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Full text of "Graduate Catalog"

Misericordia 



An opportunity to excel, 




Graduate Catalog 
1995-96 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/graduate9596mise 




College Misericordia Academic Catalog 

Graduate Studies 

Effective August, 1995 



CONTACTS 



For more information on graduate studies at College Misericordia, contact 
the people listed below at 717-674-6400 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 
Other College personnel are listed in the College Directory section of this 
catalog. All mail to College Misericordia faculty and administration may 
be addressed to College Misericordia, 301 Lake Street, Dallas, PA 18612. 



Academic Affairs 



Dr. Linda Trompetter, Director of Graduate Programs and 
Assistant Academic Dean 



Admissions and Financial Aid Jane Dessoye, Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 



Graduate Registration and 
Continuing Education 



Thomas J. O'Neill, Director of Continuing Education 



Program Directors 



Education: Dr. Joseph Rogan 



Nursing: Dr. Helen J. Streubert 
Occupational Therapy: Dr. Scott McPhee 
Organizational Management: Dr. John Kachurick 
Physical Therapy: Dr. Catherine Perry Wilkinson 



Registrar's Office 
Religious Life 



Edward Lahart, Registrar 

Reverend Michael Bryant, Director of Campus Ministry 

Agnes Therese Brennan, R.S.M., Associate Director of Campus Ministry 



Student Life 



Jean Messaros, R.S.M., Dean of Students 



POLICY STATEMENT 



This catalog contains current information regarding College Misericordia's 
graduate programs, admissions policies, degree requirements, fees and regulations. 
College Misericordia reserves the right to promulgate and change such regulations 
and to make changes in its programs and policies whenever it is deemed necessary 
or desirable. Compliance with the requirements of the graduate programs is the 
responsibility of the student. 

College Misericordia accords students of any race, color, religion, sex, 
physical handicap or disability, nationality or ethnic origin all the rights, privileges, 
programs and activities generally made available to students of the College. 
College Misericordia does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, 
sex, handicap, nationality, or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational 
policies, scholarship and loan programs or other College administered programs. 

College Misericordia complies with the Family Education Rights and Privacy 
Act (FERPA) of 1974 as amended. A copy of the act is available for inspection in 
the Office of the Academic Dean. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Contacts 2 

Catalog Policy Statement 3 

Graduate Philosophy 5 

Accreditation 5 

Academic Integrity 5 

Graduate Program Policies and Procedures 6 

Admissions Information 6 

Application for Graduate Degree 10 

Auditing 10 

Change of Address 10 

Course Withdrawal and Refund Policies 10 

Financial Aid 11 

Grading System 13 

Students with Disabilities 13 

Graduation Requirements 14 

Grievance Procedures 14 

Maintenance of Matriculation and Leave of Absence 15 

Non-Matriculation Status 15 

Program Advisement 15 

Program Retention 15 

Program Withdrawal 16 

Readmission 16 

Transcripts 16 

Transfer of Credit 16 

Tuition and Fees 16 

Graduate Program Descriptions 17 

Education 17 

Nursing 22 

Occupational Therapy 31 

Organizational Management 35 

Physical Therapy 38 

Course Descriptions 41 

Education 41 

Nursing 46 

Occupational Therapy Entry Level 52 

Organizational Management 54 

Physical Therapy 57 

College Directory 60 

Board of Trustees 60 

Administration 61 

Graduate Program Faculty 62 

Adjunct Faculty 64 

Academic Calendar 66 

Index 68 



GRADUATE PHILOSOPHY 



Graduate education at College Misericordia exists within the framework of the College's role 
and mission statement It is firmly rooted in the mission and academic traditions of the college and its 
founding group, the Religious Sisters of Mercy, stressing the values of Justice, Mercy and Service. It 
emphasizes academic excellence and critical thinking, while preparing students for productive careers 
and continued professional growth. The graduate faculty foster a climate conducive to academic 
growth, intellectual discourse, critical thinking and decision making. The aims of the graduate programs 
at College Misericordia are to provide comprehensive education in special fields, to offer instruction in 
the methods of independent investigation and to foster a spirit of research. 

Active participation, individualized planning, and selection of learning experiences facilitate 
the development of students as persons, members of society, and potential leaders in their professions. 
The graduate programs offered by College Misericordia build upon the College's traditional academic 
strengths. 



ACCREDITATION 



College Misericordia is fully accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and 
Schools/Commission on Higher Education and is empowered by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 
to grant both undergraduate and graduate degrees. The Master's degree in Education offered by College 
Misericordia is fully approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The Master's degree in 
Nursing is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing. The Master's degree in Occupational 
Therapy is approved by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education. The 
postbaccalaureate entry-level program in Physical Therapy is in the process of procuring accreditation 
by the Commission on Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education/American Physical Therapy 
Association. 



ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 



It is the student's responsibility to maintain academic integrity and intellectual honesty in 
her/his work. All students are expected to observe the generally accepted principles of scholarly work, 
to submit their own rather than another's work, to refrain from falsifying data, and to refrain from 
receiving and/or giving aid on examinations or other assigned work requiring independent effort. 

In submitting written material, the writer takes full responsibility for the work as a whole and 
implies that, except as properly noted by the use of citations, both the ideas and the language are her/his 
own. Failure to abide by the rules of scholarship is academically dishonest 

It should be clearly understood that plagiarism, cheating or other forms of academic dishonesty 
fundamentally violates the nature and purposes of an academic institution and will not be tolerated at 
College Misericordia. A student who has been found guilty of plagiarism will be dismissed from the 
College. 



GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 



ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 

Matriculation in any graduate program at College Misericordia requires at minimum a bachelor's degree 
from an accredited college or university. In addition, some graduate programs have program specific admissions 
requirements which are noted below. 

Applicants must file a formal request for admission along with three letters of recommendation (including a 
letter from a colleague and a supervisor) and the results of either the Graduate Records Examination or the Miller's 
Analogy Test as required by the program to which you are applying. A complete application consists of the applica- 
tion form, three letters of reference, the application fee, official transcripts of previous academic work to be for- 
warded directly from the institution at which the credits were earned, and the results of either the GRE or MAT 
examination as appropriate. Students for whom English is a second language must demonstrate proficiency in 
written and spoken English. 

The application and all supporting material should be mailed to: 

Office of Graduate Admissions 
College Misericordia 
301 Lake Street 
Dallas, PA 18612-1098 

FAX No. 717-675-2441 

Credentials will be screened by the Graduate Admissions Committee. The applicant will be notified in 
writing of matriculation status within eight weeks of receipt of a completed application. 

Program Specific Admissions Requirements 

EDUCATION 

Admission Criteria: 

Full Admission-Applicants are eligible for full admission to the graduate program if they either have a GPA of 
2.50 but less than 2.99 and a score on the MAT or GRE of at least the 35th percentile; or a GPA of 3.00 or above 
and a score on the MAT or GRE of at least the 25th percentile. 

Provisional Admission-Applicants who have a GPA of 2.50 to 2.99 and score below the 35th percentile on the 
MAT or GRE are eligible to be granted provisional admission. Students in this category will be required to com- 
plete up to 12 graduate credits, half of which must be in required courses, with grades no lower than "B" before 
being granted full and unconditional admission. 

Denied Admission-Applicants who have less than a 2.50 GPA in their undergraduate studies and score below the 
25th percentile on the MAT or GRE will be denied admission. 

The Graduate Education Program may enable students to become candidates for a Pennsylvania Depart- 
ment of Education Instructional Certification in Elementary Education (i.e., Elementary Track students). However, 
this is die case only for students who are certified in another instructional area and who want to expand their areas of 
certification. For example, a Graduate Education Program student already certified in secondary education may 
become a candidate for certification in elementary education. Candidates for certification in elementary education 
will need to meet other requirements as set by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. 



GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 



While the Graduate Education Program is designed for veteran teachers, persons who are not teachers may 
apply. They should realize, however, that the Graduate Education Program is no! a vehicle for earning an Instruc- 
tional I certificate (i.e., initial certification) in any area. College graduates who are not teachers but who are inter- 
ested in becoming teachers may submit their transcripts to the Director of Teacher Education for review. Initial 
certification in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Special Education (MPH), and several areas of 
Secondary Education may be possible by completing a carefully planned series of undergraduate and graduate 
courses. 

NURSING 

Admission Criteria: 

Full Admission-Applicants are eligible for full admission to the graduate program if they either have a GPA of 
2.50 but less than 2.99 and a score on the MAT or GRE of at least the 35th percentile; or a GPA of 3.00 or above 
and a score on the MAT or GRE of at least the 25th percentile. 

Provisional Admission-Applicants who have a GPA of 2.50 to 2.99 and score below the 35th percentile on the 
MAT or GRE are eligible to be granted provisional admission. Students in this category will be required to com- 
plete up to 12 graduate credits, half of which must be in required courses, with grades no lower than "B" before 
being granted full and unconditional admission. 

Denied Admission-Applicants who have less than a 2.50 GPA in their undergraduate studies and score below the 
25th percentile on the MAT or GRE will be denied admission. 

In addition, nursing applicants must submit the following: 

1 . official transcripts demonstrating graduation from an NLN accredited baccalaureate program; 

2. statement of professional goals for graduate education; 

3. copy of current professional nurse registration; 

4. documentation of a physical assessment course; 

5. documentation of undergraduate statistics course; 

6. nurse practitioner applicants must demonstrate one year of recent clinical experience. 

Applicants for Family Nurse Practitioner - Post Master's Certificate Program must submit the following: 

1. official transcripts demonstrating graduation from an NLN accredited masters program; 

2. statement of professional goals for nurse practitioner program; 

3. copy of current professional nursing license; 

4. documentation of physical assessment course; 

5. minimum one year of recent clinical experience. 

COMBINED GRADUATE PROGRAM IN NURSING AND 
ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT: 

Students with a BSN degree may wish to pursue a combined MSN/Organizational Management curricu- 
lum. The combined program prepares students for administrative positions. They will acquire a more in-depth 
ability to function in positions in nursing service by using management skills in organizational environments based 
on clinical nursing specialization. 

The combined program consists of sixty-four (64) credit hours which reflect a twelve hour reduction in the 
total credit load of the two programs combined. Four course requirements are similar in each program, namely, OM 
500, OM 510, OM/NSG 515, and OM 595. Hence course repetition is not required. All other course requirements 
for each program will be completed. Students select from the same majors in each program. 

Entrance requirements for both programs must be met, and an academic advisor from each program will be 
assigned. Students must have continuous advisement by advisors in both programs. Additional details about the 
combined MSN/OM program can be obtained from the director of either program. 



GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 



PROFESSIONAL ENTRY LEVEL MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

Admissions: 

Students who have a sincere desire to pursue a career in occupational therapy, who are able to articulate their 
leadership roles, who have an appreciation for the relevance that activity plays in their individual lives, and 
who have achieved the following criteria will be considered for the Occupational Therapy Program: 

TRADITIONAL FIVE YEAR PROFESSIONAL ENTRY LEVEL MASTERS DEGREE 

- High School science background required in biology and mathematics; physics strongly recommended 

- Minimum of 2. 5 Cumulative High School GPA 

- 950 SAT score and/or top 20th percentile in class ranking 

- Two letters of reference (at least one from an occupational therapist is highly recommended) 

- 50 hours of documented service in a health care setting in which an occupational therapist is employed 
with at least half completed prior to the admissions interview 

- Submit a 500 word, hand written statement of personal and professional goals 

- Successful interview with an Occupational Therapy faculty member 

WEEKEND COLLEGE PROFESSIONAL ENTRY LEVEL MASTERS DEGREE 
(Students with an Associate Degree who are Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants) 

- A Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant who has graduated from an accredited program with a minimum 
of a 2. 80 Cumulative Grade Point Average (if GPA is based on less than 30 credits, a 950 minimum SAT 
score is also required) 

- Two letters of reference (at least one from an occupational therapist is highly recommended) 

- Submit a 500 word, hand written statement of personal and professional goals 

- Successful interview with an Occupational Therapy faculty member 

- COTAs must submit evidence of current AOTCB certification 

WEEKEND COLLEGE PROFESSIONAL ENTRY LEVEL MASTERS DEGREE 

(students already possessing an undergraduate degree) 

- A Bachelor degree from an accredited College or University, with a minimum of a 2.8 Cumulative Grade 
Point Average 

- Successful completion of the following pre-requisite college courses with a grade of at least a "C" in each 
course: Human Anatomy and Physiology (with a lab) 2 semesters or equivalent 

Introduction to Physics (with a lab) 1 Semester or equivalent 

Statistics. 1 semester or equivalent 

- Two letters of reference (at least one from an occupational therapist is highly recommended) 

- 50 hours of documented service in a health care setting in which an occupational therapist is employed 
with at least half completed prior to the admissions interview 

- Submit a 500 word, hand written statement of personal and professional goals 

- Successful interview with an Occupational Therapy faculty member at College Miscricordia 



GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT 

Admission Criteria: 

Full Admission-Applicants are eligible for full admission to the graduate program if they either have a GPA of 
2.50 but less than 2.99 and a score on the MAT or GRE of at least the 35th percentile; or a GPA of 3.00 or above 
and a score on the MAT or GRE of at least the 25th percentile. 

Provisional Admission-Applicants who have a GPA of 2.50 to 2.99 and score below the 35th percentile on the 
MAT or GRE are eligible to be granted provisional admission. Students in this category will be required to com- 
plete up to 12 graduate credits, half of which must be in required courses, with grades no lower than "B" before 
being granted full and unconditional admission. 

Denied Admission-Applicants who have less than a 2.50 GPAIn their undergraduate studies and score below the 
25th percentile on the MAT or GRE will be denied admission. 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Admission Criteria: 

College Misericordia's program in Physical Therapy is a five-year, entry level master's degree program with 
admission at the freshman year. However, applicants who already possess a baccalaureate degree may be 
admitted directly into the professional phase of the physical therapy program on a space available basis. 

Admission Directly into the Professional Physical Therapy Program 

Applicants who possess a baccalaureate degree may be admitted directly into the professional physical therapy 

program. The following criteria for selection will apply: 

1. Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in college work completed. 

2. Successful completion of the following pre-requisite college courses with a grade 
of at least "C" in each course: 

Chemistry with lab including 2 semesters or 

organic chemistry equivalent 

Physics with lab 2 semesters or 

equivalent 

Human Anatomy with lab 1 semester or 

equivalent 

Human Physiology with lab 1 semester or 

equivalent 
(A two semester or equivalent combined Anatomy and Physiology course with 
lab is acceptable) 

Statistics 1 semester or equivalent 

Psychology to include 2 semesters or 

Developmental Psychology equivalent 



_I0 

GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 



3. If SAT scores are older than five years, the applicant will be required to submit GRE or Miller's 
Analogy Test scores. 

4. Exposure to and exploration of physical therapy as demonstrated by documented paid or 
volunteer experience of 100 or more hours in at least two different facilities qt a minimum of one 
year's full-time professional experience within the health care system. 

Advancement within the Professional Physical Therapy Program 

To advance within the professional program, students must maintain a 3.0 GPA and achieve a minimum level 
of competence (B) in all professional designated (PT) courses; further, no more than 2 grades of "C" will be 
permitted in courses at the 500 and 600 level. Grades of D or below are considered failing grades within the 
Professional Program. Policies and Procedures related to Academic Standards for the Physical Therapy 
Program will be included in the Physical Therapy Student Handbook. 

For complete information on admission requirements at the undergraduate level, see the Undergraduate Catalog. 

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATE DEGREE 

It is the student's responsibility to keep abreast of progress toward degree completion. An application for 
the graduate degree should be filed in the Office of the Registrar no later than February 1 of the anticipated year of 
graduation. Failure to do so may delay the date of awarding the diploma. 

AUDITING 

With the appropriate program director's approval, any student may register to take a course on an audit or 
non-credit basis provided that standard admission and course prerequisites have been met. A student may audit no 
more than 3 courses or 9 credits. The fee for auditing a course is one half the cost of tuition. 

Matriculating students must have the permission of their advisor before auditing a course. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

Students enrolled for course work in the graduate program are responsible for reporting any change of 
address and/or other salient information to the Office of Graduate Registration. Failure to do so will result in failure 
to receive timely registration, program, grading and billing information. 

COURSE WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND POLICIES 

A student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty within the period stated in the college 
calendar. Withdrawal forms may be obtained from the Office of Graduate Registration. A grade of "W is given for 
an approved withdrawal. The date on which the form is received by the Office of Graduate Registration is consid- 
ered as the official date of withdrawal. Refund of tuition and grade assignment is based on the date on which the 
form is received by the Office of Graduate Registration. If a student does not officially withdraw from a class and 
ceases to attend it, a grade of "F' is incurred. If a student withdraws while failing, after die date for withdrawal 
without academic penalty, a grade of "WF" is incurred. 

When a graduate student drops a course or withdraws from a course or the College, official notice must be 
filed with the Office of Graduate Registration. 

Tuition refunds arc based on the date the Office of Graduate Registration receives official notice from a 
student indicating his/her desire to withdraw from a course. 



u_ 

GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 



Graduate students who receive federal Title IV funds and who are enrolled at the college for the first time 
will be governed by Tide IV refund regulations as mandated by the Higher Education Amendments of 1992. In the 
case of withdrawal, tuition and fees will be cancelled on a pro-rated basis for the first sixty percent of the length of 
the period of study. Financial aid must be proportionately reduced and restored to the appropriate financial aid fund. 
The calculation for Tide IV refunds will be computed by the Financial Aid Office. 

In the case of a withdrawal of a graduate student who is not enrolled at the college for the first time, the 
percentage of tuition refund is as follows: 

For day and once per week evening classes the percentage rate for tuition refunds follows: 
First Week 100 percent 

Second Week 75 percent 

Third Week 50 percent 

Fourth Week 25 percent 

No refunds are allowed after the fourth week. 

For Weekend College classes the percentage of tuition refund follows: 
100 percent prior to the 2nd class meeting. 
50 percent prior to the 3rd class meeting. 
No refund after the 3rd class meeUng. 

For Summer School classes the percentage of tuition refund follows: 
100 percent prior to the 2nd class meeting. 
50 percent prior to the 3rd class meeting. 
No refund after the 3rd class meeting. 

All refund percentages are computed from charges to the student, not from the amount paid. 

There are no refunds to students dismissed from the College. Advance registration deposits and any other 
fees are not refundable. 

FINANCIAL AID 

A. Graduate Assistantships 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available on a compeutive basis to graduate students. The 
assistantships involve designated institutional or programmatic work responsibilities which relate to the student's 
graduate studies. Graduate assistantships provide full or partial payment of tuition and/or stipends. Written requests 
for assistantships should be submitted to the individual program director, who can provide specific information 
regarding available assistantships. 

B. Graduate Student Loans 

Through the Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan, graduate students enrolled on at least a half-time basis may 
apply for up to $8,500 per year. Repayment of both principal and interest is deferred until six months after program 
completion (or after a student ceases enrollment on at least a half-time basis). Through the Federal Unsubsidized 
Stafford Loan, up to an additional $10,000 may be borrowed per year. While repayment of the principal is deferred, 
quarteriy interest only payments are due while the student is enrolled. 

Students who have obtained Stafford Loans in the past and have not yet repaid those loans must borrow 
through their original lender. New borrowers may borrow from the lender of their choice at a variable interest rate. 
The interest rate as of July 1, 1995, is 8.25%. 



_12 

GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 



C. Federal Nurse Traineeship Monies 

Federal nurse traineeship monies may be available for full time graduate students in Nursing. Please check 
with the Chairperson, Nursing Department. 

D. Veteran's Benefits 

College Misericordia is approved by the Veterans Administration for the education and training of veterans 
and welcomes the opportunity to provide graduate education to veterans of the armed services. 

Veterans enrolling at the institution for the first time should notify their local Veterans Administration 
Office in order to apply for educational benefits. This application should be filed six (6) weeks prior to the begin- 
ning of the semester. Students must contact the Registrar's Office to initiate the process. 

E. Deferred Payment Plan 

College Misericordia provides an option for students to pay tuition fees and other charges on a deferred 
payment plan. The plan permits educational costs to be spread over a period of time. The requirements of the plan 
are as follows: 

1 . A down payment of twenty (20) percent of the total term/semester charges is required 
unless other arrangements have been made with the Comptroller's office. 

2. Deferments are limited to one term/semester, the unpaid balance must be paid before final 
examinations that term/semester. Failure to pay charges in full before final exams may result in 
loss of credit for the term/semester. 

3. At the close of each month, the unpaid balance will be charged a one (1) percent finance charge. 

4. Students who fail to meet their deferred payment obligations will be dropped from the plan. 

5. Participants in the plan must sign and receive a copy of the deferred payment plan. 

F. Interest Waived Policy 

It is a College policy that any outstanding balances will be charged a one (1) percent finance charge at the 
close of the second month into the semester and each month thereafter. This policy is waived for students who 
receive tuition benefits, rehabilitation benefits or Veterans' Education benefits. 

G. Tuition Reimbursement 

Students whose tuition is reimbursed by their employer must file a letter from their employer annually so 
stipulating. Students may then register and remit the tuition prior to the next registration period. 



13 



GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 





GRADING SYSTEM 




The grade point average 


is computed by dividing honor points earned 


by credits attempted according to the 


following scale: 






Grade 


Numerical Values 


Honor Points per Credit 


A 


94-100 


4 


B+ 


89-93 


3.5 


B 


84-88 


3 


C+ 


79-83 


2.5 


C 


74-78 


2 


F 


below 74 





WP 


withdraw passing 


Not calculated 


*WF 


withdraw failing 





AU 


audit 


Not calculated 


W 


withdrawn 


Not calculated 


IP (see below) 


in progress 


Not calculated 


I (see below) 


incomplete 


Not calculated 


S 


satisfactory 


Not calculated 


u 


unsatisfactory 


Not calculated 



♦Equivalent to a failure; computed as an "F\ 

Incomplete Grades 

*T' (Incomplete) grades will be issued only for those courses in which a student has not completed 
necessary requirements due to some extenuating circumstance. 

Should conditions arise that prohibit the student from completing required course assignment(s) by due 
date, the student must negotiate for a grade of Incomplete with the course professor at least two weeks prior to 
course deadline. Emergencies may arise which do not allow a two week notice. In that event, the student should 
contact the Director of Graduate Programs. That office will then inform the instructors involved. 

The "P must be removed within a maximum of one semester, or the *T* becomes an "F." 

"IP* (In Progress) grades will be issued only for Professional Contribution or Thesis courses. The "IF* 
must be removed within a maximum of one calendar year, or it becomes an "F." 

NOTE: To receive an "I" or "IF' the student must obtain and complete an Incomplete Grade Form from the office 
of Graduate Registratioa The faculty member issuing an 'T* or "IP" has the right to determine the length of time 
for completion within the maximum limits. 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES 

College Misericordia is committed to offering students with disabilities an opportunity to fully participate in 
all curricular and extracurricular programs for which they are otherwise qualified. 

Students with physical or sensory disabilities may request appropriate and reasonable support from the 
Director of Graduate Programs. Pending the review of substantiating documentation, appropriate and reasonable 
support will be offered through the college Learning Center. 

Students with disability should review the college's Institutional Testing Requirements in the Admissions 
section in this catalog. 

Students with disabilities who confront access or attitudinal barriers on campus should contact the college's 
Director of Graduate Programs, 



_14 

GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

To be eligible for a graduate degree from College Misericordia, students must have a cumulative grade 
point average of 3.0 at the time of graduation, must fulfill all program requirements including the professional 
contribution as required by the program, must have paid all tuition and fees, and must apply for the graduate degree 
no later than February 1 of the anticipated year of graduation. 

GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES 

The College provides a uniform method by which students can pursue grievable issues. Grievable issues 
are either complaints about alleged violations of the institution's academic policies, or unfairness in the application 
of policies. Formal grievances must be filed while a student is matriculating or within three months following the 
student's date of graduation. 

A student who has a grievance must attempt to resolve it on an informal basis by using the following procedure: 

1 . The student should first speak to the person with whom the complaint rests. 

2. If the matter is not satisfactorily resolved at that level, the student must proceed to the 
Program Director to discuss the issue. 

3. If the matter is not resolved at that level the student should proceed to the office of the Director 
of Graduate Programs, where a formal grievance may be filed. 

The procedure for grievance is as follows: 

1. The student shall inform the Director of Graduate Programs in writing of her/his intent to seek 
formal redress through the grievance procedure, indicating the nature of the complaint. 

2. Within fourteen (14) calendar days of receipt of the written complaint the Director of Graduate 
Programs will convene the Academic Grievance Committee. 

3. The Academic Grievance Committee is composed of the Director of Graduate Programs, one 
faculty member and one graduate student appointed by the Director of Graduate Programs. 

4. At least seven (7) days in advance of the hearing the Director of Graduate Programs will notify 
the grievant and the individual charged with the complaint of the time and place of the 
hearing, the specification of the complaint, and the composition of the committee. 

5. The individual charged has the right to be present when charges and evidence are presented to 
the committee, to question and give evidence on her/his behalf. 

6. Committee members may question witnesses to evaluate all relevant facts of a given case. 
Since the committee meeting is an internal review, all committee meetings shall be 
private. Witnesses shall be excluded except for the period of their questioning. Persons 
external to the college shall be excluded. 

The report and recommendation of the committee shall be in writing, including the committee's rationale 
for the decision and including any dissenting opinion. Only those committee members who have heard all testimony 
and evidence in a given case may vote on the committee's recommendation. 

The committee report and recommendations shall be forwarded to the Academic Dean within ten (10) 
calendar days of the hearing. The Academic Dean will make the final determination and formally advise the parties 
involved. 



15_ 

GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

MAINTENANCE OF MATRICULATION AND LEAVE OF ABSENCE 

Once accepted into a program, students must maintain matriculation on a continuing basis until they have 
completed all degree requirements unless they have been granted a formal leave of absence by the Director of 
Graduate Programs. Matriculated students not enrolled for at least one course during the Fall and Spring semesters 
must register to maintain matriculation. 

Students who are involved in a culminating activity such as a thesis, a professional contribution, or ad- 
ministrative practicum must maintain their registration in that activity until they have successfully completed it 

Normally students have no more than five (5) years after the date of matriculation to complete degree 
requirements. Students who seek a leave of absence from their graduate program should submit a letter to the 
Director of Graduate Programs. The letter must state the reasons for the request and the length of the leave, if 
known. To return to the graduate program the student should submit to the Director of Graduate Programs a letter 
requesting readmission at least six weeks before the start of the semester in which the student wishes to re-enroll. 

Cumulative leaves of absence may not exceed two (2) years after matriculation or the student will be 
dismissed from the program. Normally only one leave of absence will be granted. 

NON-MATRICULATION STATUS 

Persons who have an undergraduate degree and who are not enrolled in a graduate program may take up to 
six (6) credits without applying for admission. After successful completion of six (6) credits, matriculation is 
required to continue enrollment in program courses. However, workshops and seminars sponsored by the graduate 
programs are open to members of the public who may enroll in the workshops and seminars on an audit basis. 

PROGRAM ADVISEMENT 

The Director of each graduate program serves as or assigns an academic advisor for all students enrolled in 
that program. The advisor maintains a student record and advisement folder used to plan a student's program and 
track progress. However, all official student records are maintained in the Registrar's Office and can be reviewed by 
students upon 24 hour notice. 

Students register for courses with the help of the Program Director. The process of registering for courses 
requires the completion of a Course Registration Form. The form along with a check for tuition is submitted to the 
Office of Graduate Registration. Students who use the Deferred Payment Plan must submit a check for 20% of the 
tuition due and a Deferred Payment Form. Students who utilize employer reimbursement programs are required to 
submit a letter from their employers annually in August prior to registration. 

PROGRAM RETENTION 

Any student receiving more than six credits below "B" or more than three credits below "C will be 
terminated immediately from the degree program, and may never reenter the same program. 

One graduate course may be repeated, if a grade of "F' has been received. This may be done one time 
only. The second grade shall stand on a student's transcript. 

A student whose GPA falls below 3.0 will be placed on probation. This may occur one time only. 



_16 

GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 



PROGRAM WITHDRAWAL 

A student who wishes to withdraw from a Graduate Program at College Misericordia must inform the 
Director of Graduate Programs of the withdrawal in writing. The date the office receives the notification determines 
final grades for any courses in which the student may be enrolled at the time of withdrawal, as well as any tuition 
refund which may be warranted. 

READMISSION 

A student who has withdrawn from a program and wishes to be readmitted to that or any other graduate 
program is required to submit a request for readmission in writing to the Director of Graduate Programs. Upon 
receipt of the letter, the Admissions Committee will review the student's credentials and determine whether to 
readmit the student. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Official transcripts may be obtained from the Registrar's Office. There is a five dollar ($5) fee for each 
transcript requested. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

Applicants may transfer up to six (6) graduate credits earned previously in other accredited graduate 
programs provided the courses were completed with a grade of B or better and are appropriate substitutes for the 
courses offered in the Misericordia program. In special cases where applicants have already earned a graduate 
degree, 12 credits from that degree may be applied toward a Misericordia master's degree, provided the course 
credits are appropriate substitutes. Transfer credits are accepted after evaluation by the Registrar in consultation 
with the appropriate Program Director, and with the approval of the Director of Graduate Programs. 

Matriculating students who have not already transferred credits may, with program approval, take up to six 
graduate credits off campus from an accredited graduate program. These credits may also be transferred to College 
Misericordia to meet program requirements. However, in no case may the number of credits transferred into a 
graduate program at College Misericordia after matriculation exceed six (6). 

TUITION AND FEES 
1995-96 

Tuition (per semester hour of credit) 

Education and Organizational Management $325.00 

Nursing, Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy 365.00 

Application fee (to accompany all applications) 20.00 

Matriculation fee for master's candidates for each 

semester during which the student is not registered 

for course work 75.00 

Parking permit 5.00 

Parking fines 15.00 

Student I.D 10.00 

Thesis Continuation Fee 510.00 

Transcript fee per copy 5.00 

Graduation Fee 100.00 



17 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



Philosophy 



GRADUATE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Graduate Education Program is interested in attracting experienced 
and dedicated teachers who wish to become educational leaders. While it is 
expected that graduates of College Misericordia's Graduate Education Program 
will be highly valued by their school districts and communities, the program is 
not designed to help classroom teachers become school administrators or to 
prepare teachers for roles outside their classrooms. The program respects and 
values classroom teachers. It hopes to empower these valued professionals and 
enable them to take the lead in making important educational decisions. 

National reports indicate that our society wants classroom teachers to 
become more involved in the leadership and management of schools and of 
their profession. Teachers are willing to accept these new responsibilities, they 
are willing to take the lead in planning, implementing, and evaluating the 
educational programs needed in our nation's schools. But good intentions are 
not enough. College Misericordia's Graduate Education Program is designed to 
help teachers gain the knowledge necessary and develop the skills required to 
function as leaders. 



Program 



General 
Goals 



Cited by the Pennsylvania Department of Education for its "innovative 
programmatic and curricular design," the Graduate Education Program breaks 
away from traditional programming. College Misericordia's Graduate Education 
Program reflects and respects the learning styles and schedules of adult learners. 

The Graduate Education Program offers participants a common body of 
necessary skills and knowledge through a fifteen credit core requirement. It then 
allows students to pursue an area of interest by taking one of three available 
sequences. Each includes specialization courses appropriate to the sequence and 
the opportunity to participate in additional elective courses, as well as indepen- 
dent and directed studies. The program's unique culminating experience asks 
students to share what they have learned in the program with colleagues. 

Students enrolled in College Misericordia's Graduate Program in Educa- 
tion may choose to specialize in one of three areas. All three specialization 
sequences include the same core requirements (15 credits) and all require a 
Professional Contribution (6 credits). 

Graduates of College Misericordia's Graduate Education Programs (i.e., 
Elementary Education, Educational Technology, and Supervisor of Curriculum 
and Instruction) will demonstrate the ability to: 



1. effectively communicate with various school communities regarding current 
educational issues and trends and the principles of teaching and learning 
which make schools effective and efficient. 



2. design, organize, and manage system-wide curriculum which prepares 
students within areas relating to the goals of quality education. 

3. coordinate district-wide subject area activities, subject area curriculum 
development. 



18 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



Specific Goals 
Curriculum 



4. conduct evaluations of curriculum and instruction and use the results of 
the evaluations to encourage and facilitate curricular and instructional 
improvements. 

5. use an understanding of how learning occurs as the basis for making 
curricular and instructional decisions which support the intellectual, 
social, and personal growth of all students. 

6. use an understanding of individual and group motivation, instructional 
practices, and assessment to create school environments which foster 
effective and efficient curricular and instructional practices and proce- 
dures and which enable all students to master curriculum and meet high 
standards. 

7. use the tools of research and inquiry to gather and use information 
needed to make educational decisions. 

8. identify how educational technology can be used to facilitate and 
improve teaching and learning processes. 

Specific goals for each of the Graduate Education Program's three 
specialization sequences are available. 

The curriculum of the Graduate Education Program requires the 
completion of five core courses, a specialization track, and a professional 
contribution. 

A. CORE COURSES: 



EDU500 


Issues in Education 


EDU504 


Curriculum 


EDU510 


Learning 


EDU 


(Technology Elective) 


EDU515 


Research Methods 



B. SPECIALIZATIONS: 

The Specialization in Supervision of Curriculum and Instruction: 

Teachers should directly participate in decisions about curriculum and 
instruction. They should be primarily responsible for activities such as 
planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum and instruction. The 
curriculum track of College Misericordia's Graduate Education Program 
gives teachers the knowledge and skills they need to deal with curriculum 
issues. Graduates can function as leaders of local school district curriculum 
planning teams, site-based management teams, building level management 
teams, and will be able to otherwise work to improve curriculum in their 
schools. 

Participants in the curriculum track complete the core requirements, 
several required courses, two electives, and a professional contribution. 
Additionally, students may opt to participate in a post-graduate internship 
in supervision. 



19 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



Core 




EDU500 


Issues in Education 


EDU 504 


Curriculum 


EDU510 


Learning 


EDU515 


Research Methods 


EDU 


(Technology Elective) 


Required Courses 




EDU 530 


School Law and Finance 


EDU 548 


Clinical Supervision 


EDU 557 


Instructional Support 


Electives 




EDU 


Elective 


EDU 


Elective 


Professional Contribution 


EDU 565 


Staff Development 


EDU 595 


Professional Contribution 




TOTAL 



15 credits 



9 credits 



6 credits 



6 credits 



36 credits 



Postgraduate Internship (Optional) 

EDU 559 Supervision Internship 



6 credits 



The Specialization in Educational Technology: 

Teachers need to use advanced technology to implement modern 
curriculum. They do not need to become computer programmers or even 
software writers, but they do need to know how to use modern technology 
to plan and deliver instruction. The technology track of College 
Misericordia's Graduate Education Program gives teachers the knowledge 
and skills they need to implement technology. Graduates can function as 
leaders of local school district instructional improvement teams, technology 
planning committees, site-based management teams, building level manage- 
ment teams, and will be able to otherwise work to improve instruction in 
their schools by helping their colleagues implement technology. The 
Specialization meets all of PDE's standards for Supervision of Instruction 
and Curriculum. 

Participants who specialize in educational technology complete the 
core, five required technology courses, and a professional contribution. 



Core 

EDU 500 

EDU 504 

EDU 510 

EDU 

EDU 515 
Required courses 



15 credits 



Issues in Education 
Curriculum 
Learning 

(Technology Elective) 
Research Methods 



15 credits 



EDU 55 1 Productivity Tools 

EDU 552 Multimedia Based Education 

EDU 555 Advanced Multimedia Design 

EDU 553 Technology and Instructional Design 

EDU 554 Video in the Instructional Process 

Professional Contribution 6 credits 

EDU 565 Staff Development 

EDU 595 Professional Contribution 

TOTAL 36 credits 



_20 

GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



The Specialization in Elementary Education: 

Veteran teachers often want to expand their teaching abilities and 
credentials. Currently certified teachers (e.g., secondary educators) can 
prepare to teach in elementary classrooms by participating in the Graduate 
Education Program's specialization in elementary education. In addition to 
becoming skilled curriculum developers, participants in this track become 
candidates for certification in elementary education. 

The specialization in elementary education is available only to teachers 
who already have valid PDE instructional certification in another area. The 
specialization is not designed as a vehicle for initial certification, thus does 
not deal with the state's General Standards for teachers. It is designed to help 
currently certified teachers expand their credentials by adding a certification 
in elementary education. The specialization in elementary education meets 
all of PDE's Specific Standards for elementary education. 

Participants in the specialization in elementary education complete the 
core, six required courses, and a professional contribution. 

Core 15 credits 

EDU 500 Issues in Education 

EDU 504 Curriculum 

EDU 510 Learning 

EDU (Technology Elective) 

EDU 5 15 Research Methods 

Required Courses 18 credits 

EDU 575 Human Development 

EDU 590 Basic Methods in Elementary Education 

EDU 520 Curriculum and Methods in Reading 

EDU 524 Curriculum and Methods in Language Arts 

EDU 525 Curriculum and Methods in Mathematics 

EDU 581 Seminar in Elementary Education 

EDU 582 Observation and Practicum 

Professional Contribution 6 credits 

EDU 565 Staff Development 

EDU 595 Professional Contribution 

TOTAL 39 credits 

C. The Culminating Activity: 

As a culminating activity, students are required to develop and deliver a 
professional contribution, a project whereby they try to create curricular 
change through staff development. They first participate in a three-credit 
course in staff development during which they develop their projects. During 
a subsequent semester they formally deliver their projects to a group of 
colleagues or to a professional group. 

EDU 565 Staff Development 

EDU 595 Professional Contribution 

Course Scheduling Th c College Misericordia Graduate Education Program utilizes evening 

and Sequence an< ^ weekend formats throughout the school year and conveniently scheduled 

workshops and seminars during the school year and during the summer 
months. Students who enroll on a part-time basis can complete the program 
in three years. Full-time students can complete the program in two years. 
They may take up to nine credits during each of the semesters of the school 
year and up to twelve credits during the summer tcmi. 



21 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



A typical part-time student's schedule is depicted below: 



Year One 






Fall 


Spring 


Summer 


EDU500 


EDU 510 


Electives 


Issues in 


Learning 


or Required 


Education 




Courses 


EDU504 


EDU 


Electives 


Curriculum 


Technology 


or Required 




Elective 


Courses 


Year Two 






Fall 


Spring 


Summer 


EDU515 


Electives 


Electives 


Research 


or Required 


or Required 


Methods 


Courses 


Courses 


Year Three 






Fall 


Spring 




EDU 565 


EDU 595 




Staff 


Professional 




Development 


Contribution 





Transfer Students 



College Misericordia's Graduate Education Program will allow 
students to transfer up to six credits from other graduate programs. 
Students who have earned a Masters Equivalency Certificate from the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education may transfer up to nine credits. 
Students who have completed graduate degrees at other institutions may 
transfer up to twelve credits. All requests for credit transfers must be 
reviewed and approved by the Director of the Graduate Education Program 
and must be appropriate substitutes. 



22 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



GRADUATE PROGRAM IN NURSING 

Philosophy The Nursing Program supports the Mission Statement and Philosophy of the College. The 

undergraduate nursing program is based on a complementary relationship between liberal arts 
and professional studies. Specialization on the graduate level offers in-depth knowledge of a 
specific clinical or functional area. The approach to education focuses on critical thinking, as 
well as the values and attitudes of justice, mercy, and service. 

Each human being is viewed as intellectual, spiritual, and creative, and constantly 
interacting within the environment. The holistic view of humans takes into account the 
physical structure, mind and spirit of the individual, as well as the physical and social environ- 
ment in which each functions. Humans interact on the basis of respect for each other's cultural 
values, worth and dignity. Individuals have the potential for self-direction based on their 
developmental level. The capacity for emotion, reasoning, and perceiving is characteristic of 
human beings. 

The social environment is composed of individuals, families, groups and communities 
which can be described in terms of micro-systems and macro-systems. Biological, social, and 
psychological forces within the environment impact on a complex and dynamic health care 
system. Cultural patterns influence the human-environment interaction. 

Health care involves the promotion, maintenance and restoration of wellness. A particu- 
lar state of wellness is perceived by individuals and is influenced by their self-esteem, inner 
sense of meaning, and desire to achieve their highest potential. Individuals who are goal- 
oriented, motivated and have a high sense of energy tend to achieve a higher level of wellness. 

Nursing is an art, involved in caring, and a science based on its own theory and research. 
The nursing process involves critical thinking as related to the cognitive, affective and psy- 
chomotor domains. The profession of nursing is a vital, effective and efficient health service to 
the community. Ethical and legal issues have a strong impact on the practice of professional 
nursing. 

Leadership involves directing and providing client care, collaboration with other health 
care professionals and management. The profession of nursing is committed to making quality 
health care available and accessible to all, which reflects our commitment of mercy and justice. 
Health teaching is an integral component of wellness promotion. Nursing exerts an influence 
on, and is influenced by, the newly developing patterns of providing services, the roles of other 
members of the health team, scientific and technological advances, nursing research, and the 
social and economic pressures which contribute to the complexity of health care services. 

Undergraduate education in nursing is built on a strong core of general education require- 
ments and is generic in nature. Included within the program are liberal arts and the sciences, 
such as nutrition, anatomy and physiology, and developmental psychology, as well as other 
pure and behavioral sciences. The use of the nursing process and nursing theories are basic to 
generalized clinical practice. 

Graduate education enables professional nurses to realize their creative leadership 
potential and provides opportunities for independent and collaborative functioning with health 
professionals and others in effecting changes in nursing practice and health care. Advanced 
knowledge provides for a high degree of effectiveness in leadership capacities. Scientific 
inquiry is an integral part of the program. Such inquiry provides the basis for acquisition of 
increased competencies in utilization of the research method and in the analysis and synthesis 
of theories related to the practice of nursing. 



23 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



Learning involves critical thinking, which encompasses the analysis and synthesis of 
knowledge. It is life-long and involves developmental changes. The individual has the respon- 
sibility to achieve the highest potential with the assistance of the faculty who are facilitators. 
The faculty believe that learning occurs when the student actively participates in the learning 
process. Teaching, therefore, is a collaborative process in which a student assumes progressive 
responsibility for personal learning. Learning is directed toward the development of the values 
and professional role identification that are compatible with this philosophy. 

Program The program is designed to develop a core of skills and competencies in the master's 

candidate. In addition, it provides a flexibility which permits students to pursue their areas of 
interest. Students meet their individual learning needs through selection and development of 
concepts and in-depth analysis of populations and communities. 

The graduate nursing program at College Misericordia is designed to: 

1. provide clinically prepared nurse educators, practitioners, and adminis- 
trators for leadership positions in nursing education and the health care 
delivery system; 

2. prepare graduates to use the research process to improve nursing practice, 
nursing education, and contribute to nursing's body of knowledge; 

3. prepare graduates to initiate innovative, creative approaches to the 
emerging needs and demands of society related to the health care delivery 
system. 

4. provide an educational base for graduates to pursue further education and 
professional development. 

Post Master's The family nurse practitioner post master's certification program is designed to facilitate 

Family Nurse the integration of advanced theories and concepts into advanced nursing practice in primary 
Practitioner care. The FNP post master's program prepares nurse practitioners to function as principal 
Certificate providers of primary health care and to assume responsibility for promoting, maintaining and 

restoring the health of individuals and families. 

The program will be offered on a full time basis. It consists of 36 credits of family nurse 
practitioner specialty and cognate courses. Four semesters are required for completion of the 
program. 

Clinical learning experiences are arranged in a variety of settings to meet program 
objectives and student interests. Experiences are located in health care facilities in northeast- 
ern Pennsylvania. 



Curriculum The curriculum is designed to prepare nurses in areas of primary care, administration or 

education based on clinical knowledge at the advanced level. Students major in Adult Health/ 
Micro Systems Nursing, Matemal-Child/Macro Systems Nursing, or Community Health/ 
Macro Systems Nursing and select a functional role of either Nurse Administrator or Nurse 
Educator, or they may choose the Family Nurse Practitioner option. 

The Ginical Core Courses in Adult Health/Micro Systems Nursing are designed to 
facilitate the student's integration and clinical application of advanced theories and concepts 
as they relate to the health and nursing care needs of the adult and family. Concepts will be 



24 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



developed along the wellness- illness spectrum emphasizing care as multidimensional in 
nature. Based on a selected nursing theory, selected change theory, and current nursing mo- 
dalities, interventions will be planned, implemented, and evaluated. 

The Qinical Core Courses in Community Health/Macro Systems Nursing are designed to 
acquaint the student with advanced concepts in community assessment and intervention 
essential to practice and leadership in community settings. The primary focus on groups and 
the community as client provides the student with opportunities to assess, plan, diagnose, 
implement, and evaluate care at the aggregate level. Students will investigate the multidimen- 
sional role of change agent with the complex structure of the community. 

The Qinical Core Courses in Maternal-Child/Macro Systems Nursing are designed to 
provide students with advanced theories and concepts in dealing with child-bearing families 
and infants through adolescents. The primary focus is on infant mortality, high-risk pregnan- 
cies, vulnerable families and children, and other threats to child and family health and 
wellness. 

The Nursing Administration Sequence is designed to develop management skills. 
Courses in organizational behavior, financial management, and nursing administration provide 
the graduate student with the basis for the role of nurse administrator. 

The Nursing Education Sequence is designed to develop advanced knowledge and 
skills for the graduate student planning a teaching career. Courses in curriculum development, 
teaching/learning strategies, and an introduction to higher education provide the student with a 
basis for the roles and functions of the nurse educator. 

The Family Nurse Practitioner program is designed to allow students to integrate 
advanced theories and concepts as a framework for nursing practice. Students are prepared as 
family nurse practitioners to function as principal providers of primary health care and to 
assume responsibility for promoting, maintaining and restoring the health of individuals and 
families. 

The nursing education and administration programs consist of 40 credits. As a program 
for part-time study, students must complete these programs within five (5) years of matricula- 
tion. The family nurse practitioner program consists of 45 credits and must be completed 
within five (5) years of matriculation. 

Program GRADUATES OF THE MASTER'S PROGRAM IN NURSING WJLL BE ABLE TO: 

Objectives 

1. promote, maintain, and restore wellness through the use of in-depth knowledge, skills 
and attitudes related to the selected nursing specialization; 

2. articulate a philosophy of nursing and a personal belief system that reflects a commit- 
ment to holistic nursing care; 

3. utilize the nursing process in the practice of professional nursing with a micro/macro 
systems framework based on research and knowledge from nursing and other disci- 
plines; 

4. demonstrate leadership in working with other professionals and consumers to effect 
positive changes in nursing practice, nursing education, and the health care system; 



25_ 

GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



Program 5. function independently or in collaboration with other health professionals and consumers 

Objectives t0 promote high level wellness for the client; 



(continued) 



6. continue the process of learning for personal and professional growth by contributing to 
the scholarly literature, conducting needed research related to the nursing specialization 
or role function and participation in community and/or professional activities which 
enhance nursing; 

7. demonstrate leadership in participating in assuring quality of programs related to the 
nursing major and functional role; 

8. develop testable propositions from nursing and other theories, and critically analyze 
findings with applicability to practice; and 

9. incorporate social, political, and ethical responsibility and accountability as an 
essential part of the professional role. 

GRADUATES IN THE EDUCATIONAL SEQUENCE WILL BE ABLE TO: 

1 . demonstrate a personal philosophy and belief system in the role of nurse educator, 

2. develop skill in responding to the educational needs of students, colleagues, and society; 

3. develop skill in responding to the standards, regulations, and credentialing criteria which 
impact upon nursing education; 

4. base the practice of nursing education on theory, research, and clinical expertise; 

5. participate with professional colleagues and consumers to achieve academic standards 
and goals; 

6. develop the leadership role of nurse educator within academia, the health care system, 
and the community; and 

7. participate in lifelong learning. 

GRADUATES OF THE ADMINISTRATION SEQUENCE WILL BE ABLE TO: 

1. demonstrate a personal philosophy and belief system in the role of nurse 
administrator, 

2. demonstrate skill in responding to the dynamic changes in organizational structures 
and functions within the health care delivery system; 

3. demonstrate skill in responding to the standards, regulations, and credentialing criteria 
which impact upon nursing administration and the health care system; 

4. base the practice of nursing administration on theory, research, and administration 
expertise; 

5. participate with professional colleagues and consumers to achieve improvement in the 
delivery of health care; 



26 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



6. demonstrate the leadership role of nurse administrator within the health care system and 
community; and 

7. participate in lifelong learning. 

GRADUATES OF THE FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER PROGRAM WILL BE 
ABLE TO: 



1. analyze, test and evaluate theories and models for incorporation into advanced primary 
health care practice; 

2. develop and implement treatment plans for the management of common, acute and 
chronic health problems occurring across the lifespan; 

3. identify and systematically study researchable problems relevant to primary care 
nursing; 

4. demonstrate competence and professional accountability in the nurse practitioner role; 

5. collaborate in interdisciplinary efforts to provide and improve accessible, cost effective 
primary health care services on the local, state, and national levels; 

6. utilize leadership to enhance the status, power and autonomy of primary care nursing; 

7. actively participate in effecting legislative changes to improve health care and eliminate 
barriers for advanced nursing practice; and 

8. formulate and implement plans for own professional development as a provider of 
primary health care services. 



Education or 








Administration 




Core - 9 credits 




Focus 


NSG 553 


Analysis of Macro/Micro Systems 


(3 credits) 


(40 credits) 


NSG512 


Concepts and Theories in Nursing 


(3 credits) 




NSG 515 


Research: Concepts, Methods and Principles 
Clinical Area -9 credits 


(3 credits) 




NSG 506-507 


Adult Health/Micro Systems Nsg I & II 

f \ r 


(6 credits) 




NSG 508-509 


UJ 

Community Health/Macro Systems Nsg I & II 

Mr 


(6 credits) 




NSG 521-522 


Ul 

Matemal-Child/Macro Systems Nsg I & II 


(6 credits) 




NSG 573 


Clinical Practicum 

Functional Area - 13 credits 

Nursing Administration 


(3 credits) 




OM500 


Organizational Behavior 


(3 credits) 




OM510 


Financial Management I 


(3 credits) 




NSG 525 


Introduction to Nursing Administration 


(3 credits) 




NSG 545 


Nursing Administration Seminar/Practicum 
or 
Education 


(4 credits) 




NSG 504 


Curriculum Design 


(3 credits) 




NSG 505 


Teaching/Learning Strategies 


(3 credits) 




NSG 510 


Introduction to Higher Education 


(3 credits) 




NSG 535 


Nursing Education Practicum/Scminar 


(4 credits) 



27 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



Evening 
Program 



Friday 
Program 



NSG 555 
NSG 599 

Elective 
Year One 



Synthesis - 6 credits 
Legal, Ethical and Public Policy Issues in 
Health Care 
Graduate Nursing Synthesis Seminar 

Elective - 3 credits 

Thesis Option is available 



(3 credits) 
(3 credits) 



(3 credits) 
SUGGESTED SEQUENCE (Education or Administration) 



Year Two 



Year Three 



Year One 



Fall 


NSG 553 
NSG 512 


Spring 


NSG 504 or OM 500 

NSG 506, NSG 508, or NSG 521 


Summer 


Elective (may be taken during eit 


Fall 


NSG 505 or OM 510 

NSG 507, NSG 509 or NSG 522 


Spring 


NSG 515 

NSG 525 or NSG 510 


Fall 


NSG 573 

NSG 535 or NSG 545 


Spring 


NSG 555 
NSG 599 


Fall 


NSG 553 
NSG 512 
NSG 504 or OM 500 



Year Two 



Spring NSG 506, NSG 508, or NSG 521 

NSG 515 
NSG 505 or OM 510 

Summer Elective 

Fall NSG 507, NSG 509, or NSG 522 

NSG 573 
NSG 5 10 or NSG 525 

Spring NSG 555 

NSG 599 
NSG 535 or NSG 545 



2S 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



Nurse 

Practitioner 

Components 

(45 credits) 



NSG512 
NSG515 
NSG 553 



NSG551 
NSG 552 
NSG 554 



NSG 565 
NSG 556 

NSG 557 



NSG 558 

NSG 559 
NSG 561 
NSG 562 

NSG 563 



NSG 555 
NSG 564 



Core - 9 credits 
Concepts and Theories in Nursing (3 credits) 

Research: Concepts, Methods & Principles (3 credits) 

Analysis of the Health Status of 
Micro/Macro Systems (3 credits) 

Foundations - 9 credits 
Advanced Pharmacology (3 credits) 

Pathophysiology for Primary Care (3 credits) 

Diagnostic Reasoning and Therapeutic 
Interventions for Primary Care Nursing (3 credits) 

Clinical -18 credits 

Primary Care of Children (3 credits) 

Clinical Management for the Primary 

Care of Children (2 credits) 

Primary Care of Adults with Health 

Promotion Needs and Episodic Health 

Problems (2 credits) 

Clinical Management of Adults with Health 

Promotion Needs and Episodic Health Problems (2 credits) 

Primary Care of Women (3 credits) 

Clinical Management of Women's Health Care (2 credits) 

Primary Care of Adults with Chronic Health 

Needs and Problems (2 credits) 

Clinical Management of Adults with Chronic 

Health Needs and Problems (2 credits) 

Synthesis -9 credits 
Legal, Ethical and Public Policy Issues in 
Health Care (3 credits 

Family Nurse Practitioner Preceptorship (6 credits) 



NURSE PRACTITIONER PROGRAM 
FULL-TIME SEQUENCE 



Year One 



Fall 



NSG 551 
NSG 552 
NSG 553 
NSG 554 



Spring 



NSG 512 
NSG 565 
NSG 556 
NSG 557 
NSG 558 



Year Two 



Fall 



NSG 515 
NSG 559 
NSG 561 
NSG 562 
NSG 563 



29 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



Year Two 



Spring 



NSG 555 
NSG 564 



NURSE PRACTITIONER PROGRAM 
SUGGESTED PART-TIME SEQUENCE 



Year One 


Fall 


NSG 512 
NSG 515 




Spring 


NSG 551 
NSG 552 


Year Two 


Fall 


NSG 553 
NSG 554 




Spring 


NSG 565 
NSG 556 


Year Three 


Fall 


NSG 559 
NSG 561 




Spring 


NSG 550 
NSG 557 
NSG 558 


Year Four 


Fall 


NSG 562 
NSG 563 



Spring 



NSG 564 



NSG 565 
NSG 556 

NSG 557 

NSG 558 



NURSE PRACTITIONER POST MASTER'S PROGRAM 
SUGGESTED SEQUENCE 

Year One 





Fall 




NSG 551 


Advanced Pharmacology 


3 credits 


NSG 552 


Pathophysiology for Primary Care 


3 credits 


NSG 553 


Analysis of the Health Status of 






Macro/Micro Systems 


3 credits 


NSG 554 


Diagnostic Reasoning and Therapeutic 






Interventions for Primary Care Nursing 


3 credits 
12 credits 




Sprins 





3 credits 



2 credits 



Primary Care of Children 
Clinical Management for the Primary 
Care of Children 
Primary Care of Adults with Health Promotion 
Needs and Episodic Health Problems 2 credits 

Clinical Management of Adults with Health 
Promotion Needs and Episodic Health Problems 2 credits 

9 credits 



30 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



Year Twq 



Fall 



NSG 559 


Primary Care of Women 


3 credits 


NSG 561 


Clinical Management of Women's Health Care 


2 credits 


NSG 562 


Primary Care of Adults with Chronic Health 






Needs and Problems 


2 credits 


NSG 563 


Clinical Management of Adults with Chronic 






Health Needs and Problems 


2 credits 
9 credits 




Spring 




NSG 564 


Family Nurse Practitioner Preceptorship 


6 credits 
6 credits 



Note: These are suggested formats; courses are available based on student enrollment and faculty availability. 



PROGRAM SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: 

All graduate nursing students must have on file before entering clinical education experiences: 

CPR Certification, Health Center Clearance, and F.N.P. students must have professional malpractice insurance for 

nurse practitioner student practice. 



31_ 

GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



PROFESSIONAL ENTRY LEVEL MASTER OF SCIENCE 
DEGREE IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

The Occupational Therapy Program has a proud tradition of producing highly qualified 
and technically proficient occupational therapy practitioners over the past decade. In 1997, the 
first class of Professional Entry Level Master degree students will graduate. This graduation will 
mark the completion of an educational transition process that began in 1992. The College now 
offers two alternatives that lead to being awarded an entry level Master of Science degree in 
Occupational Therapy. The first is a traditional five year curriculum whereby students are 
admitted in their freshman year. Following five years of undergraduate and graduate course 
work, students are awarded a Bachelors degree in General Studies and a Master of Science 
degree in Occupational Therapy. The other program offers the curriculum over a three year 
period with students attending classes on alternating weekends. At the end of three years, 
students are awarded a Master of Science degree in Occupational Therapy. Students accepted 
into the Program engage in an educational process that not only prepares them to become entry 
level occupational therapy practitioners, but instills in them the understanding for and desire to 
achieve the skills of scientific inquiry and critical reasoning. Great lengths have been taken to 
create an educational experience that will prepare our students to meet and exceed the demands 
of the entry level practitioner. 

Students who are applying for the traditional program should refer to the undergraduate 
catalog for a description of admission policies. 

The weekend college Occupational Therapy Program is specially designed for students 
who already have earned a bachelor degree or are Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants. 
(COTAs must refer to the undergraduate catalog for admission requirements). Our graduates are 
eligible to sit for the American Occupational Therapy Certification Board (AOTCB) examina- 
tion. Successfully passing the AOTCB examination will allow students to apply for and receive 
a license to practice occupational therapy in the state of Pennsylvania. Students from other states 
should contact their state's licensing board for information pertaining to that state's require- 
ments. 

Occupational therapists are readily employed in clinics, hospitals, home health agencies, 
rehabilitation centers, schools, nursing homes, pediatric facilities, private practice, industrial 
centers, government agencies, and military medicine. 

Philosophy The occupational therapy program supports the mission statement and philosophy of 

the College. The professional studies of the occupational therapy program are interwoven with 
a liberal arts foundation to provide students with a broad range of intellectual skills. The 
curriculum is built on the following tenets and assumptions regarding human beings, occupa- 
tional therapy and education. The human being is a holistic, dynamic person that possesses an 
occupational nature. The holistic aspect of the human being consists of biological, psychological 
and socio-cultural dimensions. The holistic nature of each human being is unique and individual- 
ized. This unique individual functions as an open system which interacts in a dynamic fashion 
with the environment. The continuous interaction provides the individual with the opportunity to 
grow, develop, change, and adapt. The growth process is facilitated by the occupational nature 
of human beings and is evident in the interactions with the environment that are self-initiated 
and goal-directed. These interactions, or occupations, can be categorized into the performance 
areas of play/leisure, work/productivity, self maintenance, and rest/relaxation. 

Occupational therapy is based on the belief that occupations may be used to promote 
wellness and remediate dysfunction. Occupations have the ability to be graded and be used 
therapeutically to promote adaptation which enables individuals to attain the highest level of 
performance in a variety of roles and settings. The process of occupational therapy integrates the 
application of critical reasoning skills with evaluation, treatment planning, and intervention. 

The overall objective of this Occupational Therapy Program is to produce graduates 
who are able to view the person as a holistic being with numerous dimensions, demonstrate an 



32 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



understanding and appreciation of the diversity of human beings, possess an understanding of 
current occupational therapy theory and frames of reference and demonstrate the ability to 
apply them to various practice situations, analyze situations critically, think logically, employ 
scientific methodology to perform research, critically analyze research results and apply these 
appropriately to practice, express oneself clearly and persuasively in both written and verbal 
communication, ascribe to a standard of ethical conduct in their personal and professional 
lives, advocate for the consumer, and possess a knowledge base anchored in the liberal arts. 
Graduates of this program will possess entry-level skills to practice occupational therapy. 

Policies In addition to the general policies of College Misericordia, the following regulations apply to 

Occupational Therapy Students. 

Fieldwork 

Fieldwork placements are an integral part of the Occupational Therapy curriculum. The Program 
has a Fieldwork Coordinator who will assist in the arrangement of all fieldwork placements. 
Students will meet with the Coordinator assigned to their Program to arrange the placement. 
Students are responsible for all living and transportation costs associated with fieldwork placement. 

Physical Examinations 

Annual physical examinations are required for admission to occupational therapy courses. 
Records of the examination must be on file in Student Health Services at the beginning of each 
academic year. Students are required to fulfill all health requirements of fieldwork facilities prior 
to fieldwork placement and are required to demonstrate proof of health insurance coverage. 
Further details about health requirements at a specific fieldwork site can be obtained from the 
Fieldwork Coordinator. 

Related Expenses 

Additional expenses for occupational therapy students normally include uniforms, name pins, 
school patches, and a certification examination fee. As part of professional development, students 
are expected to become members of the American Occupational Therapy Association and 
encouraged to become members of the Pennsylvania Occupational Therapy Association (each 
Association has reduced student rates; the Occupational Therapy Office has details). Attendance 
at local and regional conferences is encouraged as students continue their lifelong commitment to 
learning. 

Retention and Dismissal 

To advance within the professional program, students must maintain a 3.0 GPA in their occupa- 
tional therapy major. No more than two grades of "C" will be permitted in courses at the 500 and 
600 level. Grades of "D" or below are considered failing grades within the Professional Program. 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



33 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 
Traditional Format 

For a description of core course requirements, refer to the undergraduate catalog. 



* = Cognate i 


Courses 




















YEAR I 












Fall Semester 








Spring Semester 




*PHY 


107 


Intro to Physics I 


3 


*PHY 


108 


Intro to Physics II 


3 


*HP 


100 


Intro to Health Sciences 




*SOC 


110 


Anthropology 


3 






OR 




*MTH 


115 


Statistics (Math Bank Core) 3 


OT 


103 


Intro to Prof Beh in OT 


2 


OT 


103 


Intro to Prof Beh in OT 
OR 












♦HP 


100 


Intro to Health Sciences 


2 










YEAR II 












Fall Semester 








Spring Semester 




*BIO 


211 


Anatomy & Physiology I 


4 


*BIO 


212 


Anatomy & Physiology II 


4 


OT 


220 


Dimen Hum Perf I 


3 


OT 


221 


Dimen Hum Perf II 


3 


OT 


205 


Occ Behaviors I 


4 


OT 


275 


Occ Behaviors II 


4 


OT 


230 


Interpersonal Processes 
Fall Semester 


3 


OT 
YEAR III 


290 


Conditions Affcc Hum Sys 
Spring Semester 


3 


OT 


308 


Neurosciences 


4 


OT 


310 


Applied Functional Anat 


4 


OT 


300 


Critical Reasoning 


3 


OT 


422 


OT Intervention Series I 


3 


OT 


330 


Conceptual Foundations 


3 


OT 


722 


Interventions Lab I 





*PSY 


430 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 


OT 


522 


Interventions Seminar I 


2 










OT 


335 


Env Dimen of Hum Perf 


3 










YEAR IV 












Fall Semester 








Spring Semester 




OT 


423 


Intervention Series II 


3 


OT 


424 


Intervention Series III 


3 


OT 


723 


Interventions Lab II 





OT 


724 


Interventions Lab III 





OT 


523 


Interventions Seminar II 


2 


OT 


524 


Interventions Seminar III 


2 


OT 


515 


Research in OT 


3 


OT 


570 


Mgmt and Supervision 


3 










OT 


690 


Research Project I 


3 










SUMMER 








OT 


601 


Fieldwork Level I 
Fall Semester 


3 


YEARV 




Spring Semester 




OT 


602 


Fieldwork Level II 


9 


OT 


610 


Elective: Special Topics 
inOT 


3 










OT 


620 


Adv Theory Analysis 


3 










OT 


630 


Issues and Trends 


3 










OT 


695 


Research Project II 


3 



34 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

SEQUENCE OF REQUIRED COURSES 

Weekend College Format 



YEAR1 



Spring Semester 


Summer Semester 


Fall Semester 




OT 103 Intro to Professional 


OT 221 Dimensions in Human 


OT 205 Occupational 




Behaviors in OT 2 


Performance II 3 


Behavior I 


4 


OT 220 Dimensions in Human 


OT 290 Conditions Affecting 


OT 308 Neuroscience 


4 


Performance I 3 


the Human System 3 


ELECTIVE* 




OT 230 Interpersonal Processes 3 


ELECTIVE* 






ELECTIVE* 









YEAR 2 



OT 275 Occupational 

Behaviors II 4 

OT 300 Critical Thinking in OT 3 
OT 310 Applied Functional 

Anatomy 4 

OT 330 Conceptual Foundations 



OT 335 Environmental 

Dimensions in 

Human Performance 3 
OT 422 Intervention Series I 3 
OT 522 Intervention Seminar I 2 
OT 722 Intervention Lab I 



OT 423 Intervention Series II 3 
OT 523 Intervention Seminar II 2 
OT 723 Intervention Lab II 
OT 515 Research Methods 3 



inOT 



3 ELECTIVE* 



YEAR 3 



OT 424 Intervention Series III 3 
OT 524 Intervention Seminar III 2 
OT 724 Intervendon Lab III 
OT 570 Management and 

Supervision in OT 3 
OT 690 Research Project I 3 



OT 601 Level II Field work 3 
OT 630 Issues and 

Trends in OT 3 



OT 602 Level II Fieldwork 9 
OT 620 Advance Analysis of 

OT Theory & Practice 3 
OT 695 Research Project II 3 



*Electives must consist of upper level undergraduate and/or graduate level course work and will be determined 
based upon the student's needs, course availability and advisor approval. 

Level I fieldwork experiences are integrated throughout the occupational therapy curriculum. Students are 
required to complete all Level I experiences independendy. The Fieldwork Coordinator is available to assist with 
establishing a fieldwork site. 



This course sequence is subject to change. 



35 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



GRADUATE PROGRAM IN ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT 



Philosophy 



Program 



Curriculum 



Specializations 



Human Resource 

Management 

Specialization 



Human Services 

Management 

Specialization 



General 

Management 

Specialization 



College Misericordia's Master of Science degree in Organizational Management is designed 
to educate individuals for successful careers as managers in both public and private organiza- 
tions and in industry. The program reflects a management perspective which assumes that the 
professional manager is able to analyze problems, communicate solutions and understand the 
impact of management decisions. 

The program prepares students for responsible organizational leadership. Students are encour- 
aged to think broadly about the tasks and functions of the manager and to develop and use a 
variety of management skills in organizational environments. 

The program consists of thirty-six (36) credit hours which can be completed on a part-time 
basis. A core curriculum of twenty-one (21) credits is required. Students then have the 
opportunity to specialize in one of three areas: Human Resource Management, Human 
Services Management, and General Management The specialization areas require a total of 
twelve (12) credits for completion. The program culminates in a required three (3) credit 
practicum or professional contribution which synthesizes the skills and content presented 
through academic course work. 

The program offers an opportunity for students to concentrate their elective courses in one of 
three areas of special interest. 

One of the interest areas to which the program responds is the field of Human Resource 
Management which deals with issues related to human resource management and develop- 
ment. Gearly, there is a growing need for the development of professional competencies and 
skills in this area. The program is designed to develop the skills and knowledge base needed 
to exert leadership in the management of human resources in a variety of organizations 
including corporations; health and health-related facilities; local, state and regional govern- 
ment; and other complex organizations. 

The second area of specialization available is designed for managers in human service and 
other not-for-profit agencies. The program offers practitioners the opportunity to develop 
those skills required for successful management specifically in the not-for-profit and 
voluntary sector. 

Students, with the cooperation of their program advisor, may choose to specialize in one of 
the above tracks or they may plan, with their advisor, an individualized program of study by 
choosing electives from the pool of electives offered by the program. 



^6 

GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



A. Core curriculum: 



OM500 


Organizational Behavior 


OM510 


Financial Management I 


OM511 


Financial Management II 


OM515 


Research Methods 


OM516 


or 
Qualitative Research 


OM530 


Legal Aspects of Administration 


OM550 


Personnel and Labor Relations 


OM586 


Strategic Planning and Management of Change 


OM595 


Professional Contribution 


OM596 


or 
Administrative Practicum 



B. Track I Human Resources Management: 

Choose twelve (12) credits from the following: 

OM 505 Decision Making 

OM 551 Organizational Communication 

OM 552 Regulation of Human Resources Management 

OM 553 Fundamentals of Employment Benefit Planning 

OM 554 Current Issues 

OM 555 Administration of Human Resources 

OM 556 Policies and Procedure Development 

OM 590 Seminar 

OM 599 Independent Study 

C. Track II Human Services Management: 

Choose twelve (12) credits from the following: 

OM 505 Decision Making 

OM 525 Human Service Systems 

OM 536 Marketing Management 

OM 540 Grant/Contract Development and Management 

OM 542 Fund Raising: Theory and Application 

OM 551 Organizational Communication 

OM 553 Fundamentals of Employment Benefit Planning 

OM 590 Seminar 

OM 599 Independent Study 

D. Track III General Management: 

Complete the core curriculum and 12 additional credits selected, with consent of the 
students advisor, from those offered by the program. 



37 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



Certificate A 15 credit Certificate in Human Resource Management is offered to those individuals who 

are interested in the field of Human Resources but do not wish to pursue the degree. Course 
requirements for entering and completing the Certificate program include: 

1. possession of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university in a 
field compatible with the area of advanced study; 

2. completion of the following designated courses: OM 500, OM 550, OM 552; 

3. completion of 6 additional credits from the Human Resource Management track. 



Course 


Option 


I: Three Year 


Sequence (6 


Scheduling 








and Sequence 


Year 


Semester 






One 


One 
Semester 


OM500 
OM510 






Two 


OM586 
OM511 




Year 


Semester 






Two 


One 

Semester 


OM515 
OM530 






Two 


OM550 




Year 


Semester 






Three 


One 

Semester 








Two 


OM595 



Organizational Behavior 
Financial Management I 

Strategic Planning and 
Management of Change 
Financial Management II 

Research Methods 

Legal Aspects of Administration 

Personnel/Labor Relations/Elective 



Electives 



Professional Contribution 

or 
Administrative Practicum 



OM596 
Option II: Two Year Sequence (9 credits for 4 semesters) 



Year 


Semester 






One 


One 


OM500 


Organizational Behavior 






OM510 


Financial Management I 






OM530 


Legal Aspects of Administration 




Semester 








Two 


OM586 


Strategic Planning and Managemei 






OM511 


Financial Management II 






OM550 


Personnel/Labor Relations 


Year 


Semester 






Two 


One 

Semester 


OM515 


Research Methods 
Electives 




Two 


OM595 


Professional Contribution 






OM596 


or 

Administrative Practicum 
Electives 



38 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



POSTBACCALAUREATE ENTRY-LEVEL PROGRAM IN PHYSICAL THERAPY 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL THERAPY 



Mission 



Philosophy 



College Misericordia's program in Physical Therapy is a five-year, entry level master's degree 
program with admission in the freshman year. Students admitted as freshmen or undergraduate 
transfers who successfully complete all major and college requirements will be awarded a 
Bachelor of Science degree in General Studies in addition to an M.S. in Physical Therapy 
degree. Students admitted with a baccalaureate degree will be awarded an MS in PT 
degree upon successful completion of the professional program. 

Students admitted into the professional program with a baccalaureate degree are expected to 
have a foundation in the liberal arts and sciences appropriate in depth and breadth to develop 
the ability in students to think independently, weigh values, and understand fundamental 
theory. These, in addition to a variety of life experiences further serve to develop skills of 
critical thinking and communication, inherent in professional education and socialization. The 
physical therapy professional curriculum requires three years of study and results in the 
awarding of the Master of Science in Physical Therapy degree. 

The program is guided by the standards and criteria of the Commission on Accreditation in 
Physical Therapy Education of the American Physical Therapy Association (CAPTE/APTA). 
Formal accreditation is anticipated at the earliest date permitted by established CAPTE/APTA 
policies and procedures. Under these policies, program accreditation status will be determined 
following formal evaluation in the 1996 spring term prior to the graduation of the program's 
first class. Students enrolled in the program prior to the awarding of accreditation status should 
be aware that the College can not assure accreditation status for the program. Graduates of 
accredited physical therapist education programs are eligible to apply for licensure as physical 
therapists in the individual United States and territories. 

It is the mission of the physical therapy education program at College Misericordia to provide 
professional physical therapy education opportunities to the citizens of northeastern Pennsylva- 
nia and the surrounding regions of New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and Pennsylvania and to 
help meet the physical therapy health care needs of these areas. 

The physical therapy program is committed to providing an education program which produces 
competent physical therapy practitioners who are critical thinkers and educated consumers of 
research and which prepares graduates for productive careers in physical therapy and as 
advocates for and participants in life long learning. 

As an entry-level professional postbaccalaurcate program, the physical therapy curriculum 
reflects a commitment to the complementary relationship between liberal arts and professional 
studies which enables graduates to adapt to and deal with constantly evolving societal and 
professional needs. 

The physical therapy program's commitment to providing affordable, quality physical therapy 
education expresses the founding Sisters' values and attitudes of justice, mercy, and service. 

The physical therapy education program is based on the belief that graduates of entry-level 
physical therapy programs should possess the clinical decision making and problem solving 
skills which enable them to function as peer colleagues in the contemporary, dynamic health 
care system. Physical therapists need to be sensitive to the needs of a culturally diverse society 
as evident in their interactions with clients, families, health care colleagues and the community 
in which they practice. 



39_ 

GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



An educational program for physical therapists should reflect the concepts of androgogy (adult 
education) to include problem solving, critical thinking and analysis, integration of theory and 
practice, clinical decision making, mentoring and self-directed learning. 

Physical therapists should have the ability to articulate and exchange knowledge, seek addi- 
tional knowledge and skills, and they should have the ability and desire to remain open to input 
from and collaboration with other health care professionals. They value collaboration and 
communication in a spirit of mutual collegiality among health care providers as essential to 
meeting the health care needs of society. 

A physical therapy entry-level education program prepares physical therapy generalise but 
provides graduates with the tools which enable them to develop specialty expertise through the 
application of critical thinking and problem solving skills and a wholistic approach to health 
care. 

The academic and clinical faculty and the academic and clinical education environment must 
reflect and foster professional values and behaviors. The academic and clinical faculty and 
curriculum components must be inextricably linked for the provision of professional education 
programs preparing competent health care practitioners. 

A diverse faculty whose members have responsibilities and activities consistent with their areas 
of teaching and scholarly expertise, strengthens and enhances a professional education pro- 
gram. 

Goals It is the goal of the physical therapy education program to prepare graduates who: 

1. are physical therapist generalists capable of contemporary, competent, legal, and 
ethical practice. 

2. value the relevance of, and contribute to, critical inquiry in the validation and 
advancement of the art and science of physical therapy. 

3. appreciate the roles and responsibilities of physical therapists as professionally 
autonomous practitioners within the health care system. 

4. accept the responsibility for education of self, the community, profession, clients, 
and colleagues in the health care system. 

5. value and foster communication and interaction with colleagues for the benefit of 
optimal service to clients. 

6. respect and respond to contemporary bio-psycho-social diversity in interactions with 
clients, families, colleagues and the community. 



40 



GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 



PHYSICAL THERAPY PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 



First Professional Year 



Semester I 

BIO 301 Gross Anatomy 

FT 405 Analysis Hum Mvmt 

BIO 407 App Physiol 

PT 409 Clin. Skills 



cr 
5 
4 

4 

.2 
15 



BIO 302 
PT402 
PT410 
Elective 



Semester II 

Neuroscience 

Clin Sci I 

Int CI Arts Sem I 



cr 

4 

6 

3 

121 



13-16 



Summer I 
PT515 Research Methods 3 



S econ d Prpfessipnal Y ea r 



PT503 
PT505 
PT511 
PT590 
Elective 



Third 

PT619 
PT621 



Clin Sci II 
Clin Sci III 
Int CI Arts Sem II 
Research Seminar 



Year 



4 
4 
4 
1 

(31 
13-16 



Clin Ed II (10 weeks) 
Clin Ed III (10 weeks) 
Aug. - Dec. 



6 
6 



12 



PT518 
PT506 
PT512 



PT614 
PT690 
PT692 
PT616 
PT612 



Clin Educ 1(6 weeks) 
Clin Sci IV 
Int C A Sem III 



Int C A Sem IV 
Critical Inq 
Crit Inq Sem 
Clin Dec Making 
Special Topics 



12 



3 
3 

1 
2 

2 

12 



The total credits required for the professional curriculum are 80. Of these, 28 are at the 
undergraduate level (300, 400 level) and 52 at the graduate level (500, 600). 500 level courses 
taken through the first semester of the second professional year will be counted toward the 
baccalaureate degree requirements for students in the five year, BS/MS in PT program who 
must have 128 credits to receive the baccalaureate degree. A minimum of 36 graduate credits 
beyond the baccalaureate degree requirements arc necessary for the MS in PT degree. 

Minimal competence (3.0 GPA or grade of B) must be demonstrated in all professional courses 
prefixed "PT" for successful completion of the physical therapy program. 



41_ 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



EDUCATION 500 Issues and Trends in Education 3 credits 

(EDU) Curriculum decision making is examined in light of Federal and state 

legislation, court decisions, public policy, recent research and exemplary 
educational programs. Students complete a series of readings, participate in 
discussions, and complete a major paper. 

504 Curriculum 3 credits 

Includes an examination of the foundations, models, and procedures of 
curriculum design and assessment. Curriculum theories and practices are 
explored. Students design and assess actual curriculum. 

510 Learning 3 credits 

Relates major contemporary theories of education to current methods of 
teaching. Discusses how the theories and methods affect curriculum and 
curriculum decisions. Students create a project which relates theories and 
methods to curriculum decisions. 

515 Research Methods 3 credits 

An examination of the principles and procedures of educational research. 
Techniques of gathering and analyzing data, the design of studies in educa- 
tion, and application to curriculum evaluation are highlighted. 
Basic Statistics is a prerequisite. 

520 Curriculum and Methods in Reading 3 credits 

A special course which focuses effective and efficient teaching methods and 
materials used to teach reading in elementary classrooms. This course is 
designed for currently certified teachers. 
EDU 590 Basic Methods in Elementary Education is prerequisite. 

523 Curriculum Adaptations for 1 credit 
Mainstreamed Adolescents 

This course prepares special and regular educators to effectively integrate 
mildly handicapped students in regular education. 

524 Curriculum and Methods in 3 credits 
Language Arts 

A special course which focuses effective and efficient teaching methods and 
materials used to teach language arts in elementary classrooms. This course 
is designed for currently certified teachers. 
EDU 590 Basic Methods in Elementary Education is prerequisite. 

525 Curriculum and Methods in Mathematics 3 credits 
A special course which focuses effective and efficient teaching methods 
and materials used to teach mathematics in elementary classrooms. It is 
designed for currently certified teachers. 

EDU 590 Basic Methods in Elementary Education is a prerequisite. 

530 School Law and Finance 3 credits 

Students are introduced to how state and local school district laws and 
policies govern curriculum and how school programs are financed. 



_42 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



EDUCATION 531 College Teaching 3 credits 

(EDU) Introduces prospective and novice college faculty to instructional practices 

and procedures related to teaching college courses. Topics include develop- 
ing syllabi and instructional plans, teaching methods, test construction, and 
evaluation procedures. 

532 Classroom and Instructional Management 3 credits 
This seminar identifies how special educators and elementary teachers can 
improve how they manage classrooms. Motivation and discipline issues are 
discussed. 

533 Computer-Based Education 3 credits 
This laboratory course allows students to experience first-hand the effects of 
computer-based educational programs and create an awareness of how CBA 
can be used in schools. 

534 Teaching Sensitive Issues 3 credits 
Participants identify educationally sensitive issues related to sex education 
and related topics and prepare to deal with the issues in classroom situations. 

535 Cooperative Learning 3 credits 
This course introduces students to Cooperative Learning and allows them to 
develop skills related to the implementation of Cooperative Learning strate- 
gies in elementary and secondary schools. 

536 Career Decisions in Education 1 credit 
This course introduces students to career awareness and allows them to 
develop skills related to the implementation of career programs secondary 
schools and colleges. 

537 Outcomes-Based Education 3 credits 
This course introduces students to OBE and to policies and procedures 
which facilitate the effective implementation of outcomes-based programs. 

538 Performance-Based Assessment 3 credits 
This course introduces students to performance-based assessment and to 
policies and procedures which facilitate the effective implementation of 
PBA in classroom situations. 

539 Learning Strategies 3 credits 
This course introduces students to the Strategies Intervention Model (SIM), 
an approach to helping at-risk secondary students by empowering them with 
Learning Strategies (Kansas University). 

545 Instructional Support Teams/Elementary 1 credit 
This advanced course helps elementary teachers apply concepts of instruc- 
tional support in their school settings. 

546 Instructional Support Teams/Secondary 1 credit 
This advanced course helps middle level and secondary teachers apply 
concepts of instructional support in their school settings. 



43_ 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



EDUCATION 547 Collaboration and Consultation 3 credits 

(EDU) This course introduces a process regular and special education teachers can 

follow to jointly implement programs to assist students at-risk. 

548 Clinical Supervision 3 credits 

Models and practices of clinical supervision are explored and practiced. 
Supervision projects are completed. 

551 Productivity Tools for Educators 3 credits 
An introduction to computer-based tools which help teachers deal effi- 
ciently with record keeping and reporting. Software related to word pro- 
cessing, data bases, spreadsheets, gradebooks, and graphics printing pack- 
ages is used. NOTE: Computer novices in the Educational Technology 
Specialization should take this first. 

552 Multimedia Based Education 3 credits 
Focuses on the use of computer integrated media including: laserdisc, 
CD-ROM, audio, video, graphics, and text The course is designed as an 
introduction to commercially prepared packages. Students also use 
HyperCard to develop their own materials. 

553 Technology and Instructional Design 3 credits 
Deals with ways to incorporate and integrate computer technology in 
planning and implementing instruction. Software applications and designs 
which enhance quality instruction are highlighted. 

554 Video in the Instructional Process 3 credits 
The uses and advantages of video in instruction are discussed. Participants 
learn to design instruction using commercial and educational television and 
to produce original video using camcorders and editing equipment. 

555 Advanced Multimedia Design 3 credits 
Multimedia authoring languages and scripting as a multimedia program- 
ming language are explored. The course also deals with advanced uses of 
video digitizing and QuickTime movies. EDU 554 is prerequisite. 

557 Instructional Support 3 credits 

This course introduces students to the concept of instructional support as it 
relates to helping academically at-risk students succeed in school programs. 
Current models and practices of instructional support are reviewed. 

559 Supervision Internship Variable Credit 

Students complete a specially arranged internship in a local school. They 
complete a special project under the supervision of a college supervisor and 
a school district mentor. 

565 Staff Development 3 credits 

Participants identify and develop skills needed to participate in faculty 
development programs. Procedures and practices related to conducting 
needs assessments and to planning, implementing, and evaluating the effect 
of in-service programs are highlighted. The course gives students the 
opportunity to plan major curriculum projects. 



44 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



EDUCATION 
(EDU) 



570 Software Applications 3 credits 

Identifies procedures for the selection, evaluation, and use of computer 
programs and software. 

575 Human Development 3 credits 

An in-depth study of growth and development as it relates to elementary- 
aged students. Current research and recent developments in educational 
psychology are explored. 

581 Seminar in Elementary Education 3 credits 
This seminar is designed for Track Two participants (elementary educa- 
tion). It deals with current issues and trends in elementary education 

582 Observation and Practicum credits 
Track Two participants (elementary education) are expected to log 100 
hours observing and participating in elementary classrooms. Specific 
objectives must be met and students must maintain journals. 

585 Special Topics Variable Credit 

The Graduate Education Program features a series of one, two, and three 
credit courses which deal with special topics of interest to teachers. They 
are taught by respected and expert adjunct faculty who are leaders in their 
communities and/or schools. A few Special Topics are scheduled each 
semester and several are available during the summer term. Most Special 
Topics may be used as electives within the Graduate Education Program. 



Special Topics courses have included: 

Integrating Learning Systems 

Integrating Technology in the Classroom 

Sensitive Issues in Sexuality 

Curriculum Integration 

Censorship in the Arts 

Parents/Students' Rights in Special Education 

College Programs for Disabled Students 

Religion in Public Schools 

The Federal Education Agenda 

Characteristics of Excellence 

Multicultural Education: Heritage Curriculum 



Multicultural Education: Literature 
in High School (3) 

Education in Japan 

Curriculum of the Future 

Ethics in Education 

Curriculum Update: 
State Requirements 

The Self-Study Process 

Adaptations for Exceptional 
Students/Secondary 

Preparing Students for Post- 
Secondary Education 



590 Basic Methods in Elementary Education 3 credits 

Focuses on the structure and process of elementary education and high- 
lights effective and efficient teaching methods and materials which may be 
used in elementary education. This course is designed for currently certi- 
fied, albeit not elementary teachers. 

591/ Curriculum Specialization I/II 3 credits each 

592 Students independently research and design curriculum and identify how it 

can be implemented. The course requires the completion of professionally 

publishable papers. 



45 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

EDUCATION 595 Professional Contribution 3 credits 

(EDU) Allows students the opportunity to implement major curriculum projects by 

conducting and formally and publically presenting their professional contribu- 
tions. EDU 565 Staff Development may be prerequisite. 

599 Independent Study Variable credit 

Allows students to conduct independent investigations of specific topics of 
interest and/or to complete a school-based project They are planned, imple- 
mented, and evaluated with the assistance of a mentor appointed by College 
Misericordia. A Contract Learning format is used. 



_46 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



NURSING 504 Curriculum Design 3 credits 

(NSG) An examination of the foundations, models and procedures of curriculum 

design in nursing. Curriculum theories and practice are explored. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: NSG 512 

505 Teaching-Learning Strategies 3 credits 
This course places emphasis on teaching and learning theories. 

Students are exposed to a variety of modalities utilized in teaching both 
theory and clinical courses. Test construction and clinical evaluation 
methods arc included. 

506 Adult Health: Micro Systems Nursing I 3 credits 
The focus is on the nurse and the client as a model of wellness in health 
promotion using nursing theory and research. The change process is utilized 
as it impacts upon micro systems. Clinical work is expected as part of the 
course requirement. 

Prerequisite: NSG 553, NSG 512 

507 Adult Health: Micro Systems Nursing H 3 credits 
The focus of this course will be the development of intervention strategies 
using concepts and models developed for the maintenance and restorative 
aspects of wellness within a micro system. Clinical work is included. 
Prerequisite: NSG 506 

508 Community Health/Macro Systems Nursing I 3 credits 
This course views the community as client using a macro systems frame- 
work. The nursing process with a nursing theory foundation is used to focus 
on wellness and health promotion and protection. Aggregate data is ana- 
lyzed using the epidemiologic method. Clinical work involves working with 
groups. 

Prerequisite: NSG 553, NSG 512 

509 Community Health/Macro Systems Nursing II 3 credits 
This course emphasizes community assessment planning, interventions and 
evaluation. The nursing process with a nursing theory foundation is used 
within a macro systems framework. Focus is on the community as client 
and maintenance and/or restoration of wellness. Clinical work is a require- 
ment of the course. 

Prerequisite: NSG 508 

510 Introduction to Higher Education 3 credits 
This course introduces the student to some of the concepts of higher 
education, the roles and functions of educators, demands of academia, 
external constraints on nursing in higher education, funding sources, and 
the roles and functions of educational administrators and support staff. 

512 Concepts and Theories in Nursing 3 credits 

Emphasis is placed on concept analysis, components of theories, construc- 
tion of the theoretical relationships between theory, research and practice, 
and critique of existing theoretical frameworks in the discipline. Social, 
ethical and value problems related to the development of knowledge are 
examined. 



47_ 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



NURSING 515 Research Methods: Concepts, Methods & Principles 3 credits 

(NSG) This course will present the principles and processes involved in research. 

Qualitative and quantitative approaches will be reviewed and analyzed 
relative to their strengths, limitations and practical uses. The application of 
appropriate research methods to problems worthy of study will be stressed. 
Prerequisites: NSG 512, Basic Statistics 

516 Introduction to Qualitative Research 3 credits 

This course introduces the student to the nature and importance of qualita- 
tive research methods. Case study, phenomenologic, grounded theory, 
historical and ethnographic methods are explored in relation to the health 
professions. Examples of qualitative research are analyzed. 

521 Maternal: Macro Systems Nursing I 3 credits 
This course emphasizes community maternal assessment, diagnosis, 
planning, intervention and evaluation. The nursing process with a theory 
foundation is used with a macro system framework to focus on maternal 
nursing. Focus in on the community, including the family, as a client in 
relation to maternal nursing and maintenance and/or restoration of wellness. 
Clinical work is required. Prerequisite: NSG 553, 512 

522 Child: Macro Systems Nursing II 3 credits 
This course emphasizes community child assessment, diagnosis, planning, 
intervention and evaluation. The nursing process with a nursing theory 
foundation is used with a macro systems framework to focus on child 
nursing. Focus in on the sommunity as client as well as the family as client 
in relation to child nursing and maintenance and/or restoration of wellness. 
Prerequisite: NSG 553, 512 

525 Introduction to Nursing Administration 3 credits 

This course explores the nature of administration as a concept and a variety 
of theoretical approaches to the process of administration. Common ele- 
ments of administration are considered and analyzed within the organiza- 
tional framework of nursing services as a subsystem of an overall health 
care delivery system. Prerequisites: OM 500, OM 510, NSG 512 

535 Nursing Education Practicum/Seminar 4 credits 

This course provides opportunities for students to develop the skills of 
classroom and clinical teaching and evaluation using various modalities. 
Students will explore the need to interface with faculty from nursing and 
other departments of the institution, administration, support service person- 
nel, and clinical site agency personnel. The logistics of student placement, 
contractual agreements, state approval, and accreditation are additional 
areas which are explored. Weekly seminars provide opportunities for 
exchange of ideas, clarification of concerns, and analysis of educational 
development and evaluative strategies. 
Prerequisites: NSG 504, 505, 510, and at least one clinical course. 



_48 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



NURSING 545 Nursing Administration PracticunVSeminar 4 credits 

(NSG) This course is designed to expand on the content of NSG 525 Introduction 

to Nursing Administration. Students will have selected experiences in a 
Nursing Service Department with a Nursing Administration and/or desig- 
nee and explore issues that affect the delivery of nursing care in that situ- 
ation. Concurrent classes will focus on an analysis of the scope of nursing 
services in the total health care system and particularly on the role of the 
Nursing Administrator. Prerequisite: NSG 525 and at least one clinical course. 

551 Advanced Pharmacology 3 credits 
Principles of pharmacology are applied to the primary care therapeutic 
management of the client across the life span. Emphasis is placed on 
mechanisms of drug action, prescription writing, monitoring drug regimens, 
identifying adverse reactions/toxicity and anticipating changes inherenent 
in self medication. Potential consequences of multiple drug interactions are 
considered. The cost effectiveness of medication choices is also discussed. 
Pre or Co-requisite: NSG 552 

552 Pathophysiology for Primary Care 3 credits 
The physiological principles and pathogenesis of common conditions 
affecting children and adults are presented. The application of concepts 
from anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology and epidemiology as a 
basis for advanced nursing practice is emphasized. Physical findings and 
typical diagnostic studies appropriate for common health problems occur- 
ring across the life span are addressed. 

553 Analysis of the Health Status of Macro/Micro Systems 3 credits 
This first clinical graduate nursing course is a core requirement for nurse 
practitioner students. Emphasis is placed upon the analysis of the health 
status of individuals, families (micro systems) and communities (macro 
systems). Utilizing comprehensive assessment techniques such as complete 
health history, physical examination, family, and community assessment as 
a foundation for theory based practice is the major focus. 
Co-requisite: NSG 554 for FNP students only 

554 Diagnostic Reasoning and Therapeutic Interventions 

for Primary Care Nursing 3 credits 

This is a laboratory/clinical course designed to assist students to develop 
skill in theory based clinical decision-making and performing clinical inter- 
ventions. Appropriate data collection and hypothesis formulation is a 
major emphasis. Students also practice selected psychomotor and psycho- 
social therapeutic interventions in a variety of clinical settings. A begin- 
ning understanding of the role of die Family Nurse Practitioner is included. 
Co-requisite: NSG 553 

555 Legal, Ethical and Public Policy Issues in Health Care 3 credits 
This course is designed to analyze the impact of legal, ethical and public 
policy dimensions as they relate to health care in general and nursing 
specifically. Emphasis will be on examination of current issues in these 
areas. Current trends and issues in health care will provide a framework for 
analyzing me legal, ethical and public policy aspects of the health care 
system. 



49_ 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



NURSING 556 Clinical Management for the Primary Care of Children 2 credits 

(NSG) Students will develop competence in performing a comprehensive health 

assessment of children. Clinical experiences also will assist students to gain 

competence in the management of children's health/illness status. Students 

will be guided by a preceptor in the implementation of treatment plans or 

protocols utilized to manage common childhood health problems and 

illnesses. 

Co-requisite: NSG 565; Prerequisites: NSG 551, 552, 553, 554 

557 Primary Care of Adults with Health Promotion 

Needs and Episodic Health Problems 2 credits 

Focuses on the delivery of theory based primary care to adults with health 
promotion needs and episodic health problems. The application of ad- 
vanced comprehensive assessment skills to the adult population are cov- 
ered. Emphasis is placed on risk analysis and reduction and principles of 
pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic clinical therapeutics. The stabiliza- 
tion of acute and management of common episodic health problems of 
adults are included. In addition there are selected practice experiences. 
Co-requisite: NSG 558; Prerequisites: NSG 551, 552, 553, 554 

558 Clinical Management of Adults with Health Promotion 

Needs and Episodic Health Problems 2 credits 

Students will develop competence in performing a comprehensive health 
assessment of adults with episodic health problems. Clinical experiences 
also will assist students to gain competence in the theory based manage- 
ment of adult's health/illness status. Students will be guided by a preceptor 
in the implementation of treatment plans or protocols utilized to manage 
common adult health problems and illnesses. 
Co-requisite: NSG 557; Prerequisites: NSG 551, 552, 553, 554 

559 Primary Care of Women 3 credits 
Emphasis is on gynecological and reproductive health care. Health promo- 
tion issues specific to women are covered. Focus is on the theory based 
management of gynecologic health needs and the normal reproductive 
cycle. The application of research findings to the primary care of women is 
discussed. Selected practice experiences are included. 

Co-requisite: NSG 561; Prerequisites: NSG 551, 552, 553, 554 

561 Clinical Management of Women's Health Care 2 credits 

Students will develop competence in comprehensive health assessment of 
the gynecologic and reproductive health care needs of women. Clinical 
experiences also will assist students to gain competence in the theory based 
management of women's health. Students will be guided by a preceptor in 
the implementation of treatment plans or protocols utilized to manage 
common health concerns of women throughout the life cycle. The applica- 
tion of research to practice will be included. Co-requisite: NSG 559; 
Prerequisites: NSG 551, 552, 553, 554 



_50 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



NURSING 562 Primary Care of Adults with Chronic Health Needs 

(NSG) and Problems 2 credits 

Focuses on the delivery of theory based primary care to adults with chronic 
health problems. The ongoing assessment and management of chronic 
illnesses will be discussed. Students will be encouraged to utilize problem 
solving techniques to determine potential strategies for breaking through 
barriers to care. The utilization of computers to facilitate client care 
objectives will also be covered. Selected practice experiences are included. 
Co-requisite: NSG 563; Prerequisites: NSG 551, 552, 553, 554, 557 

563 Clinical Management of Adults with Chronic Health 

Needs and Problems 2 credits 

Students will develop competence in performing a comprehensive, ongoing 
health assessment of adults with chronic health problems. Clinical experi- 
ences also will assist students to gain competence in the theory based 
management of chronic health problems. Students will be guided by a 
preceptor in the implementation of treatment plans or protocols utilized to 
manage common, stabilized adult chronic health problems and illnesses in 
collaboration with other members of the health care team. 
Co-requisite: NSG 562; Prerequisites: NSG 551, 552, 553, 554, 558 

564 Family Nurse Practitioner Preceptorship 6 credits 
This course serves as a culminating experience in role development 
Clinical practice sites will serve as an environment for students to examine 
ways to monitor and ensure quality primary care while practicing as a 
Family Nurse Practitioner in conjunction with a preceptor. Ginical semi- 
nar will focus on topics such as peer review, interdisciplinary communica- 
tion and collaboration, ethical decision-making, political and legal issues, 
and other professional issues such as responsibility, autonomy, and ac- 
countability. 

Prerequisite: All courses except NSG 555 

565 Primary Care of Children 3 credits 
Advanced pharmacology, pathophysiology for primary care, analysis of the 
health status of macro/micro systems, diagnostic reasoning and therapeutic 
interventions for primary care nursing. 

Co-requisite: NSG 556; Prerequisites: NSG 551, 552, 553, 554 

570 Faculty Role Development 3 credits 

This course is designed to develop a full understanding of entry into a 
faculty position. Students will be provided with the opportunity to learn 
how to initiate a job search, develop a dossier for promotion and tenure; 
implement the educator role as it relates to curriculum and evaluation and 
explore the opportunities for career advancement. 

573 Clinical Practicum 3 credits 

A comprehensive, advanced clinical experience providing opportunity for 
synthesis and application of previously learned knowledge and skills with 
emphasis on leadership, decision-making, clinical judgment, and change 
theory. Focus is on promotion, maintenance, and restoration of wellness. 
The nursing process is used with a nursing theory foundation within a 
micro/macro systems framework. 
Prerequisite: All clinical courses. 



51_ 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



NURSING 585 Thesis Advisement (Independent Study Option) 3 credits 

(NSG) Investigation of a research question related to a student's clinical or 

functional area based on a theoretical framework. Literature review, data 
collection, analysis of data, summary and conclusions are included. 
Prerequisite: NSG 515 

590 Special Topics (1-3 credits) 

The Nursing Program features a series of one, two, and three credit courses 
which deal with special topics of interest to graduate nursing students. 
They are taught by respected and expert faculty who are leaders in their 
field. Special Topics may be used as electives within the graduate nursing 
program. 

596 Independent Study variable credits 

Allows students to investigate a topic of interest, complete their research, 
or implement a special project with the guidance of a faculty. Topics/ 
projects/thesis must be approved in advance. 

599 Graduate Nursing Synthesis Seminar 3 credits 

This course represents the culmination of the graduate nursing program for 
students focusing on the nurse educator and administrator roles. It is 
designed to provide a forum for discussion of issues important to the 
development of competent collaborative advanced practitioners. Students 
will be required to synthesize information obtained in Concepts and 
Theories, Research, Analysis of Micro/Macro Systems, as well as clinical 
and functional role courses in order to develop a meaningful base of 
practice. Stating and defending the graduate nursing knowledge base is 
required. 

Prerequisite: NSG 512, 515, 553, Clinical I & II, NSG 504, 505, 510, or 
OM 500, 510 

777 Thesis Continuation credit 

Students who do not complete defense of the thesis (independent study 
option) before the end of the fall or spring semester must register for thesis 
continuation. 



52 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



OCCUPATIONAL 
THERAPY 
ENTRY LEVEL 
M.S. (OT) 

Note: Descriptions of 
required Occupational 
Therapy courses which 
carry undergraduate 
credit are found in the 
undergraduate catalog. 



515 Research Methods in Occupational Therapy 3 credits 

This course will present the principles and processes involved in research. 
Qualitative and quantitative approaches will be reviewed and analyzed 
relative to their strengths, limitations and practical uses. The application of 
appropriate research methods to problems worthy of study will be stressed. 
Prerequisite: MTH 1 15, all 100, 200, and 300 level occupational therapy 
courses. 

522 Occupational Therapy Intervention Seminar I 2 credits 

523 Occupational Therapy Intervention Seminar II 2 credits 

524 Occupational Therapy Intervention Seminar III 2 credits 
These seminars support the concepts and techniques learned in OT 422, OT 
423 and OT 424. Here, through the use of case studies and discussions, 
students explore relevant issues related to the practice of occupational 
therapy. These issues go beyond the concepts learned in OT 422, OT 423 
and OT 424 and discuss issues such as ethics, diversity, multicultural 
implications in treatment planning, documentation and reimbursement in 
various health care service delivery settings. 

Corequisites: OT 522 with OT 422, OT 523 with OT 423, OT 524 with 
OT424 



570 Occupational Therapy Management & Supervision 3 credits 

The occupational therapist's role in financial management, human resource 
management, staff development, quality assurance, program managment 
and evaluation are explored. Special emphasis on supervisory processes in 
facilitating professional growth and development; gender issues relating to 
management; management of COTAs and OTAs. Components of program 
planning, needs assessments, data collection and analysis, and resource 
allocation will be introduced. 
Prerequisites: All 100, 200, and 300 level occupational therapy courses 

601 Level II Fieldwork I 3 credits 
Practical educational experience designed to integrate and apply an aca- 
demically acquired body of knowledge. Particular emphasis on the develop- 
ment of clinical reasoning; the transmission of the values, beliefs and 
ethical commitments of occupational therapy; communication of profes- 
sional behaviors; development and expansion of a repertoire of occupa- 
tional therapy assessment and intervention methodologies. This Level II is 
a three month experience offered during the summer semester, may be 
repeated. 

Prerequisite: By permission of the Fieldwork Coordinator 

602 Level II Fieldwork II 9 credits 
This three month internship emphasizes the integration and application of 
an academically acquired body of knowledge and research enabling the 
student to achieve a level of competence in direct care congruent with the 
standards of entry level practice of the profession of occupational therapy. 
Students must take this class as a follow-on class to OT 601 in order to 
meet the educational prerequisites to graduate and to be eligible to sit for 
the American Occupational Therapy Certification Examination. This 
course is offered during the fall semester. 

Prerequisites: OT 601 and permission of die Fieldwork Coordinator 



53 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



OCCUPATIONAL 
THERAPY 
ENTRY LEVEL 
M.S. (OT) 



610 Elective: Special Topics in Occupational Therapy Practice 3 credits 
Specialized areas of Occupational Therapy practice will be discussed; 
these will include, but are not limited to, industrial rehabilitation (work 
hardening, job site analysis and ergonomics, pre-vocational evaluations and 
the cultural and environmental influence on work performance), home 
health care, NICU, advanced splinting techniques, wellness, AIDS, hospice, 
forensic psychiatry and independent living environments. Topics will vary 
each year depending upon the student interest and the availability of faculty 
with professional specialty expertise. 
Prerequisite: By permission of the instructor 

620 Analysis of Occupational Therapy Theories 

and Practice Models 3 credits 

Students conduct an in-depth study of theory development and analysis as it 
relates to macro and micro models of occupational therapy practice. This 
includes a comprehensive comparative analysis of frames of reference in 
differing health care delivery systems and ongoing research applications 
employed to validate the occupational therapy process. 
Prerequisite: OT602 

630 Occupational Therapy Issues and Trends 3 credits 

Students explore, discuss and critically analyze issues affecting 
occupational therapy practice including reimbursement, role delineation, 
professional autonomy, legislation, health care systems and managed care. 
Prerequisite: OT602 

690 Research Project I and II 3, 3 credits 

695 Students will complete a research project that contributes to the 
knowledge of the occupational therapy process; the outcome will 
include a paper acceptable for publication in a professional journal. 
Prerequisite: MTH 1 15, OT 515; OT 690 is a prerequisite to OT 695 



_54 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ORGANIZATIONAL 500 Organizational Behavior 3 credits 

MANAGEMENT Social and behavioral science approaches to the study of human activity in 

(OM) organizations. The course is designed to equip administrators with skills for 

managing interactions, differences and relationships in organizational 

settings. 

505 Decision Making 3 credits 

A study of decision making in complex human service organization. 
Examination of a variety of conceptual frameworks to enable administrators 
to develop an evaluative design for ethical, effective and efficient decision 
making. 

510 Financial Management I 3 credits 
Introduction to basic economic theory, accounting principles, budget theory 
and practice and financial control procedures necessary to the successful 
manager. Designed for the non-financial manager and presupposes little or 
no previous education or experience in finance. 

511 Financial Management n 3 credits 
Applies the basic skills mastered in Financial Management I through case 
studies of public and private organizations. Emphasis on integrating finan- 
cial considerations with other management considerations when analyzing 
and solving problems, and in planning. Investments, borrowing, informa- 
tion systems and financial analysis are covered. 

Prerequisite: OM 510 

515 Research Methods 3 credits 
Provides student with an understanding of the concepts, principles and 
techniques associated with the investigation of specific research problems 
in organizational behavior and management. 

Prerequisite: Basic Statistics is required. 

516 Introduction to Qualitative Research 3 credits 
This course introduces the student to the nature and importance of qualita- 
tive research. Case study, grounded theory, historical and ethnographic 
methods are explored. Examples of qualitative research are analyzed, 
especially program evaluation. 

525 Human Services Systems 3 credits 

An integrated seminar which examines the programs and policies of the 
major human service areas, with emphasis on the dynamics of the system as 
it evolves. Topics for discussion include aging, adult services, children and 
youth, drugs and alcohol, health, mental health/mental retardation. 

530 Legal Aspects of Administration 3 credits 

Provides students with an understanding of legal aspects of administrative 
action that includes the source and scope of administrative authority and the 
function of the legal process. Case method of decision analysis utilized, 
supplemented by lecture and discussion. 



55_ 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ORGANIZATIONAL 536 Marketing Management 3 credits 

MANAGEMENT An analytical approach to the study of marketing issues. Focus on influence 

(OM) of the market place and the marketing environment on decision making in 

regard to the determination of the organization's services, fee structures, 
channels and strategies of communication, and the organization's system 
for planning and controlling its marketing effort. 

540 Grant/Contract Development and Management 3 credits 

Systematic approach to the mechanics, techniques and issues involved in 
external funding. Covers the pre-application phase, the application phase, 
the post-application phase and the administration phase of grant/contract 
development and management. 

542 Fund-Raising: Theory and Application 3 credits 

Designed for the current or prospective administrator. Focus is on mechan- 
ics of fund-raising, the tools of the fund-raiser, and the types of fund-raising 
activities applicable to both public and private sectors. Consideration of the 
role of institutional development in the 1990s. 

550 Personnel and Labor Relations 3 credits 
Basic concepts, issues and practices involved in personnel administration 
and labor relations. Emphasis on the successful management of human 
resources. 

551 Organizational Communication 3 credits 
Designed to develop skills in communication to promote organizational 
goal setting, coherence and effective teamwork. 

552 Regulation of Human Resources Management 3 credits 
An examination of the legal environment of the workplace, and its impact 
on the human resources function. Emphasis on what managers need to do 
in order to be in compliance with governmental regulations. 

553 Fundamentals of Employment Benefit Planning 3 credits 
An in-depth study of the evolution and development of employee benefit 
programs. Current practices and their applicability to various organizations 
will be examined. 

554 Current Issues in Human Resource Management 3 credits 
A seminar designed for the study of timely and significant issues in human 
resource management. Current trends and relevant problem-solving tech- 
niques will be used. 

555 Administration of Human Resources 3 credits 
Theory, policy and process issues in employment relationships. Specific 
practices in selection, appraisal, compensation and discipline as they relate 
to conceptual views of management. 



_56 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ORGANIZATIONAL 556 Policy/Procedure Development in 3 credits 

MANAGEMENT Human Resource Management 

(OM) Development and implementation of policies relevant to personnel admin- 

istration. Focus on relationship between government policy and corporate 
policy and influence of management philosophy for policy planning. 
Discussion of expected and unexpected outcomes of policy decisions. 

559 Special Topics in Human 1-3 credits 

Resource Management 

Examination of selected topic relevant to human resource management. 
Possible topics include training and staff development, employee assistance 
programming, governmental relations strategies, time management, effec- 
tive supervision. 

585 Special Topics in Administration 1-3 credits 
Examination of selected topic relevant to the development of skills in 
administration. Possible topics include governmental relations strategies, 
time management, program assessment and evaluation. 

586 Strategic Planning and Management of Change 3 credits 
An introduction to the strategic planning process and its application in 
managing organizational change. Techniques and skills involved in design- 
ing and implementing planned change to improve organizational 
adaptiveness and effectiveness in the changing political, economic, social, 
and technological environment. 

590 Seminar 3 credits 

Advanced seminar offered to small groups of graduate students who wish 
to explore in greater depth a sub-specialty in administration that may 
include human resource issues and/or general management issues. 

595 Professional Contribution 3 credits 
The design and implementation of a special project or study relevant to the 
expressed needs of an organization or agency. The student's academic 
advisor's approval is a prerequisite. 

596 Administrative Practicum 3 credits 
An educationally directed experience in an approved organizational setting. 
Application for the practicum must be made with the student's academic 
advisor. 

599 Independent Study 3 credits 

Allows students to investigate a topic of interest with the guidance of a 
mentor approved by the college. Topics must be approved in advance. 



57_ 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHYSICAL Descriptions of the following required professional Physical Therapy 

THERAPY courses which carry undergraduate credit are found in the under- 

(PT) graduate catalog: 

BIO 301 Gross Anatomy 5 credits 

BIO 302 Neuroscience 4 credits 

PT 405 Analysis of Human Movement 4 credits 

BIO 407 Applied Physiology 4 credits 

PT 409 PT Clinical Skills 2 credits 

PT 402 Clinical Science I 6 credits 

PT 410 Integrated Clinical Arts Seminar I 3 credits 

503 Clinical Science II 4 credits 

This course continues and presupposes Clinical Science I. Assessment of 
the cervical spine, thoracic/lumbar spine, SI joint, and TMJ will be empha- 
sized within the previously established framework. Classroom, laboratory, 
and clinical sessions will be utilized to integrate problem solving, clinical 
decision making, and comprehensive treatment planning skills. Posture, 
gait, upper extremity, and lower extremity will be revisited in light of 
movement dysfunction with strong integration of functional analysis. 

2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab 
Pre-requisites:PT402. Co-requisites: PT 505. Fall 

505 Clinical Science DH 4 credits 
This course will review cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology, with 
expansion into pathophysiology of these systems. Analysis, evaluation, 
intervention, and differential diagnosis within physical therapy scope of 
practice will be emphasized. Pharmacology, graded exercise testing, EKG 
analysis, and laboratory testing will be covered in light of cardiopulmonary 
pathology and possible modifications to physical therapy intervention. 
Rehabilitation and exercise prescription for primary or secondary diagnosis 
of cardiopulmonary pathology will be discussed. Intervention will stress 
environmental and lifestyle factors, health and wellness attitudes, and 
physical activity as integral to patient and public education. Classroom, 
laboratory, and clinical sessions will be used for integration of 
competencies and skills. 

3 lecture hours, 2 hours lab. 

Pre-requisites: BIO 301. BIO 407; PT 402. Co-requisites: PT 503. Fall 

506 Clinical Science IV 6 credits 
This course will review neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuro- 
pathology with expansion to neurological evaluation, treatment, and 
rehabilitation. Analysis of posture and movement during the normal process 
of development and aging as well as the neurologically impaired population 
will be emphasized. Current movement theory, postural control, and motor 
learning will be applied and integrated with knowledge gained in previous 
PT course work with respect to evaluation and selection of appropriate 
treatment. The theoretical basis for rehabilitation techniques such as PNF, 
NDT, and sensory integration will be also be emphasized. 

6 hours lecture, 6 hours lab, 10 weeks 

Pre-requisites: PT 405, BIO 407, PT 409, 402, 503, 505, BIO 302. 

Co-requisite: PT 512. Spring 

511 Integrated Clinical Arts Seminar II 4 credits 

A continuation of, and pre-supposes, PT 410. 
2 hours lecture, 4 hours seminar 
Pre-requisites: PT 410. Co-requisites: PT 503; PT 505. Fall 



J58 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHYSICAL 512 Integrated Clinical Arts Seminar III 3 credits 

TH ER AP Y A continuation of, and pre-supposes, PT 5 1 1 . 

(PT) 2 hours lecture, 3 hours seminar (10 weeks) 

Pre-requisites: PT 5 1 1 ; PT 5 1 8. Co-requisites: PT 506. Spring 

515 Research Methods 3 credits 

This course will present the principles and processes involved in research. 
Qualitative and quantitative approaches will be reviewed and analyzed 
relative to their strengths, limitations and practical uses. The application of 
appropriate research methods to problems worthy of study will be stressed. 
Pre-requisite: Basic Statistics Summer 

518 Clinical Education I 3 credits 

A six-week full-time clinical education experience, spring semester second 
professional year (January-February). This will provide the opportunity for 
integration of current professional competencies into direct patient care 
using problem solving strategies. Facilitation from PT clinical faculty will 
assist in the utilization of these skills in critically analyzing a variety of 
patient and role problems. This experience will also begin the processes of: 
professional socialization and cultivation of interpersonal communication 
skills; clinical decision making; self-assessment; proactive learning; and 
development of personal values, attitudes, and motivations in relationship to 
ethical, legal, and moral practice. 

Pre-requisite: Satisfactory completion of all professional courses to date. 
Spring 

590 Research Seminar 1 credit 

Integration of material presented in PT 515 as relevant to critical inquiry in 
physical therapy; strong emphasis will be placed on clinical research design 
and theory development; pertinent physical therapy research will be criu- 
cally evaluated; development of premise for independent project of profes- 
sional significance. 2 hours seminar 
Pre-requisites: Math 115 or equivalent; PT 515. Fall 

612 Special Topics in Physical Therapy 1-3 credits 

This offering allows physical therapy students in their final semester, the 
opportunity for study in up to three professional specialty areas. Topics may 
vary from year to year depending on student interest and the availability of 
faculty with professional specialty expertise. Topics may include clinical 
specialties such as: sports physical therapy, geriatrics, or pediatrics; or role 
specialties such as administration, teaching, or community health. Indepen- 
dent study or practica for one topic may be arranged with permission of 
program faculty. 2 hours seminarAopic 
Pre-requisites: PT 619 and final semester standing. 
Co-requisites: PT 616. Spring 

614 Integrated Clinical Arts Seminar IV 3 credits 

A continuation of, and pre-supposes, PT 512. 
2 hours lecture, 2 hours seminar 
Pre-requisites: PT 5 1 2; PT 6 1 9; PT 62 1 . 
Co-requisites: PT 616; PT 690; PT 692. Spring 



59_ 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHYSICAL 616 Clinical Decision Making 2 credits 

THERAPY Discussion and application of models of clinical decision making based on 

(PT) physical therapy problems encountered in the clinical education experi- 

ences. Utilizing student generated case studies, problems will be analyzed 
in order to make sound clinical judgments related to the physical therapy 
diagnosis, scope of practice and expertise of the therapist. Clinical deci- 
sions to refer/not refer and treat/not treat will be made in preparation for 
practice with professional autonomy. 2 hours seminar 
Pre-requisites: PT 619. 
Co-requisites: PT 614. Spring 

619 Clinical Education II 6 credits 

A ten-week full-time clinical education experience in the fall semester of 
the third professional year (August-October). This experience will build 
upon Clinical Education I and incorporate the additional competencies 
attained in didactic and laboratory work. Students will continue to use 
problem solving strategies in direct patient care, under the guidance of PT 
clinical faculty. A variety of patient populations and problems will be 
provided to allow for full integration of professional knowledge and skills 
in total patient care. The students will be encouraged to reflect upon their 
knowledge and skills to identify problem area to be addressed in Clinical 
Education III. Further development of interpersonal skills, clinical decision 
making, self-assessment, proactive learning, and professional socialization 
is expected. 

Pre-requisite: Satisfactory completion of all professional courses to date. 
Fall 

621 Clinical Education III 6 credits 

A second ten-week experience immediately following Clinical Education II 
(October-December), which continues and presupposes such. This may 
occur at the same facility on a different rotation or in a different clinical 
setting. In this experience the student shall seek patient populations or 
problems with which they have limited exposure and/or lack mastery of 
entry-level skills. Students should also actively seek, where possible, 
opportunities in teaching, critical inquiry/research, administration/manage- 
ment, and quality assurance. Patient evaluation and intervention skills 
should be fine tuned. Additional emphasis placed upon addressing clinical 
decision making, goal setting/functional outcome measures, modification of 
intervention plans, and the role of physical therapy in a dynamic health care 
system. 
Fall 

690 Critical Inquiry 3 credits 

Application of the scientific method in reading and interpreting scientific 
literature and critical analysis of physical therapy theory, research, evalua- 
tion, and treatment. Students are required to complete a project of profes- 
sional significance through independent study. 
Prc-rcquisitcs: NSG 515, PT 715. 
Co-requisites: PT 692, 616, 614. Spring 

692 Critical Inquiry Seminar 1 credit 

Further discussion of critical analysis of physical therapy theory, research, 
evaluation, and treatment via case studies and published research; 
colloquium on faculty research and student projects. 2 hour seminar 
Pre-requisites: NSG 515, PT 715. 
Co-requisites: PT 690, 616, 614. Spring 



60 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

Board of Trustees 



Louis T. Alesi 

President, InterMetro Industries Corp. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Albert Bernt Anderson 
Interim President 
College Misericordia 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Robert Anderson (Retired) 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Monsignor John J. Bendik 
Pastor, Our Lady of the Snows 
Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania 

Virginia Bertschi, R.S.M. 

Principal, Our Lady of Mercy Academy 

Syosset, New York 

Frank Bevevino 

Chairman & Chief Executive Officer 

U.S. Food Service 

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Jack L. Burke 

President & Chief Executive Officer 
PA Millers Mutual Insurance Co. 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Helen Marie Burns, R.S.M. 
St. Joseph Convent 
Marion, Iowa 

Dr. Mary Ann Dillon, R.S.M. 
Assistant Profcsssor 
Saint Francis College 
Lorctto, Pennsylvania 

Ronald D. Ertley 

President, Ertley Motorworld 

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Judith Gardner-Price, Esq. 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 

Vivian Grcenbcrg 

President, Selling Strategics, Inc. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Anthony J. Grosck, Jr. 
President, Management Alliance 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 



Martha Hanlon, R.S.M. 
Member, Leadership Team 
Dallas Regional Community 
Sisters of Mercy 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 

James D. Harkins 
Chief Executive Officer 
Penn State Seed Company, Inc. 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Sarah Ellen Lenahan 

Vice President 

Mid- Atlantic Regional Headquarters 

Devereux Foundation 

Paoli, Pennsylvania 

James J. Manley 

Miller, Anderson and Sherrerd 

West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania 

Marilyn Maslow 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 

Maureen McCann, R.S.M. 
President, Dallas Regional Community 
Sisters of Mercy 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 

Monsignor Andrew J. McGowan 
Bishop's Representative for 

Catholic Institutions of Higher 

Learning 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Trustee Emeritus 

John C. Mctz 
Chairman and President 
Mctz Enterprises 
Dallas, Pennsylvania 

John L. Nespoli 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Mercy Health System 

Northeast Region 

Scranton, Pennsylvania 

ConncllJ.O'Donncll 
President/Owner 
Premium Brands 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 



The Honorable Peter Paul Olszewski 
The Superior Court of Pennsylvania 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

John M. Randolph, Jr. 
Parente, Randolph, Orlando, 

Carey & Associates 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
Trustee Emeritus 

Kathleen Dorris Reese 
Nanticoke, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Carol Ritmer, R.S.M. 
Absecon, New Jersey 

Harold Rosenn, Esq. 
Roscnn, Jenkins, and Greenwald 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
Trustee Emeritus 

Rosemary A. Sigmond 

Vice President, Coon Industries 

Luzerne, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Deborah Smith-Milcski 
School Psychologist 
Wilkes-Barre Area School District 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Margaret Spenglcr, '36 
Arlington, Massachusetts 

Judith Spitalc 
Patient Care Coordinator 
Hospice Community Care, Inc. 
Kingston, Pennsylvania 

Mary Beth Sullivan 

Vice President of Sales, Smith Barney 

New York, New York 

Murray Ufbcrg, Esq. 

Roscnn, Jenkins, and Greenwald 

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Thomas vanArsdalc 
President & Chief Executive Officer 
Franklin First Savings Bank 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 



61 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

Administration 



Interim President 

Albert B. Anderson, B.A., M.Div., M.A., Ph.D. 

Academic Dean 

Mary Glennon, R.S.M., B.A., M.A., Ed.D. 

Director of Graduate Programs and Assistant Academic Dean 

Linda S. Trompetter, B.A., M.T.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Division Chairs 

Division of Health Sciences: 

Helen Streubert, B.S., M.S.N., Ed.D. 

Division of Humanities: 

David Payne, B.S., M.A. 

Division of Mathematical and Natural Sciences: 
Frank DiPino, B.A., Ph.D. 

Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business: 

Michael Speziale, B.S., M.S., Ed.D. 

Dean of Financial and Administrative Affairs 

John Risboskin, B.A., B.S., C.P.A. 

Dean of Institutional Advancement 

Frank H. Oliver, B.A., M.S. 

Dean of Students 

Jean Messaros, R.S.M., B.S., M.S. 

Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

Jane Dessoye, B.A., M.S. 

Director of Library Services 

Mary Sharon Gallagher, R.S.M., B.A., M.S.L.S. 

Director of Continuing Education 
Thomas J. O'Neill, B.S., M.A. 

Registrar 

Edward Lahart, B.S., M.S. 



62 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

Graduate Program Faculty 



Katherine Kaby Anselmi, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.A. Wilkes College; B.S.M. Wilkes Univer- 
sity; M.S.N. University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania. 

Annette Calderone, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S.N. Hunter College-Bellevue School of Nursing, 
C.U.N.Y.; M.S.N. College Misericordia; D.N.Sc. Widcner University. 

Jean R. Bohlander, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S.N. Ed. Wilkes College; M.S.N. College 
Misericordia 

Christina Charnitski, Assistant Professor, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, B.S. College 
Misericordia; M.S. Marywood; M.A.T. Marywood; M.S. College Misericordia 

Joseph A. Cipriani, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.A. Wilkes College, B.S. College Misericordia; 
M.A. Wichita State University. 

Jeanne W. Friedrichs, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. New York University; M. S. University of 
Scran ton. 

Ruth Ann Fulton, Associate Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S.N. Bloomsburg University; M.S. Pennsylvania 
State University; D.N.Sc. Widener University. 

Christine L. Hischmann, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. Temple University; M.S. Temple 
University. 

John L. Kachurick, Associate Professor, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, B.A. King's College; 
M.B.A. Wilkes College; D.B.A. Nova University. 

Martha Ann Kokinda, Associate Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S.N. Ed. College Misericordia; M.S.N. Catholic 
University of America; Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania. 

Kathryn Monica Kruger, Assistant Professor, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, B.S. East 
Stroudsburg University; M.Ed. Lehigh University. 

Charles A. Lajeunesse, Professor, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, B.S. University of Missouri; 
M.Ed. University of Missouri; Ph.D. University of Missouri. 

Lisa Sunday Lefkowitz, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. College Misericordia; M.S. College 
Misericordia 

Patricia J. Lewis, Associate Professor, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, B.S. Wilkes College; 
M.S.W. Marywood College; D.S.W. Hunter College, City University of New York. 

Roberta II. Mawdsley, Associate Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. Springfield College; PT Cert. US Army Field 
Services School; M.Ed. Boston College; Ed.D. Boston University. 

Patricia Marie McCann, R.S.M., Associate Professor, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, B.S. 
College Misericordia; M.S. University of Scranlon; Ed.D. Lehigh University 

Jennifer McCarthy, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, B.S. St. Bonavcnlurc University; M.S. 
University of Scranton. 

Fran Grogan McClynn, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S.N. University of Pittsburgh; M.S. SUNY; 
C.R.N.P. SUNY. 



63 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

Graduate Program Faculty 



Mary Theresa McGuire, R.S.M., Assistant Professor, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, B.A. 
College Misericordia; M.S. Temple University. 

Ellen McLaughlin, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. College Misericordia; M.S. College Misericordia. 

Scott D. McPhee, Associate Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.A. University of Washington; B.S. University of 
Puget Sound; M.S. Medical College of Virginia; M.P.A. Western Kentucky University; Dr.P.H. University of Texas Health 
Science Center - Houston. 

Cecelia Meighan, R.SJVL, Assistant Professor, Division of Humanities, B.A. College Misericordia; M.A. University of 
Scranton; Ed.D. Teachers College, Columbia University; J.D. Georgetown University Law Center. 

Michael L. Moran, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. SUNY Stony Brook; M.S. University of 
Scranton; D.Sc. Nova University. 

Kathleen M. Nolan, Professor, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, B.S. D'Youville College; M. A. 
George Washington University; Ph.D. St. Louis University. 

Mary Ann Notarianni, Associate Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B. S. Georgetown University; M.S. University of 
Pennsylvania; D.N.Sc. Widcner University. 

Amy M. Pastva, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. University of Scranton; M.A. Columbia University. 

David G. Patrick, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. University of Pennsylvania; M.S. Temple 
University; CPO Northwestern University. 

John J. Ready, Assistant Professor, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, A.A. Boston University; 
M.B.A. Fairleigh Dickinson University. 

David Rice, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, B.A. Boston College; M.A. Yale University; Ph.D. 
Yale University; C.A.S. University of Wisconsin, Madison; C.A.S. Harvard University. 

Joseph Rogan, Professor, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, B.A. Kutztown University; M.A. 
Marywood College; Ed.D. Lehigh University. 

Lalit J. Shah, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. University of Bombay; M.S. College Misericordia 

Sheri P. Silfies, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. University of Scranton; M.S. Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Sinclair A. Smith, Instructor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; M.S. 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. 

Michael J. Speziale, Associate Professor, Division of Behavioral Science, Education, and Business, B.A. Kings College; 
M.S. Wilkes College; Ed.D. Lehigh University. 

Helen J. Streubert, Associate Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S.N. Cedar Crest College; M.S.N. Villanova 
University; Ed.D. Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Thomas Swartwood, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.A. University of Pennsylvania; B.S. College 
Misericordia; M.S. College Misericordia. 

Linda Trompetter, Associate Professor, Division of Humanities, B.A. Pennsylvania State University; M.T.S. Harvard 
University; M.A. University of Massachusetts-Amherst; Ph.D. University of Massachusetts- Amherst. 



M 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

Graduate Program Faculty 



Beth Velde, Associate Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. University of Illinois; M.S. University of Illinois; Ph.D. 
University of Calgary. 

Louise S. Ward, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. Russell Sage College; M.S. University of Pennsyl- 
vania; C.F.N.P. University of Pennsylvania. 

Catherine Perry Wilkinson, Professor, Division of Health Sciences, B.S. University of Connecticut; M.A. New York 
University; Ed.D. Boston University. 



Adjunct Faculty 

Michelle Ciofalo. A.A.S. Lehigh County Community College; B.S. Dominican College; M.Ed. College Misericordia. 

Dana Charles Clark. B.S.Ed. Wilkes College; M.Ph. Marywood College; M.S.N. College Misericordia; Ed.D. Teachers 
College, Columbia University. 

William Crossin. B.A. King's College; M.P.A. Pennsylvania State University. 

Anthony DeCarli. B.S. St. John's University; M.S. University of Scranton; Ed.D. Nova University. 

Grace S. Fischer. B.A. Wilkes College, M.S. College Misericordia. 

Robert A. Fumanti. B.A. West Chester State College; M.A. Columbia University; Ed.D. Nova University. 

Robert Gable. B.S. Kutztown State College; M.S. Marywood College; Ed.S. George Peabody College/Vanderbilt 
University; Ph.D. George Peabody College/Vanderbilt University. 

Michael Garzella. B.A. Kings College; M.S. Marywood College; Ed.D. Lehigh University. 

Allan Glatthorn. B.A. Temple University; M.S. Temple University; Ed.D. Temple University. 

Bernard F. Grabowski. B.S. Temple University; M.S. Temple University; Ph.D. University of Maryland. 

August Grant. B.S. East Stroudsburg University; M.S. University of Scranton; Ed.D. Nova University. 

Alberta Griffiths. B.A. Alvernia College; M.A. Marywood College; Ed.D. Lehigh University. 

Gretchen McFarland. B.A. Clarion University of Pennsylvania; M.S. Youngstown State University. 

John Mashinski. B.A. Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed.D. Lehigh University. 

Rita Mundy. B.A. College Misericordia; M.Ed. Lehigh University. 

Diana Pope. B.S. University of Vermont; M.S. Temple University. 

Patricia Preston. B. S. College Misericordia; M.S. Marywood College. 

William Price. B.S. Bloomsburg University; M.S. University of Scranton; Ph.D. Kent State University. 

Barry Simmons. B.S. Bloomsburg University; M.P.A. Marywood College. 

.John Wega. A.B. Kings College; M.S. University of Scranton. 



65 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



66 



1995 - 1996 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

with Administrative Dates 



Fall Semester 1995 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Sat.-Sun. 

Monday 



August 23 
August 24 
August 25 
August 26-27 
August 28 



Monday 


September 4 


Tuesday 


September 5 


Wednesday 


September 6 


Wednesday 


September 27 


Wednesday 


October 4 


Mon.-Tues. 


October 9-10 


Wednesday 


October 1 1 


Mon.-Fri. 


October 16-20 


Monday 


October 23 


Mon.-Fri. 


Oct. 30-Nov. 3 


Mon.-Mon. 


November 6-13 


Wed.-Sun. 


November 22-26 


Monday 


November 27 


Friday 


December 8 


Sat.-Sun. 


December 9-10 


Mon.-Sat. 


December 11-16 


Monday 


December 18 



Orientation for New Faculty 

Opening Faculty Meeting/Division Chairs Meeting 

Division Meetings/Last Day to Remove Summer Incompletes 

New Student Orientation 

First Day of Semester for All Students 

8 AM Class will be held; Opening Mass: 9-10:30 AM; 

10:30-11:20-9 AM Class; 11:30-12:20- 10 AM Class 

12:30-1:20 - Class; 1:30-2:20 - Class; 

2:30-3:15 - President's Convocation; 

3:30-4:30 - President's Reception; 

Evening Classes will be held 

Labor Day; No Day or Evening Classes 

Classes Resume 8:00 a.m. 

Add Period Ends 4:00 p.m. 

Drop Period Ends/End of Refunds 

Last Day to Withdraw from 
Courses Without Academic Penalty 

Fall Recess 

Gasses Resume Today 8:00 a.m. 

Mid-Term Week 

Mid-Term Grades Due to Registrar By 8:30 a.m. 

Advisement Week; Classes will be held 

Pre-Registration for Spring Semester 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Classes Resume 8:00 a.m. 

Last Day of Classes 

Study Days 

Final Examinations 

Grades Due to Registrar by 8:30 a.m. 



67 



1995 - 1996 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

with Administrative Dates 



Spring Semester 1996 

Monday 



January 15 



Monday 


January 22 


Friday 


January 26 


Monday 


February 12 


Friday 


February 16 


Mon.-Fri. 


February 26-Mar. 1 


Monday 


March 4 


Mon.-Fri. 


March 4-8 


Monday 


March 1 1 


Mon. - Fri. 


March 25-29 


Wed.-Tues. 


April 3-9 


Wednesday 


April 10 


Wed.-Wed. 


April 10-17 


Friday 


May 3 


Sat.-Sun. 


May 4-5 


Mon.-Sat. 


May 6- 11 


Monday 


May 13 


Saturday 


May 18 



First Day of Classes for All Students 

8 AM Class; Opening Mass: 9 - 10:30; 

10:30-11:20 -9 AM Class; 11:30- 12:20- 10 AM Class; 

12:30-1:20 - Class; 1:30-2:20 - Class; 

2:30-3:15 - President's Convocation 

3:30-4:30 - President's Reception 

Evening Classes will be held 

Add Period Ends 4:00 p.m. 

Last Day to Remove Incompletes 

Drop Period Ends 4:00 p.m./End of Refunds 

Last Day to Withdraw from Courses 
Without Academic Penalty 

Mid-Term Week 

Mid-Term Grades Due to Registrar by 8:30 a.m. 

Spring Break 

Classes Resume Today 8:00 a.m. 

Advisement Week; Classes will be held 

Easter Recess; No Day or Evening Classes 

Classes Resume Today 8:00 a.m. 

Pre-Registration for Fall Semester 

Last Day of Classes 

Study Weekend 

Final Examinations 

Final Grades Due to Registrar by 8:30 a.m. 

Baccalaureate and Commencement 



_68 

INDEX 



Academic Calendar 66 

Academic Integrity 5 

Accreditation 5 

Administration 61 

Admissions Information 6 

General 6 

Specific 6 

Education 6 

Nursing 7 

Nursing/Organizational Management: Dual Degree 7 

Occupational Therapy Entry Level 8 

Organizational Management 9 

Physical Therapy 9 

Application for Graduate Degree 10 

Auditing 10 

Board of Trustees 60 

Catalog Policy Statement 3 

Change of Address 10 

College Directory 60 

Contacts 2 

Course Descriptions 41 

Education 41 

Nursing 46 

Occupational Therapy Entry Level 52 

Organizational Management 54 

Physical Therapy 57 

Course Withdrawal and Refund Policies 10 

Faculty 62 

Financial Aid 11 

Grading System 13 

Graduation Requirements 14 

Graduate Philosophy 5 

Graduate Program Descriptions 17 

Education 17 

Nursing 22 

Occupational Therapy 31 

Organizational Management 35 

Physical Therapy 38 

Graduate Program Policies and Procedures 6 

Grievance Procedures 14 

Incomplete Grades 13 

Maintenance of Matriculation and Leave of Absence 15 

Non-Matriculation Status 15 

Program Advisement 15 

Program Retention 15 

Program Withdrawal 16 

Readmission 16 

Students with Disabilities 13 

Transcripts 16 

Transfer of Credit 16 

Tuition and Fees 16 



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VS. Postage 

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Dallas, PA 





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College Misericordia 

301 Lake Street 
Dallas, PA 18612-1098 
(717)674-6400 



Founded and Sponsored by 
the Sisters of Mercy of Dallas