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Full text of "The Graduate catalog"

1980/1981 

Graduate 

Catalog 



University of Maryland 
at College Park 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/graduatecatalog1980univ 



1980/1981 
Graduate Catalog 

University of Maryland 
at College Park 




Cover Design by Graphica. Inc. 



Rej.rir.ted September 1980 



Academic Resources 

Near the University of 

Maryland 

College Park 



Johns Hopkins 

University 

UM Professional 

Schools 



Johns Hopkins 

Applied Physics Laboratory 



D Atomic Energy 
Commission 



National Bureau u 
of Standards 



National Institutes 

of Health D 
National C 

Medical Library 



Naval Ordnance 
Laboratory 



Bethesda National 
Naval Medical 
C Center 



Washington, DC 



'National 
Agriculture^ 
Library 

D 



'Baltimore 
Washington 
Parkway 



□ Goddard Space 
Flight Center 



Baltimore 
Washington 
International 
Airport 



Smithsonian 
Ecological 
.Center 



College! 
k Park 



.Beltway 495 



Annapolis 

U.S. Naval 
Academy 



Dulles International 
Airport 

D 



National ' 
Airport C 



Resources Located In 
Washington 

American University 
Catholic University 
Corcoran Gallery 
Folger Shakespeare Library 
Freer Gallery 
Georgetown University 



George Washington University 
Howard University 
Library of Congress 
National Archives 
National Gallery of Art 
Naval Observatory 
Naval Research Laboratory 
Phillips Collection 
Smithsonian Institution 



Chesapeake Bay 



Contents 



ACADEMIC RESOURCES MAP 
THE UNIVERSITY 

Academic Calendar 

Plan of Academic Organization 

University Officers 

Graduate School Officers and Staff 

Graduate Council Committees 

University Policy Statement 

Policies on Non-discrimination 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

History, National Organizations. Major Role 9 

Governance 9 

Location 10 

Special Research Resources, Special Opportunities for the Artist 10 

Libraries 10 

Institutes, Centers, and Bureaus 11 

Consortia 13 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Graduate Fees 13 

Determination of in-State Status for Admission, Tuition, and 

Charge-differential Purposes 14 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Fellowships 14 

Assistantships 14 

Loans and Part-time Employment 14 

Golden ID Program 15 

Veteran Benefits 15 

STUDENT SERVICES 

Housing 15 

Food Services 15 

Career Development Center 15 

Counseling Center 16 

Health Care 16 

Health Insurance 16 

Publications of Interest to Graduate Students 16 

Student Data/Information Policy 16 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Graduate Programs 18 

Administrative Offices 19 

General 19 

Criteria for Admission 19 

Categories of Admission to Degree Programs 20 

Non-degree Admission Categories 20 

Offer of Admission 20 

Admission Time Limits 21 

Change of Obiective, Status, Termination of Admission 21 

Admission of Faculty 21 

Application Instructions 21 

Foreign Student Applications 21 

Records Maintenance and Disposition 21 

REGISTRATION AND CREDITS 

Schedule of Classes 22 

Developing a Program 22 

Course Numbering System 22 

Designation of Full and Part-time Students 22 

Grades for Graduate Students 22 

Minimum Registration Requirements/Dissertation 

Research/Continuous Registration 22,23 

Partial Credit Course Registration for Handicapped Students 23 

Graduate Credit for Senior Undergraduates 23 

Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Level Courses 23 

Credit by Examination 23 

Transfer of Credit 23 

Criteria that Courses Must Meet to be Accepted for Graduate 

Credit 23 

The Inter-campus Student 23 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to all Master's 

Degrees 24 

Graduate School Requirements for the MA. M.S.. Thesis Option, 

Non-thesis Option 24 

Requirements for the M Ed. Degree 24 

Requirements Applicable to Other Master's Degrees 24 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to All Doctoral 

Degrees 24 

Graduate School Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of 

Philosophy 24 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education 25 

Requirements for Other Doctoral Degrees 25 

Commencement 25 

THE GRADUATE FACULTY 26 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Administration, Supervision and Curriculum Program 

Aerospace Engineering Program 

Agricultural and Extension Education Program 
Agricultural and Resource Economics Program ... 
Agricultural Engineering Program 

Agronomy Program 

American Studies Program 

Animal Sciences Program 

Applied Mathematics Program 

Architecture Program 

Art Program 

Astronomy Program 

Biochemistry Program 

Botany Program 

Business and Management Program 

Chemical Engineering Program 

Chemical Physics Program 

Chemistry Program 

Civil Engineering Program 

Communication Arts and Theatre Program 

Comparative Literature Program 

Computer Science Program 

Counseling and Personnel Services Program 

Criminal Justice and Criminology Program 

Early Childhood-Elementary Education Program 

Economics Program 

Electrical Engineering Program 

Engineering Materials Program 

English Language and Literature Program 

Entomology Program 

Family and Community Development Program 

Food, Nutrition, and Institution Administration Program 

Food Science Program 

French Language and Literature Program 

Geography Program 

German Language and Literature Program 

Government and Politics Program 

Health Education Program 

Hearing and Speech Sciences Program 

History Program 

Concentration in the History and Philosophy of Science 

Course of Directed Study Leading to the MA m History and 

the M.L.S 

Horticulture Program 

Human Development Education Program (Institute for Child 

Study) 

Industrial Education Program 

Journalism Program 

Library and Information Services Program 

Marine-Estuanne-Environmental Science Program 

Mathematical Statistics Program 

Mathematics Program 

Measurement and Statistics Program 

Mechanical Engineering Program 

Meteorology Program 

Microbiology Program 

Music Program 

Nuclear Engineering Program 

Nutritional Sciences Program 

Philosophy Program 

Physical Education Program 

Physics Program 

Poultry Science Program 

Psychology 

Public Communication Program 

Recreation Program 

Secondary Education Program 

Social Foundations of Education Program 

Sociology Program 

Spanish Language and Literature Program 

Special Education Program 

Textiles and Consumer Economics Program 

Urban Studies Program 

Zoology Program 



42 
43 
45 
45 
47 
47 
49 
49 
51 
53 
55 
57 
56 
58 
60 
64 
66 
66 
68 
70 
74 
74 
76 
78 
79 
81 
83 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
92 
93 
94 
96 
98 
100 
101 
102 
105 

105 
106 

107 
108 
110 
111 
113 
113 
115 
118 
119 
121 
123 
124 
126 
127 
128 
129 
131 
134 
134 
137 
138 
139 
141 
142 
144 
145 
146 
148 
149 



ADDITIONAL GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Afro-American Studies Courses 152 

Agriculture Courses 152 

Anthropology Courses 152 

Applied Design Courses 153 

Biometrics Courses 153 

Chinese Courses 153 

Classics Courses 153 

Crafts Courses 153 

Dance Courses 1 53 

Engineering Cooperative Education Courses 154 

Engineering Science Courses 154 

Engineering Technology Fire Service Courses 154 

Fire Protection Engineering Courses 154 

Foreign Language Courses 154 

Geology Courses 154 



Greek courses «| other University of Maryland Campuses 157 

Hebrew Courses !|| 

Housing and Applied Design Courses ■« Inrlov 158 

Human and Community Resources Courses l« imuca 

Information Systems Management Courses ijjs 



Japanese Courses. 

Latin Courses 

Women's Studies Courses.. 



156 
156 
156 



University of Maryland. College Park 



Academic Calendar 



Fall Semester, 


1980 




August 25, 26 


Monday, Tuesday 


Registration 


August 27 


Wednesday 


Classes Begin 


September 1 


Monday 


Labor Day 


November 26, 27, 


Wednesday-Friday 


Thanksgiving 


28 




Recess 


December 12 


Friday 


Classes end 


December 13, 14 


Saturday, Sunday 


Exam Study Days 


December 15-22 


Monday-Monday 


Finals 


December 22 


Monday 


Commencement 


Spring Semester, 1981 




January 12, 13 


Monday, Tuesday 


Registration 


January 14 


Wednesday 


Classes Begin 


January 15 


Thursday 


Martin Luther King 
Day 


March 15-22 


Sunday-Sunday 


Spring Break 


May 6 


Wednesday 


Classes End 


May 7 


Thursday 


Exam Study Day 


May 8- 15 


Friday-Friday 


Finals 


May 15 


Friday 


Commencement 


Summer Session, 1981 (tentative schedule) 


Session 1 






May 18 


Monday 


Registration 


May 19 


Tuesday 


Classes Begin 


May 25 


Monday 


Memorial Day 


June 26 


Friday 


Classes End 


Session II 






June 29 


Monday 


Registration 


June 30 


Tuesday 


Classes Begin 


August 7 


Tuesday 


Classes End 


Fall Semester, 


1981 (tentative schedule) 


August 24, 25 


Monday, Tuesday 


Registration 


August 26 


Wednesday 


Classes Begin 


September 7 


Monday 


Labor Day 


November 25-27 


Wednesday-Friday 


Thanksgiving 
Recess 


December 1 1 


Friday 


Classes End 


December 12, 13 


Saturday-Sunday 


Exam Study Days 


December 14-21 


Monday-Monday 


Finals 


December 21 


Monday 


Commencement 



Plan of Academic Organization 

Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences: 

College of Agriculture: 

Agricultural and Extension Education 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Agricultural Engineering 

Agronomy 

Animal Science 

Dairy Science 

Horticulture 

Institute of Applied Agriculture 

Poultry Science 

Veterinary Science 

Other Units within the Division: 
Biochemistry 
Botany 
Chemistry 
Entomology 
Geology 



Microbiology 
Zoology 

Division of Arts and Humanities: 

School of Architecture 

College of Journalism 

Other Units within the Division: 
American Studies Program 
Art 

Classics 

Communication Arts and Theatre 
Dance 
English 

French and Italian 
Germanic and Slavic 
History 
Music 

Oriental and Hebrew 
Philosophy 
Spanish and Portuguese 

Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences: 

College of Business and Management 

Other Units within the Division: 
Afro-American Studies 
Anthropology 
Bureau of Business and Economic 

Research 
Bureau of Governmental Research 
Center for Industrial Relations and Labor Studies 
Center for Philosophy and Public Policy 
Economics 
Geography 

Government and Politics 
Hearing and Speech Sciences 
Institute for Urban Studies 
Institute of Criminal Justice and 

Criminology 
Maryland Technical Advisory Service 
Psychology 
Sociology 
Women's Studies 

Division of Human and Community Resources 

College of Education: 

Administration Supervision and Curriculum 

Counseling and Personnel Services 

Early Childhood-Elementary Education 

Industrial Education 

Institute for Child Study 

Measurement & Statistics 

Secondary Education 

Special Education 
College of Human Ecology: 

Family and Community Development 

Foods, Nutrition and Institution 
Administration 

Housing and Applied Design 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 

College of Library and Information Services 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health: 
Health Education 
Physical Education 
Recreation 

Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences and 
Engineering 

College of Engineering: 
Aerospace Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
Civil Engineering 



Electrical Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Other Units within the Division: 
Computer Science 
Institute for Physical Sciences and 

Technology 
Mathematical Statistics 
Mathematics 
Meteorology 
Physics and Astronomy 

University Officers 

Board of Regents 

Mrs. Mary H. Broadwater 

The Hon. Wayne A. Cawley, Jr., ex officio 

Mr. Percy M. Chaimson 

Mr. Ralph W. Frey 

Dr. Samuel H. Hoover 

The Hon. Blair Lee, III 

Mr. Peter F. O'Malley 

Mr. A. Paul Moss 

Mr. Allen L. Schwait 

Mrs. Constance C. Stuart 

The Hon. Joseph D. Tydings 

Mr. Wilbur G. Valentine 

Mrs. Jennifer A. Walker 

Mr. John W. T. Webb 

Mr. George W. Wilson, Jr. 

Central Administration of the University 

President 
John S. Toll 

Executive Vice President 
Albin O. Kuhn 

Vice President for General Administration 
Warren W. Brandt 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 
David Adamany 

Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research 
David S. Sparks 

Vice President for Agricultural Affairs and Legislative Relations 
Frank L. Bentz, Jr. 

Vice President for Development 
Robert Smith 

College Park Campus Administration 

Chancellor 

Robert L. Gluckstern 

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
Nancie L. Gonzalez 

Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs 
Darryl W. Bierly 

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 
William L. Thomas, Jr. 

Provosts at College Park 

Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences 
Larry N. Vanderhoef 

Division of Arts and Humanities 
Shirley S. Kenny 

Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences 
Murray Polakoff 

Division of Human and Community Resources 
George J. Funaro 

Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Engineering 
Frank Kerr 



Deans at College Park 

School of Architecture 
John W. Hill 

College of Agriculture 
Earl Brown 

College of Business Management 
Rudolph P. Lamone 

College of Education 
Vacant 

College of Engineering 
George E. Dieter, Jr. 

College of Human Ecology 
John R. Beaton 

College of Journalism 
Benjamin F. Holman (Acting) 

College of Library and Information Services 
Kieth C. Wright 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 
Marvin H. Eyler 

Administrative Dean for Graduate Studies and Research 
Rose-Marie G. Oster 

Administrative Dean for Summer Programs 
Melvin N. Bernstein 

Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies 
Robert E. Shoenberg 



Graduate School Officers and Staff 

Dean for Graduate Studies and Research 

Rose-Marie G. Oster, M.A., Stockholm University, 1956; Ph.D., Universi- 
ty of Kiel, West Germany, 1958. 

Associate Dean for Graduate Studies 

Marie S. Davidson (Acting Associate Dean), B.S., Dillard University, 
1959; M.S., University of Maryland, 1967; Ph.D., 1971. 

Associate Dean for Research 

Dalmas A. Taylor, B.A., Western Reserve University, 1959; M.S., 
Howard University, 1961; Ph.D., University of Delaware, 1965. 



Assistants to the Dean 

Alice M. Piper, B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1941. 

Joanna F. Schmeissner, B.A., Agnes Scott College, 1960; M.A., Yale 

University, 1962. 

Director of Graduate Admissions and Records 

Jud Samon, B.A., University of Nevada, 1960; M.A., University of 
Maryland, 1964; Ph.D., 1979. 

Assistant Director 

Lois M. Lyon, B.A., University of Michigan, 1952. 



Graduate Council, 1979-1980 

Ex-officio Councillors 

Chancellor Robert L. Gluckstern 

Vice Chancellor Nancie L. Gonzalez 

Acting Dean Robert E. Menzer 

Acting Associate Dean Marie S. Davidson 

Associate Dean for Research Dalmas A. Taylor 



Committees of the Graduate Council, 1979-1980 7 



Appointed Councillors 

Prof. Madeleine B. Therrien 

Prof. Frank M. Hetrick 

Prof. Dudley Dillard 

Prof. David Clarke 

Prof. William F. Hornyak 

Elected Councillors 

Mr. Robert Bray 
Prof. Gilbert Castellan 
Prof. Dean Tuthill 
Prof. Bernard A. Twigg 
Prof. Roger Meersman 
Prof. Herman Belz 
Ms. Sylvia Wagonheim 
Prof. Milne Holton 
Mr. Vincent Adams 
Prof. Don C. Piper 
Prof. David Horton 
Prof. David Segal 
Prof. Charlotte Leedy 
Prof. Robert W. Ridky 
Ms. Beverly Ann Hogg 
Prof. Robert Huebner 
Mr. David Kramer 
Prof. Patrick F. Cunniff 
Prof. Bruce Reinhart 
Prof. Robert Glasser 

Committees of the Graduate Council, 
1979-1980 

COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC STANDARDS 

Prof. Bruce Reinhart, Chairman, Mathematics, 1981 

Prof. Richard T. Farrell, History, 1982 

Prof. Martin Gannon, Business & Management, 1980 

Prof. Robert G. Glasser, Physics, 1982 

Prof. Robert A. Harper, Geography, 1982 

Prof. Sidney R. Pierce, Zoology, 1981 

Prof. Robert W. Ridky, Secondary Education, 1980 

Prof. Victor Viola, Chemistry, 1982 

Prof. Robert M. Wilson, Early Childhood/Elementary Education, 1980 

Mr. David Kramer, Graduate Student, Mathematics, 1980 

Ms. Edna Medford, Graduate Student, History, 1981 

Dean Marie S. Davidson, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Prof. Mark Keeney, Chairman, Chemistry, 1980 

Prof. Robert L. Bennett, Economics, 1981 

Prof. Edward Buchler, Zoology, 1981 

Prof. Randall Craig, Secondary Education, 1982 

Prof. J. Dan Knifong, Early Childhood/Elementary Education, 1980 

Prof. Richard McCuen, Civil Engineering, 1982 

Prof. Allan Nash, Business & Management, 1981 

Prof. Anne W. Nunamaker, Journalism, 1982 

Prof. Ronald O'Leary, Communication Arts & Theatre, 1981 

Prof. Peter Wolfe, Mathematics, 1980 

Mr. Vincent Adams, Graduate Student, 1981 

Mr. Michael Dolin, Graduate Student, 1980 

Dr. Jud Samon, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON ELECTIONS 

Prof. David Mills, Chairman, Psychology, 1982 

Prof. Otto Best, Germanic & Slavic Languages, 1980 

Prof. John Eliot, Human Development, 1980 

Prof. Kenneth Felton, Agricultural Engineering, 1982 

Prof. Robert Rivello, Aerospace Engineering, 1981 

Mrs. Alice M. Piper, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON FELLOWSHIPS 

Prof. Robert F. Carbone, Chairman, Administration, Supervision & 

Curriculum, 1980 

Prof. Genette Ashby, French & Italian, 1982 



Prof. Roger A. Bell, Astronomy, 1980 

Prof. Richard Davis, Dairy Science, 1982 

Prof. Parris N. Glendening, Government & Politics, 1980 

Prof. E. Joan Hunt, Human Development, 1981 

Prof. Everett Jones, Aerospace Engineering, 1982 

Prof. Robert Munn, Chemistry, 1982 

Prof. Craig Schneier, Business & Management, 1981 

Prof. Raymond Thorberg, English, 1981 

Mr. Walter J. Hayden, Graduate Student, Botany, 1980 

Mr. Jerry Larson, Graduate Student, Criminology, 1981 

Mrs. Joanna F. Schmeissner, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE FACULTY 

Prof. Madeleine Therrien, French & Italian, 1980 

Prof. Nancy Anderson, Psychology, 1982 

Prof. Dewey Caron, Entomology, 1982 

Prof. Saul Gass, Business & Management, 1982 

Prof. Milne Holton, English, 1982 

Prof. William Hornyak, Physics & Astronomy, 1981 

Prof. Kenneth Kammeyer, Sociology, 1982 

Prof. Billy V. Lessley, Agricultural & Resource Economics. 1980 

Prof. Glenn W. Patterson, Botany, 1980 

Prof. Walter Rundell, History, 1981 

Prof. V. Phillips Weaver, Elementary Education, 1982 

Dean Robert E. Menzer, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS AND COURSES 

Prof. Bernard A. Twigg, Chairman, Horticulture, 1980 

Prof. Stephen Carroll, Jr., Business & Management, 1980 

Prof. Gilbert Castellan, Chemistry, 1982 

Prof. Kenneth N. Derucher, Civil Engineering, 1981 

Prof. Dudley Dillard, Economics, 1981 

Prof. Phillips Foster, Agricultural & Resource Economics, 1981 

Prof. Roger Meersman, Communication Arts & Theatre, 1981 

Prof. Mary R. Miller, English, 1982 

Prof. Tonu Parming, Sociology, 1981 

Prof. Betty F. Smith, Textiles & Consumer Economics, 1982 

Prof. Cyril P. Svoboda, Human Development, 1980 

Prof. Mostafa E. Talaat, Mechanical Engineering, 1982 

Ms. Sylvia Wagonheim, Graduate Student, English, 1980 

Ms. Loretta Wertheimer, Graduate Student, Counseling & Personnel 

Services, 1980 

Dean Robert E. Menzer, ex officio 

Dr. Richard Jaquith, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAM REVIEW 

Prof. Don C. Piper, Chairman, Government & Politics, 1981 

Prof. Herman J. Belz, History, 1980 

Prof. Everett C. Carter, Civil Engineering, 1980 

Prof. Albert Gomezplata, Chemical Engineering, 1980 

Prof. Robert Huebner, Human Development, 1981 

Prof. David Horton, Psychology, 1982 

Prof. Charlotte Leedy, Recreation, 1982 

Prof. John Lembach, Art, 1981 

Prof. Joseph Mattick, Dairy Science, 1982 

Prof. Gerald R. Miller, Chemistry, 1980 

Mr. Johnny Fairfax, Graduate Student, Recreation, 1981 

Mr. Ronald Reis, Graduate Student, Secondary Education. 1980 

Mr. Richard R. Zuccarelli, Graduate Student, Psychology, 1980 

Dean Marie S. Davidson, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS 

Prof. Hans Wellisch, Chairman, Library & Information Services, 1980 

Prof. James E. Alleman, Civil Engineering, 1982 

Prof. Norman Heim, Music, 1982 

Prof. Barry D. Smith, Psychology, 1981 

Mr. Robert Bray, Graduate Student, Animal Sciences, 1981 

Ms. Ellen Sirkis. Graduate Student, Communication Arts & Theatre, 

1981 

Mrs. Joanna F. Schmeissner, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON RESEARCH 

Prof. J. Robert Anderson, Chairman, Physics, 1981 
Prof. Marvin K. Aycock, Agronomy, 1981 



8 



Prof. Ferdinand Baer, Meteorology, 1982 

Prof. Howard J. Brinkley, Zoology, 1982 

Prof. Harold Brodsky, Geography, 1981 

Prof. David Clarke, Physical Education, 1981 

Prof. Jean R. Harber, Special Education, 1982 

Prof. Frank M. Hetrick, Microbiology, 1981 

Prof. Stuart B. Kaufman, History, 1982 

Prof. George B. Macready, Measurement & Statistics, 1980 

Prof. Graciela P. Nemes, Spanish & Portuguese, 1982 

Prof. Merrill J. Roberts, Business & Management, 1980 

Prof. David R. Schelling, Civil Engineering, 1982 

Prof. William B. Walters, Chemistry, 1981 

Mr. Charles Costa, Graduate Student, Zoology, 1981 

Ms. J. Paoletti, Graduate Student, Textiles & Consumer Economics, 

1980 

Dean Robert E. Menzer, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE 

Prof. Jesse Roderick, Chairman, Early Childhood/Elem. Education, 

1981 

Prof. R. A. Brown, Psychology, 1982 

Prof. Harvey Clearwater, Health Education, 1981 

Prof. Walter W. Deshler, Geography, 1980 

Prof. J. Kirkpatrick Flack, History, 1981 

Prof. William V. Patterson, Communication Arts & Theatre, 1981 

Prof. Thomas Regan, Chemical Engineering, 1982 

Prof. William K. Rose, Astronomy, 1981 

Prof. Dean Tuthill, Agricultural & Resource Economics, 1980 

Prof. Franklin D. Westbrook, Counseling & Personnel Services, 1980 

Prof. E. P. Young, Animal Science, 1982 

Ms. Janet Headley, Graduate Student, Art History, 1981 

Ms. Anne Suzuki, Graduate Student, Business & Management, 1980 

Dean Marie S. Davidson, ex officio 



University Policy Statement 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an 
irrevocable contract between the student and the University of Mary- 
land. Changes are effected from time to time in the general regulations 
and in the academic requirements. There are established procedures 
for making changes, procedures which protect the institution's integrity 
and the individual student's interest and welfare. A curriculum or 
graduation requirement, when altered, is not made retroactive unless 
the alteration is to the student's advantage and can be accommodated 
within the span of years normally required for graduation. When the 
actions of a student are judged by competent authority, using estab- 
lished procedure, to be detrimental to the interests of the university 
community, that person may be required to withdraw from the university. 
It is university policy that smoking in classrooms is prohibited 
unless all participants agree to the contrary. Any student has the right to 
remind the instructor of this policy throughout the duration of the class. 

Policies on Nondiscrimination 

The University of Maryland is an equal opportunity institution with 
respect to both education and employment. The University's policies, 
programs, and activities are in conformance with pertinent federal and 
state laws and regulations on non-discrimination regarding race, color, 
religion, age, national origin, sex and handicap. Inquiries regarding 
compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, 
Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments, Section 504 of the 
Rehabilition Act of 1973, or related legal requirements should be 
directed to the appropriate individual designated below. 

Director, Human Relations Program 

Main Administration Building 

UMCP 

Gender Reference 

The masculine gender whenever used in this document is intended to 
include the feminine gender as well. 



General Information 



History 



The history of the Graduate School at the University of Maryland, 
College Park has been one of rapid, at times almost explosive, growth. 
Established in 1919 with an enrollment of 13, the Graduate School has 
developed into one of the nation's largest. In the fall of 1979, there were 
approximately 7,500 graduate students enrolled in the more than 65 
graduate programs and departments. In the academic year 1978-1979, 
367 doctoral degrees and 1,255 master's degrees were awarded. 

The Graduate School has matched its tremendous growth in size 
by an even more significant growth in its role as a center for the 
advancement of knowledge. The Graduate School has increasingly 
sought scholars of the highest quality, and today it numbers among its 
faculty men and women who have achieved national recognition and 
eminence in their fields. Active in scholarship in every area, students 
and faculty members of the Graduate School have designed equipment 
for the lunar space flights, excavated the gardens in Pompeii, performed 
important research in the unique ecological systems of the Chesapeake 
Bay, and won national awards for their creative work in fiction, poetry, 
and the arts. 

The history of the Graduate School has been a history of growth in 
service as well as scholarship. Graduate programs at the University 
have always reflected the mission of the School as a servant to the 
State of Maryland. That mission is continued today more vigorously than 
ever in the numerous programs, centers, and special research projects 
through which graduate faculty and students address directly the needs 
of the residents of Maryland. 

In the last two decades, the national impact of the Graduate School 
has become of major importance as well, with the ever increasing 
involvement of talented faculty and graduate students in the work of the 
many federal agencies, institutions, libraries, and programs in the 
nation's Capital. 

Finally, the University of Maryland Graduate School is especially 
aware today of its mission to the wider community of man. The 
Graduate School not only has a large number of students and faculty 
from other countries, but it also is well represented in international 
conferences and symposia by faculty members who participate on a 
regular basis. In several divisions, there are specific projects and 
programs undertaken jointly with foreign universities, and the results of 
faculty research are published in international journals. 

The Graduate School today is active and vital, conscious of its past 
growth and achievements and eager to develop more fully its potential 
as a leading educational and research institution. Its goal is to sustain 
and strengthen in every area the intellectual quality and commitment to 
service and significant scholarship that characterize the foremost 
graduate institutions. 



National Organizations 

In order to shape and participate in national policies and developments 
in graduate education, the Graduate School maintains close contact 
with other graduate schools and is a member of the following national 
organizations: the Association of American Universities, the Association 
of Graduate Schools, and the Council of Graduate Schools in the United 
States. 



Major Role 



The University of Maryland is keenly aware of the challenges facing 
graduate education today. The Graduate School has sought innovative 



and productive ways to adjust to the problems created by restricting 
financial realities and fluctuating opportunities for professionals in every 
field. In addition, the Graduate School has channelled many of its 
resources into a variety of academic services that meet the increasing 
demands of our society on universities. 

In all of its activities, however, the Graduate School is guided by the 
belief that it can best serve society and respond to current challenges 
by a consistent and firm commitment to its traditional principles. 
Accordingly, the major role of the Graduate School is to provide for the 
education of students in the scholarly methods of intellectual inquiry 
and critical analysis; to train them in the discipline and skills necessary 
for beneficial research; and to foster in them a dedication to creative 
thought and the search for knowledge. 

Not simply an extension of the colleges, schools, or divisions, the 
Graduate School is specifically designed to prepare those who will 
dedicate themselves to individual inquiry and service. To achieve this 
goal, it promotes the freedom and intellectual environment necessary to 
stimulate research and scholarship of the highest quality for both 
students and faculty. 



Governance 

The Graduate Faculty 

In 1956 the Graduate Faculty adopted a formal constitution to "provide 
a means for the Graduate Faculty to discharge its functions with respect 
to educational policies and procedures of the Graduate School on this 
campus." That Constitution, as amended in 1968 and 1974, continues 
to govern the policies and procedures of the Graduate School on the 
College Park Campus. 

The Graduate Faculty, working through the Assembly and the 
Graduate Council, establishes policies governing admission to graduate 
study and minimum requirements to be met by all students seeking 
advanced degrees in more than sixty-five graduate departments and 
programs leading to degrees awarded by the Graduate Faculty on the 
College Park Campus. The faculties of the individual academic depart- 
ments and interdisciplinary graduate programs may establish additional 
requirements for admission or for degrees above the minima estab- 
lished by the Graduate Council. 

The Assembly of the Graduate Faculty consists of all full and 
associate members of the Graduate Faculty who, through their par- 
ticipation in research and graduate instruction, have displayed a capaci- 
ty for individual research or creative and scholarly work at the highest 
levels. 

The Graduate Council consists of members of the Graduate 
Faculty elected by the Assembly, as well as appointed and ex officio 
members. It is charged with the formulation of the policies and proce- 
dures for the Graduate School of College Park including admission 
standards, the review of individual student programs, the review of all 
new programs and courses submitted by members of the Graduate 
Faculty, graduate student theses and dissertations, and the periodic 
review of all graduate degree programs. It meets approximately eight 
times a year to conduct its regular business and may be called into 
special session as the need arises. 

In its work the Graduate Council is aided and advised by ten 
standing committees. Included are committees on: Academic Stan- 
dards, Admissions, Elections, Fellowships. Program Review, Graduate 
Faculty, Programs and Courses, Publications, Research, and Student 
Life. Membership on these committees is limited to members of the 
Graduate Faculty and graduate students. Members are appointed by 
the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research for terms of three years. 

Graduate Students 

The value of student opinion and participation in determining matters of 
policy, procedure, and administration is appreciated and encouraged. In 



10 Location 



addition to their appointment to the Committees of the Graduate 
Council, graduate students serve on many divisional and departmental 
committees. 

Established in 1970, the Chancellor's Graduate Student Advisory 
Council (CGSAC) meets periodically with the Chancellor of the College 
Park campus and regularly on its own to discuss a wide range of issues 
affecting the graduate community (e.g. the role and mission of higher 
education; stipends for fellows, assistants, and researchers; parttime 
graduate student problems; redress of grievances; social activities; 
etc.). The Council also meets with administrative leaders from all fields 
and divisions as pertinent to problem solving and alternatives. In 
addition, the Council serves as a source of information to State 
Legislators and members of the Board of Regents. Membership is open 
to all interested students. For additional information, contact the Office 
of the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. 



Location 

In location, faculty and students at the University of Maryland enjoy the 
best of all possible worlds. Situated on 1 ,300 acres in Prince Georges 
County, the College Park Campus is a part of the larger metropolitan 
area of Washington, D.C., which is rapidly becoming the nation's capital 
in cultural and intellectual activity as well as political power. The 
Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Filene Center, and the 
many fine area theaters regularly present performances by the world's 
most exciting and renowned artists. The Smithsonian Museums and the 
National Gallery of Art, among others, sponsor standing collections and 
special exhibits that attract national attention. In addition to cultural 
activities, the nation's Capital provides interested students the opportu- 
nity to observe at first hand the work of federal institutions; to sit in the 
galleries of Congress; to watch the Supreme Court in session; and to 
attend public Congressional hearings. The possibilities for personal 
enrichment offered in this exciting cosmopolitan area are indeed 
enormous. 

Outside the metropolitan area, and just minutes from the campus, 
the scene in the Maryland countryside is pleasantly rural. Maryland 
offers a great variety of recreational and leisure activities in its many fine 
national and state parks, from the Catoctin Mountains in Western 
Maryland to the Assateague Island National Seashore on the Atlantic 
bound Eastern Shore, all within a pleasant drive from the campus. 
Historic Annapolis, the state capital, is only a short drive away, and the 
city of Baltimore, with its rich variety of ethnic heritages, its cultural and 
educational institutions, and its impressive urban transformation, is only 
thirty miles from College Park. 



Special Research Resources 

The College Park Campus is in the midst of one of the greatest 
concentrations of research facilities and intellectual talent in the nation, 
if not in the world. Libraries and laboratories serving virtually every 
academic discipline are within easy commuting distance. There is a 
steady and growing interchange of ideas, information, technical skills, 
and scholars between the university and these centers. The libraries 
and facilities of many of these centers are open to qualified graduate 
students at the university. The resources of many more are available by 
special arrangement. 

In the humanities, the Library of Congress and the Folger Shake- 
speare Library, with its extensive collection of rare manuscripts, are 
among the world's most outstanding research libraries. In addition, 
Dumbarton Oaks; the National Archives; the Smithsonian Institution; the 
World Bank; the National Library of Medicine; the National Agricultural 
Library; the Enoch Pratt Free Library of Baltimore; the libraries of the 
Federal Departments of Labor; Commerce; Interior; Health, Education, 
and Welfare; Housing and Urban Development; and Transportation, and 
approximately 500 other specialized libraries are all within a few minutes 
drive of the College Park Campus. These resources make the University 
of Maryland one of the most attractive in the nation for scholars of all 
disciplines. 

The proximity of the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center of the 
United States Department of Agriculture has stimulated the develop- 
ment of both laboratories and opportunities for field research in the 
agricultural and life-sciences. The National Institutes of Health offer 
unparalleled opportunities for collaboration in biomedical and behavior 
research. Opportunities are also available for collaborative graduate 
study programs with other major government laboratories, such as the 
National Bureau of Standards and the Naval Research Laboratory. 



The long-standing involvement o. the State of Maryland in the 
development of the commercial and recreational resources of the 
Chesapeake Bay has resulted in the establishment of outstanding 
research facilities for the study of marine science at the University of 
Maryland Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies, with re- 
search facilities at Horn Point near Cambridge, at Crisfield, and at 
Solomons Island, Maryland. 

Campus facilities are also excellent for research in every discipline. 
Work in the behavioral sciences, particularly in learning, is centered in 
laboratories equipped for fully automated research on rats, pigeons, 
and monkeys. 

Exceptional research facilities in the physical sciences include a 
160 MeV cyclotron; two small Van de Graaff accelerators; an assort- 
ment of computers, including a PDP 11/45, a UNI VAC 1108 and a 
UNIVAC 1100/41; a 10 KW training nuclear reactor; a full scale low 
velocity wind tunnel; several small hypersonic helium wind tunnels; 
specialized facilities in the Institute for Physical Science and Technolo- 
gy; a psychopharmacology laboratory; shock tubes; a quiescent plasma 
device (Q machine) for plasma research; and rotating tanks for labora- 
tory studies of meteorological phenomena. 

Students also have access to research farms, greenhouses, and 
even laboratory-equipped vessels for research in the Chesapeake Bay. 
The University also owns and operates one of the world's largest and 
most sophisticated long-wavelength radio telescopes located in Clark 
Lake, California and a cosmic ray laboratory located in New Mexico. 



Special Opportunities for Artists 

Advanced work in the creative and performing arts at College Park is 
concentrated in the Tawes Fine Arts Building and the recently complet- 
ed Art-Sociology Building. Creative work is greatly stimulated by the 
close interaction that has developed between the students and faculty 
of the University and the artists and scholars at the National Gallery, the 
Corcoran Gallery, the Hirshhorn Museum, the Phillips Gallery, the 
Museum of Modern Art, the Smithsonian Institution, as well as the 
musicians of the National Symphony Orchestra and small musical 
groups. The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and the Filene 
Center (Wolf Trap Farm Park) have further enhanced the climate for 
creative artists attending the University. 

Outstanding work on campus in theater, dance, radio, and televi- 
sion is aided by the proximity of the campus to the National Theater, the 
Arena Stage, the Morris Mechanic Theater, and numerous little theater 
groups in the Washington and Baltimore area. There is a frequent and 
steady interchange of ideas and talent between students and faculty at 
the University and both educational and commercial radio and television 
media as a consequence of the large professional staffs which are 
maintained in the Washington area. 



Libraries 

The University library system includes major research libraries on both 
the College Park and Baltimore Campuses. 

The Libraries on the College Park Campus contain nearly 
2,000,000 volumes, and they subscribe to more than 15,000 periodicals 
and newspapers. Additional collections of research materials are avail- 
able on microfilm, microfiche, phonorecords, tapes, and films. 

The Theodore R. McKeldin Library is the largest library on campus 
and the principal library for graduate use. Special collections include 
those of Richard Von Mises in mathematics and applied mechanics; 
Max Born in the physicai sciences; Thomas I. Cook in political science; 
Romeo Mansueti in the biological sciences; Katherine Anne Porter; 
Maryland; U.S. government publications (for which the University is a 
regional depository); documents of the United Nations, the League of 
Nations and other international organizations, agricultural experiment 
station and extension service publications; maps from the U.S. Army 
Map Service; the files of the Industrial Union of Marine and Shipbuilding 
Workers of America; the Wallenstein collection of musical scores; and 
research collections of the American Bandmasters Association, the 
National Association of Wind and Percussion Instructors, and the Music 
Educators National Conference. In addition, the collections include 
microfilm productions of government documents, rare books, early 
journals, and newspapers. 

Within the East Asia Collection is the world's largest repository of 
published and unpublished Japanese-language materials from the 
Allied Occupation period. 

Graduate students at UMCP are not served by McKeldin alone. 
Several departments and colleges maintain specialized libraries for 



Institutes, Centers, and Bureaus 11 



student use, with collections of importance to advanced students. 
These include the Library of the College of Library and Information 
Services, which contains materials for library science and a Juvenile 
Teaching Materials Collection, and the Engineering and Physical Sci- 
ences Library, which houses the Technical Report Center with over 
400,000 items from NASA, USDE, and other U.S. and foreign govern- 
mental agencies. 

Our libraries have several exciting recent acquisitions which will be 
of special interest to graduate students. One new collection, to be 
known as the International Piano Archives at Maryland, contains more 
than 1 7,000 tapes, records and piano rolls, several thousand pieces of 
sheet music and scores, and important documents, letters and other 
materials relating to pianists Joseph Hofmann, Anton Rubinstein and 
others. 

The University has also recently acquired an exceptional collection 
in astronomy: the entire library of the Georgetown University Observato- 
ry, which contains numerous catalogs, journals, and observatory bul- 
letins dating back to the 1800's. Much of this material has never been 
published commercially, and when cataloguing is completed, Maryland 
will have one of the most interesting and extensive astronomy collec- 
tions in the country. 



Institutes, Centers, and Bureaus 

Acknowledging the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to 
knowledge, the University maintains organized research units outside 
the usual department structures. These institutes, centers, and bureaus 
offer valuable opportunities for faculty and students to engage in 
research and study in specialized areas and in public service activities. 

Institute for Child Study: Director: H. Gerthon Morgan. In its program 
the institute collects, interprets, and synthesizes the scientific findings in 
various fields that are concerned with human growth, development, 
learning and behavior. The Institute offers graduate programs leading to 
the Master of Education, Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy and 
Doctor of Education degrees, and the Advanced Graduate Specialist 
Certificate in the area of human development. 

Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology: Acting Director: Bar- 
ton L. Ingraham. The Institute coordinates the University's interests and 
activities in the areas of law enforcement, criminology, and corrections. 
The Institute has a very extensive and carefully integrated undergradu- 
ate program. Special emphasis, however, is placed on graduate pro- 
grams and on research. Recently, the University, through the Institute, 
was part of a seven-university National Criminal Justice Educational 
Development Consortium funded by the Law Enforcement Assistance 
Administration. The Consortium was established for a period of three 
years for the purpose of developing and strengthening doctoral pro- 
grams in the field of criminal justice. The expansion of the Institute's 
graduate program under the impact of this grant has had a lasting effect 
on the scope and depth of graduate studies available to its students. 
Other major research grants, such as the International Seminars 
and Training Programs in Criminal Justice awarded by the Law Enforce- 
ment Assistance Administration, and the Minority Prison Community 
Project funded by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, as 
well as a number of smaller grants and contracts, add to the research 
and educational strength of the Institute. In combination, the research 
capabilities and the academic programs of the Institute make possible 
the achievement of its primary goal — the education of social and 
behavioral scientists who have chosen the problem of crime and its 
prevention and controls as their specialization. The Institute offers the 
M.A. degree with options in criminology or criminal justice and the Ph.D. 
degree in criminal justice and criminology. 

Institute for Physical Science and Technology: Director: Joseph 
Silverman. The Institute for Physical Science and Technology is a 
center for interdisciplinary research in pure and applied science prob- 
lems that lie between those areas served by the academic departments. 
These interdisciplinary problems afford challenging opportunities for 
thesis research and classroom instruction. Current topics of interest 
are: atomic physics, a wide variety of problems in plasma physics, 
statistical mechanics of physical and living systems, physics of the 
upper atmosphere and magnetosphere, fluid dynamics, physical ocea- 
nography, various aspects of space and planetary science, theoretical 
and applied numerical analysis, control theory, epidemiology and 
biomathematics, chemical processes induced by ionizing radiation, and 
the history of science. They also include analysis of a number of current 
problems of interest to society such as mathematical models applied to 
public health and many diverse efforts in basic mathematics. 

Courses and thesis research guidance by the faculty of the Institute 
are provided through the graduate programs in the academic depart- 



ments of the Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences and 
Engineering. The Institute sponsors a wide variety of seminars. Of 
principal interest are general seminars in plasma physics, applied 
mathematics, fluid dynamics, and in atomic and molecular physics. 
Information about these can be obtained by writing the Director or by 
calling (301) 454-2636. 

Institute for Urban Studies: Acting Director: Charles H. Levme The 
Institute aims at developing students knowledgeable both in the techni- 
cal competencies which constitute the skills of "urban manpower" and 
in the professional understanding of the urban community as an object 
of interdisciplinary analysis. 

The Institute for Urban Studies is a multi-campus interdisciplinary 
B A and M.A degree granting program. It was created to offer a 
teaching program to educate urban administrators and specialists to 
plan, manage and develop existing communities as well as to plan the 
development of new ones. The Washington-Baltimore urban corridor 
provides an excellent teaching and research setting for faculty and 
students. Since contemporary urban problems must be solved by a 
multi-disciplinary approach, the master's program supplements the 
Institute's core courses with the specialized problem solving methods of 
the diverse departments and professional schools of the University. 

Center on Aging: Acting Director: Dan Fritz. Through research and 
teaching, the Center on Aging focuses its efforts on stimulating interest 
in aging within existing departments, colleges, and schools throughout 
the University. In addition, it has developed and maintains contact with 
students in the general field of gerontology and helps them to devise 
educational programs to meet their goals. The Center sponsors an 
ongoing colloquium series on aging and community training programs 
based primarily on psychosocial needs of the elderly. The Center and 
the College of Library and Information Services also maintain the 
Robert N. Butler Library, which contains an extensive collection of 
materials on aging and developmental psychology. In conjunction with 
participating departments and schools, the Center offers a certificate of 
concentration at the master's and doctoral degree levels, which require, 
in addition to formal coursework, a practicum experience in aging. 

Arithmetic Center: Director: Robert Ashlock The Arithmetic Center 
facilitates a graduate program in elementary school mathematics edu- 
cation — a program with an integrated focus relating mathematics, 
psychology, and learning. The faculty of the Center believe that crucial 
to the kind of research effort envisioned is a milieu conducive to such an 
effort — a physical-psychological locale in which students, faculty, par- 
ticipating children, parents, and appropriate visitors can become in- 
volved in the formal and informal interactions so essential to integrative 
research. 

Center for Educational Research and Development: Co-directors: 
Gilbert R. Austin (UMBC), James Dudley (UMCP). The Center is 
committed to providing service to the State in the form of policy studies 
and analysis and to special educational training providing and sponsor- 
ing programs and workshops for legislators, board members, executive 
and legislative staff and agency personnel. The entire range of Universi- 
ty programs and personnel are committed to these two tasks in an effort 
to provide an interdisciplinary approach to the Center's research and 
development activities. The Center acts as a facilitator and liaison 
between the external public agencies and bodies and the internal 
University resources. In so doing, it provides research and project 
opportunities for faculty and graduate students in education, the social 
sciences, business and a variety of other fields, to engage in issues of 
educational policy. 

Computer Science Center: Director: John P. Menard. The Computer 
Science Center provides the academic community of the University with 
ready access to large-scale computer facilities. The Center's primary 
function is the effective operation, maintenance, and management of 
these facilities so as to provide, as nearly as possible, uninterrupted 
computer services to the University community. The Center also carries 
on an active program of basic and applied research in computer 
science. 

Graduate students and faculty with programming problems can 
bring them to a group of programmer consultants who work on an 
individualized basis to assist in applying appropriate computer tech- 
niques. The Center also has a staff of systems analysts to assist in 
debugging programs, to adapt software developed elsewhere to use the 
Center's equipment, and to devise original software to meet user needs. 
There is a well-stocked program library, keypunch and digitek services 
are available, and the Center offers several non-credit short courses for 
new users or those with specialized needs. 

The Center's basic hardware consists of a UNIVAC 1108 Shared 
Processor System and a UNIVAC 1100/42 system, along with other 
associated hardware. Two terminal rooms and two keypunch areas with 



12 Institutes, Centers, and Bureaus 



reproducer, interpreter and lister are maintained in the Computer 
Science Center. Terminals owned or leased by other departments can 
also access the Center's large-scale equipment 

Center of Industrial Relations and Labor Studies: Acting Director: 
Paul A. Weinstein. The Program of Industrial Relations and Labor 
Studies was recently organized at UMCP and is concerned with two 
kinds of activity. The first is interdisciplinary research directed primarily 
toward the study of labor-management relations, wages and related 
problems, the labor market, comparative studies and manpower prob- 
lems. The Program draws on the expertise and interests of faculty from 
the College of Business and Management, the School of Law and the 
Department of Economics, History, Psychology and Sociology. The 
second main activity consists of community and labor relations educa- 
tion projects serving management, unions, the public and other groups 
interested in industrial relations and labor-related activities. These 
projects consist of public lectures, conferences, and symposia as well 
as non-credit courses. Discussions concerning the development of a 
Master's degree in Industrial Relations and Labor Studies are currently 
underway. 

Center for Language and Cognition: Director: David L. Horton The 
purpose of the Center for Language and Cognition is to provide a 
central focus for instruction and research training on all aspects of 
language and cognition represented by the training staff. The Center's 
specific goals are to (1 ) encourage and support research and (2) to train 
students capable of making substantial contributions to the understand- 
ing of man's cognitive systems and of relating this understanding to 
behavior in natural settings. The training program is supported, in part, 
by a training grant from the National Institute of Mental Health. 

Center for Philosophy and Public Policy: Director: Peter G. Brown. 
The Center for Philosophy and Public Policy conducts an interdisciplin- 
ary program which engages in research and curriculum development 
with the purpose of investigating conceptual and ethical aspects of 
public policy formulation and debate. Most research efforts— chosen 
from topics expected to be a focus of public policy debate during the 
next decade — are coordinated by Center research staff and conducted 
cooperatively by working groups composed of philosophers, policy- 
makers, analysts, practitioners, and Center staff. In its research efforts 
the Center seeks to create an improved understanding of the normative 
principles which are basic to an assessment of public policies. Re- 
search products are made available through commercial publication, 
distribution of course models, workshops and the distribution of working 
papers. 

The Center's curriculum development seeks to bring philosophical 
issues before future policy-makers and citizens. To this end courses 
dealing with contemporary normative issues in the national and interna- 
tional arena are offered through the Departments of Philosophy and of 
Government and Politics and other departments whose disciplines are 
relevant to the specific course being taught. Courses which have been 
offered include: Hunger and Affluence, Human Rights and Foreign 
Policy, Philosophical Issues in Public Policy, Ethics and Welfare, Profes- 
sional Responsibility, and Business Ethics and Social Responsibility. 
The Center is sponsored jointly by the Divisions of Arts and Humanities 
and of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 

The Maryland Center for Productivity and Quality of Working Life: 

Director: Tom Tuttle. The Maryland Center for Productivity and Quality 
of Working Life operates within the College of Business and Manage- 
ment. The Center has four major functions: 1) to foster increased 
productivity and quality of working life through work with various public 
and private sector organizations in Maryland; 2) to act as a clearing 
house for information about productivity and quality of working life; 3) to 
increase knowledge levels about productivity and quality of working life 
in Maryland through the regular curriculum of the University, as well as 
through training programs sponsored by the Center; and 4) to conduct 
research which adds to the body of knowledge about productivity and 
the quality of working life. 

Science Teaching Center: Director: Emmett L. Wright. The Science 
Teaching Center has been designed to serve as a model facility to fulfill 
its functions of undergraduate and graduate science teacher education, 
science supervisor preparation, basic research in science education, 
inservice aid to teachers and supervisors, and consultative services at 
all levels, kindergarten through university. Its reference library features 
relevant periodicals, science and mathematics textbooks, and new 
curriculum materials. Its faculty members are actively involved with 
professional societies and science education activities locally, na- 
tionally, and internationally. 

Since 1962 the Science Teaching Center has served as the 
headquarters for the activities of the Science Teaching Materials 
Review Committee of the National Science Teachers Association. The 



Information Clearinghouse on Science and Mathematics Curricular 
Developments, the International Clearinghouse for A.A.A.S., N.S.F. and 
UNESCO, started here that year also. The "software" and "hardware" 
of science education are gathered within the center in what is consid- 
ered to be one of the world's most comprehensive collections of such 
materials. 

Transportation Studies Center: Director: Everett C. Carter. Spon- 
sored by the College of Engineering and the College of Business and 
Management the Center acts as a catalyst to foster research and 
development and interdisciplinary studies in transportation and to 
provide the means for investigators from different disciplines to work 
together on a wide range of transportation related problems. Objectives 
of the Center are to identify potential research projects by establishing a 
dialogue and rapport with sponsoring agencies and offices; to provide 
coordination between the various disciplines engaged in or having 
potential to engage in transportation research and between potential 
research sponsors and University researchers; to facilitate cooperation 
between the University of Maryland and other universities and industry, 
for joint undertakings; to promote and, where appropriate, to supervise 
specific educational programs of an interdisciplinary nature. 

Among the areas identified as having interest and research poten- 
tial are transportation systems management, transportation planning, 
public policy, public utilities, systems economics, multiple uses of rights- 
of-way, mass transit systems, conservation of energy, terminal siting, 
bridge and pavement design, traffic flow coordination, traffic safety and 
efficiency, transportation economics, aerospace transportation, meteor- 
ological factors, noise control, highway landscaping, environmental 
considerations, and air, rail, water and highway alternatives. 

Water Resources Research Center: Acting Coordinator: Fred 
Wheaton The Water Resources Research Center sponsors and coor- 
dinates research on all aspects of water supply, demand, distribution, 
utilization, quality enhancement or degradation, and allocation or man- 
agement. A committee of water resource research information users, 
including representatives from management, planning and regulatory 
federal, state and local governments and citizens groups, has been 
formed to advise on research needs of Maryland. Basic funding is from 
the annual allotment of the Water Resources Research Act of 1964 as 
amended. The Center also assists faculty members in developing 
matching fund proposals and in seeking other research funds. Cur- 
rently, there are nine research projects in progress in six different 
departments, including a project at UMBC and one at the Johns 
Hopkins University. 

Bureau of Business and Economic Research: Director: Dr. John H. 
Cumberland. The Bureau of Business and Economic Research con- 
ducts research in the areas of regional, urban and environmental 
economics. Projects are funded by the University, and by State and 
Federal Government agencies. Research is conducted by Bureau 
faculty members, who hold joint appointments with the Department of 
Economics, and by advanced graduate students working on degree 
programs. 

Bureau of Educational Research and Field Services: Director: 
Gerald V. Teague. The Bureau of Educational Research and Field 
Services was established to serve in a consultative capacity in imple- 
menting research designs of faculty members, graduate students and 
public school systems. It acts as a coordinating agency between the 
University and public school systems for both research and field 
services. The Bureau also serves as a source of information and 
assistance regarding federal and non-federal research support that is 
available. 

Bureau of Governmental Research: Acting Director: Charles Levine. 
Activities of the Bureau of Governmental Research relate primarily to 
the problems of state and local government in Maryland. The Bureau 
engages in research and publishes findings with reference to local, 
state and national governments and their interrelationships. It un- 
dertakes surveys, sponsored programs and grants, and offers its 
assistance and service to units of government in Maryland. The bureau 
furnishes opportunities for qualified students interested in research and 
career development in state and local administration. The Bureau also 
acts as coordinator for the Annual School for Maryland Assessing 
Officers. 

Maryland Technical Advisory Service: Acting Director: Patricia S. 
Florestano. The Maryland Technical Advisory Service provides consult- 
ing services to county and municipal governments of the state. Techni- 
cal consultation and assistance are provided on specific problems in 
such areas as preparation of charters and codes of ordinances, fiscal 
management, personnel zoning, and related local or intergovernmental 
activities. The staff analyzes and shares with governmental officials 



Fees and Expenses 13 



information concerning professional developments and opportunities 
for new or improved programs and facilities. 



Consortia 

The University of Maryland is a member of a number of national and 
local consortia concerned with advanced education and research. They 
offer a variety of opportunities for senior scholar and graduate student 

OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. (ORAU), is a non- 
profit educational and research corporation formed in order to broaden 
the opportunities for member institutions collectively to participate in 
many fields of education and research in the natural sciences related to 
nuclear energy. Educational programs range from short term courses or 
institutes, conducted with ORAU facilities and staff, to fellowship 
programs administered by ORAU for the U.S. Department of Energy. 

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), in Boulder, 
Colorado, was created in 1960 to serve as a focal point of a vigorous 
and expanding national research effort in the atmospheric sciences. 
NCAR is operated under the sponsorship of the National Science 
Foundation by the UNIVERSITY CORPORATION FOR ATMOSPHERIC 
RESEARCH (UCAR), made up of 44 U.S. and Canadian universities with 
graduate programs in the atmospheric sciences or related fields. The 
scientific staff includes meteorologists, astronomers, chemists, physi- 
cists, mathematicians, and representatives of other disciplines. 

UNIVERSITIES RESEARCH ASSOCIATION (URA), a group of 52 
universities engaged in high energy research, is the sponsoring organi- 
zation for the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, funded by the U.S. 
Department of Energy. The accelerator, located near Batavia, Illinois, is 
the world's highest-energy proton accelerator. 

The INTER-UNIVERSITY COMMUNICATIONS COUNCIL (EDU- 
COM) provides a forum for the appraisal of the current state of the art in 
communications science and technology and their relation to the 
planning and programs of colleges and universities. The council particu- 
larly fosters inter-university cooperation in the area of communications 
science. 

The UNIVERSITIES SPACE RESEARCH ASSOCIATION (USRA) 
was designed to promote cooperation between universities, research 
organizations, and the government in the development of space sci- 
ence and technology, and in the operation of laboratories and facilities 
for research, development, and education in these fields. 

The University of Maryland is a member of the INTER-UNIVERSITY 
CONSORTIUM FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH. One purpose 
of the Consortium is to facilitate collection and distribution of useful data 
for social science research. The data include survey data from the 
University of Michigan Survey Research Center and from studies 
conducted by other organizations or by individuals, census data for the 
United States, election data, legislative roll calls, judicial decision 
results, and biographical data. 

The University of Maryland jointly participates in the CHESAPEAKE 
RESEARCH CONSORTIUM, INC., a wide scale environmental research 
program, with the Johns Hopkins University, the Virginia Institute of 
Marine Science, and the Smithsonia Institution. The Consortium coor- 
dinates and integrates research on the Chesapeake Bay region at the 
Chesapeake Bay Center for Environmental Studies and is compiling a 
vast amount of scientific data to assist in the management and control 
of the area. Each participating institution calls on faculty expertise in a 
diversity of disciplines including biology, chemistry, physics, engineer- 
ing, geology, and the social and behavioral sciences. Through this 
interdisciplinary research program a computerized Management Re- 
source Bank is being developed containing a biological inventory of the 
Chesapeake Bay region, a legal survey, and socioeconomic data of the 
surrounding communities. The Consortium provides research opportu- 
nities for faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduate 
students at the University. 

Officially chartered in 1969, the ASSOCIATION OF SEA GRANT 
PROGRAM INSTITUTIONS is a growing organization concerned with 
the development and wise use of ocean and Great Lakes resources. 
Composed of the nation's major colleges, universities and institutions 
with ocean programs, the Association works for the betterment of the 
management and utilization of marine resources. 

The University of Maryland was awarded its first institutional Sea 
Grant funding by the Department of Commerce for the calendar year 
1977 Although forty-six universities, colleges and non-profit organiza- 
tions hold either regular or associate memberships in SGA, Maryland is 
one of only about a dozen who have comprehensive institutional 
programs and who are or are eligible to become Sea Grant Colleges. 
The goal of the CONSORTIUM ON HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS IN 
EDUCATION is to involve all interested agencies in the State of 



Maryland in the identification, development, and utilization of the human 
resources of the State for the purpose of improving human relationships 
in education. Fourteen agencies, including local school systems and 
institutions of higher education, are currently active in the project. 

Established in 1965, the UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL ON WATER 
RESOURCES (UCOWR), is a national consortium with approximately 
80 members. UCOWR was created to provide a forum for interchange 
of information pertaining to water resources research in academic 
communities. Member institutions also exchange information on special 
conferences, seminars, symposia and graduate study opportunities 

The University of Maryland is an associate member of the UNIVER- 
SITY-NATIONAL OCEANOGRAPHIC LABORATORY SYSTEM 
(UNOLS) established to improve coordinated use of federally supported 
oceanographic facilities, bringing together the Community of Academic 
Oceanographic Institutions which operate those facilities, and creating 
a mechanism for such coordinated utilization of and planning for 
oceanographic facilities. As an associate member, the University of 
Maryland has a very active graduate level research program in the 
marine sciences and operates facilities through the Chesapeake Bay 
Center for Environmental Studies 

The purpose of the SOUTH-EAST CONSORTIUM FOR INTERNA- 
TIONAL DEVELOPMENT is to respond to the economic and social 
needs of limited resource peoples and less developed countries. 
Membership in the organization is open to universities, research institu- 
tions and other organizations with capabilities related to rural and urban 
development and technology transfer. 



Fees and Expenses 

Payment of Fees 

Registration is not completed or official until all financial obligations are 
satisfied Although the University regularly mails bills to students, it 
cannot assume responsibility for their receipt. If a student does not 
receive a bill on or before the beginning of each semester, it is the 
student's responsibility to obtain a copy of the bill at Room 1 103, South 
Administration Building, 8:30-4:30, Monday through Friday. 

The University of Maryland does not have a deferred payment plan. 
Payment for past due balances and current semester fees are due on or 
before the first day of classes. 

It is the policy of the University not to defer payment on the basis of 
a pending application for financial assistance to an outside agency, 
including Veterans Administration benefits, bank loans, guaranteed 
student loan programs, etc. 

Students will be severed from University services for delinquent 
indebtedness to the University. In the event that severance occurs, the 
individual may make payment during the semester in which services 
were severed and all services except housing will be restored. A $25.00 
Restoration of Services fee will be assessed in addition to payment for 
the total past due amount. 

State of Maryland legislation has established a State Central 
Collections Unit, and in accordance with State law the University is 
required to turn over all delinquent accounts to that office for collection 
and subsequent legal action. 

Refund of Fees 

A Cancellation of Registration submitted to the Withdrawal and Reen- 
rollment Office before the official first day of classes entitles the student 
to a full credit or refund of semester tuition. 

After classes begin, students who wish to terminate their registra- 
tion must follow the withdrawal procedures stated in the "Schedule of 
Classes." Students will find the necessary forms for withdrawal in the 
Withdrawal and Reenrollment Office. The effective date used in com- 
puting refunds is the date the withdrawal form is filed in the Withdrawal 
and Reenrollment Office. "Stop Payment" on a check, failure to pay the 
semester bill, failure to attend classes, do not constitute withdrawal. 

A request for a refund must be processed by the student with the 
Division of Business Services; otherwise any credit on the student 
account will automatically be carried over to the next semester 

Students withdrawing from the University will be credited for tuition 
in accordance with the following schedule: 

Period from date Refundable tuition 

instruction begins only (Additional 

fees non-refundable) 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60°o 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No Refund 



14 Financial Assistance 



University Refund Statement 

Tuition, refundable fees and refundable deposits are authorized for 
refund only if the student completes the prescribed withdrawal proce- 
dures or is dismissed from the University. Residence Hall and Dining 
Services charges are authorized for refund only if the student completes 
the prescribed residence hall and dining services contract release 
procedures. Please refer to current "Schedule of Classes" for complete 
refund informat and procedures. 

Graduate Fees* 

Application fee 

This fee is not refundable $15.00' 

Tuition Per Credit Hour:' 

Resident Student $55.00 

Non-Resident Student $100.00 

Students admitted to the Graduate School must pay 

graduate tuition fees whether or not the credit will be 

used to satisfy program requirements. A graduate 

student who wishes to audit a course must pay the 

usual graduate tuition. 

Continuous Registration Fee $1 0.00 

Registration Fee' $5.00 

Recreation Fee 

(Summer School Only)? $4.00 

Vehicle Registration Fee 2 $12.00 

Graduation Fee, 

Master's Degree 2 $15.00 

Graduation Fee, 

Doctor's Degree 2 $60.00 

Health Fee' (Per Semester) $6.00 

(Part-time Student) 
Health Fee' (Per Semester) $11.00 

(Full-time Student) 
Athletic Fee' (Per Semester) $5.00 

(Students taking 4 or more credits) 

"The feer listed here are those charged at the time this Catalog went to press and are offered 
as a general guide They are sub|ect to change Fees charged in a particular semester are 
published in the Schedule of Classes for that semester 
i non-refundable 
' refundable 

Determination of In-State Status for Admission, 
Tuition and Charge-Differential Purposes 

An initial determination of in-state status for admission, tuition and 
charge-differential purposes will be made by the University at the time a 
student's application for admission is under consideration. The determi- 
nation made at that time, and any determination made thereafter shall 
prevail in each semester until the determination is successfully chal- 
lenged. The deadline for meeting all requirements for an in-state status 
and for submitting all documents for reclassification is the last day of 
registration for the semester the student wishes to be classified as an 
in-state student. 

The volume of requests for reclassification may necessitate a delay 
in completing the review process. It is hoped that a decision in each 
case will be made within ninety (90) days of a request for determination. 
During this period of time, or any further period of time required by the 
University, fees and charges based on the previous determination must 
be paid. If the determination is changed, any excess fees and charges 
will be refunded. 

Persons who are interested in obtaining a copy of the regulations or 
who wish assistance with their classification should contact: The 
Graduate School Office of Graduate Records, Room 2117, South 
Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742— phone (301)454^1004. 

Financial Assistance 

The University of Maryland recognizes the high cost of education today 
and makes every effort to offer financial assistance to qualified students 
through a variety of programs. Approximately one-half of all full-time 
graduate students receive financial support, which includes remission of 
tuition fees, through teaching and research assistantships and Universi- 
ty and state fellowships. In addition, education loans are available 
through the University at very reasonable terms, and short-term, inter- 
est-free emergency loans may be obtained if needed. Referrals for on- 
campus or area employment opportunities for students and students' 
spouses are also available in various departments and in specific 
student service centers on campus. 



Fellowships 

A fellowship is an award bestowed on a student who displays academic 
merit and promise to assist him in devoting full time to scholarly pursuits. 
All applicants for fellowships must be admitted to the Graduate School 
on a full-time basis to be eligible. Inquiries and requests for appropriate 
forms should be directed to the Fellowships and Finance Office, Room 
2126, South Administration Building, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland 20742. 

The Maryland Fellowship Program, established by the State Legisla- 
ture and administered by the Graduate School, provides a limited 
number of fellowships to qualified applicants who are enrolled in 
doctoral programs and who agree to teach in a public institution of 
higher learning in the State of Maryland for a period of three years 
following receipt of their doctoral degree, if a suitable position is offered. 
The stipend is $3,500 for the academic year, with remission of tuition. 
Although renewable annually, these fellowships normally carry a three 
year non-renewable tenure. Deadline for the application, which is 
available from the Fellowship Office of the Graduate School is February 
1. 

The Graduate School Fellowships are awarded annually on a com- 
petitive basis. The stipend is $1,000 for the academic year, with 
remission of tuition. The standard application for financial aid will serve 
as an application for this fellowship program and must be submitted by 
February 1 directly to the department in which you seek admission. 
Awards are based upon the nomination and recommendation of the 
department chairman. 

Other Race Grants have been established to provide financial assist- 
ance to qualified graduate students who meet the following criteria: 1. 
The applicant must be a member of a minority race as defined by the 
racial composition of the College Park Campus graduate student body. 
2. The applicant must be a legal resident of Maryland. 3. The applicant 
must be admitted as a full-time graduate student in a degree program. 4. 
The applicant must be a first-time graduate student. 5. The applicant 
must be able to demonstrate financial need as determined by the 
College Park Graduate School. The individual fellowship shall not 
exceed $1,000. Tuition is also waived in most cases. Students may 
apply for reappointment on a yearly basis. Additional details and 
application materials are available from the Fellowships and Finance 
Office of the Graduate School. The deadline for applications is February 



Assistantships 

Offers of assistantships are made contingent upon the applicant's 
acceptance as a graduate student by the Graduate School. 

Graduate Teaching Assistantships are available to qualified graduate 
students in many departments and programs. In addition to remission of 
tuition, these carry ten-month or twelve month stipends ranging from 
$4,800 to $7,080. Applications for assistantships should be made 
directly to the department in which the applicant will study. 

Graduate Research Assistantships, with comparable stipends, are 
available in some departments on a ten or twelve month basis. For 
information inquire in the individual department or program. 

Resident Graduate Assistantships, in limited number, are also avail- 
able. The stipend begins at $4,800 per year, plus remission of tuition, in 
-.^change for part-time work in undergraduate residence halls as 
Residence Halls staff members. These Resident Assistantships are 
open to both men and women. Applications for a Resident Graduate 
Assistantship should be made to the Office of Human Resources, 
Department of Resident Life, Cumberland Hall, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Loans and Part-Time Employment 

National Direct Student Loan Funds are available to graduate stu- 
dents of the University of Maryland. Applicants must be United States 
nationals (citizens and permanent resident status). Loans are approved 
based upon financial need; the average loan is $1,500 per year. 
Repayment begins nine months after the borrower leaves school, and 
no interest is charged until the beginning of the repayment schedule. 
Interest after that date is charged at the rate of three percent per 
annum. Repayment of the loan, including interest, is deferred during the 
time the borrower may be in military service, the Peace Corps, VISTA, 
and ACTION, up to a period of three years as well as during time of 
continued study on at least a half-time basis. Applications should be 
directed to the Director, Office of Student Financial Aid, North Adminis- 
trative Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, 
by February 15 for the fall semester. 



Student Services 15 



Guaranteed Student Loan programs which have been established for 
State of Maryland residents through the Maryland Higher Education 
Loan Corporation, permit students to borrow money from their 
hometown banks or other local financial institutions Graduate students 
in good standing may borrow up to $5,000 per year, but state agencies 
and individual banks may set their own limits up to this amount. Notes 
may not bear more than seven percent simple interest. Monthly 
repayments begin ten months after graduation or withdrawal from 
school. The federal government will pay the interest for eligible students 
while the student is in school. Further details regarding this program for 
Maryland residents may be secured from the Office of Student Financial 
Aid. For prospective non-Maryland borrowers unable to obtain informa- 
tion concerning the particular loan programs of their states, the Office of 
Student Financial Aid can provide necessary information. 

Student Emergency Loans are available, in case a student has a 
financial emergency, from the Office of Student Financial Aid. If the 
funds have not been depleted, students may borrow with no interest up 
to $75.00 ($300.00 if the student specifies that the loan is to help pay 
registration debts). Emergency loans must be repaid within one semes- 
ter. 

AAUW Loan: The College Park Maryland Branch of American Associa- 
tion of University Women has established a small AAUW loan fund for 
graduate women students at the University of Maryland. The amount 
loaned will be based on need and on the amount of funds available. 
Repayment of the loan shall begin within one year of leaving the 
University, and the note will carry 4 per cent per annum simple interest 
to be charged on the unpaid balance, beginning when the borrower 
leaves the University. For information and application forms, please 
contact the Fellowship and Finance Office in the Graduate School. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid, located in the North Administra- 
tion Building, serves without charge as a clearinghouse for students 
seeking part-time work and employers seeking help. Many jobs are 
available in the residence halls, libraries, laboratories, and elsewhere on 
and off campus. All full-time students seeking work are welcome to visit 
the office and consult referral lists. 

Work-Study Program. The University has in operation a College Work- 
Study Program provided under Title 1-C of the Economic Opportunity 
Act of 1964 and subsequent amendments. 

The purpose of the College Work-Study Program is to expand part- 
time employment opportunities for students who are in need of the 
earnings from part-time employment in order to continue their educa- 
tion. Preference is given to students with the greatest financial need. 

Employment under the College Work-Study Program is available to 
a student who meets the following qualifications: (1) is in need of 
employment in order to pursue a course of study at this University; (2) is 
capable of maintaining good standing in the course of study while 
employed; (3) is a citizen of the United States or a permanent resident; 
(4) is enrolled or has been accepted for enrollment as either an 
undergraduate, graduate, or professional student on a full-time basis. 

Students employed through the College Work-Study Program are 
assigned to most of the departments on campus and a few departments 
off-campus. Students may be employed up to 40 hours per week during 
the summer, semester break, and Spring holidays. During the school 
year, to include examination week, students may work up to 20 hours 
per week. Minimum pay for graduate students is currently $4.45 per 
hour during this school year. 

Additional information may be obtained from the Office of Student 
Financial Aid, Student Employment Section, located in Room 2114, 
North Administration Building Telephone: 454-4592. 

Golden Identification Card for Senior Citizens of 
Maryland 

The purpose of this status is to make available without charge courses 
and services of the University's campuses to citizens who are 60 years 
of age or older, who are residents of the State of Maryland and who are 
retired (a retired person will be considered one who affirms that he is not 
engaged in gainful employment for more than 20 hours per week). 
People meeting these requirements may apply for graduate admission, 
either as degree or nondegree students, and must meet the same 
admissions criteria pertaining to either category as do all applicants. 
Once admitted and having been issued the Golden Identification Card, 
such persons may register for courses in any session, subject to the 
same restrictions as any other student, and use the library and other 
campus facilities during the time they are enrolled in courses. Tuition 
fees will be waived for holders of the Golden Identification Card. 

Veterans Benefits 

Recent federal legislation has had significant impact on the veteran- 
graduate student. People who originally were entitled to 36 months of 



V.A. Educational Benefits now have a total of 45 months of educational 
benefits. The new complement of benefits can be used for graduate 
work. 

See the Veterans Section of the current Schedule of Classes for 
other current information. 

Veterans Administration counselors work on campus full-time to 
assist veterans, their dependents, and servicemen with all V.A. related 
questions and problems. These representatives can offer you help in 
getting your monthly educational assistance checks, as well as other 
less known but available benefits. Some of these are compensation for 
service connected disabilities, guaranteed home loans, and vocational 
rehabilitation services for disabled veterans. 

Related information, such as facts on individual state bonuses, 
removal of derogatory SPN codes from your military discharge (DD214), 
and University of Maryland Veterans Club activities, is also available. 

The counselors are available on a walk-m-basis during normal 
office hours in Room 1130 North Administration Building. Telephone 
454-5276. 



Student Services 

Housing 

There is no on-campus housing provided for unmarried graduate 
students. The Off-Campus Housing Office (Room 1295, Student Union, 
454-3645), in cooperation with many of the local landlords and apart- 
ment managers, maintains an extensive and up-to-date list of vacancies 
under several headings (Rooms, Unfurnished Apartments, Houses to 
Share, etc.). This office can also provide students with convenient maps 
of the College Park area and with lists of local motels, trailer and mobile 
home parks, real estate agents, and furniture rental companies. 

Current rates for housing in the area are about $125-$ 175 per 
month for a room in a private home, $250-$350 per month for an 
efficiency or one bedroom apartment; $100-$175/month for a shared 
apartment, and $450-$550/month for a two-bedroom house. 

The University itself maintains two apartment complexes for mar- 
ried graduate students and for a limited number of single graduate 
students. Both Lord Calvert Apartments and University Hills Apartments 
are within walking distance of campus, which means that there is 
usually a waiting list, especially during the period immediately preceding 
the fall semester. Priority for housing in these complexes is currently 
given to married full-time graduate assistants, then married full-time 
graduate non-assistants. 

Rent for a one-bedroom apartment is $189-$199/month, with two- 
bedroom apartments costing about twenty-five dollars more; a limited 
number of efficiencies are available to single students for a slightly 
lower monthly rent. Students must sign a one year lease and pay a 
security deposit of $100 (payable when the applicant's name is added 
to the waiting list). There is a nonrefundable application fee of $10 for 
adding a name to the waiting list. After the initial lease expires, 
residence in the apartments is on a monthly basis. Graduate students 
who maintain full-time status are permitted to live in the apartments for a 
maximum of five years. 

Information and applications for University-owned housing can be 
obtained from the Rental Office, 3424 Tulane Drive, Hyattsville, Mary- 
land 20783 (422-7445). 

University Food Services 

The University Food Service offers four dining contract options which 
are available to graduate students. The options and their costs on a 
semester basis for 1 979-1 980 were any 1 9 meals per week for $469.00; 
any 1 5 meals per week for $436.50; any 1 meals per week for $41 5.50; 
and any 5 meals per week for $258.50. Increases in these prices are 
anticipated for 1 980-81 . University people can obtain guest meal tickets 
for individual meals in contract dining halls for fairly reasonable prices 
(unlimited quantities for $2.35 at breakfast, $3.00 at lunch, and $3.50 at 
dinner). More information about contract dining can be obtained from 
Mr. John Goecker (454-2901). 

In addition to the services offered by the contract dining halls, 
graduate students may wish to take advantage of the cash line services 
available at the Hill Dining Hall or the various restaurants and snack 
bars at the Student Union. 

Hillel Kosher Dining Club, housed in Hillel House, 7505 Yale 
Avenue, College Park (779-7370), provides Kosher meals on either a 
regular or occasional basis. 

Career Development Center 

The Career Development Center, located in Hornbake Library offers a 
wide variety of services to graduate students. The goal of the Center is 



16 Code of Student Conduct 



to assist students in exploring career opportunities and planning their 
careers. Services include career advising, the Career Library, the 
credentials service, and the on-campus interview program. 

The career advising program includes both individual and group 
advising sessions and workshops on jobseeking skills, resume prepara- 
tion, and interviewing skills. The Career Library contains occupational 
information, full-time job listings, employer directories, and other refer- 
ence sources. 

Graduate students are eligible to participate in the on-campus 
interview program, which involves campus visits by representatives 
from business, government, and education. Students interested in 
employment in the fields of education and library science will find the 
credentials service especially valuable. 

Certain services of the Center are also available to students' 
spouses. 

Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center offers consultation on education/psychological 
concerns; an open educational-vocational information library; recorded 
interviews with department heads on the characteristics of graduate 
majors offered on the campus; and a weekly Research and Data series 
of presentations on current educational/psychological topics. 

Available services include the following: the Counseling Service, 
which offers initial consultation on any problems and provides further 
counseling services or referral services to appropriate individuals or 
agencies in the area; the Reading and Study Skills Laboratory, for those 
interested in improving any of their educational skills including special 
assistance for students for whom English is a second language; the 
Parent Consultation and Child Evaluation Service, providing a variety of 
services to the parents of young children with learning or behavior 
problems; and the Testing, Research and Data Processing Division, 
which serves as the testing and census taking arm of the campus. 

The Center provides consultation to a variety of groups and 
individuals concerning organizational development and group produc- 
tivity. Other programs include a series of self-understanding and devel- 
opment groups for interested students and staff. 

The Center provides a wide variety of research reports on charac- 
teristics of students and campus environment. 

National testing programs (GRE, Miller Analogies, etc.) are ad- 
ministered by the Counseling Center as well as testing for counseling 
purposes. Office location; Shoemaker Building. Telephone: Counseling 
Services 454-2931; Reading and Study Skills Lab 454-2935. 



Publications of Interest to Graduate Students 

In addition to the Catalog, the Graduate School prepares the following 
publications: 

Graduate Application Booklet: This booklet, which contains the 
application forms and information you need to complete the forms, is 
available on request from the Graduate School Mailing Office or from 
the individual departments. 

Graduate Bulletin: The Bulletin is for prospective students and pro- 
vides information on campus and area libraries, research facilities, and 
cultural opportunities; descriptions of individual programs; and a list of 
titles of courses offered at UMCP. It also contains the application forms 
and instructions for completing them. 

Guide to Graduate Life. This handbook, designed to provide the new 
graduate student with an introduction to the campus and the College 
Park area, is available from the office of the Dean for Graduate Studies 
and Research. 

Graduate Assistant Handbook. This handbook sets forth policies, 
procedures, and services of interest to graduate assistants and is 
available from the departmental graduate offices and the office of the 
Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. 

Graduate Student Academic Handbook. This manual contains the 
instructions for preparation of theses and dissertations and is available 
at a nominal cost from the University book store. 

Important Dates for Advisors and Students. This calendar card of 
dates for submission of final documents is available from the various 
departmental graduate offices, as well as from the office of the Dean for 
Graduate Studies and Research. 



Code of Student Conduct 

A Code of Student Conduct was adopted by the Board of Regents on 
January 25, 1 980, and is applicable to both graduate and undergraduate 
students. The Code is reproduced in the Undergraduate Catalog and is 
available in the Office of the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research 
and in the Office of Judicial Programs. 



Health Care 

The University Health Center is located on Campus Drive directly across 
from the Student Union. Both graduate and undergraduate students are 
eligible for health care at the Health Center. Services provided include 
both emergency and routine medical care, mental health evaluation and 
treatment, health education, laboratory, x-ray, gynecological services, 
and upon referral from a Health Center physician, dermatological 
services and orthopedic services. 

Students requiring service should call the Health Center for an 
appointment. Students who are injured or are too ill to wait for an 
appointment will be seen on a walk-in basis. Emergencies always 
receive highest priority. 

The Health Center is open 8:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. weekdays and 
11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. on weekends with acute illnesses taking priority 
on evenings and weekends. People with emergencies are seen 24 
hours a day. 

Upon payment of the health fee registration, a student becomes 
eligible for routine medical care and professional services at the Health 
Center. Charges however, are made for certain laboratory tests, all x- 
rays, casts and allergy injections. It should be noted that the mandatory 
health fee is not a form of health insurance. For information and 
emergencies, call 454-3444; Appointments, 454-4923; Mental Health, 
454-4925; Women's Health, 454-4923; Health Education, 454-4922. 

Health Insurance 

Because the mandatory health fee is not a form of health insurance and 
many students do not have adequate coverage, a voluntary group 
insurance policy is available to students. This policy provides benefits, 
at very reasonable rates, for hospital, surgery, emergency, laboratory, 
and x-ray purposes; some coverage for mental and nervous problems; 
and contains a major hospital provision. Students may enroll at mid-year 
for a half-yearly rate, and they may elect to have family coverage. 
Enrollment periods for the policy are August 15-October 1 and January 
1 -March 1. For additional information and application forms, see the 
brochure available in the Health Center or in the Office of Student 
Affairs. 



University Policy on Disclosure of 
Student Records 

(Buckley Amendment) 

The University of Maryland adheres to a policy of compliance with the 
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (Buckely Amendment). As 
such, it is the policy of the University (1) to permit students to inspect 
their education records, (2) to limit disclosure to others of personally 
identifiable information from education records without students' prior 
written consent, and (3) to provide students the opportunity to seek 
correction of their education records where appropriate. 
I. Definitions 
A. "Student" means an individual who is or who has been in 
attendance at the University of Maryland. It does not include 
any applicant for admission to the University who does not 
matriculate, even if he or she previously attended the University. 
(Please note, however, that such an applicant would be consid- 
ered a "student" with respect to his or her records relating to 
that previous attendance.) 
B. "Education records" include those records which contain infor- 
mation directly related to a student and which are maintained as 
official working files by the University. The following are not 
educational records: 

(1) records about students made by professors and administra- 
tors for their own use and not shown to others; 

(2) campus police records maintained solely for law enforce- 
ment purposes and kept separate from the education re- 
cords described above; 

(3) employment records, except where a currently enrolled 
student is employed as a result of his or her status as a 
student; 

(4) records of a physician, psychologist, or other recognized 
professional or paraprofessional made or used only for 
treatment purposes and available only to persons providing 



University Policy on Disclosure of Student Records 17 



treatment. However, these records may be reviewed by an 
appropriate professional of the student's choice; 
(5) records which contain only information relating to a person's 
activities after that person is no longer a student at the 
University. 
II. It is the policy of the University of Maryland to permit students to 
inspect their education records. 

A. Right of Access 

Each student has a right of access to his or her education 
records, except confidential letters of recommendation re- 
ceived prior to January 1, 1975, and financial records of the 
student's parents. 

B. Waiver 

A student may, by a signed writing, waive his or her rights of 
access to confidential recommendations in three areas: admis- 
sion to an educational institution, job placement, and receipt of 
honors and awards. The University will not require such waivers 
as a condition for admission or receipt of any service or benefit 
normally provided to students. If the student chooses to waive 
his or her right of access, he or she will be notified, upon written 
request, of the names of all persons making confidential recom- 
mendations. Such recommendations will be used only for the 
purpose for which they were specifically intended. A waiver may 
be revoked in writing at any time, and the revocation will apply to 
all subsequent recommendations, but not to recommendations 
received while the waiver was in effect. 

C. Types and Locations of Education Records, Titles of Re- 
cords Custodians 

Please note that all requests for access to records should be 
routed through the Registrations Office (see II. D. below). 

(1) Admissions 

Applications and transcripts from institutions previously at- 
tended. 

a. Undergraduate — Director of Undergraduate Admissions, 
North Administration. 

b. Graduate— Director of Graduate Records, South Admin- 
istration 

(2) Registrations 

All on-going academic and biographical records. Graduate 
and Undergraduate — Director of Registrations, North Ad- 
ministration. 

(3) Departments 

Departmental offices; Chairman (Check first with the Direc- 
tor of Registrations.) (Miscellaneous records kept vary with 
the department.) 

(4) Deans and Provosts 

Deans and Provosts offices of each school. Miscellaneous 
records. 

(5) Resident Life 

North Administration, Director of Resident Life Student's 
housing records. 

(6) Advisors 

Pre-law Advisor: Undergraduate Library Pre-Dental Advisor: 
Turner Laboratory Pre-Medical Advisor: Turner Laboratory 
Letters of evaluation, personal information sheet, transcript, 
test scores (if student permits). 

(7) Judicial Affairs 

North Administration Building, Director of Judicial Affairs. 
Students' judicial and disciplinary records. 

(8) Counseling Center 
Shoemaker Hall, Director. 

Biographical data, summaries of conversations with student, 
test results. (Where records are made and used only for 
treatment purposes, they are not education records and are 
not subject to this policy.) 

(9) Financial Aid 

a. Undergraduate — North Administration, Director of Finan- 
cial Aid. 

b. Graduate and Professional Schools — Located in Dean's 
Offices. 

Financial aid applications, need analysis statements, awards 
made (no student access to parents' confidential state- 
ments). 

(10) Career Development Center 

Terrapin Hall. Director. Recommendations, copies of aca- 
demic records, (unofficial) (note WAIVER section). 

(11) Business Services 

South Administration Building, Director. All student accounts 
receivable, records of students' financial charges, and cred- 
its with the University 
D Procedure to be Followed 



Requests for access should be made in writing to the Office of 
Registrations. The University will comply with a request for 
access within a reasonable time, at least within 45 days. In the 
usual case, arrangements will be made for the student to read 
his or her records in the presence of a staff member. If facilities 
permit, a student may ordinarily obtain copies of his or her 
records by paying reproduction costs. The fee for copies is S.25 
per page. No campus will provide copies of any transcripts in 
the student's records other than the student's current University 
transcript from that campus. Official University transcripts (with 
University seal) will be provided at a higher charge. 
III. It is the policy of the University of Maryland to limit disclosure of 

personally identifiable information from education records unless it 

has the student's prior written consent, subject to the following 

limitations and exclusions. 

A Directory Information 

(1) The following categories of information have been designa- 
ted directory information: 

Name 

Address 

Telephone listing 

Date and place of birth 

Photograph 

Major field of study 

Participation in officially recognized activities and sports 

Weight and height of members of athletic teams 

Dates of attendance 

Degrees and awards received 

Most recent previous educational institution attended 

(2) This information will be disclosed even in the absence of 
consent unless the student files written notice informing the 
University not to disclose any or all of the categories within 
three weeks of the first day of the semester in which the 
student begins each school year. This notice must be filed 
annually within the above alloted time to avoid automatic 
disclosure of directory information. The notice should be 
filed with the campus registrations office. See II. C. 

(2) The University will give annual public notice to students of 
the categories of information designated as directory infor- 
mation. 

(4) Directory information may appear in public documents and 
otherwise be disclosed without student consent unless the 
student objects as provided above. 
B. Prior Consent not Required 

Prior consent will not be required for disclosure of education 

records to the following parties: 

(1 ) School officials of the University of Maryland who have been 
determined to have legitimate educational interests; 

a. "School officials" include instructional or administrative 
personnel who are or may be in a position to use the 
information in furtherance of a legitimate objective; 

b. "legitimate educational interests" include those interests 
directly related to the academic environment; 

(2) Officials of other schools in which a student seeks or intends 
to enroll or is enrolled. Upon request, and at his or her 
expense, the student will be provided with a copy of the 
records which have been transferred; 

(3) Authorized representatives of the Comptroller General of 
the U.S., the Secretary of HEW, the Commissioner of the 
Office of Education, the Director of the National Institute of 
Education, the Administrator of the Veterans' Administra- 
tion, the Assistant Secretary of HEW for Education, and 
State educational authorities, but only in connection with the 
audit or evaluation of federally supported education pro- 
grams, or in connection with the enforcement of or com- 
pliance with federal legal requirements relating to these 
programs. Subject to controlling Federal law or prior con- 
sent, these officials will protect information received so as 
not to permit personal identification of students to outsiders; 

(4) Authorized persons and organizations which are given work 
in connection with a student's application for, or receipt of, 
financial aid. but only to the extent necessary for such 
purposes as determining eligibility, amount, conditions and 
enforcement of terms and conditions; 

(5) State and local officials to which such information is specifi- 
cally required to be reported by effective state law adopted 
prior to November 19. 1974; 

(6) Organizations conducting educational studies for the pur- 
poses of developing, validating, or administering predictive 
tests, administering student aid programs, and improving 
instruction. The studies shall be conducted so as not to 



18 Admission to Graduate School 



permit personal identification of students to outsiders, and 
the information will be destroyed when no longer needed for 
these purposes; 

(7) Accrediting organizations for purposes necessary to carry 
out their functions; 

(8) Parents of a student who is a dependent for income tax 
purposes. (Note: The University may require documentation 
of dependent status such as copies of income tax forms.) 

(9) Appropriate parties in connection with an emergency, where 
knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the 
health or safety of the student or other individuals; 

(10) In response to a court order or subpoena. The University will 
make reasonable efforts to notify the student before comply- 
ing with the court order. 

C. Prior Consent Required 

In all other cases, the University will not release personally 
identifiable information in education records or allow access to 
those records without prior consent of the student. Unless 
disclosure is to the student himself or herself, the consent must 
be written, signed, and dated, and must specify the records to 
be disclosed, the identity of the recipient, and the purpose of 
disclosure. A copy of the records disclosed will be provided to 
the student upon request and at his or her expense. 

D. Record of Disclosures 

The University will maintain with the student's education re- 
cords a record for each request and each disclosure, except for 
the following: 

(1) disclosures to the student himself or herself ;l 

(2) disclosures pursuant to the written consent of the student 
(the written consent itself will suffice as a record); 

(3) disclosures to instructional or administrative officials of the 
University; 

(4) disclosures of directory information. 

This record of disclosures may be inspected by the student, 
the official custodian of the records, and other University 
and governmental officials. 
IV. It is the policy of the University of Maryland to provide students the 
opportunity to seek correction of their education records. 

A. Request to Correct Records 

A student who believes that information contained in his or her 
education records is inaccurate, misleading, or violative of 
privacy or other rights may submit a written request to the Office 
of Registrations specifying the document(s) being challenged 
and the basis for the complaint. The request will be sent to the 
person responsible for any amendments to the record in 
question. Within a reasonable period of time of receipt of the 
request, the University will decide whether to amend the re- 
cords in accordance with the request. If the decision is to refuse 
to amend, the student will be so notified and will be advised of 
the right to a hearing. He or she may then exercise that right by 
written request to the Office of the Chancellor. 

B. Right to a Hearing 

Upon request by a student, the University will provide an 
opportunity for a hearing to challenge the content of the 
student's records. A request for a hearing should be in writing 
and submitted to the Office of Registrations. Within a reasona- 
ble time of receipt of the request, the student will be notified in 
writing of the date, place, and time reasonably in advance of the 
hearing. 

(1) Conduct of the hearing 

The hearing will be conducted by a University official who 
does not have a direct interest in the outcome. The student 
will have a full and fair opportunity to present evidence 
relevant to the issues raised and may be assisted or 
represented by individuals of his or her choice at his or her 
expense, including an attorney. 

(2) Decision 

Within a reasonable period of time after the conclusion of 
the hearing, the University will notify the student in writing of 
its decision. The decision will be based solely upon evidence 
presented at the hearing and will include a summary of the 
evidence and the reasons for the decision. If the University 
decides that the information is inaccurate, misleading, or 
otherwise in violation of the privacy or other rights of 
students, the University will amend the records accordingly. 

C. Right to Place an Explanation in the Records 

If, as a result of the hearing, the University decides that the 
information is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in viola- 
tion of the student's rights, the University will inform the student 
of the right to place in his or her record a statement commenting 
on the information and/or explaining any reasons for disagree- 



ing with the University's decision. Any such explanation will be 
kept as part of the student's record as long as the contested 
portion of the record is kept and will be disclosed whenever the 
contested portion of the record is disclosed. 
V. Right to File Complaint 

A student alleging University noncompliance with the Family Edu- 
cational Rights and Privacy Act may file a written complaint with the 
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA), Depart- 
ment of HEW, 330 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 
20201. 



Admission to Graduate School 

Graduate Programs 

Programs Degrees Offered 

Administration, Supervision and Curriculum 6 M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S., 

Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Aerospace Engineering M.S.*. Ph.D. 

Agricultural and Extension Education 2 M.S.", A.G.S., Ph.D. 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 3 M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Agricultual Engineering M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Agronomy M.S.*, Ph.D. 

American Studies 3 M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Animal Sciences 3 M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Applied Mathematics M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Architecture 5 M.Arch. 

Art M.A.', M.F.A., Ph.D. 

Astronomy 4 M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Biochemistry M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Botany 3 M.S., Ph.D. 

Business and Management' M.S., M.B.A. 9 , D.B.A. 

Chemical Engineering M.S.* Ph.D. 

Chemical Physics M.S.,* Ph.D. 

Chemistry M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Civil Engineering M.S.,* Ph.D. 

Communication Arts and Theatre 3 M.A.* 

Comparative Literature M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Computer Science 5 M.S.', Ph.D. 

Counseling and Personnel Services 2 M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S., Ph.D. 

Criminal Justice and Criminology 3 M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Early Childhood-Elementary Education 2 M.Ed., M.A. A.G.S., Ed.D., 

Ph.D. 

Economics 3 M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Electrical Engineering M.S.", Ph.D. 

Engineering Materials M.S.*, Ph.D. 

English Language and Literature M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Entomology 3 M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Family and Community Development 3 M.S.* 

Food, Nutrition and Institution Administration 3 M.S.* 

Food Science 3 M.S.*. Ph.D. 

French Language and Literature 5 M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Geography 3 M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Germanic Language and Literature M.A.", Ph.D. 

Government and Politics 3 M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Health Education 3 M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 3 M.A.*, Ph.D. 

History 3 M.A. 7 , 'Ph.D. 

Horticulture 3 M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Human Development Education 2 M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Industrial Education 2 M.Ed., M.A.*, A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Journalism 3 M.A.* 

Library and Information Services 3 M.L.S. 7 , Ph.D. 

Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Science 3 M.S., Ph.D. 

Mathematical Statistics M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Mathematics M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Measurement and Statistics 3 M.Ed., M.A.*, A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Mechanical Engineering M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Meteorology M.S.*. Ph.D. 

Microbiology 5 M.S., Ph.D. 

Music 5 M.M., D.M.A., Ph.D. 

Nuclear Engineering M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Nutritional Sciences M.S.*. Ph.D. 

Philosophy 3 M.A*. Ph.D. 

Physical Education 3 M.A.*. Ph.D. 

Physics" M.S.*. Ph.D. 

Poultry Science M.S.. Ph.D. 

Psychology 5 M.A., M.S., Ph.D. 

Public Communication 3 Ph.D. 



Admission to Graduate School 19 



Recreation 3 M.A., Ed.D., Ph.D 

Secondary Education? M.Ed., MA", A.G.S. Ed.D.. Ph.D. 

Social Foundations of Education 2 M.A.', Ph.D. 

Sociology 3 M.A., PhD 

Spanish Language and Literature M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Special Education 2 M.Ed., M.A., AGS., Ed.D., PhD 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 3 M.S.", Ph.D. 

Urban Studies 5 M.A * 

Zoology M.S.*, Ph.D. 

'GMAT (Graduate Management & Admissions Test). 

■"Miller Analogies Test required for admission 

'Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test required 

"Graduate Record Examination Advanced Test required 

■■Both Aptitude and Advanced Graduate Record Examinations required 

6 Either the GRE Aptitude or the Miller Analogies Test is required 

'History and Library and Information Services offer a directed course of study leading to both 

the MA and M.L S degrees 

8 The College of Business and Management offers a joint program with the Law School of the 

University of Maryland at Baltimore leading to both the MBA and JD degrees 

'Non-thesis option available tor M A or MS 

For further details on entrance examinations see Admission to 
Graduate School below. 

Administrative Offices 

The administrative offices of the Graduate School are located on the 
second floor of the South Administration Building, and the Dean, 
Associate Deans, and Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies and Re- 
search and their staff may be found in Suite 21 33. Other offices to which 
students may go for administrative assistance are listed below: 

Office of the Director of Graduate Records: Room 2125, South 
Administration Building. The Director of Records of the Graduate 
School is the person in charge of graduate admissions and records of 
degree progress for all prospective and admitted students. 

Office of Graduate Admissions: Room 2107, South Administration 
Building. This office receives and maintains all files of students applying 
for admission and answers all inquiries regarding the admission pro- 
cess. 

Office of Graduate Records: Room 2117, South Administration Build- 
ing. This office maintains all files for graduate students after they have 
been admitted and provides information on registration procedures. 
Students may obtain the "Continuous Registration Form" and the 
"Intercampus Enrollment Form" here, and petitions and information on 
in-state classification for tuition and charge-differential purposes are 
handled by this office. 

Fellowships and Finance Office: Room 2126, South Administration 
Building. The Fellowships and Finance Office serves as a clearinghouse 
for information on available fellowships which are sponsored by the 
Graduate School. 

Office of the Assistant to the Dean: Room 21 14, South Administra- 
tion Building. The Assistant to the Dean is generally responsible for 
assuring that the academic programs and accomplishments of graduate 
students fulfill the requirements for degrees established by the Gradu- 
ate Council. The following forms are received and processed by this 
office: 1 . "Doctoral Candidacy Forms"; 2. "Request for Appointment of 
Doctoral Examining Committee"; 3. "Master's Approved Program 
Form"; 4. "Certification of Completion of Non-thesis Master's Option"; 
5. "Certification of Completion of the Master's Thesis." It is to this office 
that copies of the thesis and dissertation must be submitted, and it is the 
Assistant to the Dean who prepares official commencement lists. In 
addition, students submit to this office registration forms for foreign 
language examinations and requests for approval of transfer of credit 
for the Masters' programs. 

General 

Responsibility for admitting applicants to graduate programs rests with 
the Dean and his staff, who regularly seek the advice of the chairmen 
and graduate admission committees of the academic programs in 
making their decisions. In the case of foreign student applicants, the 
University's Director of International Education Services is also con- 
sulted. Standards applied by the Graduate School and individual 
programs are to insure that students admitted have high qualifications 
and a reasonable expectation of successfully completing a graduate 
program. Standards for admission to doctoral programs are frequently 
higher than those for admission to master's programs. In many degree 
programs applications by qualified students for admission to graduate 
study regularly exceed the number of students who can be accom- 
modated. In order to maintain programs of outstanding quality, the 



number of spaces in each program is limited according to the availability 
of faculty, special resources, and funds for students requiring financial 
assistance. The Graduate School admits the most highly qualified 
applicants up to the limit of the number of spaces in each program. 

Criteria for Admission 

The decision to admit an applicant to a program is based primarily on 
results from a combination of the following criteria according to require- 
ments of the specific program or department. 

Quality of previous undergraduate and graduate work. The 
Graduate School requires as a minimum standard a B average or 
3.0 on a 4.0 scale, in a program of study resulting in the award of a 
baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or 
university. In addition, the student's undergraduate program should 
include completion of the prerequisites for graduate study in his 
chosen field. In individual programs, where resources are available, 
a few applicants who do not meet this minimum standard for 
undergraduate work may be provisionally admitted if there is 
compelling evidence on the basis of other criteria of a reasonable 
likelihood of success in the program the person desires to enter. If 
an applicant has studied at the graduate level elsewhere less 
weight may be, but is not necessarily, placed on the quality of the 
undergraduate academic record Some programs may require a 
higher minimum grade average for admission. 
2. Strength of letters of recommendation from persons com- 
petent to judge the applicant's probable success in graduate 
school. Usually these letters are from the applicant's former 
professors who are able to give an in-depth evaluation of the 
applicant's strengths and weaknesses with respect to academic 
work. Additional recommendations may come from employers or 
supervisors who are familiar with the applicant's work experience. 
Applicants should instruct their references to send all letters of 
recommendation directly to the program in which they desire 
entrance. Some departments do not require letters of recommen- 
dation. (See application form.) 

3. Scores on a nationally standardized examination. Because the 
predictive utility of these scores may vary from one group of 
applicants to another, a discriminating use of all relevant materials 
will be made in each applicant's case. The three most widely used 
standardized examinations are the Graduate Record Examinations, 
Graduate Management Admissions Test, and the Miller Analogies 
Test. 

Although many graduate programs do not require the GRE. 
almost all will use such test scores as an additional measure of 
an applicant's qualifications. The GRE may be taken in either or 
both of two forms: The Aptitude Test and The Advanced Test. 
Applicants can take this test in their senior year or when filing 
for admission. For details, applicants should write directly to 
Graduate Record Examinations, Educational Testing Service. 
Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 
GRADUATE MANAGEMENT ADMISSIONS TEST (GMAT): De- 
tails about this test, required when applying to a program in 
Business and Management, can be obtained by writing to the 
Educational Testing Service, Box 966, Princeton. N.J., 08540 
THE MILLER ANALOGIES TEST (MAT): Details about the 
graduate form of this test can be obtained by writing to the 
Director, Counseling Center, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Md. 20742. 
For information on the programs requiring one of these tests, 
please see the List of Graduate Programs in this catalog and the 
instructions accompanying application forms. 

4. Statement by the applicant of his academic career objectives 
and their relation to the program of study he wishes to pursue. 
These statements help the department or program identify stu- 
dents whose objectives are consonant with the objectives of the 
program. 

5. Other evidence of graduate potential. Some programs require 
other evidence of graduate potential, such as samples from port- 
folios of creative work, completion of specialized examinations, or 
personal interviews. 

In addition to the above criteria, special consideration will be given to: 

1. Residence of the applicant. While the University desires to 
maintain a geographically diverse graduate student population, it 
also recognizes its responsibility to legal residents of the state. 
Every effort will be made to accommodate qualified Maryland 
residents. 

2. Sex and minority group membership. The University of Mary- 
land, its Graduate School and each of its academic components 
have strong affirmative action programs for increasing the par- 
ticipation of minority groups and women among its students, staff 
and faculty. 



20 Admission to Graduate School 



Categories of Admission to Degree Programs 

Full Graduate Status 

For admission in this category an applicant must have received a 
baccalauraate degree from a regionally accredited institution and be 
otherwise fully qualified in every respect. 

Provisional Graduate Status 

This designation may be used when 1) the quality of the previous 
academic record at a regionally accredited institution is lower than 
established standards or when there is a lack of adequate prerequisite 
course work in the chosen field; 2) when the applicant has majored in 
another area with a creditable record but there is some doubt about his 
ability to pursue the program of study in question; 3) when the applicant 
is engaged in graduate study at another institution but is not able to 
furnish a transcript indicating completion of course work or degree 
requirements; or 4) when the applicant is a senior in his final semester of 
work for a bachelor's degree and is not able to furnish a final transcript 
indicating the completion of all requirements and the award of the 
degree. 

Students admitted provisionally because of incomplete official 
supporting documents must have a complete official record of all 
previous work sent to the Graduate School within three months 
following the completion of such study and the award of the degree, or 
they face cancellation of admission. 

A program to correct any deficiencies in preparation will be outlined 
by the faculty, and the student is expected to become fully qualified 
within a specified time limit. When all conditions have been met, the 
department may recommend admission of the student to full status. 
Students who are unable to qualify for full admission under the 
conditions specified may have their admission terminated. 

Non-degree Admission Categories 

Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate Status 

The Advanced Graduate Specialist program is designed to promote a 
high level of professional competence in an area of specialization in the 
field of education. The candidate must be able to show that he or she 
can operate as an effective counselor, administrator, teacher or skilled 
person in a major field of professional endeavor. The Advanced 
Graduate Specialist Certificate is offered through most of the programs 
in the College of Education and the Agricultural and Extension Educa- 
tion program in the College of Agriculture. The Certificate is awarded by 
the College of Education or by the College of Agriculture. Requirements 
are as follows: 

1. Applicants must meet the same general criteria for admission as 
are prescribed for degree seekers. Additionally, the applicant must 
have completed a master's degree or the equivalent in credits 
earned either at the University of Maryland or at another regionally 
accredited institution. The Miller Analogies Test scores are re- 
quired at the time of application. 

2. Coursework totaling not more than 30 credits with grades of at least 
a "B" from an accredited institution may be transferred to the 
program at the University of Maryland. 

3. The program must be developed in cooperation with an advisor and 
filed with the Graduate Studies office in the College of Education. 

4. The Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate program requires a 
minimum of 60 semester hours of credit with not less than 30 
semester hours of credit completed with the University of Maryland. 
At least one half of the credits earned either at other institutions or 
at the University of Maryland must be in courses comparable to 
those in the 600-800 series. The student may be required to take a 
substantial portion of the program in departments other than those 
in the College of Education or the College of Agriculture. Registra- 
tion in certain kinds of field study, field experience, apprenticeship 
or internship may also be required. 

5. There will be a written examination of not less than six hours. A "B" 
average with no "D" or "F" grades will be required before the 
certificate can be awarded. 

For additional details see "Statement of Policies and Procedures; 
Advanced Graduate Specialist Program in Education," issued by the 
College of Education. 

Advanced Special Student Status 

The Advanced Special Student Status is designed to provide an 
opportunity to individuals who do not have an immediate degree 
objective in mind to take graduate level courses. Although the primary 
mission of the Graduate School is to conduct programs of graduate 
instruction leading to advanced degrees, the Graduate Faculty wel- 
comes, to the extent that available resources allow, qualified students 
who have no degree objectives. 

Applicants for admission to Advanced Special Student Status must 
satisfy at least one of the following criteria: 



1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institu- 
tion with an overall "B" (3.0) average. Applicants must submit 
official transcripts covering all credits used in satisfying the bacca- 
laureate degree requirements. 

2. Hold a master's or doctoral degree from a regionally accredited 
institution. Applicants must submit an official transcript showing the 
award of a master's or doctoral degree. 

3. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institu- 
tion and have at least four years of successful post-baccalaureate 
work or professional experience. Applicants must submit an official 
transcript showing the award of the baccalaureate degree and a 
signed statement summarizing successful post-baccalaureate work 
or professional experience. Letters from employers or professional 
organizations to support the statement of successful professional 
experiences are also required. 

4. Achieve a score that places the applicant in the upper 50 percentile 
of appropriate national standardized aptitude examinations such as 
the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test, the Miller's Analo- 
gies Test, the Graduate Management Admissions Test. Where 
different percentiles are possible, the Graduate School will deter- 
mine which score is acceptable. 

Admission to Advanced Special Student status will continue for five 
years. If there is no registration in three consecutive academic year 
semesters, the admitted status will lapse, after which a new application 
will be required. 

Advanced Special Students must maintain a 2.75 grade point 
average. 

Advanced Special Students must pay all standard graduate fees. 
Students in this status are not eligible to hold appointments as Graduate 
Teaching or Research Assistants or Fellows. All other services, e.g., 
parking, library privileges, etc., are the same as those accorded to other 
graduate students. 

Admission to Advanced Special Student status is not intended to 
be used as a preparatory program for later admission to a doctoral or 
master's program nor to the Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate 
program. Credits earned while in this status may be applicable to a 
degree or certificate program at a later time only with the approval of the 
faculty in the desired program, if the student is subsequently accepted 
for degree or certificate study. For consideration of admission to a 
degree program at a later time, the student must submit an application 
in the standard format, with a new application fee, to the Graduate 
School. 

Visiting Graduate Student Status Graduate Student, Visiting 

A graduate student matriculated in another graduate school, who 
wishes to enroll in the Graduate School of the University of Maryland at 
College Park and who intends thereafter to return to the graduate 
school in which he is matriculated, may be admitted as a Visiting 
Graduate Student. 

Criteria for enrollment as a visitor are admission to and good 
standing in another recognized graduate school. The applicant need not 
submit full transcripts of credits, but he must apply for admission to the 
UMCP Graduate School and pay the application fee. In lieu of trans- 
cripts, a student may have his own graduate dean certify, in writing, to 
the Graduate School that he is in good standing and that the credits will 
be accepted toward his graduate degree. Unless otherwise specified, 
admission will be offered for one year only. 

Non-degree Student Status-Undergraduate 

This is an undergraduate classification and may be assigned by the 
Director of Admissions (undergraduate division) to those applicants who 
have received the baccalaureate or an advanced degree from a 
regionally accredited institution but who do not desire or who do not 
qualify for graduate admission. Non-degree seeking students who do 
not have a baccalaureate degree or an R.N. must submit transcripts and 
meet regular admission standards. Transcripts are not required from 
students with baccalaureate degrees or an R.N. 

Application for Non-degree Student Status — Undergraduate must 
be made directly to the Office of Admissions, not to the Graduate 
School. 

Students often need permission from the deans of the various 
schools and colleges of the university to enroll as a Non-degree 
Student. Non-degree Students may enroll for courses through the 500 
numbered series for which they possess the necessary prerequisites. 
Courses numbered 600 or above are intended for admitted graduate 
students only. 

The student is warned that no credit earned while in a Non-degree 
Student Status— Undergraduate may be applied at a later date to a 
degree program. 

Offer of Admission 

A written offer of admission is made to all accepted applicants and 
specifies the date of entrance, which will normally coincide with the date 



Admission to Graduate School 21 



requested in the application. The student must accept or decline the 
offer of admission by the date indicated in the offer, or it lapses and the 
space is reassigned to another applicant. An individual whose offer of 
admission has lapsed must submit a new application and fee, if he 
wants to be reconsidered for admission at a later date. 

The offer of admission is also a permit-to-register for courses and 
must be presented by the student at the time of his first registration. 
Identification as a graduate student, to be used thereafter, will be issued 
at the time of first registration. 

Admission Time Limits 

For master's degree candidates, Advanced Graduate Specialist Certifi- 
cate seekers, and Advanced Special Students, admission terminates 
five years from the entrance date. Visiting Graduate Students and NSF 
Institute students are admitted for specified periods. 

A doctoral student must be admitted to candidacy within five years 
after entrance and must complete all remaining requirements within four 
years after admission to candidacy. Admission to the doctoral program 
terminates if these conditions are not met. 

Change of Objective, Status Termination of 
Admission 

Students are admitted only to a specified program and within that 
program only for the specified objective: e.g., master's degree, doctoral 
degree, or Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate. If the student 
wishes to change either the program or his status (for example, from 
Advanced Special Student to degree status), he must submit a new 
application and fee for admission. Admission in the new status is not 
granted automatically. 

The student's admission also terminates when the original objec- 
tive has been attained; for example, the admission terminates when a 
student who is admitted for the master's degree completes the require- 
ments for that degree. If the student wishes to continue for the 
doctorate, a new application for admission to the doctoral program must 
be submitted; requests for admission to the doctoral program are 
subject to the same review process applied to others seeking admission 
to that program. 

A student can be admitted to only one graduate program at any one 
time. Application for and acceptance of an offer of admission in a 
second graduate program automatically terminates the student's admis- 
sion to the first program. 

Students must maintain an average grade of B or better in all 
graduate courses taken and must otherwise satisfy all additional 
departmental and Graduate School program requirements. The admis- 
sion of all students, both degree and non-degree, is continued at the 
discretion of the major professor, the department or program director, 
and the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. 

Admission of Faculty 

No member of the faculty employed by the University of Maryland 
having the rank of Assistant Professor or above is permitted to take 
work leading to an advanced degree at this institution. 

Application Instructions 

To apply you must send both the completed application and complete, 
official transcripts covering all credits earned at any institution, in 
duplicate, to the Office of the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Decisions on admission and financial aid for either summer terms 
and for fall semester will first be made for those whose completed 
applications and supporting material have been received by the Gradu- 
ate School on or before March 1 . Qualified applicants whose completed 
applications and supporting material are received after March 1, but on 
or before May 1, will be granted admission and financial aid on a first- 
come, first-served basis, up to the limits of available space in the 
program. 

Applications for entry for the Spring semesters must be received by 
November 1. 

Application deadlines for non-U. S. citizens — please see "Foreign 
Student Applications" below. 

It is in general to the student's advantage to apply before the 
deadline, since in many programs, no space will be available to those 
who apply after March 1 due to heavy demand for admission. Applicants 
for Maryland or Graduate School Fellowships must submit their applica- 
tions by February 1. 

The application should arrive before the arrival of transcripts and 
other supporting evidence of preparation, if these materials cannot be 
attached to the application. 



Applicants are solely responsible for making certain that their 
transcripts have, in fact, been received by the Graduate School and not 
by the Registrar's Office or the graduate program desired, since no 
follow-up action can be taken by the Graduate School. 

Students who apply in their senior year in college must have a 
transcript sent to the Graduate School of all coursework completed up 
to the time of application. In addition, senior year first semester grade 
reports should be forwarded, if they are not on the current transcript, 
since no final decision will be possible without such grades. Seniors 
should also submit with the application a list of the courses in which they 
are currently enrolled. 

An official transcript is defined as a record which bears the 
signature of the registrar and the seal of the institution. 

A complete and separate application and fee must be submitted for 
each program in which entrance is sought. A new application is also 
required if there is a change in the objective or program. 

A fee of $15.00 must accompany the application for admission. 
This fee is not refundable under any circumstances. Payment must be 
made by check or money order payable to the University of Maryland 
Do not send stamps or cash. 

Students applying for entrance in either of the two summer 
sessions are urged to check the Summer Sessions Bulletin to determine 
if the courses they wish to take will be offered in a particular session. To 
obtain this publication, write to Summer Sessions Office, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Foreign Student Application 



No foreign student seeking admission to the University of Maryland 
should plan to leave his country before receiving an official offer of 
admission from the Director of Graduate Records of the Graduate 
School. 

Academic Credentials 

The complete application and official academic credentials — beginning 
with secondary school records — should be received by the Graduate 
Admissions Office by February 1 for the Fall Semester and by June 1 for 
the Spring Semester. Space available for foreign students may have 
been filled prior to this deadline, and all qualified students may not be 
accepted. 

English Proficiency English Proficiency Test 

In addition to meeting academic requirements, the foreign student 
applicant must demonstrate proficiency in English by taking the Test of 
English as a Foreign language (TOEFL). Because TOEFL is given only 
six times a year throughout various parts of the world, as soon as a 
student contemplates study at the University of Maryland, he should 
make arrangements to take the test. For test information, write to 
TOEFL Director, Educational Testing Service, Box 899, Princeton, New 
Jersey 08540. When the applicant is ready to begin his studies, he will 
be expected to read, speak, and write English fluently, to understand 
lectures and to take pertinent notes. 

Financial Resources 

A statement regarding the applicant's financial support is required by 
the Office of International Education Services. The Office must be 
assured that an applicant has sufficient financial resources to meet 
educational and living expenses of approximately $7,400 per year for 
the entire period of study at the University of Maryland. 

Immigration Documents 

It is necessary for students eligible for admission to secure from the 
university's Director of International Education Services the immigration 
form required for obtaining the appropriate visa. Students already 
studying in the United States who wish to transfer to the University of 
Maryland must also secure proper immigration documents to request 
the Immigration and Naturalization Service to grant permission for 
transfer. 

Reporting Upon Arrival 

Every foreign student is expected to report to the Office of International 
Education Services, North Administration Building, as soon as possible 
after he arrives at the University. This Office will be able to assist not 
only with various problems regarding immigration, housing, and fees, 
but also with problems relating generally to orientation to university and 
community life. 

Questions concerning criteria and requirements for foreign appli- 
cants should be addressed to the Director, International Education 
Services, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 20742. 



Records Maintenance and Disposition 

All records, including academic records from other institutions, become 
part of the official file and can neither be returned nor duplicated for any 



22 Registration and Credits Registration 



purpose. A student should obtain an additional copy of his official 
credentials to keep in his possession for advisory purposes and for 
other personal requirements. 

The admission credentials and the application data of applicants 
who do not register for courses at the time for which they have been 
admitted or whose applications have been disapproved or who do not 
respond to the departmental requests for additional information or 
whose applications are not complete with respect to the receipt of all 
transcripts or test results are retained for 18 months only and then 
destroyed. 



Registration and Credits Registration 

Schedule of Classes 

Graduate students are expected to be thoroughly familiar with the 
"Schedule of Classes," a publication issued prior to the beginning of 
each semester, available in the libraries, the North Administration 
Building, and the Student Union. The summer session publication, with 
information on both summer sessions, is available in the Turner 
Laboratory Summer School Offices. The "Schedule of Classes" lists 
rules and regulations governing all aspects of registration including 
deadlines; procedures for dropping or adding a course or making other 
changes in registration; procedures for the payment of tuition and fees; 
information about the times and places classes will be offered; and the 
names of the professors or instructors who will be teaching a particular 
course or section. It also contains the names, telephone numbers, and 
office locations of persons who can supply additional information. 

Developing a Program 

The student is responsible for ascertaining and complying with the rules 
and procedures of the Graduate School and all applicable department 
or graduate program requirements which govern the individual program 
of study. 

Registration for the newly admitted graduate student seeking a 
degree or certificate begins with a visit to the student's academic 
advisor in the graduate program or department to which the student has 
been admitted. There the student will obtain information about specific 
degree or certificate requirements, which supplement those of the 
Graduate School. 

The student will consult the "Schedule of Classes" and will 
develop, in consultation with a graduate faculty advisor, an individual 
program of study and research. 

Students admitted to Advanced Special Student Status may seek 
advice from the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research and his staff 
or from appropriate faculty members. 

While most questions normally raised by graduate students, and 
most problems they meet, will be answered or resolved by the faculty 
advisor or a departmental committee, the students should remember 
that the staff of the Graduate School is specifically charged with the 
responsibility for assisting graduate students who need additional 
information, guidance, or assistance. Further, the Dean for Graduate 
Students is the individual to whom requests or petitions for exceptions 
or waivers of regulations or graduate degree requirements should be 
addressed and to whom appeals from decisions of departmental or 
program faculty or administrators should be directed. 

Course Numbering System 

Courses are designated as follows: 

000-099 — Non-credit courses. 

100-1 99 — Primarily freshman courses. 

200-299 — Primarily sophomore courses. 

300-399 — Junior and senior courses not acceptable for credit toward 

graduate degrees. 

400-499 — Junior and senior courses acceptable for credit toward some 

graduate degrees. 

500-599 — Professional school courses (Dentistry, Law, Medicine) and 

post-baccalaureate courses not for graduate degree credit. 

600-898 — Courses restricted to graduate students. 

799 — Master's thesis credit. 

899 — Doctoral dissertation credit. 

The first character of the numeric position determines the level of 
the course and the last two digits are used for course identification. 
Courses ending with an 8 or 9 are courses that are repeatable for credit. 
All non-repeatable courses must end in through 7. 

Graduate credit will not be given unless the student has been 
admitted to the Graduate School. 



Designation of Full and Part-time Graduate 
Students 

In order to accurately reflect the involvement of graduate students in 
their programs of study and research and the use of University 
resources in those programs, the Graduate Council uses the graduate 
unit in making calculations to determine full or part-time student status 
in the administration of the minimum registration requirements de- 
scribed below and in responding to student requests for certification of 
full-time student status. The number of graduate units per semester 
credit hour is calculated in the following manner: 

Courses in the series: 000-399 carry 2 units/credit hour. 

Courses in the series: 400-499 carry 4 units/credit hour. 

Courses in the series: 500-599 carry 5 units/credit hour. 

Courses in the series: 600-898 carry 6 units/credit hour. 

Research course: 799 carries 12 units/credit hour. 

Research course: 899 carries 18 units/credit hour. 

To be certified as a full-time student a graduate student must be 
officially registered for a combination of courses equivalent to 48 units 
per semester. A graduate assistant holding a regular appointment is a 
full-time student, if he is registered for at least 24 units in addition to the 
assistantship. 

Grades for Graduate Students 

A minimum grade point average of 3.0 is required for graduation with a 
graduate degree. 

Grading Systems 

The conventional A through F grading system is used in graduate level 
courses. 

A "Satisfactory or Failure" (S-F) grading system may be used, at 
the discretion of the department or program, for certain types of 
graduate study. These include courses which require independent field 
work, special projects, or independent study. Departmental seminars, 
workshops, and departmental courses in instructional methods may 
also be appropriate for the S-F grading system. 

The "Pass-Fail" grading system is a grading option for undergradu- 
ates. However, in certain cases, a Department or Program may give 
permission for a graduate student to use the Pass-Fail option for any 
100-300 level courses that student takes. Graduate credit may not be 
earned for these courses. 

Thesis and dissertation research, and courses labelled "independ- 
ent Study" or "Special Problems," may use either the A-F or the S-F 
grading system. 

Only one grading system will be used for a single course in a 
particular semester. The grading system will be designated by the 
department or program offering the course. 

Computation of Grade Point Average 

The A is calculated at 4 quality points, B at 3 quality points and C at 2 
quality points. The grades of D, F, and I receive no quality points. After a 
student is matriculated as a graduate student, all courses he takes 
numbered 400 and above, except 500-level courses, those numbered 
799 or 899, and those graded with an S, will be used in the calculation of 
the grade point average. A student may repeat any course in an effort to 
earn a better grade. The later grade, whether higher or lower, will be 
used in computing the grade point average. Grades for graduate 
students remain as part of the student's permanent record and may be 
changed only by the original instructor on certification, approved by the 
department chairman and the Dean for Graduate Studies and Re- 
search, that an actual mistake was made in determining or recording the 
grade. 

No course taken after August 23, 1974, will be considered "not 
applicable" for the purpose of computing the grade point average of a 
graduate student. No graduate credit transferred from another institu- 
tion will be included in the calculation of the grade point average. 

Minimum Registration Requirements 

All graduate students making any demand upon the academic or 
support services of the university, whether taking courses, using univer- 
sity libraries, laboratories, computer facilities, office space, housing, or 
consulting with faculty advisors, taking comprehensive or final oral 
examinations, must register for the number of graduate units which will, 
in the judgment of the faculty advisor, accurately reflect the student's 



Registration and Credits Registration 23 



involvement in graduate study and use of university resources. In no 
case will registration be for less than one credit. 

Minimum Registration Requirements for Doctoral 
Candidates 

Doctoral students who have been advanced to candidacy must register 
each semester, excluding summer sessions, until the degree is award- 
ed. 

Dissertation Research 

Those who have not completed the required 12 semester credit hours 
of Dissertation Research (899), or its equivalent, must register for a 
minimum of 18 graduate units each semester. Doctoral candidates 
whose demands upon the University are greater than that represented 
by this minimum registration will, of course, be expected to register for 
the number of units which reflect their use of University resources. 

Continuous Registration 

Doctoral candidates who have completed the required minimum of 12 
credit hours of Dissertation Research (899), or its equivalent, and who 
are making no use of University resources, must meet a Continuous 
Registration requirement, in each semester, except for summer ses- 
sions, until the degree is awarded. This requirement is met by submitting 
the Continuous Registration Form and paying the $10.00 Continuous 
Registration fee, in person or by mail, directly to the Graduate School. 
Forms and fees must be received before the end of the eighth week of 
classes during the fall and spring semesters. Continuous Registration 
forms may be obtained from the Graduate School, Room 21 17, South 
Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742. 

Failure to comply with the requirement for maintaining Continuous 
Registration will be taken as evidence that the student has terminated 
his doctoral program, and admitted status to the Graduate School will 
be terminated. A new application for admission, with the consequent 
reevaluation of the student's performance, will be required of a student 
wishing to resume a graduate program, whose admission has been 
terminated under this regulation. 

Partial Credit Course Registration for Handicapped 
Students 

The Graduate School recognizes that physically handicapped students 
may derive considerable educational benefit from courses which in- 
clude laboratories or other non-classroom activities in which the student 
is prevented from participating because of the handicap. It is, therefore, 
the policy of the Graduate School to allow handicapped students to 
enroll in such courses, complete only those parts of the course that their 
physical capabilities permit, and receive credit for the course propor- 
tionate to their levels of participation. 

Physically handicapped graduate students wishing to enroll in such 
courses but participate only in certain aspects of them, should consult 
the Assistant to the Dean in the Graduate School (Room 2114 South 
Administration Building). That person will assist the student in making 
the necessary arrangements with the department offering the course, 
the department supervising the student's graduate program, and the 
Registration Office. The final agreement as to the student's level of 
participation and the amount of credit to be awarded will be specified in 
an agreement to be drawn up by the Graduate School and signed by all 
parties concerned. 

Graduate Credit for Senior Undergraduates 

A senior in his final semester at the University of Maryland at College 
Park who is within seven credit hours of completing the requirements for 
an undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his undergraduate 
dean, the provost of his division, the department or program offering the 
course, and the Graduate School, register for graduate courses. These 
may later be counted for graduate credit toward an advanced degree at 
the University, if the student has been approved for admission to the 
Graduate School. The total of undergraduate and graduate courses 
must not exceed 15 credits for the semester. Excess credits in the 
senior year cannot be used for graduate credit unless proper prear- 
rangement is made. Seniors who wish to register for graduate credit 
should inquire at the Graduate School, Office of the Director of 
Records, for information about the procedure. 

Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Level Courses 

Subject to requirements determined by the graduate faculty members of 
the department or program offering the course, undergraduate students 



may register for graduate level courses, i.e., those numbered from 600 
to 898, with the exception of 799 and 899, for undergraduate credit. 

A student seeking to utilize this option will normally be in the senior 
year, have earned an accumulated grade point average of 3.0, have 
successfully completed, with a grade of B or better, the prerequisite and 
correlative courses, and be a mapr in the appropriate or a closely 
related department. The student will be required to obtain prior approval 
of the department offering the course. 

Enrollment in a graduate level course does not in any way imply 
subsequent departmental or Graduate School approval for admission 
into a graduate program, nor may the course be used as credit for a 
graduate degree at the University of Maryland 

Credit by Examination 

A graduate student may obtain graduate credit by examination in 
courses at the 400 level previously identified by the appropriate 
department or program. As a general rule, credit by examination is not 
available for courses at the 600, 700, or 800 levels for, in the judgment 
of the Graduate Council, courses at these levels require a continuing 
interaction between faculty and students to achieve the educational 
goals of advanced study. 

A student may receive credit by examination only for a course for 
which he is otherwise eligible to receive graduate credit. The depart- 
ment or program in which he is enrolled may establish a limit on the 
number of credits which may be earned in this manner. Graduate 
students seeking credit by examination must obtain the consent of their 
advisor and of the instructor currently responsible for the course. Once 
the student begins the examination, th'e grade earned will be recorded. 

The Graduate School maintains a list of courses for which examina- 
tions are available or will be prepared. The fee for credit by examination 
is $30.00 per course regardless of the number of credits or units to be 
earned. 

Transfer of Credit 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate level course credits 
earned at regionally accredited institutions prior to, or after, matricula- 
tion in the Graduate School may be applied toward master's degrees at 
the University of Maryland. Proportionately larger amounts of credit may 
be applied toward doctoral degrees. 

All graduate study credits offered as transfer credit must meet the 
following criteria: 

1 . They must have received graduate credit at the institution where 
earned. 

2. They must not have been used to meet the requirements for any 
degree previously earned. 

3. They must have been taken within the time limits applicable to 
degrees awarded by the Graduate School. 

4. the department or program to which the student has been admitted 
at Maryland must certify the courses are appropriate to the degree 
program the student is pursuing at Maryland. 

5. The student must have earned a B or better in the courses offered 
for transfer credit. 

6. Transfer work normally satisfies only the 400 level requirements for 
the master's degree and does not apply to the upper level 
requirement. 

A student seeking acceptance of transfer credit is advised to 
submit the necessary transcripts and certification of department or 
program approval to the Graduate School as promptly as possible for its 
review and decision. 

Criteria that Courses Must Meet to be Accepted for 
Graduate Credit 

Any courses, workshops, or seminars planned to take place in a span of 
time less than a normal academic semester or summer session and 
ottering graduate credit to the participants must meet the following 
criteria: 

1. There must be 15 "contact hours" per graduate credit. 

a. Lectures: 1 contact hour per 50 minutes lecture. 

b. Non-lecture contact (laboratory, workshops, discussion and 
problem working sessions, etc.): 1 contact hour per 2 or 3 hour 
session. 

2. No more than three "contact hours" per day will be permitted. 
(Three "contact hours" are equivalent to 0.2 credits) 

3. Credit may be accumulated at the rate of no more than one credit 
per week. 

The Inter-Campus Student 

A student admitted to the Graduate School on any campus of the 
University is eligible to take courses on any other campus of the 



24 Degree Requirements 



University with the approval of his academic advisor and the graduate 
deans on the home and host campuses. Credits earned on a host 
campus are resident credit at the home campus and meet all degree 
requirements. Transcripts of work taken at another campus will be 
maintained on the home campus, and fees will be paid to the home 
campus. Forms for registration as an inter-campus student may be 
obtained from the Graduate School offices on any campus of the 
University. 



Degree Requirements 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to all 
Master's Degrees. 

Programs 

The entire course of study undertaken for any master's degree must 
constitute a unified, coherent program which is approved by the 
student's advisor and by the Graduate School. 

A minimum of thirty semester hours in courses acceptable for credit 
towards a graduate degree is required; in certain cases six of the thirty 
semester hours must be thesis research credits. The graduate program 
must include at least 12 hours of course work at the 600 level or higher. 
If the student is inadequately prepared for the required graduate 
courses, additional courses may be required, which may not be consid- 
ered as part of the student's graduate program. Credits to be applied to 
a student's program for a master's degree cannot have been used to 
satisfy any other degree requirements. 

Grade-point Average 

The student seeking any master's degree must maintain an average 
grade of B over all courses taken for graduate credit. 

Time Limitation 

All requirements for the master's degree must be completed within a 
five year period. This time limit applies to any transfer work from other 
institutions to be included in a student's program. 

Residence Requirements 

A minimum residence of one year of full-time study, or its equivalent, at 
this university is required. 

Additional Requirements 

In addition to the above requirements, special departmental or collegi- 
ate requirements may be imposed, especially for degrees which are 
offered only in one department, college, or division. For these special 
requirements consult the descriptions which appear under the depart- 
mental or collegiate listing in this catalog or the special publications 
which can be obtained from the department or college. 

Graduate School Requirements for the Degrees of 
Master of Arts and Master of Science 

THESIS OPTION 

Course Requirements 

A minimum of 30 semester hours including six hours of thesis research 
credit (799) is required for the degrees of Master of Arts and Master of 
Science. Of the 24 hours required in graduate courses, no less than 12 
must be earned in the major subject. No less than one-half of the total 
required course credits for the degree, or a minimum of twelve, must be 
selected from courses numbered 600 or above. 

Thesis Requirement 

A thesis is required for the Master of Arts and Master of Science 
degrees except for those programs in which a non-thesis option has 
been approved by the Dean in conformity with the policy of the 
Graduate Council. Approval of the thesis is the responsibility of an 
examining committee appointed by the Dean. The student's advisor is 
the chairman of the committee, and the remaining members of the 
committee are members of the graduate faculty who are familiar with 
the student's program of study. The chairman and the candidate are 
informed of the membership of the examining committee by the Dean. 
Directions for the preparation and submission of theses will be 
found in the Graduate Student Academic Handbook, which may be 
purchased at the university book store. 

Oral Examination 

A final oral examination on the thesis shall be held when the student has 
completed his thesis to the satisfaction of his advisor, providing he has 
completed all other requirements for the degree and has earned a 3.0 
grade average, computed in accordance with the regulations described 
under "Grades for Graduate Students." 



The examining committee, with a minimum of three members, \ 
conducts the oral examination (an additional comprehensive written 
examination may be required at the option of the department or 
program). The chairman of the examining committee selects the time 
and place for the examination and notifies other members of the 
committee and the candidate. Members of the committee must be given 
a minimum of seven school days in which to read the thesis. The 
duration of the examination is normally about an hour, but it may be 
longer if necessary to insure an adequate examination. 

The decision to accept the examination as satisfactory must be 
unanimous. Students may present themselves for examination only 
twice. The report of the committee, signed by each member, must be 
submitted to the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research no later than 
the appropriate date listed in the "Important Dates for Advisors and 
Students," if the student is to receive a diploma at the Commencement 
in the semester in which the examination is held. 

NON-THESIS OPTION 

The requirements for Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees 
without thesis vary slightly among departments and programs in which 
this option is available. Standards for admission are, however, identical 
with those for admission to any other master's program. The quality of 
the work expected of the student is also identical to that expected in the 
thesis programs. 

The general requirements for those on the non-thesis program are 
a minimum of 30 semester credit hours in courses approved for 
graduate credit with a minimum average grade of B in all course work 
taken; a minimum of 18 semester credit hours in courses numbered 600 
or above; the submission of one or more scholarly papers; and 
successful completion of a comprehensive final examination, a portion 
of which must be written. 

A student following a non-thesis master's program will be expected 
to meet the same deadlines for application for a diploma and for final 
examination reports established for all other degree programs. 

For information on programs which offer the non-thesis option, see 
the list of Graduate Programs in this Catalog. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of 
Education 

Nearly all departments in Education offer the Master of Education 
(M.Ed.) degree with the following requirements: 

1. A minimum of 30 semester hours in coursework with a grade 
average of B. Grades for courses not a part of the program but 
taken in graduate status will be computed in the average. 

2. A minimum of 15 hours in courses numbered 600-800 with the 
remainder at least in the 400 series. Some departments require 
courses in departments outside of those in Education. 

3. A comprehensive written examination taken at the end of cour- 
sework. A part of the examination may be oral. 

4. EDMS 646 or MUED 690 and one seminar paper; or two seminar 
papers. 

5. EDMS 446 or EDMS 451. 

6. Test battery. 

For further details, see "Statement of Policies and Procedures: 
Master's Degrees in Education," issued by the College of Education, 
and descriptions of departmental programs. 

Requirements Applicable to Other Master's Degrees 

The particular requirements for the degrees of Master of Architecture, 
Master of Business Administration, Master of Library Science, Master of 
Music, and Master of Fine Arts are given under the individual Graduate 
Program entries in those fields. 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to All 
Doctoral Degrees 

Credit Requirements 

The Graduate School requires that every student seeking the doctoral 
degree register for a minimum of 12 research credits, but the number of 
research and other credit hours required in the program varies with the 
degree and program in question. 

Residence 

The equivalent of three years of full-time graduate study and research is 
the minimum required. Of the three years, the equivalent of at least one 
year must be spent at the University of Maryland. On a part-time basis 
the time needed will be increased correspondingly. All work at other 
institutions offered in partial fulfillment of the requirements for any 
doctoral degree must be submitted, with the recommendation of the 



Degree Requirements 25 



department or program concerned, to the Graduate School tor approval 
at the time of application for admission to candidacy. Official transcripts 
of the work must be filed in the Graduate School. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Preliminary examinations, or such other substantial tests as the depart- 
ments may elect, are frequently prerequisite for admission to candidacy. 

A student must be admitted to candidacy for the doctorate within 
five years after admission to the doctoral program and at least one 
academic year before the date on which the degree will be conferred. 

It is the responsibility of the student to submit his application for 
admission to candidacy when all the requirements for candidacy have 
been fulfilled. Applications for admission to candidacy are made in 
duplicate by the student and submitted to the major department for 
further action and transmission to the Graduate School. Application 
forms may be obtained at the office of the Assistant to the Dean. 

Time Limitation 

The student must complete the entire program for the degree, including 
the dissertation and final examination, during a four year period after 
admission to candidacy. Extensions of time are granted only under the 
most unusual circumstances. If a student fails to complete all require- 
ments within the time allotted, he must submit another application for 
admission to the Graduate School and, if readmitted, another applica- 
tion for Advancement to Candidacy, after satisfying the usual program 
prerequisites prior to Advancement to Candidacy. 

Dissertation 

A dissertation or its equivalent is required of all candidates for a doctoral 
degree. The topic of the dissertation must be approved by the depart- 
ment or program committee. 

During the preparation of the dissertation, all candidates for any 
doctoral degree must register for the prescribed number of semester 
hours of Doctoral Dissertation Research (899) at the University of 
Maryland. 

Directions for the preparation and submission of dissertations will 
be found in the Graduate Student Academic Handbook, which may be 
purchased at the university book store. 

Publication of the Dissertation 

If a student wishes to publish all or a portion of his thesis or dissertation 
prior to its defense and approval by the Graduate Faculty examining 
committee, he must first seek the approval of the Dean for Graduate 
Studies and Research. This approval is sought through a letter to the 
Dean, endorsed by the dissertation advisor, containing an explanation 
of the need for early publication. 

Final Examination 

The final oral defense of the dissertation is conducted by a committee of 
the Graduate Faculty appointed by the Dean for Graduate Studies and 
Research. Nominations for membership on the committee are sub- 
mitted by the student's major professor by the third week of the 
semester in which the student expects to complete all requirements, but 
no later than two months prior to the examination, on the designated 
form. 

The major professor serves as chairman of the committee, which 
will consist of a minimum of five voting members, all of whom hold the 
doctoral degree. At least one of the five must be a faculty member in a 
department or Graduate Program at UMCP external to the one in which 
the student is seeking the degree. A minimum of three members of the 
committee must be regular members of the Graduate Faculty of the 
University of Maryland. 

One or more members of the committee may be persons from 
other institutions who hold the doctorate and who are distinguished 
scholars in the field of the dissertation. 

The Dean designates one member of the committee as his 
representative. In addition to having the normal responsibility of a 
faculty examiner, the Dean's representative has the responsibility of 
assuring that the examination is conducted according to established 
procedures. Any disagreement over the examination procedures is 
referred to the Dean's representative for decision. 

The time and place of the examination are established by the 
chairman of the committee. The student is responsible for distributing a 
complete copy of the dissertation to each member of the committee at 
least ten days before the examination. 

All final oral examinations are open to all members of the Graduate 
Faculty. After the examination, the committee deliberates and votes in 
private. Two or more negative votes constitute a failure. The student 
may be examined no more than twice. 

Additional Requirements 

In addition to the above requirements, special departmental or collegi- 
ate requirements may be imposed, especially for those degrees which 



are offered in only one department, college, or division. For these 
special requirements, consult the descriptions which appear under the 
departmental or collegiate listing in this catalog or the special publica- 
tions which can be obtained from the department, college, or division. 

Graduate School Requirements for the Degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy 

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree is granted only upon sufficient 
evidence of high attainment in scholarship and the ability to engage in 
independent research. It is not awarded for the completion of course 
and seminar requirements no matter how successfully completed. 

Residence 

See requirements for all doctoral degrees. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

A number of departments have a foreign language requirement for the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree The student should inquire in the depart- 
ment regarding this requirement. The student must satisfy the depart- 
mental or program requirement before he can be admitted to candidacy 
for the doctorate. 

Program 

There is no Graduate School requirement for a specific number of 
course credits in either a major or a minor subject. It is the policy of the 
Graduate School to encourage the development of individual programs 
for each student who seeks the PhD. To that end, the academic 
departments and interdisciplinary programs have been directed to 
determine major and minor requirements, levels or sequences of 
required courses, and similar requirements for submission to the 
Graduate Council for approval. 

Admission to Candidacy 

See requirements for all doctoral degrees. 

Dissertation 

The ability to do independent research must be demonstrated by an 
original dissertation on a topic approved by the department or program. 
During the preparation of the dissertation, all candidates for the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree must register for a minimum of 12 
semester hours of doctoral research (899) at the University of Maryland. 

Final Examination 

See requirements for all doctoral degrees. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of 
Education 

The requirements for the Doctor of Education (Ed.d). degree are for the 
most part the same as those for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in 
education departments in the Graduate School. The only difference lies 
in the amount of credit for the Ed.D. proiect (6-9 hours) as compared to 
that required for the Ph.D. disseration (12-16 hours). For details see 
"Statement of Policy and Procedures: Doctoral Degrees in Education," 
issued by the College of Education, as well as requirements for the 
Ph.D., see above, and departmental regulations. 

Requirements for Other Doctoral Degrees 

The particular requirements for the degrees of Doctor of Business 
Administration and Doctor of Musical Arts are given under the corre- 
sponding program descriptions. 

Commencement 

Applications for the diploma must be filed with the Office of Admissions 
and Registrations within the first three weeks of the semester in which 
the candidate expects to obtain a degree, except during summer 
session. During the summer session, the application must be filed 
during the first week of the second summer session. Exact dates are 
noted for each semester and the summer sessions in "Important Dates 
for Advisors and Students " 

If, for any reason, a student does not graduate at the end of the 
semester in which he applies for the diploma, he must re-apply for it in 
the semester in which he expects to graduate. 

Academic costume is required of all candidates at commencement 
exercises. Those who so desire may purchase or rent caps and gowns 
at the University of Maryland student supply store. Orders must be filed 
eight weeks before the date of commencement but may be cancelled 
later if the student finds himself unable to complete the requirements for 
the degree. 



26 



The Graduate Faculty 



Abdulhadi, Rami S. Assistant Prolessor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering B.S . University ot Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1965; 
MS. 1969; Ph.D., 1975. 

Adams. John 0. Ill Associate Professor ot Economics A.B., 
Oberlin College. 1960. Ph.D.. University of Texas. 1965 
Adams William W. Professor of Mathematics B.A . Universi- 
ty of California. Los Angeles. 1959; Ph.D.. Columbia University, 
1964. 

Adklns Arthur J. Associate Professor of Secondary Educa- 
tion B.S., Saint Cloud State College. 1942; M.A.. University of 
Minnesota. 1947, PhD, 1958. 

Adler, Isidore Professor of Chemistry B.A . Brooklyn Col- 
lege, 1942; B S . New York University. 1943. MS. Polytechnic 
Institute of Brooklyn. 1947; Ph.D.. 1952 
Aggour. Mohamed S. Associate Professor. Civil Engineering 
BS, Cairo University (Egypt), 1964; MS , 1966; Ph.D.. Universi- 
ty of Washington. 1972. 

Agrawala, A.K. Associate Professor of Computer Science 
Ph.D. Harvard University. 1970 

Agre Gene P. Associate Professor of Social Foundations of 
Education B.A., Macalester College. 1951; B.S. University of 
Minnesota, 1953. M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1964 
A'Hearn, Michael F. Associate Professor of Astronomy B.S.. 
Boston College. 1961; Ph.D., University ot Wisconsin. 1966. 
Ahern, Dennis M. Assistant Professor of Philosophy BA, 
Cornell University. 1968. Ph.D., University of California, 1973 
Ahrens, Richard A. Professor of Food and Nutrition and 
Institutional Administration B.S , University of Wisconsin. 1958; 
Ph.D., University of California, Davis. 1963 
Albert Thomas F. Associate Professor of Veterinary Sci- 
ence B S.. Pennsylvania State University. 1958. VMD. Universi- 
ty ot Pennsylvania. 1962; Ph.D.. Georgetown University. 1972 
Alexander, James C. Professor of Mathematics and Statis- 
tics B.A. The Johns Hopkins University. 1964; PhD. 1968 
Alexander, Millard H. Professor of Chemistry B.A.. Harvard 
College. 1964; Ph.D., Faculte des Sciences, Orsay, 1967 
Allan. J. David Associate Professor of Zoology B.Sc. Uni- 
versity of British Columbia, 1966; M.S., University of Michigan, 
1968. PhD. 1971 

Allan. Thomas Associate Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services BS. Northwestern University, 1950. MA.. 
University of Maryland. 1964; Ph.D., 1966. 
Alleman. James E. Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
BS. University of Notre Dame. 1971. MS.. 1973; Ph.D.. 1978. 
Allen Redfield W. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S.. University of Maryland. 1943; M.S.. 1949. Ph.D.. University 
of Minnesota. 1959. 

Allen. Roger J. Assistant Professor of Health Education. 
B.S.E.. University of Kansas, 1976; MS., University of Kansas. 
1977; Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 1979. 
Alley, Carroll O., Jr. Professor of Physics B S„ University of 
Richmond. 1948, MA, Princeton University 1951; Ph.D.. 1962. 
Almenas, Kazys K. Associate Professor ot Nuclear Engi- 
neering BS. University of Nebraska, 1957; Ph.D., University 
and Polytechnic of Warsaw. 1968. 

Almon, Clopper. Jr. Professor of Economics A.B. . Vanderbilt 
University, 1956; MA. Harvard University. 1961, Ph.D.. 1962. 
Alt. Frank B. Assistant Professor ot Business and Manage- 
ment B.E.S.. Johns Hopkins University, 1967, MS, Georgia 
Institute of Technology, 1974; Ph.D. 1977 
Amershek, Kathleen G. Associate Professor of Early Child- 
hood and Elementary Education B.S . Penn State Teachers 
College. 1951; M Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 1957; 
PhD, University of Minnesota, 1965 
Ames, Carole A. Assistant Professor of Human Develop- 
ment Education B.A., Indiana University, 1967; M.S., 1968; 
Ph D.. Purdue University, 1976. 

Amnion, Herman L. Professor ot Chemistry Sc.B.. Brown 
University, 1958; Ph.D., University of Washington. 1962. 
Anand, Davinder K. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
BS. George Washington University. 1959; MS., 1961; D.Sc. 
1965. 



Anastos, George Professor of Zoology B.S., University of 
Akron. 1942. MA. Harvard University. 1947. PhD, 1949. 
Anderson. Charles R. Associate Professor of Secondary 
Education and Assistant Dean of the College of Education B.S.. 
University of Maryland. 1957, M.Ed., 1959; Ed.D.. 1969. 
Anderson, Frank G. Associate Professor of Anthropology 
A.B.. Cornell University. 1941; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. 
1951. 

Anderson, J. Paul Professor of Administration, Supervision 
and Curriculum B.S.. University of Minnesota, 1942; M.A., 1948; 
PhD, 1960 

Anderson, J. Robert Professor of Physics 8.S, State Uni- 
versity of Iowa, 1955. Ph.D. 1963 

Anderson, John D., Jr. Professor of Aerospace Engineering 
BS, University of Florida. 1959; Ph.D.. Ohio State University. 
1966. 

Anderson, Nancy S. Professor of Psychology B.A . Universi- 
ty of Colorado. 1952; MA. Ohio State University. 1953; Ph.D.. 
1956. 

Anderson, Thornton H. Professor of Government and Poli- 
tics A.B. University Of Kentucky, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D.. 
University of Wisconsin. 1948. 

Antman, Stuart S. Professor of Mathematics B S.. 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1961; M.S.. University of Min- 
nesota. 1963; Ph.D. 1965. 

Armstrong. Earlene Assistant Professor, Entomology B.S , 
North Carolina Central University. 1969; M.S., 1970; Ph.D., 
Cornell University. 1975. 

Armstrong, Ronald W. Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins University. 1955; M.Sc, Carne- 
gie-Mellon University. 1957; Ph.D., 1958. 
Arnold, Douglas N. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A B. Brown University. 1975. MA. University of Chicago. 1976, 
Ph.D.. 1979. 

Arrighi, Margarlte A. Assistant Professor ot Physical Educa- 
tion BS. Westhampton College, 1958. M.S.. University of 
Maryland, 1962. ED., University of North Carolina at Green- 
sboro, 1974. 

Arsenault, Richard J. Professor of Chemical Engineering 
and Engineering Materials B.S., Michigan Technological Univer- 
sity. 1957. Ph.D. Northwestern University. 1962. 
Ashby, Genette D. Assistant Professor of French and Italian 
B.A.. Oberlin College. 1 969; MA. Middlebury College. 1 971 ; M. 
Phil.. Columbia University. 1973; Ph.D.. 1976. 
Ashlock, Robert B. Professor of Early Childhood and Ele- 
mentary Education BS Butler University, 1957; M.S., 1959; 
Ed.D., Indiana University, 1965. 

Assad, Ar)ang A. Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1971; 
M.S.. 1976; Ph.D.. 1978 

Atchison, William F. Professor of Computer Science A.B., 
Georgetown College (Ky). 1936; M.A.. University of Kentucky. 
1940, Ph.D. University of Illinois. 1943 
Auslander. Joseph Professor of Mathematics BS. Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology, 1952. MS., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1953. PhD, 1957 

Austlng. Richard H. Associate Professor of Computer Sci- 
ence B.S., Xavier University. 1953. M.S., Saint Louis University. 
1955; Ph D„ Catholic University of America, 1963. 
Avery, William T. Professor and Chairman of Classical Lan- 
guages and Literatures B A . Western Reserve University. 1934; 
M.A., 1935; PhD.. 1937 

Axelson, Maria L Assistant Professor. Food, Nutrition and 
Institution Administration BS, Florida State University. 1975; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1979. 
Axley, John H. Professor of Agronomy B.A., University of 
Wisconsin. 1937; Ph.D.. 1945 

Ayars. James E. Assistant Professor. Agricultural Engineer- 
ing B.A.E., Cornell University. 1965, M S , Colorado State Uni- 
versity, 1973; PhD.. 1976. 

Aycock, Marvin K., Jr. Professor of Agronomy B.S., North 
Carolina State University. 1959; M.S., 1963; Ph.D., Iowa State 
University. 1966. 



Aylward, Thomas J. Professor and Chairman of Communi- 
cation Arts and Theatre B.S.. University of Wisconsin. 1947; 
M S .. 1949. PhD.. 1960. 

Babuska, Ivo Research Professor, Institute for Physical Sci- 
ence and Technology and Mathematics Dipl. Ing., Technical 
University of Prague. 1949. PhD. 1951, Ph.D. Czechoslovak 
Academy of Sciences, 1955. Ph.D.. 1960 
Baenziger, Peter Stephen Ad|unct Assistant Professor of 
Agronomy B A.. Harvard College. 1972; M.S.. Purdue University. 
1975; Ph.D., 1975. 

Baer Ferdinand Professor and Director of Meteorology 
B.A.. University Of Chicago. 1950; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1961 
Bagchi, Amltabha Assistant Professor of Physics B.Sc, ", 
Calcutta University, 1964; M.S., University ot California. San 
Diego. 1967; Ph.D.. 1970 

Bagnato, Stephen J. Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services B.S, Clarion State College. 1969; M.S., 
Pennsylvania State University. 1975. D.Ed., 1977. 
Bailey, Martin J. Professor of Economics B.A., University of 
California. Los Angeles, 1 951 ; M A , The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. 1953; Ph.D., 1956. 

Bailey, William J. Research Professor of Chemistry 
BChem. University of Minnesota, 1943; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois, 1946. 

Baker, David W. Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering B.S.. 
University of Maryland. 1943, MS., 1951; Ph.D.. 1967. 
Baker, Donald J. Associate Professor of Hearing and 
Speech Sciences B.S. Ed., Ohio State University, 1954; M.A.. 
1956. Ph.D., 1962. 

Ball, Michael Assistant Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment B.ES., Johns Hopkins University, 1972; M.S.E., 1972; 
Ph.D., Cornell University. 1977 

Bandel, Vernon A. Professor of Agronomy B.S, University of 
Maryland, 1959; M.S., 1962. Ph.D. 1965. 
Baner|ee. Mano| K. Professor of Physics BS, Patna Univer- 
sity, 1949; MS., Calcutta University. 1952. PhD., 1956. 
Baras, John S. Associate Professor ot Electrical Engineering 
Diploma. National Technical University of Athens. 1970; S.M., 
Harvard University. 1971; PhD., 1973. 
Barbosa, Pedro Associate Professor ot Entomology B.S.. 
University of Massachusetts. 1966. M.S.. 1969; Ph.D.. 1971 
Bardasls, Angelo Associate Professor of Physics A.B.. Cor- 
nell University. 1957; M.S. University of Illinois, 1959; Ph.D.. 
1962. 

Barker, Donald B. Assistant Professor ol Mechanical Engi- 
neering B.S.M.E., University of Washington. 1969; MS.. 1971; 
Ph D.. University of California at Los Angeles. 1976. 
Barkln, Steve M. Assistant Professor of Journalism A.B., 
Washington University. 1967; MS, Columbia University, 1968; 
PhD., Ohio State University, 1979 

Barlow, Jewel B. Associate Professor of Aerospace Engi- 
neering BS. Auburn University. 1963, M.S. 1964; Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of Toronto. 1970. 

Barnes, Jack C. Associate Professor of English BA., Duke 
University, 1939; M.A., 1947; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
1954. 

Barnett, Audrey J. Associate Professor of Zoology B.A., 
Wilson College. 1955; MA. Indiana University. 1957; Ph.D., 
1962 

Barnett, Neal M. Associate Prolessor of Botany B.S., Purdue 
University, 1959, Ph.D.. Duke University, 1966. 
Barrett Paul E. Assistant Professor of Botany B.S., Universi- 
ty of New Hampshire, 1964, MS., 1966, PhD, University of 
British Columbia, 1972. 

Barry, Jackson G. Associate Professor ot English B.A . Yale 
College. 1950; MA. Columbia University, 1951; M.F A.. West- 
ern Reserve University, 1962; Ph.D.. 1963. 
Bartlett, Claude J. Professor ot Psychology B.S.. Denison 
University. 1954; M.A., Ohio Slate University, 1956. Ph.D., 1958 
Bartol, Kathryn M. Associate Professor ol Business and 
Management B.A., Marygrove College. 1963; M.A., University of 
Michigan. 1966; Ph.D.. Michigan State University. 1972. 



Brown, Richard H. 27 



Basham, Ray S. Associate Professor ol Electrical Engineer- 
ing B.S.. US Military Academy. 1945; M S . University of Illinois. 
1952, PhD, 1962. 

Baslll, Victor R. Associate Professor of Computer Science 
B.S., Fordham College. 1961; MS. Syracuse University, 1963, 
Ph.D. University of Texas. 1970. 

Bean, George A. Professor of Botany B.S, Cornell Universi 
ty, 1958, M.S., University of Minnesota, 1960; Ph.D.. 1963 
Beasley. Maurlne H. Associate Professor, College of Jour 
nahsm B.A. University of Missouri, 1958; B.J., 1958. MS 
Columbia University. 1963. Ph.D.. George Washington Universi 
ty, 1974. 

Beaton, John R. Dean. College of Human Ecology and 
Professor. Food. Nutrition and Institutional Administration B.A, 
University of Toronto. 1949. MA., 1950, Ph.D.. 1952. 
Beatty, Charles J. Associate Professor of Industrial Educa- 
tion BS, Northern Michigan University, 1959, MA, Michigan 
State University. 1963. PhD. Ohio State University. 1966 
Bechhoefer, William B. Associate Professor of Architecture 
A.B, Harvard College, 1963; M Arch , 1967 
Beck, Kenneth H. Assistant Professor of Health Education, 
BS., Pennsylvania State University, 1972; MA . Syracuse Uni- 
versity. 1975, Ph.D., Syracuse University. 1977 
Seckjord, Peter R. Assistant Professor of Forestry {Horticul- 
ture) BS.F , West Virginia University. 1 972. M S F ., 1 973, Ph.D.. 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. 1978 
Beckmann, Robert B. Dean of the College of Engineering 
and Professor of Chemical Engineering BS , University of 
Illinois, 1940; Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin, 1944 
Bedlngfleld, James P. Associate Professor of Business and 
Management BS . University of Maryland, 1966; MBA, 1968. 
DBA, 1971 

Belcken, Peter U. Associate Professor, Germanic and Slavic 
Languages Mag Art, University of Munich {Germany). 1968, 
PhD, Stanford University. 1971 

Belcher, Ralph L. Lecturer and Reactor Director. Nuclear 
Engineering B S , Marshall University, 1941; M S, University of 
Kentucky, 1947; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 1966 
Bell, Roger A. Professor of Astronomy B S . University of 
Melbourne, 1957. Ph.D.. Australian National University. 1961 
Bellama, Jon M. Professor of Chemistry A.B., Allegheny 
College. 1960. Ph.D.. University of Pennsylvania, 1966 
Belz, Herman J. Professor of History B.A., Princeton Univer- 
sity, 1959; MA, University of Washington, 1963. Ph D . 1966 

Bender, Fllmore E. Professor of Agricultural and Resource 
Economics B.S.. University of California, Berkeley. 1961. MS, 
North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 1965. Ph D . 1966 

Benedetto, John J. Professor of Mathematics B.A.. Boston 
College, 1960. MA. Harvard University. 1962. Ph.D . University 
of Toronto, 1964 

Benesch, William Adjunct Professor. Institute for Physical 
Science and Technology B.A, Lehigh University, 1942; M.A, 
The Johns Hopkins University. 1950, Ph.D. 1952. 
Bennett, Lawrence H. Adjunct Professor of Physics B.A, 
Brooklyn College, 1951, M.S. University of Maryland, 1955. 
Ph.D.. Rutgers University. 1958. 

Bennett, Robert L. Associate Professor of Economics B.A, 
University of Texas, 1951. MA. 1955; Ph.D., 1963. 
Bennett, Stanley W. Associate Professor. Institute for Child 
Study BS . Iowa State University, 1959. M A , State University 
of Iowa, 1961. PhD. University of Michigan, 1970. 
Bennett, Suzanne Assistant Professor of Hearing and 
Speech Sciences B.A, Southern Illinois University. 1965. MA. 
Western Michigan University, 1969, Ph.D., Purdue University. 
1977 

Perensteln, Carlos A. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Licendiado en Mathematicas. University of Buenos Aires. 1966. 

M.S., New York University, 1969; PhD. 1970 

Berg, Kenneth R. Associate Professor of Mathematics B.S . 

University of Minnesota. 1960; PhD, 1967 

Berger, Bruce S. Professor of Mechanical Engineering B.S, 

University of Pennsylvania. 1954. MS, 1958, PhD. 1962 

Bergeron, Raymond Assistant Professor, Chemistry A.B, 

Clark University. 1967, PhD, Brandeis University. 1973 

Bergmann, Barbara R. Professor of Economics B.A, Cornell 
University. 1948, MA. Harvard University. 1955, PhD, 1959 
Berlin, Adele Assistant Professor of Oriental and Hebrew 
Languages B.H.L , Gratz College. 1963; B.A.. University of 
Pennsylvania, 1964, Ph.D., 1976. 

Berman, Joel H. Professor ol Music B S ., Juilliard School of 
Music. 1951; MA , Columbia University, 1953, DM A, Universi- 
ty of Michigan. 1961 

Berman, Louise M. Professor of Administration, Supervision 
and Curriculum and Director of Nursery-Kindergarten School 
A.B . Wheaton College, 1950; MA, Columbia University. 1953; 
Ed D, Columbia University, 1960. 



Bernard, Peter S. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering 8 E , City College of CUNY. 1972, MS , University of 
California, Berkeley. 1973. PhD. 1977, 
Bernstein, Allen R. Professor of Mathematics B.A, Califor- 
nia Institute of Technology. 1962. MA, University of California 
at Los Angeles, 1964, PhD. 1965 

Bernstein, Melvln Administrative Dean for Summer Pro- 
grams and Professor of Music A.B, Southwestern at Memphis, 
1947; B.Music. 1948, M Music, University of Michigan, 1949. 
M A . University of North Carolina, 1954; Ph D, 1964 
Best, Otto F. Professor of Germanic and Slavic Languages 
Abitur. Realgymnasium. 1948, Certificate, University de Tou- 
louse. 1951. PhD. University of Munich, 1963 
Beste, Charles Edward Associate Professor of Horticulture 
BS. Purdue University, 1961. MS. 1969; PhD, 1971 
Betancourt, Roger R. Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A, Georgetown University, 1965, Ph.D, University of Wiscon- 
sin, 1969 

Bhagat, Satlndar M. Professor of Physics B.A . Jammu and 
Kashmir University of India. 1950, MA, University of Delhi. 
1953; PhD, 1956 

Blckley, William E. Professor Emeritus of Entomology B.S . 
University of Tennessee. 1934; M.S., 1936. Ph.D.. University of 
Maryland. 1940 

Blllk. Dorothy Assistant Professor of German B.A. 1951. 
Brooklyn College. MA. University of Cincinnati, 1969; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1977 

Blllig, Frederick S. Lecturer in Aerospace Engineering BE . 
The Johns Hopkins University, 1955, M.S., University of Mary- 
land. 1958. PhD, 1964 

Blrdsall, Esther K. Associate Professor of English B A . 
Central Michigan College, 1947; MA, University of Arizona, 
1950. PhD. University of Maryland, 1959. 
Blrk, Janice M. Associate Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services and Counselor, Counseling Center B.A, Sa- 
cred Heart College, 1963; MA, Loyola College. 1966; PhD, 
University of Missouri. 1970 

Birkner, Francis B. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S, Newark College of Engineering, 1961; M.SE, University of 
Florida, 1962. PhD, 1965 

Blsh, Robert L. Associate Professor of Urban Studies B.A . 
University of Southern California. 1964; MA. Indiana University. 
1966. Phd, 1968. 

Black, Cordell W. Assistant Professor of French and Italian 
B.A, St. Augustine's College. 1965; MA, Wayne State Univer- 
sity, 1967; Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1976. 
Blair, John D. Assistant Professor of Sociology B.A.. 
Gustavus Adolphus College. 1 966, MA, University of Michigan, 
1972; PhD, 1975 

Blair, Nancy Assistant Professor of Special Education B.S , 
Ohio State University. 1964; M.Ed, Kent State University. 1973, 
PhD, 1975 

Blankenship. Gilmer L. Associate Professor of Electrical 
Engineering B.S, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1967. 
M.S. 1969; PhD, 1971. 

Block, Ira Associate Professor of Textile and Consumer 
Economics B.S, University of Maryland, 1963; PhD, 1971 
Bloom, Paul N. Associate Professor of Business and Man- 
agement B.S. Lehigh University, 1968; MBA, University of 
Pennsylvania, 1970; PhD, Northwestern University, 1974 
Bobko, Philip Assistant Professor, Psychology B.S, Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology, 1970. M.S. Bucknell Univer- 
sity, 1972; PhD. Cornell University, 1976 
Bobrow, Davis B. Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A, University of Chicago, 1955, B.A, 1956, B.A, Oxford 
University, 1958, Ph.D, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
1961 

Bode, Carl Professor of English Ph.B . University of Chicago. 
1933. M.A, Northwestern University. 1938, PhD. 1941 

Bodln, Lawrence Professor of Business and Management 
A.B, Northwestern University, 1962; MS, University of Califor- 
nia. Berkeley. 1966, PhD, 1967. 

Bodwell, C.E. Adjunct Professor of Food. Nutrition, and 
Institutional Administration B.S, Oklahoma State University. 
1957; M.Sc . University of Cambridge, 1959; Ph.D., Michigan 
State University. 1964 

Boisjoly, Russell P. Assistant Professor of Business and 
Management BS . Lowell Technological Institute. 1972. MBA . 
Boston University. 1973. DBA, Indiana University, 1978 
Bolsaitls, Peter P. Professor of Chemical Engineering B S , 
California Institute of Technology. 1960. M.S., 1961, PhD, 
Delaware State College. 1964 

Bonar, Dale B. Associate Professor. Zoology B.A, Whitman 
College. 1967. MS, University of the Pacific. 1970; PhD. 
University of Hawaii, 1973. 

Bottino. Paul J. Associate Professor of Botany B.S, Utah 
State University. 1964. MS. 1965. PhD, Washington State 
University. 1969. 



Boughner. Robert F. Assistant Professor of Classical Lan- 
guages and Literature B A . Duke University. 1968; MA. Johns 
Hopkins University. 1969 PhD, 1975 

Bourque, Mary Lyn Assistant Professor of Measurement 
and Statistics AB, Emmanuel College, 1958; M.Ed, Boston 
College University. 1964, Ed D , University of Massachusetts. 
1978 

Bouwkamp, John C. Associate Professor of Horticulture 
B S , Michigan State University, 1964. MS. 1966; Ph.D , 1969 
Boyd, Alfred C, Jr. Associate Professor of Chemistry B.S, 
Camsius College. 1951. M.S. Purdue University, 1953, PhD 
1957 

Boyd, Derek A. Associate Professor. Physics and Astrono- 
my B S . University of Cape Town (S Africa). 1964; B.S, 
(Hons). 1965. M.Sc. 1967; Ph.D. Stevens Institute of Technol- 
ogy. 1973 

Boyd, Vivian S. Assistant Professor. Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services B A . Antioch College. 1961. M.A, University of 
Colorado, 1968, MA University of Maryland, 1972; PhD. 
1975 

Boyle, Regis L. Visiting Professor of Journalism A B , Trinity 
College, 1933; MA, Catholic University. 1934. Ph.D. 1939 
Brabble, Elizabeth W. Associate Professor, Family and 
Community Development BS, Virginia State College, i960. 
MS. Pennsylvania State University. 1966; Ed D , 1969 
Brace, John W. Professor of Mathematics B.A . Swarthmore 
College. 1949, AM, Cornell University. 1951, PhD, 1953 
Bradbury, Miles L. Assistant Professor of History A.B, Har- 
vard University. 1960; A.M., 1961. Ph.D, 1967. 
Bradley, John Professor of English B.A , Yale University, 
1940; M.A. Harvard University, 1946; Ph.D, Yale University, 
1950 

Brady, Pamela L. Assistant Professor of Food, Nutrition, and 
Institutional Administration B S A, University of Arkansas. 1974, 
M.S. 1976; PhD, University of Tennessee. 1978. 
Brand, Charles F. Assistant Professor of Administration 
Supervision, and Curriculum, and Director, Cumculum Laborato- 
ry BS, West Liberty State College, 1964. M.Ed, Kent State 
University. 1972; Ph.D. 1977 

Brandt, John C. Adjunct Professor of Astronomy A.B, 
Washington University, 1956; PhD. University of Chicago, 
1960 

Brannlgan, Vincent Assistant Professor of Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics B A, University of Maryland, 1973, Juris 
Doctor, Georgetown University Law Center, 1975. 
Brauth, Steven E. Assistant Professor of Psychology BS, 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1967; Ph.D, New York Univer- 
sity, 1973. 

Brechling, Frank P. Professor of Economics B.A, Trinity 
College. Dublin, 1955. 

Breslow. Marvin A. Associate Professor of History B.A, 
University of Nebraska. 1957; M.A , Harvard University. 1958. 
PhD, 1963 

Breuer, Herbert Assistant Professor of Physics Ph.D, Uni- 
versity of Heidelberg, 1976. 

Brlgham, Bruce W. Associate Professor of Secondary Edu- 
cation B.S, State University of New York. Brockport. 1949; 
MS, Temple University, 1967, PhD, 1967 
Brill, Oleter R. Professor of Physics B.A, Pnnceton Universi- 
ty. 1954. M.A, 1956; PhD, 1959 

Brlnberg, David Assistant Professor of Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics B.S . Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1974. 
M.A, University of Illinois, 1976; PhD. 1979 
Brinkley, Howard J. Professor of Zoology B.S . West Virgin- 
ia University. 1958. MS. University of Illinois. 1960; PhD. 
1963 

Brodle, Michael Assistant Professor of information Systems 
Management B.Sc, University of Toronto. 1971, M.Sc , 1973, 
Ph.D. 1978. 

Brodsky, Harold Associate Professor of Geography BS , 
Brooklyn College, 1954; MS, University of Colorado, i960. 
Ph.D, University of Washington, 1966 

Brooks, Robert Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.A, 
Harvard University. 1974. MA. 1974. PhD. 1977 
Brown, Charles C. Assistant Professor of Economics B.A , 
Boston College. 1970; MA. 1970. Ph.D. Harvard University. 
1974 

Brown, Elizabeth D. Assistant Professor of Psychology B A . 
University of Connecticut. 1974. MS. Florida State University, 
1976. Ph.D, 1979 

Brown, John H. Associate Professor of Philosophy A.B, 
Princeton University, 1952. MA. 1957. PhD, 1959 
Brown. Joshua R.C. Professor of Zoology A B , Duke Uni- 
versity. 1948. MA, 1949. PhD, 1953 
Brown, Richard H. Associate Professor of Sociology B.A , 
University of California. Berkeley. 1961. M.A, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1965, PhD. University of California at San Diego. 1973 



28 Brown, Robert A. 



Brown, Robert A. Associate Professor ol Psychology B.A.. 
University of Richmond. 1958. MA, University ol Iowa. 1961. 
PhD. 1962. 

Brown Samuel E. Associate Professor of English AS., 
Indiana University, 1934. MA., 1946; PhD. Yale University. 
1955. 

Bruner. Carol Germain Assistant Professor of Human De- 
velopment Education B.A, University of Southern California. 
1966; Ph.D.. University of New Mexico, 1978. 
Brush, Stephen G. Professor of History and Research Pro- 
fessor B A . Harvard University, 1955; D.Phil, Oxford University, 
1958. 

Bryer JacKson R. Professor of English B A . Amherst Col- 
lege, 1959; MA . Columbia University, 1960; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin. 1965. 

Buchler, Edward R. Assistant Professor of Zoology B.S, 
California State Polytechnic College, 1964, M.S. University of 
California, 1966. Ph.D., University of Montana. Missoula. 1972. 
Buchner, Michael A. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A.B.. Princeton University, 1969. M.A, Harvard University, 1970; 
PhD. 1974 

Buck, Allen C. Associate Professor of Textile and Consumer 
Economics B.S., Michigan State University. 1939; MS., West- 
ern Reserve University, 1942; Ph.D.. 1947 
Buckley, Frank T, Jr. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S, University of Maryland. 1959. Ph.D., 1968 
Bundy, Mary Lee Professor, College of Library and Informa- 
tion Services BE. State University of New York at Potsdam. 
1948; MA. University of Denver, 1951, Ph.D. University of 
Illinois. 1960 

Burger Mary M.W. Assistant Professor of English B.A, 
University of Arkansas, Pine Bluff 1959, MA, Colorado State 
University. 1961. Ph.D. Washington University. 1973. 
Burlc, John Associate Professor of Animal Science B.S, 
West Virginia University. 1948. M.S.. University of Maryland. 
1952; Ph.D.. University of Illinois, 1960. 
Burka. Maria K. Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineer- 
ing B S . Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1969. M.S.. 
1970; PhD, Pnnceton University, 1978. 
Burke. Philip Professor and Chairman of Special Education 
B S . University of Scranton. 1963; MS.. 1965; Ph.D.. Syracuse 
University. 1970. 

Burlc, John Associate Professor of Animal Science B.S., 
West Virginia University, 1948; MS, University of Maryland, 
1952; PhD, University of Illinois. 1960 
Burt, John J. Professor and Chairman, Department of Health 
Education B.A.. Duke University, 1955; M.Ed.. University of 
North Carolina, 1956, MS.. Oregon State University, 1960, 
Ed.D.. 1963 

Buttervvorth. Charles E. Associate Professor of Govern- 
ment and Politics B.A, Michigan State University. 1959; Doc- 
torat. University of Nancy. France. 1961; MA.. University of 
Chicago. 1962; PhD. 1966 

Byrne. Richard H. Professor of Counseling and Personnel 
Services A.B.. Franklin & Marshall College. 1938. MA, Colum- 
bia University, 1947, EdD, 1952. 

Cadman, Theodore W. Professor and Director of Chemical 
Engineering BS. Carnegie-Mellon University. 1962, MS., 1964; 
Ph.D., 1966 

Cain, Jarvis l_ Professor of Agncultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics B.S.. Purdue University, 1955; MS , Ohio State Universi- 
ty, 1956; PhD. 1961 

Callendo, Mary Alice Assistant Professor of Food. Nutrition. 
and Institutional Administration B.S. University of Mas- 
sachusetts. 1971. M.S. University of Maine, 1972; Ph.D.. Cor- 
nell University. 1975 

Callcott, George H. Professor of History A.B, University of 
South Carolina. 1950, MA, Columbia University, 1951; Ph.D. 
University of North Carolina. 1956. 

Cambridge, Milton H. Assistant Professor, Counseling and 
Personnel Services B A , Queens College, 1969. MS. Universi- 
ty of Southern Mississippi. 1973; PhD, 1976. 
Campagna, Andrew F. Assistant Professor. French and 
Italian A.B.. Dartmouth College. 1966. MA . University of Roch- 
ester, 1967; Ph.D.. Washington University. 1975 
Campagnonl, Anthony T. Associate Professor of Biochem- 
istry A B , Northeastern University, 1964; Ph.D., Indiana Univer- 
sity. 1968 

Campbell, Donald L. Assistant Professor. Vetennary Sci- 
ence D.V M . University ol Georgia. 1968; M S . Texas Agncul- 
tural and Mechanical University. 1972. 
Campbell, Elwood G. Professor of Secondary Education 
B.S., Northeast Missouri State College, 1949. M A . Northwest- 
ern University. 1952, PhD. 1963. 

Campbell, Kenneth Professor ol Art Massachusetts College 
of Art. National Academy of Design; Art Students League; 
Lowell Institute 



Carbone, Robert F. Professor of Administration. Supervision 
and Curriculum BS, East Montana College, 1953; M Ed 
Emory University. 1958. Ph.D. University of Chicago. 1961 
Carlson, Severin C. Assistant Professor of Business and 
Management BS, Northeastern University. 1974, MB A . Indi- 
ana University. 1977; DBA . 1979 

Caron, Dewey M. Associate Professor of Entomology B A , 
University of Vermont. 1964. M.S., University of Tennessee. 
1966, Ph.D.. Cornell University. 1970 
Carroll, Stephen J., Jr. Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment BS.. University of California at Los Angeles. 1957; M.A.. 
University of Minnesota. 1959; Ph.D.. 1964. 
Carter, Everett C. Professor and Chairman of Civil Engineer- 
mg B.S.C.E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 1958; M.S.C.E.. 
University of California. Berkeley, 1959, Ph.D.. Northwestern 
University. 1969 

Cassidy, Edward W. Visiting Assistant Professor of Counsel- 
ing and Personnel Services A B, Catholic University. 1963. 
M.Ed, University of Maryland, 1968; Ph.D., 1973 
Castellan, Gilbert W. Professor of Chemistry B.S . Regis 
College, 1945; Ph D, The Catholic University of Amenca. 1949; 
Sc.D, Regis College, 1967 

Caswell, William E. Assistant Professor of Physics. B.A.. 
University of Maryland. 1968. M.A, Princeton University, 1972; 
Ph.D., 1975. 

Cate, G. Allen Assistant Professor of English B.A., Rutgers 
University. 1960. MA.. Duke University. 1962, Ph.D.. 1968 
Caughey, John L. Assistant Professor of American Studies 
A B, Harvard College. 1963. A M , University of Pennsylvania, 
1967. Ph.D., 1970. 

Celarler, James l_ Associate Professor of Philosophy A.B, 
University of Illinois, 1956, M.A.. 1958; Ph.D.. University of 
Pennsylvania. 1960 

Celotta. Beverly Kay Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services A.B, Queens College. 1965. M A., Brooklyn 
College, 1967; Ph.D. University of Colorado. 1971 
Certo. Nicholas J. Assistant Professor of Special Education 
B.A., Marquette University. 1970; M.A., 1972; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin. 1976 

Chambers, Robert G. Assistant Professor of Agncultural 
and Resource Economics. B.S.F.S., Georgetown University, 
1972; M.S., University of Maryland, 1975, Ph.D.. University ot 
California. Berkeley, 1978. 

Chang, Chia-Cheh Assistant Professor. Physics and Astron- 
omy B S„ Tughai University (Taiwan). 1961; M.A, University of 
Southern California. 1966; Ph.D., 1968. 
Chang, Chung-Yun Associate Professor of Physics B.S.Na- 
tional Taiwan University. 1954; PhD, Columbia University. 
1965. 

Chang, Sunyung Alice Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., National Taiwan University. 1970; Ph.D., University of 
California, Berkeley. 1974. 

Chant, Nicholas Associate Professor of Physics B.A.. Uni- 
versity ot Cambndge. 1962; M.A.. 1966; Ph.D.. Lincoln College. 
Oxford. 1966 

Chapin, John L. Professor. Institute for Child Study A.B.. 
Denison University, 1939, PhD, University of Rochester. 1950. 
Chaves. Antonio F. Associate Professor of Geography Doc- 
tor. Law. University of Havana. 1941. Doctor of Filosofia & 
Letras, 1946. MA. Northwestern University. 1948. 
Chen, Hsing-Hen Assistant Professor of Physics and Astron- 
omy B.S. National Taiwan University, 1968; MA, Columbia 
University, 1970. Ph.D.. 1973. 

Chow, Garland Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement B.S, University of Maryland. 1970; MBA, 1972; 
D.B.A, Indiana University. 1977 

Chrlstensen. Abel Cheryl J. Assistant Professor. Govern- 
ment and Politics B.A, University of Minnesota, 1968; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute ot Technology, 1975. 
Chrlstlan, Charles M. Assistant Professor of Geography and 
Urban Studies B.A, Northeastern State College. 1966. MA, 
University of Illinois. 1968; PhD, 1975. 
Chu, Hsin Professor of Mathematics B.S, Hupeh Teachers 
College. 1948; MS, Tulane University. 1957. Ph.D.. University 
ot Pennsylvania. 1959 

Chu, Yaohan Professor of Computer Science and Electrical 
Engineering BS. Chiao-tung University, 1942. MS, Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology. 1945, Sc.D, 1953 
Churaman. Charlotte V. Assistant Professor of Family and 
Community Development BS. Berea College, 1942; M.Ed. 
Penn State University. 1964; EdD. 1969. 
Church, Kenneth R. Associate Professor of Physical Educa- 
tion B.S . University of Northern Iowa. 1946; MS , University of 
Iowa, 1955. PhD. Indiana University. 1963. 
Church, Marilyn G. Associate Professor. Early Childhood 
and Elementary Education B.S, Indiana University, 1962. M.S. 
1963; Ed.D, 1969 



Churchill. John W. Associate Professor ot Recreation B S . 
State University of New York at Cortland 1958. M S , University 
of Illinois, 1959. Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin. 1968. 
Cirrlnclone, Joseph M. Associate Professor ot Secondary f 
Education and Geography B.S, State University of New York at 
Oswego. 1962; MA , Ohio State University. 1967; PhD, 1970 
Clabaugh. Susan Raye Assistant Professor of Administra- 
tion. Supervision, and Curriculum, and Director. Educational 
Technology Center B.S, Oklahoma State University, 1970. . _ 
M.S. 1975. Ed.D, 1977 

Clague, Christopher K. Professor of Economics B.A, 
Swarthmore College. 1960; PhD. Harvard University, 1966. 
Clague. Monique W. Associate Professor of Administration. 
Supervision and Curnculum BA, Swarthmore College, 1959; 
Ph.D. Harvard University. 1969 

Clapsaddle, Jerry Assistant Professor of Art B FA, Drake 
University, 1964, M.F.A . Indiana University, 1966. 
Clark, Eugenie Professor ol Zoology B.A, Hunter College, 
1942; MA, New York University. 1946. PhD, 1951. 
Clark, Thomas Associate Professor of Physics and Astrono- 
my BS. University of Colorado, 1961, PhD, 1967 
Clarke, David H. Professor of Physical Education B.S. 
Springfield College. 1952; M.S. 1953; PhD, University of 
Oregon, 1959. 

Claude, Richard P. Professor of Government and Politics 
B A , College of St Thomas, 1956; MS . Florida State Universi- 
ty. 1960; PhD, University of Virginia. 1964. 
Clearwater, Harvey E. Associate Professor, Health Educa- 
tion A.B, State University of New York at Albany, 1955; M.A, 
Michigan State University, 1967; Ed.D, 1970. 
Cllgnet, Remi Professor of Family & Community Develop- 
ment Baccalaureat. University of Pans. 1948; Licence es Let- 
tres. 1 95 1 ; Licence es Law, 1 953; Licence es Psychology. 1 958. 
Doctorate. 1963. 

Cline, Rebecca J. Assistant Professor, Department of Com- 
munication Arts and Theatre B S. Pennsylvania State Universi- 
ty, 1971; M.A, 1973; PhD, 1975. 

Cockburn, James S. Professor ol History L.L.B.. Leeds 
University. 1959; L L.M.. 1961; PhD, 1970. 
Coffindafter, Billie L Affiliate Associate Professor of Agri- 
cultural and Extension Education B.S. West Virginia University, 
1950; MS, 1955, PhD. University of Wisconsin. 1961 
Cohen, Joel Professor, Mathematics Sc.B, Brown Universi- 
ty. 1963; PhD , Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1966 
Cole, Wayne S. Professor of History B A , Iowa State Teach- 
ers College, 1946; M.S., University of Wisconsin. 1948; Ph D 
1951. 

Colettl. Theresa M. Assistant Professor of English B.A, 
University of Pittsburgh. 1971; M.A, University of Rochester. 
1973; Ph.D. 1975. 

Colletta, Nancy Donohue Assistant Professor. Institute for 
Child Study B.A. Michigan State University, 1972; MS, State 
University of New York at Buffalo, 1974, Ph D , Cornell Universi- 
ty. 1977 

Colombinl, Marco Assistant Professor of Zoology B.S, Mc- 
Gill University, 1970; PhD, 1974 

Colton, Craig W. Assistant Professor, Recreation B.S, Brig- 
ham Young University. 1963, MS. 1970; PhD, 1976 
Colvllle. James Professor of Civil Engineering BS , Purdue 
University. 1959; M S , 1960; PhD . University of Texas. 1970. 
Colwell. Rita Rossi Professor of Microbiology B.S, Purdue 
University, 1956; MS, 1958; PhD, University of Washington, 
1961. 

Conger, III. Joseph H. Assistant Prolessor of Communica- 
tion Arts and Theatre A B . University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 1970; M F.A.. University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro, 1976. 

Conway, Mary M. Associate Professor ot Government and 
Politics B.S, Purdue University, 1957, MA, University of Cali- 
fornia. Berkeley, 1960; PhD. Indiana University, 1965. 
Coogan. Robert Associate Professor ot English B.A, lona 
College, 1954, M.A, DePaul University. 1958. PhD, Loyola 
University. 1967. 

Cook, Clarence H. Professor of Mathematics B.A, State 
University of Iowa. 1948; MS, 1950, Ph.D., University of 
Colorado. 1962. 

Cook, Craig M. Assistant Professor of Information Systems 
Management B.S . University ot Pittsbugh, 1968, M.S., Universi- 
ty of Maryland. 1970. Ph.D. 1974 

Cook, Thomas M. Prolessor and Chairman of Microbiology 
B S , University of Maryland, 1955; MS , 1957; Ph.D.. Rutgers 
University, 1963. 

Cooke, Todd J„ Assistant Professor of Botany B.S, Antioch 
College, 1974; PhD, Cornell University. 1979. 
Cooney, Joseph J. Professor of Microbiology B.S . LeMoyne 
College. 1956; MS, Syracuse University. 1958 Ph.D., 1961 



Duffy, John 29 



Cooney. Stephanie Heatwole Assistant Professor ot Sec- 
ondary Education B S . Radtord College. 1967; MS, University 
ol Maryland. 1972, Ph D , 1975. 

Cooper. Elmer Lewis Assistant Professor of Agricultural and 
Extension Education B S , University of Maryland. 1956. M S , 
1965. Ed D . Virginia Polytechnic institute and State University, 
1974 

Cooper, Jeffrey M. Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A . Haverford College. 1962; M.S.. University of Illinois, 1964, 
Ph.D.. 1967 

Cooper. Sherod M.. Jr. Associate Professor of English B S , 
Temple University. 1951. M A.. 1953; Ph.D.. University of Penn- 
sylvania. 1963. 

Coplan. Michael Research Associate Professor, Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics B A . Williams Col- 
lege. I960. M.S. Yale University. 1961; PhD. 1963 
Corbett, M. Kenneth Professor ot Botany B S . McGill Uni- 
versity. 1950; Ph.D. Cornell University. 1954, 
Corey, Kenneth E. Professor and Chairman of Geography 
A B . University ot Cincinnati. 1961, MA , 1962; M.C.P., 1964; 
PhD, 1969 

Corliss, John O. Professor and Chairman of Zoology B S , 
University of Chicago, 1944; B A . University of Vermont. 1947, 
PhD. New York University. 1951 

Corning, Gerald D. Professor of Aerospace Engineering 
BS. New York University. 1937; M.S.. Catholic University. 
1954 

Correl. Ellen Professor of Mathematics BS, Douglass Col- 
lege. 1951. M.S. Purdue University. 1953; Ph.D., 1958 
Corsi, Thomas M. Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement B A , Case Western Reserve University, 1971, M.A.. 
Kent State University. 1974; PhD, University of Wisconsin at 
Milwaukee. 1976 

Coulson, Douglas B. Assistant Professor of Measurements 
and Statistics B.A.. Dartmouth College. 1968, M.S., University ol 
Massachusetts, 1974. PhD. 1978 

Coursey, Robert D. Associate Professor of Psychology B.S, 
Spring Hill College. 1966, Ph D . University of Rochester, 1970 
Courtwright, Benjamin I. Associate Professor of Informa- 
tion Systems Management B A . The Johns Hopkins University. 
1939. PhD. 1968 

Cox, Evelyn M. Associate Professor of Food, Nutrition and 
Institution Administration MS, Syracuse University. 1948. 
Ph.D., Iowa State University. 1960 

Craft, Ann Harrell Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., East Carolina University. 1962. MA, 1966; Ed D„ Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Greensboro. 1977 
Craig, Patrick M. Assistant Professor of Art B.F.A.. Western 
Michigan University. 1974. M.F.A.. University of Cincinnati. 
1976 

Craig, Randall J. Associate Professor of Secondary Educa- 
tion BS, Morgan State University, 1955; MFA. Temple Uni- 
versity. 1963. PhD. University of Maryland, 1974 

Crites, John 0. Professor of Psychology AB , Pnnceton 
University, 1950; Ph.D. Columbia University, 1957 
Cumberland, John H. Professor, Bureau of Business and 
Economic Research B A , University of Maryland, 1947, MA, 
Harvard University, 1949; Ph.D.. 1951. 

Cunnlff, Patrick F. Professor and Chairman of Mechanical 
Engineering BS. Manhattan College. 1955 MS. Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute. 1956; Ph.D. 1962 

Currie. Douglas G. Professor of Physics BE P.. Cornell 
University, 1958. PhD, University of Rochester, 1962 
Currier, Albert W. Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.A, 
State University of Iowa. 1954; MA, The Johns Hopkins 
University. 1959. PhD.. 1968 

Cussler, Margaret T. Associate Professor of Sociology B.A.. 
State University of New York at Albany. 1931, MA, . 1933, M A . 
Harvard University. 1941; Ph.D.. 1943 

Dagalakis. Nicholas G. Assistant Professor. Mechanical En- 
gineering Dipt ot Mech Engr , National Technical University 
(Greece). 1969. MS. Massachusetts Institute ot Technology. 
1971. Eng.D, 1973. PhD. 1975. 

Dager. Edward Z. Professor of Sociology B.A.. Kent State 
University, 1950. M A , Ohio State University. 1951. Ph D . 1956 
Dalnls, Andrew Associate Professor of Physical Education 
B S, University of Adelaide, South Australia, 1962. Ph.D.. 1967, 
MA. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1972 
Dancls, Jerome Associate Professor of Mathematics BS . 
Polytechnic Institute ot Brooklyn, 1961; M.S.. University of 
Wisconsin. 1963. Ph.D.. 1966 

Darden, Llndley Associate Professor of Philosophy and His- 
tory B.A.. Southwestern at Memphis. 1968, M A , University ot 
Chicago, 1969. SM. 1973, PhD., 1974 

Dardls, Rachel Professor of Textiles and Consumer Eco- 
nomics and Lecturer in Economics B S , St Mary's College, 
Dublin. 1949. MS, University ol Minnesota. 1963. Ph.D.. 1965 



Davey. H. Beth Associate Prolessor of Secondary Education 
B.S , Miami University of Ohio. 1965, MA, University ol Roch- 
ester, 1969. PhD. Case Western Reserve University. 1971 
Davidson, James P. Assistant Professor ot Veterinary Sci- 
ence B S , Michigan State University, 1964; D.V.M.. 1966; M.S., 

1974; PhD . 1977 

Davidson. John A. Professor of Entomology B.A, Columbia 
Union College, 1955, M.S.. University of Maryland. 1957; Ph D , 
1960 

Davidson, Marie S. Acting Associate Dean tor Graduate 
Studies B S . Dillard University, 1959; M.S., University of Mary- 
land. 1967. PhD. 1971 

Davidson, Neil Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
BS . Case Institute ot Technology. 1961; MS. University of 
Wisconsin. 1963. Ph.D. 1970 

Davis. Christopher C. Associate Prolessor, Electrical Engi- 
neering BA. Cambridge University, 1965, MA, 1970. Ph.D.. 
Manchester University (England). 1970 

Davis, Richard F. Prolessor and Chairman of Dairy Science 
and Animal Science BS, University of New Hampshire. 1950; 
M.S.. Cornell University. 1952; Ph.D.. 1953. 
Davis. Shelley Associate Prolessor ot Music B.A, Washing- 
ton Square College ol New York University, 1957, MA. Gradu- 
ate School of Arts and Sciences of New York University. 1 960. 
PhD.. 1971. 

Davisson, Lee D. Prolessor of Electncal Engineering BSE 
Pnnceton University, 1958; MSE . University of California at 
Los Angeles, 1961. Ph.D.. 1964. 

Dawklns. Marvin P. Assistant Professor of Alro-Amen- 
can/Urban Studies B.S.. Edward Waters College. 1970, M.S., 
Florida State University. 1972; Ph.D.. 1975. 
Dawson. Townes l_ Professor ot Business and Manage- 
ment BBA. University of Texas. 1943; B.S, United States 
Merchant Marine Academy. 1946; MB. A.. University of Texas. 
1947; PhD.. 1950; J.D., 1954. 

Dawson, Victor CD. Lecturer m Mechanical Engineering 
B.S, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1948; M.S. Har- 
vard University, 1951. ME., California Institute of Technology, 
1959; Ph.D.. University ol Maryland. 1963. 
Dayton, Chauncy M. Professor ot Measurement and Statis- 
tics A.B . University ot Chicago. 1955. MA, University of 
Maryland. 1963. Ph.D. 1964 

Dean, Shirley Ann Rush Assistant Professor of Housing and 
Applied Design B.A, University of Maryland. 1958. MFA. 
American University. 1966. 

DeBarthe, Jerry V. Associate Prolessor of Ammai Science 

BS, Iowa State University. 1961; Ph.D.. 1966. 

Decker, A. Morris Jr. Professor of Agronomy BS, Colorado 

ASM. 1949, MS , Utah State College. 1951; Ph.D.. University of 

Maryland. 1953 

Decker, William A. Assistant Professor of Health Education 

B A, State University of California at San Diego, 1967, M A . 

Wayne State University. 1969. Ph.D.. University of Connecticut. 

1975. 

DeClaris, Nicholas Professor of Electncal Engineenng BS.. 
Texas A&M University. 1952; SM, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 1954. Sc.D, 1959. 

De'.eiris. Alain Professor ot Art B F.A . Rhode Island School 
Of Design. 1948, A M , Harvard University. 1952; PhD . 1957 

DeLorenzo, William E. Associate Professor of Secondary 
Education B.A, Montclair State College. 1959. MA. 1964, 
Ph.D., Ohio State University. 1971. 

Demaitre, Ann Associate Professor of French and Italian 
B.A, Columbia University, 1950. MA. University ol California, 
Berkeley. 1951. M.S.. Columbia University, 1952, Ph.D.. Univer- 
sity ol Maryland, 1960 

DeMonte, Claudia A. Assistant Prolessor. Art BA, College 

ol Notre Dame of Maryland. 1969. MFA. Catholic University of 

America. 1971 

Denno, Robert F. Associate Professor, Entomology BS, 

University ol California (Davis). 1967; Ph.D.. 1973. 

Denny, Don W. Professor of An B A , University ot Flonda. 

1959. MA.. New York University. 1961, PhD. 1965 

Dernoeden, Peter H. Assistant Professor of Agronomy B.S, 

Colorado State University. 1970; M.S., 1976. Ph D . University of 

Rhode Island. 1980 

Derrick. Frederick W. Assistant Professor. Textiles and 

Consumer Economics B S . North Carolina State University. 

1972. MS. 1974. PhD, 1976 

Deshler, Walter W. Prolessor of Geography B.S.. Lafayette 
College. 1943. M A . University ol Maryland. 1953, Ph D, 1957 
DeSllva. Alan W. Professor of Physics BS. University ol 
California at Los Angeles. 1954, Ph D . University ol California. 
Berkeley. 1961 

Dessalnt, Alain Assistant Prolessor of Anthropology BA 
University ot Chicago. 1961. M.A.. Stanford University. 1962; 
PhD, University of Hawaii. 1972. 



Destler. William M. Associate Professor of Electncal Engi- 
neering 8.S.. Stevens Institute ot Technology. 1968. Ph.D.. 
Cornell University. 1972 

Devme. Donald J. Associate Prolessor of Government and 
Politics BBA, Saint John's University, 1959; MA. Brooklyn 
College. 1965; PhD. Syracuse University. 1967 
DeVoe. Howard J. Associate Professor ol Chemistry BA, 
Oberlin College, 1955, PhD. Harvard University, 1960 

Dies, Robert R. Professor ot Psychology B.S.. Carroll Col- 
lege. 1962. M A . Bowling Green State University, 1964, PhD „ 
University of Connecticut. 1968 

Dieter. George E. Professor ot Mechanical Engineenng and 
Acting Director, Engineering Materials Program B S . Drexel 
University. 1950. D Sc . Carnegie-Mellon University 1953 
DIFederlco. Frank Robert Associate Professor ot Art B A , 
University of Massachusetts 1955 MA. Boston University. 
1961; PhD. New York University. 1970. 
Diggs. Charles C. Assistant Professor. Heanng and Speech 
Sciences AB, Loyola College, 1969. MS. Purdue University 
1972; Ph.D.. 1973. 

Dillard, Dudley Prolessor ot Economics and Provost, Drv of 

Behavioral and Social Sciences B S . University ol California. 

Berkeley. 1935. PhD. 1940 

Dingwall. William On Associate Professor and Director. 

Linguistics Program BS, Georgetown University. 1957; Ph D . 

1964 

Dittmann, Laura L. Prolessor Institute for Child Study BS. 
University ol Colorado. 1938; MA. University ot Maryland. 
1963; PhD. 1967 

Dively, Galen P. Assistant Prolessor of Entomology 8.S, 
Juniata College, 1966; MS, Rutgers University. 1968; Ph.D. 
1971 

Dixon, Jack R. Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics BS, 
Western Reserve University. 1948; MS. 1950; Ph.D., University 
ot Maryland. 1956 

Doerr. John A. Assistant Professor of Poultry Science B.A. 
North Carolina State University. 1968; B.S, 1972; M.S. 1975; 
Phd. 1978. 

Doetsch. Raymond N. Prolessor of Microbiology B.S.. Uni- 
versity ol Illinois. 1942. A.M.. Indiana University. 1943. Ph D , 
University of Maryland. 1948. 

Dombeck, Thomas W. Assistant Professor, Physics and 
Astronomy B.A. Columbia University, 1967; Ph D , Northwest- 
ern University. 1972 

Donaldson, Bruce K. Professor of Aerospace Engineenng 
B.S, Columbia University. 1955, MS, Wichita State University. 
1962. M S. 1963. Ph D . University ol Illinois at Urbana. 1968 
Dorfman. J. Robert Professor of Physics and Institute for 
Physical Science and Technology B A , The Johns Hopkins 
University. 1957; PhD. 1961 

Dotson. Charles O. Professor of Physical Education B A . 
Morehead State University. 1963; MS, Purdue University. 
1964. PhD. 1968 

Doudna. Mark E. Assistant Professor of Heanng and Speech 

Sciences B.S, Ohio State University. 1948; MA 1956. Pt\ 

1962. 

Douglass, Larry W. Associate Prolessor of Dairy Science 

B.S, Purdue University. 1963. MA , 1966, Ph D . Oregon State 

University. 1969 

Douglis, Avron Professor of Mathematics A B . University of 
Chicago. 1938. M A, New York University. 1949; PhD . 1949 
Dowdy, Lawrence W. Assistant Prolessor of Computer Sci- 
ence B.S, Flonda State University. 1974. MA, Duke University. 
1976. Ph.D. 1977 

Dragt. Alexander J. Prolessor of Physics AB, Calvin Col- 
lege. 1958. PhD. University of California. Berkeley. 1963. 
Drew, Howard Dennis Associate Professor of Physics B S , 
University ol Pittsburgh, 1962; Ph.D.. Cornell University. 1967 
Driskell. David C. Professor and Chairman of Art A B . 
Howard University. 1955. MFA. Catholic University of Amen- 
ca. 1962. Rifksbureau voor Kunsthistonsches Documentaiie. 
Den Haag (Holland). 1964 

Dubrow. Heather Assistant Professor of English BA Har- 
vard University. 1966. PhD. 1972 

Dudley. James Professor of Administration, Supervision and 
Cumculum B A , Southern Illinois University. 1951. M S . South- 
em Illinois University. 1957, Ed D . University of Illinois. 1964 
Duffey, Dick Professor ol Chemical Engineenng and Nuclear 
Engineering B S, Purdue University. 1939. M.S. University ol 
Iowa. 1940. PhD, University ol Maryland. 1956 
Duffey. Robert V. Professor of Early Childhood and Elemen- 
tary Education BS. Millersville State College. 1938. Ed M 
Temple University. 1948; Ed.D, 1954 
Duffy, John Professor of History B.A Louisana State Nor- 
mal College. 1941, MA . 1943; PhD. University ol Caklorrxa. 
1946 



30 Dummer, Gail M. 



Dummer Gail M. Assistant Professor ot Physical Education 
B S University of Minnesota. 1972; M A., University of Califor- 
nia. Berkeley, 1973; Ph.D.. 1978 

DuMonceau, Michael Paul Assistant Professor of Communi- 
cation Arts and Theatre B.A . University of Maryland. 1966; 
MA. 1968. PhD. 1978 

Dunaway-Marlano, Debra Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
BS. Texas ASM University. 1973; Ph.D.. 1975 
Dunn, Norma E. Assistant Professor. English B.A, Madison 
College. 1946; M.A, University of Pennsylvania. 1953; Ph.D., 
1968. 

Dunson Bruce H. Assistant Professor of Economics B.A., 
University of California at Irvine. 1969, A.M., University of 
California at Berkeley. 1971. PhD, Harvard University. 1979. 
Dunst Carl J. Assistant Professor ot Special Education BS, 
Temple University, 1971. M A , George Washington University. 
1972; M.S. George Peabody College, 1978, PhD. 1979. 
Dutta. Sukanta K. Associate Professor of Veterinary Sci- 
ence B.Sc, (Vet.) Bombay University. India. 1956. M.S., Univer- 
sity of Minnesota. 1960. PhD. 1962. 
Dvorak Wayne D. Assistant Protessor of Music B.M E . 
Cornell College. 1964; MS., University of Illinois. 1971; Ed D, 
1975. 

Dworzecka, Maria Assistant Professor ot Physics M Sc, 
Warsaw University, 1964, PhD., 1969. 
Earl, James A. Protessor of Physics BS., Massachusetts 
Institute ot Technology. 1953; Ph.D., 1957 
Edmister Robert 0. Associate Professor of Business and 
Management B S., Miami University. 1964; MB A . University of 
Michigan. 1965; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1970 
Edmundson, Harold P. Professor of Mathematics and Com- 
puter Science B.A , University of California, Los Angeles, 1946, 
MA. 1948, PhD. 1953 

Egel, Andrew L. Assistant Professor of Special Education 
B.A .' University of California at Santa Barbara. 1976; MA. 
1977, PhD. 1979 

Ehrlich Gertrude Professor of Mathematics B S . Georgia 
State College tor Women. 1943; MA, University of North 
Carolina, 1945. PhD.. University of Tennessee, 1953. 
Einstein Theodore L. Assistant Protessor. Physics and As- 
tronomy'B.A. Harvard University, 1969; MA., 1969. PhD. 
Univeisity of Pennsylvania, 1973. 

Eisenberg, John Adiunct Professor ot Zoology BS . Wash- 
ington State University. 1957; MA., University ot California 
Berkeley. 1959; PhD. 1962 

Eley, George Associate Professor of Early Childhood Ele- 
mentary Education BS. Ohio State University, 1952, M.Ed, 
1957; Ph.D. 1966 

Eliot, John Professor, Institute lor Child Study A B, Harvard 
University, 1956. A.M.T , 1958, Ed D, Stanford University. 1966 
Elkln Stephen L. Associate Professor ot Government and 
Politics B.A., Alfred University. 1961, M.A, Ph.D. Harvard 
University. 1969. 

Elklns Richard L. Assistant Professor of Industrial Educa- 
tion BS . University of Maryland. 1953; M A.. 1958. Ed.D.. 1972 
Ellingson Robert G. Assistant Professor of Meteorology 
BS.. Florida State University, 1967, M.S.. 1968. Ph.D., 1972. 

Elliott. Gregory C. Assistant Professor ol Sociology A B . 
Boston College. 1968. M S . University of North Carolina. 1970, 
MS, University of Wisconsin, 1974; PhD, 1977 

Ellis Richard F. Assistant Professor of Physics B A. Cornell 
University. 1966; M A , Princeton University. 1968; Ph.D.. 1970 
BA. Miami University. 1960, PhD., Duke University, 1966 
Emad Fawzi P. Associate Professor ot Electrical Engineer- 
ing B.S.. American University (Beirut), 1961. MS , Northwestern 
University, 1963; Ph.D., 1965 

Engram, Barbara E. Visiting Assistant Professor of Counsel- 
ing and Personnel Services BA, College ol William and Mary. 
1959; M.A, University of Maryland. 1974, PhD. 1976 
Ephremides, Anthony Associate Professor of Electrical En- 
gineering B S . National Technical University ol Athens. 1967; 
MA, Princeton University. 1969, Ph.D.. 1971. 
Erdman, Richard A. Assistant Professor of Dairy Science 
BS , University of Wisconsin, 1974; M.S., University of Kentuc- 
ky. 1977; PhD. 1979 

Erlckson, William C. Protessor of Astronomy B A. . University 
ot Minnesota. 1951. MA. 1955; Ph.D., 1956. 
Evans, Emory Professor and Chairman of History B.A . Ran- 
dolph-Macon College. 1950. MA. University of Virginia. 1954; 
PhD., 1957 



Ewert, D. Merrill Assistant Professor of Agricultural and 
Extension Education BA, Tabor College, 1967, MA, University 
of Wisconsin-Madison, 1971. Ph.D.. 1977 
Eyler, Marvin H. Dean and Professor. College of Physical 
Education, Recreation and Health A.B . Houghton College. 
1942; MS . 1942, MS, University ol Illinois 1948; Ph.D.. 1956. 



Falcione, Raymond L. Associate Professor of Communica- 
tion Arts and Theatre B A,. Akron University, 1965; M.A., 1967; 
Ph.D.. Kent State University. 1972 

Falk, David S. Professor ol Physics B. Eng Phys . Cornell 
University. 1954; MS. Harvard University, 1955; Ph.D.. 1959. 
Faller. Alan J. Professor. Institute for Physical Science and 
Technology and Meteorology SB. Massachusetts Institute for 
Technology. 1951. M.S., 1953, Sc.D, 1957 
Fanning Delvin S. Professor of Agronomy B.S., Cornell 
University, 1954; M.S., 1959; Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin, 
1964. 

Farsaie, All Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
BS, Pahlavi University. 1974, MS.. North Carolina State Uni- 
versity, 1977, Ph.O . 1979 

Farquhar, Douglas James Associate Professor of Art BA. 
Washington and Lee University. 1 963; MA. University ot Chica- 
go, 1966. PhD.. 1972. 

Farrell, Richard T. Associate Professor of Secondary Edu- 
cation and History A B . Wabash College, 1954. M.S., Indiana 
University, 1958. PhD, 1967 

Feklman, Robert H.L. Assistant Professor of Health Educa- 
tion B.A. Brooklyn College, 1964, MA, Pennsylvania State 
University, 1966, M.S., Syracuse University, 1972; Ph.D., Syra- 
cuse University. 1974. 

Felton, Kenneth E. Associate Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering BS. University of Maryland. 1950; B.S., 1951; M.S., 
Pennsylvania State University. 1962 

Ferraioli. Joseph Assistant Professor of Art BID.. Pratt 
Institute. 1964; M.F.A . Columbia University, 1970. 
Ferran Guadalupe T. Assistant Professor of Secondary 
Education BA, Hunter College, 1973; MA, Ohio State Univer- 
sity. 1974. Ph.D. 1978 

Ferrell Richard A. Professor of Physics B.S.. California 
Institute of Technology. 1948; MS, 1949; Ph.D., Princeton 
University. 1952. 

Fertzlger, Allen P. Assistant Professor of Health Education, 
B.S., City College of the City University ot New York, 1963; 
Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1968 

Fey, James T. Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
and' Mathematics BS. University of Wisconsin. 1962; M.S., 
1963; Ph.D.. Columbia University, 1968. 
Fichtel, Carl Edwin Adiunct Protessor of Physics and As- 
tronomy BS. Washington University. 1955; Ph.D. 1960 
Fink Beatrice C. Associate Professor of French and Italian 
BA. Bryn Mawr College, 1953. MA., Yale University, 1956; 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 1966 

Finkelstein, Barbara J. Associate Protessor and Coordina- 
tor of Social Foundations of Education B A.. Barnard College. 
1959; MA, Teachers College, Columbia University. 1960; 
Ed.D., 1970. 

Flnsterbusch, Kurt Associate Professor of Sociology B.A, 
Princeton University. 1957; B.D.. Grace Theological Seminary, 
1960; PhD. Columbia University. 1969 
Fish Gertrude S. Assistant Professor of Housing and Ap- 
plied Design B S . Cornell University, 1968; MA. 1970. Ph D , 
1973. 

Fltzpatrick, Patrick M. Associate Professor of Mathematics 
BA, Rutgers University, 1966. Ph.D.. 1971 
Fivel, Daniel I. Associate Professor of Physics BA , The 
Johns Hopkins University. 1953, PhD, 1959 
Flack James K. Jr. Associate Professor of History B.A . 
Albion College. 1959. MA, Wayne State University, 1963; 
Ph D„ 1968. 

Flatter, Charles H. Associate Professor, Institute tor Child 
Study BA, DePauw University, 1961. E Ed, University of Tole- 
do, 1965; Ed.D , University of Maryland, 1968. 
Fleck, Jere Associate Professor of Germanic and Slavic 
Languages PhD. University ot Munich, 1968 
Fleig Albert J., Jr. Lecturer in Aerospace Engineering 
B.S.E.S, Purdue University. 1958. PhD , Catholic University of 
America, 1968. 

Fletcher, William H. Assistant Professor of Germanic and 
Slavic Languages BA, California State University, 1970. M A . 
Cornell University. 1972; PhD, 1977 
Florestano, Patricia S. Assistant Professor of Urban Studies 
B.A, University of Maryland. 1958; MA. 1970, PhD, 1974. 
Folsom, Kenneth E. Associate Professor of History B A . 
Princeton University, 1943, B.A . University of California. Berke- 
ley, 1955; MA, 1957, Ph.D.. 1964 

Folstrom, Roger J. Professor of Music and Secondary Edu- 
cation BS. College ot St Thomas. 1956, M.Ed, 1959; MM . 
Northwestern University, 1963. PhD. 1967 
Fonaroff, L. Schuyler Professor ot Geography B A, Univer- 
sity of Arizona, 1955; PhD, The Johns Hopkins University. 
1961. 



Forbes, James H., Jr. Associate Professor of Art B A, 
University of Maryland, 1964, MA, 1966. 



Ford. Gary T. Assistant Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment' B B A. Clarkson College of Technology. 1966, MBA. 
State University of New York at Buffalo. 1968. PhD, 1973 
Foss, John E. Protessor ot Agronomy B.S., Wisconsin State 
University. 1957; M.S.. University of Minnesota, 1959; PhD. 
1965 

Foster Phillips W. Professor ot Agricultural and Resource 
Economics BS. Cornell University. 1953. M.S., University of 
Illinois. 1956, PhD, 1958. 

Fourney, William L. Protessor of Mechanical Engineering 
BSA.E.West Virginia University. 1962, M.S., 1963. PhD, 
University ot Illinois. 1966. 

Foust, Clifford M. Professor of History B.A , Syracuse Uni- 
versity. 1949; MA, University ol Chicago. 1951. PhD, 1957 
Francescato, Guido Professor and Chairman of Housing 
and Applied Design B Arch, University of Illinois (Urbana). 
1959; MArch, 1966. 

Frank. Susan Assistant Professor. Psychology B.A, New 
York University. 1971; PhD, Yale University. 1976. 
Frederiksen, Elke P. Assistant Prolessor, Germanic and 
Slavic Languages MA, University of Kiel (Germany), 1962; 
M A . University ot Wisconsin, 1965. PhD , University of Colora- 
do, 1973 

Freedman, Morris Professor of English B.A, City University 
of New York. 1941; MA, Columbia University. 1950, PhD, 
1953 

Freeman, David H. Protessor of Chemistry BS, University of 
Rochester, 1952; M.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1954; 
PhD. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1957. 
Freeman, Robert Associate Protessor of Psychology and 
Counseling and Personnel Services BA, Haverford College, 
1951; MA, Wesleyan University. 1954, PhD, University of 
Maryland, 1964. 

Frelmuth, Vlckl S. Associate Professor of Communication 
Arts and Theatre BS. Eastern Illinois University. 1966; M.A, 
University of Iowa, 1967; Ph D , Flonda State University, 1974. 
Fretz. Bruce R. Adiunct Professor of Psychology B.A, Get- 
tysburg College, 1961 ; MA. Ohio State University, 1963; Ph.D.. 
1965 

Frey, Barry Chance Assistant Professor ot Agricultural Engi- 
neering B S , Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. 
1971, M.S. 1974; PhD, Oklahoma State University, 1979. 
Friedman, Herbert Adiunct Protessor of Physics B.A, 
Brooklyn College. 1936; PhD, The Johns Hopkins University. 
1940. 

Fritz, Sigmund Visiting Professor of Meteorology B S . 
Brooklyn College, 1934. M S, Massachusetts Institute ot Tech- 
nology. 1941; Sc.D, 1953 

Fromovitz, Stan Associate Protessor of Business and Man- 
agement BA, Sc, University of Toronto, 1960; M.A, 1961; 
PhD, Stanford University, 1965 

Fry, Gladys M. Associate Professor of English BA, Howard 
University. 1952; M.A, 1954; Ph.D., Indiana University, 1967 
Fuegi John B. Professor and Director. Comparative Litera- 
ture Program B.A, Pomona College, 1961; PhD, University ot 
Southern California. 1967 

Funaro, George J. Provost Division ot Human and Commu- 
nity Resources and Associate Professor of Secondary Educa- 
tion B.A, American International College. 1956. M.A, University 
of Connecticut, 1961, PhD, 1965. 

Galletta Gene J. Adiunct Prolessor of Horticulture BS, 
University of Maryland. 1951. MS. Rutgers University 1953; 
PhD, University ot California. 1959 

Galloway, Raymond A. Professor of Botany B.A, University 
of Maryland. 1952; M.S., 1956; Ph.D. 1958. 
Gambrell, Linda B. Assistant Professor of Early Childhood 
Elementary Education BS, University of Maryland, 1966; 
M.Ed, 1970; PhD, 1973 

Gammon, Robert W. Assistant Professor of Institute of 
Physical Science and Technology B.A . The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1961; MS . California Institute of Technology, 1963; 
Ph.D.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1967. 
Gannon John D. Assistant Protessor of Computer Science 
B A . Brown University. 1970. MS, 1972. University of Toronto. 
1975 

Gannon Martin J. Professor of Business and Management 
B A, University ot Scranton. 1961; PhD, Columbia University. 
1969. 

Garber Daniel L. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
BS. University of Maryland. 1952. MS, 1959; PhD, 1965. 
Gardner, Albert H. Associate Professor, Institute for Child 
Study B S , State University of New York, Cortland. 1958; M.A , 
Syracuse University. 1964; PhD, 1967 
Gardner, Marjorle H. Professor of Chemistry BS, Utah 
State University. 1946; M.A, Ohio State University. 1958; PhD, 
1960 

Garner Ruth A. Assistant Prolessor of Early Childhood/Ele- 
mentary Education B S, University of Wisconsin at Madison. 
1967; MS. 1970; Ph.D. 1977 



Harber, Jean R. 31 



Garvey Evelyn F. Professor o( Music B S . Temple Universi- 
ty, 1943; MM. University ol Rochester 1946 
Gasner, Larry L. Associate Professor ot Chemical Engineer 
ing B S., University of Minnesota, 1965. MS, Massachusetts 
Institute ol Technology, 1967, PhD,, 1971 
Gass. Saul I. Professor of Business and Management B S . 
Boston University, 1949; MA,, 1949; PhD, University Califor- 
nia. 1965. 

Gaylln, Ned L. Professor and Chairman, Department of Fam- 
ily and Community Development B A , University of Chicago. 
1956. MA, 1961; Ph.D.. 1965. 

Geddes, Margaret Anne Assistant Prolessor of Housing and 
Applied Design B A . University ol Alberta. 1 964. M A . Universi- 
ty of Iowa. 1967; M.F.A . University ol Cincinnati, 1966 
Gelman, Ellen F. Associate Professor ol Art A B . Brandeis 
University. 1961. MFA. Columbia University 1964 
Gelso, Charles J. Associate Professor of Psychology B S , 
Bloomsburg Slate College, 1963, M.S., Florida State University. 
1964. Ph.D., Ohio Slate University. 1970. 
Gemmlll, Perry R. Assistant Professor. Industrial Education 
B.S . Millersville State College. 1 968. MAE.. Ball Stale College. 
1970. PhD. University of Maryland, 1976. 
Gentry, James W. Professor of Chemical Engineering B S , 
Oklahoma State University. 1961; MS, University of Birming- 
ham. 1963. Ph.D. University of Texas, 1969. 
Glffln, Donald W. Associate Professor of History and Direc- 
tor of Admissions and Registrations B A . University ot Califor- 
nia. Santa Barbara, 1950; MA, Vanderbilt University. 1956; 
PhD. 1962 

Gilbert, James B. Professor of History B.A., Carleton Col- 
lege, 1961; MA.. University of Wisconsin. 1963, Ph.D.. 1966 
Gill, Douglas E. Associate Professor of Zoology B S , Mariet- 
ta College. 1965; MA, University of Michigan, 1967, PhD, 
1971. 



Gllmore, Al-Tony Associate Professor of History B A , North 
Carolina Central University, 1968, MA, 1969, Ph.D.. University 
of Toledo, 1972, 

Glnter, Marshall L. Professor, Institute for Physical Science 
and Technology BS, Chico State College. 1958. Ph.D., Van- 
derbilt University 1961 

Glad, John Associate Professor of Germanic and Slavic 
Language and Literature B.A , Indiana University, 1962. MA. 
1964, PhD, New York University, 1970 
Glass, James M. Associate Prolessor of Government and 
Politics B.A., University of California at Berkeley. 1961. M.A . 
1964; Ph.D.. 1970. 

Glasser, Robert G. Prolessor of Physics A B . University ol 
Chicago. 1948. BS. 1950. MS. 1952. PhD, 1954 
Glee, Ulysses S. Assistant Professor of Agricultural and 
Extension Education B S , Florida A & M University. 1967. M.S.. 
University of Maryland. 1970; Ph.D.. 1975. 
Glendenlng, Parrls N. Associate Professor of Government 
and Politics B.A., Florida State University. 1964. M.A.. 1965; 
Ph D. 1967 

Glenn, Donald Scott Assistant Professor of Agronomy B.S . 
University ol Kentucky. 1975; Ph.D. 1980 
Gllck, Arnold J. Professor of Physics B.A., Brooklyn College. 
1955. Ph D., University of Maryland. 1961. 
Gllgor, Virgil D. Assistant Professor, Computer Science B.S.. 
University of California (Berkeley). 1972. M.S.. 1973; PhD, 
1976 

Gloeckler, George Professor of Physics BS, University of 
Chicago. 1960. MS, 1961. PhD. 1965 
Glover III, Rolfe E. Professor of Physics A.B.. Bowdom 
College. 1948. BS. Massachusetts Institute ol Technology. 
1948. Ph.D. University of Goettingen. 1953. 
Gluckstern, Robert L. Chancellor and Professor of Physics 
and Astronomy BEE. City College of New York, 1944. Ph.D.. 
Massachusetts Institute ol Technology. 1948 
Goerlng, Jacob 0. Prolessor. Institute lor Child Study B.A . 
Bethel College, 1941, PhD. University ol Maryland. 1959 
Gokel, George William Associate Prolessor ol Chemistry 
BS. Tulane University. 1968, PhD, University ot Southern 
California. 1971 

Goldberg, Seymour Professor of Mathematics A B , Hunter 
College. 1950; MA , Ohio State University. 1952; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Calilornia at Los Angeles. 1958 
Golden, Bruce L. Associate Professor of Business and Man- 
agement BA, University of Pennsylvania. 1972; SM. Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology. 1974; Ph D., 1976. 
Goldenbaum, George C. Associate Professor of Physics 
B S , Muhlenberg College. 1957; Ph.D.. University ol Maryland, 
1966 

Goldhaber, Jacob K. Professor and Chairman ol Mathemat- 
ics B.A , Brooklyn College. 1 944, MA, Harvard University. 1 945 
PhD. University of Wisconsin. 1950 



Goldman, Harvey Associate Professor of Administration, 
Supervision and Curriculum B A , University ol Rhode Island. 
1960. MA. John Carroll University. 1962. Ed.D.. Michigan Stale 
University, 1966 

Goldsby, Richard Allen Professor of Biochemistry B.A. 
University of Kansas. 1957; Ph.D.. University ol California, 1961 
Goldstein. Irwin L. Professo- of Psychology B.A,, City Col- 
lege of New York, 1959; MA, University of Maryland. 1962; 
Ph.D.. 1964, 

Goldstein, Larry L. Prolessor ot Mathematics B.A , Universi- 
ty of Pennsylvania. 1965, MA., 1965, M.A., Princeton University. 
1967; Ph D, 1967 

Gollub, Lewis R. Prolessor ol Psychology A B . University ol 
Pennsylvania. 1955. Ph.D.. Harvard University. 1958. 
Gomezplata, Albert Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.Ch E . Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, 1952. M Ch E . 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1954. Ph.D., 1958. 
Gonzalez, Nancle L. Professor of Anthropology and Vice- 
Chancellor lor Academic Allairs B S . University of North Dako- 
ta, 1951. MA.. University of Michigan. 1955, Ph.D., 1959 
Good, Richard A. Professor ot Mathematics A B Ashland 
College. 1939; MA . University of Wisconsin 1940; PhD, 1945 
Goode, Melvyn Dennis Associate Prolessor of Zoology 
B.S.. University of Kansas. 1963, Ph.D.. Iowa State University. 
1967. 

Goodwyn, Frank Professor of Spanish B.A , College of Arts 
and Industries, 1940; MA, 1941. PhD University of Texas, 
1946 

Gordon, Donald C. Professor of History AB , College ol 
William and Mary, 1 934, MA. Columbia University, 1 937. PhD 
1947, 

Gordon, Glen E. Professor of Chemistry BS, University ol 
Illinois. 1956; Ph.D., University ol California, Berkeley, 1960 
Gordon, Stewart L. Professor of Music B.A., University ol 
Kansas. 1953; MA, 1954; DMA., University of Rochester 
1965. 

Gormally, James Assistant Professor, Psychology BA 
Mann College. 1969; MA., Southern Illinois University 1972 
Ph.D., 1974 

Gorovltz, Samuel Prolessor and Chairman of the Depart 
ment of Philosophy B S , Massachuetts Institute of Technology 
1960. Ph.D.. Stanford University. 1963. 



Gouln, Francis R. Professor of Horticulture B.S , University 
of New Hampshire, 1962, MS, University Maryland, 1965. 
PhD, 1969 

Gould, William, Jr. Assistant Professor of Horticulture AB . 
Albion College. 1940. ML A.. University of Georgia 1975 
Gramberg, Edvard Professor of Spanish B A., University of 
Amsterdam, 1946, M.A , University of California, Los Angeles, 
1949. Ph D., University of California Berkeley, 1956. 
Grant, Lee P. Associate Professor, Agricultural Engineering 
B.S.. University of Connecticut. 1962; M.S., Pennsylvania Slate 
University, 1971; Ph.D., 1974, 

Gray, Alfred Professor of Mathematics B.A . University of 
Kansas, 1960; MA, 1961, Ph D., University of California, Los 
Angeles, 1964 

Green, Eleanor B. Assistant Professor of Art A.B , Vassar 
College. 1949; MA. George Washington University. 1971; 
Ph.D., 1973. 

Green, Harry B., Jr. Assistant Professor, Institute of Child 
Study B.A.. University ot Virginia, 1959; M.Ed.. 1963; PhD. 
1965 

Green, Joseph E. Jr. Assistant Professor of Landscape 
Architecture BS. Furman University. 1973; ML A.. University 
ol Georgia, 1978. 

Green, Paul S. Associate Prolessor of Mathematics B.A , 
Cornell University, 1959, M.A . Harvard University. 1960; Ph D , 
Cornell University. 1964, 

Green, Wlllard W. Prolessor of Animal Science B.S . Univer- 
sity of Minnesota. 1933. M.S., 1934; Ph.D.. 1939 
Greenberg. Jerrold S. Prolessor of Health Education. B S , 
City College ol the City University ol New York. 1964; MS. City 
College ot the City University of New York. 1965, Ed D . 
Syracuse University, 1969 

Greenberg, Kenneth R. Associate Professor of Counseling 
and Personnel Services B S , Ohio State University, 1951, MA , 
1952, PhD, Western Reserve University. 1960 
Greenberg, Leon Professor of Mathematics B S . City Col- 
lege of New York, 1953; M.A,. Yale University 1955; PhD. 
1958 

Greenberg, Louis M. Associate Professor of History B.A . 
Brooklyn College. 1954, MA, Harvard University, 1957 Ph.D., 
1963 

Greenberg, Oscar W. Prolessor ol Physics B S . Rutgers 
University. 1952. A M , Princeton University. 1954; Ph.D., 1956 



Greene, James B. Assistant Professor of Business and 
Management BA, Duke Unrversity, 1969. Ph D., University of 
Michigan, 1975 

Greenspan. Patricia Associate Prolessor of Philosophy 
A.B.. Columbia University, 1966; A.M., Harvard University, 1968; 
PhD, 1972 

Greenwood, David C. Associate Professor of English BA, 
University of London, 1949, Certificate m Education, Not- 
tingham, 1953, PhD, University ol Dublin. 1968 
Greer, Sandra C. Associate Professor of Chemistry B S . 
Furman University. 1966, MS. University of Chicago. 1968; 
PhD. 1969 

Greer, Thomas V. Professor of Business and Management 
B A . University of Texas. 1953; MB A., Ohio State University. 
1957; PhD, University of Texas. 1964 

Griem. Hans Prolessor ol Physics Arbiture. Max Planck 
Schule, 1949; PhD University ol Kiel, 1954 
Griffin, James J. Prolessor of Physics B.S . Villanova Col- 
legia 1952, MS, Princeton University, 1955; Ph.D. 1956 
Grim, Samuel O. Prolessor of Chemistry B.S . Franklin and 
Marshall College. 1956; Ph.D.. Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. 1960 

Grlmsted, David A. Associate Professor of History AB . 
Harvard University. 1957; MA , University ot California. Berke- 
ley. 1958; Ph.D.. 1963. 

Grollman, Slgmund, Professor of Zoology B S , University of 
Maryland. 1947; MS. 1949. PhD. 1952 
Gross, Alan E. Prolessor and Chairman ol Psychology B S . 
Purdue University, 1959, M B.A . Stanford University. 1962, 
PhD.. 1967. 

Groves. Paul A., Associate Professor of Geography B Sc . 
University of London. 1956. M.A , University of Maryland. 1961. 
Ph D , University ol Calilornia, Berkeley, 1969. 



Gruchy, Allan G. Professor of Economics B.A., University of 
British Columbia, 1926; M.A.. McGill University. 1929. PhD 
University of Virginia. 1931. 

Grunig, James E. Professor of Journalism BS . Iowa State 
University. 1964. MS. University ol Wisconsin, 1966, Ph.D.. 
1968 

Guernsey. Ralph L. Research Associate Professor. Institute 
for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics BA, Miami Uni- 
versity, 1952; M.S., 1954. Ph.D.. University of Michigan. 1970 
Gullck. Sidney L. Prolessor ol Mathematics B A . Oberlm 
College. 1958; M.A. Yale University. 1960; PhD, 1963 
Haber. Francis C. Professor of History B.A., University of 
Connecticut, 1948, MA.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1952. 
Ph.D.. 1957 

Hacklander, Effle Assistant Professor of Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics BS. University of Minnesota, 1962; MA. 
Michigan State University. 1968; PhD. 1973 
Hage, Jerald Professor and Chairman of Sociology B.B A.. 
University of Wisconsin. 1955, PhD. Columbia University. 
1963 

Haley, A.J. Professor of Zoology B S.. University ol New 
Hampshire, 1949; M S . 1950; Sc D . The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 1955. 

Hamilton, Donna 8. Assistant Professor of English BA , St 
Olal College. 1963, PhD, University ol Wisconsin, Madison 
1968 

Hamilton, Gary 0. Associate Prolessor of English BA. St 
Olat College, 1962; M A . University of Wisconsin. 1965. Ph D . 
1968 

Hamlet. Richard Graham Assistant Professor of Computer 
Science BS, University ol Wisconsin. 1959; M.S. Cornell 
University. 1964. Ph.D.. University of Washington. 1971. 
Hamlet. Sandra L. Associate Professor ot Heanng and 
Speech Sciences 8A. University of Wisconsin, 1959. MA. 
University of Washington, 1967, PhD. 1970 
Hammond, Allen S. Assistant Prolessor of Speech and 
Dramatic Art B A . Gnnnell College. 1972; Juns Doctor, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 1975. M.A.. 1977. 
Hammond, Robert C. Prolessor and Chairman of Veterinary 
Science B.S. Pennsylvania State University. 1943. DVM. 
University of Pennsylvania. 1948 

Hancock. Charles R. Associate Professor of Secondary 
Education BA Louisiana Stale University. 1964. MA. 1966. 
PhD. Ohio State University, 1970 

Hanna, William John Professor and Chairman ot Family and 
Community Development BA, University ot Calilornia at Los 
Angeles. 1957. M.A. 1960. Ph.D. 1962. 
Hansen, J.N. Associate Prolessor ol Biochemistry BA. 
Drake University. 1964, PhD. University ot Calilornia, Los 
Angeles. 1968 

Harber. Jean R. Assistant Professor ot Special Education 
BA. State University ol New York. 1969; M Ed Temple 
University. 1971. Ed D . 1975 



32 Hardgrave, Walter Terry 



Hardgrave, Walter Terry Assistant Professor, Information 
Systems Management BS, University of Texas. 1967; MA. 
1970; Ph.D.. 1972. 

Hardie, Ian W. Associate Professor of Agricultural and Re- 
source Economics BS, University of California. Davis, 1960. 
PhD. University of California. Berkeley. 1965. 
Hardin, Russell Associate Professor, Government and Poli- 
tics B.A. and BS. University of Texas, 1963. B.A , Oxford 
University. Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1971. 
Hardy. Robert C. Professor. Institute For Child Study B.S.Ed, 
Bucknell University. 1961; M.S.Ed.. Indiana University. 1964, 
Ed.D, 1969. 

Harger, Robert O. Professor and Chairman of Electrical 
Engineering BSE , University of Michigan. 1955; M SE , 1959; 
Ph.D.. 1961. Harlan, Louis R Professor of History B.A, 
Emory University. 1943; MA. Vanderbilt University. 1947; 
Ph.D.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1955. 
Harper, Glenn A. Assistant Professor of Sociology BS, 
Purdue University. 1958; MS. 1961; PhD.. 1968. 
Harper, Robert A. Professor of Geography Ph B, University 
of Chicago. 1946; B.S.. 1947; M.S., 1948; Ph.D.. 1950. 
Harrington, J. Patrick Associate Professor of Astronomy 
BS. University of Chicago, 1961; M.S.. Ohio State University. 
1964. Ph.D., 1967. 

Harris, Curtis C. Professor of Economics B.S.. University of 
Florida, 1956, MA, Harvard University. 1959; Ph.D.. 1960. 
Harris, James F. Assistant Professor of History B.S., Loyola 
University. 1962. M.S.. University of Wisconsin. 1964. Ph.D., 
1968. 

Harris, Wesley, L. Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
BS.A.E, University of Georgia. 1953; MS. 1958. Ph.D., Michi- 
gan State University. 1960 

Harrison, Floyd P. Professor of Entomology BS , Louisiana 
State University. 1951; M.S.. 1953. PhD . University of Mary- 
land. 1955. 

Harrison, Paul E., Jr. Professor of Industrial Education 
B.Ed, Northern Illinois University, 1942. MA., University of 
Northern Colorado. 1947. Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 1955. 
Harvey, James W. Assistant Professor of Business and 
Management B.S, University of Illinois. 1966. MB A,, University 
of Miami. 1968. PhD, Pennsylvania State University. 1977 
Haslem, John A. Professor of Business and Management 
A.B, Duke University. 1956; MBA. University of North Caro- 
lina. 1961; Ph.D.. 1967 

Hatch, Randolph Thomas Associate Professor of Chemical 
Engineering BS . University of California. Berkeley. 1967; M.S.. 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1969; PhD., 1973. 
Hatfield, Agnes B. Associate Professor, Institute for Child 
Study B.A, University of California, 1948; MA, University of 
Denver, 1954; Ph.D.. 1959. 

Hathorn, Guy B. Professor of Government and Politics A.B.. 
University of Mississippi, 1940; MA., 1942; Ph.D., Duke Univer- 
sity. 1950 

Hauptman, William Assistant Professor of Art B.A.. The 
George Washington University, 1968; M.A., 1970; Ph.D., The 
Pennsylvania State University, 1975 

Hausman, Daniel M. Assistant Professor of Philosophy B.A , 
Harvard College, 1 969, MA T , New York University, 1 971 ; B.A., 
Cambridge University. 1973; M.Phil., Columbia University. 1975; 
Ph.D., 1978. 

Hawk, Harold W. Adjunct Professor of Dairy Science B.S., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1952, MS.. University of 
Wisconsin, 1953; Ph.D.. 1956. 

Hayleck, Charles R., Jr. Associate Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering B.S., University of Maryland. 1943. M.S.. 1949 
Hayward, Raymond W. Ad|unct Professor of Physics B.S, 
Iowa State College, 1943; Ph.D.. University of California. Berke- 
ley. 1950 

Head, Emerson Associate Professor of Music B Mus., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1957, M.Mus, 1961. 
Heath, James L. Professor of Poultry Science B.S., Louis- 
iana State University, 1963; M.S.. 1968; Ph.D.. 1970. 
Heathington, Betty Assistant Professor of Early Child- 
hood/Elementary Education B.S, University of Texas at Austin, 
1965; MS, Purdue University. 1972; Ed.D , University of Ten- 
nessee at Knoxville. 1975, 

Hebeler, Jean R. Professor of Special Education B.S, Buffa- 
lo State Teachers College. 1953; MS, University of Illinois. 
1956. Ed.D, Syracuse University, 1960. 
Heidelbach, Ruth Associate Professor of Early Childhood 
Elementary Education and Associate Director, Office of Labora- 
tory Experiences B.S . University of Maryland, 1949; M.Ed., 
University of Florida. 1958; Ed.D . Columbia University. 1967. 
Heikkinen, Henry Wendell Associate Professor of Chemis- 
try and Secondary Education BEng , Yale University. 1956; 
MA, Columbia University, 1962; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1973 



Heim, Norman Professor of Music B.M.Ed . Evansville Col- 
lege, 1951, M M„ University of Rochester. 1952. DMA.. 1962. 
Heins, Conrad P., Jr. Professor. Civil Engineering B S, Drex- 
el Institute of Technology. 1960. M.S., Lehigh University, 1962; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland. 1967. 

Heins, Maurice Haskell Professor of Mathematics A.B.. Har- 
vard University. 1937. A.M. 1939; Ph.D.. 1940 
Heisler, Martin O. Associate Professor of Government and 
Politics B A., University of California, Los Angeles. 1960; M.A., 
1962; Ph.D., 1969. 

Heltman, John L. Associate Professor, Entomology B.S.. 
University of Maryland. 1966; M.S.. 1968. 
Helm, E. Eugene Professor of Music B.M.E.. Southeastern 
Louisiana College, 1960; M.M.E.. Louisiana State University, 
1955. Ph.D., North Texas State University. 1958 
Helz, George R. Associate Professor of Chemistry A.B., 
Princeton University. 1964. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Universi- 
ty. 1971 

Helzer, G.A. Associate Professor of Mathematics B.A.. Port- 
land State College. 1959; MA, Northwestern University. 1962; 
Ph.D.. 1964, 

Hendrie, David L. Professor of Physics BS, University of 
Washington. 1960; Ph.D.. 1964. 

Henery-Logan, Kenneth R. Professor of Chemistry B.Sc, 
McGill University, 1942; Ph.D., 1946. 

Henkel. Ramon E. Associate Professor of Sociology Ph.B., 
University of Wisconsin. 1958; MA, 1961. Ph.D. 1967 
Henkelman, James Associate Professor of Secondary Edu- 
cation and Mathematics BS. Miami University, 1954. M.Ed., 
1955; Ed.D., Harvard University, 1965. 
Herb, Rebecca A. Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.A., 
University of Oregon, 1969; MA, 1970. PhD.. University of 
Washington, 1974. 

Hering, Christoph A. Professor and Chairman of Germanic 
and Slavic Languages Ph.D., Rhem-Fnednch-Wilhelms Univer- 
sitat. 1950. 

Herman, Harold J. Associate Professor. English B.A, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1952; PhD, University of Pennsylvania. 
1960. 

Herman, Wayne L. Associate Professor of Early Childhood 
and Elementary Education B.A, Ursinus College. 1955; M.Ed., 
Temple University. 1960. Ed.D.. 1965. 

Herschbach, Dennis R. Associate Professor of Industrial 
Education A.B., San Jose State College. 1960; MS. University 
of Illinois, 1968; Ph.D.. 1972. 

Hetrick, Frank M. Professor of Microbiology B.S, Michigan 
State University, 1954; M.S. University of Maryland. 1960; 
Ph.D.. 1962. 

Hiebert, Ray Eldon Professor of Journalism B.A, Stanford 
University, 1954. M S . Columbia University. 1957; MA. Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1961, PhD, 1962. 

Higgins, William J. Associate Professor of Zoology B.S, 
Boston College, 1969. Ph.D.. Florida State University. 1973. 
Highton, Richard Professor of Zoology A.B, New York 
University. 1950; MS . University of Florida, 1953; PhD, 1956. 
Hill, Clara E. Associate Professor of Psychology B.A, South- 
ern Illinois University. 1970; MA, 1972; Ph.D, 1974 
Hirzel, Robert K. Associate Professor of Sociology B.A, 
Pennsylvania State University, 1946; MA. 1950; Ph.D., Louis- 
iana State University. 1954 

Hochuli, Urs E. Professor of Electrical Engineering B.S, 
Technikum Biel, Switzerland. 1952; M.S. University of Mary- 
land. 1955; Ph.D. Catholic University of America. 1962. 
Hodos, William Professor of Psychology B.S, Brooklyn Col- 
lege, 1 955; MA . University of Pennsylvania, 1 957. Ph.D, 1 960. 
Hoffman, Mary Ann Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services B.A, Macalester College, 1971, Ph.D, 
University of Minnesota, 1975 

Hoffman, Ronald Associate Professor of History B.A, 
George Peabody College. 1964, MA, University of Wisconsin, 
1965, Ph.D., 1969. 

Holdaway, P.K. Assistant Professor, Dairy Science B.S, 
Brigham Young University. 1966; MS , 1969. Ph.D, Ohio State 
University. 1973. 

Holland, Joshua Z. Adjunct Professor of Meteorology B.S, 
University of Chicago. 1941; PhD, University of Washington. 
1968 

Hollies, Norman R. Lecturer in Textiles and Consumer Eco- 
nomics B.S, University of Alberta, 1944. Ph.D . McGill Universi- 
ty. 1947 

Holloway, David C. Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering BS, University of Illinois, 1966; M.S. 1969; Ph.D, 
1971. 



Holmlund. Chester E. Professor of Biochemistry B.S, 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 1943; M.S., 1951. Ph.D, Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 1954, 



Holton, William Milne Professor of English A.B, Dartmouth 
College. 1954; LLB, Harvard University, 1957; MA. Yale 
University, 1959; Ph.D, 1965 

Holum, Kenneth G. Associate Professor of History B.A, 
Augstana College, 1961; MA, University of Chicago, 1969; 
Ph.D, 1973. 

Holvey, Samuel B. Assistant Professor of Housing and Ap- 
plied Design B.F.A, Syracuse University. 1957. MA, American 
University. 1969. 

Hopkins, Richard L. Associate Professor, Social Founda- 
tions of Education B.S , Stanford University. 1962; MS, 1963; 
Ph.D, University of California, Los Angeles. 1969. 
Hornyak, William F. Professor of Physics BEE, City Univer- 
sity of New York, City College, 1944, M.S., California Institute of 
Technology. 1946; Ph.D, 1949. 

Horton, David L. Professor of Psychology B.A, University of 
Minnesota. 1955; MA, 1957. Ph.D, 1959 , 
Horvath, John M. Professor of Mathematics Ph.D . Universi- 
ty of Budapest, 1947. 

Hovey, Richard B. Professor of English A.B, University of 
Cincinnati, 1942; MA, Harvard University. 1943; Ph.D. 1950. 
Howard, John D. Associate Professor of English B.A, 
Washington College. 1956; MA, University of Maryland. 1962; 
Ph.D, 1967 

Howard, Lawrence V., Jr. Assistant Professor of Micro- 
biology B.A, Emory University, 1963; MS. University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 1966; PhD, 1970. 
Hsu, Shao T. Professor of Mechanical Engineering B.S . 
Chiao-Tung University, 1937, MS, Massachusetts institute of 
Technology. 1944, Sc.D . Swiss Federal Institute of Technolo- 
gy, 1954 

Hsueh, Chun-tu Professor of Government and Politics 
L.L.B, Chaoyang University Law School. 1946, MA. Columbia 
University, 1953; PhD, 1958. 

Hubbard. Bert E. Research Professor, Institute for Physical 
Science and Technology, and Mathematics B.S, Western Il- 
linois University, 1949; MS. State University of Iowa. 1952; 
PhD, University of Maryland. 1960. 

Hubbe, Rolf O. Associate Professor of Classical Languages 
and Literature A.B, Hamilton College. 1947; A.M.. Princeton 
University. 1950; Ph.D, 1950. 

Huden, Daniel P. Associate Professor and Chairman, Social 
Foundations of Education B.S , University of Vermont. 1954; 
MA, Columbia Teachers College. 1958; Ed.D, 1967 
Hudson, William Professor of Music 8 Mus , Philadelphia 
Conservatory of Music. 1954. B.A . University of Pennsylvania, 
1957; M.Mus, Yale School of Music. 1961 
Huebner, Robert W. Associate Professor. Institute for Child 
Study BS, Concordia Teachers College. 1957; MA. 1960; 
Ph.D, University of Maryland. 1969. 

Huheey, James E. Professor of Chemistry B.S, University of 
Cincinnati. 1957, MS, 1959; Ph.D, University of Illinois, 1961. 
Hult, Joan A. Associate Professor of Physical Education 
B.S, Indiana University, 1954; M.Ed, University of North Caro- 
lina, 1957; Ph.D, University of Southern California, 1967. 
Hummel, James A. Professor of Mathematics and Statistics 
B.S, California Institute of Technology. 1949; MA, Rice In- 
stitute. 1953; Ph.D., 1955. 

Humphrey, Fred Professor and Chairman of Recreation 
B.A, Tarkio College. 1946. MA, University of Iowa. 1953; 
Ph.D , Pennsylvania State University, 1973. 
Humphrey, James H. Professor of Physical Education B.A, 
Denison University. 1933; MA, Western Reserve University. 
1946; Ed.D, Boston University. 1951. 

Hunt, Edith J. Assistant Professor. Institute for Child Study 
A.B, University of Redlands, 1954; MA, Fresno State College. 
1964. Ed.D, University of Maryland. 1967. 
Hunt, Janet Gibbs Associate Professor of Sociology B.A, 
University of Redlands. 1962. MA. Indiana University. 1966; 
Ph.D, 1973 

Hunt, Larry L. Associate Professor of Sociology B.S, Ball 
State University, 1961, MA, Indiana University, 1964; Ph.D, 
1968. 

Husman, Burris F. Professor and Chairman of Physical Edu- 
cation B.S, University of Illinois. 1941. MS, 1948; Ed.D, 
University of Maryland, 1954 

Hynes Cecil V. Associate Professor of Business and Man- 
agement B.A, Michigan State University, 1948, MA, 1949. 
Ph.D, 1965 

Igel, Regina Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 
B.A, Umversidade de Sao Paulo, 1 964. MA, University of Iowa. 
1970; PhD, University of New Mexico, 1973. 
Imberski, Richard B. Associate Professor of Zoology B.S . 
University of Rochester. 1959; Ph.D, 1965 
Ingling, Allen L. Assistant Professor, Veterinary Science 
BSE E, University of Maryland. 1963; V.M.D, University of 
Pennsylvania, 1969. 



Koopman, Elizabeth Janssen 33 



Ingraham, Barton L. Associate Prolessor and Acting Direc 
tor. Institute of of Criminal Justice and Criminology A.B.. Hai 
vard University. 1952; L.L.B . Harvard Law School, 1957, 
MCnm, University of California, Berkeley, 1968; D Crim , 1972 
Ingram, Anne G. Professor of Physical Education A.B, Urn 
versity of North Carolina, 1944, MA. University of Georgia 
1948. Ed.D. Columbia University, 1962 
Inman, John C. Assistant Professor of Agronomy B S, Pres 
bytenan College. 1973; MS, Purdue University. 1976. Ph.D. 
1979. 

Inouye, David W. Assistant Professor, Zoology B A 
Swarthmore College. 1971, Ph.D.. University ot North Carolina, 
1976. 

Intrillgator. Barbara A. Visiting Assistant Professor ot Ad 
ministration, Supervision, and Curriculum A B .. Syracuse Uni- 
versity. 1962. M Ed, Tufts University, 1963, Ed.D., Boston 
University, 1978 

Irwin, George R. Professor of Mechanical Engineering A.B, 
Knox College. 1930; M.S.. University of Illinois. 1933. PhD, 
1937 

Isaacs, Nell D. Prolessor of English A.B.. Dartmouth College, 
1953, A.M. University of California. Berkeley. 1956. PhD, 
Brown University. 1959. 

Ishee, Sidney Professor of Agricultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics B.S., Mississippi State College. 1950; MS. Pennsylva- 
nia State University, 1952; Ph.D.. 1957. 
Jachowski, Leo A., Jr. Professor of Zoology B.S., University 
ot Michigan, 1941. MS, 1942; Sc.D., The Johns Hopkins 
University. 1953. 

Jacobs, Barry E. Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B S . Brooklyn College. 1969. M.S., New York University, 1971, 
PhD., 1975 

James, Edward F. Assistant Professor of English and Sec- 
ondary Education B.A, University of Maryland. 1954. MA. 
1955. PhD. Catholic University of America. 1969 
Jamleson, Kathleen Associate Professor of Communication 
Arts and Theatre B.A , Marquette University. 1967. MA, Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1968. PhD, 1972. 

Janes, Robert W. Professor of Sociology A.B, University of 
Chicago. 1938. MA. 1939, PhD. University of Illinois. 1942 
Jantz, Richard K. Associate Professor of Early Childhood- 
Elementary Education B.S, Indiana University at Fort Wayne. 
1968. MS, 1970, Ed.D., Ball State University. 1972 
Jaqufth, Richard H. Professor of Chemistry and Assistant 
Vice-Chancellor for Academic AHairs B.S, University of Mas- 
sachusetts. 1940; M.S., 1942. PhD, Michigan State University, 
1955 

Jarvis, Bruce B. Professor of Chemistry B.A, Ohio Wesley- 
an University. 1963, Ph.D., University of Colorado. 1966 
Jellema, Roderick H. Associate Professor of English B.A , 
Calvin College, 1951. PhD, University of Edinburgh, 1962 
Johns, Elizabeth B. Associate Professor of Art B.A, Bir- 
mingham-Southern College, 1959. MA, University of California, 
Berkeley. 1965. PhD, Emory University. 1974. 
Johnson, Arthur T. Assistant Professor, Agricultural Engi- 
neering BS.A.E, Cornell University. 1964. MS. 1967; PhD, 
1969 

Johnson, Bruce H. Assistant Professor. Institute ot Criminal 
Justice and Criminology A.B, Wheaton College, 1959, B.D, 
Fuller Theological Seminary, 1962, MA . University of Illinois. 
1968; PhD, 1973. 

Johnson, Charles E. Associate Professor of Measurement 
and Statistics B.A . University of Minnesota, 1957; Ph D . 1964 
Johnson, Charles R. Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A . Northwestern University. 1969. PhD, California Institute 
of Technology. 1972 

Johnson, Conrad D. Associate Professor ot Philosophy 
A.B . Stanford University. 1965; AM. University of Michigan, 
1966; PhD, 1969 

Johnson, Elton L Associate Professor of Poultry Science 
B.S A , Oklahoma State University. 1940, MS, Purdue Universi- 
ty, 1942, PhD. 1948 

Johnson, Janet Assistant Professor of Psychology A.B, 
George Washington University, 1951. M A., 1956. Ph D . 1962 
Johnson, Kerry A. Assistant Professor of Library and Infor- 
mation Services A B , Gettysburg College, 1962, MS , Queens 
College. 1967, Ph.D.. Syracuse University, 1976 
Johnson, Martin L. Associate Professor of Early Childhood- 
Elementary Education A A. Friendship Junior College, 1960, 
B.S . Morris College. 1962. M Ed , University of Georgia, 1968. 
EdD. 1971 

Johnson, Raymond L. Associate, Professor of Mathematics 
BA, University of Texas. 1963, PhD. Rice University, 1969 
Johnson, Roy H. Professor of Music B.M, Eastman School 
Of Music. 1959. MM. 1951. DM A , 1961 
Johnson, Warren R. Professor of Health Education B A , 
University of Denver, 1942, MA. 1946; Ed.D, Boston Universi- 
ty, 1950 



Jolson, M.A. Professor of Business and Management 8 E E 
George Washington University, 1949; MBA, University o 
Chicago. 1965. DBA, University of Maryland. 1969 
Jones, Everett Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineer 
mg BA.E, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1965. MAE 
1960; PhD, Stanford University. 1968 
Jones, George F. Professor of Germanic and Slavic Lan 
guages A.B . Emory University. 1938, M.A, Oxford University, 
1943; PhD, Columbia University, 1951 
Jones, G. Stephen Research Professor, Institute for Physi 
cal Science and Technology A.B, Duke University, 1952; Navy 
Certificate, Naval Postgraduate School. 1955, MS, University 
of North Carolina, 1958, Ph.D.. University of Cincinnati. 1960 
Jones, Jack C. Professor of Entomology B.S. Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute, 1939; MS. 1947; PhD, Iowa State Uni- 
versity, 1950 

Kacser, Claude Associate Professor of Physics B.A, Oxford 
University. 1955; MA, 1959; Ph.D.. 1959. 
Kammeyer, Kenneth C.W. Professor and Chairman of Soci- 
ology BA, University of Northern Iowa, 1953; M.A. State 
University of Iowa, 1958; PhD, 1960. 

Kanal, Laveen N. Professor of Computer Science B.S.E.E, 
University of Washington, 1951; M.S. E.E, 1953; PhD, Universi- 
ty of Pennsylvania, 1960. 

Kantzes, James G. Professor of Botany B.S , University of 
Maryland, 1951; M.S., 1954, PhD, 1957. 
Karlander, Edward P. Associate Professor of Botany B.S, 
University of Vermont, 1 960; MS, University of Maryland, 1 962, 
PhD, 1964 

Kasler, Franz J. Associate Professor of Chemistry PhD, 
University of Vienna. 1959. 

Katok, Anatoly Professor of Mathematics M.A, Moscow 
State University, 1965; PhD, 1968. 

Kaufman, Stuart B. Associate Professor of History B A 
University of Florida. 1962; M.A, 1964; PhD, Emory University 
1970. 

Kavanagh, Joseph T. Assistant Professor, Department oi 
Civil Engineering. B.S, University of Flonda, 1969. M.S. Univer 
sity of Florida. 1972; University of Michigan. Ph.D. 1976 
Kedem, Benjamin Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.S. 
Roosevelt University. 1968. MS. Carnegie-Mellon University, 
1970. PhD, 1972. 

Keeney, Mark Chairman, Nutritional Sciences and Professor 
of Biochemistry and Dairy Science B.S, Pennsylvania State 
University, 1942; M.S., Ohio State University. 1947; Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1950. 

Kelejlan, Harry H. Professor of Economics B.A, Hofstra 
College. 1962; MA, University of Wisconsin, 1965, PhD, 1968. 
Keller, Paul F.G. Assistant Professor, College of Library 
Science and Information Services B.S . Manfield State College. 
1963; MS. Elmira College, 1967, PhD, Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity. 1977. 

Kelley, David L Professor of Physical Education A.B , San 
Diego State College. 1957; MS, University of Southern Califor- 
nia, 1958. PhD, 1962. 

Kellogg, R. Bruce Research Professor, Institute for Physical 
Science and Technology, and Mathematics B.S, Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology. 1952; MS, University of 
Chicago. 1953. PhD, 1959 

Kelly, R. Gordon Associate Professor of American Studies 
BA, DePauw University. 1961, M.A, Claremont Graduate 
School. 1962; Ph.D. University of Iowa, 1970. 
Kelsay, June Adiunct Associate Professor of Food, Nutntion 
and Institutional Administration B.S, North Texas State College, 
1946. MS, 1947; PhD, University of Wisconsin, 1967 
Kelsey, Roger R. Associate Professor of Administration, 
Supervision and Curriculum B.A, Saint Olaf College, 1934; 
M.A , University of Minnesota. 1940; Ed.D , George Peabody 
College for Teachers. 1954. 

Kenny, Shirley S. Professor of English and Provost, Ans and 
Humanities BA, University ol Texas, 1955; M.A, University of 
Minnesota. 1957, Ph.D.. University of Chicago. 1964 
Kent, George O. Professor of History B.S, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1948; M.A, 1950, PhD, Oxford University. 1958 
Kenworthy, William J. Assistant Professor. Agronomy B S , 
Purdue University, 1970, MS, North Carolina State University. 
1972 

Kerkham, Eleanor Assistant Professor of Oriental and He- 
brew Languages BA. Pomona College. 1961, MA. Stanlord 
University. 1963. Ph.D. Indiana University, 1974 
Keriey, Ellis R. Professor and Chairman of Anthropology 
B S . University of Kentucky, 1950. M S . University of Michigan. 
1956; PhD, 1962. 

Kern, Dona L. Assistant Professor of Animal Science B S , 
University of Maryland. 1965. MS, 1972, Ph.D, 1976 
Kerr, Frank John Provost, Division of Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences and Engmeenng and Professor of Astronomy 
B S , University of Melbourne. 1938, MS , 1940. M.A , Harvard 
University. 1951. D Sc, University of Melbourne. 1962 



Kldd, Jerry S. Professor. College of Library and Information 
Services B.S, Illinois Wesleyan University. 1950; M.A. North- 
western University, 1954; Ph.D.. 1956, 
Kim, Chul Assistant Professor of Computer Science B.S, 
Seoul National University. 1963. MS , University ot Minnesota. 
1971. PhD, 1975 

Kim, Young S. Associate Professor of Physics B.S , Carne- 
gie Institute ol Technology. 1958. Ph.D , Princeton University. 
1961 

King, Henry C. Assistant Professor, Mathematics A.B . 
Brown University, 1969. Ph.D, University of California (Berke- 
ley), 1974. 

King, Nancy Rae Visiting Assistant Prolessor of Administra- 
tion, Supervision, and Curriculum B.A, Antioch College. 1964, 
M.Ed, Harvard University. 1965; Ph.D, University of Wisconsin. 
1976 

King, Raymond U Director, Food Science and Professor of 
Dairy Science A.B, University of California, Berkeley. 1955. 
PhD, 1958 

King, William E., Jr. Assistant Professor, Chemical Engi- 
neering B S, University of Pittsburgh, 1965; MS. Carnegie- 
Mellon University, 1968. 

Klnnalrd, John W. Professor of English BA, University of 
California, Berkeley. 1944, M.A, Columbia University. 1949, 
PhD, 1959 

Kirk, James A. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing B SEE , Ohio University. 1967. MS M E, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 1969; Sc.D, 1972. 
Klrkley. Donald H., Jr. Associate Professor of Communica- 
tion Arts and Theatre B.A , University ot Maryland. 1960. M.A, 
1962, Ph.D, Ohio University. 1967. 

Klrwan, William E. Professor and Chairman of Mathematics 
A.B, University of Kentucky. 1960; M.S., Rutgers University. 
1962; PhD. 1964 

Klank. Richard E. Associate Professor of Art B A . Catholic 
University. 1962, M FA.. 1964 

Klarman, William L. Professor of Botany B.S . Eastern Il- 
linois University, 1957. MS, University of Illinois. 1960; Ph.D, 
1962 

Klavon, Albert J. Assistant Professor of Agricultural and 
Extension Education B.S , University of Maryland, 1968. MS, 
1973; PhD, 1975 

Kleiman, Devra Gail Adiunct Associate Professor of Zoology 
B.S . University of Chicago, 1964. Ph D, University of London. 
1969 

Kleine, Don W. Associate Professor of English B A, Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 1950. M.A, 1953. PhD. University of Michigan. 
1961 

Kleppner, Adam Professor of Mathematics B.S, Yale Uni- 
versity. 1953. M A , University of Michigan. 1954, PhD, Harvard 
University. 1960. 

Knefelkamp. L Lee Associate Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services B.A, Macalester College. 1967, M A , Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. 1973. Ph.D, 1974 
Knifong, James Dan Assistant Professor of Elementary Ed- 
ucation B S , Northern Illinois University, 1964. MS. University 
of Illinois, 1968. PhD, 1971. 

Knight, Robert E.L Associate Professor of Economics A.B, 
Harvard University, 1948 Ph D , University of California. Berke- 
ley, 1958 

Kobayaskl, Takao Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering B.S, Nagoya institute of Technology. 1966. M.S. 
Illinois Institute of Technology, 1969; Ph.D, 1972 
Koch, E. James Visiting Lecturer m Horticulture B.S, Iowa 
State University, 1947, MS, North Carolina State Unrversity, 
1949 

Koehl, Dorothy Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement B.S, Purdue University, 1952. MBA, Ohio Stale 
University. 1975; Ph.D, 1978. 

Kohl, Frances L. Assistant Professor of Special Education 
B S . University of Wisconsin, 1973, M Ed . Temple University. 
1975, Ph D , University of Illinois. 1979 
Kolker, Robert P. Associate Professor of Communicabon 
Arts and Theatre BA, Queens College. 1962. M A, Syracuse 
University. 1964. PhD. Columbia University. 1969 
Konan, Mildred A.M. Research Associate. Agricultural and 
Extension Education B Sc . University of Toronto. 1964, M S . 
Cornell University. 1967. PhD. 1971 
Kolodny. Richard Associate Professor of Business and 
Management B S . B.A , Northwestern University. 1965, MB A, 
New York University, 1967. PhD. 1972 
Koopman, David W. Research Professor. Institute for FKikJ 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics B A . Amherst College. 
1957. MS, Unrversity of Michigan. 1959, PhD. 1964 
Koopman, Elizabeth Janssen Associate Professor ol 
Human Development Education A.B, University of Michigan, 
1960. MA. 1963. PhD, University of Maryland. 1973 



34 Korenman, Victor 



Korenman, Victor Prolessor of Physics B A.. Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1958. MA. Harvard University. 1959; Ph.D. 1966. 
Kotz, Samuel Prolessor ol Business and Management 
M.Sc, Hebrew University. 1956; Ph.D.. Cornell University, 1960 
Koury, Enver M. Associate Prolessor ol Government and 
Politics B.A . George Washington University, 1 953; Ph.D.. Amer- 
ican University. 1958 

Kramer, Amlhud Prolessor of Horticulture B.S.. University ot 
Maryland. 1938. M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1942 
Kramer, George F. Prolessor of Physical Education B.S., 
University of Maryland. 1 953; MA , 1 956; Ph.D.. Louisiana State 
University. 1967. 

Krisher. Lawrence C. Prolessor. Institute lor Physical Sci- 
ence and Technology A B , Syracuse University, 1955, A M . 
Harvard University. 1957; Ph.D.. 1959 
Krusberg, Lorln R. Professor ol Botany B.S , University ol 
Delaware. 1954. M.S., North Carolina State College. 1956; 
Ph.D.. 1959. 

Krushenlck, Nicholas Assistant Prolessor of Art Art Stu- 
dents League. 1950. Hans Hofmann School. 1951 
Kudla, Stephen S. Assistant Prolessor of Mathematics B.A.. 
Harvard University. 1972; M.A.. State University of New York at 
Stony Brook. 1971, PhD. 1975 

Kuehl, Phillip G. Associate Prolessor ol Business and Man- 
agement BBS Miami University. 1965. M.B.A.. Ohio State 
University, 1967, Ph.D. 1970. 

Kuenzel, Wayne J. Associate Prolessor ol Poultry Science 
B S , Bucknell University. 1964, M.S., 1966; Ph D„ University of 
Georgia, 1969 

Kumar, Parmeswar C. Assistant Prolessor ol Business and 
Management B Sc , University ol Bombay. 1956; M.S., Universi- 
ty of Banda, 1960. D B.Sa . University of Madras, 1971; Ph.D.. 
Pennsylvania State University. 1975. 

Kundt, John F. Associate Professor ol Horticulture B.S.F . 
Wesl Virginia University. 1952; Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 1972. 

Kundu. Mukul R. Professor of Astronomy B.Sc, Calcutta 
University. 1949. M.Sc. 1951. D.Sc. University of Pans, 1957. 
Kunkle, William E. Assistant Prolessor of Animal Science 
B.S.. Ohio State University, 1970; M.S., 1970; Ph.D.. 1974. 
Kuss, Frederick R. Associate Professor of Animal Science 
B.S. Ohio State University. 1970. MS. 1970. PhD. 1974 
Kuss, Frederick R. Associate Professor, Recreation B.S.. 
University of New Hampshire. 1948. M S . 1950; Ph.D.. Cornell 
University. 1968. 

Kyle, David G. Associate Professor, Institute for Child Study 
B.A.. University ol Denver. 1952; M.A.. 1953; Ed.D.. University 
ol Maryland. 1961 

Lachler, Ulrlch Assistant Prolessor of Economics B.A., 
Brown University. 1972. Ml. A.. Columbia University, 1974; M. 
Phil . 1977, Ph D. 1979. 

Lakshmanan. Sitarama Associate Prolessor ol Biochemis- 
try B.Sc. University of Annamalai, 1946; M.A., 1949; Ph.D.. 
University of Maryland. 1954. 

Lamone. Rudolph P. Professor and Dean of the College of 
Business and Management B.S . University of North Carolina, 
1960. Ph.D., 1966 

Lampe, John R. Professor ol History B A , Harvard Universi- 
ty. 1957; M.A.. University of Minnesota, 1964, Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin, 1971, 

Landry, L. Bartholomew Assistant Prolessor of Sociology 
A.A.. St. Michael's Seminary. 1959; B.A. 1961. B A.. Xavier 
University, 1966. PhD.. Columbia University. 1971 
Lanning. Eldon W. Assistant Prolessor of Governmment 
and Politics B S . Northwestern University, 1960; Ph.D.. Univer- 
sity ot Virginia. 1965. 

Lapinski, Tadeusz A. Associate Professor of Art M.F A., 
Academy ol Fine Arts (Poland). 1955 
Larkln, Willard D. Associate Prolessor of Psychology B S . 
University of Michigan. 1959; M A . University of Pennsylvania. 
1963; Ph.D.. University ol Illinois. 1967 
Lashinsky, Herbert Research Prolessor. Institute for Physi- 
cal Science and Technology B.Sc. City College of New York. 
1950; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1961 
Lawrence, Richard E. Associate Professor of Counseling 
and Personnel Services B.S.. Michigan State University, 1955. 
M.A., 1957; Ph.D.. 1965. 

Lawrence, Robert G. Associate Professor, Agricultural and 
Resource Economics B Sc . University ol Oklahoma, 1957; 
MBA. 1960; Ph.D.. Texas ASM University. 1970. 
Lawson. Lewis A. Professor of English B.S., East Tennes- 
see State College. 1957. MS. 1959; PhD.. University ol 
Wisconsin. 1964 

Lawson, Thomas B. Ill, Assistant Prolessor ol Agricultural 
Engineering BS, Louisiana Slate University. 1967; M.S., 1973; 
Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 1978 



Lay, David D. Professor ot Mathematics B.A . Aurora Col- 
lege. 1962; MA.. University ol California. Los Angeles, 1965; 
Ph.D.. 1966 

Layman, John W. Associate Prolessor ol Secondary Educa- 
tion and Physics B A.. Park College, 1955. M S . Temple Univer- 
sity. 1962; Ed.D., Oklahoma Stale University, 1970. 
Lee, Chi H. Professor of Electrical Engineering BS. National 
Taiwan University. 1959. M.S.. Harvard University. 1962; Ph.D.. 
1968 

Lee, Richard C. Assistant Prolessor ol Early Childhood/Ele- 
mentary Education and Special Education B.S . University ol 
Wisconsin, 1973; M.S.. 1974; Ph.D., University ol Illinois. 1978 
Lee, Yee-Chun Professor of Physics. B.S.. National Taiwan 
University. 1966, Ph.D.. Dartmouth College. 1970. 
Leedy, Charlotte A. Assistant Prolessor ol Recreation B.S.. 
University ot Maryland, 1960. MA. 1966; Ed D. Temple Univer- 
sity. 1975. 

Leete. Burt A. Associate Professor of Business and Man- 
agement B.S.. Juniata College. 1962, MBA, University of 
Maryland. 1964; J.D, American University. 1969 
Letlel, Emory C. Professor of Animal Science B S , Universi- 
ty ol Maryland, 1943; M.S.. 1947; Ph.D., 1953 
Legg, Joseph O. Adjunct Prolessor of Agronomy B.S., Uni- 
versity of Arkansas, 1950. M.S. 1951. Ph.D.. University ol 
Maryland, 1957 

Lehner, Guydo R. Prolessor ol Mathematics BS, Loyola 
University. 1951; M.S. University of Wisconsin. 1953. Ph.D. 
1958 

Lembach, John Professor of Education and Art B.A.. Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 1934, M.A.. Northwestern University. 1937; 
Ed.D.. Columbia University, 1946. 

Lengemann, Joseph J. Associate Professor ol Sociology 
A.8 , University of Notre Dame, 1958; M.A., 1964, Ph.D. Cornell 
University. 1969. 

Lenz, Sharon M. Assistant Professor of Secondary Educa- 
tion and Music B.M.E , Northwestern University. 1968; MM, 
1970; Ed.D., University ol Illinois. 1978. 
Leonard, Mary Margaret Associate Prolessor of Counseling 
and Personnel Services B.S., R.N., Boston College, 1968; M.A., 
University ol Minnesota. 1970; Ph.D. 1974 
Leone, Mark P. Associate Prolessor ol Anthropology A.B.. 
Tufts University, 1963; M.A., University of Arizona, 1965; Ph.D.. 
1968 

Leong, David S. Assistant Prolessor. Department of Com- 
munication Arts and Theatre B.A University of New Hampshire, 
1973; M.F. A. University ol North Carolina, Greensboro. 1975 
Lesher, James H. Associate Professor of Philosophy B.A.. 
University of Virginia. 1962; PhD.. University of Rochester. 
1966. 

Lessley, Billy V. Prolessor and Acting Chairman, Agricultural 
and Resource Economics BS, University of Arkansas, 1957; 
M.S.. 1960; PhD , University of Missouri, 1965 
Levlne, Charles H. Associate Professor of Urban Studies 
B.S , University of Connecticut. 1964. M B.A., Indiana Universi- 
ty. 1966; M.P.A., 1968, Ph.D.. 1971. 

Levlne, Marvin J. Professor, Business and Management 
B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1952; J.D, 1954, M.A.. 1959; 
Ph.D.. 1964, 

Levlne, Vlcki Choy Assistant Prolessor of Philosophy B.A., 
Western College. 1 968. Ph.D.. University of Pennsylvania. 1 977. 
Levlne, William S. Associate Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering BS. Massachusetts Institute ol Technology. 1962 
M.S.. 1965. Ph.D.. 1969. 

Levinson. Jerrold Assistant Professor of Philosophy 8S. 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1969, Ph.D., University 
of Michigan, 1974. 

Levinson, John Z. Professor of Psychology B.A.. University 
ol Toronto. 1939; M.A., 1940; Ph.D., 1948. 
Levltan, Herbert Associate Prolessor ol Zoology B.E.E.. 
Cornell University. 1962; Ph.D. 1965 
Levltine, George Professor of Art B.A., University of Pans, 
1938; MA. Boston University, 1946. Ph.D.. Harvard University, 
1952 

Leviton, Daniel Professor ol Health Education BS, George 
Washington University. 1953. M.S.. Springfield College. 1956. 
Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 1967. 

Levy, Mark R. Associate Professor of Journalism B.A.. Johns 
Hopkins University. 1964; M.A., Rutgers University, 1965, 
M Phil , Columbia University. 1975, Ph.D. 1977 
Li, Peter W. Assistant Prolessor of Mathematics B A., Cali- 
fornia State University. 1974, M.A., University of California at 
Berkeley, 1977; Ph.D. 1979. 

Libby, Ellen Weber Assistant Prolessor ol Counseling and 
Personnel Services B.A., George Washington University. 1967; 
MA. 1970; Ph.D. University ol Maryland. 1977 
Llesener. James W. Professor. College ol Library and Infor- 
mation Services B A., Wartburg College, 1955. MA. University 
of Northern Indiana. 1960, AMIS. University ol Michigan. 
1962. Ph.D., 1967 



Llgomenides, Panos A. Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Diploma, University Ot Athens. 1951; Gr Spec D„ 1952, M S . 
Slanlord University. 1956; Ph.D.. 1958 
Lin, Hung Chang Professor ol Electrical Engineering B.S., 
Chiao-Tung University. 1941. MSE. University ol Michigan. 
1948; DEE. Polytechnic Institute ol Brooklyn, 1956. 
Llnder, Harris J. Associate Prolessor ol Zoology B.S.. Long 
Island University. 1951. M.S.. Cornell University. 1955. Ph D„ 
1958. 

Lindsay, Rao H. Associate Prolessor. Social Foundations of 
Education B.A. Brigham Young University. 1954; MA.. 1958; 
MA.. University ot Michigan. 1963. Ph.D.. 1964. 
Llnduska, James J. Assistant Professor of Entomology B.S.. 
University ol Maryland. 1965. MS. 1968; Ph.D.. 1973. 
Link, Conrad B. Professor of Horticulture BS, Ohio State 
University, 1933; M.S.. 1934; Ph.D., 1940 
Llnkow, Irving Associate Professor of Communication Arts 
and Theatre B A.. University ol Denver. 1937. M.A., 1938 
Lipsman, Ronald L. Professor ot Mathematics B.S . City 
College ol New York. 1964; Ph.D.. Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 1967 

Llssltz, Robert W. Professor and Chairman of Measurement 
and Statistics B.A., Northwestern University. 1963; Ph.D.. Syra- 
cuse University. 1969 

Liu, Chuan Shen Prolessor. Physics and Astronomy Tunghai 
University (Taiwan), 1960; M.A., University of California (Berke- 
ley), 1964; PhD., 1968. 

Liu, Tai-PIng, Associate Prolessor ol Mathematics B.S.. Na- 
tional Taiwan University. 1968. M.S.. Oregon State University. 
1970; Ph.D. University ot Michigan, 1973. 
Lockard, J. David Professor ot Secondary Education and 
Prolessor ol Botany B S.. Pennsylvania State University, 1951; 
MEd., 1955; PhD.. 1962. 

Locke, Edwin A. Professor ol Business and Management 
and Psychology B A, Harvard University. 1960, MA. Cornell 
University. 1962; Ph.D.. 1964 

Loeb, Stephen E. Professor of Business and Management 
BS. University ol Pennsylvania. 1961; M.B.A.. University of 
Wisconsin, 1963; PhD.. 1970. 

Longest, James W. Professor of Agricultural and Extension 
Education B.S.. University of Illinois, 1951; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., 
Cornell University. 1957 

Longley, Edward L. Jr. Associate Professor of Secondary 
Education B.A . University ol Maryland, 1950; MA.. Columbia 
University. 1953; Ed.D . Pennsylvania State University. 1967. 
Lopez-Escobar. Edgar G. Professor of Mathematics B.A.. 
University ol Cambridge, 1958, M.A.. University ol California. 
Berkeley. 1961; Ph.D. 1965 

Lounsbury. Myron O. Associate Professor and Chairman of 
American Studies B A . Duke University. 1961; M.A.. University 
of Pennsylvania, 1962; Ph D„ 1966. 

Love, Nancy Kate. Assistant Prolessor of Zoology B.A., 
Vanderbilt University. 1967. MS. University of Alabama. 1970, 
Ph.D.. Baylor College of Medicine, 1975. 
Luetkemeyer. Joseph F. Professor of Industrial Education 
BS., University ol Wisconsin, Stout. 1953; M.S.. 1954; Ed.D.. 
University ol Illinois. 1961. 

Lutwack, Leonard I. Professor of English B.A,. Weselyan 
University. 1939. MA. 1940; PhD . Ohio State University. 1950. 
Lynch, James B., Jr. Professor of Art A B.. Harvard Universi- 
ty, 1941; A.M.. 1947; Ph.D., 1960. 

Lynn. Jeffrey W. Associate Professor. Physics and Astrono- 
my B.S.. Georgia Institute of Technology. 1969; M.S., 1970; 
Ph.D., 1974 

MacBaln, William. Prolessor, French and Italian Language 
and Literature MA.. University of Saint Andrews, 1952; Ph.D.. 
1955. 

MacDonald, William M. Professor Physics B.A.. University of 
Pittsburgh. 1950; Ph.D., Princeton. University. 1955 
Mack, Maynard, Jr. Associate Prolessor ol English B A Yale 
University, 1964, PhD, 1969 

Macklin. Eleanor D. Assistant Prolessor. Family and Com- 
munity Development B A., Oberlm College. 1954; M.A.. Cornell 
University. 1959; PhD., 1973 

Macleod, Anne S. Associate Prolessor of Library and Infor- 
mation Services B A., University of Chicago. 1948; M.L.S., 
University of Maryland. 1966. PhD, 1973. 
MacQuillan, Anthony M. Associate Professor of Micro- 
biology B.S.A., University ol British Columbia, 1956, MS. 1958; 
PhD. University of Wisconsin, 1962 
MacReady. George B. Associate Prolessor ot Measure- 
ments and Statistics B.A., Willamette University. 1965; M.A., 
University ol Oregon. 1967; Ph.D. University ol Minnesota. 
1972 

Madison, John P. Assistant Professor, Early Childhood. Ele- 
mentary Education BS., State University College of New York 
(Geneseo), 1962, M.S., 1965; Ed.D . University of Illinois. 1972. 



Miller, Gerald Ray 35 



Magoon, Thomas M. Professor of Psychology and Counsel- 
ing and Personnel Services, Director. Counseling Center B.A, 
Dartmouth College, 1947, MA , University of Minnesota, 1951, 
Ph.D., 1954. 

Malda, Peter R. Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and 
Criminology BA. St. Vincent College. 1960, M.A, Fordham 
University, 1962. Ph.D.. Pennsylvania State University. 1969. 
Majeska, George P. Associate Professor of History A.B.. 
Brooklyn College, 1961. MA. Indiana University. 1964. Ph.D.. 
1968 

Majeskle, J. Lee. Assistant Professor. Dairy Science B S, 
University of Wisconsin, 1964, MS. 1966; Ph.D.. Kansas State 
University. 1970. 

Male. George A. Professor. Social Foundations of Education 
B.A.. University of Michigan. 1948. MA. 1949; Ph.D.. 1952. 
Maley, Donald Prolessor and Chairman of Industrial Educa- 
tion B S, California State College of Pennsylvania, 1943, MA, 
University of Maryland. 1947. Ph.D. 1949 
Malouf. David B. Assistant Professor ot Special Education 
B.A.. University of Utah. 1968. M Ed, 1970, Ph.D.. University ol 
Oregon, 1976. 

Mans. Darius H. Assistant Professor of Economics A.B., 
Wayne State University, 1971, Ph D , Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 1979 

Manspeaker, Joe F. Assistant Professor ot Veterinary Sci- 
ence V M.D . University of Pennsylvania. 1952. 
Marando, Vincent L. Associate Prolessor. Acting Director. 
Institute for Urban Studies B.S.. State University College. Bufta- 
lo. 1960; M.A., Michigan State University, 1964, Ph.D.. 1967. 
Marcinkowski, M. John. Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. Engineering Material B.S , University of Maryland, 1953; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1955, Ph.D., 1959. 
Marcus, Robert F. Associate Professor of Human Develop- 
ment Education B A , Montclair State College, 1965, MA, New 
York University, 1967. Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University, 
1973 

Mariano. Patrick S. Professor of Chemistry B.S, Fairleigh 
Dickinson University, 1964; PhD. University of Wisconsin. 
1969. 

Marlon, Jerry B. Professor of Physics BA, Reed College. 
1952. MS. Rice University. 1953. PhD.. 1955. 
Markley, Nelson G. Professor of Mathematics and Statistics 
B.A, Lalayette College, 1962. MA, Yale University. 1964; 
Ph.D. 1966 

Marks, Colin H. Professor of Mechanical Engineering B.S , 
Carnegie Institute of Technology. 1956. M.S., 1957, Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1965 

Marquardt. Warren W. Associate Professor of Veterinary 
Science B.S, University of Minnesota. 1959; D V M.. 1961; 
Ph D . 1970 

Marra-Lopez, Jose R. Prolessor of Spanish BA, Nra. Sra. 
del Pilar. 1949; MA,, University of Madrid. 1959 
Marrls, Robert L. Professor of Economics BA, Cambridge 
University. 1947, Sc.D , 1968 

Martin. James G. Professor of Psychology B S . University of 
North Dakota. 1951. MA. University of Minnesota. 1958; Ph.D.. 
1960. 

Martin, L-, John Professor and Acting Dean of the College of 
Journalism BA. American University of Cairo, 1947; M.A. 
University of Minnesota. 1951. Ph.D., 1955. 
Martin, Raymond F. Associate Professor of Philosophy B.A, 
Ohio State University. 1962; MA.. 1964; Ph.D. University of 
Rochester, 1968. 

Martlndale, Melanie A. Assistant Professor ot Sociology 
B.A, University ol Texas at Austin, 1967, MA., Stanford Univer- 
sity. 1975; Ph.D.. University ot Texas at Austin, 1979 
Marx, George L. Professor and Chairman of Counseling and 
Personnel Services BA, Yankton College. 1953. MA. State 
University ot Iowa. 1958. Ph D , State University of Iowa. 1959 
Mason, Glenn M. Assistant Professor ol Physics B.A , Har- 
vard University, 1965. M.S., University of Chicago. 1967, PhD , 
1971 

Mass, Clifford Assistant Professor ol Meteorology B.S., Cor- 
nell University, 1974. Ph.D., University ol Washington. 1978 
Mather, Ian H. Assistant Professor of Dairy Science B.Sc, 
University College ol North Wales, 1966. PhD., 1969. 
Mathers. James P. Assistant Prolessor of Chemical and 
Nuclear Engineering B.S . Alfred University, 1970; M S , North 
Carolina State University. 1974. PhD. 1975 
Matosslan, Mary K. Associate Professor ol History BA, 
Stanford University, 1951; MA, American University of Beirut, 
1952, PhD, Stanford University. 1955 
Matteson, Richard L. Associate Professor. Institute for Child 
Study BA, Knox College 1952; M.A, University ol Maryland, 
1955, Ed.D, 1962. 

Matthews, David L. Research Associate Professor, Institute 
for Physical Science and Technology B S . Queens University, 
1949; PhD, Princeton University, 1959 



Matthews, Thomas A. Associate Professor ol Astronomy 
B.A.. University ol Toronto. 1950; M.S. Case Institute ol Tech- 
nology. 1951. PhD. Harvard University. 1956. 
Mattlck, Joseph F. Professor ot Dairy Science B S , Pennsyl- 
vania State University, 1942. PhD, 1950. 
Mayer-Sommer, Alan P. Assistant Prolessor ol Business 
and Management B.A, Columbia University. 1963. MBA. 
Harvard University. 1965, MP A. Georgia State University. 
1974, PhD.. 1976. 

Mayes, Sharon S. Assistant Professor of Sociology B A , 
Michigan State University, 1970. M Phil , Yale University. 1972; 
Ph.D., 1974 

Mayo, Marlene J. Associate Professor of History B.A.. 
Wayne University, 1954; MA.. Columbia University. 1957. 
Ph.D. 1961 

Mazzocchl, Paul H. Prolessor ol Chemistry, BS , Queens 
College. 1961. Ph.D.. Fordham University. 1966 
McArdle, James V. Assistant Professor of Chemistry Sc.B . 
Brown University. 1972, Ph.D.. California Institute ol Technolo- 
gy. 1975 

McCaleb, Joseph Lee Assistant Professor of Secondary 
Education BA., Abilene Christian College, 1969. M Ed . Univer- 
sity ol Texas. 1973. PhD. 1976 

McCall, Gerald N. Professor and Chairman of Hearing and 
Speech Sciences BS. Florida State University. 1959. MA, 
Northwestern University. 1962, Ph.D.. 1964 
McCarrlck. Earleen M. Assistant Prolessor ol Government 
and Politics B A , Louisiana State University. 1953, MA, 1955; 
PhD., Vanderbilt University. 1964. 

McCarthy, Michael Assistant Prolessor of American Studies 
A.B., Boston College, 1964; M.A.. University of Minnesota. 
1972; Ph.D., 1975. 

McCleary, Robert F. Assistant Professor of Communication 
Arts and Theatre B A . University of Maryland. 1965, M.A, 1967; 
Ph D . Ohio University, 1978. 

McClure, L. Morris Professor of Administration. Supervision 
and Curriculum BA, Western Michigan University. 1940. M A.. 
University of Michigan. 1946. Ed.D, Michigan University, 1953 
McClurg, Charles A. Associate Prolessor of Horticulture 
B.S, Iowa State University, 1966. M.S. Pennsylvania State 
University, 1968; PhD, 1970. 

McConnell. Kenneth E. Associate Professor of Agricultural 
and Resource Economics B.A, University of Florida. 1964, 
MA., 1966, Ph.D., University of Maryland. 1973. 
McCrank, Lawrence J. Assistant Prolessor of Library and 
Information Services BA, Moorshead State University, 1967, 
M.A, University of Kansas. 1970; M.L.S . University of Oregon 
1976. Ph.D.. University of Virginia. 1974 
McCuen, Richard H. Professor of Civil Engineering BS. 
Carnegie-Mellon University, 1967; MS, Georgia Institute ol 
Technology, 1969. PhD. 1971. 

McCusker. John J. Assistant Professor of History BA. St 
Bernard's College, 1961, MA, University of Rochester. 1963 
PhD , University of Pittsburgh. 1970 

McDonald, Frank B. Adiunct Professor of Physics BS, Duke 
University. 1948; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1952, Ph.D.. 
1955. 

McDonald, James Assistant Professor of Music B M, 
Morningside College, 1962; M.A, University ol Iowa, 1964. 
DMA, 1974. 

McElreath, Mark P. Assistant Prolessor. College of Journal- 
ism, B.A, University ol Houston, 1969; M.A, University of 
Wisconsin, 1972; PhD, 1975. 

McGuire, Martin Professor of Economics B.A, Oxford Uni- 
versity. 1958. Ph.D., Harvard University, 1964. 
Mcllrath. Thomas J. Associate Prolessor ol Physics and 
Institute lor Physical Science and Technology B S . Michigan 
State University. 1960. PhD, 1966. 

Mclntlre. Roger W. Professor of Psychology B.A, North- 
western University. 1958; MA, Louisiana State University, 
1960, PhD, 1962. 

Mcintosh, Maria S. Assistant Professor of Agronomy B S , 
University of Illinois, 1974; M.S., 1976; PhD, 1978. 
Mclntyre, Jennie J. Associate Professor ot Sociology BA . 
Howard College, 1960; M.S.. Florida State College. 1962; Ph D . 
1966 

McKay, Janet Holmgren Assistant Professor ol English 
BA, Oakland University, 1968, MA, Princeton University. 
1971, PhD, 1974 

McKee. Claude G. Prolessor ol Agronomy B S , University ol 
Maryland. 1951. MS. 1955; PhD. 1959. 
McKenzle, Douglas G. Assistant Prolessor ol Criminology 
and Criminal Justice B.S, Michigan State University, 1968, 
M.A, 1970. PhD. 1977 

McLoone, Eugene P. Associate Professor of Administration, 
Supervision and Curriculum and Economics BA, LaSalle Col- 
lege, 1951; M.S., University of Denver. 1952; Ph.D.. University 
ot Illinois. 1961. 



McMullan. Yvonne D. Assistant Professor ol Counseling & 
Personnel Services B A, Emory University, 1969; M Ed, Geor- 
gia State University. 1970, Ph.D. 1973 
McNelly, Charles H. Assistant Prolessor ol Special Educa- 
tion B.A. Earlham College. 1964. M.A, Ohio State University. 
1966, Ph.D.. University ol Michigan. 1973 
McNelly. Theodore H. Prolessor of Government and Politics 
B.S, University ol Wisconsin, 1941. M A 1942; Ph.D., Colum- 
bia University. 1952 

McNesby, James Professor and Chairman ol Chemistry 
B S , Ohio University. 1943. Ph D, New York University. 1951 
McNIcol, Lore A. Assistant Prolessor ol Microbiology BA , 
University of Montana, 1965, PhD , Boston University Medical 
School. 1968 

McWhlnnle. Harold J. Lecture in Applied Design and Crafts 
and Associate Professor of Secondary Education B.A.E, Art 
Institute of Chicago. 1953. M F A , University of Chicago, 1957, 
Ed.D, Stanford University. 1965 

Medvene, Arnold Associate Prolessor ol Counseling and 
Personnel Services and Counselor. Counseling Center BS 
Temple University. 1959; M E, 1963; Ed.D, University of Kan- 
sas. 1968 

Meeker. Barbara F. Associate Professor of Sociology BA, 
University of Kansas, 1961. M.A, Stanford University. 1963; 
PhD. 1966 

Meersman, Roger L Professor of Communication Arts and 
Theatre B.A, St Ambrose College. 1952; M.A, University ot 
Illinois, 1959; PhD, 1962 

Mehl, Jane Assistant Professor of German and Slavic Lan- 
guages and Literature BA , Douglas College, 1967. MA, Mid- 
dleburg College. 1968; Ph.D., State University of New York, 
1974 

Meljer, Marianne S. Associate Professor of French and 
Italian Baccalaureat de L'Enseignement Secondaire Francais, 
1944, Candidaats Romaanse Taal-en Lifterkrunde, Leiden, 
1948, MA, Catholic University. 1960, PhD. 1972 
Meisinger, John Joseph Adjunct Assistant Professor ot 
Agronomy BS. Iowa State University. 1967. PhD, Cornell 
University. 1976 

Mellors, William K. Assistant Prolessor ol Entomology B S . 
Yale University. 1973. MS, Cornell University, 1977, PhD, 
1979 

Melnlk, Walter l_ Professor of Aerospace Engmeenng B S, 
University of Minnesota. 1951, M.S. 1953. Ph.D. 1964 
Menzer, Robert E. Professor of Entomology and Acting 
Dean for Graduate Studies B.S, University ot Pennsylvania. 
1960. M.S., University of Maryland. 1962; PhD, University ol 
Wisconsin, 1964. 

Merkowltz, David Lecturer ol Journalism BA. New York 
University. 1963. PhD, University ol Michigan. 1971. 
Merrill, John C. Prolessor ol Journalism BA, Mississippi 
Delta State University. 1949; MA. Louisiana State University. 
1950; PhD, University ol Iowa, 1962; M.A. University ol 
Missouri. 1976 

Messersmlth, Donald H. Prolessor ol Entomology B.Ed, 
University ot Toledo. 1951. MS. University of Michigan, 1953. 
PhD, Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 1962. 
Metcalf, John T. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering BS, United States Naval Academy, 1949; M S , Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology. 1957; Ph D, Catholic Uni- 
versity, 1974 



Meyer, Paul A. Associate Professor of Economics BA, The 
Johns Hopkins University. 1961. MA, Stanford University. 
1963; PhD, 1966. 

Mletus, Walter S. Associate Professor of Industnal Educa- 
tion B S . Chicago State University. 1957, M Ed , 1959; Ed D, 
Loyola University. 1966 

Mlgnerey. Alice C. Assistant Professor of Chemistry BS . 
University of Rochester. 1971. MS. 1973. PhD. 1975. 
Mikulskl, Plotr W. Professor of Mathematics Diploma. Mam 
School ol Planning and Statistics, Warsaw, 1951, Master's, 
1952; Ph.D., University of California. 1962 
Mllhollan, Frank Associate Professor. Institute For Child 
Study B A . Colorado College. 1949. MPS. University of Colo- 
rado. 1951. PhD . Universty of Nebraska. 1966 
Miller, Catherine M. Associate Professor ot Health Educa- 
tion BS. Illinois State University. 1956 MA . Colorado State 
College, 1959. PhD. Ohio State University. 1967 
Miller, Douglas R. Adiunct Associate Professor of Entomolo- 
gy B S . University ol California. Davis. 1964; MS. 1965; PhD , 
1969 

Miller, Frederick P. Professor. Agronomy B.S, Ohio State 
University. 1958. MS. 1961. PhD. 1965 
Miller, Gerald Ray Associate Professor ol Chemistry B S . 
University ot Wisconsin. 1958, MS , Unrversity ot Illinois. 1960. 
PhD. 1962 



36 Miller, James R. 



Miller, James R. Professor and Chairman of Agronomy B.S, 
University of Maryland. 1951; M.S., 1953; Ph.D. 1956 
Miller, Mary R. Associate Professor of English B A., Universi- 
ty of Iowa, 1941; MA, University of Denver, 1959. Ph.D., 
Georgetown University, 1969 

Mills, David H. Professor of Psychology and Assistant Direc- 
tor. Counseling Center B.S.. towa State University. 1955; M.S.. 
1957; Ph.D.. Michigan State University. 1964. 
Mills, Judson R. Professor of Psychology B.S.. University of 
Wisconsin. 1953; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1958. 
Minker, Jack Professor of Computer Science B.A, Brooklyn 
College. 1949; M.S., University of Wisconsin 1950, Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania. 1959. 

Minor, W. William Assistant Professor, Institute of Criminal 
Justice and Criminology B.S., Michigan State University, 1966; 
M.S. Florida State University. 1973; Ph.D.. 1975. 
Mintz, Lawrence E. Associate Professor of American Stu- 
dies B A., University of South Carolina. 1966; MA, Michigan 
State University. 1967; Ph.D., 1969. 

Mintz, Yale Visiting Research Professor of Meteorology B.A., 
Dartmouth College, 1937, M.S., Columbia University. 1942; 
Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles. 1949. 
Mish, Charles C. Professor of English B.S , University of 
Pennsylvania. 1936; M.A, 1946; Ph.D.. 1951. 
Misner, Charles W. Professor of Physics B.S, University of 
Notre Dame. 1952; M.A., Princeton University, 1954. Ph.D., 
1957. 

Mitchell, Robert D. Associate Professor of Geography M.A, 
University of Glasgow, 1962; Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin, 
1969 

Mityga, Henry G. Assistant Professor of Horticulture B.S , 
Cornell University. 1966, M S , Purdue University. 1969. Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1976 

Mohanty, Sashi B. Professor of Veterinary Science B.V Sc 
& AH., Bihan University, India, 1956; M.S., University of Mary- 
land. 1961; PhD.. 1963 

Montero, Darrel M. Assistant Professor of Urban Studies 
B.A . California State University. 1970; MA, 1972; Ph.D.. 1974 
Montgomery, William Associate Professor of Music B.M.E., 
Cornell College of Iowa, 1953; M.M.. Catholic University of 
America. 1957, Ph.D., 1972. 

Moore, John H., Jr. Professor of Chemistry B.S., Carnegie 
Institute of Technology, 1963, MS. Johns Hopkins University, 
1965. Ph.D.. 1967 

Moore, John R. Professor of Agricultural and Resources 
Economics BS. Ohio State University. 1951. M.S., Cornell 
University, 1955; Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin, 1959. 
Moran, John P., Ml Assistant Professor of Communication 
Arts and Theatre B S, Villanova University, 1973; MA . Temple 
University, 1977, Ph.D.. 1979. 

Morgan, H. Gerthon Professor and Chairman, Institute for 
Child Study B.A., Furman University, 1940; M.A., University of 
Chicago, 1943. Ph.D.. 1946. 

Morris, Alfred E., Jr. Assistant Professor, Physical Educa- 
tion B.A, University of Massachusetts, 1964; MA, University of 
Maryland, 1966; PhD., University of Massachusetts. 1976. 
Morris, Louis Allen Assistant Professor of Textiles and 
Consumer Economics B.A, Boston University. 1968; M.A, New 
School for Social Research, 1971; Ph.D.. Tulane University. 
1974. 

Morrison, Keith A. Professor of Art B.F.A.. Art Institute of 
Chicago. 1963. M.F.A., 1965. 

Morton, Eugene S. Assistant Professor of Zoology B.S . 
Demson University, 1962. MS., Yale University. 1966; Ph.D. 
1969. 

Moser, Phylis B. Assistant Professor of Food. Nutrition, and 
Institutional Administration B.S , University of Maryland, 1969. 
M.S., 1973. PhD, 1976. 

Moss, Alfred A., Jr. Assistant Professor of History B.A.. Lake 
Forest College, 1965; M.Div, Episcopal Divinity School, 1968; 
M.A, University of Chicago. 1972. Ph.D., 1977. 
Moss, Lawrence K. Professor of Music B.A, University of 
California. Los Angeles. 1949. MA,, University of Rochester. 
1951. Ph.D.. University of Southern California, 1957 

Motta, Jerome F. Associate Professor of Botany B.A, San 
Francisco State College. 1959. MA . 1964. Ph.D.. University of 
California. 1968 

Mueller, Dennis C. Professor of Economics B.S., Colorado 
College. 1962; Ph.D. Pnnceton University. 1966 

Mulchi, Charles L. Associate Professor of Agronomy B.S, 
North Carolina State University. 1964, M.S., 1966; Ph.D., 1970. 



Munno, Frank J. Professor of Chemical Engineering. Direc- 
tor, Nuclear Engineering B.S . Waynesburg College. 1957; MS, 
University of Florida. 1962; PhD. 1964 



Munson, Karl F. Lecturer in Recreation BS, University of 
Illinois, 1950; M.S., Indiana University, 1954; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois, 1968. 

Murphy, Charles D. Professor of English B.A.. University of 
Wisconsin. 1929. MA. Harvard University. 1930. Ph.D.. Cornell 
University. 1940. 

Murphy, Thomas J. Associate Professor of Chemistry B.S., 
Fordham University, 1963. Ph.D., Rockefeller University. 1968 
Murray, Joseph F. Lecturer, Physical Education B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1967; MA, 1969; Ph.D. 1976 
Murrell, Peter Assistant Professor of Economics B.S , Lon- 
don School of Economics, 1971; M.S., 1972; Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania. 1977. 

Myers, Ralph D. Professor of Physics A.B, Cornell Universi- 
ty. 1934, AM, 1935. Ph.D., 1937 

Myers. Robert Manson Professor of English B.A, Vanderbilt 
University, 1 941 ; MA, Columbia University. 1 942, MA. Harvard 
University. 1943, PhD, Columbia University, 1948. 
Myricks. Noel Associate Professor of Family and Community 
Development B.A, San Francisco State University. 1965; MS 
1968; J.D, Howard University. 1970; Ed.D, American Universi 
ty. 1973 

Nam, Sunwoo Assistant Professor of Journalism B.A . Han 
kuk University of Foreign Studies. 1961, MA, Stanford Univer 
sity. 1965; MA, 1967, PhD, University of Wisconsin at Madi 
son, 1969. 

Nash, Allan N. Professor of Business and Managemen 
B B.A, University of Minnesota, 1957; MBA, 1959; Ph.D. 
1963. 

Nau, Dana S. Assistant Professor of Computer Science B.S 
University of Missouri, 1 974; A.M., Duke University, 1 976; Ph.D. 
1979. 

Nelson, Clifford L. Professor of Agricultural and Extension 
Education B.S . Washington State University. 1957; MS, 1962; 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 1966 

Nelson, Judd A. Assistant Professor of Entomology B.S, 
University of Wisconsin, 1969; MS. 1972, PhD, 1974. 
Nemes, Graciela P. Professor of Spanish B.S. Trinity Col- 
lege, 1942; MA, University of Maryland, 1946; Ph.D., 1952. 
Nepote, Kathryn H. Assistant Professor of Veterinary Sci- 
ence B.S.. Rutgers University. 1969; V.M.D.. University of 
Pennsylvania, 1973, 

Neri, Umberto Associate Professor of Mathematics B.S, 
University of Chicago. 1961. M.S., 1962. Ph.D.. 1966. 
Neumann, Walter Associate Professor of Mathematics B.A, 
Adelaide University. 1963. MA. 1966; PhD, Bonn University. 
1969 

Newcomb, Robert W. Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S, Purdue University 1955; M.S., Stanford University. 1957; 
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. 1960. 
Newell, Clarence A. Professor of Administration, Sup< 
sion and Cumculum A.B, Hastings College, 1935, AM, Colum 
bia University, 1939; Ph.D. 1943. 
Ng, Timothy Assistant Professor of Horticulture B.S, Univer 
sity of California. 1969; M.S., Purdue University. 1972; Ph.D 
1976 

Nickels, William G. Associate Professor of Business and 
Management B.S, Ohio State University, 1962; MBA, West- 
ern Reserve University, 1966; PhD, Ohio State University, 
1969 

Nicklason. Fred Assistant Professor of History B.S, 
Gustavus Adolphus College, 1953, MA, University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 1955; PhD, Yale University, 1967. 
Niese. Henry E. Associate Professor of Art Cert, The Coo- 
per Union. 1949. Academie Grande Chaumiere. 1949. B.F.A, 
Columbia University, 1955. 

Niles, Lyndrey A. Lecturer in Communication Arts and Thea- 
tre A. A, Caribbean Union College. 1956; B.A, Columbia Col- 
lege, 1963; M.A.. University of Maryland. 1965. Ph.D., Temple 
University. 1973. 

Noll, James W. Associate Professor. Social Foundations of 
Education B.A, University of Wisconsin. 1954. M.S.. 1962; 
PhD , University of Chicago. 1965 

Norland, Douglas L. Assistant Professor of Business and 
Management B.B A, University of Michigan, 1967, MBA, 
1968; DBA, Indiana University, 1977. 
Norman, Kent L. Assistant Professor of Psychology B.A, 
Southern Methodist University. 1969. MA, University of Iowa. 
1971, Ph.D, 1973. 

Norton, Virgil J. Professor and Chairman of Agricultural and 
Resource Economics B.S . Kansas State University, 1957, MS, 
1959. Ph.D. Oregon State University. 1964 
Nunamaker, Anne Assistant Professor of Journalism B.A , 
Middle Tennessee State University. 1955; M.A, 1959; Ed.S, 
George Peabody College. 1973; PhD, 1977. 
Oates, Wallace E. Professor of Economics MA. Stanford 
University. 1959; PhD. 1965 



O'Connell, Donald W. Professor of Economics and Vice 
President for General Administration B A . Columbia University, 
1937; M.A,, 1938; Ph.D, 1953. 

Odell, Stanley Jack Assistant Professor of Philosophy B.A, 
University of Kansas, 1960; M.A, University of Illinois, 1962; 
Ph.D., 1967, 

O'Haver. Thomas C. Professor of Chemistry B.S, Spring Hill 
College, 1963; Ph.D., University of Florida, 1968. 
O'Leary, Dianne Prost Assistant Professor of Computer 
Science B.S . Purdue University. 1972. Ph.D . Stanford Universi- 
ty. 1976. 

O'Leary, Ronald T. Assoicate Professor of Communication 
Arts and Theatre B.S, Bowling Green State University. 1960, 
MA. 1961; M.F.A.. University of Wisconsin, 1964; Ph.D., 1966 
Oliver, James H. Assistant Professor of Government and 
Politics B.A University of Washington, 1959; M.A, 1962; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin, 1968. 

Olsen. Bonnie G. Assistant Professor of Housing and Ap- 
plied Design B.S, University of Georgia. 1965; MS. Oklahoma 
State University. 1966; Ph.D, Cornell University, 1976. 
Olson, Alison Gilbert Professor of History B.A, University of 
California, 1952; MA, 1953; Ph.D, Oxford University. 1956 
Olson, Edwin E. Professor. College of Library and Informa- 
tion Services B.A. St. Olaf College, 1959; M.A. American 
University, 1961; PhD, 1966. 

Olson, Keith W. Professor of History B.A, State University of 
New York. Albany, 1957; M.A, 1959; Ph.D, University of 
Wisconsin, 1964. 

Olson, Mancur L. Jr. Professor of Economics B.S North 
Dakota State University. 1954. B.A . Oxford University. 1956; 
M.A, 1960. Ph.D. Harvard University, 1960. 
Olver, Frank W. J. Research Professor, Institute for Physical 
Science and Technology, and Mathematics B.Sc, University of 
London, 1945; M.Sc, 1948; D.Sc, 1961. 
Olyphant, Greg Allan Lecturer in Geography B.A , California 
State University, 1974; M.A, 1975; Ph.D, University of Iowa. 
1979 

Onasch. Charles M. Assistant Professor of Geology B.A, 
Franklin and Marshall College, 1971. MS, University of Mas- 
sachusetts, 1973; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1976 
Oneda, Sadao Professor of Physics B.S, Tohoku University. 
1946; M Sc, 1948; PhD. Nagoya University. 1953. 
O'Neill, Leo W., Jr. Professor of Early Childhood and Ele- 
mentary Education B.A, University of Chicago. 1938. M.A, 
University of Kansas. 1953; Ed.D. University of Colorado, 1955 
Opik, Ernst, J. Professor of Astronomy Cand Astro, Mos- 
cow Imperial University, 1916; D.Phil. Nat, National University of 
Estonia. 1923. 

Oppenheim, Joost J. Adjunct Professor of Zoology A.B, 
Columbia College. 1956; M.D, Columbia College, 1960. 
Oppenheimer, Joe A. Associate Professor. Government 
and Politics A.B , Cornell University, 1963; MA, University of 
Michigan. 1964; Ph.D, Princeton University. 1971. 



Ott, Edward Professor of Electrical Engineering B.S , Cooper 
Union, 1963; MS Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1965. 
Ph.D., 1967. 

Ottinger, Mary Ann Assistant Professor of Poultry Science 
BS, University of Maryland. 1972; M.S. 1974; Ph.D, 1977 
Ousby, Ian Associate Professor, English B.A, Cambridge 
University {England). 1968. M.A,, 1972; Ph.D, Harvard Universi- 
ty, 1973. 

Owings, James C. Associate Professor of Mathematics B.S, 
Dartmouth College. 1962; Ph.D, Cornell Univerity 1966. 
Paape, Max J. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S, Michigan State University. 1959, M.S., 1963; Ph.D , 1967 
Pai, Shih-I Research Professor, Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics B.S, National Central University, 
1935; MS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1938; 
Ph.D, California Institute of Technology. 1938; Ph.D., California 
Institute of Technology, 1940 

Paik, Ho Jung Assistant Professor of Physics B.S . Seoul 
National University. 1966, M.S., Stanford University, 1970; 
PhD. 1974 

Paine, Frank T. Professor of Business and Management 
B.S, Syracuse University, 1951, MBA, 1956, Ph.D.. Stanford 
University. 1963. 

Panagariya, Arvind Assistant Professor of Economics Bach- 
elor's Degree, Rajasthan University. 1973; Master's Degree. 
1973; MA, Princeton University, 1976. Ph.D., 1978. 
Panichas, George A. Professor of English B.A . American 
International College, 1951, M.A, Trinity College, 1952. Ph.D., 
Nottingham University, 1961. 

Papadopoulos, Konstantinos Adjunct Professor of Physics 
B.S, University of Athens, 1960; MS , Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 1965; Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 1968 



Roos, Phillip G. 37 



Park, Robert L. Professor and Chairman Physics and As- 
tronomy, Director Center for Materials Research B S . University 
of Texas (Austin), 1958; MA., 1960, Ph.D., Brown University. 
1964 

Parming, Tonu Assistant Professor. Sociology B.A, Pnn- 
cefon Universily, 1964. MA, Yale University. 1973. 
Pasch, Alan Professor ol Philosophy B.A.. University of 
Michigan, 1949; M.A., NEw School lor Social Research. 1952. 
Ph.D. Princeton University. 1955. 

Pall. Jogesh C. Prolessor of Physics B S , Ravenshaw Col- 
lege. 1955; M.Sc, Delhi University. 1957, Ph D . University of 
Maryland, 1960 

Patterson. Annabel M. Professor of English B.A.. University 
of Toronto. 1961. MA. .University of London. 1963. Ph.D., 1965 
Patterson, Glenn W. Professor and Chairman ol Bolany 
B.S, North Carolina Slale University, 1960; MS, University of 
Maryland. 1963; PhD. 1964. 

Patterson, William V. Assistant Professor of Communication 
Arts and Thealre B.F.A, University of Oklahoma. 1970, M.F.A. 
University of Utah, 1972. 

Pearl. Martin Herbert Prolessor of Mathematics B A , Brook- 
lyn College, 1950; MA, University ol Michigan, 1951; PhD, 
University of Wisconsin, 1955. 

Pearson, Carol S. Associate Professor of American Studies 
and Director of Women's Studies B A . Rice University. 1966. 
M.A., 1969. Ph.D., 1971. 

Pease, John Associate Professor of Sociology BS, Western 
Michigan University, 1960, MA Michigan Slate University. 
1963. PhD., 1968 



Pechacek, Robert E. Adiuncf Associate Professor of Phys- 
ics B S California Institute of Technology, 1954 M S University 
ol California, Berkeley. 1963; Ph.D.. 1966. 



Pelcovitz, Michael D. Assisfani Professor. Economics B A . 
University of Rochester, 1 972; Ph D . Massachusetts Instilule ol 
Technology. 1976 

Pemberton, Elizabeth G. Associate Professor. Psychology 
BA. Harvard University. 1966. PhD. University of California 
(San Diego). 1970 

Pennington, Kenneth D. Associate Professor of Music A.B, 
Friends University, 1950; B.Mus , 1950; MA , New York Univer- 
sity, 1953. D.MuS, Indiana University, 1961 
Pertnbam, B„ Marie Assistant Professor of History B.A, 
London University. 1954; M.A.. University of Toronto. 1959; 
Ph D, Georgetown University, 1969 

Perkins, Hugh V. Professor and Acting Chairman. Institute 
for Child Study A B , Oberlm College. 1941. A M . University of 
Chicago. 1946; Ph.D.. 1949; Ed D, New Yort< University. 1956. 
Perkins. Moreland Professor of Philosophy A.B, Harvard 
University. 1948. A.M. 1949; PhD. 1953 
Peters, Robert M. Associate Professor of Secondary Educa- 
tion BS. Mankato Stale College, 1955. MS. 1958; PhD. 
University of Minnesota, 1965 

Peters, Robert R. Assistant Professor of Dairy Science B S . 
University of Minnesota. 1973. MS. 1975, PhD, Michigan 
Slate University. 1980 

Peterson, William S. Professor ol English B.A.. Walla Walla 
College. 1961. MA.. University of Wisconsin. 1962; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University, 1968 

Pflster, Guenter G. Associate Professor of German and 
Secondary Education B S , Bowling Green State University. 
1963, MA . Michigan Stale University, 1965, Ph.D., University of 
Kansas, 1970 

Phillips, Robert A. Assistant Professor, Family and Commu- 
nity Development B.A, Ottawa University. 1964, MA.. Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School. 1970; Ph.D., University of Minneso- 
ta. 1977 

Phillips. Sally J. Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
B S, Slippery Rock State College. 1964; M.Ed, Colorado State 
University. 1969. Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin at Madison. 
1978 

Phillips. Warren R. Professor ol Governmenl and Politics 
B A.. Northwestern University, 1963. MA, San Francisco State 
University, 1965. Ph D„ University of Hawaii. 1969 
Phllport. Joseph C. Assistant Professor of Communication 
Arts and Theatre B.A, William Patterson College. 1970. M A . 
1971. Ph.D. Bowling Green Slate University, 1975 
Pierce, Sidney K., Jr. Prolessor of Zoology B.Ed.. University 
ol Miami. 1966. Ph.D.. Florida Stale University, 1970 
Pinker. Rachel Assistant Professor of Meteorology M Sc , 
Hebrew University, 1965. Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 1976 
Piper. Don C. Professor of Government and Politics B A 
University of Maryland. 1954; MA . 1958; Ph D . Duke Universi- 
ty. 1961 

Piper. Harry W. Associate Professor of Civil Engmeenng 
B Arch E . Catholic University of America. 1940; M C E, 1961 



Pirages. Dennis Clark Associate Professor of Government 
and Politics B.A . State University of Iowa. 1964; Ph.D., Stanford 
University. 1969. 

Pitt. David Associate Professor of Horticulture B A Syracuse 
University. 1970. ML A University of Massachusetts. 1974 
Pltter Richard l_ Assistant Professor of Meteorology A.B, 
University of Calilornia at Los Angeles. 1969; MS. 1970 
CPhil, 1972; PhD, 1973 

Plotkin, Allen Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineer- 
ing B.S., Columbia University, 1963; MS, 1964; PhD „ Stanford 
University. 1968. 

Polst, Richard F., Jr. Associate Professor of Business and 
Management B S . Pennsylvania Slate University. 1965. M B A, 
University of Maryland. 1967; Ph.D.. Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity. 1971 

Polakoff. Murray E. Professor of Business Management and 
Provost. Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences B.A, New 
York University. 1946. MA, Columbia University. 1949 PhD 
1955 

Ponnamperuma, Cyril Professor of Chemistry and Biochem- 
istry B A . University of Madras. 1948; B Sc, Birkbeck College. 
University ol London. 1959; Ph.D.. University of California. 
Berkeley. 1962 

Postbrlel. Samuel Assistant Professor. Governmenl and 
Politics A.B.. City College of New York (Brooklyn College), 1969; 
M.A., Indiana University. 1971; Ph.D.. 1975. 
Potter, Jane H. Associate Professor of Zoology B.S.. Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 1942; M.S.. 1948; Ph.D.. 1949, 
Potter. Michael Ad|unct Professor of Zoology A.B.. Prin- 
ceton University, 1945; M.D.. University of Virginia. 1949. 
Power, Paul W. Associate Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services B.A.. St Paul's College. 1955; MS, San 
Diego State University. 1971. D.Se, Boston University. 1974. 
Prange. Richard E. Professor of Physics M.S. University of 
Chicago. 1955. PhD., 1958. 

Prather, Elizabeth S. Professor and Chairman of Food Nutri- 
tion and Institution Administration BS, Auburn University. 1951; 
M.S.. 1955. PhD, Iowa State University. 1963. 
Presser. Harriet Professor of Sociology B.A, George Wash- 
ington University. 1959; MA. University of North Carolina. 
1962. PhD, University ol California (Berkeley), 1969 
Preston. Lee E. Professor. College of Business and Man- 
agement B.A, Vanderbilt University, 1951; MA. Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1953; PhD, 1958. 

Prindle, Allen M. Assistant Professor of Agricultural and 
Resource Economics BS, Wisconsin State University. 1969; 
MS, Purdue University. 1972; PhD, Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity. 1977 

Pugliese, Rudolph E. Professor of Communication Arts and 
Theatre B.A, Miami University. 1947; M.F.A, Catholic Universi- 
ty of America, 1949, PhD, Ohio State University. 1961 
Pugsley, James H. Associate Professor of Electncal Engi- 
neenng B A . Oberlm College, 1956, M.S.. University of Illinois 
1958. PhD. 1963 

Pumroy. Donald K. Professor of Counseling and Personnel 
Services and Psychology B.A, University of Iowa. 1949. M.S., 
University of Wisconsin. 1951; PhD, University of Washington 
1954 

Punch, Jerry L. Research Professor of Hearing and Speech 
Sciences BA. Wake Forest College. 1965. M.S., Vanderbilt 
University, 1967; PhD, Northwestern University, 1972. 
Puryear, Martin Assistant Professor of Art B.A, Catholic 
University, 1963; M F A, Yale University. 1971 
Racusen. Richard H. Assistant Professor ol Botany BS. 
University of Vermont. 1970. MS, 1972; Ph.D. 1975 
Rado. George T. Adiunct Professor of Physics SB. Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology. 1939; S.M , 1941. Ph.D. 
1943 

Ragan, Robert M. Professor and Chairman of Civil Engineer- 
ing BS. Virginia Military Institute. 1955; MS. Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, 1959. PhD, Cornell University. 1965. 
Ranald. Ralph A. Associate Professor of Government and 
Politics BA , University ol Calilornia. Los Angeles. 1952. MA. 
1954. MA. Princeton University. 1958; Ph.D. 1961. 
Ray. Phillip B. Associate Prolessor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services B.A . Antioch College. 1950. MS, University of 
Pennsylvania, 1955, Ph.D.. University of Minnesota. 1962 
Razar. Michael J. Associate Professor of Mathematics A B . 
Harvard University. 1965. PhD, 1971 
Reaka. Marjorie l_ Assistant Prolessor ol Zoology B.A, 
University ol Kansas. 1965; MS. 1967; PhD. University of 
California. Berkeley. 1975 

Rearick. William R. Prolessor ol Art B.A, New York Universi- 
ty. 1953. MA. 1958. Ph.D. Harvard University. 1968 
Reckers. Philip Merel Assistant Professor of Business and 
Management BS. Ouincy College. 1968; MBA. Washington 
University. 1972; PhD, University ol Illinois. 1978 



Reduh, Edward f. Professor of Physics A B . Pnnceton 
University. 1963; Ph D , Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
1968 

Reeves, Mavis M. Associate Professor of Government and 
Politics B A , West Virginia University. 1942; M A . 1943; Ph.D.. 
University of North Carolina. 1947 

Regan, Thomas M. Professor of Chemical Engmeenng 8 S . 
Tulane University. 1963. PhD. 1967 
Reichelderter. Charles F. Associate Professor of Entomolo- 
gy BS. St Cloud College. 1961. M A. University of Washing- 
ton, 1963, Ph.D.. University of Washington 1963; Ph.D.. Univer- 
sity of California at Riverside. 1968 

Reld. James Assistant Professor of Art BFA. Maryland 
institute College of Art. 1966. MA. University of Maryland 
1970 

Reinhart. Bruce L Professor of Mathematics B.A, Lehigh 
University, 1952; MA. Pnnceton University. 1954; Ph.D.. 1956 
Reiser, Martin P. Professor of Electncal Electncal Engineer- 
ing and Physics 8 Sc, Johannes Gutenberg unrversitat Mainz 
1957. PhD. 1960 

Reiser, Sheldon Adiunct Professor ol Food. Nutntion, and 
institutional Administration B.S, City College ol New York. 
1953; M.SC, University of Wisconsin. 1957. Ph.D. 1959 
Reveal. James l_ Associate Professor of Botany 8 S, Utah 
State University. 1963; MS, 1965; PhD. Bngham Young 
University. 1969 

Reynolds, Charles W. Professor of Horticulture A.B, Univer- 
sity of Alabama. 1941. BS. Auburn University, 1947. MS. 
1949; PhD, University of Maryland 1954. 
Rhee. Moon-Jhong Associate Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering BS, Seoul National University, 1958. M.S. 1960; 
PhD, The Catholic University of Amenca. 1970. 
Rhoads, David J. Associate Professor of Counselling and 
Personnel Services B.A Temple University. 1954. MA . 1958; 
Ed D University of Maryland. 1963. 

Richard. Jean-Paul Associate Prolessor ol Physics B es 
Arts. University Laval. 1956; B. e S. 1960; Doctoral 3» Cycle. 
Umversile de Pans. 1963. Doctoral d'EtaL 1965 
Ridgeway. Whitman H. Assistant Professor ol History A.B. 
Kenyon College. 1963; MA. San Francisco State College. 
1967. Ph.D. University ol Pennsylvania. 1973 
Rldky. Robert W. Associate Prolessor ol Secondary Educa- 
tion and Geology B.S, Stale University ol New York at Cortland. 
1966. MS. Syracuse University. 1970; PhD. 1973 
Ridley. Charles R. Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services BA, Taylor University. 1970: MA, Ball 
State University, 1971; PhD, University ol Minnesota. 1978 
Rieger. Charles Joseph, III Associate Prolessor ol Comput- 
er Science B.S, Purdue University. 1970. PhD. Stanlord Uni- 
versity, 1974. 

Rislnger, Robert Prolessor and Chairman. Secondary Edu- 
cation B.S, Ball Slale Universily. t940. MA, University ol 
Chicago. 1947. Ed.D, University ol Colorado. 1955 
Rissler, Jane F. Assistant Prolessor ol Botany BA. Sheperd 
College. 1966; MA. West Virginia University. 1968: Ph.D. 
Cornell University, 1977 

Ritzer. George Professor ol Sociology B.A, City College of 
New York. 1962. MBA, University of Michigan. 1964, PhD. 
Cornell University. 1968. 

Roberson, Bob S. Associate Prolessor ol Microbiology B.A, 
University of North Carolina. 1951, PhD, 1960 
Roberts, Merrill J. Prolessor ol Business and Management 
B.A, University ol Minnesota. 1938; MBA, University ol Chica- 
go. 1969; PhD, 1951 

Robertson. Carol Assistant Prolessor ol Music B S. Indiana 
University. 1970. MA. 1972; PhD. 1975. 
Robertson-Tchabo. Elizabeth A. Assistant Prolessor ol 
Human Development BA. University ol Calgary. 1966. M.Sc, 
1967. PhD. Universily ol Southern Calilornia. 1972 
Robock, Alan Assistant Prolessor ol Meteorology B A. Uni- 
versity ol Wisconsin. 1970. SM. Massachusetts Institute ol 
Technology. 1974. PhD. 1977 

Rodenhuis, David R. Associate Prolessor ol Meteorology 
B S . University ol Calilornia. Berkeley 1959. B S . Pennsylvania 
Slale University. 1960. PhD. University ol Washington. 1967 
Roderick. Jessie A. Prolessor. Early Childhood and Elemen- 
tary Education BS. Wilkes College. 1956. MA. Columbia 
University. 1957. Ed D . temple University. 1967 
Rogers. Benjamin l_ Prolessor ol Horticulture B S . Clem- 
son University. 1943 MS. University of Minnesota. 1947 
PhO. University ol Maryland. 1950 

Rogoisky, Saul Associate Prolessor. institute lor eh*) Study 
BA. Harvard University 1948. MA. Universily ol Chicago 
1953. EdO. Harvard University. 1963 
Roos, Phillip G. Prolessor ol Physics B A . Ohio Westeyan 
University. 1960. Ph D Massachusetts institute ol Technology 
1964 



38 Rose, William K. 



Rose, William K. Professor ol Astronomy A.B.. Columbia 
University, 1957; Ph.D.. 1963. 

Rosebrough, Robin Adiunct Assistant Professor ol Food, 
Nutrition, and Institutional Administration 8.S., Michigan State 
University, 1968; M.P.H., University ol Michigan, 1970; M.S.. 
University ol Kentucky, 1973; Ph.D., 1975. 
Rosenberg, Morris Professor of Sociology B.A., Brooklyn 
College, 1946, M.A., Columbia University, 1950, Ph.D.. 1953. 
Rosenberg, Theodore J. Research Professor. Institute for 
Physical Science and Technology BEE . City University of New 
York (City College). 1960; Ph.D.. University of California (Berke- 
ley), 1965 

Rosenfeld. Azriel Research Professor, Computer Science 
B.A., Yeshiva College. 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1951. 
Ph.D.. 1957. 

Rothschild. Max F. Assistant Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S.. University of California at Davis. 1974; MS. University of 
Wisconsin at Madison. 1975; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1978. 
Roush. Marvin L. Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineer- 
ing and Physics B.Sc . Ottawa University. 1956; Ph.D.. Universi- 
ty of Maryland. 1964. 

Rovner, Phillip Associate Professor of Spanish B A , George 
Washington University, 1948; M.A., 1949; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland. 1958. 

Rowan, Robert, III Assistant Professor of Chemistry B.A., 
Pomona College, 1968, MA, Harvard University. 1970. Ph D . 
1974. 

Rubin, Roger H. Associate Professor of Family and Commu- 
nity Development B.A , Brooklyn College of the City University 
of New York. 1965, M.S.. Pennsylvania State University. 1966; 
Ph.D. 1970 

Ruchkln, Judith P. Associate Professor of Secondary Edu- 
cation B.A., Swarthmore College. 1956; M.A., Yale University, 
1957; Ed.D., Columbia University Teachers College. 1972 
Ruderman, David B. Assistant Professor of History B.A., City 
College ol New York. 1966; M.A.. Columbia University, 1968; 
Ph.D , Hebrew University. Jerusalem, 1975. 
Rundell, Walter, Jr. Professor of History B.S., University of 
Texas, 1951, M.A.. American University, 1955, PhD.. 1957 
Russell, Charles C. Professor of French and Italian B.A.. 
Oberlm College, 1956; MA, Bryn Mawr College, 1964; Ph.D.. 
Harvard University, 1970. 

Russell, John D. Professor of English A.B . Colgate Universi- 
ty, 1951; M.A.. University of Washington, 1956, Ph.D., Rutgers 
University, 1959 

Rutherford, Charles S. Assistant Professor of English B.A , 
Carleton College. 1962; MA, Indiana University, 1966; Ph.D., 
1970. 

Russek, Estelle Assistant Professor of Dairy Science B.S.. 
State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1972; Ph.D., 
University of Washington. 1977 

Salamanca, Jack R. Professor of English Diploma, Royal 
Academy of Dramatic Art. 1952; Lie Deg., University of London. 
1953, Licentiate, Royal Academy of Music. 1954. 
Sallet, Dlrse W. Professor of Mechanical Engineering B S , 
George Washington University. 1961. MS. University of Kan- 
sas. 1963. Ph.D.. Technische Hochschule, Stuttgart. 1966. 
Samet, Hanan Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B.S., University of California at Los Angeles. 1970; M.S.. (Com- 
puter Science), Stanford University, 1974; M.S., (Operations 
Research). 1975. Ph.D., 1975. 

Sammons, David J. Assistant Professor of Agronomy B.S.. 
Tufts University, 1968, A.M.. Harvard University. 1972; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois. 1978 

Sampugna, Joseph Associate Professor of Biochemistry 
B.A.. University of Connecticut, 1959, MA. 1962. Ph.D.. 1968. 
Santa Maria, D. Laine Associate Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation B A, University of Pennsylvania, 1954; M.Ed., Temple 
University, 1962; Ed.D.. University ol Oregon, 1968 
Saracho, Olivia Natividad Assistant Professor of Early 
Childhood/Elementary Education B.S.. Texas Woman's Univer- 
sity, 1967; M.Ed.. 1972; Ph.D.. University ol Illinois. 1978 

Sargent, Stuart Assistant Professor of Oriental and Hebrew 
Languages B A , University of Oregon, 1968, M.A , Stanford 
University. 1974; Ph.D., 1977. 

Sather, Jerome O. Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., University of Minnesota. 1957. MS. 1959; Ph.D., 1963. 
Sayanl, Hasan Assistant Professor of Information Systems 
Management B.S.E, University of Michigan, 1965. M.S.E., 
1966; Ph.D., 1973. 

Sayre, Clifford L„ Jr. Associate Dean. College of Engineer- 
ing and Professor of Mechanical Engineering B.S . Duke Univer- 
sity. 1947. M.S.. Stevens Institute ol Technology. 1950; Ph D . 
University of Maryland. 1961 

Schafer, James A. Associate Prolessor ol Mathematics 
B.S., University of Rochester, 1961, Ph D.. University of Chica- 
go. 1965 



Schafer, William D. Associate Professor of Measurement 
and Statistics B.A,, University of Rochester. 1964. M.A., 1965; 
Ed.D., 1969. 

Schales, Franklin D. Associate Professor of Horticulture 
B.S . Louisiana State University. 1959; M.S.. Cornell University. 
1962; PhD. 1963. 

Schelllng, David R. Assistant Prolessor. Civil Engineering 
B.S.C.E , Lehigh University, 1961; M S.M.E.. Drexel Institute of 
Technology, 1964. Ph.D.. University ol Maryland, 1968. 
Schlaretzki, Walter E. Professor of Philosophy A.B.. Mon- 
mouth College, 1941; AM., University of Illinois, 1942; Ph.D.. 
Cornell University, 1948. 

Schlledt, Wolfgang M. Prolessor of Zoology Ph.D., Universi- 
ty of Vienna, 1951 

Schlossberg, Nancy K. Professor, Counseling and Person- 
nel Services B A., Bernard College, 1951; M.A., Columbia 
University (Teachers College), Ed.D., 1961 
Schmidt, Margaret N. Assistant Professor. Physical Educa- 
tion B.S . University of North Carolina, 1957; M.A . University of 
Michigan 1961, Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1972. 
Schneider, David T. Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Oberlin College. 1959; Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute ol 
Technology. 1964 

Schneler, Craig Eric Associate Professor of Business and 
Management B.S.. Ohio State University. 1969; MS.. University 
of Colorado, 1972; DBA., 1975. 

Schoenbaum, Samuel Professor of English B.A., Brooklyn 
College, 1947, MA., Columbia University. 1949. Ph.D.. 1953. 
Scholnlck, Ellin K. Professor ol Psychology BA, Vassar 
College, 1958. Ph.D.. University of Rochester. 1963. 
Schroeder, Wllburn C. Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.S., University of Michigan. 1930; M.S.E , 1931. Ph.D.. 1933. 
Schuda, Paul F. Assistant Professor of Chemistry B S . Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, 1973; PhD, 1976. 
Schultze, Charles L. Professor of Economics B.A., Geor- 
getown University, 1948; M.A.. 1950; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land. 1960 

Schumacher, Elisabeth Associate Professor of Early Child- 
hood and Elementary Education B S.. Newark State College. 
1942; M Ed . Pennsylvania State University. 1962; D.Ed.. 1965. 
Schumacher, Thomas Associate Professor of Music B.Mus . 
Manhattan School of Music. 1958; M.S.. Juilliard School ol 
Music. 1962. 

Schwartz, Charles W. Assistant Prolessor. Department of 
Civil Engineering; B.S , MS. Ph.D. M.I T. B.S. 1974, MS 1977; 
PhD 1979 

Schweitzer, Howard Christopher Research Associate Pro- 
lessor. Hearing and Speech Sciences B.A., Northern Illinois 
University. 1968. M.A.. University of Maryland, 1971; Ph.D., 
1974. 

Scott, John S. Assistant Professor, Physics and Astronomy 
B.S. Michigan State University, 1972; Ph.D.. University of 
Arizona. 1975. 

Sedlacek, William E. Associate Professor of Measurement 
and Statistics B.S.. Iowa State University. 1960; M.S.. 1961; 
Ph.D. Kansas State University. 1966 
Seefeldt, Carol A. Associate Professor of Early Childhood 
and Elementary Education BA, University of Wisconsin, 1956. 
M.A.. University of South Florida. 1968; Ph.D. Florida State 
University. 1971 

Segal, David R. Professor ol Sociology B.A.. Harpur College. 
1962, M.A., University of Chicago, 1963; Ph.D., 1967. 
Segal, Mady Wechsler Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Queens College. City University of New York. 1965, M.A., 
University of Chicago. 1967. Ph.D., 1973. 
Segovia, Antonio V. Associate Professor of Geology 
Topografo, Univ. Nacional de Paraguay. 1954, Geological En- 
gineer. Colorado School ol Mines. 1956; Ph D . Pennsylvania 
State University. 1963. 

Selbel, Ronald J. Assistant Professor of Agricultural and 
Extension Education B.S.. University of Illinois. Urbana. 1957; 
M.S.. 1958; Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 1972. 
Seldman, Eric Associate Professor of Special Education 
B.S. New York University, 1947.M.A., 1948; Ph.D., University of 
Connecticut, 1964 

Selden, Steven Assistant Professor of Administration. Su- 
pervision, and Curriculum B S . State University of New York at 
Oswego. 1963; MS.. Brooklyn College, 1967; M.A.. Columbia 
University. 1970; Ed.D, 1971 

Sengers, Jan V. Professor of Institute of Physical Science 
and Technology Doctorandus. University ol Amsterdam, 1955; 
Ph.D.. 1962. 

Senkevitch, Anatole Assistant Prolessor ol Architecture 
B.S., University of Texas. 1967; M.A.H.. University of Virginia, 
1970; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1974. 
Serwer, Howard J. Associate Prolessor of Music B.A., Yale 
University, 1949; MBA., Columbia University. 1950; Ph.D.. Yale 
University. 1969 



Shaffner. Clyne S. Professor of Poultry Science B.S , Michi- 
gan State University, 1938; M.S.. 1940; PhD . Purdue Universi- 
ty, 1947 

Shanks, James B. Professor of Horticulture B.Sc. Ohio 
State University, 1939. M.So. 1946; Ph.D., 1949 
Shapere, Dudley Professor of Philosophy BA, Harvard Uni- 
versity. 1949. M.A. 1955, Ph.D., 1957. 
Shearer, Jane K. Professor and Chairman of Housing and 
Applied Design BS, University of Tennessee, 1940; M.S.. 
1950, PhD., Florida State University, 1960 
Shneiderman, Ben A. Associate Professor of Information 
Systems Management B.S.. City College of New York, 1968, 
M.S., State University of New York. 1972; Ph.D.. 1973. 
Shreeve, Charles A., Jr. Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing BE, The Johns Hopkins University. 1935; M.S., University 
of Maryland. 1943. 

Shroyer, Charlotte A. Assistant Professor of Special Educa- 
tion B.A., Ohio State University. 1961; M.Ed-, University of 
Pittsburgh, 1972. Ph.D.. 1975. 

Sibley, Edgar H. Professor of Information Systems Manage- 
ment B.Sc. University of London. 1946; S M.. Massachusetts 
Institute ol Technology, 1962; Sc.D.. 1967 
Slegrist, Henry G., Jr. Associate Professor and Chairman of 
Geology BA, Lehigh University, 1956; M.S.. Pennsylvania 
State University. 1959; Ph.D.. 1961. 

Sigall, Harold Professor of Psychology BS, City College ol 
New York, 1964; PhD., University of Texas (Austin), 1968. 
Slllo, Charles B., Jr. Associate Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering B.S.E. E , M.S.E. E., University of Notre Dame, 1967; 
Ph.D., 1970. 

Silverman, Joseph Professor of Chemical Engineering and 
Director, Institute lor Physical Science and Technology B.A , 
Brooklyn College. 1944, A.M., Columbia University, 1948; Ph.D.. 
1951. 

Simms, Betty H. Professor of Special Education B.A.. Harris 
Teachers College, 1947; M.A., University of Michigan, 1955; 
Ed.D., University of Maryland. 1962. 

Simons, David E. Associate Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering B.S., University of Maryland. 1949, M.S.. 1951. 
Sisler. Hugh D. Chairman and Professor of Botany B.S.. 
University of Maryland, 1949, M.S., 1951; Ph.D., 1953. 
Sjoblad, Roy D. Assistant Professor of Microbiology B.S.. 
Gordon College. 1969. MS.. University of Massachusetts. 
1971; Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University, 1976. 
Skuja, Andrls Assistant Professor. Physics and Astronomy 
B.S.. University of Toronto. 1966, Ph.D.. University of California 
(Berkeley), 1972. 

Slawsky, Zaka I. Prolessor ol Physics and Astronomy B.S., 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1933; M.S.. California Institute 
of Technology, 1935; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1938. 
Slud, Eric V. Assistant Professor. Mathematics B.A.. Harvard 
University. 1972, Ph.D.. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
1976. 

Small, Eugene B. Associate Prolessor of Zoology B.A., 
Wayne State University. 1953; M.S.. 1958, Ph.D., University of 
Calitornia at Los Angeles, 1966. 

Smith, Barry D. Associate Prolessor of Psychology B.S., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1962. MA. Bucknell University. 
1964; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1967. 
Smith, Betty F. Professor and Chairman of Textiles and 
Consumer Economics B.S . University of Arkansas. 1951; M.S.. 
University of Tennessee. 1956. Ph.D.. University of Minnesota, 
1960; PhD, 1965. 

Smith, Elbert B. Professor of History A.B., Maryville College, 
1940; A.M., University of Chicago 1947; Ph.D.. 1949. 
Smith, Elske van Panhuys Professor of Astronomy B.A.. 
Harvard University, 1950; M.A., 1951; Ph.D.. 1955. 
Smith, Gayle S. Associate Prolessor of English Ph.B., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1946; B.S.. Iowa State University, 1948; 
M.A.. Cornell University, 1951, Ph.D., 1958. 
Smith, Harold D. Professor of Agricultural and Resource 
Economics B.A . Bndgewater College. 1943; M S.. University ol 
Maryland. 1947. PhD, American University. 1952. 
Smith, Hilda L. Assistant Professor of History B.S., South- 
west Missouri State University, 1963; M A , University of Mis- 
souri. 1964; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1975. 
Smith, Kenwyn K. Assistant Prolessor. Psychology B.A.. 
University ol Queensland (Australia). 1965. 1967; M.A., 1970; 
M.A., Yale University. 1973. Ph.D., 1974 
Smith, Paul Associate Professor of Mathematics BS, Drexel 
University. 1965; M.S., Case Institute of Technology. 1967; 
Ph.D. Case Western Reserve University, 1969 
Smith, Theodore G. Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.E.S. The Johns Hopkins University, 1956; M.E.S., 1958; 
D.Sc, Washington University. 1960. 

Smith-Gill, Sandra J. Associate Professor of Zoology B.S.. 
University of Michigan. 1965; M.S.. 1966; Ph.D. 1972. 



Tretter, Steven A. 39 



Snapp, Audrey Nossaman Associate Professor of Music 
BM , Westminster Choir College, 1947 

Snow, George A. Professor of Physics B.S., College of the 
City of New York, 1945, M.A., Princeton University, 1947, Ph.D., 
1949 

Snower, Dennis J. Assistant Professor of Economics B.A , 
Oxford University, MA . 1971, MA, Princeton University. 1973; 
PhD. 1975 

Soares, Jr., Joseph H. Associate Professor of Poultry Sci- 
ence B.S.. University of Maryland. 1964. MS. 1966. PhD, 
1966 

Soergel, Dagobert Professor, College of Library and Infor- 
mation Services B S , University of Freiburg. 1960. M.S., 1964; 
PhD. 1970. 

Soli, Slgfrld Assistant Professor of Psychology B.A, St. Olaf 
College, 1968; B.A, University of Minnesota. 1974. Ph.D., 1978 
Solomos, Theophanes Associate Professor of Horticulture 
MA. College of Agriculture, Athens. Greece, 1957, PhD 
University of Cambridge, 1962. 

Sommer, Sheldon E. Associate Professor of Chemistry BS 
City College of New York. 1959; MA, City University of New 
York. 1961, M.S., Texas A&M University. 1964, Ph.D.. Pennsyl 
vania State University, 1969 

Sorkln, Horlon Assistant Professor of Business and Man. 
agement B.S., University of Missouri. 1959. MBA, University of 
Minnesota, 1975. Ph.D., 1977. 

Sosnowski, Saul Professor and Chairman of Spanish and 
Portuguese A.B, University of Scranton. 1967, MA. University 
of Virginia. 1968. Ph.D., 1970. 

Spangler, Paul J. Lecturer in Entomology A.B . Lebanon 
Valley College. 1949, M.S. Ohio University. 1951; Ph.D.. Univer- 
sity of Missouri, 1960. 

Sparks, David S. Professor of History and Vice-President for 
Graduate Studies and Research A.B, Grinnell College, 1944, 
AM . University of Chicago, 1945. Ph.D.. 1951. 
Spauldlng, Jeffrey H. Assistant Professor of Art A.B, Cen- 
tral Michigan University, 1970, M.F.A . Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1974. 

Spekman, Nancy J. Assistant Professor of Special Educa- 
tion B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1969. M.Ed. Boston 
College. 1973; Ph.D.. Northwestern University, 1977. 
Spekman, Robert Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement B.A, University of Massachusetts, 1969; MBA, Syra- 
cuse University. 1971. PhD, Northwestern University, 1977 
Spiegel, Gabrielle Assistant Professor of History B.A, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1964, MAT, Harvard University. 1965, MA, 
The Johns Hopkins University. 1969; Ph.D.. 1974. 
Spiro, Marie Associate Professor of Art B.A., Wilson College. 
1957, MA . New York University. 1961. Ph.D.. Institute of Fine 
Arts. New York University 

Splvak, Steven M. Associate Professor of Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics B.S , Philadelphia College of Textiles and 
Sciences. 1963; M.S.. Georgia Institute of Technology. 1965. 
Ph.D., University of Manchester. 1967 

Splalne, John E. Associate Professor of Administration. Su- 
pervision and Curriculum B.A , University of New Hampshire. 
1963; MA., 1965; Ed.D, Boston University, 1973 
Spokane, Arnold R. Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services B.A., Ohio University, 1970; M.S.Ed.. Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, 1972. Ph D , Ohio State University, 1976 

Stagllano, Anthony Assistant Professor of Business and 
Management B.S, University of Pennsylvania, 1967, M B.A, 
University of Michigan, 1968, Ph.D.. University of Illinois. 1977 
Stairs, Allen Assistant Professor of Philosophy B.A, Univer- 
sity of New Brunswick. 1973, MA, University of Western 
Ontario. 1975; Ph.D. 1978 

Staley, Gregory A. Assistant Professor of Classical Lan- 
guages B.A, Dickinson College, 1970. MA . Princeton Universi- 
ty. 1974; PhD, 1975 

Stark, Francis C, Jr. Professor of Horticulture and Provost, 
Division of Agriculture and Life Sciences B.S, Oklahoma A&M 
College. 1940; MS, University of Maryland, 1941, PhD, 1948 

Starkweather. Kendall N. Assistant Professor of Industrial 
Education B.S, Western Illinois University. 1967. MA, Eastern 
Michigan University. 1969; PhD, University of Maryland. 1975 
Steel, Donald H. Professor of Physical Education B.A, 
Trenton State College, 1955. MA, University of Maryland. 
1957. Ph.D. Louisiana State University, 1964 

Steele, Robert E. Assistant Professor of Psychology B.A, 
Morehouse College, 1965, M.Div, Episcopal Theological 
School, 1968. MPH, Yale University School of Medicine. 1971. 
MS. Yale University, 1974, PhD, 1975 
Steinberg, Phillip H. Professor of Physics B.S, University of 
Cincinnati. 1954. Ph 0, Northwestern University. 1959 

Steinhauer, Allen L. Professor and Chairman of Entomology 
B.S, University of Manitoba, 1953, MS. Oregon State College. 
1955. PhD, 1958 



Stelnman, Robert M. Professor of Psychology D.D.S, St 
Louis University. 1968; MA, New School for Social Research. 
1962. PhD, 1964 

Stephens, E. Robert Professor. Administration, Supervision, 
and Curriculum B.S, Mornmgside College. 1952; MS, Drake 
University. 1958; Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1966 
Sternberg, Yaron M. Professor of Civil Engineering B.S . 
University of Illinois. 1961. M.S., University of California at 
Davis, 1963; PhD , 1965 

Sternhelm, Charles E. Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.S, Brooklyn College, 1961; PhD, University of Rochester. 
1967 

Stevens, George A. Professor of Agricultural and Resource 
Economics B.S. Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1941. PhD. 
University of Maryland, 1957. 

Stewart, G.W. Professor of Computer Science A.B, Universi- 
ty of Tennessee, 1962; PhD, 1968. 

Stewart, James M. Professor of Chemistry B.A . Western 
Washington College, 1953; PhD, University of Washington, 
1958 

Stewart, Larry E. Associate Professor and Chairman of 
Agricultural Engineering B.S, West Virginia University. 1960; 
MS, 1961. PhD, University of Maryland, 1972 
Stich, Stephen P. Associate Professor of Philosophy B.A, 
University of Pennsylvania. 1964; PhD, Pnnceton University, 
1968 

Stlfel, Peter B. Associate Professor of Geology B.A , Cornell 
University. 1958. Ph.D. University of Utah, 1964 
Stimart, Dennis P. Assistant Professor of Horticulture. B.S. 
University of Minnesota, 1971; M.S.. 1976; Ph.D., 1979. 
Stiner, Frederick Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement B.S, Loyola College. 1967; M.S. University of Dela- 
ware. 1969. M B.A , Marshall University, 1972, PhD, University 
of Nebraska. 1976 

Stone, Clarence N. Associate Professor of Government and 
Politics, and Director. Urban Research Group. Bureau of Gov- 
ernmental Research A.B, University of South Carolina. 1957, 
MA, Duke University. 1960; Ph.D., 1963. 
Stough, Kenneth F. Associate Professor of industrial Educa- 
tion B.S, Millersville State College, 1954. M.Ed . Pennsylvania 
State University. 1961, Ph.D., University of Maryland. 1968 
Stowasser, Karl Associate Professor of History Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Muenster, 1966 

Strand, tvar E., Jr. Assistant Professor of Agricultural and 
Resource Economics B.A, University of Rochester. 1967, MA, 
University of Rhode Island. 1971, Ph.D.. 1975 
Straszheim, Mahlon R. Professor of Economics B.S, Pur- 
due University, 1961; PhD, Harvard University, 1965. 
Strtckllng, Edward Professor of Agronomy B.S, Ohio State 
University. 1937; PhD, 1949. 

Strobell, Adah P. Associate Professor of Recreation A B , 
San Francisco State College, 1953; MS, University of Califor- 
nia. Los Angeles, 1958; PhD, University of Illinois. 1966 
Stuart, WHIIam Assistant Professor of Anthropology B.A, 
George Washington University, 1961; PhD, University of Ore- 
gon. 1971. 

Stunkard, Clayton, L. Professor and Acting Chairman of 
Measurement and Statistics B.S, University of Minnesota, 
1948. MA. 1951; PhD. 1959. 

Sublett, Henry L. Professor, Early Childhood Elementary 
Education A.B, Duke University, 1951; M.Ed, University of 
Virginia, 1953. Ed.D, 1959. 

Sucher, Joseph Professor of Physics and Astronomy B.S, 
Brooklyn College, 1952; PhD, Columbia University. 1957, 
Suppe, Frederick R. Associate Professor of Philosophy 
A.B , University of California, Riverside, 1962, AM, University of 
Michigan. 1964, PhD. 1967 

Svenonlus, Lars S. Professor of Philosophy Fil. Kand, Upp- 
sala University. 1950. Fil Mag, 1955, Fil. Lie . 1955. Fil Dr.. 
1960. 

Svoboda, Cyril P. Assistant Professor of Human Develop- 
ment Education B.A, St Columban's Major Seminary. 1954. 
BTh. 1958, B Ph, Gregorian University (Rome Italy). 1959. 
LPh, 1960; PhD, 1961, Ph D, University of Wisconsin, 1973 
Swartz, B. Katherine Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.S, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1972; MS. Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1974, PhD, 1976 
Swartz, Harry J. Assistant Professor of Horticulture. B.S . 
State University of New York at Buffalo. 1973. PhD, Cornell 
University, 1979 

Sweet, Daniel Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.S, Fair- 
leigh Dickinson University, 1965. Ph D, Brown University. 1969 
Syskl. Ryszard Professor of Mathematics B S . University of 
London. 1954. PhD, Chelsea College. 1960 
Szepesi. Bela Adjunct Associate Professor of Food. Nutri- 
tion, and Institutional Administration B.A, Albion College. 1961. 
M.S., Colorado Slate University. 1964. PhD, University of 
California. 1968. 



Taft. Charles A. Professor of Business and Management 
B.S, University of Iowa. 1937, MA, 1941; PhD, University of 
Maryland, 1952 

Talaat, Mostsfa E. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S, University of Cairo. 1946, M.S.. Unrversity of Pennsylvania. 
1947, Ph.D. 1951 

Tarica. Ralph Associate Professor of French and Italian B.A . 
Emory University. 1954, M A , 1958. Ph D, Harvard Unrversity, 
1966 

Taylor. Dalmas A. Professor of Psychology B.S . Western 
Reserve University. 1959. MS . Howard University. 1961. PhD, 
University of Delaware. 1965 

Taylor. Leonard S. Professor of Electrical Engtneenng A.B , 
Harvard University. 1951, MS, New Mexico State University, 
1956; PhD, 1960 

Teglasi, Hedwlg Assistant Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services B.A, Douglass College of Rutgers University. 
1969; MA, Temple University. 1971. Ph.D.. Hofstra University. 
1975 

Tennyson. Ray A. Associate Professor of Criminology B.S, 
Washington State University, 1951, MA. 1957, Ph.D.. 1965 
Teramura, Alan H. Assistant Professor of Botany B.A, Cali- 
fornia State University. 1971. MA, 1973. PhD . Duke Universi- 
ty. 1978. 

Terchek. Ronald J. Associate Professor of Government and 
Politics B.A, University of Chicago. 1958; MA, 1960; Ph.D. 
University of Maryland. 1965 

Therrien, Madeleine B. Professor and Chairman, French 
and Italian Cert University of Fneburg (Switzerland), 1952; Cert 
University of Athens (Greece), 1956, Lie , University of Pans 
(France). 1959; Ph.D.. Michigan State University. 1966 
Thleblot, Armand J, Jr. Associate Professor of Business 
and Management B.S, Princeton University. 1961, MBA. 
University of Pennsylvania. 1965. PhD, 1969. 
Thomas, Glenn Assistant Professor of Information Systems 
Management B A, Stanford University. 1968, MBA, University 
Of Washington, 1973; PhD, 1977 

Thomas. Laurence Assistant Professor of Philosophy B.A, 
University of Maryland. 1971, MA, University of Pittsburgh. 
1973, PhD, 1976. 

Thomas, Owen Pestell Professor and Chairman, Poultry 
Science B.Sc, University of Natal. 1954. M.Sc . 1962. PhD. 
University of Maryland. 1966 

Thomas, William L. Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services. Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs B S , 
The University of Tennessee. Knoxville. 1955. MS, 1965, 
PhD, Michigan State University. 1970. 
Thompson, Arthur H. Professor of Horticulture B.S, Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, 1941, PhD, University of Maryland. 1945 
Thompson, Derek Associate Professor of Geography B.A, 
Manchester University. 1960. MA, 1962; Ph.D, Indiana Univer- 
sity. 1969 

Thompson, Harvey W. Assistant Professor of Communica- 
tion Arts and Theatre B S, Wayne State Unrversity. 1966. 
M.F.A, Columbia University. 1972 

Thompson, Owen E. Associate Professor of Meteorology 
B.S. University of Missouri, 1961. M.S. 1963; PhD, 1966 
Thorberg, Raymond. Associate Professor of English B.A . 
University of Alaska, 1939, MA, University of Chicago, 1946; 
Ph.D, Cornell University. 1954. 



Tldman, Derek A. Research Professor. Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics B.Sc. London University. 
1952. Ph.D., 1956. 

Tlemey. William F. Associate Professor of Industrial Educa- 
tion B.S . Central Connecticut State College. 1941. MA, Ohio 
State University. 1949. Ed.D. University of Maryland. 1952 
Tlfft, Margaret A. Associate Professor of Health Education 
B S, Ohio State University. 1946. MA. Columbia University. 
1948, Ed.D. West Virginia University. 1969 
Tollver. Edmund Assistant Professor of Music B M Ed, Il- 
linois Wesleyan University. 1970. MM, University of Michigan. 
1972. DMA. 1976. 

Tossed. John L. Associate Professor of Chemistry B.S . 
University of Chicago. 1966. MA. Harvard University. 1967, 
PhD, 1972 

Tourigny, Ann W. Assistant Professor of Famify and Com- 
munity Development BS, University of Tennessee. 1968. 
M Ed Pennsylvania State University. 1969. PhD, 1979 
Traver. Paul Professor of Musk B Mus , Catholic University 
Of America. 1955. M Mus . 1957. DMA. Stanford University. 
1967 

Travis, Irene Lathrop Assistant Professor, College of Libra- 
ry and Information Services 8 A , Mills College. 1962. MLS. 
University of California. 1966. PhD. 1974 
Tretter. Steven A. Associate Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neenng BS. University of Maryland. 1962 MA, Pnnceton 
University, 1964, PhD. 1965 



40 Trickett, Edison J. 



Trlckett, Edison J. Professor of Psychology B.A, Trinity 
College, 1963; MA. Ohio State University, 1965; Ph.D., 1967 
Trimble, Virginia L. Assistant Professor of Astronomy B.A , 
University of California, Los Angeles, 1964, M.S. California 
Institute of Technology. 1965; Ph.D., 1968, M.A., University of 
Cambridge (England). 1969. 

Trlpathi, Satlsh K. Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B Sc . Banaras Hindu University, 1968, M Sc, 1970; M.Sc, 
University of Alberta, 1974, M.Sc. University of Toronto, 1976, 
Ph.D., 1979. 

Troth, Eugene W. Professor and Chairman of Music DePaul 
University. 1947; MM.. Illinois Wesleyan University. 1950. 
Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1958 

Trousdale, Marion S. Associate Professor, English B.A, 
University of Michigan. 1951. MA.. University of California 
(Berkeley). 1955. Ph D . University of London (England). 1975 
Trout, David L. Adjunct Professor, Food. Nutrition and In- 
stitutional Administration B.A, Swarthmore College. 1951. MA, 
Duke University. 1954. Ph.D.. 1958. 



Truitt, Anne Associate Professor of Art B.A, Bryn Mawr 
College. 1 943. Institute of Contemporary Art. 1 948-1 949. Dallas 
Museum of Fine Arts. 1950. 

Tsui, Chung Y. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing ME, Hong Kong Technical College. 1953; M.S.. Purdue 
University. 1959; PhD, 1967 

Turek, Ralph Assistant Professor of Music B.S, Duquesne 
University, 1966; M.M .. 1970; DMA., University of Cincinnati, 
1975. 

Tuthill, Dean F. Professor of Agricultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics B.S, Cornell University, 1 949; MS . University of Illinois. 
1954; Ph.D.. 1958. 

Twigg, Bernard A. Professor and Chairman of Horticulture 
B.S., University of Maryland. 1952; M.S., 1955; Ph.D.. 1959. 
Tyler, Bonnie B. Associate Professor. Institute for Child 
Study B.A. DePauw University, 1948; MA , Ohio State Universi- 
ty, 1949; Ph.D.. 1954 

Tyler, Forrest B. Professor of Psychology B.A, Depauw 
University, 1948; MA . Ohio State University, 1950; Ph.D. 1952 
Tyler, Robert W. Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
A.B , Drury College. 1957; MS, Pennsylvania State University, 
1960; Ph.D., 1969. 

Ulmer, Melville J. Professor of Economics B.S, New York 
University. 1937, MA. 1938, PhD, Columbia University. 1948 
Urban, Louise Associate Professor of Music B.A, College of 
Wooster, 1957, MA. Columbia Teachers College, 1959 
Uslaner, Eric M. Associate Professor of Government and 
Politics B.A . Brandeis University. 1968; MA, Indiana Universi- 
ty, 1970; Ph.D., 1973 

Vaccaro, Paul Assistant Professor of Physical Education and 
Secondary Education B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1970. 
M.S., University of Florida. 1973. Ed.D.. 1976. 
Valadez, Joseph J. Assistant Professor of Family and Com- 
munity Development B.A,, Northwestern University, 1971; 
Ph.D.. University of Lancaster, 1978. 

Vandergraft. James S. Associate Professor of Computer 
Science B.S., Stanford University. 1959; M.S., 1963; PhD, 
University of Maryland, 1966 

Vandersall, John H. Professor of Dairy Science B S , Ohio 
State University, 1950; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1959 
VanderVelden, Lee Assistant Professor of Physical Educa- 
tion B.S, University of Wisconsin, 1961; Ph.D.. 1971. 
Van Egmond, Peter Assistant Professor of English B.A . 
Mississippi College, 1959; MA. University of Mississippi, 1961; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1966. 
Van Valkenburg, Shirley D. Assistant Professor of Botany 
B.A, Washington State University. 1948; MS, University of 
Washington, 1968. PhD, 1970 

Vann, Robert Lindtey Assistant Professor of Architecture 
B.A, University of Texas. 1968; Ph.D.. Cornell University. 1976 
Vanneman, Reeve D. Assistant Professor of Sociology A.B 
Cornell University, 1967. PhD. Harvard University. 1975 
Vannoy, Donald Wayne Associate Professor of Civil Engi 
neenng B.S, West Virginia Institute of Technology. 1970; ME 
University of Virginia. 1971; PhD, 1975. 
Vavrichek, Bruce C. Assistant Professor of Economics B.S. 
Michigan State University. 1971; MA. Northwestern University 
1975; PhD, 1976. 

Verhoven, Peter J. Associate Professor of Recreation B.A. 
Moorhead State College, 1963, M.S., Indiana University, 1965 
RE.D, 1969. 

Vermel), Geerat Jacobus Associate Professor of Zoology 
A.B, Princeton University, 1968; Ph.M, Yale University. 1970 
Ph.D., 1971. 

Vernekar, Anandu D. Prolessor of Meteorology B.S , Umver 
sity of Pennsylvania. 1955; B.S, 1956; M.S., 1959; M.S., Umver 
sity of Michigan. 1963, PhD, 1966. 



Vesentini, Edoardo Professor of Mathematics Laurea in 
scienzse matematiche, Universita di Milano. 1950, Libera 
docenza in geometra, Universita di Roma. 1956 
Vigil, Eugene L. Assistant Professor of Botany B.S . Loyola 
University, 1963; MS, University of Iowa, 1965; PhD. 1967 
Vijay, Inder K. Assistant Professor of Dairy Science B.S, 
Punjab University, India, 1961. MS, University of 
Saskatchewan, 1966; PhD. University of California, Davis. 
1971 

Viola, Victor E., Jr. Professor of Chemistry A.B . University of 
Kansas, 1957; Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 1961 
Vltzthum, Richard C. Professor of English B.A, Amherst 
College, 1957; MAT. Harvard University, 1958; Ph.D., Stan- 
ford University, 1963. 

Voll, Mary J. Associate Professor of Microbiology B.A, Mt 
St. Agnes College, 1955; MS, The Johns Hopkins University, 
1961; Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania. 1964. 
Wakefield, John Associate Professor of Music B.M , Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1963, M M . 1964. 

Walker, Richard E. Assistant Professor of Germanic and 
Slavic Languages B.A, West Virginia University, 1966, MA, 
1968; Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1973 
Wallace, James M. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering BCE, Georgia Institute of Technology. 1962; MS, 
1964; Ph.D. University of Oxford, 1969. 
Wallace, Stephen J. Associate Professor of Physics B.S, 
Eng, Case Institute of Technology, 1961, M.S., University of 
Washington, 1969. PhD, 1971 

Walsh, Christopher S. Assistant Professor of Horticulture 
B.A, Middlebury College. 1969; MS, Cornell University. 1977; 
PhD, 1980. 

Walston, William H., Jr. Associate Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering B ME, University of Delaware. 1959; MM E, 
1961. PhD, 1964. 

Walters, William B. Professor of Chemistry B.S, Kansas 
State University. 1960; Ph.D.. University of Illinois. 1964 
Wang, Chlng-Ping S. Assistant Professor of Physics B.S, 
Tunghai University, 1969, MS, Louisiana State University. 
1971. PhD, 1974. 

Wang, Shih-Ho Associate Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing B.S. National Taiwan University, 1967; MS, University of 
California, 1970; PhD, 1971. 

Ward, Gerald M. Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 
DVM, New York State Veterinary College. 1949. M VS. 1968 
Warner, Charles R. Associate Professor of Mathematics and 
Statistics B.A, University of Toronto, 1955; MS, University of 
Rochester, 1957, Ph.D., 1962 

Warren, Donald R. Professor and Chairman of Administra- 
tion, Supervision, and Curriculum B.A, University of Texas, 
1957; Th.M, Harvard University, 1960; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago, 1968. 

Warren, J. Benedict Professor of History B.A, Duns Scotus 
College. 1953; MA. University of Mexico, 1960; PhD, 1963 
Washburn, Wilcomb Adjunct Professor of American Studies 
A.B, Dartmouth College. 1948. PhD, Harvard University. 1955 
Washington, Lawrence Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A, Johns Hopkins University. 1971; M.A, 1971; Ph.D., Prin- 
ceton University, 1974. 

Wasserman, Paul Professor, College of Library and Informa 
tion Services B.B.A, City College of New York. 1948; M.S.L.S. 
Columbia University, 1949; MS, 1950; PhD, University of 
Michigan, 1960 

Weaver, V. Phillips Professor, Early Childhood and Elemen 
tary Education A.B . College of William and Mary, 1951; M.Ed 
Pennsylvania State University, 1956; D.Ed, 1962. 
Weber, Joseph Professor of Physics B S, US Naval Acad 
emy, 1940, Ph.D. Catholic University of America, 1951. 
Weldner, Jerry R. Associate Professor of Geology B.A. 
Miami University. 1960; M S . 1963; PhD, Pennsylvania State 
University. 1968 

Welgl, Gail Assistant Professor of Art B.A, Wayne State 
University, 1962; M.A, University of Michigan. 1966. 
Weil, Raymond R. Assistant Professor of Agronomy B.S , 
Michigan State University, 1971, MS, Purdue University, 1973, 
PhD, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1976 
Welner, John Associate Professor of Chemistry B.S, Penn- 
sylvania State University, 1964, PhD, University of Chicago, 
1970. 

Welner, Ronald M. Associate Professor of Microbiology 
B.S, Brooklyn College. 1964; MS, Long Island University, 
1967; PhD, Iowa State University, 1970. 
Weinsteln, Paul A. Associate Professor of Economics B.A, 
William and Mary College, 1954, M.A, Northwestern University, 
1958; Ph.D., 1961. 

Welser, Mark Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
M.S.. University of Michigan. 1976; Ph.D. 1979 



Weiss, Gene S. Associate Professor of Communication Arts 
and Theatre B A, Brandeis University, 1961; MA, New York 
University, 1965, PhD, Ohio State University, 1970 

Wellisch, Hans Associate Professor, College of Library and 
Information Services MLS. University of Maryland. 1972; PhD, 
1975. 



Westbrook, Franklin Associate Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services; and Counselor, Counseling Center B.S, 
Chicago State University. 1 961 , MS, City College of New York. 
1964. Ed.D.. Indiana University. 1971. 

Westerhout. Gart Adjunct Professor of Physics and Astron- 
omy PhD, University of Leiden, Netherlands, 1958. 
Westhoft, Dennis C. Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S, University of Georgia, 1966; MS, North Carolina State 
University, 1968. Ph.D.. 1970. 

Wexler, Richard Assistant Professor of Music B.Mus . Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 1963; MA, New York University, 1969; 
Ph.D., 1974. 

Whaples, Gene C. Associate Professor of Agricultural and 
Extension Education B.S, University of Connecticut, 1960; 
MS, Kansas State University. 1965, Ph.D.. University of Mary- 
land. 1974. 

Wheatley. John Hunter Associate Professor of Agricultural 
and Extension Education and Secondary Education B.A, Duke 
University. 1963; MAT, 1965, PhD, Ohio State University. 
1972. 

Wheaton, Frederick W. Professor of Agricultural Engineer- 
ing B.S, Michigan State University, 1964; M.S.. 1965; PhD, 
Iowa State University. 1968. 

Wheelock, Arthur K., Jr. Assistant Professor Part-time, Art 
B.A, Williams College, 1965, Ph.D., Harvard University. 1973, 
White, Gregory L. Assistant Professor, Psychology B.A . 
Stanford University, 1971; M.A, University of California (Los 
Angeles), 1973. PhD, 1976. 

White, Marvin Hart Professor of Electrical Engineering 
BSE, University of Michigan, 1960. M.S.. 1961; PhD,, Ohio 
State University. 1969. 

Whlttemore, E. Reed Professor of English B.A , Yale Univer- 
sity. 1941. Litt.D, Carleton College. 1971 
Wickes, William C. Assistant Professor of Physics B.S, 
University of California. 1967; M.A , Princeton University. 1969; 
Ph.D.. 1972 

Widhelm, William B. Associate Professor of Business and 
Management B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1959: 
M.S.E. 1960; MS. 1965; PhD, 1969 
Wiebold, William J. Assistant Professor of Agronomy B.S, 
Iowa State University, 1971; M.S., 1974; PhD, University of 
Georgia, 1978 

Wiedel, Joseph W. Associate Professor of Geography B.A, 
University of Maryland, 1958; M.A, 1963. 
Wiley, Robert C. Professor of Horticulture B.S, University of 
Maryland. 1949; M.S., 1950. PhD, Oregon State University. 
1953 

Wilkenfeld, Jonathan Associate Professor of Government 
and Politics B.S. University of Maryland. 1964; MA, George 
Washington University, 1966, Ph.D., Indiana University, 1969 
Wllkerson, Thomas D. Research Professor, Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics B.S, University of 
Michigan. 1953, M.S.. 1954. PhD, 1962. 
Williams, Aubrey W. Professor of Anthropology B.A , Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1955; M.A, 1957; Ph.D., University of 
Arizona, 1964. 

Williams, David L. Associate Professor of Early Childhood 
and Elementary Education B.S, Bradley University, 1952; 
M.Ed, University of Illinois at Urbana. 1956. Ed.D., 1964. 
Williams, Eleanor Associate Professor, Food. Nutrition and 
Institutional Administration B.S, Texas Woman's University, 
1945, MS, Iowa State University, 1947. PhD , Cornell Universi- 
ty, 1963. 

Williams, Walter F. Professor of Dairy Science B.S.. Univer- 
sity of Missouri. 1951; M.S., 1952, Ph.D.. 1955. 
Williams, William H. Assistant Professor of History B.A, 
Washington & Lee University, 1956; MA, Duke University, 
1960; Ph.D. 1965. 



Wilson, Andrew S. Assistant Professor of Astronomy B.A, 
University of Cambridge. England. 1969; M.A, 1973; Ph.D.. 
1973. 

Wilson, Bruce D. Assistant Professor of Music B.Mus, Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 1960; M Mus, 1964, PhD, 1973. 
Wilson, Gayle L. Associate Professor of English B.A, Wayne 
State University. 1960; M.A, University of Rochester. 1963; 
PhD, 1965 



Zwanzig, Robert W., 41 



Wilson. Leda A. Associate Professor of Family and Commu- 
nity Development BS. Lander College. 1943. MS, University 
of Tennessee. 1950. Ed.D . 1954. 

Wilson, Mark Edward Assistant Professor of Music B.A 
University of California at Los Angeles, 1970. MA . 1972; PhD 
1974 

Wilson, Robert M. Professor of Early Childhood and Ele 
mentary Education BS,, California State College (Pennsylva 
ma). 1950; M.S., University of Pittsburgh. 1956; Ed.D.. 1960 
Wmkeinkemper. Horst E. Associate Professor of Mathe 
matics B A , National University of Mexico. 1963; MA, Pnn 
ceton University. 1965. PhD. 1970 

Wlnton, Calhoun Professor, English A.B . University of the 
South (Sewane). 1948. M A . Vanderbilt University. 1950. M A . 
Princeton University. 1954. Ph.D. 1955 
Wlrth, Willis W. Adiunct Professor of Entomology BS, Iowa 
Stale University. 1940. MS. Louisiana State University. 1947; 
Ph.D.. University of California, Berkeley. 1950 
Wise, Gene Professor of American Studies B A , Hanover 
College. 1958, Ph.D.. Syracuse University. 1963 
Wltczak, Matthew W. Professor of Civil Engineering 
BSCE , Purdue University. 1962; M.S.C.E , 1963; Ph.D. 1969 

Withers, Josephine Associate Professor of Art B.A . Oberlm 
College. 1960. MA. Columbia University. 1965. PhD.. 1971 

Wlttreich, Joseph A. Professor of English Language and 
Literature A.B., University of Louisville. 1961, M A , 1962; Ph.D.. 
Western Reserve University, 1966, 

Wolte, Peter Professor of Mathematics and Statistics BS, 
St Lawrence University, 1959; MS., Northwestern University. 
1961. Ph.D., New York University, 1965. 
Wolken, John D. Assistant Professor. Institute for Urban 
Studies B A,. University of Southern California. 1968; MA.. 

1973. PhD. 1975. 

Wolpert, Scott A. Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.S.. 
Johns Hopkins University, 1972; M.S. Stanford University. 

1974. PhD.. 1976. 

Wolvin, Andrew D. Professor of Communication Arts and 

Theatre BS, University of Nebraska. 1962; MA. 1963, Ph.D.. 

Purdue University. 1968 

Wonnacott, Paul Professor of Economics B.A , University of 

Western Ontario. 1955; M.A.. Princeton University, 1957; Ph.D., 

1959 

Woo, Chlng-Hung Professor of Physics and Astronomy B S . 

Lousiana Technological Institute. 1958. MS, University of 

California, Berkeley, 1959, Ph.D.. 1962 

Wood, Francis E. Associate Professor, Entomology BS , 

University of Missouri. 1958; M.S.. 1962. Ph.D.. University of 

Maryland. 1970. 

Woolpert, Stephen B. Associate Professor. Government 

and Politics B.A., Grmnell College, 1966. M.A., The Johns 

Hopkins University, 1968; PhD, Stanford University, 1977 

Wrenn, Jerry P. Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

BS. East Carolina College. 1961. MS , University of Tennesee, 

1963. PhD., University of Maryland. 1970 



Wright, Kleth C. Associate Professor, College of Library and 
Information Services B.A . Willamette University, 1955; M.L.S , 
Columbia University, 1968. Ph.D.. 1972. 
Wright, Wlnthrop R. Associate Professor of History B.A . 
Swarthmore College. 1958; MA, University of Pennsylvania. 
1960. Ph.D., 1964 

Wu. Chlng-Sheng Research Professor, Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics BS. National Taiwan 
University. 1954. M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1956. 
PhD. Princeton University. 1959 

Wylle, Ann G. Associate Professor of Geology B A., Welles- 
ley College. 1966. Ph.D., Columbia University, 1972. 
Wysong, John W. Professor of Agricultural and Resource 
Economics BS, Cornell University, 1953, M S , University of 
Illinois. 1954. PhD. Cornell University. 1957. 
Yaney, George L. Professor of History B Mgt E , Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute. 1952. MA.. University of Colorado, 1956, 
Ph.D., Princeton University, 1961 

Yang, Grace L. Associate Professor of Mathematics and 
Statistics B.A , National Taiwan University. 1960. MA, Universi- 
ty of California. Berkeley. 1963; Ph D., 1966 
Yang, Jackson C. Professor of Mechanical Engineering BS. 
University of Maryland. 1958; M.A., 1961. PhD., 1963 
Yang, Paul C. Assistant Professor of Mathematics AB. 
University of California. Berkeley. 1969. PhD., 1973 
Yarlan, Richard A. Assistant Professor of Health Education 
BS. Ball State University. 1971; M.S., 1972; Ed S. 1973. PhD. 
University of Maryland. 1976 

Yaramanoglu, Mellh Assistant Professor of Agricultural En- 
gineering BS. Middle East Technical University. 1971, M.S.. 
1973, Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 1978 
Yeh, Kwan-Nan Associate Professor of Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics B.S , National Taiwan University. 1961; M.S.. 
Tulane University, 1965. PhD, University of Georgia, 1970 
Yeni-Komshlan, Grace Associate Professor of Linguistics 
B.A., American University of Beirut, 1957; M.S., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1962; Ph.D.. McGill University. 1965. 
Yff, Joost Acting Chairman of Early Childhood/Elementary 
Education B.S.E.. State College at Fitchburg, 1959; M.A.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1961; Ph.D.. 1965. 
Yodh, Gaurang B. Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.Sc. University of Bombay. 1 948; M.Sc . University of Chicago. 
1951. PhD. 1955 

Yorke, James Alan Research Professor. Institute for Physi- 
cal Science and Technology and Mathematics A.B., Columbia 
University. 1963, Ph.D. University of Maryland. 1966. 
Young, Bobby G. Professor of Microbiology B.A.. Southeast 
Missouri Stale College. 1950, Ph D , The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1965. 

Young, Edgar P. Professor of Animal Science BS, Ohio 
State University. 1954; M.S. 1956; Ph.D.. 1958 
Young, Oran R. Professor, Government and Poltics AB, 
Harvard University. 1962. MA.. Yale University. 1964; PhD. 
1965 



Zagler. Don Bernard Professor of Mathematics B.S Mas 
sachusetts Institute of Technology. 1968; Dipl. Adv.. Oxford 
University. 1969; PhD, 1972, Habitation, Universitat Bonn, 
1975. 

Zajac, Felix E. Ill Associate Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing BEE.. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1962; MS. Stan- 
lord University, 1965. Ph.D.. 1968 

Zakl, Kawthar A. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 8.S., Ain-Syams University. 1962, MS . University of Califor- 
nia. Berkeley. 1966. PhD. 1969 

Zalcman, Lawrence Allen Professor of Mathematics AB, 
Dartmouth College. 1964. PhD. Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1968 

Zanot, Eric J. Assistant Professor of Journalism B.A.. Penn- 
sylvania State University. 1965; M.A., 1970. Ph.D.. University of 
Illinois. 1977. 

Zave, Pamela Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B.A.. Cornell University, 1970; M.S.. University Of Wisconsin. 
1972. PhD, 1976 

Zedek. Michael Professor of Mathematics and Statistics 
M.S. Hebrew University of Jerusalem. 1952. PhD, Harvard 
University. 1956 

Zelkowltz, Marvin Associale Professor of Computer Science 
B.S., Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute. 1967. M.S. Cornell 
University. 1969. Ph.D.. 1971. 

Zllti. Madeline C. Assistant Professor of History AB, Mount 
Holyoke College. 1964, MA. University of Chicago, 1970. 
Ph.D.. 1976 

Zlpoy, David M. Associate Professor of Astronomy B.S . 
University of Minnesota, 1954; Ph.D., 1957. 

Zoller. William H. Professor of Chemistry B.S . University of 
Alaska. 1965. Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
1969. 

Zorn, Bice Sechl Professor of Physics Dottore m Fiscia. 
University of Caglian. 1952 

Zorn, Gus T. Professor of Physics B.S.. Oklahoma Stale 
University. 1948, MS , University of New Mexico. 1953. Ph D . 
University of Padua, 1954 

Zuckerman, Benjamin M. Professor of Astronomy B.S, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1963; MS. 1963. 
Ph.D.. Harvard University, 1968. 

Zwanzig, Robert W.. Research Professor, Institute for Physi- 
cal Science and Technology B S . Brooklyn Polytechnic In- 
stitute. 1948. M.S. University of Southern California. 1950. 
Ph.D., California Institute of Technology. 1952 



42 



Graduate Programs 



Administration, 
Supervision, and 
Curriculum Program 

Professor and Chairman: Warren 
Professors: Anderson, J. P., Anderson, V.E. 
(Emeritus), Berdahl, Berman, Carbone, 
Dudley, McClure, McLoone, Newell, Stephens, 
van Zwoll (Emeritus), Wiggin (Emerita) 
Associate Professors: Clague, Goldman, 
Selden, Splaine 

Assistant Professors: Brand, Clabaugh, 
Intriligator, King (Visiting) 

The Department of Administration, Supervision, 
and Curriculum offers programs of study for the 
M.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., and Ph.D. degrees as well 
as for the Advanced Graduate Specialist certifi- 
cate. Areas of specialization include: adminis- 
tration, supervision, curriculum, adult and higher 
education, and educational technology. Pro- 
grams in all areas are individually designed for 
careers in public or private elementary and 
secondary schools, adult and higher education, 
other education agencies, government agen- 
cies, and non-school educational settings. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Admission at the doctoral level is based upon a 
number of criteria, including grade-point aver- 
age and standardized test scores. Selective 
screening of qualified applicants at the mas- 
ter's, A.G.S., and doctoral levels is necessary in 
terms of limiting enrollment to the available 
faculty resources of the Department. 

A field internship or its equivalency is re- 
quired of all A.G.S. and Ed.D. candidates. This 
internship is performed under faculty supervi- 
sion in schools, colleges or agencies, in roles 
that are consistent with the candidate's pro- 
gram emphasis. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has developed close working 
relationships with area schools, community col- 
leges and education agencies so that they may 
serve as resources for the academic offerings 
on campus. Procedures have been established 
which facilitate the use of these agencies for 
research and field experiences. The Education- 
al Technology Center in the College of Educa- 
tion is used extensively by students in the 
Department, particularly those in curriculum. 

Financial Assistance 

Some Graduate Assistantships are available to 
qualified graduate students. 

Additional Information 

For information and a departmental brochure, 
please write to the Director of the Graduate 
Program. 



Courses 

EDAD 440 Utilization of Educational Media (3) Sur- 
vey of Classroom uses of instructional media. 
Techniques for integrating media into instruction. 
Includes preparation of a unit of instruction utiliz- 
ing professional and teacher produced media. 

EDAD 441 Graphic Materials for Instruction (3) 

Prerequisites: EDAD 440 or consent of instructor. A 
laboratory course which combines graphic and photo- 
graphic processes for education and training pur- 
poses. Techniques include lettering, coloring, trans- 
parencies, illustrations, converting, duplicating trans- 
parent and opaque media. Emphasis is placed on 
appropriate media selection for target audiences. 
Heavy student project orientation. 

EDAD 442 Instructional Media Services (3) Prereq- 
uisites: Teaching experience and EDAD 440, or equiv- 
alent. Procedures for coordinating instructional media 
programs; instructional materials acquisition, storage, 
scheduling, distribution, production, evalution and 
other service responsibilities; instructional materials 
center staff coordination of research, curriculum im- 
provement and faculty development programs. 

EDAD 443 Instructional Television Utilization (3) 

Combining televised lessons, on-campus seminars, 
and related workbook assignments, this course focus- 
es upon planning for the various uses of instructional 
television with students. State, local school unit, 
school, and classroom uses will be illustrated through 
film and studio production. The aspects of producing 
ITV programs are developed through the television 
lessons and 'Hands-on' assignments of the seminars. 

EDAD 444 Programmed Instruction (3) Analysis of 
programmed instruction techniques; selection, utiliza- 
tion and evaluation of existing programs and teaching 
machines; developing learning objectives; writing and 
validating programs. 

EDAD 489 Field Experience in Education (1-4) 

Prerequisites: At least six semester hours in education 
at the University of Maryland plus such other prerequi- 
sites as may be set by the major area in which the 
experience is to be taken. Planned field experience 
may be provided for selected students who have had 
teaching experience and whose application for such 
field experience has been approved by the education 
faculty. Field experience is offered in a given area to 
both major and nonmajor students. NOTE — The total 
number of credits which a student may earn in EDAD 
489, 888, and 889 is limited to a maximum of 20 
semester hours. 

EDAD 494 The Legal Rights and Obligations of 
Teachers (3) and Students Selected state and feder- 
al court decisions, legislation, and executive guidelines 
regulating public education. Speech and other forms of 
expression, privacy, suspensions, expulsions, search 
and seizure, tort liability for negligence (including edu- 
cational malpractice), hiring, promotion, dismissal and 
non-renewal of teachers. No prior legal training re- 
quired. 

EDAD 498 Special Problems in Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Available only to 
mature students who have definite plans for individual 
study of approved problems. 

EDAD 499 Workshops, Clinics, Institutes (1-6) The 

maximum number of credits that may be earned under 
this course symbol toward any degree is six semester 
hours; the symbol may be used two or more times until 
six semester hours have been reached. The following 
type of educational enterprise may be scheduled 
under this course heading: workshops conducted by 
the College of Education (or developed cooperatively 



with other colleges and universities) and not otherwise 
covered in the present course listing; clinical experi- 
ences in pupil-testing centers, reading clinics, speech 
therapy laboratories, and special education centers. 
Institutes developed around specific topics or prob- 
lems and intended for designated groups. 

EDAD 602 The Junior College (3) 

EDAD 603 Problems in Higher Education (3) 

EDAD 605 Administrative Foundations (3) EDAD 
605 is presented as the first of the four courses for 
students majoring in the field of Educational Adminis- 
tration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development. It 
attempts to structure a theoretical and research base 
for the study and practice of administration in the field 
of education by introducing the student to selected 
contributors to administration, and by indicating the 
multidisciplinary nature of administrative study as it 
relates to purpose-determination, policy-definition, and 
task-accomplishment. 

EDAD 606 Administrative Behavior and Organiza 
tional Management (3) A critical analysis of organiza 
tional management (informal and formal dimensions) 
an assessment of the contributions from other fields 
(traditional and emerging) to the study of administra 
five behavior and the governance of organizations, 
and an analysis and assessment of the administrator's 
motivations, perceptions, and sensitivity as determi 
nants of behavior constitute the major units of study for 
EDAD 606. The theoretical and research bases for 
these areas and such related concepts as status, role, 
systems, interpersonal relations, and sensitivity train- 
ing are examined. 

EDAD 607 Administrative Processes (3) EDAD 607 
is designed to develop competence with respect to 
selected administrative process areas. It examines 
efforts to develop theories and models in these areas 
and analyzes research studies and their implications 
for administrative practice. In addition it seeks to 
develop skill in selected process areas through such 
techniques as simulation, role-playing, case analysis, 
and computer-assisted instruction. 

EDAD 608 Administrative Relationships (3) EDAD 
608 is structured to provide the student of educational 
administration with an understanding of the various 
groups and subgroups to which an administrator re- 
lates and to the significance of these relationships for 
leadership behavior. It provides an opportunity to 
examine and analyze significant principles, concepts, 
and issues in the areas of personnel administration, 
public relations, community, state, and federal agen- 
cies. The human relations skills essential to effective 
leadership in these areas constitute the other dimen- 
sion of this course. 

EDAD 611 The Organization and Administration of 
Secondary Schools (3) Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. The work of the secondary school school- 
community relationships, student activities, schedule 
making, and internal financial accounting. 

EDAD 612 School Finance and Business Adminis- 
tration (3) An introduction to principles and practices 
in the administration of the public school finance 
activity. Sources of tax revenue, the budget, and the 
function of finance in the educational program are 
considered. 

EDAD 616 Public School Supervision (3) The nature 
and functions of supervision; various supervisory tech- 
niques and procedures; human relationship factors; 
and personal qualities for supervision. 

EDAD 617 Administration and Supervision In Ele- 
mentary Schools (3) Problems in administering ele- 
mentary schools and improving instruction. 



Aerospace Engineering Program 43 



EDAD 620 General Systems Theory I (3) Prerequi- 
site: EDAD 607 or permission of instructor Theory of 
complex systems, principles and mechanisms of regu- 
lation, control, and adaptation in physical, biological, 
social, and symbolic systems Equi-Finality. evolution, 
feedback, hierarchy theory, homeostasis, requisite va- 
riety, and self-organization Applications to policy mak- 
ing, planning, and management in educational or- 
ganizations. 

EDAD 621 General Systems Theory II (3) Prerequi- 
site EDAD 620 or permission of instructor. General 
systems theory applied to actual organizational prob- 
lems. Field work and relevant social science literature 
for the definition of one or more key. long-range 
problems and the development of plans to solve the 
problems. 

EDAD 630 Elementary and Secondary School Law 

(3) Selected court opinions, legislation and executive 
guidelines regulating elementary and secondary edu- 
cation. Equal educational opportunity, first and fourth 
amendment rights of students and teachers, tori liabili- 
ty for negligence, equal protection in hiring, firing and 
non-renewal of teachers, individual and institutional 
liability for federal civil rights violations and common 
law forts. No prior legal training required. 

EDAD 631 Higher Education Law (3) Selected court 
opinions, legislation and executive guidelines regulat- 
ing higher education. First and fourth amendment 
rights of students and faculty, procedural due process, 
equal educational opportunity, equal protection in hir- 
ing, promotion, non-renewal and salaries, individual 
and institutional liability for civil rights violations and 
common law torts No prior legal training required 

EDAD 632 Collective Bargaining In Elementary- 
Secondary Education (3) Evolution and impact of 
collective bargaining in elementary and secondary 
education. Impact of collective bargaining on the edu- 
cational power structure, third-party community in- 
terests and educational policy making. 

EDAD 633 Collective Bargaining In Higher Educa- 
tion (3) Legal and educational policy of collective 
bargaining in higher education. Nature and scope of 
the bargaining process, impact of collective bargaining 
on academic governance, student interests, personnel 
decisions, and grievance mechanisms. 

EDAD 634 The School Curriculum (2-3) A founda- 
tions course embracing the curriculum as a whole from 
early childhood through adolescence, including a re- 
view of historical developments, an analysis of condi- 
tions aflecting curriculum change, an examination of 
issues in curriculum making, and a consideration of 
current trends in curriculum design. 

EDAD 635 Principles of Curriculum Development 

(3) Curriculum planning, improvement, and evaluation 
in the schools; principles for the selection and organi- 
zation of the content and learning experiences; ways 
of working in classroom and school on curriculum 
improvement. 

EDAD 636 Communication and the School Curricu- 
lum (3) Curriculum development based on communi- 
cation as the maior vehicle for describing the learner's 
interactions with persons, knowledge, and materials in 
the classroom and school environment. (Also listed as 
EDEL 636) 

EDAD 641 Selection and Evaluation of Instruc- 
tional Media (3) Development of criteria for selection 
and evaluation of instructional materials for classroom, 
school and system use; includes measures of reada- 
bility, listenability, visual difficulty, and interest level. 

EDAD 642 Mediated Instructional Systems (3) Pre- 
requisite; EDAD 440 and EDAD 444, Survey of innova- 
tive instructional systems. Comparison of effective- 
ness of alternate teaching-learning systems. System 
design to improve teaching-learning efficiency through 
instructional media. 

EDAD 644 Practicum in Instructional Systems (2-6) 

Prerequisite: EDAD 444 or EDAD 642 Design and 
development of experimental instructional materials or 
systems to solve a specific instructional problem in the 
field. 

EDAD 679 Seminar in Educational Administration 
and Supervision (2-4) Prerequisite At least four 
hours in educational administration and supervision or 
consent of instructor. A student may register for two 
hours and may take the seminar a second time for an 
additional two hours. 



EDAD 718 School Surveys (2-6) Prerequisite: Con- 
sent of instructor. Includes study of school surveys 
with emphasis on problems of school organization and 
administration, finance and school plant planning. 
Field work in school surveys is required. 

EDAD 723 The Human Dimension In Administration 

(3) Prerequisite: EDAD 605 or consent of instructor. 
Theory, research findings, and laboratory experiences 
in human skills in organizations. Goal setting, commu- 
nication, conflict, decision making evaluation, and con- 
sultant intervention. 

EDAD 724 Group Relationships in Administration 

(3) Prerequisite: EDAD 605 or consent of instructor 
Group relationships and relevant administrative skills 
in educational settings. The role of authority, group 
maturation, group member roles, group decision mak- 
ing, and intra- and inter-group conflict. 

EDAD 726 Child Accounting (2) An inquiry into the 
record keeping activities of the school system, includ- 
ing an examination of the marking system. 

EDAD 727 Public School Personnel Administration 

(3) A comparison of practices with principles governing 
the satisfaction of school personnel needs, including a 
study of tenure, salary schedules, supervision, re- 
wards, and other benefits. 

EDAD 738 Scholarly Thought and Contemporary 
Curriculum (1-3) Current curricular trends, issues, 
theory, and research in the light of past curricular and 
social thought. Linguistic analysis, analysis of thinking, 
disciplines as modes of inquiry, influence of romantic 
thought, influence of the industrial model, school as 
transformer of society, and political ideologies. May be 
repeated to a maximum of six credits. 

EDAD 750 Organization and Administration of 
Teacher Education (3) Teacher education today 
Current patterns and significant emerging changes, 
particularly those involving teachers and schools. 
Deals with selection, curriculum, research, accredition, 
and institution-school relationships. 

EDAD 798 Special Problems in Education (1-6) 

Master's, AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to 
pursue special research problems under the direction 
of their advisors may register for credit under this 
number. 

EDAD 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) Registra- 
tion required to the extent of six hours for master's 
thesis. 

EDAD 802 Curriculum in Higher Education (3) An 

analysis of research in curriculum and of conditions 
affecting curriculum change, with examination of is- 
sues in curriculum making based upon the history of 
higher education curriculum development. 

EDAD 803 Organization and Administration of 
Higher Education (3) Organization and administration 
of higher education at the local, state, and federal 
levels; and an analysis of administrative relationships 
and functions and their effects in curriculum and 
instruction. 

EDAD 805 College Teaching (3) Various methods of 
college instruction analyzed in relation to the curricu- 
lum and psychological basis. These would include the 
case study method, the demonstration method, the 
lecture method, the recitation method, teaching ma- 
chines, teaching by television, and other teaching aids 

EDAD 806 Seminar In Problems of Higher Educa- 
tion (3) Contemporary issues and problems in post- 
secondary education relevant to the interests of both 
administrators and college/university faculty mem- 
bers. Problems of individual interest. Preparation of 
publishable papers on post-secondary education top- 
ics. 
EDAD 837 Curriculum Theory and Research (2) 

EDAD 857 Administration of Adult and Continuing 
Education (3) An overview of the field of Adult Con- 
tinuing Education focusing on the administration of 
institutions and organizations that provide both credit 
and non-credit educational experiences for adult lear- 
ners. Historical Development of Adult Education in 
America. Concepts that have molded the adult educa- 
tion movement, and issues in financing and delivering 
adult education programs. 

EDAD 859 Seminar In Adult Education (3) 

EDAD 861 Seminar: Research in School Effective- 
ness (3) Prerequisite: EDAD 605, 606, 607. 608, and 



consent of instructor. Examination of organiza- 
tional effectiveness and the methodologies for 
assessing organizational effectiveness. An indi- 
vidual research project is required. 

EDAD 862 Seminar: Theoretical Basis of Adminis- 
trative Behavior (3) Prerequisite: EDAD 605. 606, 
607. 608. and consent of instructor. Study of adminis- 
trative behavior in educational institutions Develop- 
ment of a research design for the study of administra- 
tive behavior in one educational institution 

EDAD 865 Doctoral Research Seminar (3) Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. Development of the disser- 
tation proposal Definition of the problem, develop- 
ment of research design, design of data collection 
processes, and discussion of writing of the disserta- 
tion. 

EDAD 879 Seminar in Teacher Education (3-6) A 

problem seminar in teacher education. A maximum of 
six hours may be earned in this course. 

EDAD 888 Apprenticeship in Education (1-8) Ap- 
prenticeships in the major area of study are available 
to selected students whose application for an ap- 
prenticeship has been approved by the Education 
faculty. Each apprentice is assigned to work for at 
least a semester full-time or the equivalent with an 
appropriate staff member of a cooperating school, 
school system, or educational institution or agency 
The sponsor of the apprentice maintains a close 
working relationship with the apprentice and the other 
persons involved Prerequisites: Teaching experience, 
a master's degree in Education, and at least six 
semester hours in Education at the University of Mary- 
land. NOTE: The total number of credits which a 
student may earn in EDAD 489. 888, and 889 is limited 
to a maximum of twenty (20) semester hours 

EDAD 889 Internship In Education (3-8) Internships 
in the maior area of study are available to selected 
students who have teaching experience The following 
groups of students are eligible: (A) any student who 
has been advanced to candidacy for the doctor's 
degree; and (B) any student who receives special 
approval by the Education faculty for an internship, 
provided that prior to taking an internship, such stu- 
dent shall have completed at least 60 semester hours 
of graduate work, including at least six semester hours 
in Education at the University of Maryland Each intern 
is assigned to work on a full-time basis for al least a 
semester with an appropnate staff member in a 
cooperating school, school system, or educational 
institution or agency. The internship must be taken in a 
school situation different from the one where the 
student is regularly employed. The intern's sponsor 
maintains a close working relationship with the intern 
and the other persons involved NOTE: The total 
number of credits which a student may earn in EDAD 
489. 888. and 889 is limited to a maximum of twenty 
(20) semester hours. 

EDAD 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 
Registration required to the extent of 6-9 hours for an 
Ed.D Project and 12-18 hours for a PhD desserta- 
tion. 



Aerospace Engineering 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Gessow 
Professors: Anderson, Corning, Donaldson, 
Melnik, Pai, Plotkin 
Associate Professors: Barlow, Jones 
Assistant Professors. Lee, Winklemann 
Lecturers: Billlg, Case, Chander. Fleig, Griffen, 
Krone, Waltrup 

The Aerospace Engineering Department offers 
a broad program of graduate studies leading to 
the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy. The curricula for these degrees are 
adapted to meet the objectives and background 
of the individual student and are planned by the 
student and his advisor. Applications for admis- 
sion are invited from those holding a B.S. de- 
gree in engineering, the physical sciences, and 
mathematics. Aerodynamics and Propulsion, 



44 Aerospace Engineering Program 



Structural Mechanics, and Flight Dynamics are 
the major areas of specialization available to 
graduate students. Within these areas of spe- 
cialization, the student can tailor programs such 
as Computational Mechanics, and High Tem- 
perature Gas Dynamics. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Two master's degree options are available; 
thesis and non-thesis. No special departmental 
requirements are imposed beyond the Gradu- 
ate School requirements. 

For the Doctor of Philosophy degree, the 
Aerospace Engineering Department requires a 
minimum of 48 semester hours of course-work 
beyond the B.S. including (1) not less than 18 
hours within one departmental area of speciali- 
zation, (2) not less than 9 hours from among the 
other areas of specialization in the department, 
(3) not less than 12 hours in courses which 
emphasize the physical sciences or mathemat- 
ics rather than their applications. The total in (2) 
plus that in (3) must be at least 24 hours of 
which no more than 6 are less than 600 level. 
Written and oral comprehensive examinations 
are also required. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The research facilities of the department are 
available to the graduate student. The aerody- 
namic facilities include two subsonic, two super- 
sonic, a hypersonic wind tunnel, a GAT-1 flight 
simulator, and a F-101 flight simulator. Facili- 
ties are also available for static and vibration 
testing of structures. An assortment of comput- 
ers including a UNIVAC 1140 and a UNIVAC 
1 108 complemented by remote access units on 
a time-sharing basis are available. The Depart- 
ment provides special facilities for the use of 
students which include remote terminals and 
mini-computers. Under special circumstances, 
thesis research may be accomplished in off- 
campus research facilities. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of graduate assistantships and fel- 
lowships are available for financial assistance. 

Courses 

ENAE 401 Aerospace Laboratory II (2) Prerequi- 
sites: ENAE 305 and ENAE 345. Corequisites: ENAE 
452 and ENAE 471. Application of fundamental meas- 
urement techniques to experiments in Aerospace En- 
gineering, structural, aerodynamic, and propulsion 
tests, correlation of theory with experimental results. 
ENAE 402 Aerospace Laboratory III (1) Prerequi- 
sites: ENAE 305 and ENAE 345. Corequisites: ENAE 
452. ENAE 471, and ENAE 475. Application of funda- 
mental measurement techniques to experiments in 
aerospace engineering, structural, aerodynamic, flight 
simulation, and heat transfer tests. Correlation of theo- 
ry with experimental results. 

ENAE 411 Aircraft Design (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 
345. ENAE 451, and ENAE 371. Theory, background 
and methods of airplane design, subsonic and super- 
sonic. 

ENAE 412 Design of Aerospace Vehicles (3) Pre- 
requisites: ENAE 345 and ENAE 371, Theory, back- 
ground and methods of space vehicle design for 
manned orbiting vehicles, manned lunar and planetary 
landing systems. 

ENAE 415 Computer-Aided Structural Design Anal- 
ysis (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 452 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Introduction to structural design concepts and 
analysis techniques. Introduction to computer soft- 
ware for structural analysis which is utilized to verify 
exact solutions and perform parametric design studies 
of aerospace structures Not open to students who 
have earned credit in ENAE 431. 



ENAE 445 Stability and Control of Aerospace Vehi- 
cles (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 345 and ENAE 371. 
Stability, control and miscellaneous topics in dynam- 
ics. 

ENAE 451 Flight Structures I— Introduction to 
Solid Mechanics (4) Prerequisite: ENES 220. An 
introduction to the analysis of aircraft structural mem- 
bers. Introduction to theory of of elasticity, mechanical 
behavior of materials, thermal effects, finite-difference 
approximations, virtual work, variational and energy 
principles for static systems. 
ENAE 452 Flight Structures II: Structural Elements 
(3) Prerequisite: ENAE 451 . Application of variational 
and energy principles to analysis of elastic bodies; 
stresses and deflections of beams including effects of 
non — principal axes, non — homogeneity, and thermal 
gradients; differential equations of beams, bars, and 
cables. Stresses and deflections of torsional mem- 
bers, stresses due to shear. Deflection analysis of 
structures. 

ENAE 453 Matrix Methods in Computational Me- 
chanics (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 452 or consent of 
instructor. Introduction to the concepts of computa- 
tional analysis of continuous media by use of matrix 
methods. Foundation for use of finite elements in any 
field of continuum mechanics, with emphasis on the 
use of the displacement method to solve thermal and 
structural problems. 

ENAE 457 Flight Structures III (3) Prerequisite: 
ENAE 452 or equivalent. An advanced undergraduate 
course dealing with the theory and analysis of the 
structures of flight vehicles. Stresses due to shear, 
indeterminate structures, plate theory, buckling and 
failure of columns and plates. 
ENAE 461 Flight Propulsion I (3) Prerequisites: 
ENME 216 and ENAE 471. Operating principles of 
piston, turbojet, tuboprop, ramjet and rocket engines, 
thermodynamic cycle analysis and engine perform- 
ance, aerothermochemistry of combustion, fuels, and 
propellants. 

ENAE 462 Flight Propulsion II (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 
461. Advanced and current topics in flight propulsion. 

ENAE 471 Aerodynamics II (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 
371 and ENME 216. Elements of compressible flow 
with applications to aerospace engineering problems. 

ENAE 472 Aerodynamics III (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 
371. Theory of the flow of an incompressible fluid. 

ENAE 473 Aerodynamics of High-Speed Flight (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 472 or equivalent. An advanced 
course dealing with aerodynamic problems of flight at 
supersonic and hypersonic velocities. Unified hyper- 
sonic and supersonic small disturbance theories, real 
gas effects, aerodynamic heating and mass transfer 
with applications to hypersonic flight and re-entry. 
ENAE 475 Viscous Flow and Aerodynamic Heating 
(3) Prerequisites: ENAE 371, ENAE 471, and ENME 
216. Fundamental aspects of viscous flow. Navier- 
Stokes equations, similarity, boundary layer equations; 
laminar, transitional and turbulent incompressible 
flows on airfoils, thermal boundary layers and convec- 
tive heat transfer; conduction through solids, introduc- 
tion to radiative heat transfer. 
ENAE 488 Topics in Aerospace Engineering (1-4) 
Technical elective taken with the permission of the 
student's advisor and instructor. Lecture and con- 
ference courses designed to extend the student's 
understanding of aerospace engineering. Current top- 
ics are emphasized. 

ENAE 499 Elective Research (1-3) May be repeated 
to a maximum of three credits. Elective for seniors in 
Aerospace Engineering with permission of the stu- 
dent's advisor and the instructor. Original research 
projects terminating in a a written report. 
ENAE 640 Flight Mechanics I (3) Prerequisites: 
ENAE 445 or consent of instructor. Studies in the 
dynamics and control of flight vehicles. Fundamentals 
of the dynamics of rigid and non-rigid bodies and their 
motion under the influence of aerodynamic and gravi- 
tational forces. 

ENAE 641 Flight Mechanics II (3) Prerequisites: 
ENAE 640 or consent of instructor. A continuation 
ENAE 646 Helicopter Theory I (3) Prerequisites 
ENAE 461 or consent of instructor. Theories of rotor 
aerodynamics in axial and nonaxial flight, dynamics of 



rotor blades, helicopter performance, stability, control, 
and current methods of helicopter dynamic analysis. 
Development of a digital program for dynamic simula- 
tion of helicopter flight. 

ENAE 647 Helicopter Theory II (3) Prerequisites: 
ENAE 646 or consent of instructor. A continuation of 
ENAE 646. 

ENAE 650 Variational Methods in Structural Me- 
chanics (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 452 or equivalent. 
Review of theory of linear elasticity with introduction to 
cartesian tensors; application of calculus of variations 
and variational principles of elasticity; Castigliano's 
theorems; applications to aerospace structures. 
ENAE 652 Finite Element Method in Engineering (3) 
Prerequisite: ENAE 453 and ENAE 650, or consent of 
instructor. Development of finite element representa- 
tion of continua using galerkin and variational tech- 
niques. Derivation of shell elements and parametric 
representation of two and three dimensional elements. 
Application to aerospace structures, fluids and diffu- 
sion processes. 

ENAE 653 Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of 
Continua (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 652 Finite element 
formulation of nonlinear and time dependent pro- 
cesses. Introduction to tensors, nonlinear elasticity, 
plasticity and creep. Application to nonlinear continua 
including aerospace structures, shells, radiation heat 
transfer, creep. 

ENAE 655 Structural Dynamics I (3) Prerequisites: 
MATH 246 and ENAE 452 or equivalents: or consent 
of instructor. Advanced principles of dynamics neces- 
sary for structural analysis; solutions of eigenvalue 
problems for discrete and continuous elastic systems, 
solutions to forced response boundary value problems 
by direct, modal, and transform methods. 
ENAE 656 Structural Dynamics II (3) Prerequisite: 
ENAE 655 or consent of instructor. Topics in 
aeroelasticity: wing divergence; aileron reversal; flexi- 
bility effects on aircraft stability derivatives; wing, em- 
pennage and aircraft flutter; aircraft gust response. 

ENAE 657 Theory of Structural Stability (3) Prereq- 
uisite: ENAE 451 or equivalent. Static and dynamic 
stability of structural systems. Classification of leading 
systems: linear and nonlinear post — buckling behavior. 
Perfect and imperfect system behavior. Buckling and 
failure of columns and plates. 
ENAE 661 Advanced Propulsion (3) Prerequisites: 
ENAE 461, 462. Special problems of thermodynamics 
and dynamics of aircraft power plants; jet, rocket and 
ramjet engines; plasma, ion and nuclear propulsion for 
space vehicles. 

ENAE 662 Advanced Propulsion (3) Prerequisites: 
ENAE 461, 462. Special problems of thermodynamics 
and dynamics of aircraft power plants; jet, rocket and 
ramjet engines; plasma, ion and nuclear propulsion for 
space vehicles. 

ENAE 671 Aerodynamics of Incompressible Fluids 
(3) Prerequisite: MATH 463 or permission of instructor. 
Fundamental equations in fluid mechanics, irrotational 
motion, circulation theory of lift, thin airfoil theory, 
lifting line theory, wind tunnel corrections, perturbation 
methods. 

ENAE 672 Aerodynamics of Incompressible Fluids 
(3) Prerequisite: MATH 463 or permission of instructor. 
Fundamental equations in fluid mechanics, irrotational 
motion, circulation theory of lift, thin airfoil theory, 
lifting line theory, wind tunnel corrections, perturbation 
methods. 

ENAE 673 Aerodynamics of Compressible Fluids 
(3) Prerequisite: ENAE 472 or permission of instructor. 
One dimensional flow of a perfect compressible fluid. 
Shock waves. Two — dimensional linearized theory of 
compressible flow. Two — dimensional transonic and 
hypersonic flows. Exact solutions of two — dimensional 
isotropic flow. Linearized theory of three — dimensional 
potetial flow. Exact solution of axially symmetrical 
potential flow. One-dimensional flow with friction and 
heat addition. 

ENAE 674 Aerodynamics of Compressible Fluids 
(3) Prerequisite: ENAE 472 or permission of instructor. 
One dimensional flow of a perfect compressible fluid. 
Shock waves. Two — dimensional linearized theory of 
compressible flow. Two — dimensional transonic and 
hypersonic flows. Exact solutions of two — dimensional 
isotropic flow. Linearized theory of three — dimensional 



Agricultural and Resource Economics Program 45 



potetial How. Exact solution of axially symmetrical 
potential (low. One — dimensional flow with friction and 
heat addition. 

ENAE 675 Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids (3) 

Derivation of Navrer Stokes equations, some exact 
solutions: boundary layer equations. Laminar flow- 
simiiar solutions, compressibility, transformations, an- 
alytic approximations, numerical methods, stability and 
transition of turbulent flow Turbulent flow-isotropic 
turbulence, boundary layer flows, free mixing flows 

ENAE 676 Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids (3) 

Derivation of Navier Stokes equations, some exact 
solutions: boundary layer equations Laminar flow- 
similar solutions, compressibility, transformations, an- 
alytic approximations, numerical methods, stability and 
transition to turbulent flow. Turbulent flow-istropic tur- 
bulence, boundary layer flows, free mixing flows. 

ENAE 686 Seminar (1-3) 

ENAE 757 Advanced Structural Dynamics (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENAE 655 or equivalent. Fundamentals of 
probability theory pertinent to random vibrations, in- 
cluding correlation functions, and spectral densities; 
example random processes; response of single de- 
gree and multidegree of freedom systems. 

ENAE 788 Selected Topics in Aerospace Engineer- 
ing (1-3) 

ENAE 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
ENAE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Agricultural and 
Extension Education 
Program 

Chairman: Nelson 

Professor: Longest 

Associate Professors: Seibel, Whaples, 

Wheatley, Wright 

Assistant Professors: Cooper, Ewert, Klavon, 

Glee 

As a multidisciplinary department of several 
educational and social science specialities, the 
Department of Agricultural and Extension Edu- 
cation services the academic and continuing 
education needs and interests of the Coopera- 
tive Extension Service, teachers of agriculture 
and professionals involved in continuing educa- 
tion, community development, and environmen- 
tal education. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

The Master of Science and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy degree and the Advanced Graduate Spe- 
cialist Certificate (requiring 30 credits beyond 
the master's degree) may be obtained in op- 
tions in Agricultural Education, Environmental 
Education, Extension and Continuing Educa- 
tion, and Community Development. Specializa- 
tion options in Agricultural Education include 
teacher education, research and administration 
and supervision. Specialization options under 
Extension and Continuing Education include 
staff development, program development, ad- 
ministration and supervision, and continuing ed- 
ucation. The multidisciplinary Community De- 
velopment program specialties include various 
social science disciplines with research, teach- 
ing, and extension functions; human and or- 
ganizational planning and development; and 
public affairs education. 

In the Master of Science programs both 
thesis and non-thesis options are available. 
Applicants for the Master of Science program 
must present transcripts and recommendations 
for evaluation. 

No specific number of credits is required 
for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Each stu- 



dent's program is planned by his committee 
according to his previous education and experi- 
ence, special interests and needs, and profes- 
sional plans. No foreign language is required 
but is encouraged for those interested in inter- 
national development areas. Students are en- 
couraged to develop research techniques 
through specific courses and participation in 
Department research programs. 

Applicants should present results of the 
Miller Analogies and/or GRE tests with their 
applications for admission, along with recom- 
mendations from individuals competent to eval- 
uate academic strengths of the applicant. 

Courses 

RLED 423 Extension Communications (3) An intro- 
duction to communications in teaching and within an 
organization, including barriers to communication, the 
diffusion process and the application of communica- 
tion principles person to person, with groups and 
through mass media. 

RLED 426 Development and Management of Ex- 
tension Youth Programs (3) Designed for present 
and prospective state leaders of extension youth pro- 
grams. Program development, principles of program 
management, leadership development and counsel- 
ing; science, career selection and citizenship in youth 
programs, field experience in working with low income 
families' youth, urban work. 

RLED 427 Group Dynamics in Continuing and Ex- 
tension Education (3) Concepts involved in working 
with groups planning extension and continuing educa- 
tion programs Analysis of group behavior and group 
dynamics related to small groups and development of 
a competence in the selection of appropriate methods 
and techniques. 

RLED 464 Rural Life in Modern Society (3) Examina- 
tion of the many aspects of rural life that affect and are 
affected by changes in technical, natural and human 
resources. Emphasis is placed on the role which 
diverse organizations, agencies and institutions play in 
the education and adjustment of rural people to the 
demands of modern society. 

RLED 466 Rural Poverty in an Affluent Society (3) 

Topics examined include conditions under which peo- 
ple in poverty exist, factors giving rise to such condi- 
tions, problems faced by the rural poor, and the kinds 
of assistance they need to rise out of poverty Topics 
and issues are examined in the context of rural-urban 
interrelationships and their effects on rural poverty. 
Special attention is given to past and present pro- 
grams designed to alleviate poverty and to considera- 
tions and recommendations for future action. 

RLED 487 Conservation of Natural Resources (3) 

Designed primarily for teachers. Study of state's natu- 
ral resources — soil, water, fisheries, wildlife, forests, 
and minerals — natural resources problems and prac- 
tices. Extensive field study. Concentration on subject 
matter. Taken concurrently with RLED 497 in summer 
season. 

RLED 488 Critique in Rural Education (1) Current 
problems and trends in rural education. 

RLED 489 Critique in Rural Education (1) Current 
problems and trends in rural education. 

RLED 497 Conservation of Natural Resources (3) 

Designed primarily for teachers. Study of state's natu- 
ral resources — soil, water, fisheries, wildlife, forests, 
and minerals— natural resources problems and prac- 
tices. Extensive field study. Methods of teaching con- 
servation included Taken concurrently with RLED 487 
in summer season. 

RLED 499 Special Problems (1-3) Prerequisite: Staff 
approval 

RLED 606 Program Planning and Evaluation in 
Agricultural Education (2-3) Second semester Anal- 
ysis of community agricultural education needs, selec- 
tion and organization of course content, criteria and 
procedures for evaluating programs. 

RLED 626 Program Development In Extension Ed- 
ucation (3) Concepts in program planning and devel- 
opment A conceptual approach to a tested framework 
for programming Study and analysis of program de- 
sign and implimentation in the extension service. 



RLED 627 Program Evaluation in Adult and Con- 
tinuing Education (3) Prerequisite RLED 626 or 
consent of instructor An analysis of program evalua- 
tion concepts as they relate specifically to adult con- 
tinuing education Program evaluation concepts, is- 
sues and problems with emphasis on the use of 
evaluation procedures 

RLED 628 Seminar in Program Planning (1-5) The 
student assists in the development of an educational 
program in an institutional or community setting He 
also develops an individualized unit of study applicable 
to the program Seminar sessions are based on the 
actual problems of diagnosing needs, planning, con- 
ducting, and evaluating programs Repeatable to a 
maximum of five credits. 

RLED 630 Teaching-Learning in Adult and Continu- 
ing Education (3) The teaching/learning process in 
adult continuing education. Instructional techniques 
and methodologies appropriate for adults. The curricu- 
lum development process. Issues and priorities m adult 
continuing education. 

RLED 642 Continuing Education in Extension (3) 

Studies the process through which adults have and 
use opportunities to learn systematically under the 
guidance of an agent, teacher or leader. A variety of 
program areas will be reviewed giving the student an 
opportunity to plan, conduct and evaluate learning 
activities for adults. 

RLED 661 Rural Community Analysis (3) First se- 
mester. Analysis of structure and function of rural 
society and application of social understandings to 
educational processes 

RLED 663 Developing Rural Leadership (2-3) First 
semester Theories of leadership are emphasized 
Techniques of identifying formal and informal leaders 
and the development of rural lay leaders. 

RLED 691 Research Methods in Rural Education 
(2-3) First semester The scientific method, problem 
identification, survey of research literature, prepanng 
research plans, design of studies, expenmentation. 
analysis of data and thesis writing 

RLED 699 Special Problems (1-3) Prerequisite: Ap- 
proval of staff 

RLED 707 Supervision of Student Teaching (1) 

Summer session Identification of experiences and 
activities in an effective student teaching program, 
responsibilities and duties of supervising teachers, and 
evaluation of student teaching. 

RLED 789 Special Topics (1-3) May be repeated to a 
maximum of nine credits provided content is different. 

RLED 798 Seminar in Rural Education (1-3) Prob- 
lems in the organization, administration, and supervi- 
sion of the several agencies of rural and/or vocational 
education. Repeatable to a maximum of eight semes- 
ter credits 

RLED 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

RLED 882 Agricultural College Instruction (1) 

RLED 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Agricultural and 
Resource Economics 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Norton 

Professors: Bender. Cain. Foster. Ishee, 

Lessley. Moore, Smith, Stevens, Tuthill, 

Wysong 

Associate Professors: Hardie, Lawrence. 

McConnell 

Assistant Professors: Chambers. Pnndle. 

Strand 

The Department of Agricultural and Resource 
Economics offers a course of study leading to 
the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy. The graduate program prepares 
students through courses in traditional subject 
matter areas, research expenences designed to 



46 Agricultural and Resource Economics Program 



give competency in scientific methodology, and 
seminar and discussion opportunities. 

The Department provides two areas of 
specialization, agricultural economics and re- 
source economics. Areas of study and research 
in agricultural economics include agricultural 
development, international trade, agricultural 
marketing, farm management and production 
economics, agricultural policy and econome- 
trics. Resource economics areas cover land 
use, marine resources, water resources, and 
community and resource development. Both 
areas of specialization integrate opportunity for 
study and research from a variety of disciplines 
related to agricultural and resource economics. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Thesis and non-thesis options are available for 
the Master of Science degree in both areas of 
specialization. The thesis option requires a mini- 
mum of 24 hours course work and six hours of 
thesis. The final examination is oral, takes place 
after completion of the thesis and is primarily a 
defense of the thesis. The non-thesis option 
requires 33 hours of course work, including a 
scholarly paper. There is a final comprehensive 
written examination for the non-thesis option. 
The examination is primarily concerned with 
course work taken during the program. 

Students with a bachelor's degree general- 
ly enter the master's program before applying 
for the doctoral program. A minimum of 48 
hours of course work beyond the bachelor's 
degree and 12 hours of dissertation research 
are required for the Ph.D. degree. Qualifying 
examinations are administered on completion 
of core course requirements, and written and 
oral comprehensive examinations are held 
when course work has been completed. An oral 
dissertation defense is also required. 

There is no foreign language requirement 
for any graduate degree. The time required to 
complete a master's degree is generally two 
years, although it can be completed in 18 
months of concentrated effort. The Ph.D. adds 
a minimum of two years beyond the Master's 
program. The Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) Aptitude Test scores are required with 
the application for admission. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department actively employs the resources 
of many state, federal, and international agen- 
cies unique to the Washington, DC. area to 
offer experience from the world of government 
and business. The Library of Congress in Wash- 
ington and the National Agricultural Library in 
Beltsville (just north of the campus) enhance 
teaching and research efforts. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate assistantships are offered to qualified 
applicants on the basis of past academic per- 
formance and availability of funds. A large por- 
tion of the full-time students in the Department 
hold assistantships or some other form of finan- 
cial aid. Part-time and summer work is often 
available for students not receiving financial aid. 

Additional Information 

A booklet, Curriculum, of the Department de- 
scribes undergraduate and graduate programs, 
and gives a description of all courses given by 
the Department. DARE Policy Handbook for the 
Graduate Program provides course require- 
ments, examination procedures and descriptive 
material on M.S. and Ph.D. programs in both 



areas of specialization. For more specific infor- 
mation, contact: 

Dr. B.V. Lessley 

Graduate Coordinator 

Department of Agricultural and Resource 
Economics 

Courses 

AREC 404 Prices of Agricultural Products (3) An 

introduction to agricultural price behavior. Emphasis is 
placed on the use of price information in the decision- 
making process, the relation of supply and demand in 
determining agricultural prices, and the relation of 
prices to grade, time, location, and stages of process- 
ing in the marketing system. The course includes 
elementary methods of price analysis, the concept of 
parity and the role of price support programs in agricul- 
tural decisions. 

AREC 406 Farm Management (3) The organization 
and operation of the farm business to obtain an 
income consistent with family resources and objec- 
tives. Principles of production economics and other 
related fields are applied to the individual farm busi- 
ness. Laboratory period will be largely devoted to field 
trips and other practical exercises. 

AREC 407 Financial Analysis of the Farm Business 

(3) Application of economic principles to develop crite- 
ria for a sound farm business, including credit source 
and use, preparing and filing income tax returns, 
methods of appraising farm properties, the summary 
and analysis of farm records, leading to effective 
control and profitable operation of the farm business. 

AREC 410 Horse Industry Economics (3) Prerequi- 
site: ANSC 230 and 232. An introduction to the eco- 
nomic forces affecting the horse industry and to the 
economic tools required by horse farm managers, 
trainers, and others in the industry. 

AREC 414 Introduction to Agricultural Business 
Management (3) The different forms of businesses 
are investigated. Management functions, business in- 
dicators, measures of performance, and operational 
analysis are examined. Case studies are used to show 
applications of management techniques. 

AREC 427 The Economics of Marketing Systems 
for Agricultural Commodities (3) Basic economic 
theory as applied to the marketing of agricultural 
products, including price, cost, and financial analysis. 
Current developments affecting market structure in- 
cluding effects of contractual arrangement, vertical 
integration, governmental policies and regulation. 

AREC 432 Introduction to Natural Resources Poli- 
cy (3) Development of natural resource policy and 
analysis of the evolution of public intervention in the 
use of natural resources. Examination of present poli- 
cies and of conflicts between private individuals, public 
interest groups, and government agencies. 

AREC 445 World Agricultural Development and the 
Quality of Life (3) An examination of the key aspects 
of the agricultural development of less developed 
countries related to resources, technology, cultural 
and social setting, population, infrastructure, incen- 
tives, education, and government. Environmental im- 
pact of agricultural development, basic economic and 
social characteristics of peasant agriculture, theories 
and models of agricultural development, selected as- 
pects of agricultural development planning. 

AREC 452 Economics of Resource Development 

(3) A study of the adequacy and quality of the natural 
(land, water, air) and human resources, the economic 
and institutional arrangements which guide their use 
and development, and the means for improving their 
quality and use. 

AREC 453 Economic Analysis of Natural Re- 
sources (3) Rational use and reuse of natural re- 
sources. Theory and methodology of the allocation of 
natural resources among alternative uses. Optimum 
state of conservation, market failure, safe minimum 
standard, and cost-benefit analysis. 

AREC 484 Introduction to Econometrics in Agricul- 
ture (3) An introduction to the application of econo- 
metric techniques to agricultural problems with empha- 
sis on the assumptions and computational techniques 
necessary to derive statistical estimates, test hypothe- 
ses, and make predictions with the use of single 
equation models. Includes linear and non-linear 



regression models, internal least squares, discriminant 
analysis and factor analysis. 

AREC 489 Special Topics in Agricultural and Re- 
sources Economics (3) Repeatable to a maximum of 
9 credits. 

AREC 495 Honors Reading Course in Agricultural 
and Resource Economics I (3) Prerequisite: Ac- 
ceptance in the honors program of the Depart- 
ment of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Selected readings in political and economic theory 
from 1700 to 1850 This course develops a basic 
understanding of the development of economic and 
political thought as a foundation for understanding our 
present society and its cultural heritage. 

AREC 496 Honors Reading Course in Agricultural 
and Resource Economics II (3) Prerequisite: Suc- 
cessful completior of AREC 495 and registration in 
the honors program of the Department and re- 
source economics. Selected readings in political and 
economic theory from 1850 to the present. This couse 
continues the development of a basic understanding 
of economic and political thought begun in AREC 495 
by the examination of modern problems in agricultural 
and resource economics in the light of the material 
read and discussed in AREC 495 and AREC 496. 

AREC 639 Internship in Resource Management (2- 

4) Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor and de- 
partment chairman, open only to graduate students in 
the AREC resource management curriculum. Repeata- 
ble to a maximum of four hours. 

AREC 685 Applications of Mathematical Pro- 
gramming in Agriculture Business and Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 403 or consent of instructor. The 
application of mathematical programming to solve a 
wide variety of problems in agriculture, business and 
economics. Emphasis on modeling large-scale sys- 
tems and interpreting results. 

AREC 689 Special Topics in Agricultural and Re- 
source Economics (3) First and second semester. 
Subject matter taught will be varied and will depend on 
the persons available for teaching unique and special- 
ized phases of agricultural and resource economics. 
The course will be taught by the staff or visiting 
agricultural and resource economists who may be 
secured on lectureship or visiting professor basis. 

AREC 698 Seminar (1) First and second semesters. 
Students will participate through study of problems in 
the field, reporting to seminar members and defending 
positions adopted. Outstanding leaders in the field will 
present ideas for analysis and discussion among class 
members. Students involved in original research will 
present progress reports. Class discussion will provide 
opportunity for constructive criticism and guidance. 

AREC 699 Special Problems in Agricultural and 
Resource Economics (1-2) First and second semes- 
ters and summer. Intensive study and analysis of 
specific problems in the field of Agricultural and Re- 
source Economics, which provide information in depth 
in areas of special interest to the student. 

AREC 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

AREC 804 Advanced Agricultural Price and De- 
mand Analysis (3) Second semester. An advanced 
study in the theory of: (1) the individual consumer, (2) 
household behavior, and (3) aggregate demand. The 
concepts of price and cross elasticities of demand, 
income elasticity of demand, and elasticity of substitu- 
tion will be examined in detail. The use of demand 
theory in the analysis of welfare problems, market 
equilibrium (with special emphasis on trade) and the 
problem of insufficient and excessive aggregate de- 
mand will be discussed. 

AREC 806 Economics of Agricultural Production 

(3) First semester. Study of the more complex prob- 
lems involved in the long-range adjustments, organiza- 
tion and operation of farm resources, including the 
impact of new technology and methods. Applications 
of the theory of the firm, linear programming, activity 
analysis and input-output analysis. 

AREC 824 Food Distribution Management (3) Theo- 
ry and practice of the complex functional and institu- 
tional aspects of food distribution systems analyzed 
from the perspective of management decision-making 
in the food industry. Possible long-range economic 
effects of current structural adjustments: social and 
ecological aspects of food industry management deci- 
sion-making. 



Agronomy Program 47 



AREC 832 Agricultural Price and Income Policy (3) 

Second semester, alternate years, 1973. The evolu- 
tion of agricultural policy in the United States, emphaz- 
ing the origin and development ot United St govern- 
mental programs, and their effects upon agricultural 
production, prices and income. 

AREC 844 International Agriculture Trade (3) Eco- 
nomic theory, policies and practices in international 
trade in agricultural products. Principal theories of 
international trade and finance, agricultural trade poli- 
cies of various countries, and agricultural trade prac- 
tices. 

AREC 845 Agriculture in World Economic Develop- 
ment (3) First semester, alternate years, 1972 Theo- 
ries and concepts of what makes economic develop- 
ment happen. Approaches and programs for stimulat- 
ing the transformation from a primitive agricultural 
economy to an economy of rapidly developing com- 
mercial agriculture and industry. Analysis of selected 
agricultural development programs in Asia, Africa and 
Latin America. 

AREC 852 Advanced Resource Economics (3) Sec- 
ond semester, alternate years Assessment and evalu- 
ation of our natural, capital, and human resources; the 
use of economic theory and various techniques to 
guide the allocation of these resources within a com- 
prehensive framework; and the institutional arrange- 
ments for using these resources. ECON 403 or equiva- 
lent is a prerequisite. 

AREC 883 Agricultural and Resource Economics 
Research Techniques (3) First semester Emphasis 
is given to philosophy and basic objectives of research 
in the field of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 
The course is designed to help students define a 
research problem and work out logical procedures for 
executing research in the social sciences. Attention is 
given to the techniques and tools available to Agricul- 
tural and Resource Economics. Research documents 
in the field will be appraised from the standpoint of 
procedures and evaluation of the search. 

AREC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Agricultural Engineering 
Program 

Associate Professor and Chairman: Stewart 
Professors: Wheaton, Harris 
Associate Professors: Grant, Felton 
Assistant Professors: Ayars, Farsaie, Frey, 
Johnson, Lawson, Yaramanoglu 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering of- 
fers a graduate program of study with speciali- 
zation in either agricultural or aquacultural engi- 
neering leading to the degree of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Courses and 
research problems place emphasis on the engi- 
neering aspects of the production, harvesting, 
processing and marketing of terrestrial and 
aquatic food and fiber products. Concern for the 
conservation of land and water resources and 
the utilization and/or disposal of byproducts 
associated with biological systems is included 
in order to maintain and enhance the quality of 
our environment while contributing to efficient 
production of food and fiber to meet increasing 
population demands. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Admission is open to B.S. graduates in engi- 
neering, physical science or biological science 
who meet graduate school requirements and 
who have satisfactorily completed a core of 
basic engineering courses. For the M.S. pro- 
gram, a minimum of 30 semester hours are 
required of which at least 9 hours will be agricul- 
tural engineering courses, 6 hours will be thesis 
research and 3 hours will be biometrics. 

A minimum of 60 credit hours beyond a 
B.S. are required for the Ph.D. program of which 



12 hours will be thesis research and 3 hours will 
be biometrics. 

Only the thesis option is available for the 
M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. The Department has 
no language requirements for either graduate 
degree. Except for the above requirements a 
M.S. or Ph.D. program is planned on a personal 
basis and is oriented toward the intellectual and 
professional objectives of the student. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to well-equipped laboratories in the 
Department, the facilities of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station, the Computer Science 
Center, and the College of Engineering are 
available. The new University of Maryland Cen- 
ter for Environmental and Estuarine Studies 
enhances the aquacultural phase of the Depart- 
ment's graduate program. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance may be available to quali- 
fied candidates. 

Additional Information 

For additional information contact: 
Chairman 
Agricultural Engineering Department 

Courses 

ENAG 401 Agricultural Production Equipment (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
site: AGEN 100. Principles of operation and functions 
of power and machinery units as related to tillage; 
cutting, conveying, and separating units; and control 
mechanisms. Principles of internal combustion en- 
gines and power unit components. 

ENAG 402 Agricultural Materials Handling and En- 
vironmental Control (3) Two lectures and one labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisite: AGEN 100. Characteristics 
of construction materials and details of agricultural 
structures. Fundamentals of electricity, electrical cir- 
cuits, and electrical controls. Materials handling and 
environmental requirements of farm products and ani- 
mals. 

ENAG 421 Power Systems (3) Two lectures and one 
two hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: ENME 
216, ENEE 300 and ENME 340. Analysis of energy 
conversion devices including internal combustion en- 
gines, electrical and hydraulic motors. Fundamentals 
of power transmission and coordination of power 
sources with methods of power transmission. 

ENAG 422 Soil and Water Engineering (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite: ENME 340. Applica- 
tions of engineering and soil sciences in erosion 
control, drainage, irrigation and watershed manage- 
ment. Principles of agricultural hydrology and design of 
water control and conveyance systems. 

ENAG 424 Functional and Environmental Design of 
Agricultural Structures (3) Two lectures and one 
hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: AGEN 324 An 
analytical approach to the design and planning of 
functional and environmental requirements of plants 
and animals in semi-or completely enclosed struc- 
tures. 

ENAG 432 General Hydrology (3) Qualitative as- 
pects of basic hydroiogic principles pertaining to the 
properties, distribution and circulation of water as 
related to public interest in water resources. 

ENAG 433 Engineering Hydrology (3) Prerequisite: 
MATH 246, ENCE 330 or ENME 340. Properties, 
distribution and circulation of water from the sea and in 
the atmosphere emphasizing movement overland, in 
channels and through the soil profile. Qualitative and 
quantitative factors are considered. 

ENAG 435 Aquacultural Engineering (3) Prerequi- 
site: Consent of department A study of the engineer- 
ing aspects of development, utilization and conserva- 
tion of aquatic systems. Emphasis will be on harvest- 
ing and processing aquatic animals or plants as re- 
lated to other facets of water resources management 



ENAG 444 Functional Design of Machinery and 
Equipment (3) Two lectures and one two-hour labora- 
tory per week Prerequisite: ENES 221 and senior 
standing Theory and methods of agricultural machine 
design. Application of machine design principles and 
physical properties of soils and agricultural products in 
designing machines to perform specific tasks 

ENAG 454 Biological Process Engineering (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENME 342. Design of systems to pump, 
heaf, cool, dry and control biological materials as part 
of food and agricultural engineering. Study the effect 
of physical parameters on biological material response 
to these processes 

ENAG 488 Topics in Agricultural Engineering Tech- 
nology (1-3) Prerequisite Permission of the instruc- 
tor Selected topics in Agricultural Engineering tech- 
nology of current need and interest. May be repeated 
to a maximum of six credits if topics are different Not 
acceptable for credit towards maior in Agricultural 
Engineering. 

ENAG 489 Special Problems in Agricultural Engi- 
neering (1-3) Prerequisite: Approval of department 
Student will select an engineering problem and pre- 
pare a technical report The problem may include 
design, experimentation, and/or data analysis 

ENAG 499 Special Problems In Agricultural Engi- 
neering Technology (1-3) Prerequisite: Approval of 
department Not acceptable for majors in Agricultural 
Engineering. Problems assigned in proportion to cred- 
it. 

ENAG 601 Instrumentation Systems (3) Prerequi- 
site: Approval of department. Analysis of instrumenta- 
tion requirements and techniques for research and 
operational agricultural or biological systems. 

ENAG 602 Mechanical Properties of Biological 
Materials (3) Prerequisite: Differential equations a 
study of the significance and the utilization of the 
mechanical properties of biological materials under 
various conditions of loading. Emphasis on particle 
motion; relationships between stress and strain, force, 
velocity and acceleration, principles of work and ener- 
gy, and theories of failure. 

ENAG 612 Similitude in Agricultural Engineering (3) 

Prerequisites: ENCE 350 and either ENME 342 or 
ENCE 330, or consent of instructor Application and 
use of dimensional and model analysis for studying 
mechanical, structural, and fluid systems encountered 
in Agricultural Engineenng. 

ENAG 631 Land and Water Resource Development 
Engineering (3) Prerequisite ENAG 422 or approval 
of department. A comprehensive study of engineering 
aspects of orderly development for land and water 
resources. Emphasis on project formulation, data ac- 
quisition, project analysis and engineering economy 

ENAG 642 Engineering Dynamics of Biological 
Systems (3) Prerequisite AGEN 454 or equivalent 
Description of the physical state of a biological system 
using geometry, physical properties and forces. Dis- 
cussion of important interrelationships, measurement 
techniques and resulting transport processes as ap- 
plied to biological process engineenng 

ENAG 688 Advanced Topics in Agricultural Engi- 
neering (1-4) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Ad- 
vanced topics of current interest in the various areas of 
agricultural engineering Maximum eight credits. 

ENAG 698 Seminar (1) cr First and second semes- 
ters. 

ENAG 699 Special Problems in Agricultural and 
Aquacultural Engineering (1-6) First and second 
semester and summer school Work assigned in pro- 
portion to amount of credit. 

ENAG 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
ENAG 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Agronomy Program 

Professor and Chairman: Miller 
Professors: Axley, Aycock, Bandel. Decker, 
Fanning, Foss F.P. Miller. Strickling 
Associate Professor: Mulchi 
Assistant Professors: Glenn, Inman, 
Kenworthy, Mcintosh, Sammons. Weil, 
Wiebold 



48 Agronomy Program 



The Department of Agronomy offers graduate 
courses of study leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 
The student may pursue major work in the crops 
division or in the soils division of the Depart- 
ment. Programs are offered in cereal crop pro- 
duction, forage management, turf management, 
plant breeding, tobacco production, crop physi- 
ology, weed science, soil chemistry, soil phys- 
ics, soil fertility, soil and water conservation, soil 
classification, soil survey and land use, soil 
mineralogy, soil biochemistry, soil microbiology, 
air pollution, waste disposal, and soil environ- 
ment interactions. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Thesis and non-thesis options are available for 
the Master of Science degree. A bachelor's 
degree in Agronomy is not required if the stu- 
dent has adequate training in the basic sci- 
ences. All students must complete the Master 
of Science degree before admission to the 
doctoral program. Departmental regulations 
have been assembled for the guidance of can- 
didates for graduate degrees. Copies of these 
regulations are available from the Department 
of Agronomy. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Agronomy Department has over 20 well- 
equipped laboratories to carry out basic and 
applied research in crop and soil science. Basic 
equipment in the laboratories include: X-ray 
diffraction and spectrophotometer, gas chro- 
matograph, isotope counters, petrographic 
microscopes, neutron soil moisture probe and 
scaler, and carbon furnace. Growth chambers, 
extensive greenhouse space, and five research 
farms permit a wide range of environmental 
conditions for research into plant growth pro- 
cesses. A computer center, located on campus, 
is available for use by the Department. The 
University and the New National Agricultural 
Sciences Libraries, supplemented by the Libra- 
ry of Congress, make the library resources 
among the best in the nation. Many projects of 
the Department are conducted in cooperation 
with the Agricultural Research Service of the 
United States Department of Agriculture with 
headquarters located three miles from the cam- 
pus. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of research assistantships 
and teaching assistantships are available for 
qualified applicants. 

Courses 

AGRO 403 Crop Breeding (3) Prerequisite: BOTN 
414 or ZOOL 246. Principles and methods of breeding 
annual self and cross-pollinated plant and perennial 
forage species. 

AGRO 404 Tobacco Production (3) Prerequisite: 
BOTN iOO. A study of the history, adaptation, distribu- 
tion, culture, and improvement of various types of 
tobacco, with special emphasis on problems in Mary- 
land tobacco production. Physical and chemical fac- 
tors associated with yield and quality of tobacco will be 
stressed 

AGRO 405 Turf Management (3) Two lectures and 
one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: BOTN 
100. A study of principles and practices of managing 
turf for lawns, golf courses, athletic fields, playgrounds, 
airfields and highways for commerical sod production 

AGRO 406 Forage Crop Production (3) Prerequi 
sites: BOTN 101. and AGRO 100: or concurrent enroll 
ment in these courses. A general look at world grass 



lands: production and management requirements of 
major grasses and legumes for quality hay. silage and 
pasture for livestock feed; new cultivar development 
and release: seed production and distribution of im- 
proved cultivars. 

AGRO 407 Cereal and Oil Crops (3) Prerequisites: 
BOTN 101 and AGRO 100; or concurrent enrollment in 
these courses. A study of principles and practices of 
corn, small grains, rice, millets, sorghums, and 
soybeans and other oil seed crops. A study of seed 
production, processing, distribution and federal and 
state seed control programs of corn, small grains and 
soybeans. 

AGRO 411 Soil Fertility Principles (3) Prerequisite: 
AGRO 202. A study of the chemical, physical, and 
biological characteristics of soils that are important in 
growing crops. Soil deficiencies of physical, chemical, 
or biological nature and their correction by the use of 
lime, fertilizers, and rotations are discussed and illus- 
trated. 

AGRO 412 Commercial Fertilizers (3) Prerequisite; 
AGRO 202 or permission of instructor. A study of the 
manufacturing of commercial fertilizers and their use in 
soils for efficient crop production. 

AGRO 413 Soil and Water Conservation (3) Two 

lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
site: AGRO 202 or permission of instructor. A study of 
the importance and causes of soil erosion, methods of 
soil erosion control, and the effect of conservation 
practices on soil-moisture supply. Special emphasis is 
placed on farm planning for soil and water conserva- 
tion. The laboratory period will be largely devoted to 
field trips. 

AGRO 414 Soil Classification and Geography (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite: AGRO 202 or permission of instructor. 
Processes and factors of soil genesis. Taxonomy of 
soils of the world by U.S. System. Laboratory covers 
soil morphological characteristics, composition, classi- 
fication, survey and field trips to examine and describe 
soils. 

AGRO 415 Soil Survey and Land Use (3) Prerequi- 
site: AGRO 302. Evaluation of soils in the uses of land 
and the environmental implications of soil utilization. 
Interpretation of soil information and soil surveys as 
applied to both agricultural and non-agricultural prob- 
lems. Incorporation of soil data into legislation, envi- 
ronmental standards and land use plans. 

AGRO 417 Soil Physics (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: AGRO 202 and 
a course in physics, or permission of instructor. A study 
of physical properties of soils with special emphasis on 
relationship to soil productivity. 

AGRO 421 Soil Chemistry (3) One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite: AGRO 202 or 
permission of instructor. A study of the chemical 
composition of soils; cation and anion exchange; acid, 
alkaline and saline soil conditions; and soil fixation of 
plant nutrients. Chemical methods of soil analysis will 
be studied with emphasis on their relation to fertilizer 
requirements. 

AGRO 422 Soil Biochemistry (3) Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: AGRO 
202, CHEM 104 or consent of instructor. A study of 
biochemical processes involved in the formation and 
decomposition of organic soil constitutents. Signifi- 
cance of soil-biochemical processes involved in plant 
nutrition will be considered. 

AGRO 423 Soil-Water Pollution (3) Prerequisite: 
AGRO 302 and CHEM 104 or permission of instructor. 
Reaction and fate of pesticides, agricultural fertilizers, 
industrial and animal wastes in soil and water with 
emphasis on their relation to the environment. 

AGRO 451 Cropping Systems (2) Prerequisite: 
AGRO 102 or equivalent. The coordination of informa- 
tion from various courses in the development of bal- 
anced cropping systems, appropriate to different ob- 
jectives in various areas of the state and nation. 

AGRO 453 Weed Control (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: AGRO 102 or 
equivalent A study of the use of cultural practices and 
chemical herbicides in the control of weeds. 

AGRO 499 Special Problems In Agronomy (1-3) 

Prerequisites: AGRO 202, 406, 407 or permission of 
instructor. A detailed study, including a written report 
of an important problem in agronomy. 



AGRO 601 Advanced Crop Breeding (2) Alternate 
years (offered 1973-74), Prerequisite: AGRO 403 or 
equivalent. Genetic, cytogenetic, and statistical theo- 
ries underlying methods of plant breeding. A study of 
quantitative inheritance, herterosis, heritability, inter- 
specific and intergenenc hybridization, polyploidy, ste- 
rility mechanisms, inbreeding and outbreeding, and 
other topics as related to plant breeding. 

AGRO 602 Advanced Crop Breeding (2) Alternate 
years (offered 1973-74.) Prerequisite: AGRO 601 or 
equivalent. Genetic, cytogenetic, and statistical theo- 
ries underlying methods of plant breeding, A study of 
quantitative inheritance, herterosis, heritability, inter- 
specific and intergeneric hybridization, polyploidy, ste- 
rility mechanisms, inbreeding and outbreeding, and 
other topics as related to plant breeding. 

AGRO 608 Research Methods (2) Second semester. 
Prerequisite; Permission of staff. Development of re- 
search viewpoint by detailed study and report on crop 
research of the Maryland Experiment Station or review 
of literature on specific phases of a problem. 

AGRO 722 Advanced Soil Chemistry (3) Second 
semester, alternate years (offered 1972-73.) One lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites: 
AGRO 202 and permission of instructor. A continuta- 
tion of AGRO 421 with emphasis on soil chemistry of 
minor elements necessary for plant growth. 

AGRO 789 Recent Advances in Agronomy (2-4) 

First semester. Two hours each year Total credit four 
hours. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A study of 
recent advances in Agronomy research. 

AGRO 798 Agronomy Seminar (1) First and second 
semesters. Total credit toward Master of Science 
degree, 2; toward Ph.D. degree. 6. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. 

AGRO 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

AGRO 802 Breeding for Resistance to Plant Pests 

(3) Second semester, alternate years (offered 1972- 
73.) Prerequisites: ENTM 252, BOTN 221. AGRO 403, 
or permission of instructor. A study of the development 
of breeding techniques for selecting and utilizing re- 
sistance to insects and diseases in crop plants and the 
effect of resistance on the interrelationships of host 
and pest. 

AGRO 804 Technic in Field Crop Research (2) 

Second semester, alternate years (offered 1972-73.) 
Field plot technique, application of statistical analysis 
to agronomic data, and preparation of the research 
project. 

AGRO 805 Factors Affecting Crop Yields (2) Pre- 
requisites: BOTN 441 or BOTN 641 plus advanced 
training in plant sciences. Major emphasis will be on 
physiological processes affecting yield and productivi- 
ty of major food fiber and industrial crops of the world. 
Topics such as photosynthesis, respiration, pho- 
torespiration, nitrogen metabolism will be related to 
crop growth as affected by management decisions. 
Topics of discussion will also include growth analysis 
and the use of computer modeling of crop growth by 
plant scientists. 

AGRO 806 Herbicide Chemistry and Physiology (2) 

Second semester, alternate years (offered 1972- 
1973.) Prerequisite: AGRO 453 and CHEM 104 or 
permission of instructor. Two lectures a week. The 
importance of chemical structure in relation to biologi- 
cally significant reactions will be emphasized in more 
than 10 different herbicide groups. Recent advances in 
herbicidal metabolism, translocation, and mode of 
action will be reviewed. Adsorption, decomposition 
and movement in the soil will also be studied. 

AGRO 807 Advanced Forage Crops (2) First semes- 
ter, alternate years (offered 1972-1973.) Prerequisite: 
BOTN 441 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. A 
fundamental study of physiological and ecological 
responses of grasses and legumes to environmental 
factors, including fertilizer elements, soil moisture, soil 
temperature, humidity, length of day, quality and inten- 
sity of light, wind movement, and defoliation practices. 
Relationship of these factors to life history, production, 
chemical and botanical composition, quality, and per- 
sistence of forages will be considered. 

AGRO 821 Advanced Methods of Soil Investigation 

(3) First semester, alternate years (offered 1973- 
1974.) Prerequisites: AGRO 202 and permission of 
instructor. An advanced study of the theory of the 
chemical methods of soil investigation with emphasis 



Animal Sciences Program 49 



on problems involving application of physical chemis- 
try. 

AGRO 831 Soil Mineralogy (4) Soil minerals, with 
emphasis on clay minerals, are studied from the view- 
point ot soil genesis and physical chemistry. Mineral- 
ogical analyses by X-ray and chemical techniques 

AGRO 832 Advanced Soil Physics (3) Second se- 
mester, alternate years (offered 1973-1974) Prerequi- 
sites: AGRO 202 and permission of instructor. An 
advanced study of physical properties of soils. 

AGRO 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



American Studies 
Program 

Professor and Director: Wise 

Associate Director and Director of Graduate 

Studies: Kelly 

Professors: Bode, Corrigan 

Associate Professors: Lounsbury, Mintz, 

Pearson 

Assistant Professors: Caughey, McCarthy 

Adjunct Professor: Washburn 

American Studies offers an interdisciplinary pro- 
gram ot study leading to both the MA. and 
Ph.D. Graduate students in the field take (1) 
courses in the various allied departments (e.g., 
Anthropology, Education, English, History, Jour- 
nalism, Philosophy, Sociology), and (2) integrat- 
ing courses in the core program taught by the 
core American Studies faculty. 

All students take the introductory graduate 
proseminar — focused on the history, theory, 
and methodology of American culture studies. 
Other graduate seminars vary from semester to 
semester — sometimes concentrating on a cul- 
tural time period (e.g., ante-Bellum America, the 
1930's, the 1960's), a particular mode of cultur- 
al expression (e.g., film, material culture, popu- 
lar culture), an individual with special cultural 
resonance (e.g., Mencken), or a particular 
theme or movement (e.g., education in Ameri- 
can culture, literature considered in cultural 
context). A special cooperative venture enables 
students interested in material culture to take 
substantial course work at the Smithsonian 
Institution. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Master's candidates normally undertake a full 
year of course work (30 semester hours). All 
candidates are required to take at least 12 
hours of core American Studies seminars — 6 
hours of AMST 618, and 6 hours of AMST 628 
and 629. In addition, candidates select an area 
of concentration from courses offered in allied 
departments — Anthropology, Architecture, Art, 
Economics, Education, English, Geography, 
Government and Politics, History, Journalism, 
Music, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, 
Speech and Dramatic Arts. 

Before receiving the M.A., candidates take 
a comprehensive examination evaluating their 
ability to integrate various perspectives in the 
program. Research oriented candidates may 
choose to write a thesis in place of six hours of 
course credit. 

Many students accepted for the doctoral 
program already have an M.A. in American 
Studies. Well-qualified candidates without an 
American Studies M.A. may be admitted to the 
doctoral program, but they may be required to 
make up background deficiencies. 

Core program requirements for the Ph.D. 
are similar to those for the M.A. — 12 hours of 
core American Studies courses, 6 at the 618 



level and 6 in advanced seminars. The remain- 
der of the student's course work is taken from 
courses in the allied departments, and in other 
core American Studies electives. 

Ph.D. candidates must complete at least 
30 semester hours beyond the M.A., including 
an 18-hour residency requirement. Candidates 
must also demonstrate proficiency in a tool 
(e.g., foreign language, computer science), 
must pass a comprehensive examination, and 
must write a dissertation based upon original 
research and interpretation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The proximity of many federal institutions allows 
for a firsthand appreciation of politics and con- 
temporary life, while the facilities of the National 
Archives and the Library of Congress give the 
historian access to the materials documenting 
the experiences of past generations. Important 
galleries, including the National Collection of 
Fine Arts and the National Gallery of Art, exhibit 
the high points of creative expression in the 
visual arts. The holdings of the Smithsonian 
Institution possess numerous manifestations of 
the native vernacular traditions in architecture 
and technology, in the folk arts, and in American 
Indian culture. The District of Columbia and its 
surrounding regions represent an impressive 
aggregate of associations and communities — 
alternatives to traditional politics such as Com- 
mon Cause, the focus upon black cultural 
identity found in the Anacostia Neighborhood 
Museum, the new cities of Columbia, Maryland 
and Reston, Virginia — which seek to transcend 
the crises of urban America in a creative man- 
ner. 

The program, drawing upon the resources 
of its cultural environment, offers the individual 
an education in the most meaningful sense; a 
personal confrontation with academic tradition 
related to the processes of immediate and 
contemporary social change. 

Financial Assistance 

Some assistantships are available through the 
departments for qualified graduate students. 

Additional Information 

For additional information, please write to the 
Director of Graduate Studies, American Studies 
Program, University of Maryland. 

Courses 

AMST 426 Culture and the Arts In America (3) 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. A study of American 
institutions, the intellectual and esthetic climate from 
the colonial period to the present. 

AMST 427 Culture and the Arts in America (3) 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. A study of American 
institutions, the intellectual and esthetic climate from 
the colonial period to the present. 

AMST 436 Readings in American Studies (3) Pre- 
requisite: Junior standing. An historical survey of 
American values as presented in various key writings. 

AMST 437 Readings In American Studies (3) Pre- 
requisite: Junior standing An historical survey of 
American values as presented in various key writings 

AMST 446 Popular Culture In America (3) Prerequi- 
site: Junior standing and permission of instructor. A 
survey of the historical development ot the popular 
arts and modes of popular entertainment in America. 

AMST 447 Popular Culture In America (3) Prerequi- 
site: Junior standing and AMST 446 Intensive re- 
search in the sources and themes of contemporary 
American popular culture 

AMST 498 Special Topics in American Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: A course in American history, literature. 



or government, or consent of the instructor Topics of 
special interest. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits 
when topics differ. 

AMST 618 Introductory Seminar in American Stu- 
dies (3) 

AMST 628 Seminar in American Studies (3) 

AMST 629 Seminar in American Studies (3) 

AMST 638 Orientation seminar-material aspects of 
American civilization (3) Class meets at the Smithso- 
nian. 

AMST 639 Reading course in selected aspects of 
American civilization (3) Class meets at the Smithso- 
nian. 

AMST 698 Directed Readings in American Studies 
(3) This course is designed to provide students with 
the opportunity to pursue independent, interdisciplin- 
ary research and reading in specific aspects of Ameri- 
can culture under the supervision of a faculty member. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits 

AMST 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

AMST 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Animal Sciences 
Program 

Professor and Program Chairman: Davis 

Professors: (Animal Science) Flyger, Leffel, 

Young; (Dairy Science) Keeney, King, Mattick, 

Vandersall, Williams; (Veterinary Science) 

Hammond, Mohanty. 

Associate Professors: (Animal Science) Buric, 

DeBarthe; (Dairy Science) Douglass, 

Westhoff; (Veterinary Science) Albert, Dutta, 

Marquardt. 

Assistant Professors: (Animal Science) 

Hartsock, Keam, Kunkle, Stricklin; (Dairy 

Science) Erdman, Majeskie, Mather, Peters, 

Vijay; (Veterinary Science) Davidson, Haaland. 

Nepote, Sapperstein. 

Professors Emerite: Cairns, Greene 

Adjunct Professor: Hawk 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Paape 

The Graduate Program in the Animal Sciences 
offers work leading to the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Both the 
thesis and non-thesis options are available for 
the Master's Degree. Areas of concentration 
within the Program include animal nutrition, 
physiology, genetics, management, pathology 
and virology for all of the classes and species of 
animals listed. Opportunities for study related to 
domestic animals, marine and wildlife are avail- 
able. 

Degrees with research specialities identi- 
fied with meat, milk and other dairy products 
may be undertaken in this program or in the 
Graduate Program in Food Science, in which 
appropriate faculty of these Departments also 
participate. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Applicants are required to submit scores of the 
Graduate Record Examination. 

One course at the graduate level in bio- 
chemistry and one in biometrics and two credits 
of program seminar are required for the M.S. 
Degree. Students enrolled in the non-thesis 
option are expected to defend their scholarly 
paper in an oral examination. Two academic 
years, including the summer for research, are 
usually required for completing the M.S. Enter- 
ing students should have an academic back- 
ground commensurate with a baccalaureate 
degree in the Animal Sciences. Those not hav- 



50 Animal Sciences Program 



ing a course in genetics, nutrition, general ani- 
mal physiology, microbiology and animal pro- 
duction or management should plan to take 
such a course early in their graduate program. 
Ph.D. students entering from other institu- 
tions with the Master's or entering directly into 
the Ph.D. program are expected to meet the 
requirements indicated above. Two additional 
credits in the program seminar are required 
The M.S. is not a prerequisite for admission to 
Ph.D. study: however, most students find it 
advantageous. Students usually complete the 
Ph.D. in two years after the M.S. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Faculty in the program are an outstanding group 
representing research accomplished in a wide 
variety of related fields. Excellent supporting 
courses in physiology, biochemistry and micro- 
biology are available in the appropriate depart- 
ments. Courses in biometrics listed in the cata- 
log under AGRI provide a strong background in 
experimental design and statistical analysis. 
The Computer Science Center offers courses in 
programming and computer language, as well 
as facilities for the statistical analysis of thesis 
data. 

Outstanding laboratory facilities are avail- 
able in the Animal Sciences Center which in- 
cludes the combined resources of the Depart- 
ments of Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Science. 
Instrumentation is available to graduate stu- 
dents for gaslipid chromatography, atomic ab- 
sorption spectrophotometry, automated 
calorimetry, electron microscopy, liquid scintilla- 
tion radioactivity measurements, elec- 
trophoresis, ultra centrifugation and a variety of 
microbiological techniques. Controlled environ- 
ment facilities in the Center permit work with 
laboratory animals and detailed experiments on 
larger animals. A gnotobiotic laboratory is avail- 
able and currently being used in ruminent nutri- 
tion research. Excellent surgical facilities are 
available for research in the areas of reproduc- 
tive and nutritional physiology. 

Herds and flocks of beef cattle, dairy cattle, 
horses, sheep and swine are readily available 
for graduate research. Limited numbers of ex- 
periments can be conducted on the campus 
with large animals. Experiments requiring large 
numbers of animals are carried out at one of 
four outlying farms. 

A cooperative agreement with the Agricul- 
tural Research Service at nearby Beltsville, 
Maryland (BARC) makes available laboratory, 
animal and research personnel resources of 
importance in the graduate program. 

A dairy product processing facility is avail- 
able for dairy product research. 

In addition to excellent library facilities on 
the Campus, the National Agricultural Library, 
the National Library of Medicine and the Library 
of Congress, all located within 10 miles, consti- 
tute the best library resource for graduate study 
available anywhere. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of Graduate Assistantships are avail- 
able and awarded to students presenting strong 
academic records and a capability and motiva- 
tion to perform well in teaching or research 
assignments. 

Additional Information 

For specific information on the Program, admis- 
sion procedures or financial aid, contact: 

Dr. R.F. Davis, Chairman Department of 
Dairy Science 

Courses 

ANSC 401 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3) Prerequi- 
site: CHEM 104; ANSC 212 recommended. A study of 



the fundamental role of all nutrients in the body 
including their digestion, absorption and metabolism. 
Dietary requirements and nutritional deficiency syn- 
dromes of laboratory and farm animals and man will be 
considered. 

ANSC 402 Applied Animal Nutrition (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: 
MATH 110, ANSC 401 or permission of instructor. A 
critical study of those factors which influence the 
nutritional requirements of ruminants, swine and poul- 
try. Practical feeding methods and procedures used in 
formulation of economically efficient rations will be 
presented. 

ANSC 403 Applied Animal Nutrition (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: 
MATH 110, ANSC 402 or permission of instructor. A 
critical study of those factors which influence the 
nutritional requirements of ruminants, swine and poul- 
try. Practical feeding methods and procedures used in 
formulation of economically efficient rations will be 
presented. 

ANSC 406 Environmental Physiology (3) Prerequi- 
sites: Anatomy and physiology. The specific anatomi- 
cal and physiological modifications employed by ani- 
mals adapted to certain stressful environments will be 
considered. Particular emphasis will be placed on the 
problems of temperature regulation and water bal- 
ance. Specific areas for consideration will include: 
animals in cold (including hibernation), animals in dry 
heat, diving animals and animals in high altitudes. 

ANSC 407 Advanced Dairy Production (1) An ad- 
vanced course primarily designed for teachers of vaca- 
tional agriculture and county agents. It includes a study 
of the newer discoveries in dairy cattle nutrition, breed- 
ing and management. 

ANSC 41 1 Biology and Management of Shellfish (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods 
each week. Field trips. Identification, biology, manage- 
ment, and culture of commercially-important molluscs 
and Crustacea. Prerequisite: One year of Biology or 
Zoology. This course will examine the shellfisheries of 
the world, but will emphasize those of the Northwest- 
ern Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay. 

ANSC 412 Introduction to Diseases of Animals (3) 

Prerequisite: MICB 200 and ZOOL 101. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. This course gives 
basic instruction in the nature of disease: including 
causation, immunity, methods of diagnosis, economic 
importance, public health aspects and prevention and 
control of the common diseases of sheep, cattle, 
swine, horses and poultry. 

ANSC 413 Laboratory Animal Management (3) A 

comprehensive course in care and management of 
laboratory animals. Emphasis will be placed on physi- 
ology, anatomy and special uses for the different 
species. Disease prevention and regulations for main- 
taining animal colonies will be covered. Field trips will 
be required. 

ANSC 414 Biology and Management of Fish (4) 

Prerequisite: One year of B'ology or Zoology. Two 
lectures and two three-hour laboratories a week. Fun- 
damentals of individual and population dynamics; the- 
ory and practice of sampling fish populations; manage- 
ment schemes. 

ANSC 415 Parasitic Diseases of Domestic Animals 

(3) Prerequisite: ANSC 412 or equivalent. Two lectures 
and one laboratory per week. A study of parasitic 
diseases resulting from protozoan and helminth infec- 
tion and arthropod infestation. Emphasis on parasites 
of veterinary importance: their identification; life cy- 
cles, pathological effects and control by management. 

ANSC 416 Wildlife Management (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory. An introduction to the interrelation- 
ships of game birds and mammals with their environ- 
ment, population dynamics and the principles of wil- 
dlife management. 

ANSC 422 Meats (3) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 221. A course 
designed to give the basic facts about meat as a food 
and the factors influencing acceptability, marketing, 
and quality of fresh meats. It includes comparisons of 
characteristics of live animals with their carcasses, 
grading and evaluating carcasses as well as wholesale 
cuts, and the distribution and merchandising of the 
nation's meat supply. Laboratory periods are conduct- 
ed in packing houses, meat distribution centers, retail 
outlets and university meats laboratory. 



ANSC 423 Livestock Management (3) One lecture 
and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: 
ANSC 401. Application of various phases of Animal 
Science to the management and production of beef 
cattle, sheep and swine. 

ANSC 424 Livestock Management (3) One lecture 
and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: 
ANSC 423. Applications of various phases of animal 
science to the management and production of beef 
cattle, sheep and swine. 

ANSC 425 Herpetology (3) Prerequisites: ANSC 211 
and ANSC 212; or equivalent. Study of taxonomy, 
physiology, behavior, functional anatomy, evolution 
and distribution of present day amphibians and rep- 
tiles. Common diseases and management under cap- 
tive conditions. Identification of poisonous species 
with appropriate precautions. 

ANSC 426 Principles of Breeding (3) Second semes- 
ter. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: ANSC 201 
or equivalent, ANSC 222, ANSC 423 or 424. Graduate 
credit (1-3 hours) allowed with permission of instruc- 
tor. The practical aspects of animal breeding, heredity, 
variation, selection, development, systems of breeding 
and pedigree study are considered. 

ANSC 432 Horse Farm Management (3) Prerequi- 
site: ANSC 332 and AREC 410. One 90-minute lecture 
and one four-hour laboratory period per week. A 
course to develop the technical and managerial skills 
necessary for the operation of a horse breeding farm. 
Herd health programs, breeding programs and proce- 
dures, foaling activities, foot care, weaning programs, 
and the maintenance of records incidential to each of 
these activities. 

ANSC 442 Dairy Cattle Breeding (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: 
ANSC 242, and ANSC 201. A specialized course in 
breeding dairy cattle. Emphasis is placed on methods 
of evaluation and selection, systems of breeding and 
breeding programs. 

ANSC 443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lacta- 
tion (3) Prerequisites: ANSC 212 or equivalent and 
CHEM 261 or CHEM 461. The physiology and bio- 
chemistry of milk production in domestic animals, 
particularly cattle. Mammary gland development and 
maintenance from the embryo to the fully developed 
lactating gland. Abnormalities of the mammary gland. 

ANSC 444 Analysis of Dairy Production Systems 

(3) Prerequisites: AGEC 406 and ANSC 203 or 214, or 
permission of instructor. The business aspects of dairy 
farming including an evaluation of the costs and re- 
turns associated with each segment. The economic 
impact of pertinent management decisions is studied. 
Recent developments in animal nutrition and genetics, 
agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, and 
agronomic practices are discussed as they apply to 
management of a dairy herd. 

ANSC 446 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 

(3) Prerequisite: ZOOL 422 or ANSC 212. Anatomy 
and physiology of reproductive processes in 
domesticated and wild mammals. 

ANSC 447 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 
Laboratory (1) Pre-or corequisites: ANSC 446. One 
three-hour laboratory per week. Animal handling, artifi- 
cial insemination procedures and analytical techniques 
useful in Animal Management and reproductive re- 
search. Not open to students who have credit for 
ANSC 446 prior to fall 1976. 

ANSC 452 Avian Physiology (2) (Alternate even 
years) one three-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisites: A basic course in animal physiology. 
The basic physiology of the bird is discussed, exclud- 
ing the reproductive system. Special emphasis is given 
to physiological differences between birds and other 
vertebrates. 

ANSC 462 Physiology of Hatchability (1) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: 
ZOOL 421 or 422. The physiology of embryonic devel- 
opment as related to principles of hatchability and 
problems of incubation encountered in the hatchery 
industry are discussed. 

ANSC 463 Nutrition Laboratory (2) Prerequisite: 
ANSC/NUSC 401 or concurrent registration. Six hours 
of laboratory per week. Digestibility studies with rumi- 
nant and monogastnc animals, proximate analysis of 
various food products, and feeding trials demonstrat- 
ing classical nutritional deficiencies in laboratory ani- 
mals. 



Applied Mathematics Program 51 



ANSC 464 Poultry Hygiene (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: MICB 200 
and ANSC 101. Virus, bacterial and protozoan diseas- 
es, parasitic diseases, prevention, control and eradica- 
tion. 

ANSC 466 Avian Anatomy (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week Prerequisite: ZOOL 102. 
Gross and microscopies structure, dissection and 
demonstration. 

ANSC 467 Poultry Breeding and Feeding (1) This 
course is designed primarily for teachers ot vocational 
agriculture and extension service workers. The first 
half will be devoted to problems concerning breeding 
and the development of breeding stock. The second 
half will be devoted to nutrition 
ANSC 477 Poultry Products and Marketing (1) This 
course is designed primarily for teachers of vocational 
agriculture and county agents It deals with the factors 
affecting the quality of poultry products and with hatch- 
ery management problems, egg and poultry grading, 
preservation problems and market outlets for Mary- 
land poultry. 

ANSC 480 Special Topics in Fish and Wildlife 
Management (3) Three lectures. Analysis of various 
state and federal programs related to fish and wildlife 
management This would include: fish stocking pro- 
grams. Maryland deer management program, warm 
water fish management, acid drainage problems, 
water quality, water fowl management, wild turkey 
management and regulations relative to the adminis- 
tration of these programs. 

ANSC 487 Special Topics in Animal Science (1) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course is 
designed primarily for teachers of vocational agncul- 
ture and extension service personnel. One primary 
topic to be selected mutually by the instructor and 
students will be presented each session 

ANSC 601 Advanced Ruminant Nutrition (2) First 
semester. One one-hour lecture and one-three hour 
laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. Physiological, microbiological and biochemi- 
cal aspects of the nutrition of ruminants as compared 
to other animals 

ANSC 603 Mineral Metabolism (3) Second semester. 
Prerequisites: CHEM 481 and 463. The role of miner- 
als in metabolism of animals and man. Topics to be 
covered include the role of minerals in energy metabo- 
lism, bone structure, electrolyte balance, and as cata- 
lysts. 

ANSC 604 Vitamin Nutrition (3) Prerequisites: ANSC 
401 and CHEM 461. Two one-hour lectures and one 
two-hour discussion period per week. Advanced study 
of the fundamental role of vitamins and vitamin-like 
cofactors in nutrition including chemical properties, 
absorption, metabolism, excretion and deficiency syn- 
dromes. A critical study of the biochemical basis of 
vitamin function, interrelationship of vitamins with 
other substances and of certain laboratory techniques. 

ANSC 610 Electron Microscopy (4) First and second 
semesters Two lectures and two laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. The- 
ory of electron microscopy, electron optics, specimen 
preparation and techniques, operation of electron pho- 
tography, interpretation of electron images, related 
instruments and techniques. 

ANSC 612 Energy Nutrition (2) Second semester 
Prerequisites: ANSC 402 or NUSC 450, CHEM 461, or 
consent of instructor. One lecture, one 2 hour labora- 
tory per week Basic concepts of animal energetics 
with quantitative descriptions of energy requirements 
and utilization. 

ANSC 614 Proteins (2) Second semester One lecture 
and one 2 hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 
ANSC 402 and CHEM 461 or consent of instructor 
Advanced study of the roles of amino acids in nutrition 
and metabolism. Protein digestion, absorption, anabo- 
lism. catabolism and ammo acid balance. 

ANSC 622 Advanced Breeding (2) Second semes- 
ter, alternate years. Prerequistes: ANSC 426 or equiv- 
alent, and biological statistics. This course deals with 
the more technical phases of heredity and variation, 
selection indices, breeding systems, and inheritance in 
farm animals. 

ANSC 641 Expermental Mammalian Surgery I (2) 
First semester. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



A course presenting the fundamentals of anesthesia 
and the art of experimental surgery, especially to 
obtain research preparations. 

ANSC 642 Experimental Mammalian Surgery II (3) 
Second semester Prerequisites: ANSC 641, permis- 
sion of instructor A course emphasizing advanced 
surgical practices to obtain research preparations, 
cardiovascular surgery and chronic vascularly isolated 
organ techniques, experience with pump oxygenator 
systems, profound hypothermia, hemodialysis, infu- 
sion systems, implantation and transplantation proce- 
dures are taught. 

ANSC 643 Research Methods (3) First semester 
One lecture and two laboratory periods per week 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. The application 
of biochemical, physio-chemical and statistical meth- 
ods to problems in biological research 

ANSC 660 Poultry Literature (1-4) First and second 
semesters. Readings on individual topics are as- 
signed. Written reports required. Methods of analysis 
and presentation of scientific material are discussed. 

ANSC 661 Physiology ot Reproduction (3) First 
semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week Prerequisite: ANSC 212 or its equivalent. The 
role of the endoennes in reproduction is considered. 
Fertiltiy, sexual maturity, egg formation, ovulation, and 
the physiology of oviposition are studied. Comparative 
processes in birds and mammals are discussed. 

ANSC 663 Advanced Nutrition Laboratory (3) Pre- 
requisite; ANSC/NUSC 401; and either CHEM 462 or 
NUSC 670. One hour of lecture and six hours of 
laboratory per week. Basic instrumentation and tech- 
niques desired for advanced nutritional research. The 
effect of various nutritional parameters upon interme- 
diary metabolism, enzyme kinetics, endocrinology, and 
nutrient absorption in laboratory animals 

ANSC 665 Physiological Genetics ot Domestic Ani- 
mals (2) Second semester. Prerequisites: A course in 
basic genetics and biochemistry. The underlying physi- 
ological basis for genetic differences in production 
traits and selected morphological traits will be discuss- 
ed. Inheritance of enzymes, protein polymorphisms 
and physiological traits will be studied. 

ANSC 677 Advanced Animal Adaptations to the 
Environment (2) First semester Two lectures or 
discussions per week Prerequisites: ANSC 406. or 
permission of instructor A detailed consideration of 
certain anatomical and physiological modifications 
employed by mammals adapted to cold, dry heat or 
altitude. Each student will submit for discussion a 
library paper concerning a specific adaptation to an 
environmental stress. 

ANSC 686 Veterinary Bacteriology and Mycology 

(3) Prerequisite: ANSC 412. The characteristics and 
role of pathogenic bacteria and fungi in diseases of 
domestic animals with emphasis upon their pathogenic 
properties, pathogenesis and types of disease, 
epizootiology. modes of transmission and prophylaxis. 

ANSC 687 Veterinary Virology (3) Prerequisite: 
MICB 460. A detailed study of virus and rickettsial 
diseases of domestic and laboratory animals. Empha- 
sis on viruses of veterinary importance along with 
techniques for their propagation, characterization and 
identification. 

ANSC 690 Seminar in Population Genetics ot Do- 
mestic Animals (3) Second semester Prerequisites: 
ZOOL 246 and AGRI 401 or their equivalents. Current 
literature and research dealing with the principles of 
population genetics as they apply to breeding and 
selection programs for the genetic improvement of 
domestic animals, population structure, estimation of 
genetic parameters, correlated characters, principles 
and methods of selection, relationship and systems of 
mating. 

ANSC 698 Seminar (1) First and second semesters 
Students are required to prepare papers based upon 
current scientific publications relating to animal sci- 
ence, or upon their research work, for presentation 
before and discussion by the class; (1) recent ad- 
vances. (2) nuthtion; (3) physiology: (4) biochemistry 

ANSC 699 Special Problems in Animal Science (1- 
2) First and second semesters Work assigned in 
proportion to amount of credit. Prerequisite: Approval 
of staff Problems will be assigned which relate specifi- 
cally to the character of work the student is pursuing 

ANSC 799 Masters Thesis Research (1-6) 



ANSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

Applied Mathematics 
Program 

Professor and Director: Wolfe 
(ENAE) Professors: Donaldson, Plotkin 
-Associate Professors: Jones 
(BMGT) Professors: Bodin, Gass 
Associate Professors: Golden, Fromovitz. 
Widhelm 

Assistant Professors: Alt, Assad, Ball 
(ENCH) Professors: Cadman. Gentry 
(ENCE) Professor: Sternberg 
Assoc/afe Professor: Garber 
(CMSC) Professors: Edmundson. Kanal, 
Minker, Stewart 

Associate Professors: Agrawala, Basili 
Assistant Professor: O'Leary 
(ECON) Professors: Almon, Kelejian 
Associate Professor: Betancourt 
(ENEE) Professors: DeClaris. Davisson, 
Harger, Newcomb, Taylor 
Associate Professors: Baras, Blankenship, 
Ephremides, Tretter 
(MATH) Professors: Antman, Douglis, 
Hummel, Osborn, Pearl. Wolfe 
Associate Professors: Berenstein, Cooper. 
Fitzpatrick, Johnson, Liu, Sather. Schneider 
Assistant Professor: Arnold 
(ENME) Professors: Cunniff, Marks, Yang 
Associate Professors: Walston 
(METO) Professor: Baer 
Associate Professors: Rodenhuis. Vernekar 
Assistant Professor: Robock 
(IPST) Research Professors: Babuska, 
Dorfman, Faller, Hubbard, Kellogg, Lashinsky, 
Olver, Yorke, Zwanzig 
Associate Professor: Johnson 
(PHYS) Professors: Banerjee. Brill. Dragt, 
Ferrell, Glasser, Glick. Greenberg, Griffin, 
MacDonald, Misner, Prange, Sucher. Woo 
Associate Professors: Fivel, Kim, Korenman 
(STAT) Professors: Mikulski, Yang 
Associate Professor: Smith 
Assistant Professors: Kedem. Slud 
The Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics Pro- 
gram otters the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy These are awarded for 
graduate study and research in mathematics 
and its applications in the engineenng. physical, 
and social sciences. In addition, the Applied 
Mathematics Program offers certified minors in 
applied mathematics for graduate students not 
enrolled in the Program. 

The Program is administratively affiliated 
with the Department of Mathematics. In particu- 
lar, under this arrangement the Department of 
Mathematics assumes the responsibility for the 
administration of the applied mathematics 
courses under the MAPL label. Moreover, the 
Graduate Office of the Department maintains 
the records of all students in the Applied Mathe- 
matics Program and handles correspondence 
with those applying for admission. However, it is 
important that any application for admission 
indicates clearly whether a student wishes to 
enter the Mathematics (MATH) or the Applied 
Mathematics (MAPL) Program. 

The faculty considers the pnmary aim of 
applied mathematics to be the understanding of 
a wide spectrum of scientific phenomena 
through the use of mathematical ideas, meth- 
ods, and techniques The applied mathemati- 
cian should be both a mathematical specialist 
and a versatile scientist, whose interests and 
motivations derive from a strong desire to con- 
front highly complex or descriptive situations 
with mathematical analysis and ideas. In line 



52 Applied Mathematics Program 



with this, at least half of the required work is 
expected to be in courses with primarily mathe- 
matical content, and the remaining part has to 
include a coherent set of courses in some field 
of application outside of the usual mathematics 
curriculum. Some of the areas currently pursued 
by graduate students in the Program are various 
areas of physics, information structures, mete- 
orology, operations research, pattern recogni- 
tion, structural mechanics, and systems and 
control theory. Many other areas of study are 
available through the participating departments. 
It may also be noted that the faculty includes a 
strong group in numerical analysis and that 
many students include courses on numerical 
and scientific computing in their programs. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

In addition to the general requirements of the 
Graduate School, applicants for admission to 
graduate study in the Program should have 
completed, with at least a B average (3.0 on a 
4.0 scale), an undergraduate program of study 
which includes a strong emphasis on mathe- 
matics. The student's general ability for gradu- 
ate study in the Program and mathematical 
capabilities will be determined from his or her 
record or by special examination. 

A mathematical preparation with grades of 
B or better at least through the level of ad- 
vanced calculus in a school of good academic 
standing will normally be considered sufficient 
demonstration of the required mathematical 
background. Previous education in some part of 
an applicant's area, such as physics, one of the 
engineering disciplines, economics, etc., and a 
basic competence in computational techniques 
will be favorably considered in a student's appli- 
cation for admission to the Program, although 
this is not a prerequisite. 

When a student has decided upon an area 
of specialization, a study advisory committee is 
appointed by the Director of the Program. This 
committee, working together with the student, is 
responsible for formulating a course of study 
leading toward the degree sought. This course 
of study must constitute a unified, coherent 
program in an acceptable field of specialization 
of applied mathematics and must meet with the 
approval of the Graduate Committee for Ap- 
plied Mathematics. 

Besides any other requirements specified 
by the Graduate School, the following specific 
conditions must be met for an M.A. degree in 
Applied Mathematics: 

(1) At least 12 of the 24 required course 
credits for the M.A. degree with thesis are in 
courses with primarily mathematical content. At 
least 6 of these 1 2 credits are on the 600-800 
level. At least 3 of the 12 credits are in a course 
on numerical analysis. At least 1 of the 12 
credits is in an approved applied mathematics 
seminar. 

(2) The 24 required course credits include 
either 6 credits at the 600-800 level, or alterna- 
tively, 9 credits of which 3 are at the 600-800 
level, in courses whose content is primarily in 
the student's chosen field(s) of application. 

No course may be used to meet the 
requirements under both (1) and (2) above. 

(1) At least 15 of the 30 required course 
credits for the non-thesis master's option are in 
courses with primarily mathematical content. At 
least 9 of these 15 credits are on a 600-800 
level. At least 3 of these 15 credits are in a 
course on numerical analysis. At least 1 of the 
15 credits is an approved applied mathematics 
seminar. 

(2) The 30 required course credits include 
either 6 credits at the 600-800 level, or, al- 



ternately, 9 credits of which 3 are at the 600- 
800 level, in courses whose content is primarily 
in the student's chosen field(s) of application. 

No course may be used to meet the 
requirements under both (1) and (2) above. 

The student must pass the comprehensive 
examination for the M.A. degree with thesis. 
The examination consists of at least three parts, 
with at least one of the parts in a mathematics 
area, and at least one of the parts in an area of 
application. The parts shall be taken as closely 
together as possible. 

The student in the doctoral program must 
take a minimum of 36 hours of courses exclu- 
sive of dissertation research. At least 24 of 
these 36 credits are at the 600-800 level. 

A transfer of at most 27 credits of gradu- 
ate-level work taken at a regionally accredited 
institution prior to or after admission to the 
Ph.D. Program is permitted providing the (1) the 
Graduate Committee for Applied Mathematics 
has approved the transfer; (2) a grade of B or 
better was earned in the courses taken (no 
course with pass/fail grades will be accepted); 
(3) the credit was earned within the time limit 
imposed for completing the Ph.D. degree at the 
University of Maryland. 

Course Distribution: 1) at least 18 of the 
required 36 credits are in courses with primarily 
mathematical content. At least 9 of these 18 
credits are on the 600-800 level. At least 3 of 
the 18 credits are in numerical analysis. At least 
2 of the 1 8 credits are in approved mathematics 
seminars. 2) The 36 credits include either 6 
credits at the 600-800 level or alternately 9 
credits of which 3 are at the 600-800 level in 
courses whose content is primarily in the stu- 
dent's chosen field(s) of application. 3) No 
course may be used to meet the requirements 
under both items (1) and (2) above. 

The student must pass the comprehensive 
Examination for the Ph.D. The examination con- 
sists of at least three parts, with at least one of 
the parts in an area of mathematics, and at 
least one of the parts in an area of application. 
The parts shall be taken as closely together as 
possible. 

In addition the student must pass the Can- 
didacy Examination for the Ph.D. degree. The 
Candidacy Examination is an oral examination 
which serves as a test of the detailed prepara- 
tion of a student in the area of specialization 
and seeks to discover if he or she has a deep 
enough understanding to carry out the pro- 
posed research. The examination assumes fur- 
ther advanced course work beyond the Com- 
prehensive Examination. 

Certified Minors 

The Applied Mathematics Program offers cer- 
tified minors in applied mathematics to regular 
graduate students who are enrolled in a gradu- 
ate degree program of the University of Mary- 
land other than the Program itself. The success- 
ful completion of the requirements for such a 
minor will be recorded in the student's trans- 
cripts. Moreover, a number of departments par- 
ticipating in the Applied Mathematics Program 
permit the requirements for the certified minor 
to replace part of the degree requirements of 
the major department. 

A student wishing to pursue a certified 
minor in applied mathematics must fill out an 
application form for participation in the Certified 
Minor Program. Such forms are available from 
the office of the Director of the Applied Mathe- 
matics Program. 

The Certified Minor Program at the Mas- 
ter's level must contain at least either 6 semes- 
ter hours in 400-level courses and 3 semester 
hours in 600-level courses, or 6 semester hours 



in 600-level courses. At the doctoral level the 
Certified Minor Program must contain at least 9 
semester hours of graduate credit, of which at 
most 3 hours may be on the 400-level. 

Courses 

MAPL 460 Computational Methods (3) Prerequi- 
sites: MATH 240, 241, and CMSC 1 10, or equivalent. 
Basic computational methods for interpolation, least 
squares, approximation, numerical quadrature, numeri- 
cal solution of polynomial and transcendental equa- 
tions, systems of linear equations and initial value 
problems for ordinary differential equations. Emphasis 
on the methods and their computational properties 
rather than on their analytic aspects. (Listed also as 
CMSC 460.) 

MAPL 470 Numerical Mathematics: Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 240 and 241; CMSC 110 or 
equivalent. This course, with MAPL/CMSC 471, forms 
a one-year introduction to numerical analysis at the 
advanced undergraduate level. Interpolation, numeri- 
cal differentiation and integration, solution of nonlinear 
equations, acceleration of convergence, numerical 
treatment of differential equations. Topics will be sup- 
plemented with programming assignments. (Listed 
also CMSC 470.) 

MAPL 471 Numerical Mathematics: Linear Algebra 

(3) Prerequisites: MATH 240 and MATH 241; CMSC 
1 10 or equivalent. The course, with MAPL/CMSC 470, 
forms a one-year introduction to numerical analysis at 
the advanced undergraduate level. Direct solution of 
linear systems, norms, least squares problems, the 
symmetric eigenvalue problem, basic iterative meth- 
ods. Topics will be supplemented with programming 
assignments. (Listed also as CMSC 471.) 

MAPL 477 Optimization (3) Prerequisite: CMSC 110 
and MATH 405 or MATH 474. Linear programming 
including the simplex algorithm and dual linear pro- 
grams, convex sets and elements of convex pro- 
gramming, combinatorial optimization integer pro- 
gramming (Listed also as CMSC 477.) 

MAPL 498 Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics 
(1-3) Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Topics 
in applied mathematics of special interest to advanced 
undergraduate students. May be repeated to a maxi- 
mum of six credits if the subject matter is different. 

MAPL 600 Advanced Linear Numerical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: MAPL 470. 471 and MATH 405 or 
MATH 474; or consent of instructor. Advanced topics 
in numerical linear algebra, such as dense eigenvalue 
problems, sparse elimination, iterative methods, and 
other topics. (Same as CMSC 770.) 

MAPL 604 Numerical Solution of Nonlinear Equa- 
tions (3) Prerequisites: MAPL 470, 471 and MATH 
410; or consent of instructor. Numerical solution of 
nonlinear equations in one and several variables. 
Existence questions. Minimization methods. Selected 
applications. (Same as CMSC 772.) 

MAPL 607 Advanced Numerical Optimization (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 410 and MAPL/CMSC 477; or 
equivalent. Modern numerical methods for solving 
unconstrained and constrained nonlinear optimization 
problems in finite dimensions. Design of computational 
algorithms and on the analysis of their properties. 

MAPL 610 Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differen- 
tial Equations (3) Prerequisites: MAPL/CMSC 470 
and MATH 414; or consent of instructor. Methods for 
solving initial value problems in ordinary differential 
equations. Single step and multi-step methods, stabili- 
ty and convergence, adaptive methods. Shooting 
methods for boundary value problems. 

MAPL 612 Numerical Methods in Partial Differential 
Equations (3) Prerequisites: Concurrent registration in 
MATH/MAPL 680 or in MAPL 650; or consent of the 
instructor. Introduction to problems and methodolo- 
gies of the solution of partial differential equations. 
Finite difference methods for elliptic, parabolic, and 
hyperbolic equations, first order systems, and eigen- 
value problems Variational formulation of elliptic prob- 
lems. The finite element method and its relation to 
(mite difference methods. 

MAPL 614 Mathematics of the Finite Element Meth- 
od (3) Prerequisites: Concurrent registration in 
MATH/MAPL 681 or in MATH/MAPL 685, or MAPL 
612 and consent of instructor Variational formulations 



Architecture Program 53 



of linear and nonlinear elliptic boundary value prob- 
lems; formulation of the finite element method, con- 
struction of finite element subspaces; error estimates; 
eigenvalue problems; time dependent problems. 

MAPL 640 System Theory (3) General system mo- 
dels. State variables and state spaces. Differential 
dynamical systems. Discrete time systems Linearity 
and its implications. Controllability and observability. 
State space structure and representation Realization 
theory and algorithmic solutions Parametenzations of 
linear systems; canonical forms. Basic results from 
stability theory. Stabilizability Fine structure of linear 
multivanable systems; minimal indices and polynomial 
matrices. Inverse nyquist array Geometric methods in 
design. Interplay between frequency domain and state 
space design methods. Interactive computer-aided 
design methods. (Listed also as ENEE 663) 

MAPL 641 Optimal Control (3) Prerequisite; ENEE 
460 or consent of the instructor. General optimization 
and control problems Static optimization problems. 
Linear and nonlinear programming methods. Geomet- 
ric interpretations. Dynamic optimization problems. 
Discrete time maximum principle and applications. 
Pontryagm maximum principle in continuous time. Dy- 
namic-programming Feedback realization of solu- 
tions. Extensive applications to problems in optimal 
design, navigation and guidance, power systems. In- 
troduction to state constrained and singular optimal 
control problems. (Listed also as ENEE 664.) 

MAPL 644 Estimation and Detection Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: ENEE 620 or equivalent or consent of 
instructor. Estimation of unknown parameters, Cra- 
mer-Rao lower bound: optimum (map) demodulation: 
filtering, amplitude and angle modulation, comparison 
with conventional systems; statistical decision theory; 
Bayes, Mmimax, Neyman/Pearson. Cnteria-68 simple 
and composite hypotheses; application to coherent 
and incoherent signal detection; M-Ary hypotheses; 
application to uncoded and coded digital communica- 
tion systems. (Listed also as ENEE 621.) 

MAPL 650 Advanced Mathematics for the Physical 
Sciences I (3) Prerequisites: MATH 240 and 410. 
Effective analytic methods for the study of linear and 
nonlinear equations that arise in the physical sciences; 
algebraic equations, integral equations and ordinary 
differential equations. (Not open to graduate students 
in MATH or MAPL without special permission from 
their advisor.) 

MAPL 651 Advanced Mathematics for the Physical 
Sciences II (3) Prerequisite MAPL 650. Continuation 
of MAPL 650. Partial differential equations; linear and 
nonlinear eigenvalue problems (Not open to graduate 
students in MATH or MAPL without special permission 
from their advisor.) 

MAPL 655 Asymptotic Analysis and Special Func 
tions I (3) Prerequisite: MATH 413 or MATH 463 
Transcendental equations, gamma function, orthogo 
nal polynomials, Bessel functions, integral transforms. 
Watson's lemma. LaPlace's method, stationary phase 
analytic theory of ordinary differential equations, Liou 
ville-Green (or WKBJ) approximation. (Cross-listed 
with MATH 655) 

MAPL 656 Asymptotic Analysis and Special Func- 
tions II (3) Prerequisite: MATH/MAPL 655. Steepest 
descents, coalescing saddle-points, singular integral 
equations, irregular singularities, Bessel, hyper- 
geometric. and Legendre functions, Euler-MacLaurin 
formula. Darboux's method, turning points, phase shift. 
(Cross-listed with MATH 656) 

MAPL 670 Ordinary Differential Equations I (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 405 and 410 or the equivalent. 
Existence and uniqueness, linear systems usually with 
Floquet theory for periodic systems, linearization and 
stability, planar systems usually with Poincare-Bendix- 
son theorem. (Same as MATH 670) 

MAPL 671 Ordinary Differential Equations II (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 630 and MATH/MAPL 670 or 
equivalent The content of this course varies with the 
interests of the instructor and the class Stability 
theory, control, time delay systems. Hamiltonian sys- 
tems, bifurcation theory, and boundary value prob- 
lems (Same as MATH 671) 

MAPL 673 Classical Methods in Partial Differential 
Equations I (3) Prerequisite MATH 410 or equivalent 
Cauchy problem for the wave equation and heat 
equation, Dinchlet and Neumann problem for 
Laplace's equation. Classification of equations. 



Cauchy-Kowaleski theorem. General second order lin- 
ear and nonlinear elliptic and parabolic equations. 
(Same as MATH 673.) 

MAPL 674 Classical Methods in Partial Differential 
Equations II (3) Prerequisite: MATH/MAPL 673. Gen- 
eral theory of first order partial differential equations. 
characteristics, complete integrals. Hamilton-Jacobi 
theory. Hyperbolic systems in two independent varia- 
bles, existence and uniqueness, shock waves, applica- 
tions to compressible flow (Same as MATH 674.) 

MAPL 680 Eigenvalue and Boundary Value Prob- 
lems I (3) Prerequisite: MATH 405 and 410 or equiva- 
lent. Operational methods applied to ordinary differen- 
tial equations Introduction to linear spaces, compact 
operators in Hilbert space, study of Eigenvalues. 
(Same as MATH 680.) 

MAPL 681 Eigenvalue and Boundary Value Prob- 
lems II (3) Prerequisite MATH/MAPL 680. Boundary 
value problems for linear differential equations. Meth- 
od of energy integrals applied to Laplace's equation, 
heat equation and the wave equation. Study of Eigen- 
values. (Same as MATH 681.) 

MAPL 685 Modern Methods in Partial Differential 
Equations I (3) Prerequisite: MATH 630 and 631 
Spaces of distributions. Fourier transforms, concept of 
weak and strong solutions. Existence, uniqueness and 
regularity theory for elliptic and parabolic problems 
using methods of functional analysis. (Same as MATH 
685.) 

MAPL 686 Modern Methods in Partial Differential 
Equations II (3) Prerequisite: MATH/MAPL 685. Em- 
phasis on nonlinear problems. Sobolev embedding 
theorems, methods of monotonicity, compactness, 
applications to elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic prob- 
lems. (Same as MATH 686.) 

MAPL 698 Advanced Topics in Applied Mathemat- 
ics (1-4) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Repeata- 
ble if topic differs. 

MAPL 699 Applied Mathematics Seminar (1-3) Pre- 
requisite: Consent of instructor. Seminar to acquaint 
students with a variety of applications of mathematics 
and to develop skills in presentation techniques. Re- 
peatable if topic differs. 

MAPL 701 Introduction to Continuum Mechanics 

(3) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Background 
from algebra and geometry, kinematics of deforma- 
tion Stress equations of motion, thermodynamics of 
deforming continua Theory of constitutive relations. 
Materials with memory Initial boundary value prob- 
lems of nonlinear solid and fluid thermomechanics. 
Boundary value problems of linear theories of solids 
and fluids. 

MAPL 710 Linear Elasticity (3) Prerequisite: MAPL 
701 or consent of instructor Formulation of the equa- 
tions. Compatability. uniquess. existence, representa- 
tion and qualitative behavior of solutions. Variational 
principles. St. Venant beam problems, plane strain and 
plane stress, half-space problems, contact problems, 
vibration problems, wave propagation. Emphasis is 
placed on formulation and technique rather than on 
specific examples. 

MAPL 711 Non-Linear Elasticity (3) Prerequisite 
MAPL 701. or consent of instructor Formulation of 
initial boundary value problems. Constituive restric- 
tions. Special solutions Perturbation methods and 
their validity Theories of rods and shells. Buckling and 
stability Shock propagation. 

MAPL 720 Fluid Dynamics I (3) Prerequisite: Consent 
of instructor. A mathematical formulation and treat- 
ment of problems arising in the theory of incompressi- 
ble, compressible and viscous fluids 

MAPL 721 Fluid Dynamics II (3) Prerequisite: Con- 
sent of instructor. A continuation of MAPL 720 

MAPL 731 Information Theory (3) Corequisite: 
ENEE 620 Prerequisite: STAT 400 or equivalent 
Information measure, entrophy, mutual information: 
source encoding; noiseless coding theorem; noisy 
coding theorem; exponential error bounds; introduc- 
tion to probalistic error correcting codes, block and 
convolutional codes and error bounds; channels with 
memory; continuous channels; rate distortion function 
(Same as ENEE 721.) 

MAPL 732 Error Correcting Codes (3) Introduction 
to linear codes; bounds on the error correction capa- 
bilities of codes; convolutional codes with threshold. 



sequential and Viterbi decoding; cyclic random error 
corrcting codes; P-N sequences; cyclic and convolu- 
tional burst error correcting codes (Listed also as 
ENEE 722 ) 

MAPL 735 Advanced Methods and Algorithms in 
Detection and Filtering (3) Prerequisite ENEE 621 
Foundations of random processes Conditional expec- 
tations Markov processes and martingales ITO calcu- 
lus Detection and estimation of continuous signals 
with continuous observations. Jump processes Detec- 
tion and estimation with discontinuous observations 
Discrete-time case. Fast algorithms for digital filtenng 
problems. (Listed also as ENEE 772 ) 

MAPL 740 Mathematical Methods in Control Engi- 
neering (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 663 or consent of 
instructor. Applications of compactness in control and 
communication, geometric methods in optimal control 
of lumped and distnbuted systems and harmonic anal- 
ysis of linear systems. Applications to control and 
estimation problems. (Listed also as ENEE 760.) 

MAPL 741 Control of Distributed Parameter Sys- 
tems (3) Prerequisite: An introductory course in func- 
tional analytic methods at the level of ENEE 760, and 
background in control and system theory Study of 
systems governed by partial differential equations 
Delay systems. Boundary and distributed control, 
Lyapunov stability Optimal control of systems gov- 
erned by partial differential equations and of delay 
systems. Applications to continuum mechanics, dis- 
tributed networks, biology, economics, and engineer- 
ing. (Same as ENEE 761.) 

MAPL 742 Stochastic Control (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 
620 or equivalent; and ENEE 663/MAPL 640; or 
consent of the instructor. Stochastic control systems, 
numerical methods for the Ricatti equation, the 
separation principle, control of linear systems with 
Gaussian signals and quadratic cost, non-linear 
stochastic control, stochastic stability, introduction to 
stochastic games. (Same as ENEE 762 ) 

MAPL 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

MAPL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Architecture Program 

Professor and Dean: Hill 
Assistant Dean: Fogle 
Assistant to the Dean Ratcliff 
Professors: Hill. Schlesinger, Loss 
Associate Professors: Bechhoefer. Bennett, 
Fogle, Lewis, Lord, Senkevitch 
Assistant Professors: Cass, Constant, Dean, 
DuPuy, Johns, Miner, Muse, Stup , Vann 
Visiting Professors: Peterson, Stanton 
Lecturers: Arikoglu, Axlell, Bullock. Flynn, 
Kramer, Li, Percival, Rounds, Simmons, 
Wilkes 

The School of Architecture offers a graduate 
program leading to the professional degree. 
Master of Architecture The Schools basic ob- 
jective is to provide the highest possible quality 
professional education and training in architec- 
ture. Its program is organized around required 
courses in architectural and urban design, ar- 
chitectural history and theory and architectural 
science and technology. Electives in Architec- 
ture and related fields are available in a curricu- 
lum that is rigorous and challenging 
The School is accredited by the National Archi- 
tectural Accreditation Board. It is a member of 
the Association of Collegiate Schools of 
Architecture assigned to the Northeastern Re- 
gion. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Admission to the graduate program is competi- 
tive Candidates must satisfy the general 
requirements of the Graduate School and sub- 
mit the following: 1) three letters of recommen- 
dation from persons competent to |udge the 



54 Architecture Program 



applicant's probable success in graduate archi- 
tectural school; 2) results of the Graduate Re- 
cord Examination aptitude and advanced tests 
(not over five years old); and 3) evidence of 
creative ability in the form of a portfolio of 
drawings, photographs, or other expressive 
media; details concerning format and content 
may be obtained from the School of Architec- 
ture. 

Applications will be considered from three 
categories of students: 1) students with four- 
year baccalaureate degrees (architecture or 
equivalent major) from accredited architecture 
schools; 2) students with baccalaureate de- 
grees not in architecture from an accredited 
college or university who successfully complete 
specified undergraduate prerequisites which 
are outlined by the School of Architecture; and 
3) students with an accredited professional 
degree in architecture, Bachelor or Master of 
Architecture. Students are expected to enroll on 
a full-time basis. For complete information on 
curricula requirements for these categories, 
write to the School of Architecture. 

1) Students entering the program with a 
four-year baccalaureate degree in architecture 
from an accredited college or university nor- 
mally require two years of graduate study to 
complete the requirements for the professional 
degree, Master of Architecture. The established 
curriculum requires four semesters of academic 
work emcompassing a total of 60 credits. Addi- 
tional credits may be required depending upon 
the admissions committee's evaluation of the 
individual's academic and architectural experi- 
ence. 

2) Students entering the professional pro- 
gram with other than architecture undergradu- 
ate majors will normally require three years 
(including summer work) to complete all 
requirements for the Master of Architecture, 
including prerequisites. Students in this catego- 
ry will be admitted as undergraduate special 
students. They are expected to make up the 
specific coursework, or its equivalent, required 
for the Bachelor of Science with a major in 
architecture, before being admitted to graduate 
status. Although these students will not auto- 
matically be candidates for, nor receive, the 
B.S. degree, they could, at their option, qualify 
for and receive the B.S. degree if they meet all 
applicable University and School of Architec- 
ture requirements. Information on required 
courses and curriculum may be obtained from 
the School of Architecture. 

3) A special one-year option leading to the 
Master of Architecture degree is available to 
those students already possessing a profes- 
sional degree in architecture (B. Arch, or M. 
Arch.) from an accredited program. This option 
is designed to accommodate the needs of stu- 
dents who wish to do advanced, highly-special- 
ized work beyond that required for the profes- 
sional degree. Applicants must specify in detail 
the nature of the proposed course of study, for 
reviewal and approval by the admissions com- 
mittee prior to their admission. They must com- 
plete a total of 30 credits, including ARCH 799 
Thesis in Architecture (6 credits). At least 12 
credits, other than thesis, shall be 600-level or 
above. All course selections must be approved 
by the graduate committee of the School. 

Presently, areas of concentration in which 
the School has noteworthy resources for ad- 
vanced work are architectural and urban de- 
sign, architectural history and preservation, and 
architectural technology. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The School of Architecture of the University of 
Maryland is ideally located between Washing- 
ton, D.C. and Baltimore, in the midst of a large 



number of historical communities and a varied 
physical environment. The resulting opportunity 
for environmental design study is unsurpassed. 
Resources of the School include a modern 
physical plant designed for environmental de- 
sign education; extensive on-site libraries of 
books, current periodicals and slides; a faculty 
whose credentials encompass expertise in de- 
sign, architectural structures, solar and conven- 
tional heating and cooling system design, ener- 
gy optimization, architectural history and pres- 
ervation, urban planning, landscape architec- 
ture and other environmental design speciali- 
ties. The School also provides graduate stu- 
dents an opportunity for professional experi- 
ence and service through its nonprofit Center 
for Architectural Design and Research, CADRE 
Corporation, housed in the School, whose mis- 
sion is to broaden the educational experience of 
students through environmental design serv- 
ices directed by faculty members, rendered to a 
variety of clients. A limited number of stipends 
for graduate students are normally available 
through participation in CADRE Corporation 
projects. 

Financial Assistance 

The School of Architecture offers a limited and 
varying number of teaching and research 
assistantships, scholarships, fellowships and 
internships. Applicants should apply for finan- 
cial assistance when submitting the application 
for admission. 

Courses 

ARCH 400 Architecture Studio III (4) Prerequisites— 
ARCH 301 with a grade of C or better, and ARCH 311. 
Corequisite — ARCH 410. except by permission of the 
dean. Continuation of design studio, with emphasis on 
comprehensive building design and introduction to 
urban design factors. Lecture and studio 9 hours per 
week. 

ARCH 401 Architecture Studio IV (4) Prerequisite— 
ARCH 400 with a grade of C or better and ARCH 410. 
corequisite — ARCH 411, except by permission of the 
dean. Continuation of design studio with emphasis on 
urban design factors. Lecture and studio, 9 hours per 
week. 

ARCH 402 Architecture Studio III (6) Prerequisite: 
ARCH 303 with a grade of C or better. Design projects 
involving the elements of environmental control, basic 
structural systems, building processes and materials. 
Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per 
week. 

ARCH 403 Architecture Studio IV (6) Prequisite: 
ARCH 402 with a grade of C or better. Design projects 
involving forms generated by different structural sys- 
tems, environmental controls and methods of con- 
struction. Three hours 

ARCH 412 Architectural Structures II (3) Prerequi- 
site: ARCH 312. Principles and applications in analysis 
and design of determinate structures: design of timber 
and steel structures; principles of masonry design. 

ARCH 413 Structural Systems in Architecture (3) 

Theory and application of selected complex structural 
systems as they relate to architectural decisions. Pre- 
requisite, ARCH 410 or by permission of the instructor. 
Seminar, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 414 Solar Energy Applications for Buildings 

(3) Prerequisite: ARCH 313 or permission of instructor. 
Methods of utilizing solar energy to provide heating, 
cooling, hot water, and electricity for buildings and 
related techniques for reducing energy consumption. 

ARCH 415 Environmental Control Systems II (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 313. Theory and practice of 
managing energy, water and waste in buildings. 

ARCH 416 Architectural Structures III (3) Prequisite 
arch 412. Introduction to indeterminate structures. 
Principles and applications in the design of reinforced 
concrete structures, introduction to wind and seismic 
loads; foundation systems. 

ARCH 417 Environmental Control Systems III (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 415. Design principles and practi- 



cal applications of lighting and acoustics, with empha- 
sis on the integration of environmental and structural 
systems; vertical transportation; fire protection. 

ARCH 418 Selected Topics in Architectural Sci- 
ence (1-4) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Re- 
peatable to a maximum of 7 credits, provided content 
is different. 

ARCH 419 Independent Studies in Architectural 
Science (1-4) Proposed work must have a faculty 
sponsor and receive approval of the curriculum com- 
mittee. Repeatable to a maximum of 7 credits. 

ARCH 420 History of American Architecture (3) 

Prequisite: ARCH 221 or permission of instructor. 
American architecture from the late 1 7th to the 20th 
century. 

ARCH 421 Seminar in the History of American 
Architecture (3) Prerequisite: ARCH 420 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Advanced investigation of historical 
problems in American architecture. 

ARCH 422 French Architecture 1750-1800 (3) 

French architectural theory and practice of the second 
half of the eighteenth century. A reading knowledge of 
French will be required. Colloquium and independent 
research. By permission of the instructor. 

ARCH 424 History of Russian Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 221. or permission of instructor. 
Major trends in Russian architecture in the medieval 
(10th— 17th centuries), imperial (1703—1917), and 
soviet periods. 

ARCH 427 Theories of Architecture (3) Prerequisite: 
ARCH 221, or permission of instructor. Selected his- 
torical and modern theories of architectural design. For 
architecture majors only. 

ARCH 428 Selected Topics in Architectural History 
(1-3) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Repeatable 
to a maximum of 7 credits, provided the content is 
different 50ARCH 429 Independent Studies in Ar- 
chitectural History (1-4) Proposed work must have a 
faculty sponsor and receive approval of the curriculum 
committee. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. 

ARCH 431 History of Ancient Architecture (3) Pre- 
requisite: ARCH 221, or permission of instructor. 
Architecture of the ancient world through the Roman 
period, with emphasis on classical Greece and Rome. 

ARCH 432 History of Medieval Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 221, or permission of instructor. 
Architecture of Western Europe from the early Chris- 
tian and Byzantine periods through the late gothic, with 
consideration of parallel developments in the eastern 
world. 

ARCH 433 History of Renaissance Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 221, or permission of instructor. 
Renaisssance architectural principles and trends in 
the 15th and 16th centuries and their modifications in 
the Baroque period. 

ARCH 434 History of Modern Architecture (3) Pre- 
requisite: ARCH 221 , or permission of instructor. Archi- 
tectural trends and principles from 1 750 to the present, 
with emphasis on developments since the mid- 19th 
century. 

ARCH 435 Seminar in the History of Modern 
Architecture (3) Prerequisite: ARCH 434 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Advanced investigation of historical 
problems in modern architecture. 

ARCH 442 Studies in Visual Design (3) Prerequisite: 
ARCH 303. Studio work in visual design independent 
of architectural problem solving. 

ARCH 443 The Photography of Architecture (3) 

One and one-half hours lecture and four hours labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 344. Examination of 
the meaning of documentation and the use of photog- 
raphy in the evaluation of architecture. Architecture 
students only, except by permission of the instructor. 

ARCH 447 Advanced Seminar in Photography (3) 

Prerequisites: ARCH 340 or APDS 337 or JOUR 351; 
and consent of instructor. Advanced study of photo- 
graphic criticism through empirical methods, for stu- 
dents proficient in photographic skills. Photographic 
assignments, laboratory, seminar, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 448 Selected Topics in Visual Studies (1-4) 

Prerequisite. Consent of instructor. Repeatable to a 
maximum of 7 credits, provided the content is different. 

ARCH 449 Independent Studies in Visual Studies 
(1-4) Proposed work must have a faculty sponsor and 



Art Program 55 



receive approval of the curriculum committee Re- 
peatable to a maximum of 6 credits. 

ARCH 450 Introduction to Urban Planning (3) Intro- 
duction to city planning theory, methodology and tech- 
niques, dealing with normative, urban, structural, eco- 
nomic, social aspects of the city; urban planning as a 
process. Architectural majors or by permission of the 
instructor. Lecture, seminar, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 451 Urban Design Seminar (3) Prerequisite: 
ARCH 350 or permission of the instructor. Advanced 
investigation into problems of analysis and evaluation 
of the design of urban areas, spaces and complexes 
with emphasis on physical and social considerations. 
effects of public policies, through case studies Field 
observations. 

ARCH 453 Urban Problems Seminar (3) Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. A case study of urban devel- 
opment issues, dealing primarily with socio-economic 
aspects of changes in the built environment. 

ARCH 454 Theories of Urban Form (3) Theories of 
planning and design of urban spaces, building com- 
plexes, and new communities. 

ARCH 458 Selected Topics in Urban Planning (1-4) 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Repeatable to a 
maximum of 7 credits, provided the content is different. 

ARCH 459 Independent Studies in Urban Planning 
(1-4) Proposed work must have a faculty sponsor and 
receive approval of the curriculum committee. Re- 
peatable to a maximum of 6 credits. 

ARCH 460 Site Analysis and Design (3) Principles 
and methods of site analysis; the influence of natural 
and man-made site factors on site design and archi- 
tectural form. For architecture majors only, or by 
permission of instructor 

ARCH 470 Computer Applications in Architecture 

(3) Prerequisite ARCH 302 or permission of instructor. 
Introduction to computer programming and utilization, 
with emphasis on architectural applications. 

ARCH 472 Economic Determinants in Architecture 

(3) Introduction to economic factors influencing archi- 
tectural form and design, including land economics, 
real estate, financing, project development, financial 
planning, construction and cost control. 

ARCH 478 Selected Topics in Architecture (1-4) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Repeatable to a 
maximum of 7 credits, provided the content is different. 

ARCH 479 Independent Studies in Architecture (1- 

4) Proposed work must have a faculty sponsor and 
receive approval of the curriculum committee. Re- 
peatable to a maximum of 6 credits. 

ARCH 480 Problems and Methods of Architectural 
Preservation (3) Prerequisite: ARCH 420 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Theory and practice of preservation 
in America, with emphasis on the problems and tech- 
niques of community preservation. 

ARCH 488 Selected Topics in Architectural Preser- 
vation (1-4) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Re- 
peatable to a maximum of seven credits, provided the 
content is different. 

ARCH 489 Independent Studies in Architectural 
Preservation (1-4) Proposed work must have a facul- 
ty sponsor and receive approval of the curriculum 
committee Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. 

ARCH 600 Architecture Studio V (6) Prerequisite 
ARCH 403, or equivalent. Comprehensive building and 
urban design; studio options in advanced topical prob- 
lems. Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per 
week 

ARCH 601 Architecture Studio VI (6) Prerequisite: 
ARCH 600 Continuation of arch 600 Three hours of 
lecture and six hours of studio per week. 

ARCH 612 Advanced Structural Analysis In 
Architecture (3) Prerequisite: ARCH 416 Qualitative 
and quantitative analysis and design of selected com- 
plex structural systems 

ARCH 613 Structural Systems In Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 416 or permission of instructor. 
Theory and application of selected complex structural 
systems as they relate to architectural decisions. 

ARCH 614 Environmental Systems In Architecture 

(3) Prerequisite: ARCH 415 and 417 or permission of 
instructor Qualitative analysis of selected environ- 
mental systems and design determinants 



ARCH 678 Selected Topics in Architecture (1-6) 
Prerequisite Permission of instructor Repeatable to a 
maximum of six credits provided the subject matter is 
different. 

ARCH 679 Independent Studies in Architecture (1- 
6) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Repeatable to a 
maximum of six credits. 

ARCH 700 Architecture Studio VII (6) Prerequisite 
ARCH 601 Continuation of ARCH 601 . Three hours of 
lecture and six hours of studio per week. 

ARCH 770 Professional Practice (3) Prerequisite: 
ARCH 601. Project management, organizational, legal, 
economic and ethical aspects of architecture. 

ARCH 797 Thesis Proseminar (3) Prerequisite 
ARCH 601 Directed research and preparation of the- 
sis program. 

ARCH 798 Thesis in Architecture (1-6) Prerequi- 
sites: ARCH 700 and 797 

ARCH 799 Masters Thesis Research (1-6) 



Art Program 



Professor and Chairman; Driskell 
Professors: Campbell, deLeiris, Denny, 
Levitine, Lynch, Morrison, Pemberton, Reanck 
Associate Professors: DiFederico, Farquhar, 
Forbes, Gelman, Johns, Klank, Lapinski, 
Niese, Spiro, Truitt, Withers 
Assistant Professors: DeMonte, Ferraioli, 
Hauptman, Krushenick, Patton, Puryear, Reid, 
Spaulding, Weigl, Wheelock, Willis 

The Department of Art offers programs of grad- 
uate study leading to the degrees of Master of 
Arts in art history, Master of Fine Arts in studio 
art and Doctor of Philosophy in art history. Both 
disciplines, rooted in the concept of art as a 
humanistic experience, share an essential com- 
mon aim: the development of the student's 
aesthetic sensitivity, understanding and knowl- 
edge. The major in art history is committed to 
the advanced study and scholarly interpretation 
of existing works of art, from the prehistoric era 
to the present, while the studio major stresses 
the student's direct participation in the creation 
of works of art. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

For admission to graduate study in studio art, an 
undergraduate degree with an art major from an 
accredited college or university, or its equiva- 
lent, is required. The candidate should have 
approximately 30 credit hours of undergraduate 
work in studio courses and 12 credit hours in art 
history courses. Other humanities area courses 
should be part of the candidate's undergradu- 
ate preparation. In addition, special departmen- 
tal requirements must be met. A candidate for 
the Master of Fine Arts degree will be required 
to pass an oral comprehensive examination, 
present an exhibition of his thesis work, write an 
abstract based on the thesis, and present an 
oral defense of the thesis. 

For admission to graduate study in art 
history, in addition to the approved undergradu- 
ate degree, or its equivalent, special depart- 
mental requirements must be met. Departmen- 
tal requirements for the Master of Arts degree in 
Art History include ARTH 692; reading knowl- 
edge of French or German (evidenced by an 
examination administered by the Art Depart- 
ment); a written comprehensive examination 
which tests the candidate's knowledge and 
comprehension of principal areas and phases 
of art history; a thesis which demonstrates 
competency in research and in original in- 
vestigation by the candidate; and a final oral 



examination on the thesis and the field which it 
represents. 

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in Art History include ARTH 692; reading 
knowledge of French and German; an oral 
examination and a written examination; a dis- 
sertation which demonstrates the candidate's 
capacity to perform independent research in 
the field of art history; and a final oral examina- 
tion on the dissertation and the field it repre- 
sents. 

Applicants are encouraged to submit their 
applications by early March for entrance in the 
Fall and by early October for entrance in Spring 
as the available spaces are usually filled early. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Middle Atlantic Symposium in the History of 
Art is an annual Spring event which is spon- 
sored by the University of Maryland and held 
jointly at the National Gallery of Art and the 
University. This symposium provides the oppor- 
tunity for advanced graduate students from the 
member institutions to present their research in 
professional form. From time to time the De- 
partment of Art also publishes abstracts of the 
Symposium papers in Studies in Art History 
presented at the Middle Atlantic Symposium in 
the History of Art. 

In the summer of 1979, the University of 
Maryland Caesarea Project will begin excava- 
tions at Caesarea Maritima, Israel. Qualified 
graduate students are eligible for participation 
in the excavations, and work at this site may 
lead to MA. or Ph.D. dissertation subjects. 

The University of Maryland is thirty-five 
minutes from the National Gallery, the National 
Collection of Fine Arts and Portrait Gallery, the 
Freer Gallery, the Corcoran Gallery, the Phillips 
Gallery, Dumbarton Oaks, the Hirshhorn Collec- 
tion. In Baltimore, forty-five minutes from the 
University, is the Museum of Art and the Walters 
Gallery. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are 
available in art. 

Additional Information 

Description of Departmental requirements for 
the above programs and other information may 
be obtained from the Department of Art. 

For information on work leading to the 
degree of Master of Education in art education, 
the student is referred to the section devoted to 
Secondary Education in this catalog. 

Courses 

Art Education 

ARTE 600 Advanced Problems in Art Education (3) 

ARTE 601 Advanced Problems in Art Education (3) 

ARTE 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

ART HISTORY 

ARTH 401 Greek and Roman Painting (3) Survey of 
Greek and Roman frescoes and panels, study of 
extant paintings and lost works known only through 
literary sources 

ARTH 402 Greek Art and Archaeology (3) Greek art 
and archaeology from 1000 B.C. to 50 B.C 

ARTH 403 Roman Art and Archaeology (3) Roman 
art and archaeology from Etruscan ongins to Diocle- 
tian. 

ARTH 404 Bronze Age Art (3) Art of the Near East. 
Egypt and Aegean 

ARTH 405 Japanese Painting (3) Survey of Japanese 
painting from the sixth through the sixteenth centunes. 



56 Art Program 



including traditional Buddhist paintings, narrative 
scrolls, and Zen-related ink painting 

ARTH 406 Arts of the East I (3) The arts of Japan and 
China from prehistory to 1400. 

ARTH 407 Arts of the East II (3) The arts of Japan 
and China from the 1400's to the present. 

ARTH 410 Early Christian— Early Byzantine Art (3) 

Sculpture, painting, architecture, and the minor arts 
from about 312 to 726 AD. 

ARTH 411 Byzantine Art, 726-1453 (3) Sculpture, 
painting, architecture and the minor arts from 726 to 
1453 AD. 

ARTH 412 Medieval Art (3) Architecture, sculpute 
and painting in the Middle Ages. First semester will 
stress romanesque. 

ARTH 413 Medieval Art (3) Architecture, sculpture 
and painting in the Middle Ages. Second semester will 
stress the Gothic period. 

ARTH 416 Northern European Painting in the 15th 
Century (3) Painting in the Netherlands, France and 
Germany. 

ARTH 417 Northern European Painting in the 16th 
Century (3) Painting in the Netherlands, France and 
Germany. 

ARTH 422 Early Renaissance Art in Italy (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 1400 
to 1430. 

ARTH 423 Early Renaissance Art in Italy (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 1430 
to 1475. 

ARTH 424 High Renaissance Art in Italy (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 1475 
to 1500. 

ARTH 425 High Renaissance Art in Italy (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 1500 
to 1525. 

ARTH 430 European Baroque Art (3) Architecture, 
sculpture and painting of the major southern European 
centers in the 17th century. 

ARTH 431 European Baroque Art (3) Architecture, 
sculpture and painting of the major northern European 
centers in the 17th century. 

ARTH 434 French Painting (3) French painting from 
1400 to 1600. From Fouquet to Poussin. 

ARTH 435 French Painting (3) French painting from 
1600 to 1800. From Le Brun to David. 

ARTH 440 19th Century European Art (3) Architec- 
ture, sculpture and painting in Europe from neo-classi- 
cism to romanticism. 

ARTH 441 19th Century European Art (3) Architec- 
ture, sculpture and painting in Europe. From realism, to 
impressionism and symbolism. 

ARTH 445 Impressionism and Neo-lmpressionism 

(3) Prerequisite: ARTH 260, 261 or consent of instruc- 
tor. History of impressionism and neo-impressionism: 
artists, styles, art theories, criticism, sources and influ- 
ence on 20th century. 

ARTH 450 20th Century Art (3) Painting, sculpture 
and architecture from the late 19th century to 1920. 

ARTH 451 20th Century Art (3) Painting, sculpture 
and architecture from 1920 to the present. 

ARTH 452 History of Photography (3) History of 
photography as art from 1839 to the present. 

ARTH 454 Nineteenth and Twentieth Century 
Sculpture (3) Trends in sculpture from neo-classicism 
to the present. Emphasis will be put on the redefinition 
of sculpture during the 20th century. 

ARTH 460 History of the Graphic Arts (3) Prerequi- 
site: ARTH 100, or ARTH 260 and 261, or consent of 
instructor. Graphic techniques and styles in Europe 
from 1400 to 1800; contributions of major artists. 

ARTH 462 African Art (3) First semester, the cultures 
west of the Niger River (Nigeria through Mali) from 400 
B.C. to the present. The art is studied through its 
iconography and function in the culture and the inter- 
cultural influences upon the artists, including a study of 
the societies, cults and cermonies during which the art 
was used. 

ARTH 463 African Art (3) Second semester, the 
cultures east and south of Nigeria. The art is studied 



through its iconography and function in the culture and 
the intercultural influences upon the artists, including a 
study of the societies, cults and cermonies during 
which the art was used. 

ARTH 464 African Art Research (3) Seminar with 
concentration on particular aspects of African art. The 
course is given at the Museum of African Art in 
Washington, D. C. 

ARTH 470 Latin American Art (3) Art of the 

prehispanic and the colonial periods. 

ARTH 471 Latin American Art (3) Art of the 19th and 
20th centuries. 

ARTH 473 Arts of Black Americans I (3) The visual 
arts of Black Americans from the colonial period 
through the 19th century, including crafts and decora- 
tive arts. 

ARTH 474 Arts of Black Americans II (3) The visual 
arts of Black Americans in the 20th century, including 
crafts and decorative arts. 

ARTH 476 History of American Art to 1900. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the United 
States from the colonial period to 1900. 

ARTH 477 History of American Art since 1900 (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the United 
States from 1900 to the present. 

ARTH 489 Special Topics in Art History (3) May be 

repeated to a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: 
Consent of department head or instructor. 

ARTH 498 Directed Studies in Art History I (2-3) 

For advanced students, by permission of department 
chairman. Course may be repeated for credit if content 
differs. 

ARTH 499 Directed Studies In Art History II (2-3 

ARTH 612 Romanesque Art (3) Painting and sculp- 
ture in Western Europe in the 1 1 th and 1 2th centuries; 
regional styles; relationships between styles of paint- 
ing and sculpture; religious content. 

ARTH 614 Gothic Art (3) Painting and sculpture in 
Western Europe in the 1 1th and 12th centuries; region- 
al styles; relationships between styles of painting and 
sculpture; religious content. 

ARTH 630 The Art of Mannerism (3) Prerequisite: 
ART 423 or permission of instructor. Mannerism in 
Europe during the 16th century; beginnings in Italy; 
ramifications in France, Germany, Flanders, Spain; 
painting, architecture, and sculpture. 

ARTH 634 French Painting from Lebrun to Ger- 
icault— 1715-1815 (3) Development of iconography 
and style from the Baroque to neo-classicism and 
romanticism. Trends and major artists. 

ARTH 656 19th Century Realism, 1830-1860 (3) 

Courbet and the problem of realism; precursors, David, 
Gericault, landscape schools; Manet; artistic and so- 
cial theories; realism outside France. Prerequisite: 
ART 440 or 441 or equivalent. 

ARTH 662 20th Century European Art (3) Prerequi- 
site: ART 450, 451 or equivalent. A detailed examina- 
tion of the art of a individual country in the 12th 
century: France, Germany, Italy, Spain, England. 

ARTH 676 20th Century American Art (3) Prerequi- 
site: ART 450, 451 or equivalent. The 'Eight,' the 
Armory Show, American abstraction, romantic-realism, 
new deal art projects, American surrealism and ex- 
pressionism. 

ARTH 692 Methods of Art History (3) Methods of 
research and criticism applied to typical art-historical 
problems; bibliography and other research tools. May 
be taken for credit one or two semesters. 

ARTH 694 Museum Training Program (3) 

ARTH 695 Museum Training Program (3) 

ARTH 698 Directed Graduate Studies in Art History 

(3) For advanced graduate students, by permission of 
head of department. Course may be repeated for 
credit if content differs. 

ARTH 699 Special Topics in Art History (3) Prereq- 
uisite: Consent of department head or instructor. 

ARTH 702 Seminar in Classical Art (3) Prerequisite: 
ARTH 402, 403 or permission of instructor. 

ARTH 708 Seminar in Japanese Painting (3) Prereq- 
uisite: ARTH 406 or 407 or permission of instructor. 



Japanese painting of the 14th through 16th centuries, 
and their origins in Chinese models. Course may be 
repeated for a maximum of 6 credits if the content 
differs. 

ARTH 709 Seminar in Early Christian and Byzan- 
tine Art (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 410 or 411 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Course may be repeated for a 
maximum of six credits if the content differs. 

ARTH 712 Seminar in Medieval Art (3) Prerequisite: 
ARTH 412, 413 or permission of instructor. 

ARTH 728 Seminar Topics in Italian Renaissance 

Art (3) Problems selected from significant themes in 
the field of Italian Renaissance art and architecture, 
1200-1600. May be repeated for credit if content 
differs. 

ARTH 736 Seminar in 18th Century European Art 

(3) 

ARTH 740 Seminar (3) Problems derived from the 

development of romantic art during the 18th and 19th 

centuries. 

ARTH 743 Seminar in 19th Century European Art 

(3) Problems derived from the period starting with 
David and ending with Cezanne. 

ARTH 760 Seminar in Contemporary Art (3) 

ARTH 770 Seminar in Latin-American Art (3) Pre- 
requisite: ARTH 471 or permission of instructor. 

ARTH 772 Seminar in Modern Mexican Art (3) 

Prerequisite: ARTH 471 or permission of instructor. 
Problems of Mexican art of the 19th and 20th centu- 
ries; Mexicanismo; the 'mural renaissance'; architec- 
tural regionalism. 

ARTH 774 Seminar in 19th Century American Art 

(3) Problems in architecture and painting from the end 
of the colonial period until 1860. 

ARTH 780 Seminar — Problems in Architectural His- 
tory and Criticism (3) 

ARTH 784 Seminar in Literary Sources of Art 
History (3) Art historical sources from Pliny to 
Malraux. 

ARTH 798 Directed Graduate Studies in Art History 

(3) 

ARTH 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

ARTH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

Art Studio ARTS 404 Experiments in Visual Pro- 
cesses (3) Six hours per week. Prerequisites: Either 
arts 220, 330 or 340. Investigation and execution of 
process oriented art. Group and individual experimen- 
tal projects. 

ARTS 410 Drawing IV (3) Six hours per week. Prereq- 
uisite: ARTS 310. Advanced drawing, with emphasis 
on human figure, its structure and organic likeness to 
forms in nature Compositional problems deriving from 
this relationship are also stressed. 

ARTS 420 Painting IV (3) Six hours per week. Prereq- 
uisite: ARTS 324. Creative painting. Emphasis on 
personal direction and self-criticism. Group seminars. 

ARTS 430 Sculpture IV (3) Six hours per week. 
Prerequisite: ARTS 335. Problems and techniques of 
newer concepts, utilizing various materials, such as 
plastics and metals. Technical aspects of welding 
stressed. 

ARTS 440 Printmaking III (3) Six hours per week. 
Prerequisite: ARTS 340 and 344. Contemporary exper- 
imental techniques of one print medium with group 
discussions. 

ARTS 441 Printmaking IV (3) Six hours per week 
Prerequisite: ARTS 440. Continuation of arts 440. 

ARTS 489 Special Problems in Studio Arts (3) For 

advanced students, by permission of department 
chairman. Course may be repeated for credit if content 
differs. 

ARTS 610 Drawing (3) Sustained treatment of a 
theme chosen by student. Wide variety of media. 

ARTS 614 Drawing (3) Traditional materials and 
methods including Oriental. Sumi ink drawing and 
techniques of classical European masters. 

ARTS 616 Drawing (3) Detailed anatomical study of 
the human figure and preparation of large scale mural 
compositions. 



Astronomy Program 57 



ARTS 620 Painting (3) 

ARTS 624 Painting (3) 

ARTS 626 Painting (3) 

ARTS 627 Painting (3) 

ARTS 630 Experimentation in Sculpture (3) 

ARTS 634 Experimentation in Sculpture (3) 

ARTS 636 Materials and Techniques in Sculpture 

(3) For advanced students, methods of armature build- 
ing, and tiie use of a variety of stone, wood, metal, and 
plastic materials. 

ARTS 637 Sculpture-Casting and Foundry (3) The 

traditional methods of plaster casting and the compli- 
cated types involving metal, cire perdue, sand-casting 
and newer methods, such as cold metal process. 

ARTS 640 Prlntmaking (3) Advanced problems Re- 
lief process. 

ARTS 644 Prlntmaking (3) Advanced problems In- 
taglio process. 

ARTS 646 Prlntmaking (3) Advanced problems. Lith- 
ographic process. 

ARTS 647 Seminar in Prlntmaking (3) 

ARTS 689 Special Problems In Studio Art (3) Pre- 
requisite: Consent of instructor. Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of six hours. 

ARTS 690 Drawing and Painting (3) Preparation and 
execution of a wall decoration. 

ARTS 698 Directed Graduate Studies in Studio Art 

(3) For advanced graduate students by permission of 
head of department. Course may be repeated for 
credit if content differs. 

ARTS 798 Directed Graduate Studies in Studio Art 
(3) 

ARTS 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 



Astronomy Program 

Professor and Acting Director: Kundu 
Professors: Bell, Erickson, Kerr, Opik (part- 
time), Rose, Smith, Wentzel, Zuckerman 
Adjunct Professors: Brandt 
Associate Professors: A'Hearn, Harrington, 
Matthews, Trimble (part-time), Zipoy 
Adjunct Associate Professor: Clark 
Assistant Professors: Eichler, Scott, Wilson 

The Astronomy Program, administratively part 
of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, 
offers programs of study leading to the degrees 
of M.S. and Ph.D. in Astronomy. The M.S. 
program includes both thesis and non-thesis 
options. Areas of specialization include: galactic 
structure, interstellar medium, extragalactic as- 
tronomy, stellar atmospheres, stellar evolution, 
solar physics, solar system, astronomical instru- 
mentation, and cometary studies. 

A full schedule of courses in all fields of 
astronomy is offered including galactic astrono- 
my, astrophysics, solar system astronomy, ob- 
servational astronomy, celestial mechanics, 
solar physics, study of the interstellar medium 
and extragalactic astronomy. The faculty has 
expertise in most major branches of astronomy. 
The research program is centered around sev- 
eral major areas of interest. One is high energy 
and plasma astrophysics with particular interest 
centering on applications to the study of ex- 
tragalactic radio sources and of solar phenome- 
na. There are related observational programs in 
the areas of solar radio astronomy and of 
extragalactic astronomy. Other areas include 
galactic structure, the interstellar medium with 
particular emphases on molecules in space and 
on star formation, stellar atmospheres and 
cometary physics. 



Admission and Degree 
Information 

No formal undergraduate course work in astron- 
omy is required. However, an entering student 
should have a working knowledge of the basic 
facts of astronomy such as is obtainable from 
one of the many elementary textbooks. A more 
advanced knowledge of astronomy will of 
course enable a student to progress more rap- 
idly during the first year of graduate work. 

Normally a satisfactory score on the GRE 
Advanced Test in Physics is required before an 
applicant's admission to the Graduate School 
will be considered. In special cases, the Gradu- 
ate Entrance Committee may waive this require- 
ment, and set other conditions as a requirement 
for admission, to be fulfilled either before ad- 
mission or during the first year at Maryland. 

Qualification for the Ph.D. program (which 
is decided in the middle or at the end of the 
second year) requires a written examination on 
basic astronomy at the end of the first year and 
an extensive research project during the sec- 
ond year. Overall performance in the exam, 
course work and research determines admis- 
sion to the Ph.D. program. 

All students must demonstrate compe- 
tence both in theoretical astrophysics and in 
radio and optical observing techniques. The 
former can normally be satisfied by taking 
ASTR 650, 651 and the latter by taking ASTR 
411. All students must take at least two credits 
of ASTR 698. No other Astronomy courses are 
specifically required, but candidates for the 
Ph.D. should expect to take a number of 
courses at the 600 level according to their 
interests. Twelve credits of advanced physics 
courses are required for the Ph.D. 

Candidates for the Master of Science De- 
gree with thesis are required to obtain 24 credits 
(exclusive of registration for masters research) 
of which at least 12 are in the major area and at 
least 1 2 must be at the 600 level (not necessari- 
ly the same 12). In addition, at least 6 credits 
must be in a related field (supporting area). 

To obtain the Master of Science Degree 
without a thesis, 6 credits in the major at the 
600 level are required in addition to the general 
requirements described above. That is, a total 
of 30 credits are required, of which 18 must be 
in the major, and at least 18 at the 600 level. 
The student must also pass a written examina- 
tion, usually consisting of the written part of the 
Ph.D. Qualifying Examination with appropriately 
chosen passing requirements. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Astronomy Program carries on an exten- 
sive research program in the areas discussed 
above with the graduate students playing an 
active role in this research. Approximately one- 
fourth of all research papers published have a 
graduate student as one of the authors. The 
Program maintains a small optical observatory 
on campus. Due to the site, its main use is to 
enable students to gain experience in observa- 
tional techniques and to test out new equip- 
ment. There is an important effort in the pro- 
gram devoted to the development of optical 
instrumentation. A Fourier Transform Spec- 
trometer is now essentially operational and a 
photoelectric Fabry Perot Interferometer is 
being developed. 

The Program also operates a radio observ- 
atory near Borrego Springs, California. This is 
designed to operate at meter wavelengths and 
is one of the major long wavelength observato- 
ries in the country. A major commitment of this 
observatory will be to solar research, with the 
immediate aim of developing a radio heliograph 
which can provide real time mapping of the 



radio sun. Work will also go on there in the 
areas of galactic and extragalactic radio astron- 
omy. 

The library facilities of the Program have 
recently benefited from the acquisition of a 
major new collection. Reorganization of the 
current facilities is in process. When completed, 
the Astronomy library should be one of the 
foremost collections in the country. 

The Program has strong interaction with 
the national astronomy observatories, and 
many of the students and faculty carry on 
observing programs at them. There are also 
very close ties with neighboring scientific in- 
stitutes. A major program of cooperative re- 
search has been established with the Goddard 
Space Flight Center and a number of graduate 
students carry on research programs there. 
There are also close contacts with the Naval 
Observatory, the Naval Research Labs and 
other government institutes 

Financial Assistance 

Essentially all eligible graduate students are 
funded. The program offers both Research and 
Teaching Assistantships. 

Additional Information 

For more information, especially for physics 
courses related to astronomy, see the section 
on Physics. A brochure entitled "Graduate 
Study in Astronomy," describing the require- 
ments, the courses and the research program in 
detail, is available from the department. All 
correspondence, including that concerning ad- 
mission to the Astronomy Program, should be 
addressed to: 

Astronomy Program 

University of Maryland 

Courses 

ASTR 400 Stellar Astrophysics (3) Pre- or 
corequisite: PHYS 422 or consent of instructor Stellar 
atmospheres, stellar structure and evolution, neutron 
stars and black holes 

ASTR 401 Interstellar and Extragalactic As- 
trophysics (3) Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 422 or 
consent of instructor A survey of the physics of the 
interstellar medium and of astrophysics as it relates to 
galaxies and cosmology. 

ASTR 410 Observational Astronomy (3) Prerequi- 
sites: Working knowledge of calculus, physics through 
PHYS 284, or 263. and 3 credits of Astronomy An 
introduction to current methods of obtaining astronom- 
ical information including radio, infrared, optical, ultra- 
violet, and X-ray astronomy The laboratory work will 
involve photographic and photoelectnc observations 
with the department's optical telescope and 21 -cm line 
spectroscopy, flux measurements and mterterometry 
with the department's radiotelescopes 

ASTR 411 Observational Astronomy (3) Prerequi- 
sites: ASTR 410. working knowledge of calculus, phys- 
ics through PHYS 284. or 263. and 3 credits of 
Astronomy An introduction to current methods of 
obtaining astronomical information including radio, in- 
frared, optical, ultra-violet, and X-ray astronomy The 
laboratory work will involve photographic and 
photoelectric observations with the department's opti- 
cal telescope and 21 -cm line spectroscopy, flux 
measurements and interferometry with the depart- 
ment's radiotelescopes Observatory work on individu- 
al projects Every semester 

ASTR 420 Introduction to Galactic Research (3) 
Prerequisite: PHYS 192 and ASTR 182 or equivalent, 
or consent of instructor Methods of galactic research, 
stellar motions, clusters of stars, evolution ol the 
galaxy, study of our own and nearby galaxies 

ASTR 430 The Solar System (3) Prerequisite MATH 
246 and either PHYS 263 or PHYS 294, or consent ol 
instructor The structure of planetary atmospheres. 
radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres, remote 
sensing of planetary surfaces, interior structure ot 



58 Biochemistry Program 



planets. Structure of comets. Brief discussions of 
asteroids, satellite systems, and solar system evolu- 
tion. 

ASTR 440 Introduction to Extra-Galactic Astrono- 
my (3) Prerequisite: PHYS 192 and ASTR 182 or 
equivalent or consent of instructor. Properties of nor- 
mal and peculiar galaxies, including radio galaxies and 
quasars; expansion of the universe and cosmology. 
ASTR 450 Celestial Mechanics (3) Prerequisite: 
PHYS 410 or consent of instructor. Celestial mechan- 
ics, orbit theory, equations of motion. 
ASTR 498 Special Problems in Astronomy (1-6) 
Prerequisite: Major in physics or astronomy and/or 
consent of advisor. Research or special study. Credit 
according to work done. 

ASTR 600 Stellar Atmospheres (3) Prerequisite: 
ASTR 650 or an equivalent brief introduction to stellar 
atmospheres, or consent of instructor. Observationa 
methods line formation, curve of growth, equation of 
transfer, stars with large envelopes, variable stars, 
novae, magnetic fields in stars. 
ASTR 605 Stellar Interiors (3) Prerequisite: ASTR 
651 or an equivalent brief introduction to stellar interi- 
ors or consent of instructor. A study of stellar structure 
and evolution: energy transfer and generation in the 
interior of a star, the structure of stars including 
problems of turbulence, determination of chemical 
composition, non-homogeneous stars, pulsating stars 
novae, evolution of both young and old stars, the final 
stages of stellar evolution. 

ASTR 620 Galactic Research (3) Prerequisites: As- 
tronomy 420, 410, 411, or consent of the instructor. 
Current methods of research into galactic structure, 
kinematics, and dynamics. Basic dynamical theory. 
Optical and radio observational methods and current 
results Review of presently-determined distribution 
and kinematics of the major constituents of the galaxy. 
Evolution of the galaxy. 

ASTR 625 Dynamics of Stellar Systems (3) Prereq- 
uisite PHYS 601 or ASTR 420. Study of the structure 
and evolution of dynamical systems encountered in 
astronomy. Stellar encounters viewed as a two-body 
problem, statistical treatment of encounters, study of 
dynamical problems in connection with star clusters, 
ellipsoidal galaxies, nuclei of galaxies, high-velocity 
stars. 

ASTR 630 Physics of the Solar System (3) Prerequi- 
site- PHYS 422. A survey of the problems of inter- 
planetary space, the solar wind, comets and meteors, 
planetary structure and atmospheres, motions of parti- 
cles in the earth's magnetic field. 
ASTR 650 Survey of Astrophysics I (3) Prerequisite: 
PHYS 41 1 and 422 or their equivalents, or consent of 
instructor. The first semester survey of the theoretical 
tools of astrophysics. Gas and magnetohydrodynam- 
ics applied to interstellar and solar phenomena. Radia- 
tion of high-energy particles. Introduction to stellar 
atmospheres. 

ASTR 651 Survey of Astrophysics II (3) Prerequisite: 
ASTR 650 or consent of instructor. Brief survey of 
stellar structure and evolution, and the physics of the 
interstellar medium and the solar atmosphere. 
ASTR 660 Solar Physics (3) Prerequisites: PHYS 
422 ASTR 400 or consent of instructor. A detailed 
study of solar atmosphere. Physics of solar phenome- 
na, such as solar flares, structure of the corona, etc. 
ASTR 670 Interstellar Matter (3) Prerequisite: ASTR 
651 or an equivalent brief introduction to interstellar 
matter or consent of instructor. A study of the physical 
properties of interstellar gas and dust: regions of 
ionized hydrogen, regions of neutral hydrogen, the 
problems of interstellar dust and molecules. 
ASTR 688 Special Topics in Modern Astronomy (1- 
3) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Special topics 
such as extragalactic radio sources, plasma as- 
trophysics, the H.R. diagram, chemistry of the interstel- 
lar medium, radiophysics of the sun. 
ASTR 698 Seminar (1) Seminars on various topics in 
advanced astronomy are held each semester, with the 
contents varied each year. One credit for each semes- 
ter. There are weekly colloquia by staff, astronomers 
from the Washington area, and visiting astronomers, 
usually on topics related to their own work. 
ASTR 699 Special Problems in Advanced Astrono- 
my (1-6) 



ASTR 788 Selected Topics in Modern Astronomy 

(1-3) 

ASTR 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

ASTR 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Biochemistry Program 

Professor and Director: Keeney 

Professors: Goldsby, Holmlund, Keeney, 

Ponnamperuma 

Associate Professors: Campagnoni, Hansen, 

Lakshmanan, Sampugna 

Assistant Professor: Dunaway-Mariano 

The Graduate Program in Biochemistry is the 
College Park component of the University of 
Maryland Graduate Program in Biochemistry 
which also has components at University of 
Maryland Baltimore County and at the Universi- 
ty of Maryland Medical School and Dental 
School in Baltimore. The program offers study 
leading to Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. Research specialization at 
College Park is available in analytical biochem- 
istry, developmental biochemistry, drug metab- 
olism, enzyme kinetics, immunochemistry, lipid 
biochemistry, marine biochemistry, membrane 
structure and function, metabolic regulation, 
neuro-chemistry, nucleic acid biochemistry, and 
nutritional biochemistry. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Both the thesis and non-thesis options are 
offered for the M.S. degree. Applicants should 
have completed an undergraduate program of 
study with strong emphasis on chemistry 
and/or biology with appropriate supporting 
courses in mathematics and physics. Before 
obtaining a degree in the program, a student 
must demonstrate adequate preparation in bio- 
chemistry, and in analytical, organic and physi- 
cal chemistry. For this purpose diagnostic ex- 
aminations in these subjects are offered to 
students at the beginning of their first semester. 
Students who perform unsatisfactorily on these 
examinations or who may not have had un- 
dergraduate preparation in one or more of 
these areas, will be advised to register for 
appropriate courses. Information on course 
work comprehensive examinations and the re- 
search interests of the faculty is available for 
the guidance of degree candidates. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Biochemistry research is conducted in a new 
building occupied in 1975. In addition to well- 
equipped research laboratories, the following 
central facilities are available: animal colony, 
fermentation pilot plant, electron microscope, 
analytical ultracentrifuge, PDP-11 computer, 
liquid scintillation counters, nuclear magnetic 
resonance spectrometers, and a chemistry-bio- 
chemistry library. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate teaching assistantships are usually 
available in the Chemistry Department. The 
assistantships involve teaching undergraduate 
laboratory and recitation classes and permit 
tuition waiver for a ten-credit program of gradu- 
ate study each semester. 

Additional Information 

Information on requirements and research in- 
terests of the faculty may be obtained from the 
Director of the Program, Dr. Mark Keeney. 



Courses 

BCHM 461 Biochemistry I (3) Prerequisite: CHEM 
203-204 or 213-214, or permission of instructor. A 
comprehensive introduction to general biochemistry. 
The chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, 
lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. 
BCHM 462 Biochemistry II (3) Prerequisite: BCHM 
461 A continuation of BCHM 461. 
BCHM 463 Biochemistry Laboratory I (2) Two three- 
hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- or 
corerequisite: BCHM 461 

BCHM 464 Biochemistry Laboratory II (2) Two 
three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite. 
BCHM 462 or current registration therein, and CHEM 
430 or BCHM 463. 



BCHM 661 Proteins, Amino Acids, and Carbohy- 
drates (2) Prerequisite: BCHM 462 or equivalent. 
BCHM 662 Biological Energy Transductions, Vita- 
mins, and Hormones (2) Prerequisite: BCHM 462 or 
equivalent 

BCHM 663 Enzymes (2) Prerequisite: BCHM 462 or 
equivalent. 

BCHM 665 Biochemistry of Lipids (2) Prerequisite: 
BCHM 462 or equivalent. Classification and chemistry 
of lipids hpogenesis and energy metabolism of lipids, 
structural lipids, and endocrine control of lipid metabo- 
lism in mammals. 

BCHM 666 Biophysical Chemistry (2) Prerequisite: 
BCHM 461 and CHEM 482, or consent of instructor. 
BCHM 668 Special Problems in Biochemistry (2-4) 
Two to four three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite: BCHM 464 or equivalent. 
BCHM 669 Special Topics in Biochemistry (2) Pre- 
requisite: BCHM 462 or equivalent. 
BCHM 699 Special Problems in Biochemistry (1-6) 
Prerequisite: One semester of graduate study in Bio- 
chemistry. Laboratory experience in a research envi- 
ronment. Restricted to students in the non-thesis M.S. 
option Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 
BCHM 799 Masters Thesis Research (1-6) 
BCHM 898 Seminar (1) 
BCHM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Botany Program 

Professor and Chairman: Patterson 
Professors: Bean, Corbett, Galloway, Kantzes, 
Klarman, Krusberg, Lockard 1 , Sisler 
Associate Professors: Barnett, Bottino, 
Karlander, Motta, Reveal. 
Assistant Professors: Barrett, Cooke, 
Racusen, Rissler, Teramura, Van Valkenburg, 
Vigil. 

'Joint appointment with Secondary Education 
The Department of Botany offers graduate pro- 
grams leading to the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Courses and 
research problems are developed on a per- 
sonal basis and arranged according to the 
intellectual and professional needs of the stu- 
dent. Course programs are flexible and are 
designed under close supervision by the stu- 
dent's advisor. The objective of the program is 
to equip the student with a background and 
techniques for a career in plant science in 
academic, governmental, industrial or private 
laboratories. 

The areas of specialization are anatomy 
and morphology, plant biochemistry, cell biolo- 
gy, plant ecology, physiology of fungi, genetics 
and molecular biology, marine botany, mycolo- 
gy, plant nematology, plant pathology, phycolo- 
gy, plant physiology, taxonomy, and virology. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

There are no special admission requirements. A 
high degree of intellectual excellence is of 



Botany Program 59 



greater consequence than completion of a par- 
ticular curriculum at the undergraduate level. 
The degree requirements are flexible. However, 
they involve demonstration of competence in 
the broad field of botany, as well as completion 
of courses in other disciplines which are sup- 
portive of modern competence in this field. A 
foreign language may be required if deemed 
essential by the student's Graduate Advisory 
Committee. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has laboratories equipped to 
investigate most phases of botanical and mo- 
lecular biological research. Field and green- 
house facilities are available for research requir- 
ing plant culture. Major pieces of equipment 
include a transmission electron microscope, 
ultracentrifuges, X-ray equipment, low-speed 
centrifuges, microtomes, for cutting ultrathin 
sections, infra-red spectrophotometer, record- 
ing spectrophotometers, gas chromatographs, 
environmental controlled growth chambers. 
Herbarium, departmental reference room, en- 
zyme preparation rooms, dark rooms, cold 
rooms, special culture apparatus for algae, 
fungi, and higher plants, spectrophotometers, 
and respirometers are among the many special 
pieces of equipment and facilities that are avail- 
able for research. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance is available in the form of 
teaching and research assistantships. 

Additional Information 

The Department has a special brochure avail- 
able upon request. For specific information on 
departmental programs, admission procedures 
or financial aid, contact: 

Chairman, Department of Botany 

University of Maryland 

Courses 

BOTN 401 Origins of Modern Botany (1) Prerequi- 
site: 20 credit hours in biological sciences including 
BOTN 100 or 101 or equivalent. History of Botany as a 
science, from Ancient Greece through the 18th centu- 
ry; emphasis on botany as an intellectual and cultural 
pursuit. 

BOTN 402 Plant Microtechnique (3) Prerequisite 
BOTN 100 or 101, and consent of instructor. One 
lecture and five hours of laboratory per week. Prepara- 
tion of temporary and permanent mounts, including 
selection of material, killing and fixing, embedding, 
sectioning, and staining methods. 

BOTN 403 Medicinal and Poisonous Plants (2) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 100 or 101 and CHEM 104. A 
study of plants important to man that have medicinal or 
poisonous properties. Emphasis on plant source, plant 
description, the active agent and its beneficial or 
detrimental physiological action and effects. 

BOTN 405 Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
sites: BOTN 202 and BOTN 212, or equivalents. A 
review of the history and principles of plant taxonomy 
with emphasis on monographic and floristic research. 
A detailed laboratory review of the families of flowering 
plants. 

BOTN 407 Teaching Methods in Botany (2) Four 
two-hour laboratory demonstration periods per week, 
for eight weeks. Prerequisite: BOTN 100 or equivalent. 
A study of the biological principles of common plants, 
and demonstrations, projects, and visual aids suitable 
for teaching in primary and secondary schools. 

BOTN 413 Plant Geography (2) Prerequisite: BOTN 
100 or equivalent. A study of plant distribution through- 
out the world and the factors generally associated with 
such distribution. 

BOTN 414 Plant Genetics (3) Prerequisite: BOTN 100 
or equivalent The basic principles of plant genetics 



are presented; the mechanics of transmission of the 
hereditary factors in relation to the life cycle of seed 
plants, the genetics of specialized organs and tissues, 
spontaneous and induced mutations of basic and 
economic significance gene action, genetic maps, the 
fundamentals of polyploidy, and genetics in relation to 
methods of plant breeding are the topics considered 

BOTN 415 Plants and Mankind (2) Prerequisite: 
BOTN 100 or equivalent. A survey of the plants which 
are utilized by man, the diversity of such utilization, and 
their historic and economic significance. 

BOTN 416 Principles of Plant Anatomy (4) Two 

lectures and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 
The origin and development of cells, tissues, and 
tissue systems of vascular plants with special empha- 
sis on seed-bearing plants. Particular stress is given to 
the comparative, systematic, and evolutionary study of 
the structural components of the plants. Prerequisite: 
General Botany. 

BOTN 417 Field Botany and Taxonomy (2) Prerequi- 
site: BOTN 100 or General Biology Four two-hour 
laboratory periods a week for eight weeks. The identifi- 
cation of trees, shrubs, and herbs, emphasizing the 
native plants of Maryland. Manuals, keys, and other 
techniques will be used. Numerous short field trips will 
be taken. Each student will make an individual collec- 
tion. 

BOTN 419 Natural History of Tropical Plants (2) 

Prerequisite: One course in plant taxonomy or permis- 
sion of instructor. An introduction to tropical vascular 
plants with emphasis on their morphological, anatomi- 
cal, and habital peculiarities and major taxonomic 
features, geographic distribution and economic utiliza- 
tion of selected families. Two, one-hour lectures per 
week. 

BOTN 420 Plant Cytology (4) Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods per week. An introductory course in 
the methods and techniques of cell biology as they 
apply to the organization, functions and structure of 
plants at the cellular and subcellular level. Botany 101 
or its equivalent, one year of college chemistry and 
one year of college physics. 

BOTN 424 Diagnosis and Control of Plant Diseases 

(3) Prerequisite: BOTN 221. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. A study of the diagnosis 
and control of plant diseases. Emphasis on recogniz- 
ing the symptoms of plant disease and control of the 
causal organisms. Field trips and a collection of dis- 
eased plant specimens. 

BOTN 425 Diseases of Ornamentals and Turf (2) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 221. Designed for those students 
who need practical experience in recognition and 
control of ornamentals and turf diseases. The symp- 
toms and current control measures for diseases in 
these crop areas will be discussed. 

BOTN 426 Mycology (4) Two lectures and two 
three — hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: 
Botany 101 or permission of the instructor. An intro- 
ductory course in the biology, morphology and taxono- 
my of the fungi. 

BOTN 427 Field Plant Pathology (1) Prerequisite: 
BOTN 221, or equivalent. Summer session: Lecture 
and laboratory to be arranged. The techniques of 
pesticide evaluation and the identification and control 
of diseases of Maryland crops are discussed. Offered 
in alternate years or more frequently with demand. 

BOTN 441 Plant Physiology (4) Prerequisites: BOTN 
100 and general chemistry. Two lectures and one four- 
hour laboratory period a week. Organic chemistry 
strongly recommended. A survey of the general physi- 
ological activities of plants. 

BOTN 462 Plant Ecology (2) Prerequisite: BOTN 100. 
The dynamics of populations as affected by environ- 
mental factors with special emphasis on the structure 
and composition of natural plant communities, both 
terrestial and aquatic 

BOTN 463 Ecology of Marsh and Dune Vegetation 

(2) Prerequisites: BOTN 100. An examination of the 
biology of higher plants in dune and marsh 
ecosystems. 

BOTN 464 Plant Ecology Laboratory (2) Prerequi- 
site: BOTN 462 or its equivalent or concurrent enroll- 
ment therein. One three-hour laboratory period a 
week. Two or three field trips per semester. The 
application of field and experimental methods to the 
qualitative and quantitative study of vegetation and 
ecosystems. 



BOTN 471 Marine and Estuarlne Botany (3) Prereq- 
uisite: BOTN 441 or equivalent. An ecological discus- 
sion of plant life in the marine environment of sea 
coasts, salt marshes, estuaries and open seas 

BOTN 475 General Phycology (4) Prerequisites: 
BOTN 100 and BOTN 202, or permission of instructor. 
One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. An introductory study of both macro- and micro- 
algae, including the taxonomy, morphology, and life 
cycles of both fresh water and marine forms 

BOTN 612 Vascular Plant Morphology (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
sites: BOTN 202, BOTN 212. and BOTN 416, or 
equivalents. A comparative study of the morphology of 
vascular plants, with special emphasis on the evolution 
and morphogenesis of plant organs. 

BOTN 613 Identification of Wood and Timbers (2) 

Prerequisites: BOTN 416 or equivalent and permission 
of instructor. Methods and procedures for determina- 
tion of native and exotic woods used in commerce. 
Use of keys to and descriptions of timbers, origins of 
indigenous and imported woods, vernacular and trade 
names, properties, uses, and associated literature. 

BOTN 615 Plant Cytogenetics (3) First semester 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite: Introductory genetics. An advanced study of 
the current status of plant genetics, particularly gene 
mutations and their relation to chromosome changes 
in corn and other favorable materials. 

BOTN 620 Methods in Plant Tissue Culture (2) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. One lecture and 
one two-hour laboratory period a week. A methodolo- 
gy and techniques course designed to give the student 
background and experience in plant tissue culture. 

BOTN 621 Physiology of Fungi (2) First semester 
Prerequisites: Organic chemistry and BOTN 441 or 
equivalent in bacterial or animal physiology. A study of 
various aspects of fungal metabolism, nutrition, bio- 
chemical transformation, fungal products, and mecha- 
nism of fungicidal action. 

BOTN 623 Physiology of Fungi Laboratory (1) First 
semester. One laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
sites: BOTN 621 or concurrent registration therein. 
Application of equipment and techniques in the study 
of fungal physiology. 

BOTN 632 Plant Virology (2) Second semester. Two 
lectures per week on the biological, biochemical, and 
biophysical aspects of viruses and virus diseases of 
plants. Prerequisites: Bachelor's degree or equivalent 
in any biological science and permission of instructor 

BOTN 634 Plant Virology Laboratory (2) Second 
semester. Two laboratories per week on the applica- 
tion and techniques for studying the biological, bio- 
chemical and biophysical aspects of plant viruses. 
Prerequisites: Bachelor's degree or equivalent in any 
biological science and BOTN 632 or concurrent regis- 
tration therein, and permission of the instructor 

BOTN 636 Plant Nematology (4) Second semester 
Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week 
Prerequisite' BOTN 221 or permission of instructor. 
(Not offered 1970-71). The study of plant-parasitic 
nematodes, their morphology, anatomy, taxonomy, 
genetics, physiology, ecology, host-parasite relations 
and control. Recent advances in this field will be 
emphasized. 

BOTN 642 Plant Biochemistry (2) Prerequisite 
BOTN 641, or CHEM 461 and 462 A treatment of 
those aspects of biochemistry unique to plants includ- 
ing photosynthesis, synthesis of plant macromolecules 
and pertinent aspects of other metabolic processes. 

BOTN 644 Plant Biochemistry Laboratory (2) Pre- 
or corequisite BOTN 642. Use of apparutus and appli- 
cation of techniques in the study of the chemistry of 
plants and plant materials. 

BOTN 645 Growth and Development (2) Prerequi- 
site: BOTN 441 Physiology of plant hormones, control 
of morphogenesis and regulation of biosynthesis, 
photomorphogenesis and photopenodism. 

BOTN 650 Mineral Nutrition of Plants (2) Prerequi- 
site: BOTN 441. A study of the inorganic nutnents 
required for plant growth and development, with em- 
phasis on mechanisms of nutrient uptake, transloca- 
tion, and mineral metabolism. 

BOTN 652 Plant Biophysics (2) Prerequisite MATH 
220. BOTN 441 plus one year of college physics, or 



60 Business and Management Program 



their equivalents. An advanced course dealing with 
physical and chemical phenomena associated with the 
study of plants, stress on problem solving. 

BOTN 654 Plant Biophysics Laboratory (2) Pre- or 
corequisite: BOTN 652. Techniques in measurement 
of and utilization ol light and other parameters as- 
sociated with plants. 

BOTN 661 Advanced Plant Ecology (3) Prerequisite: 
A working knowledge of elementary genetics and 
calculus, or permission of the instructor. Population 
dynamics, evolutionary mechanisms, and quantitative 
aspects of the analysis of natural communities. Special 
emphasis will be given to recent theoretical develop- 
ments. 

BOTN 672 Physiology of Algae (2) Prerequisite: 
BOTN 642 or equivalent, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. A study of the physiology of the algae. 

BOTN 689 Special Topics in Botany (1-3) Credit 
according to time scheduled and organization of 
course. Maximum credit toward an advanced degree 
for the individual student at the discretion of the 
department. This course is organized as lectures, 
discussions or literature surveys on specialized ad- 
vanced topics under the direction of visiting lecturers 
or or resident faculty. 

BOTN 698 Seminar in Botany (1) Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of the instructor. Discussion of special topics 
and current literature in all phases of Botany. 

BOTN 699 Special Problems in Botany (1-3) Credit 
according to time and scheduled and organization of 
course. Maximum credit towards an advanced degree 
for the individual student at the discretion of the 
student's advisor. This course emphasizes research 
on a specialized advanced topic and may consist 
primarily of experimental procedures under the direc- 
tion of visiting lecturers or resident faculty. 

BOTN 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

BOTN 899 Ooctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Business and 
Management Program 

Dean: Lamone 
Associate Dean- 
Assistant Dean: Armlstead 
Director of Graduate Studies: Nash 
Director of MBA & MS Programs: Sharer 
Chairpersons: Fromovitz, Gannon, Greer, 
Haslem, Leete, Loeb 
Professors Emeritus: Fisher and Wright 
Professors: Bodin, Bradford, Carroll, Dawson, 
Gannon, Gass, Gordon, Greer, Haslem, 
Jolson, Kotz, Lamone, Levine, Locke, Loeb, 
Nash, Paine, Polakoff, Preston, Roberts, 
Sibley, Taff 

Associate Professors: Bartol, Bedingfield, 
Bloom, Courtright, Edelson, Edmister, Ford, 
Fromovitz, Golden, Hynes, Kolodny, Kuehl, 
Leete, Nickels, Poist, Schneier, Shneiderman, 
Thieblot, Widhelm 

Assistant Professors: Alt, Assad, Ball, Boisjoly, 
Brodie, Carlson, Chow, Corsi, Fanara, Greene, 
Hamer, Harvey, Koehl, Kumar, Mayer- 
Sommer, Norland, Sorkin, Spekman, 
Stagliano, Stiner, Wood 

The College of Business and Management of- 
fers graduate work leading to the degrees of 
Master of Business Administration (MBA), Mas- 
ter of Science in Business and Management 
(MS), and Doctor of Business Administration 
(DBA). The College's MBA program is accredit- 
ed nationally by the American Assembly of 
Collegiate Schools of Business. Only about 200 
of the more than 1,000 graduate programs in 
the country are accredited by the AACSB, a 
reflection of the quality of faculty, students, 
curriculum and facilities. 

Areas of faculty specialization include ac- 
counting; finance; management science and 



statistics; marketing; organizational behavior 
and industrial relations; and transportation, 
business and public policy. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Admission criteria for the MBA, MS and DBA 
programs are based on (1) quality of recent 
undergraduate and graduate course work; (2) 
score on the Graduate Management Admission 
Test (GMAT); (3) letters of recommendation; 
and (4) other relevant information and profes- 
sional experience with heaviest weight given to 
(1) and (2). 

The College of Business and Management 
offers an MBA program designed to provide the 
educational foundation for those students with 
the potential to exhibit the highest degree of 
excellence in future careers as professional 
managers. The MBA program varies in length 
from 35 to 48 credits depending on the stu- 
dent's previous college preparation. There is no 
thesis requirement. Successful students in the 
program are expected to demonstrate the fol- 
lowing: (1) a thorough and integrated knowl- 
edge of the basic tools, concepts and theories 
relating to professional management; (2) be- 
havioral and analytical skills necessary to deal 
creatively and effectively with organizations and 
management problems; 3) an understanding of 
the economic, political, technological, and so- 
cial environments in which organizations oper- 
ate. 4) a sense of professional and personal 
integrity and social responsibility in the conduct 
of managerial affairs both internal and external 
to the organization. 

If the student's prior coursework did not 
include the program prerequisites, the following 
500-level prerequisite courses must be com- 
pleted with a "B" average as early as possible 
in the student's graduate program: BMGT 501 
(3 hours), BMGT 502 (3 hours), BMGT 503 (3 
hours), and BMGT 504 (4 hours). These basic 
knowledge courses may be waived by the MBA 
Program Director if equivalent courses have 
been satisfactorily completed. Students with 
baccalaureate degrees in business administra- 
tion from regionally or nationally accredited 
schools will normally have included the topics 
covered by these prerequisite courses and may 
not have to take them. 

About two-thirds of the students enrolled 
are full time and one-third are part time. Full- 
time students must maintain minimum registra- 
tion requirements described in this catalog 
under "Registration and Credits. Part-time stu- 
dents are required to complete a minimum of 12 
credit hours per calendar year. Should these 
requirements not be met or should a student's 
grade point average fall below 3.0, the student 
will be placed on probation and granted one 
semester to remedy these deficiencies. Most 
courses for part-time students will begin at 4:00 
and 7:00 p.m. However, there is no guarantee 
that all courses needed at any one time will be 
available at those times. 

The College's MS program is designed for 
students with an undergraduate degree in Busi- 
ness (Quantitative), Engineering, Sciences, In- 
formation and Computer Systems, Mathematics 
and Economics who want more of a technical 
education than a broad managerial education. 
Prerequisites include some or all of the 500- 
level courses required for the MBA program 
depending upon the student's background, cal- 
culus, probability theory, and knowledge of a 
higher level algebraic computer language. Thir- 
ty credit hours beyond the prerequisites are 
required with 12 credits to be taken in a core of 
four courses and the remaining 18 hours to be 
taken in any one of three areas of concentration 
(Statistics, Operations Research, and Informa- 



tion Systems Management). A thesis option is 
offered which will represent 6 credits in the area 
of concentration. Program progress standards 
described above for the MBA program are also 
applicable to the MS program. 

The DBA program is designed to produce 
outstanding scholars in management related 
disciplines. Graduates of the program are well- 
qualified to take faculty, research, and profes- 
sional or administrative positions in colleges 
and universities, government agencies, private 
research organizations, or business firms. 

Maryland DBA students achieve excel- 
lence through (1) course work preparation in 
basic, major and minor fields (required), super- 
vised teaching during their period of residence 
(required), independent research culminating in 
the writing of a doctoral dissertation (required), 
and joint research with faculty and fellow DBA 
students (optional). A full time commitment to 
the program is normally required as a condition 
for admittance. 

Each student's DBA program must be ap- 
proved initially by the student's major area 
faculty chairman or his or her representative 
and reviewed annually with the student. Minor 
areas must be approved initially by the minor 
area chairman or his or her designated repre- 
sentative. 

Major and minor areas in the college in- 
clude the following: (1) Accounting, (2) Finance, 
(3) Management Science and Statistics, (4) 
Marketing, (5) Organizational Behavior and Or- 
ganization Theory, (6) Personnel and Labor 
Relations, (7) Transportation and Physical Dis- 
tribution. 

DBA requirements for the typical student 
are from 63 to 75 hours, not including disserta- 
tion credits. Thirty-three of the hours are devot- 
ed to fulfilling the general requirements, dis- 
cussed below, with the remaining credits distrib- 
uted among the student's major and minor 
fields of study. 

The general requirements for all DBA stu- 
dents are BMGT 720, BMGT 740, BMGT 750, 
BMGT 764, two three-credit graduate courses 
in economics (BMGT 775 may be used as one 
of the two courses), nine credits in quantitative 
methods at the 700 level or above approved by 
the student's faculty chairman, and BMGT 880 
plus three additional graduate credits in re- 
search methodology. 

These general program requirements may 
be waived by the Director of the Doctoral Pro- 
gram if equivalent courses at AACSB accredit- 
ed schools have been satisfactorily completed. 
Some of these courses may be included in the 
major and minor course requirements. 

The DBA student is placed on academic 
probation after 12 hours unless he or she 
maintains at least a 3.25 GPA. The probationary 
period will last one semester, at which time the 
student will be dismissed unless a 3.25 GPA 
level is obtained. 

The DBA student may select a single major 
with two minors or a double major. For a single 
major, the student takes 18 credits beyond the 
bachelor's degree in the major field, at least 6 of 
which must be taken in graduate seminars at 
the 800 level at the University of Maryland. The 
minors may include areas inside or outside the 
College of Business and Management. Each 
minor is comprised of 12 credits. 

For a double major, the student takes 21 
credit hours in each of two major fields, one of 
which may be in a discipline outside the College 
of Business and Management. 

Both the single and the double major ar- 
rangements comprise 42 credit hours in total. 
Special permission from the College's graduate 
committee is required for a double major or a 
single major with both minors in disciplines 
outside the College of Business and Manage- 



Business and Management Program 61 



ment. Typical outside minors include such 
areas as Computer Science, Economics, Engi- 
neering, Mathematics, Government and Poli- 
tics, Psychology, and Sociology. 

Students take comprehensive examina- 
tions in major and minor subject areas. Follow- 
ing successful completion of the written ex- 
aminations, each student must pass an oral 
examination given by a committee of the col- 
lege graduate faculty. Any student receiving a 
"pass with distinction" in all written examina- 
tions will be exempted from the oral com- 
prehensive. Failure to pass any major or minor 
written comprehensive examination in two at- 
tempts will result in termination from the pro- 
gram. 

The dissertation proposal is defended by 
each DBA candidate at an open meeting. All 
faculty and other DBA students are invited to 
attend and participate in the proposal defense. 

The dissertation must exhibit the candi- 
date's competence in analysis, interpretation, 
and presentation of research findings, and 
should be a major contribution to the literature 
of the field. The candidate must defend his or 
her dissertation in a final oral dissertation de- 
fense. 

MBA/JD Joint Program 

The College of Business and Management and 
the School of Law of the University of Maryland 
at Baltimore offer a joint program of studies 
leading to MBA and JD degrees. Under the 
terms of the joint program, a student may earn 
both degrees in four academic years. The ac- 
celerated program is possible because some 
courses can be credited toward both degrees. 
Candidates must apply for admission to the Law 
School at Baltimore as well as to The Graduate 
School at College Park and must be admitted to 
both programs. 

Under the joint program, 75 credits in law 
school coupled with 39 credits in business 
courses (or 26 credits for students who have 
completed MBA program prerequisites) are re- 
quired for graduation. Nine credits of law will be 
substituted for MBA elective coursework. Grade 
point averages in each program will be com- 
puted separately and students must maintain 
minimum standards in each school to continue 
in the program. The Graduate School will not 
accept transfer credit for coursework taken 
outside the joint program. A student must com- 
plete both programs satisfactorily in order to 
receive both degrees. A student whose enroll- 
ment in either program is terminated may elect 
to complete work for the degree in which he or 
she remains enrolled but such completion must 
be upon the same conditions as required of 
regular (nonjomt program) degree candidates. 
Student programs must be approved by the law 
school adviser for the joint program and the 
MBA Program Director. For further discussion 
of admission and degree requirements, stu- 
dents should see above and consult the entry in 
the University of Maryland School of Law cata- 
log. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The faculty has been recruited from the gradu- 
ate programs of leading universities in the na- 
tion. They are dedicated scholars, teachers, 
and professional leaders, unusual in their com- 
parative youth, academic excellence, and 
strong commitment to the education of the 
professional manager. 

Special programs of'ered by the College 
include an Executives-m-Residence Program 
and an MBA practicum course, BMGT 791. in 
which students research a problem of signifi- 
cant management concern in a participating 



firm or agency Through graduate program 
requirements and faculty research activities stu- 
dents gain exposure to state and federal agen- 
cies and to the vast educational, research, 
library, and cultural resources of Washington, 
D.C. 

The students also have access to the ex- 
ceptional academic and professional resources 
of the College Park campus including excellent 
library and computer facilities. A remote com- 
puter terminal and on-line teletype facilities are 
located in the building. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial aid is available to qualified students in 
the form of fellowships and graduate assistant- 
ships, and, for DBA students, assistant instruc- 
torships. 

Additional Information 

The College has available brochures which give 
specific degree requirements for the MBA and 
DBA programs. Initial inquiries should be direct- 
ed to: 

Director of the MBA Program College of 
Business and Management or Director of the 
Doctoral Program College of Business and 
Management 

Courses 

BMGT 401 Introduction to Systems Analysis (3) 

Students enrolled in the College of Business and 
Management curricula will register for IFSM 436. For 
detailed information on prerequisites and descriptions 
of the course, refer to IFSM 436. The credits earned in 
IFSM 436 may be included in the total credits earned in 
the area of concentration in Business and Manage- 
ment. 

BMGT 410 Fund Accounting (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 
310. An introduction to the fund-based theory and 
practice of accounting as applied to governmental 
entities and other not-for-profit associations. 

BMGT 417 Advanced Tax Accounting (3) Prerequi- 
sites: BMGT 31 1 and 323. Federal taxation of corpora- 
tions, partnerships, fiduciaries, and gratuitous trans- 
fers. Tools and techniques of tax research for com- 
pliance and planning. 

BMGT 420 Undergraduate Accounting Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing as an accounting mapr 
or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to upper 
one-third of senior class. Seminar coverage of out- 
standing current non-text literature, current problems 
and case studies in accounting. 

BMGT 421 Undergraduate Accounting Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing as an accounting major 
or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to upper 
one-third of senior class. Seminar coverage of out- 
standing current non-text literature, current problems 
and case studies in accounting. 

BMGT 422 Auditing Theory and Practice (3) Prereq- 
uisite: BMGT 311. A study of the principles and prob- 
lems of auditing and application of accounting princi- 
ples to the preparation of audit working papers and 
reports. 

BMGT 423 Apprenticeship in Accounting (0) Pre- 
requisites: Minimum of 20 semester hours in account- 
ing and the consent of the accounting staff. A period of 
apprenticeship is provided with nationally known firms 
of certified public accountants from about January 1 5 
to February 15. 

BMGT 424 Advanced Accounting (3) Prerequisite 
BMGT 311. Advanced accounting theory applied to 
specialized topics and current problems Emphasis on 
consolidated statements and partnership accounting. 

BMGT 425 CPA Problems (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 
424 or consent of instructor. An intensive study of 
various accounting areas covered in the Uniform CPA 
examination. 

BMGT 426 Advanced Cost Accounting (3) Prerequi- 
site: BMGT 321. Advanced cost accounting with em- 
phasis on managerial aspects of internal record-keep- 
ing and control systems. 



BMGT 427 Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice 
(3) Prerequisite: BMGT 422. Advanced auditing theory 
and practice and report writing. 

BMGT 430 Linear Statistical Models in Business (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 230 or consent of instructor 
Model building involving an intensive study of the 
general linear stochastic model and the applications ol 
this model to business problems. The model is derived 
m matrix form and this form is used to analyze both the 
regression and anova formulations of the general 
linear model. 

BMGT 431 Design of Statistical Experiments in 
Business (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 230 or 231 Surveys 
anova models, basic and advanced experimental de- 
sign concepts. Non-parametric tests and correlation 
are emphasized. Applications of these techniques to 
business problems in primarily the marketing and 
behavioral sciences are stressed 

BMGT 432 Sample Survey Design for Business and 
Economics (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 230 or 231 De- 
sign of probability samples Simple random sampling, 
stratified random sampling, systematic sampling, and 
cluster sampling designs are developed and compared 
for efficiency under varying assumptions about the 
population sampled. Advanced designs such as 
multistage cluster sampling and replicated sampling 
are surveyed. Implementing these techniques in esti- 
mating parameters of business models is stressed. 

BMGT 433 Statistical Decision Theory in Business 

(3) Prerequisite: BMGT 231 or consent of instructor. 
Bayesian approach to the use of sample information in 
decision-making. Concepts of loss, risk, decision crite- 
ria, expected returns, and expected utility are exam- 
ined. Application of these concepts to decision-making 
in the firm in various contexts are considered. 

BMGT 434 Operations Research I (3) Prerequisite: 
BMGT 230, MATH 240 or permission of instructor 
Designed primarily for students maionng in manage- 
ment science. Information Systems Management. 

BMGT 435 Operations Research 22 (3) Prerequisite 
BMGT 434, or permission of instructor. The second 
semester of a two-part introduction to operations re- 
search. The primary emphasis is on stochastic models 
in management science. Topics include stochastic 
linear programming, probabilistic dynamic pro- 
gramming, Markov processes, probabilistic inventory 
models, queueing theory and simulation. 

BMGT 436 Applications of Mathematical Pro- 
gramming in Management Science (3) Prerequisite 
BMGT 434 or permission of instructor. Theory and 
applications of linear, integer, and nonlinear pro- 
gramming models to management decisions. Topics 
convered include the basic theorems of linear pro- 
gramming; the matrix formulation of the simplex, and 
dual simplex algorithms; decomposition, cutting plane, 
branch and bound, and implicit enumeration al- 
gorithms; gradient based algorithms; and quadratic 
programming. Special emphasis is placed upon model 
formulation and solution using prepared computer 
algorithms. 

BMGT 438 Topics in Statistical Analysis for Busi- 
ness Management (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 430 and 
MATH 240 or permission of the instructor Selected 
topics in statistical analysis which are relevant to 
management for students with knowledge of basic 
statistical methods. Topics include evolutionary opera- 
tion and response surface analysis, forecasting tech- 
niques, pathologies of the linear model and their 
remedies, multivariate statistical models, and non- 
parametric models. 

BMGT 440 Financial Management (3) Prerequisite: 
BMGT 340. Analysis and discussion of cases and 
readings relating to financial decisions of the firm. The 
application of finance concepts to the solution of 
financial problems is emphasized 

BMGT 443 Security Analysis and Valuation (3) 
Prerequisite: BMGT 343 Study and application of the 
concepts, methods, models, and empirical findings to 
the analysis, valuation, and selection of securities, 
especially common stock 

BMGT 445 Commercial Bank Management (3) Pre- 
requisites: BMGT 340 and ECON 430 Analysis and 
discussion of cases and readings in comercial bank 
management. The loan (unction is emphasized; also 
the management of liquidity reserves, investments for 
income, and source of funds 8ank objectives, func- 
tions, policies, organization, structure, services, and 
regulation are considered 



62 Business and Management Program 



BMGT 450 Marketing Research Methods (3) Prereq- 
uisites BMGT 230 and 350. Recommended that 
BMGT 430 be taken prior to this course. This course is 
intended to develop skill in the use of scientific meth- 
ods in the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of 
marketing data. It covers the specialized fields of 
marketing research: the planning of survey proiects. 
sample design, tabulation procedure and report prepa- 
ration. 

BMGT 451 Consumer Analysis (3) ; Prerequisites. 
BMGT 350 and 351. Recommended that PSYC luu 
and 221 be taken prior to this course. Considers the 
qrowing importance of the American consumer in the 
marketing system and the need to understand him. 
Topics include the foundation considerations underly- 
inq consumer behavior such as economic, social, 
psychological and cultural factors. Analysis of the 
consumer in marketing situations-as a buyer and user 
of products and services-and in relation to the various 
individual social and marketing factors affecting his 
behavior. The influence of marketing communications 
is also considered. 

BMGT 453 Industrial Marketing (3) Prerequisites: 
BMGT 350 plus one other marketing course. The 
industrial and business sector of the marketing system 
is considered rather than the household or ultimate 
consumer sector. Industrial products range from raw 
materials and supplies to the major equipment in a 
plant business office, or institution. Topics include 
product planning and introduction, market analysis and 
forecasting, channels, pricing, field sales force man- 
agement advertising, marketing cost analysis, and 
government relations. Particular attention is given to 
industrial business and institutional buying policies 
and practice and to the analysis of buyer behavior. 
BMGT 454 International Marketing (3) Prerequisites. 
BMGT 350 plus any other marketing course. A study of 
the marketing functions from the viewpoint of the 
international executive. In addition to the coverage of 
international marketing policies relating to product 
adaptation, data collection and analysis, channels of 
distribution, pricing, communications, and cost analy- 
sis consideration is given to the cultural, legal, finan- 
cial, and organizational aspects of international mar- 
keting. 

BMGT 455 Sales Management (3) The role of the 
sales manager, both at headquarters and in the field, in 
the management of people, resources and marketing 
functions. An analysis of the problems involved in 
sales organization, forecasting, planning, communicat- 
ing evaluating and controlling. Attention is given to the 
application of quantitative techniques and pertinent 
behavioral science concepts in the management of 
the sales effort and sales force. 
BMGT 456 Advertising (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 354. 
The role of advertising in the American economy; the 
impact of advertising on our economic and social life, 
the methods and techniques currently applied by ad- 
vertising practitioners; the role of the newspaper, 
magazine, and other media in the development of an 
advertising campaign, modern research methods to 
improve the effectiveness of advertising and the orga- 
nization of the advertising business. (Not open for 
credit to students with credit for BMGT 352.) 
BMGT 457 Marketing Policies and Strategies (3) 
Prerequisite: Three courses in marketing. Integrative 
decision making in marketing. Emphasis on consumer 
and market analysis and the appropriate decision 
models. Case studies are included. 
BMGT 460 Personnel Management— Analysis and 
Problems (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 360. Recom- 
mended, BMGT 230. Research findings, special read- 
ings case analysis, simulation, and field investigations 
are used to develop a better understanding of person- 
nel problems, alternative solutions and their practical 
ramifications. 

BMGT 462 Labor Legislation (3) Case method analy- 
sis of the modern law of industrial relations. Cases 
include the decisions of administrative agencies, 
courts and arbitration tribunals. 
BMGT 463 Public Sector Labor Relations (3) Pre- 
requisite BMGT 362 or permission of instructor. De- 
velopment and structure of labor relations in public 
sector employment; federal, state, and local govern- 
ment responses to unionization and collective bargain- 
ing. 

BMGT 464 Organizational Behavior (3) Prerequisite: 
BMGT 364. An examination of research and theory 



concerning the forces which contribute to the behavior 
of organizational members. Topics covered include: 
work group behavior, supervisory behavior, mtergroup 
relations, employee goals and attitudes, communica- 
tion problems, organizational change, and organiza- 
tional goals and design. 

BMGT 467 Undergraduate Seminar in Personnel 
Management (3) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 
This course is open only to the top one-third of 
undergraduate majors in personnel and labor relations 
and is offered during the fall semester of each year. 
Highlights mapr developments. Guest lecturers make 
periodic presentations. 

BMGT 470 Land Transportation Systems (3) Pre- 
requisite' BMGT 370. Overall view of managerial prob- 
lems facing land carriers; emphasis on rail and motor 
modes of transportation. 

BMGT 471 Air and Water Transportation Systems 
(3) Prerequisite: BMGT 370. Overall view of manageri- 
al problems facing air and water carriers; emphasis on 
international and domestic aspects of air and water 
modes of transportation. Not open for credit to stu- 
dents who have credit for BMGT 472. 
BMGT 473 Advanced Transportation Problems (3) 
Prerequisite: BMGT 370. A critical examination of 
current government transportation policy and pro- 
posed solutions. Urban and intercity managerial trans- 
port problems are also considered. 
BMGT 474 Urban Transport and Urban Develop- 
ment (3) Prerequisite: ECON 203 or 205. An analysis 
of the role of urban transportation in present and future 
urban development. The interaction of transport pric- 
ing and service, urban planning, institutional restraints, 
and public land uses is studied. 
BMGT 475 Advanced Logistics Management (3) 
Prerequisites: BMGT 370, 372, 332. Application of the 
concepts of BMGT 372 to problem solving and special 
projects in logistics management; case analysis is 
stressed. 

BMGT 480 Legal Environment of Business (3) The 
course examines the principal ideas in law stressing 
those which are relevant for the modern business 
executive Legal reasoning as it has evolved in this 
country will be one of the central topics of study. 
Several leading antitrust cases will be studied to 
illustrate vividly the reasoning process as well as the 
interplay of business, philosophy, and the various 
conceptions of the nature of law which give direction to 
the process. Examination of contemporary legal prob- 
lems and proposed solutions, especially those most 
likely to affect the business community, are also cov- 
ered. 

BMGT 481 Public Utilities (3) Prerequisite: ECON 203 
or 205. Using the regulated industries as specific 
examples attention is focused on broad and general 
problems in such diverse fields as constitutional law, 
administrative law, public administration, government 
control of business, advanced economic theory, ac- 
counting, valuation and depreciation, taxation, finance, 
engineering, and management. 
BMGT 482 Business and Government (3) Prerequi- 
site- ECON 203 or 205. A study of the role of govern- 
ment in modern economic life. Social control of busi- 
ness as a remedy for the abuses of business enter- 
prise arising from the decline of competition. Criteria of 
limitations on government regulation of private enter- 
prise. 



BMGT 485 Advanced Production Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 385. A study of typical problems 
encountered by the factory manager. The objective is 
to develop the ability to analyze and solve problems in 
management control of production and in the formula- 
tion of production policies. Among the topics covered 
are plant location, production planning and control, 
methods analysis, and time study. 
BMGT 490 Urban Land Management (3) Covers the 
managerial and decision making aspects of urban land 
and property. Included are such subjects as land use 
and valuation matters. 

BMGT 493 Honors Study (3) First semester of the 
senior year. Prerequisite: Candidacy for honors in 
Business and Management. The course is designed 
for honors students who have elected to conduct 
intensive study (independent or group). The student 
will work under the direct guidance of a faculty advisor 
and the chairman of the honors committee. They shall 
determine that the area of study is of a scope and 



intensity deserving of a candidate's attention. Formal 
written and/or oral reports on the study may be 
required by the faculty advisor and/or chairman of the 
honors program. Group meetings of the candidates 
may be called at the discretion of the faculty advisors 
and/or chairman of the honors committee. 
BMGT 494 Honors Study (3) Second semester of the 
senior year. Prerequisite: BMGT 493, and continued 
candidacy for honors in Business and Management. 
The student shall continue and complete the research 
initiated in BMGT 493; additional reports may be 
required at the discretion of the faculty advisor and 
honors program chairman. Group meetings may be 
held. 

BMGT 495 Business Policies (3) Prerequisites: 
BMGT 340 350, 364, and senior standing. A case 
study course in which the aim is to have the student 
apply what they have learned of general management 
principles and their specialized functional applications 
to the overall management function in the enterprise. 
BMGT 496 Business and Society (3) Prerequisite: 
One course in BMGT or consent of instructor. Norma- 
tive role of business in society; consideration of the 
sometimes conflicting interests and claims on the firm 
and its objectives. 

BMGT 498 Special Topics in Business and Manage- 
ment (3) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Special 
topics in Business and Management designed to meet 
the changing needs and interests of students and 
faculty. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits if the 
subject matter is different. 

BMGT 501 Business Functions (3) Intensive review 
of the management functions in the business enter- 
prise the development of management thought, and 
the nature of the managerial process. Credit not appli- 
cable towards graduate degrees. 
BMGT 502 Public Policy and the Environments of 
Business (3) Intensive review of the social, economic 
and legal environments of the business enterprise. 
Credit not applicable towards graduate degrees. 
BMGT 503 Accounting and Information Systems 
(3) Intesive review of the technical and conceptual 
aspects of financial accounting and accounting infor- 
mation systems as they apply to the business enter- 
prise. Credit not applicable towards graduate degrees. 
BMGT 504 Quantitative Methods and Computer 
Laboratory (4) Intensive review of the mathematical, 
statistical, and computer concepts, methods and skills 
requisite to the analysis of business problems. Credit 
not applicable towards graduate degrees. 
BMGT 606 Information Systems Technology (3) 
Introduction to graduate courses in IFSM, a survey for 
interested graduate students in other fields. The con- 
cepts theory and techniques of information systems. 
The system life cycle. The role of information systems 
in the management and control of the organization. 
Effectiveness measures of information systems. Case 
studies of information systems as developed by indus- 
try and government. Societal impact. 
BMGT 701 Management Analysis and Communica- 
tion (1) Analysis of business problems through case 
studies to generate written and/or oral reports describ- 
ing problem definition, alternative solutions, decision 
criteria, and recommended solutions. 
BMGT 708 Special Topics in Business and Manage- 
ment (3) Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate pro- 
qram in Business and Management or approval of the 
college program director. Selected advanced topics in 
the various fields of graduate study in Business and 
Management. With permission of the college program 
director, may be repeated to a maximum of six credits 
provided the content is different. 
BMGT 710 Advanced Accounting Theory (3) The 
study of the theoretical and conceptual foundations for 
generally accepted accounting principles and prac- 
tices The basic postulates, assumptions, and stan- 
dards which underlie the measurement criteria and 
practices of financial accounting. 
BMGT 712 Accounting in Regulated Industries (3) 
Study of the unique accounting problems of industries 
subject to regulation by governmental agencies. 
BMGT 713 The Impact of Taxation on Business 
Decisions (3) The impact of tax law and regulations 
on alternative business strategies with particular em- 
phasis on the large, multidivisional firm. Problems of 
acquisitions, mergers, spinoffs, and other divestures 



Business and Management Program 63 



from the viewpoint of profit planning, cash flow, and 
tax deferment. 

BMGT 715 International Auditing (3) International 
accounting, its problems and organizations associated 
with the study of the issues involved; international 
standards of accounting and auditing; national differ- 
ences in accounting thought and practice. 

BMGT 720 Managerial Accounting I (3) The use of 

accounting data for corporate financial planning and 
control. Organization for control, profit planning, 
budgeting, relevant costing, return on investment, and 
administration of the controllership function in smaller 
organizations 

BMGT 721 Requirements Analysis and Logical De- 
sign of Information Systems (3) Prerequisite IFSM 
606 or permission of instructor. Prerequisite: IFSM 606 
or permission of instructor. The life cycle of an informa- 
tion processing system. The early part of the life cycle, 
i.e., the perception of need and the collection of 
requirements. Feasibility analysis of proposed informa- 
tion processing systems. Techniques for statement of 
the requirements of an information processing system, 
ranging from the early industrial engineering originated 
methods to current computer-aided ones. Concepts of 
logical design from the synthesis of requirements. 

BMGT 722 The Physical Design of Information 
Systems (3) Prerequisite: IFSM 606 or permission of 
instructor. Mapping the logical design to the available 
hardware and off-the-shelf software in the 'best' way 
possible. Human factors and social implications. 

BMGT 723 Database Technology (3) Prerequisite: 
IFSM 606 or permission of instructor. The concepts, 
theory and models of data, its structure, manipulation, 
and storage. The various architectures of data man- 
agement systems Evaluation and selection of data- 
base systems. 

BMGT 724 Application of Management Methods to 
Information Systems (3) Prerequisites: IFSM 606, 
BMGT 734 or equivalent. Theory and practice of 
management techniques from strategic planning to 
system acquisition to operation as applied to informa- 
tion systems. Methods of organizing the information 
center, allocation of chargeback policies, performance 
monitoring and projection, security and integrity evalu- 
ation, project selection and staffing, outside services 
for resource leveling. 

BMGT 730 Bayesian Statistics and Decision Theo- 
ry (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 732 or consent of instructor. 
Concepts and methods of Bayesian statistical decision 
theory with application to business problems. 

BMGT 731 Theory of Survey Design (3) Examines 
the usefulness of statistical principles in survey design. 
Topics include: The nature of statistical estimation, the 
differential attributes of different estimators, the merits 
and weaknesses of available sampling methods and 
designs, the distinctive aspects of simple random 
samples, stratified random samples, and cluster sam- 
ples, ratio estimates and the problems posed by 
biases and non-sampling errors. 

BMGT 732 Management Statistics and Computer 
Laboratory (4) Prerequisite: BMGT 504 or permission 
of college. Application of statistical concepts to solu- 
tion of business problems; laboratory use of computer 
packages. 

BMGT 734 Management Science and Computer 
Laboratory (4) Prerequisite: BMGT 504 or permission 
of college. Application of management science con- 
cepts to solution of business problems; laboratory use 
of computer packages. 

BMGT 735 Application of Management Science (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 734 or consent of instructor. Se- 
lected topics and case studies in the application of 
management science to decision making in various 
functional fields. 

BMGT 736 Philosophy and Practice of Manage- 
ment Science (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 734 or 735. or 
consent of instructor. Critical examination of the phi- 
losophy underlining the techniques and methodology 
of management science from a systems analysis point 
of view. 

BMGT 737 Management Simulation (3) Prerequisite: 
BMGT 734 or consent of instructor. Methodology of 
systems simulation, Monte Carlo simulation, and dis- 
crete simulation. Verification and validation of simula- 
tion models with computer applications. 

BMGT 740 Financial Management (3) Prerequisite: 
BMGT 501 . 503 and 504 or permission of college. The 



role of financial management in the firm. Topics in- 
clude valuation and leverage, capital budgeting, cost 
of capital, dividend policy, long-term financing, working 
capital management, short-term financing, intermedi- 
ate-term financing and leasing, and mergers. Required 
of all MBA students. 

BMGT 741 Advanced Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 740 Concepts underlying finan- 
cial decision making in the firm. Case studies, model 
building and applications in financial theory and man- 
agement. 

BMGT 743 Investment Management (3) Prerequi- 
site: BMGT 740. Methods of security selection and 
portfolio management in the debt and equity markets. 
Investment alternatives, securities markets, bond and 
common stock valuation, options, portfolio theory, and 
behavior of stock prices. 

BMGT 745 Financial Institutions Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 740. The role of financial manage- 
ment in financial institutions. The economic role and 
regulation of financial institutions, analysis of risks and 
returns on financial assets and liabilities, and the 
structure of assets, liabilities and capital. 

BMGT 746 International Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 740. The role of financial manage- 
ment in the multinational firm. The financing and 
managing of foreign investments, assets, currencies, 
imports and exports. National and international finan- 
cial institutions and markets. 

BMGT 747 Risk Management (3) Prerequisites: 
BMGT 720, 732, 740. Strategies for pure risk manage- 
ment, including property, personnel, and liability expo- 
sures. Quantitative decision-making techniques ap- 
plied to self-insurance, insurance, and noninsurance 
transfers in organizations. 

BMGT 750 Marketing Management (3) Prerequisite: 
BMGT 501 or permission of college. Analysis of mar- 
keting problems and evaluation of specific marketing 
efforts as they contribute to a coordinated marketing 
program. Product, price and service policies; market 
characteristics; channel selection; promotion and or- 
ganization structure. 

BMGT 751 Marketing Communications Manage- 
ment (3) Required for MBA. candidates concentrat- 
ing in marketing. Concerned with the part that advertis- 
ing, promotion, public relations and related efforts play 
in the accomplishment of a firm's total marketing 
objectives. Its purpose is to develop competence in 
the formulation of mass communications, objectives in 
budget optimization, media appraisal, theme selection, 
program implementation and management, and re- 
sults measurement. 

BMGT 752 Marketing Research Methods (3) Re- 
quired for M.B.A. candidates concentrating in market- 
ing. Deals with the process of acquiring, classifying 
and interpreting primary and secondary marketing data 
needed for intelligent, profitable marketing decisions. 
Through readings, discussion, and case studies, ef- 
forts are made to develop skill in evaluating the 
appropriateness of alternative methodologies such as 
the inductive, deductive, survey, observational, and 
experimental. Consideration is also given to recent 
developments in the systematic recording and use of 
internal and external data needed for marketing deci- 
sions. 

BMGT 753 International Marketing (3) Deals with 
environmental, organizational, and financial aspects of 
international marketing as well as problems of market- 
ing research, pricing, channels of distribution, product 
policy, and communications which face U.S. firms 
trading with foreign firms or which face foreign firms in 
their operations. 

BMGT 754 Buyer Behavior Analysis (3) A systematic 
examination and evaluation of the literature, research 
tradition and theory of buyer behavior in the market 
place from a fundamental and applied perspective 
The cognitive and behavioral bases underlying the 
buying process of individuals and institutions is in- 
vestigated to better understand, predict, and influence 
the process through the effective utilization of the 
firms' marketing resources. 

BMGT 760 Personnel Administration (3) Examina- 
tion of the human resource function in organizations. 
Human resource planning, procurement and selection, 
training and development, performance appraisal, 
wage and salary administration, and equal employ- 
ment opportunity. 



BMGT 761 Problems and Applications in Personnel 
Administration (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 760 or equiva- 
lent, or permission of instructor Applications in the 
design, implementation, and evaluation of human re- 
source management programs. Experiential learning 
activities and simulations 

BMGT 762 Problems and Issues in Collective Bar- 
gaining (3) Current problems and issues in collective 
bargaining, including methods of handling industrial 
disputes, legal restrictions on various collective bar- 
gaining activities, theory and philosophy of collective 
bargaining, and internal union problems. 

BMGT 763 Administration of Labor Relations (3) 

Analysis of labor relations at the plant level with 
emphasis on the negotiation and administration of 
labor contracts Union policy and influence on person- 
nel management activities. 

BMGT 764 Behavioral Factors in Management (3) 

Prerequisite: 8MGT 501 or permission of college 
Analysis of the influence of Behavioral Sciences on 
the theory and practice of management. 

BMGT 765 Application of Behavioral Science to 
Business (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 764 or permission of 
professor. Stresses case analysis of behavioral knowl- 
edge applied to management problems. Typical topics 
include analysis of modes for introducing change, 
group versus organizational goals, organizational bar- 
riers to personal growth, the effect of authority sys- 
tems on behavior, and the relationship between tech- 
nology and social structure. 

BMGT 770 Transportation Theory and Analysis (3) 

Examines the transportation system and its com- 
ponents. Key topics in the development and present 
form of transportation in both the United States and 
other countries are considered together with theoreti- 
cal concepts employed in the analysis of transport 
problems. 

BMGT 771 Transport and Public Policy (3) An 

intensive study of the nature and consequences of 
relations between governments and agencies thereof, 
carriers in the various modes, and users of transport 
services. Typical areas subjected to examination and 
analysis include: the control of transport firms by 
regulatory bodies, taxation of carriers, methods em- 
ployed in the allocation of funds to the construction, 
operation, and maintenance of publicly-provided trans- 
port facilities, and the direct subsidization of services 
supplied by privately-owned entities. Additional prob- 
lems considered include labor and safety Compara- 
tive international transport policies and problems are 
also examined. 

BMGT 772 Management of Physical Distribution (3) 

Focuses on managerial practices required to fulfill 
optimally the physical movement needs of extractive, 
manufacturing, and merchandising firms. Attention is 
given to the total cost approach to physical distribu- 
tion. Interrelations among purchased transport serv- 
ices, privately-supplied transport services, warehous- 
ing, inventory control, materials handling, packaging, 
and plant location are considered An understanding of 
the communications network to support physical distri- 
bution is developed in conjunction with study of the 
problems of coordination between the physical move- 
ment management function and other functional areas 
within the business firm — such as accounting, finance, 
marketing, and production. 

BMGT 773 Transportation Strategies (3) Treats 
organization structure, policies, and procedures em- 
ployed in the administration of inter- and intraurban 
transport firms. Problems receiving attention include 
managerial development, operational and financial 
planning and control, demand analysis, pricing, promo- 
tional policies, intra- and intermodal competitive and 
complementary relationships, and methods tor accom- 
modating public policies designed to delimit the mana- 
gerial discretion of carrier executives Administrative 
problems peculiar to publicly-owned and operated 
transport entities are also considered. 

BMGT 774 Private Enterprise and Public Policy (3) 
Examines the executive's social and ethical responsi- 
bilities to his employees, customers and to the general 
public Consideration is given to the conflicts occa- 
sioned by competitive relationships in the private sec- 
tor of business and the effect of institutional restraints 
The trends in public policy and their future effect upon 
management are examined For comparative pur- 
poses, several examples of planned societies are 
considered. 

BMGT 775 Product, Production and Pricing Policy 

(3) Required of MBA candidates. The application of 



64 Chemical Engineering Program 



economic theory to the business enterprise in respect 
to the determination of policy and the handling of 
management problems with particular reference to the 
firm producing a complex line of products, nature of 
competition, pricing policy, interrelationship of produc- 
tion and marketing problems, basic types of cos . 
control systems, theories of depreciation and invest- 
ment and the impact of each upon costs. 
BMGT 777 Policy Issues in Public Utilities (3) A 
critical analysis of current developments in regulatory 
policy and issues arising among public utilities, regula- 
tory agencies, and the general public. Emphasis is 
placed on the electric, gas, water, and communica- 
tions industries in both the public and private sectors 
of the economy. Changing and emerging problems 
stressed include those pertinent to cost analysis, 
depreciation, finance, taxes, rate of return, the rate 
base differential rate-making, and labor. In addition, 
the growing importance of technological develop- 
ments and their impact on state and federal regulatory 
agencies are explored. 

BMGT 781 International Business Administration 
(3) Examines the international business environment 
as it affects company policy and procedures. In- 
tegrates the business functions undertaken m interna- 
tional operations through analysis in depth and com- 
prehensive case studies. This course can be credited 
toward the 18-hour requirement for a major field in the 
D.B.A. program 

BMGT 782 Management of the Multinational Firm 
(3) Deals with the problems and policies of interna- 
tional business enterprise at the management level. 
Considers management of a multinational enterprise 
as well as management within foreign units, me 
multinational firm as a socio-econometnc institution is 
analyzed in detail. Cases in comparative management 
are utilized. 

BMGT 785 Management Planning and Control Sys- 
tems (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 501 or permission of 
colleqe. Analysis of planning and control systems as 
they relate to the fulfillment of organizational objec- 
tives Identification of organizational objectives, 
responsibility centers, information needs, and informa- 
tion networks. Case studies of integrated planning and 
control systems. 

BMGT 786 Development and Trends in Production 
Management (3) Case studies of production problems 
in a number of industries. Focuses attention on deci- 
sions concerning operating programs and manufactur- 
ing policies at the top level of manufacturing. Basic 
concepts of process and product technology are cov- 
ered taking into consideration the scale, operating 
range capital cost, method of control, and degree of 
mechanization at each successive stage in the manu- 
facturing process. 

BMGT 790 Total Enterprise Strategy (3) Prerequi- 
site BMGT 501, 502, 503 and 504, or permission of 
college Case studies and research in the identification 
of management problems, the evaluation of alternative 
solutions, and the recommendation for management 
implementation. 

BMGT 791 Total Enterprise Strategy-Management 
Practicum (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 501. 502, 503 and 
504 and permission of director of MBA prograrrv 
Expenental research project in the identification of 
management problems, the evaluation of alternative 
solutions, and the recommendation for management. 
BMGT 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
BMGT 808 Doctoral Seminar (3) Prerequisite: Admis- 
sion to the D.B.A. program or approval of the College 
Director of Graduate Studies. SelecteJ advanced top- 
ics in the various fields of doctoral study in business 
and management. With permission of the College 
Director of Graduate Studies, may be repeated pro- 
vided the content is different. 

BMGT 811 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) Pre- 
requisite: BMGT 710 or equivalent. Seminar in the 
continuing development of the fundamental theoretical 
framework of accounting. 

BMGT 814 Current Problems ot Professional Prac- 
tice (3) Generally accepted auditing standards, audit- 
ing practices, legal and ethical responsibilities, and the 
accounting and reporting requirements of the securi- 
ties and exchange commission. 
BMGT 821 Managerial Accounting II (3) Prerequi 
site BMGT 720 or equivalent. Seminar in the manage- 
ment and controllership aspects of accounting in large 
business organizations. 



BMGT 828 Independent Study in Business and 
Management (1-9) 

BMGT 830 Operations Research: Linear Pro- 
gramming (3) Prerequisite: MATH 240 or equivalent, 
or permission of instructor. Concepts and applications 
of linear programming models, theoretical develop- 
ment of the simplex algorithm, and primal-dual prob- 
lems and theory. 

BMGT 831 Operations Research: Extension of Lin- 
ear Programming and Network Analysis (3) Prereq- 
uisite BMGT 830 or equivalent, or permission of 
instructor Concepts and applications of network and 
graph theory in linear models with emphasis on com- 
putional algorithms. 

BMGT 832 Operations Research: Optimization and 
Nonlinear Programming (3) Prerequisites: BMGT 
830 and MATH 241 or equivalent, or permission of 
instructor Theory and applications of algorithmic ap- 
proaches to solving unconstrained and constrained 
non-linear optimization problems. The Kuhn Tucker 
conditions, Lagrangian and duality theory, types of 
convexity and convergence criteria. Feasible direction 
procedures, penalty and barrier techniques, and cut- 
ting plane procedures. 

BMGT 833 Operations Research: Integer Pro- 
gramming (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 830 and MATH 241 
or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Theory, 
applications, and computational methods of interger 
optimization. Zero-one implicit enumeration, branch 
and bound methods, and cutting plane methods. 
BMGT 834 Operations Research: Probabilistic Mo- 
dels (3) Prerequisites: MATH 241 and STAT 400 or 
equivalent, or permission of instructor. Theoretical 
foundations for the construction, optimization and 
applications of probabilistic models. Queuing theory, 
inventory theory, Markov processes, renewal theory, 
and stochastic linear programming. 
BMGT 835 Simulation and Design of Experiments 
(3) Prerequisites: Knowledge of fortran programming 
BMGT 732 and 734 or equivalent, or permission of 
instructor. Statistical design and analysis of simulation 
experiments. 

BMGT 841 Seminar in Corporate Finance (3) Pre- 
requisite Permission of instructor. Seminar in selected 
classic and current theoretical and empirical research 
in corporate finance. 

BMGT 843 Seminar in Portfolio Theory (3) Prerequi- 
site Permission of instructor. Seminar in selected 
classic and current theoretical and empirical research 
in portfolio theory. 

BMGT 845 Seminar in Financial Institutions and 
Markets (3) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
Seminar in selected classic and current theoretical and 
empirical research in financial institutions and markets. 



BMGT 850 Marketing Channels Analysis (3) Focus 
es on the fundamentals explain alternate channels of 
distribution and the roles played by various intermedia- 
ries the evolution of business structures in marketing, 
reasons for change, and projected marketing patterns 
for the future. M.B.A. candidates may register with 
permission of instructor. 

BMGT 851 Quantitative Methods in Marketing- 
Demand and Cost Analysis (3) Consideration is 
given to quantitative methods in the analysis and 
prediction of market demand and marketing costs 
Topics in connection with demand include market 
potentials, sales forecasting, consumer analysis 
promotional and pricing results, and the like. Cost 
analysis focuses on allocation of costs by marketing 
functions, products, territories, customers and market- 
ing personnel. Statistical techniques, mathematics, 
models and other methods are utilized in the solution 
of marketing problems. MBA. candidates may regis- 
ter with permission of instructor. 
BMGT 852 Theory in Marketing (3) An inquiry into 
the problems and elements of theory development in 
general with specific reference to the field of market- 
ing A critical analysis and evaluation of past and 
contemporary efforts to formulate theories of market- 
ing and to integrate theories from the social sciences 
into a marketing framework. Attention is given to the 
development of concepts in all areas of marketing 
thought and to their potential application in the busi- 
ness firm. 

BMGT 860 Seminar in Human Resource Planning 
and Selection (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 760 or permis- 



sion of instructor. Seminar in selected theoretical and 
empirical literature in human resource planning, fore- 
casting, and staffing. 

BMGT 861 Seminar in Performance Appraisal and 
Training (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 760 or permission of 
instructor Seminar in selected theoretical and empiri- 
cal literature in performance appraisal and training. 
BMGT 862 Seminar in Compensation Administra- 
tion (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 760 or permission of 
instructor Seminar in selected theoretical and empiri- 
cal literature in the compensation of human resources. 
BMGT 863 Seminar: The Organization and the Indi- 
vidual (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 764 or equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. Seminar in the literature on 
the relationship between individual and organizational 
characteristics. 

BMGT 864 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations and 
the Group Process in Organizations (3) Prerequi- 
site BMGT 764 or equivalent, or permission of instruc- 
tor Emphasis on the literature of small group behavior 
among industrial work groups, white-collar work 
groups, professional staff, and managerial units. 
BMGT 865 Seminar in Comparative Theories of 
Organization (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 764 or equiva- 
lent or permission of instructor. Emphasis on the 
interdisciplinary literature on classical management, 
systems, and contingency theories of organization. 
BMGT 866 Seminar in Organizational Conflict and 
Change (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 764 or equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. Emphasis on the introduction 
of planned and systematic changes in small work 
qroups organizational subsystems, and the entire or 
organization through the use of behavioral science 
techniques. 

BMGT 872 Business Logistics (3) Concentrates on 
the design and application of methods for the solution 
of advanced physical movement problems of business 
firms Provides thorough coverage of a variety of 
analytical techniques relevant to the solution of these 
problems. Where appropriate, experience will be pro- 
vided in the utilization of computers to assist in mana- 
gerial logistical decision-making. 
BMGT 873 Transportation Science (3) Focuses on 
the application of quantitative and qualitative tech- 
niques of analysis to managerial problems drawn from 
firms in each of the various modes of transport 
Included is the application of simulation to areas such 
as the control of equipment selection and terminal and 
line operations. The application of advanced analytical 
techniques to problems involving resource use effi- 
ciency within the transportation industry and between 
transportation and other sectors of the economy is an 
integral part of the course. 

BMGT 880 Business Research Methodology (3) 
Covers the nature, scope, and application of research 
methodology. The identification and formulation of 
research designs applicable to business and related 
fields. Required of D.B.A. students. 
BMGT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Chemical Engineering 
Program 

Professor and Director: Smith 

Professor and Department Chairman: Cadman 

Professors: Beckmann, Birkner?, Gentry:*, 

Regan, Schroeder 1 , Smith 

Adjunct Professors: Bolsaitis 

/Associate Professors: Gasner, Hatch 

Assistant Professors: Burka, Finger 1 , King 

'part time 

2joint appointment with Civil Engineering 

3j int appointment with Institute for Physical 

Science and Technology 

An individual plan of graduate study compatible 

with the student's interest and background is 

established between the student, his advisor 

and the Department Chairman. The general 

chemical engineering program is focused on 

four major areas; applied polymer science, bio- 



Chemical Engineering Program 65 



chemical engineering, environmental and ener- 
gy-related engineering, process and analysis 
simulation. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

The programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. 
degrees are open to qualified students holding 
the B.S. degree. Admission may be granted to 
students with degrees in any of the engineering 
and science areas from accredited programs. In 
some cases it may be necessary to require 
courses to fulfill the background. The general 
regulations of the Graduate School apply in 
reviewing applications. 

The candidate for the M.S. degree has the 
choice of following a plan of study with or 
without thesis. The equivalent of at least three 
years of full-time study beyond the B.S. degree 
is required for the Ph.D. degree. All students 
seeking graduate degrees in Chemical Engi- 
neering must enroll in ENCH 610, 620, 630, and 
640. In addition to the general rules of the 
Graduate School certain special degree 
requirements are set forth by the Department in 
its departmental publications. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

A number of special facilities are available for 
graduate study and research and are coordinat- 
ed through the Laboratory for Radiation and 
Polymer Science, the Laboratory for Process 
Analysis and Simulation, the Laboratory for 
Biochemical Engineering and Environmental 
Studies, and the Nuclear Reactor Facility. 
These laboratories contain analog and digital 
process control computers, a gamma radiation 
facility, an electron accelerator, an electron 
paramagnetic resonance spectrometer, crystal 
growth and mechanical testing equipment, and 
X-ray units. 

Courses 

ENCH 425 Transport Processes II — Heat Transfer 

(3) Steady and unsteady state conduction, convective 
heat transfer, radiation, design of condensers, heat 
exchangers, evaporators, and other types of heat 
transfer equipment. Prerequisite: MATH 246. Pre- or 
corequisite: ENCH 280 

ENCH 427 Transport Processes III— Mass Transfer 

(3) Steady and unsteady state molecular diffusion, 
inter-phase transfer, simultaneous heat and mass 
transfer, boundary layer theory, mass transfer and 
chemical reaction. Design applications in humidifica- 
tion, gas absorption, distillation, extraction, adsorption 
and ion exchange. 

ENCH 437 Chemical Engineering Laboratory (3) 

Application of chemical engineering process and unit 
operation principles in small scale semi-commercial 
equipment. Data from experimental observations are 
used to evaluate performance and efficiency of opera- 
tions. Emphasis on correct presentation of results in 
report form. Prerequisites: ENCH 427. ENCH 440 
ENCH 442. 

ENCH 440 Chemical Engineering Kinetics (3) Fun- 
damental of chemical reaction kinetics and their appli- 
cation to the design and operation of chemical reac- 
tors. Reaction rate theory, homogeneous reactions 
and catalysis electrochemical reactions. Catalytic re- 
actor design. Prerequisites: ENCH 300, ENCH 325 
CHEM 481. 

ENCH 442 Chemical Engineering Systems Analysis 

(3) Dynamic response applied to process systems 
Goals and modes ol control, Laplace transformations, 
analysis and synthesis of simple control systems, 
closed loop response, dynamic testing. Prerequisites 
ENCH 300, ENCH 425. 

ENCH 444 Process Engineering Economics and 
Design I (3) Principles of chemical engineering eco- 
nomics and process design. Emphasis on equipment 
types, equipment design principles, capital cost esti- 



mation, operating costs, and profitability. Prerequi- 
sites: ENCH 427. ENCH 440. ENCH 442. 

ENCH 445 Process Engineering Economics and 
Design II (3) Application of chemical engineering 
principles for the design of process equipment. Typical 
problems in the design of chemical plants. Com- 
prehensive reports are required Prerequisite: ENCH 
427. 

ENCH 446 Process Engineering Economics and 
Design II (3) Application of chemical engineering 
principles for the design of chemical processing equip- 
ment. Typical problems in the design of chemical 
plants. Not open to students who already have credit 
for ENCH 445. Prerequisite: ENCH 444. 

ENCH 450 Chemical Process Development (3) 

Chemical process industries from the standpoint of 
technology, raw materials, products and processing 
equipment. Operations of major chemical processes 
and industries combined with quantitative analysis of 
process requirements and yields. Prerequisite: ENCH 
427. 

ENCH 452 Advanced Chemical Engineering Analy- 
sis (3) Application of digital and analog computers to 
chemical engineering problems. Numerical methods, 
programming, differential equations, curve fitting, am- 
plifiers and analog circuits. Prerequisite: ENCH 427 

ENCH 453 Applied Mathematics in Chemical Engi- 
neering (3) Mathematical techniques applied to the 
analysis and solution of chemical engineering prob- 
lems. Use of differentiation, integration, differential 
equations, partial differential equations and integral 
transforms. Application of infinite series, numerical and 
statistical methods. Prerequisite: ENCH 427. 

ENCH 454 Chemical Process Analysis and Op- 
timization (3) Applications of mathematical models to 
the analysis and optimization of chemical processes. 
Models based on transport, chemical kinetics and 
other chemical engineering principles will be em- 
ployed. Emphasis on evaluation of process alterna- 
tives. Prerequisites: ENCH 427, 440. 

ENCH 455 Chemical Process Laboratory (3) One 

lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Experi- 
mental study of various chemical processes through 
laboratory and small semi-commercial scale equip- 
ment. Reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics, heat and 
mass transfer. Prerequisite: ENCH 427 and 440. 

ENCH 461 Control of Air Pollution Sources (3) 

Theory and application of methods for the control and 
removal of airborne materials. Principles of design and 
performance of air quality control equipment. Prerequi- 
site: Senior standing in engineering or consent of 
instructor. 

ENCH 468 Research (1-3) Investigation of a research 
project under the direction of a faculty member Com- 
prehensive reports are required. Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of six credits. 

ENCH 475 Electrochemical Engineering (3) Funda- 
mentals of electrochemistry with application to engi- 
neering and commercial processes. Equilibrium poten- 
tials, reaction mechanisms, cell kinetics, polarization, 
surface phenomena. Electrorefining, electrowinning, 
oxidation and reduction, solid, liquid and gas systems. 
Aspects of design and performance of electroprocess 
plants. 

ENCH 480 Engineering Analysis of Physiological 
Systems (3) Engineering description and analysis of 
physiological systems. Survey of bioengineering litera- 
ture and an introduction to mathematical modeling ot 
physiological systems. 

ENCH 482 Biochemical Engineering (3) Introduction 
to biochemical and microbiological applications to 
commercial and engineering processes, including in- 
dustrial fermentation, enzymology, ultrafiltration, food 
and pharmaceutical processing and resulting waste 
treatment. Enzyme kinetics, cell growth, energetics 
and mass transfer. Prerequisite, Senior standing in 
engineering or consent ol instructor. 

ENCH 485 Biochemical Engineering Laboratory (2) 

Techniques of measuring pertinent parameters in fer- 
mentation reactors, quantification of production varia- 
bles for primary and secondary metabolites such as 
enzymes and antibiotics, the insolublization of en- 
zymes for reactors, and the demonstration of separa- 
tion techniques such as ultrafiltration and affinity chro- 
matography Prerequisite or co-requisite: ENCH 482 

ENCH 490 Introduction to Polymer Science (3) The 

elements of the chemistry, physics, processing meth- 



ods, and engineering applications of polymers. Prereq- 
uisite: ENCH 425. 

ENCH 492 Applied Physical Chemistry of Polymers 

(3) Kinetics of formation of high polymers, determina- 
tion of molecular weight and structure, and applied 
thermodynamics and phase equilibria of polymer solu- 
tions. Prerequisite: CHEM 48 1 Corequisite: CHEM 482 
or consent of instructor. 

ENCH 494 Polymer Technology Laboratory (3) One 

lecture and two laboratory periods per week Measure- 
ment of mechanical, electrical, optical, thermal proper- 
ties of polymers, measurement ot molecular weight by 
viscosimetry isometric and light scattering methods. 
Application of X-ray. NMR. ESR. spectroscopy molec- 
ular relaxation, microscopy and electron microscopy to 
the determination of polymer structure, effects ol 
ultraviolet light and high energy radiation. Prerequisite 
ENCH 490 or 492. 

ENCH 495 Rheology of Polymer Materials (3) Me- 
chanical behavior with emphasis on the continuum 
point of view and its relationship to structural types. 
Elasticity, viscoelasticity, anelasticity and plasticity of 
single phase and multiphase materials Students who 
have credit for ENCH 495 may not take ENMA 495 for 
credit. Prerequisite: ENCH 490 or 492. 

ENCH 496 Processing of Polymer Materials (3) A 

comprehensive analysis of the operations carried out 
on polymeric materials to increase their utility Conver- 
sion operations such as molding extrusion, bledding. 
film forming, and calendering. Development of engi- 
neering skills required to practice in the high polymer 
industry. Students who have credit tor ENCH 496 may 
not take ENMA 496 for credit. Prerequisite: ENCH 490 
or 492. 

ENCH 609 Graduate Seminar (1) 

ENCH 610 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 

(3) First semester. Advanced application of the gener- 
al thermodynamic methods to chemical engineenng 
problems. First and second law consequences; esti- 
mation and correlation of thermodynamic properties: 
phase and chemical reaction equilibria 

ENCH 620 Methods of Engineering Analysis (3) 

First semester. Application of selected mathematical 
techniques to the analysis and solution of engineenng 
problems; included are the applications of matrices, 
vectors, tensors, differential equations, integral trans- 
forms, and probability methods to such problems as 
unsteady heat transfer, transient phenomena in mass 
transfer operations, stagewise processes, chemical 
reactors, process control, and nuclear reactor physics 

ENCH 630 Transport Phenomena (3) First semester 
Heat, mass and momentum transfer theory from the 
viewpoint of the basic transport equations Steady and 
unsteady state; laminar and turbulent flow; boundary 
layer theory, mechanics of turbulent transport; with 
specific application to complex chemical engineering 
situations. 

ENCH 640 Advanced Chemical Reaction Kinetics 

(3) Second semester The theory and application of 
chemical reaction kinetics to reactor design. Reaction 
rate theory; homogeneous batch and flow reactors; 
fundamentals ot catalysis; design ot heterogeneous 
flow reactors. 

ENCH 648 Special Problems in Chemical Engineer- 
ing (1-16) 

ENCH 655 Radiation Engineering (3) Prerequisite 
Permission of instructor An analysis of such radiation 
applications as synthesizing chemicals, preserving 
foods, control of industrial processes. Design ol ir- 
radiation installations, E.G., cobalt 60 gamma ray 
sources, electronuclear machine arrangement, and 
chemical reactors 

ENCH 656 Radiation Engineering (3) Prerequisite 
Permission of instructor. An analysis ot such radiation 
applications as synthesizing chemicals, preserving 
foods, control of industrial processes Design of ir- 
radiation installations. E.G., cobalt 60 gamma ray 
sources, electronuclear machine arrangement, and 
chemical reactors 

ENCH 667 Radiation Effects Laboratory (3) radia- 
tion on the properties of matter for purposes other 
than those pointed toward nuclear power. Radia- 
tion processing, radiation-induced chemical reac- 
tions, and conversion of radiation energy; isotope 
power sources. 

ENCH 670 Rheology of Engineering Materials (3) 
Prerequisite: ENMA 650 Mechanical behavior with 



66 Chemical Physics Program 



emphasis on the continuum point of view and its 
relationship to structural types. Elasticity, viscoelastici- 
ty. anelasticity and plasticity in single phase and mul- 
tiphase materials. 

ENCH 720 Process Analysis and Simulation (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite: ENCH 630. Develop- 
ment ot mathematical models o( chemical processes 
based on transport phenomena, chemical kinetics, 
and other chemical engineering methods. Emphasis 
on principles of model building and simulation utilizing 
mathematical solutions and computer methods. 
ENCH 723 Process Engineering and Design (3) First 
and second semesters. Coordination of chemical engi- 
neering and economics to advanced process engi- 
neering and design. Optimization of investment and 
operating costs. Solution of typical problems encoun- 
tered in the design of chemical engineering plants. 
ENCH 730 Complex Equilibrium Stage Processes 
(3) Second semester. The theory and application of 
complex equilibrium stages. Binary and multicom- 
ponent absorption; extraction; liquefaction. 
ENCH 735 Chemical Process Dynamics (3) First 
semester. Prequisites; Differential equations or con- 
sent of instructor. Analysis of open and closed control 
loops and their elements; dynamic response of pro- 
cesses; choice of variables and linkages; dynamic 
testing and synthesis; noise and drift; chemical pro- 
cess systems analysis; strategies for optimum opera- 
tion. 

ENCH 737 Chemical Process Optimization (3) Sec- 
ond semester. Techniques of modern optimization 
theory as applied to chemical engineering problems. 
Optimization of single and multivariate systems with 
and without constraints. Application of partial optimiza- 
tion techniques to complex chemical engineering pro- 
cesses. 

ENCH 761 Enzyme Engineering (3) Prerequisite; 
ENCH 640. Enzyme science and kinetics; principles of 
enzyme insolublization and denaturation with applica- 
tion to design, operation and modeling of enzyme 
reactors. The relationship between mass transfer and 
apparent kinetics in enzyme systems; and techniques 
of separation and purification of enzymes. 
ENCH 762 Advanced Biochemical Engineering (3) 
Prerequisite: ENCH 482 or permission of instructor. 
Advanced topics to include use of a digital computer 
for mathematical modeling of the dynamics of biologi- 
cal systems; separation techniques for heat sensitive 
biologically active materials; and transport phenomena 
in biological systems. 

ENCH 763 Engineering of Artificial Organs (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENCH 480 or permission of instructor. De- 
sign concepts and engineering analysis of devices to 
supplement or replace natural functions; artificial kid- 
ney; heart assistor; membrane oxygenator; materials 
problems, physiological considerations. 
ENCH 784 Polymer Physics (3) Prerequisite: ENCH 
490 or consent of instructor. Application and correla- 
tion of mechanical and dielectric relaxation, NMR, 
electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, diffusion and 
electrical properties to the mechanical properties and 
structure of polymers in the solid state. 
ENCH 786 Polymer Processing and Applications 
(3) Prerequisite: ENCH 490 or consent of instructor. 
Application of theoretical knowledge of polymers to 
industrial processes. An analysis of polymerization, 
stabilization, electrical, rheological, thermal, mechani- 
cal and optical properties and their influence on pro- 
cessing conditions and end use applications. 
ENCH 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
ENCH 818 Advanced Topics in Thermodynamics 
(3) Second semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 604. 

ENCH 828 Advanced Topics in Chemical Reaction 
Systems (3) First semester. Offered in alternate years. 
Prerequisite: ENCH 640. 

ENCH 838 Advanced Topics in Transfer Theory (3) 
First semester. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: 
ENCH 720. 

ENCH 848 Advanced Topics in Separation Pro- 
cesses (3) Second semester. Offered in alternate 
years. 
ENCH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Chemical Physics 
Program 

Acting Director: Sengers. 
Associate Director: Alexander. 
(CHEM) Professors: Alexander, McNesby, 
Moore. 

Associate Professors: Greer, Khanna, Miller, 
Murphy, Tossell, Weiner. 
(ENCH/IPST) Professor: Gentry. 
(ENEE) Professors: Hochuli, Lee. 
Associate Professor: Davis. 
(IPST) Professors: Benesch, Glnter, Montroll, 
Sengers, Wilkerson, Zwanzig. 
Associate Professors: Coplan, Gammon, 
Mcllrath. 

(METO) Associate Professor: Ellingson. 
Assistant Professor: Pitter. 
(PHYS) Associate Professors: Lynn, Redish. 
(PHYS/IPST) Professors: Dorfman, Ferrell. 
The Chemical Physics Program provides an 
academic path for those candidates wishing to 
establish a professional career for which knowl- 
edge of both physics and chemistry is desirable. 
The program offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in 
chemical physics. Candidates have the option 
of concentrating their studies in chemistry, 
physics, chemical engineering, electrical engi- 
neering or meteorology. 

The Chemical Physics Program is under 
the joint sponsorship of the Institute for Physical 
Science and Technology, the Chemistry De- 
partment, the Department of Physics and As- 
tronomy and the College of Engineering. The 
Chemical Physics Committee oversees the pro- 
gram. The Committee consists of faculty repre- 
sentatives of the sponsoring units, and has the 
director of the Chemical Physics Program as its 
chairman. The Chemical Physics Program Of- 
fice which is affiliated with the Institute for 
Physical Science and Technology administers 
the program. 

About 30 faculty members at the College 
Park campus, active in subject areas related to 
chemical physics, are affiliated with the Chemi- 
cal Physics Program. The areas of study cover 
a very broad range of subjects. Examples are: 
atomic and molecular science including atomic 
and molecular structure and spectroscopy, 
laser physics and quantum electronics, at- 
mospheric physics and spectroscopy, statistical 
physics, thermodynamics and phase transi- 
tions, physics and chemistry of gases and con- 
densed matter. Some of the research activities 
are related to similar activities in several gov- 
ernment laboratories in the Washington metro- 
politan area. A booklet describing the scope of 
chemical physics at the College Park campus 
can be obtained from the Chemical Physics 
Program Office upon request. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Students with an undergraduate major in phys- 
ics, chemistry, engineering or mathematics may 
apply. However, for a successful completion of 
the chemical physics study a strong back- 
ground in physics and some background in 
chemistry is desirable. Students admitted to the 
Chemical Physics Program will also be listed as 
graduate students in the department of their 
chosen area of concentration; however, all mat- 
ters concerning the course of study will be 
handled by the Chemical Physics Program 
Committee and the Chemical Physics Program 
Office. 

The course program will be adjusted to the 
needs of the individual student. In case the 
candidate does not possess the required un- 
dergraduate background in both physics and 
chemistry, the candidate's advisory committee 



will prescribe appropriate undergraduate 
courses. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree are 
required to pass the chemical physics qualifying 
examination which is based on material cov- 
ered by the physics qualifying examination in 
the areas of classical mechanics, quantum me- 
chanics, statistical mechanics, thermodynam- 
ics, electricity and magnetism. Additional ques- 
tions cover areas specifically appropriate to 
chemical physics, namely atomic and molecular 
spectroscopy and structure, molecular bonding 
theory, chemical reaction dynamics and chemi- 
cal thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. 
In addition to successfully passing the qualifying 
examination, the student will be required to take 
a graduate laboratory course, 3 semesters of 
seminar, 4 advanced courses and 12 credit 
hours of thesis research concluded by the pres- 
entation and defense of an original dissertation. 
Under certain circumstances graduate students 
can have access to the resources available at 
government laboratories in the Washington 
metropolitan area. 

Candidates for the M.S. degree may 
choose between a thesis or non-thesis option. 
Programs of work are arranged on an individual 
basis and require approval of an advisor as- 
sociated with the chemical physics program. 
The requirements for the non-thesis option are 
completion of 30 credit hours of courses includ- 
ing PHYS 602, PHYS 622, CHEM 601 and a 
graduate laboratory course, unless specifically 
exempted, submitting a scholarly paper and 
passing a written examination. The require- 
ments for the thesis option are completion of 24 
credit hours of courses including PHYS 602, 
PHYS 622, CHEM 601 and a graduate laborato- 
ry, unless specifically exempted, 6 credit hours 
of thesis research, a written thesis and a pass- 
ing grade on an oral examination which includes 
the defense of the written thesis. 



Financial Assistance 

Teaching and research assistantships are avail- 
able for qualified students. 

Additional Information 

Requests for further information concerning the 
Chemical Physics Program can be obtained by 
writing to Professor J. V. Sengers, Acting Direc- 
tor, Chemical Physics Program, Institute for 
Physical Science and Technology, University of 
Maryland, College Park. 



Chemistry Program 

Professor and Chairman: McNesby 
Professors: Adler, Alexander, Ammon, 
Bellama, Castellan, Fraser-Reid, Freeman, 
Goldsby, Gordon, Grim, Henery-Logan, 
Holmlund, Huheey, Jaquith, Jarvis, Keeney, 
Mariano, Mazzocchi, Moore, Munn, O'Haver, 
Ponnamperuma, Stewart, Viola, Walters, 
Zoller. 

Associate Professors: Boyd, Campagnoni, 
DeVoe, Gokel, Greer, Hansen, Heikkinen, 
Helz, Kasler, Khanna, Lakshmanan, Miller, 
Murphy, Sampugna, Tossell, Weiner 
Assistant Professors: Cheng, Dunaway- 
Mariano, McArdle, Mignerey, Schuda 
Research Professor: Bailey 

The Chemistry Department offers programs 
leading to the Master of Science or Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees with specialization in the 
fields of analytical chemistry, biochemistry, 
chemical physics (in cooperation with the In- 
stitute of Physical Sciences & Technology and 
the Department of Physics and Astronomy), 



Chemistry Program 67 



environmental chemistry, geochemistry, inor- 
ganic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, organic 
chemistry, and physical chemistry. The gradu- 
ate program in biochemistry is described 
separately in this catalog. The graduate pro- 
gram in chemistry has been designed with maxi- 
mum flexibility so that a student can achieve a 
strong background in his chosen field of spe- 
cialization. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Both the thesis and non-thesis options are 
offered for the MS degree. Departmental regu- 
lations concerning diagnostic examinations, 
comprehensive examinations, and other mat- 
ters pertaining to course work have been as- 
sembled for the guidance of candidates for 
graduate degrees. Copies of these regulations 
are available from the Department of Chemistry. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has many special research 
facilities to support research in the fields given 
above. The new research wing of the chemistry 
building houses biochemistry research, a cen- 
tralized animal colony, and some of the inor- 
ganic and analytical chemical research. Nuclear 
chemistry facilities include the 140-MeV cyclo- 
tron housed in the Physics Department. Other 
facilities include "clean" rooms for lunar and 
environmental sample analysis, an electron 
microscope, X-ray fluorescence instrumenta- 
tion, an electron microprobe, mass spectrome- 
ters, NMR spectrometers including 100 MHz 
and 200 MHz Fourier-transform NMR spec- 
trometers, ultracentrifuges, and analytical opti- 
cal spectrometers. Departmental research is 
supported on two large computers in the Com- 
puter Science Building, a UNIVAC 1100/41 and 
a UNIVAC 1108, both of which are accessible 
by remote time-sharing terminals. A variety of 
facilities including a laser laboratory, other elec- 
tron microscopes, and an ESCA spectrometer 
are available through the Center of Materials 
Research on campus. The Department has an 
excellent glassblowing shop, a fine student fac- 
ulty machine shop, and access to other campus 
machine shops. The Chemistry Library, located 
in the new research wing, has an extensive 
collection of books, journals, and abstracts in 
chemistry, biochemistry and allied fields. Includ- 
ed in the Chemistry Library is a computer termi- 
nal for literature searching. 

Financial Assistance 

Entering graduate students are normally sup- 
ported on graduate teaching assistantships. 
Their assistantships usually involve teaching 
undergraduate laboratory and recitation classes 
and enable the student to pursue a ten-credit 
program of graduate study each semester. 

Additional Information 

The Department has a brochure available de- 
scribing its graduate program and the research 
interests of its faculty. For a copy of the bro- 
chure, or for specific information on graduate 
programs in chemistry, admissions procedures, 
or financial aid, contact Dr. Paul Mazzochi, 
Associate Chairman for Graduate Studies and 
Research, Department of Chemistry. 

Courses 

CHEM 401 Inorganic Chemistry 3 Prerequisite: 
CHEM 481 

CHEM 403 Radiochemistry Prerequisite One year of 
college chemistry and one year of college physics. 



Radioactive decay; introduction to properties of atomic 
nuclei; nuclear processes in cosmology, chemical, 
biomedical and environmental applications of radioac- 
tivity; nuclear processes as chemical tools; interaction 
of radiation with matter (3) 

CHEM 421 Advanced Quantitative Analysis (3) Pre- 
requisites: CHEM 430 and 482 or concurrent registra- 
tion An examination of some advanced topics in 
quantitative analysis including nonaqueous titrations, 
precipitation phenomena, complex equilibria, and the 
analytical chemistry of the less familiar elements 

CHEM 423 Organic Quantitative Analysis (3) Pre- 
requisite: CHEM 203-204 or 213-214, and consent of 
the instructor. Two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. The semi-micro determination of carbon, hydro- 
gen, nitrogen, halogen and certain functional groups 

CHEM 430 Chemical Measurements Laboratory I 

(3) One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods 
per week Corequisite. CHEM 481. An introduction to 
the principles and applications of quantitative tech- 
niques useful in chemistry, with emphasis on modern 
instrumentation. Computer programming, electronic 
circuits, spectroscopy, chemical separations. 

CHEM 431 Chemical Measurements Laboratory II 

(3) One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 481 ; Corequisite. CHEM 
482. An introduction to the principles and applications 
of quantitative techniques useful in chemistry, with 
emphasis on modern instrumentation. Communica- 
tions techniques, vacuum systems, thermochemistry, 
phase equilibria, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry 

CHEM 433 Chemical Synthesis (3) One lecture and 
two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequi- 
site: CHEM 201-202 or 21 1-21 2, and 203-204 or 21 3- 
214. 

CHEM 441 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3) Prereq- 
uisite: CHEM 481. An advanced study of the com- 
pounds of carbon, with special emphasis on molecular 
orbital theory and organic reaction mechanisms. 

CHEM 443 Qualitative Organic Analysis (3) One 

lecture and two-three hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite: CHEM 201-202 or 211-212, and 
203-204 or 213-214. The systematic identification of 
organic compounds. 

CHEM 473 Geochemistry of Solids (3) Prerequisite: 
CHEM 482 or GEOL 422. Principles of crystal chemis- 
try applied to structures, properties and reactions of 
minerals and non-metallic solids. Emphasis is placed 
on the relation of structural stability to bonding, ionic 
size, charge, order-disorder, polymorphism, and 
isomorphism. 

CHEM 474 Environmental Chemistry (3) Prerequi- 
site: CHEM 481, or equivalent. The sources of various 
elements and chemical reactions between them in the 
atmosphere and hydrosphere are treated. Causes and 
biological effects of air and water pollution by certain 
elements are discussed. 

CHEM 481 Physical Chemistry I (3) Three lectures 
per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 203-204 or 213-214. 
MATH 141, PHYS 142 or PHYS 263 (PHYS 263 may 
be taken concurrently with CHEM 481) or consent of 
instructor A course primarily for chemists and chemi- 
cal engineers. 

CHEM 482 Physical Chemistry II (3) Three lectures 
per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 481, or consent of 
instructor. A course primarily for chemists and chemi- 
cal engineers. 

CHEM 485 Advanced Physical Chemistry (2) Quan- 
tum chemistry and other selected topics. 

CHEM 485 Advanced Physical Chemistry (2) Pre- 
requisite: CHEM 482. Quantum Chemistry and other 
selected topics. 

CHEM 486 Advanced Physical Chemistry Labora- 
tory (2) Two three-hour laboratory periods per week 
Prerequisites: ChEM 482 and consent of instructor 

CHEM 498 Special Topics in Chemistry (3) Three 
lectures or two lectures and one three-hour laboratory 
per week Prerequisite varies with the nature of the 
topic being considered Course may be repeated for 
credit if the subiect matter is substantially different, but 
not more than three credits may be accepted in 
satisfaction of major supporting area requirements for 
chemistry maiors 

CHEM 601 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 401 or equivalent. Three lectures 



per week. A survey of the fundamentals of modern 
inorganic chemistry which serves as a basis for more 
advanced work 

CHEM 602 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II (3) 

Prerequisite CHEM 601 Three lectures per week A 
continuation of CHEM 601 with more emphasis on 
current work in inorganic chemistry 

CHEM 603 Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (3) Pre- 
requisite: CHEM 601 or concurrent registration therein 
One lecture and two three-hour laboratories per week 
Practice in synthesis and modern experimental tech- 
niques in inorganic chemistry 

CHEM 605 Chemistry of Coordination Compounds 

(3) Prerequisite: CHEM 601 or consent of instructor. 
Three lectures per week. Structure and properties of 
coordination compounds and the theoretical bases on 
which these are interpreted. 

CHEM 606 Chemistry of Organometallic Com- 
pounds (3) Prerequisite: CHEM 601 or consent of 
instructor. Three lectures per week An in-depth treat- 
ment of the properties of compounds having metal- 
carbon bonds. 

CHEM 608 Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry 
(1-3) Prerequisite: CHEM 601 and 602, or equivalent 
One to three lectures per week. Topics of special 
interest and current importance. Course may be re- 
peated to a maximum of six credits if topics are 
different. 

CHEM 621 Chemical Microscopy I (2) One lecture 
and one three hour laboratory period per week. Regis- 
tration limited Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A 
study of the use of the microscope in chemistry 

CHEM 622 Chemical Microscopy II (2) One lecture 
and one three hour laboratory penod per week Pre- 
requisite: CHEM 621. A study of the topical properties 
of crystals. 

CHEM 623 Optical Methods of Quantitative Analy- 
sis (3) Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per 
week Prerequisites: CHEM 421 and 482 The quanti- 
tative applications of emission spectroscopy, atomic 
absorption spectroscopy, ultraviolet, visible, and infra- 
red spectrophotometry, fluorescence, atomic fluores- 
cence, nephelometry. and of certain closely related 
subjects like NMR and mass spectroscopy 

CHEM 624 Electrical Methods of Quantitative Anal- 
ysis (3) Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory 
per week Prerequisites: CHEM 421 and 482 The use 
of conductivity, potentiometry, polarography. voltam- 
metry, amperometry. coulometry, chronopoten- 
tiometry in quantitative analysis 

CHEM 625 Separation Methods in Quantitative 
Analysis (3) Two lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 421 and 482. The 
theory and practical application to quantitative analysis 
of the various forms of chromatography, ion exchange, 
solvent extraction, and distillation. 

CHEM 628 Modern Trends in Analytical Chemistry 

(2) Two lectures per week. Prerequisites CHEM 421 
and 482. A study of advanced methods, including 
topics such as statistical treatment of analytical data, 
kinetic methods in analytical chemistry, analytical 
measurements based on radioactivity, and enzymatic 
techniques. 

CHEM 641 Organic Reaction Mechanisms (3) 

CHEM 642 Physical Organic Chemistry (3) 

CHEM 643 Organic Chemistry of High Polymers (2) 

An advanced course covering the synthesis of mono- 
mers, mechanisms of polymerization, and the correla- 
tion between structure and properties in high poly- 
mers 

CHEM 644 Molecular Orbital Theory (2) A partial 
quantitative application of molecular orbital theory and 
symmetry to the chemical properties and reactions of 
organic molecules Prerequisites CHEM 441 and 482 

CHEM 645 The Chemistry of the Steroids (2) 

CHEM 646 The Heterocyclics (2) 

CHEM 648 Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (1- 
3) One to three lecture hours per week Topics of 
special interest and current importance Course may 
be repeated to a maximum ot nine credits provided the 
topics are different 

CHEM 664 The Chemistry of Natural Products (2) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 44 1 The chemistry and physiolog- 



68 Civil Engineering Program 

ical action of natural products. Methods of isolation, 
determination of structure and synthesis. 
CHEM 678 Special Topics in Environmental Chem- 
istry (3) Prerequisite: CHEM 474. In-depth treatment 
of environmental chemistry problem areas of current 
research interest. The topics will vary somewhat from 
year to year. Repeatable to maximum of 6 credits. 
Provided subject is different. 
CHEM 681 Infra-Red and Raman Spectroscopy (2) 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
CHEM 682 Reaction Kinetics (3) 
CHEM 683 Electrochemistry (3) Prerequisite: CHEM 
684 or equivalent. 

CHEM 684 Chemical Thermodynamics (3) Prerequi- 
site: CHEM 482 or equivalent. 
CHEM 685 Molecular Structure (3) 
CHEM 686 Chemical Crystallography (3) Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. A detailed treatment of 
single-crystal x-ray methods. 
CHEM 687 Statistical Mechanics and Chemistry (3) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 684 or equivalent. 
CHEM 688 Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry 
(2) 

CHEM 689 Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (3) 
CHEM 690 Quantum Chemistry I (3) Prerequisite. 
CHEM 485. 

CHEM 691 Quantum Chemistry II (3) Prerequisite 
CHEM 690 or PHYS 622. 

CHEM 699 Special Problems in Chemistry (1-6) 
Prerequisite: One semester of graduate study in chem- 
istry Laboratory experience in a research environ- 
ment Restricted to students in the non-thesis M.S. 
option. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 
CHEM 702 Radiochemistry Laboratory (1-2) One or 
two four-hour laboratory periods per week. Registra- 
tion limited. Prerequisites: CHEM 403 (or concurrent 
registration therein), and consent of instructor. 
CHEM 703 Advanced Radiochemistry (2) Prerequi- 
site- CHEM 403 and BCHM 462. Utilization of 
radioisotopes with special emphasis on applications to 
problems in the life sciences. 
CHEM 704 Advanced Radiochemistry Laboratory 
(1-2) One or two four-hour laboratory periods per 
week Prerequisite: CHEM 702 and consent of instruc- 
tor Laboratory training in the utilization of 
radioisotopes with special emphasis on applications to 
problems in the life sciences. 

CHEM 705 Nuclear Chemistry (3) Nuclear structure 
models, radioactive decay processes, nuclear reac- 
tions in complex nuclei, fission, nucleosynthesis and 
nuclear particle accelerators. 
CHEM 718 Special Topics in Nuclear Chemistry (1- 
3) One to three lectures per week. A discussion of 
current research problems. Subtitles will be given at 
each offering. Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 
six hours. 

CHEM 721 Organic Geochemistry (3) Prerequisite: 
CHEM 201 or equivalent. A discussion of the fate of 
natural organic products in the geological environ- 
ment The influence of diagenetic factors, such as 
hydrolysis, heat, pressure, etc., on such compounds as 
cellulose, lignin, proteins, and lipids, detailed consider- 
ation of the origin of soil organic matter, carbonaceous 
shales, coal, and crude oil. 

CHEM 722 Cosmochemistry (3) Prerequisite: CHEM 
482 or equivalent. Current theories of origin and evolu- 
tion of the solar system with emphasis on the experi- 
mental data available to chemists from examination ot 
meteorites, the moon, and the earth. 
CHEM 723 Marine Geochemistry (3) Prerequisite 
CHEM 481 or equivalent. The geochemical evolution 
of the ocean; composition of sea water, density- 
chlorinity-salinity relationship and carbon dioxide sys- 
tem The geochemistry of sedimentation with empha- 
sis on the chemical stability and inorganic and biologi- 
cal production of carbonate, silicate and phosphate 
containing minerals. 

CHEM 727 Geochemical Differentiation (3) Distribu- 
tion of the chemical elements in the earth and the 
mechanisms by which the distributions came about. 
CHEM 728 Selected Topics in Analytical 
Geochemistry (2-3) One or two lectures per week 



and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Consent of 

instructor This course will be subtitled each time it is 

offered to indicate the analytical method discussed. 

Repeatable for credit to a maximum of nine hours. 

Enrollment will be limited. 

CHEM 729 Special Topics in Geochemistry (1-3) 

One to three lectures per week. A discussion of current 

research problems. Subtitles will be given at each 

offering. Repeatable for credit to a maximum of six 

hours. 

CHEM 750 Chemical Evolution (3) Prerequisite: 

CHEM 441 or 721; BCHM 462 or ZOOL 446; or BOTN 

616 or consent of instructor. The chemical processes 

leading to the appearances of life on earth. Theoretical 

and experimental considerations related to the 

geochemical. organic, and biochemical phenomena ot 

chemical evolution. 

CHEM 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

CHEM 898 Seminar (1) 

CHEM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



laboratories in the following areas, transporta- 
tion, systems analysis, environmental, hydrau- 
lics structures, remote sensing, and soil me- 
chanics A UNIVAC 1 106 and a UNIVAC 1 108, 
complemented by remote access units located 
in the Department and engineering building, are 
available. 

The Washington and Baltimore Metropoli- 
tan Areas are easily accessible for data, field 
studies, library access, contacts with national 
organizations and attendance at national meet- 
ings. The location of the University of Maryland 
offers a unique opportunity to obtain an ad- 
vanced degree in Civil Engineering. 

Financial Assistance 

Almost all full-time graduate students receive 
financial assistance. Inquiries about financial 
assistance and program information should be 
directed to the Director of Graduate Studies, 
Department of Civil Engineering. 



Civil Engineering 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Ragan 
Professors: Birkner, Carter, Colville, Hems, 
McCuen, Sternberg, Witczak 
Associate Professors: Aggour, Garber, Piper, 
Schelling, Vannoy 

Assistant Professors: Alleman, Kavanagn, 
Saklas, Schonfeld, Schwartz 
The Department of Civil Engineering offers 
qraduate work leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. All pro- 
grams are planned on an individual basis by the 
student and his advisor to consider the stu- 
dent's background and special interests. 
Courses and research opportunities are avail- 
able in the general areas of transportation and 
urban systems, environmental engineering and 
water resources, structural engineering, and 
geotechnical engineering. In general, emphasis 
is on learning sound engineering principles and 
applying them, to provide for the needs of man. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Applicants for admission should hold a B.S. 
degree in Civil Engineering. However, appli- 
cants with undergraduate degrees in other dis- 
ciplines may be accepted with the stipulation 
that deficiencies in prerequisite undergraduate 
course work be corrected before enrolling in 
graduate courses. There are no entrance ex- 
aminations required for the program. 

Two options are available for the Master of 
Science degree: thesis and non-thesis. The 
Department's policies and requirements are the 
same as the requirements of the Graduate 

School. 

The requirements for the Doctor of Philoso- 
phy degree are the same as those imposed by 
the Graduate School. An individual program of 
study to suit the needs of the student is devel- 
oped by the student and his advisor. The equiv- 
alent of two years of full-time study beyond the 
Master of Science degree is the minimum 
requirement. The student must pass a qualifying 
examination before being admitted to candida- 
cy Normally, the qualifying exam is taken one 
year after the completion of the M.S. degree. 
There is no language requirement for the Ph.D. 
degree. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The research facilities of the Department are 
available to graduate students. These include 



Courses 

ENCE 410 Advanced Strength of Materials (3) Pre- 
requisites: ENES 220, ENCE 350 and MATH 246. 
Strength and deformation of deformable bodies, plane 
stress and strain. Torsion theory, unsymmetical bend- 
ing curved beams. Behavior of beams, columns, 
slabs, plates and composite members under load. 
Elastic and inelastic stability. 
ENCE 411 Experimental Stress Analysis (4) Three 
lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 
ENES 220 Application of experimental data on materi- 
als to design problems. Correlation of analytical and 
experimental methods of analysis with design. Electric 
strain gages, photoelasticty, brittle laquer methods 
and various analogies. 

ENCE 420 Basic Civil Engineering Planning I (3) 
Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of the instruc- 
tor Urban-regional physical planning from the civil 
engineering viewpoint. Integration of the planning as- 
pects of engineering, environmental, structural, trans- 
portation and water resources into a systems ap- 
proach to the practice of civil engineering. Also includ- 
ed site construction, and engineering materials plan- 
ning; engineering economics and evaluation; current 
topics. 

ENCE 421 Construction Engineering (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 
ENCE 340 351, 370 or consent of instructor. The 
ordering of engineered construction. Modern tech- 
niques of construction planning, estimating, schedul- 
ing operation, control. Construction methods. Con- 
tract and resource management. Systems approach to 
construction management practice. 
ENCE 430 Hydraulic Engineering and Open Chan- 
nel Flow (4) Three lectures and one laboratory per 
week Prerequisite: ENCE 330. Application of basic 
principles to the solution of engineering problems: 
ideal fluid flow, mechanics of fluid resistance open 
channel flow under uniform, gradually varied and rapid- 
ly varied conditions, sediment transport, role of model 
studies in analysis and design. 
ENCE 431 Surface Water Hydrology (3) Prerequi- 
sites- ENCE 330 and 360. Study of the physical 
processes of the hydrologic cycle. Hydrometeorology 
concepts of weather modification, evaporation and 
transpiration infiltration studies, runoff computations, 
flood routing, reservoir requirements, emphasis on 
process simulation as a tool in water resource devel- 
opment. 

ENCE 432 Ground Water Hydrology (3) Prerequi- 
sites- ENCE 330. Concepts related to the development 
of the ground water resource, hydrogeology, hydrody- 
namics of flow through porous media, hydraulics ot 
wells, artificial recharge, sea water intrusion, basin- 
wide ground water development. 
ENCE 433 Environmental Engineering Analysis (3) 
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. The theory 
and analytical techniques used in evaluating man s 
environment. Emphasis is given to the areas of quanti- 
tative physical, electroanalytical and organic chemis- 
try as applied to chemical analysis of water. 
ENCE 434 Air Pollution (3) Classification of at- 
mospheric pollutants and their effects on visibility, 



Civil Engineering Program 69 



inanimate and animate receptors. Evaluation of source 
emissions and principles of air pollution control; mete- 
orological factors governing the distribution and re- 
moval of air pollutants; air quality measurements and 
air pollution control legislation 

ENCE 435 Sanitary Engineering Analysis and De- 
sign (4) Three lectures and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite: ENCE 221 and ENCE 330. The applica- 
tion of sanitary analysis and fundamental principles to 
the design and operation of water and waste water 
treatment plants and the control of stream pollution 

ENCE 440 Engineering Soil Tests (4) Two lectures 
and two laboratory sessions per week Prerequisite: 
ENCE 340 or equivalent Critical review of major soil 
tests and their interpretation for engineering purposes. 
Engineering classification tests (Atterberg limits, grain- 
size distribution, specific gravity), permeability and 
seepage properties, in-situ and lab density-moisture 
tests, soil strength (penetrometers, vane shear, CBR, 
unconfined compression, direct shear and triaxial) and 
compressibility characteristics. 

ENCE 441 Soil-Foundation Systems (3) Prerequi- 
site-ENCE 340 or equivalent. Critical review of classi- 
cal lateral earth pressure theories, analysis of braced 
excavation systems, cantilever and anchored sheet 
piling design, bearing capacity of shallow foundations 
(footings and mats) design of deep pile foundations to 
include pile capacity and pile group action, and seismic 
effects upon foundations are treated. 

ENCE 442 Highway and Airfield Pavement Design 

(3) Prerequisite: ENCE 340 or equivalent. Principles 
relative to the design, construction and rehabilitation of 
highway and airfield pavement systems. Introduction 
to multi-layered elastic and slab theories, properties of 
pavement materials and methods of characterization, 
stochastic treatment of design variables, economic 
principles of design alternates and the effect of envi- 
ronment upon pavement performance A critical re- 
view of existing rigid and flexible design methods as 
well as major fundamentals relative to the rehabilita- 
tion of existing pavement systems. 

ENCE 450 Design of Steel Structures (3) Prerequi- 
sites: ENCE 350 and pre- or corequisite registration in 
ENCE 360. Analyses for stresses and deflections in 
structures by methods of consistent deformations, 
virtual work and internal strain energy. Application to 
design of plate girders, indeterminate and continuous 
trusses, two hinged arches and other structures. Ele- 
ments of plastic analysis and design of steel struc- 
tures. 

ENCE 451 Design of Concrete Structures (4) Pre- 
requisites: ENCE 351 and pre- or corequisite ENCE 
360. Three lecture hours and one laboratory per week. 
Design of reinforced concrete structures, including 
slabs, footings, composite members, building frames, 
and retaining walls. Approximate methods of analysis; 
code requirements; influence of concrete properties 
on strength and deflection; optimum design. Introduc- 
tion to prestressed concrete design. 

ENCE 460 Modern Techniques for Structural Anal- 
ysis (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 360 and pre- or 
corequisite: ENCE 351. Two lecture hours and one 
laboratory per week. Application of computer-oriented 
methods and numerical techniques to analysis and 
design of structural systems. Matrix formulation of the 
stiffness and flexibility methods for framed structures. 
Introduction of numerical techniques to the solution of 
selected problems in such topics as plates, structural 
stability, and vibrations. 

ENCE 461 Analysis of Civil Engineering Systems I 

(3) Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instruc- 
tor. Application of the principles of engineering econo- 
my and statistics to the solution of civil engineering 
problems. Economic comparison of alternatives using 
present worth, annual cost, rate of return and cost 
benefit analyses. Development and use of simple and 
multiple regression models, and statistical decision 
theory 

ENCE 463 Engineering Economics and System 
Analysis (3) Prerequisite: Senior standing in engineer- 
ing, or consent of instructor. Development and applica- 
tion of the principles of engineering economics to 
problems in civil engineering. Evaluation of design 
alternatives, depreciation and sensitivity analysis. Use 
of systems analysis techniques, including CPM, pert 
and decision networks. 

ENCE 470 Highway Engineering (4) Three lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 
ENCE 340 Location, design, construction and mainte- 



nance of roads and pavements. Introduction to traffic 
engineering, 

ENCE 473 Air and Water Transportation Engineer- 
ing (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 370. Detailed study of the 
planning, design, construction, operations and mainte- 
nance of airports and waterways, emphasis on design 
and operations of transportation facilities. 

ENCE 474 Railroad Mass Transportation Engineer- 
ing (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 370 Detailed study of the 
planning, design, construction, operations, and main- 
tenance of railroads and mass transportation systems, 
emphasis on design and operations of transportation 
facilities. 

ENCE 489 Special Problems (3) Prerequisite: Senior 
standing. A course arranged to meet the needs of 
exceptionally well prepared students for study in a 
particular field of civil engineering. 

ENCE 600 Advanced Engineering Materials Labo- 
ratory (3) Prerequisites: ENES 220, 221 and ENCE 
300 or equivalent. Critical examination of the methods 
for testing engineering materials and structures under 
static, repeated, sustained and impact forces Labora- 
tory experiments for the determination of strength and 
stiffness of structural alloys, concrete and other con- 
struction materials. Critical examination of the effects 
of test factors on the determination of engineering 
properties. 

ENCE 601 Structural Materials and Design (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENCE 410 and 41 1 or consent of instructor. 
Relation of structural analysis, properties of materials 
and laboratory study of the behavior of members to 
structural design methods, codes and specifications. 
Effects of temperature, loading rates and state of 
combined stress on behavior of construction materi- 
als. 

ENCE 603 Theories of Concrete and Granular 
Materials (3) Prerequisites: ENCE 600, or consent of 
instructor. Critical reviews of analytical and experimen- 
tal investigations of the behavior of concretes under 
diverse conditions of loading and environment. Me- 
chanics of granular aggregates and the chemistry of 
cements. Theories of the design of Portland cement 
and field experience. 

ENCE 610 Advanced Strength of Materials (3) Pre- 
requisites: ENES 220, 221 and ENCE 300, or equiva- 
lent. Analysis for stress and deformation in engineer- 
ing members by the methods of mechanics of materi- 
als and elementary theories of elasticity and plasticity. 
Problems in flexure, torison plates and shells, stress 
concentrations, indeterminate combinations, residual 
stresses, stability. 

ENCE 612 Structures Research Methods and 
Model Analysis (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 450 and 
ENCE 451 or equivalent. Instrumentation, data analy- 
sis; states of stress; structural models, structural simili- 
tude; analogies, non-destructive testing techniques; 
planning research projects, lab studies and reports. 

ENCE 620 Urban-Regional Civil Engineering Plan- 
ning (3) First semester. Prerequisite: Degree in civil 
engineering or consent instructor. Theory and method- 
ology for the synthesis of general civil engineering 
aspects of urban and regional planning. Integration of 
land use conditions and capabilities, population factors 
and needs, engineering economics and engineering 
technologies. Application to special problems in urban- 
regional development Preparation of engineering re- 
ports. Presentation methods. 

ENCE 621 Civil Engineering Planning (3) Second 
semester. Prerequisite: ENCE 620 or equivalent. Gen- 
eral to comprehensive planning of complex engineer- 
ing facilities such as industrial plants, bridges, utilities 
and transportation projects. Planning based on the 
synthesis of all applicable factors. Emphasis on gener- 
al civil engineering planning including site, structural 
and construction planning. Plan evaluation and feasi- 
bility. 

ENCE 622 Urban and Regional Systems Analysis 
(3) Prerequisite or corequisite: ENCE 461 or consent 
of instructor. Current applications and research ap- 
proaches in land-use forecasting, land-use evaluation, 
urban transportation, land-use interrelationships, and 
the planning implementation process in a systems 
analytic framework. 

ENCE 630 Analysis and Design of Water Resource 
Systems (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 461 or equivalent 
Use of advanced techniques for the design and analy- 
sis of complex, multi-purpose water resource systems, 



identification of the ob|ectives of design and transla- 
tion of the objectives into design criteria, evaluation of 
alternate designs and the selection of the best design; 
special emphasis on optimization and simulation tech- 
niques which are applicable to water resource sys- 
tems 

ENCE 631 Advanced Hydrologic Analysis (3) Em- 
phasis is on the analysis of hydrologic data for the 
development of information necessary for design or for 
the identification of important processes; eigenvalue 
and eigenvector analysis of linear hydrologic systems; 
application of multivanant statistical methods; non- 
linear least squares. 

ENCE 632 Free Surface Flow (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 
330 or equivalent Application of fundamentals of fluid 
mechanics to problems of free surface flow; computa- 
tion of steady and transient water surface profiles; 
stratified flows in reservoirs and estuaries; diffusion; 
transition structures; sediment transport. 

ENCE 633 The Chemistry of Natural Waters (4) 

Prerequisite: ENCE 433 or consent of instructor. Three 
lectures, one lab a week. Application of principles from 
chemical thermodynamics and kinetics to the study 
and interpretation of the chemical characteristics of 
natural water systems. The chemical composition of 
natural waters is rationalized by considering metal ion 
solubility controls, Ph, carbonate equilibria, absorption 
reactions, redox reactions, and the kinetics of ox- 
ygenation reactions which occur in natural water en- 
vironments. 

ENCE 634 Air Sampling and Analysis (3) Prerequi- 
site: ENCE 434 or consent of instructor. Two lectures 
and one laboratory a week. The theory and techniques 
used in the determination and measurement of chemi- 
cal, radiological, and biological pollutants in the atmos- 
phere. Discussion of air sampling equipment, analyti- 
cal methods and data evaluation 

ENCE 635 Design of Water Purification Facilities 

(3) Corequisite: ENCE 636 or equivalent. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods a week. Application of 
basic science and engineering science to design of 
water supply and purification processes; design and 
economics of unit operations as applied to environ- 
mental systems. 

ENCE 636 Unit Operations of Environmental Engi- 
neering (3) Prerequsite: ENCE 221 or consent of 
instructor. Properties and quality criteria of drinking 
water as related to health are mterpretated by a 
chemical and biological approach. Legal aspects of 
water use and handling are considered Theory and 
application of aeration, sedimentation, filtration, cen- 
trifugation, desalinization. corrosion and corrosion 
control are among topics to be considered. 

ENCE 637 Biological Principles of Environmental 
Engineering (4) Prerequisite: MICB 440 or equivalent. 
Three lectures and one lab period a week An exposi- 
tion of biological principles directly affecting man and 
his environment; assay, control and treatment of bio- 
logical and virological agents in water, sewage, and air; 
microbiology and biochemistry of aerobic and anerobic 
treatment processes lor aqueous wastes. 

ENCE 640 Advanced Soil Mechanics (3) Prerequi- 
sites: ENCE 340 or equivalent. Introduction to the use 
of elastic theory in stress and displacement solutions 
to geotechnical engineering (soil and rock mechanics) 
The effect of soil moisture (at rest) relative to effective 
stress principles, capillary and frost. Exact and numer- 
ic techniques for the analysis for soil seepage under 
isotropic and anisotropic conditions Classical settle- 
ment (consolidation) and compressibility theones. in- 
cluding finite difference solution for vertical and radial 
drainage. 

ENCE 641 Advanced Foundations (3) Prerequisite 
ENCE 340 or equivalent Introduction to braced lateral 
earth pressure concepts and theones applied to foun- 
dations. Analysis of braced excavations, retaining 
walls and design of cantilever and anchored sheet 
piling systems. Principles of Cofferdam design, bearing 
capacity theories related to shallow and deep founda- 
tions; soil-foundation interactions for footing and mat 
designs and analysis of single pile and pile group 
foundations. Exact and numeric solution techniques 

ENCE 642 Soil Dynamics (3) Pre- or corequisite 
ENCE 640 or consent of instructor Introduction to field 
and laboratory methods for determining the dynamic 
characterization of soil at both small and large strain 
levels Analysis and design of soil foundations sub- 
jected to machinery generated vibrations. A critical 
review of earthquake causes and their effect upon 



70 Communication Arts and Theatre Program 



foundations and earth structures relative to earth- 
quake resistant design methodologies. 

ENCE 643 Stability of Earth Structures (3) Prerequi- 
site: ENCE 340 or equivalent. Shear strength of satu- 
rated and partially saturated cohesive and cohesion- 
less soils incorporating the effects of stress history 
and in-situ stress conditions. Fundamentals of lateral 
earth pressure and classical methods of analysis. 
Integration of basic techniques of subsurface explora- 
tion methods (equipment, sampling tubes, and number 
of samples) with the above topics to critically analyze 
stability of earth structures (landslides, slope stability 
and earth dam stability). 

ENCE 644 Engineering Soil Problems of North 
America (3) Prerequisites: ENCE 340 or equivalent. A 
critical review of the distribution of the soils in North 
America with respect to engineering design and con- 
struction problems. Design factors such as availability 
of quality aggregate resouces, soil origin and texture, 
high volume change soils, potentially poor subgrade 
support conditions, and frost-susceptible soils. 

ENCE 651 Matrix Methods of Structural Analysis 

(3) Review of basic structural and matrix theory. Devel- 
opment of force and displacement methods with em- 
phasis on the latter. Discussion of special topics such 
as geometric non-linearity, automated and optimum 
design non-prismatic members and thin-walled open 
sections and sub-division of large structures. Empha- 
sis on applications to civil engineering structures. 

ENCE 652 Analysis of Plate and Shell Structures (3) 

Prerequisites: ENCE 410 and ENCE 381 or equivalent. 
Review of theory of elasticity and in-plane forces; 
theory of orthotropic plates; approximate methods; 
large deflection theory, buckling; general theory of 
shells, cylindrical shells, domes. 

ENCE 655 Plastic Analysis and Design of Struc- 
tures (3) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. The 
study of the factors effecting the plastic behavior of 
steel structures and the criteria necessary for design. 
The design of beams, rigid frames and multi-story 
braced frames using current specifications. A review of 
current research and practice. 

ENCE 656 Advanced Steel Design (3) Prerequisite: 
ENCE 450 and ENCE 451 or equivalent. Interpretation 
of specifications and codes for the design of steel 
buildings and bridges. Discussion of the behavior of 
steel connections, members and structures; the rela- 
tionship between behavior and design specifications. 

ENCE 657 Theory of Structural Design (3) Prerequi- 
site: ENCE 656. Correlation of theory, experience, and 
experiments in study of structural behavior, proportion- 
ing, and preliminary design. Special design problems 
of fatigue, buckling, vibrations, and impact. 

ENCE 660 Engineering Analysis (3) 

ENCE 661 Finite Element Techniques in Engineer- 
ing Analysis (3) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
Basic principles and fundamental concepts of the finite 
element method. Consideration of geometric and ma- 
terial nonlinearities, convergence, mesh gradation and 
computational procedures in analysis. Applications to 
plane stress and plane strain, plates and shells, eigen- 
value problems, axi-symmetric stress analysis, and 
other problems in civil engineering. 

ENCE 670 Highway Traffic Characteristics and 
Measurements (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 470 or con- 
sent of instructor. The study of the fundamental traits 
and behavior patterns of the road user and his vehicle 
in traffic. The basic characteristics of the pedestrian, 
the driver, the vehicle, traffic volume and speed, 
stream flow and intersection operation, parking, and 
accidents. 

ENCE 671 Highway Traffic Operations (3) Prerequi- 
site: ENCE 470. ENCE 670 or consent of instructor. A 
survey of traffic laws and ordinances. The design, 
application and operation of traffic control devices and 
aids, including traffic signs and signals, pavement 
markings, and hazard delineation. Capacity, accident, 
and parking analyses. 

ENCE 672 Regional Transportation Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCE 471 or consent of instructor. Fac- 
tors involved and the components of the process for 
planning statewide and regional transportation sys- 
tems, encompassing all modes. Transportation plan- 
ning studies, statewide traffic models, investment mo- 
dels, programming and scheduling. 

ENCE 673 Urban Transportation (3) Prerequisite: 
ENCE 672 or consent of instructor. Relationship of 



transportation to the total urban complex, the urban 
transportation planning process, the models used to 
achieve the various steps in the process and the 
relationship of private and public transportation. Con- 
sideration of the factors influencing the demand for 
transportation and the socio-economic consequences 
of transportation. 

ENCE 674 Urban Transit Planning and Rail Trans- 
portation Engineering (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 471 or 
consent of instructor. Basic engineering components 
of conventional and high speed railroads and of air 
cushion and other high speed new technology. The 
study of urban rail and bus transit. The characteristics 
of the vehicle, the supporting way, and the terminal 
requirements will be evaluated with respect to system 
performance, capacity, cost, and level of service. 

ENCE 675 Airport Planning and Design (3) Prerequi- 
site: ENCE 471 or consent of instructor. The planning 
and design of airports including site selection, runway 
configuration, geometric and structural design of the 
landing area, and terminal facilities. Methods of financ- 
ing airports, estimates of aeronautical demand, air 
traffic control, and airport lighting are also studied. 

ENCE 676 Highway Traffic Flow Theory (3) Prereq- 
uisite: ENCE 461 . ENCE 462 or consent of the instruc- 
tor. An examination of physical and statistical laws that 
are used to represent traffic flow phenomena. Deter- 
ministic models including heat flow, fluid flow, and 
energy-momentum analogies, car following models, 
and acceleration noise. Stochastic approaches using 
independent and Markov processes, queuing models, 
and probability distributions. 

ENCE 677 Quantitative Methods in Transportation 
Engineering (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 461 or consent of 
instructor. Theory, methods and applications relevant 
to the study of micro- and macro-scale transportation 
systems, in terms of their behavior, design, and evalu- 
ation. A selected overview of optimization, multivariate 
statistics, stochastic processes and the general sci- 
ence of systems decision processes will form the basis 
for a selected study of pertinent examples. 

ENCE 688 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering 

(1-3) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Advanced 
topics selected by the faculty from the current litera- 
ture of civil engineering to suit the needs and back- 
ground of students. May be taken for repeated credit 
when identified by topic title. 

ENCE 689 Seminar (1-16) 

ENCE 731 Advanced Ground Water Hydrology (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCE 432 or equivalent. Theory and 
application of unsteady flow in porous media. Analysis 
of one and two dimensional unsteady flow. Solutions 
of non-linear equation of unsteady flow with a free 
surface. Development and use of approximate numeri- 
cal and graphical methods in the study of ground water 
movement. 

ENCE 732 Deterministic Models in Surface Water 
Hydrology (3) A detained examination of the pro- 
cesses controlling the quantity and quality of water- 
shed runoff: emphasis is on the development of deter- 
ministic mathematical models for process simulation; 
role of land-phase processes in flood hydrology; evap- 
oration and transpiration; models for urban watershed; 
linkage for hydrograph synthesis. 

ENCE 733 Applied Water Chemistry (4) Prerequisite: 
ENCE 633 or consent of instructor. Three lectures, 
one lab a week. A study of the chemistry of both 
municipal and industrial water treatment processes. 
Among the topics to be considered are water soften- 
ing, stabilization, chemical destabilization of colloidal 
materials, ion exchange, disinfection, chemical oxida- 
tion and oxygenation reactions. 

ENCE 734 Aerosol Science and Technology (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCE 430 or equivalent. Physical proper- 
ties of air-borne particles. Theories of: particle motion 
under the action of external forces; coagulation; 
Brownian motion and diffusion. Application of aerosols 
in atmospheric sciences and industrial processes. 

ENCE 735 Design of Municipal and Industrial 
Wastes Treatment Facilities (3) Corequisite: ENCE 
736 or equivalent. One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Application of basic science and 
engineering science to design of municipal and indus- 
trial waste treatment processes; design and econom- 
ics of unit operations as applied to environmental 
systems. 

ENCE 736 Theory of Aqueous and Solid Waste 
Treatment and Disposal (3) Prerequisites: ENCE 221 



and fundamentals of microbiology, or consent of in- 
structor. Theory and basic principles of treating and 
handling waste products; hydraulics of sewers; biologi- 
cal oxidation; principles and design criteria of biologi- 
cal and physical treatment processes; disposal of 
waste sludges and solids. 

ENCE 737 Industrial Wastes (3) Corequisite: ENCE 
736 or equivalent. A study of the characteristics of 
liquid wastes from major industries, and the processes 
producing the wastes. The theory and methods of 
eliminating or treating the wastes, and their effects 
upon municipal sewage-treatment plants, and receiv- 
ing waters. 

ENCE 738 Selected Topics in Porous Media Flow 

(3) Prerequisite: ENCE 731. Analysis of two-liquid 
flows for immiscible fluids, simultaneous flow of two 
immiscible fluids and miscible fluids. Hydrodynamic 
dispersion theories, parameters of dispersion and 
solutions of some dispersion problems with emphasis 
on migration of pollutants. A maximum of six hours 
may be earned in this course. 

ENCE 741 Aircraft Remote Sensing in Civil Engi- 
neering (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 340 or equivalent or 
consent of instructor. Theoretical and practical as- 
pects of the use of remote sensing in engineering. 
Emphasis on the interpretation of aerial photography 
and infrared, radar, multispectral and other sensor 
data. The planning of aerial and field remote sensing 
missons and the applications of these sensors to 
engineering programs including regional inventories, 
route locations, environmental surveys and site in- 
vestigations. Computer analysis of remote sensing 
data is considered. 

ENCE 742 Site Investigation (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 
340 or equivalent or consent of instructor. A study of 
various techniques for evaluating the physical environ- 
ment and performing exploration programs for engi- 
neering facilities. Methods for using various tech- 
niques available for engineering site investigations, 
including interpretation of topographic, geological and 
agricultural soil maps; and the use of geophysical and 
subsurface exploration systems. 

ENCE 750 Analysis and Design of Structural Sys- 
tems (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 450 and ENCE 451 or 
equivalent. Review of classical determinate and in- 
determinate analysis techniques; numerical technique; 
multistory buildings; space structures; suspension 
bridges and cables structures; arches; long span 
bridges. 

ENCE 751 Advanced Problems in Structural Be- 
havior (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 750 or equivalent. Elas- 
tic and inelastic behavior of structural members and 
frames; problems in torsion, stability and bending; 
open and closed thin-walled sections; curved girders. 

ENCE 753 Reinforced Concrete Structures (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENCE 450 and 451 or equivalent. The be- 
havior and strength of reinforced concrete members 
under combined loadings, including the effects of 
creep, shrinkage and temperature. Mechanisms of 
shear resistance and design procedures for bond, 
shear and diagonal tension. Elastic and ultimate 
strength analysis and design of slabs. Columns in 
multistory frames. Applications to reinforced concrete 
strutures. 

ENCE 754 Prestressed Concrete Structures (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCE 450 and 451 or equivalent. Funda- 
mental concepts of prestressed concrete. Analysis 
and design of flexural members including composite 
and continuous beams with emphasis on load balanc- 
ing technique. Ultimate strength design for shear. 
Design of post tensioned flat slabs. Various applica- 
tions of prestressing including tension members, com- 
pression members, circular prestressing, frames and 
folded plates. 

ENCE 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

ENCE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Communication Arts and 
Theatre Program 

Professor and Chairman: Aylward 
Professors: Meersman, Pugliese, Wolvin 
Associate Professors: Falcione, Freimuth, 
Jamieson, Kirkley, Kolker, Linkow, O'Leary, 
Weiss, G.S. 



Communication Arts and Theatre Program 71 



Assistant Professors: Cline, Conger, 
duMonceau, Leong, McCaleb, McCleary, 
Patterson, Philport, Thompson 
Lecturer: Niles 

The Department of Communication Arts and 
Theatre offers the Master of Arts degree in 
each of the three divisions: speech communica- 
tion; theatre; radio-television-film. Within each 
of these divisions it is possible to concentrate in 
specific areas which are described below. 

The Department also participates in the 
Ph.D. degree in Public Communication, which 
embraces all three divisions and the College of 
Journalism. Although the Ph.D. program is inter- 
disciplinary within the four areas, a student is 
free to explore and concentrate in specific 
areas such as rhetoric and public address, 
organizational and political communication, 
governmental communication, broadcast com- 
munication, public relations, international com- 
munication, science and medical communica- 
tion, theatrical theory and aesthetics, theatre 
history and cinema history and aesthetics. For 
complete information on admission and degree 
requirements, see the "Public Communication 
Program" entry. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

For admission to the graduate program in any of 
the divisions, the applicant must meet all 
requirements of the Graduate School and pro- 
vide acceptable Graduate Record Examination 
Scores. If an applicant does not have the equiv- 
alent of an undergraduate major in his field of 
interest, opportunities exist for him to take 
course work in preparation for subsequent ad- 
mission. An M.A. degree in speech communica- 
tion, radio-television-film, or theatre is normally 
required for admission to to the doctoral pro- 
gram, but will not in itself guarantee admission. 
In evaluating applicants for admission, the De- 
partment utilizes GRE scores; and in addition, 
prospective doctoral students are .required to 
submit evidence of scholarly potential. 

The Department offers the M.A. degree 
with thesis and non-thesis options. Along with 
the minimum requirements established by the 
Graduate School, each division of CMRT has 
special requisites for the completion of its own 
program. Graduate assistants are generally 
able to complete their 30 hour programs in 18 
months, while students without assistantships 
most often finish in a calendar year. 

Radio-Television-Film 

A student in the Radio-Television-Film Division 
may either concentrate in a particular area (film 
or broadcasting, for example) or elect a more 
general program covering the multiple aspects 
of electronic and film communication. A student 
whose academic goals extend beyond the 
Radio-Television-Film Division may, upon ap- 
proval of his advisor, take as many as twelve 
credit hours in cognate fields in other divisions 
or other departments of the University. Exam- 
ples of such programs would include education- 
al uses of media, broadcast management, and 
electronic journalism. 

Students may either pursue a traditional 
research thesis or complete a production the- 
sis. Before a production thesis will be approved, 
the student must demonstrate his ability to 
complete such a project through the submission 
of a portfolio or equivalent evidence. 

Speech Communication 

Students who elect to pursue a program of 
study in the Division of Speech Communication 
are encouraged to develop programs reflecting 



an understanding of the genesis, the nature, 
and the effects of human speech behavior. A 
student may concentrate within a specialized 
area of Speech Communication (Political Com- 
munication or Organizational Communication, 
for example) or may elect a more general 
course of study. Students in the Speech Com- 
munication Division are urged to augment their 
program of study with coursework in comple- 
mentary disciplines and with communication 
internships in the Washington, DC, Metropoli- 
tan area. 

Theatre 

The M.A. program in Theatre is designed to 
provide the student with opportunities to en- 
hance artistic and creative talents and to devel- 
op historical and critical faculties. The student 
may pursue a general program or specialize in 
such single areas of concentration as history 
and criticism, performance, design and techni- 
cal direction, children's theatre, musical theatre, 
and arts management. The Division of Theatre 
offers both the research thesis and the produc- 
tion thesis. Before electing a production thesis, 
a student must demonstrate proficiency in 
his/her chosen area of concentration. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The University of Maryland is within a few miles 
of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Perform- 
ing Arts, Arena Stage, and the National, Ford's 
and Folger Theatres, and the Wolf Trap Farm 
Park for the Performing Arts. In addition, a 
number of Equity and non-Equity dinner the- 
atres and semi-professional experimental the- 
atres abound in the area. 

Two of the greatest libraries in the world. 
The Library of Congress and the Folger Shake- 
speare Library are in close proximity to Campus. 
Likewise, students regularly make use of the 
Broadcast Pioneers Library, the Smithsonian 
Institution, the National Archives and the more 
than 50 specialized libraries and institutions in 
the Washington metropolitan area. 

The Department has use of the Tawes 
Fines Arts Theatre, other smaller theatres on 
campus, the Communication Research Center 
and audio and video production facilities. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department is able to offer approximately 
one-half of all full-time graduate students teach- 
ing or research assistantships. A few additional 
students are employed in various divisions of 
the Department; these are required to pay their 
own tuition and fees. 

Additional Information 

Descriptions of the Departmental programs and 
divisions and other information may be obtained 
by writing to Director of Graduate Studies, De- 
partment of Communication Arts and Theatre, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 
20742. 

Courses 

Radio, Television and Film 

RTVF 402 Advanced Sound Production (3) Prereq- 
uisite: RTVF 302 and consent of instructor An ad- 
vanced sound production methodology in radio drama 
and documentaries 

RTVF 413 The History of the Film (3) An advanced 
survey of the film as an an form Cinema pre-history. 
actualities and the Lumiere tradition, Melies. Griffith, 
and their contemporaries, the silent film (1920-29): 
Germany, Russia, and the USA., screen comedy, the 
sound film (1926-present): American and foreign mas- 
ter directors, recent and current trends Recom- 
mended prior to this course: RTVF 314. 



RTVF 414 Contemporary American Cinema (3) Pre- 
requisite: RTVF 222. An analysis of the trends and 
major social issues in American culture as they are 
expressed through the film medium. Emphasis on 
'New Wave', experimental, underground, independent, 
and cinema vente motion pictures. 

RTVF 415 Contemporary European Cinema (3) A 

comparative and critical analysis of the European 
motion picture both as a distinct art form reflecting the 
national character of a particular country and as a 
medium for mass communications demonstrating the 
universality of the human condition. 

RTVF 417 Dramatic Writing for Broadcasting and 
Film (3) Prerequisite: RTVF 317 or consent of instruc- 
tor. An introduction to the principles, methods and 
limitations of writing comedy, drama, and the docu- 
mentary for radio, television, and film. 

RTVF 418 The Film Auteur (3) The intensive 
chronological study of the work of one European or 
American film director each semester 

RTVF 419 Film Genres (3) The study of one major film 
genre each semester The Gangster Film, The West- 
ern, Science Fiction and Horror. The Political Film). 
Cinema develops formal and thematic conventions 
and how, as a medium for reflecting social ideals and 
needs. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits 

RTVF 420 The Documentary Film (3) Growth, impli- 
cation, and the use of the international nonfiction film 
as propaganda, public service, promotion, education, 
and entertainment. Case studies from representative 
documentaries will be analyzed. 

RTVF 421 Film Criticism and Theory (3) Critical- 
aesthetic approaches to film in order to develop a 
vocabulary for film analysis Included will be shot 
analysis; montage and deep focus; the Auteur theory; 
the role of screenwriter, director of photography, actor: 
genre analysis; analysis of film as popular art. 

RTVF 425 Television and Politics (3) Critical review 
of studies of the effects of political broadcasts; legal 
and social issues; surveys and media campaigns 

RTVF 440 Television Direction (3) Prerequisites: 
RTVF 340 and consent of instructor. Principles of 
television direction including elements of composition, 
picturization, timing, script notation and program coor- 
dination. 

RTVF 441 Television Direction II (3) Prerequisite 
RTVF 440 or consent of instructor. Advanced theones 
of television direction; script analysis and adaptation, 
production coordination, casting, blocking, rehearsals 
and mixing. 

RTVF 449 Television Workshop (3) Two-hour lec- 
ture, four-hour laboratory Prerequisites: RTVF 340. 
440 and consent of instructor. 

RTVF 450 Radio and Television Station Manage- 
ment (3) The role of the manager in the modern 
broadcasting industry. Station communication factors, 
regulation, licensing, personnel functions, sales, pro- 
gramming supervision, audience analysis, and station 
promotion. 

RTVF 451 Broadcast Criticism (3) An analysis of the 
professional, historical, social, and psychological criti- 
cism of American radio and television, together with 
practical application of professional and scholarly criti- 
cal methods. 

RTVF 452 International and Comparative Broad- 
casting Systems (3) A comparative study of interna- 
tional broadcasting program policies, economic sys- 
tems, control and organization The use of broadcast- 
ing in international affairs as an instrument of propa- 
ganda, culture and information dissemination Monitor- 
ing of overseas broadcasts, television programs and 
discussions with representatives of domestic and for- 
eign international broadcast agencies 

RTVF 453 Broadcast Regulation (3) Prerequisite: 
RTVF 223. Legal issues involving radio and television: 
freedom, restraints, self-regulation: regulation of pro- 
gramming, competition, nghts as seen by the broad- 
caster, regulatory agencies and the public 

RTVF 454 Cable Television (3) Prerequisite: RTVF 
223 History, regulatory development, system designs, 
communications capability and franchising of cable 
television. 

RTVF 466 Film Production III, Synchronized Sound 
Film Systems (3) Prerequisites: RTVF 355 and con- 
sent of instructor. Synchronized sound and color tech- 
nology with emphasis on the 16mm format 



72 Communication Arts and Theatre Program 



RTVF 467 Film Production IV, Advanced (3) Prereq- 
uisites RTVF 464 and consent of instructor. Direction 
and production of 16mm, color, synchronized sound 
motion picture. Production management, cinematog- 
raphy, and sound recording. 

RTVF 498 Seminar (3) Prerequisites: Senior standing 
and consent of instructor. Present day radio-television- 
film research. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

RTVF 600 Introduction to Graduate Study in 
Broadcasting (3) 

RTVF 601 Visual Communication (3) A theoretical 
analysis of aspects of perception, effects of visual 
messages in human communication through television 
and film. 

RTVF 621 Formal Film Analysis (3) The elements 
and composition of intensive analysis of selected 
narrative films on a shot by shot basis. 

RTVF 628 Seminar in Film (3) Studies of various 
aspects of film. Subject matter changed each semes- 
ter. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. 

RTVF 629 Special Problems in Film (3) An experi- 
mental course for the development of new ideas in 
film. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits, if 
subject is different. 

RTVF 640 Advanced Television Direction (3) Pre- 
requisite: RATV 440 or consent of instructor. Principles 
of television direction as applied to dramatic programs, 
together with a consideration of the specific aesthetic 
values of the television medium. 

RTVF 642 History of Broadcasting (3) Seminar 
study of the individuals, technological developments, 
and social and economic factors responsible for the 
development and direction of the broadcast media in 
the United States. 

RTVF 648 Seminar in Broadcasting (3) Studies of 
various aspects of broadcasting. Subject matter 
changed each semester. 

RTVF 649 Special Problems in Broadcasting (3) An 

experimental course for the development of new ideas 
in broadcasting. 

RTVF 662 Seminar in Political Broadcasting (3) A 

seminar integrating the theory of mass communication 
with rhetorical-critical theory in an analysis of major 
political uses of the broadcast media. 

RTVF 666 Producing and Production Management 
for Film (3) Prerequisites: RTVF 357 or equivalent. 
Management problems facing independent and or- 
ganizational filmmakers, budgeting, production man- 
agement, unions, financing, insurance, taxes, and dis- 
tribution. 

RTVF 699 Independent Study (1-3) 

RTVF 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

Speech 

SPCH 400 Introduction to Research Methodolo- 
gies in Speech Communication (3) Prerequisite: 
Speech communication major or minor or consent of 
the instructor. An introductory survey of empirical and 
historical — critical research methodologies in speech 
communication. The course is designed to prepare the 
student to understand and to conduct basic research 
in the field. 

SPCH 420 Advanced Group Discussion (3) Prereq- 
uisite: SPCH 220 or consent of the instructor. An 
examination of current research and techniques in the 
discussion and conference, including extensive prac- 
tice in various types of discussions. Emphasis is upon 
small group leadership and dynamics. 

SPCH 422 Interviewing (3) Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. Speech principles and practices basic to 
recognized types of interview, giving special attention 
to behavioral objectives and communication variables 
involved in the process of interviewing. 

SPCH 423 Communication Processes in Confer- 
ences (3) Prerequisite: One course in speech commu- 
nication or consent of the instructor. Group participa- 
tion in conferences, methods of problem solving, se- 
mantic aspects of language, and the function of con- 
ferences in business, industry and government 
settings 

SPCH 424 Business, Industrial and Government 
Communication (3) Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. Structure, methodology and application ol 
communication theory in the industrial setting will be 
emphasized. 



SPCH 440 Advanced Oral Interpretation (3) Prereq- 
uisite: SPCH 240. A study of the advanced theories 
and techniques employed in the interpretation of 
prose, poetry and drama. Attention is given to selec- 
tions, analyses, cuttings, script compilations, and the 
planning of programs and performances in oral inter- 
pretation. 

SPCH 441 Readers Theatre (3) Prerequisite: SPCH 
240 or consent of the instructor. Theories and tech- 
niques of readers theatre will be analyzed to enhance 
the interpreting and directing abilities of students. 
Special attention will be given to interpretation and 
direction of prose, drama, and script compilation. 

SPCH 450 Classical and Medieval Rhetorical Theo- 
ry (3) Prerequisite: SPCH 200 or consent of instructor. 
The theories of speech-making and speech composi- 
tion as propounded by the classical rhetoricians. Spe- 
cial attention is given to Plato, Aristotle, Socrates, 
Cicero, Ouintlian, and St. Augustine. 

SPCH 451 Renaissance and Modern Rhetorical 
Theory (3) Prerequisite: SPCH 200 or consent of the 
instructor. A study of the development of modern 
rhetorical theories in Europe and America with consid- 
eration of the application of the theories to public 
address. Special attention is given to Thomas 
Sheridan, John Walker, George Campbell, Hugh Blair, 
Richard Whately, James A. Winans, Charles Woolbert, 
I. A. Richards, and Kenneth Burke 

SPCH 455 Speechwriting (3) Prerequisite: SPCH 200 
or consent of the instructor. Intensive study of rhetori- 
cal principles of speech composition through study of 
model speeches and through a practicum in speech 
writing. Emphasis will be placed on the application of 
research in speech writing to various forms and styles 
of speeches. 

SPCH 460 American Public Address 1635-1900 (3) 

Prerequisite, SPCH 200 or consent of major historical 
movements and influential spokesmen from 1635- 
1900. Emphasis on the reign of theocracy, the Ameri- 
can Revolution, the presidential inaugural as a rhetori- 
cal type, the Compromise of 1850, the Lincoln-Doug- 
las Debates, the Civil War rhetoric and The Populist 
Movement. 

SPCH 461 American Public Address in the 20th 
Century (3) Prerequisite: SPCH 200 or consent of 
instructor. Course examines the rhetorical develop- 
ment of major historical movements and influential 
spokesmen from 1900 to the present. Focus on the 
progressive movement the rise of labor, women's 
suffrage. McCarthyism and the evolution of pro- and 
anti-war rhetoric. 

SPCH 462 British Public Address (3) Prerequisite: 
SPCH 200 or consent of the instructor. A biographical, 
textual and critical-rhetorical study of great british 
speakers and their influences. Special attention will be 
devoted to the 'Golden Age' of British Oratory and to 
the forms and styles of contemporary speakers. 

SPCH 470 Listening (3) A study of the listening 
process, listening variables, listening levels, and the 
development of effective listening behavior. 

SPCH 472 Nonverbal Communication (3) Survey of 
nonverbal communication in human interaction; theory 
and research on proxemics, kinesics and paralin- 
guistics as expression of relationship, affect and orien- 
tation within and across cultures. 

SPCH 474 Communication Theory and Process (3) 

A general survey of introductory material in communi- 
cation theory. 

SPCH 475 Persuasion in Speech (3) Prerequisite: 
SPCH 200 or 230. A study of the bases of persuasion 
with emphasis on recent experimental developments 
in persuasion. 

SPCH 476 Foundations of Speech Behavior (3) This 
course will provide a study of the acquisition of 
speech, the elements that influence speech behavior, 
the influences of speech behavior, and a theoretical 
framework for the analysis of communication situa- 
tions. Students will apply the theory to analysis of 
specific communication situations. 

SPCH 477 Speech Communication and the Study 
of Language Acquisition (3) Survey of language 
acquisition and development in human communication 
behavior; theory and research on language structure, 
syntactic, phonological, and cognitive systems as an 
influence of an individual's orientation and develop- 
ment within and across cultures. 

SPCH 478 Speech Communication Colloquim (1) 

Current trends and issues in the field of speech 



communication, stressing recent research methods. 
Recommended for senior and graduate student maj- 
ors and minors in speech communication. Repeatable 
to a maximum of 4 hours. 

SPCH 482 Intercultural Communication (3) The 

major variables of communication in an intercultural 
context. Communication problems created by cultural, 
racial, and national differences; analysis of stereo- 
types, values, and cultural assumptions influencing 
verbal and nonverbal communication. 

SPCH 483 Urban Communication (3) A study of 
communication variations in the urban community, 
exploration of strategies for improving communication. 

SPCH 488 Speech Communication Internship (1-6) 

Registration by permission of adviser only. This inde- 
pendent internship is designed to give the speech 
communication student practical career experience 
with a speech communication professional in the 
Washington metropolitan area. Limited to a maximum 
of six credits. 

SPCH 489 Speech Communication Workshop (1-6) 

Workshops devoted to special, in-depth study in 
speech communication. Course may be repeatable to 
a maximum of six semester hours. 

SPCH 498 Seminar (3) Prerequisites: Senior standing 
and consent of instructor. Present-day speech re- 
search. 

SPCH 499 Honors Seminar (3) For honors students 
only. Readings, symposiums visiting lectures, discus- 
sions. 

SPCH 600 Empirical Research in Speech Commu- 
nication (3) 

SPCH 601 Historical-Critical Research in Speech 
Communication (3) Intense study in critical and his- 
torical methodology as applicable to research in 
speech communication. Emphasis will be placed on 
the composition and the evaluation of historical-critical 
studies of significance in the field of rhetorical commu- 
nication scholarship. 

SPCH 628 Organization Communication: Research 
and Intervention (3) Prerequisite: SPCH 424 or con- 
sent of the instructor. The role of the internal and 
external communication consultant as an organization 
change agent. Emphasis upon data gathered to facili- 
tate the communication development of the organiza- 
tion. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. 

SPCH 655 Seminar in Speechwriting (3) Theoretical 
and practical aspects of speechwritihg at an advanced 
level. 

SPCH 670 Seminar In Listening Behavior (3) Prereq- 
uisite: SPCH 470 or consent of instructor. A study of 
research in and measurement of listening behavior. 

SPCH 680 Speech Communication Programs in 
Education and Training (3) An analysis of instruc- 
tional development in speech communication. Instruc- 
tional objectives, strategies and evaluation are applied 
to educational, corporate and industrial training pro- 
grams. 

SPCH 688 Speech Communication Field Experi- 
ence (1-6) Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 
Applications of speech communication principles and 
research in professional communication settings. 

SPCH 698 Special Problems in Speech Communi- 
cation (3) 

SPCH 720 Seminar in Small Group Communication 

(3) The seminar will explore the variables involved in 
small group communication (formation and member- 
ship, leadership, functions, and current research prob- 
lems). The focus of the course will be two-fold: (1) to 
give the student a survey of small group communica- 
tion theory, and (2) to provide some in-depth analysis 
of current problems in small group communication. 

SPCH 724 Seminar in Organizational Communica- 
tion (3) Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 
Theories and problems of human communication with- 
in, between, and/or among formal organizations will 
be emphasized. 

SPCH 755 Seminar in Rhetorical Theory (3) Second 
semester. Prerequisite: SPCH 460, 461 or 450. Exami- 
nation of selected theories of style drawn from the 
fields of rhetoric and literature, and analysis of model 
speeches. 

SPCH 760 Seminar in Political Communication (3) 

Prerequisite: SPCH 601 or consent of the instructor. A 



Communication Arts and Theatre Program 73 



blend of theory and practice to integrate rheotrical- 
cntical theory and empirical methods with politics. 
Practitioners in political communication will be drawn 
in as resource persons. Students will map the commu- 
nication strategy for candidates and analyze actual 
campaign strategies. 

SPCH 762 Seminar in Public Address (3) An in-depth 
study of national and international speakers and is- 
sues throughout the history of the spoken word. Em- 
phasis will be placed upon the application of rhetorical 
principles to the analysis of world speakers and their 
speeches 

SPCH 775 Seminar in Persuasion and Attitude 
Change (3) This seminar will concentrate on the 
problem of making message strategy decisions. 
Course content will consist of study of both theoretical 
and empirical research on attitude and attitude change 
in persuasive communication. 

SPCH 776 Interpersonal Communication (3) Prob- 
lems and processes of symbolic representation in 
speech, the effects of language on communication, 
semantic redundancy, and interaction between mean- 
ing and the structure of oral language 

SPCH 798 Independent Study (1-3) Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor An individual course designed 
for intensive study or research of problems in any one 
of the three areas of drama, general speech, or 
radio/TV. 

SPCH 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

Theatre 

THET 420 Styles and Theories of Acting (3) Prereq- 
uisites: THET 120. 221. 320 or consent of instructor. 
Emphasis on the philosophical basis and techniques 
necessary for acting modern realistic drama and acting 
period style dramas. In-depth study of Stanislavski 
system and application of those techniques toward 
performance in scenes. Examination and application 
of the techniques necessary for the preparation and 
performance of an acting score for performing Shake- 
speare. Improvisation. Required attendance at live 
theatre productions. 

THET 429 Actor's Studio (1-3) Prerequisite: Consent 
of instructor. Participation in dramatic roles executed 
under faculty supervision in the department's produc- 
tions. Eligible students must make commitments and 
plan performances with course instructor during pre- 
registration. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

THET 430 Advanced Directing tor the Stage (3) 

Prerequisite: THET 330 or consent of instructor. Dis- 
cussion of the preparation procedures and rehearsal 
practices necessary for the presentation of a variety of 
theatrical styles and forms. Emphasis on understand- 
ing the relationship between the director, the actor, the 
script and the audience. A series of student directed 
scenes supplemented by attendance at theatre 
productions. 

THET 440 Children's Dramatics (3) Principles and 
methods of creative dramatics as applied in the class- 
room or community center for elementary, secondary 
and exceptional children. Supervised conducting of 
classes in creative dramatics at the University, nearby 
community centers or schools. 

THET 445 Directing Plays for Children's Theatre (3) 

Prerequisite: THET 440. An introduction into the formal 



elements of directing plays for children. The organiza- 
tion of large groups of children in the framework of 
children's theatre. History of children's theatre, script 
analysis, and basic directing skills for staging child- 
ren's theatre. A final presentation of a short estab- 
lished or original children's play is required. 

THET 450 American Musical Comedy (3) The evolu- 
tion of musical comedy through opera to early Ameri- 
can extravaganzas and minstrels to the musicals of 
the 1920's and 1930's. The development and high- 
lights of the form since 1940 The function and form of 
the libretto, music and lyrics, and the roles of the 
creative personnel of a musical production Work- 
shops in performance skills. 

THET 460 Theatre Management I (3) The practical 
tools of theatre management: production philosophies, 
selecting and balancing a season, tickets and box 
office procedures, budgeting, graphic arts production, 
advertising, publicity and other promotional devices 

THET 461 Theatre Management II (3) Prerequisite 
THET 460 or consent of instructor Case studies, 
discussions, lectures and proiects concerning ad- 
vance theatre management decision making and ad- 
ministration, including such areas as personnel rela- 
tions, contract negotiations, theatrical unions, fund 
raising, touring, audience development and public rela- 
tions. 

THET 471 Advanced Scenic Design (3) Prerequi- 
sites: THET 170, 273. 375 or consent of instructor. 
Study of period styles and techniques in scenic design. 
Emphasis on individual proiects and multi-use the- 
atres. 

THET 476 Principles and Theories of Stage Light- 
ing (3) Prerequisite: THET 170, recommended THET 
273. A study of the theories of electnfication, instru- 
ments, design, color, and control for stage and televi- 
sion. Brief survey of sound for the theatre. Practical 
work on productions. 

THET 477 Advanced Lighting Design (3) Prerequi 
site: THET 476 Study of history and theory of lighting 
design. Design exercises in proscenium, in-the-round, 
thrust, outdoor pageant, circus, concert, spectacle, 
dance and television lighting. A survey of lighting 
companies and equipment and architectural lighting. 

THET 479 Theater Workshop (1-3) Prerequisite: 
THET 170 and permission of the instructor. Participa- 
tion in the technical aspects of theatre production in 
selected University and experimental theatre produc- 
tions. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

THET 480 Stage Costume Design I (3) Prerequisite: 
THET 282. Basic principles of theatre costume design 
and introduction to rendering skills. Emphasis on de- 
velopment of design conception, unity, character 
statement, basic clothing design and period style ad- 
aptation. 

THET 481 Stage Costume Design II (3) One lecture 
and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 
THET 480. An advanced study of costume design and 
interpretation leading to understanding and facility in 
design of stylized productions. Emphasis on design for 
musical comedy, dance theatre, opera and various 
non-traditional forms of theatre production. 

THET 485 Advanced Makeup (3) Prerequisite: THET 
180 or consent of instructor. Advanced techniques and 



materials in makeup for the theatre, television and film 
Practical work with three-dimensional makeup (pros- 
thetic devices), hair pieces, mask-making and sylized 
makeup. Opportunity to develop skills in a creative 
approach to makeup design 

THET 490 History of the Theatre I (3) Evolution of 
the theatre from primitive origins, through the early 
renaissance with emphasis on playwnghts and plays, 
theatre architecture and decor, and significant per- 
sonalities. Extensive use of graphic material, play 
reading, related theatre-going 

THET 491 History of the Theatre II (3) A continuation 
of THET 490 beginning with the 16th century and 
progressing into the 20th, examining the late Renais- 
sance, Elizabethan, Restoration, 1 7th to 19th century 
European, and early American theatres Emphasis on 
dramatic forms and styles, theatre architecture and 
decor, and significant personalities. Extensive use of 
graphic material, play reading, related theatre-going 

THET 495 History of Theatrical Theory and Criti- 
cism (3) The development of theatrical theory and 
criticism from the Greeks to the modern theorist. The 
philosophical basis of theatre as an art form Important 
theorists and the practical application of their theones 
in either play scripts or theatrical productions. Re- 
quired attendance at selected live theatre productions 

THET 499 Independent Study (3) Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. An independent study course in 
which each student completes an assigned maior 
theatre project under close faculty supervision. Pro- 
jects may culminate with term papers, scenic or cos- 
tume designs, or a stage production Repeatable to a 
maximum of six credits. 

THET 600 Introduction to Graduate Study in Thea- 
tre (3) 

THET 669 Independent Study (1-3) 

THET 678 Theory of Visual Design for the Perform- 
ing Arts (3) Prerequisite: THET 375 or consent of 
instructor. An historical and theoretical study of design 
practices in the performing arts. 

THET 688 Special Problems in Drama (3) The prepa- 
ration of adaptations and other protects in dramaturgy 

THET 689 Theories of the Drama (3) Advanced 
study of the identification and development of dramat- 
ic form from the early Greek drama to contemporary 
forms; the aesthetics of theatre arts; and dramatic 
criticism. 

THET 698 Seminar— Studies in Theatre (3) Re- 
search projects adapted to individual back- 
grounds and special work. 

THET 699 The Theory of Pre-Modern Dramatic 
Production (3) An historical survey of production 
styles. 

THET 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 



74 



Comparative Literature 
Program 

Professor and Director: Fuegi 

Professors: Barry, Best, Bryer, Freedman, 

Goodwyn, Gramberg, Hering, Holton Jones, 

MacBain, Panichas, J. Russell, Salmanca, 

Whittemore 

Associate Professors: Beiken, Coogan, 

Demaitre, Fink, Fleck, Greenwood, Mack, C. 

Russell 

Assistant Professors: Peterson 

The Program in Comparative Literature offers 
graduate work leading to the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. 

The CMLT Program draws on a distin- 
guished faculty in several departments and of- 
fers concentrated work in Medieval and Renais- 
sance studies, and in major movements and 
genres of the modern period including the Eigh- 
teenth Century. Though the focus of courses 
and seminars is usually specifically literary, in- 
terdisciplinary work is very much encouraged as 
is practical criticsm in the arts. Departments 
cooperating in the Program include: American 
Studies, Classics, English, French and Italian, 
German and Slavic, History, Spanish and Portu- 
guese, Dramatic Arts, Radio-Television-Film, 
and the Women's Studies Programs. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Applicants should have a strong background in 
the arts and humanities. Since advanced work 
in Comparative Literature is based on the prem- 
ise that literature should be read in the original 
whenever possible, students are expected to be 
able to read at least one language other than 
English with a high degree of aesthetic ap- 
preciation. Ph.D. students are expected to use 
at least two foreign languages actively in their 
work, and it is assumed that efforts will be made 
to develop an acquaintance with one or two 
additional languages. Entrance examinations 
are not required, but high scores on GRE litera- 
ture and language examinations will add weight 
to applications. 

Students take courses in CMLT and in two 
other departments of literature. The M.A. de- 
gree requires thirty hours, either 24 hours of 
course work and a thesis, or thirty hours of 
course work and a comprehensive examination. 
No specific number of hours is required for the 
Ph.D., as the number will vary according to the 
preparation and goals of the individual student; 
the average has been eight to ten courses 
beyond the M.A. A Master's degree is a re- 
quired step toward the Ph.D. The Ph.D. com- 
prehensive examinations cover four major 
areas, determined after consultation with the 
individual student's committee. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The resources of the Kennedy Center, the 
Folger Library, the American Film Institute, Ken- 



nan Institute, and Dumbarton Oaks are regularly 
drawn upon as are internship possibilities in the 
greater Washington area and graduate ex- 
change programs with European Universities. 

Financial Assistance 

Various assistantships and general university 
fellowships are available. CMLT students may 
teach in various departments cooperating in the 
CMLT Program and may be considered for a 
year abroad as a teacher at cooperating Euro- 
pean universities. 

Courses 

CMLT 401 Introductory Survey of Comparative 
Literature (3) Survey of the background of European 
literature through study of Greek and Latin literature in 
English translations, discussing the debt of modern 
literature to the ancients. 

CMLT 402 Introductory Survey of Comparative 
Literature (3) Study of the medieval and modern 
continental literature. 

CMLT 411 The Greek Drama (3) The chief works of 
Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes in 
English translations. Emphasis on the historic back- 
ground, on dramatic structure, and on the effect of the 
attic drama upon the mind of the civilized world. 

CMLT 415 The Old Testament as Literature (3) A 

study of sources, development and literary types. 

CMLT 416 New Testament as Literature A study of 
the books of the New Testament, with attention to the 
relevant historical background and to the transmission 
of the text. A knowledge of Greek is helpful, but not 
essential. 

CMLT 421 The Classical Tradition and its Influence 
in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. (3) Em- 
phasis on major writers. Reading knowledge of Greek 
or Latin required. 

CMLT 422 The Classical Tradition and its Influence 
in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Emphasis 
on major writers. Reading knowledge of Greek or Latin 
required. 

CMLT 430 Literature of the Middle Ages (3) Narra- 
tive, dramatic and lyric literature of the Middle Ages 
studied in translation. 

CMLT 433 Dante and the Romance Tradition (3) A 

reading of the Divine Comedy to enlighten the discov- 
ery of reality in western literature. 

CMLT 461 Romanticism — Early Stages (3) Empha- 
sis on England, France and Germany. Reading knowl- 
edge of French or German required. 

CMLT 462 Romanticism — Flowering and Influence 

(3) Emphasis on England, France and Germany. 
Reading knowledge of French or German required. 

CMLT 469 The Continental Novel (3) The novel in 
translation from Stendhal through the existentialists, 
selected from literatures of France, Germany, Italy, 
Russia, and Spain. 

CMLT 470 Ibsen and the Continental Drama (3) 

Emphasis on the major work of Ibsen, with some 
attention given to selected predecessors, contempo- 
raries and successors. 

CMLT 479 Major Contemporary Authors (3) 

CMLT 488 Genres (3) A study of a recognized literary 
form, such as tragedy, epic, satire, literary criticism, 
comedy, tragicomedy, etc. The course may be re- 
peated for cumulative credit up to six hours when 
different material is presented. 



CMLT 489 Major Writers (3) Each semester two 
major writers from different cultures and languages will 
be studied. Authors will be chosen on the basis of 
significant relationships of cultural and aesthetic con- 
texts, analogies between their respective works, and 
the importance of each writer to his literary tradition. 

CMLT 496 Conference Course in Comparative Lit- 
erature (3) Second semester A tutorial type discus- 
sion course, correlating the courses in various litera- 
tures which the student has previously taken with the 
primary themes and masterpieces of world literature. 
This course is required of undergraduate majors in 
comparative literature, but must not be taken until the 
final year of the student's program. 

CMLT 498 Selected Topics in Comparative Litera- 
ture (3) 

CMLT 601 Problems in Comparative Literature (3) 

CMLT 610 Folklore in Literature (3) 

CMLT 631 The Medieval Epic (3) 

CMLT 632 The Medieval Romance (3) 

CMLT 639 Studies in the Renaissance (3) Repeata- 
ble to a maximum of nine hours. 

CMLT 640 The Italian Renaissance and its Influ- 
ence (3) 

CMLT 642 Problems of the Baroque in Literature 
(3) 

CMLT 649 Studies in Eighteenth Century Literature 

(3) Studies in eighteenth century literature: as an- 
nounced. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 hours. 

CMLT 658 Studies in Romanticism (3) Studies in 
Romanticism: as announced. Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of 9 hours. 

CMLT 679 Seminar in Modern and Contemporary 
Literature (3) Seminar in modern and contemporary 
literature: as announced. Repeatable to a maximum of 
9 hours. 

CMLT 681 Literary Criticism — Ancient and Medie- 
val (3) 

CMLT 682 Literary Criticism — Renaissance and 
Modern (3) 

CMLT 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

CMLT 801 Seminar in Themes and Types (3) 

CMLT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Computer Science 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Yeh 

Professors: Atchison, Chu 2 , Edmundson 3 , 

Kanal, Minker 4 , Stewart 4 

Associate Professors: Agrawala, Austing, 

Basili, Hamlet, Rieger, Shneiderman Zelkowitz 

Assistant Professors: Brodie, Dowdy, Gannon, 

Gligor, Jacobs, Kim, Nau, O'Leary, Privitera, 

Samet, Tripathi, Weiser, Zave 

Research Professor: Rosenfeld 1 

Adjunct Professor: Mills, H 

'joint appointment with Computer Science 

Center. 

2 joint appointment with Electrical Engineering. 

3 joint appointment with Mathematics 

4 joint appointment with Insitute for Physical 

Science and Technology. 



Computer Science Program 75 



The Department of Computer Science offers 
graduate programs leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in 
the following areas: applications, artificial intel- 
ligence, computer systems, information pro- 
cessing, numerical analysis, programming lan- 
guages, and theory of computing. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Admission and degree requirements specific to 
the graduate programs in computer science are 
described in a brochure available through the 
Departmental Education Office. There are two 
options for the master's degree: 24 hours of 
course work plus the completion of a thesis: or 
33 hours of course work, a comprehensive 
examination plus the completion of a scholarly 
paper. There is no minimum course requirement 
in the doctoral program. The number and varie- 
ty of courses offered each semester enables 
students and their advisors to plan individual- 
ized degree programs. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department maintains a laboratory con- 
sisting of several PDP 1 1 /45 computer sys- 
tems, display devices, peripheral equipment, 
and utilizes the UNIVAC 1108/1140 computer 
system maintained by the Computer Science 
Center. 

Additional Information 

For information on degree programs and gradu- 
ate assistantships. contact: Dr. Richard H. Aust- 
ing, Department of Computer Science. 

Courses 

CMSC 400 Introduction to Computer Languages 
and Systems (3) Prerequisite: MATH 241 or equiva- 
lent. A terminal course suitable for non-CMSC majors 
with no programming background. Organization and 
characteristics of computers. Procedure oriented and 
assembly languages Representation of data, charac- 
ters and instructions Introduction to logic design and 
systems organization Macro definition and generation. 
Program segmentation and linkage Extensive use of 
the computer to complete proiects illustrating pro- 
gramming techniques and machine structure. (CMSC 
400 may not be counted for credit in the graduate 
program in Computer Science.) 

CMSC 411 Computer System Architecture (3) Pre- 
requisite: CMSC 31 1 or equivalent. Input/output 
processors and techniques. Intra-system communica- 
tion, buses, caches. Addressing and memory hierar- 
chies. Microprogramming, parallelism, and pipeling. 

CMSC 412 Operating Systems (3) Prerequisite: 
CMSC 311 or equivalent. An introduction to batch 
systems, spooling systems, and third-generation mul- 
tiprogramming systems. Description of the parts of an 
operating system in terms of function, structure, and 
implementation. Basic resource allocation policies. 

CMSC 415 Systems Programming (3) Prerequisite: 
CMSC 220. 410. Basic algorithms of operating system 
software. Memory management using linkage editors 
and loaders, dynamic relocation with base registers, 
paging. File systems and input/output control. Proces- 
sor allocation for multiprogramming, timesharing. The 
emphasis of the course is on practical systems pro- 
gramming, including projects such as a simple linkage 
editor, a stand-alone executive, a die system, etc. 

CMSC 420 Data Structures (3) Prerequisite: CMSC 
220 or equivalent. Description, properties, and storage 
allocation of data structures including lists and trees. 
Algorithms for manipulating structures. Applications 
from areas such as data processing, information re- 
trieval, symbol manipulation, and operating systems. 

CMSC 426 Image Processing (3) Prerequisite: CMSC 
420 or equivalent. An introduction to basic techniques 
of analysis and manipulation of pictorial data by com- 
puter. Image input/output devices, image processing 
software, enhancement, segmentation, property 



measurement, fourier analysis. Computer encoding, 
processing, and analysis of curves. 
CMSC 430 Theory of Language Translation (3) 
Prerequisite: CMSC 120 and 250, or equivalent. CMSC 
330 recommended Formal translation of programming 
languages, program syntax and semantics Finite state 
grammars and recognizers. Context free parsing tech- 
niques such as recursive descent, prededence. LL(K). 
LR(K) and SLR(K) Machine independent code im- 
provement and generation, syntax directed translation 
schema Not open to students who have credit for 
CMSC 440 

CMSC 432 Compiler Writing (3) Prerequisites: CMSC 
220, 330. 430 A detailed examination of a compiler for 
an algebraic language designed around the writing of a 
compiler as the major part of the course. Scanning and 
parsing, code generation, optimization and error recov- 
ery, and compiler-writing techniques such as boot- 
strapping and translator writing systems. 

CMSC 435 Software Design and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 420 and 430. or equivalent State- 
of-the-art techniques in software design and develop- 
ment. Laboratory experience in applying the tech- 
niques covered. Structured design, structured pro- 
gramming, top-down design and development, seg- 
mentation and modularization techniques, iterative en- 
hancement, design and code inspection techniques, 
correctness, and chief-programmer teams. The devel- 
opment of a large software proiect. 

CMSC 450 Elementary Logic and Algorithms (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 240 or consent of instructor. This 
is the same course as MATH 444. An elementary 
development of propositional logic, predicate logic, set 
algebra, and Boolean algebra, with a discussion of 
Markov algorithms, turing machines and recursive 
functions. Topics include post productions, word prob- 
lems, and formal languages. 

CMSC 452 Elementary Theory of Computation (3) 

Prerequisites: CMSC 120. 250. This course is intended 
to serve two purposes: (1) an introduction to the theory 
of computation, and (2) a tie between many abstract 
results and their concrete counterparts. This course 
establishes a theoretical foundation for the proper 
understanding of the inherent limitations and actual 
power of digital computers. Also, it provides a relatively 
uniform way of stating and investigating problems that 
arise in connection with the computation of particular 
functions and certain classes of functions. Topics 
covered include an introductory treatment of classes 
of computable functions, computability by register ma- 
chines, computability by turing machines, unsolvable 
decision problems, concrete computational complexi- 
ty, and complexity of loop programs. 

CMSC 455 Elementary Formal Language Theory 

(3) Prerequisites: CMSC 120, 250. This course is 
intended to serve as an introduction to the theory of 
formal languages. This theory is encountered in the 
study of both programming languages and natural 
languages, and consequently will be useful in nu- 
merous other courses in Computer Science at the 
undergraduate and graduate levels. Topics covered 
include the highlights of Chomsky's hierarchy of gram- 
mars and Chomsky's hierarchy of languages, a sum- 
man/ treatment of acceptors related to these lan- 
guages, and a brief introduction to the theory of 
transformational grammars. 

CMSC 460 Computational Methods (3) Prerequi- 
sites: MATH 240, 241. and CMSC 1 10. or equivalent 
Basic computational methods for interpolation, least 
squares, approximation, numerical quadrature, numeri- 
cal solution of polynomial and transcendental equa- 
tions, systems of linear equations and initial value 
problems for ordinary differential equations. Emphasis 
on the methods and their computational properties 
rather than on their analytic aspects. (Listed also as 
MAPL 460.) 

CMSC 470 Numerical Mathematics: Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 240 and 241. CMSC 110 or 
equivalent. This course with MAPL/CMSC 471, forms 
a one-year introduction to numerical analysis at the 
advanced undergraduate level Interpolation, numeri- 
cal differentiation and integration, solution of nonlinear 
equations, acceleration of convergence, numencal 
treatment of differential equations Topics will be sup- 
plemented with programming assignments (Listed 
also as MAPL 470.) 

CMSC 471 Numerical Mathematics: Linear Algebra 
(3) Prerequisites: MATH 240 and 241; CMSC 110 or 
equivalent. The course, with MAPL/CMSC 470. lorms 
a one-year introduction to numerical analysis at the 



advanced undergraduate level Direct solution ol linear 
systems, norms, least squares problems, the symmet- 
ric eigen-value problem, basic iterative methods. Top- 
ics will be supplemented with programming assign- 
ments (Listed also as MAPL 471.) 

CMSC 475 Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 240 and MATH 241 General 
Enumeration methods, difference equations, generat- 
ing functions Elements of graph theory, matrix 
representations of graphs, applications of graph theory 
to transport networks, matching theory and graphical 
algorithms (Also listed as MATH 475 ) 

CMSC 477 Optimization (3) Pre-equisites: CMSC 110 
and MATH 405 or MATH 474. Linear programming 
including the simplex algorithm and dual linear pro- 
grams, convex sets and elements of convex pro- 
gramming, combinatorial optimization integer pro- 
gramming (Listed also as MAPL 477 ) 

CMSC 480 Simulation of Continuous Systems (3) 

Prerequisite CMSC 280 or equivalent Introduction to 
digital simulation; simulation by mimic programming; 
simulation by fortran programming; simulation by 
DSL/90 (or CSMP) programming, logic and construc- 
tion of a simulation processor; similanty between digi- 
tal simulations of continuous and discrete systems 

CMSC 498 Special Problems in Computer Science 
(1-3) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor An in- 
dividualized course designed to allow a student or 
students to pursue a specialized topic or proiect under 
the supervision of the senior staff Credit according to 
work done. 

CMSC 612 Computer Systems Theory (3) Prerequi- 
site: CMSC 411, CMSC 412. CMSC 250. and STAT 
400. or equivalent. Basic theoretical results in comput- 
er systems, including synthetic models of system 
structure, analytical (probabilistic) models of system 
structure, analysis of computer system mechanisms, 
analysis of operating system mechanisms, and analy- 
sis of resource allocation policies 

CMSC 620 Problem Solving Methods in Artificial 
Intelligence (3) Prerequisites: CMSC 420 and 450 
Underlying theoretical concepts in solving problems by 
heunstically guided trial and error search methods. 
State-space problem reduction, and first-order predi- 
cate calculus representations for solving problems. 
Search algorithms and their optimality' proofs. 

CMSC 630 Theory of Programming Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 430 Syntactic and semantic mo- 
dels of programming languages Finite state proces- 
sors and their application to lexical analysis Context 
free languages. LR(K). precedence languages as mo- 
dels of programming languages Extensions to context 
free grammars such as property grammars, inhented 
and synthesized attributes. Van Wijngearden gram- 
mars (ALGOL 68), abstract syntax, the Vienna defini- 
tion language, graph models. Translator wnting sys- 
tems. 

CMSC 640 Computability and Automata (3) Intro- 
duction to formal treatment of abstract computing 
devices and the concept of effective procedure' 
Major topics: (1) Finite-state automata. Finite-state 
transducers and acceptors, finite-state languages, reg- 
ular expressions and sets. (2) Turing machines, com- 
putability. and partial recursive functions. The tunng 
formalism as a model of the computation process: (3) 
Representative models of digital computers 

CMSC 660 Algorithmic Numerical Analysis (3) Pre- 
requisites. MATH/CMSC 460 or 470. and CMSC 1 10 
Detailed study of problems arising in the implementa- 
tion of numerical algorithms on a computer Typical 
problems include rounding errors, their estimation and 
control; numencal stability considerations, stopping 
criteria for converging processes; parallel methods 
Examples from linear algebra, differential equations. 
minimization. (Also listed as MATH 684) 

CMSC 700 Translation of Programming Languages 
(3) Prerequisites: CMSC 420 and 440 Application of 
theoretical concepts developed in formal language 
and automata theory to the analytic design of pro- 
gramming languages and their processors Theory of 
push-down automata, precedence analysis, and 
bounded-context syntactic analysis as models of syn- 
tactic portion of translator design Design cntena un- 
derlying compiler techniques, such as backtracking 
and lookahead. Methods for analyzing translator 
operation in terms of estimating storage space and 
translation time requirements Current version of 
Backus-Naur form Associated semamc notations for 
specifying the operation of programming language 
translators. 



76 Counseling and Personnel Services Program 



CMSC 710 Simulation of Computers and Software 

(3) Prerequisite: CMSC 410 or equivalent. Computer 
simulation language, marco and micro simulation, 
Boolean translation, software-hardware transforma- 
tion, description and simulation of a microprogrammed 
computer, construction and simulation of an assem- 
bler, project for unified hardware-software design. 

CMSC 720 Information Retrieval (3) Prerequisite: 
CMSC 420. Designed to introduce the student to 
computer techniques for information organization and 
retrieval of natural language data. Techniques of sta- 
tistical, syntactic and logical analysis of natural lan- 
guage for retrieval, and the extent of their success. 
Methods of designing systems for use in operational 
environments. Applications to both data and document 
systems. 

CMSC 723 Computational Linguistics (3) Prerequi- 
site: CMSC 420. Introductory course on applications of 
computational techniques to linguistics and natural- 
language processing. Research cycle of corpus selec- 
tion, pre-editing, key-punching, processing, post-edit- 
ing, and evaluation. General-purpose input, process- 
ing, and output routines. Special-purpose programs for 
sentence parsing and generation, segmentation, idiom 
recognition, paraphrasing, and stylistic and discourse 
analysis. Programs for dictionary, thesaurus, and con 
cordance compilation, and editing. Systems for auto 
matic abstracting, translation, and question-answering 

CMSC 725 Mathematical Linguistics (3) Prerequi 
sites: CMSC 640 and STAT 400. Introductory course 
on applications of mathematics to linguistics. Elemen 
tary ideas in phonology, grammar, and semantics 
Automata, formal grammars and languages. Chom 
sky's theory of transformational grammars, Yngve's 
depthhypothesis and syntactic complexity. Markov 
chain models of word and sentence generation, Shan 
non's information theory, Carnap and Bar-Hillel's se 
mantle theory, lexicostatistics and stylostatistics. 
Zopf's Law of Frequency and Mandelbrot's Rank 
Hypothesis. Mathematical models as theoretical foun- 
dation for computational linguistics. 

CMSC 730 Artificial Intelligence (3) Prerequisites: 
CMSC 620 and STAT 401. Heuristic programming; 
tree search procedures. Programs for game playing, 
theorem finding and proving, problem solving; multiple- 
purpose programs. Conversation with computers; 
question-answering programs. Trainable pattern clas- 
sifiers-linear, piecewise linear, quadratic, 'O', and mul- 
tilayer machines. Statistical decision theory, decision 
functions, liklihood ratios; mathematical taxonomy, 
cluster detection. Neural models, computational prop- 
erties of neural nets, processing of sensory informa- 
tion, representative conceptual models of the brain. 

CMSC 733 Computer Processing of Pictorial Infor- 
mation (3) Prerequisite: CMSC 420. Input, output, and 
storage of pictorial information. Pictures as information 
sources, efficient encoding sampling, quantization, ap- 
proximation. Position-invariant operations on pictures, 
digital and optical implementations, the pax language, 
applications to matched and spatial frequency filtering. 
Picture quality, 'image enhancement' and 'image res- 
toration'. Picture properties and pictorial pattern recog- 
nition. Processing of complex pictures; 'figure' extrac- 
tion, properties of figures. Data structures for pictures 
description and manipulation; 'picture languages'. 
Graphics systems for alphanumeric and other sym- 
bols, line drawings of two- and three-dimensional 
objects, cartoons and movies. 

CMSC 737 Topics in Information Science (3) Pre- 
requisite: Permission of the instructor. This is the same 
course as LBSC 721 . Definition of information science, 
relation to cybernetics and other sciences, systems 
analysis, information, basic constraints on information 
systems, processes of communication, classes and 
their use. optimalization and mechanization. 

CMSC 740 Automata Theory (3) Prerequisite: CMSC 
640. This is the same course as ENEE 652. Introduc- 
tion to the theory of abstract mathematical machines. 
Structural and behavioral classification of automata. 
Finite-state automata; theory of regular sets. Push- 
down automata. Linear-bounded automata. Finite 
transducers. Turing machines; universal turing ma- 
chines. 

CMSC 745 Theory of Formal Languages (3) Prereq- 
uisite: CMSC 640. Formal grammars; syntax and se- 
mantics. Post productions; Markov algorithms. Finite- 
state languages, parsing, trees, and ambiguity. Theory 
of regular sets. Context-free languages; pushdown 
automata. Context-sensitive languages; linear-bound- 
ed automata. Unrestricted rewriting systems; turing 



machines. Closure properties of languages under 
operations. Undecidability theorems. 

CMSC 750 Theory of Computability (3) Prerequisite 
CMSC 640. Algorithms; Church's thesis. Primitive re 
cursive functions; Godel numbering. General and par 
tial recursive functions. Turing machines; Tunngs' the 
sis. Markov algorithms. Church's lamda calculus. Gr 
zegorczyk hierarch, Peter hierarchy. Relative recur- 
siveness. Word problems, Post's correspondence 
problem 

CMSC 755 Theories of Information (3) Prerequisite: 
CMSC 620 and STAT 401. Mathematical and logical 
foundations of existing theories of information. Topics 
include Fisher's theory of statistical information, Kull- 
back and Leibler's theory of statistical information, 
Shannon's theory of selective information, and Carnap 
and Bar-Hillel's theory of semantic information. The 
similarities and differences of these and other theories 
are treated. 

CMSC 770 Advanced Linear Numerical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: MAPL 470. 471 and MATH 405 or MATH 
474; or consent of instructor. Advanced topics in 
numerical linear algebra, such as dense Eigenvalue 
problems, sparse elimination, iterative methods, and 
other topics. (Same as MAPL 600.) 

CMSC 772 Numerical Solution of Nonlinear Equa- 
tions (3) Prerequisite: MAPL 470, 471 and MATH 410; 
or consent of instructor. Numerical solution of nonlin- 
ear equations in one and several variables. Existence 
questions. Minimization methods. Selected applica- 
tions. (Same as MAPL 604.) 

CMSC 780 Computer Applications to the Physical 
Sciences (3) Prerequisites: CMSC 210, STAT 400, 
and a graduate course in physical science. Applica- 
tions of computers to numerical calculation, data 
reduction, and modeling in the physical sciences. 
Stress will be laid on the features of the applications 
which have required techniques not usually consid- 
ered in more general contexts. 

CMSC 782 Modeling and Simulation of Physical 
Systems (3) Prerequisites: CMSC 210 and STAT 401. 
Monte-Carlo and other methods of investigating mo- 
dels of interest to physical scientists. Generation and 
testing of random numbers. Probabilistic, deterministic 
and incomplete models. 

CMSC 798 Graduate Seminar in Computer Science 
(1-3) 

CMSC 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

CMSC 818 Advanced Topics in Computer Systems 
(1-3) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Advanced 
topics selected by the faculty from the literature of 
computer systems to suit the interest and background 
of students. May be repeated for credit. 

CMSC 828 Advanced Topics in Information Pro- 
cessing (1-3) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
Advanced topics selected by the faculty from the 
literature of information processing to suit the interest 
and background of students. May be repeated for 
credit. 

CMSC 838 Advanced Topics in Programming Lan- 
guages (1-3) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
Advanced topics selected by faculty from the literature 
of programming languages to suit the interest and 
background of students. May be repeated for credit. 

CMSC 840 Advanced Automata Theory (3) Prereq- 
uisite: CMSC 740. Advances and innovations in auto- 
mata theory. Variants of elementary automata; mul- 
titape, multihead, and multidimensional machines. 
Counters and stack automata. Wang machines; 
Shepherdson-Sturgis machines. Recursive hierar- 
chies. Effective computability; relative uncomputability. 
Probabilistic automata. 

CMSC 858 Advanced Topics in Theory of Comput- 
ing (1-3) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Ad- 
vanced topics selected by the faculty from the litera- 
ture of theory of computing to suit the interest and 
background of students. May be repeated for credit. 

CMSC 878 Advanced Topics in Numerical Methods 
(1-3) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Advanced 
topics selected by the faculty from the literature of 
numerical methods to suit the interest and background 
of students. May be repeated for credit. 

CMSC 898 Advanced Topics in Applications (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Advanced topics 
selected by the faculty from the literature of applica- 
tions of Computer Science to suit the interest and 
background of students. May be repeated for credit. 



CMSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 
(1-8) 



Counseling and 
Personnel Services 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Marx 

Professors: Byrne, Magoon' 2 , Pumroy', 

Schlossberg 

Associate Professors: Allan, Birk 2 , Greenberg, 

Knefelkamp, Lawrence, Leonard Medvene 2 , 

Power, Ray, Rhoads, Westbrook 

Assistant Professors: Boyd, Celotta, Dagnato, 

Freeman, Hoffman, Libby, McMullan, 

Spokane, Teglasi, Thomas, 

'Joint appointment with Psychology 
2 Joint appointment with Counseling Center. 

Historically, the programs of the Department of 
Counseling and Personnel Services have been 
responsive to societal needs in providing 
leadership in the training of specialized person- 
nel service workers. The programs are de- 
signed for the preparation of professionals who 
serve in a variety of social settings including 
schools, colleges, rehabilitative agencies, gov- 
ernment agencies and other community agen- 
cies. These professionals may serve one of 
several roles either at the practitioner's level or 
at an advanced level of leadership, supervision 
and research. Programs of preparation for prac- 
titioners are offered at the master's and Ad- 
vanced Graduate Specialist level while the ad- 
vanced offerings for researchers, supervisors, 
and personnel administrators are conducted at 
the doctoral level. The master's and Advanced 
Graduate Specialist programs are offered 
among the following six specialty programs 
within the Department. 

1) The Elementary School Counseling 
Specialty Program prepares the student as a 
child development consultant, individual and 
group counselor and coordinator of pupil serv- 
ices. 2) The Secondary School Counseling Pro- 
gram prepares the student to serve as a mem- 
ber of a human resources team in individual and 
group counseling, as information specialist re- 
garding personal, social, educational and voca- 
tional matters, and pupil personnel program 
coordination. 3) The School Psychology Pro- 
gram prepares the student to be certified as a 
school psychologist where his principal func- 
tions are to assess psychological conditions 
and devise intervention strategies to enhance 
the learning of pupils. 4) The College Student 
Personnel Specialty Program prepares spe- 
cialists at the higher education level in two 
areas of concentration: college counseling and 
Student Personnel Administration which in- 
cludes areas such as Student Development, 
Student Union, Housing, Admissions, Place- 
ment, Deans of Students and Vice Presidents of 
Student Affairs. 5) The Community Counseling 
Specialty Program provides three emphases 
within the program: Career development and 
vocational counseling, personal-social counsel- 
ing and community mental health consultation, 
and adult counseling. 6) The Rehabilitation 
Counseling Specialty Program prepares coun- 
selors to work with mentally, emotionally, so- 
cially and physically handicapped persons in 
public and private agencies. 

The doctoral programs in Counseling and 
Personnel Services are designed to prepare 
students to achieve exceptional competence in 
the areas of research, theory, and practice 
related to personnel services. Graduates typi- 
cally assume positions of leadership, research 
or supervision of personnel services in public 



Counseling and Personnel Services Program 77 



units such as large school systems, universities, 
or state rehabilitation and community agencies; 
as professors in personnel service programs; as 
counselors in higher education institutions. The 
program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree, has as its major emphasis theory and 
research in the behavioral sciences and applied 
fields. The primary thrust at the master's and 
Advanced Graduate Specialist levels is upon 
excellence in practice. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Admission to these programs is not only based 
on meeting minimum requirements, but is also 
competitively based on staff resources avail- 
able. 

The requirements for the master's and Ad- 
vanced Graduate Specialist's diplomas are 
spelled out for each of the six specialty areas. 
Write or call for the specialty area brochure(s) 
which interest you. (301) 454-2026. 

The doctoral program of studies is devel- 
oped with an advisor. The single required 
course is Advanced Statistics. There are no 
language requirements for the Ph.D. degree. 

Courses 

EDCP 410 Introduction to Counseling and Person- 
nel Services (3) Presents principles and procedures, 
and examines the function of counselors, psycholo- 
gists in schools, school social workers, and other 
personnel service workers. 

EDCP 411 Mental Hygiene (3) The practical applica- 
tion of the principles of mental hygiene to classroom 
problems 

EDCP 413 Behavior Modification (3) Knowledge and 
techniques of intervention in a variety of social situa- 
tions, including contingency contracting and time out 
will be acquired. 

EDCP 414 Principles of Behavior (3) Development of 
student proficiency in analyzing complex patterns of 
behavior on the basis of empirical evidence. 

EDCP 415 Behavior Mediation (3) Prerequisite: 
EDCP 414. Basic principles of human behavior will be 
reviewed and application of these principles will be 
implemented under supervision. 

EDCP 417 Group Dynamics and Leadership (3) The 

nature and property of groups, interaction analysis, 
developmental phases, leadership dynamics and 
styles, roles of members and interpresonal communi- 
cations. Two hours of lecture discussion and two hours 
of laboratory per week, laboratory involves experimen- 
tal based learning 

EDCP 420 Education and Racism (3) Strategy devel- 
opment for counselors and educators to deal with 
problems of racism. 

EDCP 460 Introduction to Rehabilitation Counsel- 
ing (3) Introductory course for majors in rehabilitation 
counseling, social work, psychology, or education who 
desire to work professionally with physically or emo- 
tionally handicapped persons. 

EDCP 470 Introduction to Student Personnel (3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A systematic anal- 
ysis of research and theoretical literature on a variety 
of major problems in the organization and administra- 
tion of student personnel services in higher education. 
Included will be discussion of such topics as the 
student personnel philosophy in education, counseling 
services, discipline, housing, student activities, finan- 
cial aid, health, remedial services, etc. 

EDCP 489 Field Experience in Counseling and 
Personnel Services (1-4) Prerequisites: At least six 
semester hours in education at the University of Mary- 
land plus such other prerequisites as may be set by the 
major area in which the experience is to be taken. 
Planned field experience may be provided for selected 
students who have had teaching experience and 
whose application for such field experience has been 
approved by the education faculty Field experience is 
offered in a given area to both major and nonmajor 
students Note: The total number of credits which a 
student may earn in EDCP 489, 888, and 889 is limited 
to a maximum of 20 semester hours. 



EDCP 498 Special Problems in Counseling and 
Personnel Services (1-3) Prerequisite: Consent of 
instructor. Available only to major students who have 
formal plans for individual study of approved problems. 

EDCP 499 Workshops, Clinics, Institutes (1-6) The 
maximum number of credits that may be earned under 
this course symbol toward any degree is six semester 
hours; the symbol may be used two or more times until 
six semester hours have been reached. The following 
type of educational enterprise may be scheduled 
under this course heading: workshops conducted by 
the department of counseling and personnel services 
(or developed cooperatively with other departments, 
colleges and universities) and not otherwise covered 
in the present course listing; clinical experiences in 
counseling and testing centers, reading clinics, speech 
therapy laboratories, and special education centers; 
institutues developed around specific topics or prob- 
lems and intended for designated groups. 

EDCP 605 Issues in Counseling Adults (3) Theoreti- 
cal approaches to adult development. The scope and 
variety of settings (industry, education, government) in 
which programs of adult counseling and guidance take 
place, and the nature of such programs. 

EDCP 611 Occupational Choice Theory and Infor- 
mation (3) Research and theory related to occupa- 
tional and educational decisions; programs of related 
information and other activities in occupational deci- 
sion. 

EDCP 614 Personality Theories in Counseling and 
Personnel Services (3) Examination of constructs 
and research relating to major personality theories 
with emphasis on their significance for working with 
the behaviors of individuals. 

EDCP 615 Cases in Appraisal (3) Prerequisite: EDMS 
446 or EDMS 451. Collecting and interpreting non- 
standardized pupil appraisal data, synthesis of all 
types of data through case study procedures 

EDCP 616 Counseling — Theoretical Foundations 
and Practice (3) Prerequisite: EDCP 615. Exploration 
of learning theories as applied to counseling in school, 
and practices which stem from such theories. 

EDCP 617 Group Counseling (3) Prerequisite: EDCP 
61 6. A survey of theory, research and practice of group 
counseling and psychotherapy with an introduction to 
growth groups and the laboratory approach, therapeu- 
tic factors in groups, composition of therapeutic 
groups, problem clients, therapeutic techniques, re- 
search methods, theories, ethics and training of group 
counselors and therapists. 

EDCP 619 Practicum in Counseling (2-6) Prerequi- 
sites: EDCP 616 and permission of instructor Se- 
quence of supervised counseling experiences of in- 
creasing complexity. Limited to eight applicants in 
advance. Two hours class plus laboratory. 

EDCP 626 Group Counseling Practicum (3) Prereq- 
uisite: EDCP 617, EDCP 619, and consent of instruc- 
tor. A supervised field experience in group counseling. 

EDCP 627 Process Consultation (3) Prerequisite: 
Graduate course in group process. Study of case 
consultation, systems consultation, mental health con- 
sultation and the professional's role in systems inter- 
vention strategies. 

EDCP 633 Diagnostic Appraisal of Children I (4) 

Assessment of development, emotional and learning 
problems of children in schools. Practicum experience. 

EDCP 634 Diagnostic Appraisal of Children II (4) 

Prerequisite: EDCP 633. Assessment of development, 
emotional, and learning problems of adolescents in 
schools. Practicum experience. 

EDCP 635 Therapeutic Techniques and Classroom 
Management I (3) Prerequisite: EDCP 414. Diagnosis 
and treatment of problems presented by teachers and 
parents. Practicum experience. 

EDCP 636 Therapeutic Techniques and Classroom 
Management II (3) Prerequisite: EDCP 635 The ob- 
jective of this course is to understand and to treat 
children's problems. The focus is primarily on the older 
child in secondary school and the orientation is essen- 
tially behavioral Practicum experience will be pro- 
vided. 

EDCP 645 Counseling in Elementary Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCP 61 5 or consent of instructor Coun- 
seling theory and practices as related to children 
Emphasis will be placed on an awareness of the 
child's total behavior as well as on specific methods of 



communicating with the child through techniques of 
play interviews, observations, and the use of non- 
parametric data. 

EDCP 655 Organization and Administration of Per- 
sonnel Services (2) Prerequisite: EDCP 619 or per- 
mission of instructor. Exploration of Personnel serv- 
ices programs and implementing personnel services 
practices 

EDCP 656 Counseling and Personnel Services 
Seminar (2) Prerequisite: Advanced standing Exami- 
nation of issues that bear on professional issues such 
as ethics, interprofessional relationships and research. 

EDCP 661 Psycho-Social Aspects of Disability (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCP 460 or consent of instructor This 
course is part of the core curriculum for rehabilitation 
counselors. It is designed to develop an understanding 
of the nature and importance of the personal and 
psycho-social aspects of adult disability. 

EDCP 662 Psychiatric Aspects of Disability I (3) 
Prerequisite: EDCP 460 or equivalent and consent of 
instructor. Part of core curriculum in rehabilitation 
counseling. It is designed to develop an understanding 
of the rehabilitation process, clients served, and skills 
and attitudes necessary for working effectively with the 
physically disabled. 

EDCP 663 Psychiatric Aspects of Disability II (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCP 460 or equivalent and consent of 
instructor. Part of core curriculum in rehabilitation 
counseling. The psychiatric rehabilitation client: under- 
standing his needs, treatment approaches available. 
and society's reaction to the client. 

EDCP 668 Special Topics in Rehabilitation (1-6) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Repeatable 
to a maximum of six hours. 

EDCP 716 Advanced Counseling Theory Seminar 

(3) Prerequisite: Master's degree in counseling, or 
instructor's permission. Systematic investigation of 
methods of theory analysis and their application to 
counseling theory. 

EDCP 718 Advanced Seminar in Group Processes 
(2-6) Prerequisites: EDCP 626 Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of six credits. 

EDCP 735 Seminar in Rehabilitation Counseling (2) 

This course is part of the core curriculum for rehabilita- 
tion counselors. It is designed to provide the advanced 
rehabilitation counseling student with a formal seminar 
to discuss, evaluate and attempt to reach personal 
resolution regarding pertinent professional problems 
and issues in the field. 

EDCP 771 The College Student (3) A demographic 
study of the characteristics of college students as well 
as a study of their aspirations, values, and purposes 

EDCP 776 Modification of Human Behavior: Labo- 
ratory and Practicum (3) Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. Individual and group supervised introduction 
to intake and counseling relationships 

EDCP 777 Modification of Human Behavior — Labo- 
ratory and Practicum (3) Prerequisite EDCP 776 and 
permission of instructor. Continuation of EDCP 776. 
Further experience under direct supervision of more 
varied forms of counseling relationships. 

EDCP 778 Seminar in Student Personnel (2-6) An 

intensive study of the various student personnel func- 
tions A means to integrate the knowledge from vari- 
ous fields as they relate to student personnel adminis- 
tration. 

EDCP 788 Advanced Practicum in Counseling (1-6) 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, previous prac- 
ticum experience Individual supervision of counseling, 
and group consultation Repeatable to a maximum of 
six credits. 

EDCP 789 Advanced Topics in Counseling and 
Personnel Services (1-6) Repeatable to a maximum 
of 6 credits. 

EDCP 798 Special Problems In Counseling and 
Personnel Services (1-6) Master s AGS. or doctoral 
candidates who desire to pursue special research 
problems under the direction of their advisers may 
register for credit under this number 

EDCP 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) Registra- 
tion required to the extent of six hours for master's 
thesis 

EDCP 888 Apprenticeship in Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services (1-8) Apprenticeships in the maior 
area of study are available to selected students whose 



78 Criminal Justice and Criminology Program 



application for an apprenticeship has been approved 
by the education faculty. Each apprentice is assigned 
to work for at least a semester full-time or the equiva- 
lent with an appropriate staff member of a cooperating 
school, school system, or educational institution or 
agency. The sponsor of the apprentice maintains a 
close working relationship with the apprentice and the 
other persons involved. Prerequisites: teaching experi- 
ence, a master's degree in education, and at least six 
semester hours in education at the University of Mary- 
land. Note: The total number of credits which a student 
may earn in EDCP 489. 888. and 889 is limited to a 
maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDCP 889 Internship in Counseling and Personnel 
Services (3-8) Internships in the major area of study 
are available to selected students who have teaching 
experience. The following groups of students are eligi- 
ble: (a) Any student who has been advanced to 
candidacy for the doctor's degree; and (b) Any student 
who receives special approval by the education faculty 
for an internship, provided that prior to taking an 
internship, such student shall have completed at least 
60 semester hours of graduate work, including at least 
six semester hours in education at the University of 
Maryland. Each intern is assigned to work on a full- 
time basis for at least a semester with an appropriate 
staff member in a cooperating school, school system, 
or educational institution or agency. The internship 
must be taken in a school situation different from the 
one where the student is regularly employed. The 
intern's sponsor maintains a close working relationship 
with the intern and the other persons involved. Note: 
The total number of credits which a student may earn 
in EDCP 489, 888, and 889 is limited to a maximum of 
twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDCP 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

Registration required to the extent of 6-9 hours for an 
Ed.O. project and 1 2-1 8 hours for a Ph.D. dissertation. 



Criminal Justice and 
Criminology Program 

(Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminolo- 
gy) 

Acting Director: Ingraham 

Professor Emeritus: Lejins 

Associate Professors: Ingraham, Maida, 

Tennyson 

Assistant Professors: B. Johnson, McKenzie, 

Minor 

The Program of graduate study leading to a 
Master of Arts and Ph.D. degree in the area of 
Criminal Justice and Criminology is intended to 
prepare students for research, teaching and 
professional employment in the operational 
agencies in the field of criminal justice. This 
program combines an intensive background in a 
social science discipline such as sociology, 
psychology, public administration, etc., with 
graduate-level study of selected aspects of the 
criminal justice field. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

In addition to the general Graduate School 
requirements, special admission requirements 
include the Graduate Record Examination Apti- 
tude Test, a major in a social science discipline, 
and 9 hours of course work in the appropriate 
area of criminal justice. For the M.A. applicant, 
the undergraduate social science major must 
have included at least one course each in 
theory, statistics and research methods. The 
Ph.D. applicant must have completed two sta- 
tistics, two research methods and two theory 
courses, one of each being at the master's- 
level. Admission to the Ph.D. program presup- 
poses completion of the M.A. degree. At the 
discretion of the Graduate Admissions Commit- 
tee of the Institute, deficiencies in some of the 
above areas may be made up by noncredit work 
at the beginning of the program. 

Students enrolled in the M.A. program have 
two options: a Criminology option and a Crimi- 



nal Justice option. The general plan of study for 
both options, totaling to 30 semester hours, is 
as follows: 1) Three social science courses on 
an appropriate level in theory, methodology, 
and statistics. 2) Three appropriate-level 
courses in Criminology or Law Enforcement, 
depending upon the option. Two of these must 
be at the 600 level or above. One of these 
should be a general seminar dealing with the 
overall field of criminal justice (LENF 600). 3) 
Two elective courses. 4) Tutorial courses may 
be taken only as elective courses. 5) The stu- 
dent has a choice between: a) an M.A. degree 
with an M.A. thesis, b) an M.A. degree without 
thesis, but with some additional requirements. 
For completion of the Ph.D. degree, in 
addition to the general Graduate School Ph.D. 
requirements, competence in the theory of at 
least one social science discipline, in research 
methodology and in quantitative techniques is 
expected, as well as competence in the general 
theory of the criminal justice field and in the 
specialization area selected by the student. The 
necessary coursework is determined on the 
basis of the student's previous preparation, 
needs, and interests. The candidate is required 
to pass comprehensive examinations. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate teaching assistantships are available 
on a competitive basis. Further, graduate re- 
search assistantships are sometimes available 
for graduate students to participate in research 
projects directed by faculty members and fund- 
ed by outside sources. 

Additional Information 

A brochure describing the Institute of Criminal 
Justice and Criminology and its programs is 
available upon request. Inquiries should be di- 
rected to: Graduate Program Coordinator 

Courses 

Criminology 

CRIM 432 Law of Corrections (3) Prerequisite: LENF 
230 or 234 and CRIM 220. A review of the law of 
criminal corrections from sentencing to final release or 
release on parole. Probation, punishments, special 
treatments for special offenders, parole and pardon, 
and the prisoner's civil rights are also examined. 

CRIM 450 Juvenile Delinquency (3) Prerequisite: 
SOCY 100. Juvenile delinquency in relation to the 
general problem of crime; analysis of factors underly- 
ing juvenile delinquency; treatment and prevention, 

CRIM 451 Crime and Delinquency Prevention (3) 

Prerequisites: CRIM 220 or CRIM 450 or consent of 
instructor. Methods and programs in prevention of 
crime and delinquency. 

CRIM 452 Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents 
in the Community (3) Prerequisite: CRIM 220 or 
CRIM 450 or consent of instructor. Analysis of the 
processes and methods in the modification of criminal 
patterns of behavior in a community setting. 

CRIM 453 Institutional Treatment of Criminals and 
Delinquents (3) Prerequisite: CRIM 220 or CRIM 450 
or consent of instructor. History, organization and 
functions of penal and correctional institutions for 
adults and juveniles. 

CRIM 454 Contemporary Criminological Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: CRIM 220, CRIM 450, and CRIM 451 or 
CRIM 452 or CRIM 453. Brief historical overview of 
criminological theory up to the 50's. Deviance. Label- 
ing. Typologies. Most recent research in criminalistic 
subcultures and middle class delinquency. Recent 
proposals for 'decriminalization'. 

CRIM 455 Psychology of Criminal Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: CRIM 220 or equivalent and PSYC 331 
or equivalent. Psychological, environmental, and per- 
sonality factors which influence criminal behavior. Bio- 
physiology and crime, stress and crime, maladjust- 
ment patterns, psychoses, personality disorders, ag- 
gression and violent crime, sex-motivated crime and 



sexual deviations, alcohol and drug abuse, and crimi- 
nal behavior. 

CRIM 498 Selected Topics in Criminology (3) Top- 
ics of special interest to advanced undergraduates in 
criminology- Such courses will be offered in response 
to student request and faculty interest. No more than 
six credits may be taken by a student in selected 
topics. 

CRIM 610 Research Methods in Criminal Justice 
and Criminology (3) Prerequisite: Completion of re- 
search methods and statistics requirements for the 
M.A. degree. Examination of special research prob- 
lems and techniques. 

CRIM 650 Advanced Criminology (3) First semester. 
Survey of the principal issues in contemporary crimino- 
logical theory and research. 

CRIM 651 Seminar in Criminology (3) Second se- 
mester. 

CRIM 652 Seminar in Juvenile Delinquency (3) First 
semester. 

CRIM 653 Crime and Delinquency as a Community 
Problem (3) Second semester. An intensive study of 
selected problems in adult crime and juvenile delin- 
quency in Maryland. 

CRIM 654 History of Criminological Thought (3) 

Prerequisite: CRIM 454 or its equivalent. A study of the 
development of criminological thought from antiquity 
to the present. 

CRIM 699 Special Criminological Problems (3) 

CRIM 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

CRIM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

Doctoral dissertation research in criminal justice and 
criminology. 

Law Enforcement 

LENF 444 Advanced Law Enforcement Administra- 
tion (3) Prerequisite: LENF 340 or consent of instruc- 
tor. The structuring of manpower, material, and sys- 
tems to accomplish the major goals of social control. 
Personnel and systems management. Political con- 
trols and limitations on authority and jurisdiction. 

LENF 455 Dynamics of Planned Change in Criminal 
Justice I (3) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. An 
examination of conceptual and practical issues related 
to planned change in criminal justice. Emphasis on the 
development of innovative ideas using a research and 
development approach to change. 

LENF 456 Dynamics of Planned Change in Criminal 
Justice II (3) Prerequisite: LENF 455 or consent of 
instructor. An examination of conceptual and practical 
issues related to planned change in criminal justice. 
Emphasis on change strategies and tactics which are 
appropriate for criminal justice personnel in entry level 
positions. 

LENF 462 Special Problems in Security Administra- 
tion (3) Prerequisites: LENF 360 and consent of 
instructor. An advanced course for students desiring to 
focus on specific concerns in the study of private 
security organizations; business intelligence and espi- 
onage; vulnerability and criticality analyses in physical 
security; transportation, banking, hospital and military 
security problems; uniformed security forces; national 
defense information; and others. 

LENF 498 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice (1-6) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Supervised study 
of a selected topic to be announced in the field of 
criminal justice. Repeatable to a maximum of six 
credits. 

LENF 600 Criminal Justice (3) Prerequisites: Admis- 
sion to the graduate program in criminal justice or 
consent of instructor. Current concept of criminal 
justice in relationship to other concepts in the field. 
Historical perspective. Criminal |ustice and social con- 
trol. Operational implications. Systemic aspects. Is- 
sues of evaluation. 

LENF 630 Seminar in Criminal Law and Society (3) 

Prerequisite: LENF 230 or its equivalent and a course 
in introductory criminology. The criminal law is studied 
in the context of general studies in the area of the 
sociology of law. The evolution and social and psycho- 
logical factors affecting the formulation and adminis- 
tration of criminal laws are discussed. Also examined 
is the impact of criminal laws and their sanctions on 
behavior m the light of recent empirical evidence. 

LENF 640 Seminar in Criminal Justice Administra- 
tion (3) Prerequisites: One course in the theory of 



Early Childhood-Elementary Education Program 79 



groups or organizations, one course in administration; 
or consent of instructor. Examination of external and 
internal factors that currently Impact on police adminis- 
tration. Intra-organizational relationships and policy 
formulation; the conversion of inputs into decisions 
and policies. Strategies for formulating, implementing 
and assessing administrative decisions 

LENF 699 Special Problems in Criminal Justice (1- 

3) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Supervised 
study of a selected problem in the field of criminal 
justice. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. 

LENF 720 Criminal Justice System Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: One course in criminal justice and one 
course in research methodology. System theory and 
method; examination of planning methods and models 
based primarily on a systems approach to the opera- 
tions of the criminal |ustice system. 
LENF 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 



Early Childhood- 
Elementary Education 
Program 

Visiting Associate Professor and Interim 

Chairman: YFF 

Professors: Ashlock. Duffey O'Neill. Roderick, 

Sublett, Weaver, R. Wilson 

Associate Professors: Amershek, Church, 

Eley, Heidelbach, Herman, Jantz, Johnson, 

Schumaker, Seefeldt, Williams. 

Assistant Professors: Cole, Gambrell, Garner, 

Heathington Knifong, Lee, Madison, Saracho, 

Schumacher 

Graduate programs leading to M.A., M.Ed., 
Ed.D., and Ph.D. degrees in the Department of 
Early Childhood-Elementary Education are de- 
signed to prepare teachers, curriculum spe- 
cialists, supervisors, administrators, and higher 
education instructors to function effectively in 
leadership positions in programs for children. 
Students have opportunities to specialize 
in any of the following areas: early childhood 
education, elementary education, reading sci- 
ence education, mathematics education, lan- 
guage arts, social studies education, or nursery- 
kindergarten education. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Masters Degree programs average 30-36 se- 
mester hours. Ed.D. and Ph.D. programs aver- 
age 90 semester hours, including work at the 
master's level. All applicants must submit the 
Miller Analogy Test score as prerequisite to 
admission. 

EDEL 500 and 501, qualifying courses for 
which no graduate credit is offered, may be 
required of some students. 

Programs, particularly at the doctoral level, 
are individualized to reflect the students' back- 
grounds and to meet their particular career 
goals. Regular counseling with an advisor is an 
important aspect of each program. An effort is 
made to ascertain that graduate programs in- 
clude both theory and practicum, professional 
work and academic courses. 

There is a comprehensive examination 
near the completion of work at the master's 
level. The Ph.D. program includes a preliminary 
examination after approximately 12 semester 
hours of work and a comprehensive examina- 
tion near the completion of the program. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Special facilities for graduate study include the 
Reading Center, the Science Teaching Center, 
the Arithmetic Center, the Teacher Education 
Centers in local schools, and the Center for 
Young Children. 



Financial Assistance 

The Department is able to give financial aid. in 
the form of graduate assistantships, to a limited 
number of students of proven ability who have 
had public school teaching experience. 

Courses 

EDEL 401 Science in Early Childhood Education (3) 

Designed primarily to help in-service teachers. Nursery 
School through Grade 3, to acquire general science 
understandings and to develop teaching materials for 
practical use in classrooms. Includes experiments, 
demonstrations, constructions, observations, field 
trips and use of audio-visual materials The emphasis 
is on content and method related to science units in 
common use in Nursery School through Grade 3. 
Offered during summer sessions and in off-campus 
programs taught through University College. Ordinarily 
there is no field placement. 

EDEL 402 Science in the Elementary School (3) 

Designed primarily to help in-service teachers. Grades 
1-6, to acquire general science understandings and to 
develop teaching materials for practical use in class- 
rooms. Includes experiments, demonstrations, con- 
structions, observations, field trips and use of audio- 
visual materials. The emphasis is on content and 
method related to science units in common use in 
Grades 1-6. Offered during summer sessions and in 
off-campus programs taught through University Col- 
lege Ordinarily there is no field placement. 

EDEL 404 Language Arts in Early Childhood Edu- 
cation (3) Teaching of spelling, handwriting, oral and 
written expression and creative expression. Designed 
primarily for in-service teachers. Nursery School 
through Grade 3. Offered during summer sessions and 
in off-campus programs taught through University Col- 
lege. Ordinarily, there is no field placement. 

EDEL 405 Language Arts in the Elementary School 

(3) Teaching of spelling, handwriting, oral and written 
expression and creative expression. Designed primari- 
ly for in-service teachers. Grades 1-6. Offered during 
summer sessions and in off-campus programs taught 
through University College. Ordinarily there is no field 
placement. 

EDEL 406 Social Studies in Early Childhood Educa- 
tion (3) Consideration given to curriculum, organiza- 
tion and methods of teaching, evaluation of newer 
materials and utilization of environmental resources. 
Designed for in-service teachers, Nursery School 
through Grade 3. Offered during summer sessions and 
in off-campus programs taught through University Col- 
lege. Ordinarily there is no field placement. 

EDEL 407 Social Studies in the Elementary School 

(3) Consideration given to curriculum, organization and 
methods of teaching, evaluation of newer materials 
and utilization of environmental resources. Designed 
for in-service teachers, Grades 1-6. Offered dunng 
summer session and in off-campus programs taught 
through University College. Ordinarily there is no field 
placement. 

EDEL 410 The Child and the Curriculum— Early 
Childhood (3) Relationship of the school curriculum. 
Nursery School through Grade 3, to child growth and 
development. Recent trends in curriculum organiza- 
tion; the effect of environment on learning; readiness 
to learn; and adapting curriculum content and methods 
to maturity levels of children. Designed for in-service 
teachers, Nursery School through Grade 3. Offered 
during summer sessions and in off-campus programs 
taught through University College. Ordinarily there is 
no field placement. 

EDEL 411 The Child and the Curriculum— Elemen- 
tary (3) Relationship of the school curriculum. Grades 
1-6, to child growth and development Recent trends 
in curriculum organization; the effect of environment 
on learning; readiness to learn; and adapting curricu- 
lum content and methods to matunty levels of children. 
Designed for in-service teachers. Grades 1-6 Offered 
during summer sessions and in off-campus programs 
taught through University College. Ordinarily there is 
no field placement. 

EDEL 412 Art in the Elementary School (3) Con- 
cerned with art methods and materials for elementary 
schools Includes laboratory experiences with maten- 
als appropriate for elementary schools. 

EDEL 413 Mathematics in Early Childhood Educa- 
tion (3) Prerequisite, MATH 210 or equivalent Empha- 



sis on materials and procedures which help pupils 
sense arithmetic meanings and relationships De- 
signed to help in-service teachers, nursery school 
through Grade 3. gain a better understanding of the 
number system and arithmetical processes Offered 
during summer sessions and in off-campus programs 
taught through University college Ordinarily there is no 
field placement. 

EDEL 414 Mathematics in the Elementary School 
(3) Prerequisite. MATH 210 or equivalent Emphasis 
on materials and procedures which help pupils sense 
arithmetic meanings and relationships Designed to 
help in-service teachers. Grades 1-6. gam a better 
understanding of the number system and arithmetical 
processes. Offered during summer sessions and in off- 
campus programs taught through University College. 
Ordinarily there is no field placement. 

EDEL 415 Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning 
Disabilities In Mathematics I (3) Prerequisite EDEL 
351 or equivalent and approval of instructor. Diagnosis 
and treatment of disabilities in mathematics Theoreti- 
cal models, specific diagnostic and instructional tech- 
niques and materials for working with children in both 
clinical and classroom settings. Practice using tech- 
niques by conducting case studies with children previ- 
ously diagnosed as primarily corrective rather than 
serverely disabled. Clinic hours to be arranged. 

416 The Mathematics Laboratory (3) Prerequisite 
EDEL 351 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor 
The definition, design, and uses of an elementary 
school mathematics laboratory Laboratory visitations 
The design of instructional activities and field-test 
activities with children. 

EDEL 417 Social Studies and Multiethnic Education 
(3) Prerequisites: A preservice social studies methods 
course or permission of the instructor. Seminars will be 
held relating to general social science principles that 
are applicable to multiethnic education as a compo- 
nent of social studies instruction Cultural experiences 
arranged on an independent basis for each participant 

EDEL 424 Literature for Children and Young Peo- 
ple, Advanced (3) Development of literary materials 
for children and young people. Timeless and ageless 
books, and outstanding examples of contemporary 
publishing. Evaluation of the contributions of individual 
authors and illustrators and children's book awards. 

EDEL 425 The Teaching of Reading— Early Child- 
hood (3) Concerned with the fundamentals of devel- 
opmental reading instruction, including reading readi- 
ness, use of expenence stories, procedures in using 
basal readers, the improvement of comprehension, 
teaching reading in all areas of the curriculum, uses of 
children's literature, the program in word analysis, and 
procedures for determining individual needs. Designed 
for in-service teachers, Nursery School through Grade 
3. Offered during summer sessions and in off-campus 
programs taught through University College Ordinan- 
ly. there is no field placement. 

EDEL 426 The Teaching of Reading — Elementary 

(3) Concerned with the fundamentals of developmen- 
tal reading instruction, including reading readiness, 
use of experience stories, procedures in using basal 
readers, the improvement of comprehension, teaching 
reading in all areas of the curriculum, uses of children's 
literature, the program in word analysis, and proce- 
dures for determining individual needs Designed tor 
in-service teachers, Grades 1-6 Offered dunng sum- 
mer sessions and in off-campus programs taught 
through University College. Ordinarily, there is no field 
placement. 

EDEL 430 Corrective-Remedial Reading Instruc- 
tion (3) Prerequisite: EDEL/EDSE 427 or equivalent, 
and consent of the department For teachers, super- 
visors, and administrators who wish to identify and 
assist pupils with reading difficulties Concerned with 
diagnostic techniques, instructional matenals and 
teaching procedures useful in the regular classroom. 

EDEL 431 Laboratory Practices in Reading (3) 
Prerequisite. EDEL 430 A laboratory course in which 
each student has one or more pupils for analysis and 
instruction At least one class meeting per week to 
diagnose mdivdual cases and to plan instruction 

EDEL 488 Special Topics in Elementary Education 
(1-3) Prerequisite, Consent ol instructor Special treat- 
ment of current topics and issues in Elementary Edu- 
cation Repeatable to maximum of 6 credits, provided 
content is different 

EDEL 489 Field Experience in Education (1-4) Pre- 
requisites. At least six semester hours in Education at 



80 Early Childhood-Elementary Education Program 



the University of Maryland plus such other prerequi- 
sites as may be set by the major area in which the 
experience is to be taken. Planned tield experience 
may be provided for selected students who have had 
teaching experience and whose application for such 
field experience has been approved by the Education 
faculty. Field experience is offered in a given area to 
both major and nonmaior students. Note — The total 
number of credits which a student may earn in EDEL 
489, 888, and 889 is limited to a maximum of 20 
semester hours. 

EDEL 498 Special Problems in Education (1-3) 
Prerequisite, Consent of instructor. Available only to 
mature students who have definite plans for individual 
study of approved problems. 
EDEL 499 Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes (1-6) 
The maximum number of credits that may be earned 
under this course symbol toward any degree is six 
semester hours; the symbol may be used two or more 
times until six semester hours have been reached. The 
following types of educational enterprise may be 
scheduled under this course heading: workshops con- 
ducted by the College of Education (or developed 
cooperatively with other colleges and universities) and 
not otherwise covered in the present course listing; 
clinical experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading 
clinics, speech therapy laboratories, and Special Edu- 
cation centers; institutes developed around specific 
topics or problems and intended for designated groups 
such as school superintendents, principals and super- 
visors. 

EDEL 500 Education of the Young Child (3) Prereq- 
uisites: A baccalaureate degree and consent of the 
department. An initial course for persons entering 
graduate study in Early Childhood Education, to pro- 
vide a foundation for further graduate study or a 
supplement to other areas. Intensive study of current 
education programs, teacher roles, and planning, staff- 
ing, and organizing for children's learning needs. Not 
appicable towards graduate degrees. 

EDEL 501 Materials and Practices in Early Child- 
hood Education (3) Prerequisites: A baccalaureate 
degree and consent of the department. An overview of 
practices and media available for innovative ap- 
proaches in Early Childhood programs, including diag- 
nostic and prescriptive techniques. Not applicable 
toward graduate degrees. 

EDEL 600 Seminar in Elementary Education (3) 
Primarily for individuals who wish to write seminar 
papers. Prerequisite, At least 12 hours of graduate 
work in education. 

EDEL 601 Problems in Teaching Science in Ele- 
mentary Schools (3) Prerequisite: EDEL 353 or 402 
or consent of the instructor. Analysis of the teaching of 
science to children through (1) the identification of 
problems to teaching science, (2) the investigation and 
study of research reports related to the identified 
problems, and (3) the hypothesizing of methods for 
improving the effectiveness of science education for 
children. 

EDEL 605 Problems of Teaching Language Arts in 
Elementary Schools (3) Prerequisite: EDEL 404 or 
approval of instructor. This course is designed to allow 
each student an opportunity (1) to analyze current 
issues, trends, and problems in language-arts instruc- 
tion in terms of research in fundamental educational 
theory and the language arts, and (2) to use this 
analysis in effecting changes in methods and materials 
for classroom instruction. 

EDEL 607 Problems of Teaching Social Studies in 
Elementary Schools (3) Prerequisite. EDEL 406 or 
approval of instructor. An examination of current litera- 
ture and research reports in the social sciences and in 
social studies curriculum design and instruction, with 
an emphasis on federally-sponsored projects as well 
as programs designed for urban children. 

EDEL 613 Theoretical and Research Foundations 
of Elementary School Mathematics (3) Prerequisite: 
EDEL 351 or equivalent, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. Theoretical and research literature interrelating 
mathematics education with psychology, sociology, 
philosophy, and history. Evaluation of the influence of 
this literature on research, teacher preparation, and 
mathematics instruction in schools. 

EDEL 614 Elementary School Mathematics Cur- 
ricula (3) Prerequisite. EDEL 314 or equivalent and 
approval of instructor. Critical evaluation of past and 
present curricular projects, experimental programs, 
and instructional materials. Design and implementa- 
tion of elementary school mathematics curricula. 



EDEL 615 Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning 
Disabilities in Mathematics II (3) Prerequisite. EDEL 
41 5 or equivalent and approval of instructor. Diagnosis 
and treatment of severe learning disabilities in elemen- 
tary school mathematics. Theoretical models, relevent 
research and specific techniques appropriate for ac- 
cessing the interaction of subject matter, organismic, 
and instructional variables will be developed. Clinic 
hours for case study work to be arranged. 
EDEL 618 Practium in Diagnoses and Treatment of 
Learning Disabilities in Mathematics (3) Prerequi- 
site: EDEL 615 or equivalent and approval of instruc- 
tor. Supervised clinical research studies with children 
experiencing learning difficulties in Mathematics. Ex- 
tension of diagnostic treatment and reporting proce- 
dures developed in EDEL 41 5 and 61 5. Course may be 
repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. 

EDEL 620 Teaching Children's Literature in the 
Elementary Classroom (3) Issues and trends in child- 
ren's literature with emphasis on implications in class- 
room settings. Contemporary social conditions and 
problems, trends in publishing, advertising, censor- 
ship, media adaptation, and reading habits. 

EDEL 624 Reading Diagnostic Assessment and 
Prescription (3) Prerequisites: 12 credits of graduate 
study in Education, or consent of instructor. Survey 
course in reading diagnosis and prescription for gradu- 
ate students not majoring in Reading. The interpreta- 
tion of reading diagnostic techniques with an overview 
of various prescriptions based on diagnosis. 
EDEL 626 Problems in the Teaching of Reading in 
the Elementary School (3) Implications of current 
theory and the results of research for the teaching of 
reading in the elementary school. Attention is given to 
all areas of developmental reading instruction, with 
special emphasis on persistent problems. 

EDEL 627 Clinical Assessment in Reading (3) Pre- 
requisites: EDEL 430. EDEL 626, EDMS 446 and 
EDMS 622. Clinical diagnostic techniques and materi- 
als useful to the reading specialist in assessing serious 
reading difficulties. 

EDEL 630 Clinical Remediation of Reading Disabili- 
ties (3) Prerequisites: EDEL 430, EDEL 626. EDMS 
446 and 622. Remedial procedures and materials 
useful to the reading specialist in planning programs of 
individual and small group instruction. 
EDEL 631 Advanced Laboratory Practices Diagno- 
sis (3) Prerequisite: EDEL 630. Diagnostic work with 
children in clinic and school situations. Administration, 
scoring, interpretation, and prescription via diagnostic 
instruments is stressed. Case report writing and con- 
ferences are also stressed. EDEL 631 is taken with 
EDEL 632. 

EDEL 632 Advanced Laboratory Practices (In- 
struction) (3) Prerequisite, EDEL 630 Remedial in- 
struction with children in clinic and school situations. 
Develop competency in various remedial techniques, 
diagnostic teaching and evaluation. Development of 
the reading resource role is stressed EDEL 632 is 
taken with EDEL 631. 

EDEL 636 Communications and the School Curric- 
ulum (3) Curriculum development based on communi- 
cation as the major vehicle for describing the learner's 
interactions with persons, knowledge, and materials in 
the classroom and school environment. 

EDEL 640 Curriculum for Early Childhood Educa- 
tion (3) Basic examination of curriculum theory, re- 
search and practice in educational settings for children 
birth to eight. Primarily for entering master's students 
or post-master's students who have not had a basic 
graduate curriculum course in early childhood educa- 
tion. 

EDEL 641 The Young Child in the Community (3) 
Analysis of the impact of major social and economic 
trends on young children through study and research 
of community agencies, commercial enterprises and 
social experiences. 

EDEL 642 Teaching Strategies in Early Childhood 
Education (3) An examination of theory and research 
concerning teacher-learner interaction. Analysis of 
planning, organization of learning environments, evalu- 
ation of learning, general classroom management, and 
inter-personal relationships. 

EDEL 643 Teacher-Parent Relationships (3) A study 
of the methods and materials, trends, and problems in 
establishing close home-school relationships. 

EDEL 644 Intellectual and Creative Experiences in 
Early Childhood Education (3) A critical examination 



of theories of intellectual and creative development, 
language development, problem solving and critical 
thinking. 

EDEL 650 Seminar in Early Childhood Education 

(3) A problem seminar in Early Childhood Education. 
Prerequisites: At least 12 hours of graduate work in 
Early Childhood Education. 

EDEL 651 Staffing in Early Childhood Programs (3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral programs in early 
childhool education or educational administration; ad- 
minstrative experience or consent of instructor. 

EDEL 652 Education and Group Care of the Infant 
and Young Child (3) Prerequisite: EDMS 446 or 
consent of the instructor. The historical, theoretical 
and empirical basis for the group care and education 
of young children with special emphasis on the child 
under the age of three. 

EDEL 653 Curriculum Innovations in Early Child- 
hood-Elementary Science Education (3) Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. A study of the most recently 
developed curricula in Early Childhood-Elementary 
Science Education including the psychological basis of 
each science curriculum; analysis of the components 
of each curriculum; and interaction with early child- 
hood-elementary school children using selected activi- 
ties from science curricula. 

EDEL 701 Seminar in Research and Development 
of Science Education for Children (3) Prerequisites: 
EDEL 601 and EDEL 653; or consent of instructor. The 
development of science education for children; the 
study, description and interpretation of science educa- 
tion research reports; the identification and critical 
analysis of one specific topic in Early Childhood- 
Elementary Science Education; and the development 
of a research proposal for an investigation designed to 
furr the the student's knowledge of the selected topic 
in Early Childhood-Elementary Science Education. 

EDEL 707 Elementary School Social Studies Re- 
search (3) Prerequisites: EDEL 607, EDMS 446, and 
12 graduate hours in the Social Sciences. The in- 
dentification of a significant problem in Elementary 
School Social Studies, the design and execution of a 
research study to resolve the problem. Intended for 
advanced graduate students whose concentration is in 
Elementary School Social Studies. 

EDEL 719 Research Seminar in Teaching and 
Learning of Elementary School Mathematics (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 645 and EDEL 613, or consent of 
instructor. Critical evaluation of past and current re- 
search, formulation of researchab[e questions, design 
and conduct of research in the teaching and learning 
of elementary school mathematics. Course may be 
repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. 

EDEL 726 Research Design in Early Childhood 
Education (3) Prerequisites: EDMS 646 or equivalent. 
Provides opportunity for designing and conducting 
research with children from birth to eight years of age 
based on reviews, evaluations and discussions of 
significant and relevant early childhood research litera- 
ture. 

EDEL 729 Theory and Research Seminar in Read- 
ing (3) Prerequisite-Consent of instructor. Survey of 
the literature in reading and allied fields, an examina- 
tion of current research directions and methodologies. 
Implications for classroom practice. Repeatable to a 
maximum of six credits. 

EDEL 788 Special Topics In Elementary Education 
(1-3) Prerequisite. Consent of instructor. Special and 
intensive treatment of current topics and issues in 
Elementary Education. Repeatable to maximum of 6 
credits. 

EDEL 798 Special Problems in Education (1-6) 
Master's AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to 
pursue special research problems under the direction 
of their advisers may register for credit under this 
number. Course card must have the title of the prob- 
lem and the name of the faculty member under whom 
the work will be done. 

EDEL 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) Registra- 
tion required to the extent of six hours for master's 
thesis. 

EDEL 888 Apprenticeship in Education (1-8) Ap- 
prenticeships in the major area of study are available 
to selected students whose application for an ap- 
prenticeship has been approved by the Education 
faculty. Each apprentice is assigned to work for at 
least a semester full-time or the equivalent with an 
appropriate staff member of a cooperating school, 



Economics Program 81 



school system, or educational institution or agency. 
The sponsor ot the apprentice maintains a close 
working relationship with the apprentice and the other 
persons involved. Prerequisites, Teaching experience, 
a Master's degree in Education, and at least six 
semester hours in Education at the University of Mary- 
land. Note: The total number ol credits which a student 
may earn in EDEL 489. 888 and 889 is limited to a 
maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 
EDEL 889 Internship In Education (3-8) Internships 
in the major area of study are available to selected 
students who have teaching experience. The following 
groups of students are eligible: (a) Any student who 
has been advanced to candidacy for the doctor's 
degree; and (b) Any student who receives special 
approval by the Education faculty for an internship, 
provided that prior to taking an internship, such stu- 
dent shall have completed at least 60 semester hours 
of graduate work, including at least six semester hours 
in Education at the University of Maryland. Each intern 
is assigned to work on a full-time basis for at least a 
semester with an appropriate staff member in a 
cooperating school, school system, or educational 
institution or agency. The internship must be taken in a 
school situation different from the one where the 
student is regularly employed. The intern's sponsor 
maintains a close working relationship with the intern 
and the other persons involved. 

Note: The total number of credits which a student 
may earn in EDEL 489, 888, and 889 Is limited to a 
maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDEL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

Registration required to the extent of 6-9 hours for an 
ED.D. project and 12-18 hours for a Ph.D. dissertation. 



Economics Program 

Professor and Chairman: 
Professors: Almon, Bailey, Bergmann 
Brechling, Clague, Cumberland, Dillard, 
Gruchy, Harris, Kelejian, Marris, McGuire, 
Mueller, Oates, O'Connell, Olson, Schultze, 
Straszheim, Ulmer, Wonnacott 
Associate Professors: Adams, Bennett, 
Betancourt, Johnson, Knight, Meyer, 
Weinstein. 

Assistant Professors: Boner, Brown, Dunson, 
Lachler, Mans, Murrell, Panagariya, Pelcovits, 
Snower, Swartz, Vavrichek 

Programs are ottered leading to the Master of 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Areas 
of specialization include: economic theory, ad- 
vanced economic theory, comparative econom- 
ic systems and planning, econometrics, eco- 
nomic development, economic history, environ- 
mental and natural resource economics, history 
of economic thought, industrial organization, 
institutional economics, international econom- 
ics, labor economics, monetary economics, 
public finance, regional and urban economics, 
and social policy. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Applicants should have taken (or should plan to 
take immediately) at least one advanced un- 
dergraduate course in each of microeconomics, 
macroeconomics, statistics, and calculus. In 
addition, the Aptitude Test section of the Gradu- 
ate Record Examination is required, and the 
Advanced Economics Test is strongly recom- 
mended. Letters of recommendation from three 
persons competent to judge the probability of 
the applicant's success in graduate school 
should be sent directly to the Director of Gradu- 
ate Studies in Economics. Part-time graduate 
study is difficult, since few courses are taught at 
night. 

The Master of Arts degree in Economics 
may be taken under either (1) the thesis option 
(24 hours plus a thesis) or (2) the non-thesis 
option (30 hours, including Economics 621- 
622, plus a written examination in Economic 



Theory and a research paper). The require- 
ments for the non-thesis option for the MA. are 
met automatically in the course of the Ph.D. 
program in Economics. 

The main requirements of the Ph.D. pro- 
gram are (1) a written examination in economic 
theory, normally taken at the beginning of the 
second year of full-time graduate study; (2) 
written examinations in two approved optional 
fields; (3) a comprehensive oral examination 
covering economic theory and the two optional 
fields; (4) two courses (ECON 621-622) in 
Quantitative Methods in Economics; (5) two 
courses (ECON 606, 607) in the History of 
Economic Thought; or one in Thought and one 
in Economic History (ECON 611 or 613); (6) 
foreign language competency or one of several 
options; (7) a research paper available to the 
faculty at the time of the oral comprehensive 
examination; (8) a dissertation and its success- 
ful oral defense. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The graduate program in Economics is a com- 
prehensive one. The department possesses 
special strength in the Economics of the Public 
Sector and Public Choice. The department has 
general strengths in social policy, poverty, natu- 
ral resources and the environment, in interna- 
tional economics and economic development, 
and other applied areas. Special research pro- 
jects under the supervision of faculty members 
are carried on in the Economics of Environmen- 
tal Management, Inter-industry Forecasting, 
and other fields. 

Financial Assistance 

Research assistantships are available in special 
projects. Numerous teaching assistantships are 
also available. The department can usually help 
graduate students find half-time employment in 
Federal agencies engaged in economic re- 
search. There are a limited number of fellow- 
ships available, including several for members 
of groups presently underrepresented among 
economists. 

Additional Information 

A complete description of the requirements of 
the degrees in economics and the admission 
process is available on request from: Director of 
Graduate Studies in Economics, Department of 
Economics, University of Maryland. 

Courses 

ECON 401 National Income Analysis (3) Prerequi- 
site: ECON 201, 203. Required for economics majors. 
Analysis of the determination of national income, em- 
ployment, and price levels. Discussion of consump- 
tion, investment, inflation, and government fiscal and 
monetary policy. 

ECON 402 Business Cycles (3) First semester Pre- 
requisite: ECON 430 A study of the causes of depres- 
sions and unemployment, cyclical and secular instabili- 
ty, theories of business cycles, and the problem of 
controlling economic instability. 

ECON 403 Intermediate Price Theory (3) Prerequi- 
site: ECON 201, 203. Required for economics maprs. 
An analysis of the theories of consumer behavior and 
of the firm, and of general price and distribution theory, 
with applications to current economic issues. 

ECON 407 Contemporary Economic Thought (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 201. 203. and senior standing. 
Graduate students should take ECON 705 A survey of 
the development of economic thought since 1900 with 
special reference to Thorstein Veblin and other pre- 
1939 institutionalists and to post- 1945 neo-institu- 
tionalists such as J.K Galbraith and Gunnar Myrdal 

ECON 415 Introduction to Economic Development 
of Underdeveloped Areas (3) Prerequisite: ECON 
201 and 203; or 205. An analysis of the economic and 
social characteristics of underdeveloped areas Re- 



cent theories of economic development, obstacles to 
development, policies and planning tor development 

ECON 418 Economic Development of Selected 
Areas (3) A— Latin America B— Asia C — Africa Pre- 
requisite: ECON 415 Institutional characteristics of a 
specific area are discussed and alternate strategies 
and policies for development are analyzed. 

ECON 421 Economic Statistics (3) Prerequisite 
MATH 110 or equivalent. Not open to students who 
have taken BSAD 230 or BSAD 231 An introduction to 
the use of statistics in economics Topics include: 
probability, random variables and their distributions, 
sampling theory, estimation, hypothesis testing, analy- 
sis of variance, regression analysis, correlation 

ECON 422 Quantitative Methods in Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 201. 203. and 421 (or BSAD 
230); or permission of instructor. Emphasizes the 
interaction between the economic problems posed by 
economists and the assumptions employed in statisti- 
cal theory. Deals with the formulation, estimation and 
testing of economic models Topics include single 
variable and multiple variable regression techniques, 
theory of identification, autocorrelation and simultane- 
ous equations. Independent work relating the material 
in the course to an economic problem chosen by the 
student is required. 

ECON 425 Mathematical Economics (3) Prerequi- 
sites: ECON 401 and 403 and one year of college 
mathematics. A course designed to enable economics 
majors to understand the simpler aspects of mathe- 
matical economics. Those parts of the calculus and 
algebra required for economic analysis will be pre- 
sented. 

ECON 430 Money and Banking (3) Prerequisite 
ECON 201, 203. Relation of money and credit to 
economic activity and prices; impact of public policy in 
financial markets and for goods and services; policies, 
structure, and functions of the federal reserve system; 
organization, operation, and functions of the commer- 
cial banking system, as related particularly to ques- 
tions of economic stability and public policy 

ECON 431 Theory of Money, Prices and Economic 
Activity (3) Prerequisite: ECON 430 A theoretical 
treatment of the influence of money and financial 
markets on economic activity and prices, and of the 
effects of monetary policy on the markets for goods 
and services; the role of money in the classical and 
Keynesian macro-systems; topics of theoretical inter- 
est in monetary policy formation and implementation 

ECON 440 International Economics (3) Prerequisite: 
ECON 201 , 203. A descriptive and theoretical analysis 
of international trade, balance of payments accounts, 
the mechanism of international economic adjustment, 
comparative costs, economics of customs unions. 

ECON 441 International Economic Policies (3) Pre- 
requisites: ECON 401, 403, and 440. Contemporary 
balance of payments problems; the international liquid- 
ity controversy investment, trade and economic devel- 
opment; evaluation of arguments for protection. 
ECON 450 Introduction to Public Finance (3) Pre- 
requisite: ECON 201. 203; or ECON 205 The role of 
federal, state, and local governments in meeting public 
wants. Analysis of tax theory and policy, expenditure 
theory, government budgeting, benefit-cost analysis, 
and income redistribution. 

ECON 451 Public Choice and Public Policy (3) 
Prerequisite: ECON 201. 203. or 205 Analysis of 
collective decision making, economic models of gov- 
ernment, program budgeting, and policy implementa- 
tion; emphasis on models of public choice and institu- 
tions which affect decision making. 
ECON 454 State and Local Public Finance (3) Pre- 
requisite: ECON 201 and 203; or 205 Principles and 
problems of governmental finance with special refer- 
ence to state and local jurisdictions. Topics to be 
covered include taxation, expenditures and inter- 
governmental fiscal relations 

ECON 460 Industrial Organization (3) Prerequisite: 
ECON 201 and 203; or 205 Changing structure of the 
American economy, price policies in different industnal 
classifications of monopoly and competition in relation 
to problems of public policy 

ECON 471 Current Problems In Labor Economics 
(3) Prerequisite ECON 470 For students who wish to 
pursue, in depth, selected topics in the labor field 
Issues and topics selected for detailed examination 
may include: manpower training and development, 
unemployment compensation and social secunty, race 



82 Economics Program 



and sex discrimination in employment, wage theory, 
productivity analysis, the problems of collective bar- 
gaining in public employment, wage-price controls and 
incomes policy. 

ECON 482 Economics of the Soviet Union (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 203; or 205. An analysis 
of the organization, operating principles and perform- 
ance of the soviet economy with attention to the 
historical and ideological background, planning, re- 
sources, industry, agriculture, domestic and foreign 
trade, finance, labor, and the structure and growth of 
national income. 

ECON 484 The Economy of China (3) Prerequisite: 
ECON 201 and 203; or 205. Policies and performances 
of the Chinese economy since 1949. Will begin with a 
survey of modern China's economic history. Empha- 
sizes the strategies and institutional innovations that 
the Chinese have adopted to overcome the problems 
of economic development. Some economic controver- 
sies raised during the 'cultural revolution' will be cov- 
ered in review of the problems and prospects of the 
present Chinese economy. 

ECON 486 The Economics of National Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 203; or 205. An analysis 
of the principles and practice of economic planning 
with special reference to the planning problems of 
West European countries and the United States. 

ECON 490 Survey of Urban Economic Problems 
and Policies (3) Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 203; or 
205. An introduction to the study of urban economics 
through the examination of current policy issues. Top- 
ics may include suburbanization of jobs and re- 
sidences, housing and urban renewal, urban transpor- 
tation, development of new tcwns, ghetto economic 
development, problems in services such as education 
and police. 

ECON 491 Economics and Control of Urban 
Growth (3) Prerequisite: ECON 490. An analysis of 
metropolitan development processes, the conse- 
quences of alternative growth patterns, and the evalu- 
ation of policies to control growth. 

ECON 492 Economics of Location and Regional 
Growth (3) Prerequisite: ECON 403, or consent of 
instructor. Study of the theories, problems, and poli- 
cies of regional economic development and the loca- 
tion of economic activity for both rural and metropoli- 
tan regions. Methods of regional analysis. 

ECON 601 Macro-Economic Analysis (3) First se- 
mester of a two-semester sequence, 601 and 602. 
Topics normally include general equilibrium theory in 
classical, Keynesian. and post-Keynesian treatments; 
the demand for money; theories of consumption be- 
havior and of inflation. 

ECON 602 Economic Growth and Instability (3) 

Second semester. A continuation of ECON 601. Major 
topics include growth and technological change, in- 
vestment, business cycles, and large empirial macro- 
economic models. Also included are material on 
wages and employment and on international and do- 
mestic stability. 

ECON 603 Micro-Economic Analysis I (3) Prerequi- 
site: A calculus course or concurrent registration in 
ECON 621. The first semester of a two-semester 
sequence which analyzes the usefulness and short- 
comings of prices in solving the basic economic prob- 
lem of allocating scarce resources among alternative 
uses. The central problem of welfare economics and 
general equilibrium as a framework for a detailed 
analysis of consumption and production theories in- 
cluding linear programming with decisions under un- 
certainty. 

ECON 604 Micro-Economic Analysis II (3) Prerequi- 
site: ECON 603. A continuation of ECON 603. Theory 
of capital, interest and wages. Qualifications of the 
basic welfare theorem caused by noncompetitive mar- 
ket structures, external economies and diseconomies 
and secondary constraints. Application of price theory 
to public expenditure decisions, investment in human 
capital, international trade, and other areas of eco- 
nomics. 

ECON 605 Welfare Economics (3) First semester. 
Prerequisite: ECON 603. The topics covered include 
pareto optimality, social welfare funtions, indivisibili- 
ties, consumer surplus, output and price policy in 
public enterprise, and welfare aspects of the theory of 
public expenditures. 

ECON 606 History of Economic Thought (3) First 
semester. Prerequisite: ECON 403 or consent of the 
instructor. A study of the development of economic 



thought and theories including the Greeks, Romans, 
Canonists, Mercantilists, Physiocrats, Adam Smith, 
Malthus, Ricardo. Relation of ideas to economic poli- 
cy. 

ECON 607 Economic Theory in the Nineteenth 
Century (3) Second semester. Prerequisite: ECON 
606 or consent of the instructor. A study of nineteenth- 
century and twentieth-century schools of economic 
thought, particularly the Classicists, Neo-Classists, 
Austrians, German historical school, American eco- 
nomic thought, the Socialists, and Keynes. 

ECON 611 Seminar in American Economic Devel- 
opment (3) 

ECON 613 Origins and Development of Capitalism 

(3) Second semester. Studies the transition from feu- 
dalism to modern capitalistic economies in Western 
Europe. Whenever possible, this economic history is 
analyzed with the aid of tools of modern economics, 
and in the light of comparisons and contrasts with the 
less developed areas of the present day. 

ECON 615 Economic Development of Un- 
derdeveloped Areas (3) First semester. Prerequisite: 
ECON 401 and 403. An analysis of the forces contrib- 
uting to and retarding economic progress in un- 
derdeveloped areas. Macro and micro-economic as- 
pects of development planning and strategy are em- 
phasized. 

ECON 616 Seminar in Economic Development (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite: ECON 615 or consent 
of instructor. A continuation of ECON 615. Special 
emphasis is on the application of economic theory in 
the institutional setting of a country or area of particu- 
lar interest to the student. 

ECON 617 Money and Finance in Economic Devel- 
opment (3) First semester Economic theory, strategy 
and tactics for mobilizing real and financial resources 
to finance and accelerate economic development. 
Monetary, fiscal, and tax reform policy and practice by 
the government sector to design and implement na- 
tional development plans. 

ECON 621 Quantitative Economics I (3) First semes- 
ter. An introduction to the theory and practice of 
statistical inference. Elements of computer pro- 
gramming and a review of mathematics germane to 
this and other graduate economics courses are includ- 
ed. 

ECON 622 Quantitative Economics II (3) Second 
semester. Prerequisite: ECON 621. Techniques of 
estimating relationships among economic variables. 
Multiple regression, the analysis of variance and 
covariance. and techniques for dealing in time series. 
Further topics in mathematics. 

ECON 661 Advanced Industrial Organization (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite: ECON 401 and 403 or 
consent of instructor. Analysis of market structure and 
its relation to market performance. 

ECON 662 Industrial Organization and Public Poli- 
cy (3) Second semester. Prerequisite: ECON 661 or 
consent of instructor. Analysis of the problems of 
public policy in regard to the structure, conduct, and 
performance of industry. Examination of anti-trust poli- 
cy from the point of view of economic theory. 

ECON 671 Seminar in Labor Economics (3) First 
semester. Formal models of labor demand, supply, 
utilization and price formation. Factors affecting labor 
supply; the determination of factor shares in an open 
economy; bargaining models, labor resources, trade 
union theories as they affect resource allocation. 

ECON 672 Selected Topics in Labor Economics (3) 

Second semester. The wage-price issue; public policy 
with respect to unions, labor-management relations, 
and the labor market; institutional aspects of the 
American labor movement; manpower development 
and training. 

ECON 682 Seminar in Economic Development of 
the Soviet Union (3) Second semester. Prerequisite: 
ECON 482 or consent of instructor. Measurement and 
evaluation of soviet economic growth including inter- 
pretation and use of Soviet statistics, measurement of 
national income, fiscal policies, investment and tech- 
nological change, planning and economic administra- 
tion, manpower and wage policies, foreign trade and 
aid Selected topics in bloc development and reform. 

ECON 686 Economic Growth in Mature Economies 

(3) A comparative analysis of measures for achieving 
economic stability and progress in mature economies 
such as the major West European countries and the 
United States, including fiscal and monetary policies, 



tax incentives, manpower programs, redistributional 
efforts, planning procedures and nationalization. 

ECON 698 Selected Topics in Economics (3) 

ECON 703 Advanced Economic Theory I (3) Prereq- 
uisite: Background in calculus and matrix algebra such 
as provided by ECON 621 and 622. Optimization 
techniques such as Lagrangian multipliers and linear 
programming. Mathematical treatment of general equi- 
librium, including interindustry analysis, the theory of 
production, consumption, and welfare. 

ECON 704 Advanced Economic Theory II (3) Pre- 
requisite: ECON 703. Multi-sectoral growth models 
and questions of optimal growth. Last half of course 
consists of presentations of seminar papers. 

ECON 705 Seminar in Institutional Economic Theo- 
ry (3) Second semester. A study of the recent 
developments in the field of institutional economic 
theory in the United States and abroad. 

ECON 706 Seminar in Institutional Economic Theo- 
ry (3) 

ECON 721 Econometrics I (3) First semester Special 
topics in mathematical statistics necessary for under- 
standing econometric theory, with particular emphasis 
on multivariate analysis. The estimation of simultane- 
ous equation systems, problems involving errors in 
variables, distributed lags, and spectral analysis. 

ECON 722 Seminar in Quantitative Economics (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite: ECON 622 or consent 
of instructor. Analysis of data sources for economic 
research; critical evaluation of previous and current 
quantitative economic studies; and class discussion 
and criticism of student research projects. 

ECON 731 Monetary Theory and Policy (3) First 
semester. An adequate knowledge of micro and 
macro-economics is assumed. Theory of money, fi- 
nancial assets, and economic activity; review of classi- 
cal, neo-classical and Keynesian contribution; empha- 
sis on post-Keynesian contributions, including those of 
Tobin, Patinkin, Gurley-Shaw, Friedman, and others. 

ECON 732 Seminar in Monetary Theory and Policy 

(3) Second semester. Prerequisite: ECON 731 or con- 
sent of instructor. Theory of the mechanisms through 
which central banking affects economic activity and 
prices; formation and implementation of of monetary 
policy; theoretical topics in monetary policy. 

ECON 741 Advanced International Economics I (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 601. The international mechanism 
of adjustment: price, exchange rate, and income 
changes. The flexible exchange rate system, interna- 
tional monetary reform and international investment 
and capital flows. 

ECON 742 Advanced International Economics II (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 603 and ECON 741. The pure 
theory of international trade. Comparative costs, the 
Heckscher-Ohlin Theorem, and the effect of trade on 
factor prices. Tariff analysis, commercial policy and 
customs unions. The gains from trade and ranking of 
policy interventions. 

ECON 751 Advanced Theory of Public Finance (3) 

Review of utility analysis to include the theory of 
individual consumer resource allocation and exchange 
and welfare implications. Effects of alternative tax and 
subsidy techniques upon allocation, exchange, and 
welfare outcomes. Theories of public goods, their 
production, exchange and consumption. Principles of 
benefit-cost analysis for government decisions. 

ECON 752 Seminar in Public Finance (3) Second 
semester. Theory of taxation and tax policy, with 
particular emphasis on income taxation; empirical stu- 
dies; the burden of the public debt. Research paper by 
each student to be presented to seminar. 

ECON 775 Poverty and the Labor Market (3) Prereq- 
uisite: ECON 603 and 622, or consent of instructor. 
Theories of income distribution and factor shares; 
human capital theory, empirical applications, and criti- 
cisms; theories and measurement of discrimination; 
the operation of labor markets, trade unions, and 
minimum wage laws; economic fluctuations and in- 
come distribution. 

ECON 776 Policies Affecting Income Distribution 

(3) Prerequisite: ECON 603 and 622, or consent of 
instructor. Ethics of distribution; measures of income, 
income distribution, and poverty; incidence of taxation 
and public expenditures; the design of distributional 
policies, in-kind versus cash assisstance; particular 
policy areas, education finance, housing assisstance. 
medical care, child care, cash transfer programs. 



Electrical Engineering Program 83 



ECON 781 Advanced Environmental Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 603 and 621. or consent of 
instructor Theory of externalities, microeconomic mo- 
dels of pollution damage functions, benefits and costs 
of alternative pollution control measures, macroeco- 
nomic models of material and energy balance, limits to 
economic growth and long-run problems of inter- 
generational and interregional efficiency and equity. 

ECON 785 Advanced Economics of Natural Re- 
sources (3) Prerequisites: ECON 603 and 621, or 
consent of instructor. The rate of use of renewable and 
non-renewable resources from the normative and pos- 
itive points of view, evaluation of alternative uses of 
natural environments; irreversibilities, discounting and 
intergenerational transfers. Discussion of natural re- 
source problems and policies. 

ECON 790 Advanced Urban Economics (3) Market 
processes and public policies as related to urban 
problems and metropolitan change. Employment, 
housing, discrimination, transportation and the local 
public sector. 

ECON 792 Regional and Urban Economics (3) The- 
oretical and empirical analysis of the location and 
spatial distribution of economic activity. Analysis of 
regional growth and development. The study of analyt- 
ical methods and forecasting models. 

ECON 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-«) 

ECON 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Electrical Engineering 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Harger 
Professors: Chu\ Davisson, DeClaris, Hochuli, 
Lee, Ligomenides, Lin Newcomb, Ott 2 , 
Reiser 2 , Taylor. White (part-time) 
Associate Professors: Baras, Basham, 
Blankenship, Davis, Destler, Emad, 
Ephremides, Levine, Pugsley, Rhee, Silio, 
Simons, Stnffler, Tretter, Wang, Zajac, Zaki 
Assistant Professors: Krishnaprasad 

'joint appointment with Computer Science 
2 joint appointment with Physics 

The Electrical Engineering Department offers 
graduate programs leading to the M.S. and 
Ph.D. degrees. A diverse offering of courses, as 
well as seminars, colloquium series, and thesis 
guidance, encompasses a broad spectrum of 
topics. Specialization is possible in bioelectncal 
engineering (neurophysiology systems, net- 
works, and signals), circuits (network analysis 
and synthesis, microwave and integrated cir- 
cuits, computer-aided design), communications 
(random processes; detection, estimation and 
coding, information theories; digital signal pro- 
cessing, optical communications, communica- 
tion networks, remote sensing systems), com- 
puters (computer architecture and design, 
operating and software systems), control (com- 
puter-aided design, nonlinear, sampled data, 
and distributed parameter systems, system op- 
timization, optimal and stochastic control), and 
electrophysics (electromagnetic theory, 
charged-particle dynamics, quantum electron- 
ics, microwave, antenna, and optical engineer- 
ing), lasers, nonlinear optics, and spectroscopy 
Joint programs are maintained with the mathe- 
matics, physics, and computer science depart- 
ments and the material science and transporta- 
tion programs. Opportunities for programs of 
study in conjunction with many national labora- 
tories and technical facilities also exist. The 
department has active theoretical research pro- 
jects in optical communication, communication 
networks, coding theory, traffic control, remote 
sensing, solar energy conversion devices, and 
many other areas. 



Admission and Degree 
Information 

Present minimum requirement for admission to 
the Graduate School as an Electrical Engineer- 
ing student is graduation from an ECPD ac- 
credited undergraduate program in Electrical 
Engineering with an average no lower than B, or 
similar undergraduate preparation in mathemat- 
ics, computer science, physics, or other areas 
of engineering or science. 

Requirements for the master's thesis and 
nonthesis options are those of the Graduate 
School. All requirements must be completed 
within 5 years. 

Requirements for the Ph.D. degree include 
a minimum of 42 semester hours of graduate 
approved courses; the Ph.D. qualifying exami- 
nation; and completion of all dissertation and 
oral examination requirements. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

There are modern research and project labora- 
tories within the department which support a 
wide variety of research programs. These labo- 
ratories include a laser and electromagnetics 
laboratory; a microprocessor development lab- 
oratory; a gas laser laboratory (He, Ne, and 
C02 laser stability and lifetime and applica- 
tions); a solid state laser laboratory (nonlinear 
optics); an integrated circuits laboratory (a full- 
line facility capable of producing monolithic, 
thin-film, and MOS structures); a microwave 
circuits laboratory; and an electron-ring acceler- 
ator laboratory (ion beam acceleration studies). 
The department has a computational facility 
with conversational and remote-batch terminals 
linked to the University's UNIVAC 1108 digital 
computers, as well as PDP-9 and PDP-1 1 digi- 
tal computers, and AD-5 analog computer, 
microcomputers and minicomputers, and as- 
sociated peripherals. A complete engineering 
library is housed nearby in conjunction with the 
mathematics and physical science collections. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial aid is available to graduate students in 
the form of Graduate Research Assistantships, 
Graduate Teaching Assistantships and Fellow- 
ships. Applications for Graduate Research and 
Teaching Assistantships should be completed 
and sent to the Electrical Engineering Office of 
Graduate Studies. 

Graduate Research Assistantships are 
awarded subject to availability of funds and are 
renewed subject to satisfactory research prog- 
ress. Summer appointments are often available. 

Graduate Teaching Assistantships are usu- 
ally awarded in April. Preference is given to 
United States citizens. Duties may include labo- 
ratory teaching assignments, assistance in the 
computation facility, or assistance in courses. 
Teaching Assistants must register for at least 
nine credit hours per semester. 

Local industries and government agencies 
have work-study programs in which about half 
of the Electrical Engineering graduate student 
body participates. Application should be made 
directly to the agencies. 

Additional Information 

Special brochures or publications offered by the 
Department may be obtained by writing to this 
address: 

Electrical Engineering Office of 

Graduate Studies 

University of Maryland 

Courses 

ENEE 400 Computer Aided Circuit Analysis (3) 
Prerequisite: ENEE 314. Computer aided analysis of 



electronic devices and components. Network topolo- 
gy, computer formulation of Kirchhoff laws. Nodal 
analysis of linear and non-linear networks, computer 
formulation of the state equations, time domain and 
frequency domain solution, sensitivity calculations. 

ENEE 402 Advanced Pulse Techniques (3) (See 
ENEE 403 for optional related laboratory course) 
Prerequisite. ENEE 314 or 410 or equivalent Bistable, 
monostable, and astable circuits, sweep circuits, syn- 
chronization, counting, gates, comparators Magnetic 
core circuits, semi-conductor and vacuum-tube cir- 
cuits. 

ENEE 407 Microwave-Circuits Laboratory (2) Pre- 
requisite, Senior standing in electrical engineering or 
consent of instructor. One lecture and three lab hours 
per week. Experiments concerned with circuits con- 
structed from microwave components providing practi- 
cal experience in the design, construction and testing 
of such circuits. Projects include microwave filters and 
S-parameter design with applications of current tech- 
nology. 

ENEE 410 Electronic Circuits (3) Prerequisite ENEE 
300 or equivalent knowledge of circuit theory or con- 
sent of the instructor This course is intended for 
students in the physical sciences, and for engineering 
students requiring additional study of electron circuits 
Credit not normally given for this course in an electrical 
engineering mapr program. (ENEE 413 may optionally 
be taken as an associated laboratory). P-N junctions, 
transistors, vacuum tubes, biasing and operating point 
stability, switches, large-signal analysis, models, small- 
signal analysis, frequency response, feedback and 
multistage amplifiers, pulse and digital circuits. 

ENEE 412 Telemetry Systems (3) Prerequisite 
ENEE 314. Selected digital circuits; frequency division 
multiplexing; FM/AM systems, SSB/FM systems; time 
division multiplexed systems; pulse amplitude modula- 
tion; pulse duration modulation: pulse code modula- 
tion: analog to digital converters: multiplexers and CC- 
commutators. 

ENEE 413 Electronics Laboratory (2) Corequisite: 
ENEE 314. One lecture and three lab hours per week. 
Provides experience in the specification, design, and 
testing of basic electronic circuits and practical inter- 
connections. Emphasis on design with discrete solid 
state and integrated circuit components for both ana- 
log and pulse circuits. 

ENEE 414 Network Analysis (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 
304 Network properties: linearity, reciprocity, etc.; 2- 
port descriptions and generalization: Y. S, hybird matri- 
ces; description properties: symmetry, para-unity, etc.; 
basic topological analysis; state-space techniques; 
computer-aided analysis; sensitivity analysis, approxi- 
mation theory. 

ENEE 416 Network Synthesis (3) Prerequisite — 
ENEE 304. Active and passive components, passivity, 
bounded and positive real, re properties and synthesis. 
Brune and Darlington synthesis, transfer-voltage and 
Y21 synthesis, active feedback configurations, image 
parameter design, computer-aided optimization syn- 
thesis via the embedding concept 

ENEE 418 Projects in Electrical Engineering (1-3) 

Hours to be arranged Prerequisites Senior standing 
and permission of the instructor May be taken for 
repeated credit up to a total of 4 credits, with the 
permission of the student's advisor and the instructor. 
Theoretical and experimental projects 

ENEE 419 Apprenticeship in Electrical Engineering 
(2-3) Hours to be arranged Prerequisite Completion of 
sophomore courses and permission of an apprentice- 
ship director May be taken for repeated credit up to a 
total of nine credits A unique opportunity for experi- 
ence in experimental research and engmeenng de- 
sign A few highly qualified students will be selected as 
apprentices in one of the research facilities of the 
electrical engmeenng department and will participate 
in the current research under the supervision of the 
laboratory director In the past, apprenticeships have 
been available in the following laboratories: biomedi- 
cal, electron nng accelerator, gas laser, integrated 
circuits, simulation and computer, and solid state laser 

ENEE 420 Communication Systems (3) Prerequisite 
ENEE 324. Fourier series. Founer transforms and 
linear system analysis, random signals, autocorrelation 
functions and power spectral densities, analog com- 
munication systems: amplitude modulation, smgle- 
sideband modulation, frequency and phase modula- 
tion, sampling theorem and pulse-amplitude modula- 
tion; digital communication systems pulse-code modu- 
lation, phase-shift keying, differential phase shift key- 



84 Electrical Engineering Program 



ing, frequency shift keying; performance of analog and 
digital communication systems in the presence of 
noise. 

ENEE 421 Information Theory and Coding (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENEE 324. Definition of information and 
entropy: memoryless and Markov sources; source 
coding; Kraft and MacMillan inequalities; Shannon's 
First Theorem; Hoffman Codes; channels, mutual in- 
formation, and capacity; Shannon's noisy channel 
coding theorem; error correcting codes. 

ENEE 425 Digital Signal Processing (3) Prerequisite: 
ENEE 322. Sampling as a modulation process; alias- 
ing; the sampling theorem; the Z-transform and dis- 
crete-time system analysis; direct and computer-aided 
design of recursive and nonrecursive digital filters; the 
discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and fast Fourier 
transform (FFT); digital filtering using the FFT; analog- 
to-digital and digital-to analog conversion; effects of 
quantization and finite-word-length arithmetic. 

ENEE 432 Electronics for Life Scientists (4) Three 
hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: College algebra and a physics course, 
including basic electricity and magnetism. Not accept- 
ed for credit in an Electrical Engineering major pro- 
gram. The concept of an instrumentation system with 
emphasis upon requirements for transducers, am- 
plifiers, and recording devices, design criteria and 
circuitry of power supplies amplifiers, and pulse equip- 
ment, specific instruments used for biological re- 
search, problems of shielding against hum and noise 
pickup and other interference problems characteristic 
of biological systems. 

ENEE 433 Electronic Instrumentation for Physical 
Science (3) Two hours of lecture and two hours of 
laboratory per week. Prerequisites: ENEE 300 or 306, 
PHYS 271 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. The 
concept of instrumentation systems from sensor to 
readout; discussions of transducers, system dynamics, 
precision and accuracy; measurement of electrical 
parameters; direct, differential, and potentiometric 
measurements; bridge measurements, time and fre- 
quency measurements, waveform generation and dis- 
play. 

ENEE 434 Introduction to Neural Networks and 
Signals (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 204 or 300. Introduc- 
tion in the generation and processing of bioelectric 
signals including structure and function of the neuron, 
membrane theory, generation and propagation of 
nerve impulses, synaptic mechanisms, transduction 
and neural coding of sensory events, central nervous 
system processing of sensory information and corre- 
lated electrical signals, control of effector organs, 
muscle contraction and mechanics, and models of 
neurons and neural networks. 

ENEE 435 Electrodes and Electrical Processes in 
Biology and Medicine (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 204 or 
300. Techniques for recording biological signals such 
as brain, muscle and cardial electrical potentials; 
membrane theory; half-cell potentials, liquid junction 
potentials, polarization of electrodes; biological and 
medical instrumentation; and applications in the de- 
sign of cardial pacemakers, or a similar case study. 

ENEE 438 Topics in Biomedical Engineering (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. May be 
taken for repeated credit. The content may vary from 
semester to semester Selected topics of current inter- 
est from such areas as bioelectric systems, modeling 
instrumentation, automated diagnostic, health-care 
delivery, etc. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 hours. 

ENEE 442 Software Engineering (3) Prerequisites: 
ENES 240; ENEE 250 or equivalent. Architectural 
aspects of software engineering. Machine language 
and machine structure; assembly language and as- 
semblers; macro-language and macro-processors; 
loaders and linkers; programming languages and lan- 
guage structure; compilers and interpreters; operating 
systems. 

ENEE 444 Logic Design of Oigital Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: ENEE 250. Review of switching algebra; 
gates and logic modules; map simplification tech- 
niques; multiple-output systems; memory elements 
and sequential systems; large switching systems; 
iterative networks; sample designs, computer oriented 
simplification algorithms; state assignment; partition 
techniques; sequential system decompositions. 

ENEE 445 Computer Laboratory (2) Prerequisite: 
ENEE 444. One lecture and three lab hours per week. 
Hardware-oriented experiments providing practical ex- 
perience in the design, construction, and checkout of 
components and interfaces for digital computers and 



data transmission systems. Projects include classical 
design techniques and applications of current technol- 
ogy. 

ENEE 446 Digital Computer Design (3) Prerequisite: 
ENEE 250. Essential elements of the hardware design 
of digital computers Arithmetic and logic units, adders, 
multipliers, dividers, logic and shifting operations, float- 
ing point arithmetic. Memory organization, design of a 
basic computer: instruction set, bus structure, fetch- 
execute microoperations, hard-wired control unit, 
microprogrammed control unit, index registers, indirect 
addressing, interrupt operation, direct memory access. 
Organization of commercially available computers. No 
student will be allowed credit for both CMSC 410 and 
ENEE 446. 

ENEE 450 Discrete Structures (3) Prerequisite: 
ENES 240 or equivalent. Review of set algebra includ- 
ing relations, partial ordering and mappings. Algebraic 
structures including semigroups and groups. Graph 
theory including trees and weighted graphs. Boolean 
algebra and prospositional logic. Applications of these 
structures to various areas of Computer Engineering. 

ENEE 460 Control Systems (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 
322. Mathematical models for control system com- 
ponents. Transform and time domain methods for 
linear control systems. Introductory stability theory. 
Root locus, Bode diagrams and Nyquist plots. Design 
specifications in the time and frequency domains. 
Compensation design in the time and frequency do- 
main. Introduction to sampled data systems. Introduc- 
tion to computer aided design of control systems. 

ENEE 461 Control Systems Laboratory (2) Prerequi- 
site: ENEE 460. One lecture and three lab hours per 
week. Projects to enhance the student's understand- 
ing of feedback control systems and to familiarize him 
with the characteristics and limitations of real control 
devices. Students will design, build, and test ser- 
vomechanisms, and will conduct analog and hybrid 
computer simulations of control systems. 

ENEE 462 Systems, Control and Computation (3) 

Prerequisites: ENEE 300 or 304, and MATH 246 or 
consent of instructor. Matrix algebra, state space 
analysis of discrete systems, state space analysis of 
continuous systems, computer algorithms for circuit 
analysis, optimization and system simulation. 

ENEE 472 Transducers and Electrical Machinery 

(3) Prerequisite: ENEE 304. Electromechanical trans- 
ducers, theory of electromechanical systems, power 
and wideband transformers, rotating electrical machin- 
ery from the theoretical and performance points of 
view. 

ENEE 473 Transducers and Electrical Machinery 
Laboratory (1) Corequisite: ENEE 472. Experiments 
on transformers, synchronous machines, induction 
motors, synchros, loudspeakers, other transducers. 

ENEE 480 Fundamentals of Solid State Electronics 

(3) Prerequisite: ENEE 381. Review of Maxwell's 
Equation, electromagnetic properties of dielectrics; 
introduction to quantum mechanics and quantum sta- 
tistics; classical and quantum theory of metals; theory 
of semiconductors and semiconductor devices; princi- 
ple of magnetic devices and selected topics. 

ENEE 481 Antennas (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 381. 
Introduction to the concepts of radiation, generalized 
far field formulas; antenna theorems and fundamen- 
tals; antenna arrays, linear and planar arrays; aperture 
antennas; terminal impedance; propagation. 

ENEE 483 Electromagnetic Measurements Labora- 
tory (2) Prerequisites: ENEE 305 and ENEE 380. One 
lecture and three lab hours per week. Experiments 
designed to provide familiarity with a large class of 
micro-wave and optical components, techniques for 
interconnecting them into useful systems, and tech- 
niques of high frequenc" and optical measurements. 

ENEE 487 Particle Accelerators, Physical and Engi- 
neering Principles (3) Prerequisites: ENEE 380 and 
PHYS 420, or consent of the instructor. Sources of 
charged particles; methods of acceleration and focus- 
ing of ion beams in electromagnetic fields; basic 
theory, design, and engineering principles of particle 
accelerators. 

ENEE 488 Topics in Electrical Engineering (3) Pre- 
requisite: Permission of the instructor. May be taken 
for repeated credit up to a total of six credits, with the 
permission of the student's advisor and the instructor. 

ENEE 496 Lasers and Electro-Optic Devices (3) 

Pre-or corequisite: ENEE 381. Optical resonators, 
Fabry-Perot Etalon. Theory of laser oscillation, rate 



equations. Gaseous, solid state, semiconductor and 
dye laser systems. Electro-optic effects and paramet- 
ric oscillators. Holography. 

ENEE 601 Active Network Analysis (3) Prerequisite: 
ENEE 406 or equivalent. The complex frequency 
plane, conventional feedback and sensitivity, theo- 
rems for feedback circuits, stability and physical reada- 
bility of electrical networks, Nyquist's and Routh's 
criteria for stability, activity and passivity criteria. 

ENEE 604 Advanced Electronic Circuit Design (3) 

Prerequisite: ENEE 312 or consent of the instructor. 
Comparison of bipolar and field effect transistors, 
detailed frequency response of single and multistage 
amplifiers, design of feedback applifiers, D-C coupling 
techniques, design of multistage tuned amplifiers. 

ENEE 605 Graph Theory and Network Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: ENEE 600. Linear graph theory as ap- 
plied to electrical networks, cut sets and tie sets, 
incidence matrices, trees, branches, and mazes, de- 
velopment of network equations by matrix and index 
notation, network characteristic equations for natural 
circuit behavior, signal-flow-graph theory and Mason-S 
rule, stability of active two-part networks. 

ENEE 608 Graduate Seminar (1-3) Prerequisite: Con- 
sent of instructor. Every semester regular seminars are 
held in electrical science and in the six areas of 
specialization offered by the electrical engineering 
department. They may be taken, by arrangement with 
the student's advisor, for repeated credit. 

ENEE 609 Projects in Electrical Engineering (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Individual pro- 
jects on advanced systems in electrical engineering. 
May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of three 
credits. 

ENEE 610 Electrical Network Theory (3) Undergrad- 
uate circuit theory or consent of the instructor. Matrix 
algebra, network elements, ports, passivity and activi- 
ty, geometrical and analytical descriptions of networks, 
state variable characterizations, scattering matrices, 
signal flow graphs, sensitivity. 

ENEE 620 Random Processes in Communication 
and Control (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 324 or equivalent. 
Introduction to random processes: characterization, 
classification, representation; Gaussian and other ex- 
amples. Linear operations on random processes, sta- 
tionary processes: covanance function and spectral 
density. Linear least square waveform estimating Wie- 
ner-Kolmogroff filtering, Kalman-Bucy recursive filter- 
ing: function space characterization, non-linear opera- 
tions on random processes. 

ENEE 621 Estimation and Detection Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: ENEE 620 or equivalent or consent of 
instructor. Estimation of unknown parameters, Cra- 
mer-Rao lower bound; optimum (map) demodulation; 
filtering, amplitude and angle modulation, comparison 
with conventional systems; statistical decision theory 
Bayes, Minimax. Neyman/Pearson, Criteria-68 simple 
and composite hypotheses; application to coherent 
and incoherent signal detection; M-ary hypotheses; 
application to uncoded and coded digital communica- 
tion systems. (Listed also as MAPL 644.) 

ENEE 630 Advanced Topics — Radar Signals and 
Systems (3) Corequisite: ENEE 620. Review of linear 
systems and signals: Fourier transform representation 
time bandwidth product, resolution, complex represen- 
tation; maximum signal-to-noise ratio criterion receiver 
and signal design, radar range equation; statistical 
detection theory: probability of error performance; sta- 
tistical estimation theory: unknown parameters, range- 
Doppler radar, ambiguity problem, asymptotic maxi- 
mum likelihood estimation and Cramer-Rao lower 
bound; resolution of multiple objects. 

ENEE 633 Modeling of Nerves and Muscles with 
Applications to Prosthetic Devices (3) Prerequisite: 
Undergraduate degree in Engineering or Physics, or 
permission of the instructor. Principles and circuit 
models for resting and active membrane potentials of 
nerves and muscles; synaptic mechanisms including 
probabilistic models of neuromuscular transmission; 
electrode potentials and reactions; propagation of 
biopotentials in a volume conductor; properties, me- 
chanical models, and circuit analogs for muscles and 
proprioceptors; spinal reflexes in the control of pos- 
ture; applications of the above in the design of pros- 
thetic and orthotic devices. 

ENEE 634 Models of Transduction and Signal Pro- 
cessing in Sensory Systems (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 
633 or ENEE 435 or permission of the instructor. 
General organization of sensory systems, receptor 



El ectrical Engineering Program 85 



mechanisms; receptor and neural models; statistics ot 
neural spike trains, peripheral signal processing in 
sensory systems, with emphasis on vision and audi- 
tion; introduction to signal processing in the central 
nervous system; applications to development of sen- 
sory protheses. 

ENEE 642 Software System Implementation (3) 

Prerequisite: ENEE 442 or equivalent. Implementation 
aspects of software engineering. Programming lan- 
guages; architectural designs; program design; struc- 
tured programming; peripheral storage devices; I/O 
programming; debugging and evaluation. 

ENEE 646 Digital Computer Design (3) Prerequisite: 
ENEE 446. Introduction to design techniques for digital 
computers; digital arithmetic; logic circuits; digital 
memories; design of computer elements; arithmetic 
unit; and control unit. A simple digital computer will be 
designed. 

ENEE 648 Advanced Topics in Electrical Engineer- 
ing (3) Every semester courses intended for high 
degree of specialization are offered by visiting or 
regular electrical engineering faculty members in two 
or more of the areas listed in 488. The student should 
check with the electrical engineering office of graduate 
studies for a list and the description of the topics 
offered currently. 

ENEE 654 Combinatorial Switching Theory (3) Pre- 
requisites: ENEE 450 and ENEE 444 Application of 
algebraic techniques to combinatorial switching net- 
works; multi-valued systems, symmetries and their 
use; optimization algorithms; heuristic techniques; ma- 
jority and threshold logic; function decomposition; cel- 
lular cascades. 

ENEE 655 Structure Theory of Machines (3) Prereq- 
uisites: ENEE 450 and ENEE 444, Machine realiza- 
tions; partitions and the substitution property; pair 
algebras and applications; variable dependence; 
decomposition; loop-free structures; set system 
decompositions; semigroup realizations. 

ENEE 657 Simulation of Dynamic Systems (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENEE 443. Mechanistic methods for differ- 
ential equation solution; application of analog or hybrid 
computers and digital differential analyzers for that 
purpose; design and structure of languages for digital- 
analog simulation on a general purpose digital comput- 
er: mimic language and examples of its use. Class will 
run simulation programs on a larger-scale computer. 

ENEE 660 Modern Control System Design Method 

(3) Prerequisite: ENEE 663 and ENEE 620, or equiva- 
lent, or consent of the instructor. Applications of state 
space design methods; linear regulator problem and 
applications to tracking, stabilization and disturbance 
elimination; self-tuning regulators. State estimators. 
The second method of Liapunov and applications in 
contol systems design. Applications of modern fre- 
quency domain methods in control system design; 
diagonal dominance. dynamic compensation, 
decoupling. Applications of the linear quadratic Gaus- 
sian problem in control systems design. Case studies 
from industrial, guidance and other engineering control 
problems. Analysis of computer algorithms are ana- 
lyzed for each of the above four basic design methods 
provided. Analysis of interactive computer aided de- 
sign methods and validation procedures are extensive- 
ly analyzed. 

ENEE 661 Nonlinear Control Systems (3) Prerequi- 
site: ENEE 460 or consent of instructor State space 
methods of stability analysis including second order 
systems and the phase plane, linearization and stabili- 
ty in the small, stability in the large and Lyapunov's 
second method. Frequency domain methods including 
the describing function. Popov's method and func- 
tional analytic methods. Introduction to Volterra series 
representations of nonlinear systems. Applications to 
control system design. 

ENEE 662 Sampled-Data Control Systems (3) Pre- 
requsite: Preparations in linear feedback control theory 
or consent of instructor. Z-transform and modified z- 
transform method of analysis, root locus and frequen- 
cy response methods of analysis, ideal and finite width 
sampling, discrete and continuous compensation of 
digital control systems, state space equations, control- 
lability and observability of discrete systems, stability, 
minimum time and minimum energy control, statistical 
design and the discrete Kalman filter. 

ENEE 663 System Theory (3) General systems mo- 
dels. State variables and state spaces. Differential 
dynamical systems. Discrete time systems. Linearity 
and its implications. Controllability and observability 
State space structure and representation Realization 



theory and algorithmic solutions Parametenzations of 
linear systems; canonical forms. Basic results from 
stability theory. Stabilizability. Fine structure of linear 
multivariable systems; minimal indices and polynomial 
matrices Inverse Nyquist array. Geometric methods in 
design Interplay between frequency domain and state 
space design methods. Interactive computer-aided 
design methods. (Listed also as MAPL 640) 

ENEE 664 Optimal Control (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 
460 or consent of the instructor. General optimization 
and control problems. Static optimization problems 
Linear and nonlinear programming methods. Geomet- 
ric interpretations. Dynamic optimization problems. 
Discrete time maximum principle and applications. 
Pontryagin maximum principle in continuous time. Dy- 
namic-programming. Feedback realization of solu- 
tions. Extensive applications to problems in optimal 
design, navigation and guidance, power systems. In- 
troduction to state constrained and singular optimal 
control problems (Listed also as MAPL 641.) 

ENEE 665 Linear System Identification (3) Prerequi- 
site: MATH 400 and ENEE 322 or equivalent: ENEE 
620 Representations for linear systems Parameter 
estimation techniques such as least square and maxi- 
mum likelihood. Correlation methods with white noise 
inputs Stochastic approximation and gradient al- 
gorithms. Applications of quarilinearization and invari- 
ant imbedding. Effect of abrevation noise. 

ENEE 680 Electromagnetic Theory I (3) Prerequi- 
site: ENEE 381 or equivalent. Theoretical analysis and 
engineering applications of Maxwell's equations. 
Boundary value problems of electrostatics and mag- 
netostatics. 

ENEE 681 Electromagnetic Theory II (3) Prerequi- 
site: ENEE 381 or equivalent. Continuation of ENEE 
680. Theoretical analysis and engineering applications 
of Maxwell's Equations. The homogeneous wave 
equation. Plane wave propgation. The interaction of 
plane waves and material media. Retarded potentials. 
The Hertz potential. Simple radiating systems 
Relativisitic covariance of Maxwell's Equations. 

ENEE 686 Charged Particle Dynamics, Electron 
and Ion Beams (3) Three hours per week. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. General principles of single- 
particle dynamics; mapping of the electric and mag- 
netic fields; equation of motion and methods of solu- 
tion; production and control of charge particle beams; 
electron optics; Liouville's Theorem; space charge 
effects in high current beams; design principles of 
special electron and ion beam devices. 

ENEE 690 Quantum and Wave Phenomena with 
Electrical Application (3) Two lectures per week 
Prerequisite: ENEE 381 and ENEE 382 or equivalent. 
Introduction of quantum and wave phenomena from 
electrical engineering point of view. Topics included: 
general principles of quantum mechanics, operator 
algebra, the microwave resonant cavity and the 
analagous potential well problem, harmonic oscillator, 
hydrogenic atom. Perturbation method applied to the 
transmission line and potential well problems. Periodi- 
cally loaded transmission line and Kronig-Penny model 
of band theory. 

ENEE 696 Integrated and Miowave Electronics (3) 

cr Prerequisite: ENEE 310. Registration in ENEE 793 
recommended. Active and passive elements used in 
semiconductor structures. Design application of linear 
and digital integrated circuits. 

ENEE 697 Semiconductor Devices and Technolo- 
gy (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 496 or equivalent. Registra- 
tion in ENEE 793 recommended. The principles, struc- 
tures and characteristics of semiconductor devices. 
Technology and fabrication of semiconductor devices. 

ENEE 700 Network Synthesis (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 
605 or equivalent Design of driving-point and transfer 
impedance functions with emphasis of the transfer 
loss and phase of minimum-phase networks, flow 
diagrams, physical network characteristics, including 
relations existing between the real and imaginary 
components of network functions, modern methods of 
network synthesis. 

ENEE 701 Network Synthesis (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 
700 or equivalent Design of driving-point and transfer 
impedance functions with emphasis of the transfer 
loss and phase of minimum-phase networks, flow 
diagrams, physical network characteristics, including 
relations existing between the real and imaginary 
components of network functions, modern methods of 
network synthesis. 



ENEE 703 Semiconductor Device Models (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENEE 605 or equivalents. Single-frequency 
models for transistors, small-signal and wide-band 
models for general non-reciprocal devices. hybnd-PI 
and TEE models for transistors: relationship of models 
to transistor physics; synthesis of wide-band models 
from terminal behavior, computer utilization of models 
for other semiconductor devices. 

ENEE 721 Information Theory (3) Corequisite: ENEE 
620. Prerequisite: STAT 400 or equivalent. Information 
measure, entropy, mutual information, source encod- 
ing; noiseless coding theorem, noisy coding theorem; 
exponential error bounds; introduction to probabilistic 
error correcting codes, block and convolutional codes 
and error bounds; channels with memory; continuous 
channels; rate distortion function. (Same as MAPL 
731.) 

ENEE 722 Error Correcting Codes (3) Introduction to 
linear codes; bounds on the error correction capabili- 
ties of codes; convolutional codes with threshold, 
sequential and Viterbi decoding; cyclic random error 
correcting codes; P-N sequences; cyclic and convolu- 
tional burst error correcting codes. 

ENEE 724 Digital Signal Processing (3) Prerequisite: 
ENEE 620 or consent of instructor Review of z 
transforms; correlations functions and power spectral 
densities for discrete time stochastic processes: dis- 
crete time Wiener filters, methods for designing digital 
filters to meet precise frequency domain specification; 
effects of truncation, round-off and finite word length 
arithmetic on the accuracy and stability of digital filters; 
adaptive equalizers for narrow band data channels; 
discrete Fourier transform and fast Fourier transform; 
homomorphic filtering; Gauss-Markov estimates; 
spectral density estimation. 

ENEE 728 Advanced Topics in Communication 
Theory (3) Topics selected, as announced, from ad- 
vanced communication theory and its applications. 

ENEE 730 Advanced Topics — Radar Signals and 
Systems (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 620 or equivalent 
The theory of imaging radar systems. Classifications, 
resolution mechanisms, and principles. System design 
for additive noise: effects of ambiguity, multiplicative 
noise, motion errors, nonlinearities, and scattering 
mechanism. System design for ambiguity and mul- 
tiplicative noise. Optical processing Application to 
synthetic aperture, astronomical, and hologram radar 

ENEE 733 Neural Control of Animal Movement (3) 

Prerequisite: ENEE 633 or 634. Properties of muscles, 
proprioceptors, reflexes, and central nervous system 
structures; linear and nonlinear models; field potential 
analysis and theories of cerebellar function; and the 
control and coordination of these structures during 
voluntary and involuntary movement in animals. 

ENEE 746 Digital Systems Engineering (3) Prerequi- 
site: ENEE 646. Systems aspects of digital-computer- 
based systems, data flow analysis; system organiza- 
tion; control languages; consoles and displays; remote 
terminals; software-hardware tradeoff, system evalua- 
tion; case studies from selected applications areas 
such as data acquisition and reduction information 
storage, or the like. 

ENEE 748 Topics in Computer Design (1-3) Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of the instructor Such topics as 
computer arithmetic, computer reliability, and thresh- 
old logic will be considered. May be taken for repeated 
credit. 

ENEE 760 Mathematical Methods in Control Engi- 
neering (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 663 or consent of 
instructor. Applications of compactness in control and 
communication, geometnc methods in optimal control 
of lumped and distributed systems and harmonic anal- 
ysis of linear systems. Applications to control and 
estimation problems (Listed also as MAPL 740.) 

ENEE 761 Control of Distributed Parameter Sys- 
tems (3) Prerequisite An introductory course in func- 
tional analytic methods at the level of ENEE 760. and 
background in control and system theory. Study of 
systems governed by pantial differential equations 
Delay systems Boundary and distributed control. 
Lyapunov stability optimal control of systems gov- 
erned by pantial differential equations and of delay 
systems Applications to continuum mechanics, dis- 
tributed networks, biology, economics, and engineer- 
ing (Same as MAPL 741.) 

ENEE 762 Stochastic Control (3) Prerequisites 
ENEE 620 or equivalent; and ENEE 663/MAPL 640; or 
consent of the instructor Stochastic control systems, 
numerical methods for the Ricatti Equation, the 



86 Engineering Materials Program 

separation principle, control of linear systems with 
Gaussian signals and quadratic cost, non-linear 
stochastic control, stochastic stability, introduction to 
stochastic games. (Same as MAPL 742.) 
ENEE 769 Advanced Topics In Control Theory (3) 
Topics selected, as announced, from advanced con- 
trol theory and its applications. 
ENEE 772 Advanced Methods and Algorithms in 
Detection and Filtering (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 621. 
Foundations of random processes. Conditional expec- 
tations. Markov processes and Martingales. ITO calcu- 
lus Detection and estimation of continuous signals 
with continuous observations. Jump processes. Detec- 
tion and estimation with discontinuous observations. 
Discrete-time case. Fast algorithms for digital filtering 
problems. (Listed also as MAPL 735.) 
ENEE 774 Mathematics of Continuous Networks 
(3) Nonoriented systems, ports, linear orientations, 
theory of distributions, scattering matrices, operator 
theory of networks, activity, invariant embedding, mul- 
tivariate PR and BR state-determined systems, syn- 
thesis interval functions, tolerance analysis, neuron 
networks and models. Manley-Rowe relations, oscilla- 
tors and nonlinear subharmonic generation. 
ENEE 780 Microwave Engineering (3) Prerequisite: 
ENEE 681. Mathematical methods for the solution of 
the wave equation, transmission lines and 
waveguides, selected topics in the theory of 
waveguide structures, surface guides and artificial 
dielectrics. 

ENEE 781 Optical Engineering (3) Fourier analysis in 
two dimensions, diffraction theory, optical imaging 
systems, spatial filtering, holography. 
ENEE 782 Radio Wave Propagation (3) Two lectures 
per week. Prerequisite: ENEE 681. General solutions 
of Maxwell's Equations, geometrical optics approxima- 
tions, propagation above a plane earth, effects of 
surface irregularities and stratified atmospheres, scat- 
tering by turbulence. 

ENEE 784 Antenna Theory (3) Two lectures per 
week. Prerequisite: ENEE 681 or equivalent. Review of 
Maxwell's Equations; radiative networks; linear anten- 
nas; antenna arrays; aperture antennas; advanced 
topics. 

ENEE 790 Quantum Electronics I (3) Two lectures 
per week. Prerequisite: A knowledge of quantum me- 
chanics and electromagnetic theory. Spontaneous 
emission, interaction of radiation and matter, masers. 
optical resonators, the gas, solid and semi-conductor 
lasers, electro-optical effect, propagation in anisotrop- 
ic media and light modulation. 
ENEE 791 Quantum Electronics II (3) Nonlinear 
optical effects and devices, tunable coherent light 
sources: optical parametric oscillator; frequency con- 
version and dye laser. Ultrashort pulse generation and 
measurement, stimulated Raman effect, and applica- 
tions. Interaction of acoustic and optical waves, and 
holography. 

ENEE 793 Solid State Electronics (3) Prerequisite: A 
graduate course in quantum mechanics or consent of 
instructor. Properties of crystals; energy bands: elec- 
tron transport theory; conductivity and hall effect; 
statistical distributions; Fermi level: impurities; non- 
equilibrium carrier distributions; normal modes of vibra- 
tion; effects of high electric fields; P-N junction theory, 
avaianche breakdown; tunneling phenomena; surface 
properties. 

ENEE 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
ENEE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 



Engineering Materials 
Program 

Professor and Acting Director: Dieter 2 

Professor and Department Chairman: 

Cadman' 

Professors: Armstrong 3 , Arsenault', 

Adjunct Professor: Kramer 

Assistant Professor: Mathers 1 

Associate Faculty: Marcinkowski 3 , Park 4 

'Chemical and Nuclear Engineering 



2 Dean, College of Engineering 
3 Mechanical Engineering 
■"Physics and Astronomy 
The Engineering Materials program is interdisci- 
plinary between Chemical and Mechanical En- 
gineering. It is administered by the Department 
of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering. Special 
areas of concentration include diffraction, dislo- 
cation and mechanical behavior of materials, x- 
ray and electron microscopic techniques, elec- 
tronic and magnetic behavior of materials, and 
the chemical physics of materials. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

The programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. 
degrees are open to qualified students holding 
the B.S. degree. Admission may be granted to 
students with degrees in any of the engineering 
and science areas from accredited programs. In 
some cases it may be necessary to require 
courses to fulfill the back ground. The candidate 
for the M.S. degree has the choice of following 
a plan of study with thesis or without thesis. The 
equivalent of at least three years of full-time 
study beyond the B.S. degree is required for the 
Ph.D. degree. All students seeking graduate 
degrees in Engineering Materials must enroll in 
ENMA 650, 660 and 671. In addition to the 
general rules of the Graduate School certain 
special degree requirements are set forth by the 
Department in their departmental publications. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Special equipment available includes a 
scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction 
equipment, crystal growing, sample preparation 
and mechanical testing facilities, and high pres- 
sure and cryogenic equipment. 

Additional Information 

Information is available from the Director, Engi- 
neering Materials Program, Department of 
Chemical and Nuclear Engineering. 



Courses 

ENMA 462 Deformation of Engineering Materials. 

(3) Prerequisites:ENES 230 or consent of instructor. 
Relationship of structure to the mechanical properties 
of materials. Elastic and plastic deformation, micro- 
scopic yield criteria, state of stress and ductility. Ele- 
ments of dislocation theory, work hardening, alloy 
strengthening, creep, and fracture in terms of disloca- 
tion theory. 

ENMA 463 Chemical, Liquid and Powder Process- 
ing of Engineering Materials. (3) Prerequisites: 
ENES 230 or consent of instructor. Methods and 
processes used in the production of primary metals. 
The detailed basic principles of beneficiation pro- 
cesses, pyrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, elec- 
trometallurgy, vapor phase processing and electroplat- 
ing. Liquid metal processing including casting, welding, 
brazing and soldering. Powder processing and sinter- 
ing. Shapes and structures produced in the above 
processes. 

ENMA 464 Environmental Effects on Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisites: ENES 230 or consent of 
instructor. Introduction to the phenomena associated 
with the resistance of materials to damage under 
severe environmental conditions. Oxidation, corrosion, 
stress corrosion, corrosion fatigue and radiation dam- 
age are examined from the point of view of mechanism 
and influence on the properties of materials. Methods 
of corrosion protection and criteria for selection of 
materials for use in radiation environments. 
ENMA 470 Structure and Properties of Engineering 
Materials. (3) A comprehensive survey of the atomic 
and electronic structure of solids with emphasis on the 



relationship of structure to the physical and mechani- 
cal properties. 

ENMA 471 Physical Chemistry of Engineering 
Materials. (3) Equilbnum multicomponent systems 
and relationship to the phase diagram. Thermodynam- 
ics of polycrystalline and polyphase materials. Diffu- 
sion in solids, kinetics of reactions in solids. 
ENMA 472 Technology of Engineering Materials. 
(3) Relationship of properties of solids to their engi- 
neering applications. Criteria for the choice of materi- 
als for electronic, mechanical and chemical properties. 
Particular emphasis on the relationships between 
structure of the solid and its potential engineering 
application. 

ENMA 473 Processing of Engineering Materials. (3) 
The effect of processing on the structure of engineer- 
ing materials. Processes considered include refining, 
melting and solidification, purification by zone refining, 
vapor phase processing, mechanical working and heat 
treatments. 

ENMA 495 Rheology of Engineering Materials. (3) 
Prerequisites: ENES 230 or consent of instructor. 
Study of the deformation and flow of engineering 
materials and its relationship to structural type. Elastic- 
ity viscoelasticity, anelasticity and plasticity of single 
phase and multiphase materials. Students who have 
credit for ENMA 495 may not take ench 495 for credit. 
ENMA 496 Polymeric Engineering Materials. (3) 
Prerequisite: ENES 230. A comprehensive summary of 
the fundamentals of particular interest in the science 
and applications of polymers. Polymer single crystals, 
transformations in polymers, fabrication of polymers 
as to shape and internal structure. Students who have 
credit for ENMA 496 may not take ENCH 496 for 
credit. 

ENMA 650 Structure of Engineering Materials. (3) 
Prerequisite: ENMA 470 or equivalent. The structural 
aspects of crystalline and amorphous solids and rela- 
tionships to bonding types. Point and space groups. 
Summary of diffraction theory and practice. The recip- 
rocal lattice, relationships of the microscopically meas- 
ured properties to crystal symmetry. Structural aspects 
of defects in crystalline solids. 
ENMA 651 Electronic Structure of Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite: ENMA 650. Electronic and 
magnetic materials in relationship to their applications. 
Metallic conductors, resistive alloys, superconducting 
materials, semiconductors, hard and soft magnetic 
materials, piezo-electnc and piezo-magnetic materials, 
optical materials. Emphasis on relationships between 
electronic configuration, crystal structure, defect struc- 
ture and physical properties. 
ENMA 659 Special Topics in Structure of Engineer- 
ing Materials. (3) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
ENMA 660 Chemical Physics of Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite: ENMA 650 Thermodynam- 
ics and statistical mechanics of engineering solids. 
Cohesion, thermodynamic properties. Theory of solid 
solutions. Thermodynamics of mechanical, electrical, 
and magnetic phenomena in solids. Chemical ther- 
modynamics, phase transitions and thermodynamic 
properties of polycrystalline and polyphase materials. 
Thermodynamics of defects in solids. 
ENMA 661 Kinetics of Reactions In Materials. (3) 
Prerequisite: ENMA 660. The theory of thermally ac- 
tivated processes in solids as applied to diffusion, 
nucleation and interface motion. Cooperative and dif- 
fusionless transformations. Applications selected from 
processes such as all otropic transformations, precipa- 
tion, martensite formation, solidification, ordering, and 
corrosion. 



ENMA 669 Special Topics in the Chemical Physics 
of Materials. (3) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
ENMA 671 Dislocations In Crystalline Materials. (3) 

cr Prerequisite: ENMA 650. The nature and interac- 
tions of defects in crystalline solids, with primary 
emphasis on dislocations. The elastic and electric 
fields associated with dislocations. Effects of imper- 
fections on mechanical and physical properties. 
ENMA 672 Mechanical Properties of Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite: ENMA 671. The mechani- 
cal properties of single crystals, polycrystalline and 
polyphase materials. Yield strength, work hardening 
fracture, fatigue and creep are considered in terms of 
fundamental material properties. 
ENMA 679 Special Topics in the Mechanical Behav- 
ior of Materials. (3) Prerequisite: consent of instruc- 



English Language and Literature Program 87 



ENMA 680 Experimental Methods in Materials Sci- 
ence. (3) Methods of measuring the structural aspects 
ot materials. Optical and electron microscopy. Micro- 
scopic analytical techniques. Resonance methods. 
Electrical, optical and magnetic measurement tech- 
niques. Thermodynamic methods. 

ENMA 681 Diffraction Techniques in Materials Sci- 
ence. (3) Prerequisite: ENCH 620 Theory of diffrac- 
tion of electrons, neutrons and x-rays Strong empha- 
sis on diffraction methods as applied to the study of 
defects in solids Short range order, thermal vibrations, 
stacking faults, microstrain. 

ENMA 689 Special Topics in Experimental Tech- 
niques in Materials Science. (3) Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor 

ENMA 691 Special Topics in Engineering Materials. 
(3) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
ENMA 697 Seminar in Engineering Materials. (1) 
ENMA 698 Special Problems in Engineering Materi- 
als. (1-6) 

ENMA 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 
ENMA 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



English Language and 
Literature Program 

Professor and Acting Chairman: Patterson 
Professors: Bode, Bradley, Bryer, Freedman, 
Holton Hovey, Kenny, Kinnaird Isaacs, 
Lawson, Lutwack, Mish, Myers, Panichas, 
Patterson, Peterson, Russell, Salamanca, 
Schoenbaum, Vitzthum Whittemore, Winton, 
Wittreich 

Associate Professors: Barnes, Barry, Birdsall, 
Brown, Coogan, Cooper, Fry, Greenwood, D. 
Hamilton, G. Hamilton, Herman, Howard, 
Jellema, Kleine, Mack, Ousby, Miller. Smith, 
Thorberg, Trousdale, Wilson 
Assistant Professors: Burger, Cate, Coletti, 
Dunn, James, Rutherford, Van Egmond 

The Department of English offers graduate 
work leading to the degrees of Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy. Areas of specializa- 
tion for the M.A. and Ph.D. include: English 
literature, American literature, and folklore. In 
addition, candidates for the M.A. degree may 
specialize in creative writing, and in linguistics. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

In addition to the general Graduate School 
requirements, applicants to the M.A. program 
ordinarily should present a 3.5 GPA in English 
and a minimum of 24 hours of upper-level 
English courses. Applicants to the Ph.D pro- 
gram should present a 3.75 GPA and an M.A. 
degree in English. 

The Department requires 30 credits for the 
M.A. with thesis. These credits include ENGL 
601 and a distribution requirement to assure 
coverage of the major historical fields. Candi- 
dates have a non-thesis option under which 
they take 31 credits, submit an independent 
research paper, and pass a three-hour written 
comprehensive examination. 

Departmental requirements for the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy include: (1) a foreign 
language requirement; (2) at least three hours 
of linguistics; (3) a comprehensive written ex- 
amination on three fields (dissertation field and 
two additional fields) which may be begun after 
nine hours beyond the Master of Arts. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to drawing on the cultural and intel- 
lectual resources of Washington, D.C., the Eng- 
lish department is an active participant in the 
Folger Institute of Renaissance and 18th Centu- 



ry Studies. Folger Institute fellowships have 
been awarded to advanced graduate students 
in the English department. 

The Department is also a member of South 
Atlantic Graduate English (SAGE). Graduate 
students from Maryland may take courses at 
other SAGE institutions, and the English depart- 
ment is eligible for a lecturer of its choice from 
another SAGE institution. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance is available in the form of 
fellowships and teaching assistantships. Fel- 
lowships are awarded directly by the Graduate 
School to nominees from the English depart- 
ment. The number of teaching assistantships is 
contingent on available funds; currently 96 stu- 
dents are teaching assistants. 

Additional Information 

Additional information on admission, financial 
aid, and degree requirements can be obtained 
from Calhoun Winton, Director of Graduate Stu- 
dies, Department of English, University of Mary- 
land. 

Courses 

ENGLISH 

ENGL 402 Chaucer. (3) 

ENGL 403 Shakespeare. (3) Early period— histories 

and comedies 

ENGL 404 Shakespeare. (3) Late periods— tragedies 

and romances. 

ENGL 407 Literature of the Renaissance. (3) 

ENGL 410 Edmund Spenser. (3) cr 

ENGL 411 Literature of the Renaissance. (3) 

ENGL 412 Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 
1600-1660.(3) 

ENGL 414 Milton. (3) 

ENGL 415 Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 

1660-1700.(3) 

ENGL 416 Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3) 

Age of Pope and Swift 

ENGL 417 Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3) 

Age of Johnson and the preromantics. 

ENGL 418 Major British Writers. (3) Two writers 
studied intensively each semester. 

ENGL 419 Major British Writers. (3) Two writers 
studied intensively each semester. 

ENGL 420 Literature of the Romantic Period. (3) 

First generation: Blake, Wordsworth. Coleridge, et. al. 

ENGL 421 Literature of the Romantic Period. (3) 

Second generation: Keats, Shelly, Byron, et al. 

ENGL 422 Literature of the Victorian Period. (3) 

Early years. 

ENGL 423 Literature of the Victorian Period. (3) 

Middle years. 

ENGL 424 Late Victorian and Edwardian Literature. 

(3) A study of the literary movements and techniques 

which effected the transition from Victorian to modern 

literature. 

ENGL 425 Modern British Literature. (3) An histon- 

cal survey of the major writers and literary movements 

in English prose and poetry since 1900 

ENGL 430 American Literature, Beginning to 1810. 
the Colonial and Federal Periods. (3) 

ENGL 431 American Literature, 1810 to 1865, the 
American Renaissance. (3) 

ENGL 432 American Literature, 1865 to 1914, Real- 
Ism and Naturalism. (3) 

ENGL 433 American Literature, 1914 to the Pre- 
sent, the Modern Period. (3) 
ENGL 434 American Drama. (3) 
ENGL 435 American Poetry— Beginning to the Pre- 
sent. (3) 



ENGL 436 The Literature of American Demoacy. 

(3) cr 

ENGL 437 Contemporary American Literature. (3) 

A survey of the poetry, prose, and drama written in 
America in the last decade. 

ENGL 438 Major American Writers. (3) Two writers 
studied intensively each semester 

ENGL 439 Major American Writers. (3) Two writers 
studied intensively each semester. 

ENGL 440 The Novel in America to 1910. (3) 

ENGL 441 The Novel in America Since 1910. (3) 

ENGL 442 Literature of the South. (3) A historical 
survey, from Eighteenth-century beginnings to the 
present 

ENGL 443 Afro-American Literature. (3) An exami- 
nation of the literary expression of the Negro in the 
United States, from its beginning to the present. 

ENGL 444 Experimental Approaches to Litera- 
ture — Emerson and Thoreau. (3) Vanable subiect 
matter presented in experimental methods and ap- 
proaches. Grading in satisfactory/fail only. Consent of 
instructor required for admission. 

ENGL 445 Modern British and American Poetry. (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor required for stu- 
dents with credit in ENGL 345. A study of the formation 
of the 'modern tradition' in Bntish and Amencan poet- 
ry, exploring the distinctive energy and consciousness 
in the poets of the early Twentieth Century (1896- 
1930). Special emphasis on Hopkins. Yeats, Pound. 
Eliot, and Stevens Collateral readings in essays on 
modern poetics, and in other poets of the penod. 

ENGL 446 Contemporary British and American 
Poetry. (3) Prerequisite permission of instructor re- 
quired for students with credit in ENGL 345 A study of 
British and American poetry from the depression to the 
present. Special emphasis on Auden, Williams. Dylan 
Thomas, Theodore Roethke, Robert Lowell A more 
general study of the work of some of these: Berryman. 
Jarrell, Fuller, Bishop. Wright, Kinnell, Larkin and in- 
cluding the Projectivists. the Beats and the present 
scene. 

ENGL 447 Satire. (3) An introduction to English and 
American satire from Chaucer to the present. 

ENGL 449 Playwriting. (3) 

ENGL450 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama. (3) 

Beginnings to Marlowe. 

ENGL 451 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama. (3) 

Jonson to Webster 

ENGL 452 English Drama from 1660 to 1800. (3) 
ENGL 453 Literary Criticism. (3) 
ENGL 454 Modern Drama. (3) cr 
ENGL 455 The English Novel. (3) Eighteenth Centu- 
ry. 

ENGL 456 The English Novel. (3) Nineteenth Centu- 
ry. 
ENGL 457 The Modern Novel (3) 

ENGL 461 Folk Narrative (3) Studies in legend, tale 
and myth Prerequisite: ENGL 460. 
ENGL 462 Folksong and Ballad (3) Prerequisite: 
ENGL 460. 

ENGL 463 American Folklore. (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 
460. An examination of Amencan folklore in terms ot 
history and regional folk cultures Exploration of collec- 
tions of folklore from various areas to reveal the 
difference in regional and ethnic groups as witnessed 
in their oral and literary traditions. 

ENGL 464 Afro-American Folklore and Culture. (3) 
An examination of the culture of the Negro in the 
United States in terms of history (antebellum to the 
present) and social changes (rural to urban) Explora- 
tion of aspects of Negro culture and history via oral 
and literary traditions and life histones. 
ENGL 465 Urban Folklore. (3) Prerequisite ENGL 
460 An examination of the folklore currently ongmat- 
mg in white, urban. Amencan culture 

ENGL 466 Arthurian Legend. (3) Development ot the 
Arthunan legend of heroism and love in English litera- 
ture from medieval to modem times 

ENGL 474 Literature for Children (3) Analysis of 
nineteenth and twentieth century classics of the genre 



88 Entomology Program 



Relation of this literature to the forming of future 
literary perceptions. 

ENGL 475 Literature for Adolescents. (3) Adoles- 
cent themes in contemporary and older literature de- 
signed for adolescent and young adult audiences. 

ENGL 476 Modern Fantasy and Science Fiction. (3) 

Major works of fantasy and science fiction since the 
mid-eighteenth century, emphasizing their continuity 
and their relationships to philosophical speculation, 
scientific discovery, literary history and cultural 
change. 

ENGL 478 Selected Topics in English and Ameri- 
can Literature before 1800. (3) 

ENGL 479 Selected Topics in English and Ameri- 
can Literature after 1800. (3) 

ENGL 481 Introduction to English Grammar. (3) A 

brief review of traditional English grammar and an 
introduction to structural grammar, including phonolo- 
gy, morphology and syntax. 

ENGL 482 History of the English Language. (3) 

ENGL 483 American English. (3) 

ENGL 484 Advanced English Grammar. (3) Credit 
may not be granted in both ENGL 484 and LING 402. 

ENGL 486 Introduction to Old English. (3) An intro- 
duction to the grammar, syntax, and phonology of Old 
English. Selected readings from Old English prose and 
poetry. 

ENGL 489 Special Topics in English Language. (3) 

Studies in topics of current interest; repeatable to a 
maximum of 9 hours. 

ENGL 493 Advanced Expository Writing. (3) 

ENGL 498 Creative Writing. (3) cr 

ENGL 499 Advanced Creative Writing. (3) 

ENGL 601 Bibliography and Methods. (3) 

ENGL 602 Middle English. (3) 

ENGL 603 Readings in English Language History. 

(3) An historical survey of the syntactic, lexical, and 
phonological patterns of English from Old English and 
its sources in Germanic and Indo-European through 
modern English. 

ENGL 604 Old English. (3) Grammar, syntax, phonol- 
ogy and prosody of Old English, designed to give 
graduate students a working knowledge of Old English 
and to introduce them to the major Old English texts in 
the original. 

ENGL 61 1 Approaches to College Composition. (3) 

A seminar emphasizing rhetorical and linguistic foun- 
dations for the handling of a course in freshman 
composition. For graduate assistants (optional to other 
graduate students). 

ENGL 620 Readings in Medieval English Literature. 
(3) 

ENGL 621 Readings in Renaissance English Litera- 
ture. (3) 

ENGL 622 Readings in Seventeenth — Century Eng- 
lish Literature. (3) 

ENGL 623 Readings Eighteenth-Century English 
Literature. (3) 

ENGL 624 Readings in English Romantic Litera- 
ture. (3) 

ENGL 625 Readings in English Victorian Literature. 

<3) 

ENGL 626 Readings in American Literature before 

1865. (3) 

ENGL 627 Readings in American Literature since 
1865. (3) 

ENGL 630 Readings in 20th Century English Litera- 
ture. (3) 

ENGL 699 Independent Study. (1-3) cr Prerequisite: 
departmental approval of research project and con- 
sent of the instructor. 

ENGL 718 Seminar in Medieval Literature. (3) 

ENGL 719 Seminar in Renaissance Literature. (3) 

ENGL 728 Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Litera- 
ture. (3) 

ENGL 729 Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Litera- 
ture. (3) 



ENGL 738 Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Litera- 
ture. (3) 

ENGL 739 Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Litera- 
ture. (3) 

ENGL 748 Seminar in American Literature. (3) cr 

ENGL 749 Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature. 

(3) 

ENGL 758 Literary Criticism. (3) 

ENGL 759 Seminar in Literature and the Other Arts. 

(3) 

ENGL 768 Studies in Drama. (3) 

ENGL 769 Studies in Fiction. (3) 

ENGL 778 Seminar in Folklore. (3) 

ENGL 788 Studies in the English Language. (3) May 

be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours. 

ENGL 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

ENGL 819 Seminar in Themes and Types in English 
Literature. (3) 

ENGL 828 Seminar in Themes and Types in Ameri- 
can Literature. (3) 

ENGL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Entomology Program 

Professor and Chairman: Steinhauer 

Professors: Baker, Batra, Caron, Davidson, 

Harrison, Jones, Knutson, Menke, Menzer, 

Messersmith, Wirth 

Associate Professors: Barbosa, Denno, Miller, 

Reichelderfer, Wood 

Assistant Professors: Armstrong, Dively, 

Grissell, Hellman, Mellors, Nelson Opler 

Lecturer: Marsh, Spangler 

Professor Emeritus: Bickley 

The Department of Entomology offers both the 
M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Graduate students 
may specialize in physiology and morphology, 
toxicology, biosystematics, ecology and behav- 
ior, medical entomology, apiculture, insect pa- 
thology, economic entomology and pest man- 
agement. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Students applying for graduate work in entomol- 
ogy are expected to have strong backgrounds 
in the biological sciences, chemistry and mathe- 
matics. Since the Department is particularly 
anxious to find strong basic preparation, an 
undergraduate major in entomology is not re- 
quired for admission to the program. Students 
lacking certain specific courses in their un- 
dergraduate program may need to extend the 
normal period of time required for the degree. 

In the M.S. and Ph.D. programs, the stu- 
dent is given great latitude in the selection of 
the advisory study committee, choice of the 
major study areas and supporting course work 
and choice of the research program. The M.S. 
degree is awarded following the successful 
completion of the course requirements and a 
satisfactory thesis. A non-thesis M.S. option is 
available for those interested in qualifying as 
pest management specialists. In this program a 
field experience course including a comprehen- 
sive report is substituted for the thesis. 

Upon admission to the M.S. or Ph.D. pro- 
gram, the student is given a written departmen- 
tal examination to evaluate general knowledge 
of biology and entomology. After passing this 
examination the student's study committee sug- 
gests a program of course work and approves a 
detailed research proposal. Following comple- 
tion of most course work and demonstration of 
competency in one foreign or computer lan- 
guage, the Ph.D. student is given an oral qualify- 



ing examination before applying for admission 
to candidacy. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Facilities are maintained in the Department for 
research in all areas of specialization offered, 
and in addition, cooperative programs with 
other departments in Agricultural and Life Sci- 
ences are possible. Cooperative research pro- 
grams are often maintained by the Department 
with several government agencies, such as the 
Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, The 
U.S. National Museum of Natural History, and 
the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. 
Students may also participate in the Maryland 
Center for Sytematic Entomology where coop- 
erative guidance toward advanced degrees has 
been established between the Department and 
scientists in the Insect Identification and Benefi- 
cial Insect Introduction Institute, S.E.A., 
U.S.D.A. and the Department of Entomology, 
Smithsonian Institution. Specialized facilities 
are frequently made available to graduate stu- 
dents in these programs. In many instances 
graduates of the programs in entomology find 
employment in such government agencies be- 
cause of the contacts made in these coopera- 
tive projects. 

Financial Assistance 

There are a limited number of teaching and 
research assistantships available to entomolo- 
gy graduate students on a competitive basis. 
Several part-time employment opportunities are 
available in governmental and private research 
and developemental laboratories in the area. 

Additional Information 

The Department's "Guidelines for Graduate 
Students" gives additional information on the 
graduate program, including requirements for 
admission, course requirements, examinations, 
seminars and research areas and facilities. 
Copies are available from the Department of 
Entomology, University of Maryland. 

Courses 

ENTM 407 Entomology for Science Teachers. (4) 

Summer. Four lectures and four three-hour laboratory 
periods a week. This course will include the elements 
of morphology, taxonomy and biology of insects using 
examples commonly available to high school teachers. 
It will include practice in collecting, preserving, rearing 
and experimenting with insects insofar as time will 
permit. 

ENTM 412 Advanced Apiculture. (3) One lecture and 
two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequi- 
site: ENTM 111. The theory and practice of apiary 
management. Designed for the student who wishes to 
keep bees or requires a practical knowledge of bee 
management. 

ENTM 421 Insect Taxonomy and Biology. (4) Two 

lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite: ENTM 204. Introduction to the principles 
of systematic entomology and the study of all orders 
and the important families of insects; immature forms 
considered. 

ENTM 451 Insect Pests of Agricultural Crops. (4) 

Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite: ENTM 204. The recognition, biolo- 
gy and control of insects injurious to fruit and vegeta- 
ble crops, field crops and stored products. 

ENTM 452 Insecticides. (2) Prerequisite: consent of 
the department. The development and use of contact 
and stomach poisons, fumigants and other important 
chemicals, with reference to their chemistry, toxic 
action, compatability, and host injury. Recent research 
emphasized. 

ENTM 453 Insect Pests of Ornamentals and Turf. 

(3) Prerequisites: ENTM 204 or consent of instructor. 
Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a 
week. The recognition, biology and control of insects 
and mites injurious to ornamental shrubs, trees, green- 



Family and Community Development Program 89 



house crops, and turf. Emphasis on pests of woody 
ornamental plants. 

ENTM 455 Urban Entomology. (3) Two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: 
ENTM 421 or consent of instructor. A study of the 
appearance, habits, life cycles and methods of control 
of pests of humans, pets and structures in the urban 
environment. Field observations of professional pest 
control operations and a paper on a selected pest 
group are required. 

ENTM 472 Medical and Veterinary Entomology. (4) 

Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisite: ENTM 204 or consent of depart- 
ment. A study of the morphology, taxonomy, biology 
and control of the arthropod parasites and disease 
vectors of man and animals. The ecology and behavior 
of vectors in relation to disease transmission will be 
emphasized. 

ENTM 611 Biological Control of Insects and 
Weeds. (3) Biological control of insects and weeds 
Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite: ENTM 421. A study of the princi- 
ples and practices of the biological control of insect 
pests and weeds. Systematic laboratory study of en- 
tomophagous insects with emphasis on the parasitic 
wasps; collection required. 

ENTM 612 Insect Ecology. (3) Prerequisite: a course 
in general ecology or permission of instructor. An 
advanced course in population and community ecolo- 
gy, plant-insect interactions, and insect biogeography. 
Emphasis on current entomological literature. 

ENTM 622 Principles of Systematic Entomology 

(3) Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period 
a week. Prerequisite: ENTM 421. The principles ol 
systematics including traditional classification meth 
ods, statistics, and numerical taxonomy. Nomencla 
ture, continental drift, and speciation theory. A labora 
tory problem in systematics is required. 

ENTM 625 Experimental Honey Bee Biology. (2) 

First semester. One three-hour lab a week. Fifteen 
labs during Semester will include topics such as com 
munication, nest construction and organization, be 
havior, insect societies and bee and wasp biology 

ENTM 631 Insect Anatomy. (3) Two one-hour lee 
tures and one three-hour laboratory per week, general 
organization and development of insects, the body 
well and its derivatives, body regions, sclentes and 
segmentation, segmental appendages, head and its 
appendages, thorax, legs and wings, the abdomen, 
alimentary canal, organs of distribution, respiratory 
system, nervous system, sense organs, and the 
reproductive organs. Dissections of selected systems 
of a grasshopper 

ENTM 641 Advances in Insect Physiology. (3) Two 

lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: ENTM 322 and BCHM 261 or their 
equivalents, or consent of instructor. Lectures and 
laboratory exercises on the functioning of insect body 
systems, metabolism, neuro-physiology, endocrinolo- 
gy, and physiological ecology of insects. 

ENTM 653 Toxicology of Insecticides. (4) First 
semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laborato- 
ry period a week. (Alternate years, not offered 1973- 
1974.) Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. A 
study of the physical, chemical, and bioligical proper- 
ties of insecticides. Emphasis is placed on the relation- 
ship of chemical structures to insecticidal activity and 
mode of action. Mechanisms of resistance are also 
considered. 

ENTM 654 Advanced Pest Management. (3) Three 
lectures a week Prerequisite: consent of instructor 
Current developments in pest management theory and 
practice. Emphasis on agro-ecosystem components 
and their manipulation. Biological and environmental 
monitoring, decision-making, cost-benefit relation- 
ships, and pest management modeling in major 
cropping systems 

ENTM 662 Insect Pathology. (3) Three lectures with 
directed independent laboratory study. Prerequisite: 
MICB 200. pre- or corequisite: ENTM 641 or consent 
of the instructor. An examination of primarily insect 
pathogens with special reference to symptomology, 
epizootiology and mode of action, and the microbial 
control of insect pests. 

ENTM 672 Cullcidology. (2) Second semester One 
lecture and one three-hour laboratory period a week 
(Alternate years.) The classification, distribution, ecol- 
ogy, biology, and control of mosquitoes. 



ENTM 699 Advanced Entomology. (1-6) Credit and 
prerequisites to be determined by the department. 
First and second semesters Studies of minor prob- 
lems in morphology, physiology, taxonomy and applied 
entomology, with particular reference to the prepara- 
tion of the student for individual research. 

ENTM 722 Biology and Taxonomy of Aquatic In- 
sects. (4) Biology and taxonomy of aquatic insects. 
One four-hour lecture and laboratory combined per 
week. Prerequisite: ENTM 421. Fifteen Saturday labs 
per semester will include the morphology, biology, and 
taxonomy of adult and immature insects living in water. 

ENTM 723 Taxonomy of Larval Insects. (2) Taxono- 
my of larval insects. One lecture and one two-hour 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: ENTM 421 and 
consent of instructor. A study of the identification and 
biology of larval insects. A collection is required. 

ENTM 725 Acarology. (3) Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. Introduction to the taxonomy and 
biology of mites and ticks. Emphasis on the recogni- 
tion of adult females at the family level Consideration 
of adult males and immatures. A collection of slide 
mounted specimens is required. 

ENTM 728 Advanced Systematics of Selected Or- 
ders. (1-3) Advanced systematics of selected orders. 
One lecture or one three-hour laboratory a week for 
each credit hour. Prerequisite: consent of department. 
Lectures and laboratory sessions on the systematics 
of selected major insect orders such as coleoptera, 
lepidoptera. diptera, and hymenoptera, or groups of 
minor orders. 

ENTM 743 Aspects of Insect Biochemistry. (2) First 
semester Two lectures a week. (Alternate years) One 
year of biochemistry, or equivalent, or consent of the 
instructor. Lectures and group discussions of the ener- 
gy sources of insects. Intermediary metabolism, utiliza- 
tion of energy sources, specialized subjects of current 
interest, such as light production, insect pigment for- 
mation, pheromones, venoms, and chemical defense 
mechanisms. 

ENTM 788 Entomological Topics. (1-3) One lecture 
or one two-hour laboratory period a week for each 
credit hour. Prerequisite: consent of department. Lec- 
tures, group discussions or laboratory sessions on 
selected topics such as: aquatic insects, biological 
control of insects, entomological literature, forest ento- 
mology, history of entomology, insect biochemistry, 
insect embryology, immature insects, insect behavior, 
insect communication, principles of entomological re- 
search. 

ENTM 789 Field Experience in Pest Management. 
(1-6) Prerequisite, ENTM 654 or consent of the de- 
partment. Involvement in practical problems of pest 
management in field situations. The student will be 
assigned to a problem area for intensive experience, 
usually during the summer. A final written report is 
required for each assignment. Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of six credits. 

ENTM 798 Topic Seminar. (1) Discussion and pres- 
entation of current research and literature. 

ENTM 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

ENTM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



Family and Community 
Development Program 

Professor and Chairman: Hanna 
Professors: Clignet, Gaylln 
Associate Professors: Myricks, Rubin, Wilson 
Assistant Professors: Churaman, Macklin, 
Phillips, Tourigny, Valadez 

The Department of Family and Community De- 
velopment is devoted to describing, explaining, 
and improving the quality of life in urban, subur- 
ban, and rural areas by means of interdisciplin- 
ary research, education, community outreach, 
and public service. The curriculum places spe- 
cial emphasis upon the family and the commu- 
nity as mediating structures in determining life 
quality. The approach is holistic, i.e., human 
ecology. Departmental graduate training pre- 
pares students for jobs in research centers, 
consulting firms, voluntary organizations, feder- 



al, state, and local governments, and interna- 
tional organizations. 

The Department offers a Master of Science 
degree with four specializations. Community 
Development is concerned with the processes 
and methods of local change, as well as individ- 
uals or groups as agents of change. Emphases 
include neighborhood reritalization. interna- 
tional community development, and the im- 
provement of services to communities. Man- 
agement and Consumer Studies focuses on the 
efficient utilization of available family and com- 
munity resources, the relationship between 
available resources and governmental (and pri- 
vate sector) policies, and the development of 
expanded resources through citizen action. 
Family Studies stresses a working knowledge of 
the growth of individuals throughout the life 
span, with particular emphases on inter-genera- 
tional aspects of family living and the effective 
delivery of family-oriented services. A cross- 
cultural perspective is employed. Family Thera- 
py draws upon knowledge of family dynamics 
and change using the clinical techniques of 
therapy and consultation. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

The Department employs the general policies 
of the graduate school as the basic criteria for 
admission to the Master's program. In addition, 
it is required that individuals take the Aptitude 
section of the GRE and have adequate un- 
dergraduate preparation in one or more of the 
following areas: anthropology, economics, ge- 
ography, family development, planning, political 
science, psychology, public administration, so- 
cial work, sociology, or urban studies. A course 
in elementary statistics at the undergraduate 
level is required. 

The Master's program is 30 hours The 
student may choose either the thesis or non- 
thesis option. A student selecting the thesis 
option is required to enroll for six hours of thesis 
research. For the non-thesis option, a student 
will complete 30 hours of course work and take 
oral and written comprehensive examinations. 

Financial Assistance 

Due to the limited number of available Graduate 
Teaching Assistantships, and the high demand, 
application for financial aid should be made 
prior to April 1st for the Fall semester of the 
coming year. 

Additional Information 

Further information regarding this program 
should be obtained by contacting the Depart- 
ment directly. 

Courses 

FMCD 430 Gender Role Development in the Family. 
(3) Prerequisite: FMCD 260 The development of mas- 
culinity and femininity within the context of the contem- 
porary family and the implications for family life 

FMCD 431 Family Crises and Rehabilitation. (3) 

Deals with various types of family crises situations and 
how families cope with the rehabilitation process It 
covers issues at various stages of the family cycle 
ranging from divorce, teenage runaways, abortion, to 
the effect of death on a family Role playing and 
interviewing techniques are demonstrated and ways of 
helping the family through the enses are emphasized 

FMCD 432 Intergenerational Aspects of Family 
Living. (3) Prerequisites: FMCD 105, 260 and 332. or 
permission of instructor. The historical, cultural, devel- 
opmental, and psychosocial experiences of contem- 
porary Amencan generations. Interactions among dif- 
ferent generations within the family and consequences 
for individual development. 

FMCD 443 Consumer Problems. (3) Consumer prac- 
tices of American families Merchandising practices as 



90 Food, Nutrition and Institution Administration Program 



they affect the consumer. Organizations and laws in 

the interest of the consumer. 

FMCD 446 Living Experiences with Families. (3-6) 

A— Domestic Intercultural B— International Intercul- 
tural Prerequisites: FMCD 330, ANTH 101; FMCD 250; 
optional, language competence. An individual experi- 
ence in living with families of a sub-culture within the 
U.S. or with families of another country, participating in 
family and community activities. A foreign student may 
participate and live with an American family. 

FMCD 447 Home Management for the Disabled. (3) 

Application of home management concepts in the use 
of resources to promote maintenance of homemaker 
independence through physiological and psychologi- 
cal adjustments in the family and home environment. 
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for 
working effectively with disabled homemakers. 

FMCD 448 Selected Topics in Home Management. 

(3) Seminar format will be used to examine the ways 
families set priorities and organize their efforts and 
resources to achieve both social and economic goals 
Prior registration in FMCD 250, 341, or other courses 
in management theory, systems analysis or research 
methods is desirable. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 
credits provided subject matter is different. 

FMCD 453 Family-Community Advocacy. (3) Pre- 
requisite: FMCD 201 or permission of instructor. Deci- 
sion-making processes at the federal, state and local 
levels regarding social policy determination in the 
family and community field. The origins and conse- 
quences of policies as they affect family and communi- 
ty functioning. 

FMCD 460 Violence in the Family. (3) Prerequisites: 
FMCD 260 or 330 or 332. Violence in the family from 
the perspective of interfamilial patterns and systems. 
The ways in which societal forces augment, support or 
deter violent interchanges. 

FMCD 483 Family and Community Service Sys- 
tems. (3) Prerequisite: by permission of instructor. The 
planning, implementation, administration, and evalua- 
tion of human service systems affecting families and 
communities. Major organizational theories, manageri- 
al styles, administrative techniques, and relevant is- 
sues in human service delivery. 

FMCD 485 Introduction to Family Counseling. (3) 

Provides the fundamental theoretical concepts and 
clinical procedures that are unique to marital and 
family therapy. These techniques are contrasted with 
individually-orientated psychotherapy. Pre-marital, 
marital and family, and divorce counseling techniques 
are demonstrated and evaluated 

FMCD 487 Legal Aspects of Family Problems. (3) 

Laws and legal involvement that directly affect specific 
aspects of the family: adoption, marriage, estate plan- 
ning, property rights, wills, etc. Emphasis will be given 
to the involvement of a professional lawyer; principles 
and interpretation of the law. 

FMCD 499 Special Topics. (1-3) A — Family Studies 
B — Community Studies C — Management and Con- 
sumer Studies 

FMCD 600 Readings in Research and Theory of the 
Family. (3) Emphasis is placed on surveying current 
research, concepts and theory in marital and family 
dynamics. The relationship of the contemporary family 
to the society and community are discussed and family 
patterns within various social classes and across dif- 
ferent cultures are compared. Changes in family func- 
tioning throughout the family life cycle and over the 
last hundred years are described and analyzed. 

FMCD 602 Integrative Aspects of Family and Com- 
munity Development (3) Integrative approach to stu- 
dying and improving the quality of life, drawing upon 
family, consumer, and community studies. 

FMCD 605 Community Development in Neighbor- 
hoods (3) Exploration of neighborhoods in cities and 
suburbs, as well as small towns, including their varying 
character, their dynamics of change, and the possibili- 
ty of community development. 

FMCD 609 Seminar: Current Issues in Family and 
Community Development. (1=4) This seminar will 
be open to all graduate students for non-credit or 
variable credit by prior arrangement. It is considered 
an informal vehicle to generate communication and 
discussion among all members of the department. 
Presentations will include reviews and critiques of 
recent articles and books within the field and those 
relevant to it. In addition, original informal discussion 
papers from faculty and students will be generated for 



presentation and discussion. Guest speakers and 
discussants will be encouraged when deemed appro- 
priate. 

FMCD 610 Familimetrics. (3) Prerequisites, FMCD 
401 and statistics. The primary focus is on the advan- 
tages and limitations of family research procedures 
and the degree of correspondence between these 
methods. Ways of developing and evaluating ade- 
quate research procedures will be emphasized and 
recent innovations in the field will be considered. 

FMCD 615 Needs Assessment in Family and Com- 
munity Development (3) Exploration and application 
of needs assessment in family and community pro- 
grams. A survey of the theoretical and empirical litera- 
ture on needs, the quality of life, and social indicators 
is followed by a workshop approach to the problems of 
conducting a needs assessment, including instrument 
design, implementation, data analysis, and reporting. 

FMCD 625 Advanced Consumer Affairs. (3) An 

analysis of current consumer behavior found in varous 
family life styles and of community processes for 
dealing with consumer problems. Emphasis is given to 
recent research and theoretical frameworks in the 
consuemr area. 

FMCD 630 Theory and Research in Human Sexuali- 
ty. (3) Prerequisites: PSYC 100, SOCY 100, and HLTH 
477, or consent of instructor. Survey of theory and 
research in human sexuality and their implications for 
contemporary family life. 

FMCD 660 Program Planning and Evaluation. (1-6) 

Consideration is given to research program develop- 
ment and/or evaluation of an existing research pro- 
gram in relation to objectives and need. Reporting of 
research for publication in a journal and periodicals will 
also be stressed. 

FMCD 668 Special Topics in Family Life. (1-6) 

Individual study or arranged group study. 

FMCD 678 Special Topics in Community Develop- 
ment 1-3 Individual study or arranged group study. 

FMCD 686 Introduction to Family Counseling. (3) 

This course gives the fundamental theoretical con- 
cepts and clinical procedures that are unique to family 
and marital therapy. Family and marital therapy are 
contrasted with individually-oriented psychotherapy in 
terms of historical development, assumptions and 
techniques. Various types of clinical techniques for 
marital and family therapists are presented. Premarital, 
marital and family, divorce counseling approaches are 
considered. 

FMCD 688 Special Topics in Management-Consum- 
er. (1-3) Individual study or arranged group study. 

FMCD 691 Family-Community Consultation. (3) The 

improvement of family and community environments 
through the process of consultation. Emphasis on 
techniques and approaches to consultation including 
both the role of the consultant and the needs of 
community agencies and family programs. Field expe- 
rience with problem-solving methodologies and plan- 
ning of consultation programs. 

FMCD 695 Practicum in Family and Community 
Services. (3) A field experience which provides one of 
the following: (1) direct contact with family life styles 
different from one's own (2) observation and/or (3) 
experience of a professional role in working with 
families (consulting, counseling, informal education, 
leadership training, community action, case work, 
etc.). Observation and/or experience with services, 
educational programs or action programs dealing with 
a particular type of family problem (financial, consum- 
er, help in emergencies, health, housing, homemaker 
rehabilitation, family relationships and management) 
will be included. 

FMCD 698 Special Topics in General Human Ecolo- 
gy (1-6) Individual study or arranged group study. 

FMCD 799 Masters Thesis Research. (1-6) 



Food, Nutrition and 
Institution 
Administration Program 

Professor and Chairman: Prather 
Professors: Ahrens, Beaton 
Associate Professors: Cox, Williams 



Assistant Professors: Axelson, Brady, Moser, 

Caliendo, 

Adjunct Assistant Professors: Michaelis, 

Reynolds, Rinke, Rosebrough 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Kelsay, Szepesi 

Adjunct Professors: Bodwell, Reiser, Trout 

The Department offers a program leading to a 
Master of Science degree in each of the follow- 
ing major areas: food, nutrition, and institution 
administration. The Department participates in 
an interdepartmental program for Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in 
nutritional science which is described under 
that title. The area of food includes study in 
experimental foods as well as cultural and con- 
sumer aspects of food. Nutrition includes the 
science of nutrition as well as the broad area of 
community and clinical nutrition. Institution ad- 
ministration includes all phases of food service 
systems. 

Please also check the "Food Science" and , 
"Nutritional Sciences" program entries. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

In addition to minimum Graduate School 
requirements, a satisfactory score on the apti- 
tude portion of the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion is required. A minimum combination of . 
1000 with a minimum of 450 on both the verbal 
and quantitative is required for admission. 

Thesis and non-thesis options are available 
for the Masters of Science degree in food, 
nutrition or institution administration. 

All students are required to take Seminar, 
Research Methods and a statistics course. 
Other courses are selected with the guidance of 
an advisor and/or a committee. Non-thesis • 
option students must prepare a research paper, 
present an additional seminar and take a written 
comprehensive examination in addition to an 
oral examination. An average of three or four 
semesters is usually required to complete the 
M.S. thesis option and two or three semesters 
for the non-thesis option. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has special arrangements and 
cooperative agreements with laboratories at the 
Nutrition Institute, A.R.S., U.S.D.A., the Univer- 
sity Affiliated Program in Child Development at 
Georgetown University Hospital Clinic, Universi- 
ty of Maryland Hospital in Baltimore and Child- 
ren's Hospital for students in nutrition and 
foods. There are faculty members who have 
advanced degrees in the areas of experimental 
foods and food chemistry, cultural foods, com- 
munity nutrition, clinical nutrition, human and 
animal nutrition, and food service systems. 

Financial Assistance 

There are a limited number of graduate teach- 
ing assistantships, traineeships and research 
assistantships available. 

Additional Information 

Copies of a Department mimeograph with addi- 
tional information concerning admission 
requirements, courses, faculty, facilities, etc. 
are available from the Department Chairman. 

Courses 

FOOD 440 Advanced Food Science. (3) Three lee- 
tures per week. Prerequisites: FOOD 250 and CHEM 
261 or 461. Chemical and physical properties of food 
as related to consumer use in the home and institu- 
tions. 

FOOD 445 Advanced Food Science Laboratory. (1) 

One three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 
CHEM 201 and consent of instructor. Chemical deter- 



Food, Nutrition and Institution Administration Program 91 



mination of selected components in animal and plant 
foods 

FOOD 450 Experimental Food Science. (3) One 

lecture, two laboratories per week. Prerequisite: FOOD 
440 or equivalent. Individual and group laboratory 
experimentation as an introduction to methods of food 
research. 

FOOD 480 Food Additives. (3) Prerequisite: FOOD 
440 or equivalent. Effects of intentional and incidental 
additives on food quality, nutritive value and safety 
Current regulatory procedures. 

FOOD 490 Special Problems In Foods. (2-3) Prereq- 
uisite: FOOD 440 and consent of instructor. Individual 
selected problems in the area of food science. 

FOOD 498 Special Topics. (1-3) Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. Selected current aspects of food. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits if the subject 
matter is substantially different. 

FOOD 610 Readings In Food. (3) Prerequisite: FOOD 
440 or consent of instructor A critical survey of the 
literature of recent developments in food research. 

FOOD 620 Nutritional and Quality Evaluation of 

Food (3) Prerequisite: FOOD 440 or consent of in- 
structor. Effects of production, processing, marketing, 
storage, and preparation on nutritive value and quality 
of foods. 

FOOD 640 Food Enzymes. (3) First semester, al- 
ternate years. Two lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, FOOD 440 or equivalent. The classi- 
fication and behavior of naturally occurring and added 
enzymes in food; includes the effects of temperature, 
pH, radiation, moisture, etc., on enzyme activity. 

FOOD 650 Advanced Experimental Food. (3-5) 

Second semester. Two lectures and three laboratory 
periods a week. Selected readings of literature in 
experimental foods. Development of individual prob- 
lem. 

FOOD 660 Research Methods. (3) Prerequisite: A 
statistics course. A study of appropriate research 
methodology and theories including experimental de- 
sign. Each student is required to develop a specimen 
research proposal. 

FOOD 678 Special Topics In Foods. (1-6) Individual 
or group study in an area of foods. 

FOOD 688 Seminar. (1-2) Reports and discussions of 
current research in foods 

FOOD 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

NUTR 425 International Nutrition. (2) Two lectures 
per week. Prerequisite: course in basic nutrition. Nutri- 
tional status of world population and local, national 
and international programs for improvement. 

NUTR 430 Nutritional Biochemistry. (3) Prerequisite: 
CHEM 261 or equivalent. Nutritional biochemistry with 
special emphasis on the relationship between bio- 
chemistry and nutrition. 

NUTR 435 History o» Nutrition. (2) Two lectures per 
week. Prerequisite: course in basic nutrition. A study of 
the development of the knowledge of nutrition and its 
interrelationship with social and economic develop- 
ments. 

NUTR 450 Advanced Human Nutrition. (3) Prerequi- 
sites: consent of department; NUTR 300 and CHEM 
261 or concurrent registration in CHEM 462. Two 
lectures and one two-hour laboratory. A critical study 
of the physiological and metabolic influences on nutri- 
ent utilization, with particular emphasis on current 
problems in human nutrition. 

NUTR 460 Therapeutic Human Nutrition. (3) Two 

lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
sites: NUTR 300, 450. Modifications of the normal 
adequate diet to meet human nutritional needs in 
pathological conditions. 

NUTR 470 Community Nutrition. (3) Prerequisites 
NUTR 300. 450. 460 A study of different types of 
community nutrition programs, problems and projects. 

NUTR 475 Dynamics ot Community Nutrition (3) 

Prerequisite: NUTR 470 or consent of instructor. The 
practice of community nutrition. Community assess- 
ment; nutrition program planning, implementation and 
evaluation; nutrition education and counseling; grant- 
manship, and the legislative process. 

NUTR 480 Clinical Dietetics I. (2) Pre-or corequisite' 
NUTR 450. Corequisite: NUTR 460. Open only to 
students accepted into the coordinated dietetic pro- 



gram. Principles of interviewing and counseling. Appli- 
cation of principles of normal and therapeutic nutrition 
in medical and surgical care of patients. Thirteen hours 
of supervised clinical experience per week is required. 

NUTR 485 Clinical Dietetics ii. (4) Prerequisite: 
NUTR 480 Open only to students in the coordinated 
program in dietetics Continuation of NUTR 480 with 
emphasis on development of nutritional care plans and 
patient education. Fourteen hours of clinical experi- 
ence per week is required One two hour lecture. 

NUTR 490 Special Problems In Nutrition. (2-3) 

Prerequisites: NUTR 300 and consent of instructor 
Individual selected problems in the area of human 
nutrition. 

NUTR 495 Clinical Dietetics Ml. (4) Prerequisites 
NUTR 485. Open only to senior students in the coordi- 
nated dietetic program. Clinical practice in dietetics 
under supervision of a registered dietician, including 
responsiblity for nutritional support and nutritional care 
plans for patients, supervision of dietetic personnel 
and affiliation with community agencies. Two hundred 
eighty hours of clinical practice per semester 

NUTR 498 Special Topics. (1-3) Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. Selected current aspects of nutri- 
tion. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits if the 
subject matter is substantially different. 

NUTR 600 Recent Progress in Human Nutrition. (3) 

Recent developments in the science of nutrition with 
emphasis on the interpretation of these findings for 
application in health and disease. 

NUTR 610 Readings In Nutrition. (1-3) Reports and 
discussions of signifant nutritional research and in- 
vestigation. 

NUTR 615 Maternal and Infant Nutrition. (3) prereq- 
uisite: NUTR 460 or equivalent, or consent of instruc- 
tor. Current literature concerning the importance of 
diet during pregnancy and infancy on the health of the 
mother and infant. Physiological and biochemical 
changes during pregnancy and infancy, current issues 
in infant feeding, such as possible effects of diet during 
infancy on obesity and degenerative diseases in later 
life, and current public health programs designed to 
serve pregnant women and infants. 

NUTR 620 Nutrition for Community Services. (3) 

Application of the principles of nutrition to various 
community problems of specific groups of the public. 
Students may select specific problems for independ- 
ent study 

NUTR 625 Nutritional Needs of the Developmen- 
tally Disabled (2) An anlysis of the handicapping 
conditions resulting from abnormal brain structure, 
maturation or function and the effects on nutritional 
status. Assessment techniques, requirements and 
treatment approaches. 

NUTR 630 Nutritional Aspects of Energy Balance. 

(3) Prerequisite: CHEM 462 or equivalent, or consent 
of instructor The prevalence and basic causes of 
caloric imbalance, along with a wide variety of ap- 
proaches to weight control. 

NUTR 660 Research Methods. (3) Prerequisite: a 
statistics course A study of appropriate research 
methodology and theories including experimental de- 
sign. Each student is required to develop a specimen 
research proposal. 

NUTR 670 Intermediary Metabolism In Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 461. 462 or 
equivalent. The maior routes of carbohydrate, fat, and 
protein metabolism with particular emphasis on meta- 
bolic shifts and their detection and significance in 
nutrition. 

NUTR 678 Special Topics In Nutrition. (1-6) Individ- 
ual or Group study in an area of nutrition. 

NUTR 680 Human Nutritional Status. (3) First se- 
mester, alternate years. Methods of appraisal of 
human nutritional status, to include dietary, biochemi- 
cal and anthropometric techniques. 

NUTR 698 Seminar In Nutrition. (1-3) A study in 
depth of a selected phase of nutrition. 

NUTR 699 Problems in Nutrition. (1-4) Prerequisite 
permission of faculty. Experience in a phase of nutri- 
tion of interest to the student Use is made of experi- 
mental animals, human studies and extensive, critical 
studies of research methods, techniques or data of 
specific projects 

NUTR 799 Masters Thesis Research. (1-6) 



IADM 410 School Food Service. (3) Two lectures and 
one morning a week for field experience in a school 
food service Prerequisite: FOOD 200. or 240 and 250, 
and NUTR 300, or consent of instructor. Study ot 
organization and management, menu planning, food 
purchasing, preparation, service, and cost control in a 
school lunch program. 

IADM 440 Food Service Personnel Administration. 

(2) Prerequisite: IADM 300. Principles of personnel 
administration in food services, emphasis on person- 
nel selection, supervision and training. |Ob evaluation, 
wage and payroll structure, current labor regulations, 
and interpersonal relationships and communications 
IADM 450 Food Service Equipment and Planning. 

(2) Two lectures a week. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. Equipment design selection, maintenance 
and efficient layout, relation of the physical facility to 
production and service. 

IADM 455 Manpower Planning and Labor Market In 
the Food Service Industry. (3) Prerequisites IADM 
440 or BMGT 360 or consent of the instructor. The 
labor market with particular reference to human re- 
source planning and development, productivity of 
workforce and the progress of minority towards equal 
employment opportunities. The future needs and impli- 
cations indicated by the growth and present dimen- 
sions of these and other factors. 

IADM 460 Administrative Dietetics I. (2) Corequisite: 
IADM 360 Open only to students accepted into the 
coordinated dietetic program. Ten hours of supervised 
clinical experience per week is required. Application of 
management theory through guided experience in all 
aspects of hospital dietary services administration. 

IADM 470 Administrative Dietetics II. (4) Prerequi- 
site: IADM 360, 440 and 460. Open only to senior 
students in the coordinated dietetic program. Con- 
tinuation of IADM 460 Two hundred eighty hours of 
supervised clinical practice per semester required, 
including affiliation with a general hospital. 

IADM 480 Practlcum in Institution Administration. 

(3) Prerequisite: consent of the department. In-service 
training and practical experience, totaling at least 120 
hours, in an approved food service operation under 
direct supervision of practicum advisor. 

IADM 488 (1) cr Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
Problems and controversies in food service industry 
Review of non-text literature and research findings 
pertinent to current problems. 

IADM 490 Special Problems In Food Service. (2-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing, five hours in IADM 
courses and consent of instructor Individual selected 
problems in the area of food service. 

IADM 498 Special Topics. (1-3) Prerequisite consent 
of instructor. Selected current aspects of Institution 
Administration. Repeatable to a maximum of six cred- 
its if the subject matter is subtantially different. 

IADM 600 Food Service Administration. (3) First or 

second semester Principles of organization and man- 
agement related to a food system. Control of re- 
sources through the use of quantitative methods. 
Administrative decision-making, and personnel poli- 
cies and practices. 

IADM 610 Readings in Food Administration. (3) 

Reports and discussion of significant research and 
development in the area of Food Administration. 

IADM 630 Computer Application in Food Service. 
(3) Alternate years. Prerequisite: IADM 600 or equiva- 
lent. The use of automatic data processing and pro- 
gramming for the procurement and issuing of food 
commodities, processing of ingredients, menu selec- 
tion, and labor allocations. 

IADM 640 Sanitation and Safety in Food Service. 

(3) Alternate years Prerequisite: MICB 200 Principles 
and practices of sanitation and safety unique to the 
production, storage and service of food in quantity: 
includes current legislation. 

IADM 650 Experimental Quantity Food Production. 

(3) Alternate years Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory Prerequisites: IADM 430 and FOOD 450 or 
equivalents Application of experimental methods to 
quantity food production, recipe development and 
modification: relationship of food quality to production 
methods 

IADM 660 Research Methods. (3) Prerequisite a 
statistics course A study of appropriate research 
methodology and theories including expenmental de- 



92 Food Science Program 

sign. Each student is required to develop a research 
proposal. 

IADM 670 Control and Analysis of Costs in Food 
Service Industries. (3) Prerequisite— consent of the 
instructor Principles of controlling and analyzing costs 
in food service operations. The effects of these princi- 
ples on day-to = day operations. 
IADM 678 Special Topics in Institutional Food. (1- 
6) Individual or group study in an area of Institutional 
Food Service. 

IADM 688 Seminar. (1) Reports and discussion of 
current research in institution administration. May be 
repeated to a maximum of three semester hours of 
credit. 

IADM 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) First and 
second semesters. Credit in proportion to work done 
and results accomplished. Investigation in some pha- 
ses of institution administration which may form the 
basis of a thesis. 



Food Science Program 

Professor and Chairman: Mattick (Dairy 
Science) 

Professors: Wheaton (Agricultural 
Engineering). Bender (Agricultural and 
Resource Economics), Young (Animal 
Science), Keeney (Chemistry), Davis and King 
(Dairy Science). Kramer, Twigg and Wiley 
(Horticulture), Health and Thomas (Poultry 
Sci©nc6) 

Associate Professors: Stewart (Agricultural 
Engineering), Buric (Animal Science), 
Westhoff (Dairy Science), Solomos 
(Horticulture) 

Assistant Professors: Frey (Agricultural 
Engineering), Vijay (Dairy Science) 
Visiting Lecturers: Bednarczyk, Berry, Cross, 
Green 

The Food Science Program offers the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The 
Program is interdepartmental with participation 
or support from the Departments of Animal 
Science, Dairy Science, Horticulture, Poultry 
Science, Agricultural Engineering, Chemistry, 
and Agricultural and Resource Economics. Pro- 
grams of study and research are individually 
planned with the student and an appropriate 
committee. Areas of study encompass animal, 
plant, seafood, and fabricated food products. 
Specialization is available in food microbiology 
and fermentations, food chemistry and bio- 
chemistry, quality assurance, food engineering 
and product development, nutritional evalua- 
tion, food sanitation, packaging, and distribu- 
tion. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 



In addition to minimum Graduate School 
requirements, the Aptitude Test of the GRE 
Examinations is required. The Food Science 
Admissions Committee evaluates and makes 
recommendations on all applications based on 
academic and professional experience and let- 
ters of recommendations (at least 3 required). 
When feasible the Committee may conduct a 
personal interview. In the absence of a bache- 
lor's degree in Food Science or Food Technolo- 
gy a strong background in physical and biologi- 
cal sciences is recommended. Inadequate pre- 
requisites may result in a recommendation to 
complete a remedial program as a special stu- 
dent, undergraduate status. Program require- 
ments are as follows: 1) Food Science; the 
equivalent of the following courses: FDSC 412, 
413 Principles of Food Processing; FDSC 421, 
423 Food Chemistry; FDSC 430, 434 Food 
Microbiology; FDSC 431, Food Quality Control. 
2) Biochemistry— minimum of 3 hours graduate 
credit. 3) Colloquium (seminar). Attendance 



each semester and at least 2 presentations for 
credit during the program of study. 4) Provi- 
sional requirements based on admission must 
be satisfied as soon as practical. 

For the M.S. degree, a student must com- 
plete the program of study as approved by his 
committee which will include the minimum 
requirements. Students entering the Program 
without a background in Food Science will 
probably complete about 30 hours of course 
work to obtain the M.S. degree. For the M.S. 
with thesis, a research proposal must be sub- 
mitted to the student's committee for review 
and approval by the end of the second semes- 
ter of study. Students who for various reasons 
or circumstances cannot readily satisfy the the- 
sis research may complete an additional 6 
hours of courses at the 600 level in addition to 
the program requirements above. A scholarly 
paper on a subject approved by the committee 
must be prepared and presented at a regular 
FDSC colloquium. A final comprehensive exam- 
ination including defense of the scholarly paper 
will be conducted by the student's committee. 
Part of this examination will be written. The 
above programs should be completed within 3 
semesters and a summer session. 

For admission to the doctoral program, the 
M S. degree is not required but is generally 
recommended. Students completing an M.S. 
degree in the FDSC Program, UMCP must 
receive a favorable recommendation from the 
M.S. degree final examining committee. Stu- 
dents admitted from outside the FDSC Pro- 
gram, UMCP will be examined orally by their 
committee as a basis for developing a suitable 
program of study. The student must complete a 
program of study as approved by the student's 
committee including minimum requirements of 
the Graduate School and FDSC Program 
requirements. There is no required number of 
hours of course work. Programs are developed 
on an individual basis. There is no language 
requirement. A proposal for dissertation re- 
search must be presented to the student's 
committee for review and approval by the end 
of the third semester of study. A comprehensive 
oral examination will be conducted by the com- 
mittee and other interested faculty members 
after substantial completion of the program of 
study and usually before the end of the fourth 
semester. Satisfactory performance in this ex- 
amination is required before recommendation 
for admission to candidacy is granted. Each 
student will assist in teaching at least one 
course regardless of whether employed as a 
graduate assistant. The candidate will defend 
the dissertation before a committee of at least 5 
members appointed by the Dean for Graduate 
Studies. The candidate's advisor is usually 
chairman of the committee. It is recommended 
that the candidate prepare initial drafts of in- 
tended publications for review before the final 
examination. This program should be complet- 
ed in 3 years or less depending on the candi- 
date's previous background. 



Facilities and Special Resources 

The combined resources of the participating 
Departments are available for Food Science 
research. Laboratories, pilot plants, and equip- 
ment are located in the Animal Sciences Cen- 
ter, Holzapfel Hall, Turner Laboratory and 
Shriver Hall. Facilities are available for the ex- 
perimental processing of fruits, vegetables, 
poultry, red meat, and dairy products. A seafood 
processing facility is located off campus. Labo- 
ratories are equipped for microbiological, bio- 
chemical, biophysical, and engineering re- 
search including facilities for laboratory ani- 
mals. Instrumentation includes gas-liquid chro- 
matographs, atomic absorption spec- 
trophotometers, electron microscope, radioiso- 



tope counters, amino acid analyzer, ultracen- 
trifuge, fermenters, and controlled environment 
incubator. University research farms are avail- 
able for both plant and animal production stu- 
dies Specialized facilities of nearby govern- 
ment and food industry laboratories are regu- 
larly made available for graduate student re- 
search. The National Agricultural Library is 
about 3 miles from the campus. The FDSC 
Program has an exchange agreement with the 
Food Science Department of the Central Uni- 
versity of Venezuela for graduate study and 
research. 

Financial Assistance 

Teaching and research assistantships are 
made available by the participating Depart- 
ments. Financial support is also available from 
contracts and grants and by special arrange- 
ments with several nearby government labora- 
tories. 

Additional Information 

A detailed brochure, "Graduate Study in Food 
Science," is available in the Program Office and 
can be obtained by contacting: Dr. J.F. Mattick, 
Coordinator and Chairman, Food Science Pro- 
gram, Animal Sciences Center, University of 
Maryland. Telephone: 301^154-3928. 

Courses 

FDSC 412 Principles of Food Processing I. (3) Two 

lectures and one laboratory per week. A study of the 
basic methods by which foods are preserved (unit 
operations). Effect of raw product quality and the 
various types of processes on yield and quality of the 
preserved products. 

FDSC 413 Principles of Food Processing II. (3) 
Three lectures per week. A detailed study of food 
processing with emphasis on line and staff operations, 
including physical facilities, utilities, pre-and post-pro- 
cessing operations, processing line development and 
sanitation. 

FDSC 421 Food Chemistry. (3) Three lectures per 
week Prerequisites: CHEM 203 and 204. The applica- 
tion of basic chemical and physical concepts to the 
composition and properties of foods. Emphasis on the 
relationship of processing technology, to the keeping 
quality, nutritional value, and acceptability of foods. 
FDSC 422 Food Product Research and Develop- 
ment (3) Two lectures, and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites. FDSC 413, CHEM 461 , or permission of 
instructor. A study of the research and development 
function for improvement of existing products and 
development of new, economically feasible and mar- 
ketable food products. Application of chemical-physi- 
cal characteristics of ingredients to produce optimum 
quality products, cost reduction, consumer evaluation, 
equipment and package development. 
FDSC 423 Food Chemistry Laboratory. (2) Pre— or 
corequisite: FDSC 421. Two laboratories per week. 
Analysis of the major and minor constituents of food 
using chemical, physical and instrumental methods in 
concordance with current food industry and regulatory 
practices. Laboratory exercises coincide lecture sub- 
jects in FDSC 421. 

FDSC 430 Food Miobiology. (2) cr Two lectures per 
week Prerequisite: MICB 200 or equivalent. A study of 
microorganisms of major importance to the food indus- 
try with emphasis on food-borne outbreaks, public 
health significance, bioprocessing of foods and control 
of microbial spoilage of foods. 
FDSC 431 Food Quality Control. (4) Three lectures 
and one laboratory per week. Definition and organiza- 
tion of the quality control function in the food industry; 
preparation of specifications; statistical methods for 
acceptance sampling; in-plant and processed product 
inspection. Instrumental and sensory methods for 
evaluating sensory quality, identity and wholesome- 
ness and their integration into grades and standards of 
quality. 

FDSC 434 Food Miobiology Laboratory. (2) cr Two 
laboratories per week. Pre— or corequisite: FDSC 430. 
A study of techniques and procedures used in the 
microbiological examination of foods. 



French Language and Literature Program 93 



FOSC 442 Horticultural Products Processing. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Commer- 
cial methods ol canning, freezing, dehydrating, fer- 
menting, and chemical preservation of fruit and vege- 
table crops. 

FDSC 451 Dairy Products Processing. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory per week. Method of produc- 
tion of fluid milk, butter, cheese, condensed and 
evaporated milk and milk products and ice cream. 

FDSC 461 Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. 

(3) Two lectures and one laboratory per week. A study 
of the technological factors concerned with the pro- 
cessing, storage, and marketing of eggs and poultry 
and the factors affecting their quality. 

FDSC 471 Meat and Meat Processing. (3) Two 

lectures and one laboratory a week Prerequisite, 
CHEM 461 or permission of instructor. Physical and 
chemical characteristics of meat and meat products, 
meat processing, methods of testing and product 
development. 

FDSC 482 Seafood Products Processing. (3) Two 

lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 461 or permission of instructor. The principal 
preservation methods for commercial seafood pro- 
ducts with particular reference to the invertebrates. 
Chemical and microbiological aspects of processing 
are emphasized 

FDSC 621 Systems Analysis in the Food Industry. 

(3) Construction and solution of models for optimizing 
feed, product formulations, nutrient-palatability costs 
Methods for optimizing processes, inventories, and 
transportation systems. 

FDSC 631 Advanced Food Miobiology. (2) cr One 

lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
FDSC 430 or permission of instructor. An in depth 
understanding and working knowledge of a selected 
number of problem areas and contemporary topics in 
food microbiology. 

FDSC 689 Seminar in Food Science. (1-3) A-Upids; 
B-Proteins; C-Carbohydratesi D-Organoleptic Proper- 
ties; ErFermentation; F-Enzymes and microorgan- 
isms; G-Flavor analysis; l-Assays, Studies in depth of 
selected phases of food science are frequently best 
arranged by employment if a lecturer from outside the 
university to teach a specific phase. Flexibility in the 
credit offered permits adjustment to the nature of the 
course. 

FDSC 698 Colloquium in Food Science. (1) First and 
second semester Oral reports on special topics or 
recently published research in food science and tech- 
nology. Distinguished scientists are invited as guest 
lecturers. A maximum of three credits allowed for the 
M.S. 

FDSC 699 Special Problems in Food Science. (1-4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite CHEM 461 
or permission of instructor. Credit according to time 
scheduled and magnitude of problem. An experimental 
program on a topic other than the student's thesis 
problem will be conducted. Four credits shall be the 
maximum allowed toward on advanced degree. 

FDSC 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

FDSC 811 Advances in Food Technology. (3) First 
semester, alternate years. Prerequisite. CHEM 461 or 
permission of instructor A systematic review of new 
products, processes and management practices in the 
food industry 

FDSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



French Language and 
Literature Program 

Professor and Chairman: Therrien 

Professors: MacBain 

Associate Professors: Demaitre, Fink, Hall, 

Meijer, Russell, Tarica 

Assistant Professors: Ashby, Black, 

Campagna, Felaco, Hage 

The Department of French and Italian prepares 
students for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in 
French language and literature. The composi- 
tion of the Graduate faculty and the variety of 
course offerings make it possible for students to 
specialize in any period or movement of French 



literature or any aspect of the French language, 
with the consent of their advisers. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Entry into the M.A. program is open to students 
having a solid grounding in French language 
and literature. All applicants, whether graduates 
of the University of Maryland or not. must take 
all parts of the G.R.E., including the Advanced 
Examination in French. 

The students' knowledge of French is 
screened at the beginning of their first semester 
through a Language Proficiency Examination. In 
addition to evidence of independent scholarly 
research in the form of a thesis (thesis option) 
or a substantial research paper (non-thesis op- 
tion), successful completion of the M.A. pro- 
gram involves passing a comprehensive exami- 
nation (a six-hour written examination followed 
by a one-hour oral examination) in French litera- 
ture from the Middle Ages to the present. The 
M.A. program is generally completed in four 
semesters, or less if Summer Session offerings 
are utilized. 

Entry into the Ph.D. program is open to the 
most highly qualified and most highly motivated 
candidates, who can show that individual re- 
search is their major interest and who give 
evidence of strong qualifications to pursue that 
interest. 

All applicants for the Ph.D. program (ex- 
cept M.A. graduates of this Department) must 
pass a three-part preliminary examination ad- 
ministered at the start of the Fall semester, 
consisting of an explication de texte, an essay 
and an oral examination, before being fully 
admitted to the program. They are then required 
to complete a program of seminars related to 
their field of interest and to pass five Special 
Topic examinations and a Foreign Language 
translation examination before being admitted 
to candidacy and beginning work on their dis- 
sertation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to the University graduate and un- 
dergraduate libraries, the Department maintains 
a reference library. Area research facilities in- 
clude the Library of Congress and the Folger 
Library (specializing in 16th and 18th-century 
literature). 

Financial Assistance 

Financial support is available in the form of 
assistantships and fellowships; for information 
contact the Department of French and Italian. 

Additional Information 

For complete information concerning the De- 
partment's requirements, set forth in the Guide 
to Graduate Programs in French, write to the 
Department of French and Italian Language 
and Literature. 

Courses 

FREN 400 Applied Linguistics. (3) The nature of 
applied linguistics and its contribution to the effective 
teaching of foreign languages. Comparative study of 
English and French, with emphasis upon points of 
divergence. Analysis, evaluation and construction of 
related drills. 

FREN 401 Introduction to Stylistics. (3) Prerequisite: 
FREN 302. or course chairman's consent. Compara- 
tive stylistic analysis; detailed grammatical analysis; 
translation 

FREN 404 Oral Practice for Teachers of French. (3) 

Prerequisites: FREN 3 1 1 and FREN 3 1 2, or consent of 
the instructor. Development of fluency in French, 
stress on correct sentence structure and idiomatic 
expression Credit may not be applied toward the 
French major 



FREN 405 Explication De Textes. (3) Oral and writ- 
ten analysis of short literary works, or of excerpts from 
longer works chosen for their historical, structural, or 
stylistic interest, with the purpose of training the maior 
to understand literature in depth and to make mature 
esthetic evaluations of it. 

FREN 411 Introduction to Medieval Literature. (3) 

French literature from the ninth through the fifteenth 
centry. La Chanson Epique. le Roman Courtois. le Lai; 
la litterature bourgeoise, le Theatre, la poesie lyrique 

FREN 412 Introduction to Medieval Literature. (3) 

French literature from the ninth through the fifteenth 
century La Chanson epique. le Roman courtois. le Lai, 
la litterature bourgeoise. le theatre, la poesie lyrique 

FREN 421 French Literature of the Sixteenth Cen- 
tury. (3) The renaissance in France: Humanism. 
Rabelais, Calvin, the Pleiade, Montaigne, baroque 
poetry. 

FREN 422 French Literature of the Sixteenth Cen- 
tury. (3) The Renaissance in France: Humanism, 
Rabelais, Calvin, the Pleiade. Montaigne, baroque 
poetry. 

FREN 431 French Literature of the Seventeenth 
Century. (3) Descartes. Pascal, Corneille. Racine; the 
remaining great classical writers, with special attention 
to Moliere. 

FREN 432 French Literature of the Seventeenth 
Century. (3) Descartes. Pascal. Corneille. Racine; the 
remaining great classical writers, with special attention 
to Moliere. 

FREN 441 French Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. (3) Development of philosophical and scien- 
tific movement; Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot. Rous- 
seau. 

FREN 442 French Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. (3) Development of philosophical and scien- 
tific movement; Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Rous- 
seau. 

FREN 451 French Literature of the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) Drama and poetry from romanticism to 
symbolism; the major prose writers of the same period. 

FREN 452 French Literature of the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) Drama and poetry from romanticism to 
symbolism; the major prose writers of the same period. 

FREN 461 Studies in Twentieth Century Litera- 
ture — the Early Years. (3) French poetry, theater and 
the novel during the age of Proust and Gide 

FREN 462 Studies in Twentieth Century Litera- 
ture — Mid-Century Writers. (3) Modern French poet- 
ry, theater and the novel, with special emphasis on the 
literature of anxiety and existentialism. 

FREN 463 Studies in Twentieth Century Litera- 
ture — the Contemporary Scene. (3) French writers 
and literary movements since about 1950. with special 
emphasis on new forms of the novel and theater 

FREN 471 French Civilization I. (3) French life, 
customs, culture, traditions (800-1750). 

FREN 472 French Civilization II. (3) French life, 
customs, culture, traditions (1750— present-day 
France). 

FREN 478 Themes and Movements of French Liter- 
ature in Translation. (3) cr Studies treatments of 
thematic problems or of literary or historical move- 
ments in French literature. Topic to be determined 
each semester given in English. 

FREN 479 Masterworks of French Literature In 
Translation. (3) Treats the works of one or more 
major French writers. Topic to be determined each 
semester. Given in English. 

FREN 488 Pro-Seminar in a Great Literary Figure. 
(3) Each semester a specialized study will be made of 
one great French writer chosen from some representa- 
tive literary period or movement since the middle ages. 
Repeatable for a maximum of six credits 

FREN 489 Pro-Seminar in Themes or Movements 
ot French Literature. (3) Repeatable for a maximum 
of six credits 

FREN 491 Honors Reading Course, Poetry. (3) H— 

Honors. Poetry Supervised readings to be taken nor- 
mally only by students admitted to the honors pro- 
gram. 

FREN 492 Honors Reading Course. Novel. (3) H— 

Honors. Novel Supervised readings to be taken nor- 



94 Geography Program 



mally only by students admitted to the honors pro- 
gram. 

FREN 493 Honors Reading Course Drama. (3) H— 

Honors, Drama supervised readings to be taken nor- 
mally only be students admitted to the honors pro- 
gram. 

FREN 494 Honors Independent Study. (3) H— Hon- 
ors Honors independent study involves guided read- 
ings based on an honors reading list and tested by a 6 
hour written examination. Honors 494 and 495 are 
required to fulfill the departmental honors requirement 
in addition to two out of the following, 491 h, 492h, 
493h. Open only to students admitted to the depart- 
mental honors program. 

FREN 495 Honors Thesis Research. (3) H— Honors 
Honors thesis research involves the writing of a paper 
under the direction of a professor in this department 
and an oral examination. Honors 494 and 495 are 
required to fulfill the departmental honors requirement 
in addition to two out of the following, 491 h, 492h, 
493h. Open only to students admitted to the depart- 
mental honors program. 

FREN 498 Special Topics in French Literature. (3) 

Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. 

FREN 499 Special Topics in French Studies. (3) An 

aspect oF french studies, the specific topic to be 
announced each time the course is offered. Repeata- 
ble for a maximum of 6 credits. 

FREN 600 Problems in Bibliography and Research 

Methods. (3) 

FREN 601 The History of the French Language. (3) 

FREN 602 Comparative Romance Linguistics. (3) 

Also listed as SPAN 612. 

FREN 603 Stylistics. (3) Advanced composition, 
translation, stylistic analysis. 

FREN 609 Special Topic in the French Language. 

(3) 

FREN 610 La Chanson de Roland. (3) cr Close 

reading of the text, study of epic formulae and early 

medieval literary techniques; reading knowledge of old 

French desirable. 

FREN 619 Special Topic in Medieval French Litera- 
ture. (3) 

FREN 629 Special Topic in Sixteenth Century 
French Literature. (3) 

FREN 630 Corneille. (3) 

FREN 631 Moliere. (3) 

FREN 632 Racine. (3) 

FREN 639 Special Topic in Seventeenth Century 
French Literature. (3) 

FREN 640 Voltaire. (3) 

FREN 641 Rousseau. (3) 

FREN 642 Diderot. (3) 

FREN 649 Special Topic in Eighteenth Century 
French Literature. (3) 

FREN 650 French Poetry in the Nineteenth Centu- 
ry. (3) 

FREN 651 French Poetry in the Nineteenth Centu- 
ry. (3) 

FREN 652 The French Novel in the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 653 The French Novel in the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 659 Special Topic in Nineteenth Century 
French Literature. (3) 

FREN 660 French Poetry in the Twentieth Century. 

(3) 

FREN 662 The French Novel in the Twentieth 

Century. (3) 

FREN 663 The French Novel in the Twentieth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 664 The French Theatre in the Twentieth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 665 The French Theatre in the Twentieth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 669 Special Topic in Twentieth Century 
French Literature. (3) 



FREN 679 The History of Ideas in France. (3) 

Analysis of currents of ideas as reflected in different 
periods and authors of French literature. 

FREN 689 Seminar in a Great Literary Figure. (3) 

FREN 699 Seminar. (3) Topic to be Determined Each 
Semester. 

FREN 702 Structural French Linguistics. (3) 

Synchronic description of the phonology, morphology 
and syntax of modern spoken French: standard 
French in contrast with other varieties. 

FREN 709 College Teaching of French. (1) Introduc- 
tion to the teaching of French at the college level with 
particular emphasis on methodology Seminars in the- 
ory, demonstration of different teaching techniques, 
supervised practice teaching, training in language lab- 
oratory procedures, evaluation of instructional materi- 
als. Required of all graduate assistants in French. 
Repeatable to a maximum of two credits. 

FREN 798 Masters Independent Study. (1-3) Pre- 
requisite: permission of the department's Director of 
Graduate studies. Repeatable to a maximum of 3 
credits. 

FREN 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

FREN 818 French Literary Criticism. (3) Analysis 
and evaluation of various trends in literary criticism as 
a manifestation of the french literary genius. Topic to 
be determined each semester. 

FREN 898 Doctoral Independent Study. (3) Re- 
peatable to a maximum of six credits. 

FREN 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

ITALIAN 

ITAL 410 The Italian Renaissance. (3) A study of 
major trends of thought in Renaissance literature, 
philosophy, art, and science. 

ITAL 498 Special Topics in Italian Literature. (3) 

Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. 

ITAL 499 Special Topics in Italian Studies. (3) An 

aspect of Italian studies, the specific topic to be 
announced each time the course is offered. Repeata- 
ble for a maximum of 6 credits. 



Geography Program 

Professor and Chairman: Corey 
Professors: Fonaroff, Harper 
Associate Professors: Brodsky, Chaves, 
Groves, Mitchell, Thompson, Wiedel 
Assistant Professors: Christian, Cirrincione, 
Petzold, Sawyer 
Lecturers: Kearney, Slocum 

The programs for both the Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the Depart- 
ment of Geography are designed to provide the 
student with an opportunity for specialization in 
several areas. 

Considering particular advantages inherent 
in the College Park location the Department has 
built its graduate program around three major 
areas of concentration and has assembled in 
each a group of faculty members with comple- 
mentary and overlapping interests. The areas 
are: 1) Physical geography with emphasis on 
physical systems involving the inter-relation- 
ships between landforms, climate, and other 
environmental elements and their relationship 
with man's activities including planning and 
management aspects. The University's meteor- 
ology program and Water Resources Research 
Center and work in agriculture and biology 
provide support for this program as do various 
Federal Government environmental programs 
and the special consortium studying Chesa- 
peake Bay and its resources. 2) A cultural- 
historical geography area, with particular atten- 
tion to tropical settlement and resource utiliza- 
tion, health and disease, and various themes of 
historical geography of the Americas. This spe- 
cialty draws on the incomparable archival mate- 
rial in the Washington area, in state historical 
agencies, and in Baltimore. 3) The geography of 



metropolitan areas and urban systems sup- 
ported by affiliation with the University's In- 
stitute for Urban Studies and regional and local 
planning agencies. There are particular 
strengths in social aspects, land use and trans- 
portation, and historical geography of urban 
areas. 4) Cartography. 

Individual faculty members have other in- 
terests that enable students to work on special 
programs such as human ecology, environmen- 
tal problems, medical geography, Latin Ameri- 
ca, Africa, and cartography. Students planning 
such programs should contact the Department 
or appropriate faculty member to determine 
their feasibility. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

While progress in the graduate program is lar- 
gely an individual matter, students entering the 
M.A. program should consider a two-year pro- 
gram normal; those entering the Ph.D. should 
think of three years as the norm. The Depart- 
ment requires very few particular courses — 
students at both levels initiate their own pro- 
grams of coursework and submit a plan of study 
for approval. 

Incoming M.A. students are expected to 
have an undergraduate degree in the field or in 
a closely related field, with substantial work in 
geography. In the latter case, remedial work 
may be required prior to admission to the de- 
gree program. All graduate applicants should 
submit GRE examination results. 

Because of the degree of specialization 
inherent in Ph.D. training, the Department only 
considers applicants whose interests coincide 
with departmental staff competence — in gener- 
al, the three major areas of geography de- 
scribed above. Prospective students who are 
unsure whether their interests match those of 
the Department are encouraged to submit a 
proposal for consideration. 

For admission to the doctoral program, the 
Department normally requires a grade-point av- 
erage higher than 3.0 and an M.A. degree from 
a recognized geography department, or compe- 
tence in terms of fields of study and level of 
achievement comparable to the M.A. degree of 
the Department. 

A non M.A. — direct Ph.D. program is possi- 
ble by petition from the student and upon ap- 
proval of a faculty committee appointed by the 
Department Chairman. 

M.A. students have the choice of either 
thesis or non-thesis programs. The non-thesis 
option involves the preparation of two substan- 
tial research papers and is suited to students 
desiring Breadth of study. All M.A. students take 
an oral examination defense of a research 
proposal prior to work on the thesis or papers 
and a final oral examination based either on the 
thesis or one of the two research papers. 

After completion of formal course-work 
requirements for the Ph.D., there is a two-part 
qualifying examination. Part One is a written 
examination in the student's two major fields of 
specialization. Part Two is an oral examination 
evaluating the dissertation proposal. Upon sat- 
isfactory completion of the dissertation there is 
a final oral examination. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Departmental research facilities include a carto- 
graphic laboratory, a computer graphics and 
spatial analysis facility, a self-instruction labora- 
tory, and a map and journal collection. A 
minicomputer graphics system and numerous 
data terminals are housed in the building in 
which the Department is located. These new 
quarters, to which the Department moved in 
January 1979, include two physical laborator- 



Geography Program 95 



ies, cartographic teaching and production labo- 
ratories, and a computational laboratory. Sever- 
al faculty members have particular skills in 
quantitative methods, computer aided instruc- 
tion, and other analytical tools; and the Depart- 
ment has its own publication of monographs in 
an Occasional Papers series. 

Additional Information 

More detailed information on the M.A. and 
Ph.D. programs can be obtained from the De- 
partment which has available a booklet on the 
graduate programs. 

Courses 

GEOG 400 Geography of North America. (3) An 

examination of the contemporary patterns of American 
and Candian life from a regional viewpoint. Major 
topics include: the significance of the physical environ- 
ment, resource use. the political framework, economic 
activities, demographic and socio-cultural charac- 
teristics, regional identification, and regional problems. 

GEOG 402 Geography of Maryland and Adjacent 
Areas. (3) An analysis of the physical environment, 
natural resources, and population in relation to agricul- 
ture, industry, transport, and trade in the state of 
Maryland and adiacent areas. 
GEOG 406 Historical Geography of North America 
before 1800. (3) An analysis of the changing geogra- 
phy of the U.S. and Canada from pre-Columbian times 
to the end of the 18th century. Emphasis on areal 
variations and changes in the settlements and econo- 
mies of indian and colonial populations. Areal speciali- 
zation and the changing patterns of agriculture, indus- 
try, trade, and transportation. Population growth, com- 
position and interior expansion. Regionalization. 

GEOG 407 Historical Geography of North America 
after 1800. (3) An analysis of the changing geography 
of the U.S. and Canada from 1800 to the 1920's. 
Emphasis on the settlement expansion and socio- 
economic development of the U.S., and comparisons 
with Canadian experience. Immigration, economic ac- 
tivities, industrialization, transportation and urbaniza- 
tion. 

GEOG 410 Geography of Europe. (3) Agricultural 
and industrial development of Europe and present-day 
problems in relation to the physical and cultural setting 
of the continent and its natural resources. 

GEOG 411 Historical Geography of Europe after 
1500. (3) An analysis of the changing geography of 
Europe from the Columbian discoveries until the early 
20th Century with particular emphasis on western 
Europe, the medieval legacy, the impact of overseas 
expansion, and changing patterns of population, agri- 
culture, industry, trade, and transportation. Attention to 
the development of the nation-state and to agricultural 
and industrial revolutions. 

GEOG 415 Economic Resources and Development 
of Africa. (3) The natural resources of Africa in 
relation to agricultural and mineral production; the 
various stages of economic development and the 
potentialities of the future. 

GEOG 420 Geography of Asia. (3) Lands, climates, 
natural resources, and major economic activities in 
Asia (except Soviet Asia) Outstanding differences 
between major regions. 

GEOG 421 Economic and Political Geography of 
Eastern Asia. (3) Study of China. Korea, Japan, the 
Philippines: physical geographic setting, population, 
economic and political geography. Potentialities of 
major regions and recent developments. 

GEOG 422 Cultural Geography of China and Japan. 

(3) Survey of geographical distribution and interpreta- 
tion of cultural patterns of China and Japan, emphasis 
on basic cultural institutions, outlook on life, unique 
characteristics of various groups. Trends of cultural 
change and contemporary problems. 

GEOG 423 Economic and Political Geography of 
South and Southeast Asia. (3) Study of the Indian 
subcontinent. Farther India, Indonesia; physical geo- 
graphic setting, population, economic and political 
geography. Potentialities of various countries and re- 
gions and their role in present Asia. 

GEOG 431 Economic and Cultural Geography of 
Caribbean America. (3) An analysis of the physical 
framework, broad economic and historical trends, cul- 



tural patterns, and regional diversification of Mexico, 
Central America, the West Indies. 
GEOG 432 Economic and Cultural Geography of 
South America. (3) A survey of natural environment 
and resources, economic development and cultural 
deversity of the South American republics, with em- 
phasis upon problems and prospects of the countries 

GEOG 434 Historical Geography of the Hispanic 
World. (3) An examination of the social, economic, 
political and cultural geography of the countries of the 
Iberian peninsula and Latin America in the past with 
concentration on specific time periods of special signif- 
icance in the development of these countries. 

GEOG 435 Geography of the Soviet Union. (3) The 

natural environment and its regional diversity. Geo- 
graphical factors in the expansion of the Russian state 
The geography of agricultural and industrial production 
in relation to available resources, transportation prob- 
lems, and diversity of population 
GEOG 437 Introduction to Regional Methods. (3) 
Inquiry into the evolution of regional methodology with 
specific reference to geographic problems Critical 
analysis and evaluation of past and contemporary 
theories and a thorough examination of alternate re- 
gional methodologies. Application of quantitative and 
qualitative techniques of regional analysis and synthe- 
sis to traditional and modern regional geography em- 
phasizing principles of regionalization. 

GEOG 440 Process Geomorphology. (3) Study of 
the maior processes involved in the development of 
landforms, especially weathering, wasting, and fluvial 
erosion. Evaluation of models of slope and landscape 
evolution. 

GEOG 441 Geomorphological Environment. (3) 
Prerequisite: GEOG 440. An examination of environ- 
ments, coastal, glacial, lithologic, etc., which lead to 
the spatial differentiation of landforms. 

GEOG 441 Geomorphological Environment. (3) 

GEOG 445 Climatology. (3) The geographic aspects 
of climate with emphasis on energy-moisture budgets, 
steady-state and non-steady-state climatology, and 
climatic variations at both macro and micro-scales. 
GEOG 446 Applied Climatology. (3) Prerequisite: 
GEOG 445 or consent of instructor. An in-depth analy- 
sis of the components of the earth's radiation balance 
and energy budgets: radiation, soil heat flux, and the 
evaporation process. Measurement and estimation 
techniques. Practical applications of microclimatologi- 
cal theory and techniques. 

GEOG 447 The Physical Environment of Urban 
Areas (3) Prerequisite: GEOG 201 or consent of 
instructor. An analysis of the constraints imposed upon 
urban land use by such environmental factors as 
geology, geomorphology and hydrology. The effects of 
urban land use upon climatology, soils, earth pro- 
cesses, water movement and vegetation will be in- 
vestigated. 

GEOG 450 Cultural Geography. (3) Prerequisite: 
GEOG 201. 202, or consent of instructor An analysis 
of the impact of man through his ideas and technology 
on the evolution of geographic landscapes. Major 
themes in the relationships between cultures and 
environments. 

GEOG 451 Political Geography. (3) Geographical 
factors in national power and international relations; an 
analysis of the role of 'geopolitics' and 'geostrategy,' 
with special reference to the current world scene. 

GEOG 452 Cultural Ecology. (3) Basic issues con- 
cerning the natural history of man from the perspective 
of the geographer. Basic components of selected 
behavioral and natural systems their evolution and 
adaptation, and survival strategies. 
GEOG 453 Population Geography. (3) Prerequisite: 
GEOG 202 or consent of instructor. Emphasis on the 
spatial characteristics of population distribution and 
growth, migration, fertility and mortality from a global 
perspective. Basic population-environmental relation- 
ships; carrying capacity, derfsity, relationships to na- 
tional development. 

GEOG 455 Urban Geography. (3) Origins of cities, 
followed by a study of elements of site and location 
with reference to cities. The patterns and functions of 
some major world cities will be analyzed. Theories of 
land use differentiation within cities will be appraised. 
GEOG 456 The Social Geography of Metropolitan 
Areas. (3) A socio-spatial approach to man's interac- 
tion with his urban environment; the ways people 



perceive, define, behave in. and structure their cities 
and metropolitan areas Spatial patterns ol social 
activities as formed by the distribution and interaction 
of people and social institutions. 

GEOG 457 Historical Geography of Cities. (3) The 
course is concerned with the urbanization of the 
United States and Canada prior to 1920. Both the 
evolution of the urban system across the countries and 
the spatial distribution of activities within cities will be 
considered. Special attention is given to the process of 
industrialization and the concurrent structuring of resi- 
dential patterns among ethnic groups. 

GEOG 459 Proseminar in Urban Geography (3) A 

problems-oriented course for students with a back- 
ground in urban geography using a discussion/lecture 
format It will focus on a particular sub-field within 
urban geography each time it is taught taking ad- 
vantage of the special interests of the instructor 

GEOG 460 Advanced Economic Geography I— 
Agricultural Resources. (3) Prerequisite: GEOG 201 
or 203. The nature of agricultural resources, the maior 
types of agricultural exploitation in the world and the 
geographic conditions. Main problems of conserva- 
tion. 

GEOG 461 Geographic Aspects of Environmental 
Quality. (3) Prerequisite: GEOG 202 or consent of 
instructor. Basic issues of human — environment in- 
teractions. Reactions of natural systems to human 
intervention. Examination of the geographic charac- 
teristics of environmental disruptions. 

GEOG 462 Water Resources and Water Resource 
Planning. (3) Prerequisite: GEOG 201 or 203, or 
permission of instructor. Water as a component of the 
human environment. A systematic examination of van- 
ous aspects of water, including problems of domestic 
and industrial water supply, irrigation, hydroelectric 
power, fisheries, navigation, flood damage reduction 
and recreation. 

GEOG 463 Geographic Aspects of Pollution. (3) 

The impact of man on his environment and resultant 
problems. Examination of the spatial aspects of physi- 
cal and socio-economic factors in air, water, and land 
pollution. 

GEOG 465 Geography of Transportation. (3) The 
distribution of transport routes on the earth's surface, 
patterns of transport routes, the adjustment of trans- 
port routes and media to conditions of the natural 
environment, population centers and their distribution. 

GEOG 466 Industrial Localization. (3) Factors and 
trends in the geographic distribution of the manufactur- 
ing industries of the world, analyzed with reference to 
theories of industrial location. 

GEOG 470 History and Theory of Cartography. (3) 

The development of maps throughout history. Geo- 
graphical orientation, coordinates and map scales. 
Map projections, their nature, use and limitations. 
Principles of representation of features on physical 
and cultural maps. Modern uses of maps and relation- 
ships between characteristics of maps and use types. 
GEOG 471 Cartography and Graphics Practicum. 
(3) 

GEOG 472 Problems of Cartographic Representa- 
tion and Procedure. (3) Two hours lecture and two 
hours laboratory a week. Study of cartographic compi- 
lation methods. Principles and problems of symboliza- 
tion, classification and representation of map data 
Problems of representation of features at different 
scales and for different purposes. Place-name selec- 
tion and lettering, stick-up and map composition 
GEOG 473 Problems of Map Evaluation. (3) Two 
hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week 
Schools of topographic concepts and practices Theo- 
retical and practical means of determining map relia- 
bility, map utility, and source materials Nature, status 
and problems of topographic mapping in different 
parts of the world. Non-topographic special use maps 
Criteria of usefulness for purposes concerned and of 
reliability 

GEOG 490 Geographic Concepts and Source 
Materials. (3) A comprehensive and systematic survey 
of geographic concepts designed exclusively for 
teachers Stress will be placed upon the philosophy ol 
geography in relation to the social and physical sci- 
ences, the use of the primary tools of geography, 
source materials, and the problems of presenting 
geographic pnnciples. 

GEOG 498 Topical Investigations. (1-3) Independent 
study under individual guidance. Restricted to ad- 



96 German Language and Literature Program 



vanced undergraduate students with credit for at least 
24 hours in geography and to graduate students. Any 
exception should have the approval of the head of the 
department. 

GEOG 499 Undergraduate Research. (3) Directed 
regional or systematic study involving several subfields 
of geography, including cartographic presentation, and 
usually requiring field work, and leading to an un- 
dergraduate thesis. 

GEOG 600 Introduction to Graduate Study in Ge- 
ography. (3) Introduces the student both to research 
procedures needed in graduate work and to current 
trends and developments in geographic research. Lec- 
tures by various staff members form basis for discus- 
sion. Research paper required. 

GEOG 601 Field Course. (3) 
GEOG 605 Quantitative Spatial Analysis. (3) This 
course will provide students with a working knowledge 
of various tools of multivariate analysis in the context 
of scientific geographic methodology rather than from 
the statistical theory viewpoint. Emphasis is on the 
application of statistical tools and a working knowl- 
edge of them will be a basis for evaluation of profes- 
sional literature in the various fields of geography using 
quantitative techniques. Students should gain a back- 
ground suitable for using the techniques in research. 
GEOG 610 Seminar in Geographic Methodology. 
(3) The seminar will emphasize an intensive survey of 
the basic concepts of geography, a critical evaluation 
of major approaches to the study of geography, and a 
detailed analysis of the principal methodological prob- 
lems both theoretical and practical confronting geog- 
raphy today. 
GEOG 615 Geomorphology. (3) cr 

GEOG 618 Seminar in Geomorphology. (3) Study 
and discussion of empirical and theoretical research 
methods applied to geomorphological problems in- 
cluding review of pertinent literature. 

GEOG 625 Advanced Climatology. (3) Prerequisite: 
GEOG 445 or consent of the instructor. Advanced 
study of elements and controls of the earth's climates. 
Analysis of the energy and water balances at the 
earth's surface and their importance and application to 
life on this planet: radiation, soil heat flux, evaporation 
and evaportranspiration. 

GEOG 626 Applied Climatology. (3) Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of princi- 
ples, techniques, and data of micro-climatology, physi- 
cal and regional climatology relating to such problems 
and fields as transportation, agriculture, industry, 
urban planning, human comfort, and regional geo- 
graphic analysis. 

GEOG 628 Seminar in Meteorology and Climatolo- 
gy. (3) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected 
topics in meteorology and climatology chosen to fit the 
individual needs of advanced students. Repeatable to 
a maximum of six credits. 

GEOG 638 Seminar in Physical Geography. (3) 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An examination of 
themes and problems in the field of physical geogra- 
phy. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

GEOG 640 Theory and Practice in Cultural Geogra- 
phy. (3) An introductory survey of the basic structure 
and recent trends in the field of cultural geography. 
Emphasis on theoretical principles and ar alytical pro- 
cedures employed in investigating cultural problems 
and on literature which has resulted from this research. 

GEOG 648 Seminar in Cultural Geography. (3) Pre- 
requisite: GEOG 450 or consent of instructor. An 
examination of themes and problems in the field of 
economic geography. Repeatable to a maximum of six 
credits. 

GEOG 655 Theory and Method in Historical Geog- 
raphy. (3) The philosophical and methodological is- 
sues associated with historical approaches to human 
geography. Introduction to the use and interpretation 
of sources for the study of the North American past. 
Emphasis on incorporation of time in geographic stu- 
dies, on the evaluation of traditional approaches to 
past geographies and on present theoretical, analyti- 
cal, and empirical procedures employed in historical 
inquiry. 

GEOG 658 Seminar in Historical Geography. (3) An 

examination of themes and problems in historical 
geography with reference to selected areas. Prerequi- 
site: consent of instructor. 



GEOG 668 Seminar in Economic Geography. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An examination of 
themes and problems in the field of economic geogra- 
phy. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

GEOG 670 Theory and Method in Urban Geogra- 
phy. (3) Introductory survey of the structure and recent 
trends in urban geography. Emphasis on concepts in 
urban geography using a problem solving approach. 
Urban literature, data sources, urban information sys- 
tems, and survey research and sampling. 

GEOG 678 Seminar in Political Geography. (3) Be- 
ginning with a review of contemporary advanced theo- 
ry, the seminar will turn to problems such as the spatial 
consequences of political behavior, the political sys- 
tem and the organization of space including perceived 
space, the organization of political space. Repeatable 
to a maximum of six semester hours. 
GEOG 679 Seminar in Urban Geography. (3) Flexi- 
ble in format to allow adaptation to particular topic 
being considered, this seminar is for advanced stu- 
dents in the department's metropolitan areas speciali- 
ty. Students normally will have had the seminar in 
economic geography. Possible topics include: metro- 
politan systems, the impact of migrants and im- 
migrants on the internal structure of the city, the 
development of black ghettos, the use of particular 
techniques in urban geographical research. 
GEOG 698 Seminar In Cartography. (1-6) 

GEOG 718 Seminar in the Geography of Europe 
and Africa. (3) Prerequisite: GEOG 410, 415 or con- 
sent of instructor. Analysis of special problems con- 
cerning the resources and development of Europe and 
Africa. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

GEOG 738 Seminar in the Geography of EAst Asia. 

(3) Analysis of problems concerning the geography of 
East Asia with emphasis on special research methods 
and techniques applicable to the problems of this area. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 
GEOG 748 Seminar in the Geography of Latin 
America. (3) Prerequisite: GEOG 431, 432 or consent 
of instructor, an analysis of recent changes and trends 
in industrial development, exploitation of mineral re- 
sources and land utilization. Repeatable to a maximum 
of six credits. 

GEOG 758 Seminar in the Geography of the 
U.S.S.R. (3) Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Rus- 
sian and GEOG 435 or consent of instructor. Investiga- 
tion of special aspects of Soviet geography. Emphasis 
on the use of Soviet materials. Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of six credits. 

GEOG 768 Seminar in the Geography of the Near 
East. (3) 

GEOG 788 Selected Topics in Geography. (1-3) 

Readings and discussion on selected topics in the field 
of geography. To be taken only with the joint consent 
of advisor and head of the department of geography. 
GEOG 789 Independent Readings. (1-3) Independ- 
ent reading as arranged between a graduate faculty 
member and student. Repeatable to a maximum of six 
credits. 

GEOG 790 Internship in Geography. (3) Field experi- 
ence in the student's specialty in a federal, state, or 
local agency or private business. A research paper 
required. 

GEOG 798 Independent Study. (1-6) Open only to 
students in the non-thesis M.A. option. 
GEOG 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) cr 
GEOG 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 



German Language and 
Literature Program 

Professor and Chairman: Brecht 
Professors: Best, Jones, Hering 
Associate Professors: Fleck, Beicken, Pfister 
Assistant Professors: Bilik, Fletcher, 
Frederiksen, Mehl, Walker 

The Germanic Section of the Department of 
Germanic and Slavic Languages and Litera- 
tures offers programs of study leading to the 
M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. Specialization includes 
the following areas: Language Pedagogy and 



Applied Linguistics; Germanic Philology; Medie- 
val Literature and Culture; Literature of the 
German Speaking Countries from the Renais- 
sance to the Present. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

In addition to the Graduate School require- 
ments, candidates must have a bachelor's de- 
gree with an undergraduate major in German 
language and literature or the equivalent, and 
fluency in the written and spoken language. 
Candidates for the doctorate must have a mas- 
ter's degree in Germanic Studies or in a related 
discipline, for example: German, Scandinavian 
Studies, Language Education, Medieval Stu- 
dies, etc. 

Degree requirements for the M.A. (thesis op- 
tion) are; 24 hours of coursework, the thesis, 
and a written comprehensive examination. The 
M.A. (non-thesis option) requires 30 hours of 
coursework, a mini-thesis with oral defense, 
and a written comprehensive examination. For 
both options the comprehensives consist of 
four two-hour examinations based on the cour- 
sework and the M.A. Reading List. 

Degree requirements for the Ph.D. are as 
follows: 1) completion of at least 30 hours of 
coursework beyond the master's degree, over a 
period of residency at the University of Mary- 
land of at least one year, and a further 12 hours 
of dissertation research; 2) a reading skill exam- 
ination in a language other than English or 
German, which may be another Germanic lan- 
guage or a language related to the candidate's 
research; 3) comprehensive written examina- 
tions; 4) presentation of the dissertation topic to 
the Germanic Section graduate faculty before 
the topic is approved; 5) the dissertation; 6) oral 
dissertation defense. The doctoral comprehen- 
sives consist of six three-hour examinations. 
The candidate has considerable freedom in 
choosing the subject to be covered in three of 
the examinations; the other three being the 
required fields of philology or applied linguistics, 
medieval literature, and modern literature. Can- 
didates who opt for all three selected topics in 
German literature will choose subjects in the 
following periods: 16th and 17th centuries, 18th 
century, 19th century, 20th century; in which 
case the required modern literature examina- 
tion will require interpretation of a text. Candi- 
dates who select topics from other fields such 
as philology, Scandinavian Studies, medieval 
studies, etc., will take a general examination in 
the modern literature required exam. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to its course offerings listed below, 
the Germanic Section of the Department of 
Germanic and Slavic Languages and Litera- 
tures sponsors the German Club, the University 
of Maryland Chapter of Delta Phi Alpha (the 
national German language honors society). Dis- 
tinguished scholars and lecturers, as well as 
visiting professors, visit the metropolitan area 
and campus regularly. College Park's closeness 
to Washington, D.C. facilitates participation in 
the many cultural functions of the capital with its 
wealth of German and Scandinavian social 
groups and national societies. 

Financial Assistance 

The Germanic Section is able to contribute to 
the financial support of its graduate students in 
the form of teaching and non-teaching 
assistantships as well as several fellowships. 



German Language and Literature Program 97 



Additional Information 

For further information write to: Director of 
Graduate Studies, Department of Germanic and 
Slavic Languages and Literature. 

Courses 

GERM 001 Elementary German for Graduate Stu- 
dents. (3) Intensive elementary course in the German 
language designed particularly for graduate students 
who wish to acquire a reading knowledge This course 
does not carry credit towards any degree at the 
university. 

GERM 401 Advanced Conversation. (3) Prerequi- 
site: GERM 302 or equivalent. Development of fluency 
in spoken German. Discussion of contemporary is- 
sues. 

GERM 403 Advanced Composition (3) Prerequisite: 
GERM 302 or equivalent. Advanced instruction in 
writing skills. 

GERM 405 Stylistics (3) Prerequisite: GERM 302 or 
equivalent. Stylistic analysis of oral and written Ger- 
man both literary and non-literary. Intensive study of 
vocabulary and syntax Dictionary and composition 
exercises. 

GERM 409 Selected Topics in German Language 
Study. (3) Prerequisite: GERM 302 and permission of 
instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits if 
subject matter is different. 

GERM 410 Structure of the German Language. (3) 

Prerequisite: GERM 302 or equivalent. An introduction 
to applied linguistics suited to the needs of the ad- 
vanced student and/or teacher of German. Structural 
analysis of the phonetics, phonology, morphology, 
syntax and vocabulary of modern German contrasted 
with the structure of modern English. Instruction in 
English. 

GERM 415 German/English Translation I (3) An 

intensive presentation of german grammar limited ex- 
clusively to reading skill; graded readings in the arts 
and sciences. Instruction in English; can not be used to 
satisfy the Arts and Humanities foreign language 
reauirement. May not be taken for credit by students 
who have completed GERM 111-115 and/or GERM 
301/302. 

GERM 416 German/English Translation II (3) Pre- 
requisites: GERM 302, GERM 415 or equivalent. Writ- 
ten translation of materials from the student's field of 
study. Discussion of basic problems of German-to- 
English translation, with examples from students' pro- 
jects, instruction in English. Cannot be used to satisfy 
the Arts and Humanities foreign language requirement. 

GERM 418 Practicum in german/english transla- 
tion (3) Prerequisite: GERM 416 or equivalent. Prob- 
lems of professional translating from german into 
english; translation of literary and technical texts; the 
assembling and use of a specialized translator's refer- 
ence library. May be repeated up to a maximum of six 
credits. 

GERM 420 Methodology, Bibliography and Re- 
search Methods. (3) Prerequisite: GERM 115 or 
equivalent. Principles of literary criticism. Use of Ger- 
man bibliographies, catalogs, and reference works. 
Techniques of conducting and documenting research. 
Instruction in German. 

GERM 421 Literature of the Middle Ages. (3) Pre- 
requisites: GERM 321 and 322, or permission of 

instructor. German literature from the 8th through the 
1 5th Centuries Readings include old high German 
texts; the German heroic, courtly and popular epic; 
Minnesang, Meistersang, the late medieval epic: folk 
literature of the late middle ages. Read in modern 
German translation. 

GERM 422 From the Reformation through the Ba- 
roque (3) Prerequisites: GERM 321 and 322. or per- 
mission of instructor. Readings of representative au- 
thors from the Reformation and the Period of Human- 
ism through the Baroque (CA. 1517—1720) Readings 
and instruction in German 

GERM 423 From Enlightenment through Storm and 
Stress (3) Prerequisites: GERM 321 and 322, or 
permission of instructor. Readings of representative 
authors from the Enlightenment (1720 — 1785). the 
Age of Sentimentalism (1740—1780). and Storm and 
Stress (1767—1785) Readings and instruction in Ger- 
man. 



GERM 424 Classicism (3) Prerequisites: GERM 321 
and 322, or permission of instructor Readings of 
representative authors from the Age of Classicism 
(1786 — 1832). Readings and instruction in German 

GERM 431 Romanticism and Biedermeier (3) Pre- 
requisites: GERM 321 and 322 or permission of in- 
structor Readings of representative authors from the 
periods of Romanticism (1798 — 1835) and Biedermei- 
er (1820 — 1850). Readings and instruction in German. 

GERM 432 Junges Deutschland and Realism (3) 

Prerequisite: GERM 321 and 322, or permission of 
instructor Readings of representative authors from the 
periods of Junges Deutschland (1830 — 1850) and 
Realism (1850 — 1890). Readings and instruction in 
German. 

GERM 433 Naturalism and its Counter Currents. (3) 

Prerequisites: GERM 321 and 322 or permission of 
instructor. The periods of Naturalism, Impressionism. 
Neoromanticism and Neoclassicism. Readings include 
such authors as Anzengruber, Holz, Sudermann. 
Hauptmann, George, Wedekind, Hofmannsthal. 
Schnitzler, Rilke. Heinnch Mann, Hesse. Readings and 
instruction in German. 

GERM 438 German Literature In Translation. (3) 

Different movements, genres, or other special topics 
will be treated each semester. Repeatable up to a 
maximum of six credits if subject matter is different. 
May not be counted in fulfillment of German mapr 
requirement for German literature. Readings and in- 
struction in English. 

GERM 439 Proseminar In German Literature. (3) 

Prerequisites: GERM 321 and 322, or permission of 
instructor. Specialized study of an author, school, 
genre, or theme. Repeatable to a maximum of six 
credits if subject matter is different. Readings and 
instruction in German. 

GERM 448 Yiddish Literature in Translation (3) 

Study of an important Yiddish author, period or theme, 
readings and instruction in English. Repeatable to a 
maximum of 6 credits if subject matter is different 

GERM 449 Selected Topics in Yiddish Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Study of a lin- 
guistic, literary or cultural topic in Yiddish studies. 
Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits if subject matter 
is different. 

GERM 461 Reading Swedish. Danish and Norwe- 
gian I (3) Develops reading facility in three languages 
in one semester. Texts read include Bergman's Sev- 
enth Seal. Tales by H.C Andersen, excerpts from 
works by Ibsen and Hamsun, and selected folk litera- 
ture. No foreign language prerequisite Not available 
for credit to students who have taken GERM 164 or 
GERM 165. 

GERM 462 Reading Swedish, Danish and Norwe- 
gian II (3) Prerequisite: GERM 461 or permission of 
instructor. Further development of reading facility. 

GERM 463 The Icelandic Family Saga (3) Analysis of 
the old Norse sage as historiography, literature, and 
folklore. Readings and instruction in english. 

Germ 464 The Fantastic and Historic Saga (3) My 

thological/heroic sagas, translation of chivalnc materi- 
als from the continent, and the histories of the Norwe- 
gian kings, the Viking Colonies' and the settlement of 
Iceland contrasted with the classical structure of the 
family saga, chivalnc models, and other national histo- 
ries by Germanic writers of the middle ages. Readings 
and instruction in English. 

GERM 468 Scandinavian Literature in Translation 

(3) Study of a maior Scandinavian author, genre, 
period or theme Readings and instruction in English 
Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits il subiect matter 
is different. 

GERM 469 Selected Topics in Scandinavian Stu- 
dies (3) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor Study of 
a linguistic, literary or cultural topic in Scandinavian 
studies. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits if 
subject matter is different. 

GERM 471 Introduction to Indo-European Philolo- 
gy (3) Basic principles of historical language study 
terminology of phonetics and morphology, language 
families, writing systems. Reconstructed Indo-Europe- 
an and surveys of the most important ancient Indo- 
European languages: Sanskrit, old church Slavonic, 
Lithuanian, Classic Greek. Latin. Gothic. Instruction in 
English, no knowledge of German required 

GERM 472 Introduction to Germanic Philology. (3) 

Prerequisites: GERM 115 and GERM 471, or equiva- 



lent Reconstructed Proto-Germanic and surveys of 
Gothic, old Norse, old English, old Saxon. The devel- 
opment of high German from the old high German 
period through middle high German to modern Ger- 
man; a short introduction to modern German dialectol- 
ogy. Instruction in English 

GERM 475 Old Norse. (3) The language of the old 
Icelandic saga, the Eddas and Skaldic poetry. Reading 
of texts m the original; historical development of old 
Norse and its role in the Germanic language family. No 
knowledge of German or a Scandinavian language 
required, instruction in English 

GERM 479 Selected Topics in Germanic Philology 
(3) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Selected topics 
such as comparative Germanic studies, old Norse 
language or readings in old Norse literature, modern 
German dialectology Repeatable to a maximum of six 
credits if subject matter is different 

GERM 481 The Viking Era (3) An introduction to the 
lifestyle of northern Europe in the 9th to 1 1 th centuries 
Reading and instruction in English. 

GERM 482 The Age of Chivalry (3) An introduction to 
the lifestyle of northern Europe in the 12th to 14th 
centuries Reading and instruction in English. 

GERM 489 Selected Topics in Germanic Area Stu- 
dies (3) Selected topics in the cultural and intellectual 
history of the German and Germanic language areas 
In English, repeatable to a maximum of six credits if 
subject matter is different. 

GERM 499 Directed Study (1-3) Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. For advanced students, by per- 
mission of department chairman and/or undergradu- 
ate advisor Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits if 
subject matter is different 

GERM 61 1 College Teaching of German. (3) Instruc- 
tion, demonstration and classroom practice under su- 
pervision of modern procedures in the presentation of 
elementary German courses to college age students 

GERM 621 Medieval Narrative. (3) An introduction to 
the form and structure of the medieval narrative, 
treatment of the most important authors and works of 
the period. 

GERM 631 German Lyric Poetry. (3) An exposition of 
the genre of lync poetry, its metrical and aesthetic 
background, illustrated by charactenstic examples 
from the middle ages to the present. 

GERM 641 German Novelle. (3) Study of the develop- 
ment of the genre from the 18th century to the present 

GERM 651 German Novel. (3) The theory and struc- 
ture of the German novel from the baroque to the 
present. 

GERM 661 German Drama. (3) An introduction to the 
theory and structure of the German drama from the 
baroque to the present with extensive interpretation of 
characteristic works. 

GERM 671 Gothic, Old High German, Middle High 
German I. (3) The first semester of a two-semester 
practicum in reading gothic. old and middle high Ger- 
man, with emphasis on linguistic analysis 

GERM 672 Gothic. Old High German. Middle High 
German II. (3) Prerequisite GERM 671 Continuation 
of German 671. 

GERM 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

GERM 819 Individual Study. (1-3) Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor May be repeated to a maximum of 
six credits if content differs 

GERM 829 Seminar in German Literature of the 
Middle Ages. (3) Exhaustive study of one or more 
representative authors or works of the middle ages 
May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits if 
content differs. 

GERM 839 Seminar in 16th and 17th Century Liter- 
ature. (3) The German literature of the Humanists, the 
reformation and the baroque is illustrated by study of 
one or more authors of the 16th or 1 7th Centunes May 
be repeated up to a total of nine credits when content 
differs 

GERM 849 Seminar in 18th Century Literature. (3) 

In depth study of one or more authors from the penods 
Englightenment, Sentimentalism or Storm and Stress 
or Classicism May be repeated up to a total of nine 
credits when content differs 

GERM 859 Seminar in 19th Century Literature. (3) 
Comprehensive coverage from one or more authors of 



98 Government and Politics Program 



Romanticism, Biedermeier, young Germany or Real- 
ism. May be repeated for a total of up to nine credits 
when content differs. 

GERM 869 Seminar in 20th Century Literature (3) 

Concentrated investigation of a literary movement or 
of one or more authors from the period of Naturalism 
to the present. May be repeated to a maximum of nine 
credits if the content is different. 

GERM 879 Seminar in Germanic Philology. (3) In 

depth study of a topic in Germanic or Indoeuropean 
philogy; comparative Germanic grammar, runology, 
dialect geography, Eddie or Skaidic poetry, Indoeu- 
ropean studies. May be repeated to a maximum of nine 
credits if content differs. 

GERM 889 Seminar in Germanic Area Studies. (3) 

Comprehensive study of a selected topic in German or 
Germanic Area studies: history of ideas, cultural histo- 
ry, Germanic literatures other than German, folk litera- 
ture and folklore. May be repeated to a maximum of 
nine credits if content differs. 

GERM 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-8) 

RUSSIAN 

RUSS 001 Elementary Russian for Graduate Stu- 
dents. (3) Intensive elementary course in the Russian 
language designed particularly for graduate students 
who wish to acquire reading knowledge. This course 
does not carry credit towards any degree at the 
university. 

RUSS 401 Advanced Composition. (3) 

RUSS 402 Advanced Composition. (3) 

RUSS 421 Russian Civilization (in Russian) I. (3) An 

historical survey of Russian civilization, emphasizing 
architecture, painting, sculpture, music, ballet and the 
theater to the beginning of the 19th Century pointing 
out the inter-relationship of all with literary movements. 
Taught in Russian. 

RUSS 422 Russian Civilization (in Russian) II. (3) An 

historical survey of Russian Civilization emphasizing 
architecture, painting, sculpture, music, ballet, and the 
theater, from the beginning of the 19th Century to the 
present pointing out the inter-relationships of all with 
literary movements. Taught in Russian. 

RUSS 441 Russian Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. (3) 

RUSS 451 Russian Literature of the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) 

RUSS 452 Russian Literature of the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) 

RUSS 461 Soviet Russian Literature. (3) 

RUSS 462 Soviet Russian Literature. (3) 

RUSS 465 Modern Russian Poetry. (3) 

RUSS 466 Modern Russian Drama. (3) 

RUSS 467 Modern Russian Fiction. (3) 

RUSS 468 19th Century Russian Literature in 
Translation. (3) Development of Russian literary 
thought in the Russian novel and short prose of the 
19th Century. Influence of western literatures and 
philosophies considered. Repeatable to a maximum of 
six credits when content differs. 

RUSS 470 Applied Linguistics. (3) The nature of 
applied linguistics and its contributions to the effective 
teaching of foreign languages. Comparative study of 
English and Russian, with emphasis upon points of 
divergence. Analysis, evaluation and construction of 
related drills. 

RUSS 471 Comparative Slavic Linguistics. (3) Com- 
parative Slavic linguistics and, especially, a concept of 
the place of the Russian language in the world of 
Slavic culture through the reading of selected texts 
illustrating common Slavic relationships and dis- 
similarities. 

RUSS 478 Soviet Literature in Translation. (3) Rus- 
sian literature since 1917, both as a continuation of 
prerevolutionary traditions and as a reflection of Soviet 
ideology. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits 
when content differs. 



Government and Politics 
Program 

Professor and Acting Chairman: Phillips 
Professors: Anderson, Bobrow, Claude, 
Hathorn Hsueh, McNelly, Piper, Segal, Young 
Associate Professors: Butterworth, Conway, 
Devine, Elkin, Glass, Glendening, Hardin, 
Heisler, Koury, Oppenheimer, Pirages, Ranald, 
Reeves, Stone, Terchek, Uslaner, Wilkenfeld 
Assistant Professors: Afford, Christensen, 
Hunter, Lanning, McCarrick, Nzuwah, Oliver, 
Peroff, Postbrief, Werbos, Woolpert 

The Department of Government and Politics 
offers programs leading to the degrees of Mas- 
ter of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. Areas of 
specialization include American politics, com- 
parative politics, international politics, political 
behavior, political theory, public administration, 
and public policy. 

Admission and Degree 
Information 

Master's degree candidates may select a thesis 
or a non-thesis option, both of which require six 
semester hours of research methods and statis- 
tics, six semester hours of political theory, and a 
comprehensive examination in one field of polti- 
cal science. Both options require a total of 30 
semester hours of credit. 

The doctoral program is designed for 
completion within five years and involves semi- 
nars, directed research and opportunities for 
teaching experience. A minimum of at least 36 
semester hours of course work at the 600-800 
level is required. All students must complete 
nine hours of research methods and statistics, 
nine hours of normative, and/or empirical, 
and/or formal political theory, and a com- 
prehensive examination in two fields of political 
science. The examination fields are defined by 
each student in consultation with an advisor 
and may cut across traditional departmental 
and disciplinary boundaries. 

Financial Assistance 

In addition to teaching assistantships, the De- 
partment also has a government internship pro- 
gram for students interested in public adminis- 
tration and a limited and variable number of 
research positions with research grants. 

Additional Information 

Further information and a manual on graduate 
study can be secured from the Department's 
Office of the Director of Graduate Studies. 

Courses 

GVPT 401 Problems of World Politics. (3) Prerequi- 
site, GVPT 1 70. A study of governmental problems of 
international scope, such as causes of war, problems 
of neutrality, and propaganda. Students are required to 
report on readings from current literature. 

GVPT 402 International Law. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 
170. A study of the basic character, general principles 
and specific rules of international law, with emphasis 
on recent and contemporary trends in the field and its 
relation to other aspects of international affairs. 

GVPT 41 1 Public Personnel Administration. (3) Pre- 
requisite: GVPT 410 or BMGT 360. A survey of public 
personnel administration, including the development 
of merit civil service, the personnel agency, classifica- 
tion, recruitment, examination techniques, promotion, 
service ratings, training, discipline, employee relations, 
and retirement. 

GVPT 412 Public Financial Administration. (3) Pre- 
requisite, GVPT 41 or ECON 450. A survey of govern- 
mental financial procedures, including processes of 
current and capital budgeting, the administration of 
public borrowing, the techniques of public purchasing, 



and the machinery of control through pre-audit and 
post-audit. 

GVPT 413 Governmental Organization and Man- 
agement. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 410. A study of the 
theories of organization and management in american 
government with emphasis on new trends, experi- 
ments and reorganizations. 

GVPT 414 Administrative Law. (3) Prerequisite. 
GVPT 170. A study of the discretion exercised by 
administrative agencies, including analysis of their 
functions, their powers over persons and property, 
their procedures, and judical sanctions and controls. 

GVPT 417 Comparative Study of Public Adminis- 
tration. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 280 or 410, or consent 
of instructor. An introduction to the study of govern- 
mental administrative systems viewed from the stand- 
point of comparative typologies and theoretical 
schemes useful in cross-national comparisons and 
empirical studies of the politics of the administrative 
process in several nations. Both western and non- 
western countries are included. 

GVPT 422 Quantitative Political Analysis. (3) Pre- 
requisite. GVPT 220, or consent of instructor. Introduc- 
tion to quantitative methods of data analysis, including 
selected statistical methods, block analysis, content 
analysis, and scale construction. 

GVPT 426 Public Opinion. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 
170. An examination of public opinion and its effect on 
political action, with emphasis on opinion formation 
and measure