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Full text of "The Graduate catalog"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/graduatecatalog1976univ 



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\ 





College Park 
Publications Office 



1976/1977 
Graduate Catalog 

University of Maryland 
at College Park 



Contents 



THE UNIVERSITY 

Plan of Academic Organizatlcn/1 

Academic Calendar/2 

University Otficers/3 

Graduate School Officers and Staff/4 

Graduate Council and Committees/4.5 

University of fvlaryland Campuses/6 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Introduction/7 

Special Researcti Resources/7 

Consortia/8 

Graduate Programs/9 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 

General/9 

Graduate Record Examinations/10 

Graduate l^anagement Admissions Test/10 

The Miller Analogies Test/10 

Financial Aid/10 

Fellowships/10 

Assistantships/10 

Student Loans/10 

Categories of Admission/10 

Admission to Degree Programs/10 

Admission Time Limits/11 

Change of Objective, Termination of 

Admission/11 
Application lnstructlons/11 
Transcripts/11 

Records' Maintenance and Disposition/12 
Offer of Admission/12 

Graduate Credit for Senior Undergraduates/12 
Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Level 

Courses/12 

ADVISING AND REGISTRATION 

Course Numbering System/13 
Designation of Full and Part-Time Graduate 

Students/13 
Minimum Registration Requirements/13 
Grades for Graduate Students/13 
Credit-by-Examinatlon/13 
Transfer of Credit/13 
The Inter-Campus Student/14 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Graduate Fees/14 

Determination of In-State Status for Admission, 
Tuition and Charge-Differential Purposes/14 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to 

all Master's Degrees/14 
Thesis Option/14 
Non-Thesis Option/15 
Requirements for Degree of Master of 

Education/15 
Graduate School Requirements Applicable to 

all Doctoral Degrees/15 

COMMENCEMENT/16 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 
PUBLICATIONS/17 

ACCESS TO AND RELEASE OF 
STUDENT DATA/ 
INFORMATION/17 

UNIVERSITY POLICY 
STATEMENT/18 

TITLE IX COMPLIANCE POLICY/ 
18 

THE GRADUATE FACULTY/19 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Administration, Supervision and Curriculum 

Program/35 
Aerospace Engineering Program/36 
Agricultural and Extension Education 

Program/38 
Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Program/39 
Agricultural Engineering Program/40 
Agronomy Program/41 
American Studies Program/42 
Animal Sciences Program/43 
Applied Mathematics Program/45 
Art Program/46 
Astronomy Program/48 
Botany Program/49 

Business and Management Program/51 
Chemical Engineering Program/56 
Chemical Physics Program/57 
Chemistry Program/58 
Civil Engineering Program/60 
Comparative Literature Program/63 
Computer Science Program/63 
Counseling and Personnel Services Program/ 

65 
Criminal Justice and Criminology Program/67 
Early Childhood-Elementary Education 

Program/68 
Economics Program/70 
Electrical Engineering Program/73 
Engineering Materials Program/77 
English Language and Literature Program/78 
Entomology Program/79 
Family and Community Development Program/ 

80 
Food, Nutrition, and Institution Administration 

Program/82 
Food Science Program/83 
French and Italian Languages and Literatures 

Program/84 
Geography Program/85 
German and Slavic Languages and Literatures 

Program/88 
Government and Politics Program/90 
Health Education Program/92 
Hearing and Speech Sciences Program/93 
History Program/94 
Horticulture Program/98 



Human Development Education Program 

(Institute for Child Study)/99 
Industrial Education Program/102 
Journalism Program/103 
Library and Information Services Program/104 
Mathematics Program/106 
Measurement and Statistics Program/110 
Mechanical Engineering Program/111 
Meteorology Program/114 
Microbiology Program/116 
Music Program/117 
Nuclear Engineering Program/120 
Nutritional Sciences Program/121 
Philosophy Program/122 
Physical Education Program/123 
Physics Program/125 
Poultry Science Program/128 
Recreation Program/131 
Secondary Education Program/132 
Social Foundations of Education Program/134 
Sociology Program/135 
Spanish and Portuguese Languages and 

Literatures Program/138 
Special Education Program/139 
Speech and Dramatic Art Program/141 
Textiles and Consumer Economics Program/ 

143 
Urban Studies Program/145 
Zoology Program/146 

ADDITIONAL GRADUATE LEVEL 
COURSE OFFERINGS 

Afro-American Studies Courses/149 

Applied Design Courses/149 

Agriculture Courses/149 

Anthropology Courses/149 

Architecture Courses/150 

Chinese Courses/151 

Crafts Courses/151 

Dance Courses/151 

Engineering Cooperative Education Courses/ 

151 
Engineering Science Courses/151 
Engineering Technology Fire Service Courses/ 

152 
Fire Protection Engineering Courses/152 
Foreign Language Courses/152 
Geology Courses/152 
Greek Courses/153 
Hebrew Courses/153 
Human and Community Resources Courses/ 

153 
Information Systems Management Courses/ 

153 
Japanese Courses/154 
Latin Courses/154 

ACADEMIC RESOURCES MAP/ 
155 

INDEX/ 157 



STUDENT SERVICES 

Housing/16 

Food Services/16 

Health Service/16 

Career Development Center/16 

Counseling Center/17 



The University 

Plan of Academic 
Organization 

Division of Agricultural and Life 
Sciences: 

College of Agriculture; 
Agricultural and Extension Education 
Agricultural and Resource Economics 
Agricultural Engineering 
Agronomy 
Animal Science 
Dairy Science 
Horticulture 

institute of Applied Agriculture 
Poultry Science 
Veterinary Science 

Ottier Units wittiin the Division: 
Botany 
Cfiemistry 
Entomology 
Geology 
Microbiology 
Zoology 

Division of Arts and Humanities: 

Scticol of Arcfiitecture 

College of Journalism 

Ottier Units within the Division: 
American Studies Program 
Art 

Classics 
Dance 
English 



French and Italian 

Germanic and Slavic 

History 

Music 

Oriental and Hebrew Program 

Philosophy 

Spanish and Portuguese 

Speech and Dramatic Art 

Division of Behavioral and Social 
Sciences: 

College of Business and Management 

Other Units within the Division: 
Afro-American Studies 
Anthropology 

Bureau of Business and Economic Research 
Bureau of Governmental Research 
Economics 
Geography 

Government and Politics 
Hearing and Speech Sciences 
Information Systems Management 
Institute for Urban Studies 
Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology 
Linguistics Program 
Psychology 
Sociology 

Division of Human and Communi- 
ty Resources: 

College of Education: 
Administration Supervision and Curriculum 

Counseling and Personnel Services 
Early Childhood Elementary Education 
Industrial Education 



Institute for Child Study 
Measurement & Statistics 
Secondary Education 
Special Education 

College of Human Ecology 
Family and Community Development 
Foods, Nutrition and Institution Administration 
Housing and Applied Design 
Textiles and Consumer Economics 

College of Library and Information Services 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health: 
Health Education 
Physical Education 
Recreation 

Division of Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences and Engineer- 
ing: 

College of Engineering: 
Aero-Space Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
Civil Engineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Fire Protection Curriculum 
Mechanical Engineering 

Other Units within the Division: 
Applied Mathematics Program 
Center for Materials Research 
Computer Science 

Institute for Fluid Dynamics & Applied Mathe- 
matics 
Meteorology Program 
Institute for Molecular Physics 
Mathematics 
Physics and Astronomy 



The University / 1 



Academic Calendar 



Fall Semester, 1976 

August 23. 24 

Monday-Tuesday 

Registration 

August 25 
Wednesday 
Classes begin 

August 30-September 8 
Monday-Wednesday 
Late Registration 

September 6 

Monday 

Holiday, Labor Day 

September 8 

Wednesday 

End of Schedule Adjustment Period 

November 2 

Tuesday 

Last day to drop a course 

November 25-28 
Thursday-Sunday 
Thanksgiving Recess 

December 8 
Wednesday 
Last day of classes 

December 9 
Thursday 
Exam study day 

December 10-17 
Friday-Friday 
Final exam period 

December 17 

Friday 

Commencement, 2:00 p.m. 



Spring Semester, 1977 

January 10, 11 

Monday-Tuesday 

Registration 

January 12 
Wednesday 
Classes begin 

January 17-25 
Monday-Tuesday 
Late Registration 

January 25 

Tuesday 

End of Schedule Adjustment Period 

March 21-27 
Monday-Sunday 
Spring Recess 

March 29 
Tuesday 
Last day to drop a course 

May 4 

Wednesday 

Last day of classes 

May 5 
Thursday 
Exam study day 

May 6-13 
Friday-Friday 
Final exam period 

May 14 

Saturday 

Commencement. 10:00 a.m. 



Fall Semester, 1977 

August 22, 23 

Monday-Tuesday 

Registration 

August 24 
Wednesday 
Classes begin 

August 29 - Sept. 7 
Monday-Wednesday 
Late Registration 

September 5 

Monday 

Holiday, Labor Day 

September 7 

Wednesday 

End of Schedule Adjustment Period 

November 1 

Tuesday 

Last day to drop a course 

November 23-27 
Wednesday-Sunday 
Thanksgiving Recess 

December 9 

Friday 

Last Day of Classes 

December 10, 11 
Saturday-Sunday 
Examination study days 

December 12-19 
Monday-Monday 
Final examination period 

December 19 
Monday, 7:30 p.m. 
Commencement 



Summer Session, 1977 



Session I 

May 23 
Monday 
Registration 

May 24 
Tuesday 
Classes begin 

May 30 
Monday 
Holiday, Memorial Day 

July 1 
Friday 
Term ends 



Session II 

July 4 

Monday 

Holiday. Independence Day 

Julys 

Tuesday 

Registration 

July 6 
Wednesday 
Classes begin 

August 12 
Friday 
Term ends 



2 / The University 



University Officers 
Board of Regents 

As of July 1. 1976 

Mrs. Mary H. Broadwater 

Dr. B. Herbert Brown 

Mr. Percy M. Chaimson 

Mr. Ralph W. Frey 

Mr, Barry M. Goldman 

The Honorable Young D. Nance, ex officio 

Dr. Samuel H. Hoover 

Mr. Edward V. Hurley 

Mr. Hugh A. McMullen 

Mr. Gerard F. Miles 

Mr. A. Paul Moss 

Mr. Peter F. O'Malley 

Mr. John C. Scarbath 

The Honorable Joseph D. Tydings 

Mr. N. Thomas Whittington, Jr. 

Central Administration 
of the University 

President 
Wilson H Elkins 

Vice President for General Administration 
Donald W. O'Connell 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 
R. Lee Hornbake 

Vice President for Graduate Studies and 

Research 

Michael J, Pelczar, Jr. 

Vice President for Agricultural Affairs and 

Legislative Relations 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr. 

Vice President for Development 

Robert Smith 



College Park Campus 
Administration 

Chancellor 

Robert L, Gluckstern 

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs (Acting) 

David S. Sparks 

Vice Chancellor for Academic Planning and 

Policy 

Thomas B, Day 

Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs 
John W. Dorsey 

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 
William L. Thomas, Jr. 

Provosts at College 
Park 

Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences 
Francis C, Stark 

Division of Arts and Humanities 
Robert A. Corrigan 

Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences 
Dudley Dillard (Acting) 

Division of Human and Community Resources 
George J. Funaro 

Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences 
and Engineering 
Joseph M. Marchello 



Deans at College Park 

School of Architecture 
John W, Hill 

College of Agriculture 
Gordon M. Cairns 

College of Business and Management 
Rudolph P. Lamone 

College of Education 
Gerthon H. Morgan 

College of Engineering 
Robert B. Beckmann 
College of Human Ecology 
John R. Beaton 

College of Journalism 
Ray E. Hiebert 

College of Library and Information Services 
Acting Dean: Henry J. Dubester 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and 

Health 

Marvin H. Eyier 

Administrative Dean for Graduate Studies 
(Acting) Robert E. Menzer 

Administrative Dean for Summer Programs 
Melvin N, Bernstein 

Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies 
Robert E. Shoenberg 

Administrative Dean of Academic Services and 

Facilities 

Vacant 



The University / 3 



Graduate School 
Officers and Staff 

Acting Dean for Graduate 
Studies 

Robert E. Menzer, B.S . University of 
Pennsylvania, 1960; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1962; Pfi.D., University of Wisconsin, 1964. 

Assistant Dean for Graduate 
Studies 

Arcfiie L. Buttkins, B.S., Jackson State University, 
1956; M.A., 1961; Ed.D., Columbia University, 
1963. 

Director of Graduate Records 

Carl L. Seidel. B.S., University of Maryland, 1963, 

Assistant to the Dean 

Alice M. Piper, B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 
1941. 

Assistant Director 

Lois M. Lyon, B.A,, University of Michigan, 1952. 

Graduate Council 

Ex-officio Councillors 

Chancellor, Robert L. Gluckstern 
Acting Vice Chancellor, David S. Sparks 
Acting Dean, Robert E. Menzer 

Appointed Councillors 

Prof, Rita R. Colw/ell, Microbiology 
Prof. Albert Gomezplafa, Chemical Engineering 
Prof. John A. Haslem, Business and Management 
Prof. Marie Davidson, Institute for Child Study 
Prof. John Duffy, History 

Elected Councillors 

Prof. Allen Steinhauer, Entomology 

Prof. Mark Keeney. Biochemistry 

Prof. Francis Stark, Horticulture 

Mr. David Abercrombie, Biochemistry 

Prof. Manoj Banerjee, Physics 

Prof. David Matthews, Fluid Dynamics and Ap- 
plied Mathematics 

Prof. Paul J. Smith, Mathematics 

Mr. James Beall, Physics 

Prof. Walter Deshler, Geography 

Prof. Irwin Goldstein, Psychology 

Prof. Edward Dager, Sociology 

Mr. Michael Courlander, Criminal Justice and 
Criminology 

Prof. Beatric Fink, French and Italian 

Prof. John Russell, English 

Prof Roger Meersman, Speech and Dramatic Art 

Mr. Ken Baskin, English 

Prof. David Williams, Early Childhood- 
Elementary Education 

Prof. Rachel Dardis, Textiles and Consumer Eco- 
nomics 

Prof. George Marx, Counseling and Personnel 
Services 

Mr. Gregory Nenstlel, Social Foundations of Edu- 
cation 

4 / The University 



Committees of the 
Graduate Council 

COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC 
STANDARDS 

Prof. Beatrice C. Fink, Chairman, French & Italian, 

1977 
Prof. Irwin L. Goldstein. Psychology, 1978 
Prof. Marshall L. Ginter, Molecular Physics, 1978 
Prof. James B. Lynch, Art, 1976 
Prof. Mancur L. Olson, Economics, 1977 
Prof. Marie B. Perinbam, History, 1978 
Prof. Cyril Ponnamperuma, Chemistry, 1978 
Prof. William D. Schafer, Measurement & 

Statistics, 1977 
Prof. Francis C. Stark, Horticulture, 1977 
Prof. Leonard S, Taylor, Electrical Engineering, 

1976 
Prof. Rita R. Colwell, Microbiology, 1978 
Mr. Ken Baskin. Graduate Student, English, 1977 
Mr. Gregory Nenstiel, Graduate Student, Social 

Foundations, 1976 
Dr. Robert E. Menzer, ex ofiicio 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Prof. Paul J. Smith, Chairman, Mathematics, 1977 
Prof. Esther K. Birdsall. English, 1978 
Prof. Antonio F. Chaves, Geography, 1978 
Prof. Burris, F. Husman, Physical Education, 1977 
Prof. Morris L. McClure, Admin., Super., & Curr., 

1976 
Prof, Paul A. Meyer, Economics, 1978 
Prof. James R. Miller, Agronomy, 1977 
Prof. Charles W. Reynolds, Horticulture, 1978 
Prof. W. E. Schlaretzki, Philosophy, 1976 
Prof. Elske V. P. Smith, Astronomy, 1976 
Mr. Gerald Lordan, Graduate Student, Elementary 

Education 1977 
Ms. Kathleen Alligood, Graduate Student, 

Mathematics, 1976 
Mr. Carl L. Seidel, ex ofiicio 

COMMITTEE ON ELECTIONS 

Prof. Roger Meersman, Chairman, Speech & 

Dramatic Arts, 1977 
Prof, Kenneth Fulton, Agricultural Engineering, 

1976 
Prof. Janet G, Hunt, Sociology, 1976 
Prof. Henry A. Lepper, Jr.. Civil Engineering, 1978 
Prof. Leda Wilson, Family & Comm. Dev., 1977 
Mrs. Alice M. Piper, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON FELLOWSHIPS 

Prof. Edward Z. Dager, Chairman, Sociology, 1978 
Prof. Marie S. Davidson, Inst for Child Study, 

1978 
Prof. C, Rose Broome. Botany, 1978 
Prof. Marilyn G. Church, Elementary Education, 

1977 
Prof. Douglas J. Farquhar. Art, 1978 
Prof. Albert Gomezplata, Chemical Engineering, 

1977 
Prof. David C. Lay, Mathematics, 1976 
Prof. Philip Rovner, Spanish and Portuguese, 

1976 
Prof. Joseph H, Scares, Poultry, 1977 
Prof. Walter W. Deshler, Geography, 1977 
Mr. Dewey Covington, Graduate Student, 

Government & Politics, 1977 
Mr. Hugh Mose, Graduate Student. Civil 

Engineering, 1976 
Dr. Archie L. Buffkins, ex officio 



COMMITTEE ON PROGRAM 
REVIEW 

Prof. Clifford L. Sayre, Chairman, Mechanical 

Engineering, 1977 
Prof. Nancy Anderson, Psychology, 1976 
Prof. Marjorie H. Gardner, Science Education, 

1978 
Prof. Jacob K. Goldhaber, Mathematics, 1977 
Prof, Wesley L. Harris, Agricultural Engineering, 

1976 
Prof. Ramon E. Henkel, Sociology, 1978 
Prof, Myron 0. Lounsbury, American Studies, 

1978 
Prof. Robert J. Munn, Chemistry, 1977 
Prof. Betty F. Smith, Textiles & Consumer 

Economics, 1976 
Ms. Nancy Strunah, Graduate Student, Physical 

Education, 1977 
Ms. Burdeile Boyd, Graduate Student, Spanish & 

Portuguese, 1976' 
Dr. Robert E. Menzer, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE 
FACULTY 

Prof. Hayes A. Newby, Chairman, Hearing & 

Speech Science, 1977 
Prof. J- Robert Anderson, Physics, 1977 
Prof, Louise M. Berman, Adm. Supervisor & 

Curriculum, 1978 
Prof, William E. Bickley, Entomology, 1977 
Prof. Sherod M. Cooper, Jr., English, 1978 
Prof. Gertrude S. Fish, Housing & Applied Design, 

1977 
Prof. James E. Grunig, Journalism, 1976 
Prof. Chester C. Holmlund, Chemistry, 1977 
Prof. Anne G. Ingram, Physical Education, 1976 
Prof. William MacBain, French & Italian, 1976 
Prof. Jack Minker, Computer Science, 1978 
Dr. Robert E. Menzer, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS 
AND COURSES 

Prof. Bruce R. Fretz, Chairman, Psychology, 1977 

Prof. Richard H. Austing, Computer Science, 1977 

Prof. Howard H. Brinkley, Zoology, 1976 

Prof, Patricia Florestano, Urban Studies, 1978 

Prof. Mark Keeney, Chemistry, 1977 

Prof, James W. Longest, Agri. & Ext. Education, 

1976 
Prof. Leonard I. Lutwack, English, 1978 
Prof. George L. Marx, Couns, & Personnel Ser, 

1977 
Prof Don C. Piper, Government & Politics, 1978 
Prof. George A. Snow, Physics, 1976 
Prof. E. Robert Stephens, Admin,, Sup., & Curr., 

1976 
Prof. James M. Stewart, Chemistry, 1978 
Prof. Eugene W. Troth, Music, 1978 
Mr. Eugene Owen, Graduate Student, Agri. & Ext. 

Education, 1977 
Ms. Elena Coliceili, Graduate Student, Chemistry, 

1976 
Dr. Robert E. Menzer, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS 

Prof. Allan V. Bandel, Agronomy, 1976 

Prof. Kenneth C W. Kammeyer, Sociology, 1978 

Prof. George Levitine, Art, 1977 

Prof. Allen L. Steinhauer, Entomology, 1978 

Mr. Gerald Day, Graduate Student, Industrial 

Education, 1977 
Ms. Halaine Gary, Library Science, 1976 
Mrs. Alice M. Piper, ex officio 



COMMITTEE ON RESEARCH 



COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE 



Prof. John 0. Corliss, Chairman, Zoology. 1976 
Prof. Roger Bell. Astronomy. 1977 
Prof. Dudley Dillard. Economics. 1978 
Prof. James W, Dally. Mechanical Engineering. 

1976 
Prof. Douglas D. Davis. Chemistry. 1976 
Prof. Regma M. Goff. Elementary Education. 1977 
Prof. Richard B. Imberski. Zoology. 1978 
Prof. Mano] K, Banerjee. Physics. 1978 
Prof. Wilhelmina F, Jashemski. History. 1976 
Prof. Peter P. Legins. Inst, of Criminal Justice6& 

Criminology, 1977 
Prof. Henry Mendeloff. Spanish & Portuguese. 

1977 
Prof. John R. Moore, Agri. & Resource Econ. 1978 
Prof. Robert M. Steinman. Psychology, 1977 
Prof. Richard C Vitzthum, English. 1976 
Mr. Russel Tobias. Graduate Student. Physics, 

1977 
Ms. Maureen McCall. Graduate Student, 

Psychology. 1976 
Dr. Robert E. Menzer. ex officio 



Prof. Charles R. Curtis, Botany, Chairman, 1978 

Prof. Alan W. DeSilva, Physics, 1978 

Prof. John D. Russell. English. 1978 

Prof. David L. Williams. Early Childhood-Elem. 

Ed., 1978 
Prof. Agnes 8. Hatfield. Institute for Child Study, 

1977 
Prof. Robert K. Hirzel, Sociology, 1977 
Prof. Henry A. Lepper. Civil Engineering. 1976 
Prof. Stephen E. Loeb. Business & Management, 

1976 
Prof. Guenter G. Pfister, Germanic & Slavic, 1978 
Ms. Jeanette Esser, Graduate Student, Zoology, 

1976 
Dr. Archie L. Buftkins, ex officio 



The University / 5 



University of Maryland 
Campuses— 

Information concernmg graduate programs 
offered on University of Maryland campuses otfier 
than College Park may be obtained by writing 
directly to or calling the appropriate officers for 
graduate study. 



Baltimore City 

Programs available: 

School of Dentistry: 
Anatomy 
Biochemistry 
li^lcrobiology 
Oral Pathology 
Oral Surgery 
Phslology 

School of Ivledicine; 
Anatomy 

Biological Chemistry 
Biophysics 
Clinical Pathology 

Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 
Ivlicrobiology 

Pathology, IVIedical Pathology, Legal Medicine 
Pathology, Legal Medicine Pathology. 

Physiology 

School of Nursing 



School of Pharmacy: 

Medicinal Chemistry 

Pharmacognosy 

Pharmacy — Pharmaceutics 

Pharmacy — Institutional Pharmacy 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 
School of Social Work and Community Planning 

Clinical Social Work 

Community Planning 

Social Administration 

Social Strategy 

Contact: 

Dean for Graduate Studies and Research 
University of Maryland, Baltimore City 
Baltimore. Maryland 21201 
(301)528-7131 



Baltimore County 

Programs offered: 

Applied Mathematics 
Biological and Medicinal Chemistry 
Community-Clinical Psychology 
Experimental Biology-Health Sciences 
Policy Sciences 

Contact: 

Director of Graduate Studies and Research 
University of Maryland, Baltimore County . 
Catonsville, Maryland 21228 
(301)455-2538 



Eastern Shore 

Currently, there are no graduate level courses 
offered at the Eastern Shore campus. 

Contact: 

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
University of Maryland, Eastern Shore 
Princess Anne, Maryland 21853 
(301)651-2200 



University College 

Although University College, the adult education 
evening division of the University of Maryland, is 
primarily an undergraduate college, there are 
some courses offered through this division which 
are eligible tor graduate credit. 

Contact 

Dean, University College 
Center for Adult Education 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 
(301)454-5756 



6 /The University 



General Information 



Introduction 



History 

The Graduate School was established in 1919 for 
the purpose of developing and administering 
programs of advanced study and research for 
graduate students throughout the university. At 
that time the Graduate School was placed under 
the jurisdiction of a Graduate Council acting for 
the Graduate Faculty with a Graduate Dean who 
chaired both bodies and served as the administra- 
tive officer of the Graduate School. 

In 1956 the Graduate Faculty adopted a formal 
Constitution to "provide a means for the Gradu- 
ate Faculty to discharge its functions with respect 
to educational policies and procedures of the 
Graduate School on this campus." That Constitu- 
tion, as amended in 1968 and 1974, continues to 
govern the policies and procedures of the Gradu- 
ate School on the College Park Campus. The 
names of the current members of the Graduate 
Faculty, Graduate Council and its Committees, 
and the staff of the Graduate School will be found 
in appropriate places elsewhere in this catalog. 

Objectives 

The common goal of every graduate program, 
whether in the arts, the sciences, the humanities, 
or the professions, is to provide opportunities for 
intensive and individual study under outstanding 
members of the faculty. The Graduate School is 
not simply an extension or continuation of the 
colleges, schools or divisions, but is designed to 
prepare those who will dedicate themselves to 
individual inquiry and service. To achieve this 
goal it promotes an atmosphere of research and 
scholarship at the highest levels for both students 
and faculty, and it particularly stimulates the 
harmonious relationship tietween the two which 
leads to the advancement and transmission of 
knowledge. 

Organization 

The Graduate Faculty, working through the As- 
sembly and the Graduate Council, establishes 
policies governing admission to graduate study 
and minimum requirements to be met by all stu- 
dents seeking advanced degrees in more than 
sixty-five graduate departments and programs 
leading to degrees awarded by the Graduate Fac- 
ulty on the College Park Campus. The faculties of 
the individual academic departments and interdis- 
ciplinary graduate programs rnay establish addi- 
tional requirements for admission or for degrees 
above the minima established by the Graduate 
Council. 

The Assembly of the Graduate Faculty consists 
of all full and associate members of the Graduate 
Faculty who through their participation in re- 
search and graduate instruction have displayed a 
capacity for individual research or creative and 
scholarly work at the highest levels. 

The Graduate Council consists of members of 
the Graduate Faculty elected by the Assembly, as 
well as appointed and ex officio members. It is 
charged with the formulation of the policies and 
procedures for the Graduate School at College 
Park including admission standards, the review of 
individual student programs, the review of all new 
programs and courses submitted by members of 
the Graduate Faculty, graduate student theses 
and dissertations, and the periodic review of all 
graduate degree programs. It meets approximate- 
ly eight times a year to conduct its regular busi- 



ness and may be called into special session as 
the need arises. 

In Its work the Graduate Council Is aided and 
advised by ten standing committees. Included are 
committees on; Academic Standards, Admissions, 
Elections, Fellowships, Program Review, Gradu- 
ate Faculty, Programs and Courses. Publications, 
Research, and Student Life. Membership on these 
committees is limited to memtsers of the Graduate 
Faculty and graduate students Members are 
appointed by the Dean for Graduate Studies for 
terms of three years. 

Enrollment 

In the fall of 1975 there were slightly more than 
7,500 graduate students enrolled on the College 
Park Campus. Of that number approximately 
3.000 were full-time students. Fifty-seven percent 
of the total were enrolled in masters degree pro- 
grams, and thirty-nine percent had been admitted 
to doctoral programs. The average age of the 
student t)Ody was nearly 29 years of age. 

During 1974-75 the Graduate Faculty recom- 
mended the awarding of 387 doctoral degrees 
and 1 .407 master's degrees. 

Location 

Located on 1.300 acres in Prince Georges Coun- 
ty, eight miles from the National Capital in Wash- 
ington, DC. and thirty miles from Baltimore, the 
College Park Campus is in the midst of one of the 
greatest concentrations of research facilities and 
intellectual talent in the nation, if not in the 
world. Libraries and laboratories serving virtually 
every academic discipline are within easy com- 
muting distance. There is a steady and growing 
Interchange of ideas, information technical skills, 
and scholars tjetween the university and these 
centers. The libraries and facilities of many of 
these centers are open to qualified graduate stu- 
dents at the university The resources of many 
more are available by special arrangement. 

Libraries 

The University library system includes major re- 
search libraries on both the College Park and Bal- 
timore Campuses. 

The Theodore R. McKeldin Library is the gradu- 
ate library of the College Park Campus, contain- 
ing reference works, periodicals, circulating 
books, and other materials in all fields of re- 
search and instruction. Other libraries include the 
Engineering and Physical Sciences Library, the 
Architecture Library, and the Charles White Me- 
morial Library. A new Undergraduate Library 
opened in 1972. 

The libraries on the College Park Campus con- 
tain nearly 2.000,000 volumes, and they subscribe 
to more than 15,000 periodicals and newspapers. 
Additional collections of research materials are 
available on microfilm, microfiche, phonorecords. 
tapes, and films. 

Special collections include those of Richard 
von Mises in mathematics and applied mechan- 
ics; Max Born in the physical sciences; Thomas 1. 
Cook in political science; Romeo Mansueti in the 
biological sciences; Katherine Anne Porter; Mary- ■ 
land; U.S. government publications (for which the 
university is a regional depository); documents of 
the United Nations, the League of Nations and 
other international organizations, agricultural 
experiment station and extension service publica- 
tions; maps from the U.S. Army Map Service; the 
files of the Industrial Union of Marine and Ship- 
building Workers of America; the Wallenstein 



collection of musical scores; and research collec- 
tions of the American Bandmasters Association, 
the National Association of Wind and Percussion 
Instructors and the Music Educators National 
Conference In addition, the collections include 
microfilm productions of government documents, 
rare books, early journals, and newspapers 

But it is the combined resources of the Library 
of Congress, the Folger Library. Dumbarton Oaks, 
the National Archives, the Smithsonian Institution, 
the World Bank the National Library of Medicine, 
the National Agricultural Library, and the libraries 
of the Federal Departments of Labor; Commerce; 
Interior; Health. Education and Welfare; Housing 
and Urban Development; and Transportation, and 
approximately 500 other specialized libraries in 
the area, all within a few minutes drive of the Col- 
lege Park Campus, that make the University of 
Maryland one of the most attractive in the nation 
for scholars of all disciplines. 

Special Research Resources 

Exceptional research facilities are available in 
almost all disciplines at the university. The prox- 
imity of the Beltsville Agricultural Research Cen- 
ter of the United States Department of Agriculture 
has stimulated the development of both laborato- 
ries and opportunities tor field research in the 
agricultural and life sciences. Opportunities are 
also available for collaborative graduate study 
programs with other major government laborato- 
ries, such as the National Bureau of Standards 
and the Naval Research Laboratory. 

The long-standing interest of the State of Mary- 
land in the commercial and recreational re- 
sources of the Chesapeake Bay has resulted in 
the development of outstanding research facilities 
for the study of marine biology at the University 
of Maryland Center for Environmental and 
Estuarine Studies with research facilities at Horn 
Point near Cambridge, Crisfield and at Solomons 
Island. Maryland. 

Work in the tiehavioral sciences, particularly in 
learning, is centered in laboratories equipped for 
fully automated research on rats, pigeons and 
monkeys. 

Exceptional research facilities in the physical 
sciences include a 160 MeV cyclotron; two small 
Van de Graaff accelerators; an assortment of 
computers, including a PDP 11/45. a Univac 1106 
and a Univac 1108 which is complemented by 
remote access units on a time-sharing basis; (the 
Univac 1106 and the 1108 each have 262 K of 
memory); a 10 KW training nuclear reactor; a full 
scale low velocity wind tunnel; several small hy- 
personic helium wind tunnels; specialized facili- 
ties in both the Institute for Molecular Physics 
and the Center for Materials Research; a psycho- 
pharmacology laboratory; shock tubes; a quies- 
cent plasma device (Q machine) for plasma re- 
search; and rotating tanks for laboratory studies 
of meteorological phenomena. The university also 
owns and operates one of the worlds largest and 
most sophisticated long-wavelength radio tele- 
scopes located in Clark Lake. California and a 
cosmic ray laboratory located in New Mexico. 

Special Opportunities for Artists 

Advanced work m the creative and performing 
arts at College Park centers in the Tawes Fine 
Arts Building and is greatly stimulated by the 
close interaction that has developed between the 
students and faculty of the university and the art- 
ists and scholars at the National Gallery, the Cor- 
coran Gallery, the Hirshorn Museum, the Phillips 
Gallery, the Museum of Modern Art. the Smith- 
General Information / 7 



sonlan Institution, as well as ttie musicians of the 
National Symphony Orctiestra and smaller musi- 
cal groups. Ttie Kennedy Center for ttie Perform- 
ing Arts and ttie Filene Center (Wolf Trap Farm 
Park) have further enhanced the climate for crea- 
tive artists attending the university. 

Outstanding work on campus in theater, dance, 
radio, and television is aided by the proximity of 
the campus to the National Theater, the Arena 
Stage, the Ivlorris Mechanic Theater, and numer- 
ous little theater groups in the Washington and 
Baltimore area. There is a frequent and steady 
interchange of ideas and talent between students 
and faculty at the university and both educational 
and commercial radio and television media as a 
consequence of the large professional staffs 
which are maintained in the Washington area. 

Consortia 

The University of Maryland is a member of a 
number of national and local consortia concerned 
with advanced education and research. They offer 
a variety of opportunities for senior scholar and 
graduate student research. 



Oak Ridge Associated 
Universities, Inc. (ORAU) 

Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., is a non- 
profit educational and research corporation 
formed in order to broaden the opportunities for 
member institutions collectively to participate in 
many fields of education and research in the nat- 
ural sciences related to nuclear energy. Educa- 
tional programs range from short term courses or 
institutes, conducted with ORAU facilities and 
staff to fellowship programs administered by 
ORAU for the Atomic Energy Commission. 

University Corporation For 
Atmospheric Research (UCAR) 

The National Center for Atmospheric Research 
(NCAR), in Boulder, Colorado, was created in 
1960 to serve as a focal point for a vigorous and 
expanding national research effort in the atmos- 
pheric sciences. NCAR is operated under the 
sponsorship of the National Science Foundation 
Research (UCAR), made up of 27 U.S. universities 
with graduate programs in the atmospheric sci- 
ences or related fields. The scientific staff in- 
cludes meteorologists, astronomers, chemists, 
physicists, mathematicians, and representatives of 
other disiplines. 

Universities Research 
Association (URA) 

Universities Research Association, a group of 52 
universities engaged in high energy research, is 
the sponsoring organization for the National Ac- 
celerator Laboratory, funded by the US Atomic 
Energy Commission. The accelerator, located 
near Batavia, Illinois, is the world's highest ener- 
gy machine. 

Inter-University Communications 
Council (EDUCOM) 

This Council provides a forum for the appraisal of 
the current state of the art in communications 
science and technology and their relation to the 
planning and programs of colleges and universi- 
ties. The council particularly fosters inter-uni- 
versity cooperation in the area of communica- 
tions science. 
8 / General Information 



Universities Space Research 
Association (USRA) 

The USRA was designed to promote cooperation 
between universities, research organizations, and 
the government in the development of space sci- 
ence and technology, and in the operation of lab- 
oratories and facilities for research, development 
and education in these fields. 

Inter-University Consortium For 
Political Science Research 

The University of Maryland is a member of the 
Inter-University Consortium for Political Science 
Research. One purpose of the Consortium is to 
facilitate collection and distribution of useful data 
for social science research. The data includes 
survey data from the University of Michigan Sur- 
vey Research Center and from studies conducted 
by other organizations or by individuals, census 
data for the United States, election data, legisla- 
tive roll calls, judicial decision results, and bio- 
graphical data. 

Chesapeake Bay Center for 
Environmental Studies (CBCES) 

This 2400-acre waterfront research center is dedi- 
cated to preserving and enhancing the quality of 
man's environment through programs of ecologi- 
cal study and education. Located on the western 
shore of the Chesapeake Bay, just south of An- 
napolis, it presents a wide selection of local eco- 
systems. Scientific programs of the Center, a 
major component of the Smithsonian Institution, 
are guided by the consortium in which the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity participate. The unique ecological environ- 
ment provided by the Center furnishes an attrac- 
tive site for graduate student research programs. 

Chesapeake Research 
Consortium, Inc. 

The University of Maryland jointly participates in 
this wide scale environmental research program 
with The Johns Hopkins University, the Virginia 
Institute of Marine Science, and the Smithsonian 
Institution. The Consortium originally funded by a 
1.2 million dollar grant from the National Science 
Foundation in 1971, coordinates and integrates 
research on the Chesapeake Bay region and is 
compiling a vast amount of scientific data to as- 
sist in the management and control of the area 
Each participating institutions calls on faculty 
expertise in a diversity of disciplines including 
biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, geology, 
and the social and behavioral sciences. Through 
this interdisciplinary research program a compu- 
terized Management Resource Bank is being de- 
veloped containing a biological inventory of the 
Chesapeake Bay region, a legal survey, and so- 
cioeconomic data of the surrounding communi- 
ties. 

The Consortium provides research opportunities 
for faculty members, graduate students, and un- 
dergraduate students at the University. 

Association of Sea Grant Program 
Institutions (SGA) 

Officially chartered in 1969, the Association of 
Sea Grant Program Institutions is a growing orga- 
nization concerned with the development and 
wise use of ocean and Great Lakes resources. 
Composed of the nation's major colleges, uni- 



versities and institutions with ocean programs, 
the Association works for the betterment of the 
management and utilization of marine resources. 
Members represent almost half of the universities 
and colleges in the U.S. that offer marine related 
degrees. Membership includes 35 state colleges 
and universities, 10 private universities and one 
non-profit educational and research-related orga- 
nization. 

The Association's goals are to further the devel- 
opment, use and conservation of marine and 
coastal resources, and to encourage increased 
accomplishments and initiatives in related areas; 
to increase the effectiveness of member institu- 
tions in their work on marine and coastal re- 
sources; and to stimulate cooperation and unity 
of effort among members. 



Middle Atlantic Consortium on Air 
Pollution (MACAP) 

This 20-member regional consortium was estab- 
lished in 1971 primarily as an educational effort in 
the area of air pollution, on a grant from the Envi- 
ronmental Protection Agency. Originally designed 
to administer training grant programs, the Con- 
sortium also sponsors short courses, confer- 
ences, telecom seminars, and symposia, including 
a recent one in West Virginia which was run for 
and by graduate students. 
For the telecom series of seminars, experts in 
specific fields prepare video tapes which are cop- 
ied and distributed to participating institutions for 
viewing by their students and guests from govern- 
ment and industry. After all participants have 
viewed the tape, a conference call is placed to 
the speaker allowing for a general discussion and 
question/answer session. 

Universities Council on Water 
Resources (UCOWR) 

Established in 1965, the Universities Council on 
Water Resources is a national consortium with 
approximately 80 members. UCOWR was created 
to provide a forum for interchange of information 
pertaining to water resources research in aca- 
demic communities. Member institutions also 
exchange information on special conferences, 
seminars, symposia and graduate study opportun- 
ities. Finally, the Council provides the opportunity 
for discussion of national policies pertaining to 
water resources research programs and attempts 
to inform university administrators and the execu- 
tive and legislative branches of the government, 
at all levels, of results of water resources re- 
search and of financial needs in this area. 
UCOWR operates through standing and ad hoc 
committees with specific assignments. The Exec- 
utive Board, whose members are elected among 
the official delegates, directs and coordinates the 
activities of the Consortium. The University of 
Maryland is represented by two voting delegates. 

National Criminal Justice 
Educational Consortium 

The National Criminal Justice Educational Con- 
sortium was formed in November 1973 under 
funding from the Law Enforcement Assistance 
Administration of the U.S. Department of Justice. 
The University of Maryland is one of seven uni- 
versities selected to participate. 
Among the stated goals of the consortium are the 
developing and strenghening of graduate pro- 
grams in criminal justice or directly related stud- 



ies at the doctoral level and the building of a 
framework for cooperation and the exchange of 
knowledge among affiliated universities. 

University-National 
Oceanographic Laboratory 
System (UNOLS) 

The University of Maryland is an associate mem- 
ber of the University-National Laboratory System 
(UNOLS) established to improve coordinated use 
of Federally supported oceanographic facilities, 
bringing together the Community of Academic 
Oceanographic Institutions which operate those 
facilities, and creating a mechanism for such co- 
ordinated, utilization of and planning for oceano- 
graphic facilities. As an Associate Member, the 
University of Maryland has a very active graduate 
level research program in the marine sciences 
and operates facilities through the Chesapeake 
Bay Center for Environmental Studies. 



Graduate Programs 



Programs Degrees Offered 

Administration, Supervision and Cur 

riculum2 M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Aerospace Engineering M.S., Ph.D. 

Agricultural Engineering M.S., Ph.D. 

Agricultural and Extension 

Education^ M.S., A.G.S., Ph.D. 

Agricultural and Resource 

Economics M.S., Ph.D. 

Agronomy M.S., Ph.D. 

American Studies^ M.A., Ph.D. 

Animal Sciences M.S., Ph.D. 

Applied Mathematics M.A., PhD 

Art M.A„ M.F.A., Ph.D. 

Astronomy" M.S., Ph.D. 

Botany M.S., Ph.D. 

Business Administration^ M.B.A.. D.B.A. 

Chemical Engineering M.S., Ph.D. 

Chemical Physics M.S.. Ph.D. 

Chemistry M.S., Ph.D. 

Civil Engineering M.S., Ph.D. 

Comparative Literature M.A., Ph.D. 

Computer Science^ M.S., Ph.D. 

Counseling and Personnel 

Services^ M.Ed., M.A., A.G., Ph.D. 

Criminal Justice and Criminology^ M.A., Ph.D. 

Early Childhood-Elementary Educa- 

tion2 M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Economics^ M.A., Ph.D. 

Electrical Engineering M.S., Ph.D. 

Engineering Materials M.S., Ph.D. 

English Language and Literature M.A., Ph.D. 

Entomology M.S., Ph.D. 

Family and Community 

Development^ M.S. 

Food, Nutrition and Institutional 

Administration^ M.S. 

Food Science M.S., Ph.D. 

Foundations of 

Education^ M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S.. Ed.D., Ph.D. 

French Language and Literature* M.A., Ph.D. 

Geography^ M.A., Ph.D. 

Germanic Language and 

Literature M.A., Ph.D. 

Government and Politics* M.A., Ph.D. 

Hearing and Speech Sciences^ M.A., Ph.D. 

Health Education M.A., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

History3 M.A., Ph.D. 

Horticulture M.S., Ph.D. 



Human Development 

Education^ M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph D 

Industrial 

Educations M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph D 

Journalism^ M.A. 

Library and Information 

Services3 ':' M.L.S,, Ph.D. 

Mathematics M.A., Ph.D. 

Measurement and 

Statistics2 M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Mechanical Engineering M.S., Ph.D. 

Meteorology M.S.. Ph.D. 

Microbiology" M.S., Ph.D. 

Nuclear Engineering M.S., Ph.D. 

Music* M.M., D.M.A.. Ph.D. 

Nutritional Sciences M.S., Ph.D. 

PhilosophyS M.A., Ph.D. 

Physical Educations M.A., Ph.D. 

Physics" M.S., Ph.D. 

Poultry Science M.S., Ph.D. 

Psychology* M.A., M.S., Ph.D. 

Recreations M.A., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Secondary 

Educations M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Sociology^ M.A., Ph.D. 

Spanish and Portuguese Languages and 

Literature M.A., Ph.D. 

Special 

Educations M.Ed., M.A.. A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Speech and Dramatic Art' M.A. 

Textiles and Consumer Economics^ M.S. 

Urban Studies^ M.A. 

Zoology M.S., Ph.d. 

'GMAT (Graduate Management & Admissions Test) 
SMiller Analogies Test required for admission 
^Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test required 
"Graduate Record Examination Advanced Test required 
*Both Aptitude and Advanced Graduate Record Examina- 
tions 
required 

For further details on entrance examinations 
see Admission to Graduate School below. 



Admission to 
Graduate School 

General 

Admission to doctoral and master's programs at 
the College Park Campus is the responsibility of 
the Dean for Graduate Studies. In making deci- 
sions upon the admissibility of applicants, the 
dean and his staff regularly seek the advice of the 
chairmen of the academic departments and de- 
partmental graduate admissions committees. In 
the case of foreign student applicants, the Uni- 
versity's Director of International Education Serv- 
ices is also consulted. Standards for admission to 
doctoral programs are frequently higher than 
those for admission to master's programs. 

In some degree programs applications for ad- 
mission to graduate study by qualified students 
regularly exceed the number of students who can 
be accommodated. As a consequence every appli- 
cation is carefully reviewed and the number of 
students admitted to each program is balanced 
against the faculty and other available resources. 

There are, moreover, standards which apply to 
all applicants regardless of program. They have 
been established on the basis of long experience 
with those who have succeeded, as well as with 
those who haved failed, in graduate study. They 
are similar to those standards governing admis- 



sion to nearly all major graduate schools. The 
purpose of these standards is quite simple, to 
identify those individuals who have a reasonable 
expectation of successfully completing a gradu- 
ate program. 

The decision on admission of an applicant to a 
program is based primarily on some of the follow- 
ing criteria depending on the specific program or 
department: 

1 . Quality of previous undergraduate and grad- 
uate work- As a matter of general policy within 
the Graduate School at College Park, the mini- 
mum standard as to quality of undergraduate 
work IS a B average, or 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, in a 
program of study resulting in the award of a bac- 
calaureate degree from a regionally accredited 
college or university. In addition, the student's 
undergraduate program should include comple- 
tion of the prerequisites for graduate study in his 
or her chosen field. In individual programs, where 
resources are available, a few applicants who do 
not meet this minimum standard as to work done 
at the undergraduate level may be provisionally 
admitted if there is compelling evidence on the 
basis of other criteria of a reasonable likelihood 
of success in the program the person desires to 
enter. In the case of an applicant who has done 
some graduate work elsewhere, less weight may 
be, but is not necessarily, placed on the quality of 
the undergraduate academic record. 

2. Strength of letters of recommendation from 
persons competent to judge the applicant's prob- 
able success in graduate school. Usually these 
letters are from the applicant's former professors 
who are able to give an in-depth evaluation of the 
applicant's strengths and weaknesses with re- 
spect to academic work. Additional recommenda- 
tions may come from employers or supervisors 
who are familiar with the applicant's work experi- 
ence. Applicants should instruct their references 
to send all letters of recommendation directly to 
the program in which they desire entrance. Some 
departments do not require letters of recommen- 
dation. (See application form.) 

Some programs require other evidence of grad- 
uate potential such as portfolios and samples of 
creative work, completion of specialized examina- 
tions or personal interviews. 

3. Scores on a nationally standardized 
examination such as the Graduate Record 
Examinations, Graduate Management Admissions 
Test. Miller Analogies Test, and similar tests. For 
additional information about standardized tests 
see instructions accompanying application forms. 
Because the predictive utility of these scores may 
vary from one group of applicants to another, a 
discriminating use of all relevant materials will be 
made in each applicant's case. 

4. Statement by the applicant of his academic 
and career objectives and how these are related 
to the program of study proposed at this 
university. It is important that the department or 
program of proposed study identify students 
whose objectives are consonant with the 
objectives of the program. 

In addition to the above criteria, special consid- 
eration will be given to: 

(1) Residence of the applicant. While the 
university desires to maintain a geographically 
diverse graduate student population, it also 
recognizes its responsibility to legal residents of 
the state. Every effort will be made to 
accommodate qualified Maryland residents. 

(2) Sex and minority group membership. The 
University of Maryland, its Graduate School and 
each of its academic components have strong 
affirmative action programs for increasing the 



General Information /9 



participation of minority groups (Black 
Americans. American Indians, Oriental Americans, 
Spanish-Americans) and women among its 
students, staff and faculty 

Graduate Record Examinations 
(GRE) 

Although many graduate programs do not require 
the GRE, almost all will use such test scores as 
an additional measurement of an applicant's qual- 
ifications. The GRE may be taken in either or 
both of two forms, 1) The Aptitude Test and 2) 
The Advanced Test. Applicants can take this test 
in their senior year or when filing for admission 
For details, applicants should write directly to 
Graduate Record Examinations, Educational Test- 
ing Service, Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 
08540. 

Graduate Management 
Admissions Test (GMAT) 

Details about this test, required when applying to 
a program in Business and f^anagement, can be 
obtained by writing to the Educational Testing 
Service, P.O. Box 966, Princeton, N.J 08540. 



The Miller Analogies Test (MAT) 

Details about the graduate form of this test can 
be obtained by writing to the Director, Counseling 
Center, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 
20742. Please see List of Graduate Programs in 
this catalog. 



Financial Aid 

Many departments are able to provide financial 
assistance in the form of teaching or research 
assistanfships and fellowships to graduate stu- 
dents accepted into the department's degree pro- 
grams. Inquiries concerning the availability of 
such assistance should be directed to the depart- 
ment to which the applicant expects to be admit- 
ted or to the Fellowship and Grants Office of the 
Graduate School, All applicants for fellowships 
must be admitted to the Graduate School on a 
full-time basis to be eligible. 

Fellowships 

The Maryland Fellowship Program, established by 
the State Legislature and administered by the 
Graduate School, provides a limited number of 
fellowships to qualified applicants who are 
enrolled in doctoral programs; and who agree to 
teach in a public institution of higher learning in 
the State of Maryland for a period of three years 
following receipt of their doctoral degree if a 
suitable position is offered. The stipend is $2500 
for the academic year with remission of tuition. 
Although renewable annually, these fellowships 
normally carry a three year non-renewable tenure. 
Applications for this Program may be obtained 
from the Fellowship Office of the Graduate 
School. 

The Graduate School Fellowships are awarded 
annually on a competitive basis. The stipend is 
$1,000 for the academic year, with remission of 
tuition. The standard application for financial aid 
will serve as an application for this Fellowship 
Program. Awards are based upon the 
recommendation of the department chairman. 
The primary basis on which fellowships are 
awarded is academic merit and promise. Finan- 



cial need may be taken into consideration in de- 
ciding among comparably qualified students. 
A fellowship is traditionally regarded as an 
award bestowed on a promising scholar which 
will provide him or her with sufficient income that 
he or she may be able to devote himself or her- 
self essentially full time to scholarly pursuits. 
Hence it is generally expected that fellowship 
holders will not hold outside employment. Excep- 
tions to this policy can be authorized by the Dean 
for Graduate Studies in cases of special need, 

Assistantships 

Graduate Teaching Assistantships are also availa- 
ble to qualified graduate students. In addition to 
remission of tuition, these carry ten-month sti- 
pends ranging from $3,180 to $4,480, Some de- 
partments. Graduate Research Assistantships, 
with comparable stipends, are available on a ten 
or twelve month basis. Applications for assistant- 
ships should be made directly to the Department 
in which the applicant will study. 

A few Resident Graduate Assistantships in the 
undergraduate residence halls are available. The 
stipend is $3,180 per year, plus remission of tui- 
tion, in exchange for half-time work as Residence 
Halls Staff members. These Resident Assistant- 
ships are open to both men and women. Applica- 
tions for a Resident Graduate Assistantship 
should be the Director of Resident Life, University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 

Offers of assistantships are made contingent 
upon acceptance as a graduate student by the 
Graduate School. 

Student Loans 

National Direct Student Loan Funds are available 
to graduate students of the University of Mary- 
land. The student may request up to $2,500 per 
year. Loans average $1,500 per year. Applications 
should be directed to the Director, Office of Stu- 
dent Aid, North Administration Building, Universi- 
ty of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 by 
May 1 for the fall semester. 

Categories of Admission 

Applicants may be offered admission to graduate 
level study in any of the following categories: 

Admission to Degree Programs 



FULL GRADUATE STATUS 

For admission in this category an applicant must 
have received a baccalaureate degree from an 
institution accredited by a regional accrediting 
association and be otherwise fully qualified in 
every respect 

PROVISIONAL GRADUATE 

STATUS 

This designation may be used when (1) the pre- 
vious academic record at a regionally accredited 
institution is borderline or when there is a lack of 
adequate prerequisite course work in the chosen 
field; (2) when the applicant has majored in an- 
other area with a creditable record but there is 
some doubt about his ability to pursue the pro- 
gram in question or (3) when the student has not 
yet completed his baccalaureate and so is not 
able to furnish a final transcript indicating the 
completion of all requirements and the award of 



the degree. A program to correct any deficiencies 
will be outlined by the faculty and the student is 
expected to become fully qualified within a speci- 
fied time limit. When all conditions have been 
met, the department may recommend admission 
of the student to "full status," Students who are 
unable to qualify for full admission under the 
conditions specified may have their admission 
terminated. 



Admission in Non-Degree Status 

ADVANCED GRADUATE 
SPECIALIST CERTIFICATE 
STATUS 

The Advanced Graduate Specialist'program is 
designed to promote a high level of professional 
competence in an area of specialization in the 
field of education. The candidate must be able to 
show that he or she can operate as an effective 
counselor, administrator, teacher or skilled per- 
son in his or her ma|or field of professional en- 
deavor. The Advanced Graduate Specialist Certifi- 
cate is offered through most of the programs in 
the College of Education and the Agricultural and 
Extension Education program in the College of 
Agriculture. The Certificate is awarded by the Col- 
lege of Education or by the College of Agricul- 
ture. Requirements are as follows: 

a. Applicants must meet the same general cri- 
teria for admission as are prescribed for degree 
seekers. Additionally, the applicant must have 
completed a master's degree or the equivalent in 
credits earned either at the University of Maryland 
or at another regionally accredited institution. 
The Miller Analogies Test scores are required at 
the time of application. 

b Coursework totaling not more than 30 credits 
with grades of at least a "B" from an accredited 
institution may be transferred to the program at 
the University of Maryland. 

c. The program must be developed in coopera- 
tion with an advisor and filed with the Graduate 
Studies office in the College of Education. 

d. The Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate 
program requires a minimum of 60 semester 
hours of credit with not less than 30 semester 
hours of credit completed with the University of 
Maryland. At least one half of the credits earned 
either at other institutions or at the University of 
Maryland must be in courses comparable to those 
in the 600-800 series. The student may be re- 
quired to take a substantial portion of the pro- 
gram in departments other than those in the Col- 
lege of Education or the College of Agriculture. 
Registration in certain kinds of field study, field 
experience, apprenticeship or internship may also 
be required. 

e. There will be a written examination of not 
less than six hours. A "B" average with no "D " or 

F " grades will be required before the certificate 
can be awarded. 

ADVANCED SPECIAL STUDENT 

STATUS 

The Advanced Special Student status is de- 
signed to provide an opportunity to take graduate 
level courses to individuals who do not have an 
immediate degree objective in mind. Although the 
primary mission of the Graduate School is to 
conduct programs of graduate instruction leading 
to advanced degrees, the Graduate Faculty wel- 
comes qualified students who have no degree 



10 / General Information 



objectives to the extent ttiat available resources 
allow. 

Applicants for admission to Advanced Special 
Student status must satisfy at least one of the 
following criteria: 

a. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regional- 
ly accredited institution with an overall "B" (3,0) 
average. 

b. Hold a master's or doctoral degree from a 
regionally accredited institution. 

c. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regional- 
ly accredited institution and have at least four 
years of successful post-baccalaureate work or 
professional experience. Applicant must submit 
an official transcript showing the award of the 
baccalaureate degree and a short signed state- 
ment covering at least four years of successful 
post-baccalaureate work or professional experi- 
ence. Letters from employers or professional or- 
ganizations are also required to support the state- 
ment of successful professional experiences. 

d. Achieve a score that places the applicant in 
the upper 50 percentile of appropriate national 
standardized aptitude examinations such as the 
Graduate Record Examination Aptitude test, the 
Miller's Analogies test, the Graduate Management 
Admissions test, etc. 

Admission to Advanced Special Student status 
will be granted by the Dean for Graduate Studies. 
The admitted status will continue for five years. If 
there is no registration in three consecutive aca- 
demic year semesters, the admitted status will 
lapse after which a new application will be re- 
quired. 

Advanced Special Students must maintain a 
2.75 grade point average. Students in this status 
may not preregister for courses and must pay all 
standard graduate fees. 

Advanced Special Students are not eligible to 
hold appointments as Graduate Teaching or Re- 
search Assistants or Fellow. All other services, 
e.g., parking, library privileges, etc., are the same 
as those accorded to other graduate students. 

Admission to Advanced Special Student status 
is not intended to be used as a preparatory pro- 
gram for later admission to a doctoral or master's 
program nor for the Advanced Graduate Special- 
ist Certificate program. Credits earned while in 
this status may be applicable to a degree or cer- 
tificate program at a later time only with the ap- 
proval of the faculty in the desired program if the 
student is subsequently accepted for degree or 
certificate study. Admission to a degree program 
at a later time may be considered by presenting 
an application in the standard format to the Grad- 
uate School with a new application fee. 

VISITING GRADUATE STUDENT 
STATUS 

A graduate student matriculated in another grad- 
uate school, who wishes to enroll in the Graduate 
School of the University of Maryland at College 
Park, and who intends thereafter to return to the 
graduate school in which he or she is matriculat- 
ed, may be admitted as a Visiting Graduate Stu- 
dent. 

To enroll as a visitor, the student must have 
been officially admitted to another recognized 
graduate school and must be in good standing. 
Full transcripts of credits need not be submitted 
but he or she must apply for admission to the 
Graduate School of the University of Maryland, at 
College Park, and pay the application fee. In lieu 
of transcripts, he or she must have the graduate 
dean certify, in writing, to the Graduate School 
that he or she is in good standing and that the 



credits will be accepted toward his or her gradu- 
ate degree. Unless otherwise specified, admission 
will be offered for one year only 

NON-DEGREE STUDENT 
STATUS— UNDERGRADUATE 

This is an undergraduate classification and may 
be assigned by the Director, Admissions and Reg- 
istrations (Undergraduate Division) to those appli- 
cants who have received the baccalaureate or 
other advanced degrees from an institution ac- 
credited by a regional accrediting association, but 
who do not desire or who do not qualify for grad- 
uate admission. Non-degree seeking students 
who do not have a baccalaureate degree or an 
R.N. must submit transcripts and meet regular 
admission standards. Transcripts are not required 
from students with baccalaureate degrees or an 
R.N 

The student is warned, that no credit earned 
while in a Non-degree Student Status— Under- 
graduate may be applied at a later date to a de- 
gree program. 

Non-degree students may enroll for courses 
through the 500 numbered series for which they 
possess the necessary prerequisites. Permission 
from the deans of the various schools and col- 
leges of the university is often needed to enroll as 
a Non-degree Student. Courses numbered 600 or 
above are restricted to admitted graduate stu- 
dents only. 

Application for Non-degree Student Status — 
Undergraduate must be made directly to the 
Office of Admissions and not to the Graduate 
School. 

Admission Time Limits 

For master's degree seekers and Advanced Spe- 
cial students, the admission terminates five years 
from the entrance date. Visiting Graduate Stu- 
dents and NSF Institute students are admitted for 
specified periods. 

A doctoral student must be admitted to candi- 
dacy within five years after entrance, and must 
complete all remaining requirements within four 
years after admission to candidacy. The admis- 
sion to the doctoral program terminates if these 
conditions are not met. 

Change of Objective, 
Termination of Admission 

students are admitted only to a specified pro- 
gram, and within that program only for the speci- 
fied objective; e.g., master's degree, doctoral 
degree, or Advanced Special student status. If the 
student wishes to change either the program or 
the objective within that program, he or she must 
submit a new application and fee for admission. 
Admission in the new status is not granted 
automatically. 

The Student's admission also terminates when 
the original objective has been attained; for ex- 
ample, the admission terminates when a student 
who is admitted for the master's degree com- 
pletes the requirements for that degree. If the 
student wishes to continue for the doctorate, a 
new application for admission to the doctoral 
program must be submitted; admission to the 
doctoral program is not automatic but is subject 
to the same review process applied to others 
seeking admission to that program. 

A student can be admitted to only one grc 
program at any one time. Application for and 



acceptance of an offer of admission in a second 
graduate program automatically terminates the 
student's admission to the first program. 

The student's admission also terminates when 
time limits have been exceeded or when other 
conditions for the continuation of the admission 
have not been met. 

The admission of all students, both degree and 
non-degree, is continued at the discretion of the 
major professor, the department or program 
director, and Dean for Graduate Studies. Students 
must maintain an average grade of B or better in 
all graduate courses taken and must otherwise 
satisfy all additional departmental and Graduate 
School program requirements. 

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS 

Both the completed application and supporting 
transcripts covering all credits earned at any insti- 
tution attended must be received, in duplicate, by 
the Office of the Dean for Graduate Studies, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742 by the deadline dates listed below. The 
application should arrive at the graduate offices 
before the arrival of transcripts and other 
supporting evidence of preparation if these 
materials cannot be attached to the application. 
Applicants are solely responsible for making 
certain that their transcripts have, in fact, been 
sent to the Graduate School and not to the 
Registrar's Office or the graduate program de- 
sired, since there is no followup action taken by 
the graduate offices. 

For entry for either summer terms and 

for fall semesters May 1 

For entry for spring semesters Nov. 1 

A complete and separate application and appli- 
cation fee must be submitted for each program in 
which entrance is sought. A new application is 
also required where there is a change in the 
objective or program. 

Non-U. S. citizens must apply at least seven 
months in advance of intended entrance time. 

Applicants who require financial support and 
want to be among those first considered must 
submit their applications by February 1. 

In many programs, the available openings are 
filled well in advance of the application deadlines 
so that earlier application is often desirable. 

An application fee of $15.00 must accompany 
the application for admission. This fee is not re- 
fundable under any circumstances. Payment must 
be made by check or money order payable to the 
University of Maryland. Do not send cash or 
stamps. 

Transcripts 

Applicants must hold a baccalaureate degree or 
be currently enrolled in senior status in a bacca- 
laureate degree program at a regionally accredit- 
ed college or university. Some applicants for 
Advanced Special Student Status may be eligible 
on the basis of scores attained on the Graduate 
Record (Aptitude) Examination alone. 

College seniors may apply but must have a 
transcript sent to the Graduate Offices at College 
Park of all coursework completed up to the time 
of application. Senior year first semester grade 
reports may be forwarded in lieu of transcripts 
since no final admissions decision will be possi- 
ble without such grades. In addition, a list of the 
courses currently enrolled for must be submitted 
with the application. An official transcript is de- 



General Information /11 



fined as a record which bears the signature of the 
Registrar and the Seal of the Institution. 

Application in the Senior Year 

Seniors in their final semester of work toward a 
bachelor's degree may be offered provisional 
admission pending the filing of a supplementary 
transcript recording the satisfactory completion 
of the remaining course work and the award of 
the degree. Applicants engaged in graduate study 
at another institution are also subject to this poli- 
cy. A student faces cancellation of his or her 
admission if a complete official record of all pre- 
vious work is not received within three months 
following the completion of such study and the 
award of the degree. 

Foreign Student Applications 

No foreign student seeking admission to the 
University of fJtaryland should plan to leave his 
country before obtaining an official offer of ad- 
mission from the Director of Graduate Records of 
the Graduate School. 

Academic Credentials 

The complete application and official academic 
credentials— beginning with secondary school 
records— should be received by the Graduate 
Admissions Office at least seven months prior to 
the semester in which he or she plans to begin 
his studies. Applications may be rejected prior to 
this deadline when foreign student quotas have 
been exceeded. 

Ernglish Proficiency 

In addition to meeting academic requirements, 
the foreign student applicant must demonstrate 
proficiency in English by taking the Test of Eng- 
lish as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Because 
TOEFL is given only four times a year throughout 
various parts of the world, it is necessary for the 
applicant to make arrangements with the Educa- 
tional Testing Service, Box 899, Princeton, N.J. 
08540, to take the test as soon as he or she con- 
templates study at the University of Maryland. 
When the applicant is ready to begin his or her 
studies, he or she will be expected to read, speak, 
and write English fluently, to understand lectures 
and to take pertinent notes. 

Financial Resources 

A statement regarding the applicant's financial 
status is required by the Office of International 
Education Services. Approximately $525.00 a 
month, or $6300.00 a year, is required for educa- 
tional and living expenses of two academic se- 
mesters and a summer session. 

A foreign student applicant must be prepared, 
in most cases, to meet his or her financial obliga- 
tions from his or her own resources or from those 
provided by a sponsor for at least the first year of 
study, and perhaps beyond. 

Immigration Documents 

It is necessary for students eligible for admission 
to secure from the university's Director of Interna- 
tional Education Services, the immigration form 
required for obtaining the appropriate visa. Stu- 
dents already studying in the United States who 
wish to transfer to the University of Maryland 
must also secure proper immigration documents 
to request the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service to grant permission for transfer. 

Reporting Upon Arrival 

Every foreign student is expected to report to the 

Office of International Education Services as soon 

12 / General Information 



as possible after arriving at the university. This 
office will be able to assist not only with various 
problems regarding immigration, housing and 
fees, but also with more general problems of ori- 
entation to university and community life. 

Questions concerning criteria and requirements 
for foreign applicants should be addressed to the 
Director, International Education Services, Univ- 
ersity of Maryland. College Park, Md. 20742. 

Records' Maintenance and 
Disposition 

All records, including academic records from 
other institutions, become part of the official file 
and can neither be returned nor duplicated for 
any purpose. A student should obtain an addition- 
al copy of his or her official credentials to keep in 
his or her possession for advisory purposes and 
for other personal requirements. 

The admission credentials and the application 
data of the applicants who do not register for 
courses at the time for which they have been 
admitted or whose application has been disap- 
proved or who do not respond to the departmen- 
tal requests for additional information or whose 
application is not complete with respect to the 
receipt of all transcripts or test results are re- 
tained for one year only and then destroyed. 

Offer of Admission 

A written offer of admission is made to an appli- 
cant who meets all admission requirements. The 
offer specifies the date of entrance which will 
normally coincide with the date requested in the 
application The offer of admission must be ac- 
cepted or declined by the date specified in the 
offer. If the Graduate School is not notified by the 
date specified, the offer of admission lapses and 
the space is reassigned to another applicant. An 
individual whose offer of admission has lapsed 
must submit a new application and fee, if he or 
she wants to be reconsidered for admission at a 
later date. 

The offer of admission is a permit-to-register for 
courses, and must be presented by the student at 
the time of his or her first registration. Identifica- 
tion as a graduate student, to be used thereafter, 
will be issued at the time of first registration. 

Graduate Credit for Senior 
Undergraduates 

A senior at the University of Maryland at College 
Park who is within seven credit liours of complet- 
ing the requirements for an undergraduate de- 
gree may, with the approval of the undergraduate 
dean, the provost of his or her division, the de- 
partment or program offering the course, and the 
Graduate School, register for graduate courses 
which may later be counted for graduate credit 
toward an advanced degree at the university if he 
or she has been approved for admission to the 
Graduate School. The total of undergraduate and 
graduate courses must not exceed 15 credits for 
the semester. Excess credits in the senior year 
cannot be used for graduate credit unless proper 
prearrangement is made. Seniors who wish to 
register for graduate credit should inquire at the 
Graduate School about the procedure. 

Undergraduate Credit For 
Graduate Level Courses 

Subject to requirements determined by the gradu- 
ate faculty members of the department or pro- 
gram offering the course, undergraduate students 



may register for graduate level courses, i.e., those 
numbered from 600 through 898 with the excep- 
tion of 799, for undergraduate credit 

A student seeking to utilize this option will 
normally have earned an accumulated grade 
point average of 3.0, be in his or her senior year, 
have successfully completed, with a grade of B or 
better, the prerequisite and correlative courses, 
and be a major in the appropriate or a closely 
related department. The student will be required 
to obtain prior approval of the department offer- 
ing the course. 

Enrollment in a graduate level course does not 
in any way imply subsequent departmental or 
Graduate School approval for admission into a 
graduate program, nor may the course be used as 
credit for a graduate degree at the University of 
Maryland. 



Advising and 
Registration 



Progress in an approved graduate program is a 
shared responsibility of the student and his or her 
faculty advisor. The student is responsible for 
compliance with the rules and procedures of the 
Graduate School and all applicable department or 
graduate program requirements which govern the 
individual program of study. In fulfilling this re- 
sponsibility the student should seek the advice of 
his or her faculty advisor and the administrative 
officer of the department or program in which he 
or she is studying, as well as that of the staff of 
the Graduate School 

Registration for the newly admitted graduate 
student seeking a degree or certificate begins 
with a visit to the student's academic advisor in 
the graduate department or program to which the 
student has been admitted. There the student will 
obtain information about specific degree or certif- 
icate requirements which supplement those of the 
Graduate School and will develop, in consultation 
with a graduate faculty advisor, an individual pro- 
gram of study and research. (See statement of 
student responsibility.) 

Students admitted to Advanced Special Student 
Sta'tus may seek advice from the Dean for Gradu- 
ate Studies and his staff or from appropriate fac- 
ulty members. 

In developing that program the student will 
need to consult the Schedule of Classes. 
published just prior to each registration period by 
the Office of Registration, to obtain information 
about the times and places classes will be 
offered, the names of the professors or 
instructors who will be teaching a particular 
course or section, procedures for the payment of 
tuition and fees, dropping or adding a course, or 
making other changes in registration. It also 
contains the names, telephone numbers and 
office locations of persons who can supply 
additional information. 

While most questions normally raised by gradu- 
ate students, and most problems they meet, will 
be answered or resolved by the faculty advisor or 
a departmental committee, the student should 
remember that he or she is a student in the Grad- 
uate School, and its staff is specifically charged 
with the responsibility for assiting graduate stu- 
dents who need additional information, guidance 
or assistance. Further, the Dean for Graduate 
Studies is the individual to whom requests or pe- 
tions for exceptions or waivers of regulations or 
graduate degree requirements should be ad- 
dressed and to whom appeals from decisions of 
departmental or program faculty or administrators 
should be directed. 



Course Numbering 
System 



Courses are designated as follows: 
000-099 Non-credit courses. 

100-199 Primarily freshman 

courses. 
200-299 Primarily sopfiomore 

courses. 
300-399 Junior and senior 

courses not acceptable 

for credit toward 

graduate degrees. 
400-499 Junior and senior 

courses acceptable for 

credit toward some 

graduate degrees. 
500-599 Professional scfiool 

courses (Dentistry, Law. 

Medicine) and post- 
baccalaureate courses 

not for graduate degree 

credit. 
600-898 Courses restricted to 

graduate students. 
799 Master's tfiesis credit, 

899 Doctoral dissertation 

credit. 
Tfie first cfiaracter of the numeric 
position determines tfie level of the 
course and the last two digits are used 
for course identification. Courses eding 
with an 8 or 9 (third position) are cour- 
ses that are repeatable for credit. All 
non-repeatab!e courses must end in 
through 7. 

Graduate credit will not be given unless the 
student has been admitted to 
the Graduate School. 



Designation of Full and Part-Time 
Graduate Students 

In order to accurately reflect the involvement of 
graduate students in their programs of study and 
research and the use of university resources in 
those programs, the Graduate Council uses the 
graduate unit in making calculations to determine 
full or part-time student status in the administra- 
tion of the minimum registration requirements 
described below and in responding to student 
requests for certification of full-time student 
status. The number of graduate units per semes- 
ter credit hour is calculated in the following man- 
ner: 



Courses in the series: 000-399 carry 2 

units/credit hour. 

Courses in the series: 400-499 carry 4 

units/credit hour. 

Courses in the series: 500-599 carry 5 

units/credit hour. 

Courses in the series: 600-898 carry 6 

units/credit hour. 

Research course: 799 carries 12 

units/credit hour. 

Research course: 899 carries 18 

units/credit hour. 



To be certified as a full-time student a graduate 
student must be officially registered for a combi- 
nation of courses equivalent to 48 units per se- 
mester. A graduate assistant holding a regular 



appointment is a full-time student if registered for 

24 units in addition to the service appointment. 

Minimum Registration 
Requirements 

All graduate students making any demand upon 
the academic or support services of the universi- 
ty, whether taking courses, using university librar- 
ies, laboratories, computer facilities, office space, 
housing, or consulting with faculty advisors, tak- 
ing comprehensive or final oral examinations. 
must register for the number of graduate units 
which will, in the judgment of the faculty advisor, 
accurately reflect the student's involvement in 
graduate study and use of university resources. In 
no case will registration be for less than 4 units. 

Minimum Registration 
Requirements for Doctoral 
Candidates 

Doctoral students who have been advanced to 
candidacy must register each semester, excluding 
summer sessions, until the degree is awarded. 
Those who have not completed the required 12 
semester credit hours of Dissertation Research 
(899), or its equivalent, must register for a mini- 
mum of 18 graduate units each semester. Doctor- 
al candidates whose demands upon the university 
are greater than that represented by this mini- 
mum registration will, of course, be expected to 
register for the number of units which will reflect 
their use of university resources. 

Doctoral candidates who have completed the 
required minimum of 12 credit hours of Disserta- 
tion Research (899), or its equivalent, and who 
are making no use of university resources, must 
meet a Continuous Registration requirement in 
each semester, except for summer sessions, until 
the degree is awarded. This requirement is met by 
paying the S10 Continuous Registration fee. The 
fee may be paid in person or by mail directly to 
the Graduate School. It must be paid before the 
end of the eighth week of classes during the fall 
and spring semesters. 

Failure to comp/y with the requirement for 
maintaining Continuous Registration will be taken 
as evidence that the student has terminated his or 
her doctoral program and admitted status to the 
Graduate School will be terminated. A new 
application for admission, with the consequent 
re-evaluation of the student's performance, will 
be required of a student wishing to resume a 
graduate program terminated under this 
regulation. 

Grades for Graduate Students 

The following grades are used in the evaluation 
of graduate student performance at the University 
of Maryland, College Park: 

The conventional A through F grading system is 
used in graduate level courses. The A is calculat- 
ed at 4 quality points, and the grades of D, F, and 
I receive no quality points. A student may repeat 
any course in an effort to earn a better grade. The 
later grade, whether higher or lower, will be used 
In computing the grade point average. A mini- 
mum grade point average of 3.0 is required for 
graduation with a graduate degree. All courses 
taken after matriculation as a graduate student 
numbered 400 and above, except those numbered 
799 or 899 and those graded with an S will be 
used in the calculation of the grade point aver- 
age. No course taken after August 23, 1974, will 
be considered not applicable" for the purpose of 



computing the grade point average of a graduate 
student No graduate credit transferred from an- 
other institution will be included in the calcula- 
tion of the grade point average. 

A "Satisfactory or Failure ' (S-F) grading system 
may be used, at the discretion of the department 
or program, lor certain types of graduate study 
These include courses which require independent 
field work, special projects, or Independent 
Study Departmental seminars, workshops, and 
departmental courses in instructional methods 
may also be appropriate for the S-F grading sys- 
tem. 

The ■Pass-Fail" grade option, which may be 
elected by undergraduate students, is not availa- 
ble to students at the graduate level. 

Thesis and dissertation research, and courses 
labelled "Independent Study " or Special Prob- 
lems ' may use either the A-F or the S-F grading 
system. However, only one grading system will be 
used for a single course in a particular semester. 
The grading system will be designated by the 
department or program offering the course. 

Credit-by-Examination 

A graduate student may obtain graduate credit by 
examination in courses at the 400 level previously 
identified by the appropriate department or pro- 
gram. As a general rule credit-by-examination is 
not available for courses at the 600. 700. or 800 
levels for. in the judgment of the Graduate Coun- 
cil, courses at these levels require a continuing 
interaction between faculty and students to 
achieve the educational goals of advanced study. 

A student may receive credit-by-examination 
only for a course for which he or she is otherwise 
eligible to receive graduate credit. The depart- 
ment or program in which he or sire is enrolled 
may establish a limit on the number of credits 
which may be earned through credit-by-exami- 
nation must obtain the consent of his or her advi- 
sor. 

The Graduate School maintains a list of cours- 
es for which examinations are available or will be 
prepared. The fee for credit-by-examination for 
full-time graduate students is S30.00 per course 
regardless of the number of credits or units to be 
earned. Part-time graduate students will be 
charged the same fee per credit hour they would 
pay if taking the course in the usual manner. 

Transfer of Credit 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate 
level course credits earned at regionally accredit- 
ed institutions prior to. or after, matriculation in 
the Graduate School may be applied toward mas- 
ter s degrees at the University of Maryland. Pro- 
portionately larger amounts of credit may be ap- 
plied toward doctoral degrees. 

All graduate study credits offered as trans- 
fer credit must meet the following criteria: 

1. They must have received graduate credit at 
the institution where earned. 

2. They must not have been used to meet the 
requirements for any degree previously 
earned. 

3. They must have been taken within the time 
limits applicable to degrees awarded by the 
Graduate School. 

4. The department or program to which the 
student has been admitted at Maryland must 
certify the courses are appropriate to the 
degree program the student is pursuing at 
Maryland. 

5. The student earned a B or better in the 
courses offered for transfer credit. 

General Information /IS 



A student seeking acceptance of transfer credit 
is advised to submit the necessary transcripts and 
certification of department or program approval 
to the Graduate School as promptly as possible 
for its review and decision. 

The Inter-Campus Student 

A student admitted to the Graduate School on 
any campus of the university is eligible to take 
courses on any other campus of the university 
with the approval of his or her academic advisor 
and the graduate deans on the home and host 
capipuses. Credits earned on a host campus are 
resident credit at the home campus and meet all 
degree requirements. Transcripts of work taken at 
another campus will be maintained on the home 
campus and fees will be paid to the home cam- 
pus. Forms for effecting registration as an inter- 
campus student may be obtained from the 
Graduate School offices on any campus of the 
university. 

Fees and Expenses 

All Students Who Pre-Reglster Incur a Financial 
Obligation to the University. Those students who 
pre-register and subsequently decide not to at- 
tend must notify the Registration Office, Room 
1130A, North Administration Building, in writing, 
prior to the first day of classes. If this office has 
not received a request for cancellation by 4:30 
p.m. of the last day before classes begin, the 
University will assume the student plans to attend 
and accepts his financial obligation 

After classes begin, students who wish to termi- 
nate their registration must follow the withdrawal 
procedures and are liable for charges applicable 
at the time of withdrawal. 

State of Maryland legislation has established a 

State Central Collections Unit and in accordance 
with State law the University is required to turn 
over all delinquent accounts to them for collec- 
tion and legal follow-up. These are automatically 
done on a monthly basis by computer read-out 



Graduate Fees* 

Application fee 

This fee is not refundable 

Tuition Per Credit Hour: 

Resident Student 

Non-Resident Student 

Students admitted to the Graduate 
School must pay graduate tuition fees 
whether or not the credit will be used to 
satisfy program requirements. A grad- 
uate student who wishes to audit a course 
must pay the usual graduate tuition 

Continuous Registration Fee 

Registration Fee 

Recreation Fee 

(Summer School Only) 

Vehicle Registration Fee 

Graduate Fee. 

Master's Degree 

Graduation Fee. 

Doctor's Degree 

Healtl^ Fee (Per Semester) 

(Part Time Student) 

Hea/fh Fee (Per Semester) 

(Full Time Student) 



$15.00 



$50.00 
$85.00 



$10.00 
$ 5.00 



$ 4.00 
$12.00 



$15.00 



$60.00 
$ 5.00 



$1000 



The fees listed here are those charged at the time this 
Catalog went to press and are offered as a general guide 
They are subject to change Fees charged in a particular 
semester are published in the Schedule of Classes for that 
semester 

14 / General Information 



Determination of In-State Status 
for Admission, Tuition and 
Charge-Differential Purposes 

The Board of Regents of the University of Mary- 
land approved new regulations for the determina- 
tion of in-state status for admission, tuition and 
charge-differential purposes at its meeting on 
September 21, 1973. The new regulations become 
effective with the January 1974 term. 

An initial determination of in-state status for 
admission, tuition and charge-differential purpos- 
es will be made by the University at the time a 
student's application for admission is under con- 
sideration. The determination made at that time, 
and any determination made thereafter shall pre- 
vail in each semester until the determination is 
successfully challenged. The deadline for meeting 
all requirements for an in-state status and for 
submitting all documents for reclassification is 
the last day of late registration for the semester 
the student wishes to be classified as an in-state 
student 

The volume of requests for reclassification may 
necessitate a delay in completing the review pro- 
cess. It is hoped that a decision in each case will 
be made within ninety (90) days of a request for 
determination. During this period of time, or any 
further period of time required by the University, 
fees and charges based on the previous determi- 
nation must be paid. If the determination is 
changed, any excess fees and charges will be 
refunded. 

Persons who are interested in obtaining a copy 
of the regulations or who wish assistance with 
their classification should contact; The Graduate 
School, South Administration Building, University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742— 
phone (301) 454-5428. 



Degree Requirements 

Graduate School Requirements 
Applicable to all Master's 
Degrees 

In addition to the following requirements special 
departmental or collegiate requirements may be 
imposed, especially in the case of those degrees 
which are offered only in one department, college 
or division For these special requirements con- 
sult the descriptions which appear under the 
departmental or collegiate listing in this catalog 
or the special publications which can be obtained 
from the department or college. 

The entire course of study undertaken for any 
masters degree must constitute a unified, coher- 
ent program which is approved by the student's 
advisor and by the Graduate School. 

A minimum of thirty semester hours in courses 
acceptable for credit towards a graduate degree 
are required; in certain cases six of the thirty 
semester hours must be thesis research credits. 
The graduate program must include at least 12 
hours of course work, in the major subject and at 
least 12 hours of course work at the 600 level or 
higher. If the student is inadequately prepared for 
the required graduate courses, additional courses 
may be required. These courses may not be con- 
sidered as part of his or her graduate program. 

To graduate the student must have an average 
grade of B over all graduate courses taken. 



All requirements for the master's degree must 
be completed within a five year period. A mini- 
mum residence of one year of full-time study at 
this university (or its equivalent) is required. 

The particular requirements for the degrees of 
Master of Arts, Master of Science, and Master of 
Education are given directly below. Those for the 
degrees of Master of Business Administration, 
Master of Library Science, Master of Music, and 
Master of Fine Arts are given under "Graduate 
Programs " in those fields. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 
AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 



Thesis Option 

Course Requirements 
A minimum of 30 semester hours including six 
hours of thesis research credit (799) is required 
for the degrees of Master of Arts and Master of 
Science. Of the 24 hours required in graduate 
courses, not less than 12 must be earned in the 
major subject. Not less than one-half of the total 
required course credits for the degree, or a mini- 
mum of twelve, must be selected from courses 
numbered 600 or above. 

Thesis Requirement 

A thesis is required for the Master of Arts and 
Master of Science degrees except for those pro- 
grams in which a non-thesis option has been 
approved by the Dean for Graduate Studies in 
conformity with the policy of the Graduate Coun- 
cil. Approval of the thesis is the responsibility of 
an examining committee appointed by the Dean 
for Graduate Studies. The student's advisor is the 
chairman of the committee and the remaining 
members of the committee are members of the 
graduate faculty who are familiar with the stu- 
dent's program of study The chairman and the 
candidate are informed of the membership of the 
examining committee by the Dean. 

A final oral examination on the thesis shall be 
held when the student has completed his or her 
thesis to the satisfaction of his or her advisor, 
providing he or she has completed all other re- 
quirements for the degree and has earned a 3.0 
grade point average computed in accordance 
with the regulations described above. The exam- 
ining committee, with a minimum of three mem- 
bers, conducts the oral examination (an addition- 
al comprehensive written examination may be 
required at the option of the department or pro- 
gram.). The chairman of the examining committee 
selects the time and place for the examination 
and notifies other members of the committee and 
the candidate. Members of the committee must 
be given a minimum of 7 school days in which to 
read the thesis. 

The duration of the examination is normally 
about an hour but it may be longer if necessary 
to insure an adequate examination. The report of 
the committee, signed by each member, must be 
submitted to the Dean for Graduate Studies no 
later than the appropriate date listed in the "Im- 
portant Dates for Advisors and Students" if the 
student is to receive a diploma at the Commence- 
ment in the semester in which the examination is 
held. 

Directions for the preparation and submission 
of theses will be found in the Graduate Student 



Academic Handbook which may be purchased at 
the university bool< store, 

Non-Thesis Option 

The requirements tor Master of Arts and Master 
of Science degrees without thesis vary slightly 
among departments and programs in which this 
option is available. Standards for admission are, 
however, identical with those for admission to 
any other master's program. The quality of the 
work expected of the student is also identical to 
that expected in the thesis programs. 

The general requirements for those on the 
non-thesis program are: a minimum of 30 semes- 
ter credit hours in courses approved for graduate 
credit with a minimum average grade of B in all 
course work taken; a minimum of 18 semester 
credit hours in courses numbered 600 or above: 
the submission of one or more scholarly papers; 
and passing a written comprehensive final exami- 
nation. 

A student following a non-thesis master's pro- 
gram will be expected to meet the same dead- 
lines for application for a diploma and for final 
examination reports established for all other de- 
gree programs. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
DEGREE OF MASTER OF 
EDUCATION 

Nearly all departments in Education offer the 
Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree with the fol- 
lowing requirements: 

Nearly all departments in Education offer the 
Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree with the fol- 
lowing requirements: 

1. A minimum of 30 semester hours in course- 
work with a grade average of B. Grades for 
courses not a part of the program but taken 
in graduate status will be computed in the 
average. 

2. A minimum of 15 hours in courses num- 
bered 600-800 v'ith the remainder at least in 
the 400 series. Some departments require 
courses in departments outside of those in 
Education. 

3. A comprehensive written examination taken 
at the end of coursework. A part of the 
examination may be oral. 

4. EDMS 646 or EDMU 690 and one seminar 
paper; or two seminar papers. 

5. EDMS 446 or EDMS 451. 

6. Test battery. 

For further details, see 'Statement of Policies 
and Procedures: Master's Degrees in Education," 
issued by the College of Education, and descrip- 
tions of departmental programs. 

For further details, see "Statement of Policies 
and Procedures: Master's Degrees in Education," 
issued by the College of Education, and descrip- 
tions of departmental programs. 

Advanced Graduate Specialist 
Program 

General requirements for admission are the same 
as for degree programs. Specific details for fulfill- 
ing certificate requirements are listed under Cate- 
gories of Admission— Advanced Graduate Spe- 
cialist Certificate Status. For additional details see 
"Statement of Policies and Procedures; Advanced 



Graduate Specialist Program in Education," is- 
sued by the College of Education. 



Graduate School Requirements 
Applicable to All Doctoral 
Degrees 

GENERAL 

In addition to the following requirements special 
departmental or collegiate requirements may be 
imposed especially in the case of those degrees 
which are offered in only one department, college 
or division. For these special requirements con- 
sult the descriptions which appear under the 
departmental or collegiate listing in this catalog 
or the special publications which can be obtained 
from the department, college or division. 



Program 



The number of credit hours required in the pro- 
gram varies with the degree and program in ques- 
tion. 



Residence 

The equivalent of three years of full-time graduate 
study and research is the minimum required. Of 
the three years the equivalent of at least one year 
must be spent at the University of Maryland. On a 
part-time basis the time needed will be increased 
correspondingly. All work at other institutions 
offered in partial fulfillment of the requirements 
for any doctoral degree must be submitted with 
the recommendation of the Department or Pro- 
gram concerned to the Graduate School for ap- 
proval at the time of application for admission 
candidacy. Official transcripts of the work must 
be on file in the Graduate School. 



Admission to Candidacy 

Preliminary examinations or such other substan- 
tial tests as the departments may elect are fre- 
quently prerequisite for admission to candidacy. 
A student must be admitted to candidacy within 
five years after admission to the doctoral pro- 
gram. 

A student must be admitted to candidacy for 
the doctorate at least one academic year before 
the date on which the degree will be conferred. 

Applications for admission to candidacy for the 
doctorate are made in duplicate by the student 
and submitted to his or her major department for 
further action and transmission to the Graduate 
School. Application forms may be obtained at the 
office of the Graduate School. 

The student must complete all of his or her 
program for the degree, including the dissertation 
and final examination, during a four year period 
after admission to candidacy. Extensions of time 
are granted only under the most unusual cir- 
cumstances. Failure to complete all requirements 
within the time allotted requires another applica- 
tion for admission to the Graduate School and, if 
readmitted, another application for Advancement 
to Candidacy after satisfying the usual program 
prerequisites prior to Advancement to Candidacy. 

It is the responsibility of the student to submit 
his or her application for admission to candidacy 
when all the requirements for candidacy have 
been fulfilled. 



Dissertation 

A dissertation or its equivalent is required of all 
candidates for a doctoral degree. The topic of the 
dissertation must be approved by the department 
or program committee. 

Directions for the preparation and submission 
of dissertations will be found in the Graduate 
Student Academic Handbool( which may be 
purchased at the university book store. 

During the preparation of the dissertation, all 
candidates for any doctoral degree must register 
for the prescribed number of semester hours of 
Doctoral Dissertation Research, numbered 899, at 
the University of Maryland. 

Publication of all or a portion of the disserta- 
tion prior to its defense and approval by the 
Graduate Faculty examining committee requires 
prior approval of the Dean for Graduate Studies. 
This approval is sought through a letter to the 
dean, endorsed by the dissertation advisor, con- 
taining an explanation of the need for early publi- 
cation. 



Final Examination 

The final oral defense of the dissertation is con- 
ducted by a Committee of the Graduate Faculty 
appointed by the Dean for Graduate Studies. The 
committee will consist of a minimum of five vot- 
ing members, all of whom hold the doctoral de- 
gree. At least one of the five must hold appoint- 
ment in a department or Graduate Program exter- 
nal to the one in which the student is seeking the 
degree. A minimum of three members of the 
committee must be regular members of the Grad- 
uate Faculty of the University of Maryland. 

One member of the committee is designated by 
the Dean as his Representative. In addition to 
having the normal responsibility of a faculty ex- 
aminer, the Dean's representative has the respon- 
sibility of assuring that the examination is con- 
ducted according to established procedures. Any 
disagreement over the examination procedures is 
referred to the Dean's representative for decision. 

One or more members of the committee may be 
persons from other institutions who hold the doc- 
torate and who are distinguished scholars in the 
field of the dissertation. 

Nominations for membership on the committee 
are submitted by the student's major professor on 
the form certifying that the dissertation has been 
completed and is ready for distribution to the 
Committee. Complete copies of the dissertation 
must be distributed to the committee at least ten 
days before the examination. The time and place 
of the examination are established by the major 
professor who serves as chairman of the commit- 
tee. 

All final oral examinations are open to all mem- 
bers of the Graduate Faculty. After the examina- 
tion the committee deliberates and votes in pri- 
vate. Two or more negative votes constitute a fail- 
ure. 

The candidate may only present himself or her- 
self for the final oral examination twice. 



Particular Requirements 

The particular requirements for the Doctor of Phi- 
losophy and Doctor of Education degrees are 
given immediately below. The particular require- 
ments for the degrees. Doctor of Business Admin- 
istration, and Doctor of Musical Arts are given 
under the corresponding program descriptions. 



General Information /1 5 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF 
PHILOSOPHY 

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree Is granted only 
upon sufficient evidence of high attainment in 
scholarship and the ability to engage in inde- 
pendent research. It is not awarded for the com- 
pletion of course and seminar requirements no 
matter how successfully completed. 

Residence 

See requirements for all doctoral degrees. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

A number of departments have a foreign lan- 
guage requirement for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. The student should inquire in the depart- 
ment regarding this requirement. The student 
must satisfy the departmental or program require- 
ment before he or she can be admitted to candi- 
dacy for the doctorate. 

Program 

There is no Graduate School requirement for a 
specific number of course credits in either a ma- 
jor or a minor subject. It is the policy of the Grad- 
uate School to encourage the development of 
individual programs for each student who seeks 
the Ph.D. To that end the academic departments 
and interdisciplinary programs have been direct- 
ed to determine major and minor requirements, 
levels or sequences of required courses, and sim- 
ilar requirements for submission to the Graduate 
Council for approval. 

Admission to Candidacy 

See requirements for all doctoral degrees. 

Dissertation 

The ability to do independent research must be 
demonstrated by an original dissertation on a top- 
ic approved by the department or program. 

During the preparation of the dissertation, all 
candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree 
must register for a minimum of 12 semester hours 
of doctoral research, numbered 899, at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Final Examination 

See requirements for all doctoral degrees. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF 
EDUCATION 

The requirements for the Doctor of Education 
(Ed.D.) degree are for the most part the same as 
those for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in 
Education, departments in the Graduate School. 
The only difference lies in the amount of credit 
for the Ed.D. project (6-9 hours) as compared to 
that required for the Ph.D. dissertation (12-16 
hours). For details see "Statement of Policy and 
Procedures: Doctoral Degrees in Education," is- 
sued by the College of Education as well as re- 
quirements for the Ph.D.; see above, and depart- 
mental regulations. 

16 / General Information 



Commencement 

Applications for the diploma must be filed with 
the Office of Admissions and Registrations within 
the first three weeks of the semester in which the 
candidate expects to obtain a degree except dur- 
ing summer session. During the summer session, 
the application must be filed during the first week 
of the second summer session. 

If, for any reason, a student does not graduate 
at the end of the semester m which he or she 
applies for the diploma, he or she must re-apply 
for it in the semester in which he or she expects 
to graduate. 

Academic costume is required of all candidates 
at commencement exercises. Those who so de- 
sire may purchase or rent caps and gowns at the 
University of Maryland student supply store. Or- 
ders must be filed eight weeks before the date of 
commencement but may be cancelled later if the 
student finds himself or herself unable to com- 
plete his or her work for the degree. 



Student Services 



Housing 

There is no on-campus housing provided for 
unmarried graduate students. The Off-Campus 
Housing Office (Room 1211 H, Student Union, 
454-3645), in cooperation with many of the local 
landlords and apartment managers, maintains an 
extensive and up-to-date list of vacancies under 
several headings (Rooms, Unfurnished Apart- 
ments, Houses to Share, etc.). This office can also 
provide students with convenient maps of the 
College Park area, and with lists of local motels, 
trailer and mobile home parks, real estate agents, 
and furniture rental companies. 

The lowest known rates for housing in the area 
are about $50-$125 per month for a room in a pri- 
vate home, $110-$230 per month for an efficiency 
or one bedroom apartment; $150/month for a 
furnished apartment, $90-130/month for shared 
apartment, and $250/month for a two-bedroom 
house. 

The university itself maintains two apartment 
complexes for married graduate students and for 
a limited number of single graduate students. 
Both Lord Calvert Apartments and University Hills 
Apartments are within walking distance of cam- 
pus, which means that there is usually a waiting 
list, especially during the period immediately 
preceding the fall semester. Priority for housing 
in these complexes is currently given to married 
full-time graduate assistants, then married 
full-time graduate non-assistants. 

Rent for a one-bedroom apartment is about 
$125/month, with two-bedroom apartments cost- 
ing about fifteen dollars more; a limited number 
of efficiencies are available to single students for 
a slightly lower monthly rent. Students must sign 
a one year lease and pay a security deposit of $50 
(payable when the applicant's name is added to 
the waiting list). There is a nonrefundable appli- 
cation fee for adding a name to the waiting list. 
After the initial lease expires, residence in the 
apartments is on a monthly basis. Graduate stu- 
dents who maintain full-time status are permitted 
to live in the apartments for a maximum of five 
years. 

Information and applications for university- 
owned housing can be obtained from the Rental 
Office 3424 Tulane Drive. Hyattsville, Maryland 
20783 (422-7445). 



University Food Services 

The University Food Service offers three dining 
contract options which are available to graduate 
students. One plan offers the diner 20 meals per 
week, the second offers 3 meals/day for five 
days/week, and the third offers the choice of any 
10 meals/week The 1975-1976 cost of contract 
dining plans ranged from $330 to $380 per se- 
mester. University affiliated people can obtain 
guest meal tickets for individual meals in contract 
dining halls for fairly reasonable prices (unlimited 
quantities for $1.65 at breakfast, $2.00 at lunch, 
and $2.50 at dinner). N^ore information about con- 
tract dining can be obtained from Mr. John 
Goecker (454-2901). 

In addition to the services offered by the con- 
tract dining halls, graduate students may wish to 
take advantage of the cash line services available 
at the Hill Dining Hall or the various restaurants 
and snack bars at the Student Union. 

Hillel Kosher Dining Club, housed in Hillel 
House, 7505 Yale Avenue, College Park 
(277-8961), provides Kosher meals on either a 
regular or occasional basis. 



Health Service 

The University Health Center provides routine 
medical treatment, emergency care, laboratory 
and x-ray services for all graduate and undergrad- 
uate students. The Women's Health Care Unit 
provides gynecological services and family plan- 
ning In addition Mental Health services are avail- 
able at the Health Center both by appointment 
and on an emergency basis. Specialty clinics are 
available in Dermatology and Orthopedics by re- 
ferral from Health Center physicians. Health Edu- 
cation materials and resources are available 
through the Health Educator. 

The Health Center is open throughout the year, 
Monday through Friday, 8;30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for 
routing services. Saturday hours are 9:00 a.m. to 
5:00 p.m. while Sunday hours are 10:00 a.m. to 
6:00 p.m. The center is staffed 24 hours a day for 
emergencies with nurses on duty and a physician 
IS on call at all times. During extended school 
vacation periods and semester breaks when the 
center is closed, a physician is available through 
the campus operator. There is no charge for rou- 
tine medical care or professional services but 
charges are made for certain laboratory tests, all 
x-rays and allergy injections. 



Career Development Center 

The Career Development Center offers a wide va- 
riety of services to graduate students. The goal of 
the center is to assist students in exploring career 
opportunities and planning their careers. Services 
include career advising, the Career Library, the 
credentials service, and the on-campus interview 
program. 

The career advising program includes both in- 
dividual and group advising sessions. The Career 
Library contains occupational information, 
full-time job listings, employer directories, and 
other reference sources. 

Graduate students are eligible to participate in 
the on-campus interview program, which involves 
campus visits by representatives from business, 
government, and education. Students interested 
in employment in the fields of education and li- 
brary science will find the Credentials Service 
especially valuable. 



Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center offers consultation on 
education/psychological concerns: an open edu- 
cational-vocational information library; recorded 
interviews with department heads on the charac- 
teristics of graduate majors offered on the cam- 
pus; and a weekly R&D series of presentations 
on current educational/psychological topics. 

Available services include the following; the 
Counseling Service, which offers initial consulta- 
tion on any problems and provides further coun- 
seling services or referral services to appropriate 
individuals or agencies in the area; the Reading 
and Study Skills Laboratory, for those interested 
in improving any of their educational skills; the 
Parent Consultation and Child Evaluation Service, 
providing a variety of services to the parents of 
young cfiildren with learning or behavior prob- 
lems; and the Testing, Research and Data Pro- 
cessing Division, which serves as the testing and 
census taking arm of the campus. 

Additional Graduate School 
Publications 

The following is a list of publications available to 
students who have been admitted to the Graduate 
School. 

GUIDE TO GRADUATE LIFE 

A handbook designed to provide the new gradu- 
ate student with an introduction to the campus 
and the College Park area, the Guide is available 
from the Office of the Dean for Graduate Studies. 

IMPORTANT DATES FOR 
ADVISORS AND STUDENTS 

This calendar card of dates for submission of 
final documents is available from the various 
departmental graduate offices, as well as from the 
Office of the Dean for Graduate Studies. 

GRADUATE STUDENT ACADEMIC 
HANDBOOK 

This manual contains the instructions for prepara- 
tion of dissertations and is available at a nominal 
cost from the university book store. 

Policy of the University 
of Maryland on Access 
to and Release of 
Student 
Data/Information 

General Statement 

The University of Maryland has the responsibility 
for effectively supervising any access to and/or 
release of official data/information about its stu- 
dents. Certain items of information about individ- 
ual students are fundamental to the educational 
process and must be recorded. This recorded in- 
formation concerning students must be used only 
for clearly-defined purposes, must be safeguard- 
ed and controlled to avoid violations of personal 
privacy, and must be appropriately disposed of 
when the justification for its collection and reten- 
tion no longer exists. 



In this regard, the university is committed to 
protecting to the maximum extent possible the 
right of privacy of all individuals about whom it 
holds information, records and files. Access to 
and release of such records is restricted to the 
student concerned, to others with the student's 
written consent, to officials within the university, 
to a court of competent jurisdiction and other- 
wise pursuant to law. 

Access 

All official information collected and maintained 
in the university identifiable with an individual 
student wil' be made available for inspection and 
review at the written request of that student sub- 
ject to certain exceptions. 

For purposes of access to records at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, a student enrolled (or former- 
ly enrolled) for academic credit or audit at any 
campus of the university shall have access to 
official records concerning him on any campus 
on which he is or has been enrolled. 

The personal files of members of the faculty 
and staff which concern students, including pri- 
vate correspondence, and notes which refer to 
students, are not regarded as official records of 
the university. This includes notes intended for 
the personal use of the faculty and never 
intended to be official records of the university. 

A request for general access to all official re- 
cords, files and data maintained by a campus, 
must be made in writing to the coordinator of 
records or to other person(s) as designated by 
the chancellor at that particular campus. A re- 
quest for access to official data maintained in a 
particular office may be made to the administra- 
tive head of that office. 

When a student (or former student) appears at 
a given office and requests access to the universi- 
ty records about himself. 

When a student (or former student) appears at ' 
a given office and requests access to the universi- 
ty records about himself. 

1. The student must provide proper identifica- 
tion verifying that he is the person whose 
record is being accessed. 

2. The designated staff person(s) must super- 
vise the review of the contents of the record 
with the student. 

3. Inspection and review shall be permitted 
within a period not to exceed 45 days from 
the date of the student's request. 

the date of the student's request. 

4. The student will be free to make notes con- 
cerning the contents but no material will be 
removed from the record at the time. 

Under normal circumstances, the student is en- 
titled to receive a copy only of his permanent 
academic record. A reasonable administrative fee 
may be charged for providing copies of this or 
other items. 

Record keeping personnel and members of the 
faculty and staff with administrative assignment 
may have access to records and files for internal 
educational purposes as well as for routinely 
necessary clerical, administrative and statistical 
purposes as required by the duties of their jobs. 
The name and position of the official responsible 
for the maintenance of each type of educational 
record may be obtained from the coordinator of 
records or other person appointed by the chan- 
cellor on each campus. 

Any other access allowed by law must be re- 
corded showing the legitimate educational or 
other purpose and the signature of the person 



gaining access. The student concerned shall be 
entitled to review this information. 

Release of Information 

fcxcept with the prior written consent of the stu- 
dent (or former student) concerned, or as re- 
quired by federal and state law, no information in 
any student file may be released to any individual 
(including parents, spouse, or other students) or 
organization with the exception of information 
defined as "Public Information." 

When disclosure of any personally identifiable 
data/information from university records about a 
student is demanded pursuant to court order or 
lawfully issued subpoena, the staff member re- 
ceiving such order shall immediately notify the 
student concerned in writing prior to compliance 
with such order or subpoena. 

Data/information from university records about 
students will be released for approved research 
purposes only if the identity of the student in- 
volved is fully protected. 

A record will be kept of all such releases. 

Information from university records may be re- 
leased to appropriate persons in connection with 
an emergency if the knowledge of such informa- 
tion IS necessary to protect the health or safety of 
a student or other persons. 

Public Information 

The following items are considered public 
data/information and may be disclosed by the 
university in response to inquiries concerning in- 
dividual students, whether the inquiries are in 
person, in writing or over the telephone, 

1. Name 

2. Affirmation of whether currently enrolled 

3. Campus location 

Unless the student has officially filed a request 
with the campus registrar that disclosure not be . 
made without his written permission, the follow- 
ing items in addition to those above are consid- 
ered public information and may be included in 
appropriate university/campus directories and 
publications and may be disclosed by designated 
staff members in each campus in response to 
inquiries concerning individual students, whether 
the inquiries are in person, in writing, or over the 
telephone. 

1. School, college, department, major or divi- 
sion 

2. Dates of enrollment 

3. Degrees received 

4. Honors received 

5. Local address and phone number 

6. Home address (permanent) 

7. Participation In officially recognized activi- 
ties and sports 

8. Weight and height of members of athletic 
terms 

The release of public information as described 
above may be limited by an individual campus 
policy. 

Letters of Appraisal 

Candid appraisals and evaluations of perform- 
ance and potential are an essential part of the 
educational process. Clearly, the provision of 
such information to prospective employers, to 
other educational institutions, or to other legiti- 
mately concerned outside individuals and agen- 

General Information /1 7 



cies is necessary and in the interest of the parti- 
cular student 

Data/information which was part of university 
records prior to January 1. 1975 and which was 
collected and maintained as confidential informa- 
tion, will not be disclosed to students. Should a 
student desire access to a confidential letter of 
appraisal received prior to January 1. 1975. the 
student shall be advised to have the writer of that 
appraisal notify, in writing, the concerned records 
custodian of the decision as to whether or not the 
writer is willing to have the appraisal made availa- 
ble for the student's review. Unless a written re- 
sponse is received approving a change of status 
in the letter, the treatment of the letter as a confi- 
dential document shall continue. 

Documents of appraisal relating to students 
collected by the university or any department or 
office of the university on or after January 1. 
1975. will be maintained confidentially only if a 
waiver of the right of access has been executed 
by the student. In the absence of such a waiver, 
all such documents will be available for student 
inspection and review. 

All references, recommendations, evaluations 
and other written notations or comments, origi- 
nated prior to January 1. 1975. where the author 
by reason of custom, common practice, or specif- 
ic assurance thought or had good reason to be- 
lieve that such documents and materials would 
be confidential, will be maintained as confiden- 
tial, unless the author consents in writing to 
waive such confidentiality. 

If a student files a written waiver with the de- 
partment or office concerned, letters of appraisal 
received pursuant to that waiver will be main- 
tained confidentially Forms will be available for 
this purpose. 



Challenges to the Record 

Every student shall have the opportunity to chal- 
lenge any item in his file which he considers to 
be inaccurate, misleading or otherwise inappro- 
priate data. A student shall initiate a challenge by 
submitting a request m writing for the deletion or 
correction of the particular item. The request 
shall be made to the custodian of the particular 
record in question 

If the custodian and the student involved are 
unable to resolve the matter to the satisfaction of 
both parties, the written request for deletion or 
correction shall be submitted by the student to 
the coordinator of records, or other such person 
as designated by the chancellor, who shall serve 
as the hearing officer. The student shall be given 
the opportunity for a hearing, at which the stu- 
dent may present oral or written lustification for 
the request for deletion or correction. The hear- 
ing officer may obtain such other information as 
he deems appropriate for use in the hearing and 
shall give the student a written decision on the 
matter within thirty (30) days from the conclusion 
of the hearing. If the decision of the hearing 



officer is to deny the deletion or correction of an 
item in the student's file, the student shall be en- 
titled to submit a written statement to the hearing 
officer presenting his position with regard to the 
item. Both the written decision of the hearing 
officer and the statement admitted by the student 
shall be inserted in the students file. The deci- 
sion of the hearing officer shall be final. 

Grades may be challenged under this proce- 
dure only on the basis of the accuracy of their 
transcription. 



Exceptions to the Policy 

It is the position of the university that certain 
data/information maintained in various offices of 
the university is not subject to the provisions of 
this policy with regard to inspection, review, chal- 
lenge, correction or deletion. 



(a) Statements submitted by parent/guardian 
or spouse in support of financial aid or re- 
sidency determinations are considered to 
be confidential between those persons and 
the university, and are not subject to the 
provisions of this policy except with the 
written consent of the persons involved. 
Such documents are not regarded as part 
of the student's official record. 

(b) University employment records of students 
are not included in this policy, except as 
provided under Article 76A of the Annotat- 
ed Code of N^aryland. 

(c) With regard to general health data, only 
that data/information which is used by the 
university in making a decision regarding 
the student's status is subject to review by 
the student under this policy. Written psy- 
chiatric or psychological case notes which 
form the basis for diagnoses, recommenda- 
tions, or treatment plans remain privileged 
information not accessible to the student. 
Such case notes are not considered to be 
part of official university records. To ensure 
the availability of correct and helpful inter- 
pretations of any psychological test scores, 
notes or other evaluative or medical materi- 
als, the contents of these files for an indi- 
vidual student may be reviewed by that 
student only in consultation with a profes- 
sional staff member of the specific depart- 
ment involved. 

(d) Records relating to a continuing or active 
investigation by the campus security office, 
or records of said ffice not relating to the 
student's status with the University are not 
subject to this policy. 

(3) No student is entitled to see information or 
records that pertain to another student, to 
parents, or to other third parties. A student 
is entitled to review only that portion of an 
official record or file that pertains to him or 
her. 



Notice 

Notice of these policies and procedures will be 
published by the university. 

The foregoing statement of university policy 
becomes effective immediately, but should be 
regarded as tentative pending the issuance of 
federal regulations and guidelines or amend- 
ments in the applicable laws. 

The masculine gender of personal pronouns in 
this document includes the feminine gender. 

Approved by the President's Administrative Coun- 
cil, 2/3/75. 

University Policy Statement 

The provisions of this publication are not to be 
regarded as an irrevocable contract between the 
student and the University of Maryland. Changes 
are effected from time to time in the general regu- 
lations and in the academic requirements. There 
are established procedures for making changes, 
procedures which protect the institution's integri- 
ty and the individual student's interest and wel- 
fare. A curriculum or graduation requirement, 
when altered, is not made retroactive unless the 
alteration is to the student's advantage and can 
be accommodated within the span of years nor- 
mally required for graduation When the actions 
of a student are judged by competent authority, 
using established procedure, to be detrimental to 
the interests of the university community, that 
person may be required to withdraw from the 
university 

The University of Maryland, in all its branches 
and divisions, subscribes to a policy of equal 
educational and employment opportunity for 
people of every race, creed, ethnic origin, and 
sex 

It IS university policy that smoking in class- 
rooms is prohibited unless all participants agree 
to the contrary Any student has the right to re- 
mind the instructor of this policy throughout the 
duration of the class. 

Title IX Compliance Policy 

The University of Maryland at College Park does 
not discriminate on the basis of sex in Its educa- 
tional programs and activities. The policy of 
non-discrimination extends to employment in the 
institution and academic admission to the institu- 
tion. Such discrimination is prohibited by Title IX 
of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. 
1681. et seq.) and 45 C F.R. 86, and this notifica- 
tionis required under the Federal regulations pur- 
suant to 20 use 1681 et seq. 

Inquires concerning the application of Tile IX 
and Part 86 of 45 C.F.R. to the University of Mary- 
land, College Park, may be directed to the Office 
of Human Relations Programs. Main Administra- 
tion Building. University of Maryland. College 
Park: or to the Director of the Office of Civil 
Rights of the Department of Health Education, 
and Welfare. Washington, D.C. 



18 / General Information 



The Graduate Faculty 



Aaron. Henry J.. Associate Professor ol Economics 

B A , University of California, Los Angeles. 1958; MA Harvard 

University, 1960; Ph D , 1963 

Abrshamsen, Manin A.. Professor of Agricultural and Resource 

Economics 

B,E , River Falls Teacfiers College, 1930, M A , University of 

Wisconsin, Madison, 1933; Pti D , 1940 

Adams. John 0., Ill, Associate Professor of Economics 

A,B,. Oberlin College, 1960; Pti D , University of Texas, 1965 

Adams. William W.. Professor of Mathematics 
B.A,. University of California, Los Angeles, 1959; Ph.D , Colum- 
bia University, 1%4 

Adelman. Irma. Professor of Economics 
B,S , University of California, 1950, MA , 1951, Pll D 1955 

Adklns, Arthur J., Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
B,S . Saint Cloud Slale College, 1942, M.A., University of Min- 
nesota, 1947. PhD, 1958 
Adier, Isidore, Professor of Chemistry 

B.A, Brooklyn College, 1942, BS , New York University, 1943, 
MS Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1947, Ph,0 , 1952 
Agrawata, A.K., Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
Ph , Harvard University, 1970. 
Agre, Gene P., Associate Professor of Education 
B.A , Macalester College, 1951, BS , University ol Minnesota, 
1953, M A , Ph D , University of Illinois, 1964 

A'Hearn, Michael F., Associate Professor of Astronomy 
B S , Boston College. 1961 ; Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin, 
1966 

Ahern, Dennis M., Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B A , Cornell University, 1%8. Ph.D , University of California, 1973 

Ahrens, Richard A., Professor of Food and Nutrition 
B,S,. University of Wisconsin, 1958; Ph.D , University of Califor- 
nia. Davis. 1963 

Albert, Thomas F., Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 
B,S , Pennsylvania Slate University, 1958, VMD, University ol 
Pennsylvania, 1962, Ph D , Georgetown University, 1972 

Albrecht, Pedro A., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
Dipt Ing Federal Institute of Technology, Switzerland, 1962, 
Ph.D , Lehigh University, 1972 

Alexander, James C, Associate Professor of Mathematics and 

Statistics 

B,A , The Johns Hopkins University, 1964, Pti D , 1968 

Alexander, M.H., Assistant Professor. Chemistry 

B.A, Harvard College, 1964, Ph D , University of Pans, 1967 

Allan J. David., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.Sc, University of British Columbia, 1966, MS , University of 

Michigan, 1968, PhD , 1971 

Allan, Thomas, Associate Professor of Counseling and Person- 
nel Services 

B.S.. Northwestern University. 1950; M,A„ University of Mary- 
land. 1964. Ph.D,, 1%6, 

Allen, Redfleld W., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
BS , University of Maryland, 1953; M S , 1949, Ph.D , University 
of Minnesota, 1959 

Alley, Carroll 0., Jr., Professor of Physics 
B,S , University of Richmond, 1948; MA , Princeton University, 
1951; PtiD, 1962 

Almenas, Kazys K., Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering 
BS , University of Nebraska, 1957, Ph D , University and Poly- 
technic of Warsaw, 1968 

Almon, Clopper, Jr., Professor of Economics 

A B . Vanderbilt University. 1956. MA . Harvard University. 1961 . 

Ph.D , 1962 

Althofi, Sally A., Assistant Professor of Health Education 

BS,, Bowling Green State University. 1966. MEd . University of 

Toledo. 1968. PhD, 1971 

Amersheit, Kathleen G., Associate Professor of Early Child- 
fiood and Elementary Education 

BS. State Teachers College. 1951, M Ed , Pennsylvania State 
University, 1957; PhD , University of Minnesota, 1965 

Ammon, Herman L, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

ScB,. Brown University, 1958, PhD , University ol Washington, 

1962 

Anand, Davinder K., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B,S , George Washington University. 1959. MS . 1961; D. Sc, 
1965, 

Anastos, George, Professor of Zoology 

B.S.. University of Akron, 1942; M,A,. Hanrard University, 1947, 

Ph.D., 1949 

Anderson, Carf R., Assistant Prolessor of Business and Man- 
agement 

BS, The Pennsylvania State University. 1969; MBA,. 1971; 
PhD , 1974 

Anderson, Charles H., Prolessor ol Secondary Education 
B,S„ University of Maryland, 1957, M Ed , 1959; Ed D , 1969 



Anderson, Henry, Prolessor of Secondary Education 

B S , University of Maryland, 1957; M Ed,, 1959: Ed D , 1969 

Anderson, Henry, Professor of Business Administration 

B A , University of London, 1939, MBA, Columbia University, 

1948, Ph D , 1959 

Anderson, J. Paul, Professor of Education. Administration. 

Supervision, and Curriculum 

BS University of Minnesota, 1942; MA , 1948; Ph D , 1960 

Anderson, J. Robert, Associate Professor ol Physics 

B S , State University of Iowa, 1956, Ph D , 1963 

Anderson, John D., Jr., Professor in Aerospace Engineering 

BS , University of Florida. 1959. Ph.D.. Ohio State University, 

1966 

Anderson, Nancy S., Professor of Psychology 
BA . University of Colorado. 1952; MA,, Ohio Slate University. 
1963, Ph D , 1956 

Anderson, Ronnie N., Assistant Prolessor of Business Adminis- 
tration 

B S , University ol North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1962, Ph D , 
1972 

Anderson, Thornton R, Professor of Government and Politics 
A B , University ol Kentucky, 1937, MA,, 1938, PhD . University 
ol Wisconsin. 1948 

Andry, Albert N., Assistant Prolessor ol Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 

BS . University ol Notre Dame. 1969. PhD , Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1973 

Ansello, Edward F., Assistant Prolessor. Institute lor Child 
Study 

A B . Boston College, 1966, M Ed., University of Missouri, 1967, 
Ph D , 1970, 

Antman, Stuart S., Professor of Mathematics 
B S , Rensselaer Polytechnical Institute. 1961 . MS . University 
of Minnesota, 1963, PhD , 1963, 

Armstrong, Ronald W., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
BE S The Johns Hopkins University. 1955. M.Sc, Carnegie- 
Mellon University, 1957, Ph.D , 1958 
Arsenault, Richard J., Prolessor of Chemical Engineering 
B S , Michigan Technological University. 1957; PhD . North- 
western University, 1962 

Ashlock, Robert B., Prolessor ol Early Childhood and Elemen- 
tary Education 

B S , Butler University, 1957, MS, 1959, Ed D , Indiana Univer- 
sity, 1%5 

Ashmen, Roy, Associate Professor ol Marketing 
BS , Drexel Institute of Technology, 1935. MS , Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1936, Ph D , Northwestern University, 1950, 
Asjmow. Robert M., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B S , University of California. Los Angeles. 1953. MS . 1955; 
Ph.D . 1958 

Alchison, William F.. Professor ol Computer Science 
A B-. Georgetown College (Ky ), 1936; MA, University of Ken- 
tucky. 1940; PhD,. University ol Illinois, 1943 

Auslander, Joseph, Prolessor ol Mathematics 
BS , Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1952, M S , Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 1953, PhD , 1957 

Austin, Gilbert, Lecturer in Secondary Education 
BS , Central Connecticut Slate College, 1953; M A L S , Wesley- 
an University, 1956, C A G S University of Hartford, 1959. 
Ph.D , University of Connecticut, 1965 

Austing, Richard H., Associate Prolessor of Computer Science 
B S . Xavier University, 1953. MS . Saint Louis University. 1955, 
PhD , Catholic University ol America, 1963, 

Avery, William T., Professor and Chairman of Classical Lan- 
guages and Literatures 
BA , Western Resen/e University, 1934; M A,. 1935. Ph D . 1937 

Axley, John H., Professor of Agronomy 

BA. University of Wisconsin. 1937. Ph.D.. 1945, 

Aycock, Marvin K., Jr., Associate Professor ol Agronomy 
B S . North Carolina Stale University. 1959; M.S.. 1963; PtiD , 
Iowa State University, 1966 

Aytward, Thomas J., Prolessor and Chairman ol Speech and 

Dramatic Art, 

BS-, University of Wisconsin. 1947. MS , 1949; PhD . 1960 

Babuska, Ivo, Research Professor. Institute lor Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 

Dipl Ing. Technical University ol Prague. 1949; PhD,, 1960, 
Ph D , Czechoslovak Academy ol Sciences, 1955, Ph.D , 1960 

Bagchi, Amitabha, Assistant Professor of Physics 

BSc. Calcutta University, 1964, MS , University ol Calilornia. 

San Diego, 1967; Ph D , 1970. 

Bailey, Martin J., Professor of Economics 

B A , University of California. Los Angeles. 1951 ; M A . The 

Johns Hopkins University. 1953; Ph.D . 1956 

Bailey, William J., Research Professor of Chemistry 
B. Chem . University ol Minnesota. 1943; Ph.D . University ol Il- 
linois. 1946, 



Baird, Janet R.. Assistant Prolessor ol Secondary Education 
BS , University ol Kansas, 1966, MA , 1971. PhD , 1973 
BaIrd, Joan C. Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 
B S , Kansas State University, 1956; M S , 1960; Ed D , Oklahoma State 
University, 1969 

Baker. Donald J., Associate Prolessor ol Hearing and Speech 

Sciences 

B S Ed , Ohio Slate University, 1954. M A . 1956; PhD , 1962, 

Baker, Robert L, Associate Prolessor ol Horticulture 

B A , Swarthmore Ckjilege. 1959; MS. University ol Maryland. 

1962. PhD, 1965 

Bandel. Vernon A., Associate Professor of Agronomy 

B S . University of Maryland. 1959. MS . 1962; Ph.D.. 1966. 

Banerjee, Manoj K., Professor of Physics 

BS , Patna University. 1949; M S , Calcutta University. 1951: 

PhD, 1956 

Bankson, Nicholas W., Assistant Prolessor of Hearing and 
Speech Sciences 

B S , University ol Kansas. 1960; MA. 1961; Ph.D . 1970, 
Baras, John S., Assistant Prolessor ol Electrical Engineering 
Diploma, National Technical University ol Athens, 1970 S M , 
Harvard University, 1971, PhD , 1973 
Barbarin, Oscar. Assistant Prolessor ol Psychology 
A B , St Joseph s Seminary College, 1968, M A , New York Uni- 
versity, 1971; MS , Rutgers University, 1973, PhD , 1975 
Barber, Willard F., Lecturer m Government and Politics 
A B . Stanford University, 1928, M A , 1929, Diploma, the War 
College, 1948 

Bardasis, Angelo, Associate Professor of Physics 

A B., Cornell University, 1957, MS , University of Illinois, 1959; 

PhD , 1962 

Barlow, Jewel B., Assistant Professor of Aerospace Engineer- 



Barnes, Jack C, Associate Professor of English 

B.A , Duke University, 1939, MA,. 1947, PhD . University of 

Maryland, 1954 

Barnett, Audrey J., Associate Prolessor of Zoology 

BA , Wilson College, 1955, MA,, Indiana University. 1957; 

Ph D , 1962 

Barnett, Neal M., Assistant Professor of Botany 

B S . Purdue University. 1959. PhD , Duke University, 1966, 

Barrett, James E., Assistant Prolessor ol Psychology 

B.A , University ol Maryland, 1966; Ph.D , Pennsylvania Slate 

University, 1971 

Barry, Jackson G., Associate Prolessor of English 

BA , Yale College, 1950, MA , Columbia University. 1951; 

M FA , Western Reserve University, 1962, Ph.D , 1%3 

Bartlett, Claude J., Professor and Chairman of Psychology 

BS , Denison University. 1954; MA,, Ohio State University, 

1956 Ph D , 1958 

Basham, Ray S., Associate Prolessor ol Electrical Engineering 

B.S., US Military Academy. 1945; M.S.. University ol Illinois. 

1952; Ph.D., 1962. 

Basill. Victor R., Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

BS . Fordham College. 1961. MS , Syracuse University. 1963. 

Ph D . University of Texas, 1970. 

Bates, Marcia J., Assistant Professor of Library and Informa- 
tion Services 

B.A , Pomona College. 1963; MLS. University ol Calilornia. 
1967, Ph D , 1972 

Beall, Edgar F., Associate Prolessor of Physics 

BA , University of California at Berkeley. 1958. Ph.D , 1962, 

Beall, Otho T., Jr., Prolessor and Director ol American Studies 
B.A , Williams College, 1930. MA. University ol Minnesota. 
1932: Ph D . University ol Pennsylvania. 1952 

Bean, George A., Associate Professor ol Plant Pathology 
B S,. Cornell University, 1958: MS , University ol Minnesota. 
1%0; PhD-, 1963. 

Beard, Larry H., Assistant Prolessor ol Business and Manage- 
A B,J,, University ol Georgia. 1964; MA,. 1965: Ph.D.. 1974. 
Beaton, John R., Dean and Professor. College ol Human Ecolo- 
gy 
BA.. University ol Toronto. 1949; MA , 1950; Ph,D , 1952 

Beatty, Charles J., Associate Professor of Industrial Education 
BS . Northern Michigan University. 1959; MA. Michigan Stale 
University. 1%3: Ph.D , Ohio State University, 1966 

Beckmann, Robert B., Dean of the College ol Engineering 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1940: Ph D , University of Wisconsin, 
1944 

Bedingfleld, James P., Assistant Professor of Business and 

Management 

BS,. University ol Maryland, 1966, M BA , 1968, D 8, A , 1971 



Graduate Faculty / 19 



Belcher, Ralph L. Lecturer and Reaclor Director, Nuclear Engi- 
neering 

BS , Marshall University, 1941, MS , University of Kentucky, 
1947, Ph , University cl Maryland, 1966 
Bell, Roger A., Associate Professor ol Astronomy 
B S , University ol Melbourne. 1957, Ph.D., Australian National 
University. 1962 

Bellama, Jon M., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
A B , Allegheny College. 1960; Ph D . University of Pennsylvan- 
ia. 1966 

Bellows, ttfllllam. Assistant Professor ol Agricultural and Re- 
source Economics 

A B . Harvard College. 1959. M S , University of Massachusetts. 
1%8. Ph D . 1971 

Beltz, Herman J., Associate Professor of History 
B.A , Princeton University. 1959; M.A.. University of Washing- 
Ion. 1963; Ph D . 1966 

Bender, Fllmore E., Professor of Agricultural and Resource 
Economics 

S.S . University of California. Berkeley. 1961; MS. North Carolina 
State University at Raleigh. 1965; Ph.D , 1966 
Benedetio, John J., Professor of Mathematics 
BA , Boston College, 1960, MA Harvard University, 1962. 
Ph D . University of Toronto. 1964 

Benedict, William S., Professor. Institute for Molecular Physics 
BA , Cornell University. 1928. MA, PhD . Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. 1933 

Benesch, William, Professor, Institute for Molecular Physics 
BA , Lehigh University, 1942, MA , The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity 8 A , Lehigh University, 1942, M A , The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1950; Ph D , 1952 

Bennett, Lawrence H,, Associate Professor of Physics 
B.A , Brooklyn College. 1951 .MS. University of Maryland. 
1955. PhD . Rutgers University. 1958 
Bennett, Robert L,, Associate Professor of Economics 
B A . University of Texas. 1951; MA . 1955. PhD , 1963 
Bennett, Roger V., Assistant Professor of Education Adminis- 
tration, Supervision and Curriculum 
B S , University of Wisconsin, 1956; MS , 1960; Ph.D.. 1970 
Bennett, Stanley W„ Assistant Professor. Institute for Child 
Study 

B S . lovna State University. 1959. M A . State University of Iowa. 
1961 , Ph D , University of Michigan, 1970 
Berenstein, Carlos, A., Assistant Professor ol Mathematics 
Licendiado en Matematicas, University of Buenos Aires. 1966 
MS , New York University. 1969. Ph D . 1970 
Berg, Kenneth R., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
BS . University of Minnesota. 1960. Ph D . 1967 
Berger, Bruce S., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B S . University of Pennsylvania. 1954. M S . 1958. PhD . 1962 
Bergmann, Barbara R., Professor of Economics 
BA . Cornell University. 1948; MA.. Harvard University. 1955; 
Ph D . 1959 

Berman, Joel H., Professor of Music 

B S . Juilliard School of Music. 1951 .MA. Columbia University 
1953. D MA. University of Michigan. 1961 
Berman, Louise M., Professor of Education and Director of 
Nursery-Kindergarten School 

A B.. Wheaton College. 1950; MA , Columbia University. 1953; 
Ed D , Columbia University. 1960 
Bernstein, Allen R., Professor of Mathematics 
B A . California Institute ol Technology. 1962. M A . University 
of Calilornia at Los Angeles. 1%4, Ph D , 1965. 
Bernstein, Melvin, Administrative Dean for Summer Programs 
and Professor of Music 

AB, Southwestern al Memphis. 1947. B, Music, 1948; M Mu- 
sic, University of Michigan, 1949, MA., University of North Car- 
olina, 1954; PhD , 1964 

Bernthal, Jolin E., Assistant Professor of Hearing and Speech 
Sciences 

B F A , Wayne State College, 1962, M A , Kansas University, 
1964, PhD . University of Wisconsin. Madison. 1971 
Best, Otto F., Professor of Germanic and Slavic Languages 
Abitur. Realgymnasium. 1948. Certificate. Universite de Tou- 
louse. 1951; Doctor of Philosophy. University of Munich, 1963 

Beste, Charles Edward, Assistant Professor of Horticulture 
BS , Purdue University, 1961 .MS, 1%9, PhD , 1971 
Betancourt, Roger R., Associate Prolessor of Economics 
BA , Georgetown University, 1965; Ph,D , University of Wiscon- 
sin, 1969 

Bhagat, Satindar M., Professor of Physics 
B.A , Jammu and Kashmir University of India, 1950; MA , Uni- 
versity of Delhi. 1953. PhD. 1956 
Bickley, William E., Professor of Entomology 
BS . University of Tennessee. 1934, M S , 1936, PhD , Universi- 
ty of Maryland, 1940 

BIgbee, Daniel E., Associate Professor of Poultry Science 
B S , Oklahoma State University. 1956; M.S., 1958; Ph.D.. Michi- 
gan State University. 1962 



Billig, Frederick S., Lecturer in Aerospace Engineering 
B E , The Johns Hopkins University, 1955. M S . University of 
Maryland, 1958; PhD, 1964, 
Bingham, Alfred J., Professor of French and Italian 
BA , Yale University, 1933; PhD., Columbia University, 1939 
Birdsall, Esther K., Associate Professor of English 
B A , Central Michigan College, 1947, M A , University of Arizo- 
na, 1950, Ph D , University of Maryland, 1959 
Birk, Janice M., Associate Professor of Counseling and Person- 
nel Services and Counselor, Counseling Center 
BA , Sacred Heart College, 1963, M A , Loyola College. 1966; 
Ph D . University of Missouri. 1970 

Birkner, Francis B., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B S . Newark College of Engineering 1961 . MS E . University of 
Florida. 1962, PhD , 1965 

BIsh, Robert L., Associate Professor Special Education 
B.A . University of Southern California, 1964. MA.. Indiana 
University. 1%6; PhD . 1968. 

Blair, Donald James, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engi- 
neering 

BS , Bradley University, 1957; M S . University of Florida. 
Gainesville, 1962, Ph D , University ol Maryland, 1969 
Blair, John D., Assistant Professor of Sociology 
BA , Gustavus Adolphus College, 1966, MA , University of 
Michigan, 1972; PhD, 1975 
Bievins, Dale Glenn, Assistant Professor of Botany 
B S , Southwest Missouri State University. 1965; MS . Missouri 
University. 1967; Ph.D.. University of Kentucky. 1972. 
Block, Ira, Assistant Professor of Textile and Consumer Eco- 

B.S . University of Maryland. 1963; Ph.D.. 1971 
Bloom, Paul N,, Assistant Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment 

B S . Lehigh University. 1968. MBA. University of Pennsylvan- 
ia. 1970. PhD , Northwestern University, 1974 
Blum. Beuia E., Associate Professor of Music 
B A , Queens College, 1949, M A , Columbia University, 1954; 
Ed D , University of Michigan, 1968 
BJuth, Linda Fran, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B,A , College of Emporia. 1965; MS . Kansas State Teachers 
College. 1966. Ed . University of Illinois. 1972 
Bobko, Philip, Assistant Prolessor 

B.S.. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1970; MS . Buch- 
nell University. 1972. PhD . Cornell University. 1976 
Bobrow, Davis B., Professor and Chairman of Government and 
Politics 

B A . University of Chicago. 1955. B.A . 1956. B.A . Oxford Uni- 
versity. 1958. Ph.D . Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
1961 

Bode, Carl. Prolessor of English 

Ph B . University of Chicago. 1933. MA . Northwestern Universi- 
ty. 1938; Ph.D , 1941 

Bolsaitis, Peter P., Prolessor of Chemical Engineering 
B S , California Institute of Technology, 1960, M.S., 1961 , Ph D , 
Delaware Slate College, 1964 

Boston, J. Robert, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B S E E , Slandord University. 1964. MSE E . 1966. Ph.D.. 
Northwestern University, 1971 

Bottino, Paul J., Assistant Professor of Botany 
B S , Utah State University, 1964. MS. 1965; PhD , Washington 
State University, 1969 

Boughner, Robert F., Assistant Professor of Classical Lan- 
guages and Literature 

BA . Duke University. 1968; M A . Johns Hopkins University. 
1969. PhD, 1975 

Bowers, Mollie H., Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement 

BA . University of Rochester. 1967; M.A,. University of Wiscon- 
sin, 1969; PhD , Cornell University. 1974 
Bouwkamp, John C, Associate Professor of Horticulture 
B S . Michigan State University. 1964. M S . 1966. Ph.D , 1969 
Boyd, Alfred C, Jr., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
BS , Canisius College, 1951 , M S , Purdue University, 1953. 
Ph D . 1957 

BrabMe, Elizabeth W., Acting Dean, College of Human Ecology 
and Associate Prolessor in Family Studies 
B S Virginia State College. 1960; M.S.. Pennsylvania Slate Uni- 
versity. 1966. Ed D,. 1969 
Brace, John W., Prolessor of Mathematics 
BA. Swarthmore College, 1949; AM Cornell University. 1951. 
Ph D . 1953 



Braddock, Jomills H,, II, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B A . Jacksonville University. 1969. MS. Florida Slate Universi- 
ty, 1972, Ph D , 1973 

Brandt, John C, Professor of Astronomy 
A B , Washington University. 1956. Ph.D . University of Chicago. 
1960. 



Brauth, Steven E,, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
BS . Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1967. Ph.D.. New York 
University. 1973 

Breger, Irving A., Professor of Chemistry 
BS , Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1941 , S M , Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, 1947, PhD . 1950. 

Breslow, Marvin A., Associate Professor of History 
B A . University of Nebraska. 1957. M.A.. Harvard University. 
1958. Ph.D . 1963 

Brigham, Bruce W., Associate Professor of Secondary Educa- 
tion 

BS , State University of New York, 1949: M S , Temple Universi- 
ty, 1967, PhD , 1967 

Brill, Dieter R., Professor of Physics 

B.A . Princeton University. 1954; MA. 1956. Ph.D . 1959 

Brinkiey, Howard J., Professor of Zoology 

B S . West Virginia University. 1958; M.S.. University of Illinois. 

1960. PhD , 1963 

Brodsky, Harold, Associate Professor of Geography 

B S , Brooklyn College, 1954 , M S , University of Colorado, 

1960, Ph D , University of Washington, 1966 

Broome, C. Rose, Assistant Professor of Botany 
B S . University of Miami. 1965; AM. University of South Flori- 
da. 1968. Ph D . Duke University, 1974 

Brown, Charles C, Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.A.. Boston College. 1970; MA.. 1970; Ph.D . Harvard Universi- 
ty, 1974 

Brown, John H„ Associate Professor of Philosophy 
A.B., Princeton University, 1952; M.A., 1957; Ph.D.. 1959. 

Brown, Joshua R.C., Professor of Zoology 

AB , Duke University, 1948. MA,, 1949. Ph.D.. 1953 

Brown, Richard H., Visiting Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A.. University of Calilornia, Berkeley, 1961 ; MA,. Columbia 

University. 1965. Ph.D., University of California at San Diego, 

1973 

Brown, Robert A., Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A . University of Richmond. 1958. M.A.. University of Iowa. 

1961. Ph.D. 1962 

Brown, Samuel E., Associate Professor of English 
A B.. Indiana University. 1934. MA,. 1946; Ph.D.. Yale Universi- 
ty. 1955 

Browne, Ray B., Professor of American Studies 
A B.. University of Alabama. 1943. MA. Columbia University. 
1947. Ph D University of California at Los Angeles. 1956 
Brush, Stephen G-, Professor of History and Research Profes- 
sor. Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
B A , Harvard University, 1955, D Phil. Oxford University. 1958, 

Bryer, Jackson R., Professor of English 
B.A , Amherst College. 1959. MA . Columbia University. 1960; 
Ph.D . University of Wisconsin. 1965. 
Buchler. Edward R., Assistant Professor of Zoology 
BS . California State Polytechnic College. 1964, MS . Universi- 
ty of California. 1966. Ph.D . University of Montana. Missoula. 
1972 
' Buck, Allen C, Associate Professor ol Textile and Consumer 
Economics 

BS . Michigan State University. 1939. MS.. Western Reserve 
University, 1942. Ph.D . 1947 

Buckley, Frank T., Jr., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering 

BS , University ol Maryland, 1959, PhD.. 1968 
Bundy, Mary Lee, Professor. College of Library and Informa- 
tion Services 

BE. State University of New York at Potsdam. 1948; MA. Uni- 
versity of Denver. 1951; Ph.D.. University of Illinois. 1960. 
Bunts, Frank, Professor of Art 

BS . Case Western Reserve University. 1963, Diploma, Cleve- 
land Institute of Art. 1964. MA. Case Western Reserve Univer- 
sity. 1964 

Buric, John, Associate Prolessor of Animal Science 
BS . West Virginia University, 1948; MS., University ol Mary- 
land. 1952; Ph D . University of Illinois. 1960. 
Burt, Gordon W., Associate Professor of Agronomy 
BS. Tennessee Technological Institute. 1961; MS. Cornell 
University. 1%4. Ph D , Washington State University, 1967 
Burt, Jolin J„ Professor and Chairman, Department of Health 
Education 

B.A . Duke University. 1955; M Ed . University of North Carolina. 
1956. M S . Oregon Slate University. 1960; Ed D.. 1963, 
Butler, Lillian C, Associate Professor of Food and Nutrition 
BS . University of Illinois. 1941. M S . University of Texas. 1945; 
PhD , University of Calilornia, Berkeley. 1953. 
Butler, Richard Roy, Assistant Prolessor. Institute of Criminal 
Justice and Criminology 

B.A . William Carey College. 1967; M.A.. Mississippi State Uni- 
versity. 1970. Ph.D . 1973 

Butterworth, Charles E., Assistant Professor of Government 
and Politics 



20 / Graduate Faculty 



B A Michigan State University. 1959. Doctorat. University ol 
Nancy. France. 1961 ; M.A . University of Chicago. 1%2; Ph.D 
1966 

Byrne. Richard H„ Professor of Counseling and Personnel 
Services 

A.B.. Franklin & Marshall College. 1938, M A . Columbia Univer- 
sity. 1947 1952 

Caceres, Cesar A.. Professor ol Electrical Engineering 
B S , Georgetown University 1949 M D . 1953 
Cadman. Theodore W.. Professor of Chemical Engineering 
BS. Carnegie-Mellon University. 1962 MS. 1964 Ph.D. 1966 
Cain, Jaivl$ L, Professor of Agricultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics 

B.S.. Purdue University. 1955: M.S.. Ohio State University. 1956 
Ph.D. 1%1 

Caims. Gordon M., Dean. College of Agriculture and Professor 
of Dairy Science 
BS . Cornell University. 1936. MS . 1938. Ph.D.. 1940. 

Callcon. George H.. Professor of History and Vice Chancellor 
for Academic AHairs 

AB.. University ol South Carolina. 1950. MA . Columbia Univer- 
sity 1951 PhD . University of North Carolina. 1956 
Campagnoni, Anthony T.. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
A.B.. Northeastern University. 1964; Ph.D , Indiana University. 
1968 

Campbell, Elwood G., Professor of Secondary Education 
B S Northeast Missouri Stale College. 1949; M A Northwest- 
ern University. 1952; Ph D . 1963 
Campbell. Kenneth, Associate Professor ol An 
Massachusetts College of Art, National Academy of Design Art 
Students League. Lowell Institute 
Caibone, Robert F., Professor of Education 
B.S.. East Montana College. 1953. M Ed . Emory University. 
1958. Ph D . University ol Chicago. 1961 
Caron, Oewey M., Associate Professor of Entomology 
B A . University of Vermont. 1964 M S . University of Tennes- 
see. 1966. Ph D . Cornell University. 1970 
Can, John C, Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
8 S Wilson Teachers College. 1952 M.F.A . Catholic University 
ol America. 1953 PhD . 1965 
Carroll, Edward J., Assistant Professor ol Zoology 
B S . Sacramento State College. 1968. Ph.D . University of Cali- 
fornia. Davis. 1972 

Carroll, Robert M., Assistant Professor ol Psychology 
B S University of New Mexico. 1%5. MA. Ohio State Universi- 
ty 1968 Ph D 1969 

Carroll, Stephen J., Jr., Professor of Business Organization and 
Administration 

B S University of Calilornia at Los Angeles. 1957. MA . Univer- 
sity of Minnesota. 1959. Ph D . 1964 

Carter, Everett C, Professor and Chairman of Civil Engineering 
B S C E Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 1958. M S C E . Universi- 
ty of California. Berkeley. 1959. Ph.D . Northwestenn University. 
1969 

Carter, Thomas A.. Ascistant Professor of Poultry Science 
BS . Pennsylvania State University. 1960; MS. 1969: Ph D . 
1971 

Castellan, Gilbert W., Professor of Chemistry 
B S . Regis College. 1945. Ph D . The Catholic University ol 
America. 1949. ScD . Regis College. 1967 
Cale, George G., Assistant Professor of English 
B A , Rutgers University. 1960; M A . Duke University. 1962; 
Ph D . 1968 

Causey, George D., Research Professor of Hearing and Speech 
Sciences 

B.A , University ot Maryland 1950; MA.. 1951: Ph.D . Purdue 
University. 1954 

Celarier, James L, Associate Professor ol Philosophy 
A B.. University of Illinois. 1956: MA. 1958: Ph.D.. University ol 
Pennsylvania. 1960 

Chalken. Imrin M., Lecturer in Chemistry 

A B . Brown University. 1964. Ph.D . University of Calilornia. Los 
Angeles. 1968 

Chalupa, WHIam, Professor of Dairy Science 
BS . Rutgers University. 1958: MS . 1959: Ph.D., 1962. 
Chang, Chung-Yun, Associate Professor ol Physics 
Ph.D . Columbia University. 1966 
Chant, Nicholas, Assistant Professor of Physics 
Ph D . Lincoln College. Oxford. 1966 
Chapin, John L, Professor. Institute for Child Study 
A B . Denison University. 1939; Ph . University of Rochester, 
1950, 

Chasnoff, Selina Sue, Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Sendees 

A B.. University of Connecticut. 1957. A.G.S . University of 
Maryland. 1968. M Ed . 1968; Ph D . 1971 
Chaves, Antonio F., Associate Professor ol Geography 
Doctor. Law. University of Havana. 1941: Doctor of Filosofia & 
Letras. 1946: MA. Northwestern University. 1948. 



Chen, Yung-Gann, Assistant Professor of Physics 
B S.E.S.. National Taiwan University. 1957. M.S.E.E.. National 
Chiao-Tung University. 1960: D. Eng. Sci., Columbia University. 
1966 

Christian, Charies M., Assistant Professor of Geography and 
Urban Studies 

B.A , Northeastern State College, 1966. M A . University ol Illi- 
nois. 1968. Ph D . 1975. 
Chu, Hsin, Prolessor ol Mathematics 
B S . Hupeh Teachers College. 1948 M S Tulane University 
1957, Ph D , University ot Pennsylvania. 1959 
Chu, Yaohan, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical 
Engineering 

B S Chiao-Tung University. 1942: MS. Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 1945, Sc.D . 1953 

Churaman, Charlotte v.. Assistant Professor of Home Manage- 
ment and Consumer Studies 

B S Berea College. 1942: M Ed . Penn Slate University. 1964 
Ed D . 1969 

Church, Kenneth R., Associate Prolessor ol Physical Education 
B S University of Northern Iowa. 1946. MS . University of 
Iowa. 1955. PhD Indiana University, 1963 
Church, Marilyn G.. Associate Prolessor. Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education 

B S . Indiana University. 1962: MS . 1963; Ed D . 1969 
Churchill. John W., Associate Professor of Recreation 
B S State University of New York at Cortland. 1958. MS . Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 1959; Ph D . University of Wisconsin. 1968 
Cirrincione, Joseph M., Associate Professor of Secondary Edu- 
cation and Geography 

B S State University of New York at Oswego. 1962; MA Ohio 
Slate University. 1967. Ph.D.. 1970. 
aague. Christopher K.. Associate Professor of Economics 
B A Swarthmore College. 1960: Ph.D . Harvard University. 
1966 

Clague. Monique W., Assistant Professor of Administration. 
Supervision and Curriculum 

B.A.. Swarthmore College. 1959; Ph.D.. Harvard University. 
1969 

aaiborn. William L., Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A University of Rochester. 1964. MA . Syracuse University. 
1%8. Ph.D . 1968 

Clark, Eugenie, Prolessor ol Zoology 
B A . Hunter College. 1942: M.A.. New York University. 1946. 
Ph D . 1951 

aark, Joseph E., Visiting Associate Professor ol Textiles and 
Consumer Economics 

B S Vilianova University. 1958; MS . 1960: Ph.D . University of 
Windsor. Canada. 1963. 

Clark, Neri A., Professor of Agronomy 
B S . University of Maryland, 1954; Ph.D , 1959 
Clarke, David H.. Professor of Physical Education 
BS . Springfield College. 1952. MS . 1953; Ph.D . University ol 
Oregon. 1959 

Claude. Richard P., Associate Professor of Government and 
Politics 

B.A . College ol St Thomas. 1956; MS . Florida State Universi- 
ty. 1960. Ph D . University ol Virginia. 1964 
Ctearwater, Harvey E.. Associate Professor. Health Education 
A B.. State University of New York at Albany. 1955: MA.. Michi- 
gan State University. 1967. Ed D . 1970 
demton, Barry A.. Assistant Professor of Administration. Su- 
pervision and Curriculum 

BS . The Pennsylvania State University. 1965: M.A.. 1968: 
Ph.D . 1975. 

OoHeller. Charles T.. Assistant Professor of Economics 
A B Duke University. 1969. Ph D . Harvard University. 1973 

Cockburn. James S.. Associate Professor of History 
L.L B . Leeds University. 1959: L.L.M.. 1961; Ph.D.. 1970. 
Colby. Margaret A.. Assistant Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 

A B State University ol New York at Albany. 1961 ; M Ed Uni- 
versity of Rochester. 1963. Ed D . 1969 

Cole. Wayne S.. Professor of History 

B.A . Iowa Slate Teachers College. 1946. MS. University ol 

Wisconsin. 1948; Ph D . 1951 

Colllet, Robert K.. Jr.. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 

as'.'Anzona State University. 1965, MS . 1972: Ph.D.. 1975 

Colville. James. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 

B S . Purdue University. 1959. M.S.. 1960. Ph.D . University of 

Texas. 1970 

Colwell. Rita Rossi. Professor of Microbiology 

B S Purdue University. 1956; M.S.. 1958: Ph.D.. University of 

Washington, li,"' 

Contrera Joseph F.. Associate Professor of Zoology 

B A . New York University, 1960; M S , 1%1 ; PhD , 1966 



Conway. Mai-y M., Associate Professor ol Government and Poli- 

B S Purdue University. 1957 M A . University ol Calilornia 
Berkeley 1960. Ph D Indiana University. 1965 
Coogan, Robert. Associate Prolessor ol English 
B A . lona College. 1954. M.A.. De Paul University. 1958: Ph.D.. 
Loyola University. 1967 

Cook. Clarence H., Associate Prolessor ol Mathematics 
B A , State University of Iowa. 1948. MS . 1950. Ph.D . Universi- 
ty ol Colorado. 1962 

Cook. Thomas M.. Associate Prolessor ol Microbiology 
B S . University of Maryland. 1955. MS . 1957. Ph.D . Rutgers 
University. 1%3 

Cooke. George. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A . Dartmouth College. 1963, MA.. Princeton University. 1965. 
Ph.D . 1967 

Coon. Craig N.. Assistant Professor of Poultry Science 

B S . Texas A&M University 1966. M S . 1970. Ph D 1973 

Cooper. Jeffrey M.. Associate Prolessor ol Mathematics 

B.A . Havertord College. 1%2. M S . University of Illinois. 1964. 

Ph D . 1967 

Cooper. Sherod M., Jr., Associate Professor of English 

B S Temple University. 1951 : M A . 1953: Ph.D.. University of 

Pennsylvania. 1%3 

Coplan. Michael *.. Research Associate Professor. Institute lor 

Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

B.A. Williams College. 1960; MS, 1961; Ph,D . Yale University. 

1963 

Corbett, M. Kenneth, Professor of Plant Pathology 

B S . McGill University. 1960; Ph Cornell University. 1954 

Corliss, John 0., Professor and Chairman of Zoology 

BS University ol Chicago. 1944. B.A.. University of Vermont, 

1947 Ph D , New York University, 1951 

Corning, Gerald D., Prolessor of Aerospace Engineering 

RS . New York University 1937. MS . Catholic University. 1954 

Correl, Ellen, Professor of Mathematics 

BS . Douglass College. 1951 ; MS . Purdue University 1953. 

Ph D . 1958 

Corrigan, Robert A., Provost, Division of Arts and Humanities 

A B . Brown University. 1957; M.A.. University ol Pennsylvania. 

1959. Ph D-. 1967 

Corwin. Burton D.. Assistant Professor of Business Administra- 

B.A . Lehigh University. 1964; M S . Virginia Polytechnic Insti- 
tute. 1967. Ph.D . Case Western Reserve University. 1969 
Cournyn. John B.. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B S . University of Alabama. 1946: M S . 1948 
Coursey. Robert D.. Assistant Professor of Psychology 
BS . Spring Hill College. 1966: Ph.D . University ol Rochester. 
1970. 

Courtwrighl, Beniamin F., Associate Professor ol Inlormation 
Systems Management 

B A . Johns Hopkins University. 1939: Ph.D.. 1968 
Cowan, Andrew M., Associate Prolessor ol Agricultural Engi- 
neering 

B S A E Purdue University. 1951 . M S.. Iowa State University. 
1955. Ph.D . 1967 

Cox, Evelyn M., Associate Professor of Food. Nutrition and In- 
stitution Administration 

M S Syracuse University. 1948; Ph.D . Iowa State University. 
1960. 

Crites, John O.. Professor ol Psychology 
A B.. Princeton University. 1950. Ph.D . Columbia University. 
1957 

Cumberland. John H., Acting Director. Prolessor. Bureau of 
Business ana Economic Research 

B.A University of Maryland 1947. M.A.. Harvard University. 
1949. Ph D 1951 

Cunnifl. Patrick F.. Prolessor ol Mechanical Engineering 
BS . Manhattan College. 1955: M.S.. Virginia Polytechnic Insti- 
tute. 1956. Ph.D . 1962 

Currie. Douglas G.. Associate Prolessor ol Physics 
B E P Cornell University. 1958. Ph D . University ol Rochester. 
1962 

Currier. Albert W.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A State University of Iowa. 1954. M A . The Johns Hopkins 
University. 1959. Ph.D . 1968 

Curtis, Charles R.. Associate Professor of Plant Pathology 
B S . Colorado State College. 1961 . M S . 1963; Ph . 1965. 
Curtla. John M.. Prolessor of Agricultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics 

BS . North Carolina State College. 1947, MS , 1949. Ph.D. 
University ot Maryland. 1961 

Cussler. Margaret T.. Associate Prolessor ol Sociology 
B A State University of New York at Albany. 1931 : MA . 1933: 
MA Harvard University. 1941. Ph.D. 1943. 
Dachier. H. Peter. Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.S.. Richmond Professional Institute. 1963. MA , University of 
Illinois. 1968. Ph.D . 1969 

Graduate Faculty /21 



Dager. Edward Z., Professor of Sociology 
B A , Kent Slate University, 1950; MA. Ohio Stale University. 
1951, PhD 1956 

Dalnis, Andrew, Assistant Professor of Pfiysical Education 
BS.. University of Adelaide, South Australia, 1962, Ph D , 1967 
M A , University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1972 
Dally, James W., Professor and Chairman of Mechanical Engi- 
neering 

B S , Carnegie Institute of Technology. 1951 : M S , 1953; Ph,D , 
Illinois Institute of Technology, 1958 
Oancis, Jerome, Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B S Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1961 ; M S , University of 
Wisconsin 1963, Ph D 1966 

Darden, Ltndley, Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B,A Southwestern at Memphis. 1968; M.A.. University of Chica- 
go. 1%9, S M , 1973; Ph , 1974 

Oardis, Rachel, Professor of Textiles and Consumer Economics 
and Lecturer in Economics 

8 8, St Mary s College, Dublin, 1949; MS , University of Min- 
nesota, 1963, Ph D , 1965, 

Davy, Beth, H., Assistant Professor of Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education, Secondary Education 
B.S.. Miami University of Ohio, 1965, M A , University of Roch- 
ester, 1969, Ph , Case Western Reserve University, 1971 
Davidson, John A., Associate Professor of Entomology 
B,A , Columbia Union College, 1955, M S , University of Mary- 
land, 1957 Ph D , 1960 

Davidson, Marie S., Assistant Professor, Institute for Child 
study 

B S , Dillard University. 1959; M.S.. University of Maryland, 
1967 Ph D , 1971 

Davidson, Nell, Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
and Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B S , Case Institute of Technology, 1961 , M S , University of 
Wisconsin. 1963; Ph D , 1970 
Davidson, Ronald C, Professor of Physics 
BSc, McMaster University, 1963, Ph D , Princeton University, 
1966 

Davis, Douglas D„ Associate Professor of Chemistry 
BS , University of Washington, 1962; PhD , University of Flori- 
da. 1%6 

Davis, Unda S., Assistant Professor of Psychology 
BA. University of Texas. Austin. 1971; M.A.. 1974; Ph.D. 1975 
Davis, Richard F., Professor and Chairman of Dairy Science 
B S . University of New Hampshire. 1950; M.S.. Cornell Universi- 
ty. 1952. PhD , 1953 

Davis, Shelley, Assistant Professor of Music 
B,A , Washington Square College of New York University. 1957. 
M A . Graduate School of Arts and Sciences of New York Uni- 
versity. 1960. Ph D . 1971 
Dawson, Townes L., Professor of Business Law 
B B A University of Texas. 1943; B.S,. United States Merchant 
Marine Academy, 1946, BA , University of Texas, 1947, Ph D 
1950, L L B 1954 

Dawson, Victor C. D., Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering 
B S . Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1948; MS . Har- 
vard University. 1951 .ME. California Institute of Technology. 
1959; PhD University of Maryland. 1963 
Day, Thomas B., Professor of Physics and Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Planning and Policy 

B S University of Notre Dame. 1952; Ph.D.. Cornell University. 
1957 

Dayton, Chauncy M., Professor of Measurement and Statistics 
A B . University of Chicago. 1955. MA,. University of Maryland, 
1%3, PhD , 1964 

DeBarthe, Jerry V., Associate Professor of Animal Science 
B S Iowa State University. 1961 . PhD . 1966 
Decker, A. Morris, Jr., Professor of Agronomy 
BS . Colorado ASM. 1949. MS . Utah State College. 1951. 
PhD . University of Maryland. 1953 
Declaris, Nicholas, Professor of Electrical Engineering 
BS . Texas A4M University. 1952. S M . Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology 1954, Sc D , 1859 

DeLeiris, Alain, Professor of Art 

B,F A , Rhode Island School of Design, 1948, AM., Harvard 

University 1952, Ph D , 1957 

De Lorenzo, William E., Assistant Professor of Secondary Edu- 
cation 

B.A , Montclair State College, 1959, M A , 1964, Ph D , Ohio 
State University. 1971 

Demaltre, Ann, Associate Professor of French and Italian 
BA . Columbia University 1950. MA . University of California. 
Berkeley. 1951 M S . Columbia University. 1952. PhD Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 1%0 
Denny, Don W., Professor of Art 

B A , University of Florida. 1959; MA . New York University. 
1961.Ptl,0.. 1%5 

D«Rocco, Andrew G., Professor of Molecular Physics 
BS,. Purdue University. 1951. M.S.. University of Michigan. 
1953; Ph.D.. 1957 



Deshler, Walter W., Professor of Geography 
B S . Lafayette College. 1943; MA,. University of Maryland 
1953, Ph D , 1957 

Desilva, Alan W., Professor of Physics 
B S . University of California at Los Angeles. 1954; Ph D . Uni- 
versity of California. Berkeley. 1961 
Dessaint, Alain, Assistant Professor of Anthropology 
B A . University of Chicago. 1961 . MA. Stanford University. 

1962. Ph D . University of Hawaii. 1972 

Destler, William M., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 

B S . Stevens Institute of Technology. 1968; PhD , Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1972 

Devine, Donald J., Associate Professor of Government and Pol- 
itics 

B BA Saint John s University, 1959, MA , Brooklyn College, 
1965; PhD . Syracuse University. 1967 
Devoe, Howard J., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B A . Oberlin College. 1955; Ph D . Harvard University. 1960 
Dies, Robert R., Associate Professor of Psychology 
BS . Carroll College. 1962. MA , Bowling Green State Universi- 
ty, 1964, PhD . University of Connecticut. 1968 

Dietz, Maureen A., Associate Professor of Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education 

B S , Creighton University. 1964; M.S.. University of Pennsylvan- 
ia, 1965; Ph D , 1968 

DifederJco, Frank Robert, Associate Professor of Art 
B A , University of Massachusetts, 1955; MA. Boston Universi- 
ty, 1961 ; Ph D , New York University, 1970 

Dillard, Dudley, Professor and Chairman of Economics 

B S , University of California, Berkeley, 1935, PhD , 1940 

Dillon, Contey H., Professor of Government and Politics 

A B , Marshall College, 1928, MA., Duke University, 1933, Ph D , 

1936 

DIttman, Laura L., Professor Institute for Child Study 

B S , University of Colorado. 1938; M.A.. University of Maryland. 

1963. Ph D . 1967 

Dively, Galen P., Assistant Professor of Entomology 
B S . Juniata College. 1966. M.S.. Rutgers University. 1968. 
Ph D , 1971 

Dixon, Jack R., Associate Professor of Physics 
B S , Western Reserve University, 1948; MS, 1950; Ph D , Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1956 

Dodge, Norton T., Associate Professor of Economics 
AB, Cornell University, 1948, MA. Harvard University. 1951. 
PhD. 1960 

Doetsch, Raymond N., Professor of Microbiology 
B S , University of Illinois. 1942. A.M., Indiana University. 1943. 
Ph D , University of Maryland. 1948 

Donaldson, Bruce K-, Associate Professor of Aerospace Engi- 
neering 

BS . Columbia University. 1955. M S . Wichita State University, 
1962, M S , 1963, PhD University of Illinois at Urbana. 1%8 
Dorfman, J. Robert, Professor of Physics and Institute tor Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
B A . The Johns Hopkins University. 1957. PhD . 1961 
Dorsey, John W., Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs and 
Professor of Economics 

B.S.. University of Maryland. 1958. MA Harvard University 
1962. PhD . 1963 

Dotson, Charles 0., Associate Professor of Physical Education 
B A . Morehead State University. 1963. MS . Purdue University. 

1964. PhD. 1968 

Doudna, Mark E., Assistant Professor of Hearing and Speech 

Sciences 

BS . Ohio State University. 1948. MA. 1956; Ph.D 1962 

Douglass, Larry W., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 

BS . Purdue University. 1963; M.A.. 1966; PhD,. Oregon State 

University. 1969 

Douglls, Avron, Professor of Mathematics 

A B , University of Chicago, 1938, MA,. New York University. 

1949, PhD , 1949 

Dragt, Alexander J., Professor and Chairman of Physics 

A B.. Calvin College. 1958. PhD . University of California. 

Berkeley. 1963 

Drew, Howard Dennis. Associate Professor of Physics 

B S . University of Pittsburgh. 1962; Ph.D Cornell University, 

1%7 

DulMster, Henry J., Associate Professor. School of Library and 
Information Services 

BS . State College. City of New York. 1939 MA. Columbia 
University. 1946 

Dudley, James, Professor of Administration. Supenrision and 

Curriculum 

BA . Southern Illinois University. 1951 M.S., Southern Illinois 

University 1957, Ed D , University of Illinois. 1964 

Outtey, Dick, Professor of Chemical Engineering 

BS , Purdue University, 1939; MS, University of Iowa, 1940; 

Ph D , University of Maryland, 1956 



Duttey, Robert V., Professor of Early Childhood and Elementary 

Education 

B S , Millersville State College, 1938, Ed M , Temple University, 

1948, Ed D , 1954 

Duffy, John, Professor of History 

B A , Louisana State Normal College, 1941 , M A , 1943; Ph.D , 

University of California, 1946 

Dutta, Sukanta K., Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

B Sc (Vet ) Bombay University. India. 1956; MS . University of 

Minnesota. 1960. PhD , 1962 

Oworzecka, Maria, Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics 
M Sc , Warsaw University, 1964; Ph.D , 1969 
Earl, James A., Professor of Physics 

B S . Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1953. Ph.D . 1958 
Eden, Henry Spencer, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering 

A B . M D . Boston University. 1970 
Edmister. Robert 0., Associate Professor of Business and 
Management 

BS . Miami University. 1964; M B.A'. University of Michigan. 
1965. PhD . Ohio Slate University, 1970. 
Edmundson, Harold P., Professor of Mathematics and Comput- 
er Science 

B.A , University of California. Los Angeles. 1946; M.A.. 1948; 
Ph.D . 1953 

Ehriich, Gertrude, Professor of Mathematics 
BS . Georgia State College for Women. 1943; MA , University 
of North Carolina, 1945; Ph.D . University of Tennessee. 1953 
Eisenberg, John, Research Associate Professor of Zoology 
BS , Washington Stale University, 1957, M A , University of Cal- 
ifornia, Berkeley, 1959; PhD , 1962, 

Elder, Steven D., Assistant Professor of Germanic and Slavic 
Languages 

B A , Kalamazoo College. 1962; MA, Ohio State University, 
1964, PhD , 1969 

Eley, George, Associate Professor of Early Childhood Elemen- 
tary Education 

B S , Ohio State University, 1952; M.Ed , 1957. Ph D . 1966 
Eliot, John, Associate Professor. Institute for Child Study 
A B.. Harvard University. 1956; AM T.. 1958; Ed.D.. Stanford 
University. 1966 
Elkin, Stephen L, Associate Professor of Government and Poli- 



Elkins, Earleen F., Research Associate Professor of Hearing 
and Speech Sciences 

B A . University of Maryland. 1954; MA.. 1956. Ph.D., 1967 
Elkins, Richard L., Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 
B.S.. University of Maryland. 1953; MA.. 1958; Ed D . 1972 
Elkins, Wilson H., President. University of Maryland 
B A . University of Texas. 1932. M A . 1932. Litt. B.. Oxford Uni- 
versity. 1936. DPhil . 1936 

Ellingson, Robert G.. Assistant Professor of Meteorology 
BS . Florida State University. 1967. MS . 1968; Ph.D., 1972. 
Ellis, Robert L, Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B A . Miami University. 1960. PhD . Duke University. 1966. 

Ellsworth, Robert W., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B S , Yale University, 1960, Ph.D . University of Rochester. 1965. 

Emad, Fawzi P., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B S . American University (Beirut). 1961 ; M.S., Northwestern 
University. 1963. PhD . 1965. 

Emans, Robert, Professor of Early Childhood-Elementary Edu- 
cation 

B S . University of Wisconsin. Madison. 1957, MA , University of 
Chicago, 1958, Ph D , 1963 

Ephremldes, Anthony, Associate Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering 

B S . National Technical University of Athens. 1967; M.A.. Prin- 
ceton University. 1969; Ph.D . 1971 

Erfckson, William C, Professor of Astronomy 

BA . University of Minnesota. 1951; MA . 1955; PhD . 1956 

Eyier, Marvin K, Dean and Professor. College of Physical Edu- 
cation. Recreation and Health 

AB. Houghton College. 1942. MS,. 1942. MS.. University of Il- 
linois. 1948. PhD . 1956 

Falcione, Raymond L, Assistant Professor of Speech Commu- 
nication 

BA . Akron University. 1965. M A . 1967. Ph D . Kent State Uni- 
versity. 1972 

Falk, David S., Professor of Physics 

BS . Cornell University. 1954; M S . Harvard University. 1955; 

Ph.D . 1959. 

Faller, Alan J., Research Professor. Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 

SB. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1951; M,S., 1953; 
Sc.D., 1957 



22 / Graduate Faculty 



FaKhzik. Alfred M, AssLsani Professor of Business Ai]nnin;st'a- 
liOn 

B S NofUieaste"! Unlversitv. 1957 M BA 1959 Ph D MrcMi- 
gan State Univereity 1969 

Fannhig, Detvin S„ Associate Professor of Soil Uinerology 
B.S Cornell Univefsity 1954 MS 1959 PM) University of 
Wisconsin 1964 

Farquhw. OousMs Janes, Assistant Professor ol Art 
BA. Washington and Lee University 1963: MA. Unnersity of 
Oicago 1966 Ph D 1972 

Parrel. Richard T,. Associate Professor of Secondary Educa- 
tion and History 

AB. Wat>ash College 1954 M S Indiana University 1958 
Pti.D 1967 

Felton. Kenneth E_ Associate Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering 

BS University of Maryland. 1950 BS 1951. MS Pennsyl- 
vania Slate University, 1962 
FerreN, Richard A^ Professor of Ptiysics 
B S California Institute of Technology. 1948: MS 1949 Pti 
Princeton University. 1952. 

Fey. James T^ Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
and Mathematics 

B S University of Wisconsin. 1962. M S 1963. Ph D . Columbia 
University. 1968. 

Rnk. Beatrice C Associate Professor of French and Italian 
BA Bryn Mawr College 1953. MA. Ya!e Unnersity. 1956: 
=h D University of Pittsburgh. 1966. 

Ritketstein, Barbara J., Assistant Professor. Foundations of 
Education 

BA Barnard College. 1959. MA. Teachers College. Columbia 
University. 1960: Ed.D.. 1970. 
Rnsterbusch, Kurt Assistant Professor of Sociology 
BA Princeton University. 1957 B D Grace Theological Semi- 
nary. I960. Ph.D. Columbia University. 1969. 
Fish, G er tru de S^ Assistant Professor of Housing and Applied 
Design 

B S Cornell University 1968: MA 1970: PhD 1973 
Rsher, Alan J,, Professor of Finance 

B S University of Pennsylvania 1928 Lit.M 1936 Ph.O . 1937 
Rsf*er. Anthony C Associate F>rofessor of Economics 
BA Columbia University. 1962: Ph.D.. 1968. 
Rvel. Daniel L, Associate Professor of Pliysics 
BA The Johns Hopkins Unniersity. 1953: Ph.D 1959 
Radi, James K- Jr., Associate Professor of Hstory 
BA Albion College 1959: MA. Wayne State Unnersity. 1963: 
PhD 1968 

Flatter. Charles K. Associate Professor. Irtshtute for ChikJ 
SiucJ> 

BA DePauw University. 1961 . M Ed , University of Toledo. 
"965 Ea University of Maryland. 1968. 
Flack. Jere, Associate Professor of Germanic and Slavic Larv 
guages 

Ph D U" versify of Munich. 1968. 
Fleig. Albert J., Jr.. Lecturer in Aerospace Engineering 



Rorestano. Patricia S.. Assistant Professor of Urt>an Studies 
BA. University of Maryland. 1958 MA. 1970: Ph.O . 1974 

Fotsoan, Kenneth E., Associate Professor of Mstory 

BA Princeton University. 1943: BA University of California 

Berkeley 1955 MA 1957: PhD . 1964 

Fdstroni. Roger J„ Professor of Music 

B S College of St Tnomas. 1956: M Ed . 1959: M M.. Ntorth- 

wvesiern University, 1963: Ph.D.. 1967 

Fonarofl. L Schuyler. Professor arxl Actii>g Chairman of Geog- 
raphy 
BA University of Arizona. 1955: PhD . Tfie Johns Hopkins 

University. 1961 

Forbes. James H.. Jr, Assistant Professor of Art 
BA University of Maryland. 1964: MA. 1966. 

Forsnes, Vfclor G., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 

B.E-S Bnghan Young University. 1964: M.E.. 1965: Ph. D_ 
Purdue University, 1970 
Foss. John t. Professor of Soil Oassihcahon 
BS . Wisconsin State University, 1957 MS,, University Of Min- 
nesota. 1959. PhD . 1965 

Foster, PhHps W, Professor of Agricultural and Resource 

Economics 

B S Cornell University. 1953: MS. University of Illinois. 1956. 

Ph.D . 1958 

Foumey, WiSam L, Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B SAE , West Virginia University. 1962: MS 1963: PhD . Uni- 

versiTy of Hlinois. 1966 

Foust, C— ord IL, Professor and Associate Chaimian of History 

BA. Syracuse University, 1949: MA. University of Chicago. 

1951: PhD 1957 



Freedman. Morris. ^'I'eSii' :' £-5 sn 

B,A Dty Un.vers-ry of Ne* York 1911 MA., CoJumbia Univer- 
sity, 1950: PhD 1953 
Freeman, David IC Professor of Ctiemistry 
BS . University of Rochester 1952: MS . Carnegie institute of 
Technology, 1954, Phi} . Massachusetts Institute of Technolo- 
gy. 1957 

Freeman, Rotien, Associate Professor of Psychology and 
Counseling and Personnel Services 

BA Haverford College. 1951: MA Wesleyan University 1954 
PhD University of Maryland. 1964 

Freiraulh. Vidii S.. Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic 
An 

B S Eastern IHinois University. 1966: MA. University of Iowa 
1967 Ph D Flonda SUta Unmeisity. 1974 

Fretz. Bruce R^ Professor of Psycfiofogy 
BA Gettsburg College 1961 MA Ohio State Unrversity 
1963. PhD . 1965. 

Friedman, Herbert Professor of Physics 
BA Brooklyn College. 1936: PhD . The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity 1940 
Fringer. Margaret Neal, Assistant Professor of PtiysicaJ Educa- 

B S . University of North Carolina. 1957 MA. University of 
Michigan. 1961 : PhD . University of Maryland. 1972. 
Fritz, Sigmund. Visiting Professor of Meteorology 
B.S.. Brooklyn College 1934. MS. Massachusetts ktstitute of 
Technology, 1941 Sc D 1953 

Fromovto, Stan, Associate Professor of Management Science 
BASc. Unniersity of Toronto. 1960: MA 1961: PhD Stanford 
University. 1965 

Fry, Gladys H, Associate Professor of English 
BA. Howard University. 1952: MA 1954: PhD . Indiana Uni- 
versity. 1967 

Funaro, George J,, Provost Division of Human and Community 
Resources and Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
BA American International College. 1956. M A. University of 
Connecticul 1961. Ph.D. 1965. 

Galman, PtuKp G., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 



Galoway. Raymond A„ Professor of Plant Ptiysiology 
BA. Univeisity of Maryland. 1952: MS . 1956: PhD. 1958 
Gammon, Robert W^ Assistant Professor of Molecular Physics 
BA. Johns Hopkins University. 1961 : MS California Institute 
of Technology. 1963: Ph.D . Johns Hopkins University 
Gannon, .lohn D,, Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 
BA. Brown University, 1970: MS 1972: Unniersity of Toronto. 
1975. 

Gannon, Martin J_ Associate Professor of Business arMl Man- 
agement 

BA, University of Scranlon. 1961 : Ph.D.. Columbia University, 
1969 

Gantt Walter N_ Associate Professor of Early Childhood- Ele- 
mentary Education 

BS . Coqpin State College. 1942 M A . New York University. 
1949: Ed.D. University of Maryland. 1968. 

Garbanati. Dennis, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
BA Spring Hill College. 1967: MA. Unnersity of Californiai 
Santa Barbara. 1969: Ph.D.. 1972 

Gartier, Daniel L, Associate Professor of Cnil Engineering 
BS University of Maryland. 1952: MS, 1959: Ph.D 1965 
Gardner, Aliert K, Associate Professor. Institute for Chikl 
Study 

BS . State Unnersity of New York. Cortland. 1958: MA. Syra- 
cuse University. 1964: Ph D 1967 

Gardner, Mariorie K, Professor of Secondary Education and 
Chemistry 

BS . Utah State University. 1946 MA Ohio State Unnersity. 
1958. Ph.D 1960. 

Gardner. Michael R., Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B i =eec :: e;€ 1966: Ph.D . Harvard University. 1971 
Garst Ronald D.. Assistant Professor of Geography 
BS Arizona State Unnersity. Tempe. 1963: MA. 1966: Ph.D 
Michigan State University. East Lansing. 1972 
Garvey, Emrtyn F., Associate Professor of Music 
B.S , Temple University, 1943: M,M,. University of Rochester. 
1946 

Gasner. Larry L^ Visihng Assistant Professor of Chemical Engi- 
neenng 

BS University of Minnesota. 1965: MS . Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. 1967: PhD . 1971 
Gasa, Saul L, Professor of Business and Management. 
BS Boston University, 1949: MA. 1949: PhJ) . University of 
Califon-ia. 1965. 

Galz, Margaret J., Assistant Professor of Psycliology 
BA. Southwestern at Memphis. 1966, Ph.D , Duke University, 
1972 



Gaylin. Ned u. Professor and Chairman, Department of Family 

and Community Development 

BA , University of Chicago 1956, MA 1961 , Ph D 1965 

Gelman, Ellen F, Assistant Professor of Art 

AB Brandeis University 1961 M FA. Columbia Unnersity, 

1964 

Gelso, diaries J„ Assistant Professor of Psycliology 
B S Bioomsburg Slate College. 1963: MS Ronda State Uni- 
versity 1964. Ph D Ohio State University 1970. 

Gentry, James W., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineer- 
ing 

B S . Oklahoma Slate University 1961 MS. Unnersity of Bir- 
mingham, 1963: PhD University of Texas. 1969 
Gtilette. John F„ Professor and Chairman. Measurement and 
Statistics 

BA. George Washington University. 1947: MA. University of 
Minnesota 1952 Ph.O University of Pennsylvania. 1960. 
GifUn, DonaM W., Associate Professor of History and Director 
of Admssions and Registrations 
BA University of California Santa Barbara 1950: MA, Van- 
derbilt University 1956 Ph.O 1962 
GSiert Claire P., Assistant Professor ol French and Italian 
BA Rice University 1960 MA Unnersity of Delaware 1963: 
Ph.D . The Johns Hopkins University. 1969 
GSiert James B,, Professor of History 
BA Carleton College. 1961. MA University of Wisconsin 
1963: Ph.D 1966 

GM, Douglas E_ Assistant Professor of Zoology 
B S Marietta College. 1965: MA. Unnersity of Michigan. 1967: 
Ph.D 197' 

Ginter Marshal L, Professor, ktstitute for Molecular Physics 
B.S Chico State College. 1958: Ph.D. Vanderbilt University. 
196' 

Girdano. Daniel A_ Associate Professor of Health Education 
BA . West Liberty State College, 1964: MA, Kent State Univer- 
sity. 1965: Ph.D . Unnersity of Toledo. 1970. 
Grande, Dorothy D., Associate Professor of Health Education 
B.S University of Nebraska 1960 MA Colorado State Col- 
lege. 1964: Ph D University of Toledo. 1969 
Glass. James M., Assistant Professor of Government and Pdi- 



Glasser, Robert G., Professor of Physics and Computer Sci- 
ence 

AB University of Oicago, 1948: B,S.. 1950; M.S.. 1952: Ph.D . 
1954 

Glendening, Parris K, Associate Professor of Government and 

Politics 

BA. Florida State University. 1964: MA. 1965: PhD 1967 

Gick, Arnold J„ Associate Professor of Physics 

BA Brooklyn College. 1955: Ph.D . University of Maryland. 

1959 

Gtoedder, George. Associate Professor of Physics 

BS UnversT, of Chicago. 1960: M.S. 1961: Ph.D.. 1965. 

Glover, Rofle E„ Professor of Physics 

AB,, Bowdoin College, 1948: BS.. Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology. 1948: Phi).. University of Goettingen. 1953. 

Gfuckstem, RdMrt L, Chancellor and Professor of Physics and 

Astronomy 

BEE., Oty College of New York. 1944, Ph.D Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology. 1948. 

Goering. Jacob 0.. Professor. Institute for Child Study 

B.A Bet-e' Cc'ege. 1941: PhD . Unnersity of Maiyfand. 1959. 

Gogg. Regina M., Professor of Early Childhood and Elementary 

Education 

B.S . Northwestern Unnersity. 1931 MA. Columbia University. 

1940. Ph.D.. 1948. 

Goldberg, Seymour, Professor of Mathematics 

AB . Hunter College. 1950 MA Ohio State Unnersity. 1952: 

Ph.D.. Unnersity of California at Los Angeles. 1958 

GoMenbaum. George C Associate Professor of Physics. 

BS MunenDerg College 1957 Ph.D . University of Maryland. 

Goldhaber. Jacob K.. Professor and Chairman of Mathematics 
BA Brooklyn College. 1944: MA Hanrard University 1945: 
Ph.D . University of Wisconsin. 1950. 
Goldman. David T, Professor of Chemical Engineenng 
BA Brooklyn College 1952: MS. Vandeibitt Unnersity. 1954: 
Ph.D . Unnersity of Maryland. 1958 

Goldman, Ha rvey. Associate Professor of Administration. Su- 
pervision and Curriculum 

BA. University of Rhode Island. 1960: MA John Carroll Uni- 
versity. 1962: Ed.D . Michigan Slate University, 1966 
Goldsby, Richard Al«n, Professor of Chemistry 
BA. University of Kansas. 1957. Ph.D.. Unnersity of California, 
1961 

Goldstein, Inrin U, Professor of Psychology 
BA Oty College of New York. 1959. MA. University of Mary- 
land. 1962 Ph 1964 



Graduate Faculty /23 



Goldstein, Larry J., Professor of Matfiematics 
B A , Universify of Pennsylvania, 1965: MA , 1965, M A , Prince- 
ton University, 1967, Ptl.D , 1967 
Gollub. Lewis H.. Professor of Psychology 
A B , University of Pennsylvania. 1955. Pfi , Harvard Universi- 
ty. 1958 

Gomezplata. Albert, Professor and Acting Chairman of Chemi- 
cal Engineering 

B Ch E , Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, 1952, M Che E Rens- 
selaer Polytechnic Institute, 1954, Ph D , 1958 
Good, Richard A., Professor of Mathematics 
AS Ashland College 1939. MA. University of Wisconsin. 
1940. Ph D 1945 

Goode, Melvyn Dennis, Associate Professor of Zoology 
B S . University of Kansas. 1963: Ph.D . Iowa State University. 
1967 

Goodin, Robert Edward, Assistant Professor of Government 
and Politics 
B A , Indiana University, 1972: Ph,D , Oxford University, 1974 

Goodwyn, Frank, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 
B-A , College of Arts and Industries, 1940: MA. 1941, Ph,D , 
University of Texas 1946 
Gordon. Donald C, Professor of History 

A B-, College of William and Mary. 1934. MA,, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1937, Ph.D , 1947 
Gordon, Glen E„ Professor of Chemistry 
B S . University of Illinois. 1956: Ph.D . University of California. 
Berkeley. 1960 

Gordon, Stewart L, Professor of Music 

B A University of Kansas. 1953: MA . 1954: DMA. University 
of Rochester. 1965 

Gorgacz, Edward J., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science 
V M , University of Pennsylvania, 1967: PhD , University of 
Connecticutt 1973 

Gorovitz. Samuel, Professor and Chairman of the Department 
of Philosophy 

B,S . Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1960. Ph.D . Stan- 
ford University. 1963 

Gould, Murray J., Assistant Professor of Music 
M Mus . Manhattan School of Music, 1958, Ph D , New York 
University Graduate School of Arts and Science, 1972 

Gowdy. Robert H., Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.S . Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 1963: MS, Yale Universi- 
ty, 1964 PhD, 1968 

Gramberg, Edward J., Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 
B.A . University ol Amsterdam. 1946. M A . University of Califor- 
nia, Los Angeles, 1949, Ph D , University of California, Berkeley, 
1956 

Grambs, Jean D., Professor of Secondary Education 
AB.. Reed College. 1940: M.A.. Stanford University. 1941. 
Ed D . 1948 

Gray, Alfred. Professor of Mathematics 

B.A.. University ol Kansas. 1960: MA . 1961 . Ph.D . University of 
California. Los Angeles. 1964 
Green, Eleanor B., Assistant Professor of Art 
A B . Vassar College. 1949 MA. George Washington Universi- 
ty. 1971 Ph.D . 1973 

Green, Hany B., Jr., Assistant Professor, Institute for Child 

Study 

B.A . University of Virginia. 1959: M Ed . 1963. Ph D . 1965 

Green, Paul S., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B A . Cornell University 1959. M A . Hareard University. 1960: 

Ph.D . Cornell University. 1%4 

Green, Robert L, Professor, Agricultural Engineering 

B,S A E , University of Georgia, 1934: M S , Iowa State College 

1939, PhD , Michigan State University, 1953 

Green, Wlllard W., Professor of Animal Science 

B.S,. University of Minnesota. 1933. M S . 1934, PhD , 1939 

Greentierg, Kenneth R., Associate Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services 

B S , Ohio State University. 1951: M.A.. 1952: Ph.D . Western 
Reserve University. 1960. 

Greenberg, L^on, Professor of Mathematics 

B S . City College of New York. 1953. MA.. Yale University. 

19;i5. I'h D . 1958 

Greenberg, Louis M., Associate Professor of History 

BA. Brooklyn College. 1954. MA. Harvard University. 1957. 

Ph D . 1963 

Greenberg, Oscar W„ Professor of Physics 

B S Rutgers University. 1952. MS , Princeton University, 1954, 

Ph D , 1956 

Greenwood. David C. Associate Professor of English 
B A , University of London, 1949, Certificate m Education, Not- 
tingham, 1953: PhD , University of Dublin, 1968 

Greer. Thomas V., Professor of Business Administration 
B.A , University of Texas, 1953: MBA.. Ohio Stale University. 
1957, Ph.D.. University of Texas. 1964 



Greisman. Harvey C, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B A , State University of New York, New Paltz, 1966: MA , Syra- 
cuse University, 1969, Ph.D , 1972 
Griem. Hans. Professor of Physics 

Arbitur, Max Planck Schule, 1949, Ph.D . University of Kiel. 
1954 

Griflin, James J., Professor of Physics 
B.S . Villanova College. 1952: MS.. Princeton University. 1955. 
Ph.D . 1956 

Grim, Samuel 0., Professor of Chemistry 
B S , Franklin and Marshall College. 1956. Ph D . Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 1960. 

Grimsted, David A., Associate Professor of History 

AB.. Harvard University. 1957. M.A . University of California. 

Berkeley. 1958. Ph D . 1963 

Grollman, Sigmund. Professor of Zoology 

B.S . University of Maryland. 1947: MS . 1949: Ph D , 1952 

Groves. Paul A.. Associate Professor of Geography 

BSc , University of London, 1956: MA , University of Maryland, 

1%1 , Ph D , University of California, Berkeley, 1969 

Gruchy. Allan G., Professor of Economics 
BA , University of British Columbia, 1926, MA, McGill Univer- 
sity, 1929, Ph D , University of Virginia 1931 
Grunig. James E.. Associate Professor of Journalism, 
B.S , Iowa Slate University. 1964: MS . University of Wisconsin. 
1966 Ph , 1968 

Guernsey. Ralph L. Research Associate Professor, Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
BA , Miami University, 1952, M S , 1954, Ph.D . University of 
Michigan. 1970. 

GulHory. John U., Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.A.. Rice University. 1962: Ph.D.. University of California. 
Berkeley. 1970. 

Gullck. Sidney L, Professor of Mathematics 
B A , Oberlin College. 1958: M.A., Yale University, 1960, Ph D 
1963 

Gump. Larney R., Assistant Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 

B S West Virginia University, 1959, M Ed , Temple University, 
1961 , D Ed , Pennsylvania State University, 1967 
Haber, Francis C„ Professor of History 
B A , University of Connecticut, 1948, MA, The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1952, PhD , 1957 

Hacklander, Effle, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Consum- 
er Economics 

B,S , University of Minnesota, 1962, MA , Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1968, Ph.D . 1973 

Hagerty. Patrick E., Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B.A. Syracuse University. 1960: B.E.E.. 1961; M.S.. 1967; Ph.D . 
1969 

Haley, AJ., Professor of Zoology 

BS.. University of New Hampshire. 1949: M.S.. 1950: Sc.D.. The 
Johns Hopkins University. 1955. 

Hall, Jerome W., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B S . Harvey Mudd College, 1965: M.S.. University of Washing- 
ton. 1968. Ph D . 1969 

Hall, John R.. Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
B.S.. University of Illinois. 1964: M.S.. 1965: Ph.D.. Ohio Stale 
University, 1971 

HamlHon, Donna B., Assistant Professor of English 
B.A . St Olaf College. 1963: Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin. 
Madison. 1968 

Hamilton, Gary D., Associate Professor of English 
B.A.. St Olaf College. 1962: MA,. University of Wisconsin. 
1965: Ph D , 1968 

Hamlet, Richard Graham, Assistant Professor of Computer Sci- 
ence 

BS,, University of Wisconsin. 1959: M.S.. Cornell University. 
1964: Ph.D.. University of Washington. 1971 

Hamlet, Sandra L., Assistant Professor of Hearing and Speech 
Sciences 

B.A.. University of Wisconsin. 1959: M.A.. University of Wash- 
ington. 1%7: Ph.D.. 1970. 
Hammer. DavM A., Associate Professor of Physics 
B.S., California Institute of Technology. 1964: Ph.D.. Cornell 
University. 1969 

Hammond, Robert C Professor and Chairman of Veterinary 
Science 

B S . Pennsylvania State University. 1943: D.V.M . University of 
Pennsylvania. 1948 

Handorl, tWUIIam C, Lecturer of Business Administration 
AB,. University of Michigan. 1966: M.B-A.. 1967: Ph.D.. Michi- 
gan State University. 1973 
Hansen, J.N.. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
BA . Drake University. 1964. Ph.D.. University of California. Los 
Angeles. 1968 

Harber. Jean R.. Assistant Professor of Special Education 
B.A . State University ol New York. 1969: M.Ed . Temple Uni- 
versity, 1971: EdD,, 1975. 



Hardgrave. Walter Terry, Assistant Professor. Information Sys- 
tems Management 

B S . University of Texas. 1967. M.A.. 1970. Ph.D.. 1972. 
Hardle, Ian W., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Re- 
source Economics 

B S . University of California. Davis. 1960: Ph.D.. University of 
California Berkeley. 1965 

tterdwick, Mark W., Assistant Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 
B.A . Michigan State University. 1966: M.A.. 1967: Ph.D.. 1970. 

Hardy. Robert C. Associate Professor. Institute For Child Study 
B.S Ed . Bucknell University. 1961 . M.S.Ed.. Indiana University. 
1964, EdD , 1%9 

Harger. Robert C Professor and Chairman of Electrical Engi- 
neering 

BSE University of Michigan, 1955: MSE. 1959: Ph.D.. 1961. 
Hargrove. Michael 8.. Assistant Professor of Statistics 
B S , University of Kentucky, 1963, MA, 1966: PhD.. 1971. 
Harlan. Louis R., Professor of History 

B A . Emory University. 1943: M.A-. Vanderbilt University. 1947. 
Ph.D.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1955. 
Harper. Glenn A., Assistant Professor of Sociology 
BS . Purdue Universi^. 1958: M.S.. 1961: Ph.D . 1968. 
Harper, Robert A., Professor of Geography 
Ph.B.. University of Chicago. 1946. B.S 1947 MS.. 1948: 
Ph.D , 1950. 

tterrington, J. Patrick, Associate Professor of Astronomy 
B S . University of Chicago. 1961 : M.S.. Ohio Slate University. 
1964. Ph D.. 1967 

Harris. Curtis C. Professor of Economics 

B S . University of Florida. 1956: MA.. Harvard University. 1959: 

Ph D 1960 

Harris. James F., Assistant Professor of History 

B S Loyola University. 1962: M.S.. University of Wisconsin, 

1964. PhD . 1968 

Harris, Wesley L, Professor and Chairman of Agricultural Engi- 
neering 

BSA E . University of Georgia. 1953: M.S.. 1958: Ph.D.. Michi- 
gan Stale University. 1960 
Harrison. Floyd P.. Professor of Entomology 
BS , Louisiana State University. 1951. M.S.. 1953. Ph.D.. Unn 
versify of Maryland. 1955. 

Harrison. Horace V., Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A , Trinity University, 1932: MA., L>niversity of Texas. 1941; 
Ph D.. 1951. 

Harrison, Paul E., Jr., Professor of Industrial Education 
B.Ed . Northern Illinois State College. 1942: M.A.. Colorado 
State College. 1947. Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 1955. 
ftarvey, Ellen E., Professor and Chairman of Recreation 
B.S . Columbia University. 1935: M.A.. 1941 : Ed D.. University of 
Oregon. 1951 

Haslem. John A., Associate Professor of Finance 
A B , Duke University, 1956: MBA.. University of North Caroli- 
na. 1961 Ph.D.. 1967 

Hatch, Randolph Thomas, Assistant Professor of Cliemical 
Engineering 

B S , University of California. Berkeley. 1967: M.S.. Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. 1969: Ph.D.. 1973. 
Hatfield. Agnes B, Associate Professor. Institute lor Child 
Study 

B A , University of California. 1948. MJ^ . Unreersity of Denver. 
1954. Ph.D . 1959 

Hathorn. Guy B.. Professor of Government and Politics 
A B . University of Mississippi. 1940: M.A.. 1942: Ph.D.. Duke 
University. 1950 

Hayleck, Charles R., Jr., Associate Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering 

BS,, University of Maryland, 1943: MS,, 1949 
Hayward, Raymond W., Professor of Physics 
BS , Iowa State College, 1943: Ph D., University of California, 
Berkeley, 1950, 

Head, Emerson, Associate Professor of Music 
BMus University of Michigan, 1957: M.Mus , 1961 
Heath, James L, Associate Professor of Poultry Science 
B S„ Louisiana State University, 1963: M.S.. 1968; Ph.D.. 1970. 
Hebeler, Jean R., Professor of Special Education 
B.S . Buffalo State Teachers College. 1953. M.S.. University of 
Illinois. 1956, Ed D-, Syracuse University. 1960. 
Hecht, Matthew S.. Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B.S E.. Case Western Reserve University. 1970: M.S.E.. Prince- 
ton University. 1971 . MA .1973. Ph.D . 1973 
Heldeltuch, Ruth, Associate Professor of Early Childhood Ele- 
mentary Education and Associate Director. Office of Lal)oratory 
Experiences 

B S . University ol Maryland, 1949, MEd,, University of Flonda, 
1958, Ed D , Columbia University. 1967 
Helkklnen, Henry Wendell, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.Eng . Yale University. 1956: MA. Columbia University. 1962; 
Ph D.. University of Maryland. 1973 



24 / Graduate Faculty 



Heilprln, Lawrence B., Professor. School of Library and Infor- 
mation Services, and Computer Science Center 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 192B: f^.A,, f931, PfiD , Har- 
yard University, 1941 
Heim, Norman, Professor of Music 

B.M.Ed . Evansville College, 1951 , MM , University of Rocties- 
ler, 1952: M.A , 1962 
Helmpel, Arthur M., Lecturer in Entomology 
B.A.. Queens College, 1947; MA,, 1946; Ph.D., University of Cal- 
ifornia. 1954, 

Helns, Conrad P., Jr., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 
B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology. 1960; M.S.. Lehigh Univer- 
sity. 1962; Ph.D.. University ol Maryland. 1967 
Helz, George R., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
A.B.. Princeton University. 1964; Ph.D.. Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1971. 

Helsler, Martin 0., Associate Professor of Government and Pol- 
itics 

B.A . University of California. Los Angeles. 1960; MA,. 1962. 
Ph.D.. 1969 

Helm, E. Eugene, Professor of Music 
B.M.E., Southeastern Louisiana College, 1960. MM E,, Louis- 
iana State University, 1955, PhO.. North Texas State University. 
1958. 

Helzer, G.A., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A,, Portland State College, 1959; MA,, Northwestern Universi- 
ty. 1962: PhD . 1964 

Hemps.ead, R. Ross, Assistant Professor of Education. Educa- 
tion Technology Center 

A.B.. University of California, Berkeley. 1962. MA,. 1966, Ph D , 
1968 

Henery-Logan, Kenneth R., Professor of Chemistry 
BSc, McGill University, 1942; Ph D,, 1946 
Henkel, Ramon E., Associate Professor of Sociology Ph B.. 
University of Wisconsin, 1958; MA , 1961; Ph.D., 1967, 
Henkelman, James, Associate Professor of Secondary Educa- 
tion and Mathematics 

B.S.. Miami University. 1954. MEd . 1955; Ed D., Harvard Uni- 
versity. 1965. 

Hering, Chrlstoph A., Professor and Chairman of Germanic and 
Slavic Languages 

Ph.D.. Rhein-Friedrich-Wilhelms Universitat. 1950, 
Herman, Wayne L, Associate Professor of Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education 

B.A,. Ursinus College. 1955. M Ed . Temple University. 1960; 
Ed.D,, 1965, 

Herschbach, Dennis R., Assistant Professor of Industrial Edu- 
cation 

A.B.. San Jose State College. 1960; M.S.. University of Illinois. 
1968: Ph.D.. 1972. 

Hesse, Michael Bernard, Assistant Professor of Journalism 
A.B.. University of Cincinnati. 1965; MA,, American University, 
1967: Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1974. 
Hetrlck. Frank M., Professor of Microbiology 
B.S., Michigan State University. 1954; M.S.. University of Mary- 
land. 1960: Ph.D.. 1962. 

Hicks, Eric C, Assistant Professor of French and Italian 
B.A . Yale University. 1959, PhD , 1965. 
Hlebert, Ray Eldon, Professor and Dean of the College of Jour- 
nalism 

B.A.. Stanford University. 1954; M.S . Columbia University. 
1957; M.A.. University of Maryland. 1961; Ph.D., 1962. 
HIgglns, William J., Assistant Professor ol Zoology 
B.S.. Boston College. 1969. Ph.D., Florida State University. 
1973. 

HIghton, Richard, Professor of Zoology 
A.B . New York University. 1950: M.S.. University of Florida, 
1953: Ph.D.. 1956 

Hill, Clara E., Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A.. Southern Illinois University. 1970; M.A.. 1972: Ph.D.. 1974 
Hill, OavW G., Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.S.. Carnegie-Mellon University. 1959; M.S., 1960; Ph.D.. 1964 
HIN, Kathy Jean, Assistant Professor of Elementary Education 
B.A,, Slate University of l^w York, 1964; M.Ed., 1970; Ed.D . 
1975 

Hill, Walter Lewis, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A.. University of California. Berkeley. 1%5: M.A.. 1967; Ph.D.. 
1970. 



HIrzel, Robert K., Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A.. Pennsylvania State University. 1946: MA.. 1950; Ph.D., 

Louisiana State University, 1954. 

Hochull, Urs E., Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S.. Technikum Biel. Switzerland. 1952; M.S.. University of 

Maryland. 1955. PhD . Catholic University of America. 1962. 

Hodos, William, Professor of Psychology 

B.S.. Brooklyn College. 1955. M.A.. University of Pennsylvani 

1957; Ph.D.. 1960. 



Hoffman, Ronald, Associate Professor of History 

B A . George Peabody College. 1964; University of Wisconsin. 

1965, PhD , 1969 

Holloway, David C, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering 

B S , University of Illinois, 1966, M.S.. 1969: Ph.D.. 1971 
Holmberg, Steven R., Assistant Professor of Business and 
Management 

B.S,. University of Tulsa, 1966; M B.A , Indiana University. 1968. 
DBA. 1971 

Holmgren, Harry D., Professor of Physics 

B Phys University ol Minnesota. 1949, M A , 1950, Ph D , 1954 

Holmgren, John E., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B S , University of Wisconsin. 1965; Ph.D., Stanford University, 

1970 

Holmlund, Chester E., Professor of Chemistry 
BS , Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1943; M.S.. 1951; Ph D . 
University of Wisconsin. 1954. 
HoHon, William Milne, Associate Professor of English 
A B . Dartmouth College. 1954. L LB , Harvard University, 1957; 
MA , Yale University, 1959, Ph D , 1965 
Holum, Kenneth G., Assistant Professor of History 
B.A . Agustana College. 1961 . MA.. University of Chicago. 1969; 
PhD . 1973. 

Hopkins, Richard L, Associate Professor. Foundations of Edu- 
cation 

B.S.. Stanford University, 1962, MS., 1963; PhD . University of 
California. Los Angeles, 1969 

Hornbake, R. Lee, Vice President tor Academic Affairs 
B.S , Pennsylvania Slate Teache-s College, 1934; MA , Ohio 
State University, 1936, Ph.D., 1942; L.L.D,, Eastern Michigan 
University, 1963 

Hornung, Carlton, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A . State University of New York at Buffalo. 1967. M.A.. Syra- 
cuse University. 1970; PhD 1972. 
Hornyak, William F., Professor of Physics 
BEE,. City University of New York. City College. 1944; MS . 
California Institute ol Technology. 1946; Ph.D.. 1949 

Horton, David L., Professor of Psychology 

B.A . University of Minnesota, 1955; MA., 1957; PhD , 1959 

Horvath, John M., Professor of Mathematics 

Ph D , University ol Budapest, 1947 

Houppert, Joseph W., Associate Prolessor ol English 

Ph B . University ol Detroit, 1955: M.A.. University ol Michigan. 

1957; Ph D.. 1964 

Hovey, Richard B., Prolessor ol English 

A B.. University ol Cincinnati. 1942: M.A.. Han/ard University. 

1943; Ph D , 1950 

Howard, John D., Associate Prolessor ol English 

B.A . Washington College. 1956. M.A.. University ol Maryland. 

1962; PhD , 1967 

Howard, Lawrence V., Jr., Assistant Prolessor ol Microbiology 

B.A , Emory University, 1963; M.S.. University ol North Carolina 

at Chapel Hill. 1%6. PhD . 1970. 

Hoyl. Kenneth B., Prolessor ol Counseling and Personnel Sen/- 

ices 

B.S.. University of Maryland. 1948: M.A.. George Washington 

University. 1950. Ph D.. University ol Minnesota, 1954. 

Hoyl, Richard D., Assistant Prolessor ol Journalism 

B.S.. University of Oregon. 1963; M.S.. 1967: Ph.D.. University 

of Hawaii. 1972 

Hsu, Shao T., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S . Chiao-Tung University. 1937. M S . Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 1944: ScD . Swiss Federal Institute of Technol- 
ogy, 1954 

Hsueh, Chun-tu, Professor of Government and Politics 
L.L,B-. Chaoyang University Law School, 1946. M.A,. Columbia 
University, 1953; Ph.D.. 1958 
Hu, Charles Y., Professor of Geography 

B.S . University of Nanking. 1930: M.A.. University ol Calilornia, 
Berkeley. 1936: Ph.D.. University ol Chicago. 1941 
Hut>bard, Ben E-, Research Prolessor. Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics 

B.S . Western Illinois University. 1949. M.S.. Stale University of 
Iowa, 1952; Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 1960. 
Hubbe, Roll 0., Associate Professor of Classical Languages 
and Literature 

AB,. Hamilton College. 1947. AM . Princeton University, 1950. 
Ph.D., 1950 

Huden, Daniel P., Associate Professor. Foundations ol Educa- 
tion 

B.S.. University of Vermont. 1954. MA.. Columbia Teachers 
College. 1958; Ed D., 1967 
Hudson, William, Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Philadelphia Conservatory of Music, 1954; B,A,, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 1957; MMus , Yale School of Music. 1961. 
Huebner. Robert W.. Associate Professor. Institute for Child 
Study 



B.S,, Concordia Teachers College. 1957. M A . 1960. Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1969 

Huheey, James E.. Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B S,. University ol Cincinnati. 1957. M.S.. 1959: Ph.D.. Universi- 
ty of Illinois. 1961 

Hull, Joan S., Associate Professor of Physical Education 
B.S.. Indiana University. 1954, M.Ed , University of North Caroli- 
na. 1957. Ph . University ol Southern California. 1967 

Hummel, James A., Professor of Mathematics and Statistics 
B.S . California Institute of Technology. 1949; M A , Rice Insti- 
tute. 1953: PhD . 1955 

Hummel, John W., Associate Professor of Agricultural Engi- 



Humphrey, James H., Professor of Physical Education 
B A . Denison University. 1933. M.A . Western Reserve Universi- 
ty. 1946. Ed D . Boston University. 1951. 
Hunl, Edith J., Assistant Professor. Institute for Child Study 
A.B.. University of Redlands. 1954, M.A , Fresno State College, 
1964, EdO, University of Maryland, 1967 

Hunt, Janet Glbbs, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B A , University of Redlands. 1962; M.A . Indiana University. 

1966, Ph D,, 1973 

Hunt, Larry L, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., Ball State University. 1961 : M.A,. Indiana University, 1%4; 

Ph D.. 1968 

Hurdis, Davkl A., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 

B.S , University of Rhode Island. 1962. MS . 1964. Ph D.. Catho- 
lic University. 1973 
Husman, Burrls F., Prolessor and Chairman of Physical Educa- 

B S.. University of Illinois. 1941 , MS.. 1948; Ed.D. University of 
Maryland. 1954, 

Hutchlngs, Lloyd B., Assistant Professor of Early Childhood- 
Elementary Education 

B.A . Harvard College. 1959; Ph.D.. Syracuse University. 1972. 
Hynes, Cecil V., Associate Professor of Marketing 
B.A,. Michigan State University. 1948. MA,. 1949: Ph.D.. 1965. 

Imberski, Richard B., Associate Prolessor of Zoology 
B S . University ol Rochester. 1959. Ph D . 1965 
fngraham. Barton L., Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 
and Criminology 

A B.. Harvard University. 1952: L.L.B.. Harvard Law School. 
1957. M Cnm . University of California. Berkeley. 1968; D.Crim . 
1972 

Ingram, Anne G., Professor of Physical Education 
A B.. University of North Carolina. 1944. M.A . University of 
Georgia. 1948. Ed D,, Columbia University, 1%2 
Irwin, Gabrlele I., Assistant Professor of Germanic and Slavic 
Languages 

Arbitur. Bavink Gymnasium. 1959. M.A . University of Maryland. 
1966; PhD . 1969 

Irwin, George R., Visiting Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
A B.. Knox College. 1930; MS.. University of Illinois. 1933: 
Ph.D.. 1937 

Isaacs, Nell D., Professor of English 
A.B.. Dartmouth College, 1953, AM . University of California. 
Berkeley. 1956; Ph.D., Brown University. 1959 
Ishee, Sidney, Professor of Agricultural and Resource Econom- 
ics 

B.S , Mississippi State College, 1950; M.S., Pennsylvania State 
University, 1952, PhD . 1957 

Israel, Gerhard W., Associate Professor of Meteorology 
B.S . University of Heidelberg. 1962: Ph.D., Technologische 
Hochschule. Aachen. 1965 
Jachowski, Leo A., Jr., Professor of Zoology 
B.S.. University ol Michigan. 1941; M.S., 1942; ScD., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1953 
Jackson, Stanley B., Professor of Mathematics 
AS, Bates College, 1933. A.M., Harvard University. 1934. Ph.D.. 
1937 

Jacobs, WaHer D., Professor of Government and Politics 
B.S . Columbia University. 1955; M.A.. 1956: Ph.D.. 1%1 
James, Edward F., Assistant Professor ol English and Second- 
ary Education 

B.A . University of Maryland, 1954: M.A.. 1955; PhD,. Catholic 
University of America. 1969 
James, M. Lucia, Professor. Curriculum Lab 
A B . North Carolina College. 1945. M.S.. University of Illinois. 
1949: Ph.D., University of Connecticut. 1963. 
Jamleson, Kathleen, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dra- 
matic Art 

B.A . Marquette University. 1967; M.A,. University ol Wisconsin. 
1968: Ph.D.. 1972, 

Janes, Robert W., Prolessor ol Sociology 
A.B.. University ol Chicago. 1938; M.A.. 1939; PhD . University 
ol Illinois. 1942. 



Graduate Faculty /25 



Janicki. Bernard W., Lecturer in Microbiology 
B.A . Univefsity ol Delaware. 19S3. MA. 1955: Ph.D.. George 
Washington University. 1960 

JanU, Richard K., Assistant Professor of Early Childhood Ele- 
mentary Education 

B.S.. Indiana University at Fort Wayne. 1968. M.S.. 1970. Ed D,. 
Ball State University. 1972. 

JaquHh. Richard H. Professor of Chemistry and Assistant Vice- 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

B.S , University of Massachusetts. 1940; M.S.. 1942; Ph.D.. 
Michigan Slate University. 1955. 
Jarvis, Bruce B.. Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A . Ohio Wesleyan University. 1963; Ph.D., University ol Colo- 
rado. 1966 

JaahemsW. Wllhelmlna F., Professor ol History 
A.B,. York College. 1931 . AM.. University of Nebraska. 1933; 
Ph.D.. University ol Chicago. 1942, 
Jellema, Roderick H., Associate Prolessor ol English 
B.A.. Calvin College. 1951 ; Ph.D.. University ol Edinburgh. 1962 
Johns, Elizabeth B., Assistant Professor of Art 
B A . Birmingham-Southern College. 1959; MA. University of 
California. Berkeley. 1965; PhD . Emory University, 1974. 
Johnson. Charles E.. Associate Professor of Education 
B A . University of Minnesota, 1957, Ph.D.. 1964 
Johnson, Conrad D., Assistant Professor ol Philosophy 
AB., Stanlord University. 1965; AM . University ol Michigan, 
1966. Ph D , 1969 

Johnson. Everett R., Associate Dean and Prolessor ol Chemi- 
cal Engineering 

B.A.. State University ol Iowa. 1937. M.A.. Harvard University. 
1940; Ph.D.. University ol Rochester. 1949 
Johnson, Jerry ttfayne. Assistant Prolessor ol Agronomy 
AS Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College. 1968. BS . Univer- 
sity ol Georgia, 1970. MS,. Purdue University. 1972. Ph.D., 
1974 

Johnson, KnowHon, V»„ Assistant Prolessor ol Criminal Justice 
and Criminology 

B.S . Clemson University. 1964; MA.. Michigan State University. 
1969; PhD. 1971 

Johiwon, Martin L. Associate Prolessor ol Early Childhood- 
Elementary Education 

A.A.. Friendship Junior College. 1960. B.S.. Morns College. 
1962; M Ed . University ol Georgia 1968; Ed D . 1971 
Johnson. Raymond 1_. Associate Prolessor ol Mathematics 
B.A.. University ol Texas, 1963. Ph D . Rice University. 1969. 
Johnson, Ronald C Assistant Prolessor ol Physical Education 
BS Baylor University. 1957, M.S.. 1958. Ed.D . 1970. 



Johnson, Warren R.. Prolessor ol Health Education 
B.A.. University ol Denver, 1942; M.A.. 1946; Ed.O.. Boston Uni- 
versity, 1950. 

Jolson, M.A., Assistant Prolessor ol Marketing 
B.E E , George Washington University. 1949. MBA.. University 
ol Chicago. 1965. DBA, University of Maryland. 1969 
Jones, Everett, Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering 
B.AE . Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1965; M.A.E., 1960; 
PhD Stanford University. 1968 

Jones, George F., Professor of Germanic and Slavic Lan- 
guages 

A B . Emory University. 1938, M.A.. Oxford University. 1943; 
Ph.D.. Columbia University. 1951. 

Jones, G. Stephen, Research Prolessor. Institute lor Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics 

A.B.. Duke University. 1952; Navy Certilicate. Naval Post-gradu- 
ate School. 1955. M.S.. University ol North Carolina 1958: 
Ph.D.. University ol Cincinnati. 1960. 

Jones, Jack C, Prolessor ol Entomology 
B.S.. Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 1939; MS,. 1947. Ph.D., 
Iowa Stale University. 1950 
Kacser, Oaude. Associate Professor of Physics 
BA , Oxford University. 1955. M A . 1959; Ph.D.. 1959 
Kafka, Eric P, Assistant Professor ol Counseling and Person- 
nel Services 

B.A.. State University ol New York at Albany, 1961 , M.A., 1962; 
Ph.D.. Michigan State University. 1968 
Kaniffleyer, Kenneth CW., Prolessor and Chairman ol Sociolo- 

9y 

B.A.. University ol Northern Iowa. 1953. MA.. State University ol 

Iowa. 1958. Ph D.. 1960 

Kanal, Laveen N.. Prolessor ol Computer Science 

B.S.E.E., University ol Washington. 1951; M.S.E.E., 1953, Ph.D.. 

University ol Pennsylvania. 1960 

Kantzes. James G., Prolessor ol Plant Pathology 

B.S.. University of Maryland, 1951 , M.S., 1954. Ph.D.. 1957 

Karlander, Edward P., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology 
B.S . University of Vermont, 1960, M.S.. University of Maryland, 
1962: Ph.D.. 1964, 



Karlovltz. Les A., Research Professor, Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Apptied Mathematics 

B.S., Yale University. 1959; Ph.D.. Carnegie Mellon University. 
1964. 

Kasler, Franz J., Associate Prolessor ol Chemistry 
PhD , University ol Vienna. 1959 
Kaufman, Stuart B,. Associate Prolessor ol History 
B.A.. University ol Florida. 1962; M.A . 1%4. Ph.D.. Emory Uni- 
versity. 1970. 

Kedem. Benjamin, Assistant Prolessor ol Mathematics 
B.S.. Roosevelt University. 1968: M.S.. Carnegie-Mellon Univer- 
sity. 1970, Ph.D., 1972 

Keeney, Mark. Professor of Chemistry and Dairy Science 
B.S . Pennsylvania State University. 1942; M.S.. Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 1947; PhD , Pennsylvania State University. 1950. 
Kelejian, Harry H., Professor of Economics 
B A , Hofstra College. 1962. M.A.. University of Wisconsin, 1965; 
Ph D . 1968 

Kelley, David L. Professor ol Physical Education 
A B . San Diego State College. 1957; M.S.. University of South- 
ern California. 1958, Ph . 1962. 

Kellogg, H. Bruce, Research Professor. Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics 

B S . Massachusetts Institute ol Technology. 1952; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 1953. Ph.D., 1959 

Kelsey, Roger R., Associate Professor of Administration. Su- 
pervision and Curriculum 

B.A . Saint Olaf College. 1934; M.A . University ol Minnesota. 
1940; Ed D . George Peabody College lor Teachers. 1954 
Kenny, Shirley S., Prolessor and Chairman ol English 
B.A . University ol Texas. 1955; M.A.. University ol Minnesota, 
1957, Ph.D., University ol Chicago. 1964 
Kent. George 0., Prolessor ol History 

B S . Columbia University. 1948; M.A.. 1950. Ph.D.. Oxford Uni- 
versity. 1958 

Kerley, Ellis R., Prolessor and Chairman ol Anthropology 
B S University ol Kentucky. 1950; M.S., University ol Michigan. 
1956, Ph D , 1962. 

Kerr, Frank J., Prolessor and Director ol Astronomy 
B.S . University of Melbourne, 1938; MS.. 1940; M.A.. Harvard 
University. 1951. D Sc. University ol Melbourne. 1962 
Khanna, Raj K., Associate Prolessor ol Chemistry 
Ph D , Indian Institute of Science. 1962. 
Kidd. Jerry S.. Prolessor. College of Library and Information 
Sen/ices 

B.S.. Illinois Wesleyan University. 1950; M A . Norlhwestern Uni- 
versity, 1954; PhD . 1956 

Kim, Chul, Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B.S.. Seoul National University. 1963: M.S.. University of Minne- 
sota. 1971, PhD . 1975. 

Kim, Hoglf, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and 
Physics 

B S.. Seoul National University. 1956; Ph.D.. University of Bir- 
mingham. 1964. 

Kim, Young S„ Professor ol Physics 
B.S . Carnegie Institute ol Technology. 1958: PhD . Princeton 
University. 1961 

King, A.. Thomas, Assistant Prolessor ol Economics 
A B . Stanford University. 1966; M.Phil.. Yale University. 1969; 
Ph D . 1972 

King, Raymond L, Professor of Dairy Science 
A B , University of California. Berkeley, 1955; Ph.D.. 1958 
KInnaIrd, John \W., Associate Prolessor ol English 
B A , University ol California. Berkeley. 1944. M.A . Columbia 
University. 1949. Ph D.. 1959. 
Klrby, Karen, Assistant Prolessor ol Mathematics 
Sc B . Brown University. 1972: M.S.. 1972: M.A.. Princeton. 
1974; Ph.D.. 1975. 

Kltk, James A.. Assistant Prolessor ol Mechanical Engineering 
BSE E . Ohio University. 1967. M S.M.E.. Massachusetts Insti- 
tute ol Technology. 1969. Sc.D . 1972. 
Klrkley, DonaM H., Jt„ Associate Prolessor ol Speech and 
Dramatic An 

B.A , University of Maryland. 1960; M.A,. 1962: Ph.D.. Ohio Uni- 
versity. 1967 

KIrwan. William E., Prolessor ol Mathematics 
A B.. University ol Kentucky. 1960: MS.. Rutgers University. 
1962: Ph D 1964 

Klank, Richard E., Associate Prolessor ol Art 
B.A.. Catholic University. 1962: M FA . 1964. 
Klarman, William L., Pr«lessor ol Plant Pathology 
BS.. Eastern Illinois University. 1957: M.S.. University ol Illinois. 
1960. Ph.D.. 1962. 

Klalne, Don W., Associate Professor of English 
3.A.. University of Chicago. 1950; M.A.. 1953; Ph.D.. University 
ol Michigan. 1961 

Kleppnar, Adam. Professor of Mathematics 
B.S . Yale University. 1953; M.A,. University ol Michigan. 1954; 
PhD . Harvard University. 1960 



Knefelkamp, L Lee, Assistant Professor ol Counseling and 
Personnel Services 

B.A . Macalester College. 1967. M.A . University ol Minnesota, 
1973; Ph.D.. 1974 

Knllong, James Dan, Assistant Prolessor of Elementary Education 
BS. Northern Illinois University 1964: MS.. University of Illi- 
nois. 1968. PhD. 1971 

Knight, Robert E.L., Associate Professor of Economics 

A B . Hareard University. 1948; PhD . University of California. 

Berkeley. 1958 

Knoche, Walter, Assistant Prolessor ol Germanic and Slavic 

Languages 

B.A.. Marquette University. 1961 . MA.. Ohio State University. 

1%3; PhD . 1968 

Kobayaskl, Takao. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 

B.S . I^goya Institute of Technology. 1966; M.S.. Illinois Insti- 
tute of Technology. 1969, Ph.D.. 1972. 
Koch, E. James, Visiting Lecturer in Honculture 
B.S . Iowa State University. 1947; M.S.. North Carolina State 
University. 1949 

Kolker, Robert P., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic 
Art 

B.A.. Queens College, 1962; M.A.. Syracuse University, 1964; 
Ph.D.. Columbia University, 1969 

Koopman, OavW W., Research Professor. Institute lor Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

B.A , Amherst College. 1957. M.S.. University ol Michigan, 1959; 
PhD . 1964 

Koopman, Elizabeth Janssen, Assistant Professor ol Human 
Development Education 

A B . University of Michigan. 1960; M.A.. 1963; Ph.D.. University 
of Maryland. 1973. 

Korenman, Vkrlor, Associate Professor of Physics 
B.A. Princeton University. 1958: M.A.. Hazard University. 1959. 
Ph D,. 1966, 

Koury, Enver M., Associate Prolessor of Government and Poli- 
tics 

B.A.. George Washington University, 1953; Ph.D.. American 
University, 1958. 

Kramer, Amihud, Prolessor ol Horticulture 
B.S.. University ol Maryland. 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D.. 1942. 
Kramer, George F., Prolessor ol Physical Education 
B.S.. University ol Maryland. 1953: M.A., 1956; Ph.D.. Louisiana 
State University. 1967 

Kress. Jerry R., Assistant Prolessor ol Philosophy 
B.A . Pacific Lutheran University, 1961 ; M.A.. University of Mich- 
igan. 1962. Ph.D.. 1967 

Krieger, George W., Assistant Professor ol Counseling and 
personnel Services 

B.A.. City College of New York, 1961: M.A , University of Illinois, 
1964: Ph D , Michigan State University, 1969 
Krisher, Lawrence C, Prolessor, Institute lor Molecular Physics 
A.B.. Syracuse University, 1955: A.M., Harvard University. 1957. 
Ph.D.. 1959 

Krusberg, Lorln R., Prolessor ol Plant Pathology 
B.S , University of Delaware. 1954; M.S., North Carolina State 
College. 1956. Ph.D.. 1959 
Kuehl. Phillip a. Associate Professor ol Marketing 
BBS,, Miami University, 1965; M.B.A.. Ohio Slate University. 
1967. PhD . 1970. 

Kueker, David W. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A B., University of California. Los Angeles, 1964; M.A.. 1966: 
Ph.D.. 1967 

Kuenzel, Wayne J., Assistant Professor of Poultry Science 
B.S.. Bucknell University. 1964; M.S.. 1966; Ph.D.. University ol 
Georgia. 1969 

Kugelman, Alan M., Associate Prolessor ol Chemical Engineer- 
ing 

BS,. Columbia University. 1964; M.S.. University ol Pennsylvan- 
ia. 1966; PhD . 1969 

Kuhn, Terry Lee, Assistant Prolessor ol Music 
B.S.. University ol Oregon. 1963; MM E.. 1%7; Ph.D.. Florida 
State University. 1972 

Kumar, Parmeswsr C, Assistant Professor of Business and 
Management 

B.Sc. University ol Bombay. 1956: M.S . University of Banda. 
1960; D BSa . University ol Madras. 1971, Ph.D. Pennsylvania 
State University. 1975 

Kundu, Mukul R., Prolessor ol Astronomy 

B.Sc. Calcutta University, 1949; M.Sc. 1951 . D.Sc. University 

of Pans. 1957 

KurMe, William E., Assistant Professor of Animal Science 

B S , Ohio State University. 1970: MS.. 1970: Ph.D.. 1974. 

Kurtz. John J., Professor. Institute For Child Study 
B.A.. University of Wisconsin. 1935; M.A., Northwestern Univer- 
sity. 1940: Ph.D.. University of Chicago. 1949 



26 / Graduate Faculty 



Kyle, David C. Associate Professor instriute tor Cnno Study 
BA, Unrversity o< Denver. 1952: MA 19S3: Ed . University o< 
Maryland. 1961 

Lalhr, Norman C^ Professor of Microt}K)4ogy 
as.. Allesheny College 1929 MS. University ot Maine. 1932. 
I*.D.. University of Illinois. 1937 

Lakshmanan, Srtarama, Associate Professor of Chennslry. 
B.Sc,. University of Annamalai. 19*6. MA. 1949: Ph.D . Univer- 
sity of Maryland 1954 

Lambour. Gmry P„ Assistant Professor of Special Education 
B-A Saint Francis College. 1967: M Ed.. Unmersity of Pitts- 
burgn. 1969 Pn D Ohio State University. 1975. 
Lamone. Rudolph P^ Dean of the College of Business and 
Management and Professor of Maf\agenient Science and Statts- 
lics 

B.S.. University of North Carolina. I960: Ph.D.. 1966 
Lampe, John tL. Assistant Professor ol History 
BA. Hansard University. 1957 MA. University o( Minnesota 
1964. Ph.D.. Unmersity of Wisconsin. 1971 

Landry, L Baithdomew, Assistant Professor ot Sociology 
A.A . St. Michael s Seminary. 1959: BA. 1961 . BA. Xavier Uni- 
versity. 1966 Ph D Columbia Unmersity. 1971 

Lannlng, Eldon W„ Assistant Professor of Government and Pol- 
itics 

B.S-, Northvuestern Unmersity. 1960: Ph.D . University o( Virgin- 
ia, 1965. 

LaplnaU, Tadeusz. Lecturer m An 
M.FA. Academy o( Fine Arts (Poland). 1955 
LaiWn, WMard 0, Associate Professor of Psychology 
B-S.. University of Michigan. 1959: MA University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 1963; Pti D.. University of Illinois. 1967 
Lathlnsky, Heitwrt. Research Professor Institute for Ruid 
Dynamics and Aoplied Mathematics 

B.Sc . Oty College of New York. 1950: Ph D . Columbia Unwer- 
sity, 1961 

Laster, Howard J, Professor of Physics 
A.B.. Harvard University. 1951 ; Ph.D.. Cornell Unniersity. 1957 
Lawrence, Richard E., Associate Professor of Counseling and 
f>ersonr>ei Services 

B.S-, Michigan State Uni«rsity. 19S5: MA. 1957; Ph.D.. 1965. 
Lawrence, Robed &, Associate Professor. Agncultural and 
Resource Economics 

B.Sc University of Oklahoma 1957. M BA. 1960; Ph D . Texas 
A& M University. 1970. 

Lawaon, Lewis A^ Professor of English 

as.. East Tennessee State College. 1957 MA 1959 Ph D 

University of Wisconsin. 1964 

Lay, David D„ Associate Professor of Mathematics 

BA. Aurora College. 1962. MA University of California Los 

Angeles. 1965: PhD-. 1966 

Layman, John W,, Associate Professor of Secondary Education 

and Physics 

BA. Park College. 1955; M.S.. Temple Unmersity. 1962; Ed D.. 

Oklahoma State Unrvercity. 1970. 

Lee, Chi K., Associate Professor of Electncal Er>gineering 

B.S National Taiwan Unreersity, 1959; MS.. Harvard Unniersity. 

1962: Ph.D.. 1968 

Lae, Richaid W.. Assistant Professor of Journalism 
as.. I*iiversity ol Illinois. 1956; MA. Southern Illinois Universi- 
ty, 1964. Ph.D., Unrversity of Iowa. 1972. 

L*a, Young Jadi, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S.E.. Seoul Natwnal University. 1964: MS . Ohio State Univer- 
sity, 1972; PhD., 1974. 

Laaper, Sarah L, Professor. Early Childhood and Elementary 

Education 

A.B.. Flonda State College lor Women. 1932; MA. Rooda State 

University. 1947; Ed D.. 1953. 

iBttt, Buit A., Associate Professor of Business Law 

B S Juniata College. 1962: MBA. University o( Maryland 

1964. J.D.. Amencan University. 1969. 

Laflel, Emory C., Professor of Aninul Scence 

B.S.. University of Maryland. 1943: M.S.. 1947. Ph.D.. 1953. 

Lahnar. Guydo R„ Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. Loyola Unn«t5ity. 1951; M.S.. University of Wisconsin. 

1953. Ph D 1958 

L<|ina, Peter P, Professor and Director. Institute of Criminal 
Justice ana Cnminology 

Ph.M . Unnrersity of Latvia. 1930: LLM., 1933: PhD . University 
of Chicago. 1938 

Lanbach, John, Professor of Education and Art 
BA. Lhwersity o< Chicago. 1934. MA. Northwestern Universi- 
ty, 1937. Ed D.. Columbia University. 1946 
Lengarmann, Joaeph J.. Associate Professor of Sociology 
A.B.. University of Notre Dame. 1958: MA. 1964; Ph.D.. Cornell 
University. 1969 

Leonard, Mary Margaret, Assistant Professor of Counseling 
and Personnel Services 

B.S.. R.N.. Boston College. 1968: MA. University of Minnesota 
1970; Ph.D.. 1974. 



Lepper, Henry A^ Ji,, Professor of Ovii Engineering 

B S George Washington Unniersity. 1936. MS. University of 

Illinois. 1938; D Eng. Vale University. 1947 

Leaher, Jamei it. Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B> University of Virginia. 1962; Ph.D . Universiiy of Rochester. 

1966 

Lestley, BHIy V„ Professor Agncultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics 

BS University of Arkansas. 1957; MS. i960. Ph.D.. Unnrersity 
o> Missouri. 1965. 

Levine, Marvin J^ Professor. Business Organization and Ad- 
ministration 

BA Univeisity of Wisconsin. 1952: JD . 1954. MA 1959 
Ph.D.. 1964. 

Levine, Stephen, Assistant Professor ol Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 

AB.. Hunter Collger. 1967. M.S.E.. 1969: Ph.D.. Hofstra Univer- 
sity. 1972. 

Levine, WHIam S., Associate Professor of Electnc^ Engineer- 



Levinson, John i. Professor of Psychology 
BA Unrversity Of Toronto. 1939: MA. 1940: Ph.D.. 1948 
Levftan, Herbert Associate Professor ol Zoology 
BEE. Cornell University. 1962; Ph 1965 

LeviUne, George, Professor and Chairman of Art 

BA University of Pans, 1938 MA. Boston University, 1946: 

Ph D Hanrard University. 1952 

LevHon. Daniel, Professor of riealth Education B.S., George 

Washington University. 19S3. MS.. SoringfieM College. 1956; 

Ph D. University ol Maryland. 1967 

Lieberman, Charles, Assistant Professor of Economics 
B S . Massachusetts institute ol Technology, 1970; A.M., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 1972: Ph.D.. 1974. 

Liesener, James W, Professor. College of Library and Infomia- 

tk)p Se-vices 

BA Wartburg College. 1955; MA. University of Northern Indi- 
ana 1960 AM L S . University of Michigan. 1962: Ph.D.. 1967 

Ligomenides, Panos /L, Professor of Electncal Engineenng 
Diploma University of Athens. 1951: Gr Spec. D.. 1952; MS, 
Stanford Unrversity. 1956: Ph.D., 1958. 
Lin, Hung Chang, Professor of Electncal Engineenng 
B.S Chiao-Tung University. 1941; M S.E-. University of Michi- 
gan. 1948 DEE. Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1956 
Under, iterris, J,, Associate Professor of Zoology 
B.S Long Island University. 1951; MS . Cornell University. 
1955. Ph.D . 1958 

Lindsay, Rao H, Associate Professor. Foundations of Educa- 
tion 

BA Brigham Young University, 1954; MA. 1958; MA. Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1963; Ph.D., 1964. 
Link. Conrad a. Professor of Horticulture 
B.S Ohio State University. 1933; M.S.. 1934; Ph.D.. 1940. 
Linlrow, Irving. Associate Professor of Speech arnl Dramatic Art 
BA. University of Denver. 1937; MA. 1938. 
Lipsman, Ronald U Professor of Mathematics 
B S City College ol New York. 1964: Ph.D. Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technok>gy. 1967. 
Liu, Tai-Ping, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B S , National Tanran University. 1968: M.S.. Oregon State Uni- 
versity. 1970; Ph.D.. University o( Michigan, 1973. 
Lockard, J, David, Professor of Science Teaching and Asso- 
ciate Professor of Botany 

B.S . Pennsylvania State University, 1951; M.Ed., 1955; Ph.D 
1962. 

Locke, Edwin A, Professor of Psychology 
BA. Haniard University. 1960; MA. Cornell Unniersity. 1962: 
PhD 1964 

Loeb, Stephen E^ Associate Protessor of Accounting 
B-S-. University of Pennsylvania 1961 : M.BA. University of 
Wisconsin. 1963: Ph.D., 1970. 

LortgesL Jemes W„ Professor ot Agncultural and Extension 
Education 

B.S. University of Illinois. 1951: M.S.. 1953; Ph.D.. Cornell Uni- 
versity. 1957 

Longley, Edward L, Jr„ Associate Professor of Art and Educa- 
tion 

BA. University of Maryland. 1950; MA.. Columbia Unniersity. 
1953: Ed D.. Pennsylvania State University, 1967. 
Lopez-Escober, Edgar (L, Professor of Mathematics 
8A University of Cambridge. 1958: M> . University of Califor- 
nia Berkeley. 1961 . Ph.D.. 1965. 

Lounabury, Myron C Associate Professor and Cfiairman of 
Amencan Studies. 

BA. Duke University. 1961; M.A.. University of Penrsyfvania. 
1962: Ph.D.. 1966. 

Loutzenhelaer, Roy C Assistant Professor of Civil Engineenng 
BC E Ohio State University, 1966: M.S.C.E.. Georgia Institute 
of Technology, 1968; Ph.D.. Texas A & M University, 1972. 



Luetkemeyer, Jospeh F.. Professor of industrial Education 
BS Stout State College 1953: MS. 1954. Ed D . University of 
liiinos, 1961 

Lutwack, Leonard I., Prolessor of English 

BA Weselyan University. 1939. MA. 1940: Ph D.. Ohio State 

University. 1950 

Lynch. James B., Jr., Prolessor of Art 

AB Harvard Jniversity. 1941. AM. 1947: PhD., 1960. 



MA University of Saint Andrews, 1952. PhD. 1955 

HacDonald, Willam H., Professor of Physics 

BS Unrversity of Pittsburgh. 1950: Ph.D.. Princeton. Unniersity 

1955 

Mack, Maynard, Jr., Associate Professor ol English 
BA Yale University. 1964: Ph.D.. 1969. 

MacLeod, Anne S, Assistant Professor of Library and Informa- 
tion Services 

B^ Unniersity of Chicago. 1948. MLS.. Unrversity ol Mary- 
land 1966 Ph D, 1973- 

MacOuilan, Antlwny M„ Associate Professor of Microbiology 
B.SA. University of British Columbia. 1956: M.S.. 1958: Ph.D.. 
University of Wisconsin. 1962. 

Macready, George a, Assstant Professor ol Measurements 
and Statistics 

BA. Williamette Unniersity. 1965; MA. University of Oregon. 
1967; Ph.D.. University of Minnesota. 1972. 

Magoon, Thomas M, Professor of Psychology aid Education. 
Director. Counseling Center 

BA. Dartmouth College 1947; MA. University 01 Minnesota 
1951; PhD. 1954 

Magrab, PhyHs R., Assistant Prolessor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Semices 

BA. City College of New York. 1960; M Ed . University of Mary- 
land. 1966; Ph.D.. 1969 

Maida, Peter R., Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and 

Cnminology 

BA SI Vincent College, i960; MA. Fordham University. 1962: 

Ph D Pennsylvania State University. 1969 

Majeska, George P., Assistant Professor of History 

AB. Brooklyn College. 1961; MA. Indiana University, 1964 

PhD. 1968 

Male, George A, Professor. Foundations ot Education 
BA. University of Michigan, 1948; M.A.. 1949; Ph.D.. 1952. 
Malay, DonaM, Professor and Chairman ol Industrial Education 
BS.. California State College of Pennsy^ania 1943: M.S.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1947: Ph.D.. 1949 
Marando, VincenI L, Associate Professor. Institute lor Urban 
Studies 

B.S State University College. Buffalo. 1960: MA. Michigan 
State University. 1964. Ph D.. 1967 

Marchelo. Joseph M., Provost. Division of Mathematical and 

Physical Sciences and Engineenng and Professor of Ctiemical 

Engineering 

B S.. Unrversity of Illinois, 1955: Pti.O.. Carnegie Institute ol 

Technology. 1959 

Marcinkowski, M. John, Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S.. University of Maryland. 1953: M.S.. University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 1955: Ph.D., 1959 

Marcus, Robert F., Assistant Professor of Human Development 

Education 

BA Montdair State College. 1965; MA. New York Univeisity. 

1967 Ph.D.. Pennsylvania State University. 1973. 

Maril, Herman, Professor of Art 

Graduate. The Maryland Institute ol Fine Arts. 1928. 

Marlon, Jerry a. Professor of Physics 

BA. Reed College. 1952: MS . Rice University. 1953; Ph.D. 

1955 

MarMey, Nelson G^ Associate Prolessor of Mathematics and 

Statistics 

BA. Lafayette College. 1962 MA Yale University. 1964; Ph.D . 

1966 

Marks, Coijn K, Associate Protessor ol Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 

B.S , Carnegie institute ol Technology. 1956; M.S.. 1957; Ph.D.. 
University of Maryland. 1965. 

Marquardt, Warren W., Associate Professor o4 Veterinary Sci- 
ence 
B.S University of Minnesota. 1959; D.V.M.. 1961; Ph.D.. 1970. 

Marra-Lopez. Joee R, Professor ot Spanish and Portuguese 
BA-. Nra Sra. del Pilar. 1949: MA. University ol Madnd. 1959 

Martin, David U, Associate Professor of Cehmistry 
B S University o< Minnesota. 1963; MS.. University ol Wiscon- 
sin. 1965: Ph.D.. 1968 

Martin, Fredeiick W,, Assistant Prolessor of Physics 

AB.. Pnnceton University. 1957: MS . Yale University. 1958: 

Ph.D.. 1964. 



Graduate Faculty /27 



Martin. James G., Prolessor of Psychology 
B.S., University of North Dakota. 1951 : MA,, University of Min- 
nesota, 1958: Ph,D , 1960, 

Martin, J.W.. Associate Professor of Counseling and Personnel 
Services 
B.S„ University of Missouri, 1951 , M Ed , 1956, Ed D,, 1958 

Martin. U John. Professor of Journalism 
B,A , American University of Cairo. 1947. MA,, University of 
Minnesota, 1951. Ph.D., 1955. 

Martin. Raymond F.. Associate Professor of Philosoptiy 
B,A,, Ohio State University. 1962; MA. 1964; Ph,D , University 
of Rochester, 1968 

Marx. George L. Professor and Chairman of Counseling and 
Personnel Services 

B,A-, Yankton College. 1953; MA, State University of Iowa, 
1958; Ph,D„ Slate University of Iowa. 1959 
Mather, Ian H.. Assistant Professor of Dairy Science 
B So, University College of North Wales, 1966, Ph,D , 1969 
Matossian. Mary K,, Associate Prolessor of History 
B,A-, Stanford University. 1951 ; MA,, American University of 
Beirut, 1952, PhD, Stanford University. 1955, 
Matteson, Richard l_. Associate Prolessor. Institute For Child 
Study 

B.A,, Knox College, 1952; MA,, University of Maryland, 1955; 
Ed,D.. 1962. 

Matthew, Gary it. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 

B,S , University of Florida. 1970; M.E.. 1973; Ph.D.. 1975. 
Matthews, David L, Research Associate Professor. Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
B.S,. Queens University. 1949; PhD , Princeton University. 1959, 

Matthews, Thomas A., Associate Professor of Astronomy 
8, A , University of Toronto, 1950; M S,. Case Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1951, Ph,D,, Harvard University, 1956 
Matllck. Joseph F.. Prolessor ol Dairy Science 
B S , Pennsylvania State University. 1942; PhD,, 1950. 
May. Gordon S.. Assistant Prolessor ol Accounting 
B SB, A , Wittenberg University, 1964, MBA , University ol 
Michigan. 1965; Ph D . Michigan State University. 1972 
Mayes, Sharon S., Assistant Prolessor ol Sociology 
B.A , Michigan State University, 1970; M, Phil,, Yale University, 
1972; PhD , 1974 

Mayo, Marlene J., Associate Professor of History 
B.A . Wayne University. 1954; MA,. Columbia University. 1957. 
Ph.D.. 1961, 

MazzocchI, Paul H.. Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S,. Queens College, 1961 . PhD , Fordham University. 1966 
McCall, James P., Assistant Professor of Animal Science 
B.S.. Texas A & M University, 1966; MS,, 1969, PhD , 1972, 
McCarrick, Earleen M-, Assistant Professor of Government and 
Politics 

B.A,, Louisiana State University. 19S3. MA.. 1955; Ph.D., Van- 
derbilt University. 1964 

McQelian, Gene E., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S , Iowa State University. 1965: MS,, Cornell University. 1968; 

Ph.D.. 1970, 

Mcaelian. Michael T.. Assistant Professor of Computer Sci- 



McClure. L Morris. Professor of Administration. Supervision 
and Curriculum 

B.A.. Western Michigan University. 1940; M.A,. University of 
Michigan. 1946; Ed D., Michigan University. 1953, 

McCuaig, Susannah M., Assistant Prolessor ol Early Childhood 
and Elementary Education 

A,B,, Colorado College, 1959: M.Ed . Boston University. 1963; 
D.Ed . 1969 

McCuen, Richard H., Associate Prolessor of Civil Engineering 
B.S,. Carnegie-Mellon University. 1967; MS,. Georgia Institute 
of Technology. 1969, PhD., 1971. 

McCusker, John J., Assistant Prolessor ol History 

B.A.. St Bernard s College, 1961 : MA,. University of Rochester, 

1963; Ph D-, University of Pittsburgh, 1970 

McDonald, Frank B., Prolessor ol Physics 

B.S,, Duke University. 1948. M.S,, University ol Minnesota, 

1952; Ph D,. 1955, 

McGuIre, Martin, Professor of Economics 

B.A , Oxford University. 1958: Ph.D.. Harvard University. 1964, 

Mcllratti, Thomas J., Associate of Professor ol Physics 

B S , Michigan State University, 1960: PhD , 1966, 

Mclntlre, Roger W., Prolessor ol Psychology 
B.A,. Northwestern University. 1958. M.A.. Louisiana State Uni- 
versity, 1960, PhD , 1962 

Mclntyre, Jennie J., Associate Prolessor of Sociology 
B.A . Howard College. 1960; MS. Florida Stata College. 1962; 
PhD , 1966 



McKenzie, James D., Jr., Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A , University of Buffalo. 1955: Ph D , 1961. 
McLoone, Eugene P., Associate Professor ol Administration. 
Supervision and Curriculum and Economics 
B.A , LaSalle College, 1951; MS. University of Denver, 1952: 
PhD , University ol Illinois, 1961. 

McMullan. Yyonne D.. Assistant Prolessor ol Counseling & Per- 
sonnel Services 

B.A . Emory University. 1969; M.Ed,. Georgia State University. 
1970; Ph D , 1973 

McNelly. Theodore H.. Professor ol Government and Politics 
BS . University ol Wisconsin. 1941; MA.. 1942; PhD . Columbia 
University. 1952 

McWhinnie, Harold J.. Lecturer in Applied Design and Crafts 
and Professor of Secondary Education 

B.A E , Art Institute of Chicago, 1953; M F A University of Chi- 
cago. 1957. Ed D , Stanford University, 1965 
Measday. Walter. S.. Lecturer of Economics 
A B , College of William and Mary. 1941 . PhD,. Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, 1955, 

Medvene, Arnold, Associate Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services and Counselor, Counseling Center 
BS,, Temple University, 1959: M E„ 1963. Ed D , University of 
Kansas, 1%8 

Meeker, Barbara F. Associate Professor of Sociology 
B A , University of Kansas. 1961: M.A., Stanford University. 
1963. Ph D,. 1966 

Meersman, Roger L., Professor of Speech and Dramatic an 
B A , St Ambrose College, 1952; MA. University of Illinois. 
1959. PhD , 1962 

Mehlman, Myron A., Lecturer in Food, Nutrition & Institution 
Administration 

as , City College of New York. 1957, MS,. University of Illinois. 
1962. Ph D . Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1964. 
Mel|er, Marianne S.. Assistant Professor of French and Italian 
Baccalaureat de L Enseignement Secondaire Francais. 1944: 
Candidaats Romaanse Taal — en Litterkrunde. Leiden. 1948; 
MA,, Catholic University. 1960: Ph.D., 1972, 
Melnick, Daniel. Assistant Professor of Government and Poli- 
tics 
B.A , University of Wisconsin. 1963; M.A.. 1964; Ph.D.. 1970, 

Melnik, Walter L, Professor of Aerospace Engineering 
BS , University of Minnesota, 1951; M S , 1953; PhD , 1964 
Meitzet, Richard H., Assistant Prolessor of Psychology 
B,A , Johns Hopkins University, 1968; Ph.D.. University of Cali- 
fornia. San Diego. 1971 

MendeloH, Henry, Professor and Chairman of Spanish and Por- 
tuguese 

BS.. City College of New York. 1936; MS, 1939; PhD,, Catho- 
lic University of America, 1960. 

Mendlvllle, Miguel, Assistant Professor of Library and Informa- 
tion Services 

B A, University of Corpus Christi. 1970. M ALS., Immaculate 
Heart College. 1971. Ph.D.. University of Pittsburgh, 1974. 
Menzer, Robert E., Professor ol Entomology and Associate 
Dean for Graduate Studies 

B S , University of Pennsylvania. 1960; M.S.. University of Mary- 
land. 1962. PhD . University of Wisconsin. 1964. 
Merkel, James A.. Associate Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering 

B,S„ Pennsylvania State University. 1962. MS „lowa State Uni- 
versity, 1965; PhD., 1967 
Merrill, Horace S., Professor of History 
BE, Wisconsin State University. 1932; Ph.M.. University of 
Wisconsin, 1933, PhD , 1942. 

Messersmlth. DonaW H., Professor of Entomology 

B-Ed,. University of Toledo. 1951 : M.S.. University of Michigan. 

1953. PhD,, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1962, 

Meyer, Charlton G., Associate Professor of Music 
B-Mus , Curtis Institute of Music. 1952, 

Meyer, Paul A., Associate Professor of Economics 
B,A , The Johns Hopkins University. 1961 ; M.A.. Stanford Uni- 
versity, 1963; Ph.D . 1966 

MIetus, Waiter S., Associate Professor of Industrial Education 
B S , Chicago Teachers College, 1957; MEd.. 1959; Ed.D.. Loy- 
ola University. 1966 

MIgllazza, Ernest, Assistant Professor of Anthropology 
B.A,. Indiana University, 1963: MA . 1968. Ph.D., 1972. 
MIkulski, Plotr W., Professor of Mathematics 
Diploma. Mam School of Planning and Statistics. Warsaw. 
1951. Masters. 1952; Ph.D.. University of California. 1%2, 
Mtiazzo, Tony C-, Associate Professor of Special Education 
Mllhollan, Frank, Associate Professor, Institute For Child Study 
B.A , Colorado College. 1949; MPS, University of Colorado, 
1951, PhD , University of (Nebraska, 1966 
Miller, Catherine M., Associate Professor of Health Education 
B.S,. Illinois State University. 1956; MA. Colorado Stale Col- 
lege. 1959: Ph.D.. Ohio State University. 1967 



Miller. Douglas R.. Visiting Assistant Professor of Entomology 
B S . University of California. Davis. 1964; MS.. 1965; Ph.D.. 
1969 

Miller, Gerald Ray, Associate Prolessor ol Chemistry 
B S . University ol Wisconsin. 1958; M.S.. University of Illinois. 
1%0. Ph D 1962 

Miller, James R., Prolessor and Chairman of Agronomy 
B.S . University of Maryland. 1951: MS.. 1953; Ph.D.. 1956. 
Miller. Mary R., Associate Professor of English 
B.A . University of Iowa, 1941 ; MA University of Denver. 1959. 
PhD , Georgetown University, 1969 
Miller, Paula Jean, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B A , University of Texas, Austin, 1969; MA.. 1971 : Ph,D„ 1974. 
Mills, DavkJ H., Prolessor of Psychology and Assistant Director. 
Counseling Center 

BS Iowa State University, 1955; M.S.. 1957; Ph.D.. Michigan 
State University. 1964. 

Mills. David L, Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B S E . Engineering. University of Michigan. 1960. B.S E.. Math- 
ematics. 1961 : M S.E,, 1962; M.S., 1964; PhD., 1964 
Mills, Judson R., Professor ol Psychology 
B.S.. University of Wisconsin. 1953; Ph.D.. Stanford University. 
1958 

Minker. Jack, Prolessor of Computer Science 
B A . Brooklyn College. 1949: M.S., University of Wisconsin. 
1950. Ph D . University of Pennsylvania. 1959 
Minor, W. William, Assistant Professor. Institute of Criminal 
Justice and Criminology 

BS . Michigan State University. 1968: M.S.. Florida State Uni- 
versity. 1973; PhD-, 1975 

Mintz, Lawrence E., Associate Professor of American Studies 
B,A , University of South Carolina. 1966; M.A,. Michigan State 
University. 1967. Ph D . 1969 
MIsh, Charles C, Professor of English 
BS , University of Pennsylvania, 1936; MJV , 1946, PhD,, 1951 

MIsner, Charles W.. Professor of Physics 
BS,. University of Notre Dame. 1952; MA, Princeton Universi- 
ty, 1954, PhD, 1957 

Mitchell, Robert D., Associate Prolessor of Geography 
MA , University of Glasgow, 1962: PhD,. University of Wiscon- 
sin. 1969 

Mohanty, Sashi B., Professor of Veterinary Science 
BVSc &AH . Bihar University. India. 1956; M.S.. University of 
Maryland, 1961, PhD, 1963. 
Montero, Oarrel M., Assistant Professor of Urban Studies 
BA , California State University. 1970: MA . 1972, Ph.D.. 1974 
Montgomery, William, Associate Professor of Music 
B M E , Cornell College ol Iowa. 1953: MM.. Catholic University 
of America. 1957: Ph.D.. 1972. 
Moore, John H., Jr., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S , Carnegie Institute of Technology. 1963; M.S.. Johns Hop- 
kins University. 1965. PhD , 1967 

Moore, John R., Professor of Agricultural and Resources Eco- 
nomics 

BS,. Ohio State University. 1951. M.S.. Cornell University. 1955: 
Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin, 1959. 

Moore, Michael R., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic 
Art 

B-S-. Southern Illinois University. 1966. M.S.. University of Mis- 
souri, 1970, PhD , 1973 
Moore, Robert Assistant Professor of English 
B.A . Davidson College. 1962; M.A.. Urtiversity of htorth Caroli- 
na. 1964, PhD,, University of Wisconsin. 1972. 

Morgan, Delbert, T., Jr., Professor of Botany 
B.S . Kent State University. 1940; M.A,, Columbia University, 
1942: PhD , 1948 

Morgan H. Gerthon, Prolessor and Director, Institute lor Child 
Study 

BA , Furman University. 1940: MA.. University of Chicago. 
1943 Ph D , 1946 

Morse. Douglass H.. Associate Professor of Zoology 
BS,. Bates College. 1%0, M.S.. University of Michigan. 1962: 
Ph 0,. Louisiana State University, 1965, 
Morse, Frederick H., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering 

B.S,. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1957; M.S., Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. 1959; Ph.D., Stanford University. 
1969 

Morton, Eugene S., Assistant Professor of Zoology 
BS , Denison University. 1962; MS.. Yale University. 1966: 
Ph D . 1969 

Morton, John E., Assistant Professor of Economics 
BA , Yale University, 1965. M.A., University of Michigan, 1967; 
PhD . 1970, 

Moss, LawrerKe K., Professor of Music 
B A , University of California. Los Angeles. 1949; MA.. Universi- 
ty ol Rochester, 1951 , PhD . University of Southern California. 



28 / Graduate Faculty 



Motia, Jerome F., Associate Professor ol Botany 
B.A.. San Francisco State College, 1959: M.A.. 1964; Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of California, Berkeley. 1968 

Muccl, Anthony C. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A,, University of Pennsylvania. 1961: U.K. 1964: Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of California. Irvine. 1971 
Mulchl, Charles L., Associate Professor of Agronomy 
B S.. North Carolina State University. 1964: IVI.S.. 1966: Ph.O . 
1970. 

Mullnazzl, Thomas E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.S.. Notre Dame. 1964. MS,. Purdue University, 1966: PhD 

1973, 

Miiller, Edward K.. Assistant Professor of Geography 

B,A , Dartmouth College, 1965: H/IS,, University of Wisconsin, 

1968, PhD., 1972 

Munn, Robert J.. Professor of Chemistry 

B,S,, University of Bristol, 1957, Ph D , 1961 

Munno, Frank J.. Professor ol Chemical Engineering 

B S,, Waynesburg College, 1957, M.S.. University of Florida, 

1962: PhD , 1964 

Murphy, Charles D., Professor of English 

B.A , University of Wisconsin, 1929: M,A , Harvard University. 

1930: Oh.D., Cornell University. 1940. 

Murphy, Thomas J., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B S . Fordham University. 1963: Ph.D.. Rockefeller University. 

1968 

Murphy, Thomas P., Professor and Director, Urban Studies In- 
stitute 

B.A , Queens College, 1952, M.A.. Georgetown University. 1960; 
Ph.D.. St. John s University. 1963, 

Murray, Ray A., Professor of Agriculture and Resource Eco- 
nomics 

B.S.. University of Nebraska. 1934. MA, Cornell University, 
1938; Ph,D., 1949. 

Myers, Ralph D., Professor of Physics 
A B., Cornell University, 1934; AM,, 1935. Ph.D.. 1937 
Myers, Robert Manson, Professor of English 
B.A., Vanderbilt University. 1941: M.A.. Columbia University. 
1942; M.A., Harvard University. 1943; Ph.D., Columbia Universi- 
ty, 1948, 

Myrlcks, Noel, Associate Professor of Family and Community 
Development 

B.A . San Francisco State University, 1965; MS.. 1967; J D . 
Howard University. 1970: Ed D.. American University. 1973 

Nash, Allan N., Professor of Business Administration 

B B.A . University of Minnesota, 1957, MBA , 1959: PhD , 1963. 

Natella, Arthur A,, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Por- 
tuguese 

B A . Columbia University. 1963: M.A.. Syracuse University. 
1965. Ph.D.. 1968 

Needle, Richard H., Assistant Professor of Health Education 
B.S.. Temple University. 1964; M Ed.. University of Toledo. 
1967; Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 1973. 

Nelson, Clifford L, Professor of Agricultural and Extension 
Education 

B.S.. Washington State University. 1957; M.S.. 1962. Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1966 
Nelson, Judd A., Assistant Professor of Entomology 
B S , University of Wisconsin, 1969; M S , 1972; PhD , 1974 

Nemes, Graclela P., Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 
B,S . Trinity College. 1942; M.A., University of Maryland. 1946; 
Ph.D., 1952. 

Nerl, Umberto, Associate Professor ot Mathematics 
B.S.. University of Chicago. 1961; M.S.. 1962: Ph.D.. 1966. 
Neuman. Ronald H., Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement 

B.S.. University of Laryland. 1963. J.D., 1967; LL.M., George- 
town University Law (Center. 1973 

Neumann, Walter, Assistant Professor ol Mathematics 
B.A.. Adelaide University. 1963. M.A.. 1966; Ph.D.. Bonn Univer- 
sity, 1%9 

Newby, Hayes A., Professor and Chairman of Speech and 
Hearing Sciences 

A.B,. Ohio Wesleyan University, 1935; MA.. University of Iowa. 
1939: Ph.D.. 1947. 

Newcomb, Robert W., Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B S . Purdue University. 1955: M.S.. Stanford University. 1957. 
Ph.D.. University of California. Berkeley. 1960, 

Newell, aarence A., Professor of Administration, Supervision 
and Curriculum 

A.B., Hastings College. 1935, AM,, Columbia University. 1939 
Ph.D.. 1943. 

Newtom, D. Earl, Professor of Journalism 
B.S . Oklahoma State University, 1948. M.S.J.. Northwestern 
University. 1949: Ed.D.. Oklahoma State University, 1957 
Nickels, William G., Associate Professor of Marketing 
B.S., Ohio State University. 1962: MB.A,, Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1966, Ph,D., Ohio State University. 1969 



NIcklason, Fred, Assistant Professor of History 

BS. Gustavus Adolphus College. 1953. MA . University of 

Pennsylvania, 1955, Ph D , Yale University, 1967 

NIebur, Douglas P., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

BS , Iowa Slate University, 1963; M,S.. University of Wisconsin. 

1965. Ph D . 1968 

NIese, Henry E., Associate Professor of Art 

Cert . The Cooper Union, 1949: Academie Grande Chaumiere, 

1949, BFA, Columbia University. 1955 

Nlles, Lyndrey A., Lecturer in Speech and Dramatic Art 
AA . Caribbean Union College, 1956: B.A . Columbia College. 
1963: MA.. University of Maryland. 1965: Ph D . Temple Univer- 
sity. 1973 

Noll, James W., Associate Professor and Chairman. Founda- 
tions of Education 

BA , University of Wisconsin. 1954; M.S., 1962; Ph.D,, Universi- 
ty of Chicago. 1965. 

Noonan, Robert Edward, Assistant Professor of Computer Sci- 
ence 

A.B. Providence College, 1966: M.S., Purdue University. 1968: 
Ph D , 1971 

Norman, Kent L, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B A , Southern Methodist University, 1969: M.A., University ol 

Iowa, 1971, PhD, 1973 

Nossaman, Audrey, Assciate Professor of Music 
B,M , Westminster Choir College, 1947 
O'Connell, Donald W., Professor of Economics and Vice Presi- 
dent for General Administration 

BA,, Columbia University, 1937, M.A.. 1938. PhD,, 1953, 
Odell, Stanley Jack, Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
BA., University of Kansas, 1960: MA., University of Illinois, 
1962, Ph D , 1967 

O'Gallagher, Joseph J., Assistant Professor of Physics 
SB.. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1%1 . S.M , Univer- 
sity of Chicago, 1962; PhD,, 1967 
O'Grady, E. Pearse, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineer- 



O'Haver, Thomas C, Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B S , Spring Hill College. 1963; Ph.D.. University of Florida. 
1968 

O'Leary, Ronald T., Associate Professor of Speech and Drama- 
tic Art 

BS,, Bowling Green State University, 1960. MA,. 1961; M.F.A.. 
University of Wisconsin, 1964. PhD . 1966 

Oliver, James H., Assistant Professor of Government and Poli- 
tics 

BA.. University of Washington, 1959; M.A., 1962: Ph.D.. Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1968 

Olson, Alison Gilbert, Professor of History 

B A , University of California, 1952: MA.. 1953. PhD . Oxford 

University. 1956, 

Olson, Charles E., Associate Professor ot Transportation 
BBA,, University ot Wisconsin. 1964; M.A.. 1966. Ph.D.. 1968. 

Olson, Edwin E., Professor, College of Library and Information 

Sen/ices 

BA,, St. Olaf Coflege. 1959; MA,, American University. 1961. 

Ph.D.. 1966 

Olson, Keith W., Associate Professor of History 

B.A.. State University of t>tew York. Albany. 1957: MA. 1959; 

Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin. 1964. 

Olson, Mancur L, Jr., Professor ot Economics 
BS,, North Dakota State University, 1954: B,A,, Oxford Universi- 
ty. 1956. MA . 1960. Ph.D., Harvard University, 1960. 

Oliver, Frank W. J., Research Professor. Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics 
BSc, University of London. 1945: M.Sc, 1948. D.Sc, 1961, 

Onder, James J., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic 

Art 

BFA,, Ohio University, 1962; M.S., University of Illinois. 1964; 

Ph.D.. University of Michigan. 1969. 

Oneda, Sadao, Professor of Physics 

B,S,, Tohoku University, 1946; M.Sc, 1948: PhD . Nagoya Uni- 
versity, 1953. 

O'Neill, Lao W., Jr., Professor of Early Childhood and Elemen- 
tary Education 

B.A . University of Chicago. 1938, M.A.. University of Kansas. 
1953. Ed.D,, University of Colorado, 1955. 

Oplk, Ernst, J., Professor of Astronomy 

Cand. Astro.. Moscow Imperial University, 1916. DPhil.Nat, Ua- 

tional University of Estonia. 1923. 

Osborn, John E., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

BS., University of Minnesota. 1958: M.S.. 1963: PhD . 1965 

Osterhouse, Robert A., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. Whilworth College. 1964; M.A., Ohio State University. 

1%8; Ph.D.. 1969. 



Ostrowskl, Paul P., Assistant Professor ol Mechanical Engi- 



Otts, Louis E., Jr., Professor ot Civil Engineering 
B A,. East Texas State University. 1933: BS . Texas A4M Uni- 
versity. 1946; M.S., 1946 

Owens, William R., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering 

BS. Pennsylvania State University. 1959: MS . Drexel Institute 
ol Technology, 1964, PhD , University ol Maryland, 1970. 
Owlngs, James C, Associate Professor of Mathematics 
BS., Dartmouth College. 1962, PhD, Cornell University. 1966 
Paei, Mario 0., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B S.. Inslituto Tecnologica de Monterrey. 1959: M S . Carnegie 
Institute ol Technology. 1965, Ph , North Carolina Slate Uni- 
versity. 1972 

Pal, Shih-I, Research Professor, Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 

B S , National Central University. 1935. M S . Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology. 1938. Ph D , California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1938, Ph , California Institute ol Technology, 1940 
Paine, Frank T., Professor of Business Organization and Ad- 
ministration 

BS„ Syracuse University, 1951. MBA. 1956. Ph.D.. Stanford 
University. 1963, 

Panlchas, George A., Professor of English 
BA,. American International College. 1951. MA. Trinity Col- 
lege. 1952: PhD . Nottingham University. 1961 

ParochettI, James V., Associate Professor of Agronomy 

B S.. University of Illinois. 1962, MS., Purdue University. 1964. 

Ph D., 1967 

Pasch, Alan, Professor of Philosophy 

B A,, University of Michigan, 1949, MA. New School for Social 

Research. 1952: PhD . Princeton University. 1955. 

Rati, Jogesh C, Professor ol Physics 

BS,, Utkal University. 1955: M Sc. Delhi University. 1957. Ph.D.. 

University of Laryland. 1960. 

Patterson, Glenn W., Professor of Plant Physiology 

B S.. North Carolina State University. I960: M.S.. University of 

Maryland. 1963, Ph D . 1964 

Pavey, Stanley, Associate Professor of Psychology and Coun- 
selor, Counseling Center 

BA , City Coflege of New York, 1952. M S,. 1955; Ph D , Ohio 
State University. 1961. 

Pearl, Martin Herbert, Professor of Mathematics 

B.A.. Brooklyn College. 1950; MA . University of Michigan. 

1951; PhD , University of Wisconsin, 1955, 

Pease, John, Associate Professor of Sociology 

BS . Western Michigan University, 1960, M.A.. Michigan State 

University. 1963. Ph.D.. 1966 

Pechacek, Robert E., Associate Professor of Physics 

BS . California Institute of Technology. 1954; M.S.. University 

ol California. Berkeley. 1963: Ph D , 1966 

Pelczar, Michael J., Jr., Professor ot Microbiology and Vice 

President for Graduate Studies and Research 

B.S.. University of Maryland. 1936; M.S., 1938: Ph.D.. University 

of Iowa. 1941 

Pemberton, Elizabeth G., Associate Professor of Art 

B.A. Ml. Holyoke College. 1961. M.A.. Columbia University. 

1%4. PhD . 1968 

Pennington, Kenneth D., Associate Prolessor of Music 

A.B,, Friends University, 1950; BMus , 1950, MA, l*w York ' 

University. 1953. D.Mus , Indiana University, 1961 

Perlnbam, B., Marie, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A,, London University, 1954, MA,, University of Toronto, 

1969, Ph,D,, Georgetown University, 1969 

Perkins, Hugh V., Professor, Institute For Child Study 
A,B,, Oberlin College, 1941 ; A M , University ol Chicago, 1946: 
PhD , 1949: Ed.D,, New York University, 1956 
Perkins, Moreland, Professor of Philosophy 
A B., Harvard University, 1946. A.M.. 1949; Ph.D., 1953 
Peroff, Kathleen, Assistant Professor of Government and Poli- 
tics 

B,A., Holy Names College. 1965; Diplome Annuel. Sorbonne, 
1968; M.A.. University ol Wisconsin, Madison, 1970; Ph.D., 
1975 

Perrln, OonaM G., Professor. Education Technology Center 
B.A . University of Southern California, 1960 M,A,, 1%2. Ph.D.. 
1969 

Peters, Robert M., Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
B.S.. Mankato State College, 1955: M.S.. 1958; PhD,, University 
of Minnesota, 1965, 

Peterson, Frederick M., Assistant Professor of Economics 

BS., University of California, 1964; Ph.D.. Princeton University, 

1972. 

Peterson, William S., Associate Professor of English 

B.A.. Walla Walla College. 1961 ; M.A., University ol Wisconsin, 

1962. Ph.D.. Northwestern University, 1968 



Graduate Faculty /29 



Petrlck, Michael J., Assistant Professor of Journalism 
B S . University of Wisconsin. 1965; I^.S., 1967; Ph.D.. 1970 
Pfatfenberger, Roger C, Associate Professor of Business and 
Management 

B.S-. California Polytechnic State University. 1965. M.S.. Texas 
A. and M University. 1968, Ph D . 1971 
Pflster, Guenter G.. Associate Professor of German and Sec- 
ondary Education 

B.S . Bowling Green State University. 1963. M.A . Michigan 
State University. 1966: Ph.D., University of Kansas. 1970, 
PhHIips, Warren R., Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A,. Northwestern University, 1963, MA , San Francisco State 
University. 1965. Ph D.. University of Hawaii. 1969 
PIckard, Hugh 8., Professor of Chemistry 
A B.. Haverford College. 1933; Ph.D.. Northwestern University. 
1938 

Pierce, Sidney IC, Jr., Associate Professor of Zoology 
B.Ed . University of Miami. 1966. Ph.D.. Florida State University, 
1970. 

Ptper, Don C, Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A,, University of Maryland. 1954: M.A.. 1958; Ph.D.. Duke Uni- 
versity. 1961- 

Piper, Harry W., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
BArch E , Catholic University of America. 1940: MCE. 1981 
Plrages, Dennis Clark, Associate Professor of Government and 
Politics 

B A . State University of Iowa. 1964: PhD,, Stanford University, 
1969 

Pfischke, Eimer. Professor of Government and Politics 
Ph.B . Marquette University. 1937; M.A . American University. 
1938. Ph D , Clark University. 1943 

Plotkfn, Allen, Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering 
B.S,. Columbia University. 1963; MS,. 1964; Ph.D.. Stanford 
University, 1968 

Poflenberger. Paul R., Associate Dean. College of Agriculture. 
Acting Chairman, Agricultural and Extension Education, and 
Professor, Agricultural and Resource Economics 
B,S,, University of Laryland, 1935: MS,, 1937, Ph.D.. American 
University, 1953, 

Polst. Richard P., Jr., Assistant Professor of Transportation 
B.S.. Pennsylvania State University. 1965. MBA,. University of 
Maryland. 1967. PhD,, Pennsylvania State University, 1971 
Ponnamperuma, Cyril, Professor of Chemistry 
B,A , University of Madras, 1948: BSc, Birktjeck College. Uni- 
versity of London. 1959: Ph.D.. University of California. Berke- 
ley. 1962 

Portz, John, Associate Professor of English and Director of 
Honors Program 

B.A. Duke University. 1937; MA, Harvard University. 1941; 
Ph.D., 1957 

Potter, Jane H., Associate Professor of Zoology 
B,S , University of Chicago, 1942, M S , 1948. PhD . 1949 
Prange, Gordon, Professor of History 
B.A , University of Iowa, 1932. MA,, 1934; PhD , 1937 
Prange, Richard E., Professor of Physics 
M S , University of Chicago. 1955; Ph.D.. 1958 
Prather, Elizabeth S., Professor and Chairman of Food 
Nutrition and Instilution Administration 
B.S. Auburn University. 1951; MS,. 1955. PhD,. Iowa Stale 
University. 1963, 

Pugh, Howel G., Professor of Physics 
BA. Cambridge University. 1955; M.A.. 1961; Ph.D.. 1961 
Pugllese, Rudolph E., Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A,. Miami University. 1947, M F A , Catholic University of 
America, 1949, Ph D , Ohio State University, 1961 
Pugsley, James H., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 



Pumroy, Donald K., Professor of Education and Psychology 
B.A,. University of Iowa, 1949, MS, University of Wisconsin. 
1951. PhD . University of Washington. 1954. 
Punch, Jorry L, Associate Professor of Hearing and Speech 
Sciences 

B,A„ Wake Forest College. 1965. MS . Vanderbilt University. 
1967, Ph D , Northwestern University, 1972 
Rado, George T., Professor of Physics 
SB,, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1939, S,M , 1941. 
Ph D , 1943 

Ragan, Robert M., Professor of Civil Engineering 
B S . Virginia Military Institute. 1955; M.S.. Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. 1959; Ph.D.. Cornell University. 1%5- 
Ranald, Ralph A., Associate Professor of Government and Poli- 
tics 

B.A . University of California. Los Angeles. 1952; M.A.. 1954; 
M A . Princeton University. 1958; Ph.D.. 1%1. 



Rao, T.R., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
BSc, Government Arts College. 1952; DII.Sc, Indiana Institute 
of Science. 1955; MS.E., University of Michigan. 1961 ; Ph.D.. 
1964, 

Rappieye, Robert D., Associate Professor of Botany 
BS, University of Maryland, 1941 , MS, 1947 PhD,, 1949 

Ray, Philip B., Associate Professor of Counseling and Person- 
nel Services and Counselor. Counseling Center B.A,. Antioch 
College, 1950. MS , University of Pennsylvania. 1955; Ph.D.. 
University of Minnesota. 1962 
Razar, Michael J., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A B . Hansard University. 1965. PhO , 1971 
Reaka, Marjorie L, Assistant Professor of Zoology 
B.A , University of Kansas. 1%5; M.S.. 1967, PhD,, University of 
California. Berkeley. 1975, 
Rearick, William R., Professor of Art 
BA,, New York University. 1953; M.A,. 1958. Ph.D.. Harvard 
University. 1968 

Redish, Edward F., Associate Professor of Physics 
A B,. Princeton University. 1963; Ph.D.. Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 1968 

Reeve, E., Wilkins, Professor of Chemistry 
BS,, Drexel Institute of Technology, 1936; PhD,. University of 
Wisconsin, 1940 

Reeves, Mavis M., Associate Professor of Government and Pol- 
itics 

BA , West Virginia University, 1942. MA. 1943. Ph.D.. Universi- 
ty of North Carolina. 1947 

Regan, Thomas M., Professor of Chemical Engineering 

BS , Tulane University. 1963. Ph.D . 1967 

Reicheiderler, Charles F., Associate Professor of Entonomogy 

BS , St Cloud College. 1961 . M.A,. University of Washington. 

1963; Ph D,. University of California at Riverside. 1968. 

Reid, James, Instructor in Art 

B,F A , Maryland Institute College of Art. 1966: M.A . University 

of Maryland. 1970 

Reinhart, Bruce L., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A , Lehigh University. 1952; M.A.. Princeton University. 1954; 

PhD . 1956 

Reiser, Martin P., Professor of Electrical Engineering and Phys- 



Reveal, James L, Associate Professor of Botany 

BS,, Utah State University. 1963; MS.. 1965; Ph.D.. Brigham 

Young University, 1969 

Reynolds, Charles W., Professor of Horticulture 
A B . University of Alabama. 1941 ; B.S,. Auburn University. 
1947. MS. 1949; PhD , University of Maryland. 1954 
Reyrtoids, Michael M., Professor. School of Library and Infor- 
mation Services 

A B . Hunter College. 1950: MSLS , Columbia University. 1952. 
M.A . American University. 1954. Ph D,. University of Michigan. 
1964 

Rhee, Moon-Jhong, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 

BS . Seoul National University. 1958; MS,, 1960, PhD , The 
Catholic University of America, 1970 

Rheinlxiidt, Werner C, Research Professor Computer Science 
BS,, University of Heidelberg, 1949; M.A.. 1952; Ph.D., Universi- 
ty of Freiburg. 1955, 

Rhoads, David J., Associate Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 

BA , Temple University. 1954; MA.. 1958; Ed.D,. University of 
Maryland, 1963, 

Ricci, Frederick A., Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 
BS , Bryant College. 1%4; Ed,M„ Boston University. 1965; 
Ed D-, 1972, 

Richard, Jean-Paui, Associate Professor of Physics 

B te Arts, Universiie Laval, 1956; B e S,, 1960; Doclorat de 

Speciahte. University of Paris. 1963: Doctrate es Sciences, 1965, 

Ridgway, WhHman H., Assistant Professor of History 

A B , Kenyon College, 1%3; M.A . San Francisco Slate College. 

1%7. Ph D . University of Pennsylvania. 1973. 

Ridky, Robert W., Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 
B.S,. Slate University of New York at Cortland, 1966. MS.. Syra- 
cuse University. 1970. PhD,, 1973 

Riegar, Charltfs Joseph, Ml, Assistant Professor of Computer 

Science 

BS , Purdue University. 1970. Ph.D.. Stanford University. 1974 

Risinger, Robert, Professor and Chairman. Secondary Educa- 
tion 

BS , Ball Slate University. 1940; M.A , University of Chicago. 
1947: EdD,. University of Colorado, 1955 

RItzer, George, Professor of Sociology 

BA , City College of New York, 1%2, MBA,, University of 

Michigan, 1964, PhD , Cornell University, 1968 



Ritzmann, Barbara J., Assistant Professor in Housing and Ap- 
plied Design 

BA , Pennsylvania State University. 1945. M F.A.. George Wash- 
ington University. 1966 

flivelio, Robert M., Professor of Aerospace Engineering 
BS , University of Maryland, 1943, MS, 1948 

Roberson, Bob S., Associate Professor of Microbiology 
BA , University of North Carolina. 1951: Ph.D.. 1960. 
Rotwrts, Merrill J., Professor of Business and Management 
B A . University of Minnesota. 1938, MBA . University of Chica- 
go. 1939. Ph.D., 1961 

Rodenhuis, David R., Associate Professor of Meteorology 
BS , University of California. Berkeley. 1959; B.S,. Pennsylvania 
Slate University. 1960; Ph.D.. University of Washington. 1967. 

Roderick, Jessie A., Associate Professor. Early Childhood and 

Elementary Education 

B S , Wilkes College. 1956: M.A,. Columbia University. 1957; 

Ed D , Temple University. 1967. 

Rogoisky, Saul, Associate Professor. Institute For Child Study 

B.A . Han/ard University. 1948; M.A . University of Chicago. 

1953. Ed D,. Harvard University. 1963, 

Roilinson, Carl L., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S , University of Michigan. 1933; Ph.D.. University of Illinois. 

1939 

Roos, Phillip G., Professor of Physics 

B.A . Ohio Wesleyan University. 1960; Ph.D.. Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology. 1964. 

Rose, Harry J., Visiting Professor of Chemistry 

B.S . St- Francis College. 1948; M.S.. University of Maryland. 

1952. 

Rose, Wfiilam K., Associate Professor of Astronomy 

AB,. Columbia University, 1957: PhD,, 1963, 

Rosentwrg, Morris, Visiting Professor of Sociology 

B A , Brooklyn College, 1946; MA., Columbia University. 1950: 

PhD. 1953 

Rosenfeid, Azriel, Research Professor. Computer Science 
BA . Yeshiva College. 1950; M.A.. Columbia University. 1951. 
PhD.. 1957 

Rosenfleld, Leonora C, Professor of French and Italian 

B A . Smith College 1930; AM.. Columbia University. 1931 ; 

Ph D . 1940 

Rosweii, Charles Alfred, Jr., Assistant Professor of Geography 

BA , The Johns Hopkins University. 1963; M.A.. University of 

Maryland. 1969; Ph.D.. 1974. 

Roush, Marvin L, Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering 

and Physics 

BSc , Ottawa University. 1956; Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 

1%4 

Rovner, Philip, Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

B.A . George Washington University, 1948; M.A.. 1949; Ph.D.. 

University of Maryland. 1958, 

Rowan, Robert, III, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A.. Pomona College. 1968. M.A,. Harvard University. 1970; 

PhD,. 1974 

Rubin, Roger H., Assistant Professor of Family and Community 

Oevelopmenl 

B.A . Brooklyn College of the City University of l*w York. 1965; 

MS, Pennsylvania State University, 1966, PhD,, 1970 

Ruchkln, Judith P., Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 

BA , Swarthmore College, 1956; MA, Yale University. 1957; 

Ed D . Columbia University Teachers College. 1972, 

Ruderman, David B., Assistant Professor of History 
BA , City College of l^w York, 1966; M.A , Columbia Universi- 
ty. 1968. PhD , Hebrew University. Jerusalem. 1975. 
Rundell, Walter, Jr., Professor of History 
B.S . University of Texas. 1951: M.A,. American University. 1955: 
Ph D . 1957 

Russefi, Charles C. Assistant Professor of French and Italian 
B.A . Oberlin College. 1956: M.A . Bryn Mawr College. 1964; 
PhD , Harvard University. 1970, 

Russeii, John 0., Professor of English 

A B . Colgate University. 1951 ; MA. University of Washington. 

1956. Ph D . Rutgers University. 1959 

Rutherford, Charles S., Assistant Professor of English 
B.A . Carleton College. 1%2; M.A.. Indiana University. 1966; 
Ph D . 1970, 

Ryden, EInar B., Professor emeritus of Agricultural and Exten- 
sion Education 

BA , Augsburg College. 1929. Ph.D.. Northwestern University. 
1947 

Salamanca, Jack R., Professor of English 
Diploma. Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. 1952; Lie. Deg.. Uni- 
versity of London. 1953: Licentiate. Royal Academy of Music, 
1954 

Saiiet, Olrse W., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 

BS,, George Washington University. 1961 ; M.S.. University of 
Kansas. 1963. PhD,, Technische Hochschule. Stuttgart. 1966, 



30 / Graduate Faculty 



Samet, Hanan, Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B.S , University of California at Los Angeles. 1970; M.S. (Com- 
puter Science). Stanford University, 1974. M.S. (Operations 
Research). 1975. Ph.D . 1975 
Sampugna, Joseph, Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., University of Connecticut. 1959. M A . 1962, Ph D . 1%8 
Santa Maria, D. Lalne, Associate Professor of Physical Educa- 
tion 

B.A . University of Pennsylvania. 1954. M Ed . Temple Universi- 
ty. 1962, Ed D., University of Oregon. 196B. 

Sargent, Stephen Lee. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering 

B.S , Arizona State University, 1964: MS., University of Wiscon- 
sin, 1967, Ph.D. 1971 

Sather, Jerome 0., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B S . University of Minnesota. 1957: MS.. 1959. Ph.D.. 1963 
Sayre, Qltford L., Jr.. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S., Duke University. 1947, MS, Stevens Institute of Technolo- 
gy, 1950. Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 1961 

Scliaaffer. Harry G., Associate Professor of Aerospace Engi- 
neering 

B.S . University of Washington. 1958. MS.. Arizona State Uni- 
versity. 1962. Ph D . Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 1967 
Schafer, James A., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., University of Rochester, 1961 : Ph.D.. University of Chica- 
go. 1965 

Schafer, William P., Associate Professor of Measurement and 

Statistics 

B.A.. University of Rochester. 1964. MA,. 1965: Ed 0.. 1969 

Schales, Franklin D., Associate Professor of Horticulture 

B,S„ Louisiana Slate University, 1959: MS,, Cornell University, 

1962: Ph,D,, 1963. 

Schetflar, WUIwrt A., Jr., Assistant Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering 

B.S.. Tulane University. 1961 . M.S.. 1965, Ph,D„ University of 

Minnesota, 1969 

Scfilller, Bradley R., Assistant Professor of Economics 

B,A,, University of California, Berkeley, 1965: Ph.D., Harvard 

University, 1969 

SchlaretzM, Walter E., Professor of Philosophy 

A,B,, Monmouth College, 1941, AM , University of Illinois, 1942: 

PhD,, Cornell University, 1948 

Scfileldt, Wolfgang M,, Professor of Zoology 

Ph,D,, University of Vienna, 1951 

Sclimldt, Dieter S„ Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Dipt. Technische Hochschule, Stuttgart, 1966: Ph.D., University 

of Minnesota, 1970. 

Schneider, Benjamin, Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A.. Alfred University. 1960: M B.A . City University of Hew 
York, 1962, Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1967 
Schneider, Oavld T., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
8,A., Oberlin Ck>llege, 1959: Ph.D.. Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 1964 

Schneler, Craig Eric. Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement 

B.S.. Ohio State University, 1969: M,S„ University of Colorado. 
1972: DBA, 1975, 

Scholnldt, Ellin K., Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. Vassar College. 1958: Ph.D.. University of Rochester. 1963. 

Schroeder, Wllburn C, Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S.. University of Michigan. 1930: M S.E.. 1931: Ph.D.. 1933. 

Schuessler, Herman E., Associate Professor of History 

Theologiae Doctor. University of Kiel. 1955, 

Schultze, Charles L, Professor of Economics 

B,A.. Georgetown University. 1948. MA,. 1950: Ph.D.. University 

of Maryland. 1960, 

Schumacher. Elisabeth. Assistant Professor of Early Childhood 
and Elementary Education 

B.S.. Newark State College. 1942: M.Ed.. Pennsylvania State 
University. 1962: D.Ed,. 1965. 

Schumacher, Thomas, Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus.. Manhattan School of Music. 1958: M.S,, Julliard School 

of Music, 1%2, 

Schwartz, Yvonne K., Assistant Professor of Art 

B-A,, Radcliffe College. 1958: M.A.. University of California. 

Berkeley. 1966: Ph.D.. 1973 

Schweitzer, Howard Christopher, Research Associate Profes- 
sor, Hearing and Speech Sciences 

B.A.. Northern Illinois University. 1968. MJk.. University of Mary- 
land, 1971: Ph.D.. 1974 

Sedlacak, WWIam E., Associate Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services and &>unselor. Counseling Center 
B,S.. Stale University of Iowa. 1960: MS.. 1961 : PhD,, Kansas 
State University, 1966 

Seafaldt Carol A, Associate Professor of Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education 

B,A„ University of Wisconsin, 1956: MJV,. University of South 
Florida, 1968; Ph,D„ Florida State University, 1971, 



Segal, Oavkf R., Professor of Sociology 

BA , Harpur Ckillege, 1%2, M A , University of Chicago, 1963, 

Ph D , 1967 

Segal, Mady Wechsler. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B A Queens (>3llege. City University of New York, 1965; MA., 

University of Chicago, 1967, Ph D , 1973 

Selbel. Ronald J., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Ex- 
tension Education 

B.S . University of Illinois. Urbana. 1957. M S . 1958: PhD , Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1972. 

Seldman, Eric, Associate Professor of Special Education 
BS , New York University, 1947; MA., 1948, Ph.D., University of 
Connecticut, 1964 

Selgel, Arnold E., Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering 
BS,, University of Maryland, 1944, MS,, Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology, 1947, Ph D , University of Amsterdam, 1952 
Sengers, Jan V., Professor of Molecular Physics 
Doctorandus, University of Amsterdam, 1955, Ph D,, 1962 
Serwer, Howard J., Associate Professor of Music 
B A . Yale University. 1949. M.BJ^.. Columbia University. 1950. 
Ph D , Yale University. 1969 

Shaftner, Clyne S., Professor of Poultry Science 

B S . Michigan State University. 1938: MS,. 1940; PhD . Purdue 

University. 1947 

Shanks, James 8., Professor of Horticulture 

B-Sc , Ohio State University. 1939. M.Sc. 1946: Ph.D.. 1949 

Shapere, Dudley, Professor of Philosophy 

B.A , Harvard University. 1949: M A , 1955: Ph D 1957 

Sheaks, 0. J., Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering 

B.S, North Carolina State College 1964, Ph D , 1969 

Shearer, Jane K., Professor and Chairman of Housing and 

Applied Design 

BS,, University of Tennessee, 1940, MS, 1950: Ph.D., Florida 

State University, 1960. 

Sherwood, A. Wiley, Professor of Aerospace Engineering 
ME . Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1935, MS,, University of 
Maryland, 1943 

Shillett, John M., Assistant Professor of Child Study 
BA , Santa Barbara City College, 1965: MA , University of Cali- 
fornia, 1967, PhD , 1972. 

Shreeve, Charles A., Jr., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
BE. The Johns Hopkins University. 1935. M.S.. University of 
Maryland. 1943 

Shroyer, Charlotte A., Assistant Professor of Special Education 
B.A . Ohio Slate University. 1961. MEd.. University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1972, PhD, 1975. 

SIgall, Harokl, Associate Professor of Psychology 

BS.. City Ck)llege of New York. 1964; Ph.D., University of Texas 

(Austin), 1968 

SJgnell, Kart L, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S , Julliard School of Music. 1962. MA. Columbia University. 

1963. PhD . University of Washington. 1973. 

Slllo, Charles B.. Jr.. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 

B.SE.E.. MS.E.E.. University of Notre Dame. 1967; Ph.D.. 1970 
Silverman, Joseph, Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.A . Brooklyn (Allege. 1944; AM.. Columbia University, 1948. 
PhO . 1951 

SImms, Betty K, Professor and Chairman of Special Education 
B.A,. Harris Teachers College, 1947: MA.. University of Michi- 
gan. 1955: Ed D.. University of Maryland. 1962. 

Simons, David E., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
BS , University of Maryland, 1949: MS,, 1951 

Singer, Nell M.. Associate Professor of Economics 

B A , Harvard University, 1960; M.A., Stanford University. 1961 . 

PhD, 1965. 

Sister, Hugh D,, Chairman of Botany and Professor of Plant 

Pathology 

B.S.. University of Maryland, 1949: M.S.. 1951 : Ph.D.. 1953. 

Skolnlcfc, Leonard P.. Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.S , University of Rochester. 1953, M S , r*w York University, 
1955, D,Sc,, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1958 

Slawsky. Zaka I.. Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
BS., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1933: M.S.. California 
Institute of Technology. 1935. Ph D.. University of Michigan. 



Small. Eugene B., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.A.. Wayne State University. 1953: M.S.. 1958. Ph.D.. University 

of California at Los Angeles. 1966 

Smith, Barry D., Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.S . Pennsylvania State University, 1962, M.A., Bucknell Uni- 
versity. 1964. Ph.D.. University of Massachusetts. 1967 

Smith. Betty F.. Professor and Chairman of Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics 

B.S.. University of Arkansas. 1951; M.S.. University of Tennes- 
see. 1956: Ph.D.. University of Minnesota. 1960; Ph.D,. 1965, 



Smith, Elbert B., Professor of History 

A B , Maryvilie College, 1940: AM , University of Chicago, 1947, 

Ph D,, 1949 

Smith, Elske van Panhuys, Professor of Astronomy B.A , Har- 
vard University, 1950, MA , 1951 , PhD , 1955 
Smith, Gayle S., Associate Professor of English 
Ph 8,, University of Chicago, 1946, B.S , Iowa State University. 
1948. MA , Cornell University. 1951. Ph.D , 1958 
Smith, Harold 0., Associate Director of Extension Education 
and Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics 
B A . Bridgewaler College, 1943. MS.. University of Maryland. 
1947 Ph D , Ameiican University. 1952, 
Smith, Hilda L, Assistant Professor of History 
BS . Southwest Missouri State University. 1963. M A . Universi- 
ty of Missouri. 1964, Ph , University of Chicago, 1975. 
Smith, Pamela Z., Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
BA . Cornell University. 1970: MS. University of Wisconsin. 

1972. PhD. 1976 

Smith, Paul, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
BS , Drexel University, 1965, M.S., Case Institute of Technolo- 
gy. 1967 Ph D . Case Western Reserve University. 1%9 
Smith, Theodore G.. Professor of Chemical Engineering 
BE S.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1956: M E.S.. 1958. D.Sc. 
Washington University. 1960 

Snow, George A., Professor of Physics 

B S . College of the City of New York. 1945; MA.. Princeton 

University. 1947, Ph.D , 1949 

Snower, Dennis J., Assistant Professor of Economics 

B A . Oxford University. M A . 1971. M.A.. Pnnceton University. 

1973. PhD , 1975 

Scares, Jr., Joseph H., Assistant Professor of Poultry Science 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1964: M.S.. 1966. Ph.D.. 1968. 

Soergel. Dagobert, Associate Professor. College of Library and 

Information Services 

B.S . University of Freiburg. 1960; MS. 1964. Ph.D.. 1970. 

Solomon, Susan L. Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement 

AB . Radcliffe College. 1962. M.S.. University of California. Los 
Angeles. 1966; Ph.D.. University of California. Berkeley. 1972. 
Solomos, Theophanes, Assistant Professor of Horticulture 
MA. College of Agriculture. Athens. Greece. 1957. Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of Cambridge. 1962, 

Sommer, Michael H.. Associate Professor of Journalism 
AB.. University of California. Berkeley. 1957; M.S.. University of 
California. Los Angeles. 1958: Ph.D.. University of Southern 
California. 1969 

Sommer, Sheldon E., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
S S , City College of New York. 1959 M A,, City University of 
New York. 1961 , M S., Texas A4M University, 1964; PhD,, 
Pennsylvania State University. 1969 

Sosnowskl. Saul, Associate Professor of Spanish and Portu- 
guese 

A B . University of Scranton. 1967. MA,. University of Virginia, 
1968: PhD . 1970 

Spain, Ian L, Professor of Chemical Engineering 

BS.. Imperial College of Science. 1961; Ph.D.. 1964 

Spangler, Paul J., Lecturer m Entomology 

AB.. Lebanon Valley College. 1949. M.S.. Ohio University. 1951 . 

Ph.D.. University of Missouri. 1960. 

Sparlts, DavM S., Professor of History and Dean for Graduate 
Studies AB . Grinnell College. 1944. A.M.. University of Chica- 
go. 1945. Ph.D . 1951 

Specter, Gerakj, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A . Han/ard University. 1966; Ph.D.. University of Rochester. 
1971 

Spiegel, Gabrlelle, Assistant Professor of History 
B.A. Bryn Mawr College. 1964. MAT.. Hanrard University. 
1965. M A . The Johns Hopkins University. 1969: Ph.D.. 1974. 
SplelblctMer, Otto, Assistant Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College, 1959, MA, Colgate Universi- 
ty, 1962, Ph D-, Ohio State University, 1968. 
Splvak, Steven M., Associate Professor of Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics 

BS . Philadelphia College of Textiles and Sciences. 1963: M.S.. 
Georgia Institute of Technology. 1965; Ph.D.. University of 
Manchester. 1967 

Splvey, Qlnton. Associate Professor of Business Administration 
B S . University of Illinois. 1946 MS . 1947, Ph.D , 1957 
Splalne. John E^ Assistant Professor of Administration, Super- 
vision and Curriculum 

B.A.. University of New Hampshiie. 1963: M.A . 1965: Ed.D., 
Boston University. 1973 
Stadtman, Earl fl.. Lecturer in Microbiology 
B.S., University of California. Berkeley. 1942; Ph.D,, 1949, 
Staley. Stuart W., Professor of Chemistry 
B.A,. Williams College. 1959: M.S.. Yale University. 1961 : Ph.D.. 
1963 



Graduate Faculty /31 



stark, Francis C. Jr., Professor of Horticulture and Provost. 
Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences 
B.S.. Oklahoma ASM College. 1940. M.S.. University of Mary- 
land, 1941. Ph D , 1948 

Starkweather. Kendall N., Assistant Professor of Industrial 
Education 

B.S., Western Illinois University. 1967; M.A., Eastern Michigan 
University. 1969; PhD.. University of Maryland. 1975. 
Slalom, Jodellano Johnson, Assistant Professor of Administra- 
tion. Supervision and Curriculum 

B.S., Miner Teachers College. 1954; M.Ed,. University of Mary- 
land, 1968; A.G-S,. 1968; Ed D., 1972, 
Steel, Donald H., Professor of Physical Education 
B.A . Trenton State College, 1955; MA,, University of Maryland, 
1957; Ph,D,, Louisiana Slate University. 1964, 
Steele, Robert E., Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A,, Morehouse College, 1965; M-Div,, Episcopal Theological 
School. 1968, M P.H.. Yale University School of Medicine, 1971 , 
MS,, Yale University. 1974, Ph,D,, 1975, 
Steinberg, Phillip H., Professor of Physics 
B.S,. University of Cincinnati. 1954; Ph.D,, Northwestern Univer- 
sity. 1960, 

Steinberg, Richard 1., Assistant Professor of Physics 
B,A., Swarthmore College, 1%3; Ph.D,, Yale University, 1969 
Stelnhauer, Allen L., Professor and Chairman of Entomology 
B.S-, University of Manitoba, 1953; MS,, Oregon Stale College, 
1955; PhD , 1958 

Steinman, Robert M., Professor of Psychology 
DOS,, SI Louis University. 1968; MA,. New School for Social 
Research. 1%2; Ph D„ 1964. 
Stellmacher, Karl L., Professor of Mathematics 
M,D„ University of Goettingen, 1933; Ph,D„ 1936, 
Stephens, E. Robert, Professor and Chairman of Administra- 
tion. Supervision, and Curriculum 

B.S,. Morningside College, 1952; MS,, Drake University, 1958; 
Ph.D., University of Iowa. 1966, 

Stern, Herbert J., Associate Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 

B.S., The Johns Hopkins University. 1950; M Ed,. 1953; Ed D,, 
University of Maryland, 1962, 
Stern, Lawrence, Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B,A,. Rutgers, 1958, M A , Harvard, 1%2; PhD,, 1968 
Stern, William L., Professor of Botany 

B,S„ Rutgers University, 1950; M,S,, University of Illinois, 1951, 
Ph,D,. 1954 

Sternberg, Yaron M., Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S,. University of Illinois. 1961 ; M.S,, University of California at 
Davis, 1963; Ph.D , 1965 

Sternheim, Charles E., Associate Professor of Psychology 
B,S„ Brooklyn College, 1961 ; Ph,D-, University of Rochester. 
1967 

Stevens, George A., Professor of Agricultural and Resource 
Economics 

B.S,. Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1941, Ph,D.. University of 
Maryland. 1957 

Stevenson, John C, Assistant Professor of Botany 
B.S.. Brooklyn College, 1966; Ph,D„ University of North Caroli- 
na. 1972, 

Stewart, G. W., Associate Professor of Computer Science and 
Applied Mathematics 

A,B,. University of Tennessee, 1962; PhD,, 1968 
Stewart, James M., Professor of Chemistry 
B.A,. Western Washington College, 1953; PhD,, University of 
Washington. 1958, 

Stewart, Kent K., Lecturer in Food, Nutrition and Institution 
Administration 

B.A,. University of California, Berkeley, 1956; PhD,, Florida 
State University, 1965, 

Stone, Clarence N., Associate Professor of Government and 
Politics, and Director, Urban Research Group, Bureau of Gov- 
ernmental Research 

A-B,. University of South Carolina. 1957; MA , Duke University. 
1960; Ph D , 1963 

Stone, Stephen E., Assistant Professor of Health Education 
B.S,, Lock Haven State College, 1962; M Ed , East Stroudsburg 
State College, 1969; PhD,, Texas A&M University. 1973, 
Stough, Kenrwth F., Associate Professor of Industrial Educa- 
tion 

B.S,, Millersville State College. 1954; MEd , Pennsylvania State 
University. 1961; PhD,, University of Maryland, 1968 
Stowatser, Karl, Associate Professor of History 
Ph.D-, University of Muenster, 1966 

Stratzhelm, Mahton R., Associate Professor os Economics 

B.S-, Purdue University, 1961 , PhD,, Harvard University. 1965 

Strauat, Aaron S., Professor of Mathematics 

B.S,. Case Institute of Technology, 1%1 , MS,, University of 

Wisconsin, 1962, PhD., 1%4. 

Strlckling, Edward, Professor of Agronomy 

B,S,, Ohio State University. 1937; PhD,, 1949 



StrlHler. Charles D., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 

BSE, University of Michigan, 1961 , M S E , 1963. Ph.D., 1972 
Strobell, Adah P., Associate Professor of Recreation 
A B , San Francisco State College. 1953, MS,. University of Cal- 
ifornia, Los Angeles, 1958; Ph,D,. University of Illinois. 1966 
Strouse, James C, Assistant Professor of Government and Pol- 
itics 



Stunkard, Qayton L., Professor of Measurement and Statistics 
B,S,, University of Minnesota. 1948; MA,. 1951; Ph,D,, 1959 
Sluntz, Calvin P., Professor of Chemistry 
B,A , University of Buffalo, 1939; Ph.D., 1947 
Sublett, Henry L., Professor and Chairman of Early Childhood- 
Elementary Education 

A B , Duke University. 1951; M.Ed,. University of Virginia, 1953, 
Ed D„ 1969 

Sucher, Joseph, Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B,S,, Brooklyn College, 1952; Ph.D.. Columbia University, 1958 
Sullivan, Dorothy D., Associate Professor, Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education 

A B„ University of Maryland. 1945; Ed.M., 1960; Ed.D,, 1965, 
Sunal, Dennis W., Assistant Professor of Early Childhood-Ele- 
mentary Education 

B S , University of Michigan. 1964; MA,, 1970; PhD., 1973. 
Suppe, Frederick R., Associate Professor of Philosophy 
AB,, University of California. Riverside. 1962, AM,. University 
of Michigan. 1964, PhD,, 1967 
Svenonjus, Lars S., Professor of Philosophy 
Fil Kand , Uppsala University. 1950; Fil Mag,, 1955; Fil Lie, 
1956. Fil dr , 1960, 

Svoboda, Cyril P., Assistant Professor of Human Development 
Education 

BA , SI Columban s Major Seminary, 1954; BTh,, 1958; BPh,, 
Gregorian University (Rome, Italy), 1959; L Ph , 1960; Ph.D., 
1%1, PhD University of Wisconsin, 1973 
Sweet, Daniel, Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B S , Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1965; Ph,D , Brown Univer- 
sity. 1%9 

SyskI, Ryszard, Professor of Mathematics 
B,S , University of London, 1954; PhD,, Chelsea College, 1960. 
Talf, Charles A., Professor of Business and Management 
B,S,, University of Iowa, 1937, MA, 1941; Ph D , University of 
Maryland, 1952, 

Talaat, Mostafa E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B S , University of Cairo. 1946; M.S,. University of Pennsylvania, 
1947; PhD, 1951 

Tanney, Mary Fatth, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
BA , Pennsylvania State University. 1968. MA,, Ohio State Uni- 
versity, 1971; Ph,D, 1972, 

Tarjca, Ralph, Associate Professor of French and Italian 
BA , Emory University. 1954; MA,, 1958. Ph.D.. Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1966 

Taylor, Corwin H., Professor of Secondary Education and Mu- 
sic 

BMus Ed , College of Music of Cincinnati. 1930. MMus , 1933, 
B,S , University of Cincinnati, 1932. Ed M,, 1935; Ed D,, 1941 
Taylor, Dalmas A., Professor of Psychology 
B,S . Western Reserve University, 1959; MS , Howard Universi- 
ty, 1961, PhD,, University of Delaware. 1965 

Taylor, Leonard S., Professor of Electrical Engineering 
AB,, Harvard University. 1951; MS,, New Mexico State Univer- 
sity, 1956; PhD , 1960, 

Taylor, Martin Edward, Assistant Professor of Business and 
Management 

BComm , The University of Cape Town, South Africa, 1966: 
MBA, University of Texas, Austin, 1970; PhD,, 1974. 
Teltelbaum, Herman I., Associate Professor of Psychology 
A B , The Johns Hopkins University, 1967, MS, University of 
Washington, 1959, Ph D , McGill University, 1962 
Tennyson, Ray A., Associate Professor ot Criminology 
BS, Washington State University, 1951, MA,, 1957; Ph.D,, 
1965 

Terchek, Ronald J., Associate Professor ot Government and 
Politics 

BA , University of Chicago, 1958, MA , 1960; PhD,, University 
of Maryland. 1965. 

Thleblot, Armand J., Jr., Associate Professor of Business and 
Management 

BS , Princeton University. 1961; M.B.A,. University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1965, PhD , 1969 

Thomas, Owen Pestell, Professor and Chairman. Poultry Sci- 
ence 

B Sc, University of Natal, 1954; M Sc, 1962; PhD,. University 
of Maryland. 1966 

Thomas, tWIIIlam L., Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 
B,S,. The University of Tennessee. Knoxville. 1955. MS,, 1965. 
Ph.D,, Michigan State University, 1970, 



Thompson, Arthur H., Professor of Horticulture 
B,S,, University of Minnesota. 1941, PhD,, University of Mary- 
land. 1945 

Thompson, Derek, Associate Professor of Geography 
BA , Manchester University, 1960; MA. 1962; PhD,, Indiana 
University. 1969 

Thompson, Harvey W.. Assistant Professor of Speech 
B S , Wayne Stale University. 1966, M FA,. Columbia University. 
1972 

Thompson, James Clinton, Jr., Assistant Professor of Recrea- 
tion 

B A,, Mississippi Slate University, 1967, MS,, Colorado State 
University. 1970; Ph,D„ 1974, 

Thompson, Owen E., Associate Professor of Meteorology 
BS , University of Missouri, 1%1; M.S., 1963; Ph.D,, 1966 
Thorberg, Raymond, Associate Professor of English 
BA , University of Alaska, 1939; MA, University of Chicago, 
1946, PhD,, Cornell University, 1954 
Thorn, Colin, Edward, Assistant Professor of Geography 
B A , University of Nottingham. 1967, MSc. McGill University, 
1970; Ph , University of Colorado, Boulder, 1974, 
Tldman, Derek A., Research Professor, Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics 
BSc , London University, 1952; Ph.D,. 1956 
TIerney, William F., Associate Professor of Industrial Education 
B S,, Central Connecticul State College, 1941 , MS, Ohio State 
University, 1949; Ed D , University of Maryland, 1952, 
TMft, Margaret A-, Associate Professoi of Health Education 
B S , Ohio State University, 1946; M,A,, Columbia University, 
1948, Ed D , West Virginia Umversity. 1969 
Torres, J. L., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B-S-, US, Naval Academy, 1957; MS,, Stanford University, 
1961; PhD,, 1966 

Tossell, John L., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
BS , University of Chicago, 1966; MA , Harvard University, 
1967, Ph D , 1972 
Traver, Paul, Professor of Music 

B,Mus , Catholic University of America, 1955, M Mus , 1957, 
DMA, Stanford University, 1967 

Travis, Irene Lathrop, Assistant Professor, College of Library 
and Information Sen/ices 

BA , Mills College, 1962. MLS,. University of California, 1966; 
Ph D . 1974 

Tretter, Steven A., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 

BS , University of Maryland, 1962, MA , Princeton University. 
1964; PhD . 1965, 

Trimble, Virginia L, Assistant Professor of Astronomy 
B A , University of California, Los Angeles, 1964; M S,, Califor- 
nia Institute of Technology. 1965, PhD , 1368, MA , University 
of Cambridge (England), 1969 
Trivelplece, Alvln W., Professor of Physics 
B S , California State Polytechnic College. 1953; MS,, Califor- 
nia Institute of Technology, 1955; Ph.D,. 1958, 
Troth, Eugene W., Professor and Chairman of Music 
DePaul University; Illinois Wesleyan University; Ph,D., University 
of Michigan, 1958 

True, Nellta, Associate Professor of Music 
B,M , University of Michigan, 1958. MM,, 1960, 

Tsui, Chung Y., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
ME, Hong Kong Technical College, 1953; M S,, Purdue Univer- 
sity. 1959; Ph D , 1%7, 

Tuthlll, Dean F., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics 

BS , Cornell University, 1949; MS,, University of Illinois. 1954. 
Ph D , 1958 

Twigg, Bernard A., Professor and Chairman of Horticulture 
BS , University of Maryland, 1952; MS,. 1965; PhD . 1959 

Tyler, Bonnie B., Assistant Professor, Institute lor Child Study 
B A . DePauw, 1948; M.A., Ohio State University, 1949, PhD,, 
1954, 

Tyler, Forrest B., Professor of Psychology 

B.A , Depauw University. 1948; MA,, Ohio State University, 

1950; Ph D , 1952 

Tyler, Robert W., Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
A B , Drury College, 1957; MS,, Pennsylvania State University, 
1960, Ph D , 1969 

Ulmer, Melville J., Professor of Economics 

B S , New York University. 1937; MA,. 1936; PhD,. Columbia 

University. 1948 

Undersander, Daniel J., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
B S , University of Minnesota, 1972; MS,. Purdue University. 
1974, Ph D , 1975, 



32 / Graduate Faculty 



Uslaner, Eric M.. Assistant Professor of Government and Poli- 
tics 

B.A,, Brandels University, 1968, fvl A , Indiana University, 1970: 
Pfi.D., 1973 

Valtuzls, Zigfrldas, Assistant Professor of Microbiology 
B.A , University of Connecticut. 1959; M.S,. Unrversity of Mary- 
land, 1%5, Ph,D , 1969 

Vandergoot, David, Assistant Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 

B-A , Calvin College, 1969; MA, Micfilgan State University. 
1972, Pb.D , 1975, 
Vandergrafi, James S., Associate Professor of Computer Sci- 

B S , Slanlord University. 1959; MS, 1963. Pfi.D , University of 
Maryland, 1966 

Vandersall, Jofin H., Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S,, Ofiio State University, 1950; MS, 1954; Pti.D., 1959 
Vandersllce, Joseph T., Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Boston College, 1949, Ph.D , Massactiuselts Institute of 
Technology, 1952 

Vander Velden, Lee R.. Assistant Professor of Physical Educa- 
tion 

B.S.. University of Wisconsin, 1961 ; Ph.D , 1971 . 
Van Egmond, Peter. Assistant Professor of English 
B.A,. Mississippi College. 1959. MA . University of Mississippi. 
1961 : Ph D , University of North Carolina. 1966 
Van Valkenbuig. Shirley D., Assistant Professor of Botany 
B.A.. Washington State University. 1948; MS , University of 
Washington. 1968. Ph.D.. 1970. 

Vannoy, Donald Wayne, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineer- 
ing 

B.S,. West Virginia Institute ot Technology. 1970. ME. Univer- 
sity of Virginia. 1971; Ph.D.. 1975 

Vaughn, III, Charles Henry, Associate Professor of Speech and 
Dramatic Art 

B.S.. Edinboro State College. 1961 ; MA , University of Denver. 
1962. 

Vermel), Geerat Jacobus, Associate Professor of Zoology 
A.B.. Princeton University. 1968. Ph.M.. Yale University. 1970; 
Ph.D.. 1971 

Vernekar, Anandu D., Associate Professor of Meteorology 
B.S.. University of Pennsylvania. 1955; B S . 1956; M.S.. 1959; 
M.S.. University of Michigan. 1963; Ph.D.. 1966 

Vesentlnj, Edoardo, Professor of Mathematics 
Laurea in scienzse matematiche. Universita di Milano. 1950. 
LIlDera docenza in geometra. Universita di Roma. 1956 
Via, James E., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Re- 
source Economics 

B.S.. North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 1952; M.S.. 
1964; Ph.D.. 1967. 

Vl|ay, Inder K., Assistant Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S.. Punjab University. India. 1961. MS , University of Sas- 
katchewan, 1966, Ph.D.. University of California. Davis. 1971 
Viola, Victor E., Jr., Professor of Chemistry 
A B . University of Kansas. 1957; Ph.D.. University of California 
at Berkeley. 1961. 

Vit2thum. Richard C, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Amherst College. 1957. MAT , Harvard University, 1958, 

Ph.D.. Stanford University. 1963 

Veil, Mary J., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.A,. Mt. St Agnes College. 1956. MS.. The Johns Hopkins 

University. 1961. Ph.D.. University of Pennsylvania. 1964 

Wagner, Thomas C. G., Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S., Harvard University, 1937. M.A.. University of Maryland. 
1939; Ph.D.. 1943 

Wakefield, John, Associate Professor of Music 
B.M . University of Michigan. 1963; MM.. 1964. 

Waidnor, llmar, Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.S . University of Illinois. 1961 ; Ph.D.. Stanford University. 

1969 

Waldrop, Robert S., Professor of Psychology 
B.A . University of Oklahoma. 1934; Ph.D.. University of Michi- 
gan. 1948. 

Wall, N. Sanders, Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.S.. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1949; Ph.D.. Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. 1954. 

Wallace, James M., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering 

BCE. Georgia Institute of Technology. 1%2; MS. 1964. Ph.D.. 
University of Oxford. 1969. 

Wallace, Stephen J., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S-Eng . Case Institute of Technology. 1961; M.S.. University of 

Washington. 1969; Ph.D.. 1971 

Walston, William H., Jr.. Associate Professor ot Mechanical 

Engineering 

B.M.E.. University of Delaware, 1959; M.M.E.. 1961 . Ph.D.. 1964. 



Walters, William B., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S.. Kansas Slate University. 1960, Ph.D.. University of Illinois. 
1964 

Ward. Charles D., Associate Professor of Psychology 
B A,. Pomona College. 1958; M.A . University of North Carolina. 
1962. Ph D . 1963 

Ward, Kalhryn P., Associate Professor of English 
A.B.. George Washington University. 1935; MA.. 1936; Ph.D.. 
1947 

Warner, Charles R., Associate Professor of Mathematics and 
Statistics 

A B.. George Washington University. 1935; MA . 1936. Ph D 
1947 

Warner, Charles R., Associate Professor of Mathematics and 
Statistics 

B.A . University of Toronto. 1955. MS.. University of Rochester. 
1957; Ph D . 1962, 

Warren, J. Benedict, Associate Professor of History 
B.A . Duns Scotus College. 1953; MA. University of Mexico. 
1960. Ph D , 1963 

Wasserman, Paul, Professor, College of Library and Informa- 
tion Services 

B.B.A,. City College of New York. 1948; M.S.L.S., Columbia 
University, 1949; M.S.. 1950; Ph.D.. University ol Michigan, 
1960, 

Weaver, V. Phillips, Professor. Early Childhood and Elementary 
Education 

A B . College of William and Mary. 1951 ; M Ed . Pennsylvania 
Slate University. 1956. D Ed . 1962 
Weber, Joseph, Professor of Physics 
B.S , US Naval Academy. 1940. Ph.D . Catholic University of 
America. 1951 

Wedding, Presley A., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S . University of Maryland. 1937; M.S.. 1952 
Weiner, Frederick F., Assistant Professor of Hearing and 
Speech Sciences 

B.A . Wayne State University. 1967; M.A.. 1968; Ph.D.. 1970. 
Weiner, Ronald M., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 
BS.. Brooklyn College. 1964; MS, Long Island University, 
1967; PhD , Iowa State University, 1970. 
Weinstein, Paul A., Associate Professor of Economics 
B,A,, William and Mary College, 1954. M.A.. Northwestern Uni- 
versity. 1958. Ph.D . 1961, 

Weiss, Gene S., Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic 
Art 

B.A . Brandeis University. 1961 . M.A.. New York University. 
1965; Ph.D.. Ohio State University. 1970. 
Weiss, Leonard, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Insti- 
tute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
B.S.. City University of New York. 1956; MS.. Columbia Univer- 
sity. 1959, Ph D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1962 
Weiss, Randall D., Assistant Professor of Economics 
B A . Han/ard College. 1968; M A . Hareard University. 1971 . 
Ph D . 1973. 

Weilisch, Hans, Assistant Professor. College of Library and In- 
formation Services 
MLS. University of Maryland. 1972; Ph.D . 1975 

Wentzel, Donat G., Professor of Astronomy 
B.A.. University of Chicago. 1954; B.S.. 1955; M.S., 1956. Ph.D . 
1960 

Werbos, Paul John, Assistant Professor of Government and 
Politics 

B.A , Harvard University. 1967, M.Sc, London School of Eco- 
nomics, 1968, S.M . Harvard University. 1969. PhD . 1974 
Wast. Robert C, Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.A.. University of Missouri. 1969; Ph.D.. Northwestern Universi- 
ty. 1973. 

Westbrock, Franklin, Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services, and Counselor. Counseling Center 
B S.. Chicago State University. 1%1 ; MS . City College of New 
York. 1964; Ed D . Indiana University. 1971 

Westerhout, Gart, Professor of Astronomy 

B.S . University of Leiden. 1950; MS.. 1954; Ph.D.. 1958 

Westhofl, Dennis C, Assistant Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S.. University of Georgia. 1966. M.S.. Itorth Carolina State 
University. 1968; Ph D.. 1970. 

Whaples, Gene C, Assistant Professor of Agriculture and Ex- 
tension Education 

B.S . University of Connecticut. 1960; MS. Kansas State Univ- 
ersity. 1965; PhD . University of Maryland. 1974. 

Wheatley, John Hunter, Assistant Professor of Agricultural and 
Extension Education and Secondary Education 
B.A., Duke University. 1963. MAT.. 1965; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University, 1972. 

Wheaton, Frederick W., Associate Professor of Agricultural 

Engineering 

BS.. Michigan State University. 1964; MS. 1965. Ph.D . Iowa 

State University. 1968 



Wheeler, Gerald R., Visiting Associate Professor of Criminal 
Justice 

B.A.. Long Beach State College. 1962, M S.W.. Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 1966; Ph.D.. University of Chicago. 1974 
Whittemore. E. Reed. Professor of English 
B A . Yale University. 1941 . Litt D Carleton College. 1971 
Widhelm, William B., Associate Professor of Management Sci- 
ence 

B.E.S.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1959. M S E , 1960, M.S.. 
1965; Ph.D., 1969, 

Wiedel. Joseph W., Associate Professor of Geography 
BA , University of Maryland. 1958. MA.. 1963 

Wiley, Robert C, Professor of Horticulture 

BS . University ol Maryland. 1949; MS.. 1950. Ph.D.. Oregon 

Stale University. 1953. 

Wilkenfeld, Jonathan, Associate Professor of Government and 
Politics 

B.S . University of Maryland. 1964. M.A.. George Washington 
University. 1966; Ph.D.. Indiana University. 1%9 
Wllkerson, Thomas 0., Research Professor. Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
BS , University of Michigan, 1953; MS . 1954; Ph.D.. 1962. 
Williams, David L., Associate Professor of Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education 

B.S . Bradley University. 1952; MEd.. University of Illinois at 
Urbana. 1956; Ed D . 1964 
Williams, Walter F., Professor of Dairy Science 
B S . University of Missouri. 1951 ; M.S.. 1952; Ph.D.. 1955. 
Williams, William H., Assistant Professor of History 
BA. Washington & Lee University. 1956. M.A.. Duke University. 
1960. Ph.D.. 1965 

Wilson, Bruce D., Assistant Professor of Music 
B Mus . University of Michigan. 1960. M.Mus . 1964, Ph.D.. 
1973 

Wilson, Catharine L., Assistant Professor of Educational Mea- 
surements and Statistics 

BA , Marymount Manhattan College, 1972, M.A., Columbia 
University, 1973, Ed D,, 1976 
Wilson, Gayle L., Associate Professor of English 
B.A,. Wayne State University. 1960; MA. University of Roches- 
ter. 1963. Ph.D.. 1965 

Wilson, John W.. Professor of Early Childhood and Elementary 
Education 

B A . Bowling Green State University. 1951 ; MA . Syracuse Uni- 
versity. 1953; Ph.D,, 1964. 

Wilson, Leda A., Associate Professor of Family and Community 
Development 

B S , Lander College. 1943; M.S., University ol Tennessee. 1950, 
EdD. 1954, 

Wilson, Robert M., Professor of Earty Childhood and Elementa- 
ry Education 

B S,. California State College (Pennsylvania). 1950; MS, Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, 1956; Ed D,, 1960 
Winkeinkemper, Horst E.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B A , National University of Mexico, 1963; MA,, Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1965; Ph.D , 1970 

Winn, Paul N., Jr., Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B S . Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 1947; MS,. 1958 
Wirth, Willis W., Visiting Professor of Entomology 
B.S,. Iowa State University. 1940. MS.. Louisiana State Univer- 
sity. 1947. PhD , University of California, Berkeley. 1950 
WitC2ak, Matthevt W., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B S C E . Purdue University. 1962; M S C E , 1963; Ph.D.. 1969 
Withers, Josephine, Assistant Professor of Art 
B.A,. Oberlin College. 1960; MA. Columbia University. 1965; 
Ph.D. 1971. 

Wolfe, Peter, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Statistics 
B S , St Lawrence University. 1959; MS. l*)rthwestern Univer- 
sity. 1961 , Ph.D.. New York University. 1965 
Wolk, Stephen, Assistant Professor of Child Study 
B.A . University of Pennsylvania. 1966. MA . Glassboro State 
College. 1969; PhD , Temple University, 1972 
Wolvin, Andrew D., Associate Professor of Secondary Educa- 
tion, and Speech and Dramatic Art 

BS , University ol Nebraska. 1962; MA. 1963. Ph.D.. Purdue 
University. 1%8 

Wonnacott, Paul, Professor of Economics 
B.A . University of Western Ontario, 1955; M,A.. Princeton Uni- 
versity. 1957; Ph.D . 1959 

Woo, Ching-Hung. Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
BS . Louisiana Technological Institute. 1958; MS.. University of 
California. Berkeley. 1959; Ph.D.. 1962. 
Woolf, Leonard, Professor of Secondary Education 
B.S . The Johns Hopkins University. 1942; M Ed.. University of 
Maryland. 1951. EdD. 1959. 

Wrenn, Jerry P., Assistant Professor of Physical Education and 
Secondary Education 

B.S . East Carolina College, 1961; M.S.. University of Tennes- 
see. 1963; Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 1970 



Graduate Faculty /33 



Wright, Emmett L, Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Ex- 
tension Education and Secondary Education 
B.S., University of Kansas. 1963, M.A., Wictiila Slate University. 
1968: Pti D , Pennsylvania Slate University. 1974 
Wrighl, Wlnlhrop R., Associate Professor of History 
B-A , Swarthmore College, 1958; M.A,, University of Pennsylvan- 
ia, I960, Ph D , 1964 

Wu, Chlng-Sheng, Research Professor, Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics 

B.S.. I^tional Taiwan University. 1954; M.S.. Virginia Polytech- 
nic Institute, 1956, Ph,D,, Princeton University. 1959 
Wysong, John W., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics 

B.S-, Cornell University. 1953. MS,, University of Illinois. 1954; 
Ph.D,, Cornell University, 1957 
Yaney, George L, Professor of History 

B,Mgl.E,, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1952; MA, Universi- 
ty of Colorado. 1956; Ph.D.. Princeton University. 1961 
' Yang, Grace L., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Statis- 
tics 

BJV.. National Taiwan University. 1960; MA,, University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley. 1963. Ph.D,. 1966 
Yang, Jackson C, Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S,. University of Maryland. 1958; MA, 1961, Ph.D-. 1963. 
Yeh, Kwan-Nan, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Consumer 
Economics 

B.S,, National Taiwan University. 1961 . M.S., Tulane University. 
1965; Ph.D.. University of Georgia. 1970, 



Yodh, Gaurang B., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.Sc, University of Bombay. 1948. M.Sc, University of Chicago, 
1951; PhD, 1955 

Yoo, Chal H., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S,, Seoul National University, 1962; MS., University of Mary- 
land, 1909, Ph D , 1971 

Yorke, James Alan, Research Professor. Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

A,B,, Columbia University. 1963; Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 
1966 

Yoshloka, Gary A., Assistant Professor of Geography 
B.S,, Lafayette College. 1966; PhD,. The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. 1975 

Young, Bobby G., Professor and Chairman of Microbiology 
B.A , Southeast Missouri State College. 1950; Ph.D.. The Johns 
Hopkins University. 1965 

Young, Edgar P.. Professor and Chairman of Animal Science 
BS,. Ohio State University. 1954. M.S.. 1956. Ph.D.. 1958 
Zaiac, Felix E., Ml, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 

BEE,, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1962; M.S.. Stanford 
University. 1965; PhD . 1968 

Zaki, Kawrthar A., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S,, Ain-Syams University, 1962; MS,, University of California, 
Berkeley, 1966; PhD , 1969 

Zatoman, Lawrence Allen, Professor of Mathematics 
A,B.. Dartmouth College. 1964. Ph.D , Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 1968 



Zedek, Michael, Professor of Mathematics and Statistics 
MS, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 1952, Ph.D.. Harvard 
University. 1956 

Zelkowttz, Marvin, Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
BS. Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute. 1967; M.S.. Cornell Uni- 
versity. 1969. PhD,. 1971, 

Zipoy, David M., Associate Professor of Astronomy 
Associate Professor of Astronomy 
B S , University of Minnesota, 1954, Ph D , 1957 
Zoller, WHIiam H., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
BS , University of Alaska. 1965; Ph.D.. Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 1969 

Zorn, Bice Sechi, Associate Professor of Physics 
Dottore in Fiscia. University of Cagliart. 1952. 
Zorn, Gus T., Professor of Physics 

B.S . Oklahoma State University. 1948: M.S.. University of New 
Mexico. 1953. Ph.D., University of Padua, 1954 
Zuckerman, Benjamin M., Associate Professor of Astronomy 
BS , Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1963. M.S.. 1963. 
Ph.D . Harvard University. 1968 

Zwanzig, Roben W., Research Professor. Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
B.S . Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. 1948: MS,, University of 
Southern California, 1950; PhD., California Institute of Technol- 
ogy, 1952 



34 / Graduate Faculty 



Graduate Programs 



Administration, 
Supervision and 
Curriculum Program 

Professor and Chairman: Stephens 

Professors Anderson, Berman, Carbone, Dudley, 

James, McClure, McLoone', Newell, Perrin. 

Wedberg, Wiggin 
Associate Professors: Goldman, Kelsey 
Assistant Professors: Bowering, Clague, Clemson, 

Splaine, Statom 

^Joint appointment with Economics 

The Department of Administration, Supervision 
and Curriculum offers programs of study for the 
M.A., M.Ed,, Ed.D., and Ph.D. degrees as well as 
for the Advanced Graduate Specialist certificate. 
Areas of specialization include: administration, 
supervision, curriculum, higher education, and 
educational technology. Programs in all areas are 
individually designed for public or private elemen- 
tary and secondary school specialists, personnel 
in higher education institutions or education 
agencies. 

Admission at the doctoral level is based upon 
an academic average of 3.5 at the master's level, 
performance at the 50th percentile or better on 
the Miller Analogies test battery and an under- 
graduate average of 3.0. Selective screening of 
qualified applicants at the master's, A.G.S., and 
doctoral levels is necessary in terms of limiting 
enrollment to the available faculty resources of 
the department 

The department requires at least one year of 
residence for a doctoral degree. A field internship 
or its equivalency, is required of all doctoral can- 
didates. This internship is done under faculty 
supervision in schools, colleges or agencies, in 
roles that are consistent with the candidate's 
program emphasis. 

The department has developed close working 
relationships with area schools, community col- 
leges and education agencies so that they may 
serve as resources for the academic offerings on 
campus. Procedures have been established which 
facilitate the use of these agencies for research 
and field experiences. 

The Educational Technology Center in the Col- 
lege of Education is used extensively by students 
in the department, particularly those in curricu- 
lum. 

EDAD 440 Utilization of Educational Media. (3) 

Survey of classroom uses of instructional media. 
Techniques for integrating media into instruction. 
Includes preparation of a unit of instruction utiliz- 
ing professional and teacher produced media. 

EDAD 441 Graphic Materials for Instruction. (3) 

Prerequisite — EDAD 440 or consent of instructor. 
A laboratory course which combines graphic and 
photographic processes for education and train- 
ing purposes. Techniques include lettering, color- 
ing, transparencies, illustrations, converting dupli- 
cating transparent and opaque media. Emphasis 
is placed on appropriate media selection for tar- 
get audiences. Heavy student project orientation. 

EDAD 442 Instructional Media Services. (3) 

Prerequisites, teaching experience and EDAD 440, 
or equivalent. Procedures for coordinating in- 
structional media programs; instructional materi- 
als acquisition, storage, scheduling, distribution, 
production, evaluation and other service respon- 
sibilities; instructional materials center staff coor- 
dination of research, curriculum improvement 
and faculty development programs. 



EDAD 443 Instructional Television Utilization. (3) 

Combining televised lessons, on-campus semi- 
nars, and related workbook assignments. This 
course focuses upon planning for the various 
uses of instructional television with students. 
State, local school unit, school, and classroom 
uses will be illustrated through film and studio 
production. The aspects of producing ITV pro- 
grams are developed through the television les- 
sons and 'hands-on' assignments of the seminars. 

EDAD 444 Programmed Instruction. (3) Analysis 
of programmed instruction techniques; selection, 
utilization and evaluation of existing programs 
and teaching machines; developing learning 
objectives; writing and validating programs. 
EDAD 489 Field Experience in Education. (1-4) 
Prerequisites, at least six semester hours in Edu- 
cation at the University of Maryland plus such 
other prerequisites as may be set by the major 
area in which the experience is to be taken. 
Planned field experience may be provided for se- 
lected students who have had teaching experi- 
ence and whose application for such field experi- 
ence has been approved by the Education faculty. 
Field experience is offered in a given area to both 
major and nonmajor students. NOTE — The total 
number of credits which a student may earn in 
EDAD 489, 888, and 889 is limited to a maximum 
of 20 semester hours. 

EDAD 498 Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only 
to mature students who have definite plans for 
individual study of approved problems. 

EDAD 499 Workshops, Clinics, Institutes. (1-6) 

The maximum number of credits that may be 
earned under this course symbol toward any de- 
gree is six semester hours; the symbol may be 
used two or more times until six semester hours 
have been reached. The following type of educa- 
tional enterprise may be scheduled under this 
course heading: workshops conducted by the 
College of Education (or developed cooperatively 
with other colleges and universities) and not oth- 
erwise covered in the present course listing; clini- 
cal experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading 
clinics, speech therapy laboratories, and special 
education centers; institutes developed around 
specific topics or problems and intended for des- 
ignated groups. 

EDAD 602 The Junior College. (3) 
EDAD 603 Problems in Higher Education. (3) 

EDAD 605 Administrative Foundations. (3) EDAD 
605 is presented as the first of the four courses 
for students majoring in the field of educational 
administration, supervision, and curriculum devel- 
opment. It attempts to structure a theoretical and 
research base for the study and practice of ad- 
ministration in the field of education by introduc- 
ing the student to selected contributors to admin- 
istration, and by indicating the multi-disciplinary 
nature of administrative study as it relates to pur- 
pose-determination, policy-definition, and 
task-accomplishment 

EDAD 606 Administrative Behavior and Organi- 
zational Management. (3) A critical analysis of 
organizational management (informal and formal 
dimensions), an assessment of the contributions 
from other fields (traditional and emerging) to the 
study of administrative behavior and the gover- 
nance of organizations, and an analysis and as- 
sessment of the administrator's motivations, per- 
ceptions, and sensivitity as determinants of be- 
havior constitute the major units of study for 
EDAD 606. The theoretical and research bases for 



these areas and such related concepts as status, 
role, systems, interpersonal relations, and sensi- 
tivity training are examined. 

EDAD 607 Administrative Processes. (3) EDAD 
607 is designed to develop competence with re- 
spect to selected administrative process areas. It 
examines efforts to develop theories and models 
in these areas and analyzes research studies and 
their implications for administrative practice. In 
addition it seeks to develop skill in selected proc- 
ess areas through such techniques as simulation, 
role-playing, case analysis, and computer-assisted 
instruction. 

EDAD 608 Administrative Relationships. (3) 

EDAD 608 is structured to provide the student of 
educational administration with an understanding 
of the various groups and subgroups to which an 
administrator relates and to the significance of 
these relationships for leadership behavior. It 
provides an opportunity to examine and analyze 
significant principles, concepts, and issues in the 
areas of personnel administration, public rela- 
tions, community state, and federal agencies. The 
human relations skills essential to effective lead- 
ership in these areas constitute the other dimen- 
sion of this course. 

EDAD 611 The Organization and Administration 
of Secondary Schools (3) Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. The work of the secondary school 
principal. Includes topics such as personnel prob- 
lems, school-community relationships, student 
activities, schedule making, and internal financial 
accounting. 

EDAD 612 School Finance and Business Admin- 
istration. (3) An introduction to principles and 
practices in the administration of the public 
school finance activity. Sources of tax revenue, 
the budget, and the function of finance in the 
educational program are considered. 

EDAD 614 School Plant Planning. (2-3) An orien- 
tation course in which the planning of school 
buildings is developed as educational designing 
with reference to problems of site, building facili- 
ties, and equipment. 

EDAD 616 Public School Supervision. (3) The 

nature and functions of supervision; various su- 
pervisory techniques and procedures; human re- 
lationship factors; and personal qualities for su- 
pervision. 

EDAD 617 Administration and Supervision in 
Elementary Schools. (3) Problems in administer- 
ing elementary schools and improving instruction. 

EDAD 625 School Public Relations. (3) A study of 
the interrelationship between the community and 
the school. Public opinion, propaganda, and the 
ways in which various specified agents and agen- 
cies within the school have a part in the school 
public relations program are explored. 

EDAD 634 The School Curriculum. (2-3) A foun- 
dations course embracing the curriculum as a 
whole from early childhood through adolescence, 
including a review of historical developments, an 
analysis of conditions affecting curriculum 
change, an examination of issues in curriculum 
making, and a consideration of current trends in 
curriculum design. 

EDAD 635 Principles of Curriculum Development. 

(3) Curriculum planning, improvement, andevalu- 
ation in the schools; principles for the selection 
and organization of the content and learning 
experiences; ways of working in classroom and 
school on curriculum improvement. 



Graduate Programs / 35 



EDAD 640 Seminar in Educational Technology, 
Research and Theory. (3) Prerequisite, EDAD 
440. Review of research in educational technolo- 
gy and mass media of communication which re- 
lates to the instructional process; learning theory 
implications, sociological and economic consider- 
ations. 

EDAD 641 Selection and Evaluation of instruc- 
tional Media. (3) Development of criteria for 
selection and evaluation of instructional materials 
for classroom, school and system use; includes 
measures of readability, listenability, visual diffi- 
culty, and interest level. 

EDAD 642 Mediated Instructional Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDAD 440 and EDAD 444. Survey of 
innovative instructional systems. Comparison of 
effectiveness of alternate teaching-learning sys- 
tems. System design to improve teaching-learning 
efficiency through instructional media. 

EDAD 644 Practicum in Instructional Systems. 
(2-6) Prerequisite, EDAD 444 or EDAD 642. Design 
and development of experimental instructional 
materials or systems to solve a specific instruc- 
tional problem in the field. 

EDAD 679 Seminar in Educational Administration 
and Supervision. (2-4) Prerequisite, at least four 
hours in educational administration and supervi- 
sion or consent of instructor. A student may reg- 
ister for two hours and may take the seminar a 
second time for an additional two hours. 

EDAD 718 School Surveys. (2-6) Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. Includes study of school 
surveys with emphasis on problems of school 
organization and administration, finance and 
school plant planning. Field work in school sur- 
veys is required. 

EDAD 721 Advanced School Plant Planning. (2) 
EDAD 614 is a prerequisite to this course. Howev- 
er, students with necessary background may be 
admitted without completion of EDAD 614. Em- 
phasis is given to analysis of the educational pro- 
gram and planning of physical facilities to accom- 
modate that program. 

EDAD 723 Practicum in Personnel Relationships. 
(2-6) Prerequisite, master's degree or consent of 
instructor. Prerequisite may be waived with advi- 
sor's approval. Enrollment limited. Designed to 
help teachers, school administrators, and other 
school staff members to learn to function more 
effectively in developing educational policy in 
group situations. Each student in the course is 
required to be working concurrently in the field 
with a group of school staff members or citizens 
on actual school problems. 

EDAD 726 Child Accounting. (2) An inquiry into 
the record keeping activities of the school sys- 
tem, including an examination of the marking sys- 
tem. 

EDAD 727 Public School Personnel Administra- 
tion. (3) A comparison of practices with principles 
governing the satisfaction of school personnel 
needs, including a study of tenure, salary sched- 
ules, supervision, rewards, and other benefits. 

EDAD 750 Organization and Administration of 
Teacher Education. (3) Teacher education to- 
day-current patterns and significant emerging 
changes, particularly those involving teachers and 
schools. Deals with selection, curriculum, re- 
search, accredition, and institution-school rela- 
tionships. 

EDAD 798 Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 

Master's AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire 
to pursue special research problems under the 

36 / Graduate Programs 



direction of their advisors may register for credit 
under this number. 

EDAD 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Registration required to the extent of six hours 
for master's thesis. 

EDAD 802 Curriculum in Higher Education. (3) An 

analysis of research in curriculum and of condi- 
tions affecting curriculum change, with examina- 
tion of issues in curriculum making based upon 
the history of higher education curriculum devel- 
opment. 

EDAD 803 Organization and Administration of 
Higher Education. (3) Organization and adminis- 
tration of higher education at the local, state, and 
federal levels; and an analysis of administrative 
relationships and functions and their effects in 
curriculum and instruction. 

EDAD 805 College Teaching. (3) Various methods 
of college instruction analyzed in relation to the 
curriculum and psychological basis. These would 
include the case study method, the demonstration 
method, the lecture method, the recitation meth- 
od, teaching machines, teachingby television, 
and other teaching aids. 

EDAD 806 Seminar in Problems of Higher Educa- 
tion. (2) 

EDAD 837 Curriculum Theory and Research. (2) 

EDAD 858 Adult Education. (3) 

EDAD 859 Seminar in Adult Education. (3) 

EDAD 879 Seminar in Teaching Education. (3-6) 

A problem seminar in teacher education. A maxi- 
mum of six hours may be earned in this course. 

EDAD 888 Apprenticeship in Education. (1-9) 

Apprenticeships in the major area of study are 
available to selected students whose application 
for an apprenticeship has been approved by the 
education faculty. Each apprentice is assigned to 
work for at least a semester full-time or the equiv- 
alent with an appropriate staff member of a coop- 
erating school, school system, or educational in- 
stitution or agency. The sponsor of the apprentice 
maintains a close working relationship with the 
apprentice and the other persons involved. Prere- 
quisites, teaching experience, a master's degree 
in education, and at least six semester hours in 
education at the University of Maryland. NOTE: 
the total number of credits which a student may 
earn in EDAD 489, 888. and 889 is limited to a 
maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDAD 889 Internship in Education. (3-16) 

Internships in the major area of study are availa- 
ble to selected students who have teaching expe- 
rience. The following groups of students are eligi- 
ble: (a) any student who has been advanced to 
candidacy for the doctor's degree; and (b) any 
student who receives special approval by the 
education faculty for an internship, provided that 
prior to taking an internship, such student shall 
have completed at least 60 semester hours of 
graduate work, including at least six semester 
hours in education at the University of Maryland. 
Each intern is assigned to work on a full-time 
basis for at least a semester with an appropriate 
staff member in a cooperating school, school sys- 
tem, or educational institution or agency. The in- 
ternship must be taken in a school situation dif- 
ferent from the one where the student is regularly 
employed. The intern's sponsor maintains a close 
working relationship with the intern and the other 
persons involved. NOTE: The total number of 
credits which a student may earn in EDAD 489, 
888, and 889 is limited to a maximum of twenty 
(20) semester hours. 



EDAD 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

Registration required to the extent of 6-9 hours 
for an Ed.D. project and 12-18 Hours for a Ph.D. 
dissertation. 



Aerospace Engineering 
Program 

Professor and Chairrr)an: Anderson 
Professors: Corning, Melnik, Rivello. Sherwood 
Associate Professors: Donaldson, Jones, Plotkin, 

Schaeffer 
Assistant Professors: Barlow 
Lecturers: Billig, Fleig 

The Aerospace Engineering Department offers a 
broad program of graduate studies leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Phi- 
losophy. Applications for admission are invited 
from those holding a B.S.'degree in engineering, 
the physical sciences, and mathematics. The cur- 
ricula for these degrees are adapted to meet the 
objectives and background of the individual stu- 
dent and are planned by the student and his advi- 
sor. Aerodynamics and Propulsion. Structural 
Mechanics, and Flight Dynamics are the major 
areas of specialization available to graduate stu- 
dents. Within these areas of specialization, the 
student can tailor programs such as Aircraft and 
Aerospace Vehicle Design, Naval Architecture, 
Computational Mechanics, and High Temperature 
Gas Dynamics. 

Two master's degree options are available: the- 
sis and non-thesis. No special departmental re- 
quirements are imposed beyond The Graduate 
School requirements. 

For the Doctor of Philosophy degree, the Aeros- 
pace Engineering Department requires 48 semes- 
ter hours of coursework beyond the B.S. includ- 
ing (1) not less than 18 hours within one depart- 
mental area of specialization. (2) not less than 9 
hours from among the other areas of specializa- 
tion in the department, (3) not less than 12 hours 
in courses which emphasize the physical sciences 
or mathematics rather than their applications. The 
total in (2) plus that in (3) must be at least 24 
hours of which no more than 6 are less than 600 
level. Written and oral comprehensive examina- 
tions are also required. 

The research facilities of the department are 
available to the graduate student. The aerody- 
namic facilities include two subsonic, two super- 
sonic, a hypersonic wind tunnel and a GAT-I flight 
simulator. An F-101 flight simulator will be func- 
tional soon. Facilities are also available for static 
and vibration testing of structures. An assortment 
of computers including a Univac 1106 and a Uni- 
vac 1108 complemented by remote access units 
on a time-sharing basis are available. The Depart- 
ment provides special facilities for the use of stu- 
dents which include remote terminals and mini- 
computers. Under special circumstances, thesis 
research may be accomplished in off-campus re- 
search facilities. 

A number of graduate assistantships and fel- 
lowships are available for financial assistance. 

ENAE 401 Aerospace Laboratory II. (2) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 305 and ENAE 345. Correqui- 
sites: ENAE 452 and ENAE 471 Application of 
fundamental measurement techniques to experi- 
ments in aerospace engineering, structural, aero- 
dynamic, and propulsion tests, correlation of 
theory with experimental results. 

ENAE 402 Aerospace Laboratory III. (1) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 305 and ENAE 345. Corequi- 



sites: ENAE 452, ENAE 471, and ENAE 475. 
Application of fundamental measurement tech- 
niques to experiments in aerospace engineering, 
structural, aerodynamic, flight simulation, and 
heat transfer tests. Correlation of theory with 
experimental results. 

ENAE 411 Aircraft Design. (3) Prerequisites 
ENAE 345, ENAE 451, and ENAE 371. Theory, 
background and methods of airplane design, 
subsonic and supersonic. 

ENAE 412 Design of Aerospace Vehicles. (3) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 345 and ENAE 371. Theory, 
background and methods of space vehicle design 
for manned orbiting vehicles, manned lunar and 
planetary landing systems. 

ENAE 415 Computer-aided Structural Design 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 452 or consent 
of instructor. Introduction to structural design 
concepts and analysis techniques. Introduction to 
computer software for structural analysis which is 
utilized to verify exact solutions and perform par- 
ametric design studies of aerospace structures. 
Not open to students who have earned credit in 
ENAE 431. 

ENAE 445 Stability and Control of Aerospace 
Vehicles. (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 345 and ENAE 
371. Stability, control and miscellaneous topics in 
dynamics. 

ENAE 451 Flight Structures I: Introduction to 
Solid Mechanics. (4) Prerequisite: ENAE 220. An 
introduction to the analysis of aircraft structural 
members. Introduction to theory of elasticity, 
mechanical behavior of materials, thermal effects, 
finite-difference approximations, virtual work, var- 
iational and energy principles for static systems. 

ENAE 452 Flight Structures II: Structural Ele- 
ments. (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 451. Application of 
variational and energy principles to analysis of 
elastic bodies, stresses and deflections of beams 
including effects of non-principal axes, 
non-homogeneity, and gradients, differential 
equations of beams, bars, and cables. Stresses 
and deflections of torsional members, stresses 
due to shear. Deflection analysis of structures. 

ENAE 453 Matrix Methods In Computational 
Mechanics. (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 452 or consent 
of instructor. Introduction to the concepts of 
computational analysis of continuous media by 
use of matrix methods. Foundation for use of fi- 
nite elements in any field of continuum mechan- 
ics, with emphasis on the use of the displacement 
method to solve thermal and structural problems. 

ENAE 457 Flight Structures III. (3) Prerequisite: 
ENAE 452 or equivalent. An advanced undergrad- 
uate course dealing with the theory and analysis 
of the structures of flight vehicles. Stresses due 
to shear, indeterminate structures, plate theory, 
buckling and failure of columns and plates. 

ENAE 461 Flight Propulsion I. (3) Prerequisites: 
ENME 215 and ENAE 471. Operating principles of 
piston, turbojet, turboprop, ramjet and rocket en- 
gines, thermodynamic cycle analysis and engine 
performance, aerothermochemistry of combus- 
tion, fuels, and propellants. 

ENAE 462 Flight Propulsion II. (3) Prerequisite: 
ENAE 461. Advanced and current topics in flight 
propulsion. 

ENAE 471 Aerodynamics II. (3) Prerequisite: 
ENAE 371 and ENME 216. Elements of compressi- 
ble flow with applications to aerospace engineer- 
ing problems. 



ENAE 472 Aerodynamics III. (3) Prerequisite 
ENAE 371. Theory of the flow of an incompressi- 
ble fluid. 

ENAE 473 Aerodynamics of High-speed Flight. 

(3) Prerequisite: ENAE 372 or equivalent An adv- 
anced course dealing with aerodynamic problems 
of flight at supersonic and hypersonic velocities. 
Unified hypersonic and supersonic small disturb- 
ance theories, real gas effects, aerodynamic heat- 
ing and mass transfer with applications to hyper- 
sonic flight and re-entry. 

ENAE 475 Viscous Flow and Aerodynamic Heat- 
ing. (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 371, ENAE 471, and 
ENME 216. Fundamental aspects of viscous flow, 
Navier-Stokes equations, similarity, boundary lay- 
er equations; laminar, transitional and turbulent 
incompressible flows on airfoils, thermal bounda- 
ry layers and convective heat transfer: conduction 
through solids, introduction to radiative heat 
transfer. 

ENAE 488 Topics in Aerospace Engineering. (1- 

4) Technical elective taken with the permission of 
the student's advisor and instructor. Lecture and 
conference courses designed to extend the stu- 
dent's understanding of aerospace engineering. 
Current topics are emphasized. 

ENAE 499 Elective Research. (1-3) May be re- 
peated to a maximum of three credits. Elective for 
seniors in aerospace engineering with permission 
of the student's advisor and the instructor. Origi- 
nal research projects terminating in a written 
report. 

ENAE 650 Variational Methods in Structural 
Mechanics. (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 452 or equiv- 
alent. Review of theory of linear elasticity with in- 
troduction to cartesian tensors; application of 
calculus of variations and variational principles of 
elasticity; Castigliano's theorems; applications to 
aerospace structures. 

ENAE 652 Finite Element Method in Engineering. 

(3) Prerequisite: ENAE 453 and ENAE 650, or 
consent of instructor. Development of finite ele- 
ment representation of continua using galerkin 
and variational techniques. Derivation of shell 
elements and parametric representation of two 
and three dimensional elements. Application to 
aerospace structures, fluids and diffusion proc- 
esses. 

ENAE 653 Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of 
Continual. (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 652. Finite ele- 
ment formulation of nonlinear and time depend- 
ent processes. Introduction of tensors, nonlinear 
elasticity, plasticity and creep. Application to non- 
linear continua including aerospace structures, 
shells, radiation heat transfer, creep. 

ENAE 655 Structural Dynamics I. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 246 and ENAE 452 or equiv- 
alents; or consent of instructor. Advanced princi- 
ples of dynamics necessary for structural analy- 
sis; solutions of eigenvalue problems for discrete 
and continuous elastic systems, solutions to 
forced response boundary value problems by di- 
rect, model, and transform methods. 

ENAE 656 Structural Dynamics II. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 655 or consent of instructor. 
Topics in aeroelasticity: wing divergence; aileron 
reversal; flexibility effects on aircraft stability de- 
rivatives; wing, empennage and aircraft flutter; 
aircraft gust response. 

ENAE 657 Theory of Structural Stability. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 351 or equivalent. Static and 
dynamic stability of structural systems. Classifica- 
tion of loading systems: linear and nonlinear 



post-buckling behavior. Perfect and imperfect 
system behavior. Buckling and failure of columns 
and plates. 

ENAE 661 Advanced Propulsion. (3) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 461, 462. Special problems of 
thermodynamics and dynamics of aircraft power 
plants; jet. rocket and ramjet engines. Plasma, ion 
and nuclear propulsion lor space vehicles. 

ENAE 662 Advanced Propulsion. (3) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 461. 462 Special problems of 
thermodynamics and dynamics of aircraft power 
plants; jet, rocket and ramjet engines. Plasma, ion 
and nuclear propulsion for space vehicles. 

ENAE 671 Aerodynamics of Incompressible 
Fluids I. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 463 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Fundamental equations in fluid 
mechanics. Irrotational motion Circulation theory 
of lift. Thin airfoil theory. Lifting line theory. Wind 
tunnel corrections. Perturbation methods. 

ENAE 672 Aerodynamics of Incompressible 
Fluids II. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 463 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Fundamental equations in fluid 
mechanics. Irrotational motion Circulation theory 
of lift. Thin airfoil theory. Lifting line theory. Wind 
tunnel corrections. Perturbation methods. 

ENAE 673 Aerodynamics of Compressible 
Fluids I. (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 372 or permission 
of instructor. One-dimensional flow of a perfect 
compressible fluid. Shock waves. Two-dimen- 
sional linearized theory of compressible flow. 
Two-dimensional transonic and hypersonic flows. 
Exact solutions of two dimensional isotropic flow. 
Linearized theory of three-dimensional potential 
flow. Exact solution of axially symmetrical poten- 
tial flow. One-dimensional flow with friction and 
heat addition. 

ENAE 674 Aerodynamics of Compressible 
Fluids II. (3) Prerequisite, ENAE 372 or permis- 
sion of instructor. One-dimensional flow of a per- 
fect compressible fluid. Shock waves. Two-di- 
mensional linearized theory of compressible flow. 
Two-dimensional transonic and hypersonic flows. 
Exact solutions of two dimensional isotropic flow. 
Linearized theory of three-dimensional potential 
flow. Exact solution of axially symmetrical poten- 
tial flow. One-dimensional flow with friction and 
heat addition. 

ENAE 675 Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids I. (3) 

Derivation of Navier Stokes equations, some ex- 
act solutions: boundary layer equations. Liminar 
flow-similar solutions, compressibility, transfor- 
mations, analytic approximations, numerical 
methods, stability and transition of turbulent flow. 
Turbulent flow-isotropic turbulence, boundary 
layer flows, free mixing flows. 

ENAE 676 Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids II. (3) 

Derivation of Navier Stokes equations, some exact 
solutions: boundary layer equations. Laminar 
flow-similar solutions, compressibility, transfor- 
mations, analytic approximations, numerical 
methods, stability and transition to turbulent flow. 
Turbulent flow-istropic turbulence, boundary layer 
flows, free mixing flows. 

ENAE 688 Seminar. (1-16) 

ENAE 757 Advanced Structural Dynamics. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 655 or equivalent. Fundamen- 
tals of probability theory pertinent to random vi- 
brations, including correlation functions, and 
spectral densities; example random processes; 
response of single degree and multidegree of 
freedom systems. 

ENAE 776 Heat Transfer Problems Associated 
with High Velocity Flight I. (3) Prerequisite: per- 

Graduate Programs / 37 



mission of instructor. Heat conduction jn solids 
and thermal radiation of solids and gases. Analyt- 
ic solutions to simple problems and numerical 
methods for solvmg complicated problems, 
Convective heating associated with lammar and 
turbulent boundary-layer flow. Heat transfer 
equations are derived for the plate case and for 
selected body shapes such as cones and hemi- 
spheres. Real gas effects on convective heating 
are examined, 

ENAE 777 Heat Trnasfer Problems Associated 
with High Velocity Flight II. (3) Prerequisite: per- 
mission of instructor. Heat conduction in solids 
and thermal radiation of solids and gases. Analyt- 
ic solutions to simple problems and numerical 
methods for solving complicated problems. 
Convective heating associated with laminar and 
turbulent boundary-layer flow. Heat transfer equa- 
tions are derived for the plate case and for select- 
ed body shapes such as cones and hemispheres. 
Real gas effects on convective heating are exam- 
ined. 

ENAE 788 Selected Topics in Aerospace Engi- 
neering. (3) 

ENAE 789 Selected Topics in Aerospace Engi- 
neering. (3) 

ENAE 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

ENAE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Agricultural and 
Extension Education 
Program 

Acting Chairman: Poffenberger 
Professors Longest, Nelson, Ryden 
Assistant Professors: Seibel, Wheatley, Wright 

As a multidisciplinary department of several 
educational and social science specialities, the 
Department of Agricultural and Extension Educa- 
tion services the academic and continuing educa- 
tion needs and interests of the Cooperative Ex- 
tension Service, teachers of agriculture and pro- 
fessionals involved in community development. 

The l^aster of Science and Doctor of Philioso- 
phy degree and the Advanced Graduate Specialist 
Certificate may be obtained in options in Agricul- 
tural Education, Environmental Education, Exten- 
sion and Continuing Education, and Community 
Development. Specialization options in Agricultur- 
al Education include teacher education, research, 
and administration and supervision. Specializa- 
tion options under Extension and Continuing 
Education include personnel development, pro- 
gram development, administration and supervi- 
sion, and continuing education. The multidiscipli- 
nary Community Development program special- 
ties include various social science disciplines 
with research teaching, and extension functions; 
human and organizational planning and develop- 
ment; and public affairs education an optional 
emphasis. 

In the tvlaster of Science degree programs both 
thesis and non-thesis options are available. Appli- 
cants for the Master of Science program must 
present transcripts for evaluation 

As a continuing education option the depart- 
ment offers the AGS. program leading to the 
Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate. It re- 
quires 30 credits beyond the master's degree. 

No specific number of credits is required for 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Each student's 
program is planned by his committee according 



to his previous education and experience, special 
interests and needs, and professional plans. No 
foreign language requirement exists but is option- 
al and encouraged for those interested in interna- 
tional development areas Students are usually 
encouraged to develop additional research tech- 
niques through specific courses and participation 
in department research programs. Two consecu- 
tive semesters of full-time resident study are re- 
quired. Applicants should present results of the 
Graduate Education Test Battery (Miller Analo- 
gies. Cooperative English, and SCAT quantitative 
tests) with their applications for admission. 

For other requirements and guidelines concern- 
ing the above programs, contact the Department 
of Agricultural and Extension Education. 

RLED 422 Extension Education. (3) The agricul- 
tural extension service as an educational agency. 
The history, philosophy, objectives, policy, organi- 
zation, legislation and methods used in extension 
work. 

RLED 423 Extension Communications. (3) An in- 
troduction to communications in teaching and 
within an organization, including barriers to 
communication, the diffusion process and the 
application of communication principles person 
to person, with groups and through mass media. 

RLED 426 Development and Management of 
Extension Youth Programs. (3) Designed for 
present and prospective state leaders of exten- 
sion youth programs. Program development, prin- 
ciples of program management, leadership devel- 
opment and counseling; science, career selection 
and citizenship in youth programs, field experi- 
ence in working with low income families, youth 
urban work. 

RLED 427 Group Dynamics in Continuing and 
Extension Education. (3) Concepts involved in 
working with groups planning extension and con- 
tinuing education programs. Analysis of group 
behavior and group dynamics related to small 
groups and development of a competence in the 
selection of appropriate methods and techniques. 
RLED 464 Rural Life in Modern Society. (3) 
Examination of the many aspects of rural life that 
affect and are affected by changes in technical, 
natural and human resources. Emphasis is placed 
on the role which diverse organizations, agencies 
and institutions play in the education and adjust- 
ment of rural people to the demands of modern 
society. 

RLED 466 Rural Poverty in an Affluent Society. 

(3) Topics examined include conditions under 
which people in poverty exist, factors giving rise 
to such conditions, problems faced by the rural 
poor, and the kinds of assistance they need to 
rise out of poverty. Topics and issues are exam- 
ined in the context of rural-urban interrelation- 
ships and their effects on rural poverty. Spe- 
cial attention Is given to past and present pro- 
grams designed to alleviate poverty and to con- 
siderations and recommendations for future ac- 
tion. 

RLED 487 Conservation of Natural Resources. 
(3) Designed primarily for teachers. Study of 
state's natural resources— soil, water, fisheries, 
wildlife, forests, and minerals— natural resources 
problems and practices. Extensive field study. 
Concentration on subject matter. Taken concur- 
rently with RLED 497 in summer season. 

RLED 488 Critique in Rural Education. (1) 

Current problems and trends in rural education. 

RLED 489 Critique in Rural Education. (1) 

Current problems and trends in rural education. 



RLED 497 Conservation of Natural Resources. 

(3) Designed primarily for teachers. Study of 
state's natural resources— soil, water, fisheries, 
wildlife, forests, and minerals— natural resources 
problems and practices. Extensive field study. 
Methods of teaching conservation Included. Tak- 
en concurrently with RLED 487 in summer sea- 
son. 

RLED 499 Special Problems. (1-3) Prerequisite, 
staff approval. 

RLED 606 Program Planning and Evaluation in 
Agricultural Education. (2-3) Second semester. 
Analysis of community agricultural education 
needs, selection and organization of course con- 
tent, criteria and procedures for evaluating pro- 
grams, 

RLED 626 Program Development in Extension 
Education. (3) Concepts in program planning and 
development. A conceptual approach to a tested 
framework for programming. Study and analysis 
of program design and implimentatlon In the ex- 
tension service. 

RLED 628 Seminar in Program Planning. (1-5) 

The student assists in the development of an 
educational program in an institutional or com- 
munity setting. He also develops an Individualized 
unit of study applicable to the program. Seminar 
sessions are based on the actual problems of 
diagnosing needs, planning, conducting, and 
evaluating programs. Repeatable to a maximum 
of five credits. 

RLED 642 Continuing Education in Extension. (3) 

Studies the process through which adults have 
and use opportunities to learn systematically 
under the guidance of an agent, teacher or lead- 
er. A variety of program areas will be reviewed 
giving the student an opportunity to plan, con- 
duct and evaluate learning activities for adults. 

RLED 661 Rural Community Analysis. (3) First 
semester. Analysis of structure and function of 
rural society and application of social under- 
standings to educational processes. 

RLED 663 Developing Rural Leadership. (2-3) 

First semester. Theories of leadership are empha- 
sized. Techniques of identifying formal and infor- 
mal leaders and the development of rural lay 
leaders. 

RLED 689 Special Topics in Rural Education. (2) 

RLED 691 Research Methods in Rural Education. 
(2-3) First semester. The scientific method, prob- 
lem identification, survey of research literature, 
preparing research plans, design of studies, ex- 
perimentation, analysis of data and thesis writing. 

RLED 699 Special Problems. (1-3) Prerequisite, 
approval of staff. 

RLED 707 Supervision of Student Teaching. (1) 

Summer session. Identification of experiences 
and activities in an effective student teaching 
program, responsibilities and duties of supervis- 
ing teachers, and evaluation of student teaching 

RLED 789 Special Topics in Rural Education. (2) 

RLED 798 Seminar in Rural Education. (1-3) 

Problems in the organization, administration, and 
supervision of the several agencies of rural and/ 
or vocational education. Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of eight semester credits. 

RLED 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 
RLED 882 Agricultural College Instruction. (1) 
RLED 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



38 / Graduate Programs 



Agricultural and 
Resource Economics 
Program 

Professor and Acting Chairman: Lessley 
Professors: Abrahamsen, Bender. Cain. Curtis. 
Foster. Ishee. Moore. Murray. Poffenberger. 
Smith. Stevens. Tuthill. Wysong 
Associate Professors: Hardie. Lawrence. Via 
Assistant Professors: Bellows 

The Department of Agricultural and Resource 
Economics offers two programs of work leading 
to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy degrees. Under the traditional curriculum, 
students may pursue work in production econom- 
ics — farm management, foreign economic devel- 
opment, international trade, agricultural market- 
ing, public policy, and resource development 
econmics. fisheries economics, and agricultural 
development, 

A second program in Resource Management 
and Development offers students the opportunity 
to integrate study from a wide variety of disci- 
plines related to the economics of resource use. 
Possible specializations in the program are water 
resources, marine resources, land use or some 
other aspect of environmental management. 

Thesis and non-thesis options are available for 
the Master of Science degree in both programs. 
The thesis option requires a minimum of 24 hours 
of course work; 33 hours of course work for the 
non-thesis option Students taking the non-thesis 
option in Resource Management are urged to 
participate in a two or three month internship 
with some public or private planning agency. 

Applicants with strong undergraduate records 
In diverse fields are considered for admittance to 
both Master of Science programs. Necessary 
course prerequisities (without credit) can be 
completed after admittance. No entrance exami- 
nations are required, but three letters of recom- 
mendations must be submitted. 

Students with bachelor s degrees may apply for 
the doctoral programs though they are encour- 
aged to complete requirements tor the MS de- 
gree. Applicants holding a masters degree in an 
equivalent field from an accredited institution 
may be admitted for immediate doctoral study. A 
minimum of 18 hours of course work tjeyond the 
master's level is required for the Ph.D. degree in 
both programs in addition to 12 hours of disserta- 
tion research. Qualifying examinations are admin- 
istered on completion of basic course require- 
ments and written and oral comprehensive exami- 
nations are held when all course work has been 
completed. A final oral examination Is held for the 
student to defend the dissertation. There is no 
foreign language requirement for any graduate 
degree. 

Graduate assistantships are offered to qualified 
applicants on the basis of past academic perform- 
ance and experience. Approximately one-half of 
full-time students in the department hold assist- 
antships or some form of financial aid. Part-time 
and summer work Is often available for students 
not receiving financial aid. 

The department actively employs the re- 
sources of the many state, federal, and interna- 
tional agencies in the area to offer research and/ 
or internship experiences designed to give com- 
petency in making observations from the real 
world. The course work of the various programs 
familiarizes the student with traditional subject 
matter, and seminar and discussion opportunities 
enable the student to sharpen the ability to ex- 
press his thoughts. 



AREC 404 Prices of Agricultural Products. (3) An 

Introduction to agricultural price behavior. Em- 
phasis is placed on the use of price information 
In the decision-making process, the relation of 
supply and demand in determining agricultural 
prices, and the relation of prices to grade, time, 
location, and stages of processing in the market- 
ing system The course includes elementary meth- 
ods of price analysis, the concept of parity and 
the role of price support programs in agricultural 
decisions, 

AREC 406 Farm Management. (3) The organiza- 
tion and operation of the farm business to obtain 
an income consistent with family resources and 
objectives Principles of production economics 
and other related fields are applied to the individ- 
ual farm business. Laboratory period will be 
largely devoted to field trips and other practical 
exercises. 

AREC 407 Financial Analysis of the Farm Busi- 
ness. (3) Application of economic principles to 
develop criteria for a sound farm business, in- 
cluding credit source and use. preparing and fil- 
ing income tax returns, methods of appraising 
farm properties, the summary and analysis of 
farm records, leading to effective control and 
profitable operation of the farm business. 

AREC 410 Horse Industry Economics. (3) 

Prerequisite. ANSC 230 and 232, An introduction 
to the economic forces affecting the horse indus- 
try and to the economic tools required by horse 
farm managers, trainers, and others in the indus- 
try 

AREC 414 Introduction to Agricultural Business 
Management. (3) The different forms of business- 
es are investigated. Management functions, busi- 
ness indicators, measures of performance, and 
operational analysis are examined. Case studies 
are used to show applications of management 
techniques, 

AREC 427 The Economics of Marketing Systems 
for Agricultural Commodities. (3) Basic economic 
theory as applied to the marketing of agricultural 
products, including price, cost, and financial 
analysis. Current developments affecting market 
structure including effects of contractual arrange- 
ment, vertical integration, governmental policies 
and regulation 

AREC 432 Introduction to Natural Resources 
Policy. (3) Development of natural resource policy 
and analysis of the evolution of public interven- 
tion in the use of natural resources. Examination 
of present policies and of conflicts between pri- 
vate individuals, public interest groups, and gov- 
ernment agencies, 

AREC 445 World Agricultural Development and 
the Quality of Life. (3) An examination of the key 
aspects of the agricultural development of less 
developed countries related to resources, tech- 
nology, cultural and social setting, population, 
infrastructure, incentives, education, and govern- 
ment. Environmental impact of agricultural devel- 
opment, basic economic and social characteris- 
tics of peasant agriculture, theories and models 
of agricultural development, selected aspects of 
agricultural development planning, 

AREC 452 Economics of Resource Development. 

(3) Economic, political, and institutional factors 
which influence the use of land resources. Appli- 
cation of elementary economic principles in un- 
derstanding social conduct concerning the devel- 
opment and use of natural and man-made re- 
sources. 



AREC 453 Economic Analysis of Natural Re- 
sources. (3) Rational use and reuse of natural 
resources Theory and methodology of the alloca- 
tion of natural resources among alternative uses. 
Opimum state of conservation, market failure, 
safe minimum standard, and cost-benefit analysis. 

AREC 484 Introduction to Econometrics in Agri- 
culture. (3) An introduction to the application of 
econometric techniques to agricultural problems 
with emphasis on the assumptions and computa- 
tional techniques necessary to derive statistical 
estimates, test hypotheses, and make predictions 
with the use of single equation models. Includes 
linear and non-linear regression models, internal 
least squares, discriminant analysis and factor 
analysis- 

AREC 485 Applications of Mathematical Pro- 
gramming in Agriculture, Business, and Eco- 
nomic Analysis. (3) This course is designed to 
tram students in the application of mathematical 
programming (especially linear programming) to 
solve a wide variety of problems in agriculture, 
business and economics. The primary emphasis 
Is on setting up problems and interpreting results. 
The computational facilities of the computer sci- 
ence center are used extensively. 

AREC 489 Special Topics in Agricultural and 
Resources Economics. (3) Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of 9 credits, 

AREC 495 Honors Reading Course in Agricultur- 
al and Resource Economics I. (3) Selected read- 
ings in political and economic theory from 17(X) 
to 1850. This course develops a basic understand- 
ing of the development of economic and political 
thought as a foundation for understanding our 
present society and its cultural heritage. Prere- 
quisite, acceptance in the honors program of the 
department of agricultural and resource econom- 
ics. 

AREC 496 Honors Reading Course in Agricultur- 
al and Resource Economics II. (3) Selected read- 
ings in political and economic theory from 1850 
to the present This course continues the devel- 
opment of a basic understanding of economic 
and political thought begun in AREC 495 by the 
examination of modern problems in agricultural 
and resource economics in the light of the mate- 
rial read and discussed in AREC 495 and AREC 
496. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AREC 
495 and registration in the honors program of the 
department of Agricultural and resource econom- 
ics. 

AREC 639 Internship in Resource Management 
(2-4) Prerequisite, permission of maior advisor 
and department chairman Open only to graduate 
students in the AREC resource Management cur- 
riculum. Repeatable to a maximum of four hours. 

AREC 689 Special Topics in Agricultural and 
Resource Economics. (3) First and second se- 
mester. Subject matter taught will be varied and 
will depend on the persons available for teaching 
unique and specialized phases of agricultural and 
resource economics. The course will be taught by 
the staff or visiting agricultural and resource 
economists who may be secured on lectureship 
or visiting Professor basis. 

AREC 698 Seminar. (1) First and second semes- 
ters. Students will participate through study of 
problems in the field, reporting to seminar mem- 
t)ers and defending positions adopted. Outstand- 
ing leaders in the field will present ideas for anal- 
ysis and discussion among class members. Stu- 
dents involved in original research will present 
progress reports. Class discussion will provide 



Graduate Programs / 39 



opportunity for constructive criticism and guid- 
ance. 

AREC 699 Special Problems in Agricultural and 
Resource Economics. (1-2) First and second 
semesters and summer. Intensive study and anal- 
ysis of specific problems in the field of agricultur- 
al and resource economics, vtffiich provide infor- 
mation in depth in areas of special interest to the 
student. 

AREC 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

AREC 804 Advanced Agricultural Price and 
Demand Analysis. (3) Second semester. An adv- 
anced study in the theory of: (1) the individual 
consumer, (2) household behavior, and (3) aggre- 
gate demand. The concepts of price and gross 
elasticities of demand, income elasticity of de- 
mand, and elasticity of substitution will be exam- 
ined in detail. The use of demand theory in the 
analysis of welfare problems, market equilibrium 
(with special emphasis on trade) and the problem 
of insufficient and excessive aggregate demand 
will be discussed. 

AREC 806 Economics of Agricultural Production. 

(3) First semester. Study of the more complex 
problems involved in the long-range adjustments, 
organization and operation of farm resources, 
including the impact of new technology and 
methods. Applications of the theory of the firm, 
linear programming, activity analysis and input- 
output analysis. 

AREC 824 Food Distribution Management. (3) 

Theory and practice of the complex functional 
and institutional aspects of food distribution sys- 
tems analyzed from the perspective of manage- 
ment decision-making in the food industry. Possi- 
ble long range economic effects of current struc- 
tural adjustments: social and ecological aspects 
of food industry management decision-making. 

AREC 832 Agricultural Price and Income Policy. 

(3) Second semester, alternate years, 1973. The 
evolution of agricultural policy in the United 
States, emphazing the origin and development of 
governmental programs, and their effects upon 
agricultural production, prices and income. 

AREC 844 International Agriculture Trade. (3) 

Economic theory, policies and practices in inter- 
national trade in agricultural products. Principal 
theories of international trade and finance, agri- 
cultural trade policies of various countries, and 
agricultural trade practices. 

AREC 845 Agriculture in World Economic Devel- 
opment. (3) First semester, alternate years, 1972. 
Theories and concepts of what makes economic 
development happen. Approaches and programs 
for stimulating the transformation from a primitive 
agricultural economy to an economy of rapidly 
developing commercial agriculture and industry. 
Analysis of selected agricultural development 
programs in Asia, Africa and Latin America. 

AREC 852 Advanced Resource Economics. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Assessment 
and evaluation of our natural, capital, and human 
resources; the use of economic theory and var- 
ious techniques to guide the allocation of these 
resources within a comprehensive framework; 
and the institutional arrangements for using these 
resources. ECON 403 or equivalent is a prerequi- 
site. 

AREC 883 Agricultural and Resource Economics 
Research Techniques. (3) First semester. Empha- 
sis is given to philosophy and basic objectives of 
research in the field of agricultural and resource 
economics. The course is designed to help stu- 



dents djfine a research problem and work out 
logical procedures for executing research in the 
social sciences. Attention is given to the tech- 
niques and tools available to agricultural and re- 
source economics. Research documents in the 
field will be appraised from the standpoint of pre- 
cedures and evaluation of the search. 

AREC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Agricultural Engineering 
Program 

Professor arid Chairmar}: Harris 

Professors: Green, Winn 

Associate Professors: Felton, Hummel, Ivlerkel, 

Wheaton 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering 
offers a graduate program of study with speciali- 
zation in either agricultural or aquacultural engi- 
neering leading to the degree of fvlaster of Sci- 
ence and Doctor of Philosophy. The program of 
study is planned on a personal basis and is ori- 
ented towards the intellectual and professional 
objectives of the student. 

Courses and research problems place emphasis 
on the engineering aspects of the production, 
harvesting, processing and marketing of terrestri- 
al and aquatic food and fiber products, with con- 
cern for the conservation of land and water re- 
sources and the utilization and/or disposal of by- 
products associated with biological systems in 
order to maintain and enhance the quality of our 
environment while contributing to efficient pro- 
duction of food and fiber to meet increasing pop- 
ulation demands. 

Only the thesis option is available for the M.S. 
degree. The department has no language require- 
ment for either the M.S. or Ph.D. degree. 

In addition to well-equipped laboratories in the 
department, the facilities of the Agricultural Expe- 
riment Station, the Computer Science Center, and 
the College of Engineering are available. The new 
University of Maryland Center for Environmental 
and Estuarine Studies will enhance the aquacul- 
tural phase of the department's graduate pro- 
gram. 

AGEN 401 Agricultural Production Equipment. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prere- 
quisite, AGEN 100. Principles of operation and 
functions of power and machinery units as rela- 
ted to tillage; cutting, conveying, and separating 
units; and control mechanisms. Principles of in- 
ternal combustion engines and power unit com- 
ponents. 

AGEN 402 Agricultural Materials Handling and 
Environmental Control. (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory per week. Prerequisite, AGEN 100. 
Characteristics of construction materials and de- 
tails of agricultural structures. Fundamentals of 
electricity, electrical circuits, and electrical con- 
trols. Materials handling and environmental re- 
quirements of farm products and animals. 

AGEN 421 Power Systems. (3) Two lectures and 
one two hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites, 
ENME 215, ENEE 300 and ENME 340 Analysis of 
energy conversion devices including internal 
combustion engines, electrical and hydraulic 
motors. Fundamentals of power transmission and 
coordination of power sources with methods of 
power transmission. 

AGEN 422 Soil and Water Engineering. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENME 340. Appli- 
cations of engineering and soil sciences in ero- 



sion control, drainage, irrigation and watershed, 
management. Principles of agricultural hydrology 
and design of water control and conveyance sys- 
tems. 

AGEN 424 Functional and Environmental Design 
of Agricultural Structures. (3) Two lectures and 
one hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite, AGEN 
324. An analytical appraoch to the design and 
planning of functional and environmental require- 
ments of plants and animals in semi-or complete- 
ly enclosed structures. 

AGEN 432 General Hydrology. (3) Three lectures 
per week. Qualitative aspects of basic hydrologic 
principles pertaining to the properties, distribu- 
tion and circulation of water as related to public 
interest in water resources. 

AGEN 433 Engineering Hydrology. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisites, MATH 246, ENCE 
330 or ENME 340. Properties, distribution and 
circulation of water from 'the sea and in the at- 
mosphere emphasizing movement overland, in 
channels and through the soil profile. Qualitative 
and quantitative factors are considered. 

AGEN 435 Aquacultural Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of department. A study of 
the engineering aspects of development, utiliza- 
tion and conservation of aquatic systems. Empha- 
sis will be on harvesting and processing aquatic 
animals or plants as related to other facets of 
water resources management. 

AGEN 488 Topics in Agricultural Engineering 
Technology. (1-3) Prerequisite, permission of the 
instructor. Selected topics in agricultural engi- 
neering technology of current need and interest. 
May be repeated to a maximum of six credits if 
topics are different. Not acceptable for credit 
towards major in agricultural engineering. 

AGEN 489 Special Problems in Agricultural Engi- 
neering. (1-3) Prerequisite, approval of depart- 
ment. Student will select an engineering problem 
and prepare a technical report. The problem may 
include design, experimentation, and/or data 
analysis. 

AGEN 499 Special Problems in Agricultural Engi- 
neering Technology. (1-3) Prerequisite, approval 
of department. Not acceptable for majors in agri- 
cultural engineering. Problems assigned in pro- 
portion to credit. 

AGEN 601 Instrumentation Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, approval of department. Analysis of 
instrumentation requirements and techniques for 
research and operational agricultural or biologi- 
cal systems. 

AGEN 602 Mechanical Properties of Biological 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite, differential equations a 
study of the significance and the utilization of the 
mechanical properties of biological materials 
under various conditions of loading. Emphasis on 
particle motion; relationships between stress and 
strain, force, velocity and acceleration; principles 
of work and energy, and theories of failure. 

AGEN 603 Biological Process Engineering. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, differential equations. 
Interrelationships of physical properties as func- 
tions of moisture and temperature gradients in 
agricultural and aquacultural materials. 

AGEN 605 Land and Water Resource Develop- 
ment Engineering. (3) First semester. Prerequi- 
site. AGEN 422 or approval of department. A 
comprehensive study of engineering aspects of 
orderly development for land and water re- 
sources. Emphasis will be placed on project for- 



40 / Graduate Programs 



mulation, data acquisition, project analysis and 

engineering economy 

AGEN 688 Advanced Topics In Agricultural Engi- 
neering. (1-4) Prerequisite, consent of instructor 
Advanced topics of current interest in tfie various 
areas of agricultural engineering Maximum eigtit 
credits 

AGEN 698 Seminar. (1) First and second semes- 
ters. 

AGEN 699 Special Problems in Agricultural and 
Aquacultural Engineering. (1-6) First and second 
semester and summer school. Work assigned in 
proportion to amount of credit, 

AGEN 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 
AGEN 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Agronomy Program 

Professor and Chairman: Miller 

Professors: Axley. Clark. Decker. Foss. Strickling 

Associate Professors Aycock. Bandel. Burl. 

Fanning. Mulchi. Parochetti 
Assistant Professors: Hall. Johnson. Undersander. 

Wolf 

The Department of Agronomy offers graduate 
courses of study leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The student 
may pursue major work in the crops division or in 
the soils division of the department. Programs are 
offered in cereal crop production, forage manage- 
ment, turf management, plant breeding, tobacco 
production, crop physiology, weed science, soil 
chemistry, soil physics, soil fertility, soil and water 
conservation, soil classification, soil survey and 
land use. soil mineralogy, soil biochemistry, soil 
microbiology, air pollution, waste disposal, and 
soil environment interactions. 

Thesis and non-thesis options are available for 
the Master of Science degree. A bachelor's de- 
gree in Agronomy is not required if the student 
has adequate training in the basic sciences. All 
students must complete the Master of Science 
degree before admission to the doctoral program. 
Departmental regulations have been assembled 
for the guidance of candidates for graduate de- 
grees. Copies of these regulations are available 
from the Department of Agronomy. 

The Agronomy Department has over 20 
well-equipped laboratories to carry out basic and 
applied research in crop and soil science. Basic 
equipment in the laboratories includes: X-ray dif- 
fraction and spectrograph units, atomic absorp- 
tion spectrophotometer, gas chromatograph. iso- 
tope counters, petrographic microscopes, neu- 
tron soil moisture probe and scaler, and carbon 
furnace. Growth chambers, extensive greenhouse 
space, and five research farms permit a wide 
range of environmental conditions for research 
into plant growth processes. A computer center, 
located on campus, is available for use by the 
department. The University and the new National 
Agricultural Sciences Libraries, supplemented by 
the Library of Congress, make the library re- 
sources among the best in the nation Many proj- 
ects of the department are conducted in cooper- 
ation with the Agricultural Research Service of 
the United States Department of Agriculture with 
headquarters located three miles from the cam- 
pus. 

AGRO 403 Crop Breeding. (3) Prerequisite, BOTN 
414 or ZOOL 246. Principles and methods of 
breeding annual self and cross-pollinated plant 
and perennial forage species. 



AGRO 404 Tobacco Production. (3) Prerequisite. 

BOTN too A study of the history, adaptation, dis- 
tribution, culture, and improvement of various 
types of tobacco, with special emphasis on prob- 
lems in Maryland tobacco production. Physical 
and chemical factors associated with yield and 
quality of tobacco will be stressed 

AGRO 405 Turf Management. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite. 
BOTN 100. A study of principles and practices of 
managing turf for lawns, golf courses, athletic 
fields, playgrounds, airfields and highways for 
commercial sod production. 

AGRO 406 Forage Crop Production. (2) 

Prerequisite. BOTN 100. AGRO 100 or concurrent 
enrollment therein. Study of the production and 
management of grasses and legumes for quality 
hay. silage, and pasture. 

AGRO 407 Cereal Crop Production. (2) 

Prerequisite, BOTN 100. AGRO 100 or concurrent 
enrollment therein. Study of the principles and 
practices of corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye. and 
soybean production. 

AGRO 411 Soil Fertility Principles. (3) 

Prerequisite. AGRO 202. A study of the chemical, 
physical, and biological characteristics of soils 
that are important in growing crops. Soil deficien- 
cies of physical, chemical, or biological nature 
and their correction by the use of lime, fertilizers, 
and rotations are discussed and illustrated. 

AGRO 412 Commercial Fertilizers. (3) 

Prerequisite, AGRO 202 or permission of instruc- 
tor. A study of the manufacturing of commercial 
fertilizers and their use in soils for efficient crop 
production. 

AGRO 413 Soil and Water Conservation. (3) Two 

lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prere- 
quisite. AGRO 202 or permission of instructor. A 
study of the importance and causes of soil ero- 
sion, methods of soil erosion control, and the 
effect of conservation practices on soil-moisture 
supply. Special emphasis is placed on farm plan- 
ning for soil and water conservation. The labora- 
tory period will be largely devoted to field trips. 

AGRO 414 Soil Classification and Geography. (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite. AGRO 202 or permission of instruc- 
tor. A study of the genesis, morphology, classifi- 
cation and geographic distribution of soils. The 
broad principles governing soil formation are ex- 
plained. Attention is given to the influence of 
geographic factors on the development and use 
of the soils in the United States and other parts of 
the world. The laboratory periods will be largely 
devoted to the field trips and to a study of soil 
maps of various countries. 

AGRO 415 Soil Survey and Land Use. (3) Two 

lectures and one laboratory period a week. An 
introduction to soil survey interpretation as a tool 
in land use both in agricultural and urban situa- 
tions. The implications of soil problems as deline- 
ated by soil surveys on land use will be consid- 
ered. 

AGRO 417 Soil Physics. (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 202 
and a course in physics, or permission of instruc- 
tor. A study of physical properties of soils with 
special emphasis on relationship to soil produc- 
tivity. 

AGRO 421 Soil Chemistry. (3) One lecture and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite. 
AGRO 202 or permission of instructor. A study of 
the chemical composition of soils; cation and 



anion exchange: acid, alkaline and saline soil 
conditions; and soil fixation of plant nutrients. 
Chemical methods of soil analysis will be studied 
with emphasis on their relation to fertilizer re- 
quirements. 

AGRO 422 Soil Biochemistry. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week Prerequisite, 
AGRO 202, CHEM 104 or consent of instructor A 
study of biochemical processes involved in the 
formation and decomposition of organic soil con- 
stituents. Significance of soil-biochemical proc- 
esses involved in plant nutrition will be consid- 
ered. 

AGRO 423 Soil-Water Pollution. (3) Prerequisite, 
background in biology and CHEM 104. Reaction 
and fate of pesticides, agricultural fertilizers, in- 
dustrial and animal wastes in soil and water will 
be discussed. Their relation to the environment 
will be emphasized. 

AGRO 451 Cropping Systems. (2) Prerequisite. 
AGRO 102 or equivalent. The coordination of in- 
formation from various courses in the develop- 
ment of balanced cropping systems, appropriate 
to different objectives in various areas of the state 
and nation. 

AGRO 452 Seed Production and Distribution. (2) 

One lecture and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, AGRO 102 equivalent. A study of 
seed production, processing, and distribution; 
Federal and state seed control programs; seed 
laboratory analysis; release of new varieties; and 
maintenance of foundation seed stocks. 

AGRO 453 Weed Control. (3) Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 
102 or equivalent. A study of the use of cultural 
practices and chemical herbicides in the control 
of weeds. 

AGRO 499 Special Problems in Agronomy. (1-3) 

Prerequisites, AGRO 202. 406, 407 or permission 
of instructor, A detailed study, including a written 
report of an important problem in agronomy, 

AGRO 601 Advanced Crop Breeding. (2) 

Alternate years (offered 1973-74), Prerequisite, 
AGRO 403 or equivalent. Genetic, cytogenetic, 
and statistical theories underlying methods of 
plant breeding. A study of quantitative inherit- 
ance, herterosis, heritability, interspecific and in- 
tergeneric hybridization, polyploidy, sterility 
mechanisms, inbreeding and outbreeding, and 
other topics as related to plant breeding. 

AGRO 602 Advanced Crop Breeding. (2) 

Alternate years (offered 1973-74). Prerequisite. 
AGRO 601 or equivalent. Genetic, cytogenetic, 
and statistical theories underlying methods of 
plant breeding. A study of quantitative inherit- 
ance, herterosis. heritability. interspecific and in- 
tergeneric hybridization, polyploidy, sterility 
mechanisms, inbreeding and outbreeding, and 
other topics as related to plant breeding. 

AGRO 608 Research Methods. (2) Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, permission of staff Development 
of research viewpoint by detailed study and re- 
port on crop research of the Maryland experiment 
station or review of literature on specific phases 
of a problem. 

AGRO 722 Advanced Soil Chemistry. (3) Second 
semester, alternate years (offered 1972-73). One 
lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prere- 
quisites. AGRO 202 and permission of instructor. 
A continuation of AGRO 421 with emphasis on 
soil chemistry of minor elements necessary for 
plant growth. 



Graduate Programs / 41 



AGRO 789 Recent Advances in Agronomy. (2-4) 

First semester. Two hours each year. Total credit 
four hours. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 
A study of recent advances in agronomy research, 

AGRO 798 Agronomy Seminar. (1) First and sec- 
ond semesters. Total credit toward f^aster of Sci- 
ence degree, 2; toward Ph.D. degree, 6; Prere- 
quisite, permission of instructor. 

AGRO 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

AGRO 802 Breeding for Resistance to Plant 
Pests. (3) Second Semester, alternate years, (of- 
fered 1972-73). Prerequisites, ENTM 252, BOTN 
221, AGRO 403. or permission of instructor, A 
study of the development of breeding techniques 
for selecting and utilizing resistance to insects 
and diseases in crop plants and the effect of re- 
sistance on the interrelationships of host and 
pest, 

AGRO 804 Technic in Field Crop Research. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years (offered 
1972-73). Field Plot technique, application of sta- 
tistical analysis to agronomic data, and prepara- 
tion of the research project. 

AGRO 805 Advanced Tobacco Production. (2) 

First semester, alternate years (offered 
1973-1974). Prerequisite, permission of instructor, 
A study of the structural adaption and chemical 
response of tobacco to environmental variations. 
Emphasis will be placed on the alkaloids and 
other unique components, 

AGRO 806 Herbicide Chemistry and Physiology. 

(2) Second semester, alternate years (offered 
1972-1973). Prerequisite, AGRO 453 and CHEIvl 
104 or permission of instructor. Two lectures a 
week. The importance of chemical structure in 
relation to biologically significant reactions will 
be emphasized in more than 10 different herbi- 
cide groups. Recent advances in herbicidal me- 
tabolism, translation, and mode of action will be 
reviewed. Adsorption, decomposition and move- 
ment in the soil will also be studied, 

AGRO 807 Advanced Forage Crops. (2) First 
semester, alternate years (offered 1972-73), Prere- 
quisite, BOTN 441 or equivalent, or permission of 
instructor, A fundamental study of physiological 
and ecological responses of grasses and leg- 
umes to environmental factors, including fertilizer 
elements, soil moisture, soil temperature, humidi- 
ty, length of day, quality and intensity of light, 
wind movement, and defoliation practices. Rela- 
tionship of these factors to life history, produc- 
tion, chemical and botanical composition, quality, 
and persistence of forages will be considered, 

AGRO 821 Advanced Methods of Soil Investiga- 
tion. (3) First semester, alternate years (offered 
1973-1974), Prerequisites, AGRO 202 and permis- 
sion of instructor. An advanced study of the theo- 
ry of the chemical methods of soil investigation 
with emphasis on problems involving application 
of physical chemistry. 

AGRO 831 Advanced Soil Mineralogy. First se- 
mester, alternate years (offered 1972-1973), Prere- 
quisites, AGRO 202 and permission of instructor. 
A study of the structure, physical-chemical char- 
acteristics and identification methods of soil min- 
erals, particularly clay minerals, and their relation- 
ship to soil genesis and productivity, 

AGRO 832 Advanced Soil Physics. (3) Second 
semester, alternate years (offered 1973-1974), 
Prerequisites, AGRO 202 and permission of in- 
structor. An advanced study of physical proper- 
ties of soils. 

AGRO 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



American Studies 
Program 



Associate Professor and Chairman: Lounsbury 
Professors: Beall, Corrigan 
Associate Professor: Mintz 

The American Studies Program, offering the 
M,A, and Ph,D, degrees, provides a unique combi- 
nation of opportunities for the individual seeking 
to study our civilization at the graduate level: 1) 
an academic community located near the nation's 
capital: 2) a faculty, trained in American Studies, 
that offers courses where the student may inte- 
grate a variety of cultural materials and pursue 
his speculations through the channels of interdis- 
ciplinary scholarship; 3) the availability of cpurs- 
es, emphasizing American materials, in the tradi- 
tional departments of Anthropology, Architecture, 
Art, Economics, Education, English, Geography, 
Government and Politics, History, Journalism, 
f^usic, Philosphy, Psychology, Speech and Dra- 
matic Arts. 

The proximity of many federal institutions al- 
lows for a firsthand appreciation of politics and 
contemporary life, while the facilities of the Na- 
tional Archives and the Library of Congress give 
the historian access to the materials documenting 
the experiences of past generations. Important 
galleries, including the National Collection of Fine 
Arts and the National Gallery of Art, exhibit the 
high points of creative expression in the visual 
arts. The holdings of the Smithsonian Institution 
possess numerous manifestations of the native 
vernacular traditions in architecture and technol- 
ogy, in the folk arts, and in American Indian cul- 
ture. The District of Columbia and its surrounding 
regions represent an impressive aggregate of 
associations and communities — alternatives to 
traditional politics such as Common Cause, the 
focus upon black cultural identity found in the 
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, the new cities 
of Columbia, Maryland, and Reston, Virginia 
which seek to transcend the crises of urban Amer- 
ica in a creative manner. 

The program, drawing upon the resources of its 
cultural environment, offers the individual an 
education in the most meaningful sense; a per- 
sonal confrontation with academic tradition relat- 
ed to the processes of immediate and contempo- 
rary social change. 

The new graduate candidate encounters a 
community of students who represent a reward- 
ing diversity of backgrounds, most prominently 
from the fields of history, literature and American 
civilization but also from such disciplines as psy- 
chology, political science, art, and sociology. 

The proseminar in American Studies embodies 
much of the philosophy of the graduate program; 
it allows the new major to share the perceptions 
he has gained in his undergraduate training. He is 
introduced to methodology stressing the value of 
art, literature, technology, popular culture, and 
anthropology in the observation of cultural pat- 
terns. All of the reading assignments, although 
they display different terminology and writing 
styles, are evaluated in terms of the authors' en- 
deavors to expand the role of the intellectual in 
the academy and in American society. Lastly, the 
proseminar introduces each participant to alter- 
natives of focus in his future research and read- 
ing. 

The more advanced American Studies seminars 
vary from semester to semester so that both stu- 
dents and faculty may explore new directions for 
illuminating a certain segment of our civilization 
Frequently, the seminars concentrate on a specif- 



ic period of American culture — Antebellum Ameri- 
ca, The Gilded Age, The 1930s, The 1960s— or 
emphasize thematic materials calling for a multi- 
perspective methodology— Myths and Symbols 
of the Communications Revolution, Humor and 
Satire in American Life, or National Identity in the 
United States, An important feature of the gradu- 
ate program is the Smithsonian Institution, where 
the serious student of material artifacts can take 
advantage of the seminars, exhibits and inde- 
pendent reading courses prepared by a highly 
trained staff. 

The masters degree candidate, who will nor- 
mally undertake a full year of course work (30 
semester hours), possesses a number of alterna- 
tives from which to choose a program meeting 
his professional needs and intellectual preoccu- 
pations. In addition to the American Studies semi- 
nars, he selects an area of concentration in one 
of the departments listed above. Once he has met 
the specific requirements (9 hours in American 
Studies, 9 hours in a single department) for the 
degree, he may pursue his interests in the tradi- 
tional disciplines or he may select a sequence of 
courses suggesting new perspectives on the in- 
teraction of the personality and the environment, 
including classes from departments which ad- 
dress themselves to minority group behavior, to 
an evaluation of the mass media's impact on the 
human sensibility, or to a consideration of global 
patterns emerging in Europe, Africa and Asia, 

Before receiving the M.A, degree, the candidate 
takes a comprehensive examination drawing 
upon his ability to integrate the materials of his 
particular program. Research oriented majors 
may wish to write a thesis in place of six hours of 
course credit. 

The requirements for the doctoral degree are 
flexible and enable the candidate to complete his 
course work within a year of intensive study (30 
semester hours beyond the M,A,, including an 
18-credit residency requirement). The student 
also demonstrates his proficiency in a foreign 
language or in an analytical tool such as comput- 
er science, successfully completes a comprehen- 
sive examination, and submits a thesis giving ev- 
idence of original research and interpretation. 

Other than an additional seminar in methodolo- 
gy, the candidate has no specific course require- 
ments unless he has received his master's degree 
from another institution. Under those circumst- 
ances, he enters the appropriate seminars in 
American Studies and prepares for a qualifying 
oral examination during his first year of resi- 
dence. 

If any student wishes to consider a topic which 
is not found in formal classes at the university, he 
is free to construct a reading program with the 
guidance of a faculty member in American Stud- 
ies or in one of the related disciplines. The com- 
prehensive examination is based on three sepa- 
rate segments of study; theories and methods in 
American Studies; an area of concentration (u- 
sually in American history or literature); a special- 
ized field related to the themes and time span to 
be investigated in the dissertation (for example 
Popular Culture, Afro-American Studies, American 
Thought, American Art and Technology, Urban 
Studies, Women's Studies), 

The American Studies thesis is therefore the 
logical extension of the courses and examination 
areas decided upon by the graduate student him- 
self. In the dissertation, he will employ his sense 
of historical continuity and cultural interaction to 
illuminate some segment of American society, 

AMST 426 Culture and the Arts in America. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. A study of American 



42 / Graduate Programs 



Institutions, the Intellectual and esthetic climate 
from the colonial period to the present 

AMST 427 Culture and the Arts in America. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. A study of American 
institutions, the intellectual and esthetic climate 
from the colonial period to the present. 

AMST 436 Readings in American Studies. (3) 

Prerequisite. )unior standing An historical survey 
of American values as presented in various key 
writings. 

AMST 437 Readings in American Studies. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. An historical survey 
of American values as presented in various key 
v^ritings 

AMST 446 Popular Culture in America. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing and permission of 
instructor. A survey of the historical development 
of the popular arts and modes of popular enter- 
tainment in America. 

AMST 447 Popular Culture in America. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing and AMST 446. In- 
tensive research in the sources and themes of 
contemporary American popular culture. 

AMST 498 Special Topics in American Studies. 

(3) Prerequisite: a course in American history, lit- 
erature, or government, or consent of the instruc- 
tor. Topics of special interest. Repeatable to a 
maximum of 6 credits when topics differ. 

AMST 618 Introductiory Seminar in American 
Studies. (3) 

AMST 628 Seminar in American Studies. (3) 

AMST 629 Seminar in American Studies. (3) 

AMST 638 Orientation Seminar-Material Aspects 
of American Civilization Class Meets at the 
Smithsonian. (3) 

AMST 639 Reading Course in Selected Aspects 
of American Civilization Class Meets at the 
Smithsonian. (3) 

AMST 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

AMST 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Animal Sciences 
Program 

Professor and Program Chairman: Davis 
Professors: Animal Science: Green. Leffel, Young; 

Dairy Science; Cairns. Keeney. King. Mattick. 

Vandersall. Williams; Veterinary Science; 

Hammond. Mohanty. 
Associate Professors: Animal Science; Buric, 

DeBarthe; Dairy Science; Douglass. Westhoff; 

Veterinary science; Albert. Dutta. Marquardt. 
Ass/sfan( Professors: Animal Science; McCall; 

Dairy Science; Vijay; Veterinary Science; 

Campbell. Ingling. 

The Graduate Program in the Animal Sciences 
offers work leading to the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Both the the- 
sis and non-thesis option are available for the 
Master s Degree. Areas of concentration within 
the Program include animal nutrition, physiology, 
genetics, management, pathology and virology for 
all of the classes and species of animals listed. 
Opportunities for study related to domestic ani- 
mals, marine and wildlife are available. 

Degrees with research specialties identified 
with meat, milk and other dairy products may be 
undertaken in this program or in the Graduate 



Program in Food Science, in which appropriate 
faculty of these Departments also participate. 

In addition to the admission requirements of 
the Graduate School, applicants are requested to 
submit scores of the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion. 

Requirements for degrees in the Program in- 
clude one course at the graduate level in bio- 
chemistry and one in biometrics. Two credits of 
graduate seminar are required for each degree 
obtained. Entering students should have an aca- 
demic background commensurate with the bacca- 
laureate degree in the Animal Sciences. Those 
not having a course in genetics, nutrition, general 
animal physiology, microbiology and animal pro- 
duction or management should plan to take such 
a course or courses early in their graduate pro- 
gram. 

Individual programs of course work and thesis 
work are planned for each student. Planning is 
done cooperatively by the student and his advi- 
sory committee with approval of the Graduate 
Education Committee of the Program. Ample 
course offerings are available to structure pro- 
grams to meet a wide variety of individual needs. 
Excellent courses in physiology, biochemistry and 
microbiology are available in the appropriate 
departments. Courses in biometrics listed in the 
catalog under AGRI provide a strong background 
in experimental design and statistical analysis. 
The Computer Science Center offers courses in 
programming and computer language, as well as 
facilities for the statistical analysis of theses data. 

Outstanding laboratory facilities are available in 
the Animal Sciences Center which include the 
combined resources of the Departments of Ani- 
mal. Dairy and Veterinary Science. Instrumenta- 
tion IS available to graduate students for gas-lipid 
chromatography, atomic absorption spectropho- 
tometry, automated calorimetry. electron micros- 
copy, liquid scintillation radioactivity measure- 
ments, electrophoresis, ultra centrifugation and a 
variety of microbiological techniques. Controlled 
environment facilities in the Center permit work 
with laboratory animals and detailed experiments 
on larger animals. A gnotobiote laboratory Is 
available and currently being used in ruminant 
nutrition research. Excellent surgical facilities are 
available for research in the areas of reproductive 
and nutritional physiology. 

Herds and flocks of beef cattle, dairy cattle, 
horses, sheep and swine are readily available for 
graduate research. Limited numbers of experi- 
ments can be conducted on the campus with 
large animals. Those requiring large numbers are 
located at one of four outlying farms. 

A cooperative agreement with the Agricultural 
Research Service at nearby Beltsville, Maryland 
makes available laboratory, animal and research 
personnel resources of importance in the gradu- 
ate program. 

A dairy product processing facility is also avail- 
able for dairy product research. 

In addition to excellent library facilities on the 
Campus, the National Agricultural Library, the 
National Library of Medicine and the Library of 
Congress all located within 10 miles constitute 
the best library resource for graduate study avail- 
able anywhere. 

A limited number of Graduate Assistantships 
are available and awarded to students presenting 
strong academic records and a capability and 
motivation to perform well in them. 

The Master of Science Program can normally 
be completed within one and one-half to two 
years. Requirements for the thesis option are as 
described for the Graduate School. The non- 



thesis option requires a minimum of 30 cred- 
its of course work, 18 at the 600 level, and may 
be completed somewhat more rapidly than the 
thesis option. 

Ph.D. Programs are typically completed in a 
period of three to five years. There is no specific 
credit hour requirement for the doctorate. A qual- 
ifying examination for the Ph.D. candidate is 
scheduled when he or she, and the major advisor 
agree, that sufficient course work and planning 
for dissertation research have tieen completed. 
This examination must be completed t>efore ad- 
mission to candidacy for the degree. 

The Masters Degree is not a prerequisite for 
admission to the doctorate program; however, 
most students find it advantageous. 

ANSC 401 Fundamentals of Nutrition. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 104; ANSC 
212 recommended. A study of the fundamental 
role of all nutrients in the body including their 
digestion, absorption and metabolism. Dietary 
requirements and nutritional deficiency syn- 
dromes of laboratory and farm animals and man 
will be considered. 

ANSC 402 Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week. Prere- 
quisites, MATH 110, ANSC 401 or permission of 
instructor. A critical study of those factors which 
influence the nutritional requirements of rumi- 
nants, swine and poultry. Practical feeding meth- 
ods and procedures used in formulation of eco- 
nomically efficient rations will be presented. 

ANSC 403 Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week. Prere- 
quisites. MATH 110. ANSC 402 or permission of 
instructor. A critical study of those factors which 
influence the nutritional requirements of rumi- 
nants, swine and poultry. Practical feeding meth- 
ods and procedures used in formulation of eco- 
nomically efficient rations will be presented. 

ANSC 406 Environmental Physiology. (3) 

Prerequisites. Anatomy and Physiology. The spe- 
cific anatomical and physiological modifications 
employed by animals adapted to certain stressful 
environments will be considered. Particular em- 
phasis will be placed on the problems of tempera- 
ture regulation and water balance. Specific areas 
for consideration will include: animals in cold (in- 
cluding hibernation), animals in dry heat, diving 
animals and animals in high altitudes. 

ANSC 407 Advanced Dairy Production. (1) An 

advanced course primarily designed for teachers 
of vocational agriculture and county agents. It 
includes a study of the newer discoveries in dairy 
cattle nutrition, breeding and management. 

ANSC 411 Biology and Management of Shellfish. 

(4) Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory 
periods each week. Field trips. Identification, biol- 
ogy, management, and culture of commercially- 
important molluscs and Crustacea. Prerequisite, 
one year of Biology or Zoology. This course will 
examine the shellfisheries of the world, but will 
emphasize those of the northwestern Atlantic 
ocean and Chesapeake Bay. 

ANSC 412 Introduction to Diseases of Animals. 

(3) Prerequisite, MICB 200 and ZOOL 101. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period per week. This 
course gives basic instruction in the nature of 
disease: including causation, immunity, methods 
of diagnosis, economic importance, public health 
aspects and prevention and control of the com- 
mon diseases of sheep, cattle, swine, horses and 
poultry. 



Graduate Programs / 43 



ANSC 413 Laboratory Animal Management. (3) A 

comprehensive course in care and management 
of laboratory animals. Emphasis will be placed on 
physiology, anatomy and special uses for the dif- 
ferent species. Disease prevention and regula- 
tions for maintaining animal colonies v^ill be cov- 
ered. Field trips will be required. 
ANSC 414 Biology and Management of Fish. (4) 
Prerequisite, one year of Biology or Zoology. Two 
lectures and two three-hour laboratories a week. 
Fundamentals of individual and population dy- 
namics; theory and practice of sampling fish 
populations: management schemes. 
ANSC 416 Wildlife Management. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory. An introduction to the interre- 
lationships of game birds and mammals with their 
environment, population dynamics and the princi- 
ples of wildlife management. 

ANSC 422 Meats. (3) Two lectures and one labo- 
ratory period per week. Prerequisite, ANSC 221. A 
course designed to give the basic facts about 
meat as a food and the factors influencing ac- 
ceptability, marketing, and quality of fresh meats. 
It includes comparisons of characteristics of live 
animals with their carcasses, grading and evalua- 
ting carcasses as well as wholesale cuts, and the 
distribution and merchandising of the nation's 
meat supply. Laboratory periods are conducted in 
packing houses, meat distribution centers, retail 
outlets and university meats laboratory. 
ANSC 423 Livestock Management. (3) One lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods per week. Prere- 
quisite, ANSC 401. Application of various phases 
of animal science to the management and pro- 
duction of beef cattle, sheep and swine. 

ANSC 424 Livestock Management (3) One lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods per week. Prere- 
quisite, ANSC 423. Applications of various phases 
of animal science to the management and pro- 
duction of beef cattle, sheep and swine. 

ANSC 425 Herpetology. (3) Prerequisites: ANSC 
211 and ANSC 212; or equivalent. Study of taxon- 
omy, physiology, behavior, functional anatomy, 
evolution and distribution of present day amphibi- 
ans and reptiles. Common diseases and manage- 
ment under captive conditions. Identification of 
poisonous species with appropriate precautions. 

ANSC 426 Principles of Breeding. (3) Second 
semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, 
ANSC 201 or equivalent, ANSC 222, ANSC 423 or 
424. Graduate credit (1-3 hours) allowed with 
permission of instructor. The practical aspects of 
animal breeding, heredity, variation, selection, 
development, systems of breeding and pedigree 
study are considered. 

ANSC 432 Horse Farm Management (3) 

Prerequisite, ANSC 332 and AREC 410. One 
90-minute lecture and one four-hour laboratory 
period per week. A course to develop the techni- 
cal and managerial skills necessary for the opera- 
tion of a horse breeding farm. Herd health pro- 
grams, breeding programs and procedures, foal- 
ing activities, foot care, weaning programs, and 
the maintenance of records incidental to each of 
these activities. 

ANSC 442 Dairy Cattle Breeding. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week. Prere- 
quisites, ANSC 242, and ANSC 201. A specialized 
course in breeding dairy cattle. Emphasis is 
placed on methods of evaluation and selection, 
systems of breeding and breeding programs. 
ANSC 444 Analysis of Dairy Production Systems. 
(3) Prerequisites, AGEC 406 and ANSC 203 or 



214, or permission of instructor. The business 
aspects of dairy farming including an evaluation 
of the costs and returns associated with each 
segment. The economic impact of pertinent man- 
agement decisions is studied. Recent develop- 
ments in animal nutrition and genetics, agricultur- 
al economics, agricultural engineering, and agro- 
nomic practices are discussed as they apply to 
management of a dairy herd. 
ANSC 446 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduc- 
tion. (3) Two lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory period per week. Prerequisite, ZOOL 422 or 
ANSC 212. Anatomy and physiology of reproduc- 
tive processes in wild and domesticated mam- 
mals. 

ANSC 452 Avian Physiology. (2) (Alternate even 
years) one three-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisites, a basic course in animal physiolo- 
gy. The basic physiology of the bird is discussed, 
excluding the reproductive system. Special em- 
phasis is given to physiological differences be- 
tween birds and other vertebrates. 
ANSC 462 Physiology of Hatchability. (1) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite, ZOOL 421 or 422. The physiology of 
embryonic development as related to principles of 
hatchability and problems of incubation encoun- 
tered in the hatchery industry are discussed. 
ANSC 463 Nutrition Laboratory. (2) Prerequisite. 
ANSC/NUSC 401 or concurrent registration. Six 
hours of laboratory per week. Digestibility studies 
with ruminant and monogastric animals, proxi- 
mate analysis of various food products, and feed- 
ing trials demonstrating classical nutritional defi- 
ciences in laboratory animals. 
ANSC 464 Poultry Hygiene. (3) Two lectures and 
one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites. 
lyllCB 200 and ANSC 101. Virus, bacterial and pro- 
tozoan diseases, parasitic diseases, prevention, 
control and eradication. 

ANSC 466 Avian Anatomy. (3) Two lectures and 
one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite. 
ZOOL 102. Gross and microscopic structure, 
dissection and demonstration. 
ANSC 467 Poultry Breeding and Feeding. (1) 
This course is designed primarily for teachers of 
vocational agriculture and extension service 
workers. The first half will be devoted to prob- 
lems concerning breeding and the development 
of breeding stock. The second half will be de- 
voted to nutrition. 

ANSC 477 Poultry Products and Marketing. (1) 
This course is designed primarily for teachers of 
vocational agriculture and county agents. It deals 
with the factors affecting the quality of poultry 
products and with hatchery management prob- 
lems, egg and poultry grading,. preservation prob- 
lems and market outlets for Maryland poultry. 
ANSC 480 Special Topics in Fish and Wildlife 
Management (3) Three lectures. Analysis of var- 
ious state and federal programs related to fish 
and wildlife management. This would include: 
fish stocking programs, Maryland deer manage- 
ment program, warm water fish management, 
acid drainage problems, water quality, water fowl 
management, wild turkey management and regu- 
lations relative to administration of these pro- 
grams. 

ANSC 487 Special Topics in Animal Science. (1) 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. This course 
is designed primarily for teachers of vocational 
agriculture and extension service personnel. One 
primary topic to be selected mutually by the in- 



structor and students will be presented each ses- 
sion. 

ANSC 601 Advanced Ruminant Nutrition. (2) First 
semester. One one-hour lecture and one-three 
hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of instructor. Physiological, microbiological 
and biochemical aspects of the nutrition of rumi- 
nants as compared to other animals. 

ANSC 603 Mineral Metabolism. (3) Second se- 
mester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites. 
CHEM 481 and 463. The role of minerals in me- 
tabolism of animals and man. Topics to be cov- 
ered include the role of minerals in energy metab- 
olism, bone structure, electrolyte balance, and as 
catalysts. 

ANSC 604 Vitamin Nutrition. (3) Prerequisites. 
ANSC 401 and CHEM 461. Two one-hour lectures 
and one two-hour discussion period per week. 
Advanced study of the fundamental role of vita- 
mins and vitamin-like cofactors in nutrition includ- 
ing chemical properties, absorption, metabolism, 
excretion and deficiency syndromes. A critical 
study of the biochemical basis of vitamin func- 
tion, interrelationship of vitamins with other 
substances and of certain laboratory techniques. 

ANSC 610 Electron Microscopy. (4) First and 
second semesters. Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods per week. Prerequisites, permission 
of instructor. Theory of electron microscopy, elec- 
tron optics, specimen preparation and tech- 
niques, operation of electron photography, inter- 
pretation of electron images, related instruments 
and techniques. 

ANSC 612 Energy Nutrition. (2) Second semester. 
Prerequisites, ANSC 402 or NUSC 450, CHEM 461, 
or consent of instructor. One lecture, one 2 hour 
laboratory per week. Basic concepts of animal 
energetics with quantitative descriptions of ener- 
gy requirements and utilization. 

ANSC 614 Proteins. (2) Second semester. One 
lecture and one 2 hour laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisites, ANSC 402 and CHEM 461 or consent 
of instructor. Advanced study of the roles of ami- 
no acids in nutrition and metabolism. Protein 
digestion, absorption, anabolism, catabolism and 
amino acid balance. 

ANSC 622 Advanced Breeding. (2) Second se- 
mester, alternate years. Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisites. ANSC 426 or equivalent, and bio- 
logical statistics. This course deals with the more 
technical phases of heredity and variation, selec- 
tion indices, breeding systems, and inheritance in 
farm animals. 
ANSC 641 Experimental Mammalian Surgery L 

(2) First semester. Prerequisite, permission of in- 
structor. A course presenting the fundamentals of 
anesthesia and the art of experimental surgery, 
especially to obtain research preparations. 

ANSC 642 Experimental Mammalian Surgery IL 

(3) Second semester. Prerequisites, ANSC 641, 
permission of instructor. A course emphasizing 
advanced surgical practices to obtain research 
preparations, cardiovascular surgery and chronic 
vascularly isolated organ techniques. Experience 
with pump oxygenator systems, profound hypo- 
thermia, hemodialysis, infusion systems, implanta- 
tion and transplantation procedures are taught. 
ANSC 643 Research Methods. (3) First semester. 
One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. The appli- 
cation of biochemical, physio-chemical and statis- 
tical methods to problems in biological research. 



44 / Graduate Programs 



ANSC 660 Poultry Literature. (1-4) First and sec- 
ond semesters. Readings on individual topics are 
assigned. Written reports required. Mettiods of 
analysis and presentation of scientific material 
are discussed. 

ANSC 661 Physiology of Reproduction. (3) First 
semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week Prerequisite, ANSC 212 or its equivalent. 
The role of the endocrines in reproduction is 
considered. Fertility, sexual maturity, egg forma- 
tion, ovulation, and the physiology of oviposition 
are studied. Comparative processes in birds and 
mammals are discussed. 
ANSC 663 Advanced Nutrition Laboratory. (3) 
Prerequisite, ANSC/NUSC 401 ; and either CHEM 
462 or NUSC 670. One hour of lecture and 
six hours of laboratory per week. Basic instru- 
mentation and techniques desired for advanced 
nutritional research. The effect of various nutri- 
tional parameters upon intermediary metabolism. 
Enzyme kinetics, endocrinology, and nutrient 
absorption in laboratory animals. 

ANSC 665 Physiological Genetics of Domestic 
Animals. (2) Second semester. Two lectures per 
week. Prerequisites, a course in basic genetics 
and biochemistry. The underlying physiological 
basis for genetic differences in production traits 
and selected morphological traits will be dis- 
cussed. Inheritance of enzymes, protein poly- 
morphisms and physiological traits will be stud- 
ied. 

ANSC 677 Advanced Animal Adaptations to the 
Environment. (2) First semester. Two lectures or 
discussions per week. Prerequisites: ANSC 406, 
or permission of instructor. A detailed considera- 
tion of certain anatomical and physiological mod- 
ifications employed by mammals adapted to cold, 
dry heat or altitude. Each student will submit for 
discussion a library paper concerning a specific 
adaptation to an environmental stress. 

ANSC 690 Seminar in Population Genetics of 
Domestic Animals. (3) Second semester. Prere- 
quisites, ZOOL 246 and AGRI 401 or their equiva- 
lents. Current literature and research dealing with 
the principles of population genetics as they ap- 
ply to breeding and selection programs for the 
genetic improvement of domestic animals, popu- 
lation structure, estimation of genetic parameters, 
correlated characters, principles and methods of 
selection, relationship and systems of mating. 

ANSC 698 Seminar (1) First and second semes- 
ters. Students are required to prepare papers 
based upon current scientific publications relat- 
ing to animal science, or upon their research 
work. For presentation before and discussion by 
the class; (1) recent advances; (2) nutrition; (3) 
physiology; (4) biochemistry. 

ANSC 699 Special Problems in Animal Science. 
(1-2) First and second semesters. Work assigned 
in proportion to amount of credit. Prerequisite, 
approval of staff. Problems will be assigned which 
relate specifically to the character of work the 
student Is pursuing. 

ANSC 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

ANSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

Applied Mathematics 
Program 

Professor arid Director: Rheinboldt (IVIATH,CSC) 
Professors: Almon (ECON), Antman (MATH), 



Babuska (IFDAM), Banerjee (PHYS), Brill 
(RHYS), Cadman (CHE), Cunnlff (IvIE), 
Davidson (PHYS), DeClaris (EE, IFDAM), 
Dorfman (PHYS, IFDAM), Douglis (MATH), 
Dragt (PHYS), Faller (IFDAM), Gass (B&M), 
Greenberg (PHYS), Harger (EE), Hubbard 
(IFDAM), Jones (IFDAM), Kanal (CSD), Karlovltz 
(IFDAM), Kelejian (ECON), Kellogg (IFDAM), 
MIkulski (MATH), MInker (CSD), Misner 
(PHYS), Newcomb (EE), Olver (IFDAM), Pearl 
(MATH), Prange (PHYS), Stellmacher (MATH), 
Sternberg (CE), Strauss (MATH), Sucher 
(PHYS), Taylor (EE), Weiss (EE,IFDAM), Wolfe 
(MATH), Woo (PHYS), Yorke (IFDAM), Zwanzig 
(IFDAM). 

Associate Professors: Basili (CSD), Cooper 
(MATH), Donaldson (AERO), Ephremides (EE), 
FIvel (PHYS), Fromovitz (B&M), Garber (CE), 
Gentry (CHE), Hall (CE), Johnson (MATH), 
Jones (AERO), Kim (PHYS), Marks (ME), 
Osborn (MATH), Pfaffenberger (B&M), Plotkin 
(AERO), Rao (EE), Sather (MATH), Schaeffer 
(AERO), Schneider (MATH), Sheaks (CHE), 
Stewart (CSD,IFDAM), Sweet (MATH), 
Vandergraft (CSD), Walston (ME), Widhelm 
(B&M). 

Assistant Professors: Agrawala (CSD), Andry 
(AERO), Baras (EE), Berenstein (MATH), 
Hargrove (B&M), Johnson (ECON,IFDAM), Liu 
(MATH), Loutzenheiser (CE), MacRae (ECON), 
McClellan (CSD), Schmidt (MATH). 



The interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics Pro- 
gram offers the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy. These are awarded for 
graduate study and research in mathematics and 
Its applications in the engineering, physical, and 
social sciences. The Program may be of interest 
to recent graduates or to those already in a pro- 
fession wishing to further their careers. 

The Program is administered and taught by a 
group of faculty members from the following par- 
ticipating units of the University: 

Aerospace Engineering Department 

College of Business and Management 

Chemical Engineering Department 

Civil Engineering Department 

Computer Science Department 

Economics Department 

Electrical Engineering Department 

Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics 

Mathematics Department 

Mechanical Engineering Department 

Physics and Astronomy Department 

The Program is administratively affiliated with 
the Department of Mathematics, and accordingly 
it maintains a particularly close relationship with 
that department. The Graduate Committee for 
Applied Mathematics is responsible for the aca- 
demic content of the Program. 

The course of study is very flexible and may 
vary considerably depending upon the student's 
interests and career aspirations. In general, at 
least half of the required work Is expected to be 
In courses with primarily mathematical content, 
and the remaining part has to Include a coherent 
set of courses in some field of application. 

Some of the application areas currently pur- 
sued by graduate students in the Program Include 
classical physics, fluid dynamics, meteorology, 
modeling and simulation, operations research, 
pattern recognition, structural mechanics, sys- 
tems and control theory. Many other areas of 
study are available through the various partici- 
pating units. 



Each student is assigned an advisory commit- 
tee of several faculty members who, jointly with 
him, devise an appropriate course of study and 
continue to work with the student as he progress- 
es. 

For admission to the Interdisciplinary Applied 
Mathematics Program, a student should have 
completed an undergraduate program which in- 
cluded a strong emphasis on mathematics. Pre- 
vious experience or education in applications of 
mathematics or competence In computational 
approaches will be favorably considered. Finan- 
cial assistance is available through the partici- 
pating units. 



MAPL 460 Computational Methods. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 241 and CMSC 110, or equiv- 
alent. Basic computational methods for interpola- 
tion, least squares, approximation, numerical 
quadrature, numerical solution of polynomial and 
transcendental equations, systems of linear equa- 
tions and initail value problems for ordinary dif- 
ferential equations. Emphasis on the methods 
and their computational properties rather than on 
their analytic aspects. (Listed also as CMSC 460). 

MAPL 470 Numerical Mathematics: Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 240 and 241; CMSC 110 or 
equivalent. This course with MAPL/CMSC 471, 
forms a one-year introduction to numerical analy- 
sis at the advanced undergraduate level. Interpo- 
lation, numerical differentiation and integration, 
solution of nonlinear equations, acceleration of 
convergence, numerical treatment of differential 
equations. Topics will be supplemented with pro- 
gramming assignments. (Listed also CMSC 470). 

MAPL 471 Numerical Mathematics: Linear Alge- 
bra. (3) Prerequisites: MATH 240 and MATH 241 ; 
CMSC 110 or equivalent. The course, with MAPL 
/CMSC 470, forms a one-year introduction to 
numerical analysis at the advanced undergradu- 
ate level. Direct solution of linear systems, norms, 
least squares problems, the symmetric eignevalue 
problem. Basic iterative methods. Topics will be 
supplemented with programming assignments. 
(Listed also as CMSC 471). 

MAPL 477 Optimization. (3) Prerequisite: CMSC 
110 and MATH 405 or MATH 474. Linear program- 
ming including the simplex algorithm and dual 
linear programs. Convex set and elements of 
convex programming, combinatorial optimization 
integer programming. (Listed also as CMSC 477). 

MAPL 498 Selected Topics in Applied Mathemat- 
ics. (1-3) Prerequisite: permission of the instruc- 
tor. Topics In applied mathematics of special in- 
terest to advanced undergraduate students. May 
be repeated to a maximum of six credits If the 
subject matter is different. 

MAPL 600 Advanced Linear Numerical Analysis. 

(3) Prerequisites: MAPL 470, 471 and MATH 405 
or MATH 474; or consent of instructor. Advanced 
topics in numerical linear algebra, such as dense 
eigenvalue problems, sparse elimination, iterative 
methods, and other topics. (Same as CMSC 770). 

MAPL 604 Numerical Solution of Nonlinear 
Equations. (3) Prerequisites: MAPL 470, 471 and 
MATH 410; or consent of instructor. A treatment 
of the numerical solution of nonlinear equations 
in one and several variables. Existence questions. 
Minimization methods. Selected applications. 
(Same as CMSC 772). 

MAPL 607 Advanced Numerical Optimization. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 410 and MAPL 477; or con- 



Graduate Programs / 45 



sent of instructor. Modern numerical methods for 
solving unconstrained and constrained nonlinear 
optimization problems in finite dimensions. De- 
sign of computational algorithms and on the anal- 
ysis of their properties. 

MAPL 610 Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differ- 
ential Equations. (3) Prerequisites: MAPL 470 and 
MATH 414: or consent of instructor. Methods for 
solving initial value problems in ordinary differen- 
tial equations. Single step and multi-step meth- 
ods, stability and convergence, adaptive methods. 
Shooting methods for boundary value problems. 

MAPL 612 Numerical Methods in Partial Differ- 
ential Equations. (3) Prerequisites: Concurrent 
registration in MATH/MAPL 680 or in MAPL 650: 
or consent of the instructor. Introduction to prob- 
lems and methodologies of the solution of partial 
differential equations. Finite difference methods 
for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations, 
first order systems, and eigenvalue problems. Var- 
iational formulation of elliptic problems. The finite 
element method and its relation to finite differ- 
ence methods. 

MAPL 614 Mathematics of Finite Element Meth- 
od. (3) Prerequisites: Concurrent registration in 
MATH/MAPL 681 or in MATH/MAPL 685: or 
MAPL 612 and consent of instructor. Variational 
formulations of linear and nonlinear elliptic 
boundary value problems: formulation of the fi- 
nite element method: construction of finite ele- 
ment subspaces: error estimates: eigenvalue 
problems: time dependent problems. 

MAPL 650 Advanced Mathematics for the Physi- 
cal Sciences I. (3) Prerequisites: MATH 240 and 
410. Effective analytic methods for the study of 
linear and nonlinear equations that arise in the 
physical sciences: algebraic equations, integral 
equations and ordinary differential equations. 
(Not open to graduate students in MATH or MAPL 
without special permission from their advisor). 

MAPL 651 Advanced Mathematics for the Physi- 
cal Sciences II. (3) Prerequisite: MAPL 650. Con- 
tinuation of MAPL 650. Partial differential equa- 
tions: linear and nonlinear eigenvalue problems. 
(Not open to graduate students in MATH or MAPL 
without special permission from their advisors). 

MAPL 655 Advanced Classical Analysis I. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 413. A basic course in those 
parts of analysis essential for applied mathematics. 
Asymptotic analysis and special functions of math- 
ematical physics. (Same as MATH 655). 

MAPL 656 Advanced Classical Analysis II. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 413. A basic course in those 
parts of analysis essential for applied mathemat- 
ics. Fourier series and integrals and integral 
transforms. (Same as MATH 656). 

MAPL 670 Ordinary Differential Equations I. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 405 and 410 or the equiva- 
lent. Existence and uniqueness, linear systems 
usually with floquet theory for periodic systems, 
linearization and stability, planar systems usually 
with poincare-Bendixson theorem. (Same as 
MATH 670). 

MAPL 671 Ordinary Differential Equations II. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 630 and MAPL 670 or equiv- 
alent. The content of this course varies with the 
interests of the instructor and the class. Stability 
theory, control, time delay systems, hamiltonian 
systems, bifurcation theory, and boundary value 
problems. (Same as MATH 671). 

MAPL 673 Classical Methods in Partial Dffferen- 
tial Equations I. (3) Prerequisite: I^ATH 410 or 
equivalent Cauchy problem for the wave equa- 

46 / Graduate Programs 



tion and heat equation. Dirichlet and Neumann 
problem for Laplace's equation. Classification of 
equations. Cauchy-Kowaleski Theorem. General 
second order linear and nonlinear elliptic and 
parabolic equations. (Same as MATH 673). 

MAPL 674 Classical Methods in Partial Differen- 
tial Equations II. (3) Prerequisite: MAPL 673 
General theory of first order partial differential 
equations, characteristics, complete integrals. 
Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Hyperbolic systems in 
two independent variables, existence and unique- 
ness, shock waves, applications to compressible 
flow. (Same as MATH 674). 

MAPL 680 Eigenvalue and Boundary Value Prob- 
lems I. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 405 and 410 or 

equivalent. Operational methods applied to ordi- 
nary differential equations. Introduction to linear 
spaces, compact operators in Hilbert space, study 
of eigenvalues. (Same as MATH 680). 

MAPL 681 Eignevalue and Boundary Value Prob- 
lems II. (3) Prerequisite: MAPL 680. Boundary 
value problems for linear partial differential equa- 
tions. Method of energy integrals applied to 
Laplace's equation, heat equation and the wave 
equation. Study of Eigenvalues. (Same as MATH 
681). 

MAPL 685 Modern Methods in Partial Differential 
Equations I. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 630-631. 
Spaces of distributions, Fourier transforms, con- 
cept of weak and strong solutions. Existence, 
uniqueness and regularity theory for elliptic and 
parabolic problems using methods of functional 
analysis. (Same as MATH 685). 

MAPL 686 Modern Methods in Partial Differential 
Equations II. (3) Prerequisite: MAPL 685. Empha- 
sis on nonlinear problems. Sobolev embedding 
theorems, methods of monotonicity, compact- 
ness, applications to elliptic, parabolic and hyper- 
bolic problems. (Same as MATH 686). 

MAPL 698 Advanced Topics in Applied Mathe- 
matics. (1-3) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
Repeatable if topic differs. 

MAPL 699 Applied Mathematics Seminar. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar to 
acquaint students with a variety of applications of 
mathematics and to develop skills in presentation 
techniques. Repeatable if topic differs. 

MAPL 701 Introduction to Continuum Mechanics. 

(3) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Solid and 
fluid continua, general analysis of stress and 
strain, equilibrium of elastic bodies, equations of 
motion for fluid bodies, stress-strain relations, 
equations of perfect fluids and formulation of vis- 
cous flow problems. 

MAPL 710 Linear Elasticity. (3) Prerequisite 
MAPL 701. Linear elastic behavior of solid contin- 
uous media. Topics covered include torsion and 
flexure of beams, plane strain and plane stress, 
vibration and buckling problems, variational prin- 
ciples. Emphasis on formulation and technique 
rather than on specific examples. 

MAPL 711 Non-Linear Elasticity. (3) Prerequisite 
MAPL 701, or consent of instructor. Fundamen- 
tals of non-linear elasticity. Finite deformations, 
rubber elasticity, small deformations superim- 
posed on finite deformations. 

MAPL 720 Fluid Dynamics. (3) Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. A mathematical formulation 
and treatment of problems arising in the theory of 
incompressible, compressible and viscous fluids. 

MAPL 721 FluM Dynamics I. (3) Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. A continuation of MAPL 
720. 



MAPL 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 
MAPL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Art Program 



Professor and Chairman: Levitine 

Professors: Bunts, deLeiris. Denny, Lynch, Maril 

Rearick 
Associate Professors: Campbell, DiFederico, 

Forbes, Klank, Lapinski, Niese, Pemberton 
Assistant Professors: Farquhar, Gelman, Green, 

Johns, Reid, Spiro, Withers 

The Department of Art offers programs of grad- 
uate study leading to the degrees of Master of 
Arts in art history. Master of Fine Arts in studio 
art and Doctor of Philosophy in art history. Both 
disciplines, rooted in the concept of art as a 
humanistic experience, share an essential com- 
mon aim: the development of the students aes- 
thetic sensitivity, understanding and knowledge. 
The major in art history is committed to the ad- 
vanced study and scholarly interpretation of exist- 
ing works of art, from the prehistoric era to the 
present, while the studio major stresses the stu- 
dents direct participation in the creation of works 
of art. 

For admission to graduate study in studio art, 
an undergraduate degree with an art major from 
an accredited college or university, or its equiva- 
lent, is required. The candidate should have ap- 
proximately 30 credit hours of undergraduate 
work in studio courses, and 12 credit hours in art 
history courses. Other humanities area courses 
should be part of the candidate's undergraduate 
preparation. In addition, special departmental 
requirements must be met. A candidate for the 
Master of Fine Arts degree will be required to 
pass an oral comprehensive examination, present 
an exhibition of his thesis work, write an abstract 
based on the thesis, and present an oral defense 
of the thesis. 

For admission to graduate study in art history, 
in addition to the approved undergraduate de- 
gree, or its equivalent, special departmental re- 
quirements must be met. Departmental require- 
ments for the Master of Arts degree in Art History 
include ARTH 692: reading knowledge of French 
or German (evidenced by an examination admin- 
istered by the Art Department); a written compre- 
hensive examination which tests the candidate's 
knowledge and comprehension of principal areas 
and phases of art history; a thesis which demon- 
strates competency in research and in original 
investigation by the candidate; and a final oral 
examination on the thesis and the field which it 
represents. 

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in Art History include ARTH 892: ARTH 
692/reading knowledge of French and German; 
an oral examination and a written examination: a 
dissertation whicTi demonstrates the candidates 
capacity to perform independent research in the 
field of art history; and a final oral examination 
on the dissertation and the field it represents. 

For information on work leading to the degree 
of Master of Education in art education, the stu- 
dent is referred to the section devoted to Second- 
ary Education in this catalog. 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are 
available in art. Specific information on the above 
programs should tie requested from the depart- 
ment 



Art Education 

ARTE 600 Advanced Problems in Art Education. 

(3) 

ARTE 601 Advanced Problems in Art Education. 

(3) 

ARTE 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 



''rt History 

ARTH 402 Classical Art. (3) Architecture, sculp- 
re and painting in the classical cultures. First 
^master will stress Greece. 

.RTH 403 Classical Art. (3) Architecture, sculp- 
ture and painting in the classical cultures. Sec- 
jnd semester will stress Rome. 

ARTH 404 Bronze Age Art. (3) Art of the Near 
East, Egypt and Aegean. 

ARTH 406 Art of the East. (3) Architecture, sculp- 
ture and painting. First semester will stress India. 

ARTH 407 Art of the East. (3) Architecture, sculp- 
ture and painting Second semester will stress 
3hina and Japan. 

lARTH 410 Early Christian - Early Byzantine Art. 

(3) Sculpture, painting, architecture, and the mi- 
'nor arts from about 312 to 726 A.D. 

' ARTH 411 Byzantine Art: 726 - 1453. (3) 

! Sculpture, painting, architecture and the minor 
, arts from 726 to 1453 A.D. 

I ARTH 412 Medieval Art. (3) Architecture, sculp- 
ture and painting in the Middle Ages. First semes- 
ter will stress Romanesque. 

Iji ARTH 413 Medieval Art. (3) Architecture, Sculp- 
f^ ture and painting in the Middle Ages. Second 

I semester will stress the Gothic period. 
ARTH 416 Northern European Painting in the 
15th Century. (3) Painting in the Netherlands, 
France and Germany. 

ARTH 417 Northern European painting in the 16th 
^ Century. (3) Painting in the Netherlands, France 
jL and Germany 

I ARTH 422 Early Renaissance Art in Italy. (3) 
Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 
1400 to 1430. 
ARTH 423 Early Renaissance Art in Italy. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 
' 1430 to 1475. 

4 ARTH 424 High Renaissance Art in Italy. (3) 

♦j, Architecture, sculpture and painting from atDout 
t: 1475 to 1500. 

I ARTH 425 High Renaissance Art in Italy. (3) Archi- 
tecture, sculpture and painting from about 1500 to 
1525. 

ARTH 430 European Baroque Art. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting of the major 
; southern European centers in the 17th century. 

ARTH 431 European Baroque Art. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting of the major 
northern European centers in the 17th century. 

ARTH 434 French Painting. (3) French painting 
from 1400 to 1600. From Fouquet to Poussin. 

ARTH 435 French Painting. (3) French painting 
from 1600 to 1800. From LeBrun to David. 

ARTH 440 19th Century European Art. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in Europe 
from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism. 



ARTH 441 19th Century European Art. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in Europe 
From realism, to impressionism and symbolism. 

ARTH 445 Impressionism and Neo-lmpression- 
ism. (3) Prerequisite, ARTH 260, 261 or consent of 
instructor. History of impressionism and Neo-lm- 
pressionism : artists, styles, art theories, criticism, 
sources and influence on 20th century. 

ARTH 450 20th Century Art. (3) Painting, sculp- 
ture and architecture from the late 19th century 
to 1920. 

ARTH 451 20th Century Art. (3) Painting, sculp- 
ture and architecture from 1920 to the present. 

ARTH 452 History of Photography. (3) History of 
photography as art from 1839 to the present. 

ARTH 454 Nineteenth and Twentieth Century 
Sculpture. (3) Trends in sculpture from 
Neo-Classicism to the present. Emphasis will be 
put on the redefinition of sculpture during the 
20th century. 

ARTH 460 History of the Graphic Arts. (3) 

Prerequisite, ARTH 100, or ARTH 260 and 261, or 
consent of instructor. Graphic techniques and 
styles in Europe from 1400 to 1800; contributions 
of major artists. 

ARTH 462 African Art. (3) First semester. The cul- 
tures west of the Niger River (Nigeria through 
Mali) from 400 B.C. to the present. The art is 
studied through its iconography and function in 
the culture and the intercultural influences upon 
the artists, including a study of the societies, 
cults and ceremonies during which the art was 
used. 

ARTH 463 African Art. (3) Second semester. The 
cultures east and south of Nigeria. The art is 
studied through its iconography and function in 
the culture and the intercultural influences upon 
the artists, including a study of the societies, 
cults and ceremonies during which the art was 
used. 

ARTH 464 African Art Research. (3) Seminar with 
concentration on particular aspects of African art. 
The course is given at the Museum of African Art 
in Washington, D. C. 

ARTH 470 Latin American Art. (3) Art of the 

Pre-Hispanic and the Colonial periods. 

ARTH 471 Latin American Art. (3) Art of the 19th 
and 20th centuries. 

ARTH 476 History of American Art. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the United 
States from the Colonial period to about 1875. 

ARTH 477 History of American Art. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the United 
States from about 1875 to the present. 

ARTH 489 Special Topics in Art History. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of department head or in- 
structor. May be repeated to a maximum of six 
credits. 

ARTH 498 Directed Studies in Art History I. (2-3) 

For advanced students, by permission of depart- 
ment chairman. Course may tse repeated for cred- 
it if content differs. 

ARTH 499 Directed Studies in Art History II. (2-3) 

ARTH 612 Romanesque Art. (3) Painting and 
sculpture in western Europe In the 11th and 12th 
centuries; regional styles; relationships between 
styles of painting and sculpture; religious con- 
tent. 



ARTH 614 Gothic Art. (3) Painting and sculpture 
in western Europe in the 11th and 12th centuries; 
regional styles; relationships between styles of 
painting and sculpture; religious content. 

ARTH 630 The Art of Mannerism. (3) Prerequisite, 
ART 423 or permission of instructor. Mannerism 
in Europe during the 16th century; beginning in 
Italy; ramifications in France, Germany, Flanders, 
Spain; painting, architecture, and sculpture. 

ARTH 634 French Painting from Lebrun to Geri- 
cault — 1715-1815. (3) Development of iconogra- 
phy and style from the Baroque to Neo-Classicism 
and Romanticism. Trends and major artists. 

ARTH 656 19th Century Realism, 1830-1860. (3) 

Prerequisite. ART 440 or 441 or equivalent. Cou- 
rbet and the problem of realism; precursors, Dav- 
id, Gericault, landscape schools; Manet; artistic 
and social theories; realism outside France. 

ARTH 662 20th Century European Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 450, 451 or equivalent. A de- 
tailed examination of the art of an individual 
country in the 12th century: France, Germany, Ita- 
ly, Spain, and England. 

ARTH 676 20th Century American Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 450, 451 or equivalent. The 
'Eight,' the armory show, American abstraction, 
romantic-realism, new deal art projects, American 
surrealism and expressionism. 

ARTH 692 Methods of Art History. (3) Methods of 
research and criticism applied to typical 
art-historical problems; bibliography and other 
research tools. May be taken for credit one or two 
semesters. 

ARTH 694 Museum Training Program. (3) 
ARTH 695 Museum Training Program. (3) 

ARTH 698 Directed Graduate Studies in Art His- 
tory. (3) For advanced graduate students, by per- 
mission of head of department. Course may be 
repeated for credit if content differs. 

ARTH 699 Special Topics in Art History. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of department head or in- 
structor. 

ARTH 702 Seminar in Classical Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ARTH 402, 403 or permission of in- 
structor. 

ARTH 712 Seminar in Medieval Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ARTH 412, 413 or permission of in- 
structor. 

ARTH 728 Seminar Topics in Italian Renaissance 
Art. (3) Problems selected from significant themes 
In the field of Italian Renaissance art and archi- 
tecture, 1200-1600. May be repeated for credit if 
content differs. 

ARTH 736 Seminar in 18th Century European 
Art. (3) 

ARTH 740 Seminar in Romanticism. (3) Problems 
derived from the development of romantic art 
during the 18th and 19th centuries. 

ARTH 743 Seminar in 19th Century European 
Art. (3) Problems derived from the period starting 
with David and ending with Cezanne. 

ARTH 760 Seminar in Contemporary Art (3) 

ARTH 770 Seminar in Latin-American Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ARTH 471 or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

ARTH 772 Seminar in Modern Mexican Art. (3) 
Prerequisite, ARTH 471 or permission of instruc- 
tor. Problems of Mexican art of the 19th and 20th 



Graduate Programs / 47 



centuries: Mexicanismo; the Mural Renaissance'; 
architectural regionalism. 

ARTH 774 Seminar in 19th Century American Art. 

(3) Problems in architecture and painting from 
the end of the Colonial period until 1860. 

ARTH 780 Seminar - Problems in Architectural 
History and Criticism. (3) 

ARTH 784 Seminar in Literary Sources of Art 
History. (3) Art historical sources from Pliny to 
Malraux. 

ARTH 798 Directed Graduate Studies in Art His- 
tory. (3) 

ARTH 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

ARTH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

Art Studio 

ARTS 404 Experiments in Visual Processes. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisites, either ARTS 
220, 330 or 340. Investigation and execution of 
process oriented art. Group and individual experi- 
mental projects. 

ARTS 410 Drawing IV. (3) Six hours per viieek 
Prerequisite, ARTS 310. Advanced drawing, with 
emphasis on human figure, its structure and or- 
ganic likeness to forms in nature. Compositional 
problems deriving from this relationship are also 
stressed. 

ARTS 420 Painting IV. (3) Six hours per week. 
Prerequisite, ARTS 324. Creative painting. Empha- 
sis on personal direction and self-criticism. Group 
seminars. 

ARTS 430 Sculpture IV. (3) Six hours per week. 
Prerequisite, ARTS 335. Problems and techniques 
of newer concepts, utilizing various materials, 
such as plastics and metals. Technical aspects of 
welding stressed. 

ARTS 440 Printmal(ing III. (3) Six hours per week. 
Prerequisite, ARTS 340 and 344. Contemporary 
experimental techniques of one print medium 
with group discussions. 

ARTS 441 Printmaking IV. (3) Six hours per week 
Prerequisite, ARTS 440. Continuation of ARTS 
440. 

ARTS 489 Special Problems in Studio Arts. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Repeatable to 
a maximum of six hours. 

ARTS 498 Directed Studies in Studio Art. (2-3) 

For advanced students, by permission of depart- 
ment chairman. Course may be repeated for cred- 
it if content differs. 

ARTS 610 Drawing. (3) Sustained treatment of a 
theme chosen by student. Wide variety of media. 

ARTS 614 Drawing. (3) Traditional materials and 
methods including oriental, sumi ink drawing and 
techniques of classical European masters. 

ARTS 616 Drawing. (3) Detailed anatomical study 
of the human figure and preparation of large 
scale mural compositions. 

ARTS 620 Painting. (3) 

ARTS 624 Painting. (3) 

ARTS 626 Painting. (3) 

ARTS 627 Painting. (3) 

ARTS 630 Experimentation in Sculpture. (3) 

ARTS 634 Experimentation in Sculpture. (3) 

ARTS 636 Materials and Techniques in Sculp- 
ture. (3) For advanced students, methods of ar- 



mature building, and the use of a variety of stone, 
wood, metal, and plastic materials. 

ARTS 637 Sculpture-Casting and Foundry. (3) 

The traditional methods of plaster casting and the 
complicated types involving metal, cire Perdue, 
sand-casting and newer methods, such as cold 
metal process. 

ARTS 640 Printmaking. (3) Advanced problems 
Relief process. 

ARTS 644 Printmaking. (3) Advanced problems. 
Intaglio Process. 

ARTS 646 Printmaking. (3) Advanced problems. 

Lithographic process. 

ARTS 647 Seminar in Printmaking. (3) 

ARTS 689 Special Problems in Studio Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Repeatable to 
a maximum of six hours. 

ARTS 690 Drawing and Painting. (3) Preparation 
and execution of a wall decoration. 

ARTS 698 Directed Graduate Studies in Studio 
Art. (3) For advanced graduate students by per- 
mission of head of department. Course may be 
repeated for credit if content differs. 

ARTS 798 Directed Graduate Studies in Studio 
Art. (3) 

ARTS 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 



Astronomy Program 

Professor and Director: Kerr 
Professors: Brandt (part-time), Erickson, Kundu, 
Opik (part-time). Smith, Wentzel Westerhout 
Associate Professors: AHearn, Bell, Clark 

(part-time), Harrington, N^atthews, Rose, Zipoy, 
Zuckerman 
Assistant Professors: Trimble (part-time) 

The Astronomy Program, administratively part 
of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, 
offers programs of study leading to the degrees 
of I^.S, and Ph.D. in Astronomy. The M.S. pro- 
gram includes both thesis and non-thesis options. 
Areas of specialization include: galactic structure, 
interstellar medium, extragalactic astronomy, stel- 
lar atmospheres, stellar evolution, solar physics, 
solar system, astronomical instrumentation. 

Students are expected to demonstrate compe- 
tence in the following subjects prior to admission 
to graduate work: general physics, heat, interme- 
diate mechanics, optics, electricity and magnet- 
ism, modern physics, differential and integral cal- 
culus, and advanced calculus. A student may tie 
admitted without one of these courses, but he 
should plan to make up the deficiency as soon as 
possible, either by including such a course as a 
part of his graduate program or by independent 
study. 

No formal undergraduate course work in as- 
tronomy is required. However, an entering stu- 
dent should have a working knowledge of the 
basic facts of astronomy such as is obtainable 
from one of the many elementary textbooks. A 
more advanced knowledge of astronomy will of 
course enable a student to progress more rapidly 
during the first year of graduate work. 

Normally, a satisfactory score on the GRE Ad- 
vanced Test in Physics is required before an appli- 
cant's admission to the Graduate School will be 
considered. In special cases, the Graduate En- 
trance Committee may waive this requirement, 
and set other conditions as a requirement for 



admission, to be fulfilled either before admission 

or during the first year at Maryland. '^ 

A full schedule of courses in all fields of astron- 
omy is offered including galactic astronomy, as- 
trophysics, solar system structure, observational 
astronomy, celestial mechanics, solar physics, 
study of the interstellar medium and extragalactic 
astronomy. The faculty has expertise in every 
major branch of astronomy. The research pro- a 

gram is centered around two major areas of inter- '/ 

est. The first one is the study of our galaxy: its I. 

large-scale spiral structure, detailed structure and 
theory of interstellar gas clouds, the theory of the 
interaction between cosmic rays and the gas, and 
the distribution of different types of stars. The 
second is the study of stellar atmospheres and 
interiors, including also the solar atmosphere, 
stellar evolution, and planetary nebulae. Research 
IS also done on the physics of the solar system. 

Qualification for the Ph.D. program (which is 
decided in the middle or at the end of the second 
year) requires a written examination on basic as- 
tronomy at the end of the 'first year and an exten- 
sive research project during the second year. 
Overall performance in the exam, course work 
and research determines admission to the Ph,D. 
program. 

All candidates must take the courses ASTR 400, 
401 and 410, 411 (this requirement may be waived 
if the student has previous experience). All 
full-time students are expected to attend an aver- 
age of two colloquia and/or seminars each week 
by registering for ASTR 698. Candidates for the 
Ph.D. should expect to take at least four 3-credit ■" 

Astronomy courses at the 600 and 700 level, ex- 
clusive of seminars and research projects. Nor- 
mally all Ph.D. candidates take at least 12 credits 
of advanced physics courses. Especially recom- 
mended are PHYS 601, 604, and 622. Note:Course 
requirements are currently under review and may 
be revised for the 1976-77 academic year. 

Many other courses of direct interest to astron- 
omy students are available in Physics, Mathemat- 
ics, Meteorology, Electrical Engineering, and 
Chemistry. The student is urged to obtain as wide 
a background as possible outside his field of 
specialization. 

For more information, especially for physics 
courses related to astronomy, see the section on 
F'hysics. A brochure entitled 'Graduate Study in 
Astronomy, " describing the requirements, the 
courses and the research program in detail is 
available from the department. All correspond- 
ence, including that concerning admission to the 
Astronomy Program, should be addressed to: As- 
tronomy Program, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland 20742. 

ASTR 400 Introduction to Astrophysics I. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Pre- or corequisite, 
PHYS 422 or consent of instructor. Spectroscopy, 
structure of the atmospheres of the sun and other 
stars. Observational data and curves of growth. 
Chemical composition. 

ASTR 401 Introduction to Astrophysics II. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ASTR 400. 
A brief survey of stellar structure and evolution, 
and of the physics of low-density gasses, such as 
the interstellar medium and the solar atmosphere. 
Emphasis is placed on a good understanding of a 
few theoretical concepts that have wide astro- 
physical applications. 

ASTR 410 Observational Astronomy. (3) 

Prerequisites, working knowledge of calculus, 
physics through PHYS 284, or 263, and 3 credits 
of astronomy. An introduction to current methods 
of obtaining astronomical information including 



48 / Graduate Programs 



radio, infrared, optical, ultra-violet, and x-ray as- 
tronomy. The laboratory work will involve photo- 
graphic and photoelectric observations with the 
department's optical telescope and 21-cm line 
spectroscopy, flux measurements and interfero- 
metry with the department's radiotelescopes. 

ASTR 411 Observational Astronomy. (3) 

Prerequisites. ASTR 410, working knowledge of 
calculus, physics through PHYS 284, or 263, and 
3 credits of astronomy. An introduction to current 
methods of obtaining astronomical information 
including radio, infrared, optical, ultra-violet, and 
x-ray astronomy. The laboratory work will involve 
photographic and photoelectric observations with 
the department's optical telescope and 21-cm line 
spectroscopy, flux measurements and interfero- 
metry with the department's radiotelescopes. 
Observatory work on individual projects every 
semester. 

ASTR 420 Introduction to Galactic Researcli. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, MATH 141 
and at least 12 credits of introductory physics and 
astronomy courses. Stellar motions, methods of 
galactic research, study of our own and nearby 
galaxies, clusters of stars. 

ASTR 430 The Solar System (3) Prerequisite, 
MATH 246 and either PHYS 263 or PHYS 294, or 
consent of instructor. The structure of planetary 
atmospheres, radiative transfer in planetary at- 
mospheres, remote sensing of planetary surfaces, 
interior structure of planets. Structure of comets. 
Brief discussions of asteroids, satellite systems, 
and solar system evolution. 

ASTR 440 Introduction to ExtraGalaciic Astron- 
omy. (3) Prerequisite, MATH 141 and at least 14 
credits of introductory physics and astronomy 
including a background in astronomy at the ASTR 
181-182 level, or consent of instructor. Properties 
of normal and peculiar galaxies, including radio 
galaxies and quasars; expansion of the universe 
and cosmology. 

ASTR 450 Celestial Mechanics. (3) Three lectures 
a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 410 or consent of in- 
structor. Celestial mechanics, orbit theory, equa- 
tions of motion. 

ASTR 498 Special Problems in Astronomy. (1-6) 

Prerequisite, major in physics or astronomy 
and/or consent of advisor. Research or special 
study. Credit according to work done. 

ASTR 600 Stellar Atmospheres. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, ASTR 400, 401, 
PHYS 422 or consent of the instructor. Observa- 
tional methods, line formation, curve of growth, 
equation of transfer, stars with large envelopes, 
variable stars, novae, magnetic fields in stars. 

ASTR 605 Stellar Interiors (3) Three lectures per 
week. Prerequisites, MATH 414 and PHYS 422 or 
consent of instructor. A study of stellar structure 
and evolution. This course will consider the ques- 
tion of energy transfer and generation in the inte- 
rior of a star, the structure of stars, including 
problems of turbulence, determination of chemi- 
cal composition, non-homogeneous stars, evolu- 
tion of both young and old stars, pulsating stars, 
novae. 

ASTR 620 Galactic Research. (3) Prerequisites, 
Astronomy 420, 410, 411, or consent of the in- 
structor. Current methods of research into galac- 
tic structure, kinematics, and dynamics, Basic 
dynamical theory. Optical and radio observational 
methods and current results. Review of present- 
ly-determined distribution and kinematics of the 
major constituents of the galaxy. Evolution of the 
galaxy. 



ASTR 625 Dynamics of Stellar Systems. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 601 or 
ASTR 420. Study of the structure and evolution of 
dynamical systems encountered in astronomy. 
Stellar encounters viewed as a two-body problem, 
statistical treatment of encounters, study of dy- 
namical problems in connection with star clus- 
ters, ellipsoidal galaxies, nuclei of galaxies, 
high-velocity stars. 

ASTR 630 Physics of the Solar System. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite. PHYS 422. A sur- 
vey of the problems of interplanetary space, the 
solar wind, comets and meteors, planetary struc- 
ture and atmospheres, motions of particles in the 
earth's magnetic field. 

ASTR 660 Physics of the Solar Envelope. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, PHYS 422, 
ASTR 400 or consent of instructor. A detailed 
study of the solar atmosphere. Physics of solar 
phenomena, such as solar flares, structure of the 
corona, etc. 

ASTR 670 Interstellar Matter. (3) Three lectures 
per week. Prerequisites, previous or concurrent 
enrollment in PHYS 622, ASTR 400 or 420, or 
consent of instructor. A study of the physical 
properties of interstellar gas and dust. This 
course will include diffuse nebulae, regions of 
ionized hydrogen, regions of neutral hydrogen, 
the problems of interstellar dust and perhaps 
planetary nebulae, molecules. 

ASTR 688 Special Topics in Modern Astronomy. 
(1-16) Credit according to work done each semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. These 
courses will be given by specialists in various 
fields of modern astronomy, partly staff members, 
partly visiting professors or part-time lecturers. 
They will cover subjects such as: cosmology, dis- 
crete radio sources, magnetohydrodynamics in 
astronomy, the H.R. diagram, stellar evolution, 
external galaxies, galactic structure, chemistry of 
the interstellar medium, advanced celestial me- 
chanics, astrometry, radio physics of the sun, etc 

ASTR 698 Seminar. (1) Seminars on various topics 
in advanced astronomy are held each semester, 
with the contents varied each year. One credit for 
each semester. There are weekly colloquia by 
staff, astronomers from the Washington area, and 
visiting astronomers, usually on topics related to 
their own work. 

ASTR 699 Special Problems in Advanced Astron- 
omy. (1-6) 

ASTR 788 Special Topics in Modern Astronomy. 
(1-16) 

ASTR 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

ASTR 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Botany Program 

Professor and Chairman: Sisler 

Professors: Corbett, Galloway, Kantzes, Klarman, 

Krusberg, Morgan, Patterson, Stern 
Researcli Professor: Sorokin 
Associate Professors: Barnett, Bean, Curtis, 

Karlander, Lockard,^ Motta, Rappleye, Reveal 
,4ss/s(an( Professors: Blevins, Bottino, Broome, 

Stevenson, Van Valkenburg 

'joint appointment with Secondary Education 

The Department of Botany offers graduate pro- 
grams leading to the degrees of Master of Sci- 
ence and Doctor of Philosophy. Courses and re- 
search problems are developed on a personal 
basis arranged according to the intellectual and 



professional needs of the student. Course pro- 
grams are flexible and are designed under close 
supervision by the student's advisor. The objec- 
tive of the program is to equip the student with a 
background and techniques for a career in plant 
science in academic, governmental, industrial or 
private laboratories. 

The areas of specialization are Anatomy and 
Morphology, Plant Biochemistry, Plant Biophys- 
ics, Plant Ecology, Physiology of Fungi, Genetics 
and Molecular Biology, Marine Biology, Mycolo- 
gy, Plant Nematology, Plant Pathology, Phycolo- 
gy, Plant Physiology, Taxonomy, and Plant Virolo- 
gy 

There are no special admission requirements. 
However, a high degree of intellectual excellence 
is of greater consequence than completion of a 
particular curriculum at the undergraduate level. 

The degree requirements are flexible. However, 
they involve demonstration of competence in the 
broad field of botany, as well as completion of 
courses in other disciplines which are supportive 
of modern competence in this field. 

The department has laboratories equipped to 
investigate most phases of botanical and molecu- 
lar biological research. Field and greenhouse fa- 
cilities are available for research requiring plant 
culture. Special laboratory rooms have been de- 
veloped for research employing radioactive iso- 
topes. Major pieces of equipment include a trans- 
mission electron microscope, ultracentrifuges. 
X-ray equipment, low-speed centrifuges, micro- 
tomes for cutting ultrathin sections, infra-red 
spectrophotometer, recording spectrophotomet- 
ers, environmental controlled growth chambers. 
Herbarium, departmental reference room, enzyme 
preparation rooms, dark rooms, cold rooms, spe- 
cial culture apparatus for algae, fungi, and higher 
plants, spectrophotometers, and respirometers 
are among the many special pieces of equipment 
and facilities that are available for research. 

BOTN 401 History and Philosophy of Botany. (1) 

Prerequisites, 20 semester credit hours in biologi- 
cal sciences including BOTN 100 or equivalent. 
Discussion of the development of ideas and 
knowledge about plants, leading to a survey of 
contemporary work in botanical science. 

BOTN 402 Plant Microtechnique. (3) 

BOTN 403 Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. (2) 

Prerequisite. BOTN 100 or 101 and CHEM 104. 
Two lectures per week. A study of plants impor- 
tant to man that have medicinal or. poisonous 
properties. Emphasis on plant source, plant de- 
scription, the active agent and its beneficial or 
detrimental physiological action and effects. 

BOTN 405 Systematic Botany. (3) Two two-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, BOTN 
212 or equivalent. An advanced study of the prin- 
ciples of systematic botany. Laboratory practice 
with difficult plant families including grasses, 
sedges, legumes, and composites. Field trips ar- 
ranged. 

BOTN 407 Teaching Methods in Botany. (2) Four 
two-hour laboratory demonstration periods per 
week, for eight weeks. Prerequisite, BOTN 100 or 
equivalent. A study of the biological principles of 
common plants, and demonstrations, projects, 
and visual aids suitable for teaching in primary 
and secondary schools. 

BOTN 411 Plant Anatomy. (3) Summer or Univer- 
sity College. Lectures and labs to be arranged. 
The origin and development of the organs and 
the tissue systems in the vascular plants. 
BOTN 413 Plant Geography. (2) Prerequisite, 
BOTN 100 or equivalent. A study of plant distribu- 

Graduate Programs / 49 



tion throughout the world and the factors gener- 
ally associated with such distribution. 

BOTN 414 Plant Genetics. (3) Prerequisite, BOTN 
100 or equivalent. The basic principles of plant 
genetics are presented; the mechanics of trans- 
mission of the hereditary factors in relation to the 
life cycle of seed plants, the genetics of specialized 
organs and tissues, spontaneous and induced 
mutations of basic and economic significance 
gene action, genetic maps. The fundamentals of 
polyploidy, and genetics in relation to methods of 
plant breeding are the topics considered, 

BOTN 415 Plants and Mankind. (2) Prerequisite. 
BOTN 100 or equivalent. A survey of the plants 
which are utilized by man, the diversity of such 
utilization, and their historic and economic signif- 
icance. 

BOTN 416 Principles of Plant Anatomy (4) Two 

lectures and two 2-hour laboratory periods per 
week. The origin and development of cells, tis- 
sues, and tissue systems of vascular plants with 
special emphasis on seed-bearing plants. Particu- 
lar stress is given to the comparative, systematic, 
and evolutionary study of the structural compo- 
nents of the plants. Prerequisite, general botany. 

BOTN 417 Field Botany and Taxonomy. (2) 

Prerequisite, BOTN 100 or general biology. Four 
two-hour laboratory periods a week for eight 
weeks. The identification of trees, shrubs, and 
herbs, emphasizing the native plants of Maryland, 
Manuals, keys, and other techniques will be used. 
Numerous short field trips will be taken Each 
student will make an individual collection. 

BOTN 419 Natural History of Tropical Plants (2) 

Prerequisite, one course in plant taxonomy or 
permission of instructor. An introduction to tropi- 
cal vascular plants with emphasis on their mor- 
phological, anatomical, and habital peculiarities 
and major taxonomic features, geographic distri- 
bution and economic utilization of selected fami- 
lies. Two, one-hour lectures per week. 

BOTN 422 Research Methods in Plant Pathology 

(2) Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite. 
BOTN 221 or equivalent. Advanced training in the 
basic research techniques and methods of plant 
pathology. 

BOTN 424 Diagnosis and Control of Plant Dis- 
eases (3) Prerequisite, BOTN 221. Three lectures 
per week. A study of various plant diseases 
grouped according to the manner in which the 
host plants are affected. Emphasis will be placed 
on recognition of symptoms of the various types 
of diseases and on methods of transmission and 
control of the pathogens involved. 

BOTN 425 Diseases of Ornamentals and Turf (2) 

Prerequisite, BOTN 221. Two lectures per week. 
Designed for those students who need practical 
experience in recognition and control of orna- 
mentals and turf diseases. The symptoms and 
current control measures for diseases in these 
crop areas will be discussed. 

BOTN 426 Mycology (4) Two lectures and two 
two-hour laboratory periods per week. An intro- 
ductory study of morphology, classification, life 
histories, and economics of the fungi. 

BOTN 427 Field Plant Pathology (1) Summer ses- 
sion: lecture and laboratory to be arranged. Pre- 
requisite BOTN 221 , or equivalent. The techniques 
of pesticide evaluation and the identification and 
control of diseases of Maryland crops are dis- 
cussed. Offered in alternate years or more fre- 
quently with demand. 



BOTN 441 Plant Physiology (4) Two lectures and 
one four-hour laboratory period a week. Prereq- 
uisites, BOTN 100 and general chemistry. Organ- 
ic chemistry strongly recommended. A survey of 
the general physiological activities of plants. 

BOTN 462 Plant Ecology (2) Prerequisite, BOTN 
100. Two lectures per week. The dynamics of 
populations as affected by environmental factors 
with special emphasis on the structure and com- 
position of natural plant communities, both ter- 
restial and aquatic. 

BOTN 463 Ecology of Marsh and Dune Vegeta- 
tion (2) Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, BOTN 
100. An examination of the biology of higher 
plants in dune and marsh ecosystems. 

BOTN 464 Plant Ecology Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisite. BOTN 462 or its equivalent or con- 
current enrollment therein. One three-hour labo- 
ratory period a week. Two or three field trips per 
semester. The application of field and experimen- 
tal methods to the qualitative and quantitative 
study of vegetation and ecosystems. 

BOTN 471 Marine and Estuarine Botany. (3) 

Prerequisite, BOTN 441 or equivalent. An ecologi- 
cal discussion of plant life in the marine environ- 
ment of sea coasts, salt marshes, estuaries and 
open seas, 

BOTN 475 General Phycology. (4) One lecture 
and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisites. BOTN 100 and BOTN 202. or per- 
mission of instructor. An introductory study of 
both macro- and micro-algae, including the tax- 
onomy, morphology, and life cycles of both fresh 
water and marine forms, 

BOTN 477 Marine Plant Biology. (4) Prerequisite, 
BOTN 100 or general biology plus organic chem- 
istry or the consent of the instructor. Five one- 
hour lectures and three. 3-hour laboratories each 
week for six weeks. An introduction to the taxon- 
omic, physiological and biochemical characteris- 
tics of marine plants which are basic to their role 
in the ecology of the oceans and estuaries. 

BOTN 497 Special Problems in Marine Research. 
(1-3) Prerequisites, BOTN 100 or general biology 
plus organic chemistry or consent of instructor. 
Recommended concurrent or previous enrollment 
in BOTN 477, marine plant biology. An experi- 
mental approach to problems in marine research 
dealing primarily with phytoplankton, the larger 
algae, and marine spermatophytes. Emphasis will 
be placed on their physiological and biochemical 
activities, 

BOTN 612 Plant Morphology. (3) Second semes- 
ter. One lecture and two laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisites, BOTN 212, BOTN 411, or 
equivalent, A comparative study of the morpholo- 
gy of the flowering plants, with special reference 
to the phylogeny and development of floral or- 
gans. 

BOTN 615 Plant Cytogenics. (3) First semester 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, introductory genetics. An advanced 
study of the current status of plant genetics, par- 
ticularly gene mutations and their relation to 
chromosome changes in corn and other favorable 
materials, 

BOTN 616 Nucleic Acids and Molecular genet- 
ics. (2) Fall semester, alternate years. Prerequis- 
ites, biochemistry (CHEM 661) and cytogenetics 
(BOTN 615) or equivalent, or consent of instruc- 
tor. One session of two hours per week. An ad- 
vanced treatment of the biochemistry of nucleic 



acids and molecular genetics for qualified gradu- | 
ate students. Lectures and assigned reports on 
recent progress in the chemistry of inheritance, 

BOTN 620 Methods in Plant Tissue Culture. (2) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. One lecture 
and one two-hour laboratory period a week. A 
methodology and techniques course designed to 
give the student background and experience in 
plant tissue culture. 

BOTN 621 Physiology of FungL (2) First semes- 
ter. Prerequisites, organic chemistry and BOTN 
441 or equivalent in bacterial or animal physiolo- 
gy. A study of various aspects of fungal metabo- 
lism, nutrition, biochemical transformation, fungal 
products, and mechanism of fungicidal action. 

BOTN 623 Physiology of Fungi Laboratory. (1) 

First semester. One laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisites, BOTN 621 or concurrent registra- 
tion therein. Application of equipment and tech- 
niques in the study of fungal physiology. 

BOTN 625 Physiology of Pathogens and 
Host-Pathogen Relationships. (3) Three lecture 
periods a week A study of enzymes, toxins, and 
other factors involved in pathogenicity and the 
relationship of host-pathogen interaction to dis- 
ease development. 

BOTN 632 Plant Virology. (2) Second semester. 
Two lectures per week on the biological, bio- 
chemical, and biophysical aspects of viruses and 
virus diseases of plants. Prerequisites, bachelor's 
degree or equivalent in any biological science 
and permission of instructor. 

BOTN 634 Plant Virology Laboratory. (2) Second 
semester. Two laboratories per week on the appli- 
cation and techniques for studying the biological, 
biochemical and biophysical aspects of plant vi- 
ruses. Prerequisites, bachelor's degree or equiva- 
lent in any biological science and BOTN 632 or 
concurrent registration therein, and permission of 
the instructor. 

BOTN 636 Plant Nematology. (4) Second semes- 
ter. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite. BOTN 221 or permission of 
instructor. (Not offered 1970-711. The study of 
plant-parasitic nematodes, their morphology, 
anatomy, taxonomy, genetics, physiology, ecolo- 
gy, host-parasite relations and control. Recent 
advances in this field will be emphasized. 

BOTN 641 Advanced Plant Physiology. (2) First 
semester. Prerequisites, BOTN 441 or equivalent, 
and organic chemistry. A presentation of the met- 
abolic processes occurring in plants, including 
the roles of the essential elements in these proc- 
esses with special emphasis on recent literature. 

BOTN 642 Plant Biochemistry (2) Second semes- 
ter, prerequisite, BOTN 641 or CHEM 461 and 462. 
A treatment of those aspects of Biochemistry 
especially pertinent to plants-respiration, photo- 
synthesis, and organic transformations. 

BOTN 644 Plant Biochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Plant biochemistry laboratory. Second semester 
(not offered 1973-74). Prerequisites, BOTN 642 or 
concurrent registration therein. Use of apparatus 
and application of techniques in the study of the • 
chemistry of plants and plant materials. One 
scheduled three-hour laboratory period per week, 
plus one one-hour laboratory to be arranged. 

BOTN 645 Growth and Development. (2) First 
semester. Prerequisite, 12 semester hours of plant 
science. A study of current developments in the 
mathematical treatment of growth and the effects 
of radiation, plant hormones, photoperiodism, 



50 / Graduate Programs 



and internal biochemical balance during the de- 
velopment of the plant. 

BOTH 650 Mineral Nutrition of Plants. (2) 

Prerequisite, BOTN 441. Two lectures per week. A 
study of the inorganic nutrients required for plant 
growth and development, with emphasis on 
mechanisms of nutrient uptake, translocation, 
and mineral metabolism. 

BOTN 652 Plant Biophysics. (2) Second semes- 
ter. (Not offered 1972-73). Prerequisites, BOTN 
641 and at least one year in physics. An ad- 
vanced course dealing with the operation of phys- 
ical phenomena in plant life processes. 

BOTN 654 Plant Biophysics Laboratory. (2) Plant 
biophysics laboratory. Second semester (not of- 
fered 1972-73). Prerequisites BOTN 652 or con- 
current registration therein. A quantitative and 
qualitative study of plant systems by physical and 
physiochemical methods and instruments. One 
scheduled three-hour laboratory period per week, 
plus one one-liour laboratory period to be ar- 
ranged. 

BOTN 661 Advanced Plant Ecology (3) Fall se- 
mester. (Not offered 1973-74). Prerequisite, a 
working knowledge of elementary genetics and 
calculus, or permission of the instructor. Popula- 
tion dynamics, evolutionary mechanisms, and 
quantitative aspects of the analysis of natural 
communities. Special emphasis will be given to 
recent theoretical developments. 

BOTN 672 Physiology of Algae (2) Second se- 
mester. (Not offered 1973-74). Prerequisite, BOTN 
642. the equivalent in allies fields, or permission 
of the instructor. A study of the physiology and 
comparative biochemistry of the algae. Laborato- 
ry techniques and recent advances in algal nutri- 
tion, photosynthesis, and growth will be reviewed. 

BOTN 674 Physiology of Algae Laboratory. (1) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1973-74). One lab- 
oratory period a week. Prerequisites, previous or 
concurrent enrollment in BOTN 672, and permis- 
sion of instructor. Special laboratory techniques 
involved in the study of algal nutrition. 

BOTN 698 Seminar in Botany. (3) First and sec- 
ond semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the 
instructor. Discussion of special topics and cur- 
rent literature in all phases of botany. 

BOTN 699 Special Problems In Botany. (1-3) 

A — Physiology 
B— Ecology 
C — Pathology 
D — Mycology 
E — Nematology 
F — Cytology 
G — Cytogenetics 
H — Morphology 
I — Anatomy 

J — Taxonomy 

First and second semester. Credit according to 
time scheduled and organization of course. Maxi- 
mum credit toward an advanced degree for the 
individual student at the discretion of the depart- 
ment. This course may tie organized as a lecture 
series on a specialized advanced topic, or may 
consist partly, or entirely, of experimental proce- 
dures. It may be taught by visiting lecturers, or by 
resident staff members. 

BOTN 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 
BOTN 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Business and 
Management Program 

Professor and Dean: Lamone 

Professors: H. Anderson, Carroll, Dawson, Fisher, 

Gannon, Gass, Greer, Levine, Locke, Nash, 

Paine, Roberts, Taff, Wright 
/4ssoc/a/e Professors. Ashmen, Edelson, Edmister. 

Fromovitz, Haslem, Hynes. Kuehl, Leete, Loeb, 

Nickels, Olson, Pfatfenberger, Spivey, Thieblot, 

Widhelm 
Assistant Professors: C. Anderson, Beard, 

Bedingfield. Bloom, Bowers, Ford, Holmberg, 

Jolson, Kumar, May, Poist, Robeson, Schneier, 

Taylor 
Lecturers: Formisano, Harvey, Mayer-Sommer, 

Stagliano 

The College of Business and Management of- 
fers graduate work leading to the degrees of Mas- 
ter of Business Administration and Doctor of 
Business Administration. Areas of specialization 
include accounting, finance, marketing, personnel 
and industrial relations, management and organi- 
zation theory, transportation, management sci- 
ence and statistics. 

The College of Business and Management of- 
fers an MBA program designed to provide the 
educational foundation for those students with 
the potential to exhibit the highest degree of ex- 
cellence in their future careers as professional 
managers. Successful students in the program 
are expected to demonstrate a high level of ac- 
complishment in the following areas; 

(1) A thorough and integrated knowledge of the 
basic tools, concepts, and theories relating 
to professional management. 

(2) Behavioral and analytical skills necessary to 
deal creatively and effectively with organiza- 
tional and management problems. 

(3) An understanding of the economic, political, 
technological, and social environments in 
which organizations operate. 

(4) A sense of professional and personal integ- 
rity and social responsibility in the conduct 
of managerial affairs both internal and ex- 
ternal to the organization. 

The College of Business and Management is 
the only business school in the Maryland- 
Washington area accredited by the American 
Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, a 
reflection of the quality of its faculty, programs, 
and facilities. Of the more than 500 graduate pro- 
grams in business and management in the coun- 
try, only 145 are accredited by the AACSB. In a 
recent study the College of Business and Man- 
agement ranked in the top twenty business 
schools in the areas of administrative science and 
personnel management, and industrial relations. 

Both day and evening courses are staffed by 
the full-time graduate faculty recruited from the 
graduate programs of the leading universities in 
in the nation, such as Berkeley, Stanford, North- 
western, Harvard, Case Western, Cornell, Wiscon- 
sin, Minnesota, Columbia, Johns Hopkins, North 
Carolina, Purdue, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Penn 
State, Texas, Ohio State, and Michigan. They are 
dedicated scholars, teachers, and professional 
leaders, unusual in their comparative youth, their 
academic excellence, and their strong committ- 
ment to providing superior management educa- 
tion. 

The students also have access to the exception- 
al academic and professional resources of the 
College Park Campus, including excellent library 
and computer facilities. 

If your major undergraduate work has been in 



areas other than business administration, you will 
be required to complete a set of basic core 
knowledge requirements in business and eco- 
nomics with a "B" average before beginning the 
graduate MBA courses. This knowledge is basic 
to all managers regardless of organizational 
setting or field of specialization. The courses re- 
quired in the core are: principles of economics (6 
hours), principles of accounting (6 hours), busi- 
ness law (3 hours), statistics (3 hours), marketing 
(3 hours), management and organization theory (3 
hours), and business finance (3 hours). Course 
credit by examination is available for some of the 
above courses. These core courses do not apply 
toward graduate credit and may be taken as a 
special undergraduate student. Students whose 
undergraduate degree is in business administra- 
tion will ordinarily have included these core 
courses in their undergraduate work. For the 
MBA they will need only the 30 hours described 
below. 

A group of four graduate courses (12 hours) is 
required of all MBA students: BMGT 764; BMGT 
734; BMGT 775 and BMGT 740, or BSAD 720This 
common core provides the student with a knowl- 
edge of behavioral and analytical skills as well as 
a grounding in managerial economics and finan- 
cial planning and control necessary for all profes- 
sional managers. 

FieWs of concentration and electives: The stu- 
dent has a great deal of flexibility in choosing the 
remaining 6 graduate courses (18 hours). The fol- 
lowing fields of concentration are available: (1) 
organizational behavior, personnel and labor rela- 
tions; (2) operations research-statistics; (3) ac- 
counting; (4) finance; (5) marketing; (6) transpor- 
tation. The student does not submit a thesis. 

The Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) 
program is designed for those planning careers in 
research, service, and university-level teaching as 
well as professional management and govern- 
ment. Students with masters-level or undergradu- 
ate concentrations in areas other than business 
administration may also be admitted to the pro- 
gram. No foreign language is required. The DBA 
is offered only during the day, and the Graduate 
Management Admission Test is required. 

The DBA program requires approximately 75 
semester hours, not including dissertation credits. 
For a student holding an MBA degree, this will 
amount to about 40 hours beyond the MBA. Total 
hours, including the dissertation, will be 87 se- 
mester hours for the typical student. The student 
has two basic options: a single major with two 
minors, or a double major. There is the opportuni- 
ty for a student to take a minor outside of the 
College of Business and Management. 

Students take comprehensive examinations in 
major and minor subject areas. Following the 
written examinations, each candidate must pass 
an oral examination given by a committee of the 
departmental graduate faculty. Any student re- 
ceiving a "pass with distinction" in all written 
examinations will be exempted from the oral 
comprehensive. 

The dissertation must exhibit the candidates 
competence in analysis, interpretation, and pres- 
entation of research findings, and should be a 
major contribution to the literature of the field. 

BMGT 401 Introduction to Systems Analysis. (3) 

Students enrolled in the College of Business and 
Management curricula will register for IFSM 436. 
For detailed information on prerequisites and 
descriptions of the course, refer to IFSM 436. The 
credits earned in IFSM 436 may be included in 
the total credits earned in the area of concentra- 
tion in business and management. 

Graduate Programs / 51 



BMGT 420 Undergraduate Accounting Seminar. 

(3) Prerequisite, senior standing as an accounting 
major or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited 
to upper one-third of senior class. Seminar cover- 
age of outstanding current non-text literature, 
current problems and case studies in accounting. 

BMGT 421 Undergraduate Accounting Seminar. 

(3) Prequisite. senior standing as an accounting 
major or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited 
to upper one-third of senior class. Seminar cover- 
age of outstanding current non-text literature, 
current problems and case studies in accounting. 

BIMGT 422 Auditing Theory and Practice. (3) 

Prerequisite. BMGT 311. A study of the principles 
and problems of auditing and application of ac- 
counting principles to the preparation of audit 
working papers and reports. 

BMGT 423 Apprenticeship in Accounting. (0) 

Prerequisites, minimum of 20 semester hours in 
accounting and the consent of the accounting 
staff. A period of apprenticeship is provided vidth 
nationally known firms of certified public ac- 
countants from about January 15 to February 15. 

BMGT 424 Advanced Accounting. (3) 

Prerequisites. BMGT 311. Advanced accounting 
theory to specialized problems in partnerships, 
ventures, consignments, installment sales. Insur- 
ance, statement of affairs, receiver's accounts, 
realization and liquidation reports, and consolida- 
tion of parent and subsidiary accounts. 

BMGT 425 CPA Problems. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 
311. or consent of instructor. A study of the na- 
ture, form and content of C.P.A. examinations by 
means of the preparation of solutions to, and an 
analysis of. a large sample of C.P.A. problems 
covering the various accounting fields. 

BMGT 426 Advanced Cost Accounting. (2) 

Prerequisite. BMGT 321. A continuation of basic 
cost accounting with special emphasis on proc- 
ess costs, standard costs, joint costs, and 
by-product cost. 

BMGT 427 Advanced Auditing Theory and Prac- 
tice. (3) Prerequisite. BMGT 422. Advanced audit- 
ing theory and practice and report writing. 

BMGT 430 Linear Statistical Models in Business. 

(3) Prerequisite. BMGT 230 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Model building involving an intensive study of 
the general linear stochastic model and the appli- 
cations of this model to business problems. The 
model is derived in matrix form and this form is 
used to analyze both the regression and anova 
formulations of the general linear model. 

BMGT 431 Design of Statistical Experiments in 
Business. (3) Prerequisite. BMGT 230 or 231. 
Surveys anova models, basic and advanced ex- 
perimental design concepts. Non-parametric tests 
and correlation are emphasized. Applications of 
these techniques to business problems in primari- 
ly the marketing and behavioral sciences are 
stressed 

BMGT 432 Sample Survey Design for Business 
and Economics. (3) Prerequisite. BMGT 230 or 
231. Design of probability samples. Simple ran- 
dom sampling, stratified random sampling, sys- 
tematic sampling, and cluster sampling designs 
are developed and compared for efficiency under 
varying assumptions about the population sam- 
pled. Advanced designs such as multistage clus- 
ter sampling and replicated sampling are sur- 
veyed. Implementing these techniques in estima- 
ting parameters of business models is stressed. 



BMGT 433 Statistical Decision Theory in Busi- 
ness. (3) Prerequisite. BMGT 231 or consent of 
instructor. Bayesian approach to the use of sam- 
ple information in decision-making. Concepts of 
loss. risk, decision criteria, expected returns, and 
expected utility are examined. Application of 
these concepts to decision-making in the firm in 
various contexts are considered. 

BMGT 434 Operations Research I. (3) Prerequi- 
site. BMGT 230. MATH 240 or permission 
of instructor. Designed primarily for students 
majoring in Management Science. Statistics, and 
Information Systems Management. It is the first 
semester of a two semester introduction to the 
philosophy, techniques and applications of opera- 
tions research. Topics covered include linear 
programming, postoptimality analysis, network 
algorithms, dynamic programming, inventory and 
equipment replacement models. 

BMGT 435 Operations Research II. (3) 

Prerequisite, BMGT 434, or permission of instruc- 
tor. The second semester of a two-part introduc- 
tion to operations research. The primary empha- 
sis is on stochastic models in Management Sci- 
ence. Topics include stochastic linear program- 
ming, probabilistic dynamic programming, Mar- 
kov processes, probabilistic inventory models, 
queueing theory and simulation. 

BMGT 436 Applications of Mathematical Pro- 
gramming in Management Science. (3) 

Prerequisite, BMGT 434 or permission of instruc- 
tor. Theory and applications of linear, integer, 
and nonlinear programming models to manage- 
ment decisions. Topics covered include the basic 
theorems of linear programming: the matrix for- 
mulation of the simplex, and dual simplex algo- 
rithms; decomposition, cutting plane, branch and 
bound, and implicit enumeration algorithms; gra- 
dient based algorithms; and quadratic program- 
ming. Special emphasis is placed upon model 
formulation and solution using prepared comput- 
er algorithms. 

BMGT 438 Topics in Statistical Analysis for 
Business Management. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 
430 and MATH 240 or permission of the instructor. 
Selected topics in statistical analysis which are 
relevant to management for students with knowl- 
edge of basic statistical methods. Topics include 
evolutionary operation and response surface anal- 
ysis, forecasting techniques, pathologies of the 
linear model and their remedies, multivariate sta- 
tistical models, and non-parametric models. 

BMGT 440 Financial Management. (3) 

Prerequisite. BMGT 340. Analysis and discussion 
of cases and readings relating to financial deci- 
sions of the firm. The application of finance con- 
cepts to the solution of financial problems is 
emphasized. 

BMGT 443 Security Analysis and Valuation. (3) 

Prerequisite. BMGT 343. Study and application of 
the concepts, methods, models, and empirical 
findings to the analysis, valuation, and selection 
of securities, especially common stock. 

BMGT 445 Commercial Bank Management. (3) 

Prerequisites, BMGT 340 and ECON 430. Analysis 
and discussion of cases and readings in Commer- 
cial Bank Management. The loan function is 
emphasized; also the management of liquidity 
reserves, investments for income, and source of 
funds. Bank objectives, functions, policies, orga- 
nization, structure, services, and regulation are 
considered. 

BMGT 450 Marketing Research Methods. (3) 

Prerequisites, BMGT 230 and 350. Recommended 



that BMGT 430 be taken prior to this course. This 
course is intended to develop skill in the use of 
scientific methods in the acquisition, analysis and 
interpretation of marketing data. It covers the 
specialized fields of Marketing Research; the 
planning of survey projects, sample design, tabu- 
lation procedure and report preparation. 

BMGT 451 Consumer Analysis. (3) Prerequisites. 
BMGT 350 and 351. Recommended that PSYC 
100 and 221 be taken prior to this course. Consi- 
ders the growing importance of the American 
consumer in the marketing system and the need 
to understand him. Topics include the foundation 
considerations underlying consumer behavior 
such as economic, social, psychological and cul- 
tural factors. Analysis of the consumer in market- 
ing situations— as a buyer and user of products 
and services — and in relation to the various indi- 
vidual social and marketing factors affecting his 
behavior. The influence of marketing communica- 
tions is also considered; 

BMGT 452 Promotion Management. (3) 

Prerequisites. BMGT 350 and 352. This course is 
concerned with the way in which business firms 
use advertising. Personal selling, sales promotion, 
and other methods as part of their marketing 
program. The case study method is used to pres- 
ent problems taken from actual business practice. 
Cases studied illustrate problems in the use and 
coordination of demand stimulation methods as 
well as analysis and planning. Research, testing 
and statistical control of promotional activities 
are also considered. 

BMGT 453 Industrial Marketing. (3) Prerequisites. 
BMGT 350 plus one other marketing course. The 
industrial and business sector of the marketing 
system is considered rather than the household 
or ultimate consumer sector. Industrial products 
range from raw materials and supplies to the 
major equipment in a plant, business office, or 
institution. Topics include product planning and 
introduction, market analysis and forecasting, 
channels, pricing, field sales force management, 
advertising, marketing cost analysis, and govern- 
ment relations. Particular attention is given to 
industrial, business and institutional buying poli- 
-cies and practice and to the analysis of buyer 
behavior. 

BMGT 454 international Marketing. (3) 

Prerequisites. BMGT 350 plus any other market- 
ing course. A study of the marketing functions 
from the viewpoint of the international executive. 
In addition to the coverage of international mar- 
keting policies relating to product adaptation, 
data collection and analysis, channels of distribu- 
tion, pricing, communications, and cost analysis, 
consideration is given to the cultural, legal, finan- 
cial, and organization aspects of international 
marketing. 

BMGT 455 Sales Management. (3) The role of the 
sales manager, both at headquarters and in the 
field, in the management of people, resources 
and marketing functions. An analysis of the prot>- 
lems involved in sales organization, forecasting, 
planning, communicating, evaluating and control- 
ling. Attention is given to the application of quan- 
titative techniques and pertinent behavioral sci- 
ence concepts in the management of the sales 
effort and sales force. 

BMGT 460 Personnel Management — Analysis 
and Problems. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 360. Rec- 
ommended, BMGT 230. Research findings, spe- 
cial readings, case analysis, simulation, and field 
investigations are used to develop a better under- 



52 / Graduate Programs 



s;aid'ng o* oe'so^rie D'obief^s. a'ternative soIlk 
iics a-d trer cactica^ raTufications- 

BMGT 4«2 Labor Legislation. (3) Case method 
analysis of the modern law of Industrial relations. 
Cases indude the decisions of administrattve 

agccies courts and arbitration tribunals 

BMGT 463 Public Sector Relations. (3) 
Prerequisite. BMGT 362 o' oermission of instruc- 
tor, development and structure of latxjf relations 
in public sector employment; Federal, state, and 
local government responses to unionization and 
collective bargaining. 
BMGT 464 Organizational Behavior. (3) 
Prerequisite. BMGT 364. An examination of re- 
search and theory concerning the forces which 
contribute to the behavior of organizational 
members. Topics covered indude: work group 
behavior, supervisory tjehavlor. intergroup rela- 
tions, employee goals ar>d attitudes, communica- 
tion problems, organizational change, and organi- 
zational goals and design. 
BMGT 467 Undergraduate Seminar In Personnel 
Management (3) Pre-eaj.Site. consent o' instruc- 
tor. This course is open only to the top one-third 
of undergraduate majors In personnel and latx>r 
relations and is offered during the Fall semester 
of each year. Highlights major developments. 
Guest lecturers make periodic presentations. 

BMGT 470 Land Transportation Systems. (3) 
Prerequisite. BMGT 3~: 0.e-= . e* r ~anage- 
rial problems facfng 'a-: tz" e-s e-^-asis on 
ra-i and rrotor moaes a' :ra-soota:.0' 

BMGT 471 Air and Water Transportation Sys- 
tems. (3) Prerequis t? ='.';" r: :.r; ..ewof 
managerial proble": ;: ': = I'z ■;"-■ car- 
riers; emphasis on .^:e--=: "a = -: ::~€stic 
aspects of air and water mooes of transportation. 
Not open for credit to students who have credit 
fo- BMGT -472 

BMGT 473 Advanced Transportation Problems. 
(3) Preqj.s.te. BMGT 370. A critical examination 
of current government transportation policy and 
proposed solutions. Urban and intercity manage- 
'3' transport problems are also considered. 

BMGT 474 Uitan Transport, and Urban Deve4op- 
menL (3) Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. An anal- 
ysis of the role of urban transportation in present 
and future urt)an development The interaction of 
transport pricing and service. urt>an planning, in- 
stitutional restraints, and public land uses "is stud- 
ied. 

BMGT 475 Advanced Logistics Management (3) 

Prerequisites. BMGT 370. 372. 332. Ap pi cation of 
the concepts of BMGT 372 to problem solving 
and special projects in kjgistics management; 
case analysis is stressed. 

BMGT 480 Legal Environment o< Business. (3) 

The course exarnines ttie principal ideas in law 
stressing those which are relevant for the modem 
business executive. Legal reasoning as it has 
evolved In this country will be one of tt>e central 
topics of study. Several leading antitrust cases 
will be studied to illustrate vividly the reasoning 
process as well as ttie interplay of business, phi- 
losophy, and the various conceptiorw of ttie na- 
ture of law which give direction to ttie process. 
Examination of contemporary legal problems and 
proposed solutions, especially those most likely 
to affect the business community, are also cov- 
ered. 

BMGT 481 Public Utiities. (3) Prerequisite. ECON 
203 or 205. Using the regulated industries as spe- 
cific examples, attention is focused on broad and 



general problems in such diverse fields as consti- 
tutional law. administratrve law. public administra- 
tion, government control of business, advanced 
economic theory, accounting, valuation and de- 
preciation, taxation, finance, engineering, and 
management. 

BMGT 482 Business and Government (3) 

Prerequisite. ECON 203 or 205. A study of the role 
of government in modem economic life. Social 
control of business as a remedy for the abuses of 
business enterprise arising from ttie decline of 
competition. Criteria of limitations on government 
regulation of private enterprise. 

BMGT 485 Advanced Production Management 

(3) Prerequisite. BMGT 385. A study of typical 
problems encountered by the factory manager. 
The objective is to develop the ability to analyze 
and solve problems in management control of 
production and in the formulation of produdion 
policies. Among the topics covered are plant lo- 
cation, production planning and control, methods 
analysis, and time study. 
BMGT 490 Urt>an Land Management (3) Covers 
the managerial and decision maKing aspects of 
urtian land and property. Included are such suti- 
jects as land use and valuation matters. 

BMGT 493 Honors Study. (3) Frist semester of the 
senior year. Prerequisite, candidacy for honors in 
Business and Management The course is de- 
signed for honors students who have elected to 
conduct intensive study (independent or group) 
The student will work under the direct guidance 
of a faculty advisor and the Chairman of the Hon- 
ors Committee. They shall determine that the area 
of study is of a scope and intensity deserving of a 
candidate s attention. Formal written and/or oral 
reports on the study may be required by the facul- 
ty advisor and/or (>iairman of the Honors Pro- 
gram. Group meetings of the candidates may be 
called at the discretion of the faculty advisors 
and/or Chairman of the Honors Committee. 
BMGT 494 Honors Study. (3) Second semester of 
ttie senior year. Prerequisite. BMGT 493. and con- 
tinued candidacy for honors in Business and 
Management. The student shall continue and 
complete ttie research initiated in BMGT 493. 
Additional reports may be required at the discre- 
tion of ttie faculty advisor and Honors Program 
Chairman. Group meetings may be held. 

BMGT 495 Business Policies. (3) Prerequisites. 
BMGT 340. 350. 364. and senior standing. A case 
study course in which ttie aim is to have the stu- 
dent apply what ttiey have learned of general 
management principles and ttieir specialized 
functional applications to the overall management 
function in the enteT'ise. 

BMGT 496 Business and Society. (3) 
Prerequisite: one course in BMGT or consent of 
instructor. IMormative role of business in society: 
consideration of the sometimes conflicting inter- 
ests and claims on the firm and its objectives. 

BMGT 710 Advanced Accounting Theory. (3) The 

study of the theoretical and conceptual founda- 
tions for generally accepted accounting principles 
and practices. Recent and current literature and 
ideas are studied in depth to provide coverage of 
ttie basic postulates, assumptions, and standards 
which underlie the measurement criteria and 
practices of financial accounting. 

BMGT 720 Managerial Accounting I. (3) The use 

of accounting data for corporate financial plan- 
ning and control. Topics included are organiza- 
tion for control, profit planning, budgeting, rele- 
vant costing, return on investment and adminis- 



tration of the controMership function in smaller 
organizations. BMGT 720 or 740 is required of 
M.B-A. candidates 
BMGT 730 Statistical Analysis and Business 

Decisions. (3) This course acquaints students 
with the Bayesian approach to decision-making. 
Topics include a review of basic probability con- 
cepts and theorems: the relationship between 
expected utility and rational action: incremental 
analysis; partial expectations; linear profits and 
costs; opportunity loss and the cost of uncertain- 
ty; conditional and joint probability; the binomial. 
Pascal. Poisson, gamma, and normal probability 
distributions; the revision of probabilities in the 
light of new information; preposterior analysis 
and sequential decision procedures. 

BMGT 731 Theory of Survey Design. (3) 

Examines the usefulness of statistical principles 
in survey design. Topics include: the nature of 
statistical estimation, the differential attributes of 
different estimators, the merits and weaknesses of 
available sampling methods and designs, the dis- 
tinctive aspects of simple random samples, strati- 
fied random samples, and cluster samples, ratio 
estimates and the problems posed by biases and 
non-sampling errors. 

BMGT 732 Concepts and Methods of Experimen- 
tal Statistics. (3) Prerequisites, BMGT 730 (BMGT 
330 highly desirable). Topical coverage includes 
the median test for 2 samples, Wilcoxon-Mann- 
Whitney test. Mood s square rank test for disper- 
sion, contingency table analysis, tetrachoric and 
rank correlation, analysis of variance and covari- 
ance, discriminatory analysis and factor analysis. 
The course will use EMD Class M. Oass V and 
Class S programs or other canned programs. 

BMGT 734 Introduction to Management Science. 

(3) Required of M.BA and DB.A. candidates. The 
processes, tools, and methodological problems in 
applying management science to aid managerial 
decision-making. Deals with the relationship of 
other quantitative aids to managerial actions such 
as economic analysis and systems analysis. 

BMGT 735 Application o< Management Science. 

(3) Prerequisites. BMGT 734 or consent of the in- 
structor. This course will expose the student to 
the successes and difficulties experienced in 
applying operations research to management de- 
cision making in all functional areas. The exami- 
nation of classical and contemporary applica- 
tions in the literature and case studies will be 
emphasized. 

BMGT 736 Philosophy and Practice of Manage- 
ment Science. (3) Prerequisites, completion of 
any two graduate level operations research cours- 
es and a graduate level behavioral course, or 
consent of instructor. 

BMGT 737 Management Simulation. (3) 

Prerequisite, BMGT 734 and consent of instruc- 
tor. Deals with the development, manipulation, 
and validity of an operational model. Production 
information and other decision systems of con- 
cern to management will be studied. Manipulation 
of parameter values, assumptions, and conditions 
are studied. This is accomplished in conjunction 
with the use of computer facilities at the Comput- 
er Science Center on campus. 
BMGT 740 Financial Administration. (3) The role 
of the financial rr-a-age' n executive decision 
making. Financial o'annmg analysis, and control 
in such areas as the allocation of financial re- 
sources within the firm, forecasting and budget- 
ing, capital budgeting and the bases for invest- 
ment decisions, alternative sources of short-term 

Graduate Programs / 53 



and long-term financing and financial problems 
of growth. BMGT 720 or 740 is required of M.B.A. 
candidates. 

BMGT 743 Investment Analysis. (3) Evaluation of 
debt and equity, security alternatives available for 
the employment of the investment fund. Analysis 
of economic and financial data of the national 
economy. The industry, and the company to ar- 
rive at the fundamental value of a security. Study 
of securities markets as independent regulators 
of investment values. Motives, needs, and basic 
ingredients in the selection and supervision of the 
portfolio. 

BMGT 750 Marketing Administration. (3) 

Required for M.B.A. candidates with concentra- 
tions in marketing. Principal objectives are; to 
develop an understanding of the problems and 
goals of marketing executives, to develop com- 
petence in the analysis and solution of marketing 
problems, and to evaluate specific marketing ef- 
forts as they contribute to a coordinated total 
marketing program. Attention will be focused on 
product, price, and service policies, market char- 
acteristics, channel selection, promotional poli- 
cies and organization structure. 

BMGT 751 Marlceting Communications Manage- 
ment. (3) Required for M.B.A. candidates concen- 
trating in marketing. Concerned with the part that 
advertising, promotion, public relations and relat- 
ed efforts play in the accomplishment of a firm's 
total marketing objectives. Its purpose is to devel- 
op competence in the formulation of mass com- 
munications, objectives in budget optimization, 
media appraisal, theme selection, program imple- 
mentation and management, and results measure- 
ment. 

BMGT 752 Marlceting Research Methods. (3) 

Required for M.B.A. candidates concentrating in 
marketing. Deals with the process of acquiring, 
classifying and interpreting primary and second- 
ary marketing data needed for intelligent, profita- 
ble marketing decisions. Through readings, dis- 
cussion, and case studies, efforts are made to 
develop skill in evaluating the appropriateness of 
alternative methodologies such as the Inductive, 
deductive, survey, observational, and experimen- 
tal. Consideration Is also given to recent develop- 
ments In the systematic recording and use of In- 
ternal and external data needed for marketing 
decisions. 

BMGT 753 International Marketing. (3) Deals with 
environmental, organizational, and financial as- 
pects of international marketing as well as prob- 
lems of marketing research, pricing, channels of 
distribution, product policy, and communications 
which face U.S. firms trading with foreign firms or 
which face foreign firms In their operations. 

BMGT 754 Buyer Behavior Analysis. (3) A sys- 
tematic examination and evaluation of the litera- 
ture, research tradition and theory of buyer be- 
havior in the market place from a fundamental 
and applied perspective. The cognitive and be- 
havioral bases underlying the buying process of 
Individuals and institutions Is investigated to bet- 
ter understand, predict, and Influence the process 
through the effective utilization of the firm's mar- 
keting resources. 

BMGT 760 Personnel Management— Manpower 
Procurement and Development. (3) An in depth' 
treatment of problems and techniques Involved In 
obtaining and developing a competent work 
force, manpower forecasting, job analysis, time 
study, recruitment techniques, psychological 
tests, Interviews, application blanks, references. 



programmed instruction role playing, and sensi- 
tivity training are typical topics Included. 
BMGT 761 Personnel Management— Manpower 
Compensation and Evaluation. (3) After a work 
force has been assembled and developed (BMGT 
760), the manager must see to It that his potential 
is converted Into efficient and continuing per- 
formance. This course provides an in depth' 
analysis of the role of employee compensation 
and appraisal In accomplishing this end. Typical 
topics include wage theory. Incentive systems, 
wage decision criteria, job evaluation, profit shar- 
ing, wage surveys, forced choice rating, critical 
Incidents, appraisal interviews, and fringe bene- 
fits. 

BMGT 762 Collective Bargaining— Current Prob- 
lems and Issues. (3) Includes such topics as 
methods of handling Industrial disputes, legal re- 
strictions on various collective bargaining activi- 
ties, theory and philosophy of collective bargain- 
ing, and Internal union problems. 
BMGT 763 Administration of Labor Relations. (3) 
Deals with labor relations at the plant level. Em- 
phasizes the negotiation and administration of 
labor contracts. Includes union policy and Influ- 
ence on personnel management activities. 

BMGT 764 Behavioral Factors in Management. 

(3) Required of M.B.A. candidates. A critical anal- 
ysis of the Impact of the behavioral sciences on 
traditional concepts of management as process 
and as organization. Included within the area of 
analysis are such sibjects as human motivation, 
human relations, morale, status, role, organiza- 
tion, communication, bureaucracy, the executive 
role, leadership and training. 
BMGT 765 Application of Behavioral Science to 
Business. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 764 or permis- 
sion of professor. Stresses case analysis of be- 
havioral knowledge applied to management prob- 
lems. Typical topics Include analysis of modes for 
Introducing change, group versus organizational 
goals, organizational barriers to personal growth, 
the effect of authority systems on tiehavior, and 
the relationship between technology and social 
structure. 

BMGT 770 Transportation Theory and Analysis. 
(3) Examines the transportation system and its 
components. Key topics in the development and 
present form of transportation In both the United 
States and other countries are considered togeth- 
er with theoretical concepts employed in the anal- 
ysis of transport problems. 

BMGT 771 Transport and Public Policy. (3) An 

Intensive study of the nature and consequences 
of relations between governments and agencies 
thereof, carriers In the various modes, and users 
of transport services. Typical areas subjected to 
examination and analysis Include: the control of 
transport firms by regulatory bodies, taxation of 
carriers, methods employed In the allocation of 
funds to the construction, operation, and mainte- 
nance of publicly-provided transport facilities, 
and the direct subsidization of services supplied 
by privately-owned entitles. Additional problems 
considered Include labor and safety. Comparative 
international transport policies and problems are 
also examined. 

BMGT 772 Management of Physical Distribution. 

(3) Focuses on managerial practices required to 
fulfill optimally the physical movement needs of 
extractive, manufacturing, and merchandising 
firms. Attention is given to the total cost approach 
to physical distribution. Interrelations, among 
purchased transport services, privately-supplied 



transport services, warehousing. Inventory con- 
trol, materials handling, packaging, and plant 
location are considered. An understanding of the 
communications network to support physical dis- 
tribution is developed In conjunction with study 
of the problems of coordination between the 
physical movement management function and 
other functional areas within the business 
firm — such as accounting, finance, marketing, 
and production. 

BMGT 773 Tranpsortation Strategies. (3) Treats 
organization structure, policies, and procedures 
employed In the administration of Inter- and In- 
traurban transport firms. Problems receiving at- 
tention Include managerial development, opera- 
tional and financial planning and control, demand 
analysis, pricing, promotional policies, Intra- and 
Intermodal competitive and complementary rela- 
tionships, and methods for accommodating pub- 
lic policies designed to delimit the managerial 
discretion of carrier executives. Administrative 
problems peculiar to public-owned and operated 
transport entities are also considered. 

BMGT 774 Private Enterprise and Public Policy. 

(3) Examines the executive's social and ethical 
responsibilities to his employees, customers and 
to the general public. Consideration is given to 
the conflicts occasioned by competitive relation- 
ships in the private sector of business and the 
effect of Institutional restraints. The trends In 
public policy and their future effect upon man- 
agement are examined. For comparative purpos- 
es, several examples of planned societies are 
considered. 

BMGT 775 Product, Production and Pricing Poli- 
cy. (3) Required of M.B.A. candidates. The appli- 
cation of economic theory to the business enter- 
prise in respect to the determination of policy and 
the handling of management problems with par- 
ticular reference to the firm producing a complex 
line of products, nature of competition, pricing 
policy, interrelationship of production and mar- 
keting problems, basic types of cost, control sys- 
tems, theories of depreciation and Investment and 
the Impact of each upon costs. 

BMGT 777 Policy Issues in Public Utilities. (3) A 

critical analysis of current developments In regu- 
latory policy and Issues arising among public util- 
ities, regulatory agencies, and the general public. 
Emphasis is placed on the electric, gas, water, 
and communications Industries In both the public 
and private sectors of the economy. Changing 
and emerging problems stressed Include those 
pertinent to cost analysis, depreciation, finance, 
taxes, rate of return, the rate base, differential 
rate-making, and labor. In addition, the growing 
Importance of technological developments and 
their Impact on state and federal regulatory agen- 
cies are explored. 

BGMT 781 International Business Administra- 
tion. (3) Examines the International business envi- 
ronment as it affects company policy and proce- 
dures. Integrates the business functions under- 
taken In international operations through analysis 
In depth and comprehensive case studies. This 
course can be credited toward the 18-hour re- 
quirement for a major field in the D.B.A. program. 
BMGT 782 Management of the Multinational 
Firm. (3) Deals with the problems and policies of 
international business enterprise at the manage- 
ment level. Considers management of a multina- 
tional enterprise as well as management within 
foreign units. The multinational firm as a soc- 
io-econometrlc institution is analyzed in detail. 
Cases In comparative management are utilized. 



54 / Graduate Progrants 



BMGT 785 Management Planning and Control 
Systems. (3) Concerned with planning and con- 
trol systems for the fulfillment of organizational 
objectives. Identification of organizational objec- 
tives, responsibility centers, information needs 
and information network. Case studies of inte- 
grated planning and control systems. 

BMGT 786 Development and Trends In Produc- 
tion Management. (3) Case studies of production 
problems in a number of industries. Focuses at- 
tention on decisions concerning operating pro- 
grams and manufacturing policies at the top level 
of manufacturing, Basic concepts of process and 
product technology are covered, taking into con- 
sideration the scale, operating range, capital cost, 
method of control, and degree of mechanization 
at each successive stage in the manufacturing 
process. 

BMGT 787 Management Policy Formulation. (3) 

An integrative course which applies students' 
knowledge of the various functional areas in busi- 
ness and management to the formulation, execu- 
tion, and evaluation of managerial policies. The 
viewpoint of the chief administrative officers and 
board of directors is emphasized. 

BMGT 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

BMGT 811 Advanced Accounting Theory II. (3) 

Prerequisite BMGT 710. A study of the more con- 
troversial, not generally accepted ideas and con- 
cepts, currently proposed as suggested solutions 
to current problems or to improve the state of the 
art of financial accounting measurements. 

BMGT 812 Accounting In Regulated Industries. 

(3) A study of the unique accounting problems of 
industries subject to cost and price regulations of 
government agencies. Included are government 
contracts and grants, rate regulations for trans- 
portation carriers and public utilities, distribution 
cost analyses under the Robinson-Patman Act, 
and cost regulations of the Medicare Program 

BGMT813 The Impact of Taxation on Business 
Decisions. (3) A study of the impact of tax law 
and regulations on alternative business strategies. 
Particular emphasis is given to the large, multidi- 
visional firm. Problems of acquisitions, mergers, 
spinoffs, and other divestitures are considered 
from the viewpoint of profit planning, cash flow, 
and tax deferment. 

BMGT 814 Current Problems of Professional 
Practice. (3) Generally accepted auditing stand- 
ards, auditing practices, legal and ethical respon- 
sibilities, and the accounting and reporting re- 
quirements of the Securities and Exchange 
Commission. 

BMGT 821 Managerial Accounting II. (3) 

Prerequisite, BMGT 720. The management of the 
controllership function in the large, mullidivision- 
al firm. Centralized and decentralized organiza- 
tions; management control systems in consolidat- 
ed and conglomerate corporations: alternative 
strategies for profit maximization; acquisitions 
and divestitures for increased investment return. 

BMGT 828 Independent Study in Business and 
Management. (1-9) 

BMGT 830 Management Science I— Linear Pro- 
gramming. (3) Prerequisite, mathematics, through 
differential calculus, and BMGT 734 or consent of 
instructor. The theory and use of deterministic 
models in management science. Models are 
based upon optimization technicques for condi- 
tions of data certainty. Includes linear program- 
ming models, inventory models, and replacement 
models. 



BMGT 831 Management Science II — Extension 
of Linear Programming and Network Analysis. 

(3) Prerequisites, BMGT 830 or consent of in- 
structor, and MATH 240. Basic FORTRAN pro- 
gramming proficiency is assumed. Includes a 
brief review of basic linear programming, separa- 
ble programming, application to game theory, the 
primal-dual and criss-cross algorithms, quadratic 
programming, basic concepts of network theory, 
the max-flow algorithms. The basic concepts and 
techniques of network theory will be developed 
and applied to the transportation problem. 

BMGT 832 Management Science 

III — Optimization and Nonlinear Programming. 

(3) Prerequisites, BMGT 830 or consent of in- 
structor, and MATH 241. Topical coverage in- 
cludes Kuhn-Tucker theory, the Lagrangena, the 
concept of an algorithm (notation map converg- 
ence), unconstrained problems, convex simplex 
and method of centers algorithms, penalty and 
barrier, feasible-directions and cutting plane algo- 
rithms, 

BMGT 833 Management Science IV— Integer and 
Dynamic Programming. (3) Prerequisite, Busi- 
ness— BMGT 831 and BMGT 832 or consent of 
instructor. Mathematics — MATH 241 minimum, 
MATH 400 and 410 preferred. Coverage includes 
fractional, all integer and mixed integer algo- 
rithms, the knapsack problem, decomposition, 
recusion analysis, integer optimization and sensi- 
tivity, risk and uncertainty situations and an intro- 
duction to nonserial and infinite stage systems. 

BMGT 834 Probabilistic Models. (3) Prerequisite, 
STAT 400 highly recommended. MATH 241 or 
consent of the instructor. Theoretical foundations 
for the construction and optimization of probabil- 
istic models. Following the review of stochastic 
processes, the Poisson process and the Markovi- 
an processes. Topics may include queueing theo- 
ry, inventory theory, Markovian decision process- 
es and stochastic linear programming, 

BMGT 835 Statistical Model Building. (3) 

Prerequisites, BMGT 432, MATH 241, or consent 
of instructor. Emphasizes the actual construction 
of models encountered in and drawn from experi- 
ence in business and management utilizing 
canned computer programs which are in wide 
industrial use. Topical coverage includes a review 
of the matrix approach to linear regression 
effects of bias in the general regression situation, 
weighted least squares, orthogonal polynomials, 
verification and maintenance of the mathematical 
model, and the introduction to non-linear estima- 
tion. 

BMGT 840 Working Capital Management. (3) An 

intensive study of short- and intermediate-term 
sources of funds and the management of cash, 
accounts receivable and inventories. Includes 
consideration of determinants of working capital 
needs, financial analysis as related to short-term 
financing problems, estimation of funds require- 
ments, patterns of fund requirements, and major 
types of loan arrangements. Case studies, supple- 
mented with outside readings. 

BMGT 841 Long-Term Capital Management. (3) 

An intensive study of long-term financing, return 
on investment and cost of capital. Particular at- 
tention is paid to appraising alternative forms of 
long-term financing, methods of measuring return 
on investment, and problems such as measuring 
the cost of capital of cyclical companies and 
growth companies. Case studies, supplemented 
with outside readings, 

BMGT 843 Portfolio Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, BMGT 743 or consent of instructor. 



The process of investment. Selection and supervi- 
sion of securities appropriate for the require- 
ments and objectives of both the individual and 
institutional investor. Underlying considerations 
necessary for the continued success of the invest- 
ment program. Critical analysis of cast studies in 
portfolio management. Effects of temporary 
changes on investment decisions, 

BMGT 845 Financial Institutions. (3) Provides an 

analysis of the structure of financial institutions in 
the American economy, including commercial 
banking and non-banking organizations which 
serve business and consumers. Topics covered 
include determinants of the demand for, and 
supply of, funds and the role of financial institu- 
tions in channeling financial capital among the 
various sectors of the American economy, 

BMGT 846 International Financial Administra- 
tion. (3) Deals with the problems of financial ad- 
ministration of the multinational firm. Includes the 
financing of investment abroad and management 
of assets in differing financial environments as 
well as the financing of exports and imports. 
Consideration of national and international finan- 
cial institutions as they relate to the international 
operations of American and foreign business 
firms. 

BMGT 850 Marketing Channels Analysis. (3) 

Focuses on the fundamentals to explain alternate 
channels of distribution and the roles played by 
various intermediaries, the evolution of business 
structures in marketing, reasons for change, and 
projected marketing patterns for the future. 
M.B.A. candidates may register with permission of 
instructor. 

BMGT 851 Quantitative Methods in Marketing- 
Demand and Cost Analysis. (3) Consideration is 
given to quantitative methods in the analysis and 
prediction of market demand and marketing 
costs. Topics in connection with demand include 
market potentials, sales forecasting, consumer 
analysis, promotional and pricing results, and the 
like. Cost analysis focuses on allocation of costs 
by marketing functions, products, territories, cus- 
tomers and marketing personnel. Statistical tech- 
niques, mathematics, models and other methods 
arfe utilized in the solution of marketing problems, 
M.B.A. candidates may register with permission of 
unstructor. 

BMGT 852 Theory in Marketing. (3) An inquiry 
into the problems and elements of theory devel- 
opment in general with specific reference to the 
field of marketing. A critical analysis and evalua- 
tion of past and contemporary efforts to formulate 
theories of marketing and to integrate theories 
from the social sciences into a marketing frame- 
work. Attention is given to the development of 
concepts in all areas of marketing thought and to 
their potential application in the business firm. 

BMGT 863 The Organization and Its Social Envi- 
ronment. (3) A course examining the interaction 
between organizations and aspects of their social 
and cultural environment. Analysis of the litera- 
ture concerning human resource availability and 
individual differences as they influence manageri- 
al decisions, the impact of cultural factors on 
business and other types of organizations, and 
management approaches for dealing with the so- 
cial environment. 

BMGT 864 Theory of the Industrial Work Group. 

(3) A study of major theories of group formation, 
group tiehavior, and group leadership considered 
in terms of their implications for the management 
of business and other types of organizations. Will 
involve an in-depth analysis of the literature con- 
Graduate Programs / 55 



cerning such topics as group cohesiveness, con- 
formity, leadership, communication nets, prob- 
lem-solving efficiency, productivity standards, and 
morale. 

BMGT 865 Comparative Theories of Organiza- 
tion. (3) Emphasizes business and other types of 
complex organizations. Theories of formal and 
informal organizations are covered. Analyzes the 
content, mterrelationships, and similarities be- 
tween current major schools of organization 
thought. 

BMGT 866 Organizational Conflict and Change. 
(3) An analysis and evaluation of the factors con- 
tributing to conflict and changed patterns of be- 
havior within organizations. A study of the litera- 
ture on such topics as managerial decision mak- 
ing and conflict, research creativity, labor-man- 
agement conflict, organizational maintenance and 
stability, resistance to change, and planned 
change. 

BMGT 872 Business Logistics. (3) Concentrates 
on the design and application of methods for the 
solution of advanced physical movement prob- 
lems of business firms. Provides thorough cover- 
age of a variety of analytical techniques relevant 
to the solution of these problems. Where appro- 
priate, experience will be provided in the utiliza- 
tion of computers to assist in managerial logisti- 
cal decision-malting. 

BMGT 873 Transportation Science. (3) Focuses 
on the application of quantitative and qualitative 
techniques of analysis to managerial problems 
drawn from firms in each of the various modes of 
transport. Included is the application of simula- 
tion to areas such as the control of equipment 
selection and terminal and line operations. The 
application of advanced analytical techniques to 
problems involving resource use efficiency within 
the transportation industry and between the 
transportation and other sectors of the economy 
is an integral part of the course. 

BMGT 880 Business Research Methodology. (3) 

Covers the nature, scope, and application of re- 
search methodology. The identification and for- 
mulation of research designs applicable to busi- 
ness and related fields. Required of D.B.A. stu- 
dents. 

BMGT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



CHEMICAL 

ENGINEERING 

PROGRAM 

Chairman: Gomezplata 

Program Director. Chemical Erigineering 

Program.- Cadman 
Professors.- Arsenault, Beckman, Cadman, Duffey, 

Gomezplata, Marchello, Munno, Regan, 

Schroeder, Silverman, Skolnick, Smith, Spain. 
Associate Professors: Almenas, Gentry, Roush, 

Sheaks, Spivak 
Assistant Professors: Blair, Gasner, Hatch, 

King 
Lecturers: Belcher, Dedrick 
Instructor: Paauwe 

An individual plan of graduate study compatible 
with the student's interest and background is es- 
tablished between the student, his adviser, and 
the department chairman The general chemical 
engineering program is focused on five major 
areas; applied polymer science, biochemical engi- 

56 / Graduate Programs 



neering, environmental engineering, high pres- 
sure technology, process and analysis simulation. 

The programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. 
degrees are open to qualified students holding 
the B.S. degree. Admission may be granted to 
students with degrees in any of the engineering 
and science areas from accredited programs. In 
some cases it may be necessary to require cours- 
es to fulfill the background. The general regula- 
tions of The Graduate School apply in reviewing 
applications. 

The candidate for the M.S. degree has the 
choice of following a plan of study with or with- 
out thesis. The equivalent of at least three years 
of full-time study beyond the B.S. degree is re- 
quired for the Ph.D. degree. All students seeking 
graduate degrees in Chemical Engineering must 
enroll in ENCH 610, 620, and 640. In additional to 
the general rules of The Graduate School certain 
special degree requirements are set forth by the 
department in its departmental publications. 

A number of special facilities are available for 
graduate study and research and are coordinated 
through the Laboratory for Radiation and Polymer 
Science, the Laboratory for High Pressure Sci- 
ence, the Laboratory for Process Analysis and 
Simulation, the Laboratory for Biochemical Engi- 
neering and Environmental Studies, and the Nu- 
clear Reactor Facility. These laboratories contain 
analog computers, a gamma radiation facility, an 
electron accelerator, an electron paramagnetic 
resonance spectrometer, high pressure and cry- 
ogenic systems, crystal growth and mechanical 
testing equipment. X-ray diffraction units, a neu- 
tron generator and a 200 KW pool type nuclear 
reactor, 

ENCH 425 Transfer and Transport Processes I. 

(4) Prerequisite, ENCH 250. Theory and Applica- 
tions of Molecular and Turbulent Transport Phe- 
nomena. Principles of fluid mechanics, mass 
transfer and heat transfer. Dimensional analysis, 
analogy between heat, mass and momentum 
transfer, Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow, 
convective heat and mass transfer. 

ENCH 427 Transfer and Transport Processes II. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENCH 425. Steady and unsteady 
state diffusion and conduction, simultaneous heat 
and mass transfer, interphase transfer, boundary 
layer theory. Application to absorption, adsorp- 
tion, and distillation. Principles of radient heat 
transfer, evaporation, filtration, crystallization, 
drying, condensation, boiling humidification, ion 
exchange, and phase separations. 

ENCH 437 Chemical Engineering Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCH 427. Application of chemical 
engineering process and unit operation principles 
in small scale semi-commercial equipment. Data 
from experimental observations are used to evalu- 
ate performance and efficiency of operations. 
Emphasis is placed on correct presentation of 
results in report form. 

ENCH 440 Chemical Engineering Kinetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 250. Fundamentals of chemi- 
cal reaction kinetics and their application to the 
design and operation of chemical reactors. Reac- 
tion rate theory, homogeneous reactions in batch 
and flow systems, adsorption, heterogeneous 
reactions and catalysis electrochemical reactions. 
Catalytic reactor design 

ENCH 442 Chemical Engineering Systems Analy- 
sis. (3) Prerequisite: Differential equations or 
ENCH 453. Dynamic response applied to Process 
systems. Goals and modes of control. La Place 
transformations, analysis and synthesis of simple 
control systems, closed loop response, dynamic 
testing Laboratory work on methods of process 



control, use of experimental analog and mathe- 
matical models of control systems. 
ENCH 445 Process Engineering and Design. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 427. Utilization of chemical 
engineering principles for the design of process 
equipment. Typical problems in the design of 
chemical plants. Comprehensive reports are re- 
quired. 

ENCH 447 Chemical Engineering Economics. (2) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 427. Principles of engineering 
economics applied to chemical processes. Deter- 
mination of investment and operating costs for 
chemical plants. 

ENCH 450 Chemical Process Development. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 427. Chemical process indus- 
tries from the standpoint of technology, raw ma- 
terials, products and processing equipment. Op- 
erations of major chemical processes and indus- 
tries combined with quantitative analysis of proc- 
ess requirements and yields. 
ENCH 452 Advanced Chemical Engineering 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisite, ENCH 425. Application 
of digital and analog computers to chemical engi- 
neering problems. Numerical methods, program- 
ming, differential equations, curve fitting, ampli- 
fiers and analog circuits. 

ENCH 453 Applied Mathematics In Chemical 
Engineering. (3) Prerequisite, MATH 240. Mathe- 
matical techniques applied to the analysis and 
solution of chemical engineering problems. Use 
of differentiation, integration, differential equa- 
tions, partial differential equations and integral 
transforms. Application of infinite series, numeri- 
cal and statistical methods. 

ENCH 454 Chemical Process Analysis and Op- 
timization. (3) Prerequisites. ENCH 427, 440. Ap- 
plications of mathematical models to the analysis 
and optimization of chemical processes. Models 
based on transport, chemical kinetics and other 
chemical engineering principles will be employed. 
Emphasis on evaluation of process alternatives. 

ENCH 455 Chemical Process Laboratory. (3) 

Prerequisite; ENCH 427 and 440. One lecture and 
six hours of laboratory per week. Experimental 
study of various chemical processes through lat>- 
oratory and small semi-commercial scale equip- 
ment. Reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics, heat 
and mass transfer. 

ENCH 461 Control of Air Pollution Sources. (3) 
Prerequisite, senior standing in engineering or 
consent of instructor. Theory and application of 
methods for the control and removal of airborne 
materials. Principles of design and performance 
of air quality control equipment. 

ENCH 468 Research. (1-3) Prerequisite; Permis- 
sion of the instructor. Investigation of a research 
project under the direction of a faculiy member. 
Comprehensive reports are required. Repeatable 
to a maximum of six credits. 

ENCH 475 Electrochemical Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 425. Fundamentals of electro- 
chemistry with application to engineering and 
commercial processes. Equilibrium potentials, 
reaction mechanisms, cell kinetics, polarization, 
surface phenomena. Electrorefining, electrowin- 
ning, oxidation and reduction, solid, liquid and 
gas systems. Aspects of design and performance 
of electroprocess plants. 

ENCH 480 Engineering Analysis of Physiological 
Systems. (3) Engineering description and analysis 
of physiological systems. Survey of bioengineer- 
ing literature and an introduction to mathematical 
modeling of physiological systems. 



ENCH 482 Biochemical Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing in engineering or 
consent of instructor. Introduction to biochemical 
and microbiological applications to commercial 
and engineering processes, including industrial 
fermentation, enzymology, ultrafiltration, food and 
pfiarmaceutical processing and resulting waste 
treatment. Enzyme kinetics, cell growth, energet- 
ics and mass transfer, 

ENCH 485 Biochemical Engineering Laboratory. 

(2) Prerequisite or co-requisite. ENCH 482, Tech- 
niques of measuring pertinent parameters in fer- 
mentation reactors, quantification of production 
variables for primary and secondary metabolites 
such as enzymes and antibiotics, the insolubiliza- 
tion of enzymes for reactors, and the demonstra- 
tion of separation techniques such as ultrafiltra- 
tion and affinity chromatography. 

ENCH 490 Introduction to Polymer Science. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The elements 
of the chemistry, physics, processing methods, 
and engineering applications of polymers, 

ENCH 492 Applied Physical Chemistry of Poly- 
mers. (3) Prerequisite. CHEM 481, Corequisite. 
CHEf^ 482 or consent of instructor. Kinetics of 
formation of high polymers, determination of 
molecular weight and structure, and applied ther- 
modynamics and phase equilieria of polymer so- 
lutions. 

ENCH 494 Polymer Technology Laboratory. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCH 490 or 492 or consent of in- 
structor. One lecture and two lab periods per 
week. Measurement of mechanical, electrical, op- 
tical, thermal properties of polymers. Measure- 
ment of molecular weight by viscosimetry isomet- 
ric and light scattering methods. Application of 
X-ray, NMR, ESR, spectroscopy molecular relaxa- 
tion, microscopy and electron microscopy to the 
determination of polymer structure. Effects of ul- 
traviolet light and high energy radiation, 

ENCH 495 Rheology of Polymer Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCH 490 or 492 or consent of in- 
structor. Mechanical behavior with emphasis on 
the continuum point of view and its relationship 
to structural types. Elasticity, viscoelasticity, ane- 
lasticity and plasticity of single phase and multi- 
phase materials. (Students who have credit for 
ENCH 495 may not take ENMA 495 for credit.) 

ENCH 496 Processing of Polymer Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCH 490 or 492 or consent of in- 
structor, A comprehensive analysis of the opera- 
tions carried out on polymeric materials to in- 
crease their utility. Conversion operations such as 
molding extrusion, blending, film forming, and 
calendaring. Development of engineering skills 
required to practice in the high polymer industry. 
Students who have credit for ENCH 496 may not 
take ENMA 496 for credit, 

ENCH 609 Graduate Seminar. (1) 

ENCH 610 Chemical Engineering Thermodynam- 
ics. (3) First semester. Advanced application of 
the general thermodynamic methods to chemical 
engineering problems. First and second law con- 
sequences; estimation and correlation of thermo- 
dynamic properties: phase and chemical reaction 
equilibria. 

ENCH 620 Methods of Engineering Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Application of selected mathemati- 
cal techniques to the analysis and solution of 
engineering problems; included are the applica- 
tions of matrices, vectors, tensors, differential 
equations, integral transforms, and probability 
methods to such problems as unsteady heat 
transfer, transient phenomena in mass transfer 



operations, stagewise processes, chemical reac- 
tors, process control, and nuclear reactor phys- 
ics. 

ENCH 630 Transport Phenomena. (3) First se- 
mester. Heat, mass and momentum transfer theo- 
ry from the viewpoint of the basic transport equa- 
tions. Steady and unsteady state; laminar and 
turbulent flow; boundary layer theory, mechanics 
of tubulent transport; with specific application to 
complex chemical engineering situations. 

ENCH 640 Advanced Chemical Reaction Kinet- 
ics. (3) Second semester. The theory and applica- 
tion of chemical reaction kinetics to reactor de- 
sign. Reaction rate theory; homogeneous batch 
and flow reactors; fundamentals of catalysis; de- 
sign of heterogeneous flow reactors. 

ENCH 648 Special Problems in Chemical Engi- 
neering. (1-16) 

ENCH 655 Radiation Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. An analysis 
of such radiation applications as synthesizing 
chemicals, preserving foods, control of industrial 
processes. Design of irradiation installations, e,g,, 
cobalt 60 gamma ray sources, electronuclear 
machine arrangement, and chemical reactors, 

ENCH 656 Radiation Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. An analysis 
of such radiation applications as synthesizing 
chemicals, preserving foods, control of industrial 
processes. Design of irradiation installations, e.g.. 
cobalt 6o gamma ray sources, electronuclear 
machine arrangement, and chemical reactors 

ENCH 667 Radiation Effects Laboratory. (3) 

Prerequisites, permission of instructor. Effect of 
massive doses of radiation on the properties of 
matter for purposes other than those pointed 
toward nuclear power. Radiation processing, ra- 
diation-induced chemical reactions, and conver- 
sion of radiation energy; isotope power sources, 

ENCH 670 Rheology of Engineering Materials. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENMA 650, Mechanical behavior 
with emphasis on the continuum point of view 
and its relationship to structural types. Elasticity, 
viscoelasticity. anelasticity and plasticity in single 
phase and multiphase materials. 

ENCH 720 Process Analysis and Simulation. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. ENCH 630. Devel- 
opment of mathematical models of chemical 
processes based on transport phenomena, chemi- 
cal kinetics, and other chemical engineering 
methods. Emphasis on principles of model build- 
ing and simulation utilizing mathematical solu- 
tions and computer methods. 

ENCH 723 Process Engineering and Design. (3) 

First and second semesters. Coordination of 
chemical engineering and economics to ad- 
vanced process engineering and design. Optimi- 
zation of investment and operating costs. Solu- 
tion of typical problems encountered in the de- 
sign of chemical engineering plants, 

ENCH 730 Complex Equilibrium Stage Process- 
es. (3) Second semester. The theory and applica- 
tion of complex equilibrium stages. Binary and 
multicomponent absorption; extraction; liguefac- 
tion. 

ENCH 735 Chemical Process Dynamics. (3) First 
semester. Prerequisites, differential equations or 
consent of instructor. Analysis of open and 
closed control loops and their elements; dynamic 
response of processes; choice of variables and 
linkages; dynamic testing and synthesis; noise 
and drift; chemical process systems analysis; 
strategies for optimum operation. 



ENCH 737 Chemical Process Optimization. (3) 

Second semester. Techniques of modern optimi- 
zation theory as applied to chemical engineering 
problems. Optimization of single and multivaria- 
ble systems with and without constraints. Applica- 
tion of partial optimization techniques to complex 
chemical engineerng processes, 

ENCH 761 Enzyme Engineering. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENCH 640 Enzyme science and kinetics; princi- 
ples of enzyme insolubilization and denaturation 
with application to design, operation and model- 
ing of enzyme reactors. The relationship between 
mass transfer and apparent kinetics in enzyme 
systems; and techniques of separation and purifi- 
cation of enzymes, 

ENCH 762 Advanced Biochemical Engineering. 

(3) Prerequisite. ENCH 482 or permission of in- 
structor. Advanced topics to include use of a digi- 
tal computer for mathematical modeling of the 
dynamics of biological systems; separation tech- 
niques for heat sensitive biologically active mate- 
rials; and transport phenomena in biological sys- 
tems, 

ENCH 763 Engineering of Artificial Organs. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCH 480 or permission of instruc- 
tor. Design concepts and engineering analysis of 
devices to supplement or replace natural func- 
tions; artificial kidney; heart assistor; membrane 
oxygenator; materials problems, physiological 
considerations. 

ENCH 784 Polymer Physics. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENCH 490 or consent of instructor. Application 
and correlation of mechanical and dielectric re- 
laxation. NMR. electron microscopy. X-ray diffrac- 
tion, diffusion and electrical properties to the 
mechanical properties andtructure of polymers 
in the solid state. 

ENCH 788 Polymer Processing and Applications. 

(3) Prerequisite. ENCH 490 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Application of theoretical knowledge of poly- 
mers to industrial processes. An analysis of poly- 
merization, stabilization, electrical, theological, 
thermal, mechanical and optical properties and 
their influence on processing conditions and end 
use applications, 

ENCH 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

ENCH 818 Advanced Topics in Thermodynamics. 

(3) Second semester. Prerequisite, CHEM 604, 

ENCH 828 Advanced Topics in Chemical Reac- 
tion Systems. (3) First semester. Offered in alter- 
nate years. Prerequisite, ENCH 640, 

ENCH 838 Advanced Topics in Transfer Theory. 

(3) First semester. Offered in alternate years. Pre- 
requisite, ENCH 720. 

ENCH 848 Advanced Topics in Separation Proc- 
esses. (3) Second semester. Offered in alternate 
years, 

ENCH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



CHEMICAL PHYSICS 
PROGRAM 

Professor and Director: Benesch 

Professors: Benedict. De Rocco. Ginter. Krisher, 

Sengers, Zwanzig' 
Visitmg Professor: Tilford 
Ws/t/ng Associate Professor: Dick 
Assistarit Professor: Gammon 

This curriculum is under the combined spon- 
sorship of the Institute for Molecular Physics, the 



Graduate Programs / 57 



Department of Chemistry, and the Department of 
Physics and Astronomy. It is designed to train 
students for research in this rapidly expanding 
interdisciplinary field. 

Areas of study include: astrophysical spectros- 
copy, atmospheric physics and chemistry, bioen- 
glneering. biophysics, critical phenomena, in- 
frared and Raman spectroscopy, Intermolecular 
forces. Interstellar molecules, laser spectroscopy, 
light scattering, liquid crystals, low temperature 
physics, microwave and maser spectroscopy, 
molecular structure, Nf^R and ESR spectroscopy, 
physics and chemistry at high pressure, quantum 
mechanics, reaction kinetics, solid state physics, 
statistical mechanics, transport phenomena, vacu- 
um UV spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction. 

This program is open to graduate students 
admitted to the Departments of Chemistry, and of 
Physics and Astronomy and offers a course of 
study leading to the degrees of Ivlaster of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. Entering students are 
expected to have an undergraduate degree in ei- 
ther chemistry or physics with a strong back- 
ground in the other discipline. However, a mathe- 
matics or engineering major may also be eligible. 

The course program will be adjusted to the 
needs of the individual student, who is required 
to pass a qualifying examination (a version of the 
Physics qualifier, modified to emphasize the 
atomic properties of matter). The successful Ph.D. 
student should end with a mastery of quantum 
mechanics, and have taken advanced courses in 
molecular structure (PHYS 723 or CHEM 685) and 
thermodynamics and intermolecular forces 
(CHEM 687 or 704). In keeping with the interdisci- 
plinary nature of the Program, 9 credits in Chem- 
istry are required from undergraduate Physics 
majors; 9 credits in Physics are required from 
undergraduate Chemistry majors. Research prob- 
lems in chemical physics may be supervised by 
the faculty in the Department of Chemistry, the 
Department of Physics and Astronomy, or the In- 
stitute for Molecular Physics. The program is 
supervised by a committee from the above units. 

The program employs an oral examination — 
subsequent to the written — which is the defense 
of a modest research proposal. This feature pro- 
vides two means for gauging the student's level 
of sophistication and understanding. 

The degree is granted by the department or 
program of origin, that is, physics, chemistry, 
meteorology, etc., and financial assistance de- 
pends on assignment as teaching or research as- 
sistants with individual departments or research 
groups. 

Courses will be taken from other programs. 

Chemistry Program 

Professor and Chairrr^ar): Vanderslice 

Professors; Adier. Breger, Castallan, Freeman, 
Goldsby, Gordon, Grim, Henery-Logan, 
Holmlund, Huheey, Jaquith, Keeney,' Munn, 
Pickard, Ponnamperuma, Purdy, Reeve, 
Rollinson, Rose, Staley, Stewart, Stuntz, Viola 

Associate Professors: Alexander, Ammon, 
Bellama, Boyd, Campagnoni, Davis, DeVoe. 
Hansen, Jarvis, Kasler, Khanna, Lakshmanan, 
Martin, Mazzocchi, Miller, Moore, Murphy, 
O'Haver, Sampugna, Walters, Zoller 

Assistant Professors: Alexander, Bergeron, 
Heikkinen, Helz, Rowan, Tossell 

Research Professor: Bailey 

Lecturer; Chai ken 

^joint appointment witti Dairy Science 

The Chemistry Department offers programs 
leading to the Master of Science or Doctor of Phi- 

58 / Graduate Programs 



losophy degrees with specialization in the fields 
of analytical chemistry, biochemistry, chemical 
physics (in cooperation with the Institute for Mo- 
lecular Physics and the Department of Physics 
and Astronomy), environmental chemistry, geo- 
chemistry, inorganic chemistry, nuclear chemis- 
try, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry. 
The graduate program has been designed with 
maximum flexibility so that a student can achieve 
a strong background in his chosen field of spe- 
cialization. 

Both the thesis and non-thesis options are of- 
fered for the M.S. degree. Departmental regula- 
tions concerning qualifying (diagnostic) examina- 
tions, comprehensive examinations, and other 
matters pertaining to course work have been as- 
sembled for the guidance of candidates for grad- 
uate degrees. Copies of these regulations are 
available from the Department of Chemistry. 

The Department has special research facilities 
for all the above fields and exceptional ones for 
chemical physics and nuclear chemistry. The In- 
stitute for Molecular Physics laboratories have 
been specially designed for high-precision experi- 
ments primarily in the area of chemical physics 
and physical chemistry. Nuclear chemistry facili- 
ties Include the 140-MeV cyclotron housed in the 
Physics Department. Departmental research is 
supported by two large computers in the Comput- 
er Science Building, an PDP 11/45 and a univac 
1108 (complemented by remote access units on a 
time-sharing basis). Other facilities include a 
"clean" room for lunar sample analysis. X-ray 
fluorescence instrumentation, an electron micro- 
probe, mass spectrometers, NMR spectrometers 
including a 100 MHz, Fourier-transform NMR 
spectrometer, ultracentrifuges, and analytical opt- 
ical spectrometers. Electron microscopes, ESCA 
spectrometers, and Laser laboratories are availa- 
ble through the Center of Materials Research. In- 
dividual research facilities are supported by three 
machine shops (two in the Institute for Molecular 
Physics), an excellent glassblowing shop, and 
electronic instrumentation personnel. 

CHEM 401 Inorganic Chemistry. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 481. 

CHEM 403 Radiochemistry. (3) Three lectures per 
week. Prerequisite, one year of college chemistry 
and one year of college physics. Radioactive de- 
cay; introduction to properties of atomic nuclei; 
nuclear processes in cosmology; chemical, 
biomedical and environmental applications of ra- 
dioactivity; nuclear processes as chemical tools; 
interaction of radiation with matter. 

CHEM 421 Advanced Quantitative Analysis. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 430 
and 482 or concurrent registration. An examina- 
tion of some advanced topics in quantitative anal- 
ysis including nonaqueous titrations, precipitation 
phenomena, complex equilibria, and the analyti- 
cal chemistry of the less familiar elements. 

CHEM 423 Organic Quantitative Analysis. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisite, CHEM 203-204 or 213-214, and consent 
of the instructor. The semi-micro determination of 
carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, halogen and certain 
functional groups. 

CHEM 430 Chemical Measurements Laboratory 

I. (3) One lecture and two three-hour laboratory 
periods per week. Corequisite, CHEM 481. An in- 
troduction to the principles and applications of 
quantitative techniques useful in chemistry, with 
emphasis on modern instrumentation. Computer 
programming, electronic circuits, spectroscopy, 
chemical separations. 



CHEM 431 Chemical Measurements Laboratory 

II. (3) One lecture and two three-hour laboratory 
periods per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 481; core- 
quisite, CHEM 482. An introduction to the princi- 
ples and applications of quantitative techniques 
useful in chemistry, with emphasis on modern 
instrumentation. Communications techniques, 
vacuum systems, thermochemistry, phase equili- 
bria, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry. 

CHEM 433 Chemical Synthesis. (3) One lecture 
and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 201-202 or 211-212, and 
203-204 or 213-214. 

CHEM 441 Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 481. An advanced study of 
the compounds of carbon, with special emphasis 
on molecular orbital theory and organic reaction 
mechanisms. 

CHEM 443 Qualitative Organic Analysis. (3) One 

lecture and two-three hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite: CHEM 201-202 or 211-212. 
and 203-204 or 213-214. The systematic identifica- 
tion of organic compounds. 

CHEM 447 Geochemistry of Fuels. (3) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 104 or consent of instructor. 
Discussion of the progenitors and the biochemi- 
cal, chemical and physical agencies that convert 
them into crude oils, coals of various ranks, natu- 
ral gas, and other organic fuels. The origin, com- 
position, mineralogy, and organic constituents 
(kerogen) of oil shales. Mineralogy, geochemical 
cycles, and accumulation of uranium and thor- 
ium. 

CHEM 461 Biochemistry. (3) Three lectures per 
week. Prerequisite. CHEM 203-204 or 213-214, or 
permission of instructor. A comprehensive intro- 
duction to general biochemistry wherein the 
chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lip- 
ids, nucleic acids, and proteins are discussed. 

CHEM 462 Biochemistry II. (3) Three lectures per 
week Prerequisite, CHEM 461. A continuation of 
CHEM 461. 

CHEM 463 Biochemistry Laboratory I. (2) Two 

three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prere- 
quisite, CHEM 461, or concurrent registration in 
CHEM 461. 

CHEM 464 Biochemistry Laboratory II. (2) Two 

three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prere- 
quisite. CHEM 462 or concurrent registration in 
CHEM 462. and CHEM 430 or CHEM 463. 

CHEM 471 Geochemical Methods of Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 103, 104. The course will 
consider the principles and application of geo- 
chemical analysis as applied to a variety of geo- 
logical problems. The topics covered will include 
x-ray and optical spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, 
atomic absorption, electron microprobe and elec- 
tron microscopy. 

CHEM 472 Principles of Geochemistry. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 104 or 
equivalent, and senior standing. A survey of his- 
torical and modern theories of the origin of the 
universe and the solar system. The origin of ele- 
ments and their distributions in space, on extra- 
terrestrial bodies and on earth. Discussion of 
the origin of igneous rocks, of the physical and 
chemical factors governing development and dis- 
tribution of sedimentary rocks, of the oceans, and 
of the atmosphere. Organic sediments, the inter- 
nal structures of earth and the planets, the role of 
isotopes in geothermometry and in the solution of 
other problems. 



CHEM 473 Geochemistry of Solids. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 482 or GEOL 
422. Principles of crystal chemistry applied to 
structures, properties and reactions of minerals 
and non-metallic solids. Emphasis is placed on 
the relation of structural stability to bonding, ion- 
ic size, charge, order-disorder, polymorphism, 
and isomorphism. 

CHEM 474 Environmental Chemistry. (3) Three 
lectures per week Prerequisite, CHEM 481, or 
equivalent. The sources of various elements and 
chemical reactions between them in the atmos- 
phere and hydrosphere are treated. Causes and 
biological effects of air and water pollution by 
certain elements are discussed. 

CHEM 476 Geochemistry of the Biosphere. (3) 

Prerequisite, two years of chemistry including one 
year of either organic or physical chemistry. 
Three lectures per week. An interdisciplinary ap- 
proach involving inorganic, organic, physical, and 
biochemistry to integrate the available informa- 
tion necessary to interpret and explain the major 
aspects of the geochemistry of the biosphere. 

CHEM 481 Physical Chemistry. (3) Three lectures 
per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 203-204 or 213-214, 
MATH 141, PHYS 142 or PHYS 263 (PHYS 263 
may be taken concurrently with CHEM 481) or 
consent of instructor. A course primarily for che- 
mists and chemical engineers. 

CHEM 482 Physical Chemistry II. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 481, or con- 
sent of instructor. A course primarily for chemists 
and chemical engineers. 

CHEM 485 Advanced Physical Chemistry. (2) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 482. Quantum chemistry and 
other selected topics. 

CHEM 486 Advanced Physical Chemistry Lab- 
oratory. (2) Two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisites, CHEM 482 and consent of 
instructor. 

CHEM 498 Special Topics in Chemistry. (3) Three 
lectures or two lectures and one three-hour labo- 
ratory per week. Prerequisite varies with the na- 
ture of the topic being considered. Course may 
be repeated for credic if the subject matter is sub- 
stantially different, but not more than three cred- 
its may be accepted in satisfaction of major sup- 
porting area requirements for chemistry majors. 

CHEM 601 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I. (3) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 401 or equivalent. Three lec- 
tures per week. A survey of the fundamentals of 
modern inorganic chemistry which serves as a 
basis for more advanced work. 

CHEM 602 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II. (3) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 601. Three lectures per week. 
A continuation of CHEM 601 with more emphasis 
on current work in inorganic chemistry. 

CHEM 603 Advanced Inorganic Laboratory. (3) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 601 or concurrent registration 
therein. One lecture and two three-hour laborato- 
ries per week. Practice in synthesis and modern 
experimental techniques in inorganic chemistry. 

CHEM 605 Chemistry of Coordination Com- 
pounds. (3) Prerequisite, CHEM 601 or consent of 
instructor. Three lectures per week. Structure and 
properties of coordination compounds and the 
theoretical bases on which these are interpreted. 

CHEM 606 Chemistry of Organometallic Com- 
pounds. (3) Prerequisite, CHEM 601 or consent of 
instructor. Three lectures per week. An in-depth 
treatment of the properties of compounds having 
metal-carbon bonds. 



CHEM 608 Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemis- 
try. (1-3) Prerequisite, CHEM 601 and 602, or 
equivalent. One to three lectures per week. Top- 
ics of special interest and current importance. 
Course may be repeated to a maximum of six 
credits it topics are different. 

CHEM 621 Chemical Microscopy I. (2) One lec- 
ture and one three hour laboratory period per 
week. Registration limited. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. A study of the use of the micro- 
scope in chemistry. 

CHEM 622 Chemical Microscopy II. (2) One lec- 
ture and one three hour laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite, CHEM 621. A study of the opt- 
ical properties of crystals. 
CHEM 623 Optical methods of Quantitative Anal- 
ysis. (3) Two lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 421 and 482. 
The quantitative applications of emission spec- 
troscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, ultravi- 
olet, visible, and infrared spectrophotometry, fluo- 
rescence, atomic fluorescence, nephelometry, 
and of certain closely related subjects like NMR 
and mass spectroscopy. 
CHEM 624 Electrical Methods of Quantitative 
Analysis. (3) Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 421 
and 482. The use of conductivity, potentiometry, 
polarography, voltammetry, amperometry, collo- 
metry, and chronopotentiometry in quantitative 
analysis. 

CHEM 625 Separation Methods in Quantitative 
Analysis. (3) Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 421 
and 482. The theory and practical application to 
quantitative analysis of the various forms of chro- 
matography, ion exchange, solvent extraction, 
and distillation. 

CHEM 628 Modern Trends in Analytical Chemis- 
try. (2) Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, 
CHEM 421 and 482. A study of advanced meth- 
ods, including topics such as statistical treatment 
of analytical data, kinetic methods in analytical 
chemistry, analytical measurements based on ra- 
dioactivity, and enzymatic techniques. 

CHEM 641 Organic Reaction Mechanisms. (3) 

Three lectures per week. 

CHEM 642 Physical Organic Chemistry. (3) Three 

lectures per week. 

CHEM 643 Organic Chemistry of High Polymers. 

(2) Two lectures per week. An advanced course 
covering the synthesis of monomers, mechanisms 
of polymerization, and the correlation between 
structure and properties in high polymers. 

CHEM 644 Molecular Orbital Theory. (2) Two lec- 
tures per week, A partial quantitative application 
of molecular orbital theory and symmetry to the 
chemical properties and reactions of organic 
molecules. Prerequisites, CHEM 441 and 482. 

CHEM 645 The Chemistry of the Steroids. (2) 

Two lectures per week. 

CHEM 646 The Heterocyclics. (2) Two lectures 

per week. 

CHEM 648 Special Topics in Organic Chemistry. 
(1-3) One to three lecture hours per week. Topics 
of special interest and current importance. 
Course may be repeated to a maximum of nine 
credits provided the topics are different. 

CHEM 661 Proteins, Amino Acids, and Carbohy- 
drates. (2) Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 462 or equivalent. 



CHEM 662 Biological Energy Transductions, Vi- 
tamins, and Hormones. (2) Two lectures per 
week. Prerequisite, CHEM 462 or equivalent. 

CHEM 663 Enzymes. (2) Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, CHEM 462 or equivalent, 

CHEM 664 The Chemistry of Natural Products. 

(2) Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
441. The chemistry and physiological action of 
natural products. Methods of isolation, determina- 
tion of structure and synthesis. 

CHEM 665 Biochemistry of Lipids. (2) Two lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 462 or equiv- 
alent. Classification and chemistry of lipids, lipo- 
genesis and energy metabolism of lipids, structur- 
al lipids, and endocrine control of lipid metabo- 
lism in mammals. 

CHEM 666 Biophysical Chemistry. (2) Two lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 461 and 482, 
or consent of instructor. 
CHEM 668 Special Problems in Biochemistry. 
(2-4) Two to four three-hour laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 464 or equivalent. 
CHEM 669 Special Topics in Biochemistry. (2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 462 
or equivalent. 

CHEM 678 Special Topics in Environmental 
Chemistry. (3) Prerequisite, CHEMISTRY 474 
In-depth treatment of environmental chemistry 
problem areas of current research interest. The 
topics will vary somewhat from year to year. Re- 
peatable to maximum of 6 credits, provided sub- 
ject is different. 

CHEM 681 Infra-Red and Raman Spectroscopy. 
(2) Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. 

CHEM 682 Reaction Kinetics. (3) Three lectures 
per week. 

CHEM 683 Electrochemistry. (3) Three lectures 
per week Prerequisite, CHEM 684 or equivalent. 

CHEM 684 Chemical Thermodynamics. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 482 or 
equivalent. 

CHEM 685 Molecular Structure. (3) Three lectures 
per week. 

CHEM 686 Chemical Crystallography. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. A detailed treatment of single-crystal 
x-ray methods. 

CHEM 687 Statistical Mechanics and Chemistry. 
(3) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
684 or equivalent, 

CHEM 688 Selected Topics in Physical Chemis- 
try. (2) Two lectures per week. 
CHEM 689 Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. 
(3) Three lectures per week. 

CHEM 690 Quantum Chemistry I. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 485. 
CHEM 691 Quantum Chemistry II. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 690 or PHYS 
622. 

CHEM 699 Special Problems in Chemistry. (1-6) 
Prerequisite, one semester of graduate study in 
chemistry. Laboratory experience in a research 
environment Restricted to students in the 
non-thesis M.S. option. Repeatable for a maxi- 
mum of 6 credits. 

CHEM 702 Radiochemistry Laboratory. (1-2) One 
or two four-hour laboratory periods per week. 



Graduate Programs / 59 



Registration limited. Prerequisites. CHEM 403 (or 
concurrent registration therein), and consent of 
instructor. 

CHEM 703 Advanced Radiochemistry. (2) Two 

lectures per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 403 and 
CHEM 462. Utilization of radioisotopes with spe- 
cial emphasis on applications to problems in the 
life sciences. 

CHEM 704 Advanced Radiochemistry Laborato- 
ry. (1-2) One or two four-hour laboratory periods 
per week Prerequisite, CHEM 702 and consent of 
instructor. Laboratory training in the utilization of 
radioisotopes with special emphasis on applica- 
tions to problems in the life sciences. 

CHEM 705 Nuclear Chemistry. (3) Nuclear struc- 
ture models radioactive decay processes, nuclear 
reactions in complex nuclei, fission, nucleosyn- 
thesis and nuclear particle accelerators. 

CHEM 718 Special Topics in Nuclear Chemistry. 
(1-3) One to three lectures per week. A discussion 
of current research problems. Subtitles will be 
given at each offering. Repeatable for credit to a 
maximum of six hours. 

CHEM 721 Organic Geochemistry. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 201 or equiv- 
alent A discussion of the fate of natural organic 
products in the geological environment. The influ- 
ence of diagenetic factors, such as hydrolysis, 
heat, pressure, etc., on such compounds as cellu- 
lose, lignin, proteins, and lipids. Detailed consid- 
eration of the origin of soil organic matter, car- 
bonaceous shales, coal, and crude oil. 

CHEM 722 Cosmochemistry. (3) Three lectures 
per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 482 or equivalent. 
Current theories of origin and evolution of the 
solar system with emphasis on the experimental 
data available to chemists from examination of 
meteorites, the moon, and the earth. 

CHEM 723 Marine Biochemistry. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 481 or equiv- 
alent. The geochemical evolution of the ocean; 
composition of sea water, density-chlorinity- 
salinity relationship and carbon dioxide system. 
The geochemistry of sedimentation with emphasis 
on the chemical stability and inorganic and bio- 
logical production of carbonate, silicate and 
phosphate containing minerals. 

CHEM 727 Geochemical Differentiation. (3) 

Distribution of the chemical elements in the earth 
and the mechanisms by which the distributions 
came about. 

CHEM 728 Selected Topics in Analytical Geo- 
chemistry. (2-3) One or two lectures per week 
and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. This course will be subtitled 
each time it is offered to indicate the analytical 
method discussed. Repeatable for credit to a 
maximum of nine hours. Enrollment will be limit- 
ed. 

CHEM 729 Special Topics in Geochemistry. (1-3) 

One to three lectures per week. A discussion of 
current research problems. Subtitles will be given 
at each offering. Repeatable for credit to a maxi- 
mum of six hours. 

CHEM 750 Chemical Evolution. (3) Prerequisite. 
CHEM 441 . 462, or 721 ; or ZOOL 446: or BOTN 
616; or consent of instructor. The chemical proc- 
esses leading to the appearances of life on earth. 
Theoretical and experimental considerations re- 
lated to the geochemical. organic, and biochemi- 
cal phenomena of chemical evolution. 

CHEM 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 
60 / Graduate Programs 



CHEM 898 Seminar. (1) 

CHEM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 
PROGRAM 

Professor and Chairman: Carter, Birkner, Heins, 
Lepper, Otts. Ragan. Sternberg, Israel ^ 

^jomt appointment witti Meteorology 

Associate Professors: Colville, Cournyn, Garber, 

Hall, McCuen, Piper, Wedding, Witczak 
Assistant Professors: Albrecht, Loutzenheiser, 
Mulinazzi, Schelling 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers 
graduate work leading to the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. All programs 
are planned on an individual basis by the student 
and his advisor to consider the student's back- 
ground and special interests. Courses and re- 
search opportunities are available in the general 
areas of transportation and urban systems, envi- 
ronmental engineering and water resources, 
structural engineering, and soil mechanics. In 
general, emphasis is on learning sound engineer- 
ing principles and applying them to provide for 
the needs of man. 

Applicants for admission should hold a B.S. 
degree in Civil Engineering. However, applicants 
with undergraduate degrees in other disciplines 
may be accepted with the stipulation that defi- 
ciencies in prerequisite undergraduate course 
work be corrected before enrolling in graduate 
courses. There are no entrance examinations 
required to enter the program. 

Two options are available for the Master of Sci- 
ence degree: thesis and non-thesis. The thesis 
option requires 24 credit hours plus a thesis, 
while the non-thesis option is 30 credit hours of 
course work. The department's policies are the 
same as the requirements of the Graduate 
School. 

The requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree are the same as those imposed by the 
Graduate School. An individual program of study 
to suit the needs of the student is developed by 
the student and his advisor. The equivalent of two 
years of full-time study beyond the Master of Sci- 
ence degree is the minimum requirement. The 
student must pass a qualifying examination be- 
fore being admitted to candidacy. Normally, the 
qualifying exam is taken one year after the com- 
pletion of the M.S. degree. There is no language 
requirement for the Ph.D. degree. 

Almost all full-time graduate students receive 
financial assistance which, as a minimum, in- 
cludes tuition remission plus $310 per month for 
master students. 

The research facilities of the department are 
available to graduate students. These include 
laboratories in the following areas: transportation, 
systems analysis, environmental, hydraulics, 
structures, and soil mechanics. A UNIVAC 1106 
and a UNIVAC 1108, complemented by remote 
access units located in the engineering building, 
are available. 

The Washington and Baltimore Metropolitan 
Areas are easily accessible for data, field studies, 
library access, contacts with national organiza- 
tions and attendance at national meetings. The 
location of the University of Maryland offers a 
unique opportunity to obtain an advanced degree 
in Civil Engineering. 

ENCE 410 Advanced Strength of Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENES 220. Strength and deformation 
of deformable bodies, plane stress and strain. 



Torsion theory, unsymmetrical bending, curved 
beams. Behavior of beams, columns, slabs, plates 
and composite members under load. Elastic arid 
inelastic stability. 

ENCE 411 Experimental Stress Analysis. (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite. ENES 220. Application of experimental 
data on materials to design problems. Correlation 
of analytical and experimental methods of analy- 
sis with design. Electric strain gages, photoelas- 
ticity. brittle laquer methods and various analo- 
gies. 

ENCE 420 Basic Civil Engineering Planning I. (3) 

Prerequisites — senior standing or consent of the 
instructor. Urban-regional physical planning from 
the civil engineering viewpoint. Integration of the 
planning aspects of engineering — environmental, 
structural, transportation and water resources — 
into a systems approach to the practice of civil 
engineering. Also, included: site, construction, 
and engineering materials planning; engineering 
economics and evaluation current topics. 

ENCE 430 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics. (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite — ENCE 330. Application of basic princi- 
ples to the solution of engineering problems: ide- 
al fluid flow, mechanics of fluid resistance, open 
channel flow under uniform, gradually varied and 
rapidly varied conditions, sediment transport, role 
of model studies in analysis and design. 

ENCE 431 Surface Water Hydrology. (3) 

Prerequisites. ENCE 330 and 360. Concurrent reg- 
istration in ENCE 460 or permission of instructor. 
Study of the physical processes of the hydrologic 
cycle. Hydrometology. concepts of weather modi- 
fication, evaporation and transpiration infiltration 
studies, run off computations, flood routing, re- 
servoir requirements, emphasis on process simu- 
lation as a tool in water resource development. 

ENCE 432 Ground Water Hydrology. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 330, 460 or permission of 
instructor. Concepts related to the development 
of the ground water resource, hydrogeology, hy- 
drodynamics of flow through porous media, hy- 
draulics of wells, artificial recharge, sea water in- 
trusion, basin-wide ground water development. 

ENCE 433 Environmental Health Engineering 
Analysis. (3) Two lectures and one laboratory per 
week The theory and analytical techniques used 
in evaluating man's environment. Emphasis is 
given to the areas of quantitative, physical elec- 
troanalytical and organic chemistry as applied to 
chemical analysis of water. 

ENCE 434 Air Pollution. (3) Classification of at- 
mospheric pollutants and their effects on visibili- 
ty, inanimate and animate receptors. Evaluation 
of source emissions and principles of air pollu- 
tion control; meteorological factors governing the 
distribution and removal of air pollutants; air 
quality measurements and air pollution control 
legislation. 

ENCE 435 Sanitary Engineering Analysis and 
Design. (4) Three lectures and one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite, ENCE 221 and ENCE 330. The 
application of sanitary analysis and fundamental 
principles to the design and operation of water 
and waste water treatment plants and the control 
of stream pollution, 

ENCE 440 Advanced Soil Mechanics. (4) Three 
lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
site. ENCE 340. Theories of strength, compressi- 
bility, capillarity and permeability. Critical review 
of theories and methods of measuring essential 



properties. Planning, execution and Interpretation 
of soil testing programs, 

ENCE 441 Soil-Foundation Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 340. Soil mechanics and foun- 
dation analysis are integrated In a systems ap- 
proacfi to tfie analysis and design soil founda- 
tion-structural systems. Interaction of bearing 
capacity, settlements, lateral pressures, drainage, 
vibrations, stress distributions, etc., are included 
for a variety of structural systems. 

ENCE 450 Design of Steel Structures. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 350 and concurrent registra- 
tion in ENCE 351. Analyses for stresses and de- 
flections In structures by methods of consistent 
deformations, virtual work and Internal strain en- 
ergy. Application to design of plate girders. Inde- 
terminate and continuous trusses, two hinged 
arches and other structures. Elements of plastic 
analysis and design of steel structures. 

ENCE 451 Design of Concrete Structures. (4) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 340 and ENCE 351. Three 
lecture hours and one laboratory per week. De- 
sign of reinforced concrete structures. Including 
slabs, footings, composite members, building 
frames, and retaining walls. Approximate methods 
of analysis; code requirements; Influence of con- 
crete properties on strength and deflection; opti- 
mum design. Introduction to prestressed concrete 
design 

ENCE 460 Modern Techniques for Structural 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisites, ENCE 351. and ENCE 
360. Two lecture hours and one laboratory per 
week. Application of computer oriented methods 
and numerical techniques to analysis and design 
of structural systems. Matrix formulation of the 
stiffness and flexibility methods for framed struc- 
tures. Introduction of numerical techniques to the 
solution of selected problems In such topics as 
plates, structural stability, and vibrations. 

ENCE 461 Analysis of Civil Engineering Systems 

I. (3) Prerequisite, senior standing or consent of 
instructor. Application of the principles of engi- 
neering economy and statistics to the solution of 
civil engineering problems. Economic comparison 
of alternatives using present worth, annual cost, 
rate of return and cost benefit analyses. Develop- 
ment and use of simple and multiple regression 
models, and statistical decision theory. 

ENCE 463 Engineering Economics and System 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisite, senior standing in engi- 
neering, or consent of instructor. Development 
and application of the principles of engineering 
economics to problems in civil engineering. Eval- 
uation of design alternatives, depreciation and 
sensitivity analysis. Use of systems analysis tech- 
niques, including CPI^, PERT and decision net- 
works. 

ENCE 470 Highway Engineering. (4) Three lec- 
tures and one three-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite— ENCE 340. Location, design, con- 
struction and maintenance of roads and pave- 
ments. Introduction to traffic engineering. 

ENCE 471 Transportation Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 370. A study of the principles 
of transportation engineering as applied to tfie 
various modes of transport. Consideration Is giv- 
en to cost analysis, economic aspects of route 
and site selection and layout. The organization 
and administration of engineering functions. 

ENCE 472 Highway and Airfield Pavement De- 
sign. (3) Prerequisites, ENCE 340 and 370. Two 
lectures and one laboratory per week. Principles 
of pavement analysis and design. Analysis of 
moving loads and pavement response. Subgrade 



evaluation and beneficiation. Flexible and rigid 
pavement design; related materials specifications 
and tests. 

ENCE 489 Special Problems. (3) Prerequisite, 
senior standing. A course arranged to meet the 
needs of exceptionally well prepared students for 
study in a particular field of civil engineering, 

ENCE 600 Advanced Engineering Materials L 
aboratory. (3) Prerequisites, ENES 220, 221 and 
ENCE 300 or equivalent. Critical examination of 
the methods for testing engineering materials and 
structures under static, repeated, sustained and 
Impact forces. Laboratory experiments for the 
determination of strengtti and stiffness of structu- 
real alloys, concrete and other construction mate- 
rials. Critical examination of the effects of test 
factors on the determination of engineering prop- 
erties. 

ENCE 601 Structural Materials and Design. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 410 and 411 or consent of in- 
structor. Relation of structural analysis, properties 
of materials and laboratory study of the behavior 
of members to structural design methods, codes 
and specifications. Effects of temperature, load- 
ing rates and state of combined stress on behav- 
ior of construction materials. 

ENCE 603 Theories of Concrete and Granular 
Materials. (3) Prerequisites, ENCE 600, or con- 
sent of instructor. Critical reviews of analytical 
and experimental investigations of the behavior of 
concretes under diverse conditions of loading 
and environment. Mechanics of granular aggre- 
gates and the chemistry of cements. Theories of 
the design of Portland cement and field experi- 
ence, 

ENCE 610 Advanced Strength of Materials. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENES 220, 221 and ENCE 300, or 
equivalent. Analysis for stress and deformation In 
engineering members by the methods of mechan- 
ics of materials and elementary theories of elas- 
ticity and plasticity. Problems in flexure, torsion 
plates and shells, stress concentrations. Indeter- 
minate combinations, residual stresses, stability, 

ENCE 612 Structures Research Methods and 
Model Analysis. (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 450 and 
ENCE 451 or equivalent instrumentation, data 
analysis; states of stress; structural models, struc- 
tural similitude; analogies; non-destructive testing 
techniques; planning research projects, lab stud- 
ies and reports. 

ENCE 620 Urban-Regional Civil Engineering 
Planning. (3) First semester. Prerequisite, degree 
in Civil Engineering or consent instructor. Theory 
and methodology for the synthesis of general civil 
engineering aspects of urban and regional plan- 
ning. Integration of land use conditions and capa- 
bilities, population factors and needs, engineering 
economics and engineering technologies. Appli- 
cation to special problems In urban-regional de- 
velopment. Preparation of engineering reports. 
Presentation methods. 

ENCE 621 Civil Engineering Planning. (3) Second 
semester. Prerequisite, ENCE 620 or equivalent. 
General to comprehensive planning of complex 
engineering facilities such as industrial plants, 
bridges, utilities and transportation projects. Plan- 
ning based on the synthesis of all applicable fac- 
tors. Emphasis on general civil engineering plan- 
ning including site, structural and construction 
planning. Ian evaluation and feasibility. 

ENCE 622 Urban and Regional Systems Analy- 
sis. (3) Prerequisite or corequisite, ENCE 461 or 
consent of Instructor. Current applications and 
research approaches in land-use forecasting. 



land-use evaluation, urban transportation, 
land-use interrelationships, and the planning Im- 
plementation process in a systems analytic frame- 
work, 

ENCE 630 Analysis and Design of Water Re- 
source Systems. (3) Prerequisite, ENCE 461 or 
equivalent. Use of advanced techniques for the 
design and analysis of complex, multi-purpose 
water resource systems; Identification of the 
objectives of design and translation of the objec- 
tives into design criteria; evaluation of alternate 
designs and the selection of the best design; spe- 
cial emphasis on optimization and simulation 
techniques which are applicable to water re- 
source systems. 

ENCE 631 Advanced Hydrologic Analysis. (3) 

Emphasis is on the analysis of hydrologic data for 
the development of information necessary for 
design or for the identification of important proc- 
esses; eigenvalue and eigenvector analysis of lin- 
ear hydrologic systems; application of multivar- 
lant statistical methods; non-linear least squares. 

ENCE 632 Free Surface Flow. (3) Prerequisite 
ENCE 330 or equivalent. Application of funda- 
mentals of fluid mechanics to problems of free 
surface flow; computation of steady and transient 
water surface profiles; stratified flows In reser- 
voirs and estuaries; diffusion; transition struc- 
tures; sediment transport. 

ENCE 633 The Chemistry of Natural Waters. (4) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 433 or consent of Instructor. 
Three lectures, one lab a week. Application of 
principles from chemical thermodynamics and 
kinetics to the study and interpretation of the 
chemical characteristics of natural water systems. 
The chemical composition of natural waters Is ra- 
tionalized by considering metal ion soluability 
controls. FH, carbonate equilibria, absorption 
reactions redox reactions, and the kinetics of 
oxygenation reactions which occur in natural 
water environments. 

ENCE 634 Air Sampling and Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 434 or consent of instructor. 
Two lectures and one laboratory a week. The 
theory and techniques used in the determination 
and measurement of chemical, radiological, and 
biological pollutants in the atmosphere. Discus- 
sion of air sampling equipment, analytical meth- 
ods and data evaluation. 

ENCE 635 Design of Water Purification Facilities. 

(3) Corequisite, ENCE 636 or equivalent. One lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods a week. Applica- 
tion of basic science and engineering science to 
design of water supply and purification process- 
es; design and economics of unit operations as 
applied to environmental systems. 

ENCE 636 Unit Operations of Environmental 
Health Engineering. (3) Prerequisite, ENCE 221 or 
consent of instructor. Properties and quality cri- 
teria of drinking water as related to health are 
interpreted by a chemical and biological ap- 
proach. Legal aspects of water use and handling 
are considered. Theory and application of aera- 
tion, sedimentation, filtration, centrifugation, de- 
sallnzatlon, corrosion and corrosion control are 
among topics to be considered. 

ENCE 637 Biological Principles of Environmental 
Health Engineering. (4) Prerequisite, MICE 440 or 
equivalent. Three lectures and one lab period a 
week. An exposition of biological principles di- 
rectly affecting man and his environment; assay, 
control and treatment of biological and virologi- 
cal agents in water, sewage, and air; microbiolo- 
gy and biochemistry of aerobic and anerobic 
treatment processes for aqueous wastes. 

Graduate Programs / 61 



ENCE 640 Soil Mechanics. (3) Prerequisites. 
ENCE 340, 440 or equivalent. Identification prop- 
erties tests and classification methods for earth 
materials. Strength and deformation characteris- 
tics, hydraulic properties and permeability, shear- 
ing resistance, compressibility and consolidation, 
with laboratory tests for these properties. Study 
of the basic theories involved and the develop- 
ment of test procedures. 

ENCE 641 Advanced Foundations. (3) 

Prerequisites. ENCE 340, 450 and 451 or equiva- 
lent Principles of mechanics applied to engineer- 
ing problems in foundation Earth pressure theo- 
ries, seepage and drainage phenomena, stability 
of footings and slopes, stresses and deformation 
in soils, consolidation theory and application to 
foundation settlements, 

ENCE 651 Matrix Methods of Structural Analysis. 

(3) Review of basic structural and matrix theory. 
Development of force and displacement methods 
with emphasis on the latter. Discussion of special 
topics such as geometric non-linearity, automated 
and optimum design non-prismatic members and 
thin-walled open sections and sub-division of 
large structures. Emphasis on applications to civil 
engineering structures. 

ENCE 652 Analysis of Plate and Shell Struc- 
tures. (3) Prerequisites: ENCE 410 and ENCE 381 
or equivalent review of theory of elasticity and 
in-plane forces; theory of orthotropic plates: ap- 
proximate methods; large deflection theory, 
buckling; general theory of shells, cylindrical 
shells, domes. 

ENCE 655 Plastic Analysis and Design of Struc- 
tures. (3) Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 
The study of the factors effecting the plastic be- 
havior of steel structures and the criteria neces- 
sary for design. The design of beams, rigid frames 
and multi-story braced frames using current spec- 
ifications. A review of current research and prac- 
tice. 

ENCE 656 Advanced Steel Design. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCE 450 and ENCE 451 or equiva- 
lent interpretation of specifications and codes for 
the design of steel buildings and bridges. Discus- 
sion of the behavior of steel connections, mem- 
bers and structures; the relationship between 
behavior and design specifications, 

ENCE 657 Theory of Structural Design. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 656. Correlation of theory, 
experience, and experiments in study of structur- 
al tyehavior, proportioning, and preliminary de- 
sign. Special design problems of fatigue, buck- 
ling, vibrations, and impact. 

ENCE 660 Engineering Analysis. (3) 

ENCE 661 Finite Element Techniques in Engi- 
neering Analysis. (3) Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor, Basic principles and fundamental con- 
cepts of the finite element method. Consideration 
of geometric and material nonlinearities, converg- 
ence, mesh gradation and computational proce- 
dures in analysis. Applications to plane stress and 
plane strain, plates and shells, eigenvalue prob- 
lems, axi-symmetric stress analysis, and other 
problems in civil engineering. 

ENCE 670 Highv»ay Traffic Characteristics and 
Measurements. (3) Prerequisite. ENCE 470 or 
consent of instructor. The study of the fundamen- 
tal traits and behavior patterns of the road user 
and his vehicle in traffic. The basic characteristics 
of the pedestrian, the driver, the vehicle, traffic 
volume and speed, stream flow and intersection 
operation, parking, and accidents. 

62 / Graduate Programs 



ENCE 671 Highway Traffic Operations. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 470, ENCE 670 or consent of 
instructor, A survey of traffic laws and ordi- 
nances. The design, application and operation of 
traffic control devices and aids, including traffic 
signs and signals, pavement markings, and haz- 
ard delineation. Capacity, accident, and parking 
analyses. 

ENCE 672 Regional Transportation Planning. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 471 or consent of instructor. 
Factors involved and the components of the proc- 
ess for planning statewide and regional transpor- 
tation systems, encompassing all modes. Trans- 
portation planning studies, statewide traffic mod- 
els, investment models, programming and sched- 
uling, 

ENCE 673 Urban Transportation. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENCE 672 or consent of instructor. Relationship 
of transportation to the total urban complex, the 
urban transportation planning process, the mod- 
els used to achieve the various steps in the proc- 
ess and the relationship of private and public 
transportation. Consideration of the factors influ- 
encing the demand for transportation and the 
socio-economic consequences of transportation. 

ENCE 674 Urban Transit Planning and Rail 
Transportation Engineering. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENCE 471 or consent of instructor. Basic engi- 
neering components of conventional and high 
speed railroads and of air cushion and other high 
speed new technology. The study of urban rail 
and bus transit. The characteristics of the vehicle, 
the supporting way, and the terminal require- 
ments will be evaluated with respect to system 
performance, capacity, cost, and level of service. 

ENCE 675 Airport Planning and Design. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 471 or consent of instructor. 
The planning and design of airports including site 
selection, runway configuration, geometric and 
structural design of the landing area, and termin- 
al facilities. Methods of financing airports, esti- 
mates of aeronautical demand, air traffic control, 
and airport lighting are also studied. 

ENCE 676 Highway Traffic Flow Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 461. ENCE 462 or consent of 
the instructor. An examination of physical and 
statistical laws that are used to represent traffic 
flow phenomena. Deterministic models includ- 
ing heat flow, fluid flow, and energy-momentum 
analogies, car following models, and acceleration 
noise. Stochastic approaches using independent 
and Markov processes, queuing models, and 
probability distributions. 

ENCE 677 Quantitative Methods in Transporta- 
tion Engineering. (3) Prerequisite, ENCE 461 or 
consent of instructor. Theory, methods and appli- 
cations relevant to the study of micro- and ma- 
cro-scale transportation systems, in terms of their 
behavior, design, and evaluation A selected over- 
view of optimization, multivariate statistics, sto- 
chastic processes and the general science of sys- 
tems decision processes will form the basis for a 
selected study of pertinent examples. 

ENCE 688 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering. 

(1-3) Prerequisites, permission of instructor. Ad- 
vanced topics selected by the faculty from the 
current literature of civil engineering to suit the 
needs and background of students. May be taken 
for repeated credit when identified by topic title. 

ENCE 689 Seminar. (1-16) 

ENCE 731 Advanced Ground Water Hydrology. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENCE 432 or equivalent. Theory 
and application of unsteady flow in porous media. 
Analysis of one and two dimensional unsteady 



flow. Solutions of non-linear equation of unsteady 
flow with a free surface. Development and use of 
approximate numerical and graphical methods in 
the study of ground water movement. 

ENCE 732 Deterministic Models in Surface Wa- 
ter Hydrology. (3) A detained examination of the 
processes controlling the quantity and quality of 
watershed runoff; emphasis is on the develop- 
ment of deterministic mathematical models for 
process simulation; role of land-phase processes 
in flood hydrology; evaporation and transpiration; 
models for urban watersheds; linkage for hydro- 
graph synthesis. 

ENCE 733 Applied Water Chemistry. (4) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 633 or consent of instructor. 
Three lectures, one lab a week. A study of the 
chemistry of both municipal and industrial water 
treatment processes. Among the topics to be 
considered are water softening, stabilization, 
chemical destabilization of colloidal materials, 
ion exchange, disinfection, chemical oxidation 
and oxygenation reactions. 

ENCE 734 Aerosol Science and Technology. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENCE 430 
or equivalent. Physical properties of air-borne 
particles. Theories of: particle motion under the 
action of external forces; coagulation; Brownian 
motion and diffusion. Application of aerosols in 
atmospheric sciences and industrial processes, 

ENCE 735 Design of Municipal and Industrial 
Wastes Treatment Facilities. (3) Corequisite, 
ENCE 736 or equivalent. One lecture and two lab- 
oratory periods a week. Application of basic sci- 
ence and engineering science to design of munic- 
ipal and industrial waste treatment processes; 
design and economics of unit operations as ap- 
plied to environmental systems. 

ENCE 736 Theory of Aqueous and Solid Waste 
Treatment and Disposal. (3) Prerequisites, ENCE 
221 and fundamentals of micobiology, or con- 
sent of instructor. Theory and basic principles of 
treating and handling waste products; hydraulics 
of sewers; biological oxidation; principles and 
design criteria of biological and physical treat- 
ment processes; disposal of waste sludges and 
solids. 

ENCE 737 Industrial Wastes. (3) Corequisite, 
ENCE 736 or equivalent. A study of the character- 
istics of liquid wastes from major industries, and 
the processes producing the wastes. The theory 
and methods of eliminating or treating the 
wastes, and their effects upon municipal sew- 
age-treatment plants, and receiving waters. 

ENCE 738 Selected Topics in Porous Media 
Flow. (3) Prerequisite, ENCE 731, Analysis of 
two-liquid flows for immiscible fluids, simultane- 
ous flow of two immiscible fluids and miscible 
fluids, Hydrodynamic dispersion theories, parame- 
ters of dispersion and solutions of some disper- 
sion problems with emphasis on migration of pol- 
lutants, A maximum of six hours may be earned 
in this course, 

ENCE 750 Analysis and Design of Structural 
Systems. (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 450 and ENCE 
451 or equivalent. Review of classical determinate 
and indeterminate analysis techniques; numerical 
technique; multistory buildings; space structures; 
suspension bridges and cables structures; arch- 
es; long span bridges. 

ENCE 751 Advanced Problems in Structural 
Behavior. (3) Prerequisite, ENCE 750 or equiva- 
lent. Elastic and inelastic behavior of structural 
members and frames; problems in torsion, stabili- 



ty and bending: open and closed thin-walled sec- 
tions; curved girders, 

ENCE 753 Reinforced Concrete Structures. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCE 450 and 451 or equivalent. 
The behavior and strength of reinforced concrete 
memt5ers under combined loadings, including the 
effects of creep, shrinkage and temperature. 
Mechanisms of shear resistance and design pro- 
cedures for bond, shear and diagonal tension 
Elastic and ultimate strength analysis and design 
of slabs. Columns in multistory frames. Applica- 
tions to reinforced concrete structures. 

ENCE 754 Prestressed Concrete Structures. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 450 and 451 or equivalent 
Fundamental concepts of prestressed concrete. 
Analysis and design of flexural members includ- 
ing composite and continuous beams with em- 
phasis on load balancing technique. Ultimate 
strength design for shear. Design of post ten- 
sioned flat slabs. Various applications of pre- 
stressing Including tension members, compres- 
sion members, circular prestressing. frames and 
folded plates. 

ENCE 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 
ENCE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Comparative Literature 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Fuegi 
Professors: Freedman, Goodwyn, Jones. 

Panichas. Salamanca 
Associate Professors: Coogan. Demaitre. Fleck. 
Greenwood. Walt 

The Program in Comparative Literature offers 
graduate work leading to the degrees of Master of 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy 

The CMLT Program emphasizes work in medie- 
val. Renaissance. Romantic, and modern litera- 
ture, in the standard European languages. The 
forcus of courses and seminars tends to be spe- 
cifically literary, but interdisciplinary work is by 
no means precluded. 

Applicants should have a strong background in 
literary and humanistic studies. Since advanced 
work in Comparative Literature is based on the 
premise that literature should t>e read in the origi- 
nal whenever possible, students are expected to 
be able to read at least one language other than 
English (preferably French. German, or Spanish). 
with a high degree of aesthetic appreciation 
Ph.D. students are expected to use at least two 
foreign languages actively in their work, and it is 
assumed that they will have or develop an ac- 
quaintance with one or two additional languages. 
Entrance examinations are not required, but high 
scores on GRE literature and language examina- 
tions will add weight to applications. 

Financial aid: about one fourth of CMLT gradu- 
ate students receive financial aid. Ordinarily appli- 
cants compete for assistantships in the Freshman 
English program. In exceptional cases, applicants 
have tieen able to obtain positions in foreign lan- 
guage departmefits. 

Students take courses in CMLT and two other 
departments of literature. The MA. degree re- 
quires thirty hours, either 24 hours of course 
work and a thesis, or thirty hours of course work 
and a comprehensive examination. No specific 
numtier of hours is required for the Ph.D., as the 
number will vary according to the preparation 
and goals of the individual student: the average 
has been eight courses beyond the MA. A Mas- 



ter s degree is a required step toward the Ph.D. 
The Ph D comprehensive examinations cover 
three maior areas, determined in consultation 
with the graduate advisers. 

Departments cooperating in the Program: Eng- 
lish. French and Italian. German and Russian. 
Spanish and Portuguese, Classics. 

CMLT 401 Introductory Survey of Comparative 
Literature, (3) Survey of the background of Euro- 
pean Literature through study of Greek and Latin 
literature in English translations, discussing the 
debt of modern literature to the ancients. 

CMLT 402 Introductory Survey of Comparative 
Literature. (3) Study of the medieval and modern 
continental literature. 

CMLT 411 The Greek Drama. (3) The chief works 
of Aeschylus. Sophocles. Euripides, and Aristo- 
phanes in English translations. Emphasis on the 
historic background, on dramatic structure, and 
on the effect of the Attic drama upon the mind of 
the civilized world. 

CMLT 415 The Old Testament as Literature. (3) A 

study of sources, development and literary types. 

CMLT 416 New Testament as Literature. (3) A 

study of the books of the New Testament, with 
attention to the relevant historical background 
and to the transmission of the text. A knowledge 
of Greek is helpful, but not essential. 

CMLT 421 The Classical Trandition and its Influ- 
ence in the Middle Ages and The Renaissance. 

(3) Emphasis on major writers. Reading knowl- 
edge of Greek or Latin required. 

CMLT 422 The Classical Tradition and its Influ- 
ence in the Middle Ages and The Renaissance. 

(3) Emphasis on ma|or writers. Reading knowl- 
edge of Greek or Latin required. 

CMLT 430 Literature of the Middle Ages. (3) 

Narrative, dramatic and lyric literature of the Mid- 
dle Ages studied in translation. 

CMLT 433 Dante and the Romance Tradition. (3) 

A reading of the Divine Comedy to enlighten the 
discovery of reality in western literature. 

CMLT 461 Romanticism — Early Stages. (3) 

Emphasis on England. France and Germany. 
Reading knowledge of French or German re- 
quired. 

CMLT 462 Romanticism — Flowering and Influ- 
ence. (3) Emphasis on England, France and Ger- 
many. Reading knowledge of French or German 
required. 

CMLT 469 The Continental Novel. (3) The novel 
in translation from Stendhal through the Existen- 
tialists, selected from literatures of France, Ger- 
many, Italy. Russia, and Spain. 

CMLT 470 Ibsen and the Continental Drama. (3) 

Emphasis on the major work of Ibsen, with some 
attention given to selected predecessors, contem- 
poraries and successors. 
CMLT 479 Major Contemporary Authors. (3) 

CMLT 488 Genres. (3) A study of a recognized lit- 
erary form, such as tragedy, epic, satire, literary 
criticism, comedy, tragicomedy, etc. The course 
may be repeated for cumulative credit up to six 
hours when different material is presented. 

CMLT 489 Major Writers. (3) Each semester two 
major writers from different cultures and lan- 
guages will be studied. Authors will be chosen on 
the basis of significant relationships of cultural 
and aesthetic contexts, analogies between their 
respective works, and the importance of each 
writer to his literary tradition. 



CMLT 496 Conference Course in Comparative 
Literature. (3) Second semester. A tutorial type 
discussion course, correlating the courses in var- 
ious literatures which the student has previously 
taken with the primary themes and masterpieces 
of world literature. This course is required of 
undergraduate majors in comparative literature, 
but must not be taken until the final year of the 
students program. 

CMLT 498 Selected Topics in Comparative Liter- 
ature, (3) 

CMLT 601 Problems in Comparative Literature. 
(3) 

CMLT 610 Folklore in Literature. (3) 
CMLT 31 The Medieval Epic. (3) 
CMLT 632 The Medieval Romance. (3) 

CMLT 639 Studies in the Renaissance. (3) 

Repeatable to a maximum of nine hours. 

CMLT 640 The Italian Renaissance and its Influ- 
ence. (3) 

CMLT 642 Problems of the Baroque in Litera- 
ture. (3) 

CMLT 649 Studies in Eighteenth Century Litera- 
ture (3) Studies in eighteenth century, literature: 
as announced. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 
hours. 

CMLT 658 Studies in Romanticism. (3) Studies in 
Romanticism: As announced. Repeatable to a 
maxiPTum of 9 hours. 

CMLT 679 Seminar in Modern and Contemporary 
Literature. (3) Seminar in modern and contempo- 
rary literature As announced. Repeatable to a 
maximum of 9 hours. 

CMLT 681 Literary criticism — Ancient and Me- 
dieval. (3) 

CMLT 682 Literary Criticism — Renaissance and 
Modern. (3) 

CMLT 799 Masters Thesis Research. (1-6) 
CMLT 801 Seminar in Themes and Types. (3) 
CMLT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Computer Science 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Minker 
Professors: Atchison, Chu 2 . Edmundson^ . 

Kanal. Stewarf* 
Associate Professors: Agrawala. Austing, Basili. 

Vandergraft, Zelkowitz 
Assistant Professors: Gannon, Hagerty, Hamlet, 

Hecht, McClellan, Mills. D., Noonan, Rieger, 

Samet, Zave 
Research Professors: Rheinboldt' ^ , Rosenfeld' 
Visiting Professor: Mills. H. 

'joint appointment with Computer Science Center 
2joint appointment witt> Electrical Engineering 
3joint appointment witti Mathematics 
*joint appointment with Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics 

The Department of Computer Science offers 
graduate programs leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in 
the following areas: applications, artificial intelli- 
gence, computer systems, information process- 
ing, numerical analysis, programming languages, 
and theory of computing. 

Admission and degree requirements specific to 
the graduate programs in computer science are 



Graduate Programs / 63 



described in a brochure available through the 
Departmental Education Office. There are two 
options for the master's degree: 24 hours of 
course work plus the completion of a thesis; or 
33 hours of course work plus the completion of a 
scholarly paper. There is no minimum course 
requirement m the doctoral program. The number 
and variety of courses offered each semester 
enables students and their advisors to plan an 
Individualized degree program. 

The Department maintains a laboratory con- 
sisting of several PDP 11/45 computer systems, 
display devices, peripheral equipment, and utiliz- 
es the UNIVAC 1108/1106 computer system main- 
tained by the Computer Science Center. 

CMSC 400 Introduction to Computer Languages 
and Systems. (3) Prerequisite, MATH 241 or 
equivalent, A terminal course suitable for 
non-CMSC majors with no programming back- 
ground. Organization and characteristics of com- 
puters. Procedure oriented and assembly lan- 
guages. Representation of data, characters and 
instructions. Introduction to logic design and sys- 
tems organization. Macro definition and genera- 
tion. Program segmentation and linkage. Exten- 
sive use of the computer to complete projects il- 
lustrating programming techniques and machine 
structure. (CMSC 400 may not be counted for 
credit in the graduate program in computer sci- 
ence.) 

CMSC 410 Computer Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 210 or equivalent. This is the 
same course as ENEE 440. Introduction. Comput- 
er elements. Parallel adders and subtracters. Mi- 
cro-operations. Sequences. Computer simulation. 
Organization of a commercially available stored 
program computer. Microprogrammed comput- 
ers. A large-scale batch-processing system. 

CMSC 415 Systems Programming. (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 220. 410. Basic algorithms of 
operating system software. Memory management 
using linkage editors and loaders, dynamic relo- 
cation with base registers, paging. File systems 
and input/output control. Processor allocation for 
multiprogramming, timesharing. The emphasis of 
the course is on practical systems programming, 
including projects such as a simple linkage edi- 
tor, a stand-alone executive, a file system, etc. 

CMSC 420 Data Structures. (3) Prerequisite. 
CMSC 220 or equivalent. Description, properties, 
and storage allocation of data structures includ- 
ing lists and trees. Algorithms for manipulating 
structures. Applications from areas such as data 
processing, information retrieval, symbol manipu- 
lation, and operating systems. 

CMSC 440 Structure of Programming Lan- 
guages. (3) Prerequisite, CMSC 210 or equivalent. 
Formal definition of languages including specifi- 
cation of syntax and semantics. Syntactic structure 
and semantics of simple statements including 
precedence, infix, prefix, and postfix notation. 
Global structure and semantics of algorithmic 
languages including declarations and storage al- 
location, grouping of statements and binding lime 
of constituents, subroutines, coroutines, tasks 
and parameters. List processing and data descrip- 
tion languages. 

CMSC 445 Compiler Writing. (3) Prerequisites, 
CMSC 220, 440. A detailed examination of a com- 
piler for an algebraic language designed around 
the writing of a compiler as the major part of the 
course. Topics covered In the course include a 
review of scanning and parsing, the examination 
of code generation, optimization and error recov- 
ery, and compiler-writing techniques such as 
bootstrapping and translator writing systems. 

64 / Graduate Programs 



CMSC 450 Elementary Logic and Algoritlims. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 240 or consent of instructor. 
This is the same course as MATH 444. An elemen- 
tary development of propositional logic, predicate 
logic, set algebra, and boolean algebra, with a 
discussion of Markov algorithms, turing machines 
and recursive functions. Topics include post pro- 
ductions, word problems, and formal languages. 

CMSC 452 Elementary Theory of Computation. 

(3) Prerequisites, CMSC 120, 250. This course is 
intended to serve two purposes: (1) An introduc- 
tion to the theory of computation, and (2) A tie 
between many abstract results and their concrete 
counterparts. This course establishes a theoreti- 
cal foundation for the proper understanding of 
the inherent limitations and actual power of digi- 
tal computers. Also, it provides a relatively uni- 
form way of stating and investigating problems 
that arise in connection with the computation of 
particular functions and certain classes of func- 
tions. Topics covered include an introductory 
treatment of classes of computable functions, 
computability by register machines, computability 
by turing machines, unsolvable decision prob- 
lems, concrete computational complexity, and 
complexity of loop programs. 

CMSC 455 Elementary Formal Language Theory. 

(3) Prerequisites CMSC 120, 250 This course is 
intended to serve as an introduction to the theory, 
of formal languages. This theory is encountered 
in the study of both programming languages and 
natural languages, and consequently will be use- 
ful in numerous other courses in computer 
science at the undergraduate and graduate levels. 
Topics covered include the highlights of Chom- 
sky's hierarchy of grammars and Chomsky's hier- 
achy of languages, a summary treatment of ac- 
ceptors related to these languages, and a brief 
introduction to the theory of transformational 
grammars. 

CMSC 460 Computational Methods. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 241 and CMSC 110, or equiv- 
alent. Basic computational methods for interpola- 
tion, least squares, approximation, numerical 
quadrature, numerical solution of polynomial and 
transcendental equations, systems of linear equa- 
tions and initial value problems for ordinary dif- 
ferential equations. Emphasis on the methods 
and their computational properties rather than on 
their analytic aspects. Intended primarily for stu- 
dents in the physical and engineering sciences. 
(Listed also as MAPL 460.) 

CMSC 470 Numerical Mathematics: Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 240 and 241; CMSC 110 or 
equivalent. This course with MAPL/CMSC 471, 
forms a one-year introduction to numerical analy- 
sis at the advanced undergraduate level. Interpo- 
lation, numerical differentiation and integration, 
solution of nonlinear equations, acceleration of 
convergence, numerical treatment of differential 
equations. Topics will be supplemented with pro- 
gramming assignments. (Listed also as MAPL 
470.) 

CMSC 471 Numerical Mathematics: Linear Alge- 
bra. (3) Prerequisites: MATH 240 and 241; CMSC 
110 or equivalent. The course, with MAPL/CMSC 
470, forms a one-year introduction to numerical 
analysis at the advanced undergraduate level. Di- 
rect solution of linear systems, norms, least 
squares problems, the symmetric eigenvalue 
problem, basic Iterative methods. Topics will be 
supplemented with programming assignments. 
(Listed also as MAPL 471.) 

CMSC 475 Combinatorics and Graph Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 240 or equivalent. General 
enumeration methods, difference equations, gen- 



erating functions. Elements of graph theory to 
transport networks, matching theory and graphi- 
cal algorithms. (Listed also as MATH 475.) 

CMSC 477 Optimization. (3) Prerequisites: CMSC 
110 and MATH 405 or MATH 474. Linear program- 
ming including the simplex algorithm and dual 
linear programs, convex sets and elements of 
convex programming, combinatorial optimization 
integer programming. (Listed also as MAFL 477.) 

CMSC 480 Simulation of Continuous Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 280 or equivalent. Introduc- 
tion to digital simulation; simulation by mimic 
programming; simulation by FORTRAN program- 
ming; simulation by DSL/90 (or OSMP) program- 
ming; logic and construction of a simulation pro- 
cessor; similarity between digital simulations of 
continuous and discrete systems. 

CMSC 498 Special Problems in Computer Sci- 
ence. (1-3) Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 
An individualized course designed to allow a stu- 
dent or students to pursue a specialized topic or 
project under the supervision of the sensior staff. 
Credit according to work done. 

CMSC 600 Programming Systems. (3) 

Prerequisites. CMSC 410, 420 and 440. Review of 
batch-process programming systems, their com- 
ponents, operating characteristics, services and 
limitations. Concurrent processing of input-output 
and interrupt handling. Structure of multipro- 
gramming systems for large-scale multiprocessor 
computers. Addressing techniques, storage allo- 
cation, file management, systems accounting, and 
user-related services; command languages and 
the embedding of subsystems. Operating charac- 
teristics of large-scale systems. 

CMSC 610 Computer Systems. (3) Prerequisite. 
CMSC 410 or equivalent. Computer organization. 
Memory logic. Control logic. Numerical preces- 
sors. Non-numerical processors. Computer archi- 
tecture. On-line computer systems. Time-sharing 
computer systems. Computer networks. Analog 
and Hybrid computer systems. 

CMSC 620 Problem Solving Methods in Artificial 
Intelligence. (3) Prerequisites, CMSC 420 and 
450. Underlying theoretical concepts in solving 
problems by heuristically guided trial and error 
search methods. State-space problem reduction, 
and first-order predicate calculus representations 
for solving problems. Search algorithms and their 
optlmality' proofs. 

CMSC 630 Theory of Programming Languages. 

(3) Prerequisite: CMSC 440. Syntactic and seman- 
tic models of programming languages. Finite 
state processors and their application to lexical 
analysis. Context free languages, LR(K), prece- 
dence languages as models of programming lan- 
guages. Extensions to context free grammars 
such as property grammars, inherited and syn- 
thesized attributes. Van Wiungaarden grammars 
(ALGOL 68), abstract syntax, the Vienna definition 
language, graph models. Translator writing sys- 
tems, 

CMSC 640 Computability and Automata. (3) 
Prerequisite, CMSC 450 or equivalent. Introduc- 
tion to formal treatment of abstract computing 
devices and the concept of effective procedure'. 
Major topics: (1) finite-state automata. Finite-state 
transducers and acceptors, finite-state languages, 
regular expressions and sets. (2) turing machines, 
computability. and partial recursive functions. The 
turing formalism as a model of the computation 
process; (3) representative models of digital com- 
puters. 

CMSC 660 Algorithmic Numerical Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisites. MATH/CMSC 460 or 470, and 



CMSC 110. Detailed study of problems arising in 
the implementation of numerical algorithms on a 
computer. Typical problems include rounding 
errors, their estimation and control: numerical 
stability considerations; stopping criteria for con- 
verging processes: parallel methods. Examples 
from linear algebra, differential equations, min- 
imization. (Also listed as MATH 684). 

CMSC 670 Numerical Analysis. (3) Prerequisite. 
MATH/CMSC 460 or 470. MATH 405. and MATH 
410. Perturbation theorems for linear equations 
and eigenvalue problems. Stability of solutions of 
ordinary differential equations. Discretization er- 
rors for ordinary differential equations. Rounding 
error for linear equations. Convergence theorems 
for iterative methods for linear and nonlinear 
equations. (Listed also as MATH 638). 

CMSC 700 Translation of Programming Lan- 
guages. (3) Prerequisites. CMSC 420 and 440 
Application of theoretical concepts developed in 
formal language and automata theory to the ana- 
lytic design of programming languages and their 
processors. Theory of pushdown automata, prec- 
edence analysis, and bounded-contex syntactic 
analysis as models of syntactic portion of transla- 
tor design. Design criteria underlying compiler 
techniques, such as backtracking and lookahead. 
Methods for analyzing translator operation in 
terms of estimating storage space and translation 
time requirements. Current version of Backus- 
Naur form. Associated semanic notations for 
specifying the operation of programming lan- 
guage translators, 

CMSC 710 Simulation of Computers and Soft- 
ware. (3) Prerequisite. CMSC 410 or equivalent. 
Computer simulation language, Marco and Micro 
simulation. Boolean translation, softvi/are-hard- 
v^are transformation, discription and simulation of 
a microprogrammed computer, construction and 
simulation of an assembler, project for unified 
hard»/are-softv»are design, 

CMSC 720 Information Retrieval. (3) Prerequisite. 
CMSC 420. Designed to introduce the student to 
computer techniques for information organization 
and retrieval of natural language data. Tech- 
niques of statistical, syntactic and logical analysis 
of natural language for retrieval, and the extent of 
their success. Methods of designing systems for 
use in operational environments. Applications to 
both data and document systems, 

CMSC 723 Computational Linguistics. (3) 

Prerequisite. CMSC 420. Introductory course on 
applications of computational techniques to lin- 
guistics and natural-language processing. Re- 
search cycle of corpus selection, pre-editing, 
keypunching, processing, post-editing, and evalu- 
ation. General-purpose input. Processing, and 
output routines. Special-purpose programs for 
sentence parsing and generation, segmentation. 
idiom recognition, paraphrasing, and stylistic and 
discourse analysis. Programs for dictionary, the- 
saurus, and concordnace compilation, and edit- 
ing. Systems for automatic abstracting, transla- 
tion, and question-ansv^ering 

CMSC 725 Mathematical Linguistics. (3) Prere- 
quisites. CMSC 640 and STAT 400 Introductory 
course on applications of mathematics to linguis- 
tics. Elementary ideas in phonology, grammar. 
and semantics. Automata, formal grammars and 
languages. Chomsky's theory of transformational 
grammas. Yngve's depthhypothesis and syntactic 
complexity. Markov-chain models of word and 
sentence generation. Shannon's information theo- 
ry. Carnap and Bar-Hillel's semantic theory, lexi- 
costatistics and stylostatistics. Zopf's law of fre- 



quency and mandelbrot's rank hyphthesis. Mathe- 
matical models as theoretical foundation for 

computational linguistics, 

CMSC 730 Artificial Intelligence. (3) Prerequis- 
ites. CMSC 620 and STAT 401, Heuristic program- 
ming: tree search procedures. Programs for game 
playing, theorem finding and proving, problem 
solving: multiple-purpose programs. Conversation 
with computers: question-answering programs. 
Trainable pattern classifiers-linear, piecewise line- 
ar, quadratic. 'C. and multilayer machines. Statis- 
tical decision theory, decision functions, liklihood 
ratios: mathematical taxonomy, cluster detection. 
Neural models, computational properties of neur- 
al nets, processing of sensory information, repre- 
sentative conceptual models of the brain 

CMSC 733 Computer Processing of Pictorial In- 
formation. (3) Prerequisite. CMSC 420 Input, out- 
put, and storage of pictorial information. Pictures 
as information sources, efficient encoding, sam- 
pling, quantization, approximation. Position-in- 
variant operations on pictures, digital and optical 
implementations, the PAX language, applications 
to matched and spattal frequency filtering. Pic- 
ture quality, image enhancement' and image res- 
toration'. Processing of complex pictures: figure 
extraction, properties of figures. Data structures 
for pictures description and manipulation: pic- 
ture languages . Graphics systems for alphanu- 
meric and other symbols, line drawings of two- 
and three-dimensional objects, cartoons and mov- 
ies. 

CMSC 737 Topics in Information Science. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. This is 
the same course as LBSC 721. Definition of infor- 
mation science. Relation to cybernetics and other 
sciences, systems analysis, information, basic 
constraints on information systems, processes of 
communication, classes and their use. optimaliza- 
tion and mechanization, 

CMSC 740 Automata Theory. (3) Prerequisite. 
CMSC 640, This is the same course as ENEE 652, 
Introduction to the theory of abstract mathemati- 
cal machines. Structural and behavioral classifi- 
cation of automata. Finite-state automata: theory 
of regular sets. Pushdown automata. Linear- 
bounded automata. Finite transducers. Turing 
machines: universal turing machines. 

CMSC 745 Theory of Formal Languages. (3) Prer- 
equisite. CMSC 640. Formal Grammars: syntax 
and semantics. Post productions: Markov algo- 
rithms. Finite-state languages, parsing, trees, and 
ambiguity. Theory of regular sets. Context-free 
languages: pushdown automata. Context-sensi- 
tive languages: linear-bounded automata. Unres- 
tricted rewriting systems: turing machines. Clo- 
sure properties of languages under operations. 
Undecidability theorems. 

CMSC 750 Theory of Computability. (3) Prere- 
quisite. CMSC 640. Algorithms: Church's thesis 
Primitive recursive functions: Godel numbering 
General and partial recursive functions. Turing 
machines: Turings thesis, arkov algorithms. 
Church's lamda calculus. Grzegorozyk hierarch: 
Peter hierarchy. Relative recursiveness. Word 
problems. Post's correspondence problem. 

CMSC 755 Theories of Information. (3) Prerequis- 
ites. CMSC 620 and STAT 401. Mathematical and 
logical foundations of existing theories of infor- 
mation. Topics include Fisher's theory of statisti- 
cal information, Kulleack and Leibler's theory of 
statistical information. Shannon's theory of selec- 
tive information, and Carnaf and Ear-Hillel's theo- 
ry of semantic information The similarities and 



differences of these and other theories are treat- 
ed. 

CMSC 770 Advanced Linear Numerical Analysis. 

(3) Prerequisite MAPI 470. 471 and MATH 405 or 
MATH 474: or consent of instructor. Advanced 
topics in numerical linear algebra, such as dense 
eigenvalue problems, sparse elimination, iterative 
methods, and other topics, (Same as MAPL 800) 

CMSC 772 Numerical Solution of Nonlinear 
Equations. (3) Prerequisite; MAPL 470. 471 and 
MATH 410; or consent of instructor. Numerical 
solution of nonlinear equations in one and sever- 
al variables. Existence questions. Minimization 
methods. Selected applications. (Same as MAPL 
804.) 

CMSC 780 Computer Applications to the Physi- 
cal Sciences. (3) Prerequisite. CMSC 21. STAT 

400, and a graduate course in physical science. 
Applications of computers to numerical calcula- 
tion, data reduction, and modeling in the physical 
sciences. Stress will be laid on the features of the 
applications which have required techniques not 
usually considered in more general contexts. 

CMSC 782 Modeling and Simulation of Physical 
Systems. (3) Prerequisites. CMSC 210 and STAT 

401. Monte-Carlo and other methods of investi- 
gating models of interest to physical scientists. 
Generation and testing of random numbers. Prob- 
abilistic, deterministic and incomplete models. 

CMSC 798 Graduate Seminar in Computer Sci- 
ence. (1-3) 

CMSC 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

CMSC 818 Advanced Topics in Computer Sys- 
tems. (3) 

CMSC 838 Advanced Topics in Information Pro- 
cessing. (3) 

CMSC 840 Advanced Automata Theory. (3) Prer- 
equisite CMSC 740 Advances and innovations in 
automata theory. Variants of elementary automa- 
ta: multitape, multihead. and multidimensional 
machines. Counters and stack automata. Wing 
machines: Shepherdson-Sturgis machines. Recur- 
sive Hierarchies. Effective computability: relative 
uncomputability. Probabilistic automata. 

CMSC 858 Advanced Topics in Theory and Me- 
tatheory. (3) 

CMSC 878 Advanced Topics in Numerical Meth- 
ods. (3) 

CMSC 898 Advanced Topics in Applications. (3) 

CMSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation research. (1-8) 



Counseling and 
Personnel Services 
Program 

Professor and Chairrrtan; Marx 

Professor: Byrne. Hoyt. Magoon. ' 2, Purnroy,' 
Schlossberg 

Associate Professors: Allan, Birk,^ Greentierg, L 
awrence, Medvene,^ Ray, Rhoads, Stern 

Assistant Professors: Boyd, Chasnoff. Freeman, 
Hardwick, Hahn, Knefelkamp, Leonard, Levine, 
McMullan, Thomas, Vandergoot, Westbrook 

^joint appointment with Phychology 
2joint appointment with Counseling Center 

Historically, the programs of the Department of 
Counseling and Personnel Services have been 
responsive to societal needs in providing leader- 



Graduate Programs / 65 



ship in the training of specialized personnel serv- 
ice workers. The programs are designed for the 
preparation of professionals who serve in a varie- 
ty of social settings including schools, colleges, 
rehabilitative agencies, government agencies and 
other community agencies. Thses professionals 
may serve one of several roles either at the practi- 
tioners level or at an advanced level of leader- 
ship, supervision and research. Programs of prep- 
aration for practitioners are offered at the mas- 
ters and advanced Graduate Specialist level 
while the advanced offerings for researchers, 
supervisors, and personnel administrators are 
conducted at the doctoral level. The master's and 
advanced Graduate Specialist programs are of- 
fered among the following six specialty programs 
within the department The Elementary School 
Counseling Specialty Program prepares the stu- 
dent as a child development consultant, individu- 
al and group counselor and coordinator of pupil 
services. The Secondary School Counseling Pro- 
gram prepares the student to serve as a member 
of a human resources team in individual and 
group counseling, information specialist regard- 
ing personnel, social, educational and vocational 
matters, and pupil personnel program coordina- 
tion. The Psychological Services in Schools Pro- 
grams prepares the student to be certified as a 
school psychologist where his principal functions 
are to assess psychological conditions and devise 
intervention strategies to enhance the learning of 
pupils. The College Student Personnel Specialty 
Program prepares specialists at the higher educa- 
tion level in two areas of concentration: college 
counseling and Student Personnel Administration 
which includes areas such as Student Develop- 
ment, Student Union, Housing, Admissions, 
Placement, Deans of Students and Vice Presi- 
dents of Student Affairs. The Community Counsel- 
ing Specialty Program provides three emphases 
within the program: Career development and 
vocational counseling, personal-social counseling 
and community mental health consultation, and 
adult counseling. The Rehabilitation Counseling 
Specialty Program prepares counselors to work 
with mentally, emotionally, socially and physically 
handicapped persons in public and private agen- 
cies. 

The doctoral programs in Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services are designed to prepare students 
to achieve exceptional competence in the areas 
of research, theory, and practice related to per- 
sonnel services. Graduates typically assume posi- 
tions of leadership, research or supervision of 
personnel services in public units such as large 
school systems, universities, or state rehabilita- 
tion and community agencies; as professors in 
personnel service programs: as counselors in 
higher education institutions. The doctoral pro- 
gram leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree, 
has as its major emphasis research in the behav- 
ioral sciences and applied fields. The primary 
thrust at the master's and Advanced Graduate 
Specialist levels is upon excellence in practice; 
the major emphasis at the Doctoral level is upon 
theory and research. 

Admission to these programs is based not only 
on meeting minimum requirements, but competi- 
tively based on staff resources available. 

EPCP 410 Introduction to Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services. (3) Presents principles and pro- 
cedures, and examines the function of counse- 
lors, psychologists in schools, school social work- 
ers, and other personnel service workers. 

EDCP 411 Mental Hygiene. (3) The practical appli- 
cation of the principles of mental hygiene to 
classroom problems. 

66 / Graduate Program* 



EDCP 413 Behavior Modification. (3) Knowledge 
and techniques of intervention in a variety of so- 
cial situations, including contingency contracting 
and time out will be acquired. 

EDCP 414 Principles of Behavior. (3) Develop- 
ment of student proficiency in analyzing complex 
patterns of behavior on the basis of empirical 
evidence. 

EDCP 415 Behavior Mediation. (3) Prerequisite. 
EDCP 414. Basic principles of human behavior 
will be reviewed and application of these princi- 
ples will be implemented under supervision. 

EDCP 417 Group Dynamics and Leadership. (3) 

The nature and property of groups, interaction 
analysis, developmental phases, leadership dy- 
namics and styles, roles of members and interper- 
sonal communications. Two hours of lecture- 
discussion and two hours of laboratory per 
week; laboratory involves experimental based 
learning. 

EDCP 420 Education and Racism. (3) Strategy 
development for counselors and educators to 
deal with problems of racism. 

EDCP 460 Introduction to Rehabilitation counsel- 
ing. (3) Introductory course for majors in rehabili- 
tation counseling, social work, psychology, or 
education who desire to work professionally with 
physically or emotionally handicapped persons. 

EDCP 470 Introduction to Student Personnel. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A systematic 
analysis of research and theoretical literature on 
a variety of major problems in the organization 
and administration of student personnel services 
in higher education. Included will be discussion 
of such topics as the student personnel philoso- 
phy in education, counseling services, discipline, 
housing, student activities, financial aid. health, 
remedial services, etc. 

EDCP 489 Field Experience in Counseling and 
Personnel Services. (1-4) Prerequisites, at least 
six semester hours in education at the University 
of Maryland plus such other prerequisites as may 
be set by the major area in which the experience 
is to be taken. Planned field experience may be 
provided for selected students who have had 
teaching experience and whose application for 
such field experience has been approved by the 
education faculty. Field experience is offered in a 
given area to both major and nonmajor students. 
Note: The total number of credits which a student 
may earn in EDCP 489. 888. and 889 is limited to 
a maximum of 20 semester hours. 

EDCP 498 Special Problems in Counseling and 
Personnel Services. (1-3) Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. Available only to major students who 
have formal plans for individual study of ap- 
proved problems. 

EDCP 499 Worl(shops, clinics, institutes. (1-6) 

The maximum number of credits that may be 
earned under this course symbol toward any de- 
gree is six semester hours; the symbol may be 
used two or more times until six semester hours 
have been reached. The following type of educa- 
tional enterprise may be scheduled under this 
course heading: workshops conducted by the 
department of counseling and personnel services 
(or developed cooperatively with other depart- 
ments, colleges and universities) and not other- 
wise covered in the present course listing; clinical 
experiences in counseling and testing centers, 
reading clinics, speech therapy laboratories, and 
special education centers; institutes developed 
around specific topics or problems and intended 
for designated groups. 



EDCP 611 Occupational Choice Theory and In- 
formation. (3) Research and theory related to 
occupational and educational decisions; pro- 
grams of related information and other activities 
in occupational decision. 

EDCP 614 Personality Theories in Counseling 
and Personnel Services. (3) Examination of con- 
structs and research relating to major personality 
theories with emphasis on their significance for 
working with the behaviors of individuals. 

EDCP 615 Cases in Appraisal. (3) Prerequisite. 
EDMS 446 or EDMS 451. Collecting and interpret- 
ing non-standardized pupil appraisal data; sys- 
thesis of all types of date through case study pro- 
cedures. 

EDCP 616 Counseling — Theoretical Founda- 
tions and Practice. (3) Prerequisite. EDCP 615. 
Exploration of learning theories as applied to 
counseling in school, and practices which stem 
from such theories. 

EDCP 617 Group Counseling. (3) Prerequisite, 
EDCP 616. A survey of theory, research and prac- 
tice of group counseling and psychotherapy with 
an introduction to growth groups and the labora- 
tory approach, therapeutic factors in groups, 
composition of therapeutic groups, problem 
clients, therapeutic techniques, research meth- 
ods, theories, ethics and training of group coun- 
selors and therapists. 

EDCP 619 Practicum in Counseling. (2-6) 

Prerequisites. EDCP 616 and permission of in- 
structor. Sequence of supervised counseling ex- 
periences of increasing complexity. Limited to 
eight applicants in advance. Two hours class plus 
laboratory. 

EDCP 626 Group Counseling practicum. (3) 

Prerequisite. EDCP 617. EDCP 619. and consent 
of instructor. A supervised field experience in 
group counseling. 

EDCP 627 Process Consultation. (3) Prerequisite, 
gruaduate course in group process. Study of case 
consultation, systems consultation, mental health 
consultation and the professionals role in sys- 
tems intervention strategies. 

EDCP 633 Diagnostic Appraisal of Children I. (4) 

Assessment of development, emotional and learn- 
ing problems of children in schools. Practicum 
experience. 

EDCP 634 Diagnostic Appraisal of Children II. (4) 

Prerequisite. EDCP 633. Assessment of develop- 
ment, emotional, and learning problems of ado- 
lescents in schools. Practicum experience. 

EDCP 635 Therapeutic Techniques and Class- 
room Management I. (3) Prerequisite. EDCP 414. 
Diagnosis and treatment of problems presented 
by teachers and parents. Practicum experience. 

EDCP 636 Therapeutic Techniques and Class- 
room Management II. (3) Prerequisite, EDCP 635. 
The objective of this course is to understand and 
to treat children's problems. The focus is primari- 
ly on the older child in secondary school and the 
orientation is essentially t>ehavioral. Practicum 
experience wtH be provided. 

EDCP 645 Counseling in Elementary Schools. (3) 

Prerequisite. EDCP 615 or consent of instructor. 
Counseling theory and practices as related to 
children. Emphasis will be placed on an aware- 
ness of the child's total behavior as well as on 
specific methods of communicating with the child 
through techniques of play interviews, observa- 
tions, and the use of non-parametric data. 



EDCP 655 Organization and Administration of 
Personnel Services. (2) Prerequisite, EDCP 619 
or permission of instructor. Exploration of per- 
sonnel services programs and implementing per- 
sonnel services practices. 

EDCP 656 Counseling and Personnel Services 
Seminar. (2) Prerequisite, advanced standing. 
Examination of issues that bear on professional 
issues such as ethics, interprofessional relation- 
ships and research. 

EDCP 661 Psycho-social Aspects of Disability. 

(3) Prerequisite, EDCP 460 or consent of instruc- 
tor. This course is part of the Core curriculum for 
rehabilitation counselors. It is designed to devel- 
op an understanding of the nature and impor- 
tance of the personal and psycho-social aspects 
of adult disability. 

EDCP 662 Psychiatric Aspects of Disability I. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDCP 460 or equivalent and consent 
of instructor. Part of Core curriculum in rehabili- 
tation counseling. It is designed to develop an 
understanding of the rehabilitation process, 
clients served, and skills and attitudes necessary 
for vtforking effectively with the physically disa- 
bled. 

EDCP 663 Psychiatric Aspects of Disability II. (3) 
Prerequisite, EDCP 460 or equivalent and consent 
of instructor. Part of Core curriculum in rehabili- 
tation counseling. The psychiatric rehabilitation 
client; understanding his needs, treatment ap- 
proaches available, and society's reaction to the 
client. 

EDCP 668 Special Topics in Rehabilitation. (1-6) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Repeat- 
able to a maximum of six hours. 

EDCP 718 Advanced Seminar in Group Process- 
es. (2-6) Prerequisites, EDCP 626. Repeatable to a 
maximum of six credits. 

EDCP 735 Seminar in Rehabilitation Counseling. 

(2) This course is part of the Core curriculum for 
rehabilitation counselors. It is designed to provide 
the advanced rehabilitation counseling student 
with a formal seminar to discuss, evaluate and 
attempt to reach personal resolution regarding 
pertinent professional problems and issues in the 
field. 

EDCP 771 The College Student. (3) A demo- 
graphic study of the characteristics of college 
students as well as a study of their aspirations, 
values, and purposes. 

EDCP 776 Modification of Human Behavior — 
Laboratory and practicum. (3) Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. Individual and group super- 
vised introduction to intake and counseling rela- 
tionships. 

EDCP 777 Modification of Human Behavior — 
Laboratory and Practicum. (3) Prerequisite, EDCP 
776 and permission of instructor. Continuation of 
EDCP 776. Further experience under direct super- 
vision of more varied forms of counseling rela- 
tionships. 

EDCP 778 Seminar in Student Personnel. (2-6) 

An intensive study of the various student person- 
nel functions. A means to integrate the knowl- 
edge from various fields as they relate to student 
personnel administration. 

EDCP 788 Advanced Practicum in Counseling. 
(1-6) Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Pre- 
vious practicum experience. Individual supervi- 
sion of counseling, and group consultation. Re- 
peatable to a maximum of six credits. 



EDCP 789 Advanced Topics in Counseling and 
Personnel Services. (1-6) Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of 6 credits. 

EDCP 798 Special Problems in Counseling and 
Personnel Services. (1-6) Master's AGS, of doc- 
toral candidates who desire to pursue special 
research problems under the direction of their 
advisers may register for credit under this num- 
ber. 

EDCP 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) Regis- 
tration required to the extent of six hours for 
master's thesis. 

EDCP 888 Apprenticeship In Counseling and 
Personnel Services. (1-9) Apprenticeships in the 
major area of study are available to selected stu- 
dents whose application for an apprenticeship 
has been approved by the education faculty. Each 
apprentice is assigned to work for at least a se- 
mester full-time or the equivalent with an appro- 
priate staff member of a cooperating school, 
school system, or educational institution or agen- 
cy. The sponsor of the apprentice maintains a 
close working relationship with the apprentice 
and the other persons involved. Prerequisites, 
teaching experience, a master's degree in educa- 
tion, and at least six semester hours in education 
at the University of Maryland. Note: The total 
number of credits which a student may earn in 
EDCP 489, 888, and 889 is limited to a maximum 
of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDCP 889 Intership in Counseling and Personnel 
Services. (3-16) Internships in the major area of 
study are available to selected students who have 
teaching experience. The following groups of 
students are eligible: (A) any student who has 
been advanced to candidacy for the doctor's de- 
gree; and (B) any student who receives special 
approval by the education faculty for an intern- 
ship, provided that price to taking an internship, 
such student shall have completed at least 60 
semester hours of graduate work, including at 
least six semester hours in education at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Each intern is assigned to 
work on a full-time basis tor at least a semester 
with an appropriate staff member in a coopera- 
ting school, school system, or educational institu- 
tion or agency. The internship must be taken in a 
school situation different from the one where the 
student is regularly employed. The intern's spon- 
sor maintains a close working relationship with 
the intern and the other persons involved. Note: 
The total number of credits which a student may 
earn in EDCP 489, 888, and 889 is limited to a 
maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDCP 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

Registration required to the extent of 6-9 hours 
for an Ed.D. project and 12-18 hours for a Ph.D. 
dissrtation. 

Criminal Justice and 
Criminology Program 

Professor and Director: Lejins 
Associate Professors: Maida, Tennyson 
Assistar)t Professors: Butler, Ingraham, 
Johson, Jamison, Minor 
The Program of graduate study leading to a 
Master of Arts and Ph.D. degree in the area of 
Criminal Justice and Criminology is intended to 
prepare students for research, teaching and pro- 
fessional employment in the operational agencies 
in the field of criminal justice. This program com- 
bines an intensive background in a social science 



discipline such as sociology, psychology, public 
administration, etc., with graduate-level study of 
selected aspects of the criminal justice field. 

Students enrolled in the M.A. program have two 
options: a Criminology option and a Criminal Jus- 
tice option. The general plan of study for both 
options is as follows: 

1. Three social science courses on an appropri- 
ate level in theory, methodology and statis- 
tics. 

2. Three appropriate-level courses in Criminolo- 
gy or Law Enforcement depending on the 
option. One of these should be a general 
seminar dealing with the over-all field of 
criminal justice. 

3. Two elective courses. 

4. The student has a choice between: 

a. an M.A. degree with an M.A. thesis, 

b. an M.A. degree without thesis, but with 
some additional requirements. 

In addition to the general Graduate School re- 
quirements, special admission requirements in- 
clude the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude 
Test, a major in a social science discipline, and 9 
hours of course work in the appropriate area of 
criminal justice. The undergraduate social sci- 
ence major must have included at least one 
course each in theory, statistics and research 
methods. At the discretion of the Graduate Ad- 
mission Committee of the Institute, deficiencies in 
some of the above areas may be made up by 
noncredit work at the beginning of the program. 

Admission to the Ph.D. program in Criminal 
Justice and Criminology depends on meeting the 
general Graduate School requirements and is 
determined by the Graduate Admissions Commit- 
tee of the Institute, Admission presupposes com- 
pletion of the M.A. degree. For completion of the 
Ph.D. degree, in addition to the general Graduate 
School Ph.D. requirements, competence in the 
theory of at least one social science discipline, in 
research methodology and in quantitative tech- 
niques is expected, as well as competence in the 
general theory of the criminal justice field and in 
the specialization area selected by the student. 
The necessary coursework is determined on the 
basis of the student's previous preparation, 
needs, and interests. The candidate is required to 
pass Ph.D. comprehensive examinations, acquire 
at least 12 hours of Ph.D. research credits, and 
prepare and defend a doctoral dissertation under 
the guidance of his Ph.D. dissertation committee. 



Criminology 

CRIM 432 Law of Corrections. (3) Prerequisite, 
LENF 230 or 234 and CRIM 220. A review of the 
law of criminal corrections from sentencing to 
final release or release on parole. Probation, pun- 
ishments, special treatments for special offenders, 
parole and pardon, and the prisoner's civil rights 
are also examined. 

CRIM 450 Juvenile Delinquency. (3) Prerequisite, 
SOCY 100. Juvenile delinquency in relation to the 
general problem of crime; analysis of factors 
underlying juvenile delinquency; treatment and 
prevention. 

CRIM 451 Crime and Delinquency Prevention. (3) 

Prerequisites, CRIM 220 and CRIM 450 or consent 
of instructor. Methods and programs in preven- 
tion of crime and delinquency. 

CRIM 452 Treatment of Criminals and Delin- 
quents in the Community. (3) Prerequisite, CRIM 
220 or CRIM 450 or consent of instructor. Analy- 
sis of the processes and methods in the modifica- 



Graduate Programs / 67 



tion of criminal patterns of betiavior in a commu- 
nity setting. 

CRIM 453 Institutional Treatment of Criminals 
and Delinquents. (3) Prerequisite, CRIM 220 or 
CRIM 450 or consent of instructor. History, orga- 
nization and functions of penal and correctional 
institutions for adults and juveniles. 
CRIM 454 Contemporary Criminological Theory. 
(3) Prerequisite, CRIM 220, CRIM 450, and CRIM 
451 or CRIM 452 or CRIM 453. Brief historical 
overview of criminological tfieory up to the 50's. 
Deviance. Labeling. Typologies. Most recent re- 
search in criminalistic subcultures and middle 
class delinquency. Recent proposals for 'decri- 
minalization'. 

CRIM 498 Selected Topics in Criminology. (3) 

Topics of special interest to advanced undergrad- 
uates in criminology. Such courses will be offered 
in response to student request and faculty inter- 
est. No more than six credits may be taken by a 
student in selected topics. 

CRIM 610 Research Methods in Criminal Justice 
and Criminology. (3) 

CRIM 610 Research Methods in Criminal Justice 
& Criminology. (3) Prerequisite: Completion of 
research methods and statistics requirements for 
the M.A. degree. Examination of special research 
problems and techniques. 
CRIM 650 Advanced Criminology. (3) First semes- 
ter. Survey of the principal issues in contempo- 
rary criminological theory and research. 

CRIM 651 Seminar in Criminology. (3) Second 
semester. 

CRIM 652 Seminar in Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 

First semester. 

CRIM 653 Crime and Delinquency as a Commu- 
nity Problem. (3) Second semester. An intensive 
study of selected problems in adult crime and 
juvenile delinquency in Maryland. 

CRIM 654 History of Criminological Thought. (3) 

Prerequisite: CRIM 454 or its equivalent. A study 
of the development of criminological thought 
from antiquity to the present. 
CRIM 699 Special Criminological Problems. (3) 
CRIM 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

CRIM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

Doctoral dissertation research in criminal justice 
and criminology. 



Institute of Criminal Justice and 
Criminology 

LENF 444 Advanced Law Enforcement Adminis- 
tration. (3) Prerequisite, LENF 340 or consent of 
instructor. The structuring of manpower, material, 
and systems to accomplish the major goals of 
social control. Personnel and systems manage- 
ment. Political controls and limitations on author- 
ity and jurisdiction. 

LENF 462 Special Problems in Security Adminis- 
tration. (3) Prerequisites, LENF 360 and consent 
of instructor. An advanced course for students 
desiring to focus on specific concerns in the 
study of private security organizations; business 
intelligence and espionage; vulnerability and criti- 
cality analyses in physical security; transporta- 
tion, banking, hospital and military security proti- 
lems; uniformed security forces; national defense 
information; and others. 



LENF 498 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice. 
(1-6) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Super- 
vised study of a selected topic to be announced 
in the field of criminal justice. Repeatable to a 
maximum of six credits. 

LENF 600 Criminal Justice. (3) Prerequisites, 
admission to the graduate program in criminal 
justice or consent of instructor. Current concept 
of criminal justice in relationship to other con- 
cepts in the field. Historical perspective. Criminal 
justice and social control. Operational implica- 
tions. Systemic aspects. Issues of evaluation. 

LENF 630 Seminar in Criminal Law and Society. 

(3) Prerequisite, LENF 230 or its equivalent and a 
course in introductory criminology. The criminal 
law is studies in the context of general studies in 
the area of sociology of law. The evolution and 
social and psychological factors affecting the 
formulation and administration of criminal laws 
are discussed. Also examined is the impact of 
criminal laws and their sanctions on behavior in 
the light of recent empirical evidence. 

LENF 640 Seminar in Criminal Justice Adminis- 
tration. (3) Prerequisites, one course in the theory 
of groups or organizations, one course in admin- 
istration: or consent of instructor. Examination of 
external and internal factors that currently impact 
on police administration. Intra-organizational rela- 
tionships and policy formulation: the conversion 
of imputs into decisions and policies. Strategies 
for formulating, implementing and assessing ad- 
ministrative decisions. 

LENF 699 Special Problems in Criminal Justice. 
(1-3) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Super- 
vised study of a selected problem in the field of 
criminal justice. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 
credits. 
LENF 720 Criminal Justice System Planning. (3) 

LENF 720 Criminal Justice System Planning. (3) 

Prerequisites: One course in criminal justice and 
one course in research methodology. System 
theory and method; examination of planning 
methods and models based primarily on a sys- 
tems approach to the operations of the criminal 
justice system. 
LENF 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 



Early 

Childhood-Elementary 
Education Program 

Professor and Chairman: Sublett 

Professors: Ashiock, Duffey, Goff, Leeper, O'Neill, 

Weaver, J. Wilson, R. Wilson 
/Associate Professors: Amershek, Church, Dietz, 

Eley, Gantt, Heidelbach, Herman, Johnson, 

Roderick, Seefeldt, Sullivan, Williams 
Assistant Professors: Evans, Hill, Jantz, Knifong 

Schumacher, Sunal 

Graduate programs leading to M.A., MED. and 
Ph.D. degrees in the Department of Early Child- 
hood-Elementary Education are designed to pre- 
pare teachers, curriculum specialists, supervisors, 
administrators, and higher education instructors 
to function effectively in leadership positions in- 
volving programs for young children. 

Masters Degree programs average 30-36 semes- 
ter hours. Ph.D. programs average 90 semester 
hours, including work at the master's level. All 



applicants must submit the Miller Analogy Test 
score as prerequisite to admission. 

Students have opportunities to specialize in any 
of the following areas: early childhood education, 
elementary education, corrective-remedial reading 
instruction, science education, mathematics edu- 
cation, language arts, social studies education, or 
nursery-kindergarten education. 

Special facilities for graduate study include the 
Reading Center, the Science Teaching Center, the 
Teacher Education Centers in local schools, the 
Center for Young Children. 

Programs, particularly at the doctoral level, are 
individualized to reflect the student's background 
and to meet his particular career goals. Regular 
counseling with an advisor is an important aspect 
of each program. An effort is made to ascertain 
that graduate programs include both theory and 
practicum, professional work and academic 
courses. 

The department is able to give financial aid, in 
the form of graduate assistantships, to students 
of proven ability who have had public school 
teaching experience. 

There is a comprehensive examination near the 
completion of work at the master's level. The 
Ph.D. program includes a preliminary examination 
after approximately 12 semester hours of work 
and a comprehensive examination near the com- 
pletion of the program. 

EDEL 401 Science in Early Childhood Education. 

(3) Designed primarily to help in-service teachers, 
nursery school through grade 3, to acquire gener- 
al science understandings and to develop teach- 
ing materials for practical use in classrooms. In- 
cludes experiments, demonstrations, construc- 
tions, observations, field trips and use of audio- 
visual materials. The emphasis is on content and 
method related to science units in common use 
in nursery school through grade 3. Offered during 
summer sessions and in off-campus programs 
taught through University College. Ordinarily 
there is no field placement. 
EDEL 402 Science in the Elementary School. (3) 
Designed primarily to help in-service teachers, 
grades 1-6, to acquire general science under- 
standings and to develop teaching materials for 
practical use in classrooms. Includes experi- 
ments, demonstrations, constructions, observa- 
tions, field trips and use of audio-visual materials. 
The emphasis is on content and method related 
to science units in common use in grades 1-6. 
Offered during summer sessions and in 
off-campus programs taught through University 
College. Ordinarily there is no field placement. 

EDEL 404 Language Arts in Early Childhood 
Education. (3) Teaching of spelling, handwriting, 
oral and written expression and creative expres- 
sion. Designed primarily for in-service teachers, 
nursery school through grade 3. Offered during 
summer sessions and in off-campus programs 
taught through University College. Ordinarily, 
there is no field placement. 

EDEL 405 Language Arts in the Elementary 
School. (3) Teaching of spelling, handwriting, 
oral and written expression and creative expres- 
sion. Designed primarily for in-service teachers, 
grades 1-6. Offered during summer sessions and 
in off-campus programs taught through University 
College. Ordinarily there is no field placement. 

EDEL 406 Social Studies in Early Childhood 
Education. (3) Consideration given to curriculum, 
organization and methods of teaching, evaluation 
of newer materials and utilization of environmen- 
tal resources. Designed for in-service teachers, 



68 / Graduate Programs 



nursery school through grade 3. Offered during 
summer sessions and in off-campus programs 
taught through University College. Ordinarily 
there is no field placement. 

EDEL 407 Social Studies in the Elementary 
School. (3) Consideration given to curriculum. 
Organization and methods of teaching, evaluation 
of newer materials and utilization of environmen- 
tal resources Designed for irvservice teachers, 
grades 1-6. Offered during summer sessions and 
in off-campus programs taught through University 
College. Ordinarily there is no field placement. 

EDEL 410 The Child and the Curriculum — Early 
Childhood. (3) Relationship of the school curicu- 
lum. nursery school through grade 3, to child 
growth and development. Recent trends in curric- 
ulum organization: the effect of environment on 
learning; readiness to learn; and adapting curric- 
ulum content and methods to maturity levels of 
children Designed for in-service teachers, nurs- 
ery school through grade 3. Offered during sum- 
mer sessions and in off-campus programs taught 
through University College. Ordinarily there is no 
field placement. 

EDEL 411 The Child and The Curriculum — Ele- 
mentary. (3) Relationship of the school curricu- 
lum, grades 1-6. to child growth and devevelop- 
ment. Recent trends in curriculum organization: 
the effect of environment on learning; readiness 
to learn; and adapting curriculum content and 
methods to maturity levels of children. Designed 
for in-service teachers, grades 1-6. Offered during 
summer sessions and in off-campus programs 
taught through University College. Ordinarily 
there is no field placement. 

EDEL 412 Art In the Elementary School. (3) 

Concerned with art methods and materials for 
elementary schools. Includes laboratory experi- 
ences with materials appropriated for elementary 
schools. 

EDEL 413 Mathematics in Early Chlldhoo<J Edu- 
cation. (3) Prerequisite. MATH 210 or equivalent. 
Emphasis on materials and procedures which 
help pupils sense arithmetic meanings and rela- 
tionships. Designed to help in-service teachers, 
nursery school through grade 3. gain a better 
understanding of the numtser system and arith- 
metical processes. Offered during summer ses- 
sions and in off-campus programs taught through 
University College. Ordinarily there is no field 
placement. 

EDEL 414 Mathematics In the Elementary 
School. (3) Prerequisite. MATH 210 or equivalent. 
Emphasis on materials and procedures which 
help pupils sense arithmetic meanings and rela- 
tionships. Designed to help in-service teachers, 
grades 1-6. gain a better understanding of the 
number system and arithmetical processes. Of- 
fered during summer sessions and in off-campus 
programs taught through University College. Ordi- 
narily there is no field placement. 

EDEL 415 Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning 
DisabilitJes in Mathematics I. (3) Prerequisite. 
EDEL 314 or equivalent and approval of instruc- 
tor. Diagnosis and treatment of disabilities in 
mathematics. Techniques and materials useful for 
working with children in both clinical and class- 
room settings. Case studies with children pre- 
viously diagnosed as primarily corrective rather 
than severely disabled. Laboratory hours to be 
arranged. 

EDEL 424 Literature for Children and Young 
People, Advanced. (3) Development of literary 
materials for children and young people. Timeless 



and ageless books, and outstanding examples of 
contempory publishing. Evaluation of the contri- 
butions of individual authors and illustrators and 
children's book awards 

EDEL 425 The Teaching of Reading — Early 
Childhood. (3) Concerned with the fundamentals 
of developmental reading instruction, including 
reading readiness, use of experience stories, pro- 
cedures in using Basal readers, the improvement 
of comprehension, teaching reading in all areas 
of the curriculum, uses of children s literature. 
the program in word analysis, and procedures for 
determining individual needs. Designed for 
in-service teachers, nursery school through grade 
3. Offered during summer sessions and in 
off-campus programs taught through University 
College. Ordinarily, there is no field placement. 

EDEL 426 The Teaching of Reading — Elementa- 
ry. (3) Concerned with the fundamentals of devel- 
opmental reading instruction, including reading 
readiness, use of experience stories, procedures 
in using Easal readers, the improvement of com- 
prehension, teaching reading in all areas of the 
curriculum, uses of children's literature, the pro- 
gram in word analysis, and procedures for deter- 
mining individual needs. Designed for in-service 
teachers, grades 1-6. Offered during summer ses- 
sions and in off-campus programs taught through 
University College. Ordinarily, there Is no field 
placement. 

EDEL 427 The Reading Process. (1-3) Pre- 
requisite: consent of the department A survey of 
the reading process to provide needed knowledge 
for graduate studies in reading. Students will be 
pretested prior to registration and take only those 
modules of the course identified as needed. 



EDED 430 Corrective-Remedial Reading Instruc- 
tion. (3) Prerequisite: Edel/Edse 427 or equiva- 
lent, and consent of the department. For teacfi- 
ers. supervisors, and administrators who wish to 
identify and assist pupils with reading difficulties. 
Concerned with diagnostic techniques, instruc- 
tional materials and teaching procedures useful 
in the regular classroom. 

EDEL 431 Laboratory Practices In Reading. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDEL 430. A laboratory course in 
which each student has one or more pupils for 
analysis and instruction. At least one class meet- 
ing per week to diagnose individual cases and to 
plan instruction. 

EDEL 488 Special Topics in Elementary Educa- 
tion. (1-3) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
Special treatment of current topics and issues in 
elementary education. Repeatable to maximum of 
6 credits, provided content is different. 

EDEL 489 Field Experience in Education. (1-4) 

Prerequisites, at least six semester hours in edu- 
cation at the University of Maryland plus such 
other prerequisites as may be set by the major 
area in which the experience is to be taken. 
Planned field experience may t>e provided for se- 
lected students who have had teaching experi- 
ence and whose application for such field experi- 
ence has tieen approved by the education faculty. 
Field experience is offered in a given area to both 
major and. nonmajor students. Note — The total 
number of credits which a student may earn in 
EDEL 489. 888. and 889 is limited to a maximum 
of 20 semester hours. 

EDEL 498 Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only 
to mature students who have definite plans for 
individual study of approved problems. 



EDED 499 Workshops. Oinics, and Institutes. 
(1-6) The maximum number of credits that may t>e 
earned under this course symbol toward any de- 
gree is six semester hours: the symbol may be 
used two or more times until six semester hours 
have been reached. The following types of educa- 
tional enterprise may be scheduled under this 
course heading: workshops conducted by the 
College of Education (or developed cooperatively 
with other colleges and universities) and not oth- 
enwise covered in the present course listing; clini- 
cal experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading 
clinics, speech therapy laboratories, and special 
education centers; institutes developed around 
specific topics or problems and intended for des- 
ignated groups such as school superintendents, 
principals and supervisors. 

EDED 600 Seminar In Elementary Education. (3) 

Primarily for individuals who wish to write semi- 
nar papers. Prerequisite, at least 12 hours of 
graduate work in education. 

EDEL 601 Problems in Teaching Science in Ele- 
mentary Schools. (3) Prerequisite. EDEL 401 or 
approval of instructor. Provides opportunity for 
students to analyze the teaching of science in the 
elementary school through (1) the identification 
of problems of teaching. (2) the investigation and 
study of reported research related to the stated 
problems; and (3) the hypothesizing of methods 
for improving the effectiveness of elementary 
school science programs. Students will also have 
the opportunity to study and evaluate newer pro- 
grams and practices in the teaching of science in 
the elementary school. 

EDEL 605 Problems of Teaching Language Arts 
in Elementary Schools. (3) Prerequisite. EDEL 
404 or approval of instructor. This course is de- 
signed to allow each student an opportunity (1) to 
analyze current issues, trends, and problems in 
language-arts instruction in terms of research in 
fundamental educational theory and the language 
arts, and (2) to use this analysis in effecting 
changes in methods and materials for classroom 
instruction. 

EDEL 607 Problems of Teaching Social Studies 

In Elementary Schools. (3) Prerequisite. EDEL 
406 or approval of instructor. An examination of 
current literature and research reports in the so- 
cial sciences and in social studies curriculum 
design and instruction, with an emphasis on fed- 
erally-sponsored projects as well as programs 
designed for urban children. 

EDEL 614 Elementary School Mathematics Curri- 
cula. (3) Prerequisite. EDEL 314 or equivalent and 
approval of instructor. Critical evaluation of past 
and present curricular projects, experimental 
programs, and instructional materials. Design and 
implementation of elementary school mathemat- 
ics curricula. 

EDEL 615 Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning 
Disabilities In Mathematics II. (3) Prerequisite, 
EDEL 415 or equivalent and approval of instruc- 
tor. Diagnosis and treatment of severe learning 
disabilities in elementary school mathematics. 
Theoretica* models, relevent research and specif- 
ic techniques appropriate for accessing the inter- 
action of subject matter, organismic. and instruc- 
tional variables will be developed. Laboratory 
hours for case study work to be arranged. 

EDEL 618 Practicum In Diagnosis and Treatment 
of Learning Disabilities In Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDEL 615 or equivalent and approv- 
al of instructor. Case studies under supervision 
with children experiencing learning difficulties in 



Graduate Programs / 69 



mathematics. Diagnostic treatment, and reporting 
procedures developed in EDEL 415 and 615 are 
extended. Course may be repeated to a maximum 
of 6 hours. 

EDEL 626 Problems in the Teaching of Reading 
in the Elementary School. (3) Implications of cur- 
rent theory and the results of research for the 
teachmg of reading in the elementary school. At- 
tention is given to all areas of developmental 
reading instruction, v»ith special emphasis on 
persistent problems. 

EDEL 627 Clinical Assessment in Reading. (3) 

Prerequisites: EDEL 430, EDEL 626. EDMS 446 
and EDMS 622. Clinical diagnostic techniques 
and materials useful to the reading specialist in 
assessing serious reading difficulties. 

EDEL 630 Clinical Remediation of Reading Disa- 
bilities. (3) Prerequisites: EDEL 430. EDEL 626. 
EDMS 446 and 822. Remedial procedures and 
materials useful to the reading specialist in plan- 
ning programs of individual and small group in- 
struction. 

EDEL 631 Advanced Laboratory Practices (Diag- 
nosis) (3) Prerequisite EDEL 630, Diagnostic work 
with children in clinic and school situations. Ad- 
ministration, scoring, interpretation, and prescrip- 
tion via diagnostic instruments is stressed. Case 
report writing and conferences are also stressed. 
EDEL 631 is taken with EDEL 632. 

EDEL 632 Advanced Laboratory Practices (In- 
struction). (3) Prerequisite, EDEL 630. Remedial 
instruction with children in clinic and school situ- 
ations. Develop competency in various remedial 
techniques, diagnostic teaching and evaluation. 
Development of the reading resource role is 
stressed. EDEL 632 is taken with EDEL 631. 

EDEL 640 Curriculum Planning in Nursery- 
Kindergarten Education. (3) An examination of 
significant new developments in curriculum theo- 
ry and practice. 

EDEL 641 The Young Child in the Community. (3) 

Planned observation, related research, and analy- 
sis of the experiences of young children in such 
community centers as foster homes, orphanages, 
day care centers. Sunday schools, etc. One-half 
day a week observation required. 

EDEL 642 The Yound Child in School. (3) An 

examination of significant theory and research on 
the characteristics of young children which have 
special implications for teaching children in nurs- 
ery-kindergarten groups. 

EDEL 643 Teacher-Parent Relationships. (3) A 

study of the methods and materials, trends, and 
problems in establishing close home-school rela- 
tionships. 

EDEL 644 Intellectual and Creative Experiences 
of the Nursey-Kindergarten Child. (3) A critical 
examination of materials, methods and programs 
In such areas as reading, literature, science, 
mathematics, the social studies, art, music, 
dance, etc. 

EDEL 650 Seminar In Early Childhood Education. 

(3) A problem seminar in early childhood educa- 
tion Prerequisites: at least 12 hours of graduate 
work in early childhood education 

EDEL 651 Problems of Staffing in Early Child- 
hood Education. (3) Prerequisite — Doctoral 
study in early childhood education or administra- 
tion. Administrative experience or consent of the 
Instructor 

EDEL 652 Education and Group Care of the In- 
fant and Young Cfiild. (3) Prerequisite EDMS 446 

70 / Graduate Programs 



or consent of the instructor. The historical, theo- 
retical and empirical basis for the group care and 
education of young children with special empha- 
sis on the child under the age of three. 

EDEL 707 Elementary School Social Studies 
Research. (3) Prerequisites EDEL 607. EDMS 
446. and 12 graduate hours in the social sciences. 
The identification of a significant problem in ele- 
mentary school social studies, the design and 
execution of a research study to resolve the prot>- 
lem. Intended for advanced graduate students 
whose concentration is in elementary school so- 
cial studies. 

EDEL 719 Research Seminar in Teaching and 
Learning of Elementary School Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite. EDMS 446 and EDEL 614 or equiva- 
lents. Critical evaluation of past and current re- 
search, formulation of researchable questions, 
design and conduct of research in the teaching 
and learning of elementary school mathematics. 
Course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 
hours. 

EDEL 726 Research Design In Early Childhood 
Education. (3) Prerequisites: EDMS 646 or equiva- 
lent. Provides opportunity for designing and con- 
ducting research with children from birth to eight 
years of age based on reviews, evaluations and 
discussions of significant and relevant early child- 
hood research literature. 

EDEL 788 Special Topics in Elementary Educa- 
tion. (1-3) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
Special and intensive treatment of current topics 
and issues in elementary education. Repeatable 
to maximum of 6 credits. 

EDEL 798 Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 

Master's AGS. or doctoral candidates who desire 
to pursue special research problems under the 
direction of their advisers may register for credit 
under this number. Course card must have the ti- 
tle of the problem and the name of the faculty 
member under whom the work will be done. 

EDEL 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Registration required to the extent of six hours 
for Master's thesis. 

EDEL 888 Apprenticeship in Education. (1-9) 

Apprenticeships in the major area of study are 
available to selected students whose application 
for an apprenticeship has been approved by the 
education faculty. Each apprentice is assigned to 
work for at least a semester full-time or the 
equivalent with an appropriate staff member of a 
cooperating school, school system, or education- 
al institution or agency. The sponsor of the ap- 
prentice maintains a close working relationship 
with the apprentice and the other persons in- 
volved. Prerequisites, teaching experience, a mas- 
ter's degree in education, and at least six semes- 
ter hours in education at the University of Mary- 
land. NOTE: The total number of credits which a 
student may earn in EDEL 489. 888 and 889 is 
limited to a maximum of twenty (20) semester 
hours. 

EDEL 889 Internship in Education. (3-16) 

Internships in the major area of study are availa- 
ble to selected students who have teaching expe- 
rience. The following groups of students are eligi- 
ble: (a) any student who has been advanced to 
candidacy for the doctor's degree: and (b) any 
student who receives special approval by the 
education faculty for an internship, provided that 
prior to taking an internship, such student shall 
have completed at least 60 semester hours of 
graduate work, including at least six semester 
hours in education at the University of Maryland. 



Each intern is assigned to work on a full-time ba- 
sis for at least a semester with an appropriate 
staff member in a cooperating school, school sys- 
tem, or educational institution or agency. The in- 
ternship must be taken in a school situation dif- 
ferent from the one where the student is regularly 
employed. The intern's sponsor maintains a close 
working relationship with the intern and the other 
persons involved. NOTE: The total number of 
credits which a student may earn in EDEL 489, 
888. and 889 is limited to a maximum of twenty 
(20) semester hours. 

EDEL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

Registration required to the extent of 6-9 hours 
for an Ed.D. project and 12-18 hours for a Ph.D. 
dissertation. 



Economics Program 

Professor and Chairman: Marrls 
Professors: Aaron, Adelman, Almon, Bailey, 

Bergmann, Cumberland. Dillard. Dorsey. 

Gruchy, Harris, Kelejian, McGuire. O'Connell, 

Olson, Schultze. Straszhelm, Ulmer, 

Wonnacott 
Associate Professors: Adams. Bennett. 

Betancourt, Clague, Dodge, Fisher, Knight, 

McLoone, Meyer, Singer, Weinstein 
Assistant Professors: Brown, Clotfelter, Dorman, 

Johnson, King, Lieberman, Morton, Pelcovits. 

Peterson, Schiller, Snower, Vroman, Weiss, 

West 
Lecturers: Dardis, Fleisig, Measday, Vavrichek 

Programs are offered leading to the Master of 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Areas of 
specialization include: economic theory, ad- 
vanced economictheory. comparative economic 
systems and planning, econometrics, economic 
development, economic history, environmental 
and natural resource economics, history of eco- 
nomic thought, industrial organization, institu- 
tional economics, international economics, labor 
economics, monetary economics, public finance, 
regional and urban economics, and social policy. 

Applicants should have taken (or should plan to 
take immediately) at least one undergraduate 
course in each of micro-economics, macro- 
economics, statistics, and calculus. In addition, 
the Aptitude Test section of the Graduate Record 
Examination is required, and the Advanced Eco- 
nomics Test is recommended. Letters of recom- 
mendation from three persons competent to 
judge the probability of the applicant's success in 
graduate school should be sent directly to the 
Director of Graduate Studies in Economics. While 
part-time graduate study certainly is possible, few 
courses are taught at night. 

The Master of Arts degree in Economics may be 
taken under either (1) the thesis option (24 hours 
plus a thesis) or (2) the non-thesis option (30 
hours, including Economics 621-622, plus a writ- 
ten examination In Economic Theory and a semi- 
nar paper). The requirements for the nonthesis 
option for the M.A. are met automatically in the 
course of the Ph.D. program in Economics. 

The main requirements of the Ph.D. program 
are (1) a written examination in economic theory, 
normally taken at the beginning of the second 
year of full-time graduate study; (2) written exami- 
nations in two approved optional fields; (3) a 
comprehensive oral examination covering eco- 
nomic theory and the two optional fields: (4) two 
courses (Econ 621-622) in Quantitative Methods 
in Economics; (5) two courses (Econ 606-607) in 



the History of Economic Thought; (6) foreign lan- 
guage or one of several options; (7) a seminar 
paper to be available to the faculty at the time of 
the oral comprehensive examination; (8) a disser- 
tation and its successful oral defense. 

The graduate program in Economics is a com- 
prehensive one. The department possesses spe- 
cial strength in the Economics of the Public Sec- 
tor. Special research projects under the supervi- 
sion of faculty members are being carried on in 
the Economics of Environmental Management 
and Interindustry Forecasting, Research assistant- 
ships are available in each of these projects. 
Numerous teaching assistantships are also availa- 
ble. The department can usually help graduate 
students find half-time employment in nearby 
Federal agencies engaged in economic research. 

A complete description of the requirements of 
the degrees in economics and the admission 
process is available on request from: Director of 
Graduate Studies in Economics, Department of 
Economics, University of Mayland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 

ECON 401 National Income Analysis. (3) Pre- 
requisite — ECON 201, 203. Required for eco- 
nomics majors. Analysis of the determination of 
national income, employment, and price levels. 
Discussion of consumption, investment, inflation, 
and government fiscal and monetary policy. 

ECON 402 Business Cycles. (3) First semester. 
Prerequisite, ECON 430. A study of the causes of 
depressions and unemployment, cyclical and 
secular instability, theories of business cycles, 
and the problem of controlling economic instabil- 
ity. 

ECON 403 Intermediate Price Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite — ECON 201, 203. Required for eco- 
nomics majors. In analysis of the theories of con- 
sumer behavior and of the firm, and of general 
price and distribution theory, with applications to 
current economic issues. 

ECON 407 Contemporary Economic Thought. (3) 

Prerequisites — ECON 201, 203, and senior stand- 
ing. Graduate students should take ECON 705. A 
survey of the development of economic thought 
since 1900 with special reference to Thorstein 
Veblin and other pre-1939 institutionalists and to 
post-1945 neo-institutionalists such as J.K. Gal- 
braith and Gunnar Myrdal. 

ECON 411 American Economic Development. (3) 

Prerequisites — ECON 201 and 203; or 204. 
Long-term trends in the American economy and 
analysis of the sources of output growth. Techno- 
logical changes and the diffusion of new technol- 
ogies. These subjects are discussed in the con- 
text of theoretical models. 

ECON 415 Introduction to Economic Develop- 
ment of Underdeveloped areas. (3) Prerequisite, 
ECON 201 and 203; or 205. An analysis of the 
economic and social characteristics of underde- 
veloped areas. Recent theories of economic de- 
velopment, obstacles to development, policies 
and planning for development. 

ECON 418 Economic Development of Selected 
Areas. (3) A — Latin America B — Asia C — Afri- 
ca Prerequisite, ECON 415. Institutional charac- 
teristics of a specific area are discussed and alter- 
nate strategies and policies for development are 
analyzed. 

ECON 421 Economic Statistics. (3) Prerequisite 
MATH 110 or equivalent. Not open to students 
who have taken BSAD 230 or BSAP 231. An intro- 
duction to the use of statistics in economics. Top- 
ics include: probability, random variables and 



their distributions, sampling theory, estimation, 
hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regres- 
sion analysis, correlation. 

ECON 422 Quantitative Methods in Economics. 

(3) Prerequisites, ECON 201, 203, and 421 (or 
BSAD 230); or permission of instructor. Empha- 
sizes the interaction between the economic prob- 
lems posed by economists and the assumptions 
employed in statistical theory. Deals with the for- 
mulation, estimation and testing of economic 
models. Topics include single variable and multi- 
ple variable regression techniques, theory of iden- 
tification, autocorrelation and simultaneous equa- 
tions. Independent work relating the material in 
the course to an economic problem chosen by 
the student is required. 

ECON 425 Mathematical Economics. (3) Pre- 
requisites, ECON 401 and 403 and one year of 
college mathematics. A course designed to ena- 
ble economics majors to understand the simpler 
aspects of mathematical economics. Those parts 
of the calculus and algebra required for econom- 
ic analysis will be presented. 

ECON 430 Money and Banking. (3) Prerequisite, 
ECON 201, 203. Relation of money and credit to 
economic activity and prices; impact of public 
policy in financial markets and for goods and 
services; policies, structure, and functions of the 
Federal Reserve System; organization, operation, 
and functions of the commercial banking system, 
as related particularly to questions of economic 
stability and public policy. 

ECON 431 Theory of Money, Prices and Eco- 
nomic Activity. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 430. A the- 
oretical treatment of the influence of money and 
financial markets on economic activity and prices, 
and of the effects of monetary policy on the mar- 
kets for goods and services; the role of money in 
the classical and keynesian macro-systems; top- 
ics of theoretical interest in monetary policy for- 
mation and implementation. 

ECON 440 International Economics. (3) Pre- 
requisite, ECON 201, 203. A descriptive and 
theoretical analysis of international trade, balance 
of payments accounts, the mechanism of interna- 
tional economic adjustment, comparative costs, 
economics of customs unions. 

ECON 441 International Economic Policies (3) 

Prerequisites. ECON 401, 403, and 440. Contem- 
porary balance of payments problems; the inter- 
national liquidity controversy investment, trade 
and economic development; evaluation of argu- 
ments for protection. 

ECON 450 Introduction to Public Finance. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 201, 203; or ECON 205. The 
role of federal, state, and local governments in 
meeting public wants. Analysis of tax theory and 
policy, expenditure theory, government budget- 
ing, benefit-cost analysis, and income redistribu- 
tion. 

ECON 451 Public Choice and Public Policy. (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 201, 203, or 205. Analysis of 
collective decision-making, economic models of 
government, program budgeting, and policy im- 
plementation; emphasis on models of public 
choice and institutions which affect decis- 
ion-making. 

ECON 454 State and Local Public Finance. (3) 

Prerequisite. ECON 201 and 203: or 205. Princi- 
ples and problems of governmental finance with 
special reference to state and local jurisdictions. 
Topics to be covered include taxation, expendi- 
tures and intergovernmental fiscal relations. 



ECON 460 Industrial Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 201 and 203; or 205. Chang- 
ing structure of the American economy; price pol- 
icies in different industrial classifications of mo- 
nopoly and competition in relation to problems of 
public policy. 

ECON 461 Economics of American Industries. (3) 

Prerequisite. ECON 201 and 203; or 205. A study 
of the technology, economics and geography of 
representative American industries. 

ECON 470 Labor Ecpnomics. (3) Prerequisites, 
ECON 201 and 203; or 205. A survey of labor 
force growth and composition, problems of un- 
employment and labor market operations, theo- 
ries of wage determination, the wage-price spiral, 
collective bargaining, governmental regulation of 
employment and labor relations, and the history 
and characteristics of the American labor move- 
ment. 

ECON 471 Current Problems in Labor Econom- 
ics. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 470. For students who 
wish to pursue, in depth, selected topics in the 
labor field. Issues and topics selected for detailed 
examination may include: manpower training and 
development, unemployment compensation and 
social security, race and sex discrimination in 
employment, wage theory, productivity analysis, 
the problems of collective bargaining in public 
employment, wage-price controls and incomes 
policy. 

ECON 474 Economic Problems of Women. (3) 
Prerequisite: ECON 201, 203, or 205. Discrimina- 
tion against women in the labor market; the divi- 
sion of labor in the home and the workplace by 
sex; the 'child care industry'; women in poverty. 

ECON 475 Economics of Poverty and Discrimina- 
tion. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 201 and 203; or 205. 
Topics include the causes of the persistence of 
low income groups; the relation of poverty to 
technological change, to economic growth, and 
to education and training; economic motivations 
for discrimination; the economic results of dis- 
crimination; proposed remedies for poverty and 
discrimination. 

ECON 480 Comparative Economic Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, 201 and 203; or 205. An investiga- 
tion of the theory and practice of various types of 
economic systems. An examination and evalua- 
tion of the capitalistic system followed by an anal- 
ysis of alternative types of economic systems 
such as fascism, socialism and communism. 

ECON 482 Economics of the Soviet Union. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 201 and 203; or 205. An analy- 
sis of the organization, operating principles and 
performance of the soviet economy with attention 
to the historical and ideological background, 
planning, resources, industry, agriculture, domes- 
tic and foreign trade, finance, labor, and the 
structure and growth of national income. 

ECON 484 The Economy of China. (3) Pre- 
requisite, ECON 201 and 203; or 205 Policies and 
performances of the Chinese Economy since 
1949. Will begin with a survey of modern China's 
economy since 1949. Will begin with a survey of 
modern China's economic history. Emphasizes 
the strategies and institutional innovations that 
the Chinese have adopted to overcome the prob- 
lems of economic development. Some economic 
controversies raided during the cultural revolu- 
tion' will be covered in review of the problems 
and prospects of the present Chinese economy. 

ECON 486 The Economics of National Planning. 

(3) Prerequisite, ECON 201 and 203; or 205. An 

Graduate Programs / 71 



analysis of the principles and practice of econom- 
ic planning with special reference to the planning 
problems of West European countries and the 
United States. 

ECON 490 Survey of Urban Economic Problems 
and Policies. (3) Prerequisites, ECON 201 and 
203: or 205. An introduction to the study of urban 
economics through the examination of current 
policy issues. Topics may include suburbanization 
of jobs and residences, housing and urban re- 
newal, urban transportation, development of new 
towns.ghetto economic development, problems in 
services such as education and police. 

ECON 491 Economics and Control of Urban 
Growth. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 390. An analysis 
of metropolitan development processes, the con- 
sequences of alternative growth patterns, and the 
evaluation of policies to control growth. 

ECON 492 Economics of Location and Regional 
Growth. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 403, or consent of 
instructor. Study of the theories, problems, and 
policies of regional economic development and 
the location of economic activity for both rural 
and metropolitan regions. Methods of regional 
analysis. 

ECON 601 Macro-Economic Analysis. (3) First 
semester of a two-semester sequence, 601-602. 
Topics normally include general equilibrium theo- 
ry in classical, keynesian, and post-keynesian 
treatments; the demand for money: theories of 
consumption behavior and of inflation. 

ECON 602 Economic Growth and Instability. (3) 

Second semester. A continuation of ECON 601. 
Major topics include growth and technological 
change, investment, business cycles, and large 
empirial macroeconomic models. Also included 
are material on wages and employment and on 
international and domestic stability. 

ECON 603 Micro-Economic Analysis I. (3) Pre- 
requisite. A calculus course or concurrent reg- 
istration in ECON 621. The first semester of a 
two-semester sequence which analyzes the use- 
fulness and shortcomings of prices in solving the 
basic economic problem of allocating scarce re- 
sources among alternative uses. The central prob- 
lem of welfare economics and general equilit3rium 
as a framework for a detailed analysis of con- 
sumption and production theories including line- 
ar programming with decisions under uncertainty. 

ECON 604 Micro-Economic Analysis II. (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 603. A continuation of ECON 
603. Theory of capital, interest and wages. Qualifi- 
cations of the basic welfare theorem caused by 
noncompetitive market structures, external econ- 
omies and diseconomies and secondary con- 
straints. Application of price theory to public ex- 
penditure decisions, investment in human capital, 
inter lational trade, and other areas of economics. 

ECON 605 Welfare Economics. (3) First semester 
Prerequisite, ECON 603. The topics covered in- 
clude pareto optimality. social welfare functions, 
indivisibilities, consumer surplus, output and 
price policy in public enterprise, and welfare as- 
pects of the theory of public expenditures. 

ECON 606 History of Economic Thought. (3) First 
semester. Prerequisite, ECON 403 or consent of 
the instructor. A study of the development of 
economic thought and theories including the 
Greeks, Romans. Canonists, mercantilists, physi- 
ocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Relation of 
ideas to economic policy. 



ECON 607 Economic Theory in the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) Second semester. Prerequisite. 
ECON 606 or consent of the instructor. A study of 
nineteenth-century and twentieth-century schools 
of economic thought, particularly the classicists, 
neo-classists. Austrians, German historical 
school, American economic thought, the social- 
ists, and Keynes, 

ECON 611 Seminar In American Economic De- 
velopment. (3) 

ECON 613 Origins and Development of Capital- 
ism. (3) Second semester. Studies the transition 
from feudalism to modern capitalistic economies 
in Western Europe. Whenever possible, this eco- 
nomic history is analyzed with the aid of tools of 
modern economics, and in the light of compari- 
sons and contrasts with the less developed areas 
of the present day. 

ECON 615 Economic Development of Underde- 
veloped Areas. (3) First semester. Prerequisite, 
ECON 401 and 403. An analysis of the forces con- 
tributing to and retarding economic progress in 
underdeveloped areas. MACRO-and mic- 
ro-economic aspects of development planning 
and strategy are emphasized. 

ECON 616 Seminar In Economic Development. 

(3) Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 615 or 
consent of instructor. A continuation of ECON 
615. Special emphasis is on the application of 
economic theory in the institutional setting of a 
country or area of particular interest to the stu- 
dent. 

ECUN 617 Money and Finance in Economic 
Development. (3) First semester. Economic theo- 
ry, strategy and tactics for mobilizing real and 
financial resources to finance and accelerate 
economic development. Monetary, fiscal, and tax 
reform policy and practice by the government 
sector to design and implement national develop- 
ment plans. 

ECON 621 Quantitative Economics I. (3) First 
semester. An introduction to the theory and prac- 
tice of statistical inference. Elements of computer 
programming and a review of mathematics ger- 
mane to this and other graduate economics 
courses are included. 

ECON 622 Quantitative Economics II. (3) Second 
semester. Prerequisite, ECON 621. Techniques of 
estimating relationships among economic varia- 
bles. Multiple regression, the analysis of variance 
and covariance, and techniques for dealing in 
time series. Further topics in mathematics. 

ECON 655 Case Studies in Government Re- 
source Allocation. (3) Case studies in cost-benefit 
analysis of government programs and projects as 
a basis for the program budget system; an analy- 
sis of resource management in the public sector 
of the economy. 

ECON 656 Public Sector Workshop. (3) Second 
semester. Representative problems in analysis for 
public decision making; measurement of benefits 
and costs: incommensurabilities in benefits, and 
ambiguities in cost; criteria for program and pro- 
ject selection: effects of uncertainty: time horizon 
considerations: joint costs and multiple benefits: 
non-quantifiable factors in decision analysis. 
Examples will be taken from current government 
programs. 

ECON 661 Advanced Industrial Organization. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 401 and 403 or 
consent of instructor. Analysis of market structure 
and its relation to market performance. 



ECON 662 Industrial Organization and Public 
Policy. (3) Second semester. Prerequisite. ECON 
661 or consent of instructor. Analysis of the prob- 
lems of public policy in regard to the structure, 
conduct, and performance of industry. Examina- 
tion of anti-trust policy from the point of view of 
economic theory. 

ECON 671 Seminar in Labor Economics. (3) First 
semester. Formal models of labor demand, sup- 
ply, utilization and price formation. Factors affect- 
ing labor supply; the determination of factor 
shares in an open economy: bargaining models, 
labor resources, trade union theories as they 
affect resource allocation. 

ECON 672 Selected Topics in Labor Economics. 

(3) Second semester. The wage-price issue: put)- 
lic policy with respect to unions, labor-man- 
agement relations, and the labor market: institu- 
tional aspects of the American labor movement: 
manpower development and training 

ECON 682 Seminar in Economic Development of 
the Soviet Union. (3) Second semester. Prequi- 
site, ECON 482 or consent of instructor. Measure- 
ment and evaluation of Soviet economic growth 
including interpretation and use of Soviet Statis- 
tics, measurement of national income, fiscal poli- 
cies, investment and technological change, plan- 
ning and economic administration, manpower 
and wage policies, foreign trade and aid. Selected 
topics in bloc development and reform. 

ECON 686 Economic Growth In Mature Econom- 
ics. (3) First semester. Analysis of policies and 
problems for achieving stable economic growth 
in mature economics such as the United States, 
and the major West European countries. 

ECON 698 Selected Topics in Economics. (3) 

ECON 703 Advanced Economic Theory 1. (3) 

Prerequisite: background in calculus and matrix 
algebra such as provided by ECON 621 and 622. 
Optimization techniques such as lagrangian mul- 
tipliers and linear programming. Mathematical 
treatment of general equilibrium, including inter- 
industry analysis, the theory of production, con- 
sumption, and welfare. 

ECON 704 Advanced Economics Theory II. (3) 

Prerequisite; ECON 703. Multi-sectoral growth 
models and questions of optimal growth. Last 
half of course consists of presentations of semi- 
nar papers. 

ECON 705 Seminar in Institutional Economic 
Theory. (3) Second semester. A study of the re- 
cent developments in the field of institutional 
economic theory in the United States and abroad. 

ECON 706 Seminar in Institutional Economic 
Theory. (3) 

ECON 721 Econometrics I. (3) First semester. 
Special topics in mathematical statistics neces- 
sary for understanding econometric theory, with 
particular emphasis on multivariate analysis. The 
estimation of simultaneous equation systems, 
problems involving errors in variables, distributed 
lags, and spectral analysis. 

ECON 722 Seminar in Quantitative Economics. 

(3) Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 622 or 
consent of instructor. Analysis of data sources for 
economic research: critical evaluation of previous 
and current quantitative economic studies: and 
class discussion and criticism of student research 
projects. 

ECON 731 Monetary Theory and Policy. (3) First 
semester. An adequate knowledge of micro-and 
macro-economics is assumed. Theory of money, 



72 /Graduate Programs 



financial assets, and economic activity; review of 
classical, neo-classical and Keynesian contribu- 
tion; emphasis on post-Keynesian contributions, 
including those of Tobin. Patinkin, Gurley-Shaw, 
Friedman, and others. 

ECON 732 Seminar in Monetary Theory and Poli- 
cy. (3) Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 731 
or consent of instructor. Theory of the mecha- 
nisms through which central banking affects eco- 
nomic activity and prices; formation and imple- 
mentation of monetary policy; theoretical topics 
in monetary policy. 

ECON 741 Advanced International Economic 
Relations. (3) First semester. The international 
mechanism of adjustment; price, exchange rate, 
and income changes. Comparative costs, factor 
endowments, and the gains from trade. Commer- 
cial policy and the theory of customs unions. 

ECON 742 Seminar in International Economic 
Relations. (3) Second semester. 

ECON 751 Advanced Theory of Public Finance. 

(3) Review of utility analysis to include the theory 
of individual consumer resource allocation and 
exchange and welfare implications. Effects of al- 
ternative tax and subsidy techniques upon alloca- 
tion, exchange, and welfare outcomes. Theories 
of public goods, their production, exchange and 
consumption. Principles of benefit-cost analysis 
for government decisions. 

ECON 752 Seminar in Public Finance. (3) Second 
semester. Theory of taxation and tax policy, with 
particular emphasis on income taxation; empirical 
studies; the burden of the public debt. Research 
paper by each student to be presented to semi- 
nar. 

ECON 761 The economics of Technical Change. 

(3) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Determi- 
nants and impact of inventions and innovations. 
Qualitative and quantitative aspects of technical 
change both at the micro-and macro-economic 
levels and under different conditions of economic 
development. 

ECON 775 Seminar on the Economics of Poverty 
and Discrimination. (3) Prerequisites, ECON 621 
and 622. A review of the economic literature in 
poverty and discrimination. The course will also 
function as a workshop in which research of the 
staff and students is presented. 

ECON 776 Seminar in the Economics of Human 
Resources. (3) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

ECON 790 Advanced Urban Economics. (3) 

Market processes and public policies as related 
to urban problems and metropolitan change. 
Employment, housing, discrimination, transporta- 
tion and the local public sector. 

ECON 791 Advanced Regional and Urban Eco- 
nomics. (3) First semester. Location theory and 
spatial distribution of economic activity; applica- 
tion of analytic methods, such as social account- 
ing systems, economic base theory, input-output 
techniques, and industrial complex analysis to 
problems of regional development, environmental 
quality, and natural resource management. 

ECON 792 Regional and Urban Economics. (3) 

Theoretical and empirical analysis of the location 
and spatial distribution of economic activity. Anal- 
ysis of regional growth and development. The 
study of analytical methods and forecasting mod- 
els. 

ECON 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

ECON 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Electrical Engineering 
Program 

Chairman: Harger 

Professor; Chu,' DeClaris, Hochuli, Kim,2 

Ligomenides, Lin Newcomb, Rao, Reisser,^ 

Taylor, Wagner, Weiss.^ 
Associate Professor: Basham, Emad, 

Ephremides, Lee, W. Levine, Pugsley, Rhee, 

Simons, Tretter, Zajac, Zaki 
Assistant Professors: Baras, Eden, Gallman, 

O'Grady, Paez, Silio, Striffler 

'joint appointment with Computer Science 
2joint appointment witti Physics 

3joint appointment with Institute tor Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics 

The Electrical Engineering Department offers 
graduate work leading to the Master of Science 
with or without thesis and the Doctor of Philoso- 
phy degrees with specialization in biomedical 
engineering, circuits, communication, computers, 
control and electrophysics. Each graduate stu- 
dent pursues an individual study program 
planned in conjunction with his Graduate Advisor 
and which includes an appropriate sequence of 
courses and a thesis or scholarly paper. 

In Biomedical Engineering, areas of study in- 
clude neural electrophysiology, transduction and 
neural coding of sensory events, neural control of 
movement, muscle contraction and mechanics, 
instrumental techniques and processing in health 
care delivery systems. 

Areas of study in Circuits emphasize the analy- 
sis and synthesis of passive and active linear and 
nonlinear networks including the design of digital 
data acquisition systems, optimized FM signal 
detectors, microwave active circuit synthesis, dig- 
ital computer circuit design, microminiature inte- 
grated circuits and devices, biomedical transduc- 
tors, computer aided designs and scattering for- 
malisms. 

Areas of study in computers are involved in 
computer structures, the theory and application 
of arithmetic coding and self-checking processes, 
stochastic automata theory and the design of dig- 
ital, analog, and hybrid systems for both general 
and special purposes. 

Areas of study in Communication apply the 
mathematics of random processes and statistical 
inference, to analysis, and design of communica- 
tion systems, coding theory, optical communica- 
tions, radar systems, digital signal processing, 
and communication networks. 

In Control areas of study apply the mathematics 
of dynamical systems, optimization and random 
processes to the synthesis and analysis of control 
systems. Topics included are state realizations, 
power system optimization, optimal control of 
large scale systems, control systems with time 
delay, non-linear systems, control of stochastic, 
and microminiature systems, ecological systems, 
control of distributed parameter systems and sys- 
tem identification. 

Areas of study in Electrophysics include elec- 
tromagnetic theory and applications (micro-waves 
and optics, stochastic media plasma propaga- 
tion); charged particle dynamics and accelerator 
design, including high-power micro-wave engi- 
neering applications of relativistic beams, con- 
trolled thermonuclear fusion and cyclotron de- 
sign; quantum electronics (laser technology and 
non-linear optics); integrated circuits and solid 
state devices (semiconductor devices and tech- 
nology); scattering systems. 

There are up-to-date research laboratories and 
computational facilities within the department. 



The Biomedical Laboratory is equipped with in- 
strumentation for studying the motor control 
mechanisms of man and animals. The Laboratory 
for Charged Particle Studies contains an ion 
beam facilty for source development and ion im- 
plantation. The Computer Architecture Design 
Laboratory includes a PDP 11/40 for studies on 
computer structures. The System Simulation 
Laboratory contains a digital processor core and 
drum memory with analog hardware and graph- 
ics. The Gas Laser Laboratory is devoted He-Ne 
and C02 lasers while the Solid State Laser Lab- 
oratory features a mode-locked Nd glass lasser 
and an injection GaAs laser. The integrated Cir- 
cuits Laboratory contains a full-line facility capa- 
ble of producing monolithic, thin-film and MOS 
structures. The Computational Facility contains 
conversational and remote-batch terminals to the 
University's IBM 7094 and UNIVAC 1108 digital 
computers. 

Further details and information on admission, 
financial aid, and degree requirements can be 
obtained from the Electrical Engineering Office of 
Graduate Studies, Area Code 301, 454-4173. 

ENEE 402 Advanced Pulse Techniques. (3) (See 
ENEE 403 for optional related laboratory course). 
Prerequisite, ENEE 314 or 410 or equivalent. Bist- 
able, monostable, and astable circuits, sweep cir- 
cuits, synchronization, counting, gates, compara- 
tors. Magnetic core circuits, semi-conductor and 
vacuum-tube circuits. 

ENEE 403 Pulse Techniques Laboratory. (1) Two 

hours of laboratory per week, Corequisite: ENEE 
402 and permission of the instructor. Experiments 
on switching circuits, bistable, monostable, and 
astable circuits, sweep circuits, gates, compara- 
tors. 

ENEE 404 Radio Engineering. (3) Prerequisite: 
ENEE 314. Tuned circuit amplifiers, single, dou- 
ble, and stagger tuned circuits; class c amplifiers; 
frequency multipliers; amplitude modulation; 
modulators and detectors; receiver design and 
characteristics; frequency modulation; FM trans- 
mitters and receivers. 

ENEE 405 Advanced Radio Engineering Labora- 
tory. (1) Two hours of laboratory per week. Core- 
quisite: ENEE 404. Experiments on multiple tuned 
amplifiers, noise figure measurements, class-c 
amplifiers, varactors, modulators, projects. 

ENEE 406 Mathematical Foundations of Circuit 
Theory. (3) Prerequisites: ENEE 304 and MATH 
241. or equivalent. Review of determinants, linear 
equations, matrix theory, eigenvalues, theory of 
complex variables, inverse La Place transforms. 
Applications are drawn primarily from circuit 
analysis. 

ENEE 407 Microwave-Circuits Laboratory. (2) 

Prerequisite, senior standing in electrical engi- 
neering or consent of instructor. One lecture and 
three lab hours per week. Experiments concerned 
with circuits constructed from microwave compo- 
nents providing practical experience in the de- 
sign, construction and testing of such circuits. 
Projects include microwave filters and 
S-parameter design with applications of current 
technology. 

ENEE 410 Electronic Circuits. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENEE 300 or equivalent knowledge of circuit 
theory or consent of the instructor. This course is 
intended for students in the physical sciences, 
and for engineering students requiring additional 
study of electron circuits. Credit not normally giv- 
en for this course in an electrical engineering 
major program. (ENEE 413 may optionally tie tak- 



Graduate Programs / 73 



en as an associated laboratory). P-N junctions, 
transistors, vacuum tubes, biasing and operating 
point stability, switches, large-signal analysis, 
models, small-signal analysis, frequency re- 
sponse, feedback and multistage amplifiers, pulse 
and digital circuits. 

ENEE 412 Telemetry Systems. (3) Prerequisite; 
ENEE 314. Selected digital circuits; frequency di- 
vision multiplexing; FIvl/AM systems, SSB/F(^ 
systems; time division multiplexed systems; pulse 
amplitude modulation; pulse duration modula- 
tion; pulse code modilation; analog to digital 
converters; multiplexes and DC-commutators. 

ENEE 413 Electronics Laboratory. (2) Corequi- 
site. ENEE 314. One lecture and three lab hours 
per week Provides experience in the speci- 
fication, design, and testing of basic electronic 
circuits and practical interconnections, emphasis 
on design with discrete solid state and integrated 
circuit components for both analog and pulse 
circuits. 

ENEE 414 Network Analysis. (3) Prerequisite; 
ENEE 304. Network properties: linearity, reciproc- 
ity, etc.; 2-port description and generalization; Y, 
S, hybrid matrices; description properties; sym- 
metry, para-unity, etc.; basic topological analysis; 
state-space techniques; computer-aided analysis; 
sensitivity analysis; approximation theory. 

ENEE 416 Network Synthesis. (3) Prerequisite — 
ENEE 304. Active and passive components, pas- 
sivity, bounded and positive real, RC properties 
and synthesis, Brune and Darlington synthesis, 
transfer-voltage and Y21 synthesis, active feed- 
back configurations, image parameter design, 
computer-aided optimization synthesis via the 
embedding concept. 

ENEE 417 Advanced Network Theory. (3) 

Corequisite, ENEE 414 (or consent of instructor). 
A study of network descriptions for analysis and 
basic active synthesis. Indefinite and topological 
formulations. l>J-port structures and interconnec- 
tions, active components and descriptions, syn- 
thesis using controlled sources, synthesis and 
analysis via state characterizations. Additional 
topics from non-linear, distributed parameter, and 
digital filters. 

ENEE 418 Projects in Electrical Engineering. 
(1-3) Hours to be arranged. Prerequisites, senior 
standing and permission of the instructor. May be 
taken for repeated credit up to a total of 4 credits, 
with the permission of the student's advisor and 
the instructor. Theoretical and experimental 
projects. 

ENEE 419 Apprenticeship in Electrical Engineer- 
ing. (2-3) Hours to be arranged. Prerequisite; 
completion of sophomore courses and permis- 
sion of an apprenticeship director. May be taken 
for repeated credit up to a total of nine credits. A 
unique opportunity for experience in experimen- 
tal research and engineering design. A few highly 
qualified students will be selected as apprentices 
in one of the research facilities of the Electrical 
Engineering Department and will participate in 
the current research under the supervision of the 
laboratory director. In the past, apprenticeships 
have been available in the following laboratories; 
biomedical, electron ring accelerator, gas laser, 
integrated circuits, simulation and computer, and 
solid state laser. 

ENEE 420 Communication Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 324. Rnadom signals; ele- 
ments of random processes, noise, Gaussian 
process, correlation functions and power spectra, 
linear operations; optimum receivers, vector 



waveform channels, receiver implementation, 
probability of error performance; efficient signal- 
ing; sources, encoding, dimensionality, channel 
capacity; wave form communication; linear, an- 
gle, and pulse modulation. 

ENEE 421 Introduction to Information Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 324. Definition of information 
and entropy; characterization of sources; Kraft 
and Macmillian inequalities; coding information 
sources; noiseless coding theorem; channels and 
mutual information; Shannon's coding theorem 
for noisy channels. 

ENEE 425 Signal Analysis, Modulation and 
Noise. (3) Prerequisites ENEE 314 and ENEE 
324. Signal transmission through networks, trans- 
mission in the presence of noise, statistical meth- 
ods of determining error and transmission effects, 
modulation schemes. 

ENEE 432 Electronics for Life Scientists. (4) 

Three hours of lecture and two hours of laborato- 
ry per week. Prerequisites, college algebra and a 
physics course, including basic electricity and 
magnetism. Not accepted for credit in an electri- 
cal engineering major program. The concept of 
an instrumentation system with emphasis upon 
requirements for transducers, amplifiers, and re- 
cording devices, design criteria and circuitry of 
power supplies amplifiers, and pulse equipment, 
specific instruments used for biological research, 
problems of shielding against hum and noise 
pickup and other interference problems charac- 
teristic of biological systems. 

ENEE 433 Electronic Instrumentation lor Physi- 
cial Science. (3) Two hours of lecture and two 
hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 
300 or 306. PHYS 271 or equivalent, or consent of 
instructor. The concept of instrumentation sys- 
tems from sensor to readout; discussions of 
transducers, system dynamics, precision and 
accuracy; measurement of electrical parameters; 
direct, differential, and potentiometric measure- 
ments; bridge measurements, time and frequency 
measurements, waveform generation and display. 

ENEE 434 Introduction to Neural Networks and 
Signals. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 204 or 300 Intro- 
duction in the generation and processing of bioe- 
lectric signals including structure and function of 
the neuron, membrane theory, generation and 
propagation of nerve impulses, synaptic mecha- 
nisms, transduction and neural coding of sensory 
events, central nervous system processing of sen- 
sory information and correlated electrical signals, 
control of effector organs, muscle contraction 
and mechanics, and models of neurons and 
neural networks. 

ENEE 435 Electrodes and Electrical Processes 
in Biology and Medicine. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 
204 or 300. Techniques for recording biological 
signals such as brain, muscle and cardial electri- 
cal potentials; membrane theory; half-cell poten- 
tials, liquid junction potentials, polarization of 
electrodes; biological and medical instrumenta- 
tion; and applications in the design of cardial 
pacemakers, or a similar case study. 

ENEE 438 Topics in Biomedical Engineering. 
(1-3) Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. 
May be taken lor repeated credit. The content 
may vary from semester to semester. Selected 
topics of current interest from such areas as bioe- 
lectric systems, modeling instrumentation, auto- 
mated diagnostic, health-care delivery, etc. Re- 
peatable to a maximum of 9 hours. 

ENEE 440 Digital Computer Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 210 or ENES 243 or equiva- 



lent. Same as CMSC 410. Introduction; computer 
elements; parallel adders and subtracters: mic- 
ro-operations; sequences; computer simulation; 
organization of a commerically available stored 
program computer; microprogrammed comput- 
ers; a large scale batch processing system (op- 
tional). (Intended for those minoring in computers 
and for those majoring in computer science). 

ENEE 442 Software Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisites; ENES 240; ENEE 250 or equivalent. 
Architectural aspects of software engineering. 
Machine language and machine structure; assem- 
bly language and assemblers; macro-language 
and macro-processors; loaders and linkers; pro- 
gramming languages and language structure; 
compilers and interpreters; operating systems. 

ENEE 443 Introduction to Computers and Com- 
putation. (3) Prerequisite, ENES 240 or equiva- 
lent. Basic structure and organization of digital 
systems; representation of data, introduction to 
software systems; assembly language; application 
of computers in engineering and physical sys- 
tems. Not open for students who have credit in 
ENEE 250. 

ENEE 444 Logic Design of Digital Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 250. Review of switching alge- 
bra; gates and logic modules; map simplification 
techniques; multiple-output systems; memory 
elements and sequential systems; large switching 
systems; iterative networks; sample designs, 
computer oriented simplification algorithms; state 
assignment, partition techniques; sequential sys- 
tem decompositions. 

ENEE 445 Computer Laboratory. (2) Prerequisite, 
ENEE 444. One lecture and three lab hours per 
week. Hardware oriented experiments providing 
practical experience in the design, construction, 
and checkout of components and interfaces for 
digital computers and data transmission systems. 
Projects include classical design techniques and 
applications of current technology. 

ENEE 446 Computer Architecture. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 250. Digital computer organi- 
zation;arithmetic hardware; primary and second- 
ary storage organization; read-only and associa- 
tive memories; introduction to multi-processor 
and multi-programming computer systems; inter- 
action of hardware and software. 

ENEE 450 Introduction to Discrete Structures. (3) 

Prerequisite; ENES 240 or equivalent. Review of 
set algebra including relations, partial ordering 
and mappings. Algebraic structures including 
semigroups and groups. Graph theory including 
trees and weighted graphs. Boolean algebra and 
propositional logic. Applications of these struc- 
tures to various areas of computer science and 
computer engineering. 

ENEE 451 Introduction to Automata Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 450 or permission of the in- 
structor. An introduction to finite state machines 
and their properties; properties of regular sets; 
elementary decomposition results; introduction to 
turing machines and computability theory; unde- 
cidability propositions; introduction to finite semi- 
groups with application to the decomposition of 
finite state machines. 

ENEE 456 Analog and Hybrid Computers. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 314. Programming the analog 
computer; analog computing components; error 
analysis, repetitive operation; synthesis of sys- 
tems using the computer; hybrid computer sys- 
tems. 



74 / Graduate Programs 



ENEE 460 Control Systems. (3) Prerequisite. 
ENEE 322. Review of transform analysis and line- 
ar albebra. Mathematical models for control sys- 
tem components, transient response design, error 
analysis and design, root locus, frequency re- 
sponse, system design and compensation. 

ENEE 461 Control Systems Laboratory. (2) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 460. One lecture and ttiree lab 
hours per week Projects to enhance the stu- 
dent's understanding of feedback control systems 
and to familiarize him with the characteristics and 
limitations of real control devices. Students will 
design, build, and test servomechanisms, and will 
conduct analog and hybrid computer simulations 
of control systems. 

ENEE 462 Systems, Control and Computation. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENEE 300 or 304, and MATH .246 or 
consent of instructor. Matrix algebra, state space 
analysis of discrete systems, state space analysis 
of continuous systems, computer algorithms for 
circuit analysis, optimization and system simula- 
tion. 

ENEE 464 Linear System Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 322. An introduction to the 
state space theory of linear engineering systems; 
state variables, matrix exponential and impulse 
response. Linear sampled-data systems, discrete 
systems. Reliability, stability and equivalence. 
Relation to LaPlace transform. Application to cir- 
cuits, controls, communications and computers. 

ENEE 472 Transducers and Electrical Machinery. 

(3) Prerequisite. ENEE 304. Electromechanical 
transducers, theory of electromechanical systems, 
power and wideband transformers, rotating elec- 
trical machinery from the theoretical and perform- 
ance points of view. 

ENEE 473 Transducers and Electrical Machinery 
Laboratory. (1) Corequisite, ENEE 472. Experi- 
ments on transformers, synchronous machines, 
induction motors, synchros, loudspeakers, other 
transducers. 

ENEE 480 Fundamentals of Solid State Electron- 
ics. (3) Prerequisite. ENEE 381. Review of Max- 
well's equation, electromagnetic properties of die- 
lectrics: introduction to quantum mechanics and 
quantum statistics; classical and quantum theory 
of metals; theory of semiconductors and semi- 
conductor devices: principle of magnetic devices 
and selected topics. 

ENEE 481 Antennas. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 381. 
Introduction to the concepts of radiation, general- 
ized far field formulas: antenna theorems and 
fundamentals; antenna arrays, linear and planar 
arrays: aperture antennas: terminal impedance; 
propagation. 

ENEE 483 Electromagnetic Measurements 
Laboratory. (2) Prerequisites, ENEE 305 and 
ENEE 380. One lecture and three lab hours per 
week. Experiments designed to provide familiarity 
with a large class of micro-wave and optical 
components, techniques for interconnecting them 
into useful systems, and techniques of high fre- 
quency and optical measurements. 

ENEE 487 Particle Accelerators, Physical and 
Engineering Principles. (3) Prerequisites: ENEE 
380 and PHYS 420, or consent of the instructor. 
Sources of charged particles; methods of acceler- 
ation and focusing of ion t)eams in electromag- 
netic fields: basic theory, design, and engineering 
principles of particle accelerators. 

ENEE 488 Topics in Electrical Engineering. (3) 

Prequisite, permission of the instructor. May be 
taken for repeated credit up to a total of six cred- 



its, with the permission of the student's advisor 

and the instructor, 

ENEE 496 Physical Electronics of Devices. (3) 

Pre-or corequisite; ENEE 381. Optical resonators, 
Fabry-Perot etalon. Theory of laser oscillation, 
rate equations, gaseous, solid state, semiconduc- 
tor and dye laser systems. Electro-optic effects 
and parametric oscillators. Holography. 

ENEE 601 Active Network Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 406 or equivalent. The com- 
plex frequency plane, conventional feedback and 
sensitivity, theorems for feedback circuits, stabili- 
ty and physical realiability of electrical networks, 
Nyquist's and Routh's criteria for stability, activity 
and passivity criteria. 

ENEE 602 Transients in Linear Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, undergraduate major in electrical or 
mechanical engineering or physics. Operational 
circuit analysis, the Fourier integral, transient 
analysis of electrical and mechanical systems and 
electronic circuits by the LaPlace transform meth- 
od. 

ENEE 603 Transients in Linear Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, undergraduate major in electrical or 
mechanical engineering or physics. Continuation 
of ENEE 602. 

ENEE 604 Advanced Electronic Circuit Design. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENEE 312 or consent of the in- 
structor. Comparison of bipolar and field effect 
transitors, detailed frequency response of single 
and multistage amplifiers, design of feedback 
applifiers. D-C coupling techniques, design of 
multistage tuned amplifiers. 

ENEE 605 Graph Theory and Network Analysis. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENEE 600. Linear graph theory 
as applied to electrical networks, cut sets and tie 
sets, incidence matrices, trees, branches, and 
mazes, development of network equations by 
matrix and index notation, network characteristic 
equations for natural circuit behavior, signal- 
flow-graph theory and Mason-S rule, stability of 
active two-part networks. 

ENEE 608 Graduate Seminar. (1-3) Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. Every semester regular 
seminars are held in electrical science and in the 
six areas of specialization offered by the Electri- 
cal Engineering Department. They may be taken,' 
by arrangement with the student's advisor, for 
repeated credit. 

ENEE 609 Projects in Microwave-Circuits. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: ENEE 407 or consent of instructor. 
Individual projects on microwave circuits. Repeat- 
able up to a maximum of six credits. 

ENEE 610 Electrical Network Theory. (3) 

Undergraduate circuit theory or consent of the 
instructor. Matrix algebra, network elements, 
ports, passivity and activity, geometrical and ana- 
lytical descriptions of networks, state variable 
characterizations, scattering matrices, signal flow 
graphs, sensitivity. 

ENEE 620 Random Processes in Communication 
and Control. (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 324 or equiv- 
alent. Introduction to random processes: charac- 
terization, classification, representation: Gaussian 
and other examples. Linear operations on random 
processes, stationary processes: covariance func- 
tion and spectral density. Linear least square 
waveform estimation: Wiener-Kolmogoroff filter- 
ing, Kalman-Bucy recursive filtering: function 
space characterization, non-linear operations on 
random processes. 

ENEE 621 Estimation and Detection Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 620. Estimation of unknown 



parameters. Cramer-Rao lower bound: optimum 
(map) demodulation: filtering, amplitude and an- 
gle modulation, comparison with conventional 
systems: statistical decision theory; criteria 
(Bayes, Minimac, Neyman-Pearson, and Map), 
Simple and composite hypotheses, applications 
to coherent and incoherent signal detection: 
M-ary Hypotheses, application to uncoded and 
coded digital communication systems. 

ENEE 630 Advanced Topics — Radar Signals 
and Systems.(3) Corequisite, ENEE 620. Review 
of linear systems and signals: fourier transform 
representation time — bandwidth product, resolu- 
tion, complex representation; maximum signal- 
to-noise ratio criterion receiver and signal de- 
sign, radar range equation; statistical detection 
theory: probability of error performance: statisti- 
cal estimation theory: unknown parameters, 
Range-Doppler radar, ambiguity problem, asymp- 
totic maximum likelihood estimation and Cram- 
er-Rao lower bound: resolution of multiple ob- 
jects. 

ENEE 633 Modeling of Nerves and Muscles with 
Applications to Prosthetic Devices. (3) 
Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in engineer- 
ing or physics, or permission of the instructor. 
Principles and circuit models for resting and ac- 
tive membrane potentials of nerves and muscles; 
synaptic mechanisms including probabilistic 
models of neuromuscular transmission; electrode 
potentials and reactions: propagation of biopo- 
tentials in a volume conductor; properties, me- 
chanical models, and circuit analogs for muscles 
and proprioceptors: spinal reflexes in the control 
of posture: applications of the above in the de- 
sign of prosthetic and orthotic devices. 
ENEE 634 Models of Transduction and Signal 
Processing in Sensory Systems. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENEE 633 or ENEE 435 or permission of the in- 
structor. General organization of sensory sys- 
tems; receptor mechanisms; receptor and neural 
models; statistics of neural spike trains; peripher- 
al signal processing in sensory systems, with 
emphasis on vision and audition: introduction to 
signal processing in the central nervous system; 
applications to development of sensory prothes- 
es. 

ENEE 640 Arithmetic and Coding Aspects of Dig- 
ital Computers. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 440 and 
446 or permission of the instructor. Digital logic 
design aspects: sequential circuits; computer 
number systems: arithmetic codes for error 
correction; residue number theory: arithmetic unit 
design; fault detection and correction circuits. 

ENEE 642 Software System Implementation. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENEE 442 or equivalent. Implemen- 
tation aspects of software engineering. Program- 
ming languages: architectural design; program 
design: structured programming; peripheral stor- 
age devices: 1/0 programming; debugging and 
evaluation. 

ENEE 646 Digital Computer Design. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 446. Introduction to design 
techniques for digital computers: digital arithe- 
metic: logic circuits: digital memories; design of 
computer elements: arithmetic unit; and control 
unit. A simple digital computer will be designed. 

ENEE 648 Advanced Topics in Electrical engi- 
neering. (3) Every semester courses intended for 
high degree of specialization are offered by visit- 
ing or regular electrical engineering faculty mem- 
bers in two or more of the areas listed in 488. The 
student should check with the Electrical Engi- 
neering office of Graduate Studies for a list and 
the description of the topics offered currently. 



Graduate Programs / 75 



ENEE 651 Coding Theory and Applications. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 450 and some knowledge of 
logic of switching systems. Introduction to coding 
and brief review of modern algebra; theory of lin- 
ear codes; decoding; hamming, cyclic, and 
Bose-Chaudhuri codes; error-checking codes for 
arithmetic; an +B type codes; residue checks; 
practical self checking arithmetic units; simple 
automatic fault diagnosing techniques. 

ENEE 652 Automata Theory. (3) Prerequisite. 
ENEE 421 or CMSC 640. This is the same course 
as CIvISC 740. Introduction to the theory of ab- 
stract mathematical machines; structural and 
behavioral classification of automata; finite-state 
automata; theory of regular sets; pushdown auto- 
mata; linear-bounded automata; finite transdu- 
cers; turing machines; universal turing machines. 

ENEE 654 Combinatorial Switching Theory. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENEE 450 and ENEE 444. Applica- 
tion of algebraic techniques to combinatorial 
switching networks; multi-valued systems; sym- 
metries and their use; optimization algorithms; 
heuristic techniques; majority and threshold log- 
ic; function decomposition; cellular cascades. 

ENEE 655 Structure Theory of {Machines. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENEE 450 and ENEE 444. Machine 
realizations; partitions and the substitution prop- 
erty; pair algebras and applications; variable de- 
pendence; decomposition; loop-free structures; 
set system decompositions; semigroup realiza- 
tions. 

ENEE 657 Simulation of Dynamic Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 443. Mechanistic methods for 
differential equation solution; application of ana- 
log of hybrid computers and digital differential 
analyzers for that purpose; design and structure 
of languages for digital-analog simulation on a 
general purpose digital computer; mimic lan- 
guage and examples of its use. Class will run 
simulation programs on a large-scale computer. 

ENEE 660 Control System Analysis and Synthe- 
sis. (3) Prerequisite, undergraduate automatic 
control theory background or consent of instruc- 
tor. The linear regulator problem (finite and infi- 
nite time), optimal regulation with a prescribed 
degree of stability, relation of the optimal regula- 
tor to classical control specifications, sensitivity 
of optimal regulators, state estimators and their 
use in system design, optimal regulators with 
input disturbances, tracking systems. Course in- 
cludes a brief review of classical design tech- 
niques, signal flow graphs, error coefficients and 
an introduction to sampled-data systems. 

ENEE 661 Non-Linear and Adaptive Control Sys- 
tems. (3) Prerequisite, undergraduate background 
in linear control theory or consent of instructor 
Brief review of the state space, state plane and 
phase plane, linearization and stability in the 
small, equivalent linearization and the describing 
function, systems with stochastic inputs, exact 
methods of analysis, stability in the large and the 
second method of lyaponov, frequency domain 
stability criteria, Povo's method and its exten- 
sions, introduction to optimum switched systems, 
stability of systems with input. 

ENEE 662 Sampled-Data Control Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, preparations in linear feedback con- 
trol theory or consent of instructor. Z-transform 
and modified Z-transform method of analysis, 
root locus and frequency response methods of 
analysis, ideal and finite width sampling, discrete 
and continuous compensation of digital control 
systems, state space equations, controllability and 
observability of discrete systems, stability, mini- 



mum time and minimum energy control, statisti- 
cal design and the discrete Kalman filter. 

ENEE 663 System Theory. (3) Modelling of sys- 
tems, abstract definition of state, linearity and its 
implications, linear differential systems, controlla- 
bility and observability, impulse response, transfer 
functions, realization theory, nonlinear differential 
systems, difinitions of stability Lyapunov stability 
theory, the Lure problem and Popov condition, 
input-output stability. 

ENEE 664 Optimization and Control. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 760. Calculus of variations, 
direct methods of optimization, Euler-LaGrange 
equations, inequality constraint, maximum princi- 
ple, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, dynamic program- 
ming, adaptive and stochastic control, filtering 
theory. 

ENEE 665 Linear System Identification. (3) 

Prerequisites — MATH 400 and ENEE 322 or 
equivalent ENEE 620. Representations for linear 
systems. Parameter estimation techniques such 
as least square and maximum likehood. Correla- 
tion methods with white noise inputs. Stochastic 
approximation and gradient algorithms. Applica- 
tions of quarilinearization and invariant imbed- 
ding. Effect of abreviation noise. 

ENEE 680 Electromagnetic Theory I. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 381 or equivalent. Theoretical 
analysis and engineering applications of Max- 
well's equations. Boundary value problems of 
electrostatics and magnetostatics. 

ENEE 681 Electromagnetic Theory II. (3) Prere- 
quisite. ENEE 381 or equivalent. Continuation of 
ENEE 680. Theoretical analysis and engineering 
applications of Maxwell's equations. The homoge- 
neous wave equation. Plane wave propagation. 
The interaction of plane waves and material me- 
dia. Retarded potentials. The Hertz potential. 
Simple radiating systems. Relativistic covariance 
of Maxwell's equations. 

ENEE 683 Mathematics for Electromagnetism. 
(3) Prerequisite, undergraduate preparation in 
electromagnetic theory and advanced calculus. 
Tensors and curvilinear coordinates, partial differ- 
ential equations of electrostatics and electrody- 
namics, functionals, integral equations, and cal- 
culus of variations as applied to electromagne- 
tism. 

ENEE 686 Charged Particle Dynamics, Electron 
and Ion Beams. (3) Three hours per week. Prere- 
quisite, consent of instructor. General principles 
of single-particle dynamics; mapping of the elec- 
tric and magnetic fields; equation of motion and 
methods of solution; production and control of 
charge particle beams; electron optics; Liouville's 
theorem; space charge effects in high current 
beams; design principles of special electron and 
ion tieam devices. 

ENEE 690 Quantum and Wave Phenomena with 
Electrical Application. (3) Two lectures per week 
Prerequisite, ENEE 381 and ENEE 382 or equiva- 
lent. Introduction of quantum and wave phenome- 
na from electrical engineering point of view. Top- 
ics included; general principles of quantum me- 
chanics, operator algebra, the microwave reson- 
ant cavity and the analagous potential well prob- 
lem, harmonic oscillator, hydrogenic atom. Per- 
turbation method applied to the transmission line 
and potential well problems. Periodically loaded 
transmission line and Kronig-Penny model of 
band theory. 

ENEE 696 Integrated and Microwave Electronics. 

(3) Prerequisite. ENEE 310 Registration in ENEE 
793 recommended. Active and passive elements 



used in semiconductor structures. Design appli- 
cation of linear and digital integrated circuits. 

ENEE 697 Semiconductor Devices and Technol- 
ogy- (3) Prerequisite ENEE 496 or equivalent. 
Registration in ENEE 793 recommended. The 
principles, structures and characteristics of semi- 
conductor devices. Technology and fabrication of 
semiconductor devices. 

ENEE 700 Network Synthesis. (3) Prerequisite. 
ENEE 605 or equivalent. Design of driving-point 
and transfer impedance functions with emphasis 
of the transfer loss and phase of minimum-phase 
networks, flow diagrams, physical network char- 
acteristics, including relations existing between 
the real and imaginary components of network 
functions, modern methods of network synthesis. 

ENEE 701 Network Synthesis. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENEE 700 or equivalent. Design of driving-point 
and transfer impedance functions with emphasis 
of the transfer loss and phase of minimum-phase 
networks, flow diagrams, physical network char- 
acteristics, including relations existing between 
the real and imaginary components of network 
functions, modern methods of network synthesis. 

ENEE 703 Semiconductor Device Models. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 605 or equivalents. Single-fre- 
quency models for transistors: small-signal and 
wide-band models for general non-reciprocal de- 
vices, hybrid-pi and tee models for transistors: 
relationship of models to transistor physics: syn- 
thesis of wide-band models from terminal behav- 
ior, computer utilization of models for other semi- 
conductor devices. 

ENEE 707 Applications of Tensor Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 600 or 602. The mathematical 
background of tensor notation, which is applica- 
ble to electrical engineering problems. Applica- 
tions of tensor analysis to electric circuit theory 
and to field theory. 

ENEE 721 Information Theory. (3) Corequisite. 
ENEE 620. Prerequisite, STAT 400 or equivalent. 
Information measure, entropy, mutual informa- 
tion; source encoding; noiseless coding theorem; 
noisy coding theorem; exponential error bounds; 
introduction to probabilistic error correcting 
codes, block and convolutional codes and error 
bounds; channels with memory; continuous chan- 
nels; rate distortion function. 

ENEE 722 Coding Theory. (3) Prerequisite. ENEE 
721, Algebraic burst and random error correcting 
codes, convolutional encoding and sequential 
decoding, threshold decoding, concatenated 
codes, F-N sequences, arithmetic codes. 

ENEE 724 Digital Signal Processing. (3) Prere- 
quisite. ENEE 620 or consent of instructor. Re- 
view of Z transforms; correlation functions and 
power spectral densities for discrete time sto- 
chastic processes; discrete time Wiener filters; 
methods for designing digital filters to meet pre- 
cise frequency domain specification; effects of 
truncation, round-off and finite word length arith- 
metic on the accuracy and stability of digital fil- 
ters; adaptive equalizers for narrow band data 
channels; discrete Fourier transform and fast 
Fourier transform; homomorphic filtering; Gauss- 
Markov estimates; spectral density estimation. 

ENEE 728 Advanced Topics in Communication 
Theory. (3) Topics selected, as announced, from 
advanced communication theory and its applica- 
tions. 

ENEE 730 Advanced Topics — Radar Signals 
and Systems. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 620 or 
equivalent. The theory of imaging radar systems. 



76 / Graduate Programs 



Classifications, resolution mechanisms, and prin- 
ciples. System design for additive noise: effects of 
ambiguity, multiplicative noise, motion errors, 
nonlinearities, and scattering mechanism. System 
design for ambiguity and multiplicative noise. 
Optical processing. Application to synthetic aper- 
ture, astronomical, and hologram radar. 

ENEE 746 Digital Systems Engineering. (3) Prere- 
quisite, ENEE 646. Systems aspects of digital- 
computer-based systems; data flow analysis; sys- 
tem organization; control languages; consoles 
and displays; remote terminals; softwiare-hard- 
ware tradeoff; system evaluation; case studies 
from selected applications areas such as data 
acquisition and reduction Information storage, of 
the like. 

ENEE 748 Topics in Computer Design. (1-3) Prer- 
equisite, permission of the instructor. Such topics 
as computer arithmetic. Computer reliability, and 
threshold logic will be considered. Ivtay be taken 
for repeated credit, 

ENEE 760 Mathematics ol Optimization. (3) Prer- 
equisite, course in advanced calculus or real 
analysis. Introduction to functional analysis with 
emphasis on applications to system theory and 
optimization. Topics covered are linear spaces 
and operators, Hilbert and Branch spaces. Baire 
category theorem, Hahn-Banach theorem, princi- 
ple of uniform boundedness, duality. 

ENEE 761 Control of Distributed Parameter Sys- 
tems. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 760 and background 
In control system theory, or consent of instructor. 
Study of systems governed by partial differential 
equations. Delay systems. Boundary and distribut- 
ed control. Llapunov stability. Optimal control of 
systems governed by partial differential equations 
and of delay systems. Applications to continuum 
mechanics, distributed network, biology, econom- 
ics, and engineering. 

ENEE 762 Stochastic Control. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENEE 620 and ENEE 663. Stochastic control sys- 
tems. Numerical methods for the ricatti equation. 
The separation principle. Control of linear sys- 
tems with gausslan signals and quadratic cost. 
Nonlinear stochastic control. Stochastic stability. 
Introduction to stochastic games. 

ENEE 769 Advanced Topics in Control Theory. 

(3) Topics selected, as announced, from adv- 
anced control theory and Its applications. 

ENEE 772 Mathematical Models in Estimation 
Theory. (3) Abstract measures, probability meas- 
ures on function spaces, integration; Markov 
processes, stochastic differential equations, ITO's 
rule; Kalman-Bucy model duality of estimation 
and control, singular detection, point processes; 
RKHS, linear theory, multiplicity representations; 
additional models and applications. Required 
background: functional analysis, real analysis, 
random processes. 

ENEE 774 Mathematics of Continuous Networks. 

(3) Nonoriented systems, ports, linear orienta- 
tions, theory of distributions, scattering matrices, 
operator theory of networks, activity, invariant 
embedding, multlvarlable PR and BR state-deter- 
mined systems, synthesis. Interval functions, tol- 
erance analysis, neuron networks and models, 
Manley-Rowe relations, oscillators and nonlinear 
subharmonic generation. 

ENEE 780 Microwave Engineering. (3) Prerequis- 
ite, ENEE 681. Mathematical methods for the so- 
lution of the wave equation. Transmission lines 
and waveguides, selected topics In the theory of 
waveguide structures, surface guides and artifi- 
cial dielectrics. 



ENEE 781 Optical Engineering. (3) Fourier analy- 
sis In two dimensions, diffraction theory, optical 
Imaging systems, spatial filtering, holography. 

ENEE 782 Radio Wave Propagation. (3) Two lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 681. General 
solutions of Maxwell's equations, geometrical op- 
tics approximations, propagation above a plane 
earth, effects of surface Irregularities and strati- 
fled atmospheres, scattering by turbulence. 

ENEE 783 Radio Wave Propagation. (3) Two lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite ENEE 782. Continua- 
tion of ENEE 782. 

ENEE 784 Antenna Theory. (3) Two lectures per 
week. Prerequisite, ENEE 681 or equivalent. Re- 
view of Maxwell's equations; radiative networks; 
linear antennas; antenna arrays; aperture anten- 
nas; advanced topics. 

ENEE 790 Quantum Electronics I. (3) Two lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite: A knowledge of 
quantum mechanics and electromagnetic theory. 
Spontaneous emission, interaction of radiation 
and matter, masers, optical resonators, the gas, 
solid and semi-conductor lasers, electro-optical 
effect, propagation In anisotropic media and light 
modulation. 

ENEE 791 Quantum Electronics II. (3) Nonlinear 
optical effects and devices, tunable coherent light 
sources— official parametric oscillator, frequency 
conversion and dye laser. Ultrashort pulse gener- 
ation and measurement, stimulated Raman effect, 
and applications, interaction of acoustic and opti- 
cal waves, and holography. 

ENEE 793 Solid State Electronics. (3) Prerequis- 
ite, a graduate course in quantum mechanics or 
consent of instructor. Properties of crystals; ener- 
gy bands: electron transport theory; conductivity 
and Hall effect; statistical distributions; Fermi lev- 
el: Impurities; non-equilibrium carrier distribu- 
tions; normal modes of vibration; effects of high 
electric fields; P-tvl junction theory, avalanche 
breakdown; tunneling phenomena; surface prop- 
erties. 

ENEE 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

ENEE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Engineering IMaterials 
Program 

Program Director: Spain 
Professors. Armstrong (Mech. Eng.), Arsenault 
(Chem. Eng.), MarcinkowskI (Mech. Eng.), 
Skolnick (Chem. Eng), Spain (Chem. Eng.) 

The Engineering Materials program Is Interdis- 
ciplinary between Chemical and Mechanical Engi- 
neering. Special areas of concentration include 
diffraction, dislocation and mechanical behavior 
of materials, x-ray and electron microscopic tech- 
niques, electronic and magnetic behavior of ma- 
terials, and the chemical physics of materials. 

The programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. 
degrees are open to qualified students holding 
the B.S. degree. Admission may be granted to 
students with degrees In any of the engineering 
and science areas from accredited programs. In 
some cases it may be necessary to require cours- 
es to fulfill the background. The general regula- 
tions of the Graduate School apply In reviewing 
applications. 

The candidate for the M.S. degree has the 
choice of tollowing a plan of study with thesis or 
without thesis. The equivalent of at least three 
years of full-time study beyond the B.S. degree Is 



required for the Ph.D. degree. All students seek- 
ing graduate degrees in Engineering Materials 
must enroll In ENMA 650, 660 and 671. In addition 
to the general rules of the Graduate School cer- 
tain special degree requirements are set forth by 
the Departments in their departmental publica- 
tions. 

Special facilities available for graduate study In 
Engineering Materials are coordinated through 
the Center for Materials Research, the Laboratory 
for Radiation and Polymer Science, the Labora- 
tory for High Pressure Science and various cen- 
tral facilities. Special equipment available in- 
cludes a scanning electron microscope, x-ray dif- 
fraction equipment, crystal growing, sample prep- 
aration and mechanical testing facilities and high 
pressure and cryogenic equipment. 

Information Is available from the Director, Engi- 
neering Materials Program, Department of Chemi- 
cal Engineering, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland 20742. 

ENMA 462 Deformation of Engineering Materi- 
als. (3) Prerequisites, ENES 230 or consent of in- 
structor. Relationship of structure to the mechani- 
cal properties of materials. Elastic and plastic 
deformation, microscopic yield criteria, state of 
stress and ductility. Elements of dislocation theo- 
ry, work hardening, alloy strengthening, creep, 
and fracture In terms of dislocation theory. 

ENMA 463 Chemical, Liquid and Powder Proc- 
essing of Engineering Materials. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENES 230 or consent of Instructor. 
Methods and processes used In the production of 
primary metals. The detailed basic principles of 
beneficlatlon processes, pyrometallurgy, hydro- 
metallurgy, electrometallurgy, vapor phase proc- 
essing and electroplating. Liquid metal process- 
ing including casting, welding, brazing and sol- 
dering. Powder processing and sintering. Shapes 
and structures produced in the above processes. 

ENMA 464 Environmental Effects on Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisites, ENES 230 or consent 
of instructor. Introduction to the phenomena as- 
sociated with the resistance of materials to dam- 
age under severe environmental conditions. Oxi- 
dation, corrosion, stress corrosion, corrosion fa- 
tigue and radiation damage are examined from 
the point of view of mechanism and Influence on 
the properties of materials. Methods of corrosion 
protection and criteria for selection of materials 
for use In radiation environments. 

ENMA 470 Structure and Properties of Engineer- 
ing Materials. (3) A comprehensive survey of the 
atomic and electronic structure of solids with 
emphasis on the relationship of structure to the 
physical and mechanical properties. 

ENMA 471 Physical Chemistry of Engineering 
Materials. (3) Equilbrlum multlcomponent sys- 
tems and relationship to the phase diagram. Ther- 
modynamics of polycrystalline and polyphase 
materials. Diffusion In solids, kinetics of reactions 
In solids. 

ENMA 472 Technology of Engineering Materials. 

(3) Relationship of properties of solids to their 
engineering applications. Criteria for the choice 
of materials for electronic, mechanical and chem- 
ical properties. Particular emphasis on the rela- 
tionships between structure of the solid and Its 
potential engineering application. 

ENMA 473 Processing of Engineering Materials. 

(3) The effect of processing on the structure of 
engineering materials. Processes considered in- 
clude refining, melting and solidification, purifica- 
tion by zone refining, vapor phase processing, 
mechanical working and heat treatments. 

Graduate Programs / 77 



ENMA 495 Rheology of Engineering Materials. 

(3) Prerequisites: ENES 230 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Study of tfie deformation and flow of engi- 
neering materials and its relationstiip to structural 
type. Elasticity, viscoelasticity, anelasticity and 
plasticity of single pfiase and multipfiase materi- 
als. Students who fiave credit for ENMA 495 may 
not take ENCH 495 for credit. 

ENMA 496 Polymeric Engineering Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENES 230. A comprehensive sum- 
mary of the fundamentals of particular interest in 
the science and applications of polymers. Poly- 
mer single crystals, transformations in poloymers, 
fabrication of polymers as to shape and internal 
structure. Students who have credit for ENMA 496 
may not take ENCH 496 for credit. 

ENMA 650 Structure of Engineering Materials. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENMA 470 or equivalent. The 
structural aspects of crystalline and amorphous 
solids and relationships to bonding types. Point 
and space groups. Summary of diffraction theory 
and practice. The reciprocal lattice. Relationships 
of the microscopically measured properties to 
crystal symmetry. Structural aspects of defects in 
crystalline solids. 

ENMA 651 Electronic Structure of Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite, ENMA 650. Descrip- 
tion of electronic behavior in engineering solids. 
Behavior of conductors, semiconductors and in- 
sulators in electrical fields. Thermal, magnetic 
and optional properties of engineering solids. 

ENMA 659 Special Topics in Structure of Engi- 
neering Materials. (3) Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. 

ENMA 660 Chemical Physics of Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite. Thermodynamics and 
statistical mechanics of Engineering solids. Cohe- 
sion, thermodynamic properties. Theory of solid 
solutions. Thermodynamics of mechanical, elec- 
trical, and magnetic phenomena in solids. Chemi- 
cal thermodynamics, phase transitions and ther- 
modynamic properties of polycrystalline and poly- 
phase materials. Thermodynamics of defects in 
solids. 

ENMA 661 Kinetics of Reactions in Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENMA 660. The theory of thermally 
activated processes in solids as applied to diffu- 
sion, nucleation and interface motion. Coopera- 
tive and diffusionless transformations. Applica- 
tions selected from processes such as allotropic 
transformations, precipation, martensite forma- 
tion, solidification, ordering, and corrosion. 

ENMA 669 Special Topics in the Chemical Phys- 
ics of Materials. (3) Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. 

ENMA 671 Dislocations in Crystalline Materials. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENMA 650. The nature and inter- 
actions of defects in crystalline solids, with pri- 
mary emphasis on dislocations. The elastic and 
electric fields associated with dislocations. Effects 
of imperfections on mechanical and physical 
properties 

ENMA 672 Mechanical Properties of Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite, ENMA 671. The me- 
chanical properties of single crystals, polycrystal- 
line and polyphase materials. Yield strength, work 
hardening, fracture, fatigue and creep are consid- 
ered in terms of fundamental material properties 

ENMA 679 Special Topics in the Mechanical 
Behavior of Materials. (3) Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. 

ENMA 680 Experimental Methods in Materials 
Science. (3) Methods of measuring the structural 

78 / Graduate Programs 



aspects of materials. Optical and electron micros- 
copy. Microscopic analytical techniques. Reso- 
nance methods. Electrical, optical and magnetic 
measurement techniques. Thermodynamic meth- 
ods. 

ENMA 681 Diffraction Techniques in Materials 
Science. (3) Prerequisite, ENCH 620. Theory of 
diffraction of electrons, neutrons and X-rays. 
Strong emphasis on diffraction methods as ap- 
plied to the study of defects in solids. Short range 
order, thermal vibrations, stacking faults, micro- 
strain. 

ENMA 669 Special Topics in Experimental Tech- 
niques in Materials Science. (3) Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. 

ENMA 691 Special Topics in Engineering Materi- 
als. (3) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

ENMA 697 Seminar in Engineering Materials. (1) 

ENMA 698 Special Problems in Engineering 
Materials. (1-16) 

ENMA 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

ENMA 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



English Language and 
Literature Program 

Professor and Acting Chairman: Winton 
Professors: Bode, Bryer, Freedman, Hovey, 
Isaacs, Kenny, Lawson, Lutwack, Mish, 
Murphy, Myers, Panichas, Russell, Salamanca, 
Whittemore 
/Associate Professors.' Barnes, Barry, Birdsall, 
Brown, Coogan, Cooper. Fry, Greenwood, 
Hamilton, Herman, Holton, Houpert, Howard, 
James, Jellema, Kinnaird. Kleine, Mack, Miller, 
Moore, Peterson, Portz, Smith, Thorberg, 
Vitzthum, Ward, Wilson 
Assistant Professors: Gate, Hamilton, James, 
Ruthertord, Van Egmond 
The Department of English offers graduate 
work leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy. Areas of specialization for 
the MA and Ph.D. include: English literature, 
American literature, and folklore. In addition, 
candidates for the MA degree may specialize In 
creative writing, and in linguistics. 

Departmental requirements for the degree of 
Master of Arts include: (1) ENGL 601; (2) three 
credits from the following: ENGL 482, 483, 484, 
485, 486; (3) six credits in the ENGL 620 series; 
and (4) six credits of seminars. Candidates have a 
non-thesis option under which they take 30 cred- 
its, submit a substantial seminar paper for depos- 
it, and pass a four-hour comprehensive examina- 
tion. 

Departmental requirements for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy include; (1) a foreign lan- 
guage requirement; (2) at least three hours of lin- 
guistics; (3) a comprehensive written examination 
on three fields (dissertation field and those imme- 
diately before and after it) which may be taken 
with permission after nine hours beyond the Mas- 
ter of Arts and must be taken upon the comple- 
tion of 30 hours. 

ENGL 401 English Medieval Literature in Trans- 
lation. (3) 

ENGL 402 Chaucer. (3) 

ENGL 403 Shakespeare. (3) Early period: histo- 
ries and comedies. 

ENGL 404 Shakespeare. (3) Late periods: trage- 
dies and romances. 



ENGL 405 The Major Works of Shakespeare. (3) 

Students who have credit for ENGL 403 or 404 
cannot receive credit for ENGL 405. 

ENGL 407 Literature of the Renaissance. (3) 

ENGL 410 Edmund Spenser. (3) 

ENGEL 411 Literature of the Renaissance. (3) 

ENGL 412 Literature of the Seventeenth Centu- 
ry, 1600-1660. (3) 

ENGL 414 Milton. (3) 

ENGL 415 Literature of the Seventeenth Centu- 
ry, 1660-1700. (3) 

ENGL 416 Literature of the Eighteenth Century. 

(3) Age of Pope and Swift. 

ENGL 417 Literature of the Eighteenth Century. 

(3) Age of Johnson and the Preromantics. (3) 

ENGL 418 Major British Writers. (3) Two writers 
studied intensively each semester. 

ENGL 419 Major British Writers. (3) Two writers 
studied intensively each semester. 

ENGL 420 Literature of the Romantic Period. (3) 

First generation: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, 
et. al. 

ENGL 421 Literature of the Romantic Period. (3) 

Second generation: Keats. Shelly, Byron, et. al. 

ENGL 422 Literature of the Victorian Period. (3) 

Early years. 

ENGL 423 Literature of the Victorian Period. (3) 

Middle years. 

ENGL 424 Late Victorian and Edwardian Litera- 
ture. (3) A study of the literary movements and 
techniques which effected the transition from Vic- 
torian to modern literature. 

ENGL 425 Modern British Literature. (3) An his- 
torical survey of the major writers and literary 
movements in English prose and poetry since 
1900. 

ENGL 430 American Literature, Beginning to 
1810, the Colonial and Federal Periods. (3) 

ENGL 431 American Literature, 1810 to 1865, 
The American Renaissance. (3) 

ENGL 432 American Literature, 1865 to 1914, 
Realism and Naturalism. (3) 

ENGL 433 American Literature, 1914 to the Pres- 
ent, the Modern Period. (3) 

ENGL 434 American Drama. (3) 

ENGL 435 American Poetry - Beginning to the 
Present. (3) 

ENGL 436 The Literature of American Democra- 
cy. (3) 

ENGL 437 Contemporary American Literature. 

(3) A Survey of the poetry, prose, and drama writ- 
ten in America in the last decade. 

ENGL 438 Major American Writers. (3) Two writ- 
ers studied intensively each semester. 

ENGL 439 (3) Major American Writers. Two writ- 
ers studied intensively each semester. 

ENGL 440 The Novel in America to 1910. (3) 

ENGL 441 The Novel in America Since 1910. (3) 

ENGL 442 Literature of the South. (3) A historical 
survey, from eighteenth-century beginnings to the 
present. 

ENGL 443 AFRO-Amerlcan Literature. (3) An 

examination of the literary expression of the Ne- 
gro in the United States. From its tieginning to 
the present. 



ENGL 444 Experimental Approaches to Litera- 
ture - Emerson and Thoreau. (3) Variable subiect 
matter presented in experimental methods and 
approaches. Grading in satisfactory/fail only. 
Consent of instructor required for admission 

ENGL 445 Modern British and American Poetry. 

(3) Prerequisite - permission of instructor re- 
quired for students with credit in ENGL 345. A 
study of the formation of the modern tradition' in 
British and American poetry, exploring the dis- 
tinctive energy and consciousness in the poets of 
the early twentieth century (1896-1930). Special 
emphasis on Hopkins, Yeats, Pound. Eliot, and 
Stevens. Collateral readings in essays on modern 
poetics, and in other poets of the period. 
ENGL 446 Contemporary British and American 
Poetry. (3) Prerequisite - permission of instructor 
required for students with credit in ENGL 345. A 
study of British and American poetry from the 
depression to the present. Special emphasis on 
Auden, Williams, Dylan Thomas, Theodore 
Roethke, Robert Lowell. A more general study of 
the work of some of these: Berryman. Jarrell, Full- 
er, Bishop. Wright, Kinnell, Larkin and including 
the Projectivists. the Beats and the present scene. 

ENGL 447 Satire. (3) An introduction to English 
and American satire from Chaucer to the present. 

ENGL 449 Playwriting. (3) 

Engl 450 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama. (3) 

Beginnings to Marlowe. 

ENGL 451 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama. (3) 

Jonson to Webster. 

ENGL 452 English Drama from 1660 to 1800. (3) 

ENGL 453 Literary Criticism. (3) 

ENGL 454 Modern Drama. (3) 

ENGL 455 The English Novel. (3) Eighteenth Cen- 
tury. 

ENGL 456 The English Novel. (3) Nineteenth Cen- 
tury. 

ENGL 457 The Modern Novel. (3) 

ENGL 460 Introduction to Folklore. (3) 

ENGL 461 Folk Narrative. (3) Studies in legend, 
tale and myth. Prerequisite, ENGL 460. 

ENGL 462 Folksong and Ballad. (3) Prerequisite. 
ENGL 460. 

ENGL 463 American Folklore. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENGL 460. An examination of American folklore 
in terms of history and regional folk cultures. Ex- 
ploration of collections of folklore from various 
areas to reveal the difference in regional and eth- 
nic groups as witnessed in their oral and literary 
traditions. 

ENGL 464 Afro-American Folklore and Culture. 

(3) An examination of the culture of the Negro in 
the United States in terms of history (antebellum 
to the present) and social changes (rural to ur- 
ban). Exploration of aspects of Negro culture and 
history via oral and literary traditions and life his- 
tories. 

ENGL 465 Urban Folklore. (3) Prerequisite, ENGL 
460. An examination of the folklore currently orig- 
inating in white, urban, American culture. 

ENGL 470 Honors Conference and Reading. (1) 

Prerequisite, candidacy for honors in English. 
Candidates will take ENGL 470 in their junior year 
and ENGL 471 in their senior year. 

ENGL 471 Honors Conference and Reading. (1) 

Prerequisite, candidacy for honors in English. 



Candidates will take ENGL 470 in their junior year 
and ENGL 471 in their senior year. 

ENGL 473 Senior Prosemlnar in Literature. (3) 

Open only to seniors. Required of candidates for 
honors and strongly recommended to those who 
plan to do graduate work. Individual reading as- 
signments; term paper. 

ENGL 476 Modern Fantasy and Science Fiction. 

(3) Major works of fantasy and science fiction 
since the mid-eighteenth century, emphasizing 
their continuity and their relationships to philo- 
sophical speculation, scientific discovery, literary 
history and cultural change. 
ENGL 479 Selected Topics in English and Ameri- 
can Literature. (3) 

ENGL 481 Introduction to English Grammar. (3) A 
brief review of traditional English grammar and 
an introduction to structural grammar, including 
phonology, morphology and syntax. 
ENGL 482 History of the English Language. (3) 
ENGL 483 American English. (3) 
ENGL 484 Advanced English Grammar. (3) Credit 
may not tie granted in both ENGL 484 and LING 
402. 
ENGL 485 Advanced English Structure. (3) 

ENGL 486 Introduction to Old English. (3) An in- 
troduction to the grammar, syntax, and phonolo- 
gy of Old English. Selected readings from Old 
English prose and poetry. 

ENGL 489 Special Topics in English Language. 

(3) Studies in topics of current interest: repeata- 
ble to a maximum of 9 hours. 

ENGL 493 Advanced Expository Writing. (3) 

ENGL 498 Creative Writing. (3) 

ENGL 499 Advanced Creative Writing. (3) 

ENGL 601 Bibliography and Methods. (3) 

ENGL 602 Middle English. (3) 

ENGL 603 English Language - Old English to 
Early Modern English. (3) 

ENGL 604 Old English. (3) Grammar, syntax, 
phonology and prosody of Old English. Designed 
to give graduate students a working knowledge of 
Old English and to introduce them to the major 
Old English texts in the original. 

ENGL 611 Approaches to College Composition. 

(3) A seminar emphasizing rhetorical and linguis- 
tic foundations for the handling of a course in 
freshman composition. For graduate assistants 
(optional to other graduate students). 

ENGL 620 Special Studies in English Literature - 
The Medieval Period to 1500. (3) 

ENGL 621 Special Studies in English Literature - 
Renaissance Literature. (3) 

ENGL 622 Special Studies in English Literature - 
17th Century Literature. (3) 

ENGL 623 Special Studies in English Literature • 
18th Century Literature. 

ENGL 624 Special Studies in English Literature - 
Romantic Literature. (3) 

ENGL 625 Special Studies in English Literature - 
Victorian Literature. 

ENGL 626 Special Studies in American Litera- 
ture - American Literature Before 1865. 

ENGL 627 Special Studies in American Litera- 
ture - American Literature Since 1865. (3) 

ENGL 718 Seminar in Medieval Literature. (3) 



ENGL 719 Seminar in Renaissance Literature. 
(3) 

ENGL 728 Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Lit- 
erature. (3) 

ENGL 729 Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Liter- 
ature. (3) 

ENGL 738 Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Liter- 
ature. (3) 

ENGL 739 Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Liter- 
ature. (3) 

ENGL 748 Seminar in American Literature. (3) 
ENGL 749 Studies in Twentieth-Century Litera- 
ture. (3) 

ENGL 758 Literary Criticism. (3) 
ENGL 759 Seminar in Literature and the Other 
Arts. (3) 

ENGL 768 Studies in Drama.'(3) 
ENGL 769 Studies in Fiction. (3) 
ENGL 778 Seminar in Folklore. (3) 

ENGL 788 Studies in the English Language. (3) 

May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 

hours. 

ENGL 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

ENGL 819 Seminar in Themes and Types in Eng- 
lish Literature. (3) 

ENGL 828 Seminar in Themes and Types in 
American Literature. (3) 

ENGL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

LING 401 Phonetics and Phonemics. (3) Training 
in the identification, description and symboliza- 
tion of various sounds found in language. Study 
of scientific techniques for classifying sounds 
into units which are perceptually relevant for a 
given language. 

LING 402 Morphology and Syntax. (3) A detailed 
study of language structure. No student may re- 
ceive credit for both LING 402 and ENGL 484. 

LING 403 Historical Linguistics. (3) Prerequisite, 
LING 401 and 402, or equivalent. A study of 
change in the phonological, grammatical and 
semantic structures of natural languages: lan- 
guage typology: reconstruction and various allied 
topics will be treated. 

LING 498 Seminar in Linguistics. (3) Prerequisite: 
LING 100. Advanced topics in linguistics. Lectures 
and discussions by faculty, students and invited 
outside scholars. Repeatable to a maximum of six 
credits provided content is different. 
LING 609 Seminar in Linguistics. (3) 



Entomology Program 

Professor and Chairman: Steinhauer 
Professors: Bickley, Harrison, Jones, Menzer. 

Messersmith, Wirth 
Associate Professors: Caron, Davidson. 

Reichelderfer, Wood 
Assistant Professors: Dively, Miller, Nelson 
Lecturers: Heimpel, Spangler 

The Department of Entomology offers both the 
M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees. Graduate students 
may specialize in physiology and morphology, 
toxicology, biosystematics, ecology and behavior, 
medical entomology, apiculture, insect pathology, 
and economic entomology. Normally, students 
must acquire the master s degree before being 

Graduate Programs / 79 



admitted to the doctoral program. The M.S. de- 
gree is awarded following the successful comple- 
tion of the course requirements and a satisfactory 
thesis. A non-thesis M.S. option is available for 
those interested in qualifying as pest manage- 
ment specialists. In this program a field experi- 
ence course including a comprehensive report is 
substituted for the thesis. 

Students applying for graduate work in ento- 
mology are expected to have strong backgrounds 
in the biological sciences, chemistry and mathe- 
matics. Since the department is particularly anx- 
ious to find strong basic preparation, an under- 
graduate major in entomology is not required for 
admission to the program. It should be under- 
stood, however, that the lack of certain specific 
courses taken in the undergraduate program will 
extend the period of time required for the M.S. 
degree. Students in entomology are frequently 
employed as Graduate Assistants, or find 
part-time employment in laboratories in the area. 
The student is given great latitude in the selec- 
tion of the advisory study committee, choice of 
the major study areas and supporting course 
work, and choice of the research problem. The 
demonstration of competence in one foreign lan- 
guage is required for the Ph.D. Upon admission 
to the Ph.D. program, the student is given a pre- 
liminary interview (which may tie combined with 
the M.S. final oral examination) in which the pro- 
gram of course work and collateral reading, the 
plan for demonstration of competence in the for- 
eign language chosen, and the general outline of 
the proposed research area are established and 
approved. Following the completion of most 
course work and the demonstration of foreign 
language competency, the oral qualifying exami- 
nation is administered before the student applies 
for admission to candidacy. 

Facilities are maintained in the department for 
research in all areas of specialization offered, and 
in addition, cooperative programs with other de- 
partments in Agricultural and Life Sciences are 
possible. Cooperative research programs are of- 
ten maintained by the department with several 
government agencies, such as the Beltsville Agri- 
cultural Research Center, the U.S. National Mu- 
seum of Natural History, and the Walter Reed 
Army Institute of Research. Specialized facilities 
are frequently made available to graduate stu- 
dents in these programs. In many instances grad- 
uates of the programs in entomology find employ- 
ment in such government agencies because of 
the contacts made in these cooperative projects. 

The Department's "Guidelines for Graduate 
Students" give additional information on the 
graduate program, including requirements for 
admission, course requirements, examinations, 
seminars, and research areas and facilities. Cop- 
ies are available from the Department of Entomol- 
ogy, University of Maryland, College Park, Mary- 
land 20742. 

ENTM 407 Entomology for Science Teachers. (4) 

Summer. Four lectures and four three-hour labo- 
ratory periods a week. This course will include 
the elements of morphology, taxonomy and biolo- 
gy of insects using examples commonly available 
to high school teachers. It will include practice in 
collecting, preserving, rearing and experimenting 
with insects insofar as time will permit, 

ENTM 412 Advanced AplcuKure. (3) One lecture 
and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, ENTM 111. The theory and practice 
of apiary management. Designed for the student 
who wishes to keep bees or requires a practical 
knowledge of bee management. 



ENTM 421 Insect Taxonomy and Biology. (4) Two 

lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, ENTM 200. Introduction to the 
principles of systematic entomology and the 
study of all orders and the important families of 
insects; immature forms considered. 

ENTM 432 Insect Morphology. (4) Two lectures 
and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, ENTM 200. A basic study of insect 
form, structure and organization in relation to 
function. 

ENTM 442 Insect Physiology. (4) Prerequisites, 
ENTM 200 and CHEM 104 or equivalent. Three 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. 
Functions of internal body systems in insects. 

ENTM 451 Economic Entomology. (4) Two lec- 
tures and two two-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, ENTM 200. The recognition, 
biology and control of insects injurious to fruit 
and vegetable crops, field crops and stored prod- 
ucts. 

ENTM 452 Insecticides. (2) Prerequisite, consent 
of the department. The development and use of 
contact and stomach poisons, fumigants and oth- 
er important chemicals, with reference to their 
chemistry, toxic action, compatability. and host 
injury. Recent research emphasized. 

ENTM 453 Insect Pest of Ornamental Plants. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENTM 200. Two lectures and one 
3-hour laboratory period a week. The recognition, 
biology and control of insects and mites injurious 
to ornamental shrubs, trees and greenhouse 
crops. Emphasis is placed on the pests of woody 
ornamental plants. 

ENTM 462 Insect Pathology. (3) Two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prere- 
quisite, MICB 200. Prerequisite or corequisite, 
ENTM 442 or consent of the instructor. An intro- 
duction to the principal insect pathogens with 
special reference to symptomology, epizootiology, 
and microbial control of insect pests. 

ENTM 472 Medical and Veterinary Entomology. 

(4) Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, ENTM 200 or consent 
of the department. A study of the morphology, 
taxonomy, biology and control of the arthropod 
parasites and disease vectors of man and ani- 
mals. The ecology and behavior of vectors in rela- 
tion to disease transmission will be emphasized. 

ENTM 498 Seminar. (1) Prerequisite, senior 
standing. Presentation of original work, reviews 
and abstracts of literature. 

ENTM 612 Insect Ecology. (2) Second semester. 
One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisite, consent of the department. A 
study of fundamental factors involved in the rela- 
tionship of insects to their environment. Empha- 
sis is placed on the insect as a dynamic organism 
adjusted to its surroundings. 

ENTM 625 Experimental Honey Bee Biology. (2) 

First semester. One three-hour lab a week. Fifteen 
labs during semester will include topics such as 
communication, nest construction and organiza- 
tion, behavior, insect societies and bee and wasp 
biology. 

ENTM 641 Advances in Insect Physiology. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. Two lectures a 
week. Prerequisites, ENTM 442 or consent of in- 
structor. Lectures on current literature with read- 
ing assignments and discussion. 

ENTM 643 Aspects of Insect Biochemistry. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. (Alternate 



years.) Prerequisite, one year of biochemistry, or 
equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Lectures 
and group discussions on the energy sources of 
insects, intermediary metabolism, utilization of 
energy sources specialized subjects of current 
interest, such as light production, insect pigment 
formation, pheromones, venoms, and chemical 
defense mechanisms. 

ENTM 653 Toxicology of Insecticides. (4) First 
semester. Three lectures and one three-hour labo- 
ratory period a week. (Alternate years, not offered 
1973-1974.) Prerequisite, permission of the in- 
structor. A study of the physical, chemical, and 
biological properties of insecticides. Emphasis is 
placed on the relationship of chemical structures 
to insecticidal activity and mode of action. Mech- 
anisms of resistance are also considered. 

ENTM 654 Insect Pest Population Management. 

(2) Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. Current developments in pest manage- 
ment theory and practice. Emphasis on 
agro-ecosystem components and their manipula- 
tion. Population sampling, damage thresholds, 
cost-benefit relationships, and modeling in pest 
management. 

ENTM 672 Culicidology. (2) Second semester. 
One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period 
a week. (Alternate years.) The classification, distri- 
bution, ecology, biology, and control of mosqui- 
toes. 

ENTM 689 Entomological Topics. (1-3) First and 
second semesters. One lecture or one two-hour 
laboratory period a week for each credit hour. 
Prerequisite, consent of department. Lectures, 
group discussions or laboratory sessions on se- 
lected topics such as: Aquatic insects, biological 
control of insects, entomological literature, forest 
entomology, history of entomology, insect bio- 
chemistry, insect embryology, immature insects, 
insect behavior, principles of economic entomolo- 
gy, insect communication, principles of entomo- 
logical research. 

ENTM 698 Seminar. (1) Presentation of topics of 
current interest, including thesis and dissertation 
research, by faculty members, students, and out- 
side speakers. 

ENTM 699 Advanced Entomology. (1-6) Credit 
and prerequisites to be determined by the depart- 
ment. First and second semesters. Studies of 
minor problems in morphology, physiology, tax- 
onomy and applied entomology, with particular 
reference to the preparation of the student for 
individual research. 

ENTM 789 Field Experience in Pest Manage- 
ment. (1-6) Prerequisite. ENTM 654 or consent of 
the department. Involvement in practical prob- 
lems of pest management in field situations. The 
student will be assigned to a problem area for 
intensive experience, usually during the summer. 
A final written report is required for each assign- 
ment. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

ENTM 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

ENTM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Family and Community 
Development Program 

Professor and Chairman: Gaylin 

Associate Professors: Brabble. Myricks, Wilson 

Assistant Professors: Churaman, Garrison, Rubin 



80 / Graduate Programs 



A Master of Science Degree in Family and 
Community Development is offered under a re- 
vised graduate program wittiin ttie College of 
Human Ecology. The revised program is particu- 
larly responsive to ttie contemporary needs of 
families and ttie most effective w/ays of providing 
programs and services in the community. 

The program objectives of the Department of 
Family and Community Development are directed 
toward educating professionals who are prepared 
to develop and direct a variety of programs and 
services that are both family-oriented and com- 
munity based. The areas of specialization in the 
department are: family studies, community stud- 
ies with particular emphasis on programs serving 
families, and management and consumer studies. 
Faculty members use and encourage an interdis- 
ciplinary approach to the study of human prob- 
lems related to social change and to helping stu- 
dents to become agents of change, through the 
family unit. 

An integrated practicum experience is offered 
which enables students to work directly with fam- 
ilies and community agencies. 

The Master's program is 30 hours. The student 
may choose either the Thesis or Non-thesis op- 
tion. Six hours of Thesis Research are reguired 
for those students selecting the thesis option. The 
non-thesis option permits more extensive field 
experience in lieu of the research thesis. Any stu- 
dent selecting this option will complete 30 hours 
of course work with oral and written comprehen- 
sive examinations upon completion. 

The department will continue to adopt the poli- 
cies of the Graduate School as the basic criteria 
for admission to the Master's program. In addi- 
tion, it is recommended that individuals take the 
Aptitude section of the GRE, and have adequate 
undergraduate preparation in one or more of the 
following areas: family development, psychology, 
sociology, or human ecology. A course in elemen- 
tary statistics at the undergraduate level is also 
desirable. 

Due to the limited nurhber of available Gradu- 
ate Teaching Assistantships. and the high de- 
mand, application for financial aid should be 
made prior to April 1st, for the fall semester of the 
coming year. 

Further information regarding this program 
should be obtained by contacting the department 
or the College of Human Ecology directly. 

FMCD 431 Family Crises and Rehabilitation. (3) 

Deals with various types of family crises situa- 
tions and how families cope with the rehabilita- 
tion process. It covers issues at various stages of 
the family cycle ranging from divorce, teenage 
runaways, abortion, to the effect of death on a 
family. Role playing and interviewing techniques 
ere demonstrated and ways of helping the family 
through the crises are emphasized. 

FMCD 443 Consumer Problems. (3) Consumer 
practices of American families. Merchandising 
practices as they affect the consumer. Organiza- 
tions and laws in the interest of the consumer. 

FMCD 446 Living Experiences with Families. 
(3-6) 

A - Domestic Intercultural 

B - International Intercultural 

Prerequisites: FMCD 330, ANTH 101; FMCD 250; 
Optional, language competence. An individual 
experience in living with families of a sub-culture 
within the U.S. or with families of another coun- 
try, participating in family and community activi- 
ties. A foreign student may participate and live 
with an American family. 



FMCD 447 Home Management (or the Disabled. 

(3) Application of home management concepts in 
the use of resources to promote maintenance of 
homemaker independence through physiological 
and psychological adjustments in the family and 
home environment. The purpose of this course is 
to prepare students for working effectively with 
disabled homemakers. 

FMCD 448 Selected Topics in Home Manage- 
ment. (3) Seminar format will be used to examine 
the ways families set priorities and organize their 
efforts and resources to achieve both social and 
economic goals. Prior registration in FMCD 250, 
341, or other courses in management theory, sys- 
tems analysts or research methods is desirable. 
Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits provided 
subject matter is different. 

FMCD 453 Family-Community Advocacy. (3) 

Legislative efforts, state and federal, which have 
impact on families. The techniques, tactics, and 
strazegies of lobbyists. 

FMCD 485 Introduction to Family Counseling. (3) 

Provides the fundamental theoretical concepts 
and clinical procedures that are unique to marital 
and family therapy. These techniques are con- 
trasted with individually-orientated psychothera- 
py. Pre-marital, marital and family, and divorce 
counseling techniques are demonstrating and 
evaluated. 

FMCD 487 Legal Aspects of Family Problems. (3) 

Laws and legal involvement that directly affect 
specific aspects of the family: adoption, marriage, 
estate planning, property rights, wills, etc. Em- 
phasis will be given to the involvement of a pro- 
fessional lawyer; principles and interpretation of 
the law. 

FMCD 499 Special Topics. (1-3) 

A - Family Studies 

B- Community Studies 

: C - Management and Consumer Studies 

FMCD 600 Readings in Research and Theory of 
the Family. (3) Emphasis is placed on sun/eying 
current research, concepts and theory in marital 
and family dynamics. The relationship of the con- 
temporary family to the society and community 
are discussed and family patterns within various 
social classes and across different cultures are 
compared. Changes in family functioning 
throughout the family life cycle and over the last 
hundred years are described and analyzed. 

FMCD 602 Integrative Aspects of Human Ecolo- 
gy. (3) The philosophical foundation for the home 
economics profession are explored in this course. 
An historical approach is used in part to indicate 
the growth of home economics, its relationship to 
other disciplines and its integrative function for 
the practitioner of the applied human sciences. 
Emphasis is placed upon recent trends and future 
directions for the professional as change agent 
and his role within society. 

FMCD 609 Seminar: Current Issues in Family 
and Community Development. (1-4) This seminar 
will be open to all graduate students for 
non-credit or variable credit by prior arrange- 
ment. It is considered an informal vehicle to gen- 
erate communication and discussion among all 
members of the department. Presentations will 
include reviews and critiques of recent articles 
and books within the field and those relevent to 
it. In addition, original informal discussion papers 
from faculty and students will be generated for 
presentation and discussion. Guest speakers and 



discussants will be encouraged when deemed 
appropriate. 

FMCD 610 Familimetrics. (3) Prerequisites, FMCD 
401 and statistics. The primary focus is on the 
advantages and limitations of family research 
procedures and the degree of correspondence 
between these methods. Ways of developing and 
evaluating adequate research procedures will be 
emphasized and recent innovations in the field 
will be considered. 

FMCD 615 Community Interaction with Families. 

(3) A study of relationships of the individual with- 
in the family and involvement with the communi- 
ty. Community organization and structure will be 
studied from the perspective of (1) individual in- 
volvement; (2) family involvement; (3) intergroup 
involvement, i.e., racial, ethnic, religious and 
class groups. Theoretical frameworks are to be 
developed with effective operational approaches 
applied in local community organizations. Stu- 
dents will participate in studying available com- 
munity groups and their effects on individuals. 
Governmental agency programs and funded 
community projects will be studied, with special 
attention given to the philosophy of various fund- 
ing agencies. 

FMCD 625 Advanced Consumer Affairs. (3) An 

analysis of current consumer behavior found in 
various family life styles and of community proc- 
esses for dealing with consumer problems. Em- 
phasis is given to recent research and theoretical 
frameworks in the consumer area. 

FMCD 660 Program Planning and Evaluation. 
(1-6) Consideration is given to research program 
development and/or evaluation of an existing 
research program in relation to objectives and 
need. Reporting of research for publication in a 
journal and periodicals will also be stressed. 

FMCD 668 Special Topics in Family Life. (1-6) 

Individual study or arranged group study. 

FMCD 678 Special Topics in Community Serv- 
ices. (1-6) Individual study or arranged group 
study. 
FMCD 686 Introduction to Family Counseling. (3) 

This course gives the fundamental theoretical 
concepts and clinical procedures that are unique 
to family and marital therapy. Family and marital 
therapy are contrasted with individually-oriented 
psychotherapy in terms of historical development, 
assumptions and techniques. Various types of 
clinical techniques for marital and family thera- 
pists are presented. Premarital, marital and fami- 
ly, divorce counseling approaches are consid- 
ered. 

FMCD 688 Special Topics in Management- 
Consumer. (1-6) Individual study or arranged 
group study. 

FMCD 691 Family-Community Consultation. (3) 

The foci of this course are upon defining areas of 
behavior which can be referred to the family- 
community consultant and upon methodology 
which can be applied by the consultant to family 
or professional situations. Roles such as home- 
maker rehabilitation consultant could receive 
added emphasis through field experience partici- 
pation which is encouraged in the course. 

FMCD 695 Practicum in Family and Community 
Services. (3) A field experience which provides 
one of the following: (1) direct contact with family 
life styles different from one's own (2) observation 
and/or (3) experience of a professional role in 
working with families (consulting, counseling, 



Graduate Programs / 81 



intormal education, leadership training, communi- 
ty action, case work, etc.). Observation and/or 
experience with services, educational programs 
or action programs dealing with a particular type 
of family problem (financial, consumer, help in 
emergencies, health, housing, homemaker reha- 
bilitation, family relationships and management) 
will be included. 

FMCD 698 Special Topics in General Human 
Ecology. (1-6) Individual study or arranged group 
study. 

FMCD 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Food, Nutrition, and 
Institution 
Administration Program 

Professor and Chairman: Prather 

Professor, Ahrens, Beaton 

Associate Professors: Butler, Cox, Williams 

Assistant Professor: Poplai 

Lecturer: Stewart 

The Department offers a program leading to a 
Master of Science degree in each of the following 
major areas: food, nutrition and institution admin- 
istration. The department participates in an inter- 
departmental program for Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in nutritional sci- 
ence which is described under that title. There is 
also a coordinated program in cooperation with 
the U.S. Army Medical Department at Walter Reed 
General Hospital, Washington, D.C., for Dietetic 
Interns, leading to a Master of Science degree. 

A satisfactory score on the aptitude portion of 
the Graduate Record Examination is required for 
admission. 

Thesis and non-thesis options are available for 
the Master of Science degree in food, nutrition or 
Institution administration, but the Master of Sci- 
ence degree in nutritional science is available 
only through a thesis option, 

A limited number of graduate asslstantships are 
available. 

Copies of department requirements are availa- 
ble from the department for the information and 
guidance of graduate students. 

Food 

FOOD 440 Advanced Food Science. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisites: FOOD 250 and 
CHEM 261 or 461. Chemical and physical proper- 
ties of food as related to consumer use in the 
home and institutions. 

FOOD 445 Advanced Food Science Laboratory. 

(1) One three-hour laboratory per week Prere- 
quisite, CHEM 201 and consent of instructor. 
Chemical determination of selected components 
in animal and plant foods. 

FOOD 450 Experimental Food Science. (3) One 

lecture, two laboratories per week. Prerequisite. 
FOOD 440 or equivalent. Individual and group 
laboratory experimentation as an introduction to 
methods of food research. 

FOOD 480 Food Additives. (3) Prerequisite FOOD 
440 or equivalent. Effects of intentional and Inci- 
dental additives on food quality, nutritive value 
and safety. Current regulatory procedures, 

FOOD 490 Special Problems in Foods. (2-3) 

Prerequisite, FOOD 440 and consent of instructor. 
Individual selected problems in the area of food 
science. 



FOOD 498 Special Topics. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. Selected current aspects of 
food. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits if 
the subject matter is substantially different. 

FOOD 610 Readings in Food. (3) Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, FOOD 440 or consent of instruc- 
tor. A critical survey of the literature of recent 
developments in food research. 

FOOD 620 Nutritional and Quality Evaluation of 
Food. (3) First semester. Prerequisite, FOOD 440 
or consent of instructor. Effects of production, 
processing, marketing, storage, and preparation 
on nutritive value and quality of foods. 

FOOD 640 Food Enzymes. (3) First semester, al- 
ternate years. Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory. Prerequisite, FOOD 440 or equivalent. 
The classification and behavior of naturally occur- 
ring and added enzymes in food: includes the 
effects of temperature, ph, radiation, moisture, 
etc., on enzyme activity. 

FOOD 650 Advanced Experimental Food. (3-5) 

Second semester. Two lectures and three labora- 
tory periods a week. Selected readings of litera- 
ture in experimental foods. Development of indi- 
vidual problem. 

FOOD 660 Research Methods. (3) Prerequisite: A 
statistics course. A study of appropriate research 
methodology and theories including experimental 
design. Each student is required to develop a 
specimen research proposal. 

FOOD 678 Special Topics in Foods. (1-6) 

Individual or group study in an area of foods. 

FOOD 688 Seminar. (1-2) Reports and discus- 
sions of current research in foods. 

FOOD 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 



Nutrition 

NUTR 415 Maternal, Infant and Child Nutrition. 

(2) Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, course in 
basic nutrition. Nutritional needs of the mother, 
infant and child and the relation of nutrition to 
physical and mental growth. 

NUTR 425 International Nutrition. (2) Two lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, course in basic nu- 
trition. Nutritional status of world population and 
local, national and International programs for 
improvement. 

NUTR 435 History of Nutrition. (2) Two lectures 
per week. Prerequisite, course in basic nutrition. 
A study of the development of the knowledge of 
nutrition and its interrelationship with social and 
economic developments. 

NUTR 450 Advanced Human Nutrition. (3) 

Prerequisites: consent of department: NUTR 300 
and CHEM 261 or concurrent registration in 
CHEM 462. Two lectures and one two-hour labora- 
tory. A critical study of the physiological and met- 
abolic influences on nutrient utilization, with par- 
ticular emphasis on current problems in human 
nutrition. 

NUTR 460 Therapeutic Human Nutrition. (3) Two 

lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prere- 
quisites. NUTR 300, 450. Modifications of the 
normal adequate diet to meet human nutritional 
needs in pathological conditions. 

NUTR 470 Community Nutrition. (3) Prerequisites: 
NUTR 300, 450, 460. A study of different types of 
community nutrition programs, problems and pro- 
jects. 



NUTR 480 Applied Diet Therapy. (3) Open only to 
students accepted into and participating in the 
U.S. Army dietetic internship program at Walter 
Reed General Hospital or the coordinated under- 
graduate dietetics program. Application of princi- 
ples of normal and therapeutic nutrition in total 
medical care and instruction of patients. Clinical 
experiences in hospital therapeutics, pediatrics, 
research and a variety of clinics are Included. For 
students in the coordinated undergraduate dietet- 
ics program, 238 hours of clinical experience is 
required and this course must tie accompanied 
by NUTR 460. 

NUTR 485 Applied Community Nutrition. (3) 

Prerequisite: NUTR 460 and concurrent registra- 
tion in NUTR 470. Open only to students accepted 
into and participating in the coordinated under- 
graduate program in dietetics. Application of prin- 
ciples in community nutrition through guided 
experiences in different aspects of nutrition pro- 
grams in the community. This course requires 238 
hours of clinical experience. 
NUTR 490 Special Problems In Nutrition. (2-3) 
Prerequisites, NUTR 300 and consent of instruc- 
tor. Individual selected problems in the area of 
human nutrition. 

NUTR 498 Special Topics. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. Selected current aspects of 
nutrition. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits 
if the subject matter is substantially different. 

NUTR 600 Recent Progress in Human Nutrition. 

(3) First semester. Recent developments in the 
science of nutrition with emphasis on the inter- 
pretation of these findings for application in 
health and disease. 

NUTR 610 Readings in Nutrition. (1-3) First and 
second semesters. Reports and discussions of 
significant nutritional research and investigation. 

NUTR 620 Nutrition for Community Services. (3) 

First semester. Application of the principles of 
nutrition to various community problems of spe- 
cific groups of the public. Students may select 
specific problems for independent study. 

NUTR 630 Nutritional Aspects of Energy Bal- 
ance. (3) Prerequisite: CHEM 462 or equivalent, 
or consent of instructor. The prevalance and ba- 
sic causes of caloric imbalance, along with a wide 
variety of approaches to weight control, 

NUTR 660 Research Methods. (3) Prerequisite, a 
statistics course. A study of appropriate research 
methodology and theories including experimental 
design. Each student is required to develop a 
specimen research proposal. 

NUTR 670 Intermediary Metabolism in Nutrition. 

(3) Second semester. Prerequisite, CHEM 461, 462 
or equivalent. The major routes of carbohydrate, 
fat, and protein metabolism with particular em- 
phasis on metabolic shifts and their detection and 
significance in nutrition. 

NUTR 678 Special Topics in Nutrition. (1-6) 

Individual or group study in an area of nutrition. 

NUTR 680 Human Nutritional Status. (3) First 
semester, alternate years. Methods of appraisal of 
human nutritional status, to include dietary, 
biochemical and anthropometric techniques, 

NUTR 698 Seminar in Nutrition. (1-3) A study In 
depth of a selected phase of nutrition. 

NUTR 699 Problems in Nutrition. (1-4) 

Prerequisite, permission of faculty. Experience In 
a phase of nutrition of interest to the student. Use 
is made of experimental animals, human studies 



82 / Graduate Programs 



and extensive, critical studies of research meth- 
ods, techniques or data of specific projects. 

NUTR 799 Masters Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Institution Administration 

lADM 410 School Food Service. (3) Two lectures 

and one morning a week for field experience in a 
school food service. Prerequisite. FOOD 200. or 
240 and 250. and NUTR 300. or consent of in- 
structor. Study of organization and management, 
menu planning, food purchasing, preparation, 
service, and cost control in a school lunch pro- 
gram. 

lADM 420 Quantity ^ood Purchasing. (2) 

Prerequisites; FOOD 240 and lADM 300, or con- 
sent of instructor. Food selection and the devel- 
opment of integrated purchasing programs. 
Standards of quality: marketing distribution sys- 
tems. 

lADM 430 Quantity Food Production. (4) Two 

hours of lecture and one six-hour laboratory a 
week. Prerequisites. FOOD 240 and lADM 300. or 
consent of instructor. Scientific principles and 
procedures. Laboratory experience in manage- 
ment techniques and in quantity food production 
and service. 

lADM 440 Food Service Personnel Administra- 
tion. (2) Prerequisite. lADM 300. Principles of per- 
sonnel administration in food services, emphasis 
on personnel selection, supervision and training, 
job evaluation, wage and payroll structure, cur- 
rent labor regulations, and interpersonal relation- 
ships and communications. 

lADM 450 Food Service Equipment and Plan- 
ning. (2) Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. Equipment design selection, 
maintenance and efficient layout, relation of the 
physical facility to production and service. 

lADM 460 Admlnistratrae Dietetics I. (3) Open 

only to students accepted into and participating 
in the U.S. Army dietetic internship program at 
Walter Reed General Hospital or the coordinated 
undergraduate dietetics program. Application of 
management theory through guided experience in 
all aspects of hospital dietary department admin- 
istration. For students in the coordinated under- 
graduate dietetics program. 238 hours of hospital 
food service management experience is required 
and this course must tje accompanied by lADM 
300 and 430. 

lADM 470 Administrative Dietetics II. (3) Open 
only to students accepted into and participating 
in the US Army dietetic internship program at 
Walter Reed General Hospital or the coordinated 
undergraduate dietetics program. Continuation of 
lADM 460. For students in the coordinated under- 
graduate program. 238 hours of food service ex- 
perience is required and this course must be ac- 
companied by lADM 420 and 440. 

lADM 490 Special Problems in Food Service. 
(2-3) Prerequisites, senior standing, five hours in 
lADM courses and consent of instructor. Individu- 
al selected problems in the area of food service. 

lADM 498 Special Topics. (1-3) Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. Selected current aspects of in- 
stitution administration. Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of six credits if the subject matter is sut>- 
stantially different. 

lADM 600 Food Service Administration. (3) First 
or second semester. Principles of organization 
and management related to a food system. Con- 
trol of resources through the use of quantitative 



methods. Administrative decision-making, and 

personnel policies and practices. 

■ADM 610 Readings in Food Administration. (3) 

Reports and discussion of significant research 
and development In the area of food administra- 
tion. 

lADM 630 Computer Application in Food Service. 

(3) Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisite. 
lADM 600 or equivalent. The use of automatic 
data processing and programming for the pro- 
curement and issuing of food commodities, proc- 
essing of ingredients, menu selection, and labor 
allocations. 

lADM 640 Sanitation and Safety in Food Service. 

(3) Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisite. 
MICB 200 Principles and practices of sanitation 
and safety unique to the production, storage and 
service of food in quantity: includes current legis- 
lation 

lADM 650 Experimental Quantity Food Produc- 
tion. (3) First semester, alternate years. Two lec- 
tures and one three-hour laboratory. Prerequis- 
ites. lADM 430 and FOOD 450 or equivalents. Ap- 
plication of experimental methods to quantity 
food production, recipe development and modifi- 
cation: relationship of food quality to production 
methods. 

lADM 660 Research Methods. (3) Prerequisite: a 
statistics course. A study of appropriate research 
methodology and theories including experimental 
design. Each student is required to develop a re- 
search proposal. 

lADM 678 Special Topics in Institutional Food. 
(1-6) Individual or group study in an area of insti- 
tutional food service. 

lADM 688 Seminar. (1) Reports and discussion of 
current research in institution administration. May 
be repeated to a maximum of three semester 
hours of credit. 

lADM 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) First 
and second semesters. Credit in proportion to 
work done and results accomplished. Investiga- 
tion in some phases of institution administration 
which may form the basis of a thesis. 

Food Science Program 

Professor and Chairman: King (Dairy Science) 
Professors: Bender (Agricultural and Resource 

Economics). Young (Animal Science). Keeney 

(Chemistry). Davis and Mattick (Dairy Science). 

Kramer, Twigg and Wiley (Horticulture) 
Associate Professors: Wheaton (Agricultural 

Engineering). Buric (Animal Science), Westhoff 

(Dairy Science), Bigt>ee. Heath, and Thomas 

(Poultry Science) 
Assistant Professor: Vijay (Dairy Science) 

The Food Science Program offers the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. This 
graduate program is interdepartmental with par- 
ticipation or support from the Departments of 
Animal Science. Dairy Science. Horticulture, Poul- 
try Science. Agricultural Engineering. Chemistry. 
Microbiology, and Agricultural and Resource 
Economics and the Seafood Processing Labora- 
tory of the Natural Resources Institute. Areas of 
study encompass animal, plant and seafood prod- 
ucts with specialization available in food chemis- 
try, food engineering, quality control, nutrition. 
Food Management and Marketing and Food Sci- 
ence-Nutrition. 

Individual programs of study are developed by 
the student and an appropriate committee. A 



non-thesis Master of Science degree is available 
Specific regulations for the Food Science Pro- 
gram have been formulated for the guidance of 
prospective candidates for graduate degrees. 
Copies are available from the Program Office. 

FDSC 412 Principles of Food Processing I. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory per week. A 
study of the basic methods by which foods are 
preserved (unit operations) Effect of raw product 
quality and the various types of processes on 
yield and quality of the preserved products. 

FDSC 413 Principles of Food Processing II. (3) 

Three lectures per week, A detailed study of food 
processing with emphasis on line and staff opera- 
tions, including physical facilities, utilities, 
pre-and post-processing operations, processing 
line development and sanitation 

FDSC 421 Food Ctiemistry. (3) Three lectures per 
week. Prerequisites: CHEM 203 and 204, The ap- 
plication of basic chemical and physical concepts 
to the composition and properties of foods. Em- 
phasis on the relationship of processing technol- 
ogy, to the keeping quality, nutritional value, and 
acceptability of foods. 

FDSC 422 Food Product Research and Develop- 
ment. (3) Two lectures, and one laboratory per 
week Prerequisites. FDSC 413. CHEM 461. or 
permission of instructor. A study of the research 
and development function for improvement of 
existing products and development of new. eco- 
nomically feasible and marketable food products. 
Application of chemical-physical characteristics 
of ingredients to produce optimum quality prod- 
ucts, cost reduction, consumer evaluation, equip- 
ment and package development. 

FDSC 423 Food Ctiemistry Laboratory. (2) Pre- or 
corequisite: FDSC 421. Two laboratory per week. 
Analysis of the major and minor constituents of 
food using chemical, physical and instrumental 
methods in concordance with current food indus- 
try and regulatory practices. Laboratory exercises 
coincide lecture subjects in FDSC 421. 

FDSC 430 Food Microbiology. (2) Two lectures 
per week. Prerequisite: MICB 200 or equivalent. A 
study of microorganisms of major importance to 
the food industry with emphasis on food-borne 
outbreaks, public health significance, bioprocess- 
ing of foods and control of microbial spoilage of 
foods. 

FDSC 431 Food Quality Control. (4) Three lec- 
tures and one laboratory per week. Definition and 
organization of the quality control function in the 
food industry: preparation of specifications; sta- 
tistical methods for acceptance sampling; in-plant 
and processed product inspection. Instrumental 
and sensory methods for evaluating sensory qual- 
ity, identity and wholesomeness and their integra- 
tion into grades and standards of quality. 

FDSC 434 Food Microbiology Laboratory. (2) Two 

laboratories per week. Pre- or corequisite: FDSC 
430. A study of techniques and procedures used 
in the microbiological examination of foods. 

FDSC 442 Horticultural Products Processing. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Com- 
mercial methods of canning, freezing, dehydrat- 
ing, fermenting, and chemical preservation of 
fruit and vegetable crops. 

FDSC 451 Dairy Products Processing. (3) Two 

lectures and one laboratory per week Method of 
production of fluid milk, butter, cheese, con- 
densed and evaporated milk and milk products 
and ice cream. 

Graduate Programs / 83 



FDSC 461 Technology of Market Eggs and Poul- 
try. (3) Two lectures and one laboratory per week, 
A study of tfie tectinological factors concerned 
witti tfie processing, storage, and marketing of 
eggs and poultry and tfie factors affecting their 
quality. 

FDSC 471 Meat and Meat Processing. (3) Two 

lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 461 or permission of instructor. Physical 
and chemical characteristics of meat and meat 
products, meat processing, methods of testing 
and product development. 

FDSC 482 Seafood Products Processing. (3) Two 

lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 461 or permission of instructor. The princi- 
pal preservation methods for commercial seafood 
products with particular reference to the inverte- 
brates. Chemical and microbiological aspects of 
processing are emphasized. 

FDSC 621 Systems Analysis in the Food Indus- 
try. (3) Construction and solution of models for 
optimizing feed, product formulations and nu- 
trient-palatability costs. Methods for optimizing 
processes, inventories, and transportation sys- 
tems. 

FDSC 631 Advanced Food Microbiology. (2) One 

lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prere- 
quisite, FDSC 430 or permission of instructor. An 
in depth understanding and working knowledge 
of a selected number of problem areas and con- 
temporary topics in food microbiology. 

FDSC 689 Seminar in Food Science. (1-3) 

A - Lipids 

B - Proteins 

C - Carbohydrates 

D - Organoleptic Properties 

E - Fermentation 

F - Enzymes and Microorganisms 

G- Flavor Analysis 

I - Assays 

Studies in depth of selected phases of food sci- 
ence are frequently best arranged by employment 
if a lecturer from outside the university to teach a 
specific phase. Flexibility in the credit offered 
permits adjustment to the nature of the course. 

FDSC 698 Colloquium in Food Science. (1) First 
and second semester. Oral reports on special top- 
ics or recently published research in food science 
and technology. Distinguished scientists are invit- 
ed as guest lecturers. A maximum of three credits 
allowed for the M.S. 

FDSC 699 Special Problems in Food Science. 
(1-4) First and second semesters. Prerequisite 
CHEM 461 or permission of instructor. Credit 
according to time scheduled and magnitude of 
problem will be conducted. Four credits shall be 
the maximum allowed toward on advanced de- 
gree. 

FDSC 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

FDSC 811 Advances In Food Technology. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 461 or permission of instructor. A system- 
atic review of new products, processes and man- 
agement practices in the food industry. 

FDSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



French and Italian 
Languages and 
Literatures Program 

Professor and Chairman: Therrien 
Professors: Bingham, MacBain, Rosenfield 
Associate Professors: Demaitre, Fink, Hall, Tarica 
Assistant Professors: Gilbert, Hicks, Meijer, 
Russell 

The department prepares students for the M.A. 
and Ph.D. degrees in French language and litera- 
ture. Roughly half of the graduate students are 
offered financial support. 

The composition of the Graduate faculty and 
the variety of course offerings make it possible for 
students to specialize in any period or movement 
of French literature, or any aspect of the French 
language with the consent of their advisers. 

Entry into the M.A. program is open to students 
having a solid grounding in French language and 
literature. All applicants, whether graduates of the 
University of Maryland or not, must take all parts 
of the G.R.E., including the Advanced Examina- 
tion In French. 

Successful completion of the M.A. program, 
with or without thesis, involves passing a Com- 
prehensive Examination in three parts: the Gradu- 
ate Language Proficiency Examination (transla- 
tion into and from French); a six-hour examina- 
tion in French literature from the Middle Ages to 
the present (a reading knowledge of Old French 
will be supposed); and a one hour oral examina- 
tion in French literature from the Middle Ages to 
the present. The M.A. program is generally com- 
pleted in three to four semesters, or less if Sum- 
mer Session offerings are utilized. 

Entry into the Ph.D. program is open to only the 
most highly qualified and most highly motivated 
candidates who can show that individual research 
is their major interest, and who give evidence of 
strong qualifications to pursue that interest. 

All applicants for the Ph.D. program (except 
M.A. graduates of this department) must pass a 
three-part Preliminary Examination, consisting of 
an explication de texte, an essay and an oral 
examination before being fully admitted to the 
program at the end of their first year. (The 
Preliminary Examination is administered at the 
start of the Fall Semester.) They are then required 
to complete a program of seminars related to 
their field of interest and to pass five Special 
Topic examinations and a Foreign Language 
translation examination before being admitted to 
candidacy and beginning work on their 
dissertation. 

Complete information concerning the depart- 
ment's requirements are set forth in the 
Guide to Graduate Programs in Frencti, available 
by writing to the Department of French Language 
and Literature, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland 20742. 



French 

FREN 001 Elementary French for Graduate Stu- 
dents. (3) Intensive elementary course In the 
French language designed particularly for gradu- 
ate students who wish to acquire a reading 
knowledge. This course does not carry credit 
towards any degree at the university. 

FREN 400 Applied Linguistics. (3) The nature of 
applied linguistics and its contribution to the 
effective teaching of foreign languages. Compara- 
tive study of English and French, with emphasis 



upon points of divergence. Analysis, evaluation 
and construction of related drills. 

FREN 401 Introduction to Stylistics. (3) 

Prerequisite, FREN 302, or course chairman's 
consent. Comparative stylistic analysis: detailed 
grammatical analysis; translation. 

FREN 404 Oral Practice for Teachers of French. 

(3) Prerequisites, FREN 311 and FREN 312, or 
consent of the instructor. Development of fluency 
in French, stress on correct sentence structure 
and idiomatic expression. Credit may not be ap- 
plied toward the French major. 

FREN 405 Explication de Textes. (3) Oral and 
written analysis of short literary works, or of ex- 
cerpts from longer works chosen for their histori- 
cal, structural, or stylistic interest, with the pur- 
pose of training the major to understand litera- 
ture in depth and to make mature esthetic evalua- 
tions of it, 

FREN 411 Introduction to Medieval Literature. (3) 

French literature from the ninth through the fif- 
teenth century. La Chanson Epique, le Roman 
Courtois, le Lai: la Litterature Bourgeoise, le The- 
atre, la Poesie Lyrique. 

FREN 412 Introduction to Medieval Literature. (3) 

French literature from the ninth through the fif- 
teenth century. La Chanson epique, le Roman 
courtois, le Lai; la Litterature Bourgeoise, le The- 
atre, la Poesie Lyrique. 

FREN 421 French Literature of the Sixteenth 
Century. (3) The Renaissance in France: Human- 
ism, Rabelais, Calvin, the Pleiade, Montaigne, 
Baroque poetry. 

FREN 422 French Literature of the Sixteenth 
Century. (3) The Renaissance in France: Human- 
ism, Rabelais, Calvin, the Pleiade, Montaigne, 
Barogue poetry. 

FREN 431 French Literature of the Seventeenth 
Century. (3) Descartes, Pascal, Corneille, Racine; 
the remaining great classical writers, with special 
attention to Cohere. 

FREN 432 French Literature of the Seventeenth 
Century. (3) Descartes, Pascal, Corneille, Racine; 
th^ remaining great classical writers, with special 
attention to Moliere. 

FREN 441 French Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. (3) Development of philosophical and 
scientific movement; Montesquieu, Voltaire, Di- 
derot, Rousseau. 

FREN 442 French Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. (3) Development of philosophical and 
scientific movement; Montesquieu, Voltaire, Di- 
derot, Rousseau. 

FREN 451 French Literature of the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) Drama and poetry from Romanticism 
to Symbolism; the major prose writers of the 
same period. 

FREN 452 French Literature of the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) Drama and poetry from Romanticism 
to Symbolism; the major prose writers of the 
same period. 

FREN 461 Studies In Twentieth Century Litera- 
ture - The Eary Years. (3) French poetry, theater 
and the novel during the age of Proust and Gide. 

FREN 462 Studies in Twentieth Century Litera- 
ture - Mid-Century Writers. (3) Modern French 
poetry, theater and the novel, with special empha- 
sis on the literature of Anxiety and Existentialism. 

FREN 463 Studies in Twentieth Century Litera- 
ture - The Contemporary Scene. (3) French writ- 



84 / Graduate Programs 



ers and literary movements since about 1950, with 
special emphasis on new forms of the novel and 
theater. 

FREN 471 French Civilization I. (3) French life, 
customs, culture, traditions (800-1750). 
FREN 472 French Civilization II. (3) French life, 
customs, culture, traditions (1750— present-day 
France) 

FREN 478 Themes and Movements of French 
Literature in Translation. (3) Studies treatments 
of thematic problems or of literary or historical 
movements in French literature. Topic to be de- 
termined each semester. Given in English. 

FREN 479 MastervKorks of French Literature in 
Translation. (3) Treats the works of one or more 
major French writers. Topic to be determined 
each semester. Given in English. 

FREN 488 Pro-Seminar in a Great Literary Fig- 
ure. (3) Each semester a specialized study will be 
made of one great French writer chosen from 
some representative literary period or movement 
since the Middle Ages. Repeatable for a maxi- 
mum of six credits. 

FREN 489 Pro-Seminar in Themes or Movements 
of French Literature. (3) Repeatable for a maxi- 
mum of six credits. 

FREN 491 Honors Reading Course, Poetry. (3) 
H - Honors, Poetry. 

Supervised readings to be tal<en normally only by 
students admitted to the Honors program. 
FREN 492 Honors Reading Course, Novel. (3) 
H- Honors, Novel. 

Supervised readings to be fallen normally only by 
students admitted to the Honors program. 

FREN 493 Honors Reading Course Drama. (3) 

H - Honors, Drama. 

Supervised readings to be taken normally only by 
students admitted to the Honors program. 
FREN 494 Honors Independent Study. (3) 

H- Honors. 

Honors independent study involves guided read- 
ings based on an honors reading list and tested 
by a 6 hour written examination. Honors 494 and 
495 are required to fulfill the departmental honors 
requirement in addition to two out of the follow- 
ing, 491 H, 492H, 493H. Open only to students 
admitted to the departmental Honors program. 

FREN 495 Honors Thesis Research. (3) 

H- Honors. 

Honors thesis research involves the writing of a 
paper under the direction of a professor in this 
department and an oral examination. Honors 494 
and 495 are required to fulfill the departmental 
honors requirement in addition to two out of the 
following, 491 H, 492H, 493H. Open only to stu- 
dents admitted to the departmental Honors pro- 
gram. 

FREN 498 Special Topics in French Literature. 
(3) Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. 

FREN 499 Special Topics In French Studies. (3) 

An aspect of French studies, the specific topic to 
be announced each time the course is offered. 
Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 
FREN 600 Problems in Bibliography and Re- 
search Methods. (3) 

FREN 601 The History of the French Language. 
(3) 



FREN 602 Comparative Romance Linguistics. (3) 

Also listed as SPAN 612. 
FREN 603 Stylistics. (3) Advanced composition, 
translation, stylistic analysis. 
FREN 609 Special Topic in the French Lan- 
guage. (3) 

FREN 610 La Chanson De Roland. (3) Close read- 
ings of the test. Study of epic formulae and early 
Medieval literary techniques; reading knowledge 
of Old French desirable. 

FREN 619 Special Topic in Medieval French Lit- 
erature. (3) 

FREN 629 Special Topic in Sixteenth Century 
French Literature. (3) 

FREN 630 Corneille. (3) 

FREN 631 Mollere. (3) 

FREN 632 Racine. (3) 

FREN 639 Special Topic in Seventeenth Century 

French Literature. (3) 

FREN 640 Voltaire. (3) 

FREN 641 Rousseau. (3) 

FREN 642 Diderot. (3) 

FREN 649 Special Topic in Eighteenth Century 
French Literature. 

FREN 650 French Poetry in the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury. (3) 

FREN 651 French Poetry in the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury. (3) 

FREN 652 The French Novel in the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 653 The French Novel in the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 659 Special Topic in Nineteenth Century 
French Literature. (3) 

FREN 660 French Poetry in the Twentieth Centu- 
ry. (3) 

FREN 662 The French Novel in the Twentieth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 663 The French Novel in the Twentieth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 664 The French Theatre in the Twentieth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 665 The French Theatre in the Twentieth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 669 Special Topic in Twentieth Century 
French Literature. (3) 

FREN 679 The History of Ideas in France. (3) 

Analysis of currents of ideas as reflected in differ- 
ent periods and authors of French literature. 

FREN 689 Seminar in a Great Literary Figure. (3) 

FREN 699 Seminar. (3) Topic to be determined 
each semester. 

FREN 702 Structural French Linguistics. (3) 

Synchronic description of the phonology, mor- 
phology and synta of modern spoken French: 
standard French in contrast with other varieties. 

FREN 709 College Teaching of French. (1) 

Introduction to the teaching of French at the col- 
lege level with particular emphasis on methodolo- 
gy. Seminars in theory, demonstration of different 
teaching techniques, supervised practice teach- 
ing, training in language laboratory procedures, 
evaluation of instructional materials. Required of 
all graduate assistants in French. Repeatable to a 
maximum of two credits. 



FREN 799 H^aster's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

FREN 801 Independent Study. (3) Designed to 
permit doctoral candidates to work independently 
in areas of special interest to them, under the 
close supervision of a professor of their choice. 

FREN 802 Independent study. (3) Designed to 
permit doctoral candidates to work independently 
m areas of special interest to them, under the 
close supervision of a professor of their choice. 

FREN 818 French Literary Criticism. (3) Analysis 
and evaluation of various trends in literary criti- 
cism as a manifestation of the French literary ge- 
nius. Topic to be determined each semester. 
FREN 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

Italian 

ITAL 410 The Italian Renaissance. (3) A study of 
major trends of thought in Renaissance literature, 
philosophy, art, and science. 

ITAL 498 Special Topics in Italian Literature. (3) 

Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. 

ITAL 499 Special Topics in Italian Studies. (3) An 

aspect of Italian studies, the specific topic to be 
announced each time the course is offered. Re- 
peatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 



Geography Program 

Professor and Chairman: Harper 
Professors: Deshler. Fonarift. Hu 
Associate Professors: Brodsky, Chaves, Groves, 

Mitchell, Thompson, Wiedel 
Assistant Professors: Christian, Cirrincions, Garst, 

Muller, Roswell, Thorn, Yoshicoka 



The programs for both the Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the Department 
of Geography are designed to provide the student 
with well-rounded competence in the field as well 
as opportunity for specialization. 

Considering particular advantages inherent in 
the College Park location the department has 
built its graduate program around three major 
areas of concentration. In each, the department 
has assembled a group of faculty members with 
complementary and overlapping interests. The 
areas are: (1) Physical Geography with emphasis 
on physical systems involving the inter-relation- 
ships between geomorphology, climatology, 
and other environmental elements. The 
University's meteorology program and work in 
agriculture and biology provide support for this 
program as various Federal Government environ- 
mental programs and the special consortium 
studying Chesapeake Bay and its resources. (2) 
Cultural Geography, especially the historical ge- 
ography of the United States and Canada. This 
specialty draws on the incomparable archival 
material in the Washington area, in state histori- 
cal agencies, and in Baltimore. (3) the geography 
of Metropolitan Areas and urban systems support- 
ed by affiliation with the University's Institute for 
Urban Studies and regional and local planning 
agencies. 

Individual faculty members have other interests 
that enable students to work on special programs 
such as human ecology, environmental problems, 
medical geography, Latin America, East Asia, and 
cartography. But students planning such pro- 
grams should contact the department or the inter- 
ested faculty member to determine their feasibili- 
ty- 
Graduate Programs / 85 



While progress in the graduate program is 
largely an individual matter students entering the 
MA, program should consider a two-year pro- 
gram normal; those entering the Ph.D. should 
think of three years as the norm. 

Incoming M.A students are expected to have 
an undergraduate degree in the field or in a 
closely related field, with substantial work in ge- 
ography. In the latter case, remedial work may be 
required prior to admission to the degree pro- 
gram. All graduate applicants should submit GRE 
examination results. 

Because of the degree of specialization inher- 
ent in Ph.D. training, the department only consi- 
ders applicants whose interests coincide with 
departmental staff competence — in general, the 
three major areas of geography described above- 
Prospective students who are unsure whether 
their interests match those of the department are 
encouraged to submit a proposal for considera- 
tion 

For admission to the doctoral program, the 
department normally requires a grade-point aver- 
age higher than 3.0 and an MA. degree from a 
recognized geography department, or compe- 
tence in terms of fields of study and level of 
achievement comparable to the MA. degree of 
the department 

A non MA, -direct Ph,D program is possible by 
petition from the student and upon approval of a 
faculty committee appointed by the department 
chairman, 

MA students have the choice of either thesis 
or non-thesis programs. The non-thesis option 
involves the preparation of two substantial re- 
search papers. All MA, students take an oral 
examination prior to work on the thesis or papers 
and in a final oral examination based either on 
the thesis or one of the two research papers. 

After completion of formal coursework require- 
ments for the Ph,D . there is a two-part qualifying 
examination. Part One is a written examination in 
the student's two ma|or fields of specialization 
Part Two is an oral examination evaluating the 
dissertation proposal. Upon satisfactory comple- 
tion of the dissertation there is a final oral exami- 
nation. 

Departmental research' facilities include a refer- 
ence library with extensive lournal collection, a 
map collection and a cartographic laboratory. A 
remote computer console in the building has di- 
rect connection with the University's Computer 
Science Center. There is close liaison with the 
Departments of Economics. Business Administra- 
tion, Government and Politics, Sociology, and 
with the Bureaus of Business and Economic Re- 
search, and of Government Research. The Nation- 
al Library of Agriculture is within two miles of the 
College Park Campus. 

More detailed information on the M.A. and 
Ph.D. programs can be obtained from the depart- 
ment 

GEOG 400 Geography of North America. (3) An 

examination of the contemporary patterns of 
American and Canadian life from a regional view- 
point. Major topics include the significance of 
the physical environment, resource use, the politi- 
cal framework, economic activities, demographic 
and socio-cultural characteristics, regional identi- 
fication, and regional problems. 

GEOG 402 Geography of Maryland and Adjacent 
Areas. (3) An analysis of the physical environ- 
ment, natural resources, and population in rela- 
tion to agriculture, industry, transport, and trade 
in the state of Maryland and adjacent areas. 

GEOG 406 Historical Geography of North Ameri- 
ca before 1800. (3) An analysis of the changing 

86 / Graduate Programs 



geography of the U.S. and Canada from 
pre-Columbian times to the end of the 18th centu- 
ry. Emphasis on areal variations and changes in 
the settlements and economies of Indian and 
Colonial populations. Areal specialization and the 
changing patterns of agriculture, industry, trade, 
and transportation Population growth, composi- 
tion and interior expansion Regionalization. 

GEOG 407 Historical Geography of North Ameri- 
ca after 1800. (3) An analysis of the changing 
geography of the U.S. and Canada from 1800 to 
the 1920's. Emphasis on the settlement expansion 
and socio-economic development of the U.S., and 
comparisons with Canadian experience. Immigra- 
tion, economic activities, industrialization, trans- 
portation and urbanization 

GEOG 410 Geography of Europe. (3) Agricultural 
and industrial development of Europe and pres- 
ent-day problems in relation to the physical and 
cultural setting of the continent and its natural 
resources. 

GEOG 411 Historical Geography of Europe. (3) 

An analysis of the changing geography of Europe 
at selected periods from prehistoric times until 
the end of the 19th century, with particular em- 
phasis on Western Europe. Changing patterns of 
population, agriculture, industry, trade and trans- 
portation. Development of the nation-state. Im- 
pact of overseas expansion. Agricultural and in- 
dustrial revolutions. 

GEOG 415 Economic Resources and Develop- 
ment of Africa. (3) The natural resources of Africa 
in relation to agricultural and mineral production: 
the various stages of economic development and 
the potentialities of the future. 

GEOG 420 Geography of Asia. (3) Lands, cli- 
mates, natural resources, and major economic 
activities in Asia (except Soviet Asia). Outstanding 
differences between major regions. 

GEOG 421 Economic and Political Geography of 
Eastern Asia. (3) Study of China, Korea, Japan, 
the Philippines; physical geographic setting, pop- 
ulation, economic and political geography. Poten- 
tialities of major regions and recent develop- 
ments. 

GEOG 422 Cultural Geography of China and 
Japan. (?) Survey of geographical distribution 
and interpretation of cultural patterns of China 
and Japan. Emphasis on basic cultural institu- 
tions, outlook on life, unique characteristics of 
various groups. Trends of cultural change and 
contemporary problems. 

GEOG 423 Economic and Political Geography of 
South and Southeast Asia. (3) Study of the Indian 
subcontinent. Farther India. Indonesia; physical 
geographic setting, population, economic and 
political geography. Potentialities of various 
countries and regions and their role in present 
Asia. 

GEOG 431 Economic and Cultural Geography of 
Caribbean America. (3) An analysis of the physi- 
cal framework, broad economic and historical 
trends, cultural patterns, and regional diversifica- 
tion of Mexico. Central America, the West Indies. 

GEOG 432 Economic and Cultural Geography of 
South America. (3) A survey of natural environ- 
ment and resources, economic development and 
cultural deversity of the South American repub- 
lics, with emphasis upon problems and prospects 
of the countries 

GEOG 434 Historical Geography of the Hispanic 
World. (3) An examination of the social, econom- 
ic, political and cultural geography of the coun- 



tries of the Iberian peninsula and Latin America 
in the past with concentration on specific time 
periods of special significance in the develop- 
ment of these countries. 

GEOG 435 Geography of the Soviet Union. (3) 

The natural environment and its regional diversi- 
ty Geographical factors in the expansion of the 
Russian state. The geography of agricultural and 
industrial production in relation to available re- 
sources, transportation problems, and diversity of 
population 

GEOG 437 Introduction to Regional Methods. (3) 

Inquiry into the evolution of Regional Methodolo- 
gy with specific reference to geographic prob- 
lems. Critical analysis and evaluation of past and 
contemporary theories and a thorough examina- 
tion 0* alternate regional methodologies. Applica- 
tion of quantitative and qualitative techniques of 
regional analysis and synthesis to traditional and 
modern regional geography emphasizing princi- 
ples of regionalization 

GEOG 440 Geomorphology. (3) Study of major 
morphological processes, the development of 
land forms and the relationships between various 
types of land forms and land use problems. Ex- 
amination of the physical features of the earth s 
surface and their geographic distributions. 

GEOG 441 Regional Geomorphology. (3) 

Regional and comparative morpholgy with special 
emphasis upon Anglo-America 

GEOG 445 Climatology. (3) The geographic as- 
pects of climate with emphasis on energy- 
moisture budgets, steady-state and non- 
steady-state climatology, and climatic variations 
at both macro and micro-scales. 

GEOG 446 Systematic and Regional Climatology. 

(3) Prerequisite. GEOG 445. or permission of in- 
structor. Methodology and techniques of collect- 
ing and evaluating climatological information. A 
critical examination of climatic classifications. 
Distribution of world climates and their geograph- 
ical implications. 

GEOG 450 Cultural Geography. (3) Prerequisite. 

GEOG 201. 202. or consent of instructor. An anal- 
ysis of the impact of man through his ideas and 
technology on the evolution of geographic land- 
scapes. Major themes in the relationships be- 
tween cultures and environments. 

GEOG 451 Political Geography. (3) Geographical 

factors in national power and international rela- 
tions; an analysis of the role of geopolitics' and 
geostrategy. with special reference to the cur- 
rent world scene. 

GtOG 452 Cultural Ecology. (3) Basic issues 
concerning the natural history of man from the 
perspective of the geographer. Basic components 
of selected behavioral and natural systems their 
evolution and adaptation, and survival strategies. 

GEOG 455 Urban Geography. (3) Origins of cities. 
followed by a study of elements of site and loca- 
tion with reference to cities. The patterns and 
functions of some major world cities will be ana- 
lyzed Theories of land use differentiation within 
cities will be appraised 

GEOG 456 The Social Geography of Metropolitan 
Areas. (3) A socio-spatial approach to man's in- 
teraction with his urban environment; the ways 
people perceive, define, behave in, and structure 
their cities and metropolitan areas Spatial pat- 
terns of social activities as formed by the distribu- 
tion and interaction of people and social institu- 
tions. 



GEOG 457 Historical Geography of Cities. (3) The 

course is concerned with the urbanization of the 
United States and Canada prior to 1920 Both the 
evolution of the urban system across the coun- 
tries and the spatial distribution of activities with- 
in cities will be considered Special attention is 
given to the process of industrialization and the 
concurrent structuring of residential patterns 
among ethnic groups 

GEOG 459 Proseminar in Urban Geography. (3) A 
problems-oriented course for students with a 
background in urban geography using a discus- 
sion/lecture format It will focus on a particular 
sub-field within urban geography each time it is 
taught taking advantage of the special interests of 
the instructor 

GEOG 460 Advanced Economic Geography I - 
Agricultural Resources. (3) Prerequisite. GEOG 
201 or 203, The nature of agricultural resources, 
the maior types of agricultural exploitation in the 
world and the geographic conditions. Mam prob- 
lems of conservation, 

GEOG 461 Advanced Economic Geography II - 
Mineral Resources. (3) Prerequisite. GEOG 201 
or 203 The nature and geographic distribution of 
the principal power, metallic and other minerals 
Economic geographic aspects of modes of ex- 
ploitation Consequences of geographic distribu- 
tion and problems of conservation 

GEOG 462 Water Resources and Water Re- 
source Planning. (3) GEOG 201 or 203, or permis- 
sion of instructor. Water as a component of the 
human environment A systematic examination of 
various aspects of water, including problems of 
domestic and industrial water supply, irrigation 
hydroelectric power, fisheries, navigation, flood 
damage reduction and recreation 

GEOG 463 Geographic aspects of Pollution. (3) 

The impact of man on his environment and resul- 
tant problems Examination of the spatial aspects 
of physical and socio-economic factors in air, 
water, and land pollution 
GEOG 465 Geography of Transportation. (3) The 
distribution of transport routes on the earth s sur- 
face, patterns of transport routes, the adjustment 
of transport routes and media to conditions of the 
natural environment, population centers and their 
distribution 

GEOG 466 Industrial Localization. (3) Factors and 
trends in the geographic distribution of the manu- 
facturing industries of the world, analyzed with 
reference to theories of industrial location, 

GEOG 470 History and Theory of Cartography. 

(3) The development of maps throughout history 
Geographical orientation, coordinates and map 
scales. Map projections, their nature, use and lim- 
itations. Principles of representation of features 
on physical and cultural maps. Modern uses of 
maps and relationships between characteristics of 
maps and use types. 

GEOG 471 Cartography and Graphics Practicum. 
(3) 

GEOG 472 Problems of Cartographic Represen- 
tation and Procedure. (3) Two hours lecture and 
two hours laboratory a week. Study of carto- 
graphic compilation methods. Principles and 
problems of symbolization, classification and rep- 
resentation of map data. Problems of representa- 
tion of features at different scales and for differ- 
ent purposes Place-name selection and lettering, 
stick-up and map composition, 

GEOG 473 Problems of Map Evaluation. (3) Two 

hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week 



Schools of topographic concepts and practices 
Theoretical and practical means of determining 
map reliability, amp utility, and source materials 
Nature, status and problems of topographic map- 
ping in different parts of the world 
Non-topographic special use maps Criteria of 
usefulness for purposes concerned and of relia- 
bility. 

GEOG 490 Geographic Concepts and Source 
Materials. (3) A comprehensive and systematic 
survey of geographic concepts designed exclu- 
sively tor teachers. Stress will be placed upon the 
philosophy of geography in relation to the social 
and physical sciences, the use of the primary 
tools of geography, source materials, and the 
problems of presenting geographic principles 

GEOG 498 Topical Investigations. (1-3) 

Independent study under individual guidance 
Restricted to advanced undergraduate students 
with credit for at least 24 hours in geography and 
to graduate students Any exception should have 
the approval of the head of the department 

GEOG 499 Undergraduate Research. (3) Directed 
regional or systematic study involving several 
subfields of geography, including cartographic 
presentation, and usually requiring field work, 
and leading to an undergraduate thesis 

GEOG 600 Introduction to Graduate Study in 
Geography. (3) Introduces the student both to 
research procedures needed in graduate work 
and to current trends and developments in geo- 
graphic research. Lectures by various staff mem- 
bers form basis for discussion Research paper 
required, 

GEOG 601 Field Course. (3) 

GEOG 602 Proseminar in Cultural - Historical 
Geography. (3) An introductory graduate survey 
of the basic structure and recent trends in the 
field of cultural-historical geography Emphasis 
on the theoretical principles and analytical proce- 
dures employed in researching cultural-historical 
problems and on literature which has resulted 
from this research. 

GEOG 603 Proseminar in Urban - Economic 
Geography. (3) A survey of the basic structure 
and current trends in the field of urban geogra- 
phy: social and economic aspects. Major contri- 
butions to the literature, significant research fron- 
tiers, methodologies, analytical procedures and 
theories in the context of infra-urban and ioter- 
urban problems and policies. 

GEOG 604 Proseminar in Physical Geography. 

(3) A survey of the basic structure and recent 
trends in the field of physical geography. Empha- 
sis on general concepts in the field, its role as a 
study of the natural environment, its function 
within geography as a whole, and its research 
methods. 

GEOG 60S Quantitative Spatial Analysis. (3) This 
course will provide students with a working 
knowledge of various tools of multivariate analy- 
sis in the context of scientific geographic metho- 
dology rather than from the statistical theory 
viewpoint Emphasis is on the application of sta- 
tistical tools and a working knowledge of them 
will be a basis for evaluation of professional liter- 
ature in the various fields of geography using 
quantitative techniques. Students should gain a 
background suitable for using the techniques in 
research, 

GEOG 610 Seminar in Geographic Methodology. 

(3) The seminar will emphasize an intensive sur- 
vey of the basic concepts of geography, a critical 



evaluation of major approaches to the study of 
geography, and a detailed analysis of the princi- 
pal methodological problems both theoretical and 
practical confronting geography today 

GEOG 615 Geomorphology. (3) 

GEOG 618 Seminar in Geomorphology. (3) Study 
and discussion of empirical and theoretical re- 
search methods applied to geomorphological 
problems including review of pertinent literature. 

GEOG625 Advanced General Climatology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite. GEOG 260 or con- 
sent of instructor. Advanced study of elements 
and controls of the earths climates. Principles of 
climatic classification Special analysis of certain 
climatic types, 

GEOG 626 Applied Climatology. (3) Second se- 
mester Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Study 
of principles, techniques, and data of micro- 
climatology, physical and regional climatology 
relating to such problems and fields as transpor- 
tation, agriculture, industry, urban planning, 
human comfort, and regional geographic analy- 
sis. 

GEOG 628 Seminar in Meteorology and Climatol- 
ogy. (3) First and second semesters Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. Selected topics in meteo- 
rology and climatology chosen to fit the individu- 
al needs of advanced students, 

GEOG 629 Seminar in Meteorology and Climatol- 
ogy II. (3) First and second semesters Prerequis- 
ite, consent of instfuctor. Selected topics in me- 
teorology and climatology chosen to fit the indi- 
vidual needs of advanced students, 

GEOG 638 Seminar in Physical Geography. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An examina- 
tion of themes and problems in the field of physi- 
cal geography, 

GEOG 639 Seminar in Physical Geography. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An examina- 
tion of themes and problems in the field of physi- 
cal geography, 
GEOG 648 Seminar in Cultural Geography. (3) 

Prerequisite. GEOG 450 or consent of instructor 
An examination of themes and problems in the 
field of economic geography, 

GEOG 649 Seminar in Cultural Geography. (3) 

Prerequisite, GEOG 450 or consent of instructor. 
An examination of themes and problems in the 
field of economic geography, 

GEOG 658 Seminar in Historical Geography. (3) 

An examination of themes and problems in histor- 
ical geography with reference to selected areas. 
Prerequisite consent of instructor. 

GEOG 668 Seminar in Economic Geography. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An examina- 
tion of themes and problems in the field of eco- 
nomic geography. 

GEOG 669 Seminar in Economic Geography. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An examina- 
tion of themes and problems in the field of eco- 
nomic geography, 

GEOG 678 Seminar in Political Geography. (3) 

Beginning with a review of contemporary ad- 
vanced theory, the seminar will turn to problems 
such as the spatial consequences of political 
behavior, the political systems and the organiza- 
tion of space including perceived space. The or- 
ganization of political space, Repeatable to a 
maximum of six semester hours, 

GEOG 679 Seminar in Urban Geography. (3) 

Flexible in format to allow adaptation to partlcu- 



Graduate Programs / 67 



lar topic being considered, this seminar is for 
advanced students in the department's metropoli- 
tan areas specialty Students normally will have 
had the seminar in economic geography Possible 
topics include metropolitan systems, the impact 
of migrants and immigrants on the internal struc- 
ture of the city, the development of black ghettos, 
the use of particular techniques in urban geo- 
graphical research. 

GEOG 698 Seminar in Cartography. (1-16) 

GEOG 718 Seminar in the Geography of Europe 
and Africa. (3) First and second semesters. Prere- 
quisite. GEOG 410. 415 or consent of instructor. 
Analysis of special problems concerning the re- 
sources and development of Europe and Africa. 

GEOG 728 Seminar in the Geography of Europe 
and Africa. (3) First and second semesters. Prere- 
quisite. GEOG 410. 415 or consent of instructor. 
Analysis of special problems concerning the re- 
sources and development of Europe and Africa. 

GEOG 738 Seminar in the Geography of East 
Asia. (3) First and second semesters. Analysis of 
problems concerning the geography of East Asia 
with emphasis on special research methods and 
techniques applicable to the problems of this 
area. 

GEOG 739 Seminar in the Geography of East 
Asia. (3) First and second semesters. Analysis of 
problems concerning the geography of East Asia 
with emphasis on special research methods and 
techniques applicable to the problems of this 
area. 

GEOG 748 Seminar in the Geography of Latin 
America. (3) First and second semesters. Prere- 
quisite, GEOG 431. 432 or consent of instructor. 
An analysis of recent changes and trends in in- 
dustrial development, exploitation of mineral re- 
sources and land utilization. 

GEOG 749 Seminar In the Geography of Latin 
America. (3) First and second semesters. Prere- 
quisite, GEOG 431, 432 or consent of instructor. 
An analysis of recent changes and trends in in- 
dustrial development, exploitation of mineral re- 
sources and land utilization. 

GEOG 758 Seminar in the Geography of the 
U.S.S.R. (3) First and second semesters. Prere- 
quisite, reading knowledge of Russian and GEOG 
435 or consent of instructor. Investigation of spe- 
cial aspects of Soviet geography. Emphasis on 
the use of Soviet materials. 

GEOG 759 Seminar In the Geography of the 
U.S.S.R. (3) First and second semesters. Prere- 
quisite, reading knowledge of Russian and GEOG 
435 or consent of instructor. Investigation of spe- 
cial aspects of Soviet geography. Emphasis on 
the use of Soviet materials. 

GEOG 768 Seminar In the Geography of the 
Near East. (3) 

GEOG 788 Selected Topics In Geography. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Readings and discus- 
sion on selected topics in the field of geography. 
To be taken only with joint consent of advisor and 
head of the department of geography. 

GEOG 789 Selected Topics In Geography. (1-3) 
GEOG 798 Readings. (1-3) Individual reading as 
arranged between a graduate faculty member and 
student. Repeatable to a maximum of six semes- 
ter hours. 

GEOG 799 Masters Thesis Research. (1-6) 
GEOG 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



German and Slavic 
Languages and 
Literatures Program 

Professor and Chairman Stern 
Professors Best, Hmderer. Jones. Hering 
Associate Professors Fleck. Pfister. Beicken 
Assistant Professors Elder. Frederiksen 

The Germanic Section of the Department of 
Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures 
offers programs of study leading to the fvl A and 
Ph.D. degrees. Specialization includes the follow- 
ing areas Language Pedagogy and Applied Lin- 
guistics. Germanic Philology, Medieval Literature 
and Culture. Literature of the German Speaking 
Countries from the Rennaissance to the Present. 

In addition to the Graduate School require- 
ments, candidates must have a bachelor s degree 
with an undergraduate ma|or in German language 
and literature or the equivalent, and fluency in the 
written and spoken language Candidates for the 
doctorate must have a master s degree in Ger- 
manic Studies or in a related discipline, for exam- 
ple German, Scandinavian Studies, Language 
Education, Medieval Studies, etc. 

Degree requirements for the MA. (thesis op- 
tion) are: 24 hours of coursework. the thesis, and 
a written comprehensive examination The MA. 
(non-thesis option) requires 30 hours of course- 
work, a mini-thesis with oral defense, and a writ- 
ten comprehensive examination For both options 
the comprehensives consist of five two-hour 
examinations based on the coursework and the 
MA Reading List. 

Degree requirements for the Ph.D. are as fol- 
lows 1) completion of at least 30 hours of 
coursework over a period of residency at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland of at least one year, and a fur- 
ther 12 hours of dissertation research, 2) a read- 
ing skill examination in a language other than 
English or German related to the candidate s re- 
search or in a further Germanic language; 3) 
comprehensive written examinations: 4) oral pres- 
entation of the dissertation topic to the Germanic 
Section graduate faculty before the topic is ap- 
proved: 5) the dissertation: 6) the oral dissertation 
defense. The doctoral comprehensives consist of 
seven three-hour examinations. The candidate 
has considerable freedom in choosing the subject 
to be covered in four of the examinations:— the 
other three being the required fields of philology 
or applied linguistics, medieval literature, and 
modern literature Candidates who opt for all four 
selected topics in German literature will choose 
subjects in each of the following periods: 16th 
and 17th centuries. 18th century. 19th century, 
20th century: in which case the required modern 
literature examination will require interpretation 
of a text Candidates who select topics from other 
fields such as philology, Scandinavian studies, 
medieval studies, etc., will take a general exami- 
nation in the modern literature required exam 

In addition to its course offerings listed below, 
the Germanic Section of the Department of Ger- 
manic and Slavic Languages and Literatures 
sponsors the German Club, the University of Mar- 
yland Chapter of Delta Phi Alpha (the national 
German language honors society), and a Drama 
Reading Circle at which German plays are read by 
students with assigned roles and then discussed 
with faculty assistance. The Germanic Section 
also invites a distinguished scholar to join the 
staff for a semester every few years as guest pro- 
fessor. A series of guest lectures brings interest- 
ing speakers to the campus almost monthly. Col- 



lege Park's closeness to Washington. DC. facili- 
tates participation in the many cultural functions 
of the capital with its wealth of German and Scan- 
dinavian social groups and national societies. 

The Germanic Section is able to contribute to 
the financial support of its graduate students in 
the form of teaching and non-teaching assistant- 
ships as well as several fellowships. Germanic 
Section graduate students are represented with 
two voting seats on the Department's Advisory 
Committee as well as by delegates to most of the 
other departmental committees, allowing them to 
take an active part in decisions which affect the 
Department in general and the graduate student 
in particular. 

German 

GERM (X)1 Elementary German for Graduate 
Students. (3) Intensive elementary course in the 
German language designed particularly for gradu- 
ate students who wish to acquire a reading 
knowledge. This course does not carry credit 
towards any degree at the university. 

GERM 400 Bibliography and Methods. (3) 

Introduction to the use of German bibliographies, 
catalogues, and reference books in order to lo- 
cate both primary and secondary sources. Re- 
searching, composing, and documenting term 
papers and theses. Instruction in English. 

GERM 401 Advanced Conversation. (3) 

Prerequisite: GERM 302 or equivalent. An oppor- 
tunity for the advanced student to gain further 
conversational fluency and Polish through inten- 
sive exercise in the aural/oral skills. Conducted in 
German 

GERM 402 Styllstics. (3) Prerequisite GERM 302 
or equivalent An advanced level presentation of 
German written style shifting concern from what 
IS grammatically correct to usage that is stylisti- 
cally superior. Conducted in German. 

GERM 431 Literature of the Middle Ages. (3) 

Prerequisite— GERM 321 and 322, German litera- 
ture from the 9th through the 15th centuries in 
abridged modern German versions. 

GERM 432 German Literature of the Baroque 
Period. (3) Prerequisite— GERM 321 and 322. Sur- 
vey of Baroque literature as it developed from the 
Renaissance. Humanism, the Reformation. 

GERM 441 Enlightenment: Storm and Stress. (3) 

Prerequisites— GERM 321 and 322. Covers the 
time from Gottschedt's influence to Goethe's Ital- 
ian journey (Ca. 1720-1786). Shows the intellec- 
tual, ideological and literary influenced in enlight- 
ment and storn and stress, 

GERM 442 Classicism. (3) Prerequisites GERM 
321 and 322. Covers the time from Goethe's Ital- 
ian journey to Goethe s death (ca, 1786-1832). 
Intellectual, ideological and literary influences on 
the inner development and unity of this epoch. 

GERM 451 Romanticism. (3) 

Prerequisites— GERM 321 and 322. Covers the 
main movements in German Fruh-und Spatro- 
mantik'. with reference to music, arts, science, 
and philosophy, 

GERM 452 Realism. (3) Prerequisites— GERM 321 
and 322- Representative figures of German real- 
ism from Hebbel to Fontane. 

GERM 461 Naturalism and Its Counter Currents. 

(3) Prerequisites— GERM 321 and 322, Prose and 
dramatic writings from Gerhart Hauptmann to 
Expressionism, Modern literary and philosophical 
movements. 



88 /Graduate Programs 



GERM 462 Expressionism to the Present. (3) 

Prerequisites— GERM 321 and 322, Prose and 
dramatic writings from Expressionism to present 
Modern literary and ptiilosoptiicai movements. 

GERM 469 Proseminar — Selected Topics in 
German Literature. (3) Specialized study of one 
great German writer or of relevant topics of liter- 
ary criticism. 

GERM 470 Structure of the German Language. 

(3) An introduction to applied linguistics suited to 
tfie needs of the advanced student andor teacher 
of German. Structural analysis of the phonology, 
morphology and syntax of modern German in 
comparison with structure of modern English 
Knowledge of German not required. 

GERM 471 Introduction to Indo-European Philol- 
ogy. (3) Basic principles of historic language 
study. Reconstructed Indo-European surveys of 
the most important ancient Indo-European lan- 
guages. No knowledge of German required. 

GERM 472 Introduction to Germanic Philology. 

(3) Prerequisite — GERM 471 or permission of in- 
structor. Reconstructed proto-Germanic, with 
surveys of Gothic, Old Norse, Old English, Old 
Saxon and Old High German. The high develop- 
ment of High German from the earliest docu- 
ments to the modern dialects. 

GERM 473 Reading Swedish, Danish and Nor- 
wegian I. (3) Develops reading facility in three 
languages in one semester. Texts read include 
Bergman's Seventh Seal, Tales by H. C. Andersen, 
excerpts works by Ibsen and Hamsun, and select- 
ed folk literature. No foreign language prere- 
quisite. 

GERM 474 Reading Swedish, Danish and Nor- 
wegian II. (3) Prerequisite — GERM 473 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Further development of 
reading facility. 

GERM 479 Proseminar in Germanic Philology. (3) 

Prerequisite — consent of instructor. Selected top- 
ics such as comparative Germanic studies. Old 
Norse language or readings in Old Norse litera- 
ture, moderm German dialectology. Repealable to 
a maximum of six credits if subject matter is dif- 
ferent 

GERM 483 German Civilization (In English ) I. (3) 

Literary, educational, artistic traditions: great 
men, customs and general culture 

GERM 484 German Civilization (In English) II. (3) 

Literary, educational, artistic traditions, great 
men, customs and general culture A continuation 
of GERM 483 

GERM 488 German Literature in Translation. (3) 

Different movements, genres of other special top- 
ics will be discussed every semester No knowl- 
edge of German necessary. May not be counted 
in fulfillment of German major requirement. Re- 
peatable to a maximum of six credits if subject 
matter is different 

GERM 489 Proseminar in Germanic Culture. (3) 

Selected topics in the cultural and intellectual 
history of h^e German and Germanic language 
areas. In English. Repeatable to a maximum of six 
credits if subject matter is different. 

GERM 499 Directed Study in German. (1-3) For 

advanced students, by permission of Department 
Chairman. Course may be repeated for credit if 
content differs. May be repeated to a maximum of 
six credits. 

GERM 611 College Teaching of German. (3) 

Instruction, demonstration and classroom prac- 
tice under supervision of modern procedures in 



the presentation of elementary German courses 
to college age students 

GERM 621 Medieval Narrative. (3) An introduc- 
tion to the form and structure of the medieval 
narrative, treatment of the most important authors 
and works of the period 

GERM 631 German Lyric Poetry. (3) An exposi- 
tion of the genre of lyric poetry, its metrical and 
aesthetic background, illustrated by characteristic 
examples from the Middle Ages to the present 

GERM 641 German Novelle. (3) Study of the de- 
velopment of the genre from the 18th Century to 
the present 

GERM 651 German Novel. (3) The theory and 

structure of the German novel from the Baroque 
to the present 

GERM 661 German Drama. (3) An introduction to 
the theory and structure of the German drama 
from the Baroque to the present with extensive 
interpretation of characteristic works. 

GERM 671 Gothic, Old High German, Middle 
High German I. (3) The first semester of a 
two-semester practicum in reading Gothic, Old 
and Middle Hiyh German, with emphasis on lin- 
guistic analysis. 

GERM 672 Gothic, Old High German, Middle 
High German II. (3) Prerequisite: GERM 671. Con- 
tinuation of GERM 671. 

GERM 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

GERM 819 Individual Study. (1-3) Prerequisite 
consent of instructor. May be repeated to a maxi- 
mum of six credits if content differs. 

GERM 829 Seminar in German Literature of the 
Middle Ages. (3) Exhaustive study of one or more 
representative authors or works of the Middle 
Ages. May be repeated to a maximum of nine 
credits if content differs. 

GERM 839 Seminar in 16th and 17th Century 
Literature. (3) The German literature of the Hu- 
manists, the Reformation and the Baroque is il- 
lustrated by study of one or more authors of the 
16th or 17th centuries. May be repeated up to a 
total of nine credits when content differs. 

GERM 849 Seminar in 18th Century Literature. 

(3) In depth study of one or more authors from 
the periods Enlightenment, Sentimentalism or 
Storm and Stress or Classicism. May be repeated 
up to a total of nine credits when content differs. 

GERM 859 Seminar in 19th Century Literature. 

(3) Comprehensive coverage from one or more 
authors of Romanticism, Biedermeier. Young 
Germany or Realism. May be repeated for a total 
of up to nine credits when content differs. 

GERM 869 Seminar in 20th Century Literature. 

(3) Concentrated investigation of a literary move- 
ment or of one or more authors from the period 
of Naturalism to the present. May be repeated to 
a maximum of nine credits if the content is differ- 
ent. 

GERM 879 Seminar in Germanic Philology. (3) In 

depth study of a topic in Germanic or Indoeuro- 
pean philology: comparative Germanic grammar, 
Runology, dialect geography, Edoic or Skaldic 
poetry, Indoeuropean studies May be repeated to 
a maximum of nine credits if content differs. 

GERM 889 Seminar in Germanic Area Studies. 

(3) Comprehensive study of a selected topic in 
German or Germanic area studies history of 
ideas, cultural history, Germanic literatures other 
than German, folk literature and folklore. May be 



repeated to a maximum of nine credits if content 
differs 

GERM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Russian 

RUSS 001 Elementary Russian tor Graduate 
Students. (3) Graduate students should register 
as auditors only Intensive elementary course in 
the Russian language designed particularly for 
graduate students who wish to acquire a reading 
knowledge. This course does not carry credit 
towards any degree at the university. 

RUSS 401 Advanced Composition. (3) 

RUSS 402 Advanced Composition. (3) 

RUSS 421 Russian Civilization (In Russian) I. (3) 

An historical survey of Russian civilization, em- 
phasizing architecture, painting, sculpture, music, 
ballet and the theater to the beginning of the 19th 
century pointing out the inter-relationship of all 
with literary movements Taught in Russian 

RUSS 422 Russian Civilization (In Russian) II. (3) 

An historical survey of Russian civilization em- 
phasizing architecture, painting, sculpture, music, 
ballet, and the theater, from the beginning of the 
19th century to the present pointing out the in- 
ter-relationships of all with literary movements. 
Taught in Russian, 

RUSS 441 Russian Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. (3) 

RUSS 451 Russian Literature of the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) 

RUSS 452 Russian Literature of the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) 

RUSS 461 Soviet Russian Literature. (3) 

RUSS 462 Soviet Russian Literature. (3) 

RUSS 465 Modern Russian Poetry. (3) 

RUSS 466 Modern Russian Drama. (3) 

RUSS 467 Modern Russian Fiction. (3) 

RUSS 468 19th Century Russian Literature in 
Translation. (3) Development of Russian literary 
thought in the Russian novel and short prose of 
the 19th century. Influence of Western literatures 
and philosophies considered. Repeatable to a 
maximum of six credits when content differs. 
RUSS 470 Applied Linguistics. (3) The nature of 
applied linguistics and its contributions to the 
effective teaching of foreign languages. Compara- 
tive study of English and Russian, with emphasis 
upon points of divergence. Analysis, evaluation 
and construction of related drills. 

RUSS 471 Comparative Slavic Linguistics. (3) 

Comparative Slavic linguistics and, especially, a 
concept of the place of the Russian language in 
the world of Slavic culture through the reading of 
selected texts illustrating common Slavic relation- 
ships and dissimilarities. 

RUSS 478 Soviet Literature in Translation. (3) 

Russian literature since 1917, both as a continua- 
tion of prerevolutionary traditions and as a reflec- 
tion of soviet ideology. Repeatable to a maximum 
of six credits when content differs. 



Graduate Programs / 89 



GOVERNMENT AND 
POLITICS PROGRAM 

Professor and Chairman: Bobrow 

Professors Anderson, Dillon, Harrison, Halhorn, 

Hsueh, Jacobs. McNelly, Murphy, Phillips, 

Piper, Plischke, Segal, Young 
Associate Professors Claude, Conway, Devine, 

Elkln, Glass. Glendening. Helsler, Koury, 

Pirages. Ranald, Reeves. Stone. Terchek. 

Wilkenfeld 
Assistant Professors: Butterworth, Christensen, 

Goodin, Lanning. McCarrick, Nzuwah, Oliver. 

Peroff, Postbrief. Strouse Usianer, Werbos, 

Woolpert 
Lecturer: Barber 

The Department of Government ana Politics 
offers programs lead.ng to the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. Areas of spe- 
cialization include: American politics, compara- 
tive politics, international politics, political behav- 
ior, political theory, public administration, urban 
affairs and public policy. 

Master's degree candidates may select a thesis 
(30 semester credit hours) or a non-thesis option 
(36 credit hours), both of which require a compre- 
hensive examination in two fields of political sci- 
ence. 

The doctoral program is designed for comple- 
tion within five years and includes seminars, di- 
rected research, and opportunities to gain teach- 
ing experience. Doctoral students must complete 
a minimum of 54 hours of course work and may 
take a concentration in one of the areas of spe- 
cialization. 

In consultation with an adviser each student 
will prepare, during his first semester, a plan of 
study to include six hours of political theory and 
a designation of competence in the use of foreign 
languages, quantitative research techniques, or a 
combination of both. 

The comprehensive examination encompasses 
three fields and an oral presentation of the disser- 
tation prospectus. An interdisciplinary curriculum 
may be presented as one of the fields. The exami- 
nations are normally taken after twelve seminars, 
thereby permitting the student to specialize in 
terms of a dissertation topic during his final se- 
mester. 

GVPT 401 Problems of World Politics. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of governmental 
problems of international scope, such as causes 
of war, problems of neutrality, and propaganda. 
Students are required to report on readings from 
current literature. 

GVPT 402 Internatiorial Law. (3) Prerequisite, 
GVPT 170. A study of the basic character, general 
principles and specific rules of international law, 
with emphasis on recent and contemporary 
trends in the field and its relation to other aspects 
of international affairs. 

GVPT 411 Public Personnel Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 410 or BMGT 360. A survey of 
public personnel administration, including the 
development of merit civil service, the personnel 
agency, classification, recruitment, examination 
techniques, promotion, service ratings, training, 
discipline, employee relations, and retirement. 

GVPT 412 Public Financial Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 410 or ECON 450. A survey of 
governmental financial procedures, including 
processes of current and capital budgeting, the 
administration of public borrowing, the tech- 
niques of public purchasing, and the machinery 
of control through pre-audit and post-audit. 

90 / Graduate Programs 



GVPT 41 3 Governmental Organization and Man- 
agement. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 410. A study of 
the theories of organization and management in 
American Government with emphasis on new 
trends, experiments and reorganizations. 

GVPT 414 Administrative Law. (3) Prerequisite. 
GVPT 170. A study of the discretion exercised by 
administrative agencies, including analysis of 
their functions, their powers over persons and 
property, their procedures, and judicial sanctions 
?nd controls. 

GVPT 417 Comparative Study of Public Adminis- 
tration. (3) Prerequisite. GVPT 280 or 410, or con- 
sent of instructor. An introduction to the study of 
governmental administrative systems viewed from 
the standpoint of comparative typologies and 
theoretical schemes useful in cross-national 
comparisons and empirical studies of the politics 
of the administrative process in several nations. 
Both western and non-western countries are in- 
cluded. 

GVPT 422 Quantitative Political Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 220, or consent of instructor. 
Introduction to quantitative methods of data anal- 
ysis, including selected statistical methods, block 
analysis, content analysis, and scale construction. 

GVPT 426 Public Opinion. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 
170. An examination of public opinion and its 
effect on political action, with emphasis on opin- 
ion formation and measurement, propaganda and 
pressure groups. 

GVPT 427 Political Sociology. (3) Prerequisite, 
GVPT 220, or consent of instructor. A study of the 
societal aspects of political life including selected 
aspects of the sociology of group formation and 
group dynamics, political association, community 
integration and political behavior presented in the 
context of the societal environments of political 
systems. 

GVPT 429 Problems in Political Behavior. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. The problem approach to 
political behavior with emphasis on theoretical 
and empirical studies on selected aspects of the 
political process. 

GVPT 431 Introduction to Constitutional Law. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A systematic inquiry into 
the general principles of the American constitu- 
tional system, with special reference to the role of 
the judiciary in the interpretation and enforce- 
ment of the Federal Constitution. 

GVPT 432 Civil Rights and the Constitution. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 431. A study of civil rights in 
the American constitutional context, emphasizing 
freedom of religion, freedom of expression, mi- 
nority discrimination, and the rights of defend- 
ants. 

GVPT 433 The Judicial Process. (3) Prerequisite, 
GVPT 170. An examination of judicial organiza- 
tion in the United States at all levels of govern- 
ment, with some emphasis on legal reasoning, 
legal research and court procedures. 

GVPT 434 Race Relations and Public Law. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A political and legal 
examination of the constitutionally protected 
rights affecting racial minorities and of the consti- 
tutional power of the Federal courts, Congress, 
and the Executive to define, protect and extend 
these rights. 

GVPT 435 Judicial Behavior. (3) A study of judi- 
cial decision making at the state and national lev- 
els, drawing primarily on the more recent quanti- 
tative and behavioral literature. 



GVPT 436 The Legal Status of Women. (3) An 

examination of judicial interpretation and applica- 
tion of common, statutory, and constitutional law 
as these affect the status of women in American 
society. 

GVPT 441 History of Political Theory— Ancient 
and Medieval. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A sur- 
vey of the principal political theories set forth in 
the works of writers before Machiavelli, 
GVPT 442 History of Political Theory— Modern 
and Recent. (3) Prerequisite. GVPT 170. A survey 
of the principal political theories set forth in the 
works of writers from Machiavelli to J. S. Mill. 

GVPT 443 Contemporary Political Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 441 or 442. A survey of the 
principal political theories and ideologies from 
Karl Marx to the present. 

GVPT 444 American Political Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of the develop- 
ment and growth of American political concepts 
from the colonial period to the present. 

GVPT 445 Russian Political Thought. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A survey and analysis of 
political ideas in Russia and the Soviet Union 
from early times to the present. 

GVPT 448 Non-Western Political Thought. (3) 

Political thought originating in Asia, the Middle 
East, and Africa. This is not a survey of all 
non-western political thought, but a course to tie 
limited by the professor with each offering. When 
repeated by a student, consent of instructor is 
required. 

GVPT 450 Comparative Study of Foreign Policy 
Formation. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 280 or 300, or 
consent of instructor. An introduction to the 
comparative study of foreign policy formation 
structures and processes followed by a survey of 
the domestic sources of policy for major states. A 
conspectus of substantive patterns of foreign pol- 
icy in analytically salient types of systems is pres- 
ented. Domestic and global systemic sources of 
foreign policy are compared. 

GVPT 451 Foreign Policy of the U.S.S.R. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of the develop- 
ment of the foreign policy of the Soviet Union, 
with attention paid to the forces and conditions 
that make for continuities and changes from Tsar- 
ist policies. 

GVPT 452 Inter-American Relations. (3) 
Prequisite, GVPT 170. An analytical and historical 
study of the Latin-American policies of the United 
States and of problems in our relations with indi- 
vidual countries, with emphasis on recent devel- 
opments. 

GVPT 453 Recent East Asian Politics. (3) 
Prerequisite: GVPT 170. The background and in- 
terpretation of recent political events in East Asia 
and their influence on world politics. 
GVPT 454 Contemporary African Politics. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A survey of contemporary 
development In the International Politics of Africa, 
with special emphasis on the role of an emerging 
Africa in world affairs. 

GVPT 455 Contemporary Middle Eastern Politics. 
(3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A survey of contempo- 
rary development in the International Politics of 
the Middle East, with special emphasis on the 
role of emerging Middle East Nations in world 
affairs. 

GVPT 457 American Foreign Relations. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. The principles and ma- 
chinery of the conduct of American Foreign Rela- 



tions. with emphasis on the Department of State 
and the Foreign Service, and an analysis of the 
major foreign policies of the United States. 
GVPT 460 State and Local Administration. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of the administra- 
tive structure, procedures and policies of state 
and local governments with special emphasis on 
the state level and on intergovernmental relation- 
ships, and with illustrations from l^/1aryland gov- 
ernmental arrangements. 

GVPT 461 Metropolitan Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. An examination of admin- 
istrative problems relating to public services, 
planning and coordination in a metropolitan envi- 
ronment. 

GVPT 462 Urban Politics. (3) Urban political proc- 
ess and institutions considered in the light of 
changing social and economic conditions. 

GVPT 473 Legislatures and Legislation. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A comprehensive study 
of legislative organization procedure and prob- 
lems. The course includes opportunities for stu- 
dent contact with Congress and with the Legisla- 
ture of Maryland. 

GVPT 474 Political Parties. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 
170. A descriptive and analytical examination of 
American political parties, nominations, elections, 
and political leadership. 

GVPT 475 The Presidency and tlie Executive 
Branch. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. An examina- 
tion of the Executive, Legislative and party roles 
of the President in the political process. 
GVPT 479 Problems of American Public Policy. 
(3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. The background and 
Interpretation of various factors which affect the 
formation and execution of American public poli- 
cy. 

GVPT 480 Comparative Political Systems. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 280 and at least one other 
course in comparative government. A study, 
along functional lines, of major political institu- 
tions, such as legislatures, executives, courts, 
bureaucracies, public organizations, and political 
parties. 

GVPT 481 Government and Administration of the 
Soviet Union. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study 
of the adoption of the communist philosophy by 
the Soviet Union, of Its governmental structure 
and of the administration of Government policy In 
the Soviet Union. 

GVPT 482 Government and Politics of Latin 
America. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A compara- 
tive study of the governmental systems and politi- 
cal processes of the Latin American countries, 
with special emphasis on Argentina, Brazil, Chile, 
and (Mexico. 

GVPT 483 Government and Politics of Asia. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 280 or 453, or HIST 261, or 
262 or HIFN 442, or 445. A comparative study of 
the political systems of China, Japan, India and 
other selected Asian countries. 

GVPT 484 Government and Politics of Africa. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A comparative study of 
the governmental systems and political processes 
of the African countries, with special emphasis on 
the problems of nation-building in emergent 
countries. 

GVPT 485 Government and Politics of the Middle 
East. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A comparative 
study of the governmental systems and political 
processes of the Middle Eastern countries, with 
special emphasis on the problems of nation- 
building in emergent countries. 



GVPT 486 Comparative Studies in European Pol- 
itics. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 280, or consent of 
instructor. A comparative study of political proc- 
esses and governmental forms in selected Euro- 
pean countries. 

GVPT 487 The Government and Politics of South 
Asia. (3) Political systems and governments of 
such countries as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, 
Ceylon, and Nepal. 

GVPT 492 The Comparative Politics of Race Re- 
lations. (3) Impact of government and politics on 
race relations in various parts of the world. The 
origins, problems, and manifestations of such ra- 
cial policies as segregation, apartheid, integra- 
tion, assimilation, partnership, and nonraclalism 
will be analyzed. 

GVPT 600 Proseminar in Government and Poli- 
tics. (3) Required of M.A. candidates. A prosemi- 
nar offering a survey of major concepts, ap- 
proaches, and research trends In political sci- 
ence. 

GVPT 700 Scope and Method of Political Sci- 
ence. (3) Required of all Ph.D. candidates. A sem- 
inar In the methodologies of political science, and 
their respective applications to different research 
fields. Interdisciplinary approaches and biblio- 
graphical techniques are also reviewed. 

GVPT 707 Functional Problems in International 
Relations— Comparative Systems. (3) A survey 
from Kautllya to Kalpan of the literature in IR 
theory with an emphasis on comparative histori- 
cal systems. 

GVPT 708 Seminar in International Relations 
Theory. (3) An examination of the major ap- 
proaches, concepts, and theories in the study of 
world politics with special emphasis on contem- 
porary literature. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 
hours. 

GVPT 710 Introduction to Graduate Study in 
Public Administration. (3) An examination of the 
history, background, and trends of public admin- 
istration and the basic concepts and the ap- 
proaches utilized In the organizational process of 
public bureaucracies. Readings from textual 
sources will include the following: the study of 
public administration, the societal and political 
environment, organization theory and behavior, 
administrative law, comparative and development 
administration, policy and systems analysis, pro- 
gram planning and budgeting, manpower re- 
sources development, organizational performance 
and accountability. 

GVPT 720 Policy Evaluation. (3) An examination 
of the application of social Indicators and ac- 
counts, field and laboratory experimentation, 
formal modeling, and other techniques drawn 
from the social sciences to problems of public 
policy selected from various levels of the political 
system. 

GVPT 780 Seminar in the Comparative Study of 
Politics. (3) An examination of the salient ap- 
proaches to and conceptual frameworks for the 
comparative study of politics, followed by the 
construction of models and typologies of political 
systems. 

GVPT 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

GVPT 802 Seminar in International Law. (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual 
study and reading in substantive and procedural 
International law. 

GVPT 803 Seminar in International Political Or- 
ganization. (3) A study of the forms and functions 
of various International organizations. 



GVPT 808 Selected Topics in Functional Prob- 
lems in International Relations. (3) An examina- 
tion of the major substantive issues in contempo- 
rary international relations. 

GVPT 810 Governmental Organization Theory. 

(3) A study of recent developments in the area of 
organizational theory with an emphasis on empiri- 
cal studies of organizational behavior. 

GVPT 812 Seminar in Public Financial Adminis- 
tration. (3) Readings and reports on topics as- 
signed for individual or group study in the field of 
public financial administration. 

GVPT 813 Problems of Public Personnel Admin- 
istration. (3) Reports on topics assigned for Indi- 
vidual study and readings in the field of public 
personnel administration. 

GVPT 814 Developmental Public Administration. 

(3) Reports, readings and/or field surveys on top- 
ics assigned for Individual or group study in inter- 
national, national, regional or local environments. 

GVPT 815 Government Administrative Planning 
and Management. Reports on topics assigned for 
individual study and reading in administrative 
planning and management in government. 

GVPT 816 Studies in Comparative Governmental 
Administration. (3) An examination of theoretical 
concepts and empirical findings in the field of 
comparative administration. Individual readings 
and research dealing with the civil services of 
western and non-western nations will be as- 
signed. 

GVPT 818 Problems of Public Administration. (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for Individual study 
and reading in the field of public administration. 

GVPT 822 Problems in Quantitative Political 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisite, three hours of statistics 
or consent of Instructor. Study of selected prob- 
lems in quantitative political analysis. 

GVPT 826 Seminar in Public Opinion. (3) Reports 
on topics assigned for individual study and read- 
ing in the field of public opinion. 

GVPT 827 Seminar in Political Sociology. (3) 

Prerequisite— GVPT 427 or equivalent. Inquiries 
into, the conceptual and theoretical foundations 
of and empirical data in the field of political soci- 
ology. Individual readings and research problems 
will tje assigned, dealing with the social contexts 
of politics and the political aspects of social rela- 
tionships. 

GVPT 828 Selected Problems in Political Behav- 
ior. (3) Individual reading and research reports on 
selected problems in the study of political behav- 
ior. 

GVPT 830 Seminar in Public Law. (3) Reports on 
topics for individual study and reading in the 
fields of constitutional and administrative law. 
GVPT 840 Analytical Systems and Theory Con- 
struction. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 700. Examina- 
tion of the general theoretical tools available to 
political scientists and of the problems of theory 
building. Attention is given to communications 
theory, decision-making, game theory and other 
mathematical concepts, personality theory, role 
theory, structural-functional analysis, and current 
behavioral approaches. 

GVPT 841 Great Political Thinkers. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 441. Intensive study of one or 
more men each semester. 
GVPT 842 Man and the State. (3) Prerequisite, 
GVPT 442. Individual reading and reports on such 
recurring concepts in political theory as liberty. 

Graduate Programs / 91 



equality, justice, natural law and natural rights, 
private property, sovereignty, nationalism and the 
organic state. 

GVPT 844 Americar) Political Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 444. Analytical and historical 
examination of selected topics in American politi- 
cal thought. 

GVPT 845 Marxist Political Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 443 or consent of instructor. 
Intensive study and analysis of the leading ideas 
of Marx and Engels and their development in the 
different forms of social democracy and of com- 
munism. 

GVPT 846 Theories of Democracy. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 442. A survey and analysis of 
the leading theories of democractic government, 
with attention to such topics as freedom, equality, 
representation, dissent, and critics of democracy. 

GVPT 847 Seminar in Non-Western Political 
Theory. (3) Intensive study of selected segments 
of political theory outside of the western Europe- 
an tradition. 

GVPT 848 Current Problems in Political Theory. 

(3) Prerequisite, GVPT 443. Intensive examination 
of the development of political theory since the 
second World War. 

GVPT 850 Applied Foreign Policy Analysis. (3) 

Individual research and reporting on standards of 
policy performance and analysis with emphasis 
on data display, information organization, fore- 
casting, and rational resource allocation. 

GVPT 851 Area Problems in International Rela- 
tions — Soviet Union. (3) An examination of prob- 
lems in the relations of states involving the Soviet 
Union. 

GVPT 852 Area Problems in International Rela- 
tions—Latin America. (3) An examination of prob- 
lems in the relations of states within Latin Ameri- 
ca. 

GVPT 853 Area Problems In International Rela- 
tions—Asia. (3) An examination of problems in 
the relations of states within Asia. 

GVPT 854 Area Problems in International Rela- 
tions — Africa. (3) An examination of problems in 
the relations of states within Africa. 

GVPT 855 Area Problems in International Rela- 
tions — Middle East. (3) An examination of prob- 
lems in the relations of states within the Middle 
East. 

GVPT 856 Area Problems in International Rela- 
tions—Europe. (3) An examination of problems in 
the relations of states within Europe. 

GVPT 857 Seminar in American Foreign Rela- 
tions. (3) Reports on selected topics assigned for 
individual study and reading in American foreign 
policy and the conduct of American foreign rela- 
tions. 

GVPT 858 Selected Topics in Area Problems in 
International Relations. (3) Special topics con- 
cerning regional problems in the relations of 
states. 

GVPT 862 Seminar on Intergovernmental Rela- 
tions. (3) Reports on topics assigned for individu- 
al study and reading in the field of recent inter- 
governmental relations. 

GVPT 868 Problems of State and Local Govern- 
ment. (3) Report of topics assigned for individual 
study in the field of state local government 
throughout the United States. 

GVPT 869 Seminar in Urban Administration. (3) 

Selected topics are examined by the team re- 

92 / Graduate Programs 



search method with students responsible for 
planning, field investigation, and report writing. 

GVPT 870 Seminar in American Political Institu- 
tions. (3) Reports on topics assigned for individu- 
al study and reading in the background and de- 
velopment of American Government. 

GVPT 873 Seminar in Legislatures and Legisla- 
tion. (3) Reports on topics assigned for individual 
study and reading about the composition and 
organization of legislatures and about the legisla- 
tive process. 

GVPT 874 Seminar in Political Parties and Poll- 
tics. (3) Reports on topics assigned for individual 
study and reading in the fields of political organi- 
zation and action. 

GVPT 876 Seminar in National Security Policy. 

(3) An examination of the components of United 
States security policy. Factors, both internal and 
external, affecting national security will be con- 
sidered. Individual reporting as assigned. 

GVPT 878 Problems in American Government 
and Politics. (3) An examination of contemporary 
problems in various fields of government and 
politics in the United States, with reports on top- 
ics assigned for individual study. 

GVPT 881 Comparative Governmental Institu- 
tions—Soviet Union. (3) An examination of gov- 
ernment and politics in the Soviet Union. 

GVPT 882 Comparative Governmental Institu- 
tions—Latin America. (3) An examination of gov- 
ernments and politics within Latin America. 

GVPT 883 Comparative Governmental Institu- 
tions—Asia. (3) An examination of governments 
and politics within Asia. 

GVPT 884 Comparative Governmental Institu- 
tions—Africa. (3) An examination of governments 
and politics within Africa. 

GVPT 885 Comparative Governmental Institu- 
tions—Middle East. (3) An examination of govern- 
ments and politics within the Middle East. 

GVPT 886 Comparative Governmental Institu- 
tions—Europe. (3) An examination of govern- 
ments and politics within Europe. 

GVPT 887 Seminar in the Politics of Developing 
Nations. (3) An examination of the programs of 
political development in the emerging nations 
with special references to the newly independent 
nations of Asia and Africa, and the less developed 
countries of Latin America. Individual reporting as 
assigned. 

GVPT 888 Selected Topics in Comparative Gov- 
ernmental Institutions. (3) An examination of 
special topics in comparative politics. 

GVPT 898 Readings in Government and Politics. 

(3) Guided readings and discussions on selected 
topics in political science. 

GVPT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Health Education 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Burt 

Professor/Johnson, Leviton 

Associate Professors: D. A. Girdano, D. E. 

Girdano, (filler, Tifft, Clearwater 
Assistant Professors: Althoff, Needle, Stone 

The Department of Health Education offers a 
program designed to prepare students as teach- 



ers and community health workers. Graduates of 
the program have placement opportunities in 
public school systems, colleges and universities, 
government service and community health. 

The department offers courses of study leading 
to the degrees of Master of Arts, Doctor of Educa- 
tion and Doctor of Philosophy. Admission is open 
to students holding the bachelor's degree in 
areas related to the social, psychological or bio- 
logical basis of health education. 

Each student is required to submit a thesis, to 
present the work orally in a seminar, and to de- 
fend it to the satisfaction of this examining com- 
mittee. All students must take Health Education 
600 and 710. 

The proximity of the National Institutes of 
Health and the National Library of Medicine ren- 
der the University of Maryland unusually suited 
for graduate work in health education. 

HLTH 420 Methods and Materials in Health Edu- 
cation. (3) Prerequisites, HLTH 105 or 140, 310 or 
consent of instructor. The purpose of this course 
is to present the interrelationships of curriculum 
planning, methodology and the selection and use 
of teaching aids and materials. Special problems 
associated with health teaching are discussed. 
Students will become familiar with a variety of 
resources as well as planning for and presenting 
demonstration lessons. 

HLTH 450 Health Problems of Children and 
Youth. (3) This course involves a study of the 
health needs and problems of pupils from the 
primary grades through high school. Physical, 
mental and psychomatic aspects of health are 
considered in relation to the developmental and 
school levels. Consideration is given to such top- 
ics as diet selection and control; exercise, recrea- 
tion and rest; emotional upset and its implica- 
tions; and psychosexual development and prob- 
lems. The role of the teacher and parent in en- 
couraging optimal health is emphasized. 

HLTH 455 Physical Fitness of the Individual. (3) 

A study of the major physical fitness problems 
confronting the adult in modern society. Consid- 
eration is given to the scientific appraisal, devel- 
opment and maintenance of fitness at all age lev- 
els. Such problems as obesity, weight reduction, 
chronic fatigue, posture, and special exercise 
programs are explored. This course is open to 
persons outside the fields of physical education 
and health. 

HLTH 456 Health Problems of the Aging and the 
Aged. (3) Psychological, physiological, and so- 
cio-economic aspects of aging; nutrition; sexuali- 
ty; death, dying, and bereavement; self actualiza- 
tion and creativity health needs and crises of the 
aged. 

HLTH 460 Problems in School Health Education 
in Elementary and Secondary Schools. (2-6) This 
is a workshop type course designed particularly 
for inservice teachers to acquaint them with the 
best methods of providing good health services, 
healthful environment and health instruction. 

HLTH 470 The Health Program in the Elementary 
School. (3) Prerequisites, HLTH 105 or 140; 310. 
This course, designed for the elementary school 
classroom teacher, analyzes biological and so- 
ciological factors which determine the health 
status and needs of the individual elementary 
school child. The various aspects of the school 
program are evaluated in terms of their role in 
health education. The total school health program 
is surveyed from the standpoint of organization 
and administration, and health appraisal. Empha- 
sis is placed upon modern methods and current 



materials in health instruction. (The State Depart- 
ment of Education accepts this course for biolog- 
ical science credit). 

HLTH 471 Women's Health. (3) The women's 
health movement from the perspective of con- 
sumerism and feminism. The physician-patient 
relationship in the gynecological and other medi- 
cal settings. The gynecological exam, gynecologi- 
cal problems, contraception, abortion, pregnancy, 
breast and cervical cancer and surgical proce- 
dures. Psychological aspects of gynecological 
concerns, 

HLTH 476 Death Education. (3) The course aims 
to enable students to better understand aspects 
of dying so that (1) the quality of their health and 
living is enhanced and (2) they are better able to 
help the bereaved, and the dying. The genesis 
and development of our present day attitudes and 
behavior are examined using a multi-disciplinary 
and life cycle approach. A field trip and extensive 
reading and comprehensive research report are 
required 

HLTH 477 Fundamentals of Sex Education. (3) 

This course is concerned with basic information 
regarding the physical, psychological, social, his- 
torical, semantic and comparative cultural as- 
pects of sex. The adjustment needs and problems 
of children and adults during the course of ma- 
turing and aging are studied: and special consid- 
eration is given to the sex education program in 
schools. 

HLTH 480 Measurement In Health. (3) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods per week. The 
application of the principles and techniques of 
educational measurement to the teaching of 
health and physical education; study of functions 
and techniques of measurements in the evalua- 
tion of student progress toward the objectives of 
health and physical education, and in the evalua- 
tion of the effectiveness of teaching. 

HLTH 467 Health and Developmental Programs 
for the Aged. (3) Prerequisite, at least junior 
standing in health and special permission of the 
instructor. Training and experience in a clinically 
oriented development orogram for the aged. 

HLTH 488 Children's HeaKh and Developmental 
Clinic. (1-4) Prerequisite, at least junior standing 
in health, physical education and recreation, or 
by special permission of the director. An oppor- 
tunity to acquire training and experience in a 
thereapeutically oriented physical education-rec- 
reation program for children referred by various 
education, special education, medical and psy- 
chiatric groups. Repeatable to a maximum of 4 
hours. 

HLTH 489 Reld Laboratory Projects and Work- 
shop. (1-6) A course designed to meet the needs 
of persons in the field with respect to workshop 
and research projects in special areas of knowl- 
edge not covered by regularly structured courses. 
Note: The maximum total number of credits that 
may be earned toward any degree in physical 
education, recreation, or health education under 
PHED. RECR. HLTH or EDUC 489 is six. 

HLTH 600 Seminar in Health. (1) 

HLTH 650 Health Problems in Guidance. (3) 

HLTH 651 Seminar on the HeaKh Correlates of 
the Aging and Aged. (3) Investigates the most 
recent theoretical formulations, research data, 
and clinical and therapeutic approaches to im- 
proving the health status of the aging. Extensive 
readings and research project are required. 



HLTH 652 Seminar in Death Education. (3) 

Prerequisite. HLTH 456 or permission of the in- 
structor. The advanced study and investigation of 
human dying, death, bereavement, suicidal behav- 
ior, and their relationship to human health utiliz- 
ing a multidisciplinary approach. 

HLTH 670 Status and Trends in Health Educa- 
tion. (3) 
HLTH 687 Advanced Seminar. (1-3) 

HLTH 688 Special Problems in Health Education. 
(1-6) 

HLTH 690 Administrative Direction of Health 
Education. (3) 

HLTH 710 Methods and Techniques of Research. 
(3) 

HLTH 720 Scientific Foundations of Health Edu- 
cation. (3) 

HLTH 730 Problems in Weight Control. (3) 

Prerequisite. HLTH 720 or permission of instruc- 
tor. A study of the causes, health cost, and con- 
trol of obesity through analysis of lipid-glucose 
interaction: hunger-satiety theories and mecha- 
nisms: psycho-social forces in obesity: body 
composition, energy output: and disease states 
related to obesity. 

HLTH 740 Modern Theories of Health. (3) 

HLTH 750 Stress and Disease. (3) A study of the 
causative agents of chronic disease with particu- 
lar emphasis on stress including the physiological 
response of the human organism to contempo- 
rary psycho-social stressors and mechanisms of 
adaptaion and prophylaxis. 

HLTH 760 Public Health. (3) 

HLTH 791 Curriculum Construction in Health 
Education. (3) 

HLTH 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

HLTH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Hearing and Speech 
Sciences Program 

Professor and Chairman: Newby 

Associate Professors: Baker. Bankson. Hamlet* 

Assistant Professors: Bernthal, Cicci," Diggs. 

Doundna. Suter" 
Lecturer: Sedge 
Research Professor: Causey 
Research Assistant Professor: Elkins 
Research Associates: Punch. Schweitzer 

•Joint appointment with School of Dentistry 
"Joint appointment with School of Medicine 

The Department of Hearing and Speech Sci- 
ences offers the M.A. degree with either the thesis 
or the non-thesis option, and with major empha- 
sis either in speech and language pathology or in 
audiology. The Master s degree is required for 
individuals preparing for positions as speech 
pathologists or audiologists in the schools, in 
hospitals or rehabilitation facilities, in hearing 
and speech centers, or in other clinical settings. 
Academic course work is combined with super- 
vised clinical practice in the University Speech 
and Hearing Clinic and in selected outside clini- 
cal facilities, so that the graduate will meet the 
academic requirements for clinical certification by 
the American Speech and Hearing Association, 
and for licensing in the State of Maryland. The 



Masters degree program is accredited by the 
American Boards of Examiners in Speech Pathol- 
ogy and Audiology. Applicants for the MA. de- 
gree must have completed the equivalent of an 
undergraduate major in hearing and speech sci- 
ences. The M.A program usually requires three 
semesters and a summer session to complete. 
Only full-time students are admitted to the pro- 
gram. 

The department also offers the Ph.D. degree 
with major emphasis in speech and language 
pathology, audiology speech science, or hearing 
science. Ordinarily a Master's degree is required 
for admission to the doctoral program Advanced 
courses in statistics and research design are re- 
quired of all doctoral candidates. Although no 
formal minor is required, students are encour- 
aged to take appropriate courses in other depart- 
ments. The department does not require profi- 
ciency in a foreign language. Course programs 
for the doctorate are planned by the student and 
a committee of three faculty members. Qualifying 
interviews are scheduled for each candidate after 
completion of 12 semester hours in the program. 
Written and oral comprehensive examinations for 
admission to candidacy are scheduled at the 
completion of the formal course program. 

The department's facilities include a biocom- 
munications laboratory with an anechoic cham- 
ber, a speech science laboratory, electronics 
workshop, two 2-room audiology testing suites, 
and nine therapy rooms equipped for obsen/ation. 
Additional research and clinical facilities are 
available in the Washington and Baltimore metro- 
politan areas. The Library of Congress, the Na- 
tional Library of Medicine, and the libraries of the 
various medical schools in the Washington-Balti- 
more area supplement the University's library at 
College Park, 

In addition to the application materials required 
by the Graduate School, the department requires 
applicants to furnish scores on the aptitude por- 
tions of the Graduate Record Examination, 
Prospective applicants should note that decisions 
on summer and fall admissions are made in early 
March, and on spring admissions in early Octo- 
ber. The department is able to provide some fi- 
nancial support in the form of teaching or clinical 
assistantships or traineeships to approximately 40 
percent of the graduate students enrolled. Addi- 
tional information about the M,A, and Ph.D. pro- 
grams may be obtained by writing to the Chair- 
man. Department of Hearing and Speech Sci- 
ences, 

HESP 400 Speech and Language Development 
of Children. (3) Prerequisite, HESP 202. Analysis 
of normal processes of speech and language 
development in children. 

HESP 401 Survey of Speech Disorders. (3) 

Communication disorders in school children. May 
not be used by majors in hearing and speech sci- 
ences to satisfy major or supporting course re- 
quirements. 

HESP 403 Introduction to Phonetic Science. (3) 
Prerequisites: HESP 202 and PHYS 102. Phonetic 
transcription and phonetic principles. Acoustical 
and perceptual phonetics. 

HESP 404 Speech Pathology II. (3) Prerequisite. 
HESP 302. 305. Etiology and therapeutic manage- 
ment of cleft palate and stuttering. 

HESP 406 Speech Pathology III. (3) Prerequisite. 
HESP 302. 305. Etiology and therapeutic manage- 
ment of aphasia and delayed language. 

HESP 408 Clinical Practice. (3) Prerequisites: 
Completion of the 21 hours of specified courses 



Graduate Programs / 93 



for the major. HESP 404 or HESP 406, and per- 
mission of ttie clinical staff. Observation and par- 
ticipation in tfie speecfi and hearing clinic. Re- 
peatable to a maximum of six credits, but only 
three credits may apply toward satisfaction of the 
major course requirement in hearing and speech 
sciences. 

HESP 410 Principles and Methods in Speech 
Therapy. (3) Prerequisite. HESP 404 or 406. Com- 
parative methods in the clinical management of 
speech problems. 

HESP 411 Introduction to Audiology. (3) 

Prerequisites: HESP 202 and PHYS 102. Anatomy 
and physiology of hearing, introduction to meas- 
urement and to rehabilitation of the hearing- 
handicapped. 

HESP 412 Rehabilitation of the Hearing Handi- 
capped. (3) Prerequisite: HESP 411. Speech read- 
ing, auditory training, and speech training for 
hard-of-hearing children and adults. 

HESP 414 Seminar. (3) Prerequisite, permission 
of instructor. Individual projects in phonetic sci- 
ence, speech pathology, and audiology. 

HESP 499 Independent Study. (1-3) Prerequisite, 
departmental approval. May be repeated for a 
maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 604 Acoustical and Perceptual Phonetics. 

(3) Laboratory techniques in analysis of the 
acoustical and perceptual characteristics of the 
speech signal. 

HESP 606 Basic Hearing Measurements. (3) 

Prerequisite: HESP 411 or equivalent. Administra- 
tion and interpretation of hearing tests by pure 
tones and by speech; screening and clinical test 
procedures. 

HESP 610 Aphasia. (3) Language problems of 
adults associated v/Hh brain injury. 

HESP 612 Stuttering. (3) 

HESP 614 Orofacial Anomalies. (3) 

HESP 616 Language Disorders of Children. (3) 

HESP 620 Articulation Disorders. (3) 

HESP 622 Neuromotor Disorders of Speech. (3) 

HESP 624 Voice Disorders. (3) 

HESP 626 Differential Diagnosis of Nonverbal 
Children. (3) Evaluation of the Nonverbal Child. 

HESP 634 Medical Aspects of Speech and Hear- 
ing Disorders. (1-3) Lectures by physicians on 
embryological, anatomical, physiological, and 
neurological bases of speech and hearing disor- 
ders. 

HESP 638 Minor Research Problems. (1-3) 

Special projects in hearing and speech science. 
Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 640 Advanced Principles of Hearing and 
Speech Therapy. (3) Analysis of the clinical proc- 
ess with emphasis on theapplication of learning 
theory to treatment of speech disorders. 

HESP 648 Clinical Practice in Speech. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Supervised 
training in the application of clinical methods in 
the diagnosis and treatment of speech disorders. 
Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 649 Clinical Practice In Audiology. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Supervised 
training in the application of clinical methods in 
the diagnosis and treatment of hearing disorders. 
Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 700 Hearing-Aid Characteristics and Per- 
formance. (3) Electroacoustic characteristics of 

94 /Graduate Programs 



hearing aids. Methods of hearing-aid evaluation 
and selection. 

HESP 702 Diagnostic Procedures in Speech 
Pathology. (3) Diagnostic tools and methods in 
the analysis of various types of speech disorders. 
Practicum required. 

HESP 704 Physiological Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, HESP 604. Laboratory techniques in 
the study of the speech mechanism. 

HESP 706 Advanced Clinical Audiology. (3) 

Prerequisite, HESP 606 or equivalent. Techniques 
for evaluation of children and adults presenting 
special diagnostic problems. 

HESP 708 Independent Study. (1-6) Prerequisite, 
permission of instructor. Individual research pro- 
jects under guidance of a faculty member. Re- 
peatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 710 Industrial and Environmental Noise 
Problems. (3) Prerequisite: permission of instruc- 
tor. Evaluation and control of noise hazards. Ef- 
I'ects of noise on man. Medico-legal aspects of 
noise-induced hearing impairment. 

HESP 720 Structure and Function of the Hearing 
Mechanism. (3) Anatomy and physiology of the 
peripheral auditory and vestivular systems and 
pathologies of the periphera' hearing mechanism. 

HESP 722 Experimental Audiology. (3) 

Experimental techniques in the investigation of 
problems in audiology. 

HESP 724 Quantitative Methods in Hearing and 
Speech Science. (3) Prerequisite, a course in ba- 
sic statistics. Analysis of current procedures used 
in quantifying phenomena observed in hearing 
and speech science. 

HESP 728 Advanced Clinical Practice in Speech. 
(1-10) Prerequisite, previous enrollment in HESP 
648 and permission of instructor. Clinical intern- 
ship in selected off-campus facilities. Repeatable 
for a maximum of 10 credits. 

HESP 729 Advanced Clinical Practice in Audiolo- 
gy. (1-10) Prerequisite, previous enrollment in 
HESP 649 and permission of instructor. Clinical 
internship in selected off-campus facilities. Re- 
peatable for a maximum of 10 credits. 

HESP 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

HESP 804 Instrumental Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisites, HESP 604 and 704 or permission of 
instructor. Instrumental techniques in phonetic 
science. 

HESP 806 Administration of Hearing and Speech 
Programs. (3) Problems of staffing, budgeting, 
and operating training and clinical service pro- 
grams. 

HESP 810 Experimental Design in Hearing and 
Speech Science. (3) Prerequisite, HESP 724 or 
permission of instructor. Design and evaluation of 
research projects. Preparation for undertaking the 
doctoral dissertation. 

HESP 820 Bioacoustics. (3) Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of instructor. Functioning of the hearing 
mechanism in animals and humans. Laboratory 
research methods. 

HESP 822 Psychoacoustics. (3) Prerequisite, 
permission of instractor. Study of human re- 
sponse to acoustic stimulation. 

HESP 826 Neurophysiology of Hearing. (3) 

Processing of stimuli by the auditory nervous sys- 
tem. 



HESP 848 Seminar in Audiology. (3) Prerequisite, 
permission of instructor. Repeatable for a maxi- 
mum of 6 credits. 

HESP 858 Seminar in Speech Pathology. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Repeatable 
for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 868 Seminar In Speech Science. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Repeatable 
for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 878 Seminar in Language Disorders. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Repeatable 
for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



History Program 

Professor and Chairman: Evans 
Professors: Brush,' Callcott, Cockburn, Cole, 
Duffy, Foust, Gilbert, Gordon, Haber, Harlan, 
Jashemski, Kent, Merrill, A. Olson, Prange, 
Rundell, E. Smith, Sparks, Yaneu 
Associate Professors: Belz, Breslow, Cockburn, 
Farrell^, Flack, Folsom, Hoffman, Giffin, 
Greenberg, Grimsted, Kaufman, Matossian, 
Mayo, K. Olson, Stowasser, Warren, Wright 
Assistant Professors: Bradbury, Darden,3 Harris, 
Holum, Lampe, Majeska, McCusker, Nicklason, 
Perinbam, Ridgway, Ruderman, H. Smith, 
Spiegel, Williams 

'joint appointment with Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 

Applied Mathematics 
2joint appointment with Secondary Education 
3joint appointment with Philosophy 

The Department of History offers programs 
leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doc- 
tor of Philosophy. Areas of specialization include: 
United States, Ancient, Medieval. Early Modern 
European, Modern European, British, Russian, 
Latin American, African*, Middle Eastern*, East 
Asian, Diplomatic, Science, and Women's 
History*. 

'Asterisked tields at MA level only 

The Master of Arts degree serves both as a firm 
grounding in a field of history for teaching pur- 
poses and as preparation for the expeditious pur- 
suit of the doctorate. There are no special admis- 
sions requirements for the History Department; 
(the aptitude parts of the GRE are required); it 
should be noted that an undergraduate major in 
history is not as such required for admission. Of 
the thirty credit hours required for the degree, six 
are in M.A. thesis research courses (HIST 799), 
fifteen are normally in the major field of history 
and nine in a minor (which may be taken within 
or outside of the department). The historiography 
course (HIST 600) is required and may be used as 
part of the major or minor; two 800-level re- 
search-writing seminars are required. Fifteen 
credit hours at the level of 600 or above are re- 
quired in addition to the thesis research courses. 

A written examination, which is based in large 
part on a list of books pertaining to the thesis 
and its field submitted by the student and ap- 
proved by the advisory committee, is required 
upon completion of the coursework. There will 
also be a final oral examination which will be 
confined to the thesis and the field in which it 
lies. 

Admission to the doctoral program will be de- 
cided by the student's MA. examining committee 
on the basis of the student's written and oral 
examinations, thesis, and record of achievements 
in coursework. 



The MA. degree in history is normally required 
for admission to the doctoral program, but it does 
not guarantee admission. Students with M.A. de- 
grees awarded at other institutions will be asked 
to submit sustantial evidence of their written work 
and will normally be expected to have completed 
the equivalent of the work required of Maryland 
M.A. students. Every student must pass a written 
examination on his major field normally within 
eighteen months of entry into the doctoral pro- 
gram; this examination will test a broad, intelli- 
gent, and informed handling of the major historical 
problems and literature of that field. A secondary 
or minor field of study, supportive of the major is 
required of all doctoral students; it may be taken 
within or outside of the department. The minor 
requirement may be fulfilled by taking a certain 
combination of courses, or by passing a general 
written examination in the appropriate field of 
study, or. with approval of the Department's Grad- 
uate Committee, by having done an M.A. major 
field in history substantially different from the 
Ph.D. major field. 

The Ph.D. is awarded only for demonstrated 
excellence on the part of the students as revealed 
in the written and oral examinations and the dis- 
sertation research and writing. 

An oral examination on the student's disserta- 
tion prospectus and a bibliography on the disser- 
tation field is required. The dissertation is to be 
understood as constituting the largest single por- 
tion of the doctoral program; it is expected to be 
a distinct contribution to historical knowledge 
and/or interpretation. 

All doctoral students must show a reading 
competence in one foreign language; the lan- 
guage examination must be passed before the 
student takes the written examination in the ma- 
jor field. 

Complete descriptions of these programs and 
requirements may be obtained from the History 
Department. 

Foreign History 

HIFN 401 The History of Spain and Portugal to 
1700. (3) A survey of the ancient, medieval, and 
early modern history of the Iberian Peninsula with 
attention to Spanish and Portuguese expansion 
overseas and the role of Spain in Europe under 
the Hapsburg kings. 

HIFN 402 The History of Spain and Portugal 
Since 1700. (3) The social, political and cultural 
development of modern Spam and Portugal, 
emphasizing the decline of the monarchies, Na- 
poleonic intervention, the loss of the mam part of 
the overseas empires, civil strife, and the rise of 
strong-man government. 

HIFN 403 Diplomatic History of Latin America. (3) 

A survey of the political, economic and cultural 
relations of the Latin American nations with em- 
phasis on their relations with the United States 
and the development of the Inter-American sys- 
tem 

HIFN 404 History of Canada. (3) Prerequisites. 
HIST 241, 242 or 253. 254. A history of Canada, 
with special emphasis on the nineteenth century 
and upon Canadian relations with Great Britain 
and the United States. 

HIFN 405 History of Brazil. (3) The history of Bra- 
zil with emphasis on the national period. 

HIFN 406 History of Mexico and the Caribbean I. 

(3) History of Mexico. Central America and the 
Antilles, beginning with the pre-Spanish Indian 
cultures and continuing through European con- 



tact, conquest, and colonial dominance, down to 
the beginning of the Mexican War for Independ- 
ence in 1810 
HIFN 407 History of Mexico and the Caribbean 

II. (3) A continuation of HIFN 406 with emphasis 
on the political development of the Mexican na- 
tion 

HIFN 411 Medieval Civilization I. (3) Europe from 
the fall of Rome to the death of Charlemagne. 
The economic, social and intellectual movements 
which shaped the civilization of the Latin West, 
including the rise of Christianity and the church, 
the creation of a feudal nobility, and the founda- 
tion of European states. Developments in art and 
literature. Readings from sources when available 
in translation 

HIFN 412 Medieval Civilization II. (3) Medieval 
civilization in the 12th and 13th centuries the 
Renaissance of the 12th century, the rise of uni- 
versities, gothic architecture, the European State 
System, medieval Parliaments and scholastic 
learning and culture. Emphasis on cultural and 
political developments of the high middle ages 
with study of the principal sources of medieval 
thought and learning, art and architecture and 
political theory. Recommended as a sequel to 
HIFN 411. 

HIFN 413 The Old Regine and the French Revo- 
lution, 1748-1815. (3) Europe during the French 
Revolution and Napoleonic period. Intellectual, 
social, and cultural movements in revolutionary 
Europe 

HIFN 414 History of European Ideas I. (3) Review 
of the basic western intellectual traditions as a 
heritage from the ancient-world. Selected impor- 
tant currents of thought from the scientific revo- 
lution of the 16th and 17th centuries down to the 
end of the 18th century. 

HIFN 415 History of European Ideas II. (3) A con- 
tinuation of HIFN 414 emphasizing 19th and 20th 
century thought 

HIFN 416 The Rennaissance. (3) Survey of Euro- 
pean society (1300-1550). with particular atten- 
tion to the civilization of the Rennaissance in Ita- 
ly. Emphasis on intellectual and artistic develop- 
ments, with consideration of the economic foun- 
dation of Renaissance culture, the politics of cul- 
tural transformation, and the relationship between 
social change and the emergence of new value- 
systems governing European life in the period 
of the Renaissance. 

HIFN 417 The Reformation. (3) Major develop- 
ments from the Pre-Reformation' to the 
Post-Reformation' Religion is emphasized as the 
fundamental motive force resulting in the refor- 
mations of the 16th century. The interaction be- 
tween religious forces and the political, socio- 
economic, intellectual, and cultural trends of 
the period are also considered. 
HIFN 420 History of the British Empire. (3) An 
analysis of the development of the British Empire 
since the American Revolution, Particular empha- 
sis is given to the problem of responsible 
self-government, the evolution of the British Em- 
pire into a commonwealth of nations and the 
problems of the dependent empire. Recommend- 
ed prerequisites— HIST 112, 113, 141, or 254. 

HIFN 421 History of the British Empire. (3) 

Prerequisite. HIST 241, 242 or 253. 254. Second 
semester, the rise of the second British Empire 
and the solution of the problem of responsible 
self-government (1783-1867), the evolution of the 
British Empire into a commonwealth of nations. 



and the development and problems of the de- 
pendent Empire. 

HIFN 422 Constitutional History of Great Britain. 

(3) Constitutional development in England, with 
emphasis on the history of the royal prerogative, 
the growth of the common law, the development 
of Parliament, and the emergence of systematized 
government. First semester, to 1485. 

HIFN 423 Constitutional History of Great Britain. 

(3) Constitutional development in England, with 
emphasis on the history of the royal prerogative, 
the growth of the common law, the development 
of Parliament, and the emergence of systematized 
government. Second semester, since 1485. 

HIFN 424 History of Russia to 1801. (3) A history 
of Russia from earliest times to 1801. 

HIFN 425 History of Russia from 1801—1917. (3) 

A history of Russia from earliest times to 1917. 

HIFN 432 The Soviet Union. (3) A history of Sovi- 
et Russia and the Soviet-Union from 1917 to the 
present. Stress on the relationship between Marx- 
ist theory and practice, and the development of 
peculiarly socialist institutions and practices. 

HIFN 433 Modern France from Napoleon to 
DeGaulle. (3) The changing political and cultural 
values of French society in response to recurrent 
crises throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. 
Students should have had some previous survey 
of either western civilization or European history. 

HIFN 434 Tudor England. (3) An examination of 
the political, religious and social forces in English 
life, 1485-1603, with special emphasis on Tudor 
government. The English Reformation and the 
Elizabethan era. 

HIFN 435 Stuart England. (3) An examination of 
the political, religious and social forces in English 
life, 1603-1714, with special emphasis on Puritan- 
ism and the English revolutions. 

HIFN 436 Britain In the 18th Century. (3) 

Developments in Great Britain from the revolution 
of 1688 to the end of the Napoleonic Wars. 
HIFN 437 Modern Britain. (3) A survey of British 
history from the age of the French Revolution to 
World War I with emphasis upon such subjects as 
Britain's role in the world, the democratization of 
the state, the problems arising from industrialism 
and urbanism, and Irish and Imperial problems. 

HIFN 438 Introductory Middle Eastern Lan- 
guages I. (3) Prerequisite; consent of the Depart- 
ment. An introduction to the three principal lan- 
guages of the Islamic Middle East-Arabic. Persian, 
and Turkish. Only standard written form of the 
three languages is taught. May be repeated to a 
maximum of nine hours when language varies. 
May not be used to satisfy arts and humanities 
language requirement. 
HIFN 439 Introductory Middle Eastern Lan- 
guages II. (3) Prerequisite: HIFN 438 and consent 
of the Department. Continuation of HIFN 438. May 
be repeated to a maximum of nine hours when 
language varies. May not be used to satisfy arts 
and humanities language requirement. 

HIFN 442 History of Traditional China. (3) China 
from earliest times to 1644 A.D. Emphasis on the 
development of traditional Chinese culture, 
society, and government. 
HIFN 443 A History of Modern China. (3) Modern 
China from 1644 to the People's Republic of 
China. Emphasis on the coming of the West to 
China and the various stages of the Chinese Re- 
action. 



Graduate Programs / 95 



HIFN 444 The Age of Absolutism, 1648-1748. (3) 

Europe in the Age of Louis XIV, with emphasis 
upon social, religious, and cultural developments. 

HIFN 445 History of Japan to 1800. (3) Traditional 
Japanese civilization from the age of Shinto myth- 
ology and introduction of continental learning 
down to the rule of military families, the transition 
to a money economy, and the creation of a 
townsmen's culture. A survey of political, eco- 
nomic, religious, and cultural history. 

HIFN 446 History of Japan Since 1800. (3) 

Japan's renewed contact with the western world 
and emergence as a modern state, industrial so- 
ciety, and world power, 1800-1931 , and Japan's 
road to war, occupation, and recovery, 1931 to 
the present 

HIFN 448 Intermediate Middle Eastern Lan- 
guages I. (3) Prerequisite HIFN 439 and consent 
of the Department Continuation of HIFN 439. May 
be repeated to a maximum of nine hours when 
language varies. May not be used to satisfy arts 
and humanities language requirement 

HIFN 449 Intermediate Middle Eastern Lan- 
guages II. (3) Prerequisite HIFN 448 and consent 
of the Department Continuation of HIFN 448. May 
be repeated to a maximum of nine hours when 
language varies May not be used to satisfy arts 
and humanities language requirement 

HIFN 450 The Middle East. (3) A survey of the 
political, cultural and institutional history cover- 
ing the period up to the tenth century 

HIFN 451 The Middle East. (3) A survey of the 
political, cultural and institutional history cover- 
ing the period up from the tenth century to the 
beginnings of the nineteenth century 

HIFN 452 The Contemporary Middle East. (3) 

This course covers the break-up of the Ottoman 
Empire and the emergence of contemporary 
states of the area. 

HIFN 455 History of the Agrentine Republic. (3) 

Concentration upon the recent history of Argen- 
tina with emphasis upon the social and economic 
development of a third world nation, 

HIFN 456 Ancient Greece. (3) Greek history and 
culture from the Bronze Age to 200 B C Concen- 
tration on the life and institutions of the city-state, 
poetry and society, the Peloponeesian War. and 
Alexander the Great. 

HIFN 457 History of Rome. (3) Roman history 
from the foundation of the city to the time of 
Constantine the Great, concentrating on imperial- 
ism, the crisis of the republic. Augustus and the 
organization of monarchy, and city life during the 
pnncipate (Students who have received credit for 
HIFN 410 not admitted.) 

HIFN 458 Advanced Middle Eastern Languages 

I. (3) Prerequisite HIFN 449 or equivalent and 
consent of the Department Continuation of HIFN 
449. May be repeated to a maximum of nine 
hours when language varies. May not be used to 
satisfy arts and humanities language requirement 

HIFN 459 Advanced Middle Eastern Languages 

II. (3) Prerequisite; HIFN 458 and consent of the 
Department Continuation of HIFN 458 May be 
repeated to a maximum of nine hours when lan- 
guage varies. May not be used to satisfy arts and 
humanities language requirement 

HIFN 460 Social and Cultural History of Europe. 

(3) An exploration of social structure, life styles, 
rituals, symbols, and myths of the peoples of 
Europe. 



HIFN 462 Germany in the Nineteenth Century, 
1815-1914. (3) The development of modern Ger- 
many and the rise of national socialism 

HIFN 463 Germany in the Twentieth Century, 
1914-1945. (3) Germany's aims and policies dur- 
ing World War I, its condition and policies in the 
inter-war period, the rise of national socialism, 
and Germany s part m World War II 

HIFN 464 Nineteenth Century European Diplo- 
matic History. (3) The development and execution 
of European diplomacy from the Congress of 
Vienna to the outbreak of World War I, concen- 
trating on Central and Western Europe. 

HIFN 465 Twentieth Century European Diplomat- 
ic History. (3) The development and execution of 
European diplomacy from the outbreak of World 
War I to the conclusion of World War II, concen- 
trating on Central and Western Europe. 

HIFN 466 Byzantine Empire I. (3) The Eastern 
Roman Empire from Constantine the Great to the 
crisis of the ninth century. The development of 
the late Roman State into the medieval Christian 
Byzantine Empire and the evolution of a distinc- 
tive Byzantine culture. 

HIFN 467 Byzantine Empire II. (3) The Byzantine 
Empire from the Macedonian Renaissance to the 
conquest of Constantinople by the Turks in 1453: 
The Byzantine Empire at its height, the crusades, 
Byzantium as a minor power, and its contribu- 
tions to the Renaissance and the cultures of Rus- 
sia and the Balkans. 

HIFN 470 European History to 1750. (3) 

Economic development of Europe from the man- 
orial economy of Medieval feudalism through the 
emergence of capitalist institutions and overseas 
empires to the advent of the Industrial Revolution. 

HIFN 471 European Economic History Since 
1750. (3) The mainsprings of the Industrial Revo- 
lution first in 18th century England and then 
across the rest of Europe during the 19th and 
20th centuries. Emphasis on the English, French, 
German, Austro-Hungarian and Russian experi- 
ences with private capitalism and oublic policy 
including Fascism and Communism. Social con- 
sequences of industrial development such as 
urbanization and the rise of labor movements. 

HIFN 474 A History of West Africa, (3) West Afri- 
ca from approximately 4500 BC to the Colonial 
Era The development of agricultural and techno- 
logical achievements, which made it possible for 
West African civilizations to emerge and endure 
and the development of the medieval and early 
modern state systems. The structure of West Afri- 
can societies, the people and their cultural his- 
tory. 

HIFN 475 Economic History of West Africa. (3) 

The economic history of West Africa from Neo- 
lithic times to the end of the Colonial Era. Read- 
ing knowledge of French desirable. 

HIFN 476 Modern Balkan History. (3) A political 
socio-economic, and cultural history of Yugosla- 
via, Bulgaria, Romania, Greece, and Albania from 
the breakdown of Ottoman domination to the 
present. Emphasis is on movements for national 
liberation during the nineteenth century and on 
approaches to modernization in the twentieth 
century. 

HIFN 480 Modern Jewish Intellectual History I. 

(3) An introduction to the major ideas and ideolo- 
gies of the Jewish people from the period of the 
expulsion from Spam in 1492 until the generation 
of Moses Mendelssohn and his contemporaries at 
the end of the eighteenth century The course will 



emphasize the ma|or intellectual developments 
within the Jewish community shaped by its en- 
counter with major cultural developments such as 
the Renaissance, reformation and religious scep- 
ticism as well as by the constant threats to its 
collective identity and physical well-being 
throughout this entire period 

HIFN 481 Modern Jewish Intellectual History II. 

(3) An introduction to the major ideas and ideolo- 
gies of the Jewish people from the end of the eigh- 
teenth century until the present The course will 
consider the major intellectual responses to the 
problem of Jewish identity in the context of the 
effects of political and social emancipation, na- 
tionalism and socialism, secularism and cultural 
assimilation, as well as political anti-Semitism and 
physical extermination upon the Jewish commun- 
ity. 

HIFN 485 History of Chinese Communism. (3) An 

analysis of the various factors in modern Chinese 
history that led to the victory of the Chinese 
Communist Party in 1949 and of the subsequent 
course of events of the People s Republic of 
China, from CA 1919 to the present 

HIFN 708 Readings in Latin American History. (3) 

HIFN 728 Readings in Medieval History. (3) 

HIFN 729 Readings in 17th Century European 
History. (3) 

HIFN 738 Readings in Modern European Intel- 
lectual History. (3) 

HIFN 739 Readings in the History of the Renais- 
sance and Reformation. 

HIFN 748 Readings in the History of Great Brit- 
ain and the British Empire-Commonwealth. (3) 

HIFN 758 Readings in 20th Century European 
History. (3) Readings in 20th century European 
history, 1914 to the present Requirements Read- 
ing knowledge of some European language is 
encouraged, but not required May be repeated 
for a maximum of nine semester hours. 

HIFN 759 Readings in Nineteenth Century Eu- 
rope. (3) 
HIFN 768 Readings in Russian History, (3) 

HIFN 771 Readings in European Economic and 
Labor History. (3) Selected topics in European 
economic history from 1648 to the second World 
War. Attention to the mainsprings of industrializa- 
tion, the economic consequences of war and rev- 
olution, and the variety of European labor move- 
ments. An introduction to the use of quantitative 
methods is provided. 

HIFN 776 Readings in Eastern European History. 

(3) Selected topics in the history of the Habsburg 
Monarchy and the successor states, Poland and 
the Balkans. Emphasis on the rise of nationalism 
during the 19th century and the experience with 
Fascism and Communism in the 20th century. 

HIFN 778 Readings in Modern French History. (3) 

HIFN 779 Readings in Middle Eastern History. (3) 

HIFN 788 Readings in Japanese History. (3) 

HIFN 789 Readings in Chinese History. (3) 

HIFN 798 Readings in German History, 1815 to 
the Present. (3) Reading knowledge of German is 
encouraged, but not required. May be repeated 
for a maximum of nine semester hours. 

HIFN 803 Seminar in Latin American History. (3) 



96 / Graduate Programs 



HIFN 809 Seminar in East European History. (3) 

Research papers on the history of the lands 
which are now Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, 
Poland and the Balkan States, from the 18th cen- 
tury to the present. 

HIFN 818 Seminar in Greek History. (3) 
HIFN 819 Seminar in Roman History. (3) 
HIFN 828 Seminar in Medieval History. (3) 
HIFN 829 Seminar in 17th Century European His- 
tory. 

HIFN 834 Seminar in the Social and Cultural His- 
tory o( Europe. (3) Research methods for multi- 
generational family history, the comparative 
study of folk cultures, and the study of creative 
minorities. Includes a general introduction to re- 
search in European society and culture. 

HIFN 838 Seminar in Modern European Intellec- 
tual History. (3) 

HIFN 839 Seminar in the History of the Renais- 
sance and the Reformation. (3) 

HIFN 848 Seminar in the History of Great Britain 
and the British Empire-Commonwealth. (3) 

HIFN 849 Seminar in Tudor and Stuart England. 

(3) 

HIFN 850 Seminar in English law and Govern- 
ment, 1550-1760. (3) Prerequisites, one of the fol- 
lowing courses; HIFN 423, 434, 435, 436 or con- 
sent of instructor. From the accession of Eliza- 
beth I to the death of George II. 
HIFN 858 Seminar in Russian History. (3) 
HIFN 859 Seminar in Nineteenth Century Eu- 
rope. (3) 

HIFN 868 Seminar in 20th Century European His- 
tory. (3) Seminar in 20th century European histo- 
ry, 1914 to present. Prerequisite; HIFN 758, or 
consent of instructor. 

HIFN 869 Seminar in Modern European Diplo- 
matic History. (3) Prerequisite; reading ability of 
either French or German; a course in li^odern 
European History. May be repeated for a maxi- 
mum of nine semester hours. 

HIFN 878 Seminar in Modern French History. (3) 

HIFN 879 Seminar in Middle Eastern History. (3) 

HIFN 888 Seminar in Japanese History. (3) 

HIFN 889 Seminar in Chinese History. (3) 

HIFN 898 Seminar in German History. (3) 

Prerequisite; HIFN 798, or consent of instructor. 
Reading knowledge of German is required. May 
be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. 

History 

HIST 401 The Scientific Revolution— From Cop- 
ernicus to Newton. (3) Analysis of major discover- 
ies and theories in 16th and 17th century astrono- 
my and physics. The background of ancient, me- 
dieval and Renaissance science; mathematical 
and philosophical aspects of the new theories; 
and the social context of science, especially in 
17th century England. No prerequisites. (This is 
the first part of an integrated three-semester se- 
quence covering a selected sequence of develop- 
ments in the physical sciences from the 16th cen- 
tury to the present; see HIST 402 and RHYS 490 
for continuation). 

HIST 402 The Development of Modern Physical 
Science — From Euler to Einstein (3) The history 
of physics in the 18th and 19th centuries, includ- 
ing some of its connections with mathematics. 



technology, chemistry and planetary science. 
Emphasis on internal technical developments in 
physical theory, with some discussion of experi- 
mental, philosophical and sociological aspects. 
This is the second part of a three-semester se- 
quence (HIST 401, HIST 402, PHYS 490); each 
part may be taken independently of the others. 
For HIST 402 the prerequisites are MATH 110 and 
PHYS 112 or 117, or equivalent competence in 
mathematics and physics. 

HIST 403 History of Technology. (3) A survey 
course designed for junior, senior and graduate 
students with a solid base in either engineering 
or history; it will cover the time span from Greek 
antiquity to the first World War. Technology will 
be studied as a cultural force controlled by laws 
of its own and operating within a distinctive con- 
ceptual framework. The course will concentrate 
on the changing character of technology in his- 
tory and on the interactions between technology 
and other cultural forces such as science, philos- 
ophy, art, material culture, and the economy. 

HIST 404 History of Modern Biology. (3) The in- 
ternal development of biology in the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries, including evolution, cell 
theory, heredity and development, spontaneous 
generation, and mechanism-vitalism controver- 
sies. The philosophical aspects of the develop- 
ment of scientific knowledge and the interaction 
of biology with chemistry and physics. 
HIST 405 History of Early Medicine: From Thau- 
maturgy and Theurgy to the 17th Century Theo- 
ries. (3) A historical survey of the development of 
medicine in Europe and Asia from earliest times 
to the eighteenth century. Topics discussed in- 
clude; primitive dieases, Egyptian, Chinese, Greek 
and medieval medicine, epidemics, surgical devel- 
opments, the physician and the development of 
public health administration. Enrollment limited 
to upper division and graduate students. 

HIST 406 History of the Emergence of Modern 
Medicine. (3) Prerequisite, junior standing. Devel- 
opment of modern medicine from the eighteenth 
century to the present with emphasis on the Unit- 
ed States, including American Indian medicine, 
growth of medical professions, hospitals and pub- 
lic health facilities, surgery, clinical medicine, 
psychiatry and modern medical specialization. 

HIST 408 Selected Topics in Women's History. 

(3) In-depth study of selected topics on women in 
American society including such areas as women 
and the law, women and politics, the 'feminine 
mystique', and the 'new feminism'. May be repeat- 
ed to a maximum of six semester hours. 

HIST 440 The Eastern Orthodox Church— Its Cul- 
tural History. (3) A study of the development of 
the Christian Church in the Near East and Eastern 
Europe from the conversion of Constantine to the 
present. Emphasis will be on the relations be- 
tween church and state in various periods and on 
the influence of eastern Christianity on the cul- 
tures of traditionally eastern orthodox nations. 

HIST 498 Special Topics in History. (3) May be 

repeated to a maximum of nine hours. 

HIST 600 Historiography— Techniques of Histori- 
cal Research and Writing. (3) 

HIST 608 Occupational Internship. (1-6) 

Prerequisite; permission of Department Chairman. 
Individually arranged internship tailored to indi- 
vidual student needs with a cooperating public or 
private agency in the Metropolitan, Washington/ 
Baltimore area. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 
hours. 



HIST 685 The Teaching of History in Institutions 
of Higher Learning. (1) 

HIST 708 Readings in the History of Modern Sci- 
ence. (3) 

HIST 798 Special Topics in History. (3) 
HIST 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

HIST 808 Seminar in the History of Modern Sci- 
ence. (3) Prerequisite. HIST 708 or consent of in- 
structor. 

HIST 818 Seminar in Historical Editing. (3) An 

apprenticeship in the editing of documentary 

sources and scholarly articles for publication. 

Repeatable to a maximum of six hours. 

HIST 868 Seminar in the History of World War I. 

(3) 

HIST 869 Seminar in the History of World War II. 

(3) 

HIST 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

United States History 

HIUS 401 American Colonial History. (3) Colonial 
America from Jamestown to 1763. The establish- 
ment of the various colonies with emphasis on 
the reasons for the instability of Colonial society 
to 1689; the emergence of stable societies after 
1689; the development of Colonial regionalism, 
political institutions, social divisions, education, 
urban and frontier problems in the eighteenth 
century. 

HIUS 402 The American Revolution. (3) The 

background and course of the American Revolu- 
tion through the formation of the Constitution. 
Emphasis on the impact of the political move- 
ment and war years on the character of American 
society. 

HIUS 403 The Formative Period in America, 
1789-1824. (3) The evolution of the Federal gov- 
ernment, the origins of political parties, problems 
of foreign relations in an era of international con- 
flict, beginnings of the industrial revolution in 
America, and the birth of sectionalism. 

HIUS 404 Economic History of the United States 
to 1865. (3) The development of the American 
economy from Columbus through the Civil War. 

HIUS 405 Economic History of the United States 
After 1865. (3) The development of the American 
economy from the Civil War to the present. 

HIUS 408 Society in America: Historical Topics. 

(3) A consideration of selected aspects of Ameri- 
can society from Colonial times to the present. 
Special emphasis on regionalism, immigration, 
nativism, minorities, urbanization, and social re- 
sponses to technological changes. May be repeat- 
ed to a maximum of six credits if topics are differ- 
ent. 

HIUS 409 Religion in America: Historical Topics. 

(3) Selected aspects of the American religious 
experience in detail. May be repeated to a maxi- 
mum of six semester hours when content differs. 

HIUS 410 The Middle Period of American His- 
tory, 1824-1860. (3) An examination of the politi- 
cal history of the United States from Jackson to 
Lincoln with particular emphasis on the factors 
producing Jacksonian Democracy, manifest desti- 
ny, the Whig Party, the anti-slavery movement, the 
Republican Party, and secession. 

HIUS 411 The Civil War. (3) A detailed study of 
historical interpretations; the sectionalism, the 
forces, situations, and events that caused the 
war; and the process and impact of the war itself. 



Graduate Programs/ 97 



HIUS 412 Reconstruction and the New Nation, 
1865-1896. (3) Problems of reconstruction in both 
South and North. Emergence of big business and 
industrial combinations. Problems of the farmer 
and laborer. 

HIUS 413 The Progressive Period— The United 
States 1896-1919. (3) How the Wm. f^cKinley— T. 
Roosevelt— W. H. Taft— Woodrow Wilson adminis- 
trations dealt with the trust, money, tariff, and 
black issues. World War I is treated briefly. 

HIUS 414 Between the Wars— The United States 
1919-1945. (3) The American way of life in the 
1920's and 1930's, the Great Depression. New 
Deal, and a brief consideration of World War II. 

HIUS 415 The United States Since World War II. 

(3) American history from the inauguration of 
Harry S. Truman to the present with emphasis 
upon politics and foreign relations, but with con- 
sideration of special topics such as radicalism, 
conservation, and labor. 

HIUS 416 Blacks in American Life— 1865 to the 
Present. (3) The role of the black in America 
since slavery, with emphasis on twentieth century 
developments: the migration from farm to city: 
the growth of the civil rights movement; the race 
question as a national problem. 

HIUS 420 History of the Old South. (3) The gold- 
en age of the Chesapeake, the institution of slav- 
ery, the frontier south, the antebellum plantation 
society, the development of regional identity and 
the experiment in independence. 

HIUS 421 History of the New South. (3) The expe- 
rience of defeat, the restructuring of southern 
society, the impact of industrialization and the 
modern racial adjustment. 

HIUS 422 Diplomatic History of the United States 
to 1898. (3) American foreign relations from the 
beginning of the American Revolution in 1775 
through the Spanish-American War of 1898, in- 
cluding both international developments and 
domestic influences that contributed to American 
expansion in world affairs, and analyses of signifi- 
cant individuals active in American diplomacy and 
foreign policy. 

HIUS 423 Diplomatic History of the United States 
Since 1898. (3) American foreign relations in the 
twentieth century during the age of imperialism, 
World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, 
and the Cold War. A continuation of HIUS 422. 

HIUS 424 History of Ideas in America to 1865. (3) 

The ideas, conflicts, myths, and realities that 
shaped American character and society from the 
first settlements to the Civil War. 

HIUS 425 History of Ideas in America Since 
1865. (3) A contmuation of HIUS 424. 

HIUS 426 Constitutional History of the United 
States— From Colonial Origins to 1860. (3) The 

interaction of government, law, and politics in the 
constitutional system. The nature and purpose of 
constitutions and constitutionalism; the relation- 
ship between the constitution and social forces 
and influences, the way in which constitutional 
principles, rules, ideas, and institutions affect 
events and are in turn affected by events. The 
origins of American politics and constitutionalism 
through the constitutional convention of 1787. 
Major constitutional problems such as the origins 
of judicial review, democratization of government, 
slavery in the terriories and political system as a 
whole. 

HIUS 427 Constitutional History of the United 
States— Since 1860. (3) American public law and 



government, with emphasis on the interaction of 
government, law, and politics. Emphasis on the 
political-constitutional system as a whole, rather 
than simply the development of constitutional law 
by the Supreme Court. Major crises in American 
government and politics such as Civil War, 
reconstruction, the 1890's, the New Deal era, the 
civil disorders of the 1960's. 

HIUS 430 History of Maryland. (3) Political, social 
and economic history of Maryland from seven- 
teenth century to the present. 

HIUS 432 A Cultural and Social History of the 
American Worker. (3) Examines the free Ameri- 
can working class in terms of its composition: Its 
myths and Utopias; its social conditions; and its 
impact on American Institutions. 

HIUS 433 History of the American Frontier. (3) 

Major historical interpretation of the significance 
to the period of the trans-Allegheny West. Assess- 
es the impact of the frontier experience on Ameri- 
can history. Equal attention is given to the politi- 
cal, economic, social and cultural problems asso- 
ciated with the development of the West. Indian 
culture, treatment of the Indians, and Indian- 
White relations are integrated into the course 
through readings and lectures. 

HIUS 434 History of the American Frontier. (3) 

Exploration, settlement and development of the 
trans-Mississippi West. Assesses the impact of the 
frontier experience on American history. Equal 
attention is given to political, economic, social 
and cultural problems associated with the devel- 
opment of the West. Indian culture, treatment of 
the Indians, and Indian-White relations are inte- 
grated into the course through readings and lec- 
tures. 

HIUS 708 Readings in Colonial American History. 

(3) 

HIUS 709 Readings in the American Revolution 

and the Formative Period. (3) 

HIUS 718 Readings in American Social History. 

(3) 

HIUS 719 Readings in Southern History. (3) 

HIUS 728 Readings in the Middle Period and 
Civil War. (3) 

HIUS 729 Readings in Reconstruction and the 
New Nation. (3) 

HIUS 732 Readings in American Labor History. 

(3) Social and cultural history of the American 
working class with special attention to communi- 
ties based on ethnicity, race, sex, residence and 
ideology: history of the labor movement; selected 
comparisons with working-class communities of 
other countries. 

HIUS 738 Readings in Recent American History. 
(3) 

HIUS 739 Readings in the History of American 
Foreign Policy. (3) 

HIUS 748 Readings in American Intellectual His- 
tory. (3) 

HIUS 749 Readings in American Constitutional 
History. (3) 

HIUS 769 Readings in the Economic History of 
the United States. (3) An examination of the ma- 
jor issues in the history of the economy of the 
United States from the 17th century to the pres- 
ent, as these have been discussed by the more 
important economic historians. Repeatable to a 
maximum of six hours. 



HIUS 808 Seminar in Colonial American History. 

(3) 

HIUS 809 Seminar in the American Revolution 

and the Formative Period. (3) 

HIUS 818 Seminar in American Social History. (3) 

HIUS 819 Seminar in Southern History. (3) 

HIUS 828 Seminar in the Middle Period and Civil 
War. (3) 

HIUS 829 Seminar in Reconstruction and the 
New Nation. (3) 

HIUS 832 Seminar in American Labor History. (3) 

Advanced research and writing on selected topics 
in the-history of American workers, their condi- 
tions, communities, organizations and Ideas. 

HIUS 838 Seminar in Recent American History. 

(3) 

HIUS 839 Seminar in the History of American 

Foreign Policy. (3) 

HIUS 848 Seminar in American Intellectual His- 
tory. (3) 

HIUS 849 Seminar in American Constitutional 
History. (3) 

HIUS 858 Seminar in American Legal History. (3) 

Repeatable to a maximum of six semester hours. 

HIUS 859 Seminar in the History of Maryland. (3) 

HIUS 868 Seminar in American Frontier History. 

(3) A research-writing seminar dealing with select- 
ed topics related to the American frontier, espe- 
cially the trans-Appalachian and trans-Mississippi 
West, 1774 to the 20th century. Repeatable to a 
maximum of six semester hours. 

HIUS 869 Seminar in the Economic History of the 
United States. (3) A research-writing seminar 
dealing with selected topics in American econom- 
ic development from the Colonial period to the 
present. Repeatable to a maximum of six semes- 
ter hours. 

Horticulture Program 

Professor and Chairman: Twigg 
Professors: Kramer, Link, Reynolds, Scott 

(Emeritus), Shanks, Stark, Thompson, Wiley 
Associate Professors: Baker, Bouwkamp, Gouin, 

Schales 
Assistant Professors: Beste, Solomos 
Lecturer: Koch (Visiting) 

The Department of Horticulture offers graduate 
study leading to the Master of Science and Doc- 
tor of Philosophy degrees. The Master of Science 
degree is offered with both thesis and non-thesis 
options. Candidates place major emphasis in the 
areas of pomology, olericulture, floriculture, or 
ornamental horticulture. Within these commodity 
areas, students may direct their studies and re- 
search efforts to mineral nutrition, postharvest 
physiology, plant breeding, chemical growth reg- 
ulation, water relations, plant propagation, histo- 
chemistry, photoperiodism and environmental 
control, and other factors affecting production of 
horticultural plants. The candidate's program may 
be directed toward a career in research, teaching, 
extension education, or industry. The research 
activities required for the thesis or dissertation 
are normally carried out in conjunction with the 
research programs of the departmental staff. 

Modern laboratory and greenhouse facilities are 
located at the College Park campus. Laboratory 



98 / Graduate Programs 



instrumentation provides for chromatography, 
spectrometry, elemental analysis, histology, and 
other procedures. A system for automatically 
monitoring respiratory gases and volatiles is avail- 
able in connection with controlled atmos- 
phere chambers. Controlled-temperature stor- 
ages and a bank of growth chamtiers provides 
facilities for postharvest and environmental con- 
trol studies. Adequate greenhouse and plot areas 
are available for research with floricultural and 
ornamental plants. Orchards for research with 
fruits are located at the Plant Research Farm 7 
miles from the campus. Other research studies 
are conducted cooperatively with fruit growers in 
the western part of the state. Field research with 
vegetable crops is carried on at the Vegetable 
Research Farm, Salisbury, and with ornamental 
and vegetable crops at Cheston-on-Wye near 
Grasonville. The Beltsville Research Center of the 
United States Department of Agriculture is locat- 
ed 3 miles from the campus. Students have the 
opportunity to attend seminars at the Research 
Center, to take specialized courses of the USDA 
graduate school and, in certain cases, to conduct 
research projects in cooperation with the person- 
nel at the USDA Research Center, In addition to 
library facilities at the University, the National Ag- 
ricultural Library is now relocated at the Research 
Center, readily available to graduate students of 
the University, 

Students entering with a B.S. degree in Horti- 
culture can normally complete all requirements 
for the M.S. in 2 years on a half-time basis, 4 
years for the Ph.D. Full-time students should 
complete the requirements in a shortertime. Stu- 
dents seeking admission should present under- 
graduate preparation in horticulture, botany, 
chemistry, and supporting agricultural disciplines. 
Those without this background are advised to 
enroll as special undergraduate students to cor- 
rect these deficiencies. The Graduate Record 
Examination is not required. 

Students entering the doctoral program should 
have, or plan on completing, a Master of Science 
degree in Horticulture, although presentation of 
the MS. in a related plant science field may be 
acceptable. 

Upon admission, the student is assigned to a 
faculty advisor, and an advisory committee is 
appointed. It is an early function of the committee 
to work with the candidate in developing a pro- 
gram of courses and research, tailor-made to the 
goals and aspirations of the students. The Depart- 
ment requires no foreign language proficiency. A 
comprehensive, oral examination is given each 
candidate for the M,S,; candidates for the PhD 
take an oral qualifying examination, as well as an 
oral comprehensive examination covering the 
dissertation. 

Some graduate students are supported with 
financial aid. Research and teaching assistant- 
ships are offered to students on full admission 
status, as available. All graduate assistants are 
expected to assist in the teaching program of the 
Department. 

HORT 411 Technology of Fruits. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, HORT 112, or con- 
current BOTN 441. A critical analysis of research 
work and application of the principles of plant 
physiology, chemistry, and botany to practical 
problems in commercial production. 

HORT 417 Tree and Small Fruit Management. (1) 

Primarily designed for vocational agriculture 
teachers and extension agents. Special emphasis 
will be placed upon new and improved commer- 
cial methods of production of the leading tree 



and small fruit crops. Current problems and their 
solution will receive special attention. 

HORT 422 Technology of Vegetables. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite. HORT 222. prere- 
quisite or concurrent. BOTN 441. A critical analy- 
sis of research work and application of principles 
of plant physiology, chemistry, and botany to 
practical problems in commercial vegetable pro- 
duction 

HORT 427 Truck Crop Management. (1) Primarily 
designed for teachers of vocational agriculture 
and extension agents. Special emphasis will be 
placed upon new and improved methods of pro- 
duction of the leading truck crops. Current prob- 
lems and their solutions will receive special atten- 
tion. 

HORT 432 Fundamentals of Greenhouse Crop 
Production. (3) Three lectures per week Prere- 
quisite. HORT 231. This course deals with a study 
of the commercial production and marketing of 
ornamental plant crops under greenhouse, plastic 
houses and out-of-door conditions. 

HORT 451 Technology of Ornamentals. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite, or concurrent 
BOTN 441. A study of the physiological processes 
of the plant as related to the growth, flowering 
and storage of ornamental plants. 

HORT 453 Woody Plant Materials. (3) 
Prerequisite. BOTN 212. A field and laboratory 
study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in orna- 
mental plantings. 

HORT 454 Woody Plant Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite. BOTN 212. A field and laboratory 
study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in orna- 
mental plantings. 

HORT 456 Production and Maintenance of 
Woody Plants. (3) Two lectures and one labor- 
atory period a week. Prerequisite or corequisite. 
HORT 271, 454. A study of the production meth- 
ods and operation of a commercial nursery and 
the planting and care of woody plants in the land- 
scape. 

HORT 457 Ornamental Horticulture. (1) A course 
designed for teachers of agriculture and exten- 
sion agents to place special emphasis on prob- 
lems of the culture and use of ornamental plants. 

HORT 471 Systematic Horticulture. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. A study 
of the origin, taxonomic relationship and horticul- 
tural classification of fruits and vegetables. 

HORT 474 Physiology of Maturation and Storage 
of Horticultural Crops. (2) Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisite. BOTN 441. Factors related to matu- 
ration and application of scientific principles to 
handling and storage of horticultural crops. 

HORT 489 Special Topics in Horticulture. (1-3) 

Credit according to time scheduled and organiza- 
tion of course. A lecture and/or laboratory series 
organized to study in depth a selected phase of 
horticulture not covered by existing courses. 

HORT 682 Methods of Horticultural Research. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and one four-hour 
laboratory period a week. The application of 
biochemical and biophysical methods to proti- 
lems in biological research with emphasis on 
plant materials. 

HORT 689 Special Topics in Horticulture. (1-3) 

First and second semester. Credit according to 
time scheduled and organization of the course. 
Organized as a lecture series on a specialized 
advanced topic. 



HORT 699 Special Problems in Horticulture. (1-3) 

First and second semester. Credit according to 
time scheduled and organization of the course. 
Organized as an experimental program other than 
the student s thesis problem Maximum credit al- 
lowed toward an advanced degree shall not ex- 
ceed four hours of experimental work 

HORT 781 Edaphic Factors and Horticultural 
Plants. (3) First semester, alternate years. Prere- 
quisite. BOTN 441. A critical study of scientific lit- 
erature and current research concerning factors 
of the soil affecting production of horticultural 
plants. Selected papers are studied and critically 
discussed. Attention is given to experimental pro- 
cedures, results obtained, interpretation of the 
data, and to evaluation of the contribution 

HORT 782 Chemical Regulation of Growth of 
Horticultural Plants. (3) Second semester, alter- 
nate years. Prerequisite, BOTN 441. A critical re- 
view of literature and current research relating to 
the use of chemicals in controlling growth, and 
useful in the production, ripening, and handling 
of horticultural plants and products. Emphasis is 
placed on experimental procedures and the inter- 
pretation of results, current usage in the poten- 
tials for future research. 

HORT 783 Environmental Factors and Horticul- 
tural Plants. (3) First semester, alternate years. 
Prerequisite. BOTN 441. A study of the literature 
and a discussion of current research concerned 
with the effects of environmental factors on the 
grovirth and fruiting of horticultural plants. Effects 
of temperature, light, and atmospheric conditions 
will be considered. 

HORT 784 Current Advances in Plant Breeding. 

(3) Second semester. Alternate years. Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, HORT 274 or per- 
mission of instructor. Studies of the genetic and 
cytogentic basis of plant breeding, systems of 
polination control and their application, mutation 
breeding, methods of breeding for resistance to 
plant diseases and environmental pollutants, 

HORT 798 Advanced Seminar. (1) Three credit 

hours maximum allowed toward the MS. degree 

or six credit hours maximum toward the Ph.D. 

degree. 

HORT 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

HORT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

Human Development 
Education Program 
(Institute for Child 
Study) 

Professor and Director: Morgan 

Professors: Chapin. Dittmann, Goering. Kurtz, 

Perkins 
Associate Professors: Eliot, Flatter. Gardner, 

Hardy. Hatfield. Huebner. Kyle. Matteson. 

Milhollan. Rogolsky. Wolk 
Assistant Professors: Ansello. Bennett. Davidson, 

Green. Hunt, Koopman, Marcus. Shiflett, 

Svoboda. Tyler 

The program of the Institute for Child Study 
attempts to collect, interpret, and synthesize the 
scientific findings in various fields that are con- 
cerned with human growth, development, learn- 
ing, and behavior, and to communicate this syn- 
thesis to persons who need such understandings 
as a basis for their practice and planning. 

Graduate Programs / 99 



A second purpose of the instructional program 
is to assist persons in education, and secondarily 
in other professions that deal with human beings, 
to work out the implications of scientific knowl- 
edge tor specific situations. Student personnel in 
Institute courses and programs include teachers; 
principals; superintendents; counselors; social 
workers; nurses; psychologists; psychiatric social 
workers; therapists— physical, speech, and psy- 
chological; college teachers of child develop- 
ment; college laboratory teachers; supervisors of 
curriculum, guidance, in-service projects, etc. 

The Institute for Child Study offers graduate 
programs leading to Master of Education, Master 
of Arts with thesis, Doctor of Philosophy, and 
Doctor of Education degrees and Advanced Grad- 
uate Specialist Certificate {a planned program of 
30 graduate hours beyond the Master's degree). 
The requirements for these degrees and certifi- 
cate for those majoring in human development 
education conform to those of the Graduate 
School. Master's and doctor's degrees programs 
in human development are designed to assist the 
student in gaining competencies in the areas of 
physiological processes, cultural processes, per- 
sonality, learning theory, and research methods in 
human development. A student's program is de- 
veloped through consultation with an advisor to 
meet the unique needs of the student. Knowledge 
of foreign languages is generally not required 
unless a need for foreign language is indicated in 
the student's program. 

To be admitted to the master's degree program 
in human development education an applicant 
must have a B average in the last two years of an 
undergraduate program from a regionally ac- 
credited institution, a grade point average and 
test scores that are competitive with those of oth- 
er applicants, and educational and professional 
goals that are compatible with the purposes and 
goals of the Institute for Child Study. 

Admission to a doctor's degree program is 
based upon a profile using the following informa- 
tion; favorable recommendations from at least 
three professors and/or employers who are ac- 
quainted with the applicant's qualifications; a 
grade point in previous graduate work which is 
competitive with other applicants; compatibility of 
the applicant's educational and professional 
goals with the purposes and goals of the Institute 
for Child Study; scores on the Miller's Analogies 
Test (and other standardized tests such as Gradu- 
ate Record Examination, if available) which are 
competitive with other applicants; and a masters 
degree or equivalent in an allied field from a re- 
gionally accredited institution. 

The Washington, D.C. area and the University of 
Maryland are rich in resources for graduate study 
in human development. The Institute has a spe- 
cial book collection available for use by faculty 
and students, an in-service program in child and 
youth study, and opportunities for participating in 
research. Internship experiences are available 
through cooperation with mental health agencies 
and schools in the area. Resources of the College 
of Education include a Center for Young Chil- 
dren, a Curriculum Materials Center, and an Edu- 
cational Technology Center. Resources of the 
Washington metropolitan area include various 
schools, hospitals, the Office of Education, and 
the National Institutes of Health of the United 
States Department of Health, Education, and Wel- 
fare. 

EDHD 400 Introduction to Gerontology. (3) An 

overview of the processes of aging including phy- 
siological, sociological, and psychological as- 
pects as an introduction to the field of Gerontolo- 



gy. Analysis of physiological changes, cultural 
forces and self processes that have a bearing on 
life quality in the late years. Examination of com- 
munity action in response to problems of the el- 
derly. Direct field contact with programs for the 
elderly. 

EDHD 411 Child Growth and Development. (3) 

Growth and development of the child from con- 
ception through the early childhood years, with 
emphasis on development sequences in physical, 
psychological and social areas. Implications for 
understanding and working with young children 
in the home, school, and other settings. 

EDHD 413 Adolescent Development. (3) A study 
of the interplay of physical, cultural and self 
forces as they influence behavior, development, 
learning and adjustment during adolescence. In- 
cludes observation and case study. This course 
cannot be used to meet the psychological foun- 
dations requirements for teacher certification. 

EDHD 416 Scientific Concepts In Human Devel- 
opment III. (3) Guided reading and observation of 
pupils throughout the school year. Emphasis on 
human development concepts relating to impact 
of family, school, society, and peer group on the 
student. Collection and analysis of data affecting 
learning and behavior. For in-service educators. 
(Not open to persons with credit in EDHD 402, 
403.) 

EDHD 417 Laboratory in Behavior Analysis III. 

(3) Prerequisite, EDHD 416. Guided reading and 
observation of pupils throughout the school year. 
Emphasis on analysis of intrinsic aspects of learn- 
ing and behavior including cognitive processes, 
motivation, self-concept, attitudes, and values. 
For in-service educators. (Not open to persons 
with credit in EDHD 402, 403.) 

EDHD 419 Human Development and Learning in 
School Settings. (3) Prerequisite: classroom 
teaching experience or consent of instructor. 
Advanced study of human development and 
learning principles in the continuous study and 
evaluation of several different phases of the 
school program over an extended period of time. 
Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits if the top- 
ics differ. 

EDHD 445 Guidance of Young Children. (3) 

Development of an appreciation and understand- 
ing of young children from different home and 
community backgrounds; study of individual and 
group problems. 

EDHD 460 Educational Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisites, PSYC 100 or EDUC 300 or equiva- 
lent. Offers an examination of research and prob- 
lems in educational psychology, includes consid- 
eration of measurement and the significance of 
individual differences, learning, motivation and 
emotions, transfer of learning, intelligence, atti- 
tudes, problem solving, understanding, thinking, 
and communicating knowledge. The course is 
intended to provide an overview of educational 
psychology with an emphasis on learning proc- 
esses. It may not be substituted for EDUC 300 by 
regularly matriculated students in the teacher 
education program. 

EDHD 489 Field Experiences in Education. (1-4) 

Prerequisites, at least six semester hours in edu- 
cation at the University of Maryland plus such 
other prerequisites as may be set by the major 
area in which the experience is to be taken. 
Planned field experience may be provided for se- 
lected students who have had teaching experi- 
ence and whose application for such field experi- 
ence has been approved by the education faculty. 



Field experience is offered in a given area to both 

major and non major students. Note— the total 
number of credits which a student may earn in 
EDHD 489, 888, and 889 is limited to a maximum 
of 20 semester hours. 

EDHD 498 Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only 
to mature students who have definite plans for 
individual study of approved problems. 

EDHD 499 Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes. 
(1-6) The maximum number of credits that may 
be earned under this course symbol toward any 
degree is six semester hours; the symbol may be 
used two or more times until six semester hours 
have been reached. The following type of educa- 
tional enterprise may be scheduled under this 
course heading: workshops conducted by the 
College of Education (or developed cooperatively 
with other colleges and universities) and not oth- 
erwise covered in the present course listing; clini- 
cal experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading 
clinics, speech therapy laboratories, and special 
education centers; institutes developed around 
specific topics or problems and intended for des- 
ignated groups such as school superintendents, 
principals and supervisors. 

EDHD 600 Introduction to Human Development 
and Child Study. (3) Offers a general overview of 
the scientific principles which describe human 
development and behavior and makes use of 
these principles in the study of individual chil- 
dren. Each student will observe and record the 
behavior of an individual child throughout the 
semester and must have one half-day a week for 
this purpose. It is basic to further work in child 
study and serves as a prerequisite for advanced 
courses where the student has not had field work 
or at least six weeks of workshop experience in 
child study. When offered during the summer in- 
tensive laboratory work with case records may be 
substituted for the study of an individual child. 

EDHD 601 Biological Bases of Behavior. (3) 

EDHD 600 or its equivalent must be taken before 
EDHD 601 or concurrently. Emphasizes that un- 
derstanding human life, growth and behavior 
depends on understanding the ways in which the 
body is able to capture, control and expend ener- 
gy. Application throughout is made to human 
body processes and implications for understand- 
ing and working with people. 

EDHD 602 Social Bases of Behavior. (3) EDHD 
600 or its equivalent must be taken before EDHD 
602 or concurrently. Analyzes the socially inherit- 
ed and transmitted patterns of pressures, expec- 
tations and limitations learned by an individual as 
he grows up. These are considered in relation to 
the patterns of feeling and behaving which 
emerge as the result of growing up in one's so- 
cial group. 

EDHD 603 Integrative Bases of Behavior. (3) 

EDHD 600 or its equivalent. Prerequisites are 
EDHD 601 and 602. Analyzes the organized and 
integrated pattern of feeling, thinking and behav- 
ing which emerge from the interaction of basic 
biological drives and potentials with one's unique 
experience growing up in a social group. 
EDHD 610 Physiological Aspects of Aging. (3) 
Prerequisite: ZOOL 201 or 202 or equivalent, or 
consent of instructor. Physiological changes with 
advancing age including cells and tissues; metab- 
olism; homeostasis; and sensorium, with implica- 
tions with respect to coping with these changes. 

EDHD 613 Advanced Laboratory in Behavior 
Analysis I. (3) First of a three-hour sequence in 



100 /Graduate Programs 



the study of behavior. Analysis focuses upon the 
major forces which shape the development and 
learning of children and youth Summer session 
only. 

EDHD 615 Advanced Laboratory in Behavior 
Analysis II. (3) Prerequisite. EDHD 613 or equiva- 
lent Second of a three-course sequence in the 
behavior analysis of children and youth focusing 
on self-developmental and self-ad|ustive process- 
es. Summer session only. 

EDHD 617 Advanced Laboratory in Behavior 
Analysis III. (3) Prerequisite. EDHD 615 or equiva- 
lent. Third of a three-course sequence in the be- 
havioral analysis of children and youth which 
contrasts the child s concept of self and the 
world and the world s concept of the child. Sum- 
mer session only 

EDHD 619 Advanced Scientific Concepts in 
Human Development. (3) A critical examination 
of concepts and issues in contemporary culture 
as these relate to the development and learning 
of children and youth Summer session only 
Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits 

EDHD 620 Aging in the Cultural Context. (3) The 

factors and forces that affect life quality in the 
late years, identification of those influences m the 
cultural contest, — economic, social, governmen- 
tal—that enhance and those that impede contin- 
ued growth of the person Individual projects in- 
volving direct field experience 

EDHD 630 Cognitive Processes During Aging. (3) 

Cognitive functioning of the aged. The roles of 
cultural, environmental and affectional variables 
as they contribute to the healthy functioning of 
cognitive processes. On-site field trips to consoli- 
date an understanding of these interrelationships 
Designed for those who desire a fuller under- 
standing of life-span human development and/or 
are interested in working with the elderly 

EDHD 659 Direct Study of Children. (1) May not 

be taken concurrently with EDHD 402, 403. or 
404. Provides the opportunity to observe and re- 
cord the behavior of an individual child in a near- 
by school. These records will be used in conjunc- 
tion with the advanced courses in human devel- 
opment and this course will be used in conjunc- 
tion with the advanced courses. Teachers active 
in their |0bs while taking advanced courses in 
human development may use records from their 
own classrooms for this course. A minimum of 
o.ie year of direct observation of human behavior 
IS required of all human development students at 
the Master's level. This requirement may tie satis- 
fied by this course. 

EDHD 1W Affectional Relationships and Proc- 
esses in Human Development. (3) EDHD 600 or 
its equivalent must be taken before or concur- 
rently. Describes the normal development, expres- 
sion and influence of love in infancy, childhood, 
adolescence and adulthood. Deals with the influ- 
ence of parent-child relationship involving normal 
acceptance, neglect, rejection, inconsistency, and 
over-protection upon health, learning, emotional 
behavior and personality adjustment and develop- 
ment. 

EDHD 711 Peer-Culture and Group Processes in 
Human Development. (3) EDHD 600 or its equiva- 
lent must be taken tiefore or concurrently. Analyz- 
es the process of group formation, role-taking 
and status-winning, describes the emergence of 
the peer-culture' during childhood and the evolu- 
tion of the child society at different maturity levels 
to adulthood. Analyzes the developmental tasks 
and adjustment problems associated with win- 



ning, belonging, and playing roles in the peer 
group 

EDHD 721 Learning Theory and the Educative 
Process I. (3) Provides a systematic review of the 
major theories and their impact on education. 
Considers factors that influence learning. 

EDHD 722 Learning Theory and the Educative 
Process II. (3) Prerequisite. EDUC 300 or equiva- 
lent Provides an exploration in depth of current 
theoretical and research developments in the field 
of human learning, especially as related to educa- 
tional processes. Considers factors that influence 
learning. 

EDHD 730 Field Program in Child Study I. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Offers intro- 
ductory training and apprenticeship preparing 
persons to become staff members in human de- 
velopment workshop D. consultants in child 
study field programs and coordinators of munici- 
pal or regional child study programs for teachers 
or parents. Extensive field experience is provided. 
In general, this training is open only to persons 
who have passed their preliminary examinations 
for the doctorate with a major in human develop- 
ment or psychology. 

EDHD 731 Field Program in Child Study II. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDHD 730 or consent of instructor. 
Offers advanced training and apprenticeship pre- 
paring persons to become staff members in hu- 
man development workshops, consultants to 
child study field programs and coordinators of 
municipal or regional child study programs for 
teachers or parents. Extensive field experience is 
provided. In general, this training is open only to 
persons who have passed their preliminary exami- 
nations for the doctorate with a major in human 
development or psychology. 

EDHD 779 Seminars in Special Topics in Human 
Development. (2-6) Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor, 

EDHD 798 Special Problems In Education. (1-6) 

Master's AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire 
to pursue special research problems under the 
direction of their advisors may register for credit 
under this number. 

EDHD 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Registration required to the extent of six hours 
fo' Master's thesis. 

EDHD 810 Physical Processes in Human Devel- 
opment I. (3) Prerequisite, admission to doctoral 
program in human development education. Exam- 
ines the physiology of homeostasis including the 
roles of temperature, biochemical factors, respira- 
tion, circulation, digestion, and utilization of ener- 
gy as these influence the health, functioning, and 
behavior of human beings, 

EDHD 811 Physical Processes in Human Devel- 
opment II. (3) Prerequisite, admission to doctoral 
program in human development education. Fo- 
cuses upon the physiology of communication in- 
cluding a study of the roles of the nervous sys- 
tem, endocrines, nucleic acids, and pheramones 
as these influence the health, functioning and 
behavior of human beings. 

EDHD 820 Socialization Processes In Human 
Development I. (3) Prerequisite, admission to 
doctoral program in human development educa- 
tion. Study of comparative cultures serve as a 
medium for analyzing the processes by which 
human beings internalize the culture of the 
society in which they live. 

EDHD 821 S6cialization Processes in Human 
Development II. (3) Prerequisite, EDHD 820 or 



consent of instructor. Study of major subcultures 
in the United States, their institutions, training 
procedures, and their characteristic human ex- 
pressions in folk-knowledge, habits, attitudes, 
values, goals, and adjustment patterns as these 
relate to the processes in which human beings in 
our society internalize the culture in which they 
live. 

EDHD 830 Self Processes in Human Develop- 
ment I. (3) Prerequisite, admission to doctoral 
program in human development education. The 
personality theories of Freud, Jung, Adier, Hor- 
ney, Fromm, Sullivan. Murray, Lewin, and Allport, 

EDHD 831 Self Processes in Human Develop- 
ment II. (3) Prerequisite, EDHD &30 or consent of 
instructor. The personality theories of Erickson, 
Rogers, Maslow, and others. Synthesis of the stu- 
dent's theory of personality. 

EDHD 860 Synthesis of Human Development 
Concepts. (3) Prerequisites. EDHD 810, 820 and 
830. A seminar wherein advanced students work 
toward a personal synthesis of their own con- 
cepts in human growth and development. Empha- 
sis is placed on seeing the dynamic interrelations 
between all process in the behavior and develop- 
ment of an individual. 

EDHD 888 Apprenticeship in Education. (1-9) 

Apprenticeships in the major area of study are 
available to selected students whose application 
for an apprenticeship has been approved by the 
education faculty. Each apprentice is assigned to 
work for at least a semester full-time or the equiv- 
alent with an appropriate staff member of a coop- 
erating school, school system, or educational in- 
stitution or agency. The sponsor of the apprentice 
maintains a close working relationship with the 
apprentice and the other persons involved. Prere- 
quisites, teaching experience, a Master's Degree 
in Education, and at least six semester hours in 
education at the University of Maryland. Note: 
The total number of credits which a student may 
earn in EDHD 489, 888 and 889 is limited to a 
maximum of twenty (20) semester hours, 
888 and 889 is limited to a maximum of twenty 
(20) semester hours, 

EDHD 889 Internship in Education. (3-16) 

Internships in the major area of study are availa- 
ble to selected students who have teaching expe- 
rience. The following groups of students are eligi- 
ble: (A) any student who has been advanced to 
candidacy for the Doctor's degree: and (B) any 
student who receives special approval by the 
education faculty for an internship, provided that 
prior to taking an internship, such student shall 
have completed at least 60 semester hours of 
graduate work, including at least six semester 
hours in education at the University of Maryland. 
Each internship is assigned to work on a full-time 
basis for at least a semester with an appropriate 
staff member in a cooperating school, school sys- 
tem, or educational institution or agency. The in- 
ternship must be taken in a school situation dif- 
ferent for the one where the student is regularly 
employed. The intern's sponsor maintains a close 
working relationship with the intern and the other 
persons involved. Note: The total number of cred- 
its which a student may earn in EDHD 489, 888. 
and 889 is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) 
semester hours. 

EDHD 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 
Registration required to the extent of 6-9 hours 
for an Ed.D. project and 12-18 hours for a Ph.D. 
dissertation. 



Graduate Programs / 101 



Industrial Education 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Maley 

Professors: Harrison, Hornbake, Leutkemeyer 

Associate Professors: Beatty, Mietus, Stough, 

Tierney 
Assistant Professors: Elkins. Herschbach. 

Starkweather 

The graduate programs in Industrial Education 
are designed to prepare specialized personnel in 
all fields related to Industrial Education. These 
fields include programs both in education and in 
industry. Programs related to education prepare 
personnel for teaching, administration, and super- 
visory positions in local schools or in related 
state and federal agencies, as well as prepara- 
tions for university teaching and research. Pro- 
grams designed for industrial personnel are pri- 
marily in industrial training, supervision, and pro- 
duction. 

Every graduate program in the department is 
developed on an individual basis to meet the per- 
sonal needs of the graduate student. At the same 
time, however, the graduate student is expected 
to have achieved certain specified objectives 
upon completion of his program. The student 
should exhibit: competence in a major field of 
Industrial Education; ability to analyze, conduct, 
and report research findings; and a broad under- 
standing of the relationships of education and 
industry as social institutions in our technological 
culture. 

At the master's degree level {M,A. — thesis re- 
quired, and M.Ed. — non-thesis option) programs 
are offered in four areas: Industrial Technology, 
Industrial Arts Education, Vocational-Industrial 
Education, and Technical Education. The depart- 
ment has two separate doctoral programs (Ph.D. 
and Ed.D.) in the allied fields of Industrial Arts 
Education and Vocational-Industrial Education. 
The department also offers an Advanced Gradu- 
ate Specialist Certificate in both fields. 

In addition to the extensive library and comput- 
er facilities available on the College Park Cam- 
pus, other institutions located within the Wash- 
ington area are also available for research and 
consultation services. These institutions include 
the Library of Congress, Smithsonian Institution, 
U.S. Office of Education, American Industrial Arts 
Association, American Vocational Association, 
and the National Medical Library. 

EDIN 400 Technology Activities for the Elemen- 
tary School. (3) Experience in the development 
and use of technology and career education in- 
structional materials for construction activities in 
an interdisciplinary approach to elementary 
school education. 

EDIN 409 Experimental Electricity and Electron- 
ics. (2) 

EDIN 415 Research and Experimentation in In- 
dustrial Arts. (3) This is a laboratory-seminar 
course designed to develop persons capable of 
planning, directing and evaluating effective re- 
search and experimentation procedures with the 
materials, products and processes of industry 

EDIN 416 Industrial Hygiene. (3) Introduction to 
the concept of industrial hygiene and environ- 
mental health. Evaluation techniques, instrumen- 
tation for identification of problems; design pa- 
rameters for achieving control over environmental 
epidemologlcal and toxicological hazards. 



EDIN 421 Industrial Arts in Special Education. (3) 

Four hours laboratory per week, one hour lecture. 
Prerequisite, EDSP 470 and 471 or consent of in- 
structor. This course provides experiences of a 
technical and theoretical nature in industrial 
processes applible for classroom use. Emphasis 
is placed on individual research in the specific 
area of one major interest in special education. 

EDIN 425 Industrial Training in Industry I. (3) An 

overview of the function of industrial training, in- 
cluding types of programs, their organization, 
development, and evaluation. 

EDIN 426 Industrial Training in Industry II. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDIN 425. Studies of training pro- 
grams in a variety of industries, including plant 
program visitation, training program develop- 
ment, and analysis of industrial training research. 

EDIN 443 Industrial Safety Education I. (2) This 
course deals briefly with the history and develop- 
ment of effective safety programs in modern in- 
dustry and treats causes, effects and values of 
industrial safety education inclusive of fire pre- 
vention and hazard controls. 

EDIN 444 Industrial Safety Education I. (2) In this 
course exemplary safety practices are studied 
through conference discussions, group demon- 
stration, and organized plant visits to selected 
industrial situations. Methods of fire precautions 
and safety practices are emphasized. Evaluative 
criteria in safety programs are formulated. 

EDIN 445 Systems Safety Analysis. (3) The de- 
velopment of systems safety, a review of probabil- 
ity concepts and the application of systems tech- 
nique to industrial safety problems. Hazard mode 
and effect, fault free analysis and human factors 
considerations 

EDIN 450 Training Aids Development. (3) Study 
of the aids in common use as to their source and 
application. Special emphasis is placed on princi- 
ples to be observed in making aids useful to labo- 
ratory teachers. Actual construction and applica- 
tion of such devices will be required. 

EDIN 457 Tests and Measurements. (3) The con- 
struction of objective tests for occupational and 
vocational subjects. 

EDIN 460 Essentials of Design. (2) Two laborato- 
ry periods a week. Prerequisite, EDIN 101 and 
basic laboratory work. A study of the basic princi- 
ples of design and practice in their application to 
the construction of laboratory projects. 

EDIN 461 Principles of Vocational Guidance. (3) 

This course identifies and applies the underlying 
principles of guidance to the problems of educa- 
tional and vocational adjustment of students. 

EDIN 462 Occupational Analysis and Course 
Construction. (3) Provides a working knowledge 
of occupational and job analysis and applies the 
techniques in building and reorganizing courses 
of study for effective use in vocational and occu- 
pational schools. 

EDIN 464 Laboratory Organization and IManage- 
ment. (3) This course covers the basic elements 
of organizing and managing an industrial educa- 
tion program including the selection of equip- 
ment and the arrangement of the shop. 

EDIN 465 Modern Industry. (3) This course pro- 
vides an overview of manufacturing industry in 
the American social, economic and culture pat- 
tern. Representative basic industries are studied 
from the viewpoints of personnel and manage- 
ment organization, industrial relations, production 
procedures, distribution of products, and the like. 



EDIN 466 Educational Foundations of Industrial 
Arts. (3) A study of the factors which place in- 
dustrial arts education in any well-rounded pro- 
gram of general education. 

EDIN 467 Problems in Occupational Education. 

(3) The purpose of this course is to secure, as- 
semble, organize, and interpret data relative to 
the scope, character and effectiveness of occupa- 
tional education. 

EDIN 470 Numerical Control in Manufacturing. 

(3) The historical development of numerical con- 
trol (N/C) in manufacturing. Recent industrial 
trends in N/C, and a variety of N/C equipment 
and support services. N/C machine operations: 
machine motions, positioning control systems, 
N/C tapes and their preparation, manual and 
computer assisted (APT III) pari programming. 
Experience in product design, part programming, 
and product machining. 

EDIN 471 History and Principles of Vocational 
Education. (3) An overview of the development of 
vocational education from primitive times to the 
present with special emphasis given to the voca- 
tional education movement with the American 
program of public education. 

EDIN 475 Recent Technological Developments in 
Products and Processes. (3) This course is de- 
signed to give the student an understanding of 
recent technological developments as they per- 
tain to the products and processes of industry. 
The nature of the newer products and processes 
is studied as well as their effect upon modern 
industry and/or society. 

EDIN 487 Field Experience In Education. (1-4) 

Prerequisites, at least six semester hours in edu- 
cation at the University of Maryland plus such 
other prerequisites as may be set by the major 
area in which the experience is to be taken. 
Planned field experience may be provided for se- 
lected students who have had teaching experi- 
ence and whose application for such field experi- 
ence has been approved by the education faculty. 
Field experience is offered in a given area to both 
major and nonmajor students. Note— The total 
number of credits which a student may earn in 
EDIN 487, 888, and 889 is limited to a maximum 
of 20 semester hours. 

EDIN 488 Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only 
to mature students who have definite plans for 
individual study of approved problems. 

EDIN 491 Plastics Design and Equipment Selec- 
tion. (3) Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite, 
EDIN 391 or permission of the Department. In- 
cludes experience with material selection, prod- 
uct design, mold design, auxiliary equipment and 
fixtures. 

EDIN 499 Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes. 
(1-6) The maximum number of credits that may 
be earned under this course symbol toward any 
degree is six semester hours; the symbol may be 
used two or more times until six semester hours 
have been reached. The following type of educa- 
tional enterprise may be scheduled under this 
course heading: workshops conducted by the 
College of Education (or developed cooperatively 
with other colleges and universities) and not oth- 
erwise covered in the present course listing; clini- 
cal experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading 
clinics, speech therapy laboratories, and special 
education centers; institutes developed around 
specific topics or problems and intended for des- 
ignated groups such as school superintendents, 
principals and supervisors. 



102 /Graduate Programs 



EDIN 607 Philosophy of Industrial Arts Educa- 
tion. (3) An overview of the development of the 
industrial arts movement and the philosophical 
framework upon which it was founded. Special 
emphasis is given to the contemporary move- 
ments in industrial arts and their theoretical foun- 
dations, 

EDIN 614 School Shop Planning and Equipment 
Selection. (3) Deals with the principles and proti- 
lems of providing the physical facilities for in- 
dustrial education programs. The selection, ar- 
rangement and placement of equipment are cov- 
ered as well as the determinating of laboratory 
space requirements, utility services and storage 
requirements for various types of industrial edu- 
cation programs. 

EDIN 616 Supervision of Industrial Arts. (3) Deals 
with the nature and function of the supervisory 
function in the industrial arts field. The adminis- 
trative as well as the supervisory responsibilities, 
techniques, practices and personal qualifications 
of the industrial arts supervisor are covered. 

EDIN 620 Organization, Administration and Su- 
pervision of Vocational Education. (3) 

EDIN 640 Research in Industrial Arts and Voca- 
tional Education. (2) Offered by arrangement for 
persons who are conducting research in the 
areas of industrial arts and vocational education. 

EDIN 641 Content and Method of Industrial Arts. 

(3) Various methods and procedures used in cur- 
riculum development are examined and those 
suited to the field of industrial arts education are 
applied. (Methods of and devices for industrial 
arts instruction are studied and practiced. 

EDIN 642 Coordination in Work-Experience Pro- 
grams. (3) Surveys and evaluates the qualifica- 
tions and duties of a teacher-coordinator in a 
worl<-experience program. Deals particularly with 
evolving patterns in city and county schools in 
Ivlaryland, and is designed to help teacher- 
coordinators, guidance counselors, and others 
in the supervisory and administrative personnel 
concerned with the functioning relationships of 
part-time cooperative education in a comprehen- 
sive educational program. 

EDIN 647 Seminar in Industrial Arts and Voca- 
tional Education. (2) 

EDIN 650 Teacher Education in Industrial Arts. 

(3) This course Is intended for the industrial arts 
teacher educator at the college level, it deals with 
the function and historical development of in- 
dustrial arts teacher education. Other areas of 
content include administration program and pro- 
gram development, physical facilities and require- 
ments, staff organization and relationships, col- 
lege-secondary school relationships, philosophy 
and evaluation. 

EDIN 798 Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 

Master's AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire 
to pursue special research problems under the 
direction of their advisers may register for credit 
under this number. Course card must have the ti- 
tle of the problem and the name of the faculty 
member under whom the work will be done. 

EDIN 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Registration required to the extent of 6 hours for 
master's thesis. 

EDIN 888 Apprenticeship in Education. (1-9) 

Apprenticeships in the major area of study are 
available to selected students whose application 
for an apprenticeship has been approved by the 
education faculty. Each apprentice is assigned to 
work for at least a semester full-time or the equiv- 



alent with an appropriate staff member of a coop- 
erating school, school system, or educational in- 
stitution or agency. The sponsor of the apprentice 
maintains a close working relationship with the 
apprentice and the other persons involved. Prere- 
quisites, teaching experience, a master's degree 
in education, and at least six semester hours in 
education at the University of tvlaryland. Note: 
The total number of credits which a student may 
earn in EDIN 489. 888 and 889 is limited to a max- 
imum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDIN 889 Internship in Education. (3-16) Intern- 
ships in the major area of study are available to 
selected students who have teaching experi- 
ence. The following groups of students are eligi- 
ble; (A) Any student who has been advanced to 
candidacy for the doctor's degree; and (B) Any 
student who receives special approval by the 
education faculty for an internship, provided that 
prior to taking an internship, such student shall 
have completed at least 60 semester hours of 
graduate work, including at least six semester 
hours in education at the University of Ivtaryland. 
Each intern is assigned to work on a full-time 
basis for at least a semester with an appropriate 
staff member in a cooperating school, school sys- 
tem, or educational institution or agency. The in- 
ternship must tie taken in a school situation dif- 
ferent for the one where the student is regularly 
employed. The intern's sponsor maintains a close 
working relationship with the intern and the other 
persons involved. Note; The total number of cred- 
its which a student may earn in EDIN 489, 888, 
and 889 is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) 
semester hours. 

EDIN 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

Registration required to the extent of 6-9 hours 
for an Ed.D. project and 12-18 hours for a Ph.D. 
dissertation. 

Journalism Program 

Professor and Dean: Hiebert 
Professors: Bryan, l^lartin, Newsom 
Associate Professors: Grunig, Sommer, Petrick 
Assistant Professors: Beasley, Hesse, Hoyt, Lee 

The H^aster of Arts degree in Journalism pro- 
vides academic work both for the person who 
wants a professional career in communication 
and for the student interested in mass communi- 
cation theory and research methodology. The first 
type of student usually builds on a journalism 
background, adding in-depth work in a substan- 
tive minor field, as preparation for a career in a 
specialized area of mass communication. The 
second type of student usually builds on a social 
science base coupled with the study of journalism 
or mass communication while preparing for a 
career in teaching, scholarship, or applied re- 
search in mass communication. The fvlaster's 
degree is a one-year program, with the typical 
student taking 12 hours of graduate work In the 
fall, 12 hours in the spring, and 6 hours of thesis 
or thesis-option seminars In the summer. The 
program is best suited but not limited to students 
who have completed an undergraduate major in 
journalism, with a strong minor In the social sci- 
ences. 

Applicants seeking admission to the master's 
program should hold a bachelor's degree from a 
recognized Institution of higher learning. Under- 
graduate study of journalism or professional ex- 
perience in journalistic fields are helpful but not 
required. Students who have majored in some 
other field as undergraduates are required to 
make up professional deficiencies by taking four 



or five selected courses in journalism without 
graduate credit. Completion of the general apti- 
tude portion of the Graduate Record Examination 
IS required, and three letters of recommendations 
must tie submitted. 

The College of Journalism offers a number of 
assistantships, varying in amounts from $3100 to 
$3850, usually including exemptions from tuition 
and fees. Students awarded such assistantships 
usually pursue full-time study while engaged in 
teaching or research assistance in journalism for 
up to 20 hours per week 

The University of Maryland is in an advanta- 
geous location tor the study of lournalism It is 
within easy reach of five of the nation s top news- 
papers; The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore News- 
American, The Washington Post. The Washington 
Star, and Wall Street Journal. It is also near the 
Washington press corps, the large Washington 
bureaus of the Associated Press, United Press 
International, the New York Times, and 
most important American and foreign newspa- 
pers, NBC, CBS. and ABC, and other broadcast- 
ing news bureaus; and news magazines and ma- 
jor book publishing offices. It is at the doorstep of 
the nation s major newsmakers in the executive, 
legislative, and judicial branches of the Federal 
Government 

Special facilities include photographic, news 
editing, and advertising laboratories, as well as a 
reading room with daily and weekly newspapers, 
magazines, and clipping and bulletin files, 

JOUR 400 Law of Mass Communication. (3) 

Study of the legal rights and constraints of mass 
media; libel, privacy, copyright, monopoly, and 
contempt, and other aspects of the law applied to 
mass communication. Previous study of the law 
not required. Prerequisites. JOUR 200 and 201 

JOUR 410 History of Mass Communication. (3) 

Study of the development of newspapers, maga- 
zines, radio, television, and motion pictures as 
media of mass communication Analysis of the 
influences of the media on the historical develop- 
ment of America Prerequisites, JOUR 200 and 
201 

JOUR- 420 Government and Mass Communica- 
tion. (3) Study of the relationship between the 
news media and government Analysis of media 
coverage of government and politics Study of 
governmental and political information and per- 
suasion techniques. Prerequisites, JOUR 200 and 
201 

JOUR 430 Comparative Mass Communication 
Systems. (3) Survey of the history and status of 
the mass media throughout the world; compara- 
tive analysis of the role of the press in different 
societies. Prerequisites, JOUR 200 and 201 or 
consent of the instructor for non-ma|ors 

JOUR 440 Public Opinion and Mass Communica- 
tion. (3) Prerequisites; JOUR 200 and 201 Study 
of publics and their interrelationships in the for- 
mation of public opinion; measurement of public 
opinion and media habits; role of the mass media 
in the formation of public opinion 

JOUR 459 Special Topics in Mass Communica- 
tion. (3) Issues of special concern and current 
interest Open to all students Repeatable to a 
maximum of six credits provided the topic differs, 

JOUR 490 Seminar in Journalism. (3) Seminar for 
journalism seniors in newsroom problems and 
policies, emphasizing ethics and responsibilities; 
in cooperation with the Baltimore Sun. Baltimore 
News-American, and other area news media. Pre- 
requisite, permission of the instructor. 

Graduate Programs / 103 



JOUR 497 Professional Seminar. (3) 

Prerequisites— JOUR 200, 201 and consent of in- 
structor. Projects and discussions relating profes- 
sional work experience to tfie study of journalism 
Limited to students who participated in an ap- 
proved summer work experience after the junior 
year. 

JOUR 499 Independent Study. (1-3) Individual 
projects in journalism. May be repeated to a 
maximum of three hours. 

JOUR 600 Research Methods in Mass Communi- 
cation. (3) 

JOUR 610 Seminar In Mass Media and Society. 

(3) Analysis and discussion of the interrelat- 
ionships between the mass media and society, 
including various social and cultural elements of 
modern society; responsibilities of the mass me- 
dia and the mass communicator. 

JOUR 612 Theories of Mass Communication. (3) 

JOUR 620 Seminar in Public Affairs Reporting. 
(3) 

JOUR 621 Interpretation of Contemporary Af- 
fairs. (3) 

JOUR 630 Seminar in Corporate Communication. 
(3) 

JOUR 640 Mass Culture and Mass Communica- 
tion. (3) 

JOUR 700 Seminar in Mass Media Law. (3) 

JOUR 710 Seminar in Mass Media History. (3) 

JOUR 720 Seminar in Government and Mass 
Communication. (3) 

JOUR 721 Seminar in Urban Mass Communica- 
tion. (3) 

JOUR 730 Seminar in Comparative Mass Com- 
munication. (3) 

JOUR 731 Cross-Cultural Communication. (3) 

JOUR 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

JOUR 800 Seminar in Critical Analysis. (3) 

JOUR 810 Special Problems in Communication. 

(3) 

JOUR 812 Seminar in Communication Theories. 

(3) 

Library and Information 
Services Program 

Professors, Bundy, Kidd, Liesener, Olson, 

Reynolds, Wasserman 
Associate Professor: Soergel 
Assistant Professors: Bates, Bertran, MacLeod, 

Travis, Wellisch 

The goal of the program in Library and Informa- 
tion Services is to provide professional education 
at the graduate level within the university setting. 
It endeavors to establish a position in the fore- 
front of instructional and theoretical inquiry to 
influence the vanguard of practice in librarian- 
ship. 

Admission as a student to the College is limited 
to individuals who hold the bachelor's degree 
from recognized colleges, universities or profes- 
sional schools in this country or abroad or to 
those who can give evidence of successful com- 
pletion of equivalent courses of study. The Indi- 
vidual's undergraduate academic record is of 
primary importance as an Indicator of his compe- 
tence to pursue graduate study in librarianship, 

104 / Graduate Programs 



but other factors are also taken in account in re- 
viewing applications. The potential student's per- 
formance in the verbal and quantitative tests of 
the Graduate Record Examination administered 
by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, 
New Jersey, and letter of personal recommenda- 
tion and information gained from personal inter- 
views with potential students are considered. 
Reports relating to the applicant's intellectual and 
personal development as an undergraduate are 
sometimes considered, as are such factors as 
employment experience, military service and oth- 
er related activities when they appear to be rele- 
vant in a particular case as part of the admissions 
review process. All these factors are considered 
significant in assessing the applicant's capacity 
and motivation for graduate work in the College 
and for his later performance as a responsible 
member of the library profession. The Admissions 
Committee will consider exceptions to and waiver 
of requirements in some cases. 

Although no specific undergraduate courses 
are required for admission to the program, the 
faculty views course work in the social sciences, 
mathematics, and the physical and biological sci- 
ences as especially relevant to some of the newer 
directions in the field. A broad background In the 
arts and sciences with strength in the humanities 
is also considered valuable. 

Faculty advisors recommend courses they think 
most appropriate for each student. The required 
pro-seminar and introductory courses in the or- 
ganization of knowledge and reference provide a 
base from which the student can build a purpose- 
ful program fitted to his personal needs and aspi- 
rations. Reflecting the multi-disciplinary nature of 
librarianship and its continuing need for reliance 
upon Insights from supportive intellectual disci- 
plines, students have a high degree of flexibility in 
the elective portions of their work. Their courses 
are not restricted to those within the program but 
can include relevant courses from other parts of 
the University. 

The Master of Library Science degree will be 
awarded to the student who successfully com- 
pletes a program of 36 hours with an average of 
B within three years from his first registration in 
the program. Under a full-time program a student 
normally completes 15 semester hours during the 
fall and spring semesters and 6 hours during the 
summer terms. Part-time students are also admit- 
ted to the program Such students are expected 
to pursue a minimum of two courses during each 
semester. No thesis or comprehensive examina- 
tion IS required. 

A number of fellowships and assistantships are 
available for students enrolled in the College, 
Loan funds administered by the University and 
federally insured loans are also available. Public 
libraries In the region as well as other local or- 
ganizations offer a few stipends and scholarships. 
In addition a student in the College is eligible to 
apply for scholarships, fellowships and grants 
from national organizations awarded for graduate 
study in librarianship. Information on the availa- 
bility of such awards may be requested from the 
Director of Admissions. 

The Ph.D program requires the equivalent of 
three years of full-time work, normally divided 
into approximately two years of formal course- 
work (60 semester hours) and one year of re- 
search on the dissertation. 

LBSC 499 Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes. 
(1-9) Workshops, clinics, and institutes developed 
around specific topics or problems primarily for 
practicing librarians. Repeatable to a maximum of 
nine credit hours. 



LBSC 600 Proseminar— The Development and 
Operation of Libraries and Information Services. 
(3-6) Background and orientation needed for 
advanced study in librarianship and information 
science. Covers the major problems in the devel- 
opment and provision of information services; the 
structure, functions, and economics of informa- 
tion service organizations; and the processes by 
which change is brought about in the quality of 
information services. 

LBSC 610 Introduction to Reference and Infor- 
mation Services. (3) Information and reference 
systems, services, and tools provided in libraries 
and information centers. Problems and concepts 
of communication, question negotiation, biblio- 
graphic control, and search processes are consid- 
ered. Major types of information sources and 
modes of information delivery are introduced. 

LBSC 613 Literature and Research in the Sci- 
ences, (3) Bibliographic organization, information 
structure and trends in the direction of research 
in the principal scientific disciplines. 
LBSC 615 Literature and Research in the Social 
Sciences. (3) Bibliographic organization, informa- 
tion structure and trends in the direction of re- 
search in the principal fields of the social sci- 
ences. 

LBSC 617 Literature and Research in the Hu- 
manities. (3) Bibliographic organization, informa- 
tion structure and trends in the directon of re- 
search in the principal humanistic disciplines. 

LBSC 620 Medical Literature and Librarianship. 

(3) Introduction to medical literature and its refer- 
ence sources, stressing those aspects of the field 
of medicine which lead to special characteristics 
in the organization and handling of its literature 
and innovations in medical librarianship and in- 
formation services. Various kinds of health sci- 
ence library and information centers are dis- 
cussed and biomedical library networks are stud- 
ied. Students will find it necessary to spend con- 
siderable time at the National Library of Medicine 
or another medical library. 

LBSC 624 Legal Literature. (3) Survey and evalu- 
ation of information sources in law, with empha- 
sis upon the bibliographic organization of the 
field. 

LBSC 626 Literature of the Fine Arts. (3) 

Consideration and evaluation of the resources of 
the fine arts, emphasizing bibliography and serv- 
ices contained in fine arts libraries 

LBSC 627 Governmental Information Systems. 

(3) Analysis of the organization of the information 
structure and the publication and dissemination 
programs of the U.S. Federal, State and Municipal 
Governments 

LBSC 631 Business Information Services. (3) 

Survey and analysis of information sources in 
business, finance, and economics with emphasis 
upon their use in problem solving. 

LBSC 633 Advanced Reference Services. (3) 

Theoretical and administrative considerations, 
analysis of research problems, and directed activ- 
ity in bibliographic method and search tech- 
niques in large collections. 

LBSC 635 Resources of American Libraries. (3) 

Considers distribution and extent of library re- 
sources, means of surveying collections, mecha- 
nisms of inter-institutional cooperation in building 
collections, and means of developing research 
collections in special subject fields. 

LBSC 636 Children's Literature and Materials. (3) 

A survey of literature and other media of commu- 



nication and the criteria in evaluating such mate- 
rials as they relate to the needs, interests and 
capability of the child 

LBSC 637 Storytelling Materials and Techniques. 

(3) Literary s:urces are studied and instruction 
a"d practice in oral techniques are offered 

LBSC 641 Selection and Evaluation of Instruc- 
tional Media. (3) Development of criteria for 
selection and evaluation of instructional materials 
for classroom, school and system use; includes 
measures of readability listenability visual diffi- 
culty and interest level 

LBSC 642 Organization of Knowledge in Librar- 
ies I. (3) Principles of the organization of library 
materials for physical and intellectual access 
Concepts and problems involved in subiect catal- 
oging, classification, and descriptive cataloging 
Ma)or systems and rules in use in current prac- 
tice, particularly those systems popular in the 
United States 

LBSC 644 Organization of Knowledge in Librar- 
ies 11. (3) Cc^ceptual problems in the organiza- 
tion of knowledge, specific cataloging and classi- 
fication systems, rules of entry, application of the 
systems, choice of system to suit particular insti- 
tutional and patron characteristics. 

LBSC 647 Special Problems in the Organization 
of Knowledge. (3) Seminar course in which stu- 
dents may take topics of special interest to them 
In the area of organization of knowledge and ex- 
plore them in a research project/class discussion 
format. 

LBSC 650 Fundamentals of Documentation. (3) 

The macro-organization of information services in 
the framework of the overall system of informa- 
tion transfer. The information transfer process is 
discussed, as well as the fields of study con- 
cerned with that process. Use and user studies, 
models of communication and formal and infor- 
mal communication channels, characteristics and 
behavior of the literative (bibliometrics). innova- 
tions in the communication system. 

LBSC 653 Construction and Maintenance of In- 
dex Languages. (3) Treats the making of classifi- 
cation schedules, subject heading lists and the- 
sauri and those considerations relating to the re- 
vision and extension of existing ones. 

LBSC 656 Introduction to Information Storage 
and Retrieval (ISAR) Systems. Micro-organi- 
zation of information services and basic princi- 
ples underlying both manual and mechanized 
ISAR systems, including the conceptual structure 
of indexing languages and search strategies, file 
organization, typology of classifications, abstract- 
ing, and indexing. 

LBSC 657 Testing and Evaluation of IR Systems. 

(3) A survey of recent developments in the proc- 
essing, arrangement, and retrieval of information, 
and in the procedures used in their evaluation. 

LBSC 665 Problems of Nonbook Materials. (3) 

Examination of nonbook materials such as audio- 
records, motion pictures, maps, videorecords. 
machine-readable data files, and realia. Technical 
services applicable to nonbook materials. 

LBSC 670 Seminar in Technical Services. (3) 

Special issues in technical services in large librar- 
ies. Deals with such areas as exquisitions. catal- 
oging, serial control, cooperative programs, and 
managerial controls. 

LBSC 674 Introduction to Reprography. (3) A 

survey of the processes and technology through 
which materials are made available in furthering 



library and information services, ranging from 
photography to microforms. 

LBSC 677 Seminar on Manuscript Collections. 

(3) Analysis of the methods and philosophy of 
handling special papers and documentary materi- 
al in a research library. 

LBSC 700 Introduction to Data Processing tor 
Libraries. (3) Basic principles data processing 
and the ways in which data processing systems 
have been applied to library problems. Lectures 
cover the application of punched card processing 
to library operations; an introduction to systems 
analysis and the methodology for establishing 
systems requirements; and the application of 
electronic data processing systems to library op- 
erations. In the laboratory, the fundamentals of 
computer programming are provided for develop- 
ing and running computer programs designed to 
solve typical library problems. 

LBSC 705 Advanced Data Processing in Librar- 
ies. (3) Analysis of retrieval systems and intensive 
study of machine applications in the acquisition, 
analysis, coding, retrieval and display of informa- 
tion 

LBSC 711 Programming Systems for Information 
Handling Applications. (3) The elements of pro- 
gramming system design and operation are stud- 
ied with special emphasis on the influence of in- 
formation handling and library requirements. 

LBSC 715 Library Systems Analysis. (3) 

Introduction to the total systems approach to li- 
brary and information problems, emphasizing 
administrative and managerial decision-making. 
Will give a scientific management framework, 
terms for defining a system, and its problems, 
and a set of tools, techniques, and methods to 
aid in analyzing and solving these problems. Top- 
ics to be covered include model building, flow- 
charting, motion and time study, cost analyses, 
systems design, management information, and 
cost-effectiveness and planning-programming- 
budget systems. 

LBSC 721 Seminar in Information Science. (3) 

Introduction to the fundamentals in information 
science. The nature of messages in human and 
machine communication are approached from the 
viewpoint of the physical, psychological, and logi- 
cal transformations which they undergo in their 
paths from message sender to recipient. Cyber- 
netic variety, basic constraints or variety in infor- 
mation systems and classes in their uses in 
search and communications are studied, as well 
as, models, and optimization and mechanization 
of access to messages for communication of 
data, information, knowledge. 

LBSC 726 Seminar in Information Transfer. (3) 

Prerequisite: LBSC 721, or permission of instruc- 
tor. Discussion of significant problems in informa- 
tion science: topics include fundamental con- 
cepts, theory, methodology, current research. 

LBSC 731 Library Administration. (3) An intro- 
duction to administrative theory and principles 
and their implications and applications to mana- 
gerial activity in libraries. 

LBSC 736 Advanced Organization and Adminis- 
tration of Libraries and Information Services. (3) 

The students theoretical understanding of orga- 
nization and administration will be advanced by 
intensive study in the various sub-fields of con- 
temporary library and information developments. 

LBSC 740 Seminar in Library and Information 
Networtts. (3) Explores the inter-library coopera- 
tive phenomenon and analyzes critical issues in 



network planning, economics, organization, tech- 
nology, and services. 

LBSC 743 Seminar in the Academic Library. (3) A 

seminar on the academic library within the frame- 
work of higher education, treating problems of 
programs, collections, support, planning and 
physical plant. 

LBSC 747 Seminar in the Special Library and 
Information Center. (3) A seminar on the develop- 
ment, the uses, the objectives, the philosophy and 
the particular systems employed in special library 
service. 

LBSC 754 Seminar in the School Library. (3) 

LBSC 757 Library and Information Service Facili- 
ties — Objectives and Performance. (3) The aim of 

this course is to describe the context of demands 
and policies within which an IR or library service 
facility must operate. 

LBSC 804 Communication and Libraries. (3) 

Theory and research in the multi-discipline do- 
main of communication. Inquiry is directed into 
such diverse matters as coding theory, linguistic 
analysis, decision theory, network concepts, etc. 
Connections are pointed-out tietween communi- 
cation research and library practice. 

LBSC 807 Science Information and the Organi- 
zation of Science. (3) 

LBSC 815 Library Systems. (3) Evolution and 
current patterns of regional library development, 
considering the economic, legal, service and 
management problems associated with library 
systems as well as the significance of state and 
federal programs and national information net- 
works. 

LBSC 817 Public Library in the Political Process. 
(3) Seminar on the principal influences which 
affect the patterns of organization, support and 
service patterns of public libraries based upon 
theoretical and case studies. 

LBSC 825 Libraries and Information Services in 
the Social Process. (3) The focus is upon the pol- 
icy process. Key elements in the societal political 
environment which influence decision-making in 
libraries and information service facilities are 
identified and interrelated, such as legislation, cit- 
izen participation, organized groups, mass me- 
dia, professional associations, technological 
changes, financial support. The significance of 
such temporary issues as censorship, manpower, 
community control, and automation are consid- 
ered in this context. 

LBSC 827 History of Libraries and Their Materi- 
als. (3) The development of publication forms and 
institutions set against the historical framework 
and the cultural forces within which such ad- 
vances were made. 

LBSC 833 Library Service to the Disadvan- 
taged. (3) Approaches, adaptations and potentials 
of the public library in relation to the problem of 
poverty. Includes field experience in the school's 
laboratory library. 

LBSC 837 Seminar in International and Compar- 
ative Librarianship and Information Science. (3) 

Compares and contrasts bibliographical systems, 
institutions, service arrangements, and profes- 
sional patterns in developed and developing cul- 
tures. Libraries, information organizations and 
international information systems are viewed 
against the backdrop of national cultures, and the 
influence of the social, political and economic 
factors upon these forms are considered. 



Graduate Programs / 105 



LBSC 844 Research Methods in Library and In- 
formation Activity. (3) The techniques and strate- 
gies of research and their implications for the 
definition, investigation and evaluation of library 
problems. 

LBSC 852 Seminar in Research Methods and 
Data Analysis. (3) 

LBSC 855 Seminar In the Analysis of the Library 
Service Process. (3) Teams of students, librari- 
ans, and library school faculty investigate real 
problems in libraries on the basis of quantitative 
data, using analytical skills presented in the first 
five w^eeks of the semester. 

LBSC 858 Special Topics in Library and Informa- 
tion Service. (3) No student may earn more than 
9 hours under LBSC 858, more than 9 hours un- 
der LBSC 859, nor more than a total of 12 hours 
in both LBSC 858 and LBSC 859. 

LBSC 859 Independent Study. (1-3) Designed to 
permit intensive individual study, reading or re- 
search in an area of specialized interest under 
faculty supervision. Registration is limited to the 
advanced student vi/ho has the approval of his 
advisors and of the faculty member involved. No 
student may earn more than 9 hours under LBSC 
858, more than 9 hours under LBSC 859, nor 
more than a total of 12 hours in both LBSC 858 
and 859 

LBSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Mathematics Program 

Professor and Chairman: Goldhaber 

Professors: Adams, Antman, Auslander, 
Benedetto, Brace, Chu, Correl, Douglas, 
Edmundson' , Ehrlich, Goldberg, Goldstein, 
Good, Gray, Greenberg, Gulick, Heins, 
Horvath, Hummel, Jackson, Kirwan, Kleppner, 
Lehner, Lipsman, Lopez-Escobar, (kflikulski, 
Osborn, Pearl, Reinhart, Rheinboldt^ 
Stellmacher, Strauss, Syski. Vesentini, Wolfe, 
Zalcman, Zedek 

Associate Professors: Alexander. Berg, Bernstein, 
J. Cohen, Cook, Cooper, Dancis, Ellis, Fey^ 
Green, Helzer, Henkelman^ , Johnson, Lay, 
Markley, Neri, Owdngs, Sather, Schafer, 
Schneider, Sweet, Warner, Yang 

Assistant Professors: Berenstein, Cooke, Currier, 
Davidson', Fitzpatrick, Garbanati, W. Hill, 
Kedem, Kirby, Kueker, Lee, Liu, Neumann, 
Niebur, Razar, Schmidt, Smith, Winkelnkemper 

'Joint appointment with Computer Science 
2Joint appointment with Secondary Education 

The Department of fufathematics offers strong 
programs leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees 
in the fields of Algebra and Number Theory, 
Complex Analysis, Geometry and Topology, Math- 
ematical Logic, Real and Functional Analysis, 
Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations, Math- 
ematical Logic, and Probability and Statistics. In 
addition, the faculty is actively involved in the In- 
terdisciplinary Applied Mathematics Program for 
vi/hich the department is administratively respon- 
sible. Admission is granted to applicants who 
evince marked ability and promise in mathematics 
as demonstrated by performance in collegiate 
mathematics. Although the Graduate Record 
Examination in Mathematics is not required for 
admission, applicants who have taken this exami- 
nation are requested to supply their score in their 
application for admission. 



The M.A. degree can be earned by either a the- 
sis or non-thesis option but the great majority of 
students are exercising the latter. For this option 
a student must have 30 credit hours with grades 
of B or better in courses carrying graduate credit 
of which at least 18 are at the 600/700 level. Of 
these, in turn, 12 hours must be in mathematics. 
He must have taken two full-year sequences at 
the 600/700 level and he must have passed writ- 
ten examinations in three mathematical fields. 
The student may take the Ph.D. examination 
and be scored at a lower level or he may take a 
special M.A. examination; the examination can be 
repeated once. There is no language requirement 
for the M.A. degree. About 25-30 M.A.'s are 
earned each year in mathematics. 

At Marylantj the M.A. degree is not required to 
enter the Ph.D. program. Here again the Ph.D. 
aspirant must take a set of three examinations in 
three separate fields of mathematics which can 
be repeated once. If successful, the student must 
satisfy the particular requirements of the field 
committee in his special area of interest before 
he will be permitted to engage in thesis research. 
Satisfaction of these requirements plus the tested 
ability to translate into English mathematical ma- 
terial in one of French, German, or Russian are 
conditions for admission to candidacy for the 
Ph.D. The dissertation must represent an original 
contribution to mathematical knowledge and will 
usually be published in a mathematical journal. 
Before the final oral examination on the disserta- 
tion can be scheduled the candidate must pass a 
second language examination, translating mathe- 
matical French, German, or Russian into English 
so that he will be proficient in reading technical 
material in two foreign languages. 

The average Ph.D. student will probably spend 
five years of graduate study to obtain his degree. 
From 5-10 Ph.D.'s are granted each year in the 
Department of Mathematics. 

The Department is able to offer graduate assist- 
antships to 40-50 percent of its graduate stu- 
dents; the number for 1975-76 was 108. With very 
few exceptions these graduate assistants conduct 
discussion and quiz sections associated with a 
large lecture class taught by a faculty member; 
the teaching load is usually six hours a semester. 
In addition they are required to assist at registra- 
tion time and to proctor the graduate written 
examinations. Renewals of assistantships are 
made by the Graduate Committee of the Depart- 
ment early in the spring semester on the basis of 
well-defined guide lines. 

The number of fellows is small and their fund- 
ing, being largely dependent on outside sources, 
is uncertain. There are, however, a few disserta- 
tion fellowships with a very modest stipend that 
are occasionally available for Ph.D. candidates 
who are in the late stages of writing their disser- 
tations. 

The facilities for graduate study and research 
are excellent. The Engineering and Physical Sci- 
ences library is located on the ground floor of the 
Mathematics Building and contains more than 
95,000 volumes in mathematics, physics, and en- 
gineering; more than 280 journals in pure and 
applied mathematics are received. The Library of 
Congress with its extensive collection of books 
and technical reports is only a half hour away 
from the campus. 

The Department cooperates closely with the 
Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics and with the Department of Computer Sci- 
ence. Faculty members of both these centers 
offer courses in the Department of Mathematics 
and the facilities of the computer center are avail- 
able to serve the research needs of both faculty 



and graduate students. Also, members of the 
Department participate in the interdisciplinary 
Applied Mathematics program. 

Mathematics 

MATH 400 Vectors and Matrices. (3) Prerequisite, 
MATH 141 or 221. Algebra of vector spaces and 
matrices. Recommended for students interested 
in the applications of mathematics. (Not open to 
students who have had MATH 240 or 405). 

MATH 401 Applications of Linear Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 400, or MATH 240, or consent 
of instructor. Various applications of linear alge- 
bra: theory of finite games, linear programming, 
matrix methods as applied to finite Markov 
chains, random walk, incidence matrices, graphs 
and directed graphs, networks, transportation 
problems. 

MATH 402 Algebraic Structures. (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 240 or equivalent. For students having only 
limited experience with rigorous mathematical 
proofs. Parallels MATH 403. Groups, rings, inte- 
gral domains and fields, detailed study of several 
groups; properties of integers and polynomials. 
Emphasis on the origin of the mathematical ideas 
stuijied and the logical structure of the subject. 
Credit will be given for only one of the courses, 
MATH 402 or MATH 403. 

MATH 403 Introduction to Abstract Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 241 or equivalent. Integers; 
groups, rings, integral domains, fields. Credit will 
be given for only one of the courses, MATH 402 
or MATH 403. 

MATH 404 Field Theory. (3) Prerequisite, MATH 
403, algebraic and transcendental elements, Gal- 
ois theory, constructions with straight-edge and 
compass, solutions of equations of low degrees, 
insolubility of the quintic, Sylow theorems, fun- 
damental theorem of finite Abelian groups. 

MATH 405 Introduction to Linear Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 403 or consent of instructor. 
An abstract treatment of finite dimensional vector 
spaces. Linear transformations and their invar- 
iants. Credit will be given for only one of the 
courses, MATH 400 or MATH 405. 
MATH 406 Introduction to Number Theory. (3) 
Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics. 
Rational integers, divisibility, prime numbers, 
modules and linear forms, unique factorization 
theorem, Euler's function, Mobius' function, cy- 
clotomic polynomial, congruences and quadratic 
residues, Legendre's and Jacobi's symbol, reci- 
procity law of quadratic residues, introductory 
explanation of the method of algebraic number 
theory. 

MATH 410 Advanced Calculus. (3) Prerequisite, 
MATH 241. First semester of a year course. Sub- 
jects covered during the year are: sequences and 
series of numbers, continuity and differentiability 
of real valued functions of one variable, the Rie- 
mann integral, sequences of functions, and power 
series. Functions of several variables including 
partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line and sur- 
face integrals. The implicit function theorem. 

MATH 411 Advanced Calculus. (3) Prerequisite, 
MATH 410, and MATH 240 or MATH 400. Contin- 
uation of MATH 410. 

MATH 413 Introduction to Complex Variables. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 410 the algebra of complex 
numbers, analytic functions mapping properties 
of the elementary functions. Cauchy's theorem 
and the Cauchy integral formula. Residues. (Cred- 
it will be given for only one of the courses MATH 
413 and 463). 



1 06 / Graduate Programs 



MATH 414 Differential Equations. (3) Prerequisite. 
MATH 240 and MATH 410, or equivalent. Exist- 
ence and uniqueness ttieorems for initial value 
problems. Linear theory; fundamental matrix solu- 
tions, variation of constants formula, Floquet 
tfieory for periodic linear systems. Asymptotic 
orbital and Lyapunov stability witfi phase plane 
diagrams. Boundary value theory and series solu- 
tions are optional topics. 

MATH 415 Introduction to Partial Differential 
Equations. (3) Prerequities. MATH 410. Topics will 
include one dimensional wave equation; linear 
second order equations in two variables, separa- 
tions of variables and Fourier series; Sturm-Liou- 
ville theory. (Credit will be given for only one 
course, MATH 415 or MATH 462). 

MATH 416 Introduction to Real Variables. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 410. The Lebesgue integral. 
Fubini's theorem. The LP spaces. Convergence 
theorems. 

MATH 417 Introduction to Fourier Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 410. Fourier series. Fourier 
and LaPlace transforms. 

MATH 430 Geometric Transformations. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 240. Recommended for stu- 
dents in mathematics education. Important 
groups of geometric transformations, including 
the isometries and similarities of the plane. Ge- 
ometries related to transformation groups. 

MATH 431 Foundations of Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics. 
Recommended for students in mathematics edu- 
cation. The axiomatic foundations of geometry. 
Attention will be given to one or more axiomatic 
developments of Euclidean geometry and to the 
relation of Euclidean geometry to other geometric 
systems. 

MATH 432 Introduction to Point Set Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 410 or 450. or equivalent. 
Connectedness, compactness, transformations, 
homomorphisms; application of these concepts 
to various spaces, with particular attention to the 
Euclidean plane. 

MATH 433 Introduction to Algebraic Topology. 

(3) Prerequisite, MATH 403 and 432. or equivalent. 
Chains, cycles, homology groups for surfaces, the 
fundamental group. 

MATH 436 Introduction to Differential Geometry. 

(3) Prerequisite. MATH 241 or equivalent The 
differential geometry of curves and surfaces, cur- 
vature and torsion, moving flames, the fundamen- 
tal differential forms, intrinsic geometry of a sur- 
face. 

MATH 444 Elementary Logic and Algorithms. (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 240 or consent of instructor. 
An elementary development of propositional log- 
ic, predicate logic, set algebra, and Boolean alge- 
bra, with a discussion of Markov algorithms, lur- 
ing machines and recursive functions. Topics in- 
clude post productions, word problems, and for- 
mal languages. (Also listed as CMSC 450). 

MATH 446 Axiomatic Set Ttieory. (3) Prerequisite, 
MATH 403 or 450 or consent of instructor. Devel- 
opment of a system of axiomatic set theory, 
choice principles, induction principles, ordinal 
arithmetic including discussion of cancellation 
laws, divisibility, canonical expansions, cardinal 
arithmetic including connections with the axiom 
of choice, Hartog's theorem, Konig's theorem, 
properties of regular, singular, and inaccessible 
cardinals. 

MATH 447 Introduction to Mathematic Logic. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 403 or 410 or 450. Formal 



propositional logic, completeness, independence, 
decidability of the system, formal quantificational 
logic, first-order axiomatic theories, extended 
Godel completeness theorem, Lowenheim-Skolem 
theorem, model-theoretical applications, 

MATH 450 Fundamental Concepts of Mathemat- 
ics. (3) Prerequisite, MATH 240 or consent of in- 
structor. Sets, relations, mappings. Construction 
of the real number system starting with Peano 
postulates; algebraic structures associated with 
the construction; Archimedean order, sequential 
completeness and equivalent properties of or- 
dered fields. Finite and infinite sets, denumbera- 
ble and non-denumberable sets. 

MATH 462 Linear Analysis for Scientists and 
Engineers. (3) Prerequisites— Math 241 and some 
knowledge of differential equations. Linear 
spaces and operators, orthogonality. Sturm-Liou- 
ville problems and Eigenfunction expansions for 
ordinary differential equations, introduction to 
partial differential equations, boundary and initial 
value problems. (Credit will be given for only one 
course, MATH 462 or MATH 415.) 

MATH 463 Complex Variables for Scientists and 
Engineers. (3) Prerequisite. MATH 241 or equiva- 
lent. The algebra of complex numbers, analytic 
functions, mapping properties of the elementary 
functions. Cauchy integral formula. Theory of resi- 
dues and application to evaluation of integrals. 
Conformal mapping. (Credit will be given for only 
one of the courses. MATH 413 or MATH 463) 

MATH 464 Transform Methods for Scientists and 
Engineers. (3) Prerequisites, MATH 264, and ei- 
ther MATH 463 or MATH 413. Fourier series, Four- 
ier and LaPlace transforms. Evaluation of the 
complex inversion integral by the theory of resi- 
dues. Applications to ordinary and partial differ- 
ential equations of mathematical physics; solu- 
tions using transforms and separation of varia- 
bles. Additional topics such as Bessel functions 
and calculus of variations may be included, 

MATH 472 Differential Equations and Numerical 
Methods. (3) Prerequisites: MATH 240, MATH 410, 
and CMSC 110 or their equivalents. A general in- 
troduction to the theory of ordinary differential 
equations emphasizing numerical methods for 
constructing approximate solutions. Existence 
and uniqueness theorems, Runge-Kutta method, 
systems of linear differential equations, phase 
plane methods, and numerical solution of bound- 
ary value problems. 

MATH 474 Applied Linear Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 240, MATH 241, and CMSC 
110 or their equivalents. A treatment of finite 
dimensional linear spaces and linear transforma- 
tions with an emphasis on applications and com- 
putational aspects. 

MATH 475 Combinatorics and Graph Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 240 or equivalent. General 
enumeration methods, difference equations, gen- 
erating functions. Elements of graph theory to 
transport networks, matching theory and graphi- 
cal algorithms. (Listed also as CMSC 475) 

MATH 478 Selected Topics for Teachers of 
Mathematics. (1-3) Prerequisite, one year of col- 
lege mathematics or consent of instructor. 

MATH 481 Introduction to Number Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or 
consent of instructor. Elementary number theory 
and the development of the real numbers for 
teachers. (Not open to students majoring in math- 
ematics or physical sciences.) 

MATH 482 Introduction to Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or 



consent of instructor. Modern ideas in algebra 
and the theory of equations for teachers. (Not 
open to students majoring in mathematics or 
physical sciences.) 

MATH 483 Introduction to Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or 
consent of instructor, A study of basic ideas from 
Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry for teach- 
ers, (Not open to students majoring in mathemat- 
ics or physical sciences,) 

MATH 484 Introduction to Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or 
consent of instructor, A study of the limit concept 
and the calculus for teachers. Previous knowl- 
edge of calculus is not required. (Not open to 
students majoring in mathematics or physical sci- 
ences.) 

MATH 488 National Science Foundation Summer 
Institute for Teachers of Science and Mathemat- 
ics — Seminar. (1-3) Lectures and discussion to 
deepen the student's appreciation of mathematics 
as logical discipline and as a medium of expres- 
sion. Special emphasis on topics relevant to cur- 
rent mathematical curriculum studies and revi- 
sions. 

MATH 490 History of Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite; MATH 240 and 241, or equivalent. 
The development of mathematics form around 
1900 B.C. to around 1900 A.D. with special em- 
phasis on the period of the Greeks (600 B.C.— 200 
A,D,) The period of development of the calculus 
(17th century), and the period of the institution of 
the 'modern' style of rigor (19th century). Influ- 
ence of the cultural environment on the develop- 
ment of mathematics at various times, the devel- 
opment of the mathematical concept of infinity 
and the limit process, the interplay between alge- 
bra and analysis, and the development of the 
modern concept of the mathematical proof. 

MATH 498 Selected Topics in Mathematics. 
(1-16) Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. 
Topics of special interest to advanced undergrad- 
uate students will be offered occasionally under 
the general guidance of the departmental com- 
mittee on undergraduate studies. Honors students 
register for reading courses under this number. 

MATH 600 Abstract Algebra I. (3) Prerequisite, 
MATH 405 or equivalent. Groups with operators, 
homomorphism and isomorphism theorems, nor- 
mal series, Sylow theorems, free groups. Abelian 
groups, rings, integral domains, fields, modules. 
If time permits. HOM (A.B.), tensor products, exte- 
rior algebra. 

MATH 601 Abstract Algebra II. (3) Prerequisite, 
MATH 600 or consent of instructor. Field theory, 
Galois theory, multilinear algebra. Further topics 
from: Dedekind domains, Noetherian domains, 
rings with minimum condition, homological alge- 
bra. 

MATH 602 Homological Algebra. (3) Prerequisite. 
MATH 600, Projective and injective modules, 
homological dimensions, derived functors, spec- 
tral sequence of a composite functor. Applica- 
tions. 

MATH 603 Commutative Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 600 Ideal theory of Noetheri- 
an rings, valuations, localizations, complete local 
rings, Dedekind domains. 

MATH 604 Ring Theory. (3) Prerequisite, MATH 
601 or consent of instructor. Topics selected from 
the following: ideal theory, structure theory of 
rings with or without minimum condition, division 
rings, algebras, non-associative rings. 

Graduate Programs / 107 



MATH 605 Group Theory. (3) Prerequisite, MATH 
601 or consent of instructor. Topics selected from 
tfie following: finite groups, Abelian groups, free 
groups, solvable or nipotent groups, groups with 
operators, groups with local p