(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Gospel, by John : translated from the Greek on the basis of the common English version"






'M0k: 




wiimm 



LIBRARY or THE 
JVlassacnusetts 
Bible Society 

Catalog No..AS33,.3/^^/f 5,^ 

Family M3>o eunoPE^A/J 
Siit)-ramily Te U7-p.Ai.l.c. 

Brancli We if ■•= 

Group Low 'MiucAfk 
Language ^M^L^SH .j j 

Dialect f Γ j-i i 

Jjocaiity ■ ! 

Contents zToH^• 

V er^ion A»*ne»"«'cfc»«. "Bi (r/e "niovv 

Translator 

Putlislied l^yA^^<tr ("ονκΈίΐΑ-Τ U»,i<xK 
Place J^^M^Y^yK 

Date f^S'i 

Accession No. 17^^ 

Accession Date Ji-'tic -2.^, f\3f 

Priced O.JS 



THE 



GOSPEL, BY JOHN 



Crnnslatfit frnm \^t (Bun, 



ON THE BASIS OF THE 



COMMON ENGLISH VERSION. 



NEW YORK: ' 

AMERICAN BIBLE UNION. 

LOUISVILLE : BIBLE REVISION ASSOCIATION. CINCINNATI : AMERICAN CHRISTIAN BIBLE SOCIETY. 

LONDON : TRUBNER & CO.. NO. 12 PATERNOSTER ROW 

1859. 



ADYEETISEMEIS^T. 



This is an incipient or primary revision, and is issued by the American Bible Union, and sent 
to scholars and others, in order to call forth criticisms and suggestions, which may aid tlie Final 
Committee in their work. It is proper to observe that, since the book was prepared for the press, 
and the Introduction written, the revision and notes have passed through the hands of another 
reviser, and a number of changes has been made. 

Tlie Board requests that the greatest freedom will be exercised in proposing corrections and 
improvements. If any person will return a corrected copy to the Rooms of the American Bible 
Union, 350 Broome St., New York, he will be entitled to a new copy and the cordial thanks of the 
Union. 

WM. H. WYCKOFP, 

Corresponding Secretary. 



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1859, by 

THE AMERICAN BIBLE UNION, 

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York. 



Thomas Holman, Printer and Siekeotyper, New Tore. 



INTEODUCTION. 



The Revision of "The Gospel, by John," has been made, as nearly as was practicable, in 
accordance with the following rules : 

" GENERAI RULES FOR THE DIRECTION OF TRANSLATORS AND REVISERS EMPLOYED BY THE AMERICAN BIBLE UNION 

"1. The exact meaning of the inspired text, as that text expressed it to tliose who understood the original scriptures 
at the time they were first written, must be translated bj•• corresponding words and phrases, so far as they can be found, 
in the vernacular tongue of those for whom the version is designed, with the least possible obscurity or indefiniteness, 

" 2. Wherever there is a version in common use, it shall be made the basis of revision, and all unnecessary interference 
with the established phraseology shall be avoided ; and only such alterations shall be made, as the exact meaning of the 
inspired text and the existing state of the language may require. 

"3. Translations or revisions of the New Testament shall be made from the received Greek text, critically edited, 
with known errors corrected. 

"SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO THE REVISERS OF THE ENGLISH NEW TESTAMENT. 

" 1. The common English version must be the basis of the revision ; the Greek text, Bagster & Sons' octavo edition 
of 1851. 

" 2. Whenever an alteration from that version is made on any authority additional to that of the reviser, such 
authority must be cited in the manuscript, either on the same page or in an appendi.x. 

'' 3. Every Greek word or phrase, in the translation of which the phraseology of the common version is changed, 
must be carefully examined in every other place in which it occurs in the New Testament, and the views of the reviser 
be given as to its proper translation in each place. 

" 4. As soon as the revision of any one book of the New Testament is finished, it shall be sent to the Secretary 
of the Bible Union, or such other person as shall be designated by the Committee on Versions, in order that copies may 
be taken and furnished to the revisers of the other books, to be returned with their suggestions to the reviser or revisers 
of that book. After being re-revised with the aid of these suggestions, a carefully prepared copy shall be forwarded to 
the Secretary." 

Before proceeding to speak more particularly of the Revision now offered to the reader, it may 
not be improper to present a few remarks upon the sttjle of this Evangelist, especially as regards its 
philological peculiarities. 

STYLE OF THE GOSPEL, BY JOHN. 

The style of this Evangelist is evidently peculiar; though I can not admit that its peculiarities 
are exactly what they have sometimes been represented to be. As to its features, in a philological 
point of view, the most striking that I have discovered, are the following: 

1. Exceeding ■minute7iess of descripiio?i. — (See ch. 20 : 1, N. b.) — This is easily accounted for, if 
it be admitted, that John wrote his Gospel long after tlie publication of tiic other three, (called 



IV INTRODUCTION. 



Sijnoptical,) by Matthew, Mark, and Luke ; and that his principal design was to supply facts, both 
entire narrations and minute particulars, which had been omitted by them. Or, if we adopt the 
view, that John wrote without any reference to the other Gospels, we may consider this peculiarity 
as a personal trait of this Evangelist. 

2. The use of a very small vocabulary. — No other Book of the N. T., of equal size, is made up of 
so few words. It is also worthy of remark, in this connection, that compound words, especially 
verbs compounded with prepositions, are used very sparingly by John. This peculiarity gives to 
his style an air of the most charming simplicity — a simplicity which may have been either studied, 
or natural. 

3. An evident effort to malce every thing plain to the reader. — Hence, the meaning of a term is so 
frequently explained in a parenthesis, as in ch. 1 : 38, 41, 42. 4 : 25. 9 : 7, &c. Perhaps the lateness 
of the period at which this Gospel was published, and the fact that many names and phrases, formerly 
well known, were then passing into desuetude, may have given occasion to this peculiarity. Or, John 
may have written for those readers, more particularly, who did not understand Hebrew or Syriac. 

4. A very frexjiient use of the connective, ow. True, the researches of critics have left little room 
to doubt, that many of these connectives have been intruded by transcribers at a later period, and, 
accordingly, the rejection of many of them has been recommended; still, this remains as a striking 
peculiarity of this writer's style. On the other hand, the simple connective, Sc, is not so often used 
by John as by most other N. T. writers. 

5. An uncommon use of tenses. — As, for instance, the very frequent use of the historical present, 
and of the compound forais of the imperfect, and perfect. (See ch. 1 : 28. 3 : 23, 28, &c.) Yet I can 
see no evidence that John ever uses, (as some have alleged.) one tense iJistead of another. On the 
contrary, the careful reader will see, that, in every case of apparent departure from the common 
idiom, the tense adopted was the most appropriate that could have been selected. 

6. The occasional vse of words in α iKculiar sense. — As, for example, 6 Aoyos, in ch. 1, which is 
undoubtedly to be taken in a sense different from what is common, either in sacred or profane 
writers. But, as I have not recommended any change in the translation of this word, I will not 
enlarge upon its meaning. I have no doubt but that the English term. Word, bears a meaning 
precisely equivalent to that of the Aoyog of John's first chapter, and not more unusual. 

There are, doubtless, other peculiarities; but as they are not properly within the province of 
the Reviser, they need not be mentioned in this connection. We come now to the Revision itself. 

I.— THE REVISED VERSION, AND THE PRINCIPLES ADOPTED IN THE REVISION. 

The Revised Version has been, of course, the Reviser's most difficult work. Two distinct objects 
have been constantly before his mind — First, To male the Version as faithful as possihle to the Original 
Greek. Second, To make the style as good as strict fidelity would picrmit. Of the emendations proposed, 
some occur but seldom — others on almost every page, and some, even in almost every verse. For 
the purpose of avoiding the too frequent repetition of notes, or references to notes, I have thought 
proper to lay down some general rules, which have been adopted throughout, and which may 
give the reader, at the outset, an idea of the changes he will constantly meet. 

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE CHANGES MORE FREQUENTLY MADE. 

1. In most cases, I deem it unnecessary to offer any apology for omitting the supplied words 
of the Common Version. If these supplies are not necessary, to convey the true sense of the 
Original, or to make good English, they are a useless appendage to the Word of God. If they 
make the Version speak a meaning that is not in the Original, they are positively hurtful. I have. 



INTRODUCTION. 



therefore, adopted the following rule — Xever to omit any word of the Original, nor to insert any 
word, or phrase, to which there is notliing corresponding in the Original, unless such supply, or 
omission, be required by the idiom of our language, or may be evidently necessary to convey, clearly 
and full}', the undoubted sense of the passage. I extend this rule even to the article. The 
indefinite English article, a, or an, to which there is seldom any corresponding Greek, I have 
sometimes omitted, where it is found in the E. V., because it seemed to be an unnecessary, or 
hurtful supply. 

2. Instead of using the Italic character, to indicate what supplies I find it necessaiy to 
introduce, I enclose all such \vords in brackets, for the following reasons — (I) Because the Italic 
character is not ordinarily used for such a purpose. The Bible is, perhaps, the only book in which 
supplies are so indicated. In all other English, and in most foreign books, brackets are used for 
this purpose. (2) Because the Italic character is used, in all other English books, for another 
purpose, namely, to indicate a peculiar emphasis on certain parts of a passage. This is its popular 
use, and is so nearly universal among us, that it seems to be peculiarly appropriate. T/ie and a, 
or a?i, and the personal pronouns, are not properly supplies, if they are inserted merely to satisfy 
the requirements of our idiom. 

3. I distinguish two kinds of cmpJiasis — literal and rhetorical. The latter, referred to in Obs. 2, 
foils properly within the province of the interpreter, and need not be further noticed at present. 
The former, which is inherent in the words of the passage, is, in an original work, sufficiently 
indicated to the e3'e of the intelligent reader in the words themselves. But this is not true of a 
translation from the Greek. There are many Greek words that contain, in themselves, an cnqihasi.->, 
or relative strength of meaning, which is lost in the translation, from the fact that the English 
words properly employed in translating them possess no corresponding inherent relative strength. 
The truth of this reiuark will at once be obvious to the Greek scholar. With the view of removins 
this diihcultj-, at least in part, I have adopted the black letter, and small capitals, to indicate to 
the eye of the English reader this literal emj'hasii, leaving the Italic character for its more appropriate 
use. Thus I print — 

IN BLACK LETTER 1. I, wheu it translates εγω. 

2. The personal pronouns of the third person, when they translate exenos, 

(that,) in any of its cases. 

3. The possessives, which translate ε /toi, aoi, 6s, ί^μετεροί, νμετε^οι, &c., when 

not rendered emphatic by the word, own. 

IN SMALL CAPITALS — 1. The personal pronouns of the nominative case, (except I,) when they 

translate the nominative of the coiTesponding Greek pronouns. In 
like manner, when they translate the Greek accusative before the 
infinitive. 

2. The words used to translate the emphatic oblique forms of these pro- 

nouns, εαιον, ε/ιοι, εμε, and (when Hot Cnclitic) oov, σοι, σε, ov, ol, ε, &C. 

3. The personal pronouns of the third person, when thej^ translate σίτος, 

{this,) in any of its cases. 

It is not pretended that the above plan is perfect. It is presented rather as an experiment, 
in the hope that something more nearly perfect may grow out of it. 

4. Some of the Greek tenses are treated, in the Common Version, without any apparent 
regard to their peculiar force and signification. I have endeavored, throughout, to remedy this 
defect, as far as practicable, and I hope it will appear that I have, in a great measure, succeeded, at 



VI INTRODUCTION. 



least in principal, or independent clauses. The following model will best explain the principle 
on which the Revision has been conducted, in this respect. 
Presrjit. πιστεύω, I believe, or, I am believing. 
Imperfect, επωτευον, I was believing, I kept believing, I continued believing, or, (if the English 

idiom will not admit of either of these,) I believed, like the English imperfect. 
Future. Λίστευσω, I shall, ΟΓ will believe. 

Aorist. ΐτίΐστεναα, I believed, or I did believe, like the English imperfect, as a general rule. 
Sometimes, however, (rarely in John,) where the context requii'es it, I believe, 
(indefinite present,) and, very rarely, I have believed. 
Perfect. κεπιατενχα, I Jiave believed, or, I have been believi7ig.^ 
Fluperfect. επεπιστευκειι; I had believed, or, I had been believiiig. 

Participles. 

Present. πωτενων. believing, or, ivhile believing. This participle is also used for the imperfect. 

Future. πιστεναων, abo7it to believe. 

Aorist. πιατενσα;, believing, on believing, after believing, or, occasionally where euphony may 

require it, having believed.^ 

Perfect. TteTtiarevy-tos, having believed, or, in some cases, where the idiom requires it, simply, 
believing. This participle is also used for the pluperfect. 

I prefer to translate the participles literally, when the English idiom will at all admit of so 
doino•. Accordingly, I have often used the participial, instead of the substituted relative clause, 
because, in such cases, I consider the former more effective and concise than the latter, and 
equally elegant. In dependent clauses, I have endeavored to carry out the above principles, as 
far as the comparative poverty of our language will admit. I have also endeavored to correct the 
frequent inaccuracies of the Common Version in regard to the tense of dependent verbs. In that 
Version, for example, the past is often dependent upon the present, or perfect, which is, at least, 
contrary to the present usages of our language. Certain obsolete uses of the subjunctive mood 
have also been corrected in this Revision. 

5. I have frequently changed the Order of words from the Common Version, for one of two 
general reasons: First, to make the translation agree in this respect with the Original, in cases 
where I thought that the English idiom would easily admit such agreement. Second, to make 
the translation conform to the present prevailing usages of the English language. Thus, in 
ch. 1 : 19, I write "sent from Jerusalem priests and Levites," instead of "sent p>-iests and 
Levites from Jerusalem," because the former, which is in exact accordance with the Original in 
respect to collocation, is not only quite as good Englisli as the latter, but is, at the same time, 
more clear and forcible. On the other hand, in ch. 4 : 29, 39, I write " that I ever did," instead 
of " that ever I did," because the pi-esent usages of our language require this change. I am not 
sure, but that the rules in respect to change of collocation might have been carried even further 
with advantage. 

6. The following miscellaneous changes, the reasons for most of which will be at once obvious 

• A very rare exception to this occurs in ch. 6 : 25, where the perfect γεγονα?, follows ποτέ. In this case, the 
English idiom \\\\\ not admit of a literal translation. Hence, I have rendered it aoiistically. The German and French 
translators, with few exceptions, encountering no such idiomatic diificulty, render literally. 

* The aorist participle usually describes an action as immediately following another, so as to he almost con- 
temporaneous with it; while the present participle describes the act as continuous, and contemporaneous with 
another. (See ch. 18 : 1, N. a.) 



INTRODUCTION. VU 



to the reader, are made so frequently ia the body of the Eevision, that I have thought best to 
introduce them to notice in this general manner, in order to avoid the necessity of constantly 
referring to them in the notes. 

TFho, for u'hich, referring to persons. That is sometimes substituted for wAo, or u-hich, and 
vice versa. In this I am guided solely by what I understand to be the laws of euphony 

Those, for them, in the expressions, them that, or them which. 

Will, for shall, in a great many cases, to satisfy the requirements of modern usage. 

Ann '"^^' ^^^ * man, or any man, in the translation of r«. 

No one, for no man, in the translation of ovSen. 

Because of this, or on account of this, for therefore, in the translation of Sia τούτο. 

Whoever, ichatever, for ivhosoever, whatsoever. Whomever is, however, hardly admissible. 

What, for that ivhich, as more concise. 

Every one who, or that, for whosoever, in the translation of nas b. 

To, for nnto, in all cases. See Webster's Dictionary, art. TJnto. 

Till, for nntil. See Webster's Dictionary, art. Until. 

Into which, in which, to which, by which, of which, on ivhich, for ichereinto, wherein, whereto, 
ivhereby, whereof, whereon, (or whereujjon). 

In this, for herein. 

Of it, (or its,) by it, in it, on it, (or iqwn it,) for thereof, thereby, therein, thereon, (or there^qmn). 

But, and, or now, according to the connection, for Se, where this particle is left untranslated 
in the E. V. 

But, fur and, sometimes, in the translation of δε. 

And, for then, sometimes, in the translation of δε. 

And, for but, in the translation of y.ai. 

During, for at, in several cases, in the translation of εν. See ch. 2 : 23, N. q. 

Nor, for neither, in many cases where the latter is contrary to modern usage. 

Therefore, for then, as the translation of ovu, which I would usually so render, even where 
it is left untranslated in the E. V. — For reason, see ch. 1 : 22, N. x. 

7. I have not been able fully to make up my mind, as to whether the changes enumerated 
below are in accordance with the Rules to which this Revision is subject, or not. I have concluded, 
however, to propose them in the Paragraph Edition, at the end of the Volume. I hope those into 
whose hands this work may be put for criticism, will freely express their views in relation to the 
propriety of these changes. They are proposed, because they are considered important. 

My, thy, for mine, thine, followed by a noun, as, my hour, for mine hotir, &c. 

You, for ye, in all cases. 

-s, (or-ei,) ίοτ -th, {or -eth,) in the termination of verbs in the third person singular of the 
present indicative, as, has, for /lath, Sec. 

The adoption of the above changes in the Paragraph Edition rendered necessary a few other 
slight modifications, chiefly in collocation, in order to meet the requirements of euphony, as, 
"What are you seeking?" for "What seek ye?"— Ch. 1 : 38. 

THIS REVISION NOT FINAL. 

Those who may feel inclined to censure the Writer of the following pages for having made too 
many alterations, will, it is hoped, bear in mind, that this Revision is by no means final, and, 
though no changes, either in the Text, or in the Version, have been recommended, except what 



VIU INTKODUCTION. 



are confidently believed to be improvements, all more or less important, yet any suggestions that 
may be made by those into whose hands this work may fall, with a view to its further improvement, 
shall be thankfully received, and candidly considered. 

ASSISTANCE RECEIVED IN THE EXECUTION OF THE WOEK. 

The Author is glad to acknowledge his indebtedness to those gentlemen with whom he has 
been more immediately associated in revision labors, during the prosecution of this work, for their 
many valuable and kind suggestions, of which he has availed himself in repeated instances. 
Valuable aid has also been derived from the Manuscript Revisions of several eminent British 
Scholars, who have been employed in the work of revision by the A. B. Union. The regulations 
by which the revision enterprise is conducted, however, do not allow me at present to mention 
the names of any of the gentlemen referred to above. 

II.— THE NOTES. 

In regard to the notes, I will simply remark, that it has been my aim to make them as short 
and concise as I could, consistently with perspicuity. I have endeavored also to avoid all discussions 
of points purely theological, or pertaining only to the depai'tment of interpretation. If these endeavors 
have not been entirely successful, I hope the candid reader will, at least, find evidence to satisfy 
him that the Author has tried to divest his work of every thing of a partisan or sectarian character. 
It has been my aim also, in accordance with the rules of the Union, to account for every change 
proposed, either in the Notes, or in the General Observations contained in this introduction. The 
citations of authorities might in many cases have been much more copious, had this been deemed 
necessary. Enough, it is hoped, have been given to satisfy the candid inquirer, on questions of 
minor importance ; while, on questions likely to be controverted, the array of authorities is much 
more extensive. 

III.— THE COMMON ENGLISH VERSION. 

The Common English Version, (or, as it is commonly called. King James' Version,) in this 
work, is printed from the American Bible Society's pica edition of 1851 (41st). No intentional 
variations from this have been made, except that a very few evident typographical errors have 
been corrected. This last remark applies equally to the Greek Text of the Bagsters, as printed 
in this work. 

IV.— THE GREEK TEXT ADOPTED IN THIS REVISION. 

According to the Rules, given above, " Bagster & Sons' octavo edition of 1851," " with known 
errors corrected," is the standard Greek Text. (See 1st Special, and 3d General Rule.) This 
edition of the Greek Text is that of Mill, which is almost an exact reprint of Stephens' Third 
Edition, (folio, 1550,) and difiers but slightly from the Second Elzevir Edition, or Textus Beceptus. 
It would be, perhaps, useless to trace the history of this Text, which is well known to most readers. 
It is sufficient to say, that the Textiis Receptus differs in but a few places from the Editio Frinceps 
of Erasmus, or first printed edition; and that those few diflerences were the result of but a small 
increase of facilities in the department of textual criticism. Now, it is well known, that the 
Editio Frinceps was made from a very small number of Manuscripts, and those all of comparatively 
recent date. It is equally well known that Stephens' Third Edition, of which Mill's is so nearly 
an exact copy, and also the Elzevirs, were printed before the discovery of a single one of the very 



INTRODUCTION. IX 



nncicnt ^raniiscnpts. The TexUis Rcccptus, therefore, is almost exclusively based upon Manuscripts 
tliat are known to have been written during the middle ages ; few, if any, of them dating further 
back than the tenth centur)'. Yet there are two existing Manuscripts of the greater part of the 
N. T. {B & C) that are generally admitted by the learned to have been written either before, or 
during the fifth century, Avhile many others are vastly superior in age to any one known to 
Erasmus or Stephens. Besides, the varieties of reading between the different Manuscripts, especiallj 
between the more ancient, and modern ones, are very considerable, and sometimes important. 
Need it be wondered at, then, if all those earlier printed editions are found to contain " known 
errors?" It is certain that the more modern editors have unanimously agreed, that the Received 
Text contains a great number of errors and imperfections, though they may not have entirely 
agreed in determining what they are. And perhaps it may not be improper to remark, that the 
slowness of the earlier editors and critics to adopt the readings of the more ancient Manuscripts, 
however well sustained internally, aflbrds at least a ground of suspicion that there was in the minds 
of those editors and critics a very considerable amount of prejudice in favor of readings whose sole 
recommendation, above others, was, that they had happened first to see the light of modern times. 
Indeed, there are scholars, even at the present day, who avow the conviction, that the Common 
Greek Text ought to be rcvermthj handled, even in comparing it with the most ancient Manusciipts, 
because, as is alleged, it is the Text that has been furnished us by Divine Providence. Such persons 
seem to forget, that the same Providence who watched over the labors of an Erasmus and a 
Stephens, also presided over those of a Griesbach, a Scholz, a Tischendorf, and a host of other 
critics, who have since opened up, and made available, vast stores of critical apparatus, that were 
not even known to exist two hundred years ago. It is a remarkable fact, that, though Mill had 
the various readings of a great multitude of Manuscripts before him, and has noted them in his 
margin, yet, in his critical Text, he has made but one intentional alteration from the third edition 
of Stephens (see Bagsters' Preface). Perhaps some may feel disposed to explain this singular 
fact, by alleging the extreme accuracy of Stephens' Edition, and the evident purity of the sources 
Λvhence it was drawn. But by far the more plausible explanation is found in the \vell known 
jn-evalence, in that age, of a veneration, almost superstitious, for the earlier printed editions; 
Λvhich inclined all the earlier editors to make their variations from them as few as possible. It can 
not be denied, however, that the influence of the superstitious veneration, alluded to above, has 
now in some measure subsided, and is fast dying out ; so that one may confidently predict, that, 
Λvithin another quarter of a century, the Christian world will regard the readings of the Vatican, 
Ejihrem, or Alexandrian Manuscript, as, at least, equal in authority to those of either of the four or 
five consulted by Erasmus, in preparing his first printed edition. Nay, more, that these very ancient 
Manuscripts, and others like them, will, from the evident care employed in their transcription, and 
other internal marks of their fidelity, and from their evident independence of each other, command 
an influence, which hundreds of those executed by the monks of the dark ages, (many of them in 
slavish subserviency to one common original,) will not exert. 

As it is the desire of the A. B. Union, that known errors in the Text that is made the 
basis of their operations should be corrected, I have conceived it to be my duty carefully to 
compare the results of the labors of the various critics who have produced new and corrected 
editions of the Greek. Of those most constantly consulted are Griesbach, Scholz, Lachmann, 
Tischendorf, Hahn, Knapp, Theile, and Bloomfield. Others have been consulted occasionally on 
the more difficult places. Of all these, more deference has been paid to Tischendorf than to any 
other single one, as I can not but regard his stereotype edition, (of ISoO,) as the best copy of the 
Greek Testament that has thus far been produced. And here it is but proper to acknowledge, 



INTRODUCTION. 



that, for the jiurpose of saving time, the references to many of these editions are made, in this 
work, on the authority of Bagsters' margin, or, more frequently, of Stier and Theile's Polyglotten- 
Bibel, which has been found, from actual observation, to be very accurate, and to which I am 
glad to acknowledge my indebtedness for much and valuable information on tliis branch of the 
subject. Besides the authors already mentioned. Mill, Birch, Meyer, Alford, Kuinoel, De Wette, 
and a few others, have been constantly consulted, as far as their writings bear upon the state of 
the Text. Meyer's commentary, especially, has been found to contain much valuable matter in a 
convenient form. Tischendorf s fac-simile editions of the Ephrem and Parisian Manuscripts have 
also been consulted occasionally. 

According to the Rules already referred to, two things appear to be certain — 1. That the Reviser 
is expected to correct, (or, at least, to recommend in his notes that they be corrected,) all the 
"known errors" in Bagsters' edition of Mill's Testament.— 2. That the Reviser is left to judge, 
from the best light he can obtain, what are known ertvrs. This discretionary power has occasioned 
no small difficulty in the prosecution of this work. I suppose a known error may be defined to 
be " any reading which the Reviser may leel perl'ectly satisfied, from the evidences before him, is 
not in accordance with the autograph of the first penman." But here a difficult question presents 
itself — How shall the Reviser make up his mind, in relation to a proposed reading? There are 
several ways in which this might be done. — 1. By examining, for himself, all the original sources 
of evidence. This, in the present instance, no reasonable person could expect, nor would it, 
under any circumstances, be necessary or desirable. — 2. By adopting those emendations in which 
all the learned editors agree, and rejecting all others. This plan is certainly very simple and 
convenient, and its adoption would relieve one of a great load of responsibility; but I have not 
seen my way quite clear to adopt it, for the following reasons — (1) Because, if unanimity be the 
object sought after, it is by no means attained in this way; since, not only Mill, but Stephens, 
and, in most cases, Erasmus, Beza, and the editors of the Elzevir and Complutensian Editions, 
are disregarded in the application of this rule; for these all substantially agree, except in the 
Apocalypse, of which the Complutensian, and earlier Erasmian copies are known to differ. Now 
here is quite an array of learned names, substantially sustaining the readings of the Textus Rccepus. 
The readings of that copy are also sustained by a limited number of inferior Manuscripts. Who, 
then, shall say that any definite number of names shall suffice to set their authority aside? 
Certainly, absolute unanimity can not be claimed in flivor of even a single reading diifering from 
the Received Text. — (2) Because, in carrying out this plan consistently, it would be impossible to 
make any important emendation whatever; for, there is scarcely a reading of the Received Text 
that is not supported by one or more learned names. Indeed, Mill ought by no means to be 
excluded from the list of judges; for he was not only a man of great learning and laborious 
research, but, as has been remarked above, he had access to a multitude of various readings 
that were unknown to some of the earlier editors, yet he made but one intentional alteration 
from the copy by which he collated. If, then, any important use is to be made of the labors 
of scholars in the department of textual criticism, for the last two hundred years, it seems 
necessary to adopt some more liberal rule than this. — 3. By adopting those emendations only 
which are recommended by scholars enjoying superior facilities for arriving at a just conclusion. 
This is, no doubt, the foundation on which the preceding rule is based. The rule itself might, 
however, ]je carried much further than has been done hitherto. Thus, Mill, Bengel, Griesbach, 
Michaelis, Schulz, and Scholz, were destitute of some of the very best authorities in textual 
criticism. Ought, therefore, it may be asked, their judgment to be considered equal in authority 
to that of Lachmann, Tischendorf, or Theile? This is an important question, and certainly ought 



INTRODUCTION. xi 



to have its due weight in determining the genuineness of a proposed reading. — 4. By examining the 
grounds on which each editor bases, and the authorities by which he supports, his preference 
for a given reading. This is an excellent plan, and should be followed as far as is practicable, 
liut many editors have given their readings without specifying the grounds of the same, unless, 
perhaps, in terms too general to be satisfactory. Besides, we who are not personally conversant 
with Greek. Manuscripts, are, in a measure, incompetent to judge of their respective merits. In 
determining such questions, we can not do better than to defer to the rij)er judgment of those 
whose lives have been devoted to such pursuits. At the same time, in judging of the relative 
degrees of authority of difierent Manuscripts, there are certain general common-sense principles 
which all, acquainted with the known facts, may safely venture to apply. Thus, if the very great 
antiquity of any Manuscript be universally acknowledged, its relative value, as an authority, is 
thereby enhanced, other circumstances being equal. If, besides, it be universally acknowledged, 
that the transcriber evidently employed great care and skill in the execution of his work, its 
value is still further enhanced by this circumstance. And if it be true also that its readings are, 
in the main, in accordance with the most ancient versions, this is an additional circumstance in 
its favor. Now, it will not be denied, that some Manuscripts are of much greater autliority than 
others ; and it is on this ground mainly, though not exclusively, that most of the variations from 
Bagsters' Text, proposed in the following pages, are based. It is well known that there are, at 
least, two distinct classes of Greek Manuscripts, called Recensions — the Alexandrine, (including those 
by some called the Western,) and the CunstanlinopoUlun. All the very old Manuscripts, including the 
Vatican (β), and the Ephrem (C), belong to the former Recension. It is, perhaps, equally well 
known, that Textual Critics have long been divided in their judgment as to the relative merits 
of these two Recensions. Of those who have favored the Constantinopolitan Manuscripts, perhaps 
Matthaei and Scholz are most conspicuous; while, of those who favor the other Recension, 
Lachmann and Tischendorf are prominent. I will not now rehearse the arguments for either side, 
but simply express the settled conviction, that the more ancient Manuscripts, though they are by 
no means to be considered infallible, are nevertheless by far more reliable than those of more 
modern date. I have, therefore, frequently recommended the adoption of a reading condemned 
by Scholz, Matthaei, Bloomfield, and others of the same school, but recommended by Griesbach, 
Lachmann, Meyer, and Tischendorf, giving the preference, in all cases in which I could onl}^ decide 
by authority, to the three last named, for the simple reason that their facilities for obtainino• 
accurate and thorough information, on such questions, are believed to have been superior to those 
of almost any other. 

I have, therefore, been governed by the following rules, in determining the State of the 
Text — 1. I have not ventured to entertain a doubt as to the genuineness of a reading, which 
may have been impugned by only a single critic; neither would I, in any case, recommend the 
adoption of a merely conjectural emendation, however plausible. — 2. When a majority of the 
leading editors, including the more recent oiies, have decided in favor of a reading, I recommend its 
adoption, unless I can discover some pretty strong internal evidence against it. — 3. \Vhen a 
respectable number of the more recent editors, especially of those who are known to favor the 
Alexandrine Recension, agree in adopting a reading, I have endeavored to examine the evidence, 
both external and internal, for and against it, and have decided accordingly. — In recommending 
the adoption of a new reading, I have made it a rule, whenever the change seemed to be of much 
importance, to give my reasons in the accompanying note, otherwise it has been deemed sufficient 
to quote the authorities simply. It must be added, however, that sometimes it is recommended, 
that a reading condemned by some of the latest and best critics be retained, simply because tlie 



Xll INTRODUCTION. 



internal evidence was thought to be strongly in its favor, while the external evidence was not 
whollij opposed. Thus I have endeavored to avoid both extremes ; and, however numerous, in the 
judgment of others, may be the faults of the present work, in this respect, the reader may rest 
assured, that the plan has been laid and executed with an honest intention ; and, as to any 
error of judgment that may appear, he will find little difficulty in laying the blame where it 
properly belongs. 

v.— QUESTIONS LAID OVER EOR FURTHER CONSIDERATION. 

Many amendments have been suggested to my mind, in the progress of this revision, which, 
though they seemed well wortliy of consideration, I did not feel quite ready to adopt. These have 
been laid over for further consideration. Some of them are of such a nature that they fall more 
particularly within the sphere of the labors of other Revisers, since the words in question occur 
more frequently in the portions assigned to them than in this Gospel. 

1. Should tTttd-vfua be rendered, (as it usually is in the Common English Version,) lust, or, 
simply, desire, leaving it to be determined by the context what kind of desire is meant? This 
word might be rendered desire in every case of its occurrence, without injury, and this rendering 
might be given to it exclusively. It is also worthy of consideration, whether lust is not more 
restricted in its popular use at the present day, than επι»νμια ever is, even by the context. This 
word occurs but once in this Gospel, ch. 8 : 44. 

2. Should TtoQrEia be rendered, (as it always is in the Common English Version) fornicaiion, 
or, in a more general sense, midcanness, as including all kinds of violations of the law of chastity? 
It is certain that in Matt. 5 : 32. 19 : 9, this word refers to adultery, as also in most cases where 
it is to be taken in a figurative sense. In all tliese cases it is, of course, improper to translate 
it furniccnion. It is certainly well worth our consideration whether the general term, undemmess, 
would not, in nearly all cases, convey the mind of the Spirit better than any other. This word 
occurs but once in this Gospel, ch. S : 41. 

3. Is it practicable to make use of the quotation marks in the translation of the Scriptures ? 
In favor of the affirmative it is said, that we not only have a right, but it is our duty, to punctuate 
the translation, though the Greek originally had no punctuation, and was not even divided into 
words; but we have as good a right to make quotation marks as periods, or notes of interrogation, 
since the former are a part of our regular system of punctuation. To this it may be replied — 
(]) That all punctuation is, more or less, of the nature of a commentary; and that even so much 
of commentary ought to be avoided in a translation, if it is possible to dispense with it. — (2) That 
while custom absolutely requires us to use periods, commas, &c., no such requirement exists in 
regard to quotation marks. Therefore, if we use these, we comment on the text more tlian is 
necessary. I hope this question will receive a due share of the attention of revisers. 

4. Should tlie perfect tense of the neuter verb ever be formed by the auxiliary, to be? For 
myself, I confess my ear is not offended by such expressions as, I am. come, he is gone, he is 
fallen asleep, &c., and I would have no objection to the use of such forms, unless in violation 
of the laws of euphony. But it seems to be the general preference of Grammarians, at the present 
day, to discard this mode of conjugation altogether, as a Gallicism. As this is a matter that can 
easily be attended to hereafter, I have thought best to make no changes at present, except those 
that euphony and the sense of the passages seemed to require. 

5. Should Χοιατοί be rendered, the Anointed, or the Messiah, or the Christ? I am satisfied that 
it should never be rendered simply, Christ; for, though Xowroi, without the article, was used by 



INTRODUCTION. xm 



all the Writers of the N. T. as a strict proper name, I do not believe that 6 Χριστοί ever entirely 
loses its etymological significance as an appellative = The Anointed One. Accordingly, I have 
uniformly, in this work, rendered this expression, the Christ. (An ajiparetit exception occurs in 
ch. 1 : 41, which see.) But the question is, Would it not be better to substitute the English 
word, Anointed, or the Hebrew word, Messiah, — the former, as conveying to the reader at once 
the meaning of the word, as an appellative, — the latter, as being already familiar from its frequent 
occurrence in the 0. T.? There is, perhaps, a certain harshness in the expression, the Christ, 
that does not belong to either of the others. This question is, I think, well worthy of careful 
consideration. 

6. Should ό Σατηια; be I'endered, the Accuser, or, (as it always is in the Common English Version,) 
Satan ? It is, I believe, universally conceded that ό Σαταναι. and 6 διάβολοι, the Devil, are synonymous. 
In view of this ilict, it is much to be doubted whether the former should not either be rendered, 
according to its literal import, the Accuser, wliich would distinguish it from its synonym, ό Jιaβoλos, 
or, like the latter, the Devil, applying the same English word to both. Or there is still another 
way in which the matter might be disposed of. Both these words might be translated, the Accuser, 
which would convey to the reader a just idea of their common meaning. Both Satan and the 
Devil are objectionable on the ground that they are not proper translations, but rather transfers, 
and both assume, in the mind of the English reader, the character of proper names. The former 
is further objectionable, on the ground that it does not admit the article. This word occurs but 
once in this Gospel, ch. 13 : 27. I hope the subject will be thoroughly sifted by other revisers. 

7. Should ίαιμονιζομενοί be rendered demonized, or, jmssessed of a demon, or, having a demon, or, 
demoniac? It is evident from ch. 10 : 20, 21, of this Gospel, that this word is = έχων ίαιμοηοιΊ but, 
as demonize is a word in good use, and undoubtedly means exactly what the Greek term does, 
it is well worth while to consider whether those passages in which this word occurs may not be 
much simplified by a literal translation. This word occurs, in this Gospel, only in the passage 
cited above. 

8. How should «/<oj, and its derivatives, be translated? Many good scholars are of opinion 
that ctyios properly means, sacred, or consecrated, while hohj, if, indeed, it ever has this meaning, is 
not only a secondary, but a rcrij unusual meaning of the term. This is a very important question. 
But, as tliis word occurs but βνε times in this Gospel, while its occurrence is very frequent 
elsewhere, I have preferred to suspend the examination till a future occasion, hoping that, in the 
mean time, other revisers may give their views in relation to• it. 

9. How should αιών be translated? This word is seldom translated literally in the Common 
English Version. It is often translated world, confounding it with xoofios, which should, if possible, 
be avoided. I am under the impression that it m,ay be possible to give a literal rendering almost, 
if not quite, always, though this would require great care and circumspection. I have changed 
the translation in this work, only in some negative clauses where «j toi• auova preceded by ov, μη, or 
ov μη, is rendered never, in the Common Version. I hope that at the proper time this whole 
question will be thoroughly sifted. 

10. How should χαρι; be rendered? It is, I think, doubtful, at least, wliether the idea of 
freeness is in this word, or not ; but this idea is, I apprehend, inherent in the word, grace. Now 
is it not well worth while to inquire whether Jcindness, or favor, or some equivalent term, would 
not be better than grace, to translate this word. The term occurs only three times in this Gospel, 
ch. 1 : 14, 16, 17, all in the same connection, for which reason, I prefer to make no change for 
the present. 

11. How should avaxciad-ai, αναπιπτειν, {εηιπιπτειν, ch. 13 : 25,) be translated, when spoken of the 



XIV 



INTRODUCTION. 



posture observed at meals? — No little effort has been made in the hope of finding some simple 
term that would convey to the English reader an exact idea of the meaning of these terms, but 
hitherto without success. I am not without hope, however, that the united efforts of the diflerent 
revisers who may in future examine these terms, may meet with better success. Certainly it is 
desirable, at least, to improve the Common Version in this particular. 

12. There are several prepositions of which I have changed the rendering in some cases, 
where it was evident that the precise sense was not conveyed in the Common Version. And the 
question is becoming in my mind every day more important, whether we ought not in very many 
other cases to be more literal in the rendering of prepositions, especially of those which are often 
used in precisely opposite senses, as eis, into, and ty-, out of. Thus, I have rendered ey. του ovqavov, 
out of heaven, iu ch. 3 : 13, because the contrast of i<s and εκ is there unmistakable ; and, perhaps, 
these prepositions in connection with ονρανος might always be literally rendered, in perfect 
consistency with our idiom. This is, however, a delicate subject, and I prefer not to be hasty 
in a matter of so great importance. 

VI.— CONCLUDING REMARK. 

It would, doubtless, be too much to hope, that, in a work of this character, no mistakes 
will be found. Still, the effort has been, to make the book as faultless, in this respect, as the 
nature of the case admits of. It is confidently hoped, that those who may discover errors, 
especially in the citations, will find it more agreeable to their own feelings to point them out 
to some one who may see to their prompt correction, than to make them the subject of fruitless 
cavil. This I am sure they will not do, if they have confidence in the Author's sincerity. 



^LPH^BETICA.!. 



LIST OF THE PRINCIPAL ABBREVIATIONS, 

AND THE 

WORKS MOST rHEQUENTLY CITED. 

This List does not contain the names of r.iany of the Authors cited from Booth, at the end of note a, ch. 1 : 25, to 

wliich the reader is referred. 



Aeth. (Aethiop.) — Aethiopic Version. Made from the Sep- 

tuagint. Author and date unlinown. Cited from Mill, 

and others. 
Alf.— Alford's Greek Testament. London, 1849. 
All. — AUioli's German Version. New York, 1848. 
Amb. — Ambrosii Opera. Paris, 1686. Cited, generally, from 

Meyer. 
Apoll. — Apollonius. Cited from Meyer. 
Arab.— Arabic Version. Cited from Mill, Walton, Meyer, and 

others. 



Aret. — Aretus. Cited from Meyer. 

Aug. — Augustini Opera. Paris, 1685. 

Baur. Cited from Meyer and Olshausen. 

Beng. — Bengel's Gnomon. Tubinga and London, 1850. 

Bent. — Bentley. Cited from Penn. 

Beza's Latin Version. Junius' Edition, St. Gervasius, 1607. 

B. Crus. — -B. Crusius. Cited from Meyer, and others. 

Berl. B'b. — Berlenburger Bibel. Cited from the Polyglotten- 

Bibel. 
Birch's Four Gospels. Havnia, 1788. 



LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS. 



XV 



Bleek. Cited from Meyer. 

Bio.— Bloomfield's Critical Digest. London, 1826. 

— " Greek Testament. Boston, 1837. 

Booth's Piedobaptism Examined. London, 1829. 

Buttm. — Buttmann's Greek Grammar. Robinson's Transla- 
tion. Audover, 1833, and New York, 1851. 

Bos' Greek Ellipses. Glasgow, 1813. 

Bynajus. Cited from Bloomfield. 

Calmet's Dictionary, and Fragments. London, 1830. 

Calv. — Calvin's Commentary on John. Tholuck's Edition. 
Berlin. 

Camp. — George Campbell's Four Gospels. Andover, 1837. 

Casaub. — Casaubon. Cited from Meyer, and others. 

Cassiod. — Cassiodoriig. Cited from Meyer. 

Cast. — Castalio's Latin Version. Leipsic, 1750. 

Catenffi Ed. — Editions of the Catena. Cited from Bloomfield. 
and others. 

Chr3'S. — Chrysostoni's Works. Paris, 1718. 

Clemens. Cited from Middleton. 

Const. Apost. — Coiistitutiones Apostolicse. Cited from Bloom- 
field, Meyer, and others. 

Copt. — Coptic Version. Cited from Mill, Meyer, and others. 

Corn, a Lap. — Cornelius a Lapide's Commentary on the Four 
Gospels. Antwerp, 16G0. 

Cosmas. Cited from Meyer. 

C. — Cranmer's English Version. From Bagsters' English 
Hcxapla. 

Credn. — Ciedner. Cited from Meyer. 

Cypr. — Cyprian's Works. Cited from Meyer. 

Cyr. — Cyril. Cited from Meyer, and others. 

De W. — De Wette's German Version. Heidelberg, 1839. 

— " Commentarj- on John. Leipsic, 1840. 
Dodd. — Doddridge's Family Expositor. Amherst, 1833. 
Drusius. From Critici Sacri. London, 1600. 

Dubois' (Bishop) Revised Edition of the Rhemish Testament. 
Utica, 1831. 

Dt. — Dutch Version. New York, 1850. Some of the cita- 
tions are made from an old Amsterdam Edition, without 
date. 

E. V. — Common English, or King James' Version. American 
Bible Society's Edition, 1851. Sometimes quoted from 
Bagsters' Hexapla, from which the marginal readings are 
all taken. 

Erasm. — Erasmus' Latin Version. Edition of 1516. 

— " Commentary on John. Basle, 1519. 
Eusebius' History. Cited from Meyer, and others. 

Euth. — Euthymius' Commentaries. Cited from Bloomfield, 

Meyer, and others. 
Faxardus, Petrus. Cited from Mill. 
Fr. 0. — French Aversion of Ostervald. British and Foreign 

Bible Society's Edition. 
Fr. S. — Swiss French Version. Lausanne and Lyons, 1849. 
Fr. M.— French Veraion of Martin. American Bible Society's 

Edition, 1852. 
Fr. Q. — Geneva French Version. Edition of 1805, revised by 

the A. B. Society, 1826. 



Fr. B. and L. — French Version of Beausobre and Lenfant. 
Amsterdam, 1718. 

Fr. Verss. — French Versions, including the first four men- 
tioned above. 

G. — Genevan English Version. From Bagsters' English 
Hexapla. 

Germ. — German Version of Luther. New Y'ork, 1848. Some 
times from the Polyglotten-Bibcl. 

Glass' Works. Cited from Bloomfield, and others. 

Gill's Commentaries. Philadelphia, 1811. 

Goth. — Gothic Version. Cited from Mill, and others. 

Goss. — Gossner. Cited from the Polyglotten-Bibel. 

Green, T.S. Granmiar of the N. T. Dialect. London, 1842. 

Griesb. — Gricsbach's Greek Testament. Cited from Theile's 
Knapp, Bagsters' Mill, and the Polyglotten-Bibel. 

Grotius' Annotations on John. Amsterdam, 1641. 

Ηκη. — Hienlein's Introduction to the New Testament. Cited 
from Kuinrel. 

Hahn's Greek Testament. Cited, generally, from the Poly- 
glotten-Bibel. 

Heinsius. Cited from Middleton. 

Hieron.— Ilieronymus. Cited from Meyer, and Bloomfield. 

Homberg. Cited from Meyer. 

Hoogev. — Hoogeveen. Cited from Hermann's Viger. 

It. — Italian Version of Diodati. Bagsters' Edition. 

Jansen. Cited from Meyer. 

Jahn's Biblical Archeology. 

Juvencus. Cited from Bloomfield, and others. 

Kend. — Kendrick's Revision. Philadelphia, 1842. 

Kenr. — Kenrick's (Bishop) Four Gospels. New York, 1849. 

Kist. — Kistemaker. From the Polyglotten-Bibel. 

Klee. Cited from Meyer. 

Kling. Cited from Meyer. 

Knapp's Greek Testament. Theile's Revised Edition. Leipsic, 
1852. Cited sometimes from the Polyglotten-Bibel. 

Krabbe. Cited from Meyer. 

Kfthn. — Kuhner's Greek Grammar. Edwards and Taylor's 
Translation. Andover, 1844. 

Kuin. — Kuinoel's Commentary on John. London, 1835. 

Kyphe. Cited from Parkhurst, and others. 

Each. (Lachm.) — Lachmann's Greek Testament. Berlin, 1846 

Lampe. Cited from Bloomfield, and others. 

Lange. Cited from Meyer. 

Latin Verss. — Latin Versions, including all those described in 
this list. 

Leo. Cited from Meyer. 

Le Clerc. Cited from Middleton. 

Leunclavius. Cited from Middleton. 

Liddell and Scott's Greek Lexicon. New York, 1846. 

Lightfoot's Hora3 Hebraicae. Cited from Bloomfield. 

Lucke. Cited from Meyer, Bloomfield, and others. 

Lus. — Lusitanian, or Portuguese Version. From Bagsters' 
Polyglott. This must not be confounded with the Portu- 
guese Version described below. This is a version of the 
Latin Vulgate ; that is a literal and very faithful transla- 
tion from the Hebrew and Greek. 



XTl 



LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS- 



Luther's Commentaries. Cited from various authors. 

Maier. Cited from Meyer. 

Marsh (Bishop). Cited from Penn. 

Maldonat. — Maldonatus. Cited from Meyer. 

Matthaei's Greeli Testament. Riga, 1784. 

Meyer's Greeli Testament. GOttingen, 1829. 

— Commentary on John. GOttingen, 1852. 
Meursius. Cited from Middleton. 
Michaelis. Cited from Bloomfleld. 
Midd. — Middleton's Doctrine of the Greek Article. New 

York, 1813. 
Mill's Greek Testament. Leipsic, 1723. 
Morus. Cited from Meyer. 
Murd. — Murdoch's Translation of the Syriac. New York, 

1852. 
Nary's Version. Edition of 1718. 
Newc. — Newcome's Version. Dublin, 1796. 
Nonnus' Metrical Version. Cited from various authors. 
Origen's Works. Paris, 1733. 
01s. — Olshausen's Commentary on the Gospels. Edinburgh, 

1849. 
Papias. Cited from Penn, and others. 
Parkh. — Parkhurst's Greek Lexicon. 
Passow's Greek Lexicon. Leipsic Edition. 
Paulus' Commentaries. Cited from Meyer. Kuinoel, and others. 
Pearce (Bishop). Cited from Bloomfleld, and others. 
Penn's New Covenant, and Annotations. London, 1837. 
Port. — Portuguese Version, by the Bishop of Batavia. 
Philo. Cited from Middleton. 

R. — Rhemish Version. From Bagsters' English Ilexapla. 
Rob. — Robinson's Greek Lexicon. Boston, 183G, and New 

York, 1850. 
Rosenm. — Rosenmuller's Scholia on the New Testament. 

Norimberga, 1827. 
Scaliger. Cited from Middleton. 
Schoettgen. Cited from Bloorafiekl, and others. 
Scholz' Greek Testament. From Bagsters' English Hexapla. 
Schott's Latin Version. Leipsic, 1825. 
Schweitzer. Cited from Meyer. 
Scott's Commentary. Philadelphia, 1852. 
Sedul. — Sedulius. Cited from Meyer, and others. 
Semler. Cited from Kuinoel. 
Sept. — Greek Version of the Seventy. 
Seyffarth. Cited from Meyer. 
Sharpe's Version. London, 1844. 
Spencer's New Testament. New York, 1847. 
Statidlin. Cited from various authors. 



Stier. Cited from Meyer and others. 

Stolz' German Version. Hanover, 1804. Cited sometimes 

from the Polyglotten-Bibel. 
Sturz. Cited from Middleton. 

Swed. — Swedish Version. Brit, and For. Bible Society's Ed, 
Symmachus. Cited from Parkhurst. 
Syr. — Syriac Version (Peschito). Bagsters' Edition. 
Syr. Hieros. — Jerusalem Syriac Version. Cited from Birch, 
Tatian's Harmony of the Gospels. Cited from Bloomfleld. 
TertuU. — TertuUian's Works. Leipsic, 1853. 
Text. Rec— The Received Greek Text. 
Tisch. — Tischendorf's Greek Testament. Stereotype Edition 

Leipsic, 1850. 
Tittm. — Tittmann's Meletemata Sacra. Cited from Kuincel, 
Theile's Revision of Knapp's Greek Testament. Fourth Sttreo- 

type Edition. Leipsic, 1852. 
Theodorus Mopsu. — Theodorus Mopsuestenus. Cited from 

Bloomfleld. 
Theodotion. Cited from Parkhurst. 
Tholuck. Cited from Meyer, and others. 
Trem. — Tremellius' Latin Version of the Syriac. Junius' 

Edition. St. Gervasius, 1607. 
Trollope's Analecta Theologica. London, 1842. 

— Greek Grammar to the New Testament. London, 
1842. 
T. — Tyndale's Version. From Bagsters' English Hexapla. 
Van Ess' German Version. Hildburghausen, Amsterdam, and 

Philadelphia, 1845. 
Vat. (Vatab.) — Vatablus' Latin Version. Salamanca, 1584. 
Viger, de Idiotismis. Fourth Edition, (Hermann's,). Leipsic, 

1834. 
Vulg. — Latin Vulgate. From the Polyglotten-Bibel, and 

Bagsters' Polyglott. 
Webster's Dictionary. 

Wakefleld's New Testament, and Notes. Cambridge, 1820. 
Wegsch. — Wegscheiderus' Introduction to the Gospel of John. 

Cited from Kuinoel, and Meyer. 
Wells. Cited from Middleton. 

Wesl. — Wesley's Translation and Notes. New York, 1850. 
Wets. — Wetstein. Cited from various authors. 
W. — Wiclif's Version. From Bagsters' English Ilexapla. 
Weisse. Cited from Meyer. 
Winer's Grammar of the New Testament Idiom. Leipsic, 

1844. 
Wolf's Curse Philologicse et Criticse. Basle, 1741. 
Worcester's Dictionary. Boston, 1846. 
Zigerus. From the Critici Sacri, London, 1660, and Meyer. 



•THE HOLY GOSPEL. BY JOHN. 



KING JAMES' VERSION. 

CHAP. I. 

In the beginning was the 
Word, and the Word was with 
God, and the Word was God. 

2 The same was in the begin- 
ning with God. 

3 All things were made by 
him ; and without him was not 
any thing made that was made. 



4 In him was life; and 
life was the light of men. 



the 



5 And the light shineth in 
darkness; and the darkness com- 
prehended it not. 



GREEK TEXT. 

CHAP. I. 

EN αρχτ) ην ό λόγος, και ό 
λογοί ην ττροί τον θίον, και Otos 
ήν ό λόγος. 

2 ούτος ήν ϊν άρχτ) προς τον 
θβόν. 

3 Πάντα δΐ αυτού (γβνίτο, 
καΊ χωρίς αύτοΰ ΙγΙνίτο ovSe ev, 
Ο γΐγονεν. 

4 ev αΰτω ζωη ήν, καΙ ή ζωη 
ήν το φως των ανθρώπων, 

5 καΊ το φως ev ttj σκοτία 
Oaivei, καΐ ή σκοτία αντο ού 
κατίλαββν. 



REVISED VERSION. 

CHAP. I. 

In the beginning was the 
Word, and the Word was with 
God ; and the "Word was God. 

2 =He was in the beginning 
with God. 

3 All things were made by 
him; and without him was not 
■^even one thing made that 'hath 
been made. 

4 In him was life; and the 
Life was the light of men. 

5 And the Light shineth in 
'the darkness: and the darkness 
comprehended it not. 



• The aytov of this Title certainly belongs to Ευαγγελιον, 
not to Ιωαινψι. — As it is universally conceded, that the Titles 
of the Books of the N. T. were not given by inspiration, and, 
as I consider simplicity, in such matters, the height of orna- 
ment, I would prefer that adopted by Scholz, which I would 
translate, '• The Gospel. By John." 

^ Vulg., W., C, R., Cast., Germ., take Θεοί, in this clause, 
as subject, and δ λόγος as predicate. Jlost interpreters, how- 
ever, with the E. V., reverse this order. Tyndale first adopted 
this course ; but Coverdale, in revising Tyndale, rejected his 
correction of this clause. The collocation favors the more 
ancient, while the sense seems to favor the more modern, ren- 
dering. The whole question turns, I apprehend, upon whether 
Θεοί is here used as a proper name, or not. If it is a proper 
name, the absence of the article does not, (as has been sup- 
posed by some.) afford any evidence in favor of the Common 
Version ; for proper names are often, and properly, anarthroits. 
See 1 John 2 : 22 ; 4:15; 5 : 1, 5, where Ιησούς, without the 
article, is used precisely as Θεοΐ, (if a proper name.) in this 
verse. But if Oeot is not a proper name, it must, in this case, 
be taken as the predicate, for, though this word is used a few 
times indefinitely, as the subject of a proposition, (as in 2 Cor. 
5 : 19. Gal. 2 : 6 ; 6 : 7. 1 Thess. 2:5. [1 Tim. 3 : 16],) yet 
those sentences are all different in their structure from this. 
We can say, for example, "A God is not mocked ;" but we can 
not say, ''A God was the Word." Hence, we have only to 
determine whether Qeos is here to be taken definitely, or inde- 
finitely. After a careful and somewhat extended examination. 



I am pretty well convinced that this word, with the article, is 
always definite, without it, always indefinite. I take the 
meaning to be, simply, ''the Word was a Divine Being;" but, 
as this is the more obvious meaning of the E. V., " the Word 
was God," I would not at present propose any change. I hope 
to give this subject a more thorough investigation at a future 
time, and in a connection where the discussion of it more 
properly belongs. 

' The same is, properly, ό avrog. I believe there is no 
passage in the N. Ϊ. in which ovros may not be translated, 
tills, this man, or he. Accordingly, I have, in all cases, con- 
fined myself within these limits, selecting one or the other 
word, according to the connection, or the requirements of 
euphony. For the device adopted to indicate different degrees 
of emphasis in the pronouns, see Gen. Obs. 3. 

'' Ονδε is rendered not even, in the E. V., ch. 21 : 25. Matt. 
6 : 29. 1 Cor. 11 : 14. — There are several other passages in 
which I would so render it. — 'Ev is rendered one thing, in 
ch. 9 : 25. Luke 18 : 22. Phil. 3 : 14. 2 Pet. 3 : 8.— Wesl. 
{not one single thing) ; Dodd. {not so much as one single 
being) ; (Camp, (not a single creature) ; Trcm. {ne una qui- 
deni res) ; Schott (ne ullum quidem). " OvSe if has an in- 
tensive force." (Bio.) 

• See Gen. Obs. 4.— Vulg., Calv.. Beza, Eras., Trera., Schott, 
Beng. (factum est [sit]). " Praeteritum, χεγονεν, sonat quiddam 
magis absolutum quam Aoristus, ε/ενετο." (Beng.).— It., Fr. 
0.,-S.,-M. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. I. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

6 There was a man sent from 
God, whose name was John. 



7 The same came for a witness, 
to bear witness of the Light, 
that all me7i through him might 
believe. 

8 He was not that Light, but 
was sent to bear witness of that 
Light. 

9 That was the true Light, 
which lighteth every man that 
Cometh into the world. 

10 He was in the world, and 
the world was made by him, and 
the world knew him not. 

11 He came unto his own, and 
his own received him not. 



GREEK TEXT. 

6 'Eyevero άνθρωττος aire• 
σταλμίΐΌί τταρα θβον, όνομα 
αντω 'Ιωάννης. 

7 οντοί ηλθβν ets" μαρτυρίαν, 
Ίνα μαρτνρησΎ) Trepl του φωτοί, 
Ίνα iravres ττιστβυσωσί δι αϋτου. 

8 ουκ ην 4κ€Ϊνθ5 το φως, αλλ' 
Ινα μαρτυρηστ) τηρΧ του ψωτοί. 

9 ην το φως το άληθινον, ο 
φωτίζβί πάντα ανθρωπον, €/3χο- 
μβνον els τον κοσμον. 

10 ev τω κοσμώ ην, καΐ 6 
κόσμος Si αύτου βγίνβτο, καΐ ό 
κοσμοί αΰτον ουκ βγνω. 

11 €ί? τα 'ίδια ήλθί, καΐ οΐ 
'ίδιοι αύτον ού παρίλαβον. 



REVISED VERSION. 

6 There was a man,^ sent from 
God, ''his name was John. 



7 'He came for 'Jtestimony, 
'that he might Jtestify of the 
Light, ''SO that all ' might believe 
"■through him. 

8 "He was not -the Light ; 
but was sent 'that he might J tes- 
tify of "the Light. 

9 The true Light, which pen- 
lighteneth every man, "came into 
the world. 

10 He was in the world, and 
the world was made by him, and 
the world knew him not. 

11 He came to liis own, ' and 
his own received him not. 



s See Gen. Obs. 4.— The E. V., Camp., Dodd., Sharpe, and 
many others, seem to'have regarded εγενετο . . . απεσταλμένος 
= -ην . . . απεατ., was sent. This is probably wrong, as we 
know of no authority for such a use of γίνομαι. I am satis- 
fied that εγενετο here means, properly, there arose, came, or 
appeared ; but as the idea is sufficiently clear from the con- 
text, I prefer to retain the common rendering, there was, 

'' A. B. U. Revis. of Rev., ch. 6 : 8.— De W. (sein Name Jo- 
hannes) ; Van Ess (Namens Johannes). — Though this idiom 
may sound strangely at first, yet it is hoped that its great sim- 
plicity, and literal conformity to the Orig. Text, will recommend 
it to the "sober second thought" of the reader. 

' E. v., Camp., Sharpe, Nary, Penn, and others, seem to 
take μαρτυρία in the sense of μαρτυρ. This taking one word 
for another, when the sacred writer could have used the latter 
just as easily as the former, I consider as, at best, of doubtful 
propriety. As the sense does not require it, I can see no ne- 
cessity for so doing in the present case. With Erasm., I take 
ets μαρτυριαν to be = ad testificandum, i. e. for the purpose 
of testifying ; while what follows is designed to enforce, in 
more definite terms, the idea already conveyed (Bio.). I omit 
the indef. art. a, because /or a testimony (Newc, Wesl.), may 
be understood to be = as α witness, while the Orig. expresses, 
not the character in which, but the purpose for which, he 
came. — Vulg., Trem., {in testimonium) ; Beza [ad danduin 
testimonium) ; Schott {testimonium datu/rus) ; Germ., De W. 
(zum Zeugniss). 

J R., It, Port., Germ., Van Ess, De W., Beza, Trem., Erasm., 
Vulg., Cast., Dt., Beng., Fr. S. — The word witness is used in- 
discriminately in the E. V. for μαρτνρ, μαρτυρία, and μαρτυ- 
ρεω. In order to remove all ambiguity, I would render the 



first, witness, the second, testbnony, and the last, testify, in 
all cases. 

'■ W., Port., Dt., Swed., Λ^ulg., Cast., Erasm., Beza, Trem., 
Schott, Germ., De W. — For the sake of uniformitj', I would 
render Iva, that, or so that, in almost all cases, as, indeed, it is 
usually rendered in the E. V. 

"> See Gen. Obs. 5. 

- See Gen. Obs. 3. 

» Dt., Fr. 0.,-S.,-M., It., Swed.. Port., Germ., Van Ess, De 
W., Penn, Kenr., Camp., Wesl. — I have also put the for that 
in v. 25, below. I think I would never translate the art. by 
the demonstr. pronoun. 

Ρ Ε. v., Eph. 1 : 18. Hebr. 6 : 4.— Germ, (erleiichtet) ; Dt. 
(verlicht) ; Fr. 0.,-S.,-M., (eclaire) ;-Camp., Kenr. 

' The E. V. of ερ/ομενον is pretty generally condemned by 
the best critics, who refer this word, not to αν8•ρωπον, but to 
y>i«s ; while the Vulg. and many of the ancient fathers, refer it 
to αν&ρωηον. Camp, considers the Orig. ambiguous. Upon 
the whole, I prefer the view of Beng. that tjv . . . ερχόμενοι 
is, or has the force of an imperfect. This form of the imperfect 
is by no means uncommon in John. See v. 28, below, ch. 3 : 23, 
etc. 

>• The phrase, ειε τα cSta, is variously interpreted. Camp, 
renders it to his oien home, agreeing substantially with Grot., 
Kuin., Schott, and many others. Parkh. supplies οικήματα, 
others δώματα. Dodd. translates, into his own [territories^. 
Alf. says that it means, " to his own inheritance, or possession, 
i.e. Judea; and oi ίδιοι, the Jews;" and to this, perhaps, the 
majority of interpreters agree. There are, however, those who 
understand τα ίδια to be = the κοσμοβ of the preceding verse. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. I. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

12 But as many as received 
liiiii, to them gave he power to 
become the sons of God, even to 
them that believe on his name : 

13 Which were born, not of 
blood, nor of the will of the flesh, 
nor of the will of man, but of 
God. 

14 And the Word was made 
flesh, and dwelt among us, (and 
we beheld his glory, the glory 



GREEK TEXT. 

12 oaoL be ίλαβον αΰτον, Ϊ8ω- 
Kiv αύτοΐί ίζουσίαν τίκνα Oeov 
γίΡίσθαί, τοΐί ττιστίυουσιν els το 
όνομα αύτοΰ• 

13 οι ουκ Ιζ αιμάτων, ovSe e/c 
θeλημaτo9 σαρκοί, ovSe e/c θeλη- 
ματος άνδρας, αλλ' Ικ θεον eyev- 
νηθησαν. 

1-1 Κα\ 6 λογοί σαρζ iyeveTo, 
καΐ εσκηνωσεν ev ημΐν, (/cat iOea- 
σάμeθa την δοζαν αΰτον, δόζαν 



REVISED VERSION. 

12 But as many as received 
him, to them gave he «power to 
become 'children of God, cvc7i 
to "those 'believing on his name: 

1-3 "Wlio "were begotten, not 
of 'blood, nor of 'a will of ' flesh, 
nor of >a will of man, but of God. 



14 And the Word "became 
flesh, and dwelt among us, (and 
we "saw his glory, ''a glory as 



' While there are passages in wliich ιξοναιη undoubtedly 
means 7-ight, or privilege, yet Alf. well observes, that it here 
implies more than this, and is properly expressed by power 
(De W.), "including all the actions and states needful to their 
so becoming." It is needless to add, that power is here used 
in an extended sense, as is abundantly evident from the con- 
text. 

« Germ., Dt., Swed., Fr. 0.,-S.,-M., Camp., Kenr., Van Ess, 
De W., Schott. — For the omission of the art. see Gen. Obs. 1. 

" See Gen. Obs. 6. 

' See Gen. Obs. 4. 

" Cast., Beza, Trem., Beng., Stolz, Swed., Fr. S. — I would 
venture to suggest the following rules for the translation of 
γενναειν. — 1. When spoken of natural and ordinary generation, 
as in Matt. 1: 2-16. Luke 1 : 13, 57, &c., as a matter of course, 
the father begets, while the mother bears, or brings forth. So 
also, when spoken metaphorically of a man, as in 1 Cor. 4 : 15. 
Philemon 10. — 2. When spoken of God, as the sole eflBcient 
canse of either natural and phj'sical, or spiritual and super- 
natural existence, as in Matt. 1 : 20. Luke 1 : 35, and in 1 John 
throughout, as also when spoken of the divine generation of 
the Son, Acts 13 : 33. Heb. 1:5; 5:5, let it be rendered, to 
beget. — 3. When spoken of the instrumental causes, or agen- 



cies, whether created or uncreated, employed by the Father in 
regeneration, as in ch. 3 : 3, 5, 6, 8, let it be rendered, to 
bear, or bring forth (passive, to be born). So also, when 
simply spoken of birth, whether natural or supernatural, with- 
out any particular reference to the causes, or agencies employed 
in producing it, as in Matt. 2 : 1, 4 ; 20 : 24, and a multitude 
of other cases. Gal, 4 : 24, and 2 Tim. 2 : 23, will bear either 
rendering, perhaps equally well. 

' The Orig. is in the plunal form, bloods. Penn so translates 
it ; but this can hardly be called good English. While, then 
I would recommend no change, I suggest that the following 
note be appended to the Revision : Greek, bloods. 

1 A will of fiesh = a carnal will: a will of man = a 
human loill. So Do W. {aus Fleischeslust . . . aus Mannes- 
Lust). The absence of the art., 1 think, justifies this mode of 
translation. 

» E. V. often. — Became, in this connection, sounds less 
harshly than was made, and is more in harmony with the fact 
that the Savior voluntarily assumed humanity. 

• W., T., G., R., Germ., Swed., Port., Vulg., Alf., Kenr.— I 
would translate &εαεσ&αι uniformly, to see. 

' R., Germ., It., Fr. 0.,-S., Van Ess, De W., Dt.— See Gen. 
Obs. 1. 



After a careful examination of various authorities, I have been 
led to the following conclusions : 1. That there is here no par- 
ticular reference to the Messiah's coming to the Jews, as his 
peculiar people, or to Judea, as his peculiar inheritance ; but 
that both, τα iSia and oi iSioi, refer to the κόσμος of the pre- 
ceding verse. This interpretation is, I think, more in harmony 
with the context than one more restricted. — 2. That, as this 
xooftog is, in the first clause of v. 10, evidently put for the 
material world, and its inhabitants, while, in the latter clause, 
its meaning is as evidently restricted to the rational inhabitants 
of the world ; — so, in this verse, τα cSia means, all that is 
peculiarly his own, namely, the material world, with all the 
objects it contains, animate and inanimate, including its rational 
inhabitants, to whom he was especially sent with the Gospel 
of salvation, and who are the ot iSiot of the latter clause. Ta 



iSia is neuter, not because it refers only to things without life, 
but because it comprehends all the Messiah's own, including in- 
animate and irrational objects, tlie whole being viewed as one 
mass, or single object of thought, without regard to the ra- 
tionality or accountability of any portion of it. The word 
representing such a collection of objects, is properly put in the 
neuter. See ch. 17 : 10, where the neuters, τα εμα, and τ« oa, 
are used in precisely the s.ame manner. I cannot but consider 
this view more philosophical than that of Rob. and others, who 
arrive at almost the same conclusion by s\ipposing that tho 
neuter is here put for the masculine. While, therefore, the E. 
V. does not absolutely express all the meaning of the Original, 
for want of the means of distinguishing the gender of the pro- 
nouns, j-ct it is, perhaps, the best translation of τα ίδια that 
the circmnstances admit of. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. I. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

as of the only l:)egotteTi of the 
Father,) full of grace and truth. 

15 John bare witness of him, 
and cried, saying. This was he of 
whom I spake, He that cometh 
after me, is preferred before me ; 
for he was befoi-e me. 



GREEK TEXT. 

ω? μονογ^νουί τταρα ττατρος,) 
ττληρηί \apLT09 καΐ άληθβίας. 

15 Ιωαννηί μαρτυρεί irepl αυ- 
τού, KCU κΐκραγΐ λεγωι>, Ovtos 
ήν ον ehrov, Ο όττίσω μου ΐρχο- 
μβνος, ίμττροσθίν μου yiyoviv 
ΟΤΙ πρώτοί μου ήν. 



REVISED VERSION. 

of 'the only begotten "Of 'the 
Father.) full of grace and 'of 
truth. 

15 John ftestifieth of him, and 
'hath ci'ied, saying, "Ή.Ε it was 
of whom I ^said, He that cometh 
after me "us become before me; 
'because he was before me. 



' I have inserted the art. both before μονογενούς and jrar^os, 
simply because I can find no authority for omitting it, among 
all the translators and commentators to whose works I have 
access. Had I not dreaded the charge of presumption, I 
should have omitted it in both cases, and rendered the clause 
thus : a glory as of one only begotten of a father. I am well 
aware that words, used indefinitely in Greek, are sometimes 
necessarily accompanied by the def. art. in English : but I can 
see no such necessity in the present instance. No scholar will 
deny, that the indefinite rendering above given, makes quite 
as good English as the other. It is also unquestionably the 
more literal of the two. The only question, then, that de- 
serves examination is this : Which of the two renderings ex- 
presses the more clearly the meaning of the Spirit ? In regard 
to the meaning of ws, I believe it is commonly used, in such 
a connection as this, to compare, not to declare, and nothing 
but the clear indications of the context should lead us to ex- 
plain it in this latter sense. I understand the idea of the 
Orlg. to be this : That the glory of the Word, as seen by John 
and others, (perhaps on the mount of transfiguration) Avas a 
glory in perfect harmony with the relations subsisting between 
a father and an only son ; i. e. that, as an only son possesses 
by inheritance, entire and imdivided, all the rights, titles, and 
prerogatives of his father, so this Divine Word evidently pos- 
sessed " all the fulness of the Godhead," and was, indeed, the 
very " brightness of the Father's glory, the express image of 
his person." I freely admit that both translations convey sub- 
stantially the same idea, but I am convinced that the entire 
omission of the art. would render the clause more consistent 
and perspicuous. — But there are grammatical objections to the 
common rendering : 1. In every case in which μονογενής is un- 
doubtedly spoken of the Son of God, it is accompanied by the 
art. See v. 18, below, ch. 3 : 16, 18. 1 John 4 : 9. This is per- 
fectly in accordance \vith the philosophy of language, as could 
easily be shown. — 2. The noun, πατη^, spoken of God, is very 
seldom without the art. There is not an instance of such use 
in this Gospel, if we except the one under consideration. There 
are not more, perhaps, than three or four such instances in the 
other three Gospels. 

^ Should παρη be understood in its almost universal sense 
oi from, or in the rare sense of by, denoting the agent 7 A 
few of the best commentators, both ancient and modern, take 
the former view, and refer πα^α πατρός to §οξαν. The com- 
mon usage of this preposition is in favor of this interpretation. 



There is not, perhaps, more than one single passage besides 
this in the N. T. (Acts 22 : 30, where, indeed, some copies read 
νπο), in which πάρα introduces the agent. On the other 
hand, the large majority of commentators adopt the latter view, 
which, as it yields a sense much more consistent with the 
context, should, I think, be adopted, especially since this usage 
of the preposition is frequent in the Attic writers. 

' The repetition of the preposition here is a mere matter of 
taste. I think it makes the expression a little stronger, and 
it can certainly do no injury. 

f Vulg., TV., C, R., Erasm., Lus., Schott, Van Ess, De W., 
alt translate μαρτνρει by the pres. Many translate κεκραγε by 
the pres. ; others by the imperf The latter appears to me un- 
faithful to ihe Orig. The Evang. is not speaking of a specific 
testimon3', delivered at some past time, but of the daily minis- 
trations of John, the burden of which was, to prepare the way 
for the coming of one greater than himself. Therefore, he 
says. "John tcstifieth (Hist. Pres. habitualhj), and hath cried 
(Peif. contimialhj), saying. &c." All this is, I think, included 
in the Orig., and should, if practicable, be exhibited in the 
translation. — See Gen. Obs. 4. 

ff See N. pp, v. 30, below. 

^ Vulg., Germ., Fr. 0.,-S., It., Dt., Camp., Kenr., Penn, 
Beza, Trem., Van Ess, Lus., Wesl., Dodd., and others. — The 
verb ειπώ, when followed by the thing said, in the form of a 
quotation, is usually rendered, say, in the E. V. This is, at 
least, more in accordance with the usages of our language at 
the present day than speak. Very generally, indeed, I would 
translate this word, to say. 

" E. v., Acts 7 : 40. 1 Cor. 13 : 1. 2 Cor. 5 : 17 ; 12 : 11. 
Gal. 4 : 16. Heb. 5 : 12. James 2 : 11. Vulg., W., R., Dt., 
Germ. — Interpreters are not agreed, as to Λvhether the idea of 
preference, which is prominent in the E. V., is in this verse at 
all. While I admit that it is there, I do not admit that it is 
expressed verbally, but only by implication. Surely, εμηρο- 
οί^εν does not necessarily convey the idea of superiority ; for 
John actually says (ch. 3 : 28), "I have been sent {εμπρ. εκεί- 
νου) before him (Christ)." I understand the idea to be, " He 
that cometh after me, in ihe order of time, in commencing his 
public ministrj', is now become before me, or superior to me in 
wisdom and reputation, and in the evident importance of his 
mission : and no wonder, because he was before me, that is, he 
existed before I was born." Two points I would insist upon : 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. I. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

16 And of his fullness have all 
we received, and grace for grace. 

17 For the law was given by 
Moses, but grace and truth came 
by Jesus Christ. 

18 No man hath seen God at 
any time ; the only begotten Son, 
which is in the bosom of the 
Father, he hath declared him. 



GKEEK TEXT. 



16 KaL €/c του ττληρωματοί 
αντοΰ ημβΐί -παντΐζ ίλαβομβι/ και 
χάριν άντϊ χαριτο?. 

17 ΟΤΙ ό νομοζ δια Μωσΐ'ως 
ίδοθη, ή χαρΐ9 και η αΧηθ(ΐα δια 
Ιησού Χρίστου ϊγίνίτο. 

18 θβον ούδάς ίωρακΐ ττώ- 
ποτ€• ό μονογενής υ'ιοί, 6 ων eif 
τον κολτΓον του ττατρος, ΐκΰνος 
ίζηγησατο. 



REVISED VERSION. 

16 J'And out of his fullness 
WE all ''received, and grace 'above 
grace. 

17 'Because the law was given 
"through Moses : "the grace, and 
"the truth, came "'through Jesus 
Christ. 

18 No "one hath pever seen 
God : the only begotten Son, 
who ''was in the bosom of the 
Father, he "imade him known. 



' Griesb., Lachm., Tisch., Pcnn, De W., Kuin., and many- 
others, prefer to και the more ancient reading, on. I wouUl 
recommend that this reading be adopted, and that the verse 
read, " Because, of his fullness, &c. ;" and that this note be 
appended to the revised Version. — Some copies read, And of 
his fullness, &c. 

' See Gen. Obs. 4.— The change of tense requires a change 
of the order of the words, all and we. 

' Van Ess, All., Goss., (^Gnade uber Gnade) ; Fr. 0.,-G.. 
(grace sur grace) ;-Penn. Viger, N. 50. Hoogev., p. 517, as 
quoted, with approbation, by Penn. in loco. — Gill, Scott. — The 
best commentators are agreed that this expression signifies 
properly the same as the corresponding Hebrew, -ιρπ bl' 10Π, 
I prefer this rendering, not only because it is sustained by 
good autliorities, but because it yields an apposite sense, which 
can hardly be said of the expression, grace for grace. 

" Moses and Christ are viewed, in this passage, not as the 
authors of their respective dispensations, but as the media 
through whom they were published to the world. For this rea- 
son, I prefer here to render Sia, through, which marks the in- 
strumental, while by indicates more properly the efficient cause. 
— Latin Verss. (per) ; Germ., De W., Van Ess, {durch) ;-Penn. 

° There certainly is an intimate connection between this 
verse and the 14th. Between this and the preceding verse, 
there is a still closer connection. Therefore, the gi-ace and 
the truth, here spoken of, are the same that had been 
brought to view before. Hence the art. is properly translated. 
It is not grace and truth, in the abstract, but the grace and 
the truth, before spoken of, that came through Jesus Christ. — 
I separate the words, and the truth, from the rest of the sen- 
tence, by commas, not because this makes any material change 
in the sense, but because these words were, I apprehend, par- 
enthetical, or, at least, subordinate, in the mind of the Evang. 
at the time of writing. The verb, εγενετο, is in the singular, 
and cannot, as the sentence is collocated, have two subjects 
of the feminine gender, unless we suppose a needless violation 



of the rules of grammar, which ought not to be admitted, 
while the sentence is susceptible of any other reasonable ex- 
planation. Two nominatives may be followed by a verb in the 
singular, when the latter of them is viewed as subordinate to 
the other, or is introduced by way of parenthesis. See Kiihn. 
§ 242. Rem. 2. In this case I would explain the apparent dif- 
ficulty thus : The Evang., having written η γα^α, was suddenly 
reminded of the αλήθεια which he had mentioned in connec- 
tion with χα^ΐί, in v. 14, and of the propriety of here stating 
the source Avhence it also emanated : since, therefore, both have 
the same source, he adds xat ή αλη&εια, but not till after the 
sentence had assumed, in his mind, the outlines of its grammat- 
ical form, so that when he came to the verb, the principal word 
in the sentence, falling back upon his original design, Avhich 
was, to account for the χη^ι^ am χη^ιτοί of the preceding 
ver.se, he used the singular form, as though χηρις had been the 
only subject named. In other words, this phrase, y.ai η αληθ-εια. 
was an after-thought, uttered in the proper place, as suggested 
to the mind of the Evang., and then dropped, the rest of the 
sentence retaining its originally intended shape. 

' See Gen. Obs. 6. 

ρ Ε. V. generally. I would always, when practicable, so 
render πωποτε. 

1 For the change of which is to who was, in this clause, see 
Gen. Obs. 6, and ch. 3 : 13, N. a. 

I' " made him known ; " εξηγήαατο. (Dep. mid.). Scarlett, 
Thomson (N. Test.), Norton, Campbell. De Wette, "hat es 
verkiindiget" (es, ]ieut. )i). Iberian, " el [mismo lo] ha dado a 
conocer." Heb. N. Test., ίϊ^ιτί,-ι. Kuinoel : "/s solus nobis 
patefecit, nempe τα τοϋ Θεοϋ, Deum, ejus consilia voluntatem." 
Bob. (Lex., πι verba) : " Specially of a teacher, to declare, to 
make known ; cum accus. τον Θεόν, Jno. 1 : 18. Comp. Matt. 
11 : 27." Alford : " The object to be supplied after the verb 
is most likely αυτόν, i. e., τον Θεον. De Wette thinks this 
too definite, and supplies ' that which he has seen,' as in chap. 
3 : 11."— (Second Reviser.) 



1. That γεγονεν is to be taken in the sense of become., and 
rendered literally by the perf. 2. That all ideas of order, 
time, and preference are to be sought, not in the words of the 
passage, considered by themselves, but in the connection. 



' T., G., R., Penn, Kenr. — Whenever έτι is = because, I 
prefer so to render it, in order to distinguish in the translation 
between this word and yap, which is generally rendered for 
and which, for a similar reason, I would never render because. 



ft. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. I. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

19 And this is the record of 
John, when the Jews sent priests 
and Levites from Jerusalem, to 
ask him, Who art thou ? 



20 And he confessed, and de- 
nied not ; but confessed, I am 

not the Christ. 

21 And they asked him. What 
then ? Art thou Elias ? And he 
saith, I am not. Art thou that 
prophet ? And he answered. No. 

22 Then said they unto him, 
Who art thou ? that we may give 
an answer to them that sent us. 
What sayest thou of thyself? 

23 He said, I am the voice of 
one crying in the wilderness. 
Make straight the way of the 
Lord, as said the prophet Esaias. 

24 And they which were sent 
were of the Pharisees. 

25 And they asked him, and 
said unto him. Why baptizest 
thou then, if thou be not that 



GREEK TEXT. 



19 Kal αυτή iariv ή μαρτυρία 
τοΰ Ιωάννου, ore aneareiXav οί 
'Ιουδαίοι 4ζ 'Ιεροσολύμων lepels 
και Λβυίταί, Ίνα ίρωτησωσιν αύ- 
τον, 2,υ Τί9 ίΐ ; 

20 ΚαΙ ώμολογησ€, καΐ ουκ 
ηρνησατο• καΊ ώμολογησβν, ' Οτι 
ουκ βΐμΐ ίγω 6 Χριστοί. 

21 ΚαΙ ηρωτησαν αύτον, Τι 
ούν ; Ηλίαί ei συ ; Kcu Aeyet, 
Ούκ βΐμί. Ό ττροφητηί ei συ ; 
Κ(χί άπεκρίθη. Ου. 

22 ΕΙττον ούν αυτω, Tls ei ; 
Ινα άποκρισιν δωμεν tols ττβμψα- 
σιν ήμάί• τι λβγξίί Trepl σίαυτον; 

23 ' Έφη, 'Έγω φωνή βοώντος 
ev Trj ϊρημω, Έύθυνατ€ την όδον 
Κυρίου• καθωί e'nrev Ησαΐας 6 
ττροφητηί. 

24 ΚαΙ οί άτΓβσταλμίνοι ήσαν 
£κ των Φαρισαίων 

25 καΐ ηρωτησαν αυτόν, καΙ 
ehrov αύτώ, Τι ούν βαπτίζβΐί, el 



REVISED VERSION. 

19 And this is the ■'testimony 
of John, when the Jews sent 
'from Jerusalem Priests and Le- 
vites, 'that they might ask him, 
Who art thouV 



20 And he confessed and de-' 
nied not ; -yea, he confessed, I 
am not the Christ. 

21 And they asked him, What 
then? Art thou 'Elijah? And 
he saith, I am not. Art thou 
"the Prophet ? And he answer- 
ed, No. 

22 They said to him, 'there- 
fore, Who art thou? that we 
may give an answer to J'those 
who sent us. What sayest thou 
of thyself? 

23 He said, I [am] a voice 
of one crying in the wilderness. 
Make straiglit the way of the 
Lord, as said 'Isaiah the prophet. 

24 And 'those who 'had been 
sent were of the Pharisees. 

2-5 And they asked him, and 
said to him, Wh)', then, dost 
thou ^immerse, if thou "art not 



' See N. j, V. 7, above. 

• See Gen. Obs. 5. 

« See N. k, v. 7, above. 

" W., T., C, G., R., Vulg., Erasm., Trem., Germ.. De "W., 
Lus., all have and, instead of but. Certainh', it is compara- 
tively seldom that xac has a disjunctive sense ; and I see no 
real necessity for so understanding it here. I prefer yea to 
and, because it makes a better sentence, while it means about 
the same thing. I would render και, yea, at any time when 
the sense will allow it, and euphony may require it. 

' I have adopted, in the main, the rules observed by the 
Amer. Bible Soc. in tlieir Revision of the E. V.. in regard to 
the spelling of those proper names that occur in both the Old 
Test, and the New. 

* Fr. 0.,-S., Dt, It., R., Kenr., Penn, Van Ess, De W., 
Wesl. — They doubtless had their eyes on the Prophet spoken 
of by Moses, Deut. 18 : 15. — W., T., Germ., Dodd., and others, 
vender indefinitely, a propliet ; but this certainly falls far short 
of expressing the sense of the Orig. 

» Vulg., W., R., It., Dodd., Beza, Erasni., Schott, Kenr.— 
It is often difBcult, especially in declarative sentences, to dis- 
tinguish between the conjunction, then (ow), = therefore, and 



the adverb, then (rore), = at that time. For this reason, I 
prefer always to render oi•»', therefore, unless when the con- 
nection is such as to remove all ambiguity, as is usually the 
case in interrogative and hypothetical clauses. 

y See Gen. Obs. 6. 

' See Gen. Obs. 4.— Vulg., Cast., Fr. 0.,-S.,-M., Erasm., 
Schott, Beza, Trem., Lus. — The Orig. is in the perf or phip. 
form. 

' It is, I believe, very generally admitted by lexicographers, 
that βαπτιζειν, as well in classical Greek as in the Septuagint, 
up to the days of John the Baptist, alwa3-s signifies, to dip, 
immerse, or plunge, or, at least, that this is its literal mean- 
ing. Some, however, (as Rob., Parkh., &c.) contend that in 
the N. T. it has sometimes a diflerent meaning. After a care- 
ful examination of all the passages in which this word and its 
cognates occur, I see no good reason for assigning to it any 
new meaning. I have also given some attention to the argu- 
ments of the advocates of the contrary opinion ; but I confess 
I am unable to feel their force. There are but two of these 
arguments that I consider it necessary to notice. — 1. This rite, 
it is said, was sometimes administered under circumstances 
rendering it highly improbable that water could be obtained 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. I. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 



Christ nor 
propliet? 



Elias, neither that 



GREEK TEXT. 



σν ουκ el 6 Χρίστος, ovre Ηλίας, 
ovre 6 ττροφητηϊ ; 



REVISED VERSION. 

'the Christ, nor "Elijah, 
"the Propiiet? 



"nor 



' See N. o, v. 8, above. 
" See N. V, v. 21, above. 



'' R., Newc, Dodd., Camp., Kenr.- 
""' See N. w, v. 21. above. 



-See Gen. Obs. 6. 



in sufficient quantities for immersion. The cases cited are 
those of the three thousand converted on the day of Pentecost, 
Acts 2 : 41, of the Philippian jailer, Acts 16 : 33, of Saul of 
Tarsus, Acts 9 : 18, itc. Now it happens in this case, as fre- 
quently in others, that what seems to some minds highly im- 
probable, has to others an appearance of very great probability. 
What, I would ask, is more probable, than that, in an age of 
lusuiy and great wealth, in a country visited with abundant 
rains, (even in those localities that did not abound in springs 
of water,) and in a climate where habitual bathing of the whole 
body was regarded by all classes as a necessiiry means of pre- 
serving health, there should be many pools, or reservoirs of 
water — baths, both public and private, where immersion could 
be conveniently performed ? To suppose that the believers re- 
ferred to could not have been immersed, would be to suppose 
that they could not have bathed themselves if they wished it, 
which supposition is, to my mind, one of the most improbable 
of all improbable things. Indeed, in the case of the jailer, we 
have incidental evidence that he had a bath of his own ; for 
he took Paul and Silas, immediately before his own immersion, 
'' and bathed (ελοιαει; see Rob. and other lexicographers, who 
agree that kovetv is spoken of bathing the whole body) them 
from the stripes." (Acts IG : 33.) — 2. It is alleged, that the 
phrase, βαπτιζειν εν πνευματι αγιω, kc. (v. 33, below. Matt. 
3 : 11. Mark 1 : 8. Luke 3: 10. Acts 1 : 5) indicates something 
different from immersion, from which it is argued, that βαπ- 
τιζειν εν ϋδατι may mean something different from immersion 
in water. — To this I reply: 1) The propriety of inferring the 
literal meaning of an}' word from its metaphorical use, espc- 
ciallj' of a word which has been so frequently and uniformlj• 
employed in a literal sense as this, is, I apprehend, a new dis- 
covery in the science of lexicography. — 2) From what little 
we know of the manner of the Spirit's operations, (even sup- 
posing, for the sake of argument, that the Holy Spirit of God 
is spoken of in these passages. See, however, N. h, eh. 7 : 39.) 
it is as natural to suppose that believers are immersed in the 
Spirit, as that they are sprinkled, or affused with the Spirit. 
This Holy Spirit surrounds, overwhelms, and thoroughly per- 
vades the whole believer, which fact agrees, at least, as well to 
the idea of immersion as to any other. Nor is it any valid 
objection to this, that the Spirit is sometimes said to be shed 
forth, or poured ont upon believers ; for this idea is perfectly 
consistent with that of a consequent immersion. Every rite 
should be performed in its natural and appropriate manner. 
Immersion in the Spirit is naturally and appropriately per- 
formed by pouring out that Spirit on the subject, in such 
abundance, however, that the subject may be thoroughly over- 
whelmed in its influences ; while, on the other hand, immersion 
in water is naturally and appropriately performed by dipping 



the subject in the water, so as to overwhelm him. The dif- 
ference between the two is merelj' in the mode, or manner, 
while immersion is the common result obtained, as is indicated 
in the literal import of the verb emploj'cd. in both cases, to 
represent the action. In view of the above facts and argu- 
ments, I can not hesitate in deciding, that βαπτιζειν in the N. 
T. signifies uniformly, and only, to dip, immerse, or plunge. — 
Is, then, baptize a proper English word to translate βαπτίζω 1 
We have just seen what is the meaning of the latter. Now 
what is the meaning of the former'? A comparatively small 
number of those speaking the English language say, that 
baptize = immerse ; another, and larger portion say, that 
baptize = sprinkle; another portion say, that baptize = 
pour; while another portion (and these, perhaps, form the 
large majority) saj', that baptize = immerse, sprinkle, or 
pour, indifferently. Thus, βηπτιζειν means just to immerse, 
and nothing else, while baptize is quite ambiguous, and may 
be made to suit the taste, or fancy of any one who prefers to 
walk in the light of his own eyes. I entered upon this work 
of revision with strong prejudices against the change of the 
word baptize, or of any of its derivatives ; but, upon more 
mature reflection, and after a careful examination of the rule, 
which says, that the translation must be made " with the least 
possible obscurity or indefiniteness," I became convinced that 
some change is imperative!}' demanded. I have, therefore, uni- 
formly rejected baptize and its derivatives, and substituted 
immerse, immersion, &c., as the best terms that I can find to 
convey the sense of the Orig. I would add, that the above, 
though it would seem to favor the pi-actice of but a small por- 
tion of the professed followers of Christ, comparatively, is by 
no means a one-sided, or sectarian view of this subject. All 
writers, of any note, of all schools, agree that immerse is the 
primary meaning of βαπτίζω. A multitude of those whose 
practice was opposed to immersion, have given it as their be- 
lief, that immersion was practised by John the Baptist, the 
Apostles of Christ, and the primitive Christians. I will simply 
give a list of the names of some of those last mentioned, com- 
piled from Booth's " Pcedobaptism Examined" referring the 
reader for particulars, and copious quotations, to that elaborate 
work. — Witsius, L'Enfiint, Anonymus, Gurtlerus, Bp. Daven- 
ant, Pictetus, Dr. R. Newton, Piscator, Abp. Seeker, Mastricht, 
Calvin. Spanhemius, Vitringa, Bp. Patrick, Marloratus, Stack- 
house, Burkitt, .J. AVesIey, Conf. of Helvetia, Zanchius, Hoorn- 
beekius, Daille, Salmasius, Bower, Poole's Continuators, Ra- 
vanellus, Marckius, Mosheim, Bp. Taylor, Clignetus, Doutrin, 
D. Martin, Dr. Priestley, Burmannus, J. Trapp, Grotius, Ca- 
stalio and Camerarius, Beza, Bingham, Buddeus, Heid.anus, 
Twells, Menochius and Estius, Lampe, Limborch, Sir T. Ridley, 
J. Claude, H. Altingius, Hospinianus, Curcellieus, Wolfius, G. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. I. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

26 John answered them, say- 
ing, I baptize with water : but 
there standeth one among you, 
whom ye know not : 

27 He it is, who coming after 
me, is preferred before me, wliose 
shoe's latchet I am not worthy 
to unloose. 



28 These things were done in 
Bethabara beyond Joi'dan, where 
John was baptizing. 



GREEK TEXT. 

26 ΑτΓβκρίθη avT0L9 6 Ιωάν- 
νης Χίγων, ' Ιί,γω βατττίζω iv 
νδατί' μ€σο9 δε υμών ίστηκίν, 
ον ΰμβΐς ουκ ο'ίδατβ. 

27 αντοί Ιστίν ό οπίσω μου 
ΐρ-χ^ομίνοί, ό? βμττροσθίν μου ye- 
yoviv oh 4γω ουκ €ΐμΙ αζιος ίνα. 
λύσω αυτού τον Ιμάντα του υπο- 
δήματος. 

28 Ταύτα iv Βηθαβαρα lyi- 
νίτο πίραν τού Ιορδανού, οπού 
ην Ιωάννης βαπτίζων. 



REVISED VERSION. 

26 John answered them, say- 
ing, I "immerse 'in water : but 
'in the midst of yoti standeth one 
whom YE know not. 

27 'He it is tliat ""cometh after 
me, ''wlio is 'become before me, 
'the string of whose "sandal I 
am not worthy 'to loose. 



2S These things were done iu 
"Bethabara beyond "the Jordan, 
where John was "immersing. 



• The use of the preposition εν, in connection with βατ[- 
τιζειν, is, of itself, pretty good evidence that this verb in the 
N. Ϊ. signifies to immerse, as it does in classical Greek : for, 
though it may be true that in some rare cases et- introduces 
the instrument, or means, and though Luke once (Luke 3 : 16) 
uses in connection with this verb the simple dative of the 
instrument iSaxt, (where, however, several MSS., Cant. Vat. 
360. Vind. Lamb. 31, according to Mill and Birch, have εν 
vSart,) yet the expression, εν τω Ιορδαντ•,, Matt. 3: 6, can by 
no reasonable effort of criticism be made to mean with, or by 
means of the Jordan, but must be understood, as it literally 
reads, in the Jordan. I suppose, therefore, there is no good 
reason for departing from the usual and proper rendering of εν, 
either here or elsewhere, when it occurs in connection with 
this rite.— Vulg., W., R., Camp. 

"■ In midst of you is more literal than among you. — Newc, 
(amidst you) ; W. {in the myddel of you) ; R. (in tlie middes of 
you), yu\g.. Erasm., {medius . . . vestrum). Germ., Λ^an Ess, De 
W. {mitten unier euch) ; Fr. S. {an milieu de vous). 

' Griesb. and Tisch., with some of the most ancient and reli- 
able MSS., omit auTos εστίν, (He it is) and ό» εμπ^οαβ-εν μου 
γεγονεν, (who is become before me.) Lachm. encloses these 
same words in brackets. These omissions are justified by De 
W., Meyer, Newc, and Penn. — Internal evidence is, I think, 
against the authenticity of αυτοί εατιν. I know of no other 
passage in which avros is used in the sense of ούτος. Upon 
the whole, I think, it would be well to adopt the reading of the 
editors above mentioned, and translate thus : '• He that cometh 
after me, of whose."&c., with this note in the margin : Accord- 



ing to some copies, He it is that cometh after me, who is become 
before me, etc. 

i" There is evidently a want of literal accuracy in the E. V. 
where as it put out of its proper place in the sentence. 

' See N. h, v. 15, above. 

1 Latchet is not sufficiently plain and definite. String will be 
understood by every one. 

' Newc. — It is well known, that the covering for the foot 
worn iu ancient times in Palestine, was not properly a shoe, in 
the modern sense of the term, but a sandal, bound on to the 
sole of the foot by a string, or thong of leather. In regard to 
the form of the possessive case, in which I follow Newc, Penn, 
and Kcnr., I adopt it here, and frequently elsewhere, because I 
consider it more elegant than the other. 

• Camp., Penn, Kenr. — Unloose is seldom used at the present 
day. 

° Orifen who seems to have overlooked the fact that ^εραν 
τον Ιορδανού was added, to distinguish this Bethany from the 
other, well known, near Jerusalem, was probably the author 
of the reading Βη9αβαρα, which has been adopted into the 
Text. Rec, and is found in many modern Verss. Modern editors 
almost unanimously reject it, and substitute for it Βη&ανια, 
which is found in almost all the best copies. I would adopt 
this reading, and translate, in Bethany, and insert the follow- 
ing note in the margin ; A few copies have Bethabara. 

See Gen. Obs. \—The Jordan, is strictly in accordance 
with the modern usus loquendi. 



J. Vossius, Sir P. King, Abp. TiUotson, Frid. Spanhemius, Bp. 
Pearce, Abp. Usher, Momma, Theod. Hasaeus, Baxter, Bp. 
Burnet, Braunius, De Courcy, Weemse, T. Wilson, Assembly 
of Divines, J. Mede, Dr. Cave, Dr.Towerson, Bossuet, Chambers, 
G.Whitefield, Doddridge, Jurieu, Le Clerc. Venema, Altman- 
nus, Magdeb. Centuriators, Dr. Hammond, Chamierus, Bp. Fell, 
Dutch Annotators, Bp. StiUingfleet, U. Ilulsius, Deylingius, 
Heideggerus, E. Leigh, Hardy, Locke, Wetstenius, Roell, Wal- 
ker, Dr. Whitby, Bp. Nicholson, Quenstedius. Dr. Wall.— To this 



list I would add the names of George Campbell and Macknight. 
—Let it be borne in mind that none of the authors above quoted 
practised immersion.— See also, for a complete discussion of this 
subject, Rev. 0. B. Judd's ''Baptism, in Plain English," " Tracts 
for the Times," pp. 88-161, and ''Remains of Willard Judd," 
pp. 230-236. 

»■ W., Penn, Dodd., Wesl.— There is certainly no propriety, 
at this late hour, in retaining the subjunctive here.— See Gen. 
Obs. 4. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. I. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

29 The next day John seeth 
Jesus coming unto him, and saith, 
Behold the Lamb of God, which 
taketh away the sin of tlie world ! 



30 This is he of whom I said, 
After me cometh a man which 
is preferred bel'ore me ; for he 
was before me. 

31 And I knew him not : but 
that he should be made manifest 
to Israel, therefore am I come 
baptizing with water. 

32 And John bare record, say- 
ing, I saw the Spirit descending 
from heaven like a dove, and it 
abode upon him. 

33 And I knew him not : but 
he that sent me to baptize with 
water, the same said unto me, 
Upon whom thou shalt see the 
Spirit descending and remaining 
on him, the same is he which 
baptizeth with the Holy Ghost. 



GREEK TEXT. 

29 Tij tiravpiov (SXenei 6 Ιω- 
άννης τον Ιησονν (ργομίνον irpos 
αυτόν, και Xeyei, Ιδβ ο άμνοί 
του θΐον, ό αίρων την άμαρτίαν 
τοΰ κόσμου. 

30 ούτοί Ιστί TTepL ού ϊγω 
(ΙτΓον, Οπίσω μου ίρχ^ται ανηρ, 
09 ίμττροσθίν μου yeyovev, ότί 
ττρώτοί μου ην. 

31 κάγω ούκ ySeiv αϋτον αλλ 
Ίνα φανίρωθη τω Ισραήλ, δια 
τούτο ήλθον Ιγω ev tcS υδατι 
βαπτίζων. 

32 ΚαΙ ίμαρτΰρησΐν 'Ιωάννης 
λίγων, Οτι τβθίαμαι το ΙΙνβΰμα 
καταβαΐνον ώσβί ττβριστβραν βζ 
ουρανού, και ίμβινβν €7Γ αυτόν. 

33 κάγω ουκ ηδβιν αυτόν αλλ 
ό 7Γ€μψαί μ€ βατττίζειν iv ΰδατι, 
€Κ€Ϊνος μοι eiirev, 'Έψ Όν αν Ίδης 
το ΙΙνβΰμα καταβαΐνον κα\ μ^νον 
iir αύτον, ούτος ϊστιν 6 βαπτί- 
ζων iv ΙΙνίΰματι Άγίω. 



REVISED VERSION. 

29 The next day pJohn seeth 
Jesus coming to him, and saith, 
Behold the Lamb of God, \vho 
taketh away the sin of the world ! 



30 ργΗε it is of whom I said, 
After me cometh a man who is 
■ibecorae before me ; 'because he 
was before me. 



: but, 



31 And I knew him not 
that he might be 'manifest 
Israel, because of this I came 
"immersing 'in 'the water. 

32 And John "testified, saying, 
I 'have seen the Spirit "coming 
down from heaven like a dove, 
and it abode upon him. 

33 And I knew him not: but 
he that sent me to '■immerse 'in 
water, 'he said to me. Upon 
^whomsoever thou shalt see the 
Spirit 'coming down and 'abid- 
ing upon him, »he it is that "im- 
merseth 'in ■'the Holy Spirit. 



ρ Griesb-.SchoItz, Lachm.,Tisch..and Theile, reject ό Ιωαινηί. 
Κη.ιρρ and Hahn put it in brackets. It is, I apprehend, an 
italic insertion. I would leave it out, and translate, he seeth 
Jesus, &c., and insert in the margin : According to some copies, 
John sees, &c. 

pp See N. a, v. 33, below. — By adopting this rendering of 
ovTos I avoid the supply of the personal pronoun, otherwise 
necessary. 

"> See N. h, v. 15, above. 

■■ See N. i, v. 15, above. 

• For the sake of miiformity, I would recommend that ψα- 
νΐζοΐΐν be rendered, in all cases, to manifest. — E. V., ch. 17 : 6. 
Mark. 4: 22. Rom. 3: 21. Titus. 1: 3. IJohn 1: 2; 3: 5, 8; 
4: 9.— Wesl. 

' Fr. S.— The Orig. has the art. The probability is, that 
the Evang. uses the art. because John accompanied the lan- 
guage quoted with some significant sign, calling attention to 
the stream, or pool of water in which he had just been immers- 
ing the people ; q. d. in that water, pointing to it with the 
finger, while speaking. At all events, we may be sure that the 
art. was used with design, and that the meaning of the passage 
is not perfectly presented if we disregard it in the translation. 
— See Gen. Obs. 1. 

° See N. j, V. 7, above. 

' See Gen. Obs. 4. 



"■ 1 have changed the translation of καταβαίνω, as also of 
αναβαίνω, in several places. I prefer go, or come down, for 
the former, and go, or come up, for the latter. — 1. Because 
these are the more usual renderings of these words, in the E. 
V. — 2. Because I regard the Anglo-Saxon and Celtic forms of 
expression as, in general, more pure and forcible than the for- 
eign importations of a later age. — W., Newc, Kenr. 

'■ R., Dt., Dodd., Wesl, Kenr.— Vulg. {ille) ; Cast, (ω).— See 
Gen. Obs. 3. 

' E.V., Matth. 26 : 48. Camp.— I think it is evident that this 
rendering is necessary, in order to preserve the force of the av 
of the Orig. 

" I would translate μεναι; ίο abide, in all cases, (as it is in 
V. 32, and generally elsewhere, in the E. V.) except in ch. 19 : 31. 

* This rendering makes good sense, and is perfectly literal. 
— See N. c, v. 2, above. 

•i See N. a, v. 25, above. 

' See N. e, v. 20, above. 

'' See N. h, ch. 7 : 39. — I would greatly prefer to render 
these words literally. Holy Spirit, without the article. I do 
not consider the πνεύμα άγιον here spoken of to be Uit 
personal spirit, contemplated as such, but, simply, divine 
essence, abstracted, in the mind of the writer, from all ideae 
of personal attributes or relations. 



10 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. I. 



KING JAMEs' VERSION. 

34 And I saw and bare record, 
that this is the Son of God. 



35 Again the next day after, 
John stood, and two of his dis- 
ciples ; 

36 And looking upon Jesus as 
he walked, he saith, Behold the 
Lamb of God ! 

37 And the two disciples heard 
him speak, and they followed 
Jesus. 

38 Then Jesus turned, and saw 
them following, and saith unto 
them, Wliat seek ye ? They said 
anto him. Rabbi, (which is to 
say, being interpreted. Master,) 
where dwellest thou ? 



39 He saith unto them. Come 
and see. They came and saw 
where he dwelt, and abode with 
him that day : for it was about 
the tenth hour. 

40 One of the two which heard 
John speak, and followed him, 



GREEK TEXT. 

34 καγω ίωρακα, και μβμαρ- 
τνρηκα οτι ovtos (.στιν 6 νΐοί τον 
θβοΰ. 

35 Tfj ewavpiou τταλιν είστη- 
Κ€ΐ ό Ιωάννης, καΐ e'/c των μαθη- 
τών αύτοΰ δυο. 

36 καΐ βμβλίψας τω Ίησοΰ 
TrepiiraTodvTL, Aeyet, ' I8e b άμνοί 
του θβοϋ. 

37 £^αΙ ηκουσαν αύτοΰ οί δυο 
μαθηταΐ λαλονντος, καΐ ηκολού- 
θησαν τω Ιησού. 

38 στραφείς δε ό Ιησούς, καΐ 
θεασαμβνος αυτούς άκολονθονν- 
τας, Aeyei αύτοΐς, 

39 Τι ζητ€Ϊτ€ ; 01 δί cIttov 
αύτω ' Ραββ\, (ο λίγεταί βρμη- 
ν€υόμ€νον, Αιδασκαλβ,) ττον μ€- 
νβις ; 

40 Λίγίΐ αύτοΐς, ' Ερ-χεσθβ 
και 'ίδ€Τ€. ΊΙλθον καΙ (Ιδον τνοΰ 
μ4ν(ί• καΐ Trap αύτω ίμίΐναν την 
ήμί'ραν ίκβίνην ωρα δε ην ώς 
δβκατη. 

41 Hv Άνδρίας ό άδελψος 
Σίμωνος Πίτρον, ίΐς ΐκ των δυο 



REVISED VERSION. 

34 And I 'have seen and 
• ^testified, that this is the Son 
of God. 



35 The next day ^again John 

^as sts " 
ciples ; 



.1 σ 

■■was standing, and two of his dis 



36 And looking upon Jesus 
'walking, he saith. Behold the 
Lamb of God ! 

37 And the two disciples heard 
him 'spealiing, and followed 
Jesus. 

38 JAnd Jesus, 'turning, and 
'seeing them following, saith to 
them, What seek ye ? JAnd they 
said to him. Rabbi, (which, 'in- 
terpreted, 'means, ""Teacher,) 
where "abidest thou ? 



39 He saith to them, Come 
and see. They came, and saw 
where he -abode, and abode with 
him that day. "Now it was about 
the tenth hour. 

40 pAndrew, the '«brother of 
Simon Peter, was one of the two 



' See Gen. Obs. 4. — Alf. (Jiave seen and borne testimony) ; 
Bio. (have borne, and do hear witness); Dodd., (have testified); 
Penn. (have borne testimony). 

' See N. j, V. 7, above. 

* I leave out qfler, because it is not necessary, and is want- 
ing in the E. V. of v. 29, in precisely the same circumstances. 
I change the position of again, according to the Orig. 

■■ Newc, "Wesl., Dodd., Penn. — See Gen. Obs. 4. 

' See Gen. Obs. 4. 

1 I see no good reason why Ss should, in this place, be trans- 
lated then. I prefer the uniform rendering of the more ancient 
Verss., W., T., C, G., E.,— as also of Penn., Wesl.. Dodd., and 
Kenr. — Nor is there any thing to prevent its translation in the 
next sentence. 

* I leave out the word being, as an unnecessary suppJy, 



' I understand Xeym here, and in ch. 20 : 16 = mean, or 
signify. Not onl}' is the passive, λινεται, so used, but, accord- 
ing to Passow, the active is also sometimes so emploj-ed. — 
Newc, Penn, (signifieth) ; Port, (quer dizer) ; It. (viiol dire). 

" The SiSaay.alos was not necessarily a master, or one em- 
ployed in the administration of government, but a teacher, or 
instructor. — Newc. Marg. — Van Ess (Lehrer). 

" See N. z. v. 33, above. 

• The Se of the Text. Rec, rendered for, is of so slight 
authority that it is, I believe, now universally rejected. — I 
would, therefore, leave out now. 

p Without any injury to the literary character of the trans- 
lation, I have given this verse more in accordance with the 
Orig. If literal accuracy is of importance, this change is not 
altogether in vain. 

1 I h.ave changed this phrase, in order to bring out the art. 
which is not clearly translated in the E. V. I think it proba- 
ble that Andrew was Simon's only brother. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. I. 



11 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

was Andrew, Simon Peter's 
brother. 

41 He first findeth his own 
brother Simon, and saith unto 
liim, We have found the Messias ; 
which is, being interpreted, the 
Christ. 

42 And he brought him to 
Jesus. And when Jesus beheld 
him, he said, Thou art Simon, 
the son of Jona : thou shalt be 
called Cephas ; which is, by in- 
terpretation, a stone. 

43 The day following Jesus 
would go forth into Galilee, and 
findeth Philip, and saith unto 
him. Follow me. 

44 Now Philip was of Beth- 
saida, the city of Andrew and 
Peter. 

45 Philip findeth Nathanael, 
and said unto him. We have 
found him of whom Moses in the 
law, and the prophets, did write. 



GREEK TEXT. 



Twu ακουσαντων τταρα Ιωάννου, 
καΐ άκολουθησαντων αύτω. 

42 ίύρ[σκ€ΐ οϋτος ττρώτοί τον 
άδ€λφον τον 'ίδιον Σίμωνα, καϊ 
Ae'yet αύτω, Έύρηκαμβν τον Mea- 
σίαν, (ο β'στί μζθίρμηνΐνομίνον, 
ο Χριστοί•) 

43 και ηγαγβν αντον ττροζ τον 
Ίησονν. (μβλζψαΐ δί αϋτω ο 
Ίησονς eiVe, ^ι; €Ϊ Σίμων ό υιοί 
Ίωνά• συ κληθηστ] Κηφάί• ο ίρ- 
μηνβυβται HeTpoi. 

44 Tfj (τταυριον ηθίλησβν ο 
Ίησοΰς (ζβλθβϊν ei? την Γαλι- 
λαίαν και (ύρίσκ€ΐ Φίλιτητον, κα\ 
λβγΕί αύτω, Άκολουθίΐ μοι. 

45 Ήν δ6 ό Φιλιτητοί αττο 
Βηθσάίδα, (κ τη? ττολεω? Λν- 
δρβου και Πέτρου. 

46 Εΰρίσκβι Φίλιππος τον 
Ναθαναήλ, και λίγβι αύτω, ' Ον 
ϊγραψε Μωσης iv τω νομω καΐ 
οι προφηται, ^ύρηκαμ^ν, Ιησοΰν 



REVISED VERSION. 

who heard 'from John, and fol- 
lowed him. 

41 He first findeth his own 
brother, Simon, and saith to 
him. We have found the 'Mes- 
siah (which is 'interpreted, 
■The 'Anointed). 

42 And he brought him to Je- 
sus. And Jesus, "looking upon 
him, said, Thou art Simon, the 
son of JonastTHou shalt be called 
Cephas (which is interpreted, 
A Stone). 

43 The "next day ■'Jesus >wish- 
ed to go 'out into Galilee ; and 
he findeth Philip, and saith to 
him. Follow me. 

44 Now Philip was of Beth- 
saida, "of the city of Andrew and 
Peter. 

45 Philip findeth Nathanael, 
and saith to him, AVe have found 
him of whom Hvrote Moses, (in 
the law,) and the PiOphets, Je- 



' The sense of from, or of, is almost the universal sense of 
πάρα. By rendering literally, from John, I avoid at once the 
supply of the E. V., and the ambiguity of W. and R., who 
render, of John. — Vulg., Gemi., Dt., Port., It., Van Ess, Kenr. 

• See N. V, v. 21, above. 

' There is certainly as good reason for translating X^cotos, 
in this verse, as there is for translating ΙΤετρο;, in v. 42, below. 
The object of this parenthetical clause is, evidently, to explain 
tllfe word Μεααιαι•, in the vernacular, which ccftaiuly is not 
accomplished, when a Hebrew word is replaced by a Greek 
one. — Germ., De ΛΛ^., {der Gesalbte) ; Van Ess (den Gesalbten). 
— I take coTi με&ερμηι•ενομεΐ'οΐ' to be a participial form of 
the present, = μεδ-ερμηνενεται. — The ό of the Text. Rec. is 
wanting in almost all MSS., of any authority, and is rejected by 
nearly all recent editors. I would, therefore, recommend that 
it be disregarded in the revision, and that The be left out be- 
fore Anointed. 

" Kenr., Camp. — Newc. {looked on him.) ; Dodd. {looking 
stedfastly upon him). — E.V., v. 36, above. 

' R., Vulg., Germ., De W., Port. — It is scarcely necessary 
to say, that I have translated this verb literally. 

" E. v., vv. 29, and 35. — I would so translate τ/; ιπανριον, 
in all cases. 



» Scholtz, Lach., Tisch., Griesb., and Knapp, reject this ό 
Ιησούς of the Text. Rec. The first three mentioned, however, 
place it after αυτφ. The others reject it altogether. I would 
reject it altogether, and translate, he wished to go oict, &c., with 
this note in the margin. : According to some copies, Jesus 
wished, &c. 

y It is often diflBcult for the English reader to determine 
whether will, or would, is the translation of &εΧω, {εΟ-ελω,) or 
whether it is merely a sign of the future tense, or subjunctive 
mood. To avoid this ambiguity, I would always render &ελω, 
(unless, perhaps, in a few cases,) will, or he willing. — Newc. 
{purposed); Dodd. {determined); Wesl. {was minded); Camp. 
{resolved) ; Penn. {pleased). — Latin Verss. {voliiit). 

' To go out, is not so stiff and poetical as to go forth. 

' Germ., Dt., DeW., Port., It., Trem, — As there is nothing 
to prevent the translation of εκ, I prefer not to leave it un- 
translated. 

'' Newc, Kenr., Penn. — As to the collocation, I have placed 
the verb before its suhj., because it is so in the Greek, and, being 
in the singular, it properly belongs there. This order of words 
does no violence to the sense. I use the parenthesis, to prevent 
ambiguity. , 



12 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. I. 



ICING JAMES VERSION. 

Jesus of Nazareth, the son of 
Joseph. 

46 And Nathanael said unto 
him, Can there any good thing 
come out of Nazareth? Philip 
saith unto him, Come and see. 

47 Jesus saw Nathanael com- 
ing to him, and saith of him. 
Behold an Israelite indeed, in 
whom is no guile ! 

48 Nathanael saith unto him. 
Whence knowest thou me ? Je- 
sus answered and said unto him. 
Before that Philip called thee, 
when thou wast under the fig- 
tree, I saw thee. 

49 Nathanael answered and 
saith unto him. Rabbi, thou art 
the Son of God ; thou art the 
King of Israel. 

50 Jesus answered and said 
unto him. Because I said unto 
thee, I saw thee under the fig- 
tree, believest thou? thou shalt 
see greater things than these. 

51 And lie saith unto him. 
Verily, verily, I say unto you. 
Hereafter ye shall see heaven 
open, and the angels of God as- 



GREEK TEXT. 

Toi> VLov του Ίωσηφ τον άττο JYa- 
ζαρβτ. 

47 JKai eiirev αύτω Ναθαναήλ, 
Έκ ΝαζαρΙτ δύναται tl αγαθόν 
eivai ; Λ βγβι αύτω Φίλιτητοί, 

Έρχον καΐ ίδε. 

48 Έ18βν ο Ίησοΰξ τον Να- 
θαναήλ €ρχομ€νον ττροζ αύτον, 
κα\ Aeyet Trepl αύτον, ISe άληθώί 
Ισραηλίτηί, (ν ώ δολοί ουκ εστί. 

49 Λβγβί αύτω Ναθαναήλ, 
Ποθβν μ€ γινωσκίίί ; Αττεκρίθη 
ο Ιησούς καΧ elirev αύτω, Προ 
του σε ΦίλητΐΓον ψωνησαι, οντά 
ύτΓο την συκην, eiSov σε. 

50 Άπ€κρίθη Ναθαναήλ καΐ 
λεγεί αύτω, 'ΡαββΙ, συ ει ό υΙος 
του θβοΰ, συ ει ό /Βασίλευ? τοΰ 

Ισραήλ. 

51 ΑτΓίκρίθη Ιησούς καΐ el- 
πίν αύτω. Οτι ίίττον σοί, Έίδον 
σε ΰτΓΟκατω της σνκης, ττιστευβις ; 
μίίζω τούτων o\jreL. 

52 Is^al λβγβί αύτω. Αμήν 
αμήν λίγω ύμϊν, αττ άρτι οψεσθβ 
τον ούρανον άνίωγοτα, καΐ τους 
άγγελονς τοΰ θίοΰ αναβαίνοντας 



REVISED VERSION. 

sus, the son of Joseph, '=the one 
of Nazareth. 

46 And Nathanael said to him, 
Can any ''thing good ■'be 'of Na- 
zareth? Philip saith to him, 
Come, and see. 

47 Jesus saw Nathanael com- 
ing to him, and saith of him. Be- 
hold an Israelite indeed, in whom 
is no guile ! 

48 Nathanael saith to him, 
Whence Ivuowest thou me ? Je- 
sus answered, and said to him, 
Before that Philip called thee, 
when thou wast under the fig- 
tree, I saw thee. 

49 Nathanael answered, and 
saith to him, ° Rabbi, thou art 
the Son of God ; thou art the 
King of Israel ! 

50 Jesus answered, and saith 
to him. Because I said to thee, 
I saw thee under the fig-tree, 
believest thou? Thou shalt see 
greater things than these. 

51 And he saith to him. Veri- 
ly, verily, I say to you. Here- 
after ye shall see ''the heaven 
'opened, and the angels of God 



' W., T., C, G., R., Vulg., Germ., Dt., DeW.,Van Ess, Kenr., 
all have (Jesus, the son (if Joseph, of Nazareth). This, though 
literal, is objectionable. — 1. Because it leaves it doubtful, 
whether the father or the son is of Nazareth, while no such 
doubt rests on the Orig. 2. Because of Nazareth does not 
fully convey the sense of the τον of the Orig. — The best version 
of this clause that I have seen is that of Beza, {ilium ex nrbe 
Nazaretha) ; It. (che e da Nazaret). — The phrase, τον απο 
Ναζηρετ, would seem to point to Jesus as a personage already 
well known to Philip, and, perhaps, to the neighborhood in 
general, as that Nazarene, who had begun to make a stir in the 
community — Trem. (qui est Jeschua, fiiius Jauseph, qui est 
ex Natzarelh). The foregoing translation would seem to im- 
ply that Joseph is " the one of Nazareth," which is, indeed, 
true, and according to the reading (του ατιο Ναζ.) of one of 
the Vat. MSS. 354, as quoted by Birch. 

^ Any thing• good is a more literal rendering of τι ayad-ov 
than any good thing.— Penn., R., (any good). 

' The verb, ctvai, is very rarely translated to come, and I 



doubt whether it is ever necessary so to translate it. At all 
events, no such necessity exists here. To- be of Nazareth is 
not exactly = to come out of Nazareth j yet the former is un- 
doubtedly the exact meaning of the Orig. 

' This change of preposition results naturally from the other 
change noticed above. See N. e, preceding. 

^ I do not translate 'Ραββι, because it has already been in- 
terpreted in V. 38. In this I suppose I follow the example of 
the Evang. who uses this instead of the equivalent Greek word, 
StSaay.aXos. I would, therefore, never translate 'Ραββι. 

^ It is not always practicable to translate the art. before 
ov^avos, in the singular. Here, however, no injury results 
from its translation, and I accordingly translate it, adhering to 
my general rule. — See Gen. Obs. 1. 

' Newc, Penn, "Wesl., Dodd.. Kenr., Berl. Bib., Van Ess 
Beng., Kist., and others. — This word is a perf. pai't., not an 
adjective. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. II. 



13 



KINrt JAMES VERSION. 

cending anrl descending upon the 
Son of man. 

CHAP. 11. 

And the third day there was 
a marriage in Cana of Galilee ; 
and the mother of Jesus was 
there. 

2 And both Jesus was called, 
and his disciples, to the mar- 
riage. 

3 And when they wanted wine, 
the mother ol' Jesus saith unto 
him, They have no wine. 

4 Jesus saith unto her, Wo- 
man, what have I to do with 
thee'? mine hour is not yet come. 

5 His luother saith unto the 
servants, AVhatsoever he saith 
unto you, do it. 

6 And there were set there six 
water-pots of stone, after the 
manner of the purifying of the 



GREEK TEXT. 

Koi καταβαίνοντας eVt τον vlov 
του άνθρωπου. 

CHAP. π. 

ΚΑΙ TTJ ημβρα Trj τρίτϊ] γα- 
μοί (γίνετο (ν Κανά Trji Ραλι- 
λαίαί• κα\ ην η ρητηρ του Ιησοΰ 

€Κ€Ϊ. 

2 (κλήθη δβ καΐ ό Ίησοΰς καΙ 
οΐ μαθηταΐ αϋτοΰ els τον γαμον. 

3 καΐ ΰστίρησαντοζ οίνου, λί- 
γ€ΐ η μητηρ του Ιησού ττροί αυ- 
τόν, ΟΙνον ουκ ί)(^ουσί. 

4 Λβγβί αΰτ^ 6 Ιησοΰί, Τι 
Ιμο\ καΐ σο), γυναι; οϋττω 7]Κ£ΐ η 
ωρα μου. 

5 yle'yet η μητηρ αυτού τοΐί 
δίακόνοΐί, "Ο TL αν λβγτ] ύμΐν, 
ΤΓΟίησατί. 

6 Ήσαν δε e/cet ΰδρίαι λίθιναι 
βζ κείμβναί κατά τον καθαρισμον 



REVISED VERSION. 

•"going up and ^coming down 
upon the Son of man. 

CHAP. II. 

And the third day there was 
a marriage in Cana of Galilee ; 
and the mother of Jesus was 
there. 

2 And both Jesus was called, 
and his disciples, to the mar- 
riage. 

3 And, "the wine failing, the 
mother of Jesus saith to him, 
They have no wine. 

4 Jesus saith to her. Woman, 
what ''hast thou to do with me ? 
Mine hour is not yet come. 

5 His mother saith to the 
servants, ''Whatever he «may 
say to you, do. 

6 'Now there were there six 
water-pots of stone, ^standing 
"according to the purifying of the 



i See N. w, v. 33, above. 



weak form of the subjunctive) is preferable to the E. V. — See 
Geu. Obs. 4. 



* This form of expression, equivalent to the ablative absolute 
in Latin, is always concise, and often peculiarly forcible. AV., 
T., C, G., R., Vulg., Cast, {when the wine failed) ; Fr. 0.,-S., 
(le via ayant manque) ; Portug. (faltando ο vinho) ; Italian 
(essendo vcnuto meno il vino). — It would be difficult to find a 
more objectionable translation of this phrase than that of the 

E. r. 

' Erasmus translates τι ημιν xai aoi ; quid tibi rei nobis- 
tum est ? and it has been well remarked by Penn (Note to 
Matt. 8 : 29) " that ooi denotes the agent, ϊ,μιν (εμοι) the 
■patient, iu the supposed action." — Newc. marg., Doddridge, Ken- 
rick. 

ί See Gen. Obs. 6. 

' W. — I nse the subjunctive, because I consider it more 
accurate than the indicative. Rheniish Version, and others, 
have shall say, which (being in reality, in this connection, a 



"■ When the particle δε is used to connect two paragraphs the 
latter of which introduces new matter, it is often better to 
translate it now, than but, or and. Instances of this kind are of 
frequent occurrence in the E. V. (ch. 1 : 44 ; 4:6; 11 : 1. Matt. 
1 : 18 ; 11 : 2. 1 Tim. 4 : 1, etc.). I have ventured to carry 
this rule a little farther than King James' revisers, with, I hope, 
some advantage. — See Gen. Obs. G. 

^ Κεψεναι literally means, lying: but as the idiom of our 
language will not admit of this rendering here, standing is 
evidently the nearest approach to it. I have changed the 
collocation of words, according to the Greek, as χειμεναι be- 
longs, not to the principal, but to the qualifying clause. — T., 
C, G. 

'' I can not agree with Bio., that " y.ara here signifies propter, 
for the purpose of," which be admits to be a rare significa- 
tion ; nor with Camp., who takes χατα in the sense of εις, for. 
Κα&α^ιαμοί is undoubtedly here taken in a legal and restricted 
sense, = law, or custom of purifying, as is abundantly evident 



14 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. II. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

Jews, containing two or three 
firkins apiece. 

7 Jesus saitli unto them, Fill 
the water-pots with water. And 
they filled them up to the brim. 

8 And he saith unto them. 
Draw out now, and bear unto 
the governor of the feast. And 
they bare it. 

9 When the ruler of the feast 
had tasted the water that was 
made wine, and knew not whence 
it was, (but the servants which 



GREEK TEXT. 



των Ιουδαίων, ■χωροΰσαί άνα μ€- 
τρηταζ δυο ή rpeis. 

7 Aeyei αύτοΐί 6 Ιησοΰί, Γζ- 
μίσατ€ τα? υδρίας ύδατος. ΚαΙ 
βγβμισαν αυτας έω? άνω. 

8 ΚαΙ λίγίΐ αύτοΐς, 'Αντλή- 
σατε νυν, KCU (pepeTe τω άργιτρι- 
κλίνω. Καί ηνβγκαν. 

9 ώ? δε Ιγβυσατο 6 άρ-^^ιτρί- 
κλίνοί το ύδωρ οίνον γβγβνημΐ'νον, 
καΐ ουκ ^5et ττοθίν βστίν {οΙ δε 
διάκονοι Ύ)δ€ΐσαν οι ήντληκοτίί 



REVISED VERSION. 

Jews, 'holding two or three Jrae- 
tretas ''apiece. 

7 Jesus saith to them. Fill 
the watei'-pots with water. And 
they filled them up to the brim. 

8 And he saith to them. Draw 
out now, and bear to the gov- 
ernor of the feast. And they 
bore it. 

9 'And when the "governor of 
the feast tasted the water, that 
was made wine, and knew not 
whence it was (but the servants, 



from the connection, and need not be expressed in words. Afler 
the manner is a very unusual translation of κατά, being found in 
the E. V. in only two passages besides this (1 Cor. 15 : 32. Gal. 
3 : 15), Λvhere, perhaps, it is the best rendering that could be 
given. Here the sense evidently does not require periphrasis. — 
W. {after the cleansing) ; E. [according to the purification). — 
Λ^ulg., Dt., Swed., Port., Berl. Bib., Beng., Stoltz, De W. 



' Vulg., Erasm., Beza [capientes) ; Fr. 0. [tenaient).- 
See ch. 1 : 33, N. w. 



-Swed.- 



1 Were it actually certain that the μετρητή; was precisely 
equivalent to the Hebrew bath, it would, perhaps, be best to 
render it by this term, which occurs so frequently in the 0. T. 
But, as there is some doubt of this, and as there is no measiu-e 
in nse among us that is exactly equivalent to this, I would 
recommend that the word be left untranslated ; and though, as 
a general rule, I prefer to transfer from the Orig. Greek, yet 
in this case, for the sake of euphony, I would adopt the Latin 
form, melreta, and form the plural, as in English, by the addition 
of an s. As the quantity held by each water-pot is stated 
only approximatively, and as this word occurs nowhere else 
in the N. T., I would suggest, that, in order to secure the 
attention of the reader, the clause be made to read as follows : 
" holding two or three metretas [16 to 24 gallons'] apiece." 
I would also recommend that the following note appear in the 
margin. : The metreta was equal to about eight gallons. — Vulg., 
Erasmus. 

'' Some interpreters understand ava here to be = circiter, 
about, supposing that the six vessels together held about two 
or three metretas. I apprehend, however, that the double 
approximation, about two or three, is not in very good taste ; 
and as the words admit quite as well of a different rendering, 
which is unobjectionable on the score of literary taste, I think 



this latter rendering ought to be preferred. Besides, the difBcul- 
ty which this interpretation is designed to obviate, is, perhaps, 
imaginary. Some think it incredible that so large a quantity 
of liquid as these six vessels must have contained, if each held 
16 to 24 gallons, should be turned into wine, for the use of a 
nuptial party, especially through the miraculous power of one 
who could have had no sympathy with excessive drinking. 
Those who feel the weight of this objection would do well 
to observe : 1. That the wine made on this occasion was 
probably very slightly, if at all, intoxicating. That it was 
called good wine does not prove that it was a strong alcoholic 
drink, unless it can be shown that the governor of the feast was 
a man fond of stimulus, of which there is, I believe, no evi- 
dence. — 2. That it is nowhere said, directly or indirectly, that 
any portion of this liquid was turned into wine, except that 
which was drawn out by the ministers, and borne to the governor 
of the feast. On the contrary, from v. 9, it is rendered even 
more than probable that the change from water to wine took 
place during the interval which elapsed from the time of drawing 
out to that of tasting. For it is evident, from the narrative, 
that what they drew out was loater, and that what he tasted was 
wine, which had just been made out of water, or rather wine-made 
water (De TV., "das weingewordene IVasser"). This view was 
entertained by Semler, who lived in an age when no man was 
likely to be guilty of fanaticism, in defending the principles of 
total abstinence. 

1 Dodd. {now) ; Dt. {nu) ; Germ., De Wette {aber) ; Vulg. 
{autem). — W., E., It., Port., Newc, Penn, Kenr. — See Geu. 
Obs. 6. 

" In the change from governor to ruler, in the E. V. of this 
passage, we have a striking example of that excessive fondness 
for variety which seems to have been a ruling passion with King 
James' revisers. — Newc, Wesl. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. II. 



15 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

drew the water knew,) the gov- 
ernor of the feast called the bride- 
groom, 

10 And saith unto him, Every 
man at the beginning doth set 
forth good wine; and when men 
have well drunk, then that which 
is worse : hut thou hast kept the 
good wine until now. 

11 This beginning of miracles 
did Jesus in Cana of Galilee, and 
manifested forth his glory; and 
his disciples believed on him. 



12 After this he went down 
to Capernaum, he, and his mo- 
ther, and his brethren, and his 



GREEK TEXT. 

TO νδωρ•) φωνΰ τον νυμφίον ό 
άργιτρίκΧίνοί, 

10 KOU Aeyet αυτω, Πάζ άν- 
θρωπος ττρώτον τον καλόν οίνον 
τίθησι, και όταν μ^θνσθώσι, tots 
τον (λασσω• συ τίτηρηκαί τον 
καλόν οΙνον ίωί άρτι. 

11 Ταντην €ΤΓθίησ€ την άρχην 
των (τημειων ο Ιησούς fv Κανά 
της Γαλίλαιας, και ίψαν^ρωσε 
την δοζαν αΰτοΰ• καΐ έπίστβυσαν 
€£? αύτον οΐ μαθηται αυτού. 

12 ΜΕΤΑ τοΰτο κατββη (Ις 
ΚατΓΐρναουμ, αύτος καΊ η μητηρ 
αΰτοΰ, καΐ οΐ άδ€λφοΙ αυτού, καΐ 



REVISED VERSION. 

who "had drawn the water, 
knew), the governor of the feast 
calleth the bridegroom, 

10 And saith to him, Every 
man at pfirst setteth idown 'the 
good wine, and Λvhen «they have 
drunk 'freely, then "the w• orse : 
THOU hast kept the good wine 
'till now. 

11 This beginning of "the 
'signs Jesus did in Cana of Ga- 
lilee, and manifested ' his glory : 
and his disciples believed on him. 



12 After this he went down 
to Capernaum, ^himself, and his 
mother, and his 'brothers, and 



" As ηντίηκοτεί is in the perfect, or pluperfect form, (Alf.) 
I do not see why it should not be bo translated. I have 
changed the place of knew, with the Germ, and others, in 
accordance with the Orig. — Penn {had poured out). — R., 
Vulg., Cast., Port., Dt., Fr. 0.,-S.-iM., Erasm., Beza, Lus., 
Schott, Kenr. 

Ρ Erasm., Beza, {prima loco) ; R., 'Wesl., Dodd., Van Ess, 
{first).— Germ., DeW., Fr. 0. -S.,-M., Penn, Kenr., Newc, It., 
Vulg., Cast., Trem. 

' Wesl., Dodd., {out) ; Newc. {on). — Down is, in this con- 
nection, less stiff, and more appropiate to the circumstances, 
than either /ο7•/Λ, out, or on. 

' Dt., Port., It., Swed., De W., Berl. Bib., Beng., Stoltz, All., 
Kist., Goss., Dodd., Penn. 

■ The impersonal use of men is by no means so frequent, or 
elegant, as it once was. — Fr. Verss. {on) ; Germ, {mati) ; Dt. 
{men). — Dodd., Penn. 

' Commentators generally admit, tliat this word does not 
necessarily imply intoxication. Parkh. gives, as its definition 
in this place, to drink free!//, or to cheerfulness, but not to 
drunkenness ; and shows from the use of the word in the Sept., 
tliat ■' it admits of a good, or indifferent, as well as of a bad 
sense." — Dodd. {plentifidly) ; Newc. {largely). 

" It. {il men buono). — Dt., Germ., De W., Cast, Port., 
Schott. 

" As till fully supplies the place of tmtil, (see Webster's 
Dictionary, in loco,) I would never use the latter, which is 
undoubtedly passing out of use. 

* The art. is, I think, quite necessary here, to convey the 
real sense of the Orig. This sign was not the beginning- of 
signs, in an indefinite sense ; for there had been many signs 



and wonders performed before the advent of the Savior : but 
it was the beginning of that long and splendid catalogue of 
signs, to which attention is directed by the art., and which 
forms, perhaps, the most satisfactory of all the outward evi- 
dences of Christianity. The conjecture put forth by Dodd. 
and others, that probably the Savior had already wrought 
many miracles in private, this being onlj^ the commencement 
of his public miracles, unsupported as it is by any historical 
data, and directly opposed to this plain assertion of the Evang. 
deserves only to be regarded as an unwarrantable and gratuit- 
ous assumption, well calculated to impair the confidence of the 
weak in the truth of the Evangelical History : for, (as Kenr. 
well observes.) " we know not whether he performed any 
[miracles] privately."— Dt., Berl. Bib., Beng., Stoltz, It., All., 
Kist. 

» As sign is the literal and proper rendering of ar,ueiov, 1 
would so translate it in all cases,— Germ., De W., {Zeichen) ; 
Dt. {teeckenen) ; Vulg., Erasm., Beza, {signonim).—^. 

' The word forth is left out, as a supply altogether unne- 
cessary. — See Gen. Obs. I. 

' According to Robinson, and others, avrog in the nominative 
case, is never used as a personal pronoun, but always reiiex- 
ively = ipse. I have invariably followed this rule, in this 
revision. 



born of the same parent, or parents, while his brethren are the 
members of the same society, or social circle. I am disposed 
to adopt this rule, in modernizing the E. V. Indeed, according 
to thi.s rule, his brotliers were not, at that time, his brethren. 
See eh. 7 : 5, and the note there, where also the question is 
considered, whether these brothers were actually the children 
of Joseph and Mary. 



16 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 11. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

disciples ; and they continued 
there not many days. 

13 And the Jews' passover 
was at hand, and Jesus went up 
to Jerusalem, 

14 And found in the temple 
those that sold oxen, and sheep, 
and doves, and the changers of 
money, sitting: 

15 And when he had made a 
scourge of small cords, he drove 
them all out of the temple, and 
the sheep, and the oxen ; and 
poured out the changers' money, 
and overthrew the tables ; 

16 And said unto them that 
sold doves. Take these things 
hence : make not my Father's 
house an house of merchandise. 

17 And his disciples remem- 
bered that it was written. The 
zeal of thine house hath eaten 
me up. 



GREEK TEXT. 

ol μαθηται αύτοΰ' καΙ e'/cei ΐ'μ,ίίναν 
ου ΤΓολλαί ημίρας. 

1 ο Και (γγνί ήν το ττασγα 
των Ιουδαίων, καΐ άνξβη eh Ιε- 
ροσόλυμα ό Ιησούς. 

14 /cat ehpev eV τω 'κρώ τουί 
πωλούνται βοάς και ττροβατα κα\ 
ττεριστΐρας, καΙ τους κ^ρματιστας 
καθημίΐΌυί. 

15 /cat -ποιησας φραγβλΧων e'/c 
σχοίρίων, Ίταντας ίζίβαλίν Ικ του 
lepoO, τα re ττροβατα καΐ τους 
βοάς, /cat των κολλυβιστών ίζί- 
χεε το κέρμα, καΐ τας τράπεζας 
άνβστρεψβ• 

16 καΐ τοις τας περιστέρας 
πωλονσιν είπεν, 'Αρατε ταύτα 
εντεύθεν μη ποιείτε τον οίκον 
του πατρός μου οίκον εμπορίου. 

17 Εμνησθησαν 8ε οϊ μαθη- 
ται αυτοΰ, οτι γεγραμμενον εστ\ν, 
Ό ζήλος του οίκου σου κατεφα- 
γε με. 



REVISED VERSION. 

his disciples; and "there they 
"abode not many days. 

13 And the ''Passover of the 
Jews was 'near : and Jesus went 
up to Jerusalem, 

14 And found in the temple 
'those ''selling oxen, and sheep, 
and doves, and the smoney- 
changers sitting. 



15 And, making a '"whip of 
small cords, he drove all out 
of the temple, 'both the sheep 
and the oxen, and poured out the 
money of the ^money-changers, 
and overthrew the tables ; 



16 And to 'those 'selling the 
doves he said. Take these things 
hence : make not my Father's 
house a house of merchandise. 

17 And his disciples remem- 
bered that it -"had been written, 
The zeal of thy house ''did eat 
me up. 



'■ This change of collocation is made in accordance with the 
Orig., to give greater emphasis to the adverb. 

« See ch. 1 : 33, N. z. 

■^ I have made this, and other similar changes, because I 
consider this form of the possessive more smooth and flowing 
than the other, especially when the noun is of the plural number. 
See Gen. Obs. 5.— W., R., Penn, Newc, Dodd., Wesl., Kenr. 

' The E. V. presents a great variety in the translation of 
tyyvs, to which there is no corresponding variety of meaning. 
I think it may be rendered near, in almost all cases, without 
injuring the style of the translation. — W. {nigh). — Newc. 

' See Gen. Obs. 4 and 0. — Schott, Beza, (venditores). — 
Vulg., Cast. 

^ I always prefer, if nothing prevents, to translate a single 
word by a single woid. Hence, I prefer money-changers to 
changers of money. Changers (Camp.) is objectionable, on 
the ground that it is not sufficiently explicit. 

'■ Whip is more readily understood than scourge, which, in 
modern language, conveys a very different idea. Some suppose 
that the σχοινιά were nishes, (σχοινο;:::^ jimciis,) strewed, as 
litter, on the floor of the temple. (Wesl.) But as this word is 
used generally for a rope, or cord, the material varying, no 
doubt, according to circumstances, I consider it better to re- 
tain the common idea. — Camp., Dodd., Kenr. 



' I am disposed, with Erasra.,Wesl., and Penn, to refer παν- 
Tffs exclusively to the animals, the βοής και πρόβατα of the 
preceding verse, for the following reasons : 1. Because it is 
highly improbable that the Savior would use physical force, 
much less that ho would use a whip, in expelling from the tem- 
ple reasonable beings, who seem not to have made the least 
resistance.• — 2. Because if πάντα; refers to tovs πω).οννταί, it 
necessarily includes the sellers of doves, who, as we learn from the 
next verse, were not driven from the temple. — 3. Because there 
is no valid grammatical objection to this interpretation. Hav- 
T«s is masc, agreeing with βηας, as the more worthy gender, 
which is a case of very frequent occurrence, especially when 
all the objects spoken of are possessed of life. — I take, then, τα 
τε προβ. xat τονς βοάς to be an explanatory clause, inserted 
afterwards, for the very purpose of limiting this action of the 
Savior to these two classes of animals. 

) This is undoubtedly a participial form of the perfect, =/£- 
γραπται. Such forms are very frequent in John's writings. — 
See Gen. Obs. 4. 

^ It is almost universally conceded, (Bio.) that καταψαγίται, 
not κατεψαγε, is the true reading here. I would recommend 
that this reading be adopted, and the phrase rendered, " is eat- 
ing me up ;" and that this note appear in the margin. : A few 
copies have, did eat me up. 



ΓΗΕ GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. Π. 



17 



KING JAMEf. VERSION. 

18 Then answered the Jews, 
and said unto him, What sign 
shewest tlion unto us, seeing that 
thou doest these things ? 

19 Jesus answered and said 
unto them. Destroy this temple, 
and in three days I will raise it up. 

20 Then said the Jews, Forty 
and six years was this temple in 
building, and wilt thou rear it 
up in three days ? 

21 But he spake of the tem- 
ple of his body. 

22 When therefore he was 
risen from the dead, his disci- 
ples remembered that he had 
said this unto them : and they 
believed the scripture, and the 
word which Jesus had said. 

23 Now when he was in Je- 
rusalem at the passover, in the 
feast-f/ivi/, many believed in his 
name, when they saw the mira- 
cles which he did. 

24 But Jesus did not commit 



GREEK TEXT. 

18 ' ΑίΓΐκρίθησαν ovu oi ιου- 
δαίοι και ΐίποί' αντω, Τι σημβϊον 
SeLKi'veii ήμΐΐ'} οτι ταύτα ττοιβΐί; 

1 9 ΆτΓίκρίθη 6 Ίησονί και elweu 
αντοΐί, Λυσατί τον ναον τούτον, 
και Ιν τρισ\ν ήμ^ραΐζ ίγζρω αύτον. 

20 ΈΙτΓον ούν οϊ Ιουδαίοι, 
Τβσσαράκοντα καΐ (ζ ΐτΐσιν 
ωκοδομηθη ό vaos ούτος, και συ 
iv τρισιν ημίραις iyepeii αϋτον; 

21 'Έκβΐνοί δί (λίγβ ΤΓβρΙ του 
ναοΰ τοΰ σώματος αυτοΰ. 

22 οτβ ούν ηγίρθη 4κ νβκρών, 
ίμνησθησαν οι μαθηταΐ αϋτοΰ οτι 
τοί'το tAeyev αυτοΐς• και βπιστΐυ- 
σαν Trj γραψτ}, καΐ τω λόγω ω 
eiTrev ό Ιησούς. 

23 ώςδ^ήν ίν'Ιίροσολυμοις iv 
τω ττασχα, iv Trj ίορττ], ττολλοι iiri- 
στβυσαν et? το όνομα αυτοΰ, θεω- 
ρούντ(ς αυτοΰ τα σημβΐα α eiroiei. 

24 αύτος δε ό Ιησούς ουκ 



REVISED VERSION. 

18 The Jews, therefore, an- 
swered, and said to him. What 
sign showest thou to us, 'since 
thou doest these things "? 

19 Jesus answered, and said 
to them. Destroy this temple, and 
in three days I will raise it up. 

20 The Jews, therefore, said. 
Forty and six years was this tei\i- 
ple in building, and wilt thou 
"■raise it up in three days ? 

21 But he spoke of the tem- 
ple of his body. 

22 When, therefore, he was 
"raised from the dead, his disci- 
ples remembered that he °said 
this pto them ; and they believed 
the scripture, and the word 
which Jesus said. 

23 Now when he was in Je- 
rusalem, at the Passover, "during 
the feast, many believed on his 
name, seeing 'his 'signs which 
he was doing. 

24 But Jesus 'himself did not 
"trust himself to them, 'on ac- 



1 W., R., and most other Verss. have simply ίΛαί. However, 
seeing that, or since, expresses the idea more clearly. The 
latter is preferable to the former, because it is a single word, 
and, therefore, more concise. — Newc. 

" It is hardly necessary to say that rear, in this connection, 
is obsolete. 

» This word is passive in form. As Jesus is represented 
sometimes to have been raised by the power of the Father, I 
see no impropriety in rendering literally here. 

" Had said is such a rendering as this word will hardly ever 
bear. If ελε/ον is to be regarded as an impeif., used to say 
would be the proper expression to convey the meaning here. 
But I am satisfied that this word, if it must be regarded as an 
imperf. in form, is in reality an aorist in signification. I ad- 
mit that there are many passages in ^Vhich it may be taken 
as an imperf, but I can find no passage in which it is necessary 
so to understand it. On the other hand, there are several 
passages, in which it must he taken aoristically. — See Mark. 5 : 
8, 30, 31. Luke 23: 43, and others, where the action predicated 
was momentary, and not repeated ; besides a multitude of pass- 
ages in which ελινε, εΧεγον, are evidently used interchangeably 
with tint, ειπον, which are acknowledged aorists. But I see 
no necessity for regarding this word as imperfect, even in form ; 
for ελεγον is the regular second aorist form from λέγω, and 
Schrevelius gives it as such in his Lexicon. May it not be, that 



the imperf. οί λέγω is supplied from some other root of kindred 
meaning ? I would add, that, as far as I have noticed, ελεξα, 
the regular first aorist of λέγω, is nowhere found in the N. T. 
— Compare the aoristic use of εψηι; imperf. of γημι, 

r It is generally admitted that avroig is spurious. I would, 
therefore, leave out to them. 

■• Camp., Penn. — I would render εΐ' during, at any time when 
the sense is better expressed by this rendering, as it often is. 

' W., T., C, Q., R., Erasm.,Vulg., Kenr. — When we consider 
that αυτού is in all the editions of any authorit}'. including the 
Text. Rec, it is astonishing that the E. V. and most others, 
have nothing corresponding to it. It is found, besides, in almost 
all MSS. 

■ See N. X, V. 11, above. 

< I think it will not be denied that nvTos has here the force 
of the Latin ipse = himself. — Vulg., Cast., Dt., Trem., Bcza, 
Schott, Erasm.— DeW. (&).— See N. z, v. 12, above. 

° Germ., De W., (vertraute) ; Dt. {betrouwde) ; It. {fdava) ; 
Swed. (betrodde). — Newc, Camp., Penn, Dodd.,Wesl., Kenr. 

' I translate Sin το αντον γη'ωοχειι•, on account of his know- 
ing, because this is perfectly good English, and is, by far, the 
most literal and exact rendering I can find. Besides, it cannot 
be confounded, in the mind of theEnglish reader, with the trans- 
lation of ότι, because. It also leaves the way clear for translating 
ότί in the next verse, which is left untranslated in tlie E. V. 



18 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. ΠΙ. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

himself unto them, because he 
knew all men, 

25 And needed not that any 
should testify of man : for he 
knew what was in man. 



CHAP. III. 

«■ There was a man of the 
Pharisees named Nicodemus, a 
ruler of the Jews : 

2 The same came to Jesus by 
night, and said unto him. Rabbi, 
we know that thou art a teacher 
come from God : for no man can 
do these miracles that thou doest, 
except God be with him. 

3 Jesus answered and said 
unto him, Verily, verily, I say 
unto thee, Except a man be born 



GREEK TEXT. 



1•πίστ€ν€ν eavTov αύτοΐί, δια το 
αυτόν γινωσκ^ίν τταντα^• 

25 KCU OTL ου γρβίαν (Ιχ^εν ινα 
τ\ς μαρτνρηστ) irepi τοΰ άνθρω- 
που' αύτοί γαρ ΐγίνωσκβ τι ην iv 
τω άνθρωττω. 

CHAP. III. 

ΉΝ δΐ άνθρωποί ίκ των Φα- 
ρισαίων, Ι^ικοδημοί όνομα αυτω, 
αργών των Ιουδαίων. 

2 ούτοί ηΧθί ττροί τον Ιησονν 
νυκτός, και f'nrev αυτω, ' Ραββ\, 
οϊδαμεν οτι άττο θίοΰ ΐΧηΧνθας 
διδάσκαλος• ονδβΐί γαρ ταΰτα τα 
σημίία ουναταί. Troteiv α συ ττοι- 
ΐΐί, lav μη rj h θβος μ(τ αύτοΰ. 

3 ΛτΓβκρίθη ό Ιησούς καΐ 
elwev αυτω, Αμήν άμην λβγω 
σοι, (.αν μη τις γβννηθτΙ άνωθβν, 



REVISED VERSION. 

count of his knowing ["them] 
all, 

2-5 And because he *had no 
need that any one should testify 
of man ; for he 'himself knew 
what was in man. 



CHAP. III. 

"And there was a man, of the 
Pharisees, ''his name was Nico- 
demus, a ruler of the Jews. 

2 "Ήε came to ^ Jesus by night, 
and said to him, Rabbi, we know 
that thou hast come from God 
as a teacher : for no one can do 
these 'signs which thou doest, 
^if God be not with him. 

3 Jesus answered, and said to 
him. Verily, verily, I say to thee, 
^If any one be not born ''from 



" It is evident, I think, that πάντα; refers particularly to 
those to whom Jesus " did not trust himself," and not to the 
human race in general. The doctrine, that he knows all men, is 
set forth in the next verse. The only reason, why we may not 
translate navras simply all, is, that in that case it might be 
taken to mean all things, which is not the meaning. — Erasmus, 
Vulg., Schott, Beza (omnes) ; Newc. {all of them). — Dt., Germ., 
Dodd., Camp., Van Ess. 

» This is so much more literal than the E. V., that I think, as 
it is equally elegant, no further apology need be required. — Tulg. 
(opus ei non erat) ; other Latin Verss. substantially the same. — 
Penn, It., Fr. 0.,-S.,-M., Dodd. 

" See ch. 2 : 6, N. f. — It is very desirable that the connective, 
Se, should here be translated, as we have no reason to believe that 
the occurrence with which this chapter opens was separated by 
any considerable interval of time from those detailed in the last 
chapter. On the contrary, Nicodemus was probably one of those 
referred to in ch. 2 : 23. 

*■ See ch. 1 : 6, N. h. 

■= See ch. 1 : 2, N. c. 

■* Almost all the recent editors have αντον, instead of Ιησονν, 
which is probably an Italic insertion. I would, therefore, recom- 
mend that the revised "Version read, He came to him by night. 



etc., and that this note appear in the mai-gin : According to 
some copies, to Jesus by night, etc. 

' See ch. 2 : 11, N. x. 

^ If not is the literal rendering of εαν μη. I would always 
adopt it, unless perspicuity or elegance of diction should require 
a different translation. — It., Fr. 0.,-M., Lus. 

'' Erasmus (e supernis) ; De Wette {von ohenher) ;-C., Berl. 
Bib., Eob.— E. V., v. 31, below, ch. 19 : 11. James 1 : 17; 
3 : 15, 17. — It is extremely doubtful whether ανωΟ-εν ever 
means, properly, again. It refers either to space or time. 
Eeferriug to space, it means, from the top, or highest part, 
downwards, or simply, from above. Referring to time, it 
means, in like manner, from the source, or highest point, down- 
wards (time being regarded as something that descends), or 
simply, from the beginning, from the first. These are the 
definitions given by Passow, and are believed to be the only 
senses in which the profane writers, at least, ever use the 
word. Gal. 4 : 9, is the only passage in the N. Test., in which 
the word even seems to require the rendering, again {ok 
πάλιν ανωθ•εν δονλενειν &ελετε), and even here, if I am not 
mistaken, we may very properly understand ανω&εν to mean, 
from the beginning; q. d., "to which again (πάλιν) ye wish 
to be in bondage, going back, and from the beginning (ανωΟ'εν) 
living through that dark season of carnal ordinances." The 
instances of παλ. ανω., cited from the Classics, may probably 
be explained in a similar way. Perhaps the main reason why 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. ΠΙ. 



19 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

again, he cannot see the kingdom 
of God. 

4 Nicodemus saith unto him, 
How can a man be born when 
he is old? can he enter the 
second time into his mother's 
womb, and be born ? 



5 Jesus answered. Verily, ver- 
ily, I say imto thee. Except a 
man be born of water, and of tlie 
Spirit, he cannot enter into the 
kingdom of God. 

6 That which is born of the 
flesh, is flesh ; and tiiat which is 
born of the Spirit, is spirit. 



7 Marvel not that I said unto 
thee, Ye must be born again. 



GREEK TEXT. 

ου δύναται ιδβΐν την βασιλίίαν 
του θβοΰ. 

4 Aeyei ττρος αυτόν ο Νικό- 
δημος, 77ώ? δύναται άνθρωττοζ 
γβννηθηναι γ€ρων ων ; μη δύνα- 
ται €1? την κοιλίαν της μητρός 
αύτοΰ δβυτβρον elaeXOelv /cat yev- 
νηθηναι ; 

5 ΆτΓβκρΙθη 6 Ιησούς, Άμην 
άμην λΐ'γω σοι, lav μη τις γ€ν- 
νηθη ίζ ύδατος καΐ Πνεύματος, 
οΰ δύναται ^Ίσβλθΰν eiy την βα- 
σιλβίαν του Oeov. 

ΰ το γ6γ€ννημ€νον e/c της σαρ- 
κός, σάρζ Ιστι• καΐ το γ€γεννη- 
μίνον ίκ του ττνβυματος, ττνβΰμα 
ίστι. 

7 μη θαύμασες οτι e'nrov σοι, 
Δίΐ υμάς γβννηθηναι άνωθβν. 



REVISED VERSION. 

above, he cannot see the king- 
dom of God. 

4 Nicodemus saith to him. 
How can a man be born, 'being 
old '! Can he enter a second time 
into his mother's womb, and be 
born ■? 



5 Jesus answered. Verily, ver- 
ily, I say to thee, s^If any one be 
not born of water and the 'Spirit, 
he cannot enter into the kingdom 
of God. 

6 ''What 'hath been born of 
the flesh, is flesh; and ''what 'hath 
been born of the Spirit, is spirit. 



7 Do not ""wonder, "because 
I said to thee. Ye must be born 
■■from above. 



' See Qen. Obs. 4. — I see nothing to prevent the adoption 
of the participial form here. 

i See n. h, ch. 7 : 39. 

' I use what, for ihat which, because it answers an equally 
good purpose, and is more concise. — Latin Verss. (^quod). 

1 Beza (gentium est) ; other Latin Verss. (natiim est). — 
To express the full sense of the Orig. requires the perfect 
rendering, especially in v. 8. What is there affirmed of the 
new creature is true, not only at the moment of regeneration, 



but ever afterwards. The believer remains, all his life, in 
profound ignorance of the Spirit's mode of operation, in pro- 
ducing this heavenly birth. — See Gen. Obs. 4. 

" Marvel is so nearly obsolete, that I prefer to drop it 
entirely, especially since no valid objection can be brought 
against the word proposed as a substitute. The form with do 
is adopted, for the sake of euphony and perspicuity. — Newc, 
Camp., Dodd., Penn, W., Kenr. 

" It is sometimes difficult, as in this instance, to determine 
which of the two principal meanings of οτι, because, or that, 



so many have rendered this word again, in the passage before 
us, is, that Nicodemus, as is said, (Bio., Dodd., Kenr., Alf., and 
others) must have so understood it, as appears from his using 
the word Stizeoor, in the nest verse. But I cannot admit the 
force of this argument. 1. Because Nicodemus, having mis- 
apprehended, in other respects, the purport of the Savior's 
language, and being, at the time, more or less enveloped in 
spiritual ignorance, is the last man to whom we should apply 
for instruction in the department of Biblical interpretation. 
AVhat influence should the hastily formed impressions of his 
misty mind exert in fixing the more enlightened judgment of 
those in '• the kingdom of God ? " The argument seems to be 
this : Nicodemus understood the Savior to use αι/ωΟ-εν in its 
very unusual sense, again, therefore, he must have so used it. 
By parity of reasoning, Nicodemus understood the Savior to 
be speaking of a carnal birth, therefore, he must have been 
speaking of a carnal birth ! — 2. Because there is really no 
discrepancy at all between the interpretation for which I 



contend, and the Βιντεοον of Nicodemus, in the next verse. 
To be born from above, is to be born a second time : for a man 
to be born at all, when he is old, is to be born ίεντερον, a 
second time. It does not follow, then, that because Nicodemus 
understood this to be a second birth, he. therefore, did not 
understand ανωΟ-εν to mean /ro Hi above. The presumption is, 
that he took the word in its ordinary acceptation, but what 
puzzled him was, to imagine how this or any other birth was 
possible, when a man is old. — 3. Had the Savior, (or the 
Evangelist), desired to express in so many woi-ds the idea of 
a second birth, αι>αγει•ι•αεα•, (1 Peter 1 : 3, 23) would have 
expressed it without the shghtest ambiguity. — 4. Because the 
phrase, γεννη&ηναι αΐ'ω&εΐ', is evidently equivalent to, and 
synonymous with, that other used by this same writer, γενν. 
εκ Θεον (ch. 1 : 13. 1 John 3:0; 4:7; 5 : 1, 4, 18). I Avould 
add, that I cannot see why any word should ever be taken in 
an unusual sense, when the vsual rendering makes as good 
sense, and is fully as consistent with both test and context. 



20 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. HI. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

8 The wind bloweth where 
it listeth, and thou hearest the 
sound thereof, but canst not tell 
whence it coraeth, and whither 
it goeth : so is every one that is 
born of the Spirit. 

9 Nicodemus answered and 
said unto him, How can these 
things be ? 

10 Jesus answered and said 
unto him, Art thou a master of 
Israel, and knowest not these 
things ? 



GREEK TEXT. 



8 TO πνίΰμα οττον OeXei irvu, 
Kcu την φωνην αύτοΰ άκονβΐί, 
αλλ ουκ oiSas iroOtv ίρχίταί και 
ΤΓοΰ ύτταγβι• οΰτωί 4στΙ ttols ο 
γεγΐννημενοί e'/c του ττνβυματοί. 

9 ΑτΓβκρίθη ΝικοΒημοί kcCl 
eiTref αύτω, Πώς δύναται ταΰτα 
yeveaBai ; 

10 Άπβκρίθη ό Ίησοΰί κα\ 
ehrev αύτω, Συ el 6 διδάσκαλος 
τοΰ Ισραήλ, και ταΰτα ου γι- 
νώσκίΐ9; 



REVISED VERSION. 

S The "Spirit "breathes where 
he Pwill, and thou hearest "his 
"voice ; but thou "iknovvest not 
whence he cometh, and whither 
he goeth : so is every one that 
'hath been born of the Spirit. 

9 Nicodemus answered, and 
said to him, How can these 



things be ? 



10 Jesus answered, and said 
to him, ■'Thou art «the 'teacher 
of Israel, and knowest thou not 
these things ? 



» That TO 7ί)•ενμα does sometimes, among the profane writers, 
mean the vdnd, cannot be doubted. This, however, is the only 
passage in the N. T. in which it is so translated, (though, 
perhaps, in Heb. 1 : 7, τινενματα would be better rendered 
winds). On the other hand, it must be admitted that πνεειν 
is nowhere else in the N. T. predicated of persons, but is 
always, unless it be in this instance, sjjoken of the wind. 
However, we have, in Acts 17: 24, πνο>], a noun derived from 
the second perfect of this verb, signifying breath (of men) ; 
and in Genesis, 2 : 7, both Symmachus and Theodotion, trans- 
late the corresponding Hebrew verb by πνεειν, where the 
action is predicated of .Jehovah himself. (Parkh.). It may. 
therefore, be considered as established, that the usages of the 
Greek language fully justify the proposed translation of this 
verse, and free it from all philological difficulty. I have 
endeavored to give due weight to the argument for the common 
rendering drawn from the alleged comparison in the last part 
of the verse : " SO is every one that hath been born of the 
Spirit." But it should be borne in mind, that οϋτωι does not 
always (though it does generally) introduce a comparison. 
In fact, the idea of comparison is not at all inherent in the 
word, but is, in all cases where it exists, to be inferred from the 
connection in which it is used. And I do not see why, in this 
case, this last clause of the verse may not be viewed as a 
repetition of the preceding idea, in more emphatic language, 
what was before stated as a general tnUh being here aiBrmed 
to be universal. My reasons, then, for the proposed change 
are the following : 1. The Holy Spirit, not the wind, is the 
subject of conversation in the context. — 2. It is not true, in 
any proper sense, of the wind, that it " blows where it wills :" 
" nam huic, (Spiritui,) non vento, voluntas et vox est." (Beng.) 
The winds are God's messengers, (Ps. 104 : 4) sent to per- 
form his will, and under his absolute control (Matt. 8: 27). 
With this spiritual doctrine Nicodemus was, doubtless, 



familiar, and would be very unlikely to understand the Savior 
as teaching that the wind blows where, and whenever, it 
pleases. On the other hand, it is emphatically true of the 
Spirit of God, that he "breathes where he will." — 3. If 
το πνεύμα ... πνέει is as properly rendered, the Spirit breathes, as 
the wind blows, I do not see how there could be, to the mind 
of a Greek, any proper comparison in the case ; for there is 
manifestly nothing in the connection to remind him of the 
wind. The most that could be urged, is, that the Savior was 
making use of the double entendre, which is very unlikely 
indeed. — W., R., Nary, Kenr. — The Latin Verss. generally 
have Spiritus spiral, which, like the Greek, is, in the letter, 
ambiguous. 

ρ I think the idea is better expressed hy the weak sub- 
junctive form, as in ch. 5 : 21, than by the indicative. — Kenr. 
(wHleth) ; W., R., Penn, Newc, Dodd., Nar}'. 

' Certainly, ovx oiSag is simply, thou knowest not. The 
E. V. has it, as here, in ch. 8 : 14 ; 16 : 18. Matt. 21 : 27. 
Luke 20 : 7. 2 Cor. 12 : 2, 3, in all which cases it would read 
perfectly well, if tr.anslated literally. — \V. {woost not). — R., 
Newc, Camp., Nary, Kenr. 

■■ I see no good reason for including this first clause in the 
question of which it forms no necessary part. — W., R., Fr. 
0.,-S.,-M., Vulg., De W., It., Kenr. 

• I think it probable, that Nicodemus had not only acquired 
a " pre-eminent degree of celebrity," as has been remarked by 
an editor, but that he was conscious of his being, indeed, a 
skillful interpreter of the Scriptures, and more or less proud 
of his attainments. And it may not be out of place to con- 
jecture, that the Savior's remark was, in some sense, ironical, 
and intended to rebuke this pride, of the existence of which 
he was well aware. — De W., Beng., Camp., Kenr. 

' E. v., V. 2, above. — Newc., Camp., Dodd., Wesl., Penn. — 
See ch. 1 : 38, N. m. 



to adopt. The ditfereuce between the idea expressed by the 
version here given, and that expressed by the vast majority of 
versions, seems to be this : The latter means. Do not be 
astonished at me for advancing this sentiment ; while the 



former means. Do not be astonished at the sentiment which I 
have advanced. This I take to be the true meaning of the 
Orig. — Vulg. {quia) ; Erasm., Trem., Beza, Schott, {qucd) ; 
W. (for) ; other Eng. Verss. (that). 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. HI. 



21 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

11 Verily, verily, I say unto 
thee. We speak that we do 
know, and testify that we have 
setn ; and ye receive not our 
witness. 

12 If I have told you earthly 
things, and ye believe not, how 
shall ye believe if I tell you υ/ 
heavenly things "? 

13 And no man hath ascended 
up to heaven, but he that came 
down from heaven, eveti the Son 
of man which is in heaven. 

14 And as Moses lifted up the 
serpent in the wilderness, even 
so must the Son of man be lift- 
ed up : 

15 That whosoever believeth 
in him should not perish, but 
have eternal life. 

IG For God so loved the 
world, that he gave his only be- 
gotten Son, that whosoever be- 
lieveth in him, should not perish, 
but have everlasting life. 

17 For God sent not his Son 
into the world to condemn the 



GREEK TEXT. 

11 αμήν αμήν λ^γω σοι, οτι 
Ό ο18αμ€ν λαλοΰμβν, και Ό tcopa- 
καμΐν μαρτυροΰμίν καΐ την μαρ- 
τυτ'ιαν ημών ου λαμβαν€Τ€. 

12 el τα (ττιγίΐα βίττον νμΐν, 
και ού 7Γΐστ€υ€Τ(, ττώί, iav ΐίττω 
νμιν τα Ιπουρανια, 7Γΐστ€νσ6Τ€ ; 

13 καΐ ουδίΐί άναβίβηκ^ν ety 
τον ουρανον, ei μη ο ίκ τον ου- 
ρανού καταβας, 6 υ'ιοί τοΰ άνθρώ- 
ΤΓΟι; ο ων ΐΐ> τω ου ράνω• 

14 κοΊ καθωί Μωση5 ΰψωσ€ 
τον οφιν ev Trj Ιρημω, ουτω^ ύψω- 
erjvai Bii τον υϊον τοΰ άνθρωττου' 

15 Ίνα πάί ο ττιστβυων eiy αυ- 
τόν μη άτΓοληται, άλλ' €χ^τ) ζωην 
αΐωνιον. 

1ΰ οΰτω γαρ ηγαπησβν ό Oeos 
τον κοσμον, ώστε τον υϊον αντοΰ 
τον μονογενή ίδωκβν, ινα ττας ο 
ΤΓίστευων et? αυτόν μη άττοληται, 
άλλ' ί'χ?? ζ^ν^ αιωνιον. 

17 ού γαρ άπίστζίλβν ό Oeos 
τον ν'ιον αύτοΰ eh τον κοσμον, 



REVISED VERSION. 

11 Verily, verily, I say to 
thee, "What we know we speak, 
and "what we have seen we 
testify ; and ye receive not our 
'testimony. 

12 If I "told you earthly 
things, and ye believe not, how, 
'if I tell you heavenly things, 
will ye believe"? 

13 And no one hath ''gone up 
into heaven, except he that came 
down out of heaven, the Son of 
man who »was in heaven. 

14 And as Moses lifted up the 
serpent in the wilderness, so must 
the Son of man be lifted up : 

15 That ""every one that be- 
lieveth on hira may mot perish, 
but have eternal life. 

16 For God so loved the 
world that he gave his Son, ""the 
Only Begotten, that ''every one 
that believeth on him might not 
perish, but have «eternal life. 

17 For God sent not his Son 
into the world, 'that he might 



" See V. 6, above, N. r., and Gen. Obs. 6. 
♦ See ch. 1: 7, N.j. 
' See Gen. Obs. 4. 
» See Gen. Obs. 5. 
y See N. w, ch. 1 : 33. 

« Ό ων= όί ηι•, as is admitted by many learned interpreters. 
It is not, however, because the Evang. uses the former for the 
latter, either through caprice, or ignorance of the language, as 
is hinted by some, but because the present participle, (espe- 
cially of those verbs that have no aorist in use,) is legitimately 
and properly referred to past time, whenever it depends on a 
past tenbc. In this it resembles very much the inflnitive mood. 
—See TroUope's Gr. to the N. T. § 60. Obs. 21.— There are 
numerous illustrations of the above remark in the E. V. See 
ch. 1: 48; 9 : 25, 40; 11: 31; 12: 17; 20: 1; 21: 11. Mark. 
2:26; 14:66. Luke 6: 3 ; 22: 53; 23: 7 ; 24: 6, 44. Acts 
7: 2,12; 9: 38,39; 11: 1; 13: 1; 14: 13; 16: 3; 19:31; 
20: 34; 21 : 8 ; 22: 5, 9; 24: 24; 27 : 9. Rom. 4: 10; 5: 6, 8, 
and many other passages, where ων is rendered by the Eng. 
imperf Indeed, there is scarcely a real exception to the rule, 
according to which this is done, unless here, and in ch. 1 : 18, 



in both which cases the circumstances as strongly call for the 
past rendering as in any of those cited above. 

*■ See Gen. Obs. G. — I would always, when practicable, trans- 
late nas b, every one that, or every one who. — E. V. vv. 8, 
20 ; ch. 6 : 40 ; 18 : 37. Matth. 7 : 8, 21, 26 ; 25 : 29. Luke 
11: 10; 18:14; 19: 26. Rom. 1: 16; 10: 4 1 Cor. 16: 16. 
Gal. 3.13. 2 Tim. 2 : 19. Heb. 5:13. 1 John 2 : 29 ; 4 : 7 ; 
5: 1. 

° Lachm., Tisch., and Pcnn, with some of the most ancient 
MSS. and Verss., reject μη ατιοληται αλλ', which Griesb. con- 
siders a probable interpolation. I would adopt this reading, 
and leave out not perish, but, ivith this note in the margin. : 
Many copies read, may not perish, but have, &c. 

•^ As αντου stands between τοί' vlov and τον μονογενή, it 
seems evident, that the latter is in apposition with the fonner, 
and is strictly used as an appellative. If this be so, the render- 
ing given is necessary to express the full force of the Orig. 

' Eternal and everlasting are used about an equal number 
of times in the E. V. to translate auovtos. Either is well 
enough; but I see no necessity for both. I have uniformly 
adopted the former. 

' See ch. 1 : 7, N. k. 



22 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. III. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

world, but tliat the world through 
him might be saved. 

18 He that believeth ou him, 
is not condemned : but he that 
believetli not, is condemned al- 
ready, because he liath not be- 
lieved in the name of the only 
begotten Son of God. 

1 9 And this is the condemna- 
tion, that light is come into the 
world, and men loved darkness 
rather than light, because their 
deeds were evil. 



20 For every one thai doeth 
evil hateth the light, neither 
coraeth to the light, lest his 
deeds should be reproved. 

21 But he that doeth truth, 
Cometh to the light, that his 
deeds may be made manifest, 
that tliey are wrought in God. 

22 After these things came 
Jesus and his disciples into the 
land of Judea ; and there he 
tarried with them, and Ijaptized. 

23 And John also was bap- 
tizing in j-Enon, near to Salim, 
because tliere was much water 



GREEK TEXT. 

ίνα κρίντ} τον κοσμον, άλλ' Ινα 
σωθγ] ό κοσμοί 8l αύτοΰ. 

18 ο ΤΓίστβυων eli αυτόν ου 
κρίνεται• ο 8e μη ττιστβυων ηδη 
κ€κριται, ΟΤΙ μη ττεττίστευκεν ei? 
το ονομα του μονογενούς υιού του 
Θεού. 

ly αυτή οε εστίν η κρισις, οτι 
το φώΐ εληλυθεν ety τον κοσμον, 
καΐ ηγαττησαν οι άνθρωποι μάλ- 
λον το σκότος, η το φώς• ην γαρ 
ΤΓονηρα αυτών τα έργα. 

20 ττάί γαρ ό φαΰλα ττρασ- 
σων, μισεί το φως, και ουκ έρχε- 
ται ττρος το φως, ίνα μη ελεγχθγ] 
τα έργα αυτοΰ• 

21 ο δε ποιών την αληθειαν, 
εργεται ττρος το φώς, 'ίνα φανε- 
ρωθη αυτοΰ τα έργα, ότι εν θεώ 
εστίν είργασμενα. 

22 Μετά ταύτα ηλθεν ό, Ιη- 
σούς καΐ οι μαθηταΐ αυτοΰ εΙς την 
Ιουδαίαν γην. καΐ εκεί διετριβε 

μετ αυτών καΐ εβαπτιζεν. 

2 ο ή ν δε καΙ Ιωάννης βαπτί- 
(^ων εν Λίνων εγγύς τοΰ Σαλε\μ, 



REVISED VERSION. 

condemn the world, but that the 
world through him might be 
saved. 

18 He that believeth on him 
is not condemned ; but he that 
believeth not hath been con- 
demned already, because he hath 
not believed on the name of the 
only begotten Son of God. 

19 And this is the condemna- 
tion, that the light has come into 
the world, and men loved rhe 
darkness rather than the light ; 
"for their '"works were evil. 

20 For every one that doeth 
evil 'things hateth the light, Jand 
Cometh not to the light, i<that his 
"■works may not be reproved. 

21 But he that doetli the truth 
cometh to the light, so that his 
"■works may be 'manifested, that 
they have been wrought in God. 

22 After these things came 
Jesus and liis disciples into the 
■"Judean land, and there he tar- 
ried with them, and was "im- 
mersing. 

23 And John also was ■■im- 
mersing in ^non, near to Salim, 
because there "were "many wa- 



^ The Orig. is not ότι, but γαρ. It is rendered because, in 
the E. V. of ch. 10 : 29. Rom. 4:15; seeing, in Acts 2:15; 
and because thai in Acts 28 : 20. 3 John 7. In all these cases, 
I would render simply, as here, for ; not because γαο is not a 
causative particle, but for the purpose of distinguishing it from 
ότί. — See ch. 1 : 15, N. i. — Newc. 

■■ For the sake of uniformitj', I would alwa3's translate ε^γον 
work. This is its usual translation in the E. \. 

' According to the usual custom, in such cases, I supply the 
word things, to indicate that the adjective is plural. 

J And not is the literal rendering of xac ουκ. — W., R., It., 
Newc, Dodd., Nary, Kenr., Trem.,Vulg., Germ., DeW.jVan Ess. 

' See ch. 1 : 7, N. k. 

1 See ch. 1 : 31, N. s. 

■» It is generally agreed, (Uodd., Bio., Alf., and others,) that 
την Ιουδαίαν γην means, not Judea, or the land of Judea, in 
the usual sense, but, " the territory of Judea, as distinguished 
from its metropolis : * in other words, that γη is here taken 



in the sense of χωςα. Not having been able to find a form of 
expression in common use that I consider unobjectionable, I 
have concluded to recommend the literal translation, Judean 
land, in imitation of the respect.able authorities cited below. 
— Germ., DeW., Van Ess, (^das Judische Land) ; A^ulg., Cast., 
Erasm., {in terram Judeeam). 

" See ch. 1 : 25, N. a. 

° Some take ίδατα πολλά to be = many streams, or fotmi- 
ains, (Rob., Bio., and others.) others understand this expres- 
sion to mean, a great abundance of water. The latter view 
is sustained both by the contest and parallel passages. Though 
the literal rendering, many waters, may be pronounced a He- 
braism, yet it has been so long domesticated in our English 
scriptures, that no practical good could result from rejecting 
it, especi.ally since the precise meaning of this foreign idiom is 
necessarily to be determined by the contest. — Vulg.,W., It. — 
E. v.. Rev. 1: 15; 14: 2; 17: 1 (with art); 19: 6.— Those 
just cited are the only other passages in which this expression 
occurs in the N. T. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. III. 



23 



KIXG JAMES VERSION. 

there : and they came, and were 
baptized. 

24 For John was not yet cast 
into prison. 

25 Then there arose a ques- 
tion between some of Jolin's 
disciples and the Jews, about 
purifying. 

2G And they came unto John, 
and said unto him, Rabbi, he 
til at was with thee beyond Jor- 
dan, to whom thou barest wit- 
ness, behold, the same baptizeth, 
and all men come to him. 

27 John answered and said, 
A man can receive nothing, 
except it be given him from 
heaven. 

28 Ye yourselves bear me 
witness, that I said, I am not 
the Christ, but that I am sent 
before him. 

29 He that hath the bride, is 
the bridegroom : but the friend 
of the bridegroom, which stand- 
eth and heareth him, rejoiceth 
greatly, because of the bi'ide- 
groom's voice : this my joy there- 
fore is fulfilled. 



GREEK TEXT. 



OTL ύδατα ττολλα ήι/ e'/cer καΐ ττα- 
peyLvovTo καΐ ΐβατττίζοντο. 

24 οΰ'τΓω γαρ ην βίβλημίνος 
els την φυλακην ό Ιωάννης. 

2ο Έγίνΐτο ούν ζητησίί €κ 
των μαθητών Ιωάννου μ€τα Ιου- 
δαίων irepL καθαρισμού• 

26 κοΛ. ήλθον Ίτροί τον Ίω- 
αννην κα\ ehrov αυτώ, ΡαββΙ, 

.\ ■} \ „ / ' - > τ- 

ο? ην μ€τα σου ττβραν του Ιορ- 
δανού, φ συ μΐμαρτυρηκας, 'ίδβ 
ούτος βατΓτίζβι, καΐ παντβς ep -χ^ον- 
ται ττροί αυτόν. 

27 ΑτΓΐκρίθη Ιωάννης καΙ 
tiir(v, Ου δύναται άνθρωπος λαμ- 
βάνειν ουδίν, iav μη fj δίδομίνον 
αύτώ €κ του ουρανού. 

28 αυτοί ύμ€Ϊς μοι μαρτυρείτε 
OTL είτΓον, Ουκ ειμί εγω 6 Χρί- 
στος, αλλ OTL απεσταλμένος ε'ιμ). 
έμπροσθεν εκείνου. 

29 ό έχων την νυμφην, νυμ- 
φίος εστίν ό δε φίλος του νυμ- 
φίου, 6 εστηκως καΐ άκουων 
αυτοΰ, χαρά χαίρει δια την φω- 
νην του νυμφιυυ. αυτή ούν η 
χαρά ή ε μη πεπληρωται. 



REVISED VERSION. 

ters there : and they pwere com- 
ing and rbeing "immersed. 

24 For .John had not yet been 
cast into the prison. 

25 There nvas, therefore, a 
question between tlie disciples 
of .lohn and 'the Jews, about 
purifying. 

26 And they came to John, 
and said to him. Rabbi, he who 
was with thee beyond the Jordan, 
to whom THOU hast 'testified, 
behold, "he is "immersing, and 
all are coming to him. 



27 John answered, and said, 
A man can receive nothing, ex- 
cept it hath been given him from 
heaven. 

2S Ye yourselves 'testify to 
me, that I said, I am not the 
Christ, but that I have been 
sent before him. 

29 He that hath the bride, is 
^the bi'i(!(>giOoin. Now tlie friend 
of the bridegroom, ΛνΙιο sfandeth 
and heareth him, rejoiceth >with 
joy, because of the bridegroom's 
voice : this, therefore, my joy, 
hath been fulfilled. 



ρ Accordin'j; tn tlie E. V. which translates aoristically, Jesus 
and his disciples wei-e the persons who came and were immersed. 
But this is not the fact of history, nor is it implied in the Orig. 
All ambignity vanishes when the verbs are put in the proper 
imperfect furm. Ihei/ {people) were coming, and being immerxed, 
i. e., they kept coining all the while, which can not possibly be 
predicated of Jesus and his disciples. 

1 I see no good reason for varying from the common rendering 
of γίνομαι, when no important advantage is gained thereby. — 
Dodd., Pr. 0. ,-S.,-M. 

■ Almost all modern translators and editors regard lovSmov, 
which is found in the large majority of existing MSS., as the 
true reading. All, I believe, reject lovSauor, of the Textus 
Rcceptus, as spurious. I confess that I consider the conjectural 
emendation of Bentley, adopted by Pcnn (Ιησον), sustained by an 



overwhelming weight of internal evidence ; but, as there is, as 
far as is known, no manuscriptural authority for this reading, 
I dare not venture to recommend its adoption. — De Wette, A'an 
Ess, Newc, Dodd., and others. — In view of all the facts known, 
I would recommend that it be made to read, in the revision, 
loith a Jew, etc. 

t See ch. 1 : 7, N". j. 
" See ch. 1 : 2, N. c. 
' See ch. 1 : 25, N. a. 
' See Gen. Obs. 1. 

7 This Hebraism is very beautiful, and I should be very glad 
to have it incorporated in the translation. A similar expres- 
sion occurs iu Luke 22 : 15 : " With desire I desired " {επιΟ-νμίΐί 
επε&νμησα). — Doddridge [iciih great joij). W., R., Keiir., Newc. 
marg. 



24 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IV. 



KING JAMES VKKSION. 

30 He must inci'ease, but I 
must decrease. 

31 He that cometh from above 
is above all : he that is of the 
earth is earthly, and speaketh of 
the earth : he that cometh from 
heaven is above all. 

32 And what he hath seen and 
heard, that he testifieth ; and no 
man receiveth his testimony. 

33 He that hath received his 
testimony, hath set to his seal 
that God is true. 

34 For he vphom God hath 
sent, speaketh the words of God : 
for God giveth not the Spirit by 
measure unto him. 

35 The Father loveth the Son, 
and hath given all things into his 
hand. 



36 He that believeth on the 
Son hath everlasting life : and 
he that believeth not the Son, 
shall not see life ; but the wrath 
of God abideth on him. 

CHAP. IV. 

When therefore the Lord 
knew how the Pharisees had 
heard that Jesus made and bap- 
tized more disciples tlian John, 



GREEK TEXT. 

30 eKfLUOu δίΐ av^auetv, €/xe 
δε βλαττουσθαί. 

31 ο avwOev €ρχ^ομ€νο9, ΐττανω 
τταντων ίστϊν. 6 ών 4κ τη9 γηί, 
e/c τη$ γης ε'στί, και e/c τηί γης 
λαλίΐ• ό 6Κ του ουρανού βρ^ομβ- 
νοί, ίττανω πάντων ΐστί, 

32 /cat ό ίωρακ€ καΐ ηκουσί, 
τούτο μαρτυρβΐ• και την μαρτυ- 
ρίαν αυτού οϋδίΐί λαμβάνβι. 

33 ο λαβών αυτού την μαρτυ- 
ριαν, βσφραγισεν οτι ό θβος αλη- 
θής ίστιν. 

34 Όν γαρ άττβστβιλίν ό θΐοί, 
τα ρήματα τού θβοΰ λαλεί• ού 
γαρ €κ μέτρου δίδωσιν ό Oeos το 
ΙΙνΐύμα. 

35 ο πατήρ αγάπα τον υ\ον, 
καΙ πάντα δΐδωκΐν eV τη χ^ψί 
αυτού. 

36 ό πίστ€υων th τον υίον, 
βχβι ζωην αΙώνων 6 δβ άπβιθών 
τω υΐω, ουκ οψίταί ζωην, άλλ' 7] 
οργή τού θίού μίνα eV αύτον. 

CHAP. IV. 

S22, ουν €γνω ο Κύριος, οτι 
ηκουσαν οϊ Φαρισαΐοί, οτι Ιη- 
σούς πλείονας μαθητας ποίΐϊ κα\ 
βαπτίζει ή 'Ιωάννης• 



REVISED ΛΈΕβΙΟΝ. 

30 Ηθ must increase, but I 
[must] decrease. 

31 He that cometh from above 
is above all. He that is of the 
earth, 'of the earth he is, and of 
the earth he speaketh. He that 
cometh from heaven is above all. 

32 And what he hath seen and 
heard, "^this he testifieth ; and no 
one receiveth his testimony. 

33 He that receiveth his testi- 
mony "hath set his seal, that 
God is true. 

34 For lie whom God sent 
speaketh the words of God : 
for "God giveth not the Spirit 
by measure. 

35 The Father loveth the Son, 
and hath given all things into his 
hand. 

36 He that believeth on the 
Son hath 'eternal life : ■'but he 
that "obeyeth not the Son shall 
not see life ; but the wrath of 
God abideth upon him. 

CHAP. IV. 

AVhen, therefore, the Lord 
knew, 'that the Pharisees had 
heard, 'That Jesus was making 
and 'immersing more disciples 
than John ; 



' I have adopted this phraseology (which is perfectly literal,) 
verbatim ftom R. Substantially the same are Vulg., Germ., 
De W., It., Dt., Fr. 0. -S.,-M., Dodd., Kcnr. 

» This is, I think, cue of the few instances (in the N. T..) 
in which the aorist is used as an indefinite present. — Penn. 
Newc. {hath set his seal) ; It., Vulg., Dt., Germ., Berl. Bib., 
Beng.. De W., (hath sealed.) — I can hardly imagine what the 
E. V. hath set to his seat, can mean, unless set to is used in the 
sense of a^x, in which case, the meaning would be correctly, 
but not happily, expressed. 

" Tisch. and Penn omit 6 Θεός, which is wanting in some 
very ancient MSS., and which Griesb. and Lachm. consider a 
■very probable interpolation. I recommend that this note be 
placed in the margin : According to some copies, for he giveth 
not, &c. 

'■ E. v., generally. — See ch. 4 : 18, N.q.,and v. 16, above, N.e. 



^ I think the connection shows clearly that 5e has an ad- 
versative force here. — See Gen. Obs. 6. 

' The verb, ατηι&ειν, properly signifies, to disobey ; and 
this is much more forcible than to disbelieve, since there are 
very many who profess to believe with all their hearts, yet 
never show their faith by works. — De W., Berl. Bib., (unge- 
horsam ist) ; Sharpe {disobey eth).—Q., Dt., Cast., Wesl. 

' "W., R., Newc, Dodd., Camp., and others. — How is, in this 
sense, quite obsolete. 

" De W., W., R., Vulg. — De W. treats this phrase as a quo- 
tation, in which opinion I would concur. Hence I write That, 
with a capital. In such cases, ότι is often left untranslated in 
the E.V., but not always. See Mark 6:15; Luke 4 : 4 ; 7 : 10. 
ch. 7 : 42, and others. 

' See N. a, ch. 1 : 25. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IV. 



25 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

2 (Though Jesus himself bap- 
tized not, but his disciples,) 



3 He left Judea, and departed 
again into Galilee. 

4 And he must needs go 
through Samaria. 

5 Then cometh he to a city of 
Samaria, which is called Sychar, 
near to the parcel of ground that 
Jacob gave to his sou Joseph. 

6 Now Jacob's well was there. 
Jesus therefore being wearied 
with Aw journey, sat thus on the 
well : and it was about the sixth 
hour. 

7 There cometh a woman of 
Samaria to draw water : Jesus 
saith unto her. Give me to drink. 

8 (For his disciples were gone 
away unto the city to buy meat.) 



9 Then saith the woman of 
Samaria unto him, How is it 



GREEK TEXT. 



2 (^καίτοίγ€ Ιησον? αύτοί ούκ 
(βάπτιζαν, άλλ' οι μαθηταΐ αυ- 
τού•) 

3 άφηκ€ την Iov8aiau, και 
άττηλθζ πάλιν eif την Γαλιλαίαν. 

4 iSei δε αύτον δι^ρχ^εσθαι δια 
τη? Σαμαρβιαί. 

5 βρ-χ^εται ούν ei? ττολιν της 
Σαμάρειας λβγομ^νην Συγαρ, 
πλησίον του χωρίου Ό βδωκβν 'Ια- 
κώβ 'Ιωσήφ τω νϊω αύτον. 

6 ην δβ €Κΐΐ πηγή τον Ίακωβ. 
ό ούν Ιησούς κβκοπιακως βκ της 
όδοιπορίας ίκαθίζβτο οΰτως Ιπι 
τή πηγή. ωρα ήν ωσ€ΐ έκτη. 

Ί' Εργ€ται γννη e/c της Σα- 
μαρβίας άντλησαι ύδωρ. λβγβι 
avTrj ο Ιησούς, Δος μοι πκΐν. 

8 οι γαρ μαθηταΊ αύτον άττβ- 
ληλνθίΐσαν €ΐς την πολιν 'ίνα 
τ ροφάς άγορασωσι. 

9 Λ€γ€ΐ ούν αυτώ η γννη η 
Σαμαρβΐτις, Πως συ Ιουδαίος ών 



REVISED VERSION. 

2 (Though Jesus himself did 
not 'innnerse, but his disciples;) 



3 He left Judea, and ■'went 
away again into Galilee. 

4 And it 'was necessary that 
he should go through Samaria. 

5 He cometh, therefore, to a 
city of Samaria called Sychar, 
near to the 'piece of ground 
which Jacob gave to his son 
Joseph. 

6 Now Jacob's well was there. 
Jesus, therefore, "having become 
weary from the journey, was 
sitting thus on the well. It was 
about the sixth hour. 

7 There cometh a woman of 
Samaria to draw water. Jesus 
saith to her, Give me to drink. 

8 (For his disciples w^ere gone 
away ^into the city, ^°that they 
might buy ''provisions.) 

9 The 'Samaritan woman, 
therefore, saith to him. How 



'' "W., R., Newc, Penn, Kenr., (went). — To go away is cer- 
tainly more forcible than to depart, and is the more usual 
translation of the word. 

* The impersonal verb, Ssi, I would render viitst, in the 
pres., and it was necessary that, in the impcrf., (because must 
lacks a separate form for the imperf.) ; especially whenever it 
implies simply the necessity, or certainty of an event. When 
it implies duty, or moral obligation. I would sometimes trans- 
late by ought, when the subject is expressed, otherwise by 
one ought. Must needs is, of course, to be rejected, as ob- 
solete. — Kenr. 

' W., Cast., (place) ; T., C, G., It., (possession) ; R. (manor) ; 
Vulg. (praedium); Germ. (Dmjiein) ; De W., All., (Felde) ■ 
Kist. (Ackerfelde) ; Dt. (stuck larits). — Parcel, in modern 
language, does not exactly express the idea : it is too diminu- 
tive, and would not, at the present day, be used in speaking of 
land, or similar objects. 

" In the E.V., being wearied xcith his journey, the condi- 
tion of weariness is represented as simultaneous with the act 
of sitting on the well. The Orig. expresses more than this. 
The perfect participle, κεχοττιακω;, implies that he had been 
weary before he sat down, or even arrived at the well. The 
difference between the two renderings is, indeed, but small ; 



still, it is worth the slight trouble of correction. — From is the 
usual translation of ex, and is even better here than with. 

' Unto, or to, is by no means the primary signification of 
fii, which is placed almost always before the names of objects 
which are, in some sense or another, viewed as capable of being 
entered, the primary meaning of the preposition being into. 
Still, there are cases in which the Eng. idiom precludes the 
rendering into, where to is the best that can be given. This 
is not true, however, in the present instance. I have adopted 
this general rule, not only for en, but also for other preposi- 
tions : never to depart from the primary meaning, unless the 
Eng. idiom require a different rendering, in order to make good 
sense, or unless the true sense is, according to the Eng. idiom, 
better expressed by a different preposition. 

s^ See N. k, ch. 1 : 7. 

^ This word occurs in the plural only in this place, in the 
N. T. I prefer, for the sake of greater accuracy, to translate 
it by a plural noun. In the sing., I would always render it, 
food, which is more in modem style than meat. — Kenr. marg, 

' R., Penn, Vulg.. Cast., Dt., Germ., DeW., Port-, It., Newc. 
Camp., Wesl., Nary, Kenr., Erasm., Beza, Trem. — As Sama- 
ritan woman is entirely pure English, I do not see why it 
should not be adopted. 



26 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IV. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

that thou, being a Jew, askest 
drink of me, which am a woman 
of Samaria? for the Jews have 
no dealings with the Samaritans. 

10 Jesus answered and said 
unto her, If thou knewest the 
gift of God, and who it is that 
saith to thee. Give me to drink ; 
thou wouldest have asked of him, 
and he would have given thee 
living water. 

11 The woman saith unto him, 
Sir, thou hast nothing to draw 
with, and the well is deep : from 
whence then hast thou that liv- 
ing water ? 

12 Art thou greater than our 
father Jacob, which gave us the 
well, and drank thereof himself, 
and his children, and his cattle ? 



1-3 Jesus answered and said 
unto her. Whosoever drinketh of 
this water, shall thirst again : 

14 But whosoever drinketh of 
the water that I sliall give him, 
shall never thirst ; but the water 
that I shall give him, shall be in 
him a well of water springing up 
into everlasting life. 

15 The woman saith unto him. 
Sir, give me this water, that I 
thirst not, neither come hither 
to draw. 



GREEK TEXT. 



Trap βμου τηειν aireii, ονσηζ 
γυναικός Σαμαρβίτίδοί ; ου γαρ 
συγγβώνταί Ιουδαίοι Σαμαρεί- 
Tais. 

10 Αττίκρίθη Ιησούς καχ et- 
TTiv αυττι, ΈΙ ySeii την δωρεάν 
του θβοΰ, καΐ τις Ιστιν ό λέγων 

ΑΙ ^ \ ,\ ,1 

σοι, ΖΙο? μοι ττιβιν, συ αν ητησας 
αύτον, και ίδωκεν αν σοι ΰδωρ 
ζων. 

11 Λεγβι αυτω η γυνή, Κύ- 
ριε, οΰτ€ αντλημα ε'χ^ί?, καΐ το 
φρεαρ εστί βαθύ• ττοθεν ούν εχ^εις 
το υοωρ το ί^ων ; 

12 μη συ μείζων ει του ττατρος 
ημών Ιακώβ, ό? εδωκεν ημΐν το 
φρεαρ, καΐ αυτός εζ αύτοΰ εττιε, 
/cat οι υ'ιοί αύτοΰ, καΊ τα θρέμ- 
ματα αυτοΰ ; 

13 Λττεκρίθη ό Ιησούς και 
είττεν avTrj, Πας ό πίνων εκ τοΰ 
ύδατος τούτου, διψησει τταλιν 

4 ος ο αν ττιη εκ του υοατος 
ου εγω δώσω αυτω, ου μη δί\|/?;σ•ι/ 
εις τον αιώνα• άλλα το ύδωρ Ό 
δώσω αυτω, γενησεται εν αυτω 
ττηγη ύδατος άλλομενου εις ζωην 



αΐωνιον. 



15 Λέγει προς αύτον η γυνή, 
Κύριε, δος μοι τούτο το ύδωρ, 
ινα μη διψώ, μηδέ εργωμαι εν- 
θαδε άντλεΐν. 



REVISED ΛΈΡίίΙΟΝ. 

dost THOU, being a Jew, ask 
drink of me, Avho am a 'Samari- 
tan woman ? For Jews have no 
dealings with Samaritans. 

10 Jesus answered, and said 
to her. If thou didst know the 
gift of God, and who it is that 
saitli to thee, Give me to drink, 
THOU wouldst ask him, and he 
would give thee living water. 

11 The woman saith to him. 
Sir, thou hast nothing to draw 
with, and the well is deep : 
whence, then, hast thou 'the 
living water ? 

12 Art THOU greater than our 
father Jacob, who gave us the 
well, and drank "Of it himself, 
and his ""sons, and his cattle ? 



13 Jesus answered, and said 
to her, lEvery one that drinketh 
of tliis water will thirst again. 

14 But whoever drinketh of 
the water which I will give him, 
shall never thirst ; but the wa- 
ter which I will give liim shall 
"become in him a well of wa- 
ter, springing up into «eternal 
life. 

15 The woman saith to him. 
Sir, give me this water, that I 
may not thirst, I'nor come hither 
to draw. 



' Rhemisl), Dutch, De AVette, Portuguese, Campbell.— The 
simple article, it is true, does not fully express the force of the 
doable Greek article, but we can scarcely afford, out of our 
limited resources, to strengthen the translation by using mate- 
rials that are certain to be required in rendering other forms of 
expression. 

'' Newcome, Rhemish, Doddridge. — See General Observa- 
tions 6. 

'^ Son is almost always in the singular, and very often in the 
plural, the translation of vios, adopted in the E. V. To prevent 



ambiguity, I think I would make the rule, now so general, a 
universal one, or nearly so. 

1 See N. b, ch. 3 : 16, and Gen. Obs. 6. 

° Wesl., Nary, Kenr., It., Fr. 0.,-S.,-M., Vulg., E.— W. [be. 
made).—E. V., ch. 1 : 12. Acts 4 : 11 ; 10 : 10. Rom. 3 : 19. 
1 Cor. 3 : 18, etc. 

» See N. e, ch. 3 : 16. 

ρ Newc, Camp., Dodd., Penn, Kenr. — Neither, in this connec- 
tion, is in violation of the modern rules of English grammar. — 
See Gen. Obs. 6. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IV. 



27 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

16 Jesus saith unto her, Go 
call thy husband, and come 
hither. 

17 The woman answered and 
said, I have no husband. Jesus 
said unto her. Thou hast well 
said, I have no husband : 

] 8 For thou hast had five hus- 
bands, and he whom thou now 
hast, iii not thy husband: in that 
saidst thou truly. 

19 The woman saith unto him, 
Sir, I perceive that thou art a 
prophet. 

20 Our fathers worshipped in 
this mountain ; and ye say, that 
in Jerusalem is the place where 
men ought to worship. 

21 Jesus saith unto her, Wo- 
man, believe me, the hour com- 
eth, when ye shall neither in this 
mountain, nor yet at Jerusalem, 
worship the Father. 

22 Ye worship ye know not 
what : we know what we wor- 
ship, for salvation is of the Jews. 



23 But the hour cometh, and 
now is, when the true worship- 
pers shall worship the Father in 
spirit and in truth : for the Fa- 
ther seeketh such to worship 
him. 



GREEK TEXT. 



IG Λίγ€ί avrfj b Ιησονί, 
Υτταγΐ, φωνησον τον άνδρα σου, 
καΐ ίλθί βνθαδε. 

17 ΑτΓίκρίθη η γννη καΐ el- 
TTfu, Ουκ ίχω άνδρα. Λβγα 
avrfj ό Ιησοΰί, Καλώ^ βΐττα?, 

Utl ανορα ουκ βχω• 

18 TTtvre γαρ άνδρας ϊσχ^βς- 
/cat νυν Όν ϊχ^ίί, ουκ kari σου 
ανηρ• τούτο άληθ€ί β'ιρηκαί. 

19 yle'yei αύτω η γννη, Κν- 
ρΐ€, θ€ωρώ οτί -η-ροψητης• (ί συ. 

20 οι Trarepey ήμων Ιν τούτω 
τω opei ττροσίκυνησαν και υμβΐς 
Aeyere, Ότι ev Ιβροσολυμοΐί βστίν 
ό τοποί, οτΓου δ€Ϊ ττροσκυνβΐν. 

21 Λίγίΐ αύττ] 6 Ιησοΰί, 
Γυναι, ΤΓίστβνσον μοι, οτι ε/οχε- 
ται ωρα, οτβ οϋτε iv τω bpei τούτω 
οντ€ ev Ιίροσολνμοΐί ττροσκυ- 
νησ€Τ€ τω ττατρι. 



00 



■}'ίδί 



vpeis ττροσκυνΐίτε ο ουκ 



οιύατί• ημίΐς ηροσκυνονμβν ο 
ο'ιδαμίν Ότι η σωτηρία Ικ των 
Ιουδαίων Ιστίν. 

23 αλΧ ΐργίται ωρα καΊ νυν 
(στιν, οτβ οι αληθινοί ττροσκυ- 
νηται ττροσκυνησουσι τω ιτατρ\ 
ev ττνβυματι και αληθβια• και γαρ 
ό πατήρ τοιούτους ζητβΐ τους 
προσκυνοΰνταί αύτον. 



REVISED VERSION. 

16 Jesus saith to her, Go, call 
thy husband, and come hither. 



17 The woman answered, and 
said, I have no husband. Jesus 
saith to her, Well p^didst thou 
say, I have no husband. 

18 For thou hast had five hus- 
bands, and he whom thou now 
hast is not thy husband. '^This 
ihast thou spoken truly. 

19 The woman saith to him. 
Sir, I 'see that thou art a prophet. 

20 Our fathers worshiped in 
this mountain ; and ye say that 
in Jerusalem is the place where 
one ought to worship. 

21 Jcsns saith to her. Woman, 
believe me, «that an hour is com- 
ing, when neither in this mount- 
ain, nor in Jerusalem, will ye 
worship the Father. 

22 Ye worship 'what ye know 
not : WE worship 'what we know : 
"because salvation is of the Jews. 



23 But an hour is coming, and 
now is, when the true worshipers 
will worship the Father in spirit 
and truth ; for the Father 'also 
seeketh such "as his worshipers. 



« E. v., Luke 12 : 10. Ch. 11 : 13. Acts 2:16; 8 : 24 ; 
13 : 40 ; 20 : 38 ; 23 : 5. Eom. 4 : 18.— Luke 4 : 23, is, I be- 
lieve, tlie only passage, besides tliis, in the E. V., where ερεειν 
ia translated to say, when used transitively. — J7iis is the almost 
universal rendering of τούτο. 

•■ Λν. — In the few passages where ϋ-εω^εειν is rendered to per- 
ceive, in the E. V., it may very properly be translated to see. 

• There is nothing here to prevent the translation of ότι. 

' Newc, Camp., Latin Verss.-Penn [that). — It is very evident 
that the E. V. does not convey the sense of the Orig. correctly. 
Besides it departs unnecessarily from the literal rendering of the 
words. 



° It has been well said (Bio., Alf.) that 6τι here introduces a 
reason for the fact before mentioned. Therefore, it ought to be 
translated, because. — See ch. 1 : 15, N. i. 



" W., C, and R. translate κηι, also. 
lessly left untranslated. — Germ., De W. 



In the E. V. it is need- 



" Though the future part, often, and the pres. part, sometimes 
(see Buttm., §144, No. 3) are used to express a purpose, when 
without the article, i. e., when they express merely a verbal idea, 
yet I can find no authority for so regarding them, when they 
stand for substantives, as they almost always do, when preceded 
by the article. . 



28 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IV. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

24 God is a Spirit : and tliey 
that worship him, must worship 
him in spirit and in truth. 

2-5 The woman saitli unto liim, 
I know that Messias cometh, 
which is called Christ ; when 
he is come, he will tell us all 
things. 

26 Jesus saith unto her, I that 
speak unto thee am he. 

27 And upon this came his 
disciples, and marvelled that he 
talked with the woman : yet no 



GREEK TEXT. 

24 Ilvev^a 6 θεοί• και rovi 
προσκυνουντας αΰτον, eV Trvev- 
ματί και άληθβία Set ττροσκννίίν. 

25 AeyeL αύτω η γννη, Οίδα 
Ότι Meaaias ίρχ^εται• (ό λΐγο- 
μίνοζ Χριστοί') όταν ίλΟτ) e'/cei- 
VOS, avayyeXei ημίν τταντα. 

26 Aiyei auTrj ό Ίησοΰί, 
Εγω ύμι, 6 Χαλών σοι. 

27 Καΐ eVt τούτω ήλθον οϊ 
μαθηταΐ αύτοΰ, κα\ Ιθαυμασαν 
Ότι μβτα γυναικοί iXaXei• ovSeli 



REVISED VERSION. 

24 God [is] a spirit; and those 
who worship liim must worship 
in spirit and trutii. 

25 The woman saith to him, 
I know that Messiah is coming, 
'(who is called Christ:) when he 
Cometh, he will tell us all things. 

26 Jesus saith to her, I, λυΙιο 
am ^talking to thee, am [He.] 

27 And upon this came his 
disciples, and 'wondered that he 
was talking with* "a woman : 



' '• The most eminent critics are agreed that the clause, S 
Ιεγομενοί Xqiotos, came from the Evangelist, not the woman." 
(Bio.) Accordingly, the majority of versions have this clause 
enclosed in a parenthesis. 

y Talk is a very common rendering of λαλεω. It appears 
here to be used of familiar conversation, as it often is else- 
where. Hence talk more forcibly expresses the idea than 
speak. — Newc. — E. V. v. 27, below. — As no preposition pre- 
cedes aoi, to is preferable to with. 

• See N. m, ch. 3 : 7. 

* There has been much controversy among the learned, as 
to the cause of the surprise .ittributed to the disciples, in this 
verse. The settlement of this dispute would, perhaps, be much 
aided by first determining the proper rendering of μετη γνναι- 
Kos. Does this phrase mean, with the womati, = μετά r/;s 
γνναιχοί, and referring definitely to the person spoken of in 
the preceding verses, or, simply, with a woman, as it literal- 
ly reads, without the article? Dodd., Newc, Bio., Midd.. 
Alf, maintain the former, while Camp., Wesl., Meyer, and 
others, hold the latter. Midd. and Alf. maintain, that " no 
inference can be drawn, as to the indefiniteness of the noun, 
from the omission of the article, after a preposition." Now 
notwithstanding the bold and sweeping assertion of these learn- 
ed critics, unsupported, so far as I have seen, by a single re- 
ference to parallel passages, I do not hesitate to express the 
opinion, that we are not only at liberty, but are solemnly 
bound, to infer the indefiniteness of a noun from the omission 
of the article, even after a preposition, unless other and 
weightier considerations should urge to the opposite inference : 
for no candid scholar, I presume, will alledge that the use 
or omission of the art, even in such cases, is a matter of in- 
difference, not subject to any fixed rule, though we, in our 
comparative ignorance, may not always perceive the force and 
application of the rule. It remains, then, to settle the question, 
Do those weightier considerations exist in the present case? 
I reply : 1. No one has, I believe, ever denied that μετά ti/s 



yvraixos would exactly convey the meaning of the E. V., with 
the woman, or, that that phrase would be perfectly good and 
classical Greek. On the other hand, nothing can be clearer 
than that μετά γυναικός will not only bear the rendering, with 
a woman, but that this is, indeed, its most natural and ap- 
propriate rendering. — 2. No person entertaining a proper 
regard for the inspired word, will be likely to suspect that the 
Evangelist, through ignorance or design, omitted the art. where 
it was analogically due, and where a good scholar would have 
used it ; or, that God has been pleased, in his word, to say one 
thing, while he means anothe^^3. The Evangelist either 
means, (as he says,) a woman, = a female, or he means, the 
woman = that particular woman previously introduced tc 
notice. If he means the former, we have, in the very thing 
stated, a satisfactory reason for the surprise predicated of the 
disciples ; and here the matter rests. They wondered, simply, 
that he was talking with a person of the opposite sex. The 
fact is stated, and conjecture is altogether unnecessary. If he 
means tlie latter, not only does he fail to express his meaning 
in definite language, but we are still left to conjecture the real 
cause of their surprise. Why should they wonder that he was 
talking with that particular woman, more than any other ? If 
to this it be answered, that it was '" because she was a Samar- 
itan," (Dodd., Newc.) I reply, that this is a mere gloss, and 
forms no part of the information contained in the Text. Or 
if it be said, that it was because she was a woman of bad cliar- 
acter, to this I reply, that, at the time referred to, so far as we 
know, the disciples were profoundly ignorant of her character. 
— 4. There is nothing in the context, that militates against the 
proposed interpretation. Lightfoot, Gill, and others, have 
shown, by numerous quotations from the Talmud, and Rabbin- 
ical writings, that it was a prevalent opinion among the Jews, 
that to hold a conversation with a woman, " on any serious and 
important matter, did but ill suit the dignity and gravity 
which ought to be uniformly maintained by a rabbi, or doctor 
of their law." (Camp.) It is no objection to this view, that 
these were foolish prejudices, disregarded by the Savior, in 
repeated instances, with the fuU knowledge of his disciples ; 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IV. 



29 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

man said, What seekest thou? 
or, Why talkest thou with her ? 

28 The woman then left her 
water-pot, and went lier way 
into the city, and saith to the 
men, 

29 Come, see a man which 
told me all things that ever I 
did : is not tliis the Ciirist ? 

30 Then they went out of the 
city, and came unto him. 

31 In the mean while his dis- 
ciples prayed him, saying. Mas- 
ter, eat. 

32 But he said unto them, I 
have meat to eat that ye know 
not of. 

33 Therefore said the disci- 
ples one to another, Hath any 
man brought him aught to eat ? 

34 Jesus saith unto them. My 
meat is to do the will of him 
that sent me, and to finish his 
work. 

35 Say not ye. There are yet 
four months, and then cometli 



GREEK TEXT. 

μίλτοι eiire, Τι ζητβΐί ; ή, Τι 
λαλβί? μ€τ αύτηί ; 

28 Αφηκβν ούν την vSpiau 
αυτής η γυνή, καΐ άτνηλθβν eif 
την ΤΓολιν, KOLL Aeyet τοΙς άνθρώ- 

ΤΓΟίς, 

29 Zleire, 'iSere ανθρωττον, os 
eiwe μοί πάντα οσα ΐττοίησα• 
μητι ούτος ίστιν ο Λ,ριστος ; 

30 Έ^ηλθον ούν €κ της ττο- 
λεω?, καϊ ήρχ^οντο ττρος αυτόν. 

31 Εν Se τω μζταζυ ηρώ- 
των αΰτον οί μαθηταΐ, λβγοντβς, 
' Ραββ\, φάγ€. 

32 Ο 8e ei-wev αντοΐς, 'Έγω 
βρώσίν (χω φαγβΐν, ην νμβΐς ουκ 
ο'ίδατ€. 

33 EXeyov ούν οϊ μαθητοΛ 
ττρος αλλήλους, Μητίς ήνεγκ^ν 
αυτω φαγβΐν ; 

34 Aeyet αυτοΐς 6 Ίησοΰς, 
Εμον βρώμα Ιστιν, 'ίνα ποιώ το 

θίλημα του ■7Γ€μψαντός μβ, καϊ 
τβλίίωσω αυτοΰ το ί'ργον. 

35 ουχ ύμξΐς λίγβτβ. Οτι βτί 
Τίτραμηνον €στι, καΐ 6 θβρίσμος 



REVISED VERSION. 

••nevertheless no one said. What 
seekest thou ? or, Why art thou 
talking with her? 

28 The woman, therefore, left 
her water-pot, and went away 
into the city, and saith to the 
men, 

29 Come, see a man, who told 
me all things that I ever did. 
"Is this the Christ ? 

30 They went out of the city, 
'therefore, and were coming to 
him. 

31 And in the meantime, his 
disciples kept •'asking him, say- 
ing, 'Rabbi, eat. 

32 But he said to them, I have 
ffood to eat, of which ye know 
not. 

33 The disciples, therefore, 
said, one to another, Did any 
one bring him "[any thing] to 
eat? 

34 Jesus saith to them. My 
'food is, to do the will of him 
that sent me, and finish his 
work. 

3-5 Do not YE say, ""That 'it is 
yet four months, and the harvest 



•• See N. s, ch. 



13. 



' There are only two passages in the N. T. in which μητι is 
translated, not, viz. : this one, and Matt. 12 : 23. Commentat- 
ors are not agreed, as to whether this translation is proper, or 
not. Bio., Camp., Spencer, Kenr., and others, affirm that 
the negative is not implied, and it does seem doubtful whether 
fιητt is ever used in the sense of annon. Other interpreters, 
■nith most of the Versions, agree with the E. V. I think 
Bio. has satisfactorily proved that μητι should not be trans- 
lated in this passage. 

' The editors, generally, reject ow of the Text. Rec. I would 
leave out therefore in the revision. 

Ί E. v., ch. 1 : 19, 21, 25 ; 5:12; 8:7; 9 : 2, 15 ; &c.— 
Ask is the most common rendering of this verb. I would 



always so render it, except, perhaps, in the more solemn forms 
of entreaty.— See ch., 16 : 20; 17: 9, 15, 20. 

' See N. s, ch. 1 : 49. 

f Penn, Newc, Kenr.— The word, meat, is so much more 
restricted in its meaning now than formerly, that I prefer the 
synonym, food, both for the translation of this word, and that 
of βρωμά, unless when spoken of flesh, as in Rom. 11 : 15. 20, 
and elsewhere. 

" Aught is so nearly obsolete, that I have ventured to sub- 
stitute for it the equivalent any thing. 

^ W., R. — There seems to be no necessity here for leaving 
ότι untranslated. 

' I adopt the literal translation of τετ^ημηνοί' eon, because 
I consider it far more elegant than the E. V. 



for the Evangelist is not condemning his conversation, nor justi- 
fying their surprise, but simply recording the fact, as part of 
his narrative ; and it should be borne in mind, that this occur- 
rence took place near the commencement of his ministry, and 



of their discipleship, when they were but imperfectly acquaint- 
ed with his views of conduct, and were doubtless under the 
influence of many of the prejudices received in their previous 
education. 



30 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IV. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

harvest ? beliold, I say unto you, 
Lift up your eyes, and look on 
the fields ; for they are white 
already to harvest. 

36 And he that reapeth re- 
ceiveth wages, and gathereth fruit 
unto life eternal : that both he 
that soweth, and he that reap- 
eth, may rejoice together. 

37 And herein is that saying 
true, One soweth, and another 
reapeth. 

38 I sent you to reap that 
whereon ye bestowed no labour : 
other men laboured, and ye are 
entered into their labours. 

39 And many of the Samari- 
tans of that city believed on 
him for the saying of the woman, 
which testified. He told me all 
that ever I did. 

40 So when the Samaritans 
were come unto him, they be- 
sought him that he would tarry 
with them : and he abode there 
two dajrs. 

41 And many more believed, 
because of his own word ; 



GREEK TEXT. 

kp^eraL ; 18ου, λέγω ύμΐν, Έττα- 
pare τονί οφθαλμούς υμών, καΐ 
θίασασθβ τας χώρας, οτι λβυκαί 
elai προς θβρίσμον ήδη. 

36 καΐ 6 θβρίζων μίσθον λαμ- 
βάνει, καΐ συνάγει καρττον εΙς 
ζωην αΐωνιον ΐνα και ο σπείρων 
ομοΰ χο-'φχΐ και ο θερίζων. 

37 εν γαρ τούτω 6 λόγος εστίν 
ό αληθινός, οτι άλλος εστΊν ό 
σπείρων, και άλλος ο θερίζων. 

38 εγω απέστειλα υμάς θερί- 
ζειν ο ουχ υμείς κεκοπιακατε' 
άλλοι κεκοπιακασι, κα\ ύμεΐς εις 
τον κοπον αυτών εισεληλυθατε. 

39 '-Ζ?κ δε της πόλεως εκείνης 
πολλοί επίστενσαν εΙς αυτόν τών 
Σαμαρειτών, 8ια τον λογον της 
γυναικός μαρτυρουσης, Οτι είπε 
μοι πάντα Όσα εποίησα. 

40 Ως ούν ήλθαν προς αυτόν 
οι Σαμαρεΐται, ηρωτων αυτόν μεΐ- 
ναι παρ' αυτοις• καΐ εμεινεν εκεί 
δυο ήμερας. 

41 /cat πάλλω πλειους επί- 
στευσαν 8ια τον λογον αύτοΰ, 



REVISED VERSION. 

Cometh ? Behold, I say to you, 
Lift up your eyes, and Jsee the 
fields, '«that they are white 
already to harvest. 

36 And pthe reaper receiveth 
a 'reward, and gathereth fruit to 
eternal life ; so that both ptho 
sower, and pfhe reaper may re- 
joice together. 

37 ""For "in this "the true say- 
ing is, ""That one is plhe sower, 
and another pthe reaper. 

38 I sent you to reap that ""on 
which YE diave not labored : 
others have labored, and ye are 
entered into their 'labor. 

39 And many of the Samari- 
tans of that city believed on him, 
•because of the saying of the 
woman, testifying. He told me 
all "things that I ever did. 

40 When, therefore, the Sa- 
maritans came to him, they kept 
"asking him "to "■abide with them : 
and he abode there two days. 

41 And many more believed, 
because of his word ; 



) See N. a, ch. 1 : 14. 

k See N. i, ch. 7 : 22. 

' Ϊ., C, G. — I would always translate /ita!)-og, reward. 

"• G., R. — It is surely needless to apologize for this change, 
as γαρ is almost uniformly rendered_/br. 

" W., R., Penn, Kenr., Cast., It. — In this is more literal than 
herein. — See Gen. Obs. 6. 

° T., 0., G., R., Wesl., Penn, Nary, Kenr.— See ch. 1 : 8, 
N. o. — As αλη9•ινο; is accompanied by the art., it cannot be 
assigned to the predicate, but must be construed with ό λόγος, 
and the whole rendered, the true saying. There remain but 
two ways of translating the verse : " For in this is the tnce 
saying, That one is the sower, and another the reaper," the 
reference being to a proverb already well known ; — or, '■ For in 
this the true saying is, That one is the sower, &c.," in which 
case the speaker may be viewed as originating the proverb. 
The latter view I take to be preferable, not only because ό λόγοι 
stands before eonr, but because this translation makes better 
sense than the other. 

f The participial forms, ό θερίζων, ό σπείρων, occur so fre- 



quently in these verses, that I greatly prefer the substantive 
rendering, tlie reaper, the sower, to the more clumsy peri- 
phrasis, he that reapeth, he that soweth, of v. 36, or the de- 
fective translation of v. 37. 

1 Dodd., Newc, Penn. — On which, is more literal than 
whereon, and quite as elegant. — See Gen. Obs. 6. 

■• Dodd., Newc. — The verb is in the perf tense. To labor 
on, is more literal than to bestow labor upon. 

' I know not why all the older Engl. Verss. translate κοπον 
by the plural, unless it be in imitation of the Vulg. — Cast., 
It., Germ., Port., Fr. 0.,-S.,-M. 

' See vv. 41, 42, below. — Because of gives a more definite 
idea, and is a more usual rendering of Sin, tha.n for. 

" See v. 29, above.— TV., T., G., R., Penn, Newc, Nary, 
Kenr. 

' W., Penn, Dodd., Camp., "Wesl., Kenr. — There is here, 
certainly, in the E. V. an unnecessary departure from the 
usual rendering of the infinitive. 

" See N. z, ch. 1. 33. — Penn, Newc— -E. V., next clause. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IV. 



31 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

42 And said unto the woman, 
Now we believe, not because of" 
thy saying: foi• we have heard 
him ourselves, and know that this 
is indeed the Christ, the Saviour 
of the world. 



43 Now after two days he 
departed tlience, and went into 
Galilee. 

44 For Jesus himself testified, 
that a prophet hath no honour 
in his own country. 

4-5 Then Λvhen he Avas come 
into Galilee, the Galileans re- 
ceived him, having seen all the 
things that he did at Jerusalem 
at the feast : for they also went 
unto the feast. 

46 So Jesus came again into 
Cana of Galilee, where he made 
the water wine. And there was 
a certain nobleman, whose son 
was sick, at Capernaum. 

47 When he heard that Jesus 
was come out of Judea into 
Galilee, he went unto him, and 
besought him that he would 
come down, and heal his son : 
for he was at the point of death. 



GREEK TEXT. 

42 rfi re γυναικί eXeyov, Οτι 
ουκβτί δια την σην Χαλιαν ττί- 
στίυομΐν αυτοί γαρ άκηκοαμ€ν, 
καΐ ο'ίδαμ€ν οτι ούτος Ιστιν αλη- 
θώς ό σωτηρ του κόσμου, ό Χρί- 
στος. 

43 MeTo. 8e τας δυο ημέρας 
Ιζηλθίν eiieWev, κα\ άττηλθ^ν εΙς 
την Γαλιλαιαν. 

44 αύτος γαρ 6 Ιησούς ipap- 
τυρησεν, otl προφήτης iv Trj ιδία 
ττατρίδι τιμήν ουκ ϊχ€ΐ. 

45 ' Οτ€ ούν ήλθβν €ΐς την 
Γαλιλαιαν, ϊδί^αντο αύτον οι 
Γαλιλαίοι, τταντα ίωρακοτίς α 
ΙτΓΟίησίν iv Ιβροσολυμοις Ιν τη 
eopTjj• καΐ αύτοΙ γαρ ήλθον et? 
την ίορτην. 

46 Ηλθβν ούν ο Ιησούς πά- 
λιν €ΐς την Κανά της Γαλιλαιας, 
Όπου (ποίησβ το ύδωρ οίνον. κα\ 
ην τις βασιλικός, ού 6 υ'ιος ησθί- 
vei ev Καπερναούμ. 

47 ούτος άκουσας Ότι Ιησούς 
ηκ€ΐ e'/c της Ιουδαίας β'ις την Γα- 
λιλαιαν, απήλθε προς αυτόν, καΧ 
ηρωτα αυτόν ινα καταβη κα\ Ιαση- 
ται αυτού τον υ'ιον ημβλλε γαρ 
άποθνησκειν. 



REVISED VERSION. 

42 And said to the woman. 
We »no longer believe because 
of thy saying ; for we ourselves 
have heard ; and we know that 
this is indeed yfhe Christ, the 
Savior of the world. 



43 Now after 'the two days 
he «went out thence, "and went 
away into Galilee. 

44 For Jesus himself testified, 
that a prophet hath no honor in 
his own country. 

4-5 When, therefore, he came 
into Galilee, the Galileans re- 
ceived him, having seen all 
things wliich he did in Jerusa- 
lem, during the Feast : for they 
also themselves came to the 
Feast. 

4G 'Jesus came, therefore, 
again into Cana of Galilee, where 
he made the water wine. And 
there was a certain nobleman, 
whose son was sick in Caper- 
naum. 

47 He, hearing that Jesus 
was come out of Judea into 
Galilee, went to him, and was 
"•asking him, that he would come 
down and heal his son : for he 
was 'about to die. 



=■ Newc, Wesl., Penn. It., De W., Fr. 0.-S.,-M.— Certainly, 
ovy... . £T» cannot be rendered now . . . not, ivithout using a most 
unwarrantable liberty. 

' Tisch. and Lachm. reject 6 Xoisto;. — Griesb. considers tbis 
reading doubtful. It is wanting in two very ancient, and some 
more modern MSS., also in the Vulg. and several other ancient 
Verss. I would leave out the words, the Christ, and append 
this note: Some copies have, the Christ, the Savior of the 
world. — W., R., Penn, Nary, Kenr., and others. 

' R., Dt., De W., Newc, Camp., Wesl.— Penn, It., (those). 
— It is strange that a large majority of translators seem not to 
have noticed the connection between this verse and v. 40, 
above. 

' See N. d, v. 3, above. 

" Tisch. rejects the words, xat aTtrjl&et', which are want- 



ing in three ancient MSS. {BCD), and in several ancient 
Verss. and Fathers. — Lachm. and Griesb. consider the reading 
doubtful. I would reject the words, and went away, and put 
this note in the margin : Some copies insert here, and went 
away. 

' The words, ό Ιηαονι, not being found in most of the 
ancient MSS. and Verss., are evidently an Italic insertion. 
They are rejected by Griesb., Lachm., Tisch., Theile, and 
others. I would, thei'efore, translate, He came, &c. 

"• See N. d, v. 31, above. 

' E. v., Acts 3: 3; 18: 14; 20: 3. Heb. 8: 5.— Cast. 
(morituriis erat). I can find no phrase that so elegantly and 
concisely translates μέλλω, followed by the infin., as to be 
about. I would adopt this rendering in many cases besides 
those enumerated. 



32 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IV. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

48 Then said Jesus unto him, 
Except ye see signs and won- 
ders, ye will not believe. 

49 The nobleman saitli unto 
him, Sir, come down ere my 
child die. 

50 Jesus saitli unto him. Go 
thy way ; thy son liveth. And 
the man believed the word that 
Jesus had spoken unto him, and 
he went his way. 

51 And as he was now going 
down, his servants met him, and 
told him, saying, Thy son liveth. 



52 Then inquired he of them 
the hour when he began to 
amend. And they said unto 
him. Yesterday at the seventh 
hour the fever left him. 

53 So the father knew that 
it was at the same hour, in the 
which Jesus said unto him. Thy 
son liveth : and himself believed, 
and his whole house. 



54 This is again the second 



GREEK TEXT. 



48 elirei^ ovu b Ιησοΰί irpos 
αυτόν, Eav μη σημαία και re- 
para ϊδητ€, ου μη ττίστβΰσητβ. 

49 Aeyei Trpos αύτον 6 βασι- 
λικοί, Κυρίί, καταβηθι '7τρ\ν άττο- 
θανίΐν το τταώίον μου. 

50 Λίγβι αύτω 6 Ίησονς, 
ϋορβυου• 6 υΙοΫ σου ζη. Και 
βτΓίστβυσβν ο ανθρωττοζ τώ λόγω 
φ elneu αυτω 6 Ιησοΰί, καΐ Ιπο- 
ρβυΐτο. 

51 ή8η δβ αυτού καταβαίνον- 
TOS, οι δούλοι αυτοί) άττηντησαν 
αυτω, και απηγγ^ιλαν λίγοντ(5. 

Οτι 6 τταΐί σου ζη. 

52 Έττυθίτο ούν τταρ αυτών 
την ωραν Ιν ■η κομψοτ€ρον e'cr^e• 
καΙ e'lTTOv αύτω, ' Οτι χθΐί ωραν 
ίβδομην άφηκΐν αύτον 6 ττυρΐτόί. 

53 Έγνω ούν 6 ττατηρ, οτι iv 
(Keivrj rfj ωρα, iv fj elnev αύτω 
ο Ιησοΰί, Οτι ό υ'ιοί σου ζη. 
Και βπιστευσίν αύτοί καΐ ή οικία 
αύτου Όλη. 

54 τούτο τταλιν δβυτβρον ση- 



REVISED VERSION. 

48 Jesus, therefore, said to 
him, 'If ye see not signs and 
wonders, ye will not believe. 

49 The nobleman saith to him, 
Sir, come down, ^before my child 
die. 



50 Jesus saith to him, Go, thy 
son is living. And the man be- 
lieved the word which Jesus 
^said to him, and Λvas going. 



51 And as he was now going 
down, his servants met him, and 
told, saying, Thy ""child is living. 



52 He inquired of them, there- 
fore, the hour 'in which he 'grew 
better. And they said to him, 
Yesterday, at the seventh hour, 
the fever left him. 

53 The father, therefore, knew 
that [it was] in «that hour in 
which Jesus said to him, Thy son 
is living. And he himself be- 
lieved, and 'all his house. 

54 This "'again, a second "sign, 



' See N. g, ch. 3 : 3.— Ere is "antiquated." (Worcester.) 

^ W., R., Vulg., Germ., Kenr. — E. V., generally. 

' T., Germ., Dt., Berl. Bib., Beng., Stoltz.— De W. (Knabe) ; 
Camp. (boy). This word is rendered son in only two pas- 
sages, besides this, in the E. V. (Acts 3 : 13, 26), and in these 
it would be quite as well translated child. — See Acts 4: 
27, 30. 

' Vulg., Dt., W., Germ., De W., Nary.— This is more literal 
than when. — See next verse. 

' I have made this alteration for the purpose of giving a 
more modern complexion to the translation. — Kenr. 

' There seems to be no necessity for varying from the com- 
mon rendering of εκεηοϊ in this case. The idea is rendered 
with sufficient emphasis by the qualifying clause that follows. 
— W. ithilke). 

' E. v., Acts 2 :2, 36; 7 : 10 ; 10 : 2; 11 : 14; 18:8. 
Ileb. 3 : 2, 5. — This is the only case in which the phrase is so 
rendered in the E. V. 

■» Commentators have been mach puzzled to know what to 
do with Ttaliv. Bio., Camp., and Alf., refer it ("not in 



construction, but in sense" says the latter.) to ελΟ-ων εκ τ. I. 
How these learned critics are able to discover the sense by 
overriding the construction, I am at a loss to imagine. We 
could only i-ofer πάλιν to εΐ&ων, on the supposition that the 
words of the passage, in all Greek copies extant, have suffered 
an important transposition in the hands of the transcribers, 
of which there is, I believe, no evidence. A more plausible 
view is that taken by Newc, and most probably by Penn, and 
others, who leave the word untranslated : that παλιρ is merely 
an appendage of δεύτεροι•, and, according to our modes of 
thought, redundant. It must be confessed, that this word 
does seem to be redundant in Matt. 26 : 42 ; Ch. 21 : 16 ; and 
Acts 10 : 15, though not, as stated by Newc, in Gal. 4 : 9. 
(See N. h, ch. 3 : 3). But this redundancy is only in appear- 
ance ; for, in all these cases, παλιΐ' is a strengthening adverb, 
and nothing that imparts real strength is redundant. The 
E. v.. Germ., and many others, give, I think, the idea more 
correctly than either of those referred to above ; though in 
so doing, they show a reckless disregard of the rules of Greek 
grammar, that ought, if possible, to be avoided. I consider 
the view given by Meyer substantially correct (diess hat Jesus 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. V. 



33 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

miracle that. Jesus did, when 
he was come out of Judea into 
Galilee. 



CHAP. V. 

After this there was a feast 
of the Jews : and Jesus went up 
to Jerusalem. 

2 Now there is at Jerusalem, 
by the sheep market, a pool, 
which is called in the Hebrew 
tongue, Bethesda, having five 
porches. 

3 In these lay a great multi- 
tude of impotent folk, of blind, 
halt, withered, waiting for the 
moving of the water. 



greek text. 



μύον Ιττοίησίν b 'Ιησούς, ίλθων 
βκ τηί Ιουδαίας ety την Γαλί- 
λαιαν. 

CHAP. ν. 

ΜΕΤΛ ταντα ην ίορτη των 
Ιουδαίων, και ανββη ο Ιησούς 
££? Ιεροσόλυμα. 

2 Έστι Se Ιν τοις Ιεροσολυ- 
μοις eVt τη ττροβατικη κολυμβη- 
θρα, ή β7Γΐλ€γομ€νη ΈβραϊστΙ 
ΰηθβσδα, TrevTe στοάς βχ^ουσα. 

3 ev ταυταις κατ€Κ€ΐτο ττληθος 
ΤΓολν των ασθίνουντων, τυφλών, 
■χωλών, ξηρών, ϊκδβχομίνων την 
του ύδατος κινησιν. 



revised version. 

did Jesus, on coming out of Ju- 
dea into Galilee. 



CHAP. V. 

After 'these things there was 
a feast of the Jews, and Jesus 
went up to Jerusalem. 

2 Now there is in Jerusalem, 
by the Sheep-pgate,] a j^ool, 
which is called in 'Hebrew, Be- 
thesda, having five porches. 

3 In these were lying a ""great 
multitude of the 'sick, blind, 
'lame, withered, ^waiting; for 



^waiting 
the moving of the water. 



* W., R., Newc, Nary, Penn, Kenr. It is very seldom, in 
the E. v., that ταύτα is rendered this, or that, but almost al- 
ways, these thiiigs. This distinction is the more important, if 
it be true, as Lucke remarks, that " when John wishes to in- 
dicate immediate succession, he uses μετά τούτο ; when me- 
diate, after an interval, μετά τηυτη." 

>■ Ε. V. marg. Dt., DeW., Port., It., Penn, Fr. 0.,-S.,-G., 
Wesl., Camp., Newc.• — This gate is mentioned in Neh. 3 : 1, 32 ; 
12 : 39, where the Sept. translate by this same word. " It was 
probably," says Rob., " so csUed, as the place where sheep were 
sold for the sacrifices of the temple." 

' W., G., R., E. V. ch. 19: 13, 17 (with the art.), 20. Dt., 
De W., Port., It., Vulg., Cast., Camp., Nary, Kenr., Schott, 
Erasm., Beza, Trem. — In Hebrew is enough to express the 
idea clearly and elegantly. 

■I Tisch. rejects πολύ, which is wanting in four uncial MSS. 
(BCDL). Lachm. and Griesb. consider it probably spurious. 
I would put in the margin. : Some copies omit great. 

• W., T., C, G., R., Fr. 0.,-S.,-M., Dodd., Kenr., Dt., DeW., 
Germ., Cast. — No doubt the langiieiUium of the Vulg. ex- 
presses the idea well enough in Latin. This, and v. 7, below, 
are the only places where ααβ•ενοειν is rendered, in the E. V. 
by the word, impotent. To be sick, or weak, is the almost 
universal rendering. "When the word refers to bodily infirmi- 
ty, I would translate it, to be sick ; otherwise, to be weak. 

' Newc, Penn, Camp., R., Dodd., Kenr. — Halt is obsolete, 
in this sense. 



^ This passage, from εχίεχο μένων, v. 3, to νοαηματι, end of 
V. 4, I have carefully revised, thougli I am strongly inclined to 
recommend its entire rejection : 1. Because it is wholly wanting 
in two of the most ancient MSS. (5C) while the first clause of 
it, from ίκί. to v.ir. is wanting in two others, one of them very 
ancient (,AL), and the latter clause, from αγγ. to voo. is wanting 
in one other, also very ancient (D). — 2. Because, like the pas- 
sage, ch. 7 : 53 — ch. 8 : 11 (see below), it abounds in varieties 
of reading, and in words άπαξ, λεγ., the style being unlike 
that of this Apostle. — 3. Because, as Bloomfield remarks, "the 
whole narration savors of Jewish fancy." — The internal evidence 
is strongly against its genuineness. — 4. Because it is entirely 
rejected by the learned and judicious editors, Griesb., Knapp, 
Theile, and Tischendorf, and by a goodly number of learned 
interpreters. " The passage in question," says Bloomfield, " must, 
therefore, undoubtedly have owed its origin to those who 
intended to explain what we read in v. 7, and has been rightly 
rejected by Mill. (Kuincel.) " — " Semler, Michaelis, and Marsh 
reject V. 4." (Newc). — Meyer calls this passage a legendary 
addition. I would add, that many MSS. have this passage, or 
portions of it, marked with the usual signs of suspicion ; and 
that there is, in the ancient Yerss., the .same variety of reading 
that has been noticed in the MSS. On this whole subject, the 
reader can consult, for further information, Bloomf., Alf., Meyer, 
Penn, and Kuinoel, in loco. 



als zweiten Zeichen widerum gethan) ; that is to say, τοντο is 
alone the immediate object of εποιησεν ; πάλιν follows, as a 
modifier of the verb, it is true, but with very sUght depend- 
ence upon it ; while δεύτερον οημειον stands in apposition 
with τοντο. By adopting this translation, which is perfectly 



literal, and does no violence whatever to the rules of grammar, 
I apprehend we may avoid all the difficulties that have been 
noticed by interpreters. 

- See N. X, ch. 2 : 11. 



Μ 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. V. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

4 For an angel went down at 
a certain season into the pool, 
and troubled the water : whoso- 
ever then first after the troub- 
ling of the water stepped in, 
was made whole of whatsoever 
disease he had. 

5 And a certain man was 
there, which had an infirmity 
thirty and eight years. 

6 When Jesus saw him lie, 
and knew that he had been now 
a long time in that case, he saith 
unto him, Wilt thou be made 
whole ? 

7 The impotent man answer- 
ed him. Sir, I have no man, 
when the water is troubled, to 
put me into the pool : but while 
I am coming, another steppeth 
down before me. 



8 Jesus saith unto him. Rise, 
take up thy bed, and walk. 

9 And immediately the man 
was made whole, and took up 



GREEK TEXT. 

4 άγγΐλοί γαρ κατά καιρόν 
κατίβαινεν iv rfj κολυμβηθρα, 
/cat ίταρασσβ το ύδωρ• 6 ονν 
"πρώτος ϊμβας μ€τα την ταραχην 
τον ύδατος, ύγιης ΐγίνετο, ώ δη- 
7Γ0Τ€ κατείχ^ετο νοσηματι. 

5 'ϋν δε τίί άνθρωπος ίκά 
τριακονταοκτω ετη βχων iv τη 
ασθένεια. 

6 τούτον Ιδων 6 Ιησούς κατα- 
κβίμενον, καΐ γνους otl πολύν ηδη 
χρονον ί'χει, λέγει αντω, θέλεις 
νγιης γενέσθαι; 

7 άπεκρΊθη αυτω 6 ασθενών, 
Κύριε, άνθρωπον ουκ εχω, 'ίνα 
Όταν ταραχθη το ύδωρ, βαλλη με 
εΙς την κολνμβηθραν εν φ δε 
έρχομαι εγω, άλλος προ εμού 
καταβαίνει. 

8 Λέγει αύτω ό Ιησούς, 
Έγειραι, άρον τον κραββατον 

σου, και περιπατεί. 

9 Και ευθέως, εγενετο υγιής 
ο άνθρωπος, κα\ ήρε τον κραββα- 



REVISED VERSION. 

4 For an angel used to go 
down at a certain ""time into the 
pool, and trouble the water : he, 
therefore, who first 'went in, 
after the troubling of the water, 
used to be made whole, of 
whatever disease he |'VΛ'as held. 



5 And a 
there, who 
years in "feeble health 



certain man was 
'was thirty-eiglit 



6 Jesus, seeing him lying, and 
knowing that he 'had now 'been 
["so] a long time, saith to him, 
Dost thou "wish to be made 
whole ? 

7 The 'sick man answered 
him. Sir, I have no man, pthat, 
when the water is troubled, he 
may put me into the pool : but 
while I am coming, another 
'goeth down before me. 

8 Jesus saith to him. Rise, 
take up thy bed, and walk. 



9 And immediately the man 
was made whole, and took up 



'' This is the usual rendering of this word, and I see no reason 
for departing from it in this case. — W., Wesl., Kenr. [times). — R. 

' This is, I believe, the only passage, in which the E. V. ren- 
ders εμβαινειν, to step in. — Newc, Dodd., Wesl. 

» W., R. (holden) ; Germ, [behaftet war) ; It., Dt., Cast., Vulg., 
Fr. O. — The B. V., perhaps, expresses the idea, but not so strong- 
ly as it is expressed by the passive form. 

1 Very often εχω is used in the sense of εψι, especially in the 
phrases, καλώς, κακώς, όντως, έτοιμως, αλλω^ . . . εχεη\ It oc- 
curs, however, in this sense, without any such adverb, in ch. 11:17, 
where τεααερας ημέρας is not properly the object of the verb, but 
rather an adverbial modifier. It would appear that εχεcv εν ttj 
ασ&ενεια is probably synonymous with εχειν αα9•ενείαν (Acts 
28 : 9. Heb. 7 : 28). So in English to Imvc feeble health — to be 
in feeble health. By rendering έχων as I have done, I am enabled 
to translate the remainder of the sentence literally, the whole 
conveying the exact idea of the Orig. in perfectly good English. 
I know of no other way in which this object can be attained. 
This form of expression " is found in the classical writers." (Bio.). 



"" I have rendered this word feeble health, simply because this 
expression exactly conveys the idea of the Original, neither more 
nor less. Infirmity is objectionable, because of its mdefimteness. 
Sickness is more definite, but for other obvious reasons, inadmissi- 
ble in this place. 

" So is more concise than in that case, and expresses the same 
idea. I cannot, however, agree with those interpreters who 
explain this clause by reference to the last clause of v. 5. It is 
not εν Trj αα&ενεια (Blo.) that we are to supply, but χατα- 
χειμενος. Doubtless Jesus knew that he had been a long time 
sick, but it was evidently the knowledge of the fact that he had 
been a long time lying there, waiting for some one to put him 
into the pool, that so excited his sympathies on this occasion. — 
Penn, Sharpe. 

"> See note y, ch. 1 : 43. 

ρ See Note k, ch. 1 : 7. 

■I This is the only case in which the E. V. renders κατ«• 
βαινειν, to step down. — Newc, Nary, Penn, Kenr. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. V. 



3d 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

his bed, and walked : and on the 
same day was the sabbath. 

10 The Jews therefore said 
unto him that was cured, It is 
the sabbath-day ; it is not law- 
ful for thee to carry thy bed. 

11 He answered them, He 
that made me whole, the same 
said unto me. Take up thy bed, 
and walk. 

12 Thenaskedtheyhim,What 
man is that which said unto thee. 
Take up thy bed, and walk ? 



13 And he that was healed 
wist not who it was : for Jesus 
had conveyed himself away, a 
multitude being in that place. 

14 Afterward Jesus findeth 
him in the temple, and said un- 
to him. Behold, thou art made 
whole : sin no more, lest a worse 
thiiiff come unto thee. 



15 The man departed, and 
told the Jews that it was Jesus 
which had made him whole. 



16 And therefore did the Jews 
persecute Jesus, and sought to 
slay him, because he had done 



GREEK TEXT. 

τον avTOv, και TrepceTrarei. ην Se 
σάββατον tv Ικ^ίνη rrj ήμβρα. 

10 ' Έλΐγον ούν ol 'Ιουδαίοι 
τω τβθίρατΓίυμίνο), Σάββατον 
€(ΓΤΐν• ουκ (ζβστί σοι άραι τον 
κράββατον. 

11 ΆτΓβκρίθη αντοΐς, Ό ττοίη- 
σα? μί νγίή, eKeivos μοι drrev, 
Άρον τον κράββατον σον, καΐ 
TrepnraTiL. 

12 Ή ρώτησαν ούν αϋτον, Τις 
Ιστιν Ό άνθρωπος ο (Ιττων σοι, 
Άρον τον κράββατον σου, κα\ 
irepnraTei ; 

13 Ο δι laOeli ουκ ηδΐΐ τίί 
βστιν ό γαρ Ίησοΰί ίζίν€υσ€ν, 
6\λου bvTos iv τω τοττω. 

14 MeTa ταντα βνρίσκβι αυ- 
τόν ό Ίησοΰί iv τω κρω, και 
eiTTiv αύτω, ISe ύγιη? γεγοναί• 
μηκ€τι άμαρταν€, 'ίνα μη -χείρον 
τι σοι γίνηται. 

15 Αττηλθεν ό άνθρωπος, καΙ 
ανήγγειλε τοΐί Ιουδαίοις, οτι 
Ίησοΰί εστίν 6 ποιησας αϋτον 
υγιή. 

1 6 Koii δια τοΰτο εδίωκον τον 
Ίησοΰν οι 'Ιουδαίοι, κα\ εζητουν 



REVISED VERSION. 

his bed, and \vas walking. And 
it was ■'Sabbath, on 'that day. 

10 The Jews, therefore, said 
to him that had been «healed. 
It is 'Sabbath : it is not lawful 
for thee to carry the bed. 

11 He answered them, He 
that made me whole, 'he said to 
me. Take up thy bed, and walk. 



12 They asked him, therefore, 
"Who is the man that said to 
thee. Take up thy bed, and 
walk. 

13 'But he that was healed 
"knew not Λνΐιο "he was ; for 
Jesus conveyed himself away, a 
multitude being in the place. 

11 After "these things, Jesus 
findeth him in the temple, and 
said to him. Behold, thou hast 
been made whole : sin no more, 
lest something worse may 'hap- 
pen to thee. 

15 The man 'went away, and 
told the Jews, that it was Jesus 
who made him whole. 



16 And "because of this the 
Jews were persecuting Jesus, 
'and seeking to 'kill him, be 



' See Note k, ch. 4: 53, for the rendering of εχεηι;, that. — 
Newc, Kenr., Dodd., Penn, Nary. — As οαββατον is here with- 
out the art. it is not improbable, that this was an annual, or 
festival sabbath. Comp. v. 1. — Sharpe (a sabbath). 

' E. V. very generally. — R., Wesl., Kenr. — I would almost 
always translate &ε^απενω, to heal. 

' See N. X, ch. 1 : 33, Kenr. — Dodd. {even he). — In most 
versions, this word is left untranslated. 

■ Penn, Sharpe, Camp., Germ., De AV., Van Ess, Fr. S. — 
It is very plain, from the collocation, that t/s is the subject, 
and avd-^ionos, the predicate. — ΐ put he for it in v. 13, because 
this ard^Qionos is evidently its antecedent. 

' "W., R., Penn, Newc., Germ., Vulg., Cast., Fr. 0.,-M., 
Nary, Kenr. — Dodd. {now) ; Fr. S. {or). 
" Wist is, of course, to be rejected as obsolete. 
'* See N. a, v. 1, above. — There are only three other passages 



in which the E. V. has rendered μετά ταντα, afterward. {Luke 
17:8; 18 : 4. Heb. 4 : 8.) 

1 T., C, G., Penn, Nary, Kenr. — This is a frequent meaning 
of γίνομαι. 

'■ See N. d, ch. 4 : 3. — W., Camp, [went] ; R. [went his way). 
— Dodd., Penn, Nary. 

"• See Gen. Obs. 6. — Penn [for this cause). 

'' Griesb., Knapp, Theile, Lachm., Tiach. reject the words, και 
εζ. . . . αποκ. They are wanting in most of the ancient MSS., 
and in many ancient Verss. (including the\"ulg.), and Fathers.— - 
Newc, Sharpe, AVesl., Penn, Keur., Nary, Scbott, and others. — 
I would recommend, that these words be omitted, aud that this 
note be placed in the margin. : Some copies insert here, a?iii seek- 
ing to kill him. 

" Kill is the common rendering of this verb, in the E. V. — See 
V. 18, below. 



3G 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. V. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

these things on the sabbath- 
day. 

17 But Jesus answered them, 
My Father worketh hitherto, 
and I work. 

18 Therefore the Jews sought 
the more to kill him, because he 
not only had broken the sab- 
bath, but said also, that God 
was his Father, making himself 
equal with God. 



19 Then answered Jesus, and 
said unto them, Verily, verily, 
I say unto you, The Son can do 
nothing of himself, but what he 
seeth the Father do : for what 
things soever he doetii, these 
also doeth the Son likewise. 



20 For the Father loveth the 
Son, and sheweth him all things 
that himself doeth : and he will 
shew him greater works than 
these, that ye may marvel. 

21 For as the Father raiseth 
up the dead, and quickeneth 
them; even so the Son quicken- 
eth whom he will. 

22 For the Father judgeth no 
man ; but hath committed all 
judgment unto the Son : 



23 That all mm should hon- 
our the Son, even as they hon- 
our the Father. He that hou- 



GREEK TEXT. 

avTov ατΓοκτβΐι/αι, on ταΰτα βττοίβι 
iu σαββατω. 

17 ο 5e Ιησοΰί άττζκρίνατο 
avTois, Ο ττατηρ μου εω? άρτί 
ϊργαζίται, κάγω 4ργάζομαι. 

18 Δία τοΰτο ούν μάλλον ϊζψ 
τουν αυτόν οϊ Ιουδαΐοί άποκτβί- 
vaL, oTt ου μόνον ε'λυε το σάβ- 
βατον, άλλα καΐ ττατβ'ρα ίδιον 
eAeye τον Oeov, ίσον εαυτόν 
ΤΓΟίών τφ θβω. 

19 άτΓ€κρίνατο ούν ό Ίησοΰί 
καΐ eiirev αυτοΐί, Αμήν άμην 
λ^γω υμΐν, ου δύναται ό υϊος 
TTOieiv άφ' εαντοΰ ούδίν, iav μη τι 
βλίπτί^ τον TraTepa ττοιοΰντα- α 
γαρ αν e/cetiO? Troirj, ταΰτα kcu 
6 υ'ιοί ομοίως ττοιβΐ. 

20 ό γαρ ττατηρ φιλβΐ τον 
υιον, και τταντα δ^ικνυσιν αύτώ 
α avTOf TTOiel• και μβίζονα τούτων 
δείςβι αύτω (.ργα, 'ίνα ύμβΐ^ θαυ- 
μάζητί.^^ 

21 ωστΓ^ρ γαρ ό ττατηρ iyeipei 
τουί νεκρουί και ζωοττοιβΐ, ούτω 
καΧ ό υ'ιοί ους θίλίΐ ζωοττοιβΐ. 

22 ούδς γαρ ό ττατηρ κρίνβι 
ουδβνα, αλ^α την κρίσιν ττάσαν 
δβδωκβ τω υϊώ• 

23 ίνα τταντβί τιμώσι τον υιον, 
καθώς τιμώσι τον ττατβρα. ο μη 



REVISED VERSION. 

cause he kept doing these things 
on Sabbath. 

17 But Jesus answered them, 
My Father worketh "till now, 
and I work. 

18 ^Because of this, therefore, 
the Jews were seeking the more 
to kill him, because not only 
was he breaking the Sabbath, 
but he also said that God was 
his «own Father, making himself 
equal with God. 

19 Jesus, therefore, answered, 
and said to them. Verily, verily, 
I say to you. The Son can do 
nothing of himself, ^if he see not 
the Father doing any tiling: 
for whatever things he doeth, 
these also the Son doeth like- 
wise. 

20 For the Father loveth the 
Son, and showeth him all things 
which he himself doeth : and he 
will show him greater works 
than these, that ye may ^won- 
der. 

21 For as the Father raiseth 
up, ""and quickeneth the dead, 
'so also the Son quickeneth 
whom he will. 

22 For the Father doth -nol, 
even judge any one, but hath 
'given all judgment to the Son: 

23 So that all may honor the 
Son, even as they honor the Fa- 
ther. He that honoreth not the 



Ί W., R.. Newc, Wesl., Kenr.— E. V. ch. 2:10. 1 John 2 : 9. 
I would always so render έως α^τι. For the form, till, see 
Gen. Obs. 6. 

• Sharpe, Kenr., Dodd., "Wesl.— It is important that this 
phrase be literally translated. The main force of the Orig. is 
lost in the E. V. though the defect is in part supplied in the 
last part of the Terse. The Jews were accustomed to call God 
their Father ; but they never called him iSiov πατεοα, which 
they considered blasphemous on the part of Jesus. — Camp. 
(peculiarly his Father). — (Bio.) 

f See N. h, ch. 3:3. Beza ([id est.] nisi riderit Patrem 
operantem). I understand this clause to be explanatory of 
the phrase, αφ έαυτον, and not merely, as in E. V., an exceptive 



clause, dependent on ovSev. Bio. says, "£αυ μη is for άλλα, 
or αλλ' ην." This putting of one thing for another may be a 
very convenient mode of getting rid of a diCBculty ; but I doubt 
whether it is the safest guide to the true meaning of the 
Scriptures. — Penn (unless) ; Fr. 0.,-S.,-G. (a moins que) ; De 
W. (es sei denn, dass . . . etwas). 

^ See N. m, ch. 3: 7.— E. V. often. 

'' Dodd., Penn, Nary, De TV., make rovs vey.oovi to depend 
alike upon both verbs, as I have done. This obviates the 
necessity of supplying the pronoun, as in the E. V. Kenr. 
translates the latter verb intransitively, giveth life. 

'' W., R., It., Vulg., Dt., Fr. 0.,-S.,-M., Dodd., Wesl. 
Sharpe, Nary, Kenr. — See ch. 1 : 3, n. d. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. V, 



37 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

ouretli not the Son, honoureth 
not the Father which hath sent 
him. 

24 Verily, verily, I say unto 
3'oa, He that heareth my word, 
and believeth on him that sent 
me, hath everlasting life, and 
shall not come into condemna- 
tion ; but is passed from death 
unto life. 

25 Verily, verily, I say unto 
you. The hour is coming, and 
now is, when the dead shall hear 
the voice of the Son of God : 
and they that hear shall live. 

26 For as the Father hath life 
in himself, so hath he given to 
the Sou to have life in himself; 

27 And hath given him au- 
thority to execute judgment also, 
because he is the Son of man. 

28 Marvel not at this : for the 
hour is coming, in the which all 
that are iu the graves shall hear 
his voice, 

29 And shall come forth ; they 
that have done good, unto the 
resurrection of life ; and they 
that have done evil, unto the 
resurrection of damnation. 



GREEK TEXT. 

τιμών τον υΐον, ου τίμα τον ττα- 
τβρα τον ΤΓΐμψαντα αυτόν. 

24 Λμην άμην Χ^γω ΰμΐν, 
OTL ο τον λογον μου άκουων, και 
ΤΓίστίυων τω ττβμψαντι μ(, ϊχ^ει 
ζωην αιωνιον καΐ ei? κρίσιν ουκ 
βρχεται, άλλα μ€ταβ(βηκ€ν f κ του 
θανάτου eir την ζωην. 

25 Αμην άμην λίγω ύμΐν, 
Ότι ίρχβται ωρα και νυν ϊστιν, 
ore οϊ νίκροί άκουσονται τηί φω- 
vrjs του υ'ιοΰ του θζον, και οι 
άκουσαντ€ΐ ζησονται. 

26 ωστΓβρ γαρ ό ττατηρ ίχίΐ 
ζωην iv ΐαυτω, οΰτω? βδωκβ κα\ 
τω υιω (^ωην (χ€ΐν (ν €αντω• 

27 καΊ ΐξουσίαν (δωκίν αύτώ 
και κρίσιν ττοιβϊν, οτι ν'ιοί άν- 
θρωπου έστι. 

28 μη θαυμάζίτβ τοΰτο• οτι 
ϊρχ^εται ώρα, iv fj τταντξί οι iv 
τοΐί μνημβίοΐί άκουσονται της 
φωνής αύτοΰ, 

29 καΐ iκ7Γopeΰσovτaι, ο'ι τα 
άγαθα ττοιησαντβς, ety άναστασιν 
ζωής• οϊ 8e τα φαύλα 7Γράζαντ€ς, 
ίΐς άναστασιν κρίσβως. 



REVISED VERSION. 



Son, honoreth not the Father 
who sent him. 

24 Verily, verily, I say to you. 
He that heareth my word, and 
believeth ihim that sent me, hath 
'eternal life, and cometh not into 
condemnation, but hath passed 
lout of death unto life. 

25 Verily, verily, I say to you. 
That an hour is coming, and now 
is, when the dead will hear the 
voice of the Son of God, and 
those hearing will live. 

2ΰ For as the Father hath life 
in himself, so also he gave to the 
Son to liave life in himself; 

27 And he gave him "power 
also to execute judgment, be- 
cause he is the Son of man. 

28 * Wonder not at this: "be- 
cause an hour is coming, in which 
all those in the ""tombs will hear 
his voice, 

29 And come forth ; those 
who did good ""tljings, to a re- 
surrection of life, and those who 
did evil ithings, to a resurrection 
of 'condemnation. 



See vv. 38 and 46, below. It is very evident, that the 
Saviour here I'efers to a belief of the truth of the Father's 
declarations (v. 37) : q. d., " If ye hear (believe) my word, and 
believe my Father's word concerning me, ye shall have eternal 
hfe." Hence, the idea is better expressed without the preposi- 
tion. — Vulgate, Nary, Kenrick, Germ., De Wette, Van Ess, and 
others. 

' See N. c, ch. 3 : 16. 

' American Bible Union Revision, 1 John 3 : 14. — Castalio, 
Vatablus, Vulgate, Beza, Tremellius, Erasmus, Penn, Sharpe 
{from death into life). — These prepositions are frequently so 
translated. 

"■ I would translate εξουσία, power, in all cases, in which it 
is clear, from the connection, what kind of power is meant, as in 
the present case. — W., T., C, G., R. 



» See N. i, ch. 1 : 15. 

ρ This Word occurs (and its synonym, //r;,;««,) a great many 
times in the N. T. It is, I believe, alwa3'S used in the same 
sense, yet it is sometimes rendered tomb, sometimes grave, 
and sometimes sepulchre. It is certain, that one of these is 
sufficient ; and, after examining all the passages in which it 
occurs, I have made choice of tomb, for its exclusive render- 
ing. 

« W., II. — The plural is not pointed out in the E. \., which, 
I think, is very desirable. 

■■ There is no doubt that the word, damnation, has a nar- 
rower signification at the present day, than it had when the 
E. V. was made. It is now almost exclusively restricted to 
the pains of hell, while the reference hero is evidently to the 
sentence of death to be passed upon the wicked in the day of 
judgment, which, it is true, will be speedily followed by their 
eternal damnation. — Newc, Penn, Kenr., inarg. — R., Nary, 
(judgment) ; W. (dome). 



88 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. V. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

30 I can of mine own self do 
nothing : as I hear, I jndge : and 
my judgment is just ; because I 
seek not mine own will, but the 
will of the Father which hath 
sent me. 

31 If I bear witness of my- 
self, my witness is not true. 

32 There is another that 
beareth witness of me, and I 
know that the witness which 
he witnesseth of me is true. 

33 Ye sent unto John, and he 
bare witness unto the truth. 



34 But I receive not testimony 
from man : but these things I 
say, that ye might be saved. 

35 He was a burning and a 
shining light : and ye were wil- 
ling for a season to rejoice in his 

light. 

36 But I have greater witness 
than tltat of John : for the works 
which the Father hath given 
me to finish, the same works 
that I do, bear witness of me, 
that the Father hath sent me. 



37 And the Father himself 
which hath sent me, hath borne 
witness of me. Ye have neither 
heard his voice at any time, nor 
seen his shape. 

38 And ye have not his word 
abiding in you : for whom he 
hath sent, him ye believe not. 



GREEK TEXT. 

30 ου δυι^αμαι βγω ττοιβΐν άττ 
ίμαντοΰ ovSeif. καθωί άκουω, 
κρίνω• καΐ η κρίσΐί η βμη δικαία 
ϊστίν OTL ού ζήτω το θέλημα το 
βμον, άλλα το θβλημα του ττβμ- 
ψαντοί μ€ ττατροζ. 

31 Έαν Ιγω μαρτυρώ ττβρϊ 
ξμαυτοΰ, η μαρτυρία μου ουκ 
ίστίν άληθηί. 

32 άλλος €στ\ν 6 μαρτύρων 
ΤΓβρΙ ίμοΰ, καΐ οίδα οτί αληθής 
έστιν ή μαρτυρία ην μαρτυρεί 
ΤΓβρΙ (μου. 

33 Ύμβΐς άτΓβστάλκατβ ττροί 
Ιωαννην, καΐ μβμαρτυρηκβ τη 
άληθβια• 

34 €γω δε ού τταρα άνθρωπου 
την μαρτυρίαν λαμβάνω, άλλα 
ταύτα λέγω 'ίνα ύμΐίΐί σωθητ€. 

35 €Κ€Ϊνοΐ ην ό λυ^^νοί 6 καιο- 
μ€νθί καΊ φαίνων, ύμβΐς δε ηθβλη- 
σατβ άγαλλιασθηναι ττροί ωραν 
iv τω φωτΐ αυτοΰ. 

36 ίγω δί ΐ'χω την μαρτυρίαν 
μβίζω τοϋ 'Ιωάννου• τα γαρ ίργα 
α ίδωκί μοι ό ττατηρ 'ίνα τΐλβίωσω 
αύτα, αυτά τα βργα α Ιγω ττοίώ, 
μαρτυρίΐ irepi ίμοΰ οτί ο ττατηρ 
pe άτΓίσταλκβ• 

37 καΐ ό ΤΓίμψαί μβ ττατηρ, 
αυτός μβμαρτυρηκβ ττ€ρι βμοΰ. 
ουτ€ φωνην αυτού ακηκοατε ττω- 
TTore, ouVe βίδος αύτοΰ ίωρακατε. 

38 καΐ τον λογον αύτοΰ ουκ 
ί'χ€Τ€ μένοντα iv ύμΐν, οτι Όν 
άττίστειλεν εκείνος, τούτω υμείς 
ου ττιστευετε. 



REVISED VERSION. 

30 I can of myself do nothing. 
As I hear, I judge: and my 
judgment is just, because I seek 
not mine own will, but the will 
of 'the Father that sent me. 



31 If I ttestify of myself, my 
'testimony is not true. 



32 There is another who 'tes- 
tifieth of ME, and I know that 
the 'testimony which he 'testi- 
fieth of ME is true. 

33 Ye have sent to John, and 
he hath testified to the truth. 



34 But I receive not testi- 
mony from man ; but these 
things I say, that ye may be 
saved. 

35 He was the burning and 
sliining lamp, and ye "were wil- 
ling, for a 'time, to rejoice in his 
light. 

36 But I have 'testimony 
greater than [that] of John : for 
the works which the Father gave 
me, "that I might finish them, 
the works "themselves which I 
do, 'testify of me, that the Fa- 
ther hath sent me. 

37 And the Father wlio sent 
me, himself hath 'testified of 
ME. "Neither have ye «ever 
heard his voice, or seen his 
shape. 

38 And ye have not his word 
abiding in you ; ^because whom 
he sent, HIM ye believe not. 



• Most editors reject πατρός. It is probably an Italic in- 
sertion. I would, therefore, translate, of him that sent me. 

» See N. j, eh. 1 : 7. 

•■ See N. y, ch. 1 : 43. 

' R., Penn, Newc, Nary, Kenr. 



" See N. k, ch. 1 : 7. — By adopting the literal rendering, I 
am enabled to translate αυτά, which is left untranslated in the 
E. V. 

" R.. Penn, Camp., Kenr. — This is the usual rendering of 
αντοε, in such cases. — Ούτε — 7ΐωποτε= neither — ever. 

y SeeN. i, ch. 1: 15. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. V. 



39 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

39 Search the scriptures ; for 
in them ye thinli ye have eternal 
life : and they are they which 
testify of me. 

40 And ye will not come to 
me, that ye might have life. 

41 I receive not honour from 
men. 

42 But I know you, that ye 
have not the love of God in you. 



43 I am come in my Father's 
name, and ye receive me not : if 
another shall come in his own 
name, him ye will receive. 



44 How can ye believe, which 
receive honour one of another, 
and seek not the honour that 
Cometh from God only "? 

45 Do not think that I will 
accuse you to the Father : there 
is one that accuseth you, even 
Moses, in whom ye trust. 

46 For had ye believed Moses, 
ye would have believed me : for 
he wrote of me. 



GREEK TEXT. 

39 EpevuoLTt raf γραψαΐ, otl 
ύμ€Ϊ9 δοκίϊτΐ €v ανταΐί ζωην αιω- 
νιον εχείΐ', και βκΰναί elaiif αΐ 
μαρτυρουσαι irepl ΐμοΰ- 

40 και οϋ OeXere iXOelv ιτροί 
μ€, Ίνα ζωην ΐ'χΐ]Τ€. 

41 Δο^αν πάρα ανθρώπων ου 
λαμβάνω• 

42 άλλ ίγνωκα υμάς•, otl την 
άγαττην τοΰ Θίοΰ ουκ ίχ€Τ€ iv 
ίαντοΐί. 

43 (γω ίΧηΧνθα ev τω ονόματι 
τοΰ πατρός μου, κοα ου λαμβα- 
veTe 쀕 iav άλλοί cA^rj eV τω 
ονόματι τω Ιδίω, Ικύνον λη- 
ψίσθΐ. 

44 πώς δυνασθξ ύμεΐί πιστίυ- 
σαι, δοζαν πάρα αλλήλων λαμ- 
βάνοντβς, /cat την 8όζαν την πάρα 
τοΰ μονού θΐοΰ ου ζητα.τ€ ; 

45 μη δοκ€Ϊτ€ ΟΤΙ Ιγω κατη- 
γορήσω υμών προΫ τον πατβρα• 
ίστιν ό κατηγορών υμών, Μω- 
<τη9, els ον υμΰί ηλπικατί. 

4G €Ϊ γαρ ίπίστ€υΐΤ€ Μωση, 
ίπιστ€υ€Τ€ αν Ιμοί• πβρ\ γαρ 
(.μου (κβΐνοί ('γραψ^ν. 



REVISED VERSION. 

39 'Ye search the Scriptures, 
^because ye think in them 'to 
have eternal life ; and they are 

those testifying of me. 

40 And ye "are not willing to 
come to me, that ye may have 
life. 

41 I receive not glory from 
men. 

42 But I know you, that ye 
have not the love of God in 
■■yourselves. 

43 I am come in my Father's 
name, and ye receive me not ; if 
another come in his own name, 
him ye will receive. 



44 How can ye believe, re- 
ceiving glory one from another, 
and ye seek not the glory that 
is from 'the only God"? 

45 Do not think that I will 
accuse you to the Father. There 
is one that accusetli you, Moses, 
in whom ye have ■'hoped. 

46 For if ye believed Moses, 
ye would believe me, for ho 
wrote of ME. 



• Camp., Sliarpe, Dodd., Kenr., De W. — The Latin Verss., 
like the Orig., are ambiguous. It is true that ερηνητε will 
bear either the indie, or imper. rendering ; but I think the 
former should, in this ease, be preferred. — 1. Because there is 
no other imperative word in this immediate connection. The 
nearest command, or exhortation, is in the 45th verse, below. 
The rendering of the E. V., therefore, is not suggested bj' the 
immediate context. — 2. Because the persons addressed were 
Jews, who were remarkable for their diligent study of the 
Scriptures. As the Savior never urges them to the observance 
of the Sabbath, no doubt because they were already punctil- 
ious, and unnecessarily strict in its observance, so, for similar 
reasons, he would not be likely to urge them to the study of 
the Scriptures. — 3. Because the idea suggested by the indie. 
is more forcible, and agrees better with the context than the 
other. I would paraphrase verses 39 and 40 thus : Ye search 
the Scriptures, because ye feel the need of a Savior, and think 
that in ihem ye may find comforting promises of the Messiah's 
Kingdom, and thus indulge a blessed hope to have eternal life 



at last ; and, indeed, ye search in the right place, for they are 
those testifying of me, as the promised Messiah ; and yet, 
after all, ye are so perverse and rebellious that ye are not will- 
ing to come to me, that ye may have that life for which ye 
seek.^4. Because the imper. is much less frequently used than 
the indie. Consequentlj-, the presumption is in favor of the 
latter, when the context does not call for tlie former. 

' Penn, Sharpe, Kenr. — This is more literal than the E. V., 
and quite as elegant. 

' Έρ έαντοις is certainly more emphatic than εν νμιν. For 
this reason, I prefer to translate it emphatically. — Dt. 

' E. v., ch. 17 : 3. 1 Tim. 6 : 15. Jude 4. No other similar 
examples are found in the N. T. 

^ Fr. 0.,-M., Germ-, Dt., Vulg., "W., Port.— This word is, 
perhaps, always used in the N. T. in the same sense ; yet it 
seems to be rendered indifferently, in the E. V., hope, or trust. 
1 would uniformly render it hope. 



40 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VI. 



KING JAMEs' VERSION. 

47 But if ye believe not liis 
vpritings, how shall ye believe 
my words ? 

CHAP. VI. 

After these things Jesus 
went over the sea of Galilee, 
which is the sea of Tiberias. 

2 And a great multitude fol- 
lowed him, because they saw his 
miracles which he did on them 
that were diseased. 

3 And Jesus went up into a 
mountain, and there he sat with 
his disciples. 

4 And the passover, a feast of 
the Jews, was nigh. 

5 When Jesus then lifted up 
his eyes, and saw a great com- 
pany come unto him, he saith 
unto Philip, Whence shall we 
buy bread that these may eat V 



6 (And this he said to prove 
him : for he himself knew what 
he would do.) 

7 Philip answered him. Two 



GREEK TEXT. 

47 et δε τοΊς iKeivov γραμμα- 
σιν ου 7ηστ€ν€Τ€, ττώί roiy ΐμοϊ^ 
ρημασι ττιστβνσβτβ ; 

CHAP. VI. 

ΜΕΤΑ ταντα άττηΧθίν ο Ίψ 
σοΰί Trepau τηί θαλασσή? τηί 
Γαλίλαίαί τηί Τιβίριαδοί• 

2 και ηκολουθίί αντώ ό^λο? 
ΤΓολυί, OTL ίωρων αντοΰ τα σημβΐα 
α iiroieL eVt των άσθβνονντων. 

3 άρηλθβ 8e eli το bpos ό Ιη- 
σοΰί, κα\ €Κ€Ϊ ϊκαθητο μβτα των 
μαθητών αντοΰ. 

4 ην δΐ ΐγγνί το ττασχα η 
βορτη των 'Ιουδαίων. 

5 βτταρας ονν 6 Ιησούς τους 
οφθαλμούς, καΐ θίασαμβνος otl 
ΤΓολυς οχ^λος βργίται ττρος αύτον, 
Aeyet ττρος τον ΦΙλίτητον, ΙΙοθίν 
άγορασομβν άρτους, Ινα φαγωσιν 
ούτοί ; 

6 Τοΰτο δβ e'Aeye ττ^ιράζων 
αύτον αύτος γαρ ηδει τι βμβλλε 

ΤΓΟίζΐν. 

7 άτΓβκρίθη αύτω Φίλίτητος, 



REVISED VERSION. 

47 But if ye believe not his 
writings, how will ye believe 
my words ? 

CHAP. VI. 

After these things Jesus 
Avent >away over the Sea of Ga- 
lilee, ("of Tiberias.) 

2 And a great multitude was 
following him, because they saw 
'his ■'signs which he was doing 
on the 'sick. 

3 And Jesus went up into the 
mountain, and there he was sit- 
ting with his disciples. 

4 And the Passover, the Feast 
of the Jews, was 'near. 

5 Jesus, therefore, lifting up 
[his] eyes, and seeing that a great 
^multitude was coming to him, 
saith to Philip, ΛVhence shall we 
buy ''loaves, that these may eat? 



6 'But this he said, Jprovmg 
him, for he himself knew what 
he Hvas about to do. 

7 Philip answered him, Two 



' Vulg., Germ. — T., C, G., (went his way). — No doubt the 
prep, απο, in conip. indicates a close connection of this verse 
with the preceding narrative. 

'' De W. — This sea, or lalie, is called indiiTerently, the Sea 
of Galilee, the Sea of Tiberias, and the Lake of Gennesaret. The 
opinion, perhaps, most commonly entertained by interpreters 
is, that two of these names are here combined. I have adopt- 
ed this opinion, but have left out the supplied words of the 
E. v., because I consider the sense perfectly well expressed 
without them. Some translate, to the city of Tiberias, (Germ.) ; 
others regard the first part of the description as general, the 
other as specific, and translate it, the Galilean Sea of Tiberias, 
(Beng., Meyer). This expression is, however, sufficiently ac- 
counted for, by supposing that this lake was known to some 
by one name, and to others, by the other, for which reason 
John, who always seems anxious to be xmderstood. has given 
both names. 

' W., R., Vulg., Port., Cast., It., Fr. 0.,-S.,-M., Germ., De "W., 
Griesb., Scholtz, Lachm., Tisch., Theile, Hahn, Knapp, Wesl., 



Newc., Sharpe, and others, all reject αντου of the Text. Rec. I 
would, therefore, recommend that the revision be made to read 
the signs, instead of his signs. 

" Germ., Vulg., R., Port., Sharpe.— See ch. 2 : 11, N. x. 

' Sharpe.— See ch. 5 : 3, N. e. 

"■ See ch. 2 : 13, N. e. 

^ Vulg., W., R., It., Cast., Newc, Wesl., Kenr.— This is the 
usual rendering of οχλοί in the E. V. " I would uniformly 
adopt it. 

*' W., Sharpe. — Vulg., Cast., (panes) ; Fr. Λ''eΓss. (des pains) ; 
Port, (paens). — E. V., vv. 9, 11, 13, 26, and elsewhere. It is, I 
think, unnecessary to translate the plural of α^τος by the sing, 
noun, bread, in any case. 

' W., Vulg., Port., Cast., Wesl., Germ. — Others render δε, 

now. 

i Seech. 4: 23, N. w. 

k Newc, Dodd.— See ch. 4 : 47, N. e. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VI. 



41 



KIXG JAMES VERSION. 

hundred pcnnj'wortli of bread is 
not sufficient for tlieni, that every 
one of them may take a little. 

8 One of his discii)les, Andrew, 
Simon Peter's brother, saith unto 
him, 

9 There is a lad here, which 
hath five barley-loaves, and two 
small lishcs : but what are they 
among so many 



;? 



10 And Jesus said, Make the 
men sit down. (Now there was 
much grass in the place.) So the 
men sat down in number about 
five thousand. 

11 And Jesus took the loaves; 
and when he had given thanks, he 
distributed to the disciples, and 
the disciples to them that were set 
down ; and likewise of the fishes, 
as much as they would. 

12 When they were filled, he 
said unto his disciples, Gather up 
the fragments that remain, that 
nothing be lost. 

13 Therefore they gathered them 

together, and filled twelve baskets 
with the fragments of the five bar- 
ley -loaves,which remained over and 
above unto them that had eaten. 

14 Then tliose men, when they 
had seen the miracle that Jesus 
did, said, This is of a truth that 



GREEK TEXT. 



Διακοσίων δηναρίων άρτοι ουκ 
άρκοΰσιν αντοΐί, Ίνα ίκαστος αυ- 
τών βραχύ τι λαβτ). 

8 Aiyei αύτω eir e/c των μαθη- 
τών αϋτον, 'Ανδρέας 6 άδβλφοΫ 
Σίμωνοί Πίτρον, 

9 ' Εστί τταιδαρίον ev ώδε, Ό 
ϊχβί ΤΓβντζ άρτονί κρίθινους κα\ 
δυο όψαρια• άλλα ταύτα τι εστίν 
els τοσούτους ; 

10 Εΐ7Γ€ δε ό Ιησούς, Ποιή- 
σατε τους ανθρώπους αναπεσβΐν. 
ην δε χόρτος ττολυς εν τω τοττω. 
άνεττεσον ούν οι άνδρες τον αριθ- 
μόν ώσε\ ττεντακισχίλιοι. 

11 έλαβε δε τους άρτους ό 
'Ιησούς, καΐ εύχαριστησας διε- 
δωκε τοις μαθηταις, οι δε μαθηταΊ 
τοις άνακειμενοις• ομοίως καΐ εκ 
των οψαρίων όσον ήθελαν, 

12 ώς δε ενεττλήσθησαν, λέγει 
τοις μαθηταις αυτού, Συναγάγετε 
τα ττερισσευσαντα κλάσματα, 
ίνα μη τι αττοληται. 

13 Συνήγαγον ούν, καΐ εγεμι- 
σαν δώδεκα κοφίνους κλασμάτων 
εκ τών ττεντε άρτων τών κρίθινων, 
ά επερίσσευσε τοις βεβρωκοσιν. 

1-1 0£ ούν άνθρωποι Ιδοντες ο 
εποίησε σημείον ό Ιησούς, έλε- 
γαν, 'Οτι ούτος εστίν αληθώς 6 



REVISED VERSION. 

hundred idenaria worth of loaves 
is not sufficient for them, so that 
every one of them may take a 
little. 

8 One of his disciples, Andrew 
the brother of Simon Peter, saith 
to him, 

9 There is a lad here, that hath 
five bai'ley loaves, and two small 
fishes : but what are these "for so 
many ? 

10 And Jesus said. Make the 
men sit down. Now there was 
much grass in the place. The 
men, therefore, sat down, in nimi- 
ber about five thousand. 



11 And Jesus took tlio loaves; 
and, giving thanks, distributed °to 
the disciples, and the disciples to 
those "sitting at meat ; and like- 
wise of the fishes, as much as they 
pwished. 

12 And when they were filled, 
he saith to his disciples. Gather 
up the remaining fragments, that 
nothing be lost. 

13 Therefore, they gathered 
[them] up, and filled twelve bas- 
kets with fragments, 'from the 
five barley loaves, which remain- 
ed to those who had eaten. 

1i "The men, therefore, see- 
ing the ■'sign that Jesus did, 
said, This is, 'indeed, "the Proph- 



1 The exjiression I have used conveys just the sense of the 
Original, anil no more ; at least, as far as it is possible to convey 
to the mere English reader, in a literal translation, the sense of the 
passage. The word δηΐ'αρισν I have transferred : — 1 . Because 
there is no English word equivalent to it. — 2. Because I consider 
a transfer always preferable to a mistranslation. The 8ηναριον 
was not a penny, but a coin = 7J.< pence, or about 15 cents 
(Rob.). Therefore, the E. V. is a mistranslation. — .'!. Because I 
consider a transfer, in a case of so little comparative importance 
as this, even preferable to a clumsy penjilirasts, or loose para- 
phrase. — Newc, Sbarpe, Kenr. {(lenarii). — I prefer the Greek 
form to the Latin, not only because it is more musical, but be- 
cause it is better, when practicable, to transfer from the Original 
than from any other language. I would insert after the word 
denaria, in brackets, [about 30 dollars.] and put in the margin 
this note : The denarion was equal to about 1}4 pence, or 
15 ceil is. 

" Schott, Fr. S.,-M. — This is a frequent rendering of sis. 
Though this preposition will not, in this place, bear the literal 
rendering, into, yet, I apprehend, it really has its primary force. 



The idea is, probably, this : " What are these, to be divided into 
so many parts, as would be necessary, in order to supply so many 
persons'?" So also in the parallel passages, Mark 8 : 19, 20. 
Very frequently, when, by implication, etg introduces a purpose, 
for is the best rendering that can be given, as in the present case. 

" The authorities are divided as to the genuineness of the words 
Tots μαθ^ηταις, oi δε μη&ηται. They are rejected by Knapp, 
Lach., Tisch., and Theile ; while they are retained by uriesbach, 
Scholz, and Hahn. Alf says, that probability is against them, 
internal as well as external. As they arc not found in most of 
the very ancient MSS., and are wanting in tlie A'ulg. and other 
ancient Verss., I would riject them, and a]ipend this note : .Some 
copies insert, to the disciples, and the disciples to those, etc. 

° To sit at meat is the more frequent rendering of ηνηχεισΘ•ηι. 
—See E. v.. Matt, 9 : 10. Mark 16 : 14. Luke 7 : 37 ; 22 : 27. 

Ρ See ch. 1 : 43, N. y. 

1 Of is doubtless here used in the sense of from, though U 
might be taken as a mere sign of the possessive case. From is, 
therefore, more precise. 

' R.— B. V,, V, 55, below : ch, 1 : 47 ; 4 : 42 ; 7 : 2fi ; 8 : 31 . 



i-2 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VI. 



KING JAMES' VERSION. 

Prophet that should come into the 
Avorld. 

15 When Jesus therefore per- 
ceived that they would come and 
take him by force, to make him a 
king, he departed again into a 
mountain himself alone. 



16 And when even was now 
come, his disciples went down 
unto the sea, 

17 And entered into a ship, 
and went over the sea toward 
Capernaum. And it was now 
dark, and Jesus was not come to 
them. 

18 And the sea arose by rea- 
son of a great wind that blew. 

19 So when they had rowed 
about five and twenty or thirty 
furlongs, they see Jesus walking 
on the sea, and drawing nigh 
unto the ship : and they were 
afraid. 



20 But he saith unto them. It 
is I ; be not afraid. 

21 Then they willingly receiv- 
ed him into the ship : and imme- 
diately the ship was at the land 
whither they went. 

22 The day following, when 
the people which stood on the 
other side of the sea saw that 
there was none other boat there, 
save that one whereinto his dis- 
ciples were entered, and that 



GREEK TEXT. 

προφήτης b ίρχομίνος els τον 
κοσμον. 

15 ' Ιησούς ovv γνονς οτι μίλ- 
XovaLV ΐργΐσθαί kcu άρπάζειν 
αυτόν, ίνα ττοιησωσιν αύτον βα• 
σίλβα, άνβχωρησ^ πάλιν ety το 
opos αυτός μονάς. 

16 '/2? δε οψία iyeveTO, κατέ- 
βησαν οί μαθηταΐ αύτοΰ eVi την 
θάλασσαν, 

1 7 κα\ ϊμβάντες €ί? το πλοΐον, 
ηργοντο πΐραν της θαλάσσης (Ις 
Καπΐρναουμ. kcll σκοτία ήδη 
βγβγονα, καΐ ουκ ϊληλυθΐΐ προς 
αυτούς ο Ίησοΰς, 

18 η τ€ θάλασσα άνίμου μ€- 
γαλου πνβοντος διηγειρετο. 

19 βληλακοτίς ούν ώς σταδί- 
ους (Ικοσιπΐντί ή τριάκοντα, 
θζωροΰσι τον Ιησοΰν πΐριπα- 
τοΰντα 67Γί της θαλάσσης, καΙ 
ίγγυς τοϋ πλοίου γινομίνον κα). 
(φοβηθησαν. 

20 ό δε λβγΐΐ αύτοΐς, 'Έγω 
ΐίμι• μη φοβΰσθε. 

21 Ίΐθβλον ούν λαβΐΐν αύτον 
(Ις το πλοΐον, και βυθίως το πλοΐον 
(γίνβτο (πΐ της γης ΐΐς ην υπήγον. 

22 Tfi ΐπαΰριον ό οχ^λος ό 
βστηκως π^ραν της θαλάσσης, 
Ιδων ΟΤΙ πλοιαριον άλλο ουκ ην 
€κεΐ el μη ev (κίΐνο ety Ό ΐνίβη- 
σαν οι μαθηται αύτοΰ, και οτι ού 



REVISED VERSION. 

et tliat was to come into the 
world. 

15 Jesus, therefore, 'knowing 
that they 'were about to come and 
take him by force, "tliat tliey might 
make him a king, "retired again 
into "the mountain, himself alone. 



16 And when evening came, 
his disciples went down to the 
sea ; 

17 And after entering into the 
ship, they were going over the sea 
toward Capernaum. And it was 
now 'become dark, and Jesus was 
not come to them : 



18 And the sea, "as a great wind 
blew, 'was becoming agitated. 

19 Having, therefore, rowed 
about twenty-five or thirty fur- 
longs, they see Jesus walking on 
the sea, and drawing >near to the 
ship : and they were afraid. 



20 But he saith to them, It is 
I ; be not afraid. 

21 Tliey 'were willing, tliere- 
fore, to receive him into tlic ship : 
and immediately the ship was at 
the land to which they were going. 

22 The "next day, the 'multi- 
tude who were standing beyond 
the sea, seeing that there Avas no 
other boat there, 'except ""that 
one, ■'into which his disciples 
entered, and that Jesus went not 



■ • See ch. 8 : 27, N. c. 

< See ch. 1 : 7, N. k. 

" W., T., G. — The simple definite art. is sufficient here. The 
E. Y. probably derived tliose in v. 14, from the illi homines of the 
Vulg. — For retired, see Wesl., Murd. 

' Yulg., Dt., Cast., Germ. To become is a frequent meaning 
of γινεσ&αι. 

" Vulg., Cast., Wesl. — This is perfectly literal, and for any 
thing I can see, elegant. — See ch. 2 : 3, N. a. 

' Cast, (concitabatur). — There can be no doubt that to be, or 
become agitated, is the e.xact meaning of the passive voice of 
διεγειρειν, when spoken of the sea. To arise is not only not 
literal, but it is too feeble. 

y This change is made for the sake of uniformity. — See ch. 
2 : 13, N. e. 

' Michaelis has conjectured that ηλθ-ον may be the true rea"ding. 



This is, no doubt, an ingenious conjecture ; but seems altogether 
unnecessary. I prefer to intei-pret thus, with several modern au- 
thors : — They were at first afraid, not knowing that it was Jesus ; 
afterward, when they knew him they were willing to take him 
into the ship, which they would iiot have felt like doing before. 

' See N. w, ch. 1 : 43. 

*■ See N. g, v. 5, above. 

" Save = except, is so nearly obsolete, that I prefer to dispense 
with it entirely. 

■■ The words from εκείνο to the first αντον, in this verse, are 
rejected from the text by all the learned editors, except Knapp 
(who puts them in brackets), Scholz, and Hahn. They are want- 
ing in the best MSS. I would recommend that the corresponding 
Bng. words be left out in the revised version, and that this note 
be placed in the margin. : Some copies insert here, that \one\ into 
which his disciples entered. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VI. 



43 



KIXG JAMES VERSIOX. 

Jesus went not with his disciples 
into the boat, but that his dis- 
ciples were gone away alone ; 

23 (Howbeit there came other 
boats from Tiberias nigh \uito 
the place where they did eat 
bread, after that the Lord had 
given thanks :) 

24 AVhen the people therefore 
saw that Jesus was not there, 
neither his disciples, they also 
took shipping, and came to Ca- 
pernaum, seeking for Jesus. 



25 And when they had found 
him on the other side of the sea, 
they said unto him. Rabbi, when 
camest thou hither? 

26 Jesus answered them and 
said, Verily, verily, I say unto 
you. Ye seek me, not because ye 
saw the miracles, but because ye 
did eat of the loaves, and were 
filled. 

27 Labor not for the meat 
which perisheth, but for that 
meat which endureth unto ever- 
lasting life, which the Son of 
man shall give unto you : for 
him hath God the Father sealed. 

2S Then said they unto him, 



GREEK TEXT. 



σννβισηλθξ τοΐί μαθηταΐς αυτοί) 
ο Ιησοΰί els το ττΧοιαρίον, άλλα 
μονοί οΐ μαθηταΐ αϋτοΰ άπηλθον, 

23 άλλα 8e ήλθβ -πλοιάρια ΐκ 
Τιβΐρια8ος ΐγγνς του τοτου οτνου 
ίφαγον τον άρτον, ευχαρίστησαν 
τος του ΚυρΊον 

24 οτ€ ούν elSev 6 όχλθ9 οτι 
Ίησοΰζ ουκ εστίν e/cet ούδε οί 
μαθηταΐ αυτού, ΐνίβησαν καΙ 
αντοί elf τα ττλοΐα, καΙ ήλθον etf 
Καπερναούμ, ζητοΰντες τον Ίη- 
σοΰν. 

25 καΐ ehpovTes αύτον πέραν 
τηί θαλασσή?, είπον αυτω, 

ΡαββΊ, ποτέ ώδε γεγονα? ; 

26 Απεκρίθη αυτοΊ? 6 'Ιη- 
σούς καΙ είπεν. Αμήν άμην λέγω 
ύμΐν, ζητείτε με, ούχ οτι εϊδετε 
σημεία, αλλ οτι εφαγετε έκ των 
άρτων καΐ εχορτασθητε. 

27 εργάζεσθε μη την βρώσιν 
την άπολλνμενην, άλλα την βρώ- 
σιν την μενουσαν εΙς ζωην αιώ- 
νων, ην ο υ'ιοί του άνθρωπου 
υμίν δώσει• τούτον γαρ ο πατήρ 
εσφραγισεν ο θεός. 

28 ΈΙτΓον ούν προς αυτόν. 



REVISED VERSION. 

with his disciples into the boat, 
but his disciples went away 
alone : 

23 (fBut other boats came 
from Tiberias, ''near the place 
where they ate the bread, when 
the Lord gave thanks :) 

24 When, therefore, the «mul- 
titude saw that Jesus was not 
there, nor his disciples, they also, 
themselves, ^entered into the 
ships, and came to Capernaum, 
seeking for Jesus. 

25 And finding him ""beyond 
the sea; they said to him. Rabbi, 
when didst thou come hither? 

26 Jesus answered them, and 
said. Verily, verily, I say to you, 
ye seek me, not because ye saw 
'signs, but because ye ate of the 
loaves, and were "satisfied. 

27 iLabor not for the ''food 
that perisheth, but for the food 
that 'abideth to «eternal life, 
which the Son of man will give 
you ; for him the Father, -God, 
did seal. 



28 They said to him, there- 



' TV., R. — This is the common rendering of Se. Howbeit is 
obsolete. 

ff See N. z., v. 19, above. 

^ Sharpe {entered the boats) ; Wesl. {went aboard the ves- 
sels). — It is needless to add, that the version I propose is 
strictly literal. — The art. (which I translate), is needed, in 
order to point out the identity between these πλοία, and the 
■πλοιάρια of the preceding verse.— Themselves is the proper 
rendering of αντοι. — See ch. 2: 12, N. z. 

^ E. V. frequently. — I would always so translate πέραν, 
when the sense will bear it. 

' See ch. 2: 11, N. X. " See Note on Matt. 5: 6. 

) " Labor not for." says Alf., " does not give the sense of 
ερ•/αζ. They had not labored, in this case, for the βροαις 
απολλυμεντ;, but it had been furnished miraculously." I can- 



not consent to alter the E. V. on so slender grounds as this; 
for, though it is true, as the learned critic remarks, that they 
had not labored for this food, in the βτβΐ instance, yet they 
had now rowed across the sea, at considerable expense of time 
and labor, with this perishable food for the chief object of their 
attainment ; and it is to their present and future conduct that 
the Savior's exhortation refers. 

!■ Seech. 4: 32, N.f. 

I See N. z, ch. 1 : 33. 

" See ch. 3 : 16, N. e. 

» Vulg., Erasm., Trem., Schott, Kenr., Vm Ess, R.— Beza 
(id est Deus) ; Newc. {even God).— The E. V. here presents 
a case of transposed construction. Such transpositions almost 
always weaken, if they do not destroy the sense. 



44 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VI. 



KING JAMES' VERSION. 

What shall we do, that we might 
work the works of God ? 

29 Jesus answered and said 
unto them, This is the work of 
God, that ye believe on him 
whom he hath sent. 

30 They said therefore unto 
him, What sign shewest thou 
then, that we may see, and be- 
lieve thee ? what dost thou 
work ? 

31 Our fathers did eat manna 
in the desert ; as it is written, 
He gave them bread from heaven 
to eat. 

32 Then Jesus said unto them. 
Verily, verily, I say unto you, 
Moses gave you not that bread 
from heaven ; but my Father 
giveth you the true bread from 
heaven. 



33 For the bread of God is 
he which cometh down from 
heaven, and giveth life unto the 
world. 

34 Then said they unto him, 
Loi'd, evermore give us this 
bread. 

35 And Jesus said unto them, 
I am the bread of life : he that 
cometh to me, shall never hun- 



GKEEK TEXT. 



Tl ττοιουμ^ν, 'ίνα βργαζωμβθα τα 
ΐργα του θξοΰ ; 

29 Λττεκρίθη ό Ίησοΰί κα). 
enreu αυτόΐς, ΤΌΰτο βστι το kpyov 
του θζοΰ, Ινα τηστ^υσητβ els ον 
αττεστβίλεί' βκίΐΐΌί. 

30 ΈΙτΓον ούν αυτώ, Τι ουν 
ΤΓΟίίΐί συ σημ€Ϊον, 'ίνα ίδωμ€ν κα). 
7Γΐστ€υσωμ£ν σοί ; τι ζργάζτ] ; 

31 οί TTaTepei ημών το μάννα 
ίφαγον iv Ty βρημφ, καθώί Ιστι 
γεγραμμβνον,' Αρτον βκ του ου- 
ρανού βδωκβν αυτοΐί φαγβΐν. 

32 Ehrev ούν αυτοΐί 6 Ιη- 
σούς, Αμήν άμην λ€γω ύμΐν, Ου 
Άίωσηί δεδωκεν ύμΐν τον αρτον 
€κ του ουρανού• αλλ' ό ττατηρ 
μου δίδωσιν ύμΐν τον αρτον βκ 
του ουρανού τον άληθινον. 

33 ο γαρ άρτοί του θβού 
βστιν ο καταβαίνων βκ του ουρα- 
νού, καΐ ζωην διδούί τω κόσμω. 

34 ΈΙτΓον ούν ττροί αύτον, 
Κυριβ, τταντοτβ δοί ημΐν τον 
αρτον τούτον. 

35 ΈΙττε δε αυτοΐί ό Ιησούς, 
Εγω βΐμί ό άρτος της ζωής• ό 
ΐρχομζνος προςμί, ου μη ττβινάστ)• 



REVISED VERSION. 

fore, What shall we do, that we 
may work the works of God ? 

29 Jesus answered, and said 
to them. This is the work of God, 
that ye believe on him whom he 
sent. 

30 They said to him, there- 
fore, What sign, then, «doest 
THOU, that we may see, and 
believe thee? What dost thou 
work ? 

31 Our fathers ate the manna 
in the pwilderness, as it hath 
been written, He gave them 
bread from heaven to eat. 

32 Jesus, therefore, said to 
them. Verily, verily, I say to you, 
Moses did not give you the 
bread from heaven ; but my Fa- 
ther giveth you the true bread 
from heaven. 



33 For the bread of God is 
ithat which cometh down from 
heaven, and giveth life to the 
world. 

34 They said to him, there- 
fore, 'Sir, 'always give us this 
bread. 

35 And Jesus said to them, 
I am the bread of life : he that 
cometh to me shall mot hunger; 



° Newc, Wesl. — There seems to be no necessity in this 
case, for departing from the common rendering of this verb. 

ί This word is used in only one sense, Cas a noun), in the 
N. T., and is generally translated wilderness. For the sake 
of uniformity I would always so render it. Besides, desert is 
1 little too restricted in its meaning. 

1 This expression, δ χαταβαινων, may either refer to a 
person, j. e. to Christ himself, or to the word, α^τος, im- 
mediately preceding. From what follows, I am convinced that 
the latter is the more proper view. The Jews, at least, did 
not yet understand the Savior to be speaking of his own 
personal descent from heaven; for they afterward say "Sir 
always give U3 this bread," that is τον αρτ. τοντ. τον καταβ. — 
Alf., Meyer, Camp., Beng. 

' The noun, κνριος, was used in Greek, both in addressing 
human beings of superior rank, and dignity (in which cases, 



we, in the IT. States, use, simply, Sir,) and in addressing the 
Supreme Being, (in which case, we use. Lord). I have, there- 
fore, adopted the following rule, in translating this word : — 
When it appears, from the context, that the speaker, or speak- 
ers, did not realize the fact of our Savior's Divinity and Mes- 
siahship, but regarded him merely as a man of superior chai•- 
acter and attainments, I render >αριοί. Sir, otherwise, Lord. 
I do not know but King James' revisors may have adopted 
this same rule ; but, if so, I apprehend they did not fully 
apply it ; for in this case, in ch. 8 : 11 ; 9 : 36. Luke 13 : 8, and 
other passages, the persons speaking evidently had no idea that 
they were addressing the Messiah, or any other Divine person. 

• Newc, Camp., R., Nary, Penn, Kenr. — E. V. generally. 

' W., T., C, G., R. — Though ov μη is stronger than simply 
ov, yet, by rendering it never, we introduce confusion into the 
translation. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VI. 



45 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

ger ; and be that believeth on 
me, shall never thirst. 

36 But I said unto you, That 
}'e also have seen me, and be- 
lieve not. 

37 All that the Father giveth 
me, shall come to me ; and him 
that cometh to mc, I will in no 
wise cast out. 

3S For I came down from 
heaven, not to do mine own 
will, but the will of him that 
sent me. 

39 And this is the Father's 
will which hatli sent me, that 
of all which he hath given me, I 
should lose nothing, but should 
raise it up again at the last day. 

40 And this is the will of him 
that sent me, that eveiy one 
W'hich seeth the Son, and believ- 
eth on him, may have everlasting 
life : and I will raise him up at 
the last day. 

41 The Jews then murmured 
at him, because he said I am the 
bread which came down from 
heaven. 

42 And tliey said. Is not this 
Jesus the son of Joseph, Λvhose 
father and mother we know? 
how is it then that he saith, I 
came down from heaven ? 

43 Jesus therefore answered 



GREEK TEXT. 



KUL πιστΐνωι/ ecs βμι, ου μη 
δίψηστ) ττώτΓοτβ. 

36 αλλ' eIttou νμΐν οτι και 
(ωρακατ€ /xe, /cat ου ΤΓίστβυετε. 

37 τταΐ' ο δίδωσί μοί ο ττατηρ, 
•προς (μ€ ηζίΐ' και τον ϊργομίνον 
ττροζ μβ ου μη 4κβάλω ίζω• 

38 oTt καταβίβηκα Ικ του ου- 
ρανού, ουγ^ ινα ττοιώ το θβλημα 
το ϊμον, άλλα το θβλημα του 
ττβμψαντοί μ€. 

39 τοΰτο δε ΐστι το θίλημα 
τοΰ ΤΓί'μψαντοί μ€ ττατροί, Ίνα 
τταν Ό δβδωκ€ μοι, μη αττολβσω 
4ζ αύτοΰ, άλλα αναστήσω αύτο 
ΐν τη βσχατη ήμΐρα. 

40 τοΰτο 8e βστί το θίλημα 
τοΰ ττεμψαντο! με, ίνα Tray ο 
θεωρών τον υϊον κα\ ττιστευων els 
αΰτον, ϊ'χτ) ζωην αΐωνιον, καΊ 
αναστήσω αΰτον ϊγω τη έσχατη 

41 'Έγογγυζον ούν οΐ Ιου- 
δαίοι ττερί αυτοΰ, οτι ehrev, Εγω 
ίίμι ο άρτος 6 καταβας εκ τοΰ 
ουρανού. 

42 και ελεγον, Οϋχ οΰτοί 
εστίν Ίησοΰί 6 υΙοί Ιωσήφ, ου 
ημείς οϊδαμεν τον πάτερα και την 
μητέρα ; ττώς ούν λέγει ούτος, 
' Οτι εκ του οΰρανοΰ καταβεβηκα ; 

43 Άττεκρίθη ούν ό Ιησούς 



REVISED VERSION. 

and he that believeth on me 
shall never thirst. 

36 But I said to you, That ye 
Iiave even seen me, and do not 
believe. 

37 All that the Father giveth 
me, will come to me ; and him 
that cometh to me I will 'not 
cast out. 

3S "Because I have come down 
from heaven, not «that I may do 
mine own will, but the will of 
him that sent me. 

39 And this is the will of "the 
Father that sent me, that of all 
that he hath given me I may 
lose nothing ; but may raise it 
up in the last day. 

40 >■ And this is the will of ^him 
that sent me, that every one who 
seeth the Son, and believeth on 
him, may have "eternal life : and 
I will raise hiiu up at the last 
day. 

41 The Jews, therefore, were 
murmuring at him, because he 
said, I am the bread that came 
down from heaven. 

42 And they said. Is not this 
Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose 
father and mqjher we know? 
How, then, 'doth he say, I have 
come down from heaven ? 

43 Jesus, ^therefore, answer- 



' See N. i, eh. 1 : 15. 

' See N. k, ch. 1 : 7. 

» Griesb., Knapp, Lachm., and Tisch. reject πατροι, which 
is wanting in some of the most ancient MSS. — I would, there- 
ore, translate, him that sent me. — Camp., Newc., Sharpe, Penn, 
Schott, Trem., Wesl. 

y All modern editors, and the best MSS. have γαρ, instead 
of Se. Therefore, I would translate, For this is, etc.— Lachm., 



Tisch., and Knapp have πατρός μον, instead of πεμψαντοι με, 
with several of the most ancient MSS. The Λ'ulg. and the 
Yerss. depending on it have combined these two readings, " of 
the Father who sent me." — I would translate, according to the 
editors mentioned above, of my Father, and append this note : 
According to some copies, of him that sent me. 

' There is certainly no supply needed in this case. He is 
emphatic. — W., K. 

» T., C, G. — Most editors, and most MSS. omit avr. I would 
leave out therefore. 



46 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VI. 



KING JAMKS VERSION. 

and said unto them, Murmur not 
among yourselves. 

44 No man can come to me, 
except the Father which hath 
sent me draw him : and I will 
raise him up at the last day. 

4-5 It is written in the proph- 
ets, And tliey shall be all taught 
of God. Every man therefore 
that hath heard, and hath learned 
of the Father, cometh unto me. 

46 Not that any man hath 
seen tlie Father, save he which 
is of God, he hath seen the 
Father. 

47 Verily, verily, I say uuto 
you. He that believeth on me 
hath everlasting life. 

48 I am that bread of life. 

49 Your fathers did eat manna 
in the wilderness, and are dead. 



50 This is the bread which 
comeih down from heaven, that 
a man may eat thereof, and not 
die. 

51 I am the living bread 
which came down from heaven : 
if any man eat of this bread, 
he shall live for ever : and the 
bread tliat I will give is my 
flesh, which I will give for the 
life of the world. 



52 The Jews therefore strove 
among themselves, saying. How 
can this man give us his flesh 
to eat ? 

53 Then Jesus said unto them. 



GREEK TEXT. 

KaL eiirev αύτοΐί, Μη γογγύζίτβ 
μβτ αλλήλων. 

44 ουδείί δυι/αται Ιλθεϊν ττρόί 
μ€, eav μη 6 πατήρ ό 7Γ€μψαί μ€ 
βλκνστ] αυτόν, κα\ βγω αναστήσω 
αυτόν τη βσχατη ημίρα. 

45 €στι γβγραμμίνον iv τοΪϋ 
ττροψηταίί, Καΐ βσονται ττάντΕί 
διδακτοί του θβου. Has ουν ό 
ακουσαζ τταρα του πατρός kcu 
μαθών, βρ-χβται προί μβ• 

46 ουχ^ OTC τον πάτερα τΐί 
€ωρακβν• el μη ό ών πάρα τοΰ 
θίοΰ, ούτος ίωρακζ τον πατίρα. 

47 αμήν αμήν λίγω ύμΐν, ό 
πιστβυων eh ΐμβ, βχβι ζωην αΐώ- 

VLQV. 

48 Ιγω ίίμι 6 άρτος της ζωής. 

49 οΐ πατΐρβς υμών βφαγον 
το μάννα iv τη Ιρημω, καΐ άπβ- 
θανον 

50 ούτος βστιν ο άρτος ο e/c 
τοΰ ουρανού καταβαινων, 'ίνα τις 
€ς αύτοΰ φαγη και μη άποθανη. 

51 ίγω ζ'ιμί ό άρτος 6 ζων, 6 
e/c τοΰ ουρανοΰ καταβας• ϊαν τις 
φαγη e/c τούτου τοΰ άρτου, ζησ€• 
ται ei? τον αιώνα, καΐ ό άρτος δε 
Όν βγω δώσω, η σαρξ μου ΐστίν, 
ήν βγω δώσω ύπβρ της τοΰ κόσ- 
μου ζωής. 

52 Εμαγοντο ουν προς αλλή- 
λους οί Ιουδαίοι λβγοντβς. Πώς 
δύναται ούτος ήμΐν δοΰναι την 
σάρκα φαγβΐν ; 

53 ΕΙπβν ούν αΰτοΐς ό ^Ιη- 



REVISED VERSION. 

ed, and said to them, Murmur 
not, "One with another. 

44 No one can come to me, 
except the Father who sent me, 
draw him ; and I will raise him 
up at the last day. 

45 It hath been written in the 
Prophets, And they shall all 
be taught of God. Every one, 
"therefore, that heareth and 
learneth of the Father, cometh 
to me. 

46 Not that any one hath seen 
the Father, except he that is of 
God : HE hath seen the Father. 

47 Verily, verily, I say to you, 
He that believeth on me hath 
''eternal life. 

48 I am the bread of life. 

49 Your fathers ate the manna 
in the wilderness, and died. 



50 Tills is the bread that com- 
eth down from heaven, so that 
any one may eat of it, and not 
die. 

51 I am the living bread that 
came down from heaven : if any 
one eat of this bread, he shall 
live for ever ; 'yea, and the bread 
which I will give is my flesh, 
'which I will give, for the life 
of the world. 



52 The Jews, therefore, were 
striving, ^one with another, say- 
ing, how can he give us [his] 
flesh to eat ? 

53 Jesus, therefore, said to 



' E. [one to another). — A similar construction of αλλήλων, 
with other prepositions, is common in the E. V. (Marie 4 : 41 ; 
9 : 50. Luke 2 : 15 ; 6 : 11 ; 8 : 25 ; 24 : 17, 32. Ch. 4 : 33 ; 
5 : 44; 13 : 22, 35. Acts 2 : 7 ; 15 : 39. Rom. 1 : 27 ; 12 :10, 
16 ; 15 : 5. 1 Cor. 12 : 25. Eph. 4 : 32. Col. 3 : 9. 1 Thess. 
3 : 12. James 5 : 9, 16. 1 John 1 : 7). 

^ See ch. 3 : 16, N. e. 



' I have endeavored to render both y.ai and δε. — See N. u, 
ch. 1 : 20. Meyer [audi). 

f The words r,v εγω δώσω, which are wanting in some 
ancient Manuscripts and Versions, are rejected by Lach- 
mann and Tischendorf. — Penn, Wiclif, Rhemish, Vulgate, Ken- 
rick. — I would append this note : Some copies omit, which I will 
give. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VI. 



47 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

Verily, verily, I say unto you, 
Except ye eat the flesli of the 
Son of man, and drink his blood, 
ye have no life in you. 



54 Whoso eateth my flesh, 
and drinketh my blood, hath 
eternal life ; and I will raise 
him up at the last day. 

55 For my flesh is meat in- 
deed, and my blood is drink in- 
deed. 

5G He that eateth my flesh, 
and drinketh my blood, dwelleth 
in me, and I in him. 

57 As the living Father hath 
sent me, and I live by the Fa- 



GREEK TEXT. 

σοΰί, Άμην άμην λβγω υμΐν, 
eav μη φαγητ€ την σάρκα τοΰ 
υ'ίοΰ τοΰ ανθρώττου, και ττίητί 
αύτοΰ το αίμα, ουκ «χβτε ζωην kv 
iavTOLf. 

54 ό τρώγων μου την σάρκα, 
καΐ πίνων μου το αίμα, €χ€ί ζωην 
αιώνων, καΐ βγω αναστήσω αυτόν 
TTj βσχαττ) ημβρα. 

55 ή γαρ σάρζ μου αληθώς 
βστί βρώσΐί, κα\ το α'ιμα μου 
αληθώς βστι ττοσις. 

56 ό τρώγων μου την σάρκα, 
καΐ -πίνων μου το αίμα, ev €μο\ 
μΐνβι, κάγω ev αύτω. 

57 καθώς άπίστίίλί μβ ο ζών 
πατήρ, κάγω ζώ δια τον πατ€ρα• 



REVISED VERSION. 

them. Verily, verily, I eay to 
you, 'if ye do not eat the flesh 
of the Son of man, and drink his 
blood, ye have no life in ^your- 
selves. 



54 He that eateth my flesh, 
and drinketh my blood, hath 
eternal life, and I will raise him 
up at the last daJ^ 

55 For my flesh is '■food 'in- 
deed, and my blood is drink 'in- 
deed. 

56 He that eateth my flesh, 
and drinketh my blood, 'abideth 
in ME, and I in him. 

57 As the living Father sent 
me, and I live 'because of the 



^ This pronoun is reflexive. — See N. b, eh. 5 : 42. 

" See ch. 4 : 32, N. f. 

' Lachm. and Tisch., with MSS., (BCKLT) have αληβ-η;, in- 
stead of πλη9ως. — " The difl'erence in meaning," says Camp., 
''is not material, and if it wi^re, there is not sufBcient author- 
ity in this place for an alteration." 

) See N. n, ch. 1 : 38. 

' In this passage, and several others, Stn, with the accus., is 
by many interpreters supposed to be followed by the instru- 
mental cause, or means. Since, however, this preposition, 
when followed by this case, is, to say the least, almost always 
=for, because of, for the sake of, by reasoii of or on account 
of, (except a peculiar signification found only among the poets, 
for which see the Lexicons,) there can be no doubt that this 
is its radical meaning, in such connection. If this be so, (and 
no one, I believe, denies it.) we are bound to understand it in 
this sense, whenever the connection will admit of this render- 
ing. This rule is the more imperati\e in the case before us, 
since the instrumental cause is, ordinarily, the genitive after 
Sin. In determining the question, whether Sia should be 
rendered by, or through, before an accus., we are not to 
inquire whether it is sometimes necessary so to render it, but 
whether it is necessary in the case in hand ; for an occasional 
exception, resulting from necessity, can afford no warrant for a 
similar exception, where no such necessity exists. Let us now 
apply these principles to the case before us. The translation 
of this verse, as I have given it, conveys this idea : That, as the 
Father is the object for whose sake, mainly, Jesus lives, so 
Jesus is the object for whose sake, mainly, the believer lives. 
This idea is agrceuble to the analogy of faith, and is, besides, 



consistent with the context ; for I consider it a mere gratuitous 
assertion of Bio. that ό ζων = ό ζωοποιών. The idea con- 
veyed by the E. Λ''. is, perhaps, as true as this ; but it does not 
follow from this, that it is the truth of the text. I will now 
simply give my view of the other passages, in the N. T., where 
iVirt is treated in the E. V. as in this place. — JIatt. 15 : 3, Sia 
την na^aSoaiv νμων, '' through your tradition." I understand 
the true meaning to be, "_/b;• the sake of your tradition." This 
meaning is more forcible than the other. — Ch. 15 : 3. below, 
" Now ye are clean, Sta τον λόγοι• hv Xtknhjy.n ίμιν, through the 
word which I have spoken unto you." I would translate this, 
because of the word, &c. ; and, while I confess that this pas- 
sage is more difficult of interpretation, either way, than those 
already mentioned, yet the meaning is probably this: ''Now ye 
are clean, because, or as a consequence of the doctrine, or 
ti-uth, which I have just spoken to you, as to the vine, the 
branches, and the Imsbandman." I do not feel positive that 
this is the true meaning of this verse ; but I believe it will 
very well bear this interpretation. — Rom. 8 : 11, 8ια...ηντου 
TT.vtvfia, '' by (marg. because of) his Spirit, &c. I would ren- 
der this clause thus, "for the sake of his Spirit that dwelleth 
in you." — Eph. 4 : 18, Sia την αγνοιαν . . . Sta την πωριοοιι•, 
'• through the ignorance...because of the blindness, &c. The 
former of these expressions evidently depends upon εαχο- 
τισιηνοι—'' Having been darkened. ..6eca!iie of the ignorance, 
&c. ;" while the latter depends upon οντεί ατιηλλοτ. — " having 
been alienated.. .6eca!<se of the hardness, &c." There is no 
variety that I can see in the use of Sin in these two clauses. — 
Ileb. 6 : 7, Si οίς, '■ by (marg. for,) whom." This undoubt- 
edly means, for whose sake. &c. — Rev. 12 : 11, Sta το niaa... 
Sia τον λαγον, " by the blood.. .by the word," &c. I would 
render this passage thus : '■ And they themselves overcame 



4S 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VI. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

ther : so he that eatetli me, even 
he shall live by me. 

58 This is that bread which 
came down from heaven : not 
as your fathers did eat manna, 
and are dead : he that eateth of 
this bi'ead shall live for ever. 



59 These things said he in 
the synagogue, as he taught in 
Capernaum. 

60 Many therefore of his dis- 
ciples, when they had heard this, 
said. This is an hard saying; 
who can hear it ? 

61 AVhen Jesus knew in him- 
eelf that his disciples murmured 
at it, he said unto them, Doth 
this offend you? 

62 What and if ye shall see 
the Son of man ascend up where 
he was before ? 

6-3 It is the Spirit that quick- 
eneth ; the flesh profiteth noth- 



GREEK TEXT. 



ζησί- 



και ο τρώγων μί, KaKeivos 
ταί δι €μ€. 

58 ούτοί Ιστιν ό apros ο βκ 
τον Έύρανοΰ καταβα^• ου καθώς 
(φαγον οΐ TraTepes νμων το μάννα, 
κα\ άπβθανον ό τρώγων τούτον 
τον αρτον, ζησίται ei? τον αιώνα. 

59 Ταύτα eiirev iv συναγωγγ} 
διδάσκων iv Καπερναούμ. 

60 ΠολλοΧ ούν άκουσαντζζ ίκ 
των μαθητών αυτοΰ βίττον, Σκλη- 
ροί ίστιν ovTOs ο λογοί' tis δύ- 
ναται αύτοΰ άκονβιν ; 

61 Έιδω9 δβ ό Ίησουί Ιν 
βαντώ, ΟΤΙ γογγυ(^ουσι irepX τού- 
του οϊ μαθηταΐ αύτοΰ, elirev αυ- 
τοΐί, Τοΰτο νμάί σκανδαλιζΐΐ ; 



62 tav ούν 



θεωρη 



τ€ τον νιον 



του άνθρωτΓου άναβαίνοντα οττου 
ην το ττροτίρον ; 

63 το ττνΐΰμα ίστι το ζωοττοι- 
οΰν, ή σαρζ ούκ ώφξλβΐ οϋδίν 



REVISED ΛΈRSION. 

Father ; so he that eateth me, 
even he shall live 'because of me. 

5S This is the bread that came 
down from heaven. 'Not as your 
fathers ate the manna, and died ; 
he that eateth this bread shall 
live for ever. 

59 These things he said, "'teach- 
ing in a synagogue, in Caper- 
naum. 

60 Many, therefore, of his dis- 
ciples, hearing, said, This -saying 
is hard : who can hear it ? 



61 «But Jesus, knowing in 
himself, that his disciples were 
murmuring at Pthis, said to them, 
Doth this 'oflend you ? 

62 What 'if then, ye see the 
Son of man going up, where he 
was before ? 

63 "The Spirit is -what quick- 
eneth : the flesh profiteth nothing. 



him, for the sake of the blood of the Lamb, and for the sake of 
the word (doctrhie, or promise) of their testimony," etc., i. e., 
because that blood and that word were dear to God, through 
whom they conquered. — Rev. 13 : 13, Sin τα οημίΐα, " by the 
means of those miracles, etc. I would translate this, thus : 
because, i. e., in consequence of the signs, etc. These signs were 
not wrought for the special purpose of deceiving the people, but 
they indirectly occasioned or promoted the deception attempted 
by other means. — See, on the last two passages, the Am. Bible 
Union's Revis. of Rev. in loco. 

1 This verse consists of three clauses. The first : " This is 
the bread that came down from heaven," is a complete sentence 
of itself. The second : " Not as your fathers ate the manna, and 
died," is dependent on the third : " He that eateth this bread 
shall live for ever." In the collocation of these two clauses, there 
is an inversion, such as is freqiiently met with, for the sake of 
emphasis : and, if I mistake not, the whole difficulty that com- 
mentators have found in the passage has arisen from their not 
paying attention to this fact. 

" The Orig. (as also the Vulg. and some other Latin Verss.) 
is susceptible of either this rendering, or that of the E. V. — 
Fr. G., Nary, Kenr., De W., Van Ess. It seems most probable, 
that, as these things were uttered in a synagogue, he was, at the 



time, teaching in that synagogue. No particular synagogue is 
pointed out, hence the art. is omitted. 

" W. [this u-ord is hard) ; Vulg. [darns est hie sermo) ; Beng. 
[hart 1st dieser Spruch) ; F. S. [elle est dure, cette parole). ^Kem., 
R., Pr. M. — This is undoubtedly the proper construction of the 
sentence. 

° I make it a rule always to translate δε, when it is at all 
practicable. — See Gen. Obs. 6. 

ρ Newc, Vulg., R., "Wesl., Kenr., Schott, Erasmus, Bcza, 
Trem. — W. [this thing). 

1 Though σκηΐ'δπλιζειν is ft-equcntly mistranslated, to offend, 
yet, I think, this is its proper signification here. — Rob. 

' " The Apodosis," says Bloomfield, " is omitted, from the strong 
emotion of the speaker, nor is this aposiopesis uncommon in our 
language." Bloomfield would supply, tj ερειτε ; Meyer, far 
better, τούτο v^as ov πολλω μάλλον σκανδαλίσει; 

' I have made this change, in order to attain the greatest 
practicable precision in rendering the original words. To πνεύ- 
μα is evidently the subj., and το ζωοποιονν the predicate. — See, 
on what, ch. 3 : 6, N. k. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VI. 



4!» 



KING JAMES VERSIOX. 

ing : the words that I speak 
unto you, they are spirit, and 
tlicy are life. 

64 But there are some of j'ou 
that believe not. For Jesus knew 
from the beginning who they 
were that believed not, and who 
should betray him. 

65 And he said. Therefore said 
I unto you, that no man can 
come unto me, except it were 
given unto him of my Father. 

66 From that time many of 
his disciples went back, and 
walked no more with him. 



67 Then said Jesus unto the 
twelve. Will ye also go away V 

68 Then Simon Peter answer- 
ed hira, Lord, to whom shall we 
go "? thou hast the words of 
eternal life. 

69 And we believe, and are 
sure that thou art that Christ, 
the Sou of the living God. 

70 Jesus answered them, Have 
not I chosen you twelve, and one 
of you is a devil? 



71 He spake of Judas Iscai-iot 
the son of Simon : for he it was 
that should betray him, being 
one of the Twelve. 



GREEK TEXT. 

τα ρήματα a βγω λαλώ υμίν. 
πΐ'βνμά βστι /cat ζωη Ιστίν. 

64 άλλ' eia\v i^ υμών riW? 
oi ου 7Γίστ€υουσιν. ' HiSei γαρ 
€^ άργΎ)ί ο Ίησοΰς, nVe? (Ισίν 
οι μη 7Γίστ€νοντ(9, καΐ tls ίστιν 
ό τταρα^ώσων αϋτον. 

65 Και eAeye, Δια τοντο ΐϊ- 
ρηκα υμίν, οτι ούδΐΐί δύναται 
ίλθΐϊν ττρόί μ€, (αν μη y δεδο- 
μίνον αντω e'/c τον ττατροί μου. 

66 'J^K τούτου 7γο?^οι απήλ- 
θαν των μαθητών αύτοΰ els τα 
οπίσω, και ούκίτι μβτ αυτοΰ πβ- 
ρκπατουν. 

67 ciVev ονν ό Ίησοΰί τοΐί 
δώδεκα, 3Ιη καΐ ύμ€Ϊί θβλΐΤί 
ύπαγ€ΐν ; 

68 Άπβκρίθη ονν αντω Σιμών 
IleTpof, Kvpie, προί τίνα άττε- 
λβνσόμβθα ; ρήματα ζωής αΐωνίον 

69 και ημβΐί π€πιστ€υκαμ(ν, 
καΐ (γνωκαμΐν οτι συ e'l ο Χρι- 
στοί ό νϊοί τον θβον τον ζώντος. 

70 Άπεκρίθη αντοΐς ό Ιησούς, 
Ονκ βγω υμάς τονς δώδεκα ε'^ε- 
λβζαμην, κα\ εζ υμών εί? διάβο- 
λος εστίν ; 

71 "Ελεγε δε τον Ίονδαν Σί- 
μωνος Ίσκαριώτην ούτος γαρ 
ημελλεν αύτον παραδιδοναι, εις 
ών εκ τών δώδεκα. 



REVISED VERSION. 

The words which I 'speak to you 
are spirit, and are life. 

G4 But there are some of you 
who believe not. For Jesus 
knew from the beginning who 
tliose were that believed not, 
and who he was that "was about 
to betray him. 

65 And he said, Because of 
this have I said to you, That no 
one can come to me, nf it have 
not been given him from my 
Father. 

6G From this [time] many of 
his disciples went away "back- 
ward, and were walking no more 
with him. 

67 Jesus, therefore, said to the 
Twelve, Do ye also »wish to go 
away '? 

68 Simon Peter, ^therefore, 
answered him. Lord, to whom 
shall we go? Thou hast the 
words of eternal life. 

69 And AVE have believed, 
and known, that thou art the 
Christ, the Son of 'the living 
God. 

70 Jesus answered them, Did 
not I choose you, the Twelve, 
and one of you is a devil "? 



71 "Now he spoke of Judas 
Iscariot, [son] of Simon ; for he 
nvas about to betray him, being 
one of the Twelve. 



' Scholtz, Lachm., Tisch., Theile, and Kcapp, with several 
ancient MSS., (BCDKLT) have λελαλτ,κα, for λαλώ. Also 
several ancient Verss. and Fathers. Bio. condemns this read- 
ing, but, I think, on insufficient grounds. I would adopt this 
reading, and translate, have spoken to you. — AU., Goss., Kist., 
Beng., Wesl., Penn, Kenr., Schott. 

' Ό παοαδωσοη'ι is ^ 6s έμελλε τΐαζαδίΒοναί, 

" Went away is a very usual rendering of απηλ&εν. Hack- 
ward is the most literal translation of εκ τα οηιαω, that I cac 
find.— See ch. 4 : 3, N. d. 



' See N. y, ch. 1 : 43. 

y All the editors, except Knapp and Hahn., reject this ow. 
I would leave out therefore. 

' The editors very generally reject τον ζώντος, while Griesb., 
Lachm., and Tisch., with several ancient MSS. and Yerss., have 
ό ayioi του Θεού. Blo. sustains the Text. Rec. Upon the 
whole, I would recommend that τον ζωντοι be rejected, and 
that this note appear in the margin : According to some copies 
of the living God. 

' See N. e, ch. 4 : 47. 



50 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VH. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 
CHAP. VII. 

After these things Jesus 
walked in Galilee : for he would 
not walk in Jewry, because the 
Jews sought to kill him. 



2 Now the Jews' feast of tab- 
ernacles was at hand. 

3 His brethren therefore said 
unto him, Depart hence, and go 
into Judea, that thy disciples 
also may see the works that 
thou doest. 

4 For there is no man that 
doeth any thing in secret, and 
he himself seeketh to be known 
openly. If thou do these things, 
shew thyself to the world. 

5 (For neither did his brethren 
believe in him.) 

6 Then Jesus said unto them, 
My time is not yet come : but 
your time is always ready. 



GREEK TEXT. 
CHAP. VII. 

ΚΑΙ ΤΓβρίΕττάτβί 6 Ίησονς 
μ.€τα ταντα eV rrj Γαλίλαία• ου 
γαρ -qOeXev eV rfj Ιουδαία Trepi- 
Trareiv, οτι Ιζητουν αυτόν οι 
Ιουδαίοι άτΓΟκτβΐναι. 

2 'ffu δβ ϊγγυί η ίορτη των 
Ιουδαίων η σκηνοττηγια. 

3 eliTov οϋν irpos αυτόν οΐ 
άδξλφοί αύτοΰ, Μεταβηθί ivTeD- 
θβν, καΐ υτταγί et? την Ίουδαίαν, 
Ίνα κα\ οΐ μαθηται σου θΐωρησωσι 
τα ίργα σον α ττοίβΐί• 

4 ονδβΐ? γαρ iv κρύπτω τι 
TTOiei, KCU ζητεί αύτοί iv τταρρησία 
elvai. ύ ταύτα Troiels, φανέρωσαν 
σεαυτον τω κοσμώ. 

5 Ούδβ γαρ οί αδελφοί αυτοί) 
βττίστβυον eh αύτον. 

6 Λέγει ούν αϋτοίς ο Ιησούς, 
Ό καιροί 6 εμοί ούττω τταρεστιν 
ό δε καιροί 6 υμέτερος τταντοτε 
εστίν έτοιμος. 



REVISED VERSION. 



CHAP. VII. 

°And after these things Jesus 
was walking in Galilee : for he 
•did not wish to walk in ''Judea, 
because the Jews were seeking 
to kill him. 



2 Now the Feast of the Jews 
was "^near, 'the Feast of Taber- 
nacles. 

3 His ''brothers, therefore, said 
to him. Depart hence, and go 
into Judea, so that thy disciples 
also may see 'thy works which 
thou doest. 

4 For no one doeth any thing 
in secret, and he, himself, seek- 
eth to be 'in public. If thou 
doest these things, ^manifest thy- 
self to the world. 

5 For ""not even his ''brothers 
were believing on him. 

G Jesus, therefore, saith to 
them, My time is not yet 'pre- 
sent : but your time is always 
ready. 



» Although και is wanting in one or two ancient MSS., and 
in the English Verss. generally, most editors retain it. — See 
N. y, ch. 1 : 43. 

'' E. v., everywhere, except here, and in Luke 23 : 5. 

' I have rendered each word literally. — Newc, Dodd, Germ., 
De W. — For the rendering, near, see ch. 2 : 13, N. e. 

^ See N. a, ch. 2 : 12. — Alf. has shown, I think conclusively, 
(Note on Matt. 13 : 55, which see, for a complete analysis of 
this controversy,) that, from the testimony of Scripture alone, 
those called, oi αδελψοι τον κνριον, were reall}' the children of 
his mother, Mary ; younger, of course, than himself I deem 
it unnecessary to transcribe even the substance of his argu- 
ment. SuflSce it to say, that the passage under consideration 
is one of the strongest evidences, that these persons were not 
the sons of Alpheus, as has, from tradition, been generally 
supposed, both in ancient and modern times. (Comp. ch. 2:12, 
and Acts 1 : 14.) Three, at least, of those persons (Matthew, 
James, and .Judas, see Alf., as above,) were disciples of our 
Lord, and believed on him. (See ch. 2 : 11, and 6 : 69.) But 
here, these persons, oi aS. avtov, without any exception being 
made, are said not to believe on him. It is sadly interesting 
to notice the efforts sometimes made by men, otherwise can- 



did, in defending a darling tradition against the overwhelming 
testimony of Scripture. See, for example, Penn's attempt 
(Supplem. Annot. in loco,) to explain away the phrase, επι- 
στενον eig αυτόν, one of the most vitally important of all the 
expressions used in the Gospel. For my o^vn part, I have not 
the slightest regard for the monkis/i traditions that have 
flooded the church, in relation to the domestic intercourse 
between Joseph and Jlary, subsequent to the birth of our 
Savior. Perhaps, all that the Scriptures teach on this subject, 
may be gathered from Matt. 1 : 25 ; and this, as far as it 
goes, is directly opposed to these traditions. 

• Most editors retain aov.—W., T., C, G., R., Vulg., Berl. 
Bib., De W., All., Beng., Sharpe, Kenr. 

'' R. — In public is quite as literal as openly, and makes good 
sense without any supply. I would translate παούησιη, with- 
out the art., publicly, in order to distinguish it from φανερωι, 
openly. 

f See N. s, ch. 1 : 31. 

>• See N. d, ch. 1:3. 

' E. v., generally. — Beza, Erasm., Schott, (adest) ; Germ. 
(ist . . . hier) ; De W. (ist . . . da.)— This is, without doubt, 
the more precise rendering of παρεστι. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VII. 



51 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

7 Tlie world cannot hate you ; 
but me it liateth, because I tes- 
tii'y of it, that the works thereof 
are evih 

8 Go ye up unto this feast : 
I go not up yet unto this feast ; 
for my time is not yet full come. 



9 When he had said these 
words unto them, he abode still 
in Galilee. 

10 But when his brethren 
were gone up, then went he also 
up unto the feast, not openly, 
but as it were in secret. 

11 Then the Jews sought him 
at the feast, and said, \Vhere is 
he? 

12 And there was much mur- 
muring among the people con- 
cerning him : for some said, He 
is a good man : others said. Nay ; 
but he deceiveth the people. 



13 Howbeit, no man spake 
openly of him, for fear of the 
Jews. 

14 Now about the midst of 



GREEK TEXT. 

ov ovv 



7 ov Ovuarai ο κόσμος• μισ^ιν 
υμάς• e'/xe Se μισ€Ϊ, ότι 4γω μαρ- 
τυρώ Trepl αύτοΰ, Ότι τα epya 
αυτόν ΤΓονηρα βστιν. 

8 ύ/χεΓ? άναβητί ets" την ίορτην 
ταυτην ίγω ούττω αναβαίνω eiy 
την €ορτην ταυτην, οτι ο καιροί 
6 (μο9 οϋπω ττβττληρωται. 

9 Ταύτα δε βίττων αντοΐί, 
ίμίΐν€ν Ιν τβ Γαλιλαίο.. 

10 '/}? δε άνεβησαν οί αδελ- 
φοί αντον, τοτ€ καΊ αυτοζ άνΐβη 
eli την ΐορτην, ού φανβρώί, αλλ' 
ώ? iv κρντΓτω. 

11 01 ονν 'Ιουδαίοι Ιζητουν 
αντον Ιν τη ΐορτη, καΐ ί'λίγον, 
Που ίστιν Ικτίνος ; 

1 2 Καΐ γογγυσμοί ττολυ? Trepl 
αντον ήν iv τοΐί όχλοι?, οι μίν 
ίλίγον, Οτι άγαθοί ϊστιν άλλοι 
δε ΐ'λβγον, Οι!• άλλα ττλανα τον 
οχ^λον. 

13 OvSeli μβντοι παρρησία 
ζλαλίΐ Trepl αύτου, δια τον φοβον 
των Ιουδαίων. 

1 4 ' Ηδη δε τηί Ιορτηί με- 



REVISED VERSION. 

7 The world cannot hate you, 
but ME it hateth, because I tes- 
tify of it, that its works are evil. 



S Go YE up to 'this feast : I 
am not going up 'yet to this 
feast, because my time hath not 
yet fully come. 

9 'And, saying these things to 
them, he 'abode in Galilee. 

10 But when his ''brothers had 
gone up, then he also "'himself 
went up to the feast, not openly, 
but as in secret. 

11 The Jews, therefore, "kept 
seeking him "during the feast, 
and said. Where is he ? 

12 And there was much mur- 
muring concerning him among 
the ^multitudes : ""some said. He 
is good : others said, ''No; but he 
is deceiving the pmultitude. 

13 -Nevertheless, no one was 
speaking ''publicly of him, «be- 
cause of the fear of the Jews. 

14 "And now, 'about the mid- 



' Lachra., Tisch.. Hahn., and Theile, reject the first τηντην. — 
Griesb., Scholtz, Knapp, Tisch., and Tlieile, have ουχ for ονπω. 
Griesb., Knapp, Scholtz, and Tisch., reject Se, in verse 9. I 
would adopt all these readings, and leave out this, yet, and 
and. 

1 The meaning is not, that he continued abiding- in Galilee, 
(though this is exactly the meaning of he abode still,) but, 
that, at the time when he said this to them, he decided to 
remain in Galilee, while his brothers, probabh', decided to go 
up to the feast. The E. V. would be perfectly correct, if the 
Orig. verb were imperf,, instead of aorist. As it is, the simple 
aorist, abode, is preferable. It is needless to add, that abide 
is hero used, as frequently elsewhere, in the sense of stay, or 
remain. 

" Vulg. [ipse.) — AvTos is, in this connection, precisely = 
ipse. — See ch. 2 : 12, N. z. * 

" The prep., ev, is often used in reference to time = during. 
The .Jews did not seek him only at the beginning of the feast, 
(Dodd.) but continued seeking him (as is indicated by the 



imperf.) from the beginning of the feast, till he made his ap- 
pearance among them. The tense of the verb calls for the 
proposed change. — Fr. S.,-M. 

» I have in this, and frequent other instances, drawn upon 
the colloquial dialect. — See N. v, ch. C : 16. 

Ρ See N. g, ch. 6 : 5. 

1 There is nothing in the Orig. corresponding to for. 

' Newc, Camp., Nary, Keur. — Nay is obsolete. I would 
uniformly reject it. 

' E. v., ch. 12 : 42. — Howbeit is obsolete. I would always 
render μεντοι, nevertheless. 

<■ See ch. 4 : 39, N. t. 

" See N. o, ch. 6 : 61. 

' The E. V. does not convey the idea of the Orig. at all, to 
modern ears. About the middle of the feast, though b}' no 
means litei'al, is a better translation. The verb, μεσοειν, 
occurs nowhere else in the N. T. It means, according to 
Passow, " in der MiUe sein, halb sein " — that is, to be half out 
to be half advanced. 



53 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN, CHAP. VII. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

the feast, Jesus went up into the 
temple and taught. 

15 And the Jews marvelled, 
saying, How knoweth this man 
letters, having never learned ? 

16 Jesus answered them, and 
said. My doctrine is not mine, 
but his that sent me. 



17 If any man will do his 
will, he shall know of the doc- 
trine, whether it be of God, or 
whether I speak of myself. 

18 He that speaketh of him- 
self, seeketh his own glory : but 
he that seeketh his glory that 
sent him, the same is true, and 
no unrighteousness is in him. 

19 Did not Moses give you 
the law, and yet none of you 
keepeth the law? Why go ye 
about to kill me ? 

20 The people answered and 
said. Thou hast a devil : who 
goeth about to kill thee ? 

21 Jesus answered and said 



GEEEK TEXT. 

σονσης, άνίβη ό' Ίη(τονί eiy το 
lepov, και βδίδασ-κβ. 

15 και Ιθανμαζον οί Ίονδαιοί 
λίγοντίί, Πωί ovTos γράμματα 
olSe, μη μεμαθηκώί ; 

16 ΛτΓζκρίθη αντοϊί ο 'Ιη- 
σούς κα\ einev, Ή βμη διδαχή 
ουκ ίστίν ϊμη, άλλα του ττεμψαι^- 
t6s με. 

17 iau τις θίλη το θ βλήμα 
αυτόν TTOieiv, γνωσίται Trepl της 
διδα•)(^ης, ττοτερον €κ του θβοΰ 
(.στ IV, η ΐγω άττ ΐμαντοΰ λαλώ. 

18 ό άφ ίαυτοΰ λαλών, την 
δοςαν την ιδίαν ζητβΐ• 6 δβ ζητών 
την δοςαν τον ττβμψαντος αντον, 
OVTOS αληθής Ιστι, και αδικία 4ν 
αυτω ουκ ίστιν. 

19 οι; Μωσης δίδωκεν ύμΐν 
τον νομον, KCU ονδβις i^ υμών 
ΤΓΟίίΐ τον νομον ; τ'ι μ€ ζητβΐτβ 
άποκτΐΐναι ; 

20 ΑτΓίκρίθη Ό 6•χλος καΐ 
eiire, Δαιμόνων έ'χ^εις' τις σβ 
ζητεί άτΓοκτείναι ; 

21 Αττεκριθη ό Ιησονς καΐ 



REVISED VERSION. 

die of the feast, Jesus went up 
into the temple, and was teach- 
ing. 

1 5 And the Jews were "wonder- 
ing, saying, How doth «he know 
letters, 'not having learned ? 

16 Jesus "answered them, and 
said, My doctrine is not mine, 
but his that sent me. 



17 If any one ''be willing to 
do his will, he shall know «con- 
cerning the doctrine, whether it 
is of God, or I am speaking °from 
myself. 

IS He that speaketh "from 
himself seeketh his own glory : 
but he that seeketh the glory of 
him that sent him, *he is true, 
and 'there is no unrighteousness 
in him. 

19 Hath not Moses given you 
the law, and no one of you 
'is doing the law? Why ■'are ye 
seeking to kill me ? 

20 The nnultitude answered, 
fand said. Thou hast a ^demon : 
who "^s seeking to kill thee ? 

21 Jesus answered, and said to 
them, I did one work, and "be- 



" See ch. 3 : 7, N. m. 

' See ch. 1 : 2, N. c. 

' W., R., Nary. — Μη is, simply, not. —Έ. Y., generally. 

• Most editors insert ow here. I would adopt this leading, 
and insert therefore. 

" See eh. 1 : 43, N. y.— The change of the prep, of, in this 
and the following verse, is made for the purpose of avoiding 
amhiguity. 

' This form of expression is, I think, a little more elegant 
than the E.V., and almost, if not quite, as literal. 

' E. v., ch. 3 : 21. 1 John 1 : ; 2 : 29 : 3 : 7, 19, and else- 
where, often. 

^ E. v., T. 25, helow. — Newc, Sharpe, Wesl., Nary, Penn. 
Kenr. 

' See ch. 6 : 5, N. g. 

"■ Laohm. and Tisch. omit xai είπε, on the authority of some 
ancient MSS. I would, however, retain these words, as they 
are most probably genuine. 



^ It is to be regretted, that King James' Revisors almost 
uniformly translated ίιαβολο?, δηιμονιον, and 8ηιμων, by the 
same word, devil, which properly answers to the first-named 
word. For the sake of distinction, I would always render 
διάβολοι, devil, δαιμονιον and δαίμων, which I take to be 
nearly, if not quite, synonymous, demon. 

^ See Gen. Obs. 6. — Interpreters arc divided, as to whether 
δια TovTo belongs to what precedes, or to what foUoAvs. — 
Theoph., Lucke, Tholuck, Olsh., De W., B. Crus., Maier, 
Beza, Casaub., Homberg, Maldonat., Wolf, Kypke, Bio., and 
others, (see Meyer, in loco,) refer these words to what pre- 
cedes. So also Newc, Sharpe, Camp., Dodd., Wesl., Penn, 
Van Ess. The other view is held by Chrys., Nonnus, Eutli., 
Zig., Germ., Aret., Grot., Corn, a Lap., Jansen, Beng., Alf., 
Meyer, and others, (see Meyer, !?i loco.) See Bloomfleld's note, 
171 loco. Upon the whole, I have concluded to adopt the former 
view, which is, I think, encumbered with fewer diiBculties 
than the other. — For wondering, see ch. 3 : 7, N. m. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VII. 



53 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

unto them, I have done one 
work, and ye all marvel. 

22 Moses therefore gave unto 
you circumcision, (not because 
it is of Moses, but of the fa- 
thers ;) and ye on the sabbath- 
day circumcise a man. 

23 If a man on the sabljath- 
day receive circumcision, that 
the law of Moses should not be 
broken ; are ye angry at me, be- 
cause I have made a man every 
whit whole on the sabbath-day ? 

24 Judge not according to the 
appearance, but judge righteous 
judgment. 

25 Then said some of them of 
Jerusalem, Is not this he wliom 
they seek to kill ? 

26 But lo, he spcaketh boldly, 
and they saj' nothing unto him. 
Do the rulers know indeed that 
this is the very Christ ? 

27 Howbeit, we know this 
man, whence he is : but when 
Christ cometh, no man knoweth 
whence he is. 

28 Then cried Jesus in the 
temple, as he taught, saying, Ye 
both know me, and ye know 
whence I am : and I am not 
come of myself, but he that sent 
me is true, whom ye know not. 



GREEK TEXT. 

eLTTeu αυτοίί, Εν tpyov ίττοίησα, 
και τταντίί θαυμαί^ΐτε. 

22 δια τούτο Μωσης δίδωκεν 
ύμΐν την περίτομην, οϋχ otl (κ 
τον Μωσίωί βστιν, αλλ βκ των 
ττατίρων και Ιν σαββατω πβρι- 
τβμνετε άνθρωττον. 

23 el 7Γ€ριτομην λαμβάνει άν- 
θρωποι iv σαββατω, ίνα μη λυθτ] 
6 νομός Μωσεωζ, Ιμο\ -χολατε 
ότι Όλον άνθρωττον νγίί) ίττοίησα 
iv σαββατω ; 

24 μη KpLveTe κατ όψιν, άλλα 
την δικαίαν κρίσιν κρίνατε. 

25 ' Ελβγον ούν TLves e/c των 
Ιεροσολνμιτών, Ούχ^ ούτος (.στιν 
Όν ζητοΰσιν άττοκτύναί ; 

26 και ίδβ παρρησία λαλεί, 
και ονδίν αΰτω λίγουσι. μηττοτε 
αληθώς έγνωσαν οϊ άρχοντες, otl 
ούτος εστίν αληθώς ο Χρίστος ; 

27 άλλα τούτον ο'ίδαμεν ττοθεν 
εστίν ό δε Χρίστος Όταν ερχη- 
ται, ούδεΙς γινώσκει ττοθεν εστίν. 

28 "Έκραζεν ονν εν τω Ίερω 
διδάσκων ό Ίησονς και λέγων. 
Κάμε υϊδατε, καΐ ο'ίδατε ττοθεν 
ειμί• καΐ άττ εμαυτοΰ ουκ εληλυ- 
θα, αλλ' εστίν αληθινός ό ττεμψας 
με, ον νμεΐς ουκ οϊδατε• 



REVISED VERSION. 

cause of this, ye are all •'won- 
dering. 

22 Moses hath given you cir- 
cumcision, (not 'that it is of Mo- 
ses, but of the fathers,) and on 
the Sabbath ye circumcise a 
man. 



23 If a man receive circum- 
cision on the Sabbath, so that the 
law of Moses may not be broken, 
are ye angry at me, because I 
made a man 'all whole on the Sab- 
bath? 

24 Judge not according to 
appearance, but judge righteous 
judgment. 

25 Some, therefore, of the 
''Jerusalemites said. Is not this 
he whom they are seeking to 
kill V 

26 'And, "behold, he is "talk- 
ing "publicly, and they are say- 
ino; nothinc; to him. Did the 
rulers know indeed, that this is 
pindeed the Christ? 

27 iBut we know "HIM, whence 
he is : but when the Christ com- 
eth, no one knoweth whence 
he is. 

28 Jesus, therefore, cried, 
teaciiing in the temple, and say- 
ing, Ye both know me, and ye 
know whence I am : and I am 
not come of myself, but he that 
sent me is true, whom ye know 
not. 



' The authorities are divided iu the rendering of ότι. Τ., 
C, G., Kenr., and a few others, with the E. V., render it 
because; while tlie great majority render it thai, as I have 
done. — See E. V., ch. C : 4(j. In ch. 4 : 35, I think the sense 
requires that on be translated in the same way, though there 
are by no means so many authorities for that change as for 
this. 

> Every whit is obsolete. Several Verss. have altogether. 
I consider all equally good English, and more exactly literal 
than either. The meaning is, " I have healed the wlwle man, 
while circumcision aficcts but a part of the body." — In ch. 
9 • 34, the idiom requires that oAos be rendered altogether. 

' Rob. — This occurs only here, and in Mark 1 : 5, iu both 



cases in the plural. I have translated it, according to analogy, 
(See Bethlehemite, Ephrathite, Ephraimite, and a host of 
others,) because I prefer, whenever it is practicable, to trans- 
late every word by a single term. 

' It is rarely that x«t is rendered adversatively, in the E. Λ^. 
There is certainly no necessity for it in this case. 

" E. V. generally. — I would so translate tSe, uniformly. 

° E. V. very frequently.— See ch. 4 : 26, N. y. 

° See N. f, V. 4, above. 

ρ Almost all the editors reject the second αληθ-ως, of this 
verse. I would, therefore, leave out this indeed. 

1 Howbeit is obsolete.— See N. o, ch. C : 01.— For him, see 
ch. 1 : 2, N. c. 



54 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VII. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

29 But I know him ; for I am 
from lihn, and be liatli sent me. 



30 Then they sought to take 
him : but no man laid hands on 
him, because his hour was not 
yet come. 

31 And many of the people 
believed on him, and said. When 
Christ Cometh, will he do more 
miracles than these which this 
man hath done ? 

32 The Pharisees heard that 
the people murmured such things 
concerning him : and the Phari- 
sees and the chief priests sent 
officers to take him. 

33 Then said Jesus unto them, 
Yet a little while am I with you, 
and then I go unto him that sent 
me. 

34 Ye shall seek me, and shall 
not find me: and where I am, 
tldlher ye cannot come. 

35 Then said the Jews among 
themselves. Whither will he go, 
that we shall not find him ? will 



GREEK TEXT. 



29 €γω 8c oiSa αύτον, otl 
■καρ αυτού (ΐμι, κακειίΌί μ€ αττε- 
aretXev. 

30 Έζητουν ούν αύτον ττίά- 
σαί• καΐ ουδβί^ €ΤΓ6βαλ€ν eir 
αύτον την χ^ΐρα, οτί ονπω βλη- 
λυθΐΐ η ωρα αυτού. 

31 Πολλοί δε e/c του όχλου 
ίττίστβυσαν ety αυτόν, καΐ βλβγον, 

Otl ο Χριστοί όταν (λθη, μητι 
ττλβίονα σημαία τούτων ττοιησ^ί 
ών ούτος €ΐτοίησβν ; 

32 Ηκουσαν οϊ ΦαρισαΙοι τού 
όγλου γογγνζοντοί ττβρί αυτού 
ταύτα• καΐ άττβστβίλαν οί Φαρι- 
σαΐοι και οί άρχ^ίΐρβΐί ύττηρίτας, 
Ίνα ττιασωσιν αύτον. 

33 elirev ούν αυτοίς ο Ιησούί, 
Έτι μικρόν γρονον μεθ υμών 

(Ιμι, καΐ υτταγω προ9 τον πίμ- 
ψαντα μ€. 

34 ζητησετί μβ, καΐ ούχ^ βύ- 
ρησ€Τ€• κα\ Όπου βίμι €γω, νμΐϊί 
ου δύνασθε ελθεΐν. 

35 ΈΙπον ούν οι Ιουδαίοι 
ττροί βαυτουΐ, Πού ούτοί μέλλει 
ΤΓορευεσθαι, Ότι ήμεΐί ουχ^ εύρη- 



REVISED VERSION. 

29 'But I know him, 'because 
I am from him, and he sent me. 



30 They kept seeking, there- 
fore, to take him ; 'and no one 
laid hands upon him, because his 
hour had not yet come. 

31 "But many of the 'multi- 
tude believed on him, and said, 
When the Christ cometh, will 
he do more '^signs than ^these 
which ^HE did? 

32 The Pharisees heard the 
"multitude murmuring ""these 
things concerning him ; and the 
Pharisees and the chief priests 
sent officers, ''that they might 
take him. 

33 Jesus, therefore, said 'to 
them. Yet a little «time am I 
with you, and I am going to him 
that sent me. 

34 Ye will seek me, and will 
not find 7ne, and where I am, ye 
cannot come. 

35 The Jews, therefore, said 
among themselves. Whither is 
^HE ''about to go, that we shall 



' All modern editors reject δε. I would, therefore, leave 
out but. 

' See oh. 1 : 15, n. i. 

' See N. 1, v. 20, above. 

" Newc, Vulg., Nary, R., Penn, Kenr.— I think Ss is used 
here in a disjunctive sense. 

" See N. g, ch. : 5. 

- See ch. 2 : 11, N. x. 

' Lachm. and Tisch. omit τούτων, on the authority of several 
ancient MSS. and Versions. {Steph. γ. η. Cant.. Go., Mont., N. 1, 
Co/6. 8, Gal, L., Comp., Vulg.. Aethiop.^Vat. 1209. Urb. 2. 
Borg. 1.) See Mill and Birch. — Besides these respectable ex- 
ternal evidences, there is, I think, strong internal evidence that 
this word is spurious. The reader will readily perceive that 
the translation above given is not entirely satisfactory, for the 
reason that these sounds harshly in connection with a historical 
tense ; yet this translation is perfectly literal. Nor is it easy 
to get rid of this difficulty ; for there is no sufficient authority 
for translating εηοιηααν by the pres. or the perf., nor for trans- 



lating τοντων, in this connection, by those. I would, therefore, 
reject τοντων, and explain the clause thus : The interrogator 
supposes himself to be carried forward to the time of the com- 
ing of the true Messiah, and asks the question, " Shall we, at 
that time, be able to say of him, (the true Messiah,) that he 
doeth more signs than what he, (this Jesus of Nazareth,) did, 
when he was among us ? " Accordingly, I would leave out 
these, and translate ών what, thus : will he do more signs than 
what HE did ? — with this note in the margin : According to 
some copies, than these which he did. 

" E. V. very generally. — Sharpe, W., R., Nary, Penn, Kenr. 
— I see no necessity for violating uniformity, in this case. 

' See N. k, ch. 1 : 7. 

' The editors, generally, leave out avTocs, of the Text. Rec. 
I would, therefore, leave out to them. 

' Wesl., Vulg., W., R.— This is the literal translation of 
χζονον. 

" See ch. 4 : 47, N. e. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VII. 



55 



KING JAMES VERSIOX. 

he go unto the dispersed aniong 
the Geutiles, aud teach the Gen- 
tiles ? 



36 Wliat manner of saying is 
tliis that he said, Ye shall seek 
nie, and sliall not find ??ie; aud 
Λ^^ιεί'ο I am, thither ye cannot 
come ? 

37 In the last day, that great 
day of the feast, Jesus stood and 
cried, saying. If any man thirst, 
let him come unto me, and drink. 



38 He that believeth on me,• as 
the scripture hath said, out of his 
belly shall flow rivers of living 
water. 

39 (But this spake he of the 
Spirit, which they that believe 
on him should receive, for the 
Holy Ghost was not yet given, 
because that Jesus was not yet 
glorified.) 

40 Many of the people there- 



GREEK TEXT. 

σομίν avTou ; μη (Ιί την δια- 
στΓοραν των Ελλήνων μίλλβι 
πορΐύζσθαι, και δίδασκαν tovs 
Έλληνα? ; 

ύΰ τ'ίζ ΐστιν ούτοί ο λόγος ον 
eiVf, ΖητησίΤί μζ, κα\ ούχ (ύρη- 
σ€Τ€• /cat ΟτΓον (ϊμΐ (γω, υμίΐί 
ού δυνασθί ϊλθίΐν ; 

ο ι Ji,v be TYj (σχατη ημ^ρα 
TTj μβγαλη τηί ίορτης ύστηκΐΐ ό 
Ίησοΰί, καΐ eKpa^e λίγων, 'Έαν 
τΐί δίψα, ερχ^εσθω ττρος μ€ καΐ 
τηνίτω• 

38 ό ττιστίνων eif e'/ue, καθωί 
e't-TTiv η γραφή, ποταμοί €κ της 
κοίλίαί αντον pevaouaiv ύδατος 
ζώντοί. 

ο9 Τοντο δε eiVe wep} του 
Πνεύματος οϋ εμελλον λαμβανβιν 
οϊ 7ηστ€υοντ6ί els αυτόν ούττω 
γαρ ην Πνεύμα Αγων, Ότι ο 
Ίησοΰί ονδβπω εδοζασθη• 

40 τΓολλοί ούν e/c τοΰ ογλου 



REVISED VERSION. 

not find him ? Is he '•about to go 
to the dispersed 'of the «i Greeks, 
and to teach the ""Greeks? 



36 What 'is this saying that 
he said. Ye will seek me, and will 
not find vie, and where I am, YE 
cannot come? 

37 Now in the last, tlie great 
day of the feast, Jesus was stand- 
ing, and cried, saying, If any one 
tliirst, let him come to me, and 
drink. 

38 He that believeth on me, as 
'saith the Scripture, Out of his 
belly shall flow rivers of living 
Λvater. 

39 But this he ^said of the 
Spirit, which those believing on 
him were ''about to receive : for 
the Holy Spirit was not yet 
[given], because Jesus was not 
yet glorified. 

40 Many, therefore, of the '■mul- 



' A majority, perhaps, of interpreters regard διασπ:ορα as 
referring to those Jews who were scattered abroad among the 
Greeks, or Gentiles. But Campbell judiciously remarks : " It 
is a manifest stretch to render the dispersion of the Greeks, 
' those dispersed among the Greeks ; ' but if this were allowable, 
the very next clause, ' and teach the Greeks,' excludes it, for 
it is to them surely he goes whom he intends to teach." — 
Some render Έλληνει, Hellenists, i. e-, Hellenistic Jews ; but 
this is without any good authority. Those who favor the 
English Version of this passage, object to the above view, 
taken from Campbell, that the Greeks then inhabited ' their 
native proper country' (Kuincel), and, therefore, could not 
be called dispersed. But there is uo intimation here that 
the Greeks were all dispersed, only there was, at least, one 
dispersion of the Greeks. Now though we can not, perhaps, 
say precisely where this dispersion was, yet we can readily 
believe, that among the fragments of the once powerful 
empire of the Greeks, there were, doubtless, many disper- 
sions, in different parts of the then known world. Upon the 
whole, I can not but conclude, with Campbell, that the ren- 



dering here given " is the only version which the words will 
bear." 

■■ Though the word Έλληνει was sometimes applied to any 
or all who were not Jews, i. e., to Gentiles in general, yet this 
furnishes no valid reason for translating the word Gentiles, since 
it is the context alone that can legitimately assign it this mean- 
ing, and I presume, every intelligent reader would prefer to settle 
such questions for himself. 

' I prefer this phraseology to that of the English Version, 
not only because it is more literal, but because the phrase, 
what manner of, is, if not obsolete, at least rapidly falling 
into disuse. — Wiclif, Rhemish, Penn. — Sharpe [what word ts 
this). 

' The connection shows that the aorist is here used as in- 
definite present. Comp. ch. 3 : 33. 

^ E. V. generally. 
i> See ch. 6 : 5, N. g. 



56 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VII. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

fore, -wlien tliey heard this say- 
ing, said. Of a truth this is the 
Prophet. 

41 Others said, This is the 
Christ. But some said, Shall 
Christ come out of Galilee ? 



42 Hath not the scripture said. 
That Christ cometh of the seed 
of David, and out of the town 
of Bethlehem, where David was? 

43 So there was a division 
among the people because of 
him. 

44 And some of them would 
have taken him ; but no man laid 
hands on him. 

45 Then came the officers to 
tlie chief priests and Pharisees; 
and they said unto them. Why 
have ye not brought him ? 

46 The officers answered, Never 
man spake like this man. 



47 Then answered them the 
Pharisees, Are ye also deceived ? 

48 Have any of the rulers, or 



GREEK TEXT. 

ακονσαντα τον λογον, eXeyov, 
Ούτοί βατιν άληθώί ό ττροφη- 
της. 

41 ' Αλλοί eAeyov, Ουτός 
ίστίν ο Χρίστος. 'Αλλοι 8e 
ίλίγορ, Μη γαρ e'/c 7-779 Γαλί' 
λαιας ο Χριστοί ep^eTai; 

42 ούγΐ η γραφή elirev, ότι 
e/c του σπέρματος Δαβ\8, κα\ 
απο ΰηϋλίβμ, τηί κωμηί όττον 
ην Δαβίδ, ο Χριστοί βρχβται; 

43 Σχίσμα ούν iv τω οχλω 
iyeveTO δι αυτόν. 

44 Tives δί ηθίλον βζ αυτών 
πιασαι αυτόν, αλλ ουδβΐί cVe- 
βαλίν €7Γ αντον ταζ γύρας. 

45 ήλθον ούν οι ύττηρίται 
προί τους άργίζρβΐς και Φαρι- 
σαιους- καΊ (ίπον αύτοΐς ίΚ€Ϊνοι, 
Λιατι ουκ ηγαγβτβ αυτόν ; 

4θ ΑτΓίκρίθησαν οι ΰττηρί- 
ται, ΟυδίΤΓοτβ ούτως Ιλάλησίν 
άνθρωπος, ως ούτος 6 άνθρωττος. 

47 ΆτΓβκρίθησαν ούν αύτοϊς 
οι Φαρισαΐοι, Μη και ύμβϊς ττε- 
πλανησθί ; 



48 



μη τις e/c των αργοντων 



REVISED VERSION. 

titude, hearing the 'saying, said, 
This is Undeed the Prophet. 



41 Others said. This is the 
Christ. But lOthers said. Doth, 
'then, the Christ come out of 
Galilee ? 

42 'Doth not the Scripture 
say. That of the seed of David, 
and ""from Bethlehem, the "village 
where David ivas, the Christ com- 
eth ? 

43 There was, therefore, a divi- 
sion among the '■multitude because 
of.him. 

44 And some of them "were 
wishing to take him : but no one 
laid hands on him. 

45 The officers, tlierefore, came 
to the chief priests and Phari- 
sees : and they said to them, 
Why did ye not bring him ? 

46 The officers answered. Never 
did man pso speak 'as this man. 



47 The Pharisees, therefore, an- 
swered them, Have ye also been 
deceived ? 

48 Did any one of the rulers, 



' Lacbm., Tiscli., and Theile have των λόγων [τοντωνί, the 
last word not being qviite so well sustained as the others. I 
would adopt this, as being probably the most ancient reading, 
and would translate these words, with this note in the margin. : 
According to some copies, the saying. — Newc., Vulg., W., K., 
Penn. 

) See ch. 6 : 14, N. r. 

' It is not customary to translate aiJot, some, unless it be 
■when, in two consecutive clauses, άλλοι . . . άλλοι = some . . . 
otiiers. — Newc, Sharpe. 

1 This particle [γαρ) seems here to have the force of the 
English then, or therefore. See Buttm., ξ 149, m. 17. 

"■ I render απο, from, because this is its usual rendering, 
and more correct than out of. It is very evident, too, that 
uTto governs Βηβ-λεεμ directly, and that χω /ais is in apposi- 



tion with the latter ; but these facts could never be gathered 
from the E. V.. — Penn, Newc, Wesl., Kenr. 



I would always render κώμη, village. — Sharpe. — E. V. very 



often. 



° See ch. 1 : 43, N. y. 

Ρ This change is quite necessary, if the sentence ends with 
speak. Besides, if the doubtful words be retained (see next note, 
below), the translation I have given will be as literal as it pos- 
sibly can be. 

1 Lachmann and Tischendorf reject the words ώς ovtos 
αν&^ωποι, which are not found in some of the very ancient 
Manuscripts, and which Griesbach considers a probable inter- 
polation. I think they are most probably an italic insertion, 
and would recommend that the words, as this iva.n, be left out, 
and this note be put in the margin. : Some copies insert here, as 
this man. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VIH. 



57 



of the 
Li 111? 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

Pharisees believed 



on 



49 But tills people who know- 
eth not the law arc cursed. 



50 Nicoderaus saith unto them, 
(lie tliat came to Jesus by night, 
being• one of them,) 

51 Doth (lur law judge any man 
before it hear him, and know what 
he doeth ? 



52 Tiiey answered and said 
unto him, Art thou also of Gali- 
leo ? Scarcli, and look : for out 
of Galilee ariseth no prophet. 



53 And every man went unto 
his own house. 



CHAP. VIII. 

Jesus went unto the mount of 
Olives : 

2 And early in the morning he 
came again into the temple, and 



fiREEK TEXT. 

ίτηστΐνσ^ν ei? αϋτον, η βκ των 
Φαρισαίων ; 

49 άλλ' ό ογλοί οντοί ό μη 
γίρωσκων τον νομον, ΐττικαταρα- 
τοί (Ισι. 

50 Λβγβι ΝίκόΒημοί ττροί αυ- 
τούς, ό ΐλθων νυκτός ττρος αυτόν, 
ύς ών it αύτων, 

θ\ Μη ο νομοί ημών KpivfL 
τον ανθρωτΓον, eav μη άκουση 
■παρ' αύτοΰ ττροτίρον, καΐ γνω τι 
ποκΐ; 

52 Άπίκρίθησαν κα\ βίπον 
αυτω, Μη και συ βκ της Γαλι- 
λαίας ei; (ρξυνησον καΙ ί'δβ, otl 
ττροψητηί ίκ της ΓαΧιΧαιας ουκ 
6γ7]γ€ρταί. 

5 ο _ΚαΙ (ΤΓορβυθη ίκαστος elf 
τον οίκον αυτού. 

CHAP. VIII. 

ΊΗΣΟΥΣ δβ €7Γορβΰθη eli 
το ορός των Έλαιών 

2 όρθρου δβ -πάλιν τταρβγίνβ- 
το ίΐς το lepov, καΐ πας ό λαός 



revised VERSION. 

or of the Pharisees believe on 
him ? 

49 But this "multitude, who 
know not the law, are acciu'scd. 



50 Nicodemus saith to them, 
(he that came to him 'by night, 
Ijeing one of them.) 

51 Doth our law judge the 
man, 'if it do not 'first hear 
"from him, and know what he 
doeth ? 



52 They answered, and said to 
hhn, Art thou also of Galilee? 
Search, and 'see, "that out of 
Galilee 'hath arisen no prophet. 



53 >"And every one went to his 
own house. 



CHAP. VIII. 

And Jesus went to the mount 
of Olives. 

2 And early in the morning he 
came again into the temple, and 



' The word Ir-aow has so little authority that it is nnivcrsally 
rejected from this place. Ννχτο; is also pretty generally con- 
sidered at least doubtful. Lachm. and Tisoh. reject it altogether. 
I would leave out " by night," and insert this note in the margin. : 
Some copice insert here, by night. 

' See eh. 3 : 3, N. g. 

' Lachraann and Tischend. have προιτον, instead of προτερον. 
The difference is but slight, and the version proposed would, 
perhaps, not be particularly objectionable, if this reading were 
adopted. 

" ΙΙαρα is properly from. I see no reason whatever for leav- 
ing it untranslated. This whole verse is very loosely translated 
in the B. V. 

' E. V. veiy often. I make this change, because I have 



changed the rendering of the nest word. — Newc, Dodd., IVesl., 
Nary, Penn, Kenr. 

" Wiclif, Rhemish, Penn, Kenrick, Wesley, Newcome. — 
E. v., ch. 9 : 20, 24, 29, 31 ; 11 : 42, etc. Acts 14 : 9 ; 
16 : 19. 

' Lachmann and Tischendorf read εγείρεται, ariseth, on 
the authority of several ancient and modern Manuscripts and 
Versions ; but I think the evidence is insufficient to justify 
any change of the. Text. I would recommend, however, that 
this note be appended to the revision : According to some copies, 
arises. 

y This verse forms part of a passage, the genuineness of which 
some doubt. 



58 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VHI. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

all the people came imto him ; 
and lie sat down and taught them. 

3 And the scribes and Pharisees 
brought unto him a woman taken 
in adultery : and when they had 
set her in the midst, 



4 They say unto him, Master, 
this woman was taken in adultery, 
in the very act. 

5 Now Moses in the law com- 
manded us, that such should be 
stoned : but what sayest thou ? 

6 This they said, tempting him, 
that they might have to accuse 
him. But Jesus stooped down, 
and with his finger wrote on the 
ground, as though he heard them 

TWt. 

7 So when they continued ask- 
ing him, he lifted up himself, and 
said unto them. He that is with- 
out sin among you, let him first 
cast a stone at her. 



8 And again he stooped down, 
and wrote on the ground. 

9 And they which heard it, 
being convinced by their own 
conscience, went out one by 



GREEK TEXT. 

■ηργζτο TTpof αύτον και καθίσας 



ΐδιδασκεΐ' avrovs. 



3 αγουσί Si οί γραμματεία 
και οϊ Φαρισαΐοι irpos αύτον 
γυναίκα fv μοιχ^εία κατειλημμί- 
νην, καΐ στησαντβί αύτην ev 
μέσω. 

4 λίγουσιν αντω, Δώάσκαλε, 
αυτή η γυνή κατελήφθη Ιπαυτο- 
φωρω μοιχευομενη. 

5 4ν δε τω νομω Μωσης ημΐν 
ενετείλατο τα9 τοιαύτας λιθοβο- 
ΧεΙσθαι• συ ούν τι λέγεις ; 

6 Τοΰτο δε ελεγον ττειράζον- 
re? αυτόν, Ινα εχωσι κατηγο- 
ρεΐν αύτοΰ. ό δε Ίησοΰί κάτω 
κυψαί, τω δακτυλω εγραφεν εΙς 
την γην. 

ι ώ? δε επεμενον ερωτώντες 
αύτον, άνακυψας είττε προί αυ- 
τούς, Ο άναμαρτητος υμών, 
ττρώτος τον λίθον επ αύτ^ βα- 
λέτω. 

8 κα\ πάλιν κάτω κυψας εγρα- 
φεν εΙς την γην. 

9 οι δε, άκούσαντες, κα\ ΰπο 
της συνειδήσεως ελεγχόμενοι, 
εζηργοντο εις καθείς, άρζάμενοι 



REVISED VERSION. 

all the people came to him, and, 
sitting down, he was teaching 
them. 

3 And the Scribes and the 
Pharisees bring to him a woman 
having been taken in adultery ; 
and setting her in the midst, 



4 They say to him, "Teacher, 
this woman was taken in the very 
act, "committing adultery. 

5 Now, in the law, Moses com- 
manded us, that such should be 
stoned : thou, 'therefore, what 
sayest thou ? 

6 ""But this they said, tempting 
him, that they might have to ac- 
cuse him. But Jesus, stooping 
down, with [hisj finger was writ- 
ting on the ground.' 



7 ''But when tliey continued 
asking him, 'raising himself up, 
he said to them, He ^of you that 
is without sin, let him first cast 
the stone at her. 



8 And again, stooping down, 
he was writing on the ground. 

9 And ""they, hearing, and be- 
ing convicted by [theirj con- 
science, kept going out, one by 



» See ch. 1 : 38, N. m. 

•■ I have rendered this phrase literally. 

' I see no necessity for rendering avv otherwise than as is 
usually done. 

■i See Gen. Obs. 6. 

" The Greek μη Λροεποιονμενσι, found in three or four 
inferior Manuscripts, corresponding to the supply of the English 
Yersion, is, I believe, universally discarded at the present 
day. 

' To raise one's self up, is more modern and elegant than to 
lift one's self up. 



^ Among you would be, properly, εν νμιν. I have endeavor- 
ed, without injury to the sense or style, to translate more 
literally. 

'■ It is evident, that oi . . . ακονααντει are not taken 
together, as the subject of the verb, else there would be no 
need of the following xat, but that both, ακονσηντει and 
ελεγχόμενοι, are used verbally, while ol is nominative to εξ- 
ηζχο7ηο. 

' The art. does, perhaps, sometimes occupy the place of the 
personal pronoun, when imempliatic, but never, I believe, when 
emphatic. Hence the E. V. here expresses more than is in the 
Orig. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VIII. 



59 



KING JAMES' VERSION. 

one, beginning at the eldest, 
even unto the last : and Jesus 
was left alone, and the woman 
standing in the midst. 

10 When Jesus had lifted up 
himself, and saw none but the 
woman, he said unto her. Wo- 
man, where are those thine ac- 
cusers ? hath no man condemned 
thee? 

11 She said. No man. Lord. 
And Jesus said unto her. Neither 
do I condemn thee : go, and sin 
no more. 

12 Then spake Jesus again 
unto them, saying, I am the light 
of the world : he that followeth 
me shall not walk in darkness, 
but shall have the light of life. 



13 The Pharisees therefore 
said unto him, Thou bearest 
record of thyself ; thy record is 
not true. 

14 Jesus answered and said 
unto them, Though I bear rec- 
ord of myself, yet my recoi'd is 
true : for I know whence I came, 
and whither I go : but ye cannot 
tell whence I come, and whither 
I go. 

15 Ye judge after the flesh ; 
I judge no man. 

16 And yet if I judge, my 
judgment is true: for I am not 
alone, but I and the Father that 
sent me. 



GREEK TEXT. 

ατΓΟ των ττρβσβυηρων €ω$• των 
ίσγατων και. κατελίίφθη μονοί 
ό Ιησοΰί, καΐ ή γυνή iv μ(σω 
εστωσα. 

10 άνακυψαΐ 8e ό Ιησούς, καΐ 
μηδΐ'να θβασαμβνοί ττλην της 
γυναίκοί, ύπΐν αύτ-ρ, Ή γννη, 
που elaiv eKeivoi οϊ κατήγοροι 
σου, ου8εΐί σβ κατ€κρινεν ; 

11 H δί eiTrev, OuSeii, κνριβ. 
EfLTTC Be avTrj b Ιησοΰί, OvSe 
ΐγω σ€ κατακρίνω• ττορβυου καΊ 
μηκβτι αμαρτανΐ. 

12 Πάλιν ονν ο Ιησοΰί αυ- 
τοΐί ΐλαλ7]σ€ λέγων, Έγω €ΐμι 
το φώί του κόσμου• 6 ακολουθών 
€/χοί, ου μη ΤΓΐρίττατησει iv ttj 
σκοτία, άλλ! e^ei το φως της 

ζ<^Ψ• 

13 Eiwov ουν αύτω οϊ Φαρι- 
σαΐοι, ΣυτΓΐρ\ σεαυτοΰ μαρτυρείς• 
η μαρτυρία σου ουκ εστίν αληθής. 

14 Αττεκρίθη Ιησούς καΧ 
εΊττεν αυτοΐς, Καν εγω μαρτυρώ 
ττερί εμαυτοΰ, αληθής εστίν η 
μαρτυρία μου• otl οίδα ττοθεν 
ήλθον, καί τΓοΰ ύτταγω• ύμεΐς δε 
ουκ οίδατε ττοθεν έρχομαι, καΊ 
ΤΓοΰ υτταγω. 

15 ύμεΐς κατά την σάρκα 
κρίνετε• εγω ου κρίνω ουδενα. 

10 και εαν κρίνω οε εγω, η 
κρίσις ή εμη αληθής εστίν otl 
μονός ουκ εΙμΙ, αλλ εγω κα\ ο 
ττεμψας με ττατηρ. 



REVISED VERSION. 

one, beginning from the 'elders, 
even to the last ; and Jesus was 
left alone, and the woman stand- 
ing in the midst. 

10 And Jesus, ^raising him- 
self up, and seeing no one but 
the woman, said to her. Woman, 
where are those, thine accusers ? 
Did no one condemn thee ? 



11 And she said, No onfe, 
'Sir. And Jesus said to her. 
Neither do I condemn thee : go, 
and sin no more. 

12 Again, therefore, Jesus 
spoke to them, saying, I am the 
light of the world : he that fol- 
loweth ME shall not walk in the 
darkness, but shall have the 
light of life. 

13 The Pharisees, therefore, 
said to him, Thou art "testifying 
of thyself ; thy "testimony is not 
true. 

14 Jesus answered, and said 
to them, "Even if I "testify of 
myself, my "testimony is true, 
because I know whence I came, 
and whither I am going : but 
YE "know not whence I came, 
pand whither I am going. 

15 Ye judge «according to the 
flesh : I j udge no one. 

16 But "even if I judge, my 
judgment is true ; 'because I am 
not alone, but I and the Father 
who sent me. 



'' I would suggest whether the word, πρεσβύτερος, may not 
be used here, as a term of office = an Elder, a member of the 
Sanhedrim. Nothing, certainly, would be more u>atural than 
to suppose that those who brought the woman to the Savior, 
(supposing the narrative to be genuine,) were the officers whose 
especial duty it was, according to the law of Moses, to bring 
her to justice. 

1 See ch. 6 . 34, N. r. 

" See N, j, ch. 1 : 7. 



■■ The most literal rendering I can find for κάι•, or xai εαν, 
when the και is not copulative, is, even if. 

" See ch. 3 : 8, N. q. 

I" Griesb., Scholtz, Knapp, Tisch., and Thcile, have η, instead 
of και, in V. 14, while the editors generally reject ό Ιηαονι, in 
V. 20. I would adopt these readings, and recommend that we 
read or, for and, in v. 14. and he, for Jesus, in v. 20. 

'> This is the usual rendering of κατά, in this sense, and is 
more precise than after. — Newc, Dodd., Nary, Penn, Kenr., R. 

' See N. i, ch. 1 : 15. 



60 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VHI. 



KING JAMES' VERSION. 

17 It is also written in your 
law, that the testimony of two 
men is true. 



18 I am one that bear witness 
of myself; and the Father that 
sent me, beareth witness of me. 

19 Then said they unto him, 
Where is thy Father ? Jesus an- 
swered, Ye neither know me, nor 
my Father : if ye had linown mc, 
ye should have known my Father 
also. 



20 These words spake Jesus in 
the treasury, as he taught in tlie 
temple : and no man laid hands 
on him, for his hour was not yet 
come. 



21 Then said Jesus again unto 
them, I go my way, and ye shall 
seek me, and shall die in your 
sins : whither I go, ye cannot 
come. 



22 Then said the Jews, Will 
he kill himself? because he saith, 
Whither I go, ye cannot come. 



23 And he said unto them. Ye 
are from beneath ; I am from 
above : ye are of this world ; I 
am not of this world. 



24 I said therefore unto you, 
that ye shall die in your sins : for 
if ye believe not that I am he, ye 
shall die in your sins. 



GREEK TEXT. 

17 /cat eV τώ νόμω Be τω 
νμίτβρω γίγραττται, οτι δυο 
ανθρώπων η μαρτυρία άληθηί 
ίστίν. 

18 eytu ύμι ο μαρτύρων ττβρ). 
βμαντον, καΙ μαρτυρεί nepl Ιμοΰ 
ό ΤΓίμψαί μ€ ττατηρ. 

19 ' EXeyov ούν αντω, Ποΰ 
€στιν 6 ττατηρ σου; Αττβκρί- 
θη 6 Ιησούς, Οΰτβ e/xe οίδατΐ, 
οΰτβ τον Ίτατίρα μου• €ί εμί 
fjSeLTe, καΐ τον πάτερα μου 7]8βι- 
re αν. 

20 Ταΰτα τα ρήματα ΐλάλη- 
σ€ν ό Ίησοΰί ϊν τω γαζοφν 
λακίω, διδάσκων iv τω lepco• καΐ 
ουδίίί ίπιασβν αυτόν, οτι οϋττω 
βληλυθβι η ωρα αυτοΰ. 

21 ΕΙτΓίν ούν τταλίν αντοΐς 6 
Ίησοΰί, Εγω ύτταγω, καΐ ζητή- 
σετε με, καΐ εν τη αμαρτία υμών 
ατΓοθανεΐσθε• οττου εγω ύτταγω, 
ύμεϊί ού δύνασθε ελθεΐν. 

22 ' Ελεγον ούν οί Ίουδαΐοί, 
Μητι άττοκτενεϊ εαυτόν, otl λέ- 
γει, Οττου εγω ύτταγω, ύμεΐς 
ού δύνασθε ελθεΐν; 

■^■J Ααί ειττεν αυτοις, Ι με is 
εκ των κάτω εστε, εγω εκ των 
ανω ε'ιμι• ύμεΐς εκ του κόσμου 
τούτου εστε, εγω ούκ είμ). εκ του 
κόσμου τούτου. 



24 



ειττον ουν υμιν οτι αττο- 



θανεΐσθε εν tols αμαρτιαις υμών 
εαν γαρ μη ττιστευσητε οτι εγω 
εΙμι, άττοθανεΐσθε εν ταΐί άμαρ- 
τίαΐζ υμών. 



REVISED VERSION. 

17 And it liath also been writ- 
ten in your law. That the testi- 
mony of two men is true. 



18 I am one who "testify of 
myself, and my Father who sent 
me ""testifieth of me. 

19 They said to him, therefore, 
Where is thy Father ? Jesus an- 
swered. Ye neither know me, nor 
my Father : if ye knew me, ye 
would know my Father also. 



20 These words spoke pJesus 
in the Treasury, teaching in the 
temple : and no one Hook him, 
because his hour had not yet 
come. 

21 Therefore 'Jesus said to 
them again, I am going away, and 
ye will seek me, and will die in 
your "sin : whither I am going, 
YE can not come. 



22 The Jews, therefore, said. 
Will he kill himself? because he 
saith, Whitlier I am going, ye 
can not come. 

23 And he said to them. Ye 
arc from beneatli ; I am from 
above : ye are of this world ; I 
am not of this world. 



24 I said, therefore, to you. 
That ye will die in your sins : for 
if ye believe not that I am he, ye 
shall die in your sins. 



■ This is the only passage, in which πιαζω is rendered, to lay 
hands on, in the E. V. — E. V. generally.— Dodd., Wesl. {seized). 
— Sharpe. 

t Lachm. and Tisch., with several ancient MSS., omit 6 Irjaovs. 



It is, I suspect, an Italic insertion. I would, therefore, translate, 
he said, for Jesus said, etc. 

" I know not why the E. V., and other earlier Eng. Vcrss., 
except E., have sins. — Newc, Sharpe, Dodd., Wesl., Kenr. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VIII. 



61 



KING JAMES' VERSION. 

25 Then said they unto him, 
Who art thou ? And Jesus saith 
unto them, Even the same that I 
said unto you from the beginning. 

26 I ha\'e many tilings to say, 
and to judge of you : but he tliat 
sent me, is true ; and I speak to 
the world those things -which I 
have heard of him. 



27 They understood not that 
he spake to them of the Father. 

28 Then said Jesus unto them, 
When ye liave lifted up the Son 
of man, then shall ye know that 
I am he, and that I do nothing of 
myself; but as my Father liatb 
taught mc, I speak tliese things. 



29 And he that sent me is with 
me : the Father hath not left me 
alone ; for I do always those 
things that please him. 

30 As ho spake these words, 
many believed on him. 

31 Then said Jesus to those 
Jews which believed on him, If 
ye continue in my word, then are 
ye my disciples indeed ; 



GREEK TEXT. 

25 ' JEXeyou ovv αύτω, Συ 
TiS eij Ivai einev αύτοις ό Ιη- 
croOy, Τηι/ άρχτ]ΐ> ό τί kul λαλώ 
νμΐν. 

26 τΓολλά εχω ττβρί νμων λα- 
Xe'iv Koi KpiveLV άλλ ό ττβμψα^ 
με αληθής iari, κάγω α ηκουσα 
παρ αϋτον, ταΰτα λβγω els τον 
κοσμον. 

2 ί Ουκ έγνωσαν otl τον ττα- 
Tfpa αύτοΐί eAeyev. 

28 Ehrev ούν αυτοΊί ο Ιη- 
σούς, Οταν υ^ωσητβ τον υΐον 
του ανθρώπου, τοτβ γνωσεσθί 
OTL βγω €ΐμί• και απ (μαυτού 
ποιώ ούδΐν, άλλα καθώς (δίδαςβ 
μι ό πατήρ μου, ταΰτα λαλώ. 

29 καΐ ό πε'μψας μ€, μίτ 
ίμοΰ iaTCV ουκ άφήκβ μβ μόνον 
ό πατήρ, otl ίγω τα αρεστά αυ- 
τώ ποίώ πάντοτε. 

30 Ταΰτα αύτοΰ λαλοΰντος 
πολλί επίστευσαν εΙς αυτόν. 

31 ' Έλεγεν ούν ό Ίησοΰς 
προς τους πεπιστευκοτας αυτω 
'Ιουδαίους, Έαν ύμεΐς μείνητε 
εν τώ λόγω τω εμω, αληθώς 
μαθηταί μου εστε. 



REVISED VERSION. 

25 They said to him, therefore, 
Who art thou ? And Jesus said 
to them. Even "what I "said to 
you at the beginning. 

26 I have many things to say 
and to judge 'concerning you : 
but he that sent me is true ; and 
'I, «what things I heard 'from 
him, "these I "say to the world. 

27 They ^'knew not that he 
spoke to them of the Father. 

28 Jesus, therefore, said to 
them. When ye lift up the Son of 
man, then will ye know that I 
am he, and of myself I do noth- 
ing ; but as my Father taught 
me, I 'say these things. 



29 And he that sent me is with 
me : 'the Father did not leave 
me alone, because I do always 
■■things pleasing to him. 

30 As he was speaking these 
things, many believed on him. 

31 Jesus, therefore, said to the 
Jews who had believed him. If 
TE 'abide in my word, ye are my 
disciples indeed : 



' All are agreed that this expression is very obscure and 
difficult. — Vulgate [Principium, qui et loquor vobis) ; Erasmus 
(In priniis quod et loquor vobis) ; Beza {Id quod a priucipio 
dico vobis) ; Dodd., connecting this clause with the following 
verse [Truly, because I am still speaking to i/ou) ; Newc. {Even 
wliat I told you at first) ; Meyer, as a question ( Was urspriing- 
lich ich auch rede zu euch ?) — I do not see that it is necessary to 
connect the latter part of this verse with the next verse. The 
sense of both verses is complete enough without such connec- 
tion. I think the English Version conveys the sense pretty 
well, though I suggest a slight modification, for the sake of 
greater fidelity to the Original. — From the beginning, is usually 
expressed by art" αρχηι {seldom by εξ ηρχης). To me it is 
doubtful whether την ηςχην will bear this rendering, though 
there is no doubt at all but it will bear the rendering, at the 
beginning = at first. 

" Our idiom will not bear the literal rendering of the verb 
λαλώ, I say, in this connection.. 



' E. Ύ., ch. 9 ; 18 ; 11 : 19 ; 7 : 32, and elsewhere.— 0/ is hard- 
ly free from abiguity in this case. 

y This seems to be about the only way to render the pro- 
noun with that emphasis required by the collocation of the 
Orig. 

' E. V. often.— See ch. 3 : 6, N. k. 

' E. V. very often, especially in the immediate context. 

*> There is certainly no necessity for departing from the usual 
rendering of γινωαχω. 

' Lachm., Tisch., and Theile omit 6 πατ};ρ. It is retained by 
Griesb., Scholz, Knapp, and Halm. 'I'he former is, perhaps, the 
more ancient reading. I would insert in the margin. : Some 
copies omit the Father. 

'^ Things pleasing is more literal than the things that please. 

' See ch. 1 : 33, N. z. 



62 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VIH. 



KING jambs' version. 

32 And ye shall know the 
truth, and the truth shall make 
you free. 

33 They answered him, We be 
Abraham's seed, and were never 
in bondage to auy man : how say- 
est thou. Ye shall be made free ? 



34 Jesus answered them, A-^eri- 
ly, verily, I say unto you. Who- 
soever committeth sin, is the ser- 
vant of sin. 

35 And the servant abideth not 
in the liouse for ever, but the Son 
abideth ever. 

36 If the Son therefore shall 
make you free, ye shall be free 
indeed. 

37 I know that ye are Abra- 
ham's seed ; but ye seek to kill 
me, because my word hath no 
place ill you. 

38 I speak that which I have 
seen with my Father : and ye do 
tiiat which ye have seen with your 
father. 

39 They answered and said un- 
to him, Aljraham is our father. 
Jesus saith unto them. If ye were 
Abraham's children, ye would do 
the works of Abraham. 



40 But now ye seek to kill 
me, a man tliat hath told you the 
truth, Avhich I have heard of God 
this did not Abraham. 



GREEK TEXT. 

o2 Kol γνώσίσθζ την άλη- 
θίίαν, καΐ η άληθίΐα Ιλβνθβρώ- 
σ€ί νμάί. 

33 ' ΛτΓΐκρίθησαΐ' αντω, Σττίρ- 
μα Λβρααμ ΐσμΐν, και ουδβιη 
δεδουλίνκαμίν ττωποτβ• ττώί συ 
Aeyeif, Ort iXeuuepoi -γίνησί- 
σθβ; 

34 Άττεκρίθη αύτοΐί ο Ίη- 
σοΰί, Αμήν άμην λβγω ύμΐν, 
OTL ττας ο ττοιων την αμαρτιαν, 
δοΰλοΐ iaTL Trjs αμαρτίας. 

00 ό δε δοΰλοί ου μίνβι Ιν 
TTf οικία eli τον αιώνα.• 6 νιος 
μβνΐΐ elf τον αιώνα. 

36 iav ούν 6 υ'ίο! ύμας iXev- 
θΐρω(Γϊ], bvTCus eAeuOepoi ecre- 
aOe. 

37 οίδα OTL σπίρμα 'Αβραάμ 
ίστ€• άλλα ζητ€ΐτ€ μβ άττοκτΐΐ- 
ναι, ΟΤΙ ό λογοί 6 βμοί ου χωρίΐ 
iv νμΐν. 

38 4γω ο βώρακα πάρα τω 
ττατρι μου, λαλώ• και υμβΐί ούν 
Ό ζωρακατβ πάρα τω πατρί υμών, 

πθί€ίΤ€. 

39 ' Απβκρίθησαν και βιπον 
αυτω, Ο πατηρ ημών Αβραάμ 
βστι. Aeyei αϋτοΐί ό 'Ιησούς, 
ΈΊ τίκνα του 'Αβραάμ ήτ€, 
τα kpya του Άβρααμ ίποιβΐτΐ 
αν. 

40 ι^νι> δβ ζητβΐτε μβ άποκτίϊ- 
ναι, ανθρωπον ο$ την άληθειαν 
υμιν λΐλαληκα, ην ήκουσα πάρα 
του θίοΰ• τούτο 'Αβραάμ ουκ 
ΐπθίησ€ν. 



REVISED VERSION. 

32 And ye shall know the 
truth ; and the truth shall make 
you free. 

33 They answered him. We are 
Abraham's seed, and have never 
been in bondage to any one. How 
dost THOU say. Ye shall be made 
free? 



34 Jesus answered them. Veri- 
ly, verily, I say to you, Every one 
that 'is doing sin is a servant of 
sin. 

35 And the servant abideth not 
in the house for ever : the ^son 
abideth for ever. 

36 If, therefore, the Son make 
you free, ye will be free indeed. 

37 I know that ye are Abra- 
ham's seed ; but ye are seeking to 
kill me, because my word hath 
no place in you. 

38 I speak 'what I have seen 
with my Father : and ye, tliere- 
fore, do 'what ye have seen with 
your father, 

39 They answered, and said to 
him, ''Our father is Abraliam. 
Jesus saith to tliem. If ye were 
Abraham's children, ye would do 
the works of Abraham. 



40 But now ye are seeking to 
kill me, a man who have 'spoken 
to you the truth, which I heard 
of God. This Abraham did not. 



' This phrase is analogous to several others ; viz., to do judg- 
ment, ch. 5 : 21 ; to do the law, ch. 7 : 19 ; to do righteousness, 
1 John 2 : 29, etc. 

' The word son, in this verse, is opposed to servant, and is not 
spoken of the Messiah ; therefore it ought not to begin with a 
capital, at it does in the E. V. — Newcome, Nary, Fr. M.,-S. 



i" I preserve the order of the Original, because I do not feel at 
liberty to change it on so slight grounds as those existing in the 
present case. — 



' E. Y. very commonly .- 
word. 



- To tell is an unusual rendering of this 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VHI. 



63 



KING JAMES' VERSION. 

41 Ye do the deeds of your 
fatlier. Then said they to liim, 
"We be not bora of fornication ; 
we have one Fatlier, even God. 



42 Jesus said unto them, If 
God were your Father, ye would 
love me : for I proceeded forth 
and came from God ; neither 
came I of myself, but he sent me. 



43 Why do ye not understand 
my speech ? even because you can- 
not hear my Λyord. 

44 Ye are of ymir father the 
devil, and the lusts of your fa- 
ther ye will do : he was a mur- 
derer from the beginning, and 
abode not in the truth ; because 
there is no truth in him. When 
he speaketh a lie, he speaketh 



GREEK TEST. 

41 νμίΐί 7Γ0ί(ΐτ€ τα (ργα. τον 
ττατροί υμών. ΈΙττον ούν αυτω, 
' Ημΰς ίκ πορνβίαί ου γΐγίννη- 
μεθα• eva πατίρα €χομ€ν, τον 
Oeov. 

42 Ehrev ούν αιτοΓ? ο Ιη- 
σούς, ΈΙ ο θίοί ττατηρ υμών 
ην, ηγαττατβ αν (μί• βγω γαρ €κ 
του θίοΰ Ι^ηλθον καΐ ηκω• ovSe 
γαρ άτΓ ΐμαυτοΰ ϊληλυθα, αλλ 
tmlvos με απβστβίλε. 

43 δίατί την λαλιάν την (μην 
οϋ γινώσκ€Τ€ ; Ότι ου δύνασθε 
άκουειν τον λογον τον εμον. 

44 υμείς εκ ττατροί του δια- 
βόλου εστε, καί ταί εττιθυμίαί 
τοΰ ττατροί υμών θέλετε ττοιειν. 
εκείνος άνθρωττοκτονοξ ην άττ αρ- 
χηΐ, καΙ εν Trj αλήθεια ουχ εστη- 
κεν ότι ουκ εστίν αλήθεια εν 
αύτω. όταν λαλη το ψεΰδος, 



REVISED VERSION. 

41 Ye do the works of your 
father. They said to him, there- 
fore, We have not been born of 
fornication ; we have one Father, 
God. 



42 Jesus said to them, 'there- 
fore, If God were your father, ye 
would love me : for I '•came out 
from God, and 'am come ; for I 
am "not even come of myself, but 
he sent me. 



43 Why do ye not 'know my 
speech ? Because ye can not hear 
my word. 

44 Ye are of [your] father, the 
Devil, and the lusts of your father 
yc "wish to do. He was a "man- 
slayer from the beginning, and 
phath not stood in the truth ; be- 
cause there is no truth in him. 
When 'one speaketh 'falsehood, he 



1 The editors generally reject this ow. As it is also wanting 
in the English Version, I would certainly recommend that it be 
left out. 

■■ E. Ύ. generally. — To proceed forth, is uncommon, and cer 
tainly unnecessary here. — Newc. {came foiih). 

' Newc. — Dodd. [and to come). Π/.ω is usually rendered as a 
perfect. 

" There seems to be no propriety in rendering ovde, neitlier, 
where there is no antithesis. I have given it its literal rendering, 
which, I think, conveys the true sense of the passage. — See ch. 
1 : 3, N. d. 

° See ch. 1 : 43, N. g. — It is very important, as Alf. and others 
have observed, that 3-εΙετε should be literally and unambiguously 
translated, in this case. 

" The word usually translated murderer, is ψονενι. Man-slayer 
e3φresses the precise idea of the Orig. — Newc. {slayer of men). — 
Penn, Kenr. 

Ρ I prefer the perfect, or present rendering not only because it 



is literal, but because it conveys more precisely what I conceive 
to be the true idea, — That the Devil not only was a liar at the 
beginning, but has continued to be so ever since, and is now. 
Stand is the proper idea of ίατημι, and expresses the idea here 
quite as well as abide. — W., R. 

5 This sentence, from όταν to the end of the verse, is, per- 
haps, one of the most difficult to translate of any occurring in 
this Gospel. The chief difficulties may be resolved into two 
principal questions, to which I shall endeavor to reply seriatim. — 
1. AVhat is the subject of ).rdrj ? The English Version, \vith a 
decided majority of translators and interpreters, both ancient 
and modern, make he, referring to ό διάβολος, the subject, but 
this interpretation is liable to serious objection, owing to two 
difficulties arising out of the context. — 1) Whoever is the sub- 
ject of λαλτ;, is said, in the next clause, to speak ικ των ίδιων, 
from his own. Now what does this phrase mean? Σχ denotes 
origin, not only usually, but universally, in some sense or 
other. Ot tSioi means, in every other passage where it occurs, 
in the N. Test., one's own family, people, or associates ; while τα 
tSta (supposing των ίδιων here to be neuter) means what is 
peculiar to one's self, taken in the broadest sense, but only in 
reference to external things, never in reference to the powers, 
attributes, or resources of the mind. (See ch. 1 : 11, N. r.) 
The meaning of the phrase, therefore, would be. That the dis- 



64 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VIII. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

of his own : for lie is a liar, and 
the father of it. 



GREEK TEXT. 

eK των 18ίων XaXel• on ψβυστηί 
iarl Koi 6 ττατηρ αύτοΰ. 



REVISED VERSION. 

speaketli 'from his own ; 'because 
''his father ''also is a liar. 



■ Not only is spealceth of his own ambiguous, but from is the I N. q. As to the renderiog of των tSiwv, his own, see ch. 1 : 11, 
proper word to express the radical idea of εκ. See above, in | N. r. t gee eh. 1 : 15, N. i. 



position to speak falsehood, in the subject, originates, either 
from his kindred or associates, or from something else that is 
peculiarly his own, and, at the same time external to himself. 
But this is not true of the Devil: therefore, 6 διάβολο; cannot 
be the subject of λαλη. — 2) The last word in the verse, αντον, 
naturally refers to the subject of λαλτ], as its antecedent ; nor 
is it easy to refer it to any thing else : for it cannot be referred 
to -ψευδός, in the preceding clause, without setting aside a 
standing rule of grammar, for which those critics who contend 
for this interpretation, have shown no satisfectory authority : 
neither can it be referred to ψενδος, latent, as others say, in 
the nearer substantive, -ψενστηι; for there is, for this, even less 
authority, either from custom or common sense : neither can 
it be referred to ό γενάτης, as is done by others; for this, 
though free from grammatical difficulty, would represent the 
subject as being his own father, which is repugnant to common 
sense. If, then, αντου must be referred to the subject o{ kalrj, 
as its antecedent, and that antecedent is ό διάβολος, we arrive 
at the singular conclusion that tlie Devil has a father. This 
is, in fact, the conclusion that was drawn from this passage by 
many of the ancients, (the Cajani, and the Archontici,) and 
was partially concurred in by the learned Grotius, in more 
modern times. It may, however, be considered as thoroughly 
exploded at the present day ; so destitute is it of support, from 
either Scripture or reason. "We conclude, therefore, that δ δια- 
βολος cannot be the subject of lair,. What, then, is its sub- 
ject ? In this case, as in multitudes of others, there is no sub- 
ject expressed in immediate connection with the verb ; and we 
are left to infer it from the context, a^id especially from the 
predicate. When, in the absence of a subject expressed, the 
predicate is of such a general nature, that it cannot be referred 
to any particular individual, or individuals, or class of persons, 
τις, τίνες, they, people, one, or any similar indefinite term that 
may be appropriate, may be supplied, as the subject. But 
when the predicate is such that it is naturally and properly 
spoken of some particular agent, that particular agent is its 
subject, when no other is expressed. For the sake of illustra- 
tion I will adduce a few familiar examples. — In the phrase 
όταν οινοχοεντ] δ παις, when the boy pours out the wine, there 
can be no doubt that ό παις is the subject of the verb : but if 
this word were omitted, and it read simply, όταν οινοχοεντ•,, we 
would be obliged to supply a subject from the predicate, and 
that subject could be no other than δ οινοχόος, the cup-bearer• 
(See Kuhn, § 238. R. 3.) For a similar reason, in the phrasei 
όταν οαίπιγγιι, no subject can be supplied but ό ααΐτιιχτι^ς, the 
trumpeter. (See Kuhn., as above.) Again, in the phrase, όταν 
■ψενδχι δ παις, when the boy lies, δ παις is evidently the subject 



of -ψευδιι : but if this be omitted, and we read simplj', δταν 
ψενδη, the only word that can be supplied, as subject, is δ 
γενάτης, the liar, because this alone propeily designates the 
agent of whom the action is naturally predicated. Now it is 
plain, that δταν lalrj το ψενδος is exactly = δταν ψενδη, be- 
cause το γενδος is here an abstract noun, meaning falsehood, 
in general ; so that Ιαλειν το γευδος = ψευδειν. Therefore, 
in the absense of any admissible subject, expressed, δ γενάτης 
is the only proper subject of lalrj, in the passage under con- 
sideration ; so that the idea conveyed by δταν lal. το γεν., &c., 
is simply, When [the Zi'ar] speaketh falsehood, &c. But, as it 
would generally be less euphonious, to express the real supply, 
in the translation, than to represent it by a pronoun, we say, 
one sounds the trumpet, for the trumpeter sounds, &c., they 
revile, for the revilers revile, (Matth. 5 : 11,) one lies, for the 
liar lies, one speaketh falsehood, for the liar speaketh false- 
hood, &c. — I would add, that the above reasoning receives 
additional strength, from the interpretation put upon the last 
clause of the verse. See below. — It remains to inquire whether 
we have sufficient authority for this interpretation from the 
acknowledged usages of the Greek writers. There are many 
examples of this usage in the plural number, and that, too, in 
connection with this same δταν. See ch. 2 : 10. Matth. 5:11; 
10 : 19, 23. Mark. 13 : 11. Luke 12 : 11. 1 Thess. 5 : 3.— In the 
singular, this usage is much less frequent. There is. however, 
if I mistake not, one clear example of, at least, a similar usage, 
in the N. T., in 1 Cor. 15 : 27, δταν δε ειπτ], κ. τ. λ., where the 
true subject of firtjj can only be determined from the context; 
and, if the phrase be taken indefinitely, (as it is taken by 
Sharpe, AH., Stoltz, Reich., Fr. S., and, perhaps, others.) this 
subject is undoubtedly Tis, (ojie, any one,) though the analogy 
of faith would refer it to God, as the author of revelation. 
But though there are but few examples of this kind of con- 
struction in the N. T., there are a great many in the classic 
authors, as appears from the following quotation from Midd., 
in loco. " In Hesiod, Op. et Dies, 291, Ed. Le Clerc, we have 
επην δ" εις άκρον ΊΚΗΑΙ, though, as we are told in the note, 
Philo, Clemens, Xenophon, and others confirm the common 
reading, ΊΚΗΤΑΙ. Heinsius, the author of the alteration, tells 
us, that Scaliger and Meursius approved it: they did not, 
then, perceive that τις before Ικηται might be understood. So 
also Soph. CEd. Tyr. 315. εχοι τε και δνναιτο, sc. ΤΙΣ. In 
Xenoph. the same Ellipsis is not very uncommon , in the 
Memorab. I. 2. 55. εαν βονληται τιμααΟ•αι, sc. ΤΙΣ. In the 
Apol. 7. νγιες δε (τις) το σώμα, κ. τ. Ι., where, however, says 
Sturtz, in Lea:. Xen. ΤΙΣ was first interpolated by Leunclavius. 
So also De Re Eq. VIII. 13. ώς αν βονληται αντιχαριαηται. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VIH. 



65 



KING JAMEs' VERSIOiV. 

45 And because I tell you the 
truth, 3'e believe me not. 

Ί6 Which of you convinccth 
me of sin ? And if I say the 
truth, why do ye not believe meV 



47 He that is of God, hearcth 
God's words : ye therefore hear 
them not, because ye are not of 
God. 

48 Tlicn answered the Jews, 
and said unto him, Say we not 
well tliat thou art a Samaritan, 
and hast a devil ? 

49 Jesus answered, I have not 



GREEK TEXT. 



45 ϊγω 8e on την άληθ^ιαν 
λίγω, ού 7Γίστ(υ€Τ€ μοι. 

46 τίί ίζ υμών e'Aey^et yue 
ΤΓΐρί αμαρτίας ; tl δβ αΧηθίίαν 
λίγω, διατί ύμίΐί ού ττιστίυβτί 
μοι ; 

47 ό ών €κ τοΰ θ€οΰ τα 
ρήματα τον θίοΰ aKover δια 
τοΰτο νμ(ΐί ουκ άκουβτί, Ότι Ικ 
τοΰ θίοΰ ουκ Ιστί. 

48 ΆτΓ€κρίθησαν ούν οι Ιου- 
δαίοι καΐ tiTTOv αϋτω, Ού καΧώζ 
λίγομίν ήμ(ΐί, ότι Σαμαρείτης 
el συ, καΐ δαιμόνων ϊχεις / 

49 'Λπ€κρίθη Ιησούς, 'Έγω 



REVISED VERSION. 

45 ^'But because I '■speak the 
truth, 3'e believe me not. 

46 Who of you 'convicteth 
me of sin ? *13ut if I 'speak 
truth, why do ye not believe 
me ? 

47 He that is of God heareth 
the words of God: on this ac- 
count YE hear not, because ye 
are not of God. 

48 The Jews, 'therefore, 
answered, and said to him. Do 
not WE say well, That thou art 
a Samaritan, and hast a 'demon? 

49 Jesus answered, I have not 



" I have often taken the liberty to render δε, but, where the 
E. V. has, and. I do so, because I think it is plain that the 
disjunctive idea is in the Orig. Tlie difference made is often 
slight, but sometimes important. 



* E. v., V. 9, above. — riewc., Sharpe, Wesl., Penn, Kenr. 
' Editors generally reject this ovi: I would leave out 
therefore. 

' See oh. 7 : 20, N. g. 



(sc. ΤΙΣ) which Leuncl.&nd Wells altered into βονλτ] avri- 
Knpwrj, For these passages, excepting one, I am indebted to 
Stiirtz ; and I have little doubt that a multitude of sucli might 
have been found, if every vestige of them had not in many in- 
stances been obliterated by unauthorized departure from the 
MSS." 

2. How should xai, in the phrase, xre» 6 πατΓ,ρ αντον, be 
rendered 1 All the authorities, nearly, translate this y.at as 
a copulative, making two sentences of οτι . . . ηντον. In this 
almost unanimous judgment of the learned world, I am sorry 
that I cannot acquiesce : and though my dissent may seem like 
presumption, I will, nevertheless, venture briefly to assign ni)' 
reasons for it. — 1) Because xai is, by universal consent, to be 
translated also, or ere», where the connection requires it ; so 
that the translation proposed presents no anomaly. — 2) Be- 
cause, on the supposition that my translation is correct, the 
collocation of y.ni is such as we should e.xpect, i. e. just before 
the subject. — 3) Because the placing of the predicate γενατηί 
before, and πατήρ, with its dependencies, after the copula, can 
be easily accounted for by supposing it to be a case of trans- 
position for the sake of emphasis. — 4) Because on is evidently 
used to introduce a reason of the preceding declaration, εκ των 
ώιων λαΚει ; but the assertion, he is a liar, is no reason why 
we should believe that he speaketh from his own, (see the 
remarks above, on question 1.) — 5) Because the only remain- 
ing tolerable translation, for he is a liar, and so is his father, 
(Midd.) is liable to two serious objections : (a) So must, in this 
case, be supplied, which it were desirable to avoid. — (b) He 
would be, in this case, so emphatic as to require something 



to represent it in the Original, as avrpe, (compare ch. 2 : 12.) 
— 6) Finally, because I have seen no translation as yet that 
seems to convey the meaning of the Spirit so clearly, simply, 
and forcibly, as the one I propose. But of the translation 
itself, as well as of the reasons given to enforce it, the candid 
reader will judge for himself. — See Scholefield, in loco. 

The above remarks are based upon the supposition that the 
Text has come down to us pure. AVakefield, however, has 
suggested that the original and true reading may have been, 
braf λαλτι τι; ψενίσς, when any one speaketh falsehood ; but, 
as Midd. observes, there is no need for this conjecture. A more 
probable conjecture would be this, that instead of όταν, the 
true reading may have been όσ αν, uhoerer. This would re- 
quire the change of but one letter, and, if admitted, would 
clear the passage of the last vestige of difficulty. But, as the 
text, in its present form, though not without its difficulties, is 
susceptible of a satisfactory interpretation, I vastly prefer the 
concurrent testimony of all the MSS. to any conjecture, how- 
ever plausible. 

■■ It has been remarked already, that το ψευδοί is an abstract 
noun. Now falsehood is the best word we have, that is used 
abstractly, to express the idea. It would, indeed, be desirable, 
to retain in the translation the resemblance between the ab- 
stract and the personal noun, as between ψενδο; and ψενατη!; 
but I prefer to sacrifice this object, rather than to render an 
abstract noun by a concrete. If'it be objected, that falaehood 
is not so strong a term as lie, I reply, that probably the former 
expresses the meaning of ynioi even better than the latter. 



66 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. VIII. 



KING JAMEs' VERSION. 

a devil ; but I honour my Father, 
and ye do dishonour me. 



50 And I seek not mine own 
glory : there is one that seeketh 
and judgeth. 

51 Verily, verily, I say unto 
you, If a man keep my saying, 
he shall never see death. 



52 Then said the Jews unto 
him, Now we know that thou 
hast a devil. Abraham is dead, 
and the prophets ; and thou say- 
est. If a man keep my saying, 
he shall never taste of death. 



53 Art thou greater than our 
father Abraham, which is dead ? 
and the prophets are dead : 
whom makest thou thyself? 

54 Jesus answered, If I honour 
myself, my honour is nothing : 
it is my Father that honoureth 
me, of whom ye say, that he is 
your God. 

55 Yet ye have not known 



GREEK TEXT. 

8αιμονίον ουκ «χω, άλλα τιμώ 
τον ττατερα μου, και νμβΐί άτΐ' 
μάζβτβ μ€. 

50 €γω δΐ ου ζητώ την δοζαν 
μου• ΐστιν ο ζητών και κρίνων. 

51 αμήν αμήν λέγω υμΐν, ίαν 
τΐ9 τον λογον τον Ιμον τήρηση, 
θάνατον ού μη θΐωρηστι ei? τον 
αιώνα. 

52 ΈίτΓον οδν αΰτω οι Ιου• 
δαΐοι, Νυν βγνωκαμεν οτι δαιμο- 
νιον ί'χίί?• Αβραάμ άττίθανΐ 
καΧ οι ττροφηται, καΐ συ λίγαί, 
'Έάν τις τον λογον μου τήρηση, 
ού μη γβυσ€ται θανάτου et? τον 
αΙώνα. 

53 μη συ μείζων el του ττατ- 
ρο9 ημών Αβραάμ, όστις aire- 
θαν€ ; και οϊ ττροφηται άπίθανον 
τίνα. σίαυτον συ ττοιβις , 

54 ΆτΓβκρίθη Ίησοΰς, Εαν 
ϊγώ δοξάζω βμαυτον, ή δόζα μου 
ούδίν ΐστιν βστιν ό πατήρ μου 
ο δοζάζων μ€, ον ύμίϊί λε/ετε, 
ΟΤΙ θΐοί υμών Ιστι, 

55 και ουκ έγνωκατί αυτόν, 



REVISED VERSION. 

a «demon ; but I honor my Fa- 
ther, and YE dishonor me. 



50 "But I seek not "my glory: 
there is one that seeketh, and 
judgeth. 

51 Verily, verily, I say to you, 
if any one keep my ''word, he 
shall never see death. 



52 The Jews, therefore, said 
to liini. Now we know that thou 
liast a 'demon. Abraham died, 
and the prophets : and thou 
sayest. If any one keep my 
"word, he shall never taste of 
death. 



53 Art THOU greater than our 
father, Abraham, who died, ''and 
the prophets died ? Whom mak- 
est THOU thyself? 

54 Jesus answered. If I 
'glorify myself, my 'glory is 
nothing : it is my Father who 
•glorifieth me, of Λvhom ye say, 
that he is your God. 

55 f And ye have not known 



' There is no emphasis on an enclitic, in any case. The 
emphatic word own is, therefore, an addition to the word of God. 
which I would reject, as entirely uncalled for. 

'' There seems to be no particular saying of the Savior here 
referred to, as is the case in ch. G : 60 ; 7 : 36, 40. I would 
rather prefer, therefore, with W., R., Dodd., Wesl., Nary, Pcnn, 
Kenr., to translate it word, meaning, the word of God, in general, 
as in vv. 31, 37, 43, and elsewhere. T. has sayings, conveying 
the idea more exactly, but needlessly using the plural for the 
singular. — Newc. (words). 

<■ Most of the Verss. have the note of interrogation before 
tlie clause, and the prophets died, which is taken indicatively, 
some rendering the και of this clause, also. There are some 
however, who place it as I have done, as De W., Lus., Trem. 
The last two insert than, before the prophets. I am satisfied 
that the expression, and the prophets died, ought to be in- 
cluded in the interrogation. The idea is evidently, (from the 
preceding verse,) "Art thou greater than our father Abraham 



and the prophets, all of whom diedl" This idea cannot be 
properly expressed in a literal translation, without placing the 
note of interrogation where I have placed it. If it be objected 
to this, that this punctuation does violence to the rules of gram- 
matical structure, I reply, that this is a case of frequent oc- 
currence, in the conversational style, (to which this passage 
properly belongs) ; and, indeed, no sane writer of origmal 
matter would think of confining himself, in relating a conversa- 
tion, to the formal, and often frigid, rules of grammar and 
rhetoric. This form of questioning is, it is true, unusual in 
books, but nothing could be more natural in conversation. 

• The verb, δοξαζιιν, is rendered, to honor, only here, and in 
1 Cor. 12 : 26. Once (Rom. 11 : 13,) it is rendered to magnify. 
The proper word for to honor, is τιμαειν. For the sake of uni- 
formity, I would always render δοξηζειν, to glorify. For a 
similar reason, I would render δόξα, glory, nearly, if not quite, 
always. 

"■ "And ye have not known him, but I know him." Here is 
evidently an antithesis. But the fact does not appear in the 
E. v., because xai is rendered, yet. — W., T., G., R. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IX. 



67 



KING JAMES VERSIOX. 

him ; but I know him : and if I 
should say, I Ivuow him not, I 
sluill be a liar like unto you : 
but I know him, and keep his 
saying. 

56 Your fiither Abraham re- 
joiced to see my day : and he 
saw it, and was glad. 

57 Then said the Jews unto 
him. Thou art not yet fifty years 
old, and hast thou seen Abra- 
ham? 

58 Jesus said unto them. Ver- 
ily, verily, I say unto you, Be- 
fore Abraham was, I am. 

59 Then took they up stones 
to cast at him : but Jesus hid 
himself, and went out of the 
temple, going through the midst 
of them, and so passed by. 



CHAP. IX. 

And as Jesus passed by, he 
saw a man which was blind 
from /lis birth. 

2 And his disciples asked him, 
saying. Master, who did sin, this 
man, or his parents, that he was 
born blind ? 

3 Jesus answered, Neither 
hath this man sinned, nor his 
parents : but that the νΛ -orks of 
God should be made manifest in 
him. 

4 I must work the works of 
him that sent me, while it is 



GREEK TEXT. 

βγω 8e οίδα αντον και eav βίττω 
οτι οΰκ οΙδα αΰτον, βσομαι ομοιοί 
υμών, ψίνστηί' αλλ οΙδα αυτόν, 
καΐ τον λογον αύτοΰ τηρώ. 

56 'Αβραάμ 6 ττατηρ υμών 
ηγαλλίασατο Ινα Ίδτ] την ήμβραν 
την (μην καΐ ίίδζ καΐ (χάρη. 

57 ΈΙτΓον ου ν οϊ Ιουδαίοι 
irpos αύτον, Π(ντηκοντα (τη 
ουπω (χ(ίί, καΐ Αβραάμ (ωρα- 
καί ; 

58 ΈΙτΓΐν αύτοΐς ο Ίησοΰί, 
Άμην άμην λ(γω ΰμΐν, πρΙν 
Άβρααμ γ€ν(σθαι, ίγω (ΐμι. 

59 Ήραν ούν λίθουί Ινα βα- 
λωσιν (ττ αύτον Ιησοΰζ δ( 
(κρύβη, καΐ (ζηλθβν (κ του 1(ροΰ, 
δκλθών δια μ(σου αυτών κα\ 
τταρηγΐν ούτως. 

CHAP. IX. 

Κοί τταραγων (ίδίν ανθρωπον 
τυφλον (Κ γενβτηί. 

2 καΐ ηρωτησαν αυτόν οΐ μα- 
θηταΧ αύτοΰ λ(γοντ(9, ΡαββΊ, 
τΐζ ημαρτβν, ούτος η ol γονας 
αύτοΰ, ίνα τυφλός γεννηθη ; 

ο Άπίκρίθη ο Ιησοΰς, Οΰτ( 
ούτος ημαρτ(ν οΰτ( οϊ γονβΐς αύ- 
τοΰ• άλλ' ίνα φανΐρωθη τα (ργα 
τοΰ θ(θΰ (V αύτω. 

4 e'/xc δ(ΐ (ργαζίσθαι τα (ργα 
τοΰ ττ^μψαντος μβ (ως ημ(ρα 



REVISED VERSION. 

him ; but I know him : and if I 
say, 'that I know him not, I siiall 
be like you, a liar : but I know 
him, and keep his Hvord. 

56 ""Abraham, your father, 
rejoiced, 'that he should see my 
day ; and he saw, and was glad. 

57 The Jews, therefore, said 
to him. Thou art not yet fifty 
3'ears old, and hast thou seen 
Abraham "? 

58 Jesus said to them. Verily, 
verily, I say to you, Before 
Abraham was, I am. 

59 They took up stones, 
therefore, 'that they might cast 
[them] at him : but Jesus hid 
himself, and went -"forth out of 
the temple, 'going through the 
midst of them, and so passed by. 

CHAP. IX. 

And, ^passing by, he saw a 
man blind from birth. 

2 And his disciples asked him, 
saying, ''Rabbi, who sinned, "ήε, 
or his parents, that be was born 
blind •? 

3 Jesus answered. Neither did 
"HE sin, nor his parents : but, 
that the works of God may be 
'manifested in him. 

4 I must work the works of 
him that sent me, while it is 



^ There is nothing here to prevent the translation of ότι. 

' Abraham is proper!}' the subj. of the Terb., and father is 
in apposition. 

' See oh. 1 : 7, N. k. 

' Whenever the double preposition, (in the case of compound 
verbs, followed by their own prepositions.) can be expressed 
without injury to the sentence, I prefer to do so. Here, I 
think, the style is improved by the insertion oi forth. 

^ Griesb., and Tisch., omit the words, SteX. . . . οίτωί, which 
are put in brackets by Knapp, and Lachm. They are wanting 



in the Vulgate, and other ancient Λ^'βΓβΙοιίΒ, as also in several 
ancient MSS. Beza considered them spurious. — "Additum 
(δκλΟ-ων . . . αντων,) putant £Vffsm,, Grot., ex Luc. 4 : 30, 
interprementi causa, ut et quod sequitur, κα» 7iaot;yer ovrtos, 
ex initio Cap. sequentis•" (Mill.) 

» I translate this verse literally, omitting all the supplies of 
the E. Ύ'. which are evidently unnecessary. 

^ See N. g., ch. 1 : 49.— See, for he, ch. 1 : 2, N. c. 

' Se N. s, ch. 1 : 31. 



68 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IX. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

day : the night cometh, when no 
man can work. 

5 As long as I am in tlie world, 
I am the light of the world. 

6 When he had thus spoken, 
lie spat on the ground, and made 
clay of the spittle, and he anointed 
the eyes of the blind man with the 
clay, 



7 And said unto him, Go, wash 
in the pool of Siloam (which is 
by interpretation, Sent). He went 
his way therefore, and washed, 
and came seeing. 



8 The neighbours therefore, 
and tliey whicli liefore had seen 
him that he was blind, said. Is not 
this he that sat and begged ? 



9 Some said. This is he : others 
said, He is like him : but he said, 
I am he. 



GREEK TEXT. 

eariv ϊργίταί ννζ, ore οΰδεί? 
δυΐ'αταί €ργαζ(σθαι. 

5 οται/ eV τω κοσμώ ώ, φώ: 
ίίμι του κόσμου. 

6 Ταντα ύττων, ίτττνσβ -χα• 
μοίΧ, καΐ ϊποίησί ττηλον ϊκ τον 
ΤΓτυσματοί, και (π€χ^ρισ€ τον 
■πηΧον ίττΐ τους οφθαλμούς του 
τυφλού, 

ι καΙ ύπίν αύτω, Υτταγί 
ι>ίψαί €19 την κολνμβηθραν του 
Σιλωαμ, ο (ρμηνβυίται, aire- 
σταλμΐνος. απηλθίν ούν καΙ 
€νιψατο, και ήλθβ βλίττων. 

8 01 ούν yeLTOves καΐ οΐ θίω- 
ρουντΐί αυτόν το ττροτίρον οτι 
τυφλός ην, βλεγον, Ουχ^ ούτος 
icTTiv ό καθημβνος καΐ ττροσαί- 
τών ; 

9 ' Αλλοί ίλίγον, Οτι ούτος 
(στιν αλλοί oe, (Jtl όμοιος 
αύτω ΐστιν. 'Έκβϊνος ϊλ^γβν, 

ϋτι ίγω ίίμι. 



REVISED VERSION. 

day : night is coming, when no 
one can work. 

5 ■'While I am in the world, I 
am the light of the world. 

6 Saying Hhese things, he spit 
on the ground, and made clay of 
the spittle, and 'rubbed the clay 
upon the eyes of the blind man ; 



7 And said to him. Go, wash 
"thyself at the pool of Siloam 
(which is '■interpreted. Sent). He 
went, therefore, and washed ^him- 
self, and came seeing. 



8 The neighbors, therefore, and 
those who saw him before, that 
he was 'blind, said. Is not tliis he 
that was sitting and begging ? 



9 Some said. This is' : others, 
'It is like him : he said, I am 
he. 



* E. v., 1 Cor. 3 : 4. — This word is almost always rendered 
ΐίίΛβίΐ. la this, and a very few other cases, it will not bear 
the ordinary translation. I prefer while to as long as, be- 
cause it has the same meaning, is more literal, and is equally 
elegant. 

« See ch. 5:1, N. a. — I would always, in such a con- 
nection as this, translate ταντα, these things, never so, or 
thus. 

"■ Anointed will do very well, when the object is οφθαλμούς, 
or any similar word, as the English Version has made it read 
here, but most unwarrantably. To rub, or smear, is undoubtedly 
the meaning in this verse, where πηλον is the object of the 
action. — T., C, G., and others {smeared) ; E. V., marg. [spread 
tL• day). 

* This verb is in the middle voice, and is never used in the 
sense of the active, in this form. It is generally supposed that 
the direction given did not require that he should wash his 
entire body, since this word is used of the washing of a part 
only of the body, in very many cases (see ch. 13 : 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 
14, and elsewhere), while Ιονω signifies to bathe, or wash the 
whole body. Perhaps, he understood the direction to mean 



simply, " wash thine eyes ;" but this is not said, for which reason 
I prefer the literal translation. 

" See ch. 1 : 42, N". v. 

' Almost all critics, at the present day, regard προοαιτης 
as the true reading. Bloomfield, however, defends the tvjpos 
of the Textus Receptus, but, I think, on insufficient grounds. I 
would, therefore, recommend that the former be adopted, and 
rendered, a beggar ; and that this note appear in the margin. : 
According to some copies, blind. — W., T., C, B., A^ulg., Germ., 
and others. 

' The English Version supplies he. The real supply would be, 
he that was sitting and begging, not only in these cases, but in 
the other answer contained in this verse. I can not see that any 
supply is really needed. I call the he of the English Version 
a supply, though, in the first case, it is not so indicated by the 
Italic character, because it is by no means implied in the words 
of the Orig. It can not be the nom. understood to eoztv, for 
it stands, not as subj., but as pred. — Dodd. (not correctly) (ίί 
is he). 

k There is but little real difference between it is, and he is, 
in this case. Still, I think the sense is more clearly expressed 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IX. 



69 



KIXG JAMES VERSION. 

10 Tlierefore said they unto 
Iiim, How were thine eyes open- 
ed? 

11 He answered and said, A 
man tliat is called Jesus, made 
clay, and anointed mine eyes, and 
said unto nie, Go to tlie ]iool of 
Siloani, and wash : and 1 wont and 
washed, and 1 received sight. 



12 Then said they unto him, 
Where is he? He said I know 
not. 

13 They brought to the Phari- 
sees him that aforetime was blind. 



14: And it was the sabbath-day 
when Jesus made the clay, and 
opened his eyes. 

15 Then again the Pharisees 
also asked him how he had re- 
ceived his sight. He said unto 
them, He ])ut clay upon mine eyes, 
and I washed, and do see. 



16 Therefore said some of the 
Pharisees, This man is not of 
God, because he kecpeth not the 
sabbath-day. Others said, How 
can a man that is a sinner do such 



GREEK TEXT. 

10 Ελζγον ovu αύτώ, Uuis 
αν^ωγθησαν σου o'l οφθαλμοί ; 

11 ΆτΓίκρίθη (KeifOi κα\ el- 
7Γ(ΐ', 'Ανθρωπος λεγόμενος 'Ιη- 
σούς ττηλον (ΤΓΟίησΐ, και ewe- 
χρισζ μου τους οφθαλμούς, και 
etVe μοι, Υπαγβ €ΐς την κολυμ- 
βηθραν τον Σιλωαμ, καΐ νίψαι. 
άπ^λθων 8e καΐ νιψαμΐνος, άνί- 
βλίψα. 

1 2 ΕΙτΓον ονν αύτώ. Που 
Ιστίν €Κίϊνος ; Λίγβι, Ουκ οΐ- 
δα. 

13 Αγουσιν αύτον ττρος 
τους Φαρισαωυς, τον ττοτί τν- 
φλόν. 

14 ην δβ σαββατον, οτ€ τον 
ττηλον ίποίησίν ό Ίησονς, κα\ 
άνΐωξίν αύτοΰ τους οφθαλμούς. 

1^ τταλιν ούν ηρώτων αύτον 
καΐ οϊ Φαρισαΐοι, ττώς άνίβλί- 
ψίν. ό δβ eiirev αύτοϊς, Πη- 
λον ΐτΓβθηκίν €7Γ£ τους οφθαλ- 
μούς μου, και ίνιψαμην, κα). 
βλίττω. 

16 Ελβγον ούν ίκ των Φαρι- 
σαίων τινβς. Ούτος ο άνθρω- 
πος ούκ βστι τταρα τοΰ θίοΰ, 
OTL το σαββατον ού τήρα.. 'Αλ- 
λοι ί'λβγον, Πώς δύναται άνθρω- 
πος αμαρτωλός τοιαύτα σημίΐα 



REVISED VERSION. 

10 They said to him, therefore, 
How were thine eyes opened ? 

11 He answered, and said, A 
man called Jesus made clay, and 
rubbed my eyes, and said to ine, 
Go to the 'pool of Siloam, and 
wasli ^thyself: and, "On going 
and washing 'myself, I received 
sight. 



12 They said to him, therefore, 
Where is he ? He saith, I know 
not. 

13 They bring to the Pharisees 
liim that was °ouce blind. 



1-1 Now it was the Sabbath, 
when Jesus made the clay, and 
opened his eyes. 

15 Again, therefore, the Phari- 
sees also were asking him how he 
received sight. And he said to 
them. He put clay on mine eyes, 
and I washed ^myself, and do see. 



16 Some of the Pharisees, there- 
fore, said. This man is not of 
God, because he keepeth not 
the Sabbath. Others said. How 
can a "sinful man do such 'signs ? 



by tbe former. — Doddridge. — There are a few Manuscripts and 
several versions, that insert ονχι αλλ' before ότι. I do not con- 
sider this reading, though it is very ancient, to be very well 
sustained. 



1 Griesb., Lachm., and Tisoli. reject κολνμβηΟ-ραν τον, and 
read τον for n;r. This reading is sustained by good and very 
ancient authorities, and I think it should be adopted. I would, 
therefore, leave out pool of. 

" These participles being aorists, as also the verb, ηνεβλεψη, 
the several actions would seem to be represented as simulta- 



neous : but it is evident that they can not be all absolutely so ; 
they, however, followed each other in immediate and rapid 
succession, which accounts for the mode of narration adopted 
by the Evangelists. I prefer the participial form to the finite, 
for reasons which have been given aheady. See General Ob- 
servations 4. 

° Rob. — This is the usual rendering of ποτέ. 

° Rob. — 'Λμαρτωλο9 is sometimes used as an adjective. — W., 
Fr. S.,-M. 

Ρ See cb. 2 : 11, N. x. 



η 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IX. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

miracles ? And there was a divi- 
sion among them. 

17 They say unto the blind 
man again, Wliat sayest thou of 
bim, that he hath opened thine 
eyes ? He said, He is a prophet. 



18 But the Jews did not be- 
lieve concerning him, that he had 
been blind, and received his sight, 
until they called the parents of 
biui that had received his sight. 

19 And they asked them, say- 
ing, Is this your son, wlio ye say 
was born blind? How then doth 
lie now see? 

20 His parents answered them 
and said, We know that this is 
our son, and that he was born 
blind : 

21 But by what means he now 
seeth, we know not ; or who hath 
opened his eyes, we know not : 
he is of age ; ask him : he shall 
speak for himself. 



22 These words spake his pa- 
rents, because they feared the 
Jews : for the Jews had agreed 
ah-eady, that if any man did 



GREEK TEXT. 

TTOLtiv ; KaL σχ^ίσμα ήν eu av- 

TOLf. 

17 Λβγουσι τω τυφλω πά- 
λιν, Συ τι Xeyeis Trepl αντού, 
Ότι ηνοιξβ σου τους οφθαλμοόί ; 

Ο 8e ύπβν, Οτι ττρυφητηί 
Ιστίν. 

18 Ουκ ίπίστίυσαν ουν οϊ 
Ιουδαίοι vrepl αύτοΰ, ότι τυφλοί 
ήν και άμββλίψβν, εω$• oroi» ξφω- 
νησαν τουί γονύς αύτοΰ του 
άναβλίψαντοί, 

19 και ή ρώτησαν αυτούς λβ- 
γοντβς, Ούτος ίστιν ο νιος υμών, 
Όν υμζΐς Aeycre οτι τυφλός iyev- 
νηθη ; ττώς ούν άρτι βλίττΕί; 

-^0 ΛτΓβκρίθησαν αύτοΐς οϊ 
γονείς αύτοΰ kcu ίίττον, ΟΊδαμ^ν 
ΟΤΙ ούτος €στιν ό νιος ημών, /cat 
ΟΤΙ τυφλός €γ€ννηθη• 

-Ί ττώς δε νΰν βλεπβι, ούκ 
οΊδαμίν η τίς ηνοιζΐν αύτοΰ 
τους οφθαλμούς, ήμΰς ούκ οϊδα- 
μβν αύτος ήλικίαν ίχ(ΐ' αύτον 
{ρωτησατ€, αυτός Trepl αύτοΰ 
λαλησΐΐ. 

■^■ί Ταύτα eiTTOv οι γονίΐς αύ- 
τοΰ, ΟΤΙ (φοβοΰντο τους 'Ιου- 
δαίους• ήδη γαρ συνβτ^θβιντο οι 
Ιουδαίοι, 'ίνα eav τις αύτον ομο- 



REVISED VERSION. 

And there was division among 
them. 

17 Tliey say to the blind man 
again, What sayest thou of him, 
■"seeing that he opened thine eyes? 
'And he said, "That he is a 
prophet. 

18 The Jews, therefore, did not 
believe concerning him, that he 
was blind, and received sight, till 
they called the parents of him 
that received sight, 



19 And asked tiiem, saying. Is 
this your son, 'of whom ye say, 
'That he was born bh'nd ? How, 
then, doth he now see ? 

20 His parents answered them, 
and said. We know that this is 
our son, and that he was born 
blind : 

21 But how he now seeth, we 
know not ; or who opened his 
eyes, we know not: he is, "him- 
self, of age ; ask him : he, ■■"him- 
self, shall speak 'concerning him- 
self. 



22 These things "said his pa- 
rents, because they "were afraid 
of the Jews : for the Jews had 
agreed already, that if any one 



' Ότι frequently lias this sense. — Some suppose that there 
are two questions, viz.: "What sayest thou of him? that he 
hath opened thine eyes ? " — but this is evidently Λvrong : for the 
blind man takes no notice whatever of this second question, 
which would, in that case, be the principal one. I talse the 
meaning to be, What hast thou to say, as to the character of 
this man, since thou art fully convinced that he opened thine 
eyes, and that, too, on the Sabbath ? This view is confirmed by 
the use of tlie emphatic pronoun ov, q. il., We say. that this man 
is an impostor, because he did this thing on Sabbath : others say, 
No, this is not the work of an impostor ; now what sayest 
thou ? — T., C, G. {because) ; Newc, Dodd. {since) ; Wesl. {for 
that).^Since is ambignious. 

' See Gen. Obs. 6. 

• There is no reason why ότι should not be translated here, as, 



from the context, the reader will readily perceive that I say is 
to be supplied. 

' The version I have given of this clause is perfectly literal, 
and, I think, much more elegant than the B. Λ^. 

" AvTos, in the nom. is = ipse. Perhaps, the frequent use of 
this pronoun here may be accounted for by the extreme anxiety 
of the parents to avoid a collision with the rulers of the Syna- 
gogue, by throwing the responsibility entirely on their son. — 
See ch. 2 : 12, N. z. 

» Doddridge, Wesley, Penn, Vulgate, Schott, Erasmus, Beza. 
— English Version, v. 18, above. — For himself is, in this case, 
ambiguous. 

" E. V. generally. — See ch. 1 : 15, N. g. 

' English Version, ch. 6 : 19, 20 ; 19 : 8, and elsewhere 
frequently. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IX. 



71 



KIXG JAMES VERSION. 

confess that he was Christ, he 
should be put out of the syna- 
gogue. 

23 Therefore said his parents, 
He is of age ; ask him. 



24 Then again called thej^ the 
man that was blind, and said 
unto him, Give God the praise : 
we know that this man is a 
sinner. 

25 He answered and said, 
Whether he be a sinner or no, 
I know not : one thing I know, 
that, whereas I was blind, now 
I see. 

26 Then said they to him 
again. What did he to thee ? 
how opened he thine eyes? 

27 He answered them, I have 
told you already, and ye did not 
hear : wherefore would ye hear 
u again ? v^'ill ye also be his 
disciples ? 



28 Then they re\aled him, and 
said. Thou art his disciple ; but 
we are Moses' disciples. 



29 We know that God spake 



GREEK TEXT. 

λογησττι Χριστον, άττοσνναγωγοζ 

23 δία τοΰτο οί γονβΐί αντοΰ 
(ΙτΓον, Οτι ήλικιαΐ' ίχ^ι, αύτον 
ίρωτησατΐ. 

24 Εφωνησαν ονν €Κ Sevre- 
ρου τον άνθρωποι' Of ην τυφλός, 
και elivov αντω, zJo? δοζαν τω 
Θ(ώ' ημ€Ϊ9 ο'ίδαμ€ν οτι 6 άνθρω- 
7Γ0$• ούτος αμαρτωλός βστιν. 

25 ΛτΓΐκρίθη ούν (.Ktivos και 
eiirev, ΕΙ αμαρτωλός ίστιν, ουκ 
οίδα• ev οίδα, οτι τυφλός ών, 
άρτι βλίττω. 

26 Ειττον δΐ αύτω τταλιν, Τι 
ίΤΓοίησβ σοι ; ττώς ηνοίζί σον 
τους οφθαλμούς ; 

27 Άπ€κρίθη αϋτοϊς, Ειττον 
ύμιν ηδη, και ουκ ηκουσατβ- τι 
τταλιν θβλβτΐ άκουβιν ; μη και 
ύμ€Ϊς θίλ€Τ€ αύτοΰ μαθηταΐ ye- 
νίσθαι ; 

28 Έλοιδορησαν ούν αύτον, 
καΐ eiTTOv, Συ ei μαθητής (κείνου• 
ήμ€Ϊς δί του Μωσεως βσμίν μα- 
θηταί. 

29 ημείς οΊδαμβν οτι Μωσΐι 



REVISED VERSION. 

should confess him ['to be] 
Christ, he should be put out of 
the SA'nagogue. 

23 "Because of this his parents 
said, He is of age ; ask him. 



24 They called, therefore, ^a 
second time, the man who was 
blind, and said to him, Give 
'glory to God : ΛνΕ know that 
this man is a sinner. 

25 He ansΛvered, therefore, 
and said, ■'If he is a sinner, I 
know not : one thing I do know, 
that, 'having been blind, now I 
see. 

26 'And they said to him 
again, What did he do to thee l 
how did he open thine eyes? 



27 He answered them, I told 
you ^just now, and ye did not 
why 'do ye wish to hear 
are ve also 
'become his disciples ? 



hear : 
again ? 



willing to 



28 They reviled him, 'there- 
fore, and said, thou art his dis- 
ciple ; but WE are disciples of 
Moses. 

29 We know that God hath 



' Some supply tivnt, to be. I apprehend that there is noth- 
ing omitted in the Greek, for the form of the sentence is not 
the usual form of the ace. with the infinitive ; but the Engl, 
idiom will not admit of a perfectly literal translation. Indeed, 
I am well satisfied that ομολογεω^ like τ•ομιζω^ 7^γεομαι, &€., 
verbs of similar meaning, governs two accusatives, as, in this 
case, avTot• and Χριστον. 

« See Gen. Obs. 6. 

^ Newc, Dodd., Wesl., Penn. — I suppose ex δειτερον is 
equivalent to Βεντερον, ch. 3 : 4. 

' I translate literally. ''The words," says Bio., ''are a 
form of expression often employed in the 0. T. in order to 
seriously admonish any one to speak the truth, (see Josh. 
7 : 18, 19. 1 Sam. 6 : 5. Jer. 13 : 16.)"— W., G., R., .and others. 

•^ Dodd., Nary, Kenr., Fr. S.,-M., and others.— This is the 
most literal translation I could find, and, as far as I can see, 
quite elegant. 



' The pres. part, will not here admit of being rendered by 
the present tense. Still. I prefer to retain the participial form. 
T., C, and G. have, " that I was blind, and now I see," (ότί 
TVfXos Γ^μτ^ν, xai αοτι βΙ-ετιω,^ for which there is ancient 
authority. (Giiii., Colh. 8., and Aethiop. See Mill., in loco.) 

' See Gen. Obs. 6. 

^ IlSr; frequently means, just now. (see Rob.) I prefer this 
rendering here, because the reference is to ivhat had been said 
only a moment before. 



>■ E. v., ch. 1 : 25 ; 7 
where. 



19 ; 18 : 21, .ind very often clse- 



' See N. y, ch. 1 : 43. 

1 Vulg., Dodd., Kenr., R., Germ., De W. 

k Almost all the editors reject this ow. I would leave oit 
there/ore. 



72 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IX. 



KING JAMEs' VERSION. 

unto Moses ; as for this fellow, 
we know not from whence he is. 

30 The man answered and 
said unto them, Why, herein is a 
marvellous thing, that ye know 
not from whence he is, and yet 
he hath opened mine eyes. 

31 ΝοΛν we know that God 
heareth not sinners : but if any 
man be a Λvorshipper of God, and 
doeth his will, him he heareth. 

32 Since the world began was 
it not heard that any man opened 
the eyes of one that was born 
blind. 

33 If this man were not of 
God, he could do nothing. 

34 They answered and said 
unto him, Thou wast altogether 
born in sins, and dost thou teach 
us ? And they cast him out. 

35 Jesus heard that they had 
cast him out : and when he had 
found him, he said unto him, 
Dost thou believe on the Son of 
God •? 

36 He answered and said. 
Who is he. Lord, that I might 
believe on him ? 

37 And Jesus said unto him. 
Thou hast both seen him, and 
it is he that talketh with thee. 

38 And he said. Lord, I be- 
lieve. And he worshipped him. 

39 And Jesus said, For judg- 
ment I am come into this world ; 



GREEK TEXT. 

λίλαληκ^ν 6 Oeof τούτον 8e ουκ 
οίδαμβΐ' ττοθβν Ιστίν. 

30 Λπ€κρίθη ό ανθρωτΓΟί και 
ehrev avTOLS, 'Έν γαρ τούτω θαν- 
μαστον ζστιν, otl νμΐΊί ουκ οί- 
δατ€ ττοθΐν ecrrt, καΐ άι>€ωζβ μου 
τους• οφθαλμού?. 

31 οίδαμίν 8e Οτι αμαρτωλών 
ο Oeos ουκ άκουβι• άλΧ eav tis 
θίοσζβηζ 7], κα). το θίλημα αύτοΰ 
TToirj, τούτου άκουΐΐ. 

32 c/c του αΐώνο? ουκ ηκοΰσθη, 
ΟΤΙ ή'νοιζβ τι? οφθαλμού? τυφλού 
γβγΐννημβνου. 

33 (Ι μη ή ν ούτοΐ τταρα θβοΰ, 
ουκ ηδυνατο ττοιΰν οϋδίν. 

34 ΑτΓζκριθησαν και βίττον 
αυτω, Έν άμαρτίαις συ iyevvr]- 
θη? ολο?, και συ διδάσκει? ή μα?; 
Και (ζίβαλον αύτον ίζω. 

35 Ηκουσΐν ο Ιησοΰ? οτι 
ίζεβαλον αύτον ϊ'ςω• και εύρων 
αυτόν, enrev αυτω, 2,υ ττιστίυΕί? 
ύ? τον υ'ιον του θεού ; 

36 ΑτΓίκρίθη ΐΚ€Ϊνο? καΐ etVe, 
Τι? εστί, κυρΐ€, 'ίνα ττιστευσω el? 
αύτον ; 

37 -EtVe δε αύτω ο Ιησού?, 
ΚαΙ ίωρακα? αύτον, και ο λαλών 
μετά σου, εκείνο? εστίν. 

38 Ο δε εφη. Πιστεύω, κύ- 
ριε• καΐ ττροσεκυνησεν αύτω. 

39 και €£^61» ό 'Ιησού?, ΕΙ? 
κρίμα εγω ε\? τον κοσμον τούτον 



REVISED VERSION. 

spoken to Moses ; but ihim — we 
know not whence he is. 

30 The man answered, and 
said to them, Why nin this is a 
"■wonder, that ye know not 
whence he is, and yet he opened 
my eyes ! 

31 Now we know that God 
heareth not sinners ; but if any 
one be a worshiper of God, and 
do his will, him he heareth. 

32 "From the beginning of the 
world it was not heard, that any 
one opened the eyes of one who 
had been born blind. 

33 If iHE were not of God, he 
could do nothinji. 

34 They answered, and said 
to him. Thou wast altogether 
born in sins, and dost thou teach 
us ? And they cast him out. 

35 Jesus heard that they cast 
him out: and finding him, he 
said to him. Dost thou believe 
on the Son of God ? 

36 He answered, and said, 
"Who is he, pSir, that I may be- 
lieve on him ? 

37 And Jesus said to him. 
Thou hast both seen him, and 
'he that is talkina; with thee is 
he. 

38 And he said, I believe. 
Lord. And he worshiped him. 

39 And Jesus said, For judg- 
ment came I into this world ; 



-This is more literal than 



I See ch. 1 : 2, N. c. 

II Newc, W., R.— E. V. often.- 
herein. 

"■ I see no reason why &ανμαστον may not be treated as a 
noun, as neuter adjectives often are. See E. V., 2 Cor. 11 : 14, 
where I would render it wonder, instead of marvel. 

° Bio., Newc, Dodd., Nary, Kenr. — This expression, and 
απ αιώνος, (απσ των αιώνων,) seem to be synonymous. The 
latter, which is used frequently, (this is used only here,) is 



rendered from the beginning of the workl, in Acts 15 : 18. 
Eph. 3:9. I consider this more literal than since the world 
began. 

° "I have," says Bio. "with almost all editors, from Wets, 
to Scholtz, inserted xat from very many of the best MSS., 
Versions, Fathers, and early Edd." I would, therefore, re- 
commend that this question begin thus : And who is he. 
Sir, &c. 

Ρ See N. Γ, ch. 6 : 34. 

' I have rendered this clause as literally as possible. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. X. 



73 



ICIXG JAMES VERSION. 

that tlicy wliicli see not niiglit 
see, and that tliey whicli see, 
might be made blind. 

40 And some of tlie Pharisees 
which were with him heard 
these words, and said unto him, 
Are we blind also ? 

41 .Jesus said unto them, If 
ye were blind, ye should have 
no sin : but now 3'e say, We see ; 
therefore your sin remaineth. 



CHAP. X. 

Vekily, verily, I say unto 
you. He that entereth not by 
the door into the sheepfold, but 
climbeth up some other way, the 
same is a thief and a robber. 

2 But he that entereth in by 
the door, is the shepherd of the 
sheep. 

3 To him the porter openeth ; 
and the sheep hear his voice : 
and he calleth his own sheep by 
name, and leadeth them out. 

4 And when he putteth forth 
his own sheep, he goetli before 
them, and the sheep follow him : 
for they know his voice. 



GREEK TEXT. 

ήλθον, ίνα OL μη βλίττοντΐ^ βλ(- 
ττωσι, και οί βλ^ττοντίς τυφλοί 
γίνωνται. 

40 Και ηκουσαν 4κ των Φαρι- 
σαιων ταΰτα οϊ όντβς μ€τ αύτον, 
και ίίπον αΰτω, Μη και ήμύς 
τυφλοί ίσμίν ; 

41 ΕΙττίν αυτοΐί 6 Ιησούς•, 
Ει τυφλοί ήτ€, ουκ αν ίΐχβτβ 
άμαρτίαν νυν 8e Aeyere, ' Οτι 
βλβτΓομΐν ή ούν αμαρτία υμών 
μίν€ΐ. 

CHAP. χ. 

ΑΜΗΝ άμην λίγω ύμΐν, ό 
μη uaep-^opevos δια τηί θύρας 
etf την αύλην των προβάτων, 
άλλα αναβαινων άλλαχοθίν, e/cet- 
VOS κλβτΓτηί Ιστ\ καΐ λτ]στηί• 

2 ο δΐ €ΐσ€ρχ^ομ€νοί δια τη? 
θύρας, ΤΓΟίμην ϊστι των προβά- 
των. 

ο τούτω ό θυρωρός ανοίγει, 
και τα πρόβατα της φωνής αντοΰ 
ακουΐΐ, κα\ τα ίδια πρόβατα καλεί 
κατ όνομα, κα\ Ιζάγει αυτά. 

4 και Όταν τα 'ίδια πρόβατα 
Ικβαλη, βμπροσθίν αυτών πο- 
ρεύεται• και τα πρόβατα αύτώ 
ακολουθεί, οτι ο'ιδασι την φων7]ν 
αυτού. 



REVISED VERSION. 

so that those not seeina; might 
see, and those seeing might 'be- 
come blind. 

40 And 'those of the Phari- 
sees who were with liim heard 
these things, and said to him. 
Are WE blind also ? 

41 Jesus said to them. If je 
were blind, ye would not have 
sin ; but now ye say. We see ; 
therefore, your sin 'abideth. 



CHAP. X. 

Verily, verily, I say to you. 
He that entereth not by the door 
into the fold "of the sheep, but 
■"goeth up 'another way, "^he is 
a thief and a robber. 

2 But he that 'cometh in by 
the door, is the shepherd of the 
sheep. 

3 To HixM the ''door-keeper 
openeth, and the sheep hear his 
voice, and he calleth his ΟΛνη 
sheep by name, and leadeth them 
out. 

4 And when he putteth forth 
his own "'sheep, he goeth before 
them, and the sheep follow him : 
"because they know his voice. 



■■ Be made is a stronger expression tlian is necessary to 
convey the idea of the Orig. 

■ 'Ot οΐ'τες, those who were, not some which were. There is 
no parlttive here. 

< See eh. 1 : 33, N. z. 

* W., R. — Fr. S.,-JI., {la bergerie des brebis.) — This is 
literal. If it be objected, that it is tmitological. I reply, so is 
the expression below, v. 2, '■ the shepherd of the sheep." 
Such familiar examples of tautology, in the eas_v, conversa- 
tional style of this Gospel, are by no means unpleasant. 

^ Only here, and in Luke 19 : 4, is αναβαινειν rendered, to 
climb up, in the E. V. I prefer, for the sake of uniformity, to 
render it htre, as elsewhere, to go up. 

' R., Nary, Kenr. 

^ See N. X, ch. 1 : 33. 



* T., G., (goeth in.) — It is not always practicable, to trans- 
late Εΐαερ/εα9•αι, to come in, (as, for example, in v. 1, above.) 
but whenever it is practicable, I vastly prefer the Anglo-Saxon 
phrase. — Dodd. 

■■ Door-keeper is quite as literal as porter, and has this ad- 
vantage, that its meaning cannot be mistaken, even by a child, 
while the word, porter, in this sense is seldom used, at least 
in this country. — Dodd., Wcsl. 

' Lachm. and Tisch., with several of the best MSS, and 
Verss. have παΐΎα, instead of πρόβατα. I think this reading 
is most probably the true one, and would, therefore, recommend 
that the Revision read, all his own, instead of his own sheep ; 
and that this note appear in the margin : According to some 
copies, his own sheep ; all being omitted. 

"■ See N. i, ch. 1 : 15. 



74 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. X. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 



5 And a stranger will they 
not follow, but will flee from 
him : for they know not the 
voice of strangers. 

6 This parable spake Jesus 
unto them : but they understood 
not v^fhat things they were which 
he spake unto them. 

7 Then said Jesus unto them 
again, Verily, verily, I say unto 
you, I am the door of the sheep. 



8 All that ever came before 
me are thieves and robbers : but 
the sheep did not hear them. 



9 I am the door : by me if 
any man enter in, he shall be 



GREEK TEXT. 

5 άλλοτρίω 8e ου μη άκολου- 
θησωσιν, άλλα (pev^ovraL άττ 
αντοΰ• OTL ουκ οίδασί των αλΧο- 
τρίων την φωνην. 

6 Ταυτην την τταροιμίαν βίττβν 
αύτοΐί ό Ιησοΰί• ϊκβΐνοι δβ ουκ 
ίγνωσαν τίνα ην α iXaXei αυτοΐς. 

7 Eiirev ούν τταλιν αύτοίς ό 
Ίησοΰί, Άμην άμην λΐγω ύμΐν, 
OTL βγω ζΐμί ή θύρα των προβά- 
των. 

8 ττάντβς οσοί ττρο ϊμοΰ ηλ- 
θον, κλβπταί βίσΐ κα). λησται• 
αλλ' ουκ ηκουσαν αυτών τα πρό- 
βατα. 

9 ϊγω βίμι η θύρα• Βι €μοΰ 
iav Tis ζίσβλθτ], σωθησβται, καΐ 



REVISED VERSION. 

/) But a stranger they will not 
follow, but will flee from him ; 
because they know not the voice 
of strangers. 

6 This parable spoke Jesus to 
them : but they 'knew not what 
things they were which he was 
Jsaying to them. 

7 Jesus, therefore, said to 
them again, Verily, verily, I say 
to you, I am the door of the 
sheep. 

8 All who '•came before me 
are thieves and robbers : but the 
sheep did not hear them. 



9 I am the door : by me if 
any one 'come in, he shall be 



' See N. c, ch. 8 : 27. 

' E. V. very often. I prefer this rendering of λαλεω, when 
the connection will bear it. — Dodd. (said.) 

'' Most interpreters have found a serious difficulty in this 
verse, of which various solutions have been given. Moses, 
and the prophets, say they, are uniformly spoken of by the 
Savior, elsewhere, in terms of the highest reverence ; but these 
came before him : how, then, does he here say. All who came 
before me are thieves and robbers ? This is the difficulty. 
''Many ancient and modern commentators," says Bio., "take 
προ for αΐΎΐ, and suppose an ellip. of εν τω ονόματι τον Πα- 
TQOS μον ; understanding it of false Christs, as Theudas and 
Judas of Galilee. This is also maintained by others, who take 
προ in the usual sense before." "The best solution of this 
difficulty is supposed to be that of Beng.. Rosenni., Camp., and 
Kuin., who think that ηλ&ον is to be taken of time recently 
past, and up to the present ; i. e. " have come ; " and that by 
the term is meant, ' have lately come in the character of teachers 
of God's people.'" Bio. himself says, "it is evident that the 
expression in question, oi προ εμον ηλΟ•ον, may very well mean 
those who before Christ had sustained the office of temporary 
mediators between God and man, (the high prie.'its,) but who 
were now disannulled by the disannulling of the old covenant, 
and the coming of a new and better Mediator, the Loid of the 
Temple himself." But to sustain this view, the learned critic 
is obliged to take πάντες in the sense of πολλοί, — a very con- 
venient way of getting rid of a difficulty, and, for that leason, 
perhaps, "admitted by alu ost every commentator." Penn has 
an interpretation more ingenious than plausible, if I am not 
mistaken. He translates thus : " all who come before me, 



the door;" and explains in the inarg.: "come before, i.e. 
keep without, enter not." — See the authors referred to above, 
171 loco, for a more full account of the views of commentators, 
on this point. For myself, I cannot see that there is the 
slightest difficulty in the premises. The phrase, " I am the 
door of the sheep," means simply, in plain English, 'Ί am the 
way to heaven, and happiness." This claim is set up, sub- 
stantially, by all the founders of false religions, as well as by 
very many professed teachers of the true religion, and it is 
against such founders and teachers, that the language of the 
eighth verse is aimed. — "All who came (at any time) before 
me, (as doors of t/ie sheep,) are thieves and robbers." — This 
denunciation did not, and could not, apply to Moses, or the 
prophets of the Old Dispensation, who "wrote" of Christ, and 
were proud to call him their leader, nor to John the Baptist, 
who uniformly told the people, " that they should believe on 
him that should come after him, that is, on Christ Jesus:" 
but it (//(/ apply to all those who pretended to have the kevs 
of the kingdom of heaven, — the power to save, or damn their 
fellow-creatures, at their will. It was especially applicable to 
the Scribes and Pharisees of that very day, who " shut up the 
kingdom of heaven against men," who would neither go in 
themselves, nor suffi?r those who were entering to go in. (Matt. 
23 : 13.) — There is another interpretation, suggested by the 
present, εισι, which I consider worthy of consideration, and, 
perhaps, free from any serious difficult)'. — "All who, (at any 
time,) come before me, (thrust themselves in before me, the 
Door, so as to conceal me, and take my place.) are thieves and 
robbers." There can be no doubt that προ will bear this ren- 
dering. — Upon the whole, however, I prefer the former inter- 
pretation. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. X. 



75 



KINB JAMES VERSION. 

saved, and shall go in and out, 
and find pasture. 

10 The thief cometh not, but 
for to steal, and to kill, and to 
destroy : I am come that they 
might liave life, and that they 
might have it more abundantly. 

11 I am the good slieplierd : 
the good shepherd giveth his life 
for the sheep. 



12 But he that is an hireling, 
and not the shepherd, whose 
own the sheep are not, seeth 
the wolf coming, and leaveth the 
sheep, and fleeth ; and the wolf 
catcheth them, and scattereth the 
sheep. 

13 The hireling fleeth, be- 
cause he is an hireling, and 
careth not for the sheep. 

14 I am the good shepherd, 
and know my sheep, and am 
known of mine. 



GREEK TEXT. 



ίΐσίλίυσίται καΐ i^eXevaerai, και 
νομην (νρησα. 

10 ό κλίΤΓτη? ουκ €ρχ€ταί (Ι 
μη 'ίνα κλΐψιι και θυστ) και αττο- 
Xear}' ίγω ήλθον 'ίνα ζωην ί'χωσι, 
/cat ΤΓ€ρισσον ϊγωσιν. 

11 Έγώ βιμι ό ττοιμην ό κα- 
λοί• 6 ΤΓΟίμην 6 καλοί την ψυχτ]ν 
αυτοΰ τιθησιν υττΐρ των προβά- 
των. 

12 ό μισθωτοί δε, και ουκ ων 
ΤΓΟιμην, ού ουκ ΐΐσΐ τα -πρόβατα 
ϊδια, θ(ωρ€Ϊ τον λυκον Ip^opevov, 
και άφίησι τα πρόβατα, κα). φξυ- 
γίΐ• και 6 λυκοί άρπαζβι αύτα, 
και σκορπίζίΐ τα πρόβατα. 

13 ό δβ μισθωτοί φΐυγίΐ, οτι 
μισθωτοί ΐστι, καΧ ου μβλίΐ αυτώ 
π€ρΙ των προβάτων. 

14 εγω βιμι ό ποιμην ό καλοί• 
και γινωσκω τα (μα, καΐ γινω- 
σκομαι υπο των βμών, 



REVISED VERSION. 

saved, and shall "'come in, and 
"go out, and find pasture. 

10 The thief cometh not, "un- 
less "that he may steal, and kill, 
and destroy : I came, ι hat they 
might have life, 'yea, might have 
it abundantly. 

Ill am the good shepherd : 
the good shepherd ''layetli down 
his life for the sheep. 



12 But he that is a hireling, 
and not a shepherd, whose own 
the sheep are not, seeth the wolf 
coming, and leaveth the sheep, 
and fleetii ; and the wolf catcheth 
them, and scattereth "the sheep. 



13 «Now the hireling fleeth, 
because he is a hireling, and he 
careth not for the sheep. 

14 I am the good shepherd : 
and I know "mine own, and "am 
known of mine own. 



" I adopt this rendering for the purpose of giving a literal 
translation. — Fr. S. [entiera et sorttra) ; Xary, Kenr. (go in and 
go out). — Penn. 

■' Whenever it is practicable, I prefer to render ει αη literally, 
if not. Otherwise, I prefer unless to but, or save, as being more 
elegant, and often more precise. 

• See ch. 1 : 7, K. k. 

ρ See ch. 1 : 20, N. u. I think, the clause " yea, might have 
abundantly,' is a reiteration of wliat precedes, expressed in 
stronger, and, at the same time, more general language. That 
theij, and it more, are left out, as unnecessary supplies. Have is 
sometimes used intransitively. See James 4 : 2. Perhaps, the 
real oljject would be, every object of lauful desire. 

' E. v.. vv. 15, 17, 18, and elsewhere. — Newcome, Doddridge, 
Wesley, Penn. — Though even a good shepherd does not often 
actually lo.<e his life in defending his sheep, yet he does very often 
risk it ; and he who risks his life, does, iu a certain sense, lay it 
down. 

' Tisch., with MSS. BDL, omits τα πρόβατα, which Lachm. 
puts in brackets. I think the internal evidences are against 
the received reading, and would, therefore, recommend the 



adoption of the other. This would render a slight change of 
collocation necessary, thus: and the wolf catcheth and scatter- 
eth them. I would put this note in' the margin : According 
to some copies, catcheth them, and scattereth the sheep. 

' The first part of the above remark, (ϊί. s,) applies equally 
to 6 Se μισθωτοί γενγει, of v. 13. I would also reject the En- 
glish corresponding to these words, and insert this note in the 
margin : According to some copies, JVbiu the hireling fleeth, 
liecause, &c. 

• 3Ii7ie own conveys a good sense, without any supply. — 
Nary, Penn. 

' Instead of γινωαχομαι νπο των εμων, three ancient MSS. 
(BDL) have γινωσχουαι με τα εμα. This reading is adopted 
by Lachm., Tisch., Penn, and others. It is also the reading of 
the Vulg. and most other ancient Verss., and of some Fathers. 
The internal evidence in favor of this reading amounts almost 
to demonstration. The first clause of the next verse, unless 
it be taken in immediate connection with this, can hardly be 
said to have any bearing whatever upon the subject in hand ; 
neither can it be taken thus in connection with this verse, if 
we letam the received reading; Imt by adopting the proposed 
reading, we obtain the following beautiful sense : "As the Fa- 
ther knoweth nie, so I know mine own ; and as I know the 
Father, so mine own know me." 



76 



THE GOSPEL. ΒΪ JOHN. CHAP. X. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

15 As the Father knoweth me, 
even so know I the Father : and 
I lay down my life for the sheep. 



16 And other sheep I have, 
which are not of this fold : them 
also I must bring, and they shall 
hear my voice ; and there shall 
be one fold, and one shepherd. 

17 Therefore doth my Father 
love me, because I lay down my 
life, that I miglit take it again. 

18 No man taketh it from me, 
but I lay it down of myself. I 
have power to lay it down, and 
I have power to take it again. 
This commandment have I re- 
ceived of my Father. 

19 There was a division there- 
fore again among the Jews for 
these sayings. 

20 And many of them said. 
He hath a devil, and is mad ; 
why hear ye him ? 

21 Others said, These are not 
the words of him that hath a 
devil. Can a devil open the eyes 
of the blind? 

22 And it was at Jerusalem 
the feast of the dedication, and 
it was winter. 

23 And Jesus walked in the 
temple in Solomon's porch. 

24 Then came the Jews round 
about him, and said unto him. 



GREEK TEXT. 



15 καθωί γινώσκίί μ€ ό ττα- 
τηρ, καγω γινωσκω τον ττατβρα• 
καΐ την ψυχϊ]ν μου τίθημι virep 
των προβάτων. 

16 καί άλλα ττροβατα ίχω, α 
ουκ βστίν €κ τη? αύλη$ ταύτης• 
κακίΐνα μ€ Set άγαγίΐν, κα). της 
φωνηί μου άκουσουσυ• καΐ γβνη- 
σβται μία ττοίμνη, eis ττοιμην. 

17 8ια τοΰτο ό ττατηρ μβ άγα- 
ττα, ΟΤΙ 4γω τίθημι την ψυχϊ]ν 
μου, Ίνα τταλίν λάβω αυτήν. 

1 8 ου^ζίς aipei αυτήν άττ βμοΰ, 
αλλ (γω τίθημι αϋτην άττ ίμαυ- 
τοΰ. (ζουσίαν βχω θβΐναί αύτην, 
καΐ (ζονσίαν βχ^ω ττάλιν λαββΐν 
αυτήν, ταυτην την βντολην ίλα- 
βον τταρα του ττατροί μου. 

19 Σχ^ίσμα ούν τταλιν eyeviTO 
iv ΓοΓ? ΙουδαΙοίί δια τουί λογουί 
τουτουί. 

20 ΐλβγον δβ ττολλοί i^ αυτών, 
Ααίμονιον 'έχει καΐ μαίνβται• τι 
αυτού ακουβτβ ; 

21 Αλλοί eAeyoi^, Ταύτα τα 
ρήματα ουκ ΐστι δαιμονιζομβνου' 
μη δαιμονιον δύναται τυφλών οφ- 
θαλμούς άνοίγ€ίν ; 

22 ΈΓΕΝΕΤΟ δΐ τα βγκαί- 
νια ίν τοΐϊ Ιΐροσολυμοΐί, καΧ 
χ€ΐμων ην 

23 και 7Γ€ρΐ€7Γατ€ΐ ο Ιησούς 
€v τω ί(ρω iv Trj στοά του Σολο- 
μώντος. 

24 (κύκλωσαν ούν αύτον οι 
Ιουδαίοι, καΙ (λεγον αΰτω, Εωί 



REVISED VERSION. 

15 As the Father knoweth 
me, and I know the Father : and 
I lay down my life for the sheep. 



16 And other sheep I have, 
which are not of this fold : them 
also I must bring, and they will 
hear my voice ; and there will 
be one "flock, one shepherd. 

17 On account of this doth 
the Father love me, because I 
lay down my life, that I may 
take it again. 

18 No one taketh it from me, 
but I lay it down of myself. I 
have power to lay it down, and 
I have power to take it again. 
This commandment i received 
'from my Father. 

19 There was, therefore, a di- 
vision again among the Jews 
'because of these sayings. 

20 And many of them said. 
He hath a 'demon, and is mad, 
why hear ye him ? 

21 Others said. These are not 
'the words of one that hath a 
ydemon. Can a ^demon open 
the eyes of the blind;' 

22 Now it was the Feast of 
Dedication in Jerusalem ; and it 
was winter. 

23 And Jesus was walking in 
the temple, in Solomon's porch. 



24 The Jews, therefore, came 
round about him, and said to 



* It is strange that King James' revisors did not retain 
T3'ndale's rendering of this word, wliich is so evidently proper, 
and free from ambiguity ; for, though fold has always had 
the meaning, flock, it is seldom used in this sense, at the pre- 
sent day. Fold is, in this connection, ambiguous. 

' See Gen. Obs. 6. — As to the change from of to from, v. 18, 
it is sufficient to say, that, at the present day, the latter much 



more frequently follows the yerb, receive, than the former, and 
is, therefore, much more elegant. 

y See N. g, ch. 7 : 20. 

» Though the literal reading of this clause would be, These 
words are not [Ihose] of one that hath a demon, 3'et, as no 
change would be effected in the meaning by remodelling it, I 
have, upon the whole, judged it best to leave the common 
version unchanged. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. X. 



77 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

How long dost thou make us to 
doubt y If thou be the Christ, 
tell us plainly. 

25 Jesus answered them, I 
told you, and ye believed not : 
the works that I do in my Fa- 
ther's name, they bear witness 
of me. 

26 But ye believe not, because 
ye are not of my sheep, as I said 
unto you. 

27 My sheep hear my voice, 
and I know them, and they fol- 
low me : 

28 And I give unto them eter- 
nal life ; and they shall never 
perish, neither shall any pluck 
them out of my hand. 

29 My Father, which gave 
them me, is greater than all ; and 
none is able to pluck them out of 
my Father's hand. 

30 I and mij Father are one. 

31 Then the Jews took up 
stones asrain to stone him. 



32 Jesus answered them. Many 
good works have I shewed you 



GREEK TEXT. 

wore την '^νγΐ]ν ημών aipets ! ei 
συ et ό Χριστοί, elire ημιν παρ- 
ρησία. 

25 Άπβκρίθη αύτοΐί 6 Ίη- 
σοΰί, ΈίτΓον υμΊν, και ου ττιστβυ- 
€Τ€. τα ίργα α βγω ττοιω (.ν τω 
ονόματι του πατρός μου, ταύτα 
μαρτυρίί πβρί Ιμοΰ• 

2G άλλ' ύμύς ου πίστ€υ€Τ€• 
ου γάρ ϊστβ f.n των προβάτων 
των ΐμών, καθωί ύπον υμΐν. 

27 τα πρόβατα τα €μα τηί 
φωνής μου άκουβι, κάγω γινωσκω 
αϋτα• καΙ άκολουθοϋσι μοι. 



REVISED VERSION. 



Ζ Ο καγω 



W ζωην 



αΐωνιον δίδωμι 
αυτοΐί' και ου μη απολωνται €ΐί 
τον αιώνα, και ουχ αρπασβι τις 
αύτα e/c της χβιρος μου. 

29 ό πατήρ μου ος δζδωκβ μοι, 
μβίζων πάντων €στί• καΐ ούδβ'ίς 
δύναται άρπάζβιν e/c της χίΐρος 
του πατρός μου. 

30 έγω καΐ ο πατήρ ΐν ίσμίν. 

31 'Έβάστασαν ούν πάλιν λί- 
θους οι 'Ιουδαίοι, Ινα λιθασωσιν 
αυτόν. 

32 άπ€κρίθη αύτοίς ό ' Ιησούς, 
Πολλά καλά ϊ'ργα ί'δβιξα ύμΐν e/c 



him. How long dost thou *hold 
our soul in suspense? If thou 
art the Christ, tell us plainly. 

2-5 Jesus answered them, I 
told you, and ye believe not : 
the works \vhicli I do in my Fa- 
ther's name, ''they "testify of wk. 



26 But ye believe uot, ''for ye 
are not of my sheep. 



27 'As I said to you, my 
sheep hear my voice and I know 
them, and they follow me. 

28 And I give to them eternal 
life, and they shall never perish; 
and ^no one shall pluck them 
out of my hand. 

29 My Father, who hath given 
to me, is greater than all, ^and 
no one can pluck out of my Fa- 
ther's hand. 

30 I and the Father are one. 

31 The Jews, therefore, took 
up stones again, ""that they might 
stone him. 

32 Jesus answered them, 
Many good works did I show 
you from my Father : 'because 



• E. V. marg., Dodd., {hold us in suspense) ; Newc, Wesl., 
{keep us in suspense) ; Penn (keepest our soul in siispense) ; 
Nar3', Kenr., (keep our minds in suspense). — I have given as 
literal a translation as I possibly could, in good English. 

" See Gen. Obs. 3. 

' See N. j, ch. 1 : 7. 

" See N. i, ch. 1 : 15. 

' Commentators are divided, as to the proper connection of 
the words, καΟ-ως ειττον ίψιν. Those who, with the E. V., 
refer them back to the preceding declaration, " because ye are 
not of my sheep," suppose that the substance only, and not 
the precise woids of some former remark, is cited, since no 
such remark, in so many words, is recorded. I greatly prefer, 
however, to punctuate the passage diflerently, with Bio., Pearce, 
Camp., Vat., Tittm., and Dodd. referring these words to the 
following declaration, " My sheep hear my voice, &c." (see v. 3, 



above). Several ancient, and some modern Versions leave these 
words out altogether ; but they are found in a large majority of 
Manuscripts. Griesbach, Knapp, and Theile have xat, instead 
of xa9-ws, and connect with the following verse. 

^ Ονχ . . . Tis, literally, not any one. I have given the most 
literal rendering that the circumstances will warrant. This 
expression, I take it, is not quite so strong and positive, as the 
ovSets of the next verse ; but it is diCBcult, sometimes, to express 
shades of meaning so nice as this. 

>■ See ch. 1 : 7, N. k. 

' I make it a rule, for the sake of clearness, to render δια, 
where it is = on account of, cither by this expression, or hciatise 
of, or for the sake of, as euphony may require. It can hardly 
ever be rendered for, without ambiguity. 



78 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. X. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

from my Father; for which of 
those works do ye stone mc ? 

33 The Jews answered him, 
saying, For a good work we 
stone thee not ; but for blas- 
phemy, and because that thou, 
being a man, makest thyself 
God. 

34 Jesus answered them. Is it 
not written in your law, I said. 
Ye are gods ? 



35 If he called them gods, 
unto whom the word of God 
came, and the scripture cannot 
be broken ; 

36 Say ye of him whom the 
Father hath sanctified, and sent 
into the world, Thou blasphe- 
mest ; because I said, I am the 
Son of God ? 

37 If I do not the works of 
my Father, believe me not. 

38 But if I do, though ye be- 
lieve not me, believe tlie works : 
that ye may know and believe 
that the Father is in me, and I 
in him. 

39 Therefore, they sought 
again to take him ; but he es- 
caped out of tlieir hand, 

40 And went away again 
beyond Jordan, into the place 
where John at first baptized; 
and there he abode. 

41 And many resorted unto 



GREEK TEXT. 



του ττατροί μου• Slu -ποίον αυτών 
ΐργον λιθαζβτΐ μβ ; 

33 ΛτΓβ κ ρ ίθη σαν αΰτω οΐ Ιου- 
δαίοι λ(γοντ€ί, JTept καλοΰ kp- 
γου ού λίθαζομεν ae, άλλα irepl 
βλασφημίας, καΐ οτί συ ανθρω- 
7Γ0? ών ΤΓΟίβΐς σβαυτον θβον. 

34 ΛτΓίκρίθη αύτοΐί 6 Ιη- 
σοΰί, Ουκ εστί γζγραμμβνον Ιν 
τω νομφ υμών, ' Έγω elira, θίοί 
eVre ; 

35 ΈΙ €Κ€ΐνουί elire θίους, 
TTpos οϋί ό λογοί του θβοΰ e'ye- 
veTO, καΐ ού δύναται λυθηναι ή 
γραψψ^ 

36 01» 6 ττατηρ ηγίασβ και 
άττεστβιλβν eli τον κοσμον, ύμβΐς 
λ€γ€Τ€, ' Οτι βλασφημεί, Ότι el- 
ΤΓον, ΥίΟί τοΰ θίοΰ €ΐμι ; 

37 el ού ΤΓΟιώ τα (ργα τοΰ 
ττατροί μου, μη ττιστίυίτβ μοι• 

38 6ί δε ΤΓΟίω, καν €μοΙ μη 
7Γΐστ€υητ€, τοΐζ (ργοίί ΤΓίστβυ- 
σατ€• Ίνα γνώτβ καΐ πιστ^υσητβ, 
ΟΤΙ €v €μοΙ ό ττατηρ, κάγω ev 
αύτω. 

39 Έζητουν ουν τταλιν αύτον 
ΤΓΐάσαι• και ίζηλθβν e'/c της χει- 
pos αυτών. 

40 ΚΑΙ άττηλθβ ττάλιν ττβραν 
τοΰ 'Ιορδανού, ety τον τόπον Όπου 
ην 'Ιωάννης το πρώτον βαπτίζων 
καΊ ζμ^ινβν e/cet. 

41 /cat ΤΓολλοί ήλθον προς αυ- 



RE VISED VERSION. 

of which Jwork of them do ye 
stone me ? 

33 The Jews answered him, 
'saying. For a good work we 
stone thee not, but for blas- 
phemy ; and because thou, being 
a man, makest thyself God. 

34 Jesus answered them, Hath 
it not been written in your law, 
I said. Ye are gods '? 



35 If he called them gods, to 
whom the Λvord of God came 
(and the Scripture cannot be 
broken) ; 

36 Of him whom the Father 
sanctified, and sent into the 
world, do ye say. Thou blas- 
phemest ; because I said, I am 
the Son of God ? 

37 If I do not the works of 
my Father, believe me not. 

38 But if I do, 'and if ye be- 
lieve not ME, believe the works; 
so that ye may know, and be- 
lieve, that the Father [is] in me, 
and I in "him. 

39 They were seeking, there- 
fore, again to take him : and he 
"went Ibrth out of their hand. 

40 And he went away again 
beyond the Jordan, into the place, 
where John was at first "immers- 
ing : and he abode there. 

41 And many rcame to him, 



' "W. (T. and C. with wprk omitted.) — I give the literal 
translation of the Orig. words. — Vulg., Trem., Germ. 

I• Lachm. and Tisch. reject λέγοντες, on the authority of 
ancient MSS. Griesb. considers this Λvord as very probably 
spurious. Saying is inclosed in brackets by Newc, and omitted 
by the Vulg., Trem., Wesl., Narj', Kenr., Penn, and others. — 
I would recommend that it be in this revision omitted. 

1 This is the literal translation of xap = y.ai εαν. I see no 
reason why it should be departed from in this case. — Fr. M., 
Vulg. Erasra. 



"■ Lachm. and Tisch. have τω πατςι, for αντφ. Griesb 
also favors this reading. I would adopt it, and translate, in 
the Father. — W., R., Vulg., Trem., Schott., Lus., Penn, Nary 
Kenr., and others. 

" E. V. elsewhere frequently. This is, I believe, the only 
case in which it has rendered this verb, to escape. 

' See ch. 1 : 25, N. a. 

I" E. V. generally. — Dodd., Wesl., Penn. 



ΤΗΙί GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XI. 



79 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

him, and said, John did no mir- 
acle ; but all tilings that John 
spake of this man were true. 



42 And many believed on him 
there. 

CHAP. XI. 

Now a certain man was sick, 
named Lazarus, of Bethany, the 
town of Mary and her sister 
Martha. 

2 (It was that JIary which 
anointed the Lord with oint- 
ment, and wiped his feet with 
her hair, whose brother Lazarus 
was sick.) 

3 Therefore his sisters sent 
unto him, saying, Lord, behold, 
he whom thou lovest is sick. 

4 When Jesus heard tliat, he 
said. This sickness is not unto 
death, but for the glory of God, 
that the son of God might be 
glorified thereby. 

5 Now Jesus loved Martha, 
and her sister, and Lazarus. 



6 When he had heard there- 
fore that he was sick, he abode 
two days still in the same place 
where he was. 

7 Then after that saitli he to 



GREEK TEXT. 

τον, Kou eAeyoj/, Otl 'Ιωάννης 
μ€ν σημβΐον ίττοίησβν ouSev 
τταντα δε όσα eiirev Ιωάννης ττβρι 
τούτου, άληθη ην. 

42 ICai ίπίστευσαν ττολλοί 
€Κ€ί eiy αΰτον. 

CHAP. XI. 

'ΗΝ 5e τις άσθβνών Λάζαρος 
άτΓΟ Βηθανίας, £Κ τ?;? κώμης Μα- 
ρίας κα\ Μάρθας της άδβλφης 
αυτής. 

2 ην δε Μαρία η αλβίψασα 
τον Κΰρίον μυρω, κα\ (κμαςασα 
τους 7Γθ8ας αύτοΰ ταΐς θριςιν 
αύτης, ής 6 άδ€λφος Λάζαρος 
ησθβνβι. 

3 άτΓβστβιλαν ούν αϊ αδΐλφαι 
ττρος αΰτον λίγουσαί, Kvpie, ϊδε 
Όν φιλξΐς άσθίνύ. 

4 Λκουσας δε ο Ιησούς ei- 
Tvev, Λυτή ή άσθίνβια ουκ eaTL 
ττρος θάνατον, αλλ ΰπΐρ της δο- 
ζης του Oeod, 'ίνα δοζασθη ό νΙος 
τοΰ θ(θΰ δι αυτής. 

5 Ίίγαττα δε ό Ιησούς την 
Μάρθαν καΙ την άδξλφην αυτής 
καΊ τον Λαζαρον. 

6 ως οδν ηκουσ^ν otl ασθβνβΐ, 
TOTt μβν ίμίΐνεν iv φ ην τοττω 
δυο ημίρας. 

7 ' Έπΐΐτα μετά τούτο λεγίΐ 



REVISED VERSION. 



and said, John, "indeed, did no 
'sign : but all things 
■said of HIM were true 



42 And many believed on hiin 
there. 



CHAP. XI. 

Now "there was a certain sick 
man, Lazarus of Bethany, 'of the 
''village of Mary, and Martha, her 
sister. 

2 And it was Mary who an- 
ointed the Lord with ointment, 
and wiped his feet with her hair, 
whose brother Lazarus was sick. 



3 The sisters, therefore, sent 
to him, saying. Lord, Behold, he 
whom thou lovest is sick. 

4 And Jesus, hearing, said. 
This sickness is not to death, but 
for the glory of God, that by it 
the Son of God may be glorified. 



5 Now Jesus loved Martha, 
and her sister, and Lazarus. 



6 When, therefore, he heard 
that he was sick, "then, indeed, 
he abode in the place where he 
was two days. 

7 Then, after ■'this, he saith 



" R., Vulg., De W., Dodd., Nary, Penn. Kenr. — Indeed seems 
necessary, to convey the force of the particle μεν. 

' See ch. 2 11, N. x. 

■ See ch. 1 : 15, N. g. 

" W., R., Meyer, Germ., De W., Beza, Schott. — The revisors 
of the E. V. and many others, take tjy ... ααΟ•ενων as an iniperf 
=^ was being sick; {asijv βηπτιζοιν, was immersing. Ch. 1 : 28.) 
Though this construction is, perhaps, sustained by analogy, 
yet, as it i*by no means frequent, especially with neuter verbs, 
I prefer the more obvious translation, " there was a certain sick 
man," ααΟ-ενων being viewed as nom. after r,v, and Ααζα^οϊ in 
apposition. 



'" "W., R. — Although £κ may be considered redundant^ yet I 
do not see that it does any injury to the sentence to trans- 
late it. 

' Village is the more usual rendering of χωμη. See ch. 

7 : 42, N. o. 

" As μεν is here not merely a particle of continuation, I 
prefer not to leave it untranslated. Τότε μεν is, literally, then, 
indeed. For the rendering, abode, see ch. 7 : 9, N. 1. 

^ E. \. generally. I think it well to keep up the distinction 
between τοντο and εκείνο. 



80 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XI. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

his disciples, Let us go into Ju- 
dea again. 

8 His disciples say unto him, 
Master, tlie Jews of late sought 
to stone thee; and goest thou 
thither again ? 

9 Jesus answered, Are there 
not twelve hours in the day? If 
any man walk in the day, he 
stumbleth not, because he seeth 
the light of this world. 



10 But if a man walk in the 
night, he stumbleth, because 
there is no light in him. 

11 These things said he: and 
after that he saith unto tliem. 
Our friend Lazarus sleepeth ; but 
I go that I may awake him out 
of sleep. 

12 Then said his disciples, 
Lord, if he sleep, lie shall do 
well. 

13 Howbeit Jesus spake of 
his death: but they thought 
that he had spoken of taking of 
rest in sleep. 

14 Then said Jesus unto 



GREEK TEXT. 

ToTs μαθηταΐί, ' Λγωμβν eh την 
Ιουδαιαν τταλιν. 

8 Λίγουσιν αντω οι μαθηταί, 
'ΡαββΙ, νυν βζητουν σβ λιθασαι 
οΐ 'Ιουδαίοι, καΐ τταλιν ύτταγβΐ! 
ίκίΐ ; 

9 Άττβκρίθη ο Ίησοΰί, Οΰχι 
δώδεκα elaiv ώραι της ήμβραί ; 
βάν TIS TrepLwarrj iv ττ] rjpepa, ου 
ττροσκοτΓΤβι, otl το φώί του κόσ- 
μου τούτου βλβττβι• 

10 iav δε τΐί irepnvaTrj ev Tjj 
νυκτι, ττροσκοτΓΤίΐ, Ότι το φώί 
ουκ βστιν iv αυτω. 

1 1 Ταΰτα etVe, και μίτα τοΰτο 
λίγ€ΐ αυτοί?, Λάζαρο? ό φίλος 
ημών Κ€κοίμηται• άλλα ττορβυο- 
μαι Ινα βζυπνίσω αύτον. 

12 ΈίΤΓον ούν οι μαθηταί αυ- 
τού, Κΰριβ, ei κΐκο'ιμηται, σωθη- 
σβται. 

13 ΈΙρηκβι δε ό Ίησοΰί Trepl 
του θανάτου αύτοΰ• Ικύνοι δε 
ί'δοζαν ΟΤΙ 7Γ€ρΙ τη? κοιμήσεως 
του ΰττνου λβγ€ΐ. 

14 τότε ούν elirev αυτοΐί ο 



REVISED VERSION. 

to the disciples. Let us go into 
Judea again. 

8 The disciples say to him, 
'Rabbi, the Jews were 'just now 
seeking to stone thee; and art 
thou going thither again"? 

9 Jesus answered. Are there 
not twelve hours ^of the day? 
If any one walk in the day, he 
stumbleth not, because he seeth 
the light of this world. 

10 But if any one walk in 
the night, he stumbleth, because 
■■the light is not in liim. 

11 These things he said; and 
after ''this he said to them, Laza- 
rus, 'our friend, is Jfallen asleep ; 
but I am going, that I may awake 
him. 

12 His disciples, therefore, 
said, Lord, if he is Jl'allen asleep, 
he will be ''safe. 

13 But Jesus had spoken of 
his death; but they thought 
that he was speaking of the 
'repose of sleep. 

14 "Then, therefore, Jesus 



' See N. g, ch. 1 : 49. 

' Rob. — This is a little more precise than lately, or of late. 
— Ncwc, Dodd., Wesl., Penn, Kenr., (but 7iow.) 

^ The idea is not. '• are there not twelve hours in the day 1 " 
for there might be twelve hours, and much more ; but, '' is not 
the day made up of twelve hours ? " — That is, " are there not 
twelve hours of day-light ? " — As there is nothing in the Orig. 
corresponding to in, I prefer to render literally. 

I• The art. indicates that tliis light is that spoken of in the 
preceding verse : " because the light of this world, (day-light,) 
so necessary to direct a man's footsteps, is not in him." 

' Lazarus is nom. to the verb, while friend is in apposition. 
These words are transposed, in the E. V. 

1 I have made this change, in order to be able to translate 
χικοιμηται by the perfect. — See Gen. Obs. 4. 

I• Many commentators suppose that οω&ησεται is here spoken 
of a recovery to health; q.d. "he shall 7-ccoi-e)•." (Dodd., Wesl., 
Kenr., Newc.) This would be a very plausible interpretation, 



had we any evidence that the disciples, at that time, knew 
that Lazarus was sick. But this does not appear from the 
narrative ; and I am inclined to think, that the Savior had, for 
wise reasons, concealed this fact from them. This verb signi- 
fies, literally, in the pass., to he saved, though it does some- 
times mean, simply, to be safe, or to be in a condition of salva- 
tion.— See ch. 10:9, and the Note i/tere. — Erasm., Vulg., 
(salvus erit.) 

1 Latin. Verss. {de donnitione somni) ; Newc. (rest in 
sleep.) — OiheTS translate, {natural rest); (common rest); 
(bodily rest); (natural rest of sleep) ; (genuine sleep) ; (dormir 
da sommeil), Ac— W. and R. (sleeping of s/eep.)— This is 
literal, but not allowable in modern Engl. Upon the whole, 
I prefer the rendering in the version of Kenr. (repose of sleep.) 
which I have adopted. 

■» I see no reason why τότε should not be translated, in 
addition to ow, which, I suppose, answers to the then of the 
E. V. as usual. — Fr. S.,-M., Dodd., Kenr., Vulg., Erasm., 
Beza, &c. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XI. 



81 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

them plaiiil}', Lazarus is 
dead. 

15 And I am glad for your 
sakes that I was not there, to 
the intent ye may believe ; nev- 
ertheless, let us go unto him. 

16 Then said Thomas, which 
is called Didymus, unto iiis fel- 
low-disciples, Let us also go, that 
we may die with him. 

17 Then wlien Jesus came, he 
found that he had lain in the 
grave four days already. 

IS (Now Bethany Λναβ nigh 
unto Jerusalem, about fifteen 
furlongs ofl':) 

19 And many of the .Tews 
came to Martha and Mary, to 
comfort them concerning their 
brother. 



20 Then Martha, as soon as 
she heard that Jesus was com- 
ing, went and met him : but 

Mary sat still in the house. 

21 Then said Martha unto 
Jesus, Lord, if thou hadst been 
here, my brother had not died. 



GREEK TEXT. 



Τησούί τταρρησία, Λαζαροί άττί- 
Oave• 

15 καΧ γαιρω δί υμάί, ϊνα πι• 
στ(ΰσητ€, otl ουκ ημην e'/cer άλλ' 
αγωμα/ ττροί αντον. 

10 Hhrev ούν Θωμάς, ό λε- 
γομίνος Αίδνμος, τοΐζ συμμαθη- 
Tois, Αγωμβν και ημ€Ϊς•, ίνα 
άττοθανωμ^ν μ(τ αυτόν. 

17 αχθών ούν ό Ίησοΰί ev- 
peu αυτόν τεσσάρας ημίρας ηδη 
ίγοντα iv τω μνημίΐω. 

18 ην δί ή Βηθανία Ιγγυς των 
'Ιεροσολύμων, ώ? άττο σταδίων 
δίκαττίντε• 

19 καΙ πολλοί e'/c των Ιου- 
δαίων ΐληλυθβίσαν ττρος ταί ττβρι 
Μαρθαν και Μαριαν, ίνα τταρα- 
μυθησωνται αυτας ττβρι του αδελ- 
φού αυτών. 

20 η ούν Μάρθα ώς ηκονσεν 
ΟΤΙ ο Ιησοΰί ϊργεται, νττηντησεν 
αύτω• Μαρία δε Ιν τω ο'ίκω ϊκα- 
θίζίτο. 

21 eiirev ούν η Μάρθα Trpos 
τον Ίησοΰν, Kvpie, el ης ώδε, ό 
αδελφός μου ουκ αν ετεθνηκει. 



REVISED VERSION. 

said to them plaiidy, Lazarus "is 
dead: 

1-5 And I am glad, for your 
sake, that I was not there, so 
that j'e may believe. ""But let 
us go to him. 

16 Thomas, tlierefore, "the one 
called Didymus, said to [iiis] 
lellow-disciples, Let us also go, 
that we may die with him. 

17 Jesus, therefore, coming, 
found that he had "been already 
four days in the pfomb. 

IS Now Bethany was inear 
Jerusalem, about fifteen furlongs 
ofl:". 

19 And many of the Jews 
had come to ''those about Martha 
and Mary, "that they they might 
comfort them concerning their 
brother. 



20 Martha, therefore, 'when 
she heard tliat Jesus was coming, 
went "to meet him : but Mary 
"continued sittinsr in the house. 



21 Martha, therefore, said to 
Jesus, Lord, if thou hadst been 
here, my brother had not died. 



° Απε&αυε is literuUy, died^ without reference to the pre- 
cise time of death ; but our idiom will not admit of the 
strict aorist rendering here. — For the one, see ch. 1 : 45, N. c. 

"" W., G., R. — E. v. very generally, when used in this sense. 

" To he is a frequent signification of εχω. See E. V., Acts 
7 : 1 ; 24 : 9. 2 Cor. 12 : 14, ic— See N. 1, ch. 5 : 5. 

ρ See N. p, ch. 5 : 28. 

1 See N. e, ch. 2 : 13. 

"■ The E. V. of this phrase, though it is supposed by many 
to convey the idea of the Orig. quite well, nevertheless lacks 
entire fidelity. Tas ττερι Μηρ&αν xai ίΐηριαν does not mean, 
only, to Mary and Martha, but to those about them, as well as 
themselves, ). e. to them and their relations. Comp. Acts 
13 : 13. Or, as the rag would seem, from its gender, to be 
confined to persons of the female sex, t«s περί may mean 
those more intimate and near neighboring women who came 
at first to condole with them, to whose number these Jews, 



who probably came from a greater distance, were afterwards 
added. At all events, unless the context actually require that 
such significant phrases as ras περί be left out, I feel impera- 
tively bound to translate them. — Beza {to Mar. and M. and 
those who were with them.) 
• See N. k, ch. 1 : 7. 

< When is more commonly used to translate ώ;, than as 
soon as. — R., Wesl. 

" I think the idea intended to be conveyed is, that she 
quietly left the house, and the company of mourners, and went 
out with the view of meeting the Lord on the way. True, she 
actually did meet him ; but this verb, I apprehend, as here 
used, does not say so, but only that she went with that design. 
This, according to the Lexicons, is the radical Idea of the verb. 
— Dodd., Nary, Kcnr. — Erasm., Beza, Vulg., (ocan-n't.) 

' Rob. — Sat still is not only not quite so clear a rendering of 
this imperfect as continurd sitting; but it is, in this connection, 
ambiguous, and, therefore, requires a cJiange. 



82 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XI. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

22 But I know that even now, 
whatsoever thou wilt ask of 
God, God will give it thee. 

23 Jesus saith unto her. Thy 
brother shall rise again. 

24 Martha saith unto him, I 
know that he shall rise again in 
the resurrection at the last day. 

25 Jesus saith unto her, I am 
the resurrection, and the life : he 
that believeth in me, though he 
were dead, yet shall he live : 

26 And whosoever liveth, and 
believeth in me, shall never die. 
Believest thou this? 

27 She saith unto him. Yea, 
Lord : I believe that thou art the 
Chrisi, the Son of God, which 
should come into the woi'ld. 

28 And when she had so said, 
she went her way, and called 
Mary her sister secretly, saying, 
The Master is come, and calleth 
for thee. 

29 As soon as she heard tJiat, 
she arose quickly, and came unto 
him. 

30 Now Jesus was not yet 
come into the town, but was in 
that place where Martha met 
him. 

31 The Jews then which were 
with her in the house, and com- 



GREEK TEXT. 

22 άλλα /cat νυν οιδα οτι οσα 
αν alrrjarj τον θίον, δώσει σοι 
ο Oeos. 

23 Aeyei avrfj ό Ιησοΰί, 
Λναστησ€ται 6 άδβλφο? σου. 

24 Λεγβι αύτω Μάρθα, Οίδα 
οτι αναστησβται, βν Trj ανάστα- 
σ€ΐ (V ττ] ίσγατγ] ήμερα. 

25 ΈΙτΓβν αύττ) ο Ιησούς, 
Έγω εΙμι ή άναστασίί καΙ η ζωη. 
ο ΊΓίστευων et? e/xe, καν αποθάνη, 
ζησεται• 

26 και ττάί ό ζων και ττιστεΰων 
els €μ(, ου μη άττοθανη ety τον 
αιώνα, ττιστευβίί τοΰτο ; 

27 Λεγβι αύτω, JVa], κυριβ- 
ϊγω ΤΓίττίστβυκα, οτι συ et ό Χρι- 
στοί, ό υΙοί του θίοΰ, 6 eiy τον 
κοσμον (ρχομβνοί. 

28 Και ταύτα βιτνοΰσα άττηλ- 
θβ, καΐ βφώνησβ Μαρίαν την 
άδβλφην αυτής λάθρα, ΐίττοΰσα, 

Ο διδάσκαλος τταρεστι καΐ φω- 
vei σ€. 

29 'Εκείνη ώς ήκουσεν, ίγεί- 
ρεται τα-χυ και (ρχεται ττρος 



αύτον. 



30 ού'ττω δβ Ιληλυθπ 6 Ιη- 
σούς ΐΐς την κωμην, αλλ ην (ν 
τω τοττω οττου ύπηντησεν αυτω η 
Μάρθα. 

31 οι ουν Ιουδαίοι οΊ όντβς 
μετ αύτης iv τη οικία καΐ τταρα- 



REVISED VERSION. 

22 But even now I know, that 
whatever "things thou wilt ask 
of God, God will give thee. 

23 Jesus said to her. Thy 
brother will rise again. 

24 Martha said to him, I know 
that he will rise again, in the 
resurrection, in the last day. 

25 Jesus said to her, I am the 
resurrection, and the life : he 
that believeth on me, ""even if 
he die, he shall live. 

26 And 'no one that liveth 
and believeth on me shall never 
die. Believest thou this? 

27 She saith to him, ^Yes, 
Lord; I have believed that thou 
art the Christ, the Son of God, 
"who was into tiie world coming. 

28 And saying 'these things, 
she went, and called Mary, her 
sister, secretly, saying, The 
^Teacher is come, and is calling 
for thee. 

29 She, Hvhen she heard, 
riseth up quickly, and cometh to 
him. 

30 Now Jesus had not yet 
come into the 'village, but was 
in the place where Martha met 
him. 

31 The Jews, therefore, who 
were with her in the house, and 



" This change is made to distinguisli the number of ban. 

" This is the most literal rendering that y.at' will bear, in 
this connection. The E. V. though he were dead, seems to 
imply, that the Savior's language only applied to spiritual 
death and life : " though he were dead spiritually at the time 
of exercising faith in nie, 3'et. notwithstanding this, he shall 
live spirituallj', in consequence of his faith." I do not think 
that this is the idea intended to be conveyed. The context 
shows that he referred to the life of the body, and in this 
particular phrase, to the future life of the body in the day of 
the resurrection. — "Even if he die, as other men do, he shall 



not be like those who have no hope in their death ; for he shall 
live again, and in his flesh he shall see God." 

" In this case, for the sake of euphony and perspicuity, I 
render nag . . . ov μη, no one, instead of every one . . . not. 

y Yea = yes, is very nearly obsolete. I see no good reason 
for retaining it. 

» See ch. 7 : 32, N. xx. 
« See ch. 1 : 38, N. m. 
' See V. 20, above, N. t. 
" See ch. 7 : 42, N. 0. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XI. 



83 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

forted her, when they saw Maiy 
that she rose up hastily, and 
went out, followed her, saying, 
She goeth unto the grave to 
weep there. 

32 Then when ISIary was come 
where Jesus was, and saw him, 
she fell down at his feet, saying 
unto him. Lord, if thou hadst 
been here, my brother had not 
died. 

33 When Jesus therefore saw 
her weeping, and the Jews also 
weeping which came with her, 
he groaned in the spirit, and was 
troubled, 

34 And said. Where have ye 
laid him? They say unto him, 
Lord, come and see. 

35 Jesus wept. 

36 Then said the Jews, Be- 
hold how he loved him ! 

37 And some of them said. 
Could not this man, which 
opened the eyes of the blind, 
have caused that even this man 
should not have died? 

38 Jesus therefore again groan- 
ing in himself, cometh to the 
grave. It was a cave, and a stone 
lay upon it. 

39 Jesus said, take ye away 
the stone. Martha, the sister 



GREEK TEXT. 

μνθουμΐνοι αύτην, Ίδοντίί την 
Μαρίαν OTL ταχεωί άνίστη και 
^ζηλθβν, ηκολονθησαν avrfj, λε- 
yovTey, Οτί υπαγβί els το μνη- 
μίΐον, ίνα κλανστ] €κίΐ. 

32 Ή ονν Μαρία ώί ήλθίν 
οτΓον ην ο Ιησοΰί, ΙΒονσα αυτόν, 
eireaev els tous ττοδας αυτόν, Ae- 
γουσα αντω, Kvpie, el ήί ώδε, 
ουκ αν aTTeOave μου ο a8eX<pos. 

33 Ίησοΰΐ ούν ώ? elSev αύτην 
κλαίονσαν, καΊ tovs σννίλθοντα^ 
αύτη Ιουδαίου! κλαίονται, eve- 
βριμησατο τω ττνευματι, καΐ Ιτα- 
pa^ev eavTov, 

34 κα\ ehre. Πού TeOeiKaTe 
αύτον ; Aeyovaiv αύτω, Kupie, 
epχoυ και loe. 

35 ' Έδάκρυσεν ό Ίησοΰί. 

36 eXeyov ούν οΐ Ιουδαίοι, 
' Ιδ€ πώΐ ίφίλίί αύτον. 

37 Tives δε i^ αύτων elirov, 
Ουκ ηδΰνατο οϋτοί ο άι/οίξαί 
του? οφθαλμούς του τυφλού, 
ΤΓοιησαι Ινα κα\ ούτος μη αττο- 
θαντ] ; 

38 ^Ιησούς ούν τταλιν ίμβρι- 
μωμevoς ev eaυτω, epx^eTai eis το 
μvημeΐov, ην δε σττηλαιον, καΙ 
λίθος lireKeLTO eir αύτω. 

39 λeγeL ο 'Ιησούς, ' ApaTe 
τον λίθον. Aeyec αύτω η άδeλφη 



REVISED VERSION. 

were comforting her, seeing 
Mary, that she rose up •'quickly, 
and went out, followed her, say- 
ing. She is going to the 'tomb, 
''that she may weep there. 

32 Mary, thereibre, when she 
came where Jesus was, seeing 
him, fell at his feet, saying to 
him, Lord, if thou hadst been 
here, my brother had not died. 

33 Jesus, therefore, when he 
saw her weeping, and the Jews 
who came with her, weeping, 
groaned in ^the spirit, and 
was ^troubled : 

34 And he said. Where have 
ye laid him ? The)^ say to him. 
Lord, come, and see. 

3-5 Jesus wept. 

36 The Jews, therefore, said, 
Behold, how he loved him ! 

37 But some of them said. 
Could not HE, who opened the 
eyes of the blind =°man, cause 
that even he should not die? 



38 Jesus, therefore, again 
groaning in himself, cometh to 
the tomb. Now it was a cave, 
and a stone was lying upon it. 

39 Jesus saith. Take awaj^ the 
stone. ""The sister of him that 



•> Tu^tws and τα)τυ are, I believe, considered synonyms. For 
this reason I prefer rendering the former as the latter is ren- 
dered in V. 29, above, where the idea is, doubtless, precisely the 
same. 

» See ch. 5 : 28, N. p. 

f See ch. 1 : 7, X. k. 

^ Midd., Bio., Mayer, and others render, in hix spirit, regard- 
ing the art. as a substitute for the possessive pronoun. It is, I 
believe, almost universally conceded that this refers to the human 
spirit of our Lord. 



^^ I have made this change, because the E. Y., tite blind, does 
not point out clearly the number of the adjective, and because it 
would be more natural to understand it of more than one, as if it 
were the translation of των τνψΐων. — Newc, Camp. — Vulg. 
{cad nati) ; Kenr., Van Ess, AH., Nary, as Vulg. — The versions 
generally understand τον τνγίου as referring to the person whose 
history is recorded in ch. 9, which is, no doubt, the correct view 
of the subject. 

^ I have made this slight transposition for the sake of literal 
accuracy. 



84 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XI. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

of him that was dead, saith unto 
him, Lord, by this time he 
Btinlieth: for he hath been dead 
four days. 

40 Jesus saith unto her. Said 
I not unto thee, that if thou 
wouldest believe, thou shouldest 
see the glory of Grod ? 

41 Then they took away the 
stone from the place where the 
dead was laid. And Jesus lifted 
up his eyes, and said. Father, I 
thank thee that thou hast heard 
me : 

42 And I knew that thou 
hearest me always : but because 
of the people which stand by, I 
said it. that they may believe 
that thou hast sent me. 

43 And when he thus had 
spoken, he cried with a loud 
voice, Lazarus, come forth. 

44 And he that was dead came 
forth, bound hand and foot with 
grave-clothes : and his face was 
bound about with a napkin. Je- 
sus saith unto them. Loose him, 
and let him go. 

45 Then many of the Jews 
which came to Mary, and had 
seen the things which Jesus did, 
believed on him. 

46 But some of them went 
their ways to the Pharisees, and 
told them what things Jesus 
had done. 



GREEK TEXT. 



του τΐθνηκοτοί Μάρθα, Kvpie, 
ηδη οζίί• τβταρταΐοί γάρ ίση. 

40 Aeyei avrfj ο Ιησούς, 
Ουκ etTTOf σοι, οτι ίαν ■πιστίυ- 
στ}?, οψ€ΐ την δοζαν του θίοΰ ; 

41 'Ηραν ονν τον λίθον, ου 
ην 6 τβθνηκως Keipevos. Ο 8e 

Ιησοΰί rjpe τους οφθαλμούς ανω, 
καΐ eiVe, ΙΤατερ, βύχαριστω σοι 
OTL ηκουσάί μου. 

42 βγω δε ySeiv οτι τταντοτ€ 
μου ακουεις• άλλα δια τον οχ^λον 
τον ττερκστώτα elirov, Ινα ττιστβυ- 
σωσιν οτι συ με αττίστειλαζ. 

43 ICal ταΰτα βίττων, φωντ] 
μβγαλη €κραυγασ€, Λάζαρε, δΐΰ- 
ρο εζω. 

44 ΚαΙ ΐζηλθβν 6 τβθνηκωί, 
δίδεμβνοί τους ττοδαί και ταί χ^εΐ- 
pas Keip'iais, καΧ η οψΐί αύτοΰ 
σουδαριω ττεριβδβδετο. λβγει αυ- 
Tols 6 'Ιησούς, Λύσατε αύτον, 
και αφετβ υτταγβιν. 

45 Πολλοί οδν (Κ των 'Ιου- 
δαίων οι ίλθοντες ττρος την Μα- 
ριαν, και θεασαμβνοι α εποιησβν 
ό Ιησούς, (ττίστευσαν (Is αύτον. 

46 τίνες δε ες αυτών άττηλθον 
•προς τους Φαρισαίους, καΐ είττον 
αύτοΐς α εττοίησεν ό Ιησούς. 



REVISED VERSION. 

had died, Martha, saith to him, 
Lord, he stiuketh 'now; for he 
hath been dmd four days. 

40 Jesus saith to her, Did I 
not say to thee, that, if thou 
wilt believe, thou shalt see the 
glory of God. 

41 They took away the stone, 
therefore, "where he that had 
died was lying. And Jesus lifted 
up [his] eyes, and said, Father, 
I thank thee that thou didst hear 
me. 

42 JBut I knew that thou 
hearest me always: but, because 
of the 'multitude that was stand- 
ing by, I spoke, so that they may 
believe that thou didst send me. 

4-3 And, saying 'these things, 
he cried with a loud voice, La- 
zarus, come forth. 

44 And he that had died came 
forth, having been bound hand 
and foot with grave clothes ; 
and his face was bound about 
with a napkin. Jesus saith to 
tliem, Loose iiim, and let liim 

go• 

45 Many, therefore, of the 
Jews, who came to Mary, and 
saw "what things "Jesus did, 
believed on him. 

46 But some of them went to 
the Pharisees, and told them 
what things Jesus did. 



' This is the common translation of wf. I see no reason for 
departing from it liere. 

" Qriesbacli, Scbolz, Laclimann, Tiscliendorf, Tlieile [Knapp, 
TIalin], with Manuscripts [BDCL) reject ov . . . κειμειος. It 
is, most likely, a gloss. I would, therefore, recommend that the 
English corresponding be left out, and that this note be put in 
the margin : Some copies add here, where he that had died was 

' " Father, I thank thee, that thou didst hear me : but why do 
J make this public expression of my thanks? I know, at all 



times, that thou hearest me always ; but it was for the sake of 
those who were standing by, that I spoke in this manner, that 
they might know, by my humble acknowledgments, that I am the 
ambassador, whom thou hast sent." 

k See ch. 6 : 5, N. g. 

1 See ch. 7 : 32, N. xx. 

- See ch. 3 : 6, N. k. 

° Most editors leave out ό Iqaovs, here. It ia probably 
an italic insertion. I would leave out Jesus, and translate, he 
did, etc. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. UHAP. XL 



S5 



KING JAMEs' VERSION. 

47 Then gatliered the chief 
priests and the Pharisees a coun- 
cil, and said, What do we ? for 
this man doeth many miracles. 



48 If we let him thus alone, 
all men will believe on him : and 
the Romans sliall come, and take 
away both our place and nation. 



49 And one of them, named 
Caiaphas, being the high priest 
that same year, said unto tiiera. 
Ye know nothing at all, 

50 Nor consider that it is ex- 
pedient for us, that one man 
should die for the people, and 
that the whole nation perish 
not. 

•51 And this spake he not of 
himself: but being high priest 
tluit year, he prophesied that 
Jesus should die for that nation ; 



-52 And not for that nation 
only, but that also he should 
gather together in one the chil- 
dren of God that were scattered 
abroad. 

53 Then from that day forth 
they took counsel together for to 
put him to death. 

54 Jesus therefore walked no 
more openly among the Jews ; 
but went thence unto a country 
near to the wilderness, into a 
city called Ephraim, and there 
continued with his disciples. 

55 And the Jews' passover 
was nigh at hand : and many 
went out of the country up to 



GREEK TEXT. 



47 συνήγαγαν ούν ol αρ'^ζΐε• 
p€ii και ol Φαρισαΐοι συνέδρων, 
καΐ ϊ'λεγον, Τι ττοιοΰμίν ; οτι οϋ- 
TOS ό άνθρωτΓος ττολλα σημ€Ϊα 

ΤΓΟΙίΐ. 

48 iav αψώμ€ν αύτον ούτω, 
τταντΐί ΤΓίστίυσονσίν eiy αύτον 
και ίλίυσονται οϊ Ρωμαίου κα\ 
αροΰσιν ημών και τον τόπον καΧ 
το βθνοί. 

49 Έΐί Se TL9 (ζ αυτών Καϊά- 
α?, αργίίρβυί ων του ίνιαυτου 

eKeivov, elirev αυτοΐς, Υμΐϊί ουκ 
Οίοατί ουοβν 

50 οι3δε ΒιαλογίζίσθΕ, οτι 
συμφέρει ημΐν, Ίνα els ανθρωττο; 
άτΓοθανϊ] ύττερ του λαού, καΙ μη 
όλον το εθνοί άτΓοληταί. 

51 Τούτο δε άφ εαυτού ουκ 
είττεν, άλλα άρ^ίερευξ ών το 
ενιαυτού εκείνου, ττροεφητευσεν 
οτι εμελλεν ο Ιησούί άττοθνη- 
σκειν ύττερ τού έθνους, 

52 καΐ ούχ^ ύπερ τού έθνους 
μόνον, αλλ' ίνα καΐ τα τέκνα τού 
θεού τα διεσκορτησμενα συνα- 
γαγη εΐί εν. 

53 άτΓ εκείνης ούν της ημέρας 
συνεβουλευσαντο ίνα άποκτείνω- 
σιν αυτόν. 

54 Ιησούς ούν ουκ ετι τταρρη- 
σία ττεριεττατεί εν τοΐς Ιουδαιοις, 
άλλα άττηλθεν εκείθεν εις την 
■χωράν εγγύς της έρημου, εΙς 

Έφράιμ λεγομενην ΤΓολιν, κάκεΐ 
διετρφε μετά τ ών μαθητών αυτού. 

55 ην δε εγγύς το ττασχα των 
Ιουδαίων καΐ ανεβησαν ττολλοί 
εΙς 'Ιεροσόλυμα εκ της χώρας 



REVISED VERSION. 

47 The chief priests, therefore, 
and the Pharisees, gathered a 
council, and said. What are we 
doing? because he is doing 
many signs. 

48 If we let him tlms alone, 
all will believe on him ; and the 
Romans will come, and take 
away both our place and nation. 



49 And a ^certain one of them, 
Caiaphas, being high priest that 
year, said to them, Ye know 
nothing, 

50 Nor consider, that it is 
expedient for us, that one man 
die tor the people, and all the 
nation perish not. 

51 But this he «said not of 
Q himself; but, being high priest 

tliat year, he prophesied, that 
Jesus 'Was about to die for the 
nation ; 



52 And not for the nation only, 
but that he should also gather 
together «into one the children 
of God, who have been scattered 
abroad. 

53 From that day, therefore, 
they took counsel together, ''that 
they might kill him. 

54 Jesus, therefore, Λν38 walk- 
ing no more «publicly among the 
Jews, but went away thence into 
the country near the wilderness, 
into a city called Ephraim ; and 
there he was 'tarrying with his 
disciples. 

55 And the Passover of the 
Jews was near : and many went 
up out of the country to Jernsa- 



P Τίί is left untranslated in the E. V. As I can see no good 
reason for this omission, I have restored it. 

•" See N. g. ch. 1 : 1.5. ■• See N. e, ch. 4 : 47. 

' The expression, eis iv, certainly implies, after such a verb 



as ανί'αγω, the collection of various parts, and so putting them 
together as to make of them one whole. If this be so, into is 
the proper rendering of ft,. — Dodd., Wesl., Nary, Penn. 
' See ch. 7 : 5, N. f, and E. V., ch. 3 : 22. Acts 25 : 6. 



86 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. ΧΠ. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

JtTusalem before the passover, 
to purify themselves. 

56 Then sought they for Je- 
sus, and spake among them- 
selves, as they stood in the tem- 
ple, What think ye, that he will 
not come to the feast? 

57 Now both the chief priests 
and the Pharisees had given a 
commandment, that, if any man 
knew were he were, he should 
shew it, that they might take 
him. 

CHAP. XII. 

Then Jesus, six days before 
the passover, came to Bethany, 
where Lazarus was which had 
been dead, whom he raised from 
the dead. 

2 There they made him a sup- 
per ; and Martha served : but 
Lazarus was one of them that 
sat at the table with him. 

3 Then took Mary a pound of 
ointment of spikenard, very cost- 
ly, and anointed the feet of Je- 
sus, and wiped his feet with her 
hair : and the house was filled 
with the odour of the ointment. 



4 Then saith one of his dis- 
ciples, Judas Iscariot, Simon's 



GREEK TEXT. 



TTyOo του ττασ-χα, iva αγνίσωσιν 
eavTovs. 

56 (ζητούν ovv τον Ιησονν, 
και βλβγον μ€Τ αλλήλων ev τω 
cepcp (στηκοτβς•, Τι δοκ€Ϊ νμΐν, 
ΟΤΙ ού μη ϊλθττ} eiy την €θρτην ; 

57 Αζ8ωκ(ίσαν δβ καΐ οΐ άρχ- 
Lepei? καΙ οί Φαρισαΐοι ίντολην, 
Ίνα ίαν τίί γνω που ίστι, μηνυ- 
arj, ότιω? ττιασωσιν αυτόν. 



CHAP. XII. 



Ό ΟΥΝ Ίησοΰί Ίτρο βζ ήμε- 
ρων του ττασχα ήλθβν els Βηθα- 
νίαν, οτΓου ην Λαζαροί ό τβθνη- 
κωί, Όν ήγ€ΐρ€ν e/c ν€κρών. 

2 βΤΓοίησαν ούν αυτώ δβΐττνον 
€Κ€Ϊ, και ή Μάρθα διηκονΐΓ ό δβ 
Λαζαροί ίί? ήν των συνανακβί- 
μ€νων αύτω. 

3 H ουν Μαρία λαβοΰσα λί- 
τραν μύρου ναρδου ττιστίκηί πο- 
λυτίμου, ήλ(ΐ\Ιτβ τουί ποδαί του 
Ίησοΰ, καΐ βζΐμαζβ ταΐς θριζίν 
αυτής τους πόδας αυτόν• η δΐ οι- 
κία Ιπληρωθη ΐκ της οσμής του 
μύρου. 

4 Aeyet ούν et? e/c των μα- 
θητών αύτοΰ, Ιούδας Σίμωνος 



REVISED VERSION. 

lem, before the Passover, 'that 
they might purify themselves. 

5G They were seeking Jesus, 
therefore, and said, »one to an- 
other, standing in the temple. 
What think ye, that he will not 
come to the feast ? 

57 Now both the chief priests 
and the Pharisees had given a 
commandment, that, if any one 
knew where he was, he should 
show [it], so that they might 
take him. 

CHAP. XII. 

Jesus, therefore, six days 
before the Passover, came to 
Bethany, where was Lazarus 
who had 'died, whom he raised 
from the dead. 

2 They made him, therefore, 
a supper there, and Martha was 
'■ '■ministering ; but Lazarus was 
one of those sitting at table 
with him. 

3 Mary, therefore, taking a 
pound of ointment of ""pure 
spikenard, very costly, anoint- 
ed the feet of Jesus, and wip- 
ed his feet with her hair: and 
the house was filled with the 
odor of the ointment. 



4 Therefore saith one of his 
disciples, Judas Iscariot, [son] of 



» See cb. 6 : 43, N. b. 

' It must be apparent to every one, that the active form 
of this verb is the most literal rendering of the orig. word ; 
and though the difference between the two is, perhaps, but sliglit, 
yet the act. rendering certainly presents the idea in a stronger 
light than the other, and, being more literal, is, therefore, to be 
preferred. 

■" There is certainly nothing to prevent the translation of 



" See ch. 2 : 5, N. c. 

' Rob. — There is a difference of ορϊηίοη among commentators, 



as to the meaning of πιστικηι. Some suppose that it is put 
for σπιχατης (for which, I confess, I see no authority better 
tlian conjecture), referring to the particular part of tlie fi-agrant 
shrub, used in preparing the ointment. According to this view, 
va^Sos πιστικη would be spike-nard simply. Others, with, I 
think, more reason, regard this word as used in this place and 
the parallel passage in Mark, in the sense of genuine, or pure, 
a tropical meaning very easily deduced from its literal import, 
faithful, thrust-worth ij, reliable. Again, commentators are not 
agreed as to whether πολντιμον refers to μνρου (Meyer, Dodd., 
and some others), or to ίαρδον (Eras., Schott, Nary, and many 
others). I think the Original is ambiguous, for which reason 
I prefer an ambiguous translation. — T., C. [perfect] ; W. (true) ; 
R. (right). 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. ΧΠ. 



S7 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

son, which should betray 
hiiii, 

5 Why was not this ointment 
sohl for three hundred pence, 
and given to the poor ? 

6 This he said, not that he 
cared for the poor ; but because 
he was a thief, and had the bag, 
and bare what was put therein. 



7 Then said Jesus, Let her 
alone : against the day of my 
burying hath she kept this. 

8 For the poor always ye 
have with you ; but me ye have 
not always. 

9 Much people of the Jews 
therefore knew that he was 
there : and tiiey came, not for 
.Jesus' sake only, but that they 
might see Lazarus also, Avhom 
he had raised from the dead. 

10 But the chief priests con- 
sulted that they might put La- 
zarus also to death, 

11 Because that by reason of 
him many of the Jews went 
away, and believed on Jesus. 



GREEK TEXT. 

Ισκαριώτης, ό μβλλων αυτόν ττα- 
ραδίδοναι, 

5 Λίατί τοΰτο το μυρον ουκ 
ίττραθη τριακοσίων δηναρίων, /cat 
(δοθη ΤΓτωχοΓ? ; 

ΰ ΈΙπΐ δε τοΰτο, ούχ^ οτι Trepl 
των ΤΓτωχων ίμβλβν αυτω, αλλ 
οτι κλβτΓτηί ην, κα\ το γλωσσο- 
κομον €ίχβ, καΐ τα βαλλομίνα 
(βασταζΐν. 

7 e'nrev ούν ό Ίησοΰί, ' Αφΐί 
αύτην €ΐί την ημβραν τοΰ ϊντα- 
φιασμοΰ μου Τ€τηρηκ(ν αΰτο. 

8 τοϋί τττωγους γαρ τταντοτβ 
e'^ere μίθ' ίαυτών, eyne δε ου πάν- 
τοτε ΐχετί. 

9 ' Έγνω ούν όχλο? ττολυί e'/c 
των 'Ιουδαίων οτι e/cet ίστι• καΐ 
ήλθον ου δια τον Ιησουν μόνον, 
άλΧ 'ίνα και τον Λαζαρον ϊδωσιν, 
ον ηγειρεν e'/c νεκρών. 

10 (βουλευσαντο δε οΊ άρχ^ιε- 
ρεΐί, ίνα καΐ τον Λαζαρον άποκτεί- 
νωσιν 

11 οτι ΤΓολλοι δι αυτόν ύτνη- 
γον των Ιουδαίων, και εττιστευον 
et? τον Ιησοΰν. 



REVISED VERSION. 

Simon, who ''was about to be- 
tray him, 

5 Why was not this oint- 
ment sold for three hundred 
'denaria, and given to the poor "? 

6 Now he said this, not 'be- 
cause he cared for the poor, 
but because he was a thief, 
and had the bag, and ^carried 
off what things were put in. 

7 Jesus, therefore, said. Let 
her alone : '■for the day of my 
'■embalming she hath kept it. 

8 For the poor ye have al- 
ways with 'yourselves ; but me 
ye have not always. 

9 Λ 'great multitude, there- 
fore, of the Jews knew that he 
was there, and they came, not 
'on account of Jesus only, but 
that they might see Lazarus also, 
whom he raised from the dead. 

10 But the chief pnests 
itook counsel, that they might 
"kill Lazarus also ; 

1 1 Because, ''on account of him, 
many of the Jews were going 
away, and believing on Jesus. 



" See N. e, ch. 4 : 47. 

• See N. 1, ch. 6 : 7. 

' T., C, G., R., E. Λ^., take ότι in its other sense = that. 
This is, I think, a mistake. The ambiguous quia (quod) of 
the Latin Verss. probably gave rise to this. — Dodd., Wesl., 
Penn., Kenr. 

^ Parkh. — It is generally conceded, I believe, that βααταζιιΐ' 
does not here mean simply, ίο ftear, but ^ to carry off hy stealth," 
(Bio.) as is, indeed, evident from the immediate context. Comp. 
ch. 20 : 15. Comp. also, the similar use of the French, en- 
lever. — Camp, (carried.) 

'• Lachm., Tisch., Meyer, and others, with six, MSS. including 
Β and D have iia ci; . . . . μον τηοηατ] αυτό. I would recom- 
mend that this reading be adopted, and that the rendering be 
that she may keep it for the day of my embalming. — Nary, Kenr., 
Penn, Vulg., Lus., and others. — Says Meyer, 'Nach der auf- 
zunehmenden Lesart von iac/i?re. aber: "Lass sie gewShren, 
damit sie (dieses Oel, wovon sie eben einen Theil zur Salbung 
meiner FUsse gebraucht hat, nicht fiir die Armen hergebe, son- 



dern)/ur den Tag tneiner Einbalsamirung es anfbewahre .'" 
— Against the day, is not exactly in accordance with the 
modern usages of our language. jFbr (R. and others,) is, I 
think, the best word that could be selected, to render ει^. in 
this place. See ch. 6 : 9, N. ηι.^^ΐ'το is not this, (τοντο,) but 
simply it, as in almost every other similar case in the E. V. — 
For the change from burying to embalming, see ch. 19 : 40, 
and the note there on this same word. 

' This pronoun is emphatic =: vobis ipsis. 

' I adopt the common rendering of both πολνι and o/}.os, 
simply because a great mtdtitude is far more elegant and ac- 
curate than much people, and because I wish, as far as possible, 
to restore uniformity to the translation. 

k See N. i, ch. 10 : 32. 

' E. v. Acts 5 : 33. Although consult is sometimes used 
in a neuter sense = to take counsel, yet there is a certain harsh- 
ness in this use of the word, in most cases. 

" Newc., Dodd., Wesl., Nary, Kenr. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XII. 



KINli JAMES VERSION. 

12 On the next day, much 
people that were come to the 
feast, when they heard that Je- 
sus was coming to Jerusalem, 

13 Took branches of palm- 
trees, and went forth to meet 
him, and cried, Hosanna ; Bless- 
ed is the King of Israel that 
Cometh in the name of the 
Lord. 

14 And Jesus, when he had 
found a young ass, sat thereon; 
as it is written, 

15 Fear not, daughter of Sion : 
behold, thy King cometh, sitting 
on an ass's colt. 

16 These things understood 
not his disciples at the first : but 
when Jesus was glorified, then 
remembered they that these 
things were written of him, and 
that they had done these things 
unto him. 

17 The people therefore that 
was with him when he called 
Lazarus out of his grave, and 
raised him from the dead, bare 
record. 

18 For this cause the people 
also met him, for that they heard 
that he had done this miracle. 



19 



said among 



The Pharisees therefore 
mong themselves, Perceive 



ye how ye prevail nothing V be- 



GREEK TEXT. 

12 Tfj eTravpcou ο-χ^λοί ttoXvs 
(.λθων eli την ΐορτην, άκοΰσαν- 
Tes ΟΤΙ €ρ-χ€ταί 6 Ίησοΰς els le- 
ροσολυμα, 

13 ίλαβον τα βαΐα των φοινί- 
κων, Koi βζηλθον eh ύττάντησιν 
αντω, και βκραζον, Ωσαννά- eu- 
λογημίνος ό €ρχ6μβνθ9 ev ονόματι 
Κυρίου, ό βασιλίνί του 'Ισραήλ. 

14 Εύρων 8e ο Ιησούς ονά- 
ριον, (καθισβν eV αύτο, καθώς 
(στι γβγραμμβνον, 

15 Μη φοβοΰ, θύγατερ Σιών 
Ίδου, ό βασιλεύς σου ί'ρχξται, 
καθήμενος eVi ττώλον όνου. 

16 ταύτα δβ ουκ έγνωσαν οΐ 
μαθηται αυτού το πρώτον αλλ' 
ore εδοξασθη 6 'Ιησούς, τότε 
εμνησθησαν οτι ταύτα ην εττ 
αύτω γεγραμμενα, και ταύτα 
ετΓοιησαν αύτώ. 

17 ε μαρτυρεί ούν ό οχ^λος ό 
ων μετ αυτού, οτε τον Λάζαρον 
εφωνησεν εκ τού μνημείου, και 
ήγειρεν αύτον εκ νεκρών 

18 δια τούτο καΐ ύττηντησεν 
αυτω ο ο^λος, οτι ήκουσε τούτο 
αυτόν ττετΓΟίηκεναι το σημεΐον. 

19 οι ούν Φαρισαϊοι είπον 
ττρος εαυτούς, θεωρείτε ότι ουκ 



REVISED VERSION. 

12 The next day, a 'great 
multitudii, that came to the 
feast, hearing that Jes';s was 
coming to Jerusalem, 

13 Took the branches of palm- 
trees, and went out to meet 
him, and were crying, Hosan- 
na : Blessed [be] he that com- 
eth in the name of the Lord, 
[°even] the King of Israel ! 

14 And Jesus, finding a 
young ass, sat upon it, as it 
hatii been Λvritten, 

15 Fear not, daughter of 
Sion : behold, thy King is com- 
ing, sitting upon an ass's colt. 

16 Now these things his 
disciples "knew not at first : 
but when Jesus was glorified, 
then tliey remembered that 
these things had been written 
""about him, and [that] they 
did these things to him. 

17 The multitude, therefore, 
wlio were with him, nvlien he 
called Lazarus out of tlie ■'tomb, 
and raised him from the dead, 
testified. 

18 '■Because of this also the 
multitude "went to meet him, 
because they heard that he had 
done this «sign. 

3 9 The Pharisees, therefore, 
said, among themselves. Do yc 
"see, 'that ye are "gaining 



■■ I insert the supply, even, to prevent the ambiguity re- 
sulting from the want of a distinction of cases, in English, by 
the termination. I think that the imperative form I have 
adopted will commend itself to every one conversant with 
similar exclamations in the Scriptures. No one, perhaps, will 
doubt, that ό βασιλεύς is grammatically in apposition with 
b ερχόμενος. 

' See eh. 8 : 27, N. c. 

"° This use of επι, with the dat. is very rare. I translate επι, 
about, to distinguish it from the translation of πεοι, when used in 
the same sense. 

1 Most editors, with many of the best MSS. read ότι, for ore 
of the Te.xt. Kecept. I doubt not this is the primitive reading, 



since the internal evidence is strongly in its favor; and 
would, therefore, recommend that the revision be made to read 
that, instead of when. 

' See ch. 5 : 28, N. p. 

" See N. u, ch. 11 : 20. 

■ See N. X, ch. 2: 11. 

" See ch. 4 : 19, N. r. 

' See N. a, ch. 4 : 1. 

" The usual rendering of this verb is, to profit = to gain. 
The latter is, I think, preferable in this place. Prevail docs 
not precisely convey the idea. Dodd. (gain advantage.) — 
Latin Verss. (proficere.) — Some translate the clause without in- 
terrogation. This is, perhaps, even preferable to the more 
common interpretation. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XII. 



89 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

hold, the world is gone after 
hiin. 

20 And there were certain 
Greeks among tliein, that came 
up to worship at the feast. 

21 The same came therefore 
to Philip, which was of Beth- 
saida of Galilee, and desired 
him, saying, Sir, we would see 
Jesus. 

22 Philip cometh and telleth 
Andrew : and again, Andrew and 
Philip tell Jesus. 



23 And Jesus answered them, 
saying. The• hour is come, that 
the Son of man should be glori- 
fied. 

24 Verily, verily, I say unto 
you. Except a corn of wheat fall 
into the ground and die, it abid- 
etli alone ; but if it die, it bring- 
eth forth much fruit. 



25 He that loveth his life shall 
lose it ; and he that hateth his 
life in this world, shall keep it 
unto life eternal. 

2G If any man serve me, let 
him follow me; and where I am, 
there shall also my servant be : 
if any man serve me, him will 
my Father honour. 

27 Now is my soul troubled ; 
and what shall I say '? Father, 



GREEK TEXT. 

ώφ(λ(ίΤΐ ούδίν ; ί'δε ό κόσμος 
οπίσω αντοΰ άττηλθίν. 

20 'Ησαν δι rivei Έλληνίί 
€Κ των άναβαινοντων, Ινα ττροσ- 
κννησωσιν iv rfj topTrj• 

21 ούτοι ούν ττροσηλθον Φι- 
λιτητω τώ άττο ΰηθσαϊδα τηί 
Γαλιλαίαξ, και ηρωτων αυτόν 
λΐγοντ€9, Kvpie, θίλομίν τον 
Ιησοΰν Ιδ€Ϊν. 

22 ' Έργ^εται ΦΊλιτητοί και λΐ• 
γβι τω Λνδρβα• και τταλιν Λν- 
δρίαί καΐ Φίλιπποι λίγονσι τω 
Ιησον. 

23 ό δε Ιησοΰί άπ€κρίνατο 
αύτοΐς λβγων, Έληλνθΐν ή ωρα 
'ίνα δοζασθίϊ ό νΙοΐ τον άνθρωπου. 

24 άμην άμην λΐ'γω ύμΐν, ΐάν 
μη 6 κοκκοί του σίτου πεσων eh 
την γην άποθανϊ], αυτοί μονός 
μ€ν€ΐ' eav δε άποθανη, πολύν 
καρπον φΐ'ρΐΐ. 

25 ό φιλών την ψυχΎ]ν αντοΰ 
άπολΐσ€ΐ αυτιών και 6 μισών την 
ψυχτ]ν αύτοΰ iv τω κοσμώ τούτω, 
eli ζωην α'ιώνιον φυλάζβι αυτήν. 

26 iav Ιμοι διακονρ τις, βμοί 
άκολουθβΐτω• καΐ οπον (ΙμΙ (γω, 
€Κίΐ κα\ ό διακονοί 6 βμοί ίσται• 
και lav Tis Ιμοι διακονβ, τιμήσει 
αύτον ό πατήρ. 

27 Ννν ή ψνχτ] μου τεταρακ• 
ται• και τί είττω ; πατίρ, σώσον 



REVISED VERSION. 

nothing? Behold, the world is 
gone away af.er him. 

20 And there were certain 
Greeks, 'of those who came 
up, "that they might worship, 
"during the feast. 

21 'These, therefore, came 
to Philip, yfhe one of Betlisai- 
da of Galilee, and were 'ask- 
ing him, saying. Sir, we "wish 
to see Jesus. 



22 Philip cometh, and tell- 
eth Andrew: and again Andrew 
and Philip tell Jesus. 



23 And Jesus answered them, 
saying. The hour has come, that 
the Son of man may be glori- 
fied. 

24 Verily, verily, I say to 
yon, "'If the "'grain of the wheat, 
falling into the ground, die not, 
it abidetli ''''itself alone ; but, if 
it die, it •bcareth much fruit. 

25 He that loveih his life 
shall lose it ; and he that hateth 
his life in this world, shall keep 
it to eternal life. 

26 If any one serve me, let 
him follow me ; and where I 
am, there shall also my ser- 
vant be : and if any one serve 
ME, the Father will honor him. 

27 Now is my soul trou- 
bled ; and what shall I say? 



" This is the usual rendering of tx, when used in this sense. 
W., R.— E. v., ch. 3 : 1. and elsewhere. 

" See N. k, ch. 1 : 7, and N. q, ch. 2 : 23. 

» See N. c, ch. 1 : 2. 

y There were several Philips, in all probability, all equally 
well known to the primitive disciples. Hence, to prevent mis- 
understanding, the qualifying expression, τον a. B. τ. Γ. is 
added by the Evang. See N. c, ch. 1 : 4$. 

• See N. d, ch. 4 : 31. 



» See ch. 1 : 43, N. y. 

" See cl•. 3 : 3, N. g. 

'' E. V. nniformhj elsewhere. It is needless to say that mm, 
m this sense, is obsolete. 

>''' See cb. 2 : 12, N. z. — A^ulgate, Erasmus, Beza, Trem., 
Kenr. 

' I would always so translate ψβ^ω, in this connection. — 
E. v., cb. 15 : 2, 4, 8. 



90 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XII. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

save me from this hour : but for 
this cause came I unto this hour. 



28 Father, glorify thy name. 
Then came there a voice from 
heaven, saijitig, I have botli glori- 
fied it, and will glorify it again. 

29 The people therefore that 
stood by, and heard it, said that 
it thundered. Others said, An 
angel spake to him. 

30 Jesus answered and said. 
This voice came not because of 
me, but for your sakes. 

31 Now is the judgment of 
this world : now shall the prince 
of this world be cast out. 

32 And I, if I be lifted up from 
the earth, will draw all men 
unto me. 

33 (This he said, signifying 
what death he should die.) 

34 The people answered him, 
"We have heard out of the law 
that Christ abideth for ever : 
and how sayest thou, The Son 
of man must be lifted up ? Who 
is this Son of man? 



35 Then Jesus said unto them, 



GREEK TEXT. 

με ΐκ τηί ωρα? ταύτης. άλλα 
δια τοντο ηλθον els την ωραν 
ταυτην. 

28 ττάτερ, δόζασον σον το 
όνομα. Ήλθΐν ούν φωνή Ικ τοΰ 
ουρανού, ΚαΧ ΐδοζασα, και πά- 
λιν δοξάσω. 

29 Ο ούν οχλοί 6 ίστω? και 
άκουσαί eAeye βροντην yiyovi- 
ναι. άλλοι βλεγον, Αγγελος 
αύτω λελαληκεν. 

30 Αττεκρίθη ο Ιησοΰί καΐ 
είττεν, Ου δι εμε αυτή η φωνή 
γεγονεν, άλλα δι υμάς. 

31 νυν κρίσΐί εστί τοΰ κόσμου 
τούτον νυν ο άρχων του κόσμου 
τούτου εκβληθησεται εζω• 

32 κάγω εαν υψωθώ εκ της 
γης, τταντας ελκύσω προς εμαυ- 
τυν. 

33 Τούτο δε έλεγε, σημαίνων 
ΤΓΟίω θανατω ήμελλεν άποθνη- 
σκειν. 

34 αττεκρίθη αύτω 6 όχλος, 
Ημείς ήκουσαμεν εκ τού νομού, 
ΟΤΙ ό Χρίστος μένει εΙς τον αι- 
ώνα- καΐ πώς συ λέγεις, Οτι 
δει υψωθηναι τον υιον τοΰ άν- 
θρωπου ; τις εστίν ούτος ό υ'ιος 
τοΰ άνθρωπου ; 

35 ΈΙπεν ούν αύτοΐς ό Ιη- 



REVISED VERSION. 

Father, save me from this ■'hour ? 
But 'because of this came I to 
this hour. 

28 Father, glorify thy name 
There came, therefore, a voice 
from Heaven: I both glorified, 
and will glorify again. 

29 The 'multitude, therefore, 
that was standing and hearing, 
said that there ^had been thun- 
der : others said. An angel hath 
spoken to him. 

30 Jesus answered, and said, 
This voice hath not come be- 
cause of ME, but ""because of you. 

31 ΝοΛν is the judgment of 
this world : now shall the 'rul- 
er of this world be cast out. 

32 And I, if I be lifted up 
from the earth, will draw all 
to 'myself. 

33 Now this he said, signi- 
fying i-by what death he 'was 
about to die. 

34 The 'multitude answered 
him. We heard out of the 
law, that the Christ abideth 
forever ; and how sayest thou. 
That the Son of man must be 
lifted up? Who is this Son of 
man? 



35 Jesus, therefore, said to 



•^ Many excellent commentators, and others, (Grotius, Bio., 
Chrys., Theoph., Tholuck, Kling, Schweitzer, Maier, Kuin., 
Camp., Sharpe, Newc, Dodd., Wesl., Mmd.,) make this clause, 
πάτερ . . . ταντης, a question, q. d. '■ Shall I say, Father, cf c." 
This is, to say the least, free from all reasonable objection, and 
gives a beautiful sense. 

» See Gen. Obs. 6. 

' See N. g, ch. 6 : 5. 

* The version I have given is the most literal possible, and, 
for aught I can see, it is not to be objected to, on the score of 
elegance. — Sharpe {it was thunder) ; Schott {tonuisse) ; other 
Latin Versa, substantially the same. 

I" E. v., former part of this same verse, and elsewhere often. 



I prefer not to translate δια in two different ways, in the same 
sense, in immediate connection, especially when, as in this case, 
there is no necessity for so doing. 

' Ruler and prince are, in their N. T. usage, synonymous. 
Therefore but one of them is needed to translate άρχων. I 
have selected ruler, as the more appropriate, judging from the 
etymology of the word. 

' W., R., Vulg., Eras., Beza, Kenr. — This pronciun, εμαντον, 
is essentially reflexive, and is never used for εμε. 

' Dodd., Penn. — The E. V. would be perfectly literal, if we 
read noiov θάνατον ; but as this is the dative of the maniier, 
or Tneans, by seems to be required. — For the rendering, was 
about to, see ch. 4 : 47, N. e. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOiLX. CHAP. XII. 



91 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

Yet a little while is the light 
with you. Walk while ye have 
the light, lest darkness come 
upon )OU : for he that walketh 
in darkness kuoweth not whith- 
er he goeth. 

36 While ye have light, be- 
lieve in the light, that ye may 
be the children of light. These 
things spake Jesus, and depart- 
ed, and did hide himself from 
them. 

37 But though he had done 
so many miracles before them, 
yet they believed not on him : 

38 That the saying of Esaias 
the prophet might be fulfilled, 
whicli he spake. Lord, who hath 
believed our report ? and to 
whom hath the arm of the 
Lord been revealed? 

39 Therefore they could not 
believe, because that Esaias 
said again, 

40 He hath blinded their eyes, 
and hardened their hearts; that 
they should not see with their 
eyes, nor understand with their 



GREEK TEXT. 

σους, Έτι μικροί/ γβονον το φώί 
μ(θ υμών Ιστι. 7Γ€ρητατΐϊτ€ έω? 
το φως ίχ(Τ€, 'ίνα μη σκοτία υμάς 
καταλαβη• καϊ ό τηριπατών Ιν ττ/ 
σκοτία ονκ οίδβ ττοΰ ύττάγβι. 

36 (ως το φως ε'χ^τβ, ττι- 
στ€υίτ€ €1? το φως, ίνα υΊο\ φω- 
τός γίνησθί. Ταντα ίλάλησβν 
ο Ιησούς, καϊ άπίλθων ϊκρυβη 
άτΓ αυτών. 

37 Τοσαΰτα Be αυτοί) σημΰα 
ΤΓίΤΓΟίηκοτος ('μπροσθ^ν αυτών, 
ουκ επίστ€υον ίΐς αύτον 

38 ινα ο Χογος Ησαιου του 
προφήτου Ίτληρωθΐ], Όν dire, Κυ- 
ρΐί, τις βπιστβυσε τη άκοη τιμών ; 
και ο βραχειών Κυρίου τίνι άττε- 
καλυφθη ; 

39 Αια τοΰτο ουκ ηδυναν- 
το ΤΓίστίυίΐν, οτι τταλιν eiivev 
Ησαΐας, 

40 Τβτυφλωκβν αυτών τους 
οφθαλμούς, κα). ττίπωρωκίν αυ- 
τών την καρδιαν ινα μη Ίδωσι 
τοις οφθαλμοίς, καΧ νοησωσι Trj 



REVISED VERSION. 

them. Yet a little 'time the 
light is ""with you. Walk while 
ye have the light, "so that dark- 
ness may not come upon you : 
"and he that walketh in the 
darkness knoweth not whither 
he is going. 

36 While ye have the light, 
believe ""on the light, "that )'e 
may "'become "sons of light. 
These things spoke Jesus, and, 
ppgoing away, he hid himself 
from them. 

37 But though he had done 
so many isigns before them, 
they were not believing on 
him : 

38 That the saying of Isaiah, 
the prophet, might be fulfilled, 
which he 'said: Lord, who be- 
lieved our report? and -the 
arm of the Lord, to whom was 
it revealed? 

39 'On account of this they 
could not believe, because Isa- 
iah said again, 

40 He hath blinded their 
eyes, and hardened their "heart, 
so that they might not see 
with the eyes, 'and under- 



' E. V. generally elsewhere. — I translate μιγ.ξον, without a 
substantive, in similar cases, a little while ; but I see no neces- 
sity for varying here from the common rendering of χρόνος. — 
Newc. 

" Most editors read εν ϋμιν, instead οι μεΟ•' νμων. This is, 
most probably, the true reading. — I would, therefore, recom- 
mend that it be adopted, and that the revision read, among 
you. — R., Sharpe, Newc, Nary, Vulg., and most other versions. 

» See N. k, ch. 1 : 7. 

• I see no necessity for rendering και, here, for. — R.. Vulg., 
Erasm., Trem., Kenr., Fr. S. 

•• See ch. 14 : 1, N. a. 

ρ This is a frequent rendering of this verb. It is peculiarly 
apposite in this place. Says Meyer, "j'£»'£ei9'£) nicht: seid, 
sondern : werdet." — Wesl., Penn, Beza, De. W., Fr. S. 

rr See ch. 4 : 3, N. d. 

1 See N. X ch. 2 : 11. 



' See N. g, ch. 1 : 15. 

• 1 have rendered this clause literally, according to the 
order of the Orig., without, as I apprehend, doing any violence 
to the Eng. idiom, and with, at least, a slight increase of power 
in the translation. 

• See Gen. Obs. C— "See ch. 4: 12, N. Κ Κ. 

■ The Orig. xagStav, is singular. As the Eng. idiom ad- 
mits very well of a literal translation. 1 see no reason why we 
should not adopt it, as is so often done in similar cases, and 
even in the next clause of this same verse — See ch. 14 : 1, 27 ; 
16 : 6, 22. Matt. 6 : 21 ; 15 : 8, and elsewhere.— Indeed, though 
the A. B. Society's Edition, (8vo.) which is used in this revision, 
has the plural here, yet I presume the original reading of the 
E. V. was heart, as it is in Bagster's Ilexapla. 

' I see no reason why xni should be rendered here, nor, and 
before επιοτραγωσι, and. I have, therefore, endeavored to re- 
store uniformity by translating it and, in both cases. — Dodd. 
Wesl., Nary, Beza, Trem 



92 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XII. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

heart, and be converted, and I 
should heal them. 

41 These things said Esaias, 
when he saw his glory, and 
spake of him. 

42 Nevertheless, among the 
chief rulers also many believed 
on him ; but because of the 
Pharisees they did not confess 
li'im, lest they should be put out 
of the synagogue: 

43 For they loved the praise 
of men more than the praise of 
God. 

44 Jesus cried, and said. He 
that believeth on me, believeth 
not on me, but on him that sent 
me : 

45 And he that seeth me, seeth 
him that sent me. 

46 I am come a light into the 
world, that whosoever believeth 
on me should not abide in dark- 
ness. 

47 And if any man hear my 
words, and believe not, I judge 
hiiii not: for I came not to 
judge the world, but to save the 
world. 

4S He that rejecteth me, and 
receiveth not my words, hath 
one that judgeth him : the word 
that I have spoken, the same 
shall judge him in the last day. 

49 For I have not spoken of 



GREEK TEXT. 

καρδία kou ίττιστραφώσι, kou Ιά- 
σωμαί amovs. 

41 Ταΰτα eiwev Ησαΐας, οτ€ 
eiSe την δόζαν αυτού, καΐ (λά- 
λησ€ ΤΓ(ρ\ αύτον• 

42 όμως μίντοί καΐ (κ των 
αργοντων ττολλοί ΐπίστίνσαν eiy 
αυτόν άλλα δια τουί Φαρισαίους 
ουγ^ ωμολογονν, 'ίνα μη άττοσυνα- 
γωγοί γίνωνται. 

43 ηγαττησαν γαρ την δοζαν 
των ανθρώπων μάλλον rjirep την 
δοζαν τον θβον. 

44 Ίησοΰί δβ βκραζζ καΐ ei- 
Trev, Ο τΓίστίυων eh e'/xe, ού 
ΤΓίστβυβι ety e/xe, αλλ €£? τον 
ττεμψαντα μζ• 

45 καΐ 6 θβωρών e/xe, θίωρά 
τον ΤΓΐλψαντα μι. 

46 ίγω φως ίΐς τον κοσμον 
ίληλυθα. Ίνα ττάς ό ττιστΐυων els 
eμe, iv τβ σκοτία μη μeίvr}. 

47 καΙ iav τις μου άκουστ) των 
ρημάτων καΐ μη 7ΓLστeυσr], 4γω 
ου κρίνω αυτόν ου γαρ ηλθον 
'ίνα κρίνω τον κοσμον, άλλ ίνα 
σώσω τον κοσμον. 

48 ό aOeTuiv eμe καΐ μη λαμ- 
βάνων τα ρήματα μου, e^ei τον 
κρίνοντα αύτον ό λόγος Όν ϊλα- 
λησα, eKelvos Kpivel αυτόν iv Trj 
6σχ^ατΎ) ημβρα. 

49 ΟΤΙ Ιγω e^ ίμαυτοΰ ουκ 



REVISED VERSION. 

stand with the heart, and "re- 
turn, and I might heal them. 

41 These things said Isaiah, 
when he saw his glory, and 
spoke of him. 

42 Nevertheless, many "ofthe 
"rulers also believed on him, but 
because of the Pharisees tliey 
did not confess him, so that tliey 
might not be put out of the 
synagogue. 

43 For they loved the 'glory 
of men more than the >glory 
of God. 

44 Now Jesus cried, and 
said. He that believeth on me, 
believeth not on me, but on 
him that sent me. 

45 And he that seeth me, 
seeth him that sent me. 

46 I am come a light into 
the world, so that 'no one that 
believeth on me may abide in 
the darkness. 

47 And if any one 'hear my 
words, and believe not, I do 
not judge him; for I came not, 
'■that I might judge the world, 
but ""that I might save the 
world. 

48 He that rejecteth me, and 
receiveth not my words, hath 
'that which judgeth him : the 
word which I spoke, ■'that 
will judge him in the last 
diiy. 

49 'Because I did not speak 



V» E. v., 1 Peter 2 : 25.— It is doubtful, I think, whether to 
be converted expresses here, or elsewhere, the exact idea of this 
verb, in the m.ddle voice. At all events, in all passages parallel 
with this, I think turn, turn back, or return, would express 
the meaning of the Spirit better than be converted. 

"» See N. V, v. 20, above. 

' See N. i, v. 31, above. 

y See N. e, ch. 8 : 54. 

' See N. X, ch. 11 : 26. 

• Lachm. and Tisch. have ψνλαξτι, for ττιστενατ]. Two ancient 
MSS. {A D) and many of the ancient Verss., including the 



Vulg., favor this reading. I would recommend its adoption, 
and translate thus : And if any one hear, and keep not my 
words, &c. ; with this note in the margin : According to many 
copies, hear my words, and believe not, <f c. 
>■ See N. k, ch. 1 : 7. 

' One that judgeth. is properly spoken of a person, but not 
of a woi'd spoken.- — Sharpe, Newc. 

^ See N. c, ch. 1 : 2. — This word is correlative to Svtos, and 
I doubt whether it is ever desirable to translate it the same. 

' See N. i, ch. 1 : 15, and N. a, ch. 7 : 17. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. ΧΠΙ. 



93 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

myself; but the Father which 
sent me, he gave me a com- 
mandment, what I should say, 
and what I should speak. 

50 And I know that his 
commandment is life everlast- 
ing : whatsoever I speak there- 
fore, even as the Father said 
unto me, so I speak. 

CHAP. XIII. 

Now before the feast of the 
passover, when Jesus knew 
that his hour was come that he 
should depart out of this world 
unto the Father, having loved 
his own which were in the world, 
he loved them unto the end. 



2 And supper being ended, 
(the devil having now put into 
the heai-t of Judas Iscariot, Si- 
mon's so», to betray him,) 

3 Jesus knowing that the 
Father had given all things in- 
to his hands, and that he was 
come from God, and went to 
God; 

4 He riseth from supper, and 
laid aside his garments; and 
took a towel, and girded himself. 

5 After that, he poureth water 
into a bason, and began to wash 
the disciples' feet, and to wipe 
t/wm with the towel wherewith 
he was girded. 

6 Then cometh he to Simon 



GREEK TEXT. 



(λάλησα• αλλ' ό ττίμψα? μ€ ττα- 
Τ7]ρ, avTos μοι (ντολην ίδωκβ, τι 
βϊπω και τι λαλήσω• 

50 και οίδα οτι η βντολη αυ- 
τού ζωη αιώνιοζ ϊστιν. α ούν 
λαλώ ϊγω, καθωί (Ίρηκ6 μοι ό 
ττατηρ, ούτω λαλώ. 



CHAP. XIII. 



IIP ο 8e τηί eopTTJf τοΰ 
πασ^α, €ΐδωί 6 Ιησοΰί otl (λη- 
λυθΐν αυτοΰ η ωρα, Ίνα μΐταβν] 
e'/c τοΰ κόσμου τούτου ττροί τον 
TraTfpa, αγαττησαί τους Ιδιους 
τους iv τώ κοσμώ, els τβλος ηγα- 
ττησίν αυτούς. 

2 καΐ δβίττνου γΐνομίνου, τοΰ 
διάβολου ηδη βίβληκοτος els την 
καρδίαν Ιούδα Σίμωνος Ισκα- 
ριώτου, 'ίνα αΰτον τταραδω, 

3 €ίδω? ό Ιησοΰς, Ότι πάντα 
δeδωκev αύτω 6 ττατηρ els τας 
Xeipas, καΐ οτι άττο θβοΰ βζηλθ( 
καΐ προς top Oeov ύπάγ6ΐ, 

4 eyeipcTai «κ τοΰ δeίπvoυ, καΐ 
τίθησι τα ιμάτια, καΐ λαβών Xev 
τιον δύζωσ(ν Ιαυτον 

5 etra βaλλeι ΰδωρ els τον 
νιπτήρα, και ηρςατο vavTeiv τους 
πόδας των μαθητών, και Ικμασ- 
σ(ΐν τώ λevτίω φ ην διeζωσμevoς. 

6 ep^eTai ούν προς Σίμωνα 



REVISED VERSION. 

'from myself; but the Father 
who sent me 'liimself gave me 
a commandment, what I siiould 
say, and wliat I sliould speak. 
50 And I know that his com- 
mandment is ffetcrnal life : what 
^things I ''say, therefore, as tlie 
Father hath 'spoken to me, so 
I speak. 

CHAP. XIII. 

NoAV before the feast of the 
Passover, Jesus, knowing that his 
hour was come, that he should 
depart out of this world to the 
Father, having loved liis own 
that were in the world, he loved 
them to the end. 



2 And, supper being ended, 
the Devil having now put into 
the heart of Judas Iscariot, [son] 
of Simon, ''that he should betray 
him, 

3 'Jesus, knowing tliat the 
Fatlier had given 'him all things, 
into [his] hands, and that lie came 
out from God, and was going to 
God, 

4 Eiseth up from the supper, 
and layeth aside [his] garments, 
and taking a towel, girded him- 
self. 

5 •'Afterward he '^puttetli wa- 
ter into the basin, and began to 
wash the feet of the disciples, 
and to wipe with the towel with 
which he had been girded. 

6 He cometh, therefore, to Si- 



f See ch. 2 : 12, N. z. 

ff See ch. 3 : 16, N. e. 

^ The word, things, is here inserted to indicate the plural 
form of the relative. This I have often done elsewhere. 

'■ See N. j, ch. 10 : 6. 

' See N. q, ch. 4 : 18. 

- See N. k, ch. 1 : 7. 

'' Lachm. places 6 Ιησονι in brackets. Tisch. (vrith MSS. 
BDLH, and others, and some ancient Verss.) rejects it. "Es 



werde mechanisch aus v. 1 wiederholt." (Meyer.) — I would 
leave it out. and translate, He, knowing, i-c. 

' It is evident that αντψ is dependent on δεδωχε, and is not 
to be construed with χει^αί, as the dative of possession. I 
have, therefore, given a more literal translation of the clause, 
without, as I trust, impairing its force, or beauty. 

'' W.— E. v., Mark 4 : 17.— I think είτα will bear this ren- 
dering in all cases, except in Heb. 12 : 9. I greatly prefer this 
rendering to then, which is common in the E. V. 

<• W., R., Kenr. — Vulg. (miitit.) — This is the usual render- 
ing of βάλλω, and I see no reason for departing from it. 



94 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. ΧΠΙ. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

Peter : and Peter said unto 
him, Lord, dost tliou wash my 
feet? 

7 Jesus answered and said un- 
to him, What I do thou knowest 
not now ; but thou shalt know 
hereafter. 

8 Peter saith unto him, Thou 
shalt never wash my feet. Je- 
sus answered him, if I wash 
thee not, thou hast no part with 
me. 

9 Simon Peter saith unto him. 
Lord, not my feet only, but also 
mij liands and my head. 



10 Jesus saith to him. He that 
is washed needeth not save to 
wash his feet, but is clean 
every whit : and ye are clean, 
but not all. 

11 For he knew who should 
betray him : therefore said he, 
Ye are not all clean. 

12 So after he had washed 
their feet, and had taken his 
garments, and was set down 
again, he said unto them. Know 
ye what I have done to you? 

13 Ye call me Master, aud 
Lord : and ye say well ; for so 
I am. 

14 If I then, your Lord and 
Master, have washed your feet ; 



GREEK TEXT. 

Πίτρον και Ae'yei αύτω ίκύνοί, 
Kvpie, συ μου νίπτει^ τους ττό- 

7 Λν€κριθη Ιησοΰί καΐ eiirev 
αντω, Ο €γω ποιώ, συ ουκ οίδαί 
άρτι, γυώστ) δε μ€τα ταύτα. 

8 Aeyet αύτω Πίτροζ, Ου μη 
viyj/rji τους ττοδας μου eii top αΐώ- 
να. Αττίκριθη αύτω 6 'Ιησούς, 
Εαν μη νίψω σ€, ουκ €χ€ΐί μέρος 

μ€Τ ϊμοϋ. 

9 AeyeL αύτω Σίμων Πέτρος, 
Κύριε, μη τους ττοδας μου μόνον, 
άλλα καΐ τάς γειρας καΐ την κε- 
φαλήν. 

10 Λέγει αυτώ 6 Ιησούς, Ο 
λελουμενος ού -χβείαν ε-)^ει η τους 
πόδας νίψασθαι, αλλ' εστί καθα- 
ρός όλος- και ύμεϊς καθαροί εστε, 
αλλ ουχί πάντες. 

1 1 άδει γαρ τον παραδίδοντα 
αυτόν• δια τούτο είπεν, ΟύχΙ πάν- 
τες καθαροί εστε. 

12 ϋτε ούν ένιψε τους πόδας 
αυτών, καΐ έλαβε τα ιμάτια αυ- 
τού, αναπεσων πάλιν, εΙπεν αύ• 
τοις, Γινώσκετε τι πεποίηκα 
ύμΐν ; 

13 ύμεΐς ψωνεΐτε' με, Ό δι- 
δάσκαλος, καΐ Ό κύριος• κα\ κα- 
λώς λέγετε, ειμί γαρ. 

14 ει ούν εγω ένιψα υμών 
τους πόδας, ό κύριος καΐ ό δι- 



REVISED VERSION. 

mon Peter ; and ^he saith to him, 
Lord, dost thou wash my leet? 



7 Jesus answered, and said to 
him, What I am doing, thou 
knowest not now, but thou shalt 
know hereafter. 

S Peter saith to him, Thou 
shalt never wash my feet. Je- 
sus answered him. If I wash 
thee not, thou hast no part with 

ME. 

9 Simon Peter saith to him. 
Lord, not my feet only, but also 
[m}^] hands, and [my] head. 



10 Jesus saith to him. He that 
hath been 'bathed 'hath no need, 
''unless to wash the feet, but is 
'altogether clean : and ye are 
clean, but not all. 

11 For he knew him that be- 
trayed him : because of this he 
said. Ye are not all clean. 

12 "When, therefore, he had 
washed tiieir feet, and taken liis 
garments, sitting down again, he 
said to them. Do ye know what 
I have done to you ? 

13 Ye call me. The Teacher, 
and. The Lord, and ye say well, 
for I am. 

14 If, then, I, the Lord, and the 
Teacher, have washed your feet, 



' I suppose the only reason for inserting Peter, in tliis clause, 
in most of the English Versions was, that the subject of the 
verb might be certainly linown to the reader ; but clearly no 
Buch device is needed. Indeed, it may be doubted whether the 
emphatic txetvos is genuine, as it is cancelled by Lachniann and 
Tischendorf on the authority of ancient MSS. Still, I would 
retain it. 

' All agree, that λουειν means to wash the whole body, or to 
bathe, while νιπτειν means to wash (a part of the body). My 



object, however, in making the proposed change, is, simply, to 
make a distinction between the two words, which are here liable 
to be confounded in the mind of the mere Eng. reader. Camp. 
{halli been bathing) ; Sharpe {hath been cleansed). — Newc, ΛVesl., 
Do Wctte. 

) See ch. 2 : 25, N. x. 

'■ Save, in this sense, is obsolete. — Lachm. has ει μη, for η. 

1 See ch. 7 : 23, N. j. — Every whit is obsolete. 

° E. V. commonly. — Sharpe, Dodd., Penn. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIII. 



95 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

ye also ought to wash one ano- 
ther's feet. 

15 For I have given you an 
example, that ye should do as I 
have done to you. 

16 Verily, verily, I say unto 
you, Tlie servant is not greater 
than his lord ; neither he that 
is sent greater than he that 
sent him. 

17 If ye know these things, 
happy are ye if ye do them. 

18 I speak not of you all ; I 
know whom I have chosen ; but 
that the scripture may be fulfill- 
ed. He that eateth bread with 
me, hath lifted up his heel 



agamst me. 



19 Now I tell you before it 
come, that when it is come to 
pass, ye may believe that I am 
he. 

20 Verily, verily, I say unto 
you. He that receiveth whomso- 
ever I send, receiveth me, and 
he that receiveth me, receiveth 
him that sent me. 

21 When Jesus had thus said, 
he was troubled in spirit, and 
testified, and said, Verily, verily, 
I say unto you, that one of you 
shall betray me. 



GREEK TEXT. 

δάσκαλος, και νμΐΐί οφβίλίτί 
άλληλωι/ νπΓτίΐν tovs ττοδα?. 

15 ντΓοδαγμα γαρ ί'δωκα νμΐν, 
Ινα καθωί (γω Ιττοίησα ΰμϊν, και 
ύμΐΐς 7Γ0ΐητ€. 

16 άμην άμην λ€γω νμΐι>, ουκ 
(στί δοΰλοΐ μείζων του κυρίου 
αύτοΰ, ούδ€ άττοστολος μείζων 
τοΰ ττίμψαντος αυτόν. 

17 €t ταΰτα ο'ίδατβ, μακαρωί 
€στ€ iav ποιητ€ αύτα. 

18 ου 7Γ(ρΙ Ίταντων υμών λε'- 
γω• (γω οίδα ούί ίζίλ^ζάμην- 
άλλ ίνα ή γραφή ττληρωθη, Ό 
τρώγων μ€Τ ϊμοΰ τον αρτον, 
ίττηρίν €7Γ e/Lte την τττΐρναν αυ- 
τού. 

19 απ αρτί λίγω ύμϊν ττρο 
τοΰ γβνβσθαι, Ίνα όταν γίνηται, 
ΤΓίστβυσητβ οτι ίγώ βΐμί. 

20 άμην άμην λ€γω νμΐν, Ο 
λαμβάνων iav TLva ττίμψω, e'/xe 
λάμβανα• 6 δι (μ€ λαμβάνων, 
λάμβανα τον ΤΓβμψαντα μ€. 

21 Ταΰτα βίττων ό Ιησούς 
ίταραγθη τω ττνίυματί, και. (μαρ- 
τυρήσω καΐ ('nrev, Άμην άμην 
λβγω ύμΐν, οτι et? i^ υμών παρά- 
δωσα μ€. 



REVISED VERSION. 

YE ought also to Avash one an- 
other's feet. 

15 For I have given you an 
examjile, that, "as I have done 
to you, "so YE should do. 

16 Verily, verily, I say to you, 
A servant is not greater than Ids 
lord, °nor an ^apostle, greater 
than he that sent him. 

17 If ye know these things, 
happy are ye, if ye do them. 

18 I am not speaking of you 
all : I know Λνΐιοηι I chose : but 
tliat the Scripture may be ful- 
filled, He that ate bread with 
ME, lifted up his heel against me. 



19 Even now, I tell you be- 
fore it come to pass, 'so that, 
when it cometh to pass, ye may 
believe that I am." 

20 Veriiy, verily, I say to you. 
He that receiveth, "if I send any 
one, receiveth me : and he that 
receivetii me, receiveth him that 
sent me. 

21 Jesus, saying 'these things, 
was troubled in "the spirit, and 
testified, and said. Verily, verily, 
I say to you, that one of you 
will betray me. 



° The E. V. of this clause is by no means literal ; and, as in 
most similar cases, it lacks much of the force of the Orig. — 
Και is often rendered so, and properly'. The textual order of 
words is followed by Dodd., Nary, Penn, Kenr. 

" Nor is, in this case, more agreeable to modern usage than 
neither. 

Ρ Ε. V. in all other places, except two, (2 Cor. 8 : 23. Phil. 
2 : 25,) in which it is translated messenger. While I have 
retained, or rather restored, from the prevailing usage, the 
word, apostle, in the text, at the same time, I confess, that I 
should vastly prefer to translate this word, messenger, in all 
cases. (It occurs nowhere else in John.) — 1. Because the latter 
is strictly a translation of the Orig. word, while the former is 
merely, (like baptize, presbytery, and others,) a transfer. — 
2. Because the latter is a term in use in the common business 
of life, and, therefore, well understood by the people, while 



the former is strictly an ecclesiastical term, whose meaning (to 
the mere English reader) may be modified, amplified, or covered 
up, with little difEculty, by designing spiritual leaders. 

' E. v., next clause of this verse, and often elsewhere. — 
Sharpe, Newc, Dodd., Mary, Penn, Kenr. 

• See ch. 8 : 24, N. v. 

" The Textus Receptns reads literally, " If I send any one." 
Most probably, the more ancient reading, adopted by Laehmann 
and Tischeiidorf, av τίνα, whomsoever, is the true one. I would 
recommend, therefore, that the E. V., whomsoever I send, be 
retained. 

' See ch. 9 : 6, N. e. 

» See ch. 11 : 33, N. g. 



96 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. ΧΙΠ. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

22 Then the disciples looked 
ont on another, doubting of 
whon? he spake. 

23 Now there was leaning on 
Jesus' bosom, one of his disci- 
ples, whom Jesus loved. 

24 Simon Peter therefore, 
beckoned to him, that he should 
ask who it should be of whom 
he spake. 

2-5 He then, lying on Jesus' 
breast, saith unto him, Lord who 
is it ? 



26 Jesus answered. He it is to 
whom I shall give a sop, when I 
have dipped it. And when he 
had dipped the sop, he gave it to 
Judas Iscariot the son of Simon. 

27 And after the sop Satan 
entered into him. Then said 
Jesus unto him, That thou doest, 
do quickly. 

28 Now no man at the table 
knew for what intent he spake 
this unto him. 

29 For some of them thought, 
because Judas had the bag, that 
Jesus had said unto liin), Buy 



GREEK TEXT. 

22 Εβλίτνον ούν us άλΧηΧουί 
OL μαθηταΐ, άττορονμζνοί Trepl τί- 
νος Xeyei. 

23 ήν he άνακ€ίμ€νο9 etr των 
μαθητών αντοΰ €v τώ κολττώ του 
Ιησοΰ, Όν ηγαπα ό Ιησοΰί• 

24 vevei ούν τούτω Σίμων Πί- 
τροί ττυθίσθαι tls αν e'/i; wepl ου 
λΐγβί. 

25 Ιττιττίσων Se ΐΚ€Ϊνοί eVt το 
στήθος του Ιησοΰ, Aeyet αντω, 
Κυριβ, TLS €στιν ', 

26 ΆτΓΟκρίνβταί ό Ίησοΰς, 
Έκ€Ϊνοΐ Ιστίν ώ εγω βαψας το 

ψωμίον (ττίδωσω. K<xi ίμβαψας 
το ψωμιον, δίδωσιν Ίουδα Σί- 
μωνος Ισκαριώτη. 

27 Kou μ€τα το ψωμίον, τοτ€ 
βίσηλθβν els eKeivov ο Σατανάς. 
Aeyei ούν αύτω ό Iησoΰs, ' Ο 
TTOLeis, ΤΓοίησον ταχ^ιον 

28 Τοΰτο δβ οΰδεί? €γνω των 
άνακίΐμβνων Trpos τι ehrev αύτω. 

29 TLves γαρ ΐδοκουν, eVel το 
γλωσσοκομον (Ιχ^ν ό 'louhas, 
ΟΤΙ Aeyet αυτω 6 Iησoΰs, Λγο- 



REVISED VERSION. 

22 The disciples, therefore, 
'kept looking one upon another 
doubting of whom he was speak- 
ing. 

23 Now there was "reclining 
on the bosom of Jesus, one of 
his disciples, wiiom Jesus loved. 

24 Simon Peter, therefore, 
"noddeth to him, ''to inquire who 
it was, of whom he ''was speak- 
ing? 

25 And he, "reclining on the 
breast of Jesus, saith to him. 
Lord, who is it? 

2G Jesus answereth. Ho it is, 
to whom I, after dipping, shall 
give the 'inorsel. And dipping 
tiie 'morsel, he giveth [it] to 
Judas Iscariot, [son] of Simon. 

27 And after the "morsel, ''then 
entered Satan into him. Jesus, 
therefore, saith to him, What thou 
doest, do quickly. 

28 Now no one 'of those sit- 
ting at table knew for what he 
"said this to him. 

29 For some were thinking, 
'since Judas had the bag, that 
Jesus was saying to him, Buy 



' See N. o, ch. 7 : 11. 

" Vulg. (recumbens). — It is very difficult to present those 
passages descriptive of table scenes to the Eng. reader, in an 
appreciable form, because the customs to which they refer, 
many of them, are so imperfectly known among us. If I am 
not mistaken, however, Zea» is not elsewhere used, in the E. V. 
in describing the manner of sitting at table, while recline is 
often so used. In v. 25, the Text. Rec. has ίπιπιαων = fall- 
ing back, (as some translate it,) but the reading of some of the 
bestMSS. is αναπεοων= αναχειμεΐΌΒ- This is, most probably, 
the true reading. For further light on this subject, see Penn's 
Annot. on these verses, and Jahn's Bib. Archieol., § 146. — 
Newc, Ttiar. 

» Dodd. says that this word "might more exactly be ren- 
dered nodded.'''' — Penn, Fr. S.,-M., (made a sign.) — To beckon 
docs not convey, to modem ears, the exact idea of the Orig., 
νενειν. 

^ Instead of πν9•εα3•αι ns <tv ειη, Lachm. and Tisch. follow- 
ing the most ancient JISS. have και λέγει αντω• Είπε ns εστί; 



I would recommend that this reading, (which is approved by 
Meyer, Van Ess, All., Kist., Penn, and is also the reading of 
the Vulg., and the Verss. made from it,) be adopted ; and that 
the translation be, and saith to him, Say, who is it, &c. ; and 
that this note be put in the margin : According to some copies, 
to inquire who it was, of whom, &c. I would also put is, for 
was. in the last part of the verse. 

" All agree in rejecting sup, as obsolete, and otherwise ob- 
jectionable. Many adopt the marginal reading of the E. V., 
as I have done, though this word is not full enough in its 
meaning to convey all that is implied in the Orig. I have not 
been able, however, to find a better word. 

'' There is certainly no difficulty in the way of rendering 
τότε. 

' W., R.. Sharpe, Newc , Nary, Van Ess, De W., and the 
Latin Verss. all render these words literally, as I have done. 

J See N. g, ch. 1 : 15. 

• Rob. — As there is another word usually rendered because^ 
I would render επει uniformly since, or seeing that. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CPIAP. ΧΠΙ. 



97 



ΚΙΛΟ JAMES VERSION. 

those things that we have need of 
against• the feast ; or, that he 
should give something to the 
poor. 

30 He then, having received 
the sop, went immediately out : 
and it was night. 

31 Therefore, when he was 
gone out, Jesus said. Now is 
tlie Son of man glorified, and 
God is glorified in him. 

32 If God he glorified in him, 
God shall also glorify him in 
himself, and shall straightway 
glorify him. 

33 Little children, yet a little 
while I am vs'ith you. Ye shall 
seek me ; and, as I said unto 
the Jews, Whither I go, ye 
cannot come, so now I say to 
you. 

34 A new commandment I 
give unto you. That ye love one 
another ; as I have loved you, 
that ye also love one another. 

35 By this shall all men know 
that ye are ray disciples, if ye 
have love one to another. 

36 Simon Peter said unto 
him. Lord, whither goest thou ? 
Jesus answered him, AVhither I 
go, thou canst not follow me 
now ; but thou shalt follow me 
afterward. 



GREEK TEXT. 



ρασον ων \peiav βχομβν ei? την 
ίορτην η τοΐΐ ΤΓτωχοΐί 'ίνα τι δω. 

30 λαβών ούν το ψωμίον €Κ€Ϊ- 
νος, ΐύθίως ϊζηλθΐν. ην 8e νυζ, 
0Τ€ ούν ίζηλθζ. 

31 Aeyet 6 Ίησονς, Νύν 
ΐδοζάσθη ό v'lof του άνθρωπου, 
καΐ ό θβοί (δοςασθη ev αύτώ. 

32 (Ιό θ(θί (δοζάσθη ev αύ- 
τώ, KCU 6 θ(θί δοςάσίί αύτον ev 
ίαυτω, καΙ ίύθυί δοζάσβι αυτόν. 

33 Τίκνία, €TC μικρόν μίθ' 
υμών (Ιμι. ζητησ(Τ€ μβ, και κα- 
θώς (Ιττον τοϊί Ιουδαίοι^, ' Οτι 
οτΓου υτταγω ΐγω, ύμεΐς ού δυ- 
νασθβ (λθΐΐν, καΐ νμΐν λε^ω άρτι. 

3 4 ΐντολην καινή ν δίδωμι ύμΐν, 
'ίνα άγαττάτβ άλλ?;λοι;ί• καθώς 
ηγαττηατα υμάς, ινα και νμβις αγα- 
ττάτε άλλ7]λουί. 

35 ev τούτω γνωσονται τταντα 
Ότι €μοΙ μαθηταί eVre, eav άγα- 
ττην €χΎΐΤ€ ev αλληλοΐί. 

36 Aeyei αύτώ Σιμών Jle- 
τρος, Κύριε, πού υπάγεις; άττε- 
κρίθη αύτώ 6 Ιησούς, ' Οπου 
ύπαγω, ού δυνασα'ι μοι νύν άκο- 
Χονθησαι• ύστερον δε ακολουθή- 
σεις μοι. 



REVISED VERSION. 

what things we have need of %γ 
the feast; or, that he should 
give something to the poor. 

30 He, therefore, receiving 
the "morsel, Λvent immediately 
out. And it was night. 

31 When, therefoi'e, he went 
out, Jesus saith, "Even ηοΛν was 
tiicSon of m;iu glorified, and God 
was glorifii;d in him. 

32 If God was glorified in him, 
God will also glorify him in him- 
self: ''yea, he will 'immediately 
glorify him. 

33 Little children, yet a little 
while I am with you. Ye will 
seek me, and, as I said to the 
Jews, 'That whither I am going 
YE can not come, so I say to you 

llOVl'. 

34 A new commandment I 
give to you, That ye love one 
another : as I loved you, that ye 
also love one another. 

35 By this will all know that 
ye are my disciples, if ye have 
love one for another. 

36 Simon Peter saith to him. 
Lord, whither art thou going ? 
Jesus answered him, IVhither I 
am going thou canst not follow 
me now ; but thou wilt follow 
me afterwards. 



' See N. h, ch. 12 : 7. 

^ Rob. — Even now, referring to a time just past.— It must 
have been a great relief to .Jesus, (who perfectly knew the 
heart of -Juilas,) when he went out, to return no more to the 
company of the Apostles. Bio. and others, take these aorists 
in a future sense. But I cannot find that the aorist is ever 
used, at least in the N. T. strictly as a future. Like the pre- 
sent it often describes things that occur habitually, and thus 
may have a bearing upon future time ; but it is not used to 
convey a proper prediction of that which is only future. I 
know not why the translators have so generally rendered these 
aorists by the present, unless because of the qualifying i^iv: 
but the use of this word in reference to past time is frequent : 
e. g. (with the aor.) ch. 21 : 10. Matt. 26 : 05. Rom. 5:11, 



in none of which cases does the E. Y. render by the present : 
(with the imperf.) ch. 11 : 8. Also, Xen. Cyr. 4, 5, 48. — I sup- 
pose the idea conveyed to be, That, in the entering of Satan 
into Judas, and his going out, with the determined purpose of 
betraying his Lord, both God and his son were glorified — not, 
perhaps, in the sight of men, but in the sight of angels, and 
of men redeemed, who saw in tliis act the beginning of that 
great drama that was about to be enacted. 

>■ See N. u, ch. 1 : 20. 

' E. v., ch. 21 : 3. Mark 1 : 12, 28.— I would always so render 
this adverb. — Straightway is obsolete. 

' There is nothing to prevent the translation of this ότι. 



98 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIV. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

37 Peter said unto him, Lord, 
why cannot I follow thee now ? 
I will lay down my life for thy 
sake. 

38 Jesus answered him, Wilt 
thou lay down thy life for my 
sake ? Verily, A'erily, I say unto 
thee, The cock shall not crow, 
till thou hast denied me thrice. 



CHAP. XIV. 

Let not your heart be trou- 
bled : ye believe in God, believe 
also in me. 

2 In my Father's house are 
many mansions : if it were not so, 
I would have told you. I go to 
prejiare a place for you. 

3 And if I go and prepare a 
place for you, I will come again 
and receive you unto myself; 
that where I am, there ye may 
be also. 

4 And whither I go ye know, 
and the way ye know. 



GREEK TEXT. 

37 Aeyei αύτω 6 Jlerpoi, 
Kvpie, διατι ου 8υναμαι σοι άκο- 
λονθησαι άρτί ; την ψυχτ]^ μου 
ύπ€ρ σου θησω. 

38 ΛτΓβκριθη αυτω ο Ιησούς, 
Την ψυχ^ην σου ΰττίρ €μον θη- 
σ€ΐί ,' αμήν αμήν Λίγω σοι, ου 
μη άλβκτωρ φωνησίΐ eiruy ού άπαρ- 
νηση pe τρις. 

CHAP. XIV. 

Μη ταρασσίσθω υμών ή κάρ- 
δια• πιστ€υ€τί eiy τον θ(ον, καΐ 
eiy epe ττιστβυΕΤί. 

2 ev τη οΙκια του πατρός μου 
μοναι ΤΓολλαι είσιν el 8e μη, 
eiTTOv αν ύμΐν πορεύομαι βτοιμα- 
σαι τοτΓον υ μι ν. 

3 καί eav πορευθώ και ετοι- 
μάσω ύμΐν τόπον, πάλιν ϊρ^ομαι 
και τταραληψομαι υμάς προς ίμαυ- 
τον Ίνα οπού βίμι (γω, και υμεΐς 
ήτ€. 

4 καΐ οπού €γω ύπαγω οϊδατβ, 
και την όδον οϊδατί. 



REVISED VERSION. 

37 Peter saith to him, Loid, 
why can not I follow thee now ? 
I will lay down my life ''for thee. 



38 Jesus answered him, wilt 
thou lay down thy life ''for me ? 
Verily, verily, I say to thee. The 
cock 'will not crow, till thou 
hast denied me "three times. 



CHAP. xtv. 

Let not your heart be trou- 
bled : "believe "on God, "and be- 
lieve "on ME. 

2 In my Father's house are 
many mansions : "but if not, I 
would have told you. I am going 
to prepare a place for you. 

3 And if I go and prepare a 
place for you, I am coming again, 
and will receive you to myself, 
so that where I am, ye may be 
also. 

4 And whither I am going ye 
know, 'and the way ye know. 



'' For the sake of is commonly, in Greek, δια, while νπερ, 
with the genitive, is generally rendered for, in the E. V. — See 
ch. C : 51 ; 10 : 11, 15 ; 11 : 4, 50, 51, 52; 15 : 13; 18 : 14, and 
elsewhere often. 

' Newc, Penn. 

'" E. v., Acts 11 : 10. — Thrice is gone partially into disuse. 

" A difficulty of frequent occurrence presents itself in this 
passage, arising out of the ambiguity of the Orig. I am satis- 
fied that the E. V. is wrong ; for, as Camp, well remarks, " the 
two clauses are so shnilarly expressed, and linked together by 
the copulative, that it is, I suspect, unprecedented to make the 
verb in one an indicative, and the same verb repeated in the 
other an imperative. The simple and natural way is, to render 
similarly what is similarly expressed ; nor ought this rule ever 
to be departed from, unless something absurd or incongruous 
should follow from the observance of it." The simple question, 
then, is, should πιστεύετε be rendered in both ca.ses indicativelv, 
or imperatively ? Either will give a good and apposite sense. 
The imperative rendering is adopted by Cyr., Nonnus, Theoph., 
Euth., Zig., Knapp, Paulus, Kuin., Lucke, Tholuck. De W., B. 
Crus., Maier, Meyer, Camp., Bio., Xewc, Dodd., Wesl., Schott, 
Trem., Van Ess. — Luther is almost the only respectable au- 



thority for the indicative rendering in both clauses. — I have 
changed the preposition in to on, not only because this is the 
usual manner of rendering εις, after Λίατενω, but because the 
latter is plainer, and less liable to misapprehension than the 
former. — I would remark that, though, as a general rule (see 
N. z, ch. 5 : 39), we are to prefer the indicative to the im- 
perative rendering in cases of ambiguitj', yet here the latter is 
plainly suggested by the undoubted imperative, ταραααεα3•ω, 
in the preceding clause. 

■■ The supplied words of the E. V. are certainly not neces- 
sary to make sense, or to convey the idea of the original 
clearly. The Version I have given is strictly literal. — R. 

' Tisch. omits the second xai, and the second οιδατε, in this 
verse. Lachm. encloses these words in brackets. They are 
wanting in MSS. BCQLX, and others of later dates, as also 
in several ancient Verss. I would adopt the reading of Tisch., 
and translate, ye know the way j — 1. Because this seems to be 
the most ancient reading extant. — 2. Because it removes the 
unpleasantness arising from the apparently flat contradiction 
between this clause of the Text. Rcc, and the rcpl}' of Thomas, 
in the next verse. — I would append this marginal note : Ac- 
cording to some copies, ye know, and t!ie way ye know. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIV. 



99 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

5 Thomas saith unto him, 
Lord, we know iiot whither thou 
goest ; aud how can we know 
the way ? 

6 Jesus saith unto him, I am 
the way, and the truth, and the 
life : no man cometh unto the 
Father, but by me. 

7 If ye had known me, ye 
should have known my Father 
also : and from henceforth ye 
know him, and have seen him. 

8 Philip saith unto him. Lord, 
shew us the Father, aud it suf- 
ficeth us. 

9 Jesus saith unto him. Have 
I been so long time with you, 
and yet hast thou not known 
me, Philip"? he that hath seen 
me, hath seen the Father ; and 
how sayest thou then, Shew us 
the Father ? 

10 Believest thou not that I 
am in the Father, and the Fa- 
ther in me ? the words that I 
speak unto you, I speak not of 
myself: but the Father, that 
dwelleth in me, he doeth the 
works. 

11 Believe me that I am in 
the Father, and the Father in 
me : or else believe me for the 
very works' sake. 



GREEK TEXT. 

5 Λίγα αϋτω θωμάί, Kvpie, 
ουκ οϊδαμβι/ ττοΰ υπαγβα- και 
πω? BwajXiOa την όδον elSei/ai ; 

6 AeYeiauro) 6 Ιησοΰί,'Έγώ 
ίίμι η όδο? κοί ή άληθζία και ή 
ζωη• ούδίΐί ΐ'ρχίταί irpos τον 
ττατίρα, el μη δι €μοΰ. 

7 εϊ ίγνώκ€ίΤ€ μ€, καΐ τον ττα- 
τΐρα μου (γνωκβιτί αν καΙ άττ 
άρτι γίνωσκ€Τβ αύτον, καΐ βωρα- 
Kare αυτόν. 

8 Λ(γ€ί αντω Φίλιτητοΐ, Κυ- 
pie, δβΐζον ήμΐν τον ττατίρα, κοϋ 
άρκύ ημΐν. 

9 Λίγ^ί αύτώ ό 'Ιησούς, Το- 
σούτον γ^ρονον μίθ υμών ύμι, 
και ουκ ϊγνωκα? μί Φίλίτητβ ; 6 
ίωρακως e/xe, ίωρακί τον ττατίρα• 
καΧ ττώί συ λβγβΐί, Δίϊζον ήμΐν 
τον ττατίρα ; 

10 ου τΓίστβυζίί otl ΐγω iv τω 
ττατρι, και ο ττατηρ ev ίμοι ίστι ; 
τα ρήματα α βγω λαλώ ύμΐν, άττ 
ΐμαυτοΰ οϋ λαλώ• ό δε ττατηρ ό 
(.ν Ιμο\ μίνων, αϋτοί ττοια, τα 

11 τΓίστζυίτε μοί otl €γω ev 
τώ τνατρί, καΙ ό ττατηρ ev βμοι• 
el δε μΐ], δια τα epya αυτά ττιστβυ- 
ετε μοι. 



REVISED VERSION. 

5 Thomas saith to him, "We 
know not whither thou art going, 
and how can we know the way '! 

6 Jesus saitli to him, I am the 
way, and the truth, and the life : 
no one cometh to the Father, 
except by me. 

7 If ye had known me, ye 
would have known my Father 
also : and henceforth ye know 
him, and have seen him. 

8 Philip saith to him. Lord 
show us the Father, and it 'is 
enough for us. 

9 Jesus saith to him. Am I so 
long time with you, and thou 
dost not know me, Philip ? He 
that hath seen me hath seen the 
Father : and how sayest thou, 
Show us the Father ? 



10 Believest thou not, that I 
[am] in the Father, and the 
Father is in me "? The words 
which I speak to you I speak 
not ^from myself; but the Father 
who ^^abideth in me, ''himself 
doeth the works. 

11 Believe me, •''■because I 
[am] in the Father, and the 
Father in me : ""but if not, 'be- 
cause of the works "themselves 
believe me. 



f E. v., Matt. 25 : 9.— Kend., Kenr., Dubois, Dodd. 

« See ch. 7 : 17, N. a. 

s« See ch. 1 : 33, X. z. 

" See ch. 2 : 12, N. z. 

'''' I take the meaning of this verse to be : " Believe me for 
what I am ; but if not, believe me for wluit I do." The 
question in the preceding verse, " Believest thou not, that I 
am in the Father, and the Fatliei- in me ? " is one that evidently 
implies an affirmative answer, q. il., •Ύοιι can not piissib'y deny, 
or doubt, that I am in the Father, and the Father in me." 
If this view of V. 10 be correct, how can the common inter- 
pretation of V. 11 be admitted? Would he solemnly exhort Lis 



disciples to believe what he had just placed beyond the possi- 
bility of being doubced by them? The version I propo.se also 
presents a more apposite idea than the E. V. 1 confess, 1 can 
see but little sense in the latter as it reads. It seems to re- 
solve itself into this: "If you do not believe what 1 say, yet 
believe me, from other considerations." — Wesl. is the only 
translator, so far as 1 have seen, who translates ότι, because, 
in this place, as I have done. 

' I make this change for the sake of euphony. 

" Under such circumstances as the present, ηντα is com- 
monly rendered, in the E. Y. tliemselves. — Camp., Newc. Kenr. 
Λντα is wanting in at least one ancient MS. and in at least 
two ancient Verss. Dodd., and Wesley omit it in their trans- 
lations. The Vat. MS. has amov, instead of it. 



100 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIV. 



KINU JAMES VERSION. 

12 Verily, verily, I say unto 
yoa, He that believetli on me, 
the works that I do shall he do 
also ; and greater works than 
these shall he do ; because I go 
unto my Father. 

13 And whatsoever ye shall 
ask in my name, that will I do, 
that the Father may be glori- 
fied in the Son. 

14 If ye shall ask any thing in 
my name, I will do it. 

15 If ye love me, keep my 
commandments : 

16 And I will pray the Fa- 
ther, and he shall give you an- 
other Comforter, that he may 
abide with you for ever ; 

17 Even the Spirit of truth ; 
whom the world cannot receive, 
because it seeth him not, neither 
knoweth him : but ye know him ; 
for he dwelleth with you, and 
shall be in you. 

IS I will not leave 3ou com- 
fortless : I will come to you. 

19 Yet a little while, and the 
world seeth me no more; but 
ye see me : because I live, ye 
shall live also. 

20 At that day ye shall know 
that I am in my Father, and ye 
in me, and I in you. 



21 He thathath my command- 
ments, and keepeth them, he it 



GREEK TEXT. 

12 Λ μην άμην λΐγω νμΐν, 6 
τηστίνων ei? €/xe, τα ϊργα. α ΐγω 
ΤΓΟιώ, κακβΐΐΌί ττοιησβι, και μεί- 
ζονα τούτων ττοιησΐΐ• otl Ιγω 
ττροί τον ττατίρα μου ττορβύομαι. 

13 καΐ ό Ti αν αΐτησητί iv τω 
ονόματι μου, τούτο ττοιησω• ίνα 
δοςασθη ό ττατηρ iv τώ υΐω. 

14 tav τι αΙτησητ€ iv τω ονό- 
ματι μου, €γω ττοιησω. 

15 Έαν άγαττατΐ μβ, Tas iv- 
τολαί τας iμas τηρήσατε. 

16 και ίγω ipωτησω τον ττα- 
τίρα, και άλλον τταρακλητον δώ- 
σει ύμΐν, Ίνα μ(νΎ] μίθ υμών (Ιί 
τον αιώνα, 

17 το ττνίΰμα της αληθείας, Ό 
ο κοσμοί ου δύναται λαβείν, οτι 
οϋ θεωρεί αύτο, ούδε γινωσκει 
αύτο• ύμεΐί δε γινώσκετε αύτο, 
ΟΤΙ τταρ ύμΐν μένει, και εν υμϊν 
εσται. 

1 8 ούκ άφησω ύμάί ορφανουί' 
ερ-χομαι ττροί ύμάί. 

19 ετι μικρόν καΙ υ κόσμος με 
ούκ ετι θεωρεί, ύμεΐί δε θεωρείτε 
με• ΟΤΙ iycu ζω, και ύμεΐί ζη- 
σεσθε. 

20 iv εκείντ) τη ήμερα γνω- 
σεσθε ύμεΐί οτι εγω iv τω πατρί 
μου, καΐ ύμεΐί iv εμοί, κάγω εν 
ύμΐν. 

21 ό έχων ταί εντολαί μου και 
τηρών αύταί, iκεΐvoί εστίν ό άγα- 



REVISED VERSION. 

12 Verily, verily, Ι say to you. 
He that believeth on me, the 
works which I do shall he do 
also ; and greater than these shall 
he do, because I am going to 'my 
Father. 

13 And whatever ye may ask 
in my name, "this will I do ; bo 
that the Father may be glorified 
in the Son. 

14 If ye ask any thing in my 
name, I will do [it.] 

15 If ye love me, keep my 
commandments. 

16 And I will 'ask the Father, 
and he will give you another 
Comforter, that he may "abide 
with you forever ; 

17 The Spirit of truth, whom 
the world cannot receive, be- 
cause it seeth him not, nor 
knoweth him : but ye know him, 
because he nabideth with you, 
and shall be in you. 

18 I will not leave you ""or- 
phans : I am coming to you. 

19 Yet a little while, and the 
world seeth me no more ; but ye 
see me, because I live, "and ye 
shall live. 

20 In that day shall ye know, 
that I [am] in my Father, and 
YE in ME, and I in you. 



21 He that hath my command- 
ments, and keepeth them, he it 



) The pronoun, μον, is rejected by Lachm. and Tiscli., on 
what Meyer considers good authority. I would not, however, 
venture to recommend its rejection. 

k See ch. 4 : 18, N. q. 

I See N. d, ch. 4 : 31. 

II See N. z, ch. 1 : 33. — In v. 16, Lachm. and Tisch. have 
7], for μενΐ], following several of the best SISS. I would adopt 
this reading, and translate, may be with you, &c. — Meyer, 
Penn. 

° E. v., Mar., R.— W., (fadirless.) ; Camp, (see his Note, 



in loco) ; Dodd., Wesl., Kenr., Sharpe, Nary, (as orphans) ; 
others (destitute.) 

° This passage is ambiguous. The question is, does or» in- 
troduce a reason for what is said in the preceding part of the 
verse, or for what is said in the last clause, " Ye shall live ?" 
I do not hesitate to adopt the view of Calv. and others, that 
it refers to what precedes. (Luther. De W.jVulg., Kenr.) The 
E. V. not only involves an unnecessary transposition of the 
Orig. clauses, but leaves this part of the verse quite discon- 
nected from the context. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIV. 



101 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

is that loveth me : and he that 
loveth nie, shall be loved of iny 
Father, and I will love him, and 
will manifest myself to him. 

23 Judas saith unto him, (not 
Iscariot) Lord, how is it that 
thou wilt manifest thyself unto 
us, and not unto the world ? 

23 Jesus answered and said 
unto him, If a man love me, he 
will keep ray words : and my 
Father will love him, and we 
will come unto him, and make 
our abode with him. 



24 He that loveth me not, 
keepeth not mj' saj'ings : and the 
word which ye hear is not mine, 
but the Father's which sent me. 

25 These things have I spoken 
unto you, being ijet present with 
you. 

26 But the Comforter, which 
is the Holy Ghost, whom the 
Father will send in my name, 
he shall teach you all things, 
and bring all things to your re- 
membrance, whatsoever I have 
said unto you. 

27 Peace I leave with you, my 
peace I give unto you : not as 
the world giveth, give I unto 
you. Let not your heart be 
troubled, neither let it be afraid. 



GREEK TEXT. 

ττών μ(• 6 8e άγαπώΐ' μ€, αγαττη 
Θησΐται ύτΓΟ του ττατροί μον, kol 
€γω άγαττησω αντον, kul (μφα- 
νίσω αύτω ϊμαυτον. 

22 AeyeL αύτω Ίουδαί, ούχ^ ό 
Ισκαριώτης, Κυρίί, τι yiyov^v 
OTL ήμΐν μίλλίΐί ΐμφανίζβιν aeav- 
TOU, Kcu οΰ•)(1 τω κοσμώ ; 

23 ' ΛτΓ€κρίθη ό ' Ιησοΰί και 
elireu αύτω, Εαν tls αγάπα μ(, 
τον Χογον μου τηρήσει, και ο 
ττατηρ μον αγαπήσει αύτον, και 
προί αύτον ίλβυσομεθα, κα\ μο- 
νην παρ αυτω ποιησομβν. 

24 ό μη αγαπών μ(, τουί λο- 
γουί μον ου τηρεί- καΐ ό λογοί 
Όν ακον€Τ€, ουκ βστιν e/xoy, άλλα 
του π€μψαντοί μβ πατροζ. 

25 Ταύτα λΐλαληκα ύμΐν παρ 
νμΐν μένων 

26 ο δε παρακΧητος, το Πνεύ- 
μα το Αγιο ν, Ό π€μ\ρ•€ΐ ο πατήρ 
ev τω ονόματι μου, εκείνος νμάς 
διδάξει πάντα, καΐ ύπομνησει 
υμάς πάντα α ειπον υμιν. 

27 ειρηνην άφίημι νμΐν, είρη- 
νην την (μην δίδωμι ύμΐν ού κα- 
θώς ο κόσμος διδωσιν, βγω δίδωμι 
υμίν. μη ταρασσεσθω υμών ή 
καρδία, μηδέ δειλιατω. 



REVISED VEUSION. 

is that loveth me ; and he that 
loveth lue shall be loved by my 
Father ; and I will love him, and 
will manifest myself to him. 

22 Judas saith to him, (not 
Iscariot,) Lord, °and how is it 
pcoine to pass, that thou ''art 
about to manifest thyself to us, 
and not to the world ? 

23 Jesus answered, and said 
to him, If any one love me, he 
will keep my 'word, and my Fa- 
ther will love him, and we will 
come to him, and make [our] 
abode with him. 

24 He that loveth me not, 
keepeth not my -words ; and the 
word which ye hear is not mine, 
but [that] 'of the Father who 
sent me. 

25 These things have I spoken 
to you, "abiding with you. 

2G But the Comforter, the 
Holy 'Spirit, whom the Father 
will send in my name, Ηθ will 
teach you all things, and "remind 
you of all things "which I said 
to you. 

27 Peace I leave »to you : 
mine own peace do I give to 
you: not as the world giveth, do 
I give to you: let not your 
heart be troubled, nor let it be 
afraid. 



" Jlost of the editors, following tlie best MSS. insei't και 
before τ*. 

Ρ Tlie Ε. V. is ambiguous, while there is no ambiguity in 
the Orig. The idea is not, " in what manner wilt thou manifest 
thyself?" though the E. V. will readily convey this idea; 
but, " What hath happened, that thou art about to do this ?" 
or, as I have suggested, " IIow is it come to pass, &c." — Jleyer, 
(was ist geschehen?) Van Ess, De W., (wie kommtes?) 
Fr. S., {comment sefait-ill) — Nary. 

' See N. e, ch. 4 : 47. 

*• "W., R. — The Oiig. is in the sing., and I can see no reason 
why the E. V. is plural. 

• E. v. generally. See N. b, ch. 8 : 51. 



' I make this change for the purpose of avoiding the harsh- 
ness of the construction adopted in the E. V. 

' See N. z, ch. 1 : 33. 

' See N. h, ch. 7 : 39. 

™ The single word, remind, exactly expresses the idea of the 
Orig. verb in this connection, and is in common use, so as to 
be well understood. Therefore I prefer to use it instead of 
the clumsy periphrasis of the E. V. — Camp., Sharpe, Dodd. — 
Which, not whatsoever, is tlie proper meaning of ά. 

" Says Bio., '■^Λγιημι is employed suitably to the imag- 
ei-y, and alludes to a dying man as bequeathing." Not only is 
there nothing in the Greek corresponding to with, but this 
preposition falls far short of giving a complete idea of the 
meaning intended to be conveyed. 



102 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XV. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

28 Ye have heard how I said 
unto you, I go away, and come 
agai?i unto you. If ye loved me, 
ye would rejoice, because I said, 
I go unto the Father : for my 
Father is greater than I. 

29 And now I have told you 
before it come to pass, that when 
it is come to pass, ye might be- 
lieve. 

30 Hereafter I will not talk 
much with you : for the prince 
of this world cometh, and hath 
nothing in me. 

31 But that the world may 
know that I love the Father ; 
and as the Father gave me com- 
mandment, even so I do. Arise, 
let us go hence. 



CHAP. XV. 

I AM the true vine, and my 
Father is the husbandman. 



2 Every branch in me that 
beareth not fruit, he taketh 
away : and every hranch that 
beareth fruit, he purgeth it, that 
it may bring forth more fruit. 

3 Now ye are clean through 
the word which I have spoken 
unto you. 

4 Abide in me, and I in you. 
As the branch cannot bear fruit 
of itself, except it abide in the 



GREEK TEXT. 

28 7]κουσατε otl €γω βίττον 
υμιν, Υτταγω και (ρχομαι ττροί 
υμάς. el ηγαττάη μί, (χαρ7]Τ€ αν 
OTL (ΙτΓον, Πορεύομαι irpos τον 
πατβρα• Ότι ό πατήρ μου μείζων 
μου ((Γτί. 

29 /cat νυν €φηκα ύμΐν ττρΧν 
γενέσθαι- 'ίνα Όταν γε'νηται, ττι- 
στευσητε. 

30 Ουκ ετι ΤΓολλα λαλήσω 
μεθ υμών ερ-χεται γαρ ο του 
κόσμου τούτου αρχ^ων, καΙ εν 
εμοί ουκ ε•^ει ουδέν αλλ Ίνα 
γνω ο κοσμοί, οτι αγαττω τον 
■πάτερα, καΧ καθωί ενετείλατο μοι 
ο πατήρ, ούτω ποιώ. εγειρεσθε, 
άγω μεν εντεύθεν. 

CHAP. XV. 

ΕΓΩ εΙμι ή άμπελος ή αλη- 
θινή, και ο πατήρ μου 6 γεωργοί 
εστί . 

2 πάν κλήμα εν εμοΙ μη φε'ρον 
καρπον, αίρει αυτό• και παν το 
καρπον φερον, καθαιρεί αυτό, Ίνα 
πλείονα καρπον φερη. 

ο ήδη υμεΐί καθαροί εστε, δια 
τον λογον Όν λελαληκα ύμΐν. 

4 μείνατε εν εμοΙ, κάγω εν 
υμΐν. καθώς το κλήμα ου δύνα- 
ται καρπον φερειν αφ' εαυτοί), 



REVISED VERSION. 

2S Ye heard ^that I said to 
you, I am going away, and I am 
coming to you. If ye loved me, 
ye would rejoice, ^because I said, 
I am going to the Father ; "be- 
cause my Father is greater than I. 

29 And now have I told you, 
before it come to pass, so that, 
when it cometh to pass, ye may 
believe. 

30 I shall "no more talk much 
with you: for the ■•ruler of 'this 
world is comiTig, and hath noth- 
ing in ME. 

31 But, that the world may 
know, that I love the Father, 
and as the Father gave me com- 
mandment, so I do. 'Arise, let 
us go hence. 



CHAP. XV. 

I AM the true vine, and my 
Father is the husbandman. 



2 Every branch in me not 
bearing fruit, he taketh it away ; 
and every one bearing fruit, he 
«pruneth it, so that it may ''bear 
more fruit. 

3 Now YE are clean, 'because 
of the word which I have spoken 
to you. 

4 Abide in me, and I in you. 
As the branch cannot bear fruit 
of itself, ""if it abide not in the 



y See cli. 4 : 1, N. a. 

' Most editors reject sntov. I would recommend, therefore, 
tliat, I said, be omitted, and would render ότι, that. 

> See ch. 1 : 15, N. 1. 

•' This is the only passage in which ονκ en is rendered here- 
after in the E. V. I think we may always, or nearly so, render 
it no more, or no longer. — De W. 

^ See ch. 12 : 31, N. i. 

• Most editors reject τοντον. I would, therefore, recommend 
that the revision read, of tlie world, etc. 



' Seech. 18 : 1, N. a. 

» See Eobinson's Lexicon, article κα&αι^ω, with the au- 
thorities there cited. I should be glad to preserve, in the 
translation, the resemblance between this word and y.a&a^oi 
(clean), in the next verse ; but this seems impracticable. — Newc., 
Peiin. 

' E. v., former part of the verse, and often elsewhere. — See 
ch. 12 : 24, N. c— W., Newc., Wesl., Penn. 

» See ch. 6 : 57, N. k, 

* See ch. 3 : 3, N. g. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XV. 



103 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

vine : no more can ye, except ye 
abide in me. 



GREEK TEXT. 

iav μη μ^ίι^Ι) eV Tf) άμττίλω, ου- 
ύμβΐς, iav μη iv Ιμοι 



τως ουδβ 

μβίνητ€. 
the vine, ye are the ; 5 e'yco ei/ni ή αμιτίλος, νμύς 
He that abideth in | ^^ κλήματα. 



ο μίνων ev (μοι, 



5 I am 
branches : 

me, and I in nnn, «le same , . , ^ .^^ ^g^^^ φ^. 
brniiieth fortli much iruit : lor / , '„' ,^- r r^ 

without me ye can do nothing. Jttoi' πολύν οτι χωρίς ίμου ου 

Ι δύνασθε ττοιβΐν ovSev. 

6 If a man abide not in me, i 6 iav μη tls μίίνη Iv Ιμο\, 
he is cast forth as a branch, and ^β\ηθη ίξω ώ? το κλήμα, κα\ 
is withered; and men gather! .^'^^ ^«^ avvayovcrcv αυτά 
them, and cast them into the hre, I ^^'^ , -• η 'w ^ ' 
and ihey are burned. , '^a' f'? ττυρ βαλλονσι, καυκα^τα^ 

7 If yo abide in me, and my 7 iav μβίνητβ iv €μο\, κα). τα 
words abide in you, ye shall ask βηματά μου iv νμΐν yueiV»?, ο iav 

ίί-ϊνπ,Γ''"''""^'*'*'^^^''''''""'' ^^'λ'?^^ ^'^-τησβσθβ, καΐ γίνησ^ται 

νμΐν. 

8 iv τοΰτω i8oζaσθη 6 ττατηρ 
μου, Ινα καρττον ττολνν φΐρητβ- 
καΐ γ€νησ€σθ€ iμol μαθηταί. 

9 Καθωί ηγα7Γησ€ με ό ττα- 
τηρ, κάγω ηγάπησα υμάί• μεί- 
νατε iv Ttj άγάπττ) ttj iμfj. 



REVISED VERSION. 

vine, 'SO neitlier [can] ye, 
cept ye abide in me. 



ex- 



unto you. 

8 Herein is my Father glori- 
fied, that ye bear much fruit ; so 
shall ye be my disciples. 

9 As the Father hath loved 
me, so have I loved you : con- 
tinue ye in my love. 



5 I am the vine, ye the 
branches. He that abideth in 
ME, and I in him, 'he beareth 
much fruit : ^because without 
ME ye can do nothing. 

G If any one abide not in me, 
he is cast lOut like the 'branches, 
and is withered ; and they gath- 
er, Jand cast them into the fire, 
and they are burned. 

7 If ye abide in me, and my 
words abide in yon, "whatever 
ye may wish, 'ye shall ask, and 
it shall be done to you. 

S "In this is my Father glori- 
fied, that ye bear much fruit : 
"and ye shall be my disciples. 

9 As the Father loved me, 
"and I loved you, pabide in my 
love. 



" The E. V. of this phrase is by no means literal. Ούτως is 
usually rendered so. — See ch. 1 : 3, N. d. — VV., R., (so neither). 

t See ch. 1 : 2, N. c. 

« See ch. 1 : 15, N. i. 

■■ Cast out is more in the modem style than cast forth. 

' I am satisfied that τη κλήμα is here used collectively, to 
designate those branches, or vine-shoots which are broken off 
by the vine-dresser as useless, or injurious to the vines. — 
1. Because this idea is in perfect accordance with the descrip- 
tion given. These useless branches are: 1) cast out, after 
being broken off, — 2) they are withered, — 3) they are gather- 
ed up out of the way, — 4) the_y are caM into the fire, — .5) they 
are burned. This would be very unlikelj' to be the treatment 
of any single branch. — 2. Because the plural, αντα, in the 
latter clause of the verse, refers to this κλήμα, as its antece- 
dent. This, I admit, of itself pvoycs nothing ; but is important 
taken in connection with other circumstances. But, as I have 
not been able to find a corresponding collective noun in English, 
I have, as the nearest approximation, adopted the plural form, 
retaining the article. 

' By this change, which does not vary the sense, nor offer 
any violence to grammar, I avoid the supply of the second 
</ient.— See ch. 5 : 21, N. h. 

' E. V. often elsewhere. 



1 Lachm. and Tisch. have αιτησασ&ε, with several of the 
most reliable MSS. This reading is also favored by Griesb. 
I would recommend that it be adopted, and that ye shall be 
left out of the revision, with this note in the margin : Accord- 
ing to some copies, ye shall ask, Szc. — T., C, G., Penn. 

■» See ch. 4 : 37, N. n. 

° I would always translate ym, and, when this rendering will 
make good sense, and, at the same time, good English. I see 
no good reason for varying here from the usual rendering. — 
Lachm. and Tisch., with many JISS., have γιη,α9ε, for γε^η- 
σεαΟ-ε. I would not venture to adopt this rendering, as it is not 
too well sustained. " Die Zeugen sind sehr getheilt." (Meyer.) 

° See N. n, above. — My authorities for this rendering of 
xayw, in this verse, are, Stoltz, Maldonat., Grot., Rosenm., and 
Olsh.— Stoltz gives, I think, the idea of the Orig. in a less 
literal form, in the following translation: " So wie der A'ater 
mich lieb hat, und ich Euch lieb habe, so vcrharret auch Ihr in 
der Liebe zu mir." — Says Grot., "Omnino h«c ita legenda uno 
spiritu. Et subauditur ante μείνατε, ούτως, ut supra, 3. et 
6. 57. Sensus est, Sicut Pater me dile.rit, et ego vos. sic vos 
me vicissim diligite.^' I have applied here the general rule, 
already brought to notice. That every word must have assigneil 
to it its iisual or primary signification, unless the context, 
or the analogy of faith should render such signification inad- 
missible. Now xayo) means simply n/id I. This is the usual 



104 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XV. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

10 If ye keep my command- 
ments, ye shall abide in my love ; 
even as I liave kept ni}' Father's 
commandments, and abide in his 
love. 

11 These things have I spo- 
ken unto you, that my joy might 
remain in you, and that your joy 
might be full. 

12 This is my comn^andment, 
That ye love one aiulher, as I 
have loved you. 

13 Greater love hath no man 
than this, that a man lay down 
his life for his friends. 

14 Ye are my friends, if ye do 
whatsoever I command you. 

15 Henceforth, I call you not 
servants ; for the servant know- 
eth not what his lord doeth : 
but I have called you friends; 
for all tilings that I have heard 
of my Father, I have made 
known unto you. 

16 Ye have not chosen me, 
but I have chosen you, and or- 
dained you, tinit ye should go 
and bring forth fruit, and tliat 
your fruit should remain : that 
whatsoever ye shall ask of the 
Father in my name, he may give 
it you. 

17 These tilings I command 
you, That ye love one another. 



GREEK TEXT. 

10 eav τας evroXa! μου τηρη- 
σητ€, μ€ν€ίΤ€ ev rrj άγατττ] μον 
καθώς βγω τα? ίντολας του -πα- 
τρός μου τ€τηρηκα, καΐ μ^νω αύ- 
τοΰ Cf τη άγαττη. 

11 ταΰτα λΐλαληκα ύμΐν, 'ίνα 
η χαρά η €μη iv ΰμΐν μβίντ), κα). 
7/ χαρά υμών ττληρωθη. 

12 αυτή ίστ\υ ή ίντολη ή ίμη, 
Ινα αγαπάτε αλλήλους, καθώς 
ηγαπησα υμάς. 

1 3 μβίζονα ταύτης άγάπην ού- 
δβί? έχει, ίνα τίς την ψυχην αύτοΰ 
θη υπβρ τών φίλων αύτοΰ. 

1 4 ύμξΐς φίλοι μου Ιστβ, eav 
ποίητί οσα ίγω εντέλλομαι ύμϊν. 

15 ούκετι υμάς λέγω δούλους, 
ΟΤΙ ο δούλος ούκ οίδε τι ποιεί αυ- 
τού ό κύριος• υμάς δε είρηκα φί- 
λους, ΟΤΙ πάντα ά ηκουσα πάρα 
τού πατρός μου, εγνώρισα ΰμΐν. 

1G ούχ ύμεΐς με ε^ελίζασθε, 
άλλ' εγω εζελεζάμην υμάς, καΐ 
έθηκα υμάς, ίνα ύμεΐς ύπάγητε 
και καρπον φερητε, καΊ ό καρπός 
υμών μένη• Ινα ο τι αν αΐτησητε 
τον πάτερα εν τω ονόματι μου, 
δω ύμϊν. 

1 7 ταύτα εντέλλομαι ύμϊν, 'ίνα 
αγαπάτε αλλήλους. 



REVISED VERSION. 

10 If ye keep my command- 
ments, ye shall abide in my love ; 
as I have kept my Father's com- 
mandments, and abide in his 
lovo 

1 1 These things have I spoken 
to you, that my joy may pabide 
in you, and your joy may be iful- 
filled. 

12 This is my commandment, 
That ye love one another, as I 
loved j'ou. 

13 Greater love hath no one 
than this, that any one lay down 
his life for his friends. 

14 Ye are my friends, if ye do 
what '■things I command you. 

15 I 'no more call you ser- 
vants, "because the servant know- 
eth not what his lord doeth ; but 
I have called you friends, 'be- 
cause all things tliat I heard of 
my Fatlier, I made known to 
you. 

16 Ye did not choose me, but 
Ichose you, and "appointed you, 
that ye might go, and ^bear fruit, 
and your fruit might "abide : so 
that whatever ye may ask of the 
Father in my name, he may give 
you. 



17 These things I command 
you, that ye love one another. 



1 E.V.,ch.3:29; 17:13. 2 Cor. 10 : 6. Phil. 2:2. 2Thess. 
1 : 11. — The expression in ch. 3 : 29, is exactly parallel with 
this.— W. 

' I add the word, things, here, to distinguish the plural 
number. 1 leave out soever, — 1. Because this addition to what 
is not really necessary, in translating όσα. — 2. Because there 
arc strong doubts as to the genuineness of the reading όσα. 
Lachm. and Tisch. have «, instead of it, and this is, probably, 
the true reading. 



• See ch. 14 : .'50, N. b. 
> See ch. 1 : 15, N. i. 

" See Robinson's Lex., art. τιΘ'ημι. — R., Newc, Wesl., Nary, 
Murd., Sharpe. — Vulg., Treni., (posui) ; Erasm., Schott, Beza, 
(constliui) ; Cast, (deslintici) ; De W., Van Ess, {hestimmt) ; 
Germ., AH., {gesetzl) ; Meyer {eingesetzt.) 

" See ch. 12 : 24, N. c. 
" See ch. 1 : 33. N. z. 



and primary signification of this compound. When so trans- 
lated, the sentence is good, and the meaning apposite, espe- 
cially if εν Tt) αγηπτ] τχι efirj be understood to mean, 171 the love 
of me, or in love for me, as explained by some of the best 
commentators. The absence of the correlative όντως, before 



μείνατε, offers no valid objection to this translation, since this 
correlative is often understood, as well in Greek as in English. 
Ρ See ch. 1 : 33, N. z. — Instead of μειντ], Lachm. and Tisch. 
have r], in v. 11. I would adopt this reading, and put be, for 
iifti'c/e.— See ch. 14 : 16, N. 11.— Meyer, Penn. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XV. 



105 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

18 If the world hate you, ye 
know that it hated uie before it 
hatrd you. 

19 If ye wereoftlie world, tlie 
world would love his own ; but 
because ye are not of the world, 
but I have chosen yon out of the 
world, therefore the world ha- 
teth you. 

20 Remember the word that 
I said unto you. The servant is 
not greater than his lord. If 
they have persecuted me, they 
wiil alio persecute you : if they 
liave kept my saying, they will 
keep yours also. 

21 But all these things will 
they do unto you for my name's 
sake, because they know not him 
that sent me. 

22 If I had not come and 
spoken unto them, they had not 
had sin : but now they have no 
cloak for their sin. 

23 He that hateth me, hateth 
my Father also. 

24 If I had not done among 
them the works which none 
other man did, they had not had 
sin : but now have they both 
seen, and hated both me and my 
Father. 

25 But this Cometh to pass, that 
the word might be fulfilled that 
is written in their law. They 
hated me without a cause. 

26 But wiien the comforter is 
come, whom I will send unto 
you from the Father, even the 
Spirit of truth, which proceed- 



GREEK TEXT. 



18 Έί ο κθ(τμος ΰμάί μισίΐ, 
γινωσκΐΤ€ οτι ίμΐ ττρώτον υμών 
μ^μίσηκΐν. 

19 €ί ΐκ τον κόσμου ήτβ, 6 
κόσμος (χν το ISlou (ψιλβι• οτι 
δι €κ του κόσμου οΰκ Ιστί, αλλ 
ΐγω ΙζζΧίζαμην ν μας (κ του 
κόσμου, δια τούτο μισύ υμάς ο 
κόσμος. 

20 μι/ημονίυβτβ του λογού ού 
Ιγω elirov ύμΐν, Οΰκ ί'στι δοΰλος 
μίΐζων του κυρίου αύτοΰ. el €μ€ ί 
(δίωζαυ, καΐ υμάς διώζουσιν €ΐ 
τον λογον μου ^τήρησαν, καΧ τον 
υμετίρον τηρησονσιν. 

21 άλλα ταΰτα τταντα ττοιη- 
σονσιν υμΐν δια το όνομα μου, 
οτι ουκ ο'ίδασι τον ττβμψαντα μβ. 

22 el μη ήλθαν κα\ (λάλησα 
αυτοΐς, αμαρτιαν ουκ ίίγον νυν 
δί ττροφασιν ουκ εχουσι irepi της 
αμαρτίας αυτών 

23 ό €με μισών, κα\ τον ττα- 
Τ€ρα μου μισίΐ. 

24 €ί τα ίργα μη Ιττοίησα iv 
αυτοΐς, α ουδβϊς α?(λος ττεττοιηκεν, 
αμαρτιαν ουκ ίίγον νυν Se κα\ 
ίωρακασι, κα\ μβμισηκασι καΐ e'yue 
και τον ττατερα μου• 

25 αλλ ίνα ττληρωθη ό λόγος 
6 γίγραμμβνος ev τώ νομω αυτών, 

Οτι (μίσησαν μ€ δωρβαν. 

26 Οταν δε ίλθΎ] ό τταρακλη- 
τος, ον βγω ττίμψω υμΐν τταρα 
του ττατρος, το ττνβΰμα της αλη- 
θβίας, ο τταρα του ττατρος €κπο- 



REVISED VERSION. 

18 If the world hate you, ye 
know that it hath hated me be- 
fore you. 

19 If ye were of the world, 
the world would love its own : 
but because ye are not of the 
world, but I chose you out of 
the world ; «because of this, the 
world hateth you. 

20 Remember the word that 
I said to you, A servant is not 
greater than his lord. If they 
persecuted me, they will also 
persecute you ; if they kept my 
word, they will keep yours also. 

21 But all these things will 
they do to you, for my name's 
sake, because they know not 
him that sent me. 

22 If I had not come and 
spoken to them, they would not 
have had sin ; but now they 
have no ^excuse for their sin. 

23 He that hateth me, hateth 
my Father also. 

24 If I had not done among 
them the works which no other 
one hath done, they would not 
have had sin : but now have 
they both seen and hated both 
ME and my Father. 

25 But ['it was,] that the 
'saying might be fulfilled, that 
hath been written in their law. 
They hated me without cause. 

26 But when the Comforter 
Cometh, whom I will send to 
you from the Father, the Spirit 
of truth, who ''Cometh forth from 



» See Gen. Obs. 6. 

' If προψησκ meant primarily, a cloak, or outer garment, 
I should not object to its being so translated here, and under- 
stood in a tropical sense ; but this is not the case. It means. 
what is seen before (Rob.) ; and, as excuse is quite as intelli- 
gible, and fully as literal as cloak, while it directl)' conveys the 
idea, I think it is to be preferred. — R., Newc, Dodd., "Wesl., 
Nary, Keur., Camp., and others. 



' I have endeavored here to supply as little as possible. 

° When Xoyos is used in this sense, it is generally translated 
saying, in the E. V. See ch. 4 : 37 ; G : CO ; 7 : 36 ; 18:9; 
21 : 23, &c. 

•" E. v., ch. 5 : 29, and elsewhere often. — Come forth is pure 
Saxon, and has this advantage over proceed, in this connection, 
that it has suffered no modification of meaning, in passing through 
the ordeal of theological controversy. — Sharpe (cometh out.) 



106 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVI. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

eth from the Father, he shall 
testify of me. 

27 And ye also shall bear wit- 



GREEK TEXT. 



ness, because ye have been with g 



ptverai, eneivoi μαρτυρήσει irepi 
ϊμοΰ• 

27 /cat νμβΐί Se μαρτυρείτε, 



me from the beginning. 



CHAP. XVI. 



These things have I spoken 
unte you, that ye should not be 
ofllsnded. 

2 They shall put you out of 
the synagogues : yea, the time 
Cometh, that whosoever killeth 
you, will think that he doeth 
God service. 

3 And these things will tliey 
do unto you, because they have 
not known the Father, nor me. 

4 But these things have I told 
you, that when the time shall 
come, ye may remember that I 
told you of them. And these 
things I said not unto you at 
the beginning because I was 
with you. 

5 But now I go my way to 
him that sent me, and none of 
you asketh me. Whither goest 
thou V 

6 But because I have said 



OTL απ αρχηί μετ εμού εστε. 



CHAP. XVI. 



Ταΰτα λελαληκα ύμϊν, 'ίνα μη 
σκανδαλισθητε. 

2 ατΓοσυναγωγους Ίτοιησουσιν 
υμάζ- αλλ έρχεται ωρα, ίνα -πάς 
ο ατΓΟκτείνας νμάί, So^rj λατρείαν 
τνροσφερειν τώ θεώ. 

3 και ταντα ττοιησονσιν ύμϊν, 
ΟΤΙ ουκ έγνωσαν τον πάτερα ονδε 
ε με. 

4 άλλα ταΰτα λελαληκα νμΐν. 
Ινα όταν ελθ^ η ώρα, μνημονεύ- 
ητε αυτών, οτι εγω ειπον ύμϊν 
ταΰτα δε ύμϊν εξ άρχης ουκ είπαν, 
δτί μεθ' υμών ημην. 

5 νΰν δε υπάγω προ9 τον πεμ- 
ψαντα με, καΐ ούδεΙς εζ υμών 
έρωτα με, Ποΰ ύπαγείί ; 

6 αλλ οτι ταΰτα λελαληκα 



REVISED version. 

the Father, he will testify of 
me. 

27 And YE also 'testify, be- 
cause ye are with me from the 
beginning. 

CHAP. XVI. 

These things have I spoken 
to you, that ye may not be 'led 
astray. 

2 They will put you out of 
the synagogues : •'but an ^hour 
is coming, that 'every one that 
Ivilleth you will think "to offer 
service to God. 

3 And these things will they 
do «to you, because they know 
not the Father, nor me. 

4 But these things have I 
f spoken to j^ou, so that, when the 
^hour Cometh, ye may remember 
Hhem, ""that I told you. And 
these things I said not to you 
'from the beginning, because I 
was with you. 

5 But now I am going away 
to him who sent me, and no one 
of you asketh me. Whither art 
thou going ? 

6 But because I have said 



' The influence of the Vulg. over the E. V. is manifest iu 
this case, where the future is put for the present, without the 
authority, I believe, of a single Greek MS., if we except the 
various readings of Petrus Faxardus. Indeed, not only was 
the E. V. made, in this place, from the Vulg., but almost all the 
Verss. I have seen, conform to the same model, except Trem., 
Erasm., Murd., Vatab., Cast. 

" Offend does not convey the idea of the Orig. in this place, 
at least to modern ears. I have endeavored to give the best, 
and most concise translation I could. — Rob. — R., Kenr., Nary, 
(be scandalized) ; Sharps (6e made to sin) ; Camp. (6e en- 
snared) ; Newc, marg., {fall away.) 

^ This verse is somewhat elliptical. The meaning, fully ex- 
pressed, would, I think, be this: " They shall, indeed, put you 
out of the synagogues ; but this is not the woist of it, for an 
hour is coming, &c." I can, therefore, see no necessity for de- 
viating, in the translation of this άλλα, from the ordinary 
beaten track. 

' See ch. 3 : 15, N. b. 



'' There seems to be no necessity for supplying an accusative 
with this infin. — Fr. G. (croira rendre) ; Fr. S. (pensera 
o^riV.)— Compare, ch. 4 : 40, N. v. 

' The editors generally reject this νμιν, of the Text. Rec. 
I would therefore recommend, that to you be left out. 

' E. v., elsewhere, very often. — Newc, Dodd., Nary, Murd. 

' This is the literal meaning of ώρα, and, for anything I 
can see, it conveys the idea as well as could be desired. — W., 
R., Nary, Kenr., Sharpe, Dodd., {season) ; Murd. {time.) 

^ There is considerable variety in the disposition of αντων. 
Vulg. and W., with Lachm. and Tisch., seem to have read it 
immediately after ώ^α, and depending on it. The E. V. seems 
to make it depend on tmov, for which ΐ can see no authority. 
T., C, G., R., have rightly, I think, made it to depend on μντι- 
μονενητε, according to the reading of the Text. Rec. Lachm. 
has a second αυτών, after μνημ. ; but the authority for this 
reading is hardly sufficient.— De "W., All., Germ., Meyer, Beza, 
Erasm., Cast. 

' E. Λ^, ch. : 04.— See ch. 8 : 25, N. x.— W., R., Newc, 
Dodd., Sharpe, Kenr., Murd. 



ΤίΙΕ GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVI. 



107 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

these things unto you, soitow 
hath filled your heart. 

7 Nevertheless, I tell you the 
truth : It is expedient for you 
that I go away : for if I go not 
away, the Comforter will not 
come unto you; but if I depart, 
I will send him unto you. 

8 And when he is come, he 
will reprove the world of sin, 
and of righteousness, and of 
judgment : 

9 Of sin, because they believe 
not on me ; 

10 Of righteousness, because 
I go to my Father, and ye see 
me no more; 

11 Of judgment, because the 
prince of this world is judged. 

12 I have yet many things to 
say unto you, but ye cannot 
bear them now. 

13 Howbeit, when he, the 
Spirit of truth, is come, he will 
guide you into all truth : for he 
shall not speak of himself; but 
whatsoever he shall hear, that 
shall he speak : and he will 
shew you things to come. 

14 He shall glorify me : for 
he shall receive of mine, and 
shall shew it unto you. 

15 All things that the Father 
hath are mine : therefore said I, 



GREEK TEXT. 



νμιν, ή λυττη ττΐττληρωκΐν νμων 
την KapSiau. 

7 άλλ βγω την άΧηθβιαν λίγω 
νμϊν, σνμφβρα. νμϊν Ίνα ϊγω 
άτΓβλθω. iav γαρ μη άττΐλθω, ό 
τταρακλητοί ουκ βλβνσβται ττρος 
ΰμας• eav Se ττορβυθώ, ττβμψω 
αντον ττρος υμάς• 

8 καΐ ίλθων ίκβΐνος e'Aey^et 
τον κοσμον irepX αμαρτίας και 
π€ρ\ δικαιοσύνης καΐ τηρΧ κρΊ- 
σβως. 

9 ΤΓ€ ρΐ αμαρτίας μβν, οτί ού 
τηστίυουσιν €ΐς βμβ' 

10 π(ρΙ δικαιοσύνης δβ, οτι 
ττρος τον ττατβρα μου ύτταγω, κα\ 
ουκ ίτι θβωρύτί μ€• 

11 ττΐρΐ δβ κρίσβως, οτι ο άρ- 

~. ι It 

γων τον κοσμον τούτον κβκριται. 

12 'Έτι ΤΓολλα ϊχω λβγειν 
νμϊν, άλλ' ού δννασθβ βασταζίΐν 
άρτι• 

13 όταν δβ ίλθη βκβΐνος, το 
ττνίΰμα της άληθβιας, οδηγησβι 
νμάς ίΐς ττάσαν την άληθίίαν ον 
γαρ λαλησβι άψ' ίαυτον, άλλ 
οσα αν ακουση λαλησβι, και τα 
ίρχομβνα άναγγβλβϊ υμΐν. 

14 ίΚ€Ϊνος (με δοξάσει, οτι εκ 
τον εμοΰ λτ/ψεται, καΐ άναγγελεϊ 
νμϊν. 

15 τταντα Όσα έχει ο ττατηρ, 
εμα εστί• δια τούτο βίττον, οτι εκ 



REVISED VERSION. 

these things to you, sorrow hath 
filled your heart. 

7 iBut I tell you the truth : 
It is expedient for you that I 
go away : for if I go not away, 
the Comforter will not come to 
you ; but if I ''go, I will send 
him to you. 

8 And he, being come, will 
'convince the world of sin, and 
of righteousness, and of judg- 
ment : 

9 Of sin, '"indeed, because they 
believe not on me ; 

10 "'But of righteousness, be- 
cause I am going away to my 
Father, and ye see me no more ; 

1 1 "'And of judgment, becavise 
the -ruler of this world hath been 
judged. 

12 I have yet many things to 
say to you, but ye can not bear 
[them] now. 

13 "But when he is come, the 
Spirit of truth, he will guide 
you into all the truth : for he 
will not speak pfrom himself; but 
whatever pthings he may hear, 
he will speak : and he will show 
you the things that are coming. 

14 He will glorify me : 'be- 
cause he will take of mine, and 
show to you. 

15 All things that the Father 
hath are mine : because of this 



' E. v. generally. — W., E., and others. 

1• E. y. commonly. — E., Newc, DodJ., Nary, Perm, Kcnr., 
Murd. 

1 Newcome, Doddridge, "Wes., Dubois, Penn, Sharpe. — T., C. 
(rebuke) ; Kenrick, Murdock {convict) ; Fr. S.,-M. [coiivaincra) ; 
Cast., Vulg., Tremelliiis, Beza, Erasmiis {arguci) ; Scliott (coii- 
vincet). 

" AVhon μεν and δε are used to express antithesis, which 



is, I think, the case here, they should be translated, indeed . . . 

but. (See Eob., Le.\., art. μεν.) The second δε, however, as it 

simply indicates continuance, I translate, as ordinarily in such 
cases, and. 

■> See ch. 12 : 31, N. i. 

° Howbeit is obsolete.. — E. V. generally. 

π See ch. 7 : 17. N. a, and ch. 11 : 22, N, vv. 

■• See ch. 1 : 15, N. i. 



103 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVI. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

that he shall take of mine, and 
shall shew it unto you. 

16 A little while, and 3'e shall 
not see me: and again, a little 
while, and ye shall see me, be- 
cause I go to the Father. 

17 Then said some of his dis- 
ciples among themselves. What 
is this that he saith unto us, A 
little while, and ye shall not 
see me : and again, a little while, 
and ye shall see me : and, Be- 
cause I go to the Father ? 

18 They said therefore, AVhat 
is this that he saith, A little 
while? we cannot tell what he 
saith. 

19 Now Jesus knew that they 
were desirous to ask him, and 
said unto them. Do ye inquire 
among yourselves of that I said, 
A little while, and ye shall not 
see me : and again, a little while, 
and ye shall see me "? 

20 Verily, verily, I say unto 
you, that ye shall weep and la- 
ment, but the world shall re- 
joice : and ye shall be sorrow- 
ful, but your sorrow shall be 
turned into joy. 

21 A woman when she is in 
travail hath sorrow, because her 
hour is come : but as soon as 
she is delivered of the child, she 
remembereth no more the an- 
guish, for joy that a man is born 
into the world. 



GREEK TEXT. 

τον €μοΰ ληψεταί, καΐ avayyeXel. 
υμΐν. 

16 Μικρόν καΐ ου θβωρείτΐ 
μ€, και ttuXlv μικρόν και οψΐσθε 
μ€, ΟΤΙ €γω υπάγω irpos τον ττα- 
τ€ρα. 

17 ΈΙτΓον ούν €κ των μαθητών 
αντοΰ ττροί αλλήλους, ΤΊ ecTTi 
τοΰτο υ λβγβι ήμΐν, Μικρόν και 
ου θίωρύτΐ μβ, κα\ τταλιν μικρόν 
καΐ οψίσθε μ€ ; κα\, ' Οτι 4γω 
υτταγω ττροί τον ττατερα ; 

18 Έλβγον ούν, Τοΰτο τι 
ίστιν Ό Xeyii, το μικρόν i ουκ 
οίδαμίν τΊ λαλΐΐ. 

19 ' Έγνω ούν 6 Ιησοΰί οτι 
ήθΐλον αυτόν (ρωτάν, και (lirev 
αΰτοΐί, Παρι τούτου ζητΕΪτΐ μβτ 
αλλήλων, ΟΤΙ βίττον. Μικρόν καΐ 
ου θ€ωρεΐτ€ μβ, και τταλιν μικρόν 
και όψβσθβ μ€ ; 

20 ημην άμην λέγω ύμΐν, οτι 
κλαυσβτ€ και θρηνησίτβ υμίΐί, ό 
δβ κόσμοι χαρησεται• ΰμβΐς δε 
λυττηθησβσθβ, άλλ' ή λύπη υμών 
ύί γαραν γβνησβται. 

21 7] γυνή όταν τίκττ], λυπην 
(χ€ΐ, οτι ήλθίν η ωρα αϋτης• 
όταν δβ γβννηστ] το παιδιον, ουκ 
ίτι μνημονβυβί τηί θλίψβω!, δια 
την γαραν, οτι βγβννηθη ανθρω- 
TToy €ΐγ τον κοσμον. \ 



REVISED VERSION. 

I said. That he will take of mine, 
and show to you. 

IG A little while, and ye see 
me mot, and again a little while, 
and ye shall see me, 'because I 
am going to the Father. 

17 [Some] of his disciples, 
therefore, said "one to another, 
What is this that he is saying to 
us, A little while, and ye see me 
not, and again a little while, and 
ye shall see me ; and. Because I 
am going to the Father ? 

IS They said, therefore. What 
is tliis that he is saying, A little 
while? We "know not what he is 
saying. 

19 Jesus, therefore, knew that 
they were 'wishing to ask him, 
and said to them. Are ye in- 
quiring "about "this, "one with 
another, "because I said, A little 
while, and ye see me not, and 
again a little while, and ye shall 
see me V 

20 Verily, verily, I say to you. 
That YE will weep and lament, 
but the world will rejoice ; and 
YE will be sorrowful, but your 
sorrow shall be turned into joy. 

21 The woman, when she 'is 
in travail, hath sorrow, because 
her iiour is come ; but, 'when she 
huth brought forth the child, siie 
remembereth no more the an- 
guish, "because of the joy that 
a man '•was born into the world. 



' L.iclim. and Tisch., with several ancient MSS. and Verss., 
{Vat. 1209. Steph. η. Cant. Colb. 8. Wheel. 2. Vulg. Goth.,) have 
ουκ ετί instead of ov. I would adopt this reading, and trans- 
late, no more. 

<■ Tisch. omits these words, οτι εγω τίατερα. Lachm. 

puts them in brackets. It is not unlikely that they are an 
explanatory clause inserted by some transcriber. Still, there 
is hardly sufficient authority for rejecting them. I would, how- 
ever, recommend that this note be put in the margin : Some 
copies omit the words, because I am going to the Father. 

» See ch. 6 : 43, N. b, and ch. .3 : 8, N. q. 

' See ch. 1 : 43, N. y. 



" I change of to about, to avoid ambiguity. — Tins is tlie 
proper translation of τούτο, which need not be departed from iu 
this instance. 

» C, R., Nary, Penn, Keiir., Sharpe.— AV. (for). 

y Wlien is more concise than us soon as. — Eliiglish Version 
generally. 

' See ch, 4 : 39, N. t. 

>> This verb is in the aorist, and should be translated as a past 
tense. The time referred to is when the mother looks back upon 
her anguish as a past event, and is supposed to speak of it as a 
historical fact. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVI. 



109 



KING JAMEs' VERSION. 

22 And ye now therefore have 
sorrow : but I will see you again, 
and your lieari shall rejoice, 
and your joy no man taketh 
from you. 

23 And in that day ye shall 
ask me nothing. Verily, verily, 
I say unto you, Wiiatsoever ye 
shall ask the Father in my name, 
he will give if you. 

24 Hitherto have ye asked 
nothing in my name : ask, and 
ye shall receive, that your joy 
may be full. 

25 These things have I spoken 
unto you in proverbs : but the 
time Cometh when I shall no 
more speak unto you in prov- 
erbs, but I shall shew you plain- 
ly of the Father. 

26 At that day ye shall ask in 
my name: and I say not unto 
you, that I will pray the Father 
for you : 

27 For the Father himself lov- 
eth you, because ye have loved 
me, and haA'e believed that I 
came out from God. 

28 I came forth from the Fa- 
ther, and am come into the 
world : again, I leave the world, 
and go to the Father. 

29 His disciples said unto him, 
Lo, now speakest thou plainly, 
and speakest no proverb. 



GREEK TEXT. 



22 



/cat 



REVISED VERSION. 

22 And YE now, therefore, 



νμβΐί ούν λνπην μ^ν 

udpevere• τταλίί. 5e έ>ο/χ«ι iV«r, ' ^^^ί' '°"Τ = but Ι will see you 
ν '^ , , „ ' ; \, ι again, and your heart sliall re- 

και. χαρησίται νμων η καρδία, -^^^^ .^^^^^^^^^.-^^^^^^^^^^.^^^^^^ 

και την γαραν νμων ovbeis aipei from you 

άψ νμων, 

23 και eV (κίίντ) rfj ήμερα, e/ze 

ουκ ερωτήσετε ουδέν. Αμήν 

άμην λεγο) νμΐν, οτί οσα αν αΐτη- 

σητε τον πάτερα εν τω ονόματι 

μου, 



δώσει υμΐν. 

24 €&)$• άρτι ουκ τ^τησατε ούδεν 
εν τώ ονόματι μου• αΐτεΐτε, 
λη-^εσθε, ίνα ή χαρά υμών fj ττε- 
ττληρωμενη. 

25 ταντα εν τταροιμιαίζ Χε- 
λαληκα ύμΐν αλλ έρχεται ωρα 
οτε ουκ ετι εν τταροιμιαίί λαλήσω 



2-3 And in that day ye will 
ask ME nothing. Verily, verily, 
I say to you, Whatever "^things 
ye may ask of the Father in my 
name, he will give you. 



24 '^Till now ye asked nothing 
„^^ in my name : ask, and ye shall 
receive, so that your joy may be 
'fulfilled. 



25 These things have I spoken 
to you in 'dark sayings : but an 
^hour is coming, when I will no 
more speak to you in 'dark say- 

νμΐν, άλλα παρρησία ττερί του ings, but I will show you plainly 

ττατροζ άναγγελώ ύμΐν. j οί the Father. 

2G εν εκεΐντι tij ήμερα εν τω 26 In tliat day ye will ask in 

ονόματι μου αΐτησεσθε• καΐ ου 

λέγω υμιν οτι εγω ερωτήσω τον 

πάτερα περί νμων 

27 αϋτοί γαρ ο πατήρ φιλεΐ 
υμάς, Ότι ύμεΐί εμε πεφιληκατε, 
καΐ πεπιστευκατε οτι εγω πάρα 
του θεού εξηλθον. 

28 εςηλθον πάρα του πατρός, 
και εληλυθα εις τον κοσμον πά- 
λιν άώίημι τον κοσμον, καΐ πο- 
ρεύομαι προς τον πάτερα. 

29 Λεγουσιν αύτω οι μαθηταΐ 
αύτοΰ, ' Ιδε νυν παρρησία λαλείς, 
καΐ παροιμιαν ουδεμιαν λέγεις. 



my name : and I do not say to 
you, that I will pray '■to the 
Father for you ; 

27 For the Father himself 
loveth you, because ye have loved 
ME, and have believed that I 
came out from God. 

28 I came out from the Father, 
and am come into the world : 
again I leave the world, and am 
going to the Father. 



29 His disciples say to him, 
'Behold, now thou art italking 
plainly, and art speaking no 
'dark saying. 



■"- This change is made to distinguish the number of ΰαα. 

'' Till now is perfectly literal, and more modern than 
kitherto. 

' E. v., ch. 3 : 29. — To fulfill = to complete. This appears 
to be the meaning of this verb in this connection. I would, 
therefore, always so translate it, in connection with χαρά, as also 
in connection with γοαγν,, and similar words. 

' That naqoiuin is used, in this Gospel, in a pecuhar sense, 
= 7ΐαραβοΙη, which John never uses, is generally admitted. 
Here, however, it docs not mean a parable, nor yet a proverb, 
as theise words are popularly understood. I can find no one 



word that exactly conveys the idea here intended. Dark 
saying is, according to the Lexicons, its meaning in this pas- 
sage. (Rob.) I have, therefore, adopted this expression. — 
Newc. (dark speeches) ; Dodd., Wcsl., {parnblcs) ; Kenr. 
{figures) ; Murd. (allegories) ; Cast, (oratione figiirata, figu- 
res) ; Beza, Schott, (similiiudines) ; Trem. (parabolas) ; AH., 
De W., (Gleichnissen.) Other Verss., generally, as E. V. 

^ See v. 2, above, N. g. 

^ To pray the Father, is an expression that is hardly ad- 
missible at the present day. 

' See ch. 7 : 26, N. m. ' See ch. 4 ; 20, N. y. 



110 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVH. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

30 Now are we sure that thou 
knowest all things, and needest 
not that any man should ask 
thee: by this we believe that 
thou earnest forth from God. 

31 Jesus answered them, Do 
ye now believe ? 

32 Behold, the hour cometh, 
yea, is now come, that ye shall 
be scattered every man to his 
own, and shall leave me alone : 
and yet I am not alone, because 
the Father is with me. 

33 These things I have spoken 
unto you, that in me ye might 
have peace. In the world ye 
shall have tribulation, but be 
of good cheer : I have overcome 
the world. 

CHAP. XVII. 

These words spake Jesus, and 
lifted up his eyes to heaven, and 
said. Father, the hour is come ; 
glorify thy Son, that thy Son also 
may glorify thee : 



2 As thou hast given him pow- 
er over all flesh, that he should 
give eternal life to as many as 
thou hast given him. 

3 And this is life eternal, that 
they might know thee the only 
true God, and Jesus Christ whom 
thou hast sent. 

4 I have glorified thee on the 
earth : I liave finished the work 
which thou gavest me to do. 

5 And now, Father, glorify 
thou me with thine own self. 



GREEK TEXT. 

30 νυν ο'ιδαμβν otl oiSas πάν- 
τα, και ου ^peiav ϊχ^βΐί Ίνα τις ae 
βρωτά, iv τούτω τηστβυομίν otl 
άτΓΟ θβοΰ (ζηλθίί. 

31 Αττεκρίθη αύτοΐί ό Ιη- 
σοϋί, ' Λρτί 7Γίστ€ν€Τ€ ; 

32 Ιδου, €ρχ€ταί ωρα καΐ νυν 
ίληλυθίν, Ινα σκορτησθητξ. ίκα- 
στοί iLS τα Ίδια, καΐ e'/xe μόνον 
άφητί- κα\ οΰκ €ΐμΙ μονοζ, otl 6 
Ίτατηρ μ€Τ ϊμοΰ Ιστι. 

33 ταΰτα λελαληκα νμΐν, Ινα 
iv (μοί (ΐρηνην ί'χητ€. (ν τω 
κοσμώ θλίψιν β^βτβ- άλλα θαρ- 
σβΐτβ, ίγω νβνικηκα τον κοσμον. 



CHAP. XVII. 



ΤΑ ΥΤΑ (λαλησΐν ό Ιησούς, 
KUL ίττηρβ τονί οφθαλμούς αντον 
€ΐί τον ούρανον, καΐ etVe, 77α- 
τ€ρ, Ιληλυθβν ή ωρα• δοςασον 
σου τον νΐον, Ίνα καΐ 6 υΙός σου 
δοζαση σ€• 

2 καθώς ίδωκας αύτω ΐζου- 
σιαν ττασης σαρκός, Ίνα ττάν Ό 
δίδωκας αύτώ, δώση αύτοίς ζωην 
αιωνιον. 

3 αυτή δί Ιστιν ή αιώνιος ζωη, 
ινα γινωσκωσι ere τον μόνον άλη- 
θινον Oeov, κα). ον άττίστειλας 
Ιησοΰν Χριστον. 

4 ζγώ σ€ (δοςασα eVi της γης• 
το tpyov (τελβίωσα Ό δβδωκας μοι 
Ίνα ΤΓΟίησω• 

5 καΐ νυν δόζασον μ€ συ, ττά- 
τβρ, τταρα σβαυτω, Trj δοζη fj 



REVISED VERSION. 

30 Now we 'know that thou 
knowest all things, and hast no 
need that any one ask thee : by 
this we believe that thou didst 
come out from God. 

31 Jesus answered them. Do 
ye now believe ? 

32 Behold, an hour is coming, 
yea, is now come, that ye will 
be scattered every one to his 
own, and will leave me alone : 
and yet I am not alone, because 
the Father is with me. 

33 These things have I spoken 
to you, that in me ye may have 
peace. In tlie world ye will 
have tribulation : but be of good 
cheer ; I have overcome the 
world. 

CHAP. XVII. 

These "things spoke Jesus, 
and lifted up his eyes to heaven, 
and said. Father, the hour is 
come ; glorify thy Son, that thy 
Son also may glorify thee : 



2 As thou didst give him 
power over all flesh, so that, 
["as for] all that thou hast given 
him, he might give them eter- 
nal life. 

3 And this is the eteinal life, 
that they may know thee, the 
only true God, and "^him whom 
thou didst send, Jesus Christ. 

4 I glorified thee upon the 
earth : I finished the work which 
thou hast given me, •'that I might 
do [it.] 

5 And now, Ο Father, glorify 
THOU me with 'thyself, with the 



" See ch. 3 : 8, N. q. 

' See ch. 5 : 1. N. a. 

' I have endeavored to keep as near to the letter as was 
possible in good English. This use of the neuter παν for the 
masculine is found elsewhere in this gospel. — See ch. C : 39. 

' W., T., G., R., arrange these words, as I have done, accord- 
ing to the Orig. So also Vulg., Cast, Erasm., Trem., Newc, 



Sharpe, and others. — I am not satisfied, however, that those 
interpreters are correct, who allege that stvai is to be supplied 
after αε and Ιηαονν, (Penn, and others) ; for, in that case, I 
think Χζίατοί would be preceded b}' the art. 

^ See ch. 1 : 7, n. k. 

* E. V. geneΓall3^ — There is no need of greater emphasis 
that what naturally belongs to the reflexive pronoun. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVII. 



Ill 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

with the glory which I had with 
thee before the world was. 

6 I have manifested thy name 
iinto the men whicii thou gavest 
me out of the world : thine they 
were, and thou gavest them me ; 
and they have kept thy word. 

7 Now they have known that 
all things whatsoever thou hast 
given me are of thee : 

8 For I have given unto them 
the words which thou gavest 
me; and they have received 
them, and have Ι^ηοΛνη surely 
that I came out from thee, and 
they have believed that thou 
didst send me. 

9 I pray for them : I pray 
not for the world, but for tiieni 
\vhich thou hast given me ; for 
they are thine. 

10 And all mine are thine, 
and thine are mine; and I am 
glorified in them. 

11 And now I am no more 
in the world, but these are in 
the world, and I come to thee. 
Holy Father, keep through thine 
own name those whom tliou hast 
given me, that they may be one, 
as we arc. 

12 While I was with them in 
the world, I kept them in thy 
name : those that thou gavest 
me I have kept, and none of 
them is lost, but the son of pei•- 



GREEK TEXT. 

βίχον irpo του tou κοσμον aval 
τταρα σοι. 

6 Έφαν^ρωσα σου το όνομα 
TOis άνθρωτΓΟίί ουί δ(δωκαί μοι 
ίκ του κόσμου- σο\ ήσαν, /cat 
ίμοί αυτούς υβδωκαί' καΐ τον λο- 
γον σου Τ€τηρηκασι. 

7 νΰν ΐγνωκαν ότι τταντα οσα 
δίδωκαί μοι, τταρα σοΰ ϊστιν 

8 ΟΤΙ τα ρήματα α όβόωκαί 
μοι, δίδωκα αυτοΐί' και αυτοί 
ΐλαβον, καΐ βγνωσαν αληθώς, οτι 
τταρα σοΰ ϊζηλθον, και βπίστβυ- 
σαν ΟΤΙ συ μ€ άπβστίΐλας. 

9 βγω ΤΓ(ρ\ αυτών (ρωτώ• ου 
Trepi του κόσμου ΐρωτώ, άλλα 
wepi ών δ^δωκαί μοι, οτι σοι 
(ίσι. 

10 καΐ τα (μα τταντα σα Ιστι, 
καΐ τα σα (μά• και δ(δόζασμαι 
(V αϋτοΐς. 

11 καΐ ουκ (τι (ΐμΐ (ν τω 
κοσμώ, κα\ ούτοι (ν τώ κοσμώ 
(ΐσ\, κα\ (γω ττρος σ( ('ρχομαι. 
ττατ(ρ αγκ, τηρησον αυτούς (ν 
τώ ονόματι σου, ους δβδωκας μοι, 
Ινα ώσιν (ν, καθώς ημβΐς. 

12 ore ή μην μ(τ αυτών (ν τώ 
κοσμώ, (γω (τηρούν αυτούς (ν 
τω ονόματι σον ους δ(δωκας μοι 
(φύλαγα, και ούδίΐς (ζ αυτών 



REVISED VERSION. 

glory which I had with thee 
before the world was. 

G I manifested tliy name to 
the men whom thou hast given 
me out of the world: thine 
they were, and thou hast given 
them to me ; and they have kejjt 
thy word. 

7 Now they know, that all 
things 'that thou hast given me 
are of thee. 

8 ^Because I have given to 
them the words which thou hast 
given to me : and they "them- 
selves received, and knew in- 
deed, that I came out from thee, 
and believed that thou didst send 
me. 

9 I pray for them : not for the 
world do I pray, but for those 
whom thou liast given me ; *be- 
cause they are thine. 

10 And all mine are thine, 
and thine, mine : and I have 
been glorified in them. 

11 And I am no more in the 
world, 'and these are in the 
world, and I am coming to thee. 
Holy Father, keep, Jin thy name, 
those whom thou hast given me, 
that they may be one, as ave. 

12 kWhcii I was with them 
'in the world, I was keeping 
them in thy name : those whom 
thou hast given me I kept, and 
no one of them was lost, except 



' See ch. 14 : 26, N. w. 
' See ch. 1 : 15, N. i. 

■■ E. V. generally. — Narj'. — R., Kcnr., (in very deed) ; "VY. 
(verily.) 

' I doubt the propriety of ever translating xm, but. At 
least, I have not yet found a passage in which it is clearly ne- 
cessary to do so. 

ί Most modern editors have φ, for ov; of the Text. Rec, 
though some very excellent commentators, as Bio., Stier, 
Tittm., prefer the common reading. I would recommend the 
reading ώ, as best sustained both b)' MSS. and other authorities. 
1 would, therefore, translate thus, '' keep them, in thy name, 



which thou hast given me," etc. — Alf. well remarks that tv τω 
ονόματι σον is not properly " through thy name," but " in thy 
name." 

* E. V. generally. — This change is made because of the sub- 
sequent change of tense, in the dependent clause. — W., T., 
C, G. 

1 Lachm. and Tisch. reject the words ev τω κοσιιω, whieli arc 
considered by Griesb. as probably spurious. They are wanting 
in several of the best MSS., and are thought by Meyer to be an 
addition from the preceding verse. I would recommend that the 
words, in the world, be left out. — Vulg., W.. R., Nary, Pcnn, 
All., Kenr. 



112 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVTI. 



KINU JAMES VERSION. 

dition ; that the scripture might 
be fulfilled. 

13 And now come I to tliee, 
and tliese things I speak in the 
world, that they might have my 
joy fulfilled in themselves. 

14 I have given them thy 
word ; and the world hath hated 
them, because they are not of 
the world, even as I am not of 
the world. 



15 Ipray not that thou should- 
est take them out of the world, 
but that thou shouldest keep 
them from the evil. 

16 They are not of the world, 
even as I am not of the world. 



17 Sanctify them through thy 
truth : thy word is truth. 



18 As thou hast sent me into 
the world, even so have I also 
sent them into the world. 

19 And for their sakes I sanc- 
tify myself, that they also might 
be sanctified through the truth. 

20 Neither pray I for these 
alone ; but for them also which 
shall believe on me through their 
word : 

21 That they all may be one ; 
as thou, Father, art in me, and 
I in thee, that they also may 
be one in us : that the world 



GREEK TEXT. 

άτΓωλετο, el μη ο uioy της άττω- 
λβίαί, \να η γραφή ττληρωθη. 

13 vvf δε ττροϊ ere ΐργομαι, 
και ταύτα λαλώ ev τω κοσμώ, 'ίνα 
ί'χωσι την γαραν την Ιμην ire- 
ττληρωμίνην (ν avTois. 

14 ϊγω δξδωκα αύτοΐΐ τον λο- 
γον σου, καΐ ό κόσμος ϊμίσησβν 
αυτούς, Ότι ουκ €\σ\ν ίκ τοΰ 
κόσμου, καθώς Ιγω ούκ ίΐμΐ βκ 
τοΰ κόσμου. 

15 ούκ (ρωτώ Ινα άρης αυτούς 
€κ τοΰ κόσμου, αλλ Ινα τήρησης 
αυτούς Ικ τοΰ ττονηροΰ. 

16 €κ τοΰ κόσμου ούκ (ΙσΙ, 
καθώς Ιγω ίκ τοΰ κόσμου ούκ 
ειμί. 

17 άγιασαν αυτούς eV ttj αλή- 
θεια σου• ο λόγος ο σος αλήθεια 
ϊστί. 

18 καθώς ίμβ άττίστβιλας ety 
τον κοσμον, κάγω αττίστβιλα αυ- 
τούς βίς τον κοσμον 

19 κα\ υττΐρ αυτών βγω αγιά- 
ζω ϊμαυτον. Ινα καΐ αύτοΙ ώσιν 
ήγιασμίνοι iv άληθβία. 

20 Ού ΤΓξ ρι τούτων δε (ρωτώ 
μόνον, άλλα και ττ(ρ\ τών ττιστίυ- 
σοντων δια τοΰ λογού αυτών βίς 
€μ€• 

21 Ίνα τταντίς ev ώσι• καθώς 
συ, ττάτίρ, ev ίμοΊ, κάγω iv σο), 
ίνα καΐ αύτοΙ ev ημϊν ev ώσιν Ινα 



REVISED VERSION. 

the son of perdition ; that the 
Scripture might be fulfilled. 

13 And now I am coming to 
thee ; and these things I speak 
in the world, that they may have 
my joy fulfilled in "them. 

14 I have given them thy 
word, and the world hated them ; 
because they are not of the 
world, as I am not of the world. 



15 I pray not that thou 
wouldst take them out of the 
world, but that thou wouldst 
keep them from the evil. 

16 They are not of the world, 
as I am not of the world. 



17 Sanctify them ""in 
truth : thy word is truth. 



■"■thy 



IS As thou didst send me into 
the world, so I sent them into 
the world. 

19 And "for them I sanctify 
myself, so that they also ""them- 
selves may be sanctified ""in truth. 

20 PNor do I pray for these 
alone, but also for those "about 
to believe on me through their 
word : 

21 So that all maybe one: as 
THOU, Father, in me, and I in 
thee, that they also "themselves 
may be "One in us ; so that the 



■■ Lachm., Tisch., Bio., and Alf., have avrois, for avrotg. As 
this is a mere question of punctuation, and as them appears to 
me to make better sense, in this place, tliaii themselves, I have 
concluded to follow the editors above mentioned. 

"° See N. j, above. — That the trulli is a means of sanctifiea- 
tion, I do not doubt; but I do doubt, whether this idea is 
stated here. Had this been meant, Sia, with the genitive, would. 
I think, have been used. — Vulg., ΛΥ., R., Nary, Kenr., Sharpe. — 
The word aov, after αλη9•εια, is rejected by Lachm., Jle^yer, and 
is wanting in the Vulg. and several other ancient, and many 
modern Verss. I would, therefore, put the, for thy, before truth. 



• See ch. 13 : 37, N. k. 

"> See ch. 2 : 12, N. z. 

ρ Λ'οΓ is more in accordance with modern usage here, than 
neither. 

' Most editors have τΐίοτενορτων, for πιατενσοί'των. I 
would, therefore, recommend that the revision read, those be- 
lieving oil ME, &c 

■■ Lachm. and Tisch. omit the second ίν in this verse, with 
MSS. BCD. and quite a n\imber of ancient A''erss. Griesb. 
considers this word a probable interpolation. I would recom- 
mend that one be left out. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVUI. 



113 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

may believe that thou hast sent 
me. 

22 And the glory which thou 
giivest me, I have given them ; 
that they may be one, even as 
we are one ; 

23 I in them, and thou in me, 
that they may be made perfect 
in one ; and tliat the world may 
know that thou hast sent me, 
and hast loved them as thou hast 
loved me. 

24 Father, I will that they 
also whom thou hast given me 
be with me where I am ; that 
they ma}' beliold my glory which 
thou hast given me : lor thou 
lovedst me before the foundation 
of the world. 

25 righteous Father, the 
world hath not known thee : but 
I have known thee, and these 
have known that thou hast sent 
me. 

26 And I have declared unto 
them thy name, and will declare 
it : that the love wherewith thou 
hast loved me, may be in them, 
and I in them. 

CHAP. XVIII. 

When Jesus had spoken these 



GREEK TEXT. 

ο κοσμοί τηστίυση on συ ae 
aweareiAaf. 

22 και βγω την Bo^av ην Se- 
δωκαί μοί, δβδωκα αύτοΐ^, Ινα 
ώσιν kv, καθωί ημύς ίν ίσμ^ν 

23 (.γω iv αυτοΐς, και συ iv 
€μοι, Ίνα ώσι τΐΤΐλαωμίνοι eh 
ev, κα). ίνα γινωσκτ) 6 κόσμος ότι 
συ με άττίσταλαί, καΐ ηγαττησας 
αυτούς, καθώς e/xe ηγαττησας. 

24 Πάτερ, ους δίδωκας μοι, 
θέλω Ίνα οττου (ΙμΙ ϊγω, κάκύνοι 
ώσι μβτ (μοΰ• ίνα θβωρώσι την 
δοςαν την έμην, ην βδωκας μοι, 
ΟΤΙ ηγαττησας με ττρο καταβολής 
κόσμου. 

25 Πατίρ δίκαιε, κα\ ό κόσμος 
ere ουκ ίγνω, βγω δβ σε εγνων, 
καΙ ούτοι έγνωσαν Οτι συ με άπε- 
στειλας• 

2G καΙ εγνωρισα αυτοΐς το 
όνομα σου, και γνωρίσω• Ίνα η 
άγαττη, ην ηγαττησας με, εν αύ- 
τοϊς 2J, κάγω εν αΰτοΐί. 

CHAP, χνιιι, 
ΤΑ ΥΤΛ ειττων 6 Ιησούς 



REVISED VERSION. 

world may know that thou didst 
send me. 

22 And the gloiy which thou 
hast given me, I have given 
them ; that they may be one, as 
WE are one: 

23 I in them, and thou in hie, 
that they may be made perfect 
' into one ; and that the world 
may know that thou didst send 
me, and didst love them, as thou 
didst love me. 

24 Father, those whom thou 
hast given me, I 'wish, that 
where I am, they also may be 
with ME ; so that they may see 
my glory which thou didst give 
me, "because thou didst love me 
before the foundation of the 
world. 

25 Ο righteous Father, the 
world did not know thee, but I 
knew thee, and these knew that 
thou didst send me. 

26 And I «made known, and 
will make known to them thy 
name : so that the love \\\{\\ 
which thou didst love me may 
be in them, and I in them. 

CHAP. XVIII. 

Jesus, "saving these tilings. 



■ See ch. 11 : 52, N. s. 

< See ch. 1 : 43, N. y. 

» See cb. 1 : 15, N. i. 

" E. v., cb. 15 : 15, and frequently elsewhere. I would so 
render this word uniformly. — W., Nary, Dubois, Kenr., Newc, 
Sharpe, Murd. — I have here, as in other instances, where two 
verbs govern the same object, changed the collocation, in order 
to avoid the supply (otherwise necessary) of a pronoun. See 
cb. 5 : 21, N. h. 

• There is a diOBculty in the interpretation of this verse, 
compared with ch. 14 : 31, which, as it has an important 
tearing upon the translation, seems to require at least an 
effort at explanation. AVhen the Saviour says, in the place 
last mentioned, "Arise, let us go lience," it may be presumed 



that he and his disciples, without further delay, left the room, 
and the house, where they had just partaken of the Supper, and 
started for some place, not there mentioned, but which proves, 
in the sequel, to have been the garden of Gethsemane, situated 
beyond the brook Kedron. But in chapters fifteen and sixteen, 
he appears to be continuing his remarks, as though no such 
change of circumst;inces had taken place, while chapter seventeen 
also appears, from the narrative, to have been spoken subsequent- 
ly to this time. This difficulty has been met by most com- 
mentators in one of two different ways. — 1. Some suppose, that, 
on arising from the table (ch. 14 : 31) they retired to another 
more private room, in the same house, for the purpose of enjoy- 
ing greater freedom of communion ; or, if not, that the three 
following chapters were spoken while they were standing, or 
preparing for their departure, but before they actually left the 
house. (G!ass, Pearce, Doddridge, Lampe, Kuin., Tittmann, 
Knapp, Bio., Meyer, Tholuck, Olsh., Klee, and others). This, 



114 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVIII. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

words, he went forth with his 
disciples over the brook Cedron, 
where was a garden, into the 
which he entered, and his dis- 
ciples. 



GREEK TEXT. 

e^rjXue συν τοΐί μαθηταΐ^ αύτοΰ 
πβραν του -χβιμαρρου των Κί- 
τρων, οτΐου ην κηττοί, els ον €Ϊσ- 
ηλθβν αύτοί καΐ οΐ μαθηταΐ 
αύτοΰ. 



REVISED VERSION. 

went "out with his disciples ''be- 
yond the brook "of the Cedars, 
where was a garden, into which 
he entered, ■'himself, and his dis- 
ciples. 



" See Ν ζ., ch. 1 : 43. 

ι• Ε. v., ch. 1 : 28 ; 3 : 26 ; 10 : 40.— We say properly, io go 
over the sea. as in ch. 6 : 1, because the principal part of the 
journey is performed on the sea; and the journey itself is the 
principal object of contemplation. But in this case the travel- 
ing was principally by land, as in ch. 10 : 40 ; and, besides, the 
place to which they went, and not the act of journeying, seems 
to have been the prominent object before the writer's mind, 
q. d. '• went out to beyond," &c. — Fr. S.,-M.,-B., and L., (ait- 
deld de) ; Schott, {egressas . . . trajecit) ; other Verss. gen- 
erally, as English. 



' I translate των Κέδρων, of the Cedars, because thi.s is lit- 
erally what it means ; and, I believe, this expression occurs 
nowhere else, except twice in the Sept., (Bio.) as the proper 
name of a brook, or torrent. As, however, almost all scholars 
prefer τον KeSocoi; which is the reading of a few of the oldest 
MSS., I would recommend that it be adopted, and that the 
rendering of the E. V. be retained, except the orthography of 
the word, which I would alter to Kedron, in accordance with 
the prevailing custom of the present day. — Penn. 

■i See ch. 2 : 12, N. z. 



it is needless to say, is not the more probable interpretation of 
the words, εγειρααΟ-ε, αγωμεν εντενΆ^εν, and rests upon mere 
conjecture. — 2. Others suppose, that, on arising, as above, they 
immediately left the house, and that chapters 15, 16, and 17, 
were spoken on the way, as they traveled leisurely along, over 
the brook, and towards the garden. (Grotius, Schoettgen, 
Kosenm., Luther, Aret., Wetst., Lange, and others.) To this 
view two principal objections have been made.— 1) That it is 
unnatural to suppose, that words so solemn and private in 
their character were spoken in the streets, or on the high- 
way, where, doubtless, there were many strangers passing to 
and from the festival. (Dodd., Bio., and others.) To this it 
may be replied, that the difEculty is, perhaps, imaginary. It 
is very probable that there were private walks about Jerusa- 
lem, leading from the city in every direction, where those who 
wished to converse privately had ample opportunity for so 
doing; and it by no means follows from the supposition that 
they immediately went out towards the garden of Gethse- 
mane, that they traveled by the highway. On the other 
hand it is at least natural to suppose, that the illustrations 
drawn from the vine, and the branches, ch. 15 : 1-6, were 
suggested by the actual presence of a vine before their eyes, 
while walking along : q. d. " See that vine ! with what care the 
husbandman prunes it, and how abundantly its fruitfulness 
repays his labor ! And see those withered branches, that have 
been cut off as useless, and are even now being gathered 
together, to be burned up ! Now I am the true vine, and my 
Father is the husbandman," Ac- 2) It is objected to this 
view that the words of the verse now under consideration. 
Ταντα ειπών Ό Ιησονι εξήλθε, κ. τ. Α., positively preclude this 
interpretation. (Knapp.) This objection rests upon the 
assumption that ταύτα ειπών means, ^'when he had spoken 
these things : " or, that the speaking was finished, before the 
going out was begun. Now, although I am not aware that any 
critic has hitherto disputed the correctness of this assumption, 
yet is it not well worth while to inquire, whether the laws of 



language render an}' such strict interpretation of these words 
necessary ? Ειπών and εξι;λ9-ε are both aorists ; and the dis- 
tinguishing peculiarity of this tense is, its indefiniteness. And 
though, in expressions like the one at present under consider- 
ation, where an aorist participle depends upon a finite verb in 
the same tense, the action described by the former is, more 
frequently than otherwise, completed, in whole, or in part, 
before that described b}' the latter is begun, yet this is by no 
means ahcays the case. On the contrary, the two actions are 
frequently sinudtaneous, as will appear from the following facts, 
gathered from the N. T. usage. 

1. When the action of the participle is identical with that 
of the finite verb, or. when the one is included in the other, 
the two actions are, of course, simidtaneous. — Examples.^ 
Αποχρι9•εΐί είπε, {εψη, έλεγε,) very common in Matt., Mark, 
and Luke, but not often used in John. Matt. 3 : 15 ; 4:4; 
8:8; 11 : 4, 25 ; 12 : 39, 48 ; 13 : 11, 37, &c. Mark, 6 : 37 ; 
7:6; 9 : 12, 17 ; 10 : 3, 5, &c. Luke, 1 : 19, 35, 60 ; 4:8. 
12; 5:5, 22, 31; 6:3; 7:22, &c.— A>af«s είπε, {έλεγε,) 
Mark 5:7; 9 : 2\.—Φωνηααί είπε, Luke 16 : 24 ; 23 : 46.— 
The same remark applies to such expressions as, — πε /iyag 
είπε. Matt. 2 : 8, — πεαοιτεί πυοσεχννηααν. Matt. 2 : 11, — 
ησφαλισαντο . . . αγρηγιααντεξ. Matt. 27 : ^^, — ττροσΟ'εις 
είπε, Luke 19 : 11, — αφεις . . . ηλΘ-εν, Matt. 13 : 36, — εξελΟ-ων 
. . . ανεχωρηαεν. Matt. 15 : 21, — εγωνηοε . . . ειπονσα, ch. 11 : 
28, (see \ΐί-\ο\ν,)—εποιησεν . . . παταξας. Acts 7 : 24, and, per- 
haps, several others. 

2. When either the participle or the finite verb, (or both of 
them.) describes an action that is, in its nature, continuous, 
the two actions, though different from, and independent of, 
each other, are generally simultaneous, at least in part, even 
though, at the same time, one of them may, in its inception, 
have priority over the other. Thus, in the expression, 
ψοβηβ•ειαα y.ai τρε/ιοναα . . . ι;λί>εν, Mark 5 : 33, {τρεμονσα is 
probably an aorist,) it is evident that the fearing, trembling, 
and coming were contemporaneous actions, though, in their 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVIII. 



115 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

2 Ami Judas also, which be- 
trayed him, knew the place : lor 
Jesus oft-tiiues resorted thither 
with his disciples. 



GREEK TEXT. 

2 ηδίί 8e KOLL Ιουδαί, ο τταρα- 
8i8ovi αϋτον, τον τοττον οτι 
τΓολλάκίί συνηχθη ό Ίησονί tKel 
μβτά των μαθητών αύτοΰ. 



REVISED VERSION. 

2 And Jiu'as also, who be- 
trayed iiim, l\.new the place : ""be- 
cause Jesus Often ^met ""there 
with his disciples. 



• See ch. 1 : 15, N. i. 

' Oft-times is, I think, partially obsolete. At all events, 
the addition of the S3llablc, times, adds nothing to the meaning 
of the simple often. 

' To resort is not the exact meaning cf αιναγιοΰ-αι. To be 
assembled, is the best general definition ; but this, for an ob- 



vious reason, is inadmissible in the present instance. To meet, 
in the intransitive sense, is its exact equivalent. — Wesl. — Vulg., 
Beza, Krasm., Cast., Schott. (convenerat) ; Trcm. (congregaliis 
erat) ; Fr. M. (s'i/ etait assemble). 

■■ Wesl., Sharpe, Erasni., Schott, Trem., Fr. S.,-JI., and 
others. 



inception, these several actions are mentioned in their regular 
order of succession. So, ψοβη9•ειιτεί ε9•ιχΐΐμααη>', Luke 8 : 25, 
— χοπιααη^τει . . . ελαβομεν, Luke 5 : 5, — εμβλεψαί . . . έλεγε, 
{Ιεγει, Hist, pres.) ch. 1 : 36, 43, — εν9•νδρομι;σαντεβ ηλΟ•ομεν, 
Acts 21 : 1, and, perhaps, other expressions. 

3. When the words describe actions diflercnt from and 
independent of, each other, it appears generally, but not 
always, from the context, that the action of the participle pre- 
ceded that of the finite verb, the former being usually finished 
before the latter was begun. Sometimes, however, even under 
such circumstances, the context shows that the actions were 
simultaiieuus, or contemporaneous. This is the point of espe- 
cial importance in the case before us. Ειπών and εξηλθ-ε 
describe actions difl'erent from, and independent of, each other. 
If the context would warrant it, it would undoubtedlj' be more 
in accordance with usage to understand the former as having 
been finished before the latter was begun. Since, however, 
this interpretation has been found to be embarrassed, my 
object now is, to show, that, if the context requires a different 
understanding of the relations between these two words and 
the actions represented by them, we are at perfect liberty to 
suppose them to have been simultaneous. That is, that there 
is nothing in the letter of this verse forbidding the idea, that 
it was while Jesus was in the act of saying these things, that 
he went out with his disciples beyond the brook Kedron ; or, 
as much time was necessarily consumed in both cases, that it 
was during the delivery of these three chapters that the jour- 
ney from the city to the garden was accomplished ; the whole 
of both transactions being contemplated, in the bird's-eye view 
of the historian, as a momentary thing. — 1) We have seen 
above, (in 1,) that the occurrence of two aorists connected 
together as these are, does not necessarily imply, that either 
action preceded the other, in point of time. — 2) There are 
cases, I think, entirely similar to this, in which the two 
actions were evidently simidtaneoics ; that is, there are cases 
in which an aorist participle is joined with, and depends upon, 
a finite verb in the same tense, and describes an action ditler- 
ent from, and independent of that described by the finite 
verb, while the two actions occupied tlie same moment of time 
in their ])erformance. The most remarkable of these is, per- 
haps, Luke 24 : 40, which is peculiarly proper to illustrate the 



case in hand, from its verbal similarity. Kat τοντο ειπών 
επεΒει^ερ avTois Tas χείρας κηι τους πόδας. If we compare this 
with V. 39, ιδετε τας χείρας μου y.ai τονς πόδας μον, there can 
be no reasonable doubt, but that it was while he was in the act 
of saying this, that he showed them his hands and his feet. 
Another somewhat remarkable passage is Matt. 16 : 5, Και ελ- 
ί^οι•τεςοιμα3'ΐ;ταί αντοί' εις το πέραν επελαί^οιτο αρτονς λαβείν, 
"And his disciples coming into the [country] beyond, forgot 
to take loaves." Now it is manifest that they did not forget 
after they came, but that these two actions were precisely 
simultaneous. At the very moment of starting out they forgot 
to take loaves. But besides these illustrative passages, there 
are several in which, evidently, ειπών (aor.), is used exactly 
like λέγων (pres.), and, apparently, interchangeably with it. — 
Luke 5 ; 13, ηψατο αντον, ειπών, ''he touched him, saying^' 
compared with Matt. 8 : 3, ηψατο αυτόν ο Ιηοονς, λέγων, "Je- 
sus touched him, saying," where in describing the very same 
actions of the Savior, we have these two words used by dif- 
ferent writers, in precisely the same sense, and, as it would 
appear, interchangeably. — Luke 19 : 29, 30, απέστειλε δυο 
των μαθητών αντον, ειπών, κ. τ. λ., compared with Matt. 21 : 
1, 2, απέστειλε δυο μα&ητας, λέγων αντοις, κ. τ. λ. — ch. 11 : 28, 
(see above, in 1,) εγωνηοε . . . ειποναα, κ. τ. λ., compared λνϊιΐι 
Luke 8 : 54, εψωνησε, λέγων, κ. τ. λ. — ch. 18 : 22, έδωκε . . . 
ειπών, κ. τ. λ.., compared with Matt. 28 : 12, έδωκαν . . . λέγον- 
τες, κ. τ λ. — Acts 7 : 35. bv t^nv /^οαντσ, ειποιτες, κ. τ. λ., com- 
pared with Matt. 26 : 70, ι,ονι,αατο . . . λέγων, κ. τ. λ. — Acts 
21 : 14, ησυχαααμεν ειποντες, κ. τ. λ., compared with Acts 11 : 
18, ησύχασαν . . . λέγοντες, κ. τ. λ.. 

From what has been said above, I think, we may safely 
conclude. — 1. That the relation between two, or more actions, 
as to time, when they are both, or all, expressed by aorists, 
can only be determined from the context, or the nature of the 
actions themselves, not from the fact that this tense is 
emplo}-ed. — 2. That the indefinite rendering with our present 
participle, (which is, in reality, the nearest approach to the 
Greek aorist participle that we have,) is prefer,ible to the peri- 
phrases of the E. v., both here, and in man)' other pass-igcs, in 
which the letter nf the translation positively fixes the inter- 
pretation, which is not true of the letter of the Original. 



116 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVIH. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

3 Judas then, having received 
a band of men and officers from 
the chief priests and Pharisees, 
Cometh thitlier with lanterns, 
and torches, and weapons. 

4 Jesus therefore, knowing all 
things that should come upon 
him, went forth, and said unto 
them. Whom seek ye? 

5 They answered him, Jesus 
of Nazareth. Jesus saith unto 
them, I am he. And Judas al- 
so, which betrayed him, stood 
with them. 

6 As soon then as he had said 
unto them, I am he, they went 
backward, and fell to the ground. 

7 Then asked he them again. 
Whom seek ye ? And they said, 
Jesus of Nazareth. 

8 Jesus answered, I have told 
you that I am he. If therefore 
ye seek me, let these go their 
way : 

9 That the saying might be 
fulfilled which he spake, Of them 
which thou gavest me, have I 
lost none. 

10 Then Simon Peter, having 
a sword, drew it, and smote the 
high priest's servant, and cut 
oft" his right ear. The servant's 
name was Malchus. 



11 Then said Jesus unto Pe- 
ter, Put up thy sword into the 
sheath : the cup which my Fa- 
ther hath given me, shall I not 
drink it ? 



GREEK TEXT. 



3 ο ούν Ιονδαί λαβών την 
aireipav, καί €κ των άργί€ρ(.ων 
και Φαρισαιων VTnjperaf, ('ρχ^ται 
ίκβΐ μ^τα φανών και λαμπάδων 
καΐ οπλών. 

4 Ιησοΰί ούν είδω? πάντα τα 
ΐρχομίνα eV αύτον, ίζβλθων ei- 
π€ν αΰτοίί, Τίνα ζητβΐτβ ; 

5 Λπΐκριθησαν αυτώ, Ιη- 
σονν τον Ναζωραΐον. Aeyn 
αυτοΐς ο Ιησούς, Εγω βίμι. 
Έίστηκ€ΐ Se καΐ Ιούδας 6 παρα- 
δίδονς αύτον μβτ αυτών. 

6 fis ούν emev αντοΐς, ' Οτι 
€γω (ΐμι, άπηλθον ει? τα οπίσω, 
και βπβσον γαμαι. 

7 πάλιν ούν αυτούς ίπηρω- 
τησ€, Τίνα ζητβΐτβ ; Οι Se ίίπον, 

Ιησοΰν τον Ναζωραΐον. 

8 Άπβκρίθη ό 'Ιησούς, ΕΙπον 
ΰμΐν, οτί Ιγω ύμι. ei ούν €μ€ 
ζητίΐτ€, αφβτΐ τούτους ΰπάγβιν 

9 ίνα πληρωθη ό λόγος Όν 
elTrev, Οτι ούς δίδωκας μοι, ούκ 
απώλεσα (ζ αυτών ούδίνα. 

10 Σίμων ούν Πίτρος ίχων 
μα'χαιραν, βίλκυσεν αύτην, κα\ 
ίπαισί τον τού άρχ^ΐ€ρίως δούλον, 
και άπβκοψβν αυτού το ώτιον το 

(ζίον. ην 06 άνομα τω οουλω 
Μαλ•χος. 

11 €ίπ€ν ούν ό Ιησούς τω He- 
τρω, Βαλβ την μαγαιραν σου β'ις 
την θηκην. το ποτηριον Ό δβδωκε 
μοι ό πατήρ, ου μη πιω αύτο; 



REVISED VERSION. 

3 Judas, therefore, taking the 
band, and officers from the chief 
priests and Pharisees, cometh 
thither with 'torches, and Jlamps, 
and weapons. 

4 Jesus, therefore, knowing all 
things that were coming upon 
him, going out, said to them, 
AVhom are j'e seeking V 

5 They answered him, Jesus 
''the 'Nazarene. Jesus saith to 
tiiem, I am '[he]. And Judas 
also, who betrayed him, was 
standing with them. 

6 '"\Vhen, therefore, he said to 
them, I am '[he], tliey went 
backward, and fell to the ground. 

7 Again, therefore, he asked 
them. Whom are ye seeking? 
And they said, Jesus, Hhe '■Naza- 
rene. 

8 Jesus answered, I told you 
that I am '[he]. If, therefore, 
ye are seeking me, let these go 
away : 

9 So that the saying might be 
fulfilled, wliich he "said, I lost 
no "one of those whom tiiou hast 
given me. 

10 Simon Peter, therefore, 
having a sword, drew it, and 
smote the servant of the liigh 
priest, and cut off his right ear. 
Now the servant's name was 
Malciius. 

11 Jesus, therefore, said to 
Peter, Put pthy sword into the 
sheath : the cup which the Fa- 
ther hath given me, shall I not 
drink it? 



' The γαΐ'ος was, literati}', a thing giving light ; hence torch 
is a better definition than lantern, which latter is properly 
a case in which a candle, or lamp, is put for protection. — Dodd., 
Lampe, Bynieus. 

1 Dodd., Murd.— E. V. generally. 

' E. v., Matt. 2 : 23.— As this is more literal than of Naza- 
reth, and quite as easily understood, I would always adopt it. 
— Newc. marg., Dodd., Sharpe, Murd., and others. 



1 See ch. 8 : 24, N. v. 
■» See ch. 11 : 20, N. t. 
" See ch. 1 : 15, N. g. 
° See Gen. Obs. 6. 

ρ Almost all editors reject this σον. 
commend that the be put for thy. 



I would, therefore, re- 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVIH. 



117 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

12 Then the band, and the 
captain, and officers of" the Jews 
took Jesus, and bound hiiu. 



13 And led him away to Annas 
first, (for lie was father-in-law to 
Caiaphas, which was the high 
priest that same year.) 

14 Now Caiaphas was he 
whicli gave counsel to the Jews, 
that it was expedient that one 
man should die for the people. 

15 And Simon Peter followed 
Jesus, and so did another disciple. 
That disciple was known unto 
the high priest, and went in witii 
Jesus, into the palace of the high 
priest. 

16 But Peter stood at the door 
without. Then went out that 
other disciple which Λvas known 
unto the high priest, and spake 
unto her that kept the door, and 
brought iu Peter. 

17 Then saith the damsel that 
kept the door unto Peter, Art 
not thou also one of this man's 
disciples V He saith, I am not. 

18 And the servants and offi- 
cers stood there, who had made 
a fire of coals ; (for it was cold) 
and they warmed themselves : 
and Peter stood with them, and 
warmed himself. 



GREEK TEXT. 



12 H ovv σπβΐρα και ό χί- 
λίαρχος και οί υττηρ^ται των Ιου• 
δαίων συνίλαβον τον Ιησοΰν, 
και ί'δησαν αύτον, 

13 καΙ άττηγαγον αυτόν ττροί 
' Λνναν ττρώτον ην γαρ TrevOepos 
του Καϊάφα, oy ην άρχ^ΐ€ρ€υ! του 
(.νιαυτοΰ ίκίίνου. 

14 ην 8e Καϊάφαί 6 συμβου- 
λΐυσαί τοΐί Ιουδαιοΐί, οτι συμ- 
φίρβι eva ανθρωπον άττολβσθαι 
ϋΐΓΐρ του λαοί}. 

15 Ίΐκολουθβι δ€ τω Ιησοΰ 
Σίμων Ιϋτρος, και ο άλλο? μα- 
θητής, ό 8e μαθητής ίκύνος ην 
γνωστοί τω άρ-χ^κρίΐ, και συνίΐσ- 
ηλθβ τω Ίησοΰ eii την αύλην 
του άρχίίρίωί• 

1 6 ό δε Πίτρος ΰστηκει ττροί 
Trj θύρ(^ β'ζω. ΐζηλθίν ούν ό μα- 
θητης ό άλλο? by ην γνωστός τω 
άρχκρβ'ΐ, καΐ eirre τη θυρωρω, καΊ 
€ΐσηγαγ6 τον Πβτρον. 

17 λβγβι ούν η παιδίσκη ή 
θυρωρός τω Πίτρω, Μη και συ 
(Κ των μαθητών ei του άνθρώττου 
τούτου ; Λίγ€ΐ Ικίϊνος, Ουκ (Ιμι. 

18 Είστηκ€ΐσαν 8e οι δούλοι 
καΐ οι ΰττηρΐται ανθρακιαν ττί- 
ΤΓΟιηκοτβς, οτι ψυχρός ην, καΙ e0€p- 
μαίνοντο• ην δβ μβτ αυτών ο 
Πίτρος βστώς καΐ θερμαινόμενος. 



REVISED VERSION. 

12 The band, therefore, and 
the captain, and the officers of 
the Jews, took Jesus, and bound 
him, 

13 And led him away to An- 
nas first (for he was father-in- 
law ''of Caiajihas, who was high 
priest that year). 

14 Now Caiaphas was he who 
gave counsel to the Jews, that 
it was expedient that one man 
'perish for the people. 

15 And Simon Peter was fol- 
lowing Jesus ; 'also the other dis- 
ciple. And that disciple was 
known to the high priest, and 
went in with Jesus, into the 
■court of the high priest. 

16 But Peter was standing at 
the door without. The otJier dis- 
ciple, therefore, who was known 
to the high priest, went out, and 
spoke to the "door-keeper, and 
brought in Peter. 

17 The 'maid, the "door-keep- 
er, therefore, saith to Peter, Art 
not THOU also of this man's dis- 
cii)les ■? He saith, I am not. 

IS And the servants and the 
officers were standing, (having 
made a fire of coals, "because it 
was cold,) and were warming 
themselves: and Peter was stand- 
ing with them, and warming him- 
self. 



'< Of is, in this connection, more iu accordance with usage 
than to. 

' MSS., AB, and a few others, have αποβ^ηνειν, for απο- 
λεα3•αι; which reading is adopted by Lachra., and is probably 
the original of the Vulg. and many other Verss., including the 
E. V. — Upon the whole, I would recommend its adoption, and 
that the rendering of the E. V. remain unchanged. 

• This change is made for the purpose of avoiding ambiguity, 
without any supply. 

« According to Rob., this word means here, Ihe court, or 
quadrangle, " around which the house itself was built, wliich 
served also as a place of waiting for visitors and attendants." 



" Whether the advantage gained by specifying the sex of the 
door-keeper is of sufficient importance to justify the adoption of 
a clumsy periphrasis, is, I tliink, questionable ; especially since 
we learn the same fact from the next verse. 

' Though παιδιακη is sometimes applied to a free woman, 
yet it seems not to be used in this sense in the N. T. The 
strong presumption is, that this young \voman who kept the 
door was a servant of the high priest. Still, as it is not quite 
certain who she was. or what was her condition, I have adopted 
the rendering, maid, which is just about as ambiguous, in this 
respect, as the orig. word. — G., Dubois, Penn, Kenr., Murd., 
Wesl. " See ch. 1 : 15, N. i. 



118 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. ΧΥΠΙ. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

19 The high priest then asked 
Jesus of his disciples, and of his 
doctrine. 



20 Jesus answered him, I 
spake openly to the world ; I 
ever taught in the synagogue, 
and in the temple, whither the 
.Tews always resort ; and in se- 
cret have I said nothing. 



21 Why askest thou me ? ask 
them which heard me, what I 
have said unto them: behold, 
they know what I said. 

22 And when he had thus 
spoken, one of the officers which 
stood by, struck Jesus with the 
palm of his hand, saying, An- 
swerest thou the high priest so ? 

23 Jesus answered him. If I 
have spoken evil, bear witness 
of the evil : but if well, why 
smitest thou me ? 

24 (Now Annas had sent him 
bound unto Caiaphas the high 
priest.) 

25 And Simon Peter stood 
and warmed himself. They said 
therefore unto him. Art not thou 
also one of his disciples? He 
denied ii, and said, I am not. 

26 One of the servants of the 
high priest (being his kinsman 
whose ear Peter cut off) saith. 
Did not I see thee in the garden 
with him ? 



GREEK TEXT. 



19 ovv apyiipivi Ί]ρωτΎ]σί 
τον Ιησονν irep). των μαθητών 
αυτόν, καΙ Trepl τηί διδαχτΐ^ αυ- 
τόν. 

20 άττίκρίθη αύτω 6 Ιησοΰί, 
'Έγω παρρησία (λάλησα τω 
κοσμώ• βγω τταντοτε ΐδίδαζα Ιν 
τη συναγωγή κα\ iv τω lepcp, 
οτΓου τταντοτβ οι Ιουδαίοι συνβρ- 
χονται, καΐ iv κρύπτω Ιλαλησα 



ούδβν. 



21 Τί με €πίρωταΐ ,' €π€ ρώτη- 
σαν τουί άκηκοοτας, τι ίλαλησα 
αύτοΐί• ί'δε ούτοι οϊδασιν α (Ιπον 

9 / 

(γω. 

22 Ταύτα 8e αύτοΰ ύποντοί, 
eif των υπηρίτών παρβστηκως 
βδωκβ ράπισμα τω Ιησον, (Ιπων, 
Ούτως άποκρίνη τω άρχ^ΐ€ρ(ΐ ; 

23 Λπβκρίθη αύτω ό Ιησούς, 
ΕΙ κακώς (λάλησα, μαρτυρησον 
πίρΊ του κακού• el δε καλώς, τι 
με δερεις ; 

24 Άπεστειλεν αύτον ό Αν- 
νας δεδεμενον προς Καϊαφαν τον 
αρχιερέα. 

25 'Ην δε Σίμων Πέτρος 
έστως καΙ θερμαινόμενος• είπον 
ουν αυτω, Λϊη και συ εκ των μα- 
θητών αυτού ει ; Ηρνησατυ εκεί- 
νος, KCU είπε ν, Ουκ εΙμι. 

26 Λέγει εΙς έκ τών δούλων 
του αργ^ιερεως, συγγενής ων ου 
απεκοψε Πέτρος το ώτιον, Ουκ 
εγώ σε είδον εν τω κηπω μετ 
αυτού ; 



REVISED VERSION. 

19 The high priest, therefore, 
asked Jesus of his disciples, and 
of his doctrine. 



20 Jesus answered him, I 
spoke 'publicly to the world ; I 
always taught in the synagogue, 
and in the temple, ''where the 
Jews are always ''coming to- 
gether ; and in secret I said 
nothino;. 



21 Why dost thou ask me? 
Ask those who have heard, what 
I said to them : behold, they 
know what things I said. 

22 Now when he 'said these 
'things, one of the officers, stand- 
ing by, ''gave Jesus a ''blow, say- 
ing, Dost thou answer the high 
priest so? 

23 Jesus answered him, If I 
spoke evil, 'testify of the evil ; 
but if well, why smitest thou 
me? 

24 (""Annas had sent him, hav- 
ing been bound, to Caiaphas, 
the-high priest.) 

25 And Simon Peter was stand- 
ing, and warming himself. They 
said to him, tlierefore. Art not 
THOU also of his disciples? He 
denied, and said, I am not. 

26 One of the servants of the 
high priest, (being [his] kinsman 
whose ear Peter cut off,) saith. 
Did not I see thee in the garden 
with him ? 



' See ch. 7 : 4, N. f. 

y The literal meaning of αννερχεα&αι is, to come together. 
Certainly no departure from this is necessary here. — The 
change of the verb is sufficient reason for the change of whither 
to where. 

' See ch. 1 : 15, N. g. 

* See ch. 9 : 6, N. e. 

' This is perfectly literal, while the E. V. is not only peri- 



phrastic, but, perhaps, a little more definite, as to the manner of 
the blow, than the Orig. — AVesl., Sharpe, R.. Dubois, Kenr. 

' See ch. 1 : 7, N. k. 

'' There is nothing in the te.xt from which this revision is 
made corresponding to the 7iow of the E. V. The Text. Rec, 
Lachm., and Hahn, supply ovv. Others supply 8c, or xat. 
Perhaps, in the great uncertainty that exists, it would be wise 
to leave the E. V. unchanged. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XVIH. 



119 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

27 Peter then denied again : 
and immediately the cociv crew. 

28 Then led they Jesus from 
Caiaphas unto the hall of judg- 
ment : and it was early ; and they 
themselves \vent not into the 
judgment-hall, lest they should 
be defiled ; but that they might 
eat the passover. 

29 Pilate then went out unto 
them, and said, Wiiat accusation 
bring ye against this man ? 



30 They answered and said 
unto him. If he were not a mal- 
efactor, we would not have de- 
livered him up unto thee. 

3 1 Then said Pilate unto them. 
Take ye him, and judge him ac- 
cording to your law. The Jews 
therefore said unto him. It is not 
lawful for us to put any man to 
death : 

32 Thai the saying of Jesus 
might be fulfilled, which he 
spake, signifying what death he 
should die. 

33 Tlien Pilate entered into 
the judgment-hall again, and 
called Jesus, and said unto him. 
Art thou the King of the Jews ? 



34 Jesus answered him, Say- 
est thou this thing of tliyself, or 
did others tell it thee of me ? 

35 Pilate answered, Am I a 
Jew? Thine own nation, and the 
chief priests, have delivered thee 
unto me. What hast thou done? 

36 Jesus answered, My king- 



GREEK TEXT. 



27 Παλίν ούν ηρνησατο b Πί- 
τροί, καΙ (ύθίωί άλΐκτωρ ίφω- 

28 "ΑΓΟΥΣΙΝ oL• τον Ίη- 
σουν άτΓΟ του Καϊάφα €ί? το 
ττραιτωρίον. ην he ττρωϊα• καΐ 
αυτοί ουκ βίσηλθον eli το ττραι- 
τωριον, ίνα μη μιανθώσιν, άλλ' 
\να φαγωσι το πασ-χα. 

29 €ςηλθίν ούν ό ΙΙιλατοί 
Trpos αύτουί, και dire, Τίνα κα- 
τηγοριαν φβρβτί κατά του άνθρω• 
ΤΓου τούτου ; 

30 ΑτΓβκριθησαν και βίττον 
αύτω, ΈΙ μη ην ούτο9 κακοποιός, 
ουκ αν σοι ΤΓαρβ8ωκαμ€ν αυτόν. 

31 Elnev ούν αύτοΐί ό Πιλά- 
τος, ΛαβζΤ€ αύτον ύμΐΐς, κα\ 
κατά τον νομον υμών κρίνατε 

αυτόν. ΈΙτΓον ούν αυτω οι Ιου- 

t 

δαΐοι, Ήμΐν ουκ βζΐστιν άποκτίΐ- 
ναι ουδίνα• 

32 Ίνα ο λόγος του Ιησοΰ 
ττληρωθη, Όν ΐίττΐ σημαίνων ττοίω 
θανατω ήμβλλίν αττοθνησκίΐν. 

33 Εισήλθαν ούν et? το ττραι- 
τώριον τταλιν ο Πιλάτος, καΊ 
ϊφωνησβ τον Ιησοΰν, καΐ elirev 
αυτώ, Συ e'l ο βασιλεύς των Ιου- 
δαίων ; 

34 ΛτΓ€κρίθη αύτω ό Ιησούς, 
Αφ ΐαυτοΰ συ τοΰτο λίγβις, η 
άλλοι σοι βιπον τηρι (μου ; 

35 Άττΐκρίθη Ό Πιλάτος, Μητι 
ΐγω Ιουδαίος €ΐμι ; το ϊθνυς το 
σον και οι αρχ^ιβρΐΐς τταρβδωκαν 
σε ϊμοί• τί ίποίησας ; 

36 Αττίκρίθη 6 Ιησούς, Π 



REVISED VERSION. 

27 Again, therefore, Peter de- 
nied, and immediately the cock 
crew. 

28 They lead Jesus, tlierefore, 
from Caiaphas into the "palace. 
And it was early ; and they 
themselves went not into the 
'palace, 'so that they might "^not 
be defiled; but that they might 
eat the Passover. 

29 Pilate, therefore, went out 
to them, and said. What ac- 
cusation do ye bring against this 
man? 

30 They answered, and said 
to him. If he were not an "evil- 
doer, we would not have de- 
livered him up to thee. 

31 Pilate, therefore, said to 
them. Take ye him, and judge 
him, according to your law. The 
Jews, therefore, said to him, It 
is not lawful for us to ''kill any 
one : 

32 That the saying of Jesus 
might be fulfilled, which he 
spoke, signifying 'by what death 
he Jwas about to die. 

33 Pilate, therefore, entered 
into tlie '^jialace again, and called 
Jesus, and said to him, Art thou 
the King of the Jews ? 



34 Jesus answered him. Dost 
THOU say this ''from thyself, or 
did others tell thee of me ? 

35 Pilate answered, Am I a 
Jew ? Thine own nation, and 
the chief priests, delivered thee 
to me : what didst thou do ? 

36 Jesus answered, My king- 



• E. V. mar., (Pilate's house). — See Rob. Lex. art. ΙΤραιτω- 
ριον. — R.. Weal. 

' See ch. 1 : 7, N. k, and ch. 3 : 20, N. k. 

^ I prefer evil-doer to malefactor, because it is pure En- 
glish, and better understood. — T., C, G. 



1• See N. c, ch. 5 : 16. 
' See ch. 12 : 33, N. k. 
) See N. e, ch. 4 : 47. 
" See ch. 7 : 17, N. a. 



120 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIX. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

dom is not of this world : if my 
kingdom were of this world, 
then would my servants fight, 
that I should not be delivered to 
the Jews : but now is my king- 
dom not from hence. 



37 Pilate therefore said unto 
him, Art thou a king then? 
Jesus answered, Thou sayest 
that I am a king. To this end 
was I born, and for this cause 
came I into the world, that I 
should bear witness unto the 
truth. Every one that is of the 
truth, heareth my voice. 



38 Pilate saith unto him, What 
is truth ? And when he had said 
this, he went out again unto the 
Jews, and saith unto them, I 
find in him no fault at all. 

39 But ye have a custom that 
I should release unto you one at 
the passover : will ye therefore, 
that I release unto you the King 
of the Jews ? 

40 Then cried they all again, 
saying. Not this man, but Barab- 
bas. Now Barabbas was a robber. 



CHAP. XIX. 

Then Pilate therefore took 
Jesus, and scourged him. 



GREEK TEXT. 



βασίλεια η βμη ουκ ίστιν €κ του 
κόσμου τούτον el Ικ του κόσμου 
τούτου ην η βασίλεια ή (μη, οι 
υττηρβταί αν ο\ (μοί ηγωνίζοντο, 
ίνα μη τταραδοθώ τοΓ? Ίουδαίοίί• 
νυν δί η βασιλεία η εμη ουκ εστίν 
εντεύθεν. 

37 Έιττεν ούν αύτω ό Πιλά- 
τος, Ούκοΰν βασιλεύς εΐ σύ ; 

Αττεκριθη 6 Ιησούς, Συ λέγεις 
ΟΤΙ βασιλεύς εΙμι εγω. εγω εΙς 
τούτο γεγεννημαι, κα\ εΙς τούτο 
εληλυθα εΙς τον κοσμον. Ίνα μαρ- 
τυρήσω Trj αλήθεια. ττάς 6 ων 
εκ της αλήθειας, ακούει μου της 
φωνής. 

38 Αεγει αύτω ό Πιλάτος, Τι 
εστίν αλήθεια; Και τούτο ειττων, 
τταλιν εςήλθε ττρος τους 'Ιου- 
δαίους, καΐ λέγει αϋτοΐς, 'Έγω 
ουδεμίαν αΐτιαν ευρίσκω εν αύτω. 

39 εστί δε συνήθεια ύμΐν, 
Ίνα ενα υμΐν άττολυσω εν τω 
ττασχα• βουλεσθε ούν ύμΐν απο- 
λύσω τον βασιλέα των 'Ιου- 
δαίων ; 

40 Έκραυγασαν ούν τταλιν 
τταντες, λέγοντες. Μη τούτον, 
άλλα τον Βαραββάν ην δε ό 
Βαραββάς λτ^στης. 

CHAP. XIX. 

Τότε ούν ελαβεν ό Πιλάτος 
τον Ιησούν, καΐ εμαστίγοίσε. 



REVISED VERSION. 

dom is not of this world : if my 
kingdom were of this world, my 
Officers would fight, so that I 
might not be delivered to the 
Jews : but now is my kingdom 
not from hence. 



37 Pilate, therefore, said to 
him. Art thou "not a king, then? 
Jesus answered. Thou sayest 
that I am a king. "For this 
have I been born, and "for this 
am I come into the world, that 
I may "testify to the truth. 
Every one that is of the truth, 
heareth my voice. 



38 Pilate saith to him. What 
is truth ? And, ^saying this, he 
went out again to the Jews, and 
saith to them, I find no fault in 
him. 

39 But ye have a custom that 
I release to you one 'during 
the Passover. Do ye, therefore, 
■■wish that I release to you the 
king of the Jews? 

40 Again, therefore, they all 
cried, saying, Not "him, but 
Barabbas. Now Barabbas was 
a robber. 



CHAP. XIX. 



Then Pilate, therefore, took, 
'and scourged Jesus. 



' E. V. generally. — As it is certain that Jesus nowhere else 
applies this term to his disciples, it is probable that this is his 
meaning here, " If my kingdom were of this world, then would 
I, like other kings of this world, have officers under me, who 
would zealously fight in defense of my rights," &c. 

"■ Ovy.ovv = nonne ergo. — This form of question anticipates 
an affirmative answer. (Rob.) — See Kuhn., ^ 325, Rem. 7. 

" For this [purpose] is the literal rendering- of eis τοντο. — 
Newc. (For this cau^e.) 

' See oh. 1 : 7, N. k. 



' See V. 1, N. a, above. 

1 The Passover was a festival of several days' duration, and, 
it would seem, the custom alluded to permitted the release to 
take place at any time during the feast. For this reason I 
prefer during, to at, for the translation of εν. — See eh. 2 ; 23. 

N. q. 

' See ch. 1 : 43, N. y. 

■ See Gen. Obs. 3, and ch. 1 : 2, N. c 

* See ch. 5 : 21, N. h. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIX. 



121 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

2 And the soldiers platted a 
crown of thorns, and put it on 
his head, and they put on liini a 
jiurple robe. 

3 And said, Hail, King of the 
Jews ! and they smote him with 
their hands. 

4 Pilate therefore went forth 
again, and saith nnto them. Be- 
hold, I bring him forth to yon, 
that ye may know that I iind 
no fault in him. 



5 Then came Jesus forth, 
wearing the crown of thorns, 
and the purple robe. And Fi- 
late saith unto them, Behold the 
man ! 

ϋ AVheu the chief priests there- 
fore and officers saw him, they 
ci-ied out, saying, Crucify liim, 
crucify him. Pilate saith unto 
them, Take ye him, and crucify 
him: for I find no fault in him. 



7 The Jews answered him, We 
have a law, and by our law he 
ought to die, because he made 
himself the Son of God. 



8 When Pilate therefore heard 
that saying, he was the more 
afraid ; 



GREEK TEXT. 



2 KCiL OL στρατιώται πΧίζαντίί 
στίφαΐΌν (ζ άκαιιθώι^, ^ττίθηκαν 
αύτοΰ τί] κίφαλΓ), καΐ ιματίου 
τΓορφυροΰΐ' ττβραβαλον αυτόν, 

ο και ίλζ-γον, Xalpe, ο βασι- 
λίυί των 'Ιουδαίων καΐ ίδίδουΐ' 
αΰτω ραττίσματα. 

4 'Έζηλθΐΐι ούν πάλιν ί'ζω ό 
ΙΤιλατοΫ, καΐ Aeyet αϋτοίς, ' I8e 
άγω ύμΐν αύτον ΐ'ζω, 'ίνα γνώτΐ 
Ότι (.ν αυτω ουδίμιαν αΐτιαν ΐυ• 
ρισκω. 

5 'Έζηλθΐν ούν ό'Ιησονί ΐ'ζω, 
φορών τον άκανθινον στίφανον, 
καΐ το ΤΓορφυροΰν Ίματίον και 
Aeyei αυτοίς, Ιδβ ο άνθρωττος. 

6 Οτ€ ούν (Ιδον αυτόν οί 
ap^LepeiY καΐ οΐ ύπηρ^ται, (κ- 
ραύγασαν λ(γοντ€ΐ, Σταύρωσαν, 
σταύρωσαν. Λβγβί αυτοΐς• ό ΙΙι- 
λατοί, Λαββτί αυτόν υμΐΐς καΙ 
σταυρώσατε• €γω γαρ οϋχ^ ευ- 
ρίσκω Ιν αυτω αΐτίαν. 

7 Αττβκρίθησαν αυτω οΐ 'Ιου- 
δαίοι, Ημεΐί νομον ί'χ^ομεν, κα\ 
κατά τον νομον ημών οφείλει 
άτΓοθανειν, Ότι εαυτόν υ'ιον του 
θεοΰ εποίησεν. 

8 Οτε ούν ηκουσεν ό ΙΤιλα- 
τθ9 τούτον τον λογον, μάλλον 
εφοβηθη, 



REVISED VERSION. 

2 And the soldiers, platting a 
crown of thorns, put [it] on his 
head ; and they put on him a 
pui'ple robe, 

3 "And said. Hail, King of 
the Jews ! And they ''were 
ffivins: him ^blows. 

4 Pilate, therefore, went 'out 
again, and saith to them. Be- 
hold, I bring him 'out to you, 
that ye may know that I find no 
fault in him. 

5 Jesus, therefore, came 'out, 
wearing the crown of thorns, 
and the purple robe. And he 
saith to them. Behold, the man! 

G When, therefore, the chief 
priests and the officers saw him. 
They cried out, saying, Crucify, 
crucify ! •' Pilate saith to them, 
Take YE, "and crucify him : for 
I find no fault in him. 



7 The Jews answered him. 
We have a law, and, 'according 
to "Our law, he ought to die, 
because he made himself the Son 
of God. 



8 ΛVhen, therefore, Pilate 
heard 'this saying, he was the 
more afraid, 



»" Lachm. and Tisch. add, at the beginning of tliis verse, the 
words. Km r,Q/ovTo ^qoi αντον, on what may, I think, be con- 
sidered good and .sufficient authority. ( B, Steph., γ. η. &.. 
Med. Barb. 2. Wheel. 1. Colb. 1. 8. 9. Mont., in marg., Vulg. 
Copt., Arab., Aethiop., Augustinus. Cyr., Nonnus, Pari.s. 8. Lips., 
Syra Hieros.) (Mill. Meyer, and Birch.) I would, there- 
fore, recommend that the.se words be inserted at the begin- 
ning of this verse, And they kept coming to him, &c. ; with 
this note in the margin : Many copies omit, And they kept 
coining to him. 

" See ch. 18 : 22, N. b. 

« See ch. 1 : 43, N. z. 

* Griesb., Scholz, and Lachm., add αυτόν, which is most 



likely the true reading. I would, therefore, add him, after the 
second crucify. 

' E. V. generally. — By does not express the sense so un- 
equivocally as according to. — R., Nary, Kem•., ]\iurd. — 
Lachm. and Tisch., with two ancient MSS. (BD), and several 
Verss., including the Vulg., reject ήμιον. There is however, 
hardl}• good enough authority for thi.s reading. 

f See ch. 4 : 18, N. q. — MSS. ABL, hsiye των λόγων τουτωμ, 
for τούτον τον λογον, in v. 13 ; a reading adopted by Lachm., 
Tisch., and Alf.. favored by Griesb., and approved by Meyer. 
Camp., and others. I believe there is scarcely any good au- 
thority for the reading of the Text. Rec. I would, therefore, 
recommend that these words be substituted for this saying 
in V. 13. 



122 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIX. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

9 And went again into the 
judgment-hall, and saith unto 
Jesus. Wlience art thou? But 
Jesus gave hiai no answer. 

10 Then saith Pilate unto him, 
Speakest thou not unto me? 
knowest thou not, that I have 
power to crucify thee, and have 
power to release thee ? 

11 Jesus answered. Thou 
couldest have no power at all 
against me, except it were given 
thee from above : therefore he 
that delivered me unto thee hath 
the greater sin. 

12 And from thenceforth Pi- 
late sought to release him : but 
the Jews cried out, saying. If 
thou let this man go, thou art 
not Cesar's friend. Whosoever 
maketh himself a king, speaketh 
against Cesar. 



13 When Pilate therefore heard 
that saying, he brought Jesus 
forth, and sat down in the judg- 
ment-seat, in a place that is 
called the Pavement, but in the 
Hebrew, Gabbatha. 

1 4 And it was the preparation 
of the passover, and about the 
sixth hour : and he saith unto the 
Jews, Behold your King ! 

15 But they cried out. Away 
with him, away with 1dm, crucify 
him. Pilate saith unto them. 



GREEK TEXT. 

9 Kcu ίίσηλθβν us TO ττραίτω- 
piov iraXiv, και Xeyet τω Ιησοΰ, 
HoOiv ei σΰ ; ' Se Ίησοΰί άττο- 
κρισίν ουκ. ίδωκΐν αύτω• 

10 Aeyei ούν αύτω ό ΙΙιλατοί, 
'ΈμοΙ ού λαλβΐί ; ουκ ο'ώας οτι 
εζονσίαν ε'χω σταυρώσαί ae, kcu 
ίζουσίαρ €χω άπολΰσαί σε ; 

11 Άπβκρίθη ό Ίησους, Ουκ 
ίΐχίί ΐζουσίαν ού8(μίαν κχτ Ιμού, 
el μη ην σοί δ€δομ€ΐ'οΐ' ανωθβν 
δια τοΰτο ο παραδίδουν μβ σοι 
μβ'ίζονα άμαρτίαν έχ(ί• 

12 Έκ τούτου ί(,ητ€ΐ 6 JIl- 
λατοί άτΓοΧΰσαι αυτόν. οι δβ 
'Ιουδαίοι ί'κραζον λ€γοντ€ΐ, Εαν 
τούτον άτΓολυσηί, ούκ ei φίλος 
τού Καίσαρος. ττάς ό fiaaiXea 
αύτον ΤΓΟίών, avTiXeyei τω Και- 
σαρι. 

13 Ό ουν Πιλάτος άκουσας 
τούτον τον λόγον, ηγαγ€ν ίζω 
τον Ίησοΰν, και eKaOiaev eiri τοΰ 
βήματος, eh τοττον λeγoμevov Λι- 
θόστρωτον, 'Έβρο.ϊστΙ δε Γαβ- 
βαθά- 

14 ην δ€ τταρασκευη τού να- 
σχα, ωρα δβ ώσεί Ικτη• κσΧ Aeyei 
τοΙς Ίουδαίοις, Ιδβ ό βασιλβυς 
υμών. 

1-5 01 δε Ικραυγασαν, Άρον, 
άρον, σταυρωσον αύτον. Aeyei 
αύτοϊς ό Πιλάτος, Τον βασιλβα 



REVISED VERSION. 

9 And went again into the 
^palace, and saith to Jesus, 
\Vhence art thou ? But Jesus 
gave him no answer. 

10 Pilate, therefore, saith to 
hinij Dost thou not speak to me ? 
Knowest thou not that I have 
power to crucify thee, and have 
power to release thee ? 

11 Jesus answered. Thou 
vvouldst have no power against 
ME, ^ιΐ it had ""not been given 
thee from above. Because of 
this, he who delivered me to 
thee hatli greater sin. 

12 From 'this [time] Pilate 
was seeking to release him : but 
the Jews kept crying out, say- 
ing. If tliou 'release "him, thou 
art not a friend of Cesar. 'Every 
one that maketh himself a king, 
speaketh against Cesar. 



13 Pilate, therefore, on hear- 
ing ''this saying, brought Jesus 
'out, (""and sat down upon the 
judgment seat,) "'into a place 
called The Pavement (but, in 
Hebrew, Gabbatha). 

14 And it was the Prepara- 
tion of the Passover, and about 
the sixth hour : and he saith to 
the Jews, Behold your King ! 

15 But thej^ cried out. Away, 
"away, » crucify him ! Pilate 
saith to them. Shall I crucify 



' See ch. 18 : 28, N. e. 

" See cb. 3 : 3, N. g. 

' E. y. ch. G : 66, (from, that time); also Pcnn ; Murd. 
(for this reason) ■,ShaT'pe(f7-om this). — Dodd. — See ch. 4 : 18, 
N. q. 

J E. v., generally, in this connection. See Matt. 27 : 15, 
17, 21, 26. Mark 15 : 6, 9, 11, 15. Luke 23 : 16, 17, 18, 20, 
25. Also, the immediate context, and ch. 18 : 39. 

k See ch. 1 : 2, N. c. 

1 See ch. 3 : 15, N. b. 

" This CIS, like that in ch. 9 : 7, (see N. h, in that place.) 



depends, I think, not on the nearer (ey.a&iaev), but on the 
more remote Terb (ηynycv). I have, therefore, enclosed the 
intervening matter in a parenthesis, conceiving it to be really 
parenthetical. Should the proposed version, however, seem 
too harsh, I would recommend a transposition, so that it 
might read thus: "brought Jesus out into a place called 
The Pavement, (but, in Hebrew, Gabbatha,) and sat down 
upon the judgment-seat." 

" As there is no object after ηρον, I prefer to understand it 
as a mere exclamation, (like iSf, αγε, i-c.,) equivalent to the 
English, oicaz/.'—Newc. {destroy kirn) ; Sharpe (take him) ; 
others, generally, as E. V. Wesl. italicises with him. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIX. 



123 



KINU JAMES VERSION. 

ShiiU I crucify yoiii• King? The 
chief priests answered, "We have 
no king but Cesar. 

16 Then delivered he him 
therefore unto them to be cruci- 
fied. And they took Jesus, and 
led him away. 

17 And he bearing his cross 
went fortli into a pUice called the 
place of a skull, which is called 
in the Hebrew, Golgotha : 

18 AVhere they crucified him, 
and twoothers with him, on either 
side one, and Jesus in the midst. 



19 And Pilate wrote a title, 
and put ;'/ on the cross. And 
the writing was, JESUS OF 
NAZARETH, THE KING OF 
THE JEWS. 

20 This title then read many 
of the Jews : for tlie phice 
where Jesus was crucified was 
nigh to the city : and it was 
written in Hebrew, a>id Greek, 
and Latin. 



21 Then said the chief priests 
of the Jews to Pilate, Write not. 
The King of the Jews; but that 
he said, I am King of the Jews. 



22 Pilate answered. What I 
have written, I have written. 

23 Then the soldiers, when 



GREEK TEXT. 



υμών σταυρώσω ; Αττβκριθησαν 
OL ap^j.epeh, Ουκ. e^o^u.et' βασι- 
λεα ei μη Καίσαρα. 

16 Tore ούν τταρΐδωκίν αυτόν 
αΰτοϊί, ίνα σταυρωθτ). UapeXa- 
βον Se τον Ίησοΰν καΐ άττη- 
γαγον 

17 και βαστάζων τον σταυρόν 
αΰτοΰ, ί^ηΧθβν els τον λβγομβ- 
νον Κρανίου τοττον, os λίγβται 
'ΈβραϊστΙ Γολγοθά• 

18 ότΓου αυτόν (σταύρωσαν, 
καΙ μ€τ αυτού αλλουί δυο (ντβΰ- 
θΐν καΐ (ντβυθίν, μ€σον Se τον 
Ιησοΰν. 

19 Έγραψβ δβ και τιτΧον ο 
Πιλάτος, καΐ ϊθηκίν eVt του 
σταυρού• ην δε γ^γραμμβνον, Ίη- 
σούί ό ΝαζωραΙοί ο βασιλεύς των 
'Ιουδαίων. 

20 Τούτον ούν τον τιτλον πολ- 
λοί ανέγνωσαν των Ιουδαίων, 
Ότι €γγυί ην της ττολεω? ο τοττος, 
οΊΓου ϊσταυρωθη ο Ιησούς• και 
ην γεγραμμίνον Έβρα'ίστι, Ελ- 
ληνιστή, Ρωμάίστι. 

21 ελεγον ούν τώ Πιλατω οι 
άρχκρβΐς των Ιουδαίων, Μη 
γ ράφι, Ο βασιλεύς των Ιου- 
δαίων άλλ' ΟΤΙ εκείνος είττε. Βα- 
σιλεύς ε'ιμι των Ιουδαίων. 

22 Άττεκρίθη ό Πιλάτος, Ο 
γεγραφα, γεγραφα. 

23 Οι ούν στρατιώται, οτε 



REVISED VERSION. 

γοητ King? The chief priests 
answered, We have no king, 
except Cesar. 

16 Then, therefore, he de- 
livered him to them, pthat he 
might be crucified. And they 
took Jesus, ppand led [him] 
away. 

17 And, bearing his cross, he 
went 'out into "iwhat is called, 
the Place of a Scull, which 
'means, in Hebrew, Golgotha ; 

18 Where they crucified him, 
and two others with him, "one 
on «each side, and Jesus in the 
midst. 

19 And Pilate also wrote a 
Title, and put [it] upon the 
cross : and >it had been written, 
JESUS, "THE "NAZARENE, 
THE KING OF THE JEWS. 

20 This Title, therefore, many 
of tlie Jews read, -because the 
place where Jesus was crucified 
was "near the city, and it had 
been written, in Hebrew, in 
Greek, in Latin. 

21 The chief priests of the 
Jews, therefore, said to Pilate, 
Do not write. The King of the 
Jews, but, That he said, I am 
King of the Jews. 

22 Pilate answered. What I 
have written, I have written. 

23 The soldiers, therefore, 



V See eh. 1 : 7, N. k. 

pp Lachm. and Tiscli., with MSS. BLX. and several ancient 
Yerss., omit xat απ^γαγον. Still, there is scarcely sufficient 
authority for rejecting these words. I would, however, recom- 
mend that this note appear in the margin : Some copies omit. 
and led [him] airai/. 

1 I have adoptei! this form of expression, in order to avoid tlie 
repetition of the word place. 

' See eh. 1 : 38, N. 1. 



" Eacli is undoubtedly to be preferred to cither, which is obso- 
lete in this sense. 'I'hc change of collocation, too, is required by 
the present usages of our language. 

' It is needless to say that this rendering is entirely literal, 
which the E. Ύ. is far from being. 

" See ch. 18 : δ, Ν. k. 

' See ch. 1 : 15, N. i. 

" See ch. 2 : 13, N. o. 



124 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIX. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

they had crucified Jesus, took 
his garments, and made four 
parts, to every soldier a part ; 
and also his coat : now the coat 
was without seam, woven from 
the top throughout. 

24 They said therefore among 
themselves. Let us not rend it, 
but cast lots for it whose it shall 
be : that the scripture might be 
fulfilled, which saith, They part- 
ed my raiment among them, and 
for my vesture they did cast lots. 
These things therefore the sol- 
diers did. 

25 Now there stood by the 
cross of Jesus, his mother, and 
his mother's sister, Mary the 
wife of Cleophas, and Mary 
Magdalene. 



GREEK TEXT. 

Ισταυρωσαν τον Ιησοΰν, ίλαβον 
τα Ιμάτια αυτυν, και ίποιησαν 
τέσσαρα μέρη, ίκαστω στρατιωτγι 
μ(ροί, καΐ τον χ^ιτώνα. ην δβ 6 
χ^ίτων άρραψοί, €κ των άνωθβν 
υφαντός δι όλον, 

24 eiTTOv ούν ττροί αλλήλους, 
Μη σ^ίσωμβν αΰτον, άλλα λα- 
■χωμ€ν wepl αυτήν, τίνος βσται• 
Ινα η γραφή ττλι^ρωθβ ή λβγουσα, 
Δΐίμίρίσαντο τα ιμάτια μου eav- 
τοΐς, καΐ 67rt τον ϊματισμον μου 
ίβαλον κληρον. Οι μ€ν ούν 
στρατιώται ταΰτα ΐττοιησαν 

25 β'ιστηκΕΐσαν δβ τταρα τω 
στανρω του Ίησοΰ η μητηρ αυ- 
τού, καΐ η άδΐλφη της μητρός 
αύτοΰ, Μαρία ή του Κλωττά, και 
Μαρία ή Μαγδαληνή. 



REVISED VERSION. 

when they crucified Jesus, took 
his garments, and made four 
parts, to 'each soldier a part ; 
also the coat. Now the coat 
was without seam, woven from 
the top throughout. 

24 They said, therefore, one 
to another, Let us not "tear it, 
but cast lots for it, whose it shall 
be : that the Scripture might 
be fulfilled, which saith, The^ 
xnlivided my ygai-ments among 
"themselves, and 'upon my 
"raiment they cast a lot. The 
soldiers, therefore, did these 
thinats. 

25 Now there were standing 
by the cross of Jesus, his mother, 
and his mother's sister, Mary, 
the ["wife] of Clopas, and Mary 
Magdalene. 



' Nary, Penn, Sharpe, Murd. — Every is a little too dis- 
tributive, in this comiection. — For tear, see ch. 21 : 11, X. z. 

^' To part is not so accurate and unambiguous at the 
present day as to divide. — Newc., Penn, Murd. 

' E. v., ch. 13 : 4, 12 ; v. 23, above, and often elsewhere. — 
R., Newc, Wesl., Nary, Penn, Kenr., Murd., Sharpe. 

^y See ch. 5 : 42, N. b. 

• The Orig. is ετιι, not περί, as in the preceding clau.se. — 
E. v., generally.— R., Nary, Murd., Fr. S.,-G., Treni., Beza, 
Lus., Dt., Germ., De W., and others.— W., T., G., Kenr., (on) ; 
Vulg., Erasm,, (in). 

" This wordseeras to be general in its .signification, although 
the χιτων only was the subject of the casting of lots, which 
was the burden of this part of the prophecy ; and T., C, and 
G., have accordingly, coat, for the translation of this word. 
We should bear in mind, however, that a prophecy is often 
couched in general terms, while the fulfillment of the pre- 
diction is quite specific and restricted. — I prefer raiment to 
vesture, because the former is in common use at the present 
da}', while the latter is not. — Rob. 

' The phra.se, Μαρία ri του Κλωπα, is evidently elliptical, 
and conve3's an idea of some relationship, either of blood, or 
affinity, existing between the persons named. But, as to the 
precise nature of this relationship, nothing definite can. as far 
as I can discover, be inferred from the phrase itself, in itself 
considered. Mary and Clopas were of opposite sexes ; hence 
it is plain, that, in the absence of all evidence touching the 
matter, she may have been either his mothei , {μι-τηρ,) his 
U)i/e, {γ\•ι•ι;,) his Si'.sier, (αδελγι;,) or his daughter, (&νγατηρ.) 



It is equally plain that Mary could have sustained only one of 
these several relations to Clopas. But which one? To all 
such questions there are three legitimate sources of solution : — 
1. Analogy. — 2. The immediate context. — 3. Passages found 
elsewhere, that are ecidently parallel. — The proof from ana- 
logy, though, under certain circumstances, it may be satis- 
factory, is seldom, if ever, aVjsolutely certain ; while that from 
the immediate context, and from passages evidently paralkl, if 
it exist at all, will generally amount to demonstration. An- 
other source of proof too often resorted to by critics, in the 
exarainaticn of this, and kindred questions, is conjecture ; but. 
however curiosity may be gratified by proofs drawn from such 
a source, perhaps nothing could be less entitled to our serious 
regard. As to the first source of proof above mentioned, I 
can not discover that any definite information can, in tliis in- 
stance, he derived from analogy. This will appear from the 
following facts : In the expression, lovSav Ιαχιοβον, Luke 
6 : 16, the evidently parallel passage, .Judas, 1, would authorize 
the supply of α^ελψον. In the phrase, Εμμορ τον Σνχεμ, 
Acts 7 : 16, we are, according to the parallel passage in the 
Septuagint, to supply πητροι. In the phrase, Μενελεων τον 
τι;ά Ληχεδαιμοηηί yvvaiy.oi, Chariton, p. 44, (Bos.) historj' 
authorizes the supply of αι•8ρα. In the expression, Maoia 
Ιακωβον, Luke 24 : 10, the evidently parallel passages, Matt. 
27 : 56, and Mark 15 : 40, authorize tlie supply of μητηρ. In 
the phrase, t;;s tov Ονριον, Matt. 1 : 6, history authorizes 
the supply of γυναικάς. In the phrase, Ιακωβον τον τον 
Ζεβιδηιον, {οι του Ζεβεδαιου,) the facts of history, Mark 
10 : 35, authorize the supply of υΐον, (υίοι.) In the phrase. 
Ifiycreiav την Αγαμεμιονοί, Herodotus, L. IV. C. 103, (Bos,) 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIX. 



125 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

26 When Jesus therefore saw 
liis mother, and the disciple 
standing by wliom he loved, he 
saith unto his mother, Woman, 
behold thy son ! 



GREEK TEXT. 

2G Ιησονί ούν 18ων την μη- 
τίρα, καΙ τον μαθητην τταρ^στώτα 
CP ηγάττα, Aeyei ttj μητρί αύτοΰ, 
Γύναι, Ιδον ό υίο? σου. 



REVISED VERSION. 

26 Jesus, therefore, seeing 
his mother, and the disciple 
standing by, whom he loved, 
saith to his motiier, AVoman, 
behold thy son ! 



history authorizes the supply of &νγατερα. And since the 
supply of αδελγο; is a thing considered beyond dispute, that 
of αΒίΙψη, which is found in classical authors, according to 
Fischer, as quoted by the editor of Bos, Ellips. Gnec, could 
hardly be objected to. It is, therefore plain that, as far as 
analogy goes, nothing definite can be known, as to the nature 
of this relationship. This JMary vtarj have been, as we have 
learned already from the nature of the case, either the wife, 
mother, sister, or daughter, of Clopas, As to the second 
source of proof mentioned, the immediate C07ite.Tt, it is very 
plain, that no light is by it thrown upon this question, since 
this is the only allusion, by tliis Evangelist, to cither of these 
persons. As to the third, and only remaining source of proof 
that from passages evidently parallel, (in which I would in- 
clude all historical references to persons Avhose identity with 
these, or either of them, is beyond reasonable doubt.) I have 
not been able to obtain a satisfictory solution therefrom. 
There are. I believe, but two passages that are properly 
parallel with this : Matt. 27 : 55, 5G, " Now there were many 
women there, beholding from afar, who ioUowed Jesus from 
Galilee, ministering to him ; among whom was Mary Magda- 
lene, and Mary the mother of James and Joses, and the 
mother of the sons of Zebedee." Mark 15 : 40, "' Now there 
were also women beholding from afar, among whom was both 
Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James the Little 
and .Joses, and Salome." I have cited these as parallel pas- 
sages, though in them the women are represented as "' behold- 
ing from afar," while John represents those of whom he 
speaks as " standing by the cross of Jesus." This apparent 
discrepancy is easily removed by supposing, (which is very 
natural,) that the writers refer to different times, during the 
jirogress of the crucifixion, which lasted some hours. It is 
generally assumed, that Mary the mother of James the Little 
and Joses, and Mary the [wife] of Clopas, were the same per- 
son ; but of this there is not, so far as I can see. the slightest 
evidencd. — 1. The phrase, /) του Ιηκωβον y.ai Ιωαη, was added 
to the name Mania, (which apperas to have been very com- 
mon in that day.) for the purpose of disting\ii.shing this Marv 
from all others. The same may be presumed to be true of 
the other descriptive phrase, // τον Κλωπα. If, then, .John 
had wished to designate Mary the mother of James and Joses, 
the fair presumption is, that he wculd have described her as 
the other three Evangelists have done, and not by a new 
designation. This, I say, is the fair presumption, and it can 
not be set aside, unless by positive testimony to the contrary, 
which is certainly not found in these passages. During tlie 
earlier part of the crucifixion, Mary Magdalene, Mary the 
mother of James (the Little) and Joses, the mother of the 



sons of Zebedee, and Salome, (according to Matt, and Mark.) 
with many others, were standing " beholding from afar." At 
a later period, one of these, Mary Magdalene, together with 
three others, Mary, the wife of Joseph, and mother of our 
Lord, a sister of hers, whose name is not recorded, and this 
Mary who was a near relation of Clopas. were, (according to 
•John), " standing by the cross of Jesus." Perhaps his mother, 
his mother's sister, and this Mary, were among the '' many 
women," referred to by Matt., but not mentioned by name. 
At all events, I think no candid person can object to the view 
above given. One point, hinted at above, can not be too much 
insisted upon: That whore we find different names, or personal 
designations, we are liuund to assume tliat they are the names 
or designations of different individuals, unless we have positive 
evidence to the contrary. But it is said that Mary the mother 
of -James and Joses was a sister of Mary the wife of Josejih ; 
,and that this Mar\' related to Clopas was also her sister ; 
whence it is inferred that they were one and the same person. 
To this I reply, that it is nowhere said in the Scriptures that 
either of these women was a sister of Mary the mother of our 
Lord. To saj• that Ma^ia,\n the passage under consideration, 
is put by apposition with αδελφή, is to assume that of which 
there is not the shadow of proof. I admit that the text will 
bear this construction ; but he must be a mere tyro in philo- 
logy who does not know that it will also bear another equally 
well — that it is quite as likely that John is enumerating four 
different individuals, as three, grouping them together in 
pairs, as is often done by the sacred writers. (See Luke 
6 : 14-lG. Matt. 10 : 2-4.) That the latter construction is 
the true one, is rendered probable from the fact, that, in the 
other case, the collocation would be likely to be this, και Μ. 
η τον Κ. η αδελψη τη3 μητροε ηντον. That neither of these 
JIarvs was a sister of our Lord's mother, is pretty evident 
from the fact, that, for an obvious reason, it was never common 
for two sisters, (or brothers.) to bear the same name. As to 
Jlary the mother of James and Joses, there is not a single 
passage that will even bear such an interpretation as will show 
that she was a sister of our Lord's mother. But even sup- 
posing that these two Marys were one and the same person, 
where is the evidence that she was the wife of Clopas ? May 
she not have been his sister, or his mother, or his daughter? 
The proof offered on this point, presents one of the most re- 
markable specimens of logic ever exhibited. — 1. It is assumed, 
that James the son of Mary, James the [son] of Alpheus. and 
.James the Lord's brother, were all one and the same jierson ; 
whence it is inferred, that Mary was the wife of Alpheus, and 
sister of the Lord's mother, while James the Lord's brothei 
was no more, after all, than his cousin. The proof of this 



126 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIX. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

27 Tlien saith he to the disci- 
ple, Behold thy mother ! And 
irom that hour that disciple took 
her unto his. own home. 

2S After this, Jesus knowing 
that all things were now accom- 
plished, that the scripture might 
be fulfilled, saith, I thirst. 

29 Now there was set a vessel 
full of vinegar : and they filled 
a sponge with vinegar, and put 



GREEK TEXT. 



27 Είτα Aeyet τω μαθηττ), 
Ί8ου η μητηρ σου. Καΐ αττ 
βκΐίνηί τηί ώρας ίλαβΐΐ' αύτην ό 
μαθητηί elf τα Ίδια. 

28 MeTOL τοντο εϊδω? ό Ίη- 
σοΐί, OTL τταντα ήδη τβτβλίσται, 
'ίνα TeXiiaOrj ή γραφή, Xeyei, 
.άίψω. 

29 ΣκβνοΫ ονν €Κ€ίτο οζουί 
μ€στον οΐ δε, πλησαντα σττογ- 
γον οζονί, καΙ νσσωττω ττΐριθίν- 



REVXSED VERSION. 

27 'Afterward he saith to the 
disciple. Behold thy mother ! 
And from that hour ''the disciple 
took her to his own.' 

28 After this, Jesus, knowing 
that all things had now been 
'finished, that the Scripture 
might be fulfilled, saith, I thirst. 

29 There was, therefore, a 
vessel ^standing, full of vinegar : 
and they, filling a sponge with 



' See ch. 13:5, N. d. 

J See ch. 1 : 8, N. o. 

• See ch. 1 : 11, N. r.— E. V., ch. 1 : 11 ; 10 : 32. 



' E. v., V. 30, below, and often elsewhere. This is the 
primary meaning of the word ; and 1 would always so trans- 
late it, when used in this sense. 

^ See ch. 2 : 6, N. g. 



assumption may be said to hang entirely upon one item of 
evidence: Paul calls James the Lord's brother, an apostle. 
Gal. 1 : 19 ; but James the [son] of Alpheus was the only 
James, besides James the brother of John, and son of Zebe- 
dee, among the twelve apostles. This is supposed to prove at 
least the identity of James the Lord's brother, and James the 
[son] of Alpheus. 1 know of no means by which it is 
attempted to prove the identity of James the son of Mary 
with either of the others, unless by assuming that this Mary's 
two sons, James and Joses, were identical with the James 
and Joses, who. with Judas and Simon, are styled the brothers 
of the Lord. My reply to this whole assumption may be 
summed up in two points. — 1) James the Lord's brother is 
not said to have been one of the original Twelve ; and that he 
was not, is, at least, probable from the fact, that, in the earlier 
part of our Lord's ministry, even his brothers did not believe 
on him. (See ch. 7 : 5, N. d.) He may have been an apostle, 
notwithstanding, at the time that Paul referred to, three years 
after his own conversion. Neither Matthias, nor Paul himself, 
nor Barnabas, were of the original Twelve ; yet these were all 
apostles. — 2) There is no good evidence that αδελγοι ever 
means properlj' cousin. True, this fact has been tacitly ad- 
mitted, on the authority of Alf, in the note above cited, as 
there was then no particular occasion to call it in question. 
But those passages from the Septuagint which alone are relied 
upon to sustain this interpretation, are quite different, philo- 
iogically, from those in which mention is made of the Lord's 
brothers. (Matt. 13 : 55. Mark 6 : 3.) Besides, we have 
seen above, that there is no Scriptural evidence that this, or 
any other Mary wis a sister of the Lord's mother; conse- 
quently, there can be no evidence that her sons, James and 
Joses, were even cousins of our Lord. But. supposing that 
this Mary was the mother of James the [son] of Alpheus, it 
is not yet proved that she was the wife of Alpheus ; for, it 
will be observed, that the word son, in that connection, is sup- 



plied by the translators, and it is precisely as difficult to show 
that James was the son of Alpheus, as that Mary was the 
wife of Clopas. He may have been his father, or brother, for 
aught the Scriptures teach on the subject. Much less does it 
follow, from the above supposition, that Mary was the wfe of 
Clopas. — 2. It is assumed, that Clopas and Alpheus were 
one and the same person. This assumption is so destitute of 
all foundation, other th.an conjecture, that I should not men- 
tion it at all, had it not obtained the sanction of several 
respectable names. 

The following conclusions have been deliberately adopted, 
after a careful review of the evidences of Scripture on the 
points above treated : 

1. There are at least six Marys spoken of by the sacred 
writers: — 1) Mary the Lord's mother. — 2) INLary Slagdalene. 
—3) Mary the mother of .James and Jo.ses. — 4) Maiy the 
sister of Laz.arus and Martha. — 5) Mary related to Clopas. — 
6) Mary the mother of John Mark. (Acts 12: 12.)— The 
Mary mentioned by Paul, Rom. 16 : G, may have been one ot 
these, who had removed to Rome. 

2. There are at least four Jameses spoken of in the Scrip- 
tures : — 1) J.imes the son of Zcbcdee. — -2) .James the Little. 
— -3) .James related to Alpheus, — 4) .J,araes the Lord's brother, 
— The writer of the Epistle of .James was, probabl}', either 
one or the other of the last two named. 

3. It is impossible now to determine the precise relation 
between JIary and Clopas, between .James .and Alpheus, and 
between .Judas Iscariot and Simon ; and, perhaps, in a few 
other similar cases, the same difficulty may exist. 

While, then, I retain in the text the word wfe, (as I have 
.also retained the word son, in ch. G : 7 ; 12 : 4; 13 : 2, 26,) 
because I do not know what other word would convey the 
true sense better, I would, at the saaie time, suggest that, in 
order to preserve the ambiguity of the Orig.. it might bo better 
to write, " Clopas's Mary," " Simon's Judas Iscariot," &c. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XIX. 



127 



ΚΙΝΓ, JAMEs' VERSION. 

it upon hyssop, and put it to liis 
month. 

.30 "When Jesus therefore had 
received tlie vinegar, lie said. It is 
finished : and he bowed his head, 
and gave up the ghost. 

31 Tiie Jews tlierefore, because 
it Avas tlie preparation, that tlie 
bodies sliould not remain ujion 
the cross on the sal)batli-day, (lor 
that sabbath-day was an high 
day,) besought Pilate that tlicir 
legs might be broken, and that 
they might be taken away. 



32 Then came the soldiers, and 
brake the legs of the first, and of 
the other which was crucified 
with him. 

33 But when they came to Je- 
sus, and saw tliat he was dead 
already, thej• brake not his legs: 

34 But one of the soldiers with 
a sjiear pierced his side, and 
forthwith came thereout blood 
and water. 

35 And he that saw it. bare 
record, and his record is true : 
and he knoweth that he said true, 
that ye might believe. 

36 For these things were done, 
that the Scripture should be ful- 
filled, A bone of him shall not be 
broken. 

37 And again another scripture 



r.REEK TEXT. 

τ(γ, ττροσηί'ίγκαν αΰτοΰ τω στο• 
μάτι. 

30 oTe ovu ΐ'λαβΐ το οζοί ό 
'Ιησοΰί, etVe, ΤίΤΐλίσται- και 
κλίΐ'αί την κβφαληΐ', τταρίδωκί 
το ηνίΰμα. 

31 01 ονν ΊονΒαΐοι, 'ίνα μη 
μΐίνη €7Γί του σταυρού τα σώ- 
ματα ίν τω σαββατω, εττεί 
παρασκβυη ην ην γαρ μεγάλη 
η ήμΐρα €κβίνου του σαββατου• 
ηρωτησαν τον ΠιΧατον, Ίνα 
κατΐαγωσιν αυτών τα σκέλη, 
κα\ άρθώσιν. 

32 ηλθον ούν οϊ στρατίώται, 
και του μβν ττρωτου κατεαςαν τα 
σκ(λη και τοΰ άλλου του συ- 
στανρωθεντος αυτω. 

οο 67Γί θ€ τον Ιηαουν (λσον- 
τ€ί, ώί βίδον αυτόν ηδΐ] τεθνηκο- 
τα, οΰ κατεαςαν αύτου τα σκΐλη. 

34 άλλ ft? των στρατιωτών 
λόγχη αυτού την ττλευραν (νυςβ, 
και (ύθυί Ιςηλθίν αίμα και ύδωρ. 

35 /cat ό ζωρακωΐ μεμαρτυρη- 
κ€, καϊ αληθινή αυτού ϊστίν ή 
μαρτυρία, κάκίΐνοζ οΊδίν οτι αλη- 
θή λβγ(ΐ, ινα υμεΐς ττιστευσητε. 

oC ίγβνετο γαρ ταύτα, 'ίνα ή 
γραφή ττληρωθϊ], Οστοΰν ού 
συντριβησεται αυτού. 

37 Και τταλιν Ιτερα γραφή 



REVISED VERSION. 

vinegar, and putting [it] upon 
hyssop, ''brought [it] to his mouth. 

30 When, therefore, Jesus re- 
ceived the vinegar, he said. It 
liatii been finished ! And, bowing 
the head, he 'yielded up the 'spirit. 

31 The Jews, therefore, that 
the bodies might not ''remain upon 
the cross khiring the Saljbatli, 
""since it was the Pre])aration (for 
that Sabbath-day was a "great 
one), "asked of Pilate, that their 
legs might be broken, and they 
might be taken away. 



32 The soldiers, therefore, came, 
and did, fiudeed, break the legs 
of the first, and of the other wlio 
was crucified with him : 

33 But, on coming to Jesus, 
when tliey saw that he 'had al- 
ready 'died, they did not break 
his legs : 

34: But one of the soldiers with 
a spear pierced his side, and 'im- 
mediately there came out blood 
and water : 

35 And he who hath seen hath 
■testified, and his "testimony is 
true ; and he knoweth that he is 
saying true 'things, so that ye 
may believe. 

36 For these things were done, 
that the Scripture might be ful- 
filled, A bone of him shall not be 
broken. 

37 And again another Scrip- 



^ I use this word, not only because it is more literal thiin put, 
but in order to avoid the repetition of the latter word, and the 
consequent confusion, to the mind of the Eng. reader. 

' Perhaps no apology is needed for this change. I have en- 
deavored to select, from a variety of forms of expression, that 
which would be, at the same time, elegant, and as literal as possi- 
ble. — Newc, Penn, Murd. 

1 See cb. 7 : 39, N. h.— Penn [breath). 

k See ch. 1 : 33, N. z. 

I See ch. 2 : 23, N. q. 

» See ch. 13 : 29, N. e. 



■■ This is the literal meaning of the adjective. — Λν., Κ., Newc, 
Wesl, Nary, Penn, Kenr., Murd. — Most of the translators, who 
aim to be literal, repeat the word day, as Murd. ; but I see no 
necessity for this. 

» See ch. 4 : 31, N. d. 

ρ See ch. 16 : 9, N. m. 

1 See ch. 12 : 1, N. a. 

' See ch. 13 : 32, N. i. 

• See ch. 1 : 7, N. j. 

• Saith true is not, at the present day, good English. True 
things is according to prevailing usage in similar ca.ses. 



128 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XX. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

saith, Tliey shall look on liim 
whom they pierced. 

38 And after this, Joseph of 
Ariinathea (bcino• a disciple of 
Jesus, but secretly for fear of the 
Jews) besought Pilate that he 
might take away the body of Je- 
sus : and Pilate gave /w'm leave. 
He came therefore and took the 
body of Jesus. 



39 And tliere came also Nico- 
demus (which at the first came to 
Jesus by night) and brought a 
mixture of myrrh and aloes, about 
an hundred pounds weight. 

40 Then took they the body 
of Jesus, and Avound it in linen 
clothes with the spices, as the 
manner of the Jews is to bury. 

41 Now in the place where he 
was crucified, tiiere was a gar- 
den ; and in the garden a new 
sepulchre, wherein was never man 
yet laid. 

42 There laid they Jesus there- 
fore, because of the Jews' prepa- 
ΥΆ.ύοη -day; for the sepulchre was 
nio-Ii at hand. 



CHAP. XX. 

The first day of the week com- 
etli Mary Magdalene early, when 



GREEK TEXT. 

Aeyei, ' Οψονται eli of ΐζίκίν• 
τη σαν. 

u8 ΜΕΤΑ Se ταύτα ηρώτη- 
(Γ€ τον ΙΤίλατον ό Ιωσήφ 6 άπο 
Λρίμαθαίαί, ων μαθητ7]ς του 
Τησοΰ, κβκρυμμβνοί 8e δια τον 
φοβον των 'Ιουδαίων, Ίνα aprj 
το σώμα του Ιησού• καΐ €πβ- 
τρΐψβν 6 Πιλάτος. ηλθ^ν ονν 
και ήρΕ το σώμα τού 'Ιησού. 

39 ήλθβ δε κα\ Νικόδημος ο 
ϊλθων προς τον Ιησούν νυκτός 
ττρώτον, φ(ρων μίγμα σμυρνης 
καΐ άλοης ώσβί λίτρας βκατυν. 

40 βλαβον ούν το σώμα τού 
Ιησού, και βδησαν αυτό οθονιοις 

μβτα τών αρωμάτων, καθώς βθος 
(στι τοις Ίουδαίυις €νταφιαζβιν. 

41 ην δ( ev τώ τοπω, όττου 
ζστανρωθη, κήπος, και €v τω 
κηττω μνημίΐον καινον, ev ω ου- 
δίττω ούδίΐς βτίίη. 

42 eVfi ovu δια την τταρα- 
σκΐυην τών Ιουδαίων, οτι ίγγυς 
ην το μνημ€ΐον, ίθηκαν τον Ιη- 
σούν. 

CHAP. XX. 

ΤΗ δί μια τών σαββατων 
Μαρία ή Μαγδαληνή ίργίται 



REVISED VERSION. 

ture saith. They shall look on 
him whom they pierced. 

38 Now after "these things Jo- 
seph, 'the one of Arimathea (be- 
ing a disciple of Jesus, but secret- 
ly, because of the fear of the 
Jews), °askcd of Pilate, that he 
might take away the body of Je- 
sus. And Pilate gave leave, lie 
came, therefore, and took away 
the body "of Jesus. 

39 And Nicodemus came also 
(who at first came to "Jesus by 
night), l)ringing a mixture of 
myrrh aad aloes, about a hundred 
pounds. 

40 Therefore, they took the 
body of Jesus, and "bound it 
'with linen 'cloths, with the 
spices, as Hhe Jews 'have a "cus- 
tom to '•embalm. 

41 Now in the place where he 
was crucified was a garden, and 
in the garden a new 'tomb, in 
which no one Λvas yet laid. 

42 There, therefore, "On ac- 
count of the Preparation of the 
Jews, 'because the 'tomb was 
'near, thev laid Jesus. 



CHAP. XX. 

Now the first [day] of the week 
Mary Magdalene cometh early, 'it 



" See ch. 5 : 1, N. a. 

' See ch. 1 : 45, N. e. 

" Lachm. and Tisch. have ηντον, for τον Ιηαον, in v. 38, and 
αντον, for TO»' Ιηοονν, in V. 39 ; but, though the authorities are 
some of them very ancient, they are hardly numerous enough to 
justify the adoption of these readings. 

* E. V. almost always. This is the only place where this word 
is rendered to unnd, in the Common Version. — R., Dubois, Kcnr. 
— Wesl. {wrapped). 

y There can be no reasonable doubt but that o&ovioi; is here 
the dative of the means, or instrument, and, therefore, with is the 
proper preposition to introduce it. Witli is, besides, more proper, 
after bound, than in. — I change the spelling of clothes, to doths. 
according to the established nsages of the present day. 

• Literally, as cmtom is to the Jews. As the Jews have a cus- 
tom, is much more literal than the E. V., and quite as elegant. 



» E. V. generally. — Penn, Murd. 

•" Newc, Kenr.. marg. — See ch. 12 : 7, N. h. — "Εντηγιαζεη 
est in Gra?cis, quod potius denotat funerare aut aromalibus con- 
dire" (Drusius). 'Σιτηγιαζειν est prceparare ad seputturam" 
(Grotius). — Schleus., Eob., and others. There can be no reason- 
able doubt, but that tliis word means, to prepare for burial ; and 
the circumstances show that this was generally by embahning the 
hodi/. 

' See ch. 5 : 28, N. p. 

"• This change is made for the sake of euphony, ;, c. to avoid 
the repetition of the word because. 

' See ch. 1 : 15, N. i. 

' See ch. 2 : 13, N. e. 

» Some have supposed that there is considerable discrepancy 
between the statements of the several Evangelists, in regard 
to the resurrection of our Lord, and its attendant circnm- 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XX. 



129 



KINS JAMES VERSION. 

it was yet dark, unto the se- 
pulchre, and seeth the stone 
taken away from the sepulchre. 



GREEK TEXT. 



ττρωι, σκοτίας en ουση?, eii το 
μνημζίον και βλ(ΤΓ€ΐ τον λίθον 
ηρμΐΐΌν €Κ του μνημείου. 



REVISED VERSION. 

being yet dark, ''into the 'tomb, 
and seeth the stone ""having been 
taken away "out of the 'tomb. 



'' See ch. 4 : 8, N. g. — I have not the least doubt that both 
ets and εκ, in this paragraph, liave their proper and primaiy 
meanings, hito, ottt of. though most, if not all, translators, 
hitherto, have taken the former in the sense of προ;, or επι, 
to, and the latter in the sense of απο, from. The other Evan- 
gelists, in the parallel passages, use επι, when speaking of the 
approach to the tomb, and απο, when speaking of the rolling 
away of the stone, (except Jlark. who has εκ τηι ϋ•νραί, out 
of the door of the tomb.) How, then, can we account for 
John's saying that Mary came into the tomb, and saw the 
stone taken aivay out of the tomb ? It does not appear that, 
at that time, she even looked in. to see the place where her 
Lord was laid. Uow, especially, can we account for his say- 
ing, vv. 4, 5, that the other disciple came first into the tomb, 
. . . nevertheless, he went not in ? To explain these difBculties 
by alleging that εις is here = προ;, or επι, and that εκ = απο, 
is to cut the knot, instead of untying it. Now, let it be borne 
in mind, that however tmclassical the style of this Evangelist 
may be, he can not justly be charged with using words at 
random, or even in strange and unusual senses. Indeed, I 
doubt much, if there ever was a writer, who was more scrupu- 
lously exact in the choice of his terms, with the view of being 
clearlj' understood by his readers. So much so, that the 
account given by .John of the visits of the disciples to the 
tomb, and, incidentally, of the tomb itself, is. bj' far, the most 
definite and accurate that has reached us from au}' source ; 
and it was, doubtless, because the other Evangelists did not aim 
at definiteness of description, or, rather, because they viewed 
the subject from a greater distance, that they have employed 
the more general terms, επι, and απο, where John, aiming at 
minuteness of description, employs the definite terms, ειι, and 
εκ. In order to understand this subject satisfactorily, it is im- 
portant that we should have some correct idea of the structure 
of this tomb spoken of. AVhether that, which has, for the 
last fifteen hundred years, been shown as " the Holy Sepulchre," 
is, or is not, the real tomb in which the body of our Lord was 
laid, is, I believe, a disputed point ; though, perhaps, a large 
majority of writers admit the accuracy of the tradition. The 



question is of little consequence ; for there can be no doubt 
that this "Holy Sepulchre" is, in its structure, similar to other 
ancient tombs ; and, if it is not really the tomb of Joseph, it 
may be safely taken a.5 a model of it. Of this " II0I3• Se- 
pulchre" Calmet observes, {Fragments, No. CXXXVIII,) ''The 
tomb of our Lord consisted of two chambers, (1) an outer 
chamber, about 12 or 14 feet wide, and as many deep ; (2) an 
inner chamber, about 12 or 13 feet long, by 6 or 7 broad." 
To this account of Calmet agree, I believe, almost all writers 
on this subject ; and, indeed, this mode of building tombs is 
by no means peculiar to the ancients, but is common, in its 
essential features, at the present day. Without doubt, then, 
this tomb had two chambers, and in the door of the inner one, 
which contained the body, according to custom, the stone 
I with the seal was placed. We have now reached the explana- 
, tion of this seeming difficulty. Mary came into the outer 
chamber, (which is supposed to have been left open, and, at 
least, was not locked, or sealed.) and saw the stone having 
been taken away out of the tomb, that is, out of the door 
(Mark,) of the inner chamber. So " the other disciple," who 
outran Peter, came first mto this outer chamber, and, stooping 
down, (before the low, narrow door of the inner chamber.) 
he saw the linens lying ; nevertheless, he went not in. that is, 
he entered not into the inner chamber, though he had already 
come into the outer one. Afterward Peter came, and, (being 
already with John in the outer chamber,) entered into the 
inner chamber, and saw not only what John had seen through 
the open door, but also the napkin, folded up by itself, and put 
into a place, where, probably, it could not be seen without 
passing through the door. Then John also went into this inner 
chamber, and saw, and believed. See Calmet, as quoted above. 
Also, CalmeVs Diet. Art. Sepulchre.— Jahn's Bibl. Arch. §§ 206, 
207. 

' See ch. 5 : 28, N. p. 

'' The E. V. here is ambiguous. It might be understood that 
Mary saw and witnessed the very act of taking away the 
stone, which is a construction the Orig. will not bear at all. 



stances. Says Alf., m ioco, — "I attempt no harmony of the 
accounts ; — 1 believe all such attempts to be fruitless ; — and / 
see in their failure strong corroboration of tlie truth of the 
Evangelical D/arratives." Now, while I should be extremely 
sorry to rob the Evangelical Narratives of any legitimate 
source of '• strong corroboration," 3-et, believing that their 
truth will be felt and acknowledged, even though it should be 
shown that these accounts are in perfect harmony with each 
other, I do not hesitate to avow the firm conviction, that, be- 
tween the several narratives of the four Evangelists as far as 



they bear upon this question, there is not even the appearance 
of discrepancy. Difficulties there may be, and doubtless are, 
in the interpretation of certain parts of these narratives ; but 
there are no discrepancies whatever. If, in what follows, I 
should be charged with having abandoned the province of the 
translator, and invaded that of the interpreter, I reply, that 
the thorough discussion of this question has a most importai.t 
bearing on the translation itself, not only in the passage under 
consideration, but in other passages supposed to be parallel. 
Still, I shall not go minutely into the details of this question j 



130 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN, CHAP. XX. 



KING JAMEs' VERSION. 

2 Then she runneth, and Com- 
eth to Simon Peter, and to the 
other disciple whom Jesus lov- 
ed, and saith unto them, They 
have taken away the Lord out 
of the sepulchre, and we know 
not where they have laid him. 



GREEK TEXT. 



2 rpi-^ei ovv και ίρχ^ΐται Trpos 
Σίμωνα Πίτρον καΐ Trpos τον 
άλλον μαθητην Όν ίψιλίΐ ο Ίη• 
σοΰί, καΐ Aeyet αντοΐί, Ήραν 
τον κυρών e/c τοΰ μνημβων, κα). 
ουκ οϊδαμβν που ίθηκαν αυτόν. 



REVISED VERSION. 

2 She runneth, therefore, and 
Cometh to Simon Peter, and to 
the other disciple, whom Jesus 
loved, and saith to them, They 
have taken away the Lord out 
of the tomb, and we know not 
where they have laid him. 



but simply state, in as few words as possible, certain conclu- 
sions which I have drawn from the historical records, after a 
careful examination. 

1. There were, at least, five different visits to the tomb, sub- 
sequent to the resurrection. We know these visits to have 
been different, — First, because they are represented to have 
taken place at different /i'mes,— Second, because they were 
attended by different circumstances. — 1 ) IMary Magdalene and 
the other Mary (most probably the mother of James), came 
to see the tomb, οψε οαββατων, just at the close of the Sab- 
bath, (which was, according to the Jewish law, between sun- 
set and dark,) ττ] επιγωσχονστ;, as it was beginning to shine, 
(spoken of the moon and stars, see Luke 23 : 54, Grotius.) 
towards the first [day] of the week. (See Matt. 2S : 1.) Neither 
of the other three Evangelists makes any mention of this visit. 
Some have tried to show that οψε may mean after, and that 
επιφωοκοναχι is here spoken of the morning twilight ; but the 
latter supposition is entirely gratuitous, since Luke undoubt- 
edly uses this verb of the evening twilight, and, as to the 
former, the quotations from the classics intended to prove it 
are by no means satisfactorily to the point ; and even if they 
were, no judicious critic would assign to a word an unusual 
meaning, on the authority of a half a dozen rare exceptions, 
unless actually driven to it by the context. — 2) The next 
morning, the first [day] of the week, Mary Magdalene made a 
second visit to the tomb, σκοτίας ετι οναηι, before day-light, 
or, while it was still dark. This time she was alone, and came 
thus early, probably, in consequence of her eagerness to ascer- 
tain the truth of the resurrection, of which she had vainly 
tried to persuade the other disciples the evening before. She 
did not stay long this time ; but ran, to tell Peter and John 
what she had seen. {See the passage tender consideration.) No 
other Evangelist gives any account of this second visit. — 
3) Peter and John, (see John's -narrative, as above,) imme- 
diately after the arrival of Mary Magdalene with the news of his 
resurrection, started for the tomb. At what hour they arrived, 
we are not precisely informed ; nor can we say positively 
whether this visit was contemporaneous with any other, or 
not ; but the strong probability is, that they did not arrive 
till after day-light, since they looked into the tomb, and saw 
what it contained, (vv. 5-7) ; and they probably Ungered about 
the place, till all " the disciples," except Mary Magdalene, were 
ready to go home again, (see v. 10, below.) This third visit 
also is recorded only by John. — 4) Not long after the de- 
parture of Mary Magdalene, as mentioned above, and pro- 
bably soon after the arrival of Peter and John, o^9^ov- 



βαθ-εωί, in the dusk of the morning, (Luke 24 : 1,) the 
'• women," who had prepared spices and ointments before the 
previous Sabbath, (Luke 23 : 56,) came to the tomb, bring- 
ing those spices, for the purpose of embalming him. Who 
these women were, is not particularly mentioned by Luke. 
The two Marys were not then with them, as appears from 
Mark's narrative. (See below.) Luke is the only Evangelist 
who mentions this visit of the "women." — 5) A little later, 
ανητειλαΐ'τος (αΐ'ατελλοντοί) τ^λιον, after sunrise (at sunrise,) 
Mary Magdalene, (who had by this time returned from de- 
livering her message to Peter and John,) made her third visit 
to the tomb, being accompanied by Mary the mother of James, 
and Salome. They also brought their spices and ointments, 
and now probably joined the other " women," mentioned by 
Luke. This was the last visit, of which we have any account, 
and is recorded only by Mark. Now as it regards these five 
visits, I think we may safely challenge any one to point out 
a single discrepancy in the various narratives. 

2. The resurrection of our Lord did not, as is commonly 
supposed, take place on the morning of the first day of the 
week ; but in the evening of the Sabbath, probably, (for the 
precise moment is nowhere stated,) at the very close of the 
day of rest, and just before the arrival of the two Mar3-s, who 
came to see the sepulchre, οχρε οαββατων τχι επιφωσχονατι tis 
μιαν οαββατων, at the precise point that separated between 
the last and the first daj's of the week. He was risen, when 
they arrived ; and his resurrection was probably simultaneous 
with the great earthquake, which had taken place, on their 
arrival. The Marys were not, as Alf contends, ''witnesses of 
the earthquake ;" for εγενετο, there was, is indefinite past, as 
also απεκνλιαε, while εχα&ητο is imperfect; showing that, 
when the women arrived, the angel, who rolled away the 
stone, was sitting upon it, which implies that the earthquake 
had already taken place, if, as is admitted, the οειομος "was 
the sudden opening of the tomb by the descending angel." 
(Alf) Matthew is the only one of the Evangelists who gives 
us any account of the circumstances imm£di.4tei.y attending 
the resurrection. No other writer mentions the earthquake ; 
no other brings to view the very angel who rolled away the 
stone, in the immediately subsequent act of sitting upon it. 
Mark, in reference to this point, says merely, "And, looking 
up, they (the women.) see that the stone (αποκεκνλισται, per- 
fect.) has (had) been rolled away.'" "He, (Jesus,) was 
raised, (ηγερΟ-η, aorist,) he is not here." Luke says, "And 
they found the stone {αποκεκνλισμενον, perfect,) having been 
rolled away from the tomb." " He, (Jesus,) is not here. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XX. 



131 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

3 Peter therefore went forth, 
and that other disciple, and came 
to the sepulchre. 



GREEK TEXT. 



3 ' ΕςηΧθίν ούν b Πίτροί και 
6 αλλοί μαθητηί, καΐ ηρ^οντο els 
το μνημύον. 



REVISED VERSION. 

3 Peter, therefore, went out, 
and the other disciple ; and they 
were coming, '■into the 'tomb. 



(ηνερ9•η, aorist,) he was raised." John merely says, ''And 
she, (Mary Magdalene,) seeth the stone (ηραιιον, perfect.) 
having been taken away.•' Now compare these statements 
with that of Matthew: "'And behold, there was a great earth- 
quake ; for an angel of the Lord, coming down from heaven, 
approaching, rolled away the stone, and was sitting (^imper- 
fect.) upon it." 

I have already admitted that there may be difficulties in the 
interpretation of the various parts of these narratives. There 
are only two of these that I deem it necessary to notice, in 
this place. 

1. Why, it is asked, did Mary say to the angels, on the 
morning of the first day of the week, (v. 13, below,) "They 
took away my Lord, and I know not where they laid him," if 
she had herself seen him alive, after his resurrection, the even- 
ing before, as is recorded in Matt. 28 : 9 ? I admit that this 
is a difficulty ; but, as was before remarked, there is here no 
discrepancy between Matthew and John. It would be easy, 
indeed, to magnify the difficulty by inquiring further. Why did 
Mary Magdalene say, '' They took away my Lord, and I know 
not where they laid him." after she had been told, '' he was 
alive" ? The ''two men," (Luke 24 : 5-7,) had said to her, 
and certain other women, "Why are ye seeking the living with 
the dead ? He is not here, but was raised. Remember how 
he spoke to you, being yet in Galilee, saying, It is necessary 
that the Son of man be betrayed into the hands of sinful men, 
and be crucified." Did she not know from the positive tes- 
timony of angels, that he was alive ? If I am not mistaken, 
the solution of this difficulty is not so difficult as might, at 
first, be imagined. The key is furnished by John. (v. 9. below,) 
" For thej' did not 3'et know the scripture, that he must rise 
from the dead." Mary Magdalene had, indeed, seen Jesus, 
the evening before, while returning from her first visit to the 
tomb ; but when she told the circumstance to the other dis- 
ciples, they did not believe the reality of it, and, no doubt, 
would have persuaded her that she had merely• seen a vision. 
In fact, according to Matt. 28 : 18. even after the eleven dis- 
ciples, subsequently, had seen and worshipped him in Galilee. 
some stilt doubted. Now, while we may find it very difficult 
to understand why the disciples were so slow of heart to un- 
derstand these things, the fact is incontestible, and, being ad- 
mitted, accounts for the singular conduct of Mary Magdalene, 
and, therefore, clears up the proposed difficulty. 

2. The supposition that the resurrection took place in the 
evening of the Sabbath, it is said, renders it impossible that 
the I-ord should have been in the tomb even part of three 
days. Therefore, the Scriptures could not have been fulfilled 
In hi» resurrection at that time. I apprehend that this diffi- 
culty is only imaginary; and will reply to it in three particulars. 
— 1) The most definite prophecy on record, in relation to the 



time that he was to lie in the grave, is that uttered by him- 
self, Matt. 12 : 40, " For as Jonah was in the belly of the sea- 
monster three days and three nights, so shall the Son of man 
be in the heart of the earth three days and three nights." 
Now it is generally held to be incontestable, that our Lord was 
crucified on the sixth day of the week, (Friday,) and was 
buried in the evening of the same day. From that time till 
the morning of the first day, when it is admitted by all he 
was risen, would be, at most, only one day, and a very small 
portion of another, with two nights ; so that the common 
computation lacks one night, and nearly two days of making 
the time that he was in the heart of the earth equal to three 
days and three nights, which it should have been, according 
to the prediction cited above. Now, even supposing that it 
were the legitimate object of the interpreter, to reconcile 
history with prophecy, would it be worth while to force upon 
Matthew's narrative an unnatural construction, for the pur- 
pose of postponing the resurrection a few hours, when, after 
all, we should lack one night and nearly two days of effecting 
the proposed reconciliation ? Or, should we, by this means, 
succeed in satisfying the less definite predictions, such as, 
"After three daj-s I will rise again ;" — ''and the third day rise 
again ; " would there be any real gain, while the most definite 
and unequivocal of all these predictions would remain un- 
alterably opposed to our interpretation ? I take it for granted, 
that, if language is of any use at all, in conveying ideas, three 
days and three 7iights include the whole of three diurnal re- 
volutions of our planet. But it is not the business of either 
historian or interpreter to fulfil prophecy, neither of whom 
has a right to misrepresent the facts of history for the sake of 
making them agree with any prediction whatever. I confess, 
that, on the supposition that the burial of our Lord took place 
on the evening of the sixth, and his resurrection on the morn- 
ing of the first day of the week, I find it as impossible to re- 
concile the facts with the prediction above referred to, as 
though it were admitted that he rose in the evening of the 
Sabbath, or seventh day of the week. But — 2) There is no 
evidence that our Lord was crucified on the sixth day of the 
week. All of the Evangelists agree that the day that followed 
the crucifixion was the Sabbath ; but we are nowhere informed 
that it was the seventh day of the week. We know, from the 
"commandment," (Lev. 23 : 0, 7) that the fifteenth day of the 
first month was a sabbath of rest, being the first day of un- 
leavened bread, and we also know, that this was the fifteenth 
day of the first month, and, therefore, that it was the first day 
of unleavened bread ; but what day of the week it was, we 
know not. That Sabbath was annual, not weekly, and hap- 
pened sometimes on one, sometimes on another, day of the 
week ; and there is positively no evidence that, in that year, 
it was coincident with the weekly Sabbath. AVe have, there- 



132 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XX. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

4 So they ran both too-ether : 
and the other discijjle did out- 
run Peter, and came first to the 
sepulchre 

5 And he stooping down, and 
looking in, saw the linen clothes 
lying ; yet went he not in. 

6 Then cometh Simon Peter 
following him, and went into the 
sepulchre, and seeth the linen 
clothes lie ; 

7 And the napkin that was 
about his head, not lying with 
the linen clothes, but wrapped 
together in a place by itself. 

8 Then went in also that 
other disciple which came first 
to the sepulchre, and he saw, 
and believed. 

9 For as yet they knew not 
the scripture, that he must rise 
again fi-om the dead. 

10 Then the disciples went 
away again unto their own home. 

1 1 But Mary stood without at 
the sepulchre weeping : and as 
she wept she stooped down and 
looked into the sepulchre. 



12 And seeth two angels in 



GREEK TEXT. 

4 ίτρζγον Se ol δυο ομοΰ• και 
6 αλλοί μαθητής ττροίδραμΐ τα- 
χών του ΙΤΐτρου, καΙ ήλθΐ πρώ- 
τος els το μνημύον, 

5 καΐ τταρακυψαί βλίττει κβί- 
μβνα τα οθονια, ου μίντοι βίσηλ- 
0eu. 

6 ίργβταί ούν Σίμωι> Πίτρος 
ακολουθών αύτω, καΐ βίσηλθ^ν 
els το μvημelov, καΐ eewpel τα 
οθονία κeίμeva, 

7 καΐ το σουδαρίον Ό ην eVi 
TTjs Κ6φαλης αυτού, ου μeτa των 
οθονιων κeιμevov, άλλα χωρίί ev- 
τeτυλLγμevov els eva τοττον. 

8 TOTe ούν elar]\ee kou ο άλ- 
λος μαθητής ο Ιλθων ττρώτος elς 
το μvημe^ov, καί et'Se, καΐ εττί- 
aTevaev 

9 ουδβττω γαρ ySeiaav την 
γραφην, οτί Set αύτον e'/c ν€κρών 
άναστήναι. 

10 άττηλθον ούν τταλιν ττρος 
eavτoυς οι μαθηται. 

11 Μαρία δε elστηκeL ττρος 
το μνημ€Ϊον κλαίουσα βζω. ώς 
ούν ί'κλαΐ€, 7Γapeκυψev eh το 
μvημeΐov, 

12 καΐ θeωpel δυο ά.γγeλoυς ev 



REVISED VERSION. 

4 And the two were running 
together ; and the other disciple 
ran faster than Peter, and came 
first "into the 'tomb. 

5 And, stooping down, he 
seeth the linen cloths lying : 
■nevei-theless, he went not in. 

6 Simon Peter, therefore, 
Cometh following him, and "^en- 
tered Mnto the 'tomb, and seeth 
the linen cloths ^lying, 

7 And the napkin, that was 
""upon his head, not lying with 
tlie linen cloths, but having been 
'folded up in a place by itself, 

8 Then, therefore, the other 
disciple also, who came first 
"into the 'tomb, went in, and 
saw, and believed. 

9 For they did not yet know 
the Scripture, that he must rise 
again from the dead. 

10 The disciples, therefore, 
went away ^home again. 

11 But Mary was standing by 
the «^tomb weeping without. As 
she was weeping, therefore, she 
stooped down into the" 'tomb, 

12 And seeth two angels in 



■ See ch. 7 : 13, N. s. 

' See ch. 10 : 2, N. e. 

^ E. v., V. 5, above. This is literal. 

^ This is not περί, but sTtt. See ch. 19 : 24, N. z. 

' Folded up is more properly spoken of a napkin, at the 



present day, than wrapped together, which, to say the least, is 
ambiguous. 

* Literally to themselves, like the French chez-soi. So τιη^' 
ίαντιι), after a verb of motion, means at home, as in 1 Cor. 
16: 2. 



fore, no historical data, furnished by the Evangelists, from 
which we can determine, whether the resurrection was, or was 
not, in accordance with the predictions touching that event. 
Since, however, the Apostle informs us that he arose the third 
day, "according to the Scriptures," (1 Cor. 15 : 4,) we may 
conclude that his body was literally three days and three 
nights in the tomb. Taking this, then, as the basis of our 
calculation, and applying it to Matthew's narrative, we arrive 
at the conclusion that the body was put into the tomb in the 
evening of the fourth day of the week, (Wednesday,) while 



the following day, (Thursday.) was the Paschal Sabbath, the 
first day of unleavened bread. This calculation brings us to 
the same hour of the evening when Luke represents the burial 
to have taken place ; for it is evident that the disciples hastened 
with their labor, in order that the body might be put into the 
tomb before the Sabbath, which (επεψωσκε, imperfect,) was 
beginning to shine. (See 1, p. 135.) — 3) As to the various 
traditions in relation to this whole subject, I confess I pay no 
attention to them, because I consider the scriptural account 
sufiicicntly full to explain itself, without their aid. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XX. 



133 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

white, sitting, the one at the 
head, and the other at the feet, 
where the body of Jesu^ had 
lain. 

13 And they say unto her. 
Woman, why weepest thou ? She 
saith unto them. Because they 
have taken away my Lord, and 
I know not where they have laid 
him. 

14 And when she had tlius 
said, she turned herself back, 
and saw Jesus standing, and 
knew not that it was Jesus. 

15 Jesus saith unto her. Wo- 
man, why weepest thou? whom 
seekest thou ? She, supposing 
him to be the gardener, saith 
unto him. Sir, if thou have borne 
him hence, tell me where thou 
hast laid him, and I will take 
him away. 

16 Jesus saith unto her, Mary. 
She turned herself, and saith unto 
him, Rabboni, which is to say. 
Master. 

17 Jesus saith unto her. Touch 
me not: for I am not yet as- 
cended to my Father: but go to 
my brethren, and say unto them, 
I ascend unto my Father and 
your Father, and to my God and 
your God. 



GREEK TEXT. 

λίνκοίς καθβζομίρουί, eva ττροί 
Trj κβφαλΐι, και 4va. ττρος τοϊί πο- 
σ£Γ, δτΓοι; ϊκατο το σώμα του 
Ίησου. 

13 K.OU. λίγονσίν avTrj ^κίΐνοι, 
Γυναι, TL κλαίβΐ9 ; Aeyei αυτοίς, 
' Οτι ήραν τον κυριον μου, και 
ουκ οίδα ττοΰ ίθηκαν αυτόν. 

14 Κα\ ταΰτα (Ιττοΰσα εστρά- 
φη €£f τα οπίσω, κα\ θεωρεί τον 
Ίησοΰν ίστώτα• και ουκ rjSei οτι 
ό Ιησοΰς εστί, 

15 λίγει αύττ) ό Ίησοΰς, Γυ- 
ναι, τι κλαίίΐί ; τίνα ζητεΐί ; 
'Εκείνη δοκοΰσα οτι 6 κηπουροί 
εστί, λέγει αύτω. Κύριε, ει συ 
εβαστασαί αϋτον, είπε μοι που 
αύτον εθηκαί• κάγω αυτόν αρώ. 

16 Λέγει αύτη ό Ίησοΰί, 
Μαρία. Στραφεισα εκείνη λέγει 
αύτω, ' Ραββουνί' ο λέγεται, δι- 
δάσκαλε. 

17 λέγει αύττ) ό Ιησούς, Μη 
μου άπτου, οϋπω γαρ άναβεβηκα 
προί τον πάτερα μου• πορευου 
δε προί του! αδελφούς μου, κα\ 
είπε αύτοΐί. Αναβαίνω προί τον 
πάτερα μου καΊ πάτερα υμών, 
καΐ θεον μου /cat θεον υμών. 



REVISED VERSION. 

white sitting, one at the head, 
and "One at the feet, where the 
body of Jesus 'had been laid. 



13 And they say to her, Wo- 
man, why art thou weeping ? 
She saith to them. Because they 
took away my Lord, and I know 
not where they laid him. 

14 And, ""saying -these things, 
she turned "backward, and seeth 
Jesus standing, and knew not 
that it was Jesus. 

15 Jesus saith to her. Wo- 
man, Λvhy art thou weeping ? 
Whom art thou seeking? She, 
supposing pthat he was the 
gardener, saith to him, Sir, if 
thou didst 'Carry him off, tell 
me where thou didst lay him, 
and I will take him away. 

16 Jesus saith to her, Marj' ! 
She, turning, saith to him, 
'Rabboni! which "means, 
'Teacher. 

17 Jesus saith to her. Touch 
me not ; for I have not yet "gone 
up to my Father. But go to my 
brethren, and say to them, I am 
°going up to my Father, and 
your Father; 'even my God,, 
and your God. 



I" This is literal, and in strict accordance with the English 
idiom. 

1 Though this verb is, in form, of the imperfect tense, yet, 
as the lexicograpliers agree, the present and imperfect of xeiuai 
are used for the perfect and pluperfect of τιθ'ημι. The imper- 
fect rendering, was lying, is totally inadmissible here, unless 
\re take it in the sense, used to lie, which is about the same as 
had been laid. 

" See ch. 18 : 1, N. a. 

° See ch. 5 : 1, N. a. 

« E. v., ch. 18 : 6.— See ch. G : 66, N. v. 

ρ It is very unusual, in translating Ureek into English, to 
use the accusative with the infinitive, when, in the Orig., the 
finite mood stands with the nominative. There appears to be 
no necessity for so doing here.— W., T., C, G., R., Nary, Penn, 
Kenr., Murd. 



1 See ch. 12 : 6, N. g. 

"■ Scholz and Tischendorf insert here Έβραϊστι. Lachmann 
puts this word in brackets. I would recommend that in 
Hebrew be inserted in the revision. 

• See ch. 1 : 38, N. I. 

' See ch. 1 : 38, N. m. 

° See ch. 1 : 33, N. w. 

' It is very evident, I think, that yai is used here, as fre- 
quently elsewhere, in the sense of even, for which reason I 
change the translation to even. — The Vulg., with W., T., R., 
Nary, Kenr., Camp., Germ., Van Ess, De W., Meyer, Schott, 
and others, omits και altogether. But, as there is no good 
manuscriptural authority for this omission, and as xai is very 
often used in the sense of even, I prefer not to omit it There 
can be no doubt but that a7id is improperly used here. 



];34 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XX. 



KING JAMES' VERSION. 

18 Mary Magdalene came and 
told the disciples that she had 
seen the Lord, and that he had 
spoken these things unto her. 

19 Then the same day at even- 
ing, being the first day of the 
week, when the doors were shut 
where the disciples were assem- 
bled for fear of the Jews, came 
Jesus and stood in the midst, and 
saith unto them, Peace he unto 
you. 



20 And when he had so said, 
he shewed unto them his hands 
and his side. Then were the 
disciples glad when they saw the 
Lord. 

21 Then said Jesus to them 
again, Peace be unto you : as my 
Father hath sent me, even so 
send I you. 

22 And when he had said this, 
he breathed on them, and saith 
unto them, Receive ye the Holy 
Ghost. 

23 AVhosesoever sins ye re- 
mit, they are remitted unto them ; 
and whosesoever sins ye retain, 
they are retained. 

24 But Thomas, one of the 
twelve, called Didymus, was not 
with them when Jesus came. 



25 The other disciples there- 



GREEK TEXT. 



18 ' Έρχ^βταί Μαρία η May• 
haXrjvy) άπαγγίΧλουσα τόΐζ μα- 
θηταΐί, OTL ίώρακε τον κυρών, 
KOLL ταΰτα ίΐπίν aurfj. 

19 Ουσηί ουν οψιαί, rfj 
ήμίρα. (κίίντ) ττ) μια των σαβ- 
βάτων, καΐ των θυρών κΐκλΐΐ- 
σμβνων, οττου ήσαν οί μαθητσί, 
συνηγμΐνοι, δία τον φοβον των 
'Ιουδαίων, ήλθεν 6 Ίησοΰί κα\ 
ίστη etf το μέσον, καΐ λίγα αυ- 
τοϊί. Ειρήνη ύμΐν. 

20 .ΚαΙ τοντο βίττων βδειζεν 
αυτοίς τας γεΐραί και την ττλβν- 
ραν αύτοΰ. ϊχαρησαν ούν οΙ 
μαθηταΐ 18όντε9 τον κυριον. 

21 βίττεν ούν αύτοΐί ό Ιησοΰί 
τταλιν, ΕΙρηνη ύμΐν καθωζ απβ- 
σταλκε με 6 ττατηρ, κάγω ττεμττω 
ύμάί. 

22 ΚαΙ τοΰτο είττων ενεφυ- 
σησε καΐ λέγει αύτοΐί, Λάβετε 
ϋνεΰμα'Αγιον. 

23 αν Τίνων άφητε τας αμαρ- 
τίας, άφίενται αύτοΐί• αν τίνων 
κρατητε, κεκρατηνταί. 

24 Θωμάς δε, είς έκ των 
δώδεκα ό λεγόμενος Δίδυμος, 
ουκ ήν μετ αυτών οτε ήλθεν 6 
Ίησοΰς. 

25 ελεγον ούν αυτω ο! άλλοι 



REVISED VERSION. 

IS Mary Magdalene cometh, 
telling the disciples that she had 
seen the Lord, and he "said these 
things to her. 

19 'When, therefore, it was 
evening, ^that first day of the 
week, and the doors having been 
shut, where the disciples 'had 
been assembled, "because of the 
fear of the Jews, Jesus came 
"into the midst, and stood, and 
saith to them, Peace [be] to 
you. 

20 And, '■saying ""this, he 
shov\'ed them his hands and side. 
The disciples, therefore, were 
glad, seeing the Lord. 

21 Jesus, therefore, said to 
them again. Peace [be] to you. 
As the Father hath sent me, so 
I send γο\χ. 

22 And, 'saying this, he 
breathed on, and saith to them, 
Receive the Holy ""Spirit. 

23 'Whoseever sins ye may 
'forgive, they «are 'ibrgiven 
tliem : 'whoseever ye may re- 
tain, they have been retained. 

2-1 But Thomas, one of the 
Twelve, "^the one called Didy- 
mus, was not with them, when 
Jesus came. 

25 The other disciples, there- 



- See ch. 1 : 15, N. g. 

' No one will pretend to say that the E. V. of this clause is, 
even approximatively, literal. I have made it as literal as 
possible, and I think the revision will be found to be plainer 
than the E. V. 

J See ch. 1 : 33, N. x. 

» Lachm. and Tisch., with MSS. ΑΒΏ, and a few others, omit 
αννηγμενοι. Griesb. favors the same reading. I would re- 
commend that this note be put in the margin: Some copies 
have were, for had been assembled. 

" See ch. 4 : 39, N. t. 

• See ch. 9 : 7, N. h, and ch. 19 : 13, N. m. 

" See ch. 18 : 1, N. a, and ch. 4 : 18, N. q. 



' See ch. 18 : 1, N. a. 
^ See ch. 7 : 39, N. h. 

^ W., R., Kenr., Sharpe. — Lachm. and Tisch. have εαν, for 
ar, in both cases, and ηψεωνται, for αγιενται, on the authority 
of a few MSS. and Chrysostom. Though I do not consider 
the evidences of the genuineness of these readings by any 
means satisfactory, yet, as all information on a subject so im- 
portant, in its theological bearings, as this is, will be interest- 
ing to all classes of readers, I would recommend that this note 
be appended to the revision : Some copies read, If ye forgive 
the sins of any, Uiey have been forgiven them : i/y e retain [those] 
of any, they have been retained. 

' See ch. 1 : 45 N. c. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XX. 



13-5 



KINti JAMES VERSION. 

fore said unto him, We have 
seen the Lord. But he said 
unto them, Except I shall see 
in his hands the print of the 
nails, and put my finger into the 
print of the nails, and thrust my 
hand into his side, I Λνϊΐΐ not 
believe. 

26 And after eight days again 
his disciples were within, and 
Thomas with them : then came 
Jesus, the doors being shut, and 
stood in the midst, and said. 
Peace he unto you. 

27 Then saith he to Thomas, 
Reach hither th}^ finger, and be- 
hold my hands ; and reach hith- 
er thy hand, and thrust it into my 
side; and be not faithless, but 
believing. 

28 And Thomas answered and 
said unto him, My Lord and my 
God. 

29 Jesus saith unto him, Tho- 
mas, because thou hast seen me, 
thou hast believed : blessed are 
they that have not seen, and yet 
have believed. 

30 And many other signs tru- 
ly did Jesus in the presence of 



GREEK TEXT. 

μαθηταί, Έωρακαμ€ν top Kvpiov. 
Ό δβ tlireu αύτοΐί, 'Έαν μη ϊδω 
ei> ταΐί γβρσιν αύτοΰ τον τύπον 
των ήλων, και βάλω τον δακτυ- 
λον μου els τον τύπον των ήλων, 
και βάλω την χ^ΐρά μου et? την 
πλΐνραν αύτοΰ, ου μη πιστίυσω. 

26 ΚαΙ μ(θ ήμίραί οκτώ 
παλίΐ^ ήσαν ϊσω οϊ μαθηταί 
αύτοΰ, καΙ θωμάί μ€τ αυτών, 
βρχίται ό Ιησούς, των θυρών 
κεκλίΐσμβνων, και ϊστη ety το 
μίσον καΐ βΐπβν, Έ,Ιρηνη νμΐν. 

27 Είτα λβγ€ΐ τω Θωμά, 
Φβρβ τον δακτνλον σου ώδί, κα). 
ίδε τα? χ^βΐρας μου• /cat φ(ρ€ την 
χΐΐρα σου, /cat βαλβ ety την 
πλίυραν μου. κα\ μη γίνου 
άπιστος•, άλλα πιστοί. 

28 ivat άπίκρίθη 6 θωμάί, 
καΐ ehrev αύτω, Ό κύριος μου 
KCU ό Oeos μου. 

29 Aeyei αυτω ο Ιησοΰς, 
Οτι ίωρακαί μ€, Θωμά, πεπι- 

στίυκας• μακάριοι οι μη LOOVTes, 
και πιστ€υσαντ(9. 

30 ΙΙολλα μβν ούν /cat άλλα 
σημίΐα (ποίησίν ό Ιησούς Ινω- 



REVISED VERSION. 

fore, said to him. We have seen 
the Lord. But he said to them, 
°If I do not see in his hands the 
"mark of the nails, and put my 
finger into the '■mark of the nails, 
and 'put my Iiand into his side, 
I will not believe. 



26 And after eight days again 
his disciples were within, and 
Thomas with them. Jesus, tlie 
doors having been shut, cometh 
"into the midst, and stood, and 
said. Peace [be] to you. 

27 'Afterward he saith to 
Thomas, 'Bring hither thy finger, 
and behold my hands, and 'bring 
thy hand, and 'put [it] into my 
side; and be not "unbelieving, 
but believing. 

28 And Thomas answered, 
and said to him. My Lord, and 
my God ! 

29 Jesus saith to him. Be- 
cause thou hast seen me, "Tho- 
mas, thou hast believed. "Happy 
[are] those who see not, and 
believe ! 

30 Many, piudeed, therefore, 
•■and other signs Jesus did in 



« See ch. 3 : 3, N. g. 

^ This word, TVKog, means, an impression made by a stroke, 
(τΐ'.ΎΤίίί•.) Print is by no means a bad representative of its 
meaning ; but I consider mark as preferable because it is more 
definite and less ambiguous. Impression would, perhaps, be 
better still, if it were as commonl}' used by the mass of the 
people. The Vulg., with W., R., Wesl., Nary, Kenr., and 
others, has, in the second case, place. This reading is in 
accordance with the Alex. MS. and four others, which have 
τόπον, for τύπον; but this reading is, most probably, spurious. 

' Thrust is entirely too strong a word here ; besides, it is 
seldom used to translate βαΙΙειν. It is not at all probable that 
Thomas was expected to put his hand into the Savior's body 
through the opening made by the spear ; but, simply, to put it 
into the impression, or hollow place, left after the healing up 
of the wound. 

" See ch. 13 : 5, N. d. 



' E. Λ'^. generally. 

- E. Λ'., 1 Cor. - : 14, 15. Titus 1 : 15. Kev. 21 : 8.— 1 have 
endeavored to preserve the contrast of sound, as well as of 
meaning, in imitation of the OriginaL 

° Θωμά, of the Text. Rec, is rejected by the best editors 
generally. I would, therefore, leave out Thomas. 

° E. v., ch. 13 : 17, and elsewhere frequently. 

Ρ No one will fail to discover that the E. V. of this chiuse 
is lacking in literal conformity to the Original. It is .ilso plain, 
that xat, which, in G., and R., is rendered also, is here a simple 
connective, and should either be translated and. (as in the 
Vulg., et.) or left out entirely, as in most of the Verss. I have 
given, I believe, every word, great and small, each with its 
most usual signification, anil I leave it for others to say 
whether the version proposed is in accordance with the laws 
of our language, or not. 



■ΙΙΐϊθ 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XXI. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

his disciples, which are not writ- 
ten in this book. 



31 But these are written, that 
ye might believe that Jesus is 
the Christ, the Son of God ; and 
that believing ye might have life 
through his name. 



CHAP. XXI. 

After these things Jesus 
shewed himself again to the dis- 
ciples at the sea of Tiberias : 
and on this wise shewed he 
himself. 

2 There were together Simon 
Peter, and Thomas called Did- 
ymus, and Nathanael of Cana 
in Galilee, and the so7is of 
Zebedee, and two other of his 
disciples. 

3 Simon Peter saith unto 
them, I go a fishing. They say 
unto him. We also go with thee. 
They went forth, and entered 
into a ship immediately ; and 
that night they caught nothing. 

4 But when the morning Avas 
now come, Jesus stood on the 
shore ; but the disciples knew 
not that it was Jesus. 

5 Then Jesus saith unto them, 



GREEK TEXT. 

TTLOv των μαθητών αύτον, a ουκ 
€στί γ€γραμμβνα iv τω βιβλίω 
τούτω. 

31 ταύτα δε γίγραττται, Ίνα 
ΤΓίστβνσητβ οτι ο Ιησοΰί (στΊν 6 
Χριστοί 6 υιοί του θίοΰ, καΐ 
ίνα ΤΓίστβυοντίί ζωην ΐ'χητί ίν 
τω ονόματι αϋτου. 



CHAP. XXt. 



ΜΕΤΑ ταΰτα βφανερωσβν 
eavTov τταλιν ό Ίησοΰς τοϊί 
μαθηταΐί βττΐ τηΐ θαλάσσης τηί 
ΤίβίριαΒοζ' €φαν€ρωσ€ Se οΰτως, 

2 ήσαν όμοΰ Σίμων Πβτροί, 
και Θωμάς 6 λ€γομζνθί Αίδυμος, 
καΙ Ναθαναήλ ο άττο Κανά της 
Γαλιλαίας, καΐ οΐ τον Zefie8aiov, 
και άλλοι €κ των μαθητών αύτον 
δυο. 

3 Aeyet αϋτοΐς Σίμων Πβτρος, 
'ϊ^τταγω αλανίΐν. Λβγονσιν αν- 

τω, Ερχομίθα καΙ ήμΕΪς συν 
σοι. Εζηλθον και άνίβησαν 
e'li το ττλοΐον ίύθυς, καΙ iv iKeivij 
ττ] ννκτι ίΤΓίασαν ovoev. 

4 πρωίας Se ήδη γ€νομ€νης 
βστη 6 Ιησονς (Ις τον αίγιαλον 
ου μεντοι τ^δίΐσαν οϊ μαθηταΐ 
ΟΤΙ Ιησονς €στι. 

5 Aeyei ούν αντοίς ό Ιησούς, 



REVISED VERSION. 

presence of his disciples, which 
have not been written in this 
book. 

31 But these have been writ- 
ten, that ye may believe that 
Jesus is the Chi-ist, the Son of 
God ; and that, believing, ye 
may have life "in his name. 



CHAP. XXI. 

After these things Jesus 
•manifested himself again to the 
disciples, ""on the Sea of Tiberias. 
Now he "manifested [himself] 
'thus : 

2 There were together Simon 
Peter, and Thomas, '^tlie one 
called Did3^mus, and Nathanael, 
''the one of Cana of Galilee, and 
the [sons] of Zebedee, and two 
others of his disciples. 

3 Simon Peter saith to them, 
I am going a fishing. They say 
to him. We also are going with 
THEE. They went 'out, and '^went 
up into the ship immediately ; 
and ^during that night they 
caught nothing. 

4 And, morning being now 
come, Jesus stood on the shore. 
■■Nevertheless, the disciples knew 
not that it was Jesus. 

5 Jesus, therefore, saith to 



1 See ch. 17 : 11, N. j, and cli. 17 : 17, N. nn. 

• See ch. 1 : 31, N. g. 

'' This construction is evidently elliptical ; and the ellipsis 
niajf be supplied either by ων, referring to 6 Ιησούς, or by ονσιν, 
referring to το<ί μαβ-ηταις. The only question, then, is, were 
the disciples, or was Jesus, επι της ϋ-αλαααης 1 The latter was 
undoubtedly standing on the shore, that is, fjrt rrj &ηλησση, 
or, more properly, πάρα την &αλααοην, (Matt. 13 : 1. Mark 
4 : 1, and elsewhere.) He, therefore, was not επι της &αλασ- 
οης, which means, vpon the sea, that is, so as to be borne up 
upon it. (Ch. 6 : 19. Mark 6 : 48, 49. Matt. 14 : 25.) The 
meaning, then, is, " Jesus manifested himself to the disciples, 
when they were on the Sea of Tiberias." 



' E. v., ch. 4 : 6; 11 : 48. Matt. 2 : 5 ; 3 : 15; 26 : 54. 
Mark 2 : 7. Luke 1 : 25 ; 2 : 48 ; 24 : 46, and elsewhere. On 
this wise is an obsolete expression. 

Ί See ch. 1 : 45, N. c. 

• See ch. 1 : 43, N. z. 

' This is the literal meaning of ανεβηοαν. But, as most 
editors, rightly I think, read ενεβησαν, I would recommend 
that the E. V., entered, be retained. 

5 See ch. 2 : 23, N. q. 

"■ See ch. 7 : 13. N. s. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XXI. 



137 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

Children, have ye any meat? They 
answered him, No. 

6 And he said unto tliem, Cast 
the net on the right side of the 
ship, and ye shall find. They cast 
therefore, and now they were not 
able to draw it for the multitude 
of fishes. 



7 Therefore that disciple whom 
Jesus loved saitli unto Peter, It 
is the Lord. Now when Simon 
Peter heard that it was the Lord, 
he girt his fisher's coat unto him 
(for he was naked), and did cast 
himself into the sea. 



8 And the other disciples came 
in a little ship (for they were not 
far from land, but as it were two 
hundred cubits) dragging the net 
with fishes. 



GREEK TEXT. 

ΙΤαι8ία, μη η-προσφαγιον ίχ€Τ€; 
Λπΐκρίθησαν αύτω, Ου. 

6 Ό δε elπ€u αΰτοις, JBaXere 
els τα δίζίά. μίρη τοΰ πλοίου το 
Βίκτυον, και €ύρησ€Τ€. Εβαλον 
ούν, και ουκ €τι αύτο (λκΰσαι 
Ίσχυσαν άττο τοΰ πλήθους των 
Ιχθύων. 

ι λβγ€ί ούν ό μαθητής• €Κίΐ• 
νος ον ηγαπα ό Ιησούς τω Hi- 
τ ρω, Ο κύριος (στι. Σίμων ουν 
Πίτρος, άκουσας otl 6 κυριός 
(στι, τον €πίνδυτην Βίίζώσατο• 
ην γαρ γυμνός• καΧ (βαλΐν ίαν- 
τον ίΐς την θάλασσαν 

8 οΐ 8e άλλοι μαθηταΐ τω 
πλοιαριω ήλθον ου γαρ ήσαν 
μακράν άπο της γης, αλλ ώς 
απο πηχών διακοσίων, σύροντας 
το δικτυον των Ιχθύων. 



REVISED VERSION. 

them, Children, have ye any 'thing 
to eat ? They answered him, No. 

6 And he said to them, 'Put in 
the net on the right side of the 
ship, and ye shall find. They 'put 
[it] in, therefore, and were 'no 
longer able to draw it, 'because 
of the multitude of the fishes. 



7 That disciple, therefore, whom 
Jesus loved, saith to Peter, It is 
the Lord. Simon Peter, there- 
fore, hearing, that it was the 
Lord, girded on [his] "overcoat 
(for he was naked), and cast him- 
self into the sea. 



8 But the other disciples came 
"by the "boat (for they were not 
far from the land, but 'about two 
hundred cubits ■Off), dragging the 
net with the fishes. 



' From the etymology of this word, it would appear to have 
been employed to describe something which was eaten along with 
bread, or the more substantial part of the repast. It does not 
seem, however, to be used here in so restricted a sense. Liddell 
and Schott give, as its N. Test, meaning, something to eat. The 
Germ. Verss. generally adopt the same rendering, though the 
most of them translate μη, not, which is, I think, wrong. — Penn, 
Kenrick, Murdock, Sharpe, and others. — Newc. (food) ; Camp. 
{victttals) ; Meyer {Zukost). 

I Put in seems to be a more appropriate rendering of βαλ- 
λειν, when spoken in reference to a net, than cast. — On the right 
side, literally, into the right parts, i. e., into that portion of the 
sea which is to the right of the vessel, called, the ship's right parts. 

» See ch. 4 : 42, N. x. 

' Because of, and for, in this connection, express, perhaps, 
precisely the same idea. I prefer the former, however, because 
it is not susceptible of any double meaning. This is, com- 
paratively, a rare sense of απο. — Ε. V., Matt. 18 : 7. — Murd., 
Pr. S.,-M. 



" This is the meaning of t7tevSvTr,s, as is evident from the 
etymology. — It is generally supposed, that Peter was not absolute- 
ly naked, but that he had on only his underclothing. However, 
we have no word that will ranslate γνμνοβ satisfactorily, except 
naL•d. 

" The boat was the means by which they came. It was also, 
it is true, that in which they came ; but this is not tlie truth ex- 
pressed. 

» Hkoiaqiov is elsewhere translated, boat (ch. 6 : 22, 23). This 
boat was doubtless the same in which the disciples were pursuing 
their avocations ; πΧοιον and πλοιαριον being used interchange- 
ably, as in ch. 6 : 22, 24. Hence, the article ought by all means 
to be rendered into English. 

ρ There can be no doubt, but that ώς is here used in the sense 
of ώαει, which is very generally translated, about. As it were, is, 
at least, partially obsolete. 

1 Απο is left untranslated in the E. V. This omission is un- 
necessary. — E. v., ch. 11 : 18. 



13S 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XXL 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

9 As soon then as they were 
come to hind, they saw a fire of 
coals there, and fish laid thereon, 
and bread. 

10 Jesns saith unto them, 
Bring of the fish which ye have 
now caught. 

11 Simon Peter went up, and 
drew the net to land full of 
great fishes, an hundred and 
fifty and three : and for all there 
were so many, yet was not the 
net broken. 



12 Jesus saith unto them, 
Come and dine. And none of 
the disciples durst ask him, 
Who art thou? 
was the Lord. 



knowing that it 



13 Jesus then cometh, and 
taketh bread, and giveth them, 
and fish likewise. 

14 This is now the third time 
that Jesus shewed himself to his 
disciples, after that he was risen 
from the dead. 

15 So when they had dined, 
Jesus saith to Simon Peter, Si- 



GRBEK TEXT. 

9 Ώί ούν άττίβησαν elf 7171» 
γην, βλζπουσίν άΐ'θρακίαν κΐί• 
μενην /cat οψαρων βττίκβιμίνον, 
καΙ άρτον. 

10 Aeyei αντοΐς ό Ίησοΰς, 
Ενίγκατβ άτΓΟ των οψαριων ων 
ίτηασατ€ νυν. 

11 Άνββη Σίμων Πίτροί, 
καΐ εί'λκυσβ το δίκτυον Ιττι τη$ 
γηί, μβστον Ιγθυων μίγαλων 
ίκατον πεντηκοντατριων και το- 
σούτων όντων, ουκ ίσ')(ί(τθη το 
δίκτυον. 

12 Aeyei αυτοΐς ο Ίησοΰί, 
Αβΰτ€ άριστησατζ. ουδζ\ζ δβ 
Ιτόλμα των μαθητών (ζίτασαι 
αύτον, Συ τί$• el; βίδοτίί οτι ο 

KVpLOS icTTLV. 

13 ('ρχεταί ούν ό Ίησοΰς, και 
λαμβάνβι τον άρτον καΐ δίδωσίν 
αύτοΐί, καΐ το οψαριον ομοίως. 

14 τ'οΰτο ηδη τρίτον (φανβ- 
ρώθη 6 Ίησοΰί τοΐί μαθηταΐί 
αυτού, iyepOeLS e'/c νεκρών. 

15 ' Οτβ ούν ηρίστησαν, Aeyet 
τω Σίμωνι ΙΙίτρω ό Ίησοΰζ, 



REVISED VERSION. 

9 "When, therefore, they «went 
off to the land, they see a fire of 
coals "lying, and fish lying 'upon 
it, and bread. 

i 

10 Jesus saith to them. Bring 
! of the "fishes which ye 'just now 

caught. 

11 Simon Peter went up, and 
drew the net to the land, full of 
great fishes, a hundred [and] 
fifty-three : and ''though there 
were so many, the net was not 
^toi'n. 



12 Jesus saith to them. Come, 
dine. And no one of the disci- 
ples -dared ask him. Who art 
THOU ? knowing that it was the 
Lord. 

13 Jesus, therefore, cometh, 
and taketh the bread, and giveth 
to them, and the fish likewise. 

14 This third [time] now 
•'was Jesus "^manifested to his 
disciples, being raised from the 
dead. 

15 When, therefore, they ''had 
dined, Jesus saith to Simon 



• See ch. 11 : 20, N. t. 

' To go away, or off, is the literal meaning of αποβαινειν, 
while to come falls far short of expressing the idea fully. — In 
Luke 5 : 2, this word is rendered, to go out. — Vulg., Beza, 
(descenderunt). 

" Newc, W., R. — Vulg., Trem., Beza, Erasm., (posiias) ; 
Sharpe (Zaid) ; Murd. (placed). 

' See Gen. Obs. 6. 

" The Greek is of the plural form ; and, as the English 
idiom is not opposed to it, I prefer the literal rendering. 

* See ch. 11 : 8, N. f. — The change of tense in the following 
yerb renders this change proper. 

y For all, in this connection, ie obsolete. Compare the 
English Version of a similar phrase in ch. 12 : 37. 

' Σχιζειν is generally translated, in the E. V., to rend, as in 
ch. 19 : 24, where it is spoken of a garment. There can be no 
doubt but that to rend would be more appropriate to the cir- 



cumstances here, than to break. But there is this objection 
to the word, rend ; that it is scarcely ever used at the present 
day. except in certain unusual styles of speaking and writing. 
Every modern writer, of good taste, would say, in reference to 
a net or garment, it was torn, not, it was rent, much less, it 
was broken. I have, therefore, here and in ch. 19 : 24, adopted 
tear, as the definition of σχιζειν. — Murd. (rent). 

* As dared is the regular form of the imperfect of this verb, 
and as durst is partially obsolete, I have thought it proper to 
propose a change. Some have thought that dared is too strong 
a term, and have adopted presumed, in place of it, (Wesl., 
Murd.); but this is, perhaps, a mistake, since dare is used 
sometimes in a very weak sense, as in the expression, " I dare 
say." — Penn. 

'' This verb is in the passive form, 
translation of it by the passive voice, 
pose this change. 

« See ch. 1 : 31, N. s. 

" See N. Γ, ch. 19 : 34. 



Nothing prevents the 
For this reason I pro- 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XXI. 



139 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

mon son of Jonas, lovest thou 
me more than these ? He saith 
unto him, Yea, Lord : thou know- 
est that I love thee. He saith 
unto him. Feed my himbs. 

16 He saith to him again 
the second time, Simon son of 
Jonas, lovest thou me "? He saith 
unto him, Yea Lord: thou know- 
est that I love thee. He saith 
unto him, Feed my sheep. 

17 He saith unto him the 
third time, Simon son of Jonas, 
lovest thou me ? Peter was 
grieved because he said unto 
him the third time, Lovest thou 
me ? And he said unto him, 
Lord, thou kuowest all things ; 
thou knowest that I love thee. 
Jesus saith unto him. Feed my 
sheep. 

18 Verily, verily, I say unto 
thee. When thou wast young, 
thou girdedst thyself, and walk- 
edst whither thou wouldest : but 
when thou shalt be old, thou όταν 
shalt stretch forth thy hands, 
and another shall gird thee, 
and carry thee whither thou 
wouldest not. 

19 This spake he signifying 
by what death he should glori- 



GREEK TEXT. 

Σίμων Ίωνα, άγαττα? μβ TrXeiov 
τούτων; Aeyei αυτω. Ναι Kvpie- 
συ οίδας οτί φιλώ σβ. Λίγβι 
αϋτω, Β6σκ€ τα άρνία μου. 

16 Λίγα αύτω πάλιν δευτβ- 
ρον, Σίμων Ιωνά, ayairas μ€ ; 
Aeyei αντω, JVal κυριβ• συ olSas 
OTL φιλώ σβ. Aeyei αυτω, 
ϋοίμαινβ τα πρόβατα μου. 

17 Λβγβι αντω το τρίτον, 
Σίμων Ίωνά, φιλ^ΐς• μ€ ; Έλυ- 
ττηθη ό Πίτροί, οτι emev αύτω 
το τρίτον, φιλβΐί μβ ; και βιπ€ν 
αύτω, Κύρΐί, συ πάντα oiSas' 
συ γινωσκβις οτι φιλώ σβ. Λί- 
γ€ΐ αύτω 6 Ίησοΰί, Βοσκΐ τα 
πρόβατα μου. 

18 άμην άμην λ€γω σοι, Ότί 
ηί νεώτίροΐ, βζωννυ€9 σίαυτον, 
και π€ρΐ€πατ€ΐί Όπου ηθ^λβς• 



δβ 



γηρασγ)ί, 



eKTeveis Tas 



γβΐράί σου, καΐ άλλο? σε ζωσ€ΐ, 
καΐ οίσ€ΐ όπου ού θβλβις. 



19 Τούτο δε είπε, σημαίνων 
ποίω θανάτω δοζάσβι τον θβον. 



REVISED VERSION. 

Peter, Simon, [son] of «Jonas, 
lovest thou me more than these? 
He saith to him, 'Yes, Lord ; 
THOU knowest tiiat I love thee. 
He saith to him. Feed my himbs. 
IG He saith to him again a 
second time, Simon, [son] of 
'Jonas, lovest thou me ? He saith 
to him, f Yes, Lord, thou knowest 
that I love thee. He saitli to 
him, ^Be a shepherd of my sheep. 

17 He saith to him the third 
[time,] Simon, [son] of 'Jonas, 
lovest tliou me ? Peter was 
grieved, because he said to him 
the third time, Lovest thou me ? 
And he said to him. Lord, thou 
knowest all things ; thou know- 
est that I love thee. Jesus saith 
to him, Feed my sheep. 

IS Verily, verily, I say to 
thee, AVheu thou wast ""younger, 
thou didst use to gird thyself, 
and walk 'where thou didst 
'wish ; Init, when thou art old, 
thou wilt stretch lOut thy hands, 
and another \vill gird thee, and 
carry thee whither thou dost 
not iwish. 

19 Now this he "said, signify- 
ing by what death he "-would 



' As this Jonas was not identical with any person mentioned 
in the 0. T. scriptures, I have not thought best to change the 
spelling, though I have done this in ch. 1 : 42, the onl}' place 
where this name is spelled without an s. 

f See ch. 11 : 27. N. y. 

^ After a careful examination of various passages, in the 
N. T., and in the Sept., in which ποιμαινειν occurs, as also of a 
very great number of translations and commentaries, I have 
come to the conclusion, that no one word, in our language, fully 
expresses its meaning in the connection in which it is here 
used, but that the periphrasis, to be a shepherd of. carries with 
it the whole force of the original. Those wlio desire further 
light on this subject, I would refer witli pleasure to the elabo- 
rate Note (s) of the A. B. Union, on Matt. 2 : 6, in their Ee- 
vision of the first and second chapters of that Gospel, recently 
issued. 

i" The Greek is comparative. I can not conceive why so 
many translators have rendered it by the positive. — Vulg., 
Beza, Erasm., W., R., Sharpe, Keur., Germ., De W. Meyer. 

' Vulg., W., and R., render this όπου as I have done, where. 



I can see no evidence that the verb here describes motion, or 
tendency, totcards any particular place or object. 

1 See ch. 1 : 43, N. y. 

k See ch. 1 : 43, N. z. 

1 See ch. 1 : 15, N. g. 

■» If this verb were subjunctive, in form, (5ο|ασ;,,) I should 
not hesitate to adopt the rendering of the E. V., shoiUd glorify. 
But it is indicative— literally, will glorify. Our idiom, how- 
ever, will not admit of the literal rendering, which would con- 
vey to the English reader a wrong idea ; namely, that John 
wrote this before the death of Peter, and in the full assurance 
that he should yet fulfill the Savior's symbolical prediction, as 
to the circumstances and manner of his death. This idiomatic 
peculiarity may be illustrated by comparison with ch. 20 : 14, 
where εατι is present, but must be rendered by the past tense 
into English. "And knew not that it is Jesus," would not 
make sense in English, though entirely literal. So " by what 
death he will glorify God," though entirely literal, and though 
it makes a sense, does not convey to the English ear the sense 
intended. To convey this sense properly requires, in each 
case, the substitution of the past for the present. 



140 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XXI. 



KING JAMES VERSION. 

fy God. And when he had 
spoken this, he saith unto him, 
Follow me. 

20 Then Peter, turning about, 
seeth the disciple whom Jesus 
loved, following; (which also 
leaned on his breast at supper, 
and said. Lord, which is he that 
betrayeth thee ?) 

21 Peter seeing him, saith to 
Jesus, Lord, and what shall this 
man do ? 

22 Jesus saith unto him. If 
I will that he tarry till I come, 
what is that to thee? Follow 
thou me. 

23 Then went this saying 
abroad among the brethren, that 
that disciple should not die : 
yet Jesus said not unto him. 
He shall not die ; but, If I will 
that he tarry till I come, what 
is that to thee ? 



24 This is the disciple which 
testifieth of these things, and 
wrote these things : and we 
know that his testimony is true. 

25 And there are also many 
other things which Jesus did, 
the which, if they should be 
written every one, I suppose 
that even the world itself could 
not contain the books that should 
be written. Amen. 



GREEK TEXT. 

/cat TOVTO €ΐπων Aeyet αυτω, 
Ακολούθα μοι. 

20 'ΈτηστραφίΙς δε ό Jlerpos 
βλίττα rou μαθητην, ον ηγαττα ο 
Ίησονί, άκολουθονντα, ο? και 
aveTTtaev tv τω Benrvco βτη το 
στήθος αντοΰ και (lire, Kvpie, 
τις Ιστιν ο τταραδιδονί σ€ ; 

21 Τούτον Ιδωΐ' ό Πέτρος 
Aeyei τω Ίησον, Κυρίΐ, ούτος 
Be τι ; 

22 Aeyet αυτω ο ^Ιησούς, 
Jl,av αυτόν ΟβΑω μενειν ίως ep- 
χομαι, τι ττρος ae ; συ ακολούθα 
μοι. 

23 'Έξηλθΐν ούν ο λόγος 
ούτος βις τους άδβλφους, Οτι ο 
μαθητής βκβΐνος ουκ άττοθνησκα- 
KOLi οΰκ eiVer αύτω ό Ιησούς, 
ΟΤΙ οΰκ άτΓοθνησκίΐ• αλλ , Εαν 
αυτόν θβλω μβνβιν βως ί'ρχομαι, 
τι προς σ€ ; 

24 ΟΥΤΟΣ ίστίν h μαθητής 
ό μαρτύρων irepX τούτων, κοα 
γράψας ταύτα• καΐ ο'ίδαμίν οτι 
αληθής Ιστιν ή μαρτυρία αυτού. 

25 ί'στί δΐ καΐ άλλα ττολλα 
οσα ΐττοίησίν Ό 'Ιησούς, ατινα 
eav γράφηται καθ' ev, ούδί αυτόν 
οΐμαι τον κόσμον γωρησαι τα 
γραφόμ€να βιβλία. Αμήν. 



REVISED VERSION. 

glorify God. And, on 'saying 
this, he saith to him, Follow me. 

20 And Peter, turning about, 
seeth the disciple whom Jesus 
loved following, who also "re- 
clined, "during the supper, upon 
his breast, and said, Lord, who 
is he that betrayeth thee ? 

21 Peter, seeing him, saith 
to Jesus, Lord, and what [of] 

'HIM? 

22 Jesus saith to him. If I 
am Jwilling that he "abide till 
I come, what is it to thee? 
Follow THOU me. 

23 This saying, therefore, 
went abroad among the brethren, 
That that disciple would not 
die. And Jesus did not say to 
him, 'That he shall not die ; but, 
If I am iwilling that he 'abide 
till I come, what is it to thee? 



24 This is the disciple who 
testifieth of these things, and 
wrote these things ; and we 
know, that his testimony is true. 



25 And there are also many 
other things which Jesus did, 
which, if they were written 
every one, I suppose that not 
even the world itself would con- 
tain the books written. 'Amen. 



" See ch. 13 : 25, N. w. 

• See ch. 2 : 23, N. q. 

ρ Literally, And he, — what? But this scarcely conTeys 
any idea in English. I think it will not be doubted, that the 
meaning is, "And what hast thou to say in reference to him, 
and HIS future course in this life ?" If it were necessary to 
Bupplj' the ellipsis, shall suffer would be quite as proper, and 
much more in keeping with the context, than shall do. I think, 
however, that the rendering proposed is exactly the English 
of the Greek phrase, and conveys, with almost no supply at all, 
the exact meaning intended. 

1 See ch. 1 : 33, N. z. 

■■ I see nothing here to prevent the translation of ότι. 



• Editors generally reject this Αμήν. I would, therefore, 
recommend that it be disregarded in the revision. 



Almost all scholars agree in the opinion, that this last 
chapter is a Supplement to the Gospel proper, which closes 
with the preceding chapter. There is, however, considerable 
difference of opinion, as to its authenticity. Schott, Lucke, 
De Wette, and many others, consider the whole chapter spuri- 
ous ; some of them conjecturing that it may have been written 
by John the Presbyter, or some confidential friend of the 
Apostle John. — Olshausen, Meyer, and not a few others, con- 
sider the last two verses spurious, while they hold the rest to 
be authentic. — Penn, and some others, reject only the last 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. XXI. 



141 



Terse. — Bloomfleld, and many others, consider the whole 
chapter authentic. 

For the rejection of the first 24 verses, I can not see that 
there is any external authority whatever, either from MSS., 
Verss., or tradition; while the internal evidence relied upon 
by those who reject them, is, in my opinion, altogether un- 
satisfactorj'. Against the authenticity of the last verse, there 
is, it is alleged, some slight external, and very strong internal 
evidence. — 1. One MS. (Cod. 63,) wants this verse altogether. 
This MS. is of no great antiquity, and, consequently, of but 
little authority. — 2. Several MSS. (see Birch's Note, m loco.) 
have scholia attached to this verse, commencing thus, " άλλοι 
δε π^οαΟ'ηχηΐ' είναι τούτο ψασιν, χ. τ. λ." " But others say 
that this is an addition, &c." But these scholia make no men- 
tion of any MSS. in which the verse was then wanting ; whence 
the inference is natural.^ that it was found in all copies then 
existing. These two are the only items of external evidence 
that I have yet seen. — 3. It is said, that the hyperbole con- 
tained in this verse is altogether unnatural, and out of cha- 
racter, and could not have proceeded from John himself, nor, 
indeed, from any other apostle, or inspired teacher. I am 
satisfied that the various objections to the authenticity of this 
verse are not well founded, and are by no means well sustained 
by the evidences adduced. Without entering into a length- 
ened discussion of this question, I shall simply assign two 
reasons for not entertaining the conclusions of those who re- 
ject this verse. 

1. I consider the external evidence adduced as next to noth- 
ing. One single JIS., of inferior age, can have little weight, 
when opposed to the united testimonies of all the rest, 
especially in determining the authenticity of a passage. As 
to the scholia referred to above, it seems to me that those 
who have quoted them against the genuineness of this passage, 
have failed to notice one important fact ; namely, that it is not 
asserted in these scholia that there was, or ever had been, a 
single MS. in which this passage was wanting ; or, that there 
was even any existing tradition, affecting its authenticity. 
That the reader may be able to judge for himself, how far the 
evidence of these scholia goes, I subjoin Penn's translation of 
that found in Wetstein's Cod. 36, which is almost, if not quite, 
identical with those referred to by Birch, as cited above. — 
" Others," saj-s the scholiast, "say, this last verse is an addi- 
tion,• that some one of the philoponists having placed it out 
of the text, in order to assert, that the miracles wrought by 
our Lord, were more in number than those recorded ; some 
other, through ignorance of the intention of the former, brought 
it within the te.xt ; and having been thus made a part of the 
scripture of the Gospel, time and custom brought it to be in- 
troduced into all the Gospels ; and thus it obtained a firm 
opinion in all believers, that it truly formed a part, and the 
conclusion, of the things written by the Evangelist." — Now 
observe, that the scholiast merely informs us, that others said, 
that this last verse was an addition. On what authority they 
said so, he does not inform us. And is it not fair to infer, that 
their only authority was conjecture ; and that their conjectures 
were of a piece with those of modern critics 1 Surely, as con- 



jectures, the former are entitled to no more consideration than 
the latter. It is very likely, too, that the omission of this 
verse, in Cod. 63, may have been occasioned by the influence 
of these same conjectures. 

2. I do not consider the hyperbole contained in this verse, 
a7iy sufficient evidence against its authenticity. There are in- 
stances of hyperbole in other parts of the Scriptures, whose 
authenticity has never been questioned. (See Gen. 11 : 4. 
Num. 13 : 33. Deut. 1 : 28. Dan. 4 : 11. Also, ch. 12 : 19.) 
Indeed, hyperbole appears to be an important element in the 
oriental style, as has been shown by Bp. Pearce, in numerous 
quotations from Josephus, the Rabbins, and many others. 
Now, if any deviation of this kind from the strict letter of 
truth is allowable, whose province is it to decide where the 
hyperbole shall stop ? Has the author of the Scriptures de- 
fined its limits ? I apprehend not. Whoever wrote this verse 
could not have been so ignorant as not to know, that the literal 
meaning of his statement was wholly irreconcilable with truth. 
He could not, therefore, have meant to be understood literally. 
Now, what right have we to denounce him for having made too 
free a use of hyperbole ? Do we not all use language at times, 
that literally conveys a meaning far stronger than we intend '? 
Do we feel, that, in so doing we are guilty of impropriety 1 
Why, then, should we complain of this writer, who has done 
nothing worse than simply to exceed ourselves, in the use of 
the same figure of speech ? Is any reader, of ordinary capa- 
city, misled by the statement? Had the writer said, "I sup- 
pose that even the largest library would not contain the books 
written," he would have spoken hyperbolically ; yet who, in 
that case, would have complained Ί Who coidd have mis- 
taken his meaning, or design ? While, then, we certainly have 
here a very strong case of hyperbole, I confess 1 can see no 
moral difference between this and numerous other cases, 
against which no reasonable person \vould think of making 
any objection. But the supposed unnaturalness of this_ 
hyperbole is almost the only internal evidence relied upon to 
prove the spuriousness of the passage. This whole supple- 
mentary chapter, therefore, should be retained, as an Appendix 
to the Gospel history, written by the Evangelist himself, (as 
it claims to be, in the 24th verse.) perhaps long after he had 
written, and first published his Gospel, yet so early still, that, 
as far as is known, not a vestige of doubt existed in the minds 
of the early disciples, as to its authenticity. 

The above remarks are based upon the assumption, that 
the popular interpretation of this passage is the true one. 
Tliere are. however, those whose opinions are entitled to our 
serious consideration, who contend that there is here no 
hyperbole — that the Evangelist is not speakmg only of those 
things which Jesus did during his personal ministry on earth, 
but that he refers to all that he ever did, in the entire king- 
dom of creation and providence, from the beginning of the 
world to the time of writing. This view, if true, ivould not 
only free the passage from suspicion, but would even afford 
strong presumptive evidence of its authenticity. But of the 
relative merits of different theories of interpretation, the 
reader must judge. 



REVISED VERSION: 



IN PARAGRAPHS, 



AND 



ACCORDIM TO THE EE COMMENDATIONS IN THE NOTES. 



REVISED VERSION. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. 



1 I. In the beginning was tlie "Word, and 
tlie "Word was with God ; and the Word was 

2 God. He was in tlie beginning with God. 

3 All things were made by him ; and without 
him was not even one thing made that has 

4 been made. In bim was life; and the Life 

5 was the ligbt of men. And the Light shines 
in the darkness ; and tlie darkness compre- 
liended it not. 

6 II. There was a man, sent from God, liis 

7 name was John. He came for testimony, 
that he miglit testify of the Light, so tliat all 

8 might believe through him. He was not the 
Light ; but was sent that he might testify of 

9 the Light. The true Light, which enlightens 

10 every man, came into the world. He was in 
the world, and the world was made by him, 

11 and the world knew him not. He came to his 

12 own, and his own received him not. But as 
many as received bim, to them gave he power 
to become children of God, even to those be- 

1:3 lieving on iiis name: who were begotten, not 
of blood, nor of a will of flesh, nor of a will of 

14 man, but of God. And the Word became 
flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we saw bis 
glory, a glory as of one only begotten of a 

15 father,) full of grace and of truth. John testi- 
fies of him, and has cried, saying. He it was 
of whom I said, He that comes after me is be- 



' Greek, bloods. 



come before me ; because he was before me. 
^Because out of his fullness we all received, and 16 
grace above grace. Because the law was 17 
given through Moses : the grace, and the 
truth, came through Jesus Christ. No one 18 
has ever seen God : the only begotten Son, 
who was in the bosom of the Father, he 
made him known. 

III. And this is the testimony of John, 19 
when the Jews sent from Jerusalem Priests 
and Levites, that they might ask him, Who art 
THOU ? And he confessed and denied not ; 20 
yea, he confessed: I am not the Christ. And 21 
they asked him, What then ? Art thou Elijah '? 
And lie says, I am not. Art thou the Pro- 
phet? And he answered: No. They said to 22 
him, therefore. Who art thou "? that we may 
give an answer to those who sent us. What 
sayest thou of th3'self"? He said, I [am] a 23 
voice of one crying in the wilderness. Make 
straight the way of the Lord, as said Isaiah 
tbe prophet. And those who had been sent 24 
were of tbe Pharisees. And they asked him, 25 
and said to him, Why, then, dost thou im- 
merse, if thou art not the Christ, nor Elijah, 
nor the Prophet ? John answered them, say- 26 
ing, I immerse in water : but in midst of you 
stands one Λνΐιοηι rou know not : %e that 27 

* Some copies read, And out of his fullness. &c. 
^ According to some copies. He it is that comes after me, 
icho is become before me, &c. 



146 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 2. VII. 



comes aftor mo, the string of wliose sandal I 
23 am not worthy to loose. These things were 
done in 'Bethany beyond the Jordan, where 
Joim was immersing. 

29 IV. Tlie next day, ^he sees Jesus coming to 
him, and says, Behold the Lamb of God, who 

30 takes away the sin of the world ! He it is of 
whom I said, After me comes a man who is 
become before me, because he was before me. 

3i And I knew him not : but, that he might be 
manifested to Israel, because of this I came 

32 immersing in the water. And John testified, 
saying, I have seen the Spirit coming down 
from lieaven like a dove, and it abode upon 

33 him. And I knew him not : but he that sent 
me to immerse in water, he said to me. Upon 
whomsoever thou shalt see the Spirit coming 
down and abiding upon him, he it is that im- 

34 merses in Holy Spirit. And I have seen and 
testified, that this is the Son of God. 

3-5 V. The next day again John was standing, 

36 and two of bis disciples ; and looking upon 
Jesus walking, he says. Behold the Lamb of 

37 God ! And the two disciples heard him 

38 speaking, and followed Jesus. And Jesus, 
turning, and seeing them following, says to 
them, "What are you seeking? And they said 
to him, Eabbi, (which, interpreted, means, 

39 Teacher,) where abidest thou? He says to 
them, Come and see. They came, and saw- 
where he abode, and abode with him that 

40 day. It was about the tenth hour. Andrew, 
the brother of Simon Peter, was one of the 
two who heard from John, and followed him. 

41 He first finds his own brother, Simon, and 
says to him. We have ibund the Messiah 

42 (which is interpreted, Anointed). And he 
brought him to Jesus. And Jesus, looking 
upon him, said. Thou art Simon, the son of 
Jonas : thou shalt be called Cephas (which 
is interpreted, A Stone). 

43 VI. The next day ''he Λvished to go out into 
Galilee ; and he finds Philip, and says to him. 



' A few copies have, Bethabara. 

* According to some copies, John sees. See. 

^ According to some copies, Jesus wished, &c. 



Follow me. Now Philip was of Bethsaida, of 44 
the city of Andrew and Peter. Philip finds 45 
Nathanael, and says to him. We have found 
him of whom wrote Moses, (in the law,) and 
the Prophets, Jesus, the son of Joseph, the 
one of Nazareth. And Nathanael said to him, 46 
Can any thing good be of Nazareth ? Philip 
says to him, Come, and see. Jesus saw Na- 47 
thanael coming to him, and says of him. Be- 
hold an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile ! 
Nathanael says to liim, AVhence knowest tliou 4S 
me? Jesus answered, and said to him. Before 
that Philip called thee, when thou wast under 
the fig-tree, I saw thee. Nathanael answered, 49 
and says to him, Eabbi, thou art the Son of 
God ; THOU art the King of Israel ! Jesus 50 
answered, and says to him. Because I said to 
t'aee, I saw thee under the fig-tree, believest 
thou? Thou shalt see greater things than 
these. And he says to him. Verily, veril}', I 51 
say to you, Hereafter you shall see the heaven 
opened, and the angels of God going up and 
coming down upon the Son of man. 

VII. And the third day there was a mar- 2 
riage in Cana of Galilee ; and the mother of 
Jesus was there. And both Jesus was called, 2 
and his disciples, to the marriage. And, the 3 
wine failing, the mother of Jesus says to him. 
They have no wane. Jesus says to her, 4 
Woman, what hast thou to do with me ? My 
hour is not yet come. His mother says to 5 
the servants, Whatever he may say to you, 
do. Now there were there six water-pots of 6 
stone, standing according to the purifying of 
the Jews, holding two or three ''metretas [16 
to 24 gallons'] apiece. Jesus says to them, 7 
Fill the water-pots with water. And they 
filled them up to the brim. And he says 8 
to them. Draw out now, and bear to the 
governor of the feast. And they bore it. And 9 
when the governor of the feast tasted the 
water that was made wine, and knew not 
whence it was (but the servants who had 



* The metrela was equal to about eight gallons. 



HE GOSPEL. BY JUilN. CHAP. 3. XII. 



147 



drawn the water, knew)tlie governor of the 

10 feast calls the hridegrooin, and says to him, 
Every man at first sets down the good wine, 
and when they have drunk freely, then the 
worse : thou hast kept the good wiue till 

11 now. This heginning of the signs Jesus did 
in Cana of Galilee, and manifested his glory ; 
and his disciples believed on him. 

12 Vni. After this he went down to Caper- 
naum, himself, and his mother, and his broth- 
ers, and his disciples ; and tlicre they abode 
not many days. 

13 IX. And the Passover of the Jews was 

14 near : and Jesus went up to Jerusalem, and 
found in the temple those selling oxen, and 
sheep, and doA'es, and the money-changers 

15 sitting. And, making a whip of small cords, 
he drove all out of the temple, both the 
sheep and the oxen, and poured out the 
mone}'^ of the money-changer?, and overthrew 

16 the tables ; and to those selling the doves he 
said, Take these tilings hence: make notniyFa- 

17 ther's house a house of merchandise. And 
his disciples remembered that it had been 
written, The zeal of thy house Ms eating me 

18 up. The Jews, therefore, answered, and said 
to him, What sign showest thou to us, since 

19 thou doest these things? Jesus answered, 
and said to them, Destroy this temple, and in 

20 three days I will raise it up. The Jews, 
therefore, said. Forty and six j'ears was this 
temple in building, and wilt thou raise it up 

21 in three days? But he spoke of the temple 

22 of his body. When, therefore, he was raised 
from the dead, his disciples remembered that 
he said this ; and they believed the scripture, 
and the word which Jesus said. 

23 X. Now when he was in Jerusalem, at the 
Passover, during the feast, many believed on 
his name, seeing his signs which he was 

24 doing. But Jesus himself did not trust him- 
self to them, on account of his knowing 

25 [them] all, and because he had no need that 



« A 



few copies have, did eat me up. 



any one should testify of man ; for he himself 
knew what was in man. 

XI. AxD there was a man, of the Pharisees, 3 
his name was Xicodemus, a ruler of the Jews. 
He came to -him by night, and said to him, 2 
Rubbi, we know that thou hast come from 
God as a teacher : for no one can do these 
signs which thou doest, if God be not with 
him. Jesus answered, and said to him, 3 
Verily, verily, I say to thee, If any one be 
not born from above, he cannot see the 
kingdom of God. Xicodemus sa}'s to him, 4 
How can a man be born, being old ? Can he 
enter a second time into his mother's womb, 
and be born? Jesus answered: Verily, verily, 5 
I say to thee, If any one be not born of water 
and the Spirit, he can not enter into the kingdom 
of God. What has been born of the flesh, is 6 
flesh ; and what has been born of the Spirit, is 
spirit. «Do not wonder, because I said to 7 
thee. You must be born from above. The S 
Spirit breathes where he will, and thou 
hearest his voice ; but thou knowest not 
whence he comes, and whither he goes : so is 
every one that has been born of the Spirit. 

XII. Xicodemus answered, and said to him, 9 
How can these things be ? Jesus answered, 10 
and said to him. Thou art the teacher of 
Israel,• and knowest thou not these things ? 
Verily, verily, I say to thee. What we know 11 
we speak, and what we have seen we testify ; 
and you receive not our testimonj'. If I told 12 
you earthly things, and you believe not, how, 
if I tell you heavenly things, will you believe? 
And no one has gone up into heaven, ex- 13 
cept he tliat came down out of heaven, the Son 
of man who was in heaven. And as Moses 14 
lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so 
must the Son of man be lifted up : that every 15 
one that believes on him may ^have eternal 
life. For God so loved the world tiiat he 16 
gave his Son, the Only Begotten, that every 



' According to some copies, to Jesus by night, &c. 
' Many copies read, motj not perish, but have, &c. 



148 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 4. XV. 



one that believes on him might not perish, but 

17 have eternal life. For God sent not his Son 
into the Avorld, that he might condemn the 
world, but that tlie world through him might 

18 be saved. He that believes on him is not 
condemned ; but he that believes not has 
been condemned already, because he has not 
believed on the name of the only begotten 

19 Son of God. And tliis is the condemnation, 
that the light has come into the word, and 
men loved the darkness rather than the light ; 

20 for their works Avere evil. For every one 
that does evil things hates the light, and 
comes not to the light, that his works may 

21 not be reproved. But he that does the truth 
comes to the light, so that his works may 
be manifested, that they have been wrought 
in God. 

22 ΧΠΙ. After these things came Jesus and 
his disciples into the Judean land, and there 
he tarried with them, and was immersing. 

23 And John also was immersing in ^Enon, near 
to Saliui, because there were many waters 
there : and they were coming and being 

24 immersed. For Jolm had not yet been cast 

25 into the prison. There was, therefore, a 
question between the disciples of John and a 

26 Jew, about purifying. And they came to 
John, and said to him, Rabbi, he who was 
with thee beyond the Jordan, to whom thou 
hast testified, behold, he is immersing, and 

27 all are coming to him. John answered, and 
said, A man can receive nothing, except it 

2S hath been given him from heaven. You your- 
selves testify to me, that I said, I am not the 
Christ, but that I have been sent before him. 

29 He that has the bride, is the bridegroom. Now 
the friend of the bridegroom, who stands and 
hears him, rejoices with joy, because of the 
bridegroom's voice: this, therefore, my joy, 

80 has been fulfilled. He must increase, but I 

131 [must] decrease. He that comes from above 
is above all. He that is of the earth, of the 
earth he is, and of the eartli he speaks. He 

S2 that comes froin heaven is above all. And 
what he has seen and heard, this he testifies ; 



and no one receives his testimony. He that 33 
receives his testimony, hath set his seal, that 
God is true. For he whom God sent speaks tlie 34 
words of God: for ^God gives not the Spirit 
by measure. The Father loves the Son, and 35 
has given all things into his hand. He that 36 
believes on the Son has eternal life : but he 
that obeys not the Son shall not see life ; but 
the wrath of God abides upon him. 

XIV. When, therefore, the Lord knew, 4 
that the Pharisees had heard, That Jesus was 
making and immersing more disciples than 
John ; (though Jesus himself did not immerse, 2 
but his disciples ;) he left Judea, and went 3 
away again into Galilee. And it was ne- 4 
cessary that he should go through Samaria. 

XV. He comes, therefore, to a city of 5 
Samaria called Sychar, near to the piece of 
ground wliicli Jacob gave to his son Joseph. 
Now Jacob's well was there. Jesus, there- 6 
fore, having become weary from the journey, 
was sitting thus on the well. It was about 
the sixth hour. Tliere comes a woman of 7 
Samaria to draw water. Jesus says to her. 
Give me to drink. (For his disciples were 8 
gone away into the city, tliat they might buy 
provisions.) The Samaritan woman, there- 9 
fore, says to him. How dost thou, being a 
Jew, ask drink of me, wlio am a Samaritan 
woman ? For Jews have no dealings with 
Samaritans. Jesus answered, and said to her, 10 
If thou didst know the gift of God, and who 

it is that says to thee, Give me to drink, 
THOU Λvouldst ask him, and he would give 
thee living water. Tiie woman says to him, 1 1 
Sir, thou hast nothing to draw with, and tlie 
well is deep : whence, tlien, hast thou the 
living water ? Art thou greater than our 12 
father Jacob, who gave us tlie well, and drank 
of it himself, and his sons, and his cattle ? 
Jesus answered, and said to her, Every one 13 
that drinks of this water will thirst again. 
But whoever drinks of the water which I 14 

' According to some copies, for he gives not, &c. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 4. XVIH. 



149 



will give him, shall nevei- thirst; but the 
wiiti'i• which I will give him shall become 
ill him a well of water, springing up in- 

15 to eternal life. The woman says to him, Sir, 
give me this water, that I may not thirst, uor 

16 come hither to draw. Jesus says to her, Go, 

17 call th)»^ husband, and come hither. The 
woman answered, and said, I have no hus- 
band. Jesus says to her, Well didst thou 

IS say, I have no liusband. For thou hast had five 
husbands, and he whom thou now hast is not 
thy husband. This hast thou spoken truly. 

19 The Λνοηιβη says to him. Sir, I see that thou 

20 art a prophet. Our lathers worshiped in this 
mountain ; and you say that in Jerusalem is 

21 the place where one ought to worship. Je- 
sus says to her, Woman, believe me, that an 
hour is coming, when neither in this mount- 
ain, nor in Jerusalem, will you worship the 

22 Father. You worship what you know not : 
WE worship what we know : because salva- 

23 tion is of the Jews. But an hour is coming, 
and now is, when the true worshipers will 
worship the Father in spirit and truth ; for 
the Father also seeks such as his worshijiers. 

24 God [is] a spirit ; and those who worship 

25 him must worship in spirit and truth. The 
woman says to him, I know that Messiah is 
coming (who is called Christ) : when he 

26 comes, he will tell us all things. Jesus says 
to her, I, who am talking to thee, am [He.] 

27 And upon this his disciples came, and won- 
dered that he was talking with a Λνοη:3η : 
nevertheless no one said. What seekest thou "? 
or. Why art thou talking with her? 

2S XVI. The woman, therefore, left her water- 
pot, and went away into the city, and says to 

29 the men. Come, see a man, who told me all 
things that I ever did. Is this the Christ ? 

30 They went forth out of tlie city, and 
were coming to him. 

31 XVII. And in the meantime, his disciples 
33 kept asking him, saying, Rabbi, eat. But he 

said to them, I have food to eat, of which 

33 YOU know not. The disciples, therefore, said, 

one to another. Did any one bring him [any 



thing] to eat? Jesus says to them. My 34 
food is, to do the will of him that sent 
me, and finish iiis work. Do not you 35 
say. That it is yet four months, and the 
hai-vest is coming? Behold, I say to you, 
Lift up your eyes, and see the fields, that 
they are white already to harvest. And the 36 
reaper receives a reward, and gathers fruit 
to eternal life ; so that both the sower, and 
the reaper may rejoice together. For in this 37 
the true saying is. That one is the sower, and 
another the reaper. I sent you to reap that 38 
on which you have not labored : others have 
labored, and you are entered into their labor. 
And many of the Samaritans of that city be- 39 
lieved on him, because of the saying of the 
woman, testilying, He told me all things that 
I ever did. When, therefore, the Samaritans 40 
came to him, they kept asking him to abide 
with them : and he abode there two da3^s. 
And many more believed, because of his 41 
word ; and said to the woman. We no longer 42 
believe because of thy saying ; for we our- 
selves have heard ; and we know that this is 
indeed 'the Savior of the world. 

XVIII. Now after the two days he went 43 
out thence ^into Galilee. For Jesus himself 44 
testified, that a prophet has no honor in his 
own country. When, therefore, he came into 45 
Galilee, the Galileans received him, having 
seen all things which he did in Jerusalem, 
duiing the Feast : for they also themselves 
came to the Feast. He came, therefore, 46 
again into Cana of Galilee, where he made 
the water wine. And there was a certain 
nobleman, whose son Avas sick in Capernaum. 
He, hearing that Jesus was come out of 47 
Judea into Galilee, went to him, and was 
asking him, that he would come down and 
heal his son : fur he was about to die. Je- 48 
sus, therefore, said to him. If you see not 
signs and wonders, j'ou will not believe. 
The nobleman says to him, Sir, come down, 49 



' Some copies haye, the Christ, the Savior of the world. 
^ Some copies insert here, and went away. 



150 



TPIE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 5. XX. 



50 before my cliild die. Jesus says to him, Go, 
thy son is living. And the man believed the 
word whicli Jesus said to liim, and was 

51 going. And as he was now going down, his 
servants met him, and told, saying, Thy child 

52 is living. He inquired of them, therefore, 
the hour in which he grew better. And 
they said to him. Yesterday, at the seventh 

53 hour, the fever left him. The father, there- 
tore, knew that [it was] in that hour in 
which Jesus said to him. Thy son is living. 
And he himself believed, and all his house. 

54 This again, a second sign, Jesus did, on 
coming out of Judea into Galilee. 

5 XIX. After these things there was a feast 
of the Jews, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem. 

2 Now tJiere is in Jerusalem, by the Sheep-[gate,] 
a pool, which is called iu Hebrew, Bethesda, 

3 having five porches. In these Avere lying a 
'great multitude of the sick, blind, lame, wither- 

4 ed, waiting for tlie moving of the water. For 
an angel used to go down at a certain time into 
the pool, and trouble tlie water : he, therefore, 
who first went in, after the troubling of the 
water, used to be made Avhole, of whatever 

5 disease he was held. And a certain man was 
there, who was thirty-eight years in feeble 

6 health. Jesus, seeing him lying, and knowing 
that he had now been [so] a long time, says to 

7 him. Dost thou Avish to be made whole? The 
sick man answered him. Sir, I have no man, 
that, when the water is troubled, he may put 
me into the pool : but Avhile I am coming, 

8 another goes down before me. Jesus says to 

9 him, Rise, take up thy bed, and walk. And 
immediately the man was made whole, and took 
up liis bed, and was walking. And it Avas Sab- 

10 bath, on that day. The Jews, therefore, said 
to him tliat had been healed. It is Sabbath : it 

11 is not lawful for thee to carry the bed. He 
answered them. He that made me whole, he 
said to me, Take up thy bed, and walk. 

12 They asked him, therefore. Who is the man 



Some copies omit, great. 



that said to thee, Take up thy bed, and 
walk. But he that was healed knew not 13 
who he was ; for Jesus conveyed himself 
away, a multitude being in the place. After 14 
these things, Jesus finds him in the temple, 
and said to him. Behold, thou hast been 
made whole : sin no more, lest sometliing 
worse may happen to thee- The man went 15 
away, and told the Jews, that it was Jesus 
Avho made him whole. 

XX. And because of this the Jews were 16 
persecuting Jesus,^ because he kept doing 
these things on Sabbath. But Jesus answer- 17 
ed them. My Father works till now, and I 
work. Because of this, therefore, the Jews IS 
were seeking the more to kill him, because 
not only was he breaking the Sabbath, but 
he also said that God was his own Father, 
making himself equal with God. Jesus, 19 
therefore, answered, and said to them, Verily, 
verily, I say to you. The Son can do nothing 
of himself, if he see not the Father doing 
any thing : for whatever things he does, 
these also the Son does likewise. For the 20 
Father loves the Son, and shows him all 
things which he himself does : and he will 
show him greater works than these, that you 
may wonder. For as the Father raises up, and 21 
quickens the dead, so also the Son quickens 
whom he will. For the Father does not even 22 
judge any one, but has given all judgment 
to the Son : so that all may honor the Son, 23 
even as they honor the Father. He that honors 
not the Son, honors not the Father who 
sent him. Verily, verilj', I say to you, He 24 
that hears my word, and believes him that 
sent me, has eternal life, and comes not into 
condemnation, but has passed out of death 
into life. Verily, verily, I say to you. That 25 
an hour is coming, and now is, when the 
dead will hear the voice of the Son of God, 
and those hearing will live. For as the Fa- 26 
ther has life in himself, so also he gave to 
the Son to have life in himself; and he gave 27 

^ Some copies insert liere, and seeking to kill him. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 



XXII. 



151 



him power nlso to execute judgment, because he 

28 is the Son of man. Wonder not at this : be- 
cause an hour is coming, in which all those 

29 in the tombs will hear his voice, and come 
forth ; those who did good things, to a re- 
surrection of life, and those who did evil 
things, to a resurrection of condemnation. 

30 I can of mj-self do nothing. As I hear, I 
judge: and my judgment is just, because I 
seek not my own will, but tlie will of him 

31 that sent me. If I testify of myself, my 

32 testimony is not true. There is another who 
testifies of rie, and I know that the testi- 
mony which he testifies of me is true. 

33 XXI. You have sent to John, and he has 

34 testified to the truth. But I receive not 
testimony from man ; but these things I say, 

33 tliat YOU may be saved. He was the burn- 
ing and sliining lamp, and you were willing, 

36 for a time, to rejoice in his light. But I 
have testimony greater than [that] of John : 
for the works which the Father gave me, 
that I might finish them, the works them- 
selves which I do, testify of me, that the 

37 Father has sent me. And the Father who 
sent me, himself has testified of λιε. Neither 
have you ever heard his voice, or seen his 

38 shape. And you have not his word abiding in 
you ; because whom he sent, him you believe 

39 not. Y"ou search the Scriptures, because you 
think in them to have eternal life ; and they 

40 are those testifying of me. And you are not 
willing to come to me, that you may have 

41 life. I receive not glory from men. But I 
know you, that you have not the love of God 

43 in yourselves. I am come in my Father's 
name, and you receive me not ; if another 
come in his own name, him you will receive. 

44 How can you believe, receiving glory one 
from another, and you seek not the glory 

45 that is from the only God? Do not think that 
I will accuse you to the Father. There is 
one that accuses you, Moses, in whom you 

46 have hoped. For if you believed Moses, you 

47 would believe me, for he wrote of me. But 



if you believe not his writings, how will you 
believe my words? 

XXII. After these things Jesus went 6 
away over the Sea of Galilee, (of Tiberias.) 
And a great multitude was following him, 2 
because they saw the signs which he was do- 
ing on the sick. And Jesus went up into the 3 
mountain, and there he was sitting with his 
disciples. And the Passover, the Feast of the 4 
Jews, was near. Jesus, therefore, lifting up 5 
[iiis] eyes, and seeing that a great multitude 
was coming to him, says to Philip, Whence 
shall Λve buy loaves, that these may eat? 
But this he said, proving him, for he him- 6 
self knew what he was about to do. Philip 7 
answered him : Two hundred denaries' wortli 
l_about ihiiiy dollars] are not sufficient for 
tliem, so that every one of them may take 
a little. One of his disciples, Andrew, the 8 
brother of Simon Peter, says to him, There 9 
is a lad here that has five barley loaves, and 
two small fishes : but what are these for so 
many? And Jesus said. Make the men sit 10 
down. Now there was much grass in the 
place. The men,thei-efore, sat down, in luim- 
ber about five thousand. And Jesus took the 11 
loaves; and, giving thanks, distributed^ to 
those sitting at meat ; and likewise of the 
fishes, as much as they wished. And when 12 
they were filled, he says to his disciples. 
Gather up the remaining fragments, that 
nothing be lost. Therefore, they gathered 13 
[them] up, and filled twelve baskets with 
fragments, from the five barley loaves, which 
remained to those who had eaten. The men, 14 
therefore, seeing the sign that Jesus did, said. 
This is, indeed, the prophet that was to come 
into the world. Jesus, therefore, knowing 15 
that they were about to come and take him 
by force, that they might make him a king, 
retired again into the mountain, himself 
alone. 



' The denarion was equal to about "J pence, or 15 cents. 
' Some copies insert, to the disciples, and the disciples to 
those, &c. 



152 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. 



CHAP. 

• — 



6. XXIV. 



18 
19 



20 
21 



22 



23 



16 XXIII. And when evening came, his dis- 

17 ciples went down onto the sea ; and after en- 
tering into the ship, they were going over 
the sea toward Capernaum. And it was now 
become dark, and Jesus was not come to 
them ; and the sea was becoming agitated, 
as a great wind blew. Having, therefore, 
rowed about twenty-five or thirty furlongs, 
they see Jesus walking on the sea, and draw- 
ing near to the ship : and they were afraid. 
But he says to them. It is I ; be not afraid. 
They were willing, therefore, to receive him 
into the ship : and immediately the ship was 
at the land to which they were going. 

XXIV. The next day, the multitude who 
were standing beyond the sea, seeing that 
there was no other boat there, except' one, 
and that Jesus went not with his disciples 
into the boat, but his disciples went aΛvay 
alone : (but other boats came from Tiberias, 
near the place wliere they ate the bread, when 

24 the Lord gave thanks :) when, therefore, the 
multitude saw that Jesus was not tliere, nor 
his disciples, they also, themselves, entered 
into the ships, and came to Capernaum, seek- 
ing for Jesus. And finding him beyond the 
sea, they said to him, Rabbi, when didst thou 
come hither ? Jesus answered them, and 
said. Verily, verily, I say to you, you seek 
me, not because you saw signs, but because 

27 you ate of the loaves, and were filled. Labor 
not for the food that perishes, but for the food 
that abides to eternal life, which the Son of 
man Λνϋΐ give you ; for him the Father, God, 
did seal. They said to him, therefore, What 
shall we do, that we may Λvork the Avorks of 
God ? Jesus answered, and said to them, This 
is the work of God, that you believe on him 
whom he sent. They said to him, therefore. 
What sign, then, doest thou, that we may 
see, and believe thee ? What dost thou work ? 
Our fathers ate the manna in the wilderness, 
as it has been written. He gave them bread 



25 



26 



28 



29 



30 



31 



:J 



34 



36 



37 



39 



• Some copies insert here, that [one] into which his disci- 
ples entered. 



from heaven to eat. Jesus, therefore, said to 32 
them. Verily, verily, I say to you, Moses did 
not give you the bread from heaven ; but 
my Father gives you the true bread from 
heaven. For the bread of God is that which 
comes down from heaven, and gives life to 
the world. They said to him, therefore. Sir, 
always give us this bread. And Jesus said 35 
to them, I am the bread of life : he that 
comes to me shall not hunger ; and he 
that believes on we shall never thirst. But 
I said to you. That you have even seen me, 
and do not believe. All that the Father 
gives me, will come to me ; and him that 
comes to me I will not cast out. Because 38 
I have come down from heaven, not that I 
may do my own will, but the λυΙΙΙ of him 
that sent me. And this is the will of him 
that sent me, that of all that he has given 
me I may lose nothing ; but may raise it up 
in the last day. For this is the Avill of ^my 40 
Father, that every one who sees the Son, and 
believes on him, may have eternal life: and 
I will raise him up at the last day. The 41 
Jews, therefore, were murmuring at him, be- 
cause he said, I am the bread that came down 
from heaven. And they said. Is not this Je- 42 
sus, the son of Joseph, whose father and 
mother we know ? How, then, does he 
say, I have come down from heaven? Jesus 43 
answered, and said to them. Murmur not, one 
with another. Xo one can come to me, if 44 
the Father who sent me, draw him not ; and 
I will raise him up at the last day. It has 45 
been written in the Prophets, And they 
shall all be taught of God. Every one that 
hears and learns of the Father, comes to 
me. Not that any one has seen the Father, 46 
except he that is of God : he has seen the 
Father. Verily, verily, I say to you. He that 47 
believes on me has eternal life. I am the 48 
bread of life. Your fathers ate the manna 49 
in the wilderness, and died. This is the 
bread that comes down from heaven, so that 



50 



^ According to some copies, of him that sent me. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 7. XXIX. 



153 



δ1 any one may eat of it, and not die. I am 
the living bread that came down from hea- 
ven : if any one eat of this bread, he shall live 
for ever : yea, and the bread which I will 
give is my flesl), hvliich I will give, for the 

52 life of the world. The Jews, therefore, were 
striving, one with another, saying, liow can 

53 HE give ns [his] flesh to eat? Jesus, there- 
fore, said to them, A^erily, verily, I say to 
you, if you do not eat the flesh of the Son 
of man, and drink his blood, you have no 

54 life in yourselves. He that eats my flesh, 
and drinks my blood, has eternal life, and I 

55 will raise linn np at the last day. For my 
flesh is food indeed, and my blood is drink 

56 indeed. He that eats my flcsli, aud drinks 

57 my blood, abides in me, and I in liim. As 
the living Father sent me, and I live because 
of the Father ; so he that eats me, even he 

58 shall live because of me. Tiiis is the bread 
that came down from heaven. Not as your 
fathers ate the manna, and died ; he that eats 

59 this bread shall live for ever. These things 
he said, teaching in a synagogue, in Caper- 
naum. 

60 XXV. Many, therefore, of his disciples, 
hearing, said. This saying is hard : who can 

61 hear it? But Jesus, knowing in himself, 
that his disciples were murmuring at this, 

62 said to them. Does this offend you? What if 
then, you see the Son of man going up, Avhere 

63 he was before? The Spirit is what quickens: 
the flesh profits notliing. Tlie words which 
I have spoken to γοιι are spirit, and are life. 

64 But there are some of you wlio believe not. 
For Jesus knew from the beginning who 
tliose were that believed not, and who lie 

65 was that was about to betray him. And 
he said. Because of this have I said to you. 
That no one can come to me, if it have not 
been given him fi'om my Father. 

GO XXVI. From this [time] many of his disci- 
ples went away backward, and were walking 
67 no more w'ith him. Jesus, therefore, said to 



' Some copies omit, which, I will give. 



the Twelve, Do you also wish to go away? 
Simon Peter answered him. Lord, to whom 63 
shall we go ? Thou hast the words of eternal 
life. And we have believed, and known, 69 
that THOU art the Christ, the Son of^ God. 
Jesus answered them. Did not I choose you, 70 
the Twelve, and one of you is a devil? Now 71 
he spoke of Simon's Judas Iscariot ; for he 
was about to betray him, being one of the 
Twelve. 

XXVII. And after these things Jesus was 7 
walking in Galilee : for he did not wish to 
walk in Judea, because the Jews were seek- 
ing to kill him. Now the Feast of the Jews 2 
was near, the Feast of Tabernacles. His 3 
brothers, therefore, said to him. Depart 
hence, and go into Judea, so that thy dis- 
ciples also may see thy works which thou 
doest. For no one does any thing in secret, 4 
and he, himself, seeks to be in public. If 
thou doest these tilings, manifest thyself to 
the world. For not even his brothers were 5 
believing on him. Jesus, therefore, says to 6 
them. My time is not yet present : but your 
time is alwaj's ready. The world cannot 7* 
hate you, but me it hates, because I testify 

of it, that its works are evil. Go you up to S 
the feast : I am not going u)} to this feast, be- 
cause my time has not yet fully come. 
Saying these things to them, he abode in 9 
Galilee. 

XXVIII. But when his brothers had gone up, 10 
then he also himself went up to the feast, not 
openly, but as in secret. The Jews, there- 11 
fore, kept seeking him during the feast, and 
said. Where is he ? And there w^as much 12 
murmuring concerning liim among- the mul- 
titudes : some said. He is good : others said. 
No ; but he is deceiving the multitude. 
Nevertheless, no one was speaking publicly 13 
of him, because of the fear of the Jews. 

XXIX. And now about the middle of the 14 
feast Jesus went up into the temple, and 



According to some copies, of the living God. 



154 



TPIE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 7. ΧΧΧΠ. 



15 was teaching. And the Jews were wonder- 
ing, saying, How does he know letters, not 

16 having learned? Jesus, therefore, answered 
tliem, and said, My doctrine is not mine, 

17 but his tliat sent me. If any one be willing 
to do liis will, he shall know concerning the 
doctrine, \A'hether it is of God, or I am 

IS speaking from myself. He that speaks from 
liimself seeks his own glory : but he that 
seeks the glory of him that sent him, he is 
true, and there is no unrighteousness in him. 

19 Has not Moses given you the law, and no one 
of you is doing the law? Why are you seek- 

20 ing to kill me? The multitude answered, 
and said, Thou hast a demon : who is seeking 

21 to kill thee? Jesus answered, and said to 
them, I did one work, and because of this, 

22 you are all wondering. Moses has given you 
circumcision, (not that it is of Moses, but of 
the fathers,) and on the Sabbath you circum- 

23 cise a man. If a man receive circumcision on 
the Sabbath, so that the law of Moses may not 
be broken, are you angry at me, because I 

24 made a man all whole on the Sabbatli ? Judge 
not according to appearance, but judge right- 
eous judgment. 

25 XXX. Some, therefore, of the Jerusalemites 
said, Is not this he whom they are seeking to 

26 kill? And, behold, he is talking publicly, 
and they are saying nothing to him. Did the 
rulers know indeed, that this is the Christ? 

27 But we know him, whence he is : but when 
the Christ comes, no one knows whence he 

28 is. Jesus, therefore, cried, teaching in the 
temple, and saying. You botli know me, and 
you knovs^ whence I am : and I am not come 
of myself, but he that sent me is true, whom 

29 YOU know not. I know him, because I am 

30 from him, and he sent me. They kept seek- 
ing, therefore, to take him ; and no one laid 
hands upon him, because his hour had not 

31 yet come. But many of the multitude be- 
lieved on him, and said. When the Christ 
comes, will he do more signs than^ wliat he 

' According to some copies, ihan these which he did. 



did ? The Pharisees heard the multitude 3S: 
murmuring these things concerning him ; and 
the Pharisees and the chief priests sent officers, 
that they miglit take him. Jesus, therefore, 33 
said, Yet a little time am I with you, and I am 
going to him that sent me. You will seek me, 34 
and will not find me, and where I am, you can 
not come. The Jews, therefore, said among 35 
themselves, Whither is he about to go, that 
WE shall not find him ? Is he about to go to 
the dispersed of the Greeks, and to teach the 
Greeks? What is this saying that he said, 36 
You will seek me, and will not, find me, and 
where I am, you can not come? 

XXXI. Now in the last, the great day of 37 
the feast, Jesus was standing, and cried, 
saying. If any one thirst, let him come to mc, 
and drink. He that believes on me, as says 38 
the Scripture, Out of his belly shall flow 
rivers of living water. But this he said of 39 
the Spirit, which those believing on him were 
about to receive : for there was, as yet, no Holy 
Spirit, because Jesus was not yet glorified. 
Many, therefore, of the multitude, hearing 40 
^these words, said. This is indeed the Prophet. 
Others said. This is the Christ. But others 41 
said, Does, then, the Christ come out of 
Galilee ? Does not the Scripture say. That 42 
of the seed of David, and from Bethlehem, 
the village where David was, the Christ 
comes ? There was, tlierelbre, a division among 43 
the multitude because of him. And some of 4i 
them were wishing to take him : but no one 
laid hands on him. 

XXXII. The officers, therefore, came to 45 
the chief priests and Pharisees : and they 
said to them. Why did j'ou not bring him? 
The officers answered. Never did man so 46 
speak.^ The Pharisees, therefore, answered 47 
them, Have you also been deceived? Did 48 
any one of the rulers, or of the Pharisees be- 
lieve on him ? But this multitude, who knew 49 
not the law, are accursed. Nicodemus says 50 



^ According to some copies, the saijiiig•. 
^ Some copies insert here, as this man. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 8. XXXV. 



155 



t(i tlicm, (lie tliat came to him,' being one of 

51 tlioui,) Does our law judg-e the man, if it do 
not first hear from him, and know Λvhat he 

52 docs? The}' answered, and .«aid to him. Art 
THOU also of Galilee? Search, and see, that 

53 out of Galilee ''has arisen no prophet. And 
every one went to his own house. 

8 ΧΧΧΠΙ. And Jesus went to the mount of 

1 Olives. And early in the morning he came 
again into the teni|ile, and all the people came 
to iiim, and, sitting down, he was teaching 

2 tliem. And the Scribes and the Pharisees 
bring to him a Avoman having been taken in 

4 adultery ; and setting her in the midst, They 
say to him, Teacher, this woman Avas taken in 

5 tlie very act, committing adultery. Now, in 
the law, Moses commanded us, that such be 
stoned: THOU, therefore, what sayest thou? 

6 But this they said, tempting him, that they 
might have to accuse liini. But Jesus, stooping 
down, with [his] finger was writing on the 

7 ground. But when they continued asking him, 
raising hiuiself up, he said to them, He of you 
that is without sin, let him first cast the stone 

8 at her. And again, stooping down, he Avas 

9 writing on the ground. And they, hearing, 
and being convicted by [their] conscience, kept 
goiug out, one by one, beginning from the 
elders, even to the last ; and Jesus was left 
alone, and the Avoman standing in the midst. 

10 And Jesus, raising himself up, and seeing no 
one but the woman, said to her. Woman, Avliere 
are those, thy accursers? Did no one con- 

11 dcmn thee? And she said. No one. Sir. And 
Jesus said to her. Neither do I condemn thee : 

12 go, and sin no more. Again, therefore, Jesus 
spoke to them, saying, I am tlic light of the 
world : he that follows me shall not walk in 

13 the darkness, but shall have the light of life. 
The Pharisees, therefore, said to him. Thou 
art testifying of thyself; thy testimony is not 

1-1 true. Jesus answered, and said to them. Even 
if I testify of myself, my testimony is true, 
because I know whence ί came, and whither 
I am going : but you know not whence I came, 

15 or whither I am going. You judge according to 
the flesh : I judge no one. But even if I judge, 
my judgment is true ; because I am not 
alone, but I and the Father who sent me. 

IC And it has. also been written in your la\v, 

17 That the testimony of two men is true. 

18 I am one who testify of myself, and my Father 

19 who sent me testifies of me. They said to 
hiiu, therefore. Where is thy Father? Jesus 
answered. You neither know me, nor my 
Father : if you knew me, you would know ray 

' Some copies insert here, by night. 
' Aceor(:liii,Q: to some copies, artscs. 



Father also. These words he spoke in the 
Treasury, teaching in the temple : and no one 
took Iiim, because his hour had not yet come. 
XXXIV. Therefore, he said to them again, 
I am going away, and you will seek me, and 
will die in your sin : whither I am going 
YOU can not come. The Jews, therefore, said, 
Will he kill himself? because he says, Whither 
I am going, you can not come. And he said 
to them, You are from beneath ; I am from 
above : you are of this world ; I am not of 
this world. I said, therefore, to you, That 
you will die in your sins : for if you believe 
not that I am he, you shall die in your sins. 
They said to him,' therefore, Who art thou? 
And Jesus said to them. Even what I said to 
you at the beginning. I have many things 
to say and to judge concerning you : but he 
that sent me is true ; and I, what things I 
heard from him, these I say to th* world. 
They knew not that he spoke to them of the 
Father. Jesus, therefore, said to them. When 
you lift up the Son of man, then will you know 
"that I am he, and of myself I do nothing ; but 
as my Father taught me, I say these things. 
And he that sent me is with me : 'the Father 
did not leave me alone, because I do always 
things pleasing to him. 
XXXV. As~ he was speaking these things, 
many believed on him. Jesus, therefore, said 
to the Jews who had believed him. If you 
abide in my word, you are my disciples 
indeed : and you shall know the truth ; and 
the truth shall make you free. They answered 
him: We are Abraham's seed, and have never 
been in bondage to any one. How dost thou 
say, You shall be made free ? Jesus answered 
them : Verily, verily, I say to you. Every one 
that is doing sin is a servant of sin. And 
the servant abides not in the house for ever : 
the son aViides for ever. If, therefore, the Son 
make you free, you will be free indeed. I know 
that you are Abraham's seed ; but you are seek- 
ing to kill me, because my word has no place 
in you. I speak what I have seen with my 
Father : and you, therefore, do what you have 
seen with your father. They answered, and 
said to him, Our father is Abraham. Jesus says 
to them. If yon were Aliraham's children, you 
would do the works of Abraham. But now you 
are seeking to kill me, a man who have spoken 
to you the truth, which I heard of Go_d. This 
Abraham did not. You do the works' of your 
father. They said to him, therefore. We have 
not been born of fornication ; wo have one Fa- 
ther, God. Jesus said to them. If God were 
your father, you would love me : for I came 

' Some copies omit, the Father. 



20 

21 

22 
23 

24 

25 
26 



27 
28 



29 



30 
31 



32 
33 
34 



36 
37 



38 
39 

40 

41 

42 



1.3(3 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN- CHAP. 9. XXXIX. 



out: from God, and am come ; for I am not 

43 even come of myself, but he sent me. Why 
do you not know my speech "? Because you 

44 cannot liear my word. You are of [your] 
father, the Devil, and the lusts of your father 
you wish to do. He was a man-slayer from 
the beginning, and has not stood in the truth ; 
because there is no truth in him. When one 
speaks falsehood, he speaks from his own ; 

45 because his fiither also is a liar. But because 

46 I speak the truth, you believe me not. Who 
of you convicts me of sin? But if I speak 

47 truth, why do you not believe me ? He that 
is of God hears the words of God: on this 
account you hear not, because you are not of 
God. . 

4S XXXVI. The Jews answered, and said 
to him. Do not we say well. That thou 

49 art a Samaritan, and hast a demon ? Jesus 
answered, I have not a demon ; but I honor 

50 my Father, and you dishonor ine. But I 
seek not my glory : there is one that seeks, 

51 and judges. Verily, verily, I say to you, if 
any one keep my word, he shall never 

52 see death. The Jews, therefore, said to 
him, Now we know that thou hast a demon. 
Abraham died, and the prophets : and thou 
sayest. If any one keep my word, lie shall 

53 never taste of death. Art thou greater 
than our fiither, Abraham, who died, and the 
prophets died? Whom makest thou thyself? 

54 Jesus answered. If I glorify myself, my gloiy 
is nothing : it is my Father who glorities me, 

55 of whom you say, that he is your God. And 
you have not known him ; but I know him : 
and if I say, that I know him not, I shall 
be like you, a liar: but I know him, and 

50 keep his word. Abraham, your father, re- 
joiced, that he should see my day; and he 

57 saw, and was glad. The Jews, therefore, said 
to him, Thou art not j-et fifty years old, 

5S and hast thou seen Abraham ? Jesus said to 
them. Verily, verily, I say to you, Before 

59 Abraham was, I am. They took up stones, 
therefore, that they might cast [them] at him : 



but Jesus hid himself, and went forth out 
of the temple.' 

XXXVII. And, passing by, he saw a man © 
blind from birth. And his disciples asked 2 
him, saying, Rabbi, Λνΐιο sinned, he, or his 
parents, that he was born blind? Jesus 3 
answered. Neither did he sin, nor his pa- 
rents : but, that the works of God may be 
manifested in him. I must Avork the works 4 
of him that sent me, while it is day : night 

is coming, when no one can work. While 5 
I am in the world, I am the light of the 
world. Saying these things, he spit on the 6 
ground, and made clay of the spittle, and 
rubbed the clay upon the eyes of the blind 
man ; and said to him. Go, wash thyself, at 7 
the pool of Siloam (which is interpreted, 
Sent). He went, therefore, and washed him- 
self, and came seeing. 

XXXVIII. The neighbors, therefore, and 8 
those who saw him before, that he was -a 
beggar, said. Is not this he that was sitting 
and begging ? Some said, This is : others, It 9 
is like him : he said, I am. They said to 10 
him, therefore. How were thy eyes opened? 
He answered, and said, A man called Jesus 11 
made clay, and rubbed my eyes, and said to 
me. Go to the Siloam, and wash thyself: 
and, on going and washing myself, I received 
sight. They said to him, therefore, ΛVhere is 12 
he ? He says, I know not. 

XXXIX. They bring to the Pharisees him 13 
that was once blind. Now it was the Sabbath, 14 
when Jesus made the chi}', and opened his 
eyes. Again, therefore, the Pharisees also 15 
were asking him how he received sight. And 

he said to tliem. He put clay on my eyes, and 
I washed myself, and do see. Some of the 16 
Pharisees, therefore, said. This man is not of 
God, because he keeps not the Sabbath. 
Others said. How can a sinful man do such 



' Some copies add here, going through the midst of them 
and so passed by. 

" According to some copies, bli7id. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 10. XLIV. 



157 



signs"? And there was division among tbem. 

17 They say to the blind man again, What sayest 
THOU of him, seeing that he opened thy eyes ? 

18 And he said, That he is a prophet. The 
Jews, therefore, did not believe concerning 
him, that he was blind, and received sight, 
till they called the parents of him that re- 

19 ceived sight, and asked them, saying, Is this 
your son, of whom you say, That he was 
born blind"? How, then, does he now see? 

20 His parents answered them, and said. We 
know that this is our son, and that he was 

21 born blind : but how he now sees, we know 
not ; or who opened his eyes, we know not : 
he is, himself, of age ; ask him : he, him- 

22 self, shall speak concerning liimself. These 
things said his parents, because they were 
afraid of the Jews : for the Jews had agreed 
already, that if any one should confess him [to 
be] Christ, he should be put out of the syna- 

23 gogue. Because of this his parents said. He 
is of age ; ask him. 

24 XL. They called, therefore, a second time, 
the man who was blind, and said to him. 
Give glory to God : we know that this man 

25 is a sinner. Κθ answered, therefore, and 
said. If he is a sinner, I know not : one 
thing I do know, that, having been blind, 

26 now I see. And they said to him again. 
What did he do to thee? how did he open 

27 thy eyes ? He answered them, I told you 
just now, and you did not hear: why do 
you wisli to hear again ? Are you also willing 

2S to become his disciples? They reviled him, 
and said, thou art his disciple ; but we are 

29 disciples of Moses. We know that God has 
spoken to Moses ; but him — we know not 

30 whence he is. The man answered, and said 
to them, Why, in this is a w'onder, that you 
know not whence he is, and yet he opened my 

31 eyes ! Now we know that God does not hear 
sinners ; but if any one be a worshiper of 

32 God, and do his will, him he hears. From 
the beginning of the world it was not lieard, 
that any one opened the eyes of one who had 

33 been born blind. If he were not of God, he 



could do nothing. They answered, and said 34 
to him. Thou wast altogether born in sins, 
and dost thou teach us ? And they cast him 
out. 

XLI. Jesus heard that they cast him out : 35 
and finding him, he said to him, Dost thou 
believe on the Son of God ? He answered, 36 
and said. And who is he. Sir, that I may 
believe on him ? And Jesus said to him, 37 
Thou liast both seen him, and he that is 
talking with thee is he. And he said, I 38 
believe. Lord. And he worshiped him. 

XLII. And Jesus said. For judgment I 39 
came into this world ; so that those not see- 
ing might see, and those seeing might become 
blind. And those of the Pharisees who were 40 
■with him heard these thhigs, and said to him. 
Are WE blind also? Jesus said to them. If 41 
you were blind, you would not have sin ; but 
now you say. We see ; therefore, j'our sin 
abides. 

XLIII. Verily, verily, I saj'- to you. He 10 
that enters not by the door into the fold of 
the sheep, but goes up another way, he is 
a thief and a robber. But he that comes in 2 
by the door, is the shepherd of the sheep. 
To HIM the door-keeper opens, and the 3 
sheep hear his voice, and he calls his own 
sheep by name, and leads them out. And 4 
when he puts forth 'all his own, he goes be- 
fore them, and the sheep follow him; because 
they know his voice. But a stranger they 5 
will not follow, but will flee from him ; be- 
cause the}^ know not the voice of strangers. 
Tliis parable spoke Jesus to them : but they 6 
knew not what things they were which he 
was saying to them. 

XLIV. Jesus, therefore, said to them again, 7 
Verily, verily, I say to you, I am the door of 
the sheep. All who came before me are 8 
thieves and robbers : but the sheep did not 
hear them. I am the door : by me if any 9 

' According to some copies, his own sheep; — all being 
omitted. 



158 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 11. XLVH. 



one come in, he shall be saved, and shall come 

10 in, and go out, and find pasture. The thief 
comes not, unless that he may steal, and kill, 
and destroy : I came, that they might have 

11 life, yea, might have it abundantly. I am the 
good shepherd : the good shepherd lays down 

12 his life for the sheep. But he that is a hire- 
ling, and not a shepherd, whose own the sheep 
are not, sees the wolf coming, and leaves the 
sheep, and flees ; and the wolf catches' and 

13 scatters them : -because he is a hireling, and he 

14 cares not for the sheep. I am the good shep- 
herd: and I know my own, and my own know 

15 me ; as the Father knows me, and I know the 
Father : and I lay down my life for the sheep. 

16 And other sheep I have, which are not of this 
fold : them also I must bring, and they will 
hear my voice ; and there will be one flock, 

17 one shepherd. On account of this does the 
Father love me, because I lay down my life, 

18 that I may take it again. No one takes it 
from ME, but I lay it down of myself. I have 
power to lay it down, and I have power to 
take it again. This commandment I received 

19 from my Father. There was, therefore, a divi- 
sion aiiain amoncr the Jews because of these 

20 sayings. And many of them said. He has a 
demon, and is mad, why hear you liim ? 

21 Otiiers said. These are not the words of 
one that has a demon. Can a demon open 
the eyes of the blind ? 

22 XLV. Now it Avas the Feast of Dedication 

23 in Jerusalem ; and it was winter. And Jesus 
was walking in the temple, in Solomon's 

24 porch. The Jews, therefore, came round 
about him, and said to him. How long dost 
thou hold our soul in suspense ? If thou art 

25 the Christ, tell us plainl}^. Jesus answered 
them, I told you, and you believe not : the 
works which I do in my Father's name, they 

26 testify of me. But you believe not, for you 

27 are not of my sheep. As I said to you, my 



' According to some copies, catches iheni, and scatters the 
sheep. 

' In some copies, Now the hireling fieetli, because, ^c. 



sheep hear my voice and I know them, and 
they follow me. And I give to them eter- 28 
nal life, and they shall never perish ; and 
no one shall pluck them out of my hand. 
My Father, who has given to me, is greater 29 
than all, and no one can pluck out of my Fa- 
ther's hand. I and the Father ai'e one. The 30 
Jews, therefore, took up stones again, that 
they might stone him. Jesus answered them, 32 
Many good Avorks did I show you Irom my 
Father : because of which work of them do 
you stone me ? The Jews answered him, 33 
For a good \vork we stone thee not, but for 
blasphemy; and because thou, being a man, 
niakest thyself God. Jesus answei-ed tliem, 34 
Has it not been written in your law, I said, 
You are gods? If he called them gods, to 35 
whom the word of God came (and the 
Scripture cannot be broken) ; of him whom 36 
the Father sanctified, and sent into the world, 
do YOU say. Thou blasphemest ; because I 
said, I am the Son of God? If I do not 37 
the works of my Father, believe me not. 
But if I do, and if you believe not me, be- 38 
lieve the works ; so that you may know, 
and believe, that the Father [is] in me, and 
I in the Father. They were seeking, there- 39 
fore, again to take him : and he went forth 
out of their hand. 

XLVI. And he went away again beyond 40 
the Jordan, into the place where John was 
at first immersing : and he abode there. And 41 
many came to him, and said, John, indeed, 
did no sign: but all things that John said 
of HIM were true. And many believed on 42 
him there. 

XLVII. Now there was a certain sick man, 11 
Lazarus of Bethany, of the village of Mary, 
and Martha, her sister. And it was Mary 2 
who anointed the Lord with ointment, and 
wiped his feet with her hair, whose brother 
Lazarus was sick. The sisters, therefore, sent 3 
to him, saying. Lord, Behold, he whom thou 
lovest is sick. And Jesus, hearing, said, This 4 
sickness is not to death, but for the glory of 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 11. XLIX. 



159 



God, that by it the Son of God may be glori- 

5 fied. Now Jesus loved Martha, and her sister, 

6 and Lazarus. AVhen, therefore, he heard that 
he was sick, then, indeed, he abode in the 

7 place where he was two days. Then, after 
this, he says to the disciples. Let us go into 

S Jndca again. The disciples say to him, Rabbi, 
the Jews were just now seeking to stone 
thee ; and art thou ίίοΐηίϊ thither asrain ? 

9 Jesus answered. Are there not twelve hours 
of the day V If any one walk in the day, he 
stumbles not, because he sees the light of 

10 this world. But if any one Avalk in the 
night, he stumbles, because the light is not 

11 in him. These things he said ; and after this 
he said to them, Lazarus, our friend, is fallen 
asleep ; but I am going, that I may awake 

12 him. His disciples, therefore, said, Lord, if 

13 he is fallen asleep, he Λνίΐΐ be safe. But 
Jesus had spoken of his death ; l)ut they 
thought that he was speaking of the repose 

14 of sleep. Then, therefore, Jesus said to them 

15 plainly, Lazarus is dead : and I am glad, for 
your sake, that I was not there, so that ^'ou 

16 may believe. But let us go to him. Thomas, 
therefore, the one called Didymus, said to 
[his] fellow-disciples. Let us also go, that we 
may die with him. 

17 XLVIIL Jesus, therefore, coming, foimd 
that he had been ali-eady four days in the 

18 tomb. Now Bethany was near Jerusalem, 

19 about fifteen furlongs off. And many of the 
Jews had come to those about Martha and 
Marjs that they might comfort them con- 

20 cerning their brother. Martha, therefore, 
when she heard that Jesus was coming, went 
to meet him : but Mary continued sitting in 

21 the house. Martha, therefore, said to Jesus, 
Lord, if thou hadst been here, my brother had 

22 not died. But even now I know, that what- 
ever things thou wilt ask of God, God will 

23 give thee. Jesus said to her, Thy brother 

24 will rise again. Martha said to him, I know 
that he will rise again, in the resurrection, in 

25 the last day. Jesus said to her, I am the re- 
surrection, and the life : he that believes on 



ME, even if he die, he shall live. And no one 26 
that lives and believes on me shall ever die. 
Believest thou this? Slie says to him, Yes, 27 
Lord ; I have believed that thou art tlie Christ, 
the Son of God, the one who was to come into 
the world. And saying these things, she went, 2S 
and called Mary, her sister, secretly, saying. 
The Teacher is come, and is calling for thee. 
She, when she heard, rises up cpiickly, and 2!) 
comes to him. Now Jesus had not yet come 30 
into the village, but Λvas in the place where 
Martha met him. The Jews, therefore, who 31 
were witli her in the house, and were com- 
forting her, seeing Mary, that she rose up 
C[uickly, and went out, followed her, saying. 
She is going to the tomb, that she may weep 
there. Mary, therefore, when she came where 32 
Jesus was, seeing him, fell at his feet, saying 
to Iiim, Lord, if thou hadst been here, my 
brother had not died. Jesus, therefore, when 33 
he saw her weeping, and the Jews who came 
with her, weeping, groaned in the spirit, and 
was troubled : and he said, Wliere have 34 
you laid him? They say to him. Lord, come, 
and see. Jesus wept. The Jews, therefore, 35 
said, Behold, how he loved him ! But some 37 
of them said, Could not he, who opened the 
eyes of the blind man, cause that even he 
should not die ? 

XLIX. Jesus, therefore, again groaning in 38 
himself, comes to the tomb. Now, it was a 
cave, and a stone was lying upon it. Jesus 39 
says. Take away the stone. The sister of 
him that had died, Martha, says to him. Lord, 
he stinks now; for he hath been four days dead. 
Jesus says to her, Did I not say to thee, that, 40 
if thou wilt believe, thou shalt see the glory 
of God. They took away the stone, there- 41 
fore.' And Jesus lifted up [his] eyes, and 
said. Father, I thank thee that thou didst 
hear me. But I knew that thou hearest me 42 
always: but, because of the multitude that 
was standing by, I spoke, so that they may 
believe that thou didst send me. And, say- 43 

' Some copies add here, where he that had died was lying 



160 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 



LV. 



ing these things, he cried with a loud voice, 

44 Lazarus, come forth. And he that had died 
came forth, bound hand and foot with grave 
clothes ; and his face was bound about with 
a napkin. Jesus says to them, Loose him, 
and let iiim go. 

45 L. Many, therefore, of the Jews, who came 
to Mary, and saw what things he did, believed 

46 on him. But some of them went to the 
Pharisees, and told them what things Jesus 
did. 

47 LI. The chief priests, therefore, and the 
Pharisees, gathered a council, and said, \Vhat 
are we doing? because he is doing many 

48 signs. If Λνβ let him thus alone, all will 
believe on him ; and the Romans will come, 
and take away both our place and nation. 

49 And a certain one of them, Caiaphas, being 
high priest that year, said to them, You know 

50 nothing, nor consider, that it is expedient for 
us, that one mrai die for the people, and all 

51 the nation perish not.. But this he said not 
of himself; but, being high priest that year, 
he prophesied, that Jesus Avas about to die 

52 for the nation ; and not for the nation only, 
but that he should also gatlier together into 
one the children of God, who have been 

53 scattered abroad. From that day, therefore, 
they took counsel together, tliat tliey might 
kill him. 

54 LII. Jesus, therefore, was walking no more 
publicly among the Jews, but went away 
thence into the country near the wilderness, 
into a city called Ephraim ; and there he was 

55 tarrying with his disciples. And the Passover 
of the Jews was near : and many went up out 
of the country to Jerusalem, before the Pass- 
over, that they might purify themselves. 

56 They were seeking Jesus, therefore, and 
said, one to another, standing in the tem- 
ple. What think ye, that he will not come 

57 to the feast ? Now, both the chief priests and 
the Pharisees had given a commandment, that, 
if any one knew where he was, he should 
show [it], so that they might take him. 



LIII. Jesus, therefore, six days before the 12 
Passover, came to Bethany, where was Laza- 
rus who had died, whom he raised from the 
dead. They made him, therefore, a supper 2 
there, and Martha was ministering; but Laza- 
rus was one of those sittinii at table with 
him. Mary, therefore, taldng a pound of oint- 3 
ment of j^ure spikenard, very costly, anointed 
the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her 
hair : and the house Avas filled with the odor 
of the ointment. Therefore says one of his 4 
disciples, Simon's Judas Iscariot, who was 
about to betray him. Why was not this oint- 5 
ment sold for three hundred denaria' [about 
45 dollars'], and given to the poor? Now he δ 
said this, not because he cared lor the poor, 
but because he was a thief, and had the bag, 
and carried off what things were put in. 
Jesus, therefore, said. Let her alone, ^that she 7 
may keep it for the day of my embalming. 
For the poor you have always witli your- 8 
selves; but me you have not always. 

LIV. A great multitude, therefore, of the 9 
Jews knew that he was there; and they came, 
not on account of Jesus only, but that they 
might see Lazarus also, wiiom he raised from 
the dead. But the chief priests took counsel, 10 
that they might kill Lazarus also; because, 11 
on account of him, many of the Jews were 
going away, and believing on Jesus. 

LV. The next daj', a great multitude, tliat 12 
came to the feast, hearing that Jesus was 
coming to Jerusalem, took the branches of 1-3 
palm-trees, and went out to meet him, and 
were cryino•, Hosanna: Blessed [be] he tliat 
comes in the name of the Lord, [even] the 
King of Israel! And Jesus, finding a young 14 
ass, sat upon it, as it has been written. Fear 15 
not, daughter of Sion: behold, thy King is 
coming, sitting upon an ass's colt. Now 16 
these things his disciples knew not at first : 
but when Jesus was glorified, then they 



' The denarion was equal to about TJ pence, or 15 cents. 
' According to many copies, for the day of my embalming 
she has kept it. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 12. LVHI. 



161 



remembered that these things had been Λvrit- 
ten about him, and [that] tliey did these things 

17 to liim. The multitude, therefore, who were 
with liim, wlieu lie called Lazarus out of 
the tomb, and raised him from the dead, 

18 testified. Because of this also the multitude 
Avent to meet him, because they heard that he 

19 had done this sign. The Pharisees, therefore, 
said, among themselves, Do j^ou see, that you 
are gaining nothing"? Behold, the world is 
gone away after him. 

20 ΕΛ^Ι. And there were certain Greeks, of 
those who came up, that they might worship, 

21 during the feast. These, therefore, came to 
Philip, the one of Bethsaida of Galilee, and 
were asking him, saying, Sir, we wish to 

22 see Jesus. Philip comes, and tells Andrew: 

23 and again Andrew and Philip tell .lesus. And 
Jesus answered them, saying. The hour has 
come, that the Son of man should be glori- 

24 fied. Verily, verily, I say to you. If the grain 
of the wheat, falling into the ground, die not, 
it abides itself alone; but, if it die, it bears 

25 much fruit. He that loves his life sliall lose 
it; and he that hates his life in this world, 

26 shall keep it to eternal life. If any one 
serve me, let him follow me ; and where 
I am, tliere shall also my servant be : and 
if any one serve me, the Father will 

27 honor liim. Now is my soul troubled ; and 
what shall I say? Father, save me from this 
hour? But because of this I came to this 

2S hour. Father, glorify thy name. There came, 
therefore, a voice from Heaven : I both glori- 

29 fied, and will glorify again. The multitude, 
therefore, that was standing and heariuii, said 
that tliere had been thunder: otiiers said. An 

30 angel has spoken to him. Jesus answered, 
and said, This voice has not come because of 

31 ME, but because of j'ou. Now is the judg- 
ment of this world: now shall the ruler of 

32 this world be cast out. And I, if I be lifted 
up from the earth, will draw all to myself. 

33 Now this he said, signifying by what death he 

34 was about to die. The multitude answered 
him, We heard out of the law, that the Christ 



abides forever; and how sayest thou. That 
the Son of man must be lifted up ? Who is 
this Son of man ? Jesus, therefore, said to 35 
them. Yet a little time the light is among 
you. ^\,iilk while you have the light, so that 
darkness may not come upon you: and he 
that walks in the darkness knows not whither 
he is going. Wliile you have the light, believe 36 
on the light, that you may become sons of 
liiiht. 

LVII. These things spoke Jesus, and, going 
away, he hid himself from them. But though 37 
he had done so many signs before them, they 
were not believing on him: that the saying 38 
of Isaiah, the prophet, might be fulfilled, 
which he said: Lord, who believed our report? 
and the arm of the Lord, to whom was it 
revealed ? On account of this they could not 39 
believe, because Isaiah said again. He has 40 
blinded their eyes, and hardened their heart, 
so that they might not see with the eyes, and 
undei-stand witli the heart, and return, and 
I might heal tiicm. These things said Isaiah, 41 
when he saw his glory, and spoke of him. 
Nevertheless, many of the rulers also believed 42 
on him, but because of the Pharisees they 
did not confess him, so that they might not 
be put out of the synagogue. For they loved 43 
the glory of men more than the glory of God. 

LYIII. Now Jesus cried, and said, He that 44 
believes on me, believes not on me, but on 
him that sent me. And he that sees me, sees 45 
him that sent me. Ϊ am come a light into 4G 
the world, so that no one that believes on me 
may abide in the darkness. And if any one 47 
hear, ^and keep not my words, I do not judge 
him ; for I came not, that I might judge the 
world, but that I might save the world. He 48 
that rejects me, and receives not my words, 
has that which judges him : the word which 
I spoke, that will judge him in the last day. 
Because I did not speak from myself; but 49 
the Father who sent me himself gave me a 

' According to many copies, hear my words, and believt 
not, &c. 



162 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 13. LXH. 



commandment, what I should sa}^ and what 
50 I should speak. And I know that his com- 
mandment is eternal life : what things I say, 
therefore, as the Father has spoken to me, 
so I speak. , 

13 LIX. Now before the feast of the Pass- 
over, Jesus, knowing that his hour was come, 
that lie should depart out of this world to tlie 
Father, having loved iiis own that were in the 

2 world, he loved them to tlie end. And, supper 
being ended, the Devil having now put into 
the heart of Simon's Judas Iscariot, that he 

3 should betray him, he, knowing that the 
Father had given him all things, into [his] 
hands, and that he came out from God, and 

4 was going to God, rises up from the supper, 
and lays aside [his] garments, and taking a 

5 towel, girded himself. Afterward he puts 
water into the basin, and began to wash the 
feet of the disciples, and to wipe with 
the towel with which he had been girded. 

6 He comes, therefore, to Simon Peter ; and he 
says to him. Lord, doest thou wash my 

7 feet? Jesus answered, and said to him. 
What I am doing, thou knowcst not now, 

8 but thou wilt know hereafter. Peter says 
to him. Thou sluilt never \vash my feet. 
Jesus answered him, If I wash thee not, thou 

9 hast no part with me. Simon Peter says to 
him, Lord, not my feet only, but also [my] 

10 hands, and [my] head. Jesus says to him, 
He that has been bathed has no need, un- 
less to wash the feet, but is altogether clean : 

11 and you are clean, but not all. For he knew 
him that betrayed him : because of this he 
said, You are not all clean. 

12 LX. Wiien, therefore, he had washed their 
feet, and taken his garments, sittingdownagain, 
he said to them. Do you know what I have 

13 done to you? You call me, The Teacher, 
1-1 and. The Lord ; and you say well, for I am. If, 

then, I, the Lord, and tlie Teacher, have wasli- 

ed your feet, you ought also to wash one an- 

15 otlier's feet. For I liave given you an example, 

that, as I have done to you, so you should do. 



Verily, verily, I say to you, A servant is not 16 
greater than his lord, nor an apostle, greater 
than he that sent him. If you know these 17 
things, happy are you, if you do them. I IS 
am not speaking of you all : I know whom I 
chose : but that the Scripture may be ful- 
filled. He that ate bread with me, lifted up 
his heel against me. Even now, I tell ]9 
you before it come to pass, so that, when it 
comes to pass, you may believe that I am. 
\''erily, verily, I say to you. He that receives 20 
whomsoever I send, receives me : and he 
that receives me, receives him that sent me. 

LXI. Jesus, saying these things, was troub- 21 
led in the sjsirit, and testified, and said. 
Verily, verily, I say to you, that one of you 
Λγϋΐ betray me. The disciples, therefore, 22 
kept looking one upon another, doubting of 
whom he was speaking. Now there was 23 
reclining on the bosom of Jesus, one of his 
disciples, Λνΐιοηι Jesus loved. Simon Peter, 24 
therefore, nods to him, 'and says to him, Say, 
who is it, of whom he is speaking ? And 25 
he, reclining on the breast of Jesus, says to 
him. Lord, Avho is it? Jesus answers: He 26 
it is, to whom I, after dipping, shall give 
the morsel. And dijiping the morsel, he 
gives [it] to Simon's Judas Iscariot. And 
after the morsel, then entered Satan into 27 
him. Jesus, therefore, says to him. What 
thou doest, do quickly. Now no one of 28 
those sitting at table knew for what he said 
this to him. For some were thinking, since 29 
Judas had the bag, that Jesus was saying to 
him. Buy what things we have need of for 
the feast ; or, that he should give something 
to the poor. He, therefore, receiving the 30 
morsel, went immediately out. And it was 
night. 

LXH. When, therefore, he went out, Jesus 31 
says, Even now was the Son of man glorified, 
and God was glorified in him. If God was 32 
glorified in him, God will also glorify him in 

' According to some copies, to inquire who it uas. of whom 
he was speaking. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 14. ΕΧΛ^Ι. 



163 



himself: yea, lie will immediately glorify 

33 him. Little cliildren, yet a little while I am 
with you. You will seek me, and, as I said 
to the Jews, That whitiier I am going you 

34 can not come, so I say to you now. A new 
commandment I give to you, That you love 
one another: as I loved you, that you also 

35 love one another. By this will all know that 
j'ou are jiy disciples, if you have love one for 

36 another. Simon Peter sa3's to him, Lord, 
whither art thou going? Jesus answered 
him. Whither I am going thou canst not fol- 

■ low me now; hut thou wilt follow me after- 

37 wards. Peter says to him. Lord, why can not 
I follow thee now? I will lay down my life 

33 for THEE. Jesus answered him, Wilt thou 
lay down thy life for me ? Verily, verihs I 
sa}'^ to thee. The cock will not crow, till thou 
hast denied me three times. 

14 LXIII. Let not your heart be troubled: 

2 believe on God, and believe on me. In my 
Father's house are many mansions: but if 
not, I would have told you. I am going to 

3 prepare a place for you. And if I go and 
prepare a place for you, I am coming again, 
and will receive you to myself, so that Avhere 

4 I am, YOU may be also. And whither I am 

5 going you know' the waj'. Thomas says to 
to him. We know not whither thou art going, 

6 and how can we know the wa}^? Jesus says 
to iiim, I am the way, and the truth, and the 
life : no one comes to the Father, except by me. 

7 If you had known ine, you would iiave known 
my Father also : and henceforth you know him, 

8 and liave seen liim. Philip says to him, Lord, 
show us the Father, and it is enough for us. 

9 Jesus says to him. Am I so long time with 
3'ou, and thou dost not know me, Philip ? He 
that has seen me has seen the Father: and 
how sayest thou. Show us the Father? 

10 Believest thou not, that I [am] in the 
Father, and the Father is in me ? The words 

According to some copies, you know, and the way you 
JmoxD. 



\vhich I speak to you, I speak not from 
myself; but the Father who abides in me, 
himself does the works. Believe me, because 11 
I [am] in the Father, and tiie Father in me : 
but if not, because of the works themselves, 
believe me. Verily, verily, I say to you, He 12 
that believes on me, the works which I do 
shall he do also ; and greater than these shall 
he do, because I am going to my Father. 
And whatever j-ou may ask in my name, this 13 
will I do ; so that the Father may be glorified 
in the Son. If you ask any thing in my name, 14 
I will do [it.] 

LXIV. If you love me, keep my command- 15 
meuts. And I will ask the Father, and he 16 
will give 3-ou another Comforter, that he may 
be with j^ou forever; the Spirit of truth, whom 17 
the world can not receive, because it sees him 
not, nor knows him: but you know him, 
because he abides with you, and shall be in 
you. I will not leave you orphans : I am IS 
coming to you. Y^et a little while, and the 19 
world sees me no more; but you see me, 
because I live, and you shall live. In that 20 
day shall you know, that I [am] in my 
Father, and you in me, and I in you. He 21 
that has my commandments, and keeps them, 
he it is that loves me; and he that loves 
me shall be loved by my Father; and I will 
love him, and wall manifest myself to him. 

LXV. Judas says to him, (not Iscariot,) 22 
Lord, and how is it come to pass, that thou 
art about to manifest thyself to us, and not 
to the world? Jesus answered, and said to 23 
him. If any one love me, he will keep my 
word, and my Father will love him, and we 
will come to him, and make [our] abode with 
him. He that loves me not, keeps not my 24 
words ; and the Λvord which j'ou hear is not 
mine, but [that] of the Father who sent 
me. 

LXVI. These things have I spoken to you, 25 
abiding with you. But the Comforter, the 26 
Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in 
my name, He will teach you all things, and 



164 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IB. LXYIII. 



remind you of all things which I said to jou. 

27 Peace I leave to you : my own peace do I 
give to you : not as the world gives, do I 
give to you : let not your heart be troubled, 

28 nor let it be afraid. You heard that I said 
to you, I am going away, and I am coming 
to you. If you loved me, you would rejoice, 
that I am going to the Father ; because my 

89 Father is greater than I. And now have I 
told )OU, before it come to pass; so that, 

30 when it comes to pass, you may believe. I 
will no more talk much with you : for 
tlie ruler of the world is coming, and has 

31 nothing in me. But, that the world may 
know, that I love the Father, and as the 
Father gave me commandment, so I do. 
Arise, let us go hence. 

15 LXVII. I AM the true vine, and my Father 
2 is the husbandman. Every branch in me 



not bearing fruit, he takes it awa 



and 



every one bearing fruit, he prunes it, so that 

3 it may bear more fruit. Now you are clean, 
because of the word Avhich I have spoken 

4 to you. Abide in me, and I in you. As the 
branch can not bear fruit of itself, if it abide 
not in tiie vine, so neither ca?i you, except 

5 you abide in me. I am the vine, you the 
branches. He that abides in me, and I in 
him, HE bears much fruit : because without 

6 ME you can do nothing. If any one abide 
not in me, he is cast out like the branches, 
and is withered ; and they gather, and cast 

7 them into the fire, and they are Ijurned. If 
you abide in me, and my words abide in you, 
whatever you may wish, 'ask, and it shall be 

8 done to you. In this is my Father glorified, 
that you bear much fruit : and you shall be 

9 MY disciples. As the Father loved me, and 

10 I loved you, abide in my love. If you keep 
my commandments, you shall abide in my 
love ; as I have kept my Father's command- 

11 ments, and abide in his love. These things 

• According to some copies you shall ask, &c. 



have I spoken to you, that my joy may be 
in you, and j'our joy may be falfilled. This ]2 
is my commandment. That you love one 
another, as I loved you. Greater love has no 13 
one than this, that any one lay down his 
life for his friends. YOu are my friends, if 14 
you do what things I command you. I no 1^ 
more call you servants, because the servant 
knows not what his lord does ; but I have 
called you friends, because all things that 
I heard of my Father, I made known to 
you. You did not choose me, but I chose 16 
you, and appointed you, that you might go, 
and bear fruit, and your fruit might abide : 
so that whatever you may ask of the Father 
in my name, he may give you. These things 17 
I command you, that you love one another. 

LXVIII. If the world hate you, you know 18 
that it has hated me before you. If you 19 
were of the world, the world would love its 
own: but because you are not of the world, 
but I chose you out of the world, because 
of this, the Avorld hates you. Remember 2C 
the word that I said to you, A servant is 
not greater than his lord. If they perse- 
cuted ME, they will also persecute you ; if 
they kept my word, they will keep yours 
also. But all these things will they do to 21 
you, for my name's sake, because they know 
not him that sent me. If I had not come and 22 
spoken to them, they would not have liad sin; 
but now they have no excuse for their sin. 
He that hates me, hates my Father also. 23 
If I had not done among them the works which 24 
no other has done, they would not have had 
sin : but now have they both seen and hated 
both ME and my Father. But [it was,] that 25 
the saying might be fulfilled, that has been 
written in their law, They hated me without 
cause. But when the Comforter comes, whom 21; 
I will send to you from the Father, the 
Spirit of truth, who comes forth from the 
Father, he will testify of me. And you 27 
also testify, because you are with me from 
the beginning. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. IS. LXXII. 



IGo 



LXIX. These things have I spoken to 

2 you, that you may not be led astray. They 
will put you out of the synagogues: but an 
hour is coming, that every one that kills 

3 you will think to otler service to God. And 
these tilings will they do, because they know 

4 not the Father, nor me. But these tilings 
have I spoken to you, so that, when the 
hour comes, j'ou may remember them, that I 
told you. And these things I said not to 
you, from the beginning, because I was with 

5 you. But now I am going away to him who 
sent me, and no one of you asks me, AVhither 

6 art thou going? But because I have said 
these things to you, sorrow has filled your 

7 heart. But I tell you tlic truth: It is 
expedient for you that I go away : for if I 
go not away, the Comforter will not come to 
you; but if I go, I will send him to you. 

S And Iio, being come, will convince the world 

of sin, and of righteousness, and of judg- 

9 ment : of sin, indeed, because they believe 

10 not on me ; but of righteousness, because I 
am going away to my Father, and you see 

11 me no more; and of judgment, because the 
ruler of this world has been judged. 

12 LXX. I have yet many things to say to 

13 you, but you can not bear [them] now. But 
when lie is come, the Spirit of- truth, he 
will guide j'ou into all the truth : for he 
will not speak from himself; but wiiatever 
things he may hear, lie will speak : and he 

14 will show you things to come. He will 
glorify me : because he will take of mine, 

15 and show to you. All things that the Father 
has are mino : because of this I said. That 

10 he will take of mine, and show to you. A 
little while, and you see me no more, and 
again a little while, and j'ou will see me, 

17 Mjecause I am going to the Father. [Some] 
of his disciples, therefore, said, one to another, 
What is this that he is saying to us, A little 
while, and j'ou see me not, and again a little 



* Some copies omit the words, because I am going to the 
Father. , 



while, and you w-ill see me; and, Because I 
am going to the Father? They said, there- 18 
fore, What is this, that he is saying, A little 
while? We know not what he is saying. 
Jesus, therefore, knew that they were wishing 19 
to ask him, and said to them. Are you in- 
quiring about this, one with another, because 
I said, A little while, and you see me not, 
and again a little while, and you will see me? 
Verily, verily, I say to you. That you will 20 
weep and lament, but the world will rejoice; 
and YOU will be sorrowful, but your sori'ow 
shall be turned into joy. The woman, when 21 
she is in travail, has sorrow, because her hour 
is come; but, when she hath brought forth the 
child, she remembers no more the anguish, be- 
cause of the joy that a man was born into the 
world. And you now, therefore, have sorrow : 22 
but I will see you again, and your heart shall 
rejoice; and your joy no one takes from you. 
And in that day you will ask me nothing. 23 
\"erily, verily, I say to j^ou. Whatever things 
you may ask of the Father in my name, he 
will give you. Till now you asked nothing 24 
in my name: ask, and you shall receive, so 
that your joy may be fultilled. 

LXXI. These things have I spoken to j'OU 25 
in dark sayings : but an hour is coming, when 
I will no more speak to you in dark sayings, 
but I ΛνΙΙΙ show you plainly of the Father. 
In that day you will ask in my name: and I 26 
do not say to you, that I will pray to the 
Father for you ; for the Father himself loves 27 
you, because you have loved me, and have 
believed that I came out from God. I came 2S 
out from the Father, and am come into the 
world : again I leave the world, and am going 
to the Father. 

LXXII. His disciples say to him, Be- 29 
hold, now thou art talking plainly, and art 
speaking no dark saying. Now we know 30 
that thou knowest all things, and hast no 
need that any one ask thee : by this we 
believe that thou didst come out irom God. 
Jesus answered them. Do you now believe? 31 



166 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 18. LXXIV. 



32 Behold, an hour is coming, j'ea, is now come, 
that you will be scattered every one to his 
own, and will leave me alone : and yet I am not 

S3 alone, because the Father is with me. These 
things have I spoken to you, that in me you 
may have peace. In the world you will have 
tribulation : but be of good cheer ; I have 
overcome the world. 

1^ LXXIII. These things spoke Jesus, and 
lifted up his eyes to heaven, and said. Father, 
the hour is come ; glorify thy Son, that thy 

2 Son also may glorify thee : as thou didst give 
him power over all flesh, so that, [as for] all 
that thou hast given him, he might give them 

3 eternal life. And this is the eternal life, that 
they may know thee, the only true God, and 

4 him whom thou didst send, Jesas Christ. I 
glorified thee upon the earth : I finished the 
work which thou hast given me, that I might 

5 do [it.] And now, Father, glorify thou 
me with thyself, with the glory which I had 

6 with THEE before the world was. I mani- 
fested thy name to the men whom thou hast 
given me out of the world: thine they were, 
and thou hast given them to me ; and they 

7 have kept thy word. Now they know, that 
all things that thou hast cfiven me are of 

8 thee. Because I have given to them the 
words which thou hast given to me: and 
they themselves received, and knew indeed, 
that I came out from thee, and believed that 

9 THOU didst send me. I pray for them: not 
for the world do I pray, but for those whom 
thou hast given me ; because they are thine. 

10 And all mine are thine, and tMne, mine: 

11 and I have been glorified in them. And I am 
no more in the world, and these are in the 
world, and I am coming to thee. Holy 
Father, keep them in thy name, which thou 
hast given me, that they may be one, as we. 

12 AVlien I was with them, I was keeping them 
in thy name: those whom thou hast given 
me I kept, and no one of them was lost, e.K- 
cept the son of perdition ; that the Scripture 

13 might be fulfilled. And now I am coming to 



thee; and these things I speak in the world, 
that they may have my J03' i'ulfilled in them. 
I have given them thy word, and the world 14 
hated them ; because they are not of the 
world, as I 'am not of the world. I pray 15 
not that thou wouldst take them out of the 
world, but that thou wouldst keep them from 
the evil. They are not of the world, as I 16 
am not of the Avorld. Sanctify them in the 17 
truth: thy Avord is truth. As thou didst IS 
send ME into the world, so I sent them into 
the world. And for them I sanctify myself, 19 
so that they also themselves may be sanctified 
in truth. Nor do I pray for these alone, but 20 
also for those believing on me through their 
word: so that all may be one: as thou, 21 
Father, in me, and I in thee, that they also 
themselves may be in us; so that the world 
may know that thou didst send me. And 22 
the glory Λvllich thou hast given me, I have 
given them; that they may be one, as we are 
one: I in them, and thou in me, that they 23 
may be made perfect into one; and that the 
world may know that thou didst send me, 
and didst love them, as thou didst love me. 
Father, those whom thou hast given me, I 24 
wish, that where Ϊ am, they also mny be 
with ME ; so that they may see my glory 
which thou didst give me, because thou didst 
love me before the foundation of the world. 
rigiiteous Father, the world did not know 25 
thee, but I knew tiiee, and these knew th:it 
thou didst send me. And I made known, 26 
and will make known to them thy name: so 
that the love Λvith wliicli thou didst love me 
may be in them, and I in them. 

LXXIV. Jesus, saying these things, went 1.8 
out with his disciples beyond the biook 
Kedron, where was a garden, into which he 
entered, himself, and his disciples. And 2 
Judas also, who betrayed him, knew the 
place: because Jesus often met there Λvith 
his disciples. Judas, therefore, taking the 3 
band, and officers from the chief priests and 
Pharisees, comes thither with torches, and 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 18. LXXVm. 



IG^ 



4 lamps, auJ weapons. Jesus, therefore, know- 
ing all things that were coming upoii him, 
going out, said to them. Whom are you seek- 

5 ing? They answered him, Jesus, the Naza- 
rene. Jesus says to them, I am [he]. And 
Judas also, who betrayed him, was standing 

6 with them. AVhen, therefore, he said to 
them, I am [lie], they went backward, and 

7 fell to the ground. Again, therefore, he 
asked them : Whom are 3OU seeking? And 

8 they said, Jesus, the Nazarene. Jesus answer- 
ed, I told you that I am [he]. If, therefore, 

9 you are seeking me, let these go away: so 
that the saying might be fulfilled, which he 
said : I lost no one of those whom thou hast 

10 given me. Simon Peter, therefore, having a 
sword, drew it, and smote the servant of the 
high jiriest, and cut oft" his right ear. Now 

11 the servant's name was Malchus. Jesus, 
therefore, said to Peter, Put the sword into 
the sheath : the cup which the Father has 
given me, shall I not drink it"? 

12 LXXV. The band, therefore, and the 
captain, and tlie officers of the Jews, took 

13 Jesus, and bound him, and led him away 
to Annas first (for he was father-in-law of 
Caiaphas, Λνΐιο was high priest that J'car). 

14 Now Caiaphas was he who gave counsel 
to the Jews, that it was expedient that 

15 one man die for the people. And Simon 
Peter was following Jesus; also the other 
disciple. And that disciple was known to 
the high priest, and went in Λvith Jesus, into 

16 the court of the high priest. But Peter was 
standing at the door without. The other 
disciple, therefore, who was known to the 
high priest, went out, and spoke to the door- 

17 keeper, and brought in Peter. The maid, the 
door-keeper, therefore, says to Peter, Art not 
THOU also of this man's disciples? Ho saj's, 

18 I am not. And the servants and the officers 
were standing, (having made a fire of coals, 
because it was cold,) and were warming 
themselves: and Peter was standinc; with 

19 them, and warming himself. The high priest, 
therefore, asked Jesus of his disciples, and of 



his doctrine. Jesus answered him : I spoke 20 
publicly to the world; I always taught in the 
synagogue, and in the temple, where the 
Jews are always coming together; and in 
secret I said nothing. AVhy dost thou ask 21 
me? Ask those who have heard, what I said 
to them: behold, they know what things I 
said. Now, when he said these things, one of 22 
the officers, standing by, gave Jesus a blow, 
saying. Dost thou answer the high priest so? 
Jesus answered him: If I spoke evil, testify 23 
of the evil; but if \vell, why smitest thou 
me? (Now Annas had sent him, having been 21 
bound, to Caiaphas, the high priest.) 

ΕΧΧΛ-^Ι. And Simon Peter was standing, 25 
and warming himself. They said to him, 
therefore. Art not thou also of his disciples ? 
He denied, and said, I am not. One of the 26 
servants of the high priest, (being [liis] kins- 
man whose ear Peter cut off,) says. Did not 
I see thee in the garden with him? Again, 27 
therefore, Peter denied, and immediately the 
cock crew. 

LXXVII. They lead Jesus, therefore, from 28 
Caiaphas into the palace. And it was early ; 
and they themselves Avent not into the palace, 
so that they might not be defiled ; but that 
they might eat the Passover. Pilate, there- 29 
fore, went out to them, and said. What 
accusation do j^ou bring against this man ? 
They answered, and said to him. If he were 30 
not an evil-doer, we would not have delivered 
him np to thee. Pilate, therefore, said to 31 
them, Take you him, and judge him, accord- 
ing to your law. The Jews, therefore, said 
to him, It is not lawful for us to kill any 
one : that the saying of .lesus might be ful- 32 
filled, which he spoke, signifying by what 
death he was about to die. 

LXXVIII. Pilate, therefore, entered into 33 
the palace again, and called Jesus, and said to 
him. Art thou the King of the Jews? Jesus 34 
answered him. Dost thou say this from thy- 
self, or did others tell thee of me ? Pilate 35 
auswcred. Am I a Jew? Thy own nation, and 
the chief priests, delivered thee to me : what 



168 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 1.9. LXXI. 



86 didst tliou do? Jesus answered, My king- 
dom is not of this world: if my kingdom 
were of this world, my officers would fight, 
so that I nn"ht not be delivered to the Jews : 
but now is my kingdom not from hence. 

37 Pilate, therefore, said to him, Art thou not 
a king, then ? Jesus answered : Thou sayest 
that I am a king. For this have I been born, 
and for this am I come into the world, that I 
may testify to the truth. Every one that is 

3S of the truth, hears my voice. Pilate says to 
him. What is truth? And, saying this, he 
went out again to the Jews, and says to them, 

39 I find no fault in him. But you have a 
custom that I release to you one during the 
Passover. Do you, therefore, wish that I 

40 release to you the king of the Jews ? Again, 
therefore, they all cried, saying, Not him, but 
Barabbas. Now Barabbas was a robber. 



19 LXXIX. Then Pilate, therefore, took, and 

2 scourged Jesus. And the soldiers, platting 
a crown of thorns, put [it] on his head ; and 

3 they put on him a purple robe. 'And they 
kept coming to him, and said, Hail, King of 
the Jews ! And they were giving him blows. 

4 Pilate, therefore, went out again, and says 
to them. Behold, I bring him out to you, that 
you may know tiiat I find no fault in him. 

5 Jesus, therefore, came out, wearing the crown 
of thorns, and the purple robe. And he says 

6 to them, Behold, the man! AVhen, therefore, 
the chief priests and the officers saw him, 
They cried out, saying. Crucify, crucify 
him ! Pilate says to them. Take you, and 

7 crucify him : for I find no fault in him. Tlie 
Jews answered him, λλ'Έ have a law, and, 
according to our law, he ought to die, because 
he made himself the Son of God. 

8 LXXX. When, therefore, Pilate heard this 

9 saying, he was the more afraid, and went 
again into the palace, and says to Jesus, 
ΛVhence art thou? But Jesus gave him no 



Many copies omit, And they kept coming to him. 



answer. Pilate, therefore, says to him, Dost 10 
thou not speak to me ? Knowest thou not 
that I have power to crucify thee, and have 
power to release thee? Jesus answered, 11 
Thou wouldst have no power against me, 
if it had not been given thee from above. 
Because of this, he who delivered me to 
thee has greater sin. From this [time] 12 
Pilate was seeking to release him: but the 
Jews kept crying out, saying. If thou release 
HIM, thou art not a friend of Cesar. Every 
one that makes himself a king, sjieaks 
against Cesar. Pilate, therefore, on hearing 13 
this saying, brought Jesus out, (and sat down 
upon the judgment seat,) into a place called 
The Pavement (but, in Hebrew, Gabbatha). 
And it was the Preparation of the Passover, 14 
and about the sixth hour: and he says to the 
Jews, Behold j^our King! But they cried 15 
out, Away, away, crucify him! Pilate says 
to them, Shall I crucify your King? The 
chief priests answered. We have no king, ex- 
cept Cesar. Then, therefore, he delivered 16 
him to them, that he might be crucified. 

LXXXI. And they took Jesus, ^and led 
[him] away. And, beai-iug his cross, he 17 
went out into what is called, the Place of a 
Scull, which means, in Hebrew, Golgotha; 
where they crucified him, and two others 18 
with him, one on each side, and Jesus in 
the midst. And Pilate also wrote a Title, 19 
and put [it] upon the cross: and it had been 
written : JESUS, THE NAZARENE, THE 
KING OF THE JEWS. This Title, there- 20 
fore, many of the Jews read, because the 
place where Jesus was crucified was near 
the city, and it had been written, in Hebrew, 
in Greek, in Latin. The chief priests of the 21 
Jews, therefore, said to Pilate, Do not write, 
The King of the Jews, but, Tliat he said, I 
am King of the Jews. Pilate answered : 22 
What I have written, I have written. The 23 
soldiers, therefore, when they crucified Jesus, 
took his garments, and made four parts, to 



Some copies omit, and led him away. 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 20. LXXXV. 



169 



each soldier a part ; also the coat. Now the 
coat was without seam, woven from the top 

24 throughout. They said, therefore, one to 
another, Let us not tear it, but cast lots for 
it, whose it shall bo : that the Scripture 
might be fulfilled, which says, They divided 
my garments among themselves, and upon 
my raiment they cast a lot. The soldiers, 
therefore, did these things. 

25 LXXXII. Now there were standing by the 
cross of Jesus, his mother, and his mother's 
sister, Clopas's Mary, and Mary Magdalene. 

26 Jesus, therefore, seeing his mother, and the 
disciple standing by, whom he loved, says to 

27 his mother. Woman, behold thy son! After- 
ward he says to the disciple. Behold thy 
mother! And from that hour the disciple 

28 took her to his own. After this, Jesus, 
knowing that all things had now been 
finished, that the Scripture might be fulfilled, 

29 says, I thirst. There was, therefore, a vessel 
itanding, full of vinegar: and they, filling a 
sponge with vinegar, and putting [it] upon 

30 hyssop, brought [it] to his mouth. When, 
therefore, Jesus received the vinegar, he said. 
It has been finished! And, bowing the head, 
he yielded up the spirit. 

31 LXXXIII. The Jews, therefore, that the 
bodies might not remain upon the cross 
during the Sabbath, since it was the Prepara- 
tion, (for that Sabbath-day was a great one,) 
asked of Pilate, that their legs might be 

32 broken, and they might be taken away. The 
soldiers, therefore, came, and did, indeed, 
break the legs of the first, and of the other 

33 who was crucified Avith him : but, on coming 
to Jesus, when they saw that he had already 

34 died, they did not break his legs : — But 
one of the soldiers with a spear pierced his 
side, and immediately there came out blood 

35 and water: and he who has seen has testified, 
and his testimony is true; and ho knows that 
he is saying true things, so that you may 

36 believe: — For these things were done, that 
the Scriptm-e might be fulfilled, A bone of 

37 him shall not be broken. And again another 



Scripture says, They shall look on him whom 
they pierced. 

LXXXIV. Now after these tilings Jo- 3- 
seph, the one of Arimathea, (being a dis- 
ciple of Jesus, but secretly, because of the 
fear of the Jews,) asked of Pilate, that he 
might take away the body of Jesus. And 
Pilate gave leave. He came, therefore, and 
took away the body of Jesus. And Nicode- 39 
mus came also, (who at first came to Jesus 
by night,) bringing a mixture of myrrh and 
aloes, about a hundred pounds. Therefore, 40 
they took the body of Jesus, and bound it 
with linen cloths, with the spices, as the 
Jews have a custom to embalm. Now in the 41 
place where he Λvas crucified was a garden, 
and, in the garden, a new tomb, in Λvhich 
no one was yet laid. There, therefore, on 42 
account of the Preparation of the Jews, 
because the tomb was near, they laid Jesus. 

LXXXV. Now the first [day] of the week 20 
Mary Magdalene comes early, it being yet 
dark, into the tomb, and sees the stone 
having been taken away out of the tomb. 
She runs, therefore, and comes to Simon 2 
Peter, and to the other disciple, whom Jesus 
loved, and says to them. They have taken away 
the Lord out of the tomb, and we know not 
where they have laid him. Peter, therefore, 3 
went out, and the other disciple; and they 
were coming, into the tomb. And the two 4 
were running together; and the other disciple 
ran faster than Peter, and came first into the 
tomb. And, stooping down, he sees the 5 
linen cloths lying : nevertheless, he went not 
in. Simon Peter, therefore, comes following 6 
him, and entered into the tomb, and sees the 
linen cloths lying, and the napkin, that was 1 
upon his head, not lying with the linen 
cloths, but having been folded up in a place 
by itself. Then, therefore, the other disciple 8 
also, who came first into the tomb, went in, 
and saw, and believed. For they did not yet 9 
know the Scripture, that he must rise again 
from the dead. The disciples, therefore, went 10 
a\vay home again. 



170 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 23.. XCI. 



U LXXXVI. But Mary was standing by the 
tomb, weeping without. As she was weeping, 
therefore, she stooped down into the tomb, 

j2 and sees two angels in white sitting, one at 
the head, and one at the feet, where the body 

13 of Jesus had been laid. And they say to 
her, ΛVoman, why art thou weeping? She 
says to them, Because they took away my 
Lord, and I know not where they laid him. 

14 And, saying these things, she turned_ back- 
ward, and sees Jesus standing, and knew not 

15 that it was Jesus. Jesus says to her, Woman, 
why art thou weeping? Whom art thou 
seeking? She, supposing that he was the 
gardener, says to him, Sir, if thou didst 
carry him off, tell rae where thou didst lay 

16 him, and I will take him away. Jesus says 
to her, Mary! She, turning, says to him, in 

17 Hebrew, Rabboni! which means. Teacher. 
Jesus says to her. Touch me not ; for I have 
not yet gone up to my Father. But go to my 
brethren, and say to them, I am going up to 
my Father, and your Father; even my God, 

18 and j^our God. Mary Magdalene comes, 
telling the disciples that she had seen the 
Lord, and he said these things to her. 

19 LXXXVII. When, therefore, it was evening, 
that first day of the week, and the doors having 
been shut, where the disciples ^had been as- 
sembled, because of the fear of the Jews, Jesus 
came into the midst, and stood, and says to 

20 them. Peace [be] to you. And, saying this, 
he showed them his hands and side. The 
disciples, therefore, were glad, seeing the Lord. 

21 Jesus, therefore, said to them again. Peace 
[be] to you. As the Father has sent me, so 

22 I send you. And, saying this, he breathed 
on, and says to them. Receive a Holy Spirit. 

23 ^Whoseever sins you may forgive, they are 
forgiven them: whosoever you may retain, 
they have been retained. 

• Some copies have were, for, had been assembled. 

' Some copies read, If ye forgive the sins of any, Ihey have 
been forgiven them: j/ye retain [those] of any, they have been 
retained. 



LXXXVIII. But Thomas, one of the 24 
Twelve, the one called Didymus, was not 
with them, when Jesus came. The other 26 
disciples, therefore, said to him, We have 
seen the Lord. But he said to them. If I do 
not see in his hands the mark of the nails, 
and put my finger into the mark of the nails, 
and put my hand into his side, I will not 
believe. 

LXXXIX. And after eight days again his 26 
disciples were within, and Thomas with 
them. Jesus, the doors having been shut, 
comes into the midst, and stood, and said. 
Peace [be] to you. Afterward he saj's to 27 
Thomas, Bring hither thy finger, and behold 
my hands, and bring thy hand, and put [it] 
into my side; and be not unbelieving, but 
believing. And Thomas answered, and said 28 
to him. My Lord, and my God! Jesus says 29 
to him. Because thou hast seen me, thou hast 
believed. Happy [are] those who see not, 
and believe I 

XC. Many, indeed, therefore, and other 30 
signs Jesus did in presence of his disciples, 
which have not been written in this book. 
But these have been written, that you may 31 
believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of 
God ; and that, believing, you may have life 
in his name. 



XCI. After these things Jesus manifestedZl 
himself again to the disciples, on the Sea of 
Tiberias. Now he manifested [himself] thus : 
There were together Simon Peter, and 2 
Thomas, the one called Didymus, and Na- 
thanael, the one of Cana of Galilee, and the 
[sons] of Zebedee, and two others of his dis- 
ciples. Simon Peter says to them, I am 3 
going a fisliing. They say to him. We also 
are going with thee. They went out, and 
entered into the ship immediately ; and during 
that night they caught nothing. And, morn- 4 
ing being now come, Jesus stood on the 
shore. Nevertheless, the disciples knew not 
that it was Jesus. Jesus, therefore, says to 5 



THE GOSPEL. BY JOHN. CHAP. 21. XCIV. 



171 



them, Children, have you any thing to eat? 

6 They answered him, No. And he said to 
them. Put in the net on the rigli.t side of the 
ship, and you shall find. They put [it] in, 
therefore, and were no longer able to draw 
it, because of the multitude of the fishes. 

7 That disciple, therefore, whom Jesus loved, 
says to Peter, It is the Lord. Simon Peter, 
therefore, hearing that it was the Lord, 
girded on [his] overcoat, (for he was naked,) 

8 and cast himself into the sea. But the other 
disciples came by the boat, (for they were 
not far from the land, but about two hundred 
cubits off,) dragging the net with the fishes. 

9 When, therefore, they went off to the land, 
they see a fire of coals lying, and fish lying 

10 upon it, and bread. Jesus says to them. 
Bring of the fishes which you just now 

11 caught. Simon Peter went up, and drew 
the net to the land, full of great fishes, a 
hundred [and] fifty-three: and though there 
were so many, the net Λvas not torn. 

12 XCIL Jesus says to them. Come, dine. 
And no one of the disciples dared ask him. 
Who art thou"? knowing that it was the 

I:i Lord. Jesus, therefore, comes and takes 
the bread, and gives to them, and the fish 

; 4 likewise. This third [time] now was Jesus 
manifested to his disciples, being raised from 
the dead. 

15 XCIII. When, thei'efore, they had dined, 
Jesus says to Simon Peter, Simon, [son] of 
Jonas, lovest thou me more than these ? He 
says to him, Yes, Lord ; thou knowest that I 
love thee. He says to him. Feed my lambs. 

16 He says to him again a second time, Simon, 
[son] of Jonas, lovest thou me ? He says to 



him, Yes, Lord, thou knowest that I love 
thee. He says to him. Be a shepherd of my 
sheep. He says to him the third [time,] 17 
Simon, [son] of Jonas, lovest thou me t 
Peter was grieved, because he said to him 
the third time, Lovest thou mc? And he 
said to him. Lord, thou knowest all things ; 
THOU knowest that I love thee. Jesus says 
to him. Feed my sheep. Verily, verily, I 18 
say to thee. When thou wast younger, thou 
didst use to gird thyself, and walk where 
thou didst wish ; but, when thou art old, 
thou wilt stretch out thy hands, and another 
will gird thee, and carry thee whither thou 
dost not wish. Now this he said, signifying 19 
by what death he would glorify Clod. And, 
on saying this, he says to him. Follow me. 
And Peter, turning about, sees the disciple 20 
whom Jesus loved following, who also 
reclined, during the supper, upon his breast, 
and said. Lord, who is he that betrays thee? 
Peter, seeing him, says to Jesus, Lord, and 
what [of] HIM ? Jesus says to him. If I am 22 
willing tliat he abide till I come, what is it to 
thee ? Follow thou me. This saying, there- 
fore, went abroad among the brethren. That 
that disciple would not die. And Jesus did 23 
not say to him. That he shall not die ; but. 
If I am willing that he abide till I come, 
what is it to thee ? 

XCIV. This is the disciple who testifies of 24 
these things, and wrote these things ; and we 
know, that his testimony is true. And there 2-5 
are also many other things which Jesus did, 
which, if they were written every one, I 
suppose that not even the world itself would 
contain the books written. 






llJli 




'a 




s i/ij'}rf