flour (scant). \ teaspoon soda. 

§ cup water. 1 tablespoon baking powder. 

2 eggs. | cup nuts. 
1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Beat eggs separately. Dissolve soda in the water. Mix 

as other kinds of cake. Mrs. Geo. T. McCandless. 



120 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



COCOA DEVIL'S FOOD 

If cups sugar. 
| cup butter. 

2 tablespoons cocoa. 

3 eggs. 

| cup boiling water. 



| cup sour milk. 

1 teaspoon soda. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 

1 cup chopped raisins. 

2| cups flour (before sifting). 



Dissolve the soda in the sour milk. 



Filling : 
2 cups granulated sugar. 
\ cup milk. 
\ cup butter. 



1 tablespoon cocoa. 
1 teaspoon vanilla. 
1 cup chopped walnuts. 

Mrs. Frank Faris, 

Guymon, Okla. 



DEVIL'S FOOD CAKE 

2 cups sugar. 

\ cup butter (scant meas.). 
f cup milk (good measure). 
4 eggs well beaten. 

Dissolve the chocolate in half-cup of boiling water, and 
stir until thick. Bake in a well-greased pan, in a moder- 
ate oven, three-quarters hour. Let cool, and ice. 

Helen E. Miner. 



2 teaspoons baking powder. 

2 cups flour. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 

1 cup grated chocolate. 



DEVIL'S FOOD CAKE 

1 cup butter. 

2 cups sugar. 

3 eggs. 

1 cup buttermilk. 
Salt (pinch). 

Dissolve the soda in the buttermilk. Dissolve the 
grated chocolate in the boiling water. Mix in butter, 
sugar, then milk and flour. 



1 teaspoon of soda. 
3 cups sifted flour. 
\ cup grated chocolate. 
\ cup boiling water. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 



121 



1 spoon vinegar. 

2 egg whites. 

\ 11). marshmallows. 



Filling : 
1 cu]> brown sugar. 
1 ciip white sugar. 
1 cup water. 

Boil the first four ingredients till thick like candy, and 
stir into the beaten whites of eggs and marshmallows. 

Mrs. G. T. Lee. 
DEVIL'S FOOD CAKE 



f cup shaved chocolate. 
§ cup sweet milk, 
f cup sugar. 
1 egg volk. 



\ cup butter. 

2 eggs, well beaten. 

2 cups flour. 

\ cup sour or sweet milk. 

1 even teaspoonful soda. 



1 teaspoonful vanilla. 
1 cup sugar. 

Cook the first four ingredients for five minutes, then add 
the vanilla. Cream sugar and butter, then add the other 
ingredients. Add cooked mixture to 'the second mixture. 
Bake in moderate oven. Mrs. L. K. Adams. 

May Chapman. 
MAHOGANY CAKE 



2 cups of Swansdown flour, 
1 level teaspoon of soda. 
\ cup of grated chocolate. 
i cup of milk. 



\\ cups of sugar. 
\ cup of butter. 
3 eggs. 
\ cup of sweet milk. 

Cream butter and sugar. Add eggs, the yolks and whites 
beaten all together. Beat very lightly. Add milk, soda 
and flour, and beat again. Add vanilla, then the chocolate 
which has been cooked till creamy in second half-cup of 
milk. Add this chocolate mixture to cake after it is cooled. 
Bake slowly. Ice with chocolate fudge. 

Mrs. L. R. Lockwood. 

Mrs. Alexander. 



122 



GOOD THIXGS TO EAT 



COFFEE CAKE 

2 cups of brown sugar. 

1 cup butter. 

1 cup molasses. 

1 cup strong coffee. 

4 eggs. 

1 teaspoon of soda. 

Prepare coffee as for the 
coffee. Cream butter and 
and eggs. 



2 teaspoons cinnamon. 

1 teaspoon of cloves. 

1 teaspoon grated nutmeg. 

1 lb. currants. 

1 lb. raisins. 

4 cups flour. 

table. Dissolve the soda in the 
sugar, then add coffee, molasses 
Mrs. H. J. Ellis. 



EGGLESS COFFEE CAKE 



\ cup of strong coffee. 

\ cup of sugar. 

\ cup molasses. 

\ cup butter. , 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. 



1 teaspoon cloves. 
1 teaspoon nutmeg. 
1 cup of halved raisins. 

1 teaspoon soda. 

2 cups of flour. 



Sift the soda with the flour, bake in one loaf, or very nice 
made into two layers. Mrs. Ryker. 



\ teaspoon of salt. 
\ teaspoon of cinnamon. 
3 level teaspoons baking- 
powder. 



QUICK COFFEE CAKE 

1 cup of flour. 
\ cup of corn-starch. 
\ cup of sweet milk. 
4 tablespoons of butter. 
1 egg. 

Sift dry ingredients together twice. Beat egg and add 
milk, mix to a soft dough ; add butter melted. Spread in 
shallow pan, sprinkle with sugar mixed with cinnamon, and 
bake in moderate oven. Serve fresh. 

Mrs. J. F. Corrigan. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 123 

DARK AND LIGHT LAYER CAKE 

3 egg whites. 2 cup of water. 

1 cup of sugar. 2 teaspoonfuls of baking 

\ cup of butter. powder. 

2 cups of flour. 

Dark Part : 

:> eggs, yolks. 2 cups of flour. 

1 scant cup of sugar. 1 grated nutmeg. 

\ cup of butter. 1 tablespoon molasses. 

\ cup of water. f tablespoon of cinnamon. 

2 teaspoonfuls baking powder. 
Sift the baking powder with the flour. 

Filling : 

10 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 2 eggs, whites. Beat the 
eggs stiff. Flavor. Mrs. G. H. Chilvers. 

DELICATE CAKE 

1 cup corn-starch. 2 scant cups of sifted flour. 

1 cup of butter. 7 egg whites. 

2 cups of sugar. 3 level teaspoons of baking 
1 cup of sweet milk. powder. 

Sift baking powder, corn-starch and flour well before 
mixing. Cream butter and sugar thoroughly. 

Mrs. Faris. 
EASY CAKE 

1 heaping cup of flour. \ cup of butter. 

1 level cup of sugar. 1 egg. 

1 heaping teaspoon of Milk, 
baking powder. 

Mix the first three ingredients. Then add the quarter- 
cup of butter, into which break the egg, and fill the cup 



124 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



with milk. Beat hard, and bake. This is very good — and 
! Mrs. John F. Fontron, 

McPherson, Kas. 



so easy 



EGGLESS CAKE 

1 cup sugar. 2 cups flour. 

3 rounding tablespoons 2 teaspoons baking powder, 

butter. 1 cup sweet milk. 

1 teaspoon flavoring. 

Mrs. A. D. Raffington. 



EGGLESS, MILKLESS, BUTTERLESS RAISIN CAKE 



1 cup water. 

1 cup brown sugar. 

1 cup lard. 

2 cups seeded raisins. 
1 teaspoon cinnamon. 



| teaspoon cloves. 

j teaspoon nutmeg. 

A pinch salt. 

1 teaspoon soda. 

| teaspoon baking powder. 



2 cups sifted flour. 

Boil together for three minutes the first seven ingre- 
dients, and when cold add the last four ingredients, dis- 
solving the soda in a little warm water. Bake about an 
hour in a slow oven. Mrs. C. H. Sweetser, 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 



FRUIT CAKE 

2 cups of sugar. 

1 cup of lard. 

2 cups of sour milk. 
1 package raisins. 

1 package currants. 
1 lb. dates. 



1 lb. of English walnuts. 
1 teaspoon of cinnamon. 
1 teaspoon cloves. 

1 teaspoon of nutmeg. 
4 cups of flour. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 



Sift baking powder with the flour. Put all together, 
and mix. Mrs. R. Justice. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 



125 



FRUIT CAKE NOT BAKED 

\ lb. dates chopped fine. 
h lb. citron chopped fine. 
| lb. walnut meats chopped fine. 

Grind or chop all together. Then roll in one cup of 
powdered sugar. Wrap in waxed paper. Keep in a cool 
place. It will be ready to cut in twenty-four hours. 

Mrs. Flagg. 
FINE FRUIT CAKE 



3 cups of light brown sugar. 

1 cup of granulated sugar 

2 cups of melted butter. 

4 cups of sifted flour. 
7 eggs. 

1 1 cups of sifted flour. 

3 lbs. raisins. 

g lbs. currants. 

h lb. finely shredded citron. 



2 tablespoons cinnamon. 
1 tablespoon cloves. 
1 tablespoon allspice. 

1 teaspoon black pepper. 
| teaspoon salt. 

2 grated nutmegs. 

f cup of N. 0. molasses. 

3 cup of black coffee. 



1| teaspoons of soda. 
Take the second amount of flour mentioned, and flour 
the raisins, currants and citron thoroughly, adding the 
spices. Mix with the molasses and black coffee, the soda 
having been dissolved in the coffee. This will seem a very 
stiff batter, but makes a soft, moist, rich cake that keeps 
for weeks. Mks. J. L. Penney. 



MRS. BRIGG'S CAKE 

2 scant cups granulated 

sugar. 
I scant cup of butter and 

lard, mixed. 

1 cup of sweet milk. 

2 eggs. 
2 cups of flour. 



1 teaspoon of dry soda, 
f cup of nuts. 

I cup of raisins. 
1 teaspoon of cinnamon. 
j teaspoon of cloves. 
\ teaspoon of nutmeg. 
1 cake yeast 
^ cup of water. 

(ream together the sugar and shortening, then add the 



126 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

milk, the eggs beaten separately ; add the flour. Soak the 
yeast cake in the water, add to the above, and let stand 
over night. In the morning add the soda, fruit, spices, 
and nuts. Bake in layers, and fill with fig filling. 

Filling : 
| lb. of figs. \ cup of sugar. Water. 

Grind the figs, cover with water, and simmer one hour 
with the one-third cup of sugar. 

Icing : 
2 cups confectioner's sugar. 2 or 3 tablespoons water. 
Little hot butter. Lemon juice. 

Beat thoroughly. 

LAYER FRUIT CAKE 

1 cup of brown sugar. f cup of sour milk. 
\ cup of melted butter. 1 teaspoon of soda. 

2 eggs. | cup of raisins. 
1 teaspoon of cinnamon. 1^ cups of flour. 

1 teaspoon of cloves. 

Mrs. H. T. Kerr. 
WHITE FRUIT CAKE 

1 cup of butter. 1 lb. of white seeded raisins. 
| cup of sweet milk. 1 lb. of figs. 

2 cups of sugar. 1 lb. of blanched almonds. 
2| cups of flour. \ lb. of citron. 

7 eggs, whites. 

Chop fruit and nuts fine, mix well with part of the flour 
before adding to the cake. Mrs. L. G. Dupler. 

GERMAN COFFEE CAKE 

One cake compressed yeast ; soak in two-thirds cup 
warm milk. Add one tablespoon sugar to milk, and then 
yeast will rise to top. Take two-thirds quart milk, mix 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 127 

above with it, and enough flour to make sponge. Set 
away to rise until bedtime. Take c 2 eggs, 2 cups sugar, 
\ cup butter, mix thoroughly; then, when yeast is light 
mix above with it. Make pretty stiff. So stiff you can 
hardly stir with spoon. Now let this stand all night. In 
the morning, grease about ten pie-tins; place handful of 
dough in each. Mix currants with it. Spread in tins. Let 
rise until light. Pour melted butter, sugar and cinnamon 
over same. 

Then you can make apple cake put in pan, just as for 
pie. Put butter, sugar and cinnamon over same. You 
can make prune, peach or any other fruit cake this same 
way. Mrs. Nussbaum. 

(Contributed by Mrs. Richards.) 
GINGERBREAD 

1 cup of lard. 1 cup of brown sugar. ' 

1 cup of sour milk. 3 cups of flour. 

1 cup raisins. 3 eggs. 

1 cup N. 0. molasses. 1 teaspoon ginger. 

2 teaspoons soda (level). 1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

1 teaspoon salt. 

Dissolve soda in the milk, melt lard, stir all together 
lightly, and bake in slow oven. Mrs. J. B. Mackay. 

GINGER CREAM CAKE 

1 egg. 1 teaspoon ginger. 

^ cup butter and lard. | teaspoon cinnamon. 

h cup of sugar. \ teaspoon of vanilla. 

\ cup molasses. If cups of flour. 

\ teaspoon baking soda. 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

\ cup boiling water. 

Dissolve the soda in boiling water. Bake either in 
layers or one solid pan. Mrs. II. T. Kerr, 

Chicago, 111. 



12S 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



7 egg whites. 

2 teaspoons of baking 

powder. 
1 teaspoon of vanilla. 



HOT-WATER CAKE 

2 cups sugar. 

2 cups flour. 

1 teaspoon salt. 

1 cup of boiling water. 

Sift sugar, flour and salt together five times. Then add 
the boiling water (be sure it is boiling) slowly, stirring con- 
tinually until it is nearly cold. Then add the whites of 
eggs beaten stiff. Now add the baking powder, and just 
before putting in the pan add the vanilla. When baked, 
leave in pans until cool. Use any filling desired. Cream 
and powdered sugar make an excellent filling. 

Mary Williams. 



JAM CAKE 

f cup of butter. 
1 cup of sugar. 
1 cup of jam. 
1| cups of flour. 



3 tablespoons of sour cream. 
\ of nutmeg. 
1 teaspoon of cinnamon. 
1 teaspoon of allspice. 



3 esnjs. 



Cream sugar, butter and yolks of eggs; add spices next, 
and cream; then jam, and flour in which the soda has 
been thoroughly mixed. Whites of eggs beaten stiff. Bake 
in layers. Mrs. W. E. Carr. 



JAM CAKE 

4 

h cup of butter. 
:; eggs. 

3 tablespoons cream. 
2 cups of flour. 



1 cup of sugar. 

2 cups of thick jam. 
1 teaspoon of baking 

powder. 



Hake in two layers, and put together with icing. 

Mrs. E. S. Handy. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK- L29 

STRAWBERRY JAM CAKE 

1| cups of sugar. 1 grated nutmeg. 

j cup of butter. 1 teaspoon of vanilla. 

1 teaspoon of soda. 1 cup of sour cream. 

1 large. cup of strawberry .'5 cups of flour. 
jam. 3 eggs. 

2 tablespoons of cinnamon. 2 tablespoons of cloves. 

Bake in layers, and put together with caramel filling. 

Mrs. N. E. Williams. 
LADY BALTIMORE CAKE 

1 cup of butter. . 1 teaspoon rosewater. 

"2 cups of sugar (gran.). 6 egg whites. 

1 cup of milk. 3^ cups of flour. 

3 teaspoons of baking powder (level). 

Cream butter, stir in sugar gradually, sift together the 
flour and baking powder three times, and add to the butter 
and sugar alternately with the milk and rosewater; lastly 
add the. stiffly beaten egg whites ; bake in three layers. 

Filling for Lady Baltimore Cake : 

3 cups of gran, sugar. 1 cup of chopped raisins. 

1 cup of boiling water. 1 cup of chopped nut meats. 
3 egg whites: 5 figs cut in thin slices. 

Boil sugar and water until the syrup will spin a long 
thread from the spoon. Pour upon the egg whites beaten 
dry, beating constantly until frosting is cold, then add the 
chopped nuts and fruit ; spread between layers and upon 
top of the cake. Mrs. Ruth Nichols Jones. 

LADY BETTY CAKE 

If cups of sugar. l 2 teaspoons of baking powder. 

§ cup of butter. 1 cup of milk. 

2 egg yolks. 1 1 cups of flour. 

.3 squares of chocolate. 1 cup of chopped English 

1 teaspoon of vanilla. walnuts. 

Mrs. Sawyer. 



130 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

LEMON CAKE 

1| cups of sugar. 2 tablespoons of milk or 

2 cups of flour. water. 

3 eggs. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Beat the eggs separately. Bake in three layers. • 

Jell for Filling : 
1 lemon. 2 tablespoons of sugar. 

1 egg. Small disk of butter. 

Use the grated rind and juice of the lemon. Beat all 
together, and cook in double boiler. . Mrs. J. R. Lyall. 

MAPLE NUTCAKE 

1 cup of sugar. 1 cup of sweet milk. 
Butter size of egg. 1 cup of chopped English 

2 egg yolks. walnuts. 

1 egg white. 2 cups of flour (scant). 

\ teaspoon of baking powder. 

Frosting : 
| lb. maple sugar. 1 egg white. Nuts. 

Boil the sugar till brittle when dropped in cold water. 
Beat egg white stiff. Pour sugar over egg. Beat briskly 
till like coffee cream. Whole nuts on top. 

Mrs. F. L. Martin. 
MARSHMALLOW CAKE 

\\ cups sugar. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

\ cup butter. If cups flour. 

' \ cup sweet milk. 6 egg whites. 

\ cup corn-starch. 
Dissolve the corn-starch in the sweet milk. 

Icing : 
1 coffee cup gran, sugar. \ II). marshmallows. 

4 tablespoons hot water. 2 egg whites. 

Boil the sugar and hot water till it threads from the 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 131 

spoon. Have the marshmallows quartered, and stir them 
into the syrup. Pour over the well-beaten egg' whites and 
beat until eool. Mrs. C. M. Branch. 

NUT CAKE 

| cup of butter. H teaspoons baking powder. 

1^ cups of sugar. | cup of milk. 

3 eggs. 1 cup of nuts. 

2| cups of flour. 

Bake in moderate oven 35 to 40 minutes. 

Lois Ardery. 

MRS. HODGES' MARIA PARLORA NUT CAKE 

1 cup of sugar. 1 cup of chopped English 
\ cup of butter. walnuts. 

2 eggs. 1 cup of chopped raisins. 

h cup of sweet milk. 1| teaspoons baking powder. 

2 cups of flour. 

Mix quickly, and bake in long dripping-pan 35 minutes. 

Mrs. A. W, McCaxdless. 
HICKORY -NUT CAKE 

1 cup of butter. 2 eggs, yolks. 

2 cups of sugar. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

3 cups of flour. 1 pint of hickory nut meats. 
1 cup of sweet milk. 7 egg whites. 

Chop the nuts fine, and sprinkle with flour. Beat the 
egg whites to a stiff froth. Mrs. J. B. Lyall. 

1-2-3-4 CAKE 

I cup of butter. 4 eggs. 

1 cup milk. 2 teaspoonfuls baking 

2 cups sugar. powder. 

3 cups flour. L 2 teaspoonfuls vanilla. 

Bake in layers, and put together with powdered sugar 
and sliced bananas. Mrs. Martha Wymax. 



132 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



PLAIN CAKE 

^ cup of butter. 
1 cup of milk. 



4 eggs. 

3 cups of flour. 

2 teaspoons of cinnamon and 

allspice, or 
\ teaspoon of flavoring. 

Two ounces of melted chocolate may be added after yolks 
of eggs. Cream butter, add sugar, then beaten yolks ; 
then milk and flour alternately ; lastly, beaten whites of 
eggs, which should be folded in. Nellie Nelson. 



2 heaping teaspoons baking 

powder. 
2 cups of sugar. 



PORK CAKE 

\ lb. salt pork. 

\ pint of boiling water. 

2 cups of sugar. 

1 cup of molasses. 

1 teaspoon of soda. 

2 tablespoons of cinnamon. 
1 tablespoon of allspice. 



1 tablespoon of cloves. 

Sifted flour. 

1 teaspoon baking powder. 

1 lb. of raisins. 

\ lb. of citron. 

1 lb. of currants. 

1 cup of nuts. 



Have the salt pork all fat, cut so fine as to be like lard, 
and then pour the boiling water on it. Add the sugar, 
molasses with the soda dissolved in it. the spices, and 
enough sifted flour to make a stiff mixture with the baking 
powder sifted in the flour. Lastly, add the fruit, cut and 
chopped fine, chopped nuts which have been dredged with 
flour. Bake in a slow oven. Mrs. J. B. Talbott. 



POTATO CAKE 

2 cups sugar. 
1 cup butter (scant). 
4 eggs. 

! cnp mashed potato. 
\ cup grated chocolate or 
cocoa. 



2 cups flour (very scant). 

1 teaspoon each cloves, 
nutmeg, cinnamon. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 
1 cup nuts. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 



| cup of milk. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 133 

('ream butter and sugar, and add yolks of eggs, beaten. 
Then mashed potato, then cocoa and milk. . Add beaten 
whites last, and bake rather slowly. 

Lucile W. Jones. 
POUND CAKE 

1 lb. of butter. 1 lb. of eggs (f of whites and 

1 lb. of sugar. \ of yolks). 

1 lb. of flour. 

Mix butter and flour; mix sugar and eggs beaten sepa- 
rately and till very stiff. Mrs. S. F. Raff. 

PRINCE OF WALES CAKE 

Dark Part : Light Part : 

1 cup of brown sugar. 1 cup of sugar. 
\ cup of butter. \ cup of butter. 
\ cup of sour milk. 1 cup of flour. 

2 cups of flour. \ cup of corn-starch. 
1 cup of chopped raisins. \ cup of sweet milk. 
\ teaspoon of -soda. 3 egg whites. 

1 tablespoon molasses. 
1 tablespoon cinnamon. 
1 tablespoon nutmeg. 
1 tablespoon cloves. 

3 egg yolks. 

In the dark part, dissolve the soda in a little warm water. 
In the light part, mix the corn-starch with the flour. Any 
good icing. Mrs. J. H. Buettner. 

ROLL JELLY CAKE 

3 eggs. 1 cup of flour. 

1 cup of sugar. 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

\ cup of water. 

Beat eggs till thick, add sugar, water, flour, and baking 



134 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

powder. Pour thinly in large pan. Bake in quick oven 
about ten minutes. Take from pan at once, spread with 
jelly, and roll. Ruth Leidigh. 

SNICKERDOODLE 

1 cup of gran, sugar. Pinch of salt. 

| cup of butter. "l\ cups of flour. 

1 egg. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

1 cup of milk. \ cup of currants. 

Spread in a pan. Before baking, sprinkle with sugar 
and cinnamon. Bake 20 minutes. Mrs. L. B. Young. 

SPANISH BUN 

1 cup of brown sugar. 1 teaspoon of cloves. 

\ cup of sweet milk. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

\ cup of butter. 2 egg yolks. 

1 teaspoon of cinnamon. 1 cup of flour. 

Bake in two layers, put filling on top of each layer. 

Icing : 

2 egg whites. f cup of light-brown sugar. 
Beat egg whites stiff. Sift the sugar on the eggs and 

spread on the cake, and put in oven to brown. 

Mrs. N. B. Sawyer. 
SPICE CAKE 

1 cup butter. 1 cup milk. 

2 cups sugar. 2 teaspoons cinnamon. 
Yolks of 5 eggs. 1 teaspoon allspice. 
Whites of 3 eggs. 1 teaspoon cloves. 

2| cups flour. 2 level teaspoons baking pow- 

der. 

Bake in a horn-pan in a slow oven for an hour or more. 
Ice with boiled frosting, using the two extra whites of eggs. 

Mrs. 0. A. Peterson. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (<)<)K BOOR 135 



."> eggs. 1 cup flour. 

1 teaspoon baking powder. 



SPONGE CAKE 

3 eggs. 

1 cup sugar. 1 teaspoon hi 

I cup of hot water. Pinch of salt. 

Beat yolks of eggs, sugar and water first. Add flour 
with baking powder and whites of eggs last. Bake in mod- 
erately hot oven. Mrs. Fred Briggs. 

SPONGE CAKE 

4 eggs. 2 cups sugar. 

l 2 cups flour. \ cup boiling water. 

1 teaspoon baking powder. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Stir eggs slightly ; add sifted sugar, and beat well ; then 
sifted flour (leaving enough to put in the baking powder). 
Beat well ; then add slowly, beating all the time, the boil- 
ing water; then the rest of flour and baking powder and 
vanilla. Bake in slow oven. Mrs. Mary Hinkle. 

CALIFORNIA SPONGE CAKE 

6 eggs. 1^ cups of sugar. 

H lemons. H cups of flour. 

1 lemon rind, grated. 

Sift flour four times. Beat whites of eggs until dry ; 
add one-half of sugar, and beat again for five minutes. 
Beat yolks of eggs until thick ; add one-half of sugar and 
beat five minutes. Add juice and rind of lemons to yolks ; 
put whites and yolks together. Beat five minutes, add 
flour last, and fold in carefully. Bake in slow oven about 
one hour. Do not butter pan. Ruth Leidigh. 



136 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



SUNSHINE CAKE 



7 eggs, whites. 1 scant cup of flour. 

5 egg yolks. \ teaspoon cream tartar. 

1 cup granulated sugar. 1 teaspoon flavoring. 

Measure the flour after sifting five times. 

Beat yolks of eggs till thick, and set aside ; now add 
pinch of salt and cream of tartar to the whites, and beat 
until very stiff ; add sugar ; beat thoroughly, then add 
flavoring and beaten yolks ; beat lightly, and carefully 
stir «n flour. Bake in moderate oven forty or fifty minutes. 
Invert to cool. Junta Scheble. 

TUMBLER CAKE 

H tumblers of flour. Butter. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. Milk. 

1 tumbler of sugar. Flavoring. 

2 eggs. 

Break the eggs into a tumbler, add enough butter to 
make one-half full ; fill with milk ; add flavoring. Stir 
two minutes. Butter must be very soft. 

Mrs. F. E. Larson. 

SMOOTH WHITE CAKE 

1 cup flour. 1 cup of sugar. 

\ cup of butter. \ cup of milk. 

3 egg whites. 2 teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 

der. 

Cream together the flour and butter. Beat stiff the 
whites of eggs, and add the sugar to them. Add the bak- 
ing powder to the milk, and stir well into the flour and but- 
ter mixture, then the beaten egg-whites mixture. Flavor- 
ing last. Mrs. L. T. Bostick. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAX CIH'RCII (DDK HOOK 137 



WHITE CAKE 



8 eggs, whites. 3 cups of Swansdown flour. 

■■2 cups of sugar. .'J rounding teaspoons of bak- 
\ cup of butter. ing powder. 

1 cup of milk. Vanilla. 

('ream the butter and sugar, add milk slowly, beating 
all the time, then the sifted flour slowly; reserving one- 
quarter of a cup in which to sift baking powder. Then fold 
in thoroughly, the egg whites. Bake slowly one hour. 

Mrs. L. R. Lockwood. 
WHITE LOAF CAKE 

1 cup of granulated sugar. 4 egg-whites, unbeaten. 

| cup of butier. 1 teaspoon of baking powder. 

1| cups of well-sifted flour. Flavoring. 

\ cup of sweet milk. 

Cream the butter and sugar well. Add the flour and milk 
alternately. Bake 40 minutes in slow oven. This cake 
will cut into 20 pieces. Recipe doubled makes a large 
white cake. Carrol V. Harper. 

YANKEE CAKE 

3 eggs. \ teaspoon of nutmeg. 

1 cup sugar. 1 teaspoon of cin anion. 
\ cup of butter. 1 teaspoon of cloves. 

\ cup of sour milk. 1 teaspoon of soda. 

2 cups of raisins. 

Cream butter and sugar. Add yolks of eggs beaten light, 
add milk, then fruit, spices, flour and soda dissolved in a 
little hot water, whites of eggs well beaten. Bake in two 
layers, put together with soft icing — fig best. If desired, 
1 cup of nuts, 1 cup of preserves and half-cup more of flour 
may be added. Mrs. L. R. Lockwood. 



Fillings and Icings for 
Cakes 

ICING HINT 

A pinch of baking powder added to sugar before boiling 
makes boiled icing delicious and creamy. 

Mrs. Emma Gillett Wasson. 

One teaspoon vinegar added to frosting when it is beaten 
will prevent it hardening. 

ALMOND CREAM FILLING 

^ pint of sweet cream. 1 teaspoon corn-starch. 

3 egg yolks. 1 lb. almonds, blanched. 

1 tablespoon sugar or more. 

Beat the yolks, sugar and corn-starch. Stir into the 
cream, cook until thick. Add one-half of almonds, chopped. 
Put between the layers of white cake, sticking on other half 
of nuts split in two. Mrs. W. E. Carr. 

BOILED FROSTING 

3 eggs. 1 large teacup of granulated sugar. 

4> tablespoons of hot water. 

Boil until a little of it jingles when dropped in a cup of ice 
or very cold water. Pour on stiffly beaten whites of eggs 
till cold enough to put on cake. Mas. W. E. Moore, 

Peru, 111. 

(138) 



FIRST PRESBY.TERIAN (111 II' II COOK BOOK L39 

BOILED ICING 

1 cup cane sugar. 1 egg-white. 

| cup boiling water. 

Boil the sugar and water till a soft lump is formed in cold 
water. Heat the white of egg stiff. Pour syrup hot into 
stiff egg. Flavor. Beat till a spoonful dropped on the 
cake will glaze instantly. Be sure the cake is well cooled 
before it is iced. Carrol Harper. 

BURNT CARAMEL 

1 cup of sugar. \ cup of boiling water. 

Heat a skillet hot (not smoking), and put a cup of sugar 
in it ; stir it until thoroughly browned (you will think it is 
burnt). Then add the boiling water and let boil till like 
thin molasses. This makes enough for two or three cakes. 

Helen Hubbard. 

Mrs. Lauderdale. 
CARAMEL FILLING 

3 cups brown sugar. | cup butter. h cup sweet milk. 

Boil until it thickens, and whip. Mrs. E. C. Aspey. 

CARAMEL FILLING 

1 cup of sour cream. 1 cup nut meats. 1 cup sugar. 

Cook together to soft ball. 

Mrs. Emma Gillett Wasson. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMEL FROSTING 

1| cups of sugar, gran. 7 tablespoons sweet milk. 

1 cake of sweet chocolate. 

Boil all together exactly four minutes; remove from the 
fire, and beat hard until it is like molasses ; pour over the 



140 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

cake. I often use bakers' chocolate and sweeten it in 
place of the sweet chocolate. Mrs. W. E. Moore, 

Peru, 111. 
A QUICK JELLY FILLING 
4 tablespoons of jelly. Powdered sugar. 

Use any kind of jelly ; beat in the powdered sugar until 
stiff, and put between layers. Ice top plain. Enough for 
two layer cakes. Margaret Raffington. 

LEMON JELLY 

1 lemon. 1 egg. 

1 cup of sugar. 1 lump of butter. 

Grate the rind and squeeze the juice of the lemon over 
the sugar, add the butter, and let all melt together. Last 
thing, add the beaten egg and let all boil up well till it 
thickens. Mrs. Laura A. Sinclair. 

MILK ICING 

1| cups gran, sugar. " \ cup sweet milk. Flavoring. 

Let it come to a boil, and allow to boil five minutes. 
Remove from fire ; add flavoring desired, and whip to a 
cream. 

MRS. MEISENHEIMER'S ORANGE ICING 
1 orange. Powdered sugar. 

Grate rind of one orange, add to this its juice, and 
powdered sugar till desired consistency is obtained. 

Carroll V. Harper. 
MINNEHAHA FILLING 

Chop three-fourths of a cup of seeded raisins, and stir 
into boiled frosting. Spread between layers of cake; boil 
sugar a little longer than usual, as raisins make it sticky. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 111 

MARSHMALLOW FILLING 

1 11). marshmallows. 1 tablespoon of water. 

Melt the marshmallows in a double boiler. Add the 
water, and spread between the layers of a cake. 

Mrs. A. D. Raffington. 
QUICK FROSTING. 

1 lb. of powdered sugar. Cream or rich milk. 

It is best not to mix all of sugar at once for all the layers. 
About half the amount of sugar for first two layers, and 
add only a little milk at a time, stirring constantly. 

Mrs. Lauderdale. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN FILLING 

1 grated cocoanut. 4 cups of white sugar. 

1 lb. of raisins. 1 cup of water. 

1 lb. of currants. 2 egg whites. 

h lb. of dates. \ lb. of figs. 

Make a boiled icing out of the sugar-water, and pour 
over the beaten whites, and beat until cool. Save enough 
icing for top and stir mixed fruit into balance and spread 
between layers. Any white layer cake may be used for 
foundation; layers preferably thin and smooth. 

Mrs. G. T. Lee. 
SOFT WHITE ICING 

1 cup of gran, sugar. 2 egg whites. 

6 tablespoons cold water. 1 teaspoon of baking powder. 

2 tablespoons of vinegar. 

Boil the sugar, cold water and vinegar till it hairs when 
a little is dropped from spoon. Stir this mixture into the 
stiffly beaten whites, adding 1 teaspoon of baking powder. 
Beat well till smooth. Mrs. Garland Craig. 




Quaker 

Oats 
Recipes 




QUAKER OATS BREAD. 

(Quantity for three loaves.) 

2 cups freshly boiled water. 2 cups boiling water. 

1 yeast eake. ', cup molasses. 

6 cups flour. 1 tablespoon sugar. 

2 cups Quaker Oats. 1 tablespoon butter. 

1 teaspoon salt. 
Process : Pour two cups of boiling water over the Quaker Oats ; let stand until 
lukewarm. Put salt, sugar, butter and molasses into a. mixing bcwl ; pour over two 
cups hot water. When lukewarm add yeast cake dissolved in a half cup of lukewarm 
water; add Quaker Oats and the flour; add the latter one cup at a time, beating con- 
stantly. When- you have added five cups, dredge the molding board heavily with 
the remaining cup and knead the bread until it is smooth and elastic. Set to rise in a 
warm place. When double in bulk cut down and shape into loaves ; each should 
weigh one pound. Set to rise again, and when double in bulk bake one hour. This 
dough is very sticky and it may be necessary to use more flour for dredging the board. 

GLASGOW WAFERS. 

1 cup fine Oatmeal. 1 teaspoon salt. 

1 cup Quaker Oats. $- teaspoon soda. 

2 cups flour. \ cup lard. 

\ cup sugar. h cup boiling water. 

Process : Mix oatmeal, oats, flour, sugar, salt and soda ; add lard to boiling water 
and add to first mixture. Toss on a floured board, paft and roll as thinly as possible, 
cut round or in strips. Bake on well-buttered tin sheet in a slow oven. Serve these 
at luncheon with a glass of milk. 

QUAKER OATS SUET PUDDING. 



1 teaspoon soda. 
1| teaspoons salt. 

2 teaspoons ginger. 
1 teaspoon cinnamon. 
i teaspoon cloves. 

add oats ; add molasses and milk 



1 cup finely chopped suet. 
1 cup molasses. 
1 cup milk. 

1 i cups flour. 

2 cups Quaker uncooked oats. 

J teaspoon nutmeg. 
Process: Mix and sift the dry ingredients; 
to suet ; combine mixtures ; turn into a well-buttered mold ; cover, place mold on 
a trivet in a kettle of boiling water (water must not reach the cover of mold) ; cook 
three hours. One-half cup each of raisins and currants may be added. 

THE QUAKER OATS COMPANY 

CHICAGO 



Small Cakes and Cookies 



1| cups of sugar. 

\ cup chopped almonds. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 

\\ teaspoon baking powder. 



BISHOP BREAD 

3 eggs. 

Little salt. 

\ cup chopped raisins. 

\\ cups flour. 

Cream eggs and sugar ; add other ingredients ; bake in 
shallow pan ; cut in strips about half-inch wide. Put 
strips in pan again edgewise, and toast five minutes. Place 
in air on plates ; they will be crisp. Nice to serve with 
lemonade. Miss Nussbaum. 

(Contributed by Mrs. D. E. Richards.) 



HERMIT DROP CAKES 



\\ cups sugar, brown or 

white. 
4 eggs. 

1 cup currants. 
1 cup English walnuts. 
1 teaspoon baking powder 



1 cup butter. 

1 cup raisins. 
1 cup citron, cut fine. 
1 teaspoon soda. 
1 teaspoon nutmeg. 
2§ cups flour. 
1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

Cream butter and sugar ; add beaten eggs ; boil raisins 
and currants together in cup of water a few moments. This 
should make a thick batter. Grease and flour pan, and 
drop a teaspoonful for each cooky. 

Mrs. Helen A. Decker, 

Turon, Kansas. 
(143) 



144 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



OATMEAL DROP CAKES 

1 cup butter. 1 cup sugar. 

1 cup currants. § cup sour milk. 

2 eggs. 1 teaspoon soda. 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. 1 scant cup oatmeal. 

Flour to make stiff enough to drop. 

Mrs. E. H. Richardson. 



ROXBURY CAKES 

2 eggs. 
\ cup sugar. 
j cup butter. 
| cup molasses. 
h cup sour milk. 
\\ cups flour. 

Beat yolks, add sugar gradually, then butter, molasses 
and sour milk ; mix, and sift dry ingredients ; add to first 
mixture; then add beaten whites, chopped raisins and 
nuts; bake in moderate oven in gem-pans. 

Marjorie Keys. 

Mildred Faris. 



1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

| teaspoon cloves. 

Nutmeg. 

1 teaspoon soda. 

5 cup raisins. 

\ cup English walnuts. 



1^ cup sugar. 

1 teaspoon soda. 

2| cups flour. 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

\ cup currants. 

-I tablespoons grape juice. 



BOSTON COOKIES 

1 cup butter. 

3 eggs. 

H teaspoons hot water. 

\ teaspoon salt. 

1 cup English walnuts. 
\ cup raisins. 

2 tablespoons molasses. 

Cream butter, add sugar gradually, and eggs well beaten. 
Add soda (in water) ; add half of flour mixed and sifted 
with salt and cinnamon; then add nuts, fruit, and re- 
mainder of flour. Drop by teaspoonfuls three or four 
inches apart on buttered sheet. Bake in slow oven. 

Mrs. R. L. Burns. 



FIRST PRESB1 TEIIIAX CHURCH COOK BOOK 145 

SPICE CAKES 

1 cup brown sugar. 2 cups flour. 

1 cup raisins. 1 teaspoon each of cloves, 

4 level teaspoons butter. cinnamon, nutmeg, soda 

1 cup sour milk. and baking powder. 

Bake in well-buttered gem-pans, 10 to 15 minutes. Will 
make 24 cakes. Myrtle Busee. 

BROWN SUGAR COOKIES 

3 cups sugar (brown). 1 cup butter. 

1 cup sweet milk. 2 eggs. 

3 teaspoons baking powder. Flour. 

Cream sugar and butter ; add all ingredients with enough 
flour to make a soft batter; roll medium thick, and bake 
in hot oven. 

The secret of good cookies is a soft dough and very hot 
oven. Mrs. L. A. Pennington. 

CHOCOLATE COOKIES 

| cup butter. 2 cups sugar (brown). 

1 egg. 1 cup grated chocolate. 
^ cup sour 'milk. | teaspoon soda (scant). 

2 teaspoons vanilla. Flour. • 

Cream all together, warming chocolate to a paste, using 
sufficient flour to roll. Mrs. .L. Symns. 

ENGLISH COOKIES 

2 cups brown sugar. 1 cup lard and butter 
1 cup cold coffee. (half and half.) 

1 scant teaspoon soda. 2 eggs. 

3 cups flour. 1 teaspoon baking powder. 
1 teaspoon nutmeg. 1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

2 cups seeded raisins (cooked before using). 
Nuts may be added. 

Drop off spoon; bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. C. E. Branine. 



146 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



1 cup butter. 

2 eggs. 

1 teaspoon baking soda. 
\ teaspoon cloves. 
Flour enough to roll. 

Mrs. J. H. Buettner. 



FRUIT COOKIES 

2 cups sugar. 

2 cups chopped raisins. 

2 tablespoons sour milk. 

^ teaspoon nutmeg. 

\ teaspoon essence almond. 

Bake in quick oven. 

GINGER COOKIES 

1 cup shortening (butter or half butter and half lard). 
1 cup molasses. 1 cup sour cream. 

1 egg. 2 small teaspoons soda. 

1 teaspoon each ginger and cinnamon. 

Flour to make very soft dough. Do not roll too thin. 

Mrs. F. D. Wolcott. 
GINGER CAKES 



1 cup butter. 
1 cup sugar. 

1 cup water or coffee. 

2 eggs. 

3 cups flour. 
1 cup fruit. 



1 level teaspoon soda in hot 
water. 

\ teaspoon cinnamon. 
\ teaspoon cloves. 

2 teaspoons ginger. 
1 cup molasses. 



Cream butter and sugar; then add eggs, liquid, flour, 
molasses, and spice. Bake in gem-pans. 

Ruth Leidigh. 



GINGER DROP COOKIES 



1 cup molasses, 
f cup butter. 

2 teaspoons soda in 1 cup 
hot water. 

3 cups flour. 

Drop on buttered tins. 



1 cup brown sugar. 

1 teaspoon each cinnamon 
and nutmeg. 

2 eggs. 

Mrs. J. H. Buettner. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAX ( Hl'RCH COOK BOOK 14- 



HERMIT COOKIES 

§ cup butter. 1| cups sugar. 

3 eggs. • I cup seeded raisins. 

1 teaspoon soda. 1 teaspoon each cloves, cinna- 

3 cups flour. mon, and nutmeg. 

Roll and cut with cooky-cutter. Mrs. F. E. Larson. 



GOOD COOKIES 

2 eggs. • If cups sugar. 

1 cup butter. 2 tablespoons sweet milk. 

1 teaspoon soda. Flour to roll soft. 

Season with cinnamon or to taste. Sprinkle with sugar. 

Mrs. J. L. Penney. 

OATMEAL CRISPS 

1 cup sugar. 2 eggs. 

1 tablespoon melted butter. 2| cups oatmeal. 

\ teaspoon salt. L 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

1 teaspoon orange extract. 

Cream butter and sugar; add beaten eggs and extract; 
then oatmeal with salt and baking powder mixed with it. 
Drop in small teaspoonfuls on the bottom of well-greased 
pan, two inches apart. Bake slowly. 

Mrs. F. P. Hettinger. 

OATMEAL COOKIES 

2 eggs. \ cup crisco melted. 

1 cup sugar. 2 cups oatmeal. 

2 scant cups flour. 1 cup chopped raisins. 

Salt to taste. 1 level teaspoon soda in table- 

spoon water. 

Dust raisins in the flour; after all are stirred together* 



148 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



drop small amounts on greased pans, using hand to pat in 
shape, and keep hand dusted with flour. 

Mrs. Nettie French, 

Emporia, Kans. 

PEANUT COOKIES 

2 cups shelled peanuts. 3 teaspoons butter. 

1 cup sugar. 3 eggs. 

2 tablespoons milk. Little salt and flour. 

Remove skins from peanuts, and run through meat- 
grinder ; cream butter and sugar ; mix all together, using 
enough flour to make a soft dough; roll thin on a floured 
board; cut with a small cutter, and bake in a moderate 
oven. Mrs. Kate Young. 

COOKIES WITH RAISIN FILLING 

1 cup sugar. \ cup lard. 

\ cup milk, sweet. 1 egg, beaten. 

3| cups flour, sifted. 3 teaspoons baking powder. 

Filling : 
f cup sugar. 1 cup chopped raisins. 

1 cup boiling water. Cook until thick. 

Roll dough thin; cut in circles; put one on greased 
pan; put on one-half teaspoon filling; cover with another 
circle; pinch edges. Continue to fill pan. Bake.. 

Mrs. A. D. Raffington. ' 

RICH COOKIES 

1 cup butter. 2 cups sugar. 

4 eggs. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Flour to make^soft dough. No water or milk. 

Mrs. E. C. Aspey. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 



W.) 



SUGAR COOKIES 

\\ cups sugar. 

1 cup sweel milk. 

2 heaping teaspoons baking 

powder. 

Flour to roll. 



SUGAR COOKIES 

2 eggs. 

1 cup butter. 

1 teaspoon soda. 



f cup Cottolene; salt. 

2 eggs. 

Flavor. 



Mrs. Philip Emmert. 



Sugar. 

1 cup sour cream. 
Cinnamon. 
Flour. 



Drop an egg in a cup and fill up with sugar ; repeat ; 
add the rest of the ingredients, using enough flour to make 
a soft dough. Mrs. E. H. Richardson. 



SUGAR WAFERS 



1 small teaspoonful soda. 
Flour enough to make dough. 
Flavor with vanilla. 



1 cup gran, sugar. 
| cup butter. 
f cup sour milk. 

Roll thin; sprinkle with granulated sugar; roll again; 
cut. Bake in quick oven. Mrs. J. H. Harper. 



WELSH COOKIES 

1 cup sugar. 

2 eggs. 
Nutmeg. 

f teaspoon baking powder. 
Milk to soften. 



f cup shortening (f butter, 

\ lard). 
Salt. 

3 cups flour. 
1 cup currants. 



Roll and cut thin; bake on griddle like pancakes. When 
done, sprinkle with sugar; put in jar, and cover with a 
cloth. Lucile W. Jones. 



150 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

COCOANUT KISSES 

1 cocoanut. 1| cups sugar. 

2 eggs, whites only. 3 heaping tablespoons flour. 

h teaspoon baking powder. 

Prepare cocoanut and run through grinder; mix flour 
and baking powder ; add sugar and then cocoanut, and 
lastly the whites of eggs beaten stiff. Drop on tins well 
greased, and dredged with flour ; lift off with pancake- 
turner as soon as taken from oven. 

Mrs. Lincoln Davis. 
DOUGHNUTS 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup sour milk. 

1 even teaspoon soda. 2 eggs. 

1 large spoonful melted lard. Cinnamon or nutmeg. 

Flour enough to make soft dough. 

Roll thin, and fry in hot lard. Mrs. F. E. Larson. 

DOUGHNUTS 

2 eggs. 1 cup sugar. 

1 cup sweet milk. 3 tablespoons melted 

3 teaspoons baking powder. Cottolene. 
Nutmeg. | teaspoon salt. 

Flour to roll. 

Fry in hot Cottolene. Mrs. P. M. Emmert. 

DOUGHNUTS 

1 cup sugar. 2 eggs. 

1 cup sweet milk. 5 dessert spoons melted 

2 teaspoons baking powder, butter, 
rounded. Salt. 

Nutmeg. 

Mix very soft. Inez Winchester. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 151 

DOUGHNUTS 

1 cup hot mashed potatoes. 1 large cup sugar. 
v 2 eggs. 1 cup sweet milk. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. Butter size of small egg. 
Flavoring. Flour to make soft dough. 

Mrs. Alexander. 

KISSES 

1 egg, white only. ^ cup gran, sugar. 

A few drops vanilla. 

Beat egg stiff ; add sugar slowly, flavoring last. Drop 
on wax paper ; place on thick cardboard and bake in slow 
oven 30 minutes. Makes ten. Mrs. Glover Colladay. 

MARGUERITES 

Make a boiled icing of brown sugar or white ; add English 
walnuts which have been chopped mediumly fine. Spread 
this icing on Long Branch crackers or wafers, and place 
in oven until they are a delicate brown in color. 

Miss Antrobus. 
MACAROONS 

:! egg whites. 1 cup sugar. 

2 tablespoons flour. Cocoanut, 10-cent box. 

Whites of eggs beaten stiff : add sugar, flour, cocoanut, 
flavor, and drop the size of a hickory nut on buttered paper. 
Cook in slow oven. Mrs. Geo. Bentley. 

MACAROONS 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup nuts, cut. 

f cup cracker-crumbs. 2 eggs. 

Mix sugar, nuts and cracker-crumbs not too fine ; add 
eggs beaten very stiff ; bake on buttered tins, and let 
stand until cold. Mrs. L. G. Dupler. 



152 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



BLUEBERRY CAKES 

1 cup sugar. 

1 cup sweet milk. 

1 egg. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Cream butter and sugar; 
berries. Bake in quick oven 
48 cakes. 



2^ cups flour. 
1 cup berries. 
\ cup butter. 
Salt. 

add egg, milk, flour, salt, and 
One box of berries makes 
Mrs. O. R. Slavens. 



OATMEAL HERMITS 

1 cup of sugar. 
\ cup of butter. 
1 cup cocoanut. 
1 cup raisins, chopped. 
\ cup of buttermilk, or sour 
milk. 

Drop in teaspoonfuls on a buttered pan, and bake in mod- 
erate oven. Emma Justice Pennington. 



1 egg beaten. 

1 cup oatmeal. 

2 cups flour. 

1 teaspoon of soda. 
1 cup nuts, chopped. 



BILLY GOATS 



\ cup butter. 
\\ cups brown sugar. 
1 lb. dates, cut fine. 
1 lb. walnuts, cut large 
\ cup warm water. 
Pinch salt. 



\ cup meat-fryings. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 

3 well-beaten eggs. 

2| cups flour. 

1 tablespoon cinnamon. 

1 rounding teaspoon soda. 

Drop with spoon on buttered tins. Makes about 40. 

Mrs. Fred Carpenter. 



ROCKS 

1 cup butter. 

3 eggs. 

1 teaspoon soda. 

\\ cups brown sugar. 



2§ cups flour. 

1 cup chopped raisins. 

1 lb. English walnuts. 

Sylvia H. Dukelow. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK L53 

RUSSIAN ROCKS 

1| cups sugar (light brown). 1 cup butler. 
:> eggs. 1 j cups flour. 

\ teaspoon soda. 3 tablespoons warm water. 

1 lb. raisins chopped. 1 lb. nuts, dales, figs, and 

8 tablespoons cinnamon. other fruits. 

2 tablespoons ground cloves. 

Cream together butter and sugar; add eggs well beaten ; 
dissolve soda in warm water. Grease large pan with a little 
butter and drop dough in tiny drops, as mixture will spread 
while baking. Mixture should be very thick. 

Mrs. L. P. Ballard. 
CREAM PUFFS 

1 cup boiling water. § cup butter. 

1 cup flour. 3 eggs. 

Stir water, butter and flour to a thin paste; when cold, 
add eggs and beat five minutes ; drop in spoonfuls on 
buttered tins, and bake 30 minutes in quick oven. 

Filling : 

1 cup milk. 1 egg. 

1 tablespoon flour. Small piece butter. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Cook filling and let cool. When puff is cold cut 
open with sharp knife, fill with filling, and cover. 

Mrs. Fay Hughes. 
WARM TEACAKES 

\ cup butter. 1 cup sugar. 

2 cup sweet milk. 2 egg s - 

2 cups flour. 1 heaping teaspoon baking 

Nutmeg or vanilla. powder. 

Stir quickly; bake immediately in gem-pans. 

Junta M. Sciieble. 



154 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

SUPREME SURPRISE 

1 cup sweet milk. 1 cup sugar. 

1 teaspoon melted butter. L 2 eggs. 
Little salt. 2i cups flour. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. Nutmeg. 

Mix thoroughly, and drop with a teaspoon into hot lard, 
and fry light brown. Miss S. A. Zimmers. 

BLACK WALNUT WAFERS 

| pound brown sugar. h pound black walnuts. 

2 eggs. 1 tablespoon flour. 

\ teaspoon baking powder. Pinch of salt. 

Drop from spoon, and bake. 

Mrs. Edward Colladay, 

Washington, D. C. 
WALNUT WAFERS 

2 eggs. \ lb. sugar (light brown). 

\ cup flour. \ teaspoon baking powder. 

\ cup black walnut meats. 

Beat very lightly, eggs and sugar ; add one-half cup sifted 
flour and baking powder, with a pinch of salt ; add walnut 
meats with enough flour to make a very stiff batter. Roll 
in small balls (as big as a walnut), and bake in a quick 
oven. When done, put together with stiff frosting and roll 
in frosting if desired, using brown sugar frosting. If Eng- 
lish walnuts are used, use two tablespoons melted butter. 
Makes twenty-five balls. Lucy E. Leidigh. 



Pies 

PIE HINTS 

If for juicy pie, wet lower edge before putting on top 
crust. Then wet both and pin narrow wet cloth around 
the edge, and juice will not run out. Lucy E. Leidigh. 

Mix pie crust and biscuit dough with a fork, and you will 
get better results. - 

Mix pastry crust with ice-water. 

MERINGUE 

Beat the whites of two eggs, after putting in a pinch of 
salt, until stiff; add two tablespoons white sugar. Beat 
until smooth. 

PIE CRUST 

1 cup lard. 3 cups flour — salt. 

Cold water to mix it with. The colder the better. 

Mrs. Elward. 

APPLE PIE 

Apples. Sugar. 

Cinnamon. Butter. 

Slice apples thin, and put in pie. Add sugar, cinnamon, 
and bits of butter ; put on top crust and bake in moderately 
hot oven three-quarters hour. Nannie Austin. 

(155) 



156 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

BUTTERSCOTCH PIE 

1 cup of soft "A" sugar. 2 eggs. 

2 tablespoons of flour. 1 cup of cold water. 

2 heaping tablespoons 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, 

butter. 1 baked pie crust. 

• Mix flour, sugar and yolks of eggs to a smooth paste ; 
add gradually water and butter, and stir over fire until 
thick. Then add vanilla. Pour into pie crust. Beat 
whites of eggs stiff, add 2 tablespoons sugar, put on top 
of pie and brown. Mrs. R. D. Sciiermerhorn. 

PEACH OR APPLE PIE 

1 cup sugar. 1 egg, yolk only. 

1 teaspoon flour. 2 tablespoons butter. 

2 eggs. 

Line tin with rich paste, fill with peaches or raw apples ; 
beat half-cup of sugar, butter, eggs and flour together, 
pour over fruit ; sprinkle with other half-cup of sugar and 
bake without upper crust. 

Make meringue of white of egg and put on top and 
brown. Use either fresh or canned fruit. 

Mrs. Ed. L. Teed. 
BANANA PIE 

2 bananas. § cup sugar. 

2 cups milk. 2 tablespoons corn-starch. 

2 eggs. 

Bake an under crust and take from oven and slice evenly 
over the bottom the bananas; over this pour the custard 
made -of milk, sugar, corn-starch and yolks of eggs cooked 
on top of stove. Make meringue of the whites of eggs, 
and spread on top and brown. 

Mas. L. A. Pennington. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK L57 

APPLE-SAUCE CUSTARD PIE 

1 cup apple sauce. 2 eggs. 

2 cup sugar. I teaspoon cinnamon. 
| teaspoon nutmeg. 1 pint milk. 

Run apple sauce through colander; add yolks of eggs, 
sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and milk. Bake with one crust. 
Make meringue of whites of eggs for top of pie. Brown. 

Elizabeth G. Campbell. 

CHERRY PIE 

1 pint cherries. 3 eggs. 

1 cup sugar. 2 tablespoons flour. 

2 tablespoons water. 

Cook cherries, sugar, yolks of eggs, flour and water, and 
put in baked crust. Make meringue of whites of eggs with 
three tablespoons sugar; put on top, and brown in a slow 
oven. This makes two pies. Mrs. J. W. Brady. 

CHOCOLATE PIE 

2 eggs. 1 cup sugar. 

1 tablespoon butter. 2 tablespoon-* flour. 

2 tablespoons chocolate. 1 cup milk. 

Cook milk, sugar, flour, butter and yolks of eggs' in 
double boiler. Melt chocolate in a little hot water, and 
add to above and fill a baked crust. Beat the whites of 
eggs, frost top, and brown. Mrs. Harry Elbrador. 

COCOANUT PIE 

1 cup cocoanut. 2 cups milk. 

1 tablespoon flour. 1 tablespoon butter. 

3 eggs. | cup sugar. 

Soak cocoanut with one cup of milk over night. One 
tablespoon flour added to one cup scalded milk. Cook 



158 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

until thick, add the butter. When cool, add pinch of salt 
and yolks of eggs with sugar and cocoanut. Beat all. 
Fill an unbaked crust. Make meringue with the whites 
of eggs with 3 tablespoons sugar; brown. 

Mrs. Florence Smith. 
CRACKER PIE 

2 cups sugar. 1 cup golden drip syrup. 

1 cup raisins. h cup butter. 

10 square crackers. 3 tablespoons fruit juice. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 3 eggs, yolks. 

Roll crackers and put in bowl ; then mix butter and 
sugar. Add molasses and other ingredients and mix with 
crackers ; pour over the whole amount one pint boiling 
water. Bake the crust just enough to harden before add- 
ing the filling. Make meringue with whites of eggs, 
put on top and brown. Mrs. A. L. Sponsler. 

CRANBERRY TART PIE 

1 cup sugar. 2 eggs. 

| cup butter. 1 cup cranberry pulp. 

1 cup sweet cream. Nutmeg. 

Beat sugar and eggs lightly ; melt butter, and add to 
sifted cranberry pulp, little nutmeg, and add cream just 
before putting in oven. Lucile W. Jones. 

CRANBERRY PIE 

1 cup cranberries, heaping. 1 cup of sugar. 
\ cup water. 1 tablespoon flour. 

Take fine sound ripe cranberries, and with a sharp 
knife split each one until you have a heaping coffee-cup 
full. Add sugar, flour, and water. Put into your crust, 
cover with a top crust and bake slowly in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Park Smith. 



FIRST PRESBYTERI4N CHURCH COOK HOOK 159 

CREAM PIE 

1 pint milk. 1 cup white sugar. 

\ cup flour. 2 eggs, yolks. 

Heat the milk in double boiler; when hot, mix sugar and 
flour with the yolks of two eggs well beaten; add to the 
boiling milk until cooked. Flavor with vanilla. Put the 
custard into your baked pie crust. Make meringue of 
the whites of the eggs, spread over pie, and return to 
oven to brown . Mrs. R. S. Hoagland. 

CREAM PIE 

1 cup sugar. 1 tablespoon flour. 

2 egg whites. Cream or milk. 

Nutmeg. 

Stir together sugar and flour; add the beaten whites of 
eggs and enough cream to fill your pan ; flavor with nut- 
meg. If milk is used, one-quarter cup of butter is added. 
Some use the yolk of one egg also. It makes it richer. 

Emma Justice Pennington. 

HUTCHINSON PIE 

1 cup sugar (scant). 3 tablespoons flour. 

L 2 eggs. 1 pint sweet milk. 

1 tablespoon cocoanut. \ teaspoon vanilla. 

Dash of cinnamon. 

Scald the milk in double boiler, and pour into it sugar 
and flour mixed well with the yolks of eggs; then add 
cocoanut, vanilla, and cinnamon; pour all into a baked 
crust ; cover with stiffly beaten and sugared whites of eggs 
sprinkled with cocoanut, and brown in oven. 

Mrs. J. H. Harper. 



ICO GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

DATE PIE 

1 cup dates, chopped. | cup sugar. 1 cup sweet milk. 
Boil all together until thick ; put into baked crust, and 
let cool. Put whipped cream, sweetened and flavored, on 
top. Mrs. L. P. Ballard. 

Mrs. Lucile Prigg Eichhorn, 

Miles City, Montana. 
LEMON PIE 

1 lemon. 1 cup sugar. 

2 tablespoons corn-starch. 1 cup boiling water. 
Butter, size of walnut. 1 egg. 

Use the grated rind and juice of lemon and cook sugar, 
corn-starch, water and lemon until clear ; then add lump of 
butter. When cool, add the beaten yolks of eggs. Pour in 
baked crust ; cover with beaten whites of eggs, adding a 
tablespoon of sugar. Return to oven, and brown. 

Ruth Wolcott. 
LEMON PIE 

1 lemon, juice and grated l 2 eggs, yolks, well beaten, 

rind. 1 cup sweet milk. 

1 cup sugar. Small pieee of butter. 

2 tablespoons flour. 

Stir these all together in above stated order. Lastly, 
add the whites beaten to stiff froth, stirring lightly until 
mixed. Pour into pie-tin lined with pastry, and bake 40 
minutes. May Mathews. 

MOCK CHERRY PIE 

2 cups cranberries, cut in 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

halves. \\ cups cold water. 

1 cup raisins, seeded and 1 tablespoon flour. 

halved. 2 cups sugar. 

Cook; cool. Put in crust. Mrs. A. D. Raffington. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 161 

LEMON PIE 

1 lemon. 2 eggs. 

1 slice dry bread, grated or Butter size of hickory nut. 

crumbed fine. 1 tablespoon corn-starch. 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup water. 

Grated rind and juice of lemon; mix corn-starch and 
sugar; heat yolks of eggs, add bread-crumbs, water and 
butter. Cook, stirring while boiling until it is consistency 
of jelly. Pour into baked crust ; cover with beaten whites 
of eggs slightly sweetened, and place in oven to brown. 

Mrs. Chesney. 

MOCK MINCEMEAT PIE 

\ cup molasses. Butter (size of an egg). 

| cup sugar. 1 egg. 

f cup strong tea. 6 or 8 large crackers. 

1 cup chopped raisins. § cup vinegar. 

Salt and spices. 

Roll crackers fine ; mix and bake. Mrs. L. G. Crotts. 

MAPLE PIE 

1 cup best brown sugar. \\ tablespoons flour. 

1 cup milk. 2 egg yolks. 

Vanilla. 

Cook in double boiler until thick. Fill baked pie crust, 
and cover with meringue. Bake a golden brown. 

Mrs. O. F. Wright. 
(Contributed by Mrs. D. E. Richards.) 

MERINGUE PIE 

1 cup granulated sugar. .'> egg whites. 

\\ teaspoons vinegar (mild). 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Beat eggs stiff. Add sugar, one teaspoon at a time, beat- 
ing half-hour. Add vinegar and flavoring. Put in moderate 



162 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



oven, and bake one and one-half hours in two pie-tins. 
Serve cold with whipped cream and bananas, or strawber- 
ries between the layers. Jessie Handy Gray. 

MOCK MINCE PIE 

1 cup bread-crumbs. \ cup molasses. 

1 cup sugar. \ cup raisins. 

1 cup water. Butter (small piece). 

1 egg. Cinnamon and cloves. 

\ cup vinegar. 

Put on stove and let cook for a few minutes, and when 
cool beat in the egg. Bake with two crusts. This will 
make two pies. Mrs. Harry Hoey. 



MINCE-MEAT 

2 bowls finely chopped meat. 
2 bowls finely chopped raisins. 
1 bowl finely chopped suet. 
1 bowl molasses. 
1 bowl boiled cider. 

1 nutmeg. 

2 tablespoons cinnamon. 

Cook all together unti 



3 bowls finely chopped apples. 
1 bowl finely chopped cur- 
rants. 

4 bowls sugar. 

1 bowl vinegar. 
\ lb. citron. 

2 tablespoons ground cloves. 



apples are done. Use a quart 
bowl, and when it is all cooked there will be about three 
gallons of mince-meat. Put it in a stone jar in a cool 
place, and it will keep all winter. Mary WoLCOTT. 



MINCE-MEAT 

(> lbs. nice lean beef. 

(i lbs. sugar. 

3 lbs. seeded raisins. 

3 tablespoons of cinnamon. 

3 lemons' (rind and juice) 



3 lbs. suet. 
2 lbs. currants. 
\ lb. citron. 

2 tablespoons cloves. 
1 gallon chopped apples. 



4 pints vinegar or cider, 
Boil meat tender; when cool, chop tine, meat, suet and 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 163 

citron separately, (irate rind from lemon and use juice 
and rind only. Mix all together, and add juice off of any 
spiced fruits you may have. Mrs. N. E. Williams. 

GREEN TOMATO MINCE-MEAT 

1) lbs. green tomatoes. 4 lbs. sugar. 

"2 cups vinegar. -1 tablespoons cinnamon 

h tablespoon of pepper. (ground). 

Butter size of egg. 1 tablespoon salt. 

2 lbs. raisins. 

Chop tomatoes fine; drain, pressing out all the juice. 
Dissolve the sugar in two quarts water; add tomatoes; 
let come to a boil ; cook one and one-half hours, or until 
tomatoes are done. Place all together; let boil up, and 
seal in jars. Mrs. Isabella Crosby. 

RHUBARD PIE 

1 lb. rhubarb. 2 eggs. 

1 tablespoon flour. Pinch salt. 

Stew and sweeten the rhubarb to taste ; add the yolks 
of eggs, flour and salt, and bake slowly with an under 
crust ; cover with beaten whites of eggs well sweetened 
and brown. Mrs. Geo. T. McCandless. 

PINEAPPLE PIE 

1 cup sugar. H tablespoons flour. 

Juice 1| lemons. 1 1.5c. -can grated pineapple. 

\ cup hot water. 

Cook in double boiler until thick. Fill baked pie crust, 
and cover with meringue. Enough for one large pie. 

Mrs. O. F. Wright. 
(Contributed by Mrs. D. E. Richards.) 



164 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

PUMPKIN PIE 

\ can pumpkin. 4 eggs. 

| teaspoon cinnamon. \ teaspoon ginger. 

\ teaspoon allspice. \ teaspoon salt. 

\\ cups sugar. 1 quart milk. 

This makes two pies. • Edith R. Weltmer. 

PUMPKIN PIE 

1 quart pumpkin. 6 eggs. 

1 cup sugar. \ cup molasses. 

\\ pints rich hot milk. 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon. 

\ teaspoon ginger. 

If milk is not very rich, use a little butter. 
If eggs are not plentiful, use 4 eggs and' 2 tablespoons 
flour. 

This will make three pies. Mrs. A. W. McCandless. 

RAISIN PIE 

2 cups raisins (seeded). 3 cups hot water. 
| cup sugar. 1 egg. 

1 tablespoon corn-starch. Butter size of walnut. 

Nutmeg. 

Cook raisins and water fifteen minutes; then add sugar, 
eggs, corn-starch, and butter ; cook until it thickens ; add 
nutmeg, and make into two pies. Mrs. C. T. Taylor. 

RAISIN PIE 

1 cup raisins. 1 cup water. 

1 cup sugar. 1 tablespoon flour. 

Juice of 1 lemon. 

Cook all together until raisins are tender; then thicken 
with 1 tablespoon flour in a very little water. When re- 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK L65 

moved from fire, add lemon juice; and when cool, bake 
between two crusts. Nelle Rea. 

ORANGE TARTS 

2 tablespoons lard. 3 tablespoons hot water. 

\ teaspoon salt. Enough flour for pie crust. 

Bake in muffin tins. 

Filling : 

1 egg. 2 tablespoons butter, level. 

\ cup sugar. \ cup orange juice. 

Grate a little rind. Vanilla. 

Cream butter and sugar; add orange juice and egg. 
Cook in double boiler. Mrs. Jessie Handy Gray. 

SOUR CREAM PIE 

1 cup sour cream. 1 cup sugar (brown or gran.) 

2 teaspoons cinnamon. f cup raisins. 

One crust. 3 eggs, saving 2 whites for frosting. 

Mrs. P. A. Nelson. 

SOUR CREAM RAISIN PIE 

1 cup raisins. 1 cup sour cream. 

1 egg. 1 cup sugar. 

1 teaspoon flour. 

Beat egg, sugar and flour ; add cream and raisins. Bake 
in double crust. Mrs. Fred Carpenter. 

SUGAR PIE 

\ cup of cream. \ cup of butter. 

3 eggs. 3 cups sugar (light brown). 

Beat the eggs together ; melt the butter. Bake without 
top crust. Mrs. I. N. Koons. 



166 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

SPICE PIE 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup water. 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

1 tablespoon flour. 2 eggs. 

Stir butter and sugar well ; then add eggs, water and 
cinnamon, and stir well. Bake same as for custard. 

Mrs. Fannie I. Shaffer. 

TRANSPARENT PIE 

3 cups sugar, light brown. f cup butter. 4 eggs. 

Cream butter and sugar until thin ; add eggs well beaten. 
Bake with lower crust in two small but very deep pans. 

Mrs. A. M. Adams. 

WASHINGTON PIE 

3 eggs. 1 cup sugar. 

1| cups flour. 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

3 tablespoons cold water. 

Custard : 

1 pint milk. L 2 tablespoons flour (large). 

2 eggs. 1 cup sugar (scant). 
A little butter. Vanilla. 

Bake first part in two deep pie tins ; remove from pan, 
and split open with a sharp knife. Pour on custard ; re- 
place top. Margaret McCandless. 



^FAULTLESS 
* STARCH # 

FOR 5HIRTS,C0LLAR5,CUFF5,AND FfMEUIiLN. 



Hot Desserts 



BAKED APPLES 

Core and peel nice large apples, leaving the rind around 
the center to hold together. Fill with nuts (wal- 
nuts the best), and put a tablespoon of brown sugar on top 
and a tablespoonful of boiling water. Put in oven, bake, 
and serve with whipped cream. Mrs. J. A. Ivey. 

BAKED APPLES WITH FIGS 

Peel large apples, and core. Fill with chopped figs. 
Cover with sugar. Put in deep baking-pan. Add a little 
water. Bake; baste well. Serve hot or cold with cream. 

Mrs. C. F. Little. 

APPLE OR CHERRY ROLL 

1 pint flour. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

\ cup butter. Pinch of salt. 

Mix as for biscuit dough. Roll out thin, and spread 
with apple which has been cooked and generously sweet- 
ened, also spiced. Dot thickly with butter. Roll up, and 
pinch sides together. Lay in buttered pan. Sprinkle top 
with butter, sugar, and cinnamon. Place in oven, and 
brown. When well browned, pour hot water around and 
cook a few minutes until crust is crisp and juices rich. 
Fresh cherries can be used in place of apple sauce, but 
sweeten thoroughly. Mrs. L. H. Pennington. 

(167) 



168 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

BAKED APPLE DUMPLING 

Pare, quarter and core apples. Make a rich biscuit 
dough. Take enough dough for each roll and place four 
pieces of apple in each. Also butter, cinnamon, and sugar. 
Pinch edges together. Put a pint of water in baking-dish ; 
also one cup of sugar and small piece of butter. Let it 
come to a boil on top of stove ; then place dumplings in 
it, and bake until crust and apples are done. Serve with 
cream or sweet sauce. Mrs. N. P. Stevens. 

AMBER APPLE PUDDING 

1 quart boiling milk. 1 cup corn-meal. 

1 quart sliced sweet apples. 1 teaspoon salt. 
1 cup molasses. 1 quart milk. 

Into the quart of boiling milk stir the corn-meal and 
apples. Add salt and molasses. Mix well ; add milk. 
Pour into large buttered dish and bake four hours in slow 
oven. When cold, a clear amber-colored jelly will have 
formed throughout the pudding, and the apples will be a 
dark brown. Mrs. Geo. S. Bentley. 

AMBER PUDDING 

3 eggs. h cup sugar. 

1 cup sweet milk. L 2 cups bread-crumbs. 

1 cup orange marmalade. 1 teaspoon soda. 

Beat eggs well ; mix. Steam three hours, and serve 
with hard sauce. Mrs. Chas. Greenlee. 

BREAD PUDDING 

3 cnps broken bread. ■> eggs. 

| cup sugar. 3| cups milk. 

-| level teaspoon salt. Nutmeg. 

This amount will serve six people. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 169 

Sauce: One cup confectioner's sugar, butter size of egg, 
vanilla. 

Cream butter and sugar. Add vanilla to suit taste. 

Mrs. Elward. 
CARAMEL PUDDING 

1 cup sugar. 3 cups flour. 

\ cup butter. "i teaspoons baking powder. 

1 egg. 1 cup sweet milk. 

Sauce : Two cups light brown sugar, two-thirds cup 
cream. 

Boil until forms soft ball. Beat fo.r five minutes. Serve 
warm. Mrs. James Lee Dick. 

CARROT PUDDING 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup chopped suet. 

1 cup raisins. 1 cup currants. 

1 cup grated raw carrots. 1 cup grated raw potatoes. 
A little salt. 1 teaspoon soda. 

If cups flour. 

Steam three hours in covered pan. 

Foam Sauce : Two eggs separated. Into yolks beat 
three-fourths cup powdered sugar. Set in pan of boiling 
water. Stir constantly for twenty minutes. Add beaten 
whites of eggs, and flavor. Mas. A. F. Irwin. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

3 eggs. 1 cup sugar. 

3 tablespoons sweet milk. 1 cup flour. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 1 square Baker's chocolate. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Beat eggs very lightly ; add sugar, milk, flour, baking 
powder, chocolate, and vanilla. Fill buttered cups half- 



170 



GOOD TIIIS'GS TO EAT 



full ; steam twenty minutes. Serve with hot pudding 
sauce. Mrs. L. E. Tilley. 



\ cup milk. 

\\ teaspoon baking powder. 

1 ess. 



CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

1 tablespoon butter. 
I cup chocolate. 
If cups flour. 
f cup sugar. 

Cream butter, sugar and egg together; add other in- 
gredients. Steam two hours. Serve with whipped cream 
sauce. 



Whipped Cream Sauce 

1 tablespoon butter. 

2 eggs, whites. 
1 egg yolk. 

Beat eggs, sugar, and butter ; add vanilla and whipped 
cream. Mrs. L. K. Adams. 



1 cup pulverized sugar. 
\ pint cream. 
Vanilla. 



3 tablespoons grated choco- 
late. 
3 eggs. 
Salt and vanilla to taste. 



CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

1 cup white sugar. 

5 large tablespoons bread 

crumbs. 
1 pint sweet milk. 

Mix sugar and yolks of the eggs thoroughly; add the 
bread, then the melted chocolate, and lastly the milk. 
Bake about twenty minutes, then cover with whites of 
eggs well beaten and mixed with three tablespoons sugar. 
Put back in oven to brown. Or can be served cold with 
whipped cream and marshmallows in place of the meringue. 

Lynette Mathews. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 171 

CHOCOLATE BREAD PUDDING 

c 2 cups bread-crumbs. 3 cups scalded milk. 

c 2 squares chocolate. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

i cup sugar. 2 eggs. 

' teaspoon salt. 

Soak crumbs in milk for fifteen minutes. Melt choco- 
late in saucepan over hot water ; add to chocolate one- 
half of the sugar, and enough milk taken from the bread 
and milk to make proper consistency to pour. Add to 
bread and milk the chocolate, the remaining sugar, salt, 
vanilla, and slightly beaten eggs. Turn into buttered 
pudding-dish placed in pan containing hot water. Cook in 
moderate oven until pudding is firm. Serve with hard 
sauce. 

Hard Sauce : 

\ cup butter. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

1 cup powdered sugar. 

Cream butter, and add sugar and beat until very white. 
Then add flavoring, heap in glass, and stand in cold water 
to harden. Mrs. Jennie Castle. 

COCOANUT PUDDING 

3 tablespoons tapioca. 1 quart new milk. 

4 eggs. 1 cup sugar. 
3 tablespoons cocoanut. 

Soak tapioca in water till well swelled. Put into boil- 
ing milk, and cook ten minutes. Beat the yolks of eggs, 
sugar and cocoanut together ; stir in and boil five min- 
utes longer, and then pour in dish. Beat whites of eggs to 
a stiff froth with four tablespoons of sugar. Pour over 
the pudding ; sprinkle cocoanut over top, and brown deli- 
cately in the oven. Mrs. H.'G. Welsh. 



172 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



1 cup butter. 
1 box cocoanut. 



COCOANUT PUDDING 

1 cup sugar. 

3 egg whites, beaten stiff. 

Bake in buttered pan set in a pan of water forty-five 
minutes. 

Sauce : 1 tablespoon butter, 1 cup sugar, 3 egg yolks. 
Cook in double boiler. Mrs. Anna B. Grimes. 



COLONIAL GINGERBREAD 



1 cup New Orleans mo- 
lasses. 
\ cup sugar. 

1 level dessert spoon soda. 
1 cup seeded raisins. 
1 teaspoon ginger (scant). 



§ cup butter. 
1 cup boiling water. 
1 cup English walnuts. 
| teaspoon cinnamon. 



2| cups flour. 

2 eggs. 

Dissolve soda in boiling water and pour over molasses, 
sugar, and butter. Stir well, and let mixture cool. Then 
add walnuts, quartered raisins, spices, flour, and last well- 
beaten eggs. Bake in shallow pans, and serve warm with 
whipped cream. Dorothy Elward. 



COTTAGE PUDDING 

1 cup sugar. 3 eggs. 

1 cup water. ^ cup butter. 

2| cups flour. 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

Bake in flat pan ; serve warm with sweet sauce or cream. 

Mrs. P. Matthews. 
COTTAGE PUDDING 



1 pint of quartered apples. 
1 cup milk. 

1 egg. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 



1 scant tablespoon salt, 
f cups sugar. 

3 tablespoons melted butter. 
2| cups flour. 



Place apples in bottom of a round pudding-dish ; sweeten 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 17:; 

to taste; add salt, and heat through. Make a batter of 
other ingredients and pour over apples. Bake .'$5 to 40 
minutes. Invert on plate, and serve with cream or sauce. 
Half of the batter makes a large pudding, but the pint 
of fruit should be used. Peaches or cherries may be sub- 
stituted for apples. Mybtle Buser. 

CRUMB PUDDING 

\h cups flour. I cup sugar. 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

Mix flour, sugar and butter as for pie crust. Then 
take out one-half cup of the crumbs, and add to remainder 
the baking powder and enough sweet milk to make a bat- 
ter as for cake — not too thin. Sprinkle top with the 
crumbs, and bake. Serve with sauce. 

Mrs. Geo. S. Bentley. 
CUSTARD 

1 quart new milk. 4 eggs. 

:J level tablespoons sugar. A little salt. 

Nutmeg or vanilla flavoring. 

Beat eggs ; add sugar, milk, salt, and flavoring. Put 
in pudding-dish, set in pan of boiling water, and place 
in oven. Bake twenty minutes. 

Elizabeth Mellixger. 
DATE PUDDING 

1 cup seeded dates. 1 cup nuts. 

1 cup sugar. 2 tablespoons milk. 

| cup cracker crumbs, or 2 eggs beaten separately. 

flour. 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

Cream sugar and eggs ; add baking powder in milk ; 
add rest. Bake in flat pan. Place in another pan con- 
taining water and bake forty minutes. Serve with either 
whipped or ice cream. Mrs. Harry ElbradeR; 



174 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

NUT AND DATE PUDDING 

1 cup light brown sugar. j teaspoon baking powder, 

1 cup English walnut meats scant. 

broken into pieces. 3 eggs beaten separately. 

§ cup dates. § cup flour. 

Bake in moderate oven about thirty minutes. Serve 
warm with whipped cream. Mrs. R. D. Schermerhorn. 

FIG PUDDING 

1 cup suet, chopped fine. 1 cup bread-crumbs. 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup sweet milk. 
3 eggs. i lb. chopped figs. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. Vanilla and nutmeg. 

Steam three hours. 

Sauce : Cream 2 cups powdered sugar and h cup butter. 

Then add the unbeaten white of one egg. Stir well ; 
add tablespoon milk by degrees, beating thoroughly. . One 
teaspoon vanilla. Mrs. A. C. Hoagland. 

GINGERBREAD APPLE PUDDING 

(i apples. | cup sugar. 

\ teaspoon powdered cinna- 1 cup molasses. 

mon. 2 tablespoons butter. 

\ cup boiling water. \ teaspoon powdered ginger. 

1 teaspoon baking soda. Flour. 
Pinch of salt. 

Peel apples, and slice ; then add sugar, salt, and cinna- 
mon to them, and place in buttered pudding-dish. Melt 
the butter. Add molasses with the ginger, the soda 
dissolved in boiling water, enough flour to make a thin 
batter. Pour this mixture over apples, and bake in a mod- 
erate oven for half-hour. Serve with whipped cream or 
sweet pudding sauce. Elizabeth G. Campbell. 



FIRST I'RESHYTERIAX ('MUCH COOK HOOK 17.", 



PLUM PUDDING A LA DAVID HARUM 

1 cup hot milk. 1 cup bread-crumbs, 
f cup sugar. 1 teaspoon salt. 

4 egg yolks. \ lb. raisins. 

\ lb. currants. \ cup chopped almonds 

\ lb. suet, chopped. (blanched). 

Spices to taste. 

Pour the cup of hot milk over the bread-crumbs. When 
eold, add the other ingredients. Steam six hours. Serve 
with whipped cream sweetened or hard sauce, or both. 

Mrs. Howard Lewis. 

PLUM PUDDING 

2 cups chopped suet. 2 cups flour. 

1 cup bread-crumbs. 1 cup chopped apple. 

\ cup sorghum. 1 lb. raisins. 

1 lb. currants. 1 lb. nuts. 

1 lb. figs. 1 lb. dates. 

5 cents citron. 1 cup brown sugar. 

1 teaspoon soda. 

Mix with soifr milk (about one cup). Add 5 eggs. 
Put in baking-powder cans, and steam four hours. 

Lucile W. Jones. 

PLUM PUDDING 

1 egg. \ cup butter. 

1 cup sweet milk. 1 cup molasses. 

1 cup raisins. 1 cup English walnuts. 

1 teaspoon soda. 1 teaspoon cloves. 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. 3 cups flour. 

1 teaspoon linking powder. 

Dissolve soda in a little warm water. Steam. Serve 
with any pudding sauce. Mrs. John F. Foxtrox, 

McPherson, Kas. 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

POLKA PUDDING 

| lb. mashed cold potatoes. \ lb. finely minced suet. 
h lb. flour. \ lb. raisins. 

\ lb. Karo syrup. 

Stick part of the raisins over the buttered bowl and mix 
the rest with the other ingredients. Steam for four hours 
and serve with vanilla sauce. 

Sauce : \ lb. sugar, 1 egg beaten well, with large tea- 
spoon of flour and a little salt. 

Pour over this a gill and a half of boiling milk. Stir 
well. Boil up once; flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. J. B.» Mackay. 
PRUNE KUCHEN 

2 cups sifted flour. 2 tablespoons sugar. 

\ teaspoon salt. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

| cup butter. 1 egg. 

§ cup milk. \ lb. primes. 

.'J tablespoons melted butter. 3 tablespoons sugar. 
Cinnamon to taste. 

Sift three times flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder. 
Work in the butter. Add the beaten egg; then milk and 
stir well. Turn into shallow buttered pan. Remove the 
stones from the tenderly cooked prunes, and place skin 
down on dough. Brush over with melted butter, sugar, 
and cinnamon. Bake about half-hour. Serve hot with 
hard sauce, stewed prunes or plain with tea. 

Mrs. Garland Craig. 
PRUNE PUFF 

1 cup prunes. 5 egg whiles. 

1 teaspoon (rounding) bak- 1 cup sugar (sifted four 
ing powder. times). 

Cook prunes without sugar, chop fine and measure. 
Beat egg whites very light, and stir sugar into them. Add 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 177 

prunes, then the baking powder. Hake twenty minutes. 
Serve hot with whipped cream or thin custard. 

May be served as a cold dessert, unbaked, and without 
the baking powder. Mrs. Howard Lewis. 

PRUNE WHIP 

1 11). prunes. u' egg whites. 

1-2 tablespoons powdered sugar. 

Slew prunes, seed, and chop fine. Beat the egg-whites to 
a thick froth, stir into them the sugar lightly, whip in 
prunes. Bake in a quick oven five or ten minutes; serve 
immediately with cream. Mrs. B. S. Hoagland. 

RAISIN PUFFS 

2 eggs. 4 tablespoons melted butter. 
2 cups flour. 1 cup sweet milk. 

2 tablespoons sugar. 2 teaspoons baking pow r der. 

1 cup seeded raisins, chopped. 
Steam half-hour in teacups. 

You can put canned or fresh fruit in bottom of teacups, 
and this seems to make the puffs better flavored. We like 
fresh crushed red raspberries best. Have either hard or 
soft sauce to pour over them. Mrs. W. F. Daggett, 

South Pasadena, Calif. 
RHUBARD PUDDING 

\ cup sugar. 1 large tablespoon melted 

2 cups flour. butter. 

2 eggs. 2 level teaspoons baking 

1 cup milk. powder sifted with flour. 

Bake in two layers. Stew rhubarb. Make very sweet. 
When cold, put between and over cake. Serve with cream. 
Any fruit or berries may be used. 

Mary Mellinger. 



17S 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



SEVEN-CUP PUDDING 



1 cup currants. 

2 cups bread-crumbs. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 
1 cup beef suet minced fine 

3 teaspoons ground cinna- 
mon. 



1 cup raisins. 
1 cup flour. 
1 cup sugar, brown. 
1 cup milk, more if neces- 
. sary till all is moist, not 
wet. 
h cup citron, orange and lemon peel mixed cut fine. 

Mix all the above ingredients together dry ; then add 
the milk the last thing. Butter the dish well that it is 
steamed in, and steam constantly for four hours. Be sure 
the water never goes off the boil. 

Eliza Hanna with Mrs. J. B. Mackay. 



SPICED PUDDING 

| cup butter. 

1 egg. 

| teaspoon soda. 

\ teaspoon cinnamon. 

1| cups flour. 

Steam three hours. 



f cup sugar. 

| cup sour milk. 

1 level teaspoon baking pow 

der. 
\ teaspoon nutmeg. 

Add nuts and raisins if desired. 

Mrs. J. H. Garrison. 



STRAWBERRY PUDDING 

1 large cup flour. A little salt. 

2 tablespoons sugar. 3 teaspoons baking powder. 
Enough milk to make a stiff batter. 

Put a spoonful in each buttered cup or ramkin and 
steam until done or about twenty minutes. Have the 
berries stewed or mashed with sugar to taste. Turn cake 
from molds; put strawberries on each, and serve with 
cream. Mrs. D. E. Richards. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN < 'HUR( 11 COOK HOOK 179 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE 

2 cups flour. J5 teaspoons baking powder. 

\ teaspoon salt. 1 tablespoon butter. 

2 tablespoons lard. 1 cup milk. 

Sift flour, baking powder and salt together, and rub in 
butter and lard. Add milk; roll to fit a shallow baking- 
tin, or cut into individual cakes. Bake ten or fifteen min- 
utes in a hot oven. Split quickly, butter, and place 
crushed berries between and on top of layers. Just before 
serving, cover with whipped cream. Serve hot. This rule 
is good for all kinds of shortcake. Makes good crust for 
chicken pie and very good biscuit. 

Mrs. Geo. T. McCandless. 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE 

2 cups flour. 2 teaspoons baking powder, 

j teaspoon salt. 2 teaspoons sugar, 

f cup milk. j cup butter. 

Mix sugar, salt, baking powder, and flour. Sift three 
times. Rub in the butter ; add the milk ; divide into two 
amounts ; roll, and bake in a hot oven. Split, butter ; 
place sweetened berries between and on top. This is 
equally as good with cranberries. They must be stewed, 
sweetened, and allowed to get cold. May be covered with 
whipped cream. Mrs. L. G. McLane. 

SUET PUDDING 

1 cup molasses. 1 cup sour milk. 

1 cup suet. 1 cup raisins. 

2 scant teaspoons soda and a little salt. 
2 cups flour. 

Chop the suet fine ; roll the raisins in flour. Steam two 
hours. Serve with a boiled sauce. Mary Wolcott. 



180 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



STEAMED PUDDING 

2 cups bread crumbs. 
\ cup molasses. 
1 cup chopped nuts. 
1 cup sweet milk. 
| teaspoon cloves and all- 
spice. 

Steam two hours. 



\ cup chopped suet. 
1 well-beaten egg. 
1 cup seeded raisins. 
\ teaspoon soda. 
1 teaspoon cinnamon. 



Ruth Leidigh. 



SUET PUDDING 



1 cup white sugar. 

1 cup apples, ground. 
\ cup citron if desired. 

2 teaspoons cinnamon. 
1 teaspoon soda. 

1 cup currants. 



1 cup molasses. 
1 cup suet, ground. 

1 cup sweet milk. 

2 eggs, well beaten. 
1 teaspoon salt. 
1 cup raisins (seedless). 
2| cups flour. 
1 cup nuts and | 10c. cake figs if desired. 

Put in well-greased cans, and steam three hours. 

Bess Decker Potter, 

Turon, Kans. 
SWEET POTATO PUDDING 

1 pint mashed sweet potatoes. 1 cup fine bread crumbs. 



1 cup sugar. 

1 tablespoon butter. 



\ nutmeg, 



Pake slowly until set. 
whipped cream. 



1 quart milk. 

1 tablespoon cinnamon. 

A little salt. 

Serve cold with rich sauce or 
Elizabeth Melltnger. 



Pudding Sauces 

CHOCOLATE SAUCE 

1 cup sugar. h cup chocolate. 

1 large tablespoon butter. \ cup water. 

Stir until it boils, and cook slowly eight minutes. 

Mrs. Hubbard. 
FOAM SAUCE 

2 eggs. f cup powdered sugar. 

Into the yolks of eggs beat the sugar. Set in pan of 
boiling water, and stir constantly for twenty minutes. 
Add beaten whites of eggs, and flavor. 

Mrs. A. F. Irwin. 
PUDDING DIP 

1 cup sugar. 1 egg. 

\ cup butter. 1 tablespoon vinegar. 

\\ cups hot water. Vanilla. 

Put on back of stove and let thicken. 

Elizabeth G. Campbell. 
PUDDING SAUCE 

\ cup sugar. 1 cup boiling water. 

1 tablespoon corn-starch. 2 tablespoons butter. 
Lemon flavoring or lemon 
juice. 

Mix sugar, corn-starch and water gradually, stirring 
constantly; boil five minutes; remove from fire; add 
butter and lemon juice. Louise Shockley Ryman, 

Lewisville, Indiana. 

(181) 



182 GOOD THINGS TO EA T 

PUDDING SAUCE 

1 egg white. 1 tablespoon dry cocoa. 

2 tablespoons sugar. 

Very nice on rice or tapioca pudding. 

Pearl McCarroll. 
SAUCE FOR SUET PUDDING 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 cup powdered sugar. 

1 egg. \ pint cream. 

Beat egg yolk, sugar and butter to a cream ; then add 
beaten white of egg with whipped cream. Flavor with 
vanilla. Mrs. Lucile Prigg Eichhorn. 

WHIPPED CREAM SAUCE 

1 heaping tablespoon butter. 1 cup powdered sugar. 
1 egg. \ pint cream. 

Beat egg well, and cream with sugar and butter. When 
ready to serve, add cream whipped, and flavor to suit taste. 

Mrs. J. L. Penney. 



Cold Desserts 



APRICOT WHIP 

h lb. dried apricots. \ cup sugar. 

2 eggs, whites. 

Cook apricots until tender; add sugar, and cook until a 
good syrup forms. When partly cool, whip in the eggs 
and brown in hot oven. Serve with whipped or plain 
cream. . Matme Prigg Burris, 

Chicago, 111. 
BIVO 

(i egg whites. tablespoons of sugar. 

I box gelatine (dissolved). 1 cup hickory nuts, chopped. 
\ cup candied cherries shredded. 

Beat eggs stiff ; beat sugar into eggs ; scatter nuts and 
cherries over the beaten eggs ; then pour in gelatine and 
beat until it stiffens. Put into paper-lined molds by spoon- 
fuls. Serve in slices with whipped cream. Keo Jordan. 

BLANC MANGE NUT SUNDAE 

1 pint of sweet milk, 2 tablespoons corn-starch. 

boiling. A pinch of salt. 

1 tablespoon sugar. 

Cook until it thickens. Pour into molds. 
Sauce : 
1 square of chocolate. 1 pint of water, 

f cup of sugar. 

Boil until thickened. Turn pudding out of molds, 
sprinkle with nuts, and pour sauce over it. 

Adeline B. Stratton. 

(183) 



184 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

CARAMEL PUDDING 

3 cups milk. L 2 tablespoons corn-starch. 

2 eggs. j cup sugar. 

1 cup nuts. 1 cup caramel sugar. 

Beat eggs, add corn-starch dissolved in milk ; add milk, 
scalded ; boil until thickened in double boiler. After tak- 
ing from fire, add the caramel sugar and nut meats. Serve 
with whipped cream. 

To make caramel sugar, melt one cup of granulated 
sugar in hot frying-pan until all is dissolved. 

Mrs. Allee. 
CHARLOTTE RUSSE 

^ package gelatine. 3 tablespoons cold water. 

h pint hot milk. \ teaspoon sugar. 

3 eggs, \ pint cream. 

\ teaspoon flavoring. 

Dissolve gelatine in cold water ; pour over it the hot 
milk ; stir well ; add sugar ; egg yolks, beat, strain ; cool, 
and add whipped cream, beaten whites of eggs, and flavor- 
ing. Pour in mold lined with slices of sponge cake, and 
put on ice. Serve in sherbet glasses, garnished with cream 
and candied cherries. Helen E. Miner. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

3 tablespoons of flour. \ cup grated chocolate, 

f cup sugar. 2 cups milk. 

Vanilla. 

Mix flour with enough milk to make a smooth paste. 
Mix with milk, sugar and chocolate, and cook in double 
boiler until thick. When done, take from fire and add 
vanilla to taste. Pour into molds, and cool. Serve with 
whipped, cream that has been sweetened a little. 

Mrs. R. Y. Jones. 



FIRST I'llKSHYTEIUA.X (III III II COOK HOOK is:. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

1 pint sweet milk. \ cup sugar. 

1 heaping' tablespoon flour. 1 heaping tablespoon choco- 
late. 

Cook until it thickens; flavor to taste, turn into mold. 
Serve with cream and sugar. Mrs. F. F. Prigg. 

CREAM PUDDING 

1 pint of cream whipped 1 cup powdered sugar." 

stiff. Whites of L 2 eggs, beaten 

j box gelatine. stiff. 

1 small can pineapple. 

Cover gelatine with a little cold water; let stand half 
an hour; then set bowl over boiling water until gelatine 
is melted. Add the sugar to the cream; fold in whites 
of eggs ; then add other ingredients. Beat thoroughly ; 
set on ice. When turned out of mold, put candied cherries 
on top. Mrs. Charles Hood. 

CRUMB TOTE 

6 eggs. \ lb. sugar. 

| lb. dates. \ lb. walnuts. 

1 tablespoon bread-crumbs. \ teaspoon cream tartar. 

Hake in flat pan ; serve cold with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Florence Smith. 

DATE PUDDING 

1 11). dates. 1 cup nuts. 

.'} teaspoons flour. 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

g eggs. \ cup sugar. 

Grind dates, mix flour and baking powder, and sprinkle 
over dates; add egg-yolks and sugar beaten together. 



186 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

j 

Whites of eggs beaten stiff. Bake half-hour in slow oven. 
Serve cold with whipped cream. Jessie Handy Gray. 

FAIRY PUDDING 

1 glass jelly (currant good). 1 cup boiling water. 

2 tablespoons corn-starch. | cup cold water. 

2 egg whites. 

Put hot water and jelly on fire, stir till jelly dissolves ; 
when boiling, stir in the corn-starch mixed with cold water. 
When thick, let simmer 10 minutes. Put in dish to cool. 
Beat with egg-beater, and add the beaten whites of eggs. 
Put in molds to set. Mrs. Garland Craig. 

FIG PUDDING 

| lb. figs. 1 cup sugar. 

1| cups water. 1 scant tablespoon gelatine. 

1 pint cream. 1 teaspoon vanilla. ■ 

Grind figs and stew with sugar and water until tender; 
add gelatine which has been dissolved in a little cold water. 
Stir occasionally while cooling. When cool, stir into 
whipped cream and add vanilla. Can be served with a 
spoonful of whipped cream on top if desired. Will serve 
about fifteen people. Mrs. John Fontron, 

McPherson, Kas. 

GINGER FIG PUDDING 

h lb. crystalized ginger. ( 1| lbs. figs. 

2 cups granulated sugar. 5 cups water. 

\ box gelatine. A pinch of powdered ginger. 

Cut figs and ginger small. Let simmer in water on back 
of stove two hours. Add sugar and powdered ginger. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK L87 



Dissolve gelatine in cold water ; add the hot fig mixture ; 
pour into mold, and serve cold with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Alma Sawyer. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

JELL-O WITH FRUIT 

Dissolve one package of Jell-O, any flavor, in a pint of 
boiling water. Pour into a bowl or mold. Just as Jell-0 
is beginning to set, arrange in it, with the aid of a fork, 
sliced oranges and bananas, or peaches and strawberries, 
or cherries and currants, or any other fruit that may be 
preferred for the purpose. 

Be sure to use Jell-O, with the name Jell-0 in big, red 
letters on the package. 

ICE-CREAM CUSTARD 

3 eggs, yolks. 1 pint of milk. 

Sugar to taste. Vanilla. 

Make a custard of these, and let it become ice-cold be- 
fore using. Taking a deep sherbet cup, fill one-third full 
of custard ; cover w r ith ice-cream, and cap all with whipped 
cream. A candied cherry on top adds to beauty of dish. 

Mrs. D. E. Richards. 

LEMON JELLY 

Soak one. envelope of PLYMOUTH ROCK PHOS- 
PHATED GRANULATED GELATINE in one-half pint 
cold water three to five minutes ; add one pint of hot 
water, three-fourths cup of sugar (or more if wanted 
sweeter) and stir until it is dissolved. Flavor with extract 
of lemon to taste. Set on ice until hard and ready to 
serve. 



188 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

MACAROON PUDDING 

1 tablespoon of gelatine. \ cup of cold water. 

2 cups of scalding milk. 3 eggs. 

\ cup of sugar. \ teaspoon of salt. 

1 cup chopped macaroons. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Soak gelatine in cold water. Make a custard of milk, 
sugar, salt and yolk of eggs. Then add gelatine to hot 
custard. When cool, add macaroons and vanilla; cover 
with beaten whites of eggs and brown in oven. Serve 
with whipped cream. Margaret McCandless. 

MARSHMALLOW CREAM DESSERT 

§ tablespoon gran, gelatine, f teaspoon salt. 

3 egg whites. f cup sugar. 

Flavoring. 

Dissolve gelatine in half-cup cold water ; fill cup with 
hot water ; have gelatine thoroughly dissolved. Beat eggs 
not too stiff; add salt, sugar (a little at a time), and gela- 
tine. Beat 10 or 15 minutes. Divide in three parts, or 
as many colors as you wish to have. Pour all in one mold, 
and sprinkle chopped nuts between layers. Serve with 
whipped cream. Gurtha Gary Harris. 

MARSHMALLOW PUDDING 

1 cup sugar. 3 egg whites. 

2 teaspoons gelatine. \ cup hot water. 

Pinch salt. 

Add the sugar gradually to the beaten eggs. Dissolve 
gelatine in hot water. 

Sauce: 
Yolks of eggs. 2 tablespoons sugar. 1 cup hot milk. 

Mrs. W. W. ^U'illim. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK L89 

MARSHMALLOW PUDDING 

1 pint rich cream. \ cup candied cherries. 

1 11). marshmallows: 1 cup walnut meats. 

Cut marshmallows, cherries and nuts in small pieces. 
Whip cream; sweeten to taste; flavor with vanilla; add 
the other ingredients, and let stand an hour or so in a cool 
place. Mrs. (). A. Peterson. 

MARSHMALLOW PUDDING 

4 egg whites. 1 tablespoon gelatine. 

1 cup of hot water. 1| cups of sugar. 

h lb. English walnuts. 1 can shredded pineapple. 

Dissolve gelatine in hot water; add sugar, and beat 
half-hour. Beat eggs stiff; mix all. Serve with whipped 
cream. Mrs. F. Vincent. 



MARSHMALLOW DESSERT 

1 lb. marshmallows. \ cup of cold water. 

\ cup of chopped nuts. \ cup chopped pineapple. 

A few red cherries. 

Place marshmallows in double boiler with cold water, 
and dissolve ; when dissolved, remove from stove, and beat ; 
then add nuts, pineapple and cherries ; set to cool, and 
serve with whipped cream. Junia M. Scheble. 



NYE 

14 prunes. I cup of sugar. 5 egg whites. 

Cook prunes. When cold, remove pits ; crack the latter. 
put kernels with rest of prunes, and chop fine. Then add 



190 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

to this the well-beaten eggs and sugar. Bake about 30 
minutes. Serve cold with whipped cream. 

Mrs. A. E. Elliott. 

ORANGE CREAM 

\ cup orange juice. \ cup sugar. 

% egg yolks. | package gelatine. 

\ cup cold water. 1 cup cream. 

Soften gelatine in water. Heat orange juice and sugar. 
Stir in beaten yolks of eggs, and cook over water until 
thickened/ Add gelatine, and strain into cream. Turn 
into mold, and serve when ice-cold. May Mathews. 

ORANGE JELLY 

Soak one envelope of PLYMOUTH ROCK PHOS- 
PHATE D GRANULATED GELATINE in one-half pint 
of cold water three to five minutes ; add one pint of hot 
water, three-fourths cup of sugar (or more if wanted 
sweeter) and stir until all is dissolved. Flavor with extract 
of orange to taste. Set on ice until hard and ready to 
serve. 

In a similar manner other flavored jellies may be made, 
using extracts of raspberry, pineapple, strawberry, etc. 
In serving, cut the jelly across and across, breaking it up 
into crystals and piling lightly in glass dishes. 

OLD-FASHIONED FLOAT 

(! eggs. 1 quart milk. 

Small pinch salt. Sugar to taste. 

Beat yolks of eggs, and strain; add to milk, sugar and 
salt ; place in a double boiler, or if on the stove in a single 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK I'.H 

pan must be watched and stirred constantly. When it 
boils, remove, and flavor with lemon. Pour into a dish 
that has a top. Heat the egg whites stilt'; sweeten and 
flavor; put by spoonfuls on top of hot custard. Put on 
cover. Let stand in pan of cold water to cool ; then place 
on ice. 

PINEAPPLE PUDDING 

Pour a small can of sliced pineapple' in a cake dish. 
Make a sponge cake or mock angel food and pour this 
over the pineapple. Bake in a moderate oven. Serve hot 
with a sauce or cold with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Jonas E. Geyer. 

PINEAPPLE CREAM 

1 can pineapple, or 1 pint shredded pineapple. 
\ lb. sugar. 1 oz. gelatine. 

3 eggs (whites). 1 pint cream. 

Bring pineapple to a boil with sugar; strain over gela- 
tine which has been dissolved in just enough water to 
cover it. When cool but not yet formed, stir in beaten 
eggs and imwhipped cream. Pour into mold and set on. 
ice to cool. When canned shredded pineapple is used, do 
not add sugar. Mrs. W. P. Kixkle. 

A PINEAPPLE DELICACY 

1 pineapple. 3 egg whites. 

3 tablespoons of powdered L 2 teaspoons orange juice, 
sugar. 1 pint cream. 

Grate pineapple and spread on a sieve to drain. Beat 
the eggs to a froth, and add the sugar to them gradually. 
Beat until stiff, and flavor with orange. Whip cream and 



192 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

stir or fold it a little at a time into the egg and sugar mix- 
ture. Add the grated pineapple a little at a time, and 
serve in punch glasses or custard cups, with fresh maca- 
roons. Serve very cold. Mrs. Jonas E. Geyer. 

PINEAPPLE TAPIOCA 

1 cup minute tapioca. § cup shredded pineapple. 

\ cup pineapple juice. \ cup water. 

1^ cups of sugar:* 2 lemons. 

2 egg whites. 

Cook slowly until nearly clear the pineapple, tapioca, 
lemon and pineapple juice, water and sugar. When cold, 
add the stiffly beaten eggs. Serve either with whipped 
cream or custard sauce. Mrs. E. Morgan. 

PINEAPPLE SPONGE 

1 package gelatine. 1 cup sugar. 

1 cup water. 1 can shredded pineapple. 

1 pint cream. 

Soak gelatine in as little water as possible. Boil water 
and sugar to a thick syrup ; add dissolved gelatine ; stir 
well, and add pineapple. Place on ice, and when it begins 
to thicken stir in whipped cream and pour into a brick- 
shaped mold. To serve, cut in slices as one cuts brick 
ice-cream. Mrs. E. E. Ellsworth. 

PINEAPPLE TAPIOCA 

| cup of pearl tapioca. \ cup cold water. 

1 large lemon. 1 small can sliced pineapple. 

1 cup sugar. 2 egg whites. 

Soak tapioca over- night. In the morning, drain, and 
add the water, juice of lemon, pineapple shredded, with its 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CUincif COOK BOOK L93 



juice and sugar. Boil all slowly, stirring gently so the 

tapioca will remain whole. Boil until almost clear, then 
fold in carefully beaten whites of eggs. Serve cold with 
whipped cream. Mrs. V. M. Wiley. 

PRUNE PUDDING 

1 envelope gelatine. i cup cold water. 

o 11). prunes. f cup sugar. 

5 egg whites. 

Put gelatine in cold water; when soft, set cup in hot 
water until dissolved. Cook prunes until tender; take 
out pits; chop not too fine; add sugar. Keep the prunes 
warm; add gelatine. Have whites beaten very stiff; stir 
into prunes. Pour into mold set on ice to harden. Serve 
with whipped cream. Adeline D. Wood. 

PRUNE PUDDING 

t cup of prunes. | cup sugar. 

:> eggs, whites. 1 cup tapioca. 

I se cooked, pitted and chopped prunes ; add sugar, 
stiffly beaten eggs and tapioca which has been soaked; 
bake half-hour. When cold, cover with whipped cream. 

Mrs. W. H. Taylor. 

LEMON JELL-O WHIP WITH PRUNES 
(Marion Harland's Recipe.) 
Dissolve one package of Lemon Jell-0 in a pint of boil- 
ing water and set it aside until it begins to thicken. Then 
beat with an egg-beater until it reaches the consistency of 
whipped cream. Stir in one cup of chopped prunes, which 
have been stewed until very tender. Very much better if 
one cup of whipped cream is added. Turn into mold to 



194 GOOD THINGS TO EA T 

harden. Add more sugar to the water in which they were 
cooked, and boil this down to a thick syrup. When cold, 
pour it about the base of the dessert, after you have turned 
this out, and arrange whole prunes as a garnish. 

Be sure to use Jell-O, with the name Jell-0 in big, red 
letters on the package. 

SNOW PUDDING 

Soak one envelope of PLYMOUTH ROCK PHOS- 
PHATED GRANULATED GELATINE in one-half pint 
of cold water three to five minutes ; add one pint of hot 
water to dissolve, one cup of sugar, and one teaspoonful of 
lemon or other flavoring extract ; stir until sugar is dis- 
solved. Pour into a very shallow dish and set on ice until 
ft slightly jells or thickens ; beat to a stiff froth the whites 
of two eggs and a pinch of salt; beat in the gelatine until 
light and frothy and set back on the ice until ready to 
serve. 

Sauce : Beat the yolks of the eggs with a cup of sugar 
and two teaspoonfuls of corn-starch ; scald one pint of 
milk and turn it into the yolks ; heat until it thickens, 
stirring all the time ; add vanilla and pinch of stilt and let 
it cool. 

SNOW PUDDING 

2 tablespoons gelatine. 1 cup sugar. 

2 egg whites. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

1 cup boiling water. 

Let gelatine soak half-hour in cold water; pour over it 
the boiling water; add sugar, and stir until dissolved ; add 
the lemon juice, and strain. Set in a cold place. When 
cold, whip until white as snow; beat the whites of eggs to 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 195 

a stiff froth and stir them in. Put in molds, and set in 
cool place to harden. Mrs. Petro. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING 

1 pint milk. \\ tablespoons tapioca. 

:'> tablespoons sugar. 2 eggs. 

Pinch of salt. Lump of butter. 

Boil milk, tapioca, salt and butter in a double boiler for 
fifteen minutes. When cool, add beaten yolks of eggs and 
sugar. Pour in pan and cover with beaten whites of eggs 
and two and one-half teaspoons of sugar. Add nut meats, 
and brown in oven. Mrs. A. D. Raffington. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING WITH PINEAPPLE 

1 cup of tapioca. 1 can pineapple. 

l 2 cups sugar. 3 egg whites. 

Juice of 2 lemons. 

Soak the tapioca over night in enough water to cover it. 
In the morning add water, and cook slowly until transpar- 
ent. Add the lemon-juice and pineapple, and beat the 
whites of the eggs in slowly. 

Dressing for Pudding : 
3 cups milk. 3 egg yolks. 

\% cups sugar. Lemon flavoring. 

1 large tablespoon corn-starch. 

Heat the milk in a double boiler, after which add the 
other ingredients. Rachel M. Rea. 

THE POPULAR JELL-O RECIPE 

Dissolve one package of Jell-O, any flavor, in a pint of 
boiling water. Pour into a mold, and put in a cold place 
to harden. When set, turn out on a plate. 



196 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

Be sure to use Jell-O, with the name Jell-0 in big, red 
letters on the package. 

WATER PUDDING 

4 tablespoons of eorn-starch. 1 pint boiling water. 

1 cup sugar. 1 lemon. 
3 egg whites. 

Moisten corn-starch with cold water ; pour boiling water 
over this, and cook about ten minutes. Take from fire 
and add sugar, juice, and grated rind of lemon. Pour 
while hot over beaten whites of eggs. Mix, and set away 
to cool. Serve with vanilla custard sauce, using egg-yolks. 

Mrs. J. S. Blayney. 

WHIPPED CREAM LOAF 

2 lb. blanched almonds. 1 rounded tablespoon of gela- 
\ dozen macaroons. tine. 

J cup of cold water. \ cup of boiling water. 

1 cup of sugar. 1 pint cream. 

1 dozen candied cherries. 

Chip macaroons, cherries, and almonds ; set aside. Dis- 
solve gelatine in cold water; add boiling water and sugar; 
stir until dissolved ; set aside to cool. Whip cream stiff ; 
add gelatine and fruit beaten until thoroughly mixed ; 
flavor with vanilla, and pour into mold; set on ice. When 
cold, cut in slices and serve. Mrs. W. H. Taylor. 

FRESH, RIPE, TART FRUIT. 

Pare, quarter or slice one-half dozen pears, peaches or 
other soft fruit, sprinkle with sugar and set to one side. 
Soak one envelope of PLYMOUTH ROCK PHOSPHATED 
GRANULATED GELATINE in one-half pint of cold 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 197 

water three to five minutes, add one-halt' pint of boiling 
water to dissolve the gelatine, add one cup of sugar and 
then the fruit. Set on ice to harden, etc. With pink gel- 
atine very attractive. 

All kinds of fruit, fresh, canned or preserved, can be 
used with this. Serve with sugar and cream. 




America's Most Famous 
Dessert 




No cooking — no work, when you 
make JELL-O Desserts. 

All that is required to make one is a 
ten-cent package of JELL-Q and a pint of 
boiling water. 

Seven Delightful Flavors : Lemon, 
Orange, Strawberry, Raspberry, Cheny, Peach, Chocolate. 
Frappes, sherbets, souffles, charlottes, salads, puddings, 
plain Jell-0 desserts, fruited Jell-O desserts — almost 
everything conceivable that is good for dessrrt — can be 
made of Jell-O. 

Be sure to get the Jell-O package with the word 
Jell-O in big red letters. If the word Jell-O is not on 
the package it isn't JELL-O. 

All grocers sell Jell-O, 10c. a package. The price 
never goes up. 

Send to us for our beautiful recipe book. It is free. 

THE GENESEE PURE FOOD CO., 

Le Roy, N. Y., and Bridgeburg, Can. 



Frozen Desserts 

CARAMEL ICE-CREAM 

4 whole eggs. 1 cup white sugar. 

1 cup light brown sugar. 2 quarts milk. 

1 pint cream (either sour or h cup flour. 
sweet). 

Beat eggs, white sugar and flour to a cream. Put one 
quart of milk in double boiler ; add mixture to make a 
custard. Burn brown sugar ; mix with custard. When 
cool and ready to freeze, add remainder of milk and cream. 
Mapleine may be used as flavoring if desired. 

Mrs. Guy C. Glascock. 

CHOCOLATE ICE-CREAM 

2 eggs. 1| cups sugar. 

1 tablespoon flour. 1 tablespoon chocolate. 

1 pint milk. 1^ pints cream. 

Vanilla. 

Cook eggs, flour, chocolate and sugar with milk ; then 
add cream and flavoring, and freeze. 

Mrs. Lucile Prigg Eichhorn. 

THE EASY WAY TO MAKE ICE-CREAM 

Use one quart of milk for a package of Jell-0 Ice Cream 
Powder. Pour the contents of a package of Jell-0 Ice 
Cream Powder in a dish. Pour on it one cup of milk, and 
stir to a thick smooth paste to avoid lumps. Add the rest 
of the quart of milk, stir until thoroughly dissolved, and 

freeze. 

(199) 



200 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

CRANBERRY ICE 

3 quarts cranberries. 6 lemons. h gallon water. 

Boil cranberries in water until tender. Strain through 
sieve to get all of the pulp, but hold back skins. Add the 
juice of lemons and sugar to make not very sweet. Freeze, 
and pack until ready to serve. Serve with meats. 

Lucy E. Leidigh. 
CRANBERRY SHERBET 

1 quart cranberries. 1 pint water. 

1| cups of sugar. 2 lemons. 

Cook cranberries and water ; run through sieve ; add 
sugar and juice of lemons. Freeze. Makes a pretty and 
tasty side dish for a luncheon or cold supper. 

Mrs. Garland Craig. 

FROZEN PECAN PUDDING 

12 stale macaroons. 1 pint cream. 

| cup pecan meats. Sugar. 

Whip cream stiff and mix lightly with macaroons which 
have been rolled ; add ground nut meats ; sweeten to 
taste. Put in mold, and pack in ice and salt for four 
hours. May Mathews. 

FROZEN FIG PUDDING 

1 pint milk. 1 tablespoon corn-starch 

3 tablespoons sugar. heaped. 

3 eggs. 1 cup water. 

Cook to a custard : 
1 cup of figs. 1 cup sugar. 

Cook to a preserve. 

^Vl^en these are cold, mix and add one pint whipped 
cream, and freeze. Mrs. Florence Smith. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK Iumk 201 



GREEN GAGE CREAM 

1 can green-gage plums. 1 quart water. 

1 pint sugar. 1 quart cream. 

Remove pits from fruit, and mash well; add juice. 
Make a syrup of sugar and water; to this add fruit, and 
freeze. When nearly frozen, add cream. 

Mas. Margaret Mayberger. 
GRAPE FREEZE 

1 pint cream. 1 cup grape juice. 
Juice of 1 lemon. 1 cup sugar. 

Mix all together, and freeze in three parts ice to one 
part salt. Margaret McCandless. 

MAPLE MOUSSE 

2 cups of maple syrup 5) eggs, yolks. 

(scant). l 2 eggs, whites. 

3 pints of cream. 

Beat together egg-yolks and syrup ; cook in double 
boiler until it thickens ; then set aside to cool. Whip 
cream and the whites of two eggs well beaten. Mix all; 
put in freezer; let stand three or four hours, turning often. 
This makes three quarts when frozen. 

Inez Winchester. 
MAPLE MOUSSE 

4 eggs (yolks). 1 cup maple syrup. 

5 macaroons. A few almonds. 

1 quart cream. 

Beat yolks of eggs ; pour over them boiling maple syrup, 
and whip until cold; add rolled macaroons and almonds, 
blanched and chopped; lastly, whipped cream. Put in 
freezer well packed, and let stand three or four hours. 

Xklle Hoaglaxd. 



202 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

MAPLE PARFAIT 

1 cup maple sugar. 4 eggs. \ pint cream. 

Beat yolks of eggs well ; add sugar, and cook until it 
thickens a little. Beat thoroughly; add beaten whites 
and cream whipped. Beat all together, and pack in ice. 
Mrs. Mamie Prigg Burris, 

Chicago, 111. 
MARSHMALLOW PUDDING 

\ lb. marshmallows. \ cup candied cherries. 

\ cup nuts. 1 cup whipped cream. 

2 tablespoons powdered 1 teaspoon vanilla, 
sugar mixed with cream. 

Pack, and freeze four hours. Do not turn. This will 
serve six. Inez Winchester. 

ORANGE SHERBET 

Soak one tablespoonful of PLYMOUTH ROCK PHOS- 
PHATED GRANULATED GELATINE in one-half pint 
cold water three to five minutes. Add one-half pint of hot 
water, one cup sugar (or sweeten to taste), stir until dis- 
solved. Add one cup cold water, juice of four oranges. 
Strain and freeze in usual manner. 

PEACH ICE-CREAM 

1 quart ripe peaches. 1 quart sugar. 

1 quart unskimmed milk. 1 quart rich cream. 

Pare peaches and put through a food-grinder ; add sugar, 
and stir frequently until dissolved ; then slowly stir in 
milk and cream mixed, and freeze immediately. 

Strawberries may be used in the same way for straw- 
berry cream. Mrs. E. S. Handy. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 203 

PEACH DELICACY 

1| quarts crushed peaches. 1 pint sugar. 

1 pint water. 2 egg whites beaten stiff. 

Boil water and sugar to make thick syrup ; let cool, and 
add peaches, then freeze. Mrs. Sawyer. 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET 

1 can grated pineapple. 3 large lemons. 

2 oranges. 2 pints sugar. 

1 pint water. 3 eggs (whites). 

Make a syrup of sugar and water; add pineapple, and 
juice of oranges and lemons ; pour in freezer, and fill with 
water until freezer is three-quarters full. After it begins 
to freeze, add the beaten eggs. This makes one gallon. 

Mrs. W. A. Scothorn. 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET 

4 oranges. 4> lemons. 

1 can grated pineapple 2 cups sugar. 

3 eggs (whites) . 

Make syrup of sugar ; when cool, add enough water to 
make one gallon ; add juice of oranges and lemons ; add 
pineapple. When partly frozen, add whites of eggs beaten. 

Mrs. John C. Krous. 

RASPBERRY WATER ICE 

3 pints of raspberry juice. 1 lb. pulverized sugar. 

1 lemon. 

Press raspberries through a fine sieve until desired amount 
of juice is obtained ; add juice of lemon, sugar, and freeze. 

Mrs. Lauderdale. 



20 \ GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

RED RASPBERRY CREAM 

2 quarts of berries. 2 oranges. 

1 lemon. 2 cups sugar. 

1 pint thick sweet cream. 4 eggs, whites. 

To the juice of berries, oranges and lemons, add sugar, 
and put in freezer; turn slowly for ten minutes or until it 
begins to stiffen well ; then add cream and beaten eggs, 
and finish freezing. Ruth Astle. 



RUTLAND MAPLE CREAM 

1 good pint sweet milk. 1 pint cream. 

1 cup of sugar. 2 eggs. 

1 teaspoon gelatine. § cup of maple syrup. 

^ cup of English walnuts. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Beat the whites of eggs separately. Cut nuts fine. This 
amount when frozen makes two quarts. Mrs. Ryker. 

SHERBET 

For one gallon sherbet : 
6 lemons. oranges. 

6 bananas. (> cups sugar. 

6 cups water. 1 small can pineapple. 

Mary Irwin Davidson. 



STRAWBERRY PARFAIT 

% tablespoons gelatine. 1 gill boiling water. 

\\ cups sugar. 1 pint cream. 

1 heapingcup of strawberries. 

Soak gelatine in just enough cold water to cover it ; 
when soft, add boiling water and put over the fire, stirring 
until dissolved; then add cup of sugar. As soon as this 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 205 

is melted, take from the fire and strain. When cool, heat 
in cream whipped. Mash strawberries with half-cup sugar, 
and beat lightly into above mixture. Pack in freezer, 
nsing lots of salt, and let stand four hours. 

Mrs. R. C. Whiteside. 

STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM 

1 pint ripe strawberries. 1 pint cream. \ lb. sugar. 

Rub strawberries through a sieve ; add cream and sugar, 
and freeze. If more is wanted, double the quantity. 

Mrs. Wm. R. Pennington. 

FIVE THREES ICE 

3 bananas. 3 oranges. 

3 lemons. 3 cups of water. 

3 cups sugar. 

Slice bananas; add juice of oranges and lemons, sugar 
and water ; pour in freezer, and freeze. 

Mrs. Geo. S. Allee. 
SIX THREES 

3 lemons. 3 oranges. 

3 bananas. 3 cups sugar. 

3 cups cream. 3 cups water. 

Mash the bananas ; mix all together, and freeze. This 
makes nearly three quarts. Mrs. A. R. Scheble. 



Fruits and Jellies 

To make perfect jelly requires the skill of an expert, and 
in jelly-making there are more chances of possible failure 
than in any other branch of preserving. A little knowledge 
of the cause of "jellying" and of the underlying principles 
will be welcomed by the novice. All fruits will not of 
themselves make jelly. Some because they have too much 
or not enough acid, others because they lack a substance 
known as pectin. This pectin very much resembles ordi- 
nary gelatine. To "jelly," therefore, a fruit must con- 
tain pectin and sufficient acid. Sweet apples, pears, 
peaches contain pectin but not enough acid. Sour cherries 
contain too much acid and not enough pectin. To make 
jelly of these fruits they must be mixed in their juices with 
other fruits supplying their lack, or with acid or pectin 
obtained for the purpose. Thus, to make jelly of pears or 
sweet apples without adding other fruit juice one must add 
tartaric or citric acid in the form obtainable from the drug- 
gist. The exact proportions for use cannot be given, be- 
cause it will depend upon the natural proportions of the 
juice. It is best to use a teaspoonful of tartaric acid to 
each quart of juice, allowing it to dissolve before testing. 
When it is found that this amount does not give a tartness 
equal to fruit like sour apples, more can be added. When 
it is desired to make jelly from fruits like sour cherries, 
lacking pectin, and it is not desired to add the juice of 
oilier fruits, then pectin may be obtained from the peels 

(206) 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 207 

of oranges or lemons. According to X. E. Goldthwaite, 
of the University of Illinois, the following methods of ob- 
taining pectin is used: Peel oft' the outer yellow skin of 
oranges or lemons; the white inner skin is then taken and 
ground through a food-chopper or cut fine. It is Mien 
soaked for twenty-four hours in water enough to cover it, 
and finally eooked slowly for several hours, and the juice 
is then drained off and used with fruit juice lacking pectin. 
Orange and lemon peels may be saved as used, and kept 
for this purpose. Sometimes we cannot tell if juice con- 
tains pectin, and in such cases Dr. Goldthwaite recommends 
the following test: "A few tablespoonfuls of the fruit 
juice is mixed with an equal portion of grain alcohol; on 
cooling, the pectin will settle out in a gelatinous mass so 
that it can be lifted out with a spoon." This test should 
be tried with juice from fruit that is known to jelly easily, 
as crab-apples, and also with that which does not, as sour 
cherries, and these two tests will govern one in determin- 
ing the jelly qualities of others. Fruits are cooked so that 
the juice may contain the pectin, then the juice containing 
both pectin and acid is cooked with sugar in order to make 
the jelly. Sugar is not absolutely necessary to the process, 
but improves the flavor and hastens the process. Fruits 
containing much pectin will require but little cooking. 
Too much sugar should be avoided, for that will make 
sugar crystals forming in the jelly or it will make it soft 
and "runny." Too long cooking makes ropy jelly. Often, 
cream of tartar crystals form in grape jelly. This may be 
prevented by canning the grapes for some time. When 
the grapes are cooked several times, crystals do not form. 
Here are the points to be scored in jelly : 



203 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

The jelly should not be a syrup nor taffy, but should 
hold its shape. 

The jelly should shake or tremble, yet should cut clearly. 

The natural taste of the juice of the fruit should remain. 

The combinations of materials should be proper. 

The jelly should be entirely free from crystals, or parti- 
cles or solid materials, not cloudy. 

Only natural colors produced by use of fruits are al- 
lowed. 

The method of excluding organisms is here referred to. 

The cleanliness, care and state of preservation are im- 
portant. 

There are many ways of canning and preserving. The 
chief difference lying in the fact that success in canning de- 
pends upon sterilization. This is accomplished by two 
processes : First, all germs present must be killed ; second, 
all others must be kept out. In preserving, so much sugar 
is used that bacteria cannot work actively in the mixture, 
hence sterilization is not a necessary factor. When done, 
the finished product, whether canned fruit, vegetables or 
preserves, should conform to the following rules : 

The natural taste of fruit should be evident. 

The combination of materials should be pleasing. 

The natural shape should be preserved. 

The pieces should be of uniform size. 

The natural color should be maintained as nearly as pos- 
sible. No coloring matter should be added other than 
fruit gives. 

There should be no loss of space, yet fruit should not be 
crushed together, and should present an attractive and 
j (leasing appearance. 

Method of preservation. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 209 

The contents must be free from action of yeasts, moulds 
or bacteria. The jar should he clean and air-tight. 

(By Frances L. Brown, head of the Department of Home Economics 
Extension Division, K. S. A. C.) 

TO CAN FRUIT WITHOUT COOKING 

Fill your clean glass cans just as full of cold fruit or to- 
matoes as you can without mashing the fruit — berries, 
peaches, or plums. Have hot syrup made by boiling — ■ 

Three cups sugar to a little more than one cup water. 

Set your can of fruit in pan one-third full of warm water, 
and fill the jar with hot syrup. Put on the rubbers, and 
screw the lids on tight. Put a layer of paper in bottom of 
wash-boiler, lay the cans down on their sides, and put in 
as many cans as boiler will hold. Fill the boiler with boil- 
ing water. If you have the cans lying down, they will not 
break. Cover with plenty of old carpet or rugs, and let 
stand over night, or until the water in boiler is cold, when 
the fruit will be ready to put away. Slice tomatoes, pack 
solid, and do not add any water, as they will be juicy 
enough. Mrs. Laura A. Sinclair. 

APPLE JELLY 

3 cups of juice. 1| cups of sugar. 

Wash and cut apples in half. Cook thoroughly, using 
plenty of water. Pour in bag, and drain over jar. While 
juice is hot, put on stove, and boil five minutes. Measure 
and add sugar; boil until it jellies. This gives better re- 
sults to cook a small amount at a time and use Winesap 
apples. Mrs. A. D. Krous. 



210 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

APRICOT AND PINEAPPLE JAM 

To apricot jam made in the usual way, add one can of 
pineapple to every two or three quarts of apricot. Use 
the pineapple juice instead of water in cooking the apricots. 
Then add the pineapple cut into small pieces. This is a 
delicious combination of fruits. 

Mrs. Charles Greenlee. 
PINEAPPLE JAM 

Cut the pineapple in small pieces and cook in water until 
tender ; then drain. Make a syrup of three-quarters pound 
of sugar to each pound of fruit. Make the syrup with a 
little of the water in which the pineapple was cooked. Add 
the pineapple, and boil ten minutes, stirring all the time. 

Lulu Stallman. 

CRANBERRY JELLY 

1 qt. cranberries. 1 pt. water. 
4 tart apples. 1 lb. sugar. 

Cook apples and berries with water for twenty minutes. 
Put through sieve ; add sugar, and boil five minutes. 

Zoa R. Chase. 

CRANBERRY JELLY 

2 quarts cranberries. 1 quart of water. 

Cook until fruit is tender, and strain through a thin 
cloth. Heat the juice, and to each pint add three-quarters 
pound granulated sugar, and stir until dissolved, but do 
not boil. Mrs. Geo. S. Bentley. 

CRANBERRIES THAT WILL JELLY 
4 cups cranberries. L Z cups sugar. 1 cup cold water. 

Put them all on together, and let come to a good boil; 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 211 

then let them simmer 15 minutes. If desired, put through 
colander while still warm, to remove the skins. 

Mrs. O. A. Peterson. 

GRAPE CONSERVE 

5 lbs. of grapes. h lb. English walnuts. 

2 lbs. raisins. 3 oranges. 

4 lbs. granulated sugar. 

Remove the pulp of grapes, cook, and take out seeds ; 
chop raisins and nuts ; add the grated rind and juice of 
oranges and sugar. Cook until quite thick. 

Mrs. Jed Burns. 

PLUM CONSERVE 

1 basket (.5 lbs.) blue plums. 1 lb. seeded raisins. 

3 oranges. 5 lbs. of sugar. 

Use rind of one orange and pulp of all. Put all through 
the food-grinder; add sugar, and cook slowly until it 
thickens. A pound of chopped English walnuts may be 
added just before removing from the fire. 

Mrs. O. A. Peterson. 

PLUM CONSERVE 

1 box plums. 1 lemon. 

1 small can pineapple. 1 lb. English walnuts. 

1 lb. seedless raisins. 3 lbs. sugar. 

1 orange. 

Stew plums ; remove seeds ; cut lemon and orange in 
small dice. Chop nuts. Add raisins and sugar, and cook 
down like preserves. Miss Mattie Fruit. 

Great Bend, Kans. 



212 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

RHUBARB CONSERVE 

3 pints of rhubarb. 3 pints sugar. 

3 oranges (4 if small). 1 lb. English walnuts. 

Cut rhubarb fine ; grind pulp and rind of oranges ; add 
sugar, and boil until it jellies. Break nuts in small pieces, 
and add just before taking from stove. 

Mrs. Frank Faris, 

Guymon, Okla. 
GINGER PEARS 

8 lbs. of chipped pears. \ lb. broken ginger root. 

6 lbs. sugar. 1 cup of water. 

Put in preserving-kettle, and simmer four hours or until 
red and clear. Use hard pears. Lucy E. Leidigh. 

ORANGE MARMALADE (Canadian) 

8 oranges. 4 lemons. 

4 quarts of water. 11 lbs. granulated sugar. 

Slice fruit thin with rind ; add water, and let stand over 
night. Boil one hour; add sugar, and boil until it jells. 

Mrs. Hugh T. Kerr. 

ORANGE MARMALADE 

12 oranges. 5 lemons. 

First day : slice fruit thin, using all but the ends ; weigh, 
and for every pound of fruit add a quart of water ; set 
away twenty-four hours. 

Second day : Cook fruit until you can pierce with a 
broom splint. Set away twenty-four hours. 

Third day : Weigh, and for every pound of fruit add a 
pound of sugar. Cook slowly until it jells. 

Mrs. Emma Gillett Wasson. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK ROOK 213 

ORANGE MARMALADE 

2 oranges sliced thin. 2 lemons, sliced thin. 

Pulp of one grape fruit. 

Add twice as much water as fruit, and let stand until 
the next day. Put over fire, and cook twenty minutes. 
Then measure, and add an equal amount of granulated 
sugar. Boil about twenty minutes longer, or until it will 
jell. Stella Gabrielson. 

ORANGE MARMALADE 

6 navel oranges. 8 good-sized lemons. 

Cut off thick ends of oranges and throw away. Halve, 
quarter and cut oranges in thin slices. To each pound of 
sliced fruit, add 3 pints of cold water. Let stand uncovered 
over night. Put over fire, and let boil 45 minutes. Take 
off fire, and let stand another 24 hours. Weigh again, and 
to each pound of fruit add 1 pound of sugar and the juice 
of lemons ; also add an extra pint of water. Boil 45 min- 
utes, when it will be ready for the glasses. 

Mrs. L. M. Fall, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

QUINCE HONEY 

5 large quinces. 5 lbs. granulated sugar. 

1 pint boiling water. 

Pare and grate quinces. Place sugar in granite saucepan ; 
add water, and stir until dissolved ; add quinces. Cook 
slowly for 15 or 20 minutes. If cooked too long, will have 
a reddish color; if cooked just long enough, it is the color 
of honey. Turn into jelly glasses, let cool, then cover. 

Mrs. F. H. Stallmax. 



214 dOOD THINGS TO EAT 

PEACH PICKLES 

1 lb. peaches. J lb. sugar. \ pint of vinegar. 

Peel peaches; while syrup is clarifying, put into each 
peach four cloves. When syrup is ready, put peaches in a 
few at a time, and cook not too soft. Place in jars, and 
pour syrup over them. In a few days pour off syrup and 
scald syrup again. Pour over the peaches, and seal while 
very hot. Mrs. C. M. Branch. 

PEAR AND QUINCE PRESERVES 

1 peck of pears. 3 or 4 quinces. 

1 lb. sugar to 1 lb. of cooked fruit. 

' Peel and core fruit ; slice lengthwise in thin slices. Cook 
each fruit separately in just enough water to cover. When 
clear, drain, saving juices for syrup. Make syrup, and 
when it begins to thicken add fruits and cook two or three 
hours, or until preserves are as thick as desired. 

Nell Hoagland. 
SPICED APPLES 

2 gallons peeled and quar- 1 quart vinegar. 

tered apples. 2 teaspoons whole cloves. 

3 quarts sugar. 4 teaspoons whole cinnamon. 

Bring vinegar and sugar to a boil ; add apples ; cook 
until tender ; lift out ; add spice to syrup ; bring to boil 
again, and pour over fruit. Let stand twenty-four hours ; 
bring to boil again, and seal. 

Mrs. Eliza M. Schermerhorn. 

SUNSHINE CHERRIES 

3 pints cherries. \\ pints currant juice. 3 pints sugar. 
Cook cherries in as little water as possible; add sugar 
and currant juice, and cook until it jellies. 

Mrs. F. P. Hettinger. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH HOOK COOK 215 

SPICED CANTALOUPE 

5 lbs. cantaloupe. 3 lbs. granulated sugar. 

1 pint vinegar. 1 tablespoon stick cinna- 

2 teaspoons whole cloves. inon (broken). 

Use ripe, solid cantaloupe, peel, cut in slices one half 
inch thick. Let stand in weak salt water over night ; then 
drain thoroughly. Bring vinegar and sugar to boil; pour 
over melons. Repeat for nine mornings, adding spice to 
syrup the third morning. Seal. 

Mrs. Eliza M. Schermerhorn. 

STRAWBERRY JAM 

To every box of strawberries, 1 pint of sugar. 

Stem the berries ; put the sugar over them, and let 
stand one, two or three hours, or over night. Crush, or 
let them be whole. Cook ten minutes. 

Raspberries or blackberries can be done in the same way. 

Mrs. E. L. Meyer. 

STRAWBERRY OR CHERRY PRESERVES 
1 cup berries. 2 cups sugar. 1 cup water. 

Let fruit and sugar stand four or five hours. Pour juice 
from fruit ; add water, and let come to boil ; add fruit, 
and boil until clear; remove fruit, and boil syrup until 
thick. Mrs. F. E. Larson. 

SPICED CHERRIES 

1 lb. cherries. 1 pint sugar. 

^ pint vinegar. h oz. cinnamon. 

h oz. cloves. 

Wash and pit nice fresh cherries. Put spices, sugar and 
vinegar in kettle; let boil ten minutes, and add cherries; 
cook five minutes. Pour all in jar, drain, and reheat juice 
for seven mornings. Mrs. N. E. Williams. 



216 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

SUN-PRESERVED CHERRIES * 

Remove seeds carefully, retaining all juice. Measure, 
and add an equal quantity of sugar. Let stand over night. 
Then drain off the juice, and boil briskly 15 minutes ; add 
the fruit, and boil 30 minutes longer. Remove from the 
fire, and spread on large plates or platters. Place in a 
strong sunlight under glass for several hours or until prop- 
erly congealed. Place in glasses or jars, and seal with 
paraffine. Keep in cool dark place. 

Mrs. Martin Hoagland. 

WATERMELON PRESERVE 

Pare off the green outside and the pink inside from the 
rind. Cut in pieces about two inches long. Weigh, and 
put in salted water, and let come to a boil.- Then boil un- 
til the rind is easily pierced with a fork. Remove and 
drain, pressing out all the water that you possibly can. 

Take the same weight sugar that you had rinds ; two or 
three pints of water ; 4 oz. ginger root bruised and tied in 
muslin bag, and three or four lemons sliced. Make a 
syrup of these ingredients, taking out the ginger when it 
has become strongly flavored with it ; then put in rinds, 
and let boil slowly until clear. Take out rinds and put in 
jars. Boil down syrup until it is thick, and pour over and 
seal. Mrs. D. E. Richards. 

YUM-YUM 

5 lbs. of currants. 5 lbs. sugar. 

1 lb. seeded raisins. 4 oranges. ' 

Use juice of oranges and the grated rind of three. Mix 
all together and cook 20 minutes, after it begins to boil. 
Very nice served with meats. Mrs. W. F. Reber, 

Ellwood City, Pa. 



Pickles 

AUNT HELEN'S PICKLE 

1 peck ripe tomatoes. h peek green tomatoes. 

2 heads cabbage. 3 green peppers. 
1 cup salt. 3 red peppers. 

6 onions. 

Put all through food-grinder. Cut separately; then 
mix all together with salt. Put in a bag, and drain five 
hours. To each gallon of vinegar add 3 lbs. of brown sugar, 

3 tablespoons of mixed spices. Boil all together for twenty 
minutes. Can while hot. Mrs. Ida Gary Johnson. 

BAZAAR PICKLES 

5 dozen sour cucumber 4 garlic cloves, 

pickles. | cup of olive oil. 

Use pickles about five or six inches long, cut crosswise 
into five or six pieces. Mix with garlic and oil. 

If pints cider vinegar. 5 lbs. yellow clarified sugar. 

I cup whole allspice. J cup whole black pepper. 

Let this come to a boil, and add one-third cup of Tar- 
ragen vinegar. Pour all over prepared pickle. 

Mrs. F. P. Hettinger. 

BEET PRESERVES 

1 lb. of sugar. 1 pint of vinegar. 

Boil for 20 minutes ; pour over cooked beets and boil 
20 minutes ; seal. These may be spiced. 

Mrs. John C. Krous. 

(217) 



218 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

BEET RELISH 

1 quart new beets. 1 quart cabbage. 

1 cup ground horseradish. Sugar and salt to taste. 

Grind beets and cabbage rather fine. Mix with other 
ingredients and cover with vinegar. Cook beets before 
grinding. Scald all together and seal in. jars while hot. 

Mrs. J. B. Talbott. 

BEET AND CABBAGE PICKLE 

1 quart cabbage. 2 cups of sugar. 

1 quart beets. 1 tablespoon of salt. 

1 teaspoon black pepper. | teaspoon red pepper. 

1 cup of grated horseradish. 

Chop raw cabbage and cooked beets ; cover with cold 
vinegar, and keep from the air. Mrs. Cora McLain. 

BEET RELISH 

3 cups beets. 2 cups cabbage. 

1 cup horseradish. \ cup sugar. 

Salt to taste. 

Grind cooked beets and cabbage ; measure ; add enough 
vinegar to mix well. A little mayonnaise may .be added 
just before serving. Mrs. Alexander. 

CARROT PICKLES 

2 quarts carrots. \ cup of sugar. 
1 cup water. 1 cup vinegar. 

(i cloves. Stick of cinnamon. 

Cut carrots in rather thick slices, and boil in salted 
water until tender. Boil sugar, cinnamon, cloves, water 
and vinegar together; then add carrots, and boil again; 
set on back of stove, and cook slowly about one hour. 

Woman's World. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 219 

CELERY PICKLES 

1 quart vinegar. 1 cup sugar. 

Salt to taste. 

Quarter medium-sized cucumbers lengthwise (5 to 6 
inches). Let stand in ice-water one hour. Fit into Mason 
jars with a few stalks of celery and a few slices of onions. 
Make syrup hot, ami pour in jars. Mrs. Fred Briggs. 

PICKLED CHERRIES 

Cover pitted cherries with vinegar; let stand over night. 
Drain thoroughly, and use equal parts of sugar and fruit. 
Let stand four days, stirring occasionally. Seal without 
heating. Mrs. F. P. Hettinger. 

UNCOOKED CHILI SAUCE 

1 peck ripe tomatoes. 2 cups celery. 
If pints vinegar. 3 cups onions. 

\ cup salt. 6 sweet peppers. 

2 lbs. brown sugar. 3 tablespoons mustard seed. 

2 tablespoons ground cinnamon. 

Peel tomatoes, and let drain over night in flour-sack. 
Chop, and drain half hour. Remove seeds from peppers. 
Chop celery, onions and peppers. Mix all together, and 
let stand two days before putting away. Put in glass jars, 
but do not seal. Mrs. A. Randolph Sievert. 

CHILI SAUCE 

1 peck ripe tomatoes. 6 green or red peppers (large). 

4 cups of vinegar. 4 teaspoons of sugar. 

3 teaspoons of salt. 2 teaspoons ground 

cinnamon. 

Peel and chop tomatoes. Boil all together until thick. 

Mrs. Richard Justice. 



220 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



CHILI SAUCE 

2 quarts tomatoes. f cup onions. 

2 reel peppers. f cup sugar or 1 cup. 

\ pint vinegar. f teaspoon cloves. 

\ teaspoon allspice. § teaspoon cinnamon. 

\ cup salt. | nutmeg. 

Put together in kettle, and boil until thick and seal. 

Mrs. E. L. Long. 

CHILI SAUCE 

8 quarts ripe tomatoes. 1 cup peppers. 

2 cups onions. 3 cups sugar. 

f cups salt. \\ quarts vinegar. 

3 tablespoons ground 2 tablespoons ground cloves, 
cinnamon. 2 teaspoons nutmeg. 

2 teaspoons ginger. 

Peel and slice tomatoes, onions and peppers. One tea- 
spoon cayenne pepper will do instead of peppers. Boil 
2| or 3 hours, and seal. Mrs. C. T. Taylor. 



GREEN TOMATO CHOW-CHOW 

1 peck green tomatoes. 4 large peppers. 

(> large onions. 

Chop fine and drain well. 

2 quarts cider vinegar. 1 cup white mustard seed. 
2 cups brown sugar. 2 tablespoons cinnamon. 

1 tablespoon cloves. 1 tablespoon allspice. 

1 tablespoon salt. 

Mix thoroughly with tomatoes, put over fire and let 
come to boil. This will keep without scaling. 

Mrs. W. D. Everett. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 221 

CHOW-CHOW 

1 peck green tomatoes. 2 large heads cabbage. 
L5 onions (large). 15 cucumbers (large). 
12 green peppers. | cup salt. 

Chop or run all through food-grinder. Mix with salt, 
and let stand over night ; drain, and cover with equal 
parts of water and vinegar; let drain two days. 

\ gallon vinegar. 5 cups brown sugar. 

h lb. white mustard seed. | oz. celery seed. 

| cup ground mustard and | cup cinnamon (ground), 
tumeric 

Mix well, boil and pour hot over pickles three mornings. 

Mrs. L. K. Adams. 
CHOW-CHOW 

2 heads of cabbage. 4 quarts of green tomatoes. 

1 quart onions. 1 quart cucumbers. 

3 bunches of celery. Handful of parsley. 

Chop these fine, and pack in crock ; sprinkle each layer 
with salt. Let stand over night. In the morning drain ^ 
and add : 

3 quarts of vinegar. 1| lbs. light brown sugar. 

c 2 quarts of cold water. 2 teaspoons of mustard seed. 

Bring to a boil, and cook 15 or 20 minutes. 

Mrs. I. X. Koons. 

CHOW-CHOW 

\ peck green tomatoes. 1 head cabbage. 

\ quart small onions. ,'} green peppers. 

2 red peppers. h cup salt. 

Cut onions in two. Chop other ingredients ; sprinkle 
with salt, and let stand over night. Heat one quart of 



222 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



vinegar with one quart of water with a small piece of alum ; 
put pickles in, scald and drain. 

3 quarts of vinegar. 3 cups of sugar. 

7 tablespoons mustard. 1 tablespoon tumeric powder. 

2 tablespoons flouf . 

Mix, and let boil well ; add vegetables ; stir, and seal in 
air-tight jars. Mrs. N. E. Williams. 



CORN SALAD 

18 ears corn. 
3 green or red peppers. 
2 cups light-brown sugar. 
2 tablespoons salt. 



1| heads cabbage. 

\ cup ground mustard. 

h gallon vinegar. 



Cut corn from cob ; chop cabbage and peppers fine ; dis- 
solve mustard in water so there are no lumps ; mix well 
together and cook until tender, which takes about one 
hour. Seal while hot. This makes about 8 quarts. Corn 
must be just right for roasting-ears. Mrs. Hubbard. 



PICKLED CORN 

12 ears corn. 
4 onions. 

\ dozen green peppers. 
1 teaspoon tumeric powder. 
1 tablespoon Coleman's 
mustard. 



1 small cabbage. 
\ doz. red peppers. 

1 cup granulated sugar. 

2 tablespoons salt. 
1 tablespoon flour. 
1 quart vinegar. 



Mix mustard, flour and vinegar smooth ; add the corn 
cut from cob and other vegetables ground, and mix thor- 
oughly. Cook slowly half an hour after it begins to boil. 

Mas. Alexander. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 223 

CUCUMBER PICKLES 

Pick the cucumbers when small. Wash clean, and soak 
in weak brine over night; in the morning pour oil' the 
brine and scald, and pour on the pickles three morn- 
ings in succession. Then scald in good vinegar three 
morning's, spice to taste, and seal in glass jars while hot. 
Will keep for years. Mrs. Wm. R. Pennington. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES 

1 gal. medium-sized cucum- 1 quart vinegar. 
bers. \ dozen grape leaves. 

2 cups sugar. \ teaspoon cayenne pepper. 
l 2 quarts water. Stick cinnamon. 

1 tablespoon cloves. 

Let cucumbers stand over night in brine, or until salt 
enough to suit taste. Put spices and other ingredients 
in kettle, and let boil ten minutes; then add cucumbers, 
and keep at boiling heat until thoroughly heated; take 
out of this and put in glass jars. Make fresh syrup, using 
one cup of sugar to each quart of vinegar. Let boil five 
minutes, and pour over cucumbers ; seal^ Save first 
syrup for future use. Mrs. X. E. Williams. 

SLICED CUCUMBER AND ONION PICKLE 

12 large cucumbers. (i medium onions. 

1 pint vinegar. \ pint sugar. 

1 teaspoon white mustard 1 teaspoon celery seed, 

seed. 1 tablespoon ginger. 

Slice cucumbers thick, about half-inch. Slice onions as 
for table. Salt, and let stand about an hour or more 



224 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

Heat vinegar, sugar and other ingredients ; add cucum- 
ber and onions. Cook twenty minutes. Seal while hot. 

Miss Mattie Fruit, 

Great Bend, Kans. 

CUCUMBER AND ONION PICKLES 

2 dozen lar,ge cucumbers. 8 large onions. 

1 pint salt. 3 pints vinegar. 

3 tablespoons mustard seed-. 3 tablespoons celery seed. 
3 red peppers. Sugar to taste. 

Slice cucumbers and onions ; let stand over night with 
salt sprinkled over them. Squeeze and drain well in the 
morning ; add other ingredients, and cook until clear. 

Mrs. F. E. Larson. 
CUCUMBER PICKLE 

25 cucumbers. 1 quart cider vinegar. 

1 cup pure olive oil. 1 cup white mustard seed. 

1 small cup salt. Little celery seed. 

Slice cucumbers, not too thin. This is not to be cooked. 
Pour liquid over cucumbers and put in jars. 

Mrs. Alexander. 
CUCUMBER PICKLE 

Gather small cucumbers ; let stand in salted water over 
night ; pack in glass jars ; pour over boiling spiced and 
sweetened vinegar; seal, and keep in a cool place. Will 
keep indefinitely. Mrs. L. G. McLane. 

FIG PICKLE 

7 lbs. green tomatoes. 4 lbs. granulated sugar. 

1 pint vinegar. 2 tablespoons cinnamon. 

1 lb. seeded raisins. 

Peel tomatoes and chop fine. Chop raisins. Put all 
together, and cook slowly until thick. Mrs. E. Morgan. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 225 

DILL PICKLES 

1 gallon water. 1 quart vinegar. 

1 cup salt. 1 ten-cent package dill. 

Mix water, vinegar and salt, and pour over medium- 
sized cucumbers, placing the dill plant between the layers 
of cucumbers. Mrs. C. H. Sweetser. 

FRENCH PICKLES 

-1 quarts green tomatoes. 1 quart small onions. 

1 head cauliflower. 1 quart small cucumbers. 
6 green peppers. 1 small head cabbage. 

Peel tomatoes and slice with onions, or if onions are 
small, leave whole. Slice cucumbers into thick slices. Re- 
move seeds from peppers ; cut in small pieces. Chop cab- 
bage. Put all into brine, using half-cup of salt to five 
cups of water. Let stand twenty-four hours. Drain thor- 
oughly, and steam until tender. 

:> tablespoons dry mustard. 1 teaspoon tumeric powder. 
1| cups sugar. 1 cup flour. 

2 quarts boiling vinegar. 1 pint water. 

Mix dry ingredients with just enough water to make a 
smooth paste ; add boiling vinegar and water. Cook until 
thick as custard. Add vegetables ; put into jars, and seal. 

Mrs. Jed Burns. 
GOOSEBERRY RELISH 

l'pint gooseberries. 1 cup English walnuts. 

\ cup sugar. 

Cook or steam gooseberries. Have as dry as possible, 
and sift pulp through a fine sieve; add nuts and sugar. 
Boil one hour, and if not as thick as catsup, stir in a tea- 
spoon of corn-starch blended with a spoonful of vinegar. 
Serve cold with meat or fish: Mrs S. A. Astle. 



226 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

GRAPE CATSUP 

12 lbs. grapes. 8 lbs. sugar. 

1 quart pure eider. 1 teaspoon black pepper. 

1 teaspoon cayenne pepper. 1 10-cent box mustard. 

2 oz. ground cinnamon. 1 oz. ground cloves. 

1 teaspoon salt. 

Use juice of grapes ; boil well, and skim. Add other 
ingredients ; boil thoroughly ; bottle and seal. 

Mrs. J. C. Rudesill. 

LAST OF THE GARDEN 

\ gal. cabbage, cut fine. \ gal. Lima and string beans. 

l|quart green tomatoes. 1 quart ripe cucumbers. 

\ gal. sweet corn. \ bunch celery. 

50 small pickles. 1 lb. sugar. 

1 dozen small onions. \ lb. ground mustard. 

^[dozen sweet peppers. \ gal. vinegar. 

Parboil beans, onions, and' ripe cucumbers ; put all in a 
large vessel; pour on vinegar and water sufficient, and boil 
all one hour. Season to suit taste with pepper and salt. 

Mrs. Fannie I. Shaffer. 

MIXED PICKLES 

1 peck tomatoes. 12 onions. 

Slice tomatoes and onions, place in crock, sprinkle salt 
between each layer; let stand over night, and drain well. 
Put in preserving-kettle with the following sprinkled be- 
tween the layers : 

2 tablespoons of cloves. 2 tablespoons ginger. 

2 tablespoons allspice. 2 tablespoons black pepper. 

2 tablespoons ground A little cayenne pepper. 

mustard or seed. 

Cover all with vinegar, and boil half-hour or until tender. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 227 

Have a head of cabbage sliced thin and salted over night, 
same as tomatoes and onions, but do not cook it. Just 
mix in the jars as yon put the pickles in hot. 

Miss S. A. Parks. 

MIXED PICKLES (Olive Oil) 

I gal. small cucumbers. 1 qt. green tomatoes. 

1 qt. small green canta- 6 large green peppers. 

loupes. 1 qt. cauliflower. 

1 qt. small white onions. 1 qt. celery. 

1 qt. green string beans. 

Chop fine tomatoes, peppers, celery. Cut cantaloupes 
in dice; shred cauliflower. Cook separately in strong salt 
water the cauliflower, onions and celery. When done, 
drain, and mix with other ingredients. Place in large 
porcelain kettle and add : 

3 pints vinegar. 2 pints sugar. 

1 pint olive oil. 1 heaping tablespoon 

1 heaping tablespoon mustard. 

ground cinnamon. 1 teaspoon cloves. 

1 teaspoon mace. 2 tablespoons flour. 

Mix dry ingredients, and stir into hot liquids. Now 
place all ingredients together, and simmer for half-hour. 
Salt to taste. Seal in glass jars. Mrs. R. C. Wright. 

MUSTARD PICKLES 

2 quarts small cucumbers. 2 quarts cauliflower. 
2 quarts small onions. 2 red peppers. 

2 green peppers. 2 gallons water. 

2 cups salt. 

Cut cauliflower in small pieces and cut peppers fine. 
Put salt and water over all, and let stand thirty-six hours; 
then cook in brine until tender, and drain. 



228 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

§ cup of flour. 9 tablespoons ofjmustard. 

4 quarts mild vinegar. 2jtablespoons tumeric 

4 cups of sugar. powder. 

Boil, stirring in the flour and mustard last. When thick, 
add the vegetables, and can. Mrs. N. E. Williams. 

MUSTARD PICKLES 

1 quart of small cucumbers. 2 quarts string beans. 

2 heads of cauliflower or 2 2 quarts small white onions, 
heads of cabbage. 3 quarts green tomatoes. 

Slice and chop tomatoes coarsely. Cut cauliflower in 
small pieces. Sprinkle salt sparingly through after mixing 
all together. Put in stone jar and let stand twenty-four 
hours ; then drain off all the brine. Put in kettle over the 
fire, and add the following : 

6 red peppers, chopped. 4 tablespoons mustard seed. 

L 2 tablespoons celery seed. 2 tablespoons whole allspice. 
2 tablespoon whole cloves. 1 cup of sugar. 
§ cup of ground mustard. 

Pour on enough cider vinegar to cover the whole well. 
Cover tightly, and simmer until tender, stirring often. Put 
in glass jars. Mrs. A. C. Hoagland. 

MUSTARD PICKLES 

50 small cucumbers. 1 'dozen green tomatoes. 

1 small measure onions. 4 heads cauliflower. 

1 small measure string beans and celery. 

Bring onions and cauliflower to scald in milk and water ; 
then put all ingredients together and pour over them 
strong brine scalding hot ; let stand twenty-four hours. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 229 

Make a pickle of — 

1 gallon vinegar. 2 oz. celery seed. 

h lb. mustard seed. \ teacup black pepper. 

\ oz. tumeric powder. \ teacup ground cinnamon. 

1 lb. English mustard. 1 pint olive oil. 

3 lbs. brown sugar. 5 cents worth red peppers. 

Be sure to mix oil, mustard and tumeric together ; add 
just after taking from fire. Pour over pickle hot. 

Mrs. F. D. Larabee. 

MUSTARD PICKLES 

1 gallon onions. 1 gallon green beans. 

2 heads cauliflower. 2 heads cabbage. 
2 bunches celery. 2 green peppers. 

1 gallon small cucumbers. 

Pare onions and scald ; cut beans ; separate and cut 
cauliflower, peppers, cucumbers, cabbage and celery. Place 
all in a strong brine over night. In the morning, drain 
and scald in weak vinegar; drain again. 

1 cup mustard. \ cup of flour. 

1 oz. tumeric powder. 3 quarts vinegar. 

1 cup sugar. 

Mix thoroughly ; let come to a boil, and pour over 
pickles ; let boil again, and can. Mrs. J. Hanson. 

PICKLED ONIONS 

Use small-sized onions. Let stand over night in strong 
salt water. Take sufficient vinegar to cover onions ; add 
small sacks of whole mixed spices ; sweeten to taste. Let 
boil until spices are softened. Put in onions; set on back 
of stove ; cook slowly until onions are clear, not too soft. 
Seal in cans. Mrs. F. H. Carpenter. 



230 GOOD THI yCS TO EAT 

OLIVE PICKLES 

1 gallon of cucumbers. ^ cup of salt. 

Slice cucumbers very thin, but do not pare; add salt, 
and let stand three hours, then drain. 

3 tablespoons black 4 tablespoons celery seed, 

mustard seed". 4 tablespoons olive oil. 

1 cup chopped onions. 

Place cucumbers in layers in jar with seeds, onions and 
oil between each layer. When jar is full, add cold vinegar 
to cover. Mrs. F. P. Hettinger. 

PEPPER HASH 

12 red mangoes. 12 green' mangoes. 

5 small red peppers. 15 medium-sized onions. 

1| cups sugar. 1^ pints vinegar. 

3 tablespoonsjsalt. 

Chop mangoes and onions separately, then mix. Pour 
on boiling water, and let stand 5 minutes ; drain, and 
pour boiling water on again ; let stand ten minutes ; drain 
well ; add sugar, salt and vinegar, and allow ten or fifteen 
minutes to scald ; can. Gurtha Gary Harris. 

RED PEPPER RELISH 

12 mango peppers (red and 6 medium-sized onions. 

green). 2 tablespoons celery seed. 

1 cup horseradish. 2 tablespoons white mustard 

1 tablespoon salt. seed. 

1 quart vinegar. 1 quart water. 

| lb. of sugar. 

Chop mangoes, onions and horseradish fine. Add spices 
and vinegar and water; cook all ten minutes; add sugar, 
and cook one hour. Mrs. P. P. Lorimer. 



FIRS T PRESBYTERIA N < II I IU II < '00 K HOOK 23 

CUCUMBER PICKLES 

Pare good-sized cucumbers, and slice about half an inch 
thick. Proceed same as onion pickle. 

Mrs. F. H. Carpenter. 

RED-PEPPER STRIPS 

1 peck o!' red peppers. 1 quart of vinegar. 

2 cups of sugar. 

Cut peppers with shears in thin strips. Cover with boil- 
ing water; drain. Put in ice-water, using a large quantity 
of ice. Drain, and pack solid in pint fruit jars. Boil vin- 
egar and sugar to a syrup; pour over the strips, and seal. 
Makes four pints. 

Protect the hands with rubber gloves, or rub with olive 
oil when through canning. Mrs. Florence Smith. 

TOMATO CATSUP 

1 gallon strained tomatoes. 1 quart vinegar. 

1 large cup of sugar. 4 tablespoons of pepper. 

•4 tablespoons mustard. 4 tablespoons salt. 

4 tablespoons mixed spices. 1 teaspoon red pepper. 

Boil until thick ; strain again ; bottle and seal. 

Mrs. J. D. Hanna. 
TOMATO CATSUP 

\ bushel tomatoes. 1 tablespoon whole cloves 

1 tablespoon stick cinna- (pick out buds). 

inon. 1 level teaspoon ginger. 

1 level teaspoon red pepper. 1 dozen small red peppers. 
3 cups granulated sugar. 1 quart good cider vinegar. 

\ cup chopped onions. 

Cook tomatoes with salt until soft. Drain, and cook 
down juice. Rub pulp through tomato colander; add to 



232 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

juice. Tie spices and onions in bags; add vinegar and 
red peppers. Cook until quite thick, adding sugar about 
thirty minutes before removing from fire. Bags of spices 
and onions may be taken out when cooked enough to 
flavor well. Bottle while hot, and seal. 

Mrs. J. F. Corrigan. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLE (Sweet) 

1 peck green tomatoes. "i lbs. sugar (brown or white). 

1 quart vinegar (moder- Stick cinnamon. 

ately strong). 1 dozen small onions. 

Mixed spices. 3 small red peppers. 
Whole cloves. 

Remove the hard portion around the stem and blossom 
end on the tomatoes. Slice or grind both tomatoes and 
onions ; pack in a crock in layers, with a sprinkle of salt 
between ; then cover with plate and weight. Let stand 
over night. In the morning, drain and wash ; add sugar, 
vinegar with water to almost cover, and spices tied in a 
cloth. Boil until the tomatoes look clear, about three 
hours. Remove spices and seal. Mrs. T. F. Leidigh. 

CHOPPED GREEN TOMATO PICKLE 

1 peck green tomatoes. 2 heads of cabbage. 

1 cup salt. 6 large onions. 

1 dozen peppers. 2 talnespoons of white 

mustard seed. 

Chop the tomatoes fine; sprinkle with cup of salt, and 
hang up to drain over night. Chop cabbage, onions and 
peppers. Mix all well ; pack in jar, and cover with hot 
vinegar. Mrs. Wm. R. Pennington. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 233 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLES 

1 peck green tomatoes. (5 large onions. 

1 cup salt. 2 quarts water. 

1 quart vinegar. 

Slice tomatoes and onions; sprinkle salt through them, 
and let stand over night. Drain, and boil five minutes in 
water and vinegar. Drain again through the colander, and 
add the following : 

4 quarts vinegar. 2 lbs. brown sugar. 

2 tablespoons ground \ lb. ground mustard, 
cloves. 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper. 

2 tablespoons ground 2 tablespoons ground ginger, 

cinnamon. 

Boil until well heated. Mrs. Frank Colladay. 

SLICED GREEN TOMATO PICKLE 

1 peck green tomatoes. 12 onions. 

1 oz. mustard. 1 oz. cloves. 

1 oz. allspice. 1 oz. ginger. 

1 oz. pepper. 1 oz. cinnamon. 

1 tablespoon salt. \ lb. sugar. 

Slice tomatoes thin ; sprinkle with salt, and let stand 
over night. Slice onions ; put with tomatoes in layers ; 
put in spice, cover with vinegar, and boil two hours. 

Mrs. Carrie Giles. 
COLD TOMATO PICKLE 

1 peck ripe tomatoes. 2 cups celery (2 bunches) . 
4 large onions. 6 sweet peppers. 

2 cups brown sugar. \ cup salt. 

2 oz. of mustard seed. 1 quart cider vinegar. 

Slice tomatoes, and drain over night. Chop celery, 
onions and peppers. Do not cook. 

Mrs. Isabella Crosby. 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



COLD RIPE TOMATO RELISH 



1 peck ripe tomatoes. 

2 large onions. 

1 tablespoon of black 
pepper. 

1 scant cup salt. 

2 teaspoons ground cinna- 
mon. 



2 large stalks horseradish. 
4 large stalks celery. 

2 oz. white mustard seed. 
1 teaspoon ground cloves. 
1| cups sugar. 

3 pints pure cider vinegar. 
1 dozen sweet mangoes. 



Peel tomatoes, and cut in quarters. Put in colander ; 
drain over night. Chop horseradish, onions, celery and 
peppers fine. Do not cook. Mrs. Kate E. Cathers. 



TOMATO RELISH 

1 peck ripe tomatoes. 

4 large red peppers. 

2 oz. white mustard seed. 

5 cups pure cider vinegar. 
1 lb. brown sugar. 



6 large onions. 
3 cups chopped celery. 
3 tablespoons fresh horse- 
radish. 
| cup of salt. 



Peel tomatoes, chop and drain ; squeeze perfectly dry 
with the hands, as it will not keep if any juice is left in. 
Chop fine onions, and peppers (leaving in seeds). Mix 
well. Let stand several days. Can cold in pint cans. 
This must not be cooked. The juice from the tomatoes 
may be saved for catsup. Mrs. C. E. Branine. 



-y 



FAULTLESS 
8 -STARCH &r 



^STARCH* 

FOR 5HIRTS,C0LLAR5,CUfT3.AND FIME LINFJi 



Beverages 



CANNED GRAPE JUICE 

Pick grapes from stems, and wash. Cover with water, 
and cook till thoroughly soft. Strain through jelly-bag 
over night. Return to kettle with half as much (or less) 
sugar as juice. Boil ten minutes, and seal hot in fruit jars 
or bottles. If bottled, seal corks with wax to exclude air. 
Keep in cool place. Mrs. C. M. Branch. 

COFFEE FOR LARGE NUMBER 

1 tablespoon coffee to each person. 

Mix one egg with each pound of coffee. Place coffee in 
bags (half lb. to each bag). Do not fill bags more than 
half full. Put in large kettle, and cover with cold water. 
Set on back of stove, and let come to a boil slowly. Add 
boiling water to make required amount when ready to 
serve. Mrs. L. E. Tilley. 

FRUIT PUNCH 

1 dozen lemons. 15 oranges. 

1 large can Hawaiian pine- 1^ to 2 gallons water, 
apple. h lb. candied cherries or 1 

can home-canned cherries. 

Squeeze juice from oranges and lemons ; add sugar to 
taste, pineapple cut in cubes, and juice from same. If 
canned cherries are used, add juice from them. This 
amount will serve fifty persons. Mrs. J. L. Penney, 

(235) 



236 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



SUMMER DRINK 



3 quarts water. \\ lbs. granulated sugar. 

Whi 
1 lemon. 



2 oz. tartaric acid. Whites of 3 eggs 



Slice the lemon, pour the boiling water on it and the 
other ingredients, except the whites of eggs. These beat to 
a froth, and add after the water is cold. Bottle. Put a 
glass of this in a tumbler ; pour in a glass of cold water ; 
add a pinch of baking soda, and stir till it effervesces. 

Mrs. J. B. Mackay. 
UNFERMENTED WINE 

Pick grapes from the stems and wash. Cook as for 
jelly, and strain through flannel bag. To one quart of 
juice add three-fourths pint granulated sugar. Let boil, 
and skim. Cook until sugar is dissolved ; pour boiling 
hot in bottles or self-sealing jars, and seal. 

Mrs. H. M. Shockley, 

Lewis ville, Ind. 
VENUS NECTAR 

6 rounding teaspoons 6 cups boiling milk, 

grated chocolate. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

2 tablespoons strong coffee. 

Melt chocolate ; add quickly, boiling milk ; when thor- 
oughly dissolved, add coffee and vanilla. Serve hot with 
whipped cream. Mrs. John C. Krous. 



Confectionery 

BROWN BETTY CANDY 

2 cups sugar (dark brown \ cup sweet milk, 
preferred). 1 cup walnut meats. 

Butter size of walnut. 

Boil these ingredients together over brisk fire until a 
soft ball is formed when dropped in cold water. Add one 
cup English walnuts just before removing from the fire. 
Stir until cool, and pour into buttered platter or slab. 
Mark in squares when cool. Mrs. S. H. Ghormley. 

BUTTER SCOTCH 

2 cups brown sugar. \ cup water. 

Boil until hard when dropped in cold water, then add 
butter the size of goose-egg. Flavor with vanilla. Do not 
stir. Pour into greased pans to cool. 

Isabel Sweetser, 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS 

1 cup grated chocolate. 1 cup milk. 

2 cups granulated sugar. 1 cup New Orleans molasses. 
Butter size of walnut. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Sift chocolate into milk when the latter is a little more 
than lukewarm. "When this is scalding hot, add sugar, 
and when this is dissolved add molasses and butter. Boil 

(237) 



238 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

slowly until the mixture will harden when dropped into 
cold water. Stir just enough to keep mixture even. After 
removing pan from fire, add flavoring. 

Miss Lou Brehm. 

RALSTON CHOCOLATE CARAMELS 

3 cups light brown sugar. § cup dark molasses. 
| cup cold water. •§ cup new milk. 

\ lb. butter. \ lb. chocolate. 

Almonds. 

Blanch and chop the almonds and strew on buttered 
plates. Put all ingredients except the butter into a sauce- 
pan, and stir over the fire until dissolved. Then add 
butter, and after this stir no more. It will recpiire very 
close watching to prevent burning. When the candy be- 
comes hard and brittle in cold water, it is done, and ready 
to be poured without beating into the buttered plates. 

Mayme McKee Wood, 

Kansas City, Mo. 
CREAM CANDY 

2 bowls granulated sugar. 1 glass of water. 
1 large tablespoon of vine- \ teaspoon cream tartar, 
gar. Butter size of an egg. 

Do not stir ; boil until forms ball in cold water ; pour on 
buttered plate, and cool; pull until white. 

Mrs. W. E. Carr. 
DIVINITY 

2| cups of white sugar. \ cup Karo corn syrup. 

\ cup hot water. 1 cup English walnuts. 

Whites of -I eggs beaten stiff. 

Cook syrup, water and sugar together until it will form 
a soft ball in cold water. Remove from fire, and stir in 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCB COOK BOOK 239 

stiffly beaten whites of eggs. Heat to a cream. Add 
chopped nuts. Pour in buttered tins. 

Marjorie Keyes. 

DIVINITY 

3 cups granulated sugar. 1 cup cream. 

1 cup Karo syrup. Butter size of walnut. 

1 level teaspoon salt. 

Stir constantly while cooking, and try until you can 
make a soft ball of the candy ; then beat, and add chopped 
English walnuts. Frances Petro. 



FUDGE 

2 cups granulated sugar. 2 good tablespoons cocoa. 

h pint cream. 2 level tablespoons Karo 

Butter size of walnut. syrup. 

Pinch of salt. 

Stir constantly when cooking, and try in water until you 
can make a soft ball; then beat and add English walnuts. 

Frances Petro. 

FUDGE 

2 cups sugar. 1 cup rich milk. 

2 squares chocolate. Butter size of egg. 

2 teaspoons vanilla. 

Mix sugar, milk and chocolate grated. Cook without 
stirring until it is boiled and the chocolate all melted. Add 
butter, and cook until it forms a very soft substance in 
water. Let stand until it gets perfectly cold. Add vanilla, 
and beat until it cracks. Pour on a buttered platter, and 
cut into squares. Jennie F. Colladay. 



240 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



VASSAR FUDGE 

2 cups sugar. | cup cream. 

Butter size of egg. 1 teaspoon cocoa. 

Stir until dissolved. Boil four minutes. Flavor, and 
beat until it grains. Pour in buttered tins, and cut in 
squares when cool. Add nuts if desired. 

Margaret Raffington. 

CANDIED GRAPE-FRUIT RIND 

Put the rind into quite salty water to cover same, and 
let stand thirty-six hours or more, changing water for other 
salty water once. Cut into strips not too small, and put 
on in cold water and let simmer. Change the water for 
cold again, and let cook till tender. Make an extra heavy 
syrup ; add the rinds, and cook until the syrup is nearly 
absorbed and they are clear. Roll in granulated sugar 
after standing a few hours to dry. Put in Mason jars, 
and they will keep moist. Mrs. J. L. Penney. 

LOAF CANDY 

6 cups sugar. 1 cup water. 

1 large cup corn syrup. -4 egg whites. 

2 cups nuts. Vanilla. 

Boil sugar, water and syrup until it forms hard balls 
when dropped in cold water. Have whites of eggs well 
beaten, and add to the above after it lias been allowed to 
cool slightly. Beat until it drops from spoon in large balls. 
Add nuts and flavoring. Ruth M. Graves. 

NUT LOAF 

3 cups granulated sugar. 1 cup cream. 

1 cup Karo syrup. 1 tablespoon butter. 

1 cup nut meals. Vanilla. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK BOOK 241 

Boil cream, sugar and syrup until it forms a soft ball 
when dropped in cold water. Take off stove, and beat 
until you can handle it with your hands. Then place on 
buttered space on the table and knead in the butter, nuts 
and flavoring. When hard enough, to cut, mold into any 
shape preferred. Marcia Ellsworth. 

PINOCHI 

*3 cups brown sugar. 2 tablespoons butter. 

\ teaspoon cream tartar. \ cup rich milk. 

1 cup English walnuts. 

Put all ingredients except nuts together. Cook until 
soft ball stage is reached. Beat until it begins to harden. 
Stir in chopped nuts when it begins to grain. Pour into 
buttered tins. Marjorie Keyes. 

PINOCHI 

%\ cups brown sugar. \ cup cream. Butter size of walnut. 

Boil until it forms a hard ball when dropped in cold 
water. Beat until creamy, then add flavoring, and one 
cup chopped nuts if desired. Spread in buttered pans, and 
cut in squares. Marcia Ellsworth. 

PEPPERMINT OR WINTERGREEN CREAMS 

2 cups granulated sugar. \ cup water. 

1 tablespoon butter. Pinch cream tartar. 

Boil until it will make soft balls in water. Then add 2 
drops oil of peppermint, or 3 drops oil of wintergreen. Let 
cool, beat until white, then drop with spoon into greased 
pans. Isabel Sweetser. 



242 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

PARISIAN SWEETS 

Take equal parts dates, figs, and English walnuts. Chop 
together ; knead on board dredged with powdered sugar 
until well blended. Roll out half-inch thick. Cut in 
cubes, and roll in powdered sugar. Mildred Faris. 

STUFFED PRUNES 

Scald and wash large French prunes ; then steam about 
three-quarters of an hour, so that you can shove seed out 
of end. Prepare a small bowl of coarsely chopped English 
walnut meats and a bowl of Sultana seedless raisins or 
dates, with seeds removed. Cut in pieces and place in a 
bowl of granulated sugar. When prunes are cool, press 
into each some raisins or half date and sugar and nuts to 
make original size ; then press skin over the hole and roll 
in sugar and then in paraffine paper. 

Mrs. John C. Krous. 

SEA FOAM CANDY 

3 cups sugar. \ cup Karo corn syrup. \ cup hot water. 

Cook until it forms a soft ball when tested in cold water. 
Pour half the mixture into beaten whites of two eggs, and 
beat several minutes. Put other half on fire, and cook un- 
til crisp when tested. Add to the other, and beat until 
stiff. Flavor with vanilla, and add one cup nut meats. 

Mrs. John Hostutler. 

TOFFEE 

1 lb. light-brown sugar. \ lb. butter. 

Juice of small lemon. 

Boil on slow fire until it drops hard in cold water. 

Mrs. J. B. Ma< kay. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAS CHURCH COOK BOOK 243 

TURKISH NOUGAT CANDY 

."» cups granulated sugar. 1 cup white corn syrup. 

h cup water. 3 egg whites. 

1 lb. English walnut meats. 

Boil sugar, syrup and water until when dropped in cold 
water it forms a firm hall and will crackle a little against 
the side of dish. Pour over beaten eggs, and beat steadily, 
working in nut meats. When ready to set, pour in mold 
lined with a wet cloth, and let stand several hours or over 
night. Take out, and slice. Mrs. V. M. Wiley. 

WHITE TAFFY 

2 cups granulated sugar. ^ cup water. 

h cup vinegar. 1 teaspoon flavoring. 

Boil until it hardens when dropped in cold water. Pour 
into buttered tins ; cool and pull until white. 

The different colors can be obtained by adding 1 table- 
spoon grated chocolate for the brown, or 1 teaspoon red 
sugar for the pink. Mrs. W. D. Everett. 



Household Hints 

Put red pepper in the runways of mice, and they will dis- 
appear. 

A little soda or vinegar in the water will make tough 
meat tender. 

Lard will remove wagon grease : rub hard and then wash 
in the ordinary way. 

To remove machine grease, wash in cold water and soap. 

Milk is good to remove ink stains, but must be used while 
ink is wet. Hydrogen peroxide will also remove ink stains. 

To remove scorch, lay it where the sunshine will fall di- 
rectly on the spot. 

To remove iron-rust from linen, we1 witli lemon juice, 
cover with salt and lay in the hot sun. It may be necessary 
to repeat more than once. 

Put glycerine on fruit stains before washing clothes, 
and the stains will disappear. without boiling. 

White dresses can be freed of grass stains by touching 
the spots with alcohol before washing; turpentine will also 
remove these stains. 

To clean water bottles and decanters, mix together one 
half-gill of vinegar and a handful of salt ; shake well. 

Lamp wicks soaked in vinegar twenty-four hours be- 
fore being nsed will give a clearer flame and steadier light. 

Drv well before using. 

(244) 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK ROOK 245 

A lump of paraffine in starch makes ironing easier; a 
tablespoon of kerosene is also good ; also a little borax and 

salt. 

Never allow anything to stand in tin cans. 

Eat salt with nuts, to aid digestion. 

Always eat apples either raw, baked, or in sauce, when 
eating beans, as it aids digestion. 

Nothing will remove stains from the hands as quickly 
as lemon ; cut lemon in halves and use as soap. 

A very cooling application for burns is grated or scraped 
raw potato ; apply thickly and keep moist until burn is 
relieved. 

To mend cracks in the stove, take equal parts of wood 
ashes and common salt; mix to a proper consistency with 
water and fill the cracks. 

Sprinkle clothes with warm water ; they iron much easier. 

When coloring wood-work, use a stubby paint brush for 
the corners. 

Use a thimble on the end of a curtain-rod when drawing 
on a freshly starched curtain ; or use a lead-pencil with 
rubber end first. 

Cover the top of jelly with melted paraffine, and no other 
covering is necessary. 

Buckram or any stiff material sewed on the under side 
of the corners of rugs will prevent them from curling up. 

Bleaching Linen : Wash in the usual way in clean soft 
water and soap ; then soak over night in clean water in 



246 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

which you add a teaspoon of cream of tartar to every quart 
of water. 

Salt sprinkled over carpets and swept off will brighten 
them. Dampened paper torn in bits and sprinkled over 
carpets before sweeping is good to take up dust. 

If you should have a room filled with soot from a smoking 
lamp, cover everything with corn-meal, as it absorbs the 
grease; leave for a few hours before cleaning off, and noth- 
ing will be damaged. This is sure. 

To wash fine laces or a lace handkerchief, wash in soft 
water and a good soap ; rinse well and spread on clean 
windows to dry, picking out every point; or laces can be 
put around a large glass'jar and left until dry. They will 
require no ironing. 

When dressing a chicken after scalding and picking, give 
it a bath in warm water and plenty of baking soda applied 
with a small clean cloth ; it is then ready to prepare to 
cook. 

If grease is spilled on a bare floor, never pour hot water 
on it, as it causes the grease to penetrate into the wood, 
but pour cold water on it and scrub well with cold water 
and soap. It is then ready for the hot-water application. 

WJhen the toilet becomes stained, remove the water- and 
pour acid vinegar in as far as the stain ; let stand a few hours 
and it can easily be removed. 

To set the color in all wash goods, use a tablespoonful 
of turpentine to one gallon of boiling water ; pour on imme- 
diately. A good way is to lay the material in the bath- 
tub in the folds, and when cool enough hang up carefully. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COOK HOOK 247 

leaving it still folded. Do not wring, and it will need no 
ironing. This will also shrink the goods. 

To keep ants from refrigerator, place four small tin pans, 
one under each lei;' of the refrigerator, and keep tilled with 
water. 

A pair of old black stockings with the feet cut off , opened 

down the center and sewed together in a seam, make fine 
dust-cloths. 

To Clean Silver: Use a granite kettle, one quart 
water, one tablespoon salt and one teaspoon soda. Use 
cold soft water and let stand until clear. Put in one piece 
zinc (get zinc at any hardware store), dip silver in this, 
polish off in clear water. 

Washing Fluid: One box Lewis lye, five cents salts 
tartar, two ounces ammonia, two ounces borax, one gallon 
soft water ; keep in stone jug or jar ; use one cup. of fluid 
to a boiler of water. Two tablespoons make one ounce. 

Carpet Wash : For ten gallons take five bars ivory soap, 
laundry size, one pound powdered borax and one half- 
ounce glycerine; shave soap fine. Put four gallons soft 
water in a boiler, add borax and glycerine, and heat until 
thoroughly dissolved; then add the remaining six gallons 
of soft water. Let stand until cold, when it will be a thick 
jelly and will keep in jars any length of time. When ready 
to use, thin a little with cold water and apply to carpet 
with a rice brush, taking only a small space at a time, 
scrubbing until it forms a good lather; then scrape up and 
wipe with a dry cloth. Let carpet dry well before walking 
on it and it will look like new. 



248 GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

Snow Liniment for Sprains : The yolk of an egg beaten, 
one-fourth pint vinegar, one-fourth pint turpentine and 
one-eighth pint ammonia. Place in a bottle, and shake. 
Apply with bandage on the affected part. 

Cleaning Solution : 

1 quart benzine. One-eighth oz. wintergreen. 

1 ounce alcohol. One-eighth ounce bay rum. 

One-eighth ounce ammonia. One-eighth ounce ether. 

One-eighth oz. chloroform. One drachm borax. 

Keep from flame. 



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Table of Contents 

Beverages 235 2:><! 

Breads, Rolls, Biscuits, etc 87 lot 

Cakes 109-141 

Cookies and Small Cakes 143-154 

Confectionery 237 24:; 

( Croquettes 46- 48 

Desserts, Cold 183-198 

Desserts, Frozen 1!)!) 205 

Desserts, Hot 167-180 

Eggs and Cheese 80- 86 

Fish and Oysters 17-23 

Fritters 63- 64 

Fruits and Jellies 206-216 

Household Hints 244-248 

Meats 29-45 

Pies 155-166 

Pickles 217-234" 

Poultry and Game 24- 28 

Pudding Sauces 181-182 

Quantities Needed in Serving 11-12 

Salads 65- 76 

Salad Dressings 77- 79 

Sandwiches 105-107 

Soups 13- 16 

Table of Weights and Measures 10 

Vegetables 40- 62 



OCT 13 1913 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



007 958 218 9