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NICHOL S SERIES OF STANDARD DIVINES. 

PURITAN PERIOD. 



THE 



WORKS OF THOMAS GOODWIN, D.D. 

VOL. 



COUNCIL OF PUBLICATION. 



W. LINDSAY ALEXANDER, D.D., Professor of Theology, Congregational 
Union, Edinburgh. 

JAMES BEGG, D.D., Minister of Newington Free Church, Edinburgh. 

THOMAS J. CRAWFORD, D.D., S.T.P., Professor of Divinity, University, 
Edinburgh. 

D. T. K. DRUMMOND, M.A., Minister of St Thomas s Episcopal Church 
Edinburgh. 

WILLIAM H. GOOLD, D.D., Professor of Biblical Literature and Church 
History, Reformed Presbyterian Church, Edinburgh. 

ANDREW THOMSON, D.D., Minister of Broughton Place United Presby 
terian Church, Edinburgh. 



<Sntrral Dttor. 
REV. THOMAS SMITH, M.A., EDINBURGH. 



THE WORKS 



OF 



THOMAS GOODWIN, D.D. 

t 

SOMETIME PRESIDENT OF MAGDALENE COLLEGE, OXFORD. 



Wtb (Smral fttface 

BY JOHN C. MILLER, D.D., 

LINCOLN COLLKGE ; HONORARY CANON OF WORCESTER J RBCTOR OP ST MARTIN S, BIRMINGHAM. 

^ntr gtamrir 

BY ROBERT HALLEY, D.D., 

PRINCIPAL OF THE INDEPENDENT NEW COLLEGE, LONDON. 



VOL. XII. 



SERMONS AND NOTES OF SERMONS. 
INDEXES. 



EDINBURGH: JAMES NICHOL. 

LONDON: JAMES NISBET AND CO. DUBLIN: G. HERBERT. 



M.DCCC.LXVI. 



EDINBURGH . 

PRINTED BY JOHN GRE1Q AND SON, 
OLD PHYSIC GAEDENS. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY FOR THE SPIRITS 
OF JUST MEN, TJPON DISSOLUTION, DEMON 
STRATED. . . . .2 COR. V. 5. .1 

THE GREAT INTEREST OF STATES AND KINGDOMS. Ps. CV. 14, 15. 81 

A GLIMPSE OF ZION P, GLORY; OR, THE CHURCH S 

BEAUTY SPECIFIED. . . . R E v. XIX. 6. . 61 

THE WORLD TO COME ; OR, THE KINGDOM OF 

CHRIST ASSERTED. . . . EPH. I. 21, 22. 81 

ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO FINISH THE 

TEMPLE. . . . ZECH. IV. 6-9 . 101 



APPENDIX. ..... . .129 

INDEX. . . . 149 

INDEX OF TEXTS. . . 239 



AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY 

FOR THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN, UPON DISSOLUTION, 
DEMONSTRATED. 



VOL. XII. 



AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY 

FOR THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN, UPON DISSOLUTION, 
DEMONSTRATED. 



Now he that hath wrought us for the self -same thing is God, who also hath 
given unto us the earnest of the Spirit. 2 Con. V. 5. 

THERE is no point of more moment to all, nor of greater comfort to saints, 
than what shall become of their souls when they die. It is our next stage ; 
and things that are next use more to affect us. And besides, it is the be 
ginning, and a taking possesion of our eternity. 

That these words should aim at this self-same thing, cannot be discerned 
without consulting the foregoing part of the apostle s discourse ; and yet I 
cannot be large in bringing down the coherence, having pitched upon what 
this fifth verse contributes unto this argument, which alone will require more 
than this time allotted, having also very largely gone through the exposition of 
the foregoing verses elsewhere ;* and I now go but on where I left last. But 
yet to make way for the understanding the scope of my text, take 

The coherence in brief, thus : 

In the 16th verse of the foregoing chapter, where the well-head of his 
discourse is to be found, he shews the extraordinary care G-od hath of our 
inward man, to renew it day by day. Where inward man is strictly the soul 
with its graces, set in opposition to our outward man, the body with its 
appurtenances, which he saith daily perisheth, that is, is in a mouldering and 
decaying condition. 

Chap. v. 1. For ice know, that, if our earthly house of this tabernacle were 
dissolved, we have a building of God, a house not made with hands, eternal in 
the heavens. 

In this first verse of this fifth chapter, he meets with this supposition : 
but what if this outward man or earthly tabernacle be wholly dissolved and 
pulled down, what then shall become of this inner man ? And he resolves 
it thus, That if it be dissolved, we have an .house, a building of God in the 
heavens. And what is the we, but this inner man he had spoken of, renewed 
souls, which dwell now in the body as in a tabernacle, as the inmates that 
can subsist without it ? And it is as if he had said, If this inward man be 
destituted of one house, we have another. Grod, that in this life was so 
* See Vol. VII. p. 356. ED. 



4 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY [2 COB. V. 5. 

careful over this inner man, to renew it every day, hath made another more 
ample provision against this great change. It is but its removing from one 
house to a better, which God hath built. As yourselves, to speak in your 
own language, if wars should beset you, and your country house were plun 
dered and pulled down, you would comfort yourselves with this, I have yet 
a city house to retire unto. 

Neither is the terming the glory of heaven, and that as it is bestowed upon 
a separate soul, an house, alien from the Scripture phrase, Luke xvi. 9, 
That when you fail, they may receive you into everlasting habitations. 
Death is a failing (it is your city phrase also when a man proves bankrupt). 
A statute of bankrupts comes forth then upon your old house, statutinn est 
omnibus semel mori, and upon all you have ; and then it is a receiving or 
entertaining that otherwise desolate soul into everlasting habitations, that is, 
into an house eternal in the heavens, as the text. 

Nor yet is the phrase of terming heaven a city-house remote neither ; 
for, Heb. xi. 13, Abraham and the patriarchs die d in faith. Mark that. 
In faith or expectation of what ? He had told us, ver. 10, He looked for a 
city whose builder is God. What is a city, but an aggregation and heap of 
houses and inhabitants ? Multitudes had died afore Abraham and gone to 
heaven, from Adam, Abel, Seth, downwards ; and God promiseth him peace 
at his death, and a being gathered to those fathers, Gen. xv. 15. There 
was then a city built, and already replenished with inhabitants ; and amongst 
others, an house provided for him, that is, his soul, built of God, and ready 
furnished against this removal. 

Ver. 2. For in this we groan, earnestly desiring to be clothed upon with our 
house which is from heaven. 

In this verse he utters the working of the affections of Christians towards 
their being clothed upon with this house ; and so in order to this enjoyment 
of it, their desiring even to be dissolved, which Paul also utters of himself, 
Philip, i. Now if the first verse speaks of the glory of a separate soul, when 
he calls it an house, this second verse must intend the same. 

Ver. 8. If so be that, being clothed, we shall not be found naked. 

In this verse he gives an wholesome caution by the way, and withal in 
sinuates why he used the word clothed upon in the foregoing verse, thus, 
speaking of the glory of such a separate soul, even because it is absolutely 
necessary that all our souls be found clothed first, and renewed with grace 
and holiness, and not be found naked at our deaths, that is, not devoid of 
grace, and so exposed to shame and wrath, as Kev. xvi. 15. 

Ver, 4. For we that are in this tabernacle do groan, being burdened : not 
for that we would be unclothed, but clothed upon, that mortality might be swal 
lowed up of life. 

The fourth verse gives a genuine and sincere account why a Christian doth 
thus groan, and that after dissolution itself, in order to this glory, which he 
sets out with an accurate distinction of their desires of dissolution, in differ 
ence from like desires in all other men. First, negatively, not for that being 
burdened we desire to be unclothed, or dissolved ; that is, simply for ease of 
those burdens, nor out of a despising of our bodies we now wear, as their 
heathen wise men and philosophers did, and others do. No. But secondly, 
positively, for this, as the top ground of that desire, that we would be clothed 
upon with that house spoken of, ver. 1, and that still taken in the sense 
spoken of in the second verse, to the end that this mortal animal life, which 
the soul, though immortal in itself, now leads in the body, full of sins, 
clogged with a body of death and miseries, each of which has a death in it, 
and &o it lives but a dying life ; that this life may be exchanged, yea, swal- 



2 COR. V. 5.J FOR THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN. 5 

lowed up by that which is life indeed, the only true life, the knowing God as 
we are known, and enjoying him. All which, as to our souls, is truly per 
formed at our dissolution ; although the final swallowing up the mortality 
of our bodies also doth yet remain to be accomplished ; which will be done 
at the latter day, at that change both of body and soul, though in respect of 
the body, it will be completed as then more folly. 

This interpretation, and the suiting of all the phrases used in this fourth 
verse, to hold good of this exchange at death, I cannot, through straitness 
of time, give an account of now. I have lately, and very largely, done it 
elsewhere. 

This for the coherence. I hasten to my text. 

Ver. 5. Now he that hath wrought us for the self-same thing is God, who 
hath also given us the earnest of the Spirit. 

The current of the four former verses running thus steadily along in this 
channel, the stream in this verse continues still the same. 

There is one word in this verse, sic, avro roiJro, For this self-same thing 
God hath wrought us, which serves us as a clue of thread drawn through 
the windings of the former verses, to shew us that one and the same indivi 
dual glory hath been carried on all along, and still is in this verse also ; so, 
then, we see where we are. 

What this self-same thing should be, ask the first verse, and it will tell 
you it is that house eternal in the heavens, a building of God, prepared by 
him against the time that this earthly house is dissolved. Ask the second 
verse : it is the same house we groan to be clothed upon with when the 
other is pulled down. Ask the fourth verse, and more plainly : it is that 
life which succeeds this mortal life the soul now lives in this body, and 
swallows up all the infirmities thereof; and then here it follows, Even for 
this self-same thing, &c. So, then, if the glory of the separate soul be the 
subject of any of these verses, then of all, and so of this verse also. 

And, to be sure, it cannot be that extraordinary way of entrance into 
glory, by such a sudden change, both of soul and body into glory at once, 
without dissolution, should be the self-same thing here aimed at ; for it was 
not the lot of any of those primitive Christians of whom the Holy Ghost 
here speaks this, He hath wrought us for this thing, that they should be 
in that manner changed, and so enter into glory ; but the contrary, for they 
all, and all saints since for these sixteen hundred years, have put off their 
tabernacles by death, as Peter did, and speaks of himself, 2 Peter i. 14, and 
therefore the Scripture, or Holy Ghost, foreseeing, as the phrase is, Gal. 
iii. 8, this change would be their fate, would not have uttered this of them, 
* God hath wrought us for this, whom he knew God had not designed 
thereunto. 

Neither is it that those groaning desires spoken of in the foregoing verses 
2, 3, 4 is that self-same thing here, as some would, for indeed, as Mus 
eums well, If the apostle had said, He that hath wrought this thing in us, 
&c., that expression might have carried it to such a sense, but he saith, He 
that wrought us for the salf-same thing ; and so it is not that desire of 
glory in us is spoken of, but * us, ourselves and souls, as wrought for that 
glory. 

If it be asked what is the special proper scope of these words as touching 
this glory of the soul, the answer in general ; it is to give the rational part 
of this point, or demonstrative reasons to evidence to believers, that indeed 
God hath thus ordained and prepared such a glory afore the resurrection. 
And it is as if the apostle had said, Look into your own souls and consider 
God s dealings with you hitherto, viz. : - 



6 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY [2 CoR. V. 5. 

1. First, the operation of his hands ; for what other is the meaning or 
mystery, says he, of all that God is daily so at work with you in this life ? 
What else is the end of all the workings of grace in you, and of God that is 
the worker ? This is his very design : He that hath wrought us, that is, 
our souls, for this very thing, is God. 

2. Besides the evidence the work gives, there is also over and above 
the earnest of the Spirit given to your souls now whilst in your bodies, 
in joy, full of glories of the same kind (as earnests are) of what fulness 
of glory they are both capable of then, and shall be filled with, when 
severed from your bodies : Who hath also given us the earnest of the 
Spirit. 

We preachers have it in use, as to allege proofs of Scripture for the 
points or subjects we handle, so to give reasons or demonstrations of them ; 
and so doth our apostle here of this great point he had been treating of ; and 
such reasons or demonstrations run often upon harmony and congruity of 
one divine thing or truth kissing another ; also upon becoiiiingnesses or 
meetnesses, that is, what it becometh the great God to do. For instance, 
in giving an account why God, in bringing many sons to glory, did choose 
to effect it by Christ s death rather than any other way, It became him, 
says he, Heb. ii. 10, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, 
Arc. And so in the point of the resurrection, 1 Cor. xv. 21, Since by man 
came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead ; that is, it was 
congruous, harmonious it should thus be, the one answering correspond- 
ently to the other. The like congruity will be found couched here in God s 
bringing souls to glory afore that resurrection. 

Now there are two sorts of harmonious reasons couched in the forepart of 
these words, He that wrought us for this is God. 

I. That it is finis opens et operantis, the end of the work itself upon us, 
and of God as an efficient working for an end, God huth wrought on us for 
this very thing. 

II. It is opus dignum JJeo authore, a work as he is the great God, and as 
a thing worthy and becoming of God as the author of it : * He that hath 
wrought us for this thing is God. 

There is a third point to be superadded, and that is, it is the interest of 
all three persons, which, how clearly evidenced out of the text, will appear 
when I have despatched these former doctrines. 

Doct. 1. That it is a strong argument that God hath provided a glory for 
separate souls hereafter, that he hath wrought us, and wrought on us a 
* work of grace in this life. 

Ere the reason of this will appear, I must first open three things natu 
ral to the words, which will serve as materials out of which to make forth 
that argument. 

First, that the thing here said to be wrought is grace or holiness, which 
is a preparation unto glory. (1.) Grace is the work, and so, Philip, i. 6, 
termed the good work, a frame of spirit created to good works : Eph. 
ii. 10, We are his workmanship, created unto good works. The text here 
says, * Who hath wrought us ; there similarly, We are his workmanship. 
And (2.) secondly, this work is a preparation to glory ; for, for one thing lo 
be first wrought in order to another, is a preparation thereunto. Now, saith 
the text, He hath wrought us for this thing ; and Kom. ix. 23, it is in 
terminis the vessels of mercy which he had afore prepared to glory, which 
was by working holiness, for it follows, ver. 24, even us whom he hath 
called ; likewise Col. i. 12, Who hath made us meet to be partakers of 
the inheritance of the saints in light : meet, by making us saints. So, then, 



2 COR. V. O.j FOB THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN. 7 

had prepared, hath made meet, is all one with who hath wrought us for 
this thing. Here, 

The second, What is the principal subject wrought upon or prepared and 
made meet for glory ? It is certainly the soul, in analogy to the phrase 
here. We use to say (when we speak of our conversion), Since my soul 
was wrought on. And though the body is said to be sanctified, 1 Thes. 
v. 23, yet the immediate subject is the soul, and that primitively, origin 
ally, the body by derivation from the soul. And hence it is the soul, when 
a man dies, carries with it all the grace by inherency. All flesh is grass, 
which withers ; that is, the body with all the appurtenances, saith Peter, 
1 Peter i. 24. But you, having purified your souls, being born again of 
incorruptible seed (our bodies are made of corruptible seed, which is the 
opposition there) by the word of God, which lives and abides for ever. 
* And this is the word (he says he means) * which by the gospel is preached 
(every day) unto you, ver. 25, and by preaching is engrafted in your souls, 
purifying your souls, ver. 22. In no other subject doth that word as preached 
for ever abide; for the body rots, and in the grave hath not an inherent but 
a relative holiness, such as the episcopal brethren would have to be in 
churches consecrated by them, because once it was the temple of the Holy 
Ghost, who dwells in us. 

And that it is the soul the apostle hath here in his eye, in this discourse 
of his in my text, as that which he intends the subject here wrought upon, 
appears, if we consult the well-head of his discourse about the soul, which is 
the 16th verse of the 4th chapter. Our inward man (says he) is renewed, &c. 
(there is your wrought upon here), whilst the outward (the body) perisheth. 
Which soul, in being called the inward man, connotates at once both grace 
and the soul conjunct together, and distinct from the body, as well as from 
sin and corruption. Elsewhere it is declared the subject first and originally 
wrought on : Eph. iv. 23, Be renewed in the spirit of your minds. Look 
round about the text, and what is the us wrought on ? Plainly this inward 
man, by the coherence afore and after. Ask yet, 1, If our .earthly taber 
nacle (that is, our body) be dissolved, we have, &c., that is, this inner man, 
our souls, have ; for the body is supposed dissolved. So likewise, ver. 4, 
we in this tabernacle, that is, our souls in these bodies. More expressly 
after, ver. 8, our very souls, not only whilst in our bodies, but when sepa 
rated from our bodies, have the ice given them ; we are willing to be absent 
from the body, and present with the Lord. The we present with the Lord, 
and absent from the body, is, nor can be, no other than a separate soul in 
its estate of widowhood. And so here, ver. 5, hath wrought us; the soul 
bears the person, carries away the grace with it. 

Add to this, the time here specified in the text, in which we are wrought 
upon : it is but this life, and during the term thereof.* Hath wrought us, 
says the apostle ; not in the future, who shall work us for it. That hath 
wrought, referring to the work of conversion at the first, Who hath made 
us meet to be partakers, &c., Col. i. 12, and who doth continue still to work 
us ; the preterperfect being often put by the apostle for the present, God 
renewing the inner man day by day, chap. iv. 16 ; so working upon it, in 
order to this self-same thing, continually. Unto which words there, these 
here have an evident aspect ; yet so as that time of working is but during 
this life. For it is whilst the outward man is mouldering, and that by 
afflictions, which during this moment work an eternal weight of glory, ver. 
17, and that is expressly said to be but this present time, Rom. viii. So 

* Observa quod non in futuro dicit, parabit nos. Non demum parabitur : ubi jam 
indueudum est, &c. Muse, in locum. 



8 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY [2 COR. V. 5. 

then, there is no parabit in that other world. Bat, as Solomon says of man, 
there is no work after this life, Eccles. ix. 10 ; no remembrance, says 
David, Ps. vi. 5, namely, which hath any influence into a man s eternity. 
So there is no working upon us in order thereunto after death : God hath 
done his do, hath wrought, and man hath finished his course, as Paul of 
himself, and in this chapter of my text, ver. 10, Every man receiveth the 
things done in his body, be they good or evil. Those things that are done 
in this body only ; therefore only what in this life he hath wrought. And 
for this he * hath wrought us, says the text. 

These things premised, I come to the argument to be raised out of them, 
to prove the point in hand. 

First, That grace or holiness, because they are immediately wrought in 
the soul, that therefore when the body dies the soul shall be taken up into 
life. That this is a meet and congruous ordination of God, the Scripture 
itself owns, and seems so to pitch the reason of it in Rom. viii. 10, 11, And 
if Christ be in you, the body is dead because of sin ; but the Spirit is life 
because of righteousness. But if the Spirit of him that raised up Jesus from 
the dead dwell in you, he that raised up Christ from the dead shall also 
quicken your mortal bodies by his Spirit that dwelleth in you. He gives an 
account of what is to become hereafter, both of the bodies and souls of them 
in whom Christ is. (1.) First, for the body that is condemned to die, the 
body is dead because of sin. By body I understand the same which he, in 
the llth verse, terms the mortal body to be raised up, which, says he, is 
dead, that is, appointed to die ; as one sentenced to death you term a dead 
man. And this because of sin. It was meet that that first threatening of 
dying should have some effect to evidence the truth of God therein. Only 
God is favourable in his ordination in this, that he arresteth but the body, 
the less principal debtor ; but that, to be sure, shall pay for it. * It is 
appointed to all men once to die, even for men that are in Christ, as this 
place of the Romans hath it. Then (2.) follows, what remains, the soul of 
such an one when the body dies. * But, says he (speaking by way of excep 
tion, and contrary fate too), the spirit is life because of righteousness. The 
spirit is the soul in contradistinction to the body ; this, when the body dies, 
is life. He says not living only, or immortal, but is swallowed up into life. 
And why ? because of righteousness, which is Christ s image ; and so 
preserves, and by God s ordination, upon dying, elevates the soul, which is 
the immediate and original subject of it, which is the point in hand. For 
this thing it is, G-od hath wrought it. But then because the query would be, 
Shall this body for ever remain dead, because of this first sin, and bear this 
punishment for ever ? No ; therefore (3.) he adds, He that raised up Christ 
from the dead shall also quicken your mortal bodies. So at last, and then 
bringing both body and soul together unto complete glory. 

And the congruity of reason that is for this appointment is observable, 
something like to that 1 Cor. xv., As by man came death, so by man came 
also the resurrection from the dead. For that sin that condemned us to 
this death, we had from the first Adam by bodily generation, as the channel 
or means of conveying it, who was, as other, father of our flesh. 

The arrest therefore goes forth against the body, which we had from that 
Adam, because of that sin, conveyed by means of our bodies ; for though I 
must not say the body defiles the soul, or of itself is the immediate subject 
of sin ; yet the original means or channel through which it conies down, and 
is derived unto us, is the generation of our bodies. The body therefore con 
gruously pays for this, and the death thereof is a means to let sin out of the 
world, as the propagating it was a means to bring sin in. But an holy soul 



2 COR. V. 5.] FOR THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN. 

or spirit, which is the offspring of God, having now true holiness and right- 
ousness from the second Adam communicated to it, and abiding in it ; and 
being not only the immediate subject thereof, but further, the first and 
original subject, from and by which it is derived unto the body ; the womb, 
into which that immortal seed was first cast, and in which the inward man is 
formed, and in respect of a constant abiding, in which it is that seed is termed 
incorruptible. Hence, therefore, says God of this soul, it is life. It shall 
live when this body dies. There is nothing of Christ s image, but is ordained 
to abide for ever. Charity never fails, 1 Cor. xiii. 8. His righteousness 
endures for ever, 2 Cor. ix. 9 ; and therefore is ordained to conserve and 
elevate unto life the subject it is in, and that is the soul. This as a founda 
tion of the substantial parts of this first reason out of this one scripture, 
thus directly and explicitly holding this forth. 

2. I come to the argumentation itself, which ariseth out of these 
things laid together : (1.) That the soul is the immediate subject of grace ; 
(2.) The first and primitive susceptive thereof; (3.) And itself is alone and 
immediately capable of glory, which grace is a preparation to ; and (4.) that 
God, afore our deaths, hath wrought all of grace he intends to work, in pre 
paration to glory. Out of all these a strong argument doth arise : that 
such a soul upon death shall be admitted unto glory, and not be put to stay 
till the time of the resurrection, when both soul and body shall be joined 
again together; and that this holdeth a just and meet conveniency upon 
each, or at least all these grounds when put together. 

First, Consider the soul as the immediate subject of this working and pre 
paration for glory. Hence, therefore, this will at least arise, that the in 
herency or abiding of his grace wrought in this soul, depends not upon its 
conjunction with the body ; but so as it remains as an everlasting and per 
petual conserver of that grace stamped on it ; yea, and carries it all with itself, 
as a rich treasure innate unto it wherever it goes, when separate from the 
body. I say, it either hath in it, or appertaining unto it, all that hath been 
wrought for it, either in it or by it : Rev. xiv. 13, Blessed are the dead 
which die in the Lord ; and their works do follow them. They go to 
heaven with them, and after them. And in what subject else is it, that the 
seed of G-od remains incorruptible, or the word of God abides for ever? 
1 Pet. i. 23, 25. Or how else comes that saying to be performed, 1 John 
ii. 17, He that doth the will of God endures for ever ? Having therefore 
all these riches by it, and as complete (as here it shall be), meet it is it should 
partake the benefit thereof, and live upon them now when it is single and 
alone, and in its widow s condition. And it is an opportune season, that by 
a glory given it for that holiness, this should now appear, that it was the 
soul which was the sole intrinsic and immediate receptive of all this holiness. 
This is the first. Add also, 

Secondly, Its being the first and primitive subject of holiness, from 
which it is derivatively in the body.* Meet it was this soul should not be 
deferred, till the appurtenance of it be united to it, but be served first, and 
admitted into that glory ordained ; and by having itself first possession given 
of that inheritance, the body might in its season be admitted derivatively 
thereinto from it, after that renewed union with it by the resurrection. Rea 
son good, that look as in priority, grace, the preparation unto glory, was 
wrought, so, in that order of priority, glory itself should be communicated. 
And, therefore, seeing its fate is to abide a while alone, therefore first to en 
joy, and drink both the juice and fruit of that vine it is the root of. 

* Magis conveniens videtur, ut anirnae in quibns per prius fuit culpa et meritum, 
prius etiam vel puniantur vel prscmientur. Aquinas cont. Gent. lib. iv. cap. xix. sec. 3. 



10 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY [2 COR. V. 5. 

And (3.) it being in itself, when separate, as immediately capable of this 
glory, as when it shall be again united to the body. For what is the essen 
tial of glory, the substance of that life that swallows up all, but (as we said 
on ver. 4) G-od s immediate presence, and our knowing him face to face, as 
we are known ? Now of this the apostle doth in these 6th, 7th, and 8th verses, 
expressly inform us, that the separate soul is not only capable thereof, but 
that it then begins to enjoy it : * Therefore, says he, we are always confident, 
knowing that whilst we are in the body, we are absent from the Lord ; for 
we walk by faith, not by sight. We are confident, I say, and willing rather 
to be absent from the body, and to be present with the Lord. Where, to be 
present with the Lord, and to live by sight, is expressly made the privilege of a 
soul absent from the body ; which can mean no other state than that of the 
soul between the death of the body and the resurrection. For whilst it is 
present in the body afore death, it is absent from the Lord ; and when it 
shall be present with the Lord, after the resurrection, it shall not then be 
any more absent from the body. This conjunction, therefore, of absent from 
the body and present with the Lord, falls out in no state else, but only in 
that interim or space of time between. Let us withal view this place in the 
light, by bringing the one to the other, which that passage, 1 Cor. xiii. 12, 
doth cast upon it : * For now we see through a glass darkly, but then face to 
face ; now I know in part, but then shall I know even as also I am known. 
To see as in a glass darkly there, is to walk by faith here. But to see face 
to face, and to know God as we are known, (so there) is all one ; and to attain 
to sight and be in Christ s presence (here). And to be sure, the body is in no 
estate whatever capable of knowing God as we are known of him. None 
durst ever affirm that. For besides that the spiritual knowledge of God is 
proper to an intellectual nature, further, so to know God, as God knows 
us, and so to be elevated to the similitude of God s understanding, is not 
communicable to the body. We may as well dare to affirm God himself to 
be a body, as that our bodies are capable of ever being raised up thus to 
know God. Hence, therefore, whether the soul be out of the body, as after 
death ; or so in the body, as it shall be after the resurrection ; yet still it is 
the soul that is immediately alone capable of that sight and knowledge of 
God. And therefore, seeing it depends not on the body, it is as well capable 
of it afore the resurrection without the body, as after the resurrection in the 
body. 

Only this must be added, that whilst indeed the soul is at home in this 
body, this earthly tabernacle, it is not capable of the sight of the glory of 
God, i. e. as to continue in the body, and enjoy it ; for it would crack this 
earthen vessel : as 1 Cor. xv. 50, * Flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom 
of God. And although Paul, as a stander-by, was an over-hearer and an 
eye-witness, by way of revelation and vision, of what the spirits of just men 
in glory do enjoy, 2 Cor. xii.; even as, on the contrary, the angels are often 
standers-by on earth, and overseers of us, what is therein done, as the phrase 
is, Zech. iii. 7 ; yet he was not estated into it, or admitted a possessor 
thereof himself, no more than angels into an earthly estate, and therefore 
could not say whether the revelation vouchsafed him might not be in the 
body as well as out of it. Whereas God had otherwise long since peremp 
torily determined that question, that no man could see God and live ; that 
is, at once continue in this body and see him face to face ; and Paul here 
in my text also determines it, That whilst we are at home in the body (as 
now), we are absent from the Lord. They are two incompatible estates. 
But still when that which thus lets (this body) is taken out of the way, the 
soul itself is sufficiently capable, as truly as ever it shall be. 



2 COR. V. 5.] FOB THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN. H 

But if this argument from these be yet judged not home enough, but 
short, then let us in the fourth place add what force the third premise will 
give to it, concerning the time of God s working on us, to drive all closer 
home ; namely, that God hath wrought upon the soul in this life, all that 
ever he means to work, by way of preparation for glory. For this thing God 
hath wrought us, which though it might, with the enlargements and sub- 
arguments that now shall follow, be made an argument alone, yet I choose 
to cast it into this total, to make the whole the more strong. 

Therefore (4.) gather up the demonstrations thus : If the soul be the im 
mediate and first subject of grace, which is a preparation to glory, and capable 
of this glory, when out of the body ; and God, the great agent or worker, 
hath wrought all that ever he means to work in it this way, by way of pre 
paration to glory ; then, as Peter said in the case of admitting the Gentiles 
to baptism, What should hinder that these souls should not be glorified in 
stantly, when out of their bodies ? Acts x. 47. If indeed, as the papists 
and corrupted Jews and heathens have feigned, there were any work to be 
after wrought, a purgatory or the like, then a demur or caveat might yet 
be put in, to suspend this their admission into glory. But the contrary 
being the truth, then, &c. Now, the strength of the argument from this 
latter, superadded to the rest, stands upon two strong grounds. 

First, If we consider what is common to God in this with all other but 
ordinary-wise efficients or workers that are intent upon their ends, which 
must be given to him, the only wise, all-powerful God (who is here said as 
an efficient to work us for this end), when any ordinary efficient hath 
brought his work to a period, and done as much to such and such an end as 
he means to do, he delays not to accomplish his end, and bring it to execu 
tion, unless some overpowering impediment do lie in his way to it. If you 
have bestowed long and great cost upon any of your children to fit and pre 
pare them for any employment, the university suppose, or other calling, do 
you then let these your children lie truants, idle and asleep at home, and not 
put them forth to that which you at first designed that their education unto ? 
Will you suffer them in this case to lose their time ? Do you know how to 
do good to your children, and doth not God ? We see God doth thus in 
nature. We say, when the matter is as fully prepared as ever it shall be, 
that the forms enter without delay. Now grace is expressly termed a pre 
paration to glory. Also God doth observe this in working of grace itself; 
when the soul is as fully humbled and emptied, and thereby prepared for 
the Lord by John Baptist s ministry as he means to prepare it, the work of 
justifying faith presently follows. In all his dispensations of judgments or 
mercies, he observes the same. When men s sins are at full (as of the 
Arnorites), he stays not a moment to execute judgment ; so in answering the 
faith of his people waiting on him for mercies. And thus it is for glory : I have 
glorified thee on earth (the only place and condition of our glorifying God), I 
have finished the work thougavest me to do; and now (what now, and presently 
now remains there, follows) glorify me, &c. Thus spake Christ our pattern. 

Secondly, There is this further falls out in this case and condition of such 
a soul, as doth indeed call for this out of a kind of necessity, and not of con- 
gruity only ; for whereas by God s ordination there are two ways of com 
munion with him, and but two unto all eternity, either that of faith, which 
we have at present, or of sight, which is for hereafter, into these two 
the apostle resolves all God s dispensations to us : ver. 7 of this chapter, 
* We walk by faith (namely, in this life), * not by sight ; and again, 1 Cor. 
xiii. 13, Now we see in a glass, then lace to face. These two, now and 
then, do divide the dispensations for eternity of time to come. The like in 



12 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY [2 CoR. Y. 5. 

Peter, 1 Epist. i. 8, In whom, though now you see him not (as you one 
day shall), yet believing. If, therefore, when the soul goes out of the 
body, that way of communion by God utterly ceaseth, 2 Cor. xiii. 8-13, that 
door and passage will be quite shut up, God having, 1 Thes. i. 11, John vi. 
28, fulfilled all the work of faith (the work of God) with power that ever he 
intended, then surely sight must succeed according to God s ordination, or 
otherwise this would inevitably follow, that the soul would be for that interim, 
until the resurrection, cut off from all communion with God whatever, 
having yet all its acquired holiness of sanctification abiding in it, and right 
eousness accompanying of it all that while. Look, therefore, as a child hath 
two, and but two ways of living, and when the one ceaseth the other succeeds, 
or death would follow, in the womb it lives by nourishment from the navel, 
without so much as breathing at the mouth ; but it no sooner comes into 
the world but that former means is cut off, and it liveth by breath, and taking 
in nourishment by the mouth, or it must instantly die, so stands the case 
with the soul here between faith and sight ; so that we must either affirm 
that the soul dies to all spiritual actings and communions with God until the 
resurrection, which those Scriptures so much do contradict : John ix. 51, 
and xi. 26, He that believeth hath everlasting life, &c., and shall never (no, 
not for a moment) * die. And in those promises it is not simply a sluggish 
immortality, but to live, and act, and enjoy God, which is our life, must 
needs be meant ; or we must on the other side affirm that the life of faith 
ceasing, and God yet having that way wrought all that ever he intended, that 
then sight of God face to face must come in its place, which indeed the 
apostle in that 1 Cor. xiii. affirms in saying, ver. 10, When that which is 
perfect is come, then that which is but in part is done away. There is not 
an utter ceasing of the imperfect, and then an interval or long space of time 
to come between, and then that which is perfect is to come, but the imper 
fect is done away by the very coming of that which is thus perfect ; and in 
the 12th verse he explains himself, that the imperfect is this our seeing now 
in a glass darkly, that is, by faith, and that perfect to be that seeing God 
face to face, as that which presently entertains us in that other world. Nay, 
the apostle admits not so much as a moment of cessation, but says that the 
imperfect is done away, ver. 10, and vanisheth, as ver. 8, by the coming in 
of the perfect upon it, and so the imperfect, nimely faith, is swallowed up in 
perfect, namely sight. 

And then further, if we thus grant, as we must, this separate soul to have 
this sight, or nothing now left it to enjoy Grod any way by, then it can be 
no other than glory it is admitted unto ; for the sight of God face to face, and 
to know as we are known, is the very essence of glory as it differs from 
faith. Neither is that ultimate enjoyment or happiness in God which souls 
shall have after the resurrection any other in name or thing than the sight of 
God as it is thus distinguished from faith, although it shall be then raised 
and intended unto far higher degrees of perfection. 

And for a conclusion of this first point, that which follows in that 
place lately cited out of 1 Peter i. 9, Receiving the end of your faith, the 
salvation of your souls. may as fitly serve for the confirmation of all these 
latter foregoing notions, as to any other sense interpreters have affixed. 

I am aware how these words, * receiving the end of your faith, the salva 
tion of your souls, are interpreted of that joy unspeakable and full of glory, 
which the verse afore had spoken, that many saints through believing do in 
this life enjoy, as being salvation imperfect, and the earnest of it in the same 
kind, and so a part of the reward of faith received in hand, as we say, or 
aforehand, and vouchsafed over and above the ordinary way of living by 



2 COE. V. 5.] FOE THE SPIEITS OF JUST MEN. 13 

faith. This interpretation I no way gainsay, nor will go about to exclude, 
for I know it doth consist with that other I am about to give, and is subor 
dinate to it ; and I have learned to take the most comprehensive sense the 
Holy Ghost may be supposed to aim at in any scripture ; but if this sense 
should directly alone obtain, yet by consequence, and at the rebound, it doth 
strongly argue the point in hand ; for if whilst faith continues God is pleased 
to vouchsafe the soul through believing such joys, much more when faith 
ceaseth he will vouchsafe the same soul a fuller enjoyment of himself at the 
ending of faith ; for why else are these present joys termed salvation, and 
that as distinct from that right to salvation, which otherwise faith at all 
times estates us into, but for this, that these joys are an entrance into, and 
a taking ; possession of, glory, over and above what ordinary faith giveth ? 
and therefore they have the name given them as being the earnest of the 
same kind, unto that greater sum is to be paid, as in all contracts it useth 
to be, at the end of that performance on one part, which end is when faith 
ends ; and so that is made the set date or time when this full payment is to 
begin, which this earnest aforehand bindeth God unto. 

And it were hard to suppose that God would give such a part of these joys, 
even whilst faith continues, for so long a time as until the resurrection, and 
then withdraw all communication of himself, both in joy and faith also. But 
I leave the prosecution of this argument till I come to those words, * Who 
hath also given us the earnest of the Spirit. 

I also know that by this phrase, the salvation of our souls, the soul being 
the eminent part of man, is often in Scripture, by a synecdoche, put for the 
whole person. And I must not deny but that ultimately it is intended here, 
it extending itself to the whole of salvation, first and last, after faith ended; 
which sense, on the other hand, many interpreters are for. 

I only contend for this, that the salvation of the soul is intended also of 
that salvation which falls out in the midst between these joys, the earnest in 
this life, and that ultimate salvation at the resurrection ; that is, the salvation 
of the soul, while separate, as being the next. It hath a weight in it, that 
salvation and damnation should so often be said to be of the soul by Christ 
himself; as Mat. xxvi. 16, What shall it profit a man to gain the whole 
world (and so provide for his body), * and lose his own soul ? And again, 
in speaking of the soul as considered apart from the body, Mat. x. 28, Fear 
not them that are able to kill but the body, and are not able to kill the soul. 
But that which is more conjunct to my purpose : it is observable that this 
our apostle Peter should choose to use in this epistle, more than any other 
apostle, this phrase of soul in relation to salvation, either as being the 
eminent subject, and sometimes as the single subject, both of grace and sal 
vation. So in this chapter, You have purified your souls, &c., as the im 
mediate susceptive of the incorruptible seed, as was observed. Then again, 
in chap. ii. 11, Abstain from fleshly lusts, which war against the soul; and 
ii. 25, Ye are returned to the Bishop of your souls; which he speaks as 
being the eminent part, and (upon separation from the body) the special charge 
he hath pastoral care of. And more directly to our purpose, chap. iv. 19, 
he exhorts them, when they come to die, to commit their souls to God, as 
then being to be separate from their bodies. Now, it were hard to think that 
this salvation to come should bear the title and name of the salvation of the 
soul in this and other scriptures, Heb. x. 39, James v. 20 ; and that yet 
when this soul shall in the other world come to subsist for a long time single 
and alone, and then be properly and without figure ; a mere soul without a 
body, a lonesome soul ; that during that state it should not be the subject 
of this salvation, and so intended here, when more properly and literally, ii 



14 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY 

ever, it is the salvation of the soul. And it would be yet more strange that 
the phrase salvation of the soul should be wholly restrained unto that estate 
of the soul when remitted to the body at resurrection, and only unto that ; 
and that word the soul, should serve only synecdochically as a part put to 
signify the whole man, as then it is to be raised up. But especially it were 
strangest of all if it should be confined and limited in this place of Peter, 
wherein this salvation of the soul is set forth for the comfort of such as were 
to lay down their tabernacles of their bodies for Christ (as this Peter speaks 
of himself in the next epistle), and whose faith was then to cease with their 
lives, whose expectations therefore he would in this case certainly pitch upon 
that salvation of the soul next, which is this of the soul separate. To con 
firm all which, 

That which further invited me to this place was this phrase, The end of 
your faith, especially upon the consideration that he speaks it unto such 
Christians who in these times were (as he foretells, chap. iv. 4) shortly to be 
martyred, and at present were sorely tried (verse 7 of this chapter, and in 
the last verse of the fourth). He thereupon instructeth and exhorteth them 
to commit their soul, when they die, to be kept by God. And so understood 
in a proper and literal sense, this salvation of their souls is in all respects 
termed the end of their faith. 

First, In that it is the next and immediate event that faith ends and deter 
mines in, as death is said to be the end of life ; so noting forth, that when 
faith ends, this salvation of the soul begins and succeeds it. The end of a 
thing signifies the immediate event, issue, period thereof. As of wicked men 
it is said, Whose end is destruction, Philip, iii. and Heb. x. 39. Apostasy 
and unbelief are said to be a drawing back unto perdition. And, on the 
contrary, there faith is termed a believing to the salvation of the soul. And 
both note out the final event and consequent of each, and salvation of the 
soul to be the end of faith, when men continue and go on to believe, until 
their faith arrive at and attaineth this salvation of the soul. To this sense 
also Rom. vi. 22, You have your fruit in holiness, and the end everlasting 
life. And the apostle Peter having in the foregoing verses celebrated the 
fruits and workings of their faith in this life, as in supporting them gloriously 
under the sorest trials, ver. 7 ; and then sometimes filling their hearts with 
joy unspeakable and glorious, ver. 8 ; he here at last concludeth with what 
will be the end or issue of it in that other life, when faith itself shall cease ; 
and what it is that then they shall receive : * Receiving (after all this) the 
end of your faith, the salvation of your souls ; Ko/z/^o/Agvo/, in the present, 
by a frequent and usual enallage of time, being put for the future. For ye 
shall receive (or being about to receive), to shew the certainty of it, that 
when faith shall end you may be sure on it, even of that salvation (that great 
salvation, so spoken of by the prophets, ver. 10) of your souls, which, as it 
hath no end to be put unto it as faith hath, so no interruption or space of 
time to come between, during which your souls should not be actually saved. 
A salvation of your souls singly (whilst through death they shall so exist), 
as well as of the same souls primarily, and more eminently, when both soul 
and body shall be reunited. 

2. The end of your faith, that is, of your aims and expectations in your 
faith ; the end importing the aim or expectation, which is also proper and a 
literal sense of that word. And upon this account also the salvation of the 
soul, when they should die, that being the very next thing their eyes must 
needs be upon, is therefore here intended. 

And 3. The end of your faith, that is, as being that for which the great 
God, who keeps us by his power through faith unto salvation, ver. 5, hath 



2 COR. V. 5.] FOR THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN. 15 

wrought this faith in you. Accordingly we find it termed * the work of faith, 
1 Thes. i. 3 ; which, when God hath fully wrought, and brought to that degree 
he aimed at in this life, or, to use the apostle s own expression of it, 2 Thes. 
i. 11, when God hath fulfilled the work of faith with power, he then crowneth 
it with this salvation of the soul without end ; as James speaks of patience, 
when it hath had its perfect work, chap. i. 4, compared with ver. 12. And 
so speaks my text, for * this self-same thing he hath wrought us. And there 
fore, when this faith shall cease which he wrought for this, he will attain his 
end without delay. And you, says he, shall attain your end also ; and faith 
thus ceasing, if this salvation of the soul did not succenturiate and recruit 
it anew, the end of this faith were wholly and altogether present destructive 
loss unto the soul in its well-being until the resurrection. 

4. The end signifies the perfection and consummation of anything,* as 
Christ is said to be the end of the law, Rom. x. 4 ; and so the meaning 
is, that your faith, which is but an imperfect knowing God, shall then, 
when it ceaseth, be swallowed up of sight, which is all one with that salva 
tion here, tanquam perfectibile, a perfection, as that which is imperfect is said 
to be by that which is perfect, 1 Cor. xiii. 10. Thus much for the literal 
and proper import of the word end. 

Now then, if we take the word end in its proper meaning, and the word 
soul likewise in its native proper meaning, also which sense in reason should 
be first served, when the scope will bear it, then it makes for that purpose 
more fitly which we have had in hand. 

That nothing may be wanting in this last place cited to make up all 
the particulars in the foregoing sections insisted on, so it is that the apostle 
Peter cloth further plainly insinuate that this salvation here consisteth in the 
sight and vision of Christ (which was one particular afore mentioned), 
accompanied with * joy unspeakable and glorious. The coherence, if ob 
served, makes this forth clearly ; for whereas in the verse immediately fore 
going, he had commended their present state of faith by this, Whom now 
though you see not, yet believing, rejoice with joy unspeakable and glorious, 
that now you see not (in this life) is set in opposition, and carries a pro 
mise with it of a time to come, wherein they should see, even as Christ said 
to his disciples, John xiii. 33 and 36 compared, Whither I go, I now say 
to you, ye cannot come ; but thou shalt follow me afterwards. So here now 
believing (which is the principle at the present which you live upon), you see 
him not ; but when the end of your faith shall come, you shall then see him ; 
and in this it is consisteth the salvation of your soul. So that still it car 
ries on what I have afore spoken unto, that when faith ceaseth, sight 
cometh; yea, perfects and swallows it up, as was said even now out of 
1 Cor. xiii. 10. 

And let me add this, that the apostle on purpose doth bring the mention 
of this supereminent fruit of faith, Even now when we see not, that be 
lieving, ye yet rejoice with joy unspeakable and glorious. On purpose, I 
say, to make way for the raising up their thoughts and apprehensions, how 
infinitely transcending that salvation of their souls must be when, faith ending, 
they attain to sight, to see him face to face whom their souls have loved. It 
is implicitly as if he had said unto them, * Oh think with yourselves what 
joy, what glory that must needs be, which exceedeth and surpasseth this that 
now accompanies your faith, in an answerable proportion, as much as sight 
of Christ s presence, and face to face, must be supposed to excel the know 
ledge of him by faith, which sees him but as absent darkly ! 

And further, give me leave to improve this notion. You may take this 

* TiKos pro rsXftuffig. 



16 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLOEY [2 COR. V. 5. 

assured evidence, that your souls shall then see and enjoy God when your 
faith shall cease, which will be when once your souls shall come to be sepa 
rate from your bodies by death ; in that even now, in this life, it is your 
souls and spirits that are the immediate receptives, or partakers and subjects 
of such glorious joys. 

The soul enjoys them, though in the body, yet without the help or con 
currence of the body, or the phantasms of it ; yea, such raptures do pass 
understanding, that is, the common way of understanding, which by the use 
and help of the body, or images in the fancy, the mind exerciseth in other 
things, and which do concur with the understanding ordinarily in faith. But 
this joy falls into and is illapsed within the soul itself immediately ; yea, the 
weakness of 3 7 our bodies and bodily spirits will not permit you to have so 
much of this joy as otherwise the soul is now capable of by faith. And 
therefore by this experimental taste aforehand in your own souls, you may 
be ascertained that your souls, when separate from your bodies by death, as 
well as when united again unto their bodies, shall enjoy this great salvation. 

And thus much for the first point raised out of the words, which did under 
take an argumentation for a separate soul s glory and happiness. (1.) From 
the condition of the soul, as the immediate subject of grace wrought in it. 
(2.) From God s ordination of the work wrought, to raise the soul up to life, 
whilst sin should bring dissolution upon the body. (8.) From the scope of 
the worker, God himself, who as an efficient will accomplish the end, when 
his work for that end is finished. And all these, as comprehended in what 
the very first view and front of the words of my text hold out, God hath 
wrought us for the self- same thing. 

But, lo ! a greater matter is here. It is not simply said, God hath 
wrought us for this, but He that hath wrought us for this thing is God ; 
thereby calling upon us to consider how great an hand or efficient is here, 
even God, who hath discovered in a transcendent manner his glory, in the 
ordaining and contriving of this work unto this great end. Take it not, 
therefore, as a bare demonstration given from God s working us to this end, 
such as is common to other agents, as hath been said. But further, a cele 
bration of the greatness and glory of God, in his having contrived this with 
so high an hand, like unto the great God ; and is as if he had said, There is 
a design in this worthy of God ; he hath shewn himself in this to be the 
great God indeed. He that hath wrought us for this is God. 

When God s ordinary works are spoken of, it sufficeth himself to say, God 
did thus, or this ; but when God s works of wonder, then often you find such 
an illustrious note of reflection upon, and pointing at him, to have done as 
God. And it is ordinary among men, when you would commend the known 
worth of the artist, to say, He that wrought this is such a man, so to com 
mend the workmanship. 

And thus both when the Holy Ghost speaks of this glory itself, which is 
the end, for which here his style is, Whose maker and builder is God, Heb. 
xi. 10 ; and in like equipage here of preparation to that end, he saith, He 
that hath wrought us for this thing is God. In this very chapter, 2 Cor. v., 
to go no further, when the great work of salvation in the whole of it is spoken 
of, he prefaceth thus to it, All things are of God, who hath reconciled us to 
himself, &c. ; that is, in this transaction he hath appeared like that God of 
whom all things else are, and so more eminently in this than in all, or at 
least, any other work. What there is said of salvation in the whole, is here 
of that particular salvation of a separate soul. You have the like emphasis 
put, Heb. ii. 10, of bringing many sons to glory. It became him, says the 
text. Now, put all together, and the result is, 



2 COR. V. 5.] FOR THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN. 17 

The second point. 

That to have provided a glory for separate souls of just men, wrought 
upon in this life, is a dispensation becoming the great God, yea, and that 
there is an artifice and contrivement therein worthy of God, and like unto 
himself, such as he hath shewed in other his works of wonder. 

There are two branches of this doctrine, which I set otherwise out thus : 

1. That it is a thing becoming the great God, thus to deal with such a 
separate soul, having been wrought upon. 

2. That God hath designed, and brings forth therein, a glorious artifice 
and contrivement, such as argue him a God wise in counsel, and wonderful 
in working. 

1. First branch of this second doctrine, that it becomes God. 

The account of this becomingness is best made forth by comparing and 
bringing together into an interview, both the inward and outward condition 
of such a soul, and then the relations which God bears to it, such as should 
thereupon move him through his good pleasure thus to deal with it. 

You know I at first undertook chiefly reasons of congruity or becoming- 
ness, and such always consist of two parts ; and when the one answereth and 
suiteth to the other, then the harmony of such a reason is made up. 

Let us therefore consider, 

I. What is on the soul s part. 

II. What is on God s part. 
I. On the soul s part. 
Therein two things. 

(1.) The species, the kind, and intrinsecal rank of being, which this 
creature we call the soul thus wrought upon stands in afore God. 

(2.) The outward condition or case this soul is left in upon its parting 
with the body, unless God takes it up into glory. 

(1.) First, For its rank or kind of being. 

Therein two things. 

[1.] This soul was by its first creation a spirit, and that in the substance 
or native kind thereof, and in that respect, considered apart for its union 
with the body, is in a more special manner allied unto God, than all other 
creatures, but angels, are. 

You have the pedigree of man, both in respect of body and soul, set out, 
Acts xvii. ; the extract of our bodies, in ver. 26, * He hath made of one 
blood all nations of men. So then on that side, as we say, in respect of our 
bodies, there is a consanguinity of all men, being made of one blood, between 
one another : but then in respect of our souls, we are God s offspring, ver. 
28, and so on that side there is an alliance, not of consanguinity, unto G-od, 
upon the account of having been created immediately by him, and in the 
very substance of our souls made like him, and in his image ; and yet we 
are not begotten of his essence or substance, which is only proper to his 
great Son. And in a correspondency unto this, God is styled, Heb. xii. 9, 
the Father of our spirits, in distinction from the fathers of our flesh or 
bodies (see the words) ; which alliance or fatherhood, take it as in common 
with all men s spirits, lieth in this, that he not only created our souls imme 
diately out of nothing, but in his own image, as to the substance of them ; 
which image or likeness other creatures did not bear, which yet were made 
out of nothing, as the chaos was ; both which appear by putting two places 
together : Zech. xii. 1, He frameth their spirits, speaking of the souls of 
men, and that altogether, saith the psalmist, Ps. xxxiii. 15 ; so Ainsworth 
and others read it, that is, both, each of those sprits, and also wholly and 

VOL. XII. B 



18 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY [2 COR. V. 5. 

totally, every whit of the substance of them. Creatio est productio totius entis ; 
for creation differs from generation in this, that it is a raising up or produc 
ing the whole of a being out of mere nothing, that is to say, altogether, 
whereas generation presupposeth pre-existent matter ; as in the generation of 
our bodies, which are not wholly and every whit of God immediately, but 
the parents afford the matter, and the formative virtue besides, by which our 
bodies are framed. So then, in respect of our first creation, our souls, apart 
considered, are thus allied to God, to which our bodies are not ; being spirits 
in the very being of them, that altogether do owe that their being to him. 

But there is a taint come upon the souls of all men by sin, so as this alliance 
is thereby worn out, yea, forfeited, until it be restored. Now, therefore, these 
souls, the only subject of our discourse, being such as God hath wrought, 
and so are become his workmanship by a new and far nobler creation, and 
thereby created spirit anew, according to what Christ says. That which is 
born of the Spirit is spirit. Hereupon these souls are spirit, upon a double 
account. As you say of sugar, it is double- refined, so this is now become a 
spiritual spirit, or spirit spiritualised and sublimated ; yea, and thereby the 
inward sanctuary, the holy of holies, the seat of God s most spiritual worship, 
Eom. vii. 22, 25, which the body is not, but only as it is the outward temple 
or instrument of this new-made spirit. 

And hereupon that original affinity to God of spirit, is not only restored, 
but endeared, for now there is both the stuff, or the ground-work, and then 
the workmanship, or embroidery upon it, and both of them the works of 
God ; that so look as the gold wrought upon commends the enamel, and 
then again the enamel enhanceth the value of the gold, so as both are con 
sidered in the price, so it is here with this soul wrought by God in botli 
respects. 

1 2.] Secondly, consider we now again the case and outward condition of 
such a soul, that of itself would fall out to it upon the dissolution of the body. 

1. It fails of all sorts of comforts it had in and by its union with the body 
in this world : Luke xvi, 9, When you fail, says Christ, speaking of 
death ; it is your city phrase when any of you break, and perhaps are thereby 
driven into another kingdom, as the soul now is. 

2. Then, if ever, a man s flesh and his heart fails, Ps. Ixxiii. 26. 

3. And, which is worse, a man s faith faileth or ceaseth after death, and 
all his spiritual knowledge as in this life ; it is the express phrase used 
1 Cor. xiii. at the 8th verse, and which is prosecuted to the end of that 
chapter ; and so all that communion it had with God in this life is cut off. 
It is of all creatures left the most destitute and forlorn, if God provides not. 

4. And yet, fourthly, it is now upon death, which it never was afore, imme 
diately brought into the presence of God. Naked soul comes afore naked 
God : Eccles. xii. 7, Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was ; and 
the spirit shall return unto God that gave it. It is put out of house and 
home, and turned upon its Father again. 

This as to the soul s condition. 

II. God s part. 

This is a special season for God to shew his love to such a soul, if 
ever afore or after ; an opportunity such as falls not out, neither afore, whilst 
it was in the body, nor after, when it is united to the body again at the re 
surrection. If ever, therefore, he means to shew a respect unto a poor soul, 
which is his so near kindred and alliance, it must be done now. We read, 
in Ps. Ixxiii. 26, * My flesh and my heart faileth (as at death to be sure it 
doth), but God is the strength of my heart, both in this life and at death, 
to support me, * and my portion for ever ; in the life to come without any 



2 COR. V. 5.] FOR THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN. 19 

interruption or vacant space of time, as that ever imports. And that David 
spake this with an eye unto the glory to come, when heart, and flesh, and all 
in this world he foresaw would fail him, is evident by what he had imme 
diately meditated in the words afore, ver. 24, Thou shalt guide me with 
thy counsel ; so in this life, and afterwards (that being ended), shall receive 
me unto glory. The contemplation whereof makes him cry out again, ver. 
25, * Whom have I in heaven but thee ? for all things else will fail me one 
day, when my flesh utterly fails me also. And there is none upon earth, 
where he had at present many comforts and comforters, * in comparison of 
thee. You see God is the portion of the whole of his time, even for ever, 
as ver. 26 ; and his estate in heaven and earth divide that time and portion 
between them, and no middle state between both ; but when the one ceaseth 
the other begins, for between them two must be the for ever ; and when all 
fail him which he had on earth, then God alone becomes his happiness in 
heaven. But this only in general shews what God is and will be to a soul 
in this condition. 

But I having undertaken to proceed by way of congruity, I must further 
more particularly shew how, in a correspondency to this inward and 
outward state of this soul, he shews himself God, and how meet and becom 
ing a thing it is for God to receive it into glory, upon the consideration of 
many relations which he professedly beareth to such a soul. 

1. God is a Spirit ; and thereupon in a special manner, as Wisdom xi. 26, 
the Lord is a lover of souls above all his other creation. So it is there, 
Thou art merciful to all because they are thine, Lord, thou lover of souls. 
God is a Spirit ; when, therefore, this naked and withal sublimated spirit, 
by its being born again by his own Spirit, and so assimilated to God him 
self, a pure spark now freed and severed from its dust and ashes, flying up 
(or is carried rather by spirits, the angels, out of their like spiritual love to 
it as a spirit, Luke xxvi. 22, Heb. i. 14) unto that great Spirit, that element of 
spirits, it will surely find union and coalition with him, and be taken up unto 
him ; for if, as Christ speaks, John iv. 23, God being a Spirit, therefore 
seeks for such as worship in spirit and truth, that is, he loves, delights in 
such, as a man doth in a companion or friend who suits him. And doth God 
seek for such whilst they are on earth ? Then surely when such spirits 
shall come to him, and have such a grand occasion, and indeed the first 
occasion, in such an immediate way to appear before him in such a manner 
and upon such a change as this, as they never did before, these spirits also 
having been the seat, the inner temple, of all this spiritual worship and 
sanctifying of him in this world, surely God, who sought such afore, will 
now take them into his bosom and glory. We also read, Isa. Ivii. 16, 17, 
of the regard he bears to persons of a contrite and humble spirit, to revive 
them upon this superadded consideration, that they are souls and spirit, and 
so thereby allied to him, the lofty One. Hear how in this case he utters 
himself : The spirit would fail afore me, says he, and the souls which I 
have made. He speaks of their very souls properly and respectively con 
sidered, and them it is which he [is] considering, and it moves him unto pity ; 
for he speaks of that in man whereof God is in a peculiar manner the Maker 
or Creator : The spirit which I have made, says he ; and it is one of the 
eminent titles he takes into his coat, * The framer of the spirit of man within 
him, Zech. i. 12, as in many other places. This is argued also, in that he 
speaketh of that in man which is the subject sensible of his immediate wrath : 
I will not contend for ever, nor will I be always wroth. (This I have ob 
served in what is public of mine.*) Now, what moves him to remove his 
* Child of Light walking in Darkness. 



20 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY [2 CoR. Y. 5. 

wrath from such an one ? * The spirit would fail, says he. Now, doth 
God thus profess to have a regard to them in this life, and that upon this 
account, that they are spirits, lest they should fail or faint, and shall we not 
think that when indeed otherwise they do fail (as after death you have heard 
even now Christ himself expresseth they would), and would, upon all these 
considerations before mentioned, sink into utter desolation, unless they were 
received into everlasting habitations, as Christ there also speaks, do we think 
that God will not now entertain them ? The time is now come, the full 
time to have pity on them. 

2. God at this season forgets not, but full well remembers, his relation of 
being their Creator, both by the new and also first creation, the new reviv 
ing and ingratiating the remembrance of the first. The souls which I have 
made, said he in Isaiah. But in St Peter this is more express, and men 
tioned as that which indeed moves God, and should be accordingly a support 
to our faith, to take care of our souls when we come to die, even upon this 
account, that he is the faithful Creator of them : 1 Peter iv. 19, * Where 
fore, let them that suifer according to the will of God commit the keeping of 
their souls to him in well-doing, as unto a faithful Creator. He speaks this 
specially unto such as were continually exposed unto persecution unto death for 
Christ in those primitive times ; which therefore, ver. 12, he terms the fiery 
trial, and, ver. 17, forewarns them of a time of judgment was begun, and 
going on upon the house of God, such as they had not yet felt ; who yet, 
Heb. x. 32-34, had suffered reproach and spoiling of their goods, as Peter 
writes to the same Jews ; hereupon Peter pertinently instructs them to com 
mit the keeping of their souls unto God. At death you know it is that when 
men s bodies are destroyed, and so the season when their souls to be sepa 
rated therefrom should be committed to God s care ; as our darling (as our 
translation) or lovely soul, when separate, as others,* as Christ in David 
speaks, Ps. xxii. And Peter had in his eye Christ s example, and pointed 
them thereunto, who at his death committed his separate soul or spirit into 
the hands of God, iraga&JMfUH, Luke xxiii. 46 ; and the word commit is one 
and the same in both these places, only there is this difference, that whereas 
Christ says, Father, I commit, Peter substitutes another title of God s 
(there being more than one relation moving God, and strengthening our faith 
to this), even of * faithful Creator. And I understand not the first creation 
only or chiefly here meant by Peter, but the second creation chiefly, which 
brings into repute and acceptation with God the first again together with its 
own ; and so God is thereupon engaged to be faithful in his care and pro 
vision for such souls, according to his promises. And faithfulness doth 
always respect and refer unto promises ; and my reason why thus I under 
stand it is, because I find God s faithfulness still annexed unto his calling of 
us, that is, converting us, which is all one with this new creation : Faith 
ful is he that hath called you, that is, made you new creatures, 1 Cor. i. 9, 
1 Thes. v. 24 ; and I find that David also urges it upon God as a motive, 
as in other psalms, so Ps. cxxxviii. 8, Forsake not the works of thine own 
hands ; that is, this double workmanship of thine, of the first, and then, 
superadded unto that, of the second creation, which he urgeth thereby to 
move him to perfect the work begun, and to be merciful unto him for ever, 
in the former part of that verse. 

3. God professeth himself the Father of spirits ; which relation, though 
it speaks his being the Creator of them at the first, yet hath something more 
of bowels in it. It says withal something further, when it falls out that such 
spirits as he is a Father unto by the first creation, are also the subjects of 

* See Ainsworth, Ps. xxii. 



2 COB. V. 5.] FOR THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN. 21 

his eternal love, by grace and election unto the adoption of children, as Eph. 
i. 3-5 ; see the words. Which love having accordingly taken hold of their 
souls by a work of grace wrought upon them in this life, thereby owning 
them as his in this case, that God, that is a Father of their spirits by the 
law of the first creation, is in a more transcendent manner become the Father 
of the same spirits by grace, and the second creation superadded. Hence it 
falls out, in a parallel way, that (as it was said) such souls were become 
spirit upon a double account ; that is, spirits for the substance of their 
being, and again spirit by being born again of the Spirit ; so answerably it 
is that God stands in relation unto them as a Father of their spirits upon the 
like double respect. And this is equitable upon a very great account ; for 
his relation of Father is more eminent to his grace by election, and then 
again by the grace of his second creation, than it could be any way supposed 
to be by the first creation, and therefore is set and pitched in like singularity 
and eminency upon the same object; that is, their spirits. And hence it 
may well, yea, must be supposed and acknowledged, that if God did make 
such a darling of the soul, such an account of it by creation, as to entitle 
himself so specially the Father thereof, then certainly this love of grace much 
more hath in like equipage taken up the same gracious special relation in its 
kind of father thereunto ; not only because nature shall never be found to 
exceed grace in its favours, but that indeed the motives are far greater that 
God should extend the like and greater privileges where he meant to love by 
election and choice, than he did where he loved only by a due and meet law 
of creation. So that when God shall profess himself a Father to their spirits, 
speaking to such as are his elect, he strongly insinuateth thereby that he is 
by grace likewise the Father of their spirits in a peculiar manner. And truly 
that speech of our Saviour at his death confirms it, Father, into thy hands 
I commit my spirit. It was not barely as a Father of his spirit by creation 
(as you all know), but by everlasting love, and so in that respect also in a 
peculiar manner the Father of his spirit, and therefore as to a Father he 
commends his separate spirit unto him. And this he did, although he was 
to rise again in less than three whole days space. 

Now we read, Heb. xii. 12, the apostle to hold forth this very relation of 
God s being a Father of spirits, with this promise thereunto annexed, that 
they should live ; which relation of father, &c., although it be there explicitly 
spoken in respect of their first creation (which is common unto the saints 
with others), yet being uttered of and unto men in the state of grace (as those 
were supposed whom he there e^xhorteth, and that to move them to be sub 
ject unto him as such, with promise that they should live), it evidently 
respecteth not merely the relation of Father in respect of what was past, the 
act of creating them, but it looketh to the future ; that they depended upon 
him (as children do upon fathers for their future livelihood, so these) for to 
live in him and with him as a Father to their spirits by grace ; for I take 
hold of that word and live. This life is well interpreted by ver. 14, They 
shall see God ; that is, be glorified ; and so I conclude all thus, that if he 
would have them be subject unto God in holiness as upon that relation, as 
unto the Father of spirits, with this promise, that they should live, then 
surely one special aim of the promise is answerable, and hath this eye, that 
God, as a Father of their spirits, will therefore take care of their spirits 
singly, and so, when separate, that they shall live ; and that, accordingly, he 
will give demonstration of this special relation borne to their spirits (when the 
occasion shall be), considered apart in bestowing this life on them. And 
truly when is it more proper for him to shew himself as a Father, than when 
their souls, after their subjection to him in holiness here accomplished, and 



22 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLOKY [2 CoB. V. 5. 

when that, as naked spirits, they come to stand in need, and stand afore him 
in his presence, being now turned out of house and home, and quite cashiered 
out of this world, and come stripped and naked of all but holiness unto their 
Father (for it is said they return to God that gave them), who proves to be 
their Father by grace ? And doubt not of it but he will certainly then own 
them, and give them a Father s blessing, and not reject them as if they were 
but bastards, and no children (as that chapter to the Hebrews speaks), but 
as spirits, who as sons have served him, and been subject to him. 

Add to this, fourthly, God his being our God, which is more home to the 
demonstration of this point than all the former. The text says, He that 
wrought us for this is God. I add, he is your God. And this alone, if we 
will take the Scripture s verdict, will carry it ; and lo, as he is styled the Father 
of spirits in common, and yet withal a Father of their spirits out of special love, 
so in like manner he is styled both the God of the spirits of all flesh (that is, 
of man, Job xii. 20, thus in common), and also to his elect, I am your God 
by grace, Numb. xvi. 22. And these two relations, God and Father, are 
commensurate, and exactly parallel, whether they be applied unto all men in 
common, or to the elect in special. He is termed the God of the spirits, and 
likewise the Father of the spirits of all men ; so in common. Answerably he 
is your God and your Father, by special grace to his elect ; both which in 
this latter respect you find yoked hand in hand, John xx. 17. Look how far 
he is a God of the one, so far a Father also extendeth in the other. And 
look how far that he is our God, so far reacheth also that he is our Father. 
If, therefore, the God of our spirits, to provide for them because he is our 
God, then answerably the Father of our spirits in the like peculiarness be 
cause our Father. And so the proof of this fourth particular will add further 
strength and confirmation to that we presented in the former. 

Now that his being our God (which is the substance of the covenant of 
grace) doth engage him to provide glory for separate souls, that one instance 
of Abraham (the father of the faithful, and we all his sons personated in him) 
is a sufficient evidence. God did profess himself the God of Abraham, Isaac, 
and Jacob, and unto Abraham, Gen. xv. 1, personally, * I am thy abundant 
reward (which respected the life to come), and his friend, 2 Chron. xx. 7. 

Now the Scriptures of the New Testament do improve this relation of 
God s unto us unto two inferences drawn from Abraham s instance, whereof 
the one is the point afore us. 

1. The first is Christ s inference from thence, that therefore Abraham s soul 
lives, and Abraham, both soul and body, shall rise again, for God is not the 
God of the dead, but of the living, Mat. xxii. 31. Thus Christ. 

2. Paul s collection from the same promise is, that God had provided in 
the mean time for Abraham s soul afore the resurrection a city, and an house 
therein for him. Thus Heb. xi. 16, But now they desire a better country, 
that is, an heavenly : wherefore God is not ashamed to be called their God, 
for he hath prepared for them a city. To give light to this, Paul had repre 
sented the story and case of Abraham, and the rest of the patriarchs, in the 
verses afore, to have been this : that God had indeed promised the land of 
Canaan to him and them, ver. 8, 9, whereupon, ver. 13, it is said that these 
all died in faith, not having received the promises, being strangers in the 
land ; yea, not having a foot of land in the land of promise, as Stephen 
speaks, Acts vii. 5-7, and also Paul in the 9th verse of this Heb. xi. Now 
then, when they died, what was it their faith expected instead thereof? The 
10th verse tells us, He looked for a city whose maker and builder is God. 
From which compared, observe that when he died, his faith was thus pitched 
to look for this city instead of that land of Canaan promised. This was the 



2 COR. Y. 5.] FOR THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN. 23 

expectation of their faith on their part. Well, but how doth it appear that 
this flowed from God s having professed himself to be the God of Abraham, 
&c., his .reward and his friend? You have this clear in the 16th verse, 
where you have the whole summed up as the conclusion of the story, and as 
the proof and ground hereof; but now they desire a better country, that is, 
an heavenly. There is their faith and expectation when they should come 
to die. Then it follows, Wherefore God is not ashamed to be called their 
God, for he hath prepared for them a city ; which spoken in full answer to 
that their expectation at their deaths, to shew that God, in professing him 
self to be their God, he had thereby engaged himself, according to his own 
intent in that promise, to make this provision for them at their death. The 
words are express, Wherefore God is not ashamed. What should this 
mean in this coherence, but that his declaring himself to be their G-od did 
import and carry this with it, that he had provided this estate for them at 
their death, even an heavenly ; and that otherwise (as the apostle glosseth 
upon it) he had not come up unto the amplitude of, nor filled full this 
covenanted engagement and profession of his being their God. Will you 
have it in plain English (as we speak) ? If he had not made this provision 
for their souls, he would have been ashamed to have been called their God. 
Thus deeply doth this oblige him, that he is our God and Father, which is 
the point in hand. 

And judge of this in the light of all that reason we have hitherto carried 
along ; and again, let this inference of the apostle mutually serve to confirm 
us in all that reason. For poor Abraham to be driven out of his own coun 
try by God, who called him to his foot, and said no more, but as a master 
to his servant, Take your cloak and follow me (who must presently, without 
more ado, trig, and foot it after his master), as Isa. xli. 2, and then to live 
a stranger in the land of promise, upon the faith that God would be his G-od, 
which faith in him was also to cease when he came to die. If this God in 
this case should not have taken care to answer his faith in some greater way, 
instead of the possession of Canaan ; and that after, upon his being turned 
out of that country too, which he sojourned in during this life ; if God had 
not provided another house, or country, or city for his soul, that was to live, 
to bring it into, when it should be deprived of all in this world : the apostle 
tells us, God (in this case) would have been ashamed to have been called 
his God, which now, having provided so abundantly for him upon dying, 
there is superabundant cause to say, God is not ashamed, for that is a 
diminutive, implying that he infinitely exceecieth that their expectation 
could be supposed to be. 

Let us but view the force of this inference of the apostle s (and so of all 
the reasonings hitherto read), but according to man, or what is found 
amongst men (and God will be sure infinitely to surpass men in his ways of 
favour). Take an ordinary friend, if his friend be turned out of house and 
home, plundered, banished, driven out of all, as the steward in that parable, 
Luke xvi., was, and comes to his friend at midnight, as in that other para 
ble, Luke xi. 5, 6, will not his friends entertain him into their houses, as 
ver. 9 of Luke xvi., yea, and rise at midnight to do it ; as ver. 5, 6, in that 
parable of Luke xi. ? * Shall profession of friendship engage and oblige men 
to do this, and shall not God s professing himself to be our God, Father, 
Friend, engage his heart much more ? Nay, will he not so entertain them 
as shall exceed all wonderment ? What need I say more than this ? 
Wherefore, He is not ashamed to be called their God. He will therefore 
give you an entertainment that shall be worthy of his being your God. 

The fifth and last consideration is, that these separate souls having done 



24. AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY [2 CoR. V. 5. 

and finished all their work, that in order to glory, God hath appointed them 
for ever to do, they now at death appear afore him as a judge and rewarder; 
and that is the fifth relation moving God to bestow at this season such a 
glory on them. How that then the soul returns to God, you have heard 
again and again out of Eccles. xii. 7 ; and that it is upon the account of his 
being the judge thereof at the end of their work in this life, the Chaldee 
paraphrase hath long since glossed upon it, * It returns to God, that it may 
stand in judgment afore him. In this life it came unto God by faith, as 
the apostle speaks, Believing that God is, and that he is a rewarder of 
them that diligently seek him, Heb. xi. 6 ; and now at the end of its faith, 
it comes unto God for the reward of its faith, as some interpret that 1 Peter 
i. 9, which we so largely have insisted on. This is certain, that in that 
promise to Abraham to be his God, he intended and included his being to 
him an exceeding great reward, Gen. xv. 1. And so we come to connect 
this fifth head with the foregoing. And, therefore, if the being his God 
moved him to prepare that city against his death, as hath been said, then 
surely his being his reward doth also then take place. I shall not omit it, 
because it falls in the next chapter, Heb. xii. 23, that in that stupendous 
assembly of heaven, God the judge of all is mentioned between the church 
of the first-born which are written in heaven, this afore, and the spirits of 
justified men made perfect, this after it ; for there are none of these first 
born, or the spirits of just men, do come to sit down there, but they pass 
the award of this judge first, for they sit down by him ; and surely, having 
done all their work in the time of that day is allotted to each man to work 
in, it is a righteous thing with God to give them a reward in the evening of 
this day (which is Christ s time set for rewarding, and it is the twelfth and 
last hour, succeeding the eleventh of the day, Mat. xx. 6 and 9 compared), 
which is when the night of death comes.* Now there is a law given by 
G;od, that the wages to a man hired should be given him (by him that set 
him awork) in his day ; that is, says the Septuagint, the very same day, so 
as his work, or the wages of his work, abide not with thee all the night until 
the morning, says God, Deut. xxiv. 15. Did God take care for hirelings, 
when their work was done, not to stay any space of time, no, not a night, 
and doth he not fulfil this himself unto his sons that serve him ? Surely 
yes, he defers not, nor puts them off to the morning of the resurrection, as 
the psalmist elegantly calls it, Ps. xvii. 15. It abides not with him all 
that dark and longsome night, or space after death, in which their bodies 
rest in the grave, which is termed man s long home, Eccles. xii. 5, and 
* the days of darkness are many, says Solomon ; no, he rewards them in the 
evening of the day, besides what he will add to it in the morning. It is 
observable that, Rev. vi. 9, 10, concerning the separate souls slain for 
Christ, that whilst they cry for justice on their enemies only : And when 
he had opened the fifth seal, I saw under the altar the souls of them that 
were slain for the word of God, and for the testimony which they held ; and 
they cried with a loud voice saying, How long, Lord, holy and true, dost 
thou not judge and avenge our blood on them that dwell on the earth ? that 
they had white robes given them to quiet them in the mean time : ver. 11, 
And white robes were given unto every one of them ; and it was said unto 
them, that they should rest yet for a little season, till they heard that ven 
geance also was executed on that Roman empire for their blood shed. And 
thus to deal is a righteous thing with God. 

Thus you have seen the point confirmed from all sorts of relations that 
God bears unto us, by congruous reasons, that so it becometh God, the 
* See Brugensis, Maldonat. &c., Lev. xix. 13. 



2 COR. V. 5.] FOR THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN- 25 

great God, to do : He that hath wrought us for this thing is God. And 
so much for this first branch of this second doctrine. 

The second branch of the second doctrine. 

That there is a glorious contrivement and workmanship carried on in this 
dispensation of his, like unto the great God indeed. 

This carries on this point yet higher, for it is not only an ordination 
becoming God (upon the respects mentioned), but there is an artifice, a 
workmanship in it, such as he useth to shew in his works of wonder, even 
in this, that he should work upon men s souls in this life, and then bring 
them into a glory he had in the mean space been a- working also for those 
their souls. This is the great God indeed. 

When God secretly bestows cost and curiosity in preparing matters for 
such or such an end ; and then again, as hiddenly, hath laid out a greater 
art, skill, and workmanship upon that end itself ; and then hath exactly 
suited and matched the one to the other, when all comes to be finished, and 
both wrought and brought together, then will an infinite surpassing glory 
arise unto God out of all, which deserveth to have this notoriety (that is 
here) put upon it. He that hath wrought this for that, is God ; and lo, 
this is found here, which is demonstrated, if we view, 

1. Each of these workmanships singly and apart. 

2. Jointly, as designed and fitted each to the other. ! 

1. Each singly. If there were no such ordination of the one for the 
other, yet so considered, they deserve to have each an * He that wrought 
this is God, to be written under it. 

2. For his artifice, in working us in this life. Learned Cameron* 
hath but one note upon this whole fifth chapter, and it falls to be upon this 
very word, who hath wrought, and it is this : this word, saith he, d ds xarso- 
yaffd/A&vog, as used by the Septuagint, signifies rem expolire rudem et iiifor- 
mem, to polish a thing that is rude, and without fashion ; for which he gives 
instance out of Exod. xxxv. 33, in Bezaleel s work (whom, as the 31st and 
32d verses speak of him, God hath filled with his Spirit in all wisdom, in 
all workmanship, to devise cunning work ). And again, the same word is 
used of the temple- work (that other was for Moses s tabernacle), 1 Kings 
vi. 36, by Solomon, which, how transcendent a structure it was, you have 
all read and heard. An infinitely surpassing art, then, hath the Spirit him 
self (who is the immediate worker in this) shewn in the framing, and hewing, 
and curiously carving and engraving those living stones, that grow up into a 
* temple unto God, 1 Peter ii. 5, especially considering the utter remote 
ness, indisposedness, yea, crookedness and perverseness in the matter wrought 
upon (our souls filled with the contrary form and workmanship of Satan). 
Ye are his workmanship, says the apostle, Ephes. ii. 10. And truly, if 
we could enlarge upon all the varieties of dealings God useth to each soul to 
work it, the several sorts of gracious dispositions he impresseth and carveth 
upon it, the manifold actings of every soul drawn forth by him, you may take 
a view of some in the very next chapter to that of my text, 2 Cor. vi., from 
the 4th verse. * In much patience, in afflictions, in necessities, in distresses; 
ver. 5, * In stripes, in imprisonments, in tumults, in labours, in watching, 
in fastings ; ver. 6, By pureness, by knowledge, by long- suffering, by kind 
ness, by the Holy Ghost, by love unfeigned ; ver. 7, By the word of truth, 
by the power of God, by the armour of righteousness on the right hand 
and on the left; ver. 8, By honour and dishonour, by evil report and good 
report : as deceivers, and yet true ; ver. 9, As unknown, and yet well 
known ; as dying, and, behold, we live ; as chastened, and not killed ; ver. 

* In his Myrothecium. 



26 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY [2 CoE. V. 5. 

10, As sorrowful, yet alway rejoicing ; as poor, yet making many rich ; as 
having nothing, and yet possessing all things. Ver. 11, * ye Corinthians, 
our mouth is open unto you, our heart is enlarged. What a glorious em 
broidery upon the soul of a poor believer will in all these things appear, when 
finished : Ps. xlv. 13, 14, The King s daughter is all glorious within ; her 
clothing is of wrought gold. She shall be brought unto the King, in raiment 
of needlework. 2. For his art and workmanship bestowed in the glory of 
the soul in the other world ; if any work (but Christ, God-man) be his mas 
ter-piece, it is the framing of that house, and building, spoken of, ver. 1 of 
this chapter, We have a building of God, a house not made with hands ; and 
the llth of the Hebrews, ver. 10, expressly useth two artificial words, rs^vt- 
rq$, the artificer in it, and dqf&iovgybs, the artificer in it, and the builder of it, 
that is, who hath shewn his art and skill in building of it. So then, in each, 
his workmanship appears. 1 do but add this towards the confirmation of 
the main point m hand. 

Hath the great God perfected both works upon the soul as much as he 
means to work in heaven ? Also prepared a building for it ? And will he 
then (think we) let both lie empty ? Of the one, says Heb. xi. 16, He 
hath prepared for them a city ; of the soul, in like manner, he hath wrought 
us for this self-same thing ; will God (think we) leave this his house to stand 
desolate, when he hath been at such cost in both ? Doth any man or land 
lord build or repair an house, and then let it lie empty, when he hath a tenant 
fit for it ? God is said not to be a foolish builder in respect to perfecting ; 
and he is much less a careless builder, to neglect to take his tenants into it, 
when both are ready and fitted each for other. This for the first, viz., the 
consideration of each singly. 

2. Let us consider then, next, jointly, that it is, as they are in such a 
manner wrought apart, so as to suit and match one the other, when brought 
together in that manner, as it must be said of them, For this thing hath 
God wrought us ; yea, and therein it is he hath appeared to be the great 
God. 

For therein, even to wonderment, doth the glory of God in his works ap 
pear ; and that he is wise in counsel, and wonderful in working, when he 
hath hiddenly contrived one thing for another, whenas each are in them 
selves, and apart glorious. It is said by David of himself (and it is true of 
all men in their measure), Ps. cxxxix. 15, I was made in secret, and 
curiously wrought in the lowest parts of the earth ; that is, in my mother s 
womb, as the context shews ; which are termed the * lower parts of the earth, as 
when Christ is said, Eph. iv. 10, to have * descended into the lower part of 
the earth ; that is, to be conceived in the womb of a virgin. When a child is 
born, a lump of flesh, animated with a soul, comes forth, * curiously wrought, 
&c., but wrought for what? In David s person (in which this was spoken), 
it was for a kingdom, the supremest condition of enjoyments in this world. 
But in every other man (that is born) it is that he was curiously wrought, in 
a fitness and capacity to all things that are in this world, made and prepared 
exactly for it long afore it came into the world ; you may see it in Adam (our 
first pattern) more lively. God was busy for six days in making this world ; 
the angels all that while stood wondering with themselves, to what end, or 
for whom all this was prepared, Job xxxvi. 7. At the end of the sixth day, 
they saw God to set down into the world this little thing they called man, 
and then they ceased their wonderment, for they saw all this world (pre 
pared aforehand) set in man s heart, and all in man curiously wrought and fitted 
for all things made in this world, richly to enjoy, as 1 Tim. vi. 17. We 
may apply that in the text ; to this it appeared, * that he that hath made 



2 COK. V. 5.] FOR THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN. 27 

this self-same thing is God; both works of wonder apart, and yet as fitted 
to each other, all wonderment exceeding. I might much more enlarge 
upon the suiting of Christ, the * head and husband, and the church his 
body and wife, wrought and growing up to him in all ages, both apart, 
secretly and hiddenly prepared, and each so glorious in themselves, and yet 
put together. Let us defer our admiration hereat until the latter day. Just 
thus it is in fitting the soul for that glory ; and again, that glory in heaven 
for that soul : God works the one for the other apart. The very similitude 
in the former verses do import so much. He styleth glory in heaven a being 
clothed upon, and holiness here he compares to an * under-garment, which 
that of glory is to be put over, or upon. There was never a curious artist 
in making garments that ever took measure of the proportions of an upper 
and under garment, to fit the one to the other, as God hath in proportioning 
his work upon us here, and his preparation of glory for each of us in the 
world to come. He hath took exact measure, and his law is (that designed his 
own workings on both hands aforehand), that every man shall receive his 
own reward according to his own labour, 1 Cor. iii. 8. 

Now the artifice of God in both these lies in this, that each are hiddenly 
contrived apart, and yet so gloriously matched as wrought one for the other ; 
which is an argument as if two artificers, the one in the East Indies, the 
other in the West, should the one make the case, the other make the watch, 
unbeknown each to other, and both workmanships of the highest curiosity 
in their kind, and when both brought together they exquisitely fit the one the 
other. 

And what ? Have I been telling you all this while an artificial plea 
sant story ? Doth not this scripture tell the very same ? For a close, do 
but now at last take a view and prospect of our apostle s whole discourse, 
the round and circle whereof begun at chap. iv. ver. 16, and endeth with my 
text ; and do you not find it speak (to use the text s language) the very self 
same thing ? 

1. He tells us there of an inward man renewed, whilst the outward is 
a-perishing, to the end it may live and subsist alone, when the body is wholly 
dissolved ; there he lays his foundation. And is not this all one with what 
the text says ? God works us, these souls, day by day. Even as the child 
is curiously wrought in the womb, to subsist of itself alone in this world, so 
this inward man in that other. 

2. He then immediately subjoins, ver. 17, that all afflictions, which are 
nothing else but the perishings of this outward man, as also all things and 
dispensations else that do befall us, they are secretly at work too all that 
while ; so set to work by God, who works the inner man daily unto such a 
measure of grace, and these to work, and by his ordination procure, a pro 
portionable weight (for God works all these things in weight and measure), 
1 our light affliction works for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of 
glory, as shall in a comely and in the exactest manner answer and suit that 
curious workmanship on the inward man ; and it is observable that the same 
word for working is used in that verse that is used in my text ; but yet these 
are but outwardly a work, as inferior artificers or instruments. Therefore, 

3. He further declares, verse 1 of this chapter, that God himself is at work 
about this glory, who, as the master-workman, that hath the draught and 
platform of all afore him, drawn by his own designing, he viewing the inward 
work on us, the outward work of means and dispensations, and knows 
aforehand what degree of holiness to bring us ultimately unto, he according 
unto these, as patterns, is a-framing a building for us in heaven exactly suited 
to the working of all the other ; which building he prepares and makes ready 



28 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY [^ COR. V. 5. 

for this inner man, to entertain it when the body is dissolved. If our earthly 
house were dissolved, we have a building of God, an house not made with 
hands of either men or means, or of our own graces, but of G-od. But every 
soul hath a state of glory proportioned to all these, ready built for it against 
this time ; even as statues in stone a- e framed and carved, to be set up in 
such a curious arch framed for them by the builder. Now, then, 

4. Add but the words of my text, which is the close of this his discourse. 
And it opens all the scene : He that wrought us for this self-same thing isG-od. 
The apostle s conclusion answers his beginning ; he began in chap. iv. verse 
16, and the circle ends in my text. And this is God who is wise in working, 
and wonderful in counsel. 

But there is a third point yet remains. 

Doct. 3. That it is the interest and engagement of all three persons to see 
to it, that a righteous separate soul be brought to glory at dissolution. 

And this carries it yet higher, even to the highest, and gives the most 
superabundant security and assurance of this thing that can be given, and 
superadds above all the former. 

But you will ask me, How I fetch this out of my text ? Thus : 

1. You see here are two persons expressly named, God the Father namely, 
and the Spirit. That is a rule that where the name God, and then some be 
sides other* of the two persons, Christ or the Spirit, are mentioned there 
with as distinct, there God is put personally, not essentially only, to 
express the Father. Now, here the Spirit, or Holy Ghost, is mentioned dis 
tinct from God ; for it is said, that this God hath given the Spirit ; which 
also Christ so often speaketh of the Father, as I need not insist on it. 

2. It is another rule, that in any scripture where two persons are men 
tioned as concurring in any thing or matter, there the other third person also 
must be understood to have his special share therein also ; as when he wisheth 
grace and peace from God the Father, and from Jesus Christ, it is certain 
the Holy Ghost is as specially understood, as indeed we find him in that 
apostolical blessing as distinctly spoken of as the Father, or Christ. Thus 
it must be here, Christ must be taken in, who also in John is so often said 
to give the Spirit, when the Father gives him, as it is said here he hath, for 
this same thing. 

But, 3, you have even Christ also not far off interested in this self- same 
thing, in the next verse, and ver. 8, absence from the Lord whilst in the 
body, ver. 6, and present with the Lord when separate from the body, ver. 
8. This Lord is Christ ; the phrase of the New Testament concerning 
Christ runs in this style, to be with Christ, this day with me, to be where I 
am, and see my glory ; so Christ. To be with Christ is best of all, and we 
shall be ever with the Lord ; so Paul. 

Use 1. Doth God work us for this thing ere he brings us to it? What 
hath God wrought hitherto upon thee or thee, in order to this end ? It is a 
blunt question, but the text puts it in my mouth : How many souls are there 
living in the profession of Christianity that know not what this means, to 
have a work wrought on them (anew upon them) over and above what moral 
honesty (which was nature s portion) and the common possession of Chris 
tianity adds thereunto, by custom and mere education. An honest Turk pro 
fessing also and observing the principles of his religion, upon the ground of 
his education only (and a religion every man must have), will as soon go to 
heaven as thou ; for all thy religion is founded but upon the like foundation 
that his is. I tell thee, that Christian religion is not a thing so cheap ; nor 
salvation by Christ at so low a rate. Thou must have a work upon thy soul 

* Qu. either ? ED. 



2 COR. V. 5.] FOE THE SPIRITS OF JUST MEN. 29 

suited unto all the truths thus professed in the power and efficacy of them. 
They must enter thy soul by a spiritual faith and frame, and mould it anew 
to a likeness to them. Carry home therefore the caveat our apostle hath put 
in verse 3, If so be that, being clothed, we be not found naked of grace and 
holiness wrought, and Christ s righteousness by spiritual efficacious faith ap 
plied, faith in earnest, bowing the soul to be obedient unto Christ, as heartily 
and as honestly as it expects salvation by Christ, as without which thou wilt 
never be saved. This is our religion ; and when at death thy soul (thy poor 
lonesome soul) being stripped of all things in this world, even the body and all, 
shall come before the great God and Jesus Christ, what will the inquiry be ? 
as Mat. xxii. 11, When the king came in to see the guests, he saw a man 
had not the wedding garment ; he spied him out : And the man was 
speechless, ver. 12. Take him and bind him, says he, and cast him into 
utter darkness, ver. 13. The other that were clothed were admitted unto 
the marriage ; and (as the psalmist, the words of which are here alluded to) 
she was brought unto the king (the very title which in both these places is 
given to Christ ; see ver. 11) in raiment of needlework ; and this clothing is 
of God s working ; and so my text falls in with both. There is no admission 
unto Christ without it. This is the first use. 

Use 2. Hath God begun to work this good work in thee ? He will perfect 
it : whereof the text gives this assurance, that he hath wrought it for this 
thing, that is, for this end, and God will not lose his end. Besides, he says 
he hath given earnest. 

Use 3. Thou saint, be content to live, for whilst thou livest thou art under 
God s working in order unto glory. Value life ; it is a season of being 
wrought upon. And to be sure, thou shalt live no longer, than whilst God 
is some way or other a-working this. What an advantage it is that all thy 
sins, occasioned by living long, shall surely be forgiven, and nothing of thy 
score be uncut off for thee, but all the righteousness that is wrought upon 
thee, and wrought by thee, and therefore wrought by thee because upon 
thee ; for being wrought upon, we work, acti agimus, and all is rather God 
hath wrought us, than that we have wrought. All thy righteousness, I say, 
shall remain for ever, 2 Cor. ix. 9. All the time thou remainest in this 
life, thy soul is ripening or maturing for glory. 

How great a comfort is that ! In explicating the doctrinal part, I gave 
instance of a child in the womb curiously wrought, Ps. cxxxix. 15, all that 
time, in order to its living and subsisting afterwards in this world. It is a 
dark place the womb, which the child is wrought in ; and it lives there in a 
stifled condition. It cannot breathe ; it takes nourishment but at the navel, 
a way invented and prepared of God merely for that season ; it lies boiling, 
tossing, and tumbling, and sleeping away the most of its time, and gives now 
and then a faint stirring, to shew it is still alive ; and it is a life scarce worth 
the name of life. Well, but all this is a being wrought and fitted to live 
another freer and braver life in this world. And this is your present case. 
1 Your life is hid ; it is to come ; all that you find in this world is but that 
God hath wrought you for the self-like thing. And if this child we speak 
of should be forced out of the womb afore the due time, it would have the 
more imperfect life in this world. So here, if you could suppose a saint 
should die afore the full birth of his soul s being wrought on ; therefore be 
content to wait God s leisure until your change shall come. 

Use 4. No matter what befalls thee, so it works towards this end. Let 
whatever be, so thou findest God to go on with this design, that he works 
upon thy soul ; be it upward, in communion with himself, or downward, in 
disowning thyself, thy vileness and corruptions, so it works. Thou hast 



30 AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLOKY. [2 COR. V. 5. 

afflictions that break thy heart (as reproach broke Christ s heart, says the 
psalmist in his name) ; no matter, so they work upon thy soul. Know then 
they are set awork by the hand that sent them, to work a far exceeding weight 
of glory for thee, Philip, iii. If by any means, says Paul, no matter what, 
so the work go on. A carver somes with his chisels, and cuts off this piece, 
and cuts in to that part of the stone ; no matter, a stately statue, bearing 
the image of some person of honour, is to be set up for perpetuity, and is 
accordingly a-framing. So though God carves his image out of thy flesh, no 
matter. Comfort thyself, and think not much at any condition, whilst, as 
St Paul says, Philip, i., it turns to thy salvation. Election sent thee not 
into this world to have a great name (perhaps God will load it), nor to be 
rich, or to have power, but to work thee for this self- same thing. And if 
thou seest that plough agoing, though it makes deep furrows on thy back, 
yea heart, yet so that this seed be sown therein, rejoice, for thou shalt bring 
thy sheaves with thee. For myself, so that I find election pursuing its 
design of making me holy, and blessing me with spiritual blessing in heavenly 
places, as Eph. i. 4, I care not (I would not care) what befalls me in this 
world. 



THE GREAT INTEREST OF STATES AND 
KINGDOMS. 



TO THE HOXOUBABLE HOUSE OF COMMONS, 

ASSEMBLED IN PARLIAMENT. 



I HEBE present you with one piece of the counsels of God, next those of his 
disposing the eternal conditions of persons of all other the greatest, as which 
concerneth the temporal salvation or destruction of kingdoms and nations, 
which, next to his saints therein, are dearest to God, as his patience towards 
them shews ; a subject which, had it been set out according to the merit of 
it, would of itself have fallen at your feet, who are the representative body 
of this nation and kingdom, and entitled itself to no other dedication than 
to you. But Providence having brought it forth in the way of an ordinance 
of God, preaching in your ears (though rudely), and you having been pleased 
to own it, it is become yours by all sorts of interest. 

It is certain that God did not bring that last and fatal desolation upon the 
Jews until all states and ranks of men amongst them had conspired against 
the Lord and his Anointed and his followers ; nor did he bring upon them 
that their first captivity, until all sorts had corrupted themselves, the great 
men had broken the yoke, the prophets prophesied falsely, Jer. v., the 
priests did bear rule by their means, and the people loved to have it so ; and 
then, as the prophet adds, * What will you do in the end thereof ? and yet 
therein God did not regard so much what the people as what their rulers 
did. I said (speaking of the people), Surely these are poor, these are 
foolish, I will get me to the great men ; but these have all together broke 
the yoke, and burst the bands, ver. 4, 5. Our comfort therefore is, we can 
not be undone without you, nor you without failing in this, which is our 
greatest interest : an error which, if this kingdom should, after so much 
bleeding, err a second time, is like hereafter never to be mended. Your 
preservation and guidance in this is, above all other, the constant and daily 
prayer of, 

Your most humble Servant, 

THO. GOODWIN. 



VOL. XII. 



THE INTEREST OF ENGLAND: 

A SERMON PREACHED AT THE LATE FAST BEFORE THE 
COMMONS HOUSE OF PARLIAMENT. 



He suffered no man to do them wrong ; yea, he reproved kings for their sakes; 
saying, Touch not mine anointed. Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

THE words I have read, and those from the 10th verse, as they hold forth 
the first rearing of the church of the Jews in Abraham and the patriarchs, 
so they are intended as the first primitive instance and original pattern of 
God s care and protection over his people in all ages, and likewise of his 
proceedings with all states and kingdoms, according unto their dealings with 
his people, wherever east among them, to the end of the world ; exemplified 
in what was done for their sakes, and towards them and their families. 

The story itself of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, which these words refer 
to, and how God reproved Abimelech, king of Grerar, and Pharaoh, king of 
Egypt, and others for their sakes, you may read in the 12th, 20th, and 26th 
chapters of Genesis ; and of commands given forth concerning them, to do 
them no wrong, yea, not to touch them ; declaring also of Abraham, Gen. 
xx. 7, that he was a prophet, and so not to be injured. Only what in the 
story is uttered scatteredly and in several places, is by the prophet David 
summarily put together : Touch not mine anointed, and do my prophets 
no harm. 

There is a controversy upon these words, Touch not mine anointed, 
that they should be intended principally of kings, and of these patriarchs as 
under the notion of kings. I shall but clear it in a word. 

Whether these patriarchs were kings or no, I will not now dispute. Abra 
ham is called a mighty prince by the children of Heth, Gen. xxiii. 6 ; yet, 
however, here the Holy Ghost speaks of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as re 
presenting the people of Israel, and his scope is to shew God s care and 
protection of his people by their example ; which is clear, 1, by all the 
current and stream of the whole psalm. All that goes before, and which 
follows after, is wholly to shew his care of the people of Israel from first to 
last. But as for kings, or God s care over them as such, we may say, as 
Paul in another case, Heb. vii. 14, Of that tribe the Holy Ghost speaks 
nothing ; that is, in this psalm nothing, as touching monarchy (as he there 
says nothing as concerning the priesthood). 



PS. CV. 14, 15.] THE GEEAT INTEREST OF STATES AND KINGDOMS. 35 

And, 2, then the words in the 12th verse, which speak of the persons of 
these patriarchs when they were but a few men in number ; yea, very few, 
refer not to kings, nor unto these patriarchs as such ; for he speaks of their 
whole families, their wives, children, and servants ; yea, these three patri 
archs, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, they were all alive at once : Isaac was 
above seventy years old afore Abraham died, and Jacob fifteen, and but one 
of these could have been king at once ; and yet you see he speaks of them 
all complexedly, and as making a company together ; when they were few, 
and very few, he said, * Touch not mine anointed. 

Yea, 3, it is so far from being meant of them as kings, that it is expressly 
said, in the words of the text, He reproved kings for their sakes ; therein 
speaking of them as of a sort of people distinct from kings, and yet of a 
higher and dearer value with God, than those kings reproved for them. 

But it will be said, that if it should not be meant of them under the rela 
tion of kings, yet, however, as of persons extraordinary ; and therefore this 
charge and instance cannot be drawn into a pattern of God s care and pro 
tection over all saints, and the people of God, which is the scope which I 
have put upon the words. 

I answer, that though indeed their persons were extraordinary, yet here 
they are withal set forth as representing the people of G-od, whom they were 
the fathers of. It is clear by the 8th verse, He hath remembered his 
covenant for ever, the word which he commanded to a thousand genera 
tions ; the performance of which covenant, to confirm the truth of it, he 
exemplifies by the story of God s providence over these. What, therefore, 
he saith of these anointed ones here, it extendeth to a thousand generations 
to come ; and as Abraham in other things was a common person, in faith 
justifying he is made such, Bom. iii. ; in faith as sanctifying, James ii. ; in 
being heir of the world, Rom. iv. 13, so is he here also, and Isaac and 
Jacob with him, in their anointing. 

But you will yet say, It is true they may be understood as common per 
sons, representing indeed the nation of the Jews ; but yet will what is here 
said be warrantably extended to the believers of Jews and Gentiles under 
the New Testament to the end of the world ? 

I answer, Yes. For the covenant that God made with Abraham was to be 
1 heir of the world, as well as heir of Canaan, so Rom. xiv. 13. And ac 
cordingly in other things the analogy holds for them with these here. For 
as these, so the saints, they are called strangers and pilgrims, scattered and 
dispersed in all nations. So Peter speaks of them, even as here he calls 
these strangers, verse 12, when they were but few in number, and strangers 
in the land, as the saints in the world. To give parallel places of Scripture 
to strengthen this. In the Old Testament, in the 45th Psalm, you have a 
prophecy of the Church of the New Testament, under the type of Solomon 
taking Pharaoh s daughter, who was a Gentile, into his bed, as Christ, of 
whom he was the type, one day should do the Gentiles : which church is 
made that great mother that shall have such multitudes of children, Gal. iv. 
Now of those children of the church of the New Testament as the mother, 
and of Christ as the father, the 16th verse of that psalm thus speaks : * In 
stead of thy fathers shall be thy children, whom thou mayest make princes 
in all the earth. The meaning whereof is this, that in the stead of these 
great patriarchs and other the fathers of the Jews (spoken of in the text), 
shall succeed others, the children of the New Testament, even all the saints, 
as successors of them ; and as they were as princes in all lands they came 
into here, * so shall thy children be, says the psalmist there. And the 7th 
verse of that psalm calls them anointed, and so speaks also in the language 



36 THE GREAT INTEREST OF [Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

of the text, when under that notion he commands not to touch them. That 
verse speaking of Christ, saith, He is anointed with the oil of gladness 
above his fellows ; namely, these his fellows and children, spoken of verse 
16. You have at once, as the great anointed one, Christ, so all his children 
called anointed ones also ; and as they are his fellows, so anointed too. 
Thus you have all meet : Abraham and the fathers, the anointed ones of the 
Old Testament, Christ and his saints, the anointed ones in the New, in their 
stead ; and both princes and strangers in all lands ; and so of the one as 
well as the other this charge is here intended, Touch not mine anointed, 
&c. And to this accords the language of the New Testament : the whole 
mystical body is called Christ, 1 Cor. xii. 12 ; and believers his fellows are 
said to have received an anointing, 2 Cor. i. 21, 1 John ii. 27; yea, and 
elsewhere the reason of this their preservation, and God s protection over 
them, is put upon this very anointing : Isa v x. 27, The burden shall be 
taken off thy shoulder (speaking of the oppression of God s people), and the 
yoke shall be destroyed, because of the anointing. 

Having thus explained the words, I come to those observations which I 
shall make out of them, and insist on at this time. I resolve the words into 
these three parts. 

1. Here is the nearness and the dearness of the saints unto God. They 
are dearer to him than kings and states, simply considered ; that is, other 
wise than as they in their persons are also saints ; for you see that for their 
gakes he reproved kings, and so sheweth that ke preferreth them to kings. 

2. Here is the great danger to kings and states, to deal with his saints 
otherwise than well. Which appeareth many ways ; for he doth not only 
in words give a charge not, to touch them, but he carries it in a high way 
(for so God may do when he pleads their cause), Touch them not ; as if he 
had said, Let me see if you dare so much as touch them ; and it is with an 
intimation of the highest threatening if they should ; upon your peril if you 
do ; for that is the scope of such a speech. And accordingly in deeds he 
made this good, for the text saith he suffered no man to do them wrong ; 
not that he did altogether prevent all wrong and injuries, for they received 
many as they went through those lands ; but at no time did he put it up at 
their hands, or let it go unpunished. In that sense he suffered them not. 
You know how he plagued Pharaoh, king of Egypt, with great plagues, and 
all his household, for Abraham s wife s sake, Gen. xii. And so Abimelech, 
king of Gerar, the Lord cometh upon him with a greatness, and his first 
word is in Gen. xx. 3, Behold, thou art but a dead man, afore he had first 
told him why or wherefore, though then he adds the reason ; he brings him 
upon his knees, ver. 4, bids him look to it that he give satisfaction to Abra 
ham, and restore his wife to him again, ver. 7 ; and well he escaped so ; and 
tells him also that he must be beholden to Abraham s prayers for his life. 
* He is a prophet, saith he, and he shall pray for thee, and thou shalt live/ 

3. The third is the care and protection which God had over them, set out 
and amplified, 1, by the number and condition of the persons whom he de 
fended ; though few men of number, that is soon reckoned, for their power 
and strength a few, or very small, sig fifaeavt, so the Septuagint in the 
parallel place, 2 Chron. xvi. 19; as also, 2, by what he did for them: He 
suffered no man, how great soever, to do them any wrong, how small soever ; 
not without recompence and satisfaction; not to do it, though they had a mind 
to it, though the people had an ill eye at them, Gen. xxvi. 11. God causeth 
Abimelech to make a law on purpose ; Abimelech charged all his people in 
Isaac s behalf, and of his family (which I mention, because it gives light to 
the text), and speaks in the very words of the text, He that toucheth this 



Ps. CV. 14, 15.] STATES AND KINGDOMS. 87 

man or his wife shall be put to death, although they envied him, ver. 14, 
strived with him, ver. 20, hated him, ver. 27. 

I shall pass over the set handling the first of these, namely, the nearness 
and dearness of the saints to God ; it will after come in well enough under 
the second, as the reason thereof. 

That main thing which I have singled forth to insist upon is, the danger 
that is unto states to deal otherwise than well with the saints, God s anointed. 
And the observation is plainly this, 

Obs. That the dealing well or ill with the saints of God, it is the greatest 
and highest interest of kings and kingdoms, on which their welfare or their 
ruin depends. 

I have the story of the whole world afore me, to glean demonstrations and 
instances out of, to make good this truth ; but I shall endeavour to present 
it to you under that prospect that runs through the story of the whole Bible, 
my observation out of the story of which, and the sum and issue of all, is 
this, that God from the beginning hath in his providence so ordered it, that 
the greatest and most nourishing kingdoms and states should still have to 
do with his saints and people in all ages ; and either they have been broken 
by their ill using of them, or they have prospered by their well dealing with 
them. You shall find this, I say, throughout the whole Scripture. My 
text leads the round to all the rest, and I therefore indeed chose it, rather 
than any other, though otherwise, as a bottom to this point, I might have 
pitched upon others perhaps more full. 

We will begin with the very first kings and kingdoms that you read of 
after the flood ; how he reproved the king of Egypt and the king of the 
Philistines for the sake of Abraham and Isaac, that I mentioned afore. Be 
sides those there is mention of four kings, Gen. xiv. : Amraphel, king of 
Shinar or Babylon, which was the first kingdom in the world after the flood, 
Gen. x. 10, and was one of, yea, the first great monarchy. There is like 
wise Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, or Persia, which afterward likewise proved 
a monarchy ; for as Assyria and Babylon made the first, so you know Persia 
was the next. You have two other kings more there confederate with these. 
These four kings they brake in upon, and smote all the countries about. 
They smote the Rephaims (giants) in Ashteroth Karnaim, and the Zuzims 
(terrible ones) in Ham, and the Emims and the Horites in Mount Seir, 
Deut. ii. 10, 11, and they returned and came to En-mishpat, which is Kadesh, 
and smote all the country of the Amalekites and also the Amorites that 
dwelt in Hazezon-tamar, as you may read, verses 6-8. And all the while 
they overran these vast countries, where there was not one saint to be found, 
they found no resistance, having but to do with nations, not saints in them ; 
but unhappily to them, when they came to fight against the kings of Sodom 
and Gomorrah, they light upon one saint, and but one, and that is Lot ; so 
the 12th verse, * They took Lot, Abraham s brother s son (who dwelt in 
Sodom), and his goods, and departed. Alas to them ; little thought they 
what a prisoner they had. They took him in the crowd amongst the 
wickedest people under heaven, a people so wicked, that one would have 
thought God should so little have considered this one saint, to save him 
from perishing, as that his vengeance should have taken the opportunity to 
ruin these, though this one poor Lot had been involved in their destruction. 
But you shall see how tender God is of his saints, Jer. iii. They had un 
awares devoured an hallowed thing, one righteous Lot, and had taken him 
but prisoner ; they had drunk poison, and all the riches and all the goods 
they had taken they vomit up again, together with their own blood : the 
Lord in this giving demonstration of that his care and skill, which Peter 



38 THE GEEAT INTEKEST OF [Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

makes observation of upon the story of Lot and the Sodomites: * The Lord 
knows how to preserve the righteous, and reserve the unjust, 2 Pet. ii. 9. 
And whom should God use to be the instrument to do this to ? Grod had 
not many more saints then in the world, but only Melchisedec we read of, 
and Abraham and his family, and God useth that one Abraham ; and he had 
an army but of a few, and a very few (even as the text hath it), but three 
hundred and eighteen men born in his house, ver. 14 ; he pursues them, 
and smites them, ver. 17, with a great slaughter, and brought back all the 
goods, and his brother Lot and his goods, &c., ver. 18 ; and thus they were 
reproved. You see the text made good from the very first beginning of 
kingdoms : he reproved kings for their sakes indeed. 

Thus he began the world at first ; and this very victory is made a leading 
case, a standing encouragement to the sons of Abraham, the saints, for ever 
after. So you have it applied in Isa. xli. 2, * Who raised up (says God, to 
raise up his people s hearts) the righteous man from the east ? namely, this 
one Abraham, and called him to his foot. Follow me, I will be thy general, 
said God to him, gave the nations before him, and made him rule over kings ; 
he means these very kings you have heard the story of: * He gave them as 
the dust to his sword, and as driven stubble to his bow ; he pursued them, 
and passed safely, &c. Did God do thus then for one or two of his saints, 
and will he not go on ? What saith the 4th verse ? * Who hath wrought 
and done it, calling the generations from the beginning, and so having or 
dained all the generations of Abraham to do the like exploits in their several 
ages. I the Lord am the first, and with the last, I am he. I began to 
do this with Abraham, and I will go on to do so, even to the last, for the 
sons of Abraham. And that this is plainly his meaning appears by verse 8, 
where he makes a general application of it to his seed : * But thou, Israel, art 
my servant, Jacob whom I have chosen, the seed of Abraham my friend. 
Therefore, saith he, verse 10, Fear thou not (thou worm Jacob, verse 14) 
for I am with thee : be not dismayed, for I am thy God : I will strengthen 
thee, yea, I will help thee ; yea, I will uphold thee with the right hand of 
my righteousness. Behold, all they that were incensed against thee, shall 
be ashamed and confounded : they shall be as nothing, and they that strive 
with thee shall perish. All the whole chapter is nothing else but encourage 
ment to all the seed of Abraham, from this very instance I have now given 
you. And the text here confirms it, premising unto all those instances, He 
hath remembered his covenant, the word he commanded to a thousand gene 
rations. 

The next kingdom in the world that flourished in those first times, that 
grew to any greatness that we read of, was that of Egypt ; and though Ham 
the founder of Egypt was cursed, yet as usually those God lays the greatest 
curse upon he first begins to bless with outward blessings in the world, so 
he did the seed of Ham, in that infancy of that new world. How renowned 
a kingdom that then was, both for continued succession of kings in a race 
(which Isaiah insinuates, chap. xix. 11), and for other greatness, the story 
of Moses, and Herodotus, and other profane stories, do celebrate. It was, as 
would seem, in those first times more flourishing than Assyria (the territories 
of Assyria could not then be great, when such other three kings fore-men 
tioned bordered about it, and when Chedorlaomer of Persia was the chief of all 
the four, Gen. xiv. 4, 5). Now, see how still the Lord doth follow on this 
his great design : he will have his saints to be cast upon this kingdom, and 
to live therein ; and not only Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, but in the 
end all their posterity. It is the next story the psalmist gives instance of to 
the purpose in hand, and let us take it but as he relates it : saith he, verse 



PS. CY. 14, 15.] STATES AND KINGDOMS. 39 

17, * He sent a man before them, even Joseph, who was sold for a servant, 
whose feet they hurt with fetters (Potiphar only did it, yet God lays it upon 
the nation). But, as the psalmist observes, the Lord was even with them 
for it, ver. 21 and 22. He made this man not only Lord of Pharaoh s 
house, but he adds, to bind his princes at his pleasure, as they before had 
done him. As Abraham afore, so Joseph now is another leading instance. 
* To bind their kings with chains, their nobles with fetters of iron, such 
honour hath all his saints, Psal. cxlix. He made this man a saviour to 
them (as themselves acknowledge : * Thou hast saved our lives, Gen. xlvii. 
25), and whilst they dealt well with him and his brethren, as he blessed 
Potiphar s house for his sake, so he blessed the prince and all Egypt also 
for his sake. And whilst Egypt was the nursery, or rather the granary (as 
it was called anciently Horreum Eomani Imperil) to these anointed ones, the 
people of God, so long it greatly flourished. But, verse 25, God turned 
their heart to hate his people, and to deal subtilly with his servants (for 
malice and cunning always go together in oppressing the saints), and how 
they oppressed them you all know. But as he had reproved kings for their 
sakes afore, and Pharaoh s progenitors among the rest, saying, Touch not 
mine anointed, as here, so he begins with a message by Moses his ambas 
sador, sent to that king of Egypt, and therein useth the same kind of lan 
guage, Exod. iv. 22, 23, Thou shalt say unto Pharaoh, thus saith the 
Lord, Israel is my son, even my first-born. There is only this difference 
in the expression : the psalmist here calls them his anointed ; there, his 
first-born. And it is as if he had said, Tell Pharaoh, I, Jehovah, am a 
greater king than thou art, and therefore my first-born is greater than thy 
first-born. And let my son, my first-born go, that he may serve me ; he 
carries all high. And if thou refuse to let him go, I will slay thy son, even 
thy first-born ; and so indeed he did in the end. They left not oppressing 
the people of God (and the great quarrel was to let them go to worship) till 
such time as God did overthrow that nation, with so great an overthrow as 
no kingdom could have a greater, not totally to be destroyed ; and indeed so 
great, as you hear no more of them till Solomon s time. There is not a 
word of Egypt in all the time of Joshua, and of the judges, till you read of 
Solomon s marrying Pharaoh s daughter. Here you see Egypt both blessed 
while they dealt well with the people of God, and broken when they dealt 
ill with them. 

To let pass those petty kings of Canaan, overcome by Moses and Joshua, 
let us come next to Assyria, which together with Babylon is reckoned the 
first great monarchy. The beginning of the Assyrian monarchy being from 
Babylon, Gen. x. 10, and the kingdom returning again to Babel, both are 
justly reckoned but one, though in their several revolutions they were dis 
tinct. This monarchy, in the infancy of it, Abraham had to do with, and as 
you heard, overcame the king thereof. Egypt s king was also reproved for 
their sakes, and Persia, and two kings more, God ordering it, that the 
father and representer of the faithful should reprove and chastise those 
kings whom his seed should after ruin. How the people of God were op 
pressed, first by the Assyrian kings and then by the Babylonians, the story 
of the Kings and Chronicles do shew, the Assyrian often oppressing them, 
and at last carrying the ten tribes captive, as Babylon did the other two. 
Now, to make short work of both, you shall find one scripture, Jer. L, where 
you shall see them both put together in their ruin, and the ruin of both put 
upon this, their oppression of the people of God. I mention that scripture 
only because it summarily contains the whole: verse 17, says God, * Israel 
is a scattered sheep, the lions have driven him away ; they were a scattered 



40 THE GREAT INTEREST OF [Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

people ; or as Junius and Piscator hath it, they were parva pecus, a little 
flock, a few, and very small, in comparison of the nations, as the psalmist 
hath it here ; and the lions drave them away. Who were these lions ? First, 
saith he, l the king of Assyria hath devoured him, he seized as it were on 
the flesh (Pul, Tiglath-Pileser, and Shalmaneser, oppressing and captivating 
them, 2 Kings xv.) ; and last, this Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon (he 
speaks of him with scorn and indignation, This Nebuchadnezzar) hath broken 
the bones. And because that he came last, and took away all as a sweeping 
rain, therefore his anger riseth most against him : verse 18, Thus saith the 
Lord of Hosts, Behold, I will punish the king of Babylon and his land, as I pun 
ished the king of Assyria. Merodach of Babylon subdued the Assyrian,* Nebu 
chadnezzar utterly ruins Nineveh, the head city thereof, and then Babel s time 
comes to be wasted also, and the whole land therewith. Here is that monarchy 
gone, you see, both Assyrian and Babylonian ; and whosoever were the instru 
ment, this was the cause from God s own mouth. Add unto which, that in the 
next chapter, Jer. li. 11, Because (says that text) it was the vengeance of 
the Lord, and of his temple. And take in also verse 35, * The violence 
done to me, and to my flesh, be upon Babylon, shall the inhabitants of Zion 
say, and my blood upon the inhabitants of Chaldea, shall Jerusalem say, 
then when they are destroyed. 

Now there are a great many other kingdoms and nations, that bordered 
about the Jews, whom God (as I remember) calleth his evil neighbours, for 
their ill-will to Zion ; these all fell either by or with Babylon. Of these you 
shall read in the 25th, 26th, 27th, and 28th chapters of Ezekiel, and so on. 
G-od there sends the cup round to all the nati ons. All those nations certainly 
had infinite provocations of national sins of all sorts against God amongst 
them ; but you shall see still God there lays his suit and quarrel against 
them only for their ill dealing with his people, to whom they were neighbours 
round about. 

He begins with the Ammonites, chap. xxv. 2, and what was her sin that 
ruined her ? Ammon was but glad at the fall of the Jews. * Behold (saith 
the 3d verse) thou saidst, Aha, against my sanctuary, when it was profaned ; 
and against the land of Israel, when it was desolate ; and against the house 
of Judah, when they went into captivity ; they did not help it forward, only 
cried Aha. Therefore, saith God, ver. 4, * I will deliver thee to the men of 
the east for a possession ; and ver. 6, * Because (as in speech, as afore, so 
in gesture they expressed the like joy at it) thou hast clapped thy hands, 
and stamped with the feet, and rejoiced in heart with all thy despite against 
the land of Israel ; behold, therefore, I will stretch out mine hand upon 
thee, and will deliver thee for a spoil to the heathen; I will destroy thee, &c. 

The next that he mentioneth is Moab. She did but cast out a word ; so 
verse 8, she did but only say this, Behold, the house of Judah is like unto 
all the heathen ; now laid waste as they, and there is no difference in the 
protection in their God over them, more than over the heathen themselves. 
It was but this word cast out ; yet therefore saith the Lord, verse 9, Behold 
I will open the side of Moab. He would break through and open his strong 
frontier cities (as the next words explain it), break his ribs, and so enter into 
his bowels ; and verse 1 0, < The Ammonites shall be no more remembered 
among the nations. No other sin is mentioned, but this word about his 
people. 

He comes next to Edom, verse 12, who was the posterity of Esau and 
their brother (as you shall hear anon), and of them he saith, Because that 
Edom hath dealt against the house of Judah by taking vengeance, and 
* Solianus Annales Tom, 4, An. Mund. 3333, An. 3452 



PS. CY. 14, 15.] STATES AND KINGDOMS. 41 

greatly offended, and revenged himself upon him ; therefore saith he, verse 
13, I will cut off man and beast from it, and make it desolate. He riseth 
still in his punishments proportionable to their sins, and to their dealings 
with his people. And I will do it, says he, < by the hand of my own people, 
verse 14, that were oppressed by them. 

From Edom he carries the cup to Philistia, who, because they had an old 
gradge against the Israelites, * a despiteful heart, to destroy them for the 
old hatred, verse 15, Therefore I will execute great vengeance on them, 
verses 16, 17. 

In the next place, he comes to Tyre, poor Tyre ; I call her so, because as 
of all the nations they were the most ingenious in themselves (insomuch as 
Christ says, they would have repented, &c.), and most ingenious of all 
nations else unto the Jews, that helped them to build the temple, and were 
confederates with David and Solomon. And what was her fault ? A mere 
temptation of love to herself, such as might befall any in the like case. 
Read chap. xxvi. 2, * Son of man, because Tyrus hath said against Jerusalem, 
Aha, she is broken that was the gates of the people ; I shall be replenished 
now she is laid waste. The meaning is this, I shall now have all the trade. 
You know Tyre lay nigh to Jerusalem, and it was a place of the greatest 
trade and merchandise then in the world ; she was the mart of nations (so 
she is called in Isa. xxiii., and in Ezek. xxvii. 3), and though she had the 
greater trade of the two already, yet she rejoiced in this, that Jerusalem 
should be laid waste, who had been the gates of the people, whither much 
people came for traffic, as well as to me. Now, thinks she (and it was but 
a self-loving thought), all the trade will wholly come to me, and I shall be 
replenished and increased. No more. Yet, because it fell out to be uttered 
against the church, for this, and for no other sin (there mentioned), must 
Tyre be destroyed, as she was by Nebuchadnezzar, though, to fulfil the pro 
phecy, he served twelve years in the siege thereof. And see how God pro 
portioned her punishment to her sin : Wouldst thou have more customers ? 
Thou shalt have enow. Behold, I will cause many nations to come up ; 
what, for traffic ? No ; to come up against thee, as the sea causeth his 
waves to come up ; the Babylonian soldiers shall be thy merchants that 
shall take off thy goods off thy hands. And because that Tyre was a most 
glorious people, he therefore spends two or three chapters upon the descrip 
tion of her ruin. 

In the 26th chapter he comes to Egypt. Egypt had been broken once 
afore (as you heard) by the people of Israel, and reproved for Abraham s 
sake. They were a false-hearted nation, that even Rabshakeh could afore- 
hand prophesy so of them, in Isa. xxxvi. 6, Lo, saith he, thou trustest on 
the staff of this broken reed, whereon if a man will lean, it will go into his 
hand and pierce it ; so is Pharaoh king of Egypt to all that trust in him. 
It was the genius of that nation to all that dealt with them. And as Rab- 
shakeh had foretold of them, so it fell out ; and therefore the prophet 
Ezekiel utters their sin against the church in Rabshakeh s language, chapter 
xxix. 7, * Because they have been a staff of reed to the house of Israel. It 
is a most elegant comparison, the similitude it looks many ways : 1, a reed 
was a hieroglyphic of that country. Sanctius upon those words, Ps. Ixviii. 
30, * Rebuke the company of the spearmen (so we translate it), but look in 
the margins of your Bibles, and likewise the original will bear it, it is, * Re 
buke the beast of the reeds; and he interpreteth this to be meant of Egypt, 
the Chaldee paraphrase also interpreting it of that nation, it being a country 
of reeds. On the bank of Nilus, and so throughout the whole country 
(through the overflowing of that river), there were and are_such reeds and 



42 THE GREAT INTEREST OF [Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

canes growing, as nowhere in the world again besides (so Pliny* saith), 
serving for pens, spears, arrowsf (as Pliny there), so for staves, arks, Exod. 
ii. 3 ; and Egypt is called a beast of reeds, alluding further (as I take it) to 
the crocodile, the proper beast of that country, which is an amphibion, 
living both in land and water, and so usually lies amongst the reeds by the 
river side, and there shrouds herself against the heat, as the elephant also is 
said to do, Job xl. 21. And suitably we find that, Augustus having con 
quered Antony and Cleopatra, the queen of Egypt, caused by way of triumph 
to be stamped on his coin a crocodile and a reed,! as that which was put for 
the hieroglyphic of that country, as the manner of the Romans was. And 
the Holy Ghost here in Ezekiel long before seems to have given the same 
coat of arms for that country and kingdom (perhaps according to the common 
use), using both these apart of Egypt also. For first, in the third verse of 
this chapter xxix., he calleth Pharaoh king of Egypt the dragon of the 
rivers (which I believe hath reference to the crocodile in those rivers, which 
is a kind of serpent, and beast also), and in the 7th verse after, which we 
are now upon, to a staff of reed. Whereas in that 68th Psalm you see both 
are put together, the beast of reeds, here in this 29th of Ezekiel, the 
prophet having in his eye the common hieroglyphic of the country, turns the 
similitude to their being a staff of reed ; that suiting his present scope, 
which was to express their failing that confidence the people of God reposed 
in them, and so becoming the fatal occasion of their misery. Because 
(saith he, verse 6) thou hast been a staff of reed to the house of Israel, 
when they took hold of thee thou didst break. They (as Cornelius a Lapide 
upon the place) had provoked the Jews to rebel against Nebuchadnezzar, 
promising to assist them : but though thou wert bacillus in promissione, a 
staff in promises, yet but arundines in executione, a staff of reed, vain and 
helpless in the performance (as he speaks). The prophet goes on. Yea, 
thou didst not only break, but run up, and rend all the shoulder, and madest 
their loins to be at a stand ; didst not only hinder, but hurt and weaken 
them. The Lord comes upon them with his former Therefore; verse 8, Saith 
the Lord, 1 will bring a sword upon thee, and I will cut off man and beast. 
And so he goes on in three or four chapters to set forth their punishment, 
and that relating, as the former had done, to this their unfaithful dealing with 
God s people, as that sin that was the cause thereof, which is the point in 
hand. 

When the prophet had thus despatched Egypt, and threatened the like to 
Assyria and Babylon (of which enough was touched before), he falls afresh 
upon mount Seir and Edom, and contents not himself to have put them into 
the common catalogue (which we have gone over) with the rest of the nations 
in the 25th chapter ; but he returns again to a peculiar, special reckoning 
with them in the 35th chapter (the reason of it we shall see by and by, 
because they were their brethren ). * Because, saith he there, ver. 5, thou 
hast had a perpetual hatred, and hast shed the blood of the children of Israel 
by the force of the sword in the time of their calamity, in the time that their 
iniquity had an end ; that is, when they had already suffered so much for 
their sins that it might have been thought God had punished them enough, 

* Lib. xvi. c. 36. 

t Hence arundo for sagitta with the Latins, and the same word for a reed and a 
spear (as here) in the Scripture. 

t. And in Adrian s coins of gold also. 

2 Esau, of whom both came, was called Edom from his redness, Gen. xxv. 30, and 
Seir from his hairy hands. Esau dwelt in Seir, Gen. xxxiii. 14, 16, and was given 
as a possession to his seed by God, Deut. ii. 5 ; and Esau was the father of Edom, 
Gen. xxxvi. 43. 



Ps. CV. 14, 15.] STATES AND KINGDOMS. 43 

yet then do they begin their misery afresh : Therefore as I live, saith the 
Lord, I will prepare thee unto blood, and blood shall pursue thee, &c. ; and, 
ver. 10, he adds another reason, Because thou hast said, These two nations 
and these two countries shall be mine (namely, their own, and that of Israel 
adjoining), * and we will possess it. When Nebuchadnezzar had laid it 
waste, they promised to themselves the possession of it, whereas the Lord 
was there, as the prophet adds. They thought they might as easily conquer, 
and enter upon the possession of it, as any of the other nations ; whereas 
the Lord s presence was there, to keep possession for himself and his people 
that belonged unto it. This was their sin, then follows their punishment : 
Therefore as I live, saith the Lord, I will even do according to thine anger, 
and according to thine envy, which thou hast used out of hatred against 
them ; I will proportion my punishment accordingly. And he doth not 
content himself only with his bringing of them in again here, but besides he 
spends a whole prophecy upon them, the prophecy of Obadiah, whose mes 
sage is taken up with nothing but threatenings against Edom, and resolving 
all into the same quarrel : * For thy violence against thy brother Jacob * 
Edom and Seir, as was said, coming of Esau, were brethren to the Israelites, 
and God takes it infinitely more unkindly at their hands than at the hands 
of the other nations therefore shame shall cover thee, and thou shalt be 
cut off for ever. In the day that thou stoodst on the other side (that is, 
behavedst thyself as a neuter that stood aloof), * in the day that strangers 
carried away captive his forces, and foreigners entered into his gates, and 
cast lots upon Jerusalem, thou wast as one of them, didst as much mischief 
as the Babylonians.f Thou shouldst not have enured into the gate of my 
people in the day of their calamity ; yea, thou shouldst not have looked on 
their affliction (that is, as idle spectators, much less rejoicers in it), nor 
have laid hands on their substance (nor have spoiled them of their goods), 
in the day of their calamity, &c. Therefore is their punishment to a per 
petual ruin, more heavy than any of the rest. Thus now you have also seen 
an end of all these kingdoms that were neighbours about Jerusalem, and how 
they were all reproved, yea, destroyed, upon this quarrel of touching and 
meddling with his anointed, as the text hath it. 

Now, let us go on to the other monarchies, the Persian and the Grecian ; you 
shall see still that the story of them also makes good this great point in hand. 
The Persian and the Grecian both had to do with the church ; but the first 
of these, the Persian, seems rather an instance on the other hand, viz. of the 
welfare and of the raising up of a nation and of a state for the people of God; 
for God hath given some instances of blessing as well as he hath given of ruin. 
The very raising up of Cyrus, and of that monarchy in him, it was for his 
people s sake. The Scripture is express for this ; read Isa. xliv. 28, * Thus 
saith God of Cyrus, He is my shepherd, and shall perform all my pleasure ; 
even saying to Jerusalem, Thou shalt be built ; and to the temple, Thy foun 
dation shall be laid. And go on to chap. xlv. 1, Thus saith the Lord to 
his anointed, to Cyrus, whose right hand I have holden, to subdue nations 
before him, &c. He calls Cyrus his anointed ; he calls Tyre an anointed 
covering cherub also, Ezek. xxviii. ; and no other heathen princes else in all 
the book of God. First, Tyre an anointed cherub, because he was propi 
tious to the Jews, even as the cherub covering the ark.j Then Cyrus was 
anointed ; because, as Sanctius well saith, Non minus studiose res curabat 
Judaicas quam si Jud&orum esset, et non Persarum, imperator. He took as 

* Deut. ii. 4, 5. God said to the Jews, Yon are to pass through the coast of your 
brethren the children of Esau ; meddle not with them, &c. 

t The psalmist also hath it, Ps. cxxxvii. 7. % (Ecolampad. in loc. 



44 THE GREAT INTEREST OF [Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

much care for the people of God, and the building of the temple, as if he 
had been king of Jewry himself. And God calleth him likewise his shepherd, 
even as he had done David, that was to look to his sheep. In the place I 
quoted before concerning the Assyrian and Babylonian kings, Jer. 1., you 
heard how he called them lions, because they scattered the sheep ; so the 
expression is there, but here he calls Cyrus his shepherd, that shall perform 
all his pleasure, and for that end raised him to all this greatness. For for 
whose sake was it he had the nations given him ? Read the fourth verse : 
For Jacob my servant s sake, and Israel mine elect, I have even called thee 
by thy name ; I have surnamed thee, though thou hast not known me ; not. 
for thy sake, but for my people s only. And although for a while some of 
them kings made edicts to interrupt the building of the temple, yet the gene- 
ralit} r of those kings went on in that course of favour which Cyrus had begun, 
and were more favourable to the Jews than all of the other monarchies. 
Darius Histaspis, mentioned Ezra iv. 24, permitted the Jews to go on build 
ing it, as their poverty would suffer them ; and, after another interruption, 
Darius Nothus,* Ezra vi., did put Cyrus his decree in force again, and allows 
the expense of the finishing of it out of his own revenues ; and inserts this in 
his revived decree, that the Jews might pray for the life of the king and of his 
children, ver. 10. They also had of the seed of the Jews great men at court 
with them, as Daniel, Mordecai, Ezra, and Neherniah, the two latter of whom 
were sent by Artaxerxes to build the city of Jerusalem ; yea, and another of 
their kings admitted one of that nation (through the providence of God) to 
the royal bed. Ahasuerus married Esther, of the seed of the Jews, under 
whom, and under othes of these kings, they had the greatest prosperity. 
Now, as this favour to the Jews was the cause of the erecting that monarchy 
at first, so surely of the continuance of it so long. Historians wonder that 
it should stand so long, it being so loose and dissolute a court and state,f 
and having so many great shocks. I can attribute it to nothing but this, 
the eminent favour they shewed to the Jews, the people of God. And I shall 
but cast in this observation more about it : when was it that it came to be 
ruined and destroyed, but in the time of the latter Darius, then when Cyrus 
(who had been God s shepherd) his seed was wholly extinct ? J For though his 
seed by the male issue continued not to a grandchild, yet in the seed of Atossa, 
Cyrus s daughter, wife to Darius Histaspis, the kingdom was continued in 
his race. And to make the providence the more remarkable, whereas Darius 
had sons before by another wife, yet the interest of Atossa for Cyrus s sake, 

* Thus Calvisius, and Master Mede in his account of Daniel s weeks, pages 5-7, 
which doth fall in the best, to accord all the years of Daniel s weeks. But if (as most 
other chronologers) it had been Darius Histaspis that made that decree in Ezra vi. for 
the finishing the temple, then it affords a greater observation to my purpose in hand, 
namely, that God did take away Cambyses, Cyrus his son (whom they would have to 
be that Artaxerxes, Ezra iv., that hindered by force of arms the building the temple 
both in his father s days whilst he was prince of Persia, as Daniel x. 13 he is called, 
or prorex in his father s absence and in his own), and that without issue; and so 
Cyrus s issue male ended, being punished for recalling the favour granted. But Darius 
Histaspis being chosen by the princes, God established the kingdom in him and his 
seed, for his reviving Cyrus his edict. And, however, almost all agree in this, that 
this Darius he hindered it not, but gave liberty for his time ; and is that Darius men 
tioned Ezra iv. 24 (see Mede, Daniel s Weeks, page 7, in his marginal note), whom 
therefore God blessed accordingly ; and yet regarded Cyrus also in this, that by his 
daughter Atossa, wife to this Darius, his race continued. 

f Therefore Daniel compares him to a slow unwieldy ram, as it were heavy with 
wool and flesh, chap. viii. 7. 

+ Diodo. Imitio. lib. vii. 

$ E?xt -TTUV 70 xK7is, says Herodotus of Atossa, giving it as the reason of this suc 
cession. 



PS. CV. 14, 15.] STATES AND KINGDOMS. 45 

carried the succession to Xerxes her son, Cyrus s grandchild. But that last 
Darius, in and with whom that empire was destroyed by Alexander, was of 
another race.* Such regard had God to Cyrus his shepherd, and his seed, 
that favoured the Jews. But then it was, and not afore, that God threw 
down that monarchy, whether for anything done against the people of God 
or no the Scripture is silent. 

Let us come to the Grecian monarchy, for that was the third ; some of 
the story of which you have mentioned in Zech. ix., which is an apparent 
prophecy of the expedition of Alexander; and as a late learned writerf 
rightly saith, you may better know the meaning of the first part of that chap 
ter out of Quintus Curtius and Josephus, than out of most commentators. 
You read there of a prophecy of Tyre, that it must be taken again, so ver. 3. 
Now Zechariah writ after the Babylonish captivity, therefore it is not that 
former taking of Tyre by Nebuchadnezzar, but that latter by Alexander. 
And what he says in the 5th verse of Gaza, and those other cities in Philis- 
tia, Askelon shall not be inhabited, and the cutting off the governor of 
Gaza, Quintus Curtius exactly relates the performance of it, and his cruelty 
therein ; and it is usually noted as the first and greatest act of Alexander s 
degenerating to barbarous inhumanity. Now, all that his rage against all 
those cities that were neighbours to the Jews, was ordered by God, and fore 
told by the prophet, but only to set forth the wonderful care and protection 
of God towards his people, recorded ver. 8, that although Alexander was as 
much incensed against the Jews (for their answer sent him of their resolu 
tion to cleave to Darius, to whom they had sworn), yet as that 8th verse fore 
told, I will encamp about my house, says God, because of the army, be 
cause of him that passeth by, and because of him that returneth. When 
Alexander went by, and when afterwards many other armies went to and fro, 
God still encamped about his house. And though Alexander plundered or 
destroyed all the cities round about, yet still Jerusalem and the temple were 
preserved. Yea, Alexander s heart was so changed (as Esau s), that he went 
in peaceably. And the high priest shewing him the prophecy of Daniel, how 
the king of Grecia, that is, himself, should overcome the king of Persia, he 
was thereby encouraged to the conquest of the king of Persia, and not only 
spared them, but gave many immunities to the Jews ; and in that his expe 
dition against Darius prospered accordingly. 

Now that monarchy thus raised by him was divided into four parts, Dan. 
viii. 22, all which are accounted to make up that Grecian monarchy.* 
And in the latter end of their kingdom, says the 23d verse, when the 
transgressions are come to the full, that is, when God meant to begin to 
break it, and to put a period to it, and to reckon with them for their 
other sins. This his wonted design sets his providence a-work, that they 
should fall foul upon his people, and so be broken, as the former had 
been ; and eminently, and above the rest, you have a little horn arising, 
Antiochus, the successor of one of them (the story is clear in Dan. viii.), who 
magnified himself against the people of God, the daily sacrifice, against 
the truth, &c. ver. 11, 12, and in this God laid the foundation not only of 
his ruin, but of the rest of the Grecian monarchy. This I might shew out 
of Dan. ver. 25, * He shall be broken without hand, &c. ; but I will rather 
do it out of the 9th of Zechariah (having already begun with that, and 
shewed out of it the rise and proceedings of that monarchy in the first 

* Alexander the Great, in his letters to Darius, and his speech to his soldiers 
against Darius, affirms it. Arrianus. Curtius, lib. vi. as also Justin. 

t D. Jackson, 8th Book of Commentaries on the Creed, sect. iii. cap. xvii. 
J Joseph. Antiq. Jud. lib. xi. 



46 THE GREAT INTEREST OF [Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

horn thereof, Alexander) ; let us see what it says of the ruin of it, in that 
which follows : ver. 13, When I have bent Judah for me, and filled the 
bow with Ephraim (it is an elegant similitude), and raised up thy sons, 
Zion, against thy sons, Greece, and made thee as the sword of a mighty 
man : and the Lord shall be seen over them, and his arrow shall go forth 
as the lightning, &c. Here the Grecian monarchy, in the last remainders 
of it (the kings of Egypt and Syria, the Longidae and Seleucidae, who both 
oppressed the Jews, being therefore called Greece,* because they were the 
successors of it), is ruined : and by whom ? Even by the people of the 
Jews, or for their sakes. God raised up the sons of Sion against these 
4 sons of Greece ; God made Judah his bow, and Ephraim his arrows (and 
when God himself will be the archer, weak arrows and instruments will do 
wonders). And besides, that for their sakes God used miraculous and won 
derful ways to ruin these enemies, the Lord shall be seen over them, 1 &c., 
ver. 14. God used the Jews themselves, the Maccabees, to vindicate them 
selves against these relics of the Grecian empire, as the story in the book of 
the Maccabees shews plainly (as interpreters upon the text have observed), 
and particularly how Antiochus came to his end. And afterwards the ruin 
of the whole by the Romans, it was for the Jews sake, and their quarrel, 
and at their prayer ; it was by Ephraim being his arrow, and Judah his bow, 
and God himself appearing from heaven against them. So then here the 
Grecian monarchy is likewise broken upon the Jews. And thus we have 
done with the Old Testament. 

Now let us come to the New Testament. There was, first, the Jewish state ; 
and, secondly, there was the Roman empire. Our Lord and Saviour Jesus 
Christ, who was the eminent anointed one, he comes obscurely, and, as it 
were, stealing into the world, who was to be King of all the world, in the 
days of him who laid the first sure foundation and settlement of the Roman 
empire, namely, Augustus ; and he comes to his own, to the people of the 
Jews, over whom the Romans having the power, and a president amongst 
them, our Saviour came to have to do at once with both these states. 

And first for the Jews. Because that which befell that state for their deal 
ing with Christ and his disciples, is the leading case of the New Testament, 
as what was done to these kings and nations here in the text, and in the 
story of Genesis, for their carriage towards Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, was 
the leading case of the Old, I will therefore begin therewith, and spend a 
little time in the opening of it, so far as it concerns the point in hand. 

And now you shall see that nation and state, of which hitherto you have 
heard, that it had been for the rising or falling of all the monarchies, and 
also lesser kingdoms round about it, itself to be the first of all other that 
was broken and ruined under the New Testament, as an example to all the 
rest that follow ; and broken not upon another whole nation like itself, but 
upon a few, and a very few anointed ones in that nation, namely, our Lord 
and his disciples : God altering now the way of his dispensation under the 
New Testament, using but a few saints in nations (which is the most glo 
rious) to effect the same design he did before by that whole nation of the 
Jews under the Old : Rev. v. 9, He hath redeemed us (say they) out of 
all nations (who are to him a royal nation, typified out by that whole nation 
of Jews), whom now he maketh to be to all kingdoms (where they are 
found), either a stone of stumbling, whereby they shall be broken, or a 
sure basis and foundation of their welfare, according to their usage of them. 

* They are called Greece, as the king of Persia is called king of Ashur, Ezra 
vi. 22 ; and as Cyrus, Ezra v. 13, and Artaxerxes, Neh. x. 6, are called kings of Babel, 
because successors to these kings. 



PS. CV. 14, 15.] STATES AND KINGDOMS. 47 

1 How the Jews used Christ and his disciples, we all know. The interest 
of that nation, wherein stood it ? Not so much to have entertained Christ 
for their temporal king, he avoided that ; hut to have received him for their 
Messiah, and anointed Saviour. And that this was the interest of the nation 
and its welfare, is clear hy that speech of Christ, Luke xix. 42, Oh that thou 
hadst known, in this thy day, the things that belong unto thy peace ! he 
therein intending as well the temporal peace of that nation, as the eternal 
peace of their souls. As Tyre had stood to that day if they had repented 
(as Christ speaks), so had Jerusalem also if they had known and kept to this 
their interest. But they were so far from doing this, that they clean diverted 
from it, and took up other worldly and politic interests of their own, to save 
themselves by, which were their ruin. Yea (which I beseech you mark and 
observe), the Lord did order it so in his providence, that even reason of 
state, and a worldly cross interest to this should be the chief motive to 
them of crucifying Christ, and so of the final desolation of that nation. For 
which, consult first the llth of John, ver. 49, 50 ; say they (generally), * If 
we let him thus alone, all men will believe on him, and the Romans will 
come and take away both our place and nation. And what saith the great 
high priest further upon it ? Ye know nothing at all, nor consider that it 
is expedient for us, that one man should die for the people, and that the 
whole nation perish not. And although this is there said to be spoken as 
a prophecy (God guiding his mouth therein), yet withal, if you look into 
the 18th of John, ver. 14, it is charged upon him to have been a wicked 
counsel given (take it as it was intended by him), for there he is branded, 
This is that Caiaphas that gave counsel to the Jews, that it was expedient 
that one man should die for the people. How it might be both these, as 
directed by God, and intended by him, would be too long to shew. But 
take it as it thus came from him, and he takes on him as high priest to 
speak as a deep oracle of state, and to utter a state maxim, with slighting of 
his fellows, You know nothing, and his maxim follows, Better that one man, 
who is not considerable, be taken away, than a nation perish. And yet he 
therein had an eye to the priest s interest, that is, of himself and his fellows, 
to keep up their honour, as well as to the preservation of the nation, though 
he colours it over with that of the whole nation. For, in John xi. 50, the 
words are, It is expedient for us (namely, priests), that one man should 
die for the people. They were jealous of Christ getting the people from 
them. You shall likewise find, that when the matter was brought to Pilate, 
it was state interest also caused Pilate to come off to condemn him : The 
Jews cried out, If thou let this man go, thou art not Caasar s friend : who 
soever maketh himself a king, speaketh against Ca3sar. And the text adds, 
* When Pilate therefore heard that saying, he sat down and condemned him, 
John xix. 12, 13. When I read and considered this story, it made me 
understand that, in 1 Cor. ii. 6, * We speak not the wisdom of this world, 
nor of the princes of this world, that comes to nought ; but we speak the 
wisdom of God in a mystery, which none of the princes of this world knew ; 
for had they known it, they would not have crucified the Lord of glory. He 
speaks of these very princes, the rulers of the Jews, and of Pilate ; and the 
Holy Ghost, you see, maketh the very same observation upon it that I have 
now done to you. They thought themselves wise, and they went upon axioms 
of state in doing of it ; but had they known their interest, they would never 
have crucified the Lord of glory. And the apostle, you see, gives this as the 
greatest and most eminent instance of the folly of state policy which often 
princes take up against Christ, and the wisdom of the gospel, the true wisdom. 
And it is farther observable to this purpose, what likewise the apostle saith 



48 THE GREAT INTEREST OF [Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

in the following chap. iii. 17, applying the same in substance which he 
here had observed upon their crucifying Christ, unto the defiling or destroy 
ing the church of God, the saints, which is the point in hand, whom Christ 
hath left behind him, out of the like carnal wisdom and worldly policy : If 
any man defile or destroy the temple of God, him shall God destroy : for 
the temple of God is holy, which temple are ye. Let no man deceive him 
self. If any man among you seemeth to be wise in this world, let him 
become a fool that he may be wise ; for the wisdom of this world is foolish 
ness with God ; for it is written, He taketh the wise in their own craftiness. 
As God caught those Jewish princes and priests in their own craftiness against 
Christ, so he will forever do those that offer violence to his saints, especially 
when out of state and worldly interests. That these Jews were taken in their 
own craftiness, if it needed, might largely be shewn ; the thing they feared 
and avoided was brought upon them : the Romans came and took away their 
place and nation to this day ; yea, and it was greatly occasioned by the same 
motive which in policy they embraced, whereby to avoid it.* For as the 
rising of many false Christs was the curse of that nation for refusing the true, 
and is made the sign of their destruction by our Saviour, Mat. xxiv., so it 
was the Jews proneness to believe that their Messiah should come about that 
time, and deliver them from the Roman yoke, that the more encouraged them 
in their rebellion and revolt from the Romans, which occasioned their utter 
destruction by them. And so Tacitus, yea, and Josephus also, did thereupon 
interpret that Jewish prophecy, of the king of the world to come out of Jewry, 
of Vespasian himself, that was the destroyer of them (he coming a victor out 
of Jewry, who was Lord of the world), God thus retorting out of the mouths 
of these two witnesses, a heathen and a Jew, their former sin in rejecting 
their natural Lord, the true king (indeed) of all the world, his Son. Thus 
returning, I say, with the highest reproof upon these Jews, by this, that that 
emperor of Romef (their enemy and destroyer, together with his sonj) 
should obtain and carry away the repute of that prophecy (they relied upon, 
too late), and this because they came out of Judea, from the executing that 
vengeance the Jews had by this brought upon their own heads ; this having 
been manifestly the destruction of that nation, and being likewise the pattern 
of the New Testament. Give me leave to give you this further observation 
by the way about it : that God disposed in his providence so, that all states 
and sorts of men among them should have their hands in it, because God s 
purpose is not to destroy any nation for his people s sake, till all sorts therein 

* It is the interpretation of Dr Jackson, which, because it openeth a scripture, I 
will give in his own words : Out of this undoubted pre-notion, that this was the very 
time wherein the Lord had promised to deliver this people from the hands of their 
enemies, they became so prone (as the event proves they were) to take arms and rebel 
against the liomans, partly about the time of our Saviour s birth, but especially after 
his resurrection. There was no man of great might or potency among them, which 
did not take upon him to promise this people s deliverance from the Eoman yoke ; 
and the multitude were as prone to believe every one that would take upon him the 
name and title of a saviour, or deliverer. The foresight of this proneness in great 
ones to promise salvation to this people, and the people s proneness to believe them, 
did occasion our Saviour to give those admonitions to his disciples, Beware of false 
Christs, Mat. xxiv. 4, Mark xiii. 6, Luke xxi. 6, which would arise in Jewry before the 
destruction of Jerusalem, with such fair enticing promises and pretences of deliverance, 
that if it had been possible, the very elect should have been deceived by them. (In a 
sermon upon Luke xxi. 25.) 

t Vespasian. + Titus. 

t His blood be upon us and our children, said they, who had formerly said of the 
greatest kingdoms in their ruins, My blood upon Chaldea, shall Jerusalem say, Jer. 
li. 35. 



PS. CV. 14, 15. J STATES AND KINGDOMS. 49 

concur in their ill using of them. The second Psalm prophesying of the 
crucifying of Christ, says, that the heathen, the people, the kings of the 
earth, the rulers, took counsel against the Lord s anointed, which the 
apostles in their prayer (of which by and by), Acts iv. 27, interpret, * That 
Herod, Pontius Pilate, with the Gentiles, and the people of Israel, were 
gathered together against his child Jesus. Both the ecclesiastical and the 
civil state among the Jews concurred in it : the Sanhedrim first, and elders 
of the people ; and they with much ado persuade the people (the chief priests 
and elders persuaded the multitude, Mat. xxvii. 10) ; and when that was 
with difficulty done, it was long ere Pilate did consent ; he kept off and 
washed his hands, though the people, priests and all, sought to him ; but in 
the end yielded. And what was the reason Pilate came in at length also ? 
Because God would have the Roman empire (which he meant to break upon 
Christ and his saints as the former), to be wound in, even in the guilt of 
Christ s blood, and to embrue their hands in it, as Pilate the Roman go 
vernor did by his sentence, and the Roman soldiers by execution. And 
therefore we find, Rev. xi. 8, Rome to be called the city where our Lord was 
crucified, because by the power and jurisdiction of that state, that so the 
blood of all, yea, even of Christ himself, might be found in her at her 
destruction, Rev. xviii. 24. 

But to proceed in this Jewish story. When our Lord was ascended, 
we read, Acts iv., that when Peter and John were preaching to the people, 
the priests and the captain of the temple, and the Sadducees, came upon 
them, ver. 1. And they laid hands on them, and put them in hold, 
ver. 8. And then, ver. 23, they being let go (only with threatening to 
speak no more in his name) they went to their own company, and there they 
went to prayer. And what do they urge to God but the second Psalm, and 
spread that before him, merely upon this occasion that they were fallen upon, 
and interrupted in his worship, and threatened to preach no more in that 
name, which they, being the relicts of Christ left behind him here, were to 
hold forth. They prayed over with one accord the second Psalm, Lord, 
thou art God, which hast made heaven and earth, who by the mouth of thy 
servant David hast said, Why did the heathen rage, and the people imagine 
vain things ? The kings of the earth stood up, and the rulers were gathered 
together against the Lord, and against his Christ. For of a truth against thy 
holy child Jesus, whom thou hast anointed, (and now anointed with the oil of 
gladness above his fellows), both Herod and Pontius Pilate, with the Gentiles, 
and the people of Israel, were gathered together, &c. These his disciples, 
being his fellows in his anointing, did accordingly, as you here see, interest 
their cause in his, by putting God in mind what they did unto their Lord, in 
crucifying him, to provoke him thereby to consider what was now done to 
themselves by the rulers, scribes, and elders, priests, and band of the 
temple, ver. 1-5. 

Well, still the Jews go on, and follow the same trade as our Saviour 
Christ, in Luke xxi. 10, 11, foretold his disciples that they should ; and 
withal, he foretold them that there should be wars upon this, and commo 
tions, nation rising against nation, &c. Before all these (says Christ) they 
shall lay their hands on you, and persecute you, delivering you up to the 
synagogues, and into prison, being brought before kings and rulers for my 
name s sake : our Saviour therein shewing that this persecution of the 
saints should be the cause of all these wars, and so of that nation s ruin, as 
well as his own death, so involving his cause and theirs together. But they, 
as afore the wars, so after the wars, and during the time of them, Christ 

VOL. XII. D 



50 THE GREAT INTEREST OF [Ps. CY. 14, 15. 

says, should go on, and take no warning ; this you find in Mat. xxiv. 7-9 
verses compared, And this (says Christ there) shall be a testimony unto 
you. 

Now that second Psalm, whither the apostles have brought us, and which 
the apostles in the beginning of the gospel prayed thus over against the 
Jews, was by the Holy Ghost intended against all nations and kingdoms 
that should in like manner deal injuriously with the saints, as the Jews had 
done with Christ, to the end of the world, so making this instance the pat 
tern and example to the rest. In the next words, if you read on, you find a 
solemn inauguration of Christ as king now when ascended into heaven, * I 
have set my King on my holy hill, with a proclamation and declaration of 
God s decree, and great design under the New Testament, to be effected and 
accomplished by this his new king set up : I will declare the decree, &c., 
ver. 7, which, as a preface, refers to all that follows, and is in effect no other 
than the same you have all this while heard out of the Old. He gives Christ 
as a boon, upon his inauguration, all the kingdoms of the world : I will 
give thee (saith he) the heathen for thine inheritance, and the utmost parts 
of the earth for thy possession. What to do ? Either to break them, or 
convert them. Thou shalt bruise them with a rod of iron, and dash them 
in pieces like a potter s vessel. And this drift the apostles well knew, and 
therefore pertinently urged it in their prayer to God against the Jews, which 
prayer of theirs had a concurrent influence into their ruin. Now, as the 
destruction of Jerusalem is made by Christ the fore- running type of the end 
of the world, so the destruction of that nation for these their doings to 
Christ and his apostles, and their followers, is an example to all kingdoms 
that shall do the like afterwards unto the saints ; for which Christ hath and 
will break them also. Therefore, how ends the Psalm ? Be wise, ye kings, 
and instructed, ye judges of the earth, &c. That is in effect, All ye states 
and princes of the world, learn to know this your interest. Although this 
might be enough in the general for the whole New Testament, 

Yet come we to the Roman empire. The book of the Revelation is a pro 
phecy of the destruction of that empire, either as heathenish in the whole, or else 
when Christian (yet persecuting then) in both the parts of it, east and west. 
That book is a tragi-comedy, which begins with a kingdom given to be won 
by conquest,* and ends with the coronation of a king, and the marriage of 
his bride ; and all between is but the removing of all such lets and impedi 
ments, namely, of the Roman monarchy, and all other kingdoms which that 
was broken into, so far as they stand in his way, and possess the room of 
that kingdom which he is to set up. That this is one main argument of 
that book, I refer you to what that great and learned interpreter, Master 
Mede, hath largely opened. 

And herein Christ, when he first began (the whole world then worshipping 
idols) had work enough to do. He sets first upon conquering the whole 
Roman empire, as it was heathenish, and the worship of Satan and idols in 
it, and in three hundred years he despatcheth that, and throws down all 
both idol worship, and princes that did uphold it. This the first six seals 
do shew, chapter vi. ; and then when the whole empire was turned Chris 
tian, yet (as one well said) the devil did not turn Christian ; but under the 
name and profession of Christ, he stirreth up the Arian Christian world to 
persecute the orthodox Christians as much as heathenish Rome had done. 
But Christ takes farther vengeance for this persecution under both these, 

* Eev. vi. 8, when the seals begin to be opened, Christ goes forth conquering and 
to conquer. 



PS. CV. 14, 15.] STATES AND KINGDOMS. 51 

heathenish and Arian Rome.* The empire having been divided afore into 
two parts, the eastern (all which now the Turk possesseth) and the western, 
this in Europe, he falls first upon the western European part, breaking that 
by the incursion of those barbarous nations the Goths and Vandals, and this 
the four first trumpets do sound forth, chapter viii. Then for the eastern part 
of the empire (although his revenge was slower), yet he reserved them to the 
sorest vengeance that could befall the Christian world, chapter ix., the con 
quest and tyranny of the Saracens first, and afterwards the Turks, and 
these the fifth and sixth trumpets successively held forth. Thus here is an 
end of the Roman monarchy under the emperors, in the whole, and in the 
parts of it. The western part in Europe was, by occasion of the Goths in 
vasion, broken into ten kingdoms, chapter xii, which though helping the 
woman against the flood of Arian persecution, yet (through Satan s seducing 
of them) they set up the beast, or antichristian Rome, and these altogether 
did join together to make as great a war against the saints in the 13th 
chapter, as the heathens and Arians had done. And so Christ was in a manner 
as far off his kingdom as at the first. What then is the next great counter 
plot of Jesus Christ ? It is to overcome these ten kingdoms ; so you find, 
Rev. xvii. 14, They shall (saith he) make war with the Lamb, and the 
Lamb shall overcome them : for he is Lord of lords, and King of kings ; and 
they that are with him are called, and chosen, and faithful. The world, 
though turned Christian, yet in all the variations of it goes on still to per 
secute the saints. For why ? The world will be the world still, and the devil, 
who is the prince of the world, is the same still, and so he still follows that 
trade he had formerly practised, the same which you read of chapter xii. 
verse 17, even to make war with the remnant of the woman s seed, which 
keep the commandments of God, and have the testimony of Jesus. This 
is his design ; and let the world turn never so much, and refine as much as 
it will, Satan endeavours still to form a party up amongst them, whom he 
turns against the saints (or some of the saints), for that is the great interest 
of his kingdom (as that place shews) ; it is more to persecute the saints, 
than to carry men on to sin. And he will be content to fall but upon a few 
sometimes, rather than be put out of this his trade. And therefore now 
besides plain popery, which is prophesied of in 1 Tim. iv., to arise in the 
latter days, you have in 2 Tim. iii. 1 another prophecy of a sort of men 
that shall arise in the last days (popery is prophesied of to be in the latter 
days), who shall have a form of godliness, and be despisers of them that 
are good. Thus the devil hath carried on his design age after age, and 
Jesus Christ pursues more closely his great design also, and will never leave 
till he hath overcome ; and he shall overcome, for he is the King of kings, 
and those that are with him are called chosen and faithful. And all this 
(if it were not the scope of that book of the Revelation) yet story would 
make good. Why should I instance in more ? You know the little stone, 
Christ and his saints, shall dash all in pieces, Dan. ii. But enough. 

You have heard the truth of this point exemplified by all these instances. 
As for reasons of it, the Scripture affords a far greater plenty than of in 
stances, and in many of the instances given you may find reasons adjoined 
by God himself: as here in the text, they are God s anointed; in that ex 
ample of Egypt s overthrow, God s first-born ; in that of Babel s, it was the 
vengeance of God s temple, and so on. The time will give me leave to 
single out but a very few of many. The doctrine was this, that the greatest 

* It was the cry of the blood of the saints slain under both, that brought on them 
the vengeance that followed. See chapter vi. 10, 11. 



52 THE GREAT INTEREST OF [Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

interest of all states and princes lies in their usage of the saints ; to deal ill 
or well with them is that whereon their misery or welfare doth depend. 

Reason 1. One reason of it is (that which should indeed have been my 
first observation out of the text, viz.), the nearness and dearness of the 
saints to God. You see how tender he is of them, Touch them not. If you 
would understand the tenderness of God s heart expressed in that word, 
parallel it with that, * He that toucheth them toucheth the apple of mine 
eye, and you have the expression twice, Ps. xvii. 8 and Zech. ii. 8. There 
is nothing more dear than the eye, you would have pulled out your eyes, 
says Paul, and of the eye the pupa, the black of the eye most. When the 
Ammonites required of the men of Jabesh-Gilead that they should thrust 
out all their right eyes, 1 Sam. xi. 2, the text saith, ver. 6, that when Saul 
heard of it, * the Spirit of God came upon him, and his anger was greatly 
kindled, and he went and cut them off and scattered them, so that not 
two of them were left together. If Saul, their king, a tyrannical king, was 
thus moved for this offer of an injury to the eyes of his subjects, much more 
God for those who are to him as his own eye, yea, as the apple of it ; or if 
you will have this reason in an expression more nearly akin to the doctrine 
itself, they are dearer to God than nations simply considered. The reason 
is strong, that therefore the interest of all nations must needs lie in these 
saints : Isa. xliii. 3, 4, I gave Egypt for thy ransom, Ethiopia and Seba 
for thee. Since thou wast precious in my sight, thou hast been honourable, 
and I have loved thee : therefore will I give men for thee, and people for 
thy life. Thus he valued them under the Old Testament. But did he give 
nations for them then ? They have cost him more since, they have cost him 
the blood of his Son. He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him 
up for us, how shall he not with him freely give us all things? Rom. viii. 32. 
All things are theirs, the world, &c., because they are Christ s. Look what 
reasons the Old Testament gives of this point in hand from their nearness 
to God, the New Testament useth the same. They are my first-born, 
said God to the kingdom of Egypt, and therefore I will take away thy 
first-born. The New Testament speaks the same ; they are the * church of 
the first-born, written in heaven, Heb. xii. 23. Was it the vengeance of 
the temple was Babel s overthrow ? The New Testament utters the same, 
and to the same purpose, If any man destroys the temple of God, him 
shall God destroy : for the temple of God is holy, which temple are ye, 
1 Cor. iii. 17. Again, Israel is holiness to the Lord, the first-fruits of his 
increase : and therefore all that devour him shall offend (offend greatly) ; 
* and evil shall come upon them, saith the Lord, Jer. ii. 3. Thus speaks 
the Old Testament. The same reason and expressions are given, you see, 
in the New : The temple of God is holy, and they are the first-fruits of all 
his creatures, James i. 18 ; These are the redeemed from among men, 
and the first-fruits to God and the Lamb, and therefore prevail, Rev. xiv. 4. 
And as because they are thus dear to God, therefore if they be dealt ill 
withal, it is the cause of the ruin of a nation ; so on the contrary likewise, 
if a nation deal well with them, it is a cause of his blessing upon them, yea, 
he doth give nations and states their being for their sakes. They are a 
blessing in the midst of the land, Isa. xix. 24, insomuch as God spareth 
the tree for a small bunch of grapes (so he compareth his people in re 
spect of the rest of a nation) ; Destroy it not, for there is a blessing in 
it, Isa. Ixv. 8, or rather as the same Isaiah ; they are to the whole tree 
(the nation they live in) what the pith, the heart, the substance is. As an 
oak whose substance is in them when they cast their leaves, so the holy seed 
(the saints) shall be the substance of it, Isa. vi. 13 ; that preserves life in a 



PS. CV. 14, IS.] STATES AND KINGDOMS. 53 

nation when the branches of it are hewn, or it casts its leaves. These things 
are spoken in relation to their being the cause of the preservation of a nation 
in both these places. Saints that are as strangers to a nation, and only 
make it their refuge, yet their presence is in such a case a preservation to 
them. Moab (says God), Met mine outcasts dwell with thee, and be thou 
a covert to them, Isa. xvi. 4 ; and ver. 5, And in mercy shall the throne 
be established. But much more native saints procure this blessing, their 
relation being nearer and dearer. * Of Sion it shall be said, This and that 
man was born in her ; and what follows ? * The Highest himself shall esta 
blish her, Ps. Ixxxvii. 3. 

Reason 2. Secondly, Another reason is taken from the great interest the 
saints have in God the governor, and the privilege which themselves have 
vouchsafed them by God in ruling and governing this world, and the provi 
dences of God therein. They are privy councillors to the great King of 
kings, who governs all the states and kingdoms in the world, and God doth 
give these his saints a commission to set up and pull down by their prayers 
and intercessions. The Old Testament speaks in a high language in Isaiah 
xlv. 11 (I might have quoted it before, for it comes in as the reason of God s 
setting up Cyrus for his people s sake), Ask me of things to come concern 
ing my sons, and concerning the work of my hands command ye me. Who 
speaks this ? The words afore are, Thus saith the Lord, the Holy One of 
Israel, and his Maker. It would have been blasphemy for us to have said 
it, but that the Lord himself first hath said it, and given them this privi 
lege, * Concerning the work of my hands command ye me ; and which makes 
it the more observable, before he doth in this place mentioned confer this 
honour and privilege upon them, he first (as on purpose) minds them of 
that infinite distance and disproportion betwixt himself and them (so to 
put the more wonder upon it) ; he tells them, ver. 9, 10, that they were but 
the clay, he the potter, that could not (therefore of right) say so much unto 
him about his matters as, Why madest thou me thus ? Yet behold, I that 
am thus your maker, give you leave to dispose by your prayers the great 
works of my hands, which concern my children, my sons, the affairs of king 
doms, even so far as they relate to their good. And he speaks it upon this 
occasion, that for their sakes he had raised up Cyrus, and pulled down the 
Babylonian monarchy, because they by their prayers had sought this. They 
are said elsewhere to decree a thing, so Job, chap. xxii. 28, and to bring 
it to pass ; and God is said to fulfil their counsels, Ps. xx. And this inte 
rest they have either for good or evil to the nations they live in : first, for 
evil ; thus, Eev. xi. 6, the two witnesses have power to smite the earth 
with plagues as oft as they will ; and if any man will hurt them in this 
manner, he shall be killed, that is, with the highest and sorest vengeance, 
and God avengeth them speedily, Luke xviii. 8. And so for blessing, 
1 the innocent delivers the island through the pureness of his hands, Job 
xx. 80. Thus one righteous Lot was (for the present) the cause of the 
rescue of the Sodomites, the wickedest people in the world, and afterwards 
ordained to the greatest judgment. 

Reason 3. A third reason is the interest of Jesus Christ himself. And to shew 
that he is King, even King of kings, and hath a kingdom ordained to him and his 
saints, supreme to all theirs in the mean while, his design and practice is, 
and hath been, to break all kingdoms that do oppose him or oppress his 
saints. This reason I might enlarge out of Daniel : * The God of heaven 
shall set up a kingdom, which shall break in pieces and consume all these 
kingdoms, but it shall stand for ever, chap. ii. 44 and chap. vii. ; but I shall 
insist (in this head of reasons) only upon that eminent title of Christ s (which 



54 THE GREAT INTEREST OP [Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

holds forth this his interest), that he is entitled King of saints, Rev. xv. 3 ; 
which title is there given him, as in relation to the setting up his worship, 
so to the overthrowing and overcoming the nations that do oppose his saints, 
and this by the seven vials which their prayers have filled. And at that 
time (it is likewise there said) he doth marvellous works, being King of saints. 
In the Old Testament he is called the King of nations (though he was King 
of saints also then), so Jer. x. 7 ; and he gave demonstration of it to pur 
pose, by setting up that one nation of the Jews which he had chosen of all 
nations, that that one nation should ruin all the nations round about them : 
for he was peculiarly their king, and the king of all those other nations also. 
But now he hath scattered his saints in and through all nations ( Thou hast 
redeemed us out of all nations, that is the language of the New Testament), 
he is therefore therein called King of saints ; he carrying on the same design 
by those saints which he did before, and is as able to make it good, he being 
no less King of nations still, or Lord Almighty (as you have it in that fore- 
cited place). And he being thus peculiarly their King, his interest is to 
maintain, defend, and take part with them against all those that do malign 
them, as he did the nation of the Jews. It is his title, and his most royal 
title, and the greatest title, that he is King of saints ; he preferreth it to his 
title of being King of nations ; that vanisheth, and is not mentioned in com 
parison. This, therefore, answerably must be his greatest interest, which of 
all other he now pursueth. And therefore, if all those nations in which his 
saints are do not bow to it, and comply with it, he will shew himself that he 
is King of saints, and of nations also, by ruining of them. As the greatest 
interest of the devil s kingdom is to persecute those that keep the command 
ments of Jesus, so it is the greatest interest of the kingdom of Jesus Christ 
to preserve his saints, and to confound those that injure them, for he is the 
King of saints. And further, in the Old Testament, when this his kingdom 
was farther off and longer to come, and yet you have seen how strongly he 
drove on this design then ; but in the New Testament he is ascended, and 
personally as man invested into it : We see Jesus crowned with glory and 
honour (saith the apostle, Heb. ii., whose faith was as real in this as our 
sight can be), and he sits there expecting, as thinking the time long, * till all 
his enemies are subdued, Heb. x. 13 ; which the same apostle elsewhere 
interpreteth (and therein speaks home to the point in hand), the putting 
down * all rule and dominion that are opposite to his saints, 1 Cor. xv., 
24th and 25th verses compared. And accordingly in all those psalms, 
wherever his ascension and investiture into his kingdom at God s right hand 
is prophesied of, there the ruin or conversion of kings and kingdoms are also 
spoken and prophesied of. Read Ps. ii., Ps. Ixviii., and Ps. ex. And let me 
add this to all : that as the shorter time Satan hath, the more is his rage, 
so the shorter time Christ hath, and the nearer he is to the possession of his 
kingdom, the more is his zeal for his saints, and indignation against his 
enemies. His heart is set upon it, and the more eager doth his desire be 
come every day to attain his long-expected kingdom, and to throw down all that 
oppose it ; and therefore it is that we see in this latter age he hath made such 
changes in the world. We have seen him do that in a few years that he hath 
not done in an hundred years before ; for he being King of nations, and King 
of saints, he pursues his interest ; and being more near his kingdom, he takes 
it with violence. We are now within the whirl of it, therefore his motions 
are rapt. Hence, therefore, all states and kingdoms had need now (of all 
times else) to be instructed ; and accordingly comply with this interest of 
Christ, it is more especially now than ever their greatest interest. It is well 



PS. CV. 14, 15.] STATES AND KINGDOMS. 55 

for us that Jesus Christ is our king, who is the King of kings and King of 
saints ; and withal, that he is so near the enjoyment of his kingdom. 

Application. I shall now come to a word of application, which I shall 
despatch exceeding briefly. In those fore-rehearsed instances I have carried 
you over, and given you a prospect of all kingdoms throughout the story of 
the Bible, and at last I brought you and set you down, and left you in the 
times of these ten kingdoms of Europe, of which the Holy Ghost hath prophe 
sied, Rev. xvii. 14 : These (saith he) shall make war with the Lamb, and 
the Lamb shall overcome them : for he is the Lord of hosts, and King of kings ; 
and they that are with him are called, and chosen, and faithful. And, it is 
certain, we are in the last times of these kingdoms, and we all here live in 
one of them. But a word of encouragement and direction to those of this 
kingdom. 

1. Encouragement. You have heard in those words I last read, the greatest 
security that any kingdoms can have in these times : for first, in the general, 
this text holds forth plainly that Jesus Christ by virtue of his being King of 
kings, and being King of saints (as you heard even now), he will overcome 
and subdue these kingdoms to himself, and yet (for our encouragement) not 
so as to destroy them. Why ? Because these kingdoms, as such, shall de 
stroy the whore ; and therefore shall not be overcome by way of desolation, 
but by way of a more happy conquest of reformation and conversion. Thus 
the text seems clearly to speak : For the ten horns (which are these ten 
kingdoms) shall hate the whore, and make her desolate, and burn her with 
fire, verse 16. As I have therefore thought this text to be a bar to the pro 
jected Spanish monarchy, over them, even then when it was in the greatest 
height, and in most probability to have carried it ; so the greatest security 
for continuance and preservation of these kingdoms, because they must re 
main ten kings or supreme states and kingdoms, until the whore is burnt, 
for they must destroy her. And first, for their number, ten : it is true, they 
have indeed been more, yet never fewer, since the breaking of the Roman 
empire. And when it is said ten kings, it is not necessarily to be under 
stood there should be so many monarchs always (in a strict sense as we use 
the phrase), for in the language of this book kings is put for supreme states. 
Thus Rome is said to have had seven kings, and yet five of those govern 
ments were not monarchical. These kingdoms may fall one upon another ; 
there may be civil broils, and divisions, and distractions, and thereby they 
may be sorely punished, as we have been, for dealing ill with the saints. 
Likewise, two may be joined into one, and one may be broken into two, so 
they have varied in several times and ages, yet still they have stood, and at 
the least the number of ten hath been kept up ; and though they have made 
war against the Lamb, and have been punished for so doing, yet the Lamb 
shall overcome them another way than by destroying them, even by winning 
ground upon them : so as where you see Jesus Christ hath took footing in 
any one of these kingdoms by such a way of conquest (as in ours he hath 
done a second time for double security), stand that kingdom shall till you 
see Rome down. 

Now the next thing I desire you to take notice of in the words is, the rea 
son why that Christ will thus overcome them, and preserve them. For (says 
the Holy Ghost) those that are with him (namely, in these ten kingdoms, and 
so members thereof), are called, and faithful, and chosen. Therefore it is 
that the Lamb shall work these kingdoms about, and win ground upon them, 
and shall cause them at length to hate the whore, and therefore they shall 
stand till the whore be ruined, and how long after, he only knows that hath 
set them up. 



56 THE GEEAT INTEREST OF [Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

It hath been one great outward evidence to my faith, of the truth of the 
New Testament, that what was in particular foretold in this book so dis 
tinctly, should so come to pass as we see it hath done. When John wrote 
this prophecy, there were none of all these kingdoms set up, the empire was 
not broken. You see the empire hath been broken into these kingdoms, and 
they have given their power to the beast ; and we know how rooted the 
power of the beast once was in all these kingdoms, so as, who could make 
war with the beast ? Yet we have likewise seen the Lamb hath overcome 
many of them, especially these northern kingdoms, where he hath set up 
his temple. He hath overcome them, and he wins ground upon us every 
day, and works us up age after age to a farther reformation, to more light 
and holiness, and so he will do till he hath perfectly overcome every popish 
principle out of them. We see all this done ; we see likewise all these king 
doms stand, and not subdued to any one civil monarchy over them all. We 
see Rome prophesied of in this book, Rev. xvii. 18, yet standing and pos 
sessing some of these kingdoms. We see likewise multitudes of faithful 
called and chosen, whom God hath raised up in these kingdoms to oppose 
the whore. All these things we have seen fulfilled ; therefore I believe this 
shall be fulfilled too, that these kingdoms shall still continue, where God 
hath faithful, called, and chosen, and that they shall be the ruin of the whore 
in the end. Having seen and believed so far, we may very well trust him 
for the rest. This for the general. 

More particularly, to you of this kingdom we live in. If you would yet 
know and be confirmed in what is your greatest interest, this text speaks 
more punctually to the point, and it holds forth, by way of prophecy, thus 
much to you, that your interest lies (as you are one of these ten kingdoms) 
in what I have hitherto told you, even in your faithful, called, and chosen. 
And let me speak this for your peculiar encouragement farther : that look as 
where God doth give a command with a reason, upon whom the reason falls 
most strongly, there is the greatest obligation ; so where God gives a pro 
mise, and gives it with a reason, where most of the reason is found true, 
there certainly the promise will take place most in the fulfilling of it. Now, 
upon what hath he put the standing of these kingdoms, and their being thus 
overcome by the Lamb, and that they shall hate the whore, so as to de 
stroy her in the end ? It lieth, you see, in this, that they that * are with 
the Lamb are faithful, called, and chosen. He puts the very reason of it 
upon this, The Lamb shall overcome them : for (saith he) they that are 
with him are called, and chosen, and faithful. Now, look[upon this isle in which 
we live, and it is the richest ship, that hath the most of the precious jewels 
of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ in it, and the greatest treasure of any 
kingdom in the world, I had well-nigh said, as all the world besides. Now, 
where there are most of called, chosen, and faithful, certainly there (towards 
the time of Rome s ruin) the promise will take the most effect. Here, then, 
lies your interest. You have it not only confirmed from the general truth of 
that great point I have all this while been giving demonstrations of, but fur 
ther, you have it confirmed by a more special charter of promise and pro 
phecy (which you may well believe, having seen so much of it fulfilled), 
granted forth to these kingdoms long before their erection. And as for this 
kingdom, give me leave, upon this so just and solemn an occasion, to take 
the boldness to utter this in the same expression, which now well nigh twenty 
years ago I used in public, that if we had stood at God s elbow when he 
bounded out the nations, and appointed the times and seasons that men 
should live in (as the apostle speaks), we should not have known (unless 
when Christ himself was alive, and the apostles, in those primitive times, 



PS. CV. 14, 15.] STATES AND KINGDOMS. 57 

unless in Judea itself, where all the apostles were together), in what age or 
in what place, in what nation or kingdom we should have chosen to have 
lived in, in respect of the enjoyment of the gospel, and the communion of 
saints, more than in this kingdom wherein we live. Other churches they 
have had the glory of reformation, and have had the honour in the first age 
of reformation ; but we, though in that respect we have been like to blear-eyed 
Leah, yet have since been abundantly the more fruitful of saints, faithful, 
called, and chosen. This is, therefore, our great security ; and it is the 
more special interest of this kingdom in which we live, the magna charta 
of it. 

2. Direction. And, therefore, that which I shall make further bold with your 
leave and patience, is but only this, to add a word of exhortation and direction 
to maintain this interest, and to preserve it. To this end, consider it is not 
simply having saints, and multitudes of saints, called, faithful, and chosen, 
but it is the using them kindly, and dealing well with them, that is the inte 
rest of a nation. Judea itself had the best of saints ; it had Christ and his 
apostles, and multitudes of others also in that country (which were after 
wards dispersed into all nations), yet, though they had these multitudes, 
because they dealt unkindly with them, it was their ruin, and God provided 
a safety for those his saints, by dispersing them into all nations, through 
their persecution of them. 

That worthy duke of Rohan, that writ that book of the Civil Interest 
of the States of Europe, in his preface to it, says, that according as the proper 
interest of each hath been well or ill followed, it hath caused the ruin of some, 
the greatness of others. That which that worthy duke thus speaketh of the 
civil interest, give me leave, from all the grounds fore-mentioned, to press 
upon you concerning that which is your greatest interest ; an interest most 
divine, most general, and fundamental. THE SAINTS OF ENGLAND AKE THE 
INTEREST OF ENGLAND ; look to, and keep to this your interest, namely, main 
tain and preserve the saints among you, and make provision for them, as you 
would preserve the kingdom. When afterwards the same author particu 
larly comes to speak of the proper interest of England, he hath a saying (and 
he seems to speak it as if it had been an aphorism of the late queen s), that 
England is a mighty animal, which can never die except it kill itself. To 
follow his maxim in that also, we may apply it to this interest in hand. There 
is a mighty body, and a company of saints in this kingdom. Now if they 
could all be united in one, and their divisions and animosities allayed, and 
all reconciled and made one, I am confident we need not fear if all the na 
tions of the world were gathered together round about us. But if ye bite 
and devour one another, take heed ye be not consumed one of another. It 
is a state maxim as well as a church rule, there is nothing else can de 
stroy us. 

If any man think I am a-pleading for a liberty of all opinions, of what 
nature and how gross soever, I humbly desire them to remember that I only 
plead for saints, and I answer plainly, the saints they need it not. The 
apostle tells us that there are damnable heresies, so 2 Pet. ii. 1, 2, and they 
will soon unsaint men ; there are errors that are capital, not holding the 
head, so Col. ii. Do but distinguish these from others, and let this be one 
foundation laid for this union. And when I say saints, I mean no one party 
of men. Do we not know that the new creature is found in circumcision 
and in uncircumcision, and as eminent in the one as in the other ; and it 
were the highest sacrilege in the world to engross that title of saints and 
the godly party to any one. Characters of saints I need not give you ; it 
hath been the main subject of the preaching in this kingdom for these 



58 THE GREAT INTEREST OP [Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

forty years and upwards to describe them to yon, and distinguish men 
from men. 

As there are multitudes of faithful, called, and chosen ones in this 
kingdom, so you, honourable and worthy senators, are the called and 
chosen out of all these to this great work, and have obtained mercy from 
our God to be in a great measure faithful. Consider the trust God hath 
committed to you. You have the richest treasury that I know God hath 
above ground elsewhere on earth. The saints of England are the interest 
of England. Write this upon your walls, to have it in your eye in all 
your consultations, never to swerve from it for any other interest whatsoever. 

And have respect to the saints, and to the whole lump of them. If you 
will maintain your interest whole and entire, have regard to the saints, 
small and great. You shall often find that expression, as in Kev. xi. 18, 
When the kingdoms of the world became the kingdoms of Christ ; and Kev. 
xix., when the whore is judged, ver. 2, it is said that * all the saints, small 
and great, rejoiced, ver. 5, 7. What vow doth David make when he should 
obtain the kingdom ? Mine eyes shall be upon the faithful of the land, 
that they may dwell with me, Ps. ci. 6. Let yours be so. 

You are the shields of the earth, under God, and for his saints, as in 
Ps. xlvii. The shield should defend the whole body, and all the parts and 
members of it. You are covering cherubims unto the ark of God (so the 
prince of Tyre is called, Ezek. xxviii. 16) ; stretch your wings from one end 
of the holy of holies to the other, so as to cover all. You are the nails of 
the temple, and for the vessels thereof, as Eliakim, Isa. xxii. 24, is called a 
nail, on which all the vessels should be hung, and by whom alike supported, 
the vessels of small quantity as well as great, from the vessels of cups even 
to all the vessels of flagons ; so the prophet there speaks, comparing the 
people of God to the vessels of the sanctuary, and small weak saints to the 
vessels of smaller quantity, and the stronger to the greater ; and Eliakim 
to a nail, and a like support to all. Shebna, his predecessor, had been 
an oppressor of the saints, and therefore God says of him that he should 
be driven from his station, and cut or sawn off from the wall, so as the 
wall should stand ; and he would put Eliakim in his room, and hang all 
the saints upon him. You are Mordecais, and it is said of him in Esther 
x. 3, that he was accepted of the multitude of his brethren, seeking the 
wealth of his people, and speaking peace to all his seed. You are likewise 
called shepherds ; now the shepherds are to take care of all the sheep. Oh 
see that all the sheep be folded, and have pastures to lie down in ; not only 
a staff and a rod, but folds and pastures for them. Take care not of the 
strong only, but of the sick and the diseased, so the expression is, Ezek. 
xxxiv. 21, those that are sick and diseased, that men did push with their 
horns till they were scattered abroad, not only reduce them from their scat 
terings in a dark and a cloudy day, as Ezek. xxxiv. 13, 14, but feed them 
in a good fold, and judge betwixt them and those that would push them. 
You are fathers, and you should see provision made for all the children ; 
and though they through waywardness will not eat together, yet let them 
not starve. 

And to conclude, let me use your own word to you, unite, or (if you will 
the apostle s) reconcile all the saints in this kingdom together. Providence 
hath disposed it so, that they do and will differ in judgment. The apostles, 
who were oracles infallible, could not in their times wholly prevent it ; and 
differing thus in judgment, they will hardly ever of themselves agree. But 
it is your work, and will be your honour, to make them and to cause them 
so to do, and to find out ways whereby this may be done, notwithstanding 



PS. CV. 14, 15.] STATES AND KINGDOMS. 59 

these their differences. Thus Constantine dealt as a reconciler amongst his 
divines, and he did it with success.* It is of all works the happiest and 
most glorious, for it was Jesus Christ his eminent work : Eph. ii. 14, He 
is our peace, who hath made both one, and hath broken down the partition 
wall between us, having abolished in his flesh the enmity ; and a greater 
enmity was betwixt Jews and Gentiles than among us. He did it by his 
blood ; do you mingle his blood with faith, and mingle therewith but the 
rules given by the apostles by which they effected this, as in Eom. xiv., when 
one believed that he might eat all things, another that was weak durst not, 
but ate herbs, ver. 2. Let not him that eateth, says he in this case, 
despise him that eateth not, and let not him that eateth not judge him that 
eateth. And ver. 14, Let us not judge one another any more. Certainly 
this rule, with such others, reduced to practice, as are found in their writings, 
would heal all. I shall not stand to dispute that place now. I shall only, 
upon occasion thereof, acquaint you with an observation which to me was 
strange (having considered former proceedings) when I first found it. In 
the late Book of Canons, that were made just afore this parliament and stirs 
began, when the bishops would have brought in bowing towards the com 
munion table (the altar, as it was called), after many specious colours pre 
faced thereto, they close all with this, In the practice or omission of this 
rite, we desire that the rule of charity prescribed by the apostle may be 
observed, which is, that they which use this rite despise not them who use 
it not, and that they who use it not condemn not those that use it. Could 
they not have said so sooner ? The observing this very rule about those 
other things urged by them had ended all the quarrels, prevented all the op 
pressions of tender consciences, that were during all their days ; it had saved 
and prevented the silencing of how many faithful ministers by them. But 
God (who, afore he punisheth, usually takes evidence, or at least lays a 
ground of their conviction whom he punisheth), when he had once drawn 
this out from them (though they did it for an end, to facilitate the introduc 
tion of that which was a novelty), yet then, ex ore tuo, out of their own 
mouths he condemns them, and stays not a moment from the execution. 
But from that time and word uttered by them, and published to the world, 
began their ruin ; it hastened, and hastened instantly. 

I am confident of it, that Christ, that King of saints that is in heaven, he 
will not rest till such time as he hath made us one, if not in judgment, yet 
in forbearance, and that if we will not take warning, and will not agree it, 
that either antichrist, or Jesus Christ himself, will come in upon us, and we 
shall be made to do it one way or other. 

But if this great design of reconciling all the saints could be brought to a 
full issue and perfection ; and if this your interest (a regard had to all the 
saints in this kingdom, which to me upon all the grounds fore-mentioned is 
the greatest interest of this kingdom) be followed and maintained, I would 
not fear, though (as the prophet Zechariah saith of Jerusalem, chapter iii. 
verse 3) all the people of the earth were gathered together against us. We 
fear foreign forces ; certainly let us keep to our own proper interest, and then 
if all the nations of the world were gathered together against us, I believe 
they would have the hardest pull of this nation that ever was of any. The 
Lord is here (as the prophet speaks, Ezek. xxxv. 10), or (let me express it 

* Lege Eusebium in Vita Constantini, lib. iii. c. xiii. Ipse concilio interfuit, re- 
conciliavit eos qui dissidebant, et ad concordiam persuasit : Eos qui paulo insolen- 
tiores et ferociores fuerunt, mitigavit ; nee antea desiit, quam omnes ad concordiam 
revocaverit, et turn hanc quasi secundam victoriam nactus, iwivixtov iogrvv, Festum 
Triumphale celebravit. Whitak. contr. 3, quzest. 4. 



GO THE GREAT INTEREST OF STATES AND KINGDOMS. [Ps. CV. 14, 15. 

in those similitudes Zechariah there useth) if they should come, and think 
to devour us, they will find this kingdom to be a cup of poison to them, 
verse 2 (so it is in your margins, but we read it, a cup of trembling), which 
they must not only vomit up again, but will be their death and destruction ; 
they will find it to be a burdensome stone, as verse 3, which while they go 
about to overturn, or stir, or meddle withal, it shall fall back upon them, 
and cut them to pieces : I will make Jerusalem a burdensome stone for all 
people : all that burden themselves with it shall be cut in pieces, though 
all the people of the earth be gathered together against it. And you that 
are the governors of Judah (as at the 6th verse) shall be as an hearth of fire 
among the wood, and a torch of fire in a sheaf, and all that oppose you and 
rise up against you shall be but as so many straws. Take a stack of straw, 
great for bulk and number, and lay it upon a few coals of fire upon an 
hearth, and what will become of them all ? Though they cover the fire awhile, 
yet they will soon be consumed and burnt up. Bead the 6th verse : I will 
make (saith God) the governors of Judah like a hearth of fire among the 
wood, and like a torch of fire in a sheaf, and they shall devour all the people 
round about, on the right hand and on the left. 

I shall only end with what is further spoken there of these governors of 
Judah in the 5th verse (which is the sum of what I have said), The gover 
nors of Judah shall say in their hearts (as comforting themselves thereby), 
1 The inhabitants of Jerusalem shall be my strength, in the Lord of hosts their 
God. And so say you, the saints of this our Jerusalem are our greatest 
interest and security through the Lord of hosts, his being our God ; and let 
this saying be ever in your hearts, to encourage and to guide you. 



Die Mercurii, 25 Feb. 1645. 

Ordered by the Commons assembled in Parliament, That Sir Kobert Harley and 
Master Purefoy do from this House give thanks to Master Thomas Goodwin for the 
great pains lie took in the sermon he preached this day at the entreaty of this House, 
at St Margaret s, Westminster (it being the day of public humiliation), and to desire 
him to print his sermon. And it is ordered that none shall print his sermon without 
icence under his handwriting. 

H. ELSYNGE, Cler. Parl. Dom. Com. 

I do appoint Robert Dawlman to print this sermon. 

THO. GOODWIN. 



A GLIMPSE OF Z ION S GLORY; 
OR, THE CHURCH S BEAUTY SPECIFIED. 



Original Title : * 

A 

GLIMPSE OF 
SYONS GLORY: 

OR, 

THE CHURCHES 

BEAU TIE specified. 

Briefly layd open in a Sermon, at a 

general Fastday in Holland. 

By T. G. 

And now Published for the Good and 
Benefit of all those whose Hearts are 
raised up in the expectation of the glo 
rious Liberties of the Saints. 

Psal. 87. 3. 
Glorious things are spoken of Thee, Thou Citie of GOD ! 

Esay 40. 10. 11. 

Behold the Lord shall come with might against the strong ones, and his 
arme shall rule for him. 

LONDON, 

Printed for William Larnar, and are to be sold at his 

Shoppe at the Signe of the golden Anchor 

neere Pauls-Chaine. 1641. 



* This Sermon is reprinted from a copy kindly placed at our disposal by Mr Grosart, 
the only copy known to be extant. We are not aware who the author of the Epistle 
to the Reader may have been, but there can be no doubt that the Sermon is an 
authentic production of Dr Goodwin. ED. 



THE EPISTLE TO THE EEADER. 



CHRISTIAN READER, thou hast here presented to thy view a small tract, the 
matter whereof is weighty, and of concernment to all that are the professed 
subjects of Jesus Christ. It is a thing of sad consequence to consider how 
we have been kept under blindness and darkness, although not totally, yet 
in a great measure, in regard of such truths as do immediately strike at 
antichrist and his false power : as namely this great truth, CHRIST THE 
KING OF HIS CHURCH ; and that Christ hath given this power to his church, 
not to a hierarchy, neither to a national presbytery, but to a company of 
saints in a congregational way. Now these truths strike directly at anti 
christ, and therefore kept and quelled down as errors. And so by reason 
of this obscurity (we being half blind) such bright truths seem strange to 
us, and go under many aspersions and calumnies, as carnal, erroneous, 
absurd, and the like. And truly we have been so accustomed to the yoke, 
that we seem to beat down freedom with casting up a thousand surmises, 
dreaming of strange consequents. Nay, there is a generation of men in 
these times (some or most of them seeming to plead for Christ) are as 
inveterate against the one true way of Jesus Christ, as if it would be the 
bondage of Rehoboam succeeding the light oppression of Solomon ; whereas 
it will prove to be a haven to our tedious storms, and a period to many 
distractions. 

Reader, give over thy wonted censuring of men s labours, and learn to be 
more wise ; lay aside all prejudicial thoughts concerning this tract, and 
weigh it in the balance of the sanctuary, comparing it with the word ; if it 
will hold out there, then embrace it, and make use of it for thy comfort. 
Indeed, it may be beneficial to thee divers ways. 

First, By this thou mayest learn to prize Jesus Christ more. What was 
that among other things that made Christ so beloved and excellent in the 
eyes of his spouse ? His head was of gold. Now what is this head of 
gold but that excellent government that is upon his shoulder. 

Secondly, It will administer comfort to thee, in regard of the former 
yokes, of which there are hopes they will be broken off, at least in the 
accomplishing of these truths. Nay, the day is now dawning wherein 
Sion s peace and comforts shall be fulfilled, Jesus Christ set up, the sole 
and great King of his church. 

Thirdly, It will teach you to make that use of it that the apostle Peter 
doth of the like truths, * What manner of persons ought we to be ? The 
use of it is divers, beyond my reach or weak judgment to prescribe ; and 
indeed my commendation of it doth but darken it, I being so far below the 
matter and the author. But thy experience may make up that of which I 
fall short. So commending thee (both in the use of this and anything else 



64 THE EPISTLE TO THE READEK. 

that bears the stamp and image of truth upon it) to the teaching of that 
Spirit that is the author of all truth in the hearts of believers, to be taught 
by it, I leave thee in the perusing of this small treatise, hoping thou wilt 
reap some good by it. Farewell. 

Thine in the Lord Jesus, to command, 

W. K. 



A GLIMPSE OF ZIOFS GLORY; OR, THE 
CHURCH S BEAUTY SPECIFIED. 



And I heard as it were the voice of a great multitude, and as the voice of many 
waters, and as the voice of mighty thunderings, saying, Halleluiah, for the 
Lord God omnipotent reigneth. REV. XIX. 6. 

AT the pouring forth of the fifth vial, there was a voice saying, Babylon is 
fallen, is fallen ; at the pouring forth of the sixth, John hears * a voice, as the 
voice of many waters, and as the voice of thunderings, saying, Halleluiah, 
the Lord God omnipotent reigneth, immediately following the other. Baby 
lon s falling is Zion s raising ; Babylon s destruction is Jerusalem s salvation. 
The fourth vial was poured upon the sun, which is yet doing (namely, upon 
the emperor and that house of Austria), and will be till that house be de 
stroyed. The heat of that makes the seat of the beast hot, and prepares it 
unto the fire that it is appointed unto. God is beginning the pouring forth 
of the fifth vial, namely, upon the throne of the beast, upon Babylon. This 
is the work that is in hand. As soon as ever this is done, that antichrist is 
down, Babylon fallen, then comes in Jesus Christ reigning gloriously ; 
then comes in this halleluiah, the Lord God omnipotent reigneth. Let Christ 
live, and Barabbas die, was the last speech of Tremellius. Let Babylon fall, 
let Jerusalem rise, and Christ reign in his glory ; this is the voice of all the 
saints this day, and will continue to their last voice. It is the work of the 
day to cry down Babylon, that it may fall more and more ; and it is the work 
of the day to give God no rest till he sets up Jerusalem as the praise of the 
whole world : * Blessed is he that dasheth the brats of Babylon against the 
stones. Blessed is he that hath any hand in pulling down Babylon, and 
beautiful likewise are the feet of them that bring glad tidings unto Jerusalem, 
unto Zion, saying, * The Lord God omnipotent reigneth. This is the work of 
this exercise, to shew unto you how upon the destruction of Babylon Christ 
shall reign gloriously, and how we are to further it. 

The words then read unto you, they are, you see, an halleluiah. 

Quest. But what is that to the day of a fast ? Is an halleluiah suitable 
to a fast ? Halleluiah is praise ye the Lord. The work of a fast is a mourn 
ing work, and yet this halleluiah is suitable to this day of fast. 

Ans. 1. Suitable. First, our mourning is to be evangelical, and therefore 
to have comfort mixed with it. 

VOL. XII. E 



66 A GLIMPSE OF ZION s GLORY. [REV. XIX. 6. 

Secondly, Because our mourning is a preparation to, and hastening of, this 
halleluiah. 

Thirdly, Because we are by faith to speak of things as if they were done, 
therefore now to shew you what is to be done, and what we are to look upon 
as if it were done this day, halleluiah is suitable for that. 

Yea, further, a day of humiliation is a day of reconciliation too as well as 
a day of humiliation ; and the great fruit of our reconciliation with God is 
the setting up of the kingdom of his Son. 

Yea, we read of the church of the Jews, that in their returning from the 
captivity, God did lead them by weeping, Jer. xxxi. 9. The argument of 
deliverance from captivity under antichrist, and the setting up of the king 
dom of Jesus Christ, may stand with our weeping, and we in a weeping and 
a mourning frame are fittest to hear such an argument as this is. 

Quest. Halleluiah is an Hebrew word : why here used ? 

Ans. First, To note the joining of the church of the Gentiles with the 
Jews, according to the prophecy in Zechariah xiv. 9, The Lord shall be 
King over all the earth : in that day there shall be one Lord, and his 
name one. 

Secondly, Because the Gentiles are to provoke the church of the Jews to 
come in, according to the prophecy of Isaiah, chap. ii. 3, 5, Come ye, let 
us go up to the mountain of the Lord, to the house of the God of Jacob, and 
he will teach us of his ways, and we will walk in his paths. Fifth verse, 
house of Jacob, come ye, and let us walk in the light of the Lord ; the Gentiles 
calling upon the Jews to come in. So it shall be at the Jews calling ; and 
therefore this Hebrew word is used, halleluiah, as if the Gentiles should pro 
voke the Jews, after antichrist is fallen, now to praise the Lord, because he 
reigns. 

In this halleluiah there are these two things considerable. First, what it 
is for which this halleluiah is sung ; secondly, from whom. First, what it 
is for. It is for this, because the Lord God omnipotent reigneth ; the Lord 
God, that is, Christ. Christ now appears to be Lord God. His Lordship 
and dominion was much darkened before ; now it appears to all the 
world that he is Lord God, Lord God omnipotent. The name of Christ is 
the mighty God, as Isa. ix. 6, but he is but little known by this name in 
comparison. After antichrist is fallen, he shall be known by his own name, 
the mighty God, the Lord God omnipotent, the Lord God omnipotent 
reigneth. His crown and his dignity were as it were hidden before in com 
parison. Little of the power of the sovereignty of Christ did outwardly 
appear before, but now it shall appear before the eyes of all his enemies, that 
it is he that reigns, he hath the kingdom of kingdoms, and is the Lord of 
lords. 2. From whence came this halleluiah ? I heard as it were the voice 
of a great multitude, and as the voice of many waters. By waters we are to 
understand people : the voice of many waters, of many people. 

First, It is the voice of the waters, the voice of Jesus Christ reigning in 
his church, comes first from the multitude, the common people ; the voice is 
heard from them first, before it is heard from any others. God uses the 
common people and the multitude to proclaim that the Lord God omnipotent 
reigneth. As when Christ came at first, the poor receive the gospel ; not 
many wise, not many noble, not many rich, but the poor; so in the reforma 
tion of religion after antichrist began to be discovered, it was the common 
people that first came to look after Christ. In Cant. v. 7, we find the 
church inquiring for her beloved, which is to he understood of these times of 
reformation. She went to the watchmen ; the watchmen smote her, despised 
her, and persecuted her. At the 8th verse, she goes to the daughters of Jer- 



REV. XIX. 6.] A GLIMPSE OP ZION S GLORY. 67 

nsalem, and inquires for her beloved, that is, among private Christians and 
common people ; and this glorious church that is to come, when the Lord 
God omnipotent reigneth, according as it is here said, the voice will be first 
among the multitude. It is observable that we have in Cant. vii. 1, 
where you find a description of the glorious church that is a- com ing, wherein 
Christ is to reign gloriously. The description there begins at the feet, and 
goes upward. When Christ is described, Cant, v., the description of Christ 
is from the head, and so downward ; but when the estate of the church in her 
glory is described, she begins at the feet, and goes upward ; to note the 
beginning and the raising of the church is like to be at first among the 
meaner sort of people, among the multitude. The halleluiah for Babylon s 
downfall was among the multitude before it came to the four and twenty 
elders, as you may see in the beginning of the chapter. The business, brethren, 
concerning the Scots, it is a business, in the issue whereof we hope there will 
be great things. Where began it ? At the very feet, at the very soles of 
the feet. You that are of the meaner rank, common people, be not dis 
couraged, for God intends to make use of the common people in the great 
work of proclaiming the kingdom of his Son : the Lord God omnipotent 
reigneth. The voice that will come of Christ s reigning is like to begin from 
those that are the multitude, that are so contemptible, especially in the eyes 
and account of antichrist s spirits, and the prelacy, the vulgar multitude, the 
common people. What more contemned in their mouths than they ! and 
yet it is from them that this voice doth come, The Lord God omnipotent 
reigneth. We read in the 2 Chron. xxx. 15, that the priests and Levites 
were ashamed in that glorious reformation of Hezekiah. They did not pre 
pare themselves as the people did ; so it is many times that in many places 
where God is doing a great work ; and whensoever God sets up the kingdom 
of his Son in that glorious manner that he doth intend, he will not begin 
with the priests and Levites. They will not be so forward, but the people 
at the first are more forward. In Neh. iii. 5, it is said concerning the building 
of the temple and Jerusalem, that the nobles did not put to their necks, but 
it is said the people blessed those that came to dwell at Jerusalem. But 
yet mark further, it came from the multitude as the noise of many waters. 
Though the voice of Christ s reign came first from the multitude, yet it comes 
but in a confused manner, as the noise of many waters. Though the multi 
tude may begin a thing, and their intention may be good in it, yet it is not 
for them to bring it to perfection. That which they do commonly is mixed 
with much confusion, and a great deal of disorder : it was but as the voice 
of many waters. The people had a hint at something : Down with anti 
christ, down with popery, not understanding distinctly what they did ; their 
voice was but as the voice of many waters ; therefore it follows, and as the 
voice of mighty thunderings, that is, as one paraphrases of it, the voice that 
is more terrible and piercing like the thunder. After the beginning of this 
confused noise among the multitude, God moves the hearts of great ones, of 
noble, of learned ones, and they come into the work, and their voice is as 
the voice of mighty thundering, a voice that strikes terror, and hath a 
majesty in it to prevail. We hear of the voice of the multitude in our own 
country, as the voice of many waters. They cry up the kingdom of Christ, 
and cry down the kingdom of antichrist, cry down Babylon and the prelacy ; 
but this doth seem to be the voice of many waters, that the adversaries derided 
it, scorned it : it is but the multitude, a company of rude people. But blessed 
be God, we begin to hear the voice from the thunderings too in a more 
terrible way. God begins to work upon the great ones of the land, the wor 
thies of the land that are drawn together in that assembly, and they do begin 



68 A GLIMPSE OF ZION*S GLORY. [REV. XIX. 6. 

to come to the land, and beyond the land, to our ears, as it is terrible in the 
ears of the adversaries that they begin to fear. This is the work of the day, 
for us to lift up our voice to heaven, that it might be mighty to bring forth 
more and more, the voice of our parliament as a voice of thunder, a terrible 
voice to the Antichristian party, that they may say, * The Lord God omni 
potent reigneth. And let us not be discouraged, for our prayers, though 
they be poor, and mean, and scattered, they may further the voice of thun- 
derings; though our prayers be as the voice of many waters, confused, we 
may by them further this work, so as to hear more of the voice of our 
worthies that are assembled as thunderings, saying, * The Lord God omni 
potent reigneth. 1 Sam. vii. 9, when Samuel did but offer a sucking lamb, 
there arose thunderings. If we come before the Lord, and it be but a sucking 
lamb that we are able to offer ; if we come but to present ourselves only to 
testify on what side we are, there may come that voice of thunderings from our 
parliament, furthered by our voice, saying, The Lord God omnipotent 
reigneth. How gladly would we hear this voice come from our nobles, and 
the king himself, and the great ones of the kingdom, to hear them powerfully 
commanding and speaking for the furtherance of the kingdom of Jesus Christ, 
and the setting it up. But to come more closely to the words. There are 
these two doctrinal conclusions that contain the scope of them : 

Doct. 1. First, That though the kingdom of Christ may be darkened for a 
while, yet certainly Christ will reign in his church gloriously, at which 
the saints will sing halleluiah. 

Doct. 2. Secondly, That the beginning of this glorious reign of Christ, the 
multitude of the people shall be the furtherers of it, and take special notice 
of it. It is but only the first that I do intend to speak of in way of a doc 
trinal conclusion. It is this. 

Doct. Though Christ s kingdom be for a while darkened, Christ shall reign 
gloriously. That is implied. It is revealed to John as a great wonder, as 
a glorious thing. Why, did not Christ reign before ? Yes, but not in that 
manner that now he is to reign. The kingdom of Christ hath been exceed 
ingly darkened in the world ; though it now begins to appear a little more 
brightly, it hath been exceedingly darkened. When he came in his own 
person, how did he appear to reign, and be the Lord God omnipotent ? I 
mean outwardly he was a man of sorrows, one that was rather a worm than 
a man ; as it is said of him, He was one in whom * appeared no form and 
beauty for which he should be desired. He was even bruised by his Father. 
He was in the form of a servant, yea, in the form of an evil servant, being 
made sin for us, and beaten like an evil servant, yea, made a curse for 
us, and that in the abstract. How did he reign ? They made him a 
king in way of derision, put a reed into his hand instead of a sceptre, 
and bowed the knee in scorn, and called him the king of the Jews ; and thus 
he reigned outwardly, and not otherwise, in his own person. And afterwards 
in the primitive times how did he appear to be Lord God, and to reign there, 
when the heathen emperors reigned over his subjects, and had their wills 
upon them ? His subjects were but a company of poor, distressed, forlorn 
people, wandering up and down, persecuted, and destitute of all comforts. 
Afterwards, when God brought Constantine the Christian emperor and others 
to reign, the church enjoyed a little peace ; this was but for a little time. 
In the 8th of the Revelation, it is said there was silence in heaven for half 
an hour, which is applied to the little time of respite that the church had in 
Constantine s time ; for Licinius, who was joined with Constantine in the 
empire, presently fell off, and grew a persecutor. Then spread Arianism 
over all the world, that all the world seemed to be an Arian ; so that he was 



REV. XIX. 6.] A GLIMPSE OF ZION S GLOBY. 69 

not acknowledged Lord God, and therefore not reigned. Then antichris- 
tianism spread itself, and he set up himself as Lord God, and he prescribed 
laws to the consciences of men, and Christ was cast out of his throne. Yea, 
to this day how little hath Christ reigned outwardly ! The devil himself is 
a greater king, I mean in regard of multiplicity of subjects. Divide the world 
into thirty parts, and there are not above five of those that acknowledge 
Christ ; and out of those five take them where antichrist reigns, and how 
little doth Christ reign ! And among them, where Christ is acknowledged 
and antichrist rejected, how is his kingdom persecuted, and of the better 
sort ! How is his kingdom slighted, and many forward professors and 
zealous ministers have hard thoughts of it ! Yea, among those that set up 
his kingdom, in regard of their miscarriages, his kingdom is darkened ; so that 
Christ hath but a little reign in the world. And it is a glorious thing spoken 
of to John, that Christ, Lord God omnipotent, reigneth. What shall we 
say to these things, that Christ should be king of heaven and earth, and 
should appear so little in his reign as he hath done, and yet doth to this 
day ! Let us stay a little here, and admire at the infinite depth and wisdom 
of God s counsels that are past finding out ; what God should aim at and 
mean (if we may speak with holy reverence) to suffer these things, that his 
own Son, so infinitely dear unto him, should have his glory so darkened in 
the world as he hath. We may think of some reasons why God doth suffer 
this ; but what his aim and intentions are in the depth of his counsels is 
infinitely beyond us. 

Reason 1. It may be it is to be a stumbling-block to wicked and ungodly 
men in his just judgment, that they should see and not understand. 

Eeason 2. And it was upon this ground that God suffered his kingdom to 
be darkened hitherto, that antichrist might prevail, because of much glory 
that he is intended to bring out of the prevailing of antichrist in the world. 
Therefore in his providence he hath so permitted it, as that the kingdom of 
his Son for many years should be darkened. And, my brethren, if the 
kingdom of Christ had been kept in congregations, in that way that we and 
some other churches are in, it had been impossible that antichrist should 
have got head. But God in his providence, because he would permit anti 
christ to rise and to rule for a long time, and he hath many things to bring 
out the kingdom of antichrist to work for his glory, therefore God hath 
left this truth to be so dark, the setting up of Christ in his kingly office. 

Reason 3. Thirdly, because God would exercise the faith and other graces 
of his Spirit in his children, that they might believe in and love Jesus Christ 
for his spiritual beauty, though there appears nothing but spiritual beauty, 
though no outward beauty, no outward kingdom doth appear, but he be as 
a spiritual king only. It was a great and a glorious work in those three wise 
men that came to Christ, that offered frankincense, and gold, and myrrh to 
Christ when he was in a cratch in a manger ; and so for God s people now 
to believe in him, now to love, now to rejoice in him, to offer all to him, now 
his kingdom is darkened, now he doth appear so mean as he is, this is a 
glorious work of faith ; and we should labour much to exercise this work of 
faith, in looking upon this spiritual beauty that is in Christ, and satisfying 
our souls in that, that so we may not be offended at the darkening of Christ s 
kingdom outwardly. And the less Christ doth reign outwardly in the world, 
the less glorious his kingdom doth appear outwardly, the more let us labour 
to bring our hearts under his spiritual reign ; the more others say, We will 
not have this man reign over us, the more let our souls subject themselves 
to him, and say, Christ is our King, and let him reign for ever over us ; 
yea, let us labour to sympathise with Jesus Christ in the darkening of his 



70 A GLIMPSE OF ZION s GLORY. [REV. XIX. 6. 

glory and of his kingdom. Jesus Christ, though he [is] the glory of his Father, 
the brightness of his glory, the character and graven form or the image of 
his Father, yet is he contented to have his glory darkened. Who are we 
that we must have glory in this world and outward excellencies, when Christ 
is willing to be without them ? Let us be willing to go, like the witnesses, 
clothed in sackcloth, till Christ comes to reign. There are white-shining 
garments prepared ; but that time is not yet, though it will not be long. 
The bridegroom yet seems to be absent, and therefore it is fit for the spouse 
to go low and mean in the mourning weeds as a widow ; the trimming of the 
bride in her outward glory may come hereafter, when Christ shall come in 
glory into the world. 

Reason 4. And lastly, the kingdom of Christ is darkened for a while out 
wardly, and therefore it should teach us to bless God so much the more for 
that opportunity that we have of setting up Christ as king amongst us; for yet 
the voice is not heard much, that the Lord God omnipotent reigneth abroad 
in the world, though lately some noise we have heard ; but, blessed be God, 
in our congregations amongst us we may hear that the Lord God omnipotent 
reigneth. It is through our wretched wickedness if his kingly power be not 
fully set up amongst us in all his ordinances. And that we should have an 
opportunity to set up his kingly power amongst us here, while it is so much 
opposed and so little known in the world, it is a great mercy. And let us 
take heed of abusing that opportunity we have for darkening the kingly 
power of Christ which we profess to set up, especially in these times, when 
there comes to be a voice, though confusedly, from the multitude, and some 
kind of voice of thunder from the great ones. 

But though it be dark for a while, certainly he shall reign, and the voice 
will be glorious and distinct one day, saying, * Halleluiah, the Lord God 
omnipotent reigneth. He shall reign, first, personally; secondly, in his saints. 

First, Personally. We will not fully determine of the manner of his per 
sonal reigning ; but thus far we may see, there is a voice of great waters, 
though not distinct, but a probability in his person God and man. He shall 
reign upon the earth, here in this world, before that great and solemn day. 
There are divers scriptures that have somewhat of this in them. We cannot 
give the distinct \oice of those scriptures ; but many of God s saints, they 
do hear something, and when a thing grows nearer and nearer, God will 
reveal it more distinct : Zech. xii. 10, They shall look upon him whom 
they have pierced, and shall mourn for him as one mourneth for his only 
son. It is usually understood either of a spiritual looking by the eye of 
faith, or beholding Christ at the da} 7 of judgment. But why should we take 
it for a spiritual looking, and looking at the day of judgment ? That place 
doth not hold out ; that is not the thing intended. They shall mourn every 
one apart. This is not like the setting forth of the mourning at the day of 
judgment. And take but this one rule, that all texts are to be understood 
literally, except they make against some other scriptures, or except the very 
coherence and dependence of the Scripture shews it otherwise, or it makes 
against the analogy of faith. Now there is nothing against this, but it may 
be so. A second scripture that seems to hold out somewhat is that in Mat. 
xxvi. 29, I will not henceforth drink of the fruit of the vine until that day 
when I drink it new with you in my Father s kingdom. It is true this is 
likewise interpreted in a mystical sense, but there is no reason why we may 
not take it literally ; not in the kingdom of his Father in heaven, but in that 
kingdom that he shall come in here to drink the fruit of the vine, to have 
communion with his saints in this world, 2 Thes. ii. 8. Antichrist shall be 
destroyed by the brightness of Christ s coming, the brightness of his personal 



REV. XIX. 6.] A GLIMPSE OF ZION s GLORY. 71 

coming: and that place, Rev. xx., where it is said, The saints shall reign 
with him a thousand years, which cannot be meant reigning with him in 
heaven. It is made as a proper peculiar benefit unto such as had refused 
antichrist s government, especially to the Christian church. It is likely 
divers of the prophets and patriarchs may come in, but especially it belongs 
to the Christian church. Now the reigning with Christ a thousand years is 
not meant reigning with him in heaven, for after these thousand years there 
shall be many enemies raised against the church. Gog and Magog shall 
gather themselves together. If it were meant of heaven, that could not be ; 
and therefore it must be meant of Jesus Christ coming and reigning here 
gloriously for a thousand years. And although this may seem to be strange, 
yet heretofore it hath not been accounted so ; it hath been a truth received 
in the primitive times. Justin Martyr, that lived presently after John, he 
spake of this as a thing that all Christians acknowledged; and likewise 
Lactantius hath such expressions in divers places of his seventh book, that 
there are glorious times coming, wherein shall be plenty and fruitfulness in 
the church ; yet first Rome must be burnt, and Babylon first down, and 
brings the sybils, the heathen oracles, for it ; and after a little time there 
shall be stirring up of enemies against them. Thus far they go. If they 
did not believe that Christ himself should come personally to reign, yet he 
shall with his saints reign in a glorious manner, and the church shall be so 
raised up in the world outwardly as to be above all the men of the world in 
outward glory. 

And there are many scriptures full for that which we may be much more 
confident in, than we can be of the other. There is a time coming when 
there shall be this halleluiah in the church, The Lord God omnipo 
tent reigneth, as in Dan. vii. 17, 18 ; The four beasts are the four mo 
narchies, and the last is the Roman monarchy, and that Babylon shall go 
down together ; and immediately upon that, the saints of the Most High shall 
take the kingdom, and possess the kingdom for ever and ever, at the 21st, 
22d verses ; ver. 27, And the greatness of the kingdom under the whole 
heaven shall be given to the people of the saints of the Most High. The 
kingdom under heaven is not the kingdom of the world to come. More 
apparent is that in the 12th of Daniel, which is ordinarily interpreted of 
the day of judgment ; but surely this text doth not aim at the day 
of judgment principally, but at a time before. First, because many that 
sleep shall awake, not all, but many. Secondly, he says, that they that are 
wise shall shine as the brightness of the firmament ; whereas the glory that 
shall be put upon the saints in heaven shall be as the sun. Though this 
glory be great, it is inferior to that which shall be. The third reason is, 
that Daniel must shut up these words, and seal up this book as a great secret. 
That there should be a resurrection at the last day, a reward of happiness to 
the righteous, and of misery to the wicked, is no great secret ; but this that 
was revealed to Daniel was a great secret. But Daniel might say, if the 
book be shut up, How shall the truth come to be known ? Many shall 
run to and fro, and take pains in finding it out, and at last this truth shall 
come to be found out, and knowledge shall be increased ; and certainly it 
is the antichristian yoke that doth hide this truth. Men dare not whisper 
of any truth, but of such as are held in the church of Rome; but when there 
comes to be a liberty of churches, and that men may freely search into this 
truth, knowledge will be increased. The fourth reason is, because in the 
last verse there seems to be a promise even to Daniel, that he should have 
his share and part in this glory. Was it such a matter that Daniel in the 
resurrection should have his lot, and that he should stand up at the day of 



72 A GLIMPSE OP ZION S GLORY. [REV. XIX. 6. 

judgment ? No ; but that he should have his lot in that resurrection was a 
great privilege. Again, for Christ s reigning with the saints, take two places 
in the Psalms : Ps. xlix. 14, * The upright shall have dominion over them in 
the morning ; there is a time they shall have dominion, though now they 
have a night ; a morning shall come that the upright shall have dominion ; 
Ps. cxlix. 5, and so on, Let the saints be joyful in glory, &c., and a two- 
edged sword in their hands, to execute vengeance upon the heathen, and 
punishments upon the people, &c. What shall we make of these scriptures ? 
Indeed, if we be put upon allegorical senses, we may put off any scripture ; 
but if we take them literally, why should we not ? And the promise that is 
made to them that overcome, Kev. xii., the latter end of it, * He that over- 
cometh, and keepeth my words, to him will I give power over the nations, 
and he shall rule them with a rod of iron ; and as the vessels of a potter, they 
shall be broken to shivers ; what shall we make of this, except the saints 
shall reign, and there shall be a glorious reign of Christ with the saints ? And 
so that place of the saints reigning and judging the world, some interpret it 
of the day of judgment, but these scriptures seem to have an apparency 
to be before ; and therefore Christ is said to make them kings and priests 
unto God spiritually, though not every one properly kings over others, yet 
so as to have power and dominion in the world ; and, therefore, where it is 
said in the gospel, that righteous men desired to see those things that you 
see, and did not, in the 10th of Luke it is said, Kings desired to see those 
things that you see, and have not seen them ; so that Christ shall reign 
together with his saints. And that there shall be such a reign of Christ, 
and this halleluiah, appears by many arguments, as take this one drawn from 
Scripture. 

If there be many prophecies and promises in Scripture that are not yet 
fulfilled, and the fulfilling whereof will bring the church into a more glorious 
condition than ever it was yet in the world, then there is a glorious time 
a-coming. Now there are such scriptures, wherein are such glorious things 
promised to be fulfilled to the church as yet never were fulfilled ; and that 
we know not what to make of, unless there be a truth in this : Isa. xxiv. 23, 
* Then the moon shall be confounded, and the sun shall be ashamed, when 
the Lord of hosts shall reign in mount Zion, and in Jerusalem. When was 
this, that there was such a reign of Christ in mount Zion, as that the moon 
was confounded, and the sun ashamed ? Certainly this cannot be under 
stood of their return from their captivity, for the people of the Jews were 
under contempt after their deliverance from captivity, and came not to such 
a glory as this, and were under a kind of captivity, and met with such oppo 
sitions, that they were as long building the temple as they were in captivity, 
seventy years. 

Obj. But some that were in captivity saw both the first and the second 
temple ; how could this be, if it were so long ? 

Ans. The foundation they might see, but not see it finished. And in 
Ahasuerus s time they were in captivity, as that, had not God wrought 
mightily, they had all been cut off by a wicked Haman. Therefore they 
were not so glorious : Isa. xxxiii. 20, Look upon Zion, the city of our 
solemnities : thine eyes shall see Jerusalem a quiet habitation, a tabernacle 
that shall not be taken down. This text neither hath not been fulfilled 
hitherto, but must remain : Isa. liv. 11, thou afflicted, tossed with tem 
pests, and not comforted ! behold, I will lay thy stones with fair colours, 
and thy foundations with sapphires/ &c. When antichrist shall fall down, 
and the Jews called, and this halleluiah sung, The Lord God omnipotent 
reigneth, then this promise may be made good, Isa. Ix. If you read the 



REV. XIX. 6.] A GLIMPSE OF ZION s GLORY. 73 

whole chapter, there are glorious things spoken of the reign of the church ; 
but there have never been such glorious times since those prophecies, and 
therefore these we are to expect to be fulfilled. That place of Ezekiel, of 
the dry bones receiving flesh and life, is apparent to be the Jews coming, 
and God s joining two sticks together, making Judah and Ephraim to be 
one ; and therefore glorious things are to be expected immediately after the 
fall of antichrist ; and if you may speak of the fall of antichrist as done, you 
may speak of those promises as done. So in Rev. xxi. xxii., there is a 
description of the glorious estate of the church, which ordinarily is applied 
to the glory of heaven; but there is a mistake in applying these things to the 
glory that is in heaven, and not to think of the glory that shall appear 
on earth before. It is said that John saw the new Jerusalem come down 
from heaven. If it had been the glory of heaven, more like heaven should 
have been opened, and he raised up to it. Again, John here says, that * the 
foundations of the walls had twelve stones, and in them the names of the 
twelve apostles. That the foundations of heaven should have the names of 
the twelve apostles is not like ; for Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, the patri 
archs and prophets, shall be there as well as the apostles ; and why should 
it not have the names of the patriarchs and prophets as well as the apostles? 
And if you read the Revelations, you shall find that the kings and princes 
came to give in their glory to the church. Now that the kings and princes 
should come in to make heaven glorious, there is no likelihood in that. Thus 
there are these prophecies to be fulfilled, and these promises to be accom 
plished, and therefore a time for the Lord God with the saints to reign glo 
riously. And why should we think it much ? Let us but consider the great 
designs that God hath in honouring of his saints in the world, and we have 
no cause to think much of such a truth as this ; for hereafter in heaven 
Christ will be honoured before his saints. But how will Christ be honoured 
before all the world ? You will say, at the day of judgment. But only at that 
time so long as the wicked shall stand for their sentence. Do we think 
there shall be no further time for Christ and his saints to be honoured but 
just then ? God intends to honour Christ and his saints before all the world. 
Christ hath purchased a glorious condition by humbling himself so low to 
the death of the cross, and therefore was promised the heathen for his inhe 
ritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for his possession ; and this 
must be given in due time, and God is pleased to raise the hearts of his 
people to expect it. And those that are most humble, most godly, most 
gracious, most spiritual, searching into the Scriptures, have their hearts 
most raised in expectation of this. And it is not like that that work of the 
Spirit of theirs shall be in vain ; but God is beginning to clear it up more 
and more. God is beginning to stir in the world, and to do great things in 
the world, the issue whereof (I hope) will come to that we speak of. 

Quest. But what shall be the glorious condition of the church when the 
Lord God omnipotent reigneth, for which the saints shall sing this glorious 
halleluiah ? Tell us something of this good land. 

Ans. In the general, I answer, it is the resurrection from the dead, as the 
apostle speaks, Rom. xi., concerning the calling of the Jews. But for par 
ticulars, Glorious things are spoken of thee, thou city of God. 

The first thing wherein the happiness of the church consists, is this : that 
it shall be delivered from all the enemies of it, and from all molesting troubles, 
and so be in a most blessed safety and security. The God of peace shall 
tread down Satan shortly, and all that are of Satan. Christ is described in 
this Rev. xix. with his garment dyed in blood, when he doth appear to come 
and take the kingdom ; and he appeared with many crowns on his head, 



74 A GLIMPSE OF ZION s GLORY. [REV. XIX. 6. 

that notes his many victories ; and his name was King of kings, and Lord 
of lords. And the saints appeared triumphing with him, clothed with white 
linen, and set upon white horses. Is that a clothing for soldiers ? Yes ; for 
the army of Christ, that rather comes to triumph than for to fight. Christ 
fighteth and vanquisheth all his enemies, and they come triumphing in white. 
All tears shall be wiped away from the church, Isa. xxv. 8, Rev. xxi. 4. 
There shall be no briar nor thorn, Ezek. xxviii. 24, * among the people of 
God. Ezekiel did once live among briars and thorns, but there shall be no 
pricking thorn left. And this city, that is described in the Revelation, shall 
have the gates always open, in regard of the security that is there ; no dan 
ger at all of any enemy. 

Secondly, There shall be a wonderful confluence of people to this church ; 
both Jew r and Gentile shall join together to flow to the beautifulness of the 
Lord. Dan. ii. ver. 35, Christ is compared to the stone that shall break the 
image, and shall become a mountain, and fill the whole heaven. Isa. lx., 
They shall come as doves to the windows. And when John came to mea 
sure the city, the church, it was a great and mighty city. 

Thirdly, Because where there is much confluence, there useth to be a con 
traction of much filthiness ; therefore, in the third place, it shall be most 
pure, a pure church ; yea, in great part, if not altogether. Nay, we may 
almost affirm, altogether to be delivered from hypocrites. Without there 
shall be dogs, and whosoever shall work or make a lie. Not without, in 
hell ; but without the church. Hypocrites shall be discovered and cast out 
from the church, though many get into the church now ; then the righteous 
nation shall enter in. In the 44th of Ezekiel, ver. 9, there is a description 
of the church under the gospel ; and he shews that none uncircumcised in 
heart shall enter in there. But the fulfilling of the prophecies of those chap 
ters, in the latter end of Ezekiel, will not be till this time, and then no un 
circumcised in heart shall enter : Rev. xxi. 27, There shall in nowise enter 
into it any thing that defileth, &c. There are two negatives in the original, 
they shall not, they shall not enter. As Christ says, Whosoever comes to 
me, I will in nowise cast out ; I will not, I will not cast out. Blessed are 
they that are called to the supper of the Lamb. Before, many were called, 
and few chosen ; but now all that are called are chosen, and none that are 
made partakers of the first resurrection shall die the second death. It is a 
most pure church, and therefore is described, the walls to be precious stones, 
the city to be as clear as glass, and the pavement to be pure gold. 

Fourthly, There shall be abundance of glorious prophecies fulfilled, and 
glorious promises accomplished. When you read the prophets, you have 
prophecies of many glorious things ; and the knowledge of this truth will 
help you to understand those prophecies. Rev. ii., it is said there was a 
book sealed shewed unto John, and none could open the book but the Lamb. 
The book of the prophecies is a sealed book, and especially the book of the 
prophecies of the Revelations. But when the Lamb, Christ, shall come to 
reign, this shall be opened to us. And therefore it is said, the holy apostles 
and prophets should rejoice at the destruction of antichrist, because the pro 
phets should be so clearly opened and understood by the people of God : 
Rev. xxii. 6, * These sayings are faithful and true ; and the Lord God of the 
holy prophets sent his angel, to shew unto his servants the things which 
must shortly be done. Why the Lord God of the holy prophets ? That 
Lord God that did intend to make the holy prophets clear and evident. 
Says the woman of Samaria, * When the Messiah comes, he shall teach us 
all things. We may well say it of the coming of Christ, Here the meaning 
of abundance of prophecies and promises, that we know not what to make 



REV. XIX. 6.] A GLIMPSE OF ZION s GLORY. 75 

of, shall be clear before us. Christ is called the Word of God, and is said to 
be faithful and true, because he will discover the truth and faithfulness 
of the promises. And this will be a glorious time, when the prophecies shall 
be opened, and the promises come to be fulfilled. 

Fifthly, Abundance of hidden mysteries of godliness will be cleared then, 
that now are exceeding dark, Rev. iv. John did but see a door opened in 
heaven ; but afterwards, Rev. xix., he saw heaven opened, noting the clear 
revelation of truth that shall be then. And, Rev. xi. 19, There was seen 
the ark of the testament : whereas the ark stood before, in the holy of holies, 
that was shut up, that none was to come into it but the high priest. But 
now it is opened to all. In the ark where the secrets, a type of the secrets 
that shall be opened at this time, that were shut up before, glorious truths 
shall be revealed, and above all the mystery of the gospel, and thp righteous 
ness of faith shall be discovered. Before, what a little of the mystery of the 
gospel and the righteousness of faith was discovered ! but this will grow 
brighter and brighter till that time, which is the great design of God for his 
glory to all eternity. 

Sixthly, The gifts of the saints shall be abundantly raised. He that is 
weak shall be as David, and he that is strong as the angel of the Lord, Zech. 
xii. 8 ; and then shall be accomplished that promise, that God * will pour his 
Spirit on them ; and their young men shall see visions, and their old men 
shall dream dreams. It was fulfilled in part upon the apostles, but the full 
is not till that time knowledge shall be increased. 

Seventhly, The graces of the saints shall be wonderfully enlarged, even in 
a manner glorified ; though not so full as afterwards in the highest heaven, 
but mightily raised. The saints shall be all clothed in white linen, which is 
the righteousness of the saints ; that is, the righteousness they have by 
Christ, whereby they shall be righteous before God, and holy before men. 
Holiness shall be written upon their pots, and upon their bridles : upon 
everything their graces shall shine forth exceedingly to the glory of God. 
John saw a vision of the bride coming down from heaven, with a heavenly 
glory, fit to meet Christ her bridegroom, to stand in his presence, and serve 
him day and night. 

Yea, further, religion shall be honoured, and no more be a disgrace. God 
hath promised to his church that he will wipe away their reproaches for ever. 

The people of God have been and are a despised people ; but their re 
proach shall be for ever taken away, and they shall not be ashamed of reli- 
ligion : for it shall be glorified before the sons of men. Therefore it is said, 
Rev. xiv., They shall have the name of God upon their foreheads, openly 
to profess religion ; a time shall come when ten men shall take hold on the 
skirt of a Jew, and say, We will go with thee ; Cant. viii. 1, I will kiss 
thee, yet should I not be despised. She would embrace Christ publicly, 
and should not be despised. It shall be so honourable, as none shall be able 
to despise it. There are notable texts of Scripture to shew the great honour 
that shall be in the ways of religion : Isa. xlix. 23, * Kings shall be thy nurs 
ing fathers, and queens thy nursing mothers, they shall bow down to thee, 
and lick up the dust of thy feet. What a high expression this is for the 
honour of godliness ! So in Isa. Ix. are a great many of notable expressions : 
verse 13, * I will make the place of my feet glorious ; that is, the church. 
There was a time whenas the feet of Christ were as burning brass, to shew 
the suffering condition of the church. But now the feet of Christ, that is, 
the church, shall be made glorious, ver. 14. You have two notable scriptures 
for this in the prophecy of Zechariah. The first in the 4th of Zechariah, 16, 
They shall be as the stone of a crown lifted up. They are now trampled 



76 A GLIMPSE OF ZION s GLORY. [REV. XIX. 6. 

npon as the stones of the street ; but they shall be as the stones of a crown ; 
and not only so, but as the stones of a crown lifted up. The second place 
is in Zech. xii. 5, The governors of Judah shall say in their hearts, The in 
habitants of Jerusalem shall be my strength in the Lord of hosts their God. 
We know that now in many places the governors of Judah, the great ones of 
the country, their spirits have been set against the saints of God. We know 
what reproachful names they have put upon them, and how they have dis 
countenanced them. Though the governors of Judah have counted them 
factious, and schismatics, and puritans, there is a time coming, when the 
governors of Judah shall be convinced of the excellency of God s people; so 
convinced as to say in their hearts, that the inhabitants of Jerusalem, that 
is, the saints of G-od gathered together in a church, are the best common 
wealths men : not seditious men, not factious, not disturbers of the state ; 
but they are our strength in the Lord of hosts, they are the strength of a 
kingdom, and shall be countenanced by them as the strength of a kingdom, 
as those that will be most useful in a kingdom. This will be a blessed time, 
whenas wicked men and wickedness shall be despised, and godliness as 
honourable as ever it was contemptible : this shall be when the Lord God 
omnipotent reigneth in his church. And through God s mercy we see 
light peeping out this way, that the governors of Judah are saying, The 
inhabitants of Jerusalem shall be our strength. Religion shall be hon 
oured in the world one day, and not only at the day of judgment, but here. 

In the ninth place, the presence of Jesus Christ and of God shall be ex 
ceeding glorious in the church ; then the name of it shall be called JEHOVAH- 
SHAMMAH, the Lord is there. They shall follow the Lamb wheresoever he 
goeth : they shall see the King in his beauty and glory. And such a presence 
of Christ will be there, as it is questionable whether there shall be need of 
ordinances, at least in that way that now there is. And therefore some in 
terpret that place so : They shall be all taught of God, and shall not need 
to teach one another. And so that place, 2 Peter i. 19, We have also a 
more sure word of promise, whereunto ye do well that ye take heed until the 
day dawn, and the day-star arise in your hearts. Now the morning-star the 
Holy Ghost applies to them, Rev. ii. 28, that is such a glorious presence 
of Christ, as shall so instruct them, as if they had not need to take heed to 
the word of prophecy. And in Rev. xxi., They shall need no temple, nor 
sun, nor moon ; for the Lamb is the temple and the light thereof ; the pre 
sence of Christ shall be there, and supply all kind of ordinances. And Rev. 
vii., Christ says, he will lead them to the fountain of living waters. All 
the ordinances here are but the streams and conduits ; then they shall 
be led to the fountain. Though we dare not affirm that there shall be no 
ordinances, yet is there some probability at least thus far in comparison ; 
there shall be such a presence of Christ there, as there shall not be that 
need of ordinances. 

In the tenth place, there shall be the addition of martyrs, and many of 
the worthies of God that have lived in former times shall rise again. If you 
read Rev. vii. and Rev. xxi., you cannot but be convinced of this, that those 
that have suffered martyrdom under antichrist shall have the glory of that 
time ; and Daniel shall come up and stand in his lot ; and as he, so many of 
the worthies of God in former times ; and this shall add to the glory of that 
time. 

The eleventh is this : There shall be most blessed union of all the churches 
of the world. The envy of Ephraim and of Judah shall be taken away : Isa. 
xi., There shall be one king, and one name ; Zech. xiv. 9, we all pro 
fess one Lord, but give him divers names ; but then there shall be one Lord, 



REV. XIX. 6.] A GLIMPSE OF ZION s GLORY. 77 

and his name one ; Zeph. iii. 9, * They shall serve the Lord with one con 
sent ; with one shoulder, it is in the original. And if you read that chap 
ter, you may see what reference it hath to a more glorious time than the re 
turning of the Jews from the captivity. Dissensions in any one congregation 
are evil ; and for one church to dissent from another is a grievous evil. 
Blessed will the time be when all dissensions shall be taken away, and when 
there shall be a perfect union of all, and not any distinction of Calvinists or 
Lutherans, or the like : but all shall come and serve God, and be called by 
one name. 

The twelfth is the resurrection of the creatures of the world ; and so in that 
regard there shall be abundance of outward glory and prosperity. That place 
in the 8th of the Romans : * The creature groans under the burden that it is 
in, that it may be delivered into the adoption of the sons of God ; when 
the fulness of the glory of the adoption of the sons of God shall come, the 
creatures shall be delivered to them. The whole world is purchased by 
Christ, and purchased for the saints, that is Christ s aim. All is yours 
(says the apostle), * the whole world ; and therefore, Rev. xxi. 7, it is said, 
The saints shall inherit all things. You see that the saints have but little 
now in the world ; now they are the poorest and the meanest of all ; but 
then when the adoption of the sons of God shall come in the fulness of it, the 
world shall be theirs ; for the world is purchased for them by Jesus Christ. 
Not only heaven shall be your kingdom, but this world bodily. And so that 
place, 2 Peter iii. 10, where it is said, The heavens shall pass away with a 
great noise, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat, the apostle 
speaks as if it were the day of judgment. But there is one passage whereby 
we may gather that the apostle only means a mighty change that shall be 
before the day of judgment: verse 13, We according to his promise look for 
new heavens and new earth. Where hath God promised a new heaven and 
a new earth ? I know no place in Scripture that I can refer this place unto 
but Isa. Ixv. 15, which is apparent to be meant of the church. Now the 
apostle speaks of these times when there shall be a mighty change in the 
world : then shall be fulfilled that promise, There shall be new heavens and 
a new earth. We can find no such promise but in Isaiah, and that is meant 
of the church, and therefore it is probable the apostle means that Lactantius 
says, When the thousand years come, the world shall bring forth fruit alone, 
and the rock shall distil dew, and no creature shall live upon prey ; the dog 
shall not hunt, the child shall not be afraid of the serpent : making the 
place of Isaiah, which we understand metaphorically, to be understood liter 
ally, of the wolf and the lambs living together, and the child playing upon 
the hole of the cockatrice. 

And all the prayers that ever we put up for the church will be answered, 
and the blessing of all will come upon the churches. Here we have some 
degree of blessing : but the blessing of all the prayers of the prophets and 
apostles will come upon it. In Isaiah, they were to cry to God, and give 
him no rest, till he made Jerusalem the praise of the whole world ; that is, 
till God did bring this time, and Jerusalem hath not been so lifted up. All 
these prayers that have not given God rest all this while shall be answered, 
and Jerusalem shall be advanced. 

Lastly, Those glorious titles that the church of God hath in the Old Tes 
tament will be made up to the full ; and that is a resultance from all the 
former. There are many glorious titles of the church of God in the Old 
Testament. Now, the estate of the church in the Old Testament was but 
typical, typifying the estate of the gospel. I shall name some of them, and 
when those come to be fulfilled it will be glorious : first, the Lord s portion, 



78 A GLIMPSE OP ZION S GLORY. [REV. XIX. 6. 

Deut. xxxii. 9 ; secondly, his pleasant portion, Jer. xii. 10 ; thirdly, his in 
heritance, Isa. xix. 25. All people are the work of his hands, but his church 
is his inheritance. Fourthly, the dearly beloved of his soul, Jer. xii. 7 ; 
fifthly, God s treasure, and peculiar treasure, Exod. xix. 5 ; sixthly, his 
glory, Isa. xlvi. 13 ; seventhly, the house of God s glory, Isa. Ix. 7 ; 
eighthly, a crown uf glory, Isa. Ixii. 3 ; ninthly, a royal diadem, in the 
same place; tenthly, the glory of God, Jer. iii. 17. Again, the throne 
of his glory, Jer. xiv. 21. Again, the ornament of God, and the beauty 
of his ornament, Ezek. vii. 21. Again, the beauty of his ornament in 
majesty, in the same place. Now, to have all this made up to the full, to 
shew that these are no high expressions, but rather come short of what will 
be, it must be a glorious condition. 

But you will say, Are these things true ? 

To that we answer : For the truth of them, I will go no further than this 
chapter, verse 9, These are the true sayings of God. It is a very strange 
phrase ; if they be the sayings of God, they must needs be true. Were it 
not enough to say they were the sayings of God, or true sayings ? No, they 
are the true sayings of God. And in the original it is not only the true say 
ings of God, but the true sayings of that God that is true ; therefore they 
are certain. 

Quest. But how can they be ? 

Ans. Zech. viii. 9, If it be marvellous in your eyes, should it also be 
marvellous in my eyes ? saith the Lord of hosts. They are marvellous in 
your eyes, but they are not so in mine. It is God omnipotent that shall do 
these things, by that power whereby he is able to subdue all things unto 
himself. Mountains shall be made plain, and he shall come skipping over 
mountains, and over difficulties ; nothing shall hinder him. And why should 
you think it strange that these things should be, though they be great ? 
God hath done already as great things as these. Certainly Christians that 
shall acknowledge the great and never- sufficiently admired and adored work 
of God in the hypostatical union of the natures, that God should be man, 
should never ask this question, how these things should be, or to think that 
any object propounded for our faith is too difficult. 
Quest. But when shall these things be ? 

Ans. Truly, brethren, we hope it is not long before they shall be ; and the 
nearer the time comes the more clearly these things shall be revealed. And 
because they begin to be revealed so much as they do now, we have cause 
to hope the time is at hand. In Daniel xii., God bids Daniel seal his book 
until the time come, as if then it should be opened. Doth God begin to 
open this book ? Know that the time is at hand. John was bidden not to 
seal the book, because the time was at hand. The nearness of the time at 
hand discovers the book ; and the nearer the time, the more it is discovered. 
No place in Scripture gives us so much light to know when this shall be as 
Dan. xii. 11, And from the time that the daily sacrifices shall be taken 
away, and the abomination that maketh desolate set up, there shall be a 
thousand two hundred and ninety days. What is the meaning of this ? 
The light that I have from this, I acknowledge to be from that worthy in 
strument of God Mr Brightman. A day is usually taken for a year, and 
so many days as were set, so many years it should be. All the question is 
about the beginning of the time. This abomination of desolation was in 
Julian s time, in 360, because then Julian would set up the temple again, 
that was destroyed, in despite of the Christians, and would set up the Jewish 
religion again. That was the abomination of desolation, says he, and the 
whole Jewish religion was not consumed till that time. Now, reckon so 



REV. XIX. 6.] A GLIMPSE OF ZION s GLORY. 79 

many years according to the number of the days, it comes to 1650, and it is 
now 1641, and that place for the abomination of desolation is like to be it 
as any that can be named. But it is said, * Blessed is he that comes to 
another number : t 1335 days, that is, 45 years more added; that is, says he, 
in 1650, they shall begin ; but it shall be 45 years before it comes to full 
head, and blessed is he that comes to this day. And he hath hit right in 
other things, as never the like, in making Sardis to be the church of Ger 
many, and foretold from thence how things would fall out, and we see now 
are. Now, we have also a voice from the multitude, as from the waters, 
and it begins to come from the thunderings. 

Seeing these things shall be, what manner of persons ought we to be ? 
That is the work I intended to have done, to have shewed you the duties 
these things call for at our hands. If God hath such an intention to glorify 
his church, and that in this world, oh, let every one say to his own heart, 
What manner of persons ought we to be ! And especially, what manner of 
persons ought ye to be, because you are beginning this despised work, 
gathering a church together, which way God will honour. Certainly, the 
communion of saints and independency of congregations God will honour. 

And this work is a foundation of abundance of glory that God shall have, 
and will continue till the coming of Christ. And blessed are they that are 
now content to keep the word of God s patience. And do you keep the word 
of God s patience, though you suffer for it, as you now do. And wait, the 
text says, those that testify against antichrist and antichristianism, and keep 
the word of God s patience, God will keep them in the hour of temptation, 
he will make them a pillar in his house, and they shall never go out ; God 
will open their door, so as none shall shut it till the coming of Christ ; and 
he will write upon them the name of the new Jerusalem. Therefore keep 
the word of God s patience, now you have an opportunity in your hands for 
furthering this great work. Take heed that you lose not this opportunity ; 
certainly, if there should fall out any just cause amongst you of scandal in 
regard of divisions, or any other way, you may do more hurt to hinder this 
glorious work than all the persecutors could do. For you will persuade the 
consciences of men that this is not a way of Christ. Persecutors cannot do 
so. So that the governors of Judah will not say, Our strength is in the in 
habitants of Jerusalem, and all that profess themselves to be the people of 
Jerusalem. 






THE WORLD TO COME ; OR, THE KINGDOM OF 
CHRIST ASSERTED. 






VOL. xti. 



THE WORLD TO COME ; OR, THE KINGDOM OF 
CHRIST ASSERTED. 

IN TWO EXPOSITORY LECTURES. 



Far above all principality, and power, and might, and dominion, and every 
name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come ; 
and hath put all things under his feet. EPH. I. 21, 22. 

THESE words set forth and proclaim the supremacy of our Lord and Saviour 
Jesus Christ over all persons, by what names or titles soever distinguished 
or dignified in all God s dominions, belonging either to this world or that 
which is to come. I shewed you before what it was for Christ to sit at 
God s right hand, as also how it was amplified by the sublimity of the con 
dition, and by the quality of the persons over whom Jesus Christ is set. By 
principalities, might, and dominions, he would include all sorts whatsoever, 
as angels, good and bad, and so magistrates. Now I am to speak of the 
extent of Christ s dominion, and that is in this world, and in the world to 
come. The great thing to be opened is, what is meant by the world to come. 
There are three interpretations given of the words. 

Sense 1. First, It is taken for heaven and earth, this state of the world on 
earth, and that state of the world in heaven, which are two worlds ; only 
here will be a question, why heaven should be called a world to come, when 
it is extant now as well as the earth, which is called the present world. To 
which it may be answered, that though heaven be a world now that is extant, 
yet to us poor creatures here below it is a world to come ; though it was 
created at the same time this lower world was. It is comfort to saints that 
they have a world to come ; for wicked men come in for the greatest share 
in this, therefore called men of this world ; let them take it, it is their world. 
Saints have a world to come, Luke xviii. 13. But this doth not seem to be 
that which the apostle aims at here. 

Sense 2. Secondly, This phrase may note the duration of Christ s kingdom, 
that it is everlasting ; for so in Scripture it is used to express * eternity, Mat. 
xii. 32. And therefore Isa. ix. 6, which we translate, the eternal Father, 
the Septuagint reads, * the Father of the world to come ; and so Christ s 
kingdom is said to be for ever and ever ; that is, not for one ever, but for 
all even. The apostle in Heb. x. 12 saith, that Christ, after he had offered one 
sacrifice for sin, for ever sat down at the right hand of God. Now that 



84 THE WORLD TO COME J OR, [EPH. I. 21, 22. 

word for ever doth not relate to Christ s sitting at God s right hand, bnt 
rather to the sacrifice he offered, who for ever by one sacrifice took away sin ; 
for it may be said that there are not principalities and powers for ever, that 
Christ may sit for ever at God s right hand. When this world ends, there 
will be an end of all principalities and powers : 1 Cor. xv. 24, Then cometh 
the end, when he shall deliver up the kingdom to the Father, and shall put 
down all rule, &c. Take notice in what sense Christ hath a kingdom, and 
sits at God s right hand for ever, and in what sense he is said to give up this 
kingdom to the Father. I would clear it by two distinctions. 

Distinction 1. First, There is a natural kingdom due to Jesus Christ as he 
is in the Godhead, and a natural inheritance due to him, being man, as he 
is joined to the Godhead. For so he inherits the privileges of that second 
person, which is this natural kingdom, which he obtained, and which was 
due to him by inheritance : Heb. i. 8, To the Son he said, Thy throne, 
God, is for ever and ever. He speaks of his natural inheritance, though the 
right be involved in him as he is God, and so he is joined in commission for 
ever as God and man with the Father ; and so in respect of this natural do 
minion of his, all things are said to be made * by him and for him, Col. i. 16. 
Now this natural right that Jesus Christ hath remains for ever, and accordingly 
many of those privileges which are to be understood by his sitting at the right 
hand of God, they likewise must remain for ever. 

As, first, a fulness of joy : At thy right hand is fulness of joy. Jesus 
Christ doth enjoy a fulness of joy immediately by God himself. 

Secondly, All that personal honour and those glorious abilities which he 
was filled and crowned with, when he went first to heaven, Heb. ii. 9, all 
these shall remain to eternity. And they are naturally due to Christ, though 
they were bestowed on him then when he came to heaven ; he is thus in 
commission with his Father, so far as natural rule goes, though in that respect 
less than the Father. 

2. The second part of this distinction is, that there is a dispensatory 
kingdom that Christ hath ; and that is, as he is considered as mediator between 
God and his church, which kingdom is given to him. It is not by nature due 
to him, but as he was the Son of God, he was chosen out to exercise that 
power which in this kingdom is held forth ; and this is pointed out by his 
sitting at God s right hand, which God gave him as the reward of his obe 
dience : John v. 22, 23, The Father judgeth no man, but hath committed 
all judgment to the Son. It is committed to Christ; he is that Lord that 
God hath set up to do all his business for him visibly and apparently ; and 
this kingdom is in a special manner appropriated to Christ ; it is so Christ s, 
as it is not the Father s, in a more eminent manner : * The Father judgeth 
no man. To appropriate a work to one person rather than another, is an 
act of God s wisdom ; hence it is that Christ hath his work for a time, and 
afterwards gives it up to another. Till the day of judgment be over, Jesus 
Christ hath the government of the kingdom, and shall reign ; but after the 
day of judgment, the kingdom is to be given up to the Father. And the reasons 
why God hath appointed a time of reigning to Christ, 

First, Is to draw all men s thoughts to him ; that is, that all men might 
honour the Son as they honour the Father, John v. 22. As for every work 
there is a season, so likewise for every person, wherein they shall in a special 
manner be more glorious. 

Secondly, This was a reward exceeding due to Jesus Christ, that he should 
have a kingdom appropriated to him for a season, that all judgment should 
be committed to him, and he should draw all men s eyes to him in a more 
immediate manner, because he veiled himself in obedience to his Father ; 



EPH. I. 21, 22.] THE KINGDOM OF CHRIST ASSEETED. 85 

therefore the Father, to recompense him, he will not appear himself so much 
in the government ; saith he, Let my Son take it, I will commit all judgment 
to him. And see the equity of this : because God will put all things under 
the feet of Christ, therefore will he again give up all things to God, and be 
subject himself to him as God-man, 1 Cor. xv. 28. Though Jesus Christ 
hath this kingdom, and means to conquer all his enemies, before he gives it 
up, yet when he is in the height of his dominion, when he is in his full 
triumph, and hath cleared all the world s accounts, then will he give up the 
kingdom to the Father ; which may teach us, when we are highest, and most 
assisted and raised, to fall down and give glory to the Lord. So Jesus will 
do when he hath all enemies under his feet, and judged and pronounced sen 
tence upon all ; then will he set up his Father, deliver up the kingdom unto 
him, and he shall become all in all. This will be the last and great solemnity 
of all. 

This is the first distinction, his natural kingdom which is due to him as 
man joined to God, that remains for ever ; but there is something of his me 
diatory kingdom to be given up. 

Distinction 2. The second distinction is this : This mediator s kingdom it 
receives a double consideration. 

First, Consider Christ as a mediator for the church, and so consider him 
as under imperfection, sin, or misery, or any other want, till they shall be 
complete ; or 

Secondly, Consider him as he is head to the church, made complete and 
perfected in all parts and degrees. That I may explain myself: you may call 
to mind that when I opened the third and fourth verses, compared with the 
seventh verse, I told you that in election there were two great designs or 
contrivements : the one was more principal, and chief, which I called God s 
decree of the end, what God s design was to make us ; and there it was that 
God chose us in Christ as a head unto absolute glory, which with Christ and 
in Christ we shall have for ever in the highest heavens. 

Secondly, God designed the way unto this end, and so God was pleased, 
that he might set off the glory of that perfect state the more ; therefore he 
lets us fall into sin and misery, and suffers our bodies and souls to be sepa 
rated before we shall come to that end which God hath designed us to. To 
enjoy this Canaan, we must go through a wilderness to it. Now, answerable 
to this double design of God, Jesus Christ hath a double relation to his 
church : the one as a head simply considered, and so were chosen in him to 
that perfect state unto which God hath designed us ; secondly, Christ hath 
the relation of a redeemer and mediator for us, that as we are fallen into sin, 
and misery, and distress, so he might redeem us and help us. Now while 
the church is in an imperfect state, and hath not all its members, nor they 
out of all danger neither ; though they be in no real danger, yet they are to 
give an account of their actions, and there is a final sentence to be passed 
upon them ; and in that sense there may be said to be forgiveness of sin in 
the world to come, and therefore Paul prays for one, that he may find mercy 
at that day. Now, while there is any such thing as guilt, or the appearance 
of it, or any imperfection, and till that final sentence be passed, so long is 
Jesus Christ a mediator for us, and so God hath * given him all power in 
heaven and earth, to give eternal life to them that believe. Now, so long 
as Jesus Christ rules in a way of conflict, and as a conqueror is destroying 
sin and death, and all enmity, also raising soul and body and bringing them 
together, in this sense the Scripture speaks of his sitting at the right hand 
of God ; but when once the final sentence is passed, then this work of the 
mediator, his reigning as to destroy enemies and such like, is over, and then 



86 THE WORLD TO COME ; OR, [EPH. I. 21, 22. 

Jesns Christ will present us to his Father : Lo, here I am, and the children 
which thou hast given me ; we are now as thou didst look upon us in thy 
primitive thoughts in election. So he stands in relation to them as a head ; 
there we are considered as perfect, and the mediator s office is laid down, and 
God becomes all in all both to Christ and us. I would add a third thing to 
this, and that is, how Christ is a king, and sits at the right hand of God for 
ever. When Jesus Christ hath given up this kingdom of his redeemership 
unto the Father, yet then he shall sit down for ever with this honour, that it 
was he that did exercise this office, so that there is not a soul lost, nor a sin 
unsatisfied for, nor any enemies unsubdued. It is true, he is not a general 
in war any longer, but he shall have this honour, that he did all these ex 
ploits, brought all these rebels in ; so that in deed, and in truth, Jesus Christ 
shall reign more gloriously with the Father after that time of judgment is 
over, than ever he did before ; now he shall reign triumphantly, whereas be 
fore he reigned as one in conflict and conquest. Jesus Christ himself will 
say, that he never was king so much as he shall be now ; Jesus Christ shall 
ever have the glory of it, that he was that great and glorious dictator, that 
he subdued all enemies, and delivered up the kingdom peaceably to his 
Father, and in some sense set the crown upon his Father s head, who was, as 
it were, in some sense put out of his rule in the world by Satan and wicked 
men, that did what they list ; and the saints they lie under sin and misery, 
and Christ he subdues all these enemies, and presents all these souls to the 
Father with a peaceable rule and government ; and this he enjoys with the 
Father for all eternity. Now whereas it is said, * Of his kingdom shall be no 
end, the meaning is, it shall not be destroyed for ever. It is a kingdom that 
gives way to no kingdom, it shall still be continued though he himself give it 
up to the Father, and become visibly and apparently more subject than he 
was before ; not in respect of his Godhead, for so he is never subject ; nor 
in respect of his manhood, for so he is always subject ; but then Christ shall 
acknowledge the Father to be the author of his kingdom, and that he gave 
him power, and honour, and glory, and then shall he resign up his crown to 
his Father again from whom he had it. So much for the second sense of 
the words. 

Sense 8. Now I will add a third interpretation of these words, * not only 
in this world, but in the world to come ; but not to exclude the other two I 
named before, but it shall rather take them in ; and that which I shall say is 
this : that between the state of this world as now it is, and the state of 
things after the day of judgment, when God shall be all in all, there is a 
world to come, which is of purpose, and in a more special manner appointed 
for Jesus Christ to be king in, and wherein he shall more eminently reign. 

God hath appointed a special world on purpose for Jesus Christ, which in 
Scripture is called a world to come, and Christ s world. That as this world 
was ordained for the first Adam, and given to the sons of men, so there is 
a world to come for the second Adam, even as that time after the day of 
judgment is more eminently for God, when he shall be all in all. So there 
is a world to come, which is made for Jesus Christ, and which the angels 
have nothing to do withal, for it is not subjected unto them, as this world 
now is : Heb. ii. 5-8, Unto angels hath he not put into subjection the world 
to come, whereof we speak, but one in a certain place testifieth, saying, 
What is man, that thou art mindful of him? &c. Thou madest him lower 
than the angels, thou crownedst him with glory and honour, &c. * And hath 
put all things in subjection under his feet : but (saith he) we see not yet all 
things put under him, but we see Jesus Christ, who was made lower than 
the angels, crowned with glory and honour, &c. 



EPH. I. 21, 22. J THE KINGDOM OF CHKIST ASSERTED. 87 

We see plainly that he speaks there of Jesus Christ, as he doth here in the 
text. And what he here in the Ephesians calls sitting at God s right hand, 
there he expresseth it to be his crowning with glory and honour. And 
then, likewise, for that passage, of all things being under the feet of Christ, 
which is spoken of here in the Ephesians, the apostle quotes out of Psalm 
viii. 6, which speaks of Christ s dominion ; and that sentence is nowhere 
found in the Old Testament but only there, and quoted likewise in 1 Cor. 
xv. 27, all which places relates to Christ. Then, again, he calls it a world 
to come, in Heb. ii., that is ordained for this man, and he doth the like here 
in the text : therefore, these places compared together, we see how they 
agree : 1 Cor. xv. 25, he saith, Christ must reign till he hath put all things 
under his feet, which he quotes out of Psalm ex. 1. So that these places 
before named, they are all parallel places with the text ; and there is another 
place parallel with it, 2 Peter iii. 7 compared with verse 13 : The heavens 
and earth which are now, by the same word are kept in store, and reserved 
to fire against the day of judgment. And at the 13th verse, in opposition to the 
heavens and earth which are now, he saith, We, according to his promise, 
look for new heavens, and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness ; 
that is, we look for a world to come, wherein righteousness dwells. And that 
these places hold forth the same thing, appears by this, that when he had 
alleged there was to be a new heaven and a new earth, that is, a world to 
come, at the 15th verse he quotes Paul, that he had written to them of these 
things, and that was in his epistle to the Hebrews. For it is the best argu 
ment to prove that Paul wrote the epistle to the Hebrews. He hath written 
to you, saith he, of this new world, and that was in Hebrews ii. ; there he 
wrote of this new world. So likewise, unto this give all the prophets wit 
ness, in Acts iii. And therefore I am not ashamed to give witness to it too. 
Rev. v. 10, when they saw Christ once take the book, and was installed 
king, what do their thoughts presently run out to ? It is to the world to 
come. He hath made us kings and priests, and we shall reign on earth. 
To be sure at the day of judgment they shall, which shall certainly be a long 
day, when all the accounts in the world shall be certainly ripped up, and the 
world shall be new hung against the approach of their new king, and the glory 
of the creatures then will put down the glory of this old world. We see then 
how this place to the Ephesians, and that in Heb. ii., how parallel they are. 
Now I would have you consider likewise the scope of the 8th Psalm, as the 
apostle brings it to prove this new world. And, indeed, any one that reads 
that psalm would think the psalmist doth but set out old Adam in his king 
dom in paradise, who was made in his nature a little lower than the angels. 
One would think that were all the meaning, and that the apostle applies it to 
Christ only by way of allusion : but the truth is, the apostle brings it to 
prove and to convince these Hebrews, that that psalm was meant of the Mes 
siah whom they expected : saith he, One in a certain place hath testified. 
He brings it as an express proof and testimony that it was meant of Christ, 
and was not an illusion only. Now the scope is this, as you read in Rom. v. 13, 
that Adam was a type of him that was to come, namely, Christ. So in Psalm 
viii., you read there Adam s world is the type of a world to come. The first 
Adam had his world where there were sheep, and oxen, and fowls of the air. 
Now, whereas it is said in the psalm, that all things were under his feet, it 
is not meant of man in innocency, but of the Messiah, Christ and his 
world, which is made of purpose for him, as the other world was for Adam. 
That it was not meant of man in innocency properly and principally, ap 
pears, 

First, Because it is said, Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings hast 



88 THE WORLD TO COME J OR, [EPH. I. 21, 22. 

thou ordained strength. There was no babes and sucklings in Adam s time; 
he fell before there was any. 

Secondly, It is said, was * to still the enemy and avenger. But the devil 
was not stilled by Adam, he overcame him ; therefore it must be meant of 
another that should still this enemy : How excellent saith the psalmist, 
is thy name in all the earth, speaking of this world. Adam he had a para 
dise, but he never propagated God s name in all the earth, much less did he 
sound it in the heavens. 

Again, Adam, though man, yet he was not the son of man, but called the 
son of God, he came not of a man. 

Again, take the argument the apostle useth ; saith he, this must have all 
subject to him, all but God ; he must have angels subject to him, for he 
hath put all things in subjection under his feet. This could not be Adam, 
no, not in the state of innocency ; but it is true of Jesus Christ, angels and 
all were under his feet. 

2. As it is not meant of man in innocency, so it cannot be meant of man 
fallen neither ; that is as plain as the other. The apostle himself saith, 
that we see not all things subject to him. Some think that is an objection 
the apostle answers, but indeed it is a proof to prove that man fallen cannot 
be meant, for we do not see all things subject to him. You have not any 
one man of the whole race of mankind to whom all things are subject ; take 
all the monarchs of the world, there was never any man that was a sinner 
that had all subject to him, therefore it is not meant of man fallen ; but saith 
he, We see Jesus crowned with glory and honour, and therefore it is this 
man, and no man else, that is there spoken of. And then again, take notice, 
that it is not an angel to whom all shall be subject, but plainly man, that is 
made a little while lower than the angels, but then crowned with glory and 
honour. 

And it is not only this world that shall be in subjection to this man, but 
it is a world to come. For, saith he, We see not yet all things under his 
feet, but we see Jesus Christ crowned with glory and honour. Therefore it 
is not this world, but there will be a world that shall be in subjection unto 
Christ, when all things shall be under his feet. And it is that which Psalm 
viii. speaks of ; besides, Christ interprets this psalm of himself, Mat. xxi. 3 6. 
When they cried Hosanna, and made him Saviour of the world, the Pharisees 
were angry at it : and our Saviour confutes them out of this psalm : Know 
you not, or have you not read, that out of the mouths of babes and suck 
lings he hath ordained praise ? quoting this psalm to speak of himself. What 
the meaning is, I refer to what Mr Mead hath written upon Psalm viii. ; he 
interprets it of that man Christ principally, that was but a babe, by whom 
God would still the enemy ; it is therefore Jesus Christ to whom only all 
things are subject, and shall be put under his feet. He is the sole man, 
whom the psalmist and apostle means, that hath a world to come ordained 
for him. As the first Adam had a world made for him, so shall Jesus Christ, 
the second Adam, have a world to come made for him ; this world was not 
good enough : When I consider, saith he, * thy heavens, the workmanship 
of thy hands. Jesus Christ hath a better world, a better heaven and earth, 
than Adam had. A new heaven and a new earth, according to his promise, 
when the saints shall reign : This world he hath not subjected to angels ; 
none of those principalities and powers rule there. As there are two Adams, 
and the one was the type of the other, so there are two covenants, the law 
and the gospel. The angels, they by nature were above the world and all 
things in it, and the law was their covenant, they were the deliverers and de 
clarers of it, the law was giv^u by angels. 



EPH. I. 21, 22.] THE KINGDOM OF CHRIST ASSERTED, 89 

There is a second covenant, which is the gospel, and that declares and 
speaks of this second world made for Christ. Now, the angels, God hath not 
used them to preach the gospel, they do not meddle with it, that work is not 
carried on by them ; but God hath appointed men to do it, who were babes 
and sucklings ; out of their mouth hath he ordained strength, to begin to 
create this new world. But then, why is it a world to come ? If we speak of 
it as the gospel beginning of it, because, as the other world was six days iu 
making, the work went on by degrees, so will it be in this new world ; and 
we are now but at the first day s work, the perfecting of it is to come. 
Therefore the kingdom of heaven is said to be like to a grain of mustard 
seed, which is the least of all seeds, but grows to a great bigness by degrees. 
The apostle calls conversion a delivering of us from this present evil world ; 
there is the first day s work, and God will never leave till he hath perfected 
this world : and because the perfection of it was to be afterwards, therefore 
it is said to be a world to come. And as the first world had a seventh day 
for the celebration of the creation in it, so hath the new world a Lord s day, 
a rest, of which he speaks in Heb. iv. Now this world, when it is finished, 
it shall not be subject to angels, but to Christ and his babes and sucklings, 
to the man Christ Jesus, for whom it was made, and to the saints who shall 
be the citizens of this world. As they suffer with him, so they shall reign 
with him. We do not read that the angels at the day of judgment shall sit 
upon thrones of judgment. But it is said of saints, that they * shall sit upon 
thrones, Mat. xix. 20, and so in Rev. xx. And so likewise Christ promiseth 
to give the government of ten cities to him that had ten talents, and improved 
them, and five cities to him that had five talents. The devils shall be shut 
up ; and if they be gone, there needs not the principalities of good angels k> 
oppose them. That which good angels do to the saints in this present state 
below, that office and work shall the saints that arise from the dead perform 
unto the saints that shall remain alive in that world to come. For it is now 
such as have part in the first resurrection that shall have to do in that world, 
and not angels, and it is no absurdity neither. And if angels which have 
always beheld the face of the Father, as Christ saith of them, yet have they 
been busied and employed about things below, why may not saints be so 
too ? It will be an honour rather to them : Thou hast made us kings and 
priests, and we shall reign on earth. It is true, the angels shall gather the 
elect from all the corners of the world, and they are executioners to throw 
men to hell ; but they that are the principalities and powers of this world to 
come, they are men that shall judge the angels, and then shall Christ s king 
dom be at its height ; and when that is ended, the kingdom shall be given 
up to the Father. 

Use 1. First of all, take notice, that here is two worlds for you that look 
for happiness. Methinks you should be satisfied with the expectation of 
this. Alexander wept before he had half conquered this world, that there 
were no more for him to conquer; out of a supposition, when he had con 
quered all, what he should do afterwards. If thou hadst the same desire, 
thou needst not care for this world, for there is another world ; as there are 
things present, so the comfort is there are things to come. Care not for this 
world, it is old Adam s world, it brings ofttimes much loss to saints, it is 
well if thou canst get handsomely rid of it, with little sinning. It is called a 

* present evil world. It was all Christ desired for his disciples : John xvii., 

* Not that they might be taken out of the world, but kept from the evil of it. 
But there is a world to come, which Abraham and all believers are heirs of; 
so they were not only heirs of Canaan, but it is expressly said in Rom. iv. 
13, that they were heirs of the world. 



90 THE WORLD TO COME J OR, [EPH. I. 21, 22. 

Use 2. Secondly, Admire we this man Christ Jesus, whom God hath thus 
advanced and set up, and hath made a world of purpose for him, peculiarly 
for him and his to enjoy, and for him and his (as under him) to rule and 
govern. That he that was the scorn and derision of men (for so Christ was 
when here below), that God should raise him up, and set him at his own 
right hand, and subject all principalities and powers unto him, and use him 
in all that great business of judging the world ; if this had been spoken of 
God it had been no wonder, for all nations of the earth are but as the drop 
of the bucket to him ; but to hear it spoken of man, who is but a drop of 
that bucket, that this babe or suckling should still Satan, subdue angels, 
have them under him, * Oh how excellent is thy name in all the earth ! 
This made the psalmist admire : What is man, that thou visitest him ? 
Visiting is sometimes put for visiting in anger, as in Psalm lix. 9. So God 
visited Christ at first ; and when that was done, he visited him with favour ; 
he takes that broken, shattered man, and raiseth him up, to crown him with 
glory and honour. What is man ? He speaks of the nature of man as being 
united to the Godhead. What is this babe, this suckling, that thou shouldst 
raise him up to such an height ? All this concerns us, for the psalmist calls 
him the Lord our God, how excellent will his name be one day in all the 
earth. This will swallow up the thoughts of man and angels to eternity. 
Now, put all together, and here is the most glorious appearance of a king 
dom that ever eyes beheld, more by far than all the kingdoms of the world 
that Satan shewed our Saviour, take but what this chapter holds forth of it. 

First, Here is a Father of glory mentioned, ver. 17. For as God is the 
fountain of glory, so himself is the Father of it. This Father hath an eldest 
Son, whom he made a man, and visited him as you have heard, and set him 
in the throne at his own right hand. There is your king ; and to set out the 
glory of this king he hath nobles under him, as principalities, and powers, 
and mights, and dominions, he hath them all under his feet. Those that are 
his friends, they fall down and worship him, they throw down their crowns 
before him ; and for those that are his enemies, he hath the most glorious 
conquest over them ; he sits and makes them his footstool, that he may sit 
the easier. And for Satan, that great devil, Jesus Christ triumphs so over 
him that he makes his children set their feet upon his neck. Here is the highest 
exaltation that ever was. What can be added to make Christ Jesus more 
glorious ? One would think he had enough. He is a king over a whole 
world, is advanced in the highest throne, he hath the highest power, all is 
under his feet ; what is there more to be added ? Look upon Adam, who 
was the type of Christ : he had a world about him, he had a paradise, a court 
which was peculiarly his as the king of the world (if he had stood), he was 
the father of our nature ; what wanted this man ? he wanted a wife, a helper, 
God himself saith so ; all this was in a type. This man Christ Jesus, we 
hear of his advancement far above all principalities and powers. Here is 
a Father of glory, and a Son set in glory, and he hath glorious nobility 
enough. But where is the queen ? what saith the words following ? He 
hath given him over all to be the head of the church, above all privileges 
else. He counteth this the highest and chiefest flower in the crown, that he 
is a head to the church, who is his body, and the fulness of him that filleth 
all in all ; as if our Lord and Saviour should have said, Though I have all 
this honour, and am thus full, yet if I have not a body, a church, I want my 
fulness ; for the church is the fulness of him that filleth all ; therefore above 
all hath God given this to him, to be a head to his church. Christ hath all 
else under his feet : but come up, saith he to the church, and sit on my right 
hand, Ps. xlv. As I sit at my Father s right hand, and as I sit down in my 



EPH. I. 21, 22.] THE KINGDOM OF CHRIST ASSERTED. 91 

Father s throne, you shall sit down with me in my throne. And though all 
things else be under my feet, I will have my church, my body, sit on my 
right hand, for she is my fulness. My brethren, Jesus Christ delights more 
in love than in power. Though he be a king, and hath all power committed 
to him, yet that doth no whit abate his love, he takes care that his church 
shall share with him in his glory and greatness. Oh what is man, that thou 
art mindful of him ! The Lord Christ and the church made up that man. 



THE WORLD TO COME; OR, THE KINGDOM OF 
CHRIST ASSERTED. 



THE SECOND SERMON. 



Not only in this world, but in that which is to come; and hath put all things 
under hisfeet.EpR. I. 21, 22. 

THE last time my work was to shew you, that between this world as now it 
is, and the state of things after the day of judgment, when God shall be all 
in all, that there is a state which the Scripture calls a world to come, which 
is of purpose, and in a more special manner, appointed for Jesus Christ to 
be king, when he shall have all things put under his feet. I quoted divers 
places to make it good, especially that in the 8th Psalm and the 2d of the 
Hebrews. At the 5th verse of Heb. ii., I found it was the apostle s scope to 
prove that the psalmist had prophesied of a world to come ordained for 
Christ ; and he proves it by this, that he was to have a world, wherein he 
was to have all things subject to him, which was but the same thing that fol 
lows here in the text. And saith he, though we now see Christ crowned with 
glory and honour, ver. 8, which is all one with sitting at the right hand of 
God, yet, saith he, we see not all things put under him ; therefore it 
proves that there is a world to come, wherein all things shall be subject to 
Christ. Now then, finding in the text mention of a world to come, wherein 
Christ hath his kingdom over all, and all things is under his feet, and which 
in the judgment of most interpreters is taken out of the 8th Psalm, no rational 
man could imagine, but in the same sense that the world to come is taken 
in Heb. ii., it must be taken here in the Ephesians. I spent time the last 
day to prove that the Son of man, prophesied of in the 8th Psalm, that was 
to have all things under his feet, was Jesus Christ ; now I shall speak of 
this, that he hath a world to come ordained for him, and I shall express my 
self in these two heads : 

First, That the world to come mentioned in Heb. ii. 5, wherein Christ is 
to have all things under his feet, it is not this world that now is, or merely 
the government that Christ now hath ; nor it is not the world or state that 
shall be after the day of judgment ; and yet it is said to be a world to come. 

And, secondly, I shall in a few words shew what I think is meant by that 



EPH. I. 21, 22.] THE WORLD TO COME. 93 

world to come, and see the several steps and degrees of its growing up to 
perfection. I shall speak a little to these two things, to clear up whatpL de 
livered the last day, because I fear I was not well understood in what I said, 
and I shall do it with as much brevity as I can. 

First of all, that the world to come, mentioned in Heb. ii. 5, and prophesied 
of in the 8th Psalm, that it is not the world that now is, that is plain ; for 
the apostle distinguisheth the world that now is from that world to come, 
by this ; saith he, we do not now see all things subject to him ; and it 
is the argument by which he proves there must needs be a world to come 
that must be subject to Christ : Heb. ii. 8, We see not all things now put 
under bis feet, which implies that there is a world to come wherein this is 
to be fulfilled. Take this world now as it is in its rough, and it falls short of 
that world to come, wherein all things are to be subject to Christ, for that 
is not grown to perfection ; we see Jesus now only crowned, but we see not 
all things subject to him ; it is true, this world to come is begun, but is not 
come to its perfection. 

Secondly, I shall prove that it is not the state of the world after the day 
of judgment; and that t shall prove likewise out of Heb. ii. compared with 
this place. 

My first reason to prove that the world to come ordained for Christ is not 
that world after the day of judgment. I mean it is not that state then, be 
cause this world to come here spoken of which is for Christ, Adam s world 
was the type of. Now look into Rom. viii. 19-22 ; he shews you there that 
Adam s world, that is, this very world wherein now we are, which is the type 
of that world to come ; he tells you there, that this world that now is, the 
creatures in it they groan for the manifestation of the sons of GJ-od ; for, saith 
he, * the creature was made subject to vanity, not willingly, but by reason of 
him that hath subjected the same in hope ; for we know that the whole 
creation groaneth, &c. We may in these words plainly see that there is a 
world to come, which is not that world or state of things after the day of 
judgment ; for what will become of these creatures then, no man can tell ; 
but it is this very individual creation wherein we live that groans for restitu 
tion, and the restitution of it is a world to come, as the present corruption 
and bondage of it is this world. Then look into the 8th Psalm, which is 
Christ s world typed out; it is said, that heaven and earth, the moon and 
stars, the sheep and oxen, the fowls and fish, &c., they are all said to be 
subject to him. This cannot be meant after the day of judgment, for there 
is nothing after that which heaven and earth, the sun, moon, and stars, the 
sheep and oxen, &c., should signify and typify; so that the world to come is 
a state which is between the state of this world, which is yet in its ruff and 
height, and that state which is after the day of judgment. 

A second reason for it is this : When this world to come shall come, and 
Christ shall have all subject to him, now after this subjection of all things to 
him, then shall he deliver up the kingdom to his Father, namely, after the day 
of judgment is over. This is plain in 1 Cor. xv. 24,25. When Jesus Christ 
is folly in possession of this world to come, that all things are subject to 
him, then shall the Son also himself be subject to him that put all things 
under him, so that this world of Christ s shall cease after the day of judg 
ment is over, for then cometh the end. 

Thirdly, Out of the words of the text you have this world and the world to 
come, wherein there are principalities, powers, mights, and dominions. Now, 
after the day of judgment there will be no principalities, and mights, and 
dominions ; that is plain in 1 Cor. xv. 24, He shall deliver up the kingdom 
to his Father, when he shall have put down all rule, and power, and autho- 



94 THE WORLD TO COME ; OR, [EPH. I. 21, 22. 

rity ; so that the world to come the apostle speaks of, wherein Christ is 
actually to have all things under his feet, it is not that time or state of 
things after the day of judgment is ended, nor is it this world, or the state of 
things now. So much for the first general head. 

Now I would a little explain what is meant by this world to come, and 
that but in few words. I would first shew why it is called a world, and then 
why a world to come, and the several degrees and countings on of this world, 
and when it is at its perfection, and when it shall cease. 
First, Why is it called a world ? My brethren, you must know this : that 
as God made this world for Adam, and put all things under him, though not 
under his feet, so God appointed a world for the second Adam Jesus Christ, 
and Adam s world was but a type of this world, Bom. v. 13, it is said Adam 
was the type of him that was to come ; answerably this old Adam s world, 
which now good angels, and bad angels, and sinful men rule, it is but the 
shadow of that world which is to come, prophesied of in the 8th Psalm, and 
mentioned in Heb. ii. 

Yea, let me add this, that God doth take the same world, what was Adam s, 
and makes it new and glorious. This same creation groans for this new world, 
this new clothing. As we groan to be clothed upon, so doth this whole crea 
tion; even as God takes the same substance of man s nature and engrafts 
grace upon it, so he takes the same world and makes it a new world, a world 
to come. For the second Adam, for the substance, the same world shall be 
restored which was lost in Adam ; this God will do before he hath done with 
it, and this restitution of it is the world to come. 

Now, then, why is it called a world to come ? It is called so. Though the 
foundation of it be now laid, and was laid then, when our Lord and Saviour 
was upon earth, the foundation of it is laid in the new creature. As the first 
creation began the old world, so this new creature begins the new world ; 
and as the old world was six days in making, so this new world is not per 
fected at once : the new creature that is in your hearts, it is but the begin 
ning of it. . 

Mark in Heb. ii. how this new world is begun, and but begun, and when 
it began : ver. 2, If the word spoken by angels was stedfast, how shall we 
escape if we neglect so great salvation, which at first began to be spoken of 
by our Lord, and was confirmed to us by them that heard him, God also 
bearing them witness ? &c. ; * For unto angels hath he not put into subjec 
tion the world to come, whereof we speak. It is plain, he speaks before of 
the preaching of the gospel, which was begun to be preached by Christ ; and 
though the angels delivered the law, yet this gospel, which is the kingdom of 
heaven, and the beginning of the world to come, whereof we now speak, this 
gospel was not delivered by angels, this world to come was not subjected to 
them, they preached it not, neither shall they have to do in that world which 
the gospel begins ; so that you see this world to come began when Christ 
began to preach, and therefore observe the language of the gospel : Re 
pent, saith John the Baptist, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand ; the 
world to come is coming upon you ; so our Saviour, Mark i. 14, and Mat. 
xvi. 28, There be some standing here that shall not die, saith Christ, and 
yet all were dead that stood there long ago : they shall not die, saith he, 
4 till they see the Son of man come in his kingdom. 

The foundation of this world was laid by Christ in bringing in the gospel, 
and it was he that was prophesied of in Dan. ii. 44 : * In the days of these 
kings (whiles principalities and powers were standing, he that meant to reign 
in the world came stealing in upon it) In the days of these kings shall the 
God of heaven set up a kingdom that shall never be destroyed, &c. This 



EPH. I. 21, 22.] THE KINGDOM OF CHEIST ASSERTED. 95 

new world began in the flourishing and height of the Roman monarchy. 
What did Christ when he came into the world, and afterwards went up to 
heaven ? He began this world. Before that time, the devil was worshipped 
as the god of this world, in all parts of it ; Christ he flings him down : Luke 
x. 17, 18, I saw Satan fall down like lightning. Christ destroyed the devil 
in all those heathen oracles whereby people were deceived ; when heathenism 
did not prevail, then did Jewism shew itself, and Christ he throws that down 
too by the preaching of the gospel. The apostle calls this a shaking of the 
earth. There was a great deal of the old world gone presently, and fell down 
before this new world. Jesus Christ he converted by the apostles millions 
of souls over all the world. In 2 Cor. v. 17, conversion is there expressed 
by the passing away of old things ; this is the first day s work, for the world 
is yet to come ; this is but a delivering us out of this present evil world, and 
not a subjecting of it to Christ, as in Gal. i. 4. When Christ threw down 
heathenism and Jewism, it was but the first day s work, like a new nail that, 
being strucken in, puts out the old one by degrees. This kingdom of Christ s 
shall break in pieces and consume all other kingdoms, Dan. ii. 44, this will 
eat out all the monarchies and glory of the world. 

Now, after this first day s work of throwing down heathenism and Jewism, 
then came a night of popery, which was set up in the room thereof. What 
will Christ do before he hath done ? He will have a second day s work, and 
will not cease till he hath thrown down every rag, all that dross and defile 
ment that antichrist and popery brought into the world. We now are under 
the second day s work, we are working up still to a purer world ; it is still 
this new world, working up to its perfection ; and Jesus Christ will never 
rest till he hath not only thrown out all the dross of this world, both of doc 
trine and worship, which conformity to the world hath brought in. 

But for a second degree of this work. Jesus Christ will not rest till he hath 
brought in the generality of men in the world to be subject to himself. The 
world (according to Scripture account) consists of Jews and Gentiles ; and 
how bitterly doth the apostle complain in his time of God s cutting off the 
Jews ; the generality of the nation was cast on" : and for the Gentiles, saith 
he, Who hath believed our report? There was very few of them in com 
parison that did come in to Christ ; but there will come a time when this 
new world shall have a further perfection, when the generality of mankind, 
Jew and Gentile, shall come in to Christ. The world was made for Christ, 
and he will have it before he have done : Bom. xi. 26, * All Israel shall be 
saved. There he tells us of a new world of the Jews; and for the Gentiles, 
he tells you they shall be cast in, the veil shall be taken from off all nations, 
Isa. xxv. 7. And that which is so much alleged for unity shall one day be 
fulfilled, but it will be when Christ is Lord of all the earth, and not till then. 
Christians will not agree till then. Here will be a brave world indeed, that 
will be another degree of that world to come, one shepherd and one sheep- 
fold of Jews and Gentiles, and that as large as all the world, John x. 16. 
This was never yet fulfilled, Jews and Gentiles were never yet one sheepfold 
together, but they shall be so one day. Bead the prophets, and you shall 
read there of strange things, of glorious times that shall be here upon earth, 
of all nations coming into the church, the mountains of the Lord s house 
being set on the top of the mountains, and all nations flowing unto it, and of 
great prosperity they shall have, which was never yet fulfilled ; and there 
are many fall in and acknowledge this much, that there shall be a glorious 
church on earth, when the Jews shall be called. But there is a third thing 
which is much controverted, which here folio weth. 

The third degree of this new world is this, that when this glorious time 



96 THE WORLD TO COME J OR, [EPH. I. 21, 22. 

comes, that Jesus Christ, as we have said, will call home both Jews and Gen 
tiles, and have a new world, in respect of the multitudes that shall come 
unto him. Christ will also make this new world more complete, he will 
bring part of heaven down, too, to add to the glory of this state. I shall 
briefly give you some grounds for what I say, such as for this twenty years 
I have not known well how to answer. 

I do not say that Christ himself shall come down from heaven to reign 
here on earth ; but let it be understood that Christ shall still remain in hea 
ven, and there to be his court, where he shall reign both over this world and 
the world to come. Yet this I conceive, that part of heaven shall come down 
and rule this new world, to make the glory of it more complete, and that it 
may clearly put down old Adam s world. My reasons and grounds which 
satisfies me in this are these. 

If this be not so, I do not know how to understand that place which shall 
be the foundation of the rest. In Rev. xx., the whole chapter, but specially 
the five first verses, you shall find, and such as know that book they do 
acknowledge as much, that in the chapter going before both pope and Turk 
is destroyed. In chap. xix. ver. 20, it is said there, * The beast was taken, 
and with him the false prophet, that wrought miracles before him, with 
which he deceived them that had received the mark of the beast, and them 
that worshipped his image ; these both were cast alive into the lake of fire, 
burning with brimstone. Here we see the beast and the false prophet is 
gone. Where is the devil ? He is left still. Therefore in the beginning of the 
20th chapter he tells us what becomes of the devil : I saw an angel come 
down from heaven, having the key of the bottomless pit, and a great chain 
in his hand; and he laid hold of the devil and bound him a thousand years, 
and cast him into the bottomless pit, and shut him up, set a seal upon him, 
that he should deceive the nations no more, till the thousand years were 
ended. The devil, though he now travel the earth up and down, and is ruler 
over the world, yet here he is kept up that he may not deceive the nations. 
This was never yet fulfilled, it could not be fulfilled during the times of anti 
christ ; for the devil never deceived the creatures more than he did in that 
time ; and we see how it follows in order, after the beast is taken and de 
stroyed, then is Satan bound up. But we know the beast is not yet destroyed, 
therefore this thing is not yet come ; and it cannot be after the day of judg 
ment his binding up, for he is after his binding to be loosened a little season; 
and you shall find that after Satan is let loose a little while, then the day of 
judgment follows, when all the dead shall rise to be judged, as in the llth, 
12th, and 13th verses. 

Now, take notice, that when the devil is gone and thus shut up for a 
thousand years, what there is done in these thousand years, of that we read 
in the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th verses: * And I saw thrones, and they sat upon 
them, and judgment was given unto them. Who are they that have this 
judgment given unto them ? What is meant by judgment, but reigning and 
authority, that such shall have ? And I saw the souls of them that were 
beheaded for the witness of Jesus, and the word of G-od (which were the 
martyrs in the primitive times, under the Roman emperors persecution) and 
(saith he) which had not worshipped the beast, neither had received his 
mark on their foreheads, or in their hands, which were such as had stood it 
out in the times of antichrist, and had not defiled themselves. They lived, 
saith he, and reigned with Christ a thousand years, but the rest of the dead 
lived not again until the thousand years were finished. This is the first re 
surrection. Now it is said by some that the first resurrection is a spiritual 
resurrection of men s souls from the death of sin ; such interpretations are 



EPH. I. 21, 22.] THE KINGDOM OF CHRIST ASSERTED. 97 

commonly put upon it. Now I desire you would consider with yourselves a 
little, and weigh the place. 

First of all, it is the body of men that are said to be dead ; that is plain, 
for they are said to be beheaded or slain with the sword, for the witness of 
Jesus. It cannot be said so of the soul, that it is beheaded or slain with 
the sword. And as the death is, such must be the resurrection ; but their 
death was a natural death, and their resurrection must be answerable. And, 
saith he, they lived and reigned with Christ a thousand years. This is 
not meant the glory of heaven, that they reigned with Christ only there, for 
so they shall reign for ever with him, and so they had reigned from the first 
time that they were slain, they were with Christ in glory ; but this reigning 
is upon their rising from the dead, for, saith he, the rest of the dead lived 
not again ; therefore this rising of theirs is a living again. This, saith he, 
* is the first resurrection. Now, my brethren, consider further, where do 
these reign ? It seems it is on earth by this argument, because why else is 
the devil bound up ? He need not be bound up for their reigning in heaven ; 
but we see here, as a preparation to their reigning, the devil is bound. This 
is a place I could urge multitude of things out of, but I must not enlarge ; 
I know not likewise how to answer another place, Rev. v. 10, where we have 
the saints in John s time saying, * Thou hast made us kings and priests, and 
we shall reign on earth. They do not say we do reign, but we shall reign 
on earth, and then join with that what is said in 2 Peter iii. 13 : * We ac 
cording to his promise look for new heavens, and a new earth, &c. We 
apostles, we saints that live now, we look for it. How prove you that ? Be 
cause the use he makes of it shews as much, as in ver. 14, Wherefore, be 
loved, seeing you look for such things, be diligent, that you may be found of 
him in peace, without spot, and blameless. It could be no argument to 
them in those times to be holy and blameless, if they that lived in those 
times might not personally look for it. And what was it which, according to 
his promise, the saints then looked for ? It is for a new heaven and a new 
earth. If we take heaven properly, there is new heavens to be made, but the 
old heavens shall continue which was made from the foundation of the world, 
and where we shall ever be with Christ after the day of judgment. And 
how is there a new earth ? It shall be an earth wherein righteousness 
dwells ; because, as I said, it will be a new world, subject to Jesus Christ, 
when the new Jerusalem comes down from heaven. If you ask me what the 
saints that rise from the dead shall do here in this new world, for that I shall 
give you such considerations as shall take off the absurdity that seems to be 
in the thing. 

First, To tell you what they shall not do. They shall not eat and drink, 
nor marry, and give in marriage. So Christ tells us in Mat. xxii. 30, The 
children of the resurrection do none of these things. And therefore to 
imagine a Turkish heaven here below, is the absurdity that hath been put 
upon it, and which indeed made the fathers, many of them, after the first 
three hundred years after Christ, to fly out so much against this subject ; for 
there was an opinion then that Christ should reign at Jerusalem, and that 
they should abound in all several pleasures and delights, &c., and this the 
fathers were against. 

I have told you what they do not, I will tell you what they do. He tells 
ns, as I said before, that they shall be kings and priests, as in Rev. xx. 6 : 
Blessed and holy is he that hath part in the first resurrection. Why ? On 
such, saith he, * the second death hath no power ; they are out of all dan 
ger of it, being in a celestial state. But, saith he, they shall be priests 

VOL. XII. G 



98 THE WOELD TO COME ; OR, [EPH. I. 21, 22. 

of God and of Christ, and shall reign with him a thousand years. Here is 
both their reigning and their priesthood set out ; I would open it a little. 
First, they shall be kings. You heard before out of Heb. ii. 5, that he 
hath not put this world to come in subjection to angels. The angels now 
they are the thrones, and principalities, and great ones that rules this present 
world, but the saints shall be kings then. And for them to take the angels 
places, to be as the angels now are, after their resurrection, there is no ab 
surdity in it. Christ saith, after the resurrection, the saints they shall be as 
the angels of God, and they shall be priests likewise. I shall take off what 
absurdity there may seem to be in that by this. Our Saviour, when he took 
up his body out of the grave, he continued forty days upon the earth. What 
did Christ do all that while ? It is plain he performed the part of a priest 
and prophet ; he did instruct them in the worship of God, and speaking to 
them of things pertaining to the kingdom of God. So you read expressly in 
Acts i., the apostles had a brave teacher, Christ risen from the dead ; so he 
began that new world, and he remained forty days here of purpose to do it. 
Now consider, is it any absurdity for the saints to be conformed to Christ 
their Lord and Head, to run through the same states that he did ? He lived 
in this world, was poor and miserable, so are you ; when he died, he com 
mended his spirit into the hands of his Father, and whither his soul went 
our souls go. So likewise when he took his body again out of the grave, 
he remained forty days upon earth instructing his disciples in the things 
concerning the kingdom of God. If the saints do so when they take up their 
bodies again, in all this here is but a conformity to Christ : he ascended then 
up to heaven, and so shall his, and be for ever with the Lord. 

But the great objection is, that the souls of men that are now in heaven, 
and see the face of God, for them to come down and reign on earth, and do 
such service here below, it would be a disadvantage to them, or changing a 
better estate for a worse, which seems to be a great absurdity. 

For answer, consider, to take off the absurdity, that even this state I speak 
of will be a better state than what their souls are now possessed of, for other 
wise our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, when his body and soul was united 
again at his resurrection, was not in a better state than his soul was in after 
death, when it was separated from his body. Certainly his state after his 
resurrection, whilst upon earth, was better than his state before his resurrec 
tion. But you will say, They are now in heaven, where they behold the face 
of God as the angels do, which they may lose by coming here upon earth. 
That doth not follow, for the angels came down here below, and yet Christ 
saith, they always behold the face of their Father ; so may these saints on 
earth behold the face of God. Stephen, though a mortal man, yet the hea 
vens were opened to him : he saw the glory of God, and Jesus sitting at the 
right hand of his Father. My brethren, God hath eternity of time to reveal 
himself to his people in ; and he doth advance his favourites by degrees. 
First, he glorifies their souls apart ; after, when soul and body is united, it 
is in a better condition, simply considered, than the soul had before. How 
many ways God hath to manifest himself to his saints, and how many degrees 
they shall pass through, and how many worlds he will have to do it in, that 
is known to himself; however, the more the better. If God shall lead you 
by degrees through this and that glory, from one to another, it will be to 
your advantage ; as in a masque there are several shows, which adds to the 
excellency of it. God hath eternity of time to make all these shows and re 
presentations of himself to his children. And let me add this, that the will 
that he fulfilled, which is prayed for in that we call the Lord s prayer, Thy 
will be done on earth as it is in heaven. There is a time when the will of 



EPH. I. 21, 22.] THE KINGDOM OF CHRIST ASSERTED. 99 

God shall be done on earth as completely as in heaven, which is in that 
time of the first resurrection. My brethren, I have spoken these things as 
that which hath a great show of truth in it, and as that which is exceeding 
probable. I have told you my grounds for it, which I could never answer 
myself. 

Now, there is a fourth degree of this world to come, and that I am sure 
will hold; and that is, that time during the day of judgment, strictly so taken, 
after the general resurrection both of just and unjust. Then, to honour this 
new world, not only shall the saints come down, but Jesus Christ himself 
will come down and abide a long day here below. Therefore it is not ab 
surdity for saints to leave heaven, when Christ himself shall do it ; neither 
will it diminish anything from Christ s happiness, for he will come and bring 
all his glory with him. That we call the day of judgment will be a long 
day ; judge you yourselves whether it will be so or no. Do you think that 
the accounts of all the world can be cast up in the twinkling of an eye ? 
Doth not Solomon say expressly, that God will bring every work to judg 
ment, with every secret thing, whether good or evil, in Eccles. xii. ? And 
doth not the apostle say in 1 Cor. iv. 5, that when the Lord comes he will 
bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and will make manifest the 
counsels of the heart ? Will not this require much time ? Surely it will be a 
long day, when our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ will do that great work 
or service to God, the greatest that ever was, more than all his preaching, 
which is the examining the accounts of all the world, convincing all mankind 
of their evil, and sending them speechless to hell. Things shall be so there, 
that the saints shall be able to judge the world too, according to that in 
1 Cor. vi. 2. 

Now, here this new world will be in its height and perfection, here is 
Christ and all his saints and angels about him. Yet, not that this world 
shall be subject to angels, but they shall gather all the nations together, and 
shall execute the sentence that Christ pronounceth against them, and fling 
them all to hell ; but the angels shall not sit as judges, they shall stand and 
not sit, whereas the saints are said to sit upon twelve thrones, and they 
are said likewise in 1 Cor. vi. to judge angels. And now shall this world to 
come be at its perfection ; that creature that hath groaned under man s lusts 
shall then be fully restored to the glorious liberty of the sons of God ; the 
world will then be new hung. This is Christ s world to come, wherein he 
shall have all things subject to him. For at this time shall all things be 
under Christ s feet, and never till then ; for the last enemy that shall be 
destroyed is death ; and when all things shall be subdued to him, then shall 
the Son also himself be subject, then shall he give up the kingdom to the 
Father. And what that state is that shall come after Christ hath given up 
the kingdom to his Father, no man knows ; only the Scripture saith this of 
it, that God shall be all in all, and that Christ himself shall then be 
subject. 



ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO 
FINISH THE TEMPLE. 



TO THE HONOUEABLE HOUSE OF COMMONS, 

ASSEMBLED IN PARLIAMENT. 



YOUR command giving me the opportunity, I took the boldness to urge and 
encourage you to church reformation, which is the main scope of this sermon ; 
a subject which otherwise, and in all other auditories, I have been silent in, 
and am no whit sorry for it ; for I account it the most fit and happy season 
to utter things of this nature unto authority itself, although the people like 
wise are to know their duty. My comfort is, that what I have spoken herein, 
I have, for the general, and I have spoken but generals, long believed, and 
have therefore spoken. 

You were pleased so far to own me, as to betrust me with this service, to be 
God s mouth in public unto you ; and also this sermon of mine, as to com 
mand the publishing of it. Wherefore, as in propriety it is now become 
yours more than mine, or all the world s, so let it be in the use of it. If it 
shall add the least strengthening to your resolutions to keep this purpose for 
ever in the thoughts of your hearts, I have what I aimed at. Go on, worthy 
fathers and elders of this people, and prosper in, yea, by this work, without 
which nothing that you do will prosper. But the rest I shall speak to God 
for you. Let me be known to you by no other thing than this, to be one 
whose greatest desires and constant prayers are and have been, and utmost 
endeavours in my sphere shall be, for the making up the divisions of the 
church in these distracted times with love of truth and peace. And therein, 
to use David s words, am, 

Wholly at your commandment, 

THO. GOODWIN. 



ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO 
FINISH THE TEMPLE. 



Then he answered and spake unto me, saying, This is the word of the Lord unto 
Zerubbabel, saying, Not by might, nor by power, but by my Spirit, saith the 
Lord of hosts. Who art thou, great mountain ? before Zerubbabel thou 
shalt becom-e a plain : and he shall bring forth the head-stone thereof with 
shoutings, crying, Grace, Grace unto it. Moreover, the ivordofthe Lord came 
unto me, saying, The hands of Zerubbabel have laid the foundation of this 
house ; his hand shall also finish it ; and thou shalt know that the Lord of 
hosts hath sent me unto you. ZECH. IV. 6-9. 

THESE words are part of the interpretation of a stately vision of a candle 
stick, and two olive trees standing thereby and pouring oil into it, made to 
the prophet Zechariah in the 2d and 3d verses ; and the scope and matter, 
both of that vision and of this interpretation, is to encourage Zerubbabel 
their prince, and with him the priests and elders of the Jews, to finish the 
building, and make complete the ornaments of the temple, whereof the foun 
dation had many years before been laid, but was left imperfect, and was left 
disfurnished. And this his scope is plainly, and without a parable, held 
forth in the 9th verse, The hands of Zerubbabel have laid the foundation 
of this house ; his hands shall also finish it. And, indeed, to stir him and 
them up unto this perfecting God s house, unto which work they had been 
too backward (as appears by Hag. i. 2-4, The people say, The time is not 
come that the Lord s house should be built ), was the principal end why 
God sent unto them no less than two prophets, Haggai and Zechariah, as 
two extraordinary ambassadors from heaven, on purpose to put them on upon 
it (for the finishing of the temple is a business of that moment as is worth 
two prophets at any time). And this appears not only by both their pro 
phecies, but also by the story, Ezra v. 1, 2, Then the prophet Haggai and 
Zechariah prophesied unto the Jews that were in Judah in the name of the 
God of Israel. Then rose up Zerubbabel and Jeshua, and began to build 
the house of God which is at Jerusalem : and with them were the prophets 
of God helping them. That same particle or circumstance of time, then, 
doth refer us to the story of those times, recorded in the book of Ezra, as 
that which is necessary for the full understanding of their two prophecies, 
what is recorded there being the occasion of them ; but more especially for 



ZECH. IV. 6-9.] ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT. 105 

the nnderstanding of this piece of our prophet Zechariah, his prophecy, 
which I have read unto you, which wholly concerns the finishing of the 
temple. 

I must necessarily, therefore, as a preparative introduction to the exposi 
tion of these words, set you down in, and give you a prospect of, those times, 
and the occurrences thereof, which were the occasion of these words here, 
Who art thou, great mountain ? &c. And if Zechariah himself, a prophet, 
and that lived in those times, knew not at the first the meaning of the vision 
in this chapter, ver. 5, * Knowest thou what these be ? And I said, No, my 
lord, much less shall we be able to know the interpretation thereof, and 
how fitted to this vision ; nor what this mountain here is, &c., without 
being prepossessed of the knowledge of this story, which in brief is this : 

The Babylonian monarchy (Rome s type) had trod down the holy city, 
and laid waste the temple and worship of God for seventy years ; which 
being expired, the Jews had liberty and authority from the first Persian king, 
Cyrus, to build the temple, and restore God s worship, according to their 
law. This is the sum of the first and second chapters of Ezra. In the third 
chapter you have an altar set up, sacrifices renewed, feasts kept, and the 
foundation of the temple laid (which was as true a type of that great refor 
mation from under popery). But after this work had been begun, and fairly 
carried on in all the fundamentals of it, there started up a company of Sama 
ritans that were adversaries to the Jews (as we read, chap. iv.). Samaritans 
they were, as appears by ver. 10, They were the nations seated in the city 
of Samaria, brought thither, ver. 2, in the room of the ten tribes ; a gene 
ration of men who were not heathens in their profession, for they professed 
the same religion with the Jews. So they allege for and arrogate to them 
selves in the aforesaid verse, * We seek your God as you do ; and we sacrifice 
unto him, and have done so long, * from the days of Esar-haddon, who 
brought us up hither ; and yet they were not true Jews neither, nor per 
fectly of the same religion, but of a mongrel and mixed kind, between the 
religion of the heathen and of the Jews, intermingling heathenish idolatries 
with Jewish worship. So 2 Kings xvii., ver. 38 and 41 compared, it is 
said, These nations feared the Lord, and served their graven images after 
the manner of the nations. Yea, they expected the same Messiah that the 
Jews did : * I know that the Messiah cometh, who is called Christ, saith 
the woman of Samaria, * and he will tell us all things, John iv. 25. Now 
these Samaritans were adversaries to the Jews (as they are called, ver. 1), 
and so unto their temple, and the finishing of it ; and yet at first they were 
but underhand adversaries, for they friendly offer to build with them : * Let 
us build with you, ver. 2, but so as with an intent to have defiled and 
spoiled the work. Zerubbabel and those other builders refusing them, they 
grew thereupon enraged, and openly professed their opposition, both weaken 
ing and discouraging the hands of the people ; and also, when they could 
not altogether hinder it, then they troubled them all they could in building ; 
thus ver. 4. And they ceased not here ; but further, they incensed and made 
the court against them (they growing potent there), both by hiring coun 
sellors against them, ver. 5, and also by insinuating to those mighty Persian 
kings such suggestions as they knew would take with monarchs ; misrepre 
senting these Jews unto them as of a rebellious spirit, opposite to kings and 
monarchy ; calling Jerusalem that rebellious and bad city ; so ver. 12, 
hurtful unto kings and provinces, and that had of old time moved sedi 
tion, so ver. 15 (for even thus old is this scandal), and that therefore these 
Jews must be kept under ; for if this city be builded, and the walls set up, 
and they once but get strength, * then they will not pay toll, tribute, and 



106 ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO [ZECH. IV. 6-9. 

custom, but withdraw their allegiance, so ver. 13. But, on the contrary, 
for themselves, they profess that they are their faithful servants, ver. 11, 
and that which made them speak was only a tenderness of the king s honour. 
So ver. 14, Now, because we have maintenance from the king s palace 
(had their dependence wholly upon them), * and it was not meet for us to 
see the king s dishonour, therefore have we certified the king. And by these 
their flatteries and misrepresentations, they raised up so great a mountain of 
opposition (as it is here called), that they frustrated the Jews good purpose 
of perfecting the building (as the words are, ver. 5) ; and though they could 
not prevail so far as to throw down the foundation laid, yet they made them 
to cease building any further * by force and power, so ver. 23. And thus 
the work did cease during all the days of Cyrus, and the reign of one or two 
kings more, even until the second year of Darius, ver. 5 and 24 ; and then 
it was that these prophets, Haggai and Zechariah, did prophesy unto the 
Jews, as it follows in the very next words, chap. v. 1, 2 ; then, when they 
had thus been overtopped by so potent a faction for many years, and with 
opposition wearied out, then it was that God stirred up our Zechariah to 
put spirits into them to revive the work again, and among other visions gave 
him this (which is in this fourth chapter) of all the most eminent, to strengthen 
them thereunto. And so I have brought you to Zechariah again, and unto 
the words of my text ; and now you shall see how necessary this story was 
to interpret this his prophecy, for which simply I have related it. 

The words are (as was said) the interpretation of a vision ; and to under 
stand either, we must take in both. Let us therefore first view the vision ; 
and, secondly, this the angel s interpretation of it, which are the two parts 
into which this whole chapter is resolved. 

The vision is made up of two things : 

First, A glorious candlestick all of gold, with a bowl or cistern upon the 
top of it, and with seven shafts, with seven lamps at the ends thereof, all 
lighted. 

And, secondly, that these lamps might have a perpetual supply of oil, 
without any accessory way of human help, there are presented (as growing 
by the candlestick) two fresh and green olive-trees on each side thereof, 
ver. 3, which do * empty out of themselves golden oil, ver. 12 ; that is, did 
naturally drop and distil it into that bowl, and the two pipes thereof, to feed 
the lamps continually : a vision so clear and full of light to set forth the 
work then to be done by the Jews, that the angel wonders that at the first 
sight the prophet should not understand it. 

First, This candlestick thus lighted betokened the full perfecting and 
finishing the temple, and restoring the worship of God within it unto its full 
perfection of beauty and brightness (as the psalmist speaks). And so the 
angel interprets it, This is the word of the Lord, ver. 6 ; that is, this 
hieroglyphic contains this word and mind of God in it, that, maugre all op 
position, Zerubbabel should * bring forth the head or top-stone that should 
finish the temple, so vers. 7 and 9. 

Secondly, The two olive trees betokened two eminent ranks and sorts of 
persons that should give their assistance to this work. 

First, Zerubbabel their prince, and the elders of the people with him. 

Secondly, Jeshua the high priest, and the other priests with him ; and of 
both these the rabbi doctors have long ago expounded it. 

And accordingly, both in the story, Ezra v. 2, and in these two prophets, 
we still find mention both of Zerubbabel and Jeshua as the builders of this 
house ; yet so as collective under Zerubbabel the elders, and under Jeshua 
the other priests are to be understood as included and intended; and there- 



ZECH. IV. 6-9.] FINISH THE TEMPLE. 107 

fore, in the third chapter of this prophecy, ver. 8, when Jeshua is spoken to, 
the other priests his fellows are spoken to together with him, Hear, 
Jeshua, thou and thy fellows that sit before thee. And in like manner, when 
Zerubbabel is here spoken to in the text to build the temple, the elders his 
fellows are intended in him ; and accordingly, Ezra vi. 14, it is said that 
the elders of the Jews builded and finished the temple. And so these, 
taken together, are the two olive trees. 

Now concerning the first part of this vision, namely, the candlestick, with 
all its lamps lighted, you may ask how this should come to be a fit hiero 
glyphic to betoken this work of finishing and perfecting the temple ? I 
answer thus : the candlestick was one of the chief utensils and ornaments of 
the temple, and therefore is still first mentioned, as in Exod. xxv. 31, and in 
the 9th to the Hebrews, ver. 2, where all the sacred household stuff of the 
inner temple are specified. The candlestick, as being chief, is ranked first, 
4 Wherein was the candlestick, and the table, and the shewbread, and there 
fore is here most aptly put for the bringing in all the rest into the temple, 
and of all those other best and aptliest served to represent the finishing 
thereof; for whilst the temple remained uncovered with a roof, there was no 
bringing in the candlestick as lighted ; and till then, there needed no light 
to be brought into it, it being sub dio, under open air. But when the house 
itself should once be reared according to the pattern, without the candlestick 
and its light, it would have been full of darkness (as some affirm, which I 
will not now dispute) ; for however, the bringing in the candlestick argued 
not only the completeness of the edifice and building itself, but also, by a 
synecdoche, the introducing all sorts of ordinances that were appointed for the 
adorning of it. An altar would not so evidently or necessarily have supposed 
the temple perfected ; for, Ezra iii. 3, an altar was set up when yet not so 
much as the foundation of the temple was laid, ver. 6 ; but a candlestick, 
and that lighted too, supposes the house built, and completely furnished ; 
and therefore under the gospel their whole church state, and that, as in the 
primitive times, under their full perfection, is set forth by seven golden 
candlesticks, so Rev. i. 13, which, ver. 20, are interpreted to be the seven 
churches of Asia. The difference is, that here is but one candlestick, be 
cause the church of the Jews was national, and but one ; but there are seven, 
for the churches under the gospel are many. 

And for that other part of the vision, the representing Zerubbabel and 
Jeshua by two olive trees, and those planted in God s court, so near the 
candlestick, is no new or strange thing. For David being the ruler of the 
Jews, and a nursing father to the church, compares himself to a green olive 
tree in the house of God, Ps. Hi. 8, and the pillars of the doors of the 
temple, and the cherubims therein, being made of that wood. The allusion 
is less remote. And these emptied golden oil, that is, their estates and 
pains, for the finishing this costly work ; and likewise because it was done 
in sincerity of heart, therefore it is called golden or pure oil. And further, 
seeing it was made the duty of every Jew to bring pure oil olive beaten, to 
cause the lamps to burn continually, as Lev. xxiv. 2, hence, therefore, to 
compare the eminent persons, the magistrates and priests of that church, to 
olive trees themselves, that for the first lighting of the candlestick did natu 
rally afford it, was every way most elegant. And they are called sons of 
oil, ver. 14, as being fruitful, and affording plenty of it. Thus, Isa. v. 1, a 
1 fruitful hill, and a fertile soil, is in the original (as here) called a son of 
oil. And thus much for the vision. 

Now for the interpretation of it in the words of the text. As it explains 
the mind of the vision, so it adds all encouragements unto them to set upon 



108 ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO [ZECH. IV. 6-9. 

this work. First, by assuring them that that mountain of opposition (which 
you heard in the story was raised up against it) should be made a plain 
before them ; namely, that Samaritan faction which was backed by many of 
the people of the land, Ezra iv. 4. A mountain is a similitude frequent 
in Scripture, to note out high and potent opposition lying in the way of God s 
proceedings : Prepare ye the way of the Lord ; every mountain shall be 
brought low, Luke iii. 5. And so the poets do express their feigned war of 
the giants against the gods by heaping up mountain upon mountain. 

And, secondly, whereas their doubting hearts might ask, how this was 
possible, it being so great and so rooted a mountain, with such foundations ; 
where are the spades, the means that should remove it ? The angel an 
swers, Not by might (or, as in the original, an army or multitude), nor 
by power (of authority), that was in any human foresight, as yet like to 
countenance it, but by my Spirit ; and he that says it is the Lord of 
hosts. By his Spirit, meaning both the Holy Ghost, inclining and strength 
ening their hearts, yea, turning those of their opposites thereunto ; and by 
Spirit also meaning many concurrent acts of providence, which fall in to the 
ejecting of it : for there is said to be a spirit of life in the wheels of pro 
vidence, which moves them, Ezek. i. 20. Not but that God did use the 
power and authority of the Persian monarchy ; for, Ezra vi. 8, Darius re 
versed the former decree, and made a new one for the building of the house. 
But because that God, by his Spirit and own immediate hand, brought about 
the power of that state to countenance it. Therefore it is said to be, not by 
power, but by the Spirit ; and for this he used not an army, as it is in the 
margin ; there was no sword drawn, the state stood as it did, but by my 
Spirit, says the Lord of hosts; that so it might appear, that although 
Zerubbabel s hand was in it, yet that God would bring it so to pass, that 
nothing should be ascribed to them, but the glory of all unto God himself. 

Which is the third thing in this speech of the angel here, that when the 
house should be finished, signified by Zerubbabel s bringing forth the head 
stone thereof (as master builders use to do the first and last stone), they 
should, with many shoutings and acclamations of joy, cry, Grace, grace 
unto it ; that is, magnify God s mere free grace, and acknowledge this to 
have been the work of it alone ; and it was marvellous in their eyes. 

Thus much for the exposition of the words. I shall now raise some ob 
servations out of them. 

Obs. 1. Out of the recited story, and what is here said in the 9th verse, 
which doth put Jeshua upon finishing the temple, the first observation is this, 
that God carries on the building of the second temple after the coming out 
of Babylon (which was a type of the reformation of our churches), not all at 
once, but by degrees. The first temple under the Old Testament was at 
once erected perfect, so by Solomon ; and the tabernacle before him, by 
Moses, was quickly finished, according to the pattern of the mount, Exod. 
xl. 43 ; but this second temple, after the captivity, received degrees of rearing 
of it. And thus, in the New Testament, those primitive churches were set 
up perfect (as for matter of rules) by the holy apostles. And so it was meet 
they should be, because the pattern was but once to be given in the model 
of them. But antichristianism having laid that temple desolate, and defiled 
God s worship in all parts of it, and those ages, wherein it should be re 
stored, wanting apostles immediately inspired, hence the restoration of them 
becomes a work of time : the Holy Ghost, age after age, gradually reveal 
ing pieces of the platform of it ; the Spirit by degrees consuming and dispel 
ling the darkness that antichristianism had brought in, by light shining 
clearer and clearer to the perfect day, which is the brightness of Christ s 



ZECH. IV. 6-9.] FINISH THE TEMPLE. 109 

coming, as 2 Thes. ii. 8. Compare we for this the type, the building of this 
second temple here, with this antitype under the gospel. 

These Jews, when first they were come out of Babylon, and gathered to 
mount Sion (which was holy ground, where they might sacrifice), they erected 
an altar only, Ezra iii., and that in haste, the fear of the people of the coun 
try being upon them, ver. 3, and so a poor and mean one, and (as it is 
thought), but of earth, as in the law of Moses, direction was given, before 
the tabernacle was reared ; and accordingly, of this here it is said, As it is 
written in the law of Moses, ver. 2. They now began the world anew, and 
offered burnt sacrifices upon mount Sion, kept a few feasts ; but, says the 
6th verse, the foundation of the temple was not yet laid. Then, in the 
8th verse, it is said that the foundation of the temple was laid, but left im 
perfect. But many years after, and after the succession of two or three 
kings, the temple is said to be finished, chap. vi. 15. 

Come we now to the antitype, the times of reformation from under 
popery : in the story of which like gradual proceedings might easily be ob 
served out of ecclesiastical story, if it would not be too long to make such 
narrations. I will rather take it as it is briefly and at once presented by the 
Holy Ghost himself in that great prophecy of the New Testament, and the 
succeeding times thereof, the book of Kevelation. In the 13th chapter 
throughout, you have the beast of Kome in one entire view presented in his 
height, and as possessing all the European world as worshippers of him. 
And then, in the 14th and following chapters, you oppositely have Christ, 
and those that followed him ; and the story of their separation from, and 
the several degrees of winning ground upon, that beast, in the like entire 
view laid forth before you. In the 1st verse, the Lamb appears with his com 
pany, nakedly standing upon mount Sion, without the mention of any 
temple as yet built over their heads, even such as these Jews condition was 
when they came first to Sion. Some ordinances they had ; they * harping 
with their harps, ver. 2, and sung as it were a new song, uttering some 
thing differing from the doctrine of those times, but so confusedly, as * no 
man could learn that song, ver. 3; and they in a great part kept themselves 
virgins, and from being defiled with the fornications of the whore. And these 
are said to be the first fruits to God, ver. 4, that is, the first beginnings of a 
dislike of popery. But then, by degrees, the Lamb sends out three angels, 
to make a more open separation from Rome, the latter of which rises still 
higher than the former. The first, ver. 6, only preacheth the everlasting gos 
pel ; that is, salvation by Christ alone, and calleth upon men to fear and wor 
ship God alone, who made heaven and earth, and not to worship saints and 
angels (thus the Waldenses did). But then, ver. 8, an age or two after that, 
there follow others who proclaim with open mouth, and tell Rome to her 
face that she is the whore of Babylon (thus Wickliffe and Huss). And then, 
ver. 9, after these follows a third angel, who proceeds further, and preaches 
that all those who will cleave unto her doctrine and superstitions, shall 
drink of the wrath of God for ever ; and so urge a separation from her, 
upon pain of damnation. And then, at ver. 14, you have the Son of man 
crowned, the Lamb having overcome the kings, to profess and countenance 
the protestant religion with their authority. And then, ver. 15, you have 
mention of a temple, churches being in all these northern parts publicly 
erected by their allowance and commandment ; as the Jews did build the 
temple by the decree of Cyrus. And, chap, xv., the pourers out of the vials 
do come all forth of the temple, ver. 6. And if we consult the llth chapter 
(the main occurrences of which are evidently contemporary, and do sum up 
the story of the same time with the vials, as by comparing the one with the 



110 ZEETJBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO [ZECH. IV. 6-9. 

other, late interpreters have observed), this book running over two entire 
prophecies of all times (each of them), whereof the first ends at the end of 
chap. xi. Now in that chapter (which therefore contains the story of the 
last times), there are three editions of that temple plainly intimated. The 
first, supposed to be already standing when the vision is given, but imper 
fect in this, that it hath too great an outward court of an ignorant and pro 
fane multitude laid to it. And therefore John, bearing the person of the 
godly of that age, is stirred up to set upon a second reformation of it, and 
is bidden to measure that temple, altar, and worshippers anew, and to cast 
out that outward court that had defiled it. And then, ver. 19, there is a 
third edition of an holy of holies, for therein the ark is said to be seen ; now 
the ark stood only in the holy of holies : noting out a more perfect church 
at last than all the former had been. A manifest allusion this is unto those 
three parts of Solomon s temple, the outward court, the inward temple, and 
the holy of holies. 

Thus much perhaps might more clearly have been discovered in the story 
of the Keformation, but I judged it would better and more briefly be done 
in this the prophecy of it. 

Use. Let no church therefore think itself perfect and needing nothing (as 
bragging Laodicea did), especially when it hath but that first foundation 
which it had when it came newly out of Babylon, and more especially in 
matters of worship and discipline. It is no dishonour unto those reformers 
to say that they fully finished not this work, as it was not unto Zerubbabel 
here that he perfected not the temple at first. Blessed men ! It is evident 
they purposed more than they did or could effect, because the people s hearts 
were not as yet prepared, as the phrase is, 2 Chron. xx. 33. In our veiy 
Common Prayer book there is an until the said discipline maybe restored, 
which argueth they aimed at more ; and besides, they were not apostles, 
to whom nothing might be added, as Gal. ii. 6 ; and God, raising up the 
tabernacle that was fallen down, not by immediate inspiration (as at first by 
the apostles), but by his Spirit, renewing and begetting light in an ordinary 
way. Hence, therefore, the church s coming out of the darkness of popery 
must needs recover that fulness and perfection of light (which the apostolical 
times had) croXu/^gw;, by piecemeals and degrees. As for the great things of 
the gospel, matters of faith or doctrine, they had so happy a hand therein 
that there is to be found little if any hay or stubble therein ; but in matters 
of order, which concern worship or discipline (for so the apostle distinguisheth 
Col. ii. 5, faith and order ), let it be inquired into, whether they were so 
exact therein. Although this must be said, that God did take care for all 
fundamental ordinances of his worship, and it is a bitter error and full of 
cruelty to say, We have had no churches, no ministers, no sacraments, but 
antichristianal. God s first and chief care was to build up his church mys 
tical, to make men saints, and he hath made glorious ones in their personal 
walkings with him ; and to that end he made a plentiful provision in matters 
of faith, even from the very first. It fell out in this case as in a new planta 
tion, which if men were to make in another world, and so to begin the world 
anew, their first care would be to provide necessaries for their subsistence as 
they are men ; to have corn for bread, cattle for meat, and the like ; but 
matters of order and government they think of afterwards, and often fall into 
the right by seeing their errors by degrees. Think not much, therefore, that 
men call for (as most men do) a reformation of some things amiss in matters 
of worship and discipline, or an addition of some things ; perhaps a candle 
stick or some other utensil or ordinance of church worship, is found wanting. 
You will wonder that all along during the reign of those good kings, both 



ZECH. IV. 6-9. J FINISH THE TEMPLE. Ill 

David, Solomon (who yet gave the pattern of, and also built, the temple), 
and those other reformers among the kings of Judah, there should something 
have been omitted about the feast of tabernacles until their coming out 
of the Babylonish captivity. Yet we find it was so, as appears by Neh. 
viii. 16, 17, The people went forth, and made themselves booths, every 
one upon the roof of his house, and in their courts, and in the courts of 
God s house, and in the streets ; and since the days of Joshua the son of 
Nun, until that day, the children of Israel had not done so. This feast was 
kept (as is thought) by Solomon, 2 Chron. vii. 8, and by these same Jews, 
Ezra iii. 4, yet not in this manner according unto the law ; and therefore 
at the 14th verse of that of Nehemiah it is said, * They found it written in 
the law, that the children of Israel should dwell in booths, which before that 
they had not done, although they might have kept that feast. But now they 
had learned by a sad experience to keep it aright with dwelling in booths, 
by having been lately strangers out of their own land ; to signify which, and 
to profess themselves strangers, was the intent of that feast, and that rite of 
it, the dwelling in booths. And this reason is intimated in the 17th verse : 
* All the congregation that were come again out of the captivity made booths, 
&c. They did read also every day out of the law, ver 19, which before when 
that feast was celebrated they had not done. 

Obs. 2. A second observation, that in the greatest businesses, which most 
concern the good of God s church and his own glory, he ofttimes suffers 
mountains of opposition to lie in the way of them ; so here in the way to the 
building and perfecting his church. To give another instance of it, and that 
the highest. The salvation of the sons of men, whom he hath chosen before 
all worlds, is a business which of all other he most minded and effectually 
intended ; but doth he bring it about without rubs ? Never such mountains 
lay in the way of any business. Adam, he sins, and in him all those whom 
God meant to save, whereby the way to their salvation was quite blocked up. 
Mountains of sins make a separation between him and them, Isa. lix. 2, and 
not all the power of men and angels can any whit move, much less remove, 
them, no more than straws can move a mountain. But then comes the Son 
of God, who throws and buries all these mountains in the bottom of the sea. 
And when Christ had thus removed the guilt of sin, and would come into 
men s hearts to apply his death, there lie as high mountains in his way to 
us, as before lay in ours to him : Luke iii. 5, Prepare ye the way of the 
Lord, make his paths straight : every mountain shall be brought low. 
There are high things and strong holds, 2 Cor. x. 4, that exalt themselves 
against the knowledge of Christ ; but all these shall be brought low, and 
shall be made a plain. And as this is found true in the salvation of the 
church by Christ, so in its preservation and growth. There is almost no 
mercy, but some mountain or other lies in the way of it. 

Reason. And the reason of this dispensation of God s is, both that his hand 
and power in bringing things to pass for his church may be seen and acknow 
ledged, and that his enemies may be confounded. 1 put both these reasons 
in one, because we find them mentioned together in one place, Neh. vi. 16 ; 
in which chapter you may read of the great opposition made in building the 
city, as here the temple, which yet when God had carried on, It came to 
pass, says that 16th verse, that when all their enemies heard thereof, and 
all that were about them saw these things, they were much cast down in 
their own eyes (there is one part of the reason), for they perceived that 
this work was wrought by our God ; there is the other part. First, God s 
power appears in carrying things through much opposition. If there were 
a full concurrence of all second causes, and a general suffrage of them, his 



112 ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO [ZECH. IV. 6-9. 

voice would then be lost and swallowed up among that crowd ; but when 
there is a great canvas (as in colleges we call it) then the power of his casting 
voice appears. Thus, why is God said to * bring Israel out of Egypt with a 
strong hand, Exod. xiii. 30, but because it was carried on through much 
opposition ? There lay no less than ten mountains in the way of it. Pha 
raoh s heart was hardened ten times, which God did on purpose to shew his 
power, Exod. ix. 6. Secondly, he doth it to confound his enemies the more, 
which usually goes together with doing good unto his church : * He renders 
vengeance to his adversaries, and is merciful to his land, both at once, 
Deut. xxxii. 43. He often suffers them to have the ball at their foot, till 
they come to the very goal, and yet then to miss the game, that so wherein 
they dealt proudly, he might shew himself above them, which is Jethro s 
reason, Exod. xviii. 9. 

Obs. 3. This observation but in general. More particularly, a third ob 
servation is this : that temple- work especially useth to meet with opposition. 
You shall find the building and the finishing of this temple, in all the degrees of 
it, to have had many contentions against it, all along accompanying it. 
Thus, when first that altar was set up, Ezra iii. 3, it is said, that * fear was 
upon them because of the people of those countries. Again, when the 
foundation was laid, what interruption that met with, you heard before, out 
of the 4th chapter ; and lastly, when they came to finish it, chapter v. 2, at 
verse 3, their enemies came and questioned them for it ; who hath com 
manded you to build this house? &c., and the devil was in it, in a pure 
opposition to the temple ; for they had suffered them to build their own 
houses, as appears, Hag. ii. 4, and never stirred against them, but only now 
when they began to build the temple. Thus, in the New Testament, 
sEdificabo ecclesiam, I will build my church, hath and will always have the 
gates (or the power) of hell following it to oppose it. I could demonstrate 
it all along out of that story also, but it would be too long. 

Reason 1. The reasons of it are, 

First, There is nothing more contrary to Satan than the setting up of 
God s worship, and the purifying and completing of it. And therefore, whilst 
the devil is god of this world, and hath any power therein, he will be sure to 
raise a head against that of all things else. So far as there are any aber 
rations in worship, Satan is set up ; and so far as the worship of God is 
perfected, God is set up, and Satan falls as lightning. Rev. iii. 9, false 
worshippers are called the * synagogue of Satan. 

Reason 2. Secondly, There is nothing more contrary to flesh and blood. 
When Paul came to set up evangelical and spiritual worship (which is called 
a reformation, Heb. ix. 10), he met with opposition everywhere ; and that 
from such who were worshippers also. There is a natural and blind devotion 
in men, that is most opposite to spiritual worship. Therefore, Acts xiii. 15, 
* devout women raised up a persecution against Paul. And men are addicted 
to their old customs, and what they were brought up in. Thus it is said of 
the Jews, though godly, that many thousands of them opposed Paul, out of 
their zeal to the law they were brought up in : Acts xxi. 20, * Many thou 
sands of the Jews which believe, are all zealous of the law : and thereupon, 
at verse 27, we read that they stirred up the people, crying out, verse 28, 
Men of Israel, help : this is the man that teacheth everywhere against the 
people, and this place (namely the temple, and the ceremonial worship of it). 

Use. The use of both these points together is, not to be discouraged in, 
or think the worse of any business that is for God, because of difficulties and 
interruptions. In the 4th of Nehemiah, when the Jews went to build the 
walls of the city, the enemies mocked them, and said, What will these feeble 



ZECH. IV. 6-9.] FINISH THE TEMPLE. 113 

Jews do ? but still, verse 6, the people they went on, for they had a mind 
to work; which when their enemies heard of, they then set upon them with 
open force of arms, verse 8. Yet nevertheless, We, says he, made our 
prayer to God, and set a watch day and night ; they doubled their care and 
pains, and wrought both night and day, and did not put off thsir clothes, 
verse 21. And when Nehemiah heard that the enemy threatened to kill him, 
on purpose to dishearten him, yet, chapter vi., he would not flee, verse 11, 
neither was he at all disheartened, as knowing it was a sin to be afraid, 
verse 13. 

Obs. 4. There is no mountain of opposition so great, that can stand be 
fore Zerubbabel (or God s people), especially when he goes about to finish 
the temple. (I might have made two observations of it, but I put them both 
together,) You see how contemptuously he here speaks of the opposition 
made : * Who art thou, great mountain T though great in their own eyes, 
yet as nothing in his. He speaks as a giant unto a pigmy : Who art thou? 
I will name one place more suitable to this allusion : Isa. xli. 14, -15, 
* Fear not, thou worm Jacob : I will help thee, saith the Lord. Behold, I 
will make thee a new sharp thrashing instrument having teeth : thou shalt 
thrash the mountains, and beat them small, and thou shall make the hills as 
chaff. He supposeth, in these his expressions, the church to be in the 
lowest, weakest, and most contemptible condition that might be : a worm, 
which no man fears, for it cannot do the least hurt, and which no man loves; 
yea, thinks it no cruelty or oppression to tread upon and kill. On the other 
side, he speaks of the enemies, all that might argue greatness, strength, and 
exaltation ; he calls them mountains and hills. And what an unequal match 
is this, for worms to be set upon mountains to overthrow them ! Yet, says 
God, I will take this worm (for it must be his power must do it), and make 
it as a new sharp thrashing instrument with teeth (with which kind of in 
strument those eastern countries did use to mash in pieces their rougher and 
harder fodder for their cattle), which shall thrash these mountains even as 
small as chaff, which is scattered with the wind, as verse 16. This is the 
metaphor, the plain song you have in the llth and 12th verses, Behold, all 
they that are incensed against thee shall perish ; and those that contended 
with thee be as a thing of nought. But this is especially found true when 
God s people go about to build the temple ; no mountain then can stand to 
hinder them. There stood in the way of laying the foundation of this 
temple, the greatest mountain that was then (and well nigh that hath been 
since) upon the earth, the Babylonish monarchy, by the power of which 
these Jews were detained captives, and they would never have let them go. 
And therefore, Isa. IviL 14, this phrase is used, Cast ye up, cast ye up, 
take the stumbling-block out of the way of my people ; and more expressly, 
Jer. li. 25, the prophet calls Babel a destroying mountain, I am against 
thee, destroying mountain ; and for strength of situation he compares it 
to a mountain seated upon a rock, which is a farther addition of fortification 
to it. Yet, says God, * I will stretch out my hand upon thee, and roll thee 
down from the rocks, and make thee a burnt mountain, so as they shall not 
take from thee a stone for a corner, or for foundations, verse 26. Whereas 
thou didst unbuild Jerusalem and my temple, I will unbuild thee, so as not 
so much as a stone of thee shall serve for any other building, but my Sion 
shall be built again. For to what end was the mountain thus removed ? 
Even that poor Jerusalem, and God s temple there, might be built again. 
Thus Isa. xliv. 28, and xlv. 1st and 2d verses compared, Thus saith 
the Lord of Cyrus, He is my shepherd, and shall perform all my pleasure ; 

VOL. XII. H 



114 ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO [ZECH. IV. 6-9. 

even saying to Jerusalem, Thou shalt be built ; and to the temple, Thy 
foundation shall be laid. Cyrus and his army were the workmen whom 
God hired to cast up (as Isaiah s phrase is) or throw down (as Jeremiah) 
this rubbish that lay in his people s way, and of their building this temple. 
And all the victories that Cyrus obtained, and hidden treasures that through 
spoils he acquired, were all that Jerusalem might be built. So it follows in 
the 45th chapter 1-4 verses, and so on, Thus saith the Lord to Cyrus, 
whose right hand I have strengthened to subdue nations before me ; and I 
will loose the loins of kings. He was to overcome other nations and kings, 
before he could come at Babylon ; as Croesus, that rich king of Lydia, &c. 
And God threw down all afore him : I will go before thee ; I will break in 
pieces the gates of brass, and cut in sunder the bars of iron (all difficulties 
liew open, and nothing could stand in his way), and I will give thee the 
treasures of darkness, the hidden riches of secret places. And why did 
God do all this for him ? For Jacob my servant s sake, and Israel mine 
elect. For otherwise, says God of this Cyrus, thou hast not known me, so 
verse 4. All this which God did for him was that he might * perform God s 
pleasure, saying to Jerusalem, Be built, and to the temple, Thy foundation 
shall be laid, as you had it out of the last verse of the foregoing chapter. 

And then again, when the foundation thereof was thus happily laid, there 
stood (as you see in the text) another mountain in the way to the finishing 
and perfecting of it, namely, this Samaritan faction, who gained the power 
of that Persian monarchy to be against it ; of which mountain the prophet 
here in like manner says, that it should be made a plain. And if the Persian 
monarch Darius had not come off too as he did, Ezra vi., from the 1st verse 
to the end of the chapter, God would have served him as he had done 
Babylon : Be ye wise therefore now, kings, and instructed, -ye judges 
of the earth. 

Reason. The reason of all this lies but in three words which God hath 
spoken once, yea twice, JEdificabo ecdesiam meam, I will build my church, 
which have more force in them than all the created power of heaven, earth, 
or hell. He had said it in the Old Testament (as you heard), Isa. xliv. 28, 
saying to Jerusalem, Thou shalt be built ; and to the temple, Thy founda 
tion shall be laid. And Christ said it over again in the New Testament : 
Mat. xvi. 18, * I will build my church. He speaks of that church under the 
New Testament, which in future ages was to come. And what follows ? 
* The gates of hell shall not prevail against it. You heard before in the Old 
Testament, that the brass gates were opened to make way for the building 
of that temple, Isa. xlv. 2. But here in the New Testament there are 
stronger gates than of brass ; here are the gates of hell ; which yet Christ, 
like another Samson, flings off their hinges. As whilst the devil is god of 
the world, jffldificabo ecdesiam meam shall be sure to be hindered, if he can ; 
so whilst Christ is king of this world, and hath all power committed to him, 
both in heaven and earth, most certainly the gates of hell shall never pre 
vail against it. It is this same JEdificabo ecdesiam meam, I will build my 
church, that hath made all the stir in the world. I remember in the year 
1619, or 1620, or thereabouts, when the wars in Germany began, it was re 
ported that a great brass image of the apostle Peter, which had that pre 
tended claim, by which Rome would hold her keys, fairly embossed upon a 
roll that hung down upon the image, in these words, Tu es Petrus, et super 
hanc petram adificabo ecdesiam: et tibi dabo claves, dc., * Thou art 
Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church ; and I will give to thee 
the keys, &c., standing (as I take it) in St Peter s Church at Rome ; there 
was a great and massive stone fell down upon it, and so shattered it to 



ZECH. IV. 6-9.] FINISH THE TEMPLE. 115 

pieces, that not a letter of all that sentence (whereon Rome founds her 
claim) was left whole, so as to be read, saving this one piece of that sentence, 
jffidificabo ecclesiam meam t I will build my church, which was left fair and 
entire. 

That promise, I will build my church, is the magna charta, yea, the 
prima charta, the great and first charter of the saints in the New Testa 
ment ; those words in the 16th of Matthew being the first that Christ uttered 
about it, and so contain within them all lesser promises of all sorts that 
follow, that concern the building of his church, or any piece of it. Now all 
that concern the building of his church are reducible unto these two heads : 
First, the preservation and enlarging of his church mystical, and of his 
saints on earth ; and thus considering them personally, although they should 
be scattered each from other. Or secondly, the building up his church, as 
gathered in assemblies to hold forth his public worship in the world, as that 
place fore-mentioned is apparently to be understood by the next words ; for 
he speaks of the keys in the following verse, whereby are meant all media 
cultus, all ordinances of worship whereby his church is built. So then this 
reason, taken from adijicabo ecclesiam, branches itself into two parts : the 
first is taken from his love to his church mystical, or his saints simply con 
sidered as such ; the second is from his interest in his own worship ; for 
which he loves his churches that are the seat of it more than all the world. 

1. His love to his church mystical is such that no mountain of opposition 
can stand before it, to hinder the enlargement and building of it up. This 
reason you have Isa. xliii. 3, 4, I gave Egypt for thy ransom, Ethiopia 
and Seba for thee. Since thou wast precious in my sight, thou hast been 
honourable, and I have loved thee : therefore will I give men for thee, and 
people for thy life. It is put upon this reason, quia amavi te, * because I 
have loved thee, and that more than all the world. Or if you will have it 
expressed in the language of this similitude here in the text, Mountains 
shall depart, and hills be removed, but my kindness shall not depart from 
thee, says God, Isa. liv. 10. It is such a kind of speech as that of Christ s: 
Heaven and earth shall pass away, but not a tittle of my word, &c. 

2. His love to his churches, holding forth his name and worship in the 
world, is such, as nothing shall withstand the repairing and perfecting of 
them, and of that his worship, and every parcel of it. If God had not such 
assemblies in the world, he should have no worship. Therefore these 
churches are called the ground and pillar of truth, both where it grows 
and where it is held forth, 1 Tim. iii. 15. He there speaks of church as 
semblies, as wherein Timothy was to learn how as an evangelist to behave 
himself, in the ordering and governing of them, as you have it in the words 
immediately foregoing : That thou mightest know how to behave thyself in 
the house of God, &c. And the truth is, that that building of the house of 
God, of which only Zechariah here gives us occasion to speak, was but the 
completing all the ordinances of worship. It was not so much the building 
up the nation of the Jews that was here directly intended, but the building 
of their temple, the seat of worship, and introducing the candlestick, &c. 
And their assemblings there to worship according to God s own prescription 
was more to him, and is so still, than whatever else was or is done in the 
world. In the 87th Psalm, ver. 2, The Lord loves the gates of Sion more 
than all the dwellings of Jacob. The gates of Sion were the gates of the 
temple that stood upon mount Sion, set open for the Jews to worship in ; 
and these he loves more than other societies or assemblings, though of Jacob, 
and this more than them all, take them all together ; whether civil in their 



116 ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO [ZECH. IV. 6-9. 

cities and families, or religious in their synagogues ; where they were capable 
but of some few, not of all the ordinances that were in the temple. 

And the reason of this his love, is the great concernment that his public 
worship is of unto him. God hath but three things dear unto him in this 
world, his saints, his worship, and his truth ; and it is hard to say which of 
these is dearest unto him ; they are mutud sibi fines. God therefore ordained 
saints to be in the world, that he might be worshipped ; and reciprocally ap 
pointed these ordinances of worship as means to build up his saints. In 
the commandments, the epitome of the Old Testament, the institutions of 
God s worship have the second place. The second commandment is wholly 
spent thereon ; and therein how jealous doth God profess himself of any 
aberration or swerving from his own rules. Now jealousy, you know, pro 
ceeds from the deepest love. Yea, the third and fourth commandments are 
taken up about it also : the one about the manner, that his name (for so his 
worship is called, Micah iv. 5, compared with verses 2 and 3) might not be 
taken in vain ; the other about the time. And then in the Lord s prayer, 
which is the epitome of the New Testament, in the second petition, if not the 
first, the worship and government of his church comes in ; for his worship 
is his name, as was said, and we desire that to be hallowed : and nothing is 
more properly Christ s visible kingdom here than the right administration 
of ordinances in his church, which do set him up as King of saints. To this 
purpose I shall open that in the 15th of the Revelations, where, when the saints 
had got a temple over their heads, ver. 6, as was before hinted, then they 
call for a true and right worshipping of Christ, and this because he was 
King of saints. They sing : Great and marvellous are thy works, Lord 
God almighty ; just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints, Who shall 
not fear thee, Lord, and glorify thy name ? for thou only art holy : and 
all nations shall come and worship before thee, &c. There are three pairs 
or conjugata, which harmoniously answer one to another : first, here is a 
double title and kingdom given unto Christ, (1.) Lord almighty ; (2.) King 
of saints ; or, if you will, he is King of nations, and King of saints : 
(1.) King of nations, for so in that parallel place, Jer. x, 7, from whence 
these words here uttered are evidently taken, and therefore it is quoted in the 
margin, he is called ; and so is all one with that expression here, Lord God 
almighty, unto which (2.) they add this other, Thou King of saints. 
And so these two are distinct, and both his titles. Then, secondly, here is 
a double duty suitably due unto him, according to these his titles, to fear him, 
and to worship him, both which are expressed by this general, to glorify his 
name. Thirdly, here is a double declaration of the justness of these titles, 
and the ground that calls for both these duties ; his great and marvellous 
works in the world declaring him to be Lord God almighty or King of 
nations, and therefore fear is due unto him ; and accordingly in Jeremiah 
we only read, Who would not fear thee, King of nations ? And then 
there are his just and true ways, declaring him to be King of saints, which 
these here in their song add unto that of Jeremiah ; and this calls for worship 
from us unto him : * Who shall not worship thee, King of saints ? for true 
and righteous are thy ways and judgments. In fine, here is Christ s supre 
macy acknowledged both in matters civil and ecclesiastical, in his govern 
ment of the world and of his church. And as he is known to be King of 
nations by his works of providence abroad in the world, so to be King of 
saints by those true and righteous ways wherein his churches are to walk. 
And a parallel place unto this latter, as that of Jeremiah was unto the 
former, is that in Ps. Ixviii. 24, where the psalmist, speaking of this worship 
of Christ, says, They have seen thy goings, God, even the goings of my 



ZECH. IV. 6-9.] FINISH THE TEMPLE. 117 

King in the sanctuary. Mark it ; the goings he speaks of are restrained to 
his goings in the sanctuary, and spoken of him also as the church s King, 
my king. And so the words are the very same in sense that they in the 
temple here do utter, * Just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints. 
And the psalmist evidently speaks of his ways of worship in the church, as 
appears by the very next words : ver. 25, The singers went before, the 
players on instruments followed after, &c., expressing the worship of him 
in his church in the language of the Old Testament, and he as their King in 
the midst of them, going in his greatest state. And yet more clearly, ver. 
26, Bless ye God in the congregations. Yea, and all this proves to be 
New Testament too, and a prophecy thereof, though uttered in the phrase 
of and in a prophecy of the Old. For what is said in ver. 18 before of this 
their King, is by the apostle, in Eph. iv. 8, applied unto Christ s ascension: 
Thou hast ascended up on high, thou hast led captivity captive, and hast 
received gifts for men, namely, the gifts for building of his church, and 
directing of his worship under the new Testament, as it is expounded by the 
apostle in the following verses. And therefore, that which I have even now 
cited out of that psalm, vers. 24, 25, 26, &c., is to be understood as meant 
of the worship of the gospel in the congregations thereof, erected after 
Christ s ascension. I shall add but this : these ways are called just and true, 
in opposition to ways invented by men, which on the contrary are unrighteous 
and false : Ps. cxix. 104, Through thy precepts I get understanding : there 
fore I hate every false way. There is certainly a right rule or way chalked 
out for every administration in God s sanctuary, if we could find it out. 

To illustrate all this by a similitude from other kings. Two things mani 
fest a king to be a king, and shew forth the glory of his majesty : 1. His 
power and rule abroad throughout all his dominions ; 2. The observance, the 
worship, and state ceremonies that are at court ; and these shew him to be 
king as much as the former. This we may see in Solomon, whose royalty 
and majesty was held forth thereby, as much as by his power : 2 Chron. ix. 
4, When the queen of Sheba had seen the house that he had built, the meat 
of his table, the attendance of his ministers, and their apparel, and his ascent 
by which he went up into the house of the Lord, it was said, there was no 
more spirit in her. And in the 17th and 19th verses, He made a throne 
for the glory of his majesty, the like whereof was not made in any kingdom. 
Now, Christ s court on earth are his churches, which are called God s house, 
Heb. x. 21 and 25 compared. And there his throne is set up, as in the 
temple of old. In all the visions of God, as sitting on a throne, made unto 
the prophets, that throne is presented as in the temple. So Isa. vi. 1, I 
saw the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled 
the temple. The temple was therefore called the place where God s hon 
our dwells, Ps. xxvi. 8, that is, his court, as some of our king s houses are 
called honours. And thus in the New Testament, in the representation of 
the church on earth as worshipping him, Rev. iv. 8th, 9th, and 10th verses, 
this church hath a throne in the midst of it, and God sits thereon, ver. 5, 
6, 7. So that, indeed, there is nothing doth more exalt and glorify God than 
his public worship, and the government of his church purely and rightly ad 
ministered : 1 Chron. xvi. 29, Give unto the Lord the glory due unto his 
name ; worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. These two are joined 
together ; the like you have Ps. xxix. 2. And it is part of that song which 
David made when he brought back the ark, and so set up God s worship. 
And further, in Isa. Ix. 7, it is called the house of his glory ; and that 
chapter is a prophecy of the gospel, ver. 5. 

Now, if the worship of God, and the government of his house, and every 



118 ZEEUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO [ZECH. IV. 6-9. 

ordinance thereof, tend so much to his glory, and set him up as King, then 
how much is he engaged to perfect it ! He will fully shew himself to be 
King of saints in his worship, as well as King of nations in his works. And 
therefore, as his work is said to be perfect, Deut. xxxii. 4, so he will in the 
end make his worship perfect (I speak for the outward administration of it.) 
even the perfection of beauty, as the psalmist calls it, Ps. 1. 2, which it can 
not be styled whilst any part is wanting or misplaced ; or, to conclude this 
reason in the language of the metaphor in the text, God is not like the foolish 
builder, that will begin to lay the foundation of his church, and not fully per 
fect and finish it. 

Use 1. The first use shall be an extract of the first branch of this doctrine. 
Let God s people, therefore, know their strength. Though their enemies be 
as mountains, yet in a cause of God and his church, let them not be affrighted 
at them, Deut. vii. 21 ; yea, let them despise them all, as the phrase is, 
Isa. xxxvii. 22. When Rabshakeh brought a threatening embassage from 
the king of Assyria, with this preface unto it, Thus saith the great king, 
the king of Assyria, Isa. xxxvi 4, Where are they among all the gods of the 
countries, that have delivered their land out of my hand ? &c. In answer 
to this, what doth good Hezekiah, through the prophet s encouragement, 
return again, but this, The virgin, the daughter of Sion, hath despised thee, 
Isa. xxxvii. 22. Although she be but a virgin, yet she hath a champion who 
is in love with her, that will take her part, and fight her quarrel. The people 
of God are weak in themselves, but they have a strong captain ; so Christ 
declares himself to be unto them : Joshua v. 14, As the captain of the 
Lord s host am I come. And if a lion be the captain, though the army 
consists but of harts and sheep, yet they will be too hard for the wolves that 
come against them. It is the comparison the Scripture useth : Isa. xxxi. 4, 
Like as the lion and the young lion roaring on his prey, when a multitude 
of shepherds are called forth against him, so shall the Lord of hosts come 
down to fight for mount Sion, and for the hill thereof. And then how still 
and quiet is the enemy and avenger ! Jesus Christ was born, as to be a 
king, so a conqueror ; and we may style him King Jesus the Conqueror. 
So Rev. vi. 2, He went forth conquering, and to conquer. 

Use 2. If God will throw down all mountains of opposition that hinder 
the perfecting of his church, then get up your faith and resolution for this 
great work of reforming the church, and forecast not what opposition you 
are like to encounter with ; get but your hearts filled with faith, and you will 
be able to say (as Zerubbabel here), Who art thou, great mountain ? 
It was long ere Zerubbabel could be brought to believe, or to resolve to do 
it, the discouragements were so great. The greater mountain of the two was 
the unbelief in his own heart ; but when he once did resolve to set upon the 
work, he found all those mountains to vanish before him. To speak still in 
the language of the metaphor : have but as much faith as a grain of mus 
tard seed, and you may * say to this mountain, Be removed into the sea, 
and it shall be removed. Hezekiah was a great reformer ; he removed 
the high places, and brake the images, and cut down the groves, and brake 
in pieces the brazen serpent, 2 Kings xviii. 4 ; and then, withal, it is added 
in the following words, He trusted in the Lord God of Israel, ver. 5. They 
that will reform a church or state, must trust more in God in doing it than 
in any work else. 

Use 3. It is a word of caution ; for if the worship of God and every part of 
it doth so much concern God s glory (as hath been shewed in the reason of 
this doctrine), then take heed how you meddle with it. Be sure you set the 
service of the house of the Lord in its right order (as the phrase is of Heze- 



ZECH. IV. 6-9.J FINISH THE TEMPLE. 119 

kiah s reformation, 2 Chron. xxix. 35), and that according to clear light from 
the word of truth. Know and consider that you meddle with edge tools when 
you take this work in hand (which I speak, not to discourage you from it, 
but to make you wary in and attentive to it) ; more than all the works you ever 
did set your hands and hearts unto. It was a good and a religious purpose 
in David to bring back the ark, and for the substance of the duty he was right 
in it. He mistook but in the order ; he set it upon a cart, whenas the 
priests should have carried it. Himself thus speaks of it : We sought not 
God after the due order (that is, God s institution), 1 Chron. xv. 30 ; and 
when it was like to fall (God confuting thereby their error) Uzzah did but 
touch it to keep it up (and that too was done out of a good zeal). God smote 
him for it, though God himself acknowledged it to have been but an error 
or rashness in him, even when he smote him : 2 Sam. vi. 7, The anger 
of the Lord was kindled against Uzzah, and God smote him for his error. 
But yet it was an error about the ark (God s worship), and a small one there 
is dangerous. But you will then say, We had best not meddle with it at all, 
but let it alone, and leave it as it is. It is true that David himself in his 
fear had just the same thoughts : 1 Chron. xiii. 12, * David was afraid of 
God that day. How (says he) shall I bring the ark of God home to me ? 
If men be stricken thus for touching of it, God be merciful to me (thought 
he), let it rather remain where it is : So David brought not the ark home 
to himself, but carried it aside into the house of Obed-edom, ver. 13 ; but 
God did soon confute him of this his error also, for the 14th verse tells us 
that * the Lord blessed the house of Obed-edom, and all that he had. And 
when David began to bethink himself, Surely if it brings a blessing upon the 
house of Obed-edom, it will do the like on mine too. And then we read in 
the 13th chapter, He prepared a place for it, and brought it home ; and he, 
being by this breach made put upon searching into the word, found that the 
Levites only ought to carry it ; and that because they did it not at the first, 
the Lord therefore made a breach upon them, ver. 30. Now, above all we 
observe, that when he amended that error and brought it home, he was blessed, 
and blessed indeed ; for no sooner did he think of building a house for it but 
God promised to establish his house for ever, 2 Sam. vii. 11. And read the 
18th chapter, and you shall see how all his enemies upon this were subdued 
afore him. And then of his son Solomon, God says in the 13th verse, * He 
shall build an house for my name, and I will establish the throne of his 
kingdom for ever. His own house and the kingdom were established toge 
ther by it. Thus likewise when this second temple was to be finished, God 
provokes them to it by this, From this time will I bless you, Hag. ii. 19; 
and as he blessed them, so he will bless you and your families, and the 
kingdom. To instance in some particulars, which have been in your hearts 
also, as that purpose was in David s, together with encouragements out of 
the Scriptures suited thereunto. You have declared your godly resolution to 
be (to express it in your own words), to use your utmost endeavours to esta 
blish learned and preaching ministers, with a good and sufficient maintenance, 
throughout the whole kingdom, wherein many dark corners are miserably 
destitute of the means of salvation, which project tendeth to enlarge Christ s 
mystical church. From this time God will bless you (look for it), and 
establish the kingdom by it. The Scripture, for your encouragement, holds 
forth an example of just the like practice of one of the best kings, and of 
that same blessing following upon it, which is in all your aims : 2 Chron. 
xvii. 7-10, Jehoshaphat, in the third year of his reign, sent to his princes to 
teach (that is, to countenance the teaching of the word) in the cities of 
Judah, and with them the Levites and priests ; and they taught in Judah, 



120 ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO [ZECH. IV. 6-9. 

and had the hook of the law of the Lord with them, and went throughout all 
the cities of Judah, and taught the people. Here is the same practice that 
you have resolved upon, and the success is answerable to your hearts desire ; 
for, ver. 10, it follows, And the fear of the Lord fell upon all the kingdoms 
of the lands that were round about Judah, and they made no war against 
Jehoshaphat. This will secure the land as much as that posture of war you 
intend. You have also issued out an order for the purging out divers inno 
vations in and about the worship of God, for the abolishing of all crucifixes, 
scandalous pictures, &c., and other the like superstitions. Go on to estab 
lish it ; you will establish the kingdom by it. Not to quote the book of 
Kings and Chronicles, which is abundant in such examples, we have an 
instance more ancient of the like blessing of God upon the like practice : Gen. 
xxxv., Jacob reformed his family of all their strange gods, and all their ear 
rings, ver. 2 and 4, and the success was, that the terror of God was upon all 
the cities round about them, ver. 5. You have likewise declared that you 
intend a due and necessary reformation of the government and liturgy of 
the church, &c. ; you will find the like blessing to be upon this also, in 
the war you have undertaken against the popish Irish rebels. When Abijah, 
king of Judah, was to fight with Jeroboam, king of Israel, that had perverted 
the worship of the Lord, see how he pleads the cause against them and his 
army : Ye have cast out the priests of the Lord ; but as for us, the Lord is 
our God, and we have not forsaken him ; and the priests which minister unto 
the Lord are the sons of Aaron ; that is, such as by God s own appointment 
were to govern the church, and to minister afore the Lord : And they burn 
unto the Lord every morning and every evening burnt sacrifices and sweet 
incense ; the shew-bread also set they in order upon the pure table, and the 
candlestick of gold, with the lamps thereof. We keep the charge of the Lord our 
God, but you have forsaken him ; and behold God himself is with us for our 
Captain, but you shall not prosper, &c. ver. 9-12. And the issue of all this 
is recorded ver. 16, 17, God smote Jeroboam and all Israel before Abijah 
and Judah, and the children of Israel fled before Judah ; and Abijah and his 
people slew them with a great slaughter, so that the children of Israel were 
brought under at that time. But on the contrary, if you falter in the matter 
of religion and worship, know that from that time God will curse you, as he 
did Jeroboam and Israel with him, who, when he had set up the calves to 
hold the people to him, God threatens his house, to take it away, * as a 
man takes away dung until it be all gone, 1 Kings xiv. 10. And as for Israel 
and the state of that kingdom, he threatened to smite it as a reed is shaken 
with the water, ver. 15. Whereas you may stand as a rock in the waters, and 
all alterations and turnings of the stream would but dash and break them 
selves upon you, you all that while abiding firm and unmoved ; you will 
then become as a reed in the waters, tossed up and down with contrary 
motions of fears and troubles, as the stream carries you this way or that 
way, even as that state of Israel from that time was hut fluctuating, and at 
best * unstable as waters, with variety of governments and governors, the 
stream of the people sometimes turning one way, sometimes another (as in 
the story appears) ; and in the end God says that he will root up Israel out 
of this good land, and pluck up this reed even by the roots, when it hath 
been tossed awhile up and down. So it follows there. 

I will end this caution with two rules. First, be sure you establish no 
thing but what you have full, clear, and general light for. Secondly, con 
demn nothing, and suffer nothing to stand condemned, in which you in your 
consciences are doubtful there may be a truth ; for if you should build the 
least hay and stubble, you will not only suffer loss, but lay a foundation of 



ZECH. IV. 6-9.] FINISH THE TEMPLE. 121 

a new rent and division in the age to come. For there is a Spirit mentioned 
in the text, even the Holy Ghost, who will not rest working in men s spirits 
till the whole building be rightly framed according to the pattern in every 
piece of it. And whatever is amiss, and not according to his mind, the 
light of his fire will both discover it and burn it up ; which leads me to the 
fifth observation, which is this, 

Obs. 5. That God carries on the work of finishing his temple, not by 
power nor might, but by his Spirit. By Spirit he meaneth the Holy Grhost. 
by a more immediate hand stirring up men s spirits unto this work; turning 
and convincing them of the truth, and of their duty towards it ; and likewise 
by coincident acts of providence, so apparently wheeling about to the effect 
ing of it, that though might and power be brought to concur in it, yet so as 
his hand alone shall be seen and acknowledged in it. And thus his Spirit 
here is manifestly interpreted in the 10th verse, where it is said that as all 
should * see the plummet in the hand of Zerubbabel (the instrument of 
building it), so they should perceive those seven eyes of the Lord, which 
run to and fro through the whole earth (that is, his eyes of providence, 
called seven, because of their perfection), these to have so guided and ma 
naged all the affairs thereof, that all the rays and beams of providence issuing 
from those eyes might be seen to meet in the accomplishment of this as their 
ultimate aim and scope. Now these seven eyes, Rev. v. 6, are called the 
seven spirits of God, sent forth unto all the earth. And Rev. i. 4 are 
plainly interpreted to be the Holy Ghost in his various workings, for grace 
and peace is there wished from the seven spirits. Thus much for the 
explication of it. 

Now that the building of the temple is thus more immediately carried on 
by the working of the Holy Ghost, you may read it all along in all the story 
of the building of this temple in the Old Testament, as likewise in that of 
the New. 

First, the laying the foundation of this temple, it was done indeed by the 
power and might of Cyrus ; but yet, Ezra i. 2, it is added, The Lord 
stirred up the spirit of Cyrus ; and how, but by a mere act of foresight or 
providence aforehand about it ? God had, an hundred years before his birth, 
by his Spirit written a prophecy of him, and that by name, Isa. xliv. 28, 
which these Jews shewing him, God s Spirit stirred up his spirit thereby ; 
for in his proclamation himself says, The Lord hath charged me to build 
him an house at Jerusalem, so ver. 2 of Ezra i. And when he had thus 
given leave to the Jews to go and build it, yet still it was a great matter of 
self-denial to them to leave their houses and gardens which they had built 
and planted at Babylon, Jer. xxix. 5. Therefore it is further added in the 
fifth verse of that first of Ezra, Then rose up the chief of the fathers, and 
the priests and Levites, with all them whose spirit God had raised up, to 
build the house of the Lord. And then again, when it came to this second 
work, the finishing of it, they were exceeding backward to it ; but God sent 
two prophets, who convinced them of their duty ; and therefore, Hag. i. 14, 
it is expressly and on purpose put in, that the Lord stirred up the spirit of 
Zerubbabel, and the spirit of Jeshua, and the spirit of all the remnant of 
the people, and they came and did work in the house of the Lord their God. 
And again, whereas the Persian kings had made decrees against the building 
of it (which was the greatest impediment of all the rest), God brought Darius 
his heart at last off to it, and that by so unexpected a way, as made all the 
people joyful. So it is expressly said, Ezra vi. 22, They kept the feast of 
unleavened bread with joy : for the Lord had made them joyful, and had 
turned the heart of the king of Assyria unto them, to strengthen their hands 



122 ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO [ZECH. IV. 6-9. 

in the work of the house of God. Yea, and his heart was so much stirred 
in it, that he not only makes a decree for it, ver. 8, but likewise against all 
those that should oppose it, under a capital punishment, ver. 11 ; yea, he 
curseth all that should put to their hand to alter it, ver. 12, so that the 
enemies that before opposed it were now constrained to further it, ver. 13. 
All this was done, as you see, * not by power, nor by might, but by God s 
Spirit. Thus much for this instance in the text out of the Old Testament. 

See the like in God s building his church in the New ; both in setting up 
his church in the world at first, when heathenism, backed with the power of 
the Roman empire, stood in the way of it, and likewise in raising it up again, 
when antichrist had thrown it down. For the first (the erecting of it), did 
he use might, or power, or an army (as it is varied in the margin), to conquer 
the world by ? No such matter. He chooseth twelve or thirteen men, 
whereof the most were poor fishermen, and he sends them not all together 
in one troop neither, but dispersed apart into several parts of the world, 
some taking one country to conquer, some another : the most ridiculous 
course in appearance for such a design that could be imagined. Yet (as Rev. 
vi. 2) Christ in these went forth conquering, and to conquer, and took 
nothing with him but his bow (as it is there) and his arrows (as it is Ps. 
xlv. 5), the preaching of the gospel, even * the foolishness of preaching (as 
the apostle calls it) ; yet hereby the people fell so under him (as the 
psalmist s phrase there is), that in three hundred years that whole empire 
was turned Christian, and heathenish worship thrown down ; and this, you 
see, not by power, nor by might, but by his Spirit. 

But then again antichrist steps up, the beast of Rome, and after him all 
the world wandered (that is, the European world), Rev. xiii. 8, saying, 
4 Who is like unto the beast ? who is able to make war with him ? ver. 4. 
But at the 14th chapter a lamb encounters him, and but with a handful in 
comparison, out from among whom he sends a few emissaries, to preach 
the everlasting gospel to every nation, tongue, and kindred, ver. 6, &c. ; and 
in the end he wins all the northern kingdoms to embrace that gospel, and 
will still go on to conquer and win ground ; so that, in the 15th chapter and 
2d verse, we read of a perfect victory over the beast. And whereas before 
it had been said of * his holiness the pope, Who is like unto the beast ? 
now it is said, ver. 4, Who shall not fear thee, Lord ? for thou only art 
holy. And whereas afore All the world wondered after the beast, and 
worshipped him, the world is now so altered, that it is said, < All nations 
shall come and worship before thee, in the same 4th verse. And now the 
wonder is as much how all this is brought about : * Not by power, nor by 
might, but by his Spirit. So it is expressly said, 2 Thes. ii. 8, speaking of 
* this man of sin, he says, Whom the Lord shall consume with the Spirit 
of his mouth ; that is, by his Spirit, in the preaching of the gospel, and 
working in the hearts of men, and overcoming kingdoms unto Christ and his 
church. So we read, Rev. xvii. 4, The Lamb shall overcome the kings that 
made war with him, and yet not by power, but by his Spirit. 

Reason. The reason of this is, because the building of God s church is his 
own business, in a more special manner, more than any other ; therefore he 
will be sure to do it himself, and more immediately be seen in it. As it is 
said of Christ personal (the tabernacle of his human nature), Heb. ix. 12, 
that it was * not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building (as 
the apostle there speaks) ; that is, it was not framed by the power of nature, 
as other men are, but by the Spirit; so it is true of Christ mystical, his body, 
and the tabernacle of his church. It is not of the ordinary make that other 
societies of men (whether families or kingdoms) are of; it is not made with 



ZECH. IV. 6-9.] FINISH THE TEMPLE. 123 

hands (with human wisdom or power, as they are), that is to say, is not of 
this building. Thus, Heb. iii. 4, Every house, says the apostle, is built 
by some man ; that is, all kingdoms, families, and societies, God in an 
ordinary providence leaves to men to build in their own way ; but, says he, 
* he that built all things is God. Which is spoken of God s building his 
church (which is his house), and all things appertaining unto it, as is evident 
both by the foregoing words, ver. 3, He that built the house (the apostle 
speaking of Christ, who is God) hath more honour than the house, and 
also by those words that follow after, Moses, was faithful in all his house 
(namely, in the building of that house then), as a servant ; but Christ as a 
Son over his own house (now) ; whose house are we. The reason why thus 
himself by his Spirit builds it, is held forth in that one word. It is his own 
house, and therefore he will oversee the doing this himself ; and will do it 
so that none shall share in the glory with him, although he useth them. 

Use 1. First use is that which is made of it in the 10th verse, namely, 
that in matters which concern the building of the church, we should learn to 
despise* the day of small things. The prophet speaks it by way of re 
proof, * Who hath despised the day of small things ? because the beginnings 
of this work then were but small, and there was little appearance in human 
foresight to effect it. Therefore, who almost was there that did not despise 
it and despair of it ? Remember that there is a Spirit in the text, and no 
man knows how far he may carry on the smallest beginnings, which he lays 
as the foundation of his greatest works, that his own immediate hand may 
the more appear. The kingdom of heaven was at first but * as a grain of 
mustard- seed, says Christ, * the least of all seeds ; but when it is grown, it 
is the greatest of herbs, and becomes a tree, Mat. xiii. 32. In Dan. ii. 
84, 45, there is mention made of a stone that was cut out of the mountain 
without hands ; which expression is used not only to shew the divine power 
that accompanied it, but to intimate that it was at first but some little stone 
which without hands dropped out, or was blown down from the mountain ; 
for if it had been a great one, it must then have had hands to cut and hew 
it out, and to throw it down. And yet, lo ! * this little stone became a 
mountain, and filled the whole earth, as it there follows. 

A second use is that which is in the text, that when you see anything done 
for God s church, beyond the reach of human wisdom and foresight, that you 
would fall down and cry (as they are taught here, ver. 7), Grace, grace, 
unto it. You are not to cry up, Zerubbabel, Zerubbabel, that is, any means 
or instrument whatever, whether king or parliament, much less this man or 
that man, but to exalt the free grace of God, the work of which alone it is 
and hath been. 

One word more unto Zerubbabel ; the text calls for it : This is the word 
of the Lord unto Zerubbabel. From which let the observation be this : 

That this work of finishing the temple lies first and chiefly upon Zerub 
babel and his elders to take care of, that is, upon prince and elders. And 
though Jeshua and his fellows the priests are intended (as being the one of 
those olive-trees formerly mentioned), yet Zerubbabel and the magistrates 
are only spoken to. All such motions should come first from you ; it is 
your duty to be the he-goats of the flock, to lead on all the rest, as the prophet 
Ezekiel speaks. Thus, Ezra i. 5, Then rose up the chief of the fathers of 
Judah and Benjamin to build the house of the Lord ; it had otherwise never 
been done to purpose. So in the building of the temple at first, the motion 
came first into David s heart : 1 Chron. xxix. 3, I have, says he, set my 

* Qu. not to despise ? ED. 



124 ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO [ZECH. IY. 6-9. 

affection to the house of God. And then, ver. 6, The chief of the fathers 
and princes of the house of Israel, they follow ; and then fell in the people, 
and they rejoiced and offered willingly, so ver. 13. You should commend 
unto the people what is good and right : Let us bring back the ark of our 
God unto us, said David, 1 Chron. xiii. 8 ; and no sooner had he com 
mended it unto them, but (as it follows, ver. 4), all the congregation said 
they would do so : for the thing was right in the eyes of all the people. 

And the reason why this is your more especial duty is, because God hath 
honoured princes and magistrates above, and set them over, others. And 
as those who honour God, God will honour, so those whom God hath hon 
oured, he expects should honour him, and you cannot do it better than this 
way ; for how much his honour is concerned in his worship, you heard 
before. 

Let the honour of it move you. Take the renowned men in Scripture, 
and their greatest glory hath been to be builders of God s house. It is men 
tioned as Moses his highest honour, Heb. iii. 2-4. And David, though a 
king already, accounts this a greater honour than his crown. So 1 Chron. 
xxix. 14, Who am I, says he, and what is my people, that we should 
offer so willingly ? He speaks it of offering towards the building of the 
temple. And in the New Testament it is the apostles honour, that they were 
master builders ; yea, it is made Christ s highest honour : Heb. iii. 3, This 
man was accounted worthy of more glory than Moses, inasmuch as he who 
hath builded the house hath more honour than the house. So far as you 
are capable of it, and have power to do it, be in this conformed unto him. 
The prize of this honour is set before you, and you have the first offer of it. 
An opportunity such as these last hundred years well nigh have not afforded 
the like to it. This parliament seems to have been called by God for such 
a time as this ; and if you will not do it, God will do it without yon. As 
he said that deliverance, so (say I) reformation will arise some other way. 
God hath a Spirit here in the text that will work it out in men s hearts, if 
power and might should not ; and that will be little to your honour, as De 
borah said to Barak. In the 5th of Micah, ver. 7, The remnant of Jacob 
is said to be as a dew from the Lord, and as the showers upon the grass, 
that tarrieth not for man, nor waiteth for the sons of men. The prophet 
useth two similitudes, to shew both that the multiplication and growth of 
the church depend not upon man : first, for their propagation, and their be 
ing multiplied, he compares them unto the dew, which is engendered and dis 
tilled from heaven immediately ; therefore, Ps. ex. 3, new converts added 
unto the church are compared unto the dew, and God s begetting of them 
unto the womb of the morning, when over night the earth was dry. Again, 
the growth and maintaining of them he compares unto the sprouting up of 
herbs and grass in wildernesses where man comes not, and so their spring 
ing tarrieth not for man, nor waiteth for the sons of men, for them to come 
with watering-pots to nourish them (as herbs in gardens do), but these have 
showers from heaven that give the increase : I the Lord, speaking of this 
vineyard, do keep it ; I will water it every moment, Isa. xxvii. 3. 

The conclusion. Now for a conclusion, and winding up of all. Is this 
word of the Lord spoken to you in a way of general application only, such 
as similitudinary examples, which in some things hold a likeness, use to have, 
(all things happening in the Old Testament * for examples, and are written 
for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come, as the 
apostle speaks, 1 Cor. x. 11 )? Or is there not some more special word that 
applies this vision of the candlestick and olive trees as prophetic types of the 



ZECH. IV. 6-9.] FINISH THE TEMPLE. 125 

like work of finishing the temple, to fall out under the times of the gospel, 
when the church is come out of popery ? That Babylon was the prophetic 
type of Rome, you all know where to find that ; it is in the 17th and 18th 
of the Revelations, and so applied by the Holy Grhost. And that the foun 
dation of this temple was the type of our first reformation, when we came 
out from Babylon, was in the first observation shewn you out of chap. xiv. 
and xv. And that the Samaritans are by the Holy Ghost made the type of 
those that shall in any age corrupt the worship of God, by mingling idola 
trous or popish superstitions, as our innovators have done, we meet with the 
application thereof, by the Holy Ghost himself, unto some living in the best 
of churches under the gospel, namely, that of Philadelphia, Rev. iii. 9, * who 
say they are Jews, and are not ; Behold (says God), I will make them to 
come and worship before thy feet, and to know that I have loved thee, (as 
speaking unto that church.) Now, whereas the Holy Ghost, describing them 
to be such as say they are Jews, but are not, it is in a periphrasis of 
speech all one as to say they are Samaritans. Josephus tells us that, when 
the Jews were in a prosperous estate, the Samaritans would then say that 
they were Jews ; and that fore-mentioned place, the 4th of Ezra, manifestly 
implies as much, for they there plead, * We worship God as you do, &c. 
And although we pass not this judgment on men s persons, yet we may speak 
of causes and things, as the Scripture hath done before us. Now, as certain 
it is that those God s magistrates who, under the times of the gospel, 
especially in these last days, have and shall assist the reformation of the 
churches from under those Samaritan superstitions intermingled with their 
worship, and shall afford their countenance and aid to the finishing and per 
fecting the temple, they are typified out by the olive trees here (which were 
then Zerubbabel, their chief governor, and his elders). And accordingly we 
find as express an application of it by the Holy Ghost himself, as propheti 
cally intended herein. Thus, in the same book of the Revelation (in which 
prophecy of the New Testament the Holy Ghost borrows all the elegancies 
and flowers in the story of the Old, thereby to set out the story of the New 
in succeeding ages), in the llth chap. ver. 4, the Holy Ghost describes the 
two witnesses that should oppose the beast and his party in all, and espe 
cially the latter, ages, saying, These are the two olive trees, and the two 
candlesticks, standing before the God of the earth, where, by the candle 
sticks, are meant the churches, as was shewn before, and by the two olive 
trees, the eminent magistrates and ministers that supply oil for the main 
taining of these churches light and glory now, as Zerubbabel and Jeshua the 
priests did then. Yea, the Holy Ghost deciphers them, not only by the very 
same hieroglyphic that is presented here in Zechariah, but also he useth the 
very same words which we find there in the interpretation of the vision, 
standing before the God of the earth. And, further, this vision of the 
candlestick, and those two olive trees, in Zechariah, did signify, as was 
shewn, not so much, if at all, the first laying of the foundation of the temple, 
which had been done many years before ; but was eminently, if not only, to 
hold forth that work of finishing and completing it, which remained then to 
be done, and to stir them up thereunto was that vision as there given. 
Therefore, answerably now, the full analogy of the type must principally fall 
upon, not so much the first reformation, as upon a second work of the per 
fecting and finishing of them. And accordingly, as Zerubbabel there in 
Zechariah is seen, with a plummet in his hand, ver. 10, to measure out 
what remained unfinished for the building of the temple, so here in the 1st 
Terse of the llth of the Revelation, John hath a reed given him, (he 
representing the godly of those ages) and is bidden to measure the temple 



126 ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO [ZECH. IV. 6-9. 

of God, and the altar, and the worshippers ; and this, as supposing a temple 
to have been already built, only having too vast and great an outward court 
laid to it, ver. 2. And although the computation of the whole time of anti 
christ s reign is there mentioned and annexed to these occurrences, yet but 
to this end, to shew how that time allotted him to reign should end and ex 
pire ; and so in that to shew what passages should fall out in the church, 
towards the expiration of it, as a warning and signal of it (whereof these are 
the chief) ; for, chap. x. ver. 6, the angel that gives that prophecy in 
the llth, swears that time should be no longer (that is, the beast s time), but 
until the days of the seventh trumpet, which were shortly then approaching ; 
for immediately after these occurrences rehearsed, we find that that seventh 
trumpet sounds, ver. 15 of that llth chap. 

But then, you will say, there is mentioned after this an overcoming and 
killing of these witnesses by a war of the beast, even his last war against the 
saints, whereby he shall throw down their candlesticks, and cut down these 
olive trees ; and, if so, where then is all the encouragement which you have 
given ? 

I dare not say that this killing is as yet to come. It is the greatest con 
troversy in this book whether it be past or no ; but, however, supposing it 
not yet past, to take off discouragements from thence, 

First, For the time of it, we know it not how long, it may be a good while 
unto it, and, in the mean time, we may yet enjoy a summer of the gospel, 
and an harvest of a better reformation, a little time of which (if it were to be 
bought) were worth a world. 

Secondly, If you attentively observe it, you shall find that killing ex 
pressed by an allusion unto Christ s being crucified at last, and then their 
rising again, like his rising again with an earthquake, and j ascending unto 
heaven, as these are said to do, ver. 11-13. Now, with what doth Christ 
comfort himself before he was to die ? Destroy this temple, says he, 
and in three days I will raise it up again ; with the same may you be 
encouraged also, though you supposed it yet to come. It is but a destruite 
hoc templum, a destroying of that you are about to repair, this temple, and 
but for three days and an half, no longer ; for After three days and an half 
(as it is twice said, in the 9th and llth verses), God will rear it up again, 
and that with advantage, making a better edition of it, even an holy of holies, 
in which the ark is seen (as ver. 19), in comparison of the former. Yea, 
and further (as some think), this killing shall be but a civil death, that is, 
of them as witnesses only ; not a natural death, as men. (For how else are 
their bodies said to lie dead for three years and an half ?) And so the same 
persons shall rise again, and enjoy the fruit of their former labours, and 
ascend into a greater glory. 

And thirdly, Suppose this should come upon you, even when you are 
about to finish your work (as the 7th verse hath it, orav rtXeGuoi, when these 
olive trees are about to finish or perfect their testimony (as some do read 
it), yet let not even this cause you any whit to forbear this work. Christ 
knew he was to be crucified, yet he casts the money-changers out of the 
temple ; and so do you. Purge and reform the temple, though you die for it 
in the doing of it. It is worth the observing, that though it was told good 
king Josiah, in the beginning of his reign, that God would bring evil upon 
Jerusalem, because of their apostasy in Manasseh s time, and he knew that 
all he could do in reforming should not quench God s wrath, 2 Kings xvi. 17, 
yet he reformed with all his might, and therein there was no king before 
him that was like unto him, ver. 23, 25. Do you your duty, and serve 
your generation (as David is said to do). * Be strong, and let not your 



ZECH. IV. 6-9.] FINISH THE TEMPLE. 127 

hands be weak, for your works shall be rewarded, as it is in 2 Chron. 
xv. 7. 

I conclude all with that speech unto this whole State, which David used 
to Solomon, concerning the building of the temple in his days : 1 Chron. 
xxviii. 20, 21, Be strong, and of good courage, and do it : fear not, nor be 
dismayed, for the Lord God will be with thee ; he will not fail thee, nor for 
sake thee, until thou hast finished all the work for the service of the house 
of the Lord. And behold, the courses of the priests and the Levites shall 
be with thee, for all the service of the house of God : also the princes and 
the people will be wholly at thy commandment. 



Die Mercurii, 27 Aprilis 1642. 

It is this day ordered by the House of Commons in Parliament, that Mr Goodwin 
and Mr Caryll be desired to print their sermons preached the last fast-day before the 
said House ; and that no man shall print those sermons for the space of two months 
next ensuing, without their particular licence and approbation. 

H. ELSYNGE, Cler. Parl. D. Com. 

These are to give notice, that 1 appoint K. Dawlman to print my sermon. 

THO. GOODWIN. 



APPENDIX. 



VOL. XII. 



NOTE. 

It is necessary that we should give some account of the pieces that follow. The 
first is copied from a folio volume of broad-sheets, in the British Museum. No 
date or authentication is attached to it, but it forms part of a collection of similar 
documents attributed to the Divines of Goodwin s time. We have no doubt that it is, 
as it professes to be, a genuine collection of Goodwiniana, collected by some loving 
friend. 

The others, Nos. 2-11, are notes of sermons by Goodwin, taken by one of his Cam 
bridge hearers. They are copied from an interesting MS. volume belonging to Mr 
Grosart, containing notes of a great number of sermons by Cambridge preachers, 
between November 1629 and August 1630. The volume is inscribed on a fly-leaf, 
MS. by Dr Crackenthorpe, Purchased by Mr Paul with his Bible and his Defence of Con- 

stantine, January 20. 1838 J. P. Then a note in pencil informs us that J. P. is 

J. Player of Saffron Walden, Essex. We see no reason to doubt that the notes are in 
the handwriting of Dr Crackenthorpe, At all events, they are certainly as they were 
written from day to day by some one of Dr Goodwin s hearers at Trinity Church. 
They are not of great intrinsic value, especially as most of the sermons from which 
they are taken are extant. But this gives them additional interest as a curiosity. 
In comparing their meagreness and confusion with the fulness and order of the ser 
mons as published, we ought to remember that the auditor probably heard only the 
rough draft of the sermons, which were afterwards elaborated and expanded for 
publication. 

A few blanks occur, representing words that we have been unable to decipher. It 
is quite possible that these ought to have been more numerous, as there are some 
other words that we may have read wrongly; but these, if any, we are confident are 
very few. We cannot but congratulate ourselves on being able, through Mr Grosart s 
kindness, to enrich our reprint of Goodwin s Works with what is virtually a work of 
his hitherto unpublished. ED. 



APPENDIX. 



1. SHORT, HOLY, AND PROFITABLE SAYINGS OF THE 
REVEREND DIVINE, DOCTOR THOMAS GOODWIN, 

WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE FEBRUARY 23. 1679-80. 

We sail to Glory, not in the salt Sea of our tears, but in the red Sea of 
Christ s precious Blood. 

A sanctified Heart is better than a silver Tongue. 

A Heart full of Graces is better than a Head full of Notions. 

Notional knowledge, it makes a Man s Head giddy, but it will never make 
a Man s Heart holy. 

The Wheat and the Chaff, they may both grow together, but they shall 
not both lie together. 

In hell there will not be a Saint amongst those that are terrified ; and in 
heaven there will not be a sinner amongst those that are glorified. 

Will you pity a body that is going to the Block ? and will you not pity a 
Soul that is going to the Pit ? 

What a sad visitation is that, where the Black Horse of Death goeth 
before, and the Red Horse of Wrath followeth after ! 

A Man s Condition in this Life may be honourable, and yet his State as 
to another Life may be damnable. 

There cannot be a better being for us, than for us to be with the best of 



That which makes Heaven so full of Joy is, that it is above all fear ; and 
that which makes Hell so full of Horror is, that it is below all hope. 

To be a Professor of Piety and a Practiser of Iniquity is an abomination 
to the Lord. 

Oh ! Sin is that Mark at which all the Arrows of Vengeance are shot. 

Were it not for Sin, Death had never had a beginning ; and were it not 
for Death, sin would never have had an ending. 

Oh ! did Sin bring Sorrow into the world, then let Sorrow carry Sin out 
of the world. 

Let the Cry of your Prayers outcry the Cry of your Sins. 

Nothing can quench the fire that Sin hath kindled, but the water which 
Repentance hath caused. 

You that have filled the Book of God with your sins, should fill the Bottle 
of God with your tears. 



132 APPENDIX. 

He can never truly relish the sweetness of God s Mercy, who never tasted 
the bitterness of his own misery. 

None can promise us better than Christ can, and none can threaten us 
worse than Christ can. 

Can any Man promise us anything better than Heaven ? or, can any Man 
threaten us with anything worse than Hell ? 

Heaven is promised to those that love Him, and hell is to be the Portion 
of those that hate him. 

To live without fear of death, is to die living : to labour not to die, is 
labour in vain. 

Men are afraid to die in such and such sins, but not afraid to live in such 
and such sins. 

Oh ! the hell of horrors and terrors that attend those Souls that have 
their greatest work to do when they come to Die ! 

Therefore, as you would be happy in Death, and everlastingly blessed 
after Death, prepare and fit yourselves for Death. 

Did Christ Die for us that we might live with Him ? and shall we not 
desire to Die, and be with Him ? 

A believer s dying day is his crowning day. 

God protects Men when they are in His way, but not out of His way. 

Sin is never at a higher flood, than when Grace is at a low ebb. 

Though the Church s Enemies may be Waves to toss her, yet they shall 
never be Rocks to split her. 

It is not a time for Sion s Sons to be Rejoicing, when their Mother is 
Mourning. 

When the Church s adversaries make long furrows upon her back, we 
should cast in the seed of tears. 

Many, instead of sympathising with Believers in their Misery, are censur 
ing them for their Misery. 

True love to Christ can walk on the water without drowning, and lie on 
the fire without burning. 

How shall we land at the Haven of Rest, if we are not tossed upon the 
Sea of Trouble ? 

A saint of God lives upon the love of Life, and fears not the terror of 
Death. 

None are so welcome to that spiritual Canaan as those that swim to it 
through the Red Sea of their own Blood. 

Saints are not so much afraid of suffering as they are of sinning : in suf 
fering, the offence is done to us ; but in sinning, the offence is done to God. 



2. Mr GOODWIN of Katherine Hall, at Trinity, the 5th of November 1629. 

They knew God, but glorified him not as God, neither were thankful. 

ROM. I. 21. 

Thankfulness hath relation to God as a good God. Thanksgiving is the 
subject I am upon ; and it is the duty of this day to reckon up some of 
God s common mercies to this land. The Lord made all men of one blood, 
yet he appointed certain times for them to live in ; and therefore some ages 
are happier than others ; nations, some are happier than another. We 
could never have come forth in a more happy and blessed time. 

1. For the age, which is counted the dotage, yet is blessed. Two bless 
ings make a nation happy : (1.) Human knowledge and wisdom ; (2.) 



APPENDIX. 133 

Knowledge of God, which sanctifies saints, as the other civiliseth men. Both 
lights have shined more clearly now than in any age : (1.) For the human 
knowledge the Egyptian all hath been afforded us. (2.) The knowledge 
of God, of which any nation hath not been partaker of. Blessed are those 
eyes that see those things ye see : Deut. v. 3, The Lord made that cove 
nant with us, not with our fathers. That light, in regard of the people s 
light, though not as the ministers ; full sea it is now, if ever it was, amongst 
the people. 

2. The place. If thou hadst had the wings of a dove to cull out the 
place thou most desired, couldst thou have culled out a more happy place 
to set thy foot in than this ? 

3. For the healthful temperament of it in regard of fundamental laws, 
which are as a wholesome air to the body. We enjoy our own good, which 
cost our forefathers much pains. 

4. The succession of princes, which was sometime hazarded, but God 
hath continued it still. For this God is to be magnified, for they are, 
1 Sam. ii. 8, the pillars of the world ; for he compares the world to a rotten 
house, which is underpropped with such pillars. 1 Tim. ii. 2, he commands 
to give thanks for kings ; for heathen, much more for Christian. Great 
things hath he done for us, which are never to be forgotten, in delivering 
us so often. 

5. The peace and tranquillity of this land, which is above all blessings ; 
therefore, saith Solomon, Prov. xvii. 1, More one morsel in quietness, &c. 
Blessed are the people in such a case ; but peace with gospel, as fair weather 
in harvest : Acts ix. 81, Then had the churches rest, edified, comforted. 

6. The security of religion established amongst us, and a standard of 
religion as the doctrine of the churches. The saints who live amongst you 
are in great abundance. The preaching of the gospel, which excels all the 
Jesuits ; they cannot imitate us herein, because God helps us to make ser 
mons in an immediate manner. 

7. The special deliverances of this land, which are two great ones : that 
in 88, and this which we celebrate, wherein God gave us new charters, and 
renewed our lease of the gospel that we have had. Oh ! what cause have 
we to be thankful. This day is holy to the Lord as a Sabbath as a 
fast ; though our hearts ought to run in another channel, namely, of thanks 
giving, they are mourning. Now, as these mercies are public, so public 
thanksgiving ought to be had ; and herein we may make melody to the Lord. 
You that are students ought to regard this the more, 

1. Because they are common mercies and public. Because all the mercies 
God brings on this land are for your sakes. They are all yours, * that 
the abundant grace might, &c., 2 Cor. iv. 14, 15. 

2. Because by public mercies God hath most glory. His name is made 
glorious in this world. This is a second motive the apostle adds, to the 
glory, &c. 

3. For your brethren you ought to give thanks. It is your duty ; it is 
meet to do so. Ps. cviii., this David rejoiced in ; Acts xxiv., the Jews were 
thankful for their peace. 

Now I will shew you the greatness of the sin of unth.ankfulness, to press 
it on you. 

1. Because the object is G-od s goodness ; we are unthankful immediately 

to God. In that you are unthankful unto God, you sin against the value of 

goodness, for the despising of which there is a treasure of wickedness * and 

wrath, Rom. ii. 4. Again, his goodness is his glory ; therefore it must 

* So in the MS. ; but qu. judgment ? ED. 



184 APPENDIX. 

needs be great. His mercy is the thing is most dear to him ; it is the ten- 
derest part ; therefore called the bowels of mercy, and tender com 
passion. 

2. It is an unnatural sin, because the light of nature doth condemn it, 
Luke vi. 32, 33. Sinners love those that love them. He loads you daily 
with mercies ; but, Amos ii. 13, you do load him with sins. The cords of 
love are called the cords of a man. The beasts will be thankful in their 
kind ; nay, the insensible creatures. It returns fruit. 

3. All goodness is included in this duty of thankfulness, Ps. cxlvii. 1. 
This is profitable. It is the best way to obtain mercy. Unthankfulness 
forfeiteth mercies ; it procures a blessing upon the mercies of God. An 
unthankful man eats the curses of God. 

It is pleasant to God, Eph. v. 19. You have heard it is music, Ps. 
Ixix. 81. Pleasant to man. What is the ground of thankfulness ? A joyous 
heart. Luke i. 46, 47, see, as much as she rejoiceth, so doth she thank 
God and magnify him. 

It is comely, because it gives God his due, 2 Sam. vii. 19, 20. It is all 
we can do to God. What am I able to say more to thee ? It is a comely 
thing to give God his due. It is an honourable duty. Modestissimum istud 
verbum Piogo ; but to give thanks is more honourable, though it be a part of 
prayer, &c. It moves God. 

What is it ? Thankfulness is a rendering of the glory of God s goodness, 
through Christ, in all things and always, for the acknowledgment of his 
goodness. 

(1.) It is a rendering : Ps. cxvi. 12, What shall I render to the Lord 
for all his benefits to me? (2.) It is a free rendering, because that the 
will is more than the deed in this duty of thankfulness. (3.) The glory of 
his goodness ; not the substance of your estates, but the glory, Rom. xiv. 6. 
(4.) It is the glory of his goodness. To glorify his goodness is more than to 
glorify his mercy. (5.) Through Christ. That is, thankfulness ; through 
Christ let us offer the sacrifices of praise, &c., Heb. xiii. 5. (6.) In all 
things, Col. iii. 17. Do it in the name of Christ ; that is, all within you, 
that is, in all conditions, glorify God. (7.) Always : Eph. v. 20, Give 
thanks always to God. (8.) The end, principally to acknowledge your sin, 
and testify his goodness ; for to do so out of fear is not thankfulness. 
1 Chron. xxix. 14, David praised God for that he had a heart to give God 
thanks. Even so should we have such hearts. 



3. Mr GOODWIN of Katherine Hall, at Trinity, Nov. 8. 

Neither were they thankful. ROM. I. 21. 

Now I must shew what unthankfulness [is], which I could not do unless 
I shewed what the contrary is. It is a free rendering of the glory of God s 
goodness principally, and the testification of our thankfulness and love to 
him. A larger definition : It is when, out of our own selves, we do acknow 
ledge our own unworthiness, and God s free goodness, and our kindness* in 
relation to him, in all things and at all times, principally to glorify God, and 
testify our loves. 

1. The genus is a rendering. It hath relation to good things we have 
received ; it is he returns all. 

2. It is a free rendering unto him. It is a property of thankfulness, an 

* Qu. dependence ? ED. 



APPENDIX. 135 

essential one. The chief thing looked at in kindness is good will : 2 Cor. 
viii. 10, You have been willing a year before. This is an aggravation of 
their bounty : 1 Chron. xxix. 13, 14, Who am I that I should offer so will 
ingly ? So the poor widow casting in a mite. Observe whether your sac 
rifices come off willingly. Do you pray for fear of the whips of conscience ? 
This is not thankfulness. 

3. The object ; the glory of God s goodness, 2 Cor. iv. 15, God s glory ; 
that through your thankfulness glory might redound to the glory of God. 
The schoolmen shew how to be thankful. If he be more excellent than thee, 
then the best way to be thankful is honouring him. Ps. 1. 12. But to one 
that is poorer render that he wants : ver. 14, Offer unto God thanksgiving ; 
i. e. God requires the rendering of his glory unto him. When God hath the 
quintessence of the use of all these things, that is, thankfulness. He doth 
not deny thee the possession of them. Sometimes the Lord hath need of our 
credit ; that is, when the Lord s glory lies at the stake, and thou must part 
with thy credit, or else God s glory will die. 

4. The glory of his goodness. When you consider the Lord s goodness 
to you, and it moveth you to pray, Rom. vii. 13, Render honour to whom 
honour is due, that is not thankfulness, but rather slavish fear. 

5. Wherein we are to give God the glory of his goodness. 

(1.) By acknowledging our own unworthiness, his free goodness, and our 
obedience in relation to him. Deut. viii. 17. Thou shalt remember the Lord 
thy God, and shalt not sacrifice to thy own parts. 1 Chron. xxix. 13, 14. 
Thus David did : We have given thee of thine own, for we are strangers 
here. We must acknowledge that there is nothing in yourself to move you 
thereto. Who am I, that thou hast brought me hitherto ? 

(2.) Thou art to acknowledge thy own unworthiness ; not only that there 
is nothing in thee that might move God to give thee life, but that thou art 
unworthy of it, and say that thou art less than the least of God s mercies. 
The poorest creatures art thou less [than], and unworthy of. 

(3.) Thou must acknowledge, i. e. thou must not rest in a sensibleness of 
thy unworthiness. 

(4.) It must be a real rendering. Thou must order thy conversation 
aright ; hereby may you express your thankfulness to God : I will pay my 
vows unto him. Truly I am thy servant; i.e. I will devote myself to 
serve thee. Think with thyself, What hath been done for the Lord ? as 
king Ahasuerus for Mordecai. Shall I thus foolishly requite the Lord for 
his goodness ? as Nathan to David. The Lord hath given thee this much, and 
more, and yet are unthankful. 

(5.) We may express our thankfulness, as David for Jonathan : Who is 
left to do good unto? 2 Sam. ix. We should say, jWho is left of the 
godly ? 

(6.) The sixth is to be thankful to God in all things, and always. Look 
wherein God s goodness is, therein should you be thankful. So for afflic 
tions, which we should not be thankful for, but inasmuch as they are for 
our good, and we believe it ; thus Job. For temporal, but especially spiri 
tual, mercies ; and old mercies, and mercies to come ; all the promises 
made to you. David was thankful for a blessing to come, as you may read 
Ps. xxxi. 9. 

(7.) At all times. When God leaves giving, then leave thou to be thank 
ful. But God never leaves giving, as the river running. Be thankful while 
you have being, because you cannot be thankful enough unto the Lord. 

(8.) Your end must be principally to glorify his goodness and testify your 
love. Thy thankfulness should equal God s kindness. David thanks God 



136 APPENDIX. 

for that he was able to be thankful uprightly. To testify our love : I love 
the Lord because of his goodness, and because he hath heard the voice of 
my supplication and prayer. Because he hath inclined his ear unto me, 
therefore will I call on him as long as I live. 

The causes of thankfulness. We must be thankful through Christ and for 
Christ. All come down through him, and therefore all our thankfulness must 
go up to God through him also. 

(1.) Because Christ is our high priest, and we cannot offer thanks without 
him. 

(2.) All things come by him, therefore all things must be returned by and 
through him again. 

(3.) We must be made acceptable by the power of Christ. 



4. Mr GOODWIN of Katherine Hall, Novem. 22. 1629. 

Neither were they thankful. ROM. I. 21. 

The point we have in hand is about thankfulness. I have shewn what it 
is already. It is a free rendering of the glory of God s goodness unto him, 
in testification of our love unto him, and to glorify him principally. Now 
we may enlarge this ; for so far as God s goodness extends, so far must 
thankfulness reach. Eph. v. 20. It is omne ens et non ens. Express your 
thankfulness really to him by vows and prayers, and by doing the saints good. 
Render all in Christ, because all God s goodness comes to you through Christ ; 
so in your praises. 

Now, the causes of thankfulness, and degrees of it. 

1. You must take a due consideration of his mercy. Therefore I will praise 
the Lord with mine understanding. Marvellous are thy works, and that my 
soul knoweth right well. This is the reason that brute beasts cannot be 
thankful. Deut. xxxii. 6, foolish people, &c. Study God s mercies to 
your souls. Take note of small as well as great. It is a sign of an humble 
man. David did so. Ps. ciii. 2. As you confess your sins, so God s mer 
cies ; and remember the Lord s mercy. David says, My soul, forget not 
all his benefits. This is so necessary, that it is put for thankfulness, and 
so on the contrary. Lay charge on thy heart. They soon forgot the Lord, 
that had done great things for them, Ps. cvi. 21. 

2. We should esteem God s mercies, 2 Cor. ix. 15. We must apprehend 
them as unspeakable. 1 Thes. iii. 9, What thanks shall I give to the 
Lord ? Such a mercy as this aggravates God s mercy. He hath not dealt so 
with any nation and country. Consider the number of God s mercies. Have 
a true estimate of them, and have an estimate of your own un worthiness. 
2 Chron. xxxii. 25. They were proud, and murmured against God. Ps. 
cvi. 24, 25. They despised that good land. This would set estimation on 
God s mercy. 

3. We should get the sense of God s love in these in thy heart. Either 
thou hast a heart set on God, or set love on the creature in him. Acts 
xiv. 17. Ps. Ixiii. 3, Thy love is better than life. When he perceived the 
Lord s love he was thankful. A small dinner of herbs will be pleasant to 
thee, if thou seest God s love. Apprehend God as a Father, and then give 
him thanks : Giving thanks to God and the Father. 

4. Get hearts loving of God again. This is the ground of that melody to 
the Lord. Get your hearts warmed with godly love. Self-love is the cause 
of unthankfulness. Loving the creatures inordinately will strengthen your 



APPENDIX. 137 

hate to God, and in love to his creatures we are nothing thankful, because 
of the creatures love. Get your hearts weaned from the world. It is a 
reflex act of the mind. 

5. Get joy in him, and rejoice in him always. This opens the heart. 
What, am I to offer willingly such a sacrifice to the Lord ! Get joy in his 
goodness ; for joy in the things of this life will draw away your hearts from 
God. Rejoice in God s goodness. This is the complete definition of thank 
fulness. That we might learn to be thankful, let me shew what is unthank- 
fulness. Three degrees : 

1. When you are not thankful in your thankfulness ; when it is not done 
out of a right end, or from a good ground. The pharisee took thanks to 
himself in thankfulness to God. A man may pray amiss ; so a man may 
give God thanks amiss. This is the first degree of thankfulness, Hosea iii. 5. 
Dost thou fear his goodness ? Then art thou thankful. Is thy heart quick 
ened in the sight of God s goodness ? The more thou hast, the more thank 
ful shouldst thou be. This is a character of a thankful man : I will praise 
the Lord as long as I live. To be thankful unto God because of mercies to 
come ; this is good, but not the sign of God s . . . 

2. Whenas you do not render unto [God] the glory of his goodness which 
they are able to render ... in goodness ... In Hezekiah ; he had received 
many mercies, 2 Chron. xxxii. 2, 5. He did not live so much better. 
Now, are you living according to the means God hath given you ? He 
requires meet thanksgiving as doth the earth, Heb. vi. 7. This was Solo 
mon s sin. He had from God, and rendering not according to his 
mercy. How many are there among you that render nothing at all unto 
God. Every mercy of God should lead us to repentance. The rivers 
return to the ocean, and dost not thou return thy life to God again ? 

3. When we render evil unto God for his mercy, Neh. ix. 25, Do you thus 
foolishly requite the Lord for his goodness ? You cast the Lord s laws be 
hind your backs. Do you render evil for good ? David was not stinted in 
a kingdom, and why hast thou dealt thus ? 2 Sam. xii. Thou hast wealth, 
and dost thou live in a greater sinning against God ? So for all the mercies 
of God ; as strength ; and art thou strong to pour forth strong drink ? For 
which of all God s mercies do you requite him ? What ? Do you war 
against his will ? His own weapons ! God will heap coals of fire upon 
your heads. Because God doth defer judgment, therefore do you sin more 
and more. No greater sin of ... 



5. Mr GOODWIN of Katherine Hall, at Trinity, Decem. 6. 1629. 

Because when they knew God, they glorified him not as God, neither were 
thankful. ROM. I. 21. 

Sinning against knowledge is the highest aggravation of sin. Four times 
it comes in the chapter; one in ver. 28, the other in ver. 21. I will shew 
you the aggravation of this sin by questions. 

Quest. What is meant by sins of knowledge, and how many ways may we 
sin this sin ? 

Am. Two ways may we sin against knowledge : 

1. When knowledge is the object of sin. It is one thing to sin against a 
knowledge of sin. 

2. Sin and the knowledge of sin. 

1. It is a greater sin that is directly against knowledge. 



138 APPENDIX. 

(1.) When they do abuse their knowledge, as Judas. When they do not 
only abuse their natural knowledge, but against knowledge of the Scriptures ; 
when they have some shifts for their sin, as David had in killing Uriah. So 
Saul, his sparing the fattest sheep is directly against knowledge. To use 
the law to sin by the law. Men have shifts for their covetousness. 

(2.) When men do neglect to get knowledge, herein men sin against it, 
Heb. v. 12. Though sins may be done out of ignorance, yet because they 
did not get it when they might have had, so God reckons up to the Gentiles 
their sins of knowledge. You that have lived long under the means might 
have gotten much knowledge ; therefore the Lord will reckon them as sins 
against knowledge, if you do not improve them. 

(3.) When men refuse to get knowledge, as the adder stoppeth his ear at 
the charmer ; or are afraid. 

(4.) When they hate the knowledge and the light that is come into the 
world, this is a high kind of sinning against the knowledge, so extinguishing 
this light, that they might sleep the quieter : Jude 20, But what they 
know, &c. 

(5.) When they hold their sin against their consciences. They invent 
lies in hypocrisy, 1 Tim. vi. 3, 4. They fashion their sins against God. 

2. In regard of others : Sinning against knowledge, 

(1.) When men do conceal their knowledge from others. Knowledge is 
light, and men cannot hide light, but it will discover itself. 

(2.) Suppressing of knowledge : Acts iv. 17, Let us threaten them, that 
they speak no more in his name. 

(3.) When we force others to sin against knowledge : John ix. 34, * They 
cast him out. 

II. When men sin collaterally against knowledge. Though a man know 
such a duty to be a duty, and yet doth it not. I will shew you the aggra 
vation of this sin also. 

1. When we sin against light, and according to that, the greater sin, the 
more light. Some sin against the light of nature, the men with men sin 
ning and doing uncleanly, Kom. i. 24 ; to be unthankful, and disobedient 
to parents, and unmerciful. So lying and covenant-breakers, John viii. 44. 
Two sins he reckons up there. He sins against the fact done.* 

2. When men sin against the light drunk in in their youth, Prov. xxxi. 
When Manasseh thus sinned against the sins (instruction ?) of his youth, 
Jer. ii. 3, 4, Cry unto Jerusalem, I remember thou wast thus and thus. 
Prov. xxii. 10, a principle gotten in youth will hardly depart. Your hearts 
are tender in youth. 

3. The more real and experimental knowledge is wrought in you, this is 
more grievous. Paul gives Timothy an admonition concerning his example. 
Note, thou hast the light of nature, word, and example, in Isa. xxvi. 10, 
The land of uprightness. 

4. The more taste thy knowledge hath in the world to come, when thou 
hast known the bitterness of thy burden, and yet go on, this is a high 
sin. Those that have been enlightened, and fall back, no more mercy for 
such afterwards. 

I. Before the act done, we may sin against knowledge. 
1. When thou knowest the issue and the end of thy sins. This sin leads 
to death, Prov. viii. 6 ; as Judas, Woe to him that betrays him. He 
was told fully of it. The destruction of the city was foretold, Jer. xxxviii. 
2, S.f 

* The meaning of this is clear, when compared with Vol. IV. p. 182- 
t See Vol. V. p. 178. 



APPENDIX. 



139 



2. The more consultations thou hast in thy heart, and yet dost it, the 
greater thy sin. Darius had many consultations, Dan. vi. 14. He laboured 
till the going down of the sun, to deliver him out of the lions mouths. Be 
cause every motive should leave an impression on the heart. 

3. When there is outward confirmation against it. Thus did Balaam, 
Num. xxii. 6. The ass reproved him. 2 Peter ii. 10. So Pilate ; he had 
divers confirmations of Christ, and his wife sent to him not to meddle. 
God s providence witnessed against him. 

II. In the act done three things.* 

1. The less passion in sin thou hast. 

2. The less hardness. 



6. Mr GOODWIN, at Trinity, December 13. 

Because when they knew God, they glorified him not as God, neither were 
thankful ROM. I. 21. 

I shewed the last day when and how many ways a man might sin against 
knowledge. Sinning against professed knowledge : Rom. ii. 18, Thou 
knowest the things of the law. You sin against the principles of knowledge, 
1 Tim. i. 20 ; they were excommunicated that they should no more blaspheme. 

In the act of sin, three rules whereby we might examine our hearts, 
whether it be that sin. 

1. The less passion thou hast in the heart, as Peter in a passion denied 
his Lord and Master Jesus Christ ; for he knew him to be the Messias. 
When knowledge hath its full work, and yet that a man should sin, this is 
a great aggravation. 

2. The more sorrow of heart thou hast in the committing of a sin, it 
augurs thy sin is the greater. From whence comes all the reluctancy in the 
hearts of wicked men, but from their consciences telling them, as Herod in 
beheading John Baptist. The text saith, that * he was exceeding sorrowful. 
This aggravated his sin so much the more. Here was a bank of displeasure 
cast up, over which he broke. 

3. So much the more hardness of heart that thou hast contracted in sin, 
it is the greater. 1 Tim. iv. 4, They know these to be lies, and yet speak 
them ; because they had their consciences seared with a hot iron. When 
you have light come into your hearts and reject it, it is the hot iron. Know 
ledge makes men familiar with their sin. Judas had a hard heart, for much 
knowledge had hardened his heart. Hardness of heart in contemning light 
and slighting sin, counting it as a small thing. 

(1.) When men know they are in an evil way, and yet go on in it, as 
Pharaoh did. 

(2.) Those that defer their repentance sin against knowledge. Your con 
sciences tell you you are in a bad case, and yet live in it. Thus Balaam ; 
he desired to die the death of the righteous, but would not live so. 

(3.) Those that do know the way of God, and yet for fear of shame will 
not come in ; for fear of being nicknamed thou wilt not come in. Some of 
the pharisees sinned against the Holy Ghost. God gave them up to it, be 
cause they sinned against the Son of God. Jesus Christ will gather such 
at the last day to appear before him to condemn. 

(4.) Those that know the grace of God, and have salvation offered, yet 
will not go to the price of it. The young man in the Gospel did thus. 
These three things are inaccurately stated. See Vol. IV. p. 180. 



140 APPENDIX. 

(5.) Some profess the truth and the fear of God, and yet fall back from 
that way they have professed, that make a lie, and by them is the way of 
truth [evil spoken of]. 

Use. See what a great engagement it is to [those that] have knowledge, to 
take [heed] to glorify God with it. 

1. Thou that hast knowledge canst not sin so cheap as others. Thy sins 
are dearer. 

2. Thou wilt have the more hardness of heart. How great is that 
darkness. 

3. The Lord will give thee up to worse sins, to despise his ways, hating his 
children. These are the sins to which he will give thee up, because thy end 
is seven times worse than thy beginning. 

4. God will give thee up to more despair. Isa. lix. 1, 2, salvation is far 
off from them, because they were sinners against knowledge. The more 
presumption against God s mercy, so the greater &c. 

5. The more knowledge here, the more terror of conscience thou wilt have 
hereafter, when thou comest into thy place. 

Obj. It is best to be ignorant, if knowledge, &c. 

Am. Thy sin will be the same as if thou hadst sinned against knowledge. 
Prov. i. 23, He will rejoice over them, and laugh at them when their fear 
cometh, and mock at their ruin. Thou wert best to turn speedily to him, 
for the sentence of condemnation may come out speedily against thee. The 
Lord will bear forty years with an ignorant one, but not five with you. 



7. Mr GOODWIN at Trinity, Jan. 30, An. Dom. 1629.* 
Professing themselves wise, they became fools. ROM. I. 22. 

I shew you wherein wisdom consists. 

1. Wisdom enables a man to look to those things that are profitable for 
themselves. They fall into many foolishnesses. 

2. It makes us do that that is good at all times and conditions. That is 
a wise man. A godly man only wise, for he pitcheth upon godliness, profit 
able for all things : Jer. xvii. 8, 9, He shall [not] be careful in the time 
of, &c. 

3. It directs a man to do what is right ; to the means, Wisdom is profit 
able to direct, Eccles. x. 10. 

4. It must enable a man to take the way, and to walk in it : Eph. v. 15, 
Be ye not unwise. 

I shewed you the degrees of folly, which we will not repeat. 

The particulars wherein folly doth consist. 

1. In wanting ability to consider things aright. A wicked man is a fool 
in this regard in divers particulars. 

(1.) They are unable to consider the goodness of God, and their badness, 
and therefore fools. They are unable to reflect on themselves. So mad 
men, for want of wisdom, their thoughts are dispersed ; they cannot call 
them in : Eccles. v. 1, * When thou goest into the temple, offer not the sacri 
fice of fools, for they consider not what they do : Jer. viii. 6-8, * None 
say, * What have I done ? 

(2.) He cannot consider the issues and consequents of things. He wants 

* The substance of the sermon from which these notes are evidently taken will be 
found in Vol. X. p. 200, et seq. ED. 



APPENDIX. 141 

foresight, Deut. xxxii. 27, 28. This is an unregenerate man ; but a wise 
man foresees the evil, and hides himself, Prov. xxii. 3. 

(3.) They cannot consider the fit time and circumstances of doing good : 
Esth. i. 13, they were wise, knowing the time. The stork knows his 
time, but my people do not. This is a great misery ; so where they are 
unable to discern the seasons of praying, of recreation, of study ; all this is 
folly. 

(4.) Fools are unable to lay things to heart ; therefore they are always 
uneasy, for sad thoughts enter into them. They forget the afflictions of 
Joseph : Isa. xlii, 25, He hath poured out the fury of his anger ; it burned 
him, and yet he laid it not to heart. 

(5.) He is unable to use his rule aright ; he forgets his directions ; he 
cannot walk by his rule. His wisdom fails when he walks by his rule. He 
knows not how to pray ; he cannot use the rules of prayer : Prov. xiv. 3, 
The wisdom of the prudent understands his way ; the folly of fools is de 
ceit. 2. He wants wisdom to judge of things which are good for him, and 
therefore he judgeth by false rules. 

(1.) He sees what is present to be better than that which is to come, how 
good soever. This is the part of fools, and the , as a little 

child. The promises of God they lay aside, as it was [with] Demas, 2 Tim. 
iv. 10. He loved this present world. The unregenerate, they are for pre 
sent things ; so the young man in the Gospel. It was his judgment. Rom. 
viii. 18, Paul counted the afflictions as nothing. He looked at things not 
seen. This is our rule, that false, &c. 

(2.) He prefers that which is easy to be obtained, though worse, before 
that which is more difficult, though better. He is a sluggard, the wise man 
is diligent. The ways of the wise are too high for him. A wise man will 
set on the hardest duty and difficultest. Wisdom is too high. 

(3.) A fool judgeth according to outward appearances. A fool would say 
that a man in gay apparel was best ; for the unregenerate judge outwardly, 
as children do the book best that hath most gays, and sermon that pleases 
best. They judge according to the quantity of a thing, or else by multi 
tude. They follow a multitude to do evil. They are fools. They think to 
be heard for their much babbling. They never look to a broken heart, ay 
David did. He cannot discern between things that differ. They take tem 
porary faith for true faith, because there is a likeness. A godly man hath 
wisdom to know this. They still follow their own minds and wills, and 
therefore all fools are self-willed. So will wicked men ; that way the wind 
blows, they will sail, according to their lies. 

3. In regard of their choice they make divers [mistakes]. 

(1.) They choose things that are less necessary for things that are neces 
sary. Unregenerate men spend their time before they get pardon ;* a wise 
man seeketh the kingdom of heaven first. Mary had chosen one thing ne 
cessary, but Martha busied in many things. 

(2.) They choose uncertain for certain things. God gives richly all 
things. What folly is this ! Charge them that are rich, that they be not 
high-minded, &c. 

(3.) He is a fool that provides but for one event ; a wise man provides 
in omnem eventum. The steward had done wisely in making himself friends. 
This is a wise man ; therefore to provide for all events is wisdom. 

(4.) He that will not choose rather a small inconvenience to avoid a 
greater is a fool. To endure hardship for a time is wisdom. Thus Moses, 

* The meaning of this appears on comparing it with Vol. X. p. 206. 



142 APPENDIX. 

Heb. xi. 25, Choosing rather to suffer affliction, &c. ; Job xxxvi. 21, 
Take heed of lies, for this hast thou chosen before affliction. 

(5.) The bargains that wicked men make are foolish bargains : Isa. Hi. 3, 
He sold himself for nought. The fool hath a price, but hath not a heart to 
use it aright. 

(6.) In the issue and end, wherein in divers things he is foolish. 

fl.J He believes everything, and the promises of his heart: Ps. xlii. 11, 
Their houses shall endure for ever ; this is their inward heart. They 
think prosperity will abide always : Isa. Ivi. 12, He will take his own way; 
Come, say they, to-morrow shall be, &c. 

[2.J He doth things in vain, Gal. iii. 3, Jer. xvii., as the foolish virgins 
had not oil in their lamps ; and so, when we suffer many things, and in the 
end fall away, Heb. x. 38, they are the worst fools of all the rest. The 
Galatians are called foolish, therefore, because they fell away. 

[3.] Those things that they choose for their happiness is made their ruin. 
He is taken in the snare of his own sin : 2 Chron. xxviii. 23, The gods he 
sacrificed to were his ruin. 

Use. You that are discovered to be fools, see that ye become wise. For 
nothing be fools, since a fool inherits nothing. They shall inherit shame 
and dishonour. God hath no pleasure in fools. Get more wisdom before 
God delighteth in thee. Go, get thy understanding and wisdom changed. 
Honour is not fit for the fool. A rod is fit for the fool s back, a whip for 
an horse ; so conscience shall whip the foolish men. Do not go on in your 
sins, to provoke God ; he is stronger than you. Get your hearts changed ; 
choose things rather which are certain and necessary and convenient for 
you, before the fool s uncertain things. 



8. Mr GOODWIN of Katherine Hall, at Trinity, Feb. 24. 1629. 

The Jool hath said in his heart, There is no God. Corrupt are they, and 
become abominable. Ps. XIV. 1. 

I lately discovered the folly that was in men s hearts by nature. Next 
comes vain reasonings. They are not those erroneous opinions in speculative 
knowledge, but in general of them ; those vain reasonings that guide men in 
their actions. As in his judgment he followed reason, so in his practice. 
All reasoning consists of two things. The first is of some principle, the 
second of some induction of these, &c. So two things : 1. That there 
is in men s hearts abundance of false principles, which are the root of all 
other false reasoning. These possess their judgments. 2. All those vain argu 
ments whereby men do sheathe themselves in their evil ways. For the first 
of them, to discover it unto you, it is my text. This is the fundamental 
principle of all. As all being depends on God, so the belief of a God is the 
upholder of all. Now, the fools, that is, all mankind, have said in their, &c. 
Kom. iii. 10, he applies it to all mankind. This is the ground of all im 
piety in their lives ; it proceeds from this. This text lays open unto us the 
unbelief in men s hearts, and the false principles that are in men, which 
break forth into action. 

Doct. In all men s hearts there is a principle of unbelief, or secret unbelief 
of all the principles of religion, and so consequently of corruption of manners 
in their lives. I will shew you what these principles are. Out of principles 
are gathered both the doctrine of knowledge and religion ; so in the power of 
God, Heb. xi. 6. But in these are principles. It is the foundation of 



APPENDIX. 143 

coming to God. See it in popery, which are the principles of the doctrine 
of the devil, which being believed they will be [obliged to believe all the rest]. 
For their knowledge, as that the church cannot err ; so in practice, in works 
of merit, they will practise it by giving away all their goods. So other 
principles laid in the heart will overturn all popery. It will overturn practice 
and judgment, as in Luther ; and for godliness, if sound principles were ad 
mitted and laid in the heart, would make us conformed to the truth ; so, on 
the contrary, there is a general unbelief of all the principles of the truth. 
Here is the foundation : Heb. iii. 22, as belief makes us come to God, so 
unbelief is the foundation of our departure. 

Demonstration 1. You that know your own hearts shall find as if his heart 
believed not concerning any demonstration of that there is a G-od, or that 
there is a day of judgment. It will at first seem as a strange thing ; as when 
Paul spoke to Felix, his words seemed strange. All men will say that there 
is a God ; the principle is strange to their hearts ; this is the full demon 
stration. 

Reason 1. Because they are things not seen. The principles of religion 
are not seen. Who hath seen the reward of the righteous ? None think 
there is a world to come, and a reward for the righteous, because they see 
them not, they will not believe them : Let him come down from the cross, 
that we might see it. These things must be apprehended by faith, which 
is the evidence of things not seen. 

Reason 2. The nature of man is apt to believe anything else besides the 
things that concern God and godliness : John xii. 37, they believed not 
Christ for all his signs. So God complains of it that men will believe things 
not seen, but not so of God. 

Reason 3. Men will not believe the principles of religion, because they 
delight not [in them], for self-love hath possessed their hearts ; because they 
work against them, therefore they will not believe ; they have pleasure in 
unrighteousness. 

Demonstration 2. When a man is converted, he begins to learn all the 
principles of religion again. 

Reason. Because his former belief is not strong enough to resist sin. 
Their hearts are put to no distress all this while. He comes to see that there 
is a God that he never saw before. He casts out all the false earth, and digs 
till he doth come to firm ground ; so of sound faith. 

Demonstration 3. Men do not believe the principles, and therefore this is 
a demonstration. The more a man grows in faith, he sees his unbelief more 
certainly. It is unbelief. Our Saviour complains of the little faith of his 
disciples, and God complains that there is unbelief ; and young in grace 
say it. 

Demonstration 4. If any man s heart be converted, he calls in question these 
principles, whether there is a God or not. Until then they are left in dark 
ness, having some dissension. 

Demonstration 5. Men s actions shew they do not believe, 
of the heart, as David said, They profess they believe God, but in deed they 
deny his own operation. Mai. iii., If I be a master, where is my fear? 
if I be a father, where is mine honour ? Your unbelief is seen in your 
actions. When men do otherwise than God requires, they live in unbelief: 
Jer. v. 22, if ye believe that I am he that sets bounds to the sea, ye would 
say presently, We will fear him ; but, ver. 21, if you did believe that there 
is a world to come, then you would not wholly provide for this life. When 
a traveller sees the sun almost down, he would make haste ; so if we believed 
that the time of grace is short, we would begin to make our calling and 



144 APPENDIX. 

election sure. These are the common principles of religion, which, if they 
believed, as other things, they would do as in other things ; but the fool hath 
said in his heart, There is no God. So if we believed that the enemy was 
coming, we would put on the armour of God. 



9. Mr GOODWIN, of Katherine Hall, at Trinity, Feb. 21. 

The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God. Ps. XIV. 1. 

5. Another demonstration. When a man is in a storm, then their hearts 
fail ; as the disciples, when the wind arose, they being in the ship. Christ 
said to Martha that she did not believe, John xi. 24. They mistrust God 
in some small things, because their faith is put to it, and in general we fail 
many times. Now I intend to handle some principles more at length. 
(1.) The first is, that there is no God, that in his thoughts, in all the crowd 
of them, God enters not into his thoughts, that is not the meaning ; but in 
all his presumptuous thoughts and crafty cogitations, God is not their coun 
sellor, neither is that it ; but that the ground of all is that they think there 
is no God ; in their thoughts and hearts they are far out of his sight, the 
judgments of God ; and there is no sin, this principle being laid in their 
hearts. Now, if no sin, none need to care. 

(2.) All these glorious attributes of God, of justice, of power, omnisciency, 
men believe it not. Men believe that God is omniscient, and yet this is the 
ground of all their secret sins. Would men commit sin if they thought that 
the Lord saw them? Isa. xxix., I will confound the wisdom of the wise, 
who dig up to hide their counsel from the Lord ; so the greatness of God. 
Would men come to offer lame and blind sacrifices if they did believe that 
God was the great king of heaven and earth ? Isa. li. 12, 13, Where is the 
fury of the oppressor ? Wouldst thou be afraid of a man whose breath is 
consuming, and dost not fear him, thy Maker ? It is because thou forgettest 
me. I stand by and comfort thee, therefore thou shouldst not fear, but trust 
in him. This God doth, that he might shew men that there is unbelief in 
their hearts. 

(3.) They think that God is slack, and this is the ground of their thoughts. 

(4.) They think that God is not a strict God. They call every one good 
that doth evil. Thou thoughtest that I was like to thee. This is the 
ground of their impiety, that they believe not God s attributes. 

6. Demonstration. Men do not believe that the word of God is true. This 
is the ground of sin. When the threatenings of God come in against drunk 
ards, they will not turn from their drunkenness, because they will not believe 
the word ; as in Dives. He desired one from the dead [to be sent] to them 
that they might believe. Christ tells them expressly that they did not be 
lieve. Azarias,* a wicked man, yet would not believe the word. So in 
Isa. v., * let us see the word. 

7. Demonstration,. Men do not believe that there is a world to come and 
a day of judgment, a reward for the righteous. Let us eat and drink, for 
to-morrow we shall die. Paul applies it to the resurrection. What profit in 
holiness ? Men have not judgment speedily executed. All things happen 
alike to all. This is the greatest evil under the sun ; this is the cause that 
many go to hell. Therefore their hearts are full of evil ; because they shall 
die, therefore they will take their pleasure. 

* I am not sure of the reading here, but T suppose the reference is to Azariah 
or CJzziah refusing to obey the priest, who forhade him to offer incense. ED. 



APPENDIX. 145 

Obj. This is strange. Do not all men profess that there is a God ? How 
can this be, that the fool hath said in his heart there is no God ? Then all 
men would be atheists and heretics, and the like. 

Sol. There is a twofold atheism, some expressed and direct, and others 
indirect and by consequent, 2 Peter ii. 1, Rev. xii. 1. The papists pro 
fess their religion, and yet they are called devils, 1 John iv. 1 the spirits. 

Obj. We never thought such a thing. If there were such in their hearts, 
they should know it certainly. 

Sol. John v. 46: Moses is he in whom ye trust and believe, yet Christ 
said, If ye did believe [him] ye would have believed in Christ. Yet we 
should know that he will not be of them in the court of under 

standing, but in the heart. Yet we should know that the heart is deceitful 
above all things. 

1. All principles seldom or never come forth into outward acts. Those 
principles can scarce be drawn out, yet he is guided by those principles. 
Men that speak Latin do not always speak as thinking on the rules, and yet 
they are guided by the rules ; so it is in this case. 

2. Acts of unbelief are almost secret ; as of faith, all her acts are secret- 
It is the foundation of all, which lies under ground. We live by it, and see 
by it, and pray by it, and yet it is known by its effects and fruits. Many 
live long, and cannot tell whether they have faith or not. 

3. The bottom of corruption is much more secret than the bottom of 
grace, which doth manifest and enlighten men in their ways. 

Use. Here take notice of the desperate wickedness of the heart, that hath 
so many cursed principles lurking in it, and abiding there. 

2. Look at your lusts, and you may find them to be under these prin 
ciples. 



10. MR GOODWIN, of Katherine Hall, at Trinity, Feb. 28. 1629. 

The fool hath said in his hearty that there is no God. Corrupt are they. 
Ps. XIV. 1. 

Obj. Our hearts are filled with thoughts on the contrary, that there is a 
great God, and that there is one God. 

Sol. As it is in faith, so unbelief. Many a godly man that hath faith 
will say that there is nothing but atheism ; but they walk very circum 
spectly, and fear to ofiend, which shews that there is some acts of faith that 
him ; so, on the contrary, some acts of unbelief. 

Obj. Is it possible that one thought is apparent, and the other is not ; the 
one prevailing, the other not ? 

Sol. Here the psalmist tells you that they have many thoughts ; they 
have said, There is no God. The principles of atheism are deep rooting in 
the heart, but good principles have not such firm rooting, and therefore 
speak only for excusing. They confess most, because they cannot prevent 
nor do anything. False principles do all. 

Obj. The reason why men do not live godly doth not lie in [want of] faith 
in general, but in want of application, that there is a God, my God, and 
back it on that place^ Bom. i. 23, ii. 3. They knew there was a God, this 
is all their faith. 

Sol. Many things to be laid together. It is needful and it must be be- 

VOL. XII. K 



146 APPENDIX. 

lieved that a special faith is necessary : Heb. xi. 13, Three acts of faith. 
Which place argueth that there is or ought to be an applying faith. A man 
may go to hell for all general faith. 

2. Though application be necessary, yet men fail in general faith, for the 
belief of things general hath the main swaying and ruling the heart, and of 
applying it to the soul. If a man believe truly that God is a rewarder, he 
could trust in him. Though the lepers* believed that the king was a mer 
ciful king, yet came with ropes about their necks. This hath a main influ 
ence into the hearts of men to sharpen. 

Demon. 1. Because the Scripture doth promise faith to such as believe in 
general. This is not enough. When Christ catechised Martha, he ques 
tioned whether her faith was sound in general. Dost thou believe ? This 
is general. This is one of the main foundations of all other graces. 

2. We fail most in believing the promises of general. So the counsellor 
that would not believe it though God should make windows, &c. See the 
excellency of Abraham s faith, Rom. iv. 17, 18. 

3. The stronger his faith is in general, the stronger he relies upon God 
by a special faith, that is strengthened. Wicked men do not only fail in 
applying, but in general, that there is no God ; though they fail in both. 
To give you instances : If men believed that there was a hell, truly and fully, 
they would be wary and careful of coming to that place. But the reason 
why they fear not hell is not because they believe that there is not a hell, 
but because they believe it doth not concern them. But it is evident that is 
for unbelief. It is evident they do not want special faith, but general also. 

Obj. You say it is an easy thing to believe in general. 

Sol. The answer is in James ii. 20, Know, vain man, that faith with 
out works is dead faith. Heb. xi. 1, You shall find it evidently set down, 
ver. 6, comparing it with Heb. x. 37, 38, Faith is the substance of things 
not seen. All this argueth that a godly man believeth out of another prin 
ciple ; for it stirs him and makes him active. The main thing men want is 
belief in general that there is a God, or no God. 

Use 1. If this atheism be in all men s hearts, then search into your hearts 
to find this unbelief, for it is in the bottom [of them] ; let men dig deep and 
they shall find it. 

2. When they have found out the place of unbelief, then be humbled. 
There is no rebellion or treason like this, that there is no God, for they deny 
his majesty and royal titles. As there are many church papists, so there are 
many church atheists. God is wearied with your atheism, Mai. iii. 14. 
Therefore did the King Ahaz provoke the Lord, Isa. vii. 13, 14. Ps. kxviii. 
19, They spake against God in their hearts. 

3. Is any exercised with doubtings that there is no God, as many are ? 
Do not think that thy case is desperate, such a case as never any had such 
thoughts. Look to your lives in such cases, but not to your thoughts. So 
should wicked men on the contrary. 

4. Let such as are free from such thoughts be thankful and bless God ; for 
we are all naturally troubled with atheism. It is an infinite mercy that thou 
art going to perfection, whenas he might keep thee in thy atheism still. 

5. Take heed of entertaining doubts in your thoughts. Do not cherish 
or hide them. Wilt thou maintain a Jesuit ? These doubts weaken your faith. 

6. Here you see what great necessity of coming to the ordinances : 1 Cor. 

* There is here evidently a confounding of the story of the lepers going into 
the camp of Syria (2 Kings vii.) with that of the servants of the king of Syria 
going to King Ahab with these tokens of submission (1 Kings xx.). The reference is 
to the latter, and not to the former. We should therefore for lepers read servants. ED. 



APPENDIX. 147 

xiv. 25, If one that believes not come in, he falls down. Do thou often 
and frequently ; and come with reverence also. 

7. If men believe not in principle, no wonder if they fall back, seeing they 
believe not the first principles. 

8. See what a great work grace is, what a distance there is between nature 
and faith. Gam prima negantur principia, non est disputatio ; so if you 
deny the first principles, how can you be taught in godliness ? Thou must 
believe all by a new heart. Consider what a great work it is, and apply thy 
heart to it. 



11. Mr GOODWIN of Katherine Hall, March 2. 1629.* 

The weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God, &c. 

2 COB. X. 4, 5. 

That I stood upon was to shew you what carnal reason was, and what its 
assistance was. As the strength of a kingdom lies in two things : 1, in a 
wise and able counsellor to plot, and 2, in walls, fences, and strongholds ; 
which is twofold, either soldiers in the field, or by setting up castles and 
strongholds ; so lusts have first a field army, which, would be overcome 
suddenly ; therefore there are strong reasons to defend yourselves and your 
estates. They are reasons and strongholds that exalt themselves against 
God. As the opposition lies in the knowledge of God, so the strength of 
lusts in reasonings, which are the same. The pope is the model of all 
wicked men ; and it is set up to bring all in subjection unto it. As it hath 
[by] reasonings invented the setting up of the pope, and these being backed by 
strong arguments, therefore are called strong delusions, 2 Thess. ii. 11, 
because they are to overcome strong understandings, as the kingdom of 
the pope is upholded by carnal reason, which hath invented reasons for its 
upholding, &c. 

To manifest that [there] are these strong reasons : 

1. From experience. Come to the most ignorant wretch that is, and 
question about his salvation, ye shall find that he hath somewhat to say ; and 
if ignorant, then [much more] men of knowledge. 

2. From the great work of conversion. He will tell you that he had many 
pleas before for his salvation. There are abundance of wrong wards in the 
soul, which hinder the unlocking of their souls, unless by God s help they 
be unlocked. 

3. By the preparation of the word, which hath many undermining reason 
ings, which will overcome yours, though never so strong. 

Quest. What are the grounds why there are such in the heart ? 

Ans. 1. Because the reason of men is so large. Micah vii. 3. Why are 
kings so bad ? Because they have some flatterers that smoothe over their 
doings. Self-love sets them on works. 

Quest . What is the reason why the heart of man is glad ? 

Ans. The embracing of evil out of self-flattery. John iii. 20. When 
their estates are naught, they are loath to come to the light, and are glad to 
entertain what is spoken for them. 

Again, there is a great deal of pride in men s hearts, for the most ignorant 
thinks that they shall have heaven, because else they would not be quiet. 
As the dying man lays hold on everything, so these. 

* The sermon from which these notes are taken will be found in Vol. X. p. 377, et 
seq. 



148 APPENDIX. 

Heads from whence these reasonings are fetched, and are grounds of carnal 
reason. 

1 . From wicked proverbial speeches. The devil s proverbs are many, and they 
having a stamp, so that they pass for current ; as Every man for himself, and 
God for us all, is a cursed [proverb]. Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we 
shall die ; this is a common proverb amongst epicures ; but the apostle, 
Be not deceived, evil speeches corrupt good manners. He answers with 
a proverb. There was a cursed proverb amongst the Israelites, Ezek. 
xviii. 2. The Holy Ghost spends the whole chapter in confuting it. Another 
proverbial speech amongst them, Ezek. xii. 22. To give another instance, 
Skin for skin ; all for life. This was a current proverb which was then 
used, and men use them. As the papists have abundance of traditions, so 
this is a tradition of the world. 

2. The common opinions in the world. Therefore this is the apostle s 
principal meaning in that place, Rom. xii. 2, Be not conformed to the world, 
but be renewed in your minds. Look, what most men think, and what the 
wise men do, that will we do. So for estates, they will have their religion ; 
whereas the Scripture bids us not follow a multitude to do evil. 

3. From observing God s common dealings in the world. Therefore 
because such and such courses prosper, therefore their estates are good in 
the sight of God, and if they be not rich in the world, they think that God 

them. Jer. xliv. Since we have left burning to the queen of 
heaven, we wanted nothing, but now want many things. As Ahaz, 2 Chron. 
xxviii. This was that made David to stumble. * My feet had well nigh 
slipped, because he had carnal reasons in his heart. Judges vi. 22, If 
the Lord be with us, why is all this befallen us ? This was carnal reason 
in saying this. 

4. From outward spiritual privileges, God suffering men to be baptized, 
and to be at the Lord s supper, and to hear the word. It is not circum 
cision that availeth anything. As Micah said (Judges xvii.), Certainly the 
Lord will bless. 



INDEX. 



INDEX. 



A B C in Christianity, is to be nothing in a man s self, vi. 489. 

Abel and Cain, the prototypes of regenerate and unregenerate men, vi. 308. 

Was of the election, Cain of the non-election, ix. 29, 191. 
Abilities and endowments of mind, the gift of God, x. 94 ; are good in the 

sense in which every creature is said to be good, 95. 
Ability of Christ for the work of reconciliation, demonstrated, v. 68. 
Abimelech, the acknowledgment of his integrity not a proof of the sufficiency 

of natural conscience, vi. 288, 352. 
Abounding of grace, i. 128. 
Abraham, his faith, i. 463. 

Christ his seed, that he might be made under the law, v. 62. 

Wherein his justification by works consisted, vii. 181. 

Why specially called the friend of God, vii. 186. 

Assurance given to, the greatest that heaven could afford, vii. 235. 

Before his call, an idolater, ix. 33 ; election of grace most conspicuous 

in his example, ib. 

The circumcision of his Gentile servants and their children, a type of 
the extension of the blessing to all the families of the earth, ix. 433. 
Abstinence from sin, mortifies lust, iii. 493. 
Acceptance in the beloved, blessedness of, vi. 180. 

Is in Christ as the beloved of God, rather than in Jesus as a Saviour, 

ix. 347. 

Acceptation , what, i. 100. 

Acquaintance with Christ, a means of purging, iii. 479. 
Actions, chief difference of, in the motives, iii. 442. 

Derive their worth from the persons who profess them, v. 120. 
Cannot be good unless they be done from love to God, and aiming at 
his glory as the chief end, v. 411 ; unless they flow from a pure 
heart, ib. ; from a good conscience, void of base ends, 412 ; unless 
they be out of faith, which engrafts a man into Christ, 413 ; objec 
tions answered, 415. 
ACTS OF FAITH, viii. 257. 

Adam, his corruption, how transmitted to us, ii. 127 ; we are guilty in his 
sin, ii. 129 ; a common person before his fall, ii. 131 ; not so after 
it, ii. 132 ; a type of Christ, ii. 415 ; his marriage a figure of Christ s 
union with his church, ii. 419. 
Inferiority of his grace to the Christian s, iii. 449. 
Was not a surety for all mankind, but a common person or representa 
tive, iv. 27 ; in this respect a type of Christ, 31. 



152 INDEX. 

^ condemnation and death in, parallel with justification and life in Christ, 
iv. 40. 

And Eve, the ringleaders of the rebellion, pardoned, iv. 222. 

In his marriage, a type of Christ, iv. 504. 

His righteousness, though conveyed to his posterity, would not have 
justified them eternally, v. 83. 

His will had perfect command over his atfections, v. 322. 

His righteousness could never have brought him to heaven, v. 510. 

In what sense he had the Spirit, vi. 54. 

His humility as a creature different from that which is wrought in the 
new creature, vi. 244 ; his justification different, 225 ; his love in 
ferior, 226 ; was without self-denial, 227 ; his motives to obedience 
less noble, ib. ; his assistance from God less, ib. 

His best estate but a type and shadow of that which Christ was to bring 
in, vii. 41 ; infinitely surpassed the best state that has been, since 
the fall, on earth, 42 ; his knowledge of God natural, 44; had inbred 
notions of the attributes of God, 46 ; had the principles of his mind 
and will sown in his heart, 47 ; had no promise made to him of any 
better state, but only of a continuance of that in which he was, 50. 

Had no supernatural knowledge of God by revelation, vii. 54. 

A type of Christ, vii. 70 ; in what respect, 74, 92 ; points of difference, 
95. 

His body, free from external injury, vii. 99 ; and from sickness or 
disease, ib. 

If he had continued in grace, uncertain whether he would have been 
after a set time taken to heaven, ix. 328. 

If he had stood, might have conveyed holiness to his posterity, but not 
confirmation in it, ix. 355. 

How he was led into sin, x. 7. 

How constituted a public person, representing us, x. 17 ; by the ap 
pointment of God, ib. ; yet not by absolute prerogative, but by cove 
nant, and that in accordance with the law of nature, 18 ; his actual 
righteousness not being conveyed to his posterity, 19 ; nor the guilt 
of any of his sins except the first, ib. ; justice and equity of the im 
putation, 21 ; parallel with the imputation of Christ s righteousness, 
23. 

Covenant made with, on behalf of mankind, justly imposed, x. 24 ; 
remained no longer a public person after the commission of the first 
sin, ii. 26 ; heinousness of his sin, 27 ; undervalued the Lord in his 
heart, ceasing to think him to be the chiefest good, 29 ; thinking 
that he was not faithful and true, 30 ; was jealous of God, thinking 
he had unworthy designs in prohibiting their enjoyment, ib. ; sinned 
against God s sovereignty, in aspiring to be as gods, ib. undoubtedly 
laid hold, by faith, on the promised Saviour, 36 ; in this, an en 
couragement to convicted sinners, 37. 

His nature corrupted, and the image of God extinguished, by his first 
sin, x. 48. 

His sin in eating the apple, two aggravations of, x. 58. 

And Christ, the only common roots of all sin and grace respectively, 
x. 62. 

Lost all grace at his first sinning, x. 87. 

His sin, in what sense a subject of repentance by us, x. 340 ; we should 
judge ourselves for it, or pronounce a sentence of condemnation on 
ourselves for it, 344 ; fear and tremble before God for it, ib. ; lament 



INDEX. 153 

and bewail ourselves for it, 845 ; confess our guilt in it, 846 ; exer 
cise contrition or brokenness of heart for it, 349 ; all these acts to 
be mingled with faith in Christ for its pardon, 351 ; in what manner 
the act of repentance, which is a turning from sin to God, is to be 
exercised about, 354 ; the effects which godly sorrow for sin wrought 
in the Corinthians may all be produced with relation to, 356. 

Adherence, faith of, distinguished from assurance, iv. 208. 

Adoption, what is included in, i. 88. 

Advocate, Christ an, in opposition to Satan as an accuser, v. 327 ; his 

pleas, ib. 

The devil is sin s, to plead against us, Christ ours, to plead for us, v. 
511. 

Affections may be stirred to spiritual things in the unregenerate, vi. 435 ; 
difference between carnal and renewed, 437. 

Afflictions sweetened when regarded as sent by a Father, v. 223. 
God s end in, is to take away sin, vii. 567. 

AGES, THKEE SEVERAL, OF CHRISTIANS, IN FAITH AND OBEDIENCE, Vli. 473. 

To come, 2, 268. 

And generations, distinction between, iv. 281. 
AGGRAVATION OF SIN, iv. 151. 

AGGRAVATIONS OF SINNING AGAINST KNOWLEDGE, iv. 163. 
AGGRAVATIONS OF SINNING AGAINST MERCY, iv. 188. 
Alexander, the royalty of his gifts, vi. 178. 
Alexandrian MS., value set upon, iv. 288. 
Allegory, in illustration of true and false peace, vi. 806. 
Alm.anac, God s, calculated for eternity, shews no setting of the Father of 

lights, and no winter, ix. 304. 
Ambition, pitched right, God allows, vi. 494. 
* Amen, the force of it, iv. 373. 
Amor beneplaciti, i. 109 ; complacentice, ib. 
Angel, in Rev. xi., is Christ himself, iii. 110. 

Angels, their ranks, i. 155, 171 ; their immutability not by nature, 158 ; 
their fellowship with the elect, 160 ; and with Christ, 164 ; are 
part of Christ s family, 159 ; their association with men, 162 ; 
Christ their head, 164 ; reconciled to men by Christ, 188 ; how 
sons of God, 97; not elected in Christ, 111; not members of 
Christ, 167 ; not brethren of Christ, ib. ; their mutability, 178 ; 
confirmation of, 179 ; judgments executed by them, 187 ; subordi 
nation among, 486 ; their share in the affairs of this world, 489 ; 
called gods, ib. 

Evil, their different degrees and orders, i. 486 ; their first sin, ii. 37. 
Praise God for the redemption of men, iii. 13, 215. 
Are all our guardians, iii. 15. 
Executioners of all God s great designs, iii. 82. 
Capable of love and pity, iv. 140. 

Glad to get a glimpse of the way of saving men by Christ, iv. 229 ; see 
in the gospel all that they ever saw before of the attributes of God, 
and much more, 230. 
Not clothed with so glorious a robe as that which the gospel dispenseth 

to men, iv. 245. 

Metaphorically called, in Job, fowls of heaven, iv. 286. 
Taken with the wisdom of the gospel, saints with its riches, iv. 313. 
Are poor beggarly creatures in comparison with a poor sinner clothed 
with Christ s righteousness, iv. 328. 



154 



INDEX. 



Angels, those who came to Abraham before the destruction of Sodom, iv. 357. 
Often called the heavens, from their place, iv. 389. 
Have thrones, that is, kingly dignity and dominion, among them, iv. 394. 
Not made before that beginning mentioned by Moses, iv. 410. 
Folly in, is their possibility of change, iv. 544. 
The fallen, if saved, might have been more profitable to God than 

man, v. 14. 
Unable to satisfy for the sins of men, v. 80 ; in what sense charged 

with folly, ib. 

Need a mediator to reconcile them to us, v. 90. 

Both good and evil, give accounts to God of their proceedings, v. 309. 
Do not receive righteousness through Christ s mediation, v. 504. 
A question whether they would have been ministering spirits to us in a 

state of innocence, v. 543. 
Their ministry not used to convert, or to work saving faith in any, 

vi. 374. 

Made under the same law, for substance, that men were, vii. 26 ; those 
that sinned liable to the same punishments to which men are liable, 
27. 

Why called morning-stars, vii. 90. 
Praise God s wonders, the congregation of saints his faithfulness, viii. 

65. 
Could not stand by merely such assistance as was due to them in the 

implied covenant of their creation, ix. 4. 
The grace they had by creation, a mutable and changeable good, ix. 

300. 

Anger, God s with his people, proceeds from love, iv. 277. 
Angry, God is, with the sins of wicked men, and grieved with those of be 
lievers, iii. 416. 
Annas, called Annanas by Josephus, v. 231 ; why Christ was first sent to 

him, 232. 
Anointing, of Christ was by the Father, with the Holy Spirit, v. 44. 

With oil, xi. 458 ; a standing ordinance, 459. 
Answer to prayer, not heeding, is letting God speak in vain, iii. 361 ; will 

provoke God not to answer, 362 ; prevents thanksgiving, ib. 
Antichrist, his kingdom contrasted with Christ s, i. 471 ; ii. 47 ; why the 
pope is so called, i. 471 ; claim to be the head of the church, a mark 
of, i. 547. 
The pope, iii. 67. 

To recover power just before the fall, iii. 166. 
Rose by degrees, and shall be destroyed by degrees, iv. 291. 
Antinomians hold one side of the truth and reject the other, iv. 277. 
Antiochus, his three and a half years, a type of the three and a half years of 

the witnesses lying dead, iii. 199. 
Apostates to Romanism, their great guilt, iii. 107. 

And saints, grew together in the primitive church, ix. 195. 
Abound most where true religion abounds most, ix. 206. 
Apostles, office of, i. 5 ; marks of, 10 ; authority of their writings, 6. 

Shared the prejudices of their countrymen against the Gentiles, v. 468 ; 
perhaps at first understood the commission to preach the gospel to 
all nations, as restricted to the Jews and proselytes scattered among 
all nations, 469 ; this mistake how corrected, 474. 
Had a double coming of the Spirit, the one to regenerate them, the 
other as a Comforter, to lead them into all truth, vii. 142. 



INDEX. 155 

Apostles, their office and power extraordinary, xi. 368. 

Appeals, not of absolute necessity to the government of churches, xi. 232. 

Application of Christ s remedy specially attributed to his intercession, 

iv. 63. 

Of redemption is all comprehended in Christ revealed in us, iv. 343. 
Apprehending of sinner by Christ, his calling, ix. 357 ; is in order to his 
receiving all that Christ purchased for him, and all that God intended 
for him, ib. 

Arians, the foundation of their error, iv. 276. 
AriuSj his views of the person of Christ, iv. 540. 
Aristotle, his distinction of sins of ignorance, of passion, and of deliberation, 

iv. 165. 

His answer to the complaint of Alexander the Great, iv. 294. 
Ark of the covenant, a type of the gospel, iv. 253. 
Called the glory of Israel, iv. 323. 
Of the covenant, typified the person of Christ ; the wood his humanity, 

the gold his divinity, v. 435. 

And mercy-seat, placed at the upper end of the holy of holies ; the 
former the type of Christ s person, the latter of God s grace joined 
with Christ s person, viii. 141 ; these two cannot be separated, 142. 
Of Noah, a type of Christ, ix. 49. 
Armada, Spanish, discomfiture of, iv. 254. 
Arminianism, founded upon a want of reconciling apparent, but not real, 

contradictions, iv. 277. 
Arminians mistake the nature of regeneration, vi. 188. 

Their views of election, ix. 7 ; could not be saved according to their own 

system, 12. 
Doctrine of free-will makes the salvation of all men uncertain, ix. 419 ; 

their election is no election at all, 420. 

Deny inherent corruption to be a sin distinctly^considered, x. 325. 
Armour of the Christian is all defensive, v. 321. 

Ascension, Christ s, a support of faith, iv. 44 ; compared to the Roman tri 
umph, 46. 

Of Christ, great purpose of it, to prepare a place for his people, iv. 50 ; 
in it, as well as in his death and resurrection, Christ to be regarded 
as a common person, 51. 

Assembly of the saints, need of coming often into, x. 255. 
Assessors, saints shall be Christ s, in judging the world, iv. 54. 
Assisting grace, God generally gives in proportion to the measure of grace 

acquired and gained, vii. 512. 

Assurance of salvation, two kinds of, i. 233 ; a higher light than faith, 236 ; 
if true, makes a man holy, 250 ; by the seal of the Spirit, 234 ; 
every believer called to have it, 304. 
Want of, compatible with faith, iii. 238. 
Distinguished from recumbency, iii. 368. 
Doctrine of, if not abused, is no dangerous doctrine, to make men secure 

and presumptuous in sinning, iii. 417. 
May be lost, iii. 422. 

Of God s love, a means of praying, iii. 480. 
Is a persuasion that God and Christ are prepared to save a man s own 

self in particular, iv. 207. 
Of perseverance does not make the Christian less resolute in resisting 

temptation, v. 325. 
Full, many believers want, v. 394. 



156 INDEX. 

Assurance always presupposes first act of faith of recumbency, v. 403. 

Of God s love is either from signs only, or from an immediate light of 

the Spirit revealing God s heart and mind towards us, vii. 66. 
Not essential to faith, viii. 265 ; in all faith there is an assured per 
suasion of the things I believe, but not necessarily of my personal 

interest in them, 266 ; true faith may be without, 339 ; follows upon 

faith, 345 ; comes in as a reward of faith, 346. 
May be obtained, viii. 351; blessed effects of, 354; objections answered, 

356 ; how it is produced in the heart of the believer, 360 ; by the 

three who bear witness on earth, 361 ; how they witness, 363 ; the 

three who bear witness in heaven, 367 ; to be earnestly sought, 372 ; 

and that by all believers, 373. 
Atheists, of two kinds, direct and indirect, x. 239; in what sense it may be 

affirmed that all wicked men are, ib. et seq. 
Atonement, extent of, universal as to all sins, v. 428. 

Day of, purpose of its institution, v. 428 ; signification of its services, ib. 
Attributes of God, engaged to believers, i. 336 ; subjected to his love, ii. 

152, 160. 
Infinitely more really and livelily set forth to us by what we know of 

Christ in the gospel, than they could have been by the creation of 

millions of worlds, iv. 267. 
Distinguished into communicable and incommunicable, iv. 380 ; grace 

is an imitation of the former, and an application of the latter, ib. 
Put forth most superlatively in the work of grace, vi. 428. 
Are partly communicable and partly incommunicable, viii. 78 ; often 

mentioned in pairs, 90 ; mercy and power, ib.; mercy and grace, 91; 

goodness and truth, 93; mercy and goodness, ib.; kindness and 

mercy, 94 ; truth and mercy, 95. 
A prime object of faith in prayer, viii. 422 ; his all-sufficiency and power, 

423 ; his mercy, 425 ; his wisdom, 426 ; his glory, ib. 
Of Christ, power, that is, authority, iii. 223 ; riches, 226 ; wisdom, 226. 
Christ s divine, blasphemed, v. 128. 
Awakening by the Spirit may be without regeneration, vi. 434. 

Babes in Christ, in what respects they have more communion with the Father, 

and old men with Christ, vii. 477. 

Babylon, deliverance from, a type of the Reformation, xii. 108. 
Babylonish Captivity, the sufferings and dangers of it, ix. 415. 
Bacon, Sir Francis (Lord), his confession of faith, iv. 541. 
Backslider, restoration of, answers in all respects to the conversion of a 

sinner, vi. 510. 

Backsliding, in true believer, ix. 381. 

Baptism seals our communion with Christ, both in sanctification and in jus 
tification, iv. 41 ; how it produces the answer of a good conscience, 
42. 
Of Christ, manifestation of the three persons of the Godhead at, 

vi. 420. 

Christ the significancy of, ix. 51. 
In what sense it saves, ix. 82. 
The seal more eminently of regeneration or calling, and therefore 

administered but once, ix. 362. 

And the Lord s supper, for the substance of them, enjoyed by the 
Jews, xi. 37 ; these ordinances received and practised by Christians 
in apostolic times, 38 ; are to continue to the end of the world, 39. 



INDEX. 157 

Baptism, to whom and by whom it may be administered, xi. 451. 

Beams of the sun, why called wings, iv. 451. 

Beast, the pope, iii. 20 ; its number, 72. 

Beasts, four, represent the office-bearers in the church, iii. 3. 

In Noah s ark, typical of the Gentiles calling into the church, ix. 65, 77. 
Being, threefold : actual, purposed, possible, ix. 166. 

Believers, their relation to Christ s person, i. 96 ; ordained for Christ, 98 ; 
have a representative being in Christ, 110; power working in them, 
211; power of God engaged to them, 330; how far they may be 
ignorant of the power working in them, 424 ; their position in the 
new world, 523 ; their state before conversion, ii. 8 ; quickened 
with Christ, 204 ; risen with Christ, 233, 251. 

Left in darkness, to shew God s power and faithfulness in restoring 
them, iii. 300 ; to make them conformable to Christ s sufferings, 
801; to enhance the joys of heaven, ib.; to set them in whence 
spiritual comforts come, 302 ; to prove them, 303 ; especially their 
faith, ib.; to destroy the flesh, 306; to humble, ib.; to lead to 
assurance and establishment, ib.; to train them to fear God more and 
obey him, ib. ; to make them pray more and more earnestly, ib. ; to 
lead them to prize the light of God s countenance the more, 307. 
Have the same reason to trust in God that Christ had, iv. 9 ; have 
communion with Christ both in his condemnation and his justifica 
tion, 10. 

Not one with the Father and the Son, but one in them, iv. 363. 
Condition of under the New Testament much better than theirs under 

the Old, v. 536. 
Seeing Christ in the gospel by true faith, are changed into his image 

vi. 218. 
The height of their privilege and happiness in Christ s dwelling in them. 

ix. 101. 

Committed to God by Christ, ix. 806 ; and by themselves, 308. 
Have power from Christ to embody themselves into a church, xi. 802 ; 

they may do so without being guilty of schism, 806, 462. 
Believing, before sealing, i. 238 ; mighty power of God in, 844. 

In Christ is, in the nature of it, a marriage act, viii. 145. 
Belshazzar sinned against knowledge, iv. 164. 
Benefits are all the effects of God s mercy, viii. 117. 
Bernard, an erroneous conceit of, exposed, v. 22. 
Bible, its main argument is reconciliation, iv. 222. 
Birthright, a spiritual privilege, involving the priesthood of the family 

ix. 191. 
Bishops, in the first ages of Christianity, were in churches and villages 

xi. 157. 

Blamelessness of the saints in the day of Christ, is not in respect of justifica 
tion, but sanctification, vii. 153 ; is a privilege common to all saints, 
154 ; includes perseverance, ib. ; voidness of offence against the light 
of conscience, 157 ; this latter a special privilege of some, ib. 
BLESSED STATE OF THE SAINTS IN GLORY, vii. 337. 
Blessedness of God lies in enjoying himself and his own glory, so the height 

of ours in apprehending his glory and rejoicing in it, iv. 382. 
Of God, a confluence of all happiness and glory, iv. 898 ; his blessed 
ness, in a desire to communicate it, the origin of the gospel, ix. 129. 
A state of full and perfect, to be entered into by the souls of saints as 
soon as they are dead, vii. 341. 



158 INDEX. 

Blessing, Christ s, of the disciples at his ascension, what it signified, iv. 46. 
Of the disciples at his ascension, an indication of his heart towards his 

people, iv. 107. 

God, is a matter beyond the doing of his will otherwise, iv. 384. 
Blessings bestowed, signs that they are in answer to prayer ; when a thing 
is done in such a way that God s hand is manifestly seen in it, iii. 
384 ; as when he brings it to pass against many difficulties, ib. ; or 
when he makes all means combine to facilitate it, 385 ; when he 
doth it suddenly, ib. ; when he grants the thing with an overplus 
above what was asked, ib. ; when there is some particular circum 
stance concurrent with it, shewing that his hand is in it, ib. ; when 
it comes at the very time when we have been most instant and earnest, 
386 ; or at the time which is evidently the fittest, 387 ; when in 
regard to a matter God deals in a proportion to prayer, 388 ; when 
the thing granted draws the heart more to God, 389 ; and enlarges 
the heart with thankfulness, ib. ; and encourages the heart to pray 
more confidently and fervently afterwards, 390 ; when the heart is 
careful to perform the vows made while praying for it, ib. ; when 
faith sees clearly God s hand, ib. ; when with the mercy there comes 
the assurance of God s love, 391 ; when the things obtained have 
few thorns in them, ib. 

Super-creation, of the elect, of two sorts, their being, and the endowments 
of that being, iv. 535 ; of both these Christ is the foundation, ib. ; 
these endowments of two sorts, such as are supernatural even in 
respect of our first creation state, and such as are supernatural with 
respect to our fallen state, 537 ; the first sort have their foundation 
in Christ s person, the second sort in his work of redemption, ib. 
Temporal, enumeration of, iv. 195, et seq. 
BLOOD OF CHRIST, RECONCILIATION BY, v. 499. 
The price of redemption, iii. 14. 
Preciousness of Christ s, inferred from the excellence of his person, 

iii. 220. 

A voice ascribed to it, iv. 76 ; all blood shed calls to justice for ven 
geance, 77 ; Christ s for acquittal, ib. 
Of the covenant, how Christ was brought back by it from the dead, 

v. 372. 

Of Christ, made precious by his person, v. 418. 
A perpetual fountain, that daily runs and washes after it is opened at 

conversion, ix. 312. 

Boasting, would not be excluded if we were justified by inherent righteous 
ness, though evangelical, v. 365. 
Bodius, his parallel between the mystery of Christ ""and the marriage of 

Adam, iv. 503. 

Body, generation of, is the channel through which sin is derived to us, xii. 8. 
Body of Christ, the Church so called, i. 539 ; influence from the head to, 
552 ; glory of, 564 ; disputes about, 560 ; unity of shewn in the 
Supper, ii. 389. 

Boldness of access into the holiest, what ? v. 407 ; imports a removal of 
fear or shame, arising from a sense of unworthiness, 408 ; a freedom 
from every danger, ib. ; free liberty to come if we will, 410 ; an 
enlargement of heart to express our desires, 411 ; a confidence that 
God will grant what we ask, 413. 
Book, sealed ; the decrees of God, iii. 7. 
Bounty, in God, is a free, willing, and large giving of what is merely his 



INDEX. 159 

own, looking for no recompense again, iv. 189; how it leads to 
repentance, 194. 

Branch, a name of Christ, v. 167. 

Branches, such as make a profession of being in Christ, iii. 489. 

In Christ, though they bear little fruit, are not taken away, iii. 
451 ; because in Christ God accepts a little good, and it pleaseth him 
more than sin in his displeaseth him, 452 ; because he hath ordained 
that all the fruits of his children should remain, ib. ; because he 
loves the person, and hates only the sin, therefore he preserves the 
one, and destroys the other, 453 ; therein he shews his skill, in 
that he is able to sever the corruptions without destroying the 
branch, ib. 

Unfruitful, cut off, iii. 454 ; because they dishonour the root upon 
which they profess to be graffed, ib. ; the husbandman hath no 
profit of them, ib. ; because vine branches, if they bear not fruit, are 
fit for nothing else but burning, 455 ; their casting out, what ? ib. ; 
their withering, what ? ib. ; their gathering, what ? 456 ; their burn 
ing, what ? ib. 
All true, grow in grace and fruitfulness, iii. 457. 

Bread and wine, signify and seal the conveying to us of one whole Christ, 
v. 508. 

Breathing, Christ s on his disciples, the utmost expression of his heart, 
iv. 105. 

Brightman, Mr, his explanation of the restoring of the temple, examined, 
iii. 138. 

Broicnists, i. 545. 

Burning of the unfruitful branches, what ? iii. 456. 

Cabalists, Jewish, say that the Messiah is the treasure in which God hath 
hid all the riches he means to communicate to us, and also the great 
steward and governor under God Jehovah, iv. 530. 
Caiaphas, the first to propose that Christ should be put to death, v. 236 ; 

his speech at once a prophecy and a wicked counsel, ib. 
Cain led to offer sacrifice by education and the authority and influence of 

his parents, x. 36 ; excommunicated, ib. 

Calamities, duties of God s people when public and common are threatened 
or feared, vii. 559 ; God s chief end in sending, is to purify his own 
people, and make them better and fitter for heaven, 560 ; and to 
avenge their quarrel as well as his own, 561 ; special exercises suit 
able to times of, 562 ; take him for our portion and refuge, ib. ; 
trust perfectly in him, 563 ; be fearful of offending him, 565 ; more 
than ever make him the end of all our actions, 566 ; pray to him, 
and call upon him, and keep communion with him, ib. 
Call*of office-bearers, includes choice and ordination, xi. 231. 
Calling, two parts of, i. 128 ; hope of, 302. 

Twofold : one proper only to the elect, the other common to non- 
elect, ix. 185 ; the one called according to purpose, the other not, 
ib. ; the one a holy calling, the other not, 186. 
Is not to grace only, but to glory, and that eternal, ix. 237. 
Effectual, is the proof of election, ix. 260. 
The first immediate fruit and breaking forth of electing and purposing 

grace, ix. 277. 

Of the elect is of grace, of others of providence, ix. 270,279 ; the two 
classes have no actings about spiritual things in common, 281. 



160 INDEX. 

Calling, true ; its proper notes and effects are love to God, and holiness, ix. 

286. 

According to purpose, a work of that perfection in kind, with difference 
from all other works found in others, as God is engaged to carry it 
on unto perfection, ix. 288. 

The centre of two eternities, a past of purpose, a future of glory, ix. 329. 
Is part of Christ s purchase, 349. 
The necessary consequent of election, 422. 

Of Christ to his priestly office, v. 23 ; grounded on the authority of the 
Father, ib. ; was on his birth-day, ib. ; confirmed by oath, ib. ; his 
acceptance of it voluntary, 24 ; included a recommendation to him 
of the persons to be saved, 25. 
Calvin, his exposition of Col. i. 15, iv. 459. 
Calvin Judaizing, the work of a wretched papist, iv. 460 ; answered by 

Pareus, ib. 
Cambridge, the greatest mart of truth under heaven, iv. 246, 313. 

Suspected of unsouudness of doctrine, iv. 257. 
Capacities, weak, God s condescension to, i. 143. 

Care of God for his people, ix. 410 ; consists in the vigilancy of his eye 
over them, ib ; his presence continually accompanying them, 411 ; 
his holding them by the hand, ib. ; taking them into his hand, ib.; 
into both his hands, ib. ; the attentiveness of his memory, 412 : 
objection answered, ib.; chiefly over our souls, 413. 
Carnal men, ignorant of gospel mysteries, i. 141. 

Men may know the things which the gospel reveals, but not the riches 
and glory of them, iv. 338 ; their judgment not to be trusted in 
matters of grace, 240. 

Men, how they know the gospel, iv. 295 ; they know it to their cost, 
ib.; they know it by hearsay, ib.; they make it not the main of their 
knowledge, 297, they know it not in the riches and glory of it, 299 ; 
they know it not so as to have their hearts comforted by it, 300 ; 
they know it not with the riches of assurance, ib.; they know it not, 
so that it is to them the hope of glory, 301. 
Casting out of the unfruitful branches, what ? iii. 455. 
Cedar, Christians compared to, iii. 458. 
Censures, God s institution must put efficiency into, xi. 13. 

The matter of is scandalous sin, judged so by common light and 

received principles, xi. 48 ; order of proceeding in, ib. 
Centuries, changes in the church often proceed by, iii. 203. 
Challenge, Christ s, in Isa.l., compared with the Christian s in Rom. viii., iv. 7. 
Chance, God orders all that come by it, i. 212. 
Changeableness is the condition of the creature as a creature, with difference 

from God, vii. 29. 
Chanty, Christ lived upon, iii. 226. 

Cherubims over the ark represented ministers of the gospel, iv. 253, 257. 
Children, an inheritance, both of their parents given by God, and of God 
himself, ix. 427 ; of godly parents are the most of God s elect, 428. 
Of wrath, ii. 117. 

Choosing and predestinating, how different, i. 83. 

Chorus, in ancient plays, part of, sustained by the four beasts and twenty- 
four elders, in the Revelation iii. 1. 

Chosen in Christ, what. i. 65 ; with and in Christ, how to be distinguished, 70. 
CHRIST SET FORTH, iv. 1. 

His HEART IN HEAVEN TO SINNERS ON EARTH, iv. 95. 



INDEX. 161 

CHRIST THE MEDIATOR, v. 1. 

His SUPER-EMINENCE ABOVE MOSES, v. 437. 

His DEATH DESIGNED AND EFFECTED THE RECONCILIATION OF ALL THE 

PEOPLE OF GOD, v. 463. 
RECONCILIATION BY THE BLOOD OF, v. 499. 
GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE OF THE CHURCHES OF, xi. 485. 
Christ, in Christ and with Christ, difference of, ii. 246 ; a common person, 
i. 72 ; a root of a new being to saints, 86 ; his fulness, what, 

94, 561 ; a head to angels and men, 153 ; to the church, 545 ; 
came in fulness of time, 201 ; a pattern of G-od s working in us, 

95, 427 ; his exaltation, 475, 513 ; his sitting at God s right hand, 
466 ; believers reconciled in his cross, ii. 375 ; the subjectftof the 
gospel, i. 451 ; his fulness, 561 ; his remaining in the state of death, 
456"; his resurrection proves his Sonship, 429; power that raised 
him up, what, 460 ; his resurrection a pledge of ours, 459 ; necessity 
of his resurrection, 457 ; the author of it, 461 ; his twofold rela 
tion to his people, 119 ; his blessedness, 479 ; extent of his do 
minion, 499 ; his natural kingdom, 502 ; his dispensatory kingdom, 
503 ; all judgments committed to him, 503 ; reasonableness of 
obedience to, 526 ; filleth all in all, 555 ; his dwelling in us by 
faith, ii. 404, 409 ; his patience, 433. 

The rider on the white horse, iii. 33 ; why the horse was white, 35. 

Prophet, priest, and king, iii. 211. 

A king by three titles: by inheritance, by conquest, and by his death, 
iii. 222. 

Lived by faith, iv. 8 ; needed justification from imputed sin, ib. ; exer 
cised faith in God for the salvation of those who should believe in 
him, 9 ; was made the greatest sinner that ever was, by imputation, 
ib. 

Is the object of our faith, in joint commission with God the Father, iv. 
11 ; in opposition to our own humiliation or graces, or duties, 13 ; 
his person, and not merely his promises, ib. 

In his personal excellencies, is rather an object of love than of faith, iv. 
17 ; his person gives us title to all the promises, his blood shews 
the tenure they hold on, 18. 

His death the greatest and strangest design that ever God undertook 
and acted, iv. 20 ; as it hath satisfied God for the sins of many 
thousand souls now in heaven, so it may satisfy the heart and con 
science of any sinner now on earth, 21 ; an answer to all aggrava 
tions of sin, 22. 

His sufferings more in his soul than his body, iv. 22. 

His death pays the sinner s debt, his resurrection tears or cancels the 
bond, iv. 26 ; at once a surety and a common person, 27 ; a common 
person or representative in all the conditions in which he was, all 
that he did and all that he suffered, 31. 

The surety of the covenant, both on God s part and ours, iv. 29 ; a 
common person in his resurrection, 84. 

Downwards, to us, carries it as a king, with power to justify or con 
demn, but upwards, to God, as a priest, who must still intercede, iv. 
61. 

His heart in heaven to sinners on earth ; indicated by his washing his 
disciples feet, iv. 96 ; his last discourse, 98 ; his promise of the 
Spirit, 101 ; his prayer for them, 103 ; his mefesage to them after 

VOL. XII. L 



162 INDEX. 

his resurrection, 105 ; his carriage and speech on meeting them, ib. ; 
his blessing them at his ascension, 107 ; his gift of the Spirit, ib. ; 
the miracles and conversions wrought by them, 108 ; his appearance 
to Paul at his conversion, ib. ; and to John in Patmos, 109 ; his 
last words in the book of Revelation, 110 ; the positive assurances 
he gives in his word, 111. 

His work imposed on him by his Father by command, and put into his 
heart, iv. 114. 

The natural Son of the Father, both in privileges and in properties, iv. 
115 ; as God is love, so he is love covered over with flesh, 116 ; 
laid down all infirmities of our nature when he ascended to heaven, 
but none of the graces that were in him while on earth, ib. 

His love; increased by what he did and suffered for us, iv. 125 ; the 
engagement of his office as mediator requires of him all mercifulness 

i and graciousness, 127 ; with compassion according to the measure of 
every man s distress, 129 ; if he will be faithful, he must be merci 
ful, 130. 

His own joy, comfort, happiness, and glory are enlarged by his shewing 
grace and mercy, iv. 132 ; his joy in heaven twofold, communion 
with the other persons, and the good of his church, 133 ; the former 
invariable, the latter capable of increase, ib. ; his assumption of 
human nature requisite to make him compassionate, 135 ; also a 
pledge of the everlasting continuance of God s mercies to him, 136 ; 
his manhood had all its largeness of mercy from his deity, but his 
assumption of human nature adds a new way of being merciful, ib. ; 
may now as soon cease to be God as to be a man, 137 ; and to be 
either as cease to shew mercy, ib. ; his compassion, how to be under 
stood, 138 ; as God simply, incapable of any feeling of our infirmities, 
139 ; his love and pity more tender and human than those of the 
angels, ib. ; his human nature hath knowledge of all occurrences 
which befall his members here, 141 ; remembers his death, both to 
put his Father in mind of it, and to affect his own heart with what 
we feel, 142 ; his sympathy, no man in this life can fathom how far 
it reacheth, 143 ; difficult to apprehend the precise differences of his 
affections now, and those he had on earth, 144. 

His affections of pity and sympathy do not afflict and perturb him so 
as to make him sorrowful or heavy, iv. 145 ; his perfection destroys 
not his affections, but corrects and amends the imperfections of them, 
ib. ; his affections make him not again a man of sorrows, but a man 
of succours, ib. ; his joy is imperfect until all his members be set 
free from sin and suffering, 1 47 ; how he can pity his people under 
their sins, 148 ; how he bore our sicknesses, 149 ; sins of his people 
move him to pity more than to anger, ib. 

Hath such riches of merit as are able to pay all the sinner s debts, and 
to purchase for him more grace and glory than all the angels have in 
heaven, iv. 161. 

His giving himself for us, what is implied in it, v. 175 ; he gave all his 
doings, works, operations, and actings, ib. ; he gave up the comforts 
of life, 176 ; he gave his body and soul, ib, 

His willingness to save sinners, shewn by the greatness of the work he 
undertook for this very end, iv. 209 ; and by its being his Father s 
will and appointment that he should do so, ib. 

Died as a testator, and is alive to be his own executor, iv. 215. 

Second to his Father in order of being, of working, and of willing, but 



INDEX. 163 

not in heartiness of willing, iv. 216 ; his oneness in will with the 
Father, the security of his people s salvation, 217 ; his delights set 
from eternity on the salvation of men, 218. 

Christ, his friendship to sinners so notorious that it was made a matter of 
reproach to him, iv. 219 ; his only joy recorded was at the conver 
sion of souls, ib. ; his whole heart set upon it now, 220. 

More glad to save us than we to be saved, iv. 223 ; would be preaching 
the gospel on earth now, but that he has more important work to do 
for his redeemed in heaven, ib. 

The riches of his mystery set forth to spoil the lustre of all other wis 
dom, iv. 227. 

Is the compendium and model of the world, having all the excellencies 
of all the creatures summed up in him, iv. 232. 

Knowledge of, contains in it all the treasures of wisdom, and all that is 
worth knowing, iv. 241. 

His person contains all the excellencies of all creatures, and the know 
ledge of him the excellency of all knowledge, iv. 309. 

4 Formed in you, not spoken in respect of sanctification, but of the 
apprehension of Christ, iv. 322. 

In the believer, implies that the object of his knowledge is Christ, iv. 
334 ; that all the glory and riches of Christ are his, 337. 

Though he is in heaven, is in the heart of every Christian by faith, iv. 336. 

Applied as necessary for salvation as Christ redeeming, iv. 343. 

His human nature not turned into the divine, iv. 351. 

Made another Christ, either by adding to him or by taking from him, 
iv. 453 ; his glory does not consist only in his being a redeemer, but 
in whatever God himself can challenge glory from, 454 ; as God-man, 
had, in the decrees and purposes of God, the joint honour to be the 
eldest or first-born therein, 455 ; his person consists of all sorts of 
things in heaven and earth, 456 ; his personal excellencies are either 
native and inherent in his person as God-man, or are: extrinsecal 
royalties, inconceivable to any mere creature, 457. 

The Creator and upholder of all God s works, iv. 458 ; is head of his 
church, ib. ; has all manner of privileges, in which any in heaven or 
earth may be supposed to excel, and that with a pre-eminence, 459 ; 
his pre-eminence and fulness apart from his work of redemption and 
reconciliation, ib. 

As God-man, the first-born of every creature, iv. 468; the final cause 
or end of all things, 471 ; at once the appointed heir and the rightful 
inheritor of all things, 474. 

Holds his personal glory in heaven by the tenure of natural right, of 
purchase, and of decree, iv. 476. 

As second person, had, from all eternity with God, the glory of being 
God- man, iv. 491. 

First ordained absolutely to be God-man, and the church elected with 
relation to him, iv. 504. 

In what sense called the everlasting Father, iv. 516,. 

As God-man, ordained from eternity as a middle person between God 
and his creatures, iv. 518. 

Created all things in his special character or relation of God-man, iv. 
533 ; difficulty solved, 538 ; is Lord of all creatures, but head only 
of elect men and angels, 542 ; not known as the Creator until re 
vealed as the redeemer, 543. 

In what sense called the Wisdom of God and the Power of God, iv. 556. 



164 INDEX. 

Christ, as God-man is the upholder of all things, iv. 563 ; the governor of all 
things, 564 ; the judge of all, ib. ; the founder of that other world 
into which he shall bring his people, 565. 

Must be both God and man in order to be fit for his office as Mediator, v. 34. 
The fulness of his abilities for the work of reconciliation, v. 68. 
One action of his capable of more worth than another, though all had 
an infinite moral dignity from his person, v. 119 ; his obedience ex 
ceeded in goodness the utmost evil that was in sin, 120 ; his obedience 
invested with the glory of his person, 121. 

Being God, able to be his own priest, sacrifice, and altar, v. 134. 
His willingness from eternity to the work of redemption, v. 138 ; his 
consent renewed on his coming into the world, 141 ; when his human 
nature gave consent ? 143. 
From his infancy, acted not only holily, but mediator-like, v. 166 ; his 

stedfast resolution in prospect of his last sufferings, 168. 
Made under the law, v. 180 ; under its accusing and its condemning 
power, 181 ; made sin for us, ib. ; only by imputation, 182 ; repre 
sented in the Psalms as confessing the sins thus laid upon him, 183 ; 
was not only a messenger but a surety, 184 ; died not for proposi 
tions, to make them true, but for persons, 185 ; knows all the sins 
for which he made atonement, 186. 

How made a curse for us, v. 188 ; not only bore the curse of the judi 
cial law in hanging on a tree, but of the moral, 189 ; though beloved 
of God, yet punished not out of love, but wrath, ib. ; dignity of his 
person gave an infinite merit to his sufferings, but not so as to pro 
cure an abatement, 191 ; his sufferings, in an exposition of John 
xviii., 196. 

His willingness to suffer, v. 202. 
His great care for his people, v. 212, 214. 
Acutely sensible of the disgrace of his arrest, v, 228 ; supposed to have 

been led seven miles between his arrest and his death, 230. 
Taken through the sheep- gate, through which the animals were brought 

to the temple for sacrifice, v. 230. 

His examination by the high priest, v. 251 ; in his answers does not 
stand upon his prerogative as the Messiah, but on his rights as a man, 
to hear the charges stated against him, and proved by witnesses, 258. 
Considered in the excellency of his person, might be an object of faith 
for angels, but Christ only as crucified is for sinners, v. 292 ; con 
sideration of his love works mourning for sin, 294. 
Overcomes Satan for us and in us, v. 302 ; a lamb and a lion, 304 ; 
his triumph over Satan visible to the spiritual world, 305 ; fights 
with him anew at the conversion of every sinner, 308 ; overcomes him 
by us, 309. 

His and his saints final victory over Satan at the day of judgment, v. 331. 
His fulfilling of the law for us, v. 338. 

Bears and bore the same offices wherein he places his officers under him 
in the church (deacon, bishop or elder, pastor or shepherd, apostle), 
v. 367; led through the sheep-gate to be sacrificed, 369. 
Hath all perfections in him to the height, and mixtures of contraries in 

their full perfections, v. 379. 

A great high priest, as compared with Aaron, v. 383 ; he is the only 
priest, ib. ; offered but one sacrifice, ib. ; takes away sin, ib. ; in 
his person, higher than the heavens, ib. ; the great trust reposed in 
him, 384 ; the great solemnity at his instalment, 385 ; the continu- 



INDEX. 165 

ance of his office, 386 ; in his great love to us, ib. ; in the sacrifice 

which he offered, ib. ; in respect of the temple and tabernacle made 

for him to officiate in, 387. 
Christ presents his people first to himself, and then to his Father, v. 435 ; 

his person more excellent than any or all his offices for us, 436. 
Gave the law on mount Sinai, v. 441 ; a proof that he is God, ib. 
His second coming, effects that shall attend it, v. 448 ; compared with 

those at the giving of the law, 449. 
His fulness, v. 502 ; of fitness, ib. ; of ability, 504 ; of faithfulness, 

507 ; of righteousness, ib. ; of acceptation with God, 509 ; of eter 
nity and perpetuity, 510. 
Reasons for the lateness of his coming, v. 535. 
How said to be appointed heir, v. 540 ; how he differs from other heirs, 

541 ; as Son of God he is born heir, as Mediator he is appointed 

heir, 542. 

Why called the Sun of righteousness, vi. 219. 
Why called a quickening Spirit, vii. 79. 
Whence the value of his sufferings ariseth, vii. 109. 
Represented to us as a quickening Spirit, is a proper object of our faith, 

viii. 180. 

Ordained in election for higher ends than our salvation, ix. 94. 
Is the author of predestination, as well as the Father, ix. 104. 
His predestination the pattern of ours, ix. 105 ; his catholic prayer, 

107 ; its grand subject is union, ib. ; What union ? 108. 
Whether he prayed as second person, or only as God-man, ix. 189. 
Is head and husband first, and then Jesus or Saviour, ix. 343. 
Still greatly exercised with Satan on behalf of us, ix. 408 ; disputes 

every inch of ground he wins from him in our hearts and in the 

world, ib. 

Took our nature, and every part of it, to sanctify it, x. 130. 
His character, the express image of God, x. 420. 
Has a double relation to his church, one as head simply considered, 

the other as Redeemer, xii. 85. 

CHRISTIANS, THREE SEVERAL AGES OF, IN FAITH AND OBEDIENCE, vii. 473. 
Christians living as Gentiles, ii. 74 ; the primitive Christians patterns of 

grace to us, 298. 

Young, in danger of hypocrisy, old, of deadness, iii. 467. 
Three degrees of, babes, young men, and maidens, v. 319 ; are born 

for soldiery, and conflicts with sin and Satan, ib. 
The fundamental constitution of, is being in Christ and united to him, 

v. 350. 

Young, think that they have all knowledge, v. 530. 
Their life the most delightful of all lives, vii. 138. 
Primitive, their ambitious aspiring after death, vii. 399 ; not for the 

sake of getting rid of their bodies, 401 ; nor to escape their suffer 
ings, 403 ; but to be admitted into glory, 405. 
Liable to fall into remissness, ix. 890. 
CHURCH-COVENANT, TWO LETTERS CONCERNING, xi. 526. 
CHURCHES OF CHRIST, GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE OF, x. 425. 
Church, universal, what meant by, i. 172, 538 ; particular, what, 540 ; is 
the body of Christ, 539 ; how Christ filleth, 555 ; is the Father s 
gift to the Son, 535 ; all offices in, must be held from the Head, 537. 
Unity of in all ages, iv. 302. 
Of the elect, their special dependence upon the one Lord Christ, as 



166 INDEX. 

God-man, iv. 533 ; receive from him a super-creation being and super- 
creation blessings, ib. 
Church, different opinions concerning the constitution of, xi. 3. 

Universal, not a political body, xi. 50 ; never met in that capacity, 51. 

In the New Testament, means a single congregation, xi. 86 ; never the 
meeting of the elders alone, 88 ; its chief object is worship, 89. 

Universal, and an instituted particular church, wherein they agree, xi. 
292 ; wherein they differ, 296. 

The best needs further reformation, xii. 110 ; mountains of opposition 
in the way, 111 ; God s power shewn in their removal, ib. ; hopes 
of, in Christ s love to his church, 115. 

Church-members, the communion they ought to have with one another, xi. 353. 
Churches, only congregational, xi. 6 ; their constitution hath a necessary 
dependence on the authority of Christ, 8 ; right government of, a 
part of worship under the New Testament, 9 ; the law of nature not 
sufficient to set up any thing that is parallel to a divine institution, 
ib. ; there must be a special divine institution for the government of, 
10 ; all the duties performed in, are duties amongst all Christians by 
the common law of Christianity, 11 ; constitution of, is uniform, and 
of one kind and sort, 14 ; the New Testament contains many parti 
cular directions and notes for government of, 17 ; men s hands and 
skill excluded from the constitution of, 20 ; all under the apostles 
ordered by the same rule, 32. 

Their privileges and institutions do not depend on the charter given to 
the church universal, xi. 52. 

In the apostolic times, were bodies cast into fixed relations both in 
respect of public worship and judicature, xi. 63. 

Are only particular congregations, xi. 67. 

The same assembly that meets for worship is to meet for discipline, 
xi. 80 ; the congregational government hath its bounds natural from 
a sufficiency of elders, ib. from the time appointed for worship, 
which is the Lord s day, ib. ; the duties of elders to teach and to rule 
should be of the same extent, 81. 

What intercourse or communion they should hold with each other, 
xi. 261 ; should afford part of their spiritual good things, 267 ; should 
communicate in privilege, but not in jurisdiction, ib. ; should acknow 
ledge one another s censures, ib. ; may send out elders to those that 
are in want, but without jurisdiction, 268 ; should counsel one 
another, ib. should communicate their temporal things, send alms, 
&c., 269 ; should manage common things in common, ib ; these 
obligations more special upon churches in the same nation, 276 ; may 
declare non- communion with other churches, 279. 
Circumcision was not merely the seal of a temporal covenant, vi. 86. 
City, fall of tenth part of, not the destruction of Rome, iii. 184 ; though it 
may be one of the means towards it, 185 ; one of the kingdoms of 
Europe, 186 ; perhaps France, 188 ; or Britain, 189. 

Where our Lord was crucified, means Rome, iii. 160. 
Clergy, Romish, became more corrupt after the gospel began to be preached, 

iii. 101. 
Colossians, Epistle to, sets out Christ in all his personal excellencies and 

fulness, more than any other of the Epistles, iv. 450. 
Comfort, degrees of, iii. 9. 

Spiritual, not necessary to the being, but to the well-bein^ of a Chris 
tian, iii. 292. 



INDEX. 



167 



Comforter, the Holy Ghost a" better than Christ could have been had he 
remained on earth, iv. 101 ; dwells at once in Christ s heart and in 
ours, and so communicates Christ s thoughts of love to us, and our 
prayers and faith to him, ib. 
Comforts, outward, the sparks of a man s own fire, iii. 348. 

God of all ; God so called because he has in readiness a particular 

special comfort to give forth to every discomfort, ix. 251. 
Coming of Christ ; to see his spouse, and to fetch her, iv. 100. 
Commission, sins of; more heinous than of omission, ix. 384. 
Communication of God to his people is of himself, his attributes and per 
sons, ix. 102 ; is founded upon union, 105. 

Communion of the persons in the Godhead consists in the Divine eternal 
life, iv. 365 ; the mutual interest or propriety which they have in 
the things of each other, 367 ; in their mutual communication and 
enjoyment, 368 ; in their mutual knowledge and acquaintance each 
with the others, ib. ; in the imparting of secrets and the discovery of 
each other s minds, ib. ; in their mutual love and delight, 369 ; in 
their possession of one common and equal glory and blessedness, 370. 
Of the Divine persons, the original of the communion of the saints wit) 

God, ix. 130 ; in two particulars, 133, 145. 
With God, emptiness of duties without, i. 287. 
One hour of, gives more joy than an eternity of sinful pleasures, 

iii. 415. 

To be maintained by taking occasion to come into his presence, vii. 
198 ; telling him still how well we love him, 199 ; delighting much 
in him, 201 ; unfolding our secrets to him, 202. 
Two ways of, and only two ; faith here, and sight hereafter, vii. 420. 
With God and Christ, the only source of the fulness of joy, viii. 394 ; is 
most vital, 397 ; hath for its seat both the understanding and the will, 
398 ; hath the most perfect object, ib. ; is founded on the closest of 
all unions, ib. ; faith, ib. ; the conjugal union of the will to God in 
the bonds of love, 399. 

Two, and but two ways of, to all eternity ; by faith and by sight, xii. 11. 
Of saints, is the end of a church as such, xi. 108 ; is more intimate 
under the gospel than under the law, ib. ; the greatest that is pos 
sible on earth is by public worship, 109 ; and that of the same per 
sons, under the same elders, ib. ; this end best secured by congrega 
tional churches, 110. 

Conception of Christ s human nature did not defile, because without genera 
tion, v. 59. 
Of Mary, was immediately upon her consent to the angel s message, 

v. 146. 

Concupiscence, denied by the papists to be sin, x. 42. 
Conditions of the covenant of grace on our part are only necessary means o 

being made partakers of Christ and salvation, ix. 72. 
Confession of sin, an eminent ingredient in reconciliation to God, vi. 1 3b. 
Confidence, carnal, followed by darkness, iii. 293. 

In inherent grace may lead to the withdrawal of grace, iii. 494. 
Congregation, a single, of saints, having a sufficient number of elders ana 
officers, is an entire seat of all acts of government, as well as < 
worship, xi. 132 ; objections answered, 174. 

Congregational churches, argument for, from the village churches, xi. Vo ; 
from the city churches, 101 ; exactly accommodated to the various 
conditions of saints, 107. 



168 INDEX. 

Congruity, Jesuit doctrine of, i. 351. 

Conscience, natural, does not discover unbelief, ii. 340. 

In the believer, may foment doubts and fears, iii. 254. 

Through its remaining defilement, Satan has a certain power over it in 

the believer, iii. 271 ; God alone can fully search and know it, ib. 
Answer of a good, how by the resurrection of Christ, iv. 42. 
Natural, the peace that it gives in doing well, v. 304. 
Natural and enlightened, its effects often mistaken for regeneration, vi. 231 . 
Is the Zion or David s-tower in the soul, from which the law goes 
forth to the utmost ends thereof, vi. 236 ; hath had great and power 
ful effects upon men whom the Scriptures pronounce unregenerate, 
238 ; in heathens, 239 ; in Jews under the law, ib. ; particulars of 
these effects, 243. 

Its light is from God, yet is not the relics or remainder of original 
holiness, vi. 253 ; why called the candle of the Lord, 254 ; is a light 
vouchsafed to all, more or less, through the mediation of Christ, ib. ; 
has a power over the rest of the faculties, 257 ; is the seat of the 
dominion which the law has over a natural man, 258 ; is God s 
means of punishing sinners in their spirits, 259. 

All its strength and force lies in the law, vi. 260 ; in an unregenerate 
man, turns the gospel into law, as faith, in a regenerate, turns law 
into gospel, 261 ; exercises a tyrannical and forced government over 
the heart, ib. ; has a goodness above that which is merely natural, 
and yet is not holiness, or any degree of it, 267 ; goodness of, is 
only in the regenerate, 268 ; is always joined with faith, 270 ; defi 
ciency of in the unregenerate, 274 ; that alone good which maketh 
the heart good, 277. 

Proofs of its deficiency, in its highest operations upon heathens, vi. 
278 ; none had a universal goodness, ib. ; their highest virtues were 
only in the letter, not in the spirit, 279. 

Natural, urgeth that a duty ought to be done, but does not give the 
will to do it, vi. 280 ; gives light and enforcement from legal motives 
to the duty, but gives no new inward strength, 281 ; cannot sweeten 
the law to a man, and cause him to delight in it, 282 ; discovers sin, 
but does not kill it, ib. ; why men mistake for true grace, 283 ; * of 
God, what is implied in, 297. 

Not subordinated by faith, sets a man into a legal way, ix. 203. 
Natural, as a creature of God, is good with a natural kind of goodness, 
but not with that kind of goodness which the law hath in it, x. 97 ; 
good reason to believe that it is not derived to us by birth, but restored 
by a new gift, 100 ; does not dwell in the mind, or become natural 
ised in man s nature, 104 ; the light of, defiled by the impurity of 
man s nature, ib. 

Corruption and defilements of, x. 257 ; the best thing in man, yet de 
filed, ib. ; is exceeding partial in its office, ib. ; is partial in telling a 
man what is his duty, and so is unjust to God, 258 ; is often ex 
ceedingly scrupulous of its own traditions, and the traditions of men, 
when it is lame and negligent in things which the word enjoins, 259 ; 
makes use of arguments drawn from self-interest and its lusts, and 
urges carnal motives to persuade to good actions, 260 ; joins with 
lusts to colour and countenance actions which are done chiefly out 
of lusts and ill ends, 261 : is bribed to find out arguments, and to 
plead in justification of actions utterly unlawful, 262 ; speaks peace 
when there is no reason or ground for it, 263 ; effects of, which may 



INDEX. 169 

be mistaken for the workings of grace, 265 ; it causes an inward 
conviction, combat, and strife in the heart against sin, ib. ; differences 
of this from the working of grace, 266-277. 
Liberty of, xi. 473 ; professing Christians, though they differ, should 

not judge or despise one another, 476. 
Constantine, the male child, Eev. xii., iii. 65, 365. 
Contempt of God involved in not looking for a return of prayer, iii. 398. 
Continuance in grace, part of Christ s purchase, ix. 350. 
Contribution and collection for the saints, not a civil matter, but a religious 

ordinance, vii. 319. 

Conversion, power of God in, i. 356; best definition of, 381 ; what things in 
the soul fall short of it, 405 ; is a resurrection, 438 ; power put forth 
in, 428. 
Of the Roman empire to Christianity, the subject of Rev. vi. and xii., 

iii. 208. 
Manner of, various, iii. 461 ; sudden or gradual, ib. ; doubts and fears 

incident to the two classes, 462. 
Includes the impartation of a new Jdnd of knowledge of what was 

known before, iv. 295. 
Both in the whole, and a in every part thereof, attributed to the Holy 

Ghost, vi. 48. 

Described, from the observation of Elihu, vi. 123. 
Process of, under the old dispensation, described from the book of Job, 

vi. 366. 
Produces a gracious disposition and resolution to convert others to 

God, vi. 512. 

Of a soul a matter of infinite moment, viii. 150 ; a believer cannot 
always tell when it was done, but he can tell when it was not done, 
151. 

Romish and protestant views of, viii. 301. 
Second, ix. 380 ; an acting over again of all the parts of conversion at 

first, 387. 

Not a thing to be ashamed of, x. 35. 
The great hindrance of, is false and deluding pleas in men s hearts, 

x. 379. 

Converted, worst state of, better than the best of the unconverted, ix. 314. 
Conviction of sin, is the Spirit s proper work, vi. 18. 

First produced by the law, deepened by the gospel, vi. 362. 

Of sin and humiliation, necessity of, vi. 382 ; to wean the heart from 

the comfort that is in sin, ib. ; to make it restless after Christ and his 

righteousness ; of unbelief necessary, ib. ; objections answered, 385. 

Corinth, church of, the fullest model of a church in the New Testament, 

xi. 82. 

Cornelius, the first uncircumcised man baptized, v. 471. 
Corrupt, since all are by nature equally, why do not all commit the same 
sins? x. 64 ; the constitution of their bodies are not alike, 65; the 
strength and largeness of their faculties are different, ib. ; some have 
their sins drawn out more than others, 66 ; God restrains men s 
lusts by his providence, ib.; G-od broacheth sin in a methodical 
manner, making one sin the punishment of another, 67 ; corrupt 
nature is not in every man capable of committing the sin against the 
Holy Ghost, ib. ; though men are not inclined to every sin at all 
times, yet at several times they are drawn out to them, 67. 
Corruption, original, restraint of, in natural men by the Holy Ghost, i. 391 ; 



170 INDEX. 

the doctrine known under the Old Testament, ii. 80 ; chiefly in the 
will, 94 ; of the whole man, 109 ; comes by birth, 115, 122. 
Corruption, discovery of, a means of purging, iii. 478. 

Of nature, various opinions respecting it, x. 40 ; Pelagius denied it al 
together, 41 ; so did Pighius, ib. ; some admit it, but deny the sin- 
fulness of it, ib. ; papists extenuate its sinfulness, 42 ; examination 
of these opinions, ib. 

Is in some sense the nature of man, x. 43 ; is the predominant prin 
ciple of all his actions, ib. is a body that hath multitude of numbers, 
44 ; proved by the experience of all mankind, 45 ; confirmed by 
testimony of the Gentiles, 46 ; assumed in the appointment of magis 
trates, the making of laws, the institution of the ministry, ib. ; shewn 
by the law of God, ib. ; by the gospel, 47. 

Of man s nature, grounds of, x. 48 ; Adam s nature corrupted, and the 
image of God destroyed, by his first sin, ib. ; this follows from the 
nature of sin, 49 ; if his nature were thus corrupted, then must 
ours, 51 ; because he represented us, ib. ; because our nature was 
in him, 52 ; because we were to have our natures from him, ib. ; is 
not only a misery and a punishment, but a sin, 55 ; the Scriptures 
call it so, ib. ; godly men, guided by the Spirit of God, in the sense 
of their own vileness, have acknowledged it, ib. ; the law of God 
condemns it, 56 ; is contrary to grace, and therefore is sin, ib. ; its 
effects prove it to be a sin, 58 ; every man prone to all sin, and hath 
all sins in him, 59 ; Grounds and causes of this, 62 ; objections an 
swered, 64 ; importance of cleansing ourselves from, 68 : nothing 
that is in nature can do this, 72 ; Christ came to be a refiner, 73 ; 
what purging is, 74 ; how it is to be accomplished, 75 ; is matter of 
humiliation, 77 ; is the mother of all actual sins, 81 ; and the poten 
tial root of millions more, 82. 

Its several degrees, x. 85 ; weakness, ib. ; a total privation of all that is 
good, 86 ; entireness of the weakness, 89 ; ungodliness, ib. ; consist 
ing in a want and emptiness of those dispositions and abilities in our 
natures, whereby once we were enabled and inclined to sanctify God 
as God, 90; darkness of the speculative judgment and under 
standing, 91 ; bias of the practical judgment, 92 ; alienation of the 
will and affections from him, 93 : is in all parts of man s nature, 
126. 

Is not a transformation of man s substantial nature into the image of 
the devil, x. 283. 

Is mainly manifested by the lusts of the heart, x. 306. 

Inherent, a subject of repentance, x. 361 ; its great sinfulness, 362 ; 
more sinful than any other gross actual sin, ib. ; or than all actual 
sin put together, ib. ; the mother of all other sins, and capable of 
producing an infinite number, 369. 

Two classes of, the manifest works of the flesh, and such sins as rash 
anger, love of the world, spiritual pride, &c., iii.J 424. 

Suffered to remain in believers, iii. 448 ; that God may thereby the 
more set forth and magnify his justifying grace by Christ s righteous 
ness, ib. ; to illustrate the grace of perseverance, and the power of 
God therein, ib. ; to increase the confusion of the devil in the end, 
and make the victory over him more glorious, 449 ; to keep them 
from spiritual pride, ib. ; to humble them, 450 ; to give them occa 
sions for self-denial, ib. 
Counsel, of God s will, i. 217 ; immutability of God s, 211. 



INDEX. 171 

Counsel, in what sense attributed to God, iv. 471. 

To be asked of God upon all occasions, and in all, especially in great, 
turnings of our life, vii. 203 ; and ought always to be followed, 206. 

Immutability of God s in electing grace makes it not only warrantable, 
but a duty, for even the weakest believers to have recourse to it, viii. 
241. 

Of God, expresses his deepest wisdom, ix. 425. 
Court, outer, treading down of, what, iii. 123, 127 ; purpose of, 181. 
COVENANT, A CHUKCH, TWO LETTERS CONCERNING, xi. 526. 
Covenant, of grace, mutual engagements of the Father and the Son in, v. 27 ; 
is the subject of supreme delight to all the persons of the Tri 
nity, 32. 

Of grace, makes over to us, for our good, all that is in God, both per 
sons and attributes, vi. 59. 

Of works, was united to the nature of Adam as a creature, and such as 
became his Creator to make with him, vii. 49. 

Of grace, how figured by the two covenants made with Noah, ix. 56 ; 
justification mainly by the first, perseverance by the second, 59, 64 ; 
its absoluteness, 70 ; how this is to be understood, 71 ; its stability, 
72 ; confirmed by sacrifice, 74. 

Of grace eternal, both a parte ante, and a partepost, ix. 397. 

Of the gospel, is a collection of promises, ix. 423. 
Covenants, both among the Jews and the Eomans, made by striking hands, 

iv. 28. 

CREATION, CONDITION OF THE STATE OF THE CREATURES BY, vii. 3. 
Creation, days of, i. 520. 

God imperfectly revealed in, iv. 26. 

God s eminent purpose in, was the manifestation of himself, and his 
perfections, to creatures reasonable, iv. 477 ; and to shew his love 
and communicate his goodness to those creatures, 480 ; these ends 
most fully accomplished in the assumption of a human nature into 
union with the divine, 477. 

And government of the world ordained to depend upon Jesus Christ as 
Lord, as well as upon God the Father as God, iv. 517. 

Did not involve any obligation on God to bestow grace on the creature, 

vii. 22 ; it became God to endow intelligent natures with his own 

image of holiness, 24 ; and to continue his favour and goodness to 

them, if they continued to keep their state of holiness, 25. 

Creators, often spoken of in the plural, an argument for the doctrine of 

the Trinity, iv. 355. 

CREATURES, THE CONDITION OF THEIR STATE BY CREATION, vii. 3. 
Creatures might be annihilated by God without injustice, iv. 466. 

Would not have been made but for Christ s undertaking to be himself a 
creature, iv. 544. 

Their inability to take away sin, v. 75 ; as the blood of bulls and goats, 
78; ourselves either by suffering or by doing, 79 ; saints, 80 ; angels, ib. 

A mere, could not have been our mediator, because it was not fit that 
such an one should be made the object of our faith, v. 38 ; nor a fit 
person to whom to yield that obedience which must be due to the 
mediator, 40 ; not being almighty, could not have assured our salva 
tion, ib. 

Though they can rob God of his glory, can add no glory to him, v. 123. 

Why they could not make satisfaction for sin, v. 492. 

In what sense they live, move, and have their being in God, vi. 459. 



172 INDEX. 

Creatures are not God, vii. 3 ; absurdities of Pantheism, ib. ; have not existed 
in God from eternity, 7 ; if they had, their existence would not have 
been the bestowal of a benefit, but a putting of them into a worse con 
dition, 10 ; it is a humbling of God to cast an eye upon, 17 ; their 
being is but the shadow of being, 18 ; their distance from non- 
existence is finite, from the being of God is infinite, 20. 
All made mutable, vii. 28 ; no obligation upon God to keep them from 
falling, ib. ; yet did not exert any influence to make them fall, ib. ; 
as made out of nothing, would fall to nothing again, if not sustained 
by God s power, 32 ; if any be confirmed in goodness, and made 
indefectible, it is not of creation right, but supernatural grace, 45. 

Crucifixion, accounted a cursed death by the Gentiles as well as the Jews, v. 
262 ; the most painful kind of death, 270. 

Curse, how Christ was made for us, v. 188 ; consisted in the whole wrath of 
God, and therefore comprehended all curses, 191 ; the frailties of man s 
nature, 192 ; the miseries incident to man s life, 193 ; death both 
bodily and of the soul, 196. 
Of God may be upon man in this life, vii. 299. 

Curses which men utter upon themselves, dangerous, v. 240. 

Daniel, the 12th chapter of his prophecy identical with Eev. xi., iii. Ill, 

203. 
Darkness, spiritual, the greatest evil that can befall us, iii. 235. 

Walking in, sometimes taken for living in sin, iii. 237 ; sometimes for 
living in ignorance, ib. ; sometimes for a state of discomfiture and 
sorrow, ib. ; arising either from temporal suffering, ib. ; or from the 
want of spiritual comfort, 238 ; as unbelievers may * for a season 
rejoice in the light, so a child of God may for a time walk in dark 
ness, 247. 

Directions to a soul in, iii. 315; take heed of rash, desperate, impeni 
tent, and unbelieving speeches and wishes, ib. ; make diligent search 
into the cause of God s hiding himself, and into the main doubt in 
thy heart, 316 ; consider as well what may work for comfort as what 
may work against thee, 319 ; call to remembrance former light, 320; 
renew faith and repentance, 322 ; be peremptory and resolute in faith 
and turning to God, let the issue be what it may, 324 ; Trust in the 
name of the Lord, 325 ; wait upon God, in the constant use of all 
ordinances and means of comfort, 330 ; pray, 332 ; rest not in ease, 
but healing, 337. 

Walking in, a rare experience of believers, iii. 341. 
Davenant, Bishop, on supralapsarianism, ix. 87. 
David, his behaviour when Shimei cursed, ii. 450. 

Often deprived of the light of God s countenance, iii. 239. 

His master-desire was to dwell at Jerusalem, iii. 378. 

Aggravation of his sin in the matter of Uriah, iv. 180. 

His hope founded on the covenant of God, ix. 240 ; confirmed by his 
own experience, 246 ; his dying testimony to God s faithfulness, 249. 

A specimen of his intercourse with God (exposition of 2 Sam. vii. 18- 
22), ix. 263 ; his last and best work, 268. 

His confession of the multitude of his sins, x. 479. 
Day of judgment, a long day, i. 525. 

1260, 42 months, and a time, times and half a time, identical, iii. 119. 

For a year, iii. 120. 

Of Christ, what ? vii. 150. 



INDEX. 173 

Day of judgment, a mistake to suppose that Paul expected in his own age, 
vii. 150 ; solemnity of, constantly before our eyes, would make us to 
be sincere and blameless, 159. 
Deaconship, the lowest office in the church, xi. 347. 
Death, pains of, Christ could not be held by, i. 431. 

Spiritual, ii. 9 ; unlike bodily, 10 ; threefold, 17 ; degrees of, 19 ; what 

meant by, 202. 

Of the believer with Christ and in Christ, how to be understood, iv. 33. 
Of Christ, can be put to no other use than the salvation of souls, iv. 221. 
Of Christ, valuable in proportion to the value of the life as by him 

abandoned, iv. 328. 

The most terrible of terrible things, v. 90. 
Of Christ, a superabounding satisfaction for sin, v. 130. 
In itself is a curse for sin, v. 262 ; of Christ, the shame of it, 263 ; the 

pain of it, 269. 

Spiritual is the main part of the curse, v. 271 ; the pains of this en 
dured by Christ in the sorrows of his soul, 273. 
The shooting the gulf into the separate state of souls, vii. 339. 
To be enabled to exercise faith and hope in Christ at the hour of, a 

singular blessing, vii. 342. 

Declarations, absolute, and unconditional promises, the proper object of the 
faith of recumbency, viii. 205 ; no qualifications already wrought in 
a man can be a ground and object for his first act of faith, 208. 
Decrees, of the end and the way, i. 115 ; blessings designed for us in, 117. 
Of God immutable, iv. 212. 
Of God are but the preparations of all those benefits and mercies which 

God intended to bestow on us, iv. 282. 

Especially of election, and of reprobation also, matter of praise, iv. 391. 
Of God admit of a subordination of one to another, iv. 471. 
And purposes of God all presupposed and took in Christ to be the Lord 

of us and of all things, iv. 517. 

Of God backed and guaranteed by his attributes, ix. 243. 
Of election and predestination are absolute and infallible, ix. 

419. 
Defilements of the mind distinguished from its defects and imperfections, 

x. 141. 

Dependence honours God more than service, v. 14. 
Deposition, whether an officer may be deposed for an offence which, in a 

private member, would not deserve excommunication, xi. 453. 
Desires of sealed Christians, i. 288. 

And counsel, sometimes God fulfils both, by giving the believer what 
he prayed for, and as he prayed for it ; sometimes the desire, but 
not the counsel, iii. 883. 

Of all nations, an epithet of Christ, v. 443 ; illustrated by similar ex 
pressions, ib. . 
Despair arises not from the greatness or heinousness of a man s sins, but from 

stubbornness and unbelief, vi. 887. 
Devils, subordination among, i. 485 ; different orders of, ii. 39 ; their place, 

43 ; their torments reserved, 45. 

Prince of the power of the air, ii. 35 ; his first sin, 87 ; his subjects, 52 ; 
when his kingdom ends, 48 ; it consists in sin, 51 ; his pleasure in 
the sins of men, 46 ; his power more limited under the new testa 
ment, 65 ; his working on men, 60 ; works differently at different 
periods, 63. 



174 INDEX. 

Devil, the only difference between him and the glorious angels is sin, iv. 

156. 
According to the schoolmen, cannot repent, because of the fulness of 

the knowledge against which they sin, iv. 165. 

Hath a special malice at the person of Christ, and at all truths concern 
ing him, iv. 449. 

Why does he flee when resisted ? v. 324. 
As well as men, to be openly judged in the last day, v. 338 ; the saints 

are to be their judges, 335. 
Incapable of some kinds of sin, x. 65. 
Hitherto hath had more subjects than Christ, xii. 69. 
Diocletian and Maximinius, the greatest persecutors the church ever had, 

iii. 49. 

Discernment, spiritual, in what it consists, ix. 284. 
Disciples, badge of, i. 277. 

DISCIPLINE OF THE CHURCHES OF CHRIST, GOVERNMENT AND, xi. 485. 
Discovery, Christ s, of himself to the soul illustrated by his intercourse with 
his disciples after his resurrection, viii. 380 ; the persons to whom 
the most special are made, are those who most love him, 382 ; no 
thing can give full joy without, 385 ; Christ rises higher and higher 
in, 391. 

Disobedience, children of, ii. 67. 
Dissensions between Christians will be shortly, though gradually, abolished, 

v. 467. 

Divinity of Christ essential to his being mediator, v. 37 ; otherwise he could 
not have been present at the making of the covenant, ib. ; he could 
not have undertaken the condition of it, 38 ; could not have been the 
object of faith, 39. 

Of Christ, argued from his sayings in John xvii., ix. 141. 
Divisions, caused by the fall, i. 186 ; reconciled by Christ, 188. 
Donatists, new, i. 545. 
J)oxologies in the epistles, their uses, iv. 372. 

Most of them consist of pure praise, honour, and glory given to God 

simply, and not thanks for benefits received, iv. 375. 
Have special reference to the matter of these epistles, ix. 208. 
Dragon, his heads and horns, the arms of heathen Rome, v. 330. 
Dreams and visions, distinction of, v. 530. 
Duties, emptiness of, without communion with God, i. 287. 

Negligence in the performance of, followed by darkness, iii. 294. 
Duty, distinction between privilege and, iii. 401. 

Two things in every, outward and inward, x. 194. 
Duties, only good in their season, iii. 472. 
When they are spiritual, vi. 184. 

Eagle, how she tests the breed of her young, iv. 456. 
Ear, boring of servants , its significance, v. 145. 

Earnest, how it differs from a pawn, i. 254 ; of the inheritance is the Holy 
Ghost, 255. 

Consists of the same kind with the whole that is yet behind, iv. 383. 
Earth, shaking of, i. 519. 

Grass, and trees, signify the common people, iii. 54. 
Earthquake, at the resurrection of the witnesses, what it denotes, iii. 183. 
Ease, distinguished from healing, of conscience, iii. 837. 
East, kings of, the Jews, iii. 193. 



INDEX. 175 

Eber, the head of one of the seventy nations among whom the earth was 

divided, ix. 31. 

Ecclesiastes, book of, a testimony of Solomon s repentance, x. 430. 
Eduction and creation contrasted, i. 396. 
Egyptians, grossness of their idolatry, vii. 6. 
EL, a name of God, signifies strong, viii. 45. 
Elders, twenty-four, represent the members of the church, iii. 5. 
And beasts, representatives of the saints on earth, v. 77. 
Ordinary, set over particular churches, xi. 64 ; they and the churches 

were formed up into presbyteries, ib. 
Their power and jurisdiction bounded by institution, xi. 117 ; under 

the Old Testament, 119 ; and the New, 120. 
Their jurisdiction depends on the call of .the church, xi. 27. 
Ought not to be teaching to one congregation, and ruling to others, 

xi. 224. 

Elect, why left so long uncalled, ii. 199. 
Alone redeemed, iii. 15. 
Given to Christ, not when they come to him and believe, but from. 

everlasting, v. 26. 

Why allowed to continue for a time in a state of sin, vi. 88. 
Ordained to pass through several states and dispensations before the 
crown of glory be put on their heads, vii. 34 ; this accords with God s 
manner of working in other things, 35 ; in creation, ib. ; in intro 
ducing the gospel, 36 ; this shews the perfection of his efficiency and 
workmanship, 37 ; his various and manifold wisdom, ib. ; is suited 
to the capacity of the creature, 38. 
Order of God s decrees concerning, vii. 88. 
Do not obtain salvation without calling, ix. 11. 
Styled by God his people, even before their conversion, ix. 16. 
And non-elect, have divided mankind in all ages, ix. 18, 26. 
The highest of all titles, ix. 150. 
And non-elect, their condition the same, considered as to be created, 

ix. 163 ; in every way nonentities, 166. 

And non-elect, their condition the same, viewed as fallen, ix. 168 ; the 
lives of the former and their aggravations equal to those of the latter, 
173 ; some of the former, even after calling, fall into great sins, 174 ; 
some of the latter have been far less sinners than some of the former, 
175. 

Enhancement of the gratitude they owe to God from several considera 
tions, ix. 173-182. 

Are chosen not only with but in Christ, ix. 339 ; and for his sake, 340. 
Chosen in Christ as a head according to the supralapsarian view ; in 

Jesus as a saviour according to the sublapsarian, ix. 344. 
ELECTION, A DISCOUKSE OF, ix. 1. 
Election in and with Christ, i. 70. 

Not from faith foreseen, i. 65 ; Christ not the cause of, 70 ; all things 
further the decree of, 79 ; different from predestination, 84, 85 ; end 
of, 91 ; an act of love and not of mercy, ii. 149, 156. 
Is of things that are not unto being, as well as of men that are unto 

salvation, iv. 195. 

And free grace, reconciled in the gospel, iv. 274. 
Particular, doctrine of, ought not to prevent any man s seeking recon- 

ciliation,v. 517 ; many signs of, but none of reprobation, 518. 
Pitched not upon qualifications, but persons, vi. 59. 



176 INDEX. 

Election and predestination, distinction between, vi. 218. 

God s love in, a great motive to holiness, obedience, and service, vii. 
238 ; holy obedience the main thing pitched upon in the decree of, 
239 ; hath both chosen us unto holiness, and ordained good works 
for us, 240. 

Expressed by finding grace in God s sight, viii. 254. 
Necessary in order to the certain and sure salvation of either angels or 

men, ix. 3 ; the well-head of super-creation grace, 5. 
Election-grace, without it Christ should not have saved a single man, ix. 12. 
Is of pure grace, ix. 19 ; depends not on works, but works on it, 20 ; 
is a reservation of some persons to God, 24 ; remains in the family 
of Seth, 29. 

To glory as the end had respect to man as unfallen, to the means, to 
man as fallen, ix. 84 ; different opinions of divines, 86 ; objections 
answered, 87 ; opinions of the schoolmen, 92. 

The grandness of, shewn by the chosen, ix. 150 ; the blessedness of it, 
151 ; the end of it, ib. ; the time of it, ib.; contrasted with reprobation, 
152. 

The act of, expressed by God s loving us, ix. 220. 
Decree of, sure to an impossibility of miscarriage, ix. 244. 
Sure in itself, is made sure to our faith by calling, ix. 277. 
Supralapsarian and sublapsarian views of, ix. 344. 
< Election-conversion, what ? Instanced in Paul, ix. 279. 
Elihu, exposition of his statement in Job xxxiii., vi. 366. 
Em.peror of Germany, probably the sun on which the fourth vial is poured, 

iii. 104. 
Empire, Koman, destroyed for its persecutions, iii. 27. 

Western, hindered the revelation of the man of sin, iii. 73. 
ENCOURAGEMENTS TO FAITH, iv. 205. 

ENCOURAGEMENT, ZERUBBABEL S, TO FINISH THE TEMPLE, xii. 101. 
Ends give value to duties, iii. 471. 
Enemies of Christ, three sorts of, iii. 93. 

Of Christ, conquered at his death, scattered at his resurrection, led 

captive in his ascension, iv. 47. 
England, her greatest sin contempt of the glorious gospel and the ministry, 

iv. 228. 

Her interest lies in her saints, xii. 56. 
Enlightenment, spiritual, i. 30 ; may be short of salvation, 393. 

By the Spirit may be without regeneration, vi. 433. 
Enmity of Jew and Gentile, ii. 367 ; abolished, 373. 
To God is in the mind naturally, vi. 141. 

Man s natural, to God, x. 106 ; not direct, as that of the devil is, 107 ; 
consists in estrangement, 108 ; in internal contrariety, 111 ; mani 
fests itself by evil works, 113 ; its greatness, 115 ; it is continued 
without interruption even from the beginning of a man s days, ib. ; 
no time, no means, no persuasions or threatenings, can ween it out, 
ib. ; it is universal in regard to the manifestation of it, 116 ; shewn 
by too entire affection to the world, 119; by not being subject to 
the law of God, 120 ; by daily and willingly harbouring and foster 
ing thy God s enemy, 121 ; by enmity to the children and ways of 
God, ib. 
Ephesians, Epistle to, its excellency, i. 1. 

Their self-denial, i. 2. 
Ephraim and Judah, separated by election, ix. 192. 



INDEX. 177 

Epistles, apostolical, their drift is to shew the extent of Christ s sufferings, 

iv. 19. 
Shew the use, end, and intent of all that is recorded in the Gospels, iv. 

265. 
Errors respecting the nature and person of Christ, frequent and fatal in all 

ages, iv. 448. 

Esau, had external advantages far above Jacob, ix. 191. 
Esther, her sympathy for her people in her advancement, iv. 122. 
Eternity, ages of, ii. 804. 

An incommunicable attribute of God, vii. 7 ; belongs to Christ, ib. ; 
what is meant by God s inhabiting, 11 ; it excludes all things made, 
as not having been from eternity, ib. ; it imports that he hath 
dwelt alone, and shall dwell for ever apart, by and in himself, 12 ; 
that he possesseth all things in himself, ib. that his being is infinite, 
ib. ; signifies his unchangeableness, 13. 

European kingdoms, to remain till the overthrow of popery, xii. 55. 
Evangelists give the story of the life and death of Christ in cypher, which is 

explained in the epistles, iv. 265. 
Tell the story of Christ, the epistles shew the meaning and intent, the 

efficacy and benefits accruing, x. 4. 
Eve, why made out of the substance of Adam, v. 57 ; not a daughter of man, 

as Adam not a son, ib. 
Not a public person, as Adam was, x. 16. 
Evephemus and Eucritus, story of, iv. 28. 
Exaltation of Christ, i. 466 ; its eminency and universality, 479. 

Of Christ from death to glory, the greatest act of power that God ever 

put forth, iv. 269. 

Examples for matters of practice, in many cases better than rules, xi. 82 ; 
those recorded in Scripture are intended as rules, 88 ; extraordinary 
and ordinary must be distinguished, 35. 

Excellencies of all objects, but shadows of the excellency of Christ, iii. 437. 
Excommunication, in what sense a deliverance to Satan, iii. 258, 296, 

The greatest of all ordinances, xi. 13 ; none may administer without a 

special commission and institution, ib. 
Is more than simply an ejection out of the church, xi. 44 ; why it does 

not always produce its proper effect, 46. 
Different from non-communion, xi. 279. 
Eyes and horns of the Lamb, what they denote, iii. 9, 10. 
Ezeldel, his measuring of the temple, iii. 130. 

Face, seeking of God s, what the expression imports, v. 433. 
FAITH, ENCOURAGEMENTS TO, iv. 205. 

AND OBEDIENCE, THEEE SEVEKAL AGES OF CHKIST1ANS IN, \ T il. 473. 

JUSTIFYING ; OBJECTS AND ACTS OF, viii. 1. 

OBJECT OF, viii. 3. 

ACTS OF, viii. 257. 

PROPERTIES OF, viii. 459. 

Faith, seated in the understanding and the will, i. 226 ; how it differs from 
assurance, 235 ; power of God in working, 440 ; is a work of resur 
rection, 447 ; description of, 449. 

Is merely passive, ii. 234 ; the whole of salvation conveyed by, 321 ; 
how it suits with grace, 322 ; is a modest grace, 327 ; act of, not 
the matter of justification, 339 ; nothing in us contributes to, 342 ; 
Christ dwells in the heart by, 404 ; works patience, 438. 

VOL. XII. M 



178 INDEX. 

Faith, the master-grace, as despair the master-piece of Satan, iii. 257. 

Special, that a particular prayer will be granted, akin to the faith 
of miracles of old, iii. 378 ; such faith, though wrought by God, may 
not be meant absolutely, 379. 

In the act may be weak, yet as its object is Christ, it justifies, iii. 399. 

Degrees of, first casting itself on Christ, then finding sweetness in him, 
then assurance, iii. 471. 

Distinction between Old and New Testament, iv. 12. 

Object of, for justification is Christ as dying for us, iv. 16 ; sinners 
on earth, distinguished from visions in heaven, 17 ; uniting, sancti 
fying, and justifying, have for their object Christ in several aspects, 
ib. 

Towards Christ as dying is to look to the intent of his sufferings and 
death, iv. 18. 

A coming unto God, by Christ, for salvation, iv. 88 ; does not there 
fore include assurance, ib. ; in Christ s intercession may lead to faith 
in God s election and in Christ s having died for us, ib. 

Is the great thing inculcated in the New Testament, as the fear of the 
Lord in the Old, iv. 288. 

Supreme over conscience and reason, iv. 304. 

Not a phantasia, but a hypostasia, iv. 322, 336. 

Exercise of, in prayer, v. 413. 

Special acts of, ascribed to the Holy Ghost, vi. 20. 

Of the operation of God, founded upon self-emptiness and poverty of 
spirit, vi. 102. 

In a regenerate man, turns the law into gospel, as conscience, in an 
unregenerate, turns gospel into law, vi. 261. 

Difficulty of producing, vi. 446 ; is a new principle of life put into the 
soul, 447 ; a killing of our old life, ib. ; compared with the work of 
creation, 449. 

Adam s, in his unfallen state, was natural, vii. 56 ; ours supernatural, 
58 ; in respect of the objects revealed to it, 59 ; in respect of the 
heavenly light wherewith our minds are elevated to those supernatural 
objects, 61 ; does not destroy the light of reason and conscience, 64. 

Hath the greatest certainty of knowledge about its objects, of any other 
knowledge, vii. 138. 

True, wherever it is, worketh and frameth the heart to friend-like dis 
positions towards God, vii. 187 ; this true of the faith of dependence, 
as well as of assurance, 189 ; God, in saving us by, loses nothing of 
that love and holiness which he expects from us, 190. 

Its object the mercies of God s heart and nature, viii. 3 ; under the Old 
Testament, held by the promise of the Messiah, and God s declara 
tion of his attributes, 11. 

Three more eminent acts of, for forgiveness and all other spiritual bless 
ings, viii. 115; a sight of the things promised or to be believed, a 
discerning of goodness in them, a trusting in God, and a reliance on 
him for the performance of them, ib. 

In seeking justification, must have recourse to God, as justifying the 
ungodly, viii. 133. 

Its other object Jesus Christ, both in his person, his suffering, death, 
resurrection, and ascension, and likewise the benefits that are the 
fruit of all these, viii. 140. 

Its great object Christ s person, as the Son of God in one person with 
the man Jesus, viii. 184 ; on his person as God-man, the foundation 



INDEX. 179 

of all else we believe on him for, as he is our Saviour, 188 ; the free 
grace of God, as declared and proposed in the covenant, the object of, 
194 ; absolute declarations and unconditional promises the proper ob 
ject of, 205. 

Election-grace, and the immutability of God s counsel, indefinitely pro 
posed in the promises, an object of, viii. 234. 

By which we are saved, is seated in the whole heart, viii. 258 ; its first 
act is seeing, or knowledge, ib. ; it is a spiritual light, 259 ; called 
light, to distinguish it from reason and other knowledge, ib. ; in order to 
it the Spirit giveth us a new understanding, 260 ; and then enlightens 
this new understanding, ib. ; is so genuine a knowledge that, except 
in degree, it is the same knowledge that Christ s human nature 
hath of himself, 261 ; knowledge of things spiritual in the souls of 
men, not proportioned to the compass of their natural understanding, 
263 ; does not destroy reason, but subordinates it to itself, 264 ; is 
a certain knowledge, 265 ; a real knowledge, 267 ; the believer sees 
the spiritual excellency that is in Christ, and the heart is taken with 
it, 269 ; sees an all- sufficiency of righteousness in him, 270 ; sees 
the graciousness that is in him, 271 ; is not a bare assent to the truth 
of the promises, 272 ; is special faith, on the promises of salvation 
and justification through Christ, and through the free grace of God in 
him, 276 ; is faith in his blood, and his righteousness, 288; why God 
has appropriated salvation to this special act of faith, 289 ; as an act 
of the will is a valuing of Christ above all other things whatsoever, 
303 ; the believer hath stamped upon his heart an instinct after 
Christ and after mystical union with him, so as he cannot be quiet 
without him, 304 ; looks to him for help, and to him alone, 305 ; 
then comes to him, 306; and believes, rests and trusts to him 
for salvation, 307 ; abides by him, and will not stir away from him, 
313 ; applies and fashions his heart to the law of faith, 316 ; neces 
sarily leads to willing service and obedience, 318 ; errors of common 
protestants concerning, 329 ; resting in a general assent to the truths 
of Christ s history, 330 ; taking an absence of doubt for application, 
331 ; making faith only a good persuasion and opinion of our pre 
sent condition, ib. ; merely getting into our hearts such thoughts 
about Christ, as believers are understood to have, 332 ; mixing up 
trust in our own righteousness with faith in Christ, ib. ; errors of 
men somewhat humbled for sin, 333; of men more thoroughly 
humbled, 334. 

May be without prevailing assurance, viii. 339 ; justification and bless 
edness hath been pronounced to such a condition as hath wanted this 
assurance, ib. ; in a state of desertion, a true believer may want assur 
ance while he continues to believe, 340 ; doubting may as well con 
sist with reality of faith as any other corruption, 342 ; the essential 
acts of faith may be performed without assurance, 343 ; objections 
answered, 349. 

In itself, of all graces the meanest and lowest, viii. 459 ; is, in a pri 
mary sense, the sole instrument in the covenant of grace, 461 ; it 
doth all, in the matter of our salvation, from first to last, 462 ; is 
the mother-grace, the parent of all others, 463; it honours God 
most, and God honours it most, 467 ; it prepares the soul for Christ, 
471 ; it spies out Christ, ib. ; all the communion we have with Christ 
transacted by, 472 ; all the joy we have in Christ is by, 473 ; this 
no disparagement to inherent holiness and obedience, 476. 



180 INDEX. 

Faith, difficulty of, viii. 480 ; great things to be done in heaven for us, when 
faith is wrought, 482 ; inability and obstacles in the heart to be over 
come, 483 ; all that is in man can in no way help him unto, 492 ; 
all that is in man is against, ib. ; is an effect of the infinite power of 
God alone, 503 ; yet we must endeavour after, 520 ; cautions respect 
ing, 529 ; discouragements considered, 556 ; directions to guide us, 
580 ; objections answered, 585. 
Not failing is Satan s foiling, ix. 232. 

Faithfulness of God implies that he is constant to himself and his own pur 
poses of grace, ix. 306 ; to his promises, ib. ; to the trust which he 
hath undertaken, ib. 

Fall, divisions caused by, i. 186 ; reconciled in Christ, 188. 
Of man, how it happened, x. 7. 
Did not destroy the substance of the soul, nor its faculties, but that 

holiness which was its ornament, vii. 33. 
Falling away, none from true grace, i. 260, 413 ; they who fall away are 

unregenerate, 416. 
Familiarity, Christ does not permit his disciples to use with him in their 

earthly state, viii. 387. 
Father, of glory,|i. 327. 

Everlasting, in what sense the title is applied to Christ, iv. 516. 
Sometimes set for the Godhead, including the Son and the Spirit, iv. 546. 
Why reconciliation is represented as specially to him, v. 7 ; also as 

specially wrought by him, 9. 
And Son, their love compared in that the Father gave the Son, and the 

Son gave himself for us, v. 179. 

Alone could bruise the Son, so as to satisfy for sin, vii. 194. 
What we ought to know of him, vii. 492; his person, as the Father 
of glory, the fountain of Deity, the begetter of the Son, and from 
whom the Holy Ghost proceedeth, ib. ; the riches of his mercy and 
love, ib. ; the whole of his work and hand in our salvation, ib. ; his 
bestowing on us all spiritual blessings, ib. 

How he draws the soul to Christ, viii. 153 ; great reason why it 
should be his work, 155 ; it was he that chose our persons for his 
Son, ib. ; our believing is a marriage between Christ and us, and it 
is proper for a father to bestow his son in marriage, 156 ; teaches 
us to know Christ, 159. 

What he teacheth, viii. 159 ; that the Father hath given us eternal life, 
ib. ; that this life is in his Son, 160 ; that we may seek it out of self- 
love, ib. ; that we are to take him not only as a Saviour, but as the 
Son of God, 161 ; how he teaches these things, 162 ; by bringing 
the knowledge we have of Christ home to our souls, ib. ; taking our 
hearts with what he saith to us, ib. ; giving knowledge as the truth 
is in Jesus, ib. ; persuading us that all we know of him is for his 
glory, 163. 

Fear of God, includes all piety, iv. 288. 
Feeling, want of, an exercise of faith, iii. 466. 
Fellowship of angels and men, i. 162 ; with God, called life, ii. 205. 

And communion with the persons of God the Father and Christ, the 

height and prime of Christian religion, vii. 480. 
Threefold : personal, with God in secret duties ; mystical, common to 

all saints ; and congregational, xi. 300. 

Fiery furnace; probable that it was Christ who appeared with the three 
young men in, iv. 424. 



INDEX. 181 

Fighting, for religion merely, unlawful, v. 218. 

Fire, which men kindle, and the sparks of it ; their own natural righteous 
ness, and outward comforts, iii. 345. 

Whether there be material, in hell, x. 501. 

First-born of every creature, in what sense Christ is, iv. 468 ; not spoken of 
his eternal generation, 469. 

Of every creature, in what sense Christ, as God-man, is, iv. 558. 
First-fruits, consecration of, has its antitype in Christ s resurrection, iv. 34. 

From the dead, in what sense Christ is, iv. 539. 

Of the creation, in what sense saints are, ix. 163 ; designed to be by 

election, made to be by regeneration, 165. 
Fitness of the person of Christ for the work of reconciliation, distinguished 

from his ability, v. 35. 

Flesh, described, ii. 78 ; why called so, 80 ; all creatures and creature com 
forts without Christ, are, 82 ; gospel works directed to bad ends, 
are, ib. ; why called, our, 86. 

As opposed to the spirit which is born of the Spirit, is the natural sin- 
fulness and defilement of man s nature, vi. 159, 195. 

Is the predominance of self-love, ix. 9 ; may be affected with many 
things, both in the law and gospel, but cannot do anything really 
good, 10. 

Notes out inherent corruption, which is derived from generation, x. 42 ; 
Is the principle whence all a natural man s actions proceed, 43; there 
is a bundle or mass of it, therefore called a body, that hath multi 
tude of members, 44 ; is the very nature of men, ib. ; the experience 
of all mankind shews it, 45 ; confirmed by testimonies, 46 ; of the 
Gentiles, ib. ; the institution of magistrates and laws, which pre 
suppose it, ib. ; the law of God, ib. ; the gospel, 47. 
Folly of wicked men, consists in an inability to consider of things, x. 200 ; 
to consider their own ways and states, ib. ; to consider the issues and 
consequences of things, ib. ; to consider fit times, and seasons, and 
opportunities, 201 ; to make use of a rule in any particular case, ib. ; 
to lay things to heart, 202 ; in their false judgments, 203 ; they 
judge those things best which may be presently enjoyed, ib. ; prefer 
things easy before those that are hard and difficult, 204 ; judge of 
things by their outward adorning, 205 ; by the quantity, not the qua 
lity and worth, 206. 

In the ill choice which they make of things, x. 206 ; in doing unneces 
sary things first, and putting off necessary things to the last, ib. ; in 
committing their happiness to uncertainties, 207 ; in not providing 
for all conditions and all times they are to run through, ib. ; in not 
having wit to choose a small present inconvenience, to avoid a 
greater in time to come, 208 ; in exchanging precious things for 
trifles, ib. ; is apparent in the event and issue of all their actions, 
209 ; in so acting that they must lose their labour, ib. ; in resting 
their happiness in what must in the end prove their misery, 210 ; in 
being led with vain promises, 211 ; effects of, in the hearts of un- 
regenerate men, ib. ; they are ashamed of nothing, ib. ; self-willed, 

212 ; inconstant, ib. ; unteachable, ib. ; confident in their own ways, 

213 ; still follow their own minds as their guides, 213. 
Fools, all men in a state of nature are, x. 195. 
Forbearance, duty of, i. 277. 

Foreknowledge, God s, of his people, not the ground of their election, ix. 17. 
Foretastes of heaven, sanctifying power of, i. 325. 



182 INDEX. 

Forgiveness of sins belongs to God only, and to the God-man as he is God, 

iv. 547. 

Of sins, whether it is all at once on conversion, or repeated as sins are 
committed, vi. 407. 

Formalists, among the worst of those who sin against knowledge, iv. 177. 
Their strongholds, x. 391 ; negative righteousness and outward absti 
nence from gross sins, ib. ; their good natures and dispositions, 392 ; 
their conscientiousness, ib. ; assent to the truth, ib. ; excuses for their 
deficiencies, ib. ; their good dispositions, ib. 

Forsaking of Christ by his i ? ather, what it was, v. 279 ; not a dissolution of 
the hypostatical union, ib. ; nor a deprivation of support and the in 
fluences of grace, ib. ; but a deprivation of all comfort and sense of 
happiness, ib. 

Fountains, spiritual, Komish writers and advocates, iii. 102 ; temporal 
and political, Jesuits, ib. 

France, the first of the ten kingdoms, iii. 74. 

Free grace and justice, the attributes of God most eminently concerned in 
our salvation, iv. 61 ; in Christ s death he paid a price to justice, in 
his intercession he entreateth free grace, 62. 

Free-will, sufficient to lead to evil, but not to good, vi. 207. 
Pride and presumptuousness of, ix. 186. 
In sinful men, incompatible with freedom in God, ix. 14. 

Friends and flatterers, difference between, vi. 132. 
Of God, in the world few, enemies many, x. 166. 

Friendship with God, expresses not only privilege but duty, vii. 179. 

Between God and his saints, mutual, vii. 191 ; hence the consideration 
of what a friend he is, will shew them what they ought to be, ib. ; 
Excellencies of God s shewn in fourteen particulars, 192. 
Of God should lead us to ask his counsel on all occasions, vii. 
203 ; and to follow it, 206 ; to make use of his favour and friend 
ship in all businesses, and defend them alone, 207 ; to take seeming 
denials of particular requests kindly, 209 ; to trust him, especially 
in great exigencies, and take heed of being jealous of him, ib. ; to 
study his favours, so as to find out his loving-kindness in them, 212 ; 
to be fearful of displeasing or offending him, 213 ; to study what will 
most please him, 215 ; to perform common actions so as to render 
these acceptable to him, 216 ; to manage with all simplicity and 
plain-heartedness towards him in all our walkings, 220 ; to be faithful 
to him in whatever he hath committed to our trust, 221 ; to deny 
him nothing, and yet take his denials kindly, 222 ; to stick close to 
him in time of trial, ib. ; to suffer for him gladly, if there be occa 
sion, ib. 

Fruit, bearing, in Christ, the characteristic of all believers, iii. 446 ; their 
hearts are sensible of their inability for anything good, as of them 
selves, ib. ; they are trained to a continual dependence upon a power 
from above, ib. ; they close with the Scriptural statements as to the 
necessity of Divine aid, 447 ; they refuse all offers of assistance from 
any other strength, ib. ; they gratefully acknowledge that it is Christ 
who worketh all their works in them, ib. 

Fulness of times, i. 201 ; dispensation of, 204 ; of Christ, 561. 

Of God, to be filled with, is an experience above what we are able to 
ask or to think, yet it is attainable even in this life, by the power 
which worketh in us, iv. 386. 



INDEX. 183 

Fulness which dwells in Christ, in what it consists, iv. 460 ; dwells in him as 

God-man, by an act of God s will, 461. 
Of Christ, not, plenitude vasis, sedfontis, iv. 559. 

Galatians, had not lost the image of Christ in respect of sanctification in 
their hearts, but they had been diverted from the true knowledge of 
Christ, iv. 335. 
Galileans, their custom of wearing swords, accounts for Peter s having one, 

v. 216. 
Gathering of all things in Christ, i. 150, 193. 

Of the unfruitful branches, what ? iii. 456. 
Generation, definition of, by Aquinas, iv. 428. 

Eternal, of the second person, expressed in divers terms, v. 547. 
Natural, Adam s sin transmitted by, x. 53. 
Gentile believers have a modified interest in the Abrahamic covenant, that 

God will be the God of their seed, ixr 429. 
Gentiles, men living in sin reckoned as, ii. 74. 

Conversion of, the greatest miracle wrought under the New Testament, 
the most glorious fruit of Christ s death, and among the strongest 
evidences of the truth of the Christian religion, v. 465. 
Conversion of, termed the building up of the tabernacle of David, 

viii. 70. 

Gethsemane, had been the place of Christ s repose and comfort, and com 
munion with his Father, and there he must encounter his Father s 
wrath, v. 199. 
Gift of his people to Christ by the Father, refers not to their calling, but to 

their election, or to an act concurrent with their election, iv. 502. 
Gifts in prayer, do not move God, but graces, iii. 400. 

And sacrifices, correspond to the procurement of grace and mercy, 

iv. 128. 

Extraordinary, many had who were not saved, iv. 326. 
And graces are a manifestation of the Spirit, vi. 65. 
Spiritual, given to the rebellious, ix. 160. 
And graces, as much difference between, as between a glow-worm and 

a star, ix. 178. 

Natural, are not proportioned to graces, x. 141. 
Eational, importance of, in the church, to encounter with the carnal 

reasonings of wicked men, x. 250. 
Gladiators, those brought last on the stage fought till one killed the other, 

v. 533. 

GLIMPSE OF ZION S GLOKY, xii. 61. 

Glorifying God is done by having holy ends in our common actions, iv. 383 : 
in such good works as directly in themselves do tend to his glory, 16. ; 
in performing duties of worship, and being conversant in ordinances, 
384 ; is more than to praise God for benefits received by ourselves, 
ib. ; is more than to glorify God for his love to us, for the assurance 
and hope that he will glorify us, 385. 
GLOKY OF THE GOSPEL, SERMON I., iv. 225 ; SERMON II., 241 ; DISCOURSE 

OF, 259. 

BLESSED STATE OF SAINTS IN, vii. 337. 
AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF, DEMONSTRATED, xii. 1. 
A GLIMPSE OF ZION S, xii. 61. 
Glory of Christ, God s chief end in redemption, i. 100 ; of God, essential and 



184 



INDEX. 



manifestative, 105 ; of God, cannot be added to, 106 ; definition of, 
315 ; of the resurrection body, 316 ; of God in bis saints, 321. 
Glory of bis people presented to Christ from eternity in the glass of God s 
decrees, iv. 124. 

The riches of, in the Godhead, communicated to the man Christ Jesus, 
as fully as possible unto a creature, i. 232. 

Departure of, from a people, five signs of it, iv. 255. 

The super-excellency and superlative of goodness, iv. 315. 

Of a man is his soul, by which he differeth from beasts, of a holy man 
is the Holy Ghost, by whose indwelling he differs from other men, 
iv. 327. 

The highest, of God as a king, lies in Bis own internal and personal 
attributes, iv. 396 ; justice and judgment the supports of his throne, 
mercy and truth his attendants, his almightiness his army, his faith 
fulness his council, 397. 

Of Christ with God before the world was whether as second person 
or as God-man ? iv. 484 ; was the glory which, as God-man, was 
assigned him in the eternal decree of God ? 485 ; this sense given 
by Augustine, 486 ; is the grand lever of all creature-glory, ib. 

Of Christ as God-man a supreme paramount end, iv. 505. 

Of believers, the same in kind with that of Christ, though inferior in 
degree, iv. 486. 

Of Christ twofold of his person simply as God-man, and of his office 
as Mediator, iv. 493 ; both these referred to in his prayer in John 
xvii., 495 ; difference between the personal and the mediatory glory, 
496 ; the former infinitely exceeds the latter, 498 ; the personal, as 
God-man, is the foundation both of his own mediatorial glory and of 
the glory of his people, 501. 

For which Christ prays, not the essential glory belonging to him as the 
second person, iv. 508 ; nor is it his mediatory glory, for that he has 
not given to his disciples, ib. ; eminently meant of the glory of his 
being God-man, ib. ; and our share in it is our sonship, 511. 

God s manifestative, is revealed in and by creatures, v. 93. 

Manifestative, due to the Son of God if he assume a creature into one 
person with himself, v. 106 ; this glory be relinquished, 108. 

Of God twofold, essential and manifestative, the former reflected on, 
the latter detracted from, by sin, v. 123. 

Due to Christ on his first assuming our nature, suspended during the 
time of his sojourn on earth, v. 126. 

Of Christ s person is specially his holiness, v. 434. 

Not given propter opera, but secundum opera, vi. 410. 

Of God the utmost end of the new creature, vi. 497 ; all things which 
are in him glorious, ib ; all his manifestations and works glorious, 
498 ; that it should be the utmost end, due from his reasonable 
creatures, ib. ; especially required of his saints, ib. ; all the persons 
of the Godhead give to one another, 499 ; is all that God requires of 
us in return for all that we receive from him, ib. ; if not given, God 
will curse all blessings to us, 500 ; if not glorified by us, will be in 
us, ib. ; how we glorify God, 501 ; by endeavouring to know him, 
and conceive aright of him, ib. ; by admiring him in all we know of 
him, ib. ; by speaking much of him to others, 502 ; by ascribing all 
to him, ib. ; by suffering for him, ib. ; by imitating him, 503 ; by 
glorifying him, ib. ; by living according to his will, ib. ; by doing all 
things for his glory, ib. ; by doing all we do in Christ, ib. ; by re- 



INDEX. 185 

penting and turning to him when he afflicts us, ib. ; by calling on him 
in trouble, 504 ; by believing on him, ib. ; by fearing him above all, 
ib. ; by joining ourselves to the assemblies of his saints, 505. 

And praise of God, distinction between, vii. 172. 

Different states of, after death and after the resurrection, vii. 440 ; the 
same expression used of both, 444 ; yet are to be understood with a 
vast difference and disproportion, ib. ; like expressions used of special 
manifestations of God and Christ to the soul on earth, 446 ; par 
ticulars of that of the intermediate state, 449 ; when the soul goes 
forth out of the body, the second death hath no power over it, 451 ; 
it has angels to wait on it, 452 ; it is in heaven instantly, ib. ; 
so far as it hath been rich in faith and good works, it has a rich en 
trance into the holy courts, ib. ; either in the instant of death, or in 
the passage to heaven, it is fully purified from sin, and made per 
fectly holy, 453 ; there is a great solemnity used on its first coming 
thither, 454. 

To which believers are advanced through Christ, higher than was 
attainable by the law of creation, ix. 97. 

Arising to Christ from all the creatures, not comparable to that arising 
from believers, ix. 100. 

Of God from his people commensurate with the grace he bestows on 
them, ix. 102. 

Of the redeemed in heaven riseth immediately from the glory of God 
communicated to them, ix. 215. 

Believers are called into, not in respect of possession, but of right, ix. 
320 ; into the eternity of it, 326. 

Into which we are called is God s, ix. 331 ; the same as is called the 
excellent glory, 333 ; distinct from that of Christ, ib. ; consists in 
an immediate communication, participation, and enjoyment of God 
himself, 334. 

To which Christians are called is the glory of Christ, ix. 363 ; and 
that both as he is Christ our head, ib. ; and as he is Jesus our 
Saviour, 365 ; in the one case it is an inheritance, in the other a 
purchased possession, ib. ; as he hath called us into it, so he hath 
taken possession of it for us, 366. 

His own increased by ours, ix. 366. 

Ordained and prepared for the souls of believers before the resurrection, 
xii. 5 ; in harmony with the work of grace in this life, 6 ; its essen 
tial is God s immediate presence, 10 ; the design and bestowal of at 
death, becoming God, 17. 

God both the fountain and the Father of, xii. 90. 

GOD THE FATHER AND HIS SON JESUS CHRIST, KNOWLEDGE OF, iv. 347. 
God must seek his own glory, i. 105 ; his delight in his people, 110 ; in 
shewing grace, 107. 

His joy in his people, ix. 103 ; loves us when sinners, delights in us 
when holy, 104. 

His appearances not intended to shew what he is in himself, but what 

to us, iv. 118. 

Godhead, but one ; but the persons in the one Godhead more than one, iv. 
350. 

In Christ, not the soul in his body, viii. 182. 

Godliness is being as faithful to God and devoted to his interests as the 
natural man is to himself and his, vi. 439. 

Often attacked even from the pulpit, vii. 547. 



186 INDEX. 

God-man, the glory of being was existent to the second person from eternity, 

iv. 491. 
Goodness is essentially communicative, ix. 128. 

Natural and moral in man, consistent with the corruption of his nature, 

x. 94. 

GOODWIN, MR JOHN, Two LETTERS BETWEEN, AND THE AUTHOR, xi. 526. 
GOSPEL, THE GLORY OF, SERMON I., iv. 225 ; SERMON II., 241 ; DISCOURSE 
OF, 259. 

HOLINESS IN THE HEART AND LIFE, vii. 129. 
Gospel, rejection of, always followed by plagues, iii. 38. 

First preached by God to Adam, iv. 221 ; has been preached by all 
creatures reasonable, and to all creatures reasonable, 222 ; confirmed 
by writing, seals, oaths, and by all God s actions and courses from 
the beginning of the world, ib. 

Excellency of the knowledge of, set forth by its author and revealers, 
iv. 227 ; by the worth of the subject matter revealed, 228 ; by its 
depth, ib. ; its preciousness, ib. ; its profitableness, ib. ; its secrecy 
before it was revealed, ib. ; its rareness now it is revealed, ib. ; its 
clear revealing was the desire and longing of patriarchs and pro 
phets, ib. ; is the study of the angels, 229 ; is the study of God him 
self, ib. 

Knowledge of it lay hid in God s breast from eternity till the time 
came for revealing it, iv. 230. 

Is the image of Christ, as Christ is of God, iv. 233 ; contains not only 
depths of wisdom, but also of love, 236. 

Is published to all the world, and yet is a mystery hid, and revealed 
only to the saints, iv. 238. 

Its preciousness, shewn by five qualities, iv. 242. 

Is glorious, because by it men are made partakers of the Holy Ghost, 
iv. 245 ; because it is the ministration of righteousness, ib. ; because 
through it we are brought to see the sunshine of the favour of God, 
246 ; because it changes us into the same image from glory to glory, 
ib. ; it gives a glorious joy, and the assurance of greater joy here 
after, ib. 

Is truly the glory of any people, and the want of it leaves them in the 
most miserable and inglorious condition, iv. 252. 

Civilises those whom it does not convert, iv. 253. 

Its superiority to all previous revelations of God s attributes and will, 
iv. 261 ; made on purpose to honour and set forth Christ, 264. 

Made up of reconciliations of contradictions, iv. 274. 

Is not only a mystery and a depth in respect of wisdom, but also of 
love, iv. 278. 

Lay from eternity under lock and key in the breast of God, iv. 281. 

Hid from many generations of Gentiles, iv. 282 ; and in one sense from 
the Jews also, ib. ; from the angels and from Adam in innocency, 
283. 

Not new, but from everlasting, iv. 290. 

First revealed by God to his Son, then to the holy apostles and pro 
phets, and then to all his saints, iv. 293 ; preached to every creature, 
yet hidden from all but the saints, 294 ; in what sense known by 
carnal men, 295, et seq. 

Its excellency consists in the riches of spiritual knowledge manifested 
in it, iv. 303. 

The riches of a kingdom or city, iv. 313. 



INDEX. 187 

Gospel, a most glorious revelation of God and Christ to us, iv. 815. 

More glorious than the law in respect of the manner of its promulgation, 
iv. 316; in respect of its matter, 317; is not only a picture of 
Christ, but his image in a glass, 319 ; the riches of the glory of God 
shine in it, 324; in respect of its being intended for all nations, 331. 

Hath a spirit accompanying it, which renders it not mere letter but 
spirit, iv. 320. 

Invented by God in order to communicate his own blessedness and 
glory, iv. 325. 

The most powerful means to subdue the hearts of men, v. 5. 

The least line of, worth all the law, v. 102. 

The whole story of it hath three parts, relating to the Father designing, 
the son effecting, and the Spirit applying, v. 483. 

Requires universal respect to all the commandments of God, vii. 179. 

Its great design to promote the life, power, and practice of godliness, 
vii. 291 ; the end of the word to enjoin entire holiness, 292 ; to do, 
and be active in God s word and law, the end and perfection of the 
reasonable creature, 294 ; that we should be doers of the word, the 
end of inherent grace in the soul, 295 ; holy activity the soul and 
perfection of grace, ib. 

A freehold for us and ours, x. 34 ; price at which it has been pur 
chased, ib. 

GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE OF THE CHURCHES OF CHRIST, xi. 485. 
Government, according to Presbyterians, is in the hands of a body of elders, 
according to the Congregationalists is mixed of an aristocracy of 
elders and a democracy of the people, xi. 113. 
GRACE, MAN S RESTORATION BY, vii. 519. 

Grace, doctrine of, importance of being grounded in, i. 4 ; of God, what 
riches of, 125; consistent with a satisfaction to justice, ib,; effectual, 
219; no falling from, 260, 413; habits of, 366; three passages of 
Scripture used to prove falling from grace, 413; what meant by 
grace, ii. 220 ; immutable, 226 ; sovereign, 227 ; laid up for us in 
Christ, 228. 

Saving, improvement of natural principles by the Holy Ghost falls 
short of, i. 410 ; inferior works of the Spirit distinguished from, 385 ; 
excellencies of, ii. 288 ; freeness of, 290. 

Exercise of, different from knowledge of, iii. 241. 

Too precious for God to suffer even the smallest portion of it to be de 
stroyed, iii. 452. 

Why called life, iii. 459. 

Growth in, runs through all the faculties, iii. 505. 

Christ s lying in, a part of his humiliation, and therefore of his satis 
faction, iv. 36. 

Standing in, every moment, owing to Christ s sitting in heaven, and 
interceding every moment, iv. 64. 

Helps against the power of sin, mercy against its punishment, iv. 112. 

Throne of, the highest thing in heaven, as the mercy- seat was in the 
holy of holies, iv. 13 J. 

Doctrines of, are the most inward, practical, and experimental secrets, 
iv. 238. 

Every degree of, is glory ( From glory to glory ), iv. 330. 

A company of nothings, and a company of alls, iv. 339. 

Is an imitation of God s communicable attributes, as goodness, wisdom, 
holiness, &c., and an application of his incommunicable, as sove- 



188 INDEX. 

reignty, eternity, dominion, majesty, glory, iv. 380 ; its tendency to 

have one common interest between God and our souls, 381 ; per 
fection of, is to love God for himself, 383. 
Received cannot justify the sinner, v. 80 ; in a creature, what it can do, 

what it cannot, 82. 

In the saints is a copy of the law, v. 85. 

In a creature cannot make satisfaction for the sin of a creature, v. 98. 
Its excellency is that it is a participation of the divine nature, v. 118. 
And misery correspond to corruption and guilt in sin, v. 382. 
Its freeness, vi. 94 ; its exceeding richness, ib. ; its sanctifying power, 95. 
Hath the greatest dowry that any creature, whether on earth or heaven, 

can have, vi. 184 ; wherein its excellency lies, ib. 
State of, cautious in judging of, vi. 821. 
Pelagian, semi-Pelagian, Jesuitical, and Arminian errors concerning, 

arise from men s mistakes as to the workings of grace in their own 

souls, vi. 332. 
Of the new covenant put into the hearts of believers, that they may 

answerably glorify the grace of God towards them in that covenant, 

vi. 345. 
The works of, upon the soul in this life, a strong argument that God 

hath provided glory for separate souls hereafter, vii. 414. 
Free, we must lay hold on, according as it is set forth in the covenant 

of grace, viii. 194 ; renouncing all self, 195 ; in the free sovereignty 

of it, 196 ; in the fulness and the extent of its freeness, ib. ; as that 

which is absolute, unchangeable, irrevocable, 197. 
Covenant of, is the transcript of election-decrees, ix. 11. 
Covenant of, is election purposes and designs put into promises, ix. 41. 
Not to be limited to the favour bestowed on sinners, ix. 95. 
Is the top perfection of God s name, ix. 128. 
Freedom of, ix. 129. 
Set out, not only by the greatness of the gift, but by the freeness and 

absoluteness of giving it, ix. 162. 
Of God threefold ; his purposing grace ; his dispensatory grace ; and 

the grace that is in his nature, ix. 235. 
Pardoning more conspicuous in some, sanctifying in others, ix. 249 ; 

God of all, what the name implies, 252. 
All that is in God engaged to succour us against temptation, ix. 258 ; 

secured to all the elect, 259 ; abundance of, 262. 
Discriminating of the elect more conspicuously seen by a comparison of 

them with temporaries than with those who were never called, ix. 270. 
All principles of, impressed on the heart at first calling, ix. 278. 
Sufficient, controversy about, ix. 279. 

And sin are adequately and commensurately opposite, ix. 315. 
All God s purposes and dispensations of, are by Jesus Christ, ix. 338. 
Does not only have relation to sinners, as mercy has, ix. 344 ; hence 

election of grace does not necessarily presuppose the fall, 346. 
Covenant of, engrafted upon the natural family covenant, ix. 433. 
Twofold, corresponding to guilt and corruption, x. 47. 
Loss of, not only a punishment for sin, but itself a sin, x. 58. 
Illustrated and glorified by all God s dealings with all men, x. 187. 
Distance between states of nature and, x. 254. 

Or holiness, a preparation unto glory, xii. 6 ; its subject, the soul, "7. 
And glory, made to suit and match each other, xii. 26. 
Not weighed in the scales, but tried with a touchstone, iii. 321. 



INDEX. 189 

Graces, not gifts, in prayer, move God, iii. 400. 

In the heart, are evidences of Christ in us, but are not the objects of 
faith, iv. 3. 

Are the members of the new man, iv. 585. 

And duties, cannot satisfy our consciences, much less God s justice, iv. 13. 

All are in all saints, though not all in each, ix. 253. 

Are all of a knot ; break one, and all fall asunder, ix. 315. 
GREAT INTEREST OF STATES AND KINGDOMS, xii. 31. 

Growth of Christians, depends upon their union, as members, to Christ their 
head, iii. 458 ; makes up the fulness of Christ mystical, 459. 

Of Christians depends upon the appointment and promise of God, iii. 459. 

In grace, to be apprehended by faith rather than sense, iii. 462 ; not 
so discernible as conversion, ib. ; rate of, not uniform, 463 ; not to 
be measured by growth in gifts or abilities, 464 ; nor success towards 
others in the "exercise of gifts, 465 ; nor by opportunities of doing 
good, 466 ; nor by spiritual joy, ib. 

In grace, not to be measured by joy and spiritual nourishment, iii. 
466 ; nor by increase in outward professing, ib. ; nor by some one 
kind or sort of duties, 467 ; by the adding of one grace to another, 
470 ; by additions of new degrees of the same grace, 471 ; by in 
creased spirituality in duties, ib. ; by growing more and more rooted 
in Christ, 472 ; by bringing forth fruits more in season, ib. ; by 
growing more constant in performances, and more even in a godly 
course, ib. ; by doing duties still, though difficulties be greater, and 
means less, 473 ; by growing more wise and faithful, to lay out abi 
lities and opportunities to the best advantage, ib. 
GUILTINESS, BEFOKE GOD, AN UNREGENERATE MAN S, IN RESPECT OF SIN AND 

PUNISHMENT, x. 1. 

Hagyai, his prophecy of the shaking of all things, compared with Paul s ex 
position of it, v. 450 ; comprehends the shaking and removal of all 
things, through the whole dispensation of the gospel, that are hostile 
to the kingdom of Christ, 451 ; any interpretation that confines it to 
anything short of this, involves either defect or absurdity, 456; 
includes the conversion of the Roman world from heathenism, the 
Reformation from popery, and revolutions of states and kingdoms, 
458 ; the last days of the gospel the special time for perfecting these 
changes, 459. 

< Hallowed be thy name, a petition of a higher key than Thy kingdom come, 
iv. 376. 

Hand, right, of God, i. 470. . 

Hardness of heart in sinning is an effect of having sinned much against kno 
ledge before, iv. 181. 

Harvest (Rev. xiii. 14-17), what, iii. 88. 

Hatred may be understood of a lesser love in comparison with a far greater, 
ix. 156. 

Head, Christ the head of his church, i. 545. 

Headship of Christ, comprehends all his offices, i. 549. 

HEART OF CHRIST IN HEAVEN TO SINNERS ON EARTH, iv. 95. 

HEART AND LIFE, GOSPEL HOLINESS IN, vii. 129. 

Heart, trials of its spirituality, i. 417. 

Of the believer, through its weakness as a creature, misunderstanding 
the testimony of the Spirit, produces distress and dulness, in. 24 J ; 
more especially as a sinful creature, ib. 



190 INDEX. 

God puts prayer into his people s, iii. 375 ; he does this when he will 

have any great matter done, as the return from Babylon, 376 ; he 

quiets, and calms, and contents the heart in prayer, ib. 
Sanctified, converts and digests all into spiritual, useful thoughts, 

iii. 513. 

Natural, cannot produce anything that is good, ix. 8. 
Renewal of, is the fruit of election grace, ix. 11. 
Humble and contrite, are a greater throne for God than the local 

heavens, ix. 123. 
Of man not to be trusted more than the veriest thief or adulterer in the 

world, x. 33. 
Searching of, what it is, x. 170 ; error in, arises either from men s 

viewing their hearts undivided in the gross, and not dividing between 

soul and spirit ; or else from viewing them only apart, and not in 

their concurrence with each other, 173. 
Heathen, their expectation of a Saviour grounded on a tradition of the first 

promise, v. 173. 

Their boasts regarding right reason, vi. 245. 
Deficiency of their virtue, vi. 279 ; left out God even in their highest 

attainments, 301. 
Acknowledged that men are evil, and were unable to account for it, 

x. 6. 
Heaven, why called an inheritance, i. 311. 

All besprinkled with Christ s blood, iv. 77. 

How Christ prepares a place in, for his people, iv. 99 ; writes their 

names upon the doors of the mansions with his own blood, ib. 
In what sense purified with blood, v. 415. 
Consists in the beholding of Christ, v. 548. 
Unsuited to carnal hearts, vi. 183. 

Its glories, and the happiness of glorified saints there, vii. 456. 
Is the kindness of God, heaped upon kindness, and continued, in the 

fulness of it, to all eternity, ix. 212. 

Not simply joy and happiness, but glory won by conquest, ix. 401. 
Heavenly places, i. 56. 
Hebrews, Epistle to, the top notion of it (xtpaXaiov) is the eternal priesthood 

of Christ in heaven, iv. 60. 
In Epistle to, the apostle asserts nothing but what he proves out of 

the Old Testament, iv. 443. 
Epistle to, its author uncertain, v. 525 ; speaks of Christ s priesthood 

more than any other book of Scripture, ib. ; written to Christian 

Jews, ib. 
Heirs of God, Christians are, not only in the sense that they are heirs of 

God s property, but in the sense that God himself is their inherit 
ance, iv. 311. 
Hell, called the place of the giants, ii. 73. 

Above measure fearful, as sin is above measure sinful, iv. 160. 

Christ did not literally descend into, but endured the wrath of God, 

which is its substance, v. 284. 

Souls in, remember what they were in this world, what sins they com 
mitted, what pleasures they enjoyed, vi. 461. 
Reman, his case, i. 445. 

One of the wisest of men, next to Solomon, acquired wisdom by his 

doubts and temptations, iii. 289. 
Heresies, not surprising that they arise, x. 252. 



INDEX. 191 

Herod, in beheading John, sinned against knowledge, iv. 180. 
Highlander, exclamation of one on the necessity for a mediator, v. 174. 
HIGH, MOST, God, being so called, imports his dwelling in heaven, vii. 18 ; 
his dignity and dominion, ib. ; the transcendency and super-excel 
lency of his divine being in itself, as utterly of another kind from that 
of the creatures, 15. 

High priest, his office under the law had two parts, oblation or offering the 
sacrifice, and presentation of it in the holy of holies, iv. 57 ; the 
latter was his distinction from the other priests, 59. 

Went into the holy of holies, stripped of all his gaudy robes, iv. 499. 

Alone performed the services of the day of atonement, v. 432. 
Holiest, into which Christ is entered, and to which we have access, is the 
highest heavens, v. 389 ; what is meant by our entering into ? 390. 
HOLINESS, GOSPEL, IN THE HEART AND LIFE, vii. 129. 
Holiness, the fruit of election, i. 86 : necessary to salvation, 88 ; what it is, 
383 ; a resurrection, 439. 

Of God is his beauty ; its image is ours, iv. 154. 

True, is the imitation or image of God s own nature, iv. 380. 

Of Christ, hath a transcendency above that of all creatures, iv. 467. 

As well as justice of God, done honour to in the sacrifice of Christ, iv. 119. 

Consists in a conformity of spirit to the things which God willeth or 
commandeth, and having God s glory set up in our hearts as our ut 
most end, vi. 152. 

In any or all of our faculties, consists in setting up God as our chief 
end, vi. 272. 

Of heart, the main and ultimate birth brought forth in regeneration, 
vi. 389 ; consists in a real conformity to the written word, and the 
living Word, 390. 

Is the dreadful name of God, vii. 15 ; imports separation from all the 
creatures, ib. ; is the most glorious of all his attributes, ib. 

Its effects upon the understanding, vii. 139. 

Glory and majesty of, viii. 274 ; not inconsistent with the insults and 
oppositions made to the people of God, 277 ; how to be manifested and 
preserved, 284 ; by innocence and harmlessness, 285 ;_ by doing 
good to all as much as -lies in our power, 286 ; wherein it may ap 
pear, 287 ; in shewing forth the graces of Christ, ib. ; abounding 
much in holy duties, ib. ; in consistency, 289 : in acting with reality 
and fervency of spirit, ib. ; in unselfishness, ib. ; in constancy and 
evenness, 290 ; in brotherly kindness, ib. 

Immutability of, could only be imparted to a creature of grace, ix. 4. 

Keeping of saints in, the necessary means to their attaining of union 
with God, ix. 136. 

Flows from election, ix. 161. 

The proper fruit of election, ix. 186. 

True, cannot be without faith, ix. 286 ; is the proper fruit of the cove 
nant of grace, 287. 

Is the law of God written in the heart, x. 57. 

Seen in the holy and spiritual law of God, x. 419 ; in the character of 

Christ, 420 ; in heaven, 422 ; what it is, 423. 

Holv of holies ; two things in it specially represented Christ ; the ark which 
abode there continually, and the person of the high priest, who en 
tered it once a year, v. 435 ; the former typified his person, the lat 
ter his office, ib. 
Holy city, the kingdoms of Europe, iii. 124. 



192 INDEX. 

HOLY GHOST, WORK OF, IN OUR SALVATION, vi. 3. 

Holy Ghost, why called the Spirit of promise, i. 246, 249. 

Dwells and continues in and upon Christ for ever in heaven, iv. 118 ; 
descended as a dove, to shew the gracious disposition wherewith 
Christ was endowed for his office, ib. ; rests on him more abundantly 
now in heaven than while on earth, 120. 

Translates the mystery of Christ s sufferings, death, resurrection, &c., 
into intelligible language, iv. 264. 

Does not generally get the glory due to him, vi. 3 ; his work for us in 
its kind as great as that of the Father or the Son, ib. ; procession of, 
not merely dispensatory, but substantial, 5 ; his office as a com 
forter, ib. ; a Spirit of truth, ib. ; a shewer of things to come, ib. ; a 
sanctifier, ib. ; the inditer of prayers, 7 ; a converter and convincer 
of the world, ib. ; wrought regeneration even in the Old Testament 
saints, but came in a more signal manner after Christ s ascension, 3 ; 
Old Testament prophecies of this coming, ib. ; his appearance at 
Christ s baptism the consecration of the head, at Pentecost of the 
members, 9 ; his operations upon Christ, 11 ; formed his human 
nature in the womb, ib. ; question whether he formed the union 
betwixt the divine and human nature, ib. ; consecrated him to be the 
Christ, ib. ; anointed him to all his offices, 12 ; endowed him with 
power to do all his miracles, ib. ; raised him from the dead, ib. ; 
filled him with glory when he ascended, 13 ; anointed him as king 
of heaven, ib. ; proclaims him king in men s hearts, ib. ; his work 
upon the church, ib. ; was the first founder of the church of the New 
Testament, ib. ; supplies and blesses the means of the church s edi 
fication, 14 ; is the administrator of Christ s will, 15 ; what he doth 
for every particular saint, 16 ; in regeneration is the author of the 
new creature, 17 ; convinces of sin and humbles for it, 18 ; works 
repentance, 19 ; and faith, ib. ; how he witnesseth on earth along 
with the water and the blood, 27 ; the whole work of sanctification 
wrought by, 28 ; habitual holiness, 29 ; mortification of sin and 
deadness to the world, ib. ; the implantation of all graces, 30 ; and 
the drawing of them forth into act, 31 ; warrant to pray to, 32 ; 
produces all the spiritual strength we receive for resisting tempta 
tions, ib. 

Is a Spirit of counsel to the understanding, vi. 33 ; and a persuader of 
the will, ib. ; all growth in grace, from first to last, attributed to, 34 ; 
the acceptance of our fruits and our persons by God is from, 35 ; his 
blessing alone makes the means of grace effectual, 36 ; supports in 
death, 37 ; raises the dead, 38 ; fellowship to be sought with, as a 
distinct person, 39 ; his indwelling, 41 ; his exceeding love shewn 
in his indwelling, 42 ; heinousness of resisting, 44 ; and danger, 45 ; 
why especially called Holy, 47 ; communion, both in the whole, and 
in every part of it, attributed to, 48 ; reasons for this, 49 ; it is in 
a correspondency to the creation of the first man, 49 ; it is in a con 
formity to his work with respect to Christ, 50 ; viewed as the gift of 
the Father to us, 51 ; the donor is the Father, through Christ, 52 ; 
the gift is from mere grace and love, 53 ; differences of his working 
upon servants and upon sons, 55 ; he is a person indwelling, and 
not merely an influence, 58 ; first comes upon us immediately, as we 
are in our uncleanness and pollution, 60 ; is not defiled thereby, 62 ; 
his indwelling is by his person primarily and immediately, by his 
graces secondarily, 63 , his indwelling more special than that of the 



INDEX. 193 

Father or the Son, 64 ; his indwelling in us, the same as in the 
man Christ Jesus, 66 ; is infinitely greater than all his gifts, 67 ; 
the whole, both of grace and glory, included in, 69 ; to be vehe 
mently prayed for, ib. ; his indwelling is the fountain of spiritual 
life, compared with the soul s dwelling in the body as a principle of 
lite, 1 1. 

Holy Ghost, doth not only move and stir us up to all good actions which 
we do, but in the work of conversion produceth in us living and 
lasting principles of a constant holy life, vi. 191. 
Not specially called merciful in Scripture, but called good, viii. 45 ; five 

offices ascribed to, 46. 

Sin against, is a settled revenge against God, ix. 253. 
Holy people, in Daniel, the witnesses in Revelation, iii. 114. 
Honesty and religion of unregenerate men, are but relics of the first image 
defaced, which God hath put into corrupt nature, lest men should be 
devils upon earth, x. 419. 
Honour of God, of more value than all creatures and all worlds, v. 96. 

Offences against, from inferior to superior, do most transcend satisfac 
tion, v. 492. 

Hope, believers called to, i. 806. 
* Hope of righteousness, what it implies, vi. 42. 
Horses, in the Revelation represent angels, iii. 32. 

Horse, white represents the preaching of the gospel, iii. 35 ; red signifies 
war, ib. ; the black represents famine, 36 ; and the pale, all God s 
plagues let loose at once, 37. 
Humanity of Christ hath more worth or dignity communicated to it than 

could be in all creatures, v. 105. 
Humiliation, defective, if it rest in the general notion that men are sinners, 

iv. 23. 
Is a conformity to Christ, and a beginning of the revealing of Christ 

in us, iv. 346. 

Humility of the world is a proud humility, vi. 224. 

Husbandman, how the Father is the, iii. 438 ; he engrafts and implants all 
the branches into the vine, ib. ; he appoints what fruit the branches 
shall produce, ib. ; he daily purges the branches, ib. 

Hypocrites, their punishment made the regula of those of other sinners, 
iv. 177. 

Ignorance, sinning in, does not make the fact not to be a sin, but it lesseneth 

it, iv. 164 ; must be repented of in the general, 165. 
He who lives in, is condemned only by the law ; he who sins against 

knowledge, by himself also, iv. 169. 
Without excuse under the gospel, v. 538. 
Ignorant, and out of the way, correspond to the two classes of transgressors 

under the law, iv. 129. 

And profane, their resistance to conviction, x. 379 ; their pleas con 
sidered and answered, 383. 
Image of God in Christ threefold, iv. 267. 

Of God in Jesus Christ more excellent than that in the law, iv. 318. 
Of God in Christ, essential, as he is second person, manifestative as 

God-man, iv. 462 ; in what the latter consists, 463. 
Of Christ, as found in us on earth, is a conformity to all his graces, 
vi. 222 ; a conformity to his example, 228 ; superiority of, to the 
image of God in which Adam was made, 229. 
VOL. xn. N 



194 INDEX. 

Image of God in Adam, destroyed by his first sin, x. 48 ; called the glory of 

God, 54. 

IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY DEMONSTRATED, xii. 1. 
Impatience, under desertion, to be avoided, iii. 315. 
Impediments that keep men from Christ, self-righteousness and worldliness, 

iii. 350. 
Importunity, when joined with submission to God s will, is an evidence of 

God s design to answer prayer, iii. 380. 

Imputation of Adam s sin to us is by derivation, of ours to Christ by volun 
tary assumption, v. 182. 

Of Adam s sin, denied by those who deny the imputation of Christ s 
righteousness, x. 12 ; proved at length from Rom. v. 12, &c., ib. 

Of sin to Christ, different from that of Adam s sin to his posterity, 

x. 54. 

In Christ, bearing fruit, what ? iii. 445. 

Incarnation of Christ, predicted in the Old Testament, iv. 438 ; the eter 
nally begotten Son, and the man made of a woman, are but one Son 
still, not two Sons, and therefore also one person, 440 ; proved from 
the account of his conception, ib. ; and from the constant tenor of 
his speech about himself, ib. ; the two natures are represented as 
making up one I or one he, 443 ; they remain in him distinct, and 
make up one person, 444 ; this distinction of his nature taught in 
the Old Testament as well as the New, 445 ; all the rights of 
the Son of God by inheritance given to the man Jesus, 446 ; the 
attributes proper to God given to this man, ib. ; spoken of him who 
is man, not as a man, ib. ; so the infirmities of human nature are 
attributed to God, ib. ; the obedience and bloodshed of the man 
called the blood of God, 447. 

Of Christ, a glorious exhibition of Divine power, iv. 479 ; by it God 
has given a pledge of love to the creature as such, 480 ; by means 
of it, men being united to Christ are brought into closer communion 
with God than could have been possible in any other way, 481. 

Of Christ, nothing similar to it in the works of nature, v. 19 ; revela 
tion of, is the greatest argument to prove the truth of our religion, 20. 

Of Christ, necessary to his mediatorship, v. 44 ; that he might be 
able to offer himself a sacrifice, ib. ; that he might be a reconciler, 
he must become a middle person, 45 ; he must become some way 
subject to God ratione officii, ib ; must be effected by the assumption 
of some creature, and that creature must be rational, ib. ; must be 
holy, ib. ; therefore must be either the angelic or the human nature, 
ib. ; reasons why the latter is preferable in respect of fitness, 46. 

Of Christ, the wondrousness of it, v. 66. 

Of Christ, corresponds to our first parents desire to be as gods, v. 109 ; 
is the foundation of his satisfaction, but not part of it, 110. 

Of Christ, the foundation of all his satisfaction, but no part of it, 
v. 193. 

Of the Son of God, the greatest work of wonder that God ever did in 
the world, vi. 418 ; concurrence of the three persons of the Godhead 
in, ib. 

Incense, a type of prayer, iv. 62. 

Inclinations, aggravation of their inordinacy, in regard of their conversion 
to what is evil, x. 297 ; carry us clean against reason, 299 ; if our 
be not satisfied, nothing else can please us, as long as that fit lasts, 
ib. ; their unreasonableness, 300 ; their being whetted by the dim"- 



INDEX. 195 

culty of obtaining their object, ib. ; their nntameableness, ib. ; their 

unsatisfiedness, ib. ; grounds and causes of their inordinacy, 301. 
Indefiniteness of God s mind declared concerning his intent of saving but 

some, a sufficient ground for faith, viii. 246. 
Independency of Christ, such an attribute as could not be communicated to 

a mere creature, iv. 466. 

Indiscretion may be in the carrying on of a good cause, v. 217. 
Indwelling of God the perfection of grace, ix. 116 ; is only in the humble 

and contrite, 124. 
Infants, why death reigns over them, ii. 185. 

Have not sinned after the similitude of Adam s transgression ,. x. 6. 
Infirmities, may be either the evil of afflictions or of sin, or of both, iv. 111. 
Inheritance, lot of the, i. 207 ; received by faith, 209 ; God himself our, 

261 ; riches of, 312 ; God s, in the saints, 317. 
Innocent I., claimed power over other bishops,, iii. 74 ; excommunicated the 

eastern emperor Arcadius, 75. 
Institution may be either by express command, or by example, promise, 

hint, or implicit intimation, xi. 22 ; when many things that God 

hath instituted, being put together, do necessarily infer something 

else, that also is an institution, 25 ; the use of man s reason about is 

only to find out what they are, 27. 
Integrity, twofold, absolute and comparative, vi. 352. 
Intelligence, simple, i. 100. 
Intercession of Christ, its influence to our justification and salvation, iv. 566 ; 

the most excellent part of his priesthood, 57. 
Our first justification to be ascribed to, yet more eminently ordained 

for accomplishing our salvation, iv. 64 ; is the virtual continuation 

of Christ s sacrifice, ib. ; is the perpetuation of his priesthood, for 

his glory, 67 ; its immediate and direct end is the salvation of all the 

elect, 68. 
Of Christ is absolute, not conditional, iv. 69 ; in it, as well as in his 

work on earth, he is a surety, 70. 
Of Christ, its prevalency, argued from the person pleading, iv. 71 ; his 

nearness to the Father, 71 ; the obedience he hath rendered to the 

Father, 74 ; the satisfaction he hath made to justice, 76 ; this power 

put into his hands, 79. 
Of Christ, its prevalency argued from the person pleaded with, iv. 82; 

an advocate with the Father, ib. ; his Father, 83 ; our Father, 85. 
Of Christ, no man ever loses an interest in, ix. 360 ; privilege and 

benefit of it unspeakable, ib. ; always precedes our prayers, &. ; 

always prevails, 361. 

Intermediate state is a life, vii. 346 ; for the saints, a life of glory, S04 
Inventions, human, in worship, the great quarrel in the Reformed churches, 

iii. 146. 

Invisibility of God, an object of the apostle s praise, iv. d90. 
Invocation to God, suited to the nature of the blessing sought lor, x. 1^&. 
Irenaus, his interpretation of the number of the beast, m. 73. 
Isaac, the most eminent type of Christ, v. 225, 
Israel, their deliverance from Egypt, _ an illustration of the way o 

working in answer to prayer, iii. 385. -99 

Israelites, difference between outward and true, put upon ele 

Jacob, an example of election, ix. 11. .. 1ftn 

James does not contradict the doctrine of justification by faith, vn. ISO. 



196 INDEX. 

James, Epistle of, its main design, ix. 289 ; the discovery of false professors, 

290 ; exposition of chap. i. 292. 

Japhet, fulfilment of Noah s blessing or prophecy concerning, ix. 77. 
Jealousy, the greatest wrong that can be done to friendship, vii. 211. 
Jekoshaphat, an example of relapsing into sin, iii. 420. 

An example of partial sanctification, ix. 391. 
JEHOVAH, the name of God s essence, the Jews everywhere throughout the 

world forbear from pronouncing, iv. 519. 

JEHOVAH, the chiefest name of God, never given, or to be given to any creature, 
viii. 26 ; its first revelation, with God s own comment upon it, was 
to betoken and be a sign of mercy, ib. 

JEHOVAH, wholly and abstractly imports being, viii. 29 ; imports that he alone 
hath true being, 30 ; that his being is of himself, 81 ; that he is the 
fountain of being to all things that have being, ib. ; that he is first 
and last in being, 37 ; that he is from everlasting to everlasting, 40 ; 
that he is immutable, 41. 

Jerome, agrees with the Pelagians and the modern Quakers in the error that 
the light of God in nature, and the light of moral good in the con 
science, are the grace of Christ, iv. 844. 
Jerusalem, New, i. 312. 

Destruction of, by Nebuchadnezzar and by Titus, said by Josephus to 

have taken place on the same day of the month, v. 461. 
Jesuits, their attempt to put a slur on the doctrine of God s absolute limited 

decrees, iv. 513. 

JESUS CHRIST, KNOWLEDGE OF GOD THE FATHER AND, iv. 347. 
Jesus Christ, in all his glories, is the great and eminent subject of the 

gospel, iv. 263 ; why termed the wisdom and power of God, 267. 
Jesus, the man, wondered that God should dwell personally in him, ix. 121. 
Jewish Church, had the same sacraments, in substance, that we have, vii. 

307 ; this was an aggravation of their sin, 308. 

Government of, no certain rule for that of the church of Christ, xi. 196. 
Jews, their stumbling, i. 199 ; first fruits of, 221. 
Call, to come suddenly, iii. 204. 
Their land no bigger than Wales, iv. 331. 
Did not expect their Messiah to be divine, iv. 441. 
Privileges of believers since the ascension of Christ above theirs, v. 898. 
Still adhere to such observances of the ceremonial law as their exile 

will permit, v. 458. 
Their prejudice against the Gentiles not easily or quickly removed, v. 

466. 

Their rejection of the gospel, a great exercise to Paul s spirit, and a 
shrewd objection against Christianity, ix. 15 ; resolved into election, 
16. 

Said to spit at the name of Christ, ix. 40. 
Job, his patience, ii. 437, 452. 

Supposed by some to have been intended as a type among the Gen 
tiles, of Christ in his agony, iii. 288. 

His friends, defect of their knowledge of the judgments of God, iv. 285. 
His confession of the multitude of his sins, x. 477. 
John wrote his Gospel and Epistles with the special view of confuting errors 

which had sprung up respecting the person of Christ, iv. 452. 
In his Gospel many things are said of Christ, first as he is God, and 

then as he is God-man, iv. 465. 
Jonah, the prophet, was a Galilean, v. 156. 



INDEX. 197 

Jonah, a type of Christ in other respects besides being in the whale s belly, 

ix. \)2t. 
Joseph, his affection to his father and brothers in his advancement, iv. 122. 

A type of Christ, v. 150 ; a Nazarite, ib. 

Joy at the accomplishment of what a man prayed for along with others, a 
proof to him that his prayers had a share in the procuring of it, 
iii. 873, 

Does not always accompany an act of faith, iv. 331. 
Fulness of, springs only from communion with God, viii. 394. 
Jndah, called a lion, why, iii. 10 ; a lawgiver, 12. 
Judas, curse on, ii. 54. 

Iscariot, specially aimed at in the parable of the vine as a fruitless 

branch, iii. 441. 
Aggravations of his sin, iv. 179. 
His hard-heartedness, v. 200. 
Acting of natural conscience in, vi. 245. 
The most eminent instance of a temporary on record, ix. 273. 
Jude, his epistle a counterpart of 2 Peter, iv. 52. 

Object of his epistle to distinguish between true and false professors, 
ix. 195 ; exposition of the epistle, 196-230 ; written after the death 
of most of the apostles, 197. 
Judge of the mysteries of the gospel, who is, iv. 304 ; opinion of the Soci- 

nians, ib. ; the papists, ib. 

God was to the people of Israel in a double sense, v. 423. 
Judgment, day of, a long day, i. 196. 

Final, is to respect this life only, not the intermediate state, vii. 161. 
Judgment shewn to the Gentiles, means the doctrine of free grace and the 

gospel, iv. 119. 
Judgments of God in Scripture are as well his works of mercy as of justice, 

iv. 273. 
Are God s blood-hounds, which in the end find out sin and sinners, 

vii. 545. 

Practical, concerning spiritual things, differences of those of the re 
generate and those of the unregenerate, x. 179 ; the unregenerate 
may, in the general, apprehend spiritual things to be good, and the 
best things too, 183 ; but are unable to apprehend them as good when 
they come to be acted, 184 ; do not apprehend them to be good for 
them, 185 ; though notionally they may be convinced that a state of 
grace would be better for them, yet the affection is not strong, 187. 
Julian, attempted to restore the Jewish sacrifices, iii. 157. 
JUST MEN, AN IMMEDIATE STATE OF GLORY FOR, xii. 1. 
Justice and free grace, the attributes of God most eminently concerned in 

our salvation, iv. 61. 
Requires God to discharge sinners whose debt has been paid by Christ, 

iv. 214. 
Of God more manifested in putting to death his own Son for imputed 

sin, than if a world of worlds had been damned, iv. 230. 
Justification, Romish notion of, ii. 316 ; our, in Christ when he rose, 333. 
In what sense it is by the resurrection of Christ, iv. 38 ; on believin g 
a copy of the sentence passed on Christ s resurrection, ib. ; called a 
quickening, 41. 

Has two parts, acquittance from sin, and the giving of a title to eternal 
life, iv. 51 ; the first secured by Christ s death and resurrection, the 
second by his ascension, ib. 



198 INDEX. 

Justification, matter of it in Christ s death, virtual in his resurrection, actual 
when we believe, iv. 64 ; can neither be frustrated by old sins coming 
into remembrance, nor by new sins committed, 65. 

Is separable from our graces, but condemnation is inseparable from our 
sins, v. 100. 

Its fulness and completeness, v. 187. 

Three parts of it, taking away the guilt of actual sin, bestowal of posi 
tive righteousness, and not charging against us the corruption of our 
nature, v. 352. 

God will have all the glory of it to be his own and his Son Christ s, v. 366. 

Romanist distinction between first and final, vi. 21. 

Wholly of grace, vi. 93. 

Is by faith only, as well after conversion as in conversion, vi. 104. 

Glorifies Christ s righteousness, vi. 182. 

Changes a man s state legally and forensically, regeneration physically, 
vi. 409. 

Consistency of Paul s and James s doctrines respecting, vii. 182. 

Two things in, the righteousness imputed, which is Christ s, and the 
act of imputation, which is of God primarily, viii. 134. 

An individual act, yet three several steps in it, viii. 134 ; the first, at the 
first covenant-making from all eternity, 135 ; the second, at Christ s 
resurrection, ib. ; the third, on our believing, 137 ; all these depend 
upon Christ, and upon our being one with him, by stipulation, repre 
sentation, and personally, 139. 

Is by faith, not as it is an act put forth by us, or a quality in us, but 
by reason of the objects it lays hold on, viii. 299. 

Is a single act, yet continued and renewed every day, ix. 224. 

By Christ s righteousness, an act of power, x. 17. 

Relates to guilt, sanctification to corruption, x. 43. 
JUSTIFYING FAITH, OBJECTS AND ACTS OF, viii. 1. 

Keys, power of, in what character given to Peter, xi. 54 ; imply the forma 
tion of companies of believers, 59. 
King of England, affecting speech of one, v. 266. 
Kings of the nations, are as constables under Christ, iii. 224. 
Why their hearts are unsearchable, iv. 272. 
And states, dangerous to them to deal otherwise than well with God s 

saints, xii. -36. 
Kingdom of Satan, ii. 36. 

Of God, an object of praise, both as seated in himself and as exercised 

towards his creation, iv. 388. 

Dispensatory, of Christ to be given up to the Father, iv. 499. 
A natural, due to Christ as a divine person, xii. 84 ; a dispensatory, as 
he is mediator, ib. ; the former remains for ever, something of the 
latter is to be given up, 85. 

Kingdoms, ten set up in Europe between A.D. 413 and 450, iii. 55. 
Kindness of God, ii. 276, 305. 
Knights of the post, that will speak or write anything, whereby they may get 

gain and preferment, sin against knowledge, iv. 173. 
KNOWLEDGE, AGGEAVATIONS OF SINNING AGAINST, iv. 163. 

OF GOD THE FATHER AND HIS SON JESUS CHRIST, iv. 347. 
Knowledge, in the Scripture sense, what, i. 284 ; spiritual, the main thing in 
working grace, 283 ; sanctifying, 285 ; of God, what, 288 ; spiritual, 
what, 299 ; of Christ, true and false compared, 378. 



INDEX. 199 

Knowledge, some sins against knowledge utterly exclude from mercy, iv. 166 ; 
of God and his ways, the greatest mercy, next to saving grace, & ; even 
erroneous puts an obligation on a man, 168. 

What it is to sin against, iv. 169 ; one thing to sin with, another 
against, ib.; men sin against, either directly, collaterally, objectionallv 
or circumstantially, 170 ; directly, when they abuse knowledge to help 
them to sin, 171 ; when they use their wisdom to cover their sins, 
ib. ; when they use moral or religious pretences to dissemble their sins, 
ib. ; when^they neglect the getting of knowledge which might keep them 
from sinning, ib. ; when they hate the light, and endeavour to extin 
guish it, 172 ; when they hold opinions against their knowledge, 173 ; 
when they conceal their knowledge, ib. ; endeavour to suppress it, 
ib, ; when they would make others sin against their consciences, 174 ; 
rules for measuring sin against, 178, et seq. 

Different kinds of, against which men sin, iv. 181 ; the inbred light of 
nature, ib. ; the light of education, 1 82 ; real and experimental light, 
from the examples of godly men, or the observations of God s dealings 
with themselves or others, 183 ; knowledge joined with a taste of the 
bitterness of sin, &c., 184 ; professed knowledge, ib. ; to refuse will 
damn as much as to abuse, 186. 

The choicest of God s gifts, iv. 293. 

A form of, that is not true knowledge, as of godliness that is not true 
godliness, iv. 295. 

Of Christ in heaven and in the gospel, in what respects they differ, 
iv. 320. 

Outward is merely a phantasma, that of Christ is a hypostasis, iv. 335. 

Of Christ by faith, so real a thing that it is called Christ in a man, iv. 
321. 

Of the eternal transactions of God the Father for man s salvation ; the 
highest attainment of fathers in Christ, v. 7. 

Of the gospel without grace, leads either to presumption or to legalism, 
vi. 233. 

Natural, though improved and quickened to the height, not sufficient to 
work regeneration, vi, 375, 

Of God by his saints, greater after the day of judgment than before, 
vii. 39. 

Of spiritual things in the hearts of men, of two sorts, vii. 494 ; affection 
of the regenerate towards different spiritual objects not always pro 
portioned to their knowledge of them, 495. 

Of the Father and his grace not sufficient without knowledge of Christ, 
viii. 170. 

Knowledge of God twofold ; one by his effects, the other by his presence 
with the soul, ix. 214. 

Even of natural or civil things, exceeding shallow in the wisest men, x. 143 ; 
most of it is from a new gift of God, ib. ; of things heavenly, none 
without supernatural light and assistance, 144. 

Of spiritual things that the unregenerate may have, its difference from 
that which the regenerate have, x. 158 ; is not merely in degree, ib. ; 
the one is speculative or barely knowing knowledge, the other affect 
ing knowledge, 159 ; the one is by hearsay, the other by contact, 
162 ; the regenerate man s is through the Spirit of God dwelling m 
him, who perfectly knows the things of God, 163; the regenerate 
man hath a sight of things by faith, which the other hath not, 164 ; 
a godly man s is evident, 165 ; and satisfying, 166. 



200 INDEX. 

LAMB slain, Christ why called, iii. 10, 215. 

That was slain, hath seven eyes for all knowledge, and seven horns for 

all power, iv. 141. 

Lamps, seven, denote the Holy Ghost, iii. 5. 
Last days, times of the gospel so called, v. 533 ; implying more than one 

period to have gone before, ib. 

Aarnvog, explained by Irena3us to be the number of the beast, v. 154. 
Law, dead to, what, i. 443 ; weak through the flesh, i. 389. 

Of God, in the heart of Christ ; a special law of love, mercy and pity 

to sinners, as mediator, over and above the moral law, iv. 114 ; this 

law is indelible in his heart, and is as strong now as when he was 

upon the cross, 115. 
Compared to a husband, as being the guide of the heart, iv. 167 ; and 

conscience, when they meet, make up but one law, 168. 
Glorious, both in the promulgation of it, and in the matter of it, iv. 315 ; 

moral, glorious as holding forth the image of God s mind, 316 ; was 

a copy of that originally written on the heart of Adam, 317. 
Moral, a glass to shew man to himself ; gospel, to shew God to him, 

iv. 823 ; ceremonial, was the gospel in shadows, ib. 
End of giving, to declare and shew forth God s justice and hatred 

of sin, v. 18 ; these ends fully accomplished by the substitution of 

Christ, ib. 
Is the pattern or original copy of the grace of saints, v. 85 ; consists of 

a preceptive and a penal part, ib. 
Of God is backed with his prerogative ; therefore his honour is injured 

by every sin, v. 94 ; in what senses fulfilled by Christ, 102. 
Its bond cancelled, v. 131 ; fulfilled by Christ s service and obedience, 

ib. ; his fulfilling of is as properly the obedience of God as his blood 

is the blood of God, 132 ; his obedience to it was complete, 133. 
We born under, Christ made under, v. 180. 

Of God to be fulfilled out of a principle of love and ingenuity, v. 221. 
Whatever it can say against us, Christ answers, v. 352. 
Of Moses, to the gospel, as earth is to heaven, v. 457. 
Satisfied, if the reason of making it be satisfied, v. 490. 
Why it must be prescribed, v. 512. 
The works or effects of it written in the heart or conscience by nature, 

distinguished from the law written in the inward parts by grace, 

vi. 234. 
Its bodily or literal, and its spiritual part, vi. 263 ; unregenerate men 

have but the form of the knowledge and truth of, 265. 
Mosaic, was a covenant subservient to the gospel, vi. 354 ; was not a 

covenant of salvation to the Jews as such, but only to the elect 

among them, 356. 
Necessary to work conviction, in order to conversion, vi. 362 ; its uses 

to men unregenerate, under conviction, and regenerate, 365. 
Writing on the heart, what is implied in, vi. 403. 
Of God reacheth to all that is in man, x. 57 ; in what sense the cause 

of sin, 60. 
Of God ; on every part of it his sovereignty and royal prerogative are 

enstamped, x. 113; hence every breach of it is an act of treason ; 

114 ; his image is enstamped on it, ib. 
Laws, human, all presuppose the corruption of man, x. 46. 
Learning, inordinate love of, a great sin, vi. 112. 
LETTERS, TWO, CONCERNING A CHURCH COVENANT, xi. 526. 



INDEX. 201 

Liberty and freedom which the gospel affords, the fruit of Christ s being 

bound, v. 229. 
Life m God, ii. 16; spiritual, the cause of all true mortification of sin, 

ii. 205. 

Spiritual life, what, ii. 207; why it cannot die, ii. 211. 
Of a Christian, made up of seeming contradictions, iv. 276. 
Of Christ in the believer, iv. 338. 
Eternal, Christ and we hold by different tenures ; he by nature and 

right, we by gift, iv. 367. 

Eternal, does^not only abide upon us, but in us, vi. 198. 
Hid with Christ, not in heaven merely, as a place, but in God, ix. 335. 
Light, between ordinary rational, and saving, there is a middle kind, iv. 184. 
Of God s countenance, vouchsafed to believers, iii. 239 ; the withdrawal 

of this for a time not inconsistent with God s love, 240. 
Arising from the sight of his own graces, vouchsafed to the believer, 
iii. 240 ; this is his comfort when the light of God s countenance is 
withdrawn, ib. ; when this also is withdrawn he is in darkness, ib. 
Want of, to see one s own graces, may consist with a state of grace, 

iii. 240 ; and with the continuance of his gracious influence, ib. 
In the soul of a Christian, by which he sees Jesus Christ, is created out 

of the darkness that is naturally in him, iv. 321. 
Of nature, both in the understanding and the conscience, is compara 
tively darkness, vi. 256. 
Of nature, its defects, x. 97. 

< Lights, Father of; explanation of the title, ix. 295. 
Lily, the new creature compared to, iii. 458. 
Lilies, of the Scriptures, are our tulips, ix. 299. 
Lion of the tribe of Judah, Christ why called, iii. 9, 215. 
Aoyog, in what sense the second person in the Godhead is called, iv. 415 ; 
not merely the idea of the creation in the mind of the Creator, 416 ; 
a person to whom God makes known all his designs, 417 ; John did 
not borrow the term from Plato, but from the Old Testament, 418 ; 
used by him in opposition to the Gnostics, ib. 

Lord, title of, one of the first given to Christ in the Old Testament, iv. 519; 
is of a larger extent than Saviour, ib. ; necessarily denotes and sup 
poses his divinity, ib. ; conferred upon him not with reference to his 
being second person, but to his office as God-man, 522 ; proofs of 
this, 523, et seq. 
Lord s Supper, not a commemorative sacrifice to God, but a remembrance of 

his sacrifice to men, iv. 65. 

Its intent, on G-od s part, to represent and exhibit the whole of Christ, 

as crucified for us, vii. 311 ; on our parts, publicly to solemnize and 

shew forth his death, with profession of our interest in his person, 

his death, and all the benefits thereof, ib. ; danger of profaning, 312. 

Whether it ought to be administered every Lord s day, xi. 388; whether 

a church may be divided into sections for the administration of, 415. 

Lordship of Christ implies his Sonship, iv. 351. 

Twofold, belongs to Christ, one absolute and underived, the other de 
rived, economical, dispensatory, iv. 522. 
Of Christ, parted into two administrations or commissions, one towards 

all things, the other towards us, iv. 530. 

Fitness of Christ to sustain the office of, both in relation to all things 
to be by him, and especially to the elect, iv. 525 ; his person fit for 
it, ib. ; a mere creature could not have been fit for this office, 526 ; 



202 INDEX. 

yet in order to be made Lord, he must be also a creature, ib. ; and 
the fittest creature is man, 528. 
Lordship, a main part of the mediatorial office, iv. 530. 

God s, over all things, not founded upon his being their Creator, but on 

a sovereignty in himself, iv. 547. 

Love, antecedent and consequent, i. 109 ; the guide of mercy, ii. 147 ; 
greatness of God s love set forth, 156 ; specialness of, 162 ; free, 
172 ; unchangeable and invincible, 173. 

Of God to his elect, not caused by the work of Christ, but expressed, 
iv. 86 ; Christ adds not one drop to his heart, only draws it out, ib. 

Christ s, towards his own which were in the world, iv. 97. 

Greatest exercise of, is in the reconciliation of enemies, v. 13. 

Works of, have, of all works, most delight in them, v. 487. 

Mercy and grace, distinguished, vi. 89 ; towards the elect, like a stream 
running underground till they are converted, 91. 

Proportioned to forgiveness, vi. 109. 

Is the principle immediately preceding holiness, vii. 133. 

God s, special properties and singularities by which it is commended to 
us, vii. 243 ; its priority, ib. ; its peculiarity, 245 ; its beneficence, 
246 ; his not only loving us, but delighting to love us, 248 ; its 
everlastingness, ib. ; its constancy and unchangeableness, 249. 

Must be to Christ, and to other objects subordinately, faith must be 
upon him alone, viii. 306. 

Is the foundation of mercy, ix. 98. 

To God, a proper note, and fruit, and effect of their calling, ix. 285. 
Love-feasts were not a church ordinance, xi. 389. 

Lowliness of Christianity, furnishes carnal men with reasons for not em 
bracing it, x. 388. 
Lust not only leads to sin, but is sin, x. 59. 

Inordinate in the heart, is flat and plain idolatry, x. 312 ; and is in 
many things worse than simple idolatry, 313 ; wrongful to the crea 
tures it is occupied about, ib. ; most injurious to the soul itself, 314. 
Lusts, having our conversation in, ii. 91 ; sinfulness of, 98 ; of the mind 
strongest, 113. 

All evil, are in the best of men, x. 59. 

Luther and his followers, represented by the third angel (Rev. xiii. 9-12), 
iii. 88. 

His fears and suspicions from misapprehending the righteousness of 

God, iv. 208. 
Lutherans, their doctrine of ubiquity, i. 478. 

Their error in holding the act of justifying faith to be an assured per 
suasion that our sins are pardoned, viii. 211. 

Magistrates, called gods, i. 489. 

Ministers, and people, as long as either hold by the truth, it will not be 
taken from the nation, iv. 248. 

And eminent men called gods in the Old Testament, because they 

were types of Christ, iv. 432. 

Malchus seems to have been the first to lay hands on Christ, v. 219. 
MAN S RESTORATION BY GRACE, vii. 519. 
Man, his misery by nature, ii. 5, 8, 22. 

The second, why Christ is called, ii. 134. 

The abstract and epitome of all the creatures, iv. 529, 542. 



INDEX. 203 

Man, nature of, a middle nature in creation, between the earthly and the 

heavenly, v. 42. 

As created, mutual fitness of him and the world prepared for him, vi. 166. 
Excellence of his nature as originally created, vii. 98. 
Not to be trusted since Adam fell, x. 32. 

Every part of him made to glorify God, x. 131 ; originally made en 
tirely holy, ib. ; spiritual objects and acts suited to every faculty, ib. ; 
all in him capable of glory, 132 ; not only his inferior powers, but the 
highest, corrupted, ib. 
Compared to a ship, x. 289. 

Manhood of Christ, not a person but a nature, v. 53 ; was our whole nature 
for substance in all the parts of it, 54 ; his body made out of the 
substance of the virgin, 56 ; his conception a new thing in the earth, 
58 ; though conceived not begotten, 59. 

Manasseh, commonly reckoned the greatest sinner whose pardon is related in 
the Old Testament, x. 475 ; his Prayer, though reckoned among 
the Apocrypha, yet is pious, and certainly expresseth the true sense 
of a deeply -humbled soul, ib. ; his confession runs mainly on the 
number of his sins, ib. 

< Manifestarians (who hold that Christ is only a manifestation of God) con 
futed, iv. 413 ; their system a trick of the devil, 450. 
Manifestation of God to his people, i. 293. 
Marcion, his apocryphal Gospel, iv. 337. 
Mark, name and number of names of the beast, what, iii. 68. 
Marriage into a wicked family may be an occasion of much evil to a man, 

v. 235. 
Martyrs, Book of, i. 250. 

Are the eldest sons of blessedness among all the sons of election, 

vii. 343. 

Martyrdom, a sacrifice, iii. 40 ; a perfection, 42. 
Measuring of the temple, what, iii. 116, 123, 128. 
Mede, his Apostasy of the Latter Times, quoted iv. 524. 

His explanation of the measuring of the temple examined, iii. 133. 
Mediation, Christ s, prevails for all the world, to put a stop to the proceed 
ings of justice, iv. 193. 
Mediator, end of his kingdom, i. 504. 

Necessary between sinners and God as a superior wronged, iv. 61. 
Christ not only of union but of reconciliation, v. 19. 
Man s conscience tells him of the need of one, v. 174. 
Mediatorship of Christ founded upon his person (mediatio operativa e v 

tione substantiali pendet), v. 48. 

Meekness of Moses, ii. 447, 458. r , 

That is, lowliness and submission, the grace most acceptable to I 

vii. 554 ; ariseth out of a conviction of sin, 574. ^ fv1 :fi p( i 

Melchisedec, his priesthood of a higher order than Aaron s,iv. 5 J , typ.ne 

Christ s priesthood in heaven rather than on earth 60, 6d. 
A type of Christ s eternity, iv. 411 ; and that as to the past as we! 

the future, 412. ... 

Men, sons of, the most eminent praisers oi <jpd, 111. ia. 
MEKCY, AGGRAVATIONS OF SINNING AGAINST, iv 189. 
Mercy natural to God, ii. 178 ; riches of, 182-190. 

More than goodness ; always respects misery, iv. 191. 
To sin against is to kick against God s bowels, iv. 202. 
Manages the whole plot of the gospel, iv. 2dl. 



204 INDEX. 

Mercy and grace, attributes of God, never saw the light till the gospel, iv. 
270. 

Of God is his greatest glory, iv. 325. 1 

And truth represented as God s harbingers, iv. 389. 

In pardoning one sinner greater than all goodness in preserving all the 
angels, v. 100. 

Manifestation of, has respect to misery, vi. 91. 

Eminency of, shewn in the work of regeneration, vi. 405. 

Shewn in regeneration, an incitement to shew mercy to others, vi. 415. 

In God s heart and nature, consideration of, the strongest support of 
faith, viii. 3 ; the most ample view to be taken of and pleaded before 
God, 6 ; the knowledge of, not alone an adequate ground of faith, 7 ; 
are all exposed unto the sinful sons of men by millions of promises, 9. 

Is in the nature of God, viii. 55 ; arises from his blessedness, 56 ; 
whence comes goodness, 58 ; whence love, 59 ; whence mercy, ib. ; 
is not purely ascribed to God e similitudine effective, 75. 

Is love extended to those who are in misery, ix. 98. 

Mercies, obtained in answer to prayer, come not singly, but in troops, iii. 
385. 

Of David, sure, the gospel called, v. 69. 

Of God, out of which he pardons, have infinitely more of goodness and 
sweetness in them to a humbled sinner, than the pardon itself hath, 
viii. 118; believers should meditate much upon, 128. 

God called the Father of, ix. 252. 
Mercy -seat, why to be sprinkled with blood ? v. 417. 

Merits of Christ are ex compacto, and could not absolutely oblige God to us, 
v. 31. 

Of Christ, in what sense infinite, v. 105. 

Methuselah, his name a prediction of the flood in the year of his death, ix. 46. 
Mighty, sons of, not the angels, but heroes and distinguished men, iv. 394. 
Millennium, to begin after the destruction of popery, v. 333. 

Condition of the church during, xii. 73 ; shall be delivered from all 
enemies, and all molesting troubles, ib. ; there shall be a wonderful 
confluence of people to it, 74 ; it shall be most pure, ib. ; there 
shall be abundance of glorious prophecies fulfilled, and promises 
accomplished, ib. ; abundance of hidden mysteries of godliness shall 
be cleared, 75 ; the gifts of the saints shall be abundantly roused, 
ib. ; their glories shall be wonderfully enlarged, ib. ; religion shall 
be honoured, ib. ; the presence of Christ and of God in the church 
shall be exceedingly glorious, 76 ; martyrs and many worthies who 
have lived in former times shall rise again, ib. ; there shall be most 
blessed union of all the churches in the world, ib. ; there shall be a 
resurrection of the creatures, 77 ; the glorious titles that the church 
hath in the Old Testament shall be made up to the full, ib. ; not far 
off, 78. 

Ministers too much neglect the great things of the gospel, and dwell on matters 
of less moment, iv. 228. 

To take heed that they speak nothing but what God hath revealed, 
v. 527 ; to labour to get the Holy Ghost into their own hearts, ib. ; 
should mould truths into several forms and shapes, 531 ; should 
endeavour to speak plainly, 538 ; their calling honourable, 539. 

Their different gifts, vi. 37. 

Shall have personal glory for personal holiness, as Christians, and 
superadded glory as ministers, ix. 368. 



INDEX. 205 

Ministers, need the almighty assistance of God in their preaching, x. 251. 
Are, in a true and proper sense, and for some ends, ministers to them 
without, as well as to them within, xi. 370 ; character and duty of a 
true and faithful one, 375 ; need acquire knowledge, 377 ; mainte 
nance of, 380. 
Ministry, some have inward motives to, on their first being called, as Pau 

had, iv. 346. 
Office of, might be an object of envy to the angels, if it were possible 

that they could envy, v. 5. 
The best calling in the world, vi. 415. 

The care and management of, belongs to the Holy Ghost, vi. 14. 
A permanent institution, xi. 108. 
Miracles of Christ, the immediate demonstration that he was the Son of God, 

dwelling in the human nature personally, iv. 510. 
Of Christ, some say that the greatest of them was to cause his enemies 
to fall backward, v. 205 ; will not work on the hearts of men, unless 
God strike with his Spirit, 206. 
Of Christ, were the signs and badges, rather than the duties, of his 

office, v. 338. 

Misery, contrast of, heightens bliss, i. 121. 
Missilia, gifts scattered among the people at triumphs, v. 306. 
Mohammedanism, brought in in the Eastern empire under the fifth trumpet, 

iii. 56. 

Moral virtues, corrupt nature capable of, x. 894 ; impressions of many of 
them to be found in beasts, 395 ; in heathen men, ib. ; in apostates, 
ib. ; whence they proceed in natural men, 397 ; understanding and 
natural conscience, ib. ; Christ s restraining work, ib. ; various pro 
vidential helps, as education, &c., 401 ; public opinion, 403. 
Morality distinguished from regeneration, vi. 430. 

A good gift of God, x. 426 ; to be honoured, ib. ; yet a man trusting 
to it, and looking no further, is in the most dangerous condition that 
a man can be in, 427. 

Mortality swallowed up of life, in the soul at death, in the body at the resur 
rection, vii. 407. 

Mortification of sin, is from spiritual life, ii. 205. 
Growth in, iii. 457. 

Growth in, incompatible with setting a high price upon worldly and 
carnal excellencies and pleasures, iii. 481 ; with desire of superflui 
ties, 482 ; with such an attachment of the mind to anything, that we 
cannot part with it, ib. ; with inordinateness in the pursuit of any 
object, ib. ; with carnal confidence in the creatures, 483 ; with envy- 
ings and heart-burnings against others, ib. ; with inability to bear 
reproofs, 484 ; with speediness in yielding to temptation, ib. ; with 
the power of lusts to disturb in holy duties, ib. ; with the quickening 
of lust by the recalling of former acts, 485 ; measured by the insight 
into spiritual corruptions and conflict with them, 486 ; by power 
of self-denial, ib. ; by constancy in heart and way, 487 ; by a spi 
ritual taste of the spiritual word, 488 ; by shame of former carriages 
and ways, ib. ; by decrease of strength of lust, ib. ; by abstinence 
from occasions and opportunities of satisfying lusts, 489; by not 
lingering after objects which may satisfy lust, ib. ; cautions in judg 
ing of, 490, et seq. 

Makes a man not only listless to sin, but to hate it, m. 500 ; joined 
with activity and life in the contrary duties, ib. ; every new degree of, 



INDEX. 

universal, 502; yet so that one lust may be specially mortified, 
503. 

Mortification, the subject of, is the old man, the body of sin, inherent cor 
ruption, vi. 201. 
Extends to the whole body of sin, ix. 310. 

MOSES, SUPEREMINENCE OF CHRIST ABOVE, V. 437. 

Moses, his meekness, ii. 447, 458. 

Did more for his nation than any hero we read of, iv. 125. 

His face being covered with a veil intimated that the person of the Sa 
viour was not fully revealed, vi. 172. 

His terror at the giving of the law, v. 441. 

The most extraordinary ambassador of G-od, until Christ came, viii. 27. 
Mother, story of one who said that she would rejoice in the glory of God in 

the damnation of her beloved son, iv. 392. 
Mourning for pardoned sin, ii. 353. 

Evangelical, has comfort mixed with it, xii. 65. 
Musical instruments, not to be used in worship, iii. 13, 215. 
Mystery, of the gospel, not understood by ungodly men, i. 141. 

Meaning of the term, iv. 271. 
Mystical sense of Scripture, cannot be used to prove matters of faith, vii. 82. 

Name of the Lord, the Christian s support in darkness, iii. 236. 

Of the Lord, the ground of the sinner s trust, iii. 325 ; all his attributes, 

and the Lord our righteousness, ib. 
Names, what meant by, i. 495. 

Of men, 7000, explained, iii. 187. 
National sins, to be searched into and repented of, vii. 545. 

Churches, as such, have no place under the New Testament dispensation, 

xi. 190. 

Nature, light of, its insufficiency, i. 388 ; corrupt, principles of, 403 ; de 
scription of the state of, ii. 4 ; sinfulness of men by, 122. 
Divine, in what sense Christians are partakers of, vi. 190, 199. 
Of men corrupt, yet its substance remains, x. 69. 
Union of the divine and human in Christ was by his assumption of the 
human, v. 51 ; remain distinct, yet make one person, ib. ; the manner 
of the union hath no similitude in nature to express it by, ib. 
Christ s divine and human, not severed even in death, vii. 96. 
Natural man, cannot discern spiritually, i. 375. 
Men, their miserable state, ii. 55. 

State, we should remember what it was, ii. 68 ; use of such remem 
brance, 348. 

Nazarene or Nazarite, in what sense Christ was, v. 147. 
Nestorius, held that Christ was at first mere man, and merited to be united 

to the divine nature, v. 543. 
Noah s ark, a figure of the covenant of grace, viii. 165 ; expounded at length 

from Isa. liv. 9-13, ib., et seq. 
Saved by grace, ix. 9. 

A special instance of electing grace, ix. 41 ; understood that his deliver 
ance from the flood by the ark was a type of salvation by Christ, 44 ; 
was the first man to whom God spoke of a covenant, 45. 
A type of Christ, the second Adam, ix. 47 ; his ark, also a type of 
Christ, 49 ; two covenants made with, 52, 57 ; these covenants 
made guages of the covenant of grace, 56; particular analogies 
between these and the covenant of grace, 65. 



INDEX. 207 

Noah preached the righteousness of Christ, ix. 81. 
Number of the beast s name, what, iii. 69. 
Of the beast, what, iii. 72. 

Oath of God, gospel sealed by, i. 244. 

Of God, does not make his purpose immutable, but shews it to be so 

iv. 212. 
Obedience, passive, might without injustice be laid by God upon the creature, 

not as a punishment, but as a trial of obedience, v. 88. 
Two principal ingredients in acceptable, the matter and the principle, 

v. 137. 

In the soul, is the soul of obedience, v. 286. 
Active and passive, of Christ, what they severally contribute towards 

reconciliation, v. 509. 
Acts of, how it may be known whether it proceed out of good will to 

God, vi. 138. 

Motives which the New Testament affords to invite unregenerate men 
to, vii. 233 ; follows upon faith, 234 ; God s love in electing, a great 
motive to, 238 ; the greatness of his love in giving his Son to die for 
us, 246 ; that disobedience is Satan s great work and interest, 254 ; 
that there is a common engagement of all believers against Satan, 
264 ; that there is a glory and majesty in the graces and lives of holy 
men, 274 ; that it is the great design of the gospel to promote, 291. 
The greatest and highest is to renounce our own righteousness, past, 
present, and to come, and to submit ourselves to the righteousness 
of God, vii. 538. 
New and holy, requires both a change of the will and affections, and 

wisdom to direct them, x. 191 ; these the unregenerate want, 192. 
OBJECTS AND ACTS OF JUSTIFYING FAITH, viii. 1. 
OBJECTS OF FAITH, viii. 3. 

Offence, to be without, is needfully to avoid all such footsteps and ways before 
others as may induce them to sin, vii. 146 ; not to walk in any 
action contradictory to his own principles he professeth before others, 
147 ; not to do anything contradictory to that light which a man s 
own conscience hath received to walk by, ib. 
Offices in the church, Trinity concurring to, i. 8. 

Of Christ, as well as his person and attributes, blasphemed by the Jews, 

v. 128. 

In the church, are not only many, but diverse, xi. 321 ; divided gene 
rally into two ranks or orders : those whose duty lieth in instruction, 
and those whose duty lieth in discipline, 329. 
Officers and ministers in a church, necessity of, xi. 309 ; there should be 

many in every church, 314. 
Old Testament, its visions and types appropriated in Revelation, iii. 32. 

Saints knew God as the Father of the Son, and distinct from him, 

vii. 489. 

Olive and vine, Christians compared to, iii. 458. 
Olive-trees, the two witnesses so called, iii. 144. 

Filling the lamp with oil, what they signified, xii. 106. 
ONE SACRIFICE, THE, v. 479. 
Oneness of Christ with the Father, is both as second person and as God-man, 

ix. 133. 

Opinions of the world fortify the unregenerate against conviction, x. 385. 
Opportunities, neglect of, followed by darkness, iii. 294. 



208 INDEX. 

Oracles, mute when Christ came, i. 494. 

Heathen, silenced at the death of Christ, v. 372. 

Order, erroneously restricted by popish and episcopal divines to the con 
stituting of a church officer, xi. 123. 

Ordinances, to be diligently used as a means of comfort, iii. 330 ; but not to 
be trusted in, 332. 

Are for a blessing or a curse to those who live under them, vii. 296 ; 
in carnal hearts only nourish self, and lusts, 299 ; their influence 
not always violent or sudden, but gentle and sweet, 300. 

Whether they may be forborne in times of persecution, xi. 422. 
Ordination of Christ to be God-man a mere arbitrary act, yet must be worthy 
of him who was his Son, iv. 506 ; and therefore could not dispense 
with any right which belonged to him as Son, ib. ; of all things was 
with a view to his glory, as well as the Father s, 507. 

Or fore-writing to judgment ; what ? ix. 226 ; leaving out of the book 
of life, 227 ; appointing them, viewed as sinners, to a certain kind 
or class of sins rather than others, 228 ; is a punishment of other 
sins which they first commit, 230. 
Original sin, first so called by Augustine, ii. 121. 

The term introduced by Augustine, x. 3. 

Importance of acknowledging it, x. 31 ; an object for faith, ib. ; whole 
guilt of Adam s first sin abides on every man, 32. 

Errors about, x. 41 ; Pelagius denies it altogether, ib. ; Pighius acknow 
ledges imputed guilt, but denies transmitted corruption, ib. ; others 
admit both, but in a limited sense, ib. ; Romanists make it consist 
only in the want of original righteousness, denying concupiscence to 
be a part of it, 42 ; both they and others exclude some of the facul 
ties of the soul from being infected with it, ib. ; these errors con 
futed, ib. 

No necessity to suppose it to be a positive quality come in the room of 
original righteousness, x. 304 ; yet it hath two parts, though in itself 
it be but a want of righteousness, 305 ; doctrine of, in both its parts, 
is an essential truth, which our Christianity cannot want, 324 ; 
errors of the Socinians, Arminians, and Papists concerning, ib. 

Humiliation and repentance to be exercised on account of, x. 330 ; in 
stanced in David, Ps. li., ib. 

Both its guilt and its corruption abides upon man, x. 377 ; compared 
to the strength of a kingdom, ib. 

Pains of death, could not hold Christ, what, i. 431. 

Palm-tree, Christians compared to, iii. 458. 

Pantheism, a devilish system, vii. 3 ; compared with the popish doctrine of 
transubstantiation, ib. ; hath haunted the world in former ages as 
well as now, 4 ; more dishonouring to God than heathen idolatry, 5. 

Pantheists, a generation of all others the most presumptuous, iv. 351 ; make 
the three persons in the Godhead but three manifestations or opera 
tions of God in us and to us, ib. 

Papists, take part with one truth of the gospel to the exclusion of others, 

iv. 277. 

Their doctrine of the infallibility of the pope would be reasonable if 
God had intended the mysteries of the gospel for the satisfaction of 
all mankind, iv. 304. 

Their errors respecting grace, vi. 187 ; that sanctification is justifica 
tion, ib. ; that habitual grace is the foundation of merit, 188. 



INDEX. 90Q 

&\Jo 

Papists, profess to trust in Christ, but do not really so, vi. 314. 

Their errors have usually a shadow of some truth, which they miss 

speaking either over or under, vii. 159. 
Acknowledge God to be the first in the benefits of salvation, but deny 

that he is the last, viii. 39. 

Their error as to the nature and character of justifying faith; viii. 290. 
Deny that concupiscence is sin, x. 42. 
Error of, in holding that the higher faculties of the soul are not injured 

by sin, x. 174. 

Admit original sin, but hold that it is cancelled in baptism, x. 325 ; 
different opinions of Bonaventure, Estius, Aquinas, and Suarez, ib. 
Parables, rule for interpreting, ix. 50. 
Paradise, Adam s, a type of the paradise above, vii. 50. 
Paradox, the greatest ever uttered, is that of James, Count it all joy, ix. 

289. 

Pardon, popish doctrine of, ii. 319. 
Power of God seen in, iii. 326. 

Of sinners, the procuring of, the end of Christ s death, iv. 213. 
If lightiy procured, would be less valued, v. 16. 

Of sin, a greater gift than of millions of worlds ; pardon through Christ, 
and Christ with the pardon, though but of one sin, is more than the 
pardon of worlds of sin, v. 22. 
Of our sin more precious than all gifts, short of grace, that have been 

bestowed upon all men since the beginning of the world, ix. 210. 
Pardoning grace, a fulness, a plenitude of grace, ix. 309 ; a security for the 

continuance of grace, 361. 
Parents, their sins not transmitted, ii. 127. 

The guilt of their sins not conveyed to their children, though the guilt 

of Adam s sin is conveyed through them, x. 20. 
Parliaments and public persons, necessity of praying for, x. 33. 

Of England, their responsibility, xii. 58. 
Pastor, his power of ruling flows from, and is adjunct with, his power to 

preach, xi. 227. 

And teachers are of equal rank and power, xi. 333. 
Pastures, green (Ps. xxiii.), are ordinances, v. 375. 
Patience, ii. 429 ; what the grace of, is, 436 ; how wrought 438 ; its perfect 

work, 446. 

And long-suffering of God extends only to sinful men, iv. 190. 
A further thing than mercy, as mercy than goodness, iv. 191 ; is not 
slackness, ib. ; riches of it in his bearing with so much dishonour, ib. ; 
from so many sinners, 192 ; for so long a time, ib. ; to so great an 
extent, ib. ; preciousness of it shewn in that it cost the blood of his 
Son, ib. ; in regard of the usefulness of it to us, 193. 
Of God with his people, greater than his long-suffering with the vessels 

of wrath, ix. 323. 
Paid, his name, i. 7 ; his call to the apostleship, 9. 

His tender compassion for souls derived from Christ, iv. 118. 

His converts endeared to him by the sufferings they cost him, iv. 129. 

Set free at once from those Jewish prejudices which long adhered to the 

other apostles, v. 476. 
His conversion and experience, iv. 380. 

After his conversion never on any occasion fell into inconsistency, vii. 
157. 

VOL. XII. O 



210 INDEX. 

Paul, a man that came nearest to Christ of any other, iv. 114. 
Grace rose in him to the highest elevation, ix. 254. 
The next man in heaven to Christ, ix. 400. 

In one place reckons his talent-sins, blasphemy persecution, and injuri- 
ousness ; in another his farthing-sins, all manner of concupiscence, 
x. 475. 

Pawn, and earnest, how different, i. 254. 

Peace, God does not always speak to his people, iii. 405 ; the cause of this 

ordinarily their folly, 406 ; in proportion as they are at peace with 

sin, God will be at war with them, ib. ; when they have not peace, 

they cannot have it nntil God speak it, 407. 

Of conscience is a creation of God, iii. 407 ; yet it is easy for him to 

give it, 408. 

Made by Christ, brought by the Holy Ghost, vi. 24. 
True and false, illustrated by an allegory, vi. 306 ; way in which God 
gives by the tenor of the covenant of grace, 309 ; true comes from 
without, false from within, 815. 

False, spoken by the corrupt conscience, x. 263 ; is not a peace that 

comes after a war, ib. ; its effects rather negative than affirmative, 

ib. ; is not from the true foundation, from reconciliation of God by 

Christ s blood, and justification by his righteousness, 264. 

Pelagians, and semi-Pelagians, the dross they mingle with the truth, iv. 309. 

Most professing Christians are essentially, in conceiving conscience and 

the light thereof to be grace and holiness, vi. 248. 
And semi-Pelagians would have natural conscience, enlightened by the 

word, to be what the Scripture calls grace, vi. 272. 
Pentecost, three thousand converted on, through the efficacy of Christ s 

prayer on the cross, iv. 64. 

Was the feast of first-fruits, and therefore the fittest time for the first 
putting in of the sickle to the field, vi. 9 ; law given by Moses on the 
day of, 10. 
PEOPLE OF GOD, THE EECONCILIATION OF ALL, DESIGNED AND AFFECTED BY 

CHKIST S DEATH, v. 463. 

Perfecting, stablishina, strengthening, and settling, accomplished both in this 
life, and for ever, ix. 373 ; these words not absolutely synonymous, 
379. 

Perfecting, inquiry into the meaning of the term (xaragr/^g/i/), ix. 378. 
Perfection of Christ s death, to outvie the demerits of our sins ; of his inter 
cession to save our souls, iv. 68. 
Its property to manifest itself, iv. 229. 
Alone ascribed to Christ, iii. 222. 
Persecution of the saints, with malice, after knowledge of it, is unpardonable, 

iv. 166. 

Persecutors are seldom without fear, v. 207. 
Perseverance of the saints, secured by the perpetuity of the fulness of Christ, 

v. 511. 

In grace, more remarkable than conversion, ix. 418. 

Person of Christ, strange and monstrous opinions respecting, ix. 404 ; im 
portance of right knowledge of, 405 ; as necessary to know ichat 
Christ is, as who he is, 406 ; did actually exist before he came into 
the world, and was made flesh, 407 ; before his conception, 408 ; 
before John the Baptist, ib. ; when all the prophets wrote and spoke, 
ib. ; in the time of Moses, ib. ; in and before Abraham s time, 409 ; 
in the days of Noah, ib. at the creation of the world, 410 ; from 



INDEX. 211 



titl6S given him in his P r e- , 

theSon of God,414; theopinions as to the import of the term 
Word, 415 ; whether it merely notes out the relation he hath to his 
* ather, as begotten of him, ib. ; or whether it imports his appointment to 
manifest God to us, 418 ; both may be included, 419 ; called the Son 
f trod, m respect of the substance of his person, ib. ; and that not only 
as taking man s nature, but as existing as such from eternity, 420 
not constituted the Son of God by his divine conception in the womb 
of the virgin, 423 ; this title given him by way of singularity, in com 
parison of all other who bear the title of sons, 425 ; generation or be 
getting, the foundation of his Sonship, 427 ; this generation absolutely 
peculiar to him, ib. ; is God by an identity, or oneness of one and 
the same essence of the Godhead, 428 ; professed himself to be God, 
430 ; is necessarily of equal height and dignity with the Father iv. 431 ; 
is God by nature, ib. ; otherwise were not to be worshipped, ib. ; dis 
tinguished from those whom the Old Testament called gods, 432 ; 
impossible to express more clearly that he is our God substantially 
or by nature, than it is expressed by Christ, 433 ; called the living 
God, 434 ; the true God, ib. ; Jehovah, ib. ; this name never given 
to a mere creature, 435 ; called the great God, ib. ; the only true 
God, ib.; creation ascribed to Christ, 437 ; worship, ib. ; power to 
forgive sins, ib. ; this person, who was and is God, took unto himself, 
into an unity of person with himself, the man Jesus, 440 ; see 
Incarnation of Christ. 
Person of Christ, more precious to the believer than all his benefits, iv. 481. 

The second, the fittest to be appointed Lord of all, iv. 527. 

Of Christ, its worth gives worth to his satisfaction, v. 104. 

Of Christ, a fulness of fitness in, for the work of reconciliation, v. 35. 

Of Christ, as God and man, fits him for his mediatorial office, v. 48 ; 
both natures have their appropriate work, 50 ; is one, though the 
natures are two, 51. 

The second, the fittest to be mediator, v. 41 ; as the mediator, was to 
be * Son of man ; if either of the other persons had been appointed, 
there would have been two sons, ib. ; so the due order of the persons 
is kept up, ib. ; being the middle person of the three, he bears the 
best resemblance to the work of a mediator, 42 ; fittest to convey to 
us the benefits of adoption, 43 ; as Son, was fittest to be priest, 44 ; 
as the Word and Wisdom of the Father, fittest to be prophet, ib. ; 
as heir of all things, fittest to be king, ib. 

Of Christ, error regarding, both easy and dangerous, ix. 204. 
Persons, the three, in the Godhead, have a distinct part in every saving 
work, iii. 438 ; as Christ is the vine, the Father the husbandman, 
and the Spirit the sap, ib. 

In the Godhead distinct from each other, iv. 359 ; are found addressing 
each other, ib. ; speaking of one another, 360 ; each speaks of him 
self as a person, ib. ; works proper to each are assigned, ib. ; spoken 
of as distinct, when also they are called God, ib. ; the second person 
having taken the human nature into one person with himself, mani 
festly distinct from the Father, ib. ; have a union and communion 
among themselves, which is incommunicable to us, 362. 

Of the Godhead held the highest and freest mutual converse among 
themselves from eternity, iv. 492 ; formed mutual engagements and 
promises, and glorified one another, ib. 

Of the Godhead willing and content to take their turns of manifesting 



212 INDEX. 

themselves in our narrow hearts, vii. 498 ; each glorifies the other, 
ib. ; when we have a more eminent communion with one, we have 
an implicit communion with the other two, 499. 

Persons of the Godhead, in all works besides that of our salvation, have a joint 
concurring, yet not any visible appearance in any one, vii. 529 ; in 
our salvation they concur, each acting a distinct part, 532 ; the 
Father electing, the Son redeeming, the Spirit applying, 533 ; reasons 
of this, 534. 

In the Godhead, their mutual fellowship and communion matter of in 
finite delight, ix. 146 ; their delight in the sons of men next to it, 
ib. ; the latter dependent on the former, ib. 
Personal reign of Christ, probable, xii. 70. 

Reign of Christ on earth denied, xii. 96. 
Peter, his release from prison, an illustration of God s manner of answering 

prayer, iii. 384. 

An example of repeated relapsing into the same sin, iii. 420. 
Christ s dealing with him after his resurrection an indication of his 

heart towards his people, iv. 106. 
Comparison of his sin with that of Judas, iv. 180. 
His striking with the sword had something good and something bad in 

it, v. 216. 

His denial an addition to our Lord s sufferings, v. 241 ; sinned in 
going into the high-priest s hall, ib. ; who was the other disciple 
who admitted him ? 243 ; providences connected with the denial, 
245 ; his sin greatly aggravated by the time of its commission, 248 ; 
his silence when he stood by the fire, before being challenged, was 
itself a sort of denial, 250. 
His vision, and the purpose of it, v. 472. 
In what his sin lay, vii. 517. 

And Judas, an instance of election and non-election, ix. 194, 273. 
His fall made him an able forewarner and instructor of others, ix. 

231, 375. 

Pharisees, the aggravation of their sin, that it was against conviction, iv. 175. 
Pilate, aggravation of his sin, iv. 179. 
Plato thanked God that he was a man, an Athenian, and a philosopher, 

iv. 167. 
And other philosophers stole their knowledge from the Jews, and 

vended it as their own, iv. 418. 
Pleasures, living in, ii. 91. 
Pollution, distinguished from corruption, x. 72. 
Pope, the successor of the western emperors, iii. 28. 

Temporal and spiritual power of the, iii. 67. 
Popery, invented by the devil, in imitation of the gospel, iv. 235 ; the 

greatest mystery that ever created imagination hatched, ib. 
A composition of all sorts of policies, and therefore called the mystery 

of iniquity, iv. 273. 
A consistent system, depending upon two assumptions, that the church 

cannot err, and that theirs is the true church, x. 224. 
And Pelagianism natural to men, x. 419. 
Popish worship, adopted from heathens, iii. 68. 
Postures, sin expressed by, ii. 23. 
Power which works in believers, i. 211, 423; importance of knowing it, 

421. 
Of God, limited by his will, i. 216 ; how shewed to believers, 341 ; 



INDEX. 213 

in keeping his saints, 346 ; in subduing sin, 359 ; in the new crea 
tion, 365 ; in working faith, 373, 440 ; in renewing the will, 380 
as an object of faith, 425 ; in believers, compared to his power in 
raising Christ, 436. 

To save, God s, men do not generally question, but his will, iv. 208. 

Of Christ s human nature, how distinguished from the divine omnipo 
tence, iv. 464. 

Almighty, manifested in regeneration, vi. 425. 

And mercy of God go together, viii. 47 ; his mercy proceeds from 
strength, 49. 

Of God engaged to keep the elect from falling, ix. 213. 

Spiritual or ecclesiastical, is an impress of the authority of Christ, 

xi. 22. 
Praise, a higher exercise than thanksgiving, iv. 376 ; example of in Ps. 

cxlv., ib. 
Prayer, remembrance of others in, i. 279. 

Answers to, may be deferred, iii. 42. 

The grand resort of the distressed, iii, 332. 

Ordained of God to be a means to obtain what is prayed for, iii. 360 ; 
not to expect a return is to take God s name in vain, 361. 

Answers to, a ground of self-examination, iii. 362 ; one of the purest^of 

the Christian s joys, ib. 
Prayers, some we cannot see answered in this world, iii. 365. 

For others, often answered, iii. 367 ; but not always, so as to obtain 
the special thing prayed for, ib. ; if not answered, turn to our good, 
370. 

For others, if not to be answered, will cease, iii. 370. 

United, each one who has joined in may take comfort from the answer, 
iii. 372. 

Indications of God s design to answer, iii. 375 ; when he bespeaks a 
prayer, that is, secretly speaks to the heart to pray much about a 
thing, ib. ; when he quiets, calms, and contents the heart in prayer, 
376 ; when in prayer he draws nigh to the soul, and reveals himself 
to it in connection with a particular petition, 377 ; when he stirs up 
in the heart a particular faith in a business, and upholds the heart 
to wait for it, notwithstanding all opposition, 878 ; when he puts a 
restless importunity into the heart, joined with subjection to God s 
will, 380 ; when the spirit of supplication becomes the spirit of obe 
dience, 381 ; and the spirit of waiting, -ib. 

And thanks, like respiration, iii. 390. 

May be heard, although the thing prayed for be not granted, iii. 393 ; 
when the prayer itself was made conditionally, and with a reservation 
of God s will, 394 ; or when the denial is the foundation for a greater 
mercy, ib. ; or when a greater blessing of the same kind is granted 
instead, ib. ; or when the comfort that is desired through the thing 
prayed for, is given otherwise, 395 ; when God grants all that may 
be, yet not the whole, 396 ; when the heart is enlarged to acknowledge 
(rod s holiness and righteousness, is filled with a holy contentment 
in the denial, and with thankfulness to God for not granting what he 
knew to be not for the best, 397. 

Their strength not to be estimated by the expressions, or gifts, or 
stirring of affections, but by the faith, sincerity, obedience, and the 
desires expressed, iii. 400. 

Requires watchfulness, iii. 515. 



214 INDEX. 

Prayer, Christ s, in John xvii., a summary of his intercession in heaven, 

iv. 103. 
Are the keys whereby the cupboard is unlocked, whence the children 

have their bread, iv. 256. 

Why to be addressed specially to the Father, v. 8. 
Heard presently, v. 214. 
Through the work of the Holy Ghost in us, are called our prayers, 

v. 363. 

Exercise of faith in, v. 413. 

May be distinctly addressed to the Third person, vi. 32. 
Actings of faith in, viii. 420 ; there may be a true and effectual praying 
in faith without an assured persuasion that we shall obtain what we 
ask, 421 ; principal objects of faith in, are the attributes of God, the 
promises, the name of Christ, 422 ; none of these bind him to give the 
very thing that we ask, ib. ; the main act of faith in, is a firm belief 
and persuasion of these objects, 434 ; for temporal blessings, 443 ; 
for spiritual, 451 ; several elevations of faith about absolute pro 
mises, 455 ; success of prayer will generally be in proportion to 
faith, 457. 

What ought to be its chief subject, ix. 113. 
In Scriptures, tacitly imply promises, ix. 372, 394. 
The apostles generally consist of a prefatory and a petitionary part, 

exactly fitted to one another, ix. 395. 
Preaching, which reveals the glory and beauty of grace in its strictest and 

most spiritual hue, is the most welcome to good hearts, iv. 251. 
Of the gospel, is a picturing of Christ, iv. 319. 
Private, not unlawful, v. 256. 

Of the gospel, is Christ s ordinance for the conversion of sinners, xi. 
360 ; its advantage over reading, 363 ; consists of exhortation and 
doctrine ; extempore, improper, 378. 
Predestination, God s will the first cause of, i. 101, 103 ; final cause of, 89 ; 

distinguished from election, 83 ; all privileges come from, 222. 
Of Christ, was in and for himself, of his people in and for him, iv. 489 ; 
was accompanied on the instant by an act of acceptance or acquies 
cence on the part of the second person, ib. 
Distinguished from simple election, ix. 159. 
Pre-existence of Christ, iv. 407. 

I ^re-ordination applies to Christ as well as the election, 467 ; his subsisting 
in a human nature depends wholly upon, 473 ; but this being pre 
ordained, his priority over all creatures follows of right, 475. 
Presbyterians, their argument against episcopacy turned against themselves, 

xi. 83. 

Can shew no institution for their classical assemblies, xi. 181. 
Claims for their government invalid, xi. 179 ; incongruities and incon 
sistencies of, 214. 
Presbyteries, congregational, are the natural, others are but as step-dames, 

xi. 165. 

Presbytery is in every congregation, xi. 74. 
Preservation in Christ, the immediate fruits of election, ix. 221. 
Price, bought with a, not a tautological, but an emphatic expression, 

v. 73. 

Priesthood of Christ on earth, was mainly in the offering of the sacrifice, in 
heaven mainly in intercession, and presenting the sacrifice offered, 
iv. 58. 



INDEX. 215 

Priesthood, an office of transcendent honour, v. 36. 

Irregularities in, at the time of our Lord, v. 234 : yet their acts were 

valid, 235. 
Priests, under the law, stood, offering sacrifices daily ; but Christ, after one 

sacrifice, for ever sat down, iv. 49. 
Primitive Christians, examples of grace to us. ii. 298. 
Principalities and powers, i. 483. 
Privileges, unavailing, ii. 75. 

Not to be valued in comparison of Christ, iv. 338. 

Enjoyment of, progressive, ix. 265. 

Outward, unregenerate men bring arguments from, to justify their state 

x. 387. 

Prize of our calling, what, and why so called, ix. 358. 
Proclamation, by God, of his attributes to Moses, viii. 12 ; mercy excels, 
exceeds, and is the prevailing argument in, 15 ; made immediately 
after the sin of the golden calf, 16 ; is the Magna Charta of the Old 
Testament, 19 ; frequently quoted and referred to, 20 ; by Moses 
himself, ib. ; by David, ib. ; by Jeremiah, 22 ; by Joel, ib. ; by Jonah, 
ib. ; by Micah, 23 ; by Hezekiah, 24 ; by Nehemiah, ib. ; the sweetest 
sermon that ever was preached, the richest text the whole Bible 
affords, 25 ; import of the name Jehovah, 29 ; of the name El, 45 ; 
merciful, 55 ; why this attribute placed first, 56 ; is of the nature of 
God, 75 ; not merely called merciful because he does works of mercy, 
but does works of mercy because he is merciful, 86 ; proved at length, 
ib. et seq. ; objections answered, 108. 
Prodigal Son, parable of, doubtful whether it refers to the conversion of a 

sinner or the restoration of a backslider, ix. 356. 
Promise, if one belongs to a man, then all do. iii. 321. 
Promises, Christ is the foundation of all, iv. 14 ; are the casket, Christ the 
jewel in them, ib. ; three sorts of, viz., absolute, inviting, and assur 
ing, 15. 

All made and fulfilled unto Christ first, and by him to us, iv. 121. 
Now revealed in the gospel are but the manifestation of the grand pro 
mise made to Christ in the covenant of grace, v. 29. 
First, what it contained, v. 173. 

Of Scripture, to be taken in the largest sense that may be, j. 214. 
The truth of, depends on the honesty of the promiser, viii. 121 ; and 

on the assured reality of the performance of it in the event, 124. ^ 
Absolute and unconditional, the proper object of faith, in its first acting 

of recumbency, viii. 228. 
Of our salvation, are but extracts, transcripts of God s eternal decrees, 

viii. 240. 

A prime object of faith in prayer, viii. 428 ; these are express or im 
plied for every good thing that God means to bestow, 429 ; yet they 
are indefinite *as regards the persons, 430 ; temporal, are indefinite, 
444 ; and conditional, 445 ; spiritual, of three _ sorts, absolutely ab 
solute, absolute in a qualified sense, and conditional^ 451. 
Of salvation are but the expression of election, stated indefinitely with 

respect to the persons, ix. 37. 
All made sure in Christ, ix. 341. 

Of all parts of the word, have most virtue for cleansing, x. Id. 
More force in, than in any other words (Luther), ix. 261. . 

Prophecy, from John s time to the end, contained in book of Revelation, in. 1. 
Prophecies have often a twofold fulfilment, iii. 156. 



216 



INDEX. 



Prophecies, double sense of, v. 460 ; instances, ib. 

And promises, many in Scripture yet unfulfilled, xii. 72. 
Prophets, sometimes received revelations in answer to their prayers, iii. 360. 
Did not fully know the mystery, the meaning, and the end of those 

things which they were employed to write, iv. 283. 
All the writers of the Old Testament Scriptures sometimes called so, 

v. 160. 
Propitiation, Christ made, both in his dying and in our believing on him, v. 

420 ; in the one for us, in the other to us, il. 

Protestants, unregenerate, are essentially papists in their ideas of righteous 
ness, vi. 314. 

Proverbial sayings, often used to excuse sin, x. 384. 
Providence of God, in remarkable preservations, v. 219. 
Not our rule in duty, v. 245. 

Equality of common, fortifies profane men against conviction, x. 386. 
Prudence, i. 133. 

Psalm xxii. is as clear a narrative of the crucifixion as Mat. xxvi., v. 224. 
Publican, in the parable, an illustration of the state of heart of a pious Jew, 

v. 400 

The chief were equites Romani, ix. 430. 

Punishment, God s strange work, while mercy is natural to him, iv. 115. 
Of sin depends on the will of God, hatred of it on his nature, v. 15. 
Is not deletive of sin, v. 79 ; does not stand for obedience, 86. 
Which sin deserves, x. 490 ; God himself the immediate inflicter of, in 
hell, 491 ; termed destruction, 495 ; inflicted by God, to the glory 
of his power, 498 ; is an act of justice, 514 ; of avenging wrath, 
522 ; harmony between this and other divine truths, 524 ; dreadful- 
ness of, 525. 

Purging of the vines, the work of God, iii. 474 ; yet Christians not passive, 

but workers together with God, 475 ; purging the price of Christ s 

blood, ib. ; essential to God s delight in us, ib. ; fits us for service, 

ib. ; makes both persons and services more acceptable , 476. 

Means of, iii. 477 ; even their sins, ib. ; afflictions, ib. ; the word, ib. ; 

the examples of others, 478 ; inward workings upon the heart, ib. 
Purity of worship, testified for by the witnesses, iii. 146. 
Purpose of God in himself, i. 146. 
Of God immutable, iv. 212. 
God s eternal, concerning all things, were made in Christ as God-man, 

iv. 531. 

God s, to save men is solely of his own good pleasure, v. 12. 
God s, the matrix, womb, mother, in which calling and perseverance, 
and all lay, ix. 341 ; all made in Christ, hence their firmness and 
sureness, ib. 

Quakers, their error, iv. 344. 

Quickening, what, ii. 205 ; with Christ, what, 209 ; all the work of God 
on us called so, 205. 

Eachel, weeping for her children, what it means, v. 460. 
Eainbow, about the throne, what it denotes, iii. 3. 

As God s remembrancer not to destroy the world, typical of the cove 
nant of grace, and therefore said to be round the throne, iv. 397. 

The sign of Noah s covenant, ix. 78 ; around the throne, what it signi- 



INDEX. 217 

fies, 79 ; upon the head of Christ, 80 ; the symbol of his everlasting 
kindness and mercy, ib. 
Reading, light, iii. 518. 

Reason, carnal, makes unbelievers think too favourably, and believers too 
unfavourably, of their state, iii. 250 ; like Ahithophel, our counsellor 
in worldly affairs, but not to be taken into the sanctuary, 251 ; the 
most desperate enemy of faith, ib. ; has most influence against faith 
in a time of darkness, 252. 

Its subserviency to faith, iv. 304 ; and human conscience were supreme 
in Adam, and would be so still, ib. 

Corrupted by sin, used in the service of lusts, x. 217 ; affords all its 
assistance to sin, 218 ; in justifying sinful ends, 220 ; inventing 
means for the accomplishment of sinful ends, 221 ; in making 
pleasures more delightful, 222 ; to discerning opportunities for ac 
complishing our sinful ends, ib. ; in inventions for concealing sin. 

Is able to invent some fair gloss and cover for the foulest and most 

gross enormities, x. 380. 
Rebekah, her giving Eliezer water, an indication that his prayer was answered, 

iii. 380. 

RECONCILIATION OF ALL THE PEOPLE OF GOD, DESIGNED AND EFFECTED BY 
CHKIST S DEATH, v. 463. 

BY THE BLOOD OF CHKIST, v. 499. 
Reconciliation, mutual, of believers, by the cross, ii. 375. 

Consists of two parts, peace and good will, v. 3 ; argues former friend 
ship, ib. ; ministry of, consists in declaring it on the part of God, 
and to inculcate it on the part of men, 4 ; is represented as specially 
made to the Father, 7. 

Depends more upon fitness in the person of the mediator than on the 
means that may be used, and the satisfaction that may be made, v. 
34. 

Begins with God, the party offended, v. 482 ; ministry of consists of 
two parts, to declare it on the part of God, to produce it on the part 
of man, ib. 

Work of, has been the main business of the Father from all eternity, v. 
11 ; in its application is % Christ, in its design from eternity it is in 
Christ, ib. 

May be obtained, v. 512 ; this proved by many reasons, ib. et seq ; 
objections and stumbling-blocks removed, 515. 

Ministry of, consists of two parts, the announcement of a reconciled 
God, in order to produce reconciliation on our part, vi. 117; necessity 
of, 120. 

In order to, there must first be a conviction that we are enemies, vi. 
125 ; and an apprehension of the danger of such a state, 126 ; and 
of God as placable, ib. ; and of Christ as the reconciler, 127 ; and 
then a seeking of peace and reconciliation through Christ, ib. ; and 
that with confession of, and mourning for, sin, 128 ; there must be 
a parting with, and forsaking, all other friends and lovers, 129 ; a 
resigning up of the heart, and all that it hath, to God, to be com 
manded and ruled by him, 131 ; a likeness of disposition, ib. ; an 
endeavour to walk and behave as unto a friend, ib. ; and all proceed 
ing from an inward principle of pure good will unto God, 132 ; im 
portance of, 145 ; is not merely submission, 150. 

Recumbency, faith of, Scriptural authority for distinguishing from assurance, 
viii. 219. 



218 INDEX. 

Redemption, by price, i. 124. 

Scheme of, not propounded by the Son to the Father, but by the Father 
to the Son, v. 22. 

Why the contrivance of it is generally ascribed to the Father, v. 139 : 
Christ s consent to it from eternity implied in its being called a cove 
nant, 140. 

Particular, no hindrance in coming to Christ, v. 422. 

Extent of, different opinions concerning, viii. 404. 

From a vain conversation, what it implies, ix. 349. 
Reformation, how to promote it, i. 558. 

Defect of, iii. 140. 

Like the discovery of a new world, iv. 290 ; prophesied of by Ezekiel, 
ib. ; and by Zechariah, 291. 

Accomplished gradually, v. 528. 

The common people most forward in, xii. 66. 

Gradual, xii. 109 ; begun with the Waldenses, ib. ; then Wickliffe and 

Huss, ib. 
Regenerate, in what sense they do not, and cannot, sin, vi. 213. 

Conformed to Christ in his condemnation, vi. 228 ; his crucifixion, 
229 ; his death, ib. 

And unregenerate, different grounds of their assent to the law, vi. 
290 ; worst estate of the former better than the best of the latter, 
320. 

Their relish of the pleasures of sin is but by fits and paroxysms, vi. 
466 ; it is but a broken delight, 467 ; their hearts are not wholly 
overcome with it, ib. 

Persons may sin against knowledge, viii. 319 ; may commit particular 
sins, and omit performance of duties, 320 ; may sin against a strong 
pulse of conscience, 321 ; against a strong, smiting, and checking 
direction of sanctifying light, ib. ; may sin deliberately against 
light, 323 ; the best live not fully and exactly according to their 
knowledge, 324 ; cautions respecting, ib. ; differences between his 
sinning against knowledge, and an unregenerate man s, 326. 
Regeneration, the most eminent mercy that God bestows on his people, vi. 
74 ; all the persons of the Godhead concur in, ib. ; compared to the 
manumission of a slave, 78 ; to the dissolution of a marriage by the 
death of one of the parties, 79 ; is not a mere refinement of corrupt 
nature, 80 ; is not confined to those of riper years, 85 ; angels, both 
in heaven and hell, moved at, 101. 

Called a being born again, to shew that it conveys an image or likeness 
of the begetter, vi. 152 ; is the imparting of a new nature, 153 ; 
necessity of, to salvation, 155 ; without it God is not our Father, 
ib. ; Christ is not our Lord and husband, we can have no title to, 
no hope of enjoyment of, the inheritance, 156; an unpopular doc 
trine, 157. 

Its analogy with the resurrection of the body, vi. 194. 

Must be as extensive as mortification, vi. 201 ; since it is a restoration 
of the image of God, must be a change of nature, 202 ; infants are 
capable of, 203 ; compared to the natural powers of seeing and 
understanding, 204 ; and to the instincts of animals, ib. ; necessary 
that a new nature should be imparted in the new creation, ib. : 
whether God could make a sinful creature holy in action without 
giving it anew nature, 206; never wrought upon temporary believers, 
215 ; is nothing else than the forming and fashioning the image of 



INDEX. 219 

Christ in us, 220 ; its counterfeit is the work of the law written in 
the heart by nature, or the effects of a natural enlightened conscience, 
231 ; differences from natural conscience, 252 ; takes effect in the 
whole man, 260 ; enlightens the conscience, 270 ; sets up God in 
the heart as the supreme end, 273. 

Regeneration, eminency of mercy in the work of, vi. 405 ; is the introduc 
tion to all mercies, 406 ; it is the first and the greatest sum of par 
doning mercy expended on us, ib. ; makes an entire change of a man s 
state before God, and that for ever, 407 ; takes place but once, 408 ; 
the state into which it brings us is an eternal state, never to be 
changed, 409 ; it alone makes a specifical change, others that follow 
are but gradual, ib. ; no motions from us invite God to work in us, 
410; is exclusively God s work, 411; its essentials children are 
capable of, and therefore of baptism, 412 ; is the womb, the founda 
tion, of all good works, ib. ; circumstances heightening the mercy of, 
413 ; the three persons distinctly concur and appear in, 416 ; com 
pared with the incarnation and conception of Christ, 420 ; the Father s 
part in, 421 ; the Son s, 422 ; the Spirit s, 423 ; almighty power 
manifested in, 425 ; the same power that raised Christ from the dead, 
427 ; hence mere abstinence from gross sins not regeneration, 429 ; 
nor mere interest in the things of religion, 431 ; paralleled with the 
power shewn in creation, 436 ; in raising Christ from death to glory, 
ib. ; is not only the putting a new principle of life and godliness into 
the soul, but a dissolving of the works of the devil, 441 ; power 
shewn by consideration of the powerful opposition, 443; pulling 
down strongholds, ib.; breaking off the heart from the pleasures of 
sin and inordinate lusts, 444 : loosening it from the world, 445 ; 
producing faith, 446 ; virtual cause of, is the resurrection of Christ, 
455. 

In the work of, all the persons of the Godhead concur, vin. 1 
Grace shewn in, exceeds all works which God after doth for us, even 

glory itself, ix. 309. 

And perseverance, the sum of all blessings spiritual, ix. 414. 
Greatness and wonderfulness of, shewn by consideration of the total 

depravation of our nature, x. 177. 
Rejoicing continually associated with praise, iv. 392. 
Relapsing, after peace spoken, a great aggravation of sin, iii. 413. 

After peace spoken, great folly, iii. 414 ; because, before a man had 
that peace, he felt the bitterness of sin, ib. ; because it cost so much 
to obtain peace, ib.; because there is a danger of losing so much, 
415; because the pleasures of sin will be much less after peace 
spoken, ib. 

Relation, Christ s, to his people, iv. 123. 
Religion, practical, its whole bulk and sum resolved into God s revealm 

Christ, and Christ s revealing himself within us, iv. d42. 
Religious duties and performances, unconverted men depend upon, x. 6 
Remembrance of God s former mercies a ground of comfort to the 1 

in darkness, iii. 336. -, , t w * i 

Remonstrants, an opinion of theirs refuted, i. 341 ; their doctrine of moral 

persuasions, 351 ; their notion of spiritual death, n. 202. 
Renewing of the inward man day by day, real, though not always perceived, 

ix. 304. 
REPENTANCE, vii. 543. 



220 INDEX. 

Repentance, sometimes imperfect, iii. 426 ; times of imperfect repentance the 

most critical in a believer s life, 428. 

Deferring of, argues a low and light esteem of the work of grace, vi. 
452; may be wrought in the most hardened by the power of God, 454. 
Subjects of; national sins, vii. 545; corruptions in religion and wor 
ship, ib. ; personal sins, 549. 

Romanists generally deny that original sin is a subject of, x. 326 ; re 
futation of their opinions, 328. 
Reprobation consists of two parts, ix. 154 ; preterition, ib.; rejection, 157 ; 

not an act of pure dominion, but of justice, 160. 
The stress of it generally put upon the negative act of non-election, 

ix. 227. 

Reservation of places in heaven for the elect, ix. 180. 
Resolution, Christ s stedfast, in prospect of his last sufferings, v. 168. 
Rest of God, i. 321. 

RESTORATION, MAN S, BY GRACE, vii. 519. 
Resurrection of believers in Christ, ii. 251. 

Of Christ, an evidence to our faith that God is fully satisfied with his 
death, iv. 25 ; is the ground of justification, regarded as the formal 
act of pronouncing us righteous, 26 ; its real influence towards our 
justification, 35, et seq. 

Of Christ, as of a representative of his people, iv. 34 ; in what sense 
believers are risen with him, ib. ; influence of, to our justification, 
35 ; was the justification of Christ himself from the sins wherewith 
he had been charged, 36 ; therefore called his begetting, 37, 49. 
Of Christ twofold, of his soul from the prison of hell, as well as of his 
body from the grave, v. 273 ; corresponding to the first and second 
resurrection of his people, 274. 
Of Christ, a more signal display of God s power than that of Lazarus 

or any one else, vi. 440 ; is the virtual cause of regeneration, 455. 
First, literal before the millennium, xii. 96. 
Revelation, knowing God by, i. 291. 

Book of, a special fruit of Christ s death, iii. 15. 

Book of, relates to the nations of the Gentiles, which have to do with 

the church of Christ, iii. 23. 
Book of, written about A.D. 94, iii. 120. 
Of God s Son in Paul, misunderstood by interpreters, iv. 344. 
Of God is by piece-meal (ToXuasg&s), v. 528 ; because men are incapable 
of all at once, 529 ; after several ways (ffoXureovuc,), 530 ; to k shew 
his manifold wisdom, 531 ; because there are varieties of appre 
hension, ib. 
Revelations, all previous ones were preparations for the gospel, as that is for 

heaven, iv. 261. 

Rich man and Lazarus, parable of, vi. 461. 
Rich glory and glorious riches, equivalent terms, iv. 244. 
Riches of grace, need eternity to shew them in, ii. 307. 

Of the glory of the gospel, iv. 306 ; consist in its preciousness, 807 ; 

abundance, 309 ; profitableness, 310. 

Of the Christian consist in promises, as in bonds, iv. 312 ; rich in 
faith, ib. ; in assurance, 313; the Spirit poured richly on him, ib ; 
the riches of glory, ib. 

Righteous scarcely saved, but surely saved, ix. 245. 
Righteousness, the Lord our, the afflicted believer s trust, iii. 325. 
Natural, fire of a man s own kindling, iii. 345. 



INDEX. 221 

Righteousness, Christ s, in its fulness and perfection, answers to all the par 
ticulars and aggravations of men s sinfulness, iv. 24. 
. Of Christ, of breadth enough to cover the sins of millions of worlds, 
iv. 2ioO. 

Of all creatures collected into one sum, could not free a sinner from 
the guilt of one sin, iv. 270 ; of Christ is of efficacy to serve for 
millions of sinners, of breadth to cover millions of worlds of sin, of 
length to reach to eternity, ib. 

Of Christ a glorious righteousness, iv. 828. 

Christ s being ours, depends more upon his being Jehovah, than on his 
being the Son of David, iv. 445. 

Of Christ, not only enough to pacify vengeance, but to bring us into 
favour with God, v. 135 ; its merit so great that it will not be 
rewarded to the full by all the blessedness of all the saints to eter 
nity, 136. 

Of Christ the Mediator, not the righteousness of the mediatorial office, 
communicated to believers, v. 338. 

Of Christ, made up of his active and passive obedience, v. 339 ; both 
these imputed for justification, ib. ; this proved in eight conclusions, 
ib. et seq. ; compared to the two natures of Christ, 349. 

All personal, evangelical as well as legal, excluded from justification, 
v. 352 ; proved at length from Philip, ii. 9, ib. et seq. ; instance of 
Abraham, 364. 

Of Christ manifested by his admission to his Father s presence, v. 415. 

Of a creature, cannot justify another, v. 506. 

Maxims according to which the Gentiles sought, vi. 314. 

Fruits of, what ? vii. 162 ; all sorts of holy actions, both towards God 
and man, springing from a heart made righteous, and conformable 
to, and brought forth according to, the righteous law of God, 163 ; 
what to be filled with ? 164 ; when all the members and faculties 
are filled with all righteousness proper to them, ib. ; when he 
abounds in good works of all sorts, 165 ; and at all times, 166 ; how 
they are by Jesus Christ, 170 ; they are from a workmanship created 
in him, ib. ; they are such as arise from his Spirit dwelling in the 
heart, ib. ; they flow from receiving his righteousness as our right 
eousness, ib. ; they are by motives drawn from him, 171 ; they flow 
from our union with his person, ib. ; they are done after his example, 
ib. ; we look for their acceptance though him, ib. ; in order that 
actions may be fruits of righteousness, they must be directed by the 
heart to the glory and praise of God, 172 ; shall all appear with a 
man in the day of judgment, 173. 

Of Christ, bestowed wholly and at once on calling, ix. 309 ; an ever 
lasting righteousness, 314. 

Elvers, represent cities, and their magistrates^ iii. 54. 
Rome, judgments upon, both temporal and spiritual, iii. 100. 
Roman empire, and the state of the church within its bounds, the main sub 
ject of the Book of Revelation, iii. 23. 

Empire, destruction of, subject of Rev. viii. and ix., iii. 208. 
Romans, Epistle to the, is a system of divinity methodically laid down, iv. 

272. 
Romancers place their characters in straits and difficulties, knowing how they 

are to bring them out, ix. 245. 
Romanists, called Gentiles, believers, idolaters, iii. 124. 

Deny that Christ suffered in his soul, v. 287. 



222 INDEX. 

Romanists deny the possibility of assurance except by special revelation, ix. 

280. 

Root of David, Christ why called, iii. 9, 212, 215 
* Royal Society, fellowship of, what, ix. 148. 

Sacraments, are seals added to the word of faith, iv. 14. 

SACRIFICE, THE ONE, v. 479. 

Sacrifices, what meant by eating of them, ii. 383. 

Daily, taking away, in Julian s time, iii. 199. 

Shedding of the blood of, represented Christ s making his soul an offer 
ing for sin, iv. 411. 

Unknown in a state of innocence, v. 174. 

Of Christ was himself, both body and soul, v. 177 ; its precious- 
ness, ib. 

Under the law, why not available for obtaining the pardon of certain 
sins, v. 425. 

Two things necessary to make acceptable, the altar and fire, vi. 36. 
SAINTS IN GLORY, BLESSED STATE OF, vii. 337. 
Saints nearer to Christ than angels, i. 169 ; love to, 274. 

Departed, presently enter into bliss, iii. 42. 

Intercession of, not taught in Scripture, iii. 216. 

Understand the mystery of the gospel as none else do, iv. 293. 

How they know the gospel otherwise than carnal men know it, iv. 295. 
See Carnal Men. 

Unable to satisfy for the sins of men, v. 80. 

Corruptions in all, more or less, answering to the sins of the wicked, 
vi. 480. 

All have, from the first, some knowledge of, and hold and maintain 
some fellowship with, God the Father and Christ, vii. 484. 

Their nearness and dearness to God, xii. 36. 

Dealing well or ill with, the great interest of kings and kingdoms, on 
which their welfare or ruin depends, xii. 37 ; instances in the kings 
of Sodom, ib. : of Egypt, 38 ; of Assyria, 39 ; of the Amorites, 
Moabites, and Edomites, 40 ; Tyre, 41 ; again Egypt, ib. ; Edom, 
42 ; the Persian and Grecian monarchies, 43 ; the Jews, 46 ; the 
Roman empire, 50 ; reasons, 52 ; their nearness and dearness to 
God, ib. ; their great interest in God, the governor of the world, 53 ; 
the interest of Jesus Christ himself, ib. 

Worship and truth, God s, are the three things in the world that are 

dear to him, xii. 116. 
Salutation, apostolical, i. 14. 
SALVATION, WORK OF THE HOLY GHOST IN, vi. 3. 

Salvation, its height and depth, ii. 201 ; God s utmost end in, 285 ; by 
grace, the great point of the gospel, 312 ; twofold meaning of, 314. 

Made sure by ransom, by power, by intercession, iv. 63. 

More than justification, iv. 68. 

Loved by the saints because it is God s, iv. 392. 

Of sinners, a work not of God s nature, but of his will, v. 485. 

Accomplished by three sorts of works, immanent in God towards us, 
transient in Christ for us, applicatory by the Spirit in us, vi. 405 ; 
the last, in some respects, the most abounding mercy, ib. 

The whole of, including glory, estated upon us at calling, ix. 321. 
Samaritans, accounted by the Jews as Gentiles, v. 466 ; yet not held by the 
apostles in the same position, 470. 



INDEX. 



223 



Samson, an example of relapsing again and again into sin iii 419 

A type of Christ, v. 152. 
Sanctification, prudence put for it, i. 135. 

Compared to the casting of metal into a mould, vi. 392; to engrafting 
397 ; to writing the law in the heart, 403. 

Consists of two parts, mortification of sin, and the new creature, ix. 

Is co-extensive with sin, x. 126. 

Must have two parts, corresponding to the privative and the positive 

evils of sin, x. 282. 
Sanhedrim, exceeded their legitimate power in the examination of Christ, 

Its constitution, xi. 201. 
Saracens, the fifth trumpet, iii. 27. 

Satan, has power to darken the spirit of a believer, iii. 246 ; by leading 
him to draw false conclusions from the testimony of the Spirit 247 
his favourite temptation to unbelief, 256. 

May have power given him of God to vex the believers spirits, iii. 258 ; 
deliverance to, in excommunication, what ? ib. ; has power to tempt 
a holy being only by outward suggestions, but an unholy also by in 
ward, 260. 

His great power to invent and suggest false reasonings, iii. 262 ; his 
power to adapt these reasonings to persons and seasons, 263 ; to dif 
ferent spiritual experiences, ib. ; to different degrees of knowledge, 
264 ; his false reasonings he can not only suggest, but insinuate with 
power, 265 ; yet he cannot enforce assent to them, 266 ; acts on 
the passions and the fancy, rather than on the understanding di 
rectly, ib. ; knows the answers that faith makes to his temptations, 
267 ; what power he may exercise over the conscience, 268, 282 
Cannot make us think sin worse than it is, but may make us think 
it unpardonable, and our own sins incompatible with a state of grace, 
270 ; why called xariryogoc,, and ia(3o\og, ib. ; how far he knows the 
secrets of the heart, 274 ; his darts why called fiery, 279 ; by false 
revelations confirms enthusiasts in their conceits, 286 ; God only 
can deliver from his temptations, 287. 

His power, v. 297 ; is over his own angels as his proper subjects, and 
men as his captives, 298 ; holds it by God s commission, and that 
by way of curse upon men, ib. ; Christ s quarrel with him, partly on 
his account, partly on ours, 300 ; his power over men not a natural, 
but an accidental, judicial power, limited by commission, 303 ; ex 
ceeded his commission when he assailed Christ, ib. 

Put to more shame when overcome by a Christian than when he was 
conquered by Christ, v. 315. 

Has still power allowed him over the saints to tempt them to sin, v. 
317 ; to accuse them to God, 826 ; and to bring affliction on them, 
328 ; does not know who are true believers and who not, ib. ; per 
mitted to assail believers only according to conditions, 321 ; cannot 
bring afflictions on them immediately, 328. 

Does not accuse as a mere slanderer, v. 326. 

Sin is the great work and interest of, vii. 254 ; a general engagement 
of all Christians against him as their common enemy, 257 ; onr 
sinnings, through his temptations, are the greatest, if not the only, 
delight and pleasure he hath, 260 ; story of the war against, 264 ; 
proclaimed by God in paradise, ib. ; carried on by the Old Testament 



224 INDEX. 

saints, 265 ; Christ came to secure the victory over him, 266 ; . the 
church universal engaged to fight under Christ s standard, ib. ; there 
can be no neutrality in this warfare, 267 ; this engagement a motive 
to holiness, ib. ; duty of resistance to, 271 ; cannot hurt any but those 
who yield to him, 272. 
Satan cannot devour by persecutions, but by temptations, ix. 402. 

Christ so triumphs over, that he makes his children set their feet on 

his neck, xii. 90. 
Satisfaction for sin, cannot be made by a creature, iii. 8. 

Christ s, the strength of all gospel promises, iv. 18. 

God might have pardoned sin without, but would not, v. 15 ; could not 
be made by men, 17 ; God himself provided, 18. 

Way of could not have been devised by all the wisdom of all intelligent 
creatures, v. 19. 

Christ s for sin, is the foundation of all blessings, v. 70 ; sufficiency of, 
ib. ; distinction between and restitution, 74 ; inability of all creatures 
to satisfy for sin, 75. 

Must be made to God and the law, v. 84 ; cannot be made by a creature, 
85 ; either by active obedience, 86 ; or by suffering punishment, 88 ; 
no creature can both obey and suffer at once, ib. ; every possible 
admission being made, one creature can but satisfy for one, 90 ; is 
either for goods or for honour, 91. 

To God for the injury done to his glory by sin, cannot be made by a 
creature, v. 93 ; a true satisfaction is a reductio ad aqualia, 99. 

To God s honour, required the abasement of the nature assumed by 
Christ, v. Ill ; matter of, lies principally in that the glory of Christ 
was not only lessened, but wholly taken away, 112 ; that the sub 
ject of the debasement was himself, his person, 114 ; that it was 
voluntary, 116. 

Made by Christ, superabundant, v. 125. 

Must be voluntary on the part of the satisfier, v. 493 ; must be con 
sented to by the party to be satisfied, 494. 

Saul, king, thought by some to have sinned the sin against the Holy Ghost, 
iv. 176 ; all his religion in his latter days was the exterminating of 
witches, yet went to one himself, 185. 

Sin for which he was rejected not greater than that of David, who yet 

was not rejected, ix. 193. 

Saviour, God has been, as Satan a murderer, from the beginning, iv. 222. 
Scape-goat, a type of Christ, v. 183. 

Its signification, v. 418. 
Scattering of all things by sin, i. 186. 

Schoolmen, their errors on the subject of regeneration, vi. 208. 
Scourging, of Christ was not by the Jews, who would not have exceeded forty 
stripes, but by the Romans, who were under no such restriction, v. 
270. 
Scripture, misunderstanding of, often a great temptation, iii. 268. 

Misunderstanding and misinterpreting of, a frequent cause of distress 
to believers, iii. 318. 

Their main object to set forth the full interest and purpose of God and 
Christ to pardon and receive sinners, iv. 207. 

In what sense said to be not of private interpretation, iv. 295. 

The knowledge of, makes a perfect divine, iv. 247, 301. 

Its right context, half the interpretation, v. 349. 

Contains enough to make a man a perfect divine, v. 537. 






INDEX. 225 

Scriptures of truth (Dan. x. 21), are the book of God s decrees, ix. 28. 

Perverted by unregenerate men to defend their state, x. 389. 
Sea, of glass, typified Christ s blood, iii. 5. 

Represents the extent of the jurisdiction of a kingdom, iii. 54, 102. 
Seal, the fifth, the persecution under Diocletian, iii. 40. 

The sixth, expresses the destruction of heathenism in the Roman em 
pire, iii. 42 ; not the day of judgment, 43. 
Of God set upon Christ as the Saviour, and upon all those who were to 

be saved, iv. 212. 
Seal- Prophecy, refers to the Roman empire, the book-prophecy to the church, 

iii. 25. 
Seals, of the book, to loose, what it denotes, iii. 8. 

Visions of, from 6th to 9th chapters of Revelation, iii. 17. 
Represent successive times, iii. 19. 
Seating of believers, i. 228, 231 ; when it takes place, 238 ; is the work of 

the Spirit, 245 ; sealing of Christ, 244 ; uses of, 252. 
Seed of the woman, who ? v. 310 ; both Christ personally, and the whole 

body of believers, 811. 
Of the serpent, who ? v. 312. 

Self, the most disingenuous, abominable principle that ever was, ix. 203. 
Self-confidence leads to trust in inherent evangelical righteousness for justifi 
cation, v. 361. 

Self-denial more acceptable to God than greater services without it, iii. 450. 
Self-examination, in discretion, recommended, iii. 316. 
Self-love, i. 188, 363 ; prompts to duties, 408 ; the bottom of original sin, 

411, ii. 90. 
Is essential to being, and cannot be destroyed, vi. 173 ; but must be 

sanctified, ib. 
A Proteus-monster, that assumes infinite varieties of forms, ix. 255 ; 

its effects in all wickedness, ib. 
The ground of all lusts, x. 61. 
Made by carnal men their judge, x. 390. 

1 Sense of the regenerate man relisheth the truths of the gospel, iv. 306. 
SERMONS, THREE, ON HEB. I. 1, 2, v. 523. 
Serpent s seed, i. 172. 

Said to die if a woman s naked foot tread on or touch its head, v. dlb. 
Servant, Christ made, not born, v. 132. 
Servants of righteousness equivalent to servants of God in righteousness, 

Service of *God is the end and fruit of our redemption by Christ, vii. 224 ; 
mistakes concerning, 226 ; in order to, we must know his will, and 
what will please him, ib. ; be careful of his business, 227 ; stand for 
his credit, 228 ; be subject to his will, set ourselves apart from all 
other business, 229 ; make a necessity of doing his will, 230 ; expect 
warrant from him for what we do, 231 ; do his will effectually, ib. 
Of Christ, much better, in its season, than enjoying communion 

Sexes, both share in the honour of redemption, in that the Rsdeeiner was a 

male, but born of a woman, v. 61. 
Shaking of the earth and heavens, what it signifies v. 442 ; not mere y 

putting an end to the Jewish polity and worship, 445 ; principally tl 

second coming of Christ, 448. 
Sheep may fall into the mire, swine lie down in it and wallow with Wight, 






ix. 314. 

VOL. XII. 



226 INDEX. 

Shepherd, Christ s being called, implies both his natures, v. 372 ; all his 
offices, 373 ; the good shepherd, and the great shepherd, 375. 

All the great patriarchs that were, were types of Christ, v. 872. 
Sight, spiritual, i. 377. 

Simon Magus, said to have taught antinomianism, ix. 202 ; represented him 
self to be the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, ib. 
SIN, AGGRAVATION OF, iv. 151. 

SINNING AGAINST KNOWLEDGE, AGGRAVATIONS OF, iv. 163. 
SINNING AGAINST MERCY, AGGRAVATIONS OF, iv. 188. 
SIN AND PUNISHMENT, AN UNREGENERATE MAN S GUILTINESS BEFORE GOD 

IN RESPECT OF, X. 1. 

Sin, no death but by it, ii. 14, 19 ; death in, threefold, 17 ; life of sin, 
21 ; walking in sin, ib. 

Committed against light, or unrepented of, or scandalous, or long for 
gotten, followed by darkness, iii. 294 ; though forgiven, must not be 
forgotten, 297. 

Aggravation of, answered in Christ s death, iv. 22. 

Hath debased the soul of man, the noblest creature under heaven, iv. 
153 ; denies it also, instantaneously, totally, eternally, 154 ; it hath 
robbed the soul of the image of God, ib. ; yea, of God himself, ib. ; 
hath hurled confusion over all the world, 155 ; laid the first corner 
stone of hell, ib. ; contains all evils else in it, ib. ; has transcendent 
peculiar mischief in it, that is not to be found in all other evils, 156 ; 
is contrary to God s essence, ib. ; to all his attributes, 157 ; his 
laws and ordinances, ib. ; his people, ib. ; his image, ib. ; aggra 
vated by the glory and dignity of God, against whom it is committed, 
ib. ; the least, virtually, more or less, contains all sin in the nature 
of it, ib. ; is its own worst punishment, 158. 

Unpardonable, requires two elements, light in the mind and malice in 
the heart, iv. 166. 

Is Deicidium, a destroying of God, as much as in us lies, iv. 160 ; is 
too powerful for all creatures to contend with, 161. 

A single, is stronger than any creature s holiness, iv. 269. 

Could it have been pardoned simply without satisfaction ? v. 72 ; punish 
ment of, is an act of God s will, not of his nature, ib. 

A wrong done to God, in various particulars, v. 92 ; even the least is 
a denial of his sovereignty, 94 ; is a virtual denial of his being, 95 ; 
its scope and tendency is to make God no god, 99. 

The taking away of, the greatest and most difficult business ever set on 
foot, v. 101. 

Its greatest evil is the injury it does to the honour, glory, and power 
of God, v. 103. 

Of men, paralleled with the satisfaction rendered by Christ, v. 127. 

A single one spoils and makes void all the good that is, or can be, in 
any creature, v. 130. 

In what sense Christ was made, for us, v. 185 ; not sin in the general, 
but particular sins imputed to him, ib. ; imputation is most abhor 
rent to his holiness, 186. 

Its heinousness most manifested in the sufferings of Christ, v. 287. 

Its nature and tendency, v. 491 ; to destroy God s law, ib. ; to darken 
and obscure his glory, ib. ; to destroy his very being, ib. 

Against the Holy Ghost, wherein it differs from other sins against 
knowledge, vii. 334 ; it is more than despising any part of the law, 
335 ; it is not every kind of despising the truths of the gospel, ib. ; 



INDEX. 227 

it is a hatred to God and Christ, and the light and work of the 
Spirit and his saints, a revengeful hatred, 336. 
Sin, the strength of, is the predominance of self-love, ix. 9. 

Man of, is antichrist, the pope and his deceiving clergy, ix. 171. 
Cannot provoke God to destroy his people, but it moves him to destroy 

it in them, ix. 348 ; not so hated by God as his Son is loved, ib. 
The greatest miseries that God s children have, ix. 405. 
And wrath, the condition of all by nature, and while in a state of nature, 

x. 3. 

Universality of, proved by the universality of death, x. 5, 
Derivation of ; can pass from one to another only by example or impu 

tation, x. 9. 
Adam s, derived by natural generation, x. 10; its guilt imputed, and the 

corruption of nature conveyed, 11. 

Every act of, denies the soul, x. 49 ; one act of, expels all grace, ib. ; 
and this both personally and causally, 50 ; separates between God 
and man, ib. ; is contrary to holiness, ib. ; one act of sin is stronger 
than all created grace and holiness in itself, ib. ; derives its power 
from the law, 51. 

Called a body, because it consists of many parts, x. 63. 
Every man is prone to all, and hath all in him, x. 59 ; acknowledged 

even by the heathen, 60 ; objections answered, 64, 
Its manifestation modified by various circumstances, x. 65. 
Against the Holy Ghost can only be committed by those who are en 

lightened, x. 67 ; the heathens not capable of it, 84. 
Original, more to be mourned over than all actual, x. 81 ; is the mother 
of all actual sins, ib. ; is able to produce millions more than it has 
ever produced, 82 ; consists of a privation of righteousness and holi 
ness, and a proneness to all evil, 85. 

Is a disorder and confusion of all the powers of the soul, x. 125. 
Pervades the whole being of man, x. 128 ; proved at length, 129. 
In general has two distinct evils in it, a privative and a positive, x. 281 ; 

Is either in our actions or inclinations, 282. 
Two glasses in which its deformity may be seen ; Adam s fact in para 

dise, Christ s sufi ering on the cross, x. 358. 
Sins, old, should be remembered, ii. 201. 

After prayers hinder their answers, iii. 402. ^ 

Greatness and numbers of, a discouragement to the exercise ot iaitn, 

iv. 10. ., 

Of believers forgiven in virtue of Christ s intercession through the merit 

of his sacrifice, iv. 66. 

Their multitude, iv. 158 ; to be yet in, what, 159. ^ _ 
Against knowledge, may be either of omission or commission, iv. Ibd. 
Against knowledge, or presumptuous sins, are the next step to 

unpardonable sin, iv. 166. 

Some committed at once, others continuously, iv. 175. 
Distinction of, under the law, v. 424 ; committed after believing, how 



Takml^wayof, the great business of the gospel, v. 483 ; could have 
been" easily dine, by taking away the sinners,^ ; "**"^ 
have been taken away by a covenant of pardon, not determined, 

Committed before conversion, how to be turned to good account after, 
vTlOl ; as a help and furtherance to faith, 102; for intensifying 



228 INDEX. 

love to God, 109 ; for leading to more fruitfulness, 112 ; for making 
and keeping us humble, 114 
Sins, whether before or after regeneration, should not prejudice one in the 

ministry who truly returns to God, vi. 521. 
When finally forgiven, shall be for ever forgiven, ix. 99. 
After conversion pardoned, ix. 313. 

Innumerable, x. 442 ; the account of every man s, who is grown up to 
years, infinite and numberless, 466 ; God sets the main account of, 
on their number, 471 ; reasons of this, 482. 
Sincerity implies a right intention, aiming at God, vii. 145 ; a bent of will 

to all the commandments that we know to be such, ib. 
Sin/illness, abounding, of men by nature, x. 40. 
Sinlessness, absolute, unattainable by saints in this life, v. 427. 
Sinners, encouraged to seek pardon from the example of Adam and Eve, x. 37. 
Sitting, in heavenly places in Christ, ii. 55. 

Christ s, at God s right hand, a support of faith, iv. 49 ; proves that he 
has done all his work for satisfaction, and that God is satisfied with 
it, ib. ; implies sovereignty of power, 52 ; and of authority and 
judgment, 53 ; his sitting is not merely as a Son, but as a head, ib. ; 
what is meant by our sitting with him, 54. 

Socinus, his denial that Christ raised himself from the dead, i. 460. * 
Socinians deny satisfaction, as inconsistent with free grace, iv. 277. 

Make reason the supreme judge of the mysteries of the gospel, iv. 304 ; 
would be right if God intended that these mysteries should be known 
to all men, and not to the saints only, ib. 

Their impudence in denying the pre-existence of Christ, iv. 407. 
Their view of the forgiveness of sins derogatory to God s grace and 
Christ s satisfaction, v. 424 ; their estimate of Christ s sacrifice, ib. 
Hold man s nature at his first creation not to have been holy, but only 

indifferent, vii. 30. 
Altogether deny original sin, x. 324. 

Socrates, put to death by the Athenians for reproving them, iv. 172 ; would 

not accept life on condition of concealing his knowledge of God, 173. 

Solomon, a controversy in the church whether he were saved or not, vii. 156. 

His prayer at the dedication of the temple, ix. 119 ; his temple and the 

ark in it a type of Christ, 120. 

His sins greater for kind than those even of Saul or David, ix. 193. 
Never forsook the worship of God altogether, nor grew into an utter 

profaneness of spirit, ix. 390. 

Marry ing Pharaoh s daughter, a type of Christ s callingthe Gentiles, xii. 35. 

* Son of God, this title given to Christ by way of singularity, iv. 425 ; called 

Grod his own Father in a sense in which he is not the Father of any 

other, ib. ; called the only-begotten Son, 427. 

Or second person, before his incarnation acted as God and man de jure, 

as God-man contracted, iv. 515. 
Song, new, ii. 14, 216. 
Sonship, object of, is a person, not a nature, v. 543. 

Of God, the greatest benefit and honour that can be bestowed on us, 

vi. 179; its original is the good pleasure of his will, ib. ; is bestowed 

by Jesus Christ, and is possessed by virtue of a relation to him, 180. 

Of believers, is through communication with him who is the Son, v. 43. 

Sorrow should be for sin more than for misery, v. 188. 

After a godly sort, is mainly for offending God, and piercing Christ, 
vi. 438. 



INDEX. 229 

Sorrow, godly, for sin, its effects illustrated in the Corinthians, x. 357 ; care 
and fear, ib. ; indignation and revenge, ib. ; desire and zeal, 359 ; 
cleansing ourselves, ib. 
Soul, death of, ii. 210. 

In heaven, prosecute their interests on earth, iii. 42. 
Dispositions of, when wound up to give glory to God for what is in him 
self, iv. 399 ; it sees so much of the glory of God, that it is at a loss 
what praise to give him, ib. ; it extendeth itself to praise God in all 
times, 400 ; it rejoices that God hath been celebrated by others, in 
all ages, 401 ; it would extend itself to call persons, and things, and 
works of God, to praise him, ib. ; it will still praise God, though it 
be in the lowest frame, the worst condition that can be, 402. 
Living, distinction between, and quickening spirit, vii. 78. 
Is the immediate subject of grace, vii. 417 ; is the immediate and pri 
mitive subject of holiness, 418 ; is as capable of glory when separate 
as when it shall again be united to the body, ib. ; salvation of, in 
what sense the end of faith, 422. 
Of a believer, has always a guard about it, even the whole power of 

God, ix. 359. 

Sometimes taken for the person, ix. 417. 
Of man hath lost its right way to happiness, x. 63 ; its lusts are become 

boundless, 64. 

Without the body, is capable of glory, xii. 9. 

By its creation a spirit, and more nearly allied to God than any other 
creature, except angels, xii. 17 ; condition of, at death, would be 
miserable, if there were not an immediate state of glory, 18. 
Of saints, instantly after death, received into a state of glory, vii. 411 ; 

rise through several states of glory, 440. 

Soul-suffering of Christ, came on him by degrees, v. 274 ; occasioned by the 

sins of the world imputed to him, and the curse or wrath of God upon 

him for those sins, 275 ; consisted in the loss of all comfort (pcena 

damni), and the curse and wrath of God (pcena sensus), 278. 

Sovereignty of God hath fundamental laws, as all well-regulated kingdoms 

have, ix. 239. 

Sparks, of men s kindling, what, iii. 336. 
Speeches, good and holy, value of, vi. 518. 
tipira, the guilt of his apostasy, iv 178. 

Spirit, The Holy, called the Spirit of promise, i. 246, 249; the great pro- 
mise of the New Testament, 246 ; waiting for, 248 ; an earnest, 25 b, 
259 ; witnessing of, 306 ; his assistance to unrenewed men, d 
natural principles improved by, 405. 
Spirit, in the ; phrase explained, iii. 2. ... 

Not the direct author of a believer s doubts of his state, 111. Steb ; yet 
may concur in the believer s darkness by suspending his testimony ^ol 
his adoption, 244 ; by representing God as angry with his child for 
former sins, ib. ; or by holding out to him, as a warning, the t 
enings of God s word, 245. ... 

Teaches to pray, not according to GodY secret, but his reveale 

Intercedes on earth, because Christ intercedes in heaven, iv. 107. 
The only infallible interpreter of the mysteries of the gospel, J^o. 
In Christ, frequently taken for the Godhead, or divine nature 
in him, iv. 444. . . ., 

As opposed to flesh, is a new disposition or temper c 



- 

VI. lUzi 






280 



INDEX. 



comprehending gracious and heavenly dispositions wrought in the 
whole soul, elevating and raising it, and fitting it unto things spiritual, 
as spiritual, ib. 
Spirit, restraining and elevating power of, not saving grace, vi. 432. 

Doth not pray immediately himself, but forms our prayers in us, ix. 126. 

That quickeneth, and flesh that profiteth nothing, what, viii. 174. 

As a comforter, and all his comforts, received for us by Christ, as soon 

as he set his foot in heaven, ix. 353. 
Spirits, seven, are the Holy Ghost, in respect of his various effects both in 

Christ and in us, iv. 121. 

Both in heaven and in hell, remember occurrences here below, iv. 142. 
Seven, before the throne ; that is, Jehovah, as he is everlasting and hath 

fulness of being in himself, iv. 375. 

Spiritual body, is not spirit in respect of substance, but like a spirit in re 
spect of power, iv. 144. 

Things, what they are, vi. 164; God himself and Christ, 165; all 
blessings, ib. ; all graces of the Spirit, ib. ; all the immediate duties 
of God s worship, ib. ; all moral duties, as they are directed to God, 
?5. ; how natural men may be exercised about, 169. 
Or resurrection body, its excellences above Adam s, vii. 99, 110. 
Body, shall be the same body that we have now, vii. 112 ; shall have 
all its parts and members that now it hath, 114 ; all these parts 
shall have use in heaven, in a spiritual way, and shall have objects 
suited to them, ib. ; why called a spiritual body, 115 ; compared 
with Adam s in respect of suitableness to the objects of heaven, 116; 
of beauty, 121 ; of healthful constitution, 123 ; of immortality, 125 ; 
through the indwelling of the Spirit, shall be the temple of God in 
the highest sense, 127. 
Spiritualising, excessive, danger of, vi. 161. 
STATE, BLESSED, OF THE SAINTS IN GLORY, vii. 837. 

AND KINGDOMS, GREAT INTEREST OF, xii. 31. 
State-policy, often leads men into mischief and sin, v. 238. 
Stephen, his vision, i. 467. 

His prayer answered in the conversion of Paul, iii. 365. 
Strangers to God, are yet enemies to him, x. 118 ; signs of strangeness, ib. 
Strength, spiritual, twofold, that of habitual graces, the other assistant thereto 

from the Spirit, vii. 508. 
Suarez, his character, as a writer, ii. 37. 
Suffering may be avoided by all lawful means, v. 202. 

Necessary before perfecting, ix. 398 ; appointed of God out of grace, 

400. 
Of Christ, to be the object of faith, must be viewed with reference to 

their intent, iv. 18. 

Of Christ, set forth at length in an exposition of John xviii., v. 196. 
Sun, moon, and stars, mean emperors and governors, iii. 45, 54. 

SUPEREMINENCE OF CHRIST ABOVE MOSES, V. 437. j 

Supralapsarians and Sublapsarians, their opinions, ix. 86. 

And Sublapsarian views of election, ix. 344 ; a middle view, ib. 

Supper, The Lord s, ends of, ii. 382. 

Supplication, spirit of, in prayer, rests upon a man afterwards as the spirit 
of obedience, iii. 881. 

Surety, and common person (or attorney) differences between, iv. 27; Christ 
is both, ib. ; is more than a mediator or intercessor, 29 ; the surety 
ship of Christ such as is not to be found among men, ib. 



INDEX. 



, 

Sword of the Spirit, iii. 273, 280. 

Sympathy in Christ, not a weakness, but a power, iv 113 

Synagogues of the Jews had no ceremonial worship in them v 255 

Analogies between Jewish, and Christian congregation s, xi. 69. 
Synods, elective occasional, allowed, xi. 237; but have no ^ower to rescind 
a sentence, 238 ; or to compel a church to receive again a brother 

7hnTh Ln aV6 xc mmu icated > * ; or to excommunicate other 
lurches, MO ; standing and subordinates disallowed, 248. 

Taste of the word of God, &c., how unregenerate men may have x 188 

aTir 8 f her intercession for Absalom > illustrative of Christ s for 

TEMPLE, ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO FINISH, xii. 101. 
Temple, Solomon s, alluded to in John s vision, iii. 2. 

Its dedication a type of Christ s consecration to the work of redemption, 

And ark in it, a type of Christ, ix. 120. 

Finishing it, so important that two prophets were employed to put 
them on it, xii. 104 ; state of things when Zerubbabel was building, 

Temporal things, promises respecting them not universal or absolute, but 

indefinite, iii. 370. 

Temporary believers, their highest attainments fall short of a work of grace, 
vi. 319 ; distinctions between, and those truly called, clearly laid 
down in Peter s epistles, 324 ; importance of distinguishing, 326 
reasons why God allows, 329. 

Believers do not see spiritual things in their spiritual nature, though 
they may see an accidental goodness in them, viii. 268 ; their know 
ledge not real, ib. 
Temporaries, God s dispensations towards, serve to glorify electing grace, 

ix. 185. 
Temptations may prevail for an act or many acts, but not uninterruptedly, 

formally, or wholly, ix. 316. 
Befall all Christians, vii. 273. 
Christ s in the wilderness were the heads of all sorts of temptations, iv. 

148. 
Of Christ, mere and pure sufferings to him, ix. 352 ; therefore merito 

rious to purchase ability to succour them that are tempted, ib. 
Of Christ, was according to God s appointment, ix. 399. 
Are accounted sufferings as well as persecutions, ix. 402 ; work together 

for good to them who love God, 406. 
Tenderness of Christ s heart, ix. 354. 

Testimony of experience to the truth of God s promises, vii. 136. 
Thankfulness, how to stir up our hearts to it, i. 269. 
Thanks, duty of, i. 280. 

Thanksgiving, a higher exercise than prayer, praise than thanksgiving, iv. 384. 
Theology, system of, consists of three main parts, vi. 360. 
Thessalonians appear to have kept their first conversion work purer than any 

other of the churches to whom the apostle wrote, ix. 380. 
Thieves, penitent and impenitent, instances of the difference between the 

election and the rest, ix. 184. 
* Thorn in the flesh, rather a desertion than a lust, iii. 290. 



232 



INDEX. 



Thorns, crown of, remained on Christ s head on the cross, v. 269. 
Thorny ground in the parable and in the Hebrews, expounded, vi. 335. 
Thought* , evil, not coming to the heart, nor passing through it, but lodging 

in it, distinguish the wicked, iii. 509 ; how sinful, 512. 
Goodness of, depends on their seasonableness, iii. 516. 
Evil, the oldest sons of original sin, iii. 524 ; remedies against, 526. 
The best indication of the state of the heart, vi. 476 ; how far a godly 

man s may be taken up with his worldly business, 479. 
Thousands, 144, that were sealed, who ? iii. 58. 

144, sealed, Rev. vii., eastern Christians, iii. 208 ; those in chap, xiv., 

western Christians, ib. 

Threatening*) have no place or influence in the life of glory, vii. 32. 
THEEE SEVERAL AGES OF CHRISTIANS IN FAITH AND OBEDIENCE, vii. 473. 
Throne, Christ s, both founded and upheld by grace, iv. 131. 
Thundering and lightnings, what, iii. 4. 
Time, of Christ s coming, fitness of, i. 202. 

Not only precious in itself, but because of its opportunities, iv. 193. 
Times, fulness of, i. 201 ; dispensation of, 204. 
Timothy, though a towardly child and well educated, was not converted till 

his manhood, vi. 87. 

Titles of the God-man, Jesus, Christ, and Lord, comprehend a respect 
unto all God s purposes, of what sort soever, iv. 532 ; in what sense 
called the everlasting Father, 536. 
Transfiguration of Christ intended to exhibit the glory of the gospel, 

iv. 316. 

Was a manifestation of Christ s personal glory, iv. 499. 
Christ s, shews the glory of the resurrection body, vii. 104. 
Was a glimpse of the glory of his kingdom, viii. 388. 
Treasures on earth and in heaven, what they are, vi. 462. 
Treaties of war and peace are the prerogatives of kings, and so of God, 

iii. 407. 
Trees of life and of the knowledge of good and evil, sacraments, x. 8. 

Of life and knowledge were two sacraments, xi. 41. 

Trials, spiritual, of believers, a warning to unbelievers, iii. 308 ; a lesson to 
those believers who have not experienced them, 309 ; to lead them 
selves to thankfulness to Christ, who bore so much more, and to pity 
others in like condition, and to warn others, 311 ; and to avoid sin, 
312. 
On occasion of special, God seems to seal up something to a man s 

soul of special grace to him, vii. 158. 

And probations, in themselves, endanger the spiritual life, ix. 416. 
Trinity, concurrence of the three persons in all the works of, i. 461. 

Mystery of, unfolded in the gospel, iv. 231 ; election by the Father, 

redemption by the Son, sanctification by the Spirit, ib. 
Scarcely traceable in creation or in the law, iv. 263. 
Arguments for the doctrine of, from the writings of Moses, iv. 352. 
Doctrine of, to be received by faith, yet not contradictory to reason, 

iv. 361. 

All the three persons of, concur in every divine act, vi. 417. 
Doctrine of; its great importance, ix. 145. 
Triumph of Christ over Satan, v. 305. 
Trouble, not itself the ground of peace, but the means to lead us to seek 

peace in Christ, iv. 13. 
Trumpet, seventh, and seventh vial, contemporaneous, iii. 21. 



INDEX. 233 

Trumpets, the first four, are the wars of the Goths and Vandals, iii. 53 ; 

the fifth, the Saracens ; and the sixth, the Turks, ib. 
Trust is an essential part of faith, and an eminent act of it, viii. 120. 

Is the essential form of justifying faith, viii. 308. 

Truth, God takes not away from any man or any nation, unless they will 
ingly part with it, iv. 248. 
Three several degrees of the revelation of; in the light of nature, the 

law, and the gospel, vi. 357. 
Truths, of great importance what a man holds most eminent in his religion, 

iv. 298. 

Of the gospel, all suited to the regenerate part of man, iv. 305. 
Of the gospel, are all precious, iv. 307 ; in respect of their antiquity, 
ib. ; their being far-fetched, ib. ; their being dearly bought, 308 ; 
their being charily and warily laid up, ib. ; their being incorruptible, 
ib. 
Of the gospel have all been tried and suffered for in conflicts with 

heathens and heretics, iv. 313. 
Turks, the sixth trumpet, iii, 27. 
Types of the old law were in force until Christ s ascension, iv. 58. 

Of Christ, what is attributed to them as the shadows, must needs be in 
a more divine and super-eminent manner ascribed to him as the sub 
stance, v. 148. 

Of a thing to come is a prophetical resemblance, wherein something 
more imperfect going before is intended by God to signify something 
more noble and perfect to follow after, vii. 71 ; not all resemblances 
are types, 72 ; general rule for explaining, 92. 
Have the nature of prophecies to be fulfilled, vii. 309. 
Are never complete representations of all that belongs to the thing typi 
fied, ix. 49 ; rule for interpreting, 50, 78. 

Tyre, people of, were the most civil and ingenuous of all the heathens, 
ix. 175. 

Unbelief, sin of, i. 225 ; a prison, ii. 343, 

The sin which troubles Christ most in his disciples, iv. 106. 

The great sin under the gospel, viii. 329. 

In the hearts of all men by nature, x. 226 ; proved from experience, 
ib. ; when strong convictions come into the mind that there is a God 
and a day of judgment, they are felt to be new and strange, ib. ; 
when any man is converted to God, he learns these common prin 
ciples anew, ib. ; when any man is left to the doubtmgs of his own 
heart, he calls these principles in question, 227 ; the stronger any 
man grows in faith, the more he is conscious of his tendency to un 
belief, ib. ; men s lives and actions, in times of trial and temptation, 
shew it, 228 ; their hearts failing them in times of distress, 22J ; 
reasons of, 230 ; man will naturally believe nothing but what he sees, 
ib transcendency of spiritual things above our conceptions, ib ; 
contrariety of spiritual truths to men s hearts and ways, ib.- was the 
chief of man s first sin, 231 ; men naturally believe no jtha .there 
is a God, ib. ; or, at least, believes not his attributes, 232 ; 
neither the promises nor the threatemngs of his word, 23o , b 
not that there is a world to come, 236. 

Unblameableness, i. 80. , . * i 

Vnchangeablene** of God s will, founded on the unchangeableness 
nature, ix. 302. 



234 INDEX. 

Understanding, opposition of, to conversion, i. 362 ; consents to every act 
of sin, ii. 94 ; corruption of, 109. 

As made spiritual, is the palate of the soul, vii. 143. 

So corrupted and darkened that it would, if left to itself, deny the ex 
istence of God, x. 91. 

The supreme and most spiritual faculty of man s mind, is corrupted, 
and needs renewing, x. 132 ; this a paradox to the heathen philo 
sopher, and to many of the schoolmen, ib.; proved from Scripture, 133 ; 
by reasons, 134 ; is the chief subject, both of sin and grace, 135 ; 
Christ s prophetical office hath mainly reference to, 137 ; its defect 
and pravity the original and root of all sin in the other powers of 
the soul, 138 ; both negatively and positively, ib. ; is itself the chief 
transactor of many sins, 139 ; difference between its natural defects 
and its spiritual defilement, 140. 

Ungodliness, an element in man s natural corruption, x. 89 ; in the specu 
lative judgment or understanding, leading us to deny God s existence, 
91 ; in the practical judgment, leading us to disown him, 92 ; alien 
ation of the will and affections from him, 93 ; objections answered, 
94. 
Union, with himself, God s ultimate design towards his elect, i. 181. 

With Christ, not always clearly discerned by the believer, iii. 446. 

With Christ, one of the greatest mysteries of the gospel, iv. 340 ; set 
out and paralleled by the union of Christ with his Father, ib. ; whether 
it is with the human nature of Christ first, and by it with the God 
head, or with the Godhead immediately, 341. 

Personal, of the man Jesus with the Son of God, demonstrates the dis 
tinction of persons in the Godhead, iv. 361 ; stands apart from the 
union of believers in the Father and the Son, 363. 

Of Christ with his Father has its parallel, though with infinite dispro 
portion, in that of his people with him, iv. 870. 

Of the divine and human nature in Christ stands in the middle between 
two other unions, that of the three persons in the Godhead, and that 
of us with God, iv. 439 ; proves the distinction between the persons 
in the Godhead, 442. 

Of the saints with the Son of God, different from that of the man Jesus, 
iv. 512 ; the one is derived from the other as its original, and is but 
by a beholding of the other, ib. 

Of the elect with Christ, the foundation of all promises, blessings, life, 
justification, grace, v. 30. 

With Christ the fundamental thing of justification, and sanctification, 
and all, v. 350. 

With God the design of election, ix. 105, 111 ; the foundation of com 
munication, ib. 

The grand subject of Christ s prayers, ix. 107; improperly limited to 
the union of believers to one another, ib. ; immediately intended of 
our union with God and Christ, ib. ; this interpretation vindicated, 
109; the highest the creature was capable of, 113; is the sub- 
limest, highest, purest, that can be conceived for creatures, 115; 
is indispensable, ib. ; reasons by which Christ pleads for it, 126 ; 
the greatest truth concerning our salvation, 136. 
Unity of God, iv. 349. 
UNREGENERATE MAN S GUILTINESS BEFORE GOD, IN RESPECT OF SIN AND 

PUNISHMENT, x. 1. 
Unregenerate men, their misery, ii. 53. 



INDEX. 235 

llnregenerate men, who live under the gospel, set up conscience for religion, 
vi. 251; notwithstanding the light of conscience, are in darkness, 
256. 

The, practical light that works on, falls short of the knowledge of God 
as God, vi. 269 ; how their virtues fall short of holiness, 278. 

May be enlightened and awakened by the Spirit, vi. 433. 

How they may taste ol the powers of the world to come, vi. 468. 

Are unable to discern spiritual things spiritually, x. 146 ; not only 
said in Scripture to sit in darkness, but to be darkness itself, 148 ; 
have veils, scales, and films before their eyes, 149 ; want the very 
faculty of seeing, ib. ; reasons, 151 ; the vast distance and difference 
between the object and the faculty, ib. ; the power of understanding 
spiritual things is part of that image of God which was lost in Adam, 
152; this inability consistent with responsibility, 154, 

Men, make more conscience of duties of the second table than of the 
first, x. 404 ; want the chief virtues and graces of the gospel, 405 ; 
their virtues grow up in them spontaneously, ib. ; grow not up to 
an increase, ib. ; their abstinence from sin and vicious practices is 
only such as they can practise with ease, ib. ; are guided in their 
ways by considerations of fleshly wisdom, ib. ; that which is in them 
they have by education, industry, &c., 406 ; their religious exercises 
do not quicken or build up their hearts in grace, ib. ; their self-de 
ception in regard to their state, 407 ; their morality lies most in 
negatives, 408 ; their actions have no true goodness in them, ib. ; 
especially as regards the manner of doing them, 409. 
Unthankfulness, a cause of desertion, iii. 299. 
Utmost, salvation to the, what it implies, iv. 90. 

Vanity, what ? iii. 512 ; lightness, folly, inconstancy, wickedness, ib. 

Variableness and shadow of turning, explanation of the terms, ix. 302 ; have 
reference to the two motions of the sun, daily and yearly, ib. ; com 
mentators differ as to which corresponds to which, 303. 

Variety of God s dealings, v. 531 . 

Vials, five upon the pope, the sixth upon the Turks, and the seventh upon 

both, iii. 28. 

Begin with the first separation from Home, iii, 98 ; expressed in allu 
sion to the plagues of Egypt, 99. 

First five on the pope, sixth on the Turk, seventh upon both, iii. 209. 
Fourth and fifth, what they are supposed to be, v. 209. 

Vines require more care than any other plants, iii. 438. 

Vintage, Eev. xiii. 17, what ? iii. 89. 

Virgins, parable of the wise and foolish, an argument for abiding principles 

of grace, vi. 200. 

Both wise and foolish, kept themselves undefiled from some corruptions 
and adulterous practices which others are given to, x. 71. 

Virtues, all that are in the creatures are more properly in God, viii. 104. 

Vivification, growth in, iii. 457. 

Voices out of the throne, what? iii. 5. 

1 Volume of the book, Heb. x. 7, its meaning, vii. 70. 

Waldus, Peter, his conversion, iii. 87 ; he and his followers began preach 
ing, ib. ; excommunicated, and went into Picardy, then into the low 
countries, Germany and Bohemia, ib. . 

Walking in sin, ii. 21 ; according to the prince of the power of the air, 5U. 



INDEX. 

Walking with God, a main part of, consists in prayers and their answers, 

iii. 362. 

Washing the disciples feet, when his thoughts were of his approaching 
glory, designed to shew what would be Christ s care of his people 
when he should come to that glory, iv. 98 ; not only an example of 
love and humility, but also signifies the washing away of sin, ib. 
Of the disciples feet, its mystery, ix. 414. 
Watchfulness, need of, x. 83. 
Wavering, what it is, viii. 439. 
Weakness, the more conscious we are of our own, the more we are strong, 

vii. 517. 

Westminster Assembly did not assert the jus divinum of presbytery, xi. 208. 
Wickedness, in the genius and disposition of it, equalled by grace in the 

saints, iv. 382. 
Wickliff, Huss, and Jerome, represented by the second angel, Rev. xiii. 8, 

iii. 88. 
Will of God, the good pleasure of, i. 104, 145; mystery of, 138; counsel 

of, 217. 

Of men, God s rule over, i. 213. 
Human, of Christ, freedom of, i. 353. 

God s power in renewing it, i. 380 ; the chief seat of corruption, ii. 94. 
God s approving and decreeing, distinguished, iii. 378. 
Of man, the proper seat of sin, ix. 9. 
And affections, corruptions of, x. 278. 
Willingness in sinning, the standard and measure of sin, iv. 169. 

Of God to pardon sinners, shewn by his transactions with Christ from 

everlasting, iv. 211. 

Wine in the Lord s Supper represents the pouring forth of his soul, v. 287. 
Wisdom, distinguished from prudence, i. 132; patience called so, ii. 461. 
In Job and the Proverbs, means that wisdom which will save men, 

iv. 285. 

Of Christ, the image of the divine omniscience, iv. 464, 
Of God, more fully communicated to man through the revelation of 

Christ than otherwise it could have been to any creature, iv. 483. 
In Proverbs the same with the Word in John, iv. 419. 
Near akin, or all one with Word, iv. 551. 
God s, the mediator between his justice and mercy, v. 16. 
Worldly, not a help, but the greatest hindrance, to grace, ix. 179. 
Expressly consists in choosing the best end, and the fittest means of 

attaining it, x. 199. 

Directions for the attaining of, x. 214 ; apprehend and acknowledge 
our folly, ib. ; go to God to give us wisdom to turn our hearts, 215 ; 
go to God in Christ, and for Christ, who is made to us wisdom, ib. ; 
turn to the wisdom of the just, ib. 
Wise, the godly man alone is so, i. 137. 
Withering of the unfruitful branches, what ? iii. 455. 
Witnesses, the two, iii. 142 ; why called olive-trees, 144 ; their destroying 

their enemies with fire in the fourth vial, ib. 
Their withholding rain, what ? iii. 145 ; their destroying with fire, 

what ? 146 ; their being olive-trees, 149. 

Their killing, iii. 153 ; opinions as to the time of it, 155 ; in the man 
ner there is an allusion to Christ s death and resurrection, 159. 
To lie dead for three years and a half, iii. 162 ; their killing to be a 
civil killing, as they are witnesses, 164 ; yet may be attended with 



INDEX. 



237 

bloodshed and martyrdom, 165 ; nations seeing their dead bodies 
what ? 171 ; not suffering them to be buried, probably to be taken 
in malam partem, 172, 176. 

Witnesses, killing of, probably not a general massacre, iii. 175 ; some one king- 
dom or state may be more eminently the scene of it, 176 ; perhaps 
Britain, 177 ; their resurrection and its circumstances like that of 
Christ, 180 ; denotes their full restoration to their former state, 181 ; 
their ascension to heaven denotes their elevation to a more honour 
able condition than they ever had before, 182 ; the first step towards 
the New Jerusalem, 193, 

The three earthly agree in one, the three heavenly are one, iv. 218. 
Witches, their relation to the devil by covenant, x. 51. 
Woman, who washed Christ s feet with her tears, &c., was neither Mary 
Magdalene nor Mary of Bethany, x. 473 ; her conduct, an example 
of repentance, 474. 

Word, Christ the, both as second person and as God-man, iv. 549. 
Near akin, or identical with, the other title of Wisdom, 551. ; 
Engrafted, changes the stock into its own nature, vi. 197; is the law 

of God written in the heart, ib. 

Mightiness of its operation, vii. 304 ; prepares for the great assize of 
the last day, 305 ; then will be the discoverer of all sins, known and 
unknown, ib. ; will be men s judge, 306. 
Of God, an armoury of weapons that God hath in readiness to avenge 

all disobedience, x. 124. 

Of God, perfect in whatever it meddles with, xi. 21. 
WORK OF THE HOLY GHOST IN OUR SALVATION, vi. 3. 
Works, dead, the works of unregenerate men, v. 404. 

And grace, the only two ways that can possibly be supposed of attain 
ing salvation, vi. 232. 

Judgment shall be according to, as evidences of a man s state, vii. 182. 
WORLD TO COME, xii. 81, 92. 

World, the course of it, what ? ii. 25 ; deliverance from, 30 ; its charac 
ter the same amid all changes, 31. 
Worlds, made by Christ, v. 545. 
World, a large shop of vanity, vi. 462. 

. Inward affection to, a note of enmity to God, x. 119 ; its spiritual 

adultery, ib. ; to be used, God to be enjoyed, ib. 

To come, an intermediate state between the world as it now is, and 
what shall be after the resurrection, xii. 86 ; that world prepared for, 
and subject to, Christ, 87 ; shall not be subject to angels, but to 
Christ and his babes and sucklings, 89 ; is not after the day of judg 
ment, 93 ; 

Foundation of, laid by Christ in bringing in the gospel, xii. 94 ; all the 
dross and defilement that antichrist and popery hath brought into the 
world shall be destroyed, 95 ; the generality of men in the world 
shall be subject to Christ, ib. ; both Jews and Gentiles shall be called 
home, 96. 

Wormwood, represents Augustulus, the last of the western emperors, iii. 55. 
Worth, personal, of Christ, fitted him for his office, iii. 211. 
Wounds of conscience, in God s people, God alone can cure, iii. 407. 
Wrath, children of, ii. 117 ; all are by nature, 138. 

Difference between a child under, and a child of, iii. 314. 
Of God, how Christ could endure, v. 280 ; he bore as a surety, what 
was inflicted by the Judge, 282. 



238 INDEX. 

Wrath of God, set forth under the image of fire, and fiery indignation, x. 501. ; 

instances of men who have felt it in this life, 507 ; fulness of, be- 

falleth men in hell, 510. 
Writings and conferences of godly men to be used as helps for attaining a 

knowledge of the Scriptures, iv. 301. 

* Young men, who so called in 1 John ii., vii. 500 ; they are most liable 
to be assaulted with lusts, 501 ; in what sense they are said to have 
overcome Satan, 504. 

Zaccheus, a Gentile, admitted on his conversion to the privileges of the 

Abrahamic covenant, ix. 430. 
Zechariah, his vision, xii. 106. 

ZERUBBABEL S ENCOURAGEMENT TO FINISH THE TEMPLE, xii. 101. 
ZION S GLORY, A GLIMPSE OF, xii. 61. 



INDEX OF TEXTS, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



Gen. i. 


vn. 120 


Gen. iii. 8, 9, . ; 


x. 108 


i. 1. 


i. 500 


iii. 10, 


x. 88 


i. 2, 


iv. 355 


iii. 10, 15, . 


x. 36 


i. 2, 


vi. 387 


iii. 12, 


i. 535 


i. 2, 


n. 123 


iii. 14, 


vii. 264 


i. 11, 24, . 


x. 342 


iii. 15, 


ii. 38 


i. 14, 


ix. 301 


iii. 15, 


v. 309 


i. 21, 24, . 


vi. 204 


iii. 15, 


x. 116 


i. 43, 44, . 


iv. 352 


iii. 17, 


vi. 340 


i. 26, 


iv. 354 


iii. 17, 


x. 8 


i. 26, 


iv. 415 


iii. 17, 


x. 23 


i. 26, 


vn. 75 


iii. 19, 


iv. 82 


i. 26, 


vni. 144 


iii. 20, 


x. 37 


i. 26, 


x. 48 


iii. 24, 


i. 187 


i. 26-28, . 


i. 57, 70 


iv. 1, 


ix. 497 


i. 27, . 


x. 460 


iv. 3, 4, . 


x. 36 


i. 28, 


n. 131 


iv. 3, 4, 7, . 


x. 407 


i. 28, 


vii. 96 


iv. 5, 


x. 53 


i. 28, 


x. 19 


iv. 7, 


vi. 308 


i. 31, 


vii. 262 


iv. 10, 


iv. 76 


i. 31, 


vii. 49 


iv. 13, 


vi. 305 


ii. 7, 


ii. 101 


iv. 13, 


x. 37 


ii. 7, 


vi. 49 


iv. 13-16, . 


x. 246 


ii. 17, 


iv. 32 


iv. 14, 


i. 387 


ii. 17. 


vn. 408 


iv. 20-22, . 


x. 460 


ii. 17, 


x. 8 


v. 1, 


ix. 450 


ii. 19-23, . 


x. 108 


v. 3, 


vi. 152 


ii. 21, 


ii. 422 


v. 3, . 


ix. 477 


ii. 23, 


n. 418 


v. 3, 


x. 14 


iii. 2, 


vm. 493 


v. 3, 


x. 52 


iii. 2, 3, . 


x. 38 


v. 22, 


ix. 495 


iii. 5, 


iv. 351 


vi. 


vi. 42 


iii. 5, 


vi. 100 


vi. 2, 


m. 427 


iii. 6, 


x. 29 


vi. 2-13. . 


x. 472 


iii. 7-11, . 


vn. 383 


vi. 3, . ; 


i. 387 


iii. 7-15, . 


vi. 362 


vi. 3, 


n. 80 


iii. 8, 9, . 


x. 35 


vi. 3, 


vi. 57 


VOL. XII. 


Q 





242 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 




Gen. vi. 3, 


vii. 322 


Gen. xx. 5, 6, 


vi. 287, 305 


vi. 5, 


ii. 74 


xx. 6, 


x. 399, 426 


vi. 5, viii. 21, 


n. 135 


xx. 7, 


vii. 188 


vi. 5, 


x. 370 


xx. 7, 


vii. 283 


vi. 5, 12, . 


ix. 29 


xx. 7, 9, 18, 


x. 374, 426 


vi. 6, 7, . 


iv. 197 


xxi. 10, 


ix. 487 


vi. 8, 


ix. 30 


xxi. 17-20. . 


vi. 5 r i 


*vi. 8, 


ix. 70, 81 


xxi. 22, 


ix. 411 


vi. 12, 


x. 45 


xxii. 


viii. 238 


vii. 1, 


vin. 165 


xxii. 8, 


vi. 103 


vii. 1, 


ix. 71 


xxii. 8-14, . 


vii. 210 


viii. 20, 21, . 


vi. 35 


xxii. 12, 


ii. 216 


viii. 20, 21, . 


ix. 174 


xxii. 12, 


vii. 182 


viii. 22, 


ix. 54 


xxii. 15, 16, . 


iv. 551 


viii. 21, 


n. 80 


xxii. 16, 


ix. 342 


ix. 1-3, . 


ix. 67 


xxii. 16, 17, 


vii. 184 


ix. 6, 


xi. 60 


xxii. 16, 17, . 


ix. 36 


ix. 6, 27, . 


ix. 30 


xxii. 17, 


i. 44 


ix. 8, 11, . 


ix. 52 


xxiv. 13, 14, . 


m. 386 


ix. 25, 


ix. 38 


xxiv. 31, 


i. 48 


ix. 26, 


i. 83 


xxiv. 67, 


m. 392 


ix. 27, 


vii. 322 


xxv. 22, 


x. 266 


ix. 27, 


ix. 77 


xxv. 23, 


x. 24 


x. 25, 


ix. 31 


xxv. 30-32, . 


x. 204 


xi. 7, 


iv. 352 


xxvi. 28, 


n. 383 


xi. 7, 


iv. 354 


xxvi. 29, 


i. 16 


xii. 1-3, 


vi. 104 


xxvi. 29, 


i. 48 


xii. 1-4, . 


vin. 239 


xxvii. 27, 


i. 43 


xii. 2, 


i. 49 


xxvii. 28, 29, 39 


40 i. 52 


xii. 2, 3, 


i. 44 


xxvii. 33, 


i. 49 


xii. 3, 


viii. 303 


xxvii. 39, 40, c 


n. 155 


xiii. 10, 


vii. 298 


xxvii. 42, 


vi. 473 


xiv. 13, 


ix. 31 


xxviii. 1-5, 


ii. 422 


xiv. 19, 


i. 44 


xxviii. 3, 


i. 45 


XV., 


vi. 104 


xxviii. 12, 


i. 189 


XV. 1, 


i. 46 


xxviii. 14, 


i. 172 


XV. 1, 


vii. 347 


xxviii. 15, 


ix. 411 


xv. 6, 


vn. 183 


xxviii. 20, 


iv. 200 


xv. 6, 


vin. 297 xxix. 


ix. 325 


xv. 15, 


vii. 348 xxx. 1, 


x. 320 


xvii. 1, 


i. 45 


xxx. 3, 


x. 294 


xvii. 1, 


i. 81 


xxx. 38, 39, 41 


, x. 338 


xvii. 7, 


ix. 478 


xxxi. 1, 


i. 313 


xvii. 18, 


in. 371 


xxxi. 19, 30, . 


ix. 35 


xvii. 18, 19, . 


in. 392 


xxxi. 29, 


vi. 244, 301 


xvii. 18, 20, . 


m. 396 


xxxi. 30, 


vn. 376 


xvii. 19-21, . 


ix. 35 


xxxi. 39, 41, . 


vn. 221 


xvii. 22, 


ix. 34 


xxxi. 44, 


ii. 383 


xviii. 1, 2, 22, 


iv. 357 


xxxii. 1, 2, 


i. 189 


xviii. 17, 


vn. 204 


xxxii. 9, 


ix. 495 


xix. 13, 


i. 187 


xxxii. 10, 


ix. 504 


xix. 19, 


ix. 170 


xxxii. 28, 


vni. 54 


xix. 24, 


iv. 358 


xxxii. 30, 


vn. 447 


xx. 3, .V. 


n. 17 


xxxiii. 10, 11, . 


i. 45 



Gen. xxxiv. 

xxxiv. 

xxx vii. 

xxxvii. 

xxxviii. 

xxxix. 

xxxix. 

xl. 

xii. 

xliii. 

xliii. 

xlv. 

xlv. 

xlv. 

xlv. 

xlvi. 

xlvi. 

xlviii. 

xlviii. 

xlix. 

xlix. 

xlix. 

xlix. 

Exod. ii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iv. 
iv. 
v. 
vi. 
vi. 
vii. 
vii. 
viii. 
ix. 
x. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xii. 
xii. 
xii. 
xii. 
xii. 
xiv. 
xiv. 
xv. 
xv. 



14, 

80, 

10, . 

26, 

17, . 

9, 
21, 

13-22, . 
38, 

9, 
23, 

1-9, . 

4, 
26, . 

26, 27, . 

27, . 

30, . 
15, 

22, 

4, 

6, . 

9, 
10, 

6, 

2, 

2-5, . 

2,6, . 

6, . 

7,8, , 

7-11, , 

31, ( 
31, 

1-7, 

15, 

1, 

1, 

25-27, 
20, 

7, 

3, 

5, 

7, 

8, 

8, 
29, 

. 31-35, 
35, 

35, 36, 
38, 

17, 18, 
28, 

2, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 


243 


ii. 369 Exod. xv. 4, 


n. 35 


m. 499 


xv. 26, 


iv. 200 


n. 239 


xvii. 12, 


m. 388 


m. 498 


xviii. 13-26, . 


m. 473 


i. 254 


xviii. 18, 


m. 528 


x. 272 


xix. 8, 


vm. 505 


rv. 201 


xx. 5, 6, . 


n. 191 


ix. 184 


XX. 11, 


iv. 410 


ii. 57 


xxi. 4, 


ix. 427 


iv. 71 


xxi. 4, 


ix. 487 


i. 15 


xxi. 6, 


v. 145 


iv. 122 


xxiii. 20, 


iv. 193 


iv. 105 


xxiii. 20, 


v. 41 


x. 229 


xxiii. 20, 


v. 540 


vm. 126 


xxiii. 20, 21, . 


iv. 408 


ix. 169 


xxiv. 7, 8, . 


x. 352 


vii. 352 


xxiv. 16, 


iv. 244 


iv. 357 


xxv. 17, 


vm. 141 


ix. 365 


xxv. 40, 


xi. 19 


iv. 153 


xxvi. 6, 


xi. 297 


i. 316 


xxviii.11,12,29, 


vii. 192 


m. 10 


xxxii. 4-7, 


m. 325 


i. 198 


xxxii. 9, 


ix. 176 


11. 135 


xxxii. 10, 


iv. 81 


iv. 357 


xxxii. 11, 14, . 


iv. 125 


i. 43 


xxxii. 25, 


iv. 255 


i. 47 


xxxiii. 2, 


iv. 357 


i. 33 


xxxiii. 3-5, . 


ix. 177 


iv. 357 


xxxiii. 11, 


vii. 199 


vm. 26 


xxxiii. 11, 23, . 


vn. 447 


i. 42 


xxxiii. 12, 


ii. 174 


vi. 327 


xxxiii. 12, 


ix. 46 


ix. 151 


xxxiii. 12-17, . 


ix. 259 


viii. 27 


xxxiii. 16, 17, . 


vm. 254 


i. 7 


xxxiii. 17, 


vm. 385 


vm. 35 


xxxiii. 18, 19, . 


iv. 386 


xi. 330 


xxxiii. 18-20, . 


iv. 325 


xi. 423 


xxxiii. 19, 


ii. 151 


m. 467 


xxxiii. 19, 


vi. 515 


m. 338 


xxxiii. 19, 


vm. 15 


i. 213 


xxxiii. 20, 


i. 320 


i. 469 


xxxiii. 23, 


iv. 261 


in. 386 


xxxiv. 


ix. 259 


i. 528 


xxxiv. 6, 


m. 236 


ii. 177 


xxxiv. 6, 7, . 


vm. 11 


1.469 


xxxiv. 6, 


i. 105 


m. 385 


xxxiv. 6, 


n. 221 


i. 213 


xxxiv. 6, 


iv. 246 


x. 899 


xxxiv. 7, 


n. 191 


m. 467 


xxxiv. 9, 


ix- 177 


vi. 500 


xxxiv. 24, 


i. 218 


n. 35 


xxxv. 33, 


vn. 434 


m. 94 


Lev. i. 9, 13, . 


vi. 36 


ix. 486 iv. 2, 


v. 423 



244 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



Lev. 



Num. 



iv, 2, 5, 


iv. 129 


Num. xiv. 17, 


i. 337 


iv. 4, 


xi. 300 


xiv. 17, 


i. 426 


v. 


i. 262 


xiv. 17, 


vm. 14 


v. 17, 


iv. 164 


xiv. 19, 20, . 


vi. 355 


vi. 1-8, 


iv. 166 


xiv. 21, 


iv. 331 


vi. 2, 3, 


iv. 129 


xiv. 22, 


vii. 269 


vi. 15, 


vi. 36 


xiv. 22, 


x. 486 


ix. 23, 


xi. 347 


xiv. 34, 


vm. 447 


x. 1, 2, 


m. 105 


xiv. 84, 


ix. 419 


x. 1, 2, 


m. 146 


xv. 26-30, . 


iv. 166 


x. 1, 2, 


. x. 494, 502 


xv. 80, 


iv. 168 


x. 3, 


, vi. 501 


xv. 30, 31, . 


vii. 334 


xi. 44, 45, 


x. 57 


xvi. 


m. 105 


xiii. 45, 


n. 135 


xvi. 1, 2, . 


ix. 202 


xiv. 6, 8, 


x. 352 


xvi. 2, 


m. 187 


xvi. 3, 


v. 4, 18 


xvi. 3, 


n. 174 


xvi. 11, 15, 


16, iv. 57 


xvi. 30, 33, . 


x. 561 


xvi. 21, 


v. 421 


xvi. 35, 


m. 146 


xvi. 29, 


x. 346 


xviii. 6, 7, . 


xi. 374 


xviii. 


xi. 26 


xix. 6, 18, . 


x. 352 


xviii. 26-28, 


x. 318 


xxii. 16, 17, 87, 


x. 221 


xix. 2, 


i. 87 


xxii. 18, . vi. 


fl44 301 


xix. 18, 


x. 390 


xxii. 22, 


i. 187 


xxiii. 10, 


iv. 84 


xxiii. 10, 


ix. 201 


xxiii. 10, 


vi. 9 


xxiii. 10, 


x. 184 


xxiii. 15, 16, 


i. 511 


xxiii. 24, 


m. 10 


xxiii. 36, 


xi. 407 


xxiv. 2, .;..- 


i. 393 


xxv. 21, 


i. 45 


xxiv. 2, 3, . 


vi. 56 


xxvi. 24, 


m. 88 


xxiv. 2, 4, 16, 


ix. 201 


xxvi. 34, 35, 


vii. 571 


xxiv. 10, 


i. 45 


xxvi. 36, 


x. 527 


xxiv. 25, 


ix. 31 


xxvi. 40, 


vii. 565 


xxv. 11, , 


vn. 569 


xxvi. 41, 


m. 388 


xxvi. 12, 


i. 7 


ii. 


in. 4 


xxvi. 54, 


ix. 169 


iii. 9, 10, 


xi. 332 


xxvii. 1-8, 


ix. 484 


iii. 31-35, 


xi. 200 


xxviii. 3, .. E 


m. 10 


v. 2,3, 


x. 363 


xxxi. 16, , 


ix. 201 


v. 14, 


vi. 162 


xxxi. 23, 


vi. 29 


v. 27, 28, 


vii. 317 


XXXV. 


vm. 242 


vi. 23, 


. i. 17, 18, 20 


xxx vi. 3, 


i. 207 


vi. 23-26, 


vm. 45 


Deut. iii. 23, 26, . 


m. 393 


vii. 8, 9, 


iv. 253 


iii. 28, 


m. 397 


x. 4,10, 


vm. 73 


iv. 5, 6, . 


x. 199 


xi. 1, 10, 


vii. 569 


iv. 6, 9, . 


iv. 252 


xi. 4, 


m. 467 


iv. 6, % 


vi. 290 


xi. 10, 


vi. 137 


iv. 37 ;x. 14, 


ix. 33 


xi. 14, 22, 


xi. 120 


v. 22-28, . 


ix. 8 


xi. 28, 


m. 396 


v. 24-29, . 


vi. 235 


xi. 29, 


n. 447 


v. 27, & ,5 


vm. 329 


xii. 7, 8, 


vii. 221 


v. 28, 29, . 


i. 351 


xiii. 3, 


xi. 120 


v. 29, 


vi. 354 


xiii. 28, 


x. 205 


vi. 2, 18, . 


vi. 355 


xiv. 


vm. 425 


vi. 4, 


iv. 349 


xiv. 11-18, 


m. 326 


vi. 7, 


vi. 396 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



Deut. vi. 7, 


vii. 571 


Deut. xxix. 19, 


iv. 17G 


vii. 3,4, . 


x. 438 


xxix. 19, 


vi. 453 


vii. 7, ,r: 


ix. 238 


xxix. 19, 


vii. 278 


vii. 7,9, . vm 


56, 98 


xxix. 19, 


vm. 16 


vii. 12, 13, . 


i. 47 


xxix. 19, 


x. 320 


vii. 14, 


i. 49 


xxix. 29, 


ix. 462 


viii. 10, 11, . 


ix. 509 


xxix. xxx. 


Vi. 354 


viii. 14, 17, . 


viii. 527 


xxx. 6, 


vii. 247 


viii. 14, 17, . 


ix. 512 


xxx. 6, 


vm. 543 


ix. 4, 5, 6, . 


11. 290 


xxx. 11, 


vm. 505 


ix. 5, 6, . 


ix. 237 


xxx. 12, 


vii. 293 


ix. 5, 6, 27, 


ix. 177 


xxx. 20, 


vm. 273 


ix. 6, 


i. 145 


xxxii. 


in. 94 


ix. 14, 


ix. 167 


xxxii. 2, 


vii. 299 


x. 9, 


v. 541 


xxxii. 4, 


iv. 68 


x. 12, 


iv. 190 


Josh. vi. 


vm. 554 


x. 12-17, . 


vii. 246 


vi. 18, 


x. 25 


x. 13, 


vi. 291 


vii. 1, 


x. 25 


x. 13, 


ix. 503 


vii. 21, 


x. 66 


x. 14, 


i. 145 


x. 22-24, . 


1.528 


x. 14, 15, . 


n. 156 


xvi. xvii. xix. 1, 


xi. 429 


x. 14, 15, . 


vii. 245 


xviii. 


xi. 426 


x. 15, 


ix. 104 


xxiii. 1, 


vii. 218 


x. 16, 


vm. 543 


xxiv. 15, 


xi. 423 


xii. 3, 8, . 


iv. 168 


xxiv. 16-18, . 


vi. 507 


xii. o, 6, 14, 


XL 300 


xxiv. 16-19, . 


vi. 270 


xii. 9-11, . 


xi. 446 


xxiv. 19, 


x. 94 


xiii. 6, 


vi. 137 


xxiv. 19-21, . 


x. 259 


xiii. 6, 


vii. 178 


xxiv. 19-22, . 


vi. 354 


xiii. 6, 


x. Ill 


Jud. vi. 12, 


m. 250 


xiv. 15, 25, . 


x. 96 


vi. 13, 


x. 387 


xvi. 18, 


xi. 69 


vii. 12, 


m. 56 


xvii. 15, 


n. 55 


ix. 3, 


xi. 120 


xvii. 9, 


xi. 201 


xi. 7, . 


vm. 319 


xvii. 18, 20, . 


vi. 492 


xiii. 23, 


m. 390 


xix. 15, 


vi. 5 


xiii. 25, 


vii. 509 


xx. 19, 


in. 454 


xiv. 3-20, . 


m. 419 


**** ^ j 

xx. 19, 


vii. 566 


xv. 14, 


vii. 509 


xxi. 6, 7, . 


vii. 569 


xv. 18, 


n. 369 


xxi. 11, 12, . 
xxiii. 2, 
xxiii. 6, 17, . 
xxviii. 
xxviii. 12, 
xxviii. 12, 
xxviii. 47, 48, . 
xxix. 2-4, . 
xxix. 2-4, . 
xxix. 3, 4, . i; 


vi. 173 
ix. 457 
n. 369 
i. 53 
n. 183 
n. 193 
ix. 510 
i. 351 
ix. 9 
vii. 135 


xv. 20, 
Kuth i. 16, 
i. 20, 21, . 
iv. 2, 
1 Sam. i. 6-18, . 
i. 17-28, . 
i. 20, 27, . 
ii. 1, . 
ii. 1, :-,- 
ii. 6, , 

o 


m. 419 
vm. 327 
iv. 568 
xi. 120 
xi. 347 
m. 373 
m. 384 
m. 389 
ix. 509 
vm. 488 
i. 532 


xxix. 17, . 
xxix. 18, 
xxix. 18-20, . 
xxix. 18-20, . 
xxix. 19, 



x. 43 
vi. 115 
ix. 203 
n. 100 


n. e, 
ii. 9, . 
ii. 9, ., 
ii. 9. 
ii. 21, 


vm. 535 
vm. 551 
ix. 414 
m. 385 



246 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



ISam. 



. ii. 25, 


iv. 202 


1 Sam. xx. 30, 


vi. 130 


ii. 25, 


x. 310 


xx. 31, 


n. 118 


ii. 25, 


x. 515 


xx. 33, 


vi. 126 


ii. 30, 


in. 379 


xx. 41, 


vn, 199 


iii. 9, 10, 


vn. 228 


xxi. 2, 8, . 


in. 295 


iii. 18, 


vi. 292 


xxi. 11, .. 


ix. 247 


iii. 18, 


vii. 574 


xxii. 7, ~. 


m. 428 


iii. 19, 


m. 362 


xxiii. 17, . 


vn. 200 


iv. 20, 


iv. 207 


xxiv. 6, 


x. 220 


iv. 22, 


iv. 252 


xxiv. 16, 


x. 399 


iv. 22, 


iv. 323 


xxiv. 17-19, . 


vii. 288 


vi. 5, . 


vi. 505 


xxv. 2, 


vi. 494 


vi. 20, 


x. 505 


xxv. 5, 


i. 15 


vii. 17, 19, . 


ix. 506 


xxv. 22-34, . 


ix. 245 


ix. 1, . 


x. 359 


xxv. 25, 


vm. 5 


x. 6,7, . 


ix. 193 


xxv. 27, 


i. 48 


x. 10, 


vi. 56 


xxv. 34, 


m. 499 


x. 11, 12, . 


x. 83 


xxv. 37, 


vi. 471 


x. 19, 


ix. 490 


xxv. 37, 


vn. 408 


x. 26, 


x. 399 


xxvii. 1, 


in. 378 


x.27, . 


x. 401 


xxvii. 8, 10, . 


m. 295 


xi. 6, 


x. 399 


xxix. 4, 


vn. 266 


xii. 3, 


vn. 286 


xxix. 6-8, . 


vii. 276 


xii. 6, 


vii. 81 


xxx. 6, 


n. 441 


xii. 6, 


vin. 35 


xxx. 6, 


vi. 473 


xii. 20-24, . 


vi. 520 


xxxi. 4, 


ii. 369 


xii. 22, 


m. 410 


2 Sam. i. 20, 


n. 369 


xii. 22-24, . 


iv. 258 


i. 26, 


iv. 201 


xiii. 5-7, . 


x. 482 


i. 26, 


vii. 201 


xiii. 11, 12, . 


x. 261 


iii. 20, 


n. 383 


xiii. 13-15, . 


vi. 453 


vii. 


ix. 267 


xiv. 6, 


n. 369 


vii. 2-11, . 


vii. 217 


xiv. 34, 


x. 257 


vii. 12, 


ix. 48 


xv. 23, 


vii. 332 


vii. 13-15, . 


ix. 193 


xv. 23, 26, . 


vi. 510 


vii. 18, 19 . 


vn. 469 


xv. 29, 


vii. 12 


vii. 18, 19, . 


ix. 258 


xv. 29, 


x. 80 


vii. 18-22, . 


ix. 263 


xv. 30, 


vi. 473 


vii. 21, 


vn. 489 


xv. 35, 


m. 367 


vii. 21, 


vm. 123 


xvi. 1, 


in. 370 


x. 9, 


x. 399 


xvi. 5, 


ix. 469 


xi. 25, 


m. 295 


xvi. 7-12, . 


ix. 181 


xii. 3, 4, . 


x. 28 


xvi. 14, 


m. 258 


xii. 5, 


n. 118 


xvi. 14, . 


vi. 56 


xii. 7, 8, . 


x. 38 


xvi. 14, 


vi. 510 


xii. 7-9, . 


vii. 214 


xvi. 15, 


i. 395 


xii. 7-9, . 


x. 109 


xvi. 15, 


m. 284 


xii. 8, : .- 


vii. 195 


xvii. 26, 27, . 


in. 7 


xii. 8, 13, . 


ii. 291 


xvii. 26, 36, . 


ii. 369 


xii. 9, 


iv. 166 


xviii. 9-12, . 


vii. 276 


xii. 9, 


vn. 332 


xviii. 10, 


1.394 


xii. 13, 


i. 236 


xviii. 12, 


vi. 510 


xii. 16, 22, . 


vm. 446 


xix. 2, 


vii. 201 


xii. 19-21, . 


m. 397 


xx. 14, 15, 42, 


ix. 475 


xii. 24, 


iv. 73 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



247 



2 Sam. xii. 24, 25, . 
xii. 25, 
xii. 25, 


ix. 426 

ix. 487 
x. 438 


1 Kings vi. 23, 29, . 
vi. 26, 
viii., 


i. 162 
vn. 434 
ix. 119 


xiii. 


n. 150 


viii. 23, 56, . 


vii. 471 


xiii. 2, 
xiii. 12, 13, . 


x. 300 

x. 402 


viii. 39, 
viii. 56, 59, . 


vi. 317 
in. 362 


xiii. 39, 


iv. 87 


viii. 59, 


in. 361 


xiv. 1, 


iv. 87 


ix. 4, . 


vii. 145 


xiv. 14, . :: 


iv. 159 


x. 1, 6, 7, . 


x. 166 


xiv. 32, 


vi. 135 


x. 13, 


ii. 189 


xv, 9, 


i. 15 


xi. 2-11, . 


x. 435 


xv. 25, 26, . 


n. 450 


xi. 3, 


x. 432 


xv. 25, 26, . 


vm. 416 


xi. 4-9, . 


vn. 320 


xv. 26, 


iv. 381 


xi. 9, 


m. 413 


xv. 26, 


vi. 146 


xi. 9, 


ix. 512 


xv. 26, 


vin. 316 


xi. 9, 10, . 


m. 293 


xvi. 11, 


m. 514 


xi. 32-40, . 


ix. 193 


xvi. 12, 


n. 451 


xii. 26-30, . 


x. 210 


xvi. 12, 


x. 109 


xii. 29, 30, . 


xi. 425 


xvi. 17, 


m. 417 


xii. 32, 


xi. 393 


xvi. 17, 


vi. 144 


xiii. 18, 


vii. 55 


xvi. 17, 


vii. 213 


xiv. 10-12, . 


xi. 430 


xvii. 10, 


m. 10 


xiv. 16, 


x. 38 


xix. 9, 42, . 


i. 153 


xvii., 


vm. 312 


xix. 20, 


vi. 146 


xvii. 22, 


vi. 264 


xix. 20, [ 4*1 


vii. 554 


xviii., 


xi. 425 


xix. 32, 


vi. 466 


xx. 6, 


x. 318 


xix. 35, 


in. 415 


xx. 31, 


vn. 554 


xix. 38, 


vn. 207 


xx. 31, 


vm. 568 


xx. 2, 


ix. 247 


xxi. 4, 


x. 300 


xxiii. 


ix. 264 


xxi. 9, 10, . 


x. 221 


xxiii. 5, 


iv. 61 


xxi. 29. 


x. 417 


xxiii. 5, 


ix. 48 


xxii. 19, 


i. 189 


xxiii. 5, 


ix. 240 


xxii. 19, 


iv. 395 


xxiii. 5, 


ix. 269 


xxii. 32, 33, . 


vii. 505 


xxiii. 5, 


ix. 409 


xxii. 34, 


i. 212 


xxiv. 1, 


m. 258 


2 Kings ii. 8, 


ix. 244 


xxiv. 2, 10, . 


vn. 320 


iv -> r ; 


1.412 


xxiv. 10, 


m. 283 


v., i- 


vm. 561 


xxiv. 24, 


ii. 291 


v. 11, 12, . 


vm. 510 


1 Kings i. 29, 


ix. 246 


v. 15, . 


i. 48 


ii. 5, 


m. 50 


v. 26, 


vn. 568 


ii. 15, 


ix. 247 


vi. 16, 


m. 15 


ii. 19, 


1.468 


vi. 17, 


i. 189 


iii. 5, 


iv. 73 


vi. 26, 27, . 


vm. 50 


iii. 12, 13, . 


iii. 385 


vi. 27, 


vi. 454 


iv. 5, . 


ix. 13 


vi. 33, 


vm. 315 


iv. 20, 33, . 


x. 143 


vii. 3, 


v. 517 


iv. 21, 


m. 10 


vii. 3,4, . 


m. 24 


iv. 21, 


m. 212 


vii. 3,4, . 


vin. 568 


iv. 31, 


x. 456 


viii. 11, 


x. 402 


v. 1,12,. 


ix. 487 


x. 16, . 


x. 391 


vi. 10-19, . 


ix. 244 


x. 30, 


vi 353 


vi. 23, 


iv. 253 


x. 30, 


x. 417 



248 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



2 Kings xii. 2, 


x. 402 2 Chron. xii. 7, 


vi. 296 


xvii. 21, 
xvii. 24-41, . 


xi. 428 
x. 403 


xiii. 7, 

XV. 


m. 512 
xi. 431 


xvii. 26-28, . 


vi. 509 


xvi. 9, 


m. 213 


xvii. 32-34, . 


x. 155 


xvi. 10, ; 


m. 484 


xvii. 33, 41, . 


xii. 105 


xvii. 7, : :. 


vn. 283 


xvii. 41, 


m. 150 


xvii. 7-10, . 


xn. 119 


xix. 27, .t 


vi. 110 


xvii. 10, 


iv. 254 


xix. 35, - ;i j; 


i. 187 


xvii. 31, 


vii. 505 


xx. 19, .r. j; 


iv. 392 


xviii. 1-3, . 


in. 420 


xxi. 2-17, . 


x. 475 


xviii. 18, 


xi. 201 


xxi. 16, 


vin. 563 


xviii. 21, 


ii. 62 


xxiii. 8, . 
1 Chron. iv. 10, 


xi. 120 
1.45, 48 


xviii. 21, . : 
xviii. 21, 


m. 266 
vn. 81 


iv. 10, 


in. 384 


xix. 2, 3, . 


ix. 391 


ix. 20, E . . 


xi. 200 


xix. 8, , 


xi. 203 


xiii. 3, 


xi. 424 


xx. 7, 


vii. 431 


xiii. 12-14 . 


xn. 119 


xx. 7, . 


ix. 475 


xv. 27, 


vn. 370 


xxi. 3, 


iv. 470 


xvi. 29, 


xn. 117 


xxiv. 17, 18, . 


x. 210 


xvi. 41, 


vni. 93 


xxv. 6, 


n. 189 


xvii. 19, . , 


ii. 189 


xxvi. 21, 


x. 363 


xvii. 19, 


ix. 258 


xxviii. 23, . 


x. 211 


xvii. 26, 27, . 


i. 45 


xxviii. 23, 


x. 386 


xix. 10, 


ix. 151 


xxix. 35, ,: 


xn. 119 


xxi. 1, 


ii. 62 


xxx. 10, 11, . 


xi. 447 


xxi. 1, 


in. 258 


xxx. 25, 


xi. 445 


xxi. 1, 


vii. 266 


xxx. 27, 


xi. 347 


xxi. 6, 


m. 283 


xxxii. 31, . 


m. 491 


xxi. 13, 


ii. 144 


xxxiii. 2-11, . 


x. 475 


xxi. 15, 


i. 187 


xxxiii. 3-13, . 


vin. 563 


xxi. 18-29, . 


ix. 248 


xxxiii. 10, 


vn. 335 


xxii. 9, 10, . 


ix. 426 


xxxiv. 27, 


vi. 394 


xxii. 10, 


vn. 489 


xxxvi. 21, , - 


vni. 52 


xxvi. 20, 
xxviii. 12-14, . 


xi. 332 
xi. 19 


Ezra i. 2, 
i. 2, 


vi. 244 
xii. 121 


xxix. 11, 12, . 


iv. 189 


iii. 


m. 149 


xxix. 11, 12, . 


vi. 502 


iii. 10, 


vii. 90 


xxix. 11, 14, . 


ix. 268 


iv. 1, 2, . 


m. 132 


xxix. 12, 


ii. 182 


iv. 15, 


n. 371 


xxix. 13, 14, . 


ix. 503 


iv. 24, ,. 


xii. 44 


xxix. 14, 


vi. 139 


v. 1,2, . 


xn. 104 


xxix. 18, 


vii. 517 


vi. 10, 


xn. 44 


xxxi. 25, 26, . 
2 Chron. i. 11, 


in. 4 
iv. 200 


vi. 14, ,*;i 
vii. 1,5, 


xn. 107 
vn. 569 


iii. 1, 


ix. 248 vii. 24; 25, . 


vm. 52 


v. 12, 13, . 


vin. 74 


ix. 2, 


ix. 445 


vi. 36, 


x. 5 


ix. 4, ..-...:. 


in. 425 


vii. 1, *.; 


iv. 245 


ix. 4, .j.; 


vn. 557 


vii. 1, 


vi. 36 


ix. 4, . * - 


x. 481 


vii. 3, 


in. 346 


ix. 6,7, . 


x. 471 


ix. 3-5, . 


xi. 20 


ix. 13, 


n. 440 


ix. 18-20, . 


xi. 332 


ix. 13, 


m. 333 


xi. 13, 16,. 


xi. 426 


ix. 13, 


vn. 574 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



249 



Ezra ix. 13, 14, . 
x. 2, . 
x. 3, 
x. 3, 19, . 
x. 4, . 
x. 11, 12, . 
xiv. 14, 
Neh. i. 5, 
v. 9, 15, 18, 
v. 12, 
viii. 10, 
ix. 2, 
ix. 5, 
ix. 13, 20, . 
ix. 17, 
ix. 17, 
ix. 17-20, . 
ix. 17-38, . 
ix. 19, 27, . 
ix. 20, 
ix. 20, 
ix. 20, 
ix. 25, 26, . 
ix. 31, 
ix. 31, 


m. 416 
vm. 247 
ix. 448 
x. 437 
xi. 120 
m. 426 
vii. 559 
vm. 97 
vn. 286 
vm. 52 
m. 335 
ix. 441 
i. 103 
vi. 357 
vm. 24 
vm. 222 
vm. 130 
ix. 485 
ii. 187 
1.389 
vi. 8 
vm. 45 
ix. 513 
vm. 55 
vm. 85 


J** ii. 10, 
ii. 10, 
iii. 25, 
iv. 9, 
iv. 17, 18, . 
iv. 18, 
iv. 18, 
iv. 18, 
iv. 18, 19, . 
iv. 20, 
vi. 3, . 
vi. 4, 
vi. 4, 11, . 
vii. 13, 14, . 
vii. 18, 
viii. 8, 
mi. 9, 
ix. 
ix. 2, 20, 21, 
ix. 4, 
ix. 8, . 
ix. 10, 11, . 
ix. 12, . 
ix. 16, 17, . 
ix. 20, 


ii. 454 
x. 22 
m. 288 
iv. 160 
vii. 16 
i. 185 
v. 80 
v. 90 
vii. 28 
x. 527 
m. 524 
m. 279 
x. 531 
m. 518 
n. 429 
iv. 200 
vii. 19 
x. 476 
ii. 454 
vm. 109 
iv. 354 
iv. 379 
ii. 440 
m. 384 
x. 470 


ix. 32, 


vm. 46 


ix. 33, 


v. 174 


xii. 35, 


vm. 74 


x. 4 , . 


vm. 113 


xiii. 2, 
Esther i. 2, 


i. 51 
i. 173 


xi. 8, 
xi. 12, 


VTI. 20 
iv. 567 


i. 4, 


i. 312 


xi. 12, 


vi. 253 


i. 13, 


x. 201 


xi. 12, 


ix. 383 


ii. 12, 


m. 475 


xi. 12, 


x. 105 


iii. 5, 


x. 107 


xi. 12, 


x. 175 


iii. 8, 


iv. 566 


xi. 12, 


x. 197 


v. 6, 


vi. 79 


xii. 14, 


m. 331 


v. 10, 


x. 66 


xii. 23, 


n. 440 


v. 10, 


x. 401 


xiii. 15, 


vi. 135 


v. 11, . 


m. 521 


xiii. 15, 


vm. 316 


v. 11-13, . 


x. 299 


xiii. 24, 


m. 240 


v. 11-13, . 


x. 319 


xiii. 24, 


m. 288 


vi. 11, 


iv. 488 


xiii. 24, 


vn. 72 


vi. 11, 


vn. 370 


xiii. 26, 27, . 


m. 297 


viii. 6, 


iv. 122 


xiii. 26, 27, . 


x. 475 


viii. 8, 9, . 


i. 231 


xiv. 2, 


vii. 19 


viii. 17, 


x. 403 


xiv. 7, 8, . 


x. 371 


ix. 12-14, . 


x. 22 


xiv. 7-9, . 


vi. 340 


Job . 5, 


x. 274 


xiv. 11, 


vm. 44 


. 6, 


vii. 266 


xiv. 14, : :/ 


vn. 378 


7, . 


m. 32 


xv. 7, 


x. 337 


. 8, 


vii. 263 


xv. 14, 16, . 


x. 11 


. 8, . 


vn. 232 


xv. 14-16, . 


x. 80 


i. 16, 


ii. 437 


xv. 15, 


i. 185 


11. 111. VI., 


x. 544 


xv. 15, 


vii. 15 


ii. 1, . 


v. 209 


xv. 15, 


vm. 64 



250 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



Job xv. 15, 


x. 33 Job xxxii. 8, 9, . 


iv. 201 


xv. 15, 17, . 


ix. 6 


xxxii. 9, , 


x. 175 


xv. 16, 


n. 120 


xxxii. 18, 


iv. 415 


xvii. 11, 


m. 515 


xxxiii. 


vi. 366 


xvii. 14, 


vii. 17 


xxxiii. 


iv. 199 


xix. 24, ,-;,] 


vm. 42 


xxxiii. 14, ; . r\ 


vm. 47 


xix. 25, 


vii. 113 


xxxiii. 15-26, . 


vi. 123 


xix. 26, 27, . 


vii. 112 


xxxiii. 16, /. 


vn. 65 


xix. 27, 28, . 


m. 321 


xxxiii. 19, 20, . 


m. 499 


xix. 28, 


vi. 215 


xxxiii. 22, 26, . 


m. 329 


xx. 12, 


vi. 472 


xxxiii. 23, 


vi. 555 


xx. 15, 


m. 482 


xxxiii. 24, 


iv. 215 


xx. 17, 


vn. 431 


xxxiii. 29, 


vm. 572 


xx. 23, 29, . 


ii. 119 


xxxiv. 29, , 


ii. 23 


xxi. 12-14, . 


x. 296 


xxxiv. 29, . , 


m. 408 


xxi. 13, 14, . 


x. 93 


xxxiv. 29-32, . 


vii. 576 


xxi. 14, 


m. 514 


xxxiv. 31, 


n. 440 


xxi. 15, 


m. 360 


xxxiv. 31, 32, . 


m. 289 


xxi. 17, 


x. 317 


xxxiv. 31, 32, . 


m. 317 


xxi. 17, 


x. 561 


xxxv. 7, 


vi. 497 


xxi. 25, 


iv. 199 


xxxvi. 9, 10, . 


m. 269 


xxii. 5, 


x. 470 


xxxvi. 16, 


m. 297 


xxii. 12, 


vii. 13 


xxxvi. 21, 


x. 208 


xxii. 17, 


x. 108 


xxxvi. 24, 25, . 


vii. 66 


xxii. 21, 


vi. 142 


xxx vii. 17, 


iv. 200 


xxii. 21-26, . 


vn. 201 


xxxvii. 24, r . 


x. 530 


xxii. 23, 29, . 


vn. 570 


xxxviii. 4-6, . 


vii. 90 


xxii. 25, 


vi. 463 


xxxviii. 6, 7, . 


iv. 261 


xxii. 27, 


m. 390 


xxxviii. 7, 


1.176 


xxii. 27, 28, . 


m. 383 


xxxviii. 7, 


iv. 245 


xxiii. 13, 14, . 


i. 214 


xxxviii. 7, 


iv. 393 


xxiii. 14, 


iv. 488 


xxxviii. 7, 


vi. 413 


xxiv. 13. 


iv. 168 


xxxviii. 7, 


vii. 436 


xxvii. 5, 6, . 


m. 321 


xxxviii. 28, 29, . 


iv. 469 


xxvii. 8, 


vn. 385 


xxxviii. 31, 


x. 480 


xxvii. 10, 


vi. 185 


xxxviii. 41, 


iv. 258 


xxvii. 10, 


x. 93 


xl. 2, 10, 12, 


x. 554 


xxvii. 10, 


x. 291 


xl. 4, 


m. 524 


xxviii. 


iv. 284 


xl. 17-19, . 


vii. 508 


xxviii. 


vi. 375 


xlii. 5, 


1.293 


xxviii. 28, 


i. 137 


xlii. 5, 


vm. 346 


xxix. xxx. xxxi. 


m. 321 


xlii. 5, 


x. 162 


xxix. 12, 13, . 


i. 18 


xlii. 6, 


vn. 9 


xxx. 8, 


i. 495 


Ps. ii. 2, 


vm. 380 


xxx. 13, 


ix. 8 


ii. 6, 


m. 166 


xxxi. ... Y 


m. 288 


ii. 6, I..: 


iv. 61 


xxxi. 


vn. 269 


ii. 6, 


iv. 80 


xxxi. 1,2, . 


m. 527 


ii. 6-8, . 


iv. 74 


xxxi. 7, 


x. 312 


ii. 7, 


iv. 49 


xxxi. 11, 


x. 406 


ii. 7, 


iv. 622 


xxxi. 25, 


m. 483 


ii. 7, 


iv. 492 


xxxi. 33, 


x. 360 


ii. 8, 


iv. 73 


xxxii. 8, 


n. 58 


ii. 11, 


vm. 530 


xxxii. 8, . y 


x. 103 


iii. 


ix. 79 






INDEX OP TEXTS. 



251 



Ps. iv. 3, 
iv. 6, 

iv. 6,7, . 


vn. 240 
x. 286 
vm. 399 


Ps. xix. 12, 
xix. 12, 13, . 

"Y Y 1 


vi. 18 
iv. 166 


iv. 6,7, . 
v. 9, . 
vii. 11, 
vii. 11, 

VIII. 

viii. 2, 


x. 507 
x. 167 
iv. 191 
vii. 553 

i. 508 
v. 48 


iX. I, 

xx. 3, 
xxi. 2-4, . 
xxi. 19, 
xxii. 
xxii. 
xxii. 


iv. 392 
vi. 36 
m. 384 
x. 506 
m. 396 
iv. 19 

T 99 


viii. 4, 
viii. 5, 


iv. 546 
iv. 195 


xxii. 1, 
xxii. 1-9, . 


i. aA 

iv. 49 
v 143 


viii. 8, 
x. 3, . 
x. 4, . 
x. 11, 


vi. 472 
x. 205 
x. 231 
x. 110 


xxii. 2, 3, 6,. 
xxii. 2, 6, . 
xxii. 3,5, . 
xxii. 5, 


* 1. ttO 

iv. 402 
vm. 436 
iv. 380 
IV R 


x. 15, 


vii. 545 


xxii. 6, 


J- v O 

II. 17 


x. 17, . . 


vm. 436 


xxii. 22, 


AJ - JL I 

i. 167 


xi. 17, 
xii. 6, 


vm. 87 
iv. 242 


xxii. 22, 23, . 
xxiii. 5, 


vi. 503 
iv. 200 


xii. 6, 


iv. 309 


xxiv. 1, 


iv. 189 


xiii. 1, 


m. 239 


xxiv. 3, 4, . 


x. 76 


xiv. 1-3, . 


x. 222 


xxv. 4, 5, . 


x. 193 


xiv. 1-5, . 


x. 103 


xxv. 6, 7, . 


viii. 94 


xiv. 4,5, . 


vii. 275 


xxv. 7, 


vm. 60 


xvi. 1, 


i. 274 


xxv. 10, 


vn. 211 


xvi. 1, 


iv. 269 


xxv. 10, 


vii. 564 


xvi. 2, 


i. 104 


xxv. 12, 


iv. 247 


xvi. 2, 


iv. 190 


xxv. 14, 


iv. 238 


xvi. 2, 11, . 


i. 31 


xxv. 14, 


x. 119 


xvi. 4, 


n. 384 


xxvii. 3, 


m. 378 


xvi. 5,6, . 


vi. 471 


xxvii. 4, 


ix. 113 


xvi. 5,6, . 


vn. 347 


xxvii. 8, 


m. 375 


xvi. 7, 


vi. 33 


xxvii. 8, 


vn. 484 


xvi. 8, 9, 10, 


iv. 8 


xxvii. 13, 


vi. 110 


xvi. 9, 


iv. 37 


xxviii. 5, 


vii. 260 


xvi. 10, 11, . 


ix. 214 


xxix. 1, 2, . 


vi. 497 


xvi. 11, 


iv. 120 


xxix. 1, 2, . 


iv. 375 


xvi. 11, 


iv. 133 


xxix. 9, 


iv. 239 


xvi. 23, 


iv. 551 


xxix. 10, 


iv. 293 


xvii. 14, 


vi. 463 


xxix. 11, 


i. 17 


xvii. 14, 15, . 


vii. 119 


xxix. 11, 


ix. 57 


xvii. 15, 


i. 321 


xxx. 5, 


n. 16 


xvii. 15, 


11. 416 


xxx. 5, 


11. 307 


xviii. 3, . 


iv. 379 


xxx. 7, 


x. 425 


xviii. 4, 5, . 


iv. 556 


xxxi. 22, 


m. 315 


xviii. 6-21, . 


m. 363 


xxxi. 24, 


vm. 54 


xviii. 21, 


vn. 331 


xxxii. 


m. 295 


xviii. 23, 


m. 490 


xxxii. 1, 


vn. 217 


xviii. 24, 


in. 388 


xxxii. 3-5, . 


vn. 220 


xviii. 46, 


iv. 388 


xxxii. 6, 


m. 363 


xix. 1, 


iv. 261 


xxxii. 9, 


x. 103 


xix. 7, 


i. 131 


xxxii. 9, 


x. 142 


xix. 7, 


vi. 375 


xxxii. 11, 


iv. 400 


xix. 12, .. 


iv. 165 


xxxiii. 6, 


iv. 355 


t 







252 

Ps. xxxni. 

xxxiii. 

xxxiv. 

xxxiv. 

xxxiv. 

xxxiv. 

xxxiv. 

xxxiv. 

xxxiv. 

xxxiv. 

xxxv. 

xxxv. 

xxxvi. 

xxx vi. 

xxxvi. 

xxxvi. 

xxxvi. 

xxxvi. 

xxxvi. 

xxxvi. 

xxxvi. 

xxxvi. 

xxxvi. 

xxxvii. 

xxxvii. 

xxxvii. 

xxxvii. 

xxxvii. 

xxxvii. 

xxxvii. 

xxxvii. 

xxxvii. 

xxxvii. 

xxxvii. 

xxxviii. 

xxxviii. 

xxxviii. 

xxxix. 

xxxix. 

xxxix. 

xxxix. 

xxxix. 

xl. 

ad. 

xl. 

xl. 

xl. 

xl. 

xl. 

xl. 

xl. 

xl. 

xl. 

xl. 



15, 
15, 

M, 

7, 

7, 

7, 

8, 

9, 
11, 
18, 

12, 13, 
19, 

1, 

1, 

5, 

5-7, 

5,10, 

6, 

7, 

9, 

9, 

9,10, 
10, 

3, 

3,7, 

7, 
12, 
13, 
13, 
16, 
23, 24, 

34, 

34-36, 
37, 
1-4, 

16, 18, 
18, 

6, 

7,9, 

8,9, . 
10-13, 
13, 

5, 

5, 

5, 

5, 

5-7 

6, 

6-8 

6-11, 

7, 
8, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 




VII. 426 


Ps. xl. 16, 


iv. 392 


xn. 17 


xli. 1-3, . 


vm. 446 


iv. 392 


xli. 3,4, . 


vi. 134 


i. 189 


xli. 9, ,:.: 


vn. 209 


i. 488 


xli. 11, $ 


vii. 136 


m. 15 


xliii. 4, ,< 


iv. 392 


viii. 119 


xliii. 4, 5, 


iv. 393 


vii. 135 


xliv. 8, 


vi. 473 


iv. 288 


xliv. 17, 1 


vii. 331 


vni. 50 


xliv. 17, 18, . 


vii. 575 


m. 370 


xliv. 17-23, . 


ix. 305 


x. 294 


xlv. 4, 


iv. 387 


vi. 248 


xlv. 2, 7, . 


i. 31 


x. 93 


xlv. 3, 4, . 


iv. 131 


n. 192 


xlv. 4, . 


vii. 288 


ii. 188 


xlv. 4, 6, &c., 


i. 27 


viii. 60 


xlv. 4-6, . 


m. 33 


iv. 272 


xlv. 4-7, . 


iv. 120 


ii. 306 


xlv. 6,7, . 


iv. 360 


ii. 310 


xlv. 7, 


i. 98 


iv. 365 


xlv. 7, 


n. 420 


viii. 399 


xlv. 9, /:..; 


iv. 50 


ix. 97 


xlv. 9, 


iv. 54 


vii. 210 


xlv. 10, 


vm. 156 


vra. 344 


xlv. 10, 11, . 


iv. 134 


vm. 313 


xlv. 11, 


i. 37 


iv. 171 


xlv. 11, .. : 


vm. 386 


n. 429 


xlv. 11, 


ix. 324 


iv. 204 


xlv. 11, 12, . 


i. 480 


vi. 470 


xlv. 13, 


i. 316 


vii. 205 


xlv. 13, 15, . 


vn. 382 


m. 382 


xlv. 14, 


vi. 421 


vii. 136 


xlvi. 4, 


vii. 563 


i. 19 


xlvi. 10, . . 


vi. 506 


m. 254 


xlvii. 2, 


n. 156 


ii. 120 


xlvii. 6, 7, 8, 


iv. 400 


m. 332 


xlviii. 3, 4, 6, 7, 


iv. 254 


vn. 18 


xlix. 


x. 562 


ii. 450 


xlix. 7, 


iv. 161 


n. 454 


xlix. 11, 


m. 521 


m. 335 


xlix. 11-13, . 


x. 211 


iv. 193 


xlix. 18, 


i. 47 


n. 191 


1. 7, 


in. 406 


m. 525 


1. 14, 15, 23, 


i. 280 


v. 33 


1. 14, 15, 22, 


ix. 499 


v. 485 


1. 17, . 


iv. 169 


ix. 224 


1.21, . 


x. 282 


iv. 40 


1. 23, 


iv. 384 


vm. 156 


Ii. 


ix. 387 


vm. 95 


Ii. 


vi. 136 


vn. 70 


Ii. 1, . 


n. 194 


iv. 23 


Ii. 1, 2, . 


x. 353 


iv. 114 


Ii. 3, . 


m. 317 


vi. 292 


Ii. 4,5, . 


x. 31 



Ps. 





INDEX OP TEXTS. 


r 


n. 122 Ps. Ixxii. 18. 


li. 5, 


x. 10 


Ixxii. 18, 19, 


LI. 6, 

i . , 


x. 324 


Ixxiii. 2, 3, 


li. 6, 
li. 10, 11, . 
li. 11, 12, . 


vii. 220 
YI. 17 
vi. 48 


Ixxiii. 2, 13-22, 
Ixxiii. 2-22, 
Ixxiii. 13, 14 


li. 12, 


i. 236 


* 1 

Ixxiii. 16, 


li. 12, 


m. 415 


Ixxiii. 17, is, 


li. 12, 


vi. 87 


Ixxiii. 23, 27, 28 


LI. 13, 


vi. 509 


Ixxiii. 25, 


li. 13, 


n. 77 


Ixxiii. 25, 


li. 13, 


vii. 217 


Ixxiii. 25, 


lii. 3,4, . 


x. 294 


Ixxiii. 26, 


In. 6, 


m. 171 


Ixxv. 3, 


lv. 12, 


n. 445 


Ixxv. 8, 


Iv. 12, 14, . 


m. 413 


Ixxv. 8, 


lv. 13, 14, . 


vn. 203 


Ixxvi. 1-4, 


Ivi. 4,11, . 


iv. 392 


Ixxvi. 2, 


Ivii. 3, 


iv. 389 


Ixxvi. 4, 


Iviii. 3, 


vi. 77 


Ixxvi. 10, 


Iviii. 10, 


vn. 136 


Ixxvii. 1-3, 


Iviii. 10, 11, . 
lix. 10, 17, . 


x. 226 
ix. 261 


Ixxvii. 2-10, . 
Ixxvii. 4, 


lix. 16, 17, . 


ix. 213 


Ixxvii. 12, 


Ixi. 2, 


vni. 474 


Ixxviii. 4, 


Ixi. 7, 


iv. 389 


Ixxviii. 19, 


Ixi. 7, 


ix. 242 


Ixxviii. 19, 


Ixii. 5, 6, . 


vm. 30 


Ixxviii. 19, 22, . 


Ixii. 7-9, . 


x. 32 


Ixxviii. 34-37, . 


Ixii. 8,11,12, 


vni. 51 


Ixxviii. 34-37, . 


Ixii. 8,11,12, 


vm. 127 


Ixxviii. 35, 36, 


Ixii. 11, 12, 


vin. 545 


Ixxviii. 36-38, . 


Ixiii. 1-3, . 


vn. 198 


Jxxviii. 41, 


Ixiii. 1-8, . 


vi. 128 


Ixxviii. 67, 


Ixiii. 2, 3, . 


n. 17 


Ixxviii 67, 68, . 


Ixv. 11, 


iv. 196 


Ixxviii. 67-70, . 


Ixvi. 2, 


m. 391 


Ixxviii. 68, 


Ixvi. 9-16, . 


ix. 414 


> 
Ixxix. 2, 


Ixvi. 13-19, . 


in. 390 


j 

Ixxx. 1, 


Ixvi. 18, 


m. 381 


Ixxx. 11, 12, . 


Ixvi. 18, 


vn. 327 


Ixxx. 19, 26, . 


Ixvi. 18, 19, . 


m. 363 


Ixxxi. 1, 


Ixviii. 1, 18, . 


iv. 47 


Ixxxi. 5, 


Ixviii. 3, 


iv. 392 


> 

Ixxxi. 5, 


Ixviii. 18, 


iv. 62 


J 

Ixxxi. 10, 


Ixviii. 18, 


x. 141 


Ixxxi. 10-12, , 


Ixviii. 19, 


iv. 203 


Ixxxiii. 18, 


Ixix. 6, 7, . 


ix. 352 


Ixxxiii. 18, 


Ixix. 16, 


vm. 119 


Ixxxiii. 19, 


Ixix. 32, 


n. 17 


Ixxxiv. 7, 


Ixxi. 3, 14, . 


vin. 41 


Ixxxiv. 10, . 


Ixxi. 16, 


vi. 182 


Ixxxiv. 11, 


Ixxi. 18, 19, . 


ix. 249 


Ixxxiv. 13, 14, . 


Ixxii. 17, 


i. 34 


Ixxxiv. 28, 



253 

iv. 391 
iv. 387 
x. 387 
m. 250 
ix. 411 
m. 310 
vm. 495 
vn. 136 
vn. 567 
vi. 463 
vn. 462 
vm. 306 
vn. 427 
i. 196 
m. 309 
iv. 160 
iv. 252 
v. 402 
x. 421 
x. 399 
iv. 254 
m. 318 
in. 336 
iv. 391 
vm. 26 
vm. 126 
x. 245 
vm. 329 
vi. 132 
x. 122 
i. 408 
x. 417 
x. 92 
n. 164 
ix. 39 
ix. 192 
n. 156 
n. 81 
v. 432 
m. 437 
i. 17 
iv. 253 
n. 177 
ix. 105 
iv. 567 
x. 311 
iv. 435 
vii. 15 
iv. 204 
ii. 24 
vi. 488 
ix. 322 
n. 40 
ix. 379 



254 


INDEX OP TEXfS. 


Ps. LXXXV. 8, 


in. b59 Ps. xcii. 1, . 


LXXXV. 8, 


in. 405 


xcii. 1,4, . 


LXXXV. 8, 


m. 413 


xcii. 14, 


Ixxxv. 8,9, . 


iv. 258 


xcii. 14, 


Ixxxv. 9,10, . 


m. 376 


xciii. 1, 


Ixxxvi., cxlv., 


vin. 25 


xciv. 9, 


Ixxxvi. 1, 2, 3, 


iv. 402 


xciv. 12-14, . 


Ixxxvi. 5, 


vm. 50 


xciv. 20, 


Ixxxvi. 5, 


vm. 117 


xcv. 11, 


Ixxxvi. 5, 15, 16, 


vm. 20 


xcvi. 1, 10-13, 


Ixxxvi. 12, 


iv. 400 


xcvi. 6, 


Ixxxvi. 12, 13, . 


iv. 384 


xcvi. 7, 8, . 


Ixxxvi. 15, 16, . 


vm. 53 


xcvi. 10, 


Ixxxvi. 17, 


m. 385 


xcvii. 9, 


Ixxxviii. 1, 5, . 


vm. 341 


xcix. 1, 


Ixxxviii. 1-13, . 


m. 324 


xcix. 2-9, . 


Ixxxviii. 4, 5, 10, 


1.445 


xcix. 5, 


Ixxxviii. 5, 


iv. 52 


xcix. 8, 


Ixxxviii. 6, 


m. 238 


c. 4, 


Ixxxviii. 7-17, . 


x. 508 


c. 5, 


Ixxxviii. 8, 


iv. 389 


cii. 13, 


Ixxxviii. 10, 11, . 


m. 300 


cii. 24, 


Ixxxviii. 14, 


m. 318 


cii. 24, 25, . 


Ixxxviii. 15, 


m. 289 


cii. 24, 25, . 


Ixxxix. 


vm. 48 


ciii. 1, 


Ixxxix. 1-3, . 


1.459 


ciii. 1 , 


Ixxxix. 4, 


v. 29 


ciii. 1, 


Ixxxix. 5, 7, . 


iv. 388 


ciii. 1, 


Ixxxix. 9, 10, . 


iv. 396 


ciii. 1-4, . 


Ixxxix. 13, 


i. 340 


ciii. 2, 3, . 


Ixxxix. 13, 14, . 


iv. 397 


ciii. 9, 


Ixxxix. 15, 


n. 433 


ciii. 20, 


Ixxxix. 15, 


m. 239 


ciii. 20, 22, . 


Ixxxix. 19, 


iv. 29 


civ. 1 , 


Ixxxix. 19, 20, 27, 


n. 200 


civ. 4, 


Ixxxix. 22, 


n. 66 


civ. 23, 


Ixxxix. 24, 


vm. 36 


civ. 24, 


Ixxxix. 27, 


m. 222 


civ. 24, 


Ixxxix. 27, 


iv. 470 


civ. 27, 29, . 


Ixxxix. 27, 29, . 


m. 9 


civ. 29, 


Ixxxix. 28-30, . 


m. 453 


civ. 30, 


Ixxxix. 28-35, . 


ix. 174 


civ. 33, 34, . 


Ixxxix. 30-34, . 


ix. 73 


civ. 34, 


LXXXIX. 30-37, . 


vm. 61 


cv. 12-15, . 


Ixxxix. 34-36, . 


vm. 237 


cv. 14, 15, . 


Ixxxix. 35, 


ix. 267 


cvi. 2, 


xc. 


x. 550 


cvii. 


xc. 2, 


iv. 413 


cix. 1, 


xc. 16, 


iv. 329 


cix. 8, 9, . 


xc. 17, 


vn. 282 


cix. 18, . 


xci. 10, 11, . 


i. 190 


cix. 21, 


xci. 11, 


i. 488 


ex. 


xci. 15, 


vii. 566 


ex. 1, . 


xcii. 


in. 513 


ex. 1, 



iv. 392 
iv. 391 

in. 458 

ix. 249 

iv. 398 

vm. 113 

vn. 561 
x. 309 
i. 321 

m. 14 
iv. 389 
iv. 375 
iv. 399 

vn. 14 
iv. 564 

vn. 15 

i. 531 

m. 453 

ix. 499 

vm. 40 

in. 386 

iv. 407 

vn. 7 

vii. 249 
i. 29 

vn. 540 
ix. 507 
x. 131 
x. 566 
iv. 384 
iv. 97 
iv. 384 
iv. 401 
iv. 386 
n. 43 
iv. 196 
n. 182 
iv. 188 
iv. 190 
m. 313 
iv. 353 
iv. 391 

vn. 202 

vii. 283 

xn. 34 
iv. 400 

in. 513 
iv. 380 

m. 365 

x. 509 

vm. 119 

iv. 52 

i. 36 

i. 466 



Ps. 



INDEX OP TEXTS. 


ex. 


1, 


IV. 


59 


Ps. cxxix. 


8, 




ex. 


1> 


IV. 


359 


cxxx 






ex. 


1, 


IV. 


519 


cxxx. 


1,2, 




ex. 


1, 


IV. 


522 


cxxx. 


1-7, 




ex. 


1,2, . 


IV. 


74 


cxxx. 






ex. 


1,7, . 


I. 


115 


cxxx. 


7, 




ex. 


3, . 


VI. 


34 


cxxx. 


J 

7, 




ex. 


7, 


v. 


197 


cxxx. 


J 

7, 




cxi. 


1, . 


IV. 


398 


cxxxi. 


1-3 




cxi. 


2-4, . 


VII. 


212 


cxxxii. 


, 
11, 16, 




cxiii. 


1, 2, 3, 


IV. 


402 


cxxxiii. 


i 7 

3, 




cxiii. 


5,6, . 


IX. 


117 


cxxxv. 


3, 




cxiii. 


6, . 


VII. 


241 


cxxxv. 






cxiii. 


6, . 


vin. 


14 


cxxxvi. 







cxv. 


1, 


VI. 


502 


cxxxvi. 


1.8. 




cxv. 


12-14, . 


i. 


45 


cxxxvi. 5. 


cxv. 


15, 16, . 


i. 


56 


cxxxvii 


7 

7, 




cxv. 


15, 16, . 


IX. 


169 


cxxxviii. 


7 




cxvi. 


1,2, . 


m. 


400 


cxxxviii. 


2, 




cxvi. 


2, 


m. 


363 


cxxxviii. 


2, 




cxvi. 


7, 


x. 


290 


cxxxviii. 


3, 




cxvi. 


8-16, . 


IX. 


505 


cxxxviii. 


8, 




cxvi. 


12, . 


IV. 


399 


cxxxviii. 


8, 




cxvi. 


12, 


IX. 


503 


cxxxix. 


1-17, 




cxvi. 


16, , 


IX. 


487 


cxxxix. 


7, 




cxvi. 


16, . 


X. 


331 


cxxxix. 


14, 




cxix. 


9, . 


X. 


73 


cxxxix. 


14, 




cxix. 


12, . 


vm. 


581 


cxxxix. 


15, 




cxix. 


14, . 


VI. 


481 


cxxxix. 


15, 




cxix. 


18, . 


i. 


301 


cxxxix. 


15, 


B 


cxix. 


25, . 


ii. 


207 


cxxxix. 


15, 16, 




cxix. 


25,28, . 


m. 


294 


cxxxix. 


16, 


rf 


cxix. 


30, 111, 


VII. 


141 


cxxxix. 


16, 


9 \ 


cxix. 


31, . 


VII. 


230 


cxxxix. 


17, 





cxix. 


37, . 


11. 


206 


cxxxix. 


23, 


g 


cxix. 


68, 


VI. 


202 


cxi. 


3, 


. 


cxix. 


70, . 


VI. 


296 


cxli. 


2, 


t 


cxix. 


76, . 


vm. 


59 


cxli. 


5, 


m .- 


cxix. 


96, 


x. 


364 


cxliii. 


8-10, 


. 


cxix. 


97, . 


III. 


527 


exliii. 


10, 


. 


cxix. 


98-100, 


VII. 


144 


cxliii. 


11, 





cxix. 


104, 106, 


VII. 


327 


cxliv. 


15, 


^ 


cxix. 


127, 128, 


VI. 


131 


cxlv. 




.. 


cxix. 


137, 138, 


VI. 


291 


cxlv. 


1, 2, 3, 


5, 


cxix. 


144, . 


X. 


157 


cxlv. 


7, 




cxix. 


162, 


VI. 


285 


cxlv. 


10, 


.; 


cxxm. 


2, 


VII. 


231 


cxlv. 


10, 


. - 


cxxv. 




III. 


454 


cxlv. 


10, 11, 


. 


cxxv. 


5, ! 


I. 


17 


cxlv. 10-13, . 


cxxv. 


5, 


II. 


74 


cxlvi. 


4, 


, 


cxxv. 


5, 


IV. 


176 


cxlvii. 


4, 


. 


cxxvi. 


1-6, . 


III. 


385 


cxlvii. 


5, 





cxxvii. 


3, 


IX. 


426 


cxlvii. 


19, 


, 


cxxvii. 


5, . 


VII. 


163 


cxlvii. 


19, 20, 





255 

i. 17 
vm. 344 
iv. 21 
m. 326 
vm. 290 
vm. 3 
n. 193 
vm. 270 
x. 312 
iv. 258 
i. 53 
iv. 392 
i. 92 
n. 190 
iv. 386 
iv. 356 
iv. 195 
vm. 449 
vm. 95 
ix. 127 
vm. 53 
n. 167 
vii. 193 
m. 527 
vi. 65 
vii. 212 
ix. 507 
iv. 195 
vii. 435 
xii. 26 
i. 91 
iv. 196 
vii. 196 
m. 512 
n. 24 
x. 281 
m. 13 
vii. 207 
m. 381 
vi. 33 
n. 207 
iv. 252 
iv. 376 
iv. 386 
vm. 20 
i. 28 
iv. 389 
vi. 498 
iv. 399 
i. 456 
vm. 385 
vm. 99 
iv. 331 
ix. 187 



256 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



Prov. 



si viii. 16, 


iv. 380 


Prov. viii. 21, 


vii. 18 


cxlix. 2, 


iv. 355 


viii. 21, 


vm. 29 


. 20, 22, 29, 


x. 199 


viii. 22, 


iv. 410 


. 22, 26, . 


x. 214 


viii. 22, ; . 


iv. 410 


.23, 


vm. 558 


viii. 22, 


iv. 529 


. 23, 24, . 


iv. 186 


viii. 22-31, 


iv. 554 


. 29-33, . 


vn. 8 


viii. 23, - ; . 


i. 72 


i. 32, 


x. 210 


viii. 23-32, -"\ 


ix. 118 


i. 32, 


x. 517 


viii. 24-30, -". 


vn. 8 


ii. 1, 6, 


vm. 581 


viii. 25-31, - . - 


i. 110 


ii. 4, 


vi. 481 


viii. 29-31, . 


vn. 9 


ii. 10, 


i. 131 


viii. 30, 


iv. 369 


ii. 10, 


vn. 480 


viii. 30, , . 


iv. 544 


ii. 13-15, . 


x. 212 


viii. 30, 


v. 32 


ii. 18, 


ii. 24 


viii. 30, 31, 5 . . 


iv. 558 


iii. 3, ,^.. 


vi. 285 


viii. 31, * - 


iv. 218 


iii. 5, .7. . 


vm. 511 


viii. 31, - : -; 


iv. 370 


iii. 5, 


x. 215 


viii 31, 


ix. 96 


iii. 5, 6, 


vn. 210 


viii. 31, 32, . 


iv. 551 


iii. 6, 


vn. 205 


viii. 36, 


n. 14 


iii. 14, 


iv. 307 


viii. 36, 


iv. 178 


iii. 14, 


vi. 484 


viii. 36, 


x. 114 


iii. 14, 15, . 


iv. 243 


viii. 36, 


x. 200 


iii. 15, 16, . 


iv. 242 


ix. 10, 


iv. 240 


iii. 19, 


iv. 354 


ix. 10, 


iv. 296 


iii. 35, 


x. 319 


ix. 10, 


iv. 303 


iv. 16, 


m. 518 


ix. 10, 


vi. 257 


iv. 17, 


iv. 159 


ix. 10, 


vn. 259 


iv. 23. 


vi. 212 


ix. 10. 


x. 215 


iv. 23, 


x. 412 


ix. 12, 


i. 133 


v. 15, 18, . 


i. 230 


ix. 12, 


x. 197 


v. 22. 


HI 244 


ix. 17, 


m. 363 


v. 22, 


x. 210 


ix. 17, 


x. 300 


v. 22, 23, . 


x. 197 


ix. 17, 


x. 321 


v. 23 , 


x. 212 


ix. 18, 


vn. 351 


vi. 14, 


m. 511 


x. 1, 


iv. 135 


vi. 14. 


m. 526 


x. 5, 


x. 201 


vi. 14, 


vi. 477 


x. 15, 


iv. 249 


vi. 21, 22, . 


vi. 293 


x. 20, 


m. 512 


vi. 22, 


in. 477 


x. 20, 


vn. 551 


vi. 22, 


m. 511 


x. 22, . . 


m. 391 


vi. 22, 


m. 526 


x. 22, 


iv. 200 


vi. 22, 


vi. 476 


x. 23, 


iv. 159 


vi. 22, 


vi. 480 


x. 23, 


x. 294 


vi. 22, 


vii. 571 


xi. 10, 


x. 474 


vi. 26, 


x. 436 


xi. 30, 


vi. 518 


vi. 34, 


x. 358 


xi. 30, 


vi. 521 


vii. 8, 


x. 315 


xii. 2, 5, 


vi. 477 


vii. 21, 23, . 


x. 200 


xii. 11, 


m. 512 


vii. 23, 


n. 23 


xii. 15, 


x. 212 


viii. ," -. 


vi. 515 


xiii. 7, ./-. . 


m. 462 


vm. 4-6, /.. 


x. 195 


xiii. 8, 


x. 318 


viii. 11, , ; . 


iv. 287 


xiii. 12, 


m. 376 


viii. 13, , 


v. 485 


xiii. 12, 


m. 391 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



257 



Prov. xiii. 12, 
xiii. 16, 
xiv. 8, 
xiv. 10, 
xiv. 13, 
xiv. 13, 
xiv. 15, 
xiv. 28, 
xiv. 28, 

XV. 1, 

xv. 2, 
xv. 2, 
xv. 17, 
xv. 22, 
xvi. 2, 
xvi. 3, 
xvi. 4, 
xvi. 4, 
xvi. 4, 


x. 315 
x. 199 
x. 202 
V vm. 351 
m. 349 
x. 322 
x. 211 
iv. 252 
vi. 515 
vii. 555 
x. 199 
x. 213 
ii. 306 
x. 73 
x. 393 
in. 528 
vi. 459 
ix. 101 
x. 521 


Prov. xx.^27 
xx. 27, 

xx. 27, 
xx. 27, 
, xx. 27, 
xx. 29, 
xxi. 5, 
xxi. 16, 
xxi. 17, 
xxi. 22, 
xxi. 27, 
xxi. 27, 
xxi. 29, 
xxii. 1, 
xxii. 3, 
xxii. 3, 
xxii. 6, 
xxii. 14, 
xxii. 15, 


vii. 61 
x. 37 
x. 100 
. x. 175 
. x. 474 
vii. 479 
x. 318 
vn. 351 
x. 319 
x. 204 
x. 99 
x. 419 
in. 514 
iv. 200 
vii. 559 
x. 200 
iv. 183 
x. 437 

X 1 fifi 


xvi. 4, 
xvi. 17, 
xvi. 25, 
xvi. 30, 
xvi. 31, 
xvi. 32, 
xvi. 33, 
xvii. 10, 
xvii. 16, 


x. 533 
vii. 295 
iv. 331 
m. 515 
vii. 476 
vii. 507 
i. 208 
x. 212 
iv. 247 


xxii. 26J 

xxiii. 2, 
xxiii. 5, 
xxiii. 5, 
xxiii. 7, 
xxiii. 17, 
xxiii. 22, 
xxiii. 23, 
xxiii. 23, 


-A.. X UO 

iv. 28 
x. 83 
m. 524 
x. 316 
vi. 476 
vi. 479 
iv. 313 
iv. 246 
x. 34 


xvii. 16, 


x. 208 


xxiii. 26, 


vi. 475 


xvii. 16, 
xvii. 17, 


x. 314 
vii. 196 


xxiii. 31, 32, 
xxiv. 5, 


x. 323 
x. 136 


xvii. 17, 


vn. 343 


xxiv. 9, 


m. 512 


xvii. 17, 


vii. 564 


XXV. 11, 


m. 516 


xvii. 24, 


m. 516 


xxv. 16, 17, 


vii. 197 


xvii. 24, 


x. 200 


xxv. 27, 


x. 318 


xviii. 1, 


vi. 482 


xxvi. 1, 3, 


x. 214 


xviii. 2, 


x. 213 


xxvi. 12, 


x. 214 


xviii. 5, 


iv. 272 


xxvi. 12, 


x. 427 


xviii. 10, 


x. 208 


xxvi. 13-16, 


x. 204 


xviii. 10, 11, 


vi. 472 


xxvii. 3, 


x. 544 


xviii. 11, 


vi. 444 


xx vii. 4, 


ix. 405 


xviii. 22, 


vii. 191 


xxvii. 4, 


. ix. 485 


xviii. 23, 


ir. 195 


xxvii. 5, 6, 


vii. 207 


xix. 2, 


m. 237 


xxvii. 7, 


x. 322 


xix. 2, 


x. 174 


xxvii. 7, 8, 


x. 547 


xix. 11, 


n. 185 


xxvii. 9, 


vn. 197 


xix. 11, 


vi. 504 


xxvii. 9, 


. , vni. 400 


xix. 15, 


x. 230 


xxvii. 19, 


n. 139 


xix. 17, 


vn. 572 


xxvii. 19, 


x. 61 


xx. 5, 


iv. 272 


xxvii. 20, 


vi. 371 


xx. 5, 


x. 148 


xxvii. 22, 


x. 72 


xx. 8, 


iv. 53 


xxviii. 7, 


x. 199 


xx. 12, 


i. 302 


xxviii. 22, 


x. 300 


xx. 27, 


vi. 254 


xxviii. 22, 


x. 318 


VOL. XII. 




R 



258 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



Prov. xxix. 2, 


ii. 54 


Eccles. vii. 4-6, 


x. 202 


xxix. 15, 


x. 45 


vii. 6, 


m. 236 


xxx. 2, 


x. 95 


vii. 14, 


m. 292 


xxx. 2, 


x. 175 


vii. 15, 


vn. 218 


xxx. 2, 


x. 214 


vii. 17, 


x. 317 


xxx. 6, 


iv. 423 


vii. 19, . . . 


x. 204 


xxx. 4, 


iv. 468 


vn. 23-29, 


x. 429 


xxx. 4, 


v. 177 


vii. 25, 


iv. 278 


xxx. 4, 


vn. 489 


vii. 25, 


x. 6 


xxx. 4, 


ix. 126 


vii. 25, 29, . 


x. 199 


xxx. 8, 


x. 301 


vii. 27-29, 


x. 5 


xxx. 8, 9, 


x. 66 


vii. 29, 


i. 187 


xxx. 10, 


x. 381 


vii. 29, 


vi. 377 


xxx. 12, 


x. 69 


vii. 29, 


x. 35 


xxx. 12, 


x. 76 


vn. 29, 


x. 216 


xxx. 12, 


x. 391 


vii. 29, 


x. 285 


xxx. 19, 


x. 221 


viii. 4, 


iv. 556 


xxx. 32, 


m. 512 


viii. 5, 6, 


vn. 560 


xxx. 32, 


in. 524 


viii. 6, 7, 


x. 201 


xxxi. 


iv. 307 


viii. 8, 


in. 407 


Eccles. i. 2, 3, 


m. 512 


viii. 11, 


x. 234 


i. 7, . 


vm. 130 


viii. 12, 


iv. 201 


i. 15, 


x. 143 


ix. 2, 


m. 368 


i. 15, 


x. 300 


ix. 2, 


x. 237 


ii. 1,2, . 


x. 311 


ix. 3, 


x. 225 


ii. 2,3, . 


YII. 156 


ix. 10, 


n. 436 


ii. 3,17, . 


x. 315 


ix. 10, 


vi. 479 


ii. 4-9, 


x. 222 


ix. 11, 


iv. 200 


ii. 5, 


vn. 42 


ix. 15, 


x. 205 


ii. 8, 


i. 93 


x. 6,7, . 


x. 293 


ii. 8, 


ii. 184 


x. 16, 


ii. 54 


ii. 8, 


ix. 101 


x. 16, 17, . 


x. 300 


ii. 13, 14, 


x. 143 


x. 19, 


ii. 184 


iii. 1, 


xi. 400 


x. 19, 


x. 316 


iii. 11, 


vn. 465 


xi. 1, 2, . 


vii. 572 


iii. 14, 


vn. 38 


xi. 7, 


m. 237 


iv. 8, 


x. 66 


xi. 8,9, . 


x. 552 


iv. 8, 


x. 322 


xii. 1, 


x. 74 


v. 1, 


x. 200 


xii. 1, 


x. 319 


v. 3, 


m. 528 


xii. 2, 


iv. 196 


v. 4, 


x. 212 


xii. 2, 


vn. 36 


v. 8, 


vn. 14 


xii. 7, 


vii. 95 


v. 12, 


m. 515 


xii. 7, 


vii. 427 


Y. 12, 


m. 518 


xii. 7, 


vn. 433 


v. 17, ; 


ii. 99 


xii. 7, 


x. 555 


v. 17, 


m. 237 


xii. 7,8, ... 


x. 558 


V. 17, 


iv. 199 


xii. 11, 


xi. 338 


Y. 17, 


vn. 42 


xii. 13, 


i. 136 


Y. 17, 


x. 320 


xii. 14, 


i. 525 


Vi. 


ii. 108 


xii. 14, 


v. 336 


Yi. 2, 


i. 312 


Cant. i. 2, 


x. 189 


vi. 7, .; 


vm. 583 


i.16, 


vii. 201 


Yi. 9, 


n. 22 


ii. 9, 


x. 556 


vi. 12, 


x. 143 


iii. 1-5, 


in. 340 



INDEX OF TEXTS, 



259 



Cant. 



Isa. 



iii. 2, 
iii. 2, 4, 
iv. 9, 
iv. 12-16, 
iv. 16, 
v. 1, 
v. 1, 
v. 1, 
v. 4-7, 
v. 6, 
v. 6-8, 
vii. 6, 
vii. 12, 13, 
vii. 13, 
viii. 
viii. 6, 
viii. 6, 


m. 468 
in. 307 
*x. 209 
vi. 30 
vi. 31 
iv. 123 
vi. 25 
vn. 499 
m. 294 
vn. 547 
m. 307 
vii. 201 
vn. 499 
m. 470 
in. 454 
i. 363 
in. 335 


Isa. vii. 14, 
vii. 14, 
viii. 7, 
viii. 11, 
viii. 16, 17, . 
viii. 17, 
viii. 18, 
viii. 19, 20, . 
ix. 5, 
ix. 6, 
ix. 6, 
. 6, 
ix. 6, 
ix. 6, 
ix. 6, 
ix. 6, 
ix. 6, 


iv. 423 
iv. 438 
in. 97 
vu. 565 
vn. 564 
vm. 517 
ix. 495 
x. 215 
iv. 256 
i.50l 
iv. 355 
iv. 515 
iv. 536 
iv. 438 
iv. 564 
iv. 429 
v. 138 


viii. 6, 


vn. 192 


ix. 6, 


v. 37 


viii. 6, 7, 


n. 175 


ix. 6, 


v. 300 


i. 2, 


i. 387 


ix. 6, 


v. 505 


, 


iv. 203 


ix. 6, 


vi. 220 


. 2, 


x. 109 


ix. 6, 


viii. 63 


. 6, 15, 


ii. 109 


ix. 6, 


x. 215 


. 9, 


m. 156 


ix. 26, 


ix. 104 


. 10, 
.11, 
. 13, 14, 


vn. 72 
x. 323 
x. 209 


x. 22, 
x. 22, 
xi. 1, 


n. 165 
vii. 550 
v. 161 


.15, 


vn. 164 


xi. 2, 


iv. 120 


. 16, 


viii. 362 


xi. 2, 


vi. 33 


. 16, 17, 


x. 408 


xi. 2, 


vi. 50 


.24, 


in. 416 


xi. 2,3, . 


vi. 162 


ii. 3,4, 


xi. 292 


xi. 6, 


i. 357 


ii. 4, 


vi. 360 


xi. 6, 


vm. 327 


ii. 7, 


n. 189 


xi. 6, 


xi. 264 


ii. 17-19 


m. 51 


xi. 8, 11, . 


iv. 290 


iii. 9, 


x. 212 


xi. 9, 13, . 


i. 191 


iv. 4, 


iv. 254 


xi. 10, 


m. 212 


iv. 4, 


vi. 36 


xi. 12, 


vi. 66 


iv. 4, 


vi. 394 


xi. 13-16, . 


m. 97 


iv. 5, 


iv. 253 


xiii. 10, 


in. 45 


iv. 5, 6, 


in. 96 


xiv. 1, 


ix. 159 


vi. 1, 


in. 3 


xiv. 3, 


in. 45 


vi. 1, 


iv. 408 


xiv. 12, 13, . 


m. 183 


vi. 1-3, 


iv. 478 


xiv. 23, 


vn. 568 


vi. 3, 


iv. 359 


xiv. 27, 


TX. 419 


vi. 3, 


iv. 332 


xiv. 30, 


in. 9 


vi. 5, 


iv. 250 


xvi. 5, 


i. 474 


vi. 5, 


vii. 446 


xvii. 6, 


m, 440 


vi. 5, 


viii. 435 


xix. 11, 


iv. 399 


vi. 8, 


iv. 388 


xxi. 9, 


m. 203 


vi. 9, 


iv. 414 


xxii. 13, 


x. 237 


vii. 10-13, 


x. 236 


xxiv. 2, 


vii. 568 


vii. 13, 


x. 254 


xxiv. 23, 


vii. 91 


vii. 13, 


iv. 202 


XXV. 1, 


iv. 391 



260 



Isa. 



XXV. 
XXV. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 

xxvi. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxvii. 
xxviii. 
xxviii. 
xxviii. 
xxviii. 
xxviii. 
xxviii. 
xxviii. 
xxviii. 
xxviii. 

xxix. 

xxix. 

xxix. 

xxix. 

xxix. 

xxix. 

xxx. 

xxx. 

xxx. 

xxx. 



1,2, 

7, 

3, 

3, 

4, 

4, 

8, 

8,9, 

9, 
10, 
11, 
12, 
12, 

12-18, 
13, 
16, 
19, 
20, 

2,3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

4, 

4, 



5, 

5, 

5, 

7, 

7,8, 

7-9, 
11, 
11, 
17, 

4, 
16, 
16, 
17, 
21, 

24-26, 
26, 28, 
27, 
29, 

8, 

8, 

11,12, 
13, 

13-16, 
23, 24, 

7, 
18, 
18, 
20, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 


IV. 385 


Isa. xxx. 21, 


i. 520 


xxxi. 1, 


ii. 449 


xxxii. 1, 


vm. 474 


xxxii. 7, 


vii. 563 


xxxii. 8, 


vm. 29 


xxxii. 8, 


vii. 564 


xxxiii. 14, 


vn. 566 


xxxiii. 14, 


vi. 480 


xxxiii. 14, 


iv. 184 


xxxiii. 14, 


vn. 278 


xxxiii. 18, 


vii. 208 


xxxiii. 18, 


iv. 201 


xxxiii. 24, 


vm. 533 


xxxiii. 24, 


vm. 328 


xxxiv. 2-8, 


vii. 198 


xxxv. 


ii. 253 


xxxv. 3,4,6, . 


vii. 558 


xxxv. 8, 


ix. 304 


xxxv. 8, 


iv. 133 


xxxvi. 8, 


vii. 563 


xxxv. 10, 


ix. 212 


xxxvi. 16, 


vm. 54 


xxxvii. 8, 


x. 543 


xxxvii. 9, 


iv. 81 


xxxviii. 3, 


iv. 558 


xxxviii. 13, 


v. 49 


xxxviii. 14, 


vm. 585 


xxxviii. 15, 16, 


vii. 554 


xxxviii. 20, 


x. 513 


xxxix. 8, 


x. 338 


xl. 1, 


vii. 567 


xl. 3,4,5, . 


iv. 156 


xl. 3-9, 


x. 175 


xl. 3,10,12, 


vii. 199 


xl. 4, 


vii. 570 


xl. 5. 6, 


vm. 304 


xl. 9, 


ix. 336 


xl. 12, 


x. 537 


xl. 13, 14, . 


n. 180 


xl. 15, 


x. 143 


xl. 15, 


x. 94 


xl. 17, 


m. 342 


xl. 26, 


i. 217 


xl. 31, 


m. 522 


xli. 2, 


m. 520 


xli. 4, 


x. 145 


xli. 8, 


x. 93 


xlii. 1, 


x. 233 


xlii. 1, 


vii. 293 


xlii. 1, 


vm. 538 


xlii. 1, 


m. 387 


xlii. 1, 


vm. 425 


xlii. 1, 


xi. 448 


xlii. 6, 



x. 202 

vm. 343 

vn. 567 

m. 519 

n. 289 

vm. 94 

vn. 564 

x. 556 

x. 553 

x. 504 

m. 526 

m. 517 

m. 300 

vii. 469 

m. 43 

iv. 303 

vii. 510 

i. 157 

i. 172 

x. 215 

vii. 469 

iv. 123 

iv. 240 

x. 70 

vi. 317 

m. 279 

m. 400 

m. 521 

iv. 193 

vm. 518 

ix. 150 

iv. 316 

vii. 16 

iv. 434 

iv. 318 

iv. 250 

vm. 186 

iv. 160 

iv. 355 

vii. 4 

x. 529 

vii. 6 

i. 334 

m. 236 

i. 432 

vm. 38 

ix. 13 

v. 69 

vi. 361 

vi. 55 

vn. 248 

ix. 98 

ix. 339 

n. 378 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



261 



xlii. 8, 


iv. 350 


Isa. xlviii. 4, . 


vi. 394 


xlii. 18-20, 


x. 155 


xlviii. 8, 


n. 121 


xlii. 19, 


YII. 549 


xlviii. 9, 10, 


m. 329 


xlii. 24, 25, . 


x. 202 


xlviii. 10, 11, . 


ix. 415 


xliii. 2, 


vn. 566 


xlviii. 17, 


iv. 358 


xliii. 3, 4, 


vii. 195 


xlviiii. 20-22, . 


in. 405 


xliii. 4, 


iv. 87 


xlix. 1,2, . 


v. 528 


xliii. 4, 


vi. 494 


xlix. 1-8, 


x. 17 


xliii. 10, 13, . 


vii. 20 


xlix. 4, 


iv. 213 


xliii. 12, 


vii. 561 


xlix. 4-6, 


i. 202 


xliii. 13, 


iv. 410 


xlix. 6, 


n. 177 


xliii. 18, 19, 21, 


i. 357 


xlix. 8, 


n. 379 


xliii. 20, 21, . 


i. 91 


xlix. 8, 


m. 386 


xliii. 21, 


ix. 101 


xlix. 8, 


iv. 14 


xliii. 22-25, . 


vm. 226 


xlix. 8, 


iv. 29 


xliii. 25, 


n. 287 


xlix. 12, 


m. 124 


xliii. 25, 


m. 329 


xlix. 14, 


m. 343 


xliii. 25, 


iv. 437 


xlix. 14, 


vii. 212 


xliii. 25, 


vm. 31 


xlix. 15, 


iv. 125 


xliii. 25, 


vni. 99 


xlix. 15, 16, 


vn. 564 


xliii. 26, 


vm. 218 


xlix. 23, 


i. 528 


xliii. 27, 


n. 128 


1. 4, 


m. 289 


xliii. 27, 


x. 359 


1. 5, 


v. 145 


xliv. 2, 


iv. 355 


1. 5, 


vi. 368 


xliv. 3, 


vi. 43 


1. 7,8, . 


iv. 40 


xliv. 3, 4, 


vi. 34 


1. 8, 


iv. 7 


xliv. 5, 


vi. 131 


1. 8,9, . 


iv. 36 


xliv. 5, 


ix. 249 


L. 10, 


m. 341 


xliv. 6, 


iv. 436 


1. 10, 


vm. 341 


xliv. 6, 


vm. 38 


L. 10, 11, . 


m. 235 


xliv. 6, 7, 


iv. 399 


L. 11, 


m. 345 


xliv. 7, 


ix. 241 


1. 11, 


vi. 387 


xliv. 8, 


iv. 349 


li. 7, 


vi. 391 


xliv. 15, 17, . 


ix. 242 


li. 9, 


n. 40 


xliv. 25, 


x. 210 


li. 12, 


vi. 508 


xliv. 26-28, 


m. 410 


li. 12, 13, % . 


x. 233 


xliv. 28, 


vii. 224 


li. 20, 23, . 


ix. 415 


xliv. 28, 
xlv. 3, 


vii. 239 
n. 188 


Hi. 3, 
Hi. 11, 


x. 208 
vii. 239 


xlv. 5-7, 
xlv. 9, 
xlv. 9, 


vn. 20 
vii. 6 
x. 529 


Hi. 15, 
liii.-lvi, 
liii., 


xi. 277 
ix. 74 
iv. 220 


xlv. 11, 
xlv. 15, 
xlv. 18, 
xlv. 21, 22, . 
xlv. 22, 
xlv. 22, 23, . 
xlv. 23-25, . 
xlv. 24, 
xlv. 24, 25, . 
xlvi. 13, 
xlvii. 10, 
xlvii. 16, 17, . 


iv. 81 
iv. 423 
iv. 354 
vm. 305 
n. 339 
vm. 216 
vi. 182 
vn. 517 
vn. 510 
vn. 280 
x. 138 
iv. 357 


liii. 
liii. 1, , 
liii. 1, 
liii. 1, 
liii. 5, 11, 
liii. 6, * 
liii. 6, 
liii. 6, 
liii. 6, 
liii. 6, 
liii. 6, 
liii. 8, 


iv. 19 
iv. 558 
vn. 555 
vm. 147 
vi. 440 
iv. 85 
v. 128 
v. 869 
v. 290 
i. 187 
x. 54 
iv. 30 



262 
Isa. 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 


liii. 8, 


IV. 412 


Isa. Iv. 19-26, 


liii. 10, 


iv. 86 


Ivi. 3, 


liii. 10, 


iv. 214 


Ivi. 4, 


liii. 10, 


iv. 79 


Ivi. 4, 


liii. 10, 


v. 513 


Ivi. 4-6, 


liii. 10, 


vi. 97 


Ivi. 11, 12, 


liii. 10, 


vii. 194 


Ivi. 11, 12, 


liii. 10, - . 


x. 534 


Ivi. 12, 


liii. 10, 11, . 


ix. 306 


Ivi. 12, 


liii. 10, 12, . 


iv. 411 


Ivii. 


liii. 10-12, 


v. 27 


Ivii. 1, 2, 


liii. 11, 


iv. 147 


Ivii. 2, 


liii. 11, 


1.431 


Ivii. 5, 


liii. 11, 


viii. 358 


Ivii. 14-21, 


liii. 11, 


vm. 463 


Ivii. 15, 


liii. 11, 


iv. 213 


LVII. 15, 


liii. 11, 


iv. 8 


Ivii. 15, 


liii. 12, 


iv. 63 


Ivii. 15, 


liii. 12, 


v. 302 


Ivii. 15, 16, 


liii. 16, 


iv. 157 


Ivii. 16, 


liv. 1, 


LX. 76 


Ivii. 17, 


liv. 5, 


1.191 


Ivii. 17, 


liv. 5, 


iv. 355 


Ivii. 17, 


liv. 5, 


ix. 104 


Ivii. 17, 


LIV. 7-11, . 


ix. 42 


Ivii. 17, 18, 


liv. 7, 8, 10, 


vin. 41 


Ivii. 17, 18, 


liv. 8, 


m. 240 


Ivii. 17, 18, 


liv. 8, 


m. 313 


Ivii. 17, 18, 


liv. 8, 9, 


iv. 397 


Ivii. 18, 


liv. 9, 


in. 3 


Ivii. 18, 


liv. 9, 10, . 


vm. 43 


Ivii. 18, 


LIV. 9-13, 


vm. 165 


Ivii. 18, 


liv. 11, 12, . 


ii. 443 


Ivii: 19, 


liv. 11, 12, . 


ix. 319 


Ivii. 19, 


liv. 13, 


vm. 163 


Ivii. 19, 


Iv. 1-3, 


vm. 410 


Ivii. 20, 


Iv. 2, 


iv. 193 


Ivii. 20, 


Iv. 2, 


x. 315 


Ivii. 20, 


Iv. 3, 


vii. 212 


Ivii. 20, 


Iv. 3, 


n. 192 


Ivii. 21, 


Iv. 3, 


vm. 73 


Iviii. 2, 


Iv. 3, 7, 


m. 419 


Iviii. 3, 


Iv. 7, 


m. 513 


Iviii. 7, 


Iv. 7, 


m. 525 


Iviii. 8, 


Iv. 7, 


vm. 127 


Iviii. 11, 12, 


Iv. 7, 


vm. 566 


Iviii. 13, 


Iv. 7, 


ix. 211 


Iviii. 13, 


Iv. 7, 


ix. 224 


Iviii. 13, 


Iv. 7,8, . 


vm. 86 


lix. 2, 


Iv. 8, 9, 


n. 172 


lix. 4, 


Iv. 8, 9, 


vm. 49 


lix. 7, 


Iv. 9, 


vm. 329 


lix. 7,8, 


Iv. 10, 11, . 


vm. 18 


lix. 9, 


Iv. 11, 13, . 


vi. 401 


lix. 11, 12, 



ix. 54 

ix. 492 

vi. 131 

vn. 215 

vi. 494 

x. 300 

x. 294 

x. 315 

x. 211 

m. 249 

vn. 352 

i. 19 

n. 105 

m. 405 

in. 348 

vn. 10 

ix. 116 

x. 350 

vii. 428 

vm. 382 

in. 313 

m. 342 

vii. 207 

ix. 257 

vm. 566 

ix. 311 

ix. 244 

x. 311 

n. 29i 

m. 311 

m. 335 

ix. 386 

m. 302 

m. 407 

vi. 454 

n. 23 

x. 64 

x. 367 

x. 81 

x. 263 

x. 192 

x. 209 

vii. 556 

iv. 254 

vii. 571 

vi. 494 

vi. 395 

vn. 289 

n. 11 

m. 511 

x. 363 

x. 281 

m. 237 

iv. 186 



Isa. 



lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

lix. 

Ix. 

Ix. 

Ix. 

Ixi. 

Ixi. 

Ixi. 

Ixi. 

Ixi. 

Ixii. 

Ixii. 

Ixii. 

Ixii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiii. 

Ixiv. 

Ixiv. 

Ixiv. 

Ixiv. 

Ixiv. 

Ixv. 

Ixv. 

Ixv. 

Ixv. 

Ixvi. 

Ixvi. 

Ixvi. 

LXVI. 



11, 12, 

11, 12, 
11, 12, 
13-18, 
16, 
16, 

18, 19, 
18, 
19, 
20, 
20, 
21, 
21, 
21, 
21, 
1, 2, 3, 

9, 
21, 

1,2, 

1,3, 

3,7, 

3, 6, 9, 

6, 

2, 

4, 

5, 

7, 

2, 

7, 

8, 
8,10, 

9, 
9,10, 

9, 
10, 
15, 

16, 17, 
16, 17, 
17, 
17, 
27, 

1-5, 

4, 

5, 

6, 

7, 

6, 

8, 
17, 
17, 

1, 

1, 

1,2, 
1,2, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 


263 


X. 517 


Isa. Ixvi. 1,2, 


ix. 116 


x. 472 


Ixvi. 1, 2, 


ix. 1 01 


vm. 499 


Ixvi. 2, 


m. 342 


vii. 569 


Ixvi. 2, 


ix. 410 


vii. 558 


Ixvi. 11, 


m. 322 


vni. 474 


Ixvi. 11, 


vm. 581 


m. 29 


Ixvi. 20, 


vi. 35 


x. 515 


Ixvi. 21, 


i. 18 


iv. 254 


Ixvi. 22, 


1.510 


i. 199 


Ixvi. 24, 


m. 171 


x. 34 


Ixviii. 8, 


vn. 279 


i. 249 


Jer, ii. 2, 


iv. 182 


iv. 320 


ii. 2,5,20,21, 


vm. 564 


iv. 245 


ii. 3, 


vi. 399 


ix. 485 


ii. 3, 


ix. 101 


iv. 322 


ii. 9, v . 


x. 434 


i. 313 


ii. 13, 


vi. 128 


in. 438 


ii. 13, 


x. 290 


iv. 131 


ii. 19, 


x. 43 


vi. 30 


ii. 19, 


x. 189 


ix. 378 


ii. 19, 


x. 517 


vii. 287 


ii. 21, 


m. 436 


i. 313 


ii. 22, 


iv. 154 


vi. 362 


ii. 22, 


x. 72 


ix. 104 


ii. 27-29, . 


vii. 563 


vm. 401 


ii. 32, 


vi. 477 


iv. 253 


ii. 32, 


x. 92 


m. 35 


iii. 1-3, 


x. 110 


vi. 68 


iii. 1-14, . 


m. 419 


i. 42 


iii. 1-22, . 


ix. 311 


m. 410 


iii. 1-41, 


vm. 564 


n. 177 


iii. 2, 13, . 


vi. 102 


m. 416 


iii. 4,5, 


vi. 416 


vn. 566 


iii. 4,5, 


vi. 136 


m. 297 


iii. 5,19, . 


vi. 155 


vi. 498 


iii. 14, 


vn. 196 


m. 335 


iii. 14, 15, 


iv. 258 


vii. 488 


iii. 15, 


m. 342 


m. 240 


iii. 16, 


vii. 37 


vn. 324 


iii. 16, 


xi. 139 


x. 341 


iii. 1 6, 


xi. 338 


vn. 564 


iii. 19,20, . 


vi. 84 


iv. 284 


iv. 3, 


vi. 339 


n. 189 


iv. 14, 


m. 509 


v. 362 


iv. 14, 


vi. 478 


vm. 585 


iv. 14, 


vm. 362 


x. 561 


iv. 14, 


vm. 543 


vii. 561 


iv. 14, 


x. 71 


1.199 


iv. 18, 


m. 414 


vn. 37 


iv. 18, 


x. 518 


vii. 5 


iv. 21, 


x. 94 


vi. 498 


iv. 22, 


i. 134 


i. 371 


iv. 22, 


x. 138 


\n. 10 


iv. 22, . i 


x. 180 



264 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



Jer. iv. 22, 
v. 1, 
v. 1,2, 
v. 4, 
v. 4,5, 
v. 5, 
Y. 5, 
v. 21-24, 
v. 22, 
v. 23, 
v. 24, 
v. 24, 
vi. 7, 

Ti. 8, 

vi. 14, 
vi. 15, 
vi. 18, 
vi. 30, 
vii. 19, 
vii. 30, 
viii. 4, 
viii. 4, 
viii. 6, 
viii. 6, 
viii. 6, 
viii. 9, 
ix. 1, 
ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 24, 
ix. 23, 4, 
ix. 23, 24, 
ix. 24, 
ix. 24, 
ix. 24, 
ix. 24, 
ix. 24, 
x. 6,7, 
x. 7, 
x. 10, 12, 
x. 22-24, 
x. 23, 
x. 24, 
xii. 1, 
xiii. 13, 
xiii. 27, 
xiii. 27, 
xiii. 27, 
xv. 2, 
xv. 10, 11, 
xvi. 19, 
xvi. 19, 
xvii. 
xvii. 1 



x. 191 


Jer. xvii. 1, 


x. 282 


iv. 248 


xvii. 7, 


vn. 563 


vn. 547 


xvii. 8, 10, 


vii. 174 


iv. 167 


xvii. 9, 


m. 249 


x. 517 


xvii. 9, 


iv. 278 


vi. 293 


xvii. 9, 


, - vm. 395 


vii. 332 


xvii. 9, 


^ x. 335 


x. 229 


xvii. 9, 10, 


x. 168 


ix. 56 


xvii. 9, 10, 


x. 207 


i. 187 


xvii. 10, 


m. 465 


iv. 194 


xvii. 10, 


x. 363 


ix. 512 


xvii. 11, 


* m. 522 


x. 81 


xvii. 12, 


m. 3 


xi. 338 


xvii. 12, 


iv. 324 


x. 211 


xvii. 17, 


. vii. 565 


x. 212 


xvii. 24, 25, 


vn. 571 


x. 449 


xviii. 12-15, 


. viii. 126 


x. 71 


xx. 9, 


vi. 286 


x. 518 


xx. 10, 


vn. 278 


x. 292 


xxii. 15, 16, 


x. 157 


i. 199 


xxii. 17, 


x. 94 


v. 484 


xxii. 17, 


x. 281 


vii. 550 


xxiii. 3, 4, 


. xi. 338 


vii. 560 


xxiii. 5, 


. v. 161 


x. 200 


xxiii. 6, 


m. 349 


x. 195 


xxiii. 6, 


: . iv. 434 


x. 91 


xxiii. 6, 


v. 132 


iv. 252 


xxiii. 6, 


v. 338 


vi. 495 


xxiii. 11, 


m. 485 


vm. 33 


xxiii. 22, 


vi. 520 


vm. 466 


xxiii. 24, 


vii. 12 


ix. 304 


xxiv. 2, 3, 


x. 86 


i. 107 


xxiv. 6, 7, 


ix. 410 


vi. 126 


xxiv. 7, 


x. 91 


vi. 501 


xxv. 15-29, 


x. 513 


vm. 9 


xxv. 27-29, 


m. 309 


vm. 165 


xxix. 10-12, 


m. 376 


iv. 398 


xxix. 11, 


i. 19 


m. 94 


xxix. 11, 


m. 405 


iv. 437 


xxix. 11, 


m. 410 


vii. 576 


xxix. 11, 


vi. 565 


vii. 205 


xxix. 11, 


vm. 123 


vii. 18 


xxix. 13, 


vn. 553 


m. 251 


xxx. 9, 


. vm. 63 


ix. 444 


XXX. 11, 


. iv. 160 


in. 331 


xxx. 11, 


x. 538 


iv. 191 


xxx. 31, 


m. 12 


iv. 198 


xxxi. 3, 


n. 148 


in. 38 


xxxi. 3, 


ii. 155 


vn. 569 


xxxi. 3, 


ii. 168 


vi. 472 


xxxi. 3, 


vm. 40 


vii. 565 


xxxi. 3, 


vm. 60 


x. 241 


xxxi. 3, 


ix. 151 


vi. 403 


xxxi. 3, 


ix. 329 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



2G5 



Jer. xxxi. 14, 


vm. 403 


Jer. xxxviii. 17-19, . 


TV 1 7 


xxxi. 18, 
xxxi. 18, 
xxxi. 18-20, 
xxxi. 18-20, 
xxxi. 20, 
xxxi. 20, 
xxxi. 20, 


vi. 216 
vi. 412 
m. 337 
vii. 555 
m. 252 
n. 353 
in. 406 


xxxix. 18, 
xlii. 18, 
xliii. 11-13, . 
xliv. 17, 
xlv. 3, 5, 
xlv. 5, 
1. 2, 


-IV. JL i O 

vn. 565 
ii. 371 
m. 51 
x. 386 
vm. 428 
vn. 568 

mrri 


xxxi. 20, 
xxxi. 20, 
xxxi. 20, 
xxxi. 20, 


iv. 149 
iv. 214 
vm. 80 
x. 547 


H. 13, 
li. 36, 
li. 36, 
Lam. i. 12, 


. OJL 

ii. 186 
vii. 561 
vii. 563 
m. 342 


xxxi. 21, 


v. 157 


i. 15, 


x. 472 


xxxi. 22, 


iv. 439 


iii. 1-25, 


vii. 562 


xxxi. 22, 


vm. 36 


iii. 1-25, . 


x. 438 


xxxi. 26, 


iv. 200 


iii. 17, 


m. 285 


xxxi. 31-33, 


vi. 231 


iii. 17, 18, . 


m. 320 


xxxi. 31, 32, 


x. 109 


iii. 17-19, . 


m. 316 


xxxi. 32, 


vi. 53 


iii. 18, 


m. 242 


xxxi. 33, 


vi. 349 


iii. 19, 20, . 


vm. 581 


xxxi. 33, 


vm. 451 


iii. 22, 


n. 189 


xxxi. 33, 


ix. 306 


iii. 22, 


iv. 199 


xxxi. 33, 


x. 97 


iii. 22, 


vn. 575 


xxxi. 33, 34, 


vi. 507 


iii. 22, 


vm. 43 


xxxi. 33, 34, 


ix. 53 


iii. 24, 


vm. 341 


xxxi. 33, 34, 


x. 91 


iii. 25-29, 


n. 451 


xxxi. 33, 34, 


x. 138 


iii. 26, 


m. 330 


xxxi. 34, 


vi. 126 


iii. 26, 27 


n. 449 


xxxi. 34, 


vm. 153 


iii. 28, 


vm. 538 


xxxi. 34, 35, 36, 


iv. 222 


iii. 29, 


i. 532 


xxxii. 6, 


iv. 245 


iii. 29, 


m. 324 


xxxii. 16, 


ix. 53 


iii. 29, 


vi. 22 


xxxii. 17, 18, 


vm. 52 


iii. 29, 


vm. 132 


xxxii. 17-27, 


ix. 252 


iii. 29, 


vm. 313 


xxxii 22, 


x. 487 


iii. 29, 


m. 343 


xxxii. 30, 


x. 115 


iii. 29, 


ix. 490 


xxxii. 38-40, 


ix. 53 


iii. 33, 


n. 180 


xxxii. 40, 


vi. 55 


iii. 33, 


x. 534 


xxxii. 40, 


vn. 331 


iii. 39, 


n. 439 


xxxii. 40, 


ix. 64 


iii. 40, 


m. 317 


xxxii. 40, 


ix. 306 


iii. 40, 


vii. 550 


xxxii. 40, 


x. 91 


iii. 40, 


vn. 329 


xxxii. 41, 


i. 104 


iii. 49, 


x. 487 


xxxii. 41, 


n. 180 


iv. 6-9, 


m. 36 


xxxii. 41, 


vn. 195 


vi. 3, 


iv. 258 


xxxii. 41, 


ix. 238 


Ezekiel i. 2, 3, 


in. 156 


xxxiii. 6, 


m. 236 


i. 5, 6, 


iv. 257 


xxxiii. 9, 


m. 182 


i. 20, 


xii. 108 


xxxiii. 11, 


vm. 93 


i. 26, 


m. 3 


xxxiii. 17, 18, 


iv. 258 


iii. 26, ..ij 


m. 371 


xxxiii. 18, 


n. 396 


v. 6, 


ix. 39 


xxxiii. 20, 


v. 515 


vi. 9, 


vi. 137 


xxxiii. 20, 


vm. 43 


vii. 21, 


xii. 78 


xxxiii. 20, 


ix. 55 


viii. 15, > 


iv. 158 



266 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



Ezek. 



. ix. 3, 


iv. 285 


Ezek. xxxiii. 31, 


x. 314 


ix. 3, 


iv. 258 


xxxiii. 32, 


vn. 227 


x. 9-11, . 


in. 64 


xxxiv. 


v. 368 


xi. 5, 


m. 510 


xxxiv. 12, 


ix. 303 


xi. 16, 


xi. 289 


xxxiv. 13, 14, 21, 


xii. 58 


xi. 22, 


iv. 257 


xxxiv. 16, 


iv. 131 


xii. 22, 23, . 


x. 384 


xxxvi. . 


vm. 194 


xiii. 19, 


x. 292 


xxxvi. 22, 


ix. 126 


xiv. 14, 


vn. 558 


xxxvi. 22, 31, 


vn. 554 


xiv. 14, . 


vn. 567 


xxxvi. 22, 32, 


m. 329 


xiv. 14, , 


ix. 47 


xxxvi. 25, 26, 


ix. 323 


xiv. 21, 


m. 337 


xxxvi. 25-27, 


vm. 543 


xv. 3,4, 


x. 89 


xxxvi. 26, 27, 


vi. 211 


xv. 7, 


ix. 416 


xxxvi. 26, 27, 


vi. 34 


xvi. 3, 


ix. 488 


xxxvi. 26, 27, 


IX. 11 


xvi. 3, 22, , 


vi. 102 


xxxvi. 27, 


vi. 49 


xvi. 4,5,7, . 


vn. 384 


xxxvi. 31, 32, 


m. 450 


xvi. 5-7, 


vi. 90 


xxxvi. 32, 


vi. 226 


xvi. 6, 


n. 211 


xxxvi. 36, 37, 


vii. 553 


xvi. 15, 19, . 


iv. 202 


xxxvii. 


i. 436 


xvi. 22, 


in. 297 


xxxvii. 3, 5, . 


i. 199 


xvi. 43, 


in. 425 


xxxvii. 13, 14, 


vi. 49 


xvi. 47, 48, . 


ix. 39 


xxxvii. 14, 


vi. 71 


xvi. 63, 


x. 79 


xxxvii. 19-24, 


1.191 


xvii. 14, 


iv. 255 


xxxvii. 17-19, 


n. 384 


xviii. 


n. 127 


xxxix. 29, 


vi. 68 


xviii. 2, 


x. 384 


xli. 44, 


m. 130 


xviii. 5-10, . 


vi. 308 


xliii. 4-7, 


in. 3 


xviii. 20, 


x. 24 


xliii. 8, 


x. 435 


xx. 6, 


i. 56 


xliii. 10, 11, . 


m. 130 


xxi. 20-22, 


i. 212 


xliii. 10, 11, . 


m. 135 


xxii. 22, 


ix. 415 


xliv. 23, 


xi. 204 


xxii. 26, 


vn. 551 


xiv. 17, 


xi. 407 


xxii. 30, 


vii. 562 


xlvi. 11, 


xi. 407 


xxiii. 20, 


n. 83 


xlvii. 


iv. 290 


xxiii. 21, 


in. 485 


xlvii. 12, 


vn. 166 


xxiii. 34, 


x. 538 


Daniel ii. 4, 5, . 


m. 287 


xxiv. 13, 


vi. 453 


ii. 44, 


xii. 53 


xxiv. 13, 


x. 74 


iii. 16, 17, * 


ix. 305 


xxiv. 16, 25, . 


x. 317 


iii. 25, 


iv. 425 


xxvii. 


n. 182 


iv. 1, 


ix. 225 


xxvii. 12, . 


n. 187 


iv. 3, . . 


iv. 426 


xxviii. 


xn. 43 


iv. 13, 17, . 


1.492 


xxviii. 2-6, 


vi. 491 


iv. 16, . + 


x!75 


xxviii. 10, 


n. 369 


iv. 17, 


i. 321 


xxviii. 22, 


vi. 500 


iv. 17, 


iv. 519 


xxix. 3, 


n. 40 


iv. 19, 


m. 518 


xxxi. 6-8, . 


vn. 42 


iv. 30, 


vi. 495 


xxxi. 18, 


n. 369 


iv. 32, 


i . 190 


xxxi. 18, 


vn. 227 


v. 19, i . 


ix. 483 


xxxii. 18-22, 


ix. 180 


v. 22, 


iv. 164 


xxxiii. 13, 


vi. 348 


v. 23, 


vi. 500 


xxxiii. 31, 


in. 515 


v. 29, 


vii. 382 


xxxiii. 31, ".. -. .. 


vi. 475 


vi. 5, 7, 10, . 


xi. 439 



INDEX OP TEXTS. 



Dan. 



267 



vi. 14, 

vi. 14, 


iv. 178 j Hosea ii. 7 23 
x. 270 ,; o ? 


vi. 130 


vi. 14, 23, . 


vi. 244 


" o, , 
ii Q 


x. 317 


vii. 9-19, 
vii. 10, 
vii. 14, 
vii. 14, 27, . 
vii. 15, 
vii. 15, 
vii. 17-27, 
viii. 9-11, 
viii. 11, 12,25,. 
viii. 13, 
viii. 13, 
viii. 27, 


i. 469 
m. 15 
m. 155 
i. 191 
iv. 195 
ix. 484 
xn. 71 
in. 47 
xn. 45 
i. 181 
v. 186 
m. 473 


11. y, 
ii. 14, 
ii. 19, 
ii. 19, 
ii. 19, 20, 
ii. 20, 
iv. 7, 
iv. 10, 
iv. 11, 
iv. 11, 
v. 11,12, 
vi. 2, 
vi 4- 


m. 299 
vm. 131 
. iv. 125 
vni. 472 
ix. 308 
vm. 463 
iv. 255 
x. 316 
vi. 475 
x. 314 
x. 274 
m. 163 


ix. 17, 
ix. 17, 
ix. 21, 
ix. 24, 
ix. 24, 
ix. 24, 
ix 24, 
ix. 24, 
ix. 24, 
ix. 26, 
ix. 26, 
ix. 26, 
x. 2,11,19,. 


iv. 523 
iv. 551 
vii. 452 
m. 365 
iv. 212 
iv. 231 
v. 510 
vii. 533 
ix. 315 
i. 194 
iv. 568 
v. Ill 
m. 377 


V 1* TC. 

vii. 2, 
vii. 2, 
vii. 16, 
viii. 13, 
x. 1, 
x. 1, 
x. 12, 
xi. 3,4, 
xi. 4, 
xi. 8, 
xi. 8,9, 
xi. 9, 
xii. 1, 


x. 98 
vi. 313 
x. 263 
vi. 453 
vn. 317 
in. 442 
ix. 10 
vni. 521 
vm. 573 
iv. 203 
iv. 214 
vm. 113 
vi. 508 
x. 322 


x. 12, 13, . 
x. 13, 


i. 486 
i. 155 


xii. 3, 
xii. 3, 


m. 304 
iv. 81 


x. 13, 


i. 490 


xii. 3, 5, 


iv. 183 


x. 21, 


ix. 28 


xii. 3, 4, 5, 


iv. 357 


xi. 1, 


i. 393 


xiv. 2, 


vm. 194 


xi. 24, 


v. 338 


xiv. 2, 4, 


vm. 91 


xi. 31, 


m. 163 


xiv. 3, 


vm. 306 


xi. 36, 39, 


xi. 18 


xiv. 3, 


vni. 533 


xi. 36-45, . 


m. 110 


xiv. 4, 


n. 222 


xi. 44, 


m. 124 


xiv. 4, 


vn. 195 


xi. 44, 


m. 132 


xiv. 4, 


ix. 312 


xi. 45, 


m. 166 


xiv. 8, 


m. 458 


xii. 4, 


in. 7 


xiv. 8, 


v. 363 


xii. 4, 


m. 121 


xiv. 8, 


in. 444 


xii. 4, 


iv. 246 


xiv. 9, 


x. 357 


xii. 4, 


iv. 291 


xiv. 14, 


vi. 130 


xii. 7, 


1.200 


Joel ii. 2-10, 


m. 43 


xii. 7, 


m. Ill 


ii. 11, 


in. 49 


xii. 7, 


m. 198 


ii. 12, 13, 


vm. 22 


xii. 11, 


m. 156 


ii. 12-14, 


vni. 567 


xii. 11, 


xn. 78 


ii. 13, 14, 


. vm. 131 


i. 4, 


vi. 306 


ii. 13, 14, 


vm. 246 


ii. 5, 


x. 93 


ii. 14, 15, 


vm. 230 


ii. 6,7, 


x. 311 


ii. 15, 16, 


i. 544 


ii. 7, 


vi. 144 


ii. 28, 29, 


vi. 8 


ii. 7, 


vi. 467 


Amos ii. 6, 


x. 292 



268 



Arnos 


ii. 


13, 






iii. 


3, 






iii. 


8, 






v. 


8, 






v. 


15, 






vi. 


6, 






viii. 


5, 




Jonah 


ii. 


4, 






ii. 


4, 


17, 




ii. 


7, 


8, 




ii. 


8, 






ii. 


8, 






iii. 


5, 


6,9 




iii. 


8, 


9, 




iii. 


8, 


10, 




iii. 


9, 


10, 




iii. 


9, 


10, 




iv. 


2, 




Micah 


ii. 


7, 






ii. 


11, 






iv. 


3, 






iv. 


5, 






v. 


2, 






v. 


2, 


3, 




vi. 


7, 






vi. 


7, 






vi. 


7, 






vi. 


8, 






vi. 


14, 






vii. 


3, 






vii. 


4, 


7, 




vii. 


7, 


9, 




vii. 


7, 


9, 




vii. 


18, 






vii. 


18, 






vii. 


18, 






vii. 


18, 


19, 




vii. 


18, 


19, 




vii. 


19, 




Nahum 


i. 


2, 






i. 


10, 








10, 




Habak. 




12, 






. 


12, 








12, 






. 


14, 






ii. 


1, 


2, 




ii. 


4, 






ii. 


4, 






ii. 


5, 






ii. 


5, 






it. 


10, 


11, 




ii. 


13, 






ii. 


14, 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 


IV. 203 


Zeph. i. 6, 12, 


X. 117 


i. 12, 


m. 278 


ii. 1-3, 


vii. 568 


ii. 1-3, 


vm. 132 


ii. 3, 


x. 202 


ii. 3, 


iv. 256 


ii. 3, 


m. 298 


ii. 3, 


m. 333 


iii. 2, 


vn. 562 


iii. 17, 


n. 194 


iii. 17, 


m. 320 


iii. 17, 


vm. 230 


iii. 17, .. 


vm. 23 


iii. 17, 18, 


vn. 550 


Haggai i. 2-4, 


vm. 246 


i. 6,9, 


vni. 567 


ii. 5, 


vm. 23 


ii. 5-9, 


vi. 295 


ii. 6,7, 


m. 286 


ii. 7,9, 


vi. 360 


ii. 9, 


xi. 290 


ii. 11-13, 


iv. 445 


ii. 14, 


xi. 292 


ii. 19, 


m. 339 


ii. 21, 22, 


iv. 161 


iv. 6, 


v. 78 


Zecb. i. 6, 


x. 424 


i. 8, 


x. 316 


i. 12, 


x. 380 


i. 12, 


vii. 562 


ii. 2,4, 


m. 360 


ii. 5, 


vn. 574 


ii. 8, 


ii. 189 


ii. 8, 


vm. 23 


ii. 12. 


vm. 97 


iii. 1, 


vm. 127 


iii. 2, 


vm. 226 


iii. 3, 


vi. 407 


iii. 4, 


x. 540 


iii. 7, 


m. 308 


iii. 7, 


iv. 203 


iii. 7, 


m. 41 


iii. 7, 


m. 336 


iii. 7, 


vm. 417 


iii. 8, 


iv. 182 


iv. 


m. 360 


iv. 6-9, 


ii. 344 


iv. 7, 


vm. 518 


iv. 9, 


m. 349 


iv. 9, 10, 


in. 522 


iv. 10, 


iv. 195 


iv. 10, 


x. 321 


iv. 16, 


iv. 252 


v. 1-3, 



x. 93 

vii. 570 

vii. 543 

vn. 559 

m. 369 

vm. 132 

vm. 230 

vm. 557 

x. 93 

i. 109 

vn. 195 

ix. 103 

ix. 123 

n. 441 
xii. 104 

x. 317 
vi. 53, 68 

v. 439 
m. 48 
iv. 324 
iv. 256 
XL 204 

x. 104 
xii. 11 
m. 46 

x. 316 
in. 32 
m. 35 
iv. 81 
xii. 19 
in. 139 
m. 130 
iv. 357 
xii. 52 
ix. 211 

v. 327 
m. 54 
xn. 59 
m. 152 

i. 164 

i. 193 

ii. 260 
xn. 1C 
vn. 419 

v. 161 
m. 150 
xn. 104 
vn. 90 
ix. 318 
m. 139 
m. 11 
m. 213 
xii. 75 

x. 318 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



269 



Mai. 



vi. 1, 


iv. 536 Mai. i. 11. 


xi. 291 


vii. 5, 


vi. 302 


ii. 


iv. 161 


ix. 11, 


1.462 


ii. 1,3, V 


vi. 505 


ix. 11, 


ii. 251 


ii. 2, 3, . 


vi. 500 


ix. 12, 


vm. 567 


ii. 2, 3, 


ix. 192 


ix. 13, 14, . 


xii. 46 


ii. 2,5, 


vi. 307 


xi. 10-16, . 


iv. 255 


ii. 5, 6, 


vi. 521 


xii. 1, 


vii. 428 


ii. 6, 


vn. 549 


xii. 1, 


xn. 17 


ii. 7, 


vii. 540 


xii. 2, 7, ,. 


x. 124 


ii. 7-9, . . - 


x. 258 


xii. 5, .: 


xn. 76 


ii. 11, 13, . 


m. 426 


xii. 8, 


v. 536 


ii. 11, 15, . 


ix. 445 


xii. 8, 


vii. 508 


ii. 15, 


ix. 460 


xii. 8, 


xii. 75 


ii. 17, 


x. 235 


xii. 10, 


v. 226 


ii. 17, 


x. 254 


xii. 10, 


vi. 20 


iii. 1, 


iv. 358 


xii. 10, 


vi. 136 


iii. 2, 


m. 479 


xii. 10, 


vi. 162 


iii. 2, 


x. 312 


xii. 10, 


vi. 438 


iii. 2,5, 


XVIL 303 


xii. 10, 


x. 192 


iii. 3, 


ix. 417 


xii. 10, 


x. 434 


in. 3,4, 


in. 476 


xii. 10, 


xn. 70 


iii. 5, 


iv. 187 


xii. 10-14, . 


vii. 552 


iii. 6, 


vm. 43 


xiii. 1, 


in. 479 


iii. 6, 


ix. 152 


xiii. 1, 


vi. 20 


iii. 6, 


ix. 302 


f 

xiii. 1, 


vi. 407 


iii. 9, 10, . 


x. 317 


xiii. 1, 


ix. 312 


iii. 14. 


x. 238 


xiii. 1, 


x. 73 


iii. 16-18, . 


vn. 570 


xiii. 2, 


v. 187 


iii. 17, 


iv. 87 


xiii. 7, 


i. 194 


iv. 1, 


m. 212 


xiii. 7, 


iv. 481 


iv. 1, 


vii. 303 , 


xiii. 7, 


v. 49 


iv. 1, 


vii. 570 


xiii. 7, 


vii. 103 


iv. 2, 


in. 339 


xiii. 7, 


vii. 198 


iv. 2, 


iv. 245 


xiii. 7, 


ix. 106 


iv. 2, 


iv. 324 


xiii. 9, 


ix. 416 


iv. 2, 


vi. 34 


xiv. 6, 7, 


iv. 291 


iv. 2, 


x. 320 


xiv. 9, 


xii. 66 


iv. 5, 


iv. 251 


xiv. 9, 


xii. 76 


Matt. i. 18, 


vi. 50 


xiv. 20, 

xiv. 20, 
xiv. 20, 
xiv. 20, 21, . 
i. 2, 


m. 13 
m. 215 
ix. 480 
vii. 287 
ii. 156 


i 18-20, . 
i. 20, 
i. 21, 
i. 22, 
i. 22, 23, . 


VI. 11 

ii. 134 
ii. 314 
iv. 161 
iv. 423 


i. 2, 


ix. 182 


i. 31, 


i. 398 


i. 2, 


ix. 489 


ii. 4, 


xi. 120 


i. 4 


ix. 38 


ii. 7, 


vi. 417 


i. 6, 
i. 6, 
i. 6, 
i. 6-8, 
i. 6, 8, 14, . 
i. 6-14, . 
i. 11, 


vm. 324 
ix. 499 
x. 228 
vii. 227 
vi. 506 
x. 259 
xi. 42 


ii. 23, 
iii. 5, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 13, 
iii. 15, 
iii. 15, 


v. 147 
vi. 420 
i. 216 
iv. 525 
n. 339 
v. 508 
xi. 43 



270 

Matt. 



111. 
Hi. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iv. 
iv. 
iv. 
iv. 
iv. 
iv. 

v. 

v. 

v. 

v. 

v. 

v. 

v. 

V. 

v. 

V. 
V. 
V. 

v. 

V. 
V. 
V. 
V. 

v. 

V. 

vi. 

vi. 

vi. 

vi. 

vi. 

vi. 

vi. 

vi. 

vi. 

vi. 

vi. 

vi. 

vi. 

vi 

vi. 

vi. 
vii. 
vii. 
vii. 
vii. 
vii. 
vii. 



16, 

16, 17, 
17, 

17, iv. 1, 
17, 

17, 
17, 

3, 

3,6, 

6, 

7, 

8, 
21, 

1-4, 

2-9, 

3-5, 

8, 

9, 
12, 
13, 
16, 
16, 
22, 
23, 
23, 
25, 
44, 

44, 48, 
46, 
47, 
47, 
48, 

2, 
10, 

19-21, 
20, 
20, 
21, 
21, 
26, 
28, 29, 

28, 30, 
29, 
29, 

29, 30, 
32, 
33, 
33, 
11, 
11, 
13, 

14, 
14, 
15, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 




iv. 354 Matt. vii. 16, 17, . 


ix. 8 


iv. 420 


vii. 17 ; xii. 33, 


i. 366 


i. 57 


vii. 17, 18, . 


vi. 205 


m. 290 


vii. 17, 18, . 


vn. 168 


iv. 359 


vii. 17, 18, -. . 


x. 128 


iv. 370 


vii. 23, 


vii. 182 


ix. 339 


vii. 23, 


ix. 228 


iv. 430 


vii. 23, 


ix. 229 


iv. 420 


vii. 23, . 


x. 123 


vi. 19 


vii. 24, 


vii. 291 


xi. 66 


vii. 27, 


vn. 310 


iv. 249 


viii. 


n. 57 


ix. 383 


viii. 2, 


vm. 424 


vm. 220 


viii. 4, 


xi. 204 


i. 44 


viii. 11, 


vn. 353 


n. 439 


viii. 13, . . 


vm. 298 


vii. 465 


viii. 17, 


iv. 148 


vi. 517 


viii. 17, 


v. 191 


n. 437 


viii. 17, 


ix. 353 


vi. 277 


viii. 24, 27, . 


vi. 454 


iv. 383 


viii. 27, 


vii. 177 


vi. 503 


ix. 2, 


m. 367 


xi. 72 


ix. 2, 


vm. 297 


vi. 262 


ix. 6, 


i. 360 


vn. 319 


ix. 6, 


xi. 97 


vii. 557 


ix. 13, 


vm. 466 


x. 405 


ix. 29, 30, . 


vm. 298 


vm. 58 


ix. 34, 


n. 39 


vn. 189 


ix. 38, 


iv. 256 


n. 436 


x. 1, 


ix. 257 


vii. 234 


x. 3, 10, 11, 


ix. 449 


vm. 105 


x. 5, 9, 


ix. 39 


vi. 464 


x. 6, 


ix. 468 


vii. 157 


x. 8, 


ix. 501 


vi. 459 


x. 8, 


ix. 506 


ii. 307 


x. 9,10, . 


xi. 382 


vii. 470 


x. 11, 


xi. 97 


i. 299 


x. 14, 


vn. 461 


vi. 475 


x. 15, 


vn. 319 


iv. 258 


x. 20, 


vi. 55 


vii. 98 


x. 20, 


vi. 56 


vm. 129 


x. 23, 


vi. 467 


i. 315 


x. 23, 


xi. 98 


iv. 245 


x. 28, 


x. 530 


ix. 299 


x. 29, 


iv. 249 


vm. 426 


x. 30, 


i. 212 


i. 78 


x. 30, 


vn. 195 


x. 207 


x. 37, 


vii. 222 


i. 43 


x. 37, 


vm. 323 


iv. 70 


x. 38, 


vm. 325 


n. 339 


x. 41, 


i. 273 


vm. 330 


x. 41, 


xi. 380 


ix. 50 


xi. 6, 


m. 265 


x. 117 xi. 6, 


xi. 296 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 


271 


Matt. xi. 10, 
xi. 11, 
xi. 12, 
xi. 12, 
xi. 15, 
xi. 18, 
xi. 19, 
xi. 19, 
xi. 20-25, 
xi. 25, 
xi. 25, 
xi. 25, 
xi. 25, 
xi. 25, 
xi. 25, 26, 
xi. 25, 26, 
xi. 25-27, 


II. 76 

vi. 86 
iv. 297 
vi. 128 
ix. 69 
i. 190 
n. 66 
iv. 551 
i. 146 
i. 144 
iv. 261 
iv. 293 
vi. 179 
x. 147 
ix. 152 
x. 164 
i. 290 


Matt. xii. 31, 32, 
xii. 32, 
xii. 33, 
xii. 33, 
xii. 34, 
xii. 34, 35, . 
xii. 36, 
xii. 39, 
xii. 39, 40, . 
xii. 43, 
xii. 45, 
xii. 47, 
xii. 50, 
xiii. 4, 
xiii. 6, 
xiii. 11, 
xiii. 11, 


x. 295 
ix. 98 
vi. 205 
ix. 8 
in. 247 
vi. 477 
x. 469 
vm. 328 
ix. 162 
in. 509 
vi. 163 
x. 484 
vii. 294 
x. 177 
ix. 295 
iv. 294 
ix. 159 


xi. 26, 
xi. 26, 
xi. 27, 

xi. 27, 

__ OT 


v. 485 
vi. 223 
vn. 498 
viu. 155 


xiii. llj 
xiii. 11-14, 
xiii. 15, 
xiii. 15, 


x. 149 
i. 141 
iv. 251 
vi. 313 


xi. 27, 


via. 169 


xiii. 15, 


ix. 160 


xi. 27, 


ix. 140 


xiii. 20, 21, 


vi. 469 


xi. 28, 


iv. 40 


xiii. 21, 


i. 366 


xi. 28, 


iv. 116 


xiii. 21, 


vi. 215 


xi. 28, 
xi. 28, 


v. 403 
viu. 234 


xiii. 22, 23, . 
xiii. 25, 


vii. 297 
iv. 299 


xi. 28, 


ix. 491 


xiii. 33, 


x. 129 


xi. 28, 29, 


. vm. 166 


xiii. 34, 


vii. 122 


xi. 28, 29, 


vm. 220 


xiii. 39, 


vii. 173 


xi. 29, 


x. 421 


xiii. 40, 49, . 


xi. 40 


xii. 3, 


XL 34 


xiii. 41, 42, . 


x. 506 


xii. 5, 


xi. 34 


xiii. 41, 42, 49, 


i. 187 


xii, 5, 


xi. 35 


xiii. 43, 


ix. 334 


xii. 7, 


vm. 466 


xiii. 44, 45, 


i. 255 


xii. 18, 


v. 21 


xiii. 45, 


iv. 228 


xii. 18, 


vi. 361 


xiii. 45, 


iv. 238 


xii. 18, 


ix. 339 


xiii. 45, 


iv. 270 


xii. 18, 19, 


iv. 119 


xiii. 45, 


vi. 465 


xii. 20, 


m. 321 


xiii. 45, 46, 


vm. 304 


xii. 20, 


m. 334 


xiii. 45, 46, . 


x. 203 


xii. 20, 


vi. 28 


xiii. 52, 


xi. 313 


xii. 24, 


i. 161 


xiii. 55-57, 


ix. 354 


xii. 24, -v 


n. 39 


xiv. 7, 


iv. 85 


xii. 24, 25, 


i. 485 


xiv. 7-9, 


x. 265 


xii. 26, 


. ii. 37-39 


xv. 18, 19, . 


m. 511 


xii. 27, 28, 


vi. 61 


xv. 18-20, . 


x. 49 


xii. 28, 


i. 356 


xv. 18-20, 


x. 68 


xii. 28, 


v. 228 


xv. 18-20, . 


x. 76 


xii. 28, 


vi. 12 


xv. 20, 


iv. 154 


xii. 28, 


vi. 18 


xv. 22, , . 


iv. 258 


xii. 29, 


n. 5 


xv. 22-26, 


vm. 340 


xii. 29, 


n. 42 


xv. 26, 


n. 370 


xii. 30, 


x. 123 


xvi. 11, 15, . . 


xi. 48 



272 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



Matt. 



xvi. 13, 18, . 


iv. 405 


Matt, xviii. 18, 


iv. 277 


xvi. 16, 


iv. 365 


xviii. 18, 


xi. 507 


xvi. 16, 


iv. 427 


xviii. 18-20, 


xi. 24 


xvi. 16, 


iv. 429 


xviii. 19, 


xi. 9 


xvi. 16, . 


vin. 184 


xviii. 19, . - .-, . 


xi. 52 


xvi. 16, 17, . 


vin. 187 


xviii. 19, 


xi. 344 


xvi. 16, 17, . 


x. 245 


xviii. 20, 


xi. 47 


xvi. 17, 


i. 242 


xviii. 20, , 


xi. 72 


xvi. 17, :. 


x. 133 


xviii. 20, 


xi. 82 


xvi. 17, . 


x. 147 


xviii. 20, 


xi. 143 


xvi. 17, 18, . 


iv. 441 


xviii. 20, 


xi. 285 


xvi. 18, 


i. 497 


xviii. 20, 


xi. 343 


xvi. 18, 


xi. 53 


xviii. 21, 


n. 189 


xvi. 18, ;. 


xi. 71 


xviii. 22, 


x. 486 


xvi. 18, 19, . 


xi. 66 


xviii. 23, 


vi. 384 


xvi. 19, 


iv. 53 


xviii. 23-27, 


x. 469 


xvi. 19, 


xi. 56 


xviii. 24, 27, 


ii. 189 


xvi. 19-21, . . 


vi. 461 


xviii. 24, 27, 


vi. 315 


xvi. 21, 


v. 167 


xviii. 24, 27, 


vi. 406 


xvi. 21, 


ix. 399 


xviii. 29, 


iv. 191 


xvi. 21-23, . 


in. 420 


xix. 3, 


ix. 442 


xvi. 23, 


n. 27 


xix. 4, 8, 


xi. 34 


xvi. 23, 


ii. 29 


xix. 7, 


vn. 51 


xvi. 23, 


m. 260 


xix. 16-20, 


x. 264 


xvi. 23, 


vii. 143 


xix. 16-22, 


x. 187 


xvi. 26, 


vii. 422 


xix. 17, 


n. 158 


xvi. 27, 


i. 329 


xix. 17, 


vi. 268 


xvi. 27, 


iv. 434 


xix. 17, 


vn. 29 


xvi. 27, 


vii. 123 


xix. 17, 


vin. 79 


xvi. 27, 


ix. 332 


xix. 17, 


x. 90 


xvii. 1, 


vii. 104 


xix. 17-20, . 


x. 307 


xvii. 2, 


iv. 40 


xix. 21, 


n. 307 


xvii. 5, 


viii. 160 


xix. 21, 22 . . 


x. 275 


xvii. 5, 


ix. 339 


xix. 24, 


i. 364 


xvii. 17, 


i 275 


xix. 24, 


vi. 444 


xvii. 20, 


m. 369 


xix. 26, 


viii. 469 


xvii. 20, 


x. 228 


xix. 28, . . 


i. 439 


xvii. 26, 


in. 224 


jxix. 28, 


iv. 54 


xviii. 3, 


vn. 191 


xix. 28, 


vi. 195 


xviii. 3, 


ix. 380 


xix. 28, 


vi. 455 


xviii. 3, 


xi. 301 


xix. 28, 


vin. 559 


xviii. 10, 


i. 187 


xx. 3, 6, 


vi. 484 


xviii. 10, 


v. 280 


xx. 6, 9, 


vii. 4.33 


xviii. 15-17, 


xi. 454 


xx. 11, 21, 27, 


1.471 


xviii. 15-20, 


xi. 65 


xx. 13, 


vn. 29 


xviii. 16, 


vi. 5 


xx. 15, 


n. 448 


xviii. 17, 


i. 544 


xx. 15, 


n. 452 


xviii. 17, 


n. 369 


xx. 16, 


ix. 177 


xviii. 17, 


xi. 43 


xx. 16, 


ix. 185 


xviii. 17, 


xi. 47 


xx. 22, 


m. 301 


xviii. 17, 


xi. 71 


xx. 22, 


v. 222 


xviii. 17, 


xi. 74 


xx. 25, 28, 


m. 223 


xviii. 17, 


xi. 233 


xx. 28, 


v. 176 


xviii. 18, 


m. 244 


xxi. 16, 


i. 510 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



278 



Matt. xxi. 19, 


vi. 343 


Matt. xxv. 1-13, 


vi. 215 


xxi. 21, 


vm. 439 


xxv. 1-13, 


vi. 351 


xxi. 21, 22, . 


m. 369 


xxv. 10, 


vm. 549 


xxi. 23, 


1.537 


xxv. 14, 


v. 88 


xxi. 23, 


x. 6 


xxv. 14, 


ix. 15 


xxi. 23, 


xi. 285 


xxv. 23, 


1 vii. 464 


xxi. 30, 


vi. 141 


xxv. 24, 


vii. 460 


xxi. 30, 31, . 


vii. 231 


xxv. 24, 


x. 88 


xxi. 34, 


vii. 167 


xxv. 24-27, 


x. 58 


xxi. 37, 


vn. 86 


xxv. 26, 


m. 456 


xxii. 11,12, . 


vii. 385 


xxv. 28, 29 


vn. 303 


xxii. 11, 12, 


vii. 438 


xxv. 29, 


m. 493 


xxii. 14, 


ix. 279 


xxv. 31, 


ix. 332 


xxii. 21, 


x. 420 


xxv. 32, 


ix. 334 


xxii. 30, 


i. 161 


xxv. 34, 


. vn. 120 


xxii. 30, 


1.164 


xxv. 34, 


ix. 165 


xxii. 30, 


vii. 115 


xxv. 34, 


ix. 333 


xxii. 32, 


1.457 


xxv. 34, 


ix. 336 


xxii. 32, 


iv. 78 


xxv. 34, 35, 


ix. 71 


xxii. 32, 


vii. 347 


xxv. 36, 40, 


xi. 356 


xxii. 32, 


vm. 392 


xxv. 41, 


n. 74 


xxii. 37, 


vn. 244 


xxv. 41, 


vii. 27 


xxii. 42, 


iv. 405 


xxvi. 5-7, 


xi. 203 


xxii. 42, 43, . 


iv. 519 


xxvi. 6, 


vn. 167 


xxii. 42, 43 ; 44, 


iv. 523 


xxvi. 29, 


vm. 388 


xxii. 43, 


iv. 275 


xxvi. 39, 


n. 174 


xxii. 43, 44, 


iv. 362 


xxvi. 39, 


v. 170 


xxii. 44, 


v. 484 


xxvi. 39, 


. vm. 376 


xxiii. 8, 10, . 


x. 137 


xxvi. 41, 


vii. 261 


xxiii. 15, 


n. 118 


xxvi. 48, 


v. 127 


xxiii. 15, 


n. 137 


xxvi. 51, 


v. 220 


xxiii. 15, 


vi. 80 


xxvi. 53, 


i. 189 


xxiii. 23, 


x. 28 


xxvi. 53, 


vm. 109 


xxiii. 34, 


xi. 197 


xxvi. 53, 54, 


m. 224 


xxiii. 38, 


iv 254 


xxvi. 64, 


i. 468 


xxiii. 39, 


iv. 258 


xxvi. 64, 


m. 225 


xxiv. 3, 


xi. 40 


xxvi. 64, 


iv. 52 


xxiv. 14-16, 


m. 24 


xxvi. 67, 


iv. 40 


/ 

xxiv. 24, 


n. 174 


xxvii. 4, 5, 


vi. 245 


xxiv. 24, 


ix. 198 


xxvii. 6, 


x. 258 


xxiv. 24, 


x. 252 


xxvii. 19, 


iv. 179 


xxiv. 29, 


n. 36 


xxvii. 46, 


i. 30 


xxiv. 30, 


1.471 


xxvii. 46, 


vii. 194 


xxiv. 31, 


i. 192 


xxvii. 46, 


x. 54 


xxiv. 31, 


i. 190 


xxvii. 53, 


i. 293 


xxiv. 37, 38, . 


ix. 68 


xxvii. 54, 


iv. 420 


xxiv. 37-39, 


x. 551 


xxviii. 


vm. 387 


xxiv. 40, 
xxiv. 40, 41, . 


vn. 250 
ix. 185 


xxviii. 9, 
xxviii. 18, 


i. 15 
i. 500 

r O 


xxiv. 42, 
xxiv. 45, 
xxiv. 51, 
xxiv. 53, 
xxv. 


vii. 159 
vi. 37 
x. 506 
vm. 112 
1.319 


xxviii. 18, 
xxviii. 18, 
xxviii. 18-20, 
xxviii. 18-20, 
xxviii. 19, 


iv. 53 
ix. 353 
m. 223 
xi. 346 
ix. 467 


VOL. XII. 




s 



274 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 


Matt, xxviii. 19, 


II. 503 


Mark ix. 23, 


xxviii. 20, 


I. 6 


ix. 23, 


xxviii. 20, 


iv. 46 


ix. 24, 


xxviii. 20, 


vii. 223 


ix. 24, 


xxviii. 20, 


xi. 8 


ix. 26, 


xxviii. 20, 


xi. 28 


ix. 36, 37, 


xxviii. 20, 


xi. 39 


ix. 41, 


xxviii. 20, 


xi. 42 


ix. 49, 


xxviii. 20, 


xi. 77 


x. 14, 


xxviii. 29, 


vn. 534 


x. 21, 


Mark i. 19, 


ix. 383 


x. 24, 


i.21, 


i. 170 


x. 35, 


i. 24, 


viii. 277 


x. 49, 


ii. 7, 


iv. 437 


xii. 30, 


ii. 7, 


vm. 99 


xii. 31, 


ii. 7, 9, 11, 


iv. 547 


xii. 34, 


iii. 13, 


i. 9 


xii. 34, 


iii. 28, 


vii. 336 


xiii. 11, 


iii. 35, 


x. 421 


xiii. 20, 


iv. 5, 


i. 414 


xiii. 35, 36, 


iv. 7, 


ix. 299 


xiv. 11, 


iv. 8, 


vi. 336 


xiv. 33, 


iv. 17, 


vi. 199 


xiv. 36, 


iv. 17, 


vi. 215 


xiv. 36, 


iv. 19, 


n. 99 


xiv. 61, 


iv. 19, 


vi. 339 


xiv. 61, 62, 


iv. 19, 


vi. 469 


xvi. 9, 


iv. 19, 


ix. 10 


xvi. 15, 


iv. 24, 


vii. 303 


xvi. 15, 


v. 


ii. 44 


xvi. 15, 


v. 7-14, . 


ii. 57 


xvi. 15, 


v. 12, 


n. 40 


xvi. 15, 


v. 22, 


xi. 139 


xvi. 15-20, 


v. 30, 


in. 226 


xvi. 17, 


v. 34, 


n. 259 


xvi. 19, 


vi. 2, 3, . 


m. 226 


xvi. 19, 


vi. 20, 


vii. 274 


Luke i. 6, 


vi. 20, 


vi. 293 


i. 6, 


vi. 22, 


iv. 79 


i. 15, 


vi. 26, 


iv. 180 


i.15, 


vi. 26, 


vi. 244 


i.15, 


vi. 26, ;. 


x. 261 


i. 15-17, 


vii. 7-9, 


vi. 509 


i. 15, 80, 


vii. 20, 


n. 120 


i.17, 


vii. 21, 


vii. 551 


i. 17, 


vii. 22, 


m. 516 


i. 17. 


vii. 27, 


vm. 542 


i.17, 


viii. 11, . 


vn. 351 


i. 26, 


viii. 33, ;. 


vi. 465 


i. 26-35, 


viii. 35, 


iv. 251 


i. 28, 


ix. 2, 


vn. 104 


i. 28, 32, 


ix. 18, 


vm. 544 


i. 29, 


ix. 21, 22, . 


i. 373 


i. 31, 34, 


ix. 22, 23, . 


vm. 508 


i. 31, 35, 



i. 426 
vm. 584 
vm. 364 

x. 227 
n. 65 
x. 421 

i. 273 
vi. 48 
xi. 304 
n. 307 
vi. 444 
ii. 93 
ix. 493 

i. 337 
iv. 298 

1.411 
vi. 81 
vi. 15 
ix. 150 
vii. 159 
iv. 171 

v. 275 

v. 72 
vm. 112 

i. 27 

i. 32 

vm. 381 

iv. 105 

iv. 222 

iv. 480 

vii. 98 

ix. 39 

xi. 28 

vm. 431 

i. 478 

x. 222 

vn. 146 

vn. 158 

vi. 19 

vi. 29 

vi. 412 

vi. 75 

vi. 202 

ii. 77 

vm. 275 

ix. 69 

x. 215 

v. 146 

vi. 419 

vm. 201 

vm. 71 

i. 15 

i. 331 
iv. 419 



Luke i. 32, 33, 
i. 32, 35, 
i.34, 
i. 35, 
i. 35, 
i. 35, 
i. 35, 
i. 35, 
i. 35, 
i. 35, 
i. 35, 
i. 35, 

i. 35, 

i. 35, 

i. 35, 

i. 35, 

i. 35, 

i. 35. 



i. 39, 
i. 41, 
i. 41,43, 
i. 46, 47, 

i. 46, 47, 
i.47, 
i. 60-72, 
i. 68, 
i. 68-73, 
i. 69-73, 

i. 72, 

i. 72, 73, 

i. 72, 73, 

i. 73-75, 

i.74, 

i. 77, 78, 

i. 78, 

i. 78, 79, , 

i. 79, 

i. 79, 

ii. 1,2, . 

ii. 10, 13, . 

ii. 11, 

ii. 11, 

ii. 11, 

ii. 13, 14, . 

ii. 13, 14, . 

ii. 14, 

ii. 14, 

ii. 14, 

ii. 14, : .. 

ii. 26, 29, . 

ii. 27, 28, 38, 

ii. 32, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 


275 


VIII. 63 

iv. 443 
iv. 275 


Luke ii. 32, 
ii. 35, 
ii. 40, 42, . 


vi. 68 
m. 281 
in. 458 


! OG 

i. 118 
i. 356 


ii. 48, 
49 > 


v. 164 

iv. 200 


m. 221 
iv. 420 
iv. 268 
iv. 474 
iv. 509 
v. 51 


iii. 
iii. 7, 
iii. 8, 
iii. 16, 17, ; 
iii. 20, 
iii. 21, 
iii. 38, 


n. 126 
vi. 363 
m. 442 
vn. 302 
x. 105 
vi. 420 
i. 176 


v, 59 

v. 132 


iii. 38, 
iii. 38, 


i. 509 
vm. 156 


vi. 34 
vi. 426 


iii. 38, 
iv. 


x. 10 

TT 40 


ix. 252 


iv. 1, 


11. tf 

vi. 12 


x. 10 

vm. 505 
iv. 440 


iv. 6, 
iv. 1,14,18, 
iv. 14, 


n. 42 
iv. 119 
vi. 12 


vi. 29 


iv. 18, 


vi. 12 


i. 36 


iv. 36, 


i. 429 


ix. 509 


^ 4, 


vm. 553 


ix. 510 


v. 6, 


ix. 383 


vm. 398 


v. 21, 


vni. 30 


vm. 64 


v. 22, 


x. 253 


i. 26 


v. 24, 


xi. 66 


ix. 348 


v. 39, 


m. 428 


ix. 49 


vi. 1-4, 


xi. 422 


vm. 28 


vi. 27-35, 


vm. 105 


vm. 57 


vi. 32, 


iv. 202 


vi. 350 


vi. 32, 33, . 


x. 395 


vm. 98 


vi. 33, 


iv. 189 


xi. 484 


vi. 34, 35, . 


iv. 190 


vii. 225 


vi. 34, 35, . 


vm. 57 


vm. 117 


vi. 35, 36, . 


vm. 81 


iv. 118 


vi. 35, 36, . 


vm. 94 


n. 149 


vi. 40, 


ix. 381 


i. 135 


vi. 48, 


vm. 333 


m. 17 


vii. 


x. 473 


m. 23 


vii. 19, 20, . 


vi. 98 


i. 488 


vii. 30, 


iv. 178 


i. 36 


vii. 30, .. . - 


vn. 302 


iv. 519 


vii. 30, ;.. , 


vn. 332 


iv. 522 


vii. 34, 35, . , 


vn. 8 


iv. 222 


vii. 37, 39, 48, 


vm. 357 


ix. 461 


vii. 37, 48, . 


vm. 373 


vi. 120 


vii. 47, .. 


vi. 109 


vn. 268 


vii. 47, 


vm. 382 


ix. 115 


viii. ,!.,] 


n. 41 


ix. 468 


viii. 3, Ui 


m. 226 


vn. 352 


viii. 5, 12, -.; 


ii. 43 


m. 373 


viii. 7, . 


vi. 338 


iv. 324 


viii. 10, ._;./ 


ii. 419 



276 




Luke 


viii. 12, 




viii. 13, 




viii. 13, 




viii. 14, 




viii. 14, 15, 




viii. 15, 




viii. 18, 




viii. 18, 




viii. 29, 




viii. 29, 




viii. 31, 




viii. 35, 




ix. 29, 




ix. 29, 




ix. 35, 




ix. 48, 




ix. 51, 




ix. 55, 




ix. 55, 




x. 4, 




x. 5, 




x. 6, 




x.13, 




x. 19, 




x. 20, 




x.21, 




x. 24, 




x. 25, 




x. 42, 




xi. 




xi. 1-13, 




xi. 4, 10, 




xi. 5,6, 




xi. 13, 




xi. 13, 




xi. 14, 




xi. 20, 




xi. 20, 




xi. 20-22, 




xi. 21, 




xi. 21, 22, 




xi. 23, 




xi. 24, 




xi. 39, 40, 




xi. 49, 




xii. 4, 5, 




xii. 4, 5, 




xii. 7, 




xii. 15, 




xii. 17, 28, 




xii. 19, 20, 




xii. 20, 




xii. 20, 




xii. 20, 58, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 


II. 60 


Luke xii. 21, 


m. 443 


xii. 21, 


ix. 295 


xii. 28, 


vii. 297 


xii. 32, 


n. 449 


xii. 32, 


vii. 163 


xii. 33, 


i. 416 


xii. 36, 37, 


vii. 303 


xii. 42, 


n. 57 


xii. 42, 


m. 283 


xii. 48, 


n. 44 


xii. 48, 


m. 284 


xii. 50, 


i. 316 


xii. 50, 


vii. 106 


xiii. 7, 


iv. 425 


xiii. 7, 


vii. 104 


xiii. 7, 


v. 107 


xiii. 8, 


m. 497 


xiii. 15, 


vi. 162 


xiii. 15, 


in. 528 


xiii. 16, 


viii. 570 


xiii. 23, 


ix. 40 


xiii. 24, 


ix. 156 


xiii. 24, 


v. 315 


xiii. 24, 


viii. 43 


xiii. 24, 


iv. 219 


xiii. 24, 


1.141 


xiii. 24, 


ix. 182 


xiii. 27, 


x. 198 


xiii. 32, 


n. 61 


xiii. 34, 


vi. 70 


xiv. 14, 


vm. 571 


xiv. 14, 


vii. 433 


xiv. 20, 


vm. 558 


xiv. 20, 


vm. 576 


xiv. 26, 


vm. 521 


xiv. 26, 


n. 38 


xiv. 31, 


vi. 18 


xiv. 31, 32, 


vi. 61 


xv. 4, 


v. 299 


xv. 5, 


n. 42 


xv. 8, 


n. 53 


xv. 8-10, 


n. 67 


xv. 9, 


x. 68 


xv. 17, 


vii. 8 


xv. 17, 


vi. 132 


xv. 19, 


vii. 445 


xv. 20, 


vii. 195 


xv. 20, 


vi. 471 


xv. 23, 24, 


vm. 129 


xv. 25, 


x. 207 


xvi. 3, 4, 


vi. 81 


xvi. 8, 


vii. 385 


xvi. 8, 


vn. 452 xvi. 9, 



vi. 461 

vi. 495 

x. 228 

ix. 320 

ix. 336 

n. 307 

iv. 98 

iv. 523 

xi. 317 

iv. 164 

iv. 167 

iv. 23 

v. 166 

in. 439 

iv. 191 

vi. 342 

vii. 299 

n. 369 

vi. 351 

m. 258 

ix. 50 

vi. 44 

vi. 128 

vi. 328 

vn. 553 

vm. 552 

vm. 560 

vn. 256 

ix. 396 

vi. 277 

n. 250 

i. 360 

i. 364 

vi. 444 

vi. 130 

vm. 323 

vi. 150 

vi. 126 

vi. 115 

ix. 356 

x. 142 

i. 188 

vii. 433 

i. 129 

vn. 545 

vm. 516 

vi. Ill 

xi. 515 

vi. 89 

iv. 142 

vn. 365. 

n. 28, 29. 

vi. 464 

vi. 495, 



Luke 



xvi. 9, 
xvi. 9, 
xvi. 9, 
xvi. 9, 
xvi. 9, 
xvi. 11, 
xvi. 11, 
xvi. 15, 
xvi. 15, 
xvi. 16, 
xvi. 16, 
xvi. 16, 
xvi. 16, 
xvi. 16, 
xvi. 20, 21, 
xvi. 22, 
xvi. 22, 
xvi. 22-30, 
xvi. 25, 
xvi. 25, 
xvi. 25, 
xvi. 31, 
xvii. 4, 
xvii. 5, 
xvii. 5, 
xvii. 7-9, 
xvii. 7-10, 
xvii. 7-11, 
xvii. 20, 
xvii. 25, 
xvii. 28, 
xvii. 33, 34, 
xviii. 5, 
xviii. 7, 
xviii. 8, 
xviii. 8, 
xviii. 9, 
xviii. 9, 14, 
xviii. 10, 
xviii. 11, 
xviii. 11, 12, 
xviii. 18, 
xviii. 22, 
xviii. 32, 
xix. 27, 
xix. 31, 
xix. 38, 
xix. 40, 
xix. 42, 
xix. 42, 
xx. 18, 
xx. 36, 
xxi. 3, 
xxi. 10, 11, 



IfrDEX OP TEXTS. 


vii. 353 


Luke xxi. 18, 19, 


vii. 369 


xxi. 19, 


vn. 412 


xxi. 19, 


vn. 427 


xxi. 24, 


vn. 455 


xxi. 28, 


i. 313 


xxi. 30, 31, 


vi. 462 


xxi. 34, 36, 


[ii. 29 


xxi. 34, 36, 


x. 409 


xxi. 37, 


i. 142 


xxi. 37, 


iv. 297 


xxii. 3, 


v. 5 


xxii. 15, 


vn. 301 


xxii. 15, 


vm. 171 


xxii. 22, 


vi. 460 


xxii. 24, 25, 


1.488 


xxii. 25, 


vii. 452 


xxii. 28, 


vn. 353 


xxii. 29, 


ii. 17 


xxii. 29, 


vi. 459 


xxii. 31, 


vn. 445 


xxii. 31, 


x. 236 


xxii. 31, 


xi. 48 


xxii. 31, 


vm. 476 


xxii. 32, 


vm. 544 


xxii. 32, 


vm. 526 


xxii. 32, 


xi. 518 


xxii. 32, 


vii. 219 


xxii. 44, 


i. 377 


xxii. 44, 


ix. 399 


xxii. 53, 


ix. 88 


xxii. 53, 


ix. 185 


xxii. 53, 


m. 285 


xxii. 66, 


i. 42 


xxii. 69, 


m. 313 


xxii. 70, 


m. 401 


xxiii. 11, 


vm. 533 


xxiii. 14, 16, 


vm. 340 


xxiii. 30, 


v. 399 


xxiii. 31, 


ix. 511 


xxiii. 35, 


x. 307 


xxiii. 35, 


vn. 51 


xxiii. 46, 


n. 307 


xxiii. 46, 


v. 265 


xxiv. 21, 


x. 120 


xxiv. 21, 25, 


vii. 222 


xxiv. 25, 


i. 19 


xxiv. 25, 


vm. 112 


xxiv. 26, 


vm. 570 


xxiv. 26, 


x. 147 


xxiv. 26, 


vii. 310 


xxiv. 27, 


vi. 455 


xxiv. 27, 


m. 471 


xxiv. 28, 29, 


xn. 49 


xxiv. 32, 



277 

n. 442 
ir. 446 
n. 448 
i. 201 
i. 122 
vii. 299 
vn. 570 
ix. 403 
v. 199 
vn. 206 
ii. 61 
vn. 376 
x. 285 
iv. 179 
m. 481 
iv. 394 
vii. 350 
i. 475 
ii. 256 
n. 67 
m. 258 
m. 269 
ix. 231 
v. 325 
vi. 511 
vm. 589 
ix. 412 
m. 306 
v. 277 
ii. 43 
m. 256 
vn. 573 
xi. 120 
i. 468 
xi. 443 
iv. 439 
iv. 179 
m. 49 
m. 308 
m. 173 
ix. 150 
i. 30 
vn. 429 
iv. 104 
vm. 342 
x. 230 
xi. 502 
m. 182 
ix. 331 
ix. 399 
i. 288 
m. 214 
iv. 256 
vi. 145 



278 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 




Luke xxiv. 32, 


VIII. 162 


John i. 13, 


vi. 409 


xxiv. 38, 


ii. 446 


i. 13, 


vi. 411 


xxiv. 38, 


in. 284 


i. 13, 


vi. 454 


xxiv. 39, 


iv. 140 


i. 13, 


. . vm. 562 


xxiv. 45, 46, 


iv. 494 


i. 13, 


. ix. 424 


xxiv. 46, 47, 49, 


iv. 106 


i. 13, 


. ix. 478 


xxiv. 47, 


iv. 220 


i.14, 


. . iv. 2S3 


xxiv. 47, 


vi. 19 


i. 14, 


iv. 264 


xxiv. 49, 


vi. 8 


i. 14, 


iv. 309 


xxiv. 49, 


vi. 9 


i. 14, 


iv. 318 


xxiv. 49, 


vi. 52 


i. 14, 


. . iv. 328 


xxiv. 50, 51, 


iv. 46 


i. 14, 


iv. 355 


xxiv. 50, 51, 


iv. 107 


i. 14, 


iv. 369 


xxiv. 50, 51, . 


XL 347 


i. 14, 


iv. 422 


John i. 


iv. 562 


i. 14, 


iv. 463 




1, 


iv. 355 


i.14, 


iv. 478 




. 1, 


iv. 410 


i. 14, 


vi. 56 




. 1, 


iv. 434 


i.14, 


. ix. 332 






iv. 434 


i.14, 


ix. 368 




i! . 


iv. 492 


i.14, 


vn. 19 




. i, 


iv. 552 


i.14, 


. vn. 105 




. i, 


vn. 7 


i. 14, 17, 


iv. 559 




. 1,2, . 


iv. 407 


i. 14, 18, 


iv. 427 




1,2, . 


iv. 460 


i. 14, 19, 


. . iv. 241 




1, 2, 3, . 


iv. 549 


i. 15, 


. . iv. 408 




. 1-3, . 


vi. 17 


i. 15, 18, 


30, 34, iv. 421 




. 1,3,12, 


i. 32 


i. 16, 


iv. 8 




. 1-15, . 


x. 101 


i.16, 


. . iv. 365 




. 1, 14, 18, 


31, iv. 414 


i. 16, 


. . vi. 222 




. 3, 


iv. 354 


i. 17, 18, 


iv. 293 




.3,4, 


iv. 556 


i. 17, 18, 


iv. 481 




. 3-13, . 


vi. 254 


i. 18, 


iv. 266 




. 3, 14, 18, 


iv. 527 


i. 18, 


iv. 413 




4,5, . 


iv. 560 


i. 18, 


iv. 510 




.4,5, 


iv. 563 


i.18, 


vii. 26 




. 9, 


v. 102 


i. 18, 


ix. 364 




. 9, 


vi. 254 


i. 29, 


. . v. 420 




. 9, 


vi. 433 


i. 29, 34, 


49, vm. 183 




. 9, 


ix. 296 


i. 32, 


i. 245 




.10, 


xi. 443 


i. 32, 33, 


, . iv. 120 




. 10, 11, . 


vn. 142 


i. 32-34, 


, vi. 12 




. 11, 


iv. 97 


i. 33, 


iv. 326 




.12, 


n. 315 


i. 33, 


. . ix. 297 




.12, 


n. 336 


i. 38-41, 


. vm. 171 




.12, 


iv. 509 


i. 45, 


. vi. 517 




. 12, 


vin. 34 


i. 51, 


i. 163 




.12, 


-vni. 158 


i. 51, 


ix. 265 




.12, 


vm. 344 


i. 11. m. 


. . vm. 161 




. 12, 13, . 


vi. 151 


ii. 11, 


in. 257 




.32,13, . 


vi. 194 


ii. 11, 


iv. 508 




. 12, 13, . 


vm. 503 


ii. 19, 


i. 195 




. 12, 13, . 


ix. 327 


ii. 19, 


i. 430 




.13, 


n. 93, 94 


ii. 24, 


vn. 190 




.13, 


vi. 180 


iii. 3, 4, 


x. 145 



John 



in. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

in. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

in. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

HI. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii. 

iii 



319 
o, i/;, 

3, 12, 



6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 



10, 
11, 
11, 
12, 
13, 
13, 
13, 
13, 
13, 

14, 

14, 15, 

16, 

16, 

16, 

16, 

16, 

16, 

16, 

17, 

18, 

18, 

18, 

18, 

18, 19, 

19, 

19, 

20, 

21, 

21, 

27, 

31, 

31, 

31, 32, 

33, 

33, 



INDEX OP TEXTS. 


279 


vii. 531 John iii. 33, 


vm. 263 


x. 152 


iii. 34, 


vi. 11 


v. 390 


iii. 34, 


xi. 43 


i. 365 


iii. 35, 


ix. 94 


i. 375 


iii. 36, 


n.119 


n. 83 


iii. 36, 


n. 136 


x. 113 


iii. 36, 


n. 207 


vi. 17 


iii. 36, 


n. 331 


vi. 56 


iii. 36, 


vi. 198 


vi. 74 


iv. .1, 3, 


m. 224 


vi. 158 


iv. 6-23, . 


vi. 43 


vi. 206 


iv. 9, 


n. 369 


ix. 478 


iv. 10, 


vi. 67 


x. 10 


iv. 10, 14, . 


x. 424 


x. 40 


iv. 13, 14, . 


vi. 469 


vi. 44 


iv. 14, 


vi. 30 


vi. 55 


iv. 14, 


vi. 56 


vn. 72 


iv. 14, 


vii. 132 


x. 63 


iv. 14, 


vn. 168 


xi. 81 


iv. 14, 


vm. 364 


x. 163 


iv. 14, 


vm. 397 


x. 406 


iv. 14, 


ix. 329 


vm. 485 


iv. 22, 


vi. 80 


iv. 275 


iv. 24, 


vi 163 


iv. 441 


iv. 24, 


vm. 181 


v. 383 


iv. 26, 


vm. 171 


vii. 50 


iv. 31-34, . 


x. 276 


vn. 103 


iv. 32, 34, . 


vi. 516 


ix. 399 


iv. 32-34, . 


x. 189 


vm. 216 


iv. 34, 


v. 166 


i. 126 


iv. 37, 


iv. 302 


n. 79 


v. 1, 


n. 313 


ii. 216 


v. 4, 


vi. 445 


iv. 86 


v. 4, 


xi. 12 


vi. 151 


v. 17, 


iv. 355 


vn. 485 


v. 17, 


iv. 426 


vni. 160 


v. 17, 19, 20, 


iv. 440 


iv. 208 


v. 18, 24, . 


i. 441 


1.441 


v. 19, 20, . 


i. 461 


vi. 45 


v. 19, 


v. 9 


vi. 77 


v. 19, 


v. 22 


vii. 302 


v. 19, 


v. 42 


vn. 335 


v. 19, 


vii. 530 


vn. 329 


v. 19, 20, . 


iv. 368 


x. 114 


v. 19, 20, . 


iv. 465 


iv. 172 


v. 19, 20, . 


TX. 141 


vi. 303 


v. 19, 23, . 


iv. 81 


ix. 297 


v. 20, ./ 


n. 50 


vm. 151 


v. 20, ... 


iv. 527 


1.382 


v. 20-25, . 


1.437 


i. 396 


v. 21, 


n. 210 


iv. 242 


v. 21, 


n. 236 


i. 241 


v. 21, 23, . 


iv. 80 


vii. 55 


v. 21, 22, 24, 


iv. 53 



280 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 




John v. 22, 


iv. 564 


John v. 45, 


i. 221 


v. 22, 


in. 223 


v. 45, 


iv. 85 


v. 22, 


iv. 210 


v. 45, 47, 


x. 240 


v. 22, 


iv. 564 


v. 46, 47, 


x. 236 


v. 22, 


v. 113 


v. 47, 


vm. 485 


v. 22, 


v. 540 


vi. 


. ii. 207 


v. 22, 23, . 


i. 101 


vi. 


. vm. 174 


v. 22, 23, . 


i. 503 


vi. 27, 


i. 244 


v. 22, 23, . 


vi. 7 


vi. 27, 


iv. 212 


v. 22, 23, . 


vi. 499 


vi. 27, 


v. 23 


v. 22, 23, 


vn. 498 


vi. 27-29, 


vm. 552 


v. 22, 23, . 


ix. 148 


vi. 27-29, 


vm. 583 


v. 22, 27, . 


iv. 522 


vi. 29, 


m. 257 


v. 22-27, . 


vm. 66 


vi. 29, 


v. 6 


v. 23, 


iv. 358 


vi. 29, 


vi. 446 


v. 23, 


iv. 496 


vi. 29, 


vii. 292 


v. 23, 


iv. 474 


vi. 29, 


vm. 3 


v. 23, 


vm. 172 


vi. 32, 


. vm. 159 


v. 23, 


vm. 369 


vi. 33-41, 


i. 409 


v. 23, 24, . 


vn. 485 


vi. 35-45, 


ix. 72 


v. 24, 


n. 207 


vi. 36, 37, 


vm. 152 


v. 24, 


vii. 451 


vi. 36-40, 


vm. 172 


v. 24, 


vm. 168 


vi. 37, 


ii. 387 


v. 24, 25, . 


ii. 237 


vi. 37, 


n. 424 


v. 25, 


n. 203 


vi. 37, 


iv. 502 


v. 25, 26, . 


vii. 534 


vi. 37, 


. v. 26 


v. 26, 


i. 180 


vi. 37, 


. vm. 157 


v. 26, 


n. 209 


vi. 37, 


vm. 168 


v. 26, 


in. 438 


vi. 37, 


. vm. 228 


v. 26, 


iv. 366 


vi. 37, 


. vm. 247 


v. 26, 


iv. 509 


vi. 37, 


vm. 307 


v. 26, 


iv. 513 


vi. 37, 


vm. 343 


v. 26, 


vn. 194 


vi. 37, 


. vm. 482 


v. 28, 


n. 255 


vi. 37-39, 


vi. 517 


v. 29, 


n. 250 


vi. 37-39, 


ix. 112 


v. 29, 


n. 254 


vi. 37-39, 


ix. 356 


v. 30-32, . 


iv. 360 


vi. 37-40, 


iv. 113 


v. 31, 


vn. 528 


vi. 38, 


iv. 381 


v. 33, 34, . 


i. 235 


vi. 38, 39, 


iv. 82 


v. 34, 


iv. 210 


vi. 39, 


ii. 250 


v. 35, 


iv. 184 


vi. 39, 


n. 265 


v. 35, 


iv. 561 


vi. 39, 


ix. 358 


v. 39-43, . 


vm. 173 


vi. 40, 


i. 378 


v. 40, ../ 


vm. 161 


vi. 40, 


n. 250 


v. 40, :... 


vm. 307 


vi. 40, 


n. 411 


v. 40, 


vm. 350 


vi. 40, 


vn. 66 


v. 43, 


x. 230 


vi. 40, 


. vm. 163 


v. 44, 


n. 5 


vi. 40, 


.-; vm. 216 


v. 44, 


n. 29 


vi. 40, 


vm. 257 


v. 44, 


iv. 493 


vi. 44, 


vi. 451 


v. 44, 


vi. 446 


vi. 44, 


vi. 456 


v. 44, :. .-, 


vi. 494 


vi. 44, 


vm. 155 


v. 44, 


vii. 552 


vi. 44, 


vm. 350 


v. 44, 


x. 310 


vi. 44, 


. vm. 573 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 


vi. 44, 45, . 


n. 424 John viii. 12, 


vi. 44, 45, . 


vi. 421 


viii. 12, 


vi. 44, 45, . 


vm. 304 


viii. 12, 


vi. 44, 45, . 


x. 157 


viii. 13, 14, 


vi. 44, 65, . 


vm. 144 


viii. 17, 18, 


vi. 45, 


iv. 238 


viii. 17-19, 


vi. 45, 


vn. 498 


viii. 21, 


vi. 45, 


vm. 162 


viii. 24, 


vi. 45, 


vm. 165 


viii. 24, 


vi. 45, 


vm. 198 


viii. 24, 


vi. 46, 


vm. 473 


viii. 24, 


vi. 47, 


vm. 463 


viii. 24, 


vi. 47-54, . 


vm. 269 


viii. 28-44, 


vi. 53, 


vm. 160 


viii. 32, 


vi. 55. 


vi. 451 


viii. 34, 


vi. 55; 


vn. 314 


viii. 35, 


vi. 56, 


iv. 366 


viii. 35, 


vi. 56, 57, . 


iv. 340 


viii. 36, 


vi. 56, 57, . 


vm. 188 


viii. 39, 


vi. 57, 


n. 209 


viii. 40, 


vi. 57, 


iv. 371 


viii. 40-44, 


vi. 60-63, . 


iv. 341 


viii. 41, 


vi. 61, 


iv. 441 


viii. 42, 


vi. 63, 


vi. 160 


viii. 44, 


vi. 63, 


vii. 80 


viii. 44, 


vi. 63, 


vii. 95 


viii. 44, 


vi. 63, 64, . 


vm. 173 


viii. 44, 


vi. 64, 65, . 


vi. 421 


viii. 44, 


vi. 64, 65, . 


ix. 159 


viii. 44, 


vi. 68, 


vi. 467 


viii. 44, 


vi. 69, 


iv. 420 


viii. 44, 


vi. 69, 


iv. 427 


viii. 44, 


vi. 69, 


xi. 55 


viii. 44, 


vi. 70, 


n. 164 


viii. 44, 


vi. 70, 


vn. 261 


viii. 44, 


vii. 3-5, 


vi. 224 


viii. 44, 


vii. 17, 


in. 323 


viii. 44, 


vii. 17, 18, . 


vn. 144 


viii. 44, 


vii. 18, 


iv. 382 


viii. 44, 


vii. 24, 


x. 20a 


viii. 51, 


vii. 27, 42, 52, 


x. 389 


viii. 56, 


vii. 29, 


iv. 424 


viii. 58, 


vii. 37, 


vm. 232 


viii. 58, 


vii. 37, 38, . 


iv. 110 


ix. 3, 


vii. 37-39, 


vi. 70 


ix. 4, 


vii. 38, 


i. 248 


ix. 10, 


vii. 38, 39, . 


vi. 13 


ix. 29, 


vii. 38, 39, . 


vi. 52 


ix. 32, 


vii. 38, 39, . 


vi. 56 


ix. 34, 


vii. 38, 39, . 


vn. 133 


ix. 51, 


vii. 39, 


iv. 121 


x. 


vii. 39, 


v. 126 


x. 2,3, 


vii. 48, 


ix. 180 


x. 3, 


viii. 12, 


i. 381 


x. 3. 



281 

n. 209 
vi. 434 
ix. 296 
vm. 378 
vi. 4 
vn. 526 
vi. 82 
iv. 140 
iv. 406 
vm. 170 
vm. 212 
vm. 222 
n. 37 
vn. 334 
x. 282 
vi. 57 
ix. 431 
n. 107 
ix. 488 
i. 224 
vi. 155 
iv. 426 
iv. 415 
n. 39 
n. 50 
ii. 86 
n. 101 
n. 120 
m. 261 
iv. 159 
iv. 182 
vii. 27 
vii. 256 
vn. 336 
x. 65 
x. 107 
x. 134 
x. 213 
x. 372 
vn. 420 
vm. 259 
iv. 409 
vm. 41 
n. 127 
vn. 573 
n. 21 
vm. 497 
x. 149 
x. 127 
xii. 12 
n. 210 
iv. 513 
vn. 135 
vm. 271 



282 



John 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 




x. 3, 14, 16, 


vm. 409 John xi. 23, 


i. 346 


x. 3, 26, 27, 


vm. 248 


xi. 23-39, 


x. 229 


x. 4, 


n. 200 


xi. 25, 


n. 202 


x. 6, 


iv. 106 


xi. 25, 26, 


vii. 344 


x. 10, 


n. 19 


xi. 25-27, . 


vm. 185 


x. 10, 


ii. 215 


xi. 26, 


vii. 420 


x. 10, 


in. 458 


xi. 26, 


ix. 327 


x. 14, 


i. 288 


xi. 26, - . 


xn. 12 


x. 14, 


v. 26 


xi. 40, 


x. 228 


x. 14, 


ix. 228 


xi. 45, 


vi. 427 


x. 14, 15, . 


iv. 368 


xi. 47, 


iv. 184 


x. 14, 15, . 


vm. 146 


xi. 51, 


n. 419 


x. 14-16, . 


vi. 422 




(235 


x. 15, 


n. 387 


xi. 51, 


V -J236 


x. 15, 16, 


ix. 356 


xi. 51,52, . 


n. 387 


x. 15, 18, . 


iv. 113 


xi. 53, 54, 


m. 224 


x. 16, 


iv. 131 


xii. 23, . 4 


v. 168 


x. 16, 


vm. 225 


xii. 23, 


vi. 502 


x. 16, 


vm. 268 


xii. 23, 24, 


ix. 307 


x. 16, 


xi. 312 


xii. 24, 


n. 215 


x. 17, 18, . 


iv. 114 


xii. 24, 


n. 253 


x. 18, 


1.430 


xii. 24, 


n. 420 


x. 18, 


v. 24 


xii. 24, 


iv. 209 


x. 18, 


vii. 194 


xii. 24, 


iv. 213 


x. 24-37, . 


vm. 486 


xii. 24, 


iv. 568 


x. 25, 26, . 


iv. 220 


xii. 24, 


vii. 197 


x. 26, 


iv. 441 


xii 26, 


vii. 230 


x. 26, 


ix. 159 


xii. 27, 


vm. 146 


x. 26, 


ix. 229 


xii. 27, 28, . 


vii. 206 


x. 28, 


iv. 53 


xii 28, . 


n. 38 


x. 28, 


ix. 411 


xii. 28, 


ix. 148 


x. 29, 


i. 337 


xii. 31, 


i. 161 


x. 29, 


iv. 381 


xii. 31, 


i. 370 


x. 30, 


i. 73 


xii. 31, 


i. 489 


x. 30, 


iv. 81 


xii. 31, 


n. 31 


x. 30, 


iv. 217 


xii. 31, 


n. 39 


x. 30, 


vii. 527 


xii. 31, 


n. 65 


x. 30, 


vm. 168 


xii. 31, 32, . 


vi. 361 


x. 30-33, 


. iv. 430 


xii. 32, 


n. 388 


x. 30-38, . 


ix. 132 


xii. 32, 


vii. 314 


x. 30-39, . 


iv. 431 


xii. 36, 


iv. 187 


x. 31, 33, 36, 


38, iv. 360 


xii. 37, 39, 40, 44, 


iv. 359 


x. 33, 


iv. 20 


xii. 40, 


iv. 332 


x. 33-36, . 


vm. 184 


xii. 40, 


vii. 557 


x. 35, 


iv. 432 


xii. 40, 41, . 


iv. 250 


x. 37, 38, 


iv. 361 


xii. 41, 


iv. 478 


x. 37, 38, . 


iv. 362 


xii. 41, 


ix. 131 


x. 37, 38, . 


iv. 441 


xii. 42, 4- 


iv. 175 


x. 37, 38, 


vii. 528 


xii. 46-48, . 


vm. 214 


xi. 9, 


vii. 167 


xii. 47, 48, . 


vm. 137 


xi. 15, 


iv. 220 


xii. 48, 


vii. 306 


xi. 16, 


iv. 106 


xiii. 1, 


n. 169 


xi. 21, 32, . 


vi. 95 


xiii. 1, 


iv. 96 


xi. 22-41, . 


iv. 83 


xiii. 1, 


iv. 12? 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



283 



John xiii. 1, 
xtii. 1, 
xiii. 1, 
xiii. 2, 
xiii. 2, 
xiii. 7, 
xiii. 7, 
xiii. 8, 
xiii. 13, 
xiii. 18, 
xiii. 25, 
xiii. 27, 
xiii. 32, 
xiii. 34, 
xiii. 34, 
xiv. 1, 
xiv. 1, 
xiv. 1, 
xiv. 1, 


vii. 192 
ix. 211 
ix. 238 
n. 60 
in. 264 
vi. 347 
viii. 208 
x. 76 
ix. 159 
n. 164 
vi. 460 
v. 168 
iv. 496 
i. 276 
in. 14 
n. 207 
ii. 449 
iv. 12 
vi. 346 


John xiv. 17 
xiv. 17, 
xiv. 17, 
xiv. 18, 
xiv. 18, 
xiv. 18-21, 
xiv. 19, 
xiv. 19, 
xiv. 19, 20, . 
xiv. 20, 
xiv. 20, 
xiv. 20, 
xiv. 20, 
xiv. 20, 
xiv. 20, 
xiv. 20, 
xiv. 20, 
xiv. 20, 
xiv. 21, 


vi. 63 
vi. 409 
vm. 473 
vii. 465 
ix. 359 
vm. 380 
vi. 455 
vii. 345 
xi. 361 
i. 243 
iv. 340 
iv. 368 
iv. 370 
iv. 405 
vi. 347 
vn. 142 
ix. 148 
ix. 265 
i. 250 


xiv. 1, 
xiv. 1-3, 
xiv. 1-6, 


vm. 143 
xi. 450 
vm. 368 


xiv. 21, 
xiv. 21, 
xiv. 21, 


iv. 161 
v. 436 
vi. 279 


xiv. 1,7,8, . 
xiv. 1-20, 
xiv. 1-23, 


vin. 349 
i. 242 
vm. 377 


xiv. 21, 
xiv. 21, 
xiv. 21, 


vi. 451 
vii. 185 
ix. 149 


xiv. 2, 


iv. 50 


xiv. 21, 22, . 


ix. 147 


xiv. 2, 


iv. 99 


xiv. 21-23, . 


iv. 261 


xiv. 2, 


vii. 361 


xiv. 21, 23, . 


vii. 448 


xiv. 2, 


vn. 369 


xiv. 23, 


n. 412 


xiv. 2, 3, 


vn. 50 


xiv. 23, 


m. 309 


xiv. 3, 


n. 238 


xiv. 26, 


i. 245 


xiv. 3, 


vn. 452 


xiv. 26, 


vi. 52 


xiv. 3,19, . 


iv. 100 


xiv. 27, 


i. 16 


xiv. 4-9, V. 


m. 445 


xiv. 28, 


i. 31 


xiv. 6, 


n. 409 


xiv. 28, 


iv. 83 


xiv. 6-8, 


vm. 574 


xiv. 28, 


iv. 381 


xiv. 8, 21, . 


vm. 399 


xiv. 28, 


v. 45 


xiv. 9, 


iv. 264 


xiv. 28, 


v. 109 


xiv. 9, 


iv. 357 


xiv. 28, 


vm. 401 


xiv. 9, 10, . 


ix. 114 


xiv. 31, 


iv. 20 


xiv. 10, 


iv. 370 


xiv. 31, 


vi. 186 


xiv. 10, 11, . 


iv. 362 


xiv. 31, 


ix. 108 


xiv. 10, 11, ., 


vm. 167 


XIV., XV., XVI., 


VI. 1 


xiv. 11, 13, 16, 


iv. 102 


xiv.-xvii. 


n. 397 


xiv. 12, 


1.437 


xv. 1,2, .. 


m. 435 


xiv. 12, 


iv. 108 


xv. 1-17, .. 


vi. 400 


xiv. 13, 16, 26, 


iv. 360 


xv. 2, 


vi. 343 


xiv. 14, 15-23, 


vi. 65 


xv. 2, 


vi. 410 


xiv. 16, 


iv. 62 


xv. 2, 


vii. 162 


xiv. 16, 


iv. 101 


xv. 2, 


vn. 511 


xiv. 16, 


iv. 120 


xv. 3,4, .. 


n. 409 


xiv. 16, 17, . 


vi. 55 


xv. 4, 5, 


vii. 171 


xiv. 16-20, 


vm. 366 


xv. 4,5,10, 


ix. 10S 


xiv. 16, 26, 


vi. 70 


xv. 5, 


vi. 222 



284 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 


John xv. 6, 


IV. 514 


John xvi. 12, 25, 


xv. 6, 


ix. 299 


xvi. 13, 


xv. 6, 


x. 532 


xvi. 13, 15, 


xv. 6, 


xi. 68 


xvi. 13-15, 


xv. 6, 10, 28, 


vni. 392 


xvi. 13-15, 


xv. 7, 


n. 412 


xvi. 14, 


xv. 8, 


vi. 503 


xvi. 14, 


xv. 8, 


vn. 234 


xvi. 14, 


xv. 9-11, . 


iv. 134 


xvi. 14, 


xv. 9-11, .. 


vm. 356 


xvi. 14, 


xv. 10, 


iv. 115 


xvi. 14, 15, 


xv. 10, 11, . 


iv. 147 


xvi. 14, 15, 


xv. 10-15, . 


vii. 191 


xvi. 15, 


XV. 11, 


vii. 464 


xvi. 15, 


xv. 12, 


xi. 478 


xvi. 15, 


xv. 12, 13, . 


i. 276 


xvi. 15, 


xv. 13, 


n. 212 


xvi. 15, 


xv. 13, 


vii. 193 


xvi. 16, 


xv. 14, 


vi. 131 


xvi. 16, 


xv. 14, 


vii. 179 


xvi. 23-26, 


xv. 14, 


vn. 316 


xvi. 24, 


xv. 14, 16, .. 


vn. 173 


xvi. 24, 


xv. 15, 


iv. 238 


xvi. 24, 


xv. 15, 


vi. 139 


xvi. 25, 


xv. 15, 


vi. 142 


xvi. 26, 27, 


xv. 15, 


vii. 213 


xvi. 27, 


xv. 15, 


vii. 224 


xvi. 28, 


xv. 16, 


iv. 492 


xvi. 33, 


xv. 16, 


vi. 10 


xvi. 33, 


xv. 16, 


vn. 244 


xvii. 


xv. 16, 


xi. 77 


xvii. 


xv. 19, 


n. 25 


xvii. 


xv. 19, 


n. 1 64 


xvii. 


xv. 22, 


iv. 164 


xvii. 1, 


xv. 24, 25, . 


vn. 336 


xvii. 1-22, 


xv. 26, 


v. 484 


xvii. 2, 


xv. 26, 


vi. 52 


xvii. 2, 


xv. 26, 


ix. 141 


xvii. 2, 


xv. 27, 


iv. 159 


xvii. 2, 


xvi. 


vi. 520 


xvii. 2, 3, 


xvi. 2, 


vi. 244 


xvii. 2, 3, 


xvi. 2, 


vi. 303 


xvii. 3, 


xvi. 6, 7, . 


x. 251 


xvii. 3, 


xvi. 6-11 


vi. 359 


xvii. 3, 


xvi. 7, 


iv. 99 


xvii. 3, 


xvi. 7, 16, 18, 


iv. 101 


xvii. 3, 


xvi. 8, 


n. 346 


xvii. 3, 


xvi. 8, 


vin. 471 


xvii. 3, 


xvi. 8-10, . 


vi. 48 


xvii. 3, 24, 


xvi. 9, 


vm. 482 


xvii. 4, 


xvi. 9, 10, . 


iv. 48 


xvii. 4, 


xvi. 10, 


iv. 440 


xvii. 4, 


xvi. 11, 


i. 370 


xvii. 5, 


xvi. 12, 


vn. 142 xvii. 5, 



vn. 493 
vi. 419 
iv. 355 
iv. 369 
v. 42 
iv. 264 
vi. 499 
vii. 498 

vm. 370 
ix. 147 
vi. 51 

vm. 46 
iv. 361 
iv. 368 
iv. 527 
ix. 137 
ix. 140 
iv. 100 
vi. 52 
iv. 102 
1.481 
m. 363 
in. 445 

vm. 158 
iv. 86 

vm. 191 

n. 429 

i. 112 

vi. 316 

n. 396 

iv. 66 

iv. 364 

iv. 486 

vi. 497 

i. 553 

n. 210 

iv. 53 

iv. 77 

v. 40 

vn. 483 

vm. 172 

i. 166 

iv. 435 

iv. 546 

v. 121 

vn. 63 

vm. 77 

vm. 140 

iv. 229 

iv. 75 

v. 133 

vi. 499 

i. 72 

i. 76 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



285 



John 



xvii. 5, 
xvii. 5, 
xvii. 5, 
xvii. 5, 24, 
xvii. 6, 
xvii. 6, 
xvii. 6, 


iv. 552 
iv. 454 
v. 543 
iv. 499 
iv. 87 
iv. 261 
v. 25 


John xvii. 23, 
xvii. 23, 
xvii. 23, 
xvii. 23, 
xvii. 23, 24, 
xvii. 23, 24, 
xvii. 23-26, 


iv. 115 
vi. 180 
ix. 340 
ix. 347 
iv. 511 
ix. 129 
n. 176 


xvii. 6, 
xvii. 6, 12, . 
xvii. 6-20, 
xvii. 7, 
xvii. 9, 


vn. 8 
ix. 355 
ix. 307 
iv. 497 
i. 93 


xvii. 24, 
xvii. 24, 
xvii. 24, 
xvii. 24, 
xvii. 24, 


i. 78 
n. 156 
iv. 51 
iv. 81 
iv. 234 


xvii. 9, 
xvii. 9J 
xvii. 10, 
xvii. 10, 
xvii. 10, 11, . 
xvii. 10, 24, . 
xvii. 11, 
xvii. 11, 


11. 164 
ix. 361 
iv. 368 
ix. 94 
ix. 134 
i. 98 
iv. 359 
ix. 115 


xvii. 24, . 
xvii. 24, 
xvii. 24, 
xvii. 24, 
xvii. 24, 
xvii. 24, 
xvii. 24, 
xvii. 24, 


iv. 318 
iv. 465 
iv. 565 
iv. 568 
v. 547 
vi. 498 
vn. 197 
vn. 461 


xvii. 12, 


ii. 118 


xvii. 24, 


vni. 387 


xvii. 12, 


ix. 184 


xvii. 24, 


ix. 348 


xvii. 12, 15, . 
xvii. 13, 22, 23, 


vn. 160 
iv. 134 


xvii. 24, 
xvii. 24, 


ix. 361 
ix. 368 


xvii. 15, 


iv. 99 


xvii. 25, 


ix. 17 


xvii. 15, 


ix. 414 


xvii. 26, 


iv. 370 


xvii. 17, 


x. 98 


xviii. 1-21, 


v. 196 


xvii. 19, 


iv. 38 


xviii. 4, 


iv. 20 


xvii. 19, 


v. 49 


xviii. 4, 


iv. 23 


xvii. 19, 


v. 345 


xviii. 4, 


v. 168 


xvii. 19, 


vi. 86 


xviii. 4, 


xi. 449 


xvii. 19, 


vii. 222 


xviii. 19-21, . 


v. 250 


xvii. 19, 


x. 130 


xviii. 19-21, . 


ix. 443 


xvii. 20, 


i. 6 


xviii. 22, 


m. 225 


xvii. 20, 


i. 221 


xviii. 28, 


x. 260 


xvii. 20, 


xi. 77 


xviii. 36, 


vni. 64 


xvii. 20-23, 


ix. 139 


xviii. 36, 


xi. 71 


xvii. 20-26, . 


ix. 106 


xviii. 37, 


i. 224 


xvii. 21, 


n. 387 


xviii. 37, 


iv. 561 


xvii. 21, 


ix. 145 


xix. 7, 


iv. 425 


xvii. 21, 22, 


iv. 363 


xix. 11, 


iv. 158 


xvii. 21-23, . 


iv. 362 


xix. 12, 


x. 121 


xvii. 21-23, . 


vii. 463 


xix. 30, 


v. 103 


xvii. 22, 


n. 262 


xix. 31, 32, . 


vn. 452 


xvii. 22, 


vn. 462 


xix. 37, 


iv. 446 


xvii. 22, 


ix. 96 


XX. 


iv. 5 


xvii. 22, 


ix. 363 


xx. 6, 


i. 15 


xvii. 22, 23, 


n. 410 


xx. 14-16, . 


vni. 384 


xvii. 22, 23, . 


ix. 84 


xx. 16, 17, . 


vni. 380 


xvii. 22, 23, 


ix. 265 


xx. 17, 


i. 30 


xvii. 22, 24, 


iv. 499 


xx. 17, 


i. 87 


xvii. 22-24, 


ix. 88 


xx. 17, 


n. 306 


xvii. 23, 


i. 151 


xx. 17, 


iv. 82 


xvii. 23, 


n. 279 


xx. 17, 


iv. 104 



286 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 


John xx. 20, 


IV. 330 


Acts ii. 32, 


xx. 21, 


I. 8 


ii. 33, 


xx. 22, 


vi. 15 


ii. 33, 


xx. 22, 


vi. 50 


ii. 33, 


xx. 22, 


vi. 52 


ii. 33, 


xx. 23, 


m. 244 


ii. 33, 


xx. 23, 


xi. 24 


ii. 33, 


xx. 25, 


i. 34 


ii. 33, 


xx. 25-28, ,. . 


iv. 520 


ii. 33, 


xx. 27, 


i. 13 


ii. 33, 


xx. 27, 


iv. 426 


ii. 33, 36, 


xx. 28, 


iv. 520 


ii. 33, 36, 


xx. 28, 


vm. 185 


ii. 33, 41, 


xx. 29, . . 


i. 261 


ii. 34-36, 


xx. 29, 


iv. 106 


ii. 36, 


xx. 30, 


iv. 106 


ii. 36, 


xx. 30, 


v. 243 


ii. 36, 


xxi. 17, , . 


vi. 109 


ii. 37, 38, 


xxi. 17, 


vi. 112 


ii. 38, 39, 


xxi. 17, 


vi. 139 


ii. 40, 


xxi. 18, 


vm. 516 


ii. 41, 


Acts i. 2, 


vi. 15 


ii. 41, 


i. 4, 


i. 246 


n. 42, 


i. 4, 


vi. 9 


ii. 42, 43, 


i. 8, 


vi. 10 


ii. 44, 47, 


i. 10, 11, . 


xi. 43 


ii. 46, 


i. 11, 


vn. 113 


ii. 46, 47, 


i. 13-17, . 


ix. 273 


iii. 15, 


i. 15-vi. 5, . 


i. 541 


iii. 21, 


i. 15-20, . 


ix. 194 


iii. 21, 


i. 17, 


ix. 184 


iii. 21, 


i. 18, 


n. 54 


iii. 25, 


i. 20, 


m. 365 


iii. 25, 


i. 21, 22, . 


i. 10 


iii. 25, 


i. 25, 


iv. 197 


iii. 25, 


ii. 4, 


iv. 519 


iii. 25, 


ii. 5, 9-11, . 


i. 540 


iii. 25, 26, 


ii. 16-18, . 


vi. 8 


iii. 25, 26, 


ii. 22, 


i. 429 


iii. 26, 


ii. 23, 


iv. 19 


iii. 26, 


ii. 24, . 


i. 335 


iii. 36, 


ii. 24, 


i. 351 


iv. 


ii. 24, 


i. 435 


iv. 2, 


ii. 24, 


i. 438 


iv. 3, 


ii. 24, 


ii. 237 


iv. 11, 


ii. 24, 


n. 249 


iv. 13, 


ii. 24, 


m. 393 


iv. 16, 


ii. 24, 


iv. 30 


iv. 16, 40, 


ii. 24, 


iv. 126 


iv. 19, 


ii. 24, 


iv. 269 


iv. 22, 


ii. 25, Vj 


iv. 63 


iv. 27, 


ii. 25, 


ix. 365 


iv. 27, 


ii. 25-37, . 


vn. 206 


iv. 28, 


ii. 30, " f 


vii. 188 iv. 28, 



I. 
I. 

IV. 
IV. 
IV. 
VI. 
VI. 
VI. 
IX. 
IX. 
IV. 
VI. 

I. 
III. 

IV. 

IV. 

IV. 
X. 

IX. 

XI. 

VI. 

XI. 

XI. 
VII. 
VII. 

XI. 

XI. 

II. 

I. 

II. 

III. 

I. 

I. 

I. 

IX. 
IX. 
IX. 
IX. 
IV. 
IV. 

I. 

VI. 

I. 

IX. 
IV. 

III. 

VI. 
IV. 
VI. 
IX. 

I. 

VI. 

VIII. 

IX. 



463 

475 

62 

85 

107 

8 

52 
417 
353 
338 
121 
13 
247 
221 
474 
522 
532 
328 
493 
519 
422 
531 
388 
290 
287 
109 
308 
212 
197 
312 
111 
156 
172 
459 
432 
493 
37 
468 
107 
343 
64 
22 
429 
359 
436 
420 
292 
173 
294 
83 
31 
50 
237 
399 



Acts 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 


287 


iv. 29, 30, 
iv. 32, 
iv. 32, 
iv. 32, 33, 
iv. 34, 35, 
iv. 35, 
v. 3, 
v. 3,4, 
v. 5, 
v. 13, 
v.21, 
v. 29-32, 


IV. 108 

iv. 217 
- - ix. 108 
xi. 345 
xi. 530 
xi. 514 
*. ii. 61 
vii. 319 
vi. 19 
ix. 108 
xi. 69 
vin. 325 


Acts viii. 32, 33, 
viii. 35, 
viii. 37, 
viii. 37, 
viii. 37, 
viii. 38, 39, 
ix. 
ix. 1, 
ix. 6, 
ix. 13, 
ix. 14, 15, 
ix. 15, 


vin. 185 
iv. 14 
vrn. 171 
. vin. 284 
. vin. 364 
i. 233 
. vm. 148 
vi. 110 
vi. 425 

VI. Ill 

i. 345 

i. 8 


v. 31, 
v. 31, 32, 
v. 32, 
v. 39, 


i. 475 
iv. 221 
vi. 59 
x. 121 


ix. 15, 
ix. 15, 
ix. 15, 16, 
ix. 17, 


vi! 244 
ix. 150 
. vin. 227 
i. 10 


v. 41, 


n. 444 


ix. 21, 22, 


i. 7 


vi. 1-3, 

o 


xi. 334 


ix. 31, 


vni. 47 


vi. 3, 


vi. 29 


ix. 31, 


xi. 93 


vi. 7, 


vii. 538 


x. 


ii. 71 


vi. 10, 


x. 251 


x. 


n. 313 


vii. 2, 


vi. 497 


x. 


vi. 10 


vii. 2, 


ix. 34 


x. 9, 


v. 472 


vii. 2, 


ix. 332 


x. 11, 12, 


i. 156 


vii. 5, 


vin. 448 


x. 11, 12, 


ix. 78 


vii. 5-7, 


vn. 348 


x. 15, 


ix. 462 


vii. 22, 


i. 3 


x. 19, 20, 


vm. 378 


vii. 27, 
vii. 32-37, 


x. 176 
iv. 358 


x. 28, 
x. 34, 


vii. 147 

vi. 492 


vii. 37, 38, 


vi. 8 


x. 34, 


vm. 568 


vii. 38, 


XL 18 


x. 34, 36, 


i. 174 


vii. 38, 


xi. 88 


x. 36, 


iv. 530 


vii. 48, 


i. 372 


x. 36-44, 


vi. 417 


vii. 51, 


i. 351 


x.37, 


iv. 119 


vii. 51, 


vi. 44 


x. 38, 


iv. 121 


vii. 55, 59, 


vn. 453 


x. 38, 


vi. 12 


vii. 56, 


iv. 565 


x. 38, 


vi. 13 


vii. 58, 


vi. 110 


x. 38, 


vi. 52 


vii. 59, 


vii. 343 


x. 41, 


vi. 68 


viii. 


. vra. 192 


x. 43, 


ii. 312 


viii. 1, 


n. 430 


x. 43, 


. vin. 149 


viii. 1, 


xi. 89 


x. 43, 


vm. 212 


viii. 5, 6, 


XL 499 


x. 44, 


iv. 245 


viii. 8, 9, 


vi. 490 


x. 44, 


vi. 15 


viii. 9, 10, 


ix. 202 


x. 44, 


vi. 417 


viii. 9-11, 


. vm. 256 


x. 44, 


xi. 361 


viii. 12, 


vi. 267 


x. 45, 


i. 13 


viii. 21, 


i. 207 


x.45, 


vi. 59 


viii. 21, 


vi. 55 


x. 47, 


vi. 69 


viii. 22, 


m. 512 


x. 47, 


vn. 419 


viii. 23, 


vi. 141 


xi. 3, 


. - vn. 147 


viii. 23, 


x. 112 


xi. 12, 


vi. 15 


viii. 23, 


x. 117 


xi. 15, 


vi. 10 


viii. 29, 


vi. 15 


xi. 15, 


vm. 149 



288 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 


Acts xi. 18, 


vi. 19 


Acts xiii. 48, 


xi. 19, 


ii. 430 


xiii. 48, 


xi. 23, 


n. 220 


xiii. 50, 


xi. 23, 


vii. 252 


xiv. 6, 


xi. 23, 


vm. 313 


xiv. 15, 18, 


xi. 24, 


vi. 16 


xiv. 16, 


xi. 24, 


vi. 19 


xiv. 16, 


xi. 24, 


vi. 49 


xiv. 16, 


xi. 24, 


xi. 532 


xiv. 17, 


xi. 28, 


m. 23 


xiv. 17, 


xi. 28, 


vi. 29 


xiv. 17, 


xi. 30, 


xi. 29 


xiv. 17, 


xi. 31, 


vi. 37 


xiv. 22, 


xii. 


m. 384 


xiv. 22, 23, 


xii. 5, 


xi. 262 


xiv. 23, 


xii. 5, 


xi. 420 


xiv. 23, 


xii. 24, 


vi. 521 


xiv. 23, 


xii. 46, 


iv. 314 


xiv. 23, 


xiii. 1, 


xi. 193 


xiv. 23, 


xiii. 1, 


xi. 418 


xiv. 27, 


xiii. 1,2, 


iv. 360 


xiv. 27, 


xiii. 2, 


i. 8 


xiv. 27, 


xiii. 2, 


iv. 358 


xiv. 27, 


xiii. 2, 


vi. 14 


xiv. 27, 


xiii. 2, 


vm. 378 


xiv. 27, 


xiii. 2, 


ix. 131 


xv. 5, 


xiii. 2, 


xi. 121 


xv. 7, 


xiii. 2, 


xi. 377 


xv. 7-9, 


xiii. 4, 


vi. 15 


xv. 8, 


xiii. 10, 


vi. 196 


xv. 8,9, 


xiii. 10, 


vii. 164 


xv. 8,9, 


xiii. 10, 


x. 128 


xv. 9, 


xiii. 14, 46, 49, 


xi. 94 


XV. 11, 


xiii. 32, 33, 


iv. 622 


XV. 11, 


xiii. 32, 33, 


vn. 185 


XV. 11, 


xiii. 32, 34, 


i. 459 


XV. 11, 


xiii. 33, 


1.429 


XV. 11, 


xiii. 33, 


iv. 87 


XV. 11, 


xiii. 33, 


rv. 49 


xv. 15-17, 


xiii. 33, 


iv. 458 


xv. 16, 


xiii. 33, 


vi. 12 


xv. 16, 


xiii. 33, 


vi. 455 


xv. 16, 17, 


xiii. 33, 


vm. 380 


xv. 16-18, 


xiii. 34, 


n. 192 


xv. 21, 


xiii. 34, 


vm. 41 


xv. 23, 


xiii. 38, 


iv. 15 


xvi. 6, 


xiii. 39, 


n. 337 


xvi. 6, 7, 


xiii. 39, 


iv. 436 


xvi. 7, 


xiii. 41, 


x. 148 


xvi. 9, 


xiii. 41, 


xi. 361 


xvi. 11, 


xiii. 46, 


iv. 248 


xvi. 20, 


xiii. 46, 


ix. 486 


xvi. 30, 


xiii. 46, 


ix. 493 


xvi. 30, 31, 


xiii. 48, 


i. 226 


xvi. 31, 



ix. 88 
ix. 320 
x. 401 
xi. 98 
ix. 32 
iv. 194 
ix. 24 
ix. 228 
iv. 200 
iv. 201 
ix. 500 
ix. 509 
ix. 399 
xi. 319 
xi. 64 
xi. 94 
xi. 96 
xi. 135 
xi. 339 
n. 343 
vn. 540 

vm. 145 

xi. 56 

xi. 102 

xi. 105 

vi. 241 

vn. 147 

i. 238 

vn. 7 

vi. 10 

vi. 21 

vi. 242 

n. 231 

n. 300 

n. 326 

vin. 170 

vm. 568 
ix. 235 

vm. 70 
ix. 467 
ix. 482 

vm. 64 
ix. 27 

XI. 

i. 
rx. 

VI. 

vm. 569 
m. 34 

vm. 167 
n. 371 
ix. 431 

vm. 212 
iv. 12 



74 
15 
40 
15 



Acts xvi 

xvi 

xvi 

xvi 

xvii 

xvii, 

xvii. 

xvii. 

xvii. 

xvii. 

xvii. 

xvii. 

xvii. 

xvii. 

xvii. 

xvii. 

xvii. 

xvii. 

xvii. 
xviii. 
xviii. 
xviii. 
xviii. 
xviii. 
xviii. 
xviii. 
xviii. 
xviii. 

xix. 

xix. 

xix. 

xix. 

xix. 

xix. 

xix. 

xix. 

xix. 

xix. 

xix. 

xix. 

xix. 

xix. 

xx. 

xx. 

xx. 

XX. 
XX. 
XX. 
XX. 
XX. 
XX. 
XX. 
XX. 
XX. 
VOL. XII. 



:. 31, 

. 31, 34, 
. 33, 34, 
.37, 
.11, 

.18, 
.24, 
. 24, 29, 
.25, 

25, 28, 
26, 
26, 

26, 28, 
27, 
28, 
28, 
30, 
31, 
31, 

2, 

10, 

10, 

14, 

17, 

24, 25, 

25-27, 

27, 

1, 

1, 

1,2, 

4, 

4, 

5, 

15, 16, 
19, 

24, 25, 
34, 35, 
39, 

39-41, 
40, 

7, 

7, 

7, 
17, 

18,19, 
20, 
20, 

20, 21, 
21, 
21, 
22, 



INDEX OP TEXTS. 


IX. 468 


Acts xx. 24, 


viii. 143 


xx. 24, 


i. 233 


9 

xx. 24, 


iv. 35 

iv. 254 


xx. 28, 
xx. 28, 


n. 249 


xx. 28, 


ix. 120 


xx. 28, 


vn. 5 


xx. 28, 


vin. 57 


xx. 28, 


vni. 32 


xx. 28, 


n. 126 


xx. 28, 


ix. 31 


xx. 28, 


vii. 426 


xx. 28, 


vii. 548 


xx. 28, 


iv. 194 


xx. 28, 


vi. 459 


xx. 32, 


iv. 164 


xx. 32, 


n. 255 


xx. 35, 


iv. 564 


xxi. 13, 


vi. 87 


xxi. 18, 


n. 372 


xxii. 5, 


vni. 569 


xxii. 11, 


ix. 16 


xxii. 14, 


vi. 290 


xxii. 20, 


vii. 314 


xxiii. 1, 


vii. 289 


xxiii. 1, 


vn. 142 


xxiv. 14, 16, 


n. 313 


xxiv. 20, 


ii. 63 


xxiv. 26, 


i. 12 


xxv. 26, 


xi. 297 


xxvi. 5, 


668 


xxvi. 6, 


vi. 362 


xxvi. 9, 


xi. 120 


xxvi. 11, 


ix. 281 


xxvi. 12, 13, 


ix. 400 


xxvi. 16, 


i. 2 


xxvi. 16, 


x. 313 


xxvi. 16-18, 


n. 27 


xxvi. 17-19, 


xi. 67 


xxvi. 18, 


xi. 88 


xxvi. 18, 


xi. 285 


xxvi. 18, 


i. 3 


xxvi. 18, 


xi. 33 


xxvi. 18, 


xi. 42 


xxvi. 18, 


xi. 88 


xxvi. 18, 


i. 12 


xxvi. 18, 


xi. 495 


xxvi. 18, 


i. 25 


xxvi. 18, 


xi. 230 


xxvi. 18, 


vi. 520 


xxvi. 22, 


n. 408 xxvi. 27, 


vn. 549 


xxviii. 3, 4, 


iv. 12 


xxviii. 25, 



289 

vii. 222 
vn. 399 
vm. 286 
i. 263 
iv. 77 
iv. 278 
iv. 430 
v. 105 
vi. 37 
vi. 182 
xi. 8 
xi. 62 
xi. 64 
xi. 161 
xi. 226 
i. 226 
xi. 370 
vni. 466 
ii. 457 
xi. 508 
xi. 120 
i. 315 
vii. 239 
vi. 110 
vi. 289 
vn. 149 
vn. 148 
vi. 435 
vi. 431 
ix. 462 
ix. 175 
i. 248 
vi. 243 
n. 64 
vii. 107 
i. 345 
iv. 108 
i. 10 
vm. 173 
i. 208 
1.271 
i. 301 
n. 50 
n. 53 
ii. 324 
n. 335 
iv. 14 
vi. 408 
vm. 288 
x. 149 
xi. 376 
i. 2 
x. 387 
ix. 131 



290 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 




Bom. i. 1-4, 


IV. 443 


Kom. i. 20-22, 


x. 176 


i. 2-4, 


iv. 421 


i. 21, 


iv. 161 


i. 3, 


iv. 232 


i. 21, 


iv. 165 


i. 3, 


iv. 422 


i. 21, 


vi. 168 


i. 3,4, . 


i. 30 


i. 21, 


vi. 279 


i. 3,4, . 


n. 81 


i. 21, 


vi. 303 


i. 3,4, . 


iv. 629 


i.21, 


vi. 505 


i. 3,4, .-.- 


vin. 176 


i. 21, 


ix. 499 


i. 3,4, . 


vm. 185 


i. 21, 


ix. 500 


i. 4, 


i. 195 


i. 21, 


x. 91 


i. 4, 


n. 395 


i. 21-23, . . 


x. 196 


i. 4, 


n. 397 


i. 21, 28, 


x. 144 


i. 4, 


iv. 230 


i. 22, 


iv. 167 


i. 4, 


iv. 262 


i. 22, 


vi. 495 


i. 4, 


iv. 269 


i. 23, 


vn. 6 


i. 4, 


vi. 427 


i. 23, 25, . 


iv. 373 


i. 4, 


vi. 440 


i. 24, 


n. 101 


i. 4, 


vi. 457 


i. 24, 


iv. 230 


i. 4, 


vn. 185 


i. 24, 


vi. 279 


i. 5, 


i. 536 


i. 25, 


i. 27 


i. 6, 


vi. 331 


i. 25, 


iv. 387 


i. 6, 


ix. 337 


i. 25, 


vn. 5 


i. 6, 


i. 11 


i. 26, 27 . 


x. 320 


i. 8, 


vi. 415 


i. 28, 


m. 515 


i. 12, 


xi. 355 


i. 28, 


vi. 286 


i. 14, 


iv. 295 


i. 28, 


vi. 313 


i. 17, 


i. 290 


i. 28, 


vii. 140 


i. 17, 


n. 313 


i. 28, 


vn. 328 


i. 17, 


vi. 105 


i. 28, 


x. 114 


i. 17, 


vi. 409 


i. 28, 


x. 193 


i. 17, 


vm. 281 


i. 29-32, . 


x. 61 


i. 17-19, . 


i. 403 


i. 30, 


iv. 156 


i. 18, 


iv. 560 


i. 32, 


m. 523 


i. 18, 


vi. 254 


i. 32, 


iv. 178 


i. 18, 


vi. 260 


i. 32, 


vi. 313 


i. 18, 


vi. 284 


i. 32, ii. 1, 


x. 160 


i. 18, 


vi. 286 


i. 32, ii. 15, 


vii. 47 


i. 18, 


vi. 357 


ii. 1, 


i. 405 


i. 18, 


x. 104 


ii. 1, 


iv. 169 


i. 18, 21, . 


vi. 269 


ii. 2, 


vi. 304 


i. 19, 20, . 


iv. 261 


ii. 3, 


vi. 313 


i. 19, 20, . 


iv. 438 


ii. 4, 


i. 336 


i. 19, 20, . 


vn. 67 


ii. 4, 


n. 141 


i. 19, 20, . 


vm. 76 


ii. 4, 


iv. 177 


i. 19, 20 . 


x. 227 


ii. 4,5, ,. 


vi. 353 


i. 20, 


iv. 268 


ii. 5, 


ii. 185 


i. 20, -. 


iv. 478 


ii. 7, $ 


n. 436 


i. 20, 


iv. 479 


ii. 8, .-; 


n. 67 


i. 20, 


vi. 428 


ii. 8,9, X 


x. 500 


i. 20, ^ 


vi. 498 


ii. 9, 


iv. 488 


i. 20, u 


vii. 46 


ii. 10, 


ix. 493 


i. 20, i- - 


vii. 69 


ii. 10, 


i. 19 


i. 20, 


vm. 100 


ii. 12, 15, . 


vi. 304 


i. 20, 


xi. 363 


ii. 12, 16, . 


vi. 353 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



291 



Rom. ii. 13, 
ii. 14, 
ii. 14, 
ii. 14, 
ii. 14, 
ii. 14, 
ii. 14, 15, . 
ii. 14, 15, . 
ii. 14, 15, . 
ii. 15, 
ii. 15, 
ii. 15, 
ii. 15, 
ii. 15, 
ii. 15, 
ii. 15, 20, . 
ii. 15-23, . 
ii. 17-19, . 
ii. 18, 


i. 7 
ii. 125 
m. 247 
iv. 169 
vi. 197 
vi. 402 
i. 403 
vi. 204 
vi. 231 
i. 397 
iv. 194 
vi. 284 
vi. 349 
vii. 295 
x. 189 
vi. 357 
x. 97 
x. 132 
vi. 290 


Rom. iii. 20, 
iii. 20, 
iii. 21, 
iii. 21, 22. 
iii. 22, 
iii. 22, 
iii. 22, 
iii. 22-24, 
iii. 22-24, . 
iii. 22-28, 
iii. 23, 
iii. 23, 
iii. 23, 
iii. 23, 
iii. 23, 
iii. 23, 
iii. 23, 24, 
iii. 23, 24, . 
iii. 24, 


1.288 
vi. 310 
vi. 378 
ix. 44 
ii. 224 
u. 317 
vm. 225 
vm. 197 
vm. 229 
vm. 279 
ii. 90 
iv. 316 
vi. 80 
vi. 269 
vi. 460 
x. 425 
iv. 275 
vm. 334 
ii. 71 


ii. 18, 


vi. 294 


iii. 24, 


n 22 


ii. 20, 
ii. 20, 


iv. 296 
xi. 338 


iii. 24, 
iii. 24, 


1A *^^j 

ii. 320 
v 81 


ii. 20, 
ii. 22-24, . 

" OO 


xi. 366 
vm. 236 


iii. 24, 
iii. 24, 


V O _|_ 

v. 74 
vi. 92 


11. 2<3, 


v. 93 


iii. 24, 


vi 94 


ii. 24, 


iv. 184 


iii. 24, 


VI* U T 

vm. 141 


ii. 25, 
ii. 27, 


n. 76 
ii. 116 


iii. 24, 
iii. 24, 25, . 


vm. 219 
vm. 134 


ii. 27, - . 


vi. 267 


iii. 24, 25, . 


vm. 361 


ii. 27, 


x. 99 


iii. 24, 26, . 


iv. 61 


ii. 28, 


n. 83 


iii. 24-26, . 


vi. 810 


ii. 28, 


m. 127 


iii. 25, 


i. 73 


ii. 30-34, . 


vin. 10 


iii. 25, 


ii. 408 


iii. 


n. 138 


iii. 25, 


iv. 12 


iii. 


n. 313 


iii. 25, 


iv. 18 


iii., iv. 


n. 334 


iii. 25, 


iv. 215 


iii., iv. 


vn. 180 


iii. 25, 


iv. 539 


iii. 1, 


ix. 429 


iii. 25, 


v. 420 


iii. 2, 


iv, 252 


iii. 25, 


v. 535 


iii. 2, 


iv. 314 


iii. 25, 


vi. 127 


iii. 3, 


ix. 485 


iii. 25, 26, . 


iv. 20 


iii. 4, 


vm. 96 


iii. 25, 26, . 


vm. 5 


iii. 5, 


vi. 89 


iii. 25, 26, 


vm. 206 


iii. 8, 


vi. 115 


iii. 26, 


i. 124 


iii. 9, 


vi. 93 


iii. 26, 


vm, 316 


iii. 10-12, . 


x. 156 


iii. 27, 


v. 366 


iii. 11, 


n. 90 


iii. 27, 


vm. 460 


iii. 11, 


n. 98 


iii. 27, 


vm. 484 


iii. 11, 18, . 


x. 91 


iii. 27, 28, . - 


ix. 476 


iii. 13-15, . 


x. 128 


iii. 28, 


iv. 33 


iii. 14, 


i. 203 


iii. 28, 31, .- 


vm. 523 


iii. 17, 


vi. 312 


iii. 31, 


ix. 476 


iii. 19, 


x. 79 iii. 33, 


iv. 154 


iii. 19, 23, .- 


x. 301 iv. 2, 


v. 364 



292 
Rom. 



IV. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 

iv. 



2-5, 

2, 20, 23, 

3, 

4, 

4, 

4,5, 

5, :. 

5, :. 

5, 

5, ; 

5, 

5, :. 

5, 

5, 

5, 

5, 

5, 

5, 

5-7, 

5-7, . 

7, 

7, 

7-9, .. 
10, 
11, 
11, 
12, 
13, 
13, 
13, 
13, 

13, 14, 16, 
14, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
16, 
17, 

17, 

17, 

17, $ 

17-21, . 

18, 

19, 

20, 

20, > 

20, . ,, 

20, 

20, 21, . 

21, 

21, 

21, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 




VIII. 515 


Eom. iv. 21, 23, 24, 25 


iv. 26 


VI. 181 


iv. 24, 25, . 


i. 430 


vni. 297 


iv. 25, 


vi. 312 


ii. 223 


iv. 25, 


vi. 456 


vi. 224 


iv. 25, 


vm. 136 


n. 323 


iv. 25, -. .:-. 


vm. 166 


i. 447 


v. 1, 


n. 337 


n. 315 


v. 1, 


vi. 308 


n. 350 


v. 1, 


vi. 310 


m. 334 


v. 1-5, 


vi. 25 


iv. 12 


v. 1, 2, 3, 5, 11 


, vi. 125 


vi. 21 


v. 1,10, . 


iv. 64 


vi. 103 


v. 1, 11, . 


vi. 315 


vi. 310 


v. 1, 11, . 


vi. 316 


vi. 383 


v. 1,11, . 


vm. 143 


vi. 451 


v. 1,11, . 


vm. 191 


vii. 18 


v. 1, 11, . 


vm. 337 


vii. 553 


v. 1,11, . 


x. 263 


vi. 125 


v. 2, 


vi. 76 


vni. 339 


v. 2, 


vi. 438 


iv. 156 


v. 2, 


ix. 233 


ix. 26 


v. 2,3,11, 


i. 297 


n. 439 


v. 2, 10, . 


iv. 64 


vii. 160 


v. 2,11, . 


vi. 135 


i. 243 


v. 3, 


n. 456 


vi. 85 


v. 4,5, ~, 


i. 302 


vi. 94 


v. 5, 


i. 21 


i. 512 


v. 5, 


i. 259 


n. 336 


v. 5, 


n. 157 


vm. 133 


v. 5, 


vi. 58 


xi. 55 


v. 5, 


vi. 67 


vn. 67 


v. 5, 6, . 


vii. 138 


vm. 278 


v. 6, 


i. 202 


n. 225 


v. 6, 


vi. 384 


iv. 38 


v. 6,8,10, 


x. 85 


v. 38 


v. 7, 


ix. 320 


vi. 346 


v. 8, 


n. 212 


vm. 461 


v. 8, 


iv. 86 


i. 460 


v. 8, 


vi. 140 


n. 204 


v. 8, 


vii. 193 


n. 215 


v. 8,10, . 


v. 14 


vm. 35 


v. 9, 


n. 314 


vm. 135 


v. 9, 


n. 331 


x. 246 


v. 9, 10, . 


iv. 68 


i. 303 


v. 10, 


n. 351 


n. 345 


v. 10, 


iv. 45 


vi. 504 


v. 10, 


iv. 56 


vin. 315 


v. 10, 


iv. 65 


vin. 347 


V. 10, ;. 


v. 511 


vm. 439 


v. 10, 


vi. 92 


vm. 468 


v. 10, 


vi. 107 


i. 425 


v. 10, 


vi. 456 


vm. 115 


v. 10, 


ix. 360 


vm. 277 


v. 11, 


n. 17 



INDEX OP TEXTS. 



Eom. 



293 



v. 11, 
v. 11, 
v. 11, 
v. 11, 
v. 12, 
v. 12, 
v. 12-14, . 


ii. 331 
iv. 391 
vi. 49 

vi. 184 
vn. 125 
ix. 228 
x. 4 


Rom. v. 19 
v. 19 3 , 20, 
v. 20, 
v. 20, 
v. 20, 
v. 21, 


vm. 36 
x. 23 
iv. 236 
vm. 203 
x. 41 
ii. 225 


v. 12, 15, . 
v. 12, 14, 18, 
v. 12, 18, . 
v. 12-18, . 
v. 12-18, . 
v. 12, 19, . 
v. 13, 
v. 13, 


ix. 480 
iv. 32 
n. 12 
n. 127 
x. 339 
x. 53 
n. 135 
n. 228 


v. 21, 
v. 21, 
v. 21, 
v. 21, 
v. 21, 
v. 21, 
v. 24, 
vi. 


vi. 79 
vi. 259 
vi. 260 
vi. 307 
ix. 123 
ix. 413 
ix. 236 
n. 264 


v. 13, 


v. 15 


. * 


iv. 385 


v. 13, 
v. 13, 
v. 14, 
v. 14, 
v. 14, 
v. 14, * 
v. 14, 
v. 14, 
v. 14, 
v. 14-17, . 
v. 14-21, . 
v. 15, 
v. 15, 16, . 
v. 15, 16, . 
v. 15-17, . 
v. 15, 16, 18, 
v. 15-18, . 
v. 15-20, . 
v. 16-18, . 


vii. 26 
x. 47 
i. 509 
iv. 31 
vn. 69 
vii. 74 
vii. 86 
ix. 69 
ix. 385 
iv. 32 
x. 62 
n. 222 
vi. 94 
ix. 161 
ix. 338 
ix. 481 
vin. 141 
iv. 161 
x. 16 


v * l ,3, i 
vi. 2, 
vi. 2,3, . 
vi. 3-7, . 
vi. 3,4, 
vi. 3-13, . 
vi. 4, 
vi. 4, 
vi. 4, 
vi. 4, 5, 11, . 
vi. 4,6, . 
vi. 5, 
vi. 5, 
vi. 5-11, . 
vi. 5-11, . 
vi. 6, 
vi. 6, 
vi. 6, 
vi. 7-22, . 


x. 39 
vii. 310 
n. 233 
vin. 319 
vi. 228 
vi. 41 
vii. 316 
vi. 230 
vi. 456 
vi. 498 
in. 500 
m. 451 
vi. 338 
vi. 398 
n. 241 
ix. 362 
vi. 201 
vi. 229 
ix. 310 
xii. 14 


v. 17, 


ii. 18 


vi. 8, 


n. 237 


v. 17, 


n. 187 


vi. 9, 


n. 203 


v. 17, 


n. 231 


vi. 9, 


m. 182 


v. 17, 


n. 324 


vi. 9-11, . 


vi. 408 


v. 17, 


iv. 21 


vi. 9-12, 


vi. 79 


v. 17, 


iv. 154 


vi. 10, 


i. 430 


v. 17, 


v. 31 


vi. 10, 


n. 208 


v. 17, 


v. 342 


vi. 10, 


iv. 20 


v. 17, 


v. 347 


vi. 10, 


vn. 346 


v. 17, 


v. 510 


vi. 10, 11, . 


ii. 211 


v. 17, 


vi. 315 


vi. 10, 11, . 


iv. 33 


v. 17, 


vin. 134 


vi. 11, 


iv. 41 


v. 17, 19, . 


ix. 309 


vi. 11, 


v. 292 


v. 18, 


n. 207 


vi. 12, 13, . 


x. 297 


v. 18, 


iv. 38 


vi. 12-14, . 


vi. 84 


v. 18, 


iv. 51 


vi. 12, 14, . 


vi. 284 


v. 18, 


vi. 458 


vi. 13, 


n. 106 


v. 19, 


ii. 130 


vi. 13, 


iv. 196 


v. 19, 


v. 343 


vi, 13, 


x. 65 



294 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 




Rom. vi. 14, 


n. 230 


Rom. vii. 5, 


vi. 103 


vi. 14, 


n. 347 


vii. 5,6, 


vi. 317 


vi. 14, 


vi. 79 


vii. 6, 


i. 417 


vi. 14, 


vi. 249 


vii. 6, 


vi. 262 


vi. 14, 


vi. 259 


vii. 6, 


x. 407 


vi. 14, 


,-. - vi. 260 


vii. 7, , 


vn. 299 


vi. 14, 


i vi. 306 


vii. 7-9, , 


x. 169 


vi. 14, 


vi. 350 


vii. 7-10, 


vm. 219 


vi, 14, 


vi. 352 


vii. 7-10, 


x. 307 


vi. 14, 


, ix. 413 


vii. 8, 


n. 87 


vi. 14, 16, 


t vii. 330 


vii. 8, 


x. 59 


vi. 17, 


i. 145 


vii. 8-11, , 


vi. 309 


vi. 17, 


n. 199, 201 


vii. 8-14, 


vi. 195 


vi. 17, 


vi. 390 


vii. 8,18,21, 


iv. 169 


vi. 17, 


vi. 413 


vii. 9, 


n. 13, 14 


vi. 17, 


% xi. 324 


vii. 9, 


m. 500 


vi. 17, 18, 


vi. 75 


vii. 9, 


vi. 348 


vi. 17, 18, 


vn. 223 


vii. 9, 


vi. 447 


vi. 18, 22, 


vi. 273 


vii. 9, 


vi. 471 


vi. 19, 


x. 217 


vii. 9-11, . 


x. 381 


vi. 19, 20, 


x. 49 


vii. 10, 


vi. 306 


vi. 20, 


n. 53 


vii. 10, 


vi. 387 


vi. 21, 


iv. 153 


vii. 10, 


vn. 51 


vi. 21, 


vi. 101 


vii. 10, 


ix. 476 


vi. 22, 


vn. 423 


vii. 10, 11, . 


vi. 458 


vi. 22, 


vii. 511 


vii. 11, :. 


vi. 310 


vi. 23, 


ii. 230 


vii. 11, 12, . 


m. 246 


vi. 23, 


vn. 52 


vii. 11, 12, 13, 


iv. 13 


vii. 


11. 19 


vii. 12, 


vi. 349 


vii. 


. n. 93, 94 


vii. 12, 14, . 


x. 147 


vii. 


. vi. 364-5 


vii. 12-18, . 


vi. 263 


vii. 


vi. 395 


vii. 13, , 


n. 84 


vii. 1, 


n. 347 


vii. 13, 


iv. 158 


vii. 1, 


iv. 122 


vii. 13, 


vi. 386 


vii. 1, 


vi. 249 


vii. 13, 


vi. 448 


vii. 1, 


vi. 258 


vii. 14, 


n. 79 


vii. 1, 


vi. 306 


vii. 14, 


n. 81 


Yii. 1,2, 


iv. 167 


vii. 14, 


vi. 165 


vii. 1,4, 


vi. 236 


vii. 14, 


vi. 292 


vii. 1-4, 


vi. 348 


vii. 14, 22, , 


vi. 185 


vii. 1-4, 


vi. 352 


vii. 14, 22, . 


vn. 328 


vii. 1-5, 


x. 413 


vii. 15-17, . 


x. 268 


vii. 1, 4, 6, 


vi. 232 


vii. 16, 


vi. 289 


vii. 2,3, 


vi. 80 


vii. 16, 


vi. 293 


vii. 2,3, 


, x. Ill 


vii. 17, 


n. 121 


vii. 3, 


. vm. 321 


vii. 17, 18, . 


x. 55 


vii. 3-7, 


vi. 380 


vii. 17, 18, . 


x. 87 


vii. 4, 


iv. 346 


vii. 18, 


vi. 281 


vii. 4, 


vn. 163 


vii. 18, ., 


x. 298 


vii. 4, 6, 


vn. 169 


vii. 18, 25, 


vii. 325 


vii. 5, 


n. 59 


vii. 20, 


x. 82 


vii. 5, 


n. 84 


vii. 22, 23, . 


x. 364 


vii. 5, 


n. 88 


vii. 22, 25, 


vn. 427 


vii. 5, 


t n. 107 


vii. 23, 


n. 9? 



Rom. 



vii. 

vii. 

vii. 

vii. 

vii. 

vii. 

vii. 

vii. 

vii. 

vii. 

vii. 

vii. 

vii. 

vii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
yiii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 



23, 
23, 

23, 
23, 
23, 
23, 

23, 24, 
24, 
24, 
24, 

24, 25, 
25, 
25, 
25, 



1, 

1, 

1-4, 

2, 

2, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 



5,6, 
5-11, 
6, 
6, 



7, 
7, 
7, 
7, 

7, 
7, 



INDEX OP TEXTS. 


II. 108 


Rom. viii. 7, 


vi. 259 


viii. 7, 8, 


vi. 260 


viii, 8, 


x. 50 


viii. 9, 


x. 57 


viii. 9, 


x. 808 


viii. 9, 


IX. 11 


viii. 9, 10, 23, 


n. 20 


viii. 10, 11, . 


viii. 306 


viii. 10, 11, , 


x. 70 


viii. 10, 11, . 


vn. 505 


viii. 10, 11, , 


v. 325 


viii. 11, 


vi. 350 


viii. 11, 


vn. 270 


viii. 11, 


n. 21 


viii. 11, 


ii. 84 


viii. 11, 


n. 27 


viii. 11, 


iv. 167 


viii. 11, 


v. 349 


viii. 11, 


ii. 208 


viii. 11, \ . 


x. 130 


viii. 11-13, . 


n. 75 


viii. 12, 


iv. 16 


viii. 12-14, . 


iv. 20 


viii. 13, 


iv. 209 


viii. 13, 


vi. 260 


viii. 13, 


vi. 281 


viii. 13, 


vi. 331 


viii. 13, 


vi. 455 


viii. 14, 15, . 


ii. 333 


viii. 15, 


iv. 20 


viii. 15, 


v. 182 


viii. 15, . 


vi. 282 


viii. 15, 


ix. 476 


viii. 15, 


n. 81 


viii. 15, 


ii. 88 


viii. 15, 


vi. 169 


viii. 15, 16, . 


vi. 69 


viii. 16, 


n. 209 


viii. 16, 


n. 207 


viii. 16, 


n. 208 


vm. 16, 


i. 360 


viii. 16, 17, . 


n. 79 


viii. 17, 


ii. 90 


viii. 17, 


iv. 156 


viii. 17, 


v. 84 


viii. 17, 


vi. 164 


viii. 17, 


vi. 185 


viii. 17, 


vi. 253 


viii. 17, 


vi. 428 


viii. 17, 32, . 


ix. 327 


viii. 17, 32, . 


x. 50 


viii. 18, 


x. 95 


viii. 18, : . 


x. 113 


viii. 19, 20, . 



295 

x. 186 
vi. 214 
vi. 159 
vi. 55 
x. 59 
x. 88 
i. 262 
vii. 100 
vii. 125 
vn. 416 
xn. 8 
i. 465 
n. 204 
n. 211 
n. 238 
ii. 392 
n. 400 
vi. 13 
vi. 38 
vi. 457 
vi. 40 
vi. 113 
vii. 207 
in. 245 
vi. 29 
vi. 69 
vi. 412 
vn. 454 
vi. 56 
vi. 21 
37 
48 
56 
vi. 357 
vi. 363 
vi. 386 
vi. 18 
i. 306 
vi. 27 
vm. 362 
viii. 370 
vm. 376 
i. 88 
iv. 497 
iv. 563 
vi. 468 
vn. 335 
ix. 102 
ix. 364 
iv. 243 
iv. 310 
vii. 456 
x. 204 
vn. 102 



VI. 
VI. 
VI. 



zyo 


INDEX OP TEXTS. 


Eom. viii. 19-21, . 


I. 196 


Eom. viii. 32, 


viii. 19, 21, , 


vii. 375 


viii. 32, 


viii. 19-22, 


i. 517 


viii. 32, 


viii. 20, 


iv. 155 


viii. 32, 


viii. 20, 


iv. 567 


vni. 33, 


viii. 20, 21, 


ix. 479 


viii. 34, 


viii. 20-22, . 


iv. 191 


viii. 34-39, 


viii. 20-22, .[.. 


x. 313 


... 

vni. 35, 


viii. 22, 


iv. 78 


viii. 35, 


viii. 23, L .L 


i. 261 


viii. 35-37, 


viii. 23, 


iv. 511 


viii. 37, 


viii. 23, 


vi. 9 


viii. 37, 


viii. 23, , : 


vn. 372 


viii. 37, 


viii. 23, 24, 


iv. 331 


viii. 37-39, 


viii. 24, 


vn. 237 


viii. 37-39, 


viii. 25, 28, 29, 


vii. 71 


viii. 38, 


viii. 26, 


iv. 107 


viii. 39, 


viii. 26, 


vi. 33 


viii. 39, 


viii. 26, 27, ~ f \ 


v. 8 


viii. 39, 


viii. 27, 


iv. 19 


viii. 39, 


viii. 27, 


x. 173 


J 

ix. 


viii. 28, 


ix. 270 


ix. 1, 


viii. 28, 


ix. 279 


ix. 1-3, 


viii. 28, 


ix. 285 


ix. 1-3, 


viii. 28, 29, 


ix. 406 


ix. 1-3, 


viii. 28, 30, , 


ix. 11 


ix. 2, 


viii. 28-30, , 


ix. 242 


ix. 4, 


viii. 29, 


i. 74 


ix. 4, 


viii. .29, 


i. 98 


ix. 4, 


viii. 29, 


iv. 469 


) 

iv. 4, 


viii. 29, 


iv. 470 


ix. 4, 


viii. 29, 


vi. 218 


ix. 4, 


viii. 29, 


vi. 221 


J 

ix. 5, 


viii. 29, 


vi. 421 


ix. 5, 


viii. 29, 


vn. 537 


ix. 5, 


viii. 29, 


ix. 17 


ix. 5, 


viii. 29, 


ix. 86 


ix. 6, 7, 


viii. 29, 


ix. 105 


) > 

ix. 6, 7, 


viii. 29, 


ix. 399 


> 

ix. 7, 8, 


viii. 29, 30, . 


xi. 359 


ix. 11, 


viii. 29, 30, 33, 


ix. 340 


J 

ix. 11, 


viii. 30, 


n. 237 


ix. 11, 


viii. 30, .:,. 


vi. 156 


ix. 11, 


viii. 30, 7;..ii 


vni. 135 


J 

ix. 11, 


viii. 30, ..ii 


ix. 277 


ix. 15, 


viii. 30, T-J.ji 


ix. 310 


ix. 15, 


viii. 31, 7 ..;: 


ix. 234 


ix. 15, 


viii. 32, 


i. 257 


ix. 15, 16, 


viii. 32, TUln 


11. 217 


ix. 16, 


viii. 32, TI..1: 


n. 227 


ix. 16, 


viii. 32, 


ii. 253 


ix. 17, 


viii. 32, 


n. 315 


ix. 17, 


viii. 32, 


iv. 157 


ix. 17, 


viii. 32, 


iv. 426 


ix. 17, 18, 



vn. 194 
vni. 445 
vni. 524 
in. 238 
viii. 133 
1.505 
vi. 91 
n. 441 
ix. 115 
ii. 175 
IT. 165 
vi. 24 
vm. 338 
vi. 180 
vi. 463 
i. 79 
ii. 177 
iv. 370 
ix. 118 
ix. 340 
ii. 159 
vi. 312 
vi. 27 
vi. 317 
vi. 513 
n. 443 
iv. 245 
iv. 253 
iv. 323 
iv. 511 
ix. 101 
ix. 429 
iv. 373 
iv. 387 
iv. 445 
ix. 429 
ix. 16 
ix. 489 
ix. 34 
n. 173 
vi. 226 
ix. 158 
ix. 182 
ix. 240 
n. 156 
n. 319 
ix. 46 
vi. 331 
n. 154 
vm. 195 
n. 268 
vi. 441 
vm. 545 
vm. 109 





INDEX OP TEXTS. 


rv/i rr 






297 


Rom. ix. 21, 
ix. 21, 


VII. 5 

r ix. 483 


Rom. x. 6 


iv. 51 


ix. 22, 
ix. 22, 


r .- ? H.138 
: . < n. 285 


. 6,7, ; 

x 7 


vi. 350 
vm. 335 


ix. 22, 
ix. 22, 


! .- : iv. 191 
| vn. 388 


x. 8-11, . 


vi. 482 
viii. 286 


ix. 22, 


- vm. 88 


r\ 


i. 460 


ix. 22, 
ix. 22, 
ix. 22, 23 
ix. 22, 23 
ix. 22, 23 
ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 


. x. 496 
x. 523 

, ". - : i. 105 
/- n. 185 

, r . - IX. 323 

i. 120 
ii. 275 
. n.303 
Hp n.308 
. iv. 231 
iv. 246 
. iv. 262 
<!..; iv. 270 


x. 9, 

x. 9,io, ; 
x. 12, 
x. 12, 
x. 12, 
x. 12, 
x. 12, 
x.12, 
x. 13-17, . 
x. 14, 
x. 14, 
x. 14, 15, . 
x. 14-18, . 
x 15 


vm. 273 
vii. 484 
n. 182 
ii. 185 
ii. 190, 193 
n. 270 
vm. 425 
ix. 129 
vi. 118 
vn. 548 
vm. 220 
vi. 375 
xi. 359 


ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 


. - : vi. 92 
:? . - vi. 200 
. - ; vi. 498 


-Lt-Jj a 

x. 16, 
*. 16, 
X 17 


v. 5 
m. 368 
vii. 538 

on 


ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 
ix. 23, 


. - vi. 504 
, . vn. 415 

. -. - ; ix. 84 


* J i 

x. 18, 
x. 20, 21, . 
x. 21, 


VI. OO 

xi. 378 
ix. 177 
n. 67 


ix. 23, 
ix. 25, 
ix. 29, 
ix. 30, 
ix. 30, 


t U xii. 6 

- : xi. 287 
r ! i i ix. 6 
-"i -J vi. 307 
vi. 313 


x. 38, 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 1, 


vi. 50 
ii. 302 
ii. 332 
vi. 397 
n. 176 


ix. 30, 


1 vi. 315 


xi. 1-7, . . 


ix. 15 


ix. 30, 
ix. 30, 31, 
ix. 31, 32, 


! . vm. 405 
. . - ix. 177 
. vi. 309 


xi. 2, 
xi. 2, 
xi. 4, 


vii. 536 

IX. Ill 

ix. 5 


ix. 31, 32, 
ix. 31, 32, 


. -. - vm. 487 
. > - x. 427 


xi. 4,5, . . 
xi. 5, 


ix. 181 
ii. 224 


ix. 32, 


. . iv. 298 


xi. 5, 


n. 156 


ix. 33, 


vm. 308 


xi. 5, 


ix. 168 


x. 


r . VI. 15 


xi. 5, 


ix. 227 


x. 


vm. 504 


xi. 5-7, 


vm. 195 


x. 1, 


vi. 244 


xi. 5, 7, . . 


vm. 254 


x. 2, 


vi. 239 


xi. 5, 7, f . . 


ix. 345 


x. 2, 


vi. 357 


xi. 6, 


ii. 228 


x. 2, 


:, /. vm. 546 


xi. 6, ... 


vm. 217 


x. 2,3, 


x. 427 


xi. 6, 


ix. 5 


x. 3, 


-. . in. 236 


xi. 6, . . 


IX. 11 


x. 3, 


. v. 358, 360 


xi. 6, 


ix. 476 


x. 3, 


, . vi. 303 


xi. 7, , . . 


i. 210 


x. 3, 


vi. 310 


xi. 7, , . . 


ii. 420 


x. 3, 


. . vi. 331 


xi. 7, 


ix. 154 


x. 4, 


v. 344 


xi. 8, ... 


vi. 313 


x. 4, 


. r . vi. 248 


xi. 9, 


ix. 236 


x. 4, 


vi 249 


xi. 11, 


i. 199 



298 

Rom. 



XI. 

xi. 
xi. 

XI. 

xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 

Tl. 

xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xii. 



15, 
16, 
16, 
16-22, 

17, 

17, 21, 

20, 22, 

21, 22, 
22, 
22, 
22, 
22, 
23, 

25, 26, 
26, 
26, 
28, 
28, 
28, 
29, 
29, 
30, 

31, 32, 
32, 
32, 
32, 
32, 
33, 
33, 
33, 
33, 
33, 
33, 
34, 
34, 
35, 
35, 
35, 
35, 
35, 
35, 
35, 
35, 

35, 36, 
36, 
36, 
36, 
36, 
36, 

36, 

36, 

1, 



29, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 




I. 315 


Rom. xii. 1, 


iv. 279 


II. 270 


xii. 1, 


vn. 241 


m. 201 


xii. 1, 


vm. 362 


ix. 439 


xii. 1, 


ix. 505 


ix. 457 


xii. 1, 


xi. 17 


ix. 433 


xii. 1, 2, 


vi. 271 


vn. 549 


xii. 1, 2, 


vi. 290 


vi. 398 


xii. 2, 


i. 134 


x. 34 


xii. 2, 


n. 26 


iv. 255 


xii. 2, 


n. 31 


n. 164 


xii. 2, 


vi. 290 


n. 274 


xii. 2, 


vi. 893, 394 


vm. 95 


xii. 2, 


vi. 410 


ix. 188 


xii. 2, 


x. 194 


i. 448 


xii. 2, 


x. 385 


ix. 40 


xii. 2, 3, 


. vii. 139 


i. 249 


xii. 3, 


xi. 322 


i. 520 


xii. 4, 


xi. 298 


ix. 218 


xii. 4, 6, 7, 


xi. 349 


ix. 474 


xii. 4,8, 


xi. 22 


xi. 279 


xii. 6-9, 


xi. 542 


ii. 167 


xii. 7,8, 


iv. 130 


vm. 396 


xii. 8, 


vm. 46 


i. 174 


xii. 8, 


xi. 146 


n. 149 


xii. 8, 


xi. 505 


i. 140 


xii. 9, 


x. 434 


n. 343 


xii. 10, 


xi. 357 


vi. 92 


xii. 11, 


m. 473 


vm. 494 


xii. 14, 


x. 9 


n. 185 


xii. 23, 


vi. 221 


n. 188 


xiii. 


n. 47 


iv. 272 


xiii. 1, 


n. 118 


iv. 273 


xiii. 1, 


iv. 563 


iv. 279 


xiii. 1, 


xi. 12 


ix. 425 


xiii. 1, 8, 


vi. 3 


i. 218 


xiii. 5, 


vi. 238 


vn. 204 


xiii. 5, 


vi. 251 


n. 144 


xiii. 7, 


vi. 498 


n. 223 


xiii. 7, 


ix. 502 


iv. 189 


xiii. 14, 


iv. 159 


vi. 225 


xiii. 14, 


vi. 220 


vii. 23 


xiv. 3, 4, 


i. 277 


vm. 251 


xiv. 4, 


xi. 81 


ix. 95 


xiv. 6, 


ix. 502 


ix. 209 


xiv. 6-8, 


xi. 474 


ix. 93 


xiv. 7, 


vm. 326 


i. 94 


xiv. 7, 8, 


vi. 153 


iv. 189 


xiv. 7, 8, 


vii. 154 


vi. 119 


xiv. 8, 


vi. 408 


vi. 498 


xiv. 8, 


vii. 403 


vi. 503 


xiv. 9, 


i. 458 


VII. 11 


xiv. 9, 


vi. 13 


ix. 94 


xiv. 10, 


vi. 378 


n. 187 


xiv. 10, 


xi. 484 



INDEX OP TEXTS. 



299 



Rom. xiv. 12 
xiv. 12, 
xiv. 14, 
xiv. 17, 
xiv. 17, 
xiv. 17, 
xiv. 1*7, 
xiv. 22, 
xiv. 22, 

XV. 1, 


in. 272 
x. 469 
ix. 475 
i. 19 
vi. 316 
vni. 303 
xi. 45 
x. 160 
xi. 177 
i. 275 


Rom. xvi. 20, 
xvi. 25, 
xvi. 25, 
xvi. 25, 27, 
xvi. 25-27, 
xvi. 25-34, . 
xvi. 26, 
xvi. 27, 
xvi. 27, 
1 Cor. i. 2, 


i. 497 
iv. 280 
vni. 310 
iv. 373 
ix. 208 
vi. 414 
ix. 372 
ii. 271 
ii. 305 

T fi 


xv. 1,2, 
xv. 1-4, 
xv. 3, 


xi. 481 
xi. 473 
iv. 148 


> 

i. 2, 

i. 2, 
i. 5, 


! O 

i. 11 

i. 37 
iv. 249 


xv. 3 


v. 195 


i. 5, 


iv. 306 


xv. 5, 


xi. 292 


i. 5-7, 


i. 285 


xv. 7, 


i. 278 


i. 7-20, . 


vi. 168 


xv. 7, 


i. 320 


i. 8, 


vn. 152 


xv. 7, 


iv. 497 


i. 9, 


i. 96 


xv. 7, 


vn. 454 


i. 9, 


ix. 306 


xv. 7, 


ix. 321 


i. 18, 


ii. 344 


xv. 7, 


ix. 365 


i. 18, 19, . 


vm. 495 


xv. 7, 


xi. 334 


i. 18-26, . 


i. 421 


xv. 8, 


n. 393 


i. 19, 


iv. 227 


xv. 8, 


iv. 131 


i. 19, 


iv. 236 


xv. 8, 


iv. 560 


i. 19, 


iv. 278 


xv. 8, 9, 


ii. 229 


i. 21, 


i. 145 


xv. 9, 


vni. 59 


i. 21, 


i. 203 


xv. 9-13, 


vni. 540 


i. 21, 


i. 388 


xv. 10, 


. vm. 290 


i. 21, 


vi. 275 


xv. 13, 


i. 234 


i. 21, 


vii. 91 


xv. 13, 


i. 306 


i. 21, 


vm. 553 


xv. 13, 


vi. 24 


i. 21, 25, . 


in. 8 


xv. 13, 


vi. 49 


i. 21, 25, . 


in. 210 


xv. 13, 


vi. 69 


i. 23, 


iv. 448 


xv. 13, 


vi. 310 


i. 24, 


1.437 


xv. 13, 


vi. 316 


i. 24, 


iv. 230 


xv. 13, 


vii. 343 


i. 24, 


iv. 233 


xv. 15, 


vn. 99 


i. 24, 


iv. 262 


xv. 15, 16, 


vi. 10 


i. 24, 


iv. 264 


xv. 16, 


xi. 339 


i. 24, 


iv. 267 


xv. 18, 19, 


vi. 48 


i. 24, 


iv. 293 


xv. 20, 


m. 473 


i. 24, 


iv. 464 


xv. 26, 27, 


xi. 514 


i. 24, 


iv. 588 


xv. 29, 


i. 20 


i. 24, 30, . 


iv. 418 


xv. 29, 


i. 45 


i. 24, 30, . 


iv. 556 


xv. 29, 


iv. 254 


i. 25, 


i. 333 


xv. 30, 


iv. 256 


i. 26, 


vm. 263 


xv. 30, 


vi. 39 


i. 26, 27, . 


ix. 150 


xvi. 1, 


xr. 64 


i. 26, 27, , 


ix. 168 


xvi. 1,5, 


xi. 80 


i. 26, 27, . 


x. 141 


xvi. 3, 


xr. 322 


i. 28, 


vii. 17 


xvi. 7, 


i. 222 


i. 28-30,- . 


vi. 449 


xvi. 7, 


vi. 414 


i. 28-31, . 


ix. 125 


xvi. 17, 


ix. 153 


i. 29, 


vi. 160 



300 
1 Cor. 



i. 29-31, . 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 

i.30, 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 

i. 30, 31, . 

ii. 2, 

ii. 2, 

ii. 2, 

ii. 2, 

ii. 4, 

ii. 4, 9, 16, . 

ii. 5. 



ii. 


5, 


ii. 


5, 


ii. 


5-8, 


ii. 


6, 


ii. 


6, 


ii. 


7, 


ii. 


7, 


ii. 


7, 


ii. 


7, 


ii. 


7. 


ii. 


7, 


ii. 


7, 


ii. 


7, 


ii. 


7, 


ii. 


7-10, 


ii. 


7,10, 


ii. 


7-11, 


ii. 


8, 


ii. 


8, 


ii. 


8, 


ii. 


8, 


ii. 


8, 


ii. 


8, 


ii. 


8, 


ii. 


8, 


ii. 


8, 


ii. 


9, 


ii. 


9, 


ii. 


9, 


ii. 


9, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 


vi. 183 1 Cor. ii. 9, 


1.131 


ii. 9, 


i. 77 


ii. 9, 


i. 85 


ii. 9,10, 


i. 135 


ii. 9,10, 


1.150 


ii. 9-12, 


n. 8 


ii. 9-12, 


ii. 417 


ii. 10, 


ii. 421 


ii. 10, 


in. 328 


ii. 10, 


iv. 536 


ii. 10, 


v. 347 


ii. 10, 11, 


vi. 36 


ii. 10, 11, 


vin. 34 


ii. 11, 


vni. 466 


ii. 11, 


x. 47 


ii. 11, 


n. 185 


ii. 11, 


i. 386 


ii. 11, 


iv. 17 


ii. 11, 


iv. 299 


ii. 11, 12, 


vii. 312 


ii. 12, 


vi. 16 


ii. 12, 


vin. 260 


ii. 12, 


ii. 344 


ii. 12, 


iv. 314 


ii. 12, 


vm. 485 


ii. 12, 


vm. 495 


ii. 12, 


1.552 


ii. 12, 


xn. 47 


ii. 12, 


i. 131 


ii. 12, 


i. 139 


ii. 12, 


i. 141 


ii. 12, 14, 


iv. 225 


ii. 12, 16, 


iv. 229 


ii. 13, 


iv. 235 


ii. 13, 14, 


iv. 270 


ii. 14, 


iv. 271 


ii. 14, 


iv. 295 


ii. 14, 


iv. 281 


ii. 14, 


vi. 38 


ii. 14, 


vn. 59 


ii. 14, 15, 


i. 139 


ii. 14, 15, 


i. 318 


ii. 14, 15, 


i. 327 


ii. 15, 


iv. 165 


ii. 15, 


iv. 236 


ii. 16, 


iv. 245 


ii. 16, 


iv. 260 


ii 16, 


iv. 486 


iii. 1 T 


iv. 513 


iii. 1, 


i. 379 


iii. 1, 


ii. 169 


iii. 3, 


ii. 415 


iii. 3, 


iv. 283 


iii. 3. 



vi. 166 

vi. 239 

vn. 121 

i. 324 

iv. 287 

x. 145 

x. 163 

in. 383 

iv 238 

vi. 28 

vn. 61 

i. 246 

iv. 355 

i 305 

in. 241 

m 273 

iv. 302 

iv. 366 

vi. 52 

iv. 369 

i. 289 

i. 307 

n. 27 

ii. 29 

n. 222 

ii. 228 

iv. 101 

iv. 303 

iv. 305 

vi. 59 

x. 119 

x. 150 

vi. 492 

vn. 116 

i. 60 

i. 300 

i. 374 

i. 417 

iv. 238 

x. 190 

i. 361 

i. 385 

vi. 167 

iv. 239 

x. 41 

iv. 19 

iv. 238 

iv. 434 

in. 483 

vn. 476 

vii. 494 

ii. 84 

ii. 119 

m. 484 



INDEX OP TEXTS 



301 



1 Cor. iii. 6, 
iii. 6-9, 
iii. 7, 
iii. 8, 
iii. 8, 
iii. 10, 
iii. 10, 
iii. 11, 
iii. 11, 


" . . m. 438 
vi. 400 
m. 506 
in. 465 
vn. 436 
... . i. 5 
iv. 307 
. - iv. 405 
. . vin. 334 


1 Cor. v. 12, 
vi. 
vi. 2, 
vi. 2, 3, 
vi. 3, 
vi. 7, 
vi. 8, 
vi. 9, 10, 
vL 9-11, 


m. 26 
m. 207 
. v. 325, 333 
1.525 
1.497 
.. ix. 229 
vii. 539 
.. vi. 480 
x. 247 


iii. 12, 


iv. 241 


vi. 11, 


. n. 199 


iii. 13, 


iv. 308 


vi. 11, 


. n. 354 


iii. 13, 


vii. 551 


vi. 11, 


in. 5 


iii. 13, 


x. 148 


vi. 11, 


. vi. 21 


iii. 16, 


vi. 9 


vi. 11, 


vi. 62 


iii. 16, 


, vi. 50 


vi. 11, 


vi. 75 


iii. 16, 


vi. 64 


vi. 11, 


vi. 79 


iii. 16, 17, 


vi. 71 


vi. 11, 


vni. 137 


iii. 21, 


m. 16 


vi. 13, 14, 


i. 58 


iii. 22, 


i. 78 


vi. 13, 14, 


. . vii. 118 


iii. 22, 


n. 421 


vi. 14-19, 


vii. 127 


iii. 22, 


iv. 310 


vi. 17, 


iv. 381 


iii. 22, 23, 


iv. 243 


vi. 17, 


vi. 50 


iii. 23, 


iv. 337 


vi. 19, 


vi. 59 


iii. 23, 


iv. 472 


vi. 19, 


vi. 63 


iv. 1,2, 


iv. 294 


vi. 19, 


vm. 165 


iv. 3, 


m. 482 


vi. 19, 20, 


n. 400 


iv. 3, 


vi. 492 


vi. 20, 


m. 14 


iv. 4, 


vii. 149 


vi. 20, 


m. 217 


iv. 5, 


i. 525 


vi. 20, 


v. 73 


iv. 5, 


m. 275 


vii. 2, 


m. 270 


iv. 5, 


m. 525 


vii. 5, 


m. 264 


iv. 5, 


iv. 565 


vii. 7, 


in. 498 


iv. 5, 


v. 336 


vn. 14, 


ix. 439 


iv. 8, 


n. 186 


vii. 16, 


vi. 96 


iv. 8, 


m. 293 


vii. 16, 


vi. 517 


iv. 8, 


m. 483 


vii. 17, 


xi. 107 


iv. 8, 


vni. 450 


vii. 21, 22 7 


i. 62 


iv. 8,9, 


n. 447 


vii. 27, 29, 


vn. 573 


iv. 9, 


n. 435 


vii. 29, 


n. 66 


iv. 9, 


in. 167 


vii. 30, 31, 


x. 292 


iv. 9, 


vi. 99 


vii. 31, 


n. 25 


iv. 15, 


i. 17 


vii. 31, 


n. 26 


iv. 15, 17, 


vi. 87 


vii. 31, 


x. 119 


iv. 20, 


iv. 255 


vii. 37, 


n. 316 


iv. 21, 


i. 5 


viii. 1, 2, 


iv. 296 


v. 3-5, 


xi. 25 


viii. 2, 


i. 284 


v. 4,5, 


m. 258 


viii. 4, 5, 


; vn. 21 


v. 5, 


i. 278 


viii. 4, 7, 


x. 262 


v. 7, 


ix. 69 


viii. 5, 


i. 188 


v. 6,7, 


x. 50 


viii. 5, 


i. 191 


v. 6,7, 


x. 280 


viii. 5, 


i. 405 


v. 7, 


x. 70 


viii. 5, 


iv. 350 


v. 10, 11, 


iv. 185 


viii. 5, 


iv. 524 


v. 12, 


i. 539 


viii. 6, 


i. 35 



302 

1 Cor. viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
viii. 
vni. 
viii. 
viii. 

ix. 

ix. 

ix. 

ix. 

ix. 

ix. 

ix. 

ix. 

ix. 

ix. 

x. 

x. 

x. 

x. 

x. 

x. 

x. 

x. 



6, 

6, 

6, 

6, 

6, 

6, 

6, 

6, 

6, 

9, 

8, 9, 

1, 

7, 

7, 
11, 

14, 26, 
16, 

16, 17, 
24-27, 
25, 
27, 

1,2, 

1-11, 

1-12, 

1-13, 

5-13, 

9, 

9, 



x.13, 
x. 13, 
x. 13, 
x. 13, 
x.13, 
x. 14, 15, 
x. 16, 
x. 16, 
x. 17, 
x. 17, 
x. 17, 
x. 20, 
x. 22, 
x. 31, 
x. 31, 
xi. 2, 22, 

2-22, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

7, 



x. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 
xi. 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 




I. 39 


1 Cor. xi. 7, 


ii. 90 


I. 107 


xi. 7, 


ii. 420 


iv. 472 


xi. 7, 


iv. 316 


iv. 520 


xi. 7,8, . 


iv. 504 


iv. 533 


xi. 7,8, . 


vi. 503 


iv. 545 


xi. 9, 


iv. 475 


vii. 3 


xi. 10, 


i. 162 


ix. 95 


xi. 16, 


ix. 452 


ix. 99 


xi. 16, 


xi. 24 


n. 316 


xi. 20, 


i. 540 


iv. 566 


xi. 20, 


ii. 390 


i. 10 


xi. 24, 


i. 559 


m. 443 


xi. 24, 25, 


vii. 307 


m. 455 


xi. 26, 


iv. 18 


ii. 82 


xi. 27, 


vii. 317 


viii. 570 


xi. 28, 


vin. 346 


vi. 118 


xii. 


n. 64 


vn. 215 


xii. 


in. 287 


vi. 327 


xii. 1, 


i. 386 


vm. 248 


xii. 1-3, 


vi. 60 


vn. 390 


xii. 1,3, -.. 


x. 146 


n. 459 


xii. 2, , 


n. 27 


iv. 14 


xii. 2, 


n. 55 


xi. 37 


xii. 2, 


m. 259 


vii. 306 


xii. 2, 


in. 266 


vn. 311 


xii. 3, 


vi. 13 


m. 245 


xii. 3, 


vm. 326 


iv. 358 


xii. 3-8, 


vi. 31 


iv. 408 


xii. 4, 


i. 21 


vi. 327 


xii. 4, 


m. 465 


m. 310 


xii. 4, 5, . 


in. 188 


in. 342 


xii. 4, 5, 


m. 263 


in. 423 


xii. 4-6, 


i. 8 


ix. 244 


xii. 4-6, . . 


iv. 360 


ix. 253 


xii. 4, 7, 


vi. 15 


x. 262 


xii. 6, 


i. 557 


i. 17 


xii. 6-11, . 


vi. 432 


n. 385 


xii. 7, 


i. 536 


i. 559 


xii. 7, 


in. 463 


i. 560 


xii. 7, 


vi. 37 


ii. 389 


xii. 8, 


x. 197 


in. 47 


xii. 8-10, 28, 


xi. 35 


x. 528 


xii. 11, 


1.400 


i. 220 


xii. 11, 


in. 5 


iv. 383 


xii. 11, 


vi. 17 


in. 136 


xii. 11, 


vi. 32 


xi. 62 


xii. 11, .f k . 


vn. 497 


i. 98 


xii. 12, ,\ . 


i. 546 


i. 167 


xii. 12, 


i. 550 


i. 177 


xii. 12, t ;i . 


i. 562 


i. 194 


xii. 12, 


i. 564 


1.545 


xii. 12, 


vi. 220 


iv. 232 


xii. 12, 25, 


i. 560 


i. 99 


xii. 12, 26, . 


iv. 381 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



303 



1 Cor. xii. 13, 
xii. 13, 
xii. 13, 
xii. 15, 
xii. 21, 
xii. 26, 
xii. 27, 
xii. 27, 
xii. 28, 
xii. 28, 
xii. 31, 


t . vi. 71 
vii. 308 
vii. 495 
i. 547 
i. 563 
iv. 123 
i. 539 
vi. 13 
i. 7 
i. 537 
i. 59 


1 Cor. xv. 14, 17, . 
xv. 14, 49, . 
xv. 15, 
xv. 17, 
xv. 17, 
xv. 17, 
xv. 17, 
xv. 19, 
xv. 19, 
xv. 20, 
xv. 20, 


vi. 165 
vi. 255 
vn. 40 
1.459 
iv. 13 
iv. 26 
vi. 81 
i. 500 
vi. 474 
i. 457 
n. 254 


xii. 31, 
xiii. 1-3, 


n. 288 
i. 59 


xv. 20, 
xv. 20-22, 


n. 423 
i. 435 


xiii. 1-3, 


ix. 178 


xv. 20-23, 


iv. 539 


xiii. 3, 
xiii. 5, 
xiii. 9, 10, 
xiii. 10, 


x. 411 
vn. 211 
vii. 453 
iv. 236 


xv. 20-23, . 
xv. 22, 
xv. 23, 
xv. 23, 


ix. 300 
ii. 130 
n. 252 
vi. 399 


xiii. 10, 


iv. 280 


xv. 24, 


i. 483 


xiii. 12, 


iv. 234 


xv. 24, 


i. 494 


xiii. 12, 


iv. 337 


xv. 24, 


n. 36 


xiii. 12, 


vi. 407 


xv. 24, 


m. 27 


xiii. 12, 


vn. 56 


xv. 24, 


v. 103 


xiii. 12, 


vii. 418 


xv. 24, 


v. 285 


xiii. 12, 


vii. 466 


xv. 24, 25, . 


1.515 


xiv. 1, 


i. 59 


xv. 24, 25, . 


i. 517 


xiv. 7, 8, 


viii. 74 


xv. 24, 25, . 


xn. 93 


xiv. 9, 


in. 409 


xv. 24-28, . 


i. 501 


xiv. 16, 
xiv. 16, 


m. 16 
m. 218 


xv. 24-28, 
xv. 27, 


ix. 332 
i. 516 


xiv. 23, 


i. 539 


xv. 27, 


1.530 


xiv. 23, 


i. 540 


xv. 28, 


i. 165 


xiv. 24, 25, 


vi. 360 


xv. 28, 


i. 504 


xiv. 24, 25, 


x. 255 


xv. 28, 


i. 557 


xiv. 25, 


iv. 253 


xv. 28, 


n. 400 


xiv. 33, 


i. 12 


xv. 28, 


iv. 383 


xiv. 33, 37, 


xi. 32 


xv. 28, 


v. 11 


xiv. 37, 38, 


iv. 172 


xv. 32, 


x. 237 


XV. 


n. 394 


xv. 39-44, . 


vi. 410 


XV. 1-11, 


i. 451 


xv. 40, 41, 43, 


vn. 122 


xv. 2, 


11. 250 


xv. 41, 


iv. 511 


xv. 3, 


i. 454 


xv. 41, 


vn. 140 


xv. 8, 


i. 9 


xv. 44, 


i. 375 


xv. 8, 


vi. 414 


xv. 44, ^ 


iv. 144 


xv. 9, 


i. 7 


xv. 44, 45, 


vm. 386 


xv. 9, 


vi. 114 


xv. 44-49, 


vn. 76 


xv. 9, 10, 


. vm. 202 


xv. 44-52, . 


vi. 194 


xv. 10, 


i. 6 


xv. 45, 


i. 74 


xv. 10, 


n. 230 


xv. 45, 


i. 461 


xv. 10, 


n. 317 


xv. 45, 


n. 128 


xv. 10, 


m. 465 


xv. 45, 


n. 215 


XV. 11, 


i. 25 


xv. 45, 


n. 415 


XV. 11, 


iv. 15 


xv. 45, . 


iv. 543 


xv. 14, 


vi. 118 


xv. 45, . 


vi. 457 



INDEX OP TEXTS. 



xv. 45, 


x. 16 


2 Cor. i. 12, 


n. 230 


xv. 45, 46, . 


vm. 176 


i. 12, 


vi. 297 


xv. 45-48, 


vi. 163 


i. 12, 


vi. 312 


xv. 45-50, 


vm. 181 


i. 12, 


vi. 317 


xv. 46, 


i. 153 


i. 12, 


vn. 145 


xv. 46, ;, 


i. 199 


i. 13,18, .fife 


i. 5 


xv. 46, t 


ii. 263 


i. 13, 18, . . 


i. 6 


xv. 46, 


vii. 10 


i. 17, . i,- 


i. 211 


xv. 46-49, . 


vi. 75 


i. 17, ,S 


iv. 212 


xv. 47, 


i, 57 


i. 18, 20, . -.-S. 


vm. 124 


xv. 47, 


i. 70 


i. 19, 20, . 


iv. 557 


xv. 47, 


i. 194 


i. 19, 20, 


ix. 422 


xv. 47, 


i. 454 


i. 20, -t. 


i. 224 


xv. 47, 


ii. 252 


i. 20, r. 


i. 244 


xv. 47, . 


iv. 31 


i. 20, 


iv. 14 


xv. 47, 48, . 


i. 153 


i. 20, 


iv. 308 


xv. 47, 48, . 


ii. 128 


i. 20, 


vm. 427 


xv. 47, 48, . 


vii. 49 


i. 20, 


ix. 152 


xv. 47-49, 


x. 21 


i. 20, 


ix. 341 


xv. 47-49, . 


x. 48 


i. 20, 22, ..-: 


vi. 15 


xv. 48, 


n. 89 


i. 21, 


i. 232 


xv. 48, 


n. 262 


i. 21, /it 


i. 243 


xv. 49, 


i. 96 


i. 21, 22, . 


i. 237 


xv. 49, 


1.193 


i. 21,22, . 


i. 241 


xv. 49, 


x. 62 


i. 21,22, . 


i. 259 


xv. 50, 


iv. 140 


i. 21, 22, .. 


vi. 68 


xv. 50, 


iv. 246 


i. 22, 


i. 248 


xv. 50, 


vn. 419 


ii. 7, 


in. 248 


xv. 51, 


i. 139 


ii. 7, 


in. 259 


xv. 51, 


vii. 270 


ii. 7, 


m. 270 


xv. 55, 


i. 435 


ii. 7, 


in. 279 


xv. 55, 


x. 51 


ii. 7, .2 : 


m. 296 


xv. 55-57, 


iv. 26 


ii. 7, 


in. 318 


xv. 55-57, 


iv. 30 


ii. 7, 


xi. 46 


xv. 56, 


n. 11 


ii. 7,11, . 


vi. 388 


xv. 56, 


n. 14 


ii. 11, 


m. 262 


xv. 56, 


m. 301 


ii. 14, 


HI. 34 


xv. 57, 


i. 353 


ii. 14, 


v. 309 


xv. 58, 


i. 246 


ii. 15, 


vi. 65 


xv. 58, > 


i. 326 


ii. 17, v 


vi. 397 


xvi. 15, 


i. 222 


iii. 


ii. 87 


xvi. 21, 23, . 


i. 14 


iii. 3, 


i. 230 


. 1, 


i. 11 


iii. 3, 


i. 306 


. 1,10, ; 


i. 7 


iii. 3, 


i. 366 


. 3, 


i. 46 


iii. 3, 


iv. 242 


.3, 


n. 179 


iii. 3, 


iv. 308 


. 3, 


m. 302 


iii. 3, . . . . 


iv. 366 


3, 


m. 328 


iii. 3, ,Q. 


vi. 198 


. 3, 


vm. 30 


iii. 3-6, 


vi. 32 


. 3, 


vm. 129 


iii. 4, 


iv. 320 


. 3, 


ix. 251 


iii. 5, 


i. 302 


- 4, 


m. 311 


iii. 5, 


vn. 497 


4, 


vi. 443 


iii. 5, 


x. 89 


i. 4,5, 


m. 289 


iii. 6, 


vi. 16 





INDEX OP TEXTS. 


2 Cor. iii. 6, 7, 


iv. 326 2 Cor. iv. fi 


iii. 6-8 3 


vi. 53 


~> 

iv. 6, 


iii. 7, 


i. 315 


iv. 6 


iii. 7, 


vi. 292 


1 

iv. 6, 


iii. 7,8, 


vii. 108 


> 

IV fi 


iii. 7,10, 


vm. 477 


iV. U, 

iv. 6, 


iii. 8, 


n. 81 


iv. 6, 


iii. 9, 


n. 288 


iv 6 


iii. 9, 10, 


i. 315 


IV. U, 

iv. 6, 


iii. 10, 


i. 333 


iv. 6, 


iii. 10, 


iv. 250 


J 

iv. 6, 


iii. 10, 


vii. 443 


iv. 6, 


iii. 13, 


iv. 282 


9 

iv. 6, 


iii. 14, 


i. 33 


iv. 6 


iii. 14-16, 


x. 149 


u j 
iv. 6, 


iii. 16, 


i. 301 


iv. 6 


iii. 17, 


n. 394 


v > 

iv. 6, 7 


iii. 17, 18, 


vn. 97 


\s } I , 

iv. 8 


iii. 18, 


i. 284 


> 
iv. 11, 


iii. 18, 


n. 412 


iv. 11, 13, 


iii. 18, 


m. 505 


? J 

iv. 13, 


iii. 18, 


iv. 250 


iv. 13, 


iii. 18, 


iv. 253 


iv. 13, 


iii. 18, 


iv. 265 


iv. 13, 


iii. 18, 


iv. 319 


J 

iv. 14, 


iii. 18, 


iv. 323 


iv. 14, 


iii. 18, 


iv. 508 


iv. 15, 


iii. 18, 


iv. 511 


iv. 16-18, 


iii. 18, 


v. 172 


iv. 17, 


iii. 18, 


. v. 538, 539 


iv. 17, 


iii. 18, 


vi. 17 


iv. 17, 


in. 18, 


vi. 217 


iv. 17, 18, 


iii. 18, 


vi. 390 


iv. 18, 


iii. 18, 


vn. 58 


v. 


iii. 18, 


vm. 269 


V. 1, 


iii. 18, 


vni. 348 


V. 1, 


iii. 18, 


vm. 468 


V. 1, 


iv. 1-7, 


iv. 306 


V. 1, 


iv. 2, 


vii. 290 


V. 1, 


iv 3, 


v. 520 


V. 1, 


iv. 4, 


i. 489 


V. 1, 


iv. 4, 


in. 47 


v. 1,2, 


iv. 4, 


m. 266 


v. 1-4, 


iv. 4, 


iv. 246 


v. 1-5, 


iv. 4, 


iv. 249 


v. 2, 3, 


iv. 4, 


iv. 316 


v. 2,3, 


iv. 4, 


iv. 318 


v. 3, 


iv. 4, 


iv. 319 


v. 3, 


iv. 4, 


iv. 343 


v. 3, 


iv. 4, 6, 


iv. 265 


v. 4, 


iv. 4, 6, 


iv. 321 


v. 4, 


iv. 5, 


vi. 37 


v. 5, 


iv. 6, 


i. 140 


v. 5, 


iv. 6, 


i. 287 


v. 5, 


VOL. XII. 





305 

i. 301 
i. 380 
i. 551 
in. 249 
in. 302 
iv. 232 
iv. 251 
iv. 2(53 
iv. 265 
iv. 266 
iv. 324 
vi. 449 
vn. 497 
vn. 500 
vm. 76 
vm. 193 
iv. 315 
vn. 399 
n. 210 
vm. 450 
i. 26 
n. 59 
vi. 19 
vm. 13 
n. 210 
n. 265 
i. 141 
vi. 485 
i. 315 
i. 317 
n. 431 
vii. 356 
i. 326 
n. 91 
i. 350 
i. 367 
i. 371 
n. 261 
n. 262 
n. 443 
vn. 107 
ix. 319 
vn. 356 
vn. 343 
vn. 371 
x. 48 
vi. 157 
vn. 379 
vn. 383 
vn. 58 
vn. 391 
i. 246 
1.253 
i. 257 



306 
2 Cor. 



V. 
T. 

V. 

V. 

v. 

V. 
V. 
V. 
V. 
V. 
V. 
V. 



5, 
5, 

5,6, 

5-8, 
6, 
6, 
6,7, 



7, 

9, 

.v. 11, 14, 
v. 14, 
v. 14, 
v. 15, 
v. 15, 
v. 15, 
v. 16, 
v. 16, 
v. 16, 
v. 16, 17, 
v. 16, 17, 
v. 16, 17, 
v. 16, 17, 
v. 17, 
v. 17, 
v. 17, 
v. 17, 
v. 17, 
v. 17, 
v. 17, 
v. 17, 
v. 17, 
v. 18, 
v. 18, 
v. 18, 
v. 18, 
v. 18, 19, 
v. 18-20, 
v. 18, 21, 
v. 19, 
v. 19, 
v. 19, 
v. 19, 
v. 19, 20, 
v. 19, 20, 
v. 20, 
v. 20, 
v. 20, 
v. 21, 
v. 21, 
v. 21, 
v. 21, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 


i. 367 


2 Cor. v. 21, 


vi. 200 


vi. 2, 


vii. 411 


vi. 4, 


xii. 3 


vi. 6, 


i. 259 


vi. 10, 


vn. 57 


vi. 10, 


ii. 261 


vi. 13, 14, 


vii. 458 


vi. 14, 


vii. 444 


vi. 15, 


m. 239 


vi. 16, 


m. 301 


vi. 16, 


vn. 389 


vi. 16, 


vi. 515 


vi. 18, 


i. 182 


vii. 1, 


vi. 143 


vii. 1, 


ii. 100 


vii. 9, 


iv. 338 


vii. 9, 


vm. 326 


vii. 9, 10, 


n. 82 


vii. 9, 10, 


in. 481 


vii. 10, 11, 


vm. 389 


vii. 11, 


i. 376 


vii. 11, 


i. 385 


vii. 15, 


vm. 219 


viii. 1, 


vm. 259 


viii. 1, 


i. 357 


viii. 2, 


i. 359 


viii. 2, 


i. 520 


viii. 5, 


iv. 296 


viii. 5, 


vi. 215 


viii. 5, 


vi. 428 


viii. 7, 


vm. 270 


viii. 9, 


ix. 310 


viii. 9, 


x. 127 


viii. 9, 


i. 94 


viii. 9, 


ii. 144 


viii. 9, 


v. 481 


viii. 9, 


vi. 145 


viii. 9, 


v. 8 


viii. 9, 


vi. 117 


viii. 9, 


vm. 133 


viii. 9, 


ii. 316 


viii. 10, 


iv. 29 


viii. 12, 


iv. 222 


viii. 12, 


vi. 376 


viii. 23, 


n. 374 


viii. 23, 


VTII. 410 


viii. 23, 


i. 18 


viii. 23, 


n. 362 


viii. 23, 


iv. 20 


viii. 24, 


ii. 332 


viii. 24, 


iv. 275 


ix. 5, 6, 


v. 181 


ix. 8, 


v. 348 


ix. 8, 



vm. 37 
ii. 268 
ii. 456 
n. 277 
iv. 311 

vm. 402 
ix. 147 
vi. 156 
ii. 67 
iv. 257 

vn. 275 
ix. 122 

vn. 488 
ii. 103 
in. 477 
vi. 296 
vi. 437 
vi. 140 

vii. 406 

x. 356 

m. 270 

v. 325 

vm. 531 
n. 220 
n. 230 
n. 288 
ii. 464 
i. 39 
vi. 131 

vm. 326 
ii. 432 
i. 314 
n. 320 
ii. 329 
in. 218 
m. 225 
iv. 243 
iv. 310 
iv. 414 
vi. 26 
ix. 147 
vi. 396 
iv. 190 

vm. 456 

i. 99 

n. 420 

iv. 134 

iv. 505 

ix. 421 

n. 268 

n. 284 

i. 45 

i. 128 

n. 220 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



307 



2 Cor. 



ix. 8, 


n. 455 


2 Cor. xiii. 4, i 


1.475 


x. 3, 


n. 92 


xiii. 4, 


iv. 268 


x. 3, 


in. 251 


xiii. 4, * 


vi. 26 


x. 4, 


i. 362 


xiii. 4, . 


ix. 147 


x. 4, u 


i. 384 


xiii. 5, . . 


n. 392 


x. 4, 


ii. 113 


xiii. 5, 


vi. 221 


x. 4, 


m. 281 


xiii. 7, . . 


vii. 157 


x. 4, 


iv. 80 


xiii. 8, . 4 . 


x. 272 


x. 4,5, . 


x. 251 


xiii. 10, . . . 


xi. 78 


x. 4,5, . 


x. 377 


xiii. 14, 


i. 22 


x. 4-6, 


x. 124 


xiii. 14, 


vi. 40 


x. 4-6, 


xi. 14 


xiii. 14, 


vi. 53 


x. 4-6, 


xi. 45 


xiii. 14, 


vm. 45 


x. 5, 


m. 251 


Gal. i. 1, 


i. 8 


x. 5, 


vi. 260 


i. 1, 


i. 345 


x. 5, 


vi. 369 


i. 1, 


in. 187 


x. 5, 


vn. 229 


i. 1, 


iv. 514 


x. 5, 


vii. 327 


i. 2, 


1.538 


x. 6, 


vn. 304 


i. 3, 


i. 21 


x. 7, 


m. 335 


i. 4, 


i. 511 


x. 8, 


i. 5 


i. 4, 


i. 520 


x. 12, 


x. 390 


i. 4, 


ii. 26 


x. 17, 


n. 431 


i. 4, 


n. 271 


xi. 2, 4, 


iv. 448 


i. 4, 


iv. 435 


xi. 3, 


n. 55 


i. 4, G, 


ix. 349 


xi. 3, 


m. 262 


i. 5, 


iv. 373 


xi. 3, 4, 


ix. 204 


i. 6, 


n. 229 


xi. 4, 


iv. 406 


i. 6, 


n. 320 


xi. 21, 


vi. 496 


i. 6, 


in. 487 


xi. 28, 


i. 5 


i. 6, 


iv. 452 


xi. 30, 


iv. HI 


i. 6-8, 


vm. 314 


7 

xii. 


vm. 574 


i. 8, 


i. 158 


xii. 1, 


i. 457 


i. 8, 


i. 496 


xii. 2, 


i. 10 


i. 9, 


i. 444 


xii. 2, 


i. 326 


i. 11, 12 . 


iv. 108 


xii. 2, 


in. 445 


i. 12, 


i. 1 


xii. 2-5, 


iv. 535 


i. 12, 


i. 9 


xii. 2, 5, 11, . 


vi. 490 


i. 12, 16, . 


iv. 334 


* 7 / 

xii. 5, 


IV. HI 


i. 13, 


v. 477 


xii. 7, 


n. 40 


i. 13-16, . 


vi. 421 


xii. 7, 
xii. 7, 


m. 264 
m. 286 


i. 14, 
i. 14, 


iv. 270 
iv. 229 


xii. 7, 


m. 306 


i. 15, 


i. 8 


xii. 7, 


ix. 405 


i. 15, 


n. 229 


xii. 8 . 


i. 3 


i. 15, 


x. 81 


xii. 9, 
xii. 9, 
xii. 9, 
xii. 9, 
xii. 10, . . 
xii. 10, 
xii. 15, 
xiii. 
xiii. 4, 


1.561 
n. 226 
m. 346 
vi. 346 
in. 450 
iv. 446 
vi. 122 
n. 376 
i. 434 


i. 15, 16, . 
i. 15, 16, . 
i. 16, 
i. 17, 
i. 17-19, . 

ii, 5, -rg 
ii. 11, .< 

ii. 14, 16, . 
ii. 15, . ;: 


vi. 220 
vm. 155 
n. 411 
vm. 201 
xi. 30 
iv. 256 
i. 5 
vm. 233 
ii. 71 



308 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 




Gal. ii. 15, 16, . 


VIII. 220 


Gal. iii. 21, 


vi. 261 


ii. 16, 


vin. 153 


iii. 22, 


vm. 288 


ii. 16, 


vm. 277 


iii. 22, 


vm. 494 


ii. 16, .;. . 


vm. 440 


iii. 22, . -. 


x. 127 


ii. 19, ,& 


i. 444 


iii. 23, 24, . 


vm. 477 


ii. 19, ;-,. 


iv. 153 


iii. 24, 


vm. 500 


ii. 19, 


iv. 346 


iii. 27,29, . 


vii. 381 


ii. 19, 20, . 


i. 442 


iii. 29, 


ix. 428 


ii. 19, 20, . 


vi. 3SO 


iv. 1, 


iv. 52^ 


ii. 20, 


i. 446 


iv. 1, 


v. 399 


ii. 20, 


n. 148 


iv. 1,2, 


ix. 328 


ii. 20, 


n. 208 


iv. 1-3, ^. 


. 58 


ii. 20, 


n. 393 


iv. 2, 


. 201 


ii. 20, . . 


m. 480 


iv. 4, 


. 33 


ii. 20, 


iv. 276 


iv. 4, 


. 38 


ii. 20, 


iv. 338 


iv. 4, 


. 201 


ii. 20, 


v. 174 


iv. 4, 


iv. 275 


ii. 20, 


vi. 24 


iv. 4, . 


v. 43 


ii. 20, 


vi. 72 


iv. 4, . 


v. 132 


ii. 20, 


vi. 346 


iv. 4,5, ,V. 


n. 318 


ii. 20, 


vi. 439 


iv. 4, 6, . 


vi. 421 


ii. 20, 


vi. 447 


iv. 5, 


i. 96 


ii. 20, 


vm. 331 


iv. 6, 


iv. 424 


ii. 20, 


vm. 469 


iv. 6, 


vi. 62 


ii. 20, 


vm. 493 


iv. 6-23, 


vi. 57 


ii. 21, 


n. 231 


iv. 8, 


iv. 433 


ii. 21, 


iv. 13 


iv. 8, 


vi. 75 


iii. 1, 


m. 266 


iv. 8, 


vm 75 


iii. 1, 


iv. 265 


iv. 9, 


iv. 259 


iii. 1, 


iv. 318 


iv. 9, 


vm. 467 


iii. 1, 


vn. 314 


iv. 9, 34, 


vm. 477 


iii. 2, 


iv. 17 


iv. 11, 19, . 


iv. 126 


iii. 2, 


iv. 245 


iv. 14, 15, . 


iv. 252 


iii. 2, 


iv. 326 


iv. 16, 


vi. 285 


iii. 2,5, 


vi. 16 


iv. 19, 


iv. 334 


iii. 2, 14-17, . 


vi. 54 


iv. 19, 


vi. 17 


iii. 3, 


n. 81 


iv. 21, 


iv. 298 


iii. 3, 


m. 428 


iv. 21, 


v. 17 


iii. 3, 4, 


iv. 220 


iv. 22-26, . 


ix. 36 


iii. 4, 


i. 249 


iv. 23, 24, . 


vi. 363 


iii. 4, 


iv. 126 


iv. 24, 


vn. 71 


iii. 7, 9, 10, . 


iv. 298 


iv. 24, 


vn. 223 


iii. 8, , * 


i. 44 


iv. 25, 


ix. 76 


iii. 8, 16, . 


vm. 299 


iv. 25-29, . 


vi. 416 


iii. 10, 


iv. 156 


v. 5, 


iv. 328 


iii. 13, 14, . 


vi. 9 


v. 5, 


vi. 21 


iii. 13, 14, . 


vi. 52 


v. 5, 


vi. 69 


iii. 14, . \ 


i. 51 


v. 5, 


vm. 329 


iii. 14, J 


vi. 38 


v. 5, 


vm. 577 


iii. 14, 22, . 


vm. 459 


v. 15, 


m. 484 


iii. 15-18, . 


vi. 282 


v. 16, jftl 


n. 205 


iii. 16, 


iv. 14 


v. 16, 


ix. 213 


iii. 16, 


vii. 75 


v. 16, 17, . 


in. 496 


iii. 20, .". J 


v. 48 


v. 17, 


i. 360 



Gal. 



Eph. 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 


809 


v. 17, r . 
v. 17, 


II. 97 

iv. 157 


Eph i. 6, 
i fi 


iv. 73 


v. 17, 
v. 17, 
v. 17-19, . 
v. 17-21, . 
v. 17-22, . 


vi. 206 
vi. 215 
x. 42 
vi. 159 
x. 153 


1. 0, 

i. 6, 7, 
* 6,7, . 
i- 6-11, . 
i. 6,12, . 
i. 7, 


vi. 35 
v. 552 
vi. 122 
ix. 187 
vm. 92 
iv. 18 


v. 19, 


m. 423 




v. 5,35 


v. 20, 
v. 20, 21, . 


n. 105 
n. 106 


i. 9, 
i. 9, 


ii. 173 

iv. 461 


v. 24, 
v. 24, 


n. 88 
m. 502 


i. 9-11, . 
i. 9-14, . 


iv. 531 
iv. 211 


v. 24, 


vi. 325 


i. 10, 


iv. 229 


v. 24, 


ix. 310 


i. 10, 


iv. 456 


v. 25, 


ii. 22 


i. 11, 


iv. 471 


v. 25, 


vi. 71 


i. 11, 


v. 15 


vi. 1, 


m. 421 


i. 11, 


ix. 419 


vi. 1, 


in. 423 


i. 12, 


i. 106 


vi. 2, 


i. 275 


i. 12, 


vii. 237 


vi. 7, 8, 


vi. 56 


i. 13, 


m. 239 


vi. 12, 


n. 82 


i. 13, 


iv. 132 


vi. 12, 


iv. 1 74 


i. 13, 


vi. 63 


vi. 14, 


iv. 339 


i. 13, 


vm. 345 


vi. 14, 


vi. 496 


i. 13, 


vm. 366 


vi. 16, 


in. 57 


i. 14, 


vi. 56 


vi. 16, 


m. 294 


i. 14. 


vn. 789 


i. 3, 


iv. 38 


i. 14, 


ix. 365 


i. 3, 


iv. 46 


i 15, 


iv. 112 


i. 3, 


iv. 78 


i. 17, 


iv. 266 


i. 3, 


iv. 435 


i. 17, 


iv. 345 


i. 3, 


i. 354 


i. 17, 


vn. 262 


i. 3, 


ix. 227 


i. 17, 18, . 


vi. 183 


i. 3, 5, 9, 11, 


iv. 86 


i. 18, 


iv. 244 


i. 3-7, . 


vi. 176 


i. 18, 19, . 


m. 447 


i. 3-9, 


ix. 89 


i. 19, 


m. 506 


i. 3-11, . 


vm. 237 


i. 19, 


iv. 230 


i. 3-11, . 


ix. 338 


i. 19, 


iv. 262 


i. 3-15, . 


ix. 422 


i. 19, 


iv. 269 


i. 4, 


i. 23 


i. 19, 


vi. 347 


i. 4, 


iv. 470 


i. 19, 


vi. 95 


i. 4, 


iv. 557 


i. 19, 


vm. 507 


i. 4, 


v. 300 


i. 19, 20, . 


n. 48 


i. 4, 


vi. 59 


i. 19, 20, . 


vi. 426 


i. 4, 


vn. 192 


i. 20-22, . -i 


iv. 52 


i. 4, 


vm. 42 


i. 20, 21, 22, 


iv. 133 


i. 4, 9, 10, . 


ix. 34 


i. 21, 


i. 159 


i. 5, 


n. 239 


i.21, 


i. 195 


i. 5, 


v. 43 


i.21, 


iv. 53 


i. 5, 6, . 


n. 222 


i. 21, 22, . 


iv. 145 


i. 5, 6, . 


vi. 175 


i. 21, 22, . 


vii. 14 


i. 5, 6, . 


ix. 101 


i. 21, 22, . 


xn. 83 


i. 6, 


1.348 


i. 22, . - : 


i. 88 


i. 6, 


n. 221 


i. 22, 


i. 154 


i. 6, 


n. 228 


i. 22, 


i. 198 



310 
Epb. 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 


i. 23, 
i. 23, 


I. 165 

ii. 421 


Eph. ii. 10, 
ii. 10, 


i. 23, 


. .; in. 439 


ii. 10, 


i. 23, 


.:>. J m. 458 


ii. 10, 


i. 23, 


U J iv. 146 


ii. 10, 


i. 23, 


.- . .; iv. 567 


ii. 10, 


i. 23, 


... : iv. 568 


ii. 10, 


ii. 1,2, 


. . .i vi. 75 


ii. 10, 


ii. 1-3, 


x. 37 


ii. 30, 


ii. 1-4, 


,". ; ix. 168 


ii. 10, 


ii. 1, 5, 


vi. 207 


ii. 11, 


ii. 1-5, 


. . . viii. 503 


ii. 12, 


ii. 1-6, 


. , ix. 188 


ii. 12, 


ii. 1, 11, 


. vi. 76 


ii. 12-19, 


ii. 2, 


. i . i. 162 


ii. 14-16, 


ii. 2, 


. i I . i. 198 


ii. 15, 


ii. 2, 


. i. 485 


ii. 15, 


ii. 2, 


. . ; . in. 259 


ii. 17, 


ii. 2, 


. . in. 407 


ii. 18, 


ii. 2,3, 


< ix. 173 


ii. 18, 


ii. 3, 


, x. 10 


ii. 18, 


ii. 3, 


x. 80 


ii. 20, 


ii. 3, 


x. 139 


ii. 20, 


ii. 3,5, 


iv. 274 


ii. 20, 


ii. 4, 


i. 41 


ii. 20, 


ii. 4, 


i. 120 


ii. 20, 22, 


ii. 4, 


vi. 120 


ii. 21, 22, 


ii. 4, 


ix. 98 


ii. 22, 


ii. 4, 5, 


viii. 60 


ii. 2tf, 


ii. 4,5, 


. vm. 122 


iii. 2, 


ii. 4-6, 


vi. 84 


iii. 3-5, 


ii. 5, 


i. 428 


iii. 4, 


ii. 5,6, 


, rv. 84 


iii. 4, 


ii. 5, 6, 


vi. 195 


iii. 4, 


ii. 5-7, 


vin. 39 


iii. 5, 


ii. 5-7, 


ix. 329 


iii. 5, 


ii. 6, 


i. 531 


iii. 5, 


ii. 6, 


n. 48 


iii. 5, 


ii. 6, 


iv. 54 


iii. 6, 8, 


ii. 6, 


4 vii. 50 


iii. 6, 8, 


ii. 7, 


i. 336 


J J 

iii. 7, 


ii. 7, 


, : iv. 188 


iii. 7, 


ii. 7, 


4. iv. 223 


iii. 8, 


ii. 7, 


.< ix. 147 


iii. 8, 


ii. 8, 


iv. 331 


iii. 8, 


ii. 8, 


* . vi. 148 


iii. 8, 


ii. 8, 


* vi. 233 


iii. 8, 


ii. 8, 


^ . vi. 307 


iii. 8, 


n. 8, 


vm. 490 


iii. 8, 


ii. 8, 


. vm. 534 


iii. 8, 


ii. 8, 9, 


. vm. 462 


iii. 8, 


ii. 8, 10, 


v. 364 


iii. 8, 9, 


ii. 8-11, 


A vi. 93 


iii. 9, 


ii. 10, 


.* . ; i. 14 


iii. 9, 



i. 358 
ii. 421 
iv. 544 
vi. 213 
vi. 412 
vi. 436 
vn. 224 
vii. 225 
vii. 240 
vn. 259 
ix. 58 
vi. 406 
x. 91 
ix. 438 
v. 465 
i. 190 
iv. 371 
vi. 315 
iv. 12 
iv. 89 
vi. 623 
i. 5 
i. 17 
i. 221 
ii. 423 
in. 129 
vi. 13 
in. 125 
vi. 64 
ii. 220 
vm. 368 
iv. 229 
iv. 270 
iv. 273 
iv. 283 
iv. 292 
iv. 295 
iv. 303 
iv. 243 
iv. 311 
i. 345 
n. 229 
i. 7 
i. 173 
i. 314 
iv. 21 
iv. 161 
iv. 241 
iv. 260 
iv. 282 
iv. 310 
iv. 332 
iv. 236 
iv. 242 



Eph. iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 10, 
iii. 9, 10, 
iii. 9, 10, 
iii. 9, 10, 
iii. 9, 10, 
iii. 10, 
iii. 10, 
iii. 10, 
iii. 10, 
. iii. 10, 
iii. 10, 
iii. 10, 11, 
iii. 11, 
iii. 11, 
iii. 11, 
iii. 12, 
iii. 14, 15, 
iii. 15, 
iii. 15, 
iii. 16, 
iii. 16, 
iii. 16, 
iii. 16, 
iii. 16, 
iii. 16, 
iii. 16-19, 
iii. 17, 
iii. 17, 
iii. 17-20, 
iii. 18, 
iii. 18, 
iii. 18, 
iii. 18, 
iii. 18, 19, 
iii. 18, 19, 
iii. 18, 19, 
iii. 19, 
iii. 19, 
iii. 19, 
iii. 19, 
iii. 19, 
iii. 19, 
iii. 19, 
iii. 19, 20, 
iii. 20, 
iii. 20, 21, 
iii. 21, 
iii. 21, 



INDEX OP TEXTS. 


311 


IV. 271 

iv. 308 
iv. 354 
iv. 543 
iv. 558 
vi. 18 
i. 139 
iv. 229 
iv. 230 


Epb. iii. 21, 
iii. 21, 
iv. 1,4,5 
iv. 3-7, 
iv. 4 
iv. 5,6, 
iv. 5,6, 
iv. 8, 
iv. 8, 


iv. 401 
ix. 330 
8, 23, vii. 415 
ix. 131 
vi. 14 
iv. 520 
ix. 117 
i. 494 
iv. 47 


iv. 262 
iv. 271 


iv. 8, 

iv. 8, 


iv. 107 

iv. 222 


I. 54: 


iv. 8, 


v. 306 


I. 139 


iv. 9, 


i. 433 


i. 163 


iv. 9, 


i. 457 


i. 182 


iv. 9, 10, 


ix. 401 


i. 484 


iv. 10, 11, 


i. 555 


vin. 65 


iv. 10-15, 


i. 543 


iv. 557 


iv. 10-15, 


i. 562 


iv. 531 


iv. 11, 


i. 8 


vn. 37 


iv. 11, 


i. 11 


ix. 220 


iv. 11, 12, 


15, i. 547 


vin. 292 


iv. 11-13, 


iv. 302 


iv. 371 


iv. 12, 


iv. 246 


i. 538 


iv. 13, 


i. 564 


vn. 396 


iv. 13, 


m. 458 


i. 366 


iv. 13, 


iv. 420 


i. 553 


iv. 14, 


in. 262 


n. 185 


iv. 15, 


in. 472 


IT. 466 


iv. 15, 16, 


i. 538 


m. 501 


iv. 15, 16, 


in. 458 


vi. 32 


iv. 16, 


i. 527 


vi. 428 


iv. 16, 


i. 552 


v. 179 


iv. 16, 


in. 459 


vin. 325 


iv. 17, 


ii. 26 


vi. 449 


iv. 17, 


n.119 


n. 160 


iv. 17, 


m. 237 


iv. 236 


iv. 18, 


n. 11 


iv. 385 


iv. 18, 


n. 17 


vi. 127 


iv. 18, 


vii. 508 


i. 324 


iv. 18, 19, 


iv. 185 


n. 417 


iv. 19, 


n. 107 


iv. 278 


iv. 19, 


iv. 567 


i. 22 


iv. 19, 


x. 299 


i. 556 


iv. 20, 21, 


iv. 452 


iv. 146 


iv. 20, 21, 


vi. 269 


iv. 268 


iv. 21, 


i. 378 


iv. 364 


iv. 21, 


H.231 


vn. 463 


iv. 21, 


. vn. 389 


vin. 37 


iv. 21, 22, 


.. . iv. 161 


i. 334 


iv. 21, 22, 


vin. 479 


i. 336 


iv. 22, 


n. 109 


iv. 373 


iv. 22, 


:..-; x. 278 


n. 305 


iv. 22, 23, 


vi. 164 


iv. 372 


iv. 22-24, 


vi. 430 



312 
Eph. 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 


iv. 23, 


VI. 211 


Eph. v. 32, 


iv. 23, 


vi. 274 


v. 32, 


iv. 23, 24, . 


m. 505 


vi. 5, 


iv. 24, 


i. 358 


vi. 6, 


iv. 24, 


vi. 202 


vi. 11, 


iv. 24, 


vi. 247 


vi. 12, 


iv. 24, 25, . 


vii. 55 


vi. 12, 


iv. 26, :. .. 


m. 509 


vi. 12, 


iv. 30, 


i. 261 


vi. 12, 


iv. 30, 


m. 416 


vi. 12, 


iv. 30, 


iv. 231 


vi. 12, 


iv. 30, 


vn. 321 


vi. 12, 


iv. 30, . . 


vm. 370 


vi. 12, 


iv. 32, 


n. 277 


vi. 12, 


iv. 32, 


ix. 353 


vi. 12, 


v. 1, 


vn. 241 


vi. 12, 


v. 2, 


iv. 213 


vi. 12, 


v. 2, 


iv. 343 


vi. 13, 


v. 2, 


ix. 53 


vi. 16, 


v. 6, 


ii. 118 


vi. 16, 


v. 8, 


vn. 276 


vi. 18, 


v. 8,14, . 


x. 136 


vi. 18, 


v. 13, 


i. 301 


vi. 22, 


v. 14-17, 


x. 191 


vi. 27, 


v. 18, 
v. 19, 


i. 556 
m. 13 


Philip. i. 4, 
i. 7, 


v. 19, 


m. 215 


i. 7, 


v. 19, 


iv. 159 


i. 8, 


v. 23, 


i. 546 


i. 9, 


v. 23, 


ix. 90 


i. 9, 


v. 23, 


ix. 343 


i. 9, 10, 


v. 23-25, . 


i. 37 


i. 9, 10, 


v. 23-27, 


i. 168 


i. 9, 10, 


v. 23, 30, 32, 


i. 535 


J 7 

i. 9-11, 


v. 24, 


i. 39 


i. 10, 


v. 24, 


vi. 227 


i. 10, 


v. 25, 


i. 427 


i. 10, 


v. 25-27, . 


iv. 98 


i. 10, 


v. 25-27, 


vi. 121 


i. 11, 


v. 25-33, .. 


ix. 323 


i. 11, 


v. 25, 31-33, 


iv. 123 


i. 11, 


v. 26, 


n. 423 


i. 11, 


v. 26, 


m. 471 


i. 18, 


v. 26, 


iv. 330 


i. 19, 


v. 26, 27, 


iv. 124 


i. 21, 


v. 26, 27, ;./. 


iv. 246 


i. 21-24, 


v. 27, 


n. 420 


i. 23, 


v. 27, 


v. 434 


i. 24, 


v. 27, 


ix. 104 


i. 27, 28, 


v. 27, 


ix. 213 


i. 28, 


v. 28, 


iv. 133 


i. 28, 


v. 28, 


iv. 381 


I 

ii. 


v. 30, 31, . 


iv. 504 


ii. 1, 


v. 32, 


i. 535 


ii. 1, 



iv. 282 
iv. 340 
vn. 146 
in. 267 
m. 270 
i. 484 
i. 486 
i. 489 
n. 40 
n. 51 
n. 60 
ii. 83 
n. 103 
m. 259 
in. 265 
iv. 156 
vii. 501 
vn. 271 
i. 553 
viii- 462 
in- 471 
vi. 461 
ii. 92 
vi. 108 
1.280 
i. 12 
i. 272 
iv. 117 
i. 283 
iv. 306 
i. 133 
i. 180 
x. 284 
vii. 131 
vi, 32 
VL 173 
vii. 149 
vn. 173 
i. 556 
m. 443 
in. 471 
vii. 162 
m. 499 
m. 370 
vi. 487 
x. 276 
vii. 374 
m. 469 
iv. 252 
vn. 158 
x. 511 
n. 376 
i. 276 
vi. 26 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



313 



Philip, ii. 1, 


" . - vn. 456 Philip, iii. 8 


T Q 


ii. 3, 
ii. 6, 
ii. 6, 
ii. 6, v 


i. 416 
.. n.424 
iv. 243 
104, 106, 108 


iii. 8, 
iii. 8, 

iii. 8, 

mo 


I. O 

i. 39 
i. 296 
..; iv. 229 


ii. 6,7, 
ii. 6-9, 
ii. 7, 
ii. 7, 
ii. 7, 
ii. 7, 
ii. 8,9, 
ii. 8-11, 


.. vn. 225 
ix. 365 
i. 100 
i. 556 
. : in. 329 
iv. 568 
i. 119 
vi. 503 


. o, 

iii. 8, 
iii. 8, 
iii. 8, 
iii. 8, 
iii. 8, 9, 
iii. 8,9, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 


vi. 59 
. vm. 270 
vm. 304 
. vm. 322 
x. 295 
vm. 476 
x. 147 
iv. 436 
v. 352 


ii. 9, 
ii. 10, 
ii. 10, 


i. 479 
i. 480 
i. 495 


iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 


vi. 176 
vi. 289 
ix. 44 


ii. 10, 
ii. 10, 11, 
ii. 10, 11, 

" " 1 ~i 


in. ] 6 
i. 28 
vi. 378 


iii. 10, 
iii. 10, 
iii. 10, 


i. 420 
ii. 210 
m. 159 


11. 11, 


i. 36 


iii. 10, 


m. 301 


ii. 12, 
ii. 12, 13, 


vin. 562 
vin. 529 


iii. 10, 
iii. 10, 


iv. 540 
vn. 480 


ii. 13, 


i. 270 


iii. 11, 


in. 506 


ii. 13, 


i. 301 


iii. 11,12, 


i. 439 


ii. 13, 


i. 422 


iii. 12, 


i. 80 


ii. 13, 


ii. 23 


iii. 12, 


ii. 242 


ii. 13, 


m. 218 


iii. 12, 


v. 308 


ii. 13, 


iv. 276 


iii. 12, 


vin. 483 


ii. 13, 


vm. 453 


m. 12, 


ix. 357 


ii. 13, 


vin. 552 


iii. 12, 13, 


iv. 13 


ii. 15, 


m. 47 


ni. 12, 13, 


. vm. 577 


ii. 15, 


iv. 172 


iii. 12, 13, 


ix. 12 


ii. 15, 


ix. 301 


iii. 13, 


in. 478 


ii. 15, 16, 


vii. 280 


iii. 13, 14, 


vn. 326 


ii. 15, 16, 


vii. 285 


iii. 15, 


in. 478 


ii. 19, 


i. 478 


iii. 18, 


i. 326 


ii. 20, 


iv. 117 


iii. 19, 


in. 349 


ii. 20, 


vi. 514 


iii. 19, 


vi. 483 


iii. 


ii. 454 


iii. 20, 


ii. 245 


iii. 


vi. 23 


iii. 21, 


i. 211 


iii. 3, 


i. 417 


iii. 21, 


i. 317 


iii. 3, 


m. 472 


iii. 21, 


i. 331 


iii. 3, 


iv. 299 


iii. 21, 


i. 333 


iii. 3, 


iv. 339 


iii. 21, 


i. 334 


iii. 3, 


vi. 314 


iii. 21, 


i. 336 


iii. 4, 


n. 82 


iii. 21, 


i. 342 


iii. 4, 


. m. 483 


iii. 21, 


i. 343 


iii. 4-9, 


x. 265 


iii. 21, 


i. 364 


iii. 5, 6, 


i. 376 


iii. 21, 


.- iv. 440 


iii. 5-8, 


vi. 462 


iii. 21, 


iv. 547 


iii. 7, 


vi. 300 


iii. 21, 


vi. 194 


iii. 7,8, 


iv. 314 


iii. 21, 


vn. 99 


iii. 7,8, 


vi. 484 


iii. 21, 


vn. 112 


iii. 8, 


i. 3 


iii. 21, 


ix. 214 



314 




INDEX OF 


Philip 


iv. 3, 


ix. 28 




iv. 6, 


vi. 318 




iv. 6-9, 


ii. 449 




iv. 7, 


i. 16 




iv. 7, 


i. 20 




iv. 7, 


m. 417 




iv. 11, 12, . 


n. 454 




iv. 12, 


in. 483 




iv. 13, 


in. 444 




iv. 17, 


i. 22 




iv. 17, .1 


vn. 115 




iv. 17, 


vii. 167 




iv. 19, 


i. 314 




iv. 19, 


i. 318 




iv. 19, 


iv. 310 




iv. 19, 


vni. 253 




iv. 19, 


ix. 335 




iv. 20, 


iv. 273 


Col. 


i. 


n. 459 




i. 


iv. 457 




i. 


iv. 458 




i. 2, 


i. 11 




i. 2,3, . 


iv. 252 




i. 4, 


i. 277 




i. 4,5, . 


i. 271 




i. 5, 


i. 226 




i. 5, 


i. 302 




i. 6, 


i. 224 




i. 6, 


11. 231 




i. 6, 


m. 463 




i. 6, 


vi. 400 




i. 7, iv. 12, 


xi. 101 




i. 9, 


i. 32 




i. 9, 


1.556 




i. 9, 10, . 


i. 135 




i. 9,10, . 


i. 287 




i. 10, 


i. 283 




i. 10, 


vn. 173 




i. 10, 


vii. 232 




i. 10, 11, . 


vi. 32 




i. 11, 


i. 423 




i. 11, ; . 


n. 449 




i. 11, 


n. 456 




i- 11, 


n. 466 




i. 11, 12, ..! 


i. 361 




i. 12, 


i. 312 




i. 12, 


i. 412 




i. 12, 


in. 308 




i. 12, 


vii. 574 




i. 12, 13, .. 


i. 330 




i. 12, 13, . 


in. 260 




i. 12, 13, . 


in. 301 




i. 12, 13, . 


vi. 79 




i. 13, 


i. 108 



Col. 



i. 13, 
i.13, 
i. 13, 
i. 13, 
i. 13, 

L 15, 

i. 15, 
i. 15, 
i.15, 
i. 15, 
i. 15, 16, 
i. 15, 18, 
i. 15, 18, 
i. 15, 19, 
i. 16, 
i. 16, 
i. 16, 
i. 16, 
i.16, 
i. 16, 
i. 16, 
i.16, 
i. 16, 
i. 16, 
i.16, 
i. 16, 
i. 16, 
i. 16, 17, 
i. 16-20, 
i.17, 
i.17, 
i.17, 
i.17, 
i. 18, 
i. 18, 
i.18, 
i. 18, 
i. 18, 
i.18, 
i. 18-20, 
i. 18-20, 
i. 19, 
i. 19, 
i. 20, 
i. 20, 
i. 20, 
i. 20, 
i. 20, 
i. 20, 
i. 20, 
i. 20, 21, 
i. 20, 22, 
i. 21, 



ii. 42 

ii. 117 

iv. 369 

vi. 77 

vi. 100 

iv. 18 

i. 74 

n. 420 

iv. 266 

iv. 419 

iv. 555 

i. 165 

iv. 231 

iv. 557 

iv. 456 

i. 95 

i. 98 

i. 171 

i. 483 

i. 485 

1.487 

i. 489 

1.500 

in. 14 

in. 216 

iv. 394 

iv. 542 

iv. 563 

i. 101 

i. 177 

1.180 

iv. 233 

iv. 414 

iv. 563 

i. 438 

i. 551 

i. 547 

n. 252 

vi. 184 

x. 27 

i. 119 

xi. 96 

m. 329 

vi. 219 

i. 20 

i. 185 

i. 188 

ii. 374 

v. 135 

v. 501 

vn. 354 

ix. 53 

n. 376 

i. 186 



Col. 



21, 
21, 
21, 
21, 
21, 

21, ii. 

22, 
22, 

22, 

22, 23, 
24, 
24, 
24, 
26, 
26, 

26, 27, 
26, 27, 
27, 
27, 

2, 
2, 
2, 
2, 

2, 

3, 

3, 

3,9, 

4,8, 

6, 

7, 

7, 

8,10, 

8-10, 

9, 

9, 

9, 

9, 

9, 

9, 
9, 

9-14, 
ii. 10, 
ii. 10, 
ii. 10, 
ii. 10, 
ii. 10-12, 
ii. 11, 
ii. 11, 
ii. 11, 
ii. 11, 
ii. 1], 
ii. 11, 12, 
ii. 11, 12, 



13, 



i. 
i. 

ii. 

ii. 

ii. 

ii. 

ii. 

ii. 

ii. 

ii. 

ii. 

ii. 

ii. 

ii. 

ii. 

ii. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 


i. 361 
ii. 199 
vn. 390 


Col. ii. H_i5 
ii. 12, 
ii. 12, 


x. 86 


ii. 12, 


x. 106 


ii. 12, 


vi. 75 


ii. 12, 


n. 387 


ii. 12, 


vi. 140 


ii. 12, 13 


vn. 456 


5 -*. <-/ j 

ii. 12, 13 


vn. 388 


? ^7 

ii. 12, 13, 


in. 159 


ii. 12, 13, 


v. 315 


i 1 

ii. 12-14. 


ix. 353 


ii. 13, 


i. 139 


ii. 13, 


iv. 241 


7 

ii. 13, 


iv. 227 


ii. 13, 


iv. 259 


ii. 13, 


i. 138 


ii. 13, 


iv. 299 


ii. 14, 


259, 2GO 


, 
ii. 14, 


iv. 239 


ii. 14, 


iv. 249 


ii. 14, 15, 


iv. 300 


ii. 15, 


iv. 312 


ii. 15, 


vn. 521 


ii. 17, 


iv. 309 


ii. 17, 


iv. 481 


ii. 17, 


iv. 464 


ii. 18, 


iv. 259 


ii. 18, 


vm. 321 


ii. 19, 


vin. 478 


ii. 19, 


ix. 509 


ii. 19, 


iv. 450 


ii. 19, 


iv. 569 


ii. 19, 


i. 554 


ii. 22, 


i. 551 


iii. 1,3,4, 


v. 51 


iii. 2, 


v. 105 


iii. 2, 


vi. 65 


iii. 2, 


vm. 75 


iii. 2,3, 


vni. 376 


iii. 3, 


vi. 219 


iii. 3, 


i. 36 


iii. 3-5, 


i. 159 


iii. 4, 


i. 546 


iii. 4, 


iv. 264 


iii. 4, 


i. 367 


iii. 5, 


i. 360 


iii. 5, 


i. 371 


iii. 5, 


n. 79 


iii. 7, 


n. 134 


iii. 7, 


x. 44 


iii. 7, 


i. 232 


iii. 9, 10. 


x. 55 iii. 10, 



315 

vi. 235 
i. 439 
i. 441 
1.460 
ii. 17 
vi. 446 
vi. 456 
i. 349 
i. 441 
1.448 
vni 294 
iv. 41 
i. 124 
ii. 9 
ii. 13 
n. 207 
n. 209 
n. 236 
i. 494 
n. 376 
vi. 354 
iv. 47 
i. 484 
v. 299 
iv. 234 
vn. 73 
iv. 326 
n. 105 
iv. 289 
1.538 
i. 552 
in. 458 
in. 459 
in. 506 
in. 349 
vn. 483 
i. 58 
i. 453 
ii. 82 
vm. 161 
n. 206 
IT. 215 
vi. 228 
ii. 215 
ii. 271 
n. 394 
n. 75 
n. 91 
vi. 462 
n. 21 
ii. 73 
n. 92 
x. 339 
i. 358 



316 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



Col. iii. 10, 


iv. 249 


1 Thess. ii. 16, 


iv. 525 


iii. 10, 


iv. 314 


ii. 16, 17, . 


ii. 370 


iii. 10, 


iv. 355 


ii. 19, r l ; 


iv. 135 


iii. 10, . -. ; 


iv. 535 


ii. 19, 


ix. 495 


iii. 10, 


vi. 152 


ii. 19, 20, . 


vi. 485 


iii. 10, i 


vi. 175 


ii. 19, 20, . 


ix. 367 


iii. 10, 


vi. 202 


iii. 5, 


i. 271 


iii. 10, 


vi. 247 


iii. 6, 


i. 272 


iii. 11, 


i. 61 


iii. 6-8, 


iv. 118 


iii. 11, 


i. 554 


iii. 7, . 


i. 23 


iii. 11, 


i. 556 


iii. 9, 


i. 270 


iii. 11, 


iv. 232 


iii. 9, 


ix. 508 


iii. 11, 


iv. 337 


iii. 10, 


m. 471 


iii. 12, 


iv. 114 


iv. 2, 3, . 


vi. 152 


iii. 12, 


iv. 116 


iv. 7, 


i. 304 


iii. 12, 


vm. 108 


iv. 9, 


vi. 154 


iii. 12, 13, . 


vm. 113 


iv. 9, 


vi. 204 


iii. 13, 


ii. 210 


iv. 9, 


vm. 113 


iii. 13, 


vi. 406 


iv. 9, 


vm. 305 


iii. 15, 


iv. 258 


iv. 13, 


ii. 249 


iii. 22, 


i. 81 


iv. 14, 


n. 250 


iii. 23, 


vi. 276 


iv. 14, 


ii. 254 


iii. 23, 


vn. 221 


iv. 16, 17, . 


vii. 442 


iv. 3, 


iv. 235 


iv. 17, 


1.479 


iv. 10, 


iv. 232 


iv. 17, 18, . 


n. 263 


iv. 17, 


xi. 101 


iv. 18, 


vn. 341 


1 Thess. i. 1, 


i. 14 


v. 3, 


vn. 551 


i. 4,5, . 


iv. 255 


v. 7, 


vi. 313 


i. 4,5, . 


ix. 279 


v. 9, 


i. 67 


i. 5, 


i. 228 


v. 9, 


i. 69 


i. 5, 


i. 423 


v. 9, 


1.261 


i. 5, 


iv. 257 


v. 9, 


n. 163 


i. 5, 


vi. 15 


v. 9, 


ix. 154 


i. 5, 


vi. 37 


v. 12, 


vn. 235 


i. 5, 


vm. 569 


v. 13, 


vi. 3 


i. 5, 


ix. 150 


v. 18, 


n. 454 


i. 5,6, . 


i. 260 


v. 23, 


i. 19 


i. 6, 


vn. 571 


v. 23, 


vi. 164 


i. 6-8, 


vi. 414 


v. 23, 


vii. 153 


i. 6,9, . 


iv. 251 


v. 23, 


x. 57 


i. 7, 


n. 298 


v. 23, 


x. 125 


i. 10, 


i. 249 


v. 23, 24, . 


IX. 1 


i. 10, :.. 


i. 479 


v. 24, < ; 


ix. 390 


i. 10, 11, . 


ix. 366 


2 Thess. i. 3, 


1.272 


i. 10, iv. 17, 


x. 567 


i. 3, 


m. 505 


i. 13, 


n. 205 


i. 6, 9, ! . 


x. 537 


i. 15, 


vii. 236 


i. 7, 


n. 258 


ii. 5, ,... 


vn. 501 


i. 8,9, M 


x. 490 


ii. 8,20, . 


iv. 117 


i. 8-10, . 


vn. 445 


ii. 12, 


i. 303 


i. 9, 


i. 315 


ii. 12, T . 


i. 319 


i. 9, 


n. 167 


ii. 13, 


i. 6 


i. 9, 


n. 172 


ii. 13, 


iv. 251 


i. 10, 


i. 98 


ii. 13, 16, . 


ix. 218 


i. 10, 


i. 267 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



317 



2 Thess. i. 10, ! . . 


i. 316 


2 Thess. ii. 13, 


ix. 71 


i. 10, 


i. 320 


ii. 13, 


ix. 88 


i. 10, 


i. 564 


ii. 13, 


ix. 151 


i. 10, 


n. 250 


ii. 13, 


ix. 154 


i. 10, 


iv. 498 


ii. 13, 14, . 


vii. 240 


i. 10, 


iv. 516 


ii. 13, 14, . 


ix. 322 


i. 10, 


vii. 442 


ii. 13, 14, . 


ix. 363 


i. 11, 


i. 352 


ii. 14, 


i. 267 


i. 11, 


i. 423 


ii. 16, 


ii. 221 


i. 11, 


n. 290 


ii. 16, 


vm. 243 


i. 11, 


vm. 575 


ii. 16, 17, . 


vii. 486 


i. 11, 12, . 


vi. 501 


ii. 17, 


m. 428 


i. 12, 


vm. 121 


ii. 19, 


n. 173 


i. 12, 


vm. 124 


ii. 21, 


i. 36 


i. 12, 


vm. 163 


ii. 25, 


n. 69 


i. 13, 14, . 


i. 9 


iii. 1, . 


iv. 251 


ii. 2, 


i. 9 


iii. 3, 


ix. 371 


ii. 2, 


m. 286 


iii. 5, 


vin. 330 


ii. 2,9, 


m/ 25 


iii. 5, 


vm. 194 


ii. 3, 


i. 66 


iii. 14, 


XL 155 


ii. 3, 


i. 200 


iii. 16, 


vi. 318 


ii. 3-12, . 


ix. 171 


iii. 17, 


i. 5 


ii. 4, 


1.547 


iii. 17, 18, . 


i. 14 


ii. 4, 


ii. 275 


1 Tim. i. 2, 


i. 17 


ii. 7, 


259 


i. 5, 


1.271 


ii. 7, 


iv. 273 


i. 5, 


VL 280 


ii. 7, 8, 


m. 73 


i. 5, 


vii. 292 


ii. 9, 


m. 365 


i. 5, 


vm. 502 


ii. 9, 10, . 


i. 394 


i. 5-8, . 


vi. 241 


ii. 9, 10, . 


vm. 249 


i. 10, 11, . 


iv. 251 


ii. 9-12, 


x. 67 


i. n, 


iv. 244. 


ii. 10, 


n. 262 


i. 11, 


iv. 315 


ii. 10, 


n. 68 


i. n, 


iv. 324 


ii. 10, 


iv. 256 


i. 12, 


i. 345 


ii. 10, 


iv. 258 


i. 12, 


n. 348 


ii. 10, 11, . 


ix. 230 


i. 13, 


n. 143 


ii. 11, 


i. 334 


i. 13, 


n. 149 


ii. 11, 


n. 164 


i. 13, 


n. 224 


ii. 11, 


m. 102 


i. 13, 


iv. 166 


ii. 11, 


m. 287 


i. 13, 


vm. 381 


ii. 11, 


iv. 173 


i. 13, 14, . 


vm. 199 


ii. 11, 12, . 


iv. 181 


i. 13, 15, 1G, 


iv. 108 


ii. 12, 13, . 


ix. 163 


i. 13, 17, . 


vi. 405 


ii. 13, 


i, 13 


i. 14, 


i. 129 


ii. 33, 


i. 80 


i. 14, 


n. 187 


ii. 13, 
ii. 13, 
ii. 13, 


i. 270 
ii. 154 
ii. 167 


i. 14, 
i. 14, 
i. 14, 


ii. 228 
n. 443 
in. 328 


ii. 13, 
ii. 13, 


vii. 243 
vii. 249 


i. 14, 
i. 14, 


iv. 21 
iv. 161 


ii. 13, 


vii. 536 


i. 14, 


vi. 96 


ii. 13, 
ii. 13, . 
ii. 13, 


vm. 96 

vm. 286 
ix. 18 


i.15, .- 
i. 15, 
i. 15, 


iv. 19 
v. 361 
v. 516 



818 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 




1 Tim. i. 15, 


vin. 216 


1 Tim. iv. 1, 


m. 265 


i. 15-17, 


iv. 373 


iv. 1,2, V 


m. 177 


i. 16, 


-* . i. 221 


iv. 2, 


iv. 173 


i. 16, 


n. 268 


iv. 2, 


iv. 181 


i. 16, 


n. 299 


iv. 2, 


vi. 286 


i. 16, 


iv. 192 


iv. 5, 


m. 389 


i. 17, 


A . 1.468 


iv. 8, 


i. 500 


i. 17, 


. . iv. 390 


iv. 8, 


m. 125 


i. 18, 


vii. 239 


iv. 8, 


vi. 263 


i. 19, 


i. 132 


iv. 12, 


i. 13 


i. 19, 


in. 258 


iv. 15, . \>. 


m. 464 


i. 19, 


vi. 232 


iv. 16, 


i. 487 


i. 19, 


vi. 251 


iv. 16, 


vi. 451 


i. 20, 


iv. 185 


iv. 16, 


vi. 510 


ii. 


m. 217 


v. 6, 


n. 21 


ii. 1, 


i. 156 


v. 6, 


iv. 159 


ii. 2, 


in. 49 


v. 8, 


vm. 479 


ii. 2, 


. . m. 365 


v. 13, 


m. 528 


ii. 4, 5, 


. . iv. 546 


v. 15, 


vii. 260 


ii. 5, 6, 


. vni. 206 


v. 17, 18, . 


vn. 82 


ii. 6, 


i. 124 


v. 21, 


i. 168 


ii. 6, 


in. ]4 


v. 21, 


vn. 139 


ii. 6, 


m. 328 


v. 21, 


ix. 5 


ii. 6, 


iv. 18 


v. 23, 


m. 505 


ii. 6, 


iv. 56 


vi. 4, 


iv. 247 


ii. 6, 


v. 17 


vi. 4, 5, . 


iv. 173 


ii. 6, 


v. 172, 177 


vi. 4,5, . 


vi. 429 


ii. 14, 


x. 136 


vi. 4,5, . 


x. 133 


ii. 15, 


v. 58 


vi. 5, 


x. 219 


n. 15, 


. . ix. 481 


vi. 6, 


vi. 483 


iii. 4, 


m. 368 


vi. 6,7,17, 


x. 558 


Hi. 5, 14, 


15, xi. 124 


vi. 9, 


ii. 53 


iii. 6, 


in. 449 


vi. 9, 


ii. 101 


iii. 9, 


iv. 303 


vi. 9, 


in. 478 


iii. 10, 


ii. 458 


vi. 9, 


in. 484 


iii. 15, 


vii. 150 


vi. 9, 


x. 453 


iii. 15, 


xi. 53 


vi. 12, 13, . 


vii. 334 


iii. 16, 


i. 138 


vi. 13, 


n. 293 


iii. 16, 


i. 166 


vi. 13, 


vn. 152 


iii. 16, 


i. 183 


vi. 15, - 


ii. 284 


iii. 16, 


m. 222 


vi. 15, 


iv. 350 


iii. 16, 


iv. 36 


vi. 15, - - 


iv. 388 


iii. 16, 


. . iv. 235 


vi. 15, 


iv. 394 


iii. 16, 


. . iv. 264 


vi. 15, 


ix. 118 


iii. 16, 


. . iv. 273 


vi. 16, 


iv. 390 


iii. 16, 


* . iv. 340 


vi. 16, 


iv. 479 


iii. 16, 


iv. 438 


vi. 16, . 


vn. 4 


iii. 16, 


iv. 566 


vi. 16, 


ix. 140 


iii. 16, 


.:-; . v. 124 


vi. 17, &i 


ii. 288 


iii. 16, 


.:.-.r vii. 440 


vi. 17, 


n. 305 


iii. 16, 


t U .i VIH. 136 


vi. 17, 


vii. 436 


iii. 16, 


";v : vin. 186 


vi. 17, . 


x. 207 


iii. 18, 


.",i iv. 429 


vi. 18, 


iv. 249 


iv. 1, 


U ii. 32 


vi. 19, 


n. 305 



2 Tim. 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 


319 


i- 2, 
i- 2, 
i. 3, 
i- 3, 
i. 3, 
i- 4, 
i. 5, 

o 


i. 31 
ii. 310 
i. 279 
i. 281 
vn. 149 
n. 331 
vi. 87 


2 Tim. ii. 18, 
ii. 18-20, 
ii. 19, 
ii. 19 
ii. 19, 
ii. 19, 
ii. 19, 


n. 251 
ix. 19 
i. 241 
n. 163 
m. 31 
m. 455 
m. 478 


i. 8, 

i Q 


vii. 270 


ii. 19, 


iv. 212 


i. y, 

i. 9, 

i Q 


i- 65 
i- 69 


ii. 19, 
ii. 19, 


iv. 231 
iv. 501 


i. 9, 
i. 9, 
i. 9, 

r\ 


i. 75 
ii. 156 
n. 226 


ii. 19, 
ii. 19, 
ii. 19, 


vn. 533 
vm. 206 
ix. 18 


i. 9, 

* A 


n. 228 


ii. 19, 


ix. 239 


i. 9, 

* A 


ii. 229 


ii. 19, 20, . 


vi. 328 


i. 9, 


ii. 329 


ii. 20, 21 


vi. 393 


i. 9, 


ii. 333 


ii. 21, 


in. 475 


i. 9, 


iv. 489 


ii. 21, 


vi. 396 


i. 9, 


iv. 535 


ii. 24, 


ii. 364 


i. 9, 


iv. 557 


ii. 25, 


m. 480 


i. 9, 

* A 


v. 30 


ii. 25, 


vi. 519 


i. 9, 

* A 


vi. 120 


ii. 25, 


vm. 590 


i. 9, 


ix. 97 


ii. 25, 26, . 


x. 134 


i- 9, 


ix. 270 


ii. 26, 


i. 357 


i. 9, 


ix. 286 


ii. 26, 


n. 50 


i. 9, 10, . 


vn. 192 


ii. 26, 


n. 53 


i. 9,10, . 


vm. 206 


ii. 26, 


n. 67 


i. 10, 


iv. 407 


ii. 26, 


v. 259 


i. 10, 


vn. 410 


ii. 26, 


vi. 100 


i. 12, 


i. 426 


iii. 1, 


n. 32 


i. 12, 


vm. 311 


iii. 1, 10, . 


m. 71 


i. 12, 


ix. 308 


iii. 1-14, . 


ix. 195 


i. 13, 


vi. 265 


iii. 2, 


x. 291 


i. 13, 14, . 


vi. 28 


iii. 2, 4, 


i. 363 


i. 14, 


i. 271 


iii. 2-4, 


n. 90 


i. 14, 


vi. 42 


iii. 2, 9, 


i. 188 


i. 14, 


vi. 64 


iii. 4, 


n. 100 


i. 18, 


n. 192 


iii. 5, 


i. 386 


i. 18, 


vm. 39 


iii. 5, 


iv. 296 


ii. 1, 


i. 14 


iii. 5, 


vi. 266 


ii. 1, 


i. 423 


iii. 5, 


x. 9? 


ii. 1, 


iv. 339 


iii. 5, 


xi. 281 


ii. 2, 


i. 13 


iii. 6, 


n. 92 


ii. 3,7, . 


x. 208 


iii. 6, 


x. 63 


ii. 4, 


n. 435 


iii. 7, 


vm. 579 


ii. 5, v. 303, 


317, 321 


iii. 12, 


i. 14 


ii. 4, 


vn. 239 


iii. 12, 


vn. 170 


ii. 5, 


vii. 507 


iii. 14, 


iv. 172 


ii. 5,11,12, 


ix. 401 


iii. 14, 


iv. 183 


ii. 10, 


ii. 315 


iii. 15, . 


viii. 172 


ii. 13, 


ii. 315 


in. 15, 


vm. 274 


ii. 13, 


iv. 82 


iv. 2, 


n. 459 


ii. 13, 


vm. 56 


iv. 3, 


n. 109 


ii. 13, 14, . 


iv. 303 


iv. 3,4, , 


iv. 248 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



iv. 6, 


in. 487 Titus iii. 4, 5, 


vi. 406 


iv. 7, 


vii. 152 


iii. 4-6, 


vi. 83 


iv. 7,8, ..;,. 


iv. 249 


iii. 4-6, 


vi 416 


iv. 10, 


x. 204 


m. 4-7, .-.. . 


vi. 73 


iv. 18, 


n. 259 


iii. 4, 7, . . 


n. 328 


i. 1, 


vii. 62 


iii. 5, 


n. 320 


i. 1,2, , 


ix. 88 


iii. 5, 


in. 4 


i. 2. 


iv. 491 


iii. 5, .. 


vi. 103 


i. 2, 


iv. 213 


m. 5, 6, 


vi. 47 


i. 2, 


v. 29 


iii. 5-7, 


ix. 310 


i. 2, 


vii. 524 


iii. 5-7, 


ix. 327 


i. 2, 


vm. 56 


iii. 6, ;> . 


iv. 244 


i. 2,3, ., 


iv. 557 


iii. 6, 


iv. 313 


i. 5, 


xi. 96 


iii. 6, 


vi. 58 


i- 6, 


v. 94 


iii. 7, . . 


n. 259 


i. 9, 


iv. 249 


iii. 7, 


vi. 22 


i. 15, 


vi. 298 


iii. 9, 


ix. 322 


i. 15, 


x. 104 


iii. 8, 


vi. 520 


i. 16, 


n. 67 


m. 8, 


vn. 233 


i. 16, 


iv. 184 


iii. 14, 


vn. 234 


i. 16, 


vr. 241 


Pbilem. 4. 


i. 279 


i. 16, 


x. 133 


5. 


i. 277 


i. 16, 


x. 193 


22, 


iv. 256 


i. 16, 


x. 253 


Heb. i. 


n. 48 


ii. 3, 


iv. 153 


i. 1, 


i. 204 


ii. 10, 11, . 


iv. 270 


i. 1, 


m. 470 


ii. 11, 


i. 4 


i. 1, 


iv. 247 


ii. 11, 


i. 16 


i. 1, 


iv. 263 


ii. 11, 


vni. 254 


i. 1,2, 


v. 525 


ii. 11, 12, . 


vm. 198 


i. 2, 


iv. 310 


ii. 12, 


ii. 87 


i. 2, 


iv. 506 


ii. 12, 


ii. 100 


i. 2, 


iv. 522 


ii. 12, 


vm. 479 


i. 2, 


iv. 533 


ii. 12, 13, . 


iv. 435 


i. 2, 


iv. 548 


ii. 13, 


i. 35 


i. 2, 3, 


iv. 317 


ii. 13, 


i. 302 


i. 2, 3, 


iv. 563 


ii. 14, 


in. 475 


i. 2-6, 


i. 476 


ii. 14, 


vi. 141 


i- 3, 


i. 196 


ii. 14, 


vn. 224 


i. 3, 


i. 468 


ii. 14, 


vii. 570 


i. 3, 


i. 477 


ii. 14, 


ix. 350 


i. 3, 


m. 329 


ii. 15, 


vii. 282 


i. 3, ;.. . 


iv. 60 


iii. 1, 


i. 484 


i. 3, 


iv. 155 


iii. 3, 


i. 187 


i. 3, 


iv. 233 


iii. 3, 


ii. 100 


i. 3, 


iv. 192 


iii. 3, 


n. 108 


i. 3, 


iv. 466 


iii. 3, 5, 


ii. 349 


i. 3, 


iv. 478 


iii. 4, 


ii. 143 


i. 3,4,5, .. 


iv. 53 


iii. 4, 


n. 156 


i. 4, 


i. 495 


iii. 4, 


ii. 177 


i. 4, 


iv. 23 


iii. 4, v 


vm. 60 


i. 4,5, ,v . 


in. 221 


iii. 4, 5, 


i. 130 


i. 4-6, , V . 


iv. 498 


in. 4,5, : ,. ; 


ii. 146 


i. 4-8, 


i. 502 


iii. 4 3 5, , 


ii. 159 


i. 5, . 


i. 32 



INDEX OP TEXTS. 



321 



>. i. 5, 


..v iv. 54 


Heb. ii. 9, 


i. 467 


i. 5, 


iv. 427 


ii. 9, 


i. 471 


i. 6, 


i. 37 


ii. 9, 


ii. 226 


i. 6, 


i. 160 


ii. 9, 


ii. 320 


i. 6, 


i. 480 


ii. 9, 


ii. 329 


|i. 6, 


i. 489 


ii. 9, 


ii. 423 


ii- 6, 


iv. 475 


ii. 9, 


vii. 212 


i. 6, 


vii. 103 


ii. 10, 


ii. 433 


i. 6,7, 


i. 493 


ii. 10, 


iv. 51 


i. 8, 


i. 27 


ii. 10, 


vi. 228 


i. 8, 


m. 33 


ii. 10, 


vn. 23 


i. 8, 


.. iv. 132 


ii. 10, 11, 14, 


iv. 491 


i. 8,9, 


V. /. iv. 353 


ii. 10, 14-18, 


iv. 528 


i, 9-14, 


. .- vi. 355 


ii. 11, 


n. 421 


i. 10, 


iv. 410 


ii. 11, 


iv. 104 


i. 10, 


iv. 413 


ii. 11, 


vi. 219 


i. 10, 


vii. 8 


ii. 11, 14, . 


iv. 124 


i. 11, 


i. 471 


ii. 11, 14, 17, 


x. 130 


i. 13, 


i. 477 


ii. 12-15, . 


iv. 8 


i. 13, 


iv. 50 


ii. 13, 


1.535 


i. 14, 


i. 176 


ii. 13, 


iv. 140 


i. 14, 


m. 15 


ii. 13, 14, . 


iv. 518 




m. 32 


ii. 14, 


i. 95 


i. 14, 


m. 217 


ii. 14, 


n. 422 


i. 14, 


iv. 395 


ii. 14, 


m. 282 


ii. 1, 


m. 427 


ii. 14, 


iv. 47 


ii. 2, 


iv. 160 


ii. 14, 


iv. 116 


ii. 2, 


iv. 316 


ii. 14, 


iv. 143 


ii. 2, 


, . xii. 96 


ii. 14, 


v. 47 


ii. 2-5, 


vi. 357 


ii. 14, 


v. 295 


ii. 3, 


i. 225 


ii. 14, 


vn. 266 


ii. 3, 


u. 216 


ii. 15, 


vi. 56 


ii. 3, 


ii. 301 


ii. 16, 


ii. 420 


ii. 3, 


iv. 224 


ii. 16, 


iv. 551 


ii. 3,4, 


. . iv. 108 


ii. 16, 


v. 51 


ii. 3, 4, 


vn. 56 


ii. 16, 


vi. 11 


) J 

ii. 4, 


i. 432 


ii. 16, 17, . 


iv. 136 


ii. 5, 


i. 516 


ii. 16, 17, . 


v. 34 


7 

ii. 5, 


i. 478 


ii. 17, 


iv. 130 


ii. 5. 


i. 489 


ii. 17, 


iv. 139 


ii. 5, 


i. 507 


ii. 17, 


v. 49 


ii. 5, 
ii. 5, 


i. 523 
u. 271 


ii. 17, 
ii. 18, 


vin. 37 
iv. 129 


ii. 5,6, 
ii. 5,8, 
ii. 6, 


iv. 52 
iv. 546 


ii. 18, . , 
ii. 18, 

ii. 23, ; . .1 


vn. 137 
ix. 351 
vi. 45 


*** v j 

ii. 7, 


i. 153 


iii. 1, 


_. 

n c\ 


ii. 8, 
ii. 8, 
ii. 8, 
ii. 8, 
ii. 8,9, 
ii. 9, 
ii. 9, 


i. 516 
i. 517 
iv. 54 
iv. 320 
in. 34 
. - i. 123 
i. 194 


iii. 1, 
iii. 1, 
iii. 1-3, 
iii. 2, 
iii. 2, 
iii. 3, 
iii. 3,4, 

X 


in. 69 
iv. 209 
xi. 18 
iv. 548 
vn. 81 
iv. 130 
iv. 429 


VOL. XII. 







Heb. 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 


in. 3-6, 


xi. 54 Heb. 


iii. 5, 


iv. 132 




iii. 5, 6, 


iv. 421 




iii. 6, 14, - .? 


vni. 3 




iii. 6, 14, . 


vm. 587 




iii. 10, 


vm. 328 




iii. 10, 11, .- 


vi. 312 




iii. 12, 


i. 186 




iii. -12, ; .- 


iv. 434 




iii. 12, 


vm. 174 




iii. 12, 


vm. 520 




iii. 12, 14, . 


vm. 313 




iii. 12-15, .- 


vi. 323 




iii. 13, 


vm. 537 




iii. 14, 


vi. 107 




m. 20, 21, . 


ix. 388 




iv. 1, 2, . 


vm. 582 




iv. 3, 


v. 392 




iv. 3,11, . 


vm. 335 




iv. 4, . 


i. 511 




iv. 6, 11, . 


ii. 67 




iv. 6, 9, 11, 


n. 243 




iv. 6, 11, . 


vm. 229 




iv. 10, 


iv. 49 




iv. 11, 


i. 406 




IV. 11, 


vm. 546 




iv. 11, 12, . 


m. 286 




iv. 12, 


m. 510 




iv. 12, 


m. 525 




iv. 12, 


vi. 288 




iv. 12, 


vii. 220 




iv. 12, 


VIT. 303 




iv. 12, 


x. 168 




iv. 12, 13, . 


m. 245 




iv. 12, 13, . 


vi. 329 




iv. 12, 13, . 


x. 131 




iv. 14, 


iv. 72 




iv. 14, 


v. 378 




iv. 14,16, 


iv. 59 




iv. 14, 16, .- 


iv. 71 




iv. 15, 


m. 256 




iv. 15, 


m. 311 




iv. 15, . .- 


IV. Ill 




iv. 15, .<! 


x. 47 




iv. 15, 


x. 283 




iv. 16, 


i. 63 




iv. 16, 


iv. 62 




iv. 16, 


v. 407 




iv. 16, 


vii. 273 




iv. 16, 


ix. 238 




v. 1, - .- 


iv. 135 




v. 1-3, 


iv. 127 




v. 2, .:. 


IV. Ill 




v. 2, .4 


vm. 37 





v. 

V. 

v. 
v. 

V. 



5, 

5,6, 
5,6, 
6, 

7, 



v.. 7, 
7, 
8, 



8,9, ,. 

8, 9, -> . 
8-10, . 
8-10, . 
9, 

9-11, . 
v.ll, 

v. 12, U 
v. 12, 
v. 12, 
v.12, 

v. 12, : -. 

v. 12, 13, . 
v. 12-14, . 
v.,14, , 
vi. 1, 

1, 

1,2, -, 

1-4, .... 
vi. 1,2,4, . 
vi. 4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 5, . 

4.5, . 

4.6, .:. 
vi. 4, 5, 9, . 
vi. 4-10, 

vi. 410, 

4-11, . 

4-16, . 

5, 

7, 

7,8, ... 

7, 8, 

7,8, ... 

7-9, . 

8, 

9, 

9, 

9, 10, . 
vi. 10, 

vi. 11, 

vi. 11, 13, 17, 

vi. 12, 



vi. 
vi. 
vi. 



vi. 
vi. 
vi. 
vi. 
vi. 



VI. 

vi. 
vi. 
vi, 
vi. 
vi. 
vi. 
vi. 
vi. 
vi. 
vi. 
vi. 



v. 23 
iv. 73 
iv. 90 
iv. 412 
m. 306 
m. 394 
iv. 143 
n. 433 
n. 446 
iv. 48 
vi. 121 
iv. 63 
iv. 74 
iv. 161 
iv. 60 

i. 452 

i. 223 

m. 463 

iv. 171 

vn. 299 

ix. 285 

vi. 320 

ix. 392 

vn. 134 

n. 12 

vi. 32 

vi. 357 

vn. 452 

vii. 547 

i. 407 

i. 413 
m. 318 
iv. 165 
vi. 320 
vi. 80 

i. 59 
vi. 319 
ix. 285 
ix. 195 

i. 386 
n. 271 
m. 442 

i. 60 
vi. 335 
vii. 296 
vi. 351 
m. 454 
m. 247 
m. 322 
ix. 178 

i. 415 

n. 275 

18, vii. 251 

vm. 554 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



323 



Heb. vi. 13, 
vi. 13, 14, . 
vi. 13-30, 
vi. 15, 
vi. 15-18, 


i. 225 

i. 44 
vm. 235 
i. 52 
vm. 367 


Heb. viii. 6, 10, 
viii. 7, 
viii. 9, 10, . 
viii. 11, 
viii. 13, 


ix. 287 
vii. 36 
vn. 300 
iv. 293 
i 359 


vi. 16, 17, . 


viii. 69 


ix. 2-11, . 


vn 36 


vi. 17, 


ii. 174 


ix. 5, 


v 400 


vi. 17, 


iv. 222 


ix. 5, 23, 


iv 253 


vi. 17, 


iv. 551 


ix. 6, 8, 


iv 59 


vi. 17, 


vn. 184 


ix. 8, 


v. 397 


vi. 17, 18, . 


iv. 212 


ix. .8-11, . 


ix. 48 


vi. 18, 


m. 330 


ix. 9, 


vn. 92 


vi. 19, 
vi. 20, 


ii. 243 
iv. 51 


ix. 10-15, . 
ix. 11, 


vn. 539 
i. 350 


vi. 20, 


iv. 99 


ix. 11, 


i. 367 


vii. 3, 


iv. 421 


ix. 11, 


i. 371 


vii. 3, 


iv. 446 


ix. 11, 


vm. 32 


vii. 4, 


vn. 71 


ix. 11, 


vm. 449 


vii. 5, 


iv. 161 


ix. 12, 


i. 361 


vii. 6, 


iv. 469 


ix. 12, 


m. 213 


vii. 6, 7, 


i. 17 


ix. 12, 


iv. 68 


vii. 9, 


vn. 36 


ix. 12, 


iv. 77 


vii. 16, 


ii. 82 


ix. 12-14, . 


iv. 72 


vii. 16, 


v. 69 


ix. 12, 24, . 


iv. 58 


vii. 16, 


v. 384 


ix. 14, 


i. 233 


vii. 19, 


iv. 69 


ix. 14, 


n. 12 


vii. 21, 


iv. 212 


ix. 14, 


n. 346 


vii. 21, 


v. 139 


ix. 14, 


n. 395 


vii. 21, 


v. 385 


ix. 14, 


m. 365 


vii. 21-25, 


iv. 60 


ix. 14, v. 38 


, 39, 115 


vii. 21, 24, 25, 


iv. 66 


ix. 14, 


vi. 265 


vii. 22, 


iv. 28 


ix. 14, 


vi. 270 


vii. 22, 


v. 37 


ix. 14, 


vi. 310 


vii. 22-24, 


iv. 70 


ix. 14, 


vi. 317 


vii. 24, 


v. 511 


ix. 14, 


vii. 79 


vii. 24, 26, . 


iv. 131 


ix. 14, 26, . 


x. 53 


vii. 24, 26, 28, 


iv. 74 


ix. 15, 


i. 123 


vii. 25, 


i. 153 


ix. 15, 


1.311 


vii. 25, 


iv. 56 


ix. 15, 


iv. 539 


vii. 25, 


iv. 61 


ix. 15, 


v. 8 


vii. 25, 


ix. 360 


ix. 15-17, . 


i. 454 


vii. 26, 


i. 473 


ix. 15-17, . 


iv. 53 


vii. 26, 


i. 474 


ix. 15-20, . 


vn. 533 


vii. 26, 


n. 134 


ix. 16, 17, . 


iv. 215 


vii. 26, 


m. 280 


ix. 19, 


iv. 64 


vii. 26, 


iv. 148 


ix. 21-23, . 


vi. 356 


vii. 26, 


vn. 14 


ix. 22, 


iv. 17 


viii. 1, 


i. 452 


ix. 23, 


i. 58 


viii. 1, 


iv. 57 


ix. 23, 24, . 


iv. 57 


viii. 1,4, 


iv. 58 


ix. 24, . , 


v. 399 


viii. 1-12, . 


iv. 65 


ix. 26, 


iv. 58 


viii. 3, 


v. 44 


ix. 26, 


iv. 539 


viii. 5, 


n. 61 


ix. 26, 27, . 


vi. 408 


viii. 5, 


vii. 85 


ix. 27, 


in. 868 



324 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 




Heb. ix. 27, 


iv. 32 


Heb. x. 22, 




ix. 27, 28, 


i. 455 


x. 22, 


. 


ix. 27, 28, 


vn. 153 


x. 22, 


. 


ix. 28, 


n. 332 


x. 22, 


. 


ix. 28, 


/ iv. 30 


x. 22, 


. 


ix. 28, 


iv. 37 


x. 22, 


. 


x. 


n. 187 


x. 22, 


. 


X. 1, 


i. 16 


x. 22-39, 


. 


X. 1, 


m. 437 


x. 24, 


. 


X. 1, 


iv. 234 


x. 25, 


. 


X. 1, 


iv. 252 


x.25, 


. 


X. 1, 


: . , iv. 324 


x. 25, 


. 


X. 1, 


iv. 559 


x. 26, 


. 


x. 1-4, 


x. 72 


x. 27, 


. 


x. 3, 


iv. 65 


x. 26, 27, 


29, 


x. 3-10, 


v. 137 


x. 27, 28, 


. 


x. 4, 


iv. 161 


x. 27, 28, 


. 


x. 4-7, 


v. 481 


x. 28, 


. 


x. 4-10, 


v. 68 


x. 28, 


. 


x. 5, 


in. 211 


x. 29, 


. 


x. 5, 


iv. 49 


x. 29, 


. 


x. 5, 


iv. 361 


x. 29, 


. 


x. 5, 


iv. 490 


x. 29, 


. 


x. 5,7, 


iv. 359 


x. 30, 31, 


. 


x. 5,7, 


iv. 408 


x. 30, 31, 


. 


x. 5,10, 


iv. 20 


x. 31, 


. 


x. 7, 


vii. 248 


x. 31, 


. 


x. 10, 


i. 142 


x: 32, 


. 


x. 10, 


v. 31 


x. 32-34, 


. 


x. 11, 


iv. 49 


x. 32-35, 


. 


x. 10-12, 


iv. 50 


x. 33, 34, 


. 


x. 12, 


i. 477 


x. 34, 


. 


x. 12, 13, 


iv. 54 


x. 34, 


. 


x. 12, 13, 


iv. 147 


x. 34, 


. 


x. 12-14, 


i. 501 


x. 35, 


. 


x. 13, 


iv. 568 


x. 36-39, 


. 


x. 14, 


ii. 244 


x. 37, 


. 


x.14, 


iv. 34 


x. 38, 


, 


x.14, 


iv. 48 


x. 39, 


. 


x.14, 


. ~ iv. 60 


x. 39, 


, 


x.14, 


v. 510 


x. 39, 


. 


x.14, 


vi. 39 


xi., xii., 


. 


x.14, 


ix. 286 


xi. 1, 


. 


x. 14-16, 


. vi. 350 


*xi. 1, 


. 


x. 14-16, 


vi. 390 


xi. 1, 


. 


x. 14, 16, 


vi. 402 


xi. 1, 


. 


x. 16, 


vi. 236 


xi. 1, 


. 


x. 19-22, 


v. 388 


xi. 1, 


. 


x. 21, 22, 


n. 243 


xi. 1, 


. 


x. 21-25, 


xi. 42 


xi. 1,19, 


27, 


x. 22, 


i. 13 


xi. 3, 


t 


x. 22, 


i. 233 


xi. 4, 


. 


x. 22, 


i. 260 


xi. 5,6, 


. 


x. 22, 


n. 346 


xi. 6, 


. 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



325 



Heb. 



xi. 6, 
xi. 7, 
xi. 7, 
xi. 7, 
xi. 9,10, . 
xi. 10, 
xi. 10, 
xi. 10, 
xi. 10, 
xi. 13, 


vm. 289 
vii. 558 
vm. 300 
ix. 42 
vii. 348 
i. 58 
i. 319 
vii. 367 
vn. 425 
i. 226 


Heb. xii. 15-17, . 
xii. 16, 
xii. 16, 17, . 
xii. 17, 
xii. 17, 
xii. 17, 
xii. 20, 
xii. 21, 
xii. 22, 
xii. 22, 


vi. 323 
iv. 248 
xi. 191 
i. 50 
vi. 435 
vi. 453 
v. 366 
iv. 244 
i. 97 
i. 160 


xi. 13, 


n. 261 


xii. 22, 


i. 193 


xi. 13, 


vii. 412 


xii. 22, 23, . 


vi. 416 


xi. 13, 


vm. 265 


xii. 22, 23, 24,. 


iv. 395 


xi. 13, 
xi. 13, 24, . 


vm. 269 
i. 133 


xii. 22-24, 
xii. 23, 


vii. 467 
i. 311 


xi. 13, 33, . 


vm. 475 


xii. 23, 


i. 538 


xi. 16, 


i. 56 


xii. 23, 


iv. 51 


xi. 16, 


n. 258 


xii. 23, 


iv. 99 


xi. 16, 


vii. 431 


xii. 23, 


iv. 470 


xi. 16, 


xii. 22 


xii. 23, 


vii. 409 


xi. 17, 


m. 487 


xii. 24, 


iv. 64 


xi. 17, 


vn. 183 


xii. 24, 


iv. 76 


xi. 17-19, . 


i. 464 


xii. 24, 


vm. 364 


xi. 19, 


ix. 81 


xii. 24, 


x. 264 


xi. 24-28, . 


iv. 156 


xii. 25, 


iv. 107 


xi. 26, 


vi. 481 


xii. 25, 


iv. 224 


xi. 35-37, . 


vn. 114 


xii. 25, 


iv. 242 


xi. 39, 


i. 246 


xii. 25, 


iv. 307 


xi. 40, 


iv. 332 


xii. 25, 


vi. 316 


xi. 40, 


vn. 441 


xii. 25-27, . 


vii. 37 


xii. 


m. 431 


xii. 25-29, . 


v. 439 


xii. 1, 


ii. 457 


xii. 26, 


i. 519 


xii. 1,16,17,. 


vm. 520 


xii. 26, 


iv. 434 


xii. 2, 


i. 325 


xii. 27, 


m. 48 


xii. 2, 


i. 476 


xii. 28, 


i. 80 


xii. 2, 


iv. 67 


xii. 28, 


vi. 216 


xii. 2,3, 


n. 434 


xii. 29, 


m. 310 


xii. 3, 


n. 29 


xii. 29, 


m. 344 


xii. 3, 


iv. 148 


xii. 29, 


m. 349 


xii. 4, 


vii. 258 


xiii. 


iv. 413 


xii. 6, 


m. 245 


xiii. 2, 


i. 187 


xii. 9, 


m. 314 


xiii. 3, 


n. 216 


xii. 9, 


iv. 355 


xiii. 5, 


m. 377 


xii. 9, 


vi. 411 


xiii. 5, 


iv. 209 


xii. 9, 


vi. 456 


xiii. 5, 


vm. 450 


xii. 9, 


vn. 426 


xiii. 5, 8, 


ix. 304 


xii. 10, 


vm. 78 


xiii. 8, 


m. 313 


xii. 11, 


n. 456 


xiii. 8, 


iv. 122 


xii. 11, 


vn. 560 


xiii. 8, 


iv. 127 


xii. 12, 


n. 436 


xiii. 8, 


iv. 548 


xii. 13, . * 


m. 517 


xiii. 8, 


vm. 41 


xii. 14, 


vii. 240 


xiii. 9, 


i. 4 


xii. 15, 


ix. 177 


xiii. 10-16, . ;. 


vi. 36 


xii. 15, 


x. 43 


xiii. 11, \ 


iv. 57 



326 




Heb. 


xiii. 12, 




xiii. 16, 




xiii. 18, 




xiii. 18, 




xiii. 18, 




xiii. 20, 




xiii. 20, 




xiii. 20, 21, 




xiii. 21, 




xiii. 21, 




xiii. 22, 


James 


i. 




i. ii. iv. v. 




i. 2, 




i. 2,3, 




i. 4,5, 




i. 5, 




i. 5, 




i. 5,17, 




i. 5,17, 




i. 6, 




i. 6, 




i. 6-8, 




i. 12, 




i. 13, 14, 




i. 13, 17, 




i. 13, 17, 




i. 14, 




i. 15, 




i. 16-18, 




i. 16-27, 




i. 17, 




i. 17, 




i. 17, 




i. 17, 18, 




i. 17, 18, 




i. 17-27, 




i. 18, 




i 18, 




i.18, 




i. 18, 




i. 18, 




i. 18, 




i. 18, 




i. 18, 21, 




i. 21, 




i. 21, 




i.21, 




i.21, 




i. 22, 




i. 25, 




i. 25, 




ii. 1, 




ii. 5, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



iv. 58 


James ii. 5, 


vii. 319 


ii. 10, 11, 


i. 280 


ii. 19; 


vi. 277 


ii. 19, 


vn. 149 


ii. 19, 


i. 20 


n. 21-23, 


i. 461 


ii. 24, 


iv. 373 


iii. 6, 


1.422 


iii. 8, 


ix. 404 


iii. 10, 


vi. 394 


iii. 16, 


ix. 290 


iii. 31, 


vi. 493 


iv. 1, 


vi. 486 


iv. 1, 


vm. 449 


iv. 1, 


iv. 302 


iv. 1-6, 


iv. 238 


iv. 3, 


vii. 218 


iv. 3, 


vn. 60 


iv. 3, 


x. 29 


iv. 3, 


m. 369 


iv. 4, 


vm. 265 


iv. 4, 


vm. 420 


iv. 5, 


vn. 269 


iv. 5, &c. 


vn. 28 


iv. 5,6, 


i. 179 


iv. 6, 


x. 7 


iv. 7, 


x. 284 


iv. 7, 


x. 6 


iv. 8, 


ix. 289 


iv. 8,9, 


i. 60 


iv. 13, 


i. 396 


iv. 13, 


i. 410 


iv. 13, 


vn. 534 


iv. 13-15, 


i. 381 


iv. 13, 15, 


vi. 411 


iv. 17, 


1.402 


v. 4, 


i. 92 


v. 5, 


1.168 


v. 7, 


1.367 


v. 7, 


i. 371 


v. 7, 


iv. 458 


v. 7,8, 


iv. 534 


v. 7,8, 


vi. 398 


v. 9, 


vi. 197 


v. 11, 


iv. 155 


v. 11, 


iv. 248 


v. 13, 


vi. 397 


v. 14, 


vn. 247 


v. 14, 


vn. 291 


v. 15, 16, 


i. 54 


v. 16, 


vii. 295 


v. 19, 20, 


iv. 513 


1 Peter i. 1, 


iv. 249 


i. 1-3, 



IV. 306 

x. 64 

vm. 277 

YIII. 349 

x. 247 

vii. 178 

n. 331 

ii. 45 

vii. 164 

i. 27 
m. 279 

i. 396 
ii. 92 
m. 484 
vii. 262 
ix. 250 
n. 100 
m. 349 
in. 377 
iv. 202 
vi. 130 

x. 110 

vi. 162 

vm. 536 

vi. 153 

iv. 423 

v. 322 
vm. 531 
vm. 558 

x. 75 
m. 521 
vi. 384 
ix. 293 
vi. 453 
vm. 532 
iv. 169 
iv. 215 
iv. 159 
n. 449 
ii. 458 
vi. 342 
n. 451 
vi. 518 
vii. 557 

i. 62 
ix. 214 
in. 344 

i. 17 

i. 18 

m. 367 

in. 401 

vi. 518 

n. 261 

i. 508 



1 Pet. i. 2, 
i. 2, 

i. 2, 
i. 2, 
i. 3, 
i. 3, 
i. 3, 
i. 3, 
i. 3, 
i. 3, 
i. 3, 
i. 3, 
i. 3, 
i. 3, 
i. 3-5, 
i. 3,5, 
i. 4, 
i. 4, 
i. 4, 
i. 4, 
i. 4, 
i. 4,5, 
i. 4,5, 
i. 4,22, 
i. 5, 
i. 5, 
i. 5, 
i. 5, 
i. 5, 
i. 5, 
i. 5, 
i. 5, 
i. 5, 
i. 5, 
i. 5,6, 
i. 5-7, 
i. 6, 
i. 6, 
i. 6, 
i. 6, 
i. 6,7, 
i. 6,7, 
i. 6,7, 
i. 6,7, 
i. 7, 
i. 7, 
i. 7, 
i. 7,8, 
i. 7, 25, 
i. 8, 
i. 8, 
i. 8, 
i. 8, 
i. 8, 



23, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 


827 


i. 82 1 Pet. i. 8, 


vi. 49 


iv. 64 


i- -8, 


vn. 446 


vi. 20 


i. .8, 9, . 


i. 260 


vi. 67 


i. 9, 


i. 267 


i. 26 


i- 9, 


vn. 421 


i. 130 


i. 9, 


vm. 39 


i. 209 


i. 10, 


iv. 247 


11. 149 


i. 10, 


iv. 271 


n. 187 


i- 10, 


iv. 302 


n. 320 


i. 10, 


iv. 317 


iv. 373 


i. 10, 


v. 536 


vi. 37 


i. 10, 11, . 


i. 139 


vi. 84 


i. 10, 12, . 


iv. 253 


vi. 455 


i. 10-12, . 


iv. 270 


vi. 151 


i. 10-12, . 


iv. 283 


ix. 328 


i. 11, 


in. 365 


i. 265 


i. 11, 


iv. 236 


n. 250 


i. 11, 


iv. 408 


iv. 51 


i. 11, 


vi. 14 


iv. 99 


i. 11, 12, . 


vi. 99 


vn. 121 


i. 12, 


i. 139 


vii. 452 


i. 12, 


iv. 229 


vn. 468 


i. 12, 


iv. 265 


vi. 76 


i. 12, 


vm. 65 


i. 342 


i. 13, 


n. 329 


i. 346 


i. 13, 


n. 231 


i. 449 


i. 13, 


in. 330 


m. 422 


i. 13, 


vn. 238 


in. 448 


i. 13, 


vm. 310 


vi. 316 


i. 13, 


vm. 525 


vm. 462 


i. 14, 


n. 117 


ix. 180 


i. 14, 


i. 266 


ix. 210 


i. 14, 


vii. 242 


ix. 359 


i. 14, 15, . 


ix. 331 


ix. 244 


i. 15, 18, . 


vi. 113 


vi. 452 


i. 15, 18, 19, 


ix. 349 


n. 457 


i.17, 


i. 315 


m. 247 


i. 17, 


m. 310 


m. 263 


i. 17, 


vn. 565 


vn. 504 


i. 17, 


vm. 72 


i. 63 


i. 18, 


11. 30 


n. 432 


i. 18, 


n. 354 


m. 304 


i. 18, 19, . 


vi. 182 


ix. 290 


i 19, 


m. 220 


iv. 308 


i. 19, 21, . 


iv. 554 


vn. 179 


i. 20, { 


i. 31 


vni. 464 


i. 20, 


i. 70 


vm. 346 


i. 20, .> 


i. 78 


iv. 242 


i. 20, 


i. 87 


238, 240 


i. 20, , f.J 


n. 163 


i. 249 


i. 20, 


iv. 467 


i. 316 


i. 20, 


iv. 470 


iv. 246 


i. 20, i 


ix. 94 


iv. 330 


i. 20, 21, . 


1.271 



328 


INDEX OF TEXTS. 




1 Pet. i. 21, 


I. 463 


1 Pet. ii. 19, 20, . 


vn. 216 


i. 21, 


IV. 12 


ii. 24, 


i. 275 


i. 21, 


iv. 13 


ii. 24, V; 


v. 183 


i. 21, 


vm. 143 


ii. 25, . . . 


iv. 131 


i. 21, 


vm. 166 


ii. 25, 


ix. 356 


i. 22, 


in. 479 


iii. 1, 


vi. 98 


i. 22, 24, 25, 


vn. 415 


iii. 1, 


vii. 293 


i. 22-25, . 


vi. 29 


iii. 4, 


iv. 493 


i. 23, 


vi. 56 


iii. 7, . . 


n. 230 


i. 23, 


vn. 304 


iii. 8, 


ix. 9 


i. 23, 


x. 87 


iii. 9, 


i. 48 


i. 23, 24, . 


ix. 298 


iii. 11, 


n. 108 


i. 23, 25, . 


vi. 88 


iii. 15, 


m. 318 


i. 24, 


iv. 246 


iii. 15, 


VT. 297 


i. 24, 


vn. 122 


iii. 16, >-*:. 


vii. 148 


i. 24, 


xn. 7 


iii. 17, :. . 


n. 450 


i. 25, 


iv. 250 


iii. 18, 


i. 387 


i. 25, - . 


vn. 16 


iii. 18, 


iv. 86 


ii. 1-3, . 


vii. 478 


iii. 18, 


v. 135 


ii. 2, 


vi. 397 


iii. 18, 22, . 


IV. 


ii. 2, 


vm. 340 


iii. 19, 


iv. 409 


ii. 2, 3, . 


vi. 466 


iii. 19, 


vii. 386 


ii. 2, 3, . 


x. 182 


m. 19-21, . 


ix. 81 


ii. 2, 3, 


xi. 12 


iii. 20, 21, . 


vi. 79 


ii. 4, 


vm. 343 


iii. 20, 21, , 


ix. 42 


ii. 4, 6, . 


vm. 304 


iii. 20, 21, . . 


ix. 65 


ii. 4, 7, 


vi. 481 


iii. 21, 


vi. 456 


ii. 5, 


i. 14 


iii. 22, 


i. 195 


ii. 5, 


ii. 205 


iii. 22, . . 


i. 484 


ii. 5, 


m. 129 


iii. 22, . . 


i. 497 


ii. 5,6, . 


vi. 355 


iii. 22, . . 


iv. 396 


ii. 6, 


iv. 307 


iv. 1, 


m. 478 


ii. 6, 


v. 39 


iv. 1, 


VL 98 


ii. 7, 


iv. 299 


iv. 1, 


vi. 230 


ii. 8,9, . 


vi. 410 


iv. 2, 


n. 27 


ii. 8, 9, 


vii. 241 


iv. 2, . . 


n. 29 


ii. 9, 


i. 261 


iv. 2, 


ii. 94 


ii. 9, 


iv. 246 


iv. 2, 


n. 100 


ii. 9, 


iv. 371 


iv. 2, 3, ,:... 


n. 353 


ii. 9, 


vi. 116 


iv. 5, 


iv. 564 


ii. 9, 


vi. 222 


iv. 5, 


vii. 176 


ii. 9, 


vm. 58 


iv. 8, 


m. 471 


ii. 9, 


vm. 103 


iv. 10, 11, ... 


iv. 384 


ii. 9, 10, . 


vi. 406 


iv. 11, 


iv. 253 


ii. 9, 10, . 


vm. 35 


iv. 11, 


iv. 383 


ii. 10, 


ii. 149 


iv. 11, 


vii. 172 


ii. 10, 


iv. 270 


iv. 12, 


m. 309 


ii. 10, 


vi. 76 


iv. 14, . . ; 


n. 467 


ii. 10, 


vi. 386 


iv. 14, 7. . 


iv. 245 


ii. 11, . 6 . 


ii. 91 


iv. 14, . . : 


iv. 327 


ii. 12, . . 


iv. 383 


iv. 14, .. 


vi. 38 


ii. 13, 


m. 187 


iv. 14, ;;. .; 


vii. 275 


ii. 14, 15, . 


x. 417 


iv. 14, ./,. 


vn. 344 


ii. 18-20, . 


vi. 297 


iv. 19, 


vii. 28 



1 Pet. iv. 19, 
iv. 19, 
v. 2, 
v. 2, 
v. 6, 
v. 7, 10, 
v. 8, 
v. 8, 
v. 8, 10, 
v. 9, 
v. 9, 
v. 9, 
v. 9, 10, 
v. 10, 
v. 10, 
v. 10, 
v. 10, 
v. 10, 
v. 12, 

2 Peter i. 1 ? 
i. 1, 
i. 1, 
i. 1, 
i. 1, 
i. 1, 
i. 1, 
i, 1, 

1, 

2, 

2, 

2, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

3,4, 

3,4, 

3-5, 

4 



. 

i. 

i. 

i. 

i. 

i. 

i. 

i. 

i. 

i. 
i. 
i. 
i. 
i. 
i. 
i. 
i. 
i. 
i. 

i. 4, 
i. 4, 
i. 4, 
i. 4, 
i. 4, 
i. 4, 
i. 4, 
i. 4, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 


vii. 429 


2 Pet. i. 5, 


xii. 20 


i. 5-12, 


vi. 170 


i. 8, 


xi. 226 


> 
i. 9, 


in. 306 


i. 9 


ix. 409 


) 

i. 10, 


ii. 42 
m. 351 


i. 10, 
i. 10, 


vii. 506 


i. 11, 


m. 257 


i.13; 


vii. 271 


i. 14, 


x. 83 


i. 14, 


vii. 265 


i. 14, 


i. 20 


i. 16, 


in. 306 


i. 16, 17, 


vni. 346 
ix. 231 


* * 1 

i. 16, 17, 
i. 16, 18, 


ix. 368 


7 ) 

i. 17, 


ii. 231 


i. 17, 


i. 29 


i. 17, 


i. 35 


i. 17, 19, 


i. 224 


i. 19, 


i. 389 


i. 20, 


i. 441 


i. 20, 


v. 114 


i. 20, 


vi. 21 


i. 21, 


vi. 183 


i. 21, 


vm. 283 


ii. 1, 


i. 21 


ii. 1, 


i. 22 


ii. 1, 


i. 288 


ii. 1, 


i. 349 


ii. 1, 


i. 366 


ii. 1,2, 


i. 368 


ii. 3, 


i. 381 


ii. 3-5, 


i. 391 


ii. 4, 


ii. 205 


ii. 5, 


ii. 854 


ii. 5, 


ii. 462 


ii. 7,8, 


vi. 198 


ii. 9, 


x. 62 


ii. 10, 


x. 88 


ii. 13-15, 


vi. 324 


ii. 14, 


vi. 406 


ii. 14, 


ix. 254 


ii. 14, 


n. 84 


ii. 14, 


ii. 106 


ii. 16, 


iv. 241 


ii. 18, 


iv. 308 


ii. 19, 


iv. 311 


ii. 19, 


v. 49 


ii. 20, 


vi. 153 


ii. 20, 


vi. 437 


ii. 20, 


x. 374 


ii. 20, 



329 

vii. 185 
vn. 574 
vi. 216 
in. 241 
m. 294 
VT. 426 
ix. 213 
ix. 277 
v. 391 
i. 3 
vi. 325 
vii. 297 
vii. 413 
vii. 105 
iv. 221 
vi. 418 
iv. 499 
i. 315 
iv. 492 
ix. 333 
x. 39 
iv. 483 
i. 306 
iv. 295 
vni. 264 
i. 5 
x. 145 
i. 37 
i. 196 
m. 441 
vii. 225 
vm. 283 
xii. 57 
iv. 204 
x. 553 
ii. 39 
ii. 135 
iv. 564 
x. 274 
ii. 45 
ii. 102 
x. 185 
i. 48 
i. 364 
ii. 108 
ii. 117 
iv. 179 
iv. 177 
ii. 42 
x. 49 
i. 391 
i. 413 
n. 26 
m. 423 



330 


INDEX OP 


2 Pet. ii. 20, , 


VI. 81 


ii. 20, ; . 


vii. 330 


ii. 20, ;-: . 


x. 267 


n. 20, , : 


vi. 324 


ii. 20-22, 


vn. 503 


ii. 20-22, 


x. 154 


ii. 20-22, . 


x. 397 


ii. 21, 


x. 38 


ii. 21-23, . 


ix, 314 


ii. 22, 


i. 407 


ii. 22, 


x. 69 


iii. 1,2, , f . 


ii. 354 


iii. 4,9, ;tg . 


x. 234 


iii. 5, 


vn. 4 


iii. 7, . . 


v. 448 


iii. 7, 13, . . 


xn. 87 


iii. 9, 


i. 335 


iii. 9, . . 


iv. 191 


iii. 9, 


iv. 197 


iii. 12, 


vn. 58 


iii. 13, 


i. 523 


iii. 13, 


n. 31 


iii. 14, 


vii. 161 


iii. 15, 16, .,. 


iv. 426 


iii. 17, 


i. 506 


iii. 18, 


in. 472 


iii. 22, 


in. 223 


1 John i. 1, 


iv. 558 


i. 1, 


vn. 135 


i. 1,2, 


iv. 419 


i. 1, 2, 


vm. 179 


i. 1-6, 


iv. 264 


i. 2, 


ii. 207 


i. 2, 


n. 245 


i. 2,3, . 


iv. 266 


i. 3, 


i. 224 


i. 3, 


i. 289 


i. 3, 


iv. 318 


i. 3, 


iv. 452 


i. 3, 


vn. 199 


i. 3,4, 


vi. 26 


i. 3, 6, 7, 9, 


vn. 203 


i. 4, 


i. 305 


i. 4, 


m. 417 


i. 4, 


viii. 353 


i. 4, 


vm. 393 


i. 6, 


i. 251 


i. 7, 9, 


.vi. 407 


i. 9, 


iv. 76 


i. 9, ; 


vn. 433 


i. 12, 


ix. 331 


i. 18, 


vi. 515 


ii. 1, 


iv. 82 


ii. 1, 


v. 8 



1 John 



11. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 
ii. 



1, 

1,2, 

1,2, 

1,3, 

2, 

2, 

3,8, 



4, 

4, 

ii. 4, 9, 11 . 
ii. 4, 13, 15, 
ii. 7, 
ii. 8, 
ii. 12, 

ii. 12, 13, . 
ii. 13, 
ii. 13, 
ii. 13, 

n. 13, 14, . 
ii. 14, 

ii. 14, . 
ii. 14, 
n. 14, 
ii. 14, 
ii. 15, 
ii. 16, 
ii. 16, 
ii. 20, 

ii. 20-27 ; . 
iii. 1, 

1, 
1, 

1, 
1, 
1,2, . 

1.2, . 

1.3, . 
1,9, . 
2, 

2, 

2, 

2, 

2, 

2, 

2, 

2, 

2,3, 

3,4, 

3-10, 

4, 

4, ;,. 

4, 
6, 

7, 



111. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 
iii. 



vii. 264 

iv. 66 

iv. 76 

v. 187 

iv. 58 

v. 427 

vi. 257 

iv. 184 

vn. 333 

vi. 255 

vm. 198 

vi. 227 

i. 276 

vm. 119 

i. 305 

v. 315 

v. 318 

vm. 142 

vn. 475 

m. 486 

iv. 413 

v. 7 

vn. 500 

vm. 373 

n. 25 

n. 104 

m. 482 

i. 136 

ix. 283 

n. 172 

ii. 220 

n. 316 

vm. 158 

vm. 353 

iv. 499 

vi. 220 

m. 417 

iv. 159 

i. 86 

n. 263 

ii. 315 

ii. 443 

iv. 266 

iv. 565 

v. 548 

ix. 326 

i. 302 

vii. 26 

vii. 169 

iv. 157 

in. 480 

x. 281 

vii. 133 

vii. 154 

vii. 231 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 


881 


1 John iii. 7, 
iii. 8, 


^ VII. 556 
- . - II. 51 


1 John v . 5, 10, 

TT ^ 


vm. 272 


iii. 8, 
iii. 8, 
iii. 8, 
iii. 8, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 12, 
iii. 12, 
iii. 14, 
iii. 15, 
iii. 15, 
iii. 15, 
iii. 16, 
iii. 16, 
iii. 16, 
iii. 17, 


. ii. 108 
. IT. 423 
vi. 441 
vii. 254 
. in. 449 
. : vi. 515 
. x. 42 
x. 87 
, vii. 257 
ix. 29 
vi. 78 
v. 95 
vi. 207 
vi. 408 
. , i. 277 
. I. 429 
. - 11. 217 
i. 273 


v. 6, 
v. 6, 
v. 6-8, 
v. 6-8, 
v. 7, 
v- 7, 
v- 7, 
v - 7, 8, . 
v - 7, 8, 
v. 8, 
v. 8, 
v. 8, 
v. 9, 
v. 9, 
v. 10, 
v. 10, 11, . 
v. 11, 
v. 11, 12, . 
v. 11, 13, . 


ii. 422 
in. 409 
vi. 27 
Vii. 521 
iv. 231 
iv. 217 
IV. 263 
vin. 152 
vin. 360 
I. 233 
i. 241 
iv. 350 
I. 244 
m. 229 
vm. 372 
m. 259 
iv. 419 
vm. 159 
vi. 408 


iii. 17, 


vin. 51 


v. 12, 


ii. 16 


iii. 20, 


m. 328 


v. 12, 


iv. 14 


iii. 24, 


. ii. 392 


v. 12, 


vin. 338 


iv. 3, 


x. 239 


v. 12, 


x. 118 


iv. 4, 


i. 352 


v. 13, 


in. 417 


iv. 4, 


i. 388 


v. 13, 


vm. 351 


iv. 4, 


. n. 5 


v. 13, 14, . 


m. 377 


iv. 4, 


vii. 272 


v. 13, 15, . 


m. 398 


iv. 7, 8, 


- . vm. 59 


v. 14, 15, . 


m. 360 


iv. 9, 


ii. 216 


v. 16, 


m. 367 


iv. 9, 10, 


Vin. 39 


v. 16-18, . 


ix. 253 


iv. 9, 10, 


Tin. 375 


v. 18, 


vi. 193 


iv. 9, 16, 


iv. 268 


v. 19, 


n. 29 


iv. 10, 


ii. 169 


v. .19, 


vi. 82 


iv. 10, 


vn. 246 


v. 19, 


vn. 271 


iv. 10, 


ix. 159 


v. 19, 


x. 5 


iv. 10, 16, 


vm. 463 


v. 20, 


i. 300 


iv. 12, 13, 


ii. 392 


v. 20, 


i. 374 


iv. 15, 


vn. 447 


v. 20, 


iv. 305 


iv. 15, 16, 


ix. 116 


v. 20, . 


iv. 431 


iv. 16, 


. ii. 456 


v. 20, 


iv. 434 


iv. 16, 


v. 13 


v. 20, . 


iv. 561 


iv. 16, 


. vi. 133 


v. 20, 


v. 52 


iv. 16, 


vn. 211 


v. 20, 


vi. 192 


iv. 16, 


vn. 275 


v. 20, . 


vi. 205 


iv. 16, 


x. 543 


v. 20, 


vin. 163 


iv. 18, 


m. 283 


v. 20, 


VIH. 395 


iv. 18, 


vi. 282 


2 John 1, 


ix. 277 


iv. 19, 


vi. 90 


3, 


i. 20 


v. 1, 


i. 66 


3, 


ix. 223 


v. .1, 


i. 273 


10,11, 


xi. 264 


v. 1, 


vi. 193 


3 John 3, 4, 


iv. 135 


v. 4, 


Vii. 273 


3, 


xi. 58 


v. 4, 5, 


n. 432 


Jude WHOLE, 


ix. 196 


v. 5,7, 


vi. .420 


2, 


iv. 294 



332 
Jude 



Rev. 





INDEX OF TEXTS. 


4, 


X. 520 


Eev. 


6, 


ii. 37 




6, 


ii. 44 




6, 


vii. 26 




9, 


i. 156 




9, 


i. 487 




10, 


iv. 181 




10, 


x. 96 




11-13, 


ix. 174 




12, 


m. 442 




12, 


m. 465 




12, 


vi. 337 




14, 15, 


vi. 97 




14, 15, 


VI. 330 




14, 15, 


x. 539 




18-21, 


xi. 37 




19, 


VI. 69 




20, 


vi. 24 




20, 21, 


vii. 482 




21, 


vii. 164 




22, 23, 


VI. 415 




24, 


I. 422 




24, 


I. 426 




24, 


vii. 159 




24, 


ix. 103 




i. 1, 


i. 487 




i. 1, 


m. 210 




i. 1, 


iv. 263 




i. 1, 16, 18, 


iv. 109 




i. 3,4, . 


iv. 121 




i. 3, 4, 


vin. 46 




i. 4, 


n. 320 




i. 4, 


vm. 28 




i. 4, 5, 


vm. 367 




i. 4,5, . 


vm. 378 




i. 4-8, 


vni. 38 




i. 5, 


ii. 165 




i. 5, 


iv. 430 




i. 5, 6, 


iv. 374 




i. 6, 


m. 367 




i. 8, 


VHI. 41 




i. 8, 17, . 


iv. 436 




i. 9, 


n. 434 




i. 15, 16, . 


i. 467 




i. 18, 


m. 382 




i. 18, 


iv. 53 




i. 18, 


iv. 79 




ii. 


m. 422 




ii. 2, 


i. 10 




ii. 2, 


iv. 142 




ii. 2, 


ix. 272 




ii. 6, 


m. 321 




ii. 8, 


i. 36 




ii. 9, 


vi. 495 




ii. 10, 


n. 448 





ii. 10, 
ii. 10, 
ii. 13, 
ii. 15, 
ii. 19, 
ii. 19, 
ii. 20, 
ii. 21, 
ii. 21, 
ii. 21, 
ii. 21, 
ii. 24, 
ii. 24, 
ii. 24, 
ii. 24, 25, 
ii. 28, 
iii. 2, 
iii. 2, 
iii. 7, 
iii. 7, 
iii. 9, 
iii. 10, 
iii. 14, 
iii. 14, 
iii. 17, 
iii. 17, 
iii. 17, 
iii. 17, 
iii. 17, 
iii. 18, 
iii. 18, 
iii. 20, 
iii. 20, 
iii. 21, 
iii. 21, 
iii. 21, 
iii. 21, 
iii. 21, 
iii. 21, 
iv. 3, 
iv. 6, 
iv. 8, 
iv. 9, 
iv. 11, 
iv. 11, 
v. 2, 

2, 

4, 

6, 

6, 

9, 

9, 

9, 

9, 10, 

9-12, 



ii. 458 

vii. 152 

m. 226 

iv. 156 

m. 476 

m. 471 

rv. 248 

iv. 191 

iv. 193 

iv. 197 

vii. 556 

m. 262 

m. 264 

m. 265 

iv. 258 

i. 320 

m. 259 

ix. 390 

iv. 247 

iv. 302 

m. 50 

v. 323 

i. 177 

iv. 555 

vi. 69 

vi. 449 

vi. 495 

vii. 384 

x. 394 

vii. 379 

x. 178 

m. 509 

vm. 388 

i. 480 

ii. 258 

n. 262 

iv. 54 

iv. 370 

ix. 124 

iv. 397 

iv. 257 

iv. 374 

iv. 385 

i. 218 

m. 221 

iv. 564 

v. 77 

I. 404 

i. 467 

iv. 141 

i. 156 

i. 172 

m. 14 

m. 222 

iv. 374 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 



388 



Rev. 



v. 9-12, 
v. 9-12, 
v. 9-13, 
v. 10, 
v. 11, 
v. 11, 
v. 11, 
v. 12, 

V. 12, 

v. 12, 
v. 13, 
vi. 9, 
vi. 11, 


i. 155 
i. 29 
. : i. 197 
1.523 
1.162 
I. 168 
iv. 525 
i. 478 
in. 219 
iv. 398 
iv. 293 
. iv. 79 
vn. 369 


Rev. xiii. 4, 7, 
xiii. 7, 8, 
xiii. 8, 
xiii. 8, 
xiii. 8, 
xiii. 8, 
xiii. 8, 
xiii. 10, 
xiii. 11, 
xiii. 12, 
xiii. 17, 
xiv. 3, 
xiv. 4, 


i. 200 
in. 172 
n. 32 
ii. 164 
iv. 553 
ix. 40 
ix. 227 
vn. 450 
m. 213 
in. 1 1 
vn. 573 
ii. 258 
x 71 


vi. 11, 
vi. 11, 

vi. 16, 17, 
vii. 9-11, 


vn. 374 
vii. 382 
x. 512 
I. 198 


xiv. 6, 
xiv. 6, 
xiv. 10,11, 
xiv. 12, 


-A.. / 1 
iv. 212 
iv. 242 
x. 548 
ii. 216 


vii. 9-11, 
vii. 9-11, 
vii. 11, 


I. 169 
i. 172 
i. 193 


xiv. 12, 
xiv. 13, 
xiv. 13, 


vni. 287 
Vi. 200 
vii. 339 


vii. 11, 12, 


viii. 65 


xiv. 13, 


xii. 9 


vii. 12, 


iv. 385 


xv. 3, 


i. 36 


viii. 3, 


iv. 62 


xv. 3, 


iv. 77 


viii. 7, 


in. 55 


xv. 4, 


vn. 566 


ix. 


n. 66 


xv. 4, 


. viii. 94 


ix. 11, 


vi. 371 


xv. 8, 


iv. 539 


x. 10, 


iv. 346 


xvi. 8, 9, 


iv. 251 


xi. 1, 


ii. 75 


xvi. 13, 14, 


n. 65 


xi. 1, 


iv. 253 


xvi. 15, 


VTI. 379 


xi. 2, 


n. 74 


xvi. 17, 


ii. 35 


xi. 6, 


i. 199 


xvi. 17, 


iv. 375 


xi. 10, 


iv. 251 


xvii. 5, 


iv. 273 


xi. 12, 


iv. 77 


xvii. 8, 


ix. 40 


xi. 15, 


n. 31 


xvii. 13, 


n. 28 


xi. 15, 


iv. 236 


xvii. 13-17, 


rv. 217 


xi. 17, 


m. 221 


xviii. 7, 


n. 258 


xi. 17, 


iv. 375 


xix. 5, 


i. 274 


xii. 


. I. 491, 492 


xix. 6, 


iv. 375 


xii. 1, 


iv. 245 


xix. 6, 


xii. 65 


xii. 1, 


iv. 328 


xix. 7, 8, 


vn. 380 


xii. 7, 


i. 488 


xix. 9, 


ix. 103 


xii. 8, 


v. 322 


xix. 10, 


I. 36 


xii. 9, 


n. 46 


xix. 10, 


i. 167 


xii. 9, 


in. 262 


xix. 10, 


n. 58 


xii. 9, 


v. 315 


xix. 10, 


vn. 224 


xii. 10, 


v. 326 


xix. 10, 


vni. 330 


xii. 11, 


11. 43 


xix. 11-13, 


iv. 560 


xii. 11, 


vii. 133 


xix. 11-16, 


iv. 550 


xii. 11, 


vii. 222 


xix. 15, 


m. 281 


xii. 11, 


Vii. 449 


xix. 15, 


iv. 203 


xii. 12, 


n. 65 


xix. 19, 20, 


. i. 494 


xiii., xiv., 


xii. 109 


xix. 20, 


n. 47 


xiii. 1-3, 


i. 493 


XX. 


i. 511 


xiii. 2, 


11. 47 


xx. 1-7, 


i. 522 


xiii. 3, 


n. 28 


xx. 3, 


i. 494 



334 
Eev. 



xx. 3, 
xx. 4, 5, 
xx. 6, 
xx. 6, 
xx. 10, 
xx. 12, 

xxi. 6, 

xxi. 7, 

xxi. 7, 

xxi. 11, 

xxi. 12, 

xxi. 22, 33, 

xxi. 23, 

xxi. 23, 

xxi. 23, 

xxi. 27, 
xxii. 1, 



INDEX OF TEXTS. 


II. 


45 


Eev. xxii. 


2, 


YII. 


449 


xxii. 


6, 16, 


I. 


523 


xxii. 


9, 


V. 


271 


xxii. 


9, 


II. 


47 


xxii. 


9, 


IV. 


565 


xxii. 


11, 


IV. 


109 


xxii. 


11, 


I. 


261 


xxii. 


11, 


IV. 


243 


xxii. 


11, 


I. 


319 


xxii. 


14, 


I. 


190 


xxii. 


15, 


I. 


319 


xxii. 


15, 


I. 


312 


xxii. 


16, 


IV. 


565 


xxii. 


16, 


ix. 


333 


xxii. 


16, 


XII. 


74 


xxii. 


16, 20, 


VI. 


53 


xxii. 


17, 



vii. 166 
iv. 521 
i. 167 
iv. 140 
iv. 437 
iv. 172 
vi. 45 

vn. 175 

vii. 561 
i. 64 
m. 26 
iv. 176 
m. 222 
ix. 266 
ix. 333 
iv. 109 

vm. 509 



END OF VOL. XII. 



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