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Full text of "Graduate catalog (Florida International University). [1991-1992]"

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Spes Scientiia Facultas 



T 







GRADUATE 
CATALOG 

1991 ^ 1992 



Florida International University 



Florida International University 

Member of the State University System 
Miami, Florida 

1991 - 1992 Graduate Catalog 
Contents 



2 


Academic Calendar 


5 


State Board of Education 


5 


Florida Board of Regents 


5 


University Officials 


5 


General Information 


6 


Accreditation and Memberships 


6 


Southeast Florida Educational Consonium 


6 


Academic Degree Programs 


7 


Certificate Programs 


8 


Admissions 


10 


Registration 


10 


Academic Regulations 


14 


Florida Residency Information 


14 


Financial Aid 


18 


Student Fees and Student Accounts 


19 


Academic Affairs 


22 


Student Affairs 


26 


Business and Finance 


27 


North Miami, Information Resource Management, 




and Budget Planning 


28 


University Relations and Development 


28 


Centers and Institutes 


34 


Statewide Course Numbering System 


36 


Administration and Staff 


38 


College of Arts and Sciences 


80 


College of Business Administration 


103 


College of Education 


138 


College of Engineering and Design 


158 


College of Health 


169 


School of Hospitality Management 


172 


School of Public Affairs and Services 


192 


Campus Maps 


194 


Index 



Editorial Preparation and typesetting by FlU Enrollment Support Services. 
Cover design by Office of Publications. 

FlU and Rorida Intemational University are registered marks. 

Rorida International University believes in equal opportunity practices which conform to 

all laws against discrimination and is committed to nondiscrimination with respect to 

race, color, creed, age, handicap, sex, marital status, or national origin. Additionally, the 

University is committed to the principle of taking the positive steps necessary, to achieve 

the equalization of educational and employment opportunities. 

Note: The programs, policies, requirements, and regulations published in this catalog 

are continually subject to review in order to serve the needs of the University's various 

publics and to respond to the mandates of the Florida Board of Regents and the Florida 

Legislature. Changes in programs, policies, requirements, and regulations may be made 

without advance notice. 

The ultimate responsibility for knowing degree requirements and the requirements 
imposed upon students by State law rests with the students. 

This public document was produced at a cost of $19,972 or $0.95 per copy to inform the 
public about University Programs. 

Fees given in this catalog are tentative pending legislative action. 



2 / Academic Calendar 1991-1992 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1991-1992^ 



Fall Semester 

April 1 
June 1 

July 8 - 9 
July 11 -12 
July 18 - 19 
July 22-26 

July 22 - 23 
July 24 - 26 
July 29 - August 2 
August 5-9 
August 7 
August 9 



1991 

Last day for International Students to submit applications for Fall Term admission. 
Last day to submit applications for Fall Term admission (except international students). 

• Last day for International Students to submit all required supporting documents for Fall Term admission. 
Freshman Orientation Sessions 
Freshman Orientation Sessions 
Freshman Orientation Sessions 
Control Cards available for student pick-up. 

« Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available to students planning to register. 
Freshman Orientation Sessions 
Transfer Students Orientation Sessions. 

Official Registration Weel< (Degree-Seeking Students only) by appointment time and d^. 
Open Registration Week. 

Last day to apply for Short Term Tuition Loans for students already registered. 
Last day to pay tuition and fees to retain registered courses by 5 p.m. 
. Ust day for Financial Aid recipients to validate class schedules to retain registered courses. 

• Last day to sign Short Term Tuition Loan promissory notes and validate class schedules for students already 
registered. 

Housing Check-in 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available to students planning to register on Registration Day. 

• Transfer Students Orientation. 
Freshmen Orientation Sessions. 
Telephone Registration available. 
Registration Day (10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.) 
OlctssGS Bsoin. 

. Ust day to apply for Short Term Tuition Loans for students wfho registered on or after Registration Day. 
Registration for State Employees using fee waivers. 
Last day to complete Late Registration by 5 p.m. 

• Drop/Add Period ends at 5 p.m. . 

• Last day to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring a financial liability by 5 p.m. 

• Last day to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment by 5 p.m. 
« Last day for Rnancial Aid recipients applicants to validate class schedules to retain registered courses on 

Registration Day. 
Ust day to sign Short Term Tuition Loan promissory notes for students who registered on Registration D^. 
Ubor Day Holiday (University closed). 
Ust day to register for the October 5th CLAST exam. 

Rosh Hashanah (No examinations or major quizzes may be given during the designated hours. Jewish holidays begin 
at 4 p.m. the day before the holiday and end at 7 p.m. the day of the holiday.) 

Yom Wppur (No examinations or major quizzes may be given during the designated hours. Jewish holidays begin 
at 4 p.m. the day before the holiday and end at 7 p.m. the day of the holiday.) 
Ust day to apply for graduation by 5 p.m. 

. Ust day to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition less bonding fees by 5 p.m. 
Faculty Convocation. 
CLAST Test. 
Ust day to drop a course with a DR grade by 5 p.m. 

• Ust day to withdraw from tfie University with a Wl grade by 5 p.m. 
November 1 1 Veterans' Day Holiday (University closed). 

November 28 - 29 Thanksgiving Holiday (University closed). 

December 6 Classes End. 

December 7 -14 Official Examination Period. 

December 1 7 Grades due. 

December 19 Grades Mailed to Students. 

Spring Semester 1992 

October 1 Ustday for International Students to submit applications for Spring Term admission. 

November 1 Ust day for admission for Intemational Students to submit all required supporting documents for Spring Term admission. 

• Ust day to submit applications for Spring Term admission (except international students). 

November 12- 15 Control Cards available for pick-up. . ~ • -r 

. Short Term Tuition Loan and Tuition Waiver Applirations available to students planning to register for SpnngTerm. 
November 14-15 Freshmen Orientation Sessions 
November 18 Transfer Students Orientation Session. 



August 18 
August 19 

August 19-20 
August 21 
August 22 
August 26 

August 26 - 30 
August 30 



August 30 
Septemtser 2 
September 6 
September 9- 10 

September 18 

September 20 

October 4 
October 5 
October 18 



Academic Calendar 1991-1992 / 3 



November 18-22 
December 2 - 6 
December 4 
December 6 



December 30 
January 2 

January 3 

January 6 
Januarys - 10 
January 8 
January 10 



January 20 
January 24 
January 31 

February 22 
February 28 

March 2 - 7 
April 1 
April 17 

April 18- 19 



April 18 -25 
A|Dril 24 - 25 



April 27 
April 28 
April 30 



Official Registration Week (Degree-Seeking Students only) by appointment time and day. 

Open Registration. 

Last day to apply for Short Term Tuition Loans for students already registered. 

Last day to pay tuition and fees to retain registered courses by 5 p.m. 

• Last day for Rnancial Aid recipients to validate class schedules to retain registered courses. 

• Last day to sign Short Term Tuition Loan promissory notes and validate class schedules for students already 
registered. 

Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available to students registiering on Registration Day. 
Housing check-in 9 a.m. - 8 p.m. 

• Telephone Registration available. 
Registration Day (10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.) 

• Rnancial Aid Applications available for 1992-1993. 
Classes Begin. 

Registration for State Employees using fee waivers. 

Last day to apply for Short Term Tuition Loans for students who registered on or after Registration Day. 

Last day to complete Late Registration by 5 p.m. 

• Drop/Add Period ends at 5 p.m. 

• Last day to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring a financial liability by 5 p.m. 

• Last day to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment by 5 p.m. 

• Last day for Rnancial Aid recipients applicants to validate class schedules to retain registered courses on 
Registration Day. 

• Last day to sign Short Temfi Tuition Loan promissory notes and validate dass schedules for students who 
registered on Registration day. 

Martin Luther King Holiday (University Closed). 

Last day to register for the February 22nd CLAST exam. 

Last day to apply for graduation by 5 p.m. 

• Last day to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition less bonding fees by 5 p m 
CLAST Test. 

Last day to drop a course with a DR grade by 5 p.m. 

• Last day to witfxiraw from the University with a Wl grade. 
Spring Break. 

Deadline for 1 992-1 993 Financial Aid Applications for priority consideration. 
Classes End. 

• Good Friday (No examinations or major quizzes may be given during the designated hours.) 
Passover (Students who obsen/e Passover must make arrangements with their instructors for alternate 
examination times. Jewish holidays begin 4 p.m. the day before the holiday and end at 7 p.m the dav 

of the holiday.) ^ 

Official Examination Period. 

Passover ( Students who observe Passover must make arrangements with their instructors for alternate 
examination times.Jewish holidays begin 4 p.m. the day before the holiday and end at 7 p.m. the day 
of the holiday.) 
Commencement Exercises. 
Grades due. 
Grades Mailed to Students. 



Complete Summer Semester 1992 



February 1 
March 1 

March 23 
March 23 - 27 
March 28 - 27 
March 30 



Last day for International Students to submit applications for Summer Term admission. 

Last day for admission for International Students to submit all required supporting documents for Summer Term. 

• Last day to submit applications for Summer Term admission (except international students). 

Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available to students registering for the Summer Terms. 

Control Cards available for pick-up. 

Freshmen Orientation Complete SummerTerm and SummerTerm A. 

Transfer Students Orientation Complete SummerTerm and SummerTerm A. 



March 30 - April 3 Official Registration Week (Degree-Seeking Students only) by appointment time and day. 



April 6 -10 
Aprils 
April 10 



April 30 
May 3 
May 4 



Open Registration. 

Last day to apply for Short Term Tuition Loans for students already registered. 

Last day to pay tuition and fees to retain registered courses by 5 p.m. 

• Last Day for Financial Aid recipients to validate class schedules to retain registered courses. 

• Deadline date for 1990-1991 Rnancial Aid Application for priority consideration. 

• Last day to sign Short Term Tuition Loan promissory notes and validate dass schedules for students already 
registered. 

Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available to students who plan to register on Registration D^. 
Housing Check-in 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Registration Day (10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.). 

• Last day to register for the June 6th CLAST exam. 



4 / Academic Calendar 1991-1992 

May 6 Classes Begin. 

May 6-12 Registration for State Employees using fee waivers. 

May 8 Last day to apply for Short Tuition Loans for students who registered on Registration Day. 

May 12 Last day to complete Late Registration by 5 p.m. 

• Drop/Add Period ends at 5 p.m. 

• Last day to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring a financial liability by 5 p.m. 

• Last day to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment by 5 p.m. 

• Last day for Financial Aid recipients to validate dass schedules to retain registered courses on Registration Day. 
» Last day to sign Short Term Tuition Loan promissory notes and validate class schedules for students who 

registered on Registration day. 
May 25 Memorial Day Holiday (University closed). 

May 29 Last day to apply for Graduation by 5 p.m. 

• Last day to witlxiraw from tfie University with a 25% refund of tuition less bonding fees by 5 p.m. 
June 6 CLAST Test. 

June 26 Last day to drop a course with a DR grade by 5 p.m. 

• Last day to witfxJraw from the University with a Wl grade by 5 p.m. 
July 3 - 4 Independence Day Holiday (University closed). 

August 13 Classes End. 

August 1 7 Grades due. 

August 1 9 Grades Mailed to Students. 

Summer Term A 

March 26 - 27 Freshmen Orientation Sessions. 

March 30 Transfer Students Orientation Session All Summer Sessions. 

May 4 Registration Day. 

May 6 Classes Begin. 

May 6-12 Registration for State Employees using fee waivers. 

May 12 Last day to complete Late Registration by 5 p.m. 

• Drop/Add Period ends at 5 p.m. 

e Last day to drop courses or withdraw from tfie University without incurring a financial liability by 5 p.m. 

• Last day to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment by 5 p.m. 

• Last Day for Financial Aid recipients to validate class schedules to retain registered courses. 
May 15 Last day to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition less bonding fees by 5 p.m. 
May 25 Memorial Day Holiday (University closed). 

May 29 Last day to apply for graduation by 5 p.m. 

• Last day to drop a course with a DR grade by 5 p.m. 

« Last day to withdraw from tfie University with a Wl grade by 5 p.m. 
June 6 CLAST Test. 

June 23 Classes End.** 

August 17 Grades Mailed to Students. 

Summer Term B 

May 29 Lastday to apply for graduation by 5 p.m. 

June 18 -19 Freshmen Orientation Sessions. 

June 25 Registration Day. 

June 29 Classes Begin. 

June 29 - July 6 Registration for State Employees using fee waivers. 

July 3 - 4 Independence Day (University closed). 

July 6 Last day to complete Late Registration by 5 p.m. 

• Drop/Add Period ends at 5 p.m. 

e Last day to drop courses or withdraw from tfie University without Incurring a financial liability by 5 p.m. 

• Last day to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment by 5 p.m. 

• Last Day for Financial Aid recipients to validate class schedules to retain registered courses. 
July 10 Last day to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition less bonding fees by 5 p.m. 
July 24 Last day to drop a course with a DR grade by 5 p.m. 

• Last day to withdraw from the University with a Wl grade by 5 p.m. 
August 13 Classes End. 

August 1 7 Grades Due. 

August 19 Grades Mailed to Students. 

•Calendar dates are subject to change. Please contact appropriate offices for verification and updates 

**Grades will not t>e posted on transcripts, and graduation will not t>e processed until the end of the Complete Summer Temn, August 13. 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 5 



General Information 

state Board of Education 



Lawton Chiles 
Jim Smith 
Robert Butterworth 
Gerald Lewis 
Bob Crawford 

Betty Castor 

Tom Gallagher 



Governor 

Secretary of State 

Attorney General 

Comptroller 

Commissioner 

of Agriculture 

Commissioner 

of Education 

Treasurer 



Rorida Board of Regents 
Hon. Charles B. Edwards, Sr. 

Chairman, Fort Myers 
Hon. J. Clint Brown Vice Chairman, 
Tampa 
Hon. DuBose Ausley Tallahassee 

Hon. Betty Castor Commissioner 

of Education 
Hon. Alec P. Courtelis Miami 

Hon. Rot}ert A. Dressier 

Fort Lauderdale 
Hon. Pat N. Groner Pensacola 

Hon. Cecil B. Keene St. Petersburg 
Hon. Peria Hantman Miami Lakes 

Hon. Ttiomas P. Petway III Jacksonville 
Hon. Carolyn K. Roberts Ocala 

Hon. Joan D. Ruffler Orlando 

Hon. Ross A. Wolf Student 

Regent 
Hon. Ciiarles B. Reed Chancellor, 

State University System 

University Officials 

IModesto A. Maidique President 

James A. Mau Acting Provost and Vice 

President for Academic Affairs 

Richard J. Correnti Vice President 

for Student Affairs 

Paul D. Gallagher Vke President 

for North Miami Campus 

Michael P. Morgan Vice President 

for University Relations 

and Development 

Leonardo Rodriguez Vice President 

for Business and Finance 

History 

norida International University, a mem- 
ber institution of tlie State University 
System of Florida, was established by 
the State Legislature on June 22, 1965. 
Classes k>egan at University Park on 
September 19, 1972, with 6,000 stu- 
dents enrolled in upper-division under- 
graduate and graduate programs. In 
1981 the University added lower- 
division classes for freshmen and sopho- 
mores, expanding its enrollment capa- 
city. In 1984, thie University received 
authority to begin offering degree pro- 



grams at ttie doctoral level; these pro- 
grams received Level IV accreditation 
from tfie Soutfiem Association of Col- 
leges and Schools (SACS) in 1 986. 

The Rorida Board of Regents ap- 
pointed Charies E. Perry as the first 
president of FlU in July of 1969. He was 
succeeded in June, 1976 by President 
Harold Brian Crosby. Gregory Baker 
Wolfe was named the third president in 
February, 1979. Modesto A. (f^^ltch) 
Maidique was named the fourth Presi- 
dent of Rorida International University 
on August 27, 1986. Maidique received 
his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from 
tfie Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy and was associated with MIT, Har- 
vard, and Stanford for 20 years. 

Goals 

Rorida International University (FlU), a 
comprehensive, multi-campus urban re- 
search institution, is committed to provid- 
ing both excellence and access to all 
qualified students desiring to pursue 
higher education. FlU offers a compre- 
hensive undergraduate liberal arts edu- 
cation structured around a rigorous core 
curriculum. The University also offers a 
number of highly-regarded master's and 
doctoral programs in six of its colleges 
and schools. 

The University's academic programs 
are designed to achieve four major 
goals: 

I.To provide an excellent university 
education for all qualified students, chal- 
lenging and stimulating ttiem at the 
lower-division level and preparing them 
to choose a major field in the upper divi- 
sion, leading to selection of a profession 
or occupation or further study at the 
graduate level. FlU encourages its 
graduates, as educated citizens, to pur- 
sue lifetime opportunities to contribute 
to tfie development of ttieir community's 
cultural, aestfietic, and economic envi- 
ronments through participation. 

2. To generate new knowledge 
through a vigorous and ambitious com- 
mitment to research in all academic dis- 
ciplines and to encourage creativity by 
fostering an atmosphere conducive to 
tfie expression of ideas, artistic develop- 
ment, and communication with the exter- 
nal community. 

3. To serve the university's external 
community, with special attention to 
Dade, Broward, and Monroe counties, 
enhancing South Florida's capacity to 
meet its cultural, economic, social and 
urban challenges as we move Into the 
21 St century. 

4. To foster greater global under- 
standing as a major center of interna- 
tional education for the people of tfie 



Americas and the international commu- 
nity. 

Campuses 

The University operates two campuses 
in Dade County and two educational 
centers in Ft. Lauderdale. The main 
campus is located at University Park in 
west Dade County, approximately 10 
miles west of downtown Miami. The 
North Miami Campus is adjacent to Bis- 
cayne Bay, at Northwest Biscayne 
Boulevard and 151st Street. Broward 
County area is served cooperatively by 
the FAU/FIU Center, located on the 
campus of Broward Community College 
in Davie and at University Tower in Fort 
Lauderdale. 

University Parl< 

The University Park has ten major build- 
ings including a recently completed $1 2 
million Engineering building, a $16 mil- 
lion Cfiemistry and Physics building, a 
$7 million College of Business Admini- 
stration Building (under construction), 
and a $10 million Student Center expan- 
sion. The campus development plan en- 
vision tour major expansion phases to 
the Library building, planned as a four- 
teenstory tower, beginning with the $1 1 
million base construction in 1992; a $10 
million Arts Complex to be completed in 
1993; a $3 million Baseball Stadium 
Complex to be completed in 1993; a Stu- 
dent HealttVWellness Services building 
to be completed in 1992 Labor Studies 
building to be completed in 1993, a Nau- 
tilus/Fitness Center to be completed in 
1992; a Biology Greenhouse and Con- 
servatory to be completed in 1993; and 
major campus infrastructure improve- 
ments, including a new major campus 
entrancemall for Tamiami Trail access, 
scheduled for completion in late 1 991 . 

North l\Aiami Campus 

The North Miami Campus encompasses 
200 acres on Biscayne Bay, including a 
large natural cypress preserve. Campus 
facilities include six campus buildings, 
an Olympicstandard Aquatic Center, 
apartmentstyle housing for -52 stu- 
dents, and the Library with a capacity of 
500 seats, 232,000 volumes, class- 
rooms, a modern foreign language labo- 
ratory and an instructional media 
laboratory. A $4 million remodeling was 
recently completed to accommodate tfie 
growing Hospitality Management pro- 
gram, including a 250 seat auditorium, a 
restaurant, lecture demonstration labs 
and multipurpose commercial kitchens. 
Future development plans envision a $2 
million project to complete classroom 
and lab space in the Hospitality fvlanage- 
ment building; a new $9 million Public 



6 / General Information 



Graduate Catalog 



Affairs/Journalism building; and a new 
$1 1 million Community Conference 
Center. 

FIU Broward 

In collaboration with Rorida Atlantic Uni- 
versity and Broward Community Col- 
lege, FIU faculty and administrators are 
working to provide a comprehensive ur- 
ban university presence in Broward 
County. Both FIU Broward facilities are 
staffed to provide full student services in- 
cluding admissions, registration, finan- 
cial aid, academic advising, student 
activities, and career counseling. 

The University offers full degree pro- 
grams ctnd a variety of supplementary 
courses at two major academic centers 
in Broward County. 

The FIU Broward Program, located 
in western Fort Lauderdale emphasizes 
undergraduate programs in cooperation 
with Broward Community College. Un- 
der ttie 2+2 program, students enroll in 
BCC for the first tvw) years of university 
study and FIU provides the final two 
years and awards the bachelor's degree 
to graduates. Tfie University Tower, in 
downtown Fort Lauderdale, serves as 
thie administrative headquarters for the 
FIU Broward programs and as a major 
instructional facility. Tfie University 
Tower is primarily utilized to provide 
graduate programs, research and serv- 
ices to residents and businesses and 
service industries in thie area. 

General Academic Information 

Rorida International University offers a 
variety of academic programs and 
courses at the bachielor's, master's, and 
doctorate degree levels which are de- 
signed to respond to the changing 
needs of tfie growing metropolitan areas 
of South Florida. Degree programs are 
offered in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, College of Business Administra- 
tion, College of Education, College of 
Engineering and Design, College of 
Health, School of Hospitality Manage- 
ment, School of Nursing, and School of 
Public Affairs and Services. 

Accreditation and 
Memberships 

All academic programs of tfie University 
are approved by the State Board of Edu- 
cation and tfie Florida Board of Re- 
gents. Tfie University is an accredited 
member of the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools. Tfie professional 
programs of tfie respective scfiools of 
tfie University are accredited or ap- 
proved by tfie appropriate professional 
associations, or are pursuing full profes- 
sional accreditation or approval. 



Tfie University is also an affiliate 
member of the Association of Upper 
Level Colleges and Universities, tfie 
American ^sociation of State Colleges 
and Universities, the Florida Association 
of Colleges and Universities, the Ameri- 
can Association of Community and Jun- 
ior Colleges, a Charter Member of tfie 
Southeast Rorida Educational Consor- 
tium, and numerous otfier educational 
and professional assodations. 

Tfie following agencies have accred- 
ited professional programs at the Univer- 
sity: 

Accreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology 

American Assembly of Collegiate 
Schools of Business 

American Association of Colleges of 
Teacher Education 

American Chemical Society 

American Council of Construction 
Education 

Council of Graduate Scfiools in the 
United States 

Rorida Consortium on Multilingual 
and Multicultural Education 

National Accrediting Agency for 
Clinical Laboratory Sciences 

National Association of Colleges of 
Nursing 

National Association of Schools of 
Public Affairs 

National League of Nursing 

The Accreditation Board of 
Engineering and Technology 

Tfie American Dietetics Association 

Tfie American Medical Association 

Tfie American Medical Record 
Association 

Tfie American Occupational Tfierapy 
Association 

Tfie American Physical Therapy 
Association 

Tfie American Society of Clinical 
Patfiologists 

The Council on Social Work 
Education 

Southeast Florida Educational 
Consortium 

Rorida International University, Broward 
Community College, and Miami-Dade 
Community College are charter mem- 
bers of tfie Southeast Rorida Educa- 
tional Consortium, which was 
established in 1977. This organization 
links the member institutions in plan- 
ning, maintaining, and evaluating coop- 
erative efforts in academic programs, 
student services, and administrative sup- 
port services. 



Tfie overall objectives of tfie Consor- 
tium are to: 

1 . Increase and improve educational 
opportunities. 

2. Ensure smooth transition from tfie 
community college to the university. 

3. Provide easy access to institu- 
tional sen/ices for students and facul^. 

4. Effectively utilize human and fiscal 
resources. 

Descriptions of specific cooperative 
arrangements between thie Consortium 
memljer campuses and student and fac- 
ulty procedures are given in the appro- 
priate sections of this Catalog. 

Academic Programs 
College of Arts and Sciences 

Master of Arts in 

Comparative Sociology 

Economics 

Hispanic Studies 

History 

International Studies 

Linguistics 

Master of Rne Arts In Creative Writing 

Master of Science in 

Biology 
Cfiemistry 
Computer Science 
Environmental and Urtan Systems 

(jointly with the College of 

Engineering arxJ Design) 
Geology 

Mass Communication 
Matfiematical Sciences 
Psychology 
Physics 

Doctor of Philosophy in 

Biology 

Computer Science 
Economics 
Psychology 

College of Business 

Administration 

Master of Accounting 

Master of Business Administration 

Master of International Business 

IMaster of Science in Rnance 

Master of Science in Management 

Information Systems 
Master of Science in Taxation 

Doctor of Philosophy in Business 
Administration 

College of Education 

Master of Science in 

Adult Education and Human Resource 
Development 
Art Education 
Business Education 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 7 



Counselor Education (School and 

Community) 
Diagnostic TeacWng (majors in 

Emotional Disturtiance, Mental 

Retardation, and Specific Learning 

Disabilities) 
Early Childhood Education 
Educational Leadership 
Elementary Education 
English Education 
Health Education 
Health Occupations Education 
Home Economics Education 
Industrial Arts Education 
International Development Education 
Modem Language Education (majors in 

Spanish and French) 
Mathematics Education 
Music Education 

Parks and Recreation Management 
Physical Education 
Reading 

School Psychology 
Science Education 
Social Studies Education 
Teaching English to Speakers of Other 

Languages (TESOL) 
Vocational Education (majors in 

Administration, Supen/ision, and 

Technical and Vocational Education) 

Education Specialist (Ed.S.) 

Curriculum and Instruction 
Educational Leadership 

Doctoral Programs (Ed.D.) 

Adult Education and Humetn Resource 

Development 
Community College Teaching 
Curriculum and Instruction 
Educational Leadership 
Exceptional Student Education 

College of Engineering and 
Design 

Master of Science in 

Civil Engineering 
Computer Engineering 
Construction Management 
Electrical Engineeririg 
Environmental Engineering 
Environmental and Urtsan Systems 
Industrial Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 

Master of Landscape Architecture 

College of Health 

Master of Science in 

Dietetics and Nutrition 
Medical Laboratory Sciences 
Occupational Therapy 
Physical Therapy 

Master of Public Health 



School of Hospitality 
Management 

Master of Science in Hotel and 
Food Service Management 

School of Public Affairs and 
Services 

Master of Science in Criminal 

Justice 

Master of Health Services 

Administration 
Master of Public Administration 
Master of Social Work 

Doctor of Philosophy in Public 
Administration (jointiy with FAU) 

North Miami Campus Programs 

College of Business 
Administration 

Master of Business Administration 

College of Education 

All College of Education programs are 
available. Please contact ttie College for 
additional information. 

College of Health 

Master of Public Health 

School of Hospitality 
Management 

Master of Science in Hotel and 
Food Service Management 

School of Public Affairs and 
Services 

Master of Science in Criminal 

Justice 

Master of Health Services 

Administration 
Master of Public Administration 
Master of Social Work 

Doctor of Philosophy in Public 
Administration (jointiy with FAU) 

Broward County Programs 

College of Business 
Administration 

Master of Accounting (BC) 

Advanced Certificate in 
Accounting (UT) 

Master of Business Administration 

(BC) 

Master of Science in Fmance 

(BC/UT) 

Master of Science in Taxation (UT) 



Doctor of Philosophy in Business 
Administration (UT) 

College of Education 

Master of Science in Adult 
Education and Human Resource 
Development (BC) 
Elementary Education (BC) 
Courses for Teacher Education (BC) 
Courses in Vocational Education (BC) 

Doctor in Education in Adult 
Education and Human Resources 
Development (BC) 

Doctor in Education in Community 
College Teaching 

College of Engineering and 
Design 

Master of Science in Construction 
Management (BC) 

School of Hospitality 
Management 

Courses in Hospitality Management 

School of Public Affairs and 
Services 

Master of Health Services 
Administration (BC/UT) 

Master of Social Work (UT) 

Primary Location: 

BC = Broward Program - Davie 

UT = University Tower - Fort Lauderdale 

In addition to tiie degree programs, 
a variety of support courses are offered 
fi'om the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Certificates 

Certificate Programs are structured com- 
binations of courses witii a common 
base of interest from one or more disci- 
plines into an area of concentration. 

Successful completion of a Certifi- 
cate Program is entered on the stij- 
dent's tianscript and records. Two types 
of certificates are awarded: 

Academic Certificate 

Awarded by an academic unit to a 
student at the time of awarding a 
bachelor's degree; or upon 
completion of the appropriate 
coursewori( to a student who already 
has a bachelor's degree. 

An academic certificate shall not be 
awarded to a student wfio does not pos- 
sess either a bachelor's degree or does 
not complete a bachelor's degree pro- 
gram. An academic certificate is to be in- 
terdisciplinary in nature, to ttie greatest 
extent possitile. 



8 / General Information 



Graduate Catalog 



Professional Certificate 

Awarded by an academic unit to an 
Individual who completes the 
appropriate coursework in the area of 
concentration. The professional 
certificate does not need to be 
interdisciplinary or associated with a 
degree program. 

For details and course requirements, 
refer to the appropriate catalog or sec- 
tion in each College or School. 

College of Arts and Sciences 
Academic Certificates in 

Actuarial Studies 

American Studies 

Consumer Affairs 

Environmental Studies 

Ethnic Studies 

Gerontological Studies 

Intemational Studies 

Labor Studies 

Latin American and Caribbean Studies 

Linguistic Studies 

Marine Sdence 

Western Social and Political Thought 

Women's Studies 

Professional Certificates In: 

Labor Studies and Labor Relations 
Legal Translation and Court Interpreting 
Student Media Advising 
Tropical Commercial Botany 
Translation Studies 

College of Business 
Administration 

Banking 

Intemational Bank Management 

Intemational Business 

Marketing 

College of Education 

The College offers a variety of Profes- 
sional Certificate and Add-On Teacher 
Certification programs. Refer to tfie Col- 
lege of Education program listing sec- 
tion. 

College of Engineering and 

Design 

Professional Certificates in 

Advanced Apparel Design 
Apparel Production Management 
Retailing Management 
Heating, Ventilation, and A/C Design 
Industrial and Labor Relations 
Industrial Safety Production and 

Manufacturing 
Academic Certificate 
Meinagement and Consumer Affairs. 

College of Health 

Medical Record Coding 
Occupational Therapy 



Prosthetics and Orthotics 

School of Hospitality 
Management 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 
Travel and Tourism Management 

School of Nursing 
Professional Certificate in 

Advanced Nursing Practice in Adult 
Health 

School of Public Affairs and 
Services 

Academic Certificate 

Law and Criminal Justice 

Professional Certificates in 

Aging Policy and Administration 
Gerontology 

Human Resource Policy and Manage- 
ment 

Intemational Comparative and Develop- 
ment Administration 

Justice Administration and Policy Making 
Public Management 
Public Personnel Management and 
Labor Relations 



Office of Admissions 

Rorida Intemational University encour- 
ages applications from qualified appli- 
cants without regard to sex, physical 
handicap, or cultural, racial, religious or 
ethnic background or association. 

Applicants to a graduate program of 
the University must meet tfte minimum 
standards set forth by the Rorida Board 
of Regents (BOR), ttie University, and 
when applicable, additional require- 
ments set by each department for ad- 
mission to a graduate program. 
Applicants must check the individual de- 
partmental requirements. 

A student seeking admission into a 
graduate program of the University must 
have a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from a regionally accredited institution 
or, in tfie case of foreign students, an in- 
stitution recognized in its own country 
as preparing students for further study 
at the graduate level. The applicant 
must submit official copies of all 
transcripts. 

In most cases, an applicant must, at 
a minimum, present either a 'B' average 
in upper level work, or a combined 
score of 1000 on the Graduate Record 
Exam (GRE) or a score of 500 on the 
Graduate Management Admission Test 



(GMAT) when applicable and required 
by the individual department, or a gradu- 
ate degree from an accredited Institution. 

All graduate applicants, regardless 
of previous grade point average or de- 
grees, are required to submit the appro- 
priate test scores. 

An applicant who fails to meet these 
criteria may appeal the admission deci- 
sion and be considered under the 
BOR's Exception policy. This policy al- 
lows up to 10 percent of the graduate 
students admitted for a particulsir aca- 
demic year as exceptions to the above 
criteria. 

Foreign graduate applicants are ac- 
cepted subject to space and fiscal limita- 
tions. In addition to tfie atxjve University 
admission requirements, foreign appli- 
cants must be academically eligible for 
further study in their own country and 
must demonstrate proficiency in the 
English language by presenting a score 
of 500 or higher on the Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). For 
further information, refer to the Interna- 
tional Admissions section. 



International Admissions: 
Graduate Admission Standards 
and Procedures 

International student applicants must 
meet the admission requirements of the 
University as described in the previous 
sections and comply with tiie following: 

Academic Records 

Appropriate official transcripts and their 
English translations validated by an offi- 
dal public translator, and all other appro- 
priate credentials, must be fonwarded to 
tfie Office of Admissions. 

Proficiency in English 

Proficiency must be established if the 
native language is not English. The fol- 
lowing is accepted: A minimum score of 
500 on the TOEFL. For information, ap- 
plicants should contact: TOEFL Pro- 
gram, Box 899, Princeton, New Jersey 
08540, U.S.A. 

Declaration and Certification of 
Finances 

Upon receipt of tfte application for ad- 
mission, the Declaration and Certifica- 
tion of Finances will be mailed to the 
applicant. It must be completed and re- 
turned to the office before tfie Certificate 
of Eligibility (Form I-20A) is issued. 

The University is required by immi- 
gration authorities to check carefully the 
financial resources of each applicant 
prior to issuing the Form I-20A. Tfiere- 
fore, it is important that applicants are 
aware of the cost of attending tfie Uni- 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 9 



versity and have the necessary support 
funds for the period of enrollment. 
Applicants should refer to the Annual Es- 
timate of Cost Chart. 

The total funds available for the stu- 
dent for the first or second academic 
year, or both, must equal the total esti- 
mate of institutional costs and living ex- 
penses. All items in the Declaration and 
Certification of Finances must be accu- 
rately answered to avoid unnecessary 
delay in processing. This document 
must be received by the Office of Admis- 
sions two months prior to the antici- 
pated entry date. 

Refer to the Annual Estimate of Cost 
table for more Information. A married 
student should plan on an additional 
$3,500 In costs to cover ttie living ex- 
penses of a spouse. 

A couple with children should antici- 
pate further yearly additional costs of no 
less than $1 ,800 for each child. 

Health Insurance 

All international students are required to 
purchase and maintain health insurance 
coverage to help defray the costs In 
case of catastrophic medical emer- 
gency. Coverage must be adequate to 
provide for costs at U.S. hospitals, usu- 
ally much higher tfian costs In many 
other parts of the vrorid. Tfie University 
has approved a plan which provides cov- 
erage of most expenses and which is 
adequate for the needs of most stu- 
dents; however, a student may select al- 
ternate coverage provided it meets 
minimal coverage requirements. A copy 
of tfie requirements for alternate policies 
Is availat)le from tfie Office of Interna- 
tional Services. Compliance with tfie in- 
surance regulation is required prior to 
registration. 

Application Deadlines 

Please refer to the Academic Calendar 
for appropriate dates. 

Required Entrance Tests 

Graduate applicants are required to 
take either the GRE or the GMAT. For 
information on tfie tests, applicants 
must contact ttie Educational Testing 
Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, 
U.S.A. Information about test center lo- 
cations may also be obtained at ttie 
American Embassy in tfie applicant's 
home country. 

Tuition 

An intematloneil student Is considered a 
non-resident and Is assessed non-resi- 
dent fees. Immigration regulations re- 
quire an internationeil student to attend 
scfiool at least two semesters within an 
academic year. An undergraduate stu- 



dent is required to take a minimum of 
twelve credit hours per semester, and a 
graduate student a minimum of nine se- 
mester hours per term. Please refer to 
tfie section on Student Fees and Stu- 
dent Accounts for more information. 

Fuli-Tlme Enrollment 

Non-immigrant alien students in F-1 visa 
status are required by United States im- 
migration regulations to be enrolled full- 
time, except for the summer terms, and 
to make satisfactory progress toward 
tfie degree program in each term; other- 
wise tfie immigration status may be jeop- 
ardized. Full-time enrollment is defined 
as enrollment every term In, or a mini- 
mum of nine semester hours (graduate). 

Tfie laws and regulations of the 
United States Department of Justice, Im- 
migration and Naturalization Service 
state: 

It is the student's responsibility to 
comply with all non-immigrant alien re- 
quirements as stated under tfie United 
States laws under Section 
101 (a)( 1 5)(f)(i) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act. The University is re- 
quired to report to the Immigration Of- 
fice any non-immigrant alien student 
wfio: (a) does not register at ttie Univer- 
sity at the time expected; (b) does not 
carry a full course of study; and (c) termi- 
nates attendance. 

Granting official Extension of Stay is 
dependent upon the student's achieving 
normal academic progress toward the 
degree requirements. 

Employment 

An F-1 student may not be employed off- 
campus while attending tfie University 
unless permission has been granted by 
tfie U.S. Immigration and Naturalization 
Service. Normally, employment will not 
be permitted, especially during the stu- 
dent's first year of enrollment; but under 
very special circumstances, due to unex- 
pected conditions or emergencies aris- 
ing after Ihe student's an'lval, an 
international student may be recom- 
mended for a work permit. Adequate 
proof must be presented to the Interna- 
tional Student Advisor to obtain tfie nec- 
essary recommendation. On-campus 
employment not exceeding 20 hours per 
vraek while scfiool is In session is permit- 
ted. 

Note: An international student will 
not tie granted admission to the Univer- 
sity until all academic and non-aca- 
demic requirements have been met. 
Under no circumstances should a stu- 
dent come to tfie University without hav- 
ing received tfie official Letter of 
Admission and tfie I-20A Form. 



Annual Estimate of Costs 

for Graduate 

International Students 



Single Student (24 sem hrs) 
Tuition and Fees^ $ 5,678 

l^intenance^ $ 9,300 

Books & Supplies $ 750 

f^tedical Insurance^ $ 450 

Total $ 16,178 

^Tuition and fees are subject to 
cfiange. Fees Irrclude tfie Student 
Healtfi Fee ($24.50 per semester) and 
tiie Athletic Fee ($10.00 per semes- 
ter). Amounts sfxDwn reflect 15 semes- 
ter hours for undergraduate and 1 2 
semester fiours for graduate during 
Fall and Spring terms only. 
^Maintenance Is estimated at $775 per 
montti to cover room, fxjard, clothing, 
transportation, and incidentals. This 
cost Is for 1 2 months. 
^All international students are required 
to carry medical insurance. 



All correspondence and document 
submissions sfiould be directed to: Of- 
fice of Admissions, Rorida International 
University, PC 140, University Park, Mi- 
ami, Rorida 33199 U.S.A., telephone 
(305) 348-2363. 

Credit For Non-College Learning 

Graduate credit, per semester, will not 
normally be awarded for experiential 
learning. 

In cases where a student's learning 
experience would appear to have been 
sufficient to develop tfie understanding 
and skills associated with a course tfiat 
would otfierwise be included in his or 
her graduate program of study, fie or 
sfie will be allowed to register for Inde- 
pendent Study credits and demonstrate 
competency through development of an 
appropriate project acceptable to tfie 
faculty member wfio represents tfiat spe- 
cific area of specialization. 

Not more tfian 10 semester hours of 
a 30 semester hour master's degree, 
nor 15 semester fiours of a 60 semester 
hour master's degree, may t>e so 
earned. A student wishing to have this 
policy waived, wfiolly or in part, may peti- 
tion tfie Dean of ttie academic unit to 
which fie or she has t)een admitted for 
special consideration, and final responsi- 
tnlity for a decision will rest with ttie 
Dean. 



10 / General Information 



Graduate Catalog 



Office of 
Registration and 
Records 

The Office of Registration and Records 
is responsible for directing tfie Univer- 
sity Registration activities including off- 
campus course registration, and 
establishing, maintaining, and releasing 
students' academic records. The office 
is also responsible for space and sched- 
uling, Veteran's Affairs, off-campus reg- 
istration, and graduation. 

The University Park office is located 
in PC 130, 348-2383, the North Miami 
Campus office is located in AGI-160, 
940-5750, and the Broward Programs at 
Broward Community College, Central 
Campus, 475-4160 and University 
Tower, 355-5236. 

Classification of Students 

The University classifies students as 
follows: 

Degree-Seeking Students 

This category includes students who 
have been admitted to a degree pro- 
gram, but have not completed the re- 
quirements for it. 

Graduate - Students admitted to a 
graduate program. 

Post Graduate - Students admitted to a 
doctoral program. 

Non-Degree-Seeking Students 

These students may be either affiliated 
or unaffiliated in their status. Unaffiliated 
students are limited to taking one se- 
mester of courses at tfie University. Affili- 
ated students must be approved by the 
appropriate College or School and must 
meet its specific requirements. Under 
no circumstances may more than 15 
hours, taken as a non-degree-seeking 
student, be applied toward graduation 
requirements at tfie University, if thie stu- 
dent should change from non-degree- 
seeking to degree-seeking status. 

The following regulations will apply 
to non-degree-seeking students: 

1 . Such students are not required to 
meet the usual admission requirements 
and are not officially admitted as regular 
students. Enrollment as a non-degree- 
seeking student does not imply a right 
for future admission as a regular, de- 
gree-seeking student. Credit earned will 
not be counted toward a degree at the 
University unless such students sub- 
sequently apply for regular admission 
and are accepted as undergraduate or 
graduate students. 

2. Registration is permitted on a 
space-available basis and is determined 



at the time of registration. Nonndegree- 
seeking students may not register dur- 
ing the official registration week for 
degree-seeking students. 

3. No more \han 1 5 undergraduate 
level and 12 graduate level semester 
fK>urs earned as a non-degree-seeking 
student may be counted toward a de- 
gree. Tfie appropriate Dean must ap- 
prove the acceptance of such credit. 

4. Non-degree-seeking students will 
not be allowed to register for more tfian 
one term witfiout obtaining admission to 
a degree program at the University; ob- 
taining admission into a formal Certifi- 
cate Program; or acquiring affiliated 
status from the department in which 
they are registering. 

5. Applicants denied admission to 
tfie University will not be allowed to reg- 
ister as non-degree-seeking students 
for a period of one year witfiout obtain- 
ing admission into a formal Certificate 
Program or obtaining affiliated status 
from the appropriate academic 
department. 

6. Immigration regulations prevent 
most foreign nationals from enrolling 
without being admitted into a formal de- 
gree or certificate program, depending 
on the visa type. Therefore, international 
students will not be permitted to enroll 
as non-degree-seeking students. 

Affiliated Students 

Students applying for affiliated status as 
non-degree seeking students must be 
approved by tfie appropriate Dean's Of- 
fice in accord with criteria approved by 
that College or School's Faculty Cunicu- 
lum Committee. 

Certificate Students 

This category includes students wfio 
have been accepted into a specific cer- 
tificate program by the academic depart- 
ment responsible for that program. 
Certificate programs are subject to all 
University regulations. 

Academic Degree 
Requirements 
Master's Degree 

The University will confer the master's 
degree wfien the following conditions 
fiave been met: 

1. Recommendation of the faculty of 
the College or tfie School awarding the 
degree. 

2. Certification by tfie Dean of the 
College or tfie School concerned tfiat all 
requirements of the degree being 
sought fiave been completed. 

3. Earned an overall average GPA of 
3.0 in all courses . 

4. Met the grade requirements for 
major, core courses, and course se- 



quences establisfied by the appropriate 
College or School. 

Doctoral Degree 

Tfie University will confer the doctoral 
degree wfien tfie following conditions 
fiave been met: 

1 . Recommendation of the faculty of 
tfie College or School awarding tfie de- 
gree. 

2. Completion of the residency and 
time limitation requirements. 

3. Satisfactory completion and de- 
fense of a doctoral dissertation. 

4. Certification to the Registrar by 
tfie Dean of Graduate Studies ttnat all 
academic requirements fiave been met. 

Academic Definitions 

Program and Course Regulations 

Credit Hour: The term "credit hour" 
as used refers to one hour of 
classwork or the equivalent each 
week for an entire academic term. 

Major: An integral part of the 
bachelor's and master's degree is a 
major concentration of coursework in 
an approved academic discipline or 
area. The exact course and credit 
requirements and prerequisites for 
each major are outlined in the 
departmental program areas in the 
Catalog. 

Electives: Students may usually 
select courses from any academic 
area to complement their area or 
areas of study or to meet their 
interests in order to fulfill the credit 
hour requirements for the master's 
degree. Prerequisite course 
requirements should be considered in 
selecting elective courses. Students 
should refer to their academic 
program requirements concerning 
electives. 

Certificate Programs 

Students who fiave completed an ap- 
proved certificate progreim will have an 
appropriate notation placed on tfieir tran- 
script. 

College/Major Classification 

Graduate students are classified accord- 
ing to tfie college or school and major of 
their degree program. 

Full-time course load: Graduate, 
nine semester hours. 

Change of College/School or Major 

A fully admitted graduate student can 
change majors, provided he or she 
meets the entrance requirements of 
the new program, by obtaining and 



Graduate Catalog 



General Infomfwitlon / 11 



submitting the form to the Office of 
Admissions. The student is subject to 
the program requirements in effect at 
the time of the change of major. 

Registration 

The following registration information is 
subject to change and students must 
verify the dates with the Office of Regis- 
tration and Records, PC 130, University 
Park; or ACI-160, North Miami Campus; 
or at tfie Broward Program, BCC Cen- 
tral Campus, 475-4160 and University 
Tower, 355-5236. 

Registration for courses is as 
follows: 

Registration Week is held during 
tfie preceding semester (check the Aca- 
demic Calendar for tfie dates) and ends 
one week later. Degree seeking stu- 
dents are given an appointment day and 
time based on ttieir classification, GPA, 
and credit hours completed. Students 
may add/drop at this time. 

Open Registration is held folloviflng 
Registration Week and lasts for one 
week only. There is no appointment day 
and time and registration is on a first- 
come, first-serve basis. All students who 
have not yet registered are encouraged 
to do so at this time. Students whn have 
already registered may add or drop 
courses during tWs period. 

Registration Day is held prior to the 
beginning of the term and is for one day 
only. Students who have not registered 
should do so at this time to avoid a late 
registration fee. (Check the Academic 
Calendar for the date.) 

All Students, degree and non-de- 
gree-seeking, registering for more that 
18 credit hours during one semester 
must obtain the approval arKi thie signa- 
ture of the Dean of their College or 
School. 

Telephone Registration 

All students are able to register, add 
and drop courses using a touchtone tele- 
phone. Students able to use this system 
are given a security access code and in- 
formation on the Voice Response Tele- 
phone Registration system by the Office 
of Registration and Records. 

Immunization 

To register for courses, students must • 
provide the University Health Clinic 
(Tower Trailer University Pari<; TC 1 10, 
l^torth Miami Campus) with documenta- 
tton of immunization against measles 
and rubella. Students should contact the 
Health Clink; for more information. 

Late Registration Fee 

Any student, degree-seeking or non- 
degree-seeking, who initiates registra- 



tion after Registration Day is assessed a 
late registration fee. A student may initi- 
ate late registration during tfie first week 
of classes. 

Dropping and Adding Courses 

The Official Drop/ Add period runs 
throughout the first week of classes (Re- 
fer to the Academic Calendar for spe- 
cific dates). During this period a student 
may add courses or register with a late 
registration fee. Students may also drop 
courses or witfxJraw from tfie University 
viflth no records kept of the courses and 
without a tuition fee liability. The student 
must submit a drop/add card to tfie Of- 
fice of Registration and Records to offi- 
cially drop a course. If the tuition fee 
fias already been p)aid, the student must 
fill out a Refund Request Form with the 
Cashier's Office. 

Late Adds 

Students may add courses vwth appro- 
priate authorization and signatures until 
the end of tfie second week of classes. 
No course can be added after this 
deadline. 

Late Drops 

Courses officially dropped after 
Drop/Add period and through the eighth 
week of the term (summer terms fiave 
different deadlines, please refer to calen- 
dar dates) are recorded on ttie student's 
transcript with a symbol of 'DR' 
(dropped). Tfie student is financially li- 
able for all dropp>ed courses. The stu- 
dent must submit a Course Drop Form 
to tfie Office of Registration and Re- 
cords to officially drop a course. Non-at- 
tendance or non-payment of courses 
will not constitute a drop. 

A student may appeal the deadline 
for a late drop by submitting tfie Appeal 
for Late Drop form. A drop after the 
deadline will be approved only in cases 
where circumstances beyond tfie stu- 
dent's control make it impossible for the 
student to continue; the student must 
provide appropriate documentation of 
such. The instructor will designate 
wfiether ttie student was passing or fail- 
ing tfie course at the time of ttie appeal 
to drop. The deadline to submit tills ap- 
peal is tiie last day of classes of the 
term. 

Withdrawal from the University 

A currently registered student can with- 
draw h^om the University only during ttie 
first eight weeks of tfie semester. In ttie 
Summer Semester, withdrawal dead- 
lines will be adjusted accordingly. A 
Wittxlrawal Form must be filled out and 
submitted to ttie Office of Registration 
and Records. Non-attendance or non- 
payment of courses will not constitute a 



drop. (Refer to ttie Academic Calendar 
for ttie deadline dates.) 

Ttie tt'anscript record of a student 
who wflttidraws before or during ttie 
DrofVAdd period will contain no refer- 
ence to ttie student tjeing registered 
ttiat semester and no tuition fee is as- 
sessed. If the tuition has already been 
paid, a Refund Request Form must be 
filled out witti the Cashier's Office. If a 
student wittidraws from ttie University 
prior to ttie end of ttie fourth week of 
classes, a 25 percent refurxJ, less a 
tiondlr^ fee, will be made. 

Ttie transcript record of a student 
who officially wittxJraws after Drop/ Add 
period and before ttie end of tfie elghtti 
week of the term will contain a 'Wl' for 
each course. 

Ttie tt'anscript record of a student 
who stops attending tiie University with- 
out officially wItixJrawing ft-om ttie Uni- 
versity will contain an 'F' grade for each 
course. 

A student may appeal ttie deadline 
for a late wittidrawal by submitting ttie 
Appeal for Late Wittidrawal form. A with- 
drawal after ttie deadline will be ap- 
proved only in cases where 
circumstances beyond the student's con- 
ft-ol make it impossible for ttie student to 
continue. The student must submit ap- 
propriate documentation of such. Ttie in- 
stnjctor will designate wtiettier the 
student was passing or failing the 
course(s) at ttie time of ttie appeal to 
wittTdraw. The deadline to submit this ap- 
peal is the last day of classes or ttie 
term. 

Grading System 





Grade Points Per 




Grades Credit Hour 


A 


4.00 


A- 


3.67 


B+ 


3.33 


B 


3.00 


B- 


2.67 


C-^ 


2.33 


C 


2.00 


C- 


1.67 


D+ 


1.33 


D 


1.00 


D- 


0.67 


F Failurt 


0.00 



P Satisfactory (Pass) N/A 

IN Incomplete^ N/A 

Wl V^fittxlrew from University N/A 
WP Wittidrew after deadline 

witti passing grade N/A 
WF Wittidrew after deadline with 

failing grade 

AU Audit N/A 

DR Dropped Course N/A 



12 / General Information 



Graduate Catalog 



DP Dropped after deadline with 

passing grade N/A 

DF Dropped after deadline witfi 

failing grade 

NR Grade Not Reported or 

Invalid^ N/A 

EM Examination N/A 

'in is only a temporary symbol. It will re- 
vert to the default grade after two terms. 
^NR is only a temporary symbol. It will 
default to an 'F after two terms if it is 
not changed by thie instructor. 

Note: All courses for which a student 
is officially registered at the end of the 
Drop/Add Period and on which a Letter 
Grade, a 'DF, or a 'WF is received are 
calculated in ttie GPA. 

Grading Options 

The Colleges and the Schools make the 
determination of the grading option of 
each course. A course may be offered 
for a letter grade as listed above or 
Pass/Fail; or for an optional grade in 
which the student fias a choice of either 
receiving a letter grade or pass/fail; or 
the student may choose to audit a 
course and an 'AU' grade wnll be re- 
corded on the student's records. The 
grading option must be indicated at the 
time of registration. The grading option 
cannot be changed after the Drop/Add 
period. There are no exceptions to this 
deadline. 

To register for an audit, the student 
must obtain the permission and signa- 
ture of the instructor of the course 
audited. 

incomplete Grade 

An incomplete grade is a temporary 
symbol given at the discretion of the in- 
structor for work not completed because 
of serious interruption not caused by the 
student's own negligence. An incom- 
plete must be made up within two se- 
mesters or it will automatically default to 
the grade that ttie student earned in the 
course. There is no extension of the two 
semester deadline. The student must 
not register again for the course to 
make up ttie incomplete. 

Forgiveness Policy 

A forgiveness policy is a way in which a 
student may repeat a limited number of 
courses to improve his or her grade 
point average (GPA) by having only the 
grade received on ttie last repeat used 
in its calculation. Under the University's 
forgiveness policy, a student must file a 
Repeated Course Form with the Office 
of Registration and Records. The form 
must be submitted no later than one 
year after the semester in which the 
grade was received. All courses taken 



wnth the grades earned will be recorded 
on the student's trsmscript. The re- 
peated course form will not be proc- 
essed if the first or repeated grade 
received is 'DR', 'DP', 'Wl', 'WP', 'AU', 
'NR', or 'EM'. Repeated courses will be 
appropriately designated (T: attempted; 
R: last repeat). 

Graduate students may repeat no 
more than tvro courses under this njle 
with no course being repeated more 
than once. Ttie course shall be re- 
peated on a letter grade basis. Only the 
grade and credit received in ttie second 
attempt shall be used in computing the 
overall GPA. However, tfie original 
grade will remain posted on the stu- 
dent's pennanent record, txjt will not be 
used in computing the overall GPA. 

A course taken on a letter grade ba- 
sis must be repeated on the same ba- 
sis. A student will not be allowed 
additional credit or quality points for a re- 
peated course unless the course is spe- 
cifically designated as repeatable 
(independent study, studio courses, 
etc.). If a student is not using the forgive- 
ness policy, he or she may still repeat a 
course. All attempts will apply to compu- 
tation of tfie GPA but credit for one at- 
tempt will apply toward graduation. 
Students must check with the appropri- 
ate academic department to determine 
whether there are additional restrictions 
on repeating courses. 

Departmental Credit by 
Examination 

Departmental credit by examination is 
available for certain courses. A student 
who has already gained knowledge of a 
subject offered at the University and 
wfx3 wishes to take an examination in 
lieu of taking the course should discuss 
the matter with his or hier academic advi- 
sor and with the department offering ttie 
course. 

Awarding departmental credit by ex- 
amination is ttie prerogative of each aca- 
demic unit. To receive credit by 
examination, a student must be a regu- 
lar degree-seeking student, register, 
and pay for the courses in the regular 
manner. Once the student is awarded 
the Departmental Credit by Examina- 
tion, an EM grade will be recorded on 
the transcript. 

Change or Correction of Grades 

Once submitted, end-of-semester 
grades (except Incompletes and NR's, 
which default at the end of two terms) 
are final sind are subject to change only 
through a Change of Grade Form to cor- 
rect an error in computation or transcrib- 
ing, or v\rtiere part of the student's wori< 
has been unintentionally overiooked. 



Final Examinations 

Rnal course examinations will be given 
during the week following tfie last day of 
classes during each semester. The Sum- 
mer semesters do not fiave final exami- 
nation periods and course examinations 
may be given at the discretion of the fac- 
ulty member teaching the course. 

Grade Reports 

At the end of each semester, the Office 
of Registration and Records mails each 
registered student a copy of his or her 
end of term grades. 

Application for Graduation 

Each student wfio plans to graduate is 
required to submit to the Office of Regis- 
tration and Records an Application for 
Graduation fonm. This form, supplied by 
the Office of Registration and Records, 
must be submitted before tfie end of the 
third week of classes of the academic 
semester in which graduation is ex- 
pected. A student turning in the Applica- 
tion for Graduation after the deadline 
will graduate the following semester. 
Tfiere is no charge for applying for 
graduation. The Application for Gradu- 
ation must be signed by tfie academic 
advisor prior to being submitted to ttie 
Office of Registration and Records. 

A student denied graduation must 
complete tfie remaining requirements 
needed for graduation and must re-ap- 
ply for graduation. 

Academic Warning, Probation, 
and Dismissal 

Warning 

A student wfiose cumulative GPA falls 
below a 3.0 (graduate) will be placed on 
warning, indicating academic difficulty. 

Probation 

A student on warning whose cumulative 
GPA falls below 3.0 (graduate) will be 
placed on probation, indicating serious 
academic diffkxilty. The College/School 
of tfie student on probation may appro- 
priately communicate conditions which 
must be met in order to continue to en- 
roll. 

Dismissal 

A student on Probation whose cumula- 
tive and semester GPAs fall below a 3.0 
(graduate) will be automatk^ly dis- 
missed from his or her program and the 
University. A graduate student will not 
be dismissed prkx to attempting a mini- 
mum of 12 flours of coursework as a 
graduate student. The student fias ten 
wort<ing days to appeal the dismissal de- 
cision. This appeal must be made in writ- 
ing to the Dean of thie College or the 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 13 



School in which the student is admitted. 
The dismissal from the University is for 
a minimum of one year. After one year, 
tfie student may apply for readmission 
(see Readmission) to ttie University in 
the same or a different program, or reg- 
ister as a non-degree seeking student. 
There are no exceptions to tfie one year 
waiting period. 

Dismissed students sipplying for ad- 
mission or registering as non-degree 
seeking students are placed on aca- 
demic probation. 

Student Records 

Rorida International University assures 
tfie confidentiality of student educational 
records In accordance with State Univer- 
sity System rules, state, and federal 
laws including the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as 
amended. Student academic records 
are maintained in tfie Office of Registra- 
tion and Records and in the academic 
department of the student's major. As a 
rule, all currently enrolled and former 
students have the right to review their re- 
cords to determine tfieir content and ac- 
curacy. Parents of dependent students, 
as defined by the Internal Revenue 
Code, and who give evidence of tfie de- 
pendent status, have the same rights. 
For tfie cost of photocopying, students 
may generally fiave copies of any docu- 
ments in tfieir file, except for other insti- 
tutions' transcripts. 

Release of Student Information 
from Educational Records 

The disclosure or publication of student 
information Is governed by policies of 
Ftorida International University and the 
Board of Regents of tfie State University 
System of Florida within tfie framework 
of State and Federal Laws, including the 
Family Educational Rights and Privacy 
Act of 1974. 

A student's consent is required for 
the disclosure or publication of any infor- 
mation which is a) personally identifiable 
and b) a p>art of tfie educational record. 
However, certain exceptions to that gen- 
erality, twth in types of information 
wHch can be disclosed and in access to 
that information, are allowed within tfie 
regulations of tfie Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act. The following 
persons and organizations may have ac- 
cess to personally identifiable Informa- 
tion wittiout a student's prior consent: 

A. Faculty, administrators, staff and 
consultants employed by the University 
or the Board of Regents whose work In- 
volves: 

1. Performance of administrative 
tasks which relate to students; 



2. Performance of supervisory or in- 
structional tasks which relate to stu- 
dents; or 

3. Performance of services which 
benefit students. 

A student's prior consent is not re- 
quired for disclosure of portions of the 
educational record defined by the institu- 
tion as Directory Information. Tfie follow- 
ing Directory Information may be 
released by the University: 

1 . Name, local and permanent ad- 
dress and telephone number(s); 

2. Date and place of birth, and sex; 

3. Classification and major and mi- 
nor fields of study; 

4. Participation In officially recog- 
nized activities and sports; 

5. Weight and height of members of 
athletic teams; 

6. Dates of attendance, degrees and 
awards received; 

7. Tfie most recent previous educa- 
tional agency or institution attended by 
tfie student; and 

8. Photographic image. 

The information above, designated 
by the University as Directory Informa- 
tion, may be released or published by 
the University without a student's prior 
written consent unless exception is 
made in writing by tfie student or tfie 
parents of a dependent student. 

In order to prevent access to or re- 
lease of Directory Information, students, 
or the parents of dependent students, 
must notify the Registrar (PC 130), in 
writing, prior to tfie first dass meeting 
day of the semester. Access to, or re- 
lease of Directory Information w/ill be 
withheld until further written instruction 
is received from a student, or tfie par- 
ents of a dependent student. 

Students have a right to challenge 
the correctness of tfieir educational re- 
cords and may file written requests to 
amend these records. The Office of Reg- 
istration and Records (PC 130) may be 
contacted for furttier Information regard- 
ing the procedure to follow In filing com- 
plaints. 

For complete information regarding 
the policies outlined alxive, please con- 
tact: 

Registrar 

Office Registration & Records 

PC 130 

Rorida International University 

University Park 

f^iami, Rorida 33199 

Transcripts 

The transcript Is the complete student 
record of courses taken at tfie Univer- 
sity, in addition to tfie number of transfer 
credits accepted. The GPA is calculated 



for £tll courses taken at tfie University af- 
ter Fall Term 1975 wfiether tfie courses 
are in the major program or not. Once a 
baccalaureate, master's, or doctorate 
degree is earned, the GPA recalculation 
starts again. 

A student must request his or her 
transcript in viniting. Ttiere Is a process- 
ing period. The transcript will not be re- 
leased if the student has a University 
financial liability. 

Class Attendance 

The University does not fiave an atten- 
dance policy. However, individual fac- 
ulty may establish attendance criteria in 
classes where it is necessary for aca- 
demic reasons. Academic units may es- 
tablish tfieir own attendance policies 
with tfie approval of tfie Provost. 

Veterans Information 

The Office of Veterans Affairs assists all 
veterans and their dependents wfio 
wish to receive VA educational fcienefits. 
The Office also provides personal coun- 
seling, fee deferments, tutorial assis- 
tance, and wori<-shjdy jobs. Tfie VA 
Office is located in PC 130, University 
Park; and in ACI-160, North l\^iami 
Campus. 

Veterans who are planning to attend 
tfie University should contact ttie Office 
of Veterans Affairs two montfis prior to 
tfie date of entiy in order to expedite ttie 
processing of paperwork required to ob- 
tain educational allowances from the 
Veterans Administration. 

Training Status 

Full time 9 Credits 
3/4 time 7 Credits 
1/2 time 5 Credits 
Less tfian 
1/2 time 4 Credits 

Rate of Payment^ 
Number of Dependents 

For rate of montiily payment of educa- 
tional allowances for veterans and de- 
pendents, please contact Office of 
Veteran's Affairs. 

For additional information regarding 
other Veterans Educational Programs, 
contact tfie Office of Veterans Affairs at 
University Park, PC 130, 348-2838. 

Status Certification 

The Veterans Affairs Office also verifies 
the school status of all past and present 
students for purposes of Social Security, 
tijition reimbursement, employment, and 
loan deferrals. 



14 / General InfoimaUon 



Graduate Catalog 



Enrollment Status 
Graduate: 

Full time: 9 credits or more. 
Half time: 6 - 8 credits. 
Less than half time: 5 credits or less. 
The above enrollment status is for con- 
tinuous enrollment for tfie semester tiiat 
the student is attending. Reduction of 
course load will reflect tfie student's 
status. See certification office for further 
details. 

Florida Residency Information 
Florida Student Definition 

For the purpose of assessing registra- 
tion and tuition fees, a student shall be 
classified as a "Florida" or "non-Rorida" 
Resident. 

To qualify as a "Florida" Resident, 
the student must: 

1. Be a U.S. Citizen, Resident Alien, 
parolee, Cuban National, Vietnamese 
Refugee, or othier legal alien so desig- 
nated by tiie U.S. Immigration and Natu- 
ralization Service. 

2. Have established a legal resi- 
dence in this State and hiave maintained 
tiiat legal residence for twelve monttis, 
immediately prior to tiie start of the term 
in which tine student is seeking Rorida 
resident classification. The student's 
residence in Rorida must be as a bona 
fide domiciliary rattier tiian for the pur- 
pose of maintaining a mere temporary 
residence or abode incident to enroll- 
ment in an institution of higher educa- 
tion, and sfx)uld be demonstrated as 
indicated below (for dependent students 
as defined by IRS regulations, a parent 
or guardian must qualify), 

3. Submit ttie following documenta- 
tion (or in tfie case of a dependent stu- 
dent, tfie parent must submit 
documentation) prior to thie last day of 
registration for tfie term for which resi- 
dent status is sought: 

a. Documentation establishing legal 
residence in Rorida (tills document 
must be dated at least one year prior to 
tiie first day of classes of tiie term for 
which resident status is sought). Tiie fol- 
lowing documents will be considered in 
determining legal residence; 

(1.) Declaration of Domicile. 

(2.) Proof of purchase of a home in 
Rorida which tfie shjdent occupies as 
his or her residence. 

(3.) Proof ttiat tfie student has main- 
tained residence in the state for tiie pre- 
ceding year (e.g., rent receipts, 
employment record). 

b. Documentation establishing bona 
fide domicile in Rorida which is not tem- 
porary or merely incident to enrollment 
in a Rorida institution of higher educa- 



tion. Tfie following documents will be 
considered evidence of domicile even 
though no one of these criteria, if taken 
alone, will be considered conclusive evi- 
dence of domicile (these documents 
must be dated at least one year prior to 
tfie first day of classes of tfie term for 
which resident status is sought): 

(1 .) Declaration of Domicile. 

(2.) Rorida Voter's registration. 

(3.) Rorida Driver's license. 

(4.) Proof of real property ownership 
in Rorida (e.g., deed, tax receipts). 

(5.) Employment records or otfier 
employment related documentation 
(e.g., W-2, paycheck receipts), other 
than for employment normally provided 
on a tempwrary basis to students or 
otfier temporary employment. 

(6.) Proof of membership in or affili- 
ation witin community or state organiza- 
tions or significant connections to the 
State. 

(7.) Proof of continuous presence in 
Rorida during tiie period when not en- 
rolled as a student. 

(8.) Proof of former domicile in Ror- 
ida and maintenance of significant con- 
nections while absent. 

(9.) Proof of reliance upon Rorida 
sources of support. 

(10.) Proof of domicile in Rorida of 
family. 

(11.) Proof of admission to a li- 
censed practicing profession in Rorida. 

(1 2.) Proof of acceptance of perma- 
nent employment in Rorida. 

(13.) Proof of graduation from high 
school located in Rorida. 

(1 4.) Any otiier factors peculiar to 
the individual which tend to establish 
the necessary intent to make Rorida a 
permanent home and that the individual 
is a bona fide Rorida resident, including 
tfie age and general circumstances of 
the individual. 

c. No contrary evidence establishing 
residence elsewfiere. 

d. Documentation of dependent/inde- 
pendent status (IRS return or affidavit). 

A student can also qualify for "Ror- 
ida" residency by one or more of tine fol- 
lowing criteria: 

1. Become a legal resident and be 
married to a person wfio has been a le- 
gal resident for tiie required twelve- 
montfi period, or, 

2. Be a member of the Armed 
Forces on active duty stationed in Fkar- 
ida, or a spouse or dependent, or, 

3. Be a member of the full-time in- 
stnjctional or administrative staff of a 
state public school, state community col- 
lege or state university in Florida, a 
spouse or dependent, or, 



4. Be a dependent and fiave lived 
five years with an adult relative wfxs has 
established legal residence in Rorida, or, 

5. Be a former student at a public In- 
stitution of higher education wfio was 
property classified as a resident who re^ 
establishes domiciliary status and re-en- 
rolls within a period of twelve months, or, 

6. f^^ake a statement as to ttie length 
of residence in Rorida and qualification 
under tfie above criteria. 



Financial Aid 

The University adheres to tiie philoso- 
phy tiiat a student is entitled to a college 
education regardless of his or fier finan- 
cial condition. The Rnancial Aid Pro- 
gram at the University includes 
scholarships, grants, loans, cind employ- 
ment. Instructions on how to apply for fi- 
nancial aid are listed under Application 
Procedures for Financial Aid. The Rnan- 
cial Aid Office is located in PC 1 25, Uni- 
versity Pari<, 348-2431 ; and in ACI-160, 
North Miami Campus, 940-5765. 

Loans 

Perkins Loan (fonnerly NDSL): This is 
a federally funded loan in which gradu- 
ate stijdents are allowed to borrow a 
majflmum of $18,000 for tineir graduate 
studies including any loans received at 
tiie undergraduate level. 

Tfiere is no interest on the loan while 
tiie student is enrolled at least part-time. 
The repayment period begins at 5% in- 
terest nine months after tfie student 
ceases enrollment at an institution of 
higher education. Maximum repayment 
time is 10 years and a minimum pay- 
ment of $30 per montii is required. 

Borrowers who wori< in specially des- 
ignated jobs or geographical areas may 
have part or all of their Perkins Loan re- 
payment obligation canceled. Borrowers 
also may be eligible to tiave tfieir pay- 
ments deferred or postponed for spe- 
cific periods of time. 

(Refer to Eligibility Criteria section to 
determine eligibility requirements.) 
Stafford Student Loan (formerly Guar- 
anteed Student Loan): This federal 
loan program enables students to bor- 
row directly ft-om eitiier a bank, a credit 
union, a savings and loan association, 
or other participating lenders to help 
fund tiiair post-secondary education. 
For new borrowers wfio seek loans for 
periods of enrollment beginning on or af- 
ter July 1 , 1988, tiie interest rate is 8% 
and increases to 10% beginning with 
tiTe fifth year of repayment. For students 



Graduate Catalog 



General Irrformatlon / 15 



who currently have 7% or 9% GSLs, the 
interest rate on additional loans will con- 
tinue to be 7% or 9%. 

Depending on the student's need, 
graduate students may borrow up to 
$7,500 a year. The aggregate amount 
ttiat graduates may borrow is $54,750, 
Including any Stafford loans received at 
the undergraduate level. 

Loan repayments begin six to nine 
months (depending on the interest of 
the loan) after the student graduates, 
leaves school, or drops below fialf-time 
status. 

(Refer to Eligibility Criteria section to 
determine eligibility requirements). 
PLUS Loans and Supplemental 
Loans for Students (SLS): PLUS loans 
are for parent Ijorrowers; SLS's are for 
students. Both loans provide additional 
funds for educational expenses and, like 
Stafford Student Loans, are made by a 
lender such as a bank, aedit union, sav- 
ings & loan association, and other par- 
ticipating lenders. SLS arxJ PLUS loans 
are disbursed on or after July 1 , 1988 
will hiave a variable interest rate, ad- 
justed each year. The interest rate for 
the 91 -92 award year will be determined 
in June 1991. 

PLUS enables parents to borrow up 
to $4,000 per year, to a total of $20,000, 
for each child who is enrolled at least 
half-time and is a dependent student. 

Under tfie SLS program, graduate 
students may borrow up to $4,000 per 
year, to a total of $20,000. This amount 
is in addition to the GSL. 

PLUS and SLS borrowers do not 
have to show need, although like all bor- 
rowers, they may have to undergo a 
credit analysis. To receive consideration 
for an SLS, borrowers must apply for fi- 
nancial aid to establish thieir eligibility for 
a Stafford Loan. 

SLS and PLUS borrowers must be- 
gin repaying interest within 60 days af- 



ter the loan is disbursed, unless the 
lender agrees to let the interest accumu- 
late until the deferment ends. 
Emergency Loan: This institutional 
loan program assists students wrtxi dem- 
onstrate an urgent need for immediate 
funds. Applicants must be enrolled as 
full-time students in the semester for 
which tfie request is being made. The 
amount loaned can be up to $500 and 
must be repaid within 90 days. This loan 
may also be used by financial aid recipi- 
ents as an advance on their financial aid 
awEirds for tfie purpose of purchasing 
books. 

Applications are available at the R- 
nandal Aid Office and loans are ap- 
proved within 24 hours. Release of 
funds will occur within five working days 
of tfie request. 

Short Term Tuition Loan: This is an in- 
stitutional loan program available to stu- 
dents who are unable to meet tfie 
deadline for fee payment. 

To be eligible, an applicant must be 
admitted to a degree program, be en- 
rolled on a full-time basis, etnd fiave no 
outstanding debts to the University. Fi- 
nancial aid recipients are not eligible to 
receive this loan since their tuition/fees 
payment can be deferred until tfieir fi- 
nancial aid is disbursed. 

Applicants who meet all criteria will 
be awarded the loan. The amount of 
award is limited to the student's actual 
cost of tuition and otfier required fees. 
The loan is due 60 days from the first 
day of classes each semester. (Late reg- 
istration fees or other penalty ctiarges 
are excluded from loan.) 

Student Employment 

The University offers employment oppor- 
tunities through various sources. In addi- 
tion to tfie CWS Program which is 
based on financial need, other jobs are 
available on and off-campus and assis- 



tance in locating work is provided to any 
student through the Job Location Devel- 
opment Program. 

College Work Study (CWS): This is a 
federal financial aid program often in- 
cluded in the student's financial aid 
award. It provides employment opportu- 
nities to eligible graduate students. Stu- 
dents awarded CWS funds may work on 
campus, and an effort is made to assign 
them to jobs related to their field of 
study or special interests and skills. 

(Refer to Eligibility Criteria section to 
determine eligibility requirements.) 
Job Location Developnr>ent Program 
(JLD): The Career Planning and Place- 
ment Office operates a Job Location De- 
velopment Program to help currently 
enrolled students in locating off-campus 
p>art-time employment. 

Students seeking work may contact 
the JLD coordinator in that office for in- 
formation and assistance. 
Other Personnel Services (OPS): On- 
campus employment opportunities are 
also available through the University 
Personnel Relations Department (Em- 
ployment Office) or through tfie various 
University departments. 
Caution: Rnandail aid recipients should 
be aware that all earnings from non-fi- 
nancial aid employment will be consid- 
ered as a resource for the following 
academic year. 

Eligibility Criteria 

To be eligible to receive Federal assis- 
tance, students must: 

1. Be enrolled in an eligible program 
of study. 

2. Be U.S. citizens; U.S. nationals; or 
U.S. permanent residents or reside in 
the United States for other than a tempo- 
rary purpose (supportive documentation 
is required to verify residency or citizen- 
ship status). 







5% Perkins Loans 


Repayment Chart 










Total Amount 


Number of 






Amount 


Monthly 


Monthly 


Final 


Total 


Amount 


Borrowed 


Payments 


Payments 


Payment 


Interest 


Repaid 


$500.00 


$30.00 


18 


$9.30 


$ 19.30 


$519.30 


1,000.00 


30.00 


36 


28.87 


78.87 


1,078.87 


1,500.00 


30.00 


57 


5.54 


185.84 


1,685.54 


2,000.00 


30.00 


79 


7.93 


347.93 


2,347.93 


2,500.00 


30.00 


103 


17.34 


577.34 


3,077.34 


3,000.00 


31.82 


120 


31.77 


818.35 


3,818.35 


4,000.00 


42.43 


120 


41.84 


1,091.01 


5,099.01 


5,000.00 


52.03 


120 


53.06 


1,363.63 


6,363.63 


7,500.00 


79.55 


120 


79.42 


2,045.87 


9,545.87 


10,000.00 


106.07 


120 


105.37 


2,727.70 


12,727.70 


12,000.00 


127.28 


120 


127.06 


3,273.38 


15,273.38 



16 / General Infoimation 



Graduate Catalog 



3. Maintain satisfactory academic 
progress in Itieir course of study (Refer 
to Satisfactory Academic Progress sec- 
tion). 

4. Not be in default of any loan or 
owe a repayment on a Pell Grant, 
SEOG, or state grant. 

5. Demonstrate financial need. 

Other Fornis of University 
Assistance 

A number of scholarsfiips are made 
available by the University, private or- 
ganizations, or individuals for students 
with academic promise and financial 
need. Selection of recipients, award 
amount, and eligibility criteria are deter- 
mined by the University, or the donor(s), 
or both. 

Application information and dead- 
lines can be obtained through the Finan- 
cial Aid Office. 



University-Wide Programs 

To be considered for a variety of Univer- 
sity scholarships, students are required 
to file a Need Analysis Form (see Appli- 
cation Procedures for Financial Aid). 

Graduate Assistant Matriculation Fee 
Waivers: These waivers may be 
awarded to Graduate Assistants who 
are to be employed for a minimum of 10 
hours per week and who are enrolled 
full time for at least one semester during 
the academic year. 

Tuition Waivers: Tuition waivers may 
be awarded to Non-Rorida residents 
and foreign students to help defray a 
part or all of tfie out-of-state portion of 
their tuition. Awards are made to stu- 
dents who demonstrate high scholastic 
acNevement, or to students v\rtT0 have 
special skills or talents. 

Graduate Scholarships and Fellow- 
shlps: Graduate scholarships and assis- 
tantships are provided to applicants who 
demonstrate qualifications required for 
admission to graduate programs. This fi- 
nancial aid may be available in accord 
with various criteria such as: outstand- 
ing academic potential and prior 
achievement, demonstration of financial 
r>eed, and minority recruitment. 

Doctoral fellowships, research assis- 
tantships, and teaching assistantships 
are awarded competitively for doctoral 
programs in Adult Education, Biology, 
Business Administration, Community 
College Teaching, Computer Science, 
Curriculum and Instruction, Economics, 
Education, Educatior^l Leadership, Ex- 
ceptksnal Student Education, Psychol- 
ogy, and Public Administration. Student 
aid may be available for other doctoral 



programs as new programs are estab- 
lished. 

Master's degree scholarships, re- 
search assistantships, and teaching as- 
sistantships are available in numerous 
programs. Students may also gain part- 
time employment to support studies and 
living costs. Student financial support is 
also provided by external agencies. For 
example, the Rorida Endowment Fund 
provides doctoral fellowships for stu- 
dents who are Black American citizens. 
For more information, contact the indi- 
vidual academic department. 

Fellowship Program for Blacic Gradu- 
ate and Professional Students: Avail- 
able to black graduate students 
recommended by their academic depart- 
ments. Awards are made for Spring or 
Summer semesters. Contact the Divi- 
sion of Graduate Studies at 348-2455. 



Special Schoiarsliips 

Charles E. Perry Graduate Scholar- 
ships: Available to full time graduate 
students with a 3.5 GPA or higher and fi- 
nancial need. 

Felix Memorial Scholarship: Available 
to graduate Music majors with financial 
need. Contact the Music Department at 
348-2896. 

Frank R. MacNeill Memorial Scholar- 
ship: Available to U.S. graduate stu- 
dents majoring in Insurance or 
Marketing with financial need and a 3.0 
GPA or higher. 

Isadore Hecht Scholarship: Available 
to graduates of Dade or Broward high 
schools who fiave completed 10 gradu- 
ate semester hours towards a degree at 
the University. The students must be en- 
rolled in the Colleges of Arts and Sci- 
ences or Business Administration, or the 
Schools of Education or Public Affairs 
and Services. 

Judith Seymour Memorial Scholar- 
ship: Available to students enrolled in 
the College of Arts and Sciences who 
have completed 30 semester h»urs at 
the University and are interested in his- 
toric preservation. 

Mayor IHenry Milander Public Service 
Scholarship: Available to graduate stu- 
dents majoring in Public Administration 
or Criminal Justice. Must be a graduate 
of any public high school in the Hialeah, 
Miami Springs, Miami Lakes, Medley, 
and Virginia Gardens communities to 
qualify. Must be full-time students, main- 
tain a minimum 3.0 GPA, and have civic 
leadership qualities. 
Ricardo Nunez Scholarship Fund: 
Available to full time graduate students 



with good academic progress and finan- 
cial need. Minimum 3.0 G.P.A. 
Dr. Pablo Ruiz-Orozco Scholarship: 
Available to full-time students seeking 
graduate degrees in Hispanic Studies 
who are natives of Ciego de Avila, 
Cuba, or their descendants. If no stu- 
dents meet this criteria, a student of Cu- 
ban origin may be selected. Must have 
a minimum 3.0 GPA and demonstrate fi- 
nancial need. 

Pearce Memorial Scholarship: Avail- 
able to students majoring in Biological 
Sciences or Environmental Studies who 
are interested in Plant Science. 
Student Government Association 
Academic Excellence Scholarship: 
Available to full-time students with finan- 
cial need and a minimum 3.5 GPA. 
Student Government Association 
l-landicapped Student Scholarship: 
Available to full-time students with a 
physical disability, financial need, and a 
minimum 2.0 GPA. 

Other scholarship opportunities are 
available through individual academic 
departments. Information alaout addi- 
tional externally-funded scholarships is 
available in the Rnandal Aid Office. 



Application Procedures For 
Financial Aid 

Listed below are all tfie documents re- 
quired to apply for financial assistance, 
as well as procedures for submission of 
application. The deadline date to re- 
ceive priority consideration for available 
funds is April 1 of the year preceding 
tfie academic year of enrollment. 
Need Analysis Document: Students in- 
terested in all forms of aid must com- 
plete the Rorida Rnancial Aid Form 
(FAF) and mail it to College Scfwiarship 
Service (CSS). The CSS will perform a 
need analysis based on the information 
provided on the FAF and send a copy to 
thie University. 

Financial Aid Application (FAA): This 
form must be completed by all students 
and mailed to the Rnancial Aid Office at 
ttieir primary campus. 
Financial Aid Transcript (FAT): All stu- 
dents who have attended another institu- 
tion of higher education must submit a 
Rnancial Aid Transcript for each institu- 
tion attended, wfiether or not aid was re- 
ceived. 

Income Tax Return: Students selected 
for verification by tfie U.S. Dept. of Edu- 
cation and students who claim to be in- 
dependent and are under 24 years of 
age must submit an official (signed) 
copy of their (and spouse) previous year 
Income Tax Return (1040, I040A, or 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 17 



1040EZ) to the Rnancial Aid Office. An 
official (signed) copy of their parents' tax 
return will also be required. The appli- 
cant's name and social security number 
should be written at the top of the Par- 
ent's Income Tax Fonri to insure proper 
student identification. (Students and/or 
parents who did/will not file must submit 
an Income Certification Statement for 
IRS Non-Rlers available in the Financial 
Aid Office.) 

PLUS and SLS Applicants: A separate 
application is required in addition to the 
other documents. The Financial Aid Of- 
fice will mail all completed loan applica- 
tions directly to the student. Unless the 
applicant specifies a particular lender, 
he/she must make their own contacts 
with lenders regarding the completed 
application. 

Additional information may be re- 
quested by the Financial Aid Office be- 
fore issuing an award package. 
Note: The University will not begin proc- 
essing financial aid applications until all 
eligibility criteria are met and application 
forms are properiy completed. It is the 
student's responsibility to comply with 
all requirements. All forms and addi- 
tional information may be obtained from 
tfie Financial Aid Office on eitiier 
campus. 



Notification of Award 

Once a need assessment has been 
completed, a notice of award will be 
mailed to the applk^ant. 

It Is tiie student's responsibility to re- 
view tiie award and all its conditions 
prior to accepting tfie aid offer. The stu- 
dent must then return the signed copy 
of the award along with all other re- 
quired documents witiiin 15 days or 
make an appointment witii a financial 
aid officer to discuss any concerns 
he/she may have. If the student fails to 
do this, the award will be canceled and 
tiiose funds wrill be offered to other eligi- 
ble applicants. 

Disbursement of Aid 

All financial aid recipients must go to tiie 
Cashier's Office to have their dass 
schedule validated prior to the date 
shown on the Fee Due Notice received 
during registration. Failure to do this will 
result in the cancellation of all classes 
for the semester. 

Rnancial aid cfiecks will generally be 
available one month after classes begin 
each semester. 

Tuition, fees, housing fees, and 
otfier outstanding debts will be de- 
ducted before releasing any funds to tfie 
student. 



Satisfactory Academic 
Progress 

In keeping with guidelines set by the 
U.S. Department of Education, the R- 
nancial Aid Office must determine if a 
student is maintaining satisfactory pro- 
gress for the receipt of Titie IV student fi- 
nancial aid (Pell Grant, Supplemental 
Educational Opportunity Grant, College 
Wori< Study, Perkins Loans, Stafford 
Student Loan/PLUS Loan, SLS Loan, 
and State Student Incentive Grant pro- 
grams). This rule applies regardless of 
the student's previous financial aid his- 
tory. 

Tlie student must show incrementeil 
progress in his or her coursework along 
the continuum of attendance toward de- 
gree completion, as well as remain in 
good academic standing to be eligible 
for aid. 

Students who fail to meet tiie satis- 
factory progress criteria will be issued 
warnings, placed on probation, or have 
all aid suspended. If a student dis- 
agrees with tiie Rnancial Aid Office's de- 
cision, tie or she will have tiie right to 
appeal. (The complete Satisfactory Pro- 
gress Policy statement is available in 
tfie Rnancial Aid Office and one copy is 
provided to each financial aid applicant 
along with the notification of tfieir finan- 
cial aid eligibility.) 

Financial Aid 
Refunds/Repayments 

When a student receiving financial aid 
withdraws or drops below the required 
hours for receipt of that aid, tiie amount 
of refund due (according to tiie Univer- 
sity Refund Polk;y) is refunded back into 
the financial aid programs from which 
the student received money. In addition, 
a portion of tiie financial aid received as 
cash disbursement for non-instructional 
costs must be repaid by the student to 
tfie University. 

The complete Refund/Repayment 
Policy Statement and distribution formu- 
las are available in tfie Financial Aid 
Office. 



Students' Rights and 
Responsibilities 

As a recipient of financial aid, ttiere are 
certain rights and responsibilities of 
which stijdents should be aware. By 
knowing them, ttiey will be in a better po- 
sition to make decisions which could in- 
fluence tfieir educational goals and 
objectives. 

Students fiave the right to know: 



1 . What financial aid programs are 
available at Florida International Univer- 
sity. 

2. The process and procedures that 
must be followed in order to be consid- 
ered for financial aid. 

3. The criteria used in selection of re- 
cipients, and the method used for calcu- 
lating need. 

4. The various programs in tfie finan- 
cial aid award and flow the need was de- 
termined. 

5. The refund and payment policy at 
tiie University. 

6. How the Rnancial Aid Office 
makes its determination on such ques- 
tions as student progress, the appeal 
process, and other decisions. 

7. The terms, including repayment, 
of any loan allocated by the University. 

8. What special facilities and serv- 
ices are available to tiie handicapped. 

Students are responsible for: 

1. The timely and proper completion 
of all necessary forms by the estab- 
lished deadlines, eind tfie accuracy of 
any information provided to tfie Univer- 
sity In tiie financial aid application. 

2. Promptiy providing any additional 
information requested by tiie Financial 
Aid Office. 

3. Keeping tfie Rnancial Aid Office 
informed of any changes in address, 
name, marital status, financial sihjation, 
or any cfiange in tfieir student status. 

4. Reading and understanding all fi- 
nancial aid forms sent to them and/or 
signed by tiiem and keeping copies of 
tiie forms. 

5. Notifying the Rnancial Aid Office 
of any scholarship, grant, or other re- 
sources made available to them from 
non-University sources while tiiey are re- 
ceiving financial aid. 

6. Notifying the Rnancial Aid Office if 
ttiey wittidraw from tiie University or 
cfiange ttieir enrollment status. Some re- 
payment may be expected on a pro- 
rated basis. Futijre aid may be 
suspended if arrangements for payment 
are not made witti tiie Financial Aid Of- 
fice. 

7. Maintaining satisfactory progress 
in order to be considered for financial 
aid. 

8. Visiting tfie Cashier's Office for an 
exit interview if ttiey have received a 
Peri<lns Loan or Stafford Student Loan 
and do not plan to return to scfxjol tiie 
following semester. 

9. Re-applying for aid each year. 



18 / General Information 



Graduate Catalog 



Student Fees and 
Student Accounts 

Fees 

Registration and tuition fees are estab- 
lished by tlie Board of Regents as re- 
quired by tfie Rorida Legislature. These 
fees are subject to change without no- 
tice. The 1990-91 credit hour fee sched- 
ule is as follows: 

Credit Hour Fees 

Florida Non-Florida 
Resident Resident 

Undergraduate $41.92 $152.29 

Graduate, Thesis 

or Dissertation $74.63 $236.56 

Student Fees 

Athletic $10.00 $10.00 

Health $24.30 $24.30 

The Health and Athletic fees are non- 
refundable fees assessed each term. 

Registration fees for course audits 
are the same as the above fees, except 
that no assessment will be made for the 
out-of-state portion. 

A schedule of registration and tuition 
fees for all programs is published prior 
to each semester and can be obtained 
at the Office of Registration and Re- 
cords. Since fees often change in tfie 
fall semester tfie above fees siTould be 
used for information purposes only. The 
schedule of classes will contain the 
most accurate fee information. 

Fee Waivers 

Students using a fee waiver as part of 
the fee payment must present the origi- 
nal and the student copy to the Cash- 
ier's Office at the time of payment, on or 
before tfie last day to pay fees. Stu- 
dents wfx) are responsible for a portion 
of tfieir fees in addition to the fee waiver 
will be required to pay their portion be- 
fore the fee waiver is applied. 

University and State employees us- 
ing the State employee fee waiver to 
pay their fees must register on or after 
the day establislTed in tfie official Univer- 
sity calendar for State employee regis- 
tration. A properly completed and 
approved waiver form must be pre- 
sented at the Cashier's Office by the 
date published for the last day to pay 
fees. The State employee fee waiver will 
not be accepted as payment for course 
registrations prior to the announced 
date for state employee registration. 

Senior citizens fee waivers are avail- 
able to persons 60 years of age or older 
wtio meet the requirements of Rorida 
residency as defined in this catalog. The 
fee waiver allows qualified individuals to 
attend credit classes on an audit basis. 



Senior citizens using the fee waiver 
must register during tfie first weel< of 
classes 

Rorida law requires that State em- 
ployee fee waivers and senior citizen 
fee waivers be granted on a space avail- 
able basis only; tfierefore, individuals us- 
ing tfiese waivers must comply with tfie 
procedures outlined in tfie schedule of 
classes for each semester. 

Refunds will not be processed for 
employees who have registered and 
paid prior to the state employee registra- 
tion day and wish to use the fee waiver. 

Fee Payment 

Fees may be paid at the Cashier's Of- 
fice at University Park, PC 120, or at 
North Miami ACI 140. Broward students 
may pay at the Broward Community Col- 
lege Cashier's Office, by mail or at the 
Cashier's Office at University Park or 
North Miami. Night drop boxes outside 
tfie Cashier's Offices are available for 
fee payments by check or money order 
through tfie last day to pay fees. Pay- 
ment is also accepted by mail. The Uni- 
versity is not responsible for cash left in 
the night drop or sent through the mail. 
Failure to pay fees by the estaWisfied 
deadlines will cause all courses to be 
cancelled. See Fee Liability betow. 

Late Registration/Payment Fee 

Students wfio register or pay after tfie 
publislied deadline for fee payment will 
be subject to a Late Fee. The amount 
of tfie fee will be published in the scfied- 
ule of classes for each semester. 

Rorida Prepaid Tuition Plan 
Students , 

Ail students planning to register under 
tfie Rorida Prepaid Tuition Plan must 
present ffieir FPTP identification card to 
the University Controller's Office, PC 
510 on tfie University Park Campus or 
at ttie Cashier's Office ACI 140, on the 
North Miami Campus before tfie publish- 
ed last day to pay fees. Tfie portion of 
the student fees not covered by the plan 
must be paid by the student prior to the 
published last day to pay fees to avoid 
cancellation of classes. 

Rnancial Aid Students 

All financial aid recipients must come to 
the Cashier's Office and pay the differ- 
ence between their financial aid or scItoI- 
arship awards and their final fee 
assessment and have tfieir dass sched- 
ule validated at the Cashier's Office 
prior to the published last day to pay 
fees. Failure to fiave the schedule vali- 
dated will result in tfie cancellation of all 
classes for tfie semester. The validation 
process cannot be handled through tfie 



night drop or by mail, but must be done 
in person. 

Fee Liability 

A student is liable for all fees associated 
with all courses in which he/sfie is regis- 
tered at the end of tfie drop/add period. 
Tfie fee payment deadline is published 
in the official University calendar. If fees 
are not' paid in full by the published 
dates, all courses will be cancelled and 
any money paid will be lost. 

Registration is not complete until all 
fees are paid in full. 

Reinstatement of Classes 

Appeals for reinstatement of registration 
for classes cancelled for fiscal reasons 
must be filed in writing on tfie pre- 
scribed form with the University by tfie 
time specified on tfie cancellation no- 
tice. Each request will be evaluated by 
the Reinstatement Appeals Committee. 
Reinstatement will be considered for all 
classes on tfie class schedule at the 
end of the drop/add period. Reinstate- 
ment cannot be requested selectively 
for certain classes. The decision of the 
committee is final and all reinstatement 
activity, including fee payment, must be 
completed prior to tfie end of the fourth 
week of classes. The late registra- 
tion/payment fee is applicable to all rein- 
statement approvals. 

Application Fee 

A non-refundable fee of $15 shall ac- 
company each application for admission 
to the University. 

Vehicle Registration Fee 

A non-refundable annual vehicle regis- 
tration fee is applicable to all persons op- 
erating or parking a motor vehicle on 
both tfie University Park and North Mi- 
ami campuses. Upon payment of the ap- 
plicable fee and registration of the 
vehicle at the University Public Safety 
Department each vehicle will be as- 
signed a parking decal which must be 
permanently affixed on tfie vehicle. Tfie 
decal is required for all vehicles parking 
on campus. Parking and traffic regula- 
tions are strictly enforced. 

Other Fees 
Library Fines 

Per book per library tiour .25 

Maximum fine per took $5.00 

Lost book fine $35.00 

Intern Certificate of Participation 

Per credit tiour $4.76 

A/ofe; These fees are subject to cfiange 
as permitted by law. Additional fees 
may be added and special purpose fees 
may be assessed in some instances. 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 19 



Checks 

The University will accept personal 
checks for eunounts due to the Univer- 
sity. These checks must be in the exact 
amount due only. The Cashier's Office 
will not accept checks above thie 
Eimount due, third party checks or 
checks for cash. State law requires thiat 
a service fee of $1 5 or 5% of the 
amount of thie check (whichever is 
greater) be assessed on a check re- 
turned unpaid by ttie bsink for einy rea- 
son. Returned c^cks will be assigned 
to an agency for collection if not 
promptly paid. When an account has 
been assigned the collection agency fee 
virill be added to ttie University charges 
for collection at the current contract 
rate. Returned checks on student ac- 
counts will result in cancellation of 
classes and will require petition for rein- 
statement. See reinstatement of classes 
above. 

The Cashier's Office will not accept 
a check on any student's account which 
has had tw/o previous dishonored 
checks. 

Refunds 

A refund will be made upon written appli- 
cation by the student of all fees, except 
tfie health and athletic fees, for all 
courses dropped during ttie drop/add 
period. 

Students wtio have completed regis- 
tratkjn and have paid all fees due and 
have completely wittidrawn from the Uni- 
versity prior to frie end of the fourth 
week of classes are eligible for a refund 
of 25% of total fees paid (except the 
health and athletic fees) less the capital 
improvement and building fees. Refund 
will t3e made only upon written applica- 
tion by the student. 

- In ttie following exceptional circum- 
stances, a full refund of total fees paid 
(except ttie tiealth and athletic fees) will 
be made upon presentation of the 
proper documentation: 

- Death of a student or immediate 
family member (parent, spouse, child, or 
sibling) - Death certificate required. 

- Involuntary call to military service - 
copy of orders required. 

- Illness of student of such severity 
or duration to preclude completion of 
courses - confirmation by a physician. 

Processing of refund applications be- 
gins after ttie end of tfie drop/add period 
each semester. 

Appeals for hjition refunds must be 
submitted in writing to ttie Cashier's of- 
fice witiiin two years after ttie end of tiie 
term for which the refund is requested. 
There are no exceptions to this policy. 



Past Due Accounts 

Delinquent accounts are sufficient 
cause to prohibit registration, gradu- 
ation, release of tianscripts, or release 
of diplomas. 

The University is not able to grant 
credit or time payments for any fees. R- 
nancial aid is available to those qualify- 
ing through the Financial Aid Office. A 
limited number of short term loans are 
available to full time enrolled students 
who may experience problems in meet- 
ing fee payment due dates. 

Tfie University reserves tiie right to 
assign any past due account to an 
agency for collection. When an account 
tias been assigned the collection 
agency fee will be added to the Univer- 
sity charges for collection at tiie cun-ent 
contract rate. 

Deadlines 

Students are reminded tiiat deadlines 
are strictly enforced. The University is 
not able to grant wedit or to extend tiie 
fee payment period beyond the time set 
in its official calendar. The University 
does not have tiie authority to waive 
late fees unless it lias been determined 
tfiat the University is primarily responsi- 
ble for tiie delinquency or ttiat exb'aordi- 
nary circumstances warrant such 
waiver. The University has no authority 
to extend deadlines for individual stu- 
dents beyond tiiose set by the official 
calendar. 



Academic Affairs 

The Office of Academic Affairs plans 
and administers tiie instructional pro- 
grams of tfie Colleges and Schools of 
ttie University. Matters affecting faculty, 
cuniculum and tiie development of un- 
dergraduate and graduate degree pro- 
grams fall witiiin its purview. This office 
also supervises academic support pro- 
grams, such as Continuing Education, 
ttie Libraries, Instructional Media Serv- 
ices, Sponsored Research and Training, 
FAU/FIU Joint Center for Environmental 
and Urtjan Problems, Latin American 
and Caribbean Center, Center for Eco- 
nomic Education, Institute for Judaic 
Studies, Institute for Public Policy and 
Citizenship Studies, Ttie Art Museum, 
Multilingual-Multicultural Studies Center, 
Soutiieast Rorida Center on Aging, 
Souttieast Multifunction Resource Cen- 
ter, and the Women's Studies Center. 

Providing direct service to students 
outside the classroom, and influencing 



ttie instructional programs, tiie following 
units also report to ttie Office of Aca- 
demic Affairs: tiie Office of Undergradu- 
ate Studies and the Division of 
Graduate Studies. 

Responsible for all the academic 
units, ttie chief academic officer is ttie 
Vice President for Academic Affairs. The 
Vice President also serves as liaison to 
ttie Rorida Board of Regents for aca- 
demic matters, and as a memlser of ttie 
University Executive Staff, ttie Vice 
President leads in ttie overall planning 
and direction of ttie University. 

(For detailed information on ttie Inter- 
national Banking Center, Institute for 
Public Policy and Citizenship Studies, 
FAU/FIU Joint Center for Environmental 
and Urtsan Problems, Latin American 
arKJ Caribtsean Center, Center on Aging, 
Center for Economic Education, Insti- 
tute for Judaic Studies, and Women's 
Shjdies Center refer to ttie Center and 
Institute Section.) 

Policy Statement with 
Reference to Religious Holy 
Days 

A faculty memlser who wishes to ob- 
serve a religious holy day stiall make ar- 
rangements to have anottier instructor 
conduct the class in his or tier absence, 
if possible, or stiall resctiedule the dass. 

Because ttiere are some classes 
and ottier functions wtiere attendance 
may be considered essential, ttie follow- 
ing policy is promulgated: 

1. Each student stiall, upon notifying 
his or tier insbtictor, be excused from 
dass to observe a religious tioly day of 
his or her faith. 

2. While the student will bie held re- 
sponsible for the material covered in his 
or her absence, each student shall be 
permitted a reasonable amount of time 
to make up any work missed. 

3. No major test, major dass event, 
or major University activity will be sched- 
uled on a major religious holy day. 

4. Professors and University adminis- 
ti'ators stiall in no way penalize students 
arisitrarily wtio cire absent from aca- 
demic or sodal activities tsecause of re- 
ligious observances. 



Office of Undergraduate 
Studies 

Ttie Office of Undergraduate Studies is 
responsible for undergraduate program 
activities tfiat span more ttian one aca- 
demic unit. Included in ttiese activities 
are ttie Academic Advising Center, offer- 
ing advising for freshmen, undedded 
majors, students changing majors, and 



20 / General Information 



Graduate Catalog 



non-degree seeking students, and moni- 
toring of Core Curriculum and General 
Education requirements; the University 
Learning Center, providing CI_AST coun- 
seling and academic preparation, na- 
tional test administration, and 
assistance in improving academic skills; 
the Faculty Scholars awards and the 
University Honors Progrsim; and ROTC. 
The office is located in PC 1 15, Univer- 
sity Park, 348-2099; and ACI-180, North 
Miami Campus, 940-5754. 



Division of Graduate 
Studies 

Richard L Campbell, Dean of 

Graduate Studies 
Ruben D. Jaen, Coordinator of 

Graduate Studies 
The Division of Graduate Studies is un- 
der the administration of the Dean of 
Graduate Studies, who reports directly 
to the Provost and Vice President for 
Academic Affairs. 

The Graduate Dean is assisted by a 
Coordinator of Graduate Studies, who 
has responsibility for all requests for can- 
didacy certification, assists with minority 
student recruitment and admission, and 
also assists the Dean of Graduate Stud- 
ies with the divisional matters. 

The Division of Graduate Studies is 
responsible for: (1 ) the direction and 
support of all University graduate pro- 
grams; (2) the development of and com- 
pliance with University graduate policy, 
procedures, and planning; (3) graduate 
financial aid, acquisition and distribution; 
(4) Universitydientele linkages for devel- 
opment support and productivity; (5) 
graduate program external advisory 
councils; (6) graduate program review 
eind accreditation; (7) budgetary support 
and facilities for graduate programs; 
and (8) planning, development, budget- 
ary support and external resources. 

Academic Deans and Department 
chairs within academic units have the re- 
sponsibility for detailed operations of all 
graduate programs. 

The Graduate Dean works with the 
Graduate Council in the formulation of 
new graduate policies and procedures. 
The Graduate Council is a subcommitee 
of the Faculty Senate and consists of 
memb)ers who also represent ttieir re- 
spiective colleges/schools on the Coun- 
cil. Thte Graduate Council reviews 
curricula changes proposed by aca- 
demic units and endorsed by tfie Univer- 
sity's Curriculum Committee. 

Another committee in tfie Division of 
Graduate Studies is the Advisory Com- 
mittee for Graduate Studies. This Com- 
mittee makes recommendations to the 



Graduate Dean on the implementation 
of graduate policies and procedures on 
all programs that offer graduate de- 
grees. The Dean of Graduate Studies 
serves as Chair of this Committee. Gen- 
erally, the members on this Committee 
are assistant and associate deans who 
hiave responsibility for graduate educa- 
tion in tfieir respective academic units. 
Graduate students seeking informa- 
tion on general graduate policies and 
procedures, or instructions on preparing 
and filing tfie tfiesis or dissertation, 
should contact the Division of Graduate 
Studies in PC 520, University ParK or 
call 3482455 for an appointment. 



Libraries 

The University Litxaries are housed in 
tfie Athenaeum (AT) at University Park, 
and in a new Library building (LIB) on 
the North Miami Campus. 

The total library collection comprises 
900,000 volumes, in addition to sub- 
stantial holdings of federal, state, local, 
and international documents; maps; mi- 
croforms; music scores; newspapers; In- 
stitutional archives; and curriculum 
materials. The Library subscribes to 
7,075 scholarly journals and other seri- 
als. 

A computerized catalog of litxary 
holdings provides a listing of materials 
in both FlU Libraries, and other libraries 
in the State University System. The bulk 
of the collection is housed in open 
stacks. 

Classification of library resources is 
according to the Library of Congress 
system, except for some of tfie docu- 
ments and special collections (e.g., 
U.S., Florida, and U.N. documents, ar- 
chives, etc.) wrtiich are arranged by their 
own classification systems and fiave 
separate public catalogs. 

In keeping with the University's com- 
mitment to day and night operation, the 
libraries are open wfien tfie University is 
in session and during vacation periods. 
For exact library hours, please consult 
tfie posted schedules. Staff members 
are always availalDle at tfie Public Serv- 
ice desks to assist students and faculty 
in their use of the library. 

Consortium Library Privileges 

Currently registered students, faculty, 
and staff may use tfie libraries of any of 
tfie other campuses of the State Univer- 
sity System. For access to libraries in 
tfie southeast Rorida region, students, 
faculty and staff shoukd consult with 
members of the Library staff. 

A state-of-the-art system of interii- 
brary loan links tfie libraries with others 
throughout North America. It includes 



the use of telefacsimile for time-critical 
requests. 



Instructional Media 
Services 

Instructional Media Services specializes 
in the development, production, and utili- 
zation of various types of audiovisual 
and communication media for educa- 
tional purposes. Tfie sendees offered 
are listed below, (an asterisk indicates ' 
services available to students): 
The Production Centers^ are "do-it- 
yourself media and graphic arts produc- 
tions labs, providing technical 
assistance to faculty, staff and students 
in the creation of visual aids such as 
slides, overtieads, flyers, posters and 
cfiarts for classroom presentations, pa- 
pers or projects. Professional help and 
instruction is available on the premises 
in the use of Macintosh computers, let- 
ter machines, copystand cameras, over- 
head-makers, laminators, etc. While 
consumabale items such as films, pos- 
tert)oard and transparencies are to be 
provided by students, tfiere is no fee for 
either the help provided or the use of 
tfie facilities. (AT-134 at University Park; 
LIB-150 at North Miami). 
Photography Services provides still 
photographic support and services to 
faculty and staff for educational, training 
and informational purposes. (AT-139 at 
University Park; services available to all 
FlU campuses). 

Instructional Graphics prepares art- 
wori<, graphs, illustrations, charts and 
posters for faculty and staff. (AT-135 at 
University Park; serves other campuses 
through fax and inter-office mail). 
Instructional Television Production 
produces instructional media programs 
(video and audio recordings, both in-stu- 
dio and remote, teleconferencing, and 
multi-media programs) for faculty and 
staff. (VH-245 at University Pari<; serv- 
ices available to all FlU campuses). 
Equipment Distribution and Schedul- 
ing^ provides a large variety of educa- 
tional audiovisual equipment for use by 
faculty and staff. Services are available 
to students for classroom use and wfien 
sponsored by professors. (PC-236 at 
University Park; ACI-193 at North Miami 
Campus). 

^(Tfiese services are available to stu- 
dents, as well as faculty and staff.) 

Ottier services available are consult- 
ation on the purchase, rental, and instal- 
lation of audiovisual equipment; the 
rental of films for classroom viewings; 
and professional guidance on a wide 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 21 



range of audiovisual instructional topics 
and technology. For more information, 
contact 348-281 1 , AT-136, University 
Park; or 940-5929, LIB-150, North Mi- 
ami Campus. 

Consortium Media Privileges 

Faculty, staff and students can use the 
audiovisual services on any campus of 
the Consortium. AV materials and equip- 
ment cannot be borrowed. 



Continuing Education 

Carolann W. Baldyga, Dean 
Doris K. Sadoff , Assistant Dean 
J. Patrick Wagner, Director, 

Off-Campus and Weekend Credit 

Courses 
Kari L Rodabaugh, Director, 

Conferences and Stiort Courses 

The University extends credit and non- 
credit learning opportunities through the 
Division of Continuing Education. 
Courses of instruction sire developed 
and offered in a variety of formats. 
These include conferences, seminars, 
short courses, workshops, lecture se- 
ries, certificate programs and courses 
for academic credit. Learning opportuni- 
ties are made available at locations 
throughout Dade, Broward and Monroe 
counties, the University's campuses and 
abroad through special arrangements. 
Instruction can be designed to serve 
specific needs and respond to requests 
from community groups, professional or- 
ganizations, txjsinesses and industry. 

The Division's central office is lo- 
cated in ACI-100, North Miami Campus, 
940-5669. Offices and services are also 
available in PC 245, University Park, 
348-2490. 

Administered through the Office of 
Academic Affairs, the Division of Con- 
tinuing Education carries out the follow- 
ing programs: Off-Campus and 
Weekend Credit Courses and Confer- 
ences and Short Courses. 

Off Campus and Weekend Credit 
Courses 

Over 230 courses for academic credit 
are offered off -campus and on week- 
ends each year through tfie University's 
eight Colleges and Schools. Any 
course listed in the University Catalog 
may be conducted at a suitable location 
in Dade, Broward or Monroe counties. 
Courses are regularly conducted at hos- 
pitals, banks, community schools, sind 
other public and private facilities appro- 
priate for educational delivery. An indi- 
vidual, business, agency or association 
can request that a specific course or de- 
gree program be offered. 



Registration for Continuing Educa- 
tion credit courses may be accom- 
plished at the office of Registration and 
Records at University Park arxJ North Mi- 
ami Campus, and the University's 
Broward Community College, Central 
Campus office. Students may also regis- 
ter at the first dass meeting. 

Sponsored Credit Institutes aire con- 
tract agreements through which an em- 
ployer, public agency, or professional 
organization collaborates with the Uni- 
versity to provide credit courses and de- 
gree programs for its constituents. 
These educational enhancement bene- 
fits are arranged to serve the needs of a 
designated group of individuals at a lo- 
cation and time convenient to them. 

For information on how to request a 
course or to find out more about educa- 
tional opportunities available through 
the Department, call 940-5653 in Dade, 
and 463-2790 in Broward. 

Conferences and Short Courses 

Noncredit programs to develop profes- 
sional competence. Increase business 
skills, and provide personal enrichment 
are offered through short courses, work- 
shops, seminars, and certificate pro- 
grams. Local, regional, national and 
international conferences are coordi- 
nated in conjunction with the Univer- 
sity's goals and objectives. 

Continuing Education Units applica- 
ble to professional licensing require- 
ments are available in appropriate 
programs. 

Noncredit program information is 
published each semester by the Division 
and may be requested at the Division's 
offices at University Park and North Mi- 
ami Campus, or by telephone, 940-5669 
(Dade and Monroe), 463-2790 
(Broward). Registration is Initiated by 
mail, at tfie above locations, or at the 
first session of each program on a 
space available basis. 

Certificate Programs 
Legal Certificate Programs 

Included are ttie Legal Assistant (Parale- 
gal), Advanced Legal Assistant Studies, 
Legcil Certification Review, Legal Secre- 
tarial Studies, and Law Office Admini- 
stration. Thie obijective of all programs 
Is to develop occupational competence 
through practical arxJ substantive in- 
struction. 

Legal Assistant Certificate 

The Legal Assistant curriculum consists 
of core courses wNch meet In the eve- 
nings supplemented by monthly Satur- 
day seminars, and an intensive program 
which meets only on Saturdays. Practi- 
tbners completing a course or semir»r 



may request CLA continuing education 
units from tfie National Association of 
Legal Assistants. 

Continuing Legal Education for 
Attorneys (CLER) 

Seminars focusing on substantive and 
rwnsubstantive topics, approved by the 
Rorida Bar Association for CLER credit 
are presented in half-day or full-day for- 
mat. Instructors are University faculty, 
and professiorals in various disciplines. 

Professional Education for 
Realtors and Brol(ers 

Issues of cun-ent interest to real estate 
professionals are presented in seminars 
approved by the Florida Real Estate 
Commission (FREC) for continuing edu- 
cation credit. 

Certificate for Professional 
Travel Agents 

This comprehensive six-month course 
develops skills required in the transpor- 
tation industry with emphasis on the 
travel agency profession. The program 
offers a combination of academic exer- 
cise, practical application, and on-the- 
job training to develop desired 
qualifications. Certain phases of the pro- 
gram are highlighted by field trips to pro- 
vide firsthand knowledge of travel 
industry suppliers. 

Video Production Certificate 

In conjunction with the School of Jour- 
nalism and Mass Communication, the 
Division offers thie Certificate in Video 
Production. Hands-on exercises lead 
students through all major phases of 
video production. The program pro- 
vides preparation for the fields of broad- 
casting, instructional video, corporate 
video, and applications in advertising 
and public relations. 

Marketing Communication 
Certificate 

Marketing Communication is designed 
for individuals who seek a career or 
wish to develop specific skills for current 
or prospective employment in the field. 

Designed for marketing support 
staff, designers wishing to expand their 
base of knowledge, employees as- 
signed to MARCOM tasks, home and 
small txjsiness owners who need 
greater proficiency in these areas, and 
government and non-profit employees 
who are communicating with the public. 
The courses cover writing well at work, 
graphic design and marketing strate- 
gies. Any of the courses may be taken 
for regular continuing education units. 

This certificate program recognizes 
that students come from varying back- 



22 / General Information 



Graduate Catalog 



grounds. It is organized to help 
strengthen specific areas of expertise. 

Independent Study by 
Correspondence 

The State University System offers a 
program of over 140 courses with in- 
structors drawn from the University of 
Rorida, Rorida State University, and thie 
University of South Rorida. The pro- 
gram is administered by tfie Department 
of Independent Study by Correspon- 
dence, University of Rorida, 1938 West 
University Avenue, Gainesville, Rorida 
32603,(904)392-1711. 



Sponsored Research 
and Training 

Thomas A. Breslln, Vice Provost and 

Director 
Catherine F. Kennedy-Thumian, 

Associate Director 

The Division of Sponsored Research 
and Training serves the research and 
training needs of interested faculty by 
providing timely information on the avail- 
ability of local, state, and federal pro- 
gram support. Tfie attraction of tfiese 
funds to the campus provides an oppor- 
tunity to better serve the needs of the 
people of Florida through services not 
regularly funded by tfie Legislature. 

Among tfie major goals of the Divi- 
sion of Sponsored Research and Train- 
ing are tfie following: to help stimulate 
faculty and staff interest in research and 
ti'aining projects; to assist tiie faculty 
and staff in obtaining funds for research 
and training projects; and to provide 
technical assistance to faculty and staff 
who manage conti-act and grant pro- 
grams for tfie University. For more infor- 
mation, contact 348-2494. 



The Art l\/luseum 

Dahlia Morgan, Director 
The Art Museum of tfie University fias 
served tfie South Rorida community for 
tfie last seven years exhibiting shows of 
local and national importance. Exhibi- 
tions from outside the University and tfie 
area are intended to display the finest 
available and affordable examples of 
contemporary and historical art. Tfiese 
shows are obtained from a variety of 
sources, pKimarily professional organiza- 
tions and lending institutions, individual 
artists, commercial galleries, and otfier 
educational institutions. 

The types of exhibitions displayed di- 
rectly benefit rxst only tfie University 
community, but also tfie public. Atten- 



dance records show tfiat approximately 
200 people per day visit tfie facility and 
come from Dade, Broward, Palm 
Beach, and Monroe counties, for tfie 
most part The Museum is open six 
days a week and one evening. 

The Art Museum, which occupies a 
4,000 square foot area on the University 
Pari<, opened witfi an internationally ac- 
claimed exhibition of Contemporary 
Latin American Drawings in April, 1977. 
Since that date many exhibitions have 
been displayed including: Alberto 
Giacometti, Draftsman and Sculptor; 
The Texturology Series of Jean Dubuf- 
fet; Public Relations: Pfiotographs by 
Garry WinograrxJ; Mira, Mira, Mira, Los 
Cubanos de Miami; Alfred Stieglitz, 
1894-1934; William Wiley; A Collector's 
Eye: The Olga Hirshhom Collection; 
Miriam Sfiapiro, A Retrospective: 1953- 
1980; Neil Welliver; Treasures of the 
Norton Gallery; Manuel Neri; Realist Wa- 
tercolors; English Naive Painting; Mi- 
chael Graves Exhibition; Marsden 
Hartley Exhibition; Anxious Interiors; 
American Art Today: Still Life; and na- 
tionally acclaimed Marcel Duchamp Ex- 
hibition. 

The Museum has continued to en- 
fiance its exhibition program with a lec- 
ture series which has included many of 
tfie exhibiting artists and scfiolars, mu- 
seum curators, and otf^ers wfio have 
been involved with tfie particular exhibi- 
tion. Tfie highly-acdaimed Critic's Lec- 
ture Series, sponsored by the Museum, 
fias included: Germaine Greer, Robert 
Hughes, John Cage, Tom Wolfe, Carter 
Ratdiff, Susan Sontag, Linda Nochlin, 
John Canaday, John Simon, and Mi- 
chael Graves. 

The Museum is operated by tfie Di- 
rector, the Coordinator of University Col- 
lections, and a staff made up partially of 
University students working through an 
internship program. 



Student Affairs 

The mission of tfie Division of Student 
Affairs is to contribute to tf~ie total educa- 
tional process of students by creating a 
learning environment which fosters fser- 
sonal growth and development; pro- 
motes cultural diversity; provides 
programs and services which enhance 
intellectual, social, cultajral, physical, 
emotional, and spiritual development; 
and prepares students to become con- 
tributing members of tfie community. 

The Division is comprised of tiie fol- 
lowing departments and programs: Ad- 
missions, Campus Ministiy, Career 



Planning and Placement, Disabled Stu- 
dent Services, Enrollment Support Serv- 
ices, Financial Aid, Greek 
Organizations, Intercollegiate Atfiletics, 
International Student Services, Minority 
Student Services, Orientation, Precolle- 
giate Programs, Public Safety, Student 
Activities, StiJdent Counseling, Shjdent 
Government, Student Healtfi Services, 
StiJdent Judicial Affairs, Shjdent Union, 
and University Housing. 

Student Affairs offices are located at 
University Park in University House, tfie 
first floor of PC, the Golden Pantfier 
Arena and tfie Modular Building on tfie 
west side of campus. On tfie North Mi- 
ami Campus, offices are located in the 
Student Center Building, tfie Trade Cen- 
ter, and tfie tfiird floor of the Library. 



Admissions 

Admissions is responsible for tfie recruit- 
ment and admission of undergraduate 
applicants. Staff provides information to 
prospective students, guidance counsel- 
ors and the genera! public to inform 
tfiem of tfie academic and otfier educa- 
tional programs offered by tfie Univer- 
sity. Tfie department also collects and 
processes official application materials 
for all graduate admissions. For specific 
information on the application process 
and requirements for admission please 
refer to tfie General Information section 
of tills catalog. 

Location: PC 140, University Park, 
348-2363; ACI 160, North Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-5760; Trailers, Broward Pro- 
gram, 475-4150. 



Campus Ministry 

The Interfaitii Campus Ministry serves 
student groups involved in a variety of 
activities. Professional representatives 
from various faitfis are available for per- 
sonal appointments. Individual denomi- 
nations sponsor campus-wide programs 
including worship, study groups, social 
gatfierlngs, and culhjral events. In addi- 
tion. Campus Ministry sponsors pro- 
grams and activities which are 
non-denominational. 

Location: UH 340, University Pari<, 
348-2215; SC 265, North Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-5609 or 940-56 10. 



Career Planning and 
Placement 

Career Planning and Placement (CP&P) 
assists students witfi tfie identification of 
tfieir skills, values and interests and pro- 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 23 



vides the necessary tools for on-going 
self assessment. CP&P provides live 
services: Career Advisement, Career , 
Mentoring Programs, Cooperative Edu- 
cation, Career Placement and ttie Job 
Location and Development Program. 
Through these services students and 
alumni leann up-to-date information ■ 
about the worid of work, career/major 
choices, occupational trends, career op- 
tions, and job search techniques. 

Cooperative Education allows stu- 
dents to combine classroom theory with 
career related practical work experi- 
ence. Students work in professional 
training positions related to tineir major 
field of study and earn a both a salary 
and academic credits. 

CP&P hosts numerous workshops 
and seminars, schedules on-campus in- 
terviews, operates a resume referral sys- 
tem, and lists job vacancy notices for 
part-time, full-time, and summer employ- 
ment. It also houses a comprehensive 
career library, and a computerized ca- 
reer guidance system. 

Location: UH 230, University Park, 
348-2423; SC 260, North fi^iami Cam- 
pus, 940-5813 Trailers, Broward Pro- 
gram, 474-1404. 



Disabled Student 
Services 

Disabled Student Services provides in- 
formation and assistance to students 
with disabilities who are In need of spe- 
cial accommodations. Individual serv- 
ices are available to students with 
visual, hearing, speech, physical, arid 
learning disabilities; chronic health prob- 
lems, mental or psychological disorders, 
and temporary disabilities. Services in- 
clude counseling, coordinating class- 
room accommodations, providing 
special equipment, note-takers, readers, 
interpreters, adapted testing, special 
registration, and University and commu- 
nity referrstls. Support and assistance in 
overcoming architectural, academic, atti- 
tudinal, and other barriers encountered 
is provkJed. Requests for services must 
be made prior to the beginning of each 
semester. 

Location: UH 231, University Park, 
348-3532; SC 261 , North Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-5813; BIdg. 9, Room 224, 
Broward Program, 948-6793. 



Enrollment Support 
Services 

Enrollment Support Services manages 
tfie Division's computerized student re- 



cords database, the University's degree 
audit (SASS) , and several computer-re- 
lated programs. This unit also provides 
computer system planning support to 
academic units and other depairtments 
in the Division. The University Catalog, 
and the Course Schedule txsoklet pub- 
lished each semester are produced in 
this unit. 

Location: PC 135, University Park, 
348-2933. 



Financial Aid 

Rnancial Aid is provided to students 
wfio otherwise would be unable to pur- 
sue their educational goals at die Uni- 
versity. Rnancial Aid includes 
scholarships, grants, loans and campus 
employment. Rnancial need is deter- 
mined on an individual tiasis using 
evaluation criteria provided by national 
agencies. For specific information on 
types of assistance, eligibility, applica- 
tion procedures and otiier requirements, 
please refer to the General Information 
section of tills catalog. 

Location: PC 125, University Park, 
348-2431; ACI-1 60, Nortii Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-5765. 



Greek Organizations 

Greek organizations contribute to tiie 
University by promoting leadership, 
scholarship, service, social activities 
and brotinerhood and sistertiood. There 
are nine fraternities and five sororities 
coordinated by a Greek Council. In addi- 
tion, an Interfraternity Council governs 
fraternities and a Panhellenic Council 
governs sororities. A formal rush period 
is field in the Fall semester, and an infor- 
mal rush is held during tfie Spring se- 
mester. 

Location: UH 219, University Park, 
348-2950. 



Intercollegiate Athletics 

FlU is a member of the National Colle- 
giate Athletic Association (NCAA), the 
New South Women's Conference 
(NSWAC), and the Trans America Afli- 
letic Conference (TAAC) for men. The 
University has competed at ttie Division 
l-AAA level since September of 1987, 
hiaving competed successfully at tfie Di- 
vision II level since 1972. Programs and 
services in Intercollegiate Atiiletics pro- 
vide an opfwrtunity for student-athletes 
to develop as skilled performers in an 
educational setting. Much emphasis is 
placed on tiie student in student-attilete 



to ensure intellectual, emotional and so- 
cial well-being. 

Athletics 

Atiiletic team membership Is open to all 
full-time students. Women's programs 
consist of basketball, volleyball, soccer, 
golf, tennis, and cross country. Men's 
programs consist of basketball, soccer, 
baseball, golf, tennis, and crosscountry. 
To be eligible for intercollegiate competi- 
tion, tiie University requires each stu- 
dent-atiilete to be in good academic 
standing and make satisfactory pro- 
gress towards a degree. Team memtser- 
ship is determined in a manner which 
does not discriminate based on race, 
sex, national origin, marital status, age 
or handicap. 

Rnancial assistance is available to 
botii freshmen and transfer students re- 
cruited for all 12 athletic teams. Assis- 
tance may include grants, scholarships, 
loans or self-help programs. To be eligi- 
ble for finandeil assistance, each stu- 
dent-atiilete must be In good academic 
standing and make satisfactory pro- 
gress towards a degree. 

Campus Recreation 

Campus Recreation provides a variety 
of intramural sports and recreation activi- 
ties designed to educate, improve physi- 
cal fitness, develop an appreciation for 
tfie value of physical exercise, and ex- 
tend leisure time skills. The department 
manages open recreation and physical 
fitness facilities, and coordinates intra- 
mural leagues, club sports and special 
events. 

Active sport dubs include Bowling, 
Crew, Cycling, Rtness, Lacrosse, Row- 
ing, Scuba, Shotokan Karate, Tae Kwon 
Do, Rugby and Badminton. Fourteen in- 
ti'amural sports include bowling, basket- 
ball, flag football, golf, soccer, softball, 
co-recreational softball, volleyljall, ten- 
nis, racquetball, floor hockey, wallyball, 
baseball, and slam dunk. Events such 
as power-lifting competitions, golf, soc- 
cer, racquetiaall and tennis tournaments, 
deep sea fishing trips, and otiier recrea- 
tion interests are feabjred each semes- 
ter. 

Campus Recreation also offers non- 
credit dasses in a variety of subjects. 
Credit dasses are offered each semes- 
ter in tfie College of Education. 

Athletic and Recreational 
Facilities 

Tfie Golden Panther Arena is a multi- 
purpose facility which serves as the 
base for University programs in physical 
education, athletics, and recreatton. The 
Arena has a seating ca|>aclty of 5,000. It 
contains racquettiall courts, basketi^all 
courts, an auxiliary court area, and 



24 / General Infoimation 



Graduate Catalog 



meeting rooms. The arena is open to 
students, faculty, staff, and alumni with 
valid University Identification cards. FlU 
students are admitted to all regular sea- 
son home athletic events free of charge 
upon presentation of a valid University 
identification card. 

The Baseball and Soccer Relds are 
lighted and each have a seating capac- 
ity for 1 ,500 spectators. 

ntness Centers at University Park 
and North Miami campuses are 
equipped with a compilete line of Nauti- 
lus machines and locker rooms. The 
Centers are available at rw cost to cur- 
rently enrolled students with valid identi- 
fication cards. There is a $40 semester 
fee for faculty, staff, and alumni. 

The Aquatic Center on the North M\- 
ami Campus overlooks the bay and is 
fully furnished to provide an environ- 
ment for conversation, study and/or tan- 
ning. The multipurpose design of the 50 
meter x 25 yard pool and diving well al- 
low for recreational and instructional 
use. 

The Racquet Sports Center at Uni- 
versity Park fias 12 lighted tennis courts 
and eight lighted racquetball courts. The 
Racquet Sports Center at North Cam- 
pus has six lighted tennis courts, a sand 
volleyball court, and two full-sized bas- 
ketball courts. 

For additional information or hours of 
operation call: 

Campus Recreation: 348-2951 
Rtness Center: 348-2575, Univer- 
sity Park; 940-5678, North Miami Cam- 
pus. 

Golden Panther Arena: 348-2900. 
Racquet Sports Center:348-2763, 
University Park; 948-4572, North Miami 
Campus. 

Aquatic Center: 948-4595. 



International Student 
Services 

International Student Services provides 
assistance on matters regarding immi- 
gration regulations and procedures re- 
lated to visa status. The staff also 
provides counseling and advisement on 
academic, personal and financial con- 
cerns, and serves as a liaison to aca- 
demic and administrative departments 
throughout the University. An orientation 
program is offered each semester as 
well as international and inter-cultural 
programs to assist students in adapting 
more effectively to the University com- 
munity and to living in Miami. 

An active International Student Club 
collaborates with the department in or- 



ganizing various social activities. Club 
programs enable students to participate 
in tiTe interrational dimension of the Uni- 
versity and provide opportunities for in- 
volvement in the greater Miami 
educational community. 

Location: UH 217, University Park, 
348-2421; SC 260, North Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-5813. 



Minority Student 
Programs and Services 

Minority Student Services provides mi- 
nority students with personal, academic, 
social, and cultural support needed for 
the achievement of educational goals. 
Staff provides orientation, leadership de- 
velopment, counseling and tutorial serv- 
ices; and serves as a liaison to 
academic units and student support 
services university-wide. This depart- 
ment also collaborates with student 
groups in coordinating traditional cul- 
tural celebrations, and other activities 
for minority students' physical, mental 
and social well-being. 

Location: UH 216, University Park, 
348-2436; SC 260, North Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-581 7. 



Orientation 

The Orientation program is designed to 
assist new shjdents in understanding all 
aspects of \he University environment. 

New freshmen and transfer students 
are strongly urged to attend an orienta- 
tion program before tiTeir first term of en- 
rollment. Several orientation sessions 
are scheduled each Summer Term and 
at least one session is offered before 
Spring and Summer Terms. Information 
about the orientation program and re- 
lated services is mailed to newly admit- 
ted undergraduate students. 

Location: UH 350, University Park, 
348-3828. 



Precollegiate Programs 

Precollegiate Programs provides infor- 
mation on educational opportunities and 
campus resources, and prepares prom- 
ising minority high school students for 
college through partnership programs 
with educational, civic, religious, busi- 
ness, and government agencies and or- 
ganizations. Staff wori< closely with the 
Admissions office to assist participants 
gain enb-y into the University. 

Location: UH 216, University Park, 
348-2436. 



Public Safety 

Public Safety is a full service Public 
Safety organization which maintains a 
peaceful and safe environment through- 
out the University community. The 
department is a unit of the State of Flor- 
ida law enforcement agencies and its 
members fiave full police authority to en- 
force state and local laws and University 
regulations. 

Public Safety also enforces Univer- 
sity Park Rules and Regulations. A park- 
ing decal or permit is required in order 
to pari< any vehicle (including motorcy- 
cles, motorbikes, and mopeds) on cam- 
pus. Decals may be purchased in tfie 
Cashier's office, or in Public Safety if 
paid by cfieck or money order. A receipt 
will be issued vt/hich must be presented 
at Public Safety along witii a copy of tfie 
current vehicle registration. After tfie ve- 
hicle is registered a decal will be issued. 
The entire decal (uncut and unaltered) 
must be permanently affixed to the vehi- 
cle. All regulations are strictly enforced. 
For more specific information please re- 
fer to the University Parking Rules and 
Regulations brochure available on 
eitiier campus. 

Location: Tower, University Park, 
348-2626 (Information), 348-291 1 
(Emergency); SO I, North Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-5555 (Information), 940-591 1 
(Emergency). 



Registration and 
Records 

The Office of Registration and Records 
is responsible for directing tfie Univer- 
sity registration activities, including Off- 
Campus course registration, and 
establishing, maintaining and releasing 
students' academic records. The office 
is also responsible for Space and Sched- 
uling, Veteran's Affairs, Graduation, and 
Records Archiving. 

Tfie office staff has the responsibility 
to serve tfie student, faculty, other ad- 
ministrative offices, and the general pub- 
Ik:; to hold safe and preserve tfie 
confidentiality of tfie student's records; 
arxi to ensure tiie integrity of tfie Univer- 
sity's policies and regulations. 

Location: PC 130, University Park, 
348-2383; AC1 160 North Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-5750; Broward Program, 475- 
4150. 



Student Activities 

Student Activities provides learning op- 
portunities in which stijdents can prac- 
tice and develop leadership. 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 25 



communication, problem-solving, pro- 
gram planning, organization, implemen- 
tation, and evaluation skills. Activities 
are co-currlcular and cover all aspects 
of the educational experience. Over 125 
registered student organizations exist to 
enrich campus life and contribute to the 
social, cultural, and academic growth of 
students. Students may organize addi- 
tional groups that promote the Univer- 
sity's educational mission. 

This unit also serves as a resource 
for commuter students. The Commuter 
Student Program collaborates with aca- 
demic, administrative, and student af- 
fairs units to provide resources, 
services, and inter-agency and commu- 
nity referrals. 

Vctrious informational materials are pub- 
lished and distributed on housing rental 
practices, landlord/tenant regulations, 
eind other campus resources for com- 
muter students. 

Location: UH 340, University Park, 
348-2137; SC 363, North Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-5813; Modular 12.1 Broward 
Program, 475-4167. 



Student Counseling 
Services 

Student Counseling Services focus on 
enhancing the emotional well-being of 
students. A variety of individual and 
group services are offered, including ca- 
reer/lifestyle counseling, workshops on 
mental health and wellness issues, and 
personal counseling for problems associ- 
ated with anxiety, depression, interper- 
sonal relationships, coping skills and 
feelings of inadequacy. 

Counseling Services also offers a 
structured, supervised training program 
for graduate level students who seek ex- 
posure to a diversified population within 
a multi-disciplinary setting. All services 
are provided to students free of charge. 
Complete confidentiality is assured. 

Location: UH 21 1A, University Part<, 
348-2434; SC 260, North Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-5813. 



the senate for discussion, support, fund- 
ing, or other action on matters related to 
various activities, issues or causes. 

SGA members represent the student 
body on university-wide committees and 
task forces to ensure student repre- 
sentation at the administrative level. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to become 
involved in all aspects of Student Gov- 
ernment. 

Location: UH 31 1 , University Park, 
348-21 2 1 ; SC 363, North Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-5680; Modular 12.1, Broward 
Program, 475-4167. 



Student Health Center 

The Student Healtti Center provides ac- 
cessible primary fiealtin care resources 
to enable students to maintain a positive 
state of healtii. The department holistic 
promotes health education, wellness 
programs and preventive medicine. The 
Healtti Center stimulates student aware- 
ness of health behaviors which may be 
integrated into lifestyle practices for fu- 
ture health and wellness. 

Services include routine medical 
care; physical examinations, family plan- 
ning, diagnosis and treatment, screen- 
ing, laboratory testing and private 
consultations witii a physician or nurse 
practitioner. Referrals are made to local 
hospitals, pfiarmades, and physicians 
for services not provided. Appointments 
are required. In case of an emergency 
on campus, Public Safety may be called 
24 hours a day. 

Office visits are free to students who 
present a valid identification card. Labo- 
ratory and pharmacy services are pro- 
vided for a rwminal fee. The University 
strongly recommends the purchase of 
student healtii insurance. Brochures de- 
scribing insurance coverage in detail are 
available at the Shjdent Health Center 
on both campuses. 

Please see the Student Handbook 
for more detailed information on Student 
Healtii Services. 

Location: Student Health Center, Uni- 
versity Pari< 348-2401; HM 110, North 
Miami Campus, 940-5620. 



tions of the University and the Rorida 
Board of Regents. A breach or violation 
of any of these laws or regulations may 
result in Judicial or disciplinary action. 
Complaints on academic matters should 
be directed to the Office of the Provost 
for Academic Affairs. Complaints on non- 
academic matters sfxjuld be directed to 
Judicial Affairs. 

If an individual is involved in an of- 
fense resulting in criminal charges prior 
to admission to the University, tfie cir- 
cumstances of the case may be re- 
viewed to consider tfie individual's 
eligibility for admission and participation 
in extracurricular activities. 

For more specific information on the 
Student Code of Conduct, please refer 
to tfie "Student Handbook." 

Location: SC 260, North Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-5817. 



Student Union 

Tfie Student Unions on each campus 
provide direct services to students and 
the University community. University 
House (UH) at University Park, and tfie 
Student Center (SC) at North Miami are 
tfie focal points for the University com- 
munity to meet and interact in a non- 
classroom, educational environment. As 
tfie "hub" of shjdent life, the buildings 
house the bookstore, cafeteria, grill, tjck- 
etmaster, vending machines, automatic 
banking facilities, lounges, meeting 
rooms, and a gameroom. SC also 
houses a post office and ttieatre. UH 
also houses a radio station, ballroom, 
arxi an overnight lodging facility. 

Services include lost and found, 
locker rental, vending refunds, non- 
credit courses, and student identification 
card distribution. 

Staff in the unions also coordinate 
tfie scheduling of space and assist with 
tfie production of Student and university- 
wide events. 

Location: UH 314, University Pari( 
348-2297; SC 125, North Miami Cam- 
pus, 940-5800. 



Student Government 
Association 

The Student Government Association is 
comprised of senators from all Schools 
and Colleges who are elected by tfie stu- 
dent body. SGA appropriates an annual 
budget generated by tfie Activity and 
Service fee wNch is paid by all shjdents 
at the time of registration. Bills, appro- 
priations, and resoluttons come tiefore 



Student Judicial Affairs 

University policies and procedures re- 
garding tfie rights and responsibilities of 
students, and a Code of Conduct assur- 
ing that these rights can be freely exer- 
cised witfiout interference or 
infringement by otfiers, are handled in 
this department. 

Students are subject to Federal and 
State laws, local ordinances, and regula- 



University Housing 

Apartment style housing is available for 
single and married, undergraduate and 
graduate students on botfi campuses. 
Services and programs are designed to 
be responsive to student needs and sup- 
port tfie educational goals of tfie Univer- 
sity. 

The residential environment pro- 
vides an opportunity to meet and to in- 
teract witfi others in ways tfiat 



26 / General Information 



Graduate Catalog 



sonal growth, and increase awareness 
of the rich cultural diversity within the 
University. Students residing on campus 
have ready access to academic and rec- 
feational facilities. 

Cooking and refrigeration appliances 
are provided in each room, however a 
meal plan may be purchased through 
die cafeteria on eithier campus. 

All fx)using is assigned on a space 
available basis without regard to race, 
ethnic origin, or religious preference. 
Modified space is available to students 
with physical disabilities. Contracts are 
issued for the Fall and Spring semes- 
ters. Summer housing is available on re- 
quest. For further information and ratfes, 
write the University Housing Office, H- 
101, FlU, University Park, Miami, Ror- 
ida, 33199. 

Location: H-101, University Park, 
348-4190; Residence Hall Lobby, North 
Miami Campus, 940-5587. 



Business and 
Finance 

The Division of Business and Finance 
comprises the offices of Personnel, 
Equal Opportunity Programs, Physical 
Plant and Planning, Controller, Purcfias- 
ing, Environmental & Safety, and Legal 
Affairs. 



Equal Opportunity 
Programs 

The office provides leadership and direc- 
tion in the administration of the Univer- 
sity equalization programs for women 
and minorities in several ways. It asasts 
University units in implementing and 
monitoring affirmative action proce- 
dures; provides a channel for employee 
and student grievances regarding dis- 
crimination, or issues indicating a need 
for additional affirmative action; adminis- 
ters implementation of the Policy to Pro- 
hibit Sexual Harassment; and promotes 
effective relationships between tfie Uni- 
versity and community organizations. 
The Office also administers the State 
University System Scholarship Program. 
In addition, the Office maintains a liai- 
son relationship with State and Federal 
agencies dealing with EEO and affirm- 
ative action. The Office is located on the 
University Park in PC 215. 



Florida Educational Equity Act 

The Rorida Educational Equity Act was 
passed by tfie State Legislature in 1984, 
and prohibits discrimination on the basis 
of race, sex, national origin, marital 
status, or handicap against a student or 
employee in tfie State System of Public 
Education. Procedures for implementing 
the Act have been developed, and tfie 
University prepares an annual report to 
ensure compliance with the Act. Tfie Di- 
rector of tfie Office of Equal Opportunity 
Programs is tlie University's Coordinator 
of Institutional Compliance with the Edu- 
cational Equity Act. A copy of ttie Educa- 
tion Equity Act Plan is available for 
review in tfie Office of Equal Opportunity 
Programs. This Office has tfie responsi- 
bility for implementing a comprehensive 
grievance/complaint procedure for stu- 
dents, applicants, and staff who believe 
tfiey have been treated inequitatily 
based on race, sex, national origin, mari- 
tal status, or handicap. Such griev- 
ances/complaints should be lodged with 
this Office in PC 215, University Park. 

AIDS Policy 

Students and employees of the Univer- 
sity who may become infected with tfie 
AIDS virus will not be excluded from en- 
rollment or employment or restricted in 
their access to University services or fa- 
cilities unless individual medically-based 
judgments establish that exclusion or re- 
striction is necessary to tfie welfare of 
the individual or of other members of 
the University community. The Univer- 
sity lias established an AIDS Committee 
which includes representation from ma- 
jor University divisions and other Univer- 
sity staff as appropriate. The 
Committee, which will meet regulariy, is 
responsible for monitoring develop- 
ments with regard to AIDS, acting upon 
and administering the University's Policy 
on AIDS in specific cases, and coordi- 
nating tfie University's efforts in educat- 
ing tfie University community on the 
nature of tfie disease. In addition, tfie 
Committee will meet as needed to con- 
sider individual occurrences of tfie dis- 
ease which require University action. 

Persons who know or suspect ttiey 
are sero-positive are expected to seek 
expert medical advice and are obli- 
gated, ethically and legally, to conduct 
tfiemselves responsibly for ttie protec- 
tion of others. 

Tfie University has designated AIDS 
counselors who are available to provide 
further information on this subject. Con- 
tact one of the following offices at Uni- 
versity Part: Director, Office of Equal 
Opportunity Programs, PC 215; Coun- 
seling Services, UH 340; and Student 



Health Semces, OE 1 15; and on North 
Miami Ceunpus, Counseling Services, 
SC 261 , or Student Health Clinic, TC 
110. 

Sexual Harassment/ 
Educational Equity 

All members of tfie University commu- 
nity are entitled to study and wori< in an 
atmosphere free from illegal discrimina- 
tion. Rorida International University's 
equal opportunity policies prohitiit dis- 
crimination against students and em- 
ployees on tfie basis of their race, color, 
creed, age, fiandicap, sex (including sex- 
ual fiarassment), religion, marital status, 
or natural origin. Under tfie policies, it 
does not matter whether the discrimina- 
tion was intended or not; rather tlie fo- 
cus is on wfiether students or 
employees fiave been treated differently 
or subjected to an intimidating, hostile 
or offensive environment as a result of 
tfieir belonging to a protected class or 
having a protected status. Illegal sexual 
harassment includes unwelcome physi- 
cal contact of a sexual nature, overt or 
implied threats to induce performance of 
sexual favors, verbal fiarassment, use 
of sexually suggestive terms, or display 
or posting of sexually offensive pictures. 

Any employee, applicant, or student 
who believes that he or she may be the 
victim of unlawful discrimination may file 
a complaint with the Office of Equal Op- 
portunity Programs, PC 215, University 
Pari< (348-2785) in accordance with ttie 
procedure. 



Internal Management 
Auditing 

The baste function of ttie Internal (^n- 
agement Auditing department is to as- 
sist all levels of management in carrying 
out tfieir responsit)ilities by furnishing 
tfiem with independent appraisals, rec- 
ommendations and pertinent comments 
concerning ttie activities reviewed. 



Auxiliary Services 

Auxiliary Services supervises ttie lx)ok- 
store and food service operations at 
both ttie University Park and tfie North 
Miami Campuses, including ttie Cafete- 
ria, Rathskeller and all vending opera- 
tions. 

Auxiliary Services also supervises 
ttie Duplicating Services which includes 
a Print Shop, Convenience Copiers and 
a Toted Copy Reproduction Center. 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 27 



Environmental Health 
and Safety 

The Environmental Health and Safety 
Department are responsible for compli- 
ance with all federal, state, and local en- 
vironmental, safety, fire, and radiation 
control regulations. With the exception 
of employee health and life insurarx^, 
the office also h£indies all university in- 
surance. This department coordinates 
with ttie other university department to 
control all losses. 



Legal Affairs 

Legal services are provided to the uni- 
versity under a contract with tfie law firm 
of Valdea-Faule, Cobb, Petrey, and Bis- 
choff. The Office of Legal Affairs pro- 
vides representation and advice to 
university administrators, faculty and 
staff concerning legal issues affecting 
the university. 



Personnel Relations 

The Office of Personal Relations pro- 
vides human resource management 
services for personnel of all academic 
£ind administrative departments on tfie 
University Park, North Miami and 
BrowEird Campuses. Categories of per- 
sonnel wtio receive services are faculty, 
administrators, staff and student employ- 
ees (including research or graduate as- 
sistants, college work study students, 
and student OPS employees). All serv- 
k»s provided by tfie office are in compli- 
ance with applicable federal and state 
regulations, and include six major hu- 
man resource management areas - Em- 
ployment and Recruitment, Employee 
Traning and Development, Employee 
Classification and Pay, Employee Bene- 
fits, Employee/Personnel Records, and 
Employee/Labor Relations. 
The University Park office is located in 
PC 224, 348-2181; the North Miami 
Campus office is k}cated in Library 
322-A, 940-5545. 

University Physical 
Planning 

The Physical Planning department is re- 
sponsible for tfie direction of University 
k>ng-range capital programming, facili- 
ties, arxJ campus planning. These activi- 
ties Include capital budgeting, building 
programs, design coordination, construc- 
tion management, and furnishing and 
occuparKy coordination. The depart- 



ment is also responsible for space as- 
signment and management, as staff to 
the University Space Committee, coordi- 
nating all standards and requirements 
related to facilities and site plannirig of 
all campuses. 



Purchasing Services 

Purchasing Services is responsible for a 
number of functions in addition to the pri- 
mary function of centralized university 
purchasing. These other functions in- 
clude Central Stores, Central Receiving, 
Property Control, Surplus Property, and 
Campus Mail. This same organization 
structure has been in operation since 
the university opened in 1972. Most 
key positions are filled with personnel 
with over 10 years of service in tfieir 
units. The stability of personnel as well 
as the high level of cooperation be- 
tween the related units of purchasing 
help to t)etter serve thie university. 



Physical Plant 

The Physical Plant Department at Uni- 
versity Park and North Miami Campus is 
responsible for tfie operation, mainte- 
nance, and repair of all university build- 
ings, utilities systems, grounds, roads, 
and parking lots. The university's well 
known energy conservation strategy 
and work effort was conceived, re- 
viewed, modified, and executed within 
the Physical Plant department. 



North Miami, Budget, 
and Information 
Resource 
Management 

Information Resource 
Management (IRM) 

All computing and telecommunications 
activities on FlU campuses are under 
tfie direction of tfie Associate Vice-Presi- 
dent for Information Resource Manage- 
ment (IRM). The three major divisions 
of IRM sire University Computer Serv- 
ices (UCS), the Southeast Regional 
Data Center (SERDAC), and Telecom- 
muncations. 



University Computer Services 
(UCS) 

University Computer Services (UCS) 
provides instructional and research com- 
puting support to tfie faculty and stu- 
dents of all FlU academic departments 
on tfie University Park, North Miami, 
and Broward campuses. Computer 
hardware accessible to students in- 
cludes a DEC VAX 8800 superminicom- 
puter running VMS, a SUN 4/280 
minicomputer and a SPARCserver 390 
running UNIX, and numerous IBM-com- 
patible and Apple microcomputers. Serv- 
ices of most interest to students include: 
introductory seminars and workshops 
on tfie most widely used equipment and 
software; comprefiensive discumenta- 
d'on libraries; numerous phone lines and 
several public terminal labs for dial-up 
and direct VAX/SUN access; open mi- 
crocomputer labs; a discount microcom- 
puter store; assistance with 
micro-to-larger system data communica- 
tions; and peer and professional consult- 
ation on various other computer-related 
problems, within the limits defined by 
tfie academic departments. 

In addition to instructional computing 
support, UCS, through its Applications 
Systems arxJ User Services Groups, pro- 
vides support for ttie administrative func- 
tions of tfie University, including 
Admissions, Registration, and Financial 
Aid. 

Lab Use: Students are required to 
have a valid FlU picture ID card in order 
to use UCS terminal and micro labs. Oc- 
casionally, during ttie peak periods be- 
fore midterm and final exams, lab hours 
are extended to meet increased de- 
mand. Nevertheless, users are advised 
to complete assignments eariy; time lim- 
its may be imposed during periods of 
high demand. Ethical computing prac- 
tices are stressed. The University Part< 
student lab facility is located in PC-41 1 , 
PC-413, PC-41 4, PC-41 5, PC-41 6, PC- 
419, and PC 322. For a recorded mes- 
sage with current University Park 
student lab hours, call 348-21 74. Direct 
other inquiries to ttie staff offices in PC- 
413A, 348-2568. Tlie North Miami Cam- 
pus combined micro and terminal lab is 
located in ACI 293. Call 940-5589 for in- 
formation concerning the North Miami fa- 
cility. 

Part-time Student Employment: 

Each semester, University Computer 
Services employs over 35 part-time, stu- 
dent user consultants. Alttwugh primar- 
ily responsible for maintaining a good 
working environment and flow of users 
ttirough lab facilities, these consultants 
also diagnose and resolve system and 
equipment malfunctions, and train other 
students to use the tools and computing 



28 / General Information 



Graduate Catalog 



resources available in the labs. Given 
the many different disciplines of the lab 
users, exposure to a large variety of 
hardware and software, and direct train- 
ing by DCS professional staff, working 
as a user consultant for several semes- 
ters provides an excellent career experi- 
ence and reference. Students with 
better than average interpersonal and 
computer skills are Invited to apply. 

Southeast Regional Data 
Center (SERDAC) 

The State University System's South- 
east Regional Data Center provides pri- 
mary academic computing services to 
Rorida International University via an 
Ethernet network which connects stu- 
dent and faculty wori<stations to tfie 
Data Center's Unix/SUN and VMS/DEC 
VAX cluster services. 

SERDAC's computers allow conven- 
ient access to the Internet and Bitnet in- 
ternational computer networks. The 
Data Center also provides FIRNCOM 
electronic mail and bulletin board serv- 
ices to tfie State Department of Educa- 
tion's Florida Information Resource 
Networi< (FIRN), which connects virtu- 
ally all public educational entities in Flor- 
ida. Information on these services may 
be obtained by calling 348-2695. 

SERDAC's word processing facility 
offers a multitude of services, from the 
high volume generation of personalized 
letters and envelopes, to the electronic 
transmission of manuscripts to selected 
publishers. For information concerning 
this facility, please call 348-3069. 

Primary operations and dispatch 
sen/ices for faculty, student, and admin- 
istrative printout are located in Univer- 
sity Park, PC-436. Please call 
348-2109 for information concerning 
tNs facility. 

Telecommunications 

This organization is responsible for pro- 
viding voice and data communications 
services to the University community. 
Faculty and staff are the primary users 
of the University telephone system, and 
they share with students several inter- 
campus data communications networks. 
These provide users access to all Uni- 
versity computing resources, and gate- 
ways to statewide, national, and 
internatbnal computer r>etwori<s. 

FlU Telephone Operators are on 
duty seven days a week. They are re- 
sponsible for servicing incoming informa- 
tion calls for the University Parit 
(348-2000) and North Miami Campuses 
(940-5500). 

Since they can notify the proper 
authorities in case of on-campus emer- 
gencies, FlU Operators may also be 



reached by dialing 't)" at University Park 
and ext. 5500 at North Miami. How- 
ever, in an emergency, direct contact 
should also be made with Public Safety 
by dialing ext. 291 1 at University Park 
and ext. 591 1 at North Mieimi. 



University Budget 
Planning Office 

The University Budget Planning Office is 
responsible for tfie development of all 
operating and biennial budgets in all 
budget entities, including the five year 
plan, legislative budget request, operat- 
ing budget request and internal operat- 
ing budget plan. The office is staffed by 
a director, a staff assistant, and three 
professional staff. 



University Relations 
and Development 

The Division of University Relations and 
Development is responsible for the op- 
eration of all University programs relat- 
ing to external relations and institutional 
advancement. Division activities are 
centered in three departments: 



Development 

The Develop>ment Office coordinates 
the University's efforts to raise funds in 
support of the University and its pro- 
grams from alumni and other individu- 
als, corporations, foundations, and other 
private sector organizations. The Office 
develops and implements numerous pro- 
grams to raise funds annually from 
alumni and others through the Fund for 
FlU, and works closely with ttie Board of 
Trustees of the FlU Foundation and 
other volunteers to increase private sup- 
port for the University and its students. 

The Vice President for University Re- 
lations and Development serves as the 
principal University Uaison to tfie Board 
of Trustees of the FlU Foundation, Inc., 
a group of leading South Rorida busi- 
ness and community leaders dedicated 
to securing community support and pri- 
vate funds for the University. 



Alumni Affairs 

The Office of Alumni Affairs seeks to 
maintain contact and encourage commu- 
nication with and participation in special 
events with the more than 45,000 FlU 



alumni of record. Alumni participation is 
stimulated through activities by tfie FlU 
Alumni Association and through pro- 
grams sponsored by this office includ- 
ing: publications, etlumni social events, 
career development programs, speak- 
ers and wori<shops. 



University Relations 

University Relations is comprised of 
three offices providing professional staff 
and resources to support university ad- 
vancement activity. 

The Office of University Events 
seeks to strengthen university and com- 
munity ties, and to coordinate commu- 
nity events held on tfie university 
campuses. This office manages univer- 
sity events such as commencement, 
convocation. Presidential lectures and 
receptions, and hosts special campus 
visitors. 

The Office of Publications is 
cfiarged with tiie responsibility of produc- 
ing effective, attractive, and informative 
publications which are consistent with 
tiie University's mission and goals and 
are in conformance witfi the require- 
ments of the State University System, 
Publication staff provide editorial, 
graphic, design, typesetting, and produc- 
tion assistance for all university publica- 
tions. This office produces tfie monthly 
faculty/staff newspaper, INSIDE. 

The Office of Media Relations is 
tfie University's primary linkage witfi rep- 
resentatives of tfie print and broadcast 
media. News releases on university pro- 
grams and on faculty, administrators 
and students are issued from this office. 
This office also provides assistance in 
promoting university events and activi- . 
ties in tfie media. 



Centers and 
Institutes 

Center for Accounting, 
Auditing, and Tax 
Studies 

The Center for Accounting, Auditing, 
and Tax Studies (CAATS) conducts and 
sponsors innovative research. Major on- 
going projects focus on tfie audit impact 
of emerging technology and on detec- 
tion of fi-aud. 

CAATS txiilds bridges to practitio- 
ners by turning ideas into products; it en- 
hances tfie value of accountants' 
services to clients and to tfie public by 
contributing to audit efficiency and effec- 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 29 



tiveness. CAATS' international commit- 
ments relate to the accounting issues 
confronting the less developed nations, 
particularly in the Middle East and Latin 
America. 

CAATS also conducts seminars and 
short courses designed to provide edu- 
cational opportunities to South Rorida 
public accountants, internal auditors, 
and management accountants. CAATS 
strives to be self supporting. Net fees 
earned by providing educational oppor- 
tunities to accountants, together wifri 
contributions received from the public, 
eire applied to research and to the en- 
richment of graduate instruction. In this 
way, CAATS provides the margin of ex- 
cellence which enriches the entire edu- 
cational experience. 

All CAATS activity is dedicated to ad- 
vancing accounting, auditing, and tax 
knowledge. CAATS is located in DM 
397, University Park, 348-2581. 



Center for the 
Administration of Justice 

The Center for the Administration of Jus- 
tice (CAJ) was founded at Rorida Inter- 
national University, a member of ttie 
State University System of Florida, in 
1984 to engage in research, training 
and public education about tfie admini- 
stration of justice in Latin America. With 
offices in Miami and San Jose, Costa 
Rica, CAJ has become a unique interna- 
tional resource at the forefront of justice 
sector reform in Latin America. 

CAJ employs a multidisdplinary and 
international staff of specialists, includ- 
ing lawyers, political scientists, public ad- 
ministrators and public policy analysts. 
Many are former justice sector officials 
with experience and skills in justice sec- 
tor issues. 

Giving special emphasis on support 
to kxjal efforts to strengthen and invigo- 
rate fsiir Eind independent justice sys- 
tems, the CAJ regulariy works witfi 
publk: officials, scholars and practitio- 
ners in Latin America. 

The CAJ has become a leading 
source of information and leadership on 
justice sector reform issues in Latin 
America. Its assessments have been 
widely disseminated eind fiave been criti- 
cal in public policy decision-making 
ttxoughout the region. 



Center for Banl<ing and 
Financial Institutions 

The College of Business Administration 
at Rorida International University fias a 



long tradition of preparing students for 
careers in the banking and finanaal insti- 
tutions. The Center for Banking arxl R- 
nandal Institutions was establisfied to 
provide additional sen/ices to banks and 
financial institutions located in tfie South- 
east United States and in Latin America 
and the Caribbean. 

Associates of tfie Center for Banking 
and Rnandal Institutions are a select 
group of highly qualified functional spe- 
cialists in the areas of accounting, fi- 
nance, information systems, marketing, 
and human resource management, wfio 
are interested in tfie application of tfieir 
functioned specialties in solving contem- 
porary organizational problems in banks 
and financial institutions. 

The center for banking and Fineincial 
Institutions at FlU meets the demeinds 
of tfie banking and financial service sec- 
tor tinrough four major activities: 

Education 

The Center for Banking and Rnancial In- 
stitiJtions along with the Department of 
Rnance, co-sponsors tfie Banking Cer- 
tificate program. Upon completion of a 
four course sequence of banking and fi- 
nancial institution courses, students are 
awarded a Certificate in Beinking from 
tfie College of Business Ackninistration. 
The Center also supports educational 
opportunities for bank and financial insti- 
tution employees and otfier individuals 
wfx) wish to continue their education in 
the area of banking and financial institu- 
tions, through otiier off campus pro- 
grams. 

Management Deveiopment 

The Center for Banking and Rnancial In- 
stitutions develops and conducts quality 
training programs and conferences on 
topics ti-iat are of interest to and de- 
manded by banks arxJ financial institu- 
tions. The Center also offers custom 
in-fiouse h-aining programs for tfiose in- 
stitutions who desire a more focused or 
specialized program. 

Research 

The Center for Banking and Rnancial In- 
stitutions supports theoretical and ap- 
plied research on problems and Issues 
in tfie financial service sector. The Cen- 
ter also publisfies an academic journal. 
The Review of Research in Banking and 
Finance. 

Consulting 

The Center for Banking and Financial In- 
stitiJtions serves as a consulting clear- 
inghouse. The Center will assist banks 
and otiier financial institijtions in contact- 
ing experts fi'om FlU and nationwide to 
assist ttiem in solving unique problems 
in ttieir organizations. 



Tfie Center for Beinking and Finan- 
cial Institutions is located in W4-202, 
University Pari<, 348-2771. 



Center of Economic 
Research and Education 

The Center of Economic Research and 
Education is a Type II Center approved 
by ttie Board of Regents of ttie State 
University System. The purpose of ttie 
Center is to foster a greater under- 
standing of economics. Tfie Center rep- 
resents an important link between ttie 
University, business, and education 
communities. As part of its activities, ttie 
Center undertakes research projects, 
sponsors conferences and seminars, 
provides courses in economic education 
for teacfiers, and disseminates eco- 
nomic data and information. 

Established in 1982 as one of eight 
centers located tiiroughout ttie State 
University System, tfie Center is located 
in DM 314, University Park. Its phone 
number is 348-3283. 



Center for Educational 
Development 

The Center for Educational Develop- 
ment (CED) is a multidisciplinary unit 
based in tfie College of Education 
wfiose mission includes: (1) planning, 
technical assistance, ti'aining and re- 
search in support of educational sys- 
tems development internationally and 
domestically; (2) increased minority 
group access to and achievement in 
educational systems; (3) acquisition of 
state and external resources for devel- 
opment of educational systems; and (4) 
multi-institutional collatx>ration in educa- 
tional development projects and re- 
search. 

Tfie Center is governed and sup- 
ported jointiy by Florida International 
University, Miami Dade Community Col- 
lege, and ttie University of Miami. It is 
comprised of two specialized institutes: 
ttie International InstitiJte of Educational 
Development and tfie Urban Educa- 
tional Development Institute. 

For more information call 940-5820, 
or Telefax 956-5494, or write to ttie Ex- 
ecutive Director, Center for Educational 
Development, College of Education, 
ACI-370, North Miami Campus, Florida 
International University, North Miami, FL 
33181. 



30 / General Information 



Graduate Catalog 



Center for Labor 
Research and Studies 

The Center for Labor Research and 
Studies (CLR&S) was established in 
1971 to promote research, curriculum 
development and community service in 
labor relations at the University. Accred- 
ited through the University and College 
Labor Education Association (UCLEA), 
the Center is one of 51 accredited labor 
centers in the United States. Its broad 
mission is to provide 'sen/ices to work- 
ers and their organizations". This broad 
mission translates into three specific ob- 
jectives: 1 ) to provide comprehensive, 
statewide labor education service; 2) 
provide internal and applied research 
programs designed to support faculty re- 
search in labor relations, the changing 
nature of work, and labor education is- 
sues; and 3) develop a multidisciplinary 
credit and non-credit curriculum in labor 
studies at the University. 

As a Type I Center of the Florida 
State University System, the CLR&S 
has major responsibility at the University 
for research on labor relations and tfie 
changing nature of work in Rorida as 
well as curriculum development arxJ 
community service. This responsibility 
can be met, in part, by following thie Uni- 
versity's mandate as descrit>ed in its 
mission statement: "(to) serve the broad 
community with special concern for 
greater Miami and South Rorida, en- 
hancing the metropolitan area's capac- 
ity to meet its cultural, economic, social 
and urtaan challenges." 

Since it was founded, tfie CLR&S 
fias become known nationally for its in- 
novative, statewide, non-credit training 
programs. Thiese educational activities, 
which serve over 2,000 students a year, 
hiave helped to educate labor and man- 
agement participants not only in labor re- 
lations but h\ave introduced innovations 
in pension fund administration, dynam- 
ics of privatization, and international la- 
bor perspectives to local and national 
audiences. 

The Center houses several projects 
wfiich serve to carry out its research 
and training functions. Among them are 
the Minority Workers Project, the Con- 
temporary Labor Issues Conference Se- 
ries, the Labor and Community 
Program, and the Applied Research Pro- 
gram. Faculty research is distributed 
through its various publication series. 

A credit certificate in Labor Studies, 
a Professional Certificate in Labor Stud- 
ies artd Labor Relations, and a Labor 
Studies Concentration in Liberal Studies 
are offered as well as conferences, 
wori<shops, and consultation and re- 



search services. The Center is located 
in TR-2, University Pari<, 348-2371. 



Center for Management 
Development 

The Center for Management Develop- 
ment, located in the office of tfie Dean, 
College of Business Administration, was 
created by the Board of Regents in 
1980. 

Contract Training 

Management training and executive de- 
velopment programs are provided in the 
community and at tfie North Miami Cam- 
pus. Programs are created to meet tfie 
unique training needs of each client. 
Faculty/trainers use highly interactive, 
practical, and industry-specific activities 
aimed toward developing job-related 
competencies. Certificates, Continuing 
Education Units (C.E.U.'s), and Nurses 
Contact Hours may be earned. 

Microcomputer Workstiops 

Located in North Miami Campus, this 
lab is equipped with IBM personal com- 
puters. The programs offered include: 

Introduction to Microcomputers 
Spreadsheets 
Word Processing 
Business and Accounting 
Applications 

Data Base Management 

Technical Assistance and 
Consultation 

The Center is a clearing house for 
matching a variety of faculty resources 
to complex and specialized needs of the 
community. It draws on a variety of disci- 
plines in ttie College of Business Admini- 
stration to serve the private and public 
sectors. 

Certificate Programs 

Professionals who desire to upgrade 
their kfiov\rtedge and skills will benefit 
from participating in the appropriate Cer- 
tificate program. Currently non-credit 
certificates may be earned in: 
Personnel Administration 

Training & Human Resource 
Development 

Management 

Ma riveting 

Tfie Center is located in ACII 310, 
North Miami Campus 940-5825. 



Drinking Water 
Researcli Center 

The Drinking Water Research Center 
(DWRC), the only facility of its kind in 
tfie State of Rorida, is primarily devoted 
to conducting scientific research and de- 
veloping essential technologies which 
can be used to provide quality drinking 
water. Among tfie Center's areas of in- 
vestigation are: 

Water Treatment-evaluating treat- 
ment processes; conducting research 
on tlie reactions that lead to formation 
of potentially carcinogenic compounds 
during water disinfection with chlorine; 
evaluating alternative disinfectants and 
tfieir effect on water quality; researching 
the use of high energy electrons in 
water, wastewater and hazardous waste 
treatment. 

Surtace Water Quality-examining bio- 
logical sources of acid rain; studying 
treatment of domestic, industrial and 
hazardous wastes since improper dis- 
posal can affect surtace water quality. 

The Everglades-examining nutrient 
loading and ecosystem response; study- 
ing ground water movement with 
changes in drainage canal levels; exam- 
ining tfie question of microbiologically 
mediated cfiemical processes; all to 
fielp bring understanding about how 
changes in conditions in the Everglades 
will affect the water quality in the Bis- 
cayne Aquifer, the source of South Flor- 
ida's water. 

Although the Center receives sup- 
port from the state, its research is pri- 
marily funded through research grants 
or contracts awarded to individual re- 
search projects. Funding has been re- 
ceived from the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency, the South Florida 
Water Management District, The Ever- 
glades National Park, the Dade County 
Department of Environmental Re- 
sources Management, local water utili- 
ties and private companies. 

While tfie Center has a complete ar- 
ray of instaimentation for the water qual- 
ity analyses necessary in the course of 
its research projects, time and staff con- 
straints do not permit routine testing of 
water for irvdividuals. 

The DWRC does not conduct aca- 
dernic classes. However, qualified stu- 
dents often fiave an opportunity to work 
as a research assistants in the DWRC 
laboratories or carry out independent re- 
search projects. Cooperation and inter- 
cfiange with ottier departments in tfie 
University is stressed. 

The Center is part of the College of 
Engineering and Design and is located 
in VH 326, University Pari<, 348-2826. 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 31 



Elder's Institute 

The Elder's Institute, a continuing educa- 
tion unit within the Southeast Florida 
Center on Aging, senses the educational 
needs of the senior adults on the Univer- 
sity's North Miami Campus. The Insti- 
tute's mission and scope is to initiate, 
plan, design, and manage non-credit 
short courses, lectures, seminars, and 
workshops for the retired older learner. 
Programs are offered during daytime 
hours, on campus. The courses offered 
are primarily in the humanities, the be- 
havioreil sciences and the social sci- 
ences. Workshops and seminars 
provide opportunities to develop new 
skills and to explore methods and 
means for personal grovrth and self-im- 
provement. The Institute's instructional 
staff are community experts. University 
faculty and retired seniors. The partici- 
pants are motivated learners who seek 
knowledge, new information and skills 
for intellectual stimulation and personal 
growth. Additional benefits are in- 
creased social opportunities which can 
lead to new friendships and meaningful 
relationships. The Institute also serves 
as a resource for community agencies 
and professionals in the field of gerontol- 
ogy. The Institute is located in ACI- 
383B, North Miami Campus, 940-5910. 



English Language 
Institute 

Since 1978, the English Language Insti- 
tute (ELI) has offered non-credit English 
language instruction to non-native 
speakers of English in ttie community 
and from abroad. 

Classes in reading, grammar, writ- 
ing, and conversation are taught at five 
levels of proficiency. Language labora- 
tory facilities are availat)le in which stu- 
dents can increase their listening 
comprehension and speaking skills un- 
der the guidance of an instructor. Stu- 
dents normally take a full, four-course 
k>ad, but it is also possible for fully ad- 
mitted University students to take a 
course in a single skill. 

Testing and Placement 

The English Language Institute offers 
profkjency testing of both written and 
oral proficiency in English as a support 
service for academic units throughout 
ttie University. Evaluative procedures 
are designed to fit the needs of individ- 
ual programs or schools, to assist them 
In the identificatbn of individual stu- 
dents' level of proficiency in English, 
eind to place students in appropriate pro- 



grams of study when needed. In addi- 
tion, the Testing and Placement Center 
regulariy administers ttie Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and 
the Test of Spoken English (TSE) for 
members of the University and Dade 
County school communities. Rnally, ttie 
Center provides certification in oral Eng- 
lish proficiency through the FlU Oral 
English Proficiency Exams in coopera- 
tion with English language agencies 
abroad. 

ESL Evening and Saturday 
Program 

The English Language Institute offers 
non-credit courses in the evening and 
on Saturday for non-native speakers of 
English. 

Accent Reduction 

Accent reduction classes are avail- 
able for non-native speakers of English 
wfw a have a good command of the lan- 
guage but who wish to improve their pro- 
nunciation. 

The English Language Institute is lo- 
cated in PC 316, University Pari<, 348- 
2222. 



FAU-FIU Joint Center for 
Environmental and 
Urban Problems 

The establishment in July 1972 of the 
Joint Center for Environmental and Ur- 
ban Problems at Florida International 
University and Rorida Atlantic University 
was based on ttie premise that many of 
Rorida's environmental and urtian prob- 
lems are intenelated growth manage- 
ment problems. The headquarters of the 
Joint Center are located on the Broward 
campus of FAU at the University Tower 
in Fort Lauderdale with branch offices 
on FlU's North Miami Campus and 
FAU's Boca Raton campus. 

An associate director, research asso- 
ciate, and secretary staff ttie FlU office. 
Part-time research associates and assis- 
tants supplement the full-time staff, as 
do University faculty members on indi- 
vidual research projects. 

The Joint Center functions as an ap- 
plied research and publk: service facility 
that carries out programs supportive of 
local, regional and state agencies, edu- 
cational institutions, and non-profit or- 
ganizations. The Center achieves its 
purposes through activities in the follow- 
ing program areas: (1) in-house re- 
search with eipplication to state, 
regional, eind local governments; (2) re- 
search projects, supported by grants 
and contracts with publk; and private 



agerxjies, that address environmental 
and urban problems; (3) applied re- 
search grants awarded to faculty at Ihe 
two universities; (4) publication of ttie 
Joint Center's quarteriy publication, Envi- 
ronmental and Urban Issues, and 
growth management monograph series; 
(5) production, in conjunction with FlU's 
Media Services, of television documen- 
taries and public service messages con- 
cerning selected urtan and 
environmental topics; and (6) work- 
shops, assemblies, conferences and 
lectures. 

Research 

Recent research undertaken at the FlU 
office of the Joint Center includes: a 
study of East Everglades environmental 
management for ttie Environmental Pro- 
tection Agency and Urban Land Insti- 
tute; analysis of public opinion on 
transportation issues for the Rorida 
Department of Transportation; develop- 
ment of an implementation strategy for 
an affordat)le housirig density bonus pro- 
gram in Palm Beach County; and devel- 
opment of a housing impact 
assessment model for large, regional de- 
velopments. 

Each year the Joint Center provides 
grants to support faculty research in ur- 
ban and environmental problems. Re- 
cent awards to FlU faculty have 
supported research in database design 
for geographk; information systems and 
economic modeling of the Miami-Fort 
Lauderdale economy. 

Service 

In cooperation with local, regional and 
state agencies, and with private organi- 
zations, the Joint Center fias organized, 
directed, and staffed conferences for 
public officials and community leaders 
on issues of agricultural land retention, 
protection of drinking water supplies, 
and growth management. In conjunction 
with FlU's Media Services, television 
documentaries concerning coastal man- 
agement issues, agricultural land reten- 
tion and the lives of two nationally 
prominent environmental leaders in Ror- 
ida have been produced and distributed 
for public education purposes. The FlU 
office of the Joint Center is located in 
AC-I, Room 370, North Miami Campus, 
940-5844. 



The FlU Institute of 
Government 

The Institute of Government, as a part 
of ttie School of Public Affairs and Serv- 
ices, provides technical assistance, con- 
sulting servtees, policy fooims and 



32 / General Infonnatjon 



Graduate Catalog 



executive leadership development pro- 
grams to municipal, county and state ad- 
ministrators, staff members, appointees 
and elected offlciais In Dade, Monroe, 
and Broward counties. The program 
draws the University together with the 
community in which it resides, and cou- 
ples ideas and skills from many disci- 
plines with working governments. 

Upon request, the Institute develops 
and delivers specialized training for gov- 
ernmental units to address any needs 
they have identified. The training is de- 
veloped in consultation wdth the clients 
and can be delivered at their site or tfie 
University. 

The Institute arranges technical as- 
sistance and consulting services when 
governments feel they would benefit 
from outside support. They might, for ex- 
ample, be seeking to solve an internal 
problem, to gatfier and analyze re- 
search data pertinent to their operation, 
or to carry out an evaluation of some 
segment or ctll of tfieir operation. 

The Institute hwlds conferences and 
workshops as a forum for community 
discussion about and analysis of policy 
issues of concern to local governments 
in the South Florida area. 

The Institute develops and can-ies 
out executive leadership development 
through a number of programs, such as, 
the annual Executive Leadership Devel- 
opment Mentoring Program. This pro- 
gram links upper-level public 
administrators and elected officials with 
less-experienced administrators and offi- 
cials, in a year-long program starting 
each fall, to provide personal and profes- 
sional growth for each individual 



International Institute for 
Housing and Building 

The International Institute for Housing 
and Building is established by tfie Col- 
lege of Engineering and Design, to pro- 
vide expertise in the design, engineering, 
architectural, and management aspects 
of construction. Tfie Institute provides 
academic research, and service pro- 
grams to Southeast Rorida, Latin Amer- 
ica, tfie Caribbean, and developing 
nations throughout tfie wortd. 

The Institute emphasizes the follow- 
ing activities related to fiousing environ- 
ment. 

1. To initiate and carry out research 
on problems related to building planning 
and construction, considering especially 
tfie technology, economic, financial, and 
managerial aspects of tfie topic. 



2. To generate funds from outside 
sources to finance theoretical and ap- 
plied research activities. 

3. To disseminate \he results of re- 
search projects and encourage ttieir im- 
plementation. 

4. To provide technical services to 
private and official organizations with a 
special emphasis on service to the hous- 
ing production industries of South Ror- 
ida and in international context. 

5. To act as an interface between 
new developments in Housing Science 
and their application in tfie field of fious- 
ing and planning in South Rorida and to 
assess tfieir relevance to tfie housing in- 
dustry. 

6. To collect documents and dissemi- 
nate information on tfie latest advances 
in building science and housing. 

7. To attract researchers of tfie inter- 
national stature and reputation to the 
University and South Rorida. 

8. To develop a learning environ- 
ment in the area of building sciences 
relevant to tfie needs of low- and me- 
dium-income people of the worid. 

9. To collaborate with other research 
institutes, government agendes, and 
universities to increase ihe effect of its 
research program. 

10. To organize scientific meetings, 
symposia conferences, seminars, and 
worksfiops at tfie University and else- 
wfiere. 

1 1. To incorporate tfie use of alterna- 
tive energy, energy conservation, and ef- 
ficient use of natural resources in the 
planning of large projects, and to en- 
courage the utilization of indigenous ma- 
terials and labor sources. 

12. To help implement programs to 
alleviate the impact of various disasters 
on housing including the coordination of 
disaster preparedness activities related 
to fxjusing. 

An underiying concern of the Insti- 
tute is to establish an interdisciplinary 
environment in which many disciplines 
within tfie University and ths community 
can arrive at feasible solutions to hous- 
ing and building problems. It is located 
in VH 176, University Pari<, 348-3171. 



Institute of Judaic 
Studies 

The Institute of Judaic Studies (US) 
brings the University and the community 
together in a mutual effort to nurture 
teaching and research in academic ar- 
eas which stand as tfie cornerstones of 
Western Civilization. The objective cf 
the Institute is to infuse Jewish content 
into the cum'culum of tfie University at 



all appropriate levels. Contemporary is- 
sues and problems provide focal points 
for study, dialogue, exchange and 
travel. The Institute fosters scholarship 
and inquiry into Jewish tiiemes leading 
to the development of course offerings 
witiiin existing academic departments. 
For more information, call 348-3225. 



Institute for Public 
Policy and Citizenship 
Studies 

Tfie Institute for Public Policy and Citi- 
zenship Studies was founded in 1 985 to 
offer students, faculty, and the commu- 
nity alternative learning opportunities in 
public policy and citizenship develop- 
ment. Four key objectives fiave guided 
tfie Institute's programs: 

1 . To provide non-traditional educa- 
tional opportunities to tfie student body 
on tfie responsibilities and opportunities 
of citizenship. 

2. To assist students and faculty in 
understanding the impact tiiat public pol- 
icy has on their daily lives and in tfieir 
career pursuits. 

3. To promote interdisciplinary re- 
search efforts among faculty on local 
and national policy matters. 

4. To encourage joint university and 
community efforts on local policy issues. 

Tfie Institute sponsors tfie Student 
HorKJrs Mentor Program, a semester- 
long opportunity for students to meet 
and interact witfi peers and faculty mem- 
bers from other academic disciplines. 
The Mentor Program encourages partici- 
pants to examine a public policy issue in 
a small group setting through discus- 
sions, research, or innovative projects. 
In providing an alternative mode of 
learning, ttie Institute hopes to give stu- 
dents practical experience in community 
decision-making and problem-solving. 

Tfie InstitiJte also sponsors and sup- 
ports a variety of programs through 
which FlU students provide community 
service. One such program is tfie Stu- 
dent Literacy Corps, in Dade County 
Public Sctwols' reading and writing 
skills to illiterate citizens. Otfier pro- 
grams address environmental issues, 
citizen participation in government, and 
inter-generattonal projects. 

The InstitiJte also wort<s in coopera- 
tion with other FlU centers, including tfie 
Women's Studies Center, The Center 
on Aging, The Latxsr Center, and Tfie 
Latin American/Caribbean Center. 

In addition, tfie InstitiJte sponsors 
conferences and events focusing on key I 
policy issues tfiat are salient within our 
local community. Nationally known 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 33 



speakers and University faculty are in- 
vited to present their research findings 
and perspectives on a variety of issues 
ranging from citizenship education In 
Dade County to the ethical implications 
of an aging society to tlie impact of gov- 
ernment regulations on the fishing Indus- 
try. The conferences are designed to 
offer the public and university commu- 
nity additional resources in under- 
standing the policy problems that we, as 
a community, face on a daily basis. 

The Institute is located in PC 242, 
University Parl<, 348-2977. 



Latin American and 
Caribbean Center 

The Latin American and Caribbean Cen- 
ter (LACC) promotes advanced educa- 
tion and research on Latin America and 
the Caribbean, a region of intense inter- 
est to ttie United States. LACC offers un- 
dergraduate and graduate certificate 
programs to both degree and non-de- 
gree seeking students, sponsors and 
promotes faculty researdi in the region, 
eind offers public education programs on 
Latin America and the Caribbean to en- 
hance inter-American understanding. 

Since it was founded in 1979, LACC 
f«s become one of the country's lead- 
ing programs in Latin American and Car- 
ibbean studies. Over 90 language and 
area studies faculty regulariy offer 
neariy 100 courses on diverse topics. 
Special seminars on the Latin American 
debt and business environment as well 
as other socio-political and historical is- 
sues complement LACC's efforts. Exter- 
nally funded research programs have 
supported a continual fbw of visiting 
Latin American scholars to ttie Univer- 
sity and gifts from the local community 
have helped the University to build a 
strong Latin American and Caribbean 
studies library collection. 

LACC regulariy places students in 
foreign study programs and local intern- 
ships. More information is available in 
PC 237, University Pari<, 348-2894. 



Institute for Public 
Opinion Researcli 

The Institute for Public Opinion Re- 
search (IPOR), a research arm of the 
School of Journalism and Mass Commu- 
nicatkxi, conducts public opinion polls 
from its survey research lab on tfie 
hJorth Miami Campus. The institute was 
founded in 1983 and was quickly recog- 
nized by public and private organiza- 
ttons tfxoughout South Florida as a 



valuable survey research resource. 
IPOR's primary function Is to provide 
public policy decisions-makers with 
timely and relatively inexpensive infor- 
mation on how a scientifically-selected 
cross-section of the publk: starxis on 
various policy issues. Ways in which 
IPOR is fulfilling this function include: 

1 . The annual FlU/Florida Poll which 
is the most comprehensive public opin- 
ion survey conducted in the state. The 
FlU/Fbrida Poll asks Roridians about 
the important issues facing ttiem - 
crime, education, transportation, fiealth, 
taxes, politics, etc. - and asks many of 
the questions year after year, providing 
valuable longitudinal information not be- 
fore available. The publication in book 
form of the results of the FlU/Rorida 
polls provides public officials, academ- 
ics, businessmen, and thie general pub- 
lic with a ready reference resource 
about opinion in the state. The informa- 
tion provided in the FlU/Rorida Poll 
books is unique in ttie United States, 
and gives planners and decision makers 
in Rorida an additional valuable informa- 
tion resource. 

2. IPOR provides sun^ey research ex- 
pertise to members of the FlU commu- 
nity needing such expertise in 
conjunction with thieir official duties at 
the university. This includes assistance 
in ttie preparation of research proposals 
wfiich call for survey research, provided 
thiat the survey research part of the pro- 
ject, if funded, is conducted under sub- 
contract by IPOR in cooperation vwth 
the director of the funded project. 

3. IPOR's staff and facilities are avail- 
able in support of instructional activities 
at tfie graduate and undergraduate level 
involving public opinion research and 
survey research methodology. 

4. IPOR continues to seek external 
funding in support of its long-standing in- 
terest in the area of public-policy com- 
munication. That may, for example, 
include the development of an annual 
South Fksrida survey, development of a 
standard metropolitan area assessment 
instrument which would be readily avail- 
able to major cities and counties in the 
state, or development of a standard in- 
strument by which state and local legis- 
lators can quickly and inexpensively 
gauge Itie sentiments of their constitu- 
ents on policy Issues. 

5. IPOR, in cooperation vwth the Cen- 
tral American Journalism Project of the 
SJMC, involves itself In ttie develop- 
ment of affordable and scientifically ac- 
ceptable survey research methodology 
usable in tfie developing democracies of 
Latin America and ttie Caribbean. 

IPOR is located in Academic One, 
Room 266, on tfie North Miami Cam- 
pus. For more information call 940-5991 . 



Center for Multilingual 
and Multicultural Studies 

The Board of Regents established ttie 
Center for Multilingual and Multicultural 
Studies as a center of excellence in or- 
der to improve ttie quality of foreign lan- 
guage, bilingual education, linguistics, 
arKJ multicultural programs offered in 
ttie State. 

The main purpose of the Center is to 
develop, plan and coordinate research 
and training programs in the areas of for- 
eign languages and literature, linguis- 
tics, bilingual education, multicultural 
approaches to ttie humanities in interna- 
tional and domestic contexts, and inter- 
national studies. Its primary research 
programs focus on language policy, mi- 
gration, and ethnidty. 

The Center houses several projects 
which serve to carry out its research 
and fi-aining functions. Among thiese are 
the African-New Worid Studies initiative 
and ttie documentary project: Living 
History: A Reflection on the Cuban Na- 
tion arid Exile. 

Cuban Exile History and 
Archives Project 

The Cuban Exile Archives collects rare 
imprints, manuscripts, audiovisuals, 
ephemeral, artifacts, recorded oral testi- 
monies and mactiine neadat>le records il- 
lusti'ating and documenting ttie 
Cuban-American tieritage. It seeks to 
disseminate ttiem tfirough historical re- 
search by members of the University, 
ottier area institutions, and ttie general 
public. The resulting research is publish- 
ed in Cuban Heritage: A Journal of His- 
tory and ttie Humanities which appears 
quarteriy. The presentation of ttie Cu- 
tian community's living testimony 
tfirough the technk;ues of oral Nstory is 
also one of ttie Project's main concerns. 
The Project encourages ttie donation of 
historically significant materials to ttie 
Cuban Exile Archives or to ottier appro- 
priate repositories. 



Small Business 
Development Center 

The Small Business Development Cen- 
ter (SBDC) is a program designed to 
provide comprehensive small business 
management and tectmical assistance 
to ttie small business community. The 
Center serves as a focal point for linking 
resources of ttie federal, state, and local 
governments witti ttiose resources of 
ttie University and ttie private sector. 
These resources are utilized to counsel 
and tt-£iin small businesses in resolving 



34 / General Information 



Graduate Catalog 



start-up, organizational, financial, mar- 
keting, technical, and otiier problems 
they might encounter. 

The Small Business Development 
Center is a basic services center. It dis- 
seminates business management infor- 
mation, performs financial analyses and 
management audits, assists in market 
and feasibility studies, and provides 
business management counseling and 
training. 

In June 1980, the SBDC started ac- 
tively fulfilling its mission to tiie small 
business community of greater Miami 
area by providing counseling services 
and training programs to tfie public. In 
the past year, tiie SBDC staff provided 
4,530 people from the community WAh 
small business management training. 
Also, the Center counseled 3,100 per- 
sons in starting and managing their 
small businesses during tiiie same pe- 
riod. 

The Center also attracts many cli- 
ents through its special services such as 
INFO-BID and the Florida Innovation 
Program. These services are designed 
to provide, respectively, leads for gov- 
ernment and private contracts to Florida 
small businesses and assistarK« to the 
inventor/entrepreneur. In addition, we 
provide businesses interested in export- 
ing assistance through our International 
Trade Center. 

The SBDC is actively involved in pro- 
moting community relations for the Uni- 
versity through the activities of its staff 
with Chamber of Commerce, trade asso- 
ciations, arxl community-based organi- 
zations. These activities include serving 
on committees and numerous speaking 
engagements. 

The Center is tocated in Trailer MO- 
1, University Park, 348-2272, ACI 350, 
North Miami Campos, 940-5790, and 46 
SW 1 st Avenue, Dania, 987-0100. 



Southeast Florida 
Center on Aging 

The Southeast Florida Center on Aging 
offers a multi-disciplinary program in ger- 
ontology with a unique public sector fo- 
cus. It is the mission of the Center to 
serve as a focal point for applied public 
policy research, to design and imple- 
ment comprefiensivB gerontological edu- 
cation and trainir^g program for 
students, professionals and older learn- 
ers, and to demonsti'ate concepts to 
serve older persons. The Center seeks 
to achieve its goals through a wide vari- 
ety of educational activities designed to 
further the pursuit of knowledge and un- 
derstanding about aging in today's soci- 
ety, with particular emphasis upon the 



development, implementation, and 
evaluation of public policy. 

Objectives 

The Center supports, sponsors, con- 
ducts, and participates in a wide range 
of activities etimed at improving the qual- 
ity of life for older people of South Ror- 
ida. Pursuant to its mandate for 
education and ti'ctining, research and 
community service, thie Center is en- 
gaged in: 

1 . Development of gerontology edu- 
cation across disciplines throughout the 
University community. 

2. Expanded opportunities for train- 
ing and professional development of per- 
sons working witii or planning to work 
witii older people. 

3. Aging research, with special em- 
phasis on current and future public pol- 
icy in the area of long term care. 

4. A wnde range of lifelong learning 
and educational opportunities for older 
people. 

5. Technical assistance and support 
to public agencies and community or- 
ganizations aimed at improving the ef- 
fectiveness of programs for older people. 
The center consists of three compo- 
nents: 

Research: Focus on applied public pol- 
icy research as well as promotion of re- 
search involving faculty from a variety of 
disciplines within tiie University. There 
is an emphasis on potential applications 
of research findings by policy makers 
and healtii and social sciences practitio- 
ners. 

Education and Training: Organization, 
in dose collaboration with tiie academic 
departments, of credit and non-credit 
certificate programs for undergraduate 
and graduate students and for practitio- 
ners in tiie field of aging. Delivery of 
training seminars and workshops both 
at Hie University and at locations 
throughout Southeast Rorida. 

The Elders Institute, a continuing 
education program, offers a broad array 
of continuing education courses for tfie 
older learner and is exploring develop- 
ment of additional educational and cul- 
tural activities for older persons. 
Program Development and Technical 
Assistance: Design of innovative con- 
cepts and programs that furttier public 
policy objectives to expand opportuni- 
ties for older people or to improve tiie 
delivery of health and social services to 
them. The Center provides assistance 
and support for agencies and organiza- 
tions serving older people throughout 
Rorida. 

The Center is located in ACI 383, 
North Miami Campus, 940-5550. 



Women's Studies Center 

The Women's Studies Center sen/es as 
a University resource on the specialized 
concerns and academic interests of 
women. A major focus of tiie Center is 
tiie interdisciplinary Certificate Program 
in Women's Studies which provides sup- 
port for the certificate faculty committee 
arxl the development of the program. 

The Certificate in Women's Studies 
was established to provide an opportu- 
nity for tfie interdisciplinary study of tfie 
historical, political, economic, literary, so- 
cial, and cultural roles of women; arxl of 
tiie function of gender in various socie- 
ties and cultures. Tfie program is di- 
rected toward specialists and 
generalists alike: it offers a plan of study 
for students in tfie various departments 
wfx3 wish to eann a certificate in 
women's studies, and it welcomes stij- 
dents who wish to enroll in its courses 
witiiout fulfilling the requirements for the 
certificate. 

The Center provides a place and op- 
portunity to foster women's progress 
tiirough such activities as referrals, 
counseling, peer groups, access to stud- 
ies and research on women's learning 
and culture, and assistance on issues of 
gender inequality. The Center offers 
seminars, conferences, lecture series, 
and related events on both academic 
and women's issues topics. 

The Center is located in DM 212, 
University Park, 348-2408. 



Florida's Statewide 
Course Numbering 
System 

The course numbers appearing in tfie 
catalog are part of a statewide system 
of prefixes and numbers developed for 
use by all public post -secondary and 
participating private institutions in Ror- 
ida. One of tiie major purposes of tills 
system is to make transferring easier by 
identifying courses which are equiva- 
lent, no matter where tfiey are taught in 
the state. All courses designated as 
equivalent will carry the same prefix and 
last tiiree digits. 

The classifying and numbering of 
courses is done by faculty in each aca- 
demic discipline. Their wort< is revievred 
by all of Florida's postsecondary institu- 
tions who make suggestions and criti- 
cisms to be incorporated into the 
system. 

The course numbering system is, by 
law, descriptive and not prescriptive. It 
in no way limits or controls wtiat courses 
may be offered or fx)w they are taught. 



Graduate Catalog 



General Information / 35 



It does not affect course titles or descrip- 
tions at Individual schools. It seeks only 
to describe wtiat is being offered in post- 
secondary education in Rorida in a man- 
ner that is intelligible and useful to 
students, faculty, and other interested 
users of the system. 

The course numbering system was 
developed so that equivalent courses 
could be accepted for transfer without 
misunderstanding. Each public institu- 
tion is to accept for transfer aedit any 
course which carries the same prefix 
and last three digits as a course at the 
receiving institution. For example, if a 
student has tal<en SYG 000 at a commu- 
nity college, ha cannot be required to re- 
peat SYG 000 at tfie school to which he 
transfers. Furtfier, credit for any course 
or its equivalent, as judged by tfie appro- 
priate faculty task force and published in 
the course numbering system, which 
can be used by a native student to sat- 
isfy degree requirements at a state uni- 
versity can also be used for that 
purpose by a transfer student regard- 
less of wfiere the credit was earned. 

It should be noted that a receiving in- 
stitution is not precluded from using non- 
equivalent courses for satisfying certain 
requirements. 

General Rule for Course 
Equivalencies 

All undergraduate courses bearing the 
same alpha prefix arxJ last three num- 
bers (and alpha suffix, if present) have 
been agreed upon to be equivalent. For 
example, an introductory course in soci- 
ology is offered in over 40 post-secon- 
dary institutions in FkMida. Since these 
courses are considered to be equiva- 
lent, each one will carry the designator 
SYG 000. 

Rrst Digit 

Tfie first digit of tfie course number is as- 
signed by the institution, generally to in- 
dicate the year it is offered: 1 indicates 
freshman year, 2 indicates sophomore 
year, etc. In tfta sociology example men- 
tioned above, or>e school which offers 
tfie course in the freshman year will 
number it SOC 1000; a school offering 
the same course in the sophomore year 
will number it SOC 2000. The variance 
in first numbers does not affect ttie 
equivalency. If the prefix and fast three 
digits are tfie same, tfie courses are sub- 
stantively equivalent. 

Titles 

Each Institution will retain its own title for 
each of its courses. The sociology 
courses menttoned above are titled at 
different schools 'Introductory Sociol- 
ogy,' 'General Sociology', and 'Princi- 
ples of Sock>k)gy'. The tide does not 



affect tfie equivalency. Tfie courses all 
carry tfie same prefix arxl last ttvee dig- 
its; tfiat is what identifies tfiem as 
equivalent. 

Lab Indicators 

Some courses will carry an alpfia suffix 
indicating a lab. The alpha suffixes 'L' 
and 'C are used as follows to indicate 
laboratories: 'L' means either (a) a 
course, the content of w/hich is entirely 
laboratory or (b) the laboratory compo- 
nent of a lecture-lab sequence in which 
the lab is offered at a different 
time/place from the lecture. 

'0' means a combined lecture-lab 
course in which the lab is offered in con- 
juration with the lecture at the same 
time/same place. 

Examples 

Marine Biology OCB 013 (lecture only) 
OCB013L (lab only) 

Marine Biology OCB 01 3C (lecture 
and lab combined) 
Therefore, OCB 01 3C is equivalent 

to OCB 013 plus OCB 013L. 

Equivalency of Sequences 

In certain cases, sequences of courses 
in a given disdpiina are equivalent 
rather than the individual courses which 
make up these sequences. (For exam- 
ple, CHM_045 plus CHM_046). In sev- 
eral institutions students have 
completed substantively equivalent con- 
tent. These sequences are deariy identi- 
fied in the Course Equivalency Profiles. 

Explanation of Prefixes and 
Numtiers 

Prefixes and numbers in the course 
numbering system are not chosen at 
random; they are designed to describe 
course content in an organized fashion 
within a classification system developed 
for each subject matter area. 

Generally, each of tfie major classifi- 
cations in a disci|3line is represented by 
a three-alpfia prefix. In some cases, one 
three-alpfia prefix has been sufficient for 
the entire discipline. A discipline may 
use as many prefixes as necessary to 
accommodate its major classifications. 
The togic of the system allows it to be in- 
finitely expandable with minimal dismp- 
tion to existing numbers. 

History, for example, has seven pre- 
fixes: AFH, African History; AMH, Ameri- 
can History; ASH, Asian History; EUH, 
European History; HIS, History - Gen- 
eral ; LAH, Latin American History; and 
WOH, Worid History. All history courses 
in the state will carry one of these 
prefixes. 

A complete Inventory of taxonomic 
listings, equivalent and unique courses 



has been made available to each aca- 
demic department of every institution in 
the state. Students, through thieir local 
advisors, should use this infonmatk>n in 
designing programs which will transfer 
smoothly. 

A more specific example is AMH 
3421 (Eariy American History) 

AMH Broad Area of American History; 
part of discipline of History 

3 Junior level offering (at this 
particular institution) 

4 In Taxonomy for AMH 400 
series indicates 'Areas in 
American History 

2 In Taxonomy for AMH this 

digit indicates courses in 'His- 
tory of Florida' 

1 Last digit in this case refers 

to group of equated courses 
dealing with 'Eariy History of 
Rorida' 

Exception to the Rule for 
Equivalencies 

The following are exceptions to tfie gen- 
eral rule for course equivalencies: 

1. All numbers which have second 
digit of 9 (Ex.: ART 2906) are 'place 
keeper' numbers for such courses as di- 
rected independent study, thesis hours, 
etc. Courses with 900 numbers must be 
evaluated individually and are not auto- 
matically transferable. 

2. All internships, practicum, clinical 
experiences and study abroad course, 
whatever numbers they carry, are not 
automatically transferable. 

3. Performance or studio courses in 
Art, Dance, Theatre, and Music are not 
automatically transferable, but must be 
evaluated individually. 

Authority For Acceptance of 
Equivalent Courses 

Authority for acceptance of equivalent 
courses is State Board of Education 
Rule 6A- 10.24(1 6) wNch states: 
(16) When a student transfers 
among postsecondary area vocational- 
technical centers, community colleges, 
and universities, the receiving institutton 
shall award credit for courses satisfacto- 
rily completed at the previous institu- 
tions when ttie courses are judged by 
ttie appropriate common course desig- 
nation and numbering system faculty 
task force to be equiv^ent to courses of- 
fered at the receiving institution and are 
entered in ihe course numbering sys- 
tem. Credit so awarded can be used by 
tiansfer students to satisfy certifk:ate 
and degree requirements in these insti- 
tutions on the same basis as native stu- 
dents. 



36 / General Information 



Graduate Catalog 



Administration and 
Staff 

Office of the President 

President Modesto A. Maidtque 

Executive Assistant 

to Shs President Uva A. Clavijo 

Director, internal 

Management Auditing Affredo Acin 
Director of 

Governmertt Relations Henry Solares 

Academic Affairs 

Acting Provost and 

Vica President James A. Mau 

Vice Provost, 

Broward Judith A. BlL>cker 

Vice Provost Thomas A. Bresiin 

Woe Provost Charles L. Eikins 

Vice Provost, Institutional 

Research and 

Planning Sushi I Gupta 

Assistant to the 

Provost Dennis Wiedman 

Dean, Continuing 

Education Carotann W. Baldyga 

Dean, Graduate 

StucSes Richard L Campbeii 

Dean, Undergraduate 

SbJdies Fernando Gonzafez-Reigosa 
Director, Academic 

Budget Irerte Manos 

Director, Instructional 

Meda Services Blanca A Riley 

Director, Office of 

interrtatiorral Affairs tJermis Gayle 
Director, Sponsored Research 

and Trairtng Thomas A. Breslin 

Director. Libraries Laurence A. Miller 
Director, The Art 

Museum Dahlia Morgan 

Academic Deans 
Dean, College of Arts 

and Sciences 

(Acting) Arthur W. Herriott 

Dean, College of Business 

Administration Harold E. Wyman 

Dean, College of 

Education I. Ira Goldenberg 

Dean, College of Engineering 

and Design Gordon R. Hopkins 

Dean, College of 

Health William J. Keppler 

Dean, School of Hospitality 

Management Anthony G. Marshall 
Dean, Sdwolof 

Nursing Unda A. Simunek 

Dean, School of Public Affairs 

and Services Allan Rosenbaum 



Libraries 

Director Laurence A. Miller 

Director of Administrative 
Services Calvin Burkhart 

Associate Director Antonie B. Downs 
Assistant Director for Collection 

Development Salvador Miranda 

Assistant Director, 

Reader Services Sherry Carrlllo 

Business and Finance 

Vice President (.eonardo Rodriguez 
Wee President for Operations, 

North Miami Ronald G. Arrowsmith 
Assodate Vice 

President Bradley Biggs 

Director, Auxiliary 

Services Juan Argtxiin 

Director, Controller's 

Office James Ketzle 

Director, Equal Opportunity 

Programs Toni Eisner 

Director, Facilities 

Management Dan D'Oliveira 

Director, Health and 

Environmental 

Safety Miiagros G. Gandia 

Director, Physical 

Plant Jose Gerardo Gomez 

Director. Purchasing Judy Weech 

[Erector, University 

Personnel Relations Gloria B. Carter 
University Attorney l.eslle l^ngbeln 

North r^iami, Budget, 
and Information 
Resource Management 

Wee President, North Miami 

Campus Paul D. Gallagher 

Assodate Vice President (Acting), 
Information Resource 

Management James E Helm 

Director, Budget 

Planning Charies L TirxJer 

[Xrector, Computer 

Systems and 

Services Jacqueline M. Zeldman 

Director, SERDAC Frederick Koch 
Director, Telecommunications 

Zulelka De 1.3s Pozas 
Registrar Lourdes Meneses 

Student Affairs 

Wee President Richard J. Correnti 

Assodate Vice President, 

Enrollment Thomas A. Syracuse 

Assistant Vice President, 

Student 

Development Glenda A. Belote 

Assistant Vice President, 

Minority Programs TBA 



Assistant Vice President, 

Nortii Miami Campus Helen Bllson 
Assistant to the 

Vice President John A. Bortanno 

Assistant to ttie 

Vice President Ametta R. Davis 

Director. Admissions Carmen A Brown 
Director, Career Planning 

and Placement Olga Magnusen 

Director, Counseling 

Center Lynn Simek-Mcrgan 

Director, Enrollment 

Suppon Services Gabriel E Yanni 
Director, Financial Aid Ana R. SarastI 
Director. Housing Ana Sanchez Sippin 
Director, Intercollegiate 

Athletics Richard Young 

Director, International 

Services Judith Green 

Acti'ng Director, Minority 

Programs Joanne Nottingham 

Director, Mnority Student 

Services Ozzie Ritchey 

Director Student 

Activities, Larry Lunsford 

Director, Student Center, North 

M'ami Campus George E Wilson 
Director, Health 

Center Robert Dollinger 

Director, Student Urtion 

University Park Ruth A. Hamilton 

Director, University Public 

Safety Harvey Gunson 

University Relations and 
Development 

Vice President Michael P. Morgan, Jr. 
Assistant Vice President. 

Development (Acting) Dale C. Webb 
Director, Alumni 

Affairs Victoria Hernandez 

Director. University Annual 

Suppon Sandra A. Blue 

Director. FlU 

Foundation Maryellen Canfora 

Director, News 

Bureau Connie Crowther 

Centers and Institutes 

Director, Center for 

Accounting. Auditing. 

and Tax Studies Felix Pomeranz 

Director. Center for the 

Administration of Justice Luis Salas 
Director, Center for Banking 

and Financial 

Institutions John S. Zdanowicz 

Director, Center for Economic 

Research and 

Education Jorge Salazar-Carrilk) 

Director, Center for Educational 

Development John A. Carpenter 



Graduate Catalog General Information / 37 

Direcfor, Center for Labor Research 

and Studies Gulllermo J; Grenier 
Director, Center for Management 

Development Willat>eth Jordan 

Director, Drinldng Water 

Research Center William J. Cooper 
Director, Elders Institute Diane Otis 
Director, English Language 

Institute Chariotte K. Al-Jamal 

Director (Acting), FAU-FIU Joint 

Center for Environmental 

andUrttan 

Problems Thomas D. Wilson 

Director, FlU Institute 

of Government MilanJ. DIuhy 

Director, Institute for 

Judaic Studies Stephen Fain 

Director (Acting), Institute 

for PuUic Policy 

and Citizensfiip 

Studies John F. Stack 

Director, Institute for 

Public Opinion 

Research J. Arthur Helse 

Director, International Institute 

for Housing and Building Oktay Ural 
Director, Latin American 

and Caribbean 

Center Mark B. Rosent)erg 

Director (Acting), Multilingual 

and Multicultural Studies 

Center Tanya Saunders-Hamilton 
Director, Small Business 

Development Center Marvin Nesbit 
Executive Director, Southeast 

Florida Center 

onAgng Max B. Rothman 

Director, Women's Studies 

Center Marilyn Hoder-Salnwn 



38 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalc^ 



College of Arts and 
Sciences 

The College of Arts and Sciences fur- 
thers the study of fundamental intellec- 
tual disciplines, and serves the 
University's other Colleges and Schools. 
The College grants Bachelor's, Mas- 
ter's, and Ph.D. degrees. In addition, 
the College serves students who need 
to complete general education and core 
curriculum requirements, and other re- 
quirements, in order to enroll in specific 
disciplines or professional programs. 

The College is composed of 18 de- 
partments, in addition to the Scfxiol of 
Computer Science, tfie School of Jour- 
nalism and Mass Communication, and 
tfvee Interdisciplinary programs. 

Graduate Programs 

The College has academic programs 
leading to Master's degrees in biology, 
chemistry, comparative sociology, com- 
puter science, creative writing, econom- 
ics, environmental and urban systems 
(offered jointly with the College of Engi- 
neering and Applied Sciences), geology, 
hispanic studies, history, international 
studies, linguistics, mass communica- 
tion, mathiematicai sciences, physics, 
and psychology. 

The College offers academic pro- 
grams leading to tfie Ph.D. in biology, 
computer science, economics, and psy- 
chology. 

Note: The programs, policies, require- 
ments, arxJ regulations listed in tfiis cata- 
log are continually subject to review in 
order to serve the needs of the Univer- 
sity's various publics and to respond to 
the mandates of the Rorida Board of Re- 
gents and the Rorida Legislature. 
Changes may be made witfwut advance 
notice. Please refer to tfte General Infor- 
mation section for the University's poli- 
cies, requirements, and regulations. 



Biological Sciences 

Walter M. Goldberg, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Charles Bigger, Associate Professor 

and Chair of Graduate Studies 
Chun-fan Chan, Associate Professor 
Helen Correll, Research Scientist 
Leon A. Cuervo, Professor 
George H. Dalrymple, Associate 

Professor 
Kelsey Downum, Associate Professor 



Jack B. Fisher, Research Scientist 
Kenneth Gordon, Associate Professor 
Rene Herrera, Assistant Professor 
William Houghton, Research Scientist 
Ronald D. Jones, Associate Professor 
Suzanne Koptur, Associate Professor 
David N. Kuhn, Assistant Professor 
David W. Lee, Associate professor 
John Makemson, Professor 
Gerald L Murison, Professor 
Knut W. Norstog, Research Scientist 
Steven F. Oberbauer, Assistant 

Professor 
Case K. Okubo, Associate Professor 
John Popenoe, Research Sdentist 
L Scott QuackentHish, Assistant 

Professor 
Jennifer Richards, Associate Professor 
Laurie L. Richardson, Assistant 

Professor 
Roger Sanders, Research Sdentist 
Martin L. Tracey, Professor 
Ophelia 1. Weeks, Assistant Professor 

Master of Science in Biology 

To be admitted into thie Master's degree 
program in Biology, a student must: 

1 . Hold a Bachelor's degree in a rele- 
vant discipline from an accredited col- 
lege or university. 

2. Have a 3.0 average or higher dur- 
ing the last two years of the undergradu- 
ate program and a combined score 
(vert^al arKi quantitative) of 1000 or 
higher on the Graduate Record Exam.^ 

3. Tv«j letters of recommendation of 
the student's academic potential. 

4. Foreign students whose native lan- 
guage is not English must take the 
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign 
Language) and obtain a score of 550 or 
higher. 

5. Receive approval from the Depart- 
mental Graduate Committee. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Sdence in Biology con- 
sists of 36 credits, including a thesis 
based upon tfie student's original re- 
search. A maximum of six aedits of 
graduate coursework may be trans- 
ferred from other institutions, subject to 
tfie approval of the Graduate Committee. 

Required Courses 

BSC 5408 Experimental Biology 4 
BSC 6457 Introduction to Biological 

Research 3 

BSC 5931 Graduate Seminar 
(a 1 credit course 
taken twice) 2 

BSC 6971 K^aster's Thesis 6 

Electives^ 21 

Foreign language competency^ 



These must include at least 16 credits 
of courses in the Department of Biologi- 
cal Sciences. No more than six credits 
can be transferred from anottier gradu- 
ate program, subject to tfie approval of 
ttie Graduate Committee. At least six 
credits must be at ttie 6000-level (ex- 
cluding tiiesis credits). Credits taken at 
the 4000-level beyond six, or at a lower 
levels, will not count towards graduation. 
^Competency will be determined by ex- 
amination consisting of a clear transla- 
tion of technical material in a foreign 
language. Credits taken to gain such 
proficiency will not count toward gradu- 
ation. As an alternative, students may 
substitute either six credits of computer 
programming or mathematics beyond 
Calculus II. 

Graduation Requirements 

A grade of 'C or higher must be ob- 
tained in all courses with a cumulative 
average of 3.0 or higher in the 36 cred- 
its, and a tfiesis must be completed and 
accepted after presentation to an ad 
fioc Thesis Committee ctiosen by tfie 
student's Thesis advisor. 

Doctor of Pliilosophy in Biology 

To be admitted into the Ph.D program in 
Biology, a student must: 

1 . Hold a Bachelor's degree in a rele- 
vant discipline from an accredited col- 
lege or university; 

2. Have a 3.2 grade point average 
during the last two years of tfie under- 
graduate program; 

3. Have a combined score (verbal 
and quantitative) of 1 ,000 on tfie gen- 
eral Graduate Record Exam (GRE) and 
tfie results of the biology advanced sec- 
tion; 

4. Foreign students wfiose native lan- 
guage is not Efigiish must take tfie 
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign 
Language) and obtain a score of 550 or 
higher; 

5. Arrange to have three letters of 
recommendation sent to ttie Departmen- 
tal Director of tfie Graduate Program 
evaluating tfie applicant's potential for 
graduate work; 

6. Receive approval from the Depart- 
mental Graduate Committee. 

Degree Requirements 

Tfie Ph.D in Biology is conferred In rec- 
ognition of a demonstrated ability to 
master a specific field of knowledge eind 
to conduct significant independent origi- 
nal research. A minimum of 90 semes- 
ter credits of graduate work beyond the 
baccalaureate are required, including a 
dissertation based upon tfie student's 
original research. A maximum of 36 
credits may be transferred from other 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 39 



graduate programs with the approval of 
the Advisory Committee. 

Required Courses 

BSC 5408 Experimental Biology 4 
BSC 6457 Introduction to Biological 

Research 3 

BSC 593 1 Graduate Seminar 

(a one credit course 

taken twice) 2 

BSC 5945 Supervised Teaching in 

Biology 2 

BSC 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation 24 

Electives ^ 55 

Foreign Language Competency^ 
' No more than 36 credits may be trans- 
ferred from another graduate program, 
sul3ject to tlie approval of the Graduate 
Committee. 

^ Competency will be detennined by ex- 
amination consisting of a clear transla- 
tion of technical material in a foreign 
language. Credits taken to gain such 
proficiency will rx>t count toward gradu- 
ation. As an alternative, students may 
sut>stitute either six credits of computer 
programming or matfiematics beyond 
Calculus II. 

Graduation Requirements 

A grade of "C" or Hgher must be ob- 
tained in all courses with a cumulative 
average of 3.0 or higher in tfie 90 aed- 
its; demonstration of foreign language 
completed and accepted by the Univer- 
sity. 



Course Descriptions 

Afore: laboratories should be taken con- 
currently with or subsequent to lectures. 
Students should register for each sepa- 
rately. 

Definition of Prefixes 

APB - Applied Biology; BCH - Btochem- 
istry; BOT - Botany; BSC - Introductory 
Biology; EVR - Environmental Studies; 
MCB - Microbiology; OCB - Oceanogra- 
phy (Btological); PCS - Process Cell Bi- 
ology; ZOO - Zootogy. 

BCH 5134C Woilcshop in Chromatog- 
tvphy Techniques (1). Wori^hop cov- 
ers the theory and practk^ of chromato- 
graphic techniques to separate complex 
mixtures of biomotecules, including ab- 
sorptk)n, ion exchange, size exclusion 
and affinity chromatography. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate status. 

BCH 5411 C Techniques In Molecular 
Evolution Research (5). Ribosomal 
genes from related organisms are ampli- 
fied by polymerase chain reaction 
(PCR) and sequenced. Phylogenetic 
maps are made by computer from se- 



quence data. Students may use mate- 
rial from their own research. Prereq- 
uisites: BCH 3023 and Lab, PCB 4524 
and Lab or Graduate Status. 

BCH 6507C Workshop in Spectropho- 
tometry and Enzyme Assay (1). Inter- 
action of light with matter (absorption, 
fluorescence, light scattering) and emis- 
sion (chemiluminescence, biolumines- 
cence); analysis of spectra and enzyme 
kinetics. Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

BCH 6130C Workshop In ONA Synthe- 
sis and Ampliflcation (1). Wori^shop in 
the chemical synthesis of DNA and the 
amplification of specific genes by the po- 
lymerase chain reaction (PCR). Stu- 
dents may synthesize DNA 
oligonucleotides for use in their own re- 
search. Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

BCH 6131C Workshop In Radioiso- 
tope Use and Safety (1). Worttshop in 
the safe use of radioisotopes in t>iologi- 
cal and biochemical experimentation, la- 
belling of biochemical compounds, 
purification of labelled compounds, £tnd 
instrumentation involved in detecting of 
radiosiotopes. Prerequisite: Graduate 
status. 

BCH 6132C Workshop In Electropho- 
resis (1). Workshop in the application of 
electrophoresis to biochemical and ge- 
netic experimentation. Students may 
use material from their own research in 
the laboratory section. Prerequisite: 
Graduate status. 

BCH 6133C Workshop in DNA Se- 
quencing (1). Wori<shop in tfie manual 
and automated sequencing of DNA. Stu- 
dents may sequence DNA from their 
own research. Prerequisite: Graduate 
status. 

BOT 5405 Phycology (3). 

BOT 5405L Phycology Lab (1). The 

physiology and ecotogy of marine and 
freshwater algae, including morphology, 
reproduction, and classification of major 
groups. 

BOT 5515 Biochemistry of Plant Natu- 
ral Products (3). Aspects of primary 
and secoTKiary plant metabolism will be 
covered including biosynthesis and deg- 
radation of natural products as well as 
their t)iok>gical/pharmacological activity. 
Prerequisite: CHM 321 1 or BCH 3023. 

BOT 5575 Photobiology (3) 

BOT 5575L PhotoWology Lab (1). The 

study of basic pfiotochemical mecha- 
nisms as ttiey occur in molecular biiologi- 
cal processes such as plant growth, 
animal vision, tNoluminescence, and ra- 
diation damage. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 



BOT 5605 Plant Ecology (4). In-depth 
study of plant ecology at 3 levels: individ- 
ual, population, and community. Labora- 
tory and field exercises will examine 
lecture topics. 

BOT 5682C Rorida Plant Comntunl- 
ties (3). Two-week field trip to many di- 
verse plant communities of tfie state. 
Ecological arxJ environmental factors in- 
fluencing plant distribution will be exam- 
ined, contrasting vegetation among 
sites. Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 
3043 or permission of instructor. 

BOT 6275 Plant Breeding Systems 
(3). Ecx)logy, evolution, genetics and de- 
velopment of plant breeding systems. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

BOT 6585C Plant Structure and Func- 
tion (4). A quantitative assessment of 
plant architecture, morphology and anat- 
omy in relationship to physiology, includ- 
ing the measurement of water relations, 
energy and gas exchange. Prereq- 
uisites: Permission of instiuctor and 
Graduate status. 

BOT 6920C Workshop in Fieki Tech- 
niques in Natural History of In- 
sect/Plant Interactions (1). Awori^shop 
in ttie techniques for collecting and pre- 
serving plants and insects for bNoksgical 
arxi taxonomic research. 

BOT 6921C Workshop In FieM Tech- 
niques In Pollination Biology (1). 

Techniques to do a ttiorough study of 
tfie pollination biology of any flowering 
plant; basic methods and simple instru- 
ments for field observations, measure- 
ments and manipulations. Prerequisite: 
Graduate status. 

BOT 6935 Advanced Topics in Bot- 
any (3). An intensive study of particular 
plant topics rrat otherwise offered in tfie 
curriculum. May be repeated for credit 
with different sutiject content. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. 

BSC 5215 Introduction to the Mechan- 
ics of Biological Systems (3). Me- 
chanical principles are used to analyze 
tfie structijre and function of plants and 
animals; especially Ifie statks of bone 
systems, and support structures of 
plants. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

BSC 5345 Techniques in Scientific 
Diving (4). Planning and conducting 
safe scientific diving operatk>ns and re- 
search. Prerequisite: Civilian Diving Cer- 
tificate (NAUI/PADI) or equivalent 

BSC 5408C Experimental Btology (4). 

Latx>ratory techniques used In biological 
research. 



40 / College of Arts and Sdences 



Graduate Catalog 



BSC 5409C Biology Laboratory Instru- 
mentatior) for Secondary Teachers I 
(3). Prirciples and practice of selected 
Instrumental techniques. Spectropho- 
tometry, electrical measurements and 
separatory techniques. Not for BSC ma- 
jors. Prerequisites: Tfiree undergradu- 
ate credits in physics, tlnree in 
chemistry, and six in biology. 

BSC S406C Wor1(shop In Ceil Culture 
Methods and Applications (1). Utiliza- 
tion of primary and establislied cells to 
study growth cell cyde, chromosomes, 
cell differentian. Special applications to 
basic problems in cell molecular biology. 
Permission of instructor: Graduate 
status. 

BSC 5606 Biological Systematics (3). 

Systems of nomenclature and contem- 
porary topics in classification, including 
molecular evidence, numerical methods 
and dadistics. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

BSC 5825 Wildlife Biology (3). The 

study of game and non-game wildlife 
with emphasis on management arKi 
population regulation. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of Instructor. 

BSC 5931 Graduate Seminar (1). Oral 
presentation of an assigned literature 
survey. Required of candidates in tfie 
Honors and Graduate Programs. 

BSC 5935, 6936 Topics In Biology (1- 

3). An intensive study of a particular 
topic or limited numtier of topics not oth- 
enwise offered in tfie curriculum. May be 
repeated for credit with different subject 
content. Prerequisite: Senior or gradu- 
ate standing. 

BSC 5945 Supervised Teaching In 
Biology (1-2). Teaching in a biological 
discipline, under tfie supervision of de- 
partmental faculty. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing. 

BSC 6415 Animal Cells In Culture (3) 
BSC 641 5L Animal Ceils In Culture 
Lab (2). Biology of animal cells cultured 
in semi-synthetic media: cell nutrition 
growth, cell cycle Jinalysis, cellular trans- 
formation and differentiation, tieterokary- 
ons and somatic cell genetics. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

BSC 6456C Microcomputer Use In Bi- 
ology (1). Introduction to microcom- 
puter operating environments, the utility 
of microcomputers in biology, arxl com- 
puter interfacing to t)iological instrumen- 
tation. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

BSC 6457 Introduction to Biological 
Research (3). Analysis of existing bio- 



logical data and experimental design. 
Prerequisite: Graduate starxding. 

BSC 6926 Workshop In Biology (1-2). 

A short intensive treatment of a special- 
ized research topic or technique. Prereq- 
uisite: Pemiission of instructor. 

BSC 6948 Laboratory Visitation (1-2). 

Student visits to three laboratories to 
learn tecftniques and concepts applica- 
ble to f^.S. or Ph.D. research. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

BSC 6971 Master's Thesis (1-12). 

Completion of dissertation. Prerequisite: 
Permission of major professor. 

BSC 8980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12). 

MCB 5405 Photosynthetic Bacteria 
(3). 

MCB 5405L Biology of Photosyn- 
thetic Bacteria Lab (1). Study of the 
physiology and ecology of photosyn- 
tlietic bacteria, including "Blue-green al- 
gae" (cyanobacteria), purple and green 
bacteria, and Halobacteria. 

MCB 5505 Virology (3) 
MCB 5505L Virology Lab (1). Prind- 
ples and methods of study of bacterial, 
plant, and animal viruses. Molecular as- 
pects of viral development, virus patho- 
gens, and carcinogens. Prerequisites: 
Biochemistry, Genetics, and Organic 
Chemistry. 

MCB 6418 Bacterial Mineral Cycling 
(3). Energy and metabolic processes; 
dstrital food chains; cartwn, nitrogen, 
sulfur and trace mineral cyding; 
chemoautotrophy; global element cydes. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

MCB 6445 Microbial Blolumlnes- 
cence (3). Molecular mechanisms, 
physiology, genetics and ecology of bio- 
luminescence in micro-organisms, par- 
ticulariy bacteria. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

MCB 6735 Marine Microbiology (3) 
MCB 6735L Marine Microbiology Lab 
(1). Physiological-ecological study of the 
distribution in situ activity and biology of 
marine bacteria; public health signifi- 
cance of patfiogens and microbial toxins 
conveyed to man; diseases of marine 
animals. Prerequisites: MCB 3023 & L 
and BOH 3023 & L or PCB 3023 & L 

MCB 6935 Advanced Topics in Micro- 
biology (3). An intensive study of par- 
ticular microbiological topics not 
otherwise offered in the curriculum. May 
be repeated for credit with different sub- 
ject content. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

PCB 5195 Histochemlstry/Mlcrotech- 
nlque (3) 



PCB 5195L Hlstochemlstry/Microtech- 
nlque Lab (1). Chemistry and use of 
fixatives and dyes; histochemistry em- 
phasizes procedures used In research 
and pathology labs Including techniques 
for enzymes, protein, carbohydrate, nu- 
deic acids and lipids. Prerequisite: Bio- 
chemistry or Cell Physiology. 

PCB 5205 Cell Physiology and Bio- 
physics (3). Fundamental biophysical 
properties of memlxanes, transport of 
passive arKi active electrical phenom- 
ena. Biochemistry and biophysics of con- 
tractile mechanisms and information 
transfer. Prerequisites: Calculus and 
Physical Chemistry or permission of 
instructor. 

PCB 5259 Topics In Developmental 
Biology (3). Molecular and cellular 
mechanisms in the development or 
plants and animals. Prerequisite: Senior 
status or permission of instructor. 

PCB 5344 Tropical Ecology Field Lab 
(2). Field course in Costa Rica with field- 
work in two or more diverse habitats 
(rainforest, and dry forest). Emphasis on 
diversity and interactions between spe- 
des. Visits to selected sites of deforesta- 
tion, conservation and restoration. 

PCB 5358 Everglades Research and 
Resources Management (3). Applica- 
tion of basic skills in ecology to contem- 
porary issues in tfie Everglades area, 
with emphasis on tfie relation kjetvreen 
research and management of wilder- 
ness, wildlife, vegetation, water and lire. 
Prerequisite: PCB 3043 Ecology or per- 
mission of instructor. 

PCB 5615 Molecular and Organlsmal 
Evolution (3). The evolutionary relation- 
ships among nucleotides and proteins 
as well as the processes which yield 
ttiese relationships. The possible mo- 
lecular events leading to spedation. Pre- 
requisites: Genetics and Biochemistry. 

PCB 5665 Human Genetics (3). Prind- 
ples and techniques in the analysis of 
tfie human race. Prerequisite: PCB 
3513. 

PCB 5676 Evolution and Develop- 
ment of Sex (3). The evolutionary expla- 
nations for the evolution of sexual 
reproduction and models of sexual differ- 
entiation. Prerequisites: Genetics and 
Evolution or permission of instructor. 

PCB 5677 Evolution and Develop- 
ment (3). The models and evidence for 
tfie interaction of development and evo- 
lution, using Ixsth plant and animal sys- 
tems. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 41 



PCB 5686C Population Biology (4). In- 
trinsic properties of natural and theoreti- 
cal populations and their dynamics and 
interactions, and responses to distur- 
bance. Includes field problems and com- 
puter exercises. Prerequisite: A course 
In genetics, evolution, or permission of 
instructor. 

PCB 5687 Evolutionary Ecology (3). 

Adaptations and interactions of plants 
and animals in natural and disturtied 
habitats. Prerequisite: PCB 3043 or 
equivalent. 

PCB 5835 Neurophysiology (3) 
PCB 5835L Neurophysiology (1). Com- 
parative neurophysblogy; physico- 
chemical mechanisms of resting and 
action potentials; synaptic transmission; 
neural coding and integration; sensory- 
motor function and neurophysiological 
basis of behavior. Prerequisites: Bio- 
chemistry or Cell Physiology, Calculus. 

PCB 5934 Topics In Skeletal Muscle 
Physiology (4). Advanced discussion of 
some aspects of the biophysics, bio- 
chemistry and physiology of skeletal 
muscle contraction. Topics may vary 
from year to year. Based on review arti- 
cles cind research papers. Prerequisite: 
APB 4240 or PCB 3703 and PCB 3203 
or BCH 3023. 

PCB 6175C Biological Electron Mi- 
croscopy (5). Principles and techniques 
of transmission and scanning electron 
microscopy as applied to biological ma- 
terials. Lecture-laboratory combination, 
enrollment limited. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 

PCB 6235 Comparative Immunology 
(3). An analysis of the immune systems 
and mechanisms of invertebrate and 
vertebrate animals. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instRJCtor. 

PCB 6237 Immunogenetics (3). The 

impact of classical and molecular ge- 
netic analyses on our understanding of 
die immune response. Prerequisite: A 
course in Immunology amd Genetics. 

PCB 6255 Gene Expression in Aninral 
Development (3). Introduction to the 
molecular biology of animal develop- 
ment; DNA structure, cfwomatin, tran- 
scription, molecular strategies in 
development. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

PCB 6345C Quantitative Reid Ecol- 
ogy (6). Mettiodology in the description 
and analysis of populations and commu- 
nities. Prerequisites: Permission of in- 
structor and STA 31 23 or equivalent. 

PCB 6405 Biochemical Ecology (3). 

Principles of chemical communication 



taetween diverse organisms and the im- 
portance of a variety of allelocfiemicals 
in community structure. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

PCB 6526 Advanced Molecular Biol- 
ogy (3). Molecular genetics, controlling 
mechanisms, recombinant DNA, gene 
splicing eind gene vector construction of 
viral, bacterial, plant and animal sys- 
tems. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

PCB 6566 Chromosome Structure 
and Function (3). Structural organiza- 
tion and function of the eukaryotic chro- 
mosome: euchromatin/fieterochromatin, 
replication, repair, DNA sequence organ- 
ization. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

PCB 6786 Membrane Biophysics (3). 

The structure and function of cell mem- 
branes: ionic transport, passive electri- 
cal properties, and excitation. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

PCB 6875 Trends In Neurobiology (2). 

Critical analyses and discussions of se- 
lected research articles of current inter- 
ests. Seminar format. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

PCB 6935 Advanced Topics In Genet- 
ics (3). An intensive study of particular 
genetical topics not othenwise offered in 
the curriculum. May be repeated for 
credit with different subject content. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing. 

PCB 7675 Reproductive Immunology 
(3). Molecular and cellular interactions 
in eariy development, ontogenetics, and 
mother and fetus. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 

PCB 7676 Evolution and Develop- 
ment of Sex (3). Models of sexual differ- 
entiation and reproduction treated in an 
evolutionary context. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor 

PCB 7689 Advanced Topics In Popu- 
lation and Evolutionary Genetics (3). 
Comparison of the synthetic and muta- 
tional drift hypotfieses; relationships be- 
tween molecular and phenotypic 
evolutionary rates and ttie phenotypic ef- 
fects of various forms of mutation. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

ZOO 5256 Biology of Cmstaceans (3). 
ZOO 5266L Biology of Crustaceans 
Laboratory (1). Morphology, physiol- 
ogy, systematics and evolution in crusta- 
ceans. 

ZOO 5376 Animal Design ar>d Move- 
ment (3). Basic btomechanical and be- 
havioral theories of how animals feed 
and move. Prerequisites: BSC 1010, 



BSC 1011, PHY 3053, and PHY 3054 or 
equivalent. 

ZOO 5732 Advanced Anatomy Denrv 
onstration (1-4). Dissection and demon- 
stration of ttie human body with the 
emphasis on structure and function. 
May be repeated to a maximum of 8 
credits. Prerequisite: ZOO 3733L and 
Z003734L. 

ZOO 5745 Advanced Neuroanatomy 

(3). In-depth knowledge of tfie embry- 
onic development, structure, and func- 
tion of ttie human nervous system with 
a great deal of clinical consideration. 
Prerequisite: ZOO 4743 or permission 
of instructor. 

ZOO 6378C Experimental Ap- 
proaches to FurKtional Morpttology 
(4). Ttie use of mechanical analysis, 
electromyography, high-speed cinema- 
tography and other experimental tech- 
niques to solve problems in functional 
morphology. Prerequisite: A course in 
Anatomy. 

ZOO 6935 Advanced Topics In Zool- 
ogy (3). An intensive study of particular 
topics not otherwise offered in ttie cur- 
riculum, fitey be repeated for credit with 
different subject content. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 



Chemistry 

Leonard S. Keller, Professor arid 

Chairperson 
Milagros Delgado, Assistant Professor 
Kenneth G. Furton, Assistant Professor 
Arthur W. Herrlott, Professor and 

Acting Dean 
Gary G. Hoffman, Assistant Professor 
Jeffrey A. Joens, Associate Professor 
John T. Landrum, Associate Professor 

and Graduate Coordinator 
Ramon Lopez de la Vega, Associate 

Professor 
Howard E. Moore, Professor 
John H. ParVer, Professor 
J. Martin Qulrke, Professor 
Stephen Winkle, Associate Professor 

Master of Science in Chemistry 

Ttie requirements for completion of ttie 
Master of Science degree are: 

A core curriculum of nine semester 
hours plus a minimum of three elective 
courses in chemistry or suitable cognate 
areas (including, but not limited to, phys- 
ics, geology, biology, and mathematics) 
to t>e taken at the discretion of ttie stu- 
dent and at the direction of the Stu- 
dent's Ttiesis Advisory Committee. Each 



42 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



graduate student must also register for 
Graduate Seminar during each semes- 
ter of study and must complete a mini- 
mum of 2 semester hours of graduate 
-seminar, 4 semester hours of graduate 
research and 8 semester hours of thesis 
research. A grade of 'C or higher must 
be obtained in all courses with a cumula- 
tive grade point average of 3.0 or 
higher, and a thesis must be completed 
and accepted after presentation to tfie 
Thesis Committee. 

Core Curriculum 

CHM5181 Special Topics in 

Analytical Chemistry 3 
CHM 5380 Special Topics in 

Organic Chemistry 3 

CHf»4 6430 Advanced 

Thermodynamics 3 

CHM 6935 Graduate Seminar (min) 2 
CHM 691 OL Graduate Research (min) 4 
CHM 6970 Thesis Research (min) 8 

Elective courses: (minimum 3 

required) 

CHM 5440 Kinetics and Catalysis 3 

CHM 5280 Natural Products and 

Biosyntfiesis 3 

CHM 5250 Organic Synthesis 3 

CHM 5260 Physical Organic 

Chemistry 3 

CHM 651 1 Polymer Chemistry 3 

CHM 6480 Quantum Chemistry 3 

CHM 5681 Special Topics in 

Inorganic Chemistry 3 

CHM 5581 Special Topics in Physical 

Chemistry 3 

CHM 5490 Spectroscopy and 

Molecular Structure 3 

CHM 5506 Physical Biochemistry 3 
CHM 6461 Statistical 

Thermodynamics 3 

Financial Support 

Full-time graduate students who are in 
good academic standing are eligible for 
financial support. Teaching and re- 
search assistantships are available on a 
competitive basis. Students may also ap- 
ply for waiver of both In-State and Out- 
of-State tuition. Inquiries concerning 
application to the program and availabil- 
ity of financial support should be di- 
rected to the Chemistry Graduate 
Coordinator. 



Course Descriptions 

Note: Laboratories may not be taken 
prior to the corresponding course. Labo- 
ratories must be taken concurrently 
wfiere noted. Students must register for 
the laboratory separately. 



Definition of Prefixes 

CHM-Chemistry; CHS-Chemistry-Spe- 
dalized; ISC-Interdisciplinary Natural 
Sciences; OCC-Oceanography-Chemi- 
cal. 

CHM 5150 Graduate Analytical Meth- 
ods (3). Analysis of analytical data, elec- 
trochemistry, spectroanalytical 
techniques, chromatography, survey of 
new analytical mettxjds. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of in- 
structor. 

CHM 5156 Advanced Chromatogra- 
phy (3). Intensive examination of tfie 
contemporary practice of chromatogra- 
phy Including available chromatographic 
tediniques, their selection and applica- 
tion. Prerequisite: CHM 4130 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

CHM 5181 Special Topics In Analyti- 
cal Chemistry (VAR). An intensive ex- 
amination of one or more areas 
selected by instructor and students. 
Core course Prerequisite: CHM 4130 or 
permission of instructor. 

CHM 5225 Graduate Organic Chemis- 
try (3). Advanced topics in organic 
chemistry. Structure of organic mole- 
cules, reaction mechanisms, organic 
syntfiesis, and natural product chemis- 
try. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. 

CHM 5250 Organic Synthesis (3). Use 

of classical and modem reactions in tfie 
design and constmction of complex or- 
ganic molecules including natural prod- 
ucts. Some topics covered will be 
construction reactions, refunctionaliza- 
tion, stereochemistry and conforma- 
tional analysis. Prerequisite: CHM 4220 
or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5260 Physical Organic Chemis- 
try (3). A series of topfcs will be dis- 
cussed including molecular ortsital 
tfieory as it pertains to organic mole- 
cules, kinetic and ttiermodynamic ap- 
proaches to the study of reaction 
mecfianisms, quantitative approaches 
to conformational analysis, etc. Prereq- 
uisite: CHM 4220 and physical chemis- 
try or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5280 Natural Products Chemis- 
try and Biosynthesis (3). Studies of 
the chemical origins (biosynthesis), prop- 
erties, and synthesis of the various 
classes of naturally occurring com- 
pburKJs: terpenes, steroids, alkaloids, 
acetogenins. Prerequisite: CHM 4220 or 
permission of instructor. 

CHM 5380 Special Topics In Organic 
Chemistry (VAR). An intensive exami- 
nation of one or more areas selected by 



instructor and students. Core course 
Prerequisite: CHM 4220 and physical 
chemistry or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5425 Graduate Physical Chemis- 
try (4). Prequantum physics, tfie Schrod- 
inger equation and its solutions, atoms 
arxj molecules, rotational, vibrational, 
and electronic spectroscopy. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or permission 
of instructor. 

CHM 5440 Kinetics and Catalysis (3). 

Tfieory of elementary reactions, acti- 
vated complex theory, mechanisms of 
complex reactions, f^rerequisites: CHM 
3411, MAP 3302. 

CHM 5490 Spectroscopy and Molecu- 
lar Structure (3). Introduction to atomic 
and molecular quantum states, selec- 
tion rules, and fundamental principles of 
spectroscopy. Introduction to group the- 
ory and to tfie tfieory of UV/visible, infra- 
red, Raman, microwave, nmr, photo- 
electron, and mass spectroscopies, and 
the applications of tfiese metfwds to the 
determination of fundamental physical 
properties and ttie structure of organic 
and inorganic molecules. Prerequisite: 
Physical Chemistry. 

CHM 5490L Spectroscopy and Mo- 
lecular Structure Lab (1). Tfie theory 
of spectroscopy and tfie use of modem 
instrumentation to investigate molecular 
structure. Prerequisites: CHM 3211, 
321 1L. Corequisite: PHY 4604 or CHM 
5490. 

CHM 5506 Physical Biochemistry (3). 

Physical properties of biomolecules, mo- 
lecular conformation; thermodynamic, ki- 
netic, and spectroscopic properties of 
biomolecules. Prerequisites: CHM 
321 1 , MAC 33 1 1 , and physical chemis- 
try or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5517 Solid State (3). Crystalline 
form of solids, lattice dynamics, metals, 
insulators, semiconductors, and dielec- 
tric materials. Prerequisite: CHM 5490 
or PHY 4604. 

CHM 5581 Special Topics In Physical 
Chemistry (VAR). An intensive exami- 
nation of one or more areas selected by 
instructor and students. Prerequisite: 
CHM 341 1 or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5650 Physical Inorganic Chemis- 
try (3). Introduction to use of physical 
methods to determine the structure of in- 
organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHM 
4610 or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5681 Special Topics in Inor- 
ganic Chemistry (VAR). An intensive 
examination of one or more areas se- 
lected by instructor and students. Pre- 



Graduata Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 43 



requisite: OHM 4610 or permission of in- 
structor. 

CHM 5931 Special Topics (3). A 
course covering selected special topics 
in chemistry. 

CHM 61 57 Advanced Analytical 
Chemistry (3). Modem analytical meth- 
ods, applications, and instrumentation. 
Topics include spectroscopy, chromatog- 
raphy, electrochemistry, optimization the- 
ory, and computerized instrumentation. 
Prerequisite: CHM 4130 or permission 
of instructor. 

CHM 6430 Advanced Themwdynam- 
Ics (3). The laws of classical thermody- 
namics and their application. Open and 
closed systems, In-eversible processes, 
high and low temperature systems, sol- 
ids, liquids, and gases. Core course. 
Prerequisite: CHM 341 1 or permission 
of instructor. 

CHM 6461 Statistical Thermodynam- 
ics (3). Principles of statistical thermody- 
namics. Ensembles, classical and 
quantum statistics, ideal and non-ideal 
gases, equilibrium, crystals, liquids, and 
polymers. Prerequisite: CHM 341 1 or 
permission of instructor. 

CHM 6480 Quantum Mechanics (3). In- 
troduction to quantum mechanics. The 
Schrodinger equation and its solutions, 
approximation methods, spin, symmetry, 
structure of atoms and molecules. Pre- 
requisite: CHM 341 1 or permission of in- 
structor. 

CHM 651 1 Polymer Chemistry (3). A 

quantitative study of polymers. Mecha- 
nism of fomiation, configuration of poly- 
mer chains, and the relationship 
between physical properties and chemi- 
cal constitution. Prerequisite: CHM 341 1 
or permission of instnjctor. 

CHM 6905 Independent Study In 
Chemistry (1-6). Independent study 
arxi problems in an area of chemistry, 
under faculty supen/ision. May be re- 
peated. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

CHM 6910L Graduate Research In 
Chemistry (VAR). The student works di- 
rectly with a professor on a research pro- 
ject. Credit is assigned on thte basis of 
four hr/Wk per credit hour. Results to be 
presented as a seminar. Permission of 
instructor. 

CHM 6935 Graduata Seminar (1). An 
examination of various current research 
topics in chemistry. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing. 

CHM 6940 Supervised Teaching (1-3). 

Graduate student serves as lecturer and 
demonstrator in undergraduate laborato- 



ries coordinated and supervised by a 
faculty member. May be repeated. A 
maximum of three hours may apply to 
the Master's degree. Prerequisite: Full 
graduate standing. 

CHM 6949 Industrial internship (3). A 

semester of supervised wori< in an out- 
side laboratory. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

CHM 6970 Thesis Research (1-10). Re- 
search toward completion of Master's 
Thesis. Repeatable. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of Department. 

CHM 6971 Master's Thesis (1-6). Com- 
pletion of thesis. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of major professor. 

CHS 5531 Forensic Analysis (3). An in- 
troduction to established chemical analy- 
sis techniques used in forensic science 
and new techniques under develop- 
ment. Prerequisite: CHM 3120, CHM 
31 20L, CHM 321 1 , CHM 321 1 L or per- 
mission of instructor. 

CHS 5531 L Forensic Analysis Lab (1). 

Laboratory to accompany Forensic 
Analysis CHS 5531. Prerequisite: CHM 
3120, CHM3120L, CHM 321 1, CHM 
321 1L or permission of instructor. 



School of Computer 
Science 

Jalnendra K. Naviakiia, Professor and 

Director 
Farah Arefl, Assistarit Professor 
Toby S. Berk, Professor and Associate 

Director 
David S. Barton, Professor 
John C. Comfort, Professor 
Luis L Cova, Assistant Professor 
Rairrxjnd Ege, Assistant Professor 
Carol D. Henley, Instructor 
Harry Hoffman, Instructor 
William T. Kraynek, Associate 

Professor 
Wesley F. Mackey, Lecturer 
Masoud Mllani, Assistant Professor 
Ana Pasztor, Assodate Professor 
Alexander Pelln, Associate Professor 
Norman Pestaina, Instructor 
N. Prabhakaran, Assistant Professor 
Naphtali RIshe, Associate Professor 
Orlando Sauleda, Instructor 
Wei Sun, Assistant f^ofessor 
(}oronTal, Assistant Professor 
Mark Weiss, Assistant Professor 

The School of Computer Science offers 
both a Masters of Science degree and a 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. The Mas- 



ter of Science degree provides study in 
state-of-thie-art computer applications 
as well as an introduction to the theoreti- 
Ccd foundations of computer science. 
The Doctor of Philosophy in Computer 
Science is designed to provide study in 
all major areas of computer science 
while leading to the frontiers of knowl- 
edge in a chosen field of concentration. 

Master of Science in Computer 
Science 

Admission 

The following are in addition to the Uni- 
versit/s graduate admission require- 
ments. 

1 . A Bachelor's Degree in Computer 
ScierK:e or equivalent degree in a re- 
lated field from an accredited university 
or college as judged by the School's 
Graduate Committee. 

2. A "B" average or better in all 
coursewori< attempted while registered 
as an upper-division student in the 
Bachelor's degree. 

3. Acceptable courses in Calculus 
and Statistics. 

4. GRE score of at least 650 quanti- 
tative and 500 verbal taken vi/ithin the 
last three years; tiie score of thie ana- 
lytic portion of the GRE exam will be 
considered. 

5. Three letters of recommendation 
from persons in a position to judge tfie 
applicant's potential success in gradu- 
ate study. 

6. Approval of the Graduate Commit- 
tee. 

Required Courses 

CIS 561 1 Software Engineering 3 
COP 661 1 Advanced Operating 

Systems 3 

COT 5420 Theory of Computation I 3 
COT 6400 Analysis of Algorithms 3 
In addition, thie student must cfxMse 
four courses from the following list, sub- 
ject to the approval of tfie Graduate 
Committee: 
CAP 5602 Introduction to Artificial 

Intelligence 3 

CAP 5680 Expert Systems 3 

CAP 5701 Advanced Computer 

Grapfiics 3 

CDA6501 Distributed Processing 3 
CIS 6100 Statistical Computer 

Performance Evaluation 3 
COP 5621 Compiler Constnjction 3 
COT 6421 Theory of Computation II 3 
COP 6545 Advanced Topics in 

Database Management 3 
CDA 531 2 Micro Processing for 

Software Designers 3 



44 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



COP 6556 Semantics of 

Programming 

Languages 3 

MAD 5405 Numerical Mettx3ds 3 

MAP 6127 Simulation and Modeling 3 

In addition, the student must satisfy 
one of the following two options: 

Thesis Option 

CIS 6970 Thesis 6 

After completion of the other required 
courses, frie student must conduct a re- 
search ttiesis. The topic must first be ap- 
proved by ttie faculty member who will 
supervise the research and tfien by the 
Graduate Committee. The thesis will be 
accepted only after being read and ap- 
proved by a Reading Committee. An 
oral defense is required before the 
Reading Committee. 

Non-Thesis Option 

Additional Coursework 6 

The student is required to take at addi- 
tional six semester fxjurs of approved 
electives. The student then must pass a 
comprehensive exEuninafion which may 
have tioth written and oral parts and 
which is based on the student's course- 
work. This examination may not be 
taken more than two times, except by 
permission of ttie Graduate Committee. 

Remarks: The program requires a 'B' av- 
erage or higher and a grade of 'C or 
higher in each course. A maximum of 
two courses may be transferred into the 
program from outside the University, 
subject to the approval of the Graduate 
Committee. 

Doctor of Philosophy in 
Computer Science 

The requirements for admission to the 
doctoral program in Computer Science 
are: 

1 . A baccalaureate or master degree 
in Computer Sciences, or equivalent de- 
gree in a related flekl as judged by the 
School's Graduate Committee. 

2. Present a minimum of a 'B' aver- 
age on all upper division work and ac- 
ceptable courses in Calculus and 
Statistk:s. 

3. GRE scores of at least 650 on tiie 
quantitative portion and 500 on the ver- 
bal portion. The GRE must have been 
taken witiiin the past five years. 

4. Three letters of recommendation 
from persons in a px3sition to judge the 
applicant's potential for advanced gradu- 
ate study in computer science. 

5. Approval of the School of Com- 
puter Science Graduate Committee. 



Required Courses 

All students must complete tiie tollownng 
courses and receive a grade of 'B' or 
higher in each. 
CDA 531 2 Micro Processing for 

Software Designers 3 

CDA 6501 Distributed Processing 3 
CIS 561 1 Software Engineering 3 
COP 6545 Advanced Topics in 

Database Management 3 
COP 661 1 Advanced Operating 

Systems 3 

COT 5420 Theory of Computation I 3 
COT 6400 Analysis of Algoritiims 3 
COT 6421 Theory of Computation II 3 
MAD 5405 Numerical Methods 3 

STA 6807 Queuing and Statistkal 

Models 3 

In addition, all students 

1. Must successfully pass a Qualify- 
ing Examination based on the required 
coursewori<. 

2. Must take at least 12 hours of 
6000-level courses approved by tfie 
Graduate Committee. 

3. Must write a dissertation on their 
research and successfully defend it 
orally. 

4. Must spend at least one academic 
year in full-time residence. Normally, 
this will be after passing the Qualifying 
Examination. 

For additional information and for 
specific rules and regulations relating to 
the above, please write to: 

Dr. David Barton 

Graduate Program Director 

School of Computer Science 

Rorida International University 

University Pari< 

Miami, Rorida 33199 



Ck)urse Description 

Definition of Prefixes 

CAP-Computer Applications; CDA-Com- 
puter Design/Architecture; CIS-Com- 
puter Information Systems; 
CGS-Computer General Studies; COC- 
Computer Concepts; COP -Computer 
Programming; COT-Computing Theory; 

CAP 5602 Introduction to Artificial In- 
telligence (3). Presents the basic con- 
cepts of Al and tiieir applications to 
game playing, problem solving, auto- 
mated reasoning, natural language proc- 
essing and expert systems. 
Prerequisite: COP 3530. 

CAP 5680 Expert Systents (3). Inti-o- 
duction to expert systems, knowledge 
representation techniques and construc- 
tion of expert systems. A project such as 
the implementation of an expert system 



in a high level Al-language is required. 
Prerequisite: COP 3530 or permission 
of instructor. 

CAP 5701 Advanced Computer 
Graphics (3). Advanced topics in com- 
puter graphics: system architecture, in- 
teractive techniques, image synthesis, 
current research areas. Prerequisites: 
COP 3530 and CAP 3700 or equivalent, 
or by permission. 

CDA 5312 Micro Processing for Soft- 
ware Designers (3). Design of applica- 
tion software for OEM products. Topics 
include: 16-btt microprocessor architec- 
ture and assembly language, HLLs for 
design of microprocessor software, soft- 
ware for multiprocessing and multiproc- 
essor systems. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

CDA 6501 Distributed Processing (3). 

Stijdy of disti'ibuted systems of user cind 
equipment using data communications 
facilities. Analysis of system architec- 
ture, hardware, and software for system 
design. System integrity and perform- 
ance issues and techniques are exam- 
ined. Prerequisites: COP 661 1 , CDA 
4500 and STA 6807. 

CDA 6939 Special Topics: Advanced 
Topics In Computer Architecture (3). 

This course deals witii selected special 
topics in computer architecture. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Instructor. 

CIS 5611 Software Engineering (3). 

This course deals witii the design of 
large scale computer programs. In- 
cluded are topics dealing with planning 
design, implementation, validation, met- 
rics, and the management of such soft- 
ware projects. Prerequisite: CIS 4610. 

CIS 5900 Independent Study (1-10). In- 
dividual conferences, assigned read- 
ings, and reports on independent 
investigations. 

CIS 5910 Project Research (1-6). Ad- 
vanced undergraduate or master's level 
research for particular projects. Repeat- 
able. Prerequisite: Permission of Depart- 
ment. 

CIS 5931 Special Topics (VAR). A 

course designed to give groups of stu- 
dents an opportunity to pursue special 
studies not othenwise offered. 

CIS 6100 Statistical Computer Per- 
formance Evaluation (3). An introduc- 
tion of tiie tools for quantitative, 
statistkal and rational design, analysis, 
and optimization of complex computer 
systems. Prerequisites: STA 6807 and 
COP 6611. 

CIS 6612 Special Topics: Advanced 
Topics in Software Engineering (3). 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 45 



This course deals with selected topics In 
software engineering. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. 

CIS 6931 Special Topics: Advanced 
Topics In InfonnaUon Processing (3). 

This course deals with selected special 
topics in information processing. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Instructor. 

CIS 6932 Special Topics: Advanced 
Topics In Numerical Methods (3). This 
course deals with selected topics in nu- 
merical methods. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of Instructor. 

CIS 6935 Seminar In Contemporary 
Computer Science (3). Research Semi- 
nar in Contemporary Computer Science. 
Topics will vary from term to term. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

CIS 6970 Thesis (1-10). Completion of 
all other requirements for the M.S. De- 
gree in Computer Science. 

CIS 7910 Graduate Research (1-25). 

Doctoral research prior to candidacy. Re- 
peatable. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Department. 

CIS 7980 Ph.D. Thesis (1 -1 0). PH.D. 
Thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of In- 
structor. 

COP 5621 Compiler Construction (3). 
Basic techniques of compjilation; self- 
compilers; syntax encoding eind recogni- 
tion; code generation and optimization. 
Prerequisites: MAD 3512 and CIS 4610. 

COP 6611 Advanced Operating Sys- 
tems (3). Topics in ofjerating system de- 
sign: concun-ent scheduling, security 
and protection, virtualizable architec- 
tures and monitors. Prerequisite: COP 
4610. 

COP 6545 Advanced Topics In Data- 
base Management (3). Architecture 
eind implementation aspects of DBMS; 
Distributed datalaases; Semantic mod- 
els; advanced database languages, in- 
cluding Prolog-like languages; Semantic 
aspects of datat>ases; Database ma- 
chines. Prerequisite: COP 4540. 

COP 6556 Semantics of Program- 
ming Languages (3). TNs course pro- 
vides an overview of systematic and 
effective approacfies to programming. 
Abstraction; formal specification tech- 
niques; program verification and; seman- 
tics of programming languages. 
Prerequisite: COT 5420. 

COT 5420 Theory of Computation I 
(3). Abstract models of computation; 
halting problem; decidability and unded- 
dabJIity; recursive function tlieory. Pre- 
requisite: MAD 3512. 



COT 5936 Topics In Algorithms (3). 

Advanced data structures, pattern 
matching aUgorithms, file compression, 
cryptography, computational geometry, 
numerical algorithms, combinatorial opti- 
mization algorithms and additional top- 
ics. Prerequisite: COP 3530. 

COT 6400 Analysis of Algorithnw (3). 

Complexity behavior of algorithms is de- 
scribed for Set Manipulation, Graph The- 
ory, and Matrix Manipulation problems, 
among others. P and NP classes of 
problems reveal an inherent difficulty in 
designing efficient silgorithms. Prereq- 
uisite: COP 3530. 

COT 6421 Theory of Computation II 
(3). Verification of program correctness; 
program schemes; fixed-point theory of 
programs; resolution and theorem prov- 
ing. Prerequisite: COT 5420. 

COT 6930 Special Topics: Advanced 
Topics In Theory (3). This course deals 
witti selected special topics in comput- 
ing theory. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

MAP 6127 Simulation and Modeling 
(3). Two areas are covered in this 
course: advanced queueing models and 
simulation techniques. The relationships 
between these two areas, applications, 
and simulation languages will be among 
the topics covered. Prerequisites: COP 
3530; and MAP 51 1 7 or STA 6807. 



Creative Writing 

Asher Z. Milbauer, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson 
I.ASter Standiford, Professor and 

Director, Creative Writing 
Lynne Barrett, Associate Professor 
John Dufresne, Assistant Professor 
James W. Hall, Professor 

Master of Fine Arts in Creative 
Writing 

The Master of Rne Arts in Creative Writ- 
ing is the terminal degree for the practic- 
ing writer, designed to qualify tfie 
recipient to teach creative writing on the 
collegiate and university level. The pro- 
gram is fioused at the fvlorth Miami Cam- 
pus. Writers enjoy the opportunity for 
editorial experience on Gulf Stream 
magazine, the annual FlU literary 
Awards competition, ttie FlU/South 
Beach Writers Wort^shop, the Miami 
Book Fair Competition, and the Writers 
on the Bay Series, whiich has included 
residencies by such writers as Carolyn 
Forche, Louis Simpson, John Wideman, 



Elmore Leonard, James Crumley, Luis 
A. Valenzuela, Tony Hillerman, and 
Henry Taylor. Such major writers as 
James Jones and George Gan'ett iiave 
served on ttie regular faculty. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must hiave a baccalaureate 
degree, a 3.0 GPAora 1000 combined 
score on the GRE, and a minimum of 
nine semester hours of undergraduate 
woric in creative writing. However, ad- 
mission is based primarily on the 
strength of the applicant's submitted 
writing sample. 

Degree Requirements 

Forty eight semester hours are required 
in studio/academk: curriculum, with a 
minimum in each area as follows: 
Literature 15 

Writing Wori<shop 18 

Form and Theory 3 

Thesis 6 

There is no foreign language require- 
ment. Graduate wori<shops include 
short fiction, the novel, popular fiction, 
screenwriting, creative non-fiction and 
poetry. The program places emphasis 
upon ttie preparation and completion of 
a t)ook-length aeative thesis. 

Fellowships, teaching assistantships, 
arxJ tuition remission scholarships are 
available on a competitive basis. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

CRW-Creative Writing. 

CRW 5130 Advanced Fiction Woric- 
shop (5). Practice in the techniques and 
analysis of fiction through the reading, 
discussion arxJ revision of student manu- 
scripts in a woritshop setting. May be re- 
peated. Prerequisite: 9 fwurs 
undergraduate CRW coursework. 

CRW 5331 Advanced Poetry Wor1<- 
shop (5). Practice in the techniques and 
analysis of poetry through ttie reading, 
discussion and revision of student manu- 
scripts in a wori<shop setting. May be re- 
peated. Prerequisite: 9 hours 
undergraduate CRW coursework. 

CRW 5620 Advanced Screenwriting 
Wot1(shop (5). Practice in the tech- 
niques and analysis of screenwriting 
through tfie reading, discussion, and re- 
vision of student manuscripts in a wori<- 
shop setting. May be repeated. 
Prerequisite: 9 hours undergraduate 
CRW coursevrork. 

CRW 5934 Special Topics In Creative 
Writing (1-5). A course designed to give 
students an opportunity to pursue spe- 



46 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



dal studies in aspects of creative writing 
not otherwise offered. May be repeated. 

CRW 5935 Special Topics in Creative 
Writing (1-5). Gives students an oppor- 
tunity to pursue special studies in as- 
pects of creative writing not otherwise 
offered. May be repeated. Prereq- 
uisites: CRW 2001 and three hours of 
CRW on the 3000/4000 level. 

CRW 5940 Advanced Independent 
Study in Creative Writing (1-5). Devel- 
opment and completion of a graduate 
level independent project in creative writ- 
ing undertaken with the consent of the 
instnjctor. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing and instructor permission. 

CRW 6971 Creative Writing Thesis 
(3). Research and writing for the crea- 
tive writing thesis. May be repeated. Pre- 
requisite: 12 hours graduate CRW 
coursework. 

ENG 5058 Form and Theory of Con- 
temporary Literature (3). Various ap- 
proaches and theories of practice in the 
major genres of imaginative writing, in- 
cluding development and articulation of 
the creative esthetic. May t>e repeated. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



Economics 

Raul Moncarz, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Hassan Arvin-Rad, Assistant Professor 
iVIanuel J. Carvajai, Professor 
Robert Cruz, Assistant Professor 
Irma de Alonso, Associate Professor 
IMaria Dolores Espino, Assistant 

Professor 
Timothy Goodspeed, Assistant 

Professor 
Antonio Jorge, Professor of Political 

Economy 
All Cem Karayalcin, Assistant 

Professor 
Bnice Keliey, Assistant Professor 
Panagis Uossatos, Professor 
J. Kenneth Upner, Assistant Professor 
Jorge Salazar-CarrllSo, Professor and 

Director, Center for Economic 

Researcti and Education 
Carlos Sevilla, Assistant Professor 
Jong-Shin Wei, Assistant Professor 
Mira Willdns, Professor 
Maria Willumsen, Assistant Professor 

The major in economics provides tfie 
student with an understanding of eco- 
nomk: problems and institutions, and 
analytical tools to apply this knowledge 
to contemporary problems. The pro- 



gram is designed for the student desir- 
ing a career in business, government, in- 
ternational agencies, or multinational 
corporations; and for those planning 
graduate study in economics, business, 
law, public administration, uri^an stud- 
ies, or international relations. 

Master of Arts in Economics 

To be admitted into the Master's degree 
program in Economics, a student must 
meet the Universit/s graduate admis- 
sion requirements and: 

1 . Have a 'B' average (3.0) or higher 
during ti>8 last two years of undergradu- 
ate studies, or a combined score (ver- 
bal, quantitative, and analytic) of 1,500 
or higher on the tiiree-part GRE, which 
every candidate must take. (If a student 
has taken ti% Graduate Record Exami- 
nation before the new system was intro- 
duced arxJ scored 1000 or higher on the 
combined verisal and quantitative sec- 
tions, the student does not have to re- 
take tfie examination.) Foreign students 
whose native language is rwt English 
must take tfie TOEFL and obtain a 
score of 500 or higher. 

2. Receive approval of tfie depart- 
mental graduate committee. 

3. Have taken as prerequisites inter- 
mediate microeconomics, intermediate 
macroeconomfcs, statistics, and calcu- 
lus. A student who has not fulfilled all 
these prerequisites may be admitted on 
a provisional basis. Unless specifically 
exempted, tfie student must take these 
courses as required, obtaining no credit 
for tfiem in tfie program. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master's degree program will con- 
sist of 30 semester hours of course 
work, at a graduate level (course num- 
bers 5000 or above). A maximum of six 
semester hours may be transferred into 
the program subject to tfie approval of 
the graduate committee. All courses 
listed below carry 3 credits, except tfie 
thesis (6 credits). The specific require- 
ments are: 

Core Semester Hours 

ECO 7115 Microeconomic Theory I 3 
ECO 7206 Macroeconomic Theory I 3 
ECO 7424 Econometric Metfiods I 3 

Additional Requirements: (1 2-1 5 
semester hours) 

Students will be required to write a tfie- 
sis for 6 credits, (ECO 6971), or take tfie 
advanced seminar in applied economk;s 
(ECO 6939), which involves writing a re- 
search paper. 

Electtves 

(15-18 semester hours) A student must 
take at least four electives in econom- 



ics. The additional one or two courses 
required to complete tfie Master's pro- 
gram may be taken in Mathematics, In- 
ternational Studies, tfie College of 
Business Administration, the School of 
Public Affairs and Services, or in the 
other college or schools of tiie Univer- 
sity. The graduate committee must ap- 
prove courses taken outside tfie 
department. 

Graduation Requirements 

To receive tfie Master's degree in Eco- 
nomics, tfie student must complete 30 
hours of course wori< witfi a 'B' (3.0) av- 
erage or higher; must receive a least a 
'B' (3.0) in tfie core courses; and must 
receive a grade of 'C or higher in each 
course. If the student decides to write a 
tfiesis, he must receive the grade of 
'P'(pass) for ECO 6971. 

Doctor of Philosopliy in 
Economics 

The requirements for admission to the 
doctoral program in Economics are: 

1. A baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited university or college. 

2. A minimum GPAof 3.0 from the 
last two years of the undergraduate edu- 
cation or a minimum score of 1650 on 
tfie three-part GRE (which every candi- 
date must take). Foreign students 
wrtiose native language is not English 
must take the TOEFL and obtain a 
score of 550 or higher. 

3. Three letters of recommendation 
from persons in a position to judge the 
applicant's suitability for graduate study 
in economics. 

4. Approval of tfie Graduate Studies 
Committee of tfie Department of Eco- 
nomics. 

5. Approval of tfie following courses 
at tfie undergraduate level: Intermediate 
Microeconomics, Intermediate Macro- 
economics, Statistics, and Calculus. Un- 
less specifically exempted, sbjdents 
must take tfiese courses as required. 
No graduate credit will tie awarded for 
tfiese courses. Tfiese courses are pre- 
requisites for most graduate courses 
and students cannot take the latter un- 
less tfiey take tfie prerequisites, or are 
specifically exempted by tfie instructor 
of tfie course. 

The Ph.D. program is irxdependent 
of tfie existing master's program in Eco- 
nomics and students in tfiat program 
must apply for admission as Ph.D. stu- 
dents. Certain courses taken in tf>e mas- 
ter's (xogram, however, may be 
ti^nsferred and used to fulfill tfie require- 
ments of the Ph.D. program, witfi tfie ap- 
proval Of tfie Graduate Studies 
Committee. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 47 



Degree Requirements 

To obtain the Ph.D. in Economics, stu- 
dents must complete the required 
coursework and fulfill dissertation 
requirements. 

Coursework 

1 . Requirements: Students must 
complete 48 hours (16 courses) of 
graduate level coursework. Supervised 
research, independent studies, semi- 
nars, and dissertation credit do not 
count towards this objective. 

This required minimum of 16 
courses consists of eight courses in thte 
Core, six courses in three Relds of Spe- 
cialization (at least two courses per 
field, some fields may have special re- 
quirements), and two electives as ap- 
proved by the student's advisor who will 
be assigned to thte student at thie time of 
admission to ttie program. 

Core Courses 

ECO 71 1 5 Microeconomic Theory I 3 
ECO 71 16 Microeconomic Theory II 3 
ECO 7206 Maaoeconomic Theory I 3 
ECO 7207 l^tecroeconomic Theory II 3 
ECO 7405 Mathematical Methods in 

Economic Analysis 3 

ECO 7424 Econometric Methods I 3 
ECO 7425 Econometric Methods II 3 
ECO 7305 History of Economic 

Tfiought 3 

Fields of Specialization 

Advanced Economic Theory 
Economic Development 
Economics of Human Resources 
Economics of Latin America and 
the Caribbean 
International Economk;s 
Monetary Economics 
Urt>an and Regional Economics 

2. Rrst Year of Graduate Study: Stu- 
dents are required to take courses, 
wtiich must at least include tfie first six 
courses in thie core as listed above. At 
ttie end of the year, students are re- 
quired to ptass a comprehensive qualify- 
ing examination on core theory - the first 
four of tfie core courses listed above. A 
student who fauls twice will not be al- 
lowed to remain in the program. 

3. Second Year of Graduate Study: 
Students will be required to take Econo- 
metric Metfx>ds II (with research paper). 
History of Economic Thought, and com- 
plete coursework in two "major fields" of 
specieilization. Thie designation "major 
fiekl" is to indicate a chosen field in 
which students must pass field examina- 
tions by the end of the second year. In 
contrast, the term "minor field" desig- 
nates a chosen area thiat does not re- 
quire a field examination" and the 
courses of wheh do not have to be 
taken by the second year. Students who 



fail twice any of their field examinatk>ns 
will not be allowed to continue in that 
field. 

Dissertation Work 

Upon completion of fiekl examination re- 
quirements, students will be required to 
choose a specific area of doctoral re- 
search. During this phase, wNch will nor- 
mally have a total length of two years, 
the student vwll: 

a. Conduct research and complete a 
dissertation, 

b. Continue taking courses, 

c. Attend Advanced Wori^shops by 
enrolling in ECO 7925 in the dissertation 
area and present at least one paper a 
year on the work in that woH<shop. 

Students will nomially be required to 
be enrolled as full-time students at the 
University for at least a year during the 
dissertation period. Except under abnor- 
mal circumstances, the maximum num- 
ber of years during which a student may 
do dissertation wori< is five years. 

Graduation Requirements 

To graduate, students must complete all 
course requirements; fulfill workshop 
presentation requirements, pass the 
comprehensive cind field examinations, 
and complete the oral defense and ac- 
ceptarx» of the Ph.D. dissertation. 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

ECO-Economics;'ECP-Economic Prob- 
lems and Policy; ECS-Economic Sys- 
tems and Development. 

ECO 5709 The Worid Economy (3). 

Designed to give an overview of the cru- 
cial issues in the worid economy. The 
course covers trade, capital, labor, and 
technology flows; transnational eco- 
nomic organizations; current economic 
crisis; glot>al economic interdepend- 
ence; and the nature and characteristics 
of international economic order. Re- 
quired for MIB Program. 

ECO 5735 Multinational Corporations 
(3). Economk; theory and multinatwnal 
corporations. Economic effects. Conse- 
quertces of nationalization. Spread of 
the multinational form. State-owned mul- 
tinatk>nal corporations. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor for undergraduates. 

ECO 5906 Advanced Individual Study 
(3). Supervised readings, individual tuto- 
rial, and preparation of report. Requires 
consent of faculty supervisor and 
Department Chairperson. Open to sen- 
k)rs and graduate students. 



ECO 5936 Special Topics (3). A course 
designed to give students a particular 
topic or a limited number of topics not 
othenA/ise offered in the curriculum. 

ECO 5945 internship (3). Directed indi- 
vidual study wNch assists the student in 
using economic analysis in his employ- 
ment. Prerequisite: Permission of the In- 
structor. 

ECO 6936 Special Topics (3). A course 
designed to give students a particular 
topic or a limited number of topics not 
othenwise offered in the curriculum. 

ECO 6938 Individual Graduate Study 
(6-9). Supervised readings, tutorial, and 
preparation of report. Open only to 
graduate students. Requires consent of 
supervisor and approval of Department 
Chairperson. 

ECO 6939 Advanced Seminar in Ap- 
plied Economics (3). Variable-topic 
study group in application of economic 
aralysis to specific problems. Open to 
seniors and graduate students. 

ECO 6971 Thesis (6). Writing and com- 
pletion of thesis by candidate for a Mas- 
ter of Arts. Prerequisites: Student must 
be a Master's degree candidate, have 
had at least 15 hours of graduate work 
in economics; have a thesis topic ap- 
proved by the Department's Graduate 
Committee and permission from the in- 
structor. 

ECO 711 5 Microeconomic Theory I 
(3). Models of consumer and producer 
behavior, partial equilibrium analysis of 
product and factor markets, two/sector 
models of general equilibrium and wel- 
fare economics. Prerequisites: ECO 
3101 or equivEilent, Calculus I; Calculus 
II recommended. 

ECO 7116 Microeconomic Theory U 

(3). The Hicks/Samuelson and Arrow/De- 
breu models of genered equilibrium. Ac- 
tivity analysis and competitive 
equilibrium. Capital theory. Leontief/Sraf- 
fra/Marx Systems. Temporary equilib- 
rium and money. Prerequisites: ECO 
71 15 and ECO 7405. 

ECO 7118 Graduate Seminar In Eco- 
nomic Theory (3). Variable-topic gradu- 
ate study group in theoretical problems. 
Open only to students with graduate 
standing. 

ECO 7135 Growth, DIstrl button and 
Prices (3). Alternative theories of 
growth, income distribution and prices. 
Basic growth models; neoclassical capi- 
tal theory and Cambridge cx>ntroversies; 
neo/Marxian, neo/Keynesian and other 
approaches. Prerequisites: ECO 71 16, 
ECO 7207, ECO 7405. 



b^^ 



48 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



ECO 7136 Classical and Marxian Eco- 
norhic Theory (3). Classical and Marx- 
ian theories of value aind capital in a 
mathematical mode. The Transforma- 
tion Problem. Simple and expanded re- 
production. Ttie falling rate of profit and 
other Marxian crises. Prerequisites: 
ECO 7115, ECO 7206, ECO 7405, ECO 
7116. 

ECO 7206 Macroeconomic Theory I 
(3). Analysis of macroeconomic models 
of Income determination eind tfie price 
level, microeconomic foundations of 
macro-behavior, macroeconometric 
models, and basic open economy mac- 
roeconomics. Prerequisites: ECO 3203, 
ECO 4410, or equivalents; Calculus I; 
Calculus II recommended. 

ECO 7207 Macroeconomic Theory II 
(3). Alternative approaches to macroeco- 
nomic tfieory. Business cycle theories 
and theories of growth and income distri- 
bution. Prerequisites: ECO 7115, ECO 
7206, ECO 7405. 

ECO 7216 Monetary Theory and Pol- 
icy (3). Relationship of money supply 
and interest rate to economic stabiliza- 
tion. Consideration of federal reserve 
system, money market, and factors de- 
termining money supply and demand. 
Neo-Keynesian, CNcago, and radical 
policy views. 

ECO 7236 Money, Banking, and Mone- 
tary Policy (3). Monetary theory and its 
application. Consideration of central 
banking in tfie U.S. and its relation to 
ttie international economy, money mar- 
kets, arKi financial intermediaries. Sur- 
vey of current policy views. 

ECO 7305 iHlstory of Economic 
Thought (3). Exploration of the evolu- 
tion of economic thought and analysis in 
the changing sodo/historical, institu- 
tional and political setting in which it 
takes place. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

ECO 7315 Graduate Seminar In Eco- 
nomic Theory (3). Variable-topic gradu- 
ate study group in tfieoretical prot)lems. 
Open only to students with graduate 
standing. 

ECO 7405 Mathematical Methods in 
Economic Analysis (3). Applicatk>n of 
mathematical methods to economics. 
The topics and tools of mathtematical 
economics are presented in a rigorous 
fashk>n within an economic context. 
Prerequisites: Cakxilus I, ECO 3101 
and ECO 3203, or equivalents. 

ECO 7424 Econometric Methods I (3). 

Practical and tfieoretkal foundations of 
empirical economics. Knowledge in for- 
mulation, estimation, and evaluation of 



/^( 



econometric models. Prerequisites: 
ECO 4410 or equivalent; Calculus I; 
Calculus II recommended. 

ECO 7425 Econometric Methods II 
(3). A continuation of ECO 7424. Ad- 
vanced single equation estimation, esti- 
mation of distributed lags, simultaneous 
equations, time series and models of 
qualitative choice. Prerequisites: ECO 
7424 and MAS 3103 or equivalent. 

ECO 7505 Public Finance (3). Partial 
and general equilibrium analysis of tax 
incidence efficiency, public goods, pub- 
lic pricing problems, the social rate of 
discount, and non-market decision mak- 
ing. 

ECO 7617 Seminar in Economic His- 
tory (3). Topics in economic history, ex- 
ploration of the economic history 
literature on a selected theme, student 
presentations. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor for undergraduates. — >. 

CO 7705 International Trade (3). \ 

Positive and normative aspects of inter- ! 
national trade. Theories of comptarative 
advantage, commercial policy, trade and 
income distribution. Prerequisites: Ad- 
vanced Microeconomic Theory; Calcu- 
lus. 

¥eC0 7716 International Money (3). 

Theory of international monetary equilib- 
rium. Problems of international pay- 
ments and exchange rate control; their 
effect on international monetary prob- 
lems. Analysis of short and long term 
monetary flows and macroeconomic ad- 
justment. Pi-erequisites: Advanced Mac- 
\ roeconomics and Calculus. 

^O 7925 Advanced Workshop (3)."^ 

Enables students to attend advariced 
workshop presentations and to present 
tfie results of their own researcli. Prereq- 
uisite: Completion of field examination 
requirements. 

ECO 7980 Dissertation (Ph.D.) (1 -6). 
To be taken every semester for re- 
search on, and writing of Ph.D. disserta- 
tion by candidates for the Ph.D. 
Prerequisite: Completion of field exami- 
nation requirements. 

ECP 6605 Urban and Regional Analy- 
sis (3). Application of economk: analysis 
to urtian growth and tfie urisan-regional 
environment. Consideration of public 
servk:es, transportation, ghetto prob- 
lems, and urban organization. Analysis 
of environmental protection problems 
and policies. Recommended prepara- 
tion: ECO 3101, ECO 3203 and ECP 
3303. 

ECP 6705 Managerial Economics (3). 

Basic microeconomic concepts as ttiey 



apply to decision making within the 
organization; supply and demand; mar- 
ket structure and mari<et behavior in 
specific industries. Prerequisites: ECO 
3021 and ECO 3011. 

ECP 6715 Macroeconomic Forecast- 
ing for Management (3). Bask: macro- 
economics concepts as ttiey apply to 
decision making within tfie firm. Tradi- 
tional models of income determination 
and forecasting analysis. Prerequisite: 
ECP 6705. 

ECP 7035 Cost%enefit Analysis (3). 

This course covers benefit-cost analy- 
sis, cost-effectiveness analysis, Ijenefit- 
risk analysis, risk-risk analysis, and 
systems analysis. All of these tech- 
niques are designed to provide guid- 
ance to decision makers, particularly in 
tfie government sector. Prerequisite: 
ECO 3101. 

ECP 7205 Labor and hiuman Re- 
sources (3). Empirical and theoretical 
analysis of tfie factors determining em- 
ployment and earnings, recent develop- 
ments in tfie tfieory of labor supply, 
critiques of neoclassical tfieory, and cur- 
rent issues in public policy. Prerequisite: 
Calculus. 

ECP 7405 Industrial Organization (3). 

The organization of tfie industrial econ- 
omy with particular emphasis as to the 
type of competition, the bases of monop- 
oly power and the extent of monopoly 
power. Prerequisites: Advanced Micro 
and Cetlculus. 

ECP 7606 Urban and Regional Eco- 
nomics (3). The economics of urtsaniza- 
tion processes, internal organization of 
cities, and regional settlement Spatial 
grovirth models and spatial development 
planning. Prerequisites: ECO 7115, 
ECO 5205, ECS 4013 or equivalent; 
and ECO 6636. 

ECP 7636 Location Theory (3). Sys- 
tematic exposition of urt>an arxJ indus- 
trial location tfieory. Spatial price tfieory 
and spatial competition. Prerequisites: 
ECO 3101 or equivalent; Calculus I; Cal- 
culus II and ECO 7115 recommended. 

ECS 5005 Comparative Economic 
Systems (3). A critical evaluation of tfie 
design, goals, and achievements of eco- 
nomic policies in capitalist and socialist 
economies. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor for undergraduates. 

ECS 5025 Economic Planning (3). 

Analysis of planning methods in capital- 
ist and socialist economies. Evaluation 
of macro and micro economk: planning 
tools (input-output) and programming 
techniques. Tfieory and practice of eco- 
nomic development planning of agricul- 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 49 



ture, industrialization, foreign trade, and 
manpower. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the instructor. 

ECS 6436 The Economics of Carib- 
bean Migration (3). The course exam- 
Irws the economic causes and 
consequences of Cariblsean immigra- 
tion to tiie United States. Special em- 
phasis on the effects of Carifcibean 
migration on tlie United States economy. 

ECS 7015 Development Economics: 
Theory (3). Analytical approaches to 
economic development. Analysis of 
macro models, specific resources and 
sectors, and trade and income distribu- 
tional problems in relation to developing 
countries. Prerequisites: ECO 71 15 and 
ECO 7116 or equivalents. 

ECS 7026 Development Economics: 
Planning and Policy (3). Planning and 
policy making in developing economies. 
Economy/wide planning models; project 
appraisal; financial, stabilization and 
trade policies. Prerequisites: EGO 71 15, 
ECO 71 16, ECO 5025, and ECO 7405. 

ECS 7405 Economics of Latin Amer- 
ica (3). Dependence, population explo- 
sion, urban migration, agricultural 
reform, industrialization and import sub- 
stitution, common markets. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor for undergradu- 
ates. 

ECS 7435 Economics of the Carib- 
liean (3). Macroecorramic assessment; 
income distribution, emptoyment and mi- 
gration; industrial and agricultural devel- 
opment; international ti'ade, 
multinational and integration attempts. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

ECS 7445 Economics of Central 
America (3). Recent economic events 
in region dealing witin institutional back- 
ground and structure of current eco- 
nomy activities. Special emphasis on 
problems of growth, social transforma- 
tion and economic integration. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Instiuctor. 



English 

Ashar Z. Mllbauer, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson 
Harry T. Antrim, Professor 
St George Tucker Arnold, Associate 

Professor 
Lynne Barrett, Associate Professor 
Lynn M. Berk, Assodate Professor 
GIsela Casinos, Assistant Professor 



Maneck Daruwala, Assodate Professor 
John Dufresne, Assistant Professor 
Richard A. Dwyer, Professor 
Charles Elkins, Professor and Vice 

Provost 
Mary Jane Elkins, Assodate Professor 
Peggy Endel, Associate Professor 
John Ernest, Assistant Professor 
Mary Free, Assodate Professor 
Virginia Gathercole, Associate 

Professor 
Peter Hargatai, instructor 
Jeffrey Knapp, Instructor 
James Hall, Professor 
Tometro Hopkins, instructor 
Kenneth Johnson, Associate Professor 
Kathleen McCormack, Assodate 

Professor 
Carmeia Pinto Mcintire, Assodate 

Professor 
Sheila Post-Lauria, Assistant Professor 
Robert Ratner, Instructor 
Merl-Jane Rochelson, Asdstant 

Professor 
Richard Schwartz, Associate Professor 
Ronn Sllverstein, Instructor 
Blen Sprechman, Lecturer 
Lester Standiford, Professor 
Richard Sugg, Professor 
Donald Watson, Professor 
Butler H. Waugh, Professor 
Rot>ert Weinberger, Instructor 
Barbara Weitz, Instructor 
C. Kemp Williams, Assistant Professor 
Mehmet Yavas, Assodate Professor 

The English Department offers two 
graduate degree programs: Creative 
Writing and Linguistics. See the descrip- 
tion of tfie programs and tiieir graduate 
course offerings under Creative Writing 
and Linguistics. 

Below is a list of graduate courses of- 
fered by the English Department. 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

AML - American Literahjre; CRW-Crea- 
tive Writing; ENG-English-General; ENL- 
English Literature; LIN - Linguistics; 
LIT-Literature. 

AML 5305 Major American Literary 
Rgures (3). Each section will consider 
the lifework of several autfxjrs such as 
Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Twain, 
James, Faulkner, Mailer, Wright, BaW- 
win. May be repeated. 

AML 5505 Periods In American Litera- 
ture (3). The literature and criticism re- 
garding one specified period of 
American Literature, such as Colonial, 
Federal, Transcendental, Antebellum, 



and Twentieth Century. May be re- 
peated witin change of period. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

ENG 5009 Literary Criticism and 
Scholarship (3). Techniques and goals 
of humanistic research, bibliography, 
and critical commentary. 

ENG 5018 Practical Criticism (3). Ap- 
plies various critical theories - e.g. \he 
formalistic, historical, shuctural, arche- 
typal, sociological, etc. - to specific liter- 
ary productk^ns. 

ENG 5058 Form and Theory of Con- 
temporary Literature (3). Various ap- 
proaches and ttieories of practice in the 
major genres of imaginative writing, in- 
cluding development and articulation of 
the creative esthietic. May be repeated. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

ENG 5907 independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned read- 
ings, reports on independent investiga- 
tions, with the consent of tiie Chair- 
person. 

ENG 6909 Independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned read- 
ings, reports on independent investiga- 
tions, with the consent of the Chair- 
person. 

ENL 5220 Major British Uterary Fig- 
ures (3). Each section will consider the 
lifework of an author such as Chaucer, 
Spenser, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, 
Dickens, Browning, Joyce, or others. 
May be repeated. 

ENL 5505 Periods In English Utera- 
ture (3). The literature and criticism re- 
garding one specified period of English 
Literature, such as Medieval, Renais- 
sance, Victorian, Twentietti Century, and 
Contemporary. May be repeated with 
cfiange of period. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instixictor. 

LIT 5363 Literary Movements (3). Indi- 
vidual sections will stijdy the auti^ors, 
worths, and audiences involved in such 
phenomena as Humanism, Mannerism, 
Romanticism, Symbolism, the Hariem 
Renaissance, and otfiers. May be re- 
peated. 

LIT 5934 Special Topics (3). A course 
designed to give groups of students an 
opportunity to pursue special stijdies 
not othenwise offered. May be repeated. 

UT 6934 Special Topics (3). A course 
designed to give groups of students an 
opportunity to pursue special studies 
not otiienwise offered. May be repeated. 



50 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Geology 

Rorentin Maurrasse, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Bradford Clement, Assistant Professor 
Charles ConiKM-, Assistant Professor 
Grenville Draper, Professor 
Rosemary Hickey-Vargas, Assistant 

Professor 
Claudia Owen, Lecturer 
Gautam Sen, Associate Professor 
Edward Robinson, Visiting Lecturer 

The Geology Program is designed to 
prepare students for careers In re- . 
Search, teaching, and other governmen- 
tal or private agencies. The main 
objectives of the Department Is to con- 
tribute to the search for a better under- 
standing of local geological problems, 
focusing especially on those related to 
ground water supply; and to conduct re- 
search on the geology of the Caribbean 
region. Well-equipped laboratories ex- 
pose students to the major techniques 
of the sciences. The program offers 
both a rigorous B.S. degree In Geology 
and a broader-based interdisciplinary 
B.A. in Geology. Grades of 'D' will not 
be accepted for required courses in 
eittier program option. 

Master of Science in Geology 

Admission 

To be admitted to the Master's degree 
program in Geology, a student must 
meet the following minimum require- 
ments: 

1 . Satisfactorily meet \he Universit/s 
general requirements for admission. 

2. Hold a Bachetor's degree, or 
equivalent In a relevant discipline of Sci- 
ences or Mathematics. A maximum of 4- 
credit hours of advanced undergraduate 
course wori< will be allowed to count to- 
ward the Master's degree. 

Students entering with a Badielor's 
degree in ciiemlstry wliose graduate 
work will be mainly in geochemistry/pe- 
trology, or students entering with a 
Bachelor's degree in Physics or Mathe- 
matics whose graduate wori< will be 
malr>ly in geophysics should take ad- 
vanced test (GRE) In the field of under- 
graduate specialization. 

3. Have a grade point average 
(GPA) of 3.0 or Ngher (or equivalent) 
during the last tvw years of undergradu- 
ate program, and a minimum score of 
1000 In tine Graduate Record Examina- 
tion. 

4. Submit at least tiree letters of rec- 
ommendation, preferably from persons 
in the academic community wfiia are in a 
position to comment on \he applicant's 
potential for graduate work. 



5. Students whose native language 
Is other tfian English must demonstrate 
adequate level of proficiency in English 
as a foreign language. An equivalent 
score of 500 on tfie TOEFL (Test of Eng- 
lish as a Foreign Language), of the Edu- 
cational Testing Service is required. 
Foreign students who have not met this 
requirement may be conditionally admit- 
ted and allowed to enroll in an intensive 
English Program prior to beginning 
course wori< in Geology. Satisfactory 
English proficiency must be demon- 
strated within tiie first year of study. 

Application Procedures 

Admission decisions to the Program will 
be made by the Department's Graduate 
Admission Committee. 

To hie considered for admission appli- 
cants must submit the following docu- 
ments prior to tile term In which they are 
seeking admission: 

1. FlU Graduate Application Form. 

2. Certified tianscripts of all college 
level wori<. When applicable, a certified 
English ti-anslation must accompany the 
original. 

3. Graduate Record Examination 
scores taken within the previous tvw 
years. 

4. Scores of English Proficiency, 
wften applicable. 

5. Curriculum vltae or resume witfi 
pertinent information regarding appli- 
cant's previous experience and aciiieve- 
ments. 

6. A statement of Intent, including a 
brief discussion (not to exceed 2000 
words, including space) of educational 
goals and career projections. Applicant 
may also Indude a copy of previous writ- 
ten scientific work. 

7. Three letters of recommendation 
from former professors or academic ad- 
visors. Applicants must also comply with 
deadlines set by the University for con- 
sideration for admission in tfie upcom- 
ing semester. 

Degree Requirements 

Program of Study 

Introductory meetings with faculty mem- 
bers of the department are arranged for 
all Incoming graduate students and a 
program of stijdy Is planned as eariy as 
possible after discussion with the chair- 
person of tiie Graduate Admission Com- 
mittee. 

Required Courses 

A minimum of 28 credits within the 

Department, Including: 

GLY 5931 GLY 6931 Graduate 

Seminars 2 



GLY 5286 Research Instrumentation 
and Techniques in 
Geobgy 4 

Courses in field of spedaiization 16 

GLY 6971 Thesis 12 

Electives 8 

Courses in the field of concentratbn 
and electives are chosen by the student 
In consultation with an advisor. All such 
courses are selected to fit tfie student's 
particular professional goals. 

Foreign Language Competency 

All students are required to have a read- 
ing knowledge of a modern foreign lan- 
guage. Competency will be determined 
by an examination which will consist of 
a dear translation into English of a tech- 
nical paper from French, Spanish, Ger- 
man or Russian. Courses taken to gain 
such profidency will not be counted to- 
ward graduation. As an alternative, stu- 
dents may substitute 6 credits of 
Computer Sdence or Mathematics be- 
yond Calculus II. 

Relds of Concentration 

Petrology - Geochemistry 

Reld, analytical and experimental re- 
search In petrology/geochemistry of Ig- 
neous rocks. Application of phase 
equilibria, and major element trace ele- 
ment and Isotope systematlcs to tiie in- 
terpretation of the origin and chemical 
evolution of tiie upper mantle and mag- 
mas. Stijdy areas Indude Hawaii, Chile, 
the Caribbean islands, tiie Bonln-Mari- 
ana arc-basin system and India. 

Paleontology 

Biostratigraphic analyses of major fossil 
groups and their application to universal 
problems of earth history as can be ex- 
emplified in Florida, tfie Caribbean and 
Soutii America. Analyses of general 
protJems of animal extinction, paleoecol- 
ogy of specific groups, evolution, and 
computer programs in paleontology. 
The department's Caribbiean Geological 
Collection indudes the most comprehen- 
sive stratigraphic sections of the region 
to canry our stratigraphic analyses. 

Stratigraphy • Sedimentation 

Research on lltlx>stnatigraphy and fades 
analysis of sedimentary rocks of South 
Florida and the dncum Cariblaean re- 
gion. Tectonic evolution and paleoecol- 
ogy of sedimentary Isasins of ttiese 
regions and tiieir relationships to global 
and regional tectonk; processes. Hydro- 
cartxsn assessment of potential source 
of rocks. 

Structural Geology - Tectonics 

Analysis of geologic deformation as it oc- 
curs from the microscopk: to the re- 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / SI 



gional scale, based on the principles of 
continuum mechanics and rock rtieol- 
ogy. Geometry and dynamics of major 
types of stmctures. Structural analysis 
and tectonic synttiesis. Field oriented in- 
vestigations in the circum Caribbean 
region. 

Geophysics 

Application of geophysical metfxjds to 
ttie investigation of current problems in 
the Earth Sciences. Lil«ely thesis topics 
include: analysis of regional gravity, 
aeromagnetic and related potentiail field 
data from Mexico and tlie circum Carib- 
bean, paleomagnetic stratigraphy and 
plate reconstmction, geophysical vol- 
canology. Coursework will cover topics 
In geophysical principles, field methods 
and data analysis. 

Regional Geology 

Tailored to student's professional needs 
including options in Environmental Geol- 
ogy, Hydrogeology and General Geol- 
ogy. Such options are multidisciplinary 
in nature and will involve courses from 
other science departments and engi- 
neering. 

Graduation Requirements 

1 . A minimum GPA of 3.0 in all 
course wori< required for the 36 credits 
toward tlie master's degree. 

2. Satisfactory performance on quali- 
fying examinations on general geologic 
skills and field of subspecialization. FeuI- 
ure to pass this examination will termi- 
nate the student's admission in the 
progreun. 

3. Completbn and successful de- 
fense of a thesis. Members of the The- 
sis committee will t>e jointly determined 
tiy the students advisor and the Gradu- 
ate Admission Committee. 

Participation in Instructional 
Activities 

All students in tfw program are required 
to participate in instmctional aspects of 
the Department as teaching assistants. 
Specific assignments may include super- 
vision of laboratories, assistance on 
field trips, or curatorial duties. 



^ Course Descriptions 

Note: Laboratories may not be taken 
prior to the con^esponding lecture 
course. Laboratories must be taken con- 
cuaendy where noted, but students 
must register for the laboratory sepa- 
rately. 

Dsfinitlon of Prefixes 

EVS-Environmental Science; GEO-Ge- 
ography/Systematk:; GLY -Geology; 
MET-M<Bteorology; OCE-Oceanography; 



OCG-Oceanography-Geological; OCP- 
Ocecinography/Physical. 

GLY 5021 Eartti Sciences for Teach- 
ers (3). Study of geological materials 
and processes, as covered in Physical 
Geology, but at a higher level and with 
additional assignments. Prerequisite: 
Penmission of instructor. Corequisite: 
GLY 5021 L 

GLY 5021 L Earth Sciences for Teach- 
ers Lal>oratory (1). Study of tfie proper- 
ties of minereils arid rocks; interpretation 
of topographic and geologic maps; 
study of the geology of Rorida, includ- 
ing field trips. Prerequisite: Pennission 
of instructor. Corequisite: GLY 5021 . 

GLY 5158 Florida Geology (4). De- 
tailed lithostratigraphic arxl biostratig- 
rctphic analyses of Southeast Rorida 
and tfieir relationship to tectonics, paleo- 
dimates. Prerequisite: GLY 5695 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

GLY 5246 Geochemistry (3). 
GLY 5246L Geochemistry Lab (1). Ori- 
gin of chemical elements and principles 
affecting their distribution in tfie solar 
system, solid earth and hydrosphere. 
Use of chemical data to solve geologic 
problems. Prerequisites: Physical Geol- 
ogy and General Chemistry 

GLY 5286 Research Instrumentation 
and Techniques in Geology (3). Sur- 
vey of techniques and instrumentation 
used in geological research, including 
computing and data handling. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or pennission 
of instructor. Corequisite: GLY 5286L. 

GLY 5286L Research Instrumentatton 
and Techniques in Geology Lab (1). 

Introductbn to advarv^ instrumenta- 
tion and analytical techniques in Geol- 
ogy, including computing and data 
processing. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 
Corequisite: GLY 5286. 

GLY 5298 Topics in Geochemistry (3). 

Seminar covering current research in se- 
lected areas of low-temperature geo- 
chemistry: oceans and oceanic 
sediments; continental waters and sedi- 
ments; hydrothermal systems. Prequi- 
site: GLY 4555 or permission of 
instructor. 

GLY 5322 Igneous Petrology and Geo- 
chemistry (3). Presentation and discus- 
sion of current topics in igneous 
petrology and geochemistry in a semi- 
r»r format. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Instructor. 

a.y 5335 Metamorphic Geology (3). 

Metamorphic mineralogy; characteristics 
of low, medium and high pressure meta- 



morphic rocks; pressure-temperature de- 
terminations; metamorphic textures; 
modeling and detennlnation of P-T-t 
paths. 

GLY 5335L Metamorphic Geology Lab 
(1). Metamorphic mineralogy; charac- 
teristics of low, medium and high pres- 
sure metamorphk: rocks; 
pressure-temperature determinations; 
metamorphic textures; modeling and de- 
termination of P-T-t paths. 

GLY 5346 Sedimentary Petrology (3). 

Systematic study of sedimentary rocks. 
Special emphasis on geneticai aspects, 
geochemistry, paleontology, mineralogy, 
and microfades. Emphasizes micro- 
scopic study. Prerequisite: GLY 4555. 
Corequisite: GLY 5346L. 

GLY 5346L Sedlmentery Petrology 
Lab (1). Laboratory studies of sedi- 
ments and sedimentary rocks with em- 
phasis on microscopic analyses and 
geochemical techniques. Prerequisite: 
GLY 4555 and GLY 4555L. Corequisite: 
GLY 5346. 

GLY 5408 Advanced Stnjctural Geol- 
ogy (3). Advanced treatment of the the- 
ory of rock mechanics to solve problems 
solve natural rock deformation. Prereq- 
uisites: GLY 4400, MAC 3413, or permis- 
sion of instructor. Corequisite: GLY 
5408L 

GLY 5408L Advanced Structural Geol- 
ogy Lab (1). Problem solving in tfieory 
of rock defomiation. Experimental proce- 
dures in rock mecfianics. Corequisite: 
GLY 5408. 

GLY 5425 Tectonics (3). Properties of 
the litfx>sphere; plate kinematics and 
continental drift; characteristics of plate 
boundaries; mountain belts; formation of 
sedimentary basins. Prerequisites: GLV 
1010, 1100, 4400, 4310, 3200 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

GLY 5446 Topics in Structural Geol- 
ogy and Tectonics (3). Selected ad- 
vanced topics in structural geology and 
rock deformation. Latest advances in 
cfustal tectonics. Prerequisite: GLY 
5408. 

GLY 5455 Physical Volcanology (3). 
Description of vok^arwes and their prod- 
ucts, ^ophysical and tectonk; con- 
straints on volcanic processes, and 
modeling and forecasting of voteanic 
eruptions. Prerequisite: GLY 4450, GLY 
4310 or permission of instructor. 

GLY 5457 Analysis of Geophysical 
Data (3). Reduction arxl interpretation 
of geophysical data, induding time se- 
ries analysis, continuation of potential 
fields. Three-dimensional modeling of 



52 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



gravity, magnetic data, integrated geo- 
physical surveys. Prerequisites: GLY 
4450, PHY 3048, PHY 3049, MAC 
3311, MAC 331 2, MAP 3302. Corequi- 
site:GLY5457L. 

GLY 5457L Analysis of Geophysical 
Data Lab (1). Field and laboratory appli- 
cations of geophysical techniques. Com- 
puter aided analysis and three- 
dimensional modeling of gravity and 
magnetic data. Prerequisites: GLY 
4450, PHY 3048, PHY 3049, MAC 
3311, MAC 3312, MAP 3302. Corequi- 
site: GLY 5457. 

GLY 5495 Seminar in Geophysics (2). 

Detailed investigation of current geo- 
physical techniques, including topics on 
instrument design. Prerequisite: GLY 
5457 or permission of instructor. 

GLY 5546 Topics in Stratigraphy (3). 

Discussion of research projects and/or 
current literature in stratigraphic correla- 
tion as derived from sedimentologic prin- 
ciples and biozonation. Prerequisite: 
GLY 5346. 

GLY 5608 Advanced Paleontology i 
(3). Discussion of current literature and 
research projects on evolution, system- 
atics functional morphology, with reports 
by members of tfie seminar. Prereq- 
uisites: GLY 4650, GLY 5609, or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

GLY 5621 Caribbean Stratigraphic Mi- 
cropaleontology (3). Survey of the stra- 
tigraphy of biostratigraphic type-sections 
described in the Caribbean area. Deep- 
sea stratigraphy from both piston-cores 
and Deep-Sea Drilling Project samples. 
Emphasis is placed on planktonic fo- 
raminifera and radiolaria species used 
as index-species in thie equatorial-tropi- 
cal tMozonation typified in Cretaceous 
and Cenozoic Caribbean sediments. Pa- 
leot>iogeographic and paleoecologic 
considerations. Considerable time will 
be devoted to the study and identifica- 
tion of specimens under tfie micro- 
scope. Prerequisite: GLY 4650 or 
permission of instructor. 

GLY 5785 Caribbean Shaiiow-Marine 
Environments (3). Four-week field 
study of multiple tropical environments 
as illustrated in tfie Caribbean. Physico- 
chemical processes in nearshore arena- 
ceous, argillaceous and calcareous 
environments. Coral reef morphology, 
ecology and distributk>n patterns. Dy- 
namical processes acting on nearshore 
environments, and tiieir effects on reef 
growth and distribution. Reef bioero- 
sion. Coastal evolution in response to 
natural processes. On-site study of 
some similar emerged environments in 
the Caribbean islands. Economic impor- 



tarx^ of tropiced shallow-marine environ- 
ments in worid fuel resources. Course in- 
cludes extensive field wori^ both on land 
and underwater, and an individual field 
research project. Qualifications: Open to 
advanced undergraduate and graduate 
students in the eartii and biological sci- 
ences or cognate fields. 

GLY 5826 Hydrogeoiogic Modeling 
(3). Inti'oduction to the techniques used 
in modeling groundwater flow and sol- 
ute transport in geologic systems and 
their application in regional studies. Pre- 
requisites: GLY 5827, MAP 3302, or per- 
mission of insbxictor. 

GLY 5827 Hydrogeology (3). Recharge 
and discharge of groundwater, geologic 
controls on groundwater occurrence, 
movement and water chemistry. Prereq- 
uisite: Physical Geology, Chemistry, or 
permission of insbxictor. 

GLY 5931 Graduate Seminar (1). Pres- 
entation or critical examination of cur- 
rent research problems in geology. A 
selection of topics is considered each 
term. Topics may also include individual 
research in tiie student's field of investi- 
gation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or permission of instixjctor. 

GLY 6159 Stratigraphy of the Circum 
Caribbean Region (4). Detailed litfios- 
tratigraphic and biostratigraphic analy- 
ses of Caribbean islands, Central 
America, northern Soutii America and 
Caribbean basin. Prerequisite: GLY 
5621 or permission of instructor. 

GLY 6247 Trace Element and Isotope 
Geochemistry (3). Principles of b-ace 
element and isotope fractionation and 
radioactive decay, and ttieir application 
to the interpretation of igneous rocks 
and the chemical evolution of tfie eetrth. 
Prerequisite: GLY 5246 or permission of 
instructor. Corequisite: GLY 6247L. 

GLY 6247L Trace Element and iso- 
tope Geochemistry Lab. (1). Analysis 
of trace elements in rocks eind minerals; 
use of trace element and isotopk: data 
in solving geologic problems. Prereq- 
uisite: GLY 5246 or pemiission of instruc- 
tor. 

GLY 6328 Advanced igneous Petrol- 
ogy (3). Interpretation of igneous rocks; 
chemistry and physics of magma gen- 
eration and crystallization; origin of ma- 
jor igneous rock series with emphasis 
on tectonic controls. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of insbuctor. Corequisite: GLY 
6328L. 

GLY 6328L Advanced igneous Petrol- 
ogy Lab (1). Identification of rocks us- 
ing microscopic and microprobe 



techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of 
insbuctor. Corequisite: GLY 6328. 

GLY 6392 Topics in Igneous Petrol- 
ogy and Geochemistry (3). Research 
seminar in contemporary pebology and 
geochemistry. Student presentation on 
tiiesis research. Prerequisite: GLY 5322 
or permission of instructor. 

GLY 6417 Caribbean Structural Geol- 
ogy and Tectonics (4). Students will be 
assigned areas and/or topics tq make 
presentation of. Tfiese will be intro- 
duced and supplemented by lecture ma- 
terial. Prerequisite: GLY 5408 

GLY 6447 Advanced Topics in Struc- 
tural Geology and Tectonics (3). De- 
tailed exploration of selected research 
topics in structural geology and tecton- 
ics. Prerequisites: GLY 5446 or permis- 
sion of insbxictor. 

GLY 6468 Paleomagnetism (3). Phys- 
ics of rock and mineral magnetism, geo- 
magnetism and paleomagnetism; field 
£uxJ laboratory metfiods, geomagnetic 
field behavior, magnetosttatigraphy, ap- 
parent polar wander. Prerequisite: GLY 
4400, GLY 3200 or permission of insfruc- 
tor. Corerequisite: GLY 6468L. 

GLY 6468L Paleomagnetism Lat>ora- 
tory (1). Physics of rock and minerals 
magnetism, geomagnetism and paleo- 
magnetism; field £tnd laboratory meth- 
ods, geomagnetic field behavior, 
magneostratigraphy, apparent p>olar 
wander. Prequisite: GLY 4400, GLY 
3200 or pennission of insfructor. Core- 
quisite: GLY 6468 

GLY 6485 Physics of the Earth (3). 

Properties and dynamics of tiie Earth's 
interior studied from a physical perspec- 
tive. Topics include heat flow, fluid flow, 
earthquake seismology. Prerequisites: 
GLY 4450 and MAC 3313. 

GLY 6496 Advanced Topics in Geo- 
physics (3). Discussion of research pro- 
jects and current literature in geo- 
physics. Prerequisite: GLY 5495. 

GLY 6595 Topics in Sedimentoiogy 
(3). Oral presentation by students of re- 
search projects and survey of relevant 
literature with reports by members of 
(he seminar. Prerequisite: GLY 5546. 

GLY 6626 Stratigraphic MIcropaleon- 
tology: Foraminifera (3). Nomencla- 
ture, taxonomy, and biostratigraphy of 
Cretaceous and Cenozoic planktonic fo- 
raminifera. Studies of stratigraphicaily 
important teixa from Caribbean land sec- 
tions, piston cores, and DSDP/ODP 
sites. Prerequisites: GLY 5621 or per- 
mission of insbxictor. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 53 



GLY 6627 Stratlgraphic Mlcropaleon- 
tology: Radlolaria (3). Nomenclature, 
taxonomy and biostratigraphy of Creta- 
ceous and Cenozolc radiolaria. Studies 
of stratigrapfiicaily important taxa using 
Caribbean land sections, piston cores, 
and DSDP/ODP sites. Prerequisites: 
GLY 5621 or permission of instructor. 

GLY 6628 Stratlgraphic Mlcropaleon- 
tology: Calcareous Nannofosslls (3). 
Nomerxjiature, taxonomy, and biostratig- 
raphy of Triassic to Recent nannofos- 
sils. Intensive training of identification of 
mari<er taxa using land and DSDP/ODP 
sites. Prerequisites: GLY 5621 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

GLY 6690 Topics In Paleontology (3). 

Oral presentation and discussion of cur- 
rent research projects and relevant lit- 
erature, with reports by members of the 
seminar. Prerequisite: GLY 5608 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

GLY 6931 Advanced Graduate Semi- 
nar (1). Oral presentation and discus- 
sion by students of an assigned 
literature survey, with reports by mem- 
bers of the seminar. Prerequisite: GLY 
5931 or permission of the Instructor. 

GLY 6966 Master's Comprehensive 
Examination (0). Oral and written ex- 
aminations on knowledge in general ge- 
ology and the student's field of 
concentration. Scliedule to be selected 
in consultation with the Graduate Com- 
mittee. Prerequisite: Advanced graduate 
standing. 

GLY 6971 Master's Thesis (1-12). 

Field and/or laboratory research project 
toward ttiesis. Selected in consultation 
with major professor. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of major professor. 

OCG 6105 Advanced Marine Geology 
(3). 

OCG 610SL Advanced Marine Geol- 
ogy Lab (1). Application of geophysical 
and geological data to the interpretation 
of the earth's crust under the oceans, in- 
cluding tfie data provided by the Deep- 
Sea Drilling Project, dredging, pistorv 
coring, gravity magnetism, and seismidly. 
Special emphasis will be gpven to the 
genesis and evolution of the Atlantic and 
Caribbean margins, and their potential for 
oil resources. PrerequisitB: GLY4730 or 
permission of insk^uctor. 

OCG 6280 Marine Sedimentary Petrol- 
ogy (3). 

OCG 6280L Marine Sedimentary Pe- 
trology Lab (1). Analysis of the gene- 
sis, distribution pattern, physical and 
chemical properties of marine sedimen- 
tary fades, with emphasis on deep-sea 
sediments. Topics include deep-sea di- 



ager«t°ic and lithification processes, 
their geochemical relationship in time 
and space. Prerequisite: GL'Y' 4555 or 
permission of instructor. 

OCG 6664 Paleoceanography (3). 

Mesozoic/Cenozoic development of thte 
major ocean t>asins, their circulation and 
sedimentation history. Use of micropale- 
ontologic and stable isotopic techniques 
in paleoceanographic analysis. Prereq- 
uisite: GLY 4730 or permission of insHuctor. 



History 

Mark D. Szuchman, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Daniel Cohen, Assistant Professor 
John D. French, Assistant Professor 
Howard Kaminsky, Professor Emeritus 
Eric J. Leed, Associate Professor 
Alex Uchtenstein, Assistant Professor 
Felice LHshllz, Assistant Professor 
Brian Peterson, Associate Professor 
Joyce S. Peterson, Associate Professor 
Gerald Poyo, Assistant Professor 
Darden Asbury Pyron, Associate 

Professor 
Howard B. Rock, Professor 
Warren T. Treadgold, Associate 

Professor 

Master of Arts in History 

The Department of History offers the 
M.A. degree, with concentration in one 
of the three culture areas: United States 
History, European History and Latin 
American History. Students will chose to 
follow either a thesis or a report track, in 
consultation with Vne Department's 
Graduate Advisor. Students must make 
their selection either prior to registering 
for ttieir first Research Seminar or be- 
fore completing the first twelve (12) se- 
mester-liours toward the degree, 
whichever comes first. The degree re- 
quirements for the M.A. vary somewhat, 
according to the option taken. 

Entranca Requirements 

Requirements for admission into the 
M.A. degree program in History are tfie 
same regardless of the option selected. 
Applk^nts must also satisfy wfiatever 
additional requirements the University 
sets for admission to graduate work. Ap- 
plications should include transcripts 
from any postsecondary institutions at- 
tended, GRE scores, and two (2) letters 
of recommendation. 



Applicants seeking entrance for the 
Fall Term should prepare all application 
materials in time for the Department of 
History to receive tfiem no later than 
February 1 5. Applicants will be notified 
of the Department's decisbn regarding 
their application no later than March 15. 

Application materials from individu- 
als seeking entrance for the Spring 
Term must be received by the Depsirt- 
ment of History no later than Octolser 
15. Applicants will be notified of the De- 
partment's decision no later than No- 
vember 15. 

1 . Applicants to the M.A. degree pro- 
gram in History must have an under- 
graduate average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) 
or score 1000 or tsetter In the Graduate 
Record Examination. The GRE must be 
taken within three years prior to tfie ap- 
plication. 

2. Two letters of recommendation. 
Applicants should ensure that each let- 
ter on their behalf is signed by the 
author along the sealed flap of the enve- 
lope. Letters should be mailed directly 
to the Graduate Advisor, Department of 
History. 

3. Applicants must have completed 
12 semester-hours of credit (on the ba- 
sis of 3-hour courses) in the undergradu- 
ate courses in History. 

Any applicant with fewer than twelve 
(1 2) semester-hours of undergraduate 
courses in History may be accepted pro- 
visionally and take a maximum of nine 
(9) semester-hour credits by registering 
for courses under the category of "Spe- 
cial Student" (consult ttie University 
Catalog and the Office of Admissions). 
After completing nine semester-hiours of 
undergraduate course wori^ in History 
wnth no grade lower than a 'B' (3.0), the 
student may apply for regular admis- 
sion. The application will be reviewed by 
the Department's Graduate Advisor, in 
consultation with tfie Department's fac- 
ulty. 

Degree Requirements 

Thesis Option 

1. A minimum of 30 semester-hours 
for ttie degree, including a maximum of 
six semester-hours of Thesis Research. 
All coursework must be taken at FlU. 

2. A minimum of 24 semester-hours 
of coursework. 

3. A minimum of one Research Semi- 
nar (3 semester-fiours). 

4. Reading competence in a foreign 
language. Language competency is as- 
sessed in cooperation with tfie Depart- 
ment of Modem Languages. Courses 
required to meet ttie language compe- 
tency requirement do not count toward 
ttie degree. The Latin American concen- 
tration requires proficiency in Spanish or 



54 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Portuguese; the European concentra- 
tion in Spanish, French or German; tfie 
United States concentration in any of 
the above. 

5. The following limits are placed in 
accumulating credits toward the M.A. de- 
gree: 

a. ^k) more than three semester- 
hours of HIS 5908 (Independent Study). 

b. Students must receive the grade 
of 'B' (3.0) or better for any course to 
count toward the degree. 

c. A maximum of six semester-hours 
of HIS 5930 (Special Topics). 

6. All students are required to take 
HIS 6128 (Historical Methods). 

7. Core Area. Students will select 
one core area for concentration in 
United States History, European History, 
or Latin American History, in consult- 
ation with the Graduate Advisor. Twelve 
semester-hours of course work will be 
taken within the core area. 

8. Breadth Areas. Students will take 
six semester-hours in breadth areas. 
These may be courses taken within the 
Department of History tfiat are outside 
the culture area of concentration, or in 
associated disciplines outside of the 
Department (writh the approval of the 
Graduate Advisor), or a combination of 
the two. 

9. Students will register for up to six 
semester-hours of HIS 6970 (Thesis Re- 
search). 

10. The thesis must be successfully 
defended and formally approved by a 
Supervisory Committee composed of 
three members of the Department of 
History. The Supervisory Committee is 
convened and headed by the thesis su- 
pervisor. In cases of cross-disciplinary 
research, an external reader from a dif- 
ferent department may form part of the 
Supervisory Committee, substituting for 
one member from the Department of 
History. 

11 . The degree candidate will pre- 
pare the thesis in accordance to the 
regulations stipulated in the University's 
Graduate Policies Manual. The degree 
will be conferred after the approval of 
ttie final version of the thesis by the Of- 
fice of the Dean of tfie College of Arts 
and Sciences. 

Report Option 

1 . A total of 30 semester-hours of 
course work are needed for tfie M.A. de- 
gree. The report option does not set re- 
quirements of the Core/Breadth area 
distribution. Students will design tfieir 
distribution needs in consultation with 
tfie Graduate Advisor and the relevant 
faculty. All courses must be taken in tfie 
Department of History. 



2. A minimum of two Research Semi- 
nars (6 semester-hours) must be taken. 
If approved by the faculty, the papers 
written for the seminars will be pre- 
sented to the Graduate Advisor. 

3. The following limits are placed on 
accumulating credits towards tfie Mas- 
ter's degree: 

a. Students must receive the grade 
of 'B' (3.0) or better for the course to 
count toward the degree. 

b. HIS 5908 (Independent Study) is 
limited to three semester-hours. 

c. HIS 5930 (Special Topics) is lim- 
ited to six semester-hours. 

4. HIS 6128 (Historical Methods) is 
required of all students. 

Core Courses 

The following courses count as Re- 
search Seminars for both the Thesis 
and the Report options: 
AMH 5905 Readings in American 

History 
AMH 59 1 5 Research in American 

History 
EUH 5905 Readings in European 

History 
EUH 5915 Research in European 

History 
LAH 5905 Readings in Latin 

American History 
LAH 591 5 Research in Latin 

American History 
HIS 5289 Comparative History 
HIS 5930 Special Topics 
HIS 5908 Independent Study 
HI S 59 1 Advanced Research 

Seminar 
Consultation with the Graduate Advi- 
sor is required before registering for the 
following courses: 
HIS 61 28 Historical Methods 
HIS 6970 Ttiesis Research 
HIS 6971 fibster's Thesis 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

AMH-Amertean History; EUH- European 
History; HIS-General; LAH-Latin Ameri- 
can History; WOH-Worid History. 

AMH 5905 Readings in American His- 
tory (3). Students read books from dif- 
ferent historiographical traditions and 
with conflicting interpretations about an 
important subject in American history. 
Subjects will vary according to profes- 
sors. Course may be repeated with de- 
partmental approval. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

AMH 5915 Research In American His- 
tory (3). Students conduct research in 



primary and secondary sources on as- 
pects of important subjects in American 
History. Subjects will vary according to 
professor. F'rerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

AMH 5935 Topics in American His- 
tory (3). An examination of specific 
tfiemes or topics in American fiistDry. 
The theme will vary from semester to se- 
mester. With a change in theme, tfie 
course may be repeated. (Tfie theme 
will be announced in the yeariy sched- 
ules.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

EUH 5905 Readings In European His- 
tory (3). Students read books from dif- 
ferent historiographical traditions and 
with conflicting interpretations about an 
important subject in European history. 
Subjects will vary according to profes- 
sors. Course may be repeated with de- 
partmental approval. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

EUH 5915 Research In European His- 
tory (3). Students conduct research in 
primary and secondary sources on as- 
pects of important subjects in European 
History. Subjects will vary according to 
professor. Course may be repeated with 
departmental approval. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

EUH 5935Toplcs In European History 

(3). An examination of specifk: themes 
or topics in European Wstory. The 
theme will vary from semester to semes- 
ter. With a change in theme, the course 
may be repeated. (The theme will be 
announced in the yeariy schedules.) 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

HIS 5289 Comparative History (3). A 

study of specific topics in history tfiat cut 
across regional, national, and dirono- 
logical lines. Tfie topics will change from 
semester to semester, and with a 
change in content, the course may be 
repeated. (Tfie topic of the course will 
be announced in the yearly schedule). 

HIS 5908 Independent Study (VAR). In- 
dividual conferences, assigned readings 
arxi reports on independent investiga- 
tions, with the consent of the instmctor. 

HIS 5910 Advanced Research Semi- 
nar (3). Small group sessions will ana- 
lyze particular subject areas in history, 
with the consent of the instructor. 

HIS 5930 Special Topics (3). An exami- 
nation of specific themes or topics in his- 
tory. The tfieme will vary from semester 
to semester, and with a change in con- 
tent, the course may be repeated. (The 
theme will be announced in tfie yeariy 
schedule). Prerequisite: Graduate 
Standing. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 55 



HIS 5940 Supervised Teaching (3). 

The students will work under the close 
supervision of a regular member of the 
faculty in a mentorial fashion. The super- 
vision will cover various aspects of 
course design and delivery in History. 

HIS 6128 Historical Methods (3). A 

seminar designed to introduce the begin- 
ning graduate student to the technical 
aspects of tfie study of history. This 
course treats thie problems involved in 
the preparation of tfie Master's thesis. 

HIS 6970 Thesis Research (1-10). Re- 
search toward completion of Master's 
Thesis. May be repeated. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Department. 

HIS 6971 Master's Thesis (3). The 

course is for students preparing their 
tfieses. Prerequisite: Successful comple- 
tion of all graduate requirements and 
electives. 

LAH 5905 Readings in Utin Ameri- 
can History (3). Students read books 
from different Nstoriographiceil traditions 
and with conflicting interpretations about 
an important subject in Latin American 
Nstory. Subjects will vary according to 
professors. Course may be repeated 
with departmental approval. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. 

LAH 5915 Research In Latin Ameri- 
can History (3). Students conduct re- 
search in primary and secondary 
sources on aspects of importzint sub- 
jects in Latin American History. Subjects 
will vary according to professor. Course 
may be repeated with departmental ap- 
proval. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

LAH 5935 Topics In Latin American 
History (3). An examinatbn of specific 
themes or toptes in Latin American his- 
tory. The tfieme will vary from semester 
to semester. With a change in theme, 
tfte course may be repeated. (The 
theme will be announced in ttie yearly 
schedules.) Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 



International Relations 

Ralph S. Clem, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Ken I. Boodhoo, Associate Professor 
Thomas A. Breslln, Associate Professor 
Peter R. Craumer, Assistant Professor 
Nancy E Erwin, Assistant Professor 
Damlan J. Fernandez, Assistant 

Professor 
Farrokh Jhabvala, Professor 
Antonio Jorge, Professor 



Charies G. MacDonald, Professor 
Mohladdin Mesbahl, Assistant 

Professor ^ 

Susan Waltz, Associate Professor 
Gregory B. Wolfe, Professor 

The Department of International Rela- 
tions does not presently offer a degree 
program at the graduate level but does 
however offer graduate courses. These 
courses are offered to supplement other 
graduate degree programs at tfie Uni- 
versity. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

CPO-Comparative Politics; GEA-Geog- 
raphy-Regional (Area); GEO-Geogra- 
phy-Systemic; HFT-Hospitality, Food, 
Tourism; INR-lntemational Relations; 
POS- Political Science; PUP-Public Pol- 
icy. 

GEO 5415 Topics in Social Geogra- 
phy (PG, IP) (3). Topics discussed in- 
clude geographic aspects of population 
and ethnicity, with empfiasis on sources 
and analysis of data and pertinent con- 
cepts. Prerequisite: GEA 3000 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

INR 5087 Ethnicity and the Politics of 
Development (3). This course exam- 
ines tfie conceptual and substantive di- 
mensions of etfinidty in tfie context of 
worid politics and political development. 
The course will highlight ethnicity and 
ethnic groups as critical factors in North- 
South politics. 

INR 5607 international Relations and 
Development (3). An analysis and con- 
ceptualization of the process of develop- 
ment as it takes place in the international 
context. Special attention given to tiie 
role of international organizations in pro- 
moting development and tfie manner in 
wliich differences in developmental 
levels conditions international relations. 

INR 5906 Independent Study (VAR). 
Directed independent research. Re- 
quires prior approval by instructor. 

INR 5935 Topics In International Rela- 
tions (3). Varies according to tfie instruc- 
tor. 

INR 6008 Colloquium In Intemational 
Studies (3). A systemk; and Intema- 
tioneil Relations theory supplemented 
with a consideration of legal. Institutional 
and developmental issues. Prerequisite 
for MIB students: INR 6603 (Worid Poli- 
tk»). 

INR 6605 Contemporary Intemational 
System (3). Study of syntiietic review of 
tfieories of devetopment and ap- 



proaches to tfie study of development 
as a process of social, political, and eco- 
nomic change. Prerequisites: CPO 5035 
and ESC 5025. 

INR 6975 Thesis (1-6). Registration for 
students working on tfieir tiiesis. Prereq- 
uisites: All other coursewori< for tiie Mas- 
ter's in Intemational Studies. 



International Studies 

Susan Waltz, Director, International 

Studies 
Participating Departments: 
Usandro Perez, Chairperson, 

Anthropology / Sociology 
Raul Moncarz, Chairperson Economics 
Mark Szuchman, Cftairperson, History 
Ralph Clem, Chairperson, International 

Relations 
Joel Gottlieb, Chairperson, Political 

Science 

Master of Arts in International 
Studies 

Tfie Master's program in Intemational 
Studies is an interdisciplinary program 
designed to prepare students for ca- 
reers in government, tfie private sector, 
or intemational agencies. The program 
focuses on tfie txoad issue of socio-eco- 
nomic development. Students may spe- 
cialize in tfie area of intemational 
relations and development, social 
cfiange and development, development 
economics, or Latin America and Carib- 
bean studies. The interdisciplinary char- 
acter of tfie progrsim ensures tiiat ttie 
subject matter is treated as a wfide. 
Scfiolarships and assistantships are 
available. 

Admission Requirements 

A 3.0 GPA in upper-level wort< from an 
accredited institution and a combined 
score of 1000 on the Graduate Record 
Examination. Foreign applicants must 
be eligible for furtfier study in tiieir own 
country and must demonstrate profi- 
ciency in tfie English letnguage. 

Degree Requirements 

Tfie Master of Arts in Intematkjnal Stud- 
ies requires a minimum of 36 semester 
hours of course wori< at the graduate 
level. Students may also have to satisfy 
prerequisites at tfie undergraduate level 
for some courses in tfie program. Such 
courses will not be counted toward the 
36 fiour minimum requirement. (A maxi- 
mum of six semester hours of graduate 
coursewori< may be transfen-ed from 
otfier institutions of fiigtier education 
subject to the approval of tfie Interde- 
partmental Advisory Committee). 



56 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Core Courses: (1 5 semester hours) 
CPO 5035 Politics of Development 3 
ECS 5025 Economic Problems of 

Emerging Nations 3 

INR 5607 International Relations 

and Development 3 

POS 5706 Research Methodology 3 
SYP 5447 Sociology of International 

Development 3 

Electives 15 

A minimum of five graduate level 
courses chosen from frie departments 
of Economics, History, International Re- 
lations, Political Science, and Sociol- 
ogy/Anthropology. Elective courses may 
also be taken in otfier fields with the ap- 
proval of the Director. 

Thesis (6) 

The thesis requirement will rwrmally be 
undertaken after completion of a major 
portion of the coursework and the ap- 
proval of a thesis proposal. The thesis 
must demonstrate an ability to organize 
existing knowledge, synthesizing the 
available information from more than 
one discipline, and focusing that knowl- 
edge to illuminate a problem, policy, or 
theory in International Studies. 

Language Requirement 

Prior to graduation, all students must 
demonstrate competency in tfie use of a 
modern foreign language. Language 
courses cannot count for credit in the 
program. 



School of Journalism 
and Mass 
Communication 

J. Arthur Helse, Professor and Director 
Lillian Lodge Kopenhaver, Professor 

and Associate Director 
Wiliiam Adams, Associate Professor 
Gerardo Bolanos, Deputy Executive 

Director, CAJP 
James E Couch, Associate Professor 
Humberto Deigado, Assistant Professor 
Charles Fair, Associate Professor 
Aivin Goldstein, Associate Professor 
Charles Green, Executive Director, 

Central American Journalism Project 
Kevin Hall, EcBtor-in-Residence 
David L Martinson, Associate 

Professor 
Debra Miller, Assistant Professor 
Agatha Ogazon, Program Coordinator, 

CAJP 
Patricia B. Rose, Associate Professor 
Robert Ruttenberg, Associate 

Professor 



Mel Stein, Creative IDirector-ln- 

Residence 
Lorna Veraldl, Assistant Professor 
Jacic Virtue, Associate Executive 

Director, CAJP 
William F. Wright, Associate Professor 

Master of Science in Mass 
Communication 

The graduate program of tfie School of 
Journalism and Mass Communication of- 
fers professional education leading to 
the M.S. in Mass Communication writh 
spedalizations in print journalism, stu- 
dent media advising, and publk: rela- 
tions. The orientation of tfie graduate 
fxogram is primarily professional, not 
theoretical. The program is designed to 
enhance graduates' abilities to wori< in 
the mass communication professions. 

Admission Requirements 

To be eligible for admission to the gradu- 
ate program, applicants must meet the 
following requirements: 

1 . All applicants must fiave a bache- 
lor's degree from a regionally accredited 
college or university. 

2. Ail candidates must show promise 
of success in graduate studies. The fac- 
ulty will consider the following criteria in 
making this determination: 

a. Grade Requirements 
Minimum GPA: Candidates must 

have a minimum grade point average 
(GPA) of 3.0 earned during ttie junior 
and senior undergraduate years. 

Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE): The GRE or - upon request from 
the candidate in certain cases - the 
Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT) is required. Passing score for 
the GRE is at least 1000; passing score 
for the GMAT is 450.However, if the un- 
dergraduate GPA is higher, a lower GRE 
score can be accepted. No applicant will 
be fully admitted to the master's pro- 
gram if Ns or lier GRE score is tower 
than 850. 

Applicants who have taken the GRE 
more than five years from the date of ad- 
mission have to repeat the GRE exami- 
nation. 

b. Professional experience in a field 
directly related to the specialization the 
student plans to pursue is an advan- 
tage. Applicants without such profes- 
sional experience must complete 
additional undergraduate coursework. 
Some may be required to serve an in- 
ternship with a professional organiza- 
tion. Applicants should contact tfie 
graduate coordinator in the appropriate 
area of specialization to find out what 
they must do to meet this requirement. 



c. Three letters or recommendation 
sent to the student services coordinator. 
These letters should be from persons 
competent to judge the applicant's aca- 
demic or professional record aind poten- 
tial for success as a professional in 
mass communication. 

d. A detailed statement explaining 
why the applk:ant wsints to pursue the 
M.S. in Mass Communication. 

e. Competence in the fundamentals 
of statistics. Undergraduate coursewori^ 
in statistics or quantitative social re- 
search may demonstrate this compe- 
tence. Students wittiout coursework in 
statistics will not be admitted to tfie 
graduate research course, MMC 5445. 

3. All candidates whose native lan- 
guage is not English must present a 
minimum score of 550 on the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL). 

Appiication Procedures 

A student applying for admission to tfie 
graduate program must; 

1 . Submit an application for admis- 
sion to the University Admissions Office. 

2. Have two official copies of tran- 
scripts from all colleges or universities 
attended sent to tfie Admissions Office. 
(Copies submitted by applicants will be 
rejected.) 

3. Submit scores of tfie GRE and 
TOEFL to tfie Admissions Office. 

Admission Deadline 

Students wishing admittance to the 
graduate program must apply at least 
six weeks prior to tfie start of classes of 
tfieir first term of graduate study. 

Degree requirements 

Plan of Study: During the first semester, 
students working with faculty advisers, 
will plan their pursuit of the master's de- 
gree. The study plan will include a time- 
table for completion of the wori<. Any 
changes in tfie plan must be approved 
by tfie student's adviser. 

Writing Proficiency 

During the first week of tfie first semes- 
ter, students must mke a writing profi- 
ciency exam, which includes grammar. 
Students wfio fail tfie test must com- 
plete tfie school's undergraduate writing 
course, MMC 3101 , with a grade of 'B' 
or better. (No graduate aedit is given 
for this course.) Students may take no 
more tfian nine graduate credits - and 
no professional courses - until they pass 
tfie writing proficiency exam or MMC 
3101. 

Transfer Credit 

Students may petition to transfer up to 
six flours of graduate credit toward the 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 57 



degree. To be approved for transfer, the 
courses must have been taken at a re- 
gionally accredited college or university; 
the student's advisor must Judge the 
courses relevant to the student's plan of 
study; the student must not have used 
tie credits toward another degree; and 
the student must have earned a 'B' or 
Ngher in the courses. No transfer 
courses will substitute for the school's 
core courses. 

Time Limit 

All work applicable to the degree, includ- 
ing transfer credit, must be completed 
witNn six years. 

Grades 

Students must maintain a minimum 
GPA of 3.0 in all courses required for 
ttie degree. No more ttian two 'C 
grades will be allowed. 

Foreign Language Requirements 

No foreign language will be required un- 
less the student's plan of study includes 
profkitency in another language. 

Professional Project, Thesis 

Students complete a professional pro- 
ject in their areas of specialization. Work 
on tfie project will center around the Pro- 
fessional Project Seminar, to be taken 
during the final semester. Projects will 
be graded by an evaluation committee. 
Students must receive a 'B' or higher on 
fhe project. Students may also opt to do 
a thesis. 

Required Courses 

To earn Itie M.S. in Mass Communica- 
tion, students must meet the following 
requirements: 

1 . Students must take at least 36 
flours of acceptable graduate credit. 
(Students receiving three credit hours 
for the Professional Project will be re- 
quired to take one or two 3-credit elec- 
tives, depending on the specialization.) 
No undergraduate credit in the field of 
journalism and mass communication 
may count toweird these 36 hours. 

2. At least nine hours must tie in a 
fiekj of concentration outside the School 
of Journalism and Mass Communica- 
tkjn. A minimum of three of those credits 
have to be at thie graduate level (5000 
or 6000 level). 

3. Foreign students who have 
passed the TOEFL test with a score of 
500 or higher but who are unable to use 
the English language on a professional 
level may substitute one advanced writ- 
ing course with a course approved by 
their advisor. 

In addition, to qualify for this rule, the 
foreign student htas to demonstrate an 



acceptable level of skills in tfie language 
of origin. 

Cor« Curriculum 

All students, in all areas of specializa- 
tion, must take 1 2 to 1 5 semester hours 
in the following core courses: 
MMC 6402 Theories of Mass 

Communication 3 

MMC 5445 Applied Research 

Methods in Media 3 

MMC 6635 Contemporary Issues in 

Mass Communication 3 
MMC 6950 Professional Project 3-6 

Journalism 

The sequence in journalism is for tfiose 
wtx) wish to develop advanced joumalis- 
tk: skills as reporters for newspapers, 
wire services, magazines, radio and tele- 
vision. Courses in ttie sequence, plus 
Ein outside concentration, permit ttie stu- 
dent to develop a specialization in one 
aspect of journalism. 

Students pursuing the sequence in 
journalism may be mid-career profes- 
sionals; may have a communication un- 
dergraduate degree but no professional 
experience; or may have an undergradu- 
ate degree in another discipline and no 
professional journalism experience. 

Students in tfie latter two categories 
will be required to complete necessary 
undergraduate journalism skills courses. 
They must complete a professional in- 
ternship as part of their preparation for 
the master's degree. Specific under- 
graduate course requirements will be de- 
termined by thie journalism program 
coordinator. 

In addition to tfie core courses, stu- 
dents must take the following courses: 
JOU 61 96 Advanced Writing 

Techniques 3 

(print majors only) 
JOU 6197 Advanced Reporting 

Techniques 3 

JOU 61 98 Advanced Public Affairs 

Reporting 3 

JOU 6199 Judicial System Reporting 3 
JOU 6931 Seminar on Special 

Topics 3 

Student Media Advising 

In addition to tfie core courses, students 
in tfie student media advising sequence 
must take tfie folkswing courses: 
JOU 5806 Student PuWicattons 

Supervision 3 

MMC 5207 Ethical and Legal 

Foundations of the 

Student Press 3 

VIC 5205 Trends in Graphics and 

Design 3 

Students specializing in student me- 
dia advising must take one or two addi- 



tional 3-credit graduate courses in tfie 
school in an appropriate area of empha- 
sis. Courses must be approved by tfie 
student's advisor. 

Public Relations 

In addition to tfie core courses, students 
in the publk: relations sequence must 
take tfie following courses: 

PUR 5406 Multi-Cultural 

Communications 3 

PUR 5607 Public Relations 

Management 3 

PUR 5806 Public Relations 

Strategy, Planning, and 

Evaluation 3 

PUR 6935 Advanced Public 

Relations Seminar 3 

Student Media Advising 
Certificate Program 

This professional certificate program is 
designed primarily for journalism teach- 
ers and for student media advisers on 
all levels and for those eisplring to the 
profession. This program will satisfy the 
requirements of tfie certification, re-certi- 
fication or incentive credits for current 
public scfiool teachers in tfie field. 

Tfie Certifk^ate in Student Media Ad- 
vising requires 15 credits to be taken as 
follows: 

Required Courses: 

JOU 5806 Student Publications 

Supervision 
MMC 5207 Ethical and Legal 

Foundations of ttie 

Student Press 
VIC 5205 Trends in Graphics and 

Design 

Elective Courses 

Students must take two of the folk>wlng: 
RTV 5936 Seminar in New 

Communication 

Technologies 
MMC 6402 Theories of Mass 

Communication 
MMC 6635 Contemporary Issues in 

Mass Communication 
JOU 6 1 96 Advanced Writing 

Techniques 
PUR 4101 Publications Editing and 

Design 
JOU 4208 Magazine Editing and 

Production 



otfier courses upon approval of faculty 
advisor. 



58 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

ADV-Advertising; FIL-Film; JOU-Journal- 
ism; MMC- Mass Media Communica- 
tion; PGY-Photography; PUR-Public 
Relations; RTV-Radio-Television; VIC- 
Visual Communication. 

ADV 6355 Advertising and Society 
(3). The relationship between advertis- 
ing, economic, political, moral, and ethi- 
cal issues. 

ADV 6805C Advanced Creative Strat- 
egy and Tactics (3). Writing and visuali- 
zation relevant to developing creative 
strategies for different media, clients 
and campaigns. 

JOU 5806 Student Publications Su- 
pervision (3). Oesigned to assist teach- 
ers £uxl advisers of journalism at the 
high school etnd junior college level, this 
course emphasizes the technical as- 
pects of producing student newspapers, 
yeartxioks, and magazines, as well as 
the legal and ethical considerations fac- 
ing today's adviser. In addition, attention 
is given to matters pertaining to curricu- 
lum and methodology for effective jour- 
nalistic Instruction. 

JOU 6196 Advanced Writing Tecli- 
nlques (3). Techniques of creative jour- 
nalistic writing. Including description, 
narration, euiecdote, point of view. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing. 

JOU 6197 Advanced Reporting Tecii- 
niques (3). Intensive instruction in hnw 
to find accurate and printable facts, with 
emphasis on use of public records. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing. 

JOU 6198 Advanced Public Affairs 
Reporting (3). A journalist's examina- 
tion of how to report urban government 
and thte forces shaping public policy and 
dedsion-meiking. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

JOU 6199 Judicial System Reporting 
(3). A journalist's examination of the judi- 
cial system, from police headquarters to 
the courtroom. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

JOU 6931 Seflfiinar on Special Topics 
(3). Instruction in specialized areas of 
journalism. 

MMC 5207 Ethical and Legal Founda- 
tions of the Student Press (3). Exam- 
ines ethical and legal foundations 
underlying the operation of the student 
press on American ceimpuses, stressing 
both rights and responsibilities and how 
to organize publications to protect both. 



MMC 5445 Applied Research Meth- 
ods In the Mass Media (3). An ad- 
vanced course in the design, execution, 
and utilization of research studies by me- 
dia practitioners with special emphasis 
on origineil proprietary studies. 

MiUC 5661 Minorities and the Mass 

Media (3). A critical review of tfie role of 
thie mass media as it relates to ethnic, 
religious, and social minorities in a plu- 
ralistic society. 

MiMC 5932 Special Topics Seminar 
(3). A variable topic seminar dealing with 
issues of interest to tfie community. Ex- 
amples are rights of high scfiool joumal- 
ists, cable TV, the use of mini-computers 
in creative communication. 

MMC 6402 Theories of Mass Commu- 
nication (3). Examines theories and 
processes of mass communication. Spe- 
cial emphasis on explaining, measuring 
and reporting the impact of mass Com- 
munication. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

MiUC 6635 Contemporaty Issues In 
Mass Communication (3). Contempo- 
rary issues regarding media responsi- 
bility to society and thie social 
responsibility of communicators. Analy- 
sis and evaluation of media ethics and 
performance. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

MIMC 6950 Mass Communication Pro- 
fessional Project (1-6). The profes- 
sional project is designed to 
demonstrate thte student's excellence in 
an area of communication study. Must 
be completed within one calendar year. 
Prerequisites: Completion of Core, Se- 
quence Courses and Electives. 

PUR 5406 Multi-Cultural Communica- 
tions (3). Explores the multi-cultural di- 
mensions of communications with 
diverse audiences in the United States 
and abroad. Prerequisite: PUR 3000, 
PUR 4800 or permission of instructor. 

PUR 5607 Public Relations Manage- 
ment (3). Operations and objectives of 
organized public relations activities and 
programs. The role of management in 
corporate and agency public relations 
and policy formulation in tiie public proc- 
ess. Prerequisite: PUR 3000 and PUR 
4100 and PUR 4800 or permission of in- 
sti^ctor. 

PUR 5806 Public Relations Strategy, 
Planning and Evaluation (3). Ad- 
vanced study in evaluating public rela- 
, tions effectiveness, measurement and 
interpretation of public attitudes, and de- 
velopment of campaign strategies. Pre- 
requisite: PUR 3000, and PUR 4800 or 
permission of instructor. 



PUR 6935 Advanced Public Relations 
Seminar (3). A series of case studies im- 
merses students in the applications of 
public relations tfieory/prindples to prac- 
tice. A variety of different public relations 
fields will be studied. Prerequisites: 
PUR 5607 and PUR 5806. 

RTV 5806 Telecommunication Man- 
agement Structures (3). Intensive 
study of telecommunication manage- 
ment problems, theory of same, solu- 
tions of same tiirough practical 
application and examination of case 
studies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

RTV 5935 Seminar in International 
Comparative Broadcasting Systems 

(3). Intt-oduction to international telecom- 
munication systems witii special empha- 
sis on broadcasting. Comparison with 
other countries. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of instiuctor. 

RTV 5936 Seminar in New iUlass Com- 
munication Technologies (3). Discus- 
sion of new communication techno- 
logies and their influence on the society. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

RTV 6309 Advanced Broadcast News 
(3). Advanced techniques, principles 
and issues of reporting for the electi'onic 
media, from spot news to documenta- 
ries. Prerequisite: Graduate steindlng. 

RTV 6465C Field Production Practi- 
cum (3). The student will be responsible 
for the organization and complete pre- 
production, production, and post-produc- 
tion of his/her pfoject(s). Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

RTV 6468C Studio Production Practi- 
cum (3). The student will t>e responsible 
for tiie organization and complete pre- 
production, production and post-produc- 
tion of his/her project(s). Will also be 
required to do directing and I.D. work. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

RTV 6937 Seminar in Telecommunica- 
tion Policies and Planning (3). Intro- 
duction to national and international 
telecommunication policies, witti empha- 
sis on planning and decision making. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

VIC 5205 Trends In Graphics and De- 
sign (3). Design principles arxJ hx>w 
tfiey relate to trends in student and pro- 
fessional media, including newspapers, 
magazines and yeartxwks. Deals with 
graphics, packaging, typography and 
modern design. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 59 



Linguistics 

Asher Z. Milt>auer, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson, English 
C. Kemp Williams, Assistant Professor 

and Director, English 
Lynn M. Berk, Associate Professor, 

English 
Isabel Castellanos, Associate 

Professor and Chair, ^/lodern 

Languages 
Virginia Gathercoie, Associate 

Professor, English 
Tometro Hopkins, Instructor, English 
John B. Jensen, Associate Professor. 

Modern Languages 
Peter A. Machonis, Associate 

Professor, Modern Languages 
Mehmet Yavas, Assodate Professor, 

English 

Master of Arts in Linguistics 
Admission Requirements 

Applicants must meet the University's 
graduate general admissions require- 
ments; a GRE score of 1000 on the ver- 
bal and quantitative sections or an 
undergraduate GPA of 3.0 will be re- 
quired. In addition, non-native speakers 
of English must submit a TOEFL score 
of 600. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Arts in Unguistics re- 
quires 36 graduate hours in Linguistics, 
distributed as follows: 

1. Required Courses: (21) 

LIN 5018 Introduction to Linguistics 3 
LIN 5501 English Syntax 3 

LIN 5206 Phonetics 3 

LIN 6323 General Phonology 

(Prerequisite: LIN 5206) 3 
LIN 6510 Generative Syntax I 3 

LIN 6805 Semantics , 

(Prerequisite: LIN 6510) 3 
LIN 5146 Historical and Comparative 

Linguistics 

(Prerequisite: LIN 5206) 3 

or 
LIN 5107 History of ttie English 

Language 

or 
FRE 5840 History of tfie French 

Language 

or 
SPN 5840 History of the Spanish 

Language 

2. The remaining hours must be se- 
lected from any graduate Linguistics of- 
ferings, including courses in the 
following areas: 

Acoustic Phonetics 

General Morphology and Syntax 

Dialectology 



Sociolinguistics 

Psychology of Language 

Language Acquisition 

Second Language Acquisition 

Language Contact 

Studies in Bilingualism 

Applied Linguistics 

Language Universals 

Cognitive Linguistics 

Speech Errors and Linguistic 
Knowledge 

Research Methods in Unguistics 

StRJCture of a Non-Indo-European 
Language 

Special Topics in Linguistics 

Seminar (various topics) 

Thesis (maximum of six hours) 
Linguistic courses are taught in the De- 
partments of English and Modern Lan- 
guages. See those sections for specific 
course descriptions. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

Each student will be required to take a 
minimum of five semester hours of for- 
mal study of a foreign language not al- 
ready known by tiie student or of Middle 
or Old English. The language to be 
studied will be decided on in consult- 
ation witii the student's advisor. 

Examination Requirement 

Students will be required to take a writ- 
ten comprehensive exam in Unguistics. 

Thesis/Non-Thesis Options 

Students may elect to follow a thesis or 
a non-thesis option. Those electing to 
write a thesis will take up to six credit 
hours in thesis research as part of their 
required 36 hours. When completed, 
the tfiesis will be defended orally before 
a committee made up of ttiree faculty 
members, including the thesis director. 
Those electing to follow the non-thesis 
option will take all 36 hours in non-the- 
sis courses. 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

LIN - Unguistics. 

UN 5017 Cognitive LingulsUcs (3). Ex- 
plores the nature of fuiman reason and 
categorization as revealed by language. 
Examines the role of the metaptior, 
imagination, and bodily experience In 
human thought processes. Prereq- 
uisites: UN 3013, or UN 3010, or the 
equivalent, or permission of instixictor. 

UN 5018 Introduction to Linguistics 
(3). Inti-oduction to Unguistic theory and 
analysis, witii special emphasis on the 
major components of languages and 
modem approaches to tiieir analysis. 



UN 5107 History of the English Lan- 
guage (3). Study of tiie development of 
tiie grammar arxd vocabulary repre- 
sented in samples of the English lan- 
guage from the 8tti century to modern 
times. Prerequisite: LIN 3013 or permis- 
sion of insti-uctor. 

LIN 5108 Language Universals (3). 
Universal properties of language from 
two major perspectives: those of Typolo- 
gists and of Universal Grammarians. A 
variety of linguistic structures and tiieo- 
retical explanations are examined. Pre- 
requisite: LIN 3013, or UN 3010, or UN 
5018, or the equivalent. 

UN 5146 Historical and Comparative 
Unguisttes (3). The study of linguistic 
metix)dology for determining historical 
and genetic relationships among lan- 
guages. Diachronic syntax and its meth- 
odology will he included. The relevance 
of historical comparative linguistics to 
similar processes found in language ac- 
quisition and to socio-llnguistics will be 
studied. Prerequisite: LIN 5206. 

UN 5206 Phonetics (3). The study of 
the articulatory mecfianisms used in pro- 
ducing speech sounds and of tiieir 
acoustic properties. Ear training in tiie 
phonetic transcription of speech sounds 
used in the world's languages. 

UN 5431 General Morphology and 
Syntax (3). The study of linguistic meth- 
odology for determining tfie morphologi- 
cal and syntactic structures of 
languages. Distinct thieoretical ap- 
proaches to analysis will be empha- 
sized. The student will study recent 
developments in linguistics tiiat bear on 
language-universal and language-spe- 
cific aspects of morphology and syntax. 
Prerequisite: Introductory course in Lin- 
guistics or permission of instiTJctor. 

UN 5501 English Syntax (3). This 
course will focus on syntactic analysis of 
English. Altixsugh the course itself is 
non-tfieoretical, it uses a variety of un- 
deriying tfieoretical approaches to ti-ain 
students in syntactic analysis. 

UN 5715 Language Acquisition (3). 
The study of tiie processes underiying 
normal first-language acquisition. The fo- 
cus is on tiie development of tiie subsys- 
tems of language (i.e., tiie phonological, 
morphological, syntactic, and semantic 
subsystems) in the child's growing com- 
mand of his native language. 

UN 5732 Speech En-orsand Linguis- 
tic Knowledge (3). This course focuses 
on tiie nature of linguistic errors pro- 
duced by speakers In tfieir native lan- 
guages. Students will read research on 
enters produced by adult native speak- 



60 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



ers of a language, on first-language er- 
rors of children, arxi on errors made by 
persons acquiring a second language. 
Prerequisite: LIN 3013 or LIN 3010. 

UN 5748 Applied Ungulstics: Theory 
and Applications (3). Theoretical & 
practical approaches to second-lan- 
guage acquisition. Examination of & 
hands-on experience with early and re- 
cent approaches (Contrastive Analysis, 
Error Analysis, Parameter Setting, etc.) 

UN 6323 General Phonology (3). The 

study of phonological process in lan- 
guages and linguistic methodology for 
phonological analysis. Emphasis will be 
placed on recent theoretical questions 
corx»ming such issues as the abstract- 
ness of underlying forms, the natural- 
ness of processes, and the relevance of 
markedness to a phonological descrip- 
tion. Prerequisite: LIN 5206, Phonetics. 

UN 6378 Structure of a Non-Indo- 
European Language (3). An in-depth 
study of tfie structure of a non-Indo- 
European language. Tfie peirticular lan- 
guage to be studied will be varied from 
semester to semester. Course may be 
repeated. Prerequisites: LIN 5013, LIN 
5206, LIN 5222, and a course in syntax. 

UN 6510 Generative Syntax 1(3). This 
course will expose students to thie theo- 
retical models on wNch much contempo- 
rary work in English grammar is based. 
Students will read works on selected top- 
ics such as stmctural linguistics, trans- 
formational grammar, and case 
grammar. Specific content may change 
from semester to semester. May be re- 
taken for credit when content changes. 
Prerequisite: LIN 5501, English Syntax. 

UN 6602 Language Contact (3). A 
study of the language changes that oc- 
cur wfien two or more languages come 
into contact with one anottier. The 
course will also examine the charac- 
teristtes of the individuals and communi- 
ties involved in such contact. 

UN 6805 Semantics (3). The study of 
linguistic semantic language-universal 
and language-specific prop>erties of tfie 
semantic stnjcture of words in sen- 
tences will be considered. Recent de- 
bate and theoretical aspects, including 
tfx>se toucNng on the nature of word 
meaning, presuppositional-assertional 
grammar, and Speech-Act tfieory, will 
be read and discussed. Prerequisite: In- 
troductory course In Linguistics or per- 
mission of instructor. 

UN 6905 Independent Study (VAR). 

This course is designed for students 
wtto wish to pursue specialized topics in 
advanced Linguistics: phonetics, phonol- 



ogy, morphology, syntax, semantics, 
psycholinguistics, historical linguistics, 
or language contact. Prerequisite: Intro- 
ductory course in Linguistics or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

UN 6937 Seminar in Ungulstics (3). 

Topics vary each semester. Prerequisite: 
A previous course in the same sub-area 
of Linguistics. 

UN 6971 Thesis (1-6). Prerequisite: 
Completion of all other requirements for 
the M.A. degree in Linguistics. 



Mathematics 

Dev K. Roy, Associate Professor and 

Chairperson 
Gerardo Aiadro, Assistant Professor 
William Calbeck, Assistant Professor 
Mark L Copper, Assistant Professor 
Domitlla Fox, Instructor 
Susan Gorman, Instructor 
Peter Hoiden, Assistant Professor 
Steven M. Hudson, Assistant Professor 
George Kafkoulis, Assistant Professor 
Mark Leckband, Associate Professor 
Diana McCoy, Instructor 
Abdelhamid IMezlani, Assistant 

Professor 
Richard Nadel, Instructor 
J. Michael Pearson, Assistant Professor 
Thanases Pheldas, Assistant Professor 
Taje Ramsamujh, Assistant Professor 
David Rltter, Associate Professor 
Michael Rosenthal, Instructor 
Richard L. Rubin, Associate Professor 
Anthony C. Shershin, Associate 

Professor 
Minna Shore, Instructor 
James F. Sllfker, Associate Professor 
W. Jay Sweet, Assistant Professor 
Enrique Villamor, Assistant Professor 
Willie E Williams, Associate Professor 
John Zweibel, Assistant Professor 

Master of Science in 
Mathematical Sciences 
Admission 

Tfie following are in addition to the Uni- 
versity's graduate admission require- 
ments 

1 . Bacfielor's degree in mathemat- 
ics, applied mathematics or mathemati- 
cal sciences from an accredited 
university or college. 

2. A 'B' average or higher In upper di- 
vision mathematics courses. 

3. Graduate Record Examination 
taken viflthin the past five years, with at 



least 650 on the quantitative portion and 
500 on each of the other two parts. 

4. Three letters of recommendation 
concerning the candidate's achievement 
sind potential, from persons familiar with 
ttie candidate's previous academic per- 
formance. 

5. Approval of the Graduate Commit- 
tee. 

Core Courses 

The student must choose three courses 
form each of the following lists: 

List A: 

MAA 5616 Introduction to Real 

Analysis 3 

MAP 5236 Mathematical Techniques 

of Operations Reseeirch 3 
MAS 52 15 Number Theory 3 

STA 5446 Probability Theory 3 

STA 6807 Queuing and Statistical 

Models 3 

ListB: 

MAD 5405 Numerical Methods 3 

MAP 5407 Methods of Applied 

Analysis 3 

MAS 5415 Applied Linear Algebra 3 

COT 5420 Theory of Computation I 3 

COT 6400 Analysis of Algorithms 3 

Eiectives: (6 semester hours) 
Tfie student must choose six fiours of 
graduate level coursework in computer 
science, economics, engineering, 
matfiematics, physics or statistics, with 
the prior approval of tfie Mathematics 
Graduate Committee. 

Master's Project 

Tfie student will prepare an expository 
paper under tfie direction of a faculty 
member, wfio will assign tfie grade. 
Successful completion of the master's 
project requires a grade of 'B' or higher, 
as well as approval of a committee con- 
sisting of tfiree mathematics faculty (in- 
cluding tfie director). 
Remarks: The coursework must be com- 
pleted with a 'B' average or higher and 
a grade of 'C or higfier in each csurse. 
A maximum of two courses may be 
transferred into tfie program from out- 
side the University, subject to the ap- 
proval of the Graduate Committee. 

Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

MAA-Mathematics, Analysis; MAD - 
Mathematics, Discrete; MAP-Mathe- 
matics, Applied. 

COT 5420 Theory of Computation I 
(3). Abstract models of computation; 
halting prol>lem; decidability and undeci- 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 61 



daljiiity; recursive function theory. Pre- 
requisite: MAD 3512. 

COT 640Q Analysis of Algorithms (3). 

Complexity ksehavior of algorithms is de- 
scribed for Set Manipulation, Graph The- 
ory, and Matrix Manipulation problems, 
among others. P and NP dasses of 
problems reveal an inherent difficulty in 
designing efficient algorithms. Prereq- 
uisite: COP 3530. 

MAA 5616 Introduction to Real Analy- 
sis (3). Lebesgue Measure and Integral 
vyith applications to Integretl Trsinsforms. 
Prerequisite: MAS 3105, MAA 421 1 , 
MAP 4401 or MAA 421 2. 

MAD 5405 Numerical Methods (3). Ad- 
vanced ideas and techniques of numeri- 
cal analysis for digital computation. 
Topics include: linear and non-linear sys- 
tems, ordinary differential equations, 
continuous system modeling tech- 
niques, and languages. Prerequisites: 
MAS 3105 and MAP 3302. 

MAP 5236 Mathematical Techniques 
of Operations Research (3). This 
course surveys the mathematical meth- 
ods used in operations research. Topics 
will be chosen from linear programming, 
dynamic programming, integer program- 
ming, network analysis, classical optimi- 
zation techniques, and applications 
such as inventory theory. Prerequisite: 
MAP 51 17 and MAS 3105 and either 
CGS 3420 or COP 2210. 

MAP 5407 Methods of Applied Analy- 
sis (3). Convergence, fixed point theo- 
rems, application to finding roots of 
equations, normed function spaces, lin- 
ear operators, applications to numerical 
Integration, differential and integral equa- 
tions. Prerequisites: MAA 4211, MAP 
3302, and MAS 3105. 

MAS 5145 Applied Unear Algebra (3). 

Concepts of finite dimensional vector 
spaces. Theorems that have infinite di- 
mensioned analogues and ttx^se with im- 
portant applications are emphasized. 
Prerequisites: MAS 3105 and MAA 
3200. 

MAS 5215 Number Theory (3). Topics 
to t>e discussed are selected from the 
following: congruences, Diophantine 
equations, distribution of primes, primi- 
tive roots, quadratic reciprocity, and clas- 
sical theorems of number tfieory. 

MAT 5907 Independent Study (VAR). 

IrxJividual confererKes, assigned read- 
ing, and reports on independent investi- 
gations. 

STA 5446-STA 5447 Probability The- 
ory I and II (3-3). This course is de- 
signed to acquaint the student with ttie 



basic fundamentals of probability theory. 
It reviews tfie basic fourxJations of prob- 
ability tiieory, covering such topics as 
discrete probability spaces, random 
walk, Markov Chains (transition matrix 
£ind ergodk; properties), strong laws of 
probability, convergence theorems, and 
law of iterated logarithm. Prerequisite: 
MAC 3313. 

STA 6807 Queuing and Statistical 
Models (3). Review of probability con- 
cepts, basic probability distributions, 
Poisson process, queuing models, statis- 
tical models. Prerequisites: Permission 
of Instructor, MAC 331 2 and either STA 
3033 or STA 3321. 



Modern Languages 

lsal>el Castetlanos, Associate 

Professor and Chairperson 
Irmenla Aragon, Instructor, (North 

Miami Campus) 
Aurelk) Baldor, Instructor 
Rodolfo Cortina, Professor 
James O. Crosby, Professor 
Leonei A. de la Cuesta, Associate 

Professor 
Lucia l-lelena, Visiting Associate 

Professor 
Danielle JohnsorvCousin, Associate 

Professor 
Elena de Jongh, Assistant Professor 
Yvonne Guers-Viliate, Professor 

Emeritus 
John B. Jensen, Associate Professor 
Peter A. Machonis, Associate Professor 
Ramon Mendoza, Professor (North 

Miami Campus) 
Ana Roca, Assistant Professor 
Reinaldo Sanchez, Professor 
ArKlnee Stayman, Instructor 
Marceiie Welch, Associate Professor . 
Florence Yudin, Professor 
Maida Watson Espener, Associate 

Professor 

Master of Arts in Hispanic 
Studies 

To be admitted into thie Master's degree 
program, a student must: 

1 . Hold a Bachelor's degree in Mod- 
em Languages, Linguistics or one of the 
Socieil Sciences as related to thie His- 
pank; worid from an accredited univer- 
sity or college, or its equivalent; 

2. Have a 3.0 GPA or higher during 
the last two years of the student's under- 
graduate program and a combined 
score (quantitative and vert>al) of 1 ,000 
or Ngher on the ORE. Students who 
have not taken thie GRE may enroll in 



graduate courses in tfie cooperating de- 
partments; however, admission to the 
graduate program is conditional upon 
taking and receiving a score of 1 ,000 on 
tiie GRE within six months of the begin- 
ning of study; 

3. Have the ability to SF>eak both 
Spanish arxJ English with near-native flu- 
ency; 

4. Submit two letters of recommenda- 
tion, preferably from persons in Une aca- 
demic community who are in a position 
to comment on the applicant's suitability 
for graduate wori<; 

5. Receive approval of the depart- 
mental graduate committee. Students 
with defidendes will be advised to com- 
plete certain course work Isefore begin- 
ning graduate work. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master's degree program consists 
of 33 semester hours of graduate level 
work. A maximum of six credits of gradu- 
ate course wori< may be transfen-ed into 
tfie progrsun from other institutions, sub- 
ject to the approval of tfie departmental 
graduate committee. Six core courses 
and three elective courses are required 
at tfie 5000-and 6000-level. 

Core Courses 

LIN 5934 Special Topics in 

Linguistics 3 

FOT 5805 Translation and 

Interpretation Arts 3 

SPN 6505 Spanish Culture 3 

SPN 5525 Spanish American 

Culture 3 

SPN 6535 The Hispanic Presence in 

tine United States 3 

One course at tfie graduate level on 
Latin American sociology, anthropology, 
political science, or history, to be taken 
outside of the dep>artment. 

The following are examples of 
courses that will satisfy tWs require- 
ment. Each semester tfie department 
prepares a list of appropriate courses 
from among the offerings of tfie cooper- 
ating departments, which should be con- 
sulted prior to registration. 
SOC 5338 Sociology of International 

Development 3 

CPO 5035 The Politics of 

Development 3 

HIS 591 Urtaanism in Latin America 3 
ECS 5005 Comparative Economic 

Systems 3 

ECS 5025 Economic Problems of 

Emerging Nations 3 

EC^ 5405 Economics of Latin 

America 3 

CYP 6055 Theories and Research in 

Acculturation and 

Multiculturallsm 3 



62 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



GYP 6076 Psychology of 

Crosscultural 

Sensitization in a 

Multicultural Context 3 
DEP6145 Culture and Childhood 3 
DEP 6450 Culture and Aging 3 

Electives 

A student must take at least nine gradu- 
ate credits of electives from courses of- 
fered by the department, such as 
French or Spanish linguistics, literature 
and translation/interpretation, or from 
tfx>se offered by the departments of His- 
tory, Political Sciences, Sociology/An- 
thropology, Economics, and Psychology. 

Third Language 

Students will be required to speak either 
French, Portuguese, or Haitian Creole 
at a level of general communication. Stu- 
dents who do not meet this requirement 
upon admission must begin their study 
of the third language in their first semes- 
ter of study. 

Graduation Requirements 

To receive the Master's degree In His- 
panic Studies, students must complete 
all the course work with a 3.0 GPA or 
higher, eind must receive at least a 'B' in 
each of the core courses. After having 
completed 27 graduate credits (core 
and elective courses), students will have 
the option of writing a thesis (equivalent 
to six credits) or taking two courses or 
more and submitting a research paper. 
The thesis will be presented to an ad 
hoc committee chosen by the student 
and his or her advisor. 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

ARA-Arabic Language; CHI-Chinese 
Language; FOL-Foreign Languages; 
FOT-Foreign Languages in Translation; 
FOW-Foreign Languages, Comparative 
Literature; FRE-French Language; FRT- 
French Translation; FRW-French Litera- 
ture (Writings); GER-Genman 
Language; GET-German Translation; 
HBR -Hebrew; ITA-ltallan Language; 
ITT-ltalian Translation; JPN-Japanese 
Language; UN-Linguistics; POR-Portu- 
guese Language; POW-Portuguese Lit- 
erature (Writings); PRT-Portuguese 
Translation; RUS-Russian Language; 
SPN-Spanish Language; SPT -Spanish 
Translation; SPW-Spanish Literature 
(Writings). 

(See English listing for additional Lin- 
guisttes courses.) Application of basic 
language skills. 



FOL 5735 Romance Linguistics (3). 

The common and distinctive Romance 
features. Survey of linguistic geography 
and internal/external influences. 

FOL 5906 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, or re- 
search. 

FOT 5125 Uterature inTransiation 
(3). Masterpieces of worid literature. 
Open to students who are proficient in 
more than one language. 

FOT 5805Trartslatlon/lnterpretation 
Arts (3). The language bam'er and trans- 
lation and interpretation. Types, modes, 
and quality of T/i: philologicJal, linguistic, 
and socio-linguistic theories. History of 
T/I from Rome to date. The impact of T/I 
on Inter-American developments. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

FOW 5395 Genre Sttidles (3). Examina- 
tion of a single literary form (e.g. short 
story, poetry), or tfie study of interaction 
between literary types (e.g. novel and 
drama). 

FOW 5545 Bicultural Writings (3). Ex- 
periment in linguistic pluralism. Content 
and focus to be determined by the inter- 
national community. 

FOW 5587 Comparative Studies (3). 

Cross-over and distinctiveness in a 
multi-language problem, period, or aes- 
thetic. 

FOW 5934 Special Topics In Lan- 
guage/Literature (3). Content and ob- 
jectives to be determined by students 
and teacher. 

FOW 5938 Graduate Seminar (3). 

Topic and approach to be determined by 
students and instructor. (Approval of tfie 
Department required.) 

FRE 5060 Language for Reading 
Knowledge (3). Designed primarily for 
graduate students wtx) wish to attain 
proficiency for M.A. and Ph.D. require- 
ments. Open to any student who has no 
prior knowledge of tfie language. 

FRE 5061 Language for Reading 
Knowledge (3). Emphasis on transla- 
tion of materials from the student's field 
of specialization. Prerequisite: FRE 
5060 or equivalent. 

FRE 5565 Studies In Billngualism (3). 

Readings and analysis of bilingual pro- 
grams and binational goals. 



FRE 5735 Special Topics in Linguis- 
tics (3). Content to be determined by 
students and instructor. (Approyal of 
Department required.) 

FRE 5755 Old French Language (3). 

Introduction to the phonology, morphol- 
ogy, and syntax of the Old French lan- 
guage. Reading and analysis of thte 
12th and 13th century texts in their origi- 
nal. Comparison of major medieval dia- 
lects. Prerequisite: FRE 4840 or FRE 
5845. 

FRE 5845 History of the Language 
(3). The internal and external history of 
language development. Examination of 
modal texts from key periods of evolu- 
tion. Prerequisite: FRE 3780 or LIN 
3010 or LIN 3013. 

FRE 5908 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, or re- 
search. 

FRT 5805 Translation/interpretation 
Arts (3). Techniques of professional 
translation and interpretation. Prereq- 
uisite: FRT 4801. 

FRW 5395 Genre Studies (3). Examina- 
tion of a single literary form (e.g. short 
story, poetry), or tfie study of interaction 
between literary types (e.g. novel and 
drama). 

FRW 5934 Special Topics In Lan- 
guage Uterature (3). Content and ob- 
jectives to be determined by student 
and instructor. 

FRW 5938 Graduate Seminar (3). 

Topic and approach to be determined by 
students and instructor. (Approval of the 
Department required.) 

GER 5060 German for Reading Knowl- 
edge (3). Designed primarily for gradu- 
ate students who wish to attain 
proficiencyJor M.A. or Ph.D. require- 
ments. Open to any student who has no 
prior knowledge of the language. 

GER 5061 German for Reading Knowl- 
edge (3). Emphasis on translation of 
materials from tt>e student's field of spe- 
cialization. Prerequisite: GER 5060 or 
tfie equivalent. 

UN 5207C Acoustic Phonetics (3). In- 
troduction to principles of acoustic and 
instrumental phonetics, including tfie 
physics of speech sounds and use of 
tfie sound spectrograph and other instru- 
ments. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 and one 
additional course in phonetics/ptionol- 
ogy. Corequisite: One of the prereq- 
uisites may be counted as a corequisite. 

UN 5760 Research Methods In Lin- 
guistics (3). The collection and analysis 
of linguistic data: sampling techniques. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 63 



Interviews, recordings, questionnaires, 
transcription, basic statistical proce- 
dures, including the use of computer 
analysis. Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or 
equivalent. 

UN 5601 Soclollngulstlcs (3). Princi- 
pies and theories of linguistic variation 
with special attention to con'espon- 
dences betwreen social and linguistic 
variables. Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or 
equivalent. 

UN 5613 Dialectology (3). The geogra- 
phy of language variation: linguistic ge- 
ography, adases, national and regional 
studies. Dialectology within a modem so- 
dolinguistic frame work; research ap- 
proaches. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 and 
one other graduate-level linguistics 
course. 

UN 5625 Studies Irt Blllnguallsm (3). 

Readings and analysis of bilingual pro- 
grams and binational goals. Prereq- 
uisite: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

UN 5720 Second Language Acquisi- 
tion (3). Research, theories, and issues 
in second language acquisition. Topics 
include the Monitor Model, tfw role of 
the first language, motivation, age, indi- 
vidual differences, code-switching, and 
tfie environment; affective variables and 
attitudes. 

UN 6934 Special Topics in Unguis- 
tics (3). Content to be determined by 
students and instructor. (Approval of the 
Department required.) 

(See English listing for additional Lin- 
guistics courses.) 

SF>N 5060 Language for Reading 
Knowledge (3). Designed primarily for 
graduate students who wish to attain 
proficiency for M.A. or Ph.D. require- 
ments. Open to any student wtw fias no 
prior knowledge of the language. 

SPN 5061 Language for Reading 
Knowledge (3). Emphasis on tiansla- 
tion of materials from tiie student's field 
of specialization. Prerequisite: SPN 
5060 or the equivalent. 

SPN 5525 Spanlsii American Culture 
(3). A graduate survey of the major artis- 
tic phenomena in Latin America. Art, mu- 
sic, film, and literature will be discussed 
in their cultursil context. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing and permission of 
the instructor. 

SPN 5565 Studies in Blllnguallsm (3). 
Readings and analysis of bilingual pro- 
grams and tiinational goals. 



SPN 5845 History of the language 
(3). Historical development of the Span- 
ish language, primarily from the point of 
view of internal linguistic change. Span- 
ish as an example of general processes 
of language development. Prereq- 
uisites: LIN 3010 and one ottier course 
in Spanish linguistics. 

SPN 5908 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, or 
research. 

SPN 6505 Spanish Culture (3). Se- 
lected development in language, litera- 
ture, £U1, music, film, and the social 
institutions of Spain. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing and permission of in- 
structor. 

SPN 6535 The Hispanic Presence In 
the United States (3). Readings in lit- 
erature, culture, and language to illus- 
trate ttie experience of the major 
Hispanic groups in the United States. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 
permission of the instixictor. 

SPN 6930 Special Topics In Unguls- 
tics (3). Content to be determined by 
students and instmctor. (Approval of tiie 
Defjartment required.) 

SPN 6970 Thesis Research (1-10). Re- 
search toward completion of Master's 
Thesis. Repeatable. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of Department. 

SPT 5118 Uterature In Translation (3). 
Masterpieces of world literature. Open 
to students who are profk:ient in more 
than one language. 

SPW 5155 Comparative Studies (3). 

Cross-over and distirwtiveness in a 
multi-language problem, period, or aes- 
thetic. 

SPW 5237 The Traditional Spanish 
American Novel (3). Study and analy- 
sis of the traditional Spanish novel as a 
form of art, from 19th century LJzardi's 
El periquillo sarniento, to 1950. The nov- 
els and autfiors studied are repre- 
sentative of 'costijmbrismo', 
'romantidsmo', 'naturalismo', 'modernis- 
mo', and 'criollismo'. 

SPW 5277 Twentieth Century Spanish 
Novel, from 1956 to the Present (3). 

Analysis of tine Spanish novel from Fer- 
losio's El Jarama to tfie present. The 
perspective will be focused within histori- 
cal, social, and artistk: context. Repre- 
sentative autinors such as Cela, Martin 
Santos, Umbral, Dellt)es, Benet, Goyti- 
solo, etnd others will be included. 

SPW 5286 Contemporary Spanish 
American Novel (3). A study of the 
Spanish American Novel from 1950. 
The course will intensively and exten- 



sively focus on ttie novelists wtx> are 
best known for their innovations, defin- 
ing and analyzing the qualities which 
give originality and newness both in 
ttiemes and language. 

SFW 5346 Poetry of Jorge Guillen (3). 

Selected readings from the five volumes 
of Aire nuestro. Emphasis on the tech- 
niques of dose reading and explication. 
Related selections from Guillen's literary 
critidsm. 

SPW 5358 Graduate Seminar: Prose 
and Poetry of Jorge Luis Borges' (3). 

Close readings of short stories and po- 
etry. Emphiasis on Borge's linguistic and 
cultijral pluralism and the interplay of 
philosophy with tabulation. 

SPW 5359 Graduate Seminar: Poetry 
of Pablo-Neruda (3). Chronological ex- 
amination of the major works of Chile's 
Nobel Laureate. Related readings from 
Neruda's Memories. Emphasis on ttie 
poet's linguistic and aesthetic innova- 
tions. 

SPW 5425 Quevedo: Poetry (3). Ck>se 

reading of selected poems by Spain's 
greatest baroque poet and creator of 
modern Spanish satire, including poems 
on love, death, and metaphysical con- 
cerns, and a wide range of humorous 
poems. 

SPW 5426 Quevedo: Prose Satire (3). 
Close reading of selected satires in 
prose by Spain's greatest baroque sati- 
rist and creator of modem Spanish sat- 
ire. Indudes Quevedo's picaresque 
novel El Buscon, and his Suenos, or Vi- 
sions of Hell. 

SPW 5575 Spanish American Modem- 
ism (3). An in-depth study of prose and 
poetry of one of ttie most important peri- 
ods of Spanish American literature, fo- 
cusing on Marti, Dario, Najera, Casals, 
Silva, Valenda, Lugones, and Herrera y 
Reissig. 

SPW 5934 Special Topics In Un- 
guaga^Uterature (3). Content and ob- 
jectives to be determined t>y student 
and instructor. 

SPW 6395 Genre Studies (3). Examina- 
tion of a single literary form (e.g. short 
story, poeti^,) or ttie study of interactkxi 
between literary types (e.g. novel and 
drama). 

SPW 6936 Graduate Seminar (3). 

Topic and approach to be detennined by 
students and instructor. (Approval of tiie 
Department required.) 



64 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Physics 

Richard A. Bone, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson 
Yesim DaricI, Assistant Professor 
Rudolf Rebig, Associate Professor 
Bernard Gerstman, Associate Professor 
Kenneth Hardy, Professor 
Wal Leung, Assistant Professor 
Oren Maxwell, Associate Professor 
Stephen L. MIntz, Professor 
John W. Sheldon, Professor 
Walter van Hamme, Assistant Professor 
Xuewen Wang, Assistant Professor 
James R. Webb, Asastant Professor 

Master of Science in Pliysics 

The Master of Science In Physics is a 
45 semester hour program consisting of 
coursework at the 5000 and 6000 level 
and research with one of the departmen- 
tal research groups culminating in a 
master's thesis. Students entering the 
program must have a bachelor's degree 
or equivalent coursework in 
Physics. 

Required Courses: 

PHY 5115 Mathematical Physics I 3 
PHY 5116 Mathematical Physics II 3 
PHY 5240 Advanced Classical 

Mechanics 3 

PHY 5346 Advanced 

Electromagnetic 

Theory I 3 

PHY 5347 Advanced 

Electromagnetic 

Theory II 3 

PHY 6645 Advanced Quantum 

Mechanics I 3 

PHY 6646 Advanced Quantum 

Mechetnics II 3 

PHY 6524 Statistical Physics 3 

PHY 6935 Graduate Research 

Semineir 4-6 

In addition, three semester hours of spe- 
cialized coursework are required in the 
student's area of specialization and 12- 
14 hours of the»s work for a total of 45 
hours. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

AST-Astronomy; PHS-Physics/Special- 
ized; PHY-Physfcs; PHZ-Physlcs; PSC- 
Physical Sciences; ENU-Nuclear 
Engineering. 

AST 5214 Stellar Astrophysics (3) Top- 
tes in Stellar Astrophysics, in greater de- 
tail and depth than similar topics in AST 
3213. Emphasis on current stellar struc- 
ture, evolution models cind tfie underly- 
ing observational data. Prerequisites: 



PHY 3124, PHY 3503, PHY 4324, PHY 
4222 or equivalent. 

PHY 511S Mathematical Physics I (3). 

Methods of solution for problems In 
mathematical physics: Variational princi- 
ples, complex variables, partial differen- 
tial equations, integral equations, and 
transforms. Prerequisites: MAG 3313, 
MAP 3302. 

PHY 5116 Mathematicai Physics II (3). 

Additional solution methods in mathe- 
matical physics: Perturtiation metlxjds, 
Laplace's and Pbisson's Equations, 
waves, special functions, vector fields, 
vector waves. Prerequisite: PHY 51 15. 

PHY 5240 Advanced Classical Me- 
chanics (3). Advanced formulations of 
thie equations of motion and their appli- 
cations: tfie central field protilem, rigid 
body dynamics, oscillations and continu- 
ous systems. Prerequisite: PHY 4222. 

PHY 5346 Advanced Electromagnetic 
Theory I (3). Advanced treatment of 
classical electromagnetism: Electrostat- 
ics, Green's function, (^place's equa- 
tion, multipole expansion, 
magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, 
waves. Prerequisite: PHY 4324. 

PHY 5347 Advanced Electromagnetic 
Theory II (3). Additional topics in classi- 
cal electomagnetism: Wave guides, radi- 
ating and diffracting systems, Kirchoff's 
Integra! for diffraction, covariant formula- 
tion of field equations. Prerequisite: 
PHY 5346. 

PHY 5930 Seminar in Physics (1-3). A 

series of specialized lectures/seminars 
on selected topics in Physics/Astro- 
Physics. Prerequisites: Permission of 
Department. 

PHY 5936 Special Topics Research (1- 
10). Participation in an original investiga- 
tion in ttieoretical or experimental 
physics/astro-physics under direct fac- 
ulty supervision. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 

PHY 5937, PHY 5938 Seminar in Spe- 
cial Topics (3). Seminar work under tfie 
supervision of a faculty member on sub- 
ject material of mutual interest. 

PHY 6255 Molecular Biophysics (3). 

The use of ttieoretical physics tech- 
niques to investigate biological systems: 
Protein structure arxl dynamics, electron 
tunneling, nuclear tunneling, hemoglo- 
bin, photosynthesis, vision. Prerequisite: 
PHY 4605. 

PHY 6524 Statistical Physics (3). Fun- 
damental principles of statistical me- 
chanics; fluctuations, noise and 
irreversible ttiermodynamics; kinetic 



metfiods and transport theory. Prereq- 
uisites: PHY 3503 and PHY 4222. 

PHY 664S Advanced Quantum M«- 
chanlcs I (3). Advanced topics in quan- 
tum mechanics: Quantized systems, 
relativistic quantum mechanics, poten- 
tial scattering. Prerequisite: PHY 4605. 

PHY 6646 Advanced Quantum Me- 
chanics II (3). Additional topics in ad- 
vanced quantum mechetnics: Collision 
theory, symmetry transformations, con- 
servation laws, group theory. Prereq- 
uisite: PHY 6645. 

PHY 6651 Quantum Scattering The- 
ory I (3). Tfie investigation of atomic 
and electronic scattering processes: Po- 
tential scattering, long range potentials, 
electron-atom collisions. Prerequisite: 
PHY 6645. 

PHY 6652 Quantum Scattering The- 
ory 11 (3). The mathematical investiga- 
tion of scattering processes: 
Auto-ionization, fast vs. slow collisions, 
Regge poles, S and T matrices. Prereq- 
uisite: PHY 6651. 

PHY 6668 Relativistic Quantum Reld 
Theory I (3). Introduction to relativistic 
quantum fields: General formalism, 
Klein-Gordon field, Dirac field, vector 
fields, interacting fields, CPT theorem, 
reduction formulae, gauge tfieory. Pre- 
requisite: PHY 6646. 

PHY 6669 Relativistic Quantum Field 
II (3). Additional topics in relativistic 
quantum fields: perturbation theory, U 
matrix, Wick's tlieorem, dispersion rela- 
tions, renormaiization. Ward identity, 
renormalization group, path integral for- 
malism. Prerequisite: PHY 6668. 

PHY 6675 Quantum Theory of Many 
Particle Systems I (3). An introduction 
to the physics of many particle systems: 
Second quantization, Fock spaces. 
Boson and Fermion symmetry, Gell- 
Mann-Low theorem, diagrammatic ex- 
pansions, Goldstone theorem. 
Prerequisite: PHY 6646. 

PHY 6676 Quantum Theory of Many 
Particle Systems II (3). Additional top- 
ics in the piiysics of many particle sys- 
tems: Fermi gas, Bose condensation, 
Hartree-Fock approximation, random 
phase approximation, finite temperature 
formalism, hadrons. Prerequisite: PHY 
6675. 

PHY 6935 Graduate Research Semi- 
nar (1-2). Seminars presented by stu- 
dents, faculty, and visitors on a variety 
of topics of current research interest. Re- 
peataUe. Required every semester. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 65 



PHY 6970 Thesis Research (1-10). Re- 
search toward completion of Master's 
Thesis. Repeatable. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of Department. 

PHY 6971 Master's Thesis (3). Theo- 
retical and/or experimentai research 
leading to thesis. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of major professor. 

PHY 7980 Dissertation Research (1- 

9). Students conduct dissertation re- 
search at \he doctoral level in theoretical 
or experimentai physics under faculty su- 
pervision. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

PHZ 51 30 Theoretical Treatment of 
Experimentai Data (3). Statistical analy- 
sis of physical processes and statistical 
tests, with particular emphasis 

on instrumentation-related problems. 
Mathematical modeling and computer 
simulation. Prerequisite: Undergraduate 
statistics course, or equivalent, or per- 
mission of instaictor. 

PHZ 5234 Atomic and Molecular Colli- 
sion Phenomena (3). Investigation of 
atomic and molecular collision phenom- 
ena: Kinetic theory, elastic scattering, in- 
elastic scattering, excitation and 
ionization, heavy particle collisions. Pre- 
requisites: PHY 4605 and PHY 4222. 

PHZ 5405 Solid State Physics (3). 
Crystalline form of solids, lattice dynam- 
ics, metals, insulators, semi-conductors, 
crystalline surfaces, and amorphous ma- 
terials. Prerequisites: PHY 3124 or CHM 
3411. 

PHZ 5505 Low Energy Plasma Phys- 
ics (3). The investigation of the kinetics 
of rarefied gases and thermal plasmas: 
Phase space, random currents, orbit the- 
ory, plasma sheaths, radiation, the pinch 
effect. Prerequisites: PHY 3503, PHY 
4324, and PHY 4222. 

PHZ 5606 Special Relativity (3). A de- 
tailed study of special relativity: Lorentz 
transformations, relativistic electrody- 
namics. Prerequisite: PHY 3124. 

PHZ 6326 Low Energy Nuclear Phys- 
ics I (3). Introduction to the physics of 
nuclei and nuclear processes: Nuclear 
forces, scattering processes and nu- 
clear models. Prerequisite: PHY 4605. 

PHZ 6327 Low Energy Nuclear Phys- 
ics II (3). Additional topics in nuclear 
physics: The shell and collective mod- 
els, nuclear reactions and applications, 
scattering theory, entrance channel phe- 
nomena, rearrangement collision and 
breakup reactions. Prerequisite: PHZ 
6326. 



PHZ 6354 introduction to Particle 
Physics (3). An introduction to modern 
particle theory: Elementary field theory, 
symmetries, quantum electrodynamics, 
quari^-parton model, quantum chromody- 
namics, Weinberg-Salam model. Prereq- 
uisite: PHY 6646. 

PHZ 6426 Advanced Solid State Phys- 
ics (3). Electronic structures of solids 
and surfaces, electron-electron interac- 
tion, superconductivity, magnetism in 
solids, amorphous systems, glasses, 
polymers, percolation, localization, 
phase transition, fractals. Prerequisites: 
PHY 4324 and PHY 4605. 



Political Science 

Joel Gottlieb, Associate Professor and 

Chairperson 
Bruce Detwiler, Associate Professor 
Eduardo Gamarra, Assistant Professor 
Antonio Jorge, Professor 
Dario Moreno, Assistant Professor 
Brian Nelson, Associate Professor 
Nicol Rae, Assistant Professor 
Marie Rosenberg, Professor 
Cheryl Rubent>erg, Associate Professor 
Rebecca Saiolcar, Assistant Professor 
John Stacic, Professor 
Judith H. Stiehm, Professor and 

Provost 
Mary Volcansek, Professor 
Christopher Warren, Associate 

Professor 

The Department of Political Science 
does not presently offer a degree pro- 
gram at tfie graduate level but does 
however offer graduate courses. Tliese 
courses are offered to supplement other 
graduate degree programs at the Univer- 
sity. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

OPO-Comparative Politics; INR-lnterna- 
tbnal Relations; POS-Political Science; 
POT-Poiitical Theoi^; PUP-Public Policy. 

CPO 5036 Politics of Development 
(5). This course examines divergent ex- 
planations for development and under- 
development. Of central importarx» are 
the concepts and theories which empha- 
size ttie political dimensions of develop- 
ment, including theory and concept. 



processes of development, and actors 
in the development process. 

CPO 5935 Topics In Comparative Poli- 
tics (1-6). A rigorous examination of a 
topic in comparative politics. Subject 
matter varies according to instructor. 
Topic will be announced in advance. 

CPO 6936 Seminar in Comparative 
Polltk^s (3). Graduate seminar on spe- 
cial topic in comparative politics. Topic 
to be announced in advance. 

INR 5087 Ethnicity and the Politics of 
Development (3). This course exam- 
ines tfie conceptual and substantive di- 
mensions of ettinicity in tfie context of 
world politics and political development. 
The course will highlight ethnicity and 
ethnic groups as critical factors in North- 
South politics. 

INR 5414 Topics in International Law 
(3). An intensive examination of tfie po- 
litical dimensions of international law in 
the context of rapidly changing global 
political relations. 

INR 5933 Topics In Interriational Poli- 
ttes (1-6). A rigorous examination of a 
topic in intennatlonal politics. Subject 
matter varies according to instiuctor. 
Topic to be announced in advance. 

INR 6007 Semirtar in international 
Politics (3). Graduate seminar on spe- 
cial topic in international politics. Topic 
to be announced in advance. 

INR 6205 World Politics (3). This 
course provides graduate students with 
an understanding of tfie major concep- 
tual approaches to worid politics. It em- 
phasizes tfie analysis of significant 
actors, institutions, and processes at 
work in tfie contemporary global system 
as well as possibile future alternatives. 

INR 6939 Semlnar.in International 
Law (3). Allows for specialized and topi- 
cal offerings by regular and visiting fac- 
ulty. Also permits experimental courses. 

POS 51 58 Topics in Politics (VAR). 
Sut)ject matter varies according to in- 
structor. 

POS 5638 Topics in Public Law (1-6). 

A rigorous examination of a topic in pub- 
lic law. Subject matter varies according 
to instructor. Topic will be announced in 
adveince. 

POS 5706 Methodology (3). This 
course is an introduction to the principal 
concepts and techniques of quantitative 
and non-quantitative methodology in the 
Social Sciences. It is designed to famil- 
iarize the student with the language and 
format of quantitative and non-quantita- 
tive applications in order to permit stu- 



66 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



dents to deal effectively with the litera- 
ture of their field. 

POS 5909 Independent Study (1-6). 

Designed for advanced students who 
wish to pursue specialized topics in f>o- 
litical science. Arrangements must be 
made with instructor during prior 
semester. 

POS 5932 Topics In Urban Politics 
(VAR). An extensive examination of the 
processes by which social conflicts In 
American urban areas are represented 
and regulated. Emphasis is on ttie ways 
in which urtsan problems are identified 
and proposed solutions formulated, le- 
gitimatized, and administered by urtsan 
policy-making processes, includes a dis- 
cussion of urban political culture. En- 
ables the student to understand the 
major problems confronting communi- 
ties in urt>an areas. 

POS 6146 Seminar in Urban Politics 
(VAR). Graduate seminar on special top- 
ics in urban politics. Topic to be an- 
nounced in advance. 

POS 6934 Seminar in Politics (VAR). 

Subject matter varies according to in- 
structor. 

POS 6939 Seminar in Public Law 
(VAR). Graduate seminar on special 
topic in public law. Topic to be an- 
nounced in advance. 

POS 6976 Thesis (1-6). Requires stu- 
dents to enroll for thesis or dissertation 
research for at least one credit hour 
every semester in wNch ttiey are en- 
gaged in such research. Prerequisites: 
All other coursework for the Master's in 
International Studies. 

POT 5934 Topics in Political Theory 
(VAR). An intensive examination of se- 
lected topics dealing with political the- 
ory. Subjects will vary, depending upon 
ttie desires of students and faculty. Al- 
lows the student to choose topics of par- 
ticular interest to him or her. 

PUP 5934 Topics In Public Policy (1- 

6). A rigorous examination of a topic in 
public policy. Subject matter varies ac- 
cording to instructor. Topic will be an- 
nounced in advance. 

PUP 6007 Seminar in Public Policy (1- 

6). Graduate seminar on special topic 
dealing with public policy analysis. Sub- 
ject matter varies according to instnjc- 
tor. Topic to be announced in 
advance. 



Psychology 

Paul Foos, Associate Professor and 

Chairperson 
Lorraine Bahrick, Associate Professor 
Milton Blum, Professor Emeritus 
Brian Cutler, Associate Professor 
Marvin Dunn, Associate Professor 
Joan Erber, Professor 
Luis Escovar, Associate Professor 
Gordon FInley, Professor 
Ronald Fisher, Professor 
Arthur Rexser, Associate Professor 
Scott Fraser, Associate Professor 
Jacob Gewirtz, Professor 
Edward Girden, Distinguished 

Professor Emeritus 
Fernando Gonzalez-Relgosa, 

Associate Professor 
David Kravitz, Assistant Professor 
William Kurtines, Professor 
Mary Levitt, Associate Professor 
Gary Moran, Professor 
Janat Parker, Assodate Professor 
James Rotton, Associate Professor 
Juan Sar>chez, Assistant Professor 
Bernard Saper, Professor 
Wendy Silverman, Associate Professor 

Master of Science in 
Psychology 

The Masters of Science in Psychology 
program at ttie University is designed to 
train practitioners and researchers wtxj 
can function in a variety of applied set- 
tings. The core curriculum and admis- 
sion prerequisites are intended to 
provide students with a base of knowl- 
edge in psychology. A distinctive feature 
of tfie program is its emphasis on a 
dose working relationship between stu- 
dent and faculty. Under faculty supervi- 
sion, students are encouraged to 
develop individually tailored programs of 
study that reflect both student interests 
and program strengths. 

The curriculum consists of 36 semes- 
ter hours of graduate study in wNch the 
exposures focus specifically on training 
the student to perform the skills men- 
tioned ahiove. Students are expected to 
select electives, project/thesis topics, 
and supervised field experiences that 
meet not only the degree requirements, 
but also their academic interest and par- 
ticular professional objectives. Six of the 
36 semester credit hours consist of Mas- 
ter's thesis credits. 

Doctor of Philosophy in 
Psychology 

The doctorate program in psychology 
has a two-fold focus: (1 ) Life-span devel- 
opment (2) applied psychology. The 
program emphasizes normal develop- 



ment as well as cross-cultural and url^an 
perspectives on the life span and legal 
and industrial/organizational applied psy- 
cfx)logy. The emphasis is on academic 
quality and the curriculum is designed to 
foster a commitment both to basic re- 
search and to application as an integral 
. part of tfie IrxJividual student's specialty 
area development. The curriculum of- 
fers a broad background in life-span de- 
velopment and applied psychology 
while encouraging the development of 
an area of specialization early in gradu- 
ate training. 

Students are expected to master a 
series of core-course requirements de- 
signed to facilitate a thorough grounding 
in theory, methodology, and content 
both in basic and applied research. In 
addition, a number of seminars reflect- 
ing specialized foci are offered. Stu- 
dents are also required to pursue 
specific areas of interest through inde- 
pendent study with individual faculty 
members and through apprenticeship 
with a primary advisor for the purpose of 
acquiring direct research experience. 

Graduate Admission 
Requirements 

The following are in addition to the Uni- 
versity's Graduate Admission Require- 
ments: 

1. A 3.0 or higher GPAduring the 
last two years as an upper division stu- 
dent or a total score (quantitative plus 
vert)al) of 1 ,000 or higher on the GRE 
tor ttie Master's degree and 1100 or 
higher for the Ph.D. degree, or both. For- 
eign students whose native language is 
not English must take the Test of Eng- 
lish as a Foreign Language (the TOEFL 
examination) and obtain a 500 score of 
higher. 

2. The GRE and GPA stated above 
are only minimum requirements. All ap- 
plications are reviewed by the Graduate 
Studies Admission Committee, wtiich 
makes the final admissions decisions. 
Since admission to the program is com- 
petitive, the committee's requirements 
are normally higher than the minimum 
aforementioned standards. 

Graduate Admissions Procedures 

Applicants must submit ttie following to 
the Graduate Studies Admission Com- 
mittee, Department of Psychology, Ror- 
ida International University, Miami, 
Rorida 33199: 

1 . A photocopy of the admission ap- 
plication submitted to the Admissions Of- 
fice. 

2. A brief essay stating thefeasons 
for the interest in ttie program and ca- 
reer goals. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 67 



3. Three letters of recommendation, 
preferably from previous instructors 
and/or persons familiar witfi applicant's 
academic background. 

Applicants to the program who are 
not psychwiogy majors may be accepted 
conditionally until they meet the cate- 
gory requirements, listed below, early In 
tfieir graduate career. A maximum of 
nine semester hours credit earned in 
the non-degree seeking student cate- 
gory exclusive of prerequisite under- 
graduate courses may be applied to 
graduate degree requirements. The un- 
dergraduate course requirements are 
designed to make certain tfiat students 
accepted into thie graduate program 
have a broad base of dependable psy- 
chological krwwiedge and acquaintance 
with tfie basic methodologies upon 
which tfie discipline is founded. 

Category A. Satisfactory completion 
of one psychology laboratory or re- 
search methods course. 

Category B. Satisfactory completion 
of introductory upper division statistics. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

CLP-Clinical Psychology; CYP-Commu- 
nity Psychology; DEP-Developmental 
Psychology; EAB-Experimental Analysis 
of Behavior; EDP-Educational Psychol- 
ogy; EXP-Experimental Psychology; 
INP-lndustrial and Applied Psychology; 
LIN-Lingulstlcs; PCO-Psychology for 
Counseling; PPE-Psychology of Person- 
ality; PSB-Psychobiotogy; PSY-Psychol- 
ogy; SOC-Sociotogy; SOP -Social 
Psychology; SPA-Speech Pathology 
and Audiology. 

CLP 5166 Advanced Abnormal Psy- 
chology (3). Advanced study of the 
causes, psychopathology manifesta- 
tions, and social and personal conse- 
quences of behavior disturbance. 
Emphasis is placed on tfie critical exami- 
nation of current research on tfie biologi- 
cal, psychological, and social aspects of 
these disorders. Clinical approaches to 
diagnosis, course, and prognosis in tfie 
contemporary mental health context (in- 
cluding 'practlcum' assignments if feasi- 
ble) are covered. 

CLP 5175 Personality Dynamics (3). A 
review of different approaches to the 
study of personality dynamics and of the 
related therapeutic modalities. Special 
consideration is given to psycfioanalysis 
and neo-analytk; psycfiology. Otfier 
therapeutic models wHch Influence cur- 
rent psychological Itiought are also con- 
sidered. Prerequisites: Successful 
completion of a course in tfieories of per- 



sonality, or equivalent. Permission of in- 
structor. 

CLP 5185 Current Issues in Mental 
Health (3). A critical, intensive examina- 
tion of selected, important issues in 
mental health. Emphasis is given to the 
empirical study of contemporary prob- 
lems related to the making of mental pa- 
tients; planning, programming, and 
administering mental health services; po- 
litical, ethical, and legal constraints on 
the operation of mental health facilities; 
interdisciplinary cooperation among 
helping sind human service profession- 
als; and evaluation of preventive care 
£ind treatment services. Prerequisite: Ab- 
normal Psychology or permission of tiie 
instructor. 

CLP 6168 Psychopathology Across 
the Ufe-Span (3). Exploration of the 
causes of psycfiopathology from a life- 
span developmental orientation and im- 
plications for theories of personality. 
Prerequisites: CLP 5166 and permission 
of insti-uctor. 

CLP 6395 Forensic Psychology.(3). 

This course surveys the practical and 
ethical issues surronding the interface 
between clinical psychology and ttie 
law. Prerequisite: CLP 4144, CLP 6168 
or equivalent of either. 

CLP 6437 Behavioral Assessment in 
Childhood (3). Standardized tests and 
inventories for tfie behavior assessment 
of infants, children, and adolescents will 
be surveyed. Prerequisites: Proseminar 
courses eind second year graduate 
standing. 

CLP 6438 Psychological Assessment 
(3). Theory, research, and applications 
of psychological assessment in areas 
such as interviewing, intellectual and 
cognitive functioning, and personality 
testing. May t>e repeated for credit witii 
different subject matter. Prerequisite: 
STA3122 and permission of instructor. 

CYP 5534 Groups as Agents of 
Change (3). Theory and practice in util- 
izing groups as agents of change or 
development in communities and organi- 
zations. Didactic presentation and struc- 
tured exercises focus on relevant 
issues. Stijdents design and implement 
problem-focused interventions, using 
class as client system. 

CYP 5535 Psychology of Institutional 
and Social Change (3). A stijdy of the 
theoretical basis of and strategies ap- 
plied to tfie process of effecting social 
change In community Institutions in- 
volved in the delivery of human services. 

CYP 5954 Community Psychology 
Reld Experiences II (5). Same orienta- 



tion and description as Reld Experience 
I. Students in this course will be able to 
pursue their wori< with community institu- 
tions in more depth. Prerequisite: Stu- 
dents enrolled in this course must have 
completed Community Psychology Reld 
Experiences I. 

CYP 6055 Psychological Theories 
and Research on Acculturation and 
MulUculturallsm (3). A review of tfieo- 
ries and research on acculturation and 
multicultijralism concepts with an em- 
phasis on tf-iose models that have gener- 
ated a substantial body of empirical 
research. Stress will be placed on tfie 
implications of these findings for commu- 
nity stability and disruption as well as 
tfie implications for the delivery of hu- 
man services in multicultural settings. 

CYP 6526 Psychological Methods of 
Program Evaluation (3). Development 
of skills for the psychological assess- 
ment monitoring and evaluation of hu- 
man service programs witii emphasis 
on the application of basic principles of 
behavioral science research in tfie fieU, 
exclusive of public school settings. 

CYP 6536 Principles and Methods of 
Psychological Consultation (3). An 

analysis of tfie basic psychological ap- 
proaches underiying consultation, with 
special emphasis on tfie practical appli- 
cation of the processes of learning, cog- 
nition, and interpersonal relations to 
techniques of consulting witi^ various 
'target' agencies, individual clients, and 
other professionals in community set- 
tings. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
at FlU or permission of instnjctor. 

CYP 6766 The Psychology of Cross- 
cultural Sensitization in a Multicul- 
tural Context (3). A series of weekly 
seminars to increase student sensitivity 
to working with clients from different cul- 
tural backgrounds. Thie objectives of the 
course are: (1) facilitating shjdent aware- 
ness of cultural differences and their im- 
pact on social and human services 
delivery systems, (2) identifying tfie stu- 
dent's own personal cultursd biases and 
values when interacting witii culturally 
different persons, and (3) teaching stij- 
dents to develop culturally appropriate 
intervention skills. 

CYP 6936 Current Issues in Commu- 
nity Psychology (3). An intensive analy- 
sis of contemporary tfieoretical, 
practical, and professional aspects of 
tfie field of Community Psychology. Top- 
ics discussed may lead to the graduate 
project required of each student Prereq- 
uisite: Admission to graduate study in 
psychology (otfier graduate students ad- 
mitted by permission of instructor). 



68 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



DEP 5056 Issues In Life-Span Devel- 
opmental Psycfiology: Infancy 
through Old Age (3). A survey in depth 
of theories, issues, methods, and data 
in life-span developmental psychology 
through the entire age range. Prereq- 
uisites: DEP 3001 or DEP 4464, or their 
equivalents, are recommended. 

DEP 5058 Biological Basis of Behav- 
ior Development (3). Introduction to 
tfieory and research underiying behav- 
ioral development. Covers such pre-and 
post-natal determinants as evolution, ge- 
netics, neuroendocrines, as well as so- 
cial development, behavioral ecology, 
eind sodobiology. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing or permission of instructor. 
Corequisite: Proseminar courses. 

DEP 5068 Applied Life Span Develop- 
mental Psychology (3). This course is 
designed to acquaint the student with 
various applications in life-span develop- 
mental psychology. An overview of gen- 
eral issues and areas of application is 
offered, and specific applications are 
considered. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 

DEP 5099 Proseminar in Infancy, 
Childhood, arKi adolescence (3). Pro- 
vides a comprehensive review of issues 
in perceptual, cognitive, social, emo- 
tional, and personality development 
from infancy through adolescence. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor. Corequisite: 
Pro-seminars. 

DEP 51 18 Cuirent Issues in Cognitive 
and Perceptual Development In in- 
fancy (3). Provides an in-depth analysis 
of current issues, methods, research 
and theory of cognitive and perceptual 
development during the first year of life. 
Special emphasis on object and event 
perception, memory, and imitation. Pre- 
requisites: Two courses in developmen- 
tal psychology - any level recommended. 

DEP 5405 Proseminar in Psychology 
of Adulthood and Aging (3). A compre- 
fiensive review of topics in adulthood 
and aging including: biological changes, 
social processes, work, family, cogni- 
tion, memory, personality, and psychopa- 
tinology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or permission of insbuctor. 

DEP 5608 Theoretical Perspectives in 
Deveiopmental Psychology (3). The 
focus of tNs course is on the major para- 
digms, models, and theories that have 
been influentiEtl in developmental psy- 
chology, both historically and contempo- 
raneously. Meta-theoretical issues, 
paradigmatic influences, and specific 
theories are considered. Prerequisite: 



Graduate standing or permission of in- 
structor. 

DEP 5725 Research Seminar in Psy- 
chosocial Development (1). This 
course is designed to develop research 
sl<ills and competencies in thie area of 
psychosocial development. Tfie empha- 
sis of the course is on involvement in 
original research. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. Corequisite: Senior un- 
dergraduate or graduate standir>g. 

DEP 5796 Methods of Developmental 
Research (3). Survey of issues and 
metiiods at all stages of life-span devel- 
opmental research including ttieofy, 
metiiods, design, and data reduction. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or per- 
mission of instructor. Corequisite: 
Proseminars. 

DEP 6069 Seminar in LHe-Span Cog- 
nitive Developmental (3). This gradu- 
ate seminar will examine, tiirough 
intensive reading and seminar discus- 
sion, the major tiieories, issues and em- 
pirical research on cognitive growth, 
change and decline from infancy 
through old age. Prerequisites: Two 
courses in Developmental Psychology 
(any level). 

DEP 6096 Seminar in Psychology of 
Life-Span Social Development (3). 
This course includes a consideration of 
general issues and discussion of the ap- 
plication of life-span models to selected 
topics development. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing or permission of instructor. 

DEP 6117 Psychology of Caregiving 
(3). A survey of theory and research on 
the effects of caregiving/parenting be- 
haviors, and conditions on behavior out- 
comes in offsprings, botti for infra- 
humans and humans. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of in- 
stil ctor. 

DEP 6145 Psychology of Culture and 
Childhood (3). Extensive cross-cultural 
readings will serve as tiie focus for semi- 
nar discussion of cultural influences on 
children's t)iological, motor, perceptual, 
cognitive, social, and personality devel- 
opment. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing or permission of inshiictor. 

DEP 6186 Social Development and 
Learning (3). Theories and facts of so- 
do-emotional development, learning, 
and the acquisition and mainterrance of 
social relationships in eariy life are ex- 
amined critically. Prerequisites: DEP 
3000 or DEP 3001 or equivalent. 

DEP 6438 Gerontological Assess- 
ment (3). This seminar for advanced 
graduate students involves an intensive 
examination of \he theory, validity, and 



reliability of the major assessment instru- 
ments in gerontology. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

DEP 6465 Psychology of Culture and 
Aging (3). An intensive examination of 
cultural influerwes on social and psycho- 
logical aging processes including minor- 
ity aging and involving seminar 
discussion and independent projects. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

DEP 6466 Cognitive Processes in Ag- 
ing (3). An intensive analysis of tiie 
background and recent developments in 
tiie area of age changes and age differ- 
ences in intellectual functioning and 
learning memory processes. Prereq- 
uisite: DEP 5405. 

DEP 6477 Psychology of Social Proc- 
esses in Aging (3). An intensive analy- 
sis of tfie tiackground and recent 
developments in theoretical models of 
social development, personality proc- 
esses, and social processes in the older 
adult. Prerequisite: DEP 5405. 

DEP 6645 Cognitive and Language 
(3). Course covers the acquisition of 
cognitive processes and language, and 
ttieir interdependence. Tfieory and re- ' 
search focusing on innate vs. learned 
aspects are discussed. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of in- 
structor. 

DEP 6936 Current Literature in the 
Psychology of Infancy, Childhood, 
arKi AdolescerKe (3). This seminar will 
present and evaluate current research 
articles in tiie major journals in infant, 
child, and adolescence psyctrology. Pre- 
requisite: Second year graduate stand- 
ing. 

DEP 6937 Current Literature in the 
Psychology of Adulthood and Aging 
(3). This seminar will present and evalu- 
ate current research articles in the major 
journals in the psychiology of adultiiood 
cind aging. Prerequisite: Second year 
graduate standing. 

DEP 6945 Ufe-span Developmental 
Psychology Practicum (3). This is an 
individually tailored program wtiere stu- 
dents will work in cin agency on a spe- 
cific problem or project, culminating in a 
final written report. Prerequisite: Second 
year graduate standing. 

EAB 5655 Advanced Methods of Be- 
havior Change (3). An intensive stijdy 
of selected metfiods of modifying hu- 
man befiavior, empfiasizing the applica- 
tions of the principles of respondent and 
operant conditioning, as well as tfx>se 
derived from modern social learning 
tfieories. Practice and role playing op- 
portunities are provided in behavior ther- 



Graduate Catalog 



\L^ 



College of Arts and Sciences / 69 



apy, relaxation thierapy, bel^avior modifi- 
cation, biofeedbacic or similar behavioral 
approaches. Prerequisites: EAB 4794, 
CLP 4374, GYP 4144; enrollment In an 
authiorized program; equivalent bacl«- 
ground; or permission of instructor. 

EDP 6935 Special Topics In Educa- 
tional Psychology (VAR). An intensive 
analysis of a p>articular topic In educa- 
tior«l psychology. Students must have 
topics approved by the instructor prior to 
registration. Open only to advanced and 
graduate students in tfie College of Edu- 
cation. 

EXP 5005 Advanced Experimental 
Psychology Lecture (2) 
EXP 5005L Advanced Experimental 
Psychology Lab (3). Lecture and Labo- 
ratory courses investigating experimen- 
tal research in ttie fundamental 
processes of human behavior. Includes 
preceptual, cognitive, and linguistic proc- 
esses. Prerequisites: PSY3212 and 
STA3122orSTA3111. 

EXP 5099 Prosemlnar In Experimen- 
tal Psychology (3). Provides a compre- 
hensive review of current research and 
ttieory in areas such as learning, mem- 
ory, cognition, sensation, and percep- 
tion. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. 

EXP 5406 Theories of Learning (3). 
The major tJ>eoretical systems of learn- 
ing are covered, with the intent of deter- 
mining fx)w well each accounts for the 
pherK>mena of learning. Emphasis is 
placed on exploring the controversial is- 
sues raised by extant theories, and the 
experimental resolution of these theoreti- 
cal controversies. The impact of ttieory 
on current thinking about learning is 
considered. 

EXP 5508 Applied Cognitive Psychol- 
ogy (3). Covers the basic tfieories of 
cognitive psychology perception, atten- 
tion, memory, learning, knowledge, with 
emphasis on application to real-world 
problems. Prerequisite: Graduate 
Standing. 

EXP 7747 Practicum In Causal K/lodel- 
Ing (3). Introduction to linear structural 
relations models, emphasizing logical 
and practical problems in inferring cau- 
sation for experimental and correlational 
research designs. 

INP 6136 Psychology of Legal Con- 
sultation (3). Practice in basic non-clini- 
cal areas in which psychologists assist 
attorneys, including jury selection, sur- 
veys, and simulations. Prerequisite: 
SOP 6098 or equivalent. 

INP 6940 Strategies and Methods of 
Applied Psychological Research (3). 



A practicum course in tfie psycfnlogical 
research strategies and tfie application 
of computers In tfie analyses of psycho- 
logical data. 

UN 5701 Psychology of Language 
(3). An overview of tiie psychology of 
language and the psychological 'reality' 
of linguistic structure. Behavioristic vs. 
cognitive views of psycholinguistics are 
examined. Consideration is given to the 
biological bases of language and 
thiought, language acquisition, and lan- 
guage pathology. 

PSY 5206 Fundamentals of Design of 
Experlnrtents (3). CRD and RCB de- 
signs. Latin square designs. Factorial, 
nested and nested-factorial experi- 
ments. Rxed, random and mixed mod- 
els. Split-plot designs. Covariance 
Einalysis. Prerequisites: STA3122 and 
31 23, or tiieir equivalents. 

PSY 5246C Multivariate Analysis In 
Applied Psychological Research (3). 

Covers basic techniques of multivariate 
analysis, emphasizing the rationale and 
applications to psychological research. 
Includes multiple regression, Hotellings 
T#, MANOVA, principle component 
analysis, and factor analysis. Prereq- 
uisite: STA3123 or equivalent; linear al- 
gebra recommended. 

PSY 5908 Directed Individual Study 
(VAR). Under tine supervision of an in- 
structor in the graduate degree pro- 
gram, the graduate student delves 
individually into a topic of mutual inter- 
est which requires intensive and pro- 
found analysis and which is not 
available in a formal offering. May t>e re- 
peated once. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instf-uctor. 

PSY 5917 Psychology Research 
Prosemlnar (3). Specialized research 
and presentation to faculty members in 
his or her major research area. Seminar 
style. This course is intended as a core 
course for the masters program in psy- 
chology. Prerequisite: Full graduate ad- 
mission. 

PSY 5918 Supervised Research 
(VAR). Research atpprenticeship under 
tfie direction of a research professor or 
a thesis advisor. Prerequisite: Full gradu- 
ate admission. 

PSY 5939 Special Topics in Psychol- 
ogy (VAR). Special topics will be an- 
nounced in advance. 

PSY 6328 Principles of Psychological 
Assessment (3). This course provides 
advanced instruction in tfie principles 
and methods underiying tfie administi-a- 
tion, construction and evaluation of 



psychological tests and measures. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing. 

PSY 6956 Psychology Reld Experi- 
ence (VAR). Placement of students in 
applied settings for the purpose of devel- 
oping community-based experience in 
tfie application of tfieoretical and metii- 
odologlcal approaches. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

PSY 6971 Master's Thesis in Psychol- 
ogy (3-6). Supervised research on an 
original research project submitted in 
partial fulfillment of Master's degree re- 
quirement. 

PSY 7940 Supervised Teaching In 
Psychology (1). Supervised teaching 
under the guidance of faculty advisor. 
May be repeated only ttiree times. Pre- 
quisite: Doctoral graduate study. 

PSY 7980 Dissertation Research In 
Psychology (3-12). Supervised re- 
search on an original research project 
submitted in partial fulfillment of doctoral 
degree requirements. Prerequisite: Ad- 
mission to candidacy. 

SOP 5058 Prosemlnar In Social Psy- 
chology (3). An in-deptii examination of 
tfie role of social psychology in tfie so- 
cial sciences and tfie major substantive 
prokiiems as tfiey relate to contempo- 
rary societal issues. Minimum Prereq- 
uisite: An inb'oductory course in soda! 
psychology or its equivalent. 

SOP 5316 Theories and Methods of 
Cross-Cultural Research (3). An inten- 
sive analysis of contemporary theories 
and methods of cross-cultural research 
in psycfxjiogy including topics such as: 
culture as a research treatinent, differen- 
tial incidence of personality ti-aits, tfie 
use of ethnographies, 'etic' vs. 'emic' dis- 
tinction. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or permission of instructor. 

SOP 5616 Social Psychology of Or- 
ganizations (3). The application of con- 
cepts and theories from social psy- 
chology and sociology to the organiza- 
tional setting. Emphasis would be on 
role tiieory, value formation and the op- 
eration of norms, including tfieir devel- 
opment and enforcement. Formal and 
informal organization stixicture, power 
and authority concepts, and leadership 
tiieories will be covered. Communica- 
tion processes and networks and tfieir 
effects on task accomplishment and sat- 
isfaction will be included. 

SOP 6098 Prosemlnar in Legal Psy- 
chology (3), Tfie application of psycfio- 
logical research methods and 
psychological knowledge to contempo- 
rary issues in criminal and dvil litiga- 
tions. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 



70 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Sociology/Anthropology 

Usandro Perez, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson 
Jerry Brown, Associate Professor 
Janet Chernela, Associate Professor 
Stephen Fjellman, Professor 
Chris Girard, Assistant Professor 
Hugh Gladwin, Associate Professor 
Guillermo Grenier, Associate Professor 
Jannes Ito-Adler, Assistant Professor 
Antonio Jorge, Professor 
A. Douglas KIncaid, Assistant 

Professor 
Barry Levlne, Professor 
Kathleen Logan, Associate Professor 
Shearon Loweiy, Associate Professor 
Anthony P. Maingot, Professor 
James Mau, Professor and Acting 

Provost 
Betty Mon'ow, Associate Professor 
William Osborne, Associate Professor 
Patricia Pessar, Associate Professor 
Alejandro Portes, Patricia and Phillip 

Frost Endowed Professor 
Alex Stepick, Associate Professor 
William T. Vickers, Professor 
Lois West, Assistant Professor 

Master of Arts in Comparative 
Sociology 

The M.A. program in Comparative Soci- 
ology provides students with advanced 
educational opportunities in social sci- 
ence research and analysis leading to 
professional-level competence and em- 
ployment opportunities in higher educa- 
tion, government service, and the 
private sector. This M.A. program can 
also serve as preparation for doctoral- 
level studies in Sociology and Anthropol- 
ogy. The M.A. curriculum emphasizes 
our faculty strengths in Sociology, So- 
ciocultural Anthropology, and cross-cul- 
tural research, and provides a strong 
foundation in social theory and meth- 
ods. Selected electives, graduate collo- 
quiums, and a research thesis complete 
the requirements for the M.A. in Com- 
parative Sociology. 

Admission Requirements 

Application to the Master of Arts pro- 
gram in Comparative Sociology is made 
through FlU's Office of Admissions. The 
minimum requirements for admission in- 
clude: 

1 . A tiaccalaureate degree from an 
accredited college or university; 

2. A 3.2 grade point average (GPA) 
or higher during tl>e last two years of the 
undergraduate program, or a combined 
score of 1 000 or higher on the vert>al 
and quantitative sections of the Gradu- 
ate Record Examination (GRE); 



3. Two letters of reference from for- 
mer instructors or others who are able 
to evaluate thie applicant's potential for 
graduate study; 

4. Foreign students wfhose native lan- 
guage is not English must take the 
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign 
Language) and obtain a score of 500 or 
higher. 

Each applicant to thie program must 
complete a graduate application form, 
and arrange for tfie sending of official 
transcripts of all prior college work, an 
official report of GRE scores, and letters 
of reference to the Office of Admissions. 
An application will not be processed un- 
til the file is complete. 

Applications for admission are evalu- 
ated by the Departmental Graduate 
Studies and Assistantship Committee. 
Admissions are competitive, so the 
meeting of the minimum requirements 
does not guarantee acceptance into the 
M.A. program. 

A baccalaureate major in Sociology 
or Anthropology is not required for ad- 
mission to tfie M.A. Program in Com- 
parative Sociology. Beginning graduate 
students who fiave no prior coursework 
in Sociology, Anthropology, or Statistics 
may be required to take one or more un- 
dergraduate courses as prerequisites 
for graduate courses (based on the 
Graduate Committee's evaluation of the 
student's undergraduate record). 

Degree Requirements 

The M.A. in Comparative Sociology re- 
quires a total of 36 semester hours of 
credits, including 15 credits in core 
courses, 15 credits in electives, and a 
master's thesis based upon tfie stu- 
dent's original research (including 6 
credits of enrollment in SYA 6975 The- 
sis). A maximum of six credits of gradu- 
ate coursework may be transferred from 
other institutions, subject to tfie ap- 
proval of the Graduate Committee. 

Required Courses (36): 

SYA 61 25 Classical Social Theories 3 
SYA 61 26 Contemporary Social 

Theories 3 

SYA 6305 Research Methods I 3 

SYA 6306 Research Methods II 3 

SYA 6925 Graduate Colloquium in 
Comparative Sociology 
(1 credit course taken 
three times) 3 

Four electives in Sociology and Anthro- 
pology (must be at the 5000-level or 
higher) 12 

One elective In another department 
(must be numbered 5000 or above and 
be approved by the graduate advisor 3 
SYA 6975 Thesis 6 



Graduation Requirements 

To remain in good standing and to qual- 
ify for graduation, students must main- 
tain a graduate GPA of 3.0 or higher. All 
M.A. course requirements must be met 
and a tfiesis must be completed eind ac- 
cepted after presentation to a Thesis 
Committee cfiosen by tfie student's and 
tfie Thesis advisor. All requirements for 
tfie M.A. in Comparative Sociology, in- 
cluding the successful defense of the 
thesis, must be completed within six 
years of tfie first enrollment in the gradu- 
ate program. 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

ANT-Anthropology; DHE-Demography & 
Human Ecology; HUS-Human Services; 
LIN-Linguistics; MAF-Marriage & Fam- 
ily; SYA-Sociological Analysis; SYD-So- 
ciology of Demography and Area 
Studies; SYG-Sociology, General; SYO- 
Social Organization; SYP-Social Proc- 
esses. 

ANT 5316 American Culture and Soci- 
ety (3). Anthropological analysis of tfie 
cultures and subcultures of the United 
States, focusing on the social, ethnic, 
and regional organizations and their cor- 
responding value and symbolic sys- 
tems. Prerequiate: Graduate standing 
or permission of instaictor. 

ANT 5496 Social Research and Analy- 
sis (3). A graduate overview of the sd- 
entific methods used in intercultural 
studies. Includes tfie philosophical basis 
of science, research design, and hy- 
pothesis testing using both secondary 
and original data. Students will conduct 
a research project in this course. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate status or permission of 
tfie instructor. 

ANT 5548 Ecological Anthropology 
(3). Theories of human adaptation, in- 
cluding environmental determinism, pos- 
sibilism, cultural ecology, materialism, 
and evolutionary ecology. Credit for both 
ANT 3403 and ANT 5548 will not be 
granted. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing or permission of instructor. 

ANT 5908 Directed Individual Study 
(VAR). Supervised readings and/or field 
research and training. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of Instructor. 

ANT 5915 Directed Field Research 
(VAR). Permission of instructor required. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 71 



ANT 6931 Seinli\ar on Latin America 
(3). Analysis of Latin American cultures 
and classes using case studies. Stu- 
dents read a series of anthropological or 
sociological wori<s and discuss them in 
a semir«r format. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing or permission of instructor. 

ANT 6932 Seminar In Human Ecology 

(3). Analysis of human ecology using 
case studies. Students read a series of 
works on human adaptations and dis- 
cuss them in a seminar format. Prereq- 
uisite: ANT 3403 or ANT 6548 or 
equivalent. 

SYA 5135 Sociology of Knowledge 
(3). The study of the theoretical basis of 
knowledge and the inter-relatedness of 
knowledge and social factors, particu- 
lariy as krKiwIedge relates to institutional 
forms of befiavior. 

SYA 5909 Directed Individual Study 
(VAR). Supervised readings and/or field 
research and training. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. 

SYA 5941 Directed Field Researcli 
(VAR). Permission of instructor required. 

SYA 6125 Classical Social Theories 

(3). Classical sodal theories of the 19th 
arid eariy 20th centuries. Includes the 
ideas of such thinkers as Spencer, 
Comte, Durkheim, Marx, \Neber, Sim- 
mel, Pareto, Morgan, Tylor and Boas. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or per- 
mission of instructor. 

SYA 6126 Contemporary Social Theo- 
ries (3). The major currents and trends 
in contemporary sociological theory. Em- 
ph£isis on the application of tfieories to 
specific research issues and practices. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or per- 
mission of instructor. 

SYA 6305 Research Methods i (3). 
The first in a two course sequence on re- 
search methods in comparative sociol- 
ogy. Includes research design and 
hypothesis testir)g, participant ot>sen/a- 
tion, interviewing techniques and survey 
research. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
\ng or permission of instructor. 

SYA 6306 Research Methods ti (3). 
The second in a two-course sequence 
on research methods in comparative so- 
ciology. Includes the quantitative analy- 
sis of sociological research data, and 
the preparation of written reports and ar- 
ticles. Prerequisite: SYA 6305 and STA 
31 11 or STA 61 66 or equivalent. 

SYA 6925 Graduate Colloquium In 
Comparative Sociology (1). Colloqui- 
ums presented by facul^, visiting schol- 
ars, ar>d graduate students on topics of 



current research interest. Repeatable. 
Prerequisite: Graduate starxling. 

SYA 6943 South Rorida Area Study 
(3). Current issues in South Rorida Stud- 
ied through large-scale survey research 
conducted by class members. Provides 
experience in resesirch techniques and 
the development and testing of theory. 
Prerequisites: SYD 6625 and SYA 6305. 

SYA 6975 Thesis (1-6). Registration for 
students working on thie thesis for the 
M.A. in Comparative Sociology or the 
M.A. in International Studies. Prereq- 
uisite: All other course work for the M.A. 
in Comparative Sociology or Intema- 
tional Studies. 

SYD 5045 Demographic Analysis (3). 

The study of tfie processes that deter- 
mine the size and composition of hu- 
man populations. Emphasis on 
demographic transition theory and the 
antecedents and consequences of differ- 
ential growth rates throughout the world. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

SYD 6236 International Migration and 
Refugees (3). Comparative analysts of 
the causes, consequences, artd policies 
concerning population movements 
across national borders. Includes review 
of various theories of labor migration. 
Students will conduct research on a mi- 
gration or refugee topic. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of in- 
structor. 

SYD 6325 Seminar in the Compara- 
tive Sociology of Gender (3). The ex- 
amination of women's and men's roles, 
statuses, and life opportunities from a 
historical and comparative perspective. 
Current theoretical developments in Ihe 
study of gender are empfiasized. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

SYD 6427 Seminar in Comparative Ur- 
ban issues (3). Current theoretical de- 
velopments in the study of urbanism, 
including the evolution and growth of cit- 
ies, spatial and social structures, migra- 
tion, and tfie critical problems of social 
life in cities. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 

SYD 6615 Seminar in Comparative 
Analysis of Selected Regions (3). 

Comparative social analysis using stud- 
ies from two or more world regions. Stu- 
dents read a series of works on issues 
such as bureaucracy, modernization, 
and development, and discuss them in 
a seminar fonnat Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate starKling or permission of instructor. 



SYD 6625 South Florida Sociocultural 
Systems (3). The sociological and an- 
thropological analysis of South Florida. 
Presents tools for regional study includ- 
ing demography, cultural ecology, and 
ethnic group-centered symbolic sys- 
tems. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or permission of tJie instructor. 

SYD 6655 Seminar on Social Change 
In Asia (3). An examination of social 
change in contemporctry Asia, including 
tfie relationships between states, the 
changing political economies, and the 
role of social movements and cultural in- 
stitutions in change. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing or permission of instructor. 

SYD 6705 Comparative Analysis of 
Ethnicity and Race (3). Consideration 
of major tfieories of ethnicity and race 
and analysis of selected ethnic groups 
in various worid regions. Includes tfie 
study of race and ethnic issues in Miami 
and the South Rorida region. 

SYO 6135 Advanced Comparative 
Family Systems (3). Comparative 
study of the family as an institution 
adapting to social and economic condi- 
tions. Cultural variation in marriage, par- 
enthood and gender roles. Historical 
influences on tfie pluralistic American 
family. Credit for both SYO 4130 and 
SYO 6135 will not be granted. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or permission 
of tfie instructor. 

SYP 5447 Sociology of intemationai 
Development (3). To introduce tfie ba- 
sic concepts arid questions of the field 
as applied to the intemationai arena. To 
illustrate the common areas of sodal sd- 
ence analysis in dealing wnth questions 
of intemationai development. 

SYP 6306 Comparative Social iMove- 
ments (3). Comparative analysis of so- 
dal movements and social cfiange, 
irx:luding peasant movements, environ- 
mentalism, dvil rights, feminism, and na- 
tionalism. Competing theories of social 
movements are exaimined. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of tfie 
instructor. 

SYP 6907 Seminar in Comparative So- 
cial Chiange (3). The cross<ultural and 
comparative analysis of contemporary 
social change, including processes of 
social action such as terrorism, re- 
formism, revolution, and tfie use of elec- 
toral systems and democratic 
processes. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of tfie instructor. 



72 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Statistics 

Carlos W. Brain, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson 
Ung Chen, Instructor 
Gaurl L. Ghal, Associate Professor 
Ina Parks Howell, Lecturer 
Laura Relsert, Instructor 
Samuel S. Shapiro, Professor and 

Associate Dean 
Hassan Zahedi-Jasbi, Associate 

Professor 
Jyoti N. Zaikiicar, Assistant Professor 

The Department of Statistics does not 
presently offer a degree program at the 
graduate level but does however offer 
graduate courses. These courses are 
offered to supplement other graduate 
degree programs at the University. 



Course Description 

Definition of Prefixes 

STA - Statistics. MAP - Mathematics/Ap- 
plied. 

MAP 51 17 Mathematical and Statisti- 
cal Modeling (3). Study of ecological, 
probabilistic, and various statistical mod- 
els. Prerequisites: MAC 3313, COP 
2210 or COS 3420, MAS 3105; and 
STA 3322 or STA 3164 or STA 3033. 

STA 5126/PSY 5206 Fundamentals of 
Design of Experiments (3). CRD and 

RGB designs. Latin square designs. Fac- 
torial, nested and nested-factorial experi- 
ments. Rxed, random and mixed 
models. Split-plot designs. Covariance 
analysis. Prerequisites: STA 31 23 or 
STA 31 12 or equivalent. 

STA 5206 Design of Experiments I (3). 

Design and aralysis of completely ran- 
domized, randomized block, Latin 
square, tectorial, nested and related ex- 
periments. Multiple comparisons. Credit 
for both STA 4202 aixi STA 5206 will not 
be granted. Prerequisite: STA 3322 or 
STA 31 64 or STA 3033 or (STA 31 63 
and STA 3321). 

STA 5207 Topics in Design of Experi- 
ments (3). This applied course in de- 
sign of experiments covers topics such 
as spjit-plot design, confounding, frac- 
tional replication, incomplete block de- 
signs, and response surface designs. 
Prerequisite: STA 5206. 

STA 5236 Regression Analysis (3). 

Simple, multiple and polynomial regres- 
sion, analysis of residuals, model build- 
ing and other related topics. Credit for 
both STA 4234 and STA 5236 will not be 



granted. Prerequisites: STA 31 64 or 
STA 31 23 or STA 31 1 2, and MAS 31 05. 

STA 5446-STA 5447 Probability The- 
ory I and II (3-3). This course is de- 
signed to acquaint the student with the 
basic fundamentals of probability theory. 
It reviews the basic foundations of prob- 
ability theory, covering such topics as 
discrete probability spaces, random 
walk, hterkov Chains (transition matrix 
and ergodic properties), strong laws of 
probability, convergence theorems, and 
law of iterated logarithm. Prerequisite: 
MAC 3313. 

STA 5505 Nonparametric Methods 
(3). Distribution-free tests: sign, Mann- 
Whitney U, Wilcoxon signed rank, 
Kruskai-Wallis, Friedman, etc. Rank cor- 
relation, contingency tables and other re- 
lated topics Credit for both STA 4502 
and STA 5505 will not be granted. Pre- 
requisite: Rrst course in statistics. 

STA 5676 Reliability Engineering (3). 

The course material is designed to give 
the student a basic understandir)g of the 
statistical and mathematical techniques 
which are used in engineering reliability 
analysis. A review will be made of the 
basic fundamental statistical techniques 
required. Subjects covered include: dis- 
tribiutions used in reliability (exponential, 
binomial, extreme value, etc.); tests of 
hypotheses of failure rates; prediction of 
component reliability; system reliability 
prediction; and reliability apportionment. 
Prerequisite: STA 3322. 

STA 5800 Stochastic Processes for 
Engineers (3). Probability and condi- 
tional probability distributions of a ran- 
dom variable, bivariate probability 
distributions, multiple random variables, 
stationary processes, Poisson and nor- 
mal processes. Prerequisites: STA 
3033, MAC 3313, MAP 3302. 

STA 5826 Stochastic Processes (3). 

This course is intended to provide the 
student with She basic concepts of sto- 
chastic processes, and tfie use of such 
techniques in the analysis of systems. 
Subjects include: Markov Processes, 
queueing theory, renewal processes, 
birth and death processes, Poisson and 
Normal processes. Applications to sys- 
tem reliability ctnalysis, behavioral sci- 
ence, and natureil scier>ces will be 
stressed. Prerequisite: STA 5447. 

STA 5906 Independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned read- 
ing, and reports on independent investi- 
gation. 



STA 6166/STA 6167 Statistical Meth- 
ods In Research I and II (3-3). For non- 
matfiematical sciences graduate 
students. A non-calculus exposition of 
methods and applications of statistical 
techniques for the analysis of data. Sta- 
tistical packages will be used. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. 

STA 6246 Data Analysis I (3). Explora- 
tory data analysis; testing of distribu- 
tional assumptions; Chi-square tests, 
tests for means, variances, and propor- 
tions. Prerequisites: STA 3033, STA 
3322, or STA 6327. 

STA 6247 Data Analysis II (3). Analysis 
of variance, regression analysis. Analy- 
sis of covariance, quality control, correla- 
tion, empirical distributions. 
Prerequisites: STA 6246 and MAS 3105. 

STA 6326 Mathematical Statistics I 
(3). An Introduction to the theories un- 
deriying statistical analysis. Basic con- 
cepts of probability theory, combina- 
torial analysis, random variables, and ex- 
pectation. Prerequisite: MAC 3313. 

STA 6327 MaUiematical Statistics II 
(3). Estimation of parameters, tests of 
hypotfieses, regression, non-parametric 
methods, analysis of variance, and multi- 
variate concepts. Prerequisite: STA 
6326. 

STA 6807 Queueing arxl Statistical 
Models (3). Review of probability con- 
cepts, basic probability distributions, 
Poisson process, queueing models, sta- 
tistical models. Prerequisites: Permis- 
sion of Instructor, MAC 3312 and either 
STA 3033 or STA 3321. 

STA 6940 Supervised Statistical Con- 
sulting (3). Formulation of statistk^ 
problems from client information, con- 
sulting session management, interper- 
sonal aspects of consulting, problem 
solving techniques. Prerequisites: Per- 
mission of instructor, STA 41 02, STA 
6247, and STA 6327. 

STA 7707 Multivariate Methods I (3). 

Multivariate normal, Wishart and Hotell- 
ing's distributions. Inferences for one 
and two mean vectors. Profile analysis. 
One- and two-way MANOVA. Multivari- 
ate multiple regression. Prerequisite: 
STA3123orSTA3112. 

STA 7708 Multivariate Methods II (3). 

Principal components analysis. Factor 
analysis. Canonical correlatiori analysis. 
Discriminant analysis. Cluster analysis. 
Multidimensional scaling. Prerequisite: 
STA 7707. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 73 



Visual Arts 

William Maguire, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Ralph F. Buckley, Associate Professor 
William Burke, Associate Professor 
James M. Coupor III, Professor 
Carol Damlan, Instructor 
Eduardo Del Valle, Associate Professor 
Richard Duncan, Associate Professor 
MIrta Gomez, Associate Professor 
Ellen Jacobs, Professor 
Juan Martinez, Instructor 
Dahlia Morgan, Lecturer/Art Museum 

Director 
Manuel Torres, Associate Professor 
Barbara Watts, Assistant Professor 
Sandra Winters. Assistant Professor 

The Department of Visual Arts does not 
presently offer a degree program at ttie 
graduate level but does, however, offer 
graduate courses. These courses are 
offered to supplement other graduate 
degree programs at tfie University. 

Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

ARH-Art History; ART-Art. 

ARM 5907 Directed Studies (1-6). A 

group of students, with the approval of 
the art faculty, may select a master 
teachier of theory, research or criticism 
in selected areas as film, painting, sculp- 
ture, architecture, crafts, art history, 
mulli-rhedia art, etc. Arrangements must 
be made at least a semester tiefore 
course is offered. May be repeated. 

ARH 5913 Research (1-6). Art history, 
criticism, and theory in areas not cov- 
ered by the present program and which 
ttie student wisties to study. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. May be 
repeated. 

ART 5125C Ceramics (3). The ad- 
vanced student will explore all aspects 
of expression in day and glaze. Stu- 
dents will be expected to be mostly self- 
directed. Prerequisite: ART 31 1 1 0, or 
permission of the instructor. May be 
repeated. 

ART 5133C Fabrics and Fibers (3). A 

creative approach to fabrics and fit>ers, 
using processes such as dyeing, embroi- 
dery, quilting, soft sculpture, t}atll<, on 
and off loom weaving, etc. May be re- 
peated. 

ART 5159C Jewelry and Metals (3). A 

study of basic metal techmiques and 
strengthening of three- dimensional de- 
sign concepts for the beginner. The ad- 



vanced student will explore the more dif- 
ficult technical aspects of areas such as 
hollow ware, enameling, casting, and 
stone setting. May be repeated. 

ART 5165C Glassblowing (3). A basic 
course in off- hand glass blowing, con- 
cerned with preparing, forming, and fin- 
ishing glass; understanding of glass as 
an art form; operation and maintenance 
of a glass studio. May be repeated. 

ART 5340C Drawing (3). Drawing will 
be considered as an essential part of 
every art student's curriculum. Depend- 
ing on his lower level worl<, a student 
will be encouraged to tal<e at least one 
drawing course at the University. Off- 
campus studio work may be arranged. 
May be repeated. 

ART 5341C Figure Drawing (3). Draw- 
ing from the model during assigned stu- 
dio time. Open to all students. May be 
repeated. Prerequisite: ART 3310. 

ART 5403C Prlntmaklng (3). With a 
knowledge of basic intaglio and relief 
printing, tfie student will explore specific 
media such as etching, lithography, silk- 
screen and other experimental tech- 
niques. May be repeated. 

ART 5580C Painting (3). An advanced 
course concentrating on conceptual clar- 
ity and the realization of stylistic develop- 
ment. Group, individual criticism will be 
emphasized. May be repeated. Prereq- 
uisites: ART 35100 or equivalent. Sug- 
gested prerequisites: ART 383 10 and 
ART 38030. May be repeated. 

ART 571 OC Figure Sculpture (3). To 
develop skills in representational struc- 
ture and anatomy from tfie model and 
learn mold-making techniques. May be 
repeated. 

ART 5730C Sculpture (3). With a back- 
ground in beginning sculpture, the stu- 
dent will develop standards of 
excellence, both in concept and tech- 
nique, with stress on Individual expres- 
sion. An equipped shnp Will be available 
to ttie student. May be repeated. 

ART 5907C Directed Study (VAR). A 

group of students, with ttie approval of 
the Visual Arts Department faculty, may 
select a master artist teacher and pur- 
sue a course of art study in selected ar- 
eas such as graphic design, film, 
multi-media, environmental design, 
sound, etc. Arrangements must be 
made at least one semester tiefore 
course is offered. May be repeated. 

ART 5910C Research (1-6). Students 
may study or research an individual art 
project with an art faculty member. Com- 
plexity and amount of wori< will deter- 



mine the number of credit hours 
granted. May tie repeated. 

PGY 5420C Photography (3). An ad- 
vanced course for majors and accom- 
plislied non-majors, includes 
demanding critique of student's work. 
May be repeated. Prerequisite: PGY 
34100 or permission of instructor. 



College of Arts and 
Sciences 

IDean (Acting), Arthur W. Herriott 

Associate Dean, Curriculum 

and Advisement Fred Bouma 

Associate Dean, Budget 

and Development Samuel Shapiro 
Associate Dean, 

North Miami, Joyce Peterson 

Director, 

School of Computer 

Science Jainendra Navlakha 

Director, School of 

Journalism and 

Mass Communication J. Arthur Heise 

Chairpersons and Program 
Directors: 

Biological Sciences Walter Goldberg 

Chemistry Leonard Keller 

Economics Raul Moncarz 

English Asher Milbauer 
Environmental Studies John ParVer 
Geology RorenUn Maurrasse 

History Mark Szuchman 

Humanities Ramon Mendoza 
International 

Relations Ralph Clem 

International Studies Susan Waltz 

Liberal Studies Janat Parker 

Mathematics bev Roy 

Modern Languages Isabel Castellanos 

Music John Augenblick 
Philosophy and 

Religious Studies Bruce Hauptll 

Physics Richard Bone 

Political Science Joel Gottlieb 

Psychology Paul Foos 
Sodology and 

Anthropology LJsandro I'erez 

Statistics Carlos W. Brain 

Theatre and Dance Marilyn Skow 

Visual Arts William Maguire 

Faculty 

Adams, William, M.A. (University of 
Wisconsin-Madison), Associate 
Professor, School of Journalism and 
Mass Communication 



74 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Aladro, Gerardo, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania 

State University), Assistant 

Professor, Mathematics 
Antrim, Harry, Ph.D. (University of 

f^orida). Professor, Engiisfi 
Aragon, Irmenia, M.A. (Temple 

University), Instructor. Modern 

Languages 
Arofi, Farahangiz, Ph.D. (University of 

Central Florida), Assistant Professor, 

Scfiool of Computer Science 
Arnold, St. George Tucker, Jr., Ph.D. 

(Stanford University), Associate 

Professor, English 
Arvin-Rad, Hassan, Ph.D. (University 

of Pennsylvania), Assistant 

Professor, Economics 
Augenblick, John, D.M.A. (University 

of Miami), Associate Professor arid 

Chairperson, Music 
Bahrick, Lon'aine, Ph.D. (Cornell 

University), Associate Professor, 

Psychology 
Baldor, Aure)k>, M.A. (Florida 

International University), Instructor, 

Modern Languages 
Bailey, Patrice, M.A. (Indiana State), 

Instructor, Theatre and Dance 
Barrett, Lynn, M.F.A. (University of 

North Carolina- Greensboro), 

Associate Professor, English 
Barton, David, Ph.D. (University of 

Cambridge), Professor, School of 

Computer Science 
Beer, IMichelle, Ph.D. (University of 

Pittsburgh), Associate Professor, 

Philosophy and Religious Studies 
Berk, Lynn, Ph.D. (Purdue University), 

Associate Professor, English 
Berk, Toby, Ph.D. (Purdue University), 

Professor, arxi Associate Director, 

Scfmol of Computer Science 
Bigger, Charles, Ph.D. (Florida State 

University), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Blum, Milton, Ph.D. (New York 

Uni\/brsity), Professor Emeritus, 

Psycfiology 
Bone, Richard, Ph.D. (University of 

West Indies, Jamaica), Associate 

Professor and Chairperson, Physics 
Boodhoo, Ken, Ph.D. (University of the 

West Indies, Jamaica), Associate 

Professor, International Relations 
Brain, Carlos W., Ph.D. (West Virginia 

University), Associate Professor, and 

Chairperson, Statistics 
Breslln, Thomas A., Ph.D. (University 

of Virginia), Associate Professor, 

InterrKttional Relations, and Vice 

Provost 
Brick, John, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Assistant Professor, Music 
Brooke, Lee, B.S. (The Julliard 

School), Assistant Professor, 

Theatre and Dance 



Brown, Jeny, Ph.D. (Cornell 

University), Associate Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Buckley, Ralph, M.FA. (Maryland 

Institute), Associate Professor, 

Visual Ms 
Burke, William, MF.A. (State 

University of New York at New 

Paltz), Associate Professor, Visual 

Arts 
Calbeck, William, Ph.D. (University of 

Wisconsin-Madison), Assistant 

Professor, Mathematics 
Carvajal, Manuel, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Professor, Economics 
Carrington, Jane, B.FA. (The Julliard 

School), Assistant Professor, 

Theatre and Dance 
Casines, Gisela, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Associate Professor, English 
Castellanos, Isabel, Ph.D. 

(Georgetown University), Associate 

Professor and Chairperson, Modern 

Languages 
Chen, Chun-Fan, Ph.D. (University of 

Michigan), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Chen, Ling, M.S. (Tongji University 

People's Republic of China), 

Instructor, Statistics 
Chernela, Janet, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Associate Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Chung, Bongkil, Ph.D. (Michigan State 

University), Associate Professor, 

Philosophy and Religious Studies 
Church, Philip, M.FA. (University of 

California at Irvine), Associate 

Professor, Theatre and Dance 
Cifone, Rocco, M.A. (San Diego State 

University), Instructor, Tfrnatre and 

Dance 
Clem, Ralph, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Professor, and 

Chairperson, International Relations 
Clement, Bradford, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Geology 
Cohen, Daniel, Ph.D. (Brandeis 

University), Assistant Professor, 

History 
Comfort, John C, Ph.D. (Case 

Western Reserve University), 

Professor, School of Computer 

Science 
Connor, Charles, Ph.D. (Dartmouth 

College), Assistant Professor, 

Geology 
Copper, Mark L., Ph.D. (University of 

Georgia), Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 
Correll, Helen, Ph.D. (Duke University), 

Research Scientist, Biological 

Sciences 
Cortina, Rodolfo, Ph.D. (Case Western 

Reserve University), Professor, 

h/k)dern Languages 



Couch, James E., M.S. (Florida State 

University), Associate Professor, 

School of Journalism and Mass 

Communication 
Couper, James, M.A. (Florida State 

University), Professor, Visual Arts 
Cova, Luis, Ph.D. (Princeton 

University), Assistant Professor, 

School of Computer Science 
Craumer, Peter, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Assistant Professor, 

International Relations 
Crosby, James, Ph.D. (Ya/e 

University), Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Cruz, Robert, Ph.D. (University of 

Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor, 

Economics 
Cuervo, Leon, Ph.D. (University of 

Maryland), Professor, Biological 

Sciences 
Cutler, Brian, Ph.D. (University of 

Wisconsin-Madison), Associate 

Professor, Psychology 
Dalrymple, George, Ph.D. (University 

of Toronto), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Damian, Carol M.A. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, Visual Arts 
Darici, Yesim, Ph.D. (University of 

Missouri), Assistant Professor, 

Physics 
Daruwala, Maneck, Ph.D. (University of 

Rochester), Associate Professor, 

English 
de Alonso, Inna, Ph.D. (University of 

York, England), Associate Professor, 

Economics 
de Jongh, Elena, Ph.D. (Tulane 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Modern Languages 
de la Cuesta, Leonel A., Ph.D. (Johns 

Hopkins University), Associate 

Professor, Modern Languages 
del Valle, Eduardo, M.F.A. (Brooklyn 

College, City University of New 

York), Associate Professor, Visual 

Arts 
Delgado, Humberto, M.A. (Goddard 

College), Assistant Professor, 

School of Journalism and Mass 

Communication 
Delgado, Milagros, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Assistant Professor, 

Chemistry 
Detwiler, Bruce, J.D., Ph.D., (Cornell 

University), Associate Professor, 

Political Science 
Downum, Kelsey, Ph.D. (University of 

British Columbia), Associate 

Professor, Biological Scierves 
Draper, Grenville, Ph.D. (University of 

tfie West Indies), Professor, Geology 
Draper, Paul, Ph.D. (University of 

California- Irvine), Assistant 

Professor, Philosophy and Religious 

Studies 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 75 



Dufresne, John, M.F.A. (University of 

Arl<ansas), Assistant Professor, 

English! 
Duncan, Richard, M.FA. (Southern 

Illinois University), Associate 

Professor. Visual Arts 
Dunn, Marvin, Ph.D. (University of 

Tennessee), Associate Professor, 

Psycfwlogy 
Dunscomb, Richard, M.M.E. (Millikin 

University), Professor, f^sic 
Dwyer, Richard, Ph.D. (University of 

California at Los Angeles), 

Professor, English 
Ege, Ralmund, Ph.D. (Oregon 

Graduate Center), Assistant 

Professor, School of Computer 

Science 
Elklns, Charles, Ph.D. (Southern 

Illinois University), Professor, English 

and Vice Provost 
Elklns, Mary Jane, Ph.D. (Southern 

Illinois University), Associate 

Professor, English 
Endel, Peggy, Ph.D. (Cornell 

University), Associate Professor, 

English 
Erber, Joan, Ph.D. (St. Louis 

University), Associate Professor, 

Psychology 
Ernest, John, Ph.D. (University of 

Virginia), Assistant Professor, English 
Erwin, Nancy, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Assistant Professor, 

International Relations 
Escovar, Luis, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania 

State University), Associate 

Professor, Psydiology 
Espino, Maria Dolores, Ph.D. (Florida 

State University), Assistant 

Professor, Economics 
Fair, Charles, Ph.D. (Ohio University), 

Associate Professor, School of 

Journalism and Mass 

Communication 
Fernandez, Damian J., Ph.D. 

(University of Miami), Assistant 

Professor, International Relations 
Rebig, Rudolf, Ph.D. (University of 

Munster), Associate Professor, 

Physics 
Rnk, Philip, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Professor, Music 
Flnley, Gordon, Ph.D. (Harvard 

University), Professor, Psychology 
Rsher, Jacl( B., Ph.D. (University of 

California at Davis), Research 

Scientist, Biological Sciences 
Rsher, Robert, Ph.D. (University of 

Kansas), Professor Emeritus, School 

of Computer Science 
Rsher, Ronald, Ph.D. (Ohio State 

University), Professor, Psycfwlogy 
FJeilman, Stephen, Ph.D. (Stanford 

University), Associate Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 



Rexser, Arthur, Ph.D. (Stanford 

University), Associate Professor, 

Psychology 
Foos, Paul, Ph.D. (Bowling Green 

State University), Associate 

Professor and Chairperson, 

Psychology 
Fox, DomlUla, M.S. (University of 

Mami), Instructor, Mathematics 
Fraser, Scott, Ph.D. (University of 

Akron), Associate Professor, 

Psychology 
Free, Mary, Ph.D. (University of 

Georgia), Associate Professor and 

Associate Chiairperson, English 
French, John, Ph.D. (Yale University), 

Assistant Professor, History 
Furton, Kenneth, Ph.D. (Wayne State 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Chemistry 
Gamarra, Eduardo, Ph.D. (University 

of Pittsburgh), Assistant Professor, 

Political Science 
Gamble, Richard, Ph.D. (Texas Tech 

University), Associate Professor, 

Theatre and {Dance 
Garcia, Orlando, D.M.A. (University of 

Miami), Assistant Professor, Music 
Gathercole, Virginia, Ph.D. (University 

of Kansas), Associate Professor, 

English 
Gerstman, Bernard, Ph.D. (Princeton 

University), Associate Professor, 

Physics 
Gewirtz, Jacob, Ph.D. (State University 

of Iowa), Professor, Psycfwlogy 
Ghal, Gauri, Ph.D. (Iowa State 

University), Associate Professor, 

Statistics 
GIrard, Chris, Ph.D. (University of 

Wisconsin), Assistant Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Girden, Edward, Ph.D. (University of 

Illinois), fDistinguished Professor 

Emeritus, Psychology 
Gladwin, Hugh, Ph.D. (Stanford 

University), Assodate Professor, 

Sociology/ Anthropology 
Goldberg, Walter, Ph.D. (University of 

fiXami), Professor and Chairperson, 

Biological Sderwes 
Goldstein, Aivin H., M.A. (New York 

University), Assodate Professor, 

School of Journalism and Mass 

Communication 
Gomez, Mirta, MF.A. (Brooklyn 

College, City University of New 
York), Associate Professor, Visual 

Arts 
Gonzalez-Relgosa, Fernando, Ph.D. 

(Florida State University), Associate 

Professor, Psychology, and Dean, 
Undergraduate Studies 
Goodspeed, Timothy, Ph.D. 

(University of Maryland), Assistant 

Professor, Economics 



Gordon, Kenneth, Ph.D. (University of 

California, Davis), Associate 

Professor, Biological Sdences 
Gorman, Susan, Ph.D. (University of 

Maryland), Instructor, Mathematics 
Gotterer, Malcolm, D.B.A. (Harvard 

University), Professor Emeritus, 

School of Computer Sdence 
Gottlieb, Joel, Ph.D. (University of 

California at Riverside), Assodate 

Professor and Chairperson, Political 

Sdence 
Grenler, Gulllermo, Ph.O. (University 

of New Mexico), Assistant Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Grenier, Rot>ert, D.M.A. (University of 

Rochester), Assistant Professor, 

Music 
Guers-Vlllate, Yvonne, Ph.D. (Bryn 

Mawr College), Professor Emeritus, 

Modern Languages 
Hail, James, Ph.D. (University of Utah), 

Professor, English 
Hall, Kevin, B.A. (Fordham University), 

Editor-in-Residence, School of 

Journalism and Mass 

Communication 
Hann, Rolwrt, Ph.D. (Temple 

University), Associate Professor, 

Philosophy and Religious Studies 
Hardy, Kenneth, Ph.D. (Tulane 

University), Professor, Physics 
Hargltai, Peter, MF.A. (University of 

lulassachusetts). Instructor, English 
Hauptli, Bruce, Ph.D. (Washington 

University), Associate Professor and 

Ctiairperson, Pfvlosophy and 

Religious Studies 
Heise, J. Arthur, Ph.D. (Syracuse 

University), Professor and Director, 

School of Journalism and Mass 

Communication 
Helena, Lucia, Ph.D. (The Federal 

University of Rio de Janeiro), 

Associate Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Henley, Carol, M.S. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, School of 

Computer Science 
Henley, Kenneth, Ph.D. (University of 

Virginia), Associate Professor, 

PHIosophy and Religious Studies 
Herrera, Rene, Ph.D. (Fordham 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Biological Sdences 
Herring, David, M.A. (Trinity 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Theatre and Dance 
Herriott, Arthur, Ph.D. (Urvversity of 

Florida), f^ofessor. Chemistry and 

Acting Dean, College of Arts and 

Sdences 
Hicicey-Vargas, Rosemary, Ph.D. 

(t^ssachusetts Institute of 

Technology) Associate Professor, 

Geology 



76 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Hoffman, Gary, Pti.D. (Harvard 
University), Assistant Professor, 
Chemistry 
Hogan, Bart)ara, Ph.D. (Temple 
University), Assistant Professor, 

Philosopfiy and Reiigious Studies 
Holden, Peter, Ph.D. (California 

Institute of Technology), Assistant 

Professor, Mathematics 
Hopkins, Tometro, Ph.D. (Indiana 

University), Assistant Professor, 

English 
Houghton, William, M.S. (University of 

Georgia), Research Scientist, 

Biological Sciences 
Howell, Ina Parks, Ph.D. (University of 

South Florida), Lecturer, Statistics 
Huchlngson, James, Ph.D. (Emory 

University), Associate Professor, 

Philosophy and Religious Studies 
Hudson, Steven, Ph.D. (University of 

Chicago), Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 
Hynes, Mary, Ph.D. (St. Louis 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Philosophy and Religious Studies 
Ito-Adler, James, Ph.D. (Harvard 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Jacobs, Ellen, M.S. (Illinois Institute of 

Technology), Professor, Visual Arts 
Jensen, John, Ph.D. (Harvard 

University), Associate Professor, 

Modern Languages 
Jhabvala, Farrokh, Ph.D. (Fletcher 

School of Law and Diplomacy), 

Professor, International Relations 
Joens, Jeffrey, Ph.D. (Indiana 

University), Associate Professor, 

Chemistry 
Johnson, Kenneth, Ph.D. (Brown 

University), Associate Professor, 

English 
Johnson-Cousin, Danielle, Ph.D. 

(University of Illinois), Associate 

Professor, hAodern Languages 
Jones, Ronald, Ph.D. (Oregon State 

University), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences and Drinking 

Water Research Center 
Jorge, Antonio, Ph.D. (Villanova 

Universidad), Professor, Economics, 

International Relations, Political 

Science and Sociology/Anthropology 
Juang, Shing-Her, Ph.D. (Ohio State 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Statistics 
Kafkoulls, Geonge, Ph.D. (California 

Institute of Technology), Assistant 

Professor, Mathematics 
Karayalcin, All Cem, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University). Assistant Professor, 

Economics 
Keller, Leonard, Ph.D. (Yale 

University), Professor and 

Chairperson, Chemistry 



Kelley, Bruce, Ph.D. (University of 

Massachusetts at Amherst), 

Assistant Professor, Economics 
Kincaid, A. Douglas, M.A. (University 

of North Carolina), Assistant 

Professor, Sociology/Anthropology 

and Associate Director, Latin 

American and Caribbean Center 
Knapp, Jeffrey, M.A. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, English 
Kopenhaver, Lillian L., Ed.D. (Nova 

University), Professor and Associate 

Director, School of Journalism and 

Aifess Communication 
Koptur, Suzanne, Ph.D. (University of 

California), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Kovacs, George, Ph.D. (University of 

Louvain), Professor, Philosophy and 

Religious Studies 
Kravitz, David, Ph.D. (University of 

lUinois), Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 
Kraynek, William, Ph.D. 

(Carnegie-Mellon University), 

Associate Professor, School of 

Computer Science 
Kuhn, David N., Ph.D. (University of 

California at Davis), Assistant 

Professor, Biological Sciences 
Kurtines, William, Ph.D. (Johns 

Hopkins University), Professor, 

Psychology 
l^ndnjm, John, Ph.D. (University of 

Soutfiern California), Associate 

Professor, Chemistry 
Leckband, IMark, Ph.D. (Purdue 

University) Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Lee, David, Ph.D. (Rutgers University), 

Associate Professor, Biological 

Sciences 
Leed, Eric, Ph.D. (University of 

Rochester), Associate Professor, 

History 
Levine, Barry, Ph.D. (New School for 

Social Research), Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Levitt, Mary, Ph.D. (Syracuse 

University), Associate Professor, 

Psychology 
Lichtenstein, Alex, Ph.D. (University of 

Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor, 

History 
Ufshltz, Felice, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Assistant Professor, 

History 
Uossatos, Panagis, Ph.D. (University 

of Pennsylvania), Professor, 

Economics 
Upner, Kenneth, Ph.D. (Rutgers 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Economics 
Logan, Kathleen, Ph.D. (Bryn Mawr 

College), Associate Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology arid 

Women's Studies 



Lopez de la Vega, Ramon, Ph.D. 

(University of Miami), Assistant 
Professor, Chemistry 
Lowery, Shearon, Ph.D. (Washington 

State University), Associate 

Professor, Sociology/Anthropology 
MacDonald, Charles, Ph.D. (University 

of Virginia), Professor, International 

Relations 
Machonis, Peter A., Ph.D. 

(Pennsylvania State University), 

Associate Professor, hAodern 

Languages 
Mackey, Wesley, Ph.D. (University of 

Manitoba), Lecturer, School of 

Computer Science 
Maguire, William, M.S. (Illinois Institute 

of Technology), Professor and 

Chairperson, Visual Arts 
Malngot, Anthony, Ph.D. (University of 

Rorida), Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Makemson, John, Ph.D. (Washington 

State University), Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Martinez, Juan A., M.A. (Florida State 

University), Instructor, Visual Arts 
Martinson, David L., Ph.D. (University 

of Minnesota), Associate Professor, 

School of Journalism and ft/lass 

Communication 
Mau, James A., Ph.D. (University of 

California at Los Angeles), 

Professor, Sociology/Anthropology 

and Acting University Provost 
Maurer, David, Ph.D. (University of 

Pittsburgh), Lecturer, Biological 

Sciences 
Maurrasse, Rorentin, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Professor and 

Chairperson, Geology 
Maxwell, Oren, Ph.D. (State University 

of New York at Stony Brook), 

Associate Professor. Physics 
IMcCormack, Kathleen, Ph.D. 

(University of Miami), Associate 

Professor, English 
McCoy, Diana, M.A. (Case Western 

Reserve University), Instructor, 

Mathematics 
McElfresh, Clair, D.M.A. (Case 

Western Reserve University), 

Professor, Music 
Mclntire, Canrtela Pinto, Ph.D. 

(Michigan State University), 

Associate Professor, English 
IMendoza, Ramon, Ph.D. (Frei 

Universitat, Berlin), Professor, 

Modem Languages and Director of. 

Humanities 
Mesbahl, Mohiaddin, Ph.D. (University 

of Miami), Assistant Professor, 

International Relations 
Meziani, Abdelhamid, Ph.D. (Rutgers 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 77 



MllanI, Masoud, Ph.D. (University of 

Central Florida), Assistant Professor, 

Scfwol of Computer Science 
Mllbauer, Asher, Ph.D. (University of 

Washington, Seattle), Associate 

Professor and Chairperson, English 
Miller, Debra, M.A. (Ohio University), 

Assistant Professor, School of 

Journalism and Mass 

Communication 
MIntz, Stephen, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins 

University), Professor, Physics 
Moncarz, Raul, Ph.D. (Florida State 

University), Professor and 

Chairperson, Economics 
Moore, Howard, Ph.D. (University of 

Arkansas), Professor, Chemistry 
Moraies-iVlartinez, Zaida C, M.S. 

(Pennsylvania State University), 

Instructor and Coordinator of 

Latxiratories, Chemistry 
Morgan, Dahlia, Diplomate of College 

Teaching (University of Rorida), 

Lecturer, Visual Arts and Director of 

The Art l^useum 
Moran, Gary, Ph.D. (Katholieke 

University, Nijmegan, Netherlands), 

Professor, Psychology 
Moreno, Dario, Ph.D. (University of 

Southern California), Assistant 

Professor, Political Science 
Morrow, Betty, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Associate Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Murison, Gerald, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins 

University), Professor, Biological 

Sciences 
Nadel, Richard, M.S. (Northwestern 

University), Instructor, Mathematics 
Navlakha, Jainendra, Ph.D. (Case 

Western Reserve University), 

Professor and Director, School of 

Computer Science 
Neal, Leslie, M.A. (Rorida State 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Theatre and Dance 
Nelson, Brian, Ph.D. (University of 

California at Riverside), Associate 

Professor, Political Science 
Norstog, Knut, Ph.D. (University of 

Michigan), Research Scientist, 

Biological Sciences 
O'Brien, Mary Ellen, M.F.A. (Tulane 

University), Assistant Professor, 
Theatre and Dance 
Oberbauer, Steven, Ph.D. (Duke 
University), Assistant Professor, 

Biohgical Sciences 
Okulx), Case, Ph.D. (University of 
Guelph), Associate Professor, 
Biological Sciences 
Osborne, William, Jr., Ph.D. (Emory 
University), Associate Professor, 
Sodology/Anthropology 
Owen, Claudia, Ph.D. (University of 
Washington). Lecturer, Geology 



Parker, Janat, Ph.D. (University of 
California at Berkeley), Associate 
Professor, Psychology and Director 
of Liberal Studies 
Parker, John, Ph.D. (University of 
California at Berkeley), Professor, 
Ctiemistry and Director of 
Environmental Studies 
Pasztor, Ana, DRN (Darmstadt 
University, West Germany), 
Associate Professor, School of 
Computer Science 
Pearson, J. Michael, Ph.D. (University 
of Texas at Austin), Assistant 
Professor, Mathematics 
Peiin, Alexandru, Ph.D. (University of 
Pennsylvania), Associate Professor, 
School of Computer Science 
Perez, LIsandro, Ph.D. (University of 
Rorida), Associate Professor and 
Chairperson, Sociology/Anthropology 
Pessar, Patricia, Ph.D. (University of 
Chicago), Associate Professor, 
Sociology/Anthropology 
Pestaina, Norman, M.S. (Pennsylvania 
State University), Instructor, School 
of Computer Science 
Peterson, Brian, Ph.D. (University of 
Wisconsin), Associate Professor, 
History 
Peterson, Joyce, Ph.D. (University of 
Wisconsin), Associate Professor, 
History and Associate Dean, College 
of Arts and Sciences 
Pheidas, Athanasios, Ph.D. (Purdue), 

Assistant Professor, Mathematics 
Pliske, Thomas, Ph.D. (Cornell 
University), Lecturer, Biological 
Sciences 
Popenoe, John, Ph.D. (University of 
Maryland), Research Scientist, 
Biological Sciences 
Portes, Alejandro, Ph.D. (University of 
Wisconsin- Madison), Patricia and 
Phillip Frost Distinguished Professor, 
Sociology/Anthropology 
Post-Luria, Slwila, Ph.D. (University of 
Chicago), Assistant Professor, 
English 
Poyo, Gerald, Ph.D. (University of 

Rorida), Assistant Professor, History 
Prabhakaran, Nagarajan, Ph.D. 
(University of Queensland), 
Assistant Professor, School of 
Computer Science 
Pyron, Darden, Ph.D. (University of 

Virginia), Associate Professor, History 
Quackenbush, L. Scott, Ph.D. (Florida 
State University), Assistant 
Professor, Biological Sciences 
Quirke, Martin, Ph.D. (University of 
Liverpool), Professor, Chemistry 
Rae, Nicol, D.Phll. (OKford University), 
Assistant Professor, Political Science 
Ramsamuih, Taje, Ph.D. (California 
Institute of Technology), Assistant 
Professor, Mathematics 



Ratner, Robert, M.A. (University of 

Miami), Instnictor, English 
Relsert, Laura, M.S. (University of 

Rorida), Instructor, Statistics 
Richards, Jennifer, Ph.D. (University of 

California, Berkeley), Associate 

Professor, Biological Sciences 
Richardson, Laurie, Ph.D. (University 

of Oregon), Assistant Professor, 

Biological Sciences and Drinking 

Water Research Center 
Rishe, Naphtall, Ph.D. (Tel Aviv 

University, Israel), Associate 

Professor, School of Computer 

Science 
Ritter, David, Ph.D. (Louisiana State 

University), Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Roca, Ana, D.A. (University of Miami), 

Assistant Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Rochelson, Meri-Jane, Ph.D. 

(University of Chicago), Assistant 

Professor, English 
Rock, Howard, Ph.D. (New York 

University), Associate Professor, 

History 
Rogerson, Kenneth, Ph.D. (University 

of California at San Diego), 

Associate Professor, Philosophy and 

Religious Studies 
Rohm, Joseph, Ph.D. (Rorida State 

University), Associate Professor, 

Music 
Rose, Patricia, M.BA. (University of 

Miami), Associate Professor, Sclxiol 

of Journalism and Mass 

Communication 
Rosenberg, Mark, Ph.D. (University of 

Pittsburgh), Professor, Political 

Science, and Director of Latin 

American and Caribbean Center 
Rosenthal, Michael, M.S. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, Mathematics 
Rotton, James, Ph.D. (Purdue 

University), Associate Professor, 

Psychology 
Roy, Dev, Ph.D. (University of 

Rochester), Associate Professor.and 

Chairperson, Mathematics 
Rut>ent>erg, Cheryl, Ph.D. (University 

of Miami), Associate Professor, 

Polithal ScierTce 
Rubin, Richard, Ph.D. (WasNngton 

UrMversity), Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Ruttenberg, Robert, M.A. (New York 

University), Associate Professor, 
' School of Journalism and ^4ass 

Communication 
Saiazar-Canilk), Jorge, Ph.D. 

(University of California at Berkeley), 

Professor, Economics and Director, 
Center of Economic Research anf 
Education 



78 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Salokar, Rebecca, Ph.D. (Syracuse 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Political Science 
Salvador, Miguel, D.M.A. (University of 

Miami), Assistant Professor, Music 
Sanchez, Juan, Ph.D. (University of 

South Florida), Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 
Sanders, Roger, Ph.D. (University of 

Texas at Austin), Research Sdentist, 

Biological Sdences 
Sanchez, Reinaldo, Ph.D. (Washington 

University), Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Saper, Bernard, Ph.D. (University of 

California at Los Angeles), 

Professor, Psychology 
Sauleda, Orlando, M.S. (Florida 

International University), Instructor, 

School of Computer Science 
Schwartz, Richard, Ph.D. (University of 

Chicago), Assodate Professor, 

English 
Sen, Gautam, Ph.D. (University of 

Texas at Dallas), Assodate 

Professor, Geology 
Sevilla, Carlos, Ph.D. (Stanford 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Economics 
Shapiro, Samuel S., Ph.D. (Rutgers 

University), Professor, Statistics and 

Assodate Dean, College of Arts and 

Sciences 
Sheldon, John, Ph.D. (Texas A&M 

University), Professor, Physics 
Shershin, Anthony, Ph.D. (University 

of Florida), Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Shore, Minna, Ph.D. (Leningrad 

Technical Institute), Instructor, 

Mathematics 
Silverman, Wendy, Ph.D. (Case 

Western Reserve University), 

Assodate Professor, Psychology 
Silverstein, Ronn, M.A. (Sir George 

Williams University. Montreal), 

Instructor, English 
Skow, Marilyn, IM.Ph. (Columbia 

University), Assodate Professor and 

Chairperson, Theatre and Dance 
Slifker, James, Ph.D. (University of 

Notre Dame), Assodate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Sprechman, Ellen, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Lecturer, English 
Stack, John, Jr., Ph.D. (University of 

Denver), Professor, Political Science 
Standiford, Lester, Ph.D. (University of 

Utah), Associate Professor, English 

and IXrector, Creative Writing 

Program 
Stayman, Andree, M.A. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, Modern 

Languages 
Stein, Mel, BA. (Hofstra College), 

Lecturer/Creative 

DiiBctor-in-Residence, School of 



Journalism and Mass 

Communication 
Stepick, Alex, Ph.D. (University of 

California at Irvine), Associate 

Professor, Sodology/Anthropology 
Stiehm, Judith, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Professor, Political 

Sdence and University Provost 
Sugg, Richard, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Professor, English 
Sun, Wei, Ph.D. (University of 

Illinois-Chicago Cirde), Assistant 

Professor, Sc/wo/ of Computer 

Sdence 
Sweet, William, Ph.D. (University of 

Maryland), Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 
Szuchman, Mark, Ph.D. (University of 

Texas), Professor and Chairperson, 

History 
Tal, Doron, Ph.D. (Ben Gurion 

University, Israel), Assistant 

Professor, School of Computer 

Sdence 
Ticknor, Donna, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Lecturer, Chemistry 
Todd, Theraid, Ph.D. (University of 

Oregon), Associate Professor, 

Theatre and Dance 
Torres, Manuel, Ph.D. (University of 

New Mexico), Associate Professor, 

Visual Arts 
Tracey, Martin, Ph.D. (Brown 

University), Professor, Biological 

Sdences 
Treadgold, Warren, Ph.D. (Harvard 

University), Assistant Professor, 

History 
Vagramian-Nishanian, Violet, Ph.D. 

(University of Miami), Professor, 

Music 
Van Hamme, Walter, Ph.D. (University 

of Ghent, Belgium), Assistant 

Professor, Physics 
Veraldi, Lorna, J.D. (New York School 

of Law), Assistant Professor, School 

of Journalism and Mass 

Communication 
Vickers, William, F>h.D. (University of 

Rorida), Professor, 

Sodology/Anthropology 
Villamor, Enrique, Ph.D. (Washington 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 
Volcansek, Mary, Ph.D. (Texas Tech 

University), Professor, Political 

Sdence 
Wainwright, Peter, Ph.D. (University of 

Chicago), Assistant Professor, 

Biological Sdences 
Waltz, Susan, Ph.D. (University of 

(Denver), Associate Professor, 

International Relations and Director 

of International Studies 
Wang, Xuewen, Ph.D. (Iowa State 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Physics 



Warren, Christopher, D.A. (Lehigh 

University), Associate Professor, 

Political Sdence 
Warren, Paul, Ph.D. (University of 

Wisconsin-Madison), Assistant 

Professor, Philosophy and Religious 

Studies 
Watson, Donald, Ph.D. (University of 

Virginia), Professor, English 
Watson-Espener, Maida, Ph.D. 

(University of Florida), Associate 

Professor, Modern Languages 
Watts, Barbara, Ph.D. (University of 

Virginia), Assistant Professor, Visual 

Arts 
Waugh, Butler, Ph.D. (Indiana 

University), Professor, English 
Webb, James, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Assistant Professor, Physics 
Weeks, Ophelia, Ph.D. (Howard 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Biological Sdences 
Weinberger, Robert, M.A. (Columbia 

University), Instructor, English 
Weiss, Mark, Ph.D. (Princeton), 

Assistant Professor, School of 

Computer Science 
Weilz, Barbara, M.S. (Florida 

International University), Instructor, 

English 
Welch, Marcelle, Ph.D. (University of 

Michigan), Associate Professor, 

Modern Languages 
West, Lois, Ph.D. (University of 

California at Berkeley), Assistant 

Professor, Sodology/Anthropology 

and Women's Studies 
Wilklns, Mira, Ph.D. (University of 

Cambridge), Professor, Economics 
Williams, C. Kemp, Ph.D. (Indiana 

University), Assistant Professor, 

English and Director, Unguistics 
Williams, Willie, Ph.D. (Michigan State 

University), Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Willumsen, Maria, Ph.D. (Cornell 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Economics 
Winkle, Stephen, Ph.D. (University of 

California at Berkeley), Associate 

Professor, Chemistry 
Winters, Sandra, M.F.A. (Cornell 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Visual Arts 
Wright, William, M.A. (Pennsylvania 

State University), Assodate 

Professor, School of Journalism and 

Mass Communication 
Wolfe, Gregory Baker, Ph.D. (The 

Fletcher School of Law and 

Diplomacy), Professor, International 

Relations 
Yavas, Mehmet, Ph.D. (University of 

Kansas), Associate Professor, 

English 



Graduate Catalog 



I 



Yudin, Rorence, Ph.D. (University of 

Illinois), Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Zahedl-Jasbl, Hassan, Ph.D. 

(University of California at 

Riverside), Associate Professor, 

Statistics 
Zaiklkar, Jyotin, Ph.D. (University of 

California at Santa 

Barbara),Assistant Professor, 

Statistics 
Zwelbel, John, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 



College of Arts and Sciences / 79 



80 / College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business 
Administration 

The College of Business Administration 
(CBA) offers academic programs lead- 
ing to the graduate degrees of Master of 
Accounting (M.Acc.), Master of Busi- 
ness Administration (M.B.A.), Master of 
International Busirwss (M.I.B.), Master 
of Science in Rnance (M.S.F.), Master 
of Science in Information Systems (M.S. 
in MIS), Master of Science in Taxation 
(M.S.T.), and Doctor of Philosophy in 
Business Administration (Ph.D.). 

The College is organized into the 
School of Accounting and Departments 
of Decision Sciences and Information 
Systems, Rnance, Management and In- 
ternational Business, and Nterketing and 
Environment. 

Note: The programs, policies, re- 
quirements, and regulations listed in this 
catalog are continually subject to review 
In order to serve the heeds of the Uni- 
versity's various publics and to respond 
to the mandates of the Rorida Board of 
Regents and the Rorida Legislature. 
Changes may be made v\flthout advance 
notice. Please refer to the General Infor- 
mation section for the University's poli- 
cies, requirements and regulations. 

Master's Degree Programs 

All students taking graduate business 
courses must be admitted to a business 
graduate program or have prior ap- 
proval from tfie appropriate graduate 
counselor. 

The graduate programs of the Col- 
lege offer tfie student advanced profes- 
sional education for managerial careers 
in business and government. At the Mas- 
ter's level, thie degrees of Master of Ac- 
counting, Master of Business 
Administration, Master of International 
Business, Master of Science in Finance, 
f^toster of Science in Management Infor- 
mation Systems, and Master of Science 
in Taxation are offered. 

The Master of Business Administra- 
tion degree is designed to give students 
a general management education and 
to assist tfiem in preparing for their cho- 
sen careers. More specialized prepara- 
tion Is available in the otfier programs. 

Admission Requirements 

To be eligible for admission to the gradu- 
ate programs in the College, the appli- 
cant must: 

1 . Satisfactorily meet ttie general 
University requirements for admission to 
graduate programs. 

2. Hold a Bachelor's degree from a re- 
gionally accredited college or university. 



3. Shiow high promise of success in 
graduate studies as determined by the 
faculty. Admission to all the College 
graduate programs w/ill be based upon a 
combination of the Graduate Manage- 
ment AdmissionTest (GMAT) and the 
upper-division grade point average. 

4. A foreign student must obtain a 
minimum score of 500 on the TOEFL, or 
an equivalent score on a comparable ex- 
amination. See General Admission re- 
quirements for Foreign Students 
(undergraduate and graduate) in tfie Ad- 
mission section of the catalog. 

5. Be in good standing with previous 
colleges or universities attended. 

Application Procedures 

A student planning to enroll in graduate 
studies in the College must complete 
the following steps and meet the stipu- 
lated requirements: 

1 . Submit a Graduate Application for 
admission to the Admissions Office. Ap- 
plication Forms will be mailed upon re- 
quest. Tfie admission process may 
require as long as two months after re- 
ceipt of the application, depending upon 
tfie time involved in tfie receipt of tran- 
scripts and test scores. 

2. Have a copy of the official tran- 
scripts of all previously earned college 
or univeraty credits sent from the appli- 
cant's former institution(s) to tfie Admis- 
sions Office. (Copies submitted directly 
by applicants are not accepted for appli- 
cation purposes). 

3. Submit scores on the Graduate 
Management Admissions Test (GMAT), 
administered nationally by the Educa- 
tional Testing Service (Box 966, Prince- 
ton, New Jersey 08540). Registration 
forms will be mailed upon request. 

Degree Requirements 

To be eligible for a Master's degree, a 
student must: 

1 . Satisfy all University requirements 
for a master's degree. 

2. Meet tfie requirements of an ap- 
proved program of study. This program 
of study is developed by the student 
and his or her graduate counselor and 
must be approved by tfie appropriate 
Department Cfiairperson. 

3. (a) Complete a minimum of 36 se- 
mester hours (depending on program) 
of graduate level coursework, for tfie 
Master of Science in Rnance and Mas- 
ter of Science in Management Informa- 
tion Systems 

(b) Complete a minimum 40 semes- 
ter hours of graduate level coursework, 
for the Master of Business Administra- 
tion or 39 semester hours for the Master 
of International Business. 



(c) Complete a minimum of 30 se- 
mester hours of graduate level course- 
work for tfie Master of Accounting or the 
Master of Science in Taxation programs. 

4. Earn a minimum average of 'B' 
(3.0) in all approved courses in tfie stu- 
dent's program of study. 

No courses in which a grade below 
'C Is earned may be counted toward the 
M.Acc., MBA, MIB, MSF, M.S. in MIS, or 
MST degrees. However, all approved 
work taken as a graduate student will be 
counted in computing the grade point av- 
erage, including courses graded 'D' or 
'P, and any approved undergraduate 
courses taken while a graduate student. 

Transfer Credit 

Students may receive permission to 
transfer up to a maximum of six semes- 
ter hours of graduate aedit toward their 
degree program, provided that: (1 ) tfie 
courses were taken at the graduate 
level at an accredited college or univer- 
sity; (2) the courses were not introduc- 
tory or 'survey' in nature; (3) grades of 
'B' or higfier were earned; (4) tfie 
courses are judged by the faculty advi- 
sor, the Department Chairperson, and 
the Dean to be relevant to the student's 
graduate program; (5) tfie credits were 
not used toward another degree; and 
(6) the credits were completed within six 
years immediately preceding the award- 
ing of the degree. Credits are not trans- 
ferable until tfie student fias earned 15 
semester fiours in tfie CBA graduate 
program. Students wishing to transfer to 
ttie CBA must be in good standing at 
their previous school or college. 

Time Limit 

All work applicable to tfie Master's de- 
gree, including transfer credit, must be 
completed within six years immediately 
preceding the awarding of the degree. 

Change of Major 

The graduate student who wishes to 
change his or her program major must 
submit a Graduate Change of Major re- 
quest to the Admissions Office and 
meet the admission and program re- 
quirements in effect at the time of the 
change of major. 

Master of Business 
Administration (MBA) 

The objective of the MBA program is to 
develop a management generalist who 
fias a breadth of knowledge and under- 
standing of business and who is ori- 
ented toward pragmatic problem- 
solving. The courses leading to the 
MBA degree are designed to provide ex- 
perience in tfie techniques and con- 
cepts of business administration. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration / 81 



The MBA program has two tracks: 

1 . A track of 40 hours for students 
who have an undergraduate degree in 
business from an AACSB accredited 
school awarded five years or less prior 
to acceptance in this program. This 
track consists of 28 hours of non-waive- 
able core courses and 1 2 hours of ap- 
proved electives which may be taken 
towards a concentration in one subject 
area. {Note: students are required to 
take GEB 6445, Legal Environment of 
Business, in addition to the four elec- 
tives, if an upper-division legal environ- 
ment of business course was not 
completed within five years prior to ad- 
mission.) 

2. A track of up to 61 hours for stu- 
dents who have a) a business under- 
graduate degree awarded more than 
five years prior to acceptance into this 
program, b) a business undergraduate 
degree ffom a school not accredited by 
the AACSB, or c) a non-business under- 
graduate degree. This track consists of 
21 hours of waiveable pre-core courses, 
28 hours of non-waiveable core 
courses, and 12 hours of approved elec- 
tives which may be taken towards a 
concentration in one subject area. 

Seven Pre-Core Courses (21 hours) 

AGG 6026 Accounting for Managers 
ECP 6705 Managerial Economics I 
ECP 671 5 Macroeconomic 

Forecasting for 

Management 
GEB 6445 Legal Environment of 

Business 
MAN 6569 Kianageriai 

Decision-Making 

I^WR 6805 Marketing Management 
QMB 6603 Quantitative Methods in 
Management 

Nine Core Courses (28 hours) 

ACQ 6175 Financial Reporting and 

Analysis 
FIN 6428 Financial Management 
FIN 6456 Quantitative Methods in 

Rnancial Analysis 
MAN 6204 Organization and 

Management Theory 
MAN 6245 Organizational Behavior 
MAN 6501 Operations Management 
MAN 6830 Organizatkjn Information 

Systems 
MAN 6830L Organization Information 

Systems l^b 
MAN 6726 Policy Analysis 
MAR 6816 Advanced Nterketing 

Management 



Four Elective Courses (1 2 hours) 

Completion of four approved 6000-level 
courses offered by two or more CBA 
units leads to an MBA in General Busi- 
ness. Areas of concentration are also 
available by completing up to three of 
the four 6000-level elective courses of- 
fered by the following CBA units. One of 
the electives is required to be taken in 
the Internatinal Area. 



CBA Unit 

Accounting 



Concentration 

Accounting, Taxation 



Decision Sciences Management 
and Information Information Systems, 
Systems Operations 

Management 



Rnance 



Finance 



Management and Organizational 
International Behavior, 

Business Human Resources 

Management, 
International 
Business 



Marketing and 
Environment 



Marketing 



Each area of concentration is sub- 
ject to approval by the department offer- 
ing courses in that area. Some areas of 
concentration may require completion of 
one or two additional courses beyond 
the MBA requirements. 

Doctoral Degree Programs 

The doctoral program in Business Ad- 
ministration is a selective one leading to 
the Ph.D. degree. 

The program emphasizes the devel- 
opment of research and teaching skills 
to ensure that graduates acquire the cre- 
dentials necessary for placement in lead- 
ing academic institutions. 

Each doctoral student's program of 
study is tailored to mesh faculty and stu- 
dent interests and to maintain a high 
level of interaction among the students 
and the faculty. 

The program requires three to four 
years of full-time stuc^, including a year 
to a year-and-a-half of dissertation re- 
search. Core txjsiness courses are re- 
quired of all doctoral candidates during 
the first year of study; the second year 
consists of courses in a major area of 
concentration. The first year is geared 
toward breadth of knowledge, whereas 
the second year develops students' de- 
pth of knowledge in a particular area of 
concentration. 



Major Areas of Concentration 

Accounting 

Decision Sciences and Information 
Systems 
Rnance 

International Business 
Management 
Mari^eting 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants are considered from students 
with a wide variety of educational tack- 
grounds, such as business, liberal arts 
and ttie sciences. Those wtio are ac- 
cepted into tfie program show strong evi- 
dence of ability and scholarly interests. 

Potential students should provide 
the following: 

1. Completed application form and 
processing fee. 

2. Three letters of recommendation 
from academic sources. 

3. Official transcripts from all under- 
graduate and graduate coursework. 

4. A report of the Graduate Manage- 
ment Admissions Test (GMAT) score 
from the Educational Testing Service 
(the average GfulAT score for entering 
students is above 600). 

5. A formed statement of purpose for 
seeking the doctoral degree. 

6. International students whose na- 
tive language is other than English must 
also submit an official report of tfieir 
score on tfie Test of English as a For- 
eign Language (TOEFL) from the Educa- 
tional Testing Service. A minimum score 
of 500 is required. See the General Ad- 
mission Requirements for Foreign Stu- 
dents (undergraduate and graduate) in 
the Admission section of the catalog. 

Admission to the program is consid- 
ered as soon as all the required docu- 
ments are received. The Doctoral 
Program in Business Administratksn at 
the University encourages all qualified 
persons to apply and admits applicants 
without regard to sex, age, race, color, 
creed, handicap, marital status, national 
or ethnic origin. 

Degree Requirements 

General degree requirements for all doc- 
toral candidates are: 

1. Demonstration of practical knowl- 
edge of research methods and proce- 
dures in the areas of statistics, 
economics, and behavioral sciences; a 
research project is conducted at the end 
of ttie first year of study to ensure that 
all candidates have acquired the rele- 
vant skills. 

2. Successful completion of a com- 
prehensive examination at tfie end of 
tfie secorKi year in a major area of con- 
centration to ensure ttiat students are 
prepared to liegin dissertation research. 



82 / College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



3. Successful completion and oral 
defense of doctoral dissertation. 

Rnancial Aid 

Applicants to the doctoral program may 
request financial aid by completing the 
form included with the application. Re- 
search and teaching stipends are avail- 
able. The stipend may include both 
cash award and waiver of tuition, de- 
pending upon the applicant's qualifica- 
tions. 



School of Accounting 

Lewis F. Davidson, Professor and 

Director 
Lucia S. Chang, Professor and 

Associate Director 
Rolf Auster, Professor 
Delano H. Beny, Instructor 
William L Campfieid, Professor 

Emeritus 
Jacl< L. Carter, Assistant Professor 
Yong S. Ciioe, Assistant Professor 
i\tenuel Dieguez, Instructor 
Mortimer Dittenlioffer, Professor 
Donald W. Fair, Instructor and 

Associate Dean 
Miin hi. Guo, Assistant Professor 
Georgina Garcia, Lecturer 
Rosalie C. Halibauer, Associate 

Professor 
Harvey S. Hendricltson, Professor 
Kevin Kemerer, Assistant Professor 
David Lavin, Associate Professor 
IMyron S. Lul>eii, Associate Professor 
Kenneth S. Most, Professor 
Charles A. Nickerson, Professor 
Leandro S. Nunez, Lecturer 
Robert B. Oliva, Associate Professor 
Felix Pomeranz, Distinguished 

Lecturer, and Director, Center for 

Accounting, Auditing, and Tax 

Studies 
Leonardo Rodriguez, Professor and 

Vice President, Business and 

Finance 
Bernadette Ruf, Assistant Professor 
Robert W. Rutiedge, Assistant 

Professor 
Paul J. Schiacter, Assistant Professor 
JohnT. Sennetti, Professor 
Barbara T. Uliss, Instructor 
Richard H. Wislceman, Jr., Lecturer 
John Wrieden, Lecturer 
Harold E. Wyman, Professor and Dean 
ShuYeh, Assistant Professor 
Doria Yeaman, Associate Professor 



The School of Accounting offers two 
graduate degree programs, Master of 
Accounting and Master of Science in 
Taxation. The tvro programs are de- 
signed for students who have com- 
pleted an undergraduate degree in 
accounting, or ttie equivalent, from a re- 
gionally accredited college or university. 
Equivalency of undergraduate degrees 
will be determined by tPie Director of the 
School of Accounting. Students whose 
degrees are in majors other tfian ac- 
counting will be required to complete 
business or accounting deficiencies, or 
both. Before a student with deficiencies 
may tal<e courses in either program, the 
Director of the School must approve the 
student's program of study. 

A student with a degree in business 
who is admitted to the M.Acc. program 
may be required to complete up to six 
accounting pre-core courses (21 semes- 
ter hours) from the following: 

ACQ 6 1 05 Accelerated Rnancial 

Accounting I 4 

ACG 6115 Accelerated Rnandal 

Accounting II 4 

ACG 6655 Auditing and Accounting 

Systems 4 

ACG 6345 Management Accounting 

and Control 3 

BUL6124 Sun/ey of Business Law 3 
TAX 6005 Income Tax 3 

A student with a non-business de- 
gree who is admitted to the M.Acc. pro- 
gram will be required to complete, in 
addition to the pre-core courses listed 
above, the seven pre-core courses of 
thie Master of Business Administration, 
with the exception of GEB 6445 (Legal 
Environment of Business), for which 
MAN 6726 (Policy Analysis) must be 
substituted. 

Graduate Student Advising and 
Preregistration 

All students taking graduate accounting 
and tax courses must be fully admitted 
to a graduate accounting program or 
have written permission from the Direc- 
tor of the School of Accounting. Regis- 
tration for all graduate accounting and 
tax courses must be made through the 
School of Accounting Graduate Advisor. 
All graduate students are preregistered 
during a two-week period commencing 
three weeks prior to official university 
registration. 

Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) 

The M.Acc. degree is designed to pre- 
pare students for entry and advance- 
nfient in the accounting profession and 
to provide the additional formal educa- 
tion needed by persons already in ac- 
counting and other fields seeking either 



a career change or advancement, or 
both. 

Tfie M.Acc. degree is available in 
the concentrations of accounting/audit- 
ing, systems, government accounting, 
and corporate/management accounting, 
and a separate track of government ac- 
counting and auditing. These are de- 
signed to prepare the students for the 
careers described below: 

Concentration/ 

Track Career 

Rnandal Independent Accountant 

Accounting/ in tfie public accounting 
Auditing profession 

Systems Accounting systems, 

consultant, auditor, or 
officer in a business 
corpxjration or public 
accounting. 



Internal 
Auditing 



Industry or Government 
internal auditor 



Corporate Internal accountant, 
Management/ auditor, or officer in a 
Accounting business corporation. 

A student wtx) wishes to sit for tfie 
CPA examination must select courses 
which satisfy tfie 30 hours of post-bacca- 
laureate study required by the Rorida 
Statute. Relevant portions of tfie Florida 
Statute are detailed below. 

M.Acc. Program Concentrations 

Tfie M.Acc. program with a concentra- 
tion in financial accounting/auditing, sys- 
tems, internal auditing, or 
corporate/management accounting con- 
sists of two parts requiring 30 hours: tfie 
accounting core (nine semester hours) 
and tfie elective (21 semester hours). 

Accounting Core Requirements 

ACG 6135 Seminar in Rnancial 

Accounting Theory I 
ACG 6657 The Environment of 

Accounting 
ACG 6437 Advanced Accounting 

Systems 
Courses in accounting are not trans- 
ferable unless approved in advance by 
tfie Director of the School of Accounting. 

The accounting elective require- 
ments are seven courses (21 semester 
hours) selected from tfie following tfiree 
groups of courses: 

1 . No more than two tax courses 
from ttiese: 

TAX 6105 Taxation of Corporations I 
TAX 6205 Partnership Taxation . 
TAX 6065 Tax Research Practice 

and Procedure 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration / 83 



2. If sitting for the CPA examination, 
three courses, which include any 6000- 
level auditing course and these: 

BUL 61 16 Business l^w 

TAX 60 1 5 Taxation of Corporations 
and Partnerships 

3. Additional 6000-level courses ap- 
proved by the Director of the Schtool of 
Accounting with a minimum of four 
courses (12 semester hours) in a single 
concentration of financial account- 
ing/auditing, systems, government ac- 
counting, or corporate/management 
accounting. 



Master of Science in Taxation 

The M.S.T. program is designed to pre- 
pare students entry or advancement In 
the specialized area of taxation. Stu- 
dents may develop their own specializa- 
tions. The final program of studies must 
be approved by Director of tlie School 
of Accounting. 

The M.S.T. program consists of Iwo 
parts requiring 30 hours of coursework: 
tax core (12 semester hiours); and elec- 
tives (18 semester hours). 

Tax Core Requirements 

TAX 6065 Tax Research Practice 
and Procedure 

TAX 6105 Taxation of Corporations I 
TAX 6405 Estate and Gift Taxation 
TAX 6875 Current Developments in 
Taxation 

The elective requirements are six ad- 
ditional 6000-level courses approved by 
the Director of the School of Accounting 
three of which must be tax courses ex- 
cluding TAX 601 5, TAX 6005, and TAX 
6935. 

Students admitted to the M.S.T. pro- 
gram who wish to sit for the CPA exami- 
nation and who are required to com plete 
deficiencies in undergraduate account- 
ing by completing the accounting pre- 
core courses, are not required to take 
TAX 6005 (Income Tax) as part of the 
accounting pre-core. 

Rorida State Board of Accountancy as 
meeting the requirements for the addi- 
tional credit hours required for the CPA 
Examination. With a carefully planned 
program of study, a student who earns 
either a M.Acc. or a M.S.T., will be quali- 
fied to sit for the Certified Public 
Accounting Examination, and upon suc- 
cessful completion of thie examination 
be certified in the State of Rorida. There 
Is no additional experience requirement. 



Decision Sciences and 
Information Systems 

Daniel Robey, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Dinesh Batra, Assistant Professor 
Joyce J. Elam, Professor and James L 

Knight Eminent Schol^ 
Sushll K. Gupta, Professor and Vice 

Provost 
Peeter J. Kirs, Assistant Professor 
ChristasP. Koulamas, Assistant 

Professor 
Jerzy Kyparlsis, Associate Professor 
Tomlslav Mandakovic, Professor 
Krishnamurty Muralldhar, Assistant 

Professor 
Elena Pemas, Instructor 
Rajiv Sabherwal, Assistant Professor 
Radhlka Santhanam, Assistant 

Professor 
Maung K. Sein, Assistant Professor 
Larry A. Smith, Associate Professor 
Steve H. Zanakis, Professor 
Peter J. Zegan, Lecturer 

Master of Science in 
Management Information 
Systems 

The Master of Science in MIS program 
emphasizes advanced study in the 
analysis, design, implementation and 
overall management of information sys- 
tems in organizations. This program is 
designed to prepare graduates for posi- 
tions of advanced responsibility in both 
systems and user departments. The pro- 
gram is a natural extension of under- 
graduate study in txjsiness or computer 
science. Students with other lack- 
grounds will normally require additional 
courses to satisfy the general College's 
requirements. 

The M.S. in MIS program consists of 
courses in two areas: 

Prerequisites: Seven courses (21 

semester hours) 

COS 3403 COBOL for Non-Computer 

Science Majors 3 

COP 2210 Programming in PASCAL 3 
MAN 6051 Organization and 

Maragement 3 

ACG 6026 Accounting for Managers 3 
MAR 6805 Marketing Management 3 
QMB 6603 Quantitative Methods In 

Management 3 

ECP 6705 Managerial Economics 3 

All of the courses listed atwve can 
be waived if they, or ttieir equivalents, 
have been taken previously. Students 
may substitute "C" or a structured pro- 
gramming language (not FORTRAN or 
BASIC) for PASCAL. 



Required Courses: 14 courses (40 
semester hours) 

ISM 6106 Systems Analysis 3 

MAN 6569 Managerial Decision 

Making 3 

MAN 6726 Policy Analysis 3 

ISM 6305 Information Systems 

Planning 3 

ISM 6205 Data Structures and File 

Processing 3 

ISM 6105 Information Systems 

Analysis and Design 3 
ISM 6405 Decision Support 

Systems 3 

ISM 6045 Cunent Economic and 

Social Implications of 

Infomiation Systems 3 
MAN 69 1 1 Research in Systems 

Development 3 

MAN 6501 Operations Management 3 
FIN 6428 Rnancial Management 3 
MAN 6830 Organization Information 

Systems 3 

MAN 6830L Organization Information 

Systems Lab 1 

QMB 6845 Simulation of 

Management Systems 3 
A minimum of 40 hours is required 
for graduation, this may be reduced to 
30 hours for students with a graduate 
degree in Business Administration or re- 
lated Eirea. Graduation requirements in- 
clude a minimum overall GPA of 3.0. 
Courses with a grade below a 'C will 
not be accepted for graduate credit. 



Finance 

Arun Prakash, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Gary Anderson, Assistant Professor 
Robert Bear, Professor and Director, 

Broward Programs 
William R. Beaton, Professor 
Joel Barber, Assistant Professor 
Chun-Hao Chang, Assistant Professor 
Robert T. Daigler, Associate Professor 
Krishnan Dandapani, Assistant 

Professor 
Karen Duhala, Assistant Professor 
Shahid Hamid, Assistant Professor 
James Keys, Instructor 
Simon Pak, Associate Professor 
All Parhlzgarl, Professor and Director, 

h^BA Program 
Emmanuel Roussakis, Professor 
George B. Slmmorw, Distinguished 

Service Professor 
Michael Sullivan, Assistant Professor 
William Welch, Associate Professor 

and Associate Director, Center for 

Banking and Firtancial Institutions 



84 / College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



John S. Zdanowicz, Professor and 
Director, Cer^ter for Banking and 
Financial Institutions 

Master of Science in Finance 

This graduate program leading to the de- 
gree of Master of Science in Rnance 
(MSF) is offered primarily for students 
with an undergraduate business degree 
who want to concentrate in Rnance at 
the graduate level. The MSF program is 
designed to extend analytical skills and 
decision-making abilities in the solution 
of problems related to obtaining and util- 
izing funds. Graduates will also have a 
sound working knowledge of current de- 
velopments and opportunities as they 
pertain to financial institutions, capital 
markets, and the corporate 
enterprise. 

Content and Stmcture 

The program has a minimum of 36 se- 
mester hours (12 courses). 

Group 1 - Common Body of 
Knowledge 

All or some of the common body 
courses can be waived (without substitu- 
tion) depending on tfie student's prior 
education. Students with a recent de- 
gree in Business Administration from a 
regionally accredited university should 
be able to waive most or all of the Com- 
mon Body Courses. The areas covered 
under common body of knowledge are fi- 
nancial and cost accounting, legal envi- 
ronment in business, economics, 
financial management and policy, opera- 
tions management, managerial decision 
making, organizational Information sys- 
tems, marketing, and organizational the- 
ory. If a student is deficient In any of 
tiiese areas, the student will be required 
to fulfill the requirement by taking the ap- 
propriate courses. As part of tiie com- 
mon body for Rnance majors, students 
will be required to take FIN 6428 (Finan- 
cial Management); this requirement 
may, but not necessarily, be waived if 
tiie student has satisfactorily completed 
two undergraduate Corporate Rnance 
courses. 

Group 2 - Finance Core Courses 

All MSF-Rnance students are required 

to take tfie following courses: 

FIN 6246 Rnandal Mari^ets and 

Institutions 
FIN 6456 CXiantitive Methods in 

Financial Analysis 
FIN 6516 Security Analysis 
FIN 6636 International Rnance 
Fl N 6804 Theory of Finance 



Group 3 • Finance Electives 

Nine hours of approved Rnance elec- 
tives, other than those mentioned in 
Group 1 and Group 2, must be com- 
pleted. 

Group 4 • Four Related Electives 

Students will be required to select four 
6000-level coupses from concentrations 
in business, economics, computer sci- 
ence, and other related areas. Students 
will be permitted, but not required, to 
concentrate in one area. These elec- 
tives must be chosen witii prior approval 
of the MSF program advisor. 

The 36 semester hours requirement 
may be reduced to 30 for students who 
possess an accredited Master's Degree 
in Business Administration (this would 
result in the reduction of two related 
electives). Up to two graduate courses 
may be transferred in from another ac- 
credited school, even if no advanced de- 
gree was obtained. 



Management and 
International Business 

Dana L. Farrow, Professor and 

Cliairperson 
Richard Ahlers, Instructor 
Constance 8. Bates, Associate 

Professor 
Leonard H. Chusmir, Associate 

Professor 
Gary Dessler, Professor 
Herman Dorsett, Associate Professor 
Earnest Friday, Assistant Professor 
Ronald Gilbert, Associate Professor 
Jerry Haar, Associate Professor 
Richard M. Hodgetts, Professor 
William T. Jerome, Oistinguisiied 

University Professor 
Willabeth Jordan, Instructor 
K. Galen Kroeck, Associate Professor 

and Director, [k>ctoral Studies 
Jan B. Luytjes, Professor 
Kari O. Magnusen, Associate Professor 
Modesto A. Maidlque, Professor and 

University President 
Sherry Moss, Assistant Professor 
Qeanor Polster, Instructor 
Kannan Ramaswamy, Assistant 

Professor 
William E Renforth, Professor 
Leonardo Rodriguez, Professor and 

Vice President Business and Finance 
Ronnie Sllverblatt, Associate Professor 
Christine Specter, Assistant Professor 
George Sutija, Associate Professor 
William M. Taggart, Professor 
Anisya S. Thomas, Assistant Professor 
Enzo Valenzl, Professor 



Master of International 
Business (MIB) 

The Department offers a graduate de- 
gree, the Master of International Busi- 
ness, and the graduate level Certificate 
in International Business. (See Certifi- 
cate Programs.) The Master In Interna- 
tional Business is designed to prepare 
students who seek a career in some as- 
pect of global business. The past few 
decades have seen a rapid expansion 
in the field of international ti'ade and in- 
vestments and virtually no business en- 
tity today is exempt from woridwide 
competitive forces. This expansion has 
resulted in \he development of interde- 
pendent economic systems witfi all the 
political ramifications of such interde- 
pendence. The business person of the 
future must not only have a keen aware- 
ness of domestic business practices, 
but foreign business strategies as well. 
Furthermore, there must be a global po- 
litical awareness and sensitivity in order 
to develop viable corporate strategies. 

The global character of the program 
is not only to be found in tfie cuniculum, 
but witfiin the multinational composition 
of tfie students enrolled in tfie program. 
Qualified foreign stijdents are actively re- 
cruited and the program seeks tiie ac- 
tive participation of foreign as \Ne\\ as 
domestic corporations tfiough lectures 
by executives of these corporations or 
internships. 

The program is designed in such a 
manner as to accommodate undergradu- 
ate business majors as well as non-busi- 
ness majors. The latter will have to meet 
tfie pre-core requirements which focus 
on the basic functional aspects of busi- 
ness and tfie related skills that might be 
necessary. Undergraduate business ma- 
jors w/ho have not taken the equivalent 
of any of the pre-core courses also 
would have to meet these pre-core re- 
quirements. 

Pre-Core Courses 

MAN 6245 
ACQ 6026 
MAR 6805 
QMB 6603 



MAN 6830 
MAN6830L 



ECP 6705 
MAN 6569 



FIN 6428 
MAN 6608 



Organizational Behavior 
Accountir)g for Managers 
Marketing Management 
Quantitative Metiiods in 
Management 
Organization Information 
Systems 

Organization Information 
Systems Lab 
Managerial Economics 
Managerial 
Decision-Making 
Rnanclal Management 
International Business 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration / 85 



Core Courses 

ACG 6255 International Accounting 
BUL 6631 International Commercial 

FIN 6636 International Finance 

MAN 6603 Problems in Comparative 

Management 
MAN 6635 International Business 

Policy 
MAN 671 7 Corporate Negotiations 
MAR 6158 International Marl<eting 
MAN 66 1 7 Managing Global 

Production and 

Technology 

In addition to the core, MIB candi- 
dates are required to take five electives. 
Tvw of the electives must be in one func- 
tional area (either within or outside tlie 
College of Business Administration), 
while the others may be taken in otiner 
eireas. All electives must be approved by 
the advisor. 

Students may choose their five elec- 
tives so as to have a concentration or 
specialization within a particular area. 
For example, suggested course se- 
quences for concentrations in Interna- 
tional Banking Management of Scierx^, 
Technology, and Innovation are given 
b)elow: 

International Banlting 
concentration: 

FIN 6315 



Graduate with Non-Business 
Degree 



FIN 6325 



FIN 6346 
FIN 6625 



FIN 6626 



Commercial Banking 
Cunent Issues in 
Commercial Banking 
Credit Analysis 
International Bank 
Management 

International Bank Lending 
Policies and Practices 



Management of Science, 
Technology, and Innovation 
concentration: 

MAN 6679 Master's Project in 

International Business 

MAN 6805 Entrejxeneurship 

ISM 6045 Current Economic and 
Social Implications of 
Information Systems 

ISM 6305 Informatbn Systems 
Planning 

MAN 6675 Special Topics in 

International Business 

Other concentratkins (e.g., in area 
studies) may be developed to meet a 
student's needs. 

Suggested sequence of courses to 
be taken assuming full-time status: 



Fall 

ACG 6026 
MAN 6608 
ECP 6705 
MAN 6830 

MAN 6830L 



Hrst Year 

Spring 

MAN 6245 
MAR 6805 
MAN 6569 
QMB6603 



Fall 

ACG 6255 
FIN 6636 
BUL 6631 
MAN 6603 



Second Year 

Spring 

MAN 661 7 
MAN 671 7 
MAN 6635 



Summer 

FIN 6428 
MAR 6158 
Elective 



Summer 

Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



Graduate witii Business Degree 
First Year 



Fall 

ACG 6255 
MAN 6603 
FIN 6636 



Fall 



Spring 

MAN 661 7 
MAN 671 7 
MAN 6635 
Elective 

Second Year 



Summer 

MAR 6158 

Elective 

Elective 



BUL 6631 - Elective - Elective 

The purpose of sequencing the 
courses is not only to assure having the 
appropriate prerequisites for the pro- 
gram, but also to build a dass con- 
sciousness which may lead to an 
esprit-de-corps that can be of great 
value at some future time. 

Suggested Electives 

FIN 6625 International Bank 
Management 

FIN 6626 International Bank Lending 
Policies and Practices 

MAN 66 1 5 I ntemational 

Labor-Management 
Relations 

MAN 6675 Special Topics in 

International Business 

MAN 6606 International Business 
Environment 

REE 6935 Seminar in International 
Real Estate 

EGO 5709 The World Economy 

MAN 6601 International Management 

MAN 6679 Master's Project in 

International Business 



Certificate Programs 

Advanced Certificate in 
Accounting 

The purpose of the certificate program 
is to provide a structured program of 
graduate level instruction for those who 
do not wish to enroll in a graduate de- 
gree program; who need to satisfy man- 
datory continuing professional 
education requirements of any state; 
and wrtTo need to satisfy post-t>accalau- 
reate course credits to qualify for ttie 
CPA in Rorida or any other state requir- 
ing a fifth year of education to sit for tiie 
CPA examination. 

Admission 

To be admitted to the certificate pro- 
gram, a student must have graduated 
from an accredited university degree 
program in accounting, or be a graduate 
of any other business discipline, pro- 
vided tiiat tiie student's transcript shows 
a completion of at least nine semester 
hours in accounting courses beyond the 
principles level witii grades of 'B' or 
higher. Each student's transcript will be 
evaluated by an advisor to ensure that 
all deficiencies are satisfied. 

Students applying for admission to 
tiie certificate program must submit cur- 
rent transcripts from all colleges or uni- 
versities attended. 

Tfie certificate program consists of 
ten courses selected from the list below. 
However, students are allowed to attend 
classes in the program witiiout complet- 
ing the entire certificate program. None 
of these courses will be transferable for 
graduate credit in College of Business 
Administration degree programs. 

Required Courses: (30 semester 
hours) 

ACG 51 75 Issues and Problems in 

Accounting for 

Nonprofit Entities 3 

ACG 5395 Seminar in Managerial 

Accounting 3 

ACG 5656 Operational Auditing 3 
ACG 5657 Systems Auditing 3 

ACG 5695 Seminar in Accounting 3 
ACG 5805 Seminar in Rnancial 

Accounting 3 

ACG 5837 International Dimensions 

of Accounting and 

Auditing 3 

ACG 5695 Statistical MetiTods ih 

Accounting and Auditing 3 
ACG 5005 Standards and Principles 

of Financial Accounting 3 
ACG 5356 Advanced Managerial 

Accounting 3 

ACG 5386 Conti^ollership 3 



86 / College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



ACG 5905 


Independent Study in 






Accounting and Auditing 


3 


ACG 5895 


Specia) Topics in 






Accounting and Auditing 


3 


BUL5105 


Legal Environment of 






Business 


3 


BUL 5666 


Accountant's Liability 


3 


BUL5665 


Law for Accountants 


3 


TAX 5406 


Taxation of Estates and 






Trusts 


3 


TAX 5065 


Taxation Research and 






Reporting 


3 


TAX 5105 


Corporation Taxation 


3 


TAX 5516 


International Dimensions 






of Taxation 


3 


TAX 5726 


Tax Planning 


3 


TAX 5875 


Seminar in Taxation 


3 


TAX 5904 


Independent Study in 






Taxation 


3 


TAX 5936 


Special Topics in 






Taxation 


3 



Banking Certificate 

The GIB (Certificate in Banking) is de- 
signed for practicing bank managers 
and bank employees. The core program 
consists of four undergraduate or gradu- 
ate Finance courses. Upon successful 
completion of the four course sequence, 
a Certificate signed by the Dean of the 
College of Business Administration will 
be awarded. 

Participants in the CIB Program 
must meet certain admission require- 
ments. In general, those intending to 
take undergraduate level courses must 
have an Associate of Arts Degree or its 
equivalent, and must meet the other 
lower division preparation requirements 
of tfie College. Participants planning to 
take graduate level courses must hold a 
Bachelor's degree, submit a satisfactory 
score on the Graduate Management Ad- 
missions Test, provide transcripts of all 
undergraduate work, and meet all ad- 
mission requirements of the College's 
graduate programs. 

Program requirements 

FIN 3414 Intermediate Rnance 3 

or 
FIN 6426 Rnandal Management 

Policies 
FIN 4303 Financial Markets and 

Institutions 3 

or 
FIN 6246 Rnandal Markets and 

Institutions 
FIN 4324 Commercial Bank 

Management 3 

or 
FIN 6315 Commercial Banking 



FIN 4345 Credit Analysis and Loan 
Evaluation 3 



FIN 6346 Credit Analysis 

Applicants who are interested in pur- 
suing a Master's degree in Rnance 
should take RN 6426, FIN 6246, RN 
6315, and RN 6346 rather than FIN 
3414, RN 4303, FIN 4324, and RN 
4345. 



International Bank 
Management Certificate 

The Certificate in International Bank 
Management (CIBM) is designed to 
train existing and future bankers in tfie 
areas of international b>anking policy, 
(sractice, and technique. Its interest Is to 
provide an interface between tfie domes- 
tic and international side of banking for 
bank managers. This certificate is not 
open to finance majors. 

Partidpants in the CIBM must meet 
tfie admission requirements listed for 
the Certificate in Banking Program. 

Required Courses 

FIN 3414 Intermediate Rnance 3 



FIN 6426 Rnandal Management 

Pol ides 
FIN 4324 Commerdal Bank 

Management 3 

or 
FIN 6315 Commerdal Banking 

or 
FIN 6325 Current Issues in 

Commercial Banking 

or 
FIN 4345 Credit Analysis and Loan 

Evaluation 

or 
FIN 6345 Credit Analysis 
FIN 4604 International Rnandal 

Management 3 

or 
FIN 6636 International Rnance 
FIN 4615 International Banking 3 

or 
FIN 6625 International Bank 

Management 

Applicants with a Bachelor's Degree 
wfx) are interested in pursuing a Mas- 
ter's degree in Finance should take FIN 
6426, FIN 6636, FIN 6625, and either 
RN 6315, RN 6325, or RN 6345 rather 
than RN 3414, FIN 4324 or FIN 4345, 
RN 4604, RN 4615. 



Certifk^te in International 
Business 

A Certificate program is available to 
graduate students wishing to acquire an 
in-depth understanding of international 
business, but wh» find it unnecessary or 
inconvenient to enroll for a graduate de- 
gree program. Such students may al- 
ready have the MBA degree, or an 
undergraduate business degree. 

Students in the Certificate in Interna- 
tional Business program must meet the 
general admission requirements for 
graduate study in the College of Busi- 
ness Administration, and satisfactorily 
complete an approved program of study 
consisting of four courses, as 
follows: 

MAN 6608 Intennational Business 3 
MAN 6635 International Business 

Policy 3 

and two graduate international business 
courses approved by the Chairperson of 
the Department of Management and In- 
ternational Business. 



Course Descriptk>ns 

Definition of Prefixes: 

ACG-Accounting; BAN-Banking; BUL- 
Business Law; CIS-Computer and Infor- 
mation Systems; GEB-General 
Business; FIN-Rnance; MAN-Manage- 
ment; MAR-Marketing; QMB-Quantita- 
tive Methods in Business; REE-Real 
Estate; RMl-Risk Management and In- 
surance; TAX -Taxation. 

Departmental or School/College 
Designation: 

AC - Course taught by School of Ac- 
counting 

BA - Interdepartmental course taught by 
College of Business Administration 

OS - Course taught by Department of 
Dedsion Sdences and Information Sys- 
tems 

EC - Course taught by Department of 
Economics, College of Arts and Sd- 
ences 

R - Course taught by Department of Fi- 
nance. 

MA - Course taught by Department of 
Management and International Business 

ME - Course taught by Department of 
Marketing and Environment 

MS - Course taught by Department of 
Matfiematical Sdences, College of Arts 
and Sdences 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration / 87 



ACG 5137 Standards and Principles 
of Rnancial Accounting (AC) (3). A 
survey of offidal pronouncements on ac- 
counting standards and principles. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of Accounting 
certificate program advisor. 

ACG 5256 Intematioruil Dimensions 
of Accounting and Auditing (AC) (3). 

Review of and reasons for variations in 
accounting and auditing practices 
tfirougfiout ttie world; explore Initiatives 
undertal^en to promote transparency, 
liarmonizatlon, and standardization to fa- 
cilitate understanding of financial state- 
ments prepared under various 
conventions. Prerequisite: Permission 
of Accounting certificate program advi- 
sor. 

ACG 5307 Advanced Managerial Ac- 
counting (AC) (3). In depth study of de- 
termlrtation and control of production 
costs; Ixidgetary control; CVP analysis; 
and aitennative methods of performance 
measurement sind analysis. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Accounting certifi- 
cate program advisor. 

ACG 5386 Controllership (AC) (3). 

Study of controllership function; role of 
controller in planning, accounting for, 
sind evaluating company performance; 
relationshiip with internal auditing. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of Accounting cer- 
tificate program advisor. 

ACG 5395 Seminar In Managerial Ac- 
counting (AC) (3). An in-depth study of 
selected areas of managerial account- 
ing. Prerequisite: ACG 4341 or equiva- 
lent and Permission of Accounting 
certificate program advisor. 

ACG 5507 Issues ar>d Problems In Ac- 
counting for Non-ProfK Entitles (AC) 
(3). Study £ind analysis of accounting, 
reporting, and control standards and 
practices of non-profit organization - In- 
cluding accounting for governments, 
hospitals, universities, churches, and 
otfiers. Prerequisite: Permission of Ac- 
counting certificate program advisor. 

ACG 5516 The Environment of Gov- 
ernment Accounting (AC) (3). Basic 
public administration emphasizing gov- 
ernmental processes with which govern- 
mental EKSountants and auditors come 
Into contact, includes legislative and ad- 
ministrative activities and operating func- 
tions having high accounting and 
auditing Involvement. Prerequisite: Ad- 
mission to graduate program in School 
of Accounting or permission of School 
Director. 

ACG 5518 Historical and Compara- 
tive Govemnwnt Accounting (AC) (3). 
Research and reporting on subjects in 



the history of, or on comparative as- 
pects of, government accounting. Pre- 
requisite: Admission to ti>e graduate 
program in ttie ScItooI of Accounting or 
permission of School Director. 

ACG 5519 Contemporary issues In 
Government Accounting (AC) (3). Re- 
search and reporting on current Issues 
related to government accounting. Pre- 
requisite: Admission to graduate pro- 
gram In School of Accounting or 
pemilssion of School Director. 

ACG 5545 Analysis of Governmental 
Hnancial Reports (AC) (3). Describes 
content of government fir»ncial reports 
and analytical methods employed by in- 
ternal ctnd external users; covers con- 
cepts of disclosure, budget/actual 
analysis, credit evaluations, operational 
evaluations, measures of fiscal capacity 
and signs of fiscal stress Prerequisites: 
ACG 6515 arxJ admission to graduate 
program In tfie School of Accounting or 
permission of School Director. 

ACG 5546 Governmental Planning 
and Budgetary Accounting with 
Cases (AC) (3). Budgeting in govern- 
ments emphasizing formulation leased 
on accounting and auditing Input. 
Budget execution and analysis of devia- 
tions of actual from budgets; study of 
ZBB, PPBS, and M80 systems and 
their behavioral and accounting bases. 
Prerequisites: ACG 6505, ACG 6525 
and admission to the graduate program 
in the School of Accounting or permis- 
sion of the School Director. 

ACG 5596 Accounting for Specialized 
Governmental and Nonprofit Entities 
(AC) (3). Survey course by guest lectur- 
ers covering detailed accounting con- 
cepts, procedures, and reporting for 
enterprise fund entities, educational enti- 
tles, and unique types of internal service 
funds. Prerequisites: ACG 6505, and ad- 
mission to the graduate program of (he 
School of Accounting or permission of 
tfw School Director. 

ACG 5627 Systems Auditing (AC) (3). 

Principies and procedures of auditing 
systems of information. Including tfie 
function, approach, and techniques of 
systems auditing and the evaluation of 
systems controls. Emphasis on auditing 
computerized systems. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Accounting certificate pro- 
gram advisor. 

ACG 5675 Operational Auditing (AC) 

(3). Examines operational auditing as a 
professional discipline for testing and 
evaluating totality of planning and oper- 
ating controls; particular attention to de- 
velopment, "selling" and Implementation 
of recommendations for operating im- 



provement and cost containment. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of Accounting cer- 
tificate program advisor. 

ACG 3696 Seminar In Auditing (AC) 
(3). An in-depth study of recent develop- 
ments In auditing. Prerequisite: ACG 
4651 or equivalent and permission of Ac- 
counting certificate program advisor. 

ACG 5806 Seminar In Rnancial Ac- 
counting (AC) (3). An In-depth study of 
recent developments in financial ac- 
counting. Prerequisite: ACG 4111 and 
permission of Accounting certificate pro- 
gram advisor. 

ACG 5846 Statistical Methods in Ac- 
counting and Auditing (AC) (3). For- 
mulation, analysis and implementation 
on a microcomputer of matfiematical 
models in financial and managerial ac- 
counting and auditing. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Accounting certificate ad- 
visor. 

ACG 5905 independent Study In Ac- 
counting and Auditing (1-3). Individual 
conferences, supervised readings, and 
reports on personal investigations. Pre- 
requisites: Written permission of instruc- 
tor, accounting certificate program 
advisor. School Director, and Dean. 

ACG 5936 Special Topics In Account- 
ing and Auditing (AC) (3). For groups 
of students wfio wish cin Intensive study 
of a particular topic or a limited number 
of topics not otherwise offered In the cur- 
riculum. Prerequisite: Written permis- 
sion of instructor, accounting certificate 
program advisor, School Director, arHJ 
Dean. 

ACG 6005 fHrtancial Accounting 
Analysis (AC) (3). Introduction to thie 
tfieory and practice of financiaJ account- 
ing and reporting, with emphasis on un- 
derstanding and detennining income 
and financial position. (No credit will be 
given to students wfio have had under- 
graduate or graduate equivalents). Pre- 
requisite: QMB 6603 or equivalent 

ACG 6026 Accounting for Managers 
(AC) (3). Presentation of the nature, 
techniques and uses of accounting from 
the perspective of people vAxt manage 
businesses and investments in txjsi- 
nesses. Covers both financial and man- 
agement accounting. Not ofjen to M.S.T. 
or M.Acc. students. 

ACG 6105 Aoceierated Financial Ac- 
counting I (AC) (4). Underiying con- 
cepts and ethical, regulatory and 
business environment of financial report- 
ing; emphasis on measurement, analy- 
sis and interpretation of income, cash 
flows and financial position. Prereq- 
uisites: Admission to a graduate pro- 



88 / College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



gram in the School of Accounting or per- 
mission of tfie School Director. Not open 
to those with undergraduate accounting 
degrees. 

ACG 6115 Accelerated Rnancial Ac- 
counting II (AC) (4). Underlying con- 
cepts and ethical, regulatory and 
business environment of financial report- 
ing; emphasis on measurement, analy- 
sis and Interpretation of financial 
position, accounting for partnerships, in- 
ternational corpwrations, and business 
combinations. Prerequisites: ACG 6105 
and admission to a graduate program in 
tfie School of Accounting or permission 
of the School Director. Not open to 
tfwse with undergraduate accounting 
degrees. 

ACG 6135 Seminar in Financial Ac- 
counting Theory I (AC) (3). A study of 
the theoretical structure of accounting, 
with special attention to asset and in- 
come definition, recognition, and meas- 
urement; and an afspraisal of 
pronouncements of professional ac- 
counting organizations. Prerequisite: 
ACG 4201 and admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting or 
permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6145 Seminar in Financial Ac- 
counting Theory II (AC) (3). A continu- 
ation of ACG 6135, with emphasis on 
tfie protJems of accounting for price- 
level changes and other cun-ent issues. 
Prerequisite: ACG 6135 and admission 
to a graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of tfie School 
Director. 

ACG 6175 Rnancial Reporting and 
Analysis (AC) (3). Comprehensive 
treatment of analysis of financial state- 
ments as aid for decision making; looks 
at current state of financial reporting 
practices and impact of published state- 
ments on economic systems. Prereq- 
uisite: ACG 6026 or equivalent. Not 
open to M.S.T. or M.Acc. students. 

ACG 6205 Financial Accounting III 
(AC) (3). Underlying concepts and ethi- 
cal, regulatory and business environ- 
ment of financial reporting, with 
emphasis on accounting for partner- 
ships, international corporations, and 
business combinatkjns. Prerequisite: 
ACG 4111 with a grade of 'C or higher 
and admission to a graduate program In 
tfie Scfxjol of Accounting or permission 
of tfie School Director. 

. ACG 6245 Accounting and Auditing 
Compliance Issues (AC) (3). Corpo- 
rate, government and putilic accounting 
compliance with response to institutional 
and political regulation; attention to com- 
pliance in specialized industries such as 



fiealth care, transportation, financial in- 
stitutions real estate and construction. 
Prerequisites: ACG 41 1 1 or equivalent, 
ACG 4651 and admission to a graduate 
program In the School of Accounting or 
permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6255 International Accounting 
(AC) (3). Comparative analysis of ac- 
counting concepts and practices in differ- 
ent countries; international accounting 
standards; problems of accounting for 
multinational corporations, including 
transfers of funds and income measure- 
ments; the role of accounting in national 
economic development. Prerequisite: 
ACG 4201 or equivalent, and admission 
to a graduate program In tfie School of 
Accounting or pemfiission of tfie School 
Director. 

ACG 6295 Financial Accounting IV 
(AC) (3). The application of accounting 
principles in tfie production of informa- 
tion for selected topics in financial state- 
ments vifith extensive examination and 
evaluation of FASB and international 
standards of accounting. Prerequisites: 
ACG 6205 and admission to a graduate 
program in tfie School of Accounting or 
the permission of the Director. 

ACG 6308 Accounting for Decision 
Making (AC) (3). The uses and limita- 
tions of accounting data as sources of 
information for managerial decisions. 
Prerequisite: ACG 6005. 

ACG 6345 Management Accounting 
and Control (AC) (3). Accounting con- 
cepts and techniques useful in evalu- 
ation, planning, organization and control 
of a business enterprise, with attention 
to mettiods of accounting for production 
activities; ethics in management ac- 
counting. Prerequisites: ACG 61 15 and 
admission to a graduate fyogram in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
tfie School Director. Not open to those 
with undergraduate accounting degrees. 

ACG 6346 Seminar in Managerial Ac- 
counting I (AC) (3). Analysis of transfer 
pricing; product pricing; Incremental 
profit analysis; decision models; alterna- 
tive performance measurement tech- 
niques; and other advanced topics. 
Prerequisite: ACG 4341 or ACG 6308, 
and admission to a graduate program in 
the School of Accounting or permission 
of tfie School Director. 

ACG 6356 Seminar in Managerial Ac- 
counting II (AC) (3). A study of the con- 
trollership function in corporate 
organizations; an appraisal of tfie con- 
troller's role in planning, accounting for, 
and evaluating company performance; 
and relationship to internal audit func- 
tion. Prerequisite: ACG 4341 and admis- 



sion to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
tfie Scfxiol Director. 

ACG 6385 Managerial Control and 
Controllership (AC) (3). Control meth- 
ods for management; control structure, 
planning and forecasting for budgets; 
tfie functions of controllership, including 
cash management, risk management, in- 
vestments, tax administration and re- 
cords management Prerequisite: 
Admission to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
ttie SofTool Director. 

ACG 6405 Seminar in Accounting In- 
fonnation Systems I (AC) (3). Account- 
ing information systems security and 
control and legal and ethical compli- 
ance; control of computer failure and 
abuse and compliance with laws, regula- 
tions, and standards. Computer usage 
required. Prerequisite: Admission to a 
graduate program in the School of Ac- 
counting or permission of tfie School Di- 
rector. 

ACG 6415 Seminar in Accounting In- 
fomnation Systems 11 (AC) (3). Account- 
ing information systems for strategic use 
in the management of competitive enter- 
prises; txjdgeting, performance meas- 
urement, and cost accounting for 
generating strategic Information. Com- 
puter usage required. Prerequisite: Ad- 
mission to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or pemiisskjn of 
tine School Director. 

ACG 6437 Advanced Accounting Sys- 
tems (AC) (3). Development and con- 
trol of information systems for 
accounting, emphasis on new microcom- 
puter technology, software engineering, 
metfiods of data processing and data- 
base management systems. Prereq- 
uisites: ACG 4401 or equivalent and 
admission to a graduate program in tfie 
School of Accounting or permission of 
tiie School Director. 

ACG 6445C Accounting Infomtation 
Systems Analysis and Design (AC) 
(3). Accounting applications of infonna- 
tion systems analysis and design con- 
cepts, mettiods, and tools; 
requirements, design, control, and proto- 
typing of accounting information sys- 
tems. Computer usage required. 
Prerequistes: Admission to a graduate 
program in tfie School of Accounting or 
pemiission of tfie Scfiool Director. 

ACG 6455 Accounting Information 
Systems Technology, Control and 
Audit I (AC) (3). Accounting applica- 
tions, conti-ol, and audit of large com- 
puter systems; technology, control 
concepts and procedures, audit testing 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration / 89 



and documentation, and control and 
audit software. Computer usage re- 
quired. Prerequisites: Admission to a 
graduate program In the School of Ac- 
counting or permission of tfie School Di- 
rector. 

ACG 6456C Accounting informatipn 
Systems Technology, Control and 
Audit II (AC) (3). Accounting applica- 
tions, control, and audit of small com- 
puter systems; technology, control 
concepts and procedures, audit testing 
and documentation, and control and 
audit software. Computer usage re- 
quired. 

ACG 6506 Governmental and Institu- 
tional Accounting (AC) (3). Budgeting, 
accounting, and reporting standards 
and practices for government and othier 
not-for-profit entities. Prerequisite: ACG 
41 11 and admission to a graduate pro- 
gram in the School of Accounting or per- 
mission of the School Director. 

ACG 6515 Advanced Governmental 
Accounting (AC) (3). Treats the devel- 
oping concept of consolidated finandai 
statements for governments. Also cov- 
ers advanced areas of accounting, e.g., 
concepts, investment accounting, grant 
accounting, and pension accounting. 
Prerequisites: ACG 6505, ACG 6584, 
admission to graduate program in 
School of Accounting or permission of 
School Director. 

ACG 6517 Audit of Governmental En- 
tities (AC) (3). Covers methods of 
audits of governments by independent 
public accountants, coordination with in- 
ternal audit staffs; describ>es audits of 
governments by internal auditors (audits 
of fidelity, efficiency and effectiveness); 
covers current single audit concept. Pre- 
requisites: ACG 6505, admission to the 
graduate program in the School of Ac- 
counting, or permission of School 
Director. 

ACG 6625 EDP Auditing Concepts 
(AC) (3). Understanding and application 
of concepts and procedures of auditing 
computer information systems; analysis, 
testing, and documentation of computer 
security and controls for management 
and financial statement reports. Prereq- 
uisites: Admission to a graduate pro- 
gram in the School of Accounting or 
permission of ttie School 
Director. 

ACG 6655 Auditing aiKl Accounting 
Systems (AC) (4) Standards and proce- 
dures of auditing, etNcs and responsi- 
bilities of auditors, audit evidence, 
reporting, international standards; de- 
sign and control of accountirtg informa- 
tion systems. Prerequisites: ACG 61 15 



with a grade of 'C or higher and admis- 
sion to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
the School Director. Not open to those 
with a undergraduate accounting 
degrees. 

ACG 6657 The Environment of Ac- 
counting (AC) (3). Economics and 
scope of accounting practice in context 
of self-regulated profession, public pol- 
icy constraints, complex business struc- 
tures and innovative transactions, and 
rapidly changing information technology 
with extensive reference to business pe- 
riodicals and on-line databases. Prereq- 
uisites ACG 6135 and admission to a 
graduate program In the School of Ac- 
counting or permission of tfie School 
Director. 

ACG 6675 Studies in Auditing li (AC) 
(3). This course examines auditing in de- 
pth as a professionalized discipline for 
reviewing testing, and evaluating ttie fi- 
nancial and (he operational activities 
and controls of an economic entity. Fo- 
cus will be directed to private sector 
profit seeking entities as well as govern- 
mental and other nonprofit organiza- 
tions. Prerequisite: Admission to a 
graduate program in tfie School of Ac- 
counting or permission of tfie School 
Director. 

ACG 6676 Advanced Internal Audit- 
ing (AC) (3). Special topics in internal 
auditing such as forensic auditing, man- 
agement consulting, work with external 
auditors, ethics, multinational aspects, 
evaluation methods, quality control, new 
technologies and recent research. Pre- 
requisite: Admission to a graduate pro- 
gram in the Scfxiol of Accounting or 
permission of thie School 
Director. 

ACG 6677 Applied Internal Auditing 
(AC) (3). The expansion of the internal 
audit process into such areas as admin- 
istrative and support functions; line func- 
tions such as research, sales, and 
production; and special areas such as 
compliarice, budgeting and controls. 
Prerequisite; Admission to a graduate 
program in tte School of Accounting or 
permission of tfie School Director. 

ACG 6696 Studies in Auditing I (AC) 
(3). Professional and technical aspects 
of auditing practice; inlnoduction to SEC; 
ethics and legal responsibilities; emer- 
gence of non-public practice; public ex- 
pectations and professional reality; the 
impact of technology; international audit- 
ing; recent auditing developments. Pre- 
requisite: ACG 4651 and admission to a 
graduate program in tfie School of Ac- 



counting or permission of the School 
Director. 

ACG 6835 Behavioral Accounting 
(AC) (3). Study of the effect of the proc- 
ess and products of accounting and of 
tine relation of cfianges in the process 
and products to individual and group be- 
havior; consideration of ways in which 
accounting can aid individuals and or- 
ganizations to attain their goals. Prereq- 
uisites: ACG 4111 and 4341 or 
equivalents, and admission to a gradu- 
ate program in ttie School of Accounting 
or permission of tfie School Director. 

ACG 6845 Accounting and Quantita- 
tive Methiods (AC) (3). Study of statisti- 
cal and management science 
techniques that are or may be utilized in 
financial and managerial accounting. 
Prerequisites: MAN 3503, QMB 3150 
and ACG 4401 , or equivalents, and ad- 
mission to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
tiie School Director. 

ACG 6875 Evolutton of Accounting 
TiKJught (AC) (3). Tfie cultural origins 
of accounting and its traditional contro- 
versies, from pre-historic time onward, 
and in an international context. Prereq- 
uisites: Admission to graduate program 
in School of Accounting or permission of 
School Director. 

ACG 6885 Accounting Research and 
Reporting (AC) (3). Examine tiie pro- 
jects relating to historical and current 
problems in public accounting practice, 
and preparation of appropriate reports 
in oral and written formats, under a vari- 
ety of professional settings. Prereq- 
uisite: Admission to a graduate program 
in die School of Accounting or permis- 
sion of the School Director. 

ACG 6905 Independent Study In Ac- 
counting (AC) (1-3). Individual confer- 
ences; supervised readings; reports on 
personal investigations. Prerequisite: Ad- 
mission to a graduate program in ttie 
School of Accounting or permission of 
ttie School Director. 

ACG 6935 Special Topics In Account- 
ing (AC) (1-3). Intensive study for 
groups of students of a particular topic 
or a limited numtjer of topics not other- 
wise offered in ttie cuniculum. Prereq- 
uisite: Admission to a graduate program 
in \he School of Accounting or permis- 
sion of the School Director. 

ACG 7157 Seminar: Theory and Con- 
temporary Research In Rnanclal Ac- 
counting (AC) (3). An evaluative 
overview of ttie dassical literature in fi- 
nandai accounting and ttie contempo- 
rary empirical research published in ttie 



90 / College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



leading scholarly journals. Examined 
are income determination theories, nor- 
mative accounting principles, account- 
ing information and stock prices, and 
principal-agent relationships. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Doctoral advisor in 
Accounting. 

ACG 7177 Seminar: Accounting Infor- 
mation and Security Prices (AC) (3). 

An in-depth examination of accounting 
information and security prices v*nthin 
capital markets theory, including a thor- 
ough examination of the cross-sectional 
properties and time-series profjerties of 
accounting numbers and the importance 
of research findings and new develop- 
ments in research methodology. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Doctoral advisor in 
Accounting. 

ACG 7436 Seminar: information 
Value and Agency Researcli Account- 
ing (AC) (3). An in-depth examination of 
ttie research [saradigm and thie associ- 
ated empirical research in accounting , 
and auditing. Examined are the issues 
of information value, risk aversion, risk 
sharing contracts, as well as account- 
ability from tfie starxJpoint of monitoring 
contracts. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Doctoral advisor in Accoun-ting. 

ACG 7695 Seminar: Contemporary 
Research in Management Accounting 
and Auditing (AC) (3). A broad over- 
view of classical and contemporary em- 
pirical research in managerial 
accounting and auditing including 
budget and performance review, deci- 
sion making, information analysis, pro- 
fessional judgement, sampling 
problems, audit risk, etc. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Doctoral advisor in Ac- 
counting. 

ACG 7836 Seminar: Behavioral Re- 
search in Accounting-Individual Be- 
havior (AC) (3). An in-depth 
exeimination of tfie relationship of cogni- 
tive psychology, cognitive models of hu- 
man judgement, decisbn tfieory and 
accounting information. Emphasis is 
placed upon tfie human processing of 
accounting information, the decision 
value of information, arid tfie develop- 
ment of decision aids or tieuristics. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of Doctoral advisor 
In Accounting. 

ACG 7837 Seminar: Behavioral Re- 
search in Accounting-Human Groups 
and Systems (AC) (3). The multifarious 
befiavioral relationships of groups within 
the formal and informal organizational 
structure are examined with respect to 
performeince measurement (efficiency 
eind effectiveness), accountability, plan- 
ning and control of the development of 



decision support systems. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Doctoral advisor in 
Accounting. 

ACG 7886 Seminar: Empirical Re- 
search Methodology and Paradigms 
in Accounting (AC) (3). Study of re- 
search design, methods of data collec- 
tion and analysis and problems of 
measurement in accounting research. 
Empirical research studies in accounting 
are integrated throughout to illustrate 
and analyze the structuretl problems of 
research design as well as the strengths 
and weaknesses of various acceptable 
paradigms. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Doctoral advisor in Accounting. 

ACG 7887 Research Forum and Wortc- 
shop (AC) (1). Regulariy scheduled 
wori<sfiop at which visiting scholars as 
well as faculty and doctoral candidates 
present and evaluate research papers. 
Candidates are expected to participate 
in discussions, act as discussants and 
present their own research for critique. 
Sessions are held for structuring and 
"brainstorming" research projects in the 
formative stages as well as for present- 
ing completed efforts. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of Doctoral advisor in 
Accounting. 

ACG 7888 Seminar: The Phitosophy 
of Science, Theory Construction, and 
Verification in Accounting (AC) (3). 
An examination of knowledge, tfieories, 
scientific explanation and prediction as 
related to the social sciences. Various 
theories of accounting are critically ex- 
amined from the standpoint of tfieory 
construction sind verification in tfie phi- 
losophy of science. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of Doctoral advisor in Accounting. 

ACG 7889 Seminar: Positive Theory 
Research in Accounting (AC) (3). Con- 
struction of tfieory to explain accounting 
£tnd auditing practices in an environ- 
ment of regulation using empirical re- 
search findings from a growing body of 
economic-based research in accounting 
and finance. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Doctoral advisor in Accounting. 

ACG 7896 Accounting Research 
Methods on Capital Markets. (AC) (3). 
An advanced accounting graduate 
course in current time series methods 
used to analyze capitals and otfier time- 
related financial markets. This course is 
designed for Ph.D. students in account- 
ing and business who already have ad- 
vanced statistical and financial training, 
and serves as an introduction to other 
doctoral courses. Prerequisite; Permis- 
sion of Ph.D. advisor. 

ACG 7938 Seminar: Special Topics in 
Accounting Research (AC) (3). Topics 



vary according to instructor and student 
interest in problems and issues on the 
frontier issues of accounting. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Doctoral advisor in 
Accounting. 

BAN 5652 Savings and Loan Manage- 
ment (Fl) (3). Financial management of 
savings and loan associations and other 
mortgage lenders, supply and demand 
of mortgage funds; state and federal 
regulatory bodies' legal and institutional 
cfiaracteristics related to mortgage mar- 
kets. Prerequisite: FIN 3403 or FIN 
6428, or equivalent. 

BUL 5105 Legal Environment of Busi- 
ness (AC) (3). Studies tfie importance 
of law and legal institutions on com- 
merce workings of administrative law; 
various asfjects of employment legisla- 
tion and other areas of legal environ- 
ment of Isusiness. Prerequisite: 
Permission of accounting certificate pro- 
gram advisor. 

BUL 5661 Law for Accountants (AC) 
(3). A survey of select topics of direct in- 
terest to accounting students, including 
contracts, sales, agencies, partnerships, 
corporations. Prerequisite: Permission 
of Accounting certificate program 
advisor. 

BUL 5662 Accountanfs Uabiiity (AC) 
(3). Overview of accountant exposure to 
private and public sector liability suits, in- 
dependent in auditor engagements, se- 
curities regulations and otfier state and 
federal laws of chief concern to account- 
ants. Prerequisite: Permission of Ac- 
counting certificate program advisa. 

BUL 61 16 Business Law II (AC) (3). 

Sut)stantive issues and principles of law 
including agency, partnership and corpo- 
ration law, commercial paper, antitrust, 
employment, administrative, environ- 
mental and computer law; ethical issues 
in business \an. 

BUL 6124 Survey of Business Lavi 
(AC) (3). Overview of substantive and 
procedural aspects of contract law, 
U.C.C, fjartnerships and corporations, 
accountant's liability, and other aspects 
of government regulation of business. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate 
program in tfie School of Accounting, or 
permission of tfie Sctiooi Director, fvlot 
open to ttiose with undergraduate ac- 
counting degrees. 

BUL 6631 international Commercial 
Law (AC) (3). Analysis of legal prob- 
lems facing the U.S. international and 
multinational businesses. Topics include 
tfie transnational research of economic 
regulation, international trade and invest- 
ment, antitrust law, technology trans- 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration / 91 



fers, and secxirities law. Prerequisite: Ad- 
mission to a graduate program in the 
Sdiool of Accounting or permission of 
the Schooi Director. 

BUL6651 Special Topics In Business 
Law (AC) (1-6). intensive study for 
groups of students of a particular topic, 
or a limited number of topics, not otlier- 
wise offered in the curriculum. Prereq- 
uisite: Admission to a graduate program 
in the Sdiool of Accounting or permis- 
sion of ttie Sctx)ol Director. 

BUL 6906 Independent Study In Busi- 
ness Law (AC) (1-6). Individual confer- 
ences; supervised readings; reports on 
personal investigations. Prerequisite: Ad- 
mission to a graduate program in ttie 
Sdiool of Accounting or permission of 
the School Director. 

COP 7545 File and Database Manage- 
ment Systems (DS) (3). Fundamentals 
of datat>ase concepts and methodolo- 
gies, including data representation, data 
modeling, and file organization. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. 

ECP 6705 Managerial Economics 
(EC) (3). Basic microeconomic concepts 
as thiey apply to decisbn making within 
thie organization; supply and demand; 
msirt<et structure and market behavior in 
specific industries. Prerequisites: ECO 
3021 and ECO 3011. 

ECP 6715 Macroeconomic Forecast- 
ing for Management (EC) (3). Busi- 
ness macroeconomic concepts as they 
apply to decision making witfiin the firm. 
Traditional models of income determina- 
tion and forecasting analysis. Prereq- 
uisite: ECP 6705. 

RN 5418 Working Capital Manage- 
ment (R) (3). Intermediate theories and 
techniques of cash, accounts receiv- 
able, inventory, and accounts payable 
management. Prerequisite: FIN 3403 or 
equivalent. 

RN 5473 Small Business Rnance (R) 
(3). The financial markets, financial in- 
struments, cirKJ managerial policies and 
techniques available to potential and ex- 
isting entrepreneurs and owner/meinag- 
ers. Emphasis will be upon analysis of 
cireas of opportunity for small business: 
analysis of finar>cing alternatives; and 
analysis of profitability. Prerequisite: FIN 
3403 or FIN 6428, or equivalent. 

RN 5495 Leasing and IMergers (Fl) 
(3). Discussion-oriented course; will pro- 
vide an analytk^ foundatton to corpo- 
rate development, strategies, and 
resource allocatbn deciskjns. Merger 
activity and leasing decisions will be 
viewed as strategic decisions by the firm 
to enable them to achiieve corporate ob- 



jectives. Prerequisite: FIN 3403 or FIN 
6428, or equivalent. 

RN 6246 Financial Maricets and Insti- 
tutions (Fl) (3). Analysis of the charac- 
teristics and efficiency of the money 
markets and capit£il markets. Types of 
money market and capital market instru- 
ments, and the role of financial institu- 
tions in tfiese mari<ets. 

RN 6315 Commercial Banking (R) 
(3). The objectives, constraints, aixf poli- 
cies applicable to the management of 
commercial banks. Emphasis will be 
given to asset and liability management, 
marketing of services and othier banking 
functions. 

FIN 6316 Management of Non-Bank 
Rnancial Institutions (R) (3). The ob- 
jectives, constraints, and policies appli- 
cable to the management of non-bank 
financial institutions, savings and loans 
associations, credit unions, REfTs, and 
insurance, investment and finance 
companies. 

RN 6325 Current Issues In Commer- 
cial Banking (Fl) (3). I\^ain policy issues 
in commercial banking and the role of 
regulatory authorities. Presentation in- 
cludes bank mergers and holding com- 
panies; national bank branching; and 
ttie present structure and prospects of 
tfie financial sector. Prerequisite: FIN 
6315 or equivalent. 

RN 6346 Credit Analysis (R) (3). This 
course examiries htow the accounting 
framewort^ is integrated with tools and 
techniques for the einalysis and interpre- 
tation of financial statements. Evalu- 
ation of risk in domestic and foreign 
loans and the pricing of credit facilities. 
Prerequisite: FIN 6428. 

RN 6426 Financial Management Poli- 
cies (Fl) (3). The selection and manage- 
ment of current and permanent assets 
to achieve corporate objectives. The se- 
lection and management of alternative 
sources of funds to obtain ttie optimal 
capital structure. Prerequisite: FIN 6428 
or equivalent. 

RN 6428 Financial Management (Fl) 
(3). In-depth examination of asset, liabil- 
ity and capital structajre management, 
witti emphasis on capital budgeting tech- 
niques; risk evaluation; working capital 
management; and methods of short- 
term, intermediate and k)ng-term financ- 
ing. Prerequisite: ACG 6005 or 
equivalent. 

RN 6436 Capital Budgeting and Long 
Term Resource Allocation (Fl) (3). The 

tfieory of capital allocation at thie level of 
the firm, and empirical findings. Deci- 
sion models and their application. Tfie 



pattern of capital expenditure of indus- 
tries and of tfie economy as a wfiole. In- 
vestment determinants. Prerequisite: 
FIN 6428 or equivalent. 

RN 6446 Competitive Strategy (R) 
(3). Provision of tools for managerial de- 
cision-making in a variety of competitive 
environments including demand analy- 
sis, shwrt- and long-run costs of produc- 
tion, demand for factors, mari<et 
structure and competitive strategy. 

RN 6455 Rnancial Modeling and 
Forecasting (Fl) (3). An introduction to 
Rnancial Modeling and Forecasting. 
Emphasis is on computer models and 
forecasting tfie financial variables. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

RN 6456 Quantitative Methods in R- 
nancial Analysis (Fl) (3). The applica- 
tions of computer techniques to financial 
management of manufacturing firms 
and financial institutions. Prerequisite: 
FIN 6428 or equivalent. 

RN 6487 Rnancial Risk Management - 
Rnancial Engineering (Fl) (3). A sur- 
vey of financial instruments used for 
financial risk management, including for- 
wards, futures, options and swaps. Em- 
phasis is on identification of finarxiial 
risks and designing optimal risk manage- 
ment program. 

RN 6508 Rnancial Futures and Rxed 
Income lnvestnr«ents (Fl) (3). An exami- 
nation of tfie structure, uses, and sti-ate- 
gies associated witii financial futures 
markets. Hedging, speculative activity, 
arxJ otfier risk-return procedures are dis- 
cussed. Prerequisite: FIN 6428 or 
equivalent. 

FIN 6516 Securities Analysis (Fl) (3). 

An analysis of contemporary securities 
markets and their operations. The deter- 
minants of tfie risk-reward stt'ucture of 
equity and debt securities. Prerequisite: 
FIN 6428 or equivalent. 

RN 6525 Portfolio Management (Fl) 
(3). Financial ttieories will be applied to 
tfie constnjction of portfolios. Portfolio 
management techniques will be ana- 
lyzed in regard to tfie goals of indlvkJu- 
als, corporations, and various financicti 
instihjtions. Prerequisite: FIN 6516 or 
equivalent. 

RN 6625 International Bank Manage- 
ment (Fl, MA) (3). Management of the 
international banking function; setting 
goals and developing strategies, estab- 
lishing an organizational sbucture and 
managing operations. International 
banking services. Foreign lending, risks, 
restraints, and portfolio considerations. 
International banking trends and implica- 
tions for regulation. 



92 / College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



HN 6626 International Bank Lending 
Policies and Practices (R, MA) (3). 

Organization of the lending function and 
examination of the basic types of inter- 
national lending: trade financing, loans 
or placements to foreign banks, loans to 
governments and official institutions, 
and loans to businesses. Syndicated 
bank loans. Documentation and legal 
considerations in foreign lending. As- 
sessing and managing risk in the inter- 
national loan portfolio. 

RN 6636 IntemaUonal Finance (Fl, 
IMA) (3). A comparative study of the insti- 
tutional characteristics and internal effi- 
dency of developed and under- 
developed capital markets. Tfie relation- 
ships between world and capital mar- 
kets and prospects for integration. The 
role of multilateral Institutions, multina- 
tional corporations, states, and ttie struc- 
ture of trade in ttie international short 
and long term capital flows. The devel- 
opment of financial centers. Prereq- 
uisite: FIN 6428 or equivalent. 

RN 6716 Financial Management of 
Governmental Organizations (Fl) (3). 
The budgetary process of identifying, 
justifying, eind allocating funds. The se- 
curing of funds in the market and the ef- 
ficient allocation of funds. 

RN 6804 The Theory of Finance (R) 
(3). The study of the development of the 
theory of finance and its implications for 
the financial decisksns made by ttie man- 
ager of business firms. Topics include: 
utility theory; capital budgeting; portfolio 
tfieory; capital market equilibrium; multi- 
period valuation; and the cost of capital. 
Rnancial decision making is explored 
under both certainty and uncertainty 
and within the context of both perfect 
and imperfect markets. Prerequisite: 
FIN 6428 or equivalent. 

RN 6906 Independent Study in R- 
nance (Fl) (1-6). Individual conferences; 
supervised readings; reports on per- 
sonal investigations. Consent of faculty 
tutor and Department Cfiairperson re- 
quired. 

RN 6915 Master's Project In Rnance 
(Fl) (1-6). An individualized research pro- 
ject and report, which may include field 
experience with a fimi or agency; library 
research; computer programming; or 
project development. The course should 
be taken during the last half of tfie stu- 
dent's graduate program. Consent of 
faculty tutor and Department Cfiairper-. 
son required. 

RN 6936 Special Topics in Rnance 
(Fl) (1-3). For groups of students who 
desire intensive study of a particular 
topic or a limited number of topics not 



otherwise offered in ttie curriculum. Con- 
sent of faculty supervisor and Depart- 
ment Chairperson required. 

RN 7507 Seminar in Futures Markets 
(Fl) (3). Acomprefiensive examination 
of ttie literature in futures martlets. Em- 
phasizes the structure and pricing of fu- 
tures, and risk-management via hedging 
and artsitrage. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

RN 7528 Seminar in Investments (Fl) 
(3). Examines analysis and measure- 
ment problems of investments. Includes 
the application of statistical techniques, 
current tfieoretical issues and empirical 
literature. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Instmctor. 

RN 7606 International Corporate Fi- 
nance (Fl) (3). The study of topics of re- 
search interest to international financial 
decisions. Topics include foreign ex- 
change risk, international financial mar- 
kets, and foreign exchange market 
efficiency. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

RN 7807 Seminar in Corporate R- 
nance (Fl) (3). Familiarizes students 
with recent developments in finance tfie- 
ory. Includes such topics as tfie influ- 
ence of leverage, uncertainty and tfie 
cost of capital, agency theory and re- 
lated topics. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

RN 7808 Financial Theory t (R) (3). 

This course focuses on ttie tfieory of fi- 
nancial decision-making under certainty 
and risk. Includes investment under un- 
certainty, capital structure, dividend, as- 
set valuation, and options pricing. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

RN 7809 Financial Theory II (R) (3). 

This course focuses on the tfieory of fi- 
nancial decision-making under certainty 
and risk. Includes investment under un- 
certainty, capital structure, dividend, as- 
set valuation, and options pricing. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

RN 7810 Financial Theory III (Fl) (3). 

This sequel to Rnancial Theory I and II 
focuses in on microfinance. Discusses 
issues primarily in corporate finance 
such as effects of taxation, agency the- 
ory, and signalling tfieory. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

RN 7811 Seminar In Rnancial Mar- 
kets and Institutions (Fl) (3). Exam- 
ines recent developments in economic 
and financial tfieories as applied to top- 
ics such as ttie structure of financial mar- 
kets eind the economics of information 
and financial institutions. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 



RN 7812 Seminar In Options and Con- 
tingent Claims (Fl) (3). An examination 
of Die tfieories of option valuation and 
artsitrage pricing, and their applications 
to security analysis, portfolio manage- 
ment and financial instrument valuation. 
Prerequisite: Pennission of instructor. 

RN 7816 Seminar In Portfolio Theory 
(Fl) (3). Examines investment and port- 
folio theory, with emphasis on the histori- 
cal development of tfie literature in this 
area and ttie recent analytical and em- 
pirical wori<. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

RN 7818 Foundations of Financial 
Models (Fl) (3). Introduction to mathe- 
matical eind economic models underiy- 
ing the development of modem finance 
tfieory. Includes discrete and continuous 
time models in finance using stochastic 
ceilculus. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

RN 7845 Statistical Methods In R- 
nance I (Fl) (3). Estimation, and testing 
of various economic and financial mod- 
els. Emphasis on econometrk: tech- 
niques to deal with various problems of 
single-equation models and introduction 
to simultaneous equation. Prerequisite: 
Instructor's permission. 

RN 7846 Statistical Methods in R- 
nance II (Fl) (3). Emphasis on econo- 
metric techniques and multivariate 
statistks as applied in finance. Includes 
simultaneous equation models, multiple 
discriminant analysis and factor analy- 
sis. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. 

RN 7855 RnatKiai Economics I (R) 
(3). An advance doctoral course cover- 
ing selected advanced topics in Micro- 
economic foundations and other topics 
related to business. Emphasis will t>e on 
economics of uncertainty, agency prob- 
lems, information and signalling. Prereq- 
uisite: ECO 7115 or Permission of 
instructor. 

RN 7856 Rnancial Economics II (Fl) 
(3). An advanced doctoral course cover- 
ing selected advanced topics in the the- 
ory of macrofinance. Emphasis will be 
on financial intemiediation. Prerequisite: 
ECO 7206 or Permisston of instructor. 

GEB 6445 The Legal Environment of 
Business (BA) (3). A study of federal 
and state regulatory laws, encompass- 
ing aspects of ttie judicial process, le- 
gal/economic aspects of Ixjsiness 
organizations, international legal envi- 
ronment, and legal/political elements of 
business ethics. 

GEB 7906 independent Study for Doc- 
toral Students (1-15). Supervised re- 
search projects determined by professor 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration / 93 



and student. May Involve conferences, 
supervised reading, and reports. Con- 
sent of sponsoring professor and chair- 
person required. 

GEB 7916 Doctoral Research Project 
in Business (BA) (15). Intensive re- 
search project conducted after the first 
tier of coursework is complete. Con- 
ducted on an individual t»sis under the 
supervision of a faculty member. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. 

GEB 7936 Doctoral Seminar in Busi- 
ness Administration (BA) (1). Weekly 
informal seminars to discuss current is- 
sues, educational approaches, and ca- 
reer management for Ph.D. students in 
Business Administration. 

GEB 7980 Doctoral Dissertation in 
Business Adminlstratk>n (BA) (3-15). 
Original research that is supervised by a 
faculty committee and defended openly 
before the university committee. Prereq- 
uisite: Admission to Candidacy. 

ISM 6045 Current Economic and So- 
cial Implications of Information Sys- 
tems (DS) (3). Effects and implications 
of socioeconomic factors in the opera- 
tion of information systems and interde- 
pendence with the legal and inter- 
national business environment. Privacy 
and fraud; computer system purchase 
eind lease contracts; economics of sys- 
tem design, selection and operation; 
electronic fund transfers and mail; inter- 
national considerations. Prerequisites: 
MAN 6830 and MAN 6051. 

ISM 6106 Systems Analysis (OS) (3). 

A study of the systems approach to 
problem solving as it applies to any area 
of specialization. Consideration of the 
problems in determining system objec- 
tives; identifying system boundaries and 
constraints; marshalling resources for 
acWeving system objectives; analyzing 
tfie sub-components of tfie system and 
their respective objectives; and manag- 
ing ttie system. Prerequisites: MAN 
6830, CGS 3300, and COP 2210. 

ISM 6155 Information Systems Analy- 
sis and Design (DS) (3). Concepts 
and methods used In the analysis and 
design of MIS. Feasibility stuc^, system 
flow darting, data requirements analy- 
sis, data design, user friendly systems 
design. Systems design project. Prereq- 
uisites: ISM 6205 and ISM 6105. 

ISM 6205 Data Structures and RIe 
Processing in Business (DS) (3). This 
course deals with major levels of data 
organization, data base management, 
Nerarcfiic and associative structures, 
file maintenance, and privacy and secu- 
rity measures and safeguards. Prereq- 



uisites: MAN 6830, CGS 3300, and 
COP 2210. 

ISM 6305 Infomnation Systems Plan- 
ning (DS) (3). An in-depth study of sys- 
tems concepts, as they apply to 
information systems in orgeinizations. 
Consideration of planning for systems 
development and its accomplishment 
through the phases of the life cycle, and 
of tfie overall management of the infor- 
mation systems function. Prerequisites: 
MAN 6830 and MAN 6051. 

ISM 6357 Computer Administration 
(DS) (3). The theory and computer man- 
agement. Topics include selection, train- 
ing, job and performance evaluation, 
arKJ incentive schemes as thiey relate to 
key positions of systems analysis, pro- 
gramming, data preparation and entiy, 
and project management. Special atten- 
tion is given to human resources man- 
agement and development at various 
levels within the EDP department. 

ISM 6405 Decision Support Systems 
(DS) (3). Concept of decision support is 
examined and typ>es of applied decision 
support systems in business are sur- 
veyed. Prerequisites: MAN 6830, MAN 
6569, ISM 6205, and ISM 6106. 

ISM 6455 Microcomputer Applica- 
tions in Business (DS) (3). Fundamen- 
tals and comparison of contemporary 
microcomputers. Extensive usage of 
available software for making business 
decisions. Emphasis on small business 
applications and cases. Student pro- 
jects. Prerequisites: Computer program- 
ming proficiency, MAN 4504 and CGS 
3300 or MAN 6501 and 6830. 

ISM 6930 Special Topics in Manage- 
n>ent Information Systems (DS) (1-6). 

To study the recent developments in the 
MIS field not otfienwise offered in the 
curriculum, such as office automation, 
computer graphics, etc. Prerequisites: 
Advanced standing and department 
chairman approval. 

ISM 7126 Systems Analysis and De- 
sign (DS) (3). The process of analyzing 
information requirements and the de- 
sign and implementation of software sys- 
tems. Emphasis on the theoretical 
foundations of different systems devel- 
opment techniques. 

ISM 7083 Deterministic Decision 
Models (DS) (3). This course deals with 
the optimal decision making and model- 
ing of deterministic systems that origi- 
nate from real life. These applications, 
which occur in government, business, 
engineering, economics, and the natural 
and social sciences, are largely charac- 



terized by tfie need to allocate limited re- 
sources. 

ISM 7087 Probabilistic Decision Mod- 
els (DS) (3). This course deals with the 
optimal decision making aryj modeling 
of probabilistic systems that originate 
from real life. These applications, which 
occur in government, business, engi- 
neering, economics, and the natural and 
social sciences, are largely charac- 
terized by the need to allocate limited re- 
sources. 

ISM 7152 Seminar on System Imple- 
mentation (DS) (3). Theory and re- 
search on tfie implementation of 
information systems in organizational 
settings. Theories of technological inno- 
vation and political action applied in tfie 
design and development of systems 
within organizations. 

ISM 7306 Seminar on Managing infor- 
mation Resources (DS) (3). Theory 
and research on the managerial view- 
point on information processing func- 
tions within an organization. Relation- 
ship of information management to stra- 
tegic planning and other business func- 
tions. 

ISM 7345 Organizational Impacts of 
Information Systems (DS) (3). Analy- 
sis of ttieory and research on tfie im- 
pacts of information systems on human 
behavior in organizations and upon or- 
ganizational design. 

ISM 7406 Decision Support Systems 
(DS) (3). Theory and research on the de- 
sign of decision aids. Integrating mod- 
els and data with a technological 
delivery system that supports unstmc- 
tured problem-solving by executive. 

MAN 5123 Human Interaction 1: Per- 
sonal Growth l^tMratory (MA) (3). Ex- 
perience designed to increase 
awareness of personal social impact, 
and sensitivity to the feelings of others; 
to improve interpersonal communica- 
tion, and increase understanding of the 
cfiange-learning process. Study and 
analysis of class-group participation as 
well as other furx:tional social groups. 

MAN 5524 Advanced Production Man- 
agement (DS) (3). More advanced 
metixids in master planning, forecast- 
ing, capacity management, production 
activity scheduling/control, MRP and in- 
ventory management. This course has a 
professbnal orientation similar to the 
APICS certification guidelines. Prereq- 
uisite: MAN 4504 or MAN 6501 , or 
Department Cfiairperson's approval. 

MAN 5930 Seminar in Personnel Man- 
agement (MA) (3). Overview and exami- 



94 / College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



nation of the various aspects of the per- 
sonnel management function. 

MAN 6051 Organization and Manage- 
ment Process (MA) (3). Analysis of or- 
ganizations including the evolution of 
management thought and the effects of 
technology and the environment on the 
organization. Emphasis will be on such 
concepts as division of work, delegation 
and decentralization, leadership, motiva- 
tion, work satisfaction; as well as plan- 
ning, organizing, directing, and 
controlling. 

IMAN 6121 Interpersonal Behavior 
and Analysis (MA) (3). A human inter- 
action/human relations training labora- 
tory, designed to inaease both 
self-awareness and understanding of be- 
havior dynamics in groups. Course is in- 
tended to enable students to broaden 
their conceptual understanding of hu- 
man interpersonal communications and 
conflict. 

MAN 6124 Hurran Interaction II: Or- 
ganizational Consultation (IVIA) (3). 

Theories and approaches to organiza- 
tion development and change, with a 
particular focus on public schools and or- 
ganizations. Supervised laboratory on 
systematic consultation and action 
skills, including schools and organiza- 
tions. Supervised laboratory on system- 
atic consultation and action skills. 
Including method of assessment (survey 
feedback, milling, confrontation meet- 
ings, systems analysis); agenda-setting; 
feedback; coaching; ttiird-party consult- 
ation for conflict management; arri team 
training. Prerequisite: MAN 5123. 

MAN 6145 Decision Styles and Mana- 
gerial Effectiveness (MA) (3). An expe- 
riential, theoretical, and applied 
investigation of personal decision styles 
and tfieir relation to management and 
fiuman effectiveness. Focus upon ana- 
lytic and intuitive styles of thinking. 

MAN 6204 Organization and Manage- 
ment Theory (MA) (3). Analysis and de- 
sign of ttie structure and process of 
complex organizations. Effects of task 
uncertainty, grovrth, power, goals, and 
information tecfmology on organization 
structure and control. 

MAN 6245 Organizational Behavior 
(MA) (3). Individual, interpersonal, and 
small group behavior in complex organi- 
zations. Focus on behavior, its causes, 
arKi management interventions to im- 
prove organizational effectiveness. Re- 
search methods to study organizational 
behavksr. 

MAN 6265 Group Processes In Or- 
ganizations (MA) (3). The social and 



psychological processes of organiza- 
tional functioning. The roles played by 
small groups in organizational settings. 

MAN 6295 Conflict in Organizations 
(MA) (3). A critical examination of ttie 
role and impact of interpersorial and in- 
tergroup conflict in organizations. Mod- 
els as approaches to utilizing and 
resolving conflict toward conshuctive 
personal and organization ends will be 
emphasized. 

MAN 6311 Advanced Personnel Man- 
agement (MA) (3). Attention is focused 
on tiie ttieory and practice of modem 
personnel management, as related to 
otfier management functions. Topics in- 
clude selection; 6-aining; job and per- 
formance evaluation; and incentive 
schemes. Special attention is given to 
human resources management and de- 
velopment at various organizational 
levels. 

MAN 6321 Personnel Selection and 
Placement (MA) (3). Individual differ- 
ences and their measurement in person- 
nel selection and job placement. Job 
design and redesign. 

MAN 6331 Compensation Administra- 
tion (MA) (3). An in-deptii analysis of 
Wages and salary administration, includ- 
ing such topics as job evaluation; wage 
incentive systems; and work sampling. 

MAN 6351 Personnel Training and De- 
velopment (MA) (3). Determining b^ain- 
ing needs. Training metfnods. The 
training staff. Supervisor development. 
Equal Employment Opportijnity manage- 
ment 

MAN 6405 Lat>or Relations (MA) (3). 

Examines the collective bargaining sys- 
tem in the United States from the view- 
point of the practitioner. Various aspects 
of tiie environment, stixictijre, proc- 
esses, issues and impact of collective 
bargaining are considered. Special at- 
tention is given to tiie negotiation and 
administration of agreements. 

MAN 6411 Collective Bargaining Top- 
ics (MA) (3). An advanced course in la- 
bor relations for students wrttii some 
background who desire more deptti 
than tfiat provided in inti'oductory 
courses. Topics of contemporary inter- 
est, such as put)lic sector collective ne- 
gotiations, are treated at length. 

MAN 6501 Operations Managen>ent 
(DS) (3). This course covers analysis, 
design, and operations of organizational 
systems. The systems approach is used 
to provide a framework or general 
model of analysis, to which specific con- 
cepts, quantitative techniques, and tools 
can be related. The material presented 



has applkation to any organization of 
people and machines, including hospi- 
tals, governmental agencies, service or- 
ganizations, and industrial concerns. 
Prerequisite: MAN 6569. 

MAN 6529 Seminar in Production 
Control Systems (DS) (3). The control 
systems for production operations auto- 
mation and its impact on organizations. 
Integrated operational-simulation ap- 
proach. Group and individual projects. 

MAN 6559 Seminar in Management 
Science (DS) (3). New topics applica- 
tion areas will be explored. Lectures will 
relate to ttie latest advances in the the- 
ory and application of management sci- 
ence. Prerequisite: Insti^ctor's approval. 

MAN 6569 Managerial Decision-Mak- 
ing (DS) (3). This course will investigate 
and analyze the decision-making prob- 
lems that managers face in business, 
volunteer organizations, government, 
and ttie public sector. Emphasis will be 
F>laced on providing a variety of decision- 
making experiences for the student. Pre- 
requisite: QMB 6603 or equivalent. 

MAN 6585 Productivity Management 
Seminar (DS) (3). Analysis of productiv- 
ity in manufacturing and service organi- 
zations and metiiodology for 
productivity improvement. Extensive 
cases, projects, tours, and guests speak- 
ers. Prerequisite: Graduate stijdents (or 
CBA certificate students). 

MAN 6601 International Management 
(MA) (3). Graduate seminar focusing on 
management issues confronting ttie mul- 
tinational enterprise. Includes basic 
trade theory; tariffs and trade barriers; 
organizational transfer, foreign ex- 
change; international financial manage- 
ment; export-import procedures; 
comparative business customs; person- 
nel msinagement; and institutions affect- 
ing the multinational manager. 

MAN 6603 Problems In Comparative 
Management (MA) (3). Discussion of lit- 
erature, readings, and cases, aimed at 
underscoring the differences and simi- 
larities in management behavior in differ- 
ent countries cind cultures. General 
instruction in obtaining and utilizing com- 
parative data on management differ- 
ences. 

MAN 6606 interrtational Business En- 
vironment (ME, MA) (3). A macro-ex- 
amination of economic, political, and 
cultijral variables affectirig ttie organiza- 
tion. Emphasis will be placed on social 
indications and societal forecasting of 
diange; organizational responses to 
change; and tfie nature and rate of 
change in different societies. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration / 95 



MAN 6608 International Business 
(MA) (3). International variables as they 
affect managers. Theoretical constructs 
and their application to specific prob- 
lems In International business. 

MAN 6615 International Labor-Man- 
agement Relations (MA) (3). Compara- 
tive analysis of selected industrial 
relations systems and impact on multina- 
tional firms and international latxjr move- 
ments. Emphasis on empirical models 
and management-oriented case studies. 

MAN 6617 Managing Global Produc- 
tion arxl Technology (MA) (3). An ex- 

ploratbn of tfie management of 
technology and its relationship to ttie dy- 
namics of globalization of production in 
both manufacturing and service indus- 
tries. Prerequisite: MAN 6608. 

MAN 6635 International Business Pol- 
icy (MA) (3). An analysis of corporate 
strategies in a rapidly developing and 
changing worid environment. Emphasis 
will be placed on forecasting, planning, 
and contingency strategies. Tfie course 
is taught by case method and stresses 
the environmental and institutional con- 
straints on decision making M^ithin the 
organization. Corporate executives are 
invited to attend wtienever possible. Pre- 
requisites: ACG 6005, MAN 6245, FIN 
6428, and MAR 6805. 

n/IAN 6675 Special Topics in Interna- 
tional Business (MA) (3). For groups 
of students who wish to study inten- 
sively a particular topic, or a limited num- 
ber of topics, in international business, 
not offered elsewfiere In the curriculum. 
Prerequisites: Approval of the faculty ad- 
visor, Department Cfiairperson, and 
Dean. 

MAN 6679 Master's Project In Interna- 
tional Business (MA) (3). An irxJividual 
research project on an international txjsi- 
ness problem, which may include field 
work (including intemsWp), library re- 
search, computer modeling, or tf>e use 
of an approved research methodology. 
Prerequisites: Assignment of faculty ad- 
visor and permission of Department 
Chairperson. 

MAN 6695 Independent Study In Busi- 
ness (MA) (3). Individual conferences; 
supervised readings; reports on per- 
sonal investigations. Prerequisites: As- 
signment of faculty tutor arxi written 
permission of Department Chairperson, 
and Dean. 

MAN 6715 Business Environment 
and Public Policy (ME) (d). An exami- 
nation of the economic, politkal, social 
and moral context in wtiich manage- 
ment decisions are made. The focus is 



on the public policy environment of busi- 
ness, vvhereby community direction is 
transformed into corporate behiavior. 

MAN 6717 Corporate Negotiations 
(MA) (3). An examination and analysis 
of corporate negotiation strategies in 
such areas as collective bargaining, 
mergers, joint ventures, and with govern- 
ment regulation agencies. The legal en- 
vironment affecting tfie negotiated 
process will be dosely scrutinized, as 
well as internal and external politiceil 
processes. Prerequisites: ACG 6026, 
MAN 6245, FIN 6428, MAR 6805. 

MAN 6726 Policy Analysis (MA) (3). 

The use of cases, guest lectures, and 
gaming to integrate tfie analysis and 
measurement tools, the functional areas 
and public policy issues. The objective 
is to develop skill in broad areas of ra- 
tional decision-making in ar\ administra- 
tive context of uncertainty. Sfiould be 
taken in tfie last semester of master's 
program. 

MAN 6805 Entrepreneurship (MA) (3). 

A discussion of tfie general tfieories, 
principles, concepts and practices of en- 
trepreneurship. Heavy emphasis is 
placed on lecture, readings, case stud- 
ies and group projects. 

MAN 6830 Organization Information 
Systems (DS) (3). Introduction to infor- 
mation systems and their role in organi- 
zations from a user's viewpoint. Survey 
and application of tfie basic concepts 
necessary for understanding information 
systems. Study of tfie main activities in 
the development cyde used to acquire 
information systems capability. 

MAN 6830L Organization Information 
Systems Laboratory (DS) (1). Labora- 
tory applications for MAN 6830. 

MAN 6905 independent Study in Man- 
agement (MA) (1-6). Individual confer- 
ences; supervised readings; reports on 
personal investigations. Consent of fac- 
ulty sponsor. Department Cfiairman, 
and Dean required. P/F only. 

MAN 6910 Research Methods In Man- 
agement (MA) (3). Covers tfie research 
methods and analytical techniques most 
widely used in research in fiuman re- 
sources £ind general management. Em- 
phasis is on helping students to become 
more aware of current techniques and 
tfieir applications. 

MAN 6911 Research In Systems De- 
velopment (DS) (3). Conduct an indi- 
vidual research project or tfiesis on a 
topic in tfie area of computer personnel, 
systems analysis and design, or other 
areas within tfie framewori^ of tfie MIS 



program, subject to tfie Instructor's ap- 
proval. Prerequisite: ISM 6155. 

MAN 6930 Master's Seminar In Man- 
agement (MA) (1-3). An examination of 
recent research findings in selected ar- 
eas of current concern. Emphasis is 
placed on readings; active discussion; 
and small, short-term action and re- 
search projects. The student may make 
a preliminary selection of his/her mas- 
ter's tfiesis or project topic. Prereq- 
uisites: Consent of faculty sponsor. 
Department Chairperson, and Dean. 

MAN 6974 Master's Project in Man- 
agement (MA) (1-6). Each student is re- 
quired to develop and conduct an 
individual research project or tfiesis on a 
topic of interest. The topk: will be cfio- 
sen in consultation with a faculty mem- 
ber in the College. 

MAN 7146 Leadership I (MA) (3). 

Course identifies leadership tfieories 
and research bearing on modern man- 
agement practice. Behavioral, situ- 
ational and transformational tfieories of 
leadership are emphasized, compared 
and evaluated. 

MAN 7147 Leadership II (MA) (3). 
Draws on research and case studies for 
understanding of adaptive leadership in 
turbulent, uncertain environments. Em- 
phasis on effective management of inno- 
vation, entrepreneurial activity and new 
ventures. 

MAN 7155 Fundamentals of Behav- 
k)ral Research (MA) (3). Analytical 
tools to conduct systematic research. 
Metfiods of data collection in lab, survey 
and field reseetrch. Emphasis on princi- 
ples of measurement and statistics to in- 
terpret/report behavioral data. 

MAN 7206 Organizational Analysis 
(MA) (3). Develops skills In organiza- 
tional protilem-solving through applica- 
tions of tiieory and research to actual 
problems. Empfiasis on needs analysis, 
process consultation, team-building and 
action research. 

MAN 7207 Theories of Organization 
(MA) (3). Organization functioning from 
a macro perspective; emphasis on evo- 
lution, structure, design and processes 
of complex systems. Study of communi- 
cation/information networks, inter-group 
processes and control strategies. 

MAN 7235 Management Philosophy 
and Strategy (MA) (3). Compares vari- 
ous cross-cultural management phitoso- 
phies to structure and function of 
different types of organizations. Empha- 
sis on how to develop and implement a 
management strategy for maximum pro- 
ductivity in different organizations. 



96 / College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



MAN 7275 Organizational Behavior 
Management (MA) (3). An introduction 
to the study of human behavior in or- 
ganizations. Emphasis Is given to man- 
agement of individual and group 
processes including conflict attitudes, 
decision making, motivation and stress. 

MAN 7305 l^uman Resource Manage- 
ment (MA) (3). Personnel management 
topics including personnel selection, per- 
formance appraisal, training design, em- 
ployee development, and compensation 
administration. Legal and practical is- 
sues are emphasized. 

MAN 7412 L^bor-Ktenagement Topics 
(MA) (3). Presents various aspects of 
tfie labor-management relationship to 
provide a contemporary perspective. 
Emphasis on structure, processes, 
strategies and legal Issues in collective 
negotiation and industrial relations. 

MAN 7609 Comparative Management 
(MA) (3). Course focus is cross-cultural 
management, i.e., how cultural values 
influence managerial behavior. The prob- 
lems of cross-cultural communications, 
leadership, motivation, and decision 
making are examined. Prerequi- 
sites: Admission to Doctoral program 
and completion of doctoral core. 

MAN 7616 Multinational Firm Global 
Strategy (MA) (3). Overview of the stra- 
tegic management and international 
txjsiness concepts that frame strategic 
activity in iWNGs. Competitive business 
strategies in global and multidomestic in- 
dustries. Prerequisite: Completion of 
business Ph.D. core. 

MAN 7620 International Business Op- 
erations i (MA) (3). Examination of the 
functional management, operations and 
concerns of international businesses. 
Emphasizes analysis of problems in 
managing joint ventures, licensing, bar- 
ter, and technology transfer. Prereq- 
uisites: Admission to Doctoral program 
and completion of doctoral core. 

MAH 7621 International Business Op- 
erations II (MA) (3). Focus on political, 
economic, and national security issues 
wtiich influence IB operations or strate- 
gies. Examines techniques for political 
and economic risk, assessment and re- 
actions to such influences. Prereq- 
uisites: Admission to Doctoral program 
and completion of doctoral core. 

MAN 7640 International Business Re- 
searcii Methods (MA) (3). Overview of 
IB academic research, emphasizing top- 
ics, literature, metfwds, information 
sources, applicatbns, problems, and 
journal characteristics. Prerequisite:s 



Admission to business IDoctoral pro- 
gram and completion of doctoral core. 

MAN 7718 Analysis of Corporate Pol- 
icy Methods (MA) (3). Links functional 
areas of management to provide inte- 
grated view of organization and public 
policy. Emphasis on measurement, 
einalysis and conceptualization of organi- 
zation as a totality of operations. 

MAN 7814 Advanced Management Re- 
search (IMA) (3). Covers applications of 
analytical methods in contemporary 
management research. Emphasis is 
given to complex research design strate- 
gies including multivariate techniques 
and multidimensional scaling. 

MAN 7895 Seminar In l\/lanagement 
(MA) (3). Key concepts in management 
ranging from individual worker styles to 
business ethics. Emphasis on topics 
such as men and women in organiza- 
tion, decision making styles, and attribu- 
tion management. 

IMAR 6158 international Marketing 
(ME) (3). This course discusses the na- 
ture and scope of international market- 
ing, and explores problems facing 
multinational firms and other interna- 
tional marketing organizations, together 
with strategies for foreign market pene- 
tration. Prerequisite: MAR 6816 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

MAR 6336 Advanced Promotional 
Strategy (ME) (3). The course focuses 
on planning, problem-solving, and deci- 
sion-making, as ttiey apply to promotion 
programs. Primary emphasis is on ad- 
vertising, with discussion of the role of 
promotion in relation to other elements 
of the marketing program. Prerequisite: 
MAR 6816. 

MAR 6406 Advanced Sales Manage- 
ment (ME) (3). Analysis of personal sell- 
ing's roles in marketing strategy using 
detailed case studies on field sales man- 
agement, working with channel organi- 
zation, and planning and controlling 
sales operations. 

MAR 6506 Advanced Consumer Be- 
havior (ME) (3). Modern comprehen- 
sive models of consumer behavior are 
utilized as a framework for under- 
standing consumer decision processes. 
Prerequisite: MAR 6816. 

MAR 6646 Advanced Mari(eting Re- 
search (ME) (3). The role of research in 
providing information for mari<eting deci- 
sion-making, including an examination 
of the research process and the tools 
available to the researcher. Prerequisite: 
MAR 6816 or permission of instructor. 



MAR 6075 Current Issues in Market- 
ing I (ME) (3). Intensive study of various 
topic areas in mari^eting. Course empha- 
sizes student reading and research, 
with oral and written reports. Students 
electing to take this seminar may take 
no more tfian 3 credit hours of inde- 
pendent study In marketing. Prereq- 
uisite: MAR 6816. 

MAR 6707 Current Issues in Market- 
ing II (ME) (3). Students electing to take 
this seminar may not take independent 
study in marketing. Prerequisite: MAR 
6075. 

MAR 6805 Marketing Management 
(ME) (3). A study of analysis and applica- 
tion of theory and problem solving in 
marketing management. Emphasis will 
be on tfie role of marketing in the organi- 
zation; planning tfie mari^eting effort; 
management of tfie marketing organiza- 
tion; control of marketing operations; 
and evaluation of ttie marketing contribu- 
tion. 

lUIAR 6816 Advanced Marketing Man- 
agement (ME) (3). Course emphasis is 
on application and integration of con- 
cepts and tools, through participation in 
the marketing management of a firm in 
competition with otfier firms. The 
course's focal point is a computerized 
marketing management simulation. Pre- 
requisite: MAR 6805 or equivalent. 

MAR 6915 Independent Study in IMar- 

keting (ME) (1-6). Individual confer- 
ences; supervised reading; reports on 
personal investigations. Consent of fac- 
ulty tutor. Department Chairperson and 
Dean required. 

MAR 6936 Special Topics in Market- 
ing (ME) (1-6). For groups of students 
desiring intensive study of a particular 
topic or a limited number of topics, not 
otfienA/ise offered in the curriculum. Con- 
sent of faculty supervisor and Depart- 
ment Chairperson required. 

MAR 7246 Seminar In Internattonal 
Marketing (ME) (3). Analyzes distinctive 
characteristics and trends in foreign mar- 
kets. Explores alternative intematbnal 
marketing strategies, considering critical 
environmental differences among coun- 
tries. 

MAR 7622 Marketing Research Meth- 
odology I (ME) (3). Philosophy, con- 
cepts, metfiods of mari<eting research 
design. Experimental methods, sam- 
pling procedufes, measurement tech- 
niques, other methodologteal 
considerations. Prerequisites: Success- 
ful completion of first year research 
metliods requirements in a College of 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration / 97 



Business Ph.D. Program or permission 
of instructor. 

MAR 7623 Swninar In Marketing Envi- 
ronment (ME) (3). Examines the dy- 
namic interaction between marl<eting 
meinagement and the corporate environ- 
ment. Encourages development of an 
ability to design arxd implement effective 
marketing strategies. 

MAR 7667 Seminar toi Mariceting Man- 
agement (ME) (3). Analytical ap- 
proaches to strategical and tactical 
marketing and public policy decisions. 
Emphasis is on relevant concepts from 
behavioral sciences as applied to mar- 
keting decisions. 

IMAR 7786 Seminar in Marketing Tlie- 
ory (ME) (3). Intensive analysis of the 
nature and role of hypotheses, generali- 
zations, and empirical regularities. Criti- 
cal examination of theories of marketihg 
and interaction of marketing theory and 
practice. 

MAR 7815 Seminar In Foundations of 
Marketing Thought (ME) (3). Founda- 
tions of marketing, interdisciplinary nela- 
tionship>s; reviews major research areas: 
the marketing mix, consumer choice 
models, segmentation, stochiastic, and 
analytical models. 

MAR 7845 Seminar hi Services Mar- 
keting (ME) (3). Analyzes the nexus be- 
tween sen/ices and marketing 
management. Identifies and appraises 
alternative corporate strategies wittiin in- 
dustries such as banking and finance, in- 
surance, hospitality, entertainment and 
leisure, health care, and education. 

MAR 7875 Sectorial Marketing (MA) 
(3). Course includes retailing, wtx)lesal- 
ing, pricing, distribution, advertising, 
sales promotion and management, per- 
sonal selling, interr^tional services and 
macromarketing; and mari<eting and 
economic development. 

MAR 7979 Doctoral Research in Mar- 
keting (ME) (1-6). Research while en- 
rolled for a doctorad degree under the 
directton of faculty members. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Department. 

QMB 6603 Quantitative Methods in 
Management (DS) (3). Introduction to 
basic quantitative tools for tiie analysis 
of problems arising in the management 
of organizations, and the application of 
these tools to real-life problems. Prereq- 
uisites: College Algebra and completion 
of tfie Computer Programming Profi- 
ciency requirement. 

QMB 6805 Deterministic Models for 
lUlanagement Analysis (DS) (3). Appii- 
cations of deterministic models such as 



linear and nonlinear programming, net- 
wort< analysis (PERT), dynamic pro- 
gramming, and branch and bound 
algorithms) to managerial problems of 
allocation, planning, scheduling, Invest- 
ment, and conti-ol. 

QMB 6845 Simulation of Management 
Systems (DS) (3). Basic concepts of 
computer simulation of systems; applica- 
tion of ttiese concepts to a variety of 
management problems. Industrial dy- 
namics, urt>an dynamics, and large sys- 
tem simulation. Simulation in economic 
analysis, heuristic methods, and man- 
agement games are covered. Prereq- 
uisites: MAN 6569 and a Computer 
Programming language. 

QMB 6855 StochasUc Models for Man- 
agement Analysis (OS) (3). Applica- 
tions of probabilistic models (such as 
queuing, inventory, and renewal) to tiieir 
managerial prolslems. 

QMB 6875 Stochastic Models for Pro- 
ject Management (DS) (3). Review of 
deterministic models and principles. In- 
troduction to GERT, critical path metfi- 
ods, criticality index, and resource 
considerations in stochastic networks. 
Emphasis on operational decision-mak- 
ing, advanced topics, and individual pro- 
jects. Students use tiie computer, and 
existing programs, to analyze hypotheti- 
cal project networi<s, and learn to inter- 
pret the results in order to facilitate 
operational decisions. 

QMB 6905 independent Study in Deci- 
sion Sciences (DS) (1-6). Individual 
conferences; supervised readings; re- 
ports on personal investigations. Con- 
sent of instructor, Department 
Cfiairperson and Dean required. P/F 
only. 

QMB 6934 Seminar in Decision Sci- 
ences (DS) (1-3). An examination of re- 
cent research findings in selected areas 
of current concern. Emphasis is placed 
on readings; active discussion; and 
small, short-term action and research 
projects. Consent of instructor required. 

QMB 6974 Project In Decision Sci- 
ences (DS) (1-6). Each student is re- 
quired to develop and conduct an 
individual research project or tiiesis on a 
topic of interest. The topic will be cho- 
sen In consultation with a faculty mem- 
ber in the College and approved by the 
Department Cfiairperson. 

REE 5115 income Property Appraisal 
(Fi) (3). Veiluation and appraisal frame- 
work applied to income proF>ertles; capi- 
tallzatk)n; rates and techniques; 
discounting and compound interest; 
mortgage-equity analysis. Includes Ell- 



wood analysis; the role of computers; 
valuation as a guide to business deci- 
sions. 

REE 6020 industrial Real Estate I (R) 
(3). General overview of industrial real 
estate, focusing on types of activities; lo- 
cational requirements; finandng tech- 
niques; brokerage; government 
influence; current trends; technological 
change; characteristics of industrial 
buildings. 

REE 6021 industrial Real Estate 11 (FI) 
(3). Introduction to investment and valu- 
ation problems in industrial real estate. 
Topics include: taxation and investment 
analysis; discounted cash flow tech- 
niques; appraisal framewori< applied to 
income properties. A computer will be 
utilized in approaching tlie alxjve prob- 
lems. 

REE 6105 Appraisal of Real Estate 
(Fi) (3). Valuation and appraisal frame- 
work applied to residential and income 
producing property; role of computers; 
valuation ti^ory and process as a guide 
to business decisions. Prerequisite: 
REE 4303 or permission of instructor. 

REE 6195 Seminar in Real Estate 
Valuation Theory and Practice (FI) (3). 

A study of ttie process of property valu- 
ation, utilizing cost, market and income 
approaches. Tfie role of computers and 
mass appraisal techniques will also be 
examined. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing sind permission of Instructor. 

REE 6207 Real Estate Financial Analy- 
sis (R) (3). Rnancial analysis and struc- 
turing of real estate projects; traditional 
and creative concepts for constoiction 
and permanent financing; portfolio deci- 
sions; government programs; money 
and mortgage martlets. Prerequisite: 
REE 6306 or permission of instructor. 

REE 6295 Seminar In Real Estate Fi- 
nance (FI) (3). A study of financial insti- 
tutions, their mettTods; and interregional 
flows of funds in mortgage markets. Fur- 
tiier emphasis is placed on national eco- 
nomic policies affecting mortgage 
markets. Prerequisites: Graduate stand- 
ing and permission of instaictor. 

REE 6305 Real Estate Investment (FI) 
(3). Advanced concepts of acquisition, 
ownership, and disposition of invest- 
ment (xoperty; taxation; risk and return; 
cash flow forecasting; financial structur- 
ing process; case analysis; strategy for- 
mulation. Prerequisite: REE 6306 or 
permission of instructor. 

REE 6306 Real Property Analysis (Fi) 
(3). A study of tfie decision making proc- 
esses of real property asset manage- 
ment. Private and public policy issues 



98 / College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



regarding the housing process and the 
regulation of the real property business 
environment. Legal considerations of 
real property ownership, financing and 
transfer of interests. Prerequisite: Con- 
sent of instructor. 

REE 6395 Seminar in Real Estate In- 
vestment and Taxation (Fl) (3). The 

techniques of real estate investment 
analysis, utilizing present value and 
cash flow approaches. The impact of 
Federal taxation on real estate invest- 
ment decisions. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing and permission of instructor. 

REE 6435 Legal Environment of Real 
Estate (Fi) (3). Legal environment of 
real property owrwrship, transfer and 
brokerage; estates in land; sales con- 
tracts; mortgage transactions; titles; con- 
veyances; landlord and tenant; 
restrictions; zoning; and eminent do- 
main; does not cover Florida Real Es- 
tate License Law or licensing 
regulations of Florida Real Estate Com- 
mission; not a license "prep" course. 
Prerequisite: REE 4043 or REE 6306 or 
permission of instructor. 

REE 6505 Real Estate Management 
(Fl) (3). Advanced theories and tech- 
niques of professional management of 
real estate; developing a management 
plan; merchandi^ng space; market 
analysis; maintenance; operating budg- 
ets; fiduciary relationships. Prerequisite: 
REE 6306 or permission of instructor. 

REE 6715 Regional Real Estate Devel- 
opment (Fl) (3). Operation of real es- 
tate markets in land allocation; land use 
decision making In real estate; real es- 
tate feasibility studies, applied to spe- 
dfk: real estate projects. Prerequisite: 
REE 6306 or permission of instructor. 

REE 6734 Real Estate Land Develop- 
ment (Fl) (3). Real estate development, 
acquisition of raw land; zoning; subdivi- 
sion into sites; provision of utilities and 
services; financing; merchandising of im- 
proved sites. Emphiasis on design and 
development of residential communities. 

REE 6736 Real Estate Land Planning 
(Fl) (3). Advanced theories of city 
growth and structure; operations of the 
real estate market in land allocation; cur- 
rent practices in real estate land plan- 
ning. Prerequisite: REE 6306 or 
permission of instructor. 

REE 6755 Real Estate and Regional 
Development Policy (Fl) (3). An ad- 
vanced capstone course integrating all 
the aspects of real estate and regional 
development learned in previous 
courses, projects, cases, and field trips. 



Prerequisite: REE 6306 or permission of 
instructor. 

REE 6795 Seminar in Urban Housing 
Policy Problems (Fl) (3). Examination 
of national housing policies and their for- 
mulation; the role of the public and pri- 
vate sectors in regard to fx>using 
problems; effectiveness of various hous- 
ing policies. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing and permission of instructor. 

REE 6816 Real Estate Matlceting (Fl) 
(3). Techniques of selecting, training, 
and compensating sales personnel; ob- 
taining and controlling listings; creative 
selling techniques; promotion, advertis- 
ing, and public relations; growth; ethics. 
Prerequisite: REE 6306 or permission of 
instnactor. 

REE 6825 industrial Brokerage (Fl) 
(3). Defines distinction between indus- 
trial brokerage and general real estate 
brokerage; role and functions of the in- 
dustrial broker; industrial brokerage 
practice. Includes negotiating arxi leas- 
ing; regulations and ethics. 

REE 6906 Independent Study in Real 
Estate (Fl) (1-6). IrxJividual confer- 
ences; supervised readings; reports on 
personal investigations. Consent of fac- 
ulty tutor, Department Chairperson, and 
Dean required. 

REE 6932 Special Topics in Real Es- 
tate (R) (1-6). For groups of students 
desiring intensive studies of a particular 
topic or a limited number of topics, not 
otfierwise offered in the cuniculum. Con- 
sent of faculty tutor and Department 
Chairperson required. 

REE 6935 Seminar in international 
Real Estate (Fl, MA) (3). Current trends 
and issues affecting real estate on an in- 
ternational level. Topics include; the mul- 
tinational corporation and its location 
decisions; foreign taxation; inteniational 
trade and exchange rates. 

REE 6946 Industry Project (Fl) (3). Ad- 
vanced individual or group study of spe- 
cialized problems in the real estate field. 
Guidance of study to be provided by 
real estate faculty. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of advisor. 

RMI 5175 Life and Health Insurance 
(Fl) (3). A review of life insurance con- 
tracts. Matfiematics of Life Insurance. 
Fundamentals of Health Insurance. Life 
lnsurarx» Accounting, Reserves, Divi- 
dend, Non-forfeiture values. Operations 
and Investment. 

RMI 5297 Property and Liability Insur- 
ance (Fl) (3). Comparative study of the 
structures and forms of the major prop- 
erty and liability insurance, policies, per- 



sonal and commerdal lines. Analytic de- 
termiriation of tfie choice of tfie optimal 
mode of protection or coverage. Major 
functions of insurers and regulation. 

RMI 6008 Graduate Survey of Insur- 
ance (R) (1-6). Graduate examination 
of current problems in insurance, IrKslud- 
ing theory, uses of insurance in busi- 
ness organizations; property and liability 
insurance; life and health insurance. 

RMI 6178 Mathematics of Life Insur- 
ance (Fl) (3). Present Values and Fu- 
ture \^ues of Lump Sums and 
Annuities. Mortality Tables Single Premi- 
ums, Annual Premiums and Net Level 
Premiums. Reserves, Nonforfeiture Val- 
ues and Dividends. Prerequisite: MAC 
3233 or equivalent. 

RMI 6912 Independent Study in Insur- 
ance (R) (1-6). Supervised study of in- 
surance or insurance related topics, 
developments, current issues and antici- 
pated trends. Study may be designed to 
investigate a specialized area or adopt 
a more general approach. Consent of 
faculty supervisor. Department Chairper- 
son, and Dean required. 

RMI 6936 Special Topics in Insurance 
(Fl) (1-6). Intensive study for groups of 
students of a particular topic or a limited 
number of topics, not otfienA/ise offered 
in the Curriculum. Consent of faculty su- 
pervisor and l^epartment Chairperson 
required. 

TAX 5066 Tax Research and Report- 
ing (AC) (3). A study of tax planning as- 
pects of a variety of business and other 
transactions. Emphasis will t>e placed 
upon perceiving tax issues and conduct- 
ing research to resolve them. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Accounting 
certificate program advisor. 

TAX 5106 Corporate Taxation (AC) 
(3). Tax implksation of corporate forma- 
tions, distributions, redemptions, liquida- 
tions, divisions, reorganizations, 
collapsibles, attributes, consolidations, 
S-Corp, AET and PHC's. Prerequisites: 
Permission of Accounting certificate pro- 
gram advisor. 

TAX 5406 Taxation of Estates and 
Trusts (AC) (3). Study of income tax as- 
pects of decedents, followed by income 
taxation of estates and trusts (subchap- 
ter J). Special emphasis on throw- 
back" rules, grantor trusts, charitalsle 
remainder trusts, artd foreign trusts. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Accounting 
certificate program advisor. 

TAX 5506 International Dimensions of 
Taxation (AC) (3). Tax provisions affect- 
ing foreign corporations and non-resi- 
dent etliens, as well as those tax 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration / 99 



provisions affecting U.S. person's busi- 
ness and investment activities outside 
the U.S. Prerequisite: Permission of Ac- 
counting certificate program advisor. 

TAX 5725 Tax Planning for Managers 
(AC) (3). An exploration of tlie concepts 
of federal income teixation and tax plan- 
ning, from tfie point of view of the man- 
ager. Prerequisites: ACG 6308 and 
permission of accounting certificate pro- 
gram advisa. 

TAX 5875 Seminar In Taxation (AC) 
(3). An in-depth study of recent legisla- 
tive, administrative, and judicial develop- 
ments in taxation. Prerequisites: TAX 
4001 or equivalent, and permission of 
Accounting certificate program advisor. 

TAX 5904 Independent Study In Taxa- 
tion (AC) (1-3). Individual conferences, 
supervised readings, reports on per- 
sonal investigations. Prerequisite: Writ- 
ten permission of instructor, Accounting 
certificate program advisor, School direc- 
tor, and dean. 

TAX 5936 Special Topics in Taxation 
(AC) (3). Intensive study for groups of 
students of a particular topic or topics 
not otherwise offered in tfie cuniculum. 
Prerequisite: Written pennission instmc- 
tor. Accounting certificate program advi- 
sor, School director, and dean. 

TAX 6005 income Tax (AC) (3). A sur- 
vey of federal income taxation, with em- 
phasis on the taxation of individuals and 
corporations and the ethics of income 
tax accounting. Prerequisites: ACG 
61 15 and admission to a graduate pro- 
gram in the School of Accounting or per- 
mission of tfie School Director. Not open 
to those with undergraduate accounting 
degrees. 

TAX 6015 Taxation of Corporations 
and Partnerships (AC) (3). An in-depth 
study of income taxation of corporations 
and partnerships, including tax plan- 
ning. Prerequisite: TAX 4001 or equiva- 
lent with a grade of 'C or higher and 
admission to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
the School Director. 

TAX 6065 Tax Research (AC) (3). An in- 
depth study and application of both tradi- 
tional and computer-assisted tax 
research tools and of relevant practice 
and procedural mechanisms affecting 
taxation. Prerequisite: Admission to a 
graduate program in the School of Ac- 
counting or permission of the School Di- 
rector. 

TAX 6105 Taxation of Corporations I 
(AC) (3). The study of federal tax conse- 
querK»s of the formation and operation 
of corporations ; distritutions and re- 



demptions; elections of Subchapter S 
status. Prerequisites: TAX 6065 and ad- 
mission to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
the School Director. 

TAX 61 15 Taxation of Corporations II 
(AC) (3). The study of federal tax conse- 
quences of thie liquidation and reorgani- 
zation of corporations; multiple 
corporations; advanced topNcs in corpo- 
rate taxation. Prerequisites: TAX 6065 
and TAX 6105, and admission to a 
graduate program in the School of Ac- 
counting or permission of the School Di- 
rector. 

TAX 6205 Partnership Taxation (AC) 
(3). The intensive study of the formation, 
operation, and dissolution of partner- 
ships (general and limited). Prereq- 
uisites: TAX 6065 and admission to a 
graduate program in tfie School of Ac- 
counting or permission of the School Di- 
rector. 

TAX 6405 Estate and Gift Taxation 
(AC) (3). The study of the federal estate 
tax and federal gift tax provisions. Pre- 
requisites: TAX 6065, and admission to 
a graduate program in tfie School of Ac- 
counting or permission of tfie School 
Director. 

TAX 6415 Fiduciary Accounting and 
Taxation (AC) (3). The study of the in- 
come taxation of estates, trust, and the 
beneficiaries thereof, including the deter- 
mination of distributable net income, 
and throwtjack rules. The grantor trust 
and income in respect of a decedent is 
emphasized. The use of tnjsts in tax 
and estate planning is also explored. 
Prerequisites: TAX 6065 and admission 
to a graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of tfie School 
Director. 

TAX 6445 Estate Planning (AC) (3). An 
in-depth discussion of tfie use of estate 
tax planning tools, such as lifetime gifts, 
life insurance, the marital deduction, the 
use of trusts, future interests, annuities, 
powers of appointment, charitable trans- 
fers, and postmortem pisinning. Prereq- 
uisites: TAX 6405 and admission to a 
graduate program in tfie School of Ac- 
counting or permission of ttie School Di- 
rector. 

TAX 6505 International Taxation I 
(AC) (3). Federal income tax provisions 
applicable to non-resident aliens and for- 
eign corporations. Prerequisites: TAX 
6065 and admission to a graduate pro- 
gram in the School of Accounting or per- 
mission of ttie School Director. 

TAX 6515 international Taxation 11 
(AC) (3). Federal income tax provisions 



applicable to U.S. persons, business, 
and investment activities outside the 
U.S. Prerequisite: TAX 6505 and admis- 
sion to a graduate (xogram in tfie 
School of Accounting or p>ermission of 
the Scfiool Director. 

TAX 6805 Tax Policy (AC) (3). A study 
of tfie tax accounting concepts and the 
judicial doctrines infierent in trie federal 
tax law, tax planning, and tax policy. Pre- 
requisite: TAX 6065 and admission to a 
graduate program in the School of Ac- 
counting or permission of the School 
Director. 

TAX 6835 Taxation of Defetred Coiiv 
pansation (AC) (3). The taxation of 
qualified and non-qualified pension and 
profit-sharing plans, stock options, an- 
nuities, lump-sum distributions, death 
benefits, rollovers, self-employment 
plans, employee stock ownership plans, 
etc. Prerequisites: TAX 6065 and admis- 
sion to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
tfie School Director. 

TAX 6875 Current Developments in 
Taxation (AC) (3). The study of recent 
legislative, administrative and judicial de- 
velopments in taxation. Prerequisites: 
TAX 6065 and at least four additional 
graduate tax courses and admission to 
a graduate program in the School of Ac- 
counting or permission of the School Di- 
rector. 

TAX 6876 Transactions in Property 
(AC) (3). An in-depth investigation into 
tax problems relating to basis, capit£tl 
gains and losses, and nonrecognition 
provisions for transactions in property 
with special emphasis on personal prop- 
erty transactions and securities invest- 
ments. Prerequisites: TAX 6065 and 
admission to a graduate program In the 
Scfiool of Accounting or permission of 
the Scfiool Director. 

TAX 6877 Seminar In Taxation (AC) 
(3). Intensive study of a particular topic 
or a limited number of topfcs. Tfie topics 
included in tfiis course will depend upon 
tfie availability of faculty with expertise 
in the following special classes of tax 
problems: advanced corporate taxatnn; 
t£txation of not-for-profit institutions; inter- 
state, state and local taxation; and oth- 
ers, as current developments demand. 
Prerequisites: TAX 6065 and TAX 6805 
and admission to a graduate program in 
ttie Scfiool of Accounting or permission 
of tfie Scfiool Director. 

TAX 6905 Independent Study InTaxa- 
tlon (AC) (1-3). Individual conferences, 
supervised readings; reports on per- 
sonal investigations. Prerequisites: Ad- 
mission to a graduate program in the 



100 / College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



School of Accounting or permission of 
tfie Sdiool Director. 

TAX 6935 Special Topics In Taxation 
(AC) (1-3). Intensive study for groups of 
students of a particular topic(s) not otti- 
erwise offered in ttie curriculum. Prereq- 
uisite: Admission to a graduate program 
in the School of Accounting or permis- 
sion of ttie School Director. 

TAX 7067 Seminar: Special Topics In 
Taxation Research (AC) (3). Topics 
vary according to instructor and student 
interest in problems and issues on tfie 
frontier issues of taxation. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Doctoral advisor in Ac- 
counting. 

TAX 6726 Tax Rannlng for Managers 
(AC) (3). An exploration of the concepts 
of federal income taxation and tax plan- 
ning, from the point of view of tine man- 
ager. Prerequisites: ACG 6308 or 
equivalent and permission of Account- 
ing advisor. 

TAX 7815 Seminar: Tax Policy: An 
Analysis of the Issues (AC) (3). An in- 

deptii examination of the horizontal and 
vertical equity issues in taxation, the ef- 
fects on income distribution, business 
decisions, foreign baleince of payments, 
public finance issues, and economic pol- 
icy. Emphasized are ttie areas of empiri- 
cal research vis a vis legal research. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Doctoral ad- 
visor in Accounting. 

TRA 5245 Transportation Logistics 
(ME) (3). Quantitative mettxxis applied 
to solving problems in business logis- 
tics; mathematical and statistical mod- 
els; optionalization tiieory and 
simulation. Problems selected from ar- 
eas of physical distribution manage- 
ment, inventory control, mode selection, 
and facility locations. 

TRA 5401 Transportation Operations 
and Carrier Management (ME) (3). 
Contemporary management techniques 
as applied to earners; management- 
problems peculiar to transportation 
firms; economic analysis of marl^eting 
problems; capital formation; costs; pric- 
ing; labor relations; and government 
regulation. 

TRA 6035 Graduate Survey of Trans- 
portation Management (ME) (3). 
Graduate survey of transportation, its 
elements, and their impact on society. 
History, economics, arid regulatory prin- 
ciples in transportation. Gunent policies 
and problems for all the major transpor- 
tation modes. 

TRA 6905 Independent Study in 
Transportation (ME) (1-6). Individual 
conferences; sup>ervised readings; re- 



ports on personal investigations. Con- 
sent of faculty tutor. Department Chair- 
person, and Dean required. 

TRA 6936 Special Topics in Transpor- 
tation (ME) (1-6). For groups of stu- 
dents desiring intensive study of a 
particular topic or a limited number of 
topics, not otiierwise offered in tiie cur- 
riculum. Consent of faculty supervisor 
and Department Chairperson required. 



CoSlege of Business 
Administration 

Dean Harold E. Wyman 

Associate Dean Donald W. Fair 

Assistant Dean Anne M. Fiedler 

Director, School of 

Accounting Lewis F. Davidson 

Chairpersons: 
Decision Sciences and 

Infomfiation Systems Daniel Robey 
Rnance Anjn J. Prakash 

Management and International 

Business Dana L Farrow 

Marketing and 

Environment BarnettA. Greenberg 

Faculty 

Ahlers, Richard, M.B.A. (University of 

Detroit), Instructor, Management and 

International Business 
Anderson, Gary, Ph.D. (University of 

Illinois), Assistant Professor, Finance 
Auster, Rolf, Ph.D. (Northwestern 

University), CPA CMA, Professor, 

Accounting 
Bart>er, Joel, Ph.D. (University of 

Arizona), Assistant Professor, 

Finance. 
Bates, Constance S., D.B.A. (Indiana 

University), Associate Professor, 

Management and International 

Business 
Batra, Dinesh, Ph.D. (Indiana 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Decision Sciences and Information 

Systems. 
Bear, Robert M., Ph.D. (University of 

Iowa), Professor, Finance and 

Director, Broward Programs 
Beaton, William R., Ph.D. (Ohio State 

University), Professor, Finance 
Berry, Delano H., M.B.A. (East 

Carolina University), CMA, 

Instructor, Accounting 
Campfleid, William, Ph.D. (University 

of Illinois), CPA Professor Emeritus, 

Accounting 



Caimone, Frank, Ph.D. (Waterloo 

University), Business Men's 

Professor of Marl<eting 
Carter, Jack L, Ph.D. (University of 

Cincinnati), Assistant Professor, 

Accounting 
Chang, Chung-Hao, Ph.D. 

(Northwestern University), Assistant 

Professor, Finance 
Chang, Lucia S., Ph.D. (University of 

Texas at Austin), Professor, and 

Associate Director, Accounting 
Choe, Yong S., (University of Florida), 

Assistant Professor, Accounting 
Chusmir, Leonard H., Ph.D. (University 

of Miami), Associate Professor, 

Management and International 

Business 
Comer, Lucette, Ph.D. (University of 

Maryland), Assistant Professor, 

Marketing and Environment 
Daigler, Robert T, Ph.D. (University of 

Oklahoma), Associate Professor, 

Finance 
DandapanI, Krishnan, Ph.D. 

(Pennsylvania State University), 

Assistemt Professor, Finance 
Davidson, Lewis F., Ph.D. 

(Pennsylvania State University), 

Professor and Director, Accounting 
Dessler, Gary, Ph.D. (City University of 

New York), Professor, Management 

and International Business 
Dieguez, Manuel, M.S.M. (Florida 

International University), CPA 

Lecturer, Accounting 
Dittenhofer, Mortimer, Ph.D. 

(American University), Professor, 

Accounting 
Dorsett, Herman W., Ed.D. (Columbia 

University), Associate Professor, 

Management and International 

Business 
Duhala, Karen, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania 

State University), Assistant 

Professor, Finance 
Elam, Joyce, J. (University of Texas, 

Austin), Professor and James L 

Knight Eminent Scholar, Decision 

Sciences and Information Systems 
Fair, Donald W., M.Acc. (Bowling 

Green State University), CPA 

Instructor, Accounting, and Associate 

Dean 
Farrow, L Dana, Ph.D. (Ureversity of 

Rochester), Professor and 

Chairperson, Management and 

International Business 
Fiedler, Anne, M.BJV. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, Marketing and 

Environment, and Assistant Dean, 

Academic Counseling 
Friday, Earnest, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Assistant Professor, 

Management and International 

Business 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration / 101 



Garcia, Georglna, M.S.M. (Florida 
International University), CPA, 
Lecturer, Accounting 
Gayle, Dennis J., Ph.D. (UCLA). 
Associate Professor, Marketing and 
Environment 
Gilbert, G. Ronald, Ph.D. (University of 
Southern California), Associate 
Professor, Management and 
International Business 
Goodrich, Jonathan N., Ph.D. (State 
University of New York at Buffalo), 
Professor, Marketing and 
Environment 
Greenl}erg, Barnett A., DBA 

(University of Cohrado), Professor 
and Chairperson, Marketing and 
Environment 
Guo, Miin H., Ph.D. (University of 
Arizona), Assistant Professor, 
Accounting 
Gupta, Sushll K., Ph.D. (University of 
Delhi), Professor, Decision Sciences 
and Information Systems and Vice 
Provost 
Haar, Jerry, Ph.D. (Columbia 
University). Associate Professor, 
I Management and International 
Business 
Hallbauer, Rosalie C, Ph.D. 

(University of f^Jorida), CPA, CMA, 
Associate Professor, Accounting 
Hamid, Siiahid, Ph.D. (University of 
Maryland), Assistant Professor, 
Finance 
Hendrickson, Harvey S., Ph.D. 
(University of Minnesota), CPA, 
Professor, Accounting 
Hodgetts, Richard M., Ph.D. 

(University of Oklahoma), Professor, 
Management and International 
Business 
Hogner, Robert H., Ph.D. (University of 
Pittsburgh), Associate Professor, 
tAarketing and Environment 
Jarrett, Royland D., M.B.A. (American 
University), Regional Manager, 
Small Business Development Center 
Jerome, William T., Ill, D.C.S. (Harvard 
University), IDistinguished University 
Professor. Management and 
International Business 
JorxJan, Willabeth, M.P.A. (Florida 
International University), Instructor, 
Management and International 
Busiryess, and IDirector. Center for 
Management Development 
Kemerer, Kevin, M.Acc (Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute), Instructor, 
Accounting 
Keys, James D., M.BJ\. (Florida 
International University), Instructor, 
Finance 
Kirs, Peeter J., Ph.D. (State University 
of New York at Buffalo), Assistant 
Professor, Decision Sciences and 
Information System 



Koulamas, Christas P., Ph.D. (Texas 
Tech University), Assistant 
Professor, Decision Sciences and 
Information Systems 

Kranendonk, Carl J., M.B.A. 
(University of Tulsa), Instructor, 
Marketing and Environment 

Kroeck, K. Galen, Ph.D. (University of 
Akron), Associate Professor, 
Management and International 
Business, and Director, Doctoral 
Studies 

Kyparlsis, Jerzy, D.Sc. (George 
Washington University), Associate 
Professor, Decision Sciences 

Laskey, Henry A., Ph.D. (University of 
Georgia), Assistant Professor, 
Marketing and Environment 

L^vln, David, Ph.D. (University of 
Illinois), CPA Associate Professor, 
Accounting 

Lee, Donghoon, Ph.D. (University of 
Pittsburgh), Assistant Professor, 
Marketing and Environment 

Lubeil, Myron, D.BA. (University of 
Maryland), CPA, Associate 
Professor, Accounting 

Luytjes, Jan B., Ph.D. (University of 
Pennsylvania), Professor, 
Management and International 
Business 

Magnusen, Karl O., Ph.D. (University 
of Wisconsin), Associate Professor, 
Management and International 
Business 

Maidlque, Modesto A., Ph.D. 
(Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology), Professor, 
Management and International 
Business, and University President 

Mallen, David C, M.B.A. (Columbia 
University), Information Bid 
Coordinator, Small Business 
Development Center 

Mandakovic, Tomisiav, Ph.D. 

(University of Pittsburgh), Professor, 
Decision Sciences and Information 
Systems 

Mintu, Alma, Ph.D. (University of 
Kentucky), Assistant Professor, 
Marketing and Environment 

Moss, Sherry, Ph.D. (Florida State 
University), Assistant Professor, 
Management and International 
Business 

Most, Kenneth S., Ph.D. (University of 
Florida), CPA F.CA.. Professor, 
Acxxjunting 

Muralldhar, Krisnmurty, Ph.D. (Texas 
A&M University), Assistant 
Professor, Decision and Information 
Systems 

Nesbit, Marvin D., M.BA. (University 
of West Florida), Director, Small 
Business Development Center 

Nicholls, J.A.F., D.B.A. (Indiana 
University), Associate Professor, 
Marketing and Environment 



NIckerson, Charles A., Ph.D. 

(University of Georgia), Professor, 

Accounting 
Nurtez, Leandro S., J.D. (Nova 

University), CPA CMA, Lecturer, 

Accounting 
Ollva, Robert B., LLM. (University of 

San Diego) CPA Associate 

Professor, Accounting 
Ortiz, Marta, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Associate Professor, 

Marketing and Environment 
Pak, Sinnon, Ph.D. (University of 

California, Berkeley) Associate 

Professor, Finance 
Parhizgarl, All, Ph.D. (University of 

Maryland), Professor, Finance and 

Director, MBA Program 
Pernas, Elena M., M.B.A. (University of 

Miami), Instnictor, Decision Sciences 

and Information Systems 
Polster, Elearrar, M.B.A. (Florida 

International University), Instructor, 

Management and International 

Business 
Pomeranz, Felix, M.S. (Columbia 

University), CPA CSP, Distinguished 

Lecturer, Accounting, and Director, 

Center for Accounting, Auditing, and 

Tax Studies 
Prakash, Arun, Ph.D. (University of 

Oregon), Professor and 

Chairperson, finance 
Ralieem, Lynda, M.B.A. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, Marketing and 

Environment, and Coordinator of 

Graduate Programs 
Ramaswamy, Kannan, Ph.D. (Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute and State 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Management and International 

Business 
Renforth, William, D.B.A. (Indiana 

University), Professor, Management 

and International Business 
Robey, Daniel, D.B.A. (Kent State 

University), Professor and 

Chairperson, Decision Sciences and 

Information Systems 
Rodriguez, Leonardo, D.BJV. (Fkirkia 

State University). Professor, 

Accounting and Management and 

International Business and Vice 

President, Business and Finance 
Roslow, Sydney, Ph.D. (New Yorti 

Urnversity), Professor Emeritus, 

Marketing and Environment 
Roussakis, Emnruinuel, Ph.D. 

(Catholic University ofLouvain, 

Belgium), Professor, Finance 
Ruf, Bemadette, M.S. (Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute), Instructor, 

Accounting 
RuUedge, Robert W., (University of 

South Carolina), Assistant Professor, 

Accounting 



102 / College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



Sabherwal, Rajiv, Ph.D. (University of 

Pittsburgh), Assistant Professor, 

Decision Sciences and Information 

Systems 
Saldarriaga, Alexander, M.B.A. 

(Rorida International University), 

Regional Manager, Small Business 

Development Center 
Santhanam, Radhiks, Ph.D. 

(University of Nebraska), Assistant 

Professor, Decision Sciences and 

Information Systems 
Schlachter, Paul J., Ph.D. (University 

of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). 

Assistant Professor. Accounting 
Seaton, Bruce, Ph.D. (Washington 

University). Associate Professor, 

Marketing and Environment 
Sein, Maung K., Pti.D. (Indiana 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Decision Sciences and Information 

Systems 
Sennetti, John T, Ph.D. (Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute), Professor. 

Accounting 
Shepherd, Philip, Ph.D. (Vanderbilt 

University), Associate Professor. 

Marketing and Environment 
Silverblatt, Ronnie, Ph.D. (Georgia 

State University), Associate 

Professor, Management and 

International Business 
Simmons, George B., D.6A. (Indiana 

University), Distinguished University 

Professor, Finance 
Smith, Larry A., Ph.D. (State University 

of New York at Buffalo), Associate 

Professor, Decision Sciences and 

Information Systems 
Specter, Christine, D.B.A. (George 

Washington University), Assistant 

Professor. Management and 

International Business 
Still, Richard R., Ph.D. (University of 

Washington). Professor. Marketing 

and Environment 
Sullivan, Michael A., Ph.D. (Yale 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Finance 
Sutija, George, M.B.A. (Columbia 

University), Associate Professor, 

Management and International 

Business 
Taggart, William M., Ph.D. (University 

of Pennsylvania), Professor, 

Management and International 

Business 
Thomas, Anisya, S. Ph.D. (Virginia 

Polytechnic and State University). 

Assistant Professor. Management 

and International Business 
Tsalikis, John, Ph.D. (University of 

Mississippi), Assistant Professor, 

Marketing and Environment 
Ullss, Barbara!., M.Acc. (Case 

Western Reserve University), CPA, 

CDP, Instructor, Accounting 



Valenzi, Enzo R., Ph.D. (Bowling Green 

State University), Professor, 

Management and Intematiortal 

Business 
Vasquez, Arturo, Ph.D. (Texas Tech 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Marketing and Environment 
Welch, William W., Ph.D. (University of 

Michigan), Associate Professor, 

Finance, and Associate Director, 

Center for Banking and Financial 

Institutions. 
Wlskeman, Richard H., Jr., MBA 

(Uriversity of Mami), CPA, 

Distinguisfied Lecturer. Accounting 
Wrieden, John A., J.D. (George hteson 

University), Lecturer, Accounting 
Wyman, Harold E., Ph.D. (Stanford 

University), Professor, Accounting, 

and Dean 
Yeaman, Doria, J.D. (University of 

Tennessee), Associate Professor, 

Accounting 
Yeh, Shu, Ph.D., (UCLA), Assistant 

Professor, Accounting 
Zanakis, Steve H., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania 

State University), Professor , 

Decision Sciences and Information 

Systems 
Zdanowicz, John S., Ph.D. (Michigan 

State University), Professor Finance 

and Director, Center for Banking and 

Financial Institutions 
Zegan, Peter J., M.S. (Urvversity of 

Florida), Lecturer, IDecision Sdences 

and Information Systems 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 103 



College of Education 

The College of Education has a dual 
mission: to prepare competent and crea- 
tive professionals to botti serve and 
lead existing learning environments; 
and to address the social, economic, 
and political conditions that restrict the 
possibilities of educational opportunity in 
a multicultural, multipluralistic society. 
Accordingly, the College concerns itself 
with lx>th education and social changes. 

To support its mission, the College is 
organized into six separate txjt related 
departments: 

Educational Leadership and Policy 
Studies* 

Educational Psychology and Special 
Education 

Elementary Education* 

Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation 

Middle, Secondary and Vocational 
Education 

Urtsan, Multicultural and Community 
Education 

•(Name change pending Board of 
Regents approval) 

Programs of studies include adult 
education and human resource develop- 
ment, art education, biology education, 
chemistry education, community college 
teaching, eariy childhood education, 
educational leadership, educational psy- 
chology (including counseling and 
school psychology), elementary educa- 
tion, English education, history educa- 
tion, international development 
education, mathematics education, mod- 
em language education, music educa- 
tion, parks and recreation management, 
physical education (teacher certification 
for grades k-8, teacher certification for 
grades 6-12, exercise physiology, and 
sports managmenent), physics educa- 
tion, reading education, social studies 
education, special education, teaching 
English as a Second Language . 
(TESOL), and vocational education pro- 
grams (administration and supervision, 
business teacher education, health oc- 
cupations education, technology educa- 
tion, organizational trair>ing, 
post-secondary technical education, vo- 
cational home economics education, 
and vocational industrial education). 

The College also administers the Ur- 
lan Education Program. It is comprised 
of the Urtjan Education Certificate Pro- 
gram arxl the Master's Degree in Urtan 
Education. 

Applicants to the College's programs 
should carefully examine tfie choices of 
major concentrations and program ob- 
jectives. Because there are occasional 
revisions of College of Education curricu- 



lum during ttie academic year, some cur- 
riculum changes may not be reflected in 
the current catalog. Prospective stu- 
dents are advised to contact appropriate 
advisors to ask for current information 
regarding specific programs of interest. 
General advisement is available by 
telephone: (305) 348-2768 for Univer- 
sity Pari<, (305) 940-5820 for North Mi- 
ami Campus. Broward residents may 
call (305) 523-4422 for North Miami 
Campus or 475-4156 for the Broward 
Program. Dade residents may call (305) 
948-6747 for the Broward Program. Spe- 
cific program advisement is available by 
prearranged personal appointment with 
advisors at all locations. 

Note: The programs, policies, require- 
ments, and regulations listed in tfiis cata- 
log are continually subject to review in 
order to serve the needs of the Univer- 
sity's various publics and to respond to 
the mandates of the Rorida Board of Re- 
gents and tfie Rorida Legislature. 
Changes may be made without advance 
notice. Please refer to the General Infor- 
mation section for tfie University's poli- 
cies, requirements, and regulations. 

Master's, Specialist, and 
Doctoral Degrees 

Graduate studies offered by the College 
provide specialization in degree pro- 
grams developed to reflect individual stu- 
dent interests. A graduate program may 
include courses, seminars, field experi- 
ences, research courses, theses, and 
dissertations, depending upon the stu- 
dent's level and area of emphasis. 

A/laster's Degree Programs 

Applicants for admission to most Mas- 
ter's programs in Education must hold 
or qualify for Rorida teacher certification 
in the appropriate area. All applicants 
must also satisfy Board of Regents ad- 
mission requirements: A GPA of 3.0 in 
ttie last 60 semester hours of under- 
graduate study or 1000 on the Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE). Applicants 
admitted with a pending GRE score 
must sulxnit a test score within one se- 
mester to be fully admitted or become a 
candidate for graduation. All applicants, 
regardless of GPA, must submit a GRE 
score. 

A/ofe; Specif ic (jrograms may have 
higher standards for admission. 

Prior to formal admission to a gradu- 
ate progretm, students may be approved' 
to take 1 2 semester hours of 6000 level 
graduate credit as non-degree seeking 
students, v>tiich, if applicable to the ma- 
jor field of study and approved by an ad- 
visor, may be applied to the degree 
program. 



Graduate students will complete at 
least 30 semester hours of study to earn 
a Master of Science degree in educa- 
tion. However, specific programs may re- 
quire more than the minimum number of 
hours. Students may transfer six semes- 
ter hours taken at another accredited 
college or university toward a master's 
degree program having 30-45 semester 
hours, and nine semester hours toward 
a program having more than 45 semes- 
ter hours with advisor's approval. 

Master's program students must 
maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 in order 
to graduate. No more than two grades 
of 'C and no grades of 'D' or 'F re- 
ceived in courses that are part of a mas- 
ter's degree program of study will be 
accepted toward graduation. 

No more than two workshop courses 
may be included in a master's degree 
program. 

Applicants who do not hold or qualify 
for Florida Teacher Certification may be 
eligible for the Alternative Track Master 
of Science Degree described in the Mid- 
dle, Secondary and Vocational Educa- 
tion section. 

Educational Specialist Degree 
Programs 

The College offers Educational Special- 
ist degree programs in Curriculum and 
Instruction and in Educational Leader- 
ship. The programs require a minimum 
of 36 semester hours of wori< at tfie Uni- 
versity beyond the Master's degree. 
However, specific programs may require 
more than the minimum number of 
hours and may include six semester 
hours of thesis if that option is chosen. 

Admission requirements and transfer 
of credit are the same as for the mas- 
ter's programs. 

Other program requirements are con- 
tained in the program descriptions 
which may be obtained from each pro- 
gram leader. 

Doctor of Education Degree 
Programs 

Thie Doctor of Education degree is of- 
fered in Adult Education and Human Re- 
source Development, Community 
College Teaching, Cuniculum arid In- 
struction, Educational Administration 
and Supervision, and Exceptional Stu- 
dent Education. Advisement for these 
programs may be obtained by calling 
thie appropriate Department Office or by 
contacting the Coordinator of Doctoral 
Programs at (305) 348-2770. Detailed 
admission requirements, program de- 
scriptions, and graduation requirements 
may be obtained from doctoral program 
advisors in specific areas and by exam- 



104 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



ining program descriptions in this 
catalog. 

North Miami Campus and 
Broward Program 

The College of Education has programs 
of studies at ttie North Miami Campus 
and at the Broward Center on tfie 
Broward Community College Central 
Campus. Students interested in Informa- 
tion regarding the North Miami Campus 
or Broward Program course offerings 
should call the College of Education in 
Broward at (305) 948-6747. 

If calling Broward from Dade, dial 
475-4156. If calling North Miami cam- 
pus from Broward, dial 523-4422. To call 
North Miami campus from Dade, dial 
940-5820. 



Educational Leadership 
and Policy Studies* 

Stephen M. Fain, Professor and 

Chairperson, Curriculum and 

Instruction 
Carlos M. Alvarez, Associate 

Professor, International 

IDevelopment Education and 

Research 
Peter J. Cistone, Professor, 

Educational Leadership 
Charles Divita, Jr. Professor, Adult 

Education and Human Resource 

Development 
Miguel Escotet, Visiting Professor 

(Courtesy), International 

Development Education/Educational 

Psychology 
Allen Rsher, Associate Professor, 

Educational Leadership 
Paul D. Gallagher, Associate Professor, 

Educational Research, and Vice 

President, North Miami Campus 
Lorraine R. Gay, Professor, 

Educational Research 
Barry Greenberg, Professor, 

Educational Research, Community 

College Teaching 
Loriana M. Novoa, Assistant Professor, 

Educational Research 
Sarah W. J. Pell, Associate Professor, 

Educatiortal LeadersNp 
Douglas H. Smith, Associate 

Professor, Adult Education and 

Human Resource Development 
Robert S. Winter, Associate Professor, 

International Development Education 

The Department of Educational Leader- 
ship and Policy Studies offers graduate 
programs in adult education and human 
resource development, curriculum and 
Instruction, educational leadership and 
international development education. 



The department also provides research 
preparation for College of Education 
graduate programs. Tlie department 
graduate programs and support serv- 
ices exist to enhance the College of 
Education's role of a professional school 
within ttie University. The graduate pro- 
grams and services provide access and 
offer excellence in professional prepara- 
tion of educational leaders, researchers, 
and planners. The programs serve stu- 
dents who focus on South Rorida's ur- 
ban challenges; state of Florida cultural, 
economic, and social development; na- 
tional educational policy development; 
and international cultural, economic, 
and social development through educa- 
tion. 

The department offers Master of Sci- 
ence degrees in Adult Education and 
Human Resource Development, Educa- 
tional Leadership and International De- 
velopment Education, tfie Specialist 
degree in Curriculum and Instruction 
and Educational Leadership, and the 
Doctor of Education degree in Adult Edu- 
cation and Human Resource Develop- 
ment, Curriculum and Instruction and 
Educational Leadership. The depart- 
ment also offers a Certificate in Educa- 
tional Leadership for students who 
possess a graduate degree from an ac- 
credited institution of higher education 
and wfx) seek State of Rorida Certifica- 
tion in Educational Leadership. Special- 
ties in elementary, middle, secondary, 
and higher education may t>e included 
in programs of study. 

Tfie department offers wori< for stu- 
dents enrolled in other doctoral pro- 
grams who seek a minor in educational 
leadership. Furtfier, the College require- 
ments tfiat all doctoral students com- 
plete a minimum of 12 semester hours 
of research preparation establishes a 
substantive department role in all col- 
lege doctoral programs. 

The department offers graduate pro- 
grams leading to the Master of Science, 
Educational Specialist, and tfie Doctor 
of Education degrees. 

"(Name change pending Board of 
Regents approval) 

Master of Science Degree 
Programs in AduH Education 

The Graduate Program in Adult Educa- 
tion and Human Resource Development 
is designed for the individual who 
chooses to serve as learning facilitator, 
training director, counselor, administra- 
tor, curriculum developer and/or re- 
searcher in adult education and human 
resource development programs in busi- 
ness and industry, public schools, fK)spi- 
tals, governmental agencies, community 
BS, universities, civic organiza- 



tions, military service, or other agencies. 
Graduate programs of study are de- 
signed in relation to an individual's spe- 
cific Interests, needs, and career goals. 

The Department offers two master's 
degree programs in Adult Education: Ad- 
ministration and Supervision, and Adult 
Education: Human Resource Develop- 
ment. Two options are possible in the 
Administration and Supervision pro- 
gram: (1 ) Public School Administration, 
or (2) General Adult Education Admini- 
stration/Non-Public School Administra- 
tion (not a certification program). 

Adult Education: Human Resource 
Development is designed for persons in- 
terested in the design, implementation, 
evaluation, and management of human 
resource development programs. One 
half (15 hours) of ttie program is re- 
quired, and the otfier half consists of 
elective courses selected by tfie advisor 
in relation to tfie student's career goals. 

Adult Education: Administration 
and Supervision 

(For public school adult educators only) 

Required Program: (30 semester 

hours) 

Required Core: (18): 

ADE 508 1 I nttoduction to Adult 
Education and Human 
Resource Development 3 

ADE 5180 Organizational/Community 
Processes in AE/HRD 3 

ADE 5260 Organization and 

Administration of Adult 
Education and HRD 
Programs 3 

ADE 5385 Adult Teaching and 

Learning 3 

EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 

of Education Research 3 

RED 6336 Teaching Reading in the 

Content Area 3 

Area of Professional Emphasis: (12) 
EDA 6061 Introduction to 

Educational Leadership 3 
EDG 6250 Curriculum Development 

and Improvement 3 

EDS 6050 Supervision and Staff 

Development 3 

Advised Elective 3 

Adult Education: Human 
Resource Development (HRD) 

Required Program: (30 semester 

hours) 

Required Core: (15) 

ADE 508 1 I ntroduction to Adult 
Education and Human 
Resource Development 3 

ADE 51S0 Organizational Community 
Processes in AE/HRD 3 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 105 



ADE 5383 Instaictional Processes In 
AE/HRD 3 

ADE 5385 Adult Teaching and 

Learning 3 

EOF 5481 Analysis and Application 

o{ Education Research 3 

Advised Electives 1 5 

The candidate, with the approval of 
tfie advisor, will select courses that will 
increase competence in a spedalty or a 
supportive social/behavioral science. 

Master of Science in 
Educational Leadersliip 

The Master of Science degree in Educa- 
tional Leadership is awarded upon suc- 
cessful completion of all program 
requirements. The program consists of 
courses and experiences designed to 
develop entry level competencies for 
persons seeking Rorida certification in 
Educational Leadership. The curriculum 
consists of the Florida Educational Lead- 
ership Core which contains competen- 
cies identified in the eight domains of 
effective school leadership. Also in- 
cluded are competencies for high-per- 
forming principals identified by the 
Rorida Council on Educational Manage- 
ment. Specialized experiences in se- 
lected areas of school leadership 
corresponding to career aspirations of 
the candidate are reviewed. Topics spe- 
cific to non-public school administration 
may also be elected. 

Admission to the program requires 
that the candidate meet criteria estab- 
lished by the Board of Regents for 
graduate study and other criteria estab- 
lished by the program faculty. 

To become certified in Educational 
Leadership, formerly Administration and 
Supervision, all candidates must suc- 
cessfully complete the Florida Educa- 
tional Leadership Core arxJ pass the 
Rorida Educational Leadership Certifica- 
tion Examination. 

Required Program: (36 semester 

hours) 

EDA 6061 



EDA 6192 
EDA 6195 

EDG 6250 
EDA 6232 
EDA 6242 
EDA 6503 
EDA 6271 



EDA 6930 



Introduction to 

Educational Leadership 3 

Leadership in Education 3 
Communication in 

Educational Leadership 3 

Curriculum Development 3 



School Law 
School Finance 
Principalship 
Microcomputer 
Applications for 
Administrators 
Seminar in Educational 
Leadership 



EDF 5481 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

EDS 6115 School Personnel 

Management 3 

Guided Electives 3 

Six semester hours must be earned 
in one of the following areas: Eariy Child- 
hood, Middle School, or Secondary 
School curriculum for state certification. 

Master of Science in 
International Development 
Education 

The Master of Science degree in Inter- 
national Development Education (IDE) 
is designed to provide graduate training 
to students interested in acquiring skills 
as specialists in educational develop- 
ment within the context of a changing 
society. The program places special em- 
phasis on planning, management, re- 
search, and evaluation skills. Such skills 
are developed in relation to a specific 
area of educational specialization and 
with a special empfiasis on under- 
standing the influence of the social con- 
text of education on educational 
development and change. 

Admission Requirements 

To be admitted into the Master's degree 
program in International Development 
Education (IDE), a student must: (a) 
hold a Bachelor's degree from an ac- 
credited institution or its equivalent for in- 
ternational students; (b) have a 3.0 GPA 
or higher during the last 60 semester 
hours of undergraduate study (or its 
equivalent for foreign students); and/or 
(c) have a combined score (verbal and 
quantitative) of 1000 or higher on the 
GRE (students must submit the GRE 
scores regardless of their GPA or de- 
gree); and/or (d) have a graduate de- 
gree from an accredited institution of 
higher learning; (e) in the case of for- 
eign students whose first language is 
other than English, a minimum score of 
500 on the TOEFL examination is also 
required; (f) submit two letters of recom- 
mendation, preferably from persons in 
the academic community who are famil- 
iar with the applicant's record and who 
are able to evaluate the applicants back- 
ground, professional interest, and ca- 
reer goals; (g) submit a short essay of 
approximately 250 words concerning 
the applicants background, professional 
interests and goals in the area of Inter- 
national Development Education. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master's program requires the com- 
pletion of a minimum of 36 semester 
hours of coursewori^ at thie graduate 
level with a 3.0 GPA. A maximum of six 



semester hours of graduate wori< may 
be transferred to the program from other 
universities. The 36 semester hours are 
to be completed in accordance with the 
program curriculum. 

Language Requirement 

The student must demonstrate compe- 
tency in the use of a modern language, 
other than English, prior to graduation. 
International students may demonstrate 
competency in their native language. 
Language courses will not count for 
credit toward program completion. 

Required Program: (36) 

Social Context of Education and 
Development: (6) 

EDF 5850 International Development 
Education: Historical 
and Contemporary 
Reality 3 

EDF 5852 Educational Development 
Issues in Context: A 
Multidisclplinary 
Perspective 3 

Educational Research and 
Evaluation Methods: (9) 

EDF 5481 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

EDF 6486 Research Methods in 

Education: 

Experimental Design 

and Analysis 3 

EDF 6475 Qualitative Foundations of 

Educational Research 3 

Educational Policy, Planning, 
Implementation/Management and 
Evaluation SItills: (12) 

EDF 6654 Macro- and 

Micro-Planning in 
Education 3 

EDF 6651 International Development 
Education: Educational 
Technology, Planning 
and Assessment 3 

EDF 6656 International Development 
Education: Innovative 
Approaches in 
Educational Planning 3 

EDF 6658 Selected Topics: 
International 
Development 
Education, Current 
Policy Issues and 
Problems 3 

Electives: (9) 

The student wrtll select, with advisor's 
permission, a minimum of six semester 
hours from courses available in one of 
the following areas: 

1. A content area of educational spe- 
cialization; 



106/ College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



2. Comparative/lntercultural Educa- 
tion; 

3. System's consultation; 

4. Socioeconomic and political con- 
text of development; 

5. Courses in any ofrier area of spe- 
cial interest to the student. 

6. Thesis (3-9) 

EDF 6972 Thesis in International 
Development Education 

Educational Specialist 

The Educatiorial Specialist program in 
Educational Leadership is designed to 
build upon the educator's master de- 
gree preparation and professional expe- 
rience. The degree candidates may 
Include coursework that prepares them 
for state certification in Educational 
Leadership. Program descriptions may 
be obtained from tfie program leader 
(305-348-3221). 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must hold a current regular 
Florida teaching certificate or possess 
such prior to award of the degree. A 3.0 
GPA in the last 60 semester hours of un- 
dergraduate study or a 3.5 GPA in the 
master's program from an accredited 
university and 1000 on the Graduate Re- 
cord Examination (GRE), verbal and 
quantitative scores, are required. Fur- 
ther, an interview with program faculty 
and two recommendations are required. 

Doctor of Education Degree 
Programs 

Adult Education and Human 
Resource Development (HRD) 

The doctoral program in Adult Educa- 
tion and Human Resource Development 
(HRD) is designed to serve the ad- 
vanced graduate study needs of a wide 
range of professionals in leadership po- 
sitions who are concerned with thie de- 
sign, implementation, and evaluation of 
educational and training programs for 
adults. These professionals may be en- 
gaged in program development and 
evaluation, instruction and training, 
counseling and advisement, consult- 
ation, and marketing and recruitment ac- 
tivities designed to further the growth 
and development of adult learners or to 
improve organizational functioning 
through educationally-related interven- 
tion strategies, or both. Accordingly, par- 
ticipants in ttie program come from such 
diverse backgrounds as business and in- 
dustry, higher educatkan, public and pro- 
prietary schools, health and soda) 
service agencies, law enforcement and 
corrections, the military, governmental 
agencies, religious organizations, librar- 



ies and museums, and civic and profes- 
sional associations. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants to ttie program must submit 
thie following records and documents: 

1 . Official transcript from all higher 
education institutions attended. 

2. Official copy of the GRE scores. 

3. Three letters of recommendation. 

4. A current resume. 

5. A statement of personal interest in 
tfie program. 

6. A completed Application for Gradu- 
ate Admission. 

The data from applicants is reviewed 
by an admissions committee. The crite- 
ria applied in reviewing the applicant's 
files are noted below. Exceptions to one 
or more of tfie criteria may be granted 
provided the applicant has excelled in 
certain off-setting assessment areas. 

1 . 3.0 GPA in tfie last two years of 
undergraduate work; 

2. 3.25 in all graduate work at- 
tempted; 

3. A master's degree from an accred- 
ited institution or equivalent preparation; 

4. A score of at least 1 000 on the 
general aptitude portion of the GRE; 

5. Evidence of commitment to a ca- 
reer in the broad field of Adult Education 
and HRD; 

6. Successful professional experi- 
ence in the field of Adult Education and 
HRD; 

7. Potential for leadership or re- 
search in the field, or both. 

Program of Study 

Doctorate programs of study vary ac- 
cording to the individual needs of the 
participants and tfieir cun-ent or antici- 
pated professional goals. A typical pro- 
gram will require a minimum of 101 
semester hours beyond the baccalaure- 
ate degree and will involve the catego- 
ries of courses noted below. The list 
should be considered as a sample pro- 
gram rather ttian an absolute deline- 
ation of exact requirements. Actual 
programs are planned by ttie partici- 
pants, tfieir major professor, and doc- 
toral committee. 

Required Core (18-24) 

Adult Education and HRD includes such 
courses as comprehensive Adult Educa- 
tion and HRD planning, program devel- 
opment, instructional design, adult 
teaching and learning. Adult Education 
and HRD trends and issues, strategies, 
and research. 



Elective Core (9-1 5) 
Elective Core varies according to the 
participants' background and profes- 
sional goals. 

Research and Statistics. (1 2) 
Prospectus and Dissertation. (24) 

Curriculum and Instruction 

The doctoral program in Curriculum and 
Instruction offers specieilties in the fol- 
lowing areas: Art Education, Eariy Child- 
fxx)d Education, Elementary Education, 
English Education, Mathematics Educa- 
tion, Music Education, Science Educa- 
tion, Reading Education, and Social 
Studies Education. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants to the program must submit 
the following records and documents: 

1 . Official transcript from all higher 
education institutions attended. 

2. Official copy of the GRE scores. 

3. Three letters of recommendation. 

4. A current resume. 

5. A statement of personal interest in 
ttie program. 

6. A completed Application for Gradu- 
ate Admission. 

Final decisions on admission are 
made by the Faculty Admissions Com- 
mittee. Additional information can Ise ob- 
tained from the Coordinator of Doctoral 
Programs, DM 255. 

Core Courses: (15) 

EDG 7222 Curriculum : Theory and 

Research 3 

EDG 7362 Instruction: Theory and 

Research 3 

EDG 7665 Seminar in Curriculum 3 
EDF 7934 Seminar in Social 

Foundations of 

Education 3 

EDF 621 1 Psychological Foundations 

of Education 3 

Specialty Area: (36) 
The specialty areas include art educa- 
tion, eariy childhood education, elemen- 
tary education, English education, 
instructional leadership, mathematics 
education, music education, reading 
education, science education, and so- 
cial studies education. 

Cognate Area: (18) 
The cognate area requires a minimum 
of 18 semester hours of coursework in a 
single area of study related to the spe- 
cialty. The courses should be cfiosen 
with regard to coherence and relevance 
to the anticipated substantive aspect of 
ttie dissertation and in consultation with 
the advisor. The cognate area may be 
taken in the College of Education, in the 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 107 



College of Arts and Sciences, or any 
other area offering courses relevant to 
the student's program. 

Research and Statistics: (1 2) 

Comprehensive Examinations and 
Advancement to Candidacy 

The student must successfully pass 
comprehensive examinations covering 
coursewori< and also submit copies of a 
dissertation proposal, which has k>een 
approved by the supervisory committee, 
to the Dean of the College and to the 
Dean of Graduate Studies. 

Dissertation 

The student is responsible for 24 semes- 
ter hours of dissertation credits. The dis- 
sertation must be an original 
contribution to knowledge in an area of 
early childhood education, elementary 
education, secondary education, one of 
the K- 12 areas, or in instructional leader- 
ship. 

The student is expected to complete 
the dissertation five years from the date 
of advancement to candidacy (i.e. suc- 
cessful completion of all written and oral 
examinations, favorable recommenda- 
tions of tiie supervisory and guidance 
committee, and an approved disserta- 
tion proposal). Six credit hours of disser- 
tation are taken per semester during the 
time that the dissertation is being com- 



EDG 7980 Doctoral Dissertation 24 

Educational Administration 

The doctoral program in Educational Ad- 
ministration and Supervision is designed 
for students who wish to pursue leader- 
ship roles in educational institutions. 
Among those roles are principals, super- 
visors, directors, and superintendents of 
public and independent schools; state, 
federal, and international agency admin- 
istrators and staff; and research and de- 
vek)pment personnel. The curriculum is 
designed to enable stiJdents to become 
familiar with and utilize effectively both 
tfieoretical and technical knowledge. 
The program of study is multidisciplinary 
and integrates broad intellectual per- 
spectives into the shjdy and practice of 
Educational Leadership. 

Admission Requirements 

The minimum admission requirements 
are as follows: 

1 . A master's degree from an accred- 
ited institution. 

2. A3.0 GPAin the last 60 hours of 
undergraduate work. 

3. A 3.25 GPA in prior graduate 
work. 



4. A score of 1000 on the GRE (ver- 
bal and quantitative). 

5. Evidence of three years or more 
of successful and appropriate profes- 
sional experience. 

6. Three letters of recommendation 
to support the application for admission. 

7. A statement that sets forth the ap- 
plicant's career goals and relates those 
goals to \he completion of the doctoral 
program. 

8. In the case of a foreign student, a 
TOEFL score of at least 600 and a 
score of at least 470 on the verisal por- 
tion of tiie GRE. 

9. An interview with program faculty 
that utilizes targeted selection methods. 

10. Recommendation by tfie pro- 
gram faculty. 

Program of Study 

The program requires the completion of 
a minimum of 99 semester hours of aca- 
demic work beyond tiie baccalaureate 
degree. Program requirements include 
the following: 

Required Core Courses 18 

Guided Electives in Educational 

Leadership 15 

Minor/Cognate Area 15 

Research and Statistics 12 

Dissertation 24 

Upon completion of tfie coursework, 
each shjdent must pass a comprehen- 
sive examination and be advanced to 
candidacy. 

Tfte doctoral dissertation is the final 
component of tiie series of academic ex- 
periences tfiat culminate in the award- 
ing of the Ed.D. degree. A successful 
dissertation is a demonstration of thie 
candidate's ability to use the tools and 
metfiods of basic or applied research in 
the field, or both, to organize die find- 
ings, and to report them in a literate, 
logical, and lucid fashion. 

More specific information concerning 
thte doctoral program is available from 
faculty members in the program area. 

Research and Statistics 
Component of Doctoral Programs 

A research requirement of 1 2 semester 
hours is common to all College of Edu- 
cation doctoral programs. 

Required Courses: 

EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 
of Educational 
Research 3 

EDF 6486 Research Ivlethods in 
Education: 
Experimental Design 
and Analysis 3 

STA 51 66 Statistical Methods in 

Research I 3 



One of the following: 

EDF 6403 Quantitative Foundations 

of Educational 

Research 3 

or 
EDG 6475 Qualitative Foundations of 

Educational Research 3 



Professional Certificate 
Program in Adult Learning 
Systems 

The professional certificate in adult 
learning systems is a comprefiensive 
and integrated university-based option 
to provide professionals with skills and 
ti-aining for adult education program- 
mers. The non-degree certificate pro- 
gram may be pursued in conjunction 
witfi a bachelor's or master's degree; or 
beyond tfie bachelor's or master's de- 
gree; or independent of the pursuit of a 
degree. The latter option is for persons 
having special responsibilities and expe- 
riences in the field of Adult Education 
and Human Resource Development. 

Required Program: (20) 
ADE 5925 Wort<shop in Adult 

Education and Human 
Resource Development 1-6 
ADE 5385 Adult Teaching and 

Learning 3 

ADE 5180 Organizational and 

Community Processes 
in AE/HRD 3 

ADE 5383 Development of Adult 
Education and HRD 
Programs II 3 

ADE 5935 Special Topics in Adult 
Education and Human 
Resource Development 1 
ADE 6930 Seminar in Adult 

Education and Human 
Resource Development 1-3 
To be admitted to the program the stu- 
dent must: 

1 . Hold or be seeking a bachelor's or 
master's degree from an accredited insti- 
hJtion; 

2. Have submitted ttiree letters of 
recommendation describing ability to en- 
gage in and profit from such a program 
of studies; 

3. Submit a personal statement of in- 
terests and goals which relate to Adult 
Education and Human Resource Devel- 
opment. 

Applicants will develop a project or 
problem -oriented learning contract dur- 
ing tfie initial workshop to be pursued 
tiiroughout tfie program. Contracts will 
be refined as tfie stijdent progresses 
ttirough the first part of tine program of 
studies. The culminating activity, tiie 



108 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



Seminar, ADE 6930, will require the stu- 
dent to complete, share, and evaluate 
the tasks and activities within the individ- 
ual learning contract. 

Professional Certificate 
Program in Educational 
Leadership 

The objectives of the certificate are to 
meet the requirements of SBE 6A-4.082 
(5) C which requires a "modified core 
Rorida Educational Leadership pro- 
gram"; and to assist professional educa- 
tors In meeting tfie State requirements 
for certification in Educational Leader- 
ship. 

Required Courses: (24) 

EDA 6192 Leadership in Education 3 

EDA6195 Communication in 

Educational Leadership 3 
EDA 6232 School Law 3 

EDA 6242 School Finance 3 

EDA 6271 Administration and 

Application of 

Computers 3 

EDA 6503 School Principalship 3 

EDE 6250 Development and 

Improvement 3 

EDS 6050 Supervision and Staff 

Development 3 

or 
EDS 6115 School Personnel 

Management 



Educational Psychology 
and Special Education 

Stephen S. Strichart, Professor, 

Learning Disabilities and Chairperson 
Wendy Cheyney, Associate Professor, 

Learning Disabilities 
Marisal Gavllan, Associate Professor, 

Educational Psychology/Bilingual 

Education 
Daniel A. Kennedy, Associate 

Professor, School Ck>unseling 
Philip J. Lazarus, Associate Professor, 

School Psychology 
Luretha F. Lucky, Associate Professor, 

Ii4ental Retardation 
David E Nathanson, Professor, Gifted 

Education and Mental Retardation 
Howard Rosenberg, Associate 

Professor, Mental Retardation 
Donald C. Smith, Professor, 

Educational Psychology/School 

Psychology 
Jethro W. Toomer, Professor, 

Educational Psychology/Community 

Counseling 



Judith Jones Wallcer, Assistant 
Professor, Counselor Education, 
Educational Psychology 

The Department offers a variety of pro- 
grams to prepare counselors to work in 
school and community settings, psy- 
chologists to work in the schools, and 
teachers of emotionally disturbed, 
gifted, learning disabled, and mentally 
retarded students. All programs require 
substantial supervised fieldwork. State 
of Rorida certification requirements are 
met for all programs preparing school 
personnel. 

Master of Science 

Community Counseling 

Diagnostic Teaching: Emotional 
Disturbance 

Diagnostic Teaching: Mental 
Retardation 

Diagnostic Teaching: Specific 
Learning Disabilities 

School Counseling 

School Psychology 
Doctor of Education 

Exceptional Student Education 

Master of Science Degree 
Programs 

Educational Psychology 

Programs within the field of Educational 
Psycfxjiogy are designed to train profes- 
sionals to meet the unique needs of indi- 
viduals who experience cognitive, 
academic, and/or social-emotional diffi- 
culties that interfere with the individual's 
progress in school and in the commu- ' 
nity. Specific competencies are deline- 
ated for professionals in the field of 
school counseling, community counsel- 
ing, and school psychology. 

Tfiese programs emphasize the 
blending of research and theory with 
practical applied experience. They con- 
sider the urban, multi-cultural nature of 
the community, as well as more general 
trends within specific fields. All pro- 
grams involve extensive field work with 
accompanying seminars. Independent 
study courses are available to allow stu- 
dents to pursue specialized interests 
and needs. 

Applicants are required to submit an 
application to the Office of Admissions. 
All applicants must present ORE scores 
for the Verbal and Quantitative sections, 
three letters of recommendation (at 
least one from academic sources and 
one from work or volunteer experience), 
and an autobiographical statement. Can- 
didates are admitted by action of the De- 
partment's Graduate Admissions 
Committee. Criteria for program accep- 
tance include GRE scores, undergradu- 



ate grade point average during junior 
and senior years, wori< and volunteer ex- 
perience, quality and source of letters of 
recommendation, and the candidate's 
career aspirations and goals. A com- 
bined Verbal-Quantitative GRE score of 
1000 and/or GPAof 'B' or higher during 
tfie undergraduate junior and senior 
years (i.e. last 60 semester hours), or 
both, are required for a candidate to be 
admitted via regular procedures. 

All programs preparing school per- 
sonnel are approved by the State of 
Rorida and allow students completing 
thie program to be eligible for certifica- 
tion by the State. 

Counselor Education Tracks 

The counselor education tracks require 
60 semester hours, or the equivalent of 
four academic semesters, arid lead to 
tfie Master of Science degree. The 
tracks follow a competency based 
model, the eariy part of which is largely 
generic In nature and is concerned with 
the development of knowledge and 
skills in thie areas of individual and 
group counseling, consultation, preven- 
tive mental fiealth, educational-voca- 
tional development, client appraisal, 
systems intervention, and model pro- 
gram organization and evaluation. The 
latter pan of tlie program is more differ- 
entiated, and enables a specialization in 
either community or school counseling. 
Both areas of specialization meet the 
standards recommended by the Ameri- 
can Association for Counseling and De- 
velopment and specialization in school 
counseling qualifies tfie graduate for the 
Rorida School Guidance Certificate. 
The Community Counselor curriculum 
meets the master's degree requirement 
for eligibility towards licensure as a men- 
tal fiealth counselor by the State of 
Rorida. 

The prospective student should be 
advised that a substantial amount of 
time is spent in field work to meet practi- 
cum and internship requirements. The 
practicum requirement is the equivalent 
of one wori< day per week spent in a 
field placement during one academic se- 
mester followed by an internship consist- 
ing of a 40 hour vrark week in a field 
placement for tiye duration of one aca- 
demic semester. The student should 
plan for this field work to be during the 
day, rather tfian during evening hours. 

All students entering the School 
Counseling track with an undergraduate 
degree in an area other than education 
must enroll for courses in general profes- 
sional education as well as a course in 
reading as required by tfie Rorida State 
Department of Education in order to 
meet state certification requirements in 
Rorida. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 109 



Students applying to the Community 
Mental Health program with an out-of- 
field undergraduate major must com- 
plete 18 hours of prerequisite 
cxjursework. 

Community Counseling 
Required Program: (60) 

First Year: (27) 

EGC 6605 Professional Problems in 

Counseling 3 

EGC 5405 Introduction to 

Counseling 3 

EGC 6725 Human Interaction I: 

Group Process and 

Social Behavior 3 

EGC 6707 Applied Behavioral 

Analysis in Counseling 

and Education 3 

EGC 6726 Human Interaction II 3 

EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research^ 3 

EGC 6708 Advanced Counseling and 

Consultation: Theory 

and Practice 3 

EGC 6203 Appraisal and 

Measurement in 

Counseling 3 

EGC 5305 Educational-Vocational 

Counseling 3 

Second Year: (33) 

EGC 6616 Program Evaluation in the 

Helping Professions 3 

EGC 6822 Advanced Practicum in 

Counseling and 

Consultation 3 

EGC 6676 Supervised Field 

Experience Counseling 10 
EGC 6709 Organizational 

Consultation: Human 

Interaction III 3 

EGC 6936 Seminar in Counseling 

and Education 3 

EGC 6469 Counseling the Culturally 

Different 3 

Electives and Independent Study 8 

School Counseling 
Required Program: (60) 

First Year: (27) 

EGC 6605 Professional Problems in 

Counseling 3 

EGC 5405 Introduction to 

Counseling 3 

EGC 6725 Human Interaction I: 
Group Process and 
Social Behavior 3 

EGC 6707 Applied Behiavioral 

An8ilysis in Counseling 
and Education 3 

EGC 6726 Human Interaction II 3 



EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research' 3 

EEX 6051 Exceptional Children and 

Youth 3 

EGC 6203 Appraisal and 

Measurement In 

Counseling 3 

EGC 5305- Educational-Vocational 

Counseling 3 

Second Year: (33) 

EGC 6616 Program Evaluation in 

Counseling and 

Education 3 

EGC 6708 Advanced Counseling and 

Consultation: Theory 

and Practice 3 

EGC 6822 Advanced Practicum in 

Counseling and 

Education 3 

EGC 6676 Supervised Field 

Experience in 

Counseling 10 

EGC 6469 Counseling the Culturally 

Different 3 

EGC 6936 Seminar in Counseling 

and Education 3 

Advised Electives' 8 

'students should consult with program 
advisor regarding courses required by 
the Department of Professional Regula- 
tion for certification eligibility as a Mental 
Health Counselor. 

School Psychology 

The program in School Psychology re- 
quires 60 semester hours and leads to 
State of Florida certification as a special- 
ist in School Psycfx)logy as well as edu- 
cational requirements for private 
licensure. The competencies to be dem- 
onstrated by the student completing this 
program are derived from ttie following: 
Isehavioral/educational assessment and 
planning; counseling and child-centered 
consultation with teachers, parents, and 
agency representatives; staffing, liaison, 
refen-al, and case management; pro- 
gram development and evaluation; in- 
service education; administrative 
consultation; and community develop- 
ment. 

Required Program: (60) 

EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

EGC 5405 Introduction to Counseling 3 
EGC 6725 Human Interaction I: 

Group Process and 

Social Behavior 3 

EGC 6726 Human Interaction II 3 



EGC 6707 Applied Behavioral 

Analysis in Counseling 

and Education 3 

EGC 6708 Advanced Counseling and 

Consultation: Theory 

and Practice 3 

EEX 6227 Diagnostic Teaching: 

Educational Assessment 3 
SPS 6805 Professional Problems 

and Issues in School 

Psychology 3 

SPS 6191 Psycho-Educational 

Assessment I: 

Intellectual 3 

SPS 6191 L Psycho-Educational 

Assessment I : Lab 3 

SPS 6192 Psycfx3-Educational 

Assessment II: Process 3 
SPS6192L Psycho-Educational 

Assessment II: Lab 3 

SPS 61 93 Psycho-Educational 

Assessment III: 

Behavior 3 

SPS6193L Psycho-Educational 

Assessment III: Lab 3 

EGC 6616 Program Evaluation in 

Counseling and 

Education 3 

EGC 6678 Supervised Field 

Experience School 

Psychology 10 

EGC 6936 Seminar in Counseling 

and Education 3 

Electives 3-6 

Ttie student is required to enter an 
internship in School Psychology under 
the supervision of a field based school 
psychologist for a period of 1 200 dock 
hours. This internship is a full-time, eight 
JTOur day, five day wreek involvement 
and students entering tfie program 
should plan for it during the final stage 
of their training. At least 600 hours of 
tfie internship must be in a setting from 
kindergarten to grade 1 2 in a public 
school. Other approved internship expe- 
riences may include private state ap- 
proved educational programs or ottier 
appropriate mental health-related pro- 
grams or settings for tfie education of 
children and youth. 

A student with an undergraduate ma- 
jor in education is encouraged to select 
electives in the social and behavioral sci- 
ences. Other students must meet re- 
quirements in general professional 
education to meet State of Rorida certifi- 
cation requirements. 

Special Education 

Tfie Department offers master's degree 
programs that prepare individuals to 
teach exceptional children and youth. 
Emphasis is given to the development 
of skills in assessment, prescriptive pro- 



110 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



gramming, behavior management, con- 
sultant and group leadership skills. 

Program applicants are required to 
submit an application to the Office of Ad- 
missions. All applicants must present 
GRE scores for the Verbal and Quantita- 
tive sections, three letters of recommen- 
dation (at least one from academic 
sources and one from work or volunteer 
experience), and an autobiographical 
statement. Candidates are admitted by 
action of the Department's Graduate Ad- 
missions Committee. Criteria for pro- 
gram acceptance include GRE scores, 
undergraduate grade point average dur- 
ing the junior and senior years, wori< 
and volunteer experience, quality and 
source of letters of recommendation, 
and the candidate's career aspirations 
and goals. A combined Verbal-CJuantita- 
tive GRE score of 1000 and/or GPA of 
3.0 or higher, during the undergraduate 
junior and senior years is required for a 
candidate to be admitted via regular pro- 
cedures. Applicants who do not hold a 
valid Florida Teaching Certificate must 
complete all requirements for certifica- 
tion in addition to degree requirements. 

Programs are offered in Exceptional 
Student Education: Diagnostic Teaching 
(Mental Retardation, Emotional Distur- 
bance, and Spedfic Learning Disabili- 
ties). All programs are approved by the 
State of Rorida and allow students com- 
pleting the program to be eligible for cer- 
tification by the State. Courses leading 
to certification in the areas of the Gifted 
are also offered. 

ExcdptionaJ Student Education: 
Diagnostic Teaching 

The major competencies of the diagnos- 
tic teacher are an extension and refine- 
ment of those developed by the student 
in the undergraduate speda! education 
curriculum: a) Assessment of learning 
styles through observation and on-going 
monitoring techniques; b) application of 
behavioral approaches to ttie building, 
monitoring and remediation of dass- 
room behavior; c) communication of in- 
formation concerning children to others 
within tiie school and to parents, consult- 
ation skills; d) curriculum planning and 
innovatton including staffings and lEP; 
e) supervision of spedal education 
units; f) consultation skills. 

Professional Certificate programs 
are available in a number of specialized 
areas. Consult the program faculty for 
furttier information. 

In-Field Majors 

Tfie following program of study is for the 
student who holds an undergraduate de- 
gree in Special Education from Rorida 
Intematkinal University. A student with 
an undergraduate major in Spedal Edu- 



cation from another institution must plan 
a program witii an academic advisor to 
ensure having tiie entiy skills for this 
program. 



Required 

EDF5481 

EEX6050 

EEX 6227 
EEX6211 
EEX 6535 



EMR 6852 



ELD 6323 



Program: (36) 
Analysis and Application 
of Educational Research 
Curriculum Planning and 
Development 
Assessment of Behavior 
Educational Assessment 
Seminar in Spedal 
Education: School 
Administration 
Advanced Theory and 
Practice: Mental 
Retardation 
Advanced Theory and 
Practice: Specific 
Learning Disabilities 
Advanced Theory and 
Practice: Emotioned 
Handicaps 
Diagnostic Teaching: 
Advanced Practicum 
Independent Living and 
the Handicapped 
or 

Reading for Exceptional 
Learners 



EED 6226 

EEX 6846 
EEX 5771 

EEX 5250 

Electives 6 

Out-of-Field Majors 

A student eligible for or holding a Rorida 
teaching certificate in other areas of edu- 
cation should consult with an academic 
advisor for evaluation of entry competen- 
des to the program. If enti^ competen- 
des cannot be demonstrated either on 
the basis of course equivalents or work 
experience, the student will be asked to 
complete one or more of tfie following 
courses in addition to those listed above 
for In-Field Majors. 
EEX 322 1 Assessment of 

Exceptional Children 3 
EMR 4251 Educational Planning for 

the Mentally Retarded 3 

or 
ELD 4240 Educational Planning for 

Spedfic Learning 

Disabilities 

or 
EED 4227 Educational Planning for 

Emotionally 

Handicapped 
EEX 6051 Exceptional Children and 

Youth 3 

EEX 4601 Behavioral Approaches to 

Classroom Learning 3 

EEX 46 1 1 Behavioral Analysis 1 1 3 
EEX 6106 Diagnostic Teaching: 

Acquisition of Language 

and Reading Skills 3 



EEX 4861 Student Teaching 12 

A student who does not hold nor is 
currently eligible for a Rorida Teaching 
certificate must also complete all certifi- 
cation requirements as stipulated by tiie 
State Department of Education. 

Doctor Of Education in 
ExceptionaS Student Education 

The Doctoral Program in Exceptional 
Student Education offers specialties in 
ttie following areas: Administration; Cur- 
riculum Development; and Research. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants to tfie program must submit 
tiie following records and documents: 

1 . Offidal transcript from all higher 
education institutions attended. 

2. Offidal copy of the GRE scores. 

3. Three letters of recommendation. 

4. A current resume. 

5. A statement of personal interest in 
tfie program. 

6. A completed Application for 
Graduate Admission. 

Students applying for the doctoral 
program must have a Master's degree 
GPA of at least 3.25, and a combined 
GRE score of at least 1000 on tiie ver- 
bal and quantitative sections, tiiree 
years of appropriate experience with ex- 
ceptional individuals, a Bachelor's or 
Master's Degree in Exceptional Student 
Education or related area. 

Applicants who do not hold a Mas- 
ter's degree must have a GPA of at 
least 3.0 during tiie undergraduate jun- 
ior and senior years (i.e. last 60 semes- 
ter hours). 

The program components are as fol- 
lows: 

Special Education Core: (1 5) 
EEX 6937 Seminars in Spedal 

Education 3 

EEX 6208 Medical Aspects of 

Exceptionality 3 

EEX 6301 Research in Cognitive 

Processes of 

Handicapped Stijdents 3 
EEX 6203 Advanced Psycho-Sodal 

Aspects of Exceptionality 3 
EEX 6535 Seminar in Special 

Education School 

Administration 3 

Specialty Area: (30) 
Exceptional Student Education and/or 
related area (can be satisfied by appro- 
priate master's level wortc). 

Cognate Area: (15) 
Tfie cognate area requires a minimum 
of 15 semester hours in one of tfie fol- 
lowing career tiirusts: spedal education 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education /111 



administrator; special education curricu- 
lum specialist; special education re- 
searcher. 

Research and Statistics: (1 2) 

Required Courses: 

EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

EDF 6486 Research Methods in 

Education: 

Experimental Design 

and Analysis 3 

STA5166 Statistical Methods I 3 

One of the following: 

EDF 6403 Quantitative Foundations 
of Education 3 

or 

EDF 6475 Oialltative Foundations of 
Educational Research 

Electives 1 2 

Additional courses in the area of the 

student's interests as determined by the 

student and his or her Program of Study 

Committee. 

Comprehensive Examinations and 
Advancement to Candidacy 

The student may be admitted to candi- 
dacy for the degree after the following 
conditions have been met: 

a. Residency requirement 

b. Successful completion of Compre- 
hensive Examination 

c. Recommendation of tfie Program 
of Study Committee 

d. Approval of a dissertation topic by 
the student's Dissertation Committee. 

Dissertation: (EEX 7980) 
The s-udent is responsible for 24 or 
more semester hours of dissertation 
credits. The dissertation must be an 
original contribution to knowledge in ex- 
ceptional student education. The stu- 
dent is expected to complete the 
dissertation within five years from the 
date of advancement to candidacy. 

Certificate and Add-On 
Certification Programs 

Professional Certificate 
Program in Specific Learning 
Disabilities, Emotional 
Disturbance, and Mental 
Retardation 

In order to meet the needs of teachers 
not wisWng to enter a Master's Degree 
program, but who wish to complete 
state certification in a sequential and 
planned program of study, the Univer- 
sity has establisfied ttvee Professional 
Certificate Programs: Specific Learning 



Disabilities, Emotional Disturbance, and 
Mental Retardation. The entrance re- 
quirement is eligibility for or possession 
of a Florida Teaching Certificate in ele- 
mentary education. 

In the event a student enrolled in the 
Professional Certificate Program elects 
to apply course work taken toward meet- 
ing tfie requirements for a Master of Sci- 
ence Degree, tfie student must follow 
tfie stipulated entrance procedures for 
the Master's Degree program. 

Specific Learning Disabilities 

EEX 6051 Exceptional Children and 

Youth 3 

EEX 6106 Diagnostic Teaching: 
Acquisition of Language 
and Reading Skills 3 

EEX 6227 Diagnostic Teaching: 

Educational Assessment 3 

EEX 4601 Behavioral Approaches to 
Classroom Learning 3 

EEX 621 1 Assessment of Befiavior I 3 

ELD 6323 Advanced Theory and 
Practice: Specific 
Learning Disabilities 3 

ELD 4240C Educational Planning for 
Specific Learning 
Disabilities 3 

Emotional Disturbance 

EEX 6051 Exceptional Children and 

Youth 3 

EEX 61 06 Diagnostic Teaching: 

Acquisition of Language 

and Reading Skills 3 

EEX 6227 Diagnostic Teaching: 

Educational Assessment 3 
EEX 4601 Behavioral Approacfies to 

Classroom Learning 3 

EEX 461 1 Behavioral Approaches to 

Classroom Learning II 
EED 4227 Educational Planning for 

Emotional Handicaps 3 

Mental Retardation 

EEX 6051 Exceptional Children and 

Youth 3 

EEX 61 06 Diagnostic Teaching: 
Acquisition of 
Language and Reading 
Skills 3 

EEX 6227 Diagnostic Teaching: 

Educational Assessment 3 

EMR 4251 Educational Planning for 

the Mentally Retarded 3 

EMR 6852 Advanced Theory and 
Practice for the 
ivlentally Retarded 3 

EEX 5771 Independent Living for the 
Handicapped 3 



Program for Guidance 
Certification 

To provide a means of obtaining the 
Rorida Guidance Certificate (K-1 2) for 
tiiose vt/fx) already possess a Master's 
degree in Education and do not wish to 
pursue a second Master's degree. 

Entrance Requirements 

1 . Master's degree in Education. 

2. Cun-ent employment as a coun- 
selor or a minimum of tiiree years teach- 
ing experience. 

3. Status as a non-degree seeking 
graduate student. 

Required Program: (27) 

EGC 5405 Introduction to Counseling 3 

EGC 5305 Educational-Vocational 

Counseling 3 

EGC 6708 Advanced Counseling and 
Consultation: Theory 
and Pi;actice 3 

Professional Problems in 



EGC 6605 
EGC 6203 
EGC 6707 
EDF 5432 
EGC 6936 



Counseling 
Measurement and 
Appraisal in Counseling 
Applied Behavioral 
Analysis in Education 
Measurement and 
Evaluation in Education 
Seminar in Pupil 
Personnel Services 



EDF 6215 Application of Learning 

Theory of Instruction 
EGC 6822 Advanced Practica in 
Counseling and 
Consultation' 3 

Note: At the discretion of the program 
coordinator, a minimum of six semester 
flours of tiBnsfer credit may be used to 
satisfy ttiese requirements. 
^This is the terminal course in the pro- 
gram. All other courses are required as 
prerequisites. Enrollment is by permis- 
sion of instructor only. 



Elementary Education* 

Alicia Mendoza, Associate Professor, 

Early Childhood/Elemer)tary 

Education arid Chairperson 
John Bath, Assistant Professor, 

Science, Mathematics, and 

Elementary Education 
TonI Bilbao, Associate Dean, 

Elementary Education 
Victoria J. Dlmidjlan, Professor, Early 

Childhood Education 
Sharon W. Kossack, Professor, 

Reading Education 



112 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



Nancy Marshall, Associate Professor, 

Reading and language Arts 

Education 
Graver C. Mathewson, Associate 

Professor, Reading and language 

Arts Education 
Lynne Miller, Assistant Professor, 

Reading and Language Arts 

Education 
George S. Morrison, Professor, Early 

Cliiidhood Education and Urban 

Education 
Edward M. Reichbach, Associate 

Professor, Social Studies Education 
S. L Woods, Associate Professor, 

Elementary Education 

The department offers programs in ele- 
mentary, early childhood, and reading 
education. The elementary education 
program may be tal<en at tiie bache- 
lor's, master's, or doctoral levels. The 
early "childhood and reading programs 
offer master's and doctoral degrees only. 
The department is committed to serv- 
ice to the community and the extension 
of knowledge through research. 
The department's programs are: 
Master of Science in Early Childhood 
Education, Elementary Education; Read- 
ing Education; and Doctor of Education 
specialties in the Curriculum and Instruc- 
tion degree in Early Childfxiod Educa- 
tion, Elementary Education, and 
Reading Education. 
*(Name change pending Board of Re- 
gents approval.) 

Master of Science in Early 
Childhood Education 

Applicants for admission to the Master's 
program in Early Childhood Education 
must hold or qualify for Rorida certifica- 
tion or equivalent in elementary educa- 
tion, and must satisfy requirements for 
scholastic aptitude as determined by the 
graduate admissions standards: GPA of 
3.0 or 1000 on ORE. Applicants must 
submit GRE scores. 

Standard Track 

Required Program: (36) 

EDE 6205 Curriculum Dea'gn for 

Childhood Education 3 
EDF 5432 Measurement and 

Evaluation in Education 3 
EDF 5481 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

EEC 6261 Education Programs for 

Younger Children 3 

RED 6305 Instruction in Eariy 

Childhood Reading 3 

Psychology, Sociology, or Anthropology 
course (consult advisor 4000-level 
course or higher) 3 



Specialization Courses 

Courses to be selected from among 
Eariy Childhood course listings, in con- 
sultation and with approval of advisor 18 

Thesis Track 

Required Program: (36) 

This master's thesis track provides a 

special foundation for doctoral Degree 

program entrance. 

EDE 6205 Curriculum Design for 

Childhood Education 3 
EDF 5432 Measurement and 

Evaluation in Education 3 
EDF 5481 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

EEC 6678 Research 3 

EEC 6932 Seminar 3 

RED 6305 Instruction in Reading 

(Eariy Childhood) 3 

Psychology, Sociology, or Anthropology 
course (consult advisor) 3 

EEC 6971 Thesis 6 

Specialization Courses to be selected 
from among course listings in eariy child- 
hood education in consultation and with 
approval of advisor 9 

Master of Science in 
Elementary Education 

Applicants for admission to the Master's 
program in Elementary Education must: 
(1 ) hold or qualify for Florida certification 
or equivalent in elementary education, 
and (2) satisfy requirements for scholas- 
tic aptitude as determined by the gradu- 
ate admissions standards: GPA of 3.0 
or 1000 on GRE. The applicants must 
submit GRE scores. The final decision 
for admission rests with the Faculty Ad- 
missions Committee. 

Standard Track 

Required Program: (36 ) 

EDE 6205 Curriculum Design for 

Childhood Education 3 
EDE 6225 Educational Program for 

Older Children 3 

EDF 5432 Measurement and 

Evaluation in Education 3 
EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

RED 6155 Instruction in Elementary 

Reading 3 

Psychology, Sociology, or Anthropology 
course (consult advisor - 4000-level or 
higher) 3 

Specialization Courses 

Courses to be selected from among Ele- 
mentary course only and in consultation 
and with approval of advisor. 1 8 



Thesis Track 

Required Program: (36 ) 

This master's thesis track provides a 
special fourxJation for doctoral degree 
program entrance. 
EDE 6205 Cuniculum Design for 

Childhood Education 3 
EDE 6225 Educational Programs for 

Older Children 3 

EDF 5432 Measurement and 

Evaluation in Education 3 
EDF 5481 Analysis and application of 

Educational Research 3 
EDE 6488 Research 3 

EDE 6930 Seminar 3 

RED 6155 Instruction in Reading 3 
Psychology, Sociology, or Anthropology 
course (consult advisor) 3 

EDE 6971 Thesis 6 

Specialization Courses 

Courses to be selected from among 
course listings in elementary education 
in consultation and with approval of 
advisor 6 

Reading 

The Master of Science in Reading devel- 
ops competencies in diagnosis and 
remediation, teaching of reading K to 
12, and administration and supervision 
of remedial, corrective, developmental, 
and content area reading programs. 
The graduate is competent to take lead- 
ership in improving reading instruction 
and [xeventing reading failure in 
schools or clinics. 

Requirements for admission to the 
Master's program in Reading Education 
are completion of an appropriate under- 
graduate teacher education program, 
satisfactory scholastic aptitude, as deter- 
mined by tfie graduate admission stand- 
ards a GPA 3.0 or 1000 on the GRE; 
applicants are required to submit GRE 
scores. Applicants must have taught for 
a minimum of three years prior to receiv- 
ing tfie Master's degree in Reading. 

Standard Track 

This master's track is designed to meet 
the needs of students interested in read- 
ing assessment and instruction. This 
track and the tfiesis track both lead to 
state certification. 

Required Program: (36 ) 

EDE 6205 Curriculum Design for 

Childhood Education 3 

EDF 5432 Measurement and 

Evaluation in Education 3 

EDF 5481 Analysis arxJ Application 

of Education Research 3 

RED 6155 I nstnjction in Reading 3 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 113 



RED 6515 Programs of Remediation 

In Reading 3 

RED 6546 Diagnosis of Reading 

Difficulty 3 

Psychology, sociology, anthiropology, or 
linguistics course in or outside of ttie 
College of Education 3 

Specialization Courses 

Courses to be selected from cimong 
Reading or Language Arts course list- 
ings, in consultation and with sipprova) 
of advisor 1 5 

Thesis Traclt 

This master's track is designed to meet 
the needs of students interested In pur- 
suing Independent research and pro- 
vides a special foundation for doctoral 
degree program entrance. Admission re- 
quirements for this program are the 
same as for the regular Master's degree 
program. 

Required Program: (36) 

EDE 6205 Curriculum Design for 

Childhood Education 3 
EOF 5432 Measurement and 

Evaluation In Education 3 
EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 

of Educationed 

Research 3 

RED 6155/RED 6305 Instruction in 

Early Childhood 

Reading 3 

RED 651 5 Programs of Remediation 

in Reading 3 

RED 6546 Diagnosis of Reading 

Difficulty 3 

RED 6747 Research in Reading 3 
RED 6932 Seminar in Reading 

Education 3 

Psychology, sociology, anthropology, or 
linguistic course in or outside of the Col- 
lege of Education (consult advisor) 3 
RED 6971 Thesis in Reading 

Education 6 

Specialized Course: One course to be 
selected from among the course listing 
in reading education 3 

Doctor of Education Degree 
Program 

Tile Department offers Curriculum and 
Instruction doctoral specialties In Eariy 
ChiJdfiood Education, Elementary Edu- 
cation and Reading Education. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants to the program must submit 
the follovi/Ing records and documents: 

1 . Official transcript from all higher 
education Institutions attended. 

2. Official copy of the GRE scores. 

3. Three letters of recommendation. 



4. A current resume. 

5. A statement of personal interest in 
the program. 

6. A completed Application for Gradu- 
ate Admission. 

Applicants must have a 3.25 GPA, a 
combined GRE score of 1000 on the 
verbal and quantitative sections. Final 
decisions on admission are made by the 
Faculty Admissions Committee. Addi- 
tional Information can be obtained from 
the Department in DM 284. 

Core Courses: (15 semester hours) 
EDG 7222 Curriculum : Theory and 

Research 3 

EDG 7362 Instruction: Theory and 

Research 3 

EDG 7665 Seminar In.Curriculum 3 
EDF 7934 Seminar In Social 

Foundations of 

Education 3 

EDF 6211 Psychological Foundations 

of Education 3 

Specialty Area: (36 semester hours) 
The specialty areas are art education, 
eariy childfxjod education, elementary 
education, English education, instruc- 
tional leadership, mathematics educa- 
tion, mi^c education, reading 
education, science education, and so- 
cial studies education. 

Cognate Area: (18 semester hours) 
The cognate area requires a minimum 
of 18 semester hours of course In a sin- 
gle area of study related to the spe- 
cialty. The courses should be chosen 
w/ith regard to coherence and relevance 
to the anticipated substantive aspect of 
the dissertation and in consultation with 
tfie advisor. The cognate area may be 
taken in ttie other departments of the 
College of Education, In ttie College of 
Arts and Sciences, or any other area of- 
fering courses relevant to the student's 
progreim. 

Research and Statistics: (12) 
Required Courses 

EDF 5481 Analysis and Application 

of Research 3 

EDF 6486 Research Methods in 

Education: Design and 

Analysis 3 

STA 51 66 Statistical Methods In 

Research I 3 

One of the following: 
EDF 6403 Quantitative Foundations 

of Educational 

Research 3 

or 
EDF 6475 Qualitative Foundations 

of Educational 

Research 



Comprehensive Examinations and 
Advancement to Candidacy 

The student must successfully pass 
comprefiensive examinations covering 
coursework and also submit copies of a 
dissertation proposal, which has been 
approved by the supervisory committee, 
to the Dean of the College ar>d to the 
Dean of Graduate Studies. 

Dissertation 

The student Is responsible for 24 semes- 
ter hours of dissertation credits. The dis- 
sertation must be an original contribution 
to knowledge in an area of eariy child- 
hood education, elementary education, 
secondary education, one of tfie K-1 2 ar- 
eas, or in instnjctional leadership. 

The student is expected to complete 
the dissertation five years from the date 
of advancement to candidacy (I.e. suc- 
cessful completion of all written and oral 
examinations, favorable recommenda- 
tions of the supervisory and guidance 
committee, and an approved disserta- 
tion proposal). Six credit hours of disser- 
tation are taken per semester during the 
time that the dissertation is being com- 
pleted. 
EDG 7980 Doctoral Dissertation 24 

Graduate Professional 
Certificate Program in Reading 
and Language Arts 

Tfie Reading and Language Arts Certifi- 
cate Program enables teachers to ex- 
tend their competence in reading and 
language arts instruction. Completion of 
ttie Certificate Program qualifies tfie 
teacher to receive Rorida State Certifica- 
tion in Reading, grades K-1 2. Entrance 
requirements are an introductory read- 
ing course, and a 2.75 GPA in the last 
two years of college woric Students are 
required to have completed two years of 
full-time teaching prior to completing the 
program. Applicants should apply di- 
rectly to ttie Chairperson of the Reading 
Program. 

Prerequisite Course 

RED 6155 Instruction in Elementary 

Reading 

or 
RED 6305 Instruction in Reading 3 

Required Program 

EDF 5432 Measurement and 

Evaluation in Education 3 
LAE5415 Chikiren's Literature 3 

LAE 6355 Instruction to Elementary 

Language Arts 3 

RED 6546 Diagnosis of Reading 

Difficulty 3 

RED 6515 Programs of Remediation 

in Reading 3 



114 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



Advised Electives 

Two courses chosen from language-re- 
lated courses offered outside of the 
College of Education 6 

"^Elective courses are chosen from an 
approved list in consultation with a 
Reading Program advisor. 

Certification in Gifted Education 

Individuals who hold Rorida teacher cer- 
tification in any subject or field, may re- 
ceive certification for teaching the gifted 
(Grades K-12) by completing tfie follow- 
ing courses: 
EGI 5051 Nature and Needs of the 

Gifted 3 

EGI 5232 Educational Procedures 

and Curriculum for the 

Gifted 3 

EEX 6732 Guidance and Counseling 

of Gifted Students 3 



Health, Physical 
Education and Recreation 

Ida F. Chadwick, Associate Professor. 

Physical Education and Cliairperson 
Judith A. Blucker, Professor, Pliysical 

Education, and Vice Provost 
Richard Lopez, Associate Professor, 

Exercise Physiology 
George B. Pearson, Professor, 

Physical Education 
Thomas Skaiko, Associate Professor, 

Therapeutic Recreation 
Robert M. Wolff, Associate Professor. 

Parks and Recreation Management 

The Department of Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation offers pro- 
grams leading to the Master of Science 
degree in Exercise Physiology, Health 
Education, Parks and Recreation Man- 
agement, Physical Education, and 
Sports Management. 

The program requirements and de- 
scriptions listed below are subject to 
change without advanced notice. Pro- 
gram faculty should be consulted for 
academic advisement. 

Master of Science in Health 
Education 

Exercise Physiology 
Specialization 

The graduate specialization in exercise 
physiology is designed to prepare indi- 
viduals to work in the fields of exercise 
testing in a supervisory capacity and in 
cardiac rehabilitation as a designer of 
exercise rehabilitation programs. 



The program will focus on the physi- 
ological effects of exercise and training 
with application to the improvement of 
fiealth and functional capacity of hospi- 
talized and non-hospitalized individuals 
with heart disease. The program will 
emphasize the role of exercise in diag- 
nosis, prevention, and rehabilitation of 
heart disease. 

The program will enable students to 
develop the competencies required by 
tfie American College of Sports Medi- 
cine for certification as an Exercise Spe- 
cialist, a Health Fitness Director, and a 
Program Director. Provisions will be 
made to enable those students entering 
the program without an Exercise Test 
Technologist Certification and a 
HealttVRtness Instructor Certification to 
develop ttiose prerequisite competen- 
des. 

Admission Requirements 

An applicant for admission to graduate 
study must meet the existing criteria set 
forth by tfie Florida Board of Regents. 
Presently, tfiese are a 3.0 GPA in the 
third and fourth year of the undergradu- 
ate program, or a combined score of 
1000 on the GRE (verbal and quantita- 
tive sections), or completion of a mas- 
ter's degree program at an accr^ited 
university. All applicants must submit a 
GRE test score. 

Prerequisite Classes 

One class in each of the following ar- 
eas: exercise physiology, kinesiology or 
applied ^atomy, physiology, and nutri- 
tion. 

Required Program: (30) 

i. Exercise Physiology/Sports 
Medicine Requirement^ 

PEP 5116 Exercise Specialist 3 

PET 5625 Sports Medicine 3 

PET 6786 Health Fitness Director 3 
PET 6787 Exerdse Program 

Director 3 

II. Physiology/Biochemistry/Special 
Topics Requirement 

APB 4240 Human Systemic 

Physiology 3 

or 
An approved altemativB 

and 
A second approved course in physiol- 
ogy, biochemistry, special topics or 
nutrition 3 

III. Research Requirement 

Advisor approved course in research. 

IV. Internship Requirement 

PET 6940 Internship in Exercise 
Physiology^ 



V. Electives^ (0-6 ) 

^Students presently employed in tfie 
field in an administrative capacity may 
be exempted from this requirement. 
Students wfxj have not taken PET 
5387 Exercise Test Technology and 
PEP 51 15 Rtness Instructor or wtio do 
not fiave ACSM certification in these ar- 
eas must take these dasses as part of 
their required program of study. Stu- 
dents who fiave the dasses or the certifi- 
cations will take electives. 

Master of Science in Parks and 
Recreation Management 

The graduate program in Pari<s and 
Recreation Management is planned to 
provide advanced preparation for admin- 
istrative and supervisory level positions 
within a leisure services delivery sys- 
tem. The program includes electives 
which give flexibility regarding an individ- 
ual's spedfic career goals as a future 
practitioner in Parks and Recreation 
fulanagement. 

To enter tfie program in Parks and 
Recreation Administration, a student 
must fiave a 3.0 GPA in upper division 
work or score 1000 or higher on the 
Graduate Record Examination, possess 
a bachelor's degree, and have appropri- 
ate undergraduate preparation in recrea- 
tion. 

Required Program: (30-31) 

Required Core: (12) 

EDF 5481 Educational Research 3 

LEI 5510 Program Administration in 
Parks and Recreation 3 

LEI 5595 Seminar in Pari<s, 

Recreation, and Sports 
Management 3 

LEI 5605 Philosophical and Social 
bases of Parks and 
Recreation 3 

Area of Professional Emphasis: 

(18-19) 

LEI 5907 Individual Study 3 

Advised Electives 15 

^A student wfio did not complete a 
Parks, Recreation, Leisure or Sports ori- 
ented intemshipfield experience during 
his or her undergraduate degree curricu- 
lum will be required to take: LEI 6922 
Supervised FieW Experiences in Parks 
and Recreation 6-9. 

Master of Science in Physical 
Education 

Tfie Master of Science degree program 
in Physical Education is designed to pro- 
vide advanced preparation for teachers 
of physical education. Applicants for ad- 
mission must hold or qualify for Rorida 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 115 



Teacher Certification in Physical Educa- 
tion and must satisfy requirements for 
scholastic aptitude as determined by the 
graduate admission standards: GPA of 
3.0 or 10CX) on the GRE, or both. Appli- 
cants must submit GRE scores. 

Required Program: (30) 

Professional Education: (3) 

EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 
of Educational 
Research 3 

Area of Specialization: (21) 

PET 5216 Sports Psychology 3 

PET 52380 Perceptual Motor 

Learning 3 

PET5256C Sociology of Sport 3 

PET 5625 Sports Medicine 3 

PET 5436 Physical Education 

Cum'culum in 

Elementary School 3 

PET 6597 Survey of Research in 

Physical Education 3 

PET 6932 Seminar in Physical 

Education 3 

PET 451 Evaluation In Physical 

Education^ 3 

RED 6336 Readirra in the Secondary 

School^ 3 

Electives 6-12 

^Not required of students holding K-8 
Certification or students who have com- 
pleted an equivalent urxjergraduate 
course. 

^Students who have already met the 
Reading Requirement as undergradu- 
ates or through ctpproved in-service edu- 
cation may substitute an elective for this 
course. The course Is not required of 
students holding K-8 certification in 
Physical Education. 

Sport Management 

The purpose of this track is to provide 
an option for persons seeking a mas- 
ter's degree in an allied (non-teaching) 
career in physical education. This de- 
gree program would primarily be for per- 
sons who do not presently hold Rorida 
teaching certificatior) credentials. Conse- 
quently, completion of this degree would 
not provide such teacher certification for 
the degree recipients. Examples of po- 
tential student clientele would include all 
foreign ctnd American college graduates 
with bachelor's degrees in physical edu- 
cation, sports science, business, recrea- 
tion, and otfier related areas. 

Admission Requirements 

Students must hokl a bachelor's degree 
from an accredited university. The pub- 
lished university requirements for admis- 
sion into the master's degree programs 
must be met. Students who do not have 



an undergraduate major in physical edu- 
cation or a related area are responsible 
for meeting the prerequisites for any 
course listed in the program's curricu- 
lum. A program advisor must be con- 
sulted regarding complete degree 
requirements. 

Required Program: (33) 

EDF 5481 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

PET 5216 Sports Psychology 3 

PET5256C Sociology of Sport 3 

PET5625C Sports Medicine 3 

PET 6944 Supervised Reld 

Experience' 3-6 

PET 5936 Special Topics: Sport 

Management 2-4 

PET 54 1 6 Sports Administration and 

Management 3 

'An internship in an appropriate sport 
agency or business will be required. 

Advised Electives: (8-1 3) 

With the prior approval of the program 
advisor, students must elect at least 
nine credits from a variety of courses to 
build a specialized degree program 
based on long-term career goals. With 
approval from the appropriate depart- 
ment, examples of electives would in- 
clude, but not limited to, graduate 
courses from such areas as business, 
management, public administration, 
parks and recreation administration, nu- 
trition, psychology, sociology, and physi- 
cal and occupational therapy. 



Middle, Secondary and 
Vocational Education 

Luis A. Martinez-Perez, Associate 
Professor, Science Education and 
Chairperson 

Arnhilda Badia, Associate Professor, 
Modern Languages Education 

Rosemere Baum, Associate Professor, 
Home Economics Education, 
Vocational Education 

Curtis H. Bradley, Professor, 
Organizational Training, 
Vocational-Industrial Education 

David Y. Chang, Assistant Professor, 
Art Education 

Myrna P. Crabtree, Professor, hiome 
Economics Education, Vocational 
Education 

Rot>ert K. Gilbert, Associate Professor, 
Mathematics Education 



A. Dean Hauenstein, Professor, 

Technology Education, Vocational 

Education 
Edwin C. McClintock, Professor, 

Mathematics Education 
Dominic A. Mofiamed, Associate 

Professor, Vocational Administration 

and Supervision, Vocational 

Education 
George E. O'Brien, Assistant 

Professor, Science Education 
Clem Pennington, Associate Professor, 

Art Education 
Janice R. Sandiford, Associate 

Professor, Health Occupations 

Education, Computer Education, 

Vocational Education, and Assistant 

Dean for North Miami/Broward 
Robert Shostak, Professor, English 

Education 
Rotiert F. Testa, Associate Professor, 

Educational Foundations, Music 

Education 
Jan L Tucker, Professor, Social 

Studies Education 
Robert Vos, Associate Professor and 

Associate Dean, Organizational 

Training, Technical Education, 

Vocational Education 
h/iichael J. Wagner, Professor, Music 

Education 

The Department of Middle, Secondary 
and Vocational Education offers gradu- 
ate programs leading toward the Master 
of Science and the Doctor of Education 
degrees. Masters Programs are avail- 
able in thie following fields of study: 

Art Education 

English Education 

Mathematics Education 

Modem Languages Education 

Music Education 

Science Education 

Social Studies Education 

Vocational Home Economics 
Education 

Home Economic Education Track 
(non-school based) 

Vocational Industri8tl Education 

Vocational Administration and 
Superviston 

Business Education Track 

Health Occupations Education Track 

Technology Education Track 

Technical Education Track 
Doctoral programs are available in the 
following fields of study: 

Curriculum and Instructkin 

Vocatk)nal and Technical 

Educational Leadership 
(a track of the Adult Education and HRD 
program) 



116 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



Master of Science Degree 
Programs 

Art Education 
Required Program: (36) 

Education, including Art 

Education: (15) 

■EDF5481 Analysis and Application 
of Educational 
Research 3 

ARE 6140 Curriculum and Instruction 
in Art 3 

ARE 6262 Organization and 

Coordination of School 
and Community Art 
Programs 3 

ARE 6706 Seminar in Art Education: 
Contemporary Issues 
and Research 3 

Select one of the following: 

EDE 6205 Curriculum Design for 

Childhood Education 

or 
ESE 621 5 Secondary School 

Teaching Field 

or 
EEX 6051 Exceptional Children and 

Youth 
Rve graduate art courses, including one 
art history: 

Art History 3 

Studio Art (Three semester hours credit 
for each studio course) 1 2 

Advisor Approved Electives (2) 6 

English Education 

Required Program: (30) 

EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

LAE 6339 Teaching English In the 

Secondary School 3 

ESE 621 5 Secondary School 

Curriculum 3 

LAE 6935 Seminar in English 

Education^ 3 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate English 
methods course. 

^Permission of Instructor required. 
Teaching Field: English 15 

Advisor Approved Electives: 3 

Mathematics Education 
Required Program: (33) 

EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

MAE 6336 Teaching Matfiematics in 

the Secondary School 3 
MAE 6899 Seminar In Mathematics 

Education' 3 



ESE 62 1 5 Secondary School 

Curriculum 3 

Teaching Reld: Mathematics 12 

Electives: In Education or Mathematics, 
or both 9 

' Permission of instructor; undergradu- 
ate secondary mathematic methods, 
and mastery of programming language 
beyond Basic and graduate level mathe- 
matics coursewort< required. 

Modern Language Education 

Prerequisites 

One course in general linguistics or the 
successful completion of LIN 3010 or 
LIN 3013. 

Applicants for Admission must hold 
or qualify for a Rorida Teaching Certifi- 
cate in the area selected, must satisfy 
requirements for scholastic aptitude as 
determined by the Graduate Admissions 
Standards, and must show evidence of 
a satisfactory record in the teaching field. 

To be admitted into the Master's De- 
gree program, tfie student must hold a 
bachelor's degree from an accredited 
university or college; have a 3.0 aver- 
age or higfier in all junior and senior 
year course work for the bachelor's De- 
gree; or have a combined score (verbal 
and quantitative) of 1000 or higher on 
the graduate record examination; or 
hold a master's degree from an accred- 
ited university or college. In any case, 
tfie student must present a GRE score; 
achieve a score of 220 on the Test of 
Spoken English; and in the case of inter- 
national students, whose first language 
is other than English, a score of 500 on 
the TOEFL examination is also required. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Science Degree will con- 
sist of 30 semester hours. A maximum 
of six semester hours may be trans- 
ferred into the program from outside the 
University, subject to tfie approval of the 
major advisor. Also, a maximum of six 
semester hours of upper division under- 
graduate courses may be included in 
the program provided they fiave not 
been used to satisfy degree require- 
ments for an undergraduate program. 
This program does not include require- 
ments for initial teacfier certification by 
tfie State of Florida Department of Edu- 
cation. 

Required Program: (30) 

Tfie specific graduate requirements 
are: (30 semester fiours) 

1. Required Core 
All students will be required to complete 
the following twelve semester hours in 
the College of Education: 



EDF 5481 Analysis smd Application 

of 

Educational Research 3 
ESE 62 1 5 Secondary School 

Curriculum (or 

equivalent) 3 

FLE 6336 Teaching Second 

Language in the 

Secondary School 3 

FLE 6938 Seminar in Second 

Language Testing 3 

Teaching Reld: Modem Languages 15 
(Prerequisite: LIN 3010 - 3 semester 
credits 

2. Reld Component: (3) 
The remaining three semester hours will 
consist of a supervised field experience 
in the teaching of one of the modern lan- 
guages. The field experience may be ar- 
ranged according to one of the following 
options: 

(a) County Public Scfiools; 

(b) private school; 

(c) adult or community college edu- 
cation; 

(d) adjunct teaching at the University. 
All arrangements for field experience 
must be approved by the advisa. 

Graduation Requirements 

To receive tfie Master of Science De- 
gree with a sub-specialty in Second Lan- 
guage Education, Modem Language 
track, the student must complete the re- 
quired 30 fxiurs of coursework with a 'B' 
average or higher. 

Music Education 
Required Program: (30 ) 

ESE 62 1 5 Secondary School 

Cuniculum 3 

or 
EDE 6205 Curriculum Design for 

Childhood Education 
EDF 5481 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

MUE 6345 Methodology of Music 

Teaching 3 

MUE 6938 Seminar in Music 

Education 3 

MUE 6815 Psychology of Music 

Behavior 3 

MUT 5325 Arranging 3 

MUG 5105 Advanced Conducting 1 
Advisor Approved Electives 1 1 

Science Education 

Required Program: (33 ) 

EDF 5481 Analysis and Application 
of Educational 
Research 3 



I 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 11 7 



ESE 621 5 Secondary School 

Curriculum 3 

SCE 6635 Teaching Science In the 

Secondary School 3 

SCE 6933 Seminar in Science 

Education 3 

Teaching Field 12 

Biology or chemistry or physics or 

courses from the following areas witii 

approval of advisor: biology, chemistry, 

physics, geology, and environmental 

sciences. (For Junior High Science 

Teachers). 

Advisor Approved Electives 9 

Social Studies Education 

Required Program: (33 semester 
hours) 

SSE 6633 TeacWng Social Studies in 

the Secondary School 3 
ESE 6215 Secondary School 

Curriculum 3 

EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

SSE 6939 Seminar in Social Studies 

Education 3 

Teaching Field: Social Studies, Social 
Science, History 12 

Advisor Approved Electives 9 

Master of Science: Alternate 
Track 

The Alternate Track modifies the exist- 
ing master's degree programs to accom- 
modate candidates with a t>accalaureate 
degree appropriate to the certification 
area but witiiout certification, who are 
seeking entry into the teaching profes- 
sion. This modified track will be no less 
rigorous than the existing master's de- 
gree program, but it will include courses 
which provide tiie rwcessary back- 
ground in professional education to- 
gether with the master's level academic 
coursework. 

Enti7 requirements include a bache- 
tor's degree or a strong minor (30 hours 
with a 3.0 or higher in the major sutjject 
area) in a certifiable teaching area (i.e. 
mathematics, science, modem lan- 
guages, music, art English, social stud- 
ies, Nstory) and a minimum 3.0 
cumulative GPA for tfie two most recent 
years of study or a combined GRE 
score of 1000. In either case, the GRE 
score must tie submitted. In addition to 
the minimum GPA or the combined GRE 
score, or both, the applicant must re- 
ceive an affirmative recommendation 
from the designated Program Leader, 
Dean of the College, or his designee fol- 
k>wing a personal intervieM/. 

This degree program requires a mini- 
mum of four semester sequence of full- 



time study which includes two Summer 
Terms, a Fall and a Spring Term and will 
consist of 45-48 semester hours, de- 
pending on each student's previous aca- 
demic preparation. 

Alternate Track 

All students admitted to tNs track will 
complete the following courses as well 
as the graduate program courses in 
each of the chosen fields. 
EDF 3521 Education in History 3 

EDP 621 1 Psychological 

Foundations of 

Education 3 

EDG 5995 General Teaching, Skills 

and Lab 3 

Special Teaching Lab: Area 3-6 

Student Teaching Practicum 6 

Administratk)n and 
Supervisk>n of Vocattonal 
Education 

Admission to tiie Vocational Administra- 
tion and Supervision program requires 
adherence to ttie general standards as 
specified in tfie Admission Require- 
ments for Graduate Students at the Uni- 
versity. To be certified in Administi'ation 
and Supervision in Vocational Education 
in Rorida, a person must have at least 
three years of successful teaching expe- 
rience in one of the vocational educa- 
tion areas. While one year of successful 
teaching will meet the experience re- 
quirement for admission to the master's 
degree program initially, the tfiree-year 
teaching experience requirement must 
have been completed eitiier before or at 
the same time as degree requirements 
are completed. Each graduate student, 
in consultation with the advisor, plans a 
program of study to include a core of 
professional competence, an area of 
emphasis, £ind electives. 

Note: This program is currently un- 
der review. Program currentiy under re- 
view. Program modifications may be 
made to conform to Department of Edu- 
cation Certification requirements. 
Please consult a program advisor. 

Required Program: (33-36 ) 

Required Core: (27-30) 

EVT5168 Curriculum Development 

in Vocational Education 3 

EVT 5265 Supervision and 
Coordination of 
Vocational Education 
Programs 3 

EVT 5664 Community Relations and 
Resources for 
Vocational Education 3 

EVT 6264 Administration of Local 
Vocational Education 
Programs 3 



EVT 6930 Seminar in Vocational 

Education 3 

EDA 6061 The Organization and 
Operation of the Public 
School System 3 

EDA 6530 The Administration of the 
Secondary School 3 

EDS 6050 Supervision and Staff 

Development 3 

EDG 6250 Curriculum Development 3 

RED 6336 Reading in the Content 

Area' 3 

Area of Professional Emphasis 
EVT 6946 Supervised Reld 

Experience 3 

Electives 

The candidate may select a course (or 
courses) that will increase administra- 
tive and supervisory competencies 3 
'students who have met the reading re- 
quirement as undergraduates or 
through approved in-service education 
may substitute an elective for this 
course. 

Business Education 
Required Program: (33 ) 
Required Core: (12-15) 
EVT 5168 Curriculum Development 

in Vocational Educatton 3 
EVT 5769 Evaluation in Vocational 

and Technical 

Education 3 

EVT 6760 Research in Vocational 

Education 3 

EVT 6930 Seminar in Vocational 

Education 3 

RED 6336 Reading in the Content 

Area' 3 

Area of Professional Emphasis: 

(12-15) 

BTE 5671 ProtJems, Issues and 

Trends in Business 

Education 3 

BTE 5455 Teaching in Business 

Education 

Occupational Programs 3 
BTE 5447 Teaching Basic Business 

and Consumer 

Education 3 

or 
BTE 6432 Teaching Word 

Processing 3 

BTE 6905 Directed Independent 

Study 

or 
BTE 6940 Supervised Qinlcal Reld 

Experience 3 

'students w/ho have met ttie reading re- 
quirement as undergraduates or 
through approved in-service education 



118 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



may substitute an elective for this 
course. 

The candidate will be encouraged to 
make selections on the basis of individ- 
ual needs and career goals. 3-6 

Health Occupations Education 
Required Program: (30) 
Flequired Core: (12-15) 
EVT5168 Curriculum Development 

in Vocational Education 3 
EVT 5769 Evaluation in Vocational 

Education 3 

EVT 6760 Research in Vocational 

Education 3 

EVT 6930 Seminar in Vocational 

Education 3 

RED 6336 Reading in the Content 

Area^ 3 

^Students who have met the reading re- 
quirement as undergraduates or 
through approved in-service education 
may substitute an elective for this 
course. 

Area of Professional Emphasis: (9) 

EVT 531 5 Improvement of Teaching 

Sti-ategies in Healtii 

Occupations and 

Nursing Education 3 

EVT 531 7 Occupational Analysis in 

Health Occupations 

and Nursing Education 3 
EVT 63 1 8 Issues in Health 

Occupations and 

Nursing Education 3 

Technical Electives: (6) 

The candidate will be encouraged to se- 
lect courses that will increase subject 
area technical competence, career 
goals, and teaching certification require- 
ments. 

Home Economics Education^ 

This track focuses on educational lead- 
ership of Home Economists presently 
employed in non-school educational en- 
vironments and tfiose preparing for 
such positions. 

Required Program: (30) 

Required Core: (18) 

HEE 5335 Trends in Vocational 
Home Economics 
Education 3 

HEE 6156 Teaching Home 

Economics in Diverse 
Environments 3 

ADE 5 1 80 Organizational and 

Community Processes 
In AE/HRD 3 

EDF 548 1 Analysis and Applteation 
of Educational 
Research 3 



HEE 6915 Research in Home 

Economics Education 3 

HEE 6937 Seminar in Home 

Economics Education 3 

Area of Professional Emphasis 

Witii prograim advisor's approval, stu- 
dents may select courses in Home 
Economics subject matter based on pro- 
fessional competendes needed. 9 

Electives 

The candidate in consultation with the 
advisor will make selections on the ba- 
sis of individual needs and career goals3 

^This program does not lead to State of 
Rorida Teacher Certification. Admission 
to this track does not require teacher 
certification. 



Technical Education 
Required Program: (30) 

Required Core: (15-18) 

EVT 5650 Trends and Issues in 

Vocational Education 3 
EVT 5168 Curriculum Development 

in Vocational Education 3 
EVT 5769 Evaluation in Vocational 

and Technical 

Education 3 

EVT 6760 Research in Vocational 

Education 3 

EVT 6930 Seminar in Vocational 

Education 3 

RED 6336 Reading in the Content 

Area^ 3 

Area of Professional Emphasis: (6) 

EVT 5078 Technical Education in 

American Society 3 

ADE 5385 Adult Teaching and 

Learning 3 

Technical Electives: (6-9) 

The candidate w/ill be encouraged to se- 
lect courses ttiat will increase subject 
area technical competence. 

Advised Electives for 
Non-education Graduates: (6) 

EDF 581 2 National Educational 

Systems: A 

Comparative Analysis 3 

or 
EDF 621 5 Application of Learning 

Theory to Instruction 3 

'students who have met the reading re- 
quirement as undergraduates or 
tfvough approved in-service education 
may substitiJte an elective for tiiis 
course. 



Technology Education 

This track focuses on educational 
leadership of technical education pro- 
grams commonly found in industry, 
adult vocational education and commu- 
nity/junior colleges. 

Required Program: (30) 

Required Core: (15-18) 

EVT 5650 Trends arxl Issues in 

Vocational Education 3 
EVT 5168 Curriculum Development 

in Vocational Education 3 
EVT 5769 Evaluation in Vocational 

and Technical 

Education 3 

EVT 6760 Research in Vocational 

Education 3 

EVT 6930 Seminar in Vocational 

Education 3 

RED 6336 Reading in the Content 

Area' 3 

Area of Professional Emphasis: 

(9-12) 

EIA 581 1 Equipment and Facilities 

Planning 3 

EIA 6931 Instructional Projects 

Development 3 

The stijdent, under the direction of 
tiie program advisor, may develop pro- 
fessional competencies in an area of 
emphasis tiirough seminars, metiiods 
courses, workshops, or independent 
study. 

'StiJdents who have met tiie reading re- 
quirement as undergraduates or 
tinrough approved in-service education 
may substitute an elective for tiiis 
course. 

Technical Electives 

The student is encouraged to select 
courses that will inaease subject area 
technical competence. 3-6 

Vocational Home Economics 
Education 

Required Program: (30) 

Required Core: (15-18) 

HEE 5335 Trends in Vocational 

Home Economics 

Education 3 

EVT 5168 Curriculum Development 

in Vocational Education 3 
HEE 61 56 Teaching Home 

Economics in Diverse 

Educational 

Environments 3 

HEE 69 1 5 Research in Home 

Economics Education 3 
HEE 6937 Seminar in Home 

Economics Education 3 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 119 



RED 6336 Reading in the Content 

Area' 3 

Area of Professional Emphasis 

Witli program advisor's approval, a stu- 
dent may select courses in subject 
matter of Home Economics chosen from 
offerings outside of the College of Edu- 
cation, based on professional 
competencies needed. 9 

Electives 

The candidate will be encouraged to 
make selections on the basis of individ- 
ual needs and career goals. 3-6 
'students who have met the reading re- 
quirement as undergraduates or 
through approved in-service education 
may substitute an elective for this 
course. 

Vocational Industrial Education 

Required Program: (30) 

Required Core: (18-21) 

EVT 5650 Trends and Issues in 

Vocational Education 3 
EVT 5168 Curriculum Development 

in Vocational Education 3 
EVT 5695 International Comparative 

Vocational Education 3 
EVT 5769 Evaluation in Vocational 

and Technical 

Education 3 

EVT 6760 Research in Vocational 

Education 3 

EVT 6930 Seminar in Vocational 

Education 3 

RED 6336 Reading in the Content 

Area' 3 

Area of Professional Emphasis 

A student under the direction of an advi- 
sor, may develop professional 
competencies in an area of emphasis 
through school-based field experiences, 
seminars, methods courses, workshops, 
or independent study 3-9 

Technical Electives 

Tfie candidate will be encouraged to se- 
lect courses that increase subject area 
technical comjsetence 3-6 

'students who have met the reading re- 
quirement as undergraduates or 
through approved in-service education 
may substitute an elective for this 
course. 

Doctoral Programs 
Curriculum and Instruction 

The doctoral program In Curriculum and 
Instruction offers specialties in the fol- 
lowing areas: Art Education, Early Child- 
hood Education, Elementary Education, 
English Education, Mathematics Educa- 



tion, Music Education, Science Educa- 
tion, Reading Education, and Social 
Studies Education. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants to the program must submit 
the following records and documents: 

1 . Official transcript from all higher 
education institutions attended. 

2. Official copy of the GRE scores. 

3. Three letters of recommendation. 

4. A current resume. 

5. A statement of personal interest in 
the program. 

6. A completed Application for 
Graduate Admission. 

Applicants to tfie program must have a 
3.25 GPA, a combined GRE score of 
1000 on the verbal and quantitative sec- 
tions. Rnal decisions on admission are 
made by the Faculty Admissions Com- 
mittee. Additional information can be ob- 
tained from the Coordinator of Doctoral 
Programs, DM 255. 

Core Courses: (15) 

EDG 7222 Curriculum : Theory and 

Research 3 

EDG 7362 Instruction: Theory and 

Research 3 

EDG 7665 Seminar in Curriculum 3 
EDF 7934 Seminar in Social 

Foundations of 

Education 3 

EDF 621 1 Psychological Foundations 

of Education 3 

Specialty Area: (36) 
The specialty areas include art educa- 
tion, early childhood education, elemen- 
tary education, English education, 
instructional leadership, mathematics 
education, music education, reading 
education, science education, and so- 
cial studies education. 

Cognate Area: (18) 
The cognate area requires a minimum 
of 18 semester hours of coursework in a 
single area of study related to the spe- 
cialty. The courses should be chosen 
with regard to coherence and relevance 
to the anticipated substantive aspect of 
the dissertation and in consultation with 
the advisor. The cognate area may be 
taken in the College of Education, in the 
College of Arts and Sciences, or any 
other area offering courses relevant to 
the student's program. 

Research and Statistics: (12) 

Comprehensive Examinations and 
Advancement to Candidacy 

The student must successfully pass 
comprehensive examinations covering 
coursewori< and also submit copies of a 



dissertation proposal, which has been 
approved by the supervisory committee, 
to the Dean of tfie School and to tfie 
Dean of Graduate Studies. 

Dissertation 

The student is responsible for 24 semes- 
ter hours of dissertation credits. The dis- 
sertation must be an original contribution 
to knowledge in an area of early child- 
hood education, elementary education, 
secondary education, one of the K-1 2 ar- 
eas, or in instructional leadership. 

Tfie student is expected to complete 
tfie dissertation five years from tfie date 
of advancement to candidacy (i.e. suc- 
cessful completion of all written and oral 
examinations, favorable recommenda- 
tions of the supervisory and guidance 
committee, and an approved disserta- 
tion proposal). Six credit hours of disser- 
tation are taken per semester during the 
time that the dissertation is being com- 
pleted. 

EDG 7980 Doctoral Dissertation 24 
Admission Requirements 

Applicants to the program must submit 
the following records and documents: 

1 . Official transcript from all higher 
education institutions attended. 

2. Official copy of tfie GRE scores. 

3. Three letters of recommendation. 

4. A current resume. 

5. A statement of personal interest in 
the program. 

6. A completed Application for 
Graduate Admission. 

Vocational and Technical 
Education Leadership 

The doctoral track in Vocational and 
Technical Education Leadership is de- 
signed to promote the preparation of 
highly competent professionals in voca- 
tional and technical education. 

It is a track within the Adult Educa- 
tion and Human Resource Development 
doctoral program. Although each curricu- 
lum has its own specific objectives, tfie 
goals sfiared by these programs are the 
improvement of educational practice 
and stimulation of personal and profes- 
sional growth toward excellence. 

The Doctor of Education degree is 
conferred on the basis of high scholar- 
ship and skill in the application of knowl- 
edge from tfieory and research findings 
to practical vocational and technical edu- 
cation problems. 

Applications for admission to tfie doc- 
toral program are invited from individu- 
als who are highly motivated and 
intellectually capable of meeting the 
cfiallanges of a rigorous doctoral degree 
program. 



120 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



Admission Requirements 

Applicants to the program must submit 
the following records and documents: 

1 . Official transcript from all higher 
education institutions attended. 

2. Official copy of tfie GRE scores. 

3. Three letters of recommendation. 

4. A current resume. 

5. A statement of personal interest in 
tfie program. 

6. A completed Application for 
Graduate Admission. 

The data from applicants is reviewed 
by an admissions committee. The crite- 
ria applied in reviewing the applicant's 
files are noted below. Exceptions to one 
or more of the criteria may be granted 
provided the applicant has excelled in 
certain off-setting assessment areas. 

1 . 3.0 GPA in the last two years of 
undergraduate work. 

2. 3.25 in all graduate work at- 
tempted. 

3. A master's degree from an accred- 
ited institution or equivalent preparation. 
4. A score of at least 1000 on the gen- 
eral aptitude portion of the GRE. 

5. Evidence of commitment to a ca- 
reer in the broad field of Adult Education 
and HRD. 

6. Successful professional experi- 
ence in the field of Adult Education and 
HRD. 

7. Potential for leadership or re- 
search in the field, or both. 

Program of Study 

Doctorate programs of study vary ac- 
cording to the individual needs of the 
participants and their current or antici- 
pated professional goals. A typical pro- 
gram will require a minimum of 99 
semester hours beyond the baccalaure- 
ate degree and will involve the catego- 
ries of courses noted below. The list 
should be considered as a sample pro- 
gram ratfier than an absolute deline- 
ation of exact requirements. Actual 
programs are planned by the partici- 
pants, their major professor, and doc- 
toral committee. 

Program Components (99) 
Adult Education and HRD Gore 1 2 

Generic Core 30-36 

Vocational and Technical Education 
Leadership 15-21 

Research and Statistics 1 2 

Prospectus and Dissertation 24 

1 . Common AE & HRD and V & TEL 
requirement 

2. K/lay include up to 36 semester 
hours of graduate credit from an ap- 
proved Masters degree program and 
transfer credit. 



3. May include AE & HRD courses. 

Certificate and Add-on 
Certification Programs 

Graduate Professional 
Certificate Program in 
Business Education 

The professional Graduate Certificate 
Program for Business Education re- 
quires a minimum of 18 semester hours 
of course work above tfie bachelor's de- 
gree. This program is designed for 
those who fiave already earned a bache- 
lor's degree with a major in Business 
Education. Consequently, the student 
will hiave already met tfie State Depart- 
ment of Education certificate require- 
ments. 

A candidate is urged to consult the 
Business Education advisor to plan a 
program of study prior to starting a pro- 
gram. 

Required Courses: (18) 

RED 6336 Reading in tfie Content 

Area^ 3 

EVT5168 Curriculum Development 

in Vocational Education 3 
EVT 5769 Evaluation in 

Vocational-Technical 

Education 3 

BTE 5671 Problems, Issues and 

Trends in Business 

Education 3 

BTE 5455 Teaching in Business 

Education 

Occupational Programs 3 

or 
BTE 5447 Teaching Basic Business 

and Consumer 

Education 
Advised Electives 3-6 

^Students who have met the reading re- 
quirements as an undergraduate or 
through approved in-service education 
may substitute an elective for this 
course. 

Graduate Professional 
Certificate - Health Occupation 
Education 

The overall purpose of tfie professional 
certificate program in health occupa- 
tions education is to enfiance the devel- 
opment of basic teaching skills and/or 
instnjctional techniques of fiealth occu- 
pations educators. The professional cer- 
tificate program provides for the 
continuing education, upgrading or redi- 
rection needs of health occupations 
teachers through planned advisement 
and professional certificate recognition. 
The programs are for both undergradu- 



ate and graduate, degree or non-degree 
seeking students. 

This 24 semester hour plan is designed 
to meet tfie needs of the individual wtio 
(1 ) is occupationally competent in a 
fiealth field and currently teaching or de- 
sires to teach a health occupations sub- 
ject, (2) holds a teaching certificate or 
equivalent or bacfielor's degree or both 
including out of field and (3) does not 
wish to, or is unalDle to, meet tfie mas- 
ter's degree entrance requirements nec- 
essary to pursue the master's degree. 

Prescribed Courses: (24) 

EVT 5078 Technical Education in 

American Society 3 

or 
EVT 5650 Trends and Issues in 

Vocational Education 3 
EVT 5168 Curriculum Development 

in Vocational Education 3 
EVT 5769 Evaluation in Vocational 

and Technical 

Education 3 

EVT 5315 Improvement of Teaching 

Strategies in Health 

Occupations and 

Nursing Education 3 

EVT 531 7 Occupational Analysis in 

Health Occupations 

and Nursing Education 3 

and/or 
ADE 5385 Adult Teaching and 

Learning 3 

Advised Electives 

A minimum of two courses selected 
from courses in General Professional 
and Adult Education, Vocational Educa- 
tion, Health Service Administration or 
Health Speciality 6 



Urban, Multicultural and 
Community Education 

Robert V. Farrell, Associate Professor 
and Chairperson, Educational 
Foundations 

John A. Carpenter, Professor, 
Educational Foundations and 
International Development Education 

Joseph B. Cook, Professor, 
Community College Teaching 

Chris Uber Crosse, Assistant 
Professor, TESOL 

E. Joseph Kaplan, Assistant Professor, 
Educational Foundations 

Colleen A. Ryan, Associate Professor, 
Special Education for the 
Emotionally Handicapped 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 121 



The Department of Urban, Multicultural 
and Community Education is fully com- 
mitted to two guiding missions of the 
College of Education: to support the 
preparation of superior teachers and 
other human resource professional, and 
to work for change where change Is 
needed in society and its institutions. 
The Department oversees graduate pro- 
grams for students who are interested in 
working in the fields of: 

Community College Teaching (Doc- 
toral) 

Teaching English to Speakers of 
Other Languages (TESOL) 

Urt)an Education 

The Department also coordinates 
ttie Foundation of Education courses 
and the Professional Education Core. It 
is the administrative location of the 
Dade County Public School/FlU Urban 
Education Program, which is comprised 
of the Urtian Education Certificate Pro- 
gram and the Master's Degree in Urban 
Education. 

Master of Science in Teaching 
English to Speakers of Other 
Languages (TESOL) 

Requirements for admission are satisfac- 
tory scholastic aptitude as determined 
by tfie Graduate Admissions Standards, 
and evidence of a satisfactory record in 
the teaching field. 

To be admitted into t^ie Master's de- 
gree program, a student must: a) hold a 
bachelor's degree from an accredited 
university or college; b) have a 'B' (3.0) 
average or higher in all junior and in sen- 
ior years course work for ttie bachelor's 
degree; or have a combined score (ver- 
t>al and quantitative) of 1 000 or higlier 
on ttie Graduate Record Examination; 
or hold a master's degree from an ac- 
credited university or college; in any 
case the student must present a GRE 
score; c) achieve a score of 220 on the 
Test of Spoken English; d) in the case of 
foreign students whose first language is 
other than English, a score of 500 on 
ttie TOEFL examination is also required. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Science degree consists 
of 30 semester hours. A maximum of six 
semester hours may be transferred into 
tlie prograi.i from outside the University, 
sutjject to the approval of the major advi- 
sor. Also, a maximum of six semester 
hours of upper division undergraduate 
courses may be included in the program 
provided they have not been used to sat- 
isfy degree requirements for an under- 
graduate program. 

This program does not meet require- 
ments for initial teacher certification by 
tfie Florida Department of Education. 



Prerequisite 

Introduction to Linguistics is the prereq- 
uisite to study in the program. It may be 
satisfied with LIN 3010 or LIN 3013. 

Required Program: (30) 

Professional Education: (12) 

All students will be required to complete 

12 semester hours in the College of 

Education: 

EDF 548 1 Analysis and Application 

of Educational 

Research 3 

TSL5142 Curriculum Development 

in ESOL 3 

or 
ESE 62 1 5 Secondary School 

Curriculum 
TSL 5371 Special Methods of 

TESOL 3 

FLE 6938 Seminar in Language 

Testing 3 

Program Courses: (15) 

In consultation with the advisor, stu- 
dents will choose 15 semester hours 
from among five groups of courses from 
the Departments of English, Modern 
Languages, and the College of Educa- 
tion. The student must take one course 
from each category: 

a. LIN 4680 Modem English 

Grammar 3 

b. LIN 5206 Phonetics 3 
LIN 5222 General Phonology 

SPN 5790 Contrastive Phonology 

c. LIN 5342 Advanced Syntax 3 
LIN 5805 Semantics 

LIN 5431 General Morphology and 

Syntax 
LIN 5748 Applied Linguistics: Theory 

& Applications 
LIN 5625 Studies in Bilingualism 
LIN 5602 Language Contact 
LIN 5601 Introduction to 

Sociollnguistics 
EDG 5707 Cross-Cultural Studies 
FLE 5908 Individual Studies 
LIN 5715 Language Acquisition 
LIN 5701 PsycfwIogy of Language 
LIN 5107 History of the English 

Language 
LIN 5732 Speech Errors and 

Linguistic KmwIedge 

Field Component: (3) 

The remaining three semester hours will 
consist of a supervised field experience 
in the teaching of English to speakers of 
other languages. The field experience 
may be arranged according to one of 
the following options: 

1. ESOL in Public Schools; 



2. ESOL in adult or community col- 
lege education, or both; 

3. ESOL in private schools or private 
enterprise; 

4. the English Language Institute at 
the University. 

All an'angements must be approved 
by tfie advisor. 

Graduation Requirements 

To receive ttie Master of Science de- 
gree in Cuniculum and Instruction, with 
a subspecialty in Second Language 
Education, TESOL track, the student 
must complete the required 30 semes- 
ter hours of coursework with a 'B' or 3.0 
average or higher and no more than two 
'C grades in required courses. 

Master of Science in Urban 
Education 

To be eligible to enroll in the Master's in 
Urban Education program, students 
must meet all the University's and tfie 
College of Education's admission re- 
quirements. 

Required Courses 

EDF 5941 Practicum I in Urban 

Schools Education 5 

EDF 5942 Practicum II in Urban 

Schools Education 5 

EDF 5943 Practicum III in Urban 

Schools Education 5 

EDF 5481 Analysis and Application 

of Education Research 3 
EDE 5267 Education of the Child in 

Urban Society 3 

EDF 621 1 Psychological Foundations 

of Education 3 

EDE 6488 Research in Elementary 

Education 3 

Guided Electives 

As approved by tfie student's advisor 6 

Doctor of Education in 
Community College Teaching 

The doctoral program in Community Col- 
lege Teaching is designed to provide 
ttie opportunity for specially selected stu- 
dents to enhance instructional and re- 
search skills related to the continuing 
development and operation of ttie com- 
munity college. The program is offered 
in a format to make it attractive and 
available to place bound professionals 
in Southeast Rorida. The program is de- 
signed to stimulate research related to 
the community college, particularly in 
the development of innovative instruc- 
tional approaches. 

Admission Requirements 

The requirements for admission consist 
of a master's degree from an accredited 



122 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



university; combined quantitative and 
vert>al scores of 1000 on the GRE; a 
score at the 50th percentile or higher on 
the appropriate subject test of the GRE; 
a 3.25 GPA on all post-baccalaureate 
work, a departmental interview, and ac- 
ceptance by the department of the in- 
structional field. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants to the program must submit 
the following records and documents: 

1. Official transcript from all higher 
education institutions attended. 

2. Official copy of the GRE scores. 

3. Three letters of recommendation. 

4. A current resume. 

5. A statement of personal interest in 
ttie program. 

6. A completed Application for Gradu- 
ate Admission. 

Program of Study 

Post-baccalaureate coursework mini- 
mum requirements for tfie degree, while 
subject to individual variations, consist 
of the following: 

Community College/Higher 
Education Core: (20) 
EDH 7065 Higher Education: 
Philosophical and 
Historical Perspectives 3 
EDH 7204 Higher Education: 

Community College 3 

EDH 7307 Higher Education: 

Instructional Metfxxls 4 
EDH 7225 Higher Education: 
■Developmental ' 
Programs 3 

Additional courses in Education that will 
enhance tfie student's instructional abili- 
ties and skills. 7 

Instructional Field Specialty Area: 
(30) 

The instructional field consists of 30 
graduate hours related to the subject 
which Is or will be taught in tfie commu- 
nity/junior college. 

Cognate Area: (16) 
The cognate area may be taken in one 
or more subject areas and may include 
graduate or undergraduate (post-bacca- 
laureate) courses. Tfie design of ttie 
cognate should assist the student in de- 
veloping into a well-rounded community 
college teacher, one wtx) is able to 
adapt to changing conditions of instruc- 
tion. 

Research and Statistics: (1 2) 

The research and statistics requirement 
Is to assist tfie student in expanding the 
capacity to use research related to in- 
struction. 



Dissertation: (24) 

The dissertation should be on a topic of 
importance to higher education and 
should reflect the student's professional 
interests and goals. 

Previous graduate course work, in- 
cluding work completed as part of a 
master's degree program may be ap- 
plied toward the doctoral program re- 
quirements. 

Add-on Certification and 
Certificate Programs 

Add-on Certification in ESOL 

Individuals who cun'entiy hold or are 
working toward a teaching certificate in 
any area of education may receive add- 
on certification in ESOL by completing a 
set of courses in ESOL, and demonstrat- 
ing language proficiency in English. For 
admissions and graduation require- 
ments, please refer to the Degree pro- 
gram. 

Required Program 

FLE 6938 Seminar in Second 

Language Testing 3 

EDG 5707 Cultural and 

Cross-Cultural Studies 3 
LIN 5625 Studies in Bilingualism^ 3 
TSL 5371 Special Methods of 

TESOL^ 3 

TSL 5142 Curriculum Development 

in ESOL 3 

'Prerequisite; LIN 3010 

The language proficiency instru- 
ment, (thie Test of Spoken English (TSE) 
will be administered at tfie University on 
a regularly scheduled basis. Please con- 
sult the Director of the Teacher Training 
Program in Bilingual Education for fur- 
ttier information. 

These courses can also be taken by 
interested individuals for tine purpose of 
add-on certification only. Requirements ' 
for admissions are a valid Rorida 
Teacher's Certificate and a score of 220 
on the Test of Spoken English. 

Students are also encouraged to 
take, in addition to tiieir regular pro- 
gram, EGC 6469, Counseling tfie Cultur- 
ally Different, and EDF 6444, 
Non-Biased Assessment of the Culhjr- 
ally Different. 

Graduate Urban Education 
Certificate Program 

This 15 semester-hour certificate pro- 
gram is designed to meet the needs of 
teachers working in urtsan schools. 

Dade County Public School teachers 
currently teaching in Chapter I schools 
are eligible to apply for tuition reimburse- 
ment and stiperids. A limited number of 
teachers are selected by Dade County 



Public Schools to participate in the pro- 
gram. Applications are available from, 
and sfx>uld be submitted to, tfie Bureau 
of Education, Dade County Public 
Schools. Details concerning tuition reim- 
bursement and stipends are available 
from United Teachers of Dade or tfie Bu- 
reau of Staff Development, Dade 
County Public Schools. 

Topics which are included in tfie 
courses are tine Urtian Community, Af- 
fective Education Strategies, Assess- 
ment of Shjdent Performance, 
Classroom Management, Language De- 
velopment, Learning Styles, Motiva- 
tional Techniques, Multi-Cultural 
Perspectives, Parent Community In- 
volvement, and teaching tiie basic skills 
of mathematics and reading. 

Admission 

To be admitted to tiie program students 
must have a bachelor's degree from an 
accredited college or university; fiave a 
valid Rorida Teaching Certificate; and 
be currentiy employed as a teacher in 
selected Dade County Chapter I 
Scfxjols. 

Required Courses: (33) 

EDF 5941 Practicum I in Urban 

Schools Education 5 

EDF 5942 Practicum II in Urban 

Schools Education 5 

EDF 5943 Practicum III in Urban 

Schools Education 5 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

ADE - Adult Education; ARE - Art Educa- 
tion; BTE - Business Teacfier Educa- 
tion; CGS - Computer Applications; 
CHD - Child Development; COA - Con- 
sumer Affairs; DAA - Dance Activities; 
DAE - Dance Education; EDA - Educa- 
tion: Educational Leadership; EDE - 
Education: Elementary; EDF - Educa- 
tion: Foundations; EDG - Education: 
General; EDH - Education - Higher; 
EDP - Education: Psychology; EDS - 
Education: Supen/ision; EEC - Educa- 
tion: Early Childfwod; EED - Education: 
Emotional Disorders; EEX - Education: 
Exceptional Child, Core Competencies; 
EGC - Education: Guidance and Coun- 
seling; EGI - Education: Exceptional 
Child, Gifted; EIA - Education: Industi-ial 
Arts; ELD - Education: Specific Learning 
Disabilities; EME - Education: Technol- 
ogy and Media; EMR - Education: Men- 
tal Retardation; ESE - Education 
Secondary; ETE - Engirieering Technol- 
ogy: Electrical; ETM - Engineering Tech- 
nology: Mechanical; EVT - Education: 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 123 



Vocational/ Technical; FAD - Family De- 
velopment; FLE - Foreign Language 
Education; HEE - Home Economics Edu- 
cation; HHD - Housing; HLP - Health, 
Leisure, and Physical Education; HME - 
Home Management Equipment; HOE - 
Home Economics; HSC - Health Sci- 
ences; LAE - Language Arts and Eng- 
lish Education; LEI - Leisure; MAE - 
Mathematics Education; MUE - Music 
Education; PEL - Physical Education; 
PEM - Physical Education Activities; 
PEO - Physical Education Activities; 
PEP - Physical Education Activities; 
PEQ - Physical Education Professional 
Water; PET - Physical Education Ther- 
apy; RED - Reading Education; SCE - 
SderK8 Education; SPA - Speech Pa- 
thology and Audiology; SPS - School 
Psychology; SSE - Social Studies Edu- 
cation; TSL - TESOL 

ADE 5081 Introduction to Adult Edu- 
cation and Human Resource Develop- 
ment (3). Developing rationale for and 
philosophy of human resource develop- 
ment/adult education: contrasting agen- 
cies, program, and curricula; analyzing 
factors affecting human resource devel- 
opment, differentiating adults and 
youths as learners; planning and ap- 
praising human resource development 
programs. 

ADE 5180 Organizational and Com- 
munity Processes In A&HRD (3). Ana- 
lyzing human resource and community 
development programs, the processes 
and implemental strategies; needs as- 
sessment objectives, curricula, recruit- 
ment, implementation, and evaluation. 

ADE 5195 Designing Education and 
HRD Programs for Disadvantaged 
Adults (3). Distinguishing various forms 
of disadvantage; analyzing forces which 
inhibit solution; criticizing responses to 
problems; developing programs, curric- 
ula materials, recruitment strategies, 
and evaluation designs. 

ADE 5260 Organization and Admini- 
stration of Aduit Education and Hu- 
man Resource Development 
Programs (3). Analyzing regulations af- 
fecting adult education/human resource 
development, selecting and training 
staff; selecting organizational patterns; 
executing managerial responsibilities; 
administering supportive services; relat- 
ing training to organization development. 

ADE 5383 instnicdonal Processes in 
AE/HRD (3). Analyzing models for in- 
structional design; Identifying and evalu- 
ating variables related to such models; 
developing designs unique for adult 
leamers and organization£il needs. 



ADE 5385 AduH Teaching and Learn- 
ing (3). Differentiating theories of learn- 
ing in relation to teaching adults; 
contrasting characteristics of adults as 
opposed to youth; evaluating the impli- 
cations of such distinctions in relation to 
learning situations appropriate for adults. 

ADE 5906 Individual Study In Adult 
Education and Huntan Resource De- 
velopment (1-3). Specialized intensive 
study in areas of interest to the student. 
Subject to approval of program adviser. 

ADE 5925 Wotlcsiiop in Aduit Educa- 
tion and Human Resource Depart- 
ment (1-6). Intensive development of 
selected competencies related to instruc- 
tional, curricular and/or administrative 
skills of special interest to students in 
adult education/human resource devel- 
opment. 

ADE 5935 Special Topics in Adult 
Education and Human Resource De- 
velopment (1). 'Mini-courses' which pro- 
vide for an examination of special facets 
of adult education and human resource 
development. 

ADE 5945 Supervised Reid Experi- 
ence In Adult Education and Human 
Resource Development (1-6). Intern- 
ship in various programs according to 
needs and interests. Supervisory visits 
by advisor. Joint conferences artd semi- 
nars involving tfie student, the program 
advisor, and an appropriate repre- 
sentative of the cooperating agency are 
conducted intermittently. 

ADE 6674 Organizational Training 
and HRD Trends and Issues (3). Pres- 
entation & analysis of state-of-art trends 
impacting development of human re- 
sources in specific organizations includ- 
ing educational agencies/business & 
industry/public sector and commerce. 
Prerequisites: ADE 5081 or equivalent. 

ADE 6772 Review of Research in 
Adult Education and Human Re- 
source Development (3). A review and 
synthesis of research & development ac- 
tivities in Adult Education/HRD. Exami- 
nation of resources/practices/designs & 
justifications. Assessment of the status 
of research in this field. Prerequisites: 
EDF 5481 , ADE 5383, ADE 5180. 

ADE 6920 Adult Education/HRD Collo- 
quium (1-6). Lectures & discussions by 
dstinguishied educators/social scien- 
tists/organizational executives/graduate 
faculty & students. Colloquia presents 
specific topics related to is- 
sues/trends/designs & applications. 

ADE 6930 Seminar In Adult Educa- 
tion and Human Resource Develop- 
ment (1-3). Intensive study of 



insb-uctional, cunicular, and/or adminis- 
trative principles and practices for the 
solution of problems of special interest 
to students in adult education and hu- 
man resource development. 

ADE 7475 Comparative Systems, 
Strategies and Materials for Adult 
Education/HRD (3). A review and cri- 
tique of ttie prevailing inventory of pack- 
aged systems on tiie market. 
Examination of assumptions and prob- 
lems surrounding their actual usage in 
local and national organizations. Prereq- 
uisites: ADE 51 80/ ADE 5383. 

ADE 7571 Consulting as an Adult 
Education/HRD Process (3). Examina- 
tion of use of internal/extemal consult- 
ation in organizations. Strategies for 
making entry diagnoses interventions 
achieving internalization of processes 
outcomes. Prerequisites: ADE 5180, 
ADE 5383. 

ADE 7980 Dissertation, Adult Educa- 
tion (3-20). Research for doctoral disser- 
tation for tiTose students approved for 
candidacy in tiie Adult Education/ Hu- 
man Resource Development Program. 
Prerequisite: Advancement to Candi- 
dacy in doctoral program. 

ADE 9964 Compreiiensive Doctoral 
Examination, Adult Education/HRD 
(0). Comprehensive doctoral examina- 
tion in tiie Adult Education/Human Re- 
source Development. Prerequisite: 
Pennission of Major Professor. 

ADE 9985 Dissertation Defense, 
Adult Education/HRD (0). Defense of 
Dissertation. Prerequisites: Permission 
of Major Professor and ADE 7980. 

ARE 5251 Art for the Exceptional 
Child (3). Development of instructronal 
art skills, techniques, and sb'ategies as 
related to the exceptional child. Observa- 
tion and field participation required. 

ARE 5553 Introduction to Art Therapy 
(3). An overview of art ttierapy as a ver- 
bal and nonvertsal means of communica- 
tion with special emphasis on 
psychodynamic fundamentals inherent 
to the process for tfie purpose of diagno- 
sis, treatment, and intervention for peo- 
ple with special needs. 

ARE 5905 Directed Study in Art Edu- 
cation (1-3). Individual investigation and 
research in one or more areas of art 
education. Prerequisite: Consent of pro- 
fessor. 

ARE 5945 Practlcum: Art Education 
(6). Supervised teaching In a junior or 
senior high school. Prerequisites: Admls- 
swn to the Alternate Track Program and 
completion of prerequisite coursework in 



124 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



education and subject matter area. Su- 
pervised teaching in an elementary or 
secondary school. 

ARE 6140 Curriculum and Instruction 
In Art (3). Examination of theoretical 
bases of curriculum development in art 
education. Analysis of objectives, con- 
tent, metlTods, and materials for art in- 
struction in tfie elementary, junior, and 
senior high school. 

ARE 6262 Organization and Coordina- 
tion of School and Community Art 
(3). Procedures for the organization, co- 
ordination and evaluation of school, 
community, and In-service art programs, 
with particular attention to thie urt>an 
multi-cultural setting. 

ARE 6304 Instruction in Early Child- 
hood Art (3). Refinement of skills re- 
lated to program development, methods 
of teaching, selection of materials, and 
review of research, in preschool and 
early childhood education. 

ARE 631 5 Instruction in Elementary 
Art (3). Refinement of skills related to 
program development, methods of 
teaching, selection of materials, and re- 
view of research, in elementary educa- 
tion. 

ARE 6706 Seminar in Art Education: 
Contemporary issues and Research 
(3). Examination of current issues and 
review of research in art education litera- 
ture. Delineation and application of an 
individual research problem. Prereq- 
uisite: EDF 5481. 

ARE 6925-29 Workshop in Art Educa- 
tion (3). Production and application of 
materials and techniques in art educa- 
tion, in a laboratory or field setting. 

ARE 7938 Doctoral Seminar In Art 
Education (3). Advanced doctoral study 
in current Uieories and research related 
to art education. Prerequisites: ARE 
6706 and EDF 6486. 

BTE 5447 Teaching Basic Business 
and Consumer Education (3). Compe- 
tency: Knowledge of current and evolv- 
ing methods, techniques and practices 
to teach and evaluate basic business 
and consumer education programs. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate Standing. 

BTE 5455 Teaching In Business Edu- 
cation Occupatiortal Programs (3). 
Competency: Knowledge of current and 
evolving methods, techniques and prac- 
tices to teach and evaluate office educa- 
tion programs to include office 
simulation and cooperative business 
education. 

BTE 5671 Problems, Issues and 
Trends in Business Education (3). 



Competency: Historical information, is- 
sues, current trends, new dimensions 
and problems in business education. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

BTE 6432 Teaching Word Processing 
(3). Competency: Knowledge, tech- 
niques, methods of teaching, concepts 
and applications of word processing es- 
sential for instruction. 

BTE 6905 Directed independent 
Study (1-3). Competency: The ability to 
identify, research, and repwrt on a spe- 
cial problem in business education. Sub- 
ject to approval of die program advisor. 

BTE 6925 Worl(Shop in Business Edu- 
cation (1-3). Competency: Selected 
competencies related to instructional 
and technical areas of business educa- 
tion. 

BTE 6940 Supervised Clinical Field 
Experience (1-3). Competency: Updat- 
ing and upgrading of occupational skills 
developed via field-based work experi- 
ence in tfie business and office occupa- 
tions. Placement is made subject to 
approval of program advisor. 

CHD 5264 Advanced Studies In Child 
Development (3). Survey of current lit- 
erature on selected areas, analysis of 
trends and issues, and investigation of 
recent research in Child Development. 
Prerequisites: CHD 3220, CHD 4210 or 
equivsilent. 

CGS 5410 Logo for Educators (3). As- 
pects of Logo as used by educators. 
Creative aspects, tiie language, philoso- 
phy, sti-ucture, and application. Prereq- 
uisite: Computers in Classroom or 
equivalent. 

CGS 5413 PILOT for Educators (3). 

Authoring language PILOT for teachers. 
Designed to develop language and its 
application to all levels of education. Pre- 
requisite: EME 6405 or equivalent 

EDA 6061 Introduction to Educational 
Leadership (3). Examines the public 
school system as a complex formal 
organization; the dynamics of commu- 
nity-school interactions; goal clarification 
and program evaluation; procurement 
and allocation of resources; and Vne le- 
gal context witfiin which tiie school sys- 
tem operates. 

EDA 6063 Administration of Inde- 
pendent Schools (3). A survey course 
to examine administration of private 
schools. Will include sectarian and non- 
sectarian schools, historical overview, 
values, funding, administration. 

EDA 6192 Leadership In Education 

(3). Review, analysis and application of 
concepts and ttieories of leadership with 



emphasis on organizational factors, 
group dynamics, and change processes 
in education. 

EDA 61 95 Communication in Educa- 
tionai Leadership (3). Analysis of princi- 
ples, processes, and techniques of 
effective communication and public rela- 
tions in educational leadership. Study of 
the tfieory and practice of school-com- 
munity relations. 

EDA 6225 Labor Relations In Educa- 
tion (3). Examining relations between a 
disti-ict school board and its employees 
as professional organizations, unions, 
contract management , and employer- 
employee relationship)s. 

EDA 6232 School Law (3). A basic 
course in school law. Students will un- 
derstand: tf>e law library and its relation- 
ship to the school; demonsti-ate a 
knowledge about our legal system; will 
function in a legal framework; and will 
identify basic concepts of the law as ap- 
plied to education. 

EDA 6242 School Finance (3). De- 
scribes and analyzes current and emerg- 
ing school finance plans; \he influence 
of the courts and federal and state legis- 
lation on those pleins; special focus on 
the Rorida Education Finance Plan; and 
tiie budget responsibilities of the school 
principal at tfie school center. 

EDA 6271 Microcomputer Application 
for Administrators (3). The role of com- 
puters in educational administration. Ap- 
plications generic to effective leadership 
utilizing computer technology. 

EDA 6503 The Principalship (3). 

Organization and administration of the 
school; emphasis on competencies nec- 
essary for leadership and management 
of ti% school center, both elementary 
and secondary. 

EDA 6905 individual Study in Educa- 
tionai Administration and Supervi- 
sion (1-3). For advanced students 
virishing to undertake an individual pro- 
ject directly related to school administra- 
tion or supervision. May not substitute 
for regular course offerings. Prereq- 
uisites: The student must be in a mas- 
ter's degree program in educational 
leadership at this university and receive 
tfie permission of the program leader 
and instructor. 

EDA 6928 Worlcshop: School Improve- 
ment (1-5). Offers an opportunity for ex- 
perienced scfiool personnel supervisors 
to participate in a problem-oriented 
wori^shop. 

EDA 6930 Seminar In Educational 
Leadership (3). In-deptti review of com- 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 125 



patencies in the eight domains of effec- 
tive educational leadership. Focus is on 
case studies and research related to ba- 
sic and high performing comfjetencies 
of school managers. 

EDA 6943 Supervised Field Experi- 
ence (1-5). Supervised field experience 
appropriate to the student's interests 
and professional goals. 

EDA 7069 Educational Policy (3). Re- 
view, analysis, and synthesis of various 
concepts and models of educational pol- 
icy formation and implementation. 

EDA 7103 Theories of Educational Ad- 
ministration (3). Examination of theo- 
retical constructs and models related to 
the organization and administration of 
educational institutions. Prerequisites: 
Admission to doctoral program and com- 
pletion of at least 12 semester hours of 
EDA coursework. 

EDA 7233 School Law 11 (3). Examines 
the area of school law in depth and In- 
cludes special topics in law, policy and 
research. Prerequisite: EDA 6232. 

EDA 7236 Law and Higher Education 
(3). Analyzes the legal structure of 
higher education including religion, aca- 
demic freedom, employment, due proc- 
ess, student's rights, desegregation, tort 
liability, and cun'ent other issues. 

EDA 7288 Politics of Education (3). 

Analysis of the political dynamics of edu- 
cational governance and of the political 
dimension of educational administration. 

EDA 7550 Administration of Higher 
Education (3). Analysis of colleges and 
universities as social organizations with 
sfiecial emphasis on issues of admini- 
stration, organization, and governance 
in higher education. 

EDA 7905 Independent Study (1-6). 

An opportunity for advanced graduate 
students to engage In independent 
study under the direction of a faculty 
member. Prerequisite: Admission to doc- 
toral program, aind permission of pro- 
gram leader. 

EDA 7930 Seminar in Educational Ad- 
ministration and Supervision (3). Con- 
sideration of current critical problems 
and issues in the organization and ad- 
ministration of educational institutions 
and tlie role of official leadership in rela- 
tion to them. Prerequisites: EDA 7103 
and admission to doctoral program. 

EDA 7937 Special Topics in Higher 
Education Administration (3). Semi- 
nar devoted to the in-<tepth treatment of 
selected special topics in thieory, re- 
search, and practice related to higher 
education administration. 



EDA 7943 Field Projects (1-6). Partici- 
pation by advanced graduate students 
in field projects and studies, usually as a 
member of an official worl< group related 
to an educational organization. Prereq- 
uisite: Admission to doctoral program, 
and permission of program leader. 

EDA 7979 Dissertation Research 
Seminar (3). Designed to provide ad- 
vanced doctoral students with a knowl- 
edge and understanding of the process 
of dissertation research and writing and 
of tlie dissertation defense. Prerequisite: 
Advanced doctoral standing. 

EDA 7980 Dissertation (3-12). Re- 
search for doctoral dissertation. Prereq- 
uisite: Advancement to candidacy in 
doctoral program. 

EDE 5267 Education of the Child in 
Urt>an Society (3). For students desir- 
ing advanced study in the schooling of 
inner-city pupils in K-6. Prerequisites: 
EDF 3723, EDG 3321 , EDG 3322. 

EDE 5905 individual Study in Elemen- 
tary Education (1-3). Individual investi- 
gation in tiie area of instruction in 
elementary education. Permission of in- 
structor required. 

EDE 5925 Workshop In Elementary 
Education (3). An opportunity for teach- 
ers to continue to develop competency 
in a specified area under ttie guidance • 
of a specialist in selected fields in ele- 
mentary education. 

EDE 6205 Curriculum Design for 
Childhood Education (3). A study of 
cuniculum theory, construction, and 
evaluation. 

EDE 6225 Education Programs for 
Older Children (3). Program developed 
for older children; curriculum fi-ends 
based on contemporary psychological, 
educational and sociological research. 

EDE 6488 Research In Elementary 
Education (3). Expose students to re- 
search in elementary education and the 
paradigms associated with this re- 
search. Teach students to be critical 
readers of this research. Prepare stu- 
dents for ttiesis. Prerequisite: EDF 5481. 

EDE 6930 Seminar in Elementary Edu- 
cation (3). Advanced study of critical is- 
sues and problems in elementary 
education. 

EDE 6948 Supervised Reld Experi- 
ence in Elementary Education (3-9). 

Field work in education institutions and 
organizations in elementary education. 

EDE 6971 Thesis In Elementary Edu- 
cation (6). Design and preparation of 
an original scholarly investigation in ele- 



mentary education. Prerequisites: EDF 
5481 , EDB 6488, and consent of instruc- 
tor. Corequisites: EDE 6930. 

EDE 7935 Doctoral Seminar in Ele- 
mentary Education (3). Advanced doc- 
toral study of cun'ent tiieories and 
research related to elementary educa- 
tion. Prerequisite: EDF 6486. 

EDF 5216 Effective Learning in the 
Classroom (3). A behavioral approach 
to effective teaching techniques, includ- 
ing theoretical background, behavioral 
definitions, writing effective objectives, 
and evaluation of effective learning in 
the classroom. A field experience will be 
included. 

EDF 5287 Instructional Technology: 
Systems Approach (3). Development 
of instructional competencies, witii an 
emphasis on &te use of a systems ap- 
proach in the design, implementation, 
and evaluation of programs. 

EDF 5432 Measurement and Evalu- 
ation in Education (3). Competencies 
required for tine design, construction or 
selection, and evaluation of measuring 
instruments. Prerequisite: EDF 5481. 

EDF 5481 Analysis and Application of 
Educational Research (3). Competen- 
cies required for the design, implementa- 
tion, and evaluation of educational 
research, including: problem formulation 
cind analysis; sample selection; instil- 
ment selection; formulation of research 
design and procedure; and data analy- 
sis. 

EDF 5517 History of American Educa- 
tion (3). An examination of different his- 
torical perspectives in the development 
of American education. Special focus on 
differing interpretations of school and so- 
ciety relationships. 

EDF 5812 NaUonal EducaUonal Sys- 
tems: A Comparative Arulysis (3). Ex- 
amination of educational structures and 
guiding educational objectives in a lim- 
ited number of both developed and de- 
veloping countiies. Analysis of the 
responses of national educational sys- 
tems to common educational issues. 

EDF 5820 Latin American Education: 
An Historical and Contemporary 
Overview (3). Historical and current de- 
velopment of Latin American education, 
and analysis of the principal forces shap- 
ing this development. 

EDF 5821 African Educational Sys- 
tems: A Comparative Approach (3). 

Contemporary trends and issues of edu- 
cation in selected independent African 
countries, with historical analysis of colo- 
nial educational policies and practices. 



126 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



EOF 5850 International Development 
Education: Historical and Contempo- 
rary Reality (3). Designed to explore 
the relationship between education and 
the modernization/development proc- 
ess. Special emphasis on historic/con- 
temporary educational planning models. 

EDF 5851 Sodo/CulturaS Conflict in 
Educational Change (3). This course 
explores radical interpretations of the re- 
lationship of education to development 
in the Third World. Emphasis will be 
placed on the problem of values conflict 
eind on the use of appropriate educa- 
tional technologies. Prerequisite: EDF 
5850. 

EDF 5852 Educational Development 
Issues in Context: A Multfdisciplinary 
Perspective (3). A critical analysis of 
educatiorial reforms of the past and the 
present, drawing on social science re- 
search and policy issues in the Third 
Worid. Prerequisite: EDF 5850. 

EDF 5880 Intercultural Education: Na- 
tional and International Perspectives 
(3). Analysis of concepts and programs 
of intercultural and international educa- 
tion, consideration of the role of educa- 
tion in fostering intercultural 
understanding both nationally and inter- 
nationally. 

EDF 5881 Foundations of Bilingual 
Education (3). Focus on an under- 
standing of the bases and rationale for 
bilingual education, including linguistic, 
psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic; his- 
torical legal perspectives. Issues in ele- 
mentary, secondiary, adult, vocational, 
and special education will also be ad- 
dressed. 

EDF 5905 Independent Study (1-3). 

The student plans and carries out an in- 
dependent study project under direction. 
Topics are to directly relate to content of 
education courses. Independent study 
may not substitute for regular course of- 
ferings. Prerequisites: Written permis- 
sion of ttie chairman of the Division and 
the approval of the instructor. 

EOF 5941 PracUcum I in Urban Educa- 
tion (5). Demonstration of competen- 
cies needed by teachers in urtian 
schools. Prerequisite: Current Florida 
Teaching Certificate. 

EDF 5942 Practicum II In Urban Edu- 
cation (5). Demonstration of competen- 
cies needed by teachers in urlsan 
schools. Prerequisite: Current Florida 
Teaching Certificate. 

EDF 5943 Practicum III in Urban Edu- 
cation (5). Demonstration of competen- 
cies needed by teachers in urfc>an 



schools. Prerequisite: Current Rorida 
Teaching Certificate. 

EDF 5955 Field Study Abroad (3-6). 

Development of intemational and cross- 
cultural understarxjings of educational 
philosophies and systems through 
planned travel and study abroad. 

EDF 621 1 Psychological Foundations 
of Education (3). An advanced survey 
course designed to acquaint students 
with major tfieories and tiasic principles 
of learning, instruction, human develop- 
ment, personality and motivation. 

EDF 6215 ApplicaHon of Learning 
Theory to Instruction (3). Competen- 
cies required for analysis of selected 
learning theories and application of 
thiese theories to an instructional system. 

EDF 6403C Quantitative Foundations 
of Educational Research (3). Integra- 
tive coverage of fundamentals in the 
general field of educational research 
with emphasis on utilizing computer for 
data analysis. Prerequisites: EDF 5481 
and EDF 6486, and STA 5163 or STA 
6113. 

EDF 6444 Non-Biased Assessment of 
the Culturally Different (3). Issues in 
the development and use of assess- 
ment procedures designed to avoid bias 
against an individual's cultural, linguis- 
tic, or ethnic background. 

EDF 6475 Qualitative Foundations of 
Educational Research (3). Introduction 
to philosophical, historical, sociological, 
and other methodologies as aspects of 
qualitative educational research. Prereq- 
uisites: EDF 5481 and EDF 6486. 

EDF 6486 Research Methods in Edu- 
cation: Experimental Design and 
Analysis (3). Competendes required 
for tie design and analysis of complex 
educational problems, including formula- 
tion of pre-experimental, true experimen- 
tal, quasi-experimental, and factorial 
designs; and related analysis. Prereq- 
uisite: EDF 5481. 

EDF 6651 international Development 
Education: Educational Technology, 
Planning, and Assessment (3). Intro- 
duction to tfie impact of technology in 
the delivery and management of educa- 
tion. Emphasis is placed on planning, im- 
plementation, and assessment in 
developing societies. 

EDF 6654 Macro- and Micro-Planning 
in Education (3). This course Is de- 
signed to study ihe theoretical and meth- 
odological foundations of educational 
planning in the U.S. and other countries. 

EDF 6656 International Development 
Education: Innovative Approaches in 



Educational Planning (3). Introduction 
to educational planning approaches 
which stress decentralization. It focuses 
on new and innovative perspectives 
which emphasize strategic aspects of 
educational planning. 

EDF 6658 Selected Topics In Interna- 
tional Development Education: Cur- 
rent Policy Issues and Problems (3). 

This course is dedicated to the study of 
contemporary problems and issues in 
tfie fields of educational policy, planning, 
management, implementation, and re- 
search In developing societies. 

EDF 6906 Independent Study In Inter- 
national Development Education (3). 

Specialized intensive study in areas of 
interest to Intemational Development 
Education majors. Prerequisite: Ap- 
proval of program advisor and instructor. 

EDF 6925 Workshop In Urban Educa- 
tion (1-5). An opportunity for school per- 
sonnel to develop special competencies 
in teaching in an urban environment. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

EDF 6212 Research Problems In Edu- 
cational Psychology (3). Critical analy- 
sis of research trends and topics in 
educational psychology with specific 
relevance to counseling, school psychol- 
ogy, or special education. Students pre- 
pare a prospectus for thesis. 

EDF 6972 Thesis In Intemational De- 
velopment Education (3-9). A thesis is 
required of students in International De- 
velopment Education which demon- 
strates tfie application of their analytical, 
conceptual, and technical skills to a spe- 
cific educational development problem. 
Prerequisite: Final semester standing in 
the Intemational Development Educa- 
tion Master's degree program. 

EDF 7934 Seminar In the Social Foun- 
dations of Education (3). Provides a 
social and philosophical frame of refer- 
ence reflecting the society in which edu- 
cation occurs and the resulting 
implications for the functioning of 
schools. Prerequisites: M.S. or equiva- 
lent and at least one graduate course in 
history, philosophy or sodology, or 
equivalent. 

EDG 5325 Analysis of Teaching (3). 

Examination of the research on instruc- 
tion in teaching, sind the development of 
skills in the observation and analysis of 
teacher behavior. 

EDG 5414C Instructional Strategies 
for the Classroom Teacher (4). This 
course is spedfically designed for the 
Modified Master's Program in Educa- 
tion. Focus is on generic teaching strate- 
gies suitable for teaching in South 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 127 



Rorida. Special Emphasis will be 
placed on thte development of com- 
petance and l^nowledge supportive of a 
reflective practitioner. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of Instructor. 

EDG 5707 Cultural and Cross-Cul- 
tural Studies (3). Oven/iew of Immigra- 
tion patterns In U.S., discussions of 
theories of ethnicity, acculturation, inter- 
cultural communication. Development of 
teaching strategies for multicultural 
classrooms. Multicultural Issues In ele- 
mentary, secondary, adult, vocational, 
and special education will also be ad- 
dressed. 

EDG 5757 Curriculum Development 
for Bilingual Programs (3). Presents 
curriculum designs and plans for bilin- 
gual schooling. Examines materials 
available for bilingual classes, with em- 
phasis on adaptations and original crea- 
tions to meet local needs. Issues In 
elementary, secondary, adult, voca- 
tional, and special education will £tlso be 
addressed. 

EDG 6250 Curriculum Development 
(3). Development of basic technical con- 
structs of curriculum. Planning of reality- 
based educational programs at all levels 
of schooling. 

EDG 6286 Curriculum Evaluation and 
Improvement In Urban School Sys- 
tems (3). Development of skills in cur- 
riculum evaluation and strategies for 
improvement of on-going curriculum. 

EDG 6693 Problems In Curriculum 
and Instruction: Elementary (3). Inves- 
tigation of current problems and solu- 
tions to essential curricular and 
insbxictlonal issues in elementary educa- 
tion. Prerequisites: EDE 6205, EDE 
6225 or equivalent. 

EDG 6694 Problems in Curriculum 
and Instruction: Middle Scfiool (3). In- 
vestigation of current problems and solu- 
tions to essential curricular and 
Instiuctlonal Issues In Middle School 
education. Prerequisite: ESE6215or 
equivalent. 

EDG 6695 Problems In Curriculum 
and Instruction: H\gh School (3). In- 
vestigation of cun'ent problems and solu- 
tions to essential curricular and 
instructional Issues in high scfx>ol educa- 
tion. Prerequisite: ESE 6215 or equiva- 
lent. 

EDG 6920 Colloquium In Curriculum 
and Instruction (1-6). Selected read- 
ings, presentations and discussions on 
topics related to curriculum and instruc- 
tion. Colloqula considers specific topics 
related to Issues, b'ends and applica- 



tions In the broad field of education. Pre- 
requisite: Masters Degree. 

EDG 6925 Wori(shop In General Pro- 
fessional Education (1-3). Offers an 
opportunity for school personnel to par- 
ticipate In a problem -oriented wori<shop 
in one of the fields of general profes- 
sional education. 

EDG 6943 Supervised Field Experi- 
ence (1-5). Students are provided an op- 
portunity to perform supervisory duties 
appropriate to tfie students professional 
goals. Only advanced graduate stu- 
dents are permitted to enroll. 

EDG 7222 Theory and Research (3). 

Theories of curriculum organization and 
a survey of curriculum research and his- 
torical patterns of curriculum develop- 
ment. Prerequisite: EDG 6250. 

EDG 7362 Theory and Research (3). 

Theories of instruction and research in 
the learning process, creativity, tfie 
thought process, human relations and 
group dynamic and otiier fields related 
to tPie development of Instructional \he- 
ory and practice. Prerequisites: EDG 
6250 Psycfxjiogy of Learning or equiva- 
lent. 

EDG 7391 Seminar In Instructional 
Leadership (3). Review theories of 
change and organizational development 
applicable to education. Discussion of 
rules and functions of supervisors, cur- 
riculum developers and other leaders in 
tfie instixictlonal process. Prerequisites: 
EDS 61 15 or EDS 6050. 

EDG 7665 Seminar in Curriculum (3). 

Provides advanced doctoral students 
thie opportunity to participate in a high 
level seminar focused on Identifying the 
forces wrtiich shape cuniculum theory 
and practice. Prerequisite: EDG 7222. 

EDG 7938 Doctoral Seminar In In- 
structional Leadership (3). Advanced 
doctoral studies In cun-ent thieorjes and 
research related to Instructional leader- 
ship. Prerequisite: EDG 7391. 

EDG 7980 Doctoral Dissertation (3- 
20). Original contribution to knowledge 
In major field. Prerequisite: doctoral can- 
didate. 

EDH 6905 Directed Independent 
Study (1-6). Specialized Intensive study 
In higher education and/or community 
college in areas of interest to the stu- 
dent. Subject to approval of program ad- 
visor. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

EDH 6925 Wori(shop In Higher Educa- 
tion/Community College (1-6). Inten- 
sive development of selected 
competencies related to instructional 



curricular, staff development and/or ad- 
ministrative skills of special interest to 
students In higher education and com- 
munity college. Prerequisite: Permission 
of Instructor. 

EDH 6935 Special Topics In Higher 
Educatlon/Corrvnunity College (1-6). 

This course provides for the examina- 
tion of special aspects of higher educa- 
tion of Interest to students In higher 
education and community college teach- 
ing. Prerequisite: Permission of Instruc- 
tor. 

EDH 7065 Higher Education: Philo- 
sophical/Historical Perspectives (3). 

This course examines basic philosophi- 
cal positions in higlier education; and 
ttie history of American higher educa- 
tion. A contemporary philosophical posi- 
tion Is then developed. 

EDH 7204 Higher Education: Commu- 
nity College (3). This course examines 
ttie structure of the community college 
Including: curriculum; administration and 
legal aspects; the community college 
concept; technical and career programs 
and current Issues and problems. 

EDH 7225 Higher Education: Develop- 
mental Programs (3). This course ex- 
amines tiie spectrum of developmental 
programs In higher education. Special 
attention Is given to program stiucture, 
academic support systems and curricula 
designed to increase student achieve- 
ment. 

EDH 7307 Higher Education: Instruc- 
tional Methods (4). This course will de- 
velop knowledge of and skill In tfie use 
of higher education instructional meth- 
ods, such as lectijre, discussion, demon- 
stration, TV Instruction, and computer 
assisted instruction. 

EDH 7980 Dissertation In Community 
College Teaching (1-10). Research for 
doctoral dissertation. Prerequisites: Ad- 
vancement to candidacy in tiie doctoral 
program arx) completion of all other doc- 
toral requirements. Course may be re- 
peated as needed. 

EDS 6050 Supervision and Staff De- 
velopment (3). Competencies in super- 
vision and staff development. Focus is 
on functions, tasks, and job dimensions 
of educational leaders who serve as su- 
pervisors and providers of staff develop- 
ment activities. 

EDS 61 15 School Personnel Manage- 
ment (3). Competencies required of ef- 
fective school personnel. Focus Is on 
skills needed for exercising leadership 
In school personnel selection, evalu- 
ation, and development. 



128 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



EEC 5906 Individual Study In Early 
Childiiood Education (1-3). Individual 
Investigation in the area of preschool 
and early childhood education. Permis- 
sion of Instnjctor required. 

EEC 5926 Workshop In Eariy Child- 
hood Education (3). An opportunity for 
teachers to continue to develop compe- 
tency in a specified area under the guid- 
ance of a specialist in selected fields in 
preschool and early childhood educa- 
tion. 

EEC 6261 Education Programs for 
Younger Children (3). Programs devel- 
oped for young children; curriculum 
trends t)ased on contemporary psycho- 
logical, educational, and sociological re- 
search. 

EEC 6612 Screening and Assessing 
for Assignment of Preventative, De- 
velopmental, and Enrichment Strate- 
gies for Primary Children (3). 

Designed to assist the primary teacher 
and primary specialist to understand the 
processes of and methods for screen- 
ing, assessing, and assignment of pre- 
ventative, developmental, and 
enrichment strategies for primary chil- 
dren. 

EEC 6678 Research in Eariy Child- 
hood Education (3). Expose students 
to research in eariy childhood education 
and the paradigms associated with this 
research. Teach students to be critical 
readers of this research. Prepare stu- 
dents for thesis. Prerequisite: EDF 5481 . 

EEC 6932 Seminar in Eariy Childhood 
Education (3). Advanced study of criti- 
cal issues aixj prot>lems in preschool 
and eariy childhood education. 

EEC 6948 Supervised Experience in 
Eariy Childhood Education (3-9). Raid 
wori< in educational institutions and or- 
ganizations in preschnol and eariy child- 
hood education. 

EEC 6971 Thesis in Eariy Childhood 
Education (6). Design and preparation 
of an original scholariy investigation in 
eariy childhood education. Prereq- 
uisites: EDF 5481, EEC 6678, and con- 
sent of instructor. Corequisite: EEC 
6932. 

EEC 7932 Doctoral Seminar in Eariy 
Childhood Education (3). Advanced 
doctoral study of current tfieories and re- 
search related to eariy childhood educa- 
tion. Topics will vary and may include: 
social, cognitive, affective and language 
development. Prerequisite: EDF 6486. 

EED 6226 Advanced Theory and Prac- 
tice: Emotional Handicaps (3). Major 
theories In the area of betnavior disor- 



ders, and skills in the application of 
these theories to education. Prereq- 
uisite: EED 4227 or permission of in- 
structor. 

EElk 5250 Reading for Exceptional 
Students (3). Instructional and curricu- 
lar adaptations and modifications of de- 
velopmental reading programs for 
students for varying exceptionalities. 
Prerequisite: RED 4150 or equivalent. 

EEX 5771/HME 5255 Independent Uv- 
ing for the Handicapped (3). Explores 
the special home and personal living 
skills required in order for persons with 
mental and physical limitations to 
achieve ttieir maximum independence. 
Suitable for students in psychoeduca- 
tional services, health, physical educa- 
tion and recreation, social wori<, home 
economics, or anyone planning to work 
with the elderiy or handicapped. Ap- 
proved for certification for teachers of 
the mentally retarded. 

EEX 6051 Exceptional Children and 
Youth (3). Significant concepts in rela- 
tion to the learning and adjustment prob- 
lems of exceptional children and youth. 
Field experience and graduate project 
required. 

EEX 6060 Curriculum Planning and 
Development in Special Education 
(3). This course stresses special educa- 
tion curriculum content and methodolo- 
gies, and emphasizes the learning 
characteristics of exceptional children 
and youth. Curriculum planning and de- 
velopment as a generic process will be 
also reviewed. Prerequisite: EEX 4241 . 

EEX 6072 IMainstreaming Exceptional 
Children: Issues and Techniques (3). 

Awareness of issues underiying the 
movement to mainstream mildly handi- 
capped students. Techniques and proce- 
dures for effective mainstreaming of 
these students. 

EEX 6106 Diagnostic Teaching: Ac- 
quisition of Language and Reading 
Skills (3). Concepts in acquisition and 
development of language and reading 
skills. 

EEX 6203 Advanced Psychologi- 
cal/Sociological Aspects of Excep- 
tionality (3). Advanced psychological 
and social aspects of fiandicapping con- 
ditions in relationship to classroom be- 
havior and community functioning. 

EEX 6208 Medical Aspects of Disabil- 
ity (3). Medical etiology and remediation 
of disability. Includes genetic, biochemi- 
cal, nutritional, and physical agents in re- 
tardation, learning handicaps, and 
emotional illness. Prerequisite: EEX 
3202 or equivalent. 



EEX 621 1 Assessntent of Behavior I 

(3). Basic concepts in assessment tfie- 
ory. Competencies in using a variety of 
standardized tests In assessing and writ- 
ing educational prescriptions for children 
with disorder in visual, auditory and hap- 
tic processir)g, in language, or integra- 
tive systems. 

EEX 6227 Diagnostic Teaching: Edu- 
cational Assessment (3). Skill in appli- 
cation of assessment theory to class- 
room diagnosis and to tfie development 
of instructional objectives. 

EEX 6301 Research In Cognitive Proc- 
ess (3). Review of research and theory 
pertaining to cognitive development of 
exceptional individuals. Applications of 
theory and research include cognitive 
strategy training and enhancement of at- 
tention and memory. Prerequisite: EEX 
6165 or DEP 6645. 

EEX 6417 Guidance and Counseling 
of Gifted Students (3). Affective devel- 
opment, parental involvement, counsel- 
ing theories, underachieving gifted. 

EEX 6535 Seminar In Special Educa- 
tion School Administration (3). Prob- 
lems in school administration and 
patterns of curriculum organization as 
tfiey relate to thte handicapped. Focus 
on conceptual frameworks, change fac- 
tors, and future trends in special educa- 
tion. Prerequisite: EEX 6051 or 
equivalent. 

EEX 6846 Diagnostic Teaching: Ad- 
vanced Practicum (3). Application of di- 
agnostic teaching models to indivi- 
dualized, remedial, and compensatory 
instructional programs. 

EEX 6863 Supervised Field Experi- 
ence in Special Education (3-9). Dem- 
onstration of the full range of compe- 
tencies in diagnostic teaching learned 
throughout the program. Intemship 
placements include a variety of field set- 
tings. 

EEX 6906 Individual Study in Special 
Education (1-6). Concepts or compe- 
tencies contracted for by graduate stu- 
dents with an instructor. 

EEX 6927 Workshop In Special Edu- 
cation (1-6). Selected competencies in 
special education, developed in short- 
term, intensive workshops. 

EEX 6937 Seminars In Special Educa- 
tion (3, repeatable to 9). A. Topics in 
Mental Retardation. B. Topics in Specific 
Learning Disabilities C. Topics in Behav- 
ior Disorders. 

EEX 7980 Doctoral Dissertation (3- 
20). Original contribution to knowledge 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 129 



in major field. Prerequisite: Doctoral can- 
didate. 

EGC 5305 Educational-Vocational 

Counseling (3). Concepts and sl<ills per- 
taining to vocational development, infor- 
mation systems, career education 
programs, educational-vocational coun- 
seling, and socio-psychological Influ- 
ences on career development. 

EGC 5405 Introduction to Counseling 
(3). Majortlieoretical concepts in coun- 
seling, competencies In relationship- 
building, interviewing, role-playing, 
simulation, and micro-counseling. 

EGC 5425 Crisis Counseling and In- 
tervention (3). Prevention and interven- 
tion stategies in crisis situations 
including child abuse and neglect, sui- 
cide, substance abuse, AIDS, and per- 
sonal loss. 

EGC 6203 Measurement and Ap- 
praisal In Counseling (3). Concepts 
and sl^ills related to the use of tests and 
other appraisal procedures in counsel- 
ing. Particular emphasis on career and 
vocational choice processes. l.aboratory 
experiences included. 

EGC 6469 Counseling the Culturally 
Different (3). Concepts and skills in- 
volved in counseling clients with back- 
grounds different from the majority 
culture. 

EGC 6510 Theories in Group Dynam- 
ics (3). Systematic examination of vari- 
ous tfieories and relevant research used 
in study of small group pfienomena. Pre- 
requisites: EGC 6725, EGC 6729, EGC 
6709. 

EGC 6540 Group Counseling (3). Ex- 
ploration of roles and function of group 
counseling In meeting client needs in a 
variety of settings. Prerequisites: EGC 
5405, EGC 6725, EGC 6726. 

EGC 6560 Advanced Group Develop- 
ment Latwratory (3). Development of 
advanced skills in ttie analysis and un- 
derstanding of group process, function, 
and structures through actual observa- 
tion of an ongoing group. Prerequisites: 
EGC 6725, EGC 6726. 

EGC 6569 Organization Development 
in Education (3). Analysis of theory and 
practice of organization development 
and p)lanned change in educational sys- 
tems. Prerequisites: EGC 6725, EGC 
6726, EGC 6709. 

EGC 6605 Professional Problems in 
Counseling (3). Competencies in re- 
gard to ttie development of major role 
and service models and the application 
of budgeting systems, legal, and ethical 



standards in a psycho-educational set- 
ting. 

EGC 6616 Program Evaluation In the 
Helping Professions (3). Evaluation 
skills in tfie student's area of specializa- 
tion, including competencies in design- 
ing evaluation proposals and conducting 
an actual program evaluation. Prereq- 
uisite: EDF 5481. 

EGC 6676 Supervised Field Experi- 
ence in Counseling (10). Demonstra- 
tion of ttie full range of competencies 
learned throughout the program in Coun- 
seling. Internship placements Include a 
variety of field settings. 

EGC 6678 Supervised Field Experi- 
ence in School Psychology (10). (Dem- 
onstration of the full range of 
competencies learned throughout the 
program in School Psychology. Intern- 
ship placements Include a variety of 
field settings. 

EGC 6705C Principles of Design in 
Group Intervention: Role of the Con- 
sultant (3). Focuses on role of leader or 
trainer in complex training design in 
leadership and human relations training. 
Emphasis on Diagnostic and behavioral 
skills that help groups become more ef- 
fective. Prerequisites: EGC 6725, EGC 
6726, EGC 6510, EGC 6509. 

EGC 6707 Applied Behavioral Analy- 
sis in Counseling and Education (3). 

Concepts and skills in using behavior 
modification: functional analysis of be- 
havior, precision teaching, token econo- 
mies, contingency contracting, parent 
and/or teacher consultation. 

EGC 6708 Advanced Counseling and 
Consultation: Theory and Practice 

(3). Extended laboratory experiences 
stressing the development of skills in be- 
havioral approaches to individual and 
group counseling, consultation, parent 
education, and in-service training. Pre- 
requisites: EGC 5405 and EGC 6707 or 
equivalent. 

EGC 6709 Human Interaction III: Or- 
ganizadoruii Consultation (3). Theo- 
retical concepts and skills in 
organizational development and 
change. Competencies in systems diag- 
nosis and assessment, consultation, 
agenda setting, team building, decision- 
making, and feedback. Prerequisite: 
EGC 6726. 

EGC 6725 Human Interaction I: Group 
Process and Social Behavior (3). Con- 
cepts, research, and theory relative to 
small group process. Students will par- 
ticipate in small face-to-face task 
groups, with an emphasis on developing 



competencies in diagnosis and interven- 
tion in small groups. 

EGC 6726 Hunrwn Interaction II: 
Analysis of Group Participation (3). 

Participation In an on-going group with 
attention given to examination of proc- 
esses of small group phenomena such 
as interpersonal communication, norms, 
decision-making, leadership, authority, 
and membership. Prerequisite: EGC 
6725. 

EGC 6822 Advanced Practlcum In 
Counseling (3). Advanced competen- 
cies in counseling and consultation. Pre- 
requisite: Admission to ttie Certificate or 
Degree program. 

EGC 6905 Individual Study In Coun- 
seling and School Psychology (1-6). 

Competencies contracted for between a 
student and an instructor in accordance 
with the student's irxjlvidual needs. 

EGC 6936 Seminars in Counseling 
and Education (3, repeatable to 9). 

Special topics in relation to counseling 
or school psychology. 

EGI 5051 Nature and Needs of the 
Gifted (3). Identification and placement 
procedures, history of the field, and psy- 
chological factors affecting development 
of ttie gifted-talented. 

EGI 5232 Educational Procedures 
and Curriculum for Gifted (3). Basic 
curriculum models in education of ttie 
gifted. Relation of models to planning, 
implementation in traditional class- 
rooms, resource rooms, and special 
classes. 

EIA 5811 Equipment and Facilities 
Planning (3). Competency: Utilization of 
research, design, and engineering 
knowledge and skills to plan laboratory 
facilities and equipment. 

EIA 5905 Individual Study (1-3). Com- 
petency: The ability to identity, research, 
and report on an industrial arts protslem 
of interest to the student. Subject to ap- 
proval of program advisor. 

EIA 5925L Wori(shop In Technology 
Education (3). Competency: Selected 
competencies related to instructional 
and technical areas. 

EIA 6683 Instructional Projects Devel- 
opment (3). Competency: Knowledge 
and skill in developing innovative instruc- 
tional projects for use in industrisil arts 
programs, grade 7-12. (Includes pro- 
jects for handicapped and disadvan- 
taged.) 

EIA 6931 Analysis of Technology Edu- 
cation (3). Competency: Knowledge of 



130 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



technology education at the national, 
state, and local levels. 

ELD 6323 Advanced Theory and Prac- 
tice: Specific Learning Disabilities 
(3). Major concepts In the area of spe- 
cific learning disability, and skills in the 
application of these concepts to educa- 
tion. Prerequisite: ELD 4240 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

EME 5315 Instructional Media (3). De- 
velopment of competencies for effective 
selection and utilization of instructional 
media. Consideration of sources, selec- 
tion, evaluation, and methods of imple- 
menting media. 

EME 5403 Introduction to Instruc- 
tional Delivery Systems (3). A study of 
tfie rapidly expanding electronic media 
technology and its impact on instruc- 
tional delivery. Prerequisite: EME 3402 
or EME 6405. 

EME 5945 Workshop Computer Edu- 
cation (1-3). Offers an opportunity for 
teachers arid trainers to participate in ac- 
tivities using specific computer applica- 
tions. 

EME 6405 Computers in the Class- 
rooms (3). Learriing to use microcom- 
puters in a school setting. Emphasis on 
evaluating and documenting software; 
creation of classroom materials leading 
to development of useful software. 

EME 6406 Microcomputers as Teach- 
ing Tools (3). This course develops abil- 
ity to use the miaocomputer as an 
object, medium, and manager of instruc- 
tion in the classroom. Prerequisite: EME 
6405 or EME 3402 or permission of in- 
structor. 

EME 6407C Instructional Program- 
ming for Teachers (3). An introductory 
course for teachers to use BASIC to 
write educational programs appropriate 
to the teacher's area of specialization. 
Prerequisite: EME 3402 or EME 6405 or 
permission of instructor. 

EME 6412 Educational Courseware 
Evaluation and Development (3). This 
course develops ability to select, evalu- 
ate, design , and utilize appropriate soft- 
ware for the school curriculum. 
Prerequisites: EME 6405 or EME 3402 
and one computer language or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

EME 6628 Administrative and Instruc- 
tional Applications of Technology (3). 

Topics of this course include data man- 
agement, instructional management, 
teleconferencing, scheduling, and pro- 
ductivity software for educational lead- 
ers and school managers. 



EME 6905 Independent Study: Com- 
puter Education (1-3). The course pro- 
vides an opportunity for tfie student to 
plan and carry out an independent study 
project under direction. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

EMR 6852 Advanced Theory and 
Practice: Mental Retardation (3). Ma- 
jor concepts in the area of mental retar- 
dation and skills in the application of 
these concepts to education. Prereq- 
uisite: EMR 4251 or permission of in- 
structor. 

ESE 6215 Secondary School Curricu- 
lum (3). Examination of programs, 
trends, and developments in curriculum 
and instruction in thie secondary school. 
Consideration and evaluation of innova- 
tions. 

ESE 6425 Research In Secondary 
Education (1-3)(ARR). Examination 
and evaluation of research studies in 
secondary education. Prerequisite: At 
least one course in research methods or 
equivalent competency. (Determination 
of equivalent competency will be made 
by the instructor.) 

ESE 6925 Wortcshop in Secondary 
Education (1-3)(ARR). Production and 
application of materials and techniques 
in a lalx)ratory or field setting. Prereq- 
uisite: Consent of instructor. 

ESE 6935 Seminar in Secondary Edu- 
cation (1-3)(ARR). Analysis of selected 
problems in secondary education. 

ESE 6947 Supervised Reld Experi- 
ence (3-9)(ARR). Reld wori< in an edu- 
cational institution or organization. 
Prerequisite: Consent of Chairperson of 
the Division. 

EVT 5078 Technical Education in 
American Society (3). Competency: 
Knowledge of thie basic role and current 
status of technical education in an indus- 
trial democracy. 

EVT 51 56 Teaching Career Related 
Activities (3). Competency: Integration 
and articulation of career concepts and 
activities with regular curriculum. 

EVT 5168 Curriculum Development in 
Vocational Education (3). Compe- 
tency: Basic knowledge and skill in ana- 
lyzing, planning, organizing, and 
developing curriculum in an area of spe- 
cialization. 

EVT 5255 Cooperative Vocational 
Education Programs (3). Competency: 
Knowledge and skill in the basic philoso- 
phy, principles, processes, arxi proce- 
dures of the cooperative method in 
vocational and technical education. 



EVT 5265 Supervision and Coordina- 
tion of Vocattonal Education Pro- 
grams (3). Competency: Knowledge 
and skill in tfie supervision of personnel 
arxi tfie coordination of work to achieve 
institutional goals. 

EVT 5315 Improvement of Teaching 
Strategies in Health Occupations and 
Nursing Education (3). Competency: 
Knowledge and skills in methods of 
teaching and clinical performance evalu- 
ation appropriate to the health field and 
development of teaching. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

EVT 5317 Occupational Analyses In 
Health Occupations and Nursing Edu- 
cation (3). Competency: Analysis of cur- 
rent trends in area of fiealth specialty 
and tfieir application to teaching learn- 
ing situations in health occupations edu- 
cation. Prerequisites: Currently 
teaching, permission of instructor and 
professional liability insurance. 

EVT 5369 Vocational Educational Me- 
dia (3). Competency: Knowledge and 
skill in selecting, developing, and utiliz- 
ing vocational instructional media forms 
to communicate or demonstrate con- 
cepts. 

EVT 5505 Vocational Laboratory Ac- 
tivities for Teachers of the Handi- 
capped (3). Competency: The use of 
projects, tools, materials and equipment 
to facilitate training the occupationally 
fiandicapped, physically handicapped, 
and mentally retarded. Approved for cer- 
tification for teachers of the mentally re- 
tarded. 

EVT 5650 Trends and Issues in Voca- 
tional Education (3). Competency: A 
knowledge of the basic philosophical 
and curricular trends and issues in voca- 
tional-technical education at the interna- 
tional, national, state, and local levels. 

EVT 5664 Community Relations and 
Resources for Vocational Education 
(3). Competency: Knowledge and skill in 
developing and utilizing community re- 
sources and establishing public rela- 
tions procedures and practices to 
implement vocational education pro- 
grams. 

EVT 5695 International Comparative 
Vocational Education (3). Compe- 
tency: Skill and knowledge in compari- 
son of vocational education in tfie 
United States in terms of purposes, sys- 
tems, and problems with those of se- 
lected foreign countries. 

EVT 5769 Evaluation In Vocational 
and Technical Education (3). Compe- 
tency: Knowledge and skills in the use 
of tests and measurements, to evaluate 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 131 



teaching and learning effectiveness and 
the validity of objectives. 

EVT 5905 Individual Study (1-3). Com- 
petency: The ability to identify, research, 
and report on a special problem of inter- 
est to the student. Subject to approval 
of program advisor. 

EVT 5925 Workshop in Vocational 
Education (1-6). Competency: Selected 
competencies related to instructional 
and technical areas. 

EVT 5927 Woricshop In Health Occu- 
pations Education (1-3). Competency: 
Selected competencies related to 
Health Occupations Education. 

EVT 6264 Administration of Voca- 
Uonal Education Programs (3). Com- 
petency: Knowledge of the principles, 
practices, functions, and roles of admini- 
stration in the operation of vocational 
education programs. 

EVT 6267 Program Planning In Voca- 
tional Education (3). Competency: 
Knowledge and skill necessary to deter- 
mine vocational program feasibility and 
implementation of new programs. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing. 

EVT 6318 Issues in Health Occupa- 
tions and Nursing Education. (3). 

Competency: Identification and examina- 
tfon of current issues in Health Occupa- 
tions and Nursing Education. Prere- 
quisites: Currently teacNng, permission 
of instructor. 

EVT 6359 Vocattonat Education in a 
IMuitlcuitural Setting (3). Competency: 
Knowledge and skill in developing and 
modifying vocational education pro- 
grams, materials, and practices for a 
multicultural setting. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing. 

EVT 6760 Research in Vocationat Edu- 
cation (3). Competency: Knowledge 
and skill in identifying, defining, collect- 
ing, analyzing, and synthesizing re- 
search-related problems in vocational 
and adult education. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

EVT 6790 Program Evaluation in Vo- 
cational Technical Educatk>n (3). 

Competency: Knowledge and skill 
needed to conduct a systematic evalu- 
ation of vocational-technical education 
programs. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing and EDF 5432 or equivalent. 

EVT 6925 Graduate Workshop In Vo- 
cational Education (1-6). Competency: 
Selected competencies related to pro- 
fessional and program areas. 

EVT 6930 Seminar In Vocational Edu- 
cation (3). Competency: The applica- 



tion of knowledge and skills to solve spe- 
cial instnjctional, curricular arxi/or ad- 
ministrative and supervisory problems 
and issues in vocational education. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing. 

EVT 6946 Supervised Field Experi- 
ence (3-6). Competency: Application 
and refinement of competencies in 
eitfier classroom, laboratory, or admini- 
stration and supervision, via school- 
based field experiences. Placement is 
subject to approval of program leader. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

EVT 6947 Internship in Vocational 
Education (3). Competency: Kmwl- 
edge and skill in a new leadership set- 
ting, relative to the student's selected 
area of emphasis. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing. 

FAD 5260 Family Development (3). Dy- 
namics of family interaction and struc- 
ture, including analysis of socio- 
economic and cultural influences, crisis- 
producing situations, eind current issues 
and trends affecting the family unit. 

FAD 5450 Human Sexuality (3). Pro- 
vides a cognitive overview of human 
sexuality. Main emphasis is on the affec- 
tive dimension - an exploration of atti- 
tudes and values related to sexuality. 

FLE 5895 Bilingual Education Teach- 
ing Methodologies (3). Examination of 
various approaches to t)ilingual educa- 
tion, including specific school and class- 
room organizations. Development of 
specific instructional strategies for bilin- 
gual students. Issues in elementary, sec- 
ondary, adult, vocational, and special 
education will also be addressed. 

FLE 5908 individual Study (1-3)(ARR). 

The student plans and carries out an in- 
dependent study project under direction. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

FLE 5945 Practlcum: Modern Lan- 
guages (6). Supervised teaching in a 
junior or senior high school. Prereq- 
uisites: Admission to the Alternate Track 
Master's Program and completion of pre- 
requisite coursewori< in education and 
subject matter area. 

FLE 6336 Methods of Teaching Mod- 
em Language (3). A modem study of 
language learning and teaching from 
the theoretical and practical points of 
view, including the evaluation and devel- 
opment of techtniques and materials for 
second language teaching. Prerequisite: 
LIN 3010 or ENG 3500 or equivalent. 

FLE 6925 Workshop in Second Lan- 
guage Education (1-3)(ARR). Produc- 
tion and application of materials and 



techniques in second language educa- 
tion in a laboratory or field setting. 

FLE 6938 Seminar In Second Lan- 
guage Testing (3). Advanced study and 
research on current topics and Issues In 
the field of second language education. 
\feriety of topics to Include language 
testing, language proficiency, language 
and society, billnguai-bicultural educa- 
tion, and error analysis and the lan- 
guage learner. 

HEE 5335 Trends in Vocational Home 
Economics Education (3). Compe- 
tency: Knowledge of cun-ent social, eco- 
nomic, and educational issues affecting 
tfie field of vocational home economics. 

HEE 5360 Teaching Child Develop- 
ment (3). Course is designed to up- 
grade competency in planning, 
researching, and evaluating experi- 
ences that are current in content and 
educational strategies. 

HEE 5361 Teaching Consumer Educa- 
tion and Family Economics (3). 

Course is designed to upgrade compe- 
tency in planning, researching, and 
evaluating experiences that are current 
in content and educational strategies. 

HEE 5362 Teaching Clothing and Tex- 
tiles (3). Course Is designed to upgrade 
competency in planning, researching, 
and evaluating experiences that are cur- 
rent in content and educational strate- 
gies. 

HEE 5363 Teaching Family LHe Edu- 
cation (3). Course is designed to up- 
grade competency in planning, 
researching, arxJ evaluating experi- 
ences that are current in content and 
educational strategies. 

HEE 5364 Teaching Housing and 
Home Furnishings (3). Course is de- 
signed to upgrade competency in plan- 
ning, researching, and evaluating 
experiences that are current in content 
and educational strategies. 

HEE 5365Teachlng Food and Nutri- 
tion (3). Course is designed to upgrade 
competency in planning, researching, 
and evaluating experiences that are cur- 
rent in content and educational strate- 
gies. 

HEE 5905 Individual Study (1-3). Com- 
petency: The ability to identify, research, 
and report on a special problem in voca- 
tional home economics. Subject to ap- 
proval of program advisor. 

HEE 5927 Special Wortcshop Home 
Economics Educatk>n (1-3). Compe- 
tency: Skill in developing, organizing, 
teaching, evaluating, and administering 



132 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



programs related to specified aspects of 
liome economics education. 

HEE6156 Teaching Home Economics 
in Diverse Educational Environments 
(3). Competency: Knowledge of current 
and evolving strategies, programs, and 
materials to teach and evaluate home 
economics. 

HEE 6915 Research in Home Econom- 
ics Education (3). Competency: The 
analysis and application of research per- 
taining to philosophy, curriculum, evalu- 
ation, and teacher education in home 
economics. Subject to approval of pro- 
gram advisor. 

HEE 6928 Special Worlcshop in Home 
Economics Education (1-3). Compe- 
tency: Skill in developing, organizing, 
teaching, evaluating, and administering 
programs related to specific aspects of 
home economics education. 

HEE 6937 Seminar in Home Econom- 
ics Education (3). Competency: Appli- 
cation of selected instructional, 
curricular , and/or administrative princi- 
ples and practices to the solution of 
prolslems of special Interest to voca- 
tional home economics educators. Sub- 
ject to approval of program advisor. 

HIUIE 5225 Problems of Home Man- 
agement in Contemporary Society 
(3). Influence of diversified cultural im- 
pact on management life styles, with em- 
phasis on problems of management 
resources. Discussion of problems re- 
lated to single-parent homes, retire- 
ment, poverty, death, working parents, 
migrant families, and other human situ- 
ations. Prerequisites: COA 2410, HME 
4230, or permission of instructor. 

HIUIE 5255/EEX 5771 Independent Liv- 
ing for the Handicapped (3). Explores 
the special home and personal living 
skills required in order for persons with 
mental and physical limitations to 
achieve their maximum independence. 
Suitable for students in psychoeduca- 
tional services, health, physical educa- 
tion and recreation, social work, home 
economics, or anyone planning to work 
with the elderly or handicapped. Ap- 
proved for certification for teachers of 
ttie mentally retarded. 

HSC 5455 Basic Driver Education (3). 
Content includes knowledge of the high- 
way transportation system, rules and 
regulations. For Driver Education Certifi- 
cation endorsement. 

HSC 5456 Advanced Driver Educa- 
tion (3). Content includes advanced 
skills for the teaching of driver's educa- 
tion. Prerequisite: HSC 5455. 



HSC 5465 Administration and Super- 
vision of Driver Safety Education (3). 

Content includes competencies for 
teacher ptreparation arxJ improvement in 
driver and traffic safety education. Pre- 
requisites: HSC 5455 and HSC 5456. 

UVE 5415 Children's Literature (3). 

Designed to develop a critical analysis 
of ttie purposes, strategies for teaching, 
and evaluation of literature for children. 
Prerequisites: RED 4150 and LAE 
4314, or their equivalent. 

LAE 5908 Individual Study (1-3) 
(ARR). The student plans and carries 
out an indeperxdent study project under 
direction. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. 

LAE 5927 Workshop in Language 
Arts (3). Offers opportunities for elemen- 
tary sciiool teachers to Increase their un- 
derstanding of reading language arts 
instruction, K-6. 

UkE 5945 Practicum: English Educa- 
tion (6). Supervised teaching in a junior 
or senior high school. Prerequisites: Ad- 
mission to the Alternate Track Master's 
Program and completion of prerequisite 
coursework in education and subject 
matter area. 

LAE 6305 Instruction In Early Child- 
hood Language Arts (3). Refinement 
of skills related to program develop- 
ment, methods of teaching, selection of 
materials, and review of research in pre- 
school and eariy childhood education. 

LAE 6355 Instruction to Elementary 
Language Arts (3). Refinement of 
skills related to program development, 
methods of teaching, selection of materi- 
als, and review of research in elemen- 
tary education. 

I^E 6339 Teaching English in the 
Secondary School (3). Analysis of 
methods, progreims, and materials for 
teaching English in tlie junior and senior 
high school, and development of teach- 
ing skills. Prerequisite: Undergraduate 
course in methods of teaching English. 

LAE 6815 Computers in English and 
the Language Arts (3). Covers tfie ba- 
sics needed to integrate computers in 
teaching language arts. Emphasizes se- 
lecting and learning to use software to 
meet objectives In language, literature, 
and composition. Corequisite: English 
major or equivalent. 

LAE 6925-26 Workshop in English 
Education (1-3)(ARR). Production and 
application of materials and techniques 
in English education in a laboratory or 
field setting. 



LAE 6935 Seminar in English Educa- 
tion (3). Designed for advanced stu- 
dents, the readings and discussions will 
focus on policy issues and recent re- 
search in English education. Though pri- 
marily for experienced English teachers 
and supervisors, the course is open to 
administrators and others, with the con- 
sent of the instructor. 

U^E 7938 Doctoral Seminar in Eng- 
lish Education (3). Advanced doctoral 
study of current theories and research 
related to English education. Prereq- 
uisites: LAE 6935, EDF 6486. 

LEI 5440 Program Development in 
Parl(s and Recreation (3). The develop- 
ment of specific programs in parks and 
recreation with emphasis on special pro- 
grams for young cliildren, retardates, 
handicapped persons, and the elderly. 

LEI 5510 Program Administration in 
Parks and Recreation (3). A detailed 
analysis of administrative procedures 
and responsibilities in connection with 
parks and recreation facilities and per- 
sonnel. 

LB 5595 Seminar In Paries and Rec- 
reation Management (3). A discussion 
of current problems, issues, and trends 
in administration of parks and recreation 
programs. 

LEI 5605 Physical and Social Bases 
of Parl(s and Recreation Planning (3). 

Concentration on major phases of pre- 
design, design, development, actualiza- 
tion of park and recreation facilities. 
Course will explore funding, budget, site 
selection, layout, and maintenance. 

LEI 5716 Program Planning In Thera- 
peutic Recreation (3). This course is 
designed to prepare the student for the 
development of systematically designed 
therapeutic recreation service delivery 
programs from the viewpoint of the T.R. 
specialist and the T.R. administrator. 

LE! 5719 Client Assessment, Evalu- 
ation and Documentation InT.T. (3). 
The course adresses client assessment, 
documentation and evaluation from the 
direct service prespective, administra- 
tive requirements, and health care regu- 
latory agency demands. 

LEI 5907 individual Study In Parks 
and Recreation Management (3). An 

opportunity for individuals interested in 
various aspects of park and recreation 
administration to wori< on their own un- 
der the close supervision of an advisor. 
Permission of tfie instructor and depart- 
ment chairperson is required. 

LEI 6725 Administrative Aspects of 
Therapeutic Recreation (3). An in-de- 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 133 



pth examination of issues related to the 
roles and responsibilities of ttie Activity 
Therapies/Therapeutic Recreation Ad- 
ministrator. 

LEI 6922 Supervised Reld Experi- 
ences In Parks and Recreation Ad- 
ministration (3-9). A practical 
experience for individuals interested in 
administrative responsibilities. Permis- 
sion of the instructor and Department 
Chairperson required. 

MAE 5516 Diagnosis and Remedia- 
tion In Mathematics (3). Strategies for 
studying symptoms, causes, and conse- 
quences of difficulties experienced by 
children in elementary school mathemat- 
ics. Includes supervised case study and 
theoretical models. Prerequisite: MAE 
4312. 

MAE 5655 Computers In Mathematics 
Education (3). Examines tfie use of 
computers (microcomputers) in secon- 
dary school mathematics. Designing, 
evaluating, and using varied types of 
programs in mathematics classes. 
Learning to use computers to design 
mathematics curriculum. 

MAE 5908 Individual Study (1-3). The 

student plans and carries out an inde- 
pendent study project under direction. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

MAE 5923 Workshop In Elementary 
Math Education (3). Production and ap- 
plication of materials and strategies for 
teaching mathematics in elementary 
and middle schools. 

MAE 5945 Practicum: Mathematics 
Education (6). Supervised teaching in a 
junior or senior high school. Prereq- 
uisites: Admission to the Alternate Track 
Master's Program and completion of pre- 
requisite coursework in education and 
subject matter area. 

MAE 6305 Instruction to Eariy Child- 
hood Mathematics (3). Refinement of 
skills related to program development, 
metfiods of teaching, selection of materi- 
als and review of research, in preschool 
and early childfx>od education. 

MAE 6318 Instruction In Elementary 
Mathematics (3). Refinement of skills 
related to program development, meth- 
ods of teaching, selection of materials, 
and review of research, in elementary 
education. 

MAE 6336 Teaching Mathematk^ In 
the Secondary School (3). Analysis of 
methiods, programs, and materials for 
teacNng mathematics in tne junior and 
senior Ngh school, and development of 
teacNng skills. Prerequisites: Under- 



graduate secondary math methods and 
permission of instructor. 

MAE 6899 Seminar In Mathematics 
Education (3). Designed to provide the 
advanced student with deeper under- 
standing related to mathematics educa- 
tion. Prerequisites: EDF 6486, minimum 
of 3 doctoral level math courses. 

MUE 5907 Directed Study in Music 
Education (1-3). Individual investigation 
in one or more areas of music education. 

MUE 5928 Workshop In Music (1-3). 

Applications of materials and techniques 
in music in a laboratory or field setting. 

MUE 5945 Practicum: Music Educa- 
tion (6). Supervised teaching. Prereq- 
uisites: Admission to the Alternate Track 
Master's Program eind completion of pre- 
requisite coursewori( in education and 
tfie sutjject matter area. 

MUE 6305 Instruction In Eariy Child- 
hood Music (3). Refinement of skills re- 
lated to program development, methods 
of teaching, selection of materials, and 
review of research, in preschool and 
eariy childhood education. 

MUE 6316 Instruction in Bementary 
Music (3). Refinement of skills related 
to program development, methods of 
teaching, selection of materials, and re- 
view of research, in elementary educa- 
tion. 

MUE 6345 Methodology of Music 
Teaching (3). Analysis of metfxxls, pro- 
grams and materials for teaching music 
in the public schools, and development 
of music pedagogy skills. 

MUE 6815 Acoustical and Psychologi- 
cal Foundations of Music Behavior 
(3). An overview of acoustical, physi- 
ological and psychological foundations 
of music as it influences human t)ehav- 
ior. The course will deal with musical 
acoustics, the anatomy of tfie human 
fiearing apparatus, perception, reac- 
tions, personality, mood and powers of 
discrimination. 

MUE 6925-26 Wort(shop In Music Edu- 
cation (1-3). Applications of materials 
and techniques in music education in a 
laboratory or field setting. 

MUE 6938 Seminar In Music Educa- 
tion (3). Seminar in music programs in 
tfie United States and otfier countries, 
and current issues and problems facing 
the musk: educator. 

PEP 5115 Rtness Instruction (3). The 

course prepares tfie student for tfie 
American College of Sports Medicine's 
Rtness Instnjctor Certification examina- 
tion. Prerequisite: PET 3351. 



PEP 51 16 Exercise Specialists (3). 

The course prepares the student for the 
American College of Sports Medicine's 
Exercise Specialists Certification Exami- 
nation. Prerequisites: PET 3351 and 
PET 5387. 

PEP 51 17 Fitness for Older Adults (3). 
The course explores tfie value of physi- 
cal activity for improving tfie physical 
and mental well being of older adults. 
Emphasis is placed on exercise prescrip- 
tion and supervision of p>rograms for 
those working with older adults. Prereq- 
uisite: PET 3351. 

PET 5216 Sports Psychology (3). 

Course will irK:lude an analysis of psy- 
cfwlogical variables which might influ- 
ence fjhysical performance. Topics to be 
discussed include personality develop- 
ment, motivation, anxiety, tension, 
stress, aggression, attribution tfieory, 
and social facilitation. The course is in- 
tended for prospective physical educa- 
tors and otfiers interested in motor 
performance. 

PET 5238C Perceptual Motor Learn- 
ing (3). Students will demonstrate knowl- 
edge and understanding of various 
approacfies to, and theories of, percep- 
tual motor learning, with special empha- 
sis in physical education. Perceptual 
motor tasks will be performed as well as 
taught by tfie students. 

PET 5256C Sociology of Sport (3). 

Students will demonstrate a tfiorough 
understanding of the sociological bases 
of sport and vi/ill actively engage in a 
field study involving a particular phase 
of sport and society. 

PET 5387 Exercise Test Techrrology 
(3). The course prepares ttie student for 
the American College of Sports Medi- 
cine's Exercise Test Technology Certifi- 
cation examination. Prerequisite: PET 
3351. 

PET 5436 Physical Education Curricu- 
lum In the Elementary School (3). Ex- 
amination of objectives, content, 
metfiods of teaching, and evaluative 
techniques in elementary school physi- 
cal education. Emphasis on cuniculum 
development and refinement of teaching 
skills. 

PET 5476 Sports Management and 
Administration (3). Examination of 
skills and knowledge required in the 
management and administration of 
sports-related careers in athletics, rec- 
reation, or industry. Prerequisites: Basic 
management courses: MAN 3025, PAD 
4432 or equivalent. 

PET 5625C Sports Medicine (3). Ad- 
vanced conditioning techniques. 



134 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



strength and cardio-vascular endurance 
training are presented. The prevention 
and treatment of overuse injuries are 
also emphasized. Prerequisite: PET 
3351. 

PET 5906 Individual Study (1-3). Stu- 
dents will work independently on a topic 
concerning some phase of physical edu- 
cation or sport under the guidance of a 
faculty member. Registration is by per- 
mission of advisor. 

PET 5925 Workshop in Pliysical Edu- 
cation (1-3). Production and or applica- 
tion of materials etnd techniques for' 
physical education in a classroom and 
or field setting. 

PET 5931 Special Topics in Exercise 
Physiology (1-3). Designed to present 
contemporary issues and practices in ex- 
ercise physiology. Prerequisite: PET 
3360. 

PET 5936 Special Topics in Physical 
Education (1-3). Designed to present 
contemporary issues and practices in 
physical education and sp)ort. 

PET 6597C Survey of Research in 
Physical Education (3). Following a 
survey of research in physical educa- 
tion, students will demonstrate compe- 
tencies in applying this knowledge to 
teaching situations in tfie public schools. 

PET 6775 Health Rtness Director (3). 

Designed to prepare the student for 
ACSM's Health Fitness Director certifica- 
tion. Prerequisite: PET 3351, PET 5387, 
PEP5115,andPEP5116. 

PET 6785 Exercise Program Director 
(3). Designed to prepare the student for 
ACSM's Exercise Program Director certi- 
fication examination. Prerequisite: PET 
3351 , PET 5387, PEP 51 1 5, and PEP 
5116. 

PET 6925-27 Worlcshop in Physical 
Education (1-3). Production and or ap- 
plication of materials and techniques for 
physical education in a classroom and 
or field setting. 

PET 6932 Seminar in Physical Educa- 
tion (3). Students will participate in the 
exploration, examination, and discus- 
sion of problems, issues, and trends in 
physical education and sport. 

PET 6940 internship In Exercise 
Physiology: Graduate (3-6). Clinical ex- 
perience, supervised by physician, de- 
signed to provide tiie student with 
competence in exercise prescription and 
leadership in preventive and rehabilita- 
tive outpatient exercise programs. Pre- 
requisites: PET 5387, PEP 51 15, and 
PEP 51 16. 



PET 6944 Supervised Reid Experi- 
ence (3-9). Students may use this 
course to become involved in an in-de- 
pth shjdy, research project, or any one 
of a variety of other activities, under tfie 
guidance of a faculty member. 

RED 5447 Analysis and Production 
Reading K/laterials (3). Exploration, 
creation, and evaluation of basic read- 
ing materials, commercial and non-com- 
mercial. Prerequisite: RED 4150 or 
equivalent. 

RED 5448C Teaching Reading by 
Computer (3). Evaluation and creation 
of computer programs for teaching read- 
ing in grades 4-12. No prior computer 
experience is required. 

RED 5911 individual Study in Read- 
ing (1-3). Individual investigation in the 
area of instruction. Permission of instix:c- 
tor required. 

RED 5925 Worl(shop In Reading Edu- 
cation (3). An opportunity for teachers 
to continue to develop competency in a 
specified area under Vne guidance of a 
specialist in selected fields in reading 
education. 

RED 6155 Instiuction in Elementary 
Reading (3). Refinement of skills re- 
lated to program development, methods 
of teaching, selection of materials, and 
review of research in elementary educa- 
tion. 

RED 6247 Organization and Supervi- 
sion of Reading Program (3). Thie 
organization arxJ supervision of reading 
programs; problems of organization and 
supervision; continuity of school-wide 
programs, emphasis on leadership re- 
sponsibilities. Prerequisites: EDF 5481. 

RED 6305 instruction in Early Child- 
hood Reading (3). Refinement of skills 
related to program development, metii- 
ods of teaching, selection of materials, 
and review of research, in preschool 
and eariy childhood education. 

RED 6336 Reading in the Content Ar- 
eas (3). Sti-ategies for developing tiie 
reading abilities of students in specific 
subject areas. Sti^sses vocabulary and 
comprehension development, study 
skills, library usage, reasoning, and moti- 
vating reading. Prerequisites: None. 

RED 6515 Programs of Remediation 
in Reading (3). A course demonsb'ating 
corrective and remedial procedures; ap- 
plication of specific psychological, peda- 
gogical, and psychottierapeutic 
techniques. Prerequisites: RED 6155 or 
6305, RED 6546, or tiieir equivalents. 

RED 6546 Diagnosis of Reading Diffi- 
culty (3). Technique for analyzing and 



clarifying reading difficulties. Prereq- 
uisite: RED 6155 or 6305, or its equiva- 
lent. 

RED 6747 Research in Reading (3). A 

course to shJdy significant research in 
reading and research metiiodology. In- 
volves planning and research in read- 
ing. Permission of instructor required. 
Prerequisite: EDF 5481. 

RED 6805 Practicum in Reading (3). 

An analysis of reading difficulties 
tiirough various teaching techniques 
and programs. 

RED 6845 Clinical Procedures In 
Reading (3). Supervised experience, re- 
sulting in diagnosis, prescription and 
evaluation of particular children in a clini- 
cal setting. Prerequisites: RED 6515, 
RED 6546. 

RED 6932 Seminar in Reading Educa- 
tion (3). An advanced master/beginning 
doctoral course dealing wittn advances 
in the tiieory and practice of reading in- 
struction. Prerequisites: Permission of in- 
structor and RED 6747. 

RED 6932 Special Topics in Reading 
Education (3). In-deptii exploration of a 
specific area, issue, or practice in read- 
ing education. Repeatable, but Master's 
in Reading students may count no more 
than two special topics courses toward 
tile degree. 

RED 6971 Thesis in Reading Educa- 
tion (6). Design, implementation, and 
written repwrt of an original research in- 
vestigation in reading education. Prereq- 
uisites: Advanced graduate standing 
and consent of instructor. 

RED 7938 Doctoral Seminar in Read- 
ing Education (3). Advanced shjdy in 
current tileries and research related to 
reading education. Prerequisites: RED 
6747, RED 6932, EDF 6486. 

SCE 5435 SecorKlary Science Labora- 
tories: Methods & Materials (3). In- 
crease tiie quantity and quality of 
laboratory experiences for secondary 
students by managing tfie laboratory 
safely, selecting appropriate activities, 
and evaluating sbident performance. 

SCE 5905 individual Study (1-3). The 

student plans and carries out an inde- 
pendent study project under direction. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

SCE 5930 Workshop In Elementary 
Science Education (3). Focus on con- 
tent, metiiods, and materials needed for 
teaching science in the elementary 
school, K-6. 

SCE 5945 Practicum: Science Educa- 
tion (6). Supervised teaching in a junior 



II 



I 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 135 



or senior high school. Prerequisites: Ad- 
mission to the Alternate Track Master's 
Program and completion of prerequisite 
coursework In education and subject 
matter area. 

SCE6306 Instruction In Eariy Child- 
hood Science (3). Refinement of skills 
related to program development, meth- 
ods of teaching, selection of materials, 
and review of research, in preschool 
and early childhood education. 

SCE 6315 Instruction in Elementary 
Science (3). Refinement of skills related 
to program development, methods of 
teaching, selection of materials, and re- 
view of research, in elementary educa- 
tion. 

SCE 6635 Teaching Science in the 
Secondary School (3). Analysis of 
methods, programs, and materials for 
teaching science in the junior and senior 
high school, and development of teach- 
ing skills. 

SCE 6637 Science Education and 
Community Resources (3). This 
course examines the utilization and culti- 
vation of community resources to meet 
science education goals for various 
populations. 

SCE 6925-26 Workshop In Science 
Education (1-3). Production and appli- 
cation of materials sind techniques in sci- 
ence education in a laboratory or field 
setting. 

SCE 6931 Special Topics In Science 
Education (3). An Individual topic or lim- 
ited number of topics not othenvise of- 
fered in the curriculum that facilitate 
science teaching in the elementary 
school will be selected. 

SCE 6933 Seminar in Science Educa- 
tion (3). Analysis of research trends and 
selected topics in science education. 
Mainly for graduate students in secon- 
dary science education. Individual 
needs and interests will determine tfie 
fine structure of the course content. 

SCE 7165 Curriculum Development in 
Science Education (3). Analysis of 
theoretical basis of curriculum develop- 
ment in Science Education Evaluation of 
currently availafcile material. Develop- 
ment and testing of science curriculum 
materials. Prerequisites: SCE 6933, 
EOF 6486. 

SCE 7761 Research In Science Edu- 
cation (3). Application of research meth- 
odology to Science Education. Analysis 
of current research. Development of re- 
search proposal in Science Education. 
Corxiuct field study. Prerequisites: SCE 



6933, EDF 6486, SCE 7165. Gorequi- 
site SCE 7938. 

SCE 7938 Doctoral Seminar In Sci- 
ence Education (3). Advanced doctoral 
seminar in current theories and re- 
search related to science education. Pre- 
requisites: SCE 6933, EDF 6486. 

SPS 6191 Psycho-Educational As- 
sessment I: Intellectual (3). Competen- 
cies in tfie assessment of intellectual 
ability and adaptive behavior in children. 
Corequisite: SPS 6191 L for School Psy- 
chology majors. No corequisite for other 
majors. 

SPS 61 91 L Psycho-Educational As- 
sessment I: Lab (2). Practical skills In 
the assessment of intellectual ability and 
adaptive behavior in children. Corequi- 
site: SPS 6191. 

SPS 6192 Psycho-Educationai As- 
sessment 11: Process (3). Competen- 
cies in ttie assessment of psycho- 
educational processes in children and 
their relationship to intellechjal ability. 
Corequisite SPS 6192L for School Psy- 
chology majors. No corequisite for other 
majors. Prerequisite: SPS 6191. 

SPS 6192L Psycho-Educational As- 
sessment ti: Lab (2). Practical skills in 
tfie assessment of psycho-educational 
processes in children. Emphasis on as- 
sessing disorders in the visual, auditory, 
haptic, language, and sensory integra- 
tion areas. Corequisites SPS 6191, SPS 
6191L. 

SF>S 6193 Psycho-Educationai As- 
sessment III: Behavior (3). Competen- 
cies in t>ehavioral ctnd personality 
assessment of students within the 
school setting. Emphasis on projective 
testing and behavioral observations. 
Corequisite: SPS 6193L. Prerequisites: 
SPS 6191, SPS 6192. 

SPS 6193L Psycho-Educationai As- 
sessment III: Lab (3). Practical skills in 
projective aind behavioral assessment of 
students witfnin tiie school setting. Core- 
quisite: SPS 6193. Prerequisites: SPS 
6191, SPS 6192. 

SPS 6805 Professional Problems in 
School Psychology (3). Competencies 
in regard to tiie devetopment, role and 
furKtion of school psychologists. Gen- 
eral orientation arxl legal and ethical is- 
sues included. 

SSE 5908 Individual Study (1-3) 
(ARR). The student plans and carries 
out an independent study project under 
direction. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
sbTJCtor. 

SSE 5929 Wori(shop In Elementary 
Social Studies Education (3). Focus 



on content, methods and materials 
needed for teaching social studies in tiie 
elementary school, K-6. 

SSE 5945 Practicum: Social Studies 
Education (6). Supervised teaching In a 
junior or senior high school. Prereq- 
uisites: Admission to ttie Alternate Track 
Master's Program and completion of pre- 
requisite coursewori^ in education and 
subject matter area. 

SSE 6305 instruction in Early Child- 
hood Social Studies (3). Refinement of 
skills related to program development, 
mettxjds of teaching, selection of materi- 
Eils, and review of research, in preschool 
and eariy childhood education. 

SSE 6355 Instruction In Elementary 
Social Studies (3). Refinement of skills 
related to program development, meth- 
ods of teaching, selection of materials, 
and review of research in elementary 
education. 

SSE 6394 Social Studies In Other Na- 
tions (3). The course wflll examine the 
concept of social studies as a subject 
area in elementary and secondary 
schools found in both developed and de- 
veloping nations. Comparisons and con- 
trasts will be made. Prerequisites: SSE 
6633, SSE 6939. 

SSE 6633 Teaching Social Studies in 
the Secondary School (3). Analysis of 
metiiods, programs, and material for 
teaching social studies in tfie junior and 
senior high school, and development of 
teaching skills. 

SSE 6795 Seminar: Research In So- 
cial Studies Education (3). The course 
will examine research in social studies 
education. The course will serve as a 
lab for developing a dissertation re- 
search design. Prerequisite: EDF 5481. 
Corequisites: EDF 6486, STA 5166, 
EDF 6403 or EDF 6475. 

SSE 6925-28 Woricshop in Social 
Studies Education (1-3). Production 
and application of materials and tech- 
niques in social studies education in a 
laboratory or field setting. 

SSE 6939 Seminar In Social Studies 
Education (3). Designed for advanced 
students, ihe readings and discussions 
will focus on policy issues and recent re- 
search in social studies education. 
Though primarily for experienced social 
studies teachers and supen/isors, tiie 
course is open to administrators and otti- 
ers, with the consent of ttie instnjctor. 

SSE 7938 Doctoral Seminar in Social 
Studies Education (3). Advanced doc- 
toral study in current ttieories and re- 
search related to social studies 



136 / College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



education. Prerequisites: SSE 6939, 
EDF6486. 

TSL 5142 Curriculum Development In 
English as a Second Language (3). 

Description, analysis, planning, design, 
and evaluation of curriculum in English 
as a second language (K-adult). Prereq- 
uisite: TSL 6341. 

TSL 5371 Special Methods of TESOL 
(3). Investigation of modern techniques 
for the teaching of oral and written com- 
munication in English to non-native 
speakers of English, including the evalu- 
ation and development of materials for 
English to speakers of other languages. 
Issues in elementary, secondary, adult, 
vocational, and special education will 
also be addressed. Prerequisite: LIN 
3010. 



College of Education 

Dear7 I. Ira Goldent)erg 

Associate Dean for 

Academic Affairs Rol>ert Vos 

Associate Dean for 

Student and Community 

Services TonI Bilbao 

Director of Budget and 

Finance Carmen Mendez 

Assistant Dean for 

Nortii Miami Campus/ 

Broward Janice R. Sandlford 

Chairpersons: 

Educational Leadership, 

and Policy Studies Stephen M. Fain 
Educational Psychology 

and Special 

Education Stephen S. Sttlchart 

Health Physical 

Education and 

Recreation Ida F. Chadwick 

Mddle, Secondary 

and Vocational 

Education Luis A. Martinez-Perez 
Elementary Education Alicia Mendoza 
Urban, Multicultural 

and Community 

Community Robert V. Farrell 

Coordinators/Directors 

Coordinator of Doctoral 

Programs Rotiert Vos 

Director of Internship and 

Student Teaching TBA 

Director of Student 

Services Susan H. Lynch 

Faculty 

Alvarez, Carlos, M., Ph.D. (University 
of Florida), Associate Professor, 



International Development 
Education, Educational Psychology, 
Educational Research, Educational 
Leadership, and Policy Studies 

Badia, Amhilda, Ph.D. (University of 
l^orth Carolina, Chapel Hill), 
Associate Professor, Modern 
Language Education, Middle, 
Secondary, and Vocational 
Education. 

Baum, Rosemere, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania 
Slate University), Associate 
Professor, Home Economics 
Education, Middle, Secondary and 
Vocational Education 

Bath, John B., Ph.D. (Syracuse 
University), Assistant Professor, 
Elementary Mathematics and 
Science Education, Elementary 
Education 

Biltiao, TonI, M.A. (University of 

Miami), Associate Dean, Elementary 
Education, Elementary Education 

Bradley, Curtis H., Ed.D. (Temple 
University), Professor, 
Organizational Training, 
Vocational-Industrial Education, 
Middle, Secondary and Vocational 
Education 

Blucker, Judith A., Ph.D. (Rorida State 
University), Professor, Health and 
Physical Education, Curriculum and 
Instruction, and Vice Provost 

CamptwII, Richard, Ed.D. (Indiana 
University), Professor, Science 
Education, Curriculum and 
Instruction, Dean of Graduate 
Studies, and Director of Institutional 
Development 

Carpenter, John A., Ph.D. (University 
of Southern California), Professor, 
Educational Foundations, 
Educational Leadership, Urban, 
Multicultural and Community 
Education 

Chadwick, Ida F., Ph.D. (Florida State 
University), Associate Professor and 
Chairperson, Physical Education, 
Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation 

Chang, DavWY., M.A. (Florida 
International University), Assistant 
Professor, Art Education, Middle, 
Secondary and Vocational Education 

Cheyney, Wendy, Ed.D. (University of 
Miami), Associate Professor, Special 
Education for Learning Disabilities, 
Educational Psychology and Special 
Education 

CIstone, Peter J., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania 
State University), Professor, 
Educational Leadership, Educational 
Leadership and Policy Studies 

Cook, Joseph B., Ed.D. (University of 
Florida), Professor, Community 
College Teaching, Urban, 
Multicultural and Community 
Education 



Crabtree, MyrnaP., Ed.D. (Teachers 
College, Columbia University), 
Professor, Home Economics 
Education, Middle, Secondary and 
Vocational Education 

Dimldjian, Victoria J., Ph.D. 

(University of Pittsburgh), Professor, 
Early Childhood Education, 
Elementary Education 

Divita, Charles, Jr., Ph.D. (Florida 
State University), Professor, Adult 
Education and Human Resource 
Development, Educational 
Leadership and Policy Studies 

Escotet, Miguel Angel, Ph.D. 
(University of Nebraska), Visiti'ng 
Professor (Courtesy), International 
Development Education and 
Educational Psychology, Educational 
Leadership, and Policy Studies 

Fain, Stephen M., Ed.D. (Teachers 
College, Columbia University), 
Professor and Chairperson, 
Curriculum and Instruction, 
Educational Leadership and Policy 
Studies 

Farrell, Rol>ertV. Ph.D. (Teachers 
College, Columbia University), 
Associate Professor and 
Chairperson, Soa'al Foundations of 
Education, Urban, Multicultural and 
Community Education 

Rsher, Alien, Ph.D. (University of 
Connecticut), Associate Professor, 
Educational Leadership, Educational 
Leadership and Policy Studies 

Gallagher, Paul D., Ph.D. (Rorida State 
University), Associate Professor, 
Educational Research, Educational 
Leadership and Policy Studies, and 
Vice President for North Miami 
Campus 

Gavilan, Marisal, Ed.D. (University of 
Tennessee), Associate Professor, 
Educational Psychology and 
Bilingual Education/TESOL, 
Educational Psychology and Special 
Education 

Gay, Lorraine R., Ph.D. (Florida Stale 
University), Professor, Educational 
Research, Educational Leadership 
and Policy Studes 

Gilbert, Robert K., Ph.D. (University of 
Minnesota), Associate Professor, 
Mathematics Education, Middle, 
Secondary and Vocational Education 

Goldenberg, I. Ira, Ph.D. (University of 
Connecticut), Professor, Urban, 
Multicultural and Community 
Education and Dean 

Greenberg, Barry, Ph.D. (New York 
University), Professor. Educational 
Research and Community College 
Teaching, Educational Leadership 
and Policy Studies 

Grosse, Christine Uber, Ph.D. 

(University of North Carolina. Chapel 
Hill), Assistant Professor, TESOL, 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education / 137 



Urban, Multicultural and Community 
Education 

Hauenstein, A. Dean, Ph.D. (Ohio 
Slate University), Professor, 
Vocational Education, Technology 
Education, Middle, Secondary and 
Vocational Education 

Kaplan, E. Joseph, Ph.D. (Florida 
State University), Assistant 
Professor, Foundations of 
Education, Urban, Multicultural and 
Community Education 

Kennedy, Daniel A., Ph.D. (University 
of Oregon), Associate Professor, 
School Counseling, Educational 
Psychology and Special Education 

Kossack, Sharon Wall, Ph.D. 

(University of Georgia), Professor, 
Reading and Language Arts 
Education, Elementary Education 

Lazarus, Philip J., Ph.D. (University of 
Florida), Associate Professor, 
Educational Psychology and School 
Psychology, Educational Psychology 
and Special Education 

Lopez, Richard, Ed.D. (Florida Atlantic 
University), Associate Professor, 
Exercise Physiology, Health, 
Physical Education, and Recreation 

Lucky, Luretha, Ed.D. (Arizona State 
University), Associate Professor, 
Special Education for Mental 
Retardation, Educational Psycholgy 
and Special Education 

Lynch, Susan H. M.S. (Florida State 
University), Early Childhood 
Education 

Marshall, Nancy, Ph.D. (Cornell 
University), Associate Professor, 
Reading and Language Arts 
Education, Elementary Education 

Martinez-Perez, Luis A., Ph.D. (Florida 
State University), Associate 
Professor and Chairperson, Science 
Education, Middle, Secondary and 
Vocational Education 

Mathewson, Grover, Ph.D. (University 
of California at Berkeley). Associate 
Professor, Reading and Language 
Arts Education, Elementary 
Education 

McCtintock, C. Edwin, Ed.D. 

(University of Georgia), Professor, 
Mattiematics Education and 
Computer Education, Middle, 
Secondary and Vocational Education 

Mendez, Carmen, MPA (Florida 
International University), Public 
Administration, and Director of 
Budget and Finance 

Mendoza, Alicia, Ed.D. (University of 
Miami), Associate Professor and 
Chairperson, Early CNidhood 
Education, Elementary Education 

Miller, Lynne Ph.D. (University of 
Arizona), Assistant Professor, 
Reading and Language Arts, 
Elementary Education 



Mohamed, Dominic A., Ph.D. 

(University of Minnesota), Associate 
Professor, Vocational Administration 
and Supervision and Vocational 
Education, Middle, Secondary and 
Vocational Education 

Morrison, George S., Ed.D. (University 
of Pittsburgh), Professor, Early 
Childhood Education and Urban 
Education, Elementary Education 

Nathanson, David E., Ph.D. (University 
of Minnesota), Professor, Special 
Education for tiie Gifted/Mental 
Retardation, Educational Psychology 
and Special Education 

Novoa, Loriana M., Ed.D. (Harvard 
University), Assistant Professor, 
Special Education, Educational 
Research, Educational Leadership 
and Policy Studies 

O'Brien, George E., Ph.D. (University 
of Iowa), Assistant Professor, 
Science Education, Middle, 
Secondary and Vocational Education 

Pearson, George B., Ed.D. (University 
of Oregon), Professor, Physical 
Education, Health, Physical 
Education and Recreation 

Pell, Sarah W. J., Ed.D. (Duke 
University), Assodate Professor, 
Educational Leadership, Educational 
Leadership, and Policy Studies 

Pennington, Clement, Ed.D. 
(Pennsylvania State University), 
Associate Professor, Art Education, 
Middle, Secondary and Vocational 
Education 

Reichbach, Edward M., Ed.D. (Wayne 
State University), Associate 
Professor, Elementary Education, 
Elementary Education 

Rosenberg, Howard, Ed.D. (Teachers 
College, Columbia University), 
Associate Professor, Special 
Education for Mental Retardation, 
Educational Psychology and Special 
Education 

Ryan, Colleen A., Ph.D. (Ohio State 
University), Associate Professor, 
Special Education for tije 
Emotionally Handicapped, Urban, 
Multicultural and Community 
Education 

Sandiford, Janice R., Ph.D. (Ohio 
State University), Associate 
Professor, Healtii Occupations 
Education and Computer Education, 
Middle, Secondary and Vocational 
Education, and Assistant Dean for 
North Miami Campus/Broward 

Shostak, Rot)ert, Ph.D. (University of 
Connecticut), Professor, English 
Education and Computer Education, 
Middle, Secondary and Vocational 
Education 

Skaiko, Thomas, Ph.D (University of 
Maryland), Therapeutic Recreation, 



Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation 

Smith, Donald C, Ph.D. (Syracuse 
University), Professor, Educational 
Psychology and School Psychology, 
Educational Psychology and Specif 
Education 

Smith, Douglas H., Ph.D. (Ohio State 
University), Associate Professor, 
Adult Education and Human 
Resource Development, Educational 
Leadership and Policy Studies 

Strichart, Stephen S., Ph.D. (Yeshiva 
University), Professor and 
Chairperson, Special Education for 
Learning Disabilities, Educational 
Psycholgy and Special Education 

Testa, Rot)ert F., Ph.D. (University of 
Miami), Associate Professor, 
Educational Foundations and Music 
Education, Middle, Secondary and 
Vocational Education 

Toomer, Jethro, Ph.D. (Temple 

University), Professor, Educational 
Psychology and Community 
Counseling, Educational Psychology 
and Special Education 

Tucker, Jan L, Ph.D. (Indiana 

University), Professor, Social Studies 
Education and Global Education, 
Middle, Secondary and Vocational 
Education 

Vigilante, Nicholas J., Ph.D. (ONo 
State University), Professor 
Emeritus, Matiiematics Education, 
Elementary Education, Mddle, 
Secondary and Vocational Education 

Vos, Robert Ed.D. (Rutgers 

University), Associate Professor and 
Associate Dean, Organizational 
Training, Technical Education, and 
Vocational Education, Middle, 
Secondary and Vocational Education 

Wagner, Michael J., Ph.D. (Rorida 
State University), Professor, Music 
Education, Middle, Secondary and 
Vocational Education 

Walker, Judith Jones, Ph.D. 
(University of Miami), Assistant 
Professor, Counselor Education, 
Educational Psychology, Educational 
Psychology and Special Education 

Winter, Rotjert S., Ph.D. (University of 
Illinois), Associate Professor, 
International Development 
Education, Educational Technology, 
Educational Leadership and Policy 
Studies 

Wolff, Robert M., Ph.D. (Ohio State 
University), Associate Professor, 
Parks and Recreation Management, 
Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation 

Woods, Sandra L, Ed.D. (Rutgers 
University), Associate Professor, 
Elementary Education 



138 1 College of Engineering and Design 



Graduate Catalog 



College of 
Engineering and 
Design 

Gordon Hopkins, Dean 
Gautam Ray, Associate Dean 
Adele Smith, Associate Dean 
Gustavo Rolg, Acting Associate Dean 
Neil Hout-Cooper, Director of 

Information Systems and External 

Programs 

The College of Engineering and Design 
is composed of two schools committed 
to the development of professionals 
who will serve the community in a wide 
variety of fields. In addition, there are 
two units in the College solely devoted 
to research and otfier creative activities. 

Master's Degrees can be earned in 
the following fields of study; 

Civil Engineering 

Computer Engineering 

Construction Management 

Electrical Engineering 

Environmental Engineering 

EnvironmentaJ and Urt>an Systems 

Industrial Engineering 

Landscape Architecture 

Mechanical Engineering 

The programs of the College are di- 
rected towards the practical use of scien- 
tific, engineering and technical 
principles to meet tfie objectives of in- 
dustry, business, government and the 
public. 

The College provides each student 
with the opportunity to develop mari<et- 
able skills and to obtain an education 
which will prepare Hm or her for a re- 
warding career and personal growth. 

Underlying the programs of ttie Col- 
lege is a recognition that ttie growing im- 
pact of technology upon the quality of 
life is growing and ttiat the proper appli- 
cation of technology is critical to meet- 
ing current and emerging human needs. 

The College is actively engaged in a 
number of special programs as a serv- 
ice to the community and tfie University. 
One of these activities is the Interna- 
tional Association for Housing Sdence. 
an organization with membership from 
more than 20 nations, dedicated to Im- 
proving housing technology and produc- 
tion, as well as studying the 
inter-disciplinary aspects of fiousing. 

The College faculty is actively en- 
gaged witfn business, industry and gov- 
ernment. Faculty members are 
participating in a variety of applied re- 
search! projects in such areas as en- 
ergy, ti^nsportatlon, solid waste 
disposal, biomedical devices and instru- 
mentation, water resources, computer 



engineering, artificial intelligence, manu- 
facturing, robotics, telecommunications, 
micro-electronics, structural systems 
biotechnology, etc. 



School of 
Engineering 

Gordon R. Hopkins, Dean 
Gautam Ray, Associate Dean 
Gustavo Roig, Acting Associate Dean 
Neil Hout-Cooper, Director of 

Information Sen/ices and External 

Programs 

Master of Science Degree 
Programs 

The School offers Master of Science de- 
grees in Civil Engineering, Computer En- 
gineering, Electi-ical Engineering, 
Industi-ial Engineering, and Mechanical 
Engineering. The various curricula for 
the School are designed to give the stu- 
dent an education for entry into the pro- 
fession of engineering. 

Prospective graduate students 
should refer to the appropriate section 
of the catalog, or contact the graduate 
advisor in eitfier program. 

l\lote: The programs, policies, re- 
quirements and regulations listed in the 
catalog are continually subject to re- 
view, in order to serve the needs of tfie 
University's various policies, and to re- 
spond to the mandates of the Rorida 
Board of Regents and the Rorida Legis- 
lature. Changes may be made witix)ut 
advance notice. 

Rorida Internationa) University and 
the College believe in equal opportunity 
practices which confonn to all laws 
against discrimination and are commit- 
ted to non-discrimination with respect to 
race, color, creed, age, handicap, sex, 
marital status, or national origin. Addi- 
tionally, the University is committed to 
the principle of taking the positive steps 
necessary to achieve the equalization of 
educational and employment opportuni- 
ties. 

Accreditation 

The Engineering Accreditation Commis- 
sion of the Accreditation Board for Engi- 
neering and Technology (ABET) 
accredits college engineering programs 
on a nationwkte basis. Accreditatksn is 
important in many areas of tiie engineer- 
ing profession. Students wishing more 
information about accreditation should 
consult their departmental offk« or the 
Office of die Dean. The following engi- 
neering baccalaureate programs are 



ABET accredted: Civil, Electrical, Indus- 
trial and MedTanreal. 

Academic Appeal Procedures 

Academic Appeals not covered under 
the Academic Misconduct Policy shall 
be processed in the following manner: 

Step 1 . The student and faculty 
member will meet informally in an at- 
tempt to resolve the problem within 45 
days of tfie alleged occurrence. 

Step 2. If the informal meeting does 
not result in an acceptable remedy, the 
student can appeal in writing to the 
Department/Divisional Cfiairperson 
within ten days of tfie informal meeting. 
The viffitten appeal should include the 
nature and conditions of tiie problem 
and a summary of the informal meeting 
with the faculty member involved. 

Within ten days of tfie receipt of the 
vrtitten appeal, the Chairperson, stu- 
dent, and faculty member will meet in 
an attempt to resolve the problem. 

Step 3. If the results from tfie meet- 
ing in Step 2 is not acceptable, tfie stu- 
dent can appeal in writing to tfie Dean 
of tfie College witiiin ten days. The writ- 
ten appeal should include tJie nature 
and conditions of tJie problem and a 
summary of tfie meetings in Step 1 and 
in Step 2. 

Within ten days of the receipt of the 
written appeal, tfie Dean will meet with 
ttie Chairperson, tfie student, and the 
faculty member in an attempt to resolve 
the problem. 

The Dean will provide a written deci- 
sion within ten days of tfie meeting in 
Step 3. 

The Dean's decision is final. 



Civil and Environmental 
Engineering 

Oktay Ural, Professor and Chairperson 

Robert J. Fennema, Assistant Professor 

Jeffrey H. Greenfield, Assistant 
Professor 

Luis A. Prieto-Portar, Professor 

L David Shen, Associate Professor 

Vasant H. SurtJ, Professor 

Lambert Tall, Professor 

Berrin Tansel, Wsiting Assistant 
Professor 

Leroy E Thompson, Professor 
Fernando TInoco, Visiting Professor 
Ton-Lo Wang, Associate Professor 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Engineering and Design / 139 



Graduate Programs 

Leroy E. Thompson, Graduate Studies 

Coordinator 
The Department of Civil and Environ- 
mental Engineering offers advanced 
study for the degree ot Master of Sci- 
ence. Tfie areas of specialty are Struc- 
tures, Mechanics, Geotechnical, 
Construction, Transportation, Water Re- 
sources, and Environmental Engineer- 
ing. The degree will be a Master of 
Science in Civil Engineering or a Master 
of Science In Environmental Engineer- 
ing depending upon the eirea of selected 
graduate study. 

Master of Science in Civil 
Engineering 

The Master of Science program In Civil 
Engineering emphasizes course w^ork 
as well as research. The student is gen- 
erally encouraged to specialize in a de- 
fined area of civil engineering, but also 
find it desirable to pursue a more gen- 
eral program of studies combining sub- 
ject material from different areas of 
specialization and interdisciplinary re- 
lated courses. 

The graduate degree is offered to 
prepare qualified students for the profes- 
sional practice of civil engineering. The 
degree is available in a thesis or non- 
thesis program. Tfie thesis program en- 
tails a minimum of six credits for the 
successful completion of the research 
and thesis. The non-thesis program 
must be supported by the successful 
completion of a project and a report of 
substantial engineering content for a 
minimum of three credits. A student 
must satisfactorily complete a minimum 
of 36 semester credits of acceptable 
graduate coursework which includes a 
minimum of 12 credits of graduate 
courses in the specialty area. 

Master of Science in 
Environmental Engineering 

A Master of Science In Environmental 
Engineering is availsible to persons inter- 
ested in graduate work in Environmental 
Engineering. The program is designed 
to give graduate students a broad base 
of knowledge on environmental engi- 
neering and on problem solving while 
encouraging them to pursue individual 
Interests. Thus, the curriculum has a 
common core of courses but is flexible 
enough to permit an interdisciplinary ap- 
proach, if so desired, and allows the stu- 
dent to pursue Ns or her career goals. 
A proposed program of studies will 
be developed at the time of admission 
or no later than at the end of the stu- 
dent's first semester. The applicant 
should hold a Bachelor's degree in engi- 



neering, the natural sciences, or a re- 
lated field. Students who do not meet 
the stated criteria as developed by the 
faculty may be considered for admission 
if they complete the required prereq- 
uisites and satisfy any deficiencies. 

Master of Science in 
Environmental and Urban 
Systems 

This program prepares the student to 
practice urban and regional planning, as 
a discipline to address social, physical, 
and economic problems of neighbor- 
hoods, cities, suburbs, metropolitan ar- 
eas, and larger regions. The student 
must identify problems and opportuni- 
ties, devise alternative policies or plans 
and effect their implications. 

Admission Policies for all 
Graduate Programs 

A student seeking admission into the 
graduate program must have a bache- 
lor's degree or equivalent from an ac- 
credited institution or, in the case of 
foreign students, an institution recog- 
nized in its own country as prefjaring stu- 
dents for further study at the graduate 
level. All graduate applicants, regard- 
less of previous grade point average or 
degrees, are required to submit their 
GRE (general) scores. An applicant 
must present: 

1 . A "B" average in upper level under- 
graduate wori<, or a 3.0 GPA., 

2. A combined score of 1000 or 
higher on the vertjal and quantitative 
sections of the Graduate Record Exami- 
nation (GRE). 

Grades earned at an institution with 
non-traditional grading systems will be 
given every consideration and appli- 
cants will be treated equally with stu- 
dents from institutions with traditional 
grading systems. 

Foreign students are admitted as 
governed by University Admission rules 
and Board of Regents Rule 6C-6.09: 

1 . Eligible students may be accepted 
at the appropriate level subject to space 
and fiscal limitations. 

2. In addition to University admission 
requirements, foreign students must 
meet tfie following requirements as a 
minimum: 

a. The applicant shall be academi- 
cally eligible for further study in his or 
her own country. 

b. The applicant whose native lan- 
guage is other than English shall demon- 
strate proficiency in the English 
language by presenting a score of 550 
or higher on ttie Test of English as a For- 
eign Language (TOEFL). 



Application Procedures for all 
Graduate Programs 

A student planning to enroll in the gradu- 
ate program must complete the follow- 
ing: 

1 . Submit a Graduate Application for 
Admission to the Admissions Office. Ap- 
plication forms will be mailed upon re- 
quest. 

2. Have a copy of ttie official tran- 
scripts of all ixeviously earned college 
or university credits sent from the appli- 
cant's former institution(s) to the Admis- 
sion Office. 

3. Submit scores on the Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE). 

4. Foreign students must submit 
TOEFL scores. 

5. It should be emphasized that the 
admission cannot be acted upon until all 
of the documents arxl credentials have 
been received. 

Degree Requirements 

To be eligible for a Master's degree a 
student must: 

1 . Satisfy all University requirements 
for a Master's degree. 

2. Meet all undergraduate deficien- 
cies, the requirements of the core or the 
requirements of an approved program 
of study, or both. This program of study 
is developed by tfie student and his or 
her advisor and must be approved by 
the Supervisory Committee and by the 
Coordinator of tfie Program. 

3. Complete a minimum of 36 semes- 
ter hours of acceptable graduate level 
courses. 

4. Earn a minimum average of 3.0 in 
all approved courses in the student's 
program of study. 

5. Complete an acceptable thesis or 
an engineering project. 

6. Pass an oral examination that in- 
cludes an oral defense of the thesis. 

7. Master's degree students in Envi- 
ronmental Engineering must, in addition; 

a Take ENV 6615 Environmental Im- 
pact Assessment. 

b. Select, with advisor approval at 
least two courses from the following: 
EES 5506 Occupational Health 
EES5605C Noise Control 

Engineering 
ENV 5105 Air Quality Management 
ENV 5356 Solid Wastes 
ENV 5666 Water Quality 

Management 

c. Take a mathematics course as de- 
termined by ttie advisor for the thesis or 
project. 

d. Take at least one credit of ENV 
6935 Environmental Graduate Seminar. 



140 / College of Engineering and Design 



Graduate Catalog 



e. Complete a minimum of nine 
credit hours of courses at the 6000 level. 

f. Complete eight credit hours of 
ENV 6971 Thesis, or two credits of ENV 
6916 Engineering Project. 

Grades and Credits 

No course in which a grade below a 'C 
is earned may be counted toward the 
Master of Sdence in Civil Engineering 
or in Environmental Engineering. 

Transfer Credit 

The student may receive permission to 
transfer up to a maximum of six semes- 
ter hours of graduate credit provided 
that: (1 ) the course(s) were taken at \he 
graduate level at an accredited college 
or university; (2) grade(s) of 'B' or 
higher; (3) the course(s) are judged by 
the faculty advisor, Supervisory Commit- 
tee, or Coordinator of ttie Program; (4) 
the credits were not used toward an- 
other degree; and (5) tfie credit(s) were 
completed within seven years immedi- 
ately preceding tfie awarding of the de- 
gree. 

Credit is not transferable until the stu- 
dent has earned 12 semester hours in 
the Civil Engineering or Environmental 
Engineering programs. 

Time Limit 

All work applicable to the Master's de- 
gree, including transfer credit, must be 
completed writhin seven years immedi- 
ately preceding the awarding of the 
degree. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

CES-Civil Engineering Structures; ECI- 
Engineering, Civil; EGM-Engineering, 
Mechanics; EGN-Engineering, General; 
ENV-Engineering, Environmental; SUR- 
Surveying and Related Areas; TTE- 
Transportation and Traffic Engineering 

CCE 5035 Construction Engineering 
Management (3). Course will cover con- 
struction organization, planning and im- 
plementation; impact and feasilDility 
studies; contractual subjects; liability 
and performance; the responsib>ility of 
owner, contractor and engineer. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

CES 5106 Advanced Structural Analy- 
sis (3). Extension of the fundamental 
topics of structural analysis with empha- 
sis on energy methods and methods 
best suited for non-prismatic members. 
Prerequisite: CES 4152. 

CCE 5505 Computer Integrated Con- 
struction Engineering (3). Course cov- 



ers the discussion of available software 
related to Construction Engineering top- 
ics; knowledge based expert systems 
and their relevance to construction engi- 
neering planning and management Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

CEG 5065C Geotechnical Dynanvcs 
(4). Analytical, field, and laboratory tech- 
niques related to vitxation problems of 
foundations, wave propagations, behav- 
ior of soils and rocks, earth dams, shal- 
low and deep foundations. Earthquake 
engineering. Prerequisite: ECl 4312. 

CES 5565 Computer Applications in 
Structures (3). Discussion and applica- 
tion of available computer programs, 
techniques and equipment for the analy- 
sis, design and drafting of structures. 
Prerequisites: CES 4605 and CES 4704. 

CES 5606 Advanced Structural Steel 
Design (3). Extension of the analysis 
and design of structural elements and 
connections for buildings, bridges, and 
specialized structures utilizing structural 
steel. Prerequisites: CES 4152, CES 
4605. 

CES 5715 Prestressed Concrete De- 
sign (3). The behavior of steel and con- 
crete under sustained load. Analysis 
and design of pre-tensioned smd post- 
tensioned reinforced concrete mem- 
bers, and designing these members into 
the integral structure. Prerequisite: CES 
4704. 

CES 5800 Timtier Design (3) The 
analysis and design of modem wood 
structures. Effect of plant origin and 
physical structure of wood on its me- 
chanical strength; fasteners and their 
significance in design. 

CES 6706 Advar>ced Reinforced Con- 
crete Design (3). The analysis and de- 
sign of reinforced concrete and masonry 
structural systems to formalize the stu- 
dent's knowledge of the behavior of 
structural components into a final inte- 
grated structure. Prerequisites: CES 
4152, CES 4704, ECl 4305. 

CGN 5905 Directed Independent 
Study (1-3). Individual conferences, as- 
signed readings, and reports inde- 
pendent investigations selected by the 
student and professor with approval of 
advisor. 

CGN 5930 Advanced Special Topics 
In Civil Engineerirtg (1-3). A course de- 
signed to give groups of students an op- 
portunity to pursue special studies in an 
advanced topic of Civil Engineering rrot 
otherwise offered. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 



CGN 5935 Professiortal Engineering 
(Civil) Review (4). Prepares qualified 
candidates to take the P.E. written ex- 
amination in the filed of Civil Engineer- 
ing. Reviews hydraulics, hydrology, 
water supply and wastewater, geotech- 
nics, structures, concrete and steel 
design, etc. 

CWR 5235 Open Channel Hydraulics 
(3). Theoretical treatment and applica- 
tion of hydraulics. Flow in open chan- 
nels with special reference to varied 
flew, critical state hydraultejump, and 
wave formation. Prerequisites: EGN 
3353 and ENV 3621. 

ECl 6317 Theoretical Geotechnical 
Mechanics (3). A continuum mechanics 
interpretation of geotechnical engineer- 
ing: soil rheology: theories of yielding: 
failure arKl plastic stability. Analytical 
and numerical modeling of non-linear 
properties. Prerequisites: ECl 5324 and 
MAP 3302. Suggested corequisite: MAP 
4401. 

ECl 6326 Advanced Foundations En- 
girteering (3). Computer applications in- 
volving the numerical analysis and 
design of complex soil-stmcture interac- 
tions: highway and airfield pavements, 
deep foundation groups and NATM tun- 
nelling techniques. Prerequisite: ECl 
4312. 

ECl 6616 Advanced Groundwater Hy- 
draulics (3). Groundwater flow through 
porous medium. Velocity holograph, con- 
formal mapping, Schwartz-Christotfel 
transformation, numerical methods. Pre- 
requisite: ECl 6617. 

ECl 6617 Groundwater Hydrology (3). 

Groundwater occurrence, movement, 
hydraulics, and application to groundwa- 
ter flow, including saltwater intrusion, 
groundwater recharge and drainage, 
seepage through earth dams. Prereq- 
uisite: ENV 3621. 

ECl 6637Statistical Hydrology (3). 

Quantitative determination of surface 
water run-off from a statistical approach. 
Prerequisite: ENV 3621. 

ECl 6916 Engineering Project (1-3). In- 
dependent research work culmirating in 
a professional practice oriented report 
for the requirements of the non-thesis 
option of the M.S. degree. Prereq- 
uisites: Fifteen graduate credits and ap- 
proved project plan. 

ECl 6939 Graduate Seminar (1-3). An 

examination of recent technical findings 
in selected areas of concern. Emphasis 
is placed on presentations (oral and writ- 
ten), research activities, readings, and 
active discussions among participants. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Engineering and Design / 141 



Prerequisite: Permission of graduate's 
advisor. 

ECl 6971 Thesis (1-6). The student fol- 
lowing the thesis option of the Master's 
degree will pursue research through this 
course. The research work will culmi- 
nate with an acceptable thesis. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of graduate's thesis 
advisor. 

EES 5135 Water Quality Indicators 
(3). Ecological studies of miao and 
macro organisms which are indicators of 
water quality. Emphasis of bioassays 
and early warning systems. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

EES 5137 Biological Monitoring of 
Freshwater Ecosystenns (3). The use 

of aquatic insects and other inverte- 
brates to monitor changes in tfie aquatic 
environment. Tfie ecological aspects of 
aquatic insects in relation to pollution 
stress are assessed. Prerequisite: EES 
5135 or permission of insti^ctor. 

EES 5506 Occupational Health (3). Ef- 
fects, assessment, aind control of physi- 
cal and chemical factors in man's 
working environment, including chemi- 
cal agents, electromagnetic radiation, 
temperature, humidity, pressures, illumi- 
nation, noise, and vibration. Prereq- 
uisite: Admission to graduate program. 

EES 5605C Noise Control Engineer- 
ing (3). Fundamentals of sound and 
noise. Health fiazards and otiier effects. 
Measurement and noise control in trans- 
portation, construction, and other envi- 
ronments. Prerequisite: Admission to 
graduate program. 

EES 6506 Envlronnrwntat and Human 
Factors (3). Effects, assessment and 
control of physical and chemical factors 
in the natural and man-made environ- 
ments, including noise, electi'o-magnetic 
radiation, air and water pollution, public 
and occupational health, vector control, 
communicable diseases. Prerequisite: 
Admission to graduate program. 

EES 6508 Occupational Health and 
Toxicology (3). A continuation of EES 
5506. Investigation of toxic substances 
in air, water, and food in the indusbial 
environment. Prerequisite: EES 5506. 

EGM 5111 Experimental Stress Analy- 
sis (3). Course covers the necessary 
tiieory and techniques of experimental 
stress analysis and tiie primary methods 
employed: Ixittle coating, strain gauges, 
photoelasticity and Moire. Prerequisites: 
EGM 3520, EGM 5653. 

EGM 5351 Finite Element Methods In 
■Mechanics (3). Matrix techniques and 
variational metix>ds in solid mechanics; 



single element, assemblage and gener- 
alized tfieory: non-linear analysis; appli- 
cations in structijral and soil mechanics, 
torsion, heat conduction cind hydro-elas- 
ticity, etc. Prerequisite: EGM 3520. 

EGM 5421 Structural Dynamics (3). 

Fundamentals of free, forced, and tran- 
sient vibration of singles arKi multi-de- 
gree of freedom stixictures, including 
damping of lumped and distributed pa- 
rameters systems. Prerequisite: MAP 
3302. Corequisite: EGM 5533. 

EGM 5533 Advanced Mechanics of 
Materials (3). Extension of the funda- 
mental principles of engineering me- 
chanics to include curved beams, 
warping, stability, etc. Prerequisites: 
CES 4152, MAP 3302. 

EGM 5653 Theory of Elasticity (3). An 

advanced course covering ttie concepts 
of stress etnd strain tensors, indicia nota- 
tion, ti-ansformation of sti-esses, compati- 
bility equations, ttie stress function eind 
tfie closed form solution of some impor- 
tant continuum mechanics problems. 
Prerequisites: EGM 3520, MAP 3302. 

EGM 6675 Advanced PlasUclty (3). 

Formulation of the plastic sti'ess-sti'ain 
relationships; Prandtl-Reuss equations; 
yield criteria; Plane Plastic Row and tiie 
Plane Slip Line Reld Theory; limit analy- 
sis and basics of aeep. Prerequisite: 
EGM 3520. 

EGM 6736 Theory of Elastic Stability 
(3). Course will cover ttie beam-column 
problem; elastic and inelastic buckling of 
bars and frames; review of experimental 
wori( and design formulas; buckling of 
rings, curved bars and eirches; bending 
and buckling of thin plates and thin 
shells. Prerequisites: EGM 3520. 

EGM 6796 Theory of Plates and 
Shells (3). A course covering tfie con- 
cepts of thin plates writh small deflec- 
tions; ttiin plates witti large deflections; 
thick plates; ttie Membrane theory of 
Shells; and the General Theory of Cylin- 
drical Shells. Prerequisites: EGM 3520. 

EGN 5455 Numerical Methods In Engi- 
neering (3). Stijdy of procedures tliat 
permit rapid approximate solutions, 
wittiin limits of desired accuracy, to com- 
plex structural analysis. Prerequisite: 
CES 4152. 

EGN 5990 Fundamentals of Engineer- 
ing (FE) Review (4). Prepares upper 
level engineering stijdents to take ttie 
Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) 
State Board examinations. Reviews 
chemistry, computers, statics, dynamics, 
electrical circuits, fluid mechanics, me- 
chanic of materials, material science 
and ttiermodynamics. 



ENV 5007 Environmental Planning 
(3). Ecological principles necessary to 
preserve a quality environment are pre- 
sented by means of planning policies, 
processes, and environmental indica- 
tors. Emphasis will be placed on the im- 
pact of growth on environmental quality. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

ENV 5008 Appropriate Technology for 
Developing Countries (3). Tlie use of 
appropriate technology in developing 
counb'ies. Local traditions and adapta- 
tions. Local materials in housing, food 
production, cottage industries. Coopera- 
tives and ti^aining. 

ENV 5062 Environmental Health (3). 
Stijdy of ttie control and prevention of 
environmental-related diseases, both 
communicable and non-communicable, 
injuries, and ottier interactions of hu- 
mans with the environment. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of ttie instructor. 

ENV 5065 Vector and Pest Control 
(3). Effects and management of public 
fiealtti vectors and communicable dis- 
eases. Prerequisite: ENV 5500 or per- 
mission of instixictor. 

ENV 5105 Air Quality Managenient 
(3). The air pollution prob)lem, principal 
types, sources and dispersion of pollut- 
ants. Physical, economic, and legal as- 
pects of control of atmospheric 
pollutants. 

ENV 51 16 Air Sampling Analysis (3). 

Practical laboratory work and ttieoretical 
aspects involved in a wide range of air 
sampling and analysis systems. Critical 
comF>cUison and examination of meth- 
ods and inshumentation. Source test- 
ing, instrumental sensitivity, sipplicability 
and remote sensing systems. Prereq- 
uisite: ENV 5105 or ENV 4101 . 

ENV 5126 Air Pollution Control (3). Air 

pollution control-devices, principles, effi- 
ciencies, costs. Gas scfubtiers, electi-o- 
static precipitation, thermal deposition, 
filters, condensers, after- burners. By- 
product recovery. Stoichiometry of com- 
bustion mixtures and basic industrial 
plant designs are discussed. Prereq- 
uisite: ENV 4101 or ENV 5105. 

ENV 5356 Solid Wastes (3). In-deptti 
study of ttie solid waste problem. Topics 
include municipal, industrial, and agricul- 
tural generation of wastes; municipal col- 
lection syetems; methods of disposal, 
hazardous wastes, and energetic con- 
siderations in ttie recovery and recycle 
of wastes. 

ENV 5512 Water and Wastewater 
Analysis (3). Relevance of ttie main 
quality parameters and ttieir measure- 
ments by wet chemistry and analytical 



142 / College of Engineering and Design 



Graduate Catalog 



equipment. Includes BOD, CX3D, TOC, 
CO, TSS, VSS, alkalinity, acidity, pH 
hardness, ammonia, TKN, NO2, NO3, 
PO4, etc. Prerequisites: ENV 5666, 
OHM 1046, and CHIVI 1046L. Corequi- 
site:ENV5512L. 

ENV 551 2L Water and Wastewater 
Analysis Laboratory (1). Experiments 
are conducted which measure gross or- 
ganic pollution indicators, suspended 
solids, conductivity, all<alinity, acidity, 
pH, nitrate, nitrite, TKN, ammonia, total 
phosphates, chlorine residual and chlo- 
rine breakpoint. Prerequisites: ENV 
5666, CHM 1046, and CHM 1046L. 
Corequisite: ENV 551 2. 

ENV 5517 Water and Wastewater 
Treatment (3). Wastewater collection 
systems. Integration of unit operations 
into the planning and design of treat- 
ment plants, including sludge handling 
and disposal. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

ENV 5659 Regional Planning Engi- 
neering (3). Theories of urban and re- 
gional growth; collective utility analysis; 
input-output models in planning; applica- 
tion of linear programming to regional 
soda! accounting; economic base analy- 
sis. Prerequisite: Computer Program- 
ming or permission of instructor. 

ENV 5666 Water Quality Management 
(3). Predicting and evaluating the effect 
of human activities on streams, lakes, 
estuaries.and ground waters; and the re- 
lation of human activities to water qual- 
ity and protection of water resources. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

ENV 5905 Independent Study (1-3). In- 
dividual research studies available to 
academically qualified students on 
graduate status. 

ENV 5930 Special Topics in Environ- 
mental Engineering (1-3). Specific as- 
pects of environmental technology and 
urtjan systems not available through for- 
mal course study. Open to academically 
qualified students only. 

ENV 6045 Environmental Modeling 
(3). Evaluation of regional resources, en- 
vironmental stresses, and considera- 
tions in regional systems; systems 
analysis in environmental management 
and its relation to dedsion making; mod- 
eling of air and water systems. Prereq- 
uisite: Computer programming-or 
permission of the instructor. 

ENV 6510 Advanced Unit Operations 
I (3). Tlieory and design of physical, 
chemical, and biological unit operations 
as applied to thte advanced treatment of 
water and wastewater. Prerequisite: 
ENV 4514 or equivalent. 



ENV 6511 Advanced Unit Operations 
II (3). A continuation of ENV 6510 indud- 
ing tbe re-use of treated wastewaters 
ctnd of sludges. Prerequisite: ENV 6510. 

ENV 651 1 L Advanced Unit Opera- 
tions II Lab (1). Bench scale experi- 
ments for scaling-up arxJ designing thie 
following water and wastewater proc- 
esses: sedimentation, coagulation, filtra- 
tion, adsorption, oxidation and gas 
transfer. Prerequisite: ENV 6510. Core- 
quisite: ENV 6511. 

ENV 6516 Advanced Treatment Sys- 
tems (3). Integration of unit operations 
into advanced treatment systems for wa- 
ters and wastewater. Prerequisite: ENV 
6511. 

ENV 6558 Industrial Wastewater Treat- 
ment (3). Characteristics and composi- 
tion of industrial wastewaters. Sampling 
techniques and analyses. Water conser- 
vation arxJ re-use. Joint industrial-com- 
mercial collection and treatment of 
wastewaters. Prerequisite: ENV 6516. 

ENV 6615 Environmental Impact As- 
sessment (3). An examination of alter- 
native techniques useful for analysis 
and environmental impacts of man's ac- 
tivities. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor and 24 graduate credits. 

ENV 6916 Engineering Project (1-2). 

Individual work culminating in a profes- 
sional practice-oriented rep>ort suitable 
for the requirements of tfie M.S. degree- 
project operation. Only three credits are 
applicable towards degree. Prerequisite: 
Completion of 20 graduate credits. 

ENV 6935 Graduate Environmental 
Seminar (1-3). The course consists of 
oral presentations made by students, 
guests, and faculty memlaers on current 
topics and research activities in environ- 
mental and urtsan systems. 

ENV 6971 Thesis (1-6). Research for 
li^aster's thesis. 

TTE 5015 Applied Statistics In Traffic 
and Transportation (3). Civil and Envi- 
ronmental Engineering statistics meth- 
ods as applied to traffic and 
transportation are covered. Topics in- 
dude: significance tests, standard distri- 
butions, analysis of variance, and 
regression analysis. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing. 

TTE 5215 Urban Traffic Charac- 
teristics (3). Speed and volume stud- 
ies, stream characteristics, traffic flow 
theory, accident characteristics. Prereq- 
uisite: TTE 4201. 

TTE 5315 Highway Safety Analysis 
(3). Accident reconstruction, intersection 
analysis, highway safety standards. 



speed estimations from skidding, mo- 
mentum/energy relationships, human 
factors. Prerequisites: STA 3033, TTE 
4201. 

TTE 5506 Urt>an Mass Transit and 
Transportation Planning (3). Models of 
urtan growth, population forecasts, trip 
generation, trip distribution, and trip as- 
signment models, model split, system 
evaluation, transit marketing. Prereq- 
uisite: TTE 4201 . 

TTE 5526 Airport Planning and De- 
sign (3). Theory and prindples of airport 
planning and design, include both gen- 
eral aviation and major commercial air- 
ports. [Design projects required. 
Prerequisite: TTE 5835 or consent of in- 
structor. 

TTE 5606 Transportation Systems 
Modeling and Analysis (3). f^^deling 
and analysis techniques in transporta- 
tion. Unear Programming, queueing the- 
ory, decision making techniques. 
Prerequisite: TTE 4201. 

TTE 5805 Advanced Geometric De- 
sign of Highways (3). Parameters gov-, 
erning the geometric design of 
highways; curve super-elevation; widen- 
ing on liighway curves; elements of in- 
tersection design; design of inter- 
changes; use of AASHO design guide- 
lines. Ctesign project required. Prereq- 
uisite: SUR 4201 . 

TTE 5835 Pavement Design (3). Analy- 
sis and design of sub-base, l^ase, and 
pavement of a roadway. Discussions of 
flexible pavement and rigid pavement 
as structural units. Boussinesq's ap- 
proach. Westergaard's tfieory. Beams 
on Elastic Foundations. Prerequisites: 
ECI4312andCES4704. 

TTE 5925C Urt>an Traffic Wori(shop 
(3). Selected laboratory problems re- 
lated to urtian traffic. Prerequisite: TTE 
4201. 



Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 

James Story, Associate Professor and 

Chairperson 
Maiek Adjouadi, Assistant Professor 
Jean ArKirian, Associate Professor 
Tadeusz Babij, Associate Professor 
Manuel Cereijo, Professor 
Mark Hagmann, Associate Professor 
Malcolm Helmer, Associate Professor 
W. Kinzy Jones, Associate Professor 
Grover Larkins, Assistant Professor 
Edward Lee, Professor 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Engineering and Design / 143 



Osama Mohammed, Professor 
Dong Pari*, Assistant Professor 
Gustavo Rolg, Associate Professor 
Laura Ruiz, Instructor 
Pierre Schmidt, Professor 
Frank Urt)an, Associate Professor 
Kang Yen, Associate Professor 

Master of Science in Electrical 
Engineering 

The Oep>artment of Electrical Engineer- 
ing offers both thesis and non-thesis op- 
tions for the Master's Degree. A 
student seeking the Master's degree 
with or without thesis Is required to pass 
a comprehensive oral or written exami- 
nation. 

All work counted for the Master's de- 
gree must be completed during the five 
years immediately following the date of 
admission. 

T>ie program shall provide a broad 
education, covering more than one field, 
followed by in-depth studies of areas of 
interest. Multi-disciplinary programs 
such as Computer Engineering, Sys- 
tems Engineering, and Biomedical Engi- 
neering are also available. 

Admission Requirements 

The following is in addition to thie Univer- 
sity's graduate admission requirements. 

1 . A student seeking admission into 
the graduate program must have a 
Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineer- 
ing or equivalent from an accredited in- 
stitution or, in thte case of foreign 
students, an institution recognized in its 
own country as preparir>g students for 
further study at the graduate level. 

2. An applicant must present a 3.0 
GPA in upper level work and a com- 
bined score of 1000 on the Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE). 

3. Applicants who do not meet tfie 
above criteria will be evaluated by a 
committee for possible admission. 

Graduate Requirements 

All matters concerning academic regula- 
tions and policies etre decided by the 
Dean of ttie School. The decisions will 
be made on the advice and recommen- 
dations of tfie specifk: Department Chair- 
person of the unit of the program, and 
by ttie Committee on Admission and 
Academic Performance. 

The degree will be conferred wtien 
thie following conditions have been met. 

1 . Recommendation of the advisor 
and faculty of the department. 

2. Certification by ttie Dean of the 
School tfiat all requirements of ttie de- 
gree being sought have been completed. 

3. A GPA of at least 3.0 has tjeen 
earned for certain courses required by 



the program. No grade below 'C will be 
accepted in a graduate program. 

4. Met tfie undergraduate deficien- 
cies, if any existed in tfie student's 
graduate program, as additional 
courses toward the degree. 

5. Completed a minimum of 36 se- 
mester hours of graduate level credit 
(not more tfian nine graduate semester 
hours with a grade of "B" or higher can 
be transferred from other accredited in- 
stitutions). 

6. Completed an acceptable gradu- 
ate thesis if required of the selected pro- 
grsim. 

7. Students must maintain an over- 
all GPA of 3.0. In the event that a stu- 
dent is placed on a probationary status, 
fie or she must obtain a directed pro- 
gram from his or her advisor and ap- 
proved by the dean prior to continuing 
furtfier course wori< toward the degree. 
The student must satisfy the directed 
course of action within the prescribed 
time limit, othenA/ise he or sfie will be 
academically dismissed. 

Thesis Option 

A student shall complete 36 semester 
credit hours of technical course wori< in- 
cluding a maximum of six semester 
credit hours and minimum of three se- 
mester credit fiours of EEL 6971 - Mas- 
ter's Thesis. 

The Supervisory Committee shall de- 
termine the appropriate number of the- 
sis hours a student shall be required to 
take for the thesis. Thus, 30 or more se- 
mester credit hours of course work are 
required. 

The course requirements include a 
minirnum of 12 fiours of 6000-level 
course credit and a minimum of nine 
hours at the 5000-6000 level in Electri- 
cal Engineering. No more than six 
hours of Individual Work (EEL 6905) 
may be counted toward the degree. 

Upon the successful completion of 
all course wort<, including tfiesis work, 
and after tfie determination by tfie stu- 
dent's advisor tfiat fie or she has com- 
pleted ttie ot)jectives set for tfie tiiesis 
research, tfie student must pass a final 
oral examination which is primarily a de- 
fense of tfie tfiesis research. Tfie candi- 
date should limit tfie presentation to 40 
minutes, unless told differently by tfie ad- 
visor. Tfie essence of tfie tfiesis sfiould 
be presented in the same manner as 
tfiat of a technical paper at a conference. 

Tfie student must submit ttie thesis 
to ttie examining committee and depart- 
ment chairperson at least ten days prior 
to tfie orEil examination date. Upon 
passing the oral examination, and com- 
pletion of any cfianges or additions, or 
both, as required by the committee, 
each memljer of ttie committee will sign 



a special front page available in the 
Department. Hardcover bound copies 
sfiould be submitted to tfie student's ad- 
visor and to tfie Library. Tfie student 
should consult with ttie advisor for ap- 
proval of all course work prior to registra- 
tion. 

Non-Thesis Option (By petition only) 

A student shall complete 36 semester 
credit fwurs of technical course work 
with a maximum of six semester credit 
hours of Individual Work (EEL 6905). 
Ttie course requirements include a mini- 
mum of 12 semester credit fiours of 
6000-level course credit and a minimum 
of 1 2 semester credit hours at tfie 5000- 
6000 level in Electrical Engineering. 

Tfie candidate is required to pass a 
comprehensive final examination. This 
examination is given near the end of ttie 
c£tndidate's final semester by a commit- 
tee composed of three faculty members 
appointed by ttie Department. A student 
who fails the examination may not at- 
tempt it again until one semester has 
elapsed or until additional wori< pre- 
scribed by ttie examining committee is 
completed. Ttie student may retake tfie 
examination only once. Tlie examina- 
tion will test tfie student's general ability 
in his or fier areas of study as deter- 
mined by ttie student's supen/isory com- 
mittee. 

Course Requirements 

Common Core 

Select three courses with advisor ap- 
proval 
EEL 5482 Relds and Waves 

Engineering 3 

EEL 5500 Digital Communications 

Systems I 3 

EEL 5725 Digital Systems 

Engineering I 3 

EEL 5 1 7 1 Advanced System Theory 3 
EEL 5352 Bipolar Transistors 3 

EEL 6261 Power Systems 

Engineering 3 

EEL 631 1 Advanced Electronics 

Systems I 3 



Select two courses with advisor approval 
EEL 6020 Numerical Analysis of 

Electrical Devices 3 

MAA4211 Advanced Calculus 3 

MAA 4402 Complex Variables 3 

MAD 3401 Numerical Analysis 3 
MAP 4401 Advanced Differential 

Equations 3 
MAP 5117 Mathematics and 

Statistics Modeling 3 

STA 5546 Probability Theory I 3 

STA 5447 Probability Theory II 3 



144 / College of Engineering and Design 



Graduate Catalog 



STA 5800 Stochastic Processes for 

Engineering 3 

The above two lists may be changed 
or expanded by the committee. 
Remaining course work will be selected 
by the student and his advisor based on 
the student's career objectives. 

Students who are dismissed from 
the University due to low grades, may 
appeal to the Dean for reinstatement. A 
second dismissal results in no possibility 
of reinstatement. 

Master of Science in Computer 
Engineering 

The Department of Electrical and Com- 
puter Engir>eering offers both thesis and 
non-thesis options for the Master's De- 
gree in Computer Engineering. A stu- 
dent pursuing the Master's degree with 
or wifriout thesis is required to pass a 
comprehensive oral or written examina- 
tion and must complete all the required 
wori< during the five years immediately 
following tfie date of admission to the 
program. 

The program requires that students 
entering this program Inave a strong 
background in math through differential 
equations, physics with calculus, engi- 
neering science, electrical engineering 
and computer hardware and software. 
Tfie degree program will provide train- 
ing in electrical engineering, specializing 
in computer hardware design as well as 
in software engineering. 

Admission Requirements 

A prospective student must meet all the 
University's graduate admission require- 
ments. In addition, tfie following criteria 
will be applied to consider a student as 
a candidate for tfie degree: 

1 . A student seeking admission into 
tfie program must have a bacfielor's de- 
gree in engineering, physical sciences, 
computer science or mathematics from 
an accredited institution, or, in the case 
of foreign students, from an institution 
recognized in its own country as prepar- 
ing students for further study at the 
graduate level. 

2. An applicant must have achieved 
a "B" average in upper level undergradu- 
ate work arid a combined score of 1000 
on tfie Graduate Record Examination 
(vert)al and quantitative portions). 

3. Applicants who have not satisfied 
tfie above vinll be evaluated by the de- 
partmental graduate admission commit- 
tee for probationary admission. 

4. In addition to tfie above criteria, 
foreign students wtiose native language 
is not English, must take the Test of Eng- 
lish as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
and obtain a score of 550 or better. 



5. The GPA, GRE and TOEFL 
scores above are to be considered mini- 
mum requirements for admissions. Ap- 
plicants from science areas otfier ttian 
electrical or computer engineering will 
be expected to complete sufficient back- 
ground material at the undergraduate 
level prior to unconditional acceptance 
into the graduate program. 

The degree will be conferred wfien 
ttie following conditions have been met: 

1 . Recommendation of tfie advisor 
and faculty of tfie Electrical and Com- 
puter Engineering Department. 

2. Certification by tfie Dean of tfie 
College of Engineering and Design that 
all requirements of tfie degree being 
sought fiave been completed. 

3. An overall GPA of at least 3.0 has 
been achieved for all graduate course 
work. 

4. The undergraduate deficiencies, 
if any existed, have been met, as addi- 
tional courses toward the degree. 

5. Completed a minimum of 30 cred- 
its in engineering and computer sci- 
ence, plus six credits of tfiesis. Not 
more tfian nine graduate semester 
hours with a grade of 'B" or higher can 
be transferred from other accredited in- 
stitutions. 

6. Completed at least 12 credits of 
6000 level and nine credits of 5000 or 
6000 level in electrical and computer en- 
gineering. 

7. Completed the remaining nine 
credits from computer science or engi- 
neering. Six credits maximum of 4000 
level may be taken outside the School 
of Engineering with advisor's approval. 

8. All courses and tfiesis topics must 
be approved by the student's tfiesis advi- 
sor in consultation with ttie student's the- 
sis committee. 

9. Completed an acceptable gradu- 
ate thesis if required of ttie selected pro- 
gram. 

10. Students must maintain an over- 
all GPA of at least 3.0. No grade below 
"C will be accepted in any course taken 
to satisfy the graduate program require- 
ments. In tfie event tfiat a student is 
placed on a probationary status, he or 
she must obtain a directed program of 
studies from his or fier advisor and ap- 
proved by the Dean prior to continuing 
furtfier into the degree. The student 
must satisfy the directed course of ac- 
tion within the prescribed time limit, oth- 
erwise he or she will be academically 
dismissed. 

Thesis Option 

A student shall complete 36 semester 
credit hours of technical course wori< in- 
cluding a maximum of six semester 
credit hours and a minimum of three se- 



mester credit fxjurs of EEL 6971 , dus- 
ter's Thesis. 

The Supervisory Committee sfiall de- 
termine the appropriate number of the- 
sis hours tfie student shall be required 
to take for tfie thesis. 

Upon tfie successful completion of 
all coursewori<, including the thesis 
work, and after tfie determination by the 
student's advisor that he or sfie has 
completed the objectives set for the the- 
sis research, the student must pass a fi- 
nal oral examination which is primarily a 
defense of the thesis research. 

The student must submit tfie tfiesis 
to the examining committee and depait- 
ment chairperson at least ten days prior 
to the oral examination date. Upon 
passing tfie oral exEunination, and com- 
pletion of any cfianges as required by 
the committee, each member of ttie 
committee will sign a special front page 
available in the department. Hardcover 
txjund copies of tfie thesis sfxjuld be 
submitted to ttie student's advisor and 
to the Library. 

Non-Thesis Option (By petition only). 

A student shall complete 36 semester 
credit hours of technical coursewori^, ap- 
proved by his or tier supervisory commit- 
tee. The candidate is required to pass a 
comprefiensive final examination. This 
examination is given near ttie end of the 
candidate's final semester by a commit- 
tee composed of three faculty members 
appointed by tfie department. A student 
virtio fails the examination may not at- 
tempt it again until one semester has 
elapsed or until additional wori< pre- 
scritsed by ttie examining committee is 
completed. The student may retake the 
examination only once. The examina- 
tion will test ttie student's general ability 
in his or tier areas of study as deter- 
mined by tfie student's supervisory com- 
mittee. 

Common Core 

EEL 5741 Advanced Microcomputers 
EEL 5718 Computer Communication 

Networi< Engineering 
Parallel Computer Design 
VLSI Design 

Electives Engineering 

EEL 5725 Digital Systems 

Engineering I 
EEL 6726 Digital Systems 

Engineering II 
EEL 6575 Data Communications 

Engineering 
EEL 6444 Optical Rber 

Communications 

Systems 
EEL 6505 Digital Signal Processing 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Engineering and Design / 145 



EEL 6509 Digital Communications 

by Satellite 
EEL 6253 Computer Analysis of 

Power Systems 
EEL 6758 Engineering Design of 
Microprocessor Based 
Operating Systems 
Electives Computer Science 9 

Courses may be selected by student 
and advisor from 4000, 5000, and 6000 
level Computer Science course listings. 
The above lists may be changed or 
expanded by the supervisory committee. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

EEL - Engineering: Electrical 

EEL soil Electrical Design in Build- 
ings (3). Review of electrical code and 
regulations. Design of loads, circuits, 
surge protectors, security, emergency 
systems, lighting systems. Special con- 
siderations for electrical system in new 
industrial buildings. Prerequisites: EEL 
3112 and EEL 4304. 

EEL 5071 Bioelectrical Models (3). En^ 

gineering models for electrical behavior 
of nerve and muscle cells, electrode-tis- 
sue junctions, volume conductions in tis- 
sue and the nervous system as an 
electrical networi^. Prerequisite: ELR 
4202 or permission of instructor. 

EEL 5085 Bioradiation Engineering 
(3). Spectrum of radiation sources, 
types of fields, properties of living tis- 
sue, mechanisms of field propagation in 
tissue. Applications in imaging and ther- 
apy, hazards and safety. Prerequisite: 
EEL 4410 or permission of instructor. 

EEL 5145 Advanced Rlter Design (3). 

Graduate course in tfie design and ad- 
vance Einalysis of passive and active 
Ngh order circuits. Use of computer as 
a design tool. Prerequisite: EEL 4140 or 
permission of instructor. 

EEL 5171 Advanced Systems Theory 
(3). State-space representations for con- 
tinuous and discrete-time systems, con- 
trollability and observability, pole-zero 
allocation, Lyapunov stability theorem, 
state ohservers. Prerequisites: EEL 
3657 and graduate level or advanced 
senior standing or permission of 
instructor. 

EEL 5270 Electrical Transients in 
Power Systems (3). Traveling waves 
on transmission and multi-conductor sys- 
tems, successive reflections, distrikxited 
parameter systems, transients on inte- 



grated power systems. Prerequisite: 
EEL 4213 or permission of instructor. 

EEL 5275 Power Systems Protection 
(3). Analysis of power systems under 
faulted conditions using linear transfor- 
mation. The study of surge, transient 
and waves on power lines. Computer- 
aided analysis and design emphasizing 
the protection of equipment. Prereq- 
uisite: EEL 4215 or permission of 
instructor. 

EEL 5352 Bipolar Junction Transis- 
tors (3). Bipolar junction transistor phys- 
ics. Semiconductor bulk properties at 
equilibrium and rxsnequilibrium. PN junc- 
tion theory. Theory ot the bipolar junc- 
tion transistor. Prerequisite: EEL 3396 
or permission of instructor. 

EEL 5353 Reld Effect Transistors (3). 

Field effect device physics and technol- 
ogy. MOS capacitor. DC and AC charac- 
teristics of the MOS transistor. The MOS 
transistor in dynamic operation. Prereq- 
uisites: EEL 3396 or permision of in- 
structor. 

EEL 5366 Industrial Electronics (3). A 

study of solid state devices for the con- 
trol of power, their applications and limi- 
tations in power switching circuits and in 
the control of physical transducer. Pre- 
requisites: EEL 4213, EEL 4304 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

EEL 5371 High Frequency Amplifiers 
(3). Analysis and design of high fre- 
quency amplifiers and oscillators: stabil- 
ity, scattering parameters, use of the 
Smith chart and other practical design 
tools, noise. Prerequisites: EEL 4304, 
EEL 4410 or permission of instructor. 

EEL 5437 Mlicrowave Engineering (3). 

Microwave guides. Microwave tubes. Mi- 
crowave solid state devices. Microwave 
integrated circuits. Microwave enclo- 
sures. Prerequisite: EEL 4410 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

EEL 5482 Fields and Waves Erigineer- 
ing (3). Concepts and theorems in fields 
and waves, analytic techniques for 
guided waves, radiation and scattering, 
numerical techniques for analysis of 
electrical devices using digital comput- 
ers. Prerequisite: EEL 4410 or permis- 
, sion of instructor. 

EEL 5500 Digital Communication 
Systems I (3). This course will consider 
most important aspects of digital com- 
munication systems such as noise re- 
lated subjects, random signals, lineetr 
systems, and baseband digital modula- 
tion and multiplexing. Prerequisites: 
EEL 3135, EEL 3514, EEL 31 12 or per- 
mission of instructor. 



EEL 5501 Digital Communication Sys- 
tenrw 11 (3). This course will consider 
more important aspects of digital com- 
munication systems such as matched fil- 
ters, digital base and modulation, 
multiplexing, carrier digital modulation 
and error correction coding. Prereq- 
uisite: EEL 5500 or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

EEL 5524 Statistical Communication 
Theory (3). Noise, random processes, 
correlation, spectral analysis in the 
analysis and design of communication 
systems. Optimization techniques; mini- 
mum mean square error. Prerequisite: 
EEL 351 4. 

EEL 5563 introduction to Optical 
Fibers (3). Use of fiber optics as a com- 
munication medium. Principles of fiber 
optics; mode theory; transmitters, modu- 
lators, sensors, detectors and demodula- 
tors; fiber data links. Prerequisites: EEL 
3514, EEL4314 and EEL 4410 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

EEL 5653 Digital Control Systems (3). 

Analysis and design of digital control 
systems. Z-transforms, analysis and 
control of discrete-time systems, digital 
control of analog systems. Several digi- 
tal controller design methods. Computer 
simulation and microprocessor imple- 
mentation. Prerequisite: EEL 3657. 
Corequisite: EEL 461 1 or permission of 
instructor. 

EEL 5718 Computer-Communication 
Networl( Engineering (3). System engi- 
neering synthesis, analysis, and evalu- 
ation of computer-communication 
networks. Network deagn, routing and 
flow control, telecommunication traffic 
engineering, transmission, switching, 
etc. Prerequisite: EEL 5501 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

EEL 5719 Digital niters (3). Analysis, 
design and implementation ot digital fil- 
ters. Hardware and software approach 
to design. Prerequisites: EEL 4709 or 
permission of instructor. 

EEL 5725 Digital Systems Engineer- 
ing I (3). This course involves system- 
atic studies of digital instrumentation, 
digital control, digital communication sys- 
tems concepts emd case studies. Prereq- 
uisites: EEL 4304, EEL 4746 or 
equivalent or permission of instructor. 

EEL 5741 Advanced Microprocessor 
Systems (3). Interfacing of various mi- 
croprocessors together. Concepts of 
master-slave systems, virtual memory 
and I/O control techniques. Digital sys- 
tem evaluation and optimization. Prereq- 
uisite: EEL 4746 or permission of 
instructor. 



146 / College of Engineering and Design 



Graduate Catalog || 



EEL 5935 Advanced Special Topics 
(1-3). A course designed to give groups 
of students an opportunity to pursue 
special studies in an advanced topic of 
Electrical Engineering not othenwise of- 
fered. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

EEL 6020 Numerical Analysis of Elec- 
trical Devices (3). Numerical tech- 
niques for the analysis of static and 
diffusion eddy current type field prob- 
lems and associated phenomena in 
electrical devices. Emphasis on imple- 
mentation and applications to practical 
problems. Prerequisites: EEL 421 3, 
MAP 3302 or equivalent or permission 
of instructor. 

EEL 6075 Biosignal Processing i (3). 

Cfiaracterizing biosignals by application 
of time and frequency domain analytic 
methods. Comparison of analog and 
digital processing. Engineering design 
for VLSI implementations in implantable 
devices. Prerequisites: ELR 4202 and 
EEL 6505 or permission of instructor. 

EEL 6076 Biosignal Processing ii (3). 

Engineering design of advanced sys- 
tems for processing biosignals. Methods 
for signal compression. Adaptive sys- 
tems for automatic recognition. Applica- 
tion of artificial intelligence for signal 
classification. Prerequisite: EEL 6075 or 
permission of instructor. 

EEL 6141 Advanced Networic Analy- 
sis (3). Modeling ctnd analysis of net- 
wori<s by t-domain and s-domain 
techniques. Topics include topology, for- 
mulation of loop eqs and node pair eqs., 
state space networks, computer solu- 
tions. Prerequisite: EEL 31 12 and FOR- 
TRAN or permission of instructor. 

EEL 6207 Dynamic Analysis of Electri- 
cal Machines (3). State models of rotat- 
ing machines, derivation of machine 
model parameters, modeling of machine 
and power system dynamics. Includes 
utilization of digital computers to se- 
lected practical problems. Prerequisite: 
EEL 4213 or permission of instructor. 

EEL 6253 Computer Analysis of 
Power systems (3). Power systems 
einalysis and designs by computer solu- 
tions. Interactive solutions, povrar flew, 
optimum solutions. Dynamic solutions 
and stability. Prerequisite: EEL 4215 or 
permission of instructor. 

EEL 6254 Power Systems Reliability 
(3). Expansion planning, load forecast- 
ing, reliability and availability application 
to generation planning, bulk power sup- 
ply systems, generation system opera- 
tion and production costing analysis. 
Prerequisite: EEL 4215 or permission 
of instructor. 



EEL 6261 Power Systems Engineer- 
ing (3). steady-state analysis, fault stud- 
ies, load flow, dynamic and transient 
performance, on-line control, practical 
applications. Prerequisite: EEL 4215 or 
permission of instructor. 

EEL 6273 Power System Stat>ility and 
Control (3). Direct methods for system 
stability, computer analysis of large 
scale models, Lyapunov stability, longer 
term stability, security analysis, MW-fre- 
quency control, isolated and multiple 
area control. Prerequisites: EEL 4215 
and FORTRAN or permission of 
instructor. 

EEL 6311 Advanced Electronic Sys- 
tems i (3). Principles of analog and digi- 
tal electronics network. Advanced 
analysis, modeling and computer simula- 
tion of op amps. Analog design tech- 
niques and practical examples are 
covered. Prerequisite: EEL 431 4 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

EEL 6312 Advanced Electronic Sys- 
tems ii (3). Study of linear properties of 
electronic systems and design of fault 
tolerant systems using A/D and D/Aand 
control algorithms. Prerequisite: EEL 
631 1 or permission of instructor. 

EEL 6315 Advanced Solid State Elec- 
tronics (3). IC technologies, properties 
and fabrication concepts. Bipolar, MOS, 
I^L, CCD, bubble technologies. Ion im- 
plantation characteristics. Lithography 
techniques. Prerequisite: EEL 3396, 
EEL 4304 or permission of instructor. 

EEL 6395 Applied Superconductivity 
(3). Covers the basic physical properties 
of superconductors. Superconducting 
devices: squids, memory & logic ele- 
ments. Emphasis is placed on applica- 
tions of superconductors. Prerequisites: 
EEL 3396 and EEL 4410. Corequisite: 
EEL 6315, EEL 6397 or permission of in- 
structor. 

EEL 6397 Semiconductor Device The- 
ory (3). Device physics and modeling of 
GaAs FETS. GaAs analog and digital in- 
tegrated circuits. Modulation doped field 
effect transistors. Heterojunction bipolar 
transistor theory. Prerequisite: EEL 
3396. 

EEL 6443C Electro-Optical Devices 
and Systems (3). introduction to optical 
devices and systems such as solid state 
laser systems, their applications in in- 
dustry. Also holography, linear and non- 
linear optical modulation and demodu- 
lation concepts. Prerequisites: EEL 
4410, EEL 4314. Corequisite: EEL 5563 
or permission of instructor. 

EEL 6444 Optical Fiber Communica- 
tion Systems (3). Course focuses on 



specification, design and application of 
fiber optic communication systems con- 
sidering the fiber optic wave guide, opti- 
Ccil devk:e sources, photo-detector, 
receiver and transmitter designs. Prereq- 
uisite: EEL 5501 or permission of 
instructor. 

EEL 6505C Digital Signal Processing | 
(3). Treatment of digital signal and sys- 
tem characteristics: Z transforms and 
FFT theory. Real time and correlation 
functions. Multidimensional signal proc- 
essing and digital filtering. Prerequisites: 
EEL 451 0, EEL 431 4, EEL 5653 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

EEL 6509 Digital Communications by 
Satellite (3). This course will consider 
processing and non-processing 
transponders, earth termir^ls, propaga- 
tion link characteristics, multiple access 
techniques, and spread spectrum tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: EEL 5501 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

EEL 6575 Data Communications Engi- 
neering (3). Digital networks for data 
communications, CCITT, HDLC, SDLG. 
Real time switching techniques. Micro- 
processor based network topologies. 
Busing schemes such as VME, MUL- 
TIB, RS232. Prerequisites: EEL 4746 
and EEL 4314 or permission of Instruc- 
tor. 

EEL 6614 Modern Control Theory I 
(3). Graduate level treatment of modem 
control systems. Optimal control of feed- 
back systems. Performance measures, 
Pontryagln's minimum principle, dy- 
namic programming, numerical tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: EEL 5171 or 
permission of instructor. 

EEL 6615 Modem Control Theory II 
(3). Graduate level course in Stocfiastic 
control. Stochastic processes, linear esti- 
mation, Kalman filtering techniques in 
state estimation. Design of feedback 
control in the presence of noise. Prereq- 
uisite: EEL 6614 or permission of 
instructor. 

EEL 6666 Intelligent Electronic Ma- 
chine Design (3). Design of electronic 
systems with sensors and transducers, 
to function as an integrated expert sys- 
tem in process control and industry. 
Computer vision, image processing and 
robotics. Prerequisites: EEL 4304, EEL 
3712 and EEL 4746 or permission of 
instructor. 

EEL 6726C Digital Systems Engineer- 
ing II (3). Analysis and design of time 
shared digital electronic systems. Artifi- 
cial intelligence and automation. Robot- 
ics and remote control systems. 
Advanced digital instrumentation and 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Engineering and Design / 147 



testing. Prerequisite: EEL 5725 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

EEL 6758 Engineering Design of Mi- 
croprocessor Based Operating Sys- 
tems (3). Hardware microprocessor 
based systems, BIOS (basic input and 
output), Kernel partitions, memory, staci^ 
organization and physical design of op- 
erating systems. Prerequisites: EEL 
4709 and EEL 4746 or permission of in- 
structor. 

EEL 6905 Individual Work (3). Special 
problems or projects selected by the stu- 
dents and a faculty member. The stu- 
dent conducts the project with a 
minimum of supervision. Consent of 
Department Chairperson arxJ Faculty 
Advisa. 

EEL 6916 Graduate Project (1-3). Inde- 
pendent research work culminating In a 
professional practice-oriented report for 
the requirements of the non-thesis op- 
tion of the M.S. degree project. Prereq- 
uisites: Fifteen graduate credits and 
approved project plan. 

EEL 6932 Graduate Seminar (1). An 

examir»tlon of recent technical findings 
in selected areas of concern. EmplTasis 
is placed on presentations (oral and writ- 
ten), research activities, readings, and 
active discussions among participants. 
Prerequisite: Consent of graduate advi- 
sor. 

EEL 6971 Research Master's Thesis 
(1-6). The student, following the option 
of the Master's Degree with tiiesis, 
should vwrk for his/her thesis tiirough 
this course. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

EEL 6977 Extended Thesis Research 
(0). For Graduate research students 
who fiave completed their sequence of 
thesis credits, but must register for a 
course to remain on graduate student 
status. 



Industrial and Systems 
Engineering 

Fredrick Swift, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Hector Carrasco, Assistant Professor 
Chin-Sheng Chen, Associate Professor 
Khoklat Kengskool, Associate 

Professor 
ShIh-MIng Lee, Associate Professor 
Menberu Lulu, Associate Professor 
Sergio Martinez, Senior Lecturer and 

Acting Associate Chairperson 
German Nunez, Associate Professor 
Milton Torres, Lecturer 



Master of Science in Industrial 
Engineering 

Sergio Martinez, Coordinator 

The Master of Science program In Indus- 
trial Engineering emphasizes research, 
as well as course work, and tfie gradu- 
ate degree Is intended to prepare stu- 
dents for the professional practice of 
Industi-ial Engineering. The Department 
offers botti ttnesis and non-thesis op- 
tions for the Master's Degree. The tiie- 
sis progrsim entails a minimum of six 
credits for the successful completion of 
tlie research and tiiesis. The non-tfiesis 
option must be supported by the suc- 
cessful completion of a project and a re- 
port documenting the engineering effort. 

Admission requirements 

The student must meet all University 
graduate admission requirements. In 
addition, he or sfie must also: 

1 .Have a BS In engineering from an 
accredited instltijtion or must take pre- 
requisites as required to remedy defi- 
ciencies. 

2.. Must have a "B" average in the 
last 60 hours of undergraduate work 
and have a combined score of 1000 on 
the Graduate Record Examination. 

3. Applicants meeting only one of ttie 
two requirements In no. 2 will be evalu- 
ated by tlie department admissions com- 
mittee for prolsationary admissions. 
Indusb'ial experience and special re- 
search will be considered. 

4. Foreign students must take tt\e 
test of English as a foreign language 
(TOEFL) and obtain a score of 550 or 
better. 

5. Students with BS in engineering 
other than Industrial must take one or 
two additional courses that have been 
specially developed which cover IE ar- 
eas of special need. 

6. Students with degrees from disci- 
plines other than engineering will be re- 
quired to take additional courses as 
needed in math, natural sciences and 
tiasic engineering. 

Course requirements 

All MSIE degree seeking students must 
take tiie following four courses or 
equivalent as core requirements. 
EIN 5322 Engineering Management 
El N 5605 Robotic Assembly Cell 
EIN 6248 Advanced Ergonomics 
EIN 6936 Design of Industrial 

Engineering Systems 

Students must also take an addi- 
tional 24 hours as prescribed by their 
advisor. 



Recommended program: (36) 
Four core IE graduate courses 12 

Four elective IE graduate courses 12 
Two elective graduate courses (otiier 
departments) 6 

Thesis 6 

Available areas of concentration 

Integrated Manufacturing 
Humsin Factors 
Engineering Management 
Non-Thesis option 
By petition only. The candidate is re- 
quired to F>ass a comprehensive final ex- 
amination. The exam will be 
administered by committee. 

Industrial Engineering Electives 

EIN 5332 Quality Engineering 
EIN 5359 Industi-ial Financial 

Decisions 
EIN 61 1 7 Advanced Industrial 

Information Systems 
EIN 6249 Occupational 

Biomechanics 
EIN 6367 Design of Production 

Systems 
EIN 631 9 Advanced Wori< Design 
EIN 6345 Inventory Conti-ol Systems 
EIN 6357 Advanced Engineering 

Economy 
EIN 6392 Product Design for 

Manufacturability and 

Automation 
EIN 6397 Advanced Topics in 

Manufacturing 

Automation 
EIN 6398 Advanced Manufacturing 

Process Engineering 
EIN 6603 Applied Al/Expert Systems 

in industi-ial Engineering 
EIN 6606 Robotic Systems 
EIN 6932 Graduate Seminar 
EIN 6971 Master's Thesis 
EIN 51 1 5 Sun/ey of Industiial 

Engineering Basics 
ESI 531 5 Survey of Operations 

Research 
ESI 631 6 Applications of OR in 

Manufacturing 
ESI 6524 Applied Industrial Systems 

Simulation 
ESI 6546 NetvK)ri< Row Analysis 

Course Description 
Description of Prefixes 

EIN-Engineering, Industi-ial; ESI-Engi- 
neering Systems Industial. 

EIN 5115 Survey of Industrial Engi- 
neering Basics (3). Review of the fol- 
lowing topics: Human Factors, Work 
Design, Automation & Robotics, Engi- 



148 / College of Engineering and Design 



Graduate Catalog 



neering Economy, Microprocessor Appli- 
cations and Production Planning and 
Control. 

EIN 5322 Engineering Management 
(3). Organization of engineering sys- 
tems including production and service 
organizations. Inputs of human skills, 
capital, technology, and managerial ac- 
tivities to produce useful products and 
services. 

BN 5332 Quality Engineering (3). This 
course examines quality control from an 
engineering standpoint. It covers ways 
to meet the challenge of designing high- 
quality products and processes at low 
cost. 

EIN 5359 Industrial Rnancial Deci- 
sions (3). The use of financial tech- 
niques and data in planning, controlling 
and coordinating industrial activities. 
This course will familiarize tfie student 
witfv accounting concepts and analytical 
metiiods. 

EIN 5605 Robotic Assembly Cell (3). 

Concepts of rotxst manipulation and 
sensing, part design for robotic assem- 
iDly, planning manipulator trajectories, 
machine vision, robot p>rogramming lan- 
guage, cell control, and material transfer. 

EIN 6117 Advanced Industrial Infor- 
mation Systems (3). Review of thie fun- 
damental and theoretical foundation of 
industrial information systems. Applica- 
tion of the system design process and 
information system concepts to develop 
integrated engineering systems. 

EIN 6248 Advance Ergonomics (3). 

Analysis of human factors in tiie design 
of engineering systems, with emphasis 
on tiie interphase of man-machine-me- 
dia and human limitations in relation to 
equipment design and wori< environ- 
ments. Prerequisites: EIN 4314, EIN 
4243, and PCB 3702 or equivalent. 

EIN 6249 Occupational Biomechanics 
(3). Study of the theoretical fundamentals 
for the mechanics of the body. The link 
system of the body and kinematic as- 
pects of body movement inducing appli- 
cations of biomechanics to work systems. 

BN 6367 Design of Production Sys- 
tems (3). The design of an industrial en- 
terprise including feasibility, plant layout, 
equipment specifications, auxiliary serv- 
ices, economics arKJ scheduling. 

BN 6319 Advanced Wortc Design (3). 

Study of tine various human physiologic 
systems and their responses as it re- 
lates to occupational wori< including en- 
durance, fatigue, recovery, and energy 
cost of work. Prerequisites: EIN 6248. 



BN 6345 Inventory Control Systems 

(3). Design of non-traditional inventory 
control systems. Development of sev- 
eral inventory system models. Explora- 
tion of methods of collecting apfxopriate 
demand and cost data for effective sys- 
tems analysis. Prerequisite: ESI 3314. 

BN 6357 Advanced Engineering 
Economy (3). Review of engineering 
economy and ttie evaluation of ad- 
vanced manufacturing dydtems. Evalu- 
ation of alternative capital investments 
considering income taxes, depreciation, 
inflation, risk and uncertainty. Prereq- 
uisite: EIN 3354. 

BN 6392 Product Design for Manufac- 
turability and Automation (3). Over- 
view and integration of the 
design-material-manufacture process. 
Design considerations for manufactijra- 
bility, assembly, and economical produc- 
tion. Concurrent engineering systems. 
Prerequisite: EIN 4395. 

BN 6397 Advanced Topics in Manu- 
facturing Automation (3). Overview of 
manufacturing systems; evolution of 
controls and Al; material handling; auto- 
mation damps, jigs, and fixtures; cutting 
sensors; machine vision and autono- 
mous manufacturing. Prerequisites: EIN 
6392 and EIN 6398. 

BN 6398 Advanced Manufacturing 
Process Engineering (3). Non-tradi- 
tional manufacturing processes. Tool se- 
lection. Jig and fixture design. Material 
handling. Tolerance and dimensioning. 
Product assembly. Engir)eering econom- 
ics. Manufacturing process planning. 
Prerequisite: EIN 3390. 

BN 6603 Applied Al/Expert Systems 
In Industrial Engineering (3). Applica- 
tion of artificial intelligence and expert 
systems as engineering tools. Exploring 
the use of PCs and symbolic machine 
witin various Al/Expert Systems soft- 
ware. Several projects are required. Pre- 
requisites: CAP 5680. 

BN 6606 Robotic Systems (3). Basic 
robotic system principles, functional re- 
quirements of robotic systems, simula- 
tion of system preliminary design, and 
physical experimentation of robotic sys- 
tems. 

BN 6932 Graduate Seminar (1). An ex- 
amination of recent technical findings in 
selected areas of concern. Emphasis is 
placed on presentations (oral and writ- 
ten), research activities, readings and 
discusstons among participants. 

BN 6936 Design of Industrial Engi- 
neering Systenrts (3). Overview of sys- 
tems ttieories. Systems design process 
induding: Problem definition, analysis, 



generation of alternatives, systems 
evaluation, selection of preferred sys- 
tem, and implementation. Prerequisites: 
EIN 6345, ESI 6316, and ESI 6524. 

BN 6971 Master's Thesis (1-3). The 

students following the thesis option 
should wori< on his/her thesis through 
tills course. 

ESI 5315 Survey of Operations Re- 
search (3). Review of the followflng top- 
ics: Linear Programming, Integer 
Programming, Dynamic Progrsimming, 
Network, Queuing, Forecasting, Inventory 
Theory, Simulation and Quality Control. 

ESi 6316 Applications of OR in Manu- 
facturing (3). Overview of OR tech- 
niques. Manufacturing system and 
product selection. Sixjp loading, re- 
source allocation, production schedul- 
ing, job sequencing, and plant layout 
problems. System performance evalu- 
ation. Prerequisite: EIN 3314. 

BN 6345 Inventory Control Systems 
(3). Design of non-traditional inventory 
control systems. Development of sev- 
eral inventory system models. Explora- 
tion of metiiods of collecting appropriate 
demand and cost data for effective sys- 
tems analysis. Prerequisite: ESI 3314. 

ESi 6524 Applied Industrial Systems 
Simulation (3). Advanced simulation 
techniques with a focus on practical sys- 
tems modeling using several user-ori- 
ented simulation languages. Projects 
involving design of high-perfomiance 
simulation programs are required. Pre- 
requisite: ESI 3523. 

ESI 6546 Networic Flow Analysis (3). 

Deterministic and stochastic network 
flow analysis; minimal cost flow, shortest 
route, max-flow, and out-of-kilter algo- 
ritfims; consti-ained networt< analysis; 
and stochastic queueing networks. Pre- 
requisite: ESI 3314. 



Mechanical Engineering 

M. Ali Et>adlan, Professor and 

Chairman 
S. Chellaiah, Assistant Professor 
Wei Jiang, Visiting Assstant Professor 
W. KInzy Jones, Assodate Professor 
Rene Leonard, Assodate Professor 
Cesar Levy, Assodate Professor 
Ian Radin, Visiting Assodate Professor 
Gautam Ray, Professor 
Richard Schoephoerster, Visiting 

Assistant Professor 
Ebrahim Shirazlnedjad, Visiting 

Assistant Professor 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Engineering and Design / 149 



Fredrick Swift, Professor 
Itirahim Tansel, Assistant Professor 
Kuang-Hsl Wu, Associate Professor 
Gao Yang, Visiting Assistant Professor 
Tachung Ylh, Assistant Professor 

Master of Science in 
Mechanical Engineering 

Cesar Levy, Coordinator 

Admission Requirements 

Bachelor's degree in Engineering or re- 
lated field from an accredited institution 
with a minimum 3.0 GPA (on a scale of 
4.0 maximum) in the upper level work 
and a combined (vertiai and quantita- 
tive) score of 1000 on tfie Graduate Re- 
cord Examination (GRE). Applicants 
having either a 3.0 GPA or a score of 
1000 on the GRE will be evaluated by 
the department committee for possible 
admission. Under certain circum- 
stances, consistent with state university 
requirements, students may be admitted 
under 10% exception rule. Therefore, 
minority students are encouraged to ap- 
ply for proper program admission. A stu- 
dent whose degree is mt in Mechanical 
Engineering may need additional reme- 
dial coursework. Foreign students re- 
quire a minimum of 500 on tfie TOEFL. 

Course Requirements 

All MSME degree seeking students 
must take the following five courses or 
equivalent as common core courses: 
EGM 531 5 Intermediate Analysis of 

Mechanical Systems 3 
EGM 561 5 Synthesis of Engineering 

Mechanics 3 

EGM 6422 Advanced Analysis of 

Mechanical Systems 3 
EML 5709 Intermediate Ruid 

MechEinics 3 

EML 5277 Computer Aided Design 

and Analysis of 

Mechanical Engineering 3 

An additional 21 credit hours are to 
be taken from the foltowing Mechanical 
Engineering courses (up to a maximum 
of six semester hours may be taken 
from courses offered by other depart- 
ments). 
EGM 6586 Fluid Mechanic 

Applicatjons in 

Physiotogical Systems 3 
EGM 6587 Applied Biomedical and 

Diagnostk; 

Measurements 3 

EGM 6588 Solid Mechanics 

Applications in 

Physiological Systems 3 
EML 5 1 03 Intermediate 

Thermodynamics 3 



EML 5104 Classical 

Thermodynamics 3 

EML 51 25 Classical Dynamics 3 

EML 51 52 Intermediate Heat 

Transfer 3 

EML 5385 Identification Techniques 

of Mechanical Systems 3 
EML 5562 Advanced Electronic 

Packaging 3 

EML 5708 Advanced Design of 

Thermal and FluW 

Systems 3 

EML 61 53 Advanced Heat Transfer 3 
EML 6 1 54 Conduction Heat Transfer 3 
EML 61 55 Convection Heat Transfer 3 
EML 6223 Advanced Mechanical 

Vibrations Analysis 3 

EML 6233 Fatigue and Failure 

Analysis 3 

EML 6532 Advanced Applications in 

Mechanical Computer 

Aided Design 3 

EML 671 2 Advanced Fluid 

Mechanics 3 

EML 6714 Advanced Gas Dynamics 3 
EML 6725 Computational Ruid 

Dynamics 3 

EML 6805 Advanced Kinematics of 

Mechanisms and 

Robots 3 

EML 6971 Master's Thesis 1-6 

Tliesis Requirement 

Six semester hours (three credits maxi- 
mum per semester) must be earned and 
an acceptable thesis must be com- 
pleted. Upon the approval of tfie depart- 
mental committee, the thesis 
requirement may be replaced by two ad- 
ditional courses. Usually, this permis- 
sion is granted to the student with 
considerable research and development 
related wori< experience. 
Othier Requirements: 

1 . Earn a minimum of 3.0 GPA aver- 
age in all approved courses in the stu- 
dent's program of study. 

2. Pass a comprehensive examina- 
tion (given by the departmental commit- 
tee) which may include an oral defense 
of tfie thesis project. Students with non- 
thesis option must also pass this com- 
prehensive examination. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

EGM - Engineering Mechanics; EGN - 
Engineering; General; EMA - Engineer- 
ing; Materials; EML - Engineering: Me- 
chanical 

EGM 5315 Intermediate ArtalysJs of 
Mechanical Systems (3). Rrst course 



at the graduate level in the analysis of 
mechanical systems. Modeling of the 
system and analytical and numerical 
methods of solution of the governing 
equations will be studied. Ruid and 
thermodynamic systems will be empha- 
sized in this course. Prerequisite: EGM 
331 1 or permission of instructor. 

EGM 5354 Finite Element Method Ap- 
plication in Mechanical Engineering 
(3). Utilize the finite element method to 
solve protilems in heat transfer, fluid dy- 
namics, diffusion, acoustics, vibration, 
and electromagnetism, as well as the 
coupled interaction of these phenom- 
ena. Prerequisites: CGS 3420, EGM 
3520, and EML 41 40. 

EGM 5615 Synthesis of Engineering 
Mechanics (3). Unified approach to the 
analysis of continuous media using con- 
stitutive equations, mechanical behavior 
of materials and their usefulness in han- 
dling failure ttieories and composite ma- 
terials. Prerequisites: MAP 3302 and 
EGM 3520. 

EGM 5935 Review of Topics in Me- 
cfianical Engineering (4). To prepare 
qualified candidates to take Mechanical 
Engineering PE written examination. Re- 
viewed courses include Thermodynam- 
ics, Ruid Mechanics, Mechanics of 
Materials, Ntechanlcal Design and Heat 
Transfer. 

EGM 6422 Advanced Analysis of Me- 
cfianlcal Systems (3). Modeling of vi- 
brational and dynamic systems 
including solution of governing equa- 
tions by analytical and numerical tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: EGM 5315 or 
permission of instructor. 

EGM 6570 Fracture Mechanics (3). 

Failure criteria and the different modes 
of fracture; stress intensity factor; tfie J 
integral; viscous and plastic fracture me- 
chanics and crack displacement models 
will be studied. Prerequisite: EGM 5615. 

EGM 6586 Fluid Mechanics Applica- 
tion in Physioiogicai Systems (3). 

Ruid mechanics principles including fi- 
nite element and finite difference meth- 
ods as it is applied to the analysis of 
various physiological systems will be 
covered. Process flow, diffusion and 
transport will be discussed in cardiovas- 
cular and pulmonary systems. Applica- 
tion of these primarily in the design of 
heart-lung machine, dialysis units and 
heart valves will be discussed. Prereq- 
uisite: EGM 4580 or permission of in- 
structor. 

EGM 6587 Applied Biomedical and Di- 
agnostic Measurements (3). Funda- 
mentals of Hemodynamic measure- 



ISO / College of Engineering and Design 



Graduate Catalog 



ments and various imaging modalities 
will be covered. The students will be 
spending some time In clinical laborato- 
ries in making actual measurements. 
The course will be taught In collabora- 
tion with the Diagnostic Radiology 
Department at Mt. Sinai Medical Center, 
and Baptist Hospital. Prerequisite: EGM 
4580 or permission of instructor. 

EGM 6588 Solid Mechanics Applica- 
tion in Physiological Systems (3). 

Solid mechanics and numerical meth- 
ods as applied to rheology etnalysis of 
musculoskeletal system and trauma. De- 
sign application in orthotics and prothe- 
sis and heart valve. Prerequisite: EGM 
4580 or permission of Instructor. 

EGN 5990 Fundamentals of Engineer- 
ing (FE) Review (4). Prepares upper 
level engineering students to take the 
fundamentals of Engineering (FE) State 
Board Examinations. Reviews Chemis- 
try, Computers, Statics, Synamics, Elec- 
trical Circuits, Ruid Mechanics, 
Mechanic of Materials, Material Science 
and Thermodynamics. 

EMA 5295 Principles of Composite 
Materials (3). Thie mechanical behavior 
of composite materials used in thte auto- 
motive, aircraft and sporting goods in- 
dustries, material and laminar 
properties; design of composites; failure 
analysis; and environmental effects. Pre- 
requisite: EGN 5615 or permission of in- 
structor. 

EMA 5935 Advanced Topics in Materi- 
als Engineering (3). Topics include ther- 
modynamics of solids, principles of 
physical metallurgy, including phase 
transformation and diffusion and analyti- 
cal methods in materials engineering. 

EML 5103 Intermediate Thermody- 
namics (3). Thermodynamic approach 
to processes and engines; alternative 
formulations and legendre transforma- 
tions; maxwell relations, first and sec- 
ond order phase transitions. 
Prerequisites: EML 4101 and EGM 3311. 

EML 5104 Classical Thennodynamics 
(3). Mathiematical analysis of tfie laws of 
classical reversible and irreversible tfier- 
modynamics. Applications to mechani- 
cal, electromagnetic, and chemical 
systems, under ideal and real current in- 
terest. Prerequisite: EML 3101. 

EML 51 25 Classical Dynamics (3). 

Kinematics of rigid body motion, Eule- 
rian angles, lagrangian equations of mo- 
tion, inertia tensor, momental ellipsoid. 
Rigid-body equations of motion, Euler's 
equations, force-free motion, polhade 
and herpolhade, theory of tops and gyro- 
scopes. Variational principles. Hamilto- 



nian equations of motion. Poinsote rep- 
resentation. Prerequisites: MAP 3302 
and EGN 3321. 

EML 5152 Intermediate Heat Transfer 
(3). Multi-dimensional heat conduction 
under steady and transient conditions. 
Heat, mass and momentum transfer. Ra- 
diation heat transfer. Gas radiation. 
Free and forced convection. Prereq- 
uisites: EML 4140 and EML 5709. 

EML 5277 Computer Aided Design 
and Analysis of IMechanical Systems 
(3). Computer aided geometrical model- 
ing of spatial mecfianical systems. De- 
sign criteria and analytical approaches 
for planer kinematic systems will be em- 
phasized. Prerequisites: EML 4260, 
EML 4535, or permission of instructor. 

EML 5385 Identification Techniques 
of Mechanical Systems (3). FFT, time 
series analysis and neuretl networks are 
introduced. Applications of these tech- 
niques are discussed for identification of 
mechanical structures, and machine di- 
agnostics. Prerequisite: EML 431 2. 

EML 5562 Advanced Electronic Pack- 
aging (3). Advanced topics in electronic 
packaging. Evaluation of first through 
fourth level assembly. Applications of 
computer layout design, tfiermal man- 
agement and mechanical stability analy- 
sis. Prerequisite: EML 4561 or 
permission of instructor. 

EML 5606 Advanced Refrigeration 
and Air Conditioning Systems (3). 

The various methods used in the ther- 
mal design and analysis of both refrig- 
eration and heat pump systems are 
investigated. Various methods of produc- 
ing heating and cooling are examined in- 
cluding vapor compression, absorption, 
air cycle, steam jet, thermoelectric, solar 
heating and cooling systems. 

EML 5615 Computer Aided Design in 
Air Conditioning (3). Software will t>e 
used to demonstarate hieatirg, ventilat- 
ing and air conditioning design concepts 
and sizing equipment and determing 
performance parameters. Project design 
is required. Prerequisite: EML 4601, 
EML 4603. 

EML 5708 Advanced Design of Ther- 
mal and Fluid System (3). Advanced 
designs of pumps, compressors, heat 
exchangers, HVAC systems and ther- 
mal and fluid control devices. Prereq- 
uisite: EML 4706. 

EML 5709 Intermediate Ruid Mechan- 
ics (3). Basic concepts and scope of 
fluid dynamics; non-inertial reference 
frames. Two-dimensional potential the- 
ory. Applications to airfoils. The Navier- 
Stokes equations; selected exact and 



approximate equations. Prerequisite: 
EGN 3353. 

EML 6153 Advanced Heat Transfer 
(3). Review of analogies among heat, 
mass and momentum transfer. Free and 
forced convection from theoretical and 
experimental viewpoint for laminar and 
turbulent flows. Rim and dropwise con- 
densation. Prerequisite: EML 5152. 

EML 6154 Conduction Heat Transfer 
(3). Heat transfer by conduction for 
steady and unsteady One and Multidi- 
mensional systems with and without 
heat generation. Temperature distribu- 
tion analysis using analytical and compu- 
tational methods. Prerequisite: EML 
4140. 

EML 61 55 Convection Heat Transfer 
(3). Development and solution of gov- 
erning equations of parallel flows, 
boundary layer flows, instability and tur- 
bulence with convection fieat transfer. 
Prerequisite: EML 4140. 

EML 6157 Advanced Radiation Heat 
Transfer (3). Introduce the graduate stu- 
dent to fieat transfer by radiation for 
steady and unsteady one and multi-di- 
mensional systems. Radiation parame- 
ters effecting different systems will be 
studies. Prerequisite: EML 4140. 

EML 6223 Advanced Mechanical Vi- 
bration Analysis (3). Multidegree of 
freedom systems, discrete and continu- 
ous systems; vibration control and intro- 
duction to vibration of non-linear 
systems. Prerequisite: EML 4220. 

EML 6233 Fatigue and Failure Analy- 
sis (3). A study of tfie theoretical and 
practical aspects of material failure in- 
cluding failure modes, life prediction, cor- 
rosion with tfie goal of designing a safe 
product Prerequisite: EGM 5615. 

EML 6532 Advanced Application in 
IMechanical Computer Aided Design 
(3). Advanced CAD techniques in de- 
sign of mechanical systems. Architec- 
ture of CAD systems including database 
applications. Advanced computational 
geometry student programming. Prereq- 
uisites: EML 5277, EML 5277 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

EML 6712 Advanced Ruid Mechanics 
I (3). Turbulent flows with emphasis on 
engineering metfwds. Momentum, en- 
ergy, eind species transfer. Production, 
dissipation, and scaling laws for turbu- 
lence. Mixing length, effective viscosity. 
Prerequisite: EML 5709. 

EML 6714 Advanced Gas Dynamics 
(3). Thermodynamic and fluid mechan- 
ics principles to high speed flows. Rows 
to be studied include flows with friction 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Engineering and Design / 151 



and heat loss/addition. Prerequisite: 
EML4711. 

EML 6725 Computational Fluid Dy- 
namics (3). Basic computational meth- 
ods for incompressible and 
compressible flows. Methods for solving 
the stream function equation. Boundary 
conditions for vortidty and steam func- 
tion equations. Finite difference and fi- 
nite element techniques. Prerequisites: 
CGS 3420, EML 6712. 

EML 6805 Advanced Kinematics of 
Mechanisms and Robots (3). Kine- 
matic analysis of mechanisms and rolsot 
arms, geometric configurations, analyti- 
cal and numerical methods in kinemat- 
ics. Prerequisite: EML 3262. 

EML 6908 Independent Studies (1-3). 

Individual research studies available for 
qualified graduate students. The work is 
to be performed under tfie supervision 
of an advisor. A report is to be submit- 
ted. Students may register for 1 to 3 
credits per semester. Prerequisite: Advi- 
sor's permission. 

EML 6971 Masters Thesis (1-6). Mas- 
ters thesis in any advanced topic, a re- 
port is to be submitted and an oral 
presentation is to be made. Students 
may register for 1 to 3 credits per se- 
mester. Totcil of 6 credits to be earned. 
Prerequisite: Advisor's permission. 



School of Design 

Gordon Hopkins, Dean 
Adele Smith, Associate Dean 
Jos6 D. Mltranl, Chairperson, 

Construction Management 
Leonardo Alvarez, Ctiairperson, 

Landscape Architecture and 

ArcNiectural Studies 
John Konarsld, III, Chairperson, 

Retailing arid Apparel Studies 

The School of Design offers graduate 
degree programs in Construction Man- 
agement and Landscape Architecture. 

Community Involvement 

The School maintains dose ties with tfie 
landscape arcNtecture, architecture, 
and construction industries. Industry ad- 
visory committees periodically review 
the cuniculum to maintain its relevance 
to the needs of tfw industry. 

Admission Preparation 

Prospective students who are consider- 
ing majors within the School of Design 
must meet tfie University's graduate ad- 
mission requirements. Many of tfie 



School's academic programs require ex- 
tensive prerequisite preparation prior to 
enrollment in certain courses. Students 
should check the individual program re- 
quirements. 



Construction 
Management 

Jos6 D. MitranI, P.E., Associate 

Professor and Chairperson 
Irtlshad Ahmad, Assistant Professor 
Gabriel Auricles, Associate Professor 
Wilson Barnes, Assistant Professor 

arxi Coordinator, Broward Program 
Bhaskar Chaudhari, Professor 
Eugene D. Farmer, Assistant Professor 
Ayman Morad, Assistant Professor 
Juik) Otazo, Assistant Professor 

Master of Science in 
Construction Management 

The master's degree is rapidly t)ecom- 
ing the entry level requirement for mid- 
dle and upper level managerial 
positions in the construction industry. 
The primary goal of this program is to 
provide ttie knowledge and advanced 
skills essential for success in ttiese posi- 
tions. The program is flexible enough to 
accommodate graduates from other dis- 
dplines who may lack a part of tiie un- 
dergraduate tjackground in construction 
management. 

Students who hold four-year under- 
graduate degrees in construction man- 
agement or its equivalent in related 
fields may nonnally complete the mas- 
ter's degree in one academic year as 
full-time students. 'Equivalent in related 
fields' should indude studies in con- 
struction materials and metfxxds, struc- 
tures, cost estimating, construction 
scheduling and business manage- 
ment/finsince. Students with deficiencies 
in these fields may need longer resi- 
dence for tfie master's degree, as ttiey 
will t>e required to take specified basic 
courses to provide a foundation for ad- 
vanced courses. 

Admission Application 

Each student wishing to enter the gradu- 
ate program must formally apply to the 
University for acceptance. See catalog 
for graduate application instructions. 

Admission Requirements 

In order to be admitted, applicants 
should hold a Bachelor's Degree in Con- 
struction, Construction Management, Ar- 
cNtecture, Engineering, Business or 
'equivalent related fields.' In addition, 
applicants must meet one of the two fol- 
lowing criteria: 



1 . Have a 'B' average (3.0 GPA) or 
better w/hile registered as an upper-divi- 
sion student working toward a baccalau- 
reate degree. 

2. Obtained a score of at least 1000 
on tfie Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) or a minimum score of 500 on 
the Graduate Management Admissions 
Test (GMAT). 

GRE or GMAT 

All graduate students, regardless of un- 
dergraduate GPA, are required by tfie 
University to take the GRE or tfie 
GMAT. Students that did not take the 
GRE or tfie GMAT for admission into 
tfie program must take either one no 
later ttian the second semester into their 
master's work. 

Background 

Applicants should fiold a Bachelor's de- 
gree in Construction, Construction Man- 
agement, Architecture, Engineering, 
Business or "equivalent related fields." 
Transcripts of all applicants vinll be re- 
viewed to ascertain successful comple- 
tion of program prerequisites. 

"Equivalent in related fields" should 
include studies in construction materials 
and methods, structures, cost estimat- 
ing, construction scheduling and busi- 
ness management/finance. Students 
with defidendes in these fields may 
need longer residence for the master's 
degree, as they will be required to take 
spedfied basic courses to provide a 
foundation for advanced courses. 

Curriculum 

The graduate student has a choice of 
either a thesis or non-tfiesis track to- 
wards graduation. The 33 semester 
hour tfiesis track consists of 30 semes- 
ter hours of course work, and three se- 
mester hours of thesis (three hours for 
research and three hours for tfiesis 
preparation). Tfie non-tfiesis (master's 
report) option consists of 36 semester 
flours of course work and six semester 
hours of master's report (three hours for 
research and three hours for report 
preparation). A student sheill not register 
for either the master's tfiesis or master's 
report without first having received the 
approval from his/her advisor, supervi- 
sory committee, and the Chairman of 
the Department. 

Course Requirements 

Graduate credit is awarded for courses 
numbered 5000 and above. Tfie work in 
the major field must be in courses num- 
bered 5000 or above. For wof1< outside 
the major, courses numbered 3000 or 
atxive may be taken provided they are 
part of an approved plan of study. The 
program of course vrork for a master's 



152 / College of Engineering and Design 

degree must be approved by the stu- 
dent's advisor, supervisory committee, 
and Department Chair. No more than 
six credits from a previous master's de- 
gree program may be applied toward a 
second master's degree. These credits 
are applied only with the written ap- 
proval of the Department Chair and th« 
Dean of the College of Engineering and 
Design. 

Transfer of Credit 

Only graduate (5000 - 7000) level work 
to the extent of two courses, totaling six 
semester hours, earned with a grade of 
A, B+, or B may be transferred from an- 
other institution approved by the Depart- 
ment Chair and the Dean of tfie College 
of Engineering and Design, or from post- 
baccalaureate worl< at Rorida Interna- 
tional University. Credits transferred 
from otfier universities will he applied to- 
ward meeting the degree requirements 
but the grades earned will not be com- 
puted in the student's grade point aver- 
age. Acceptance of transfer of wedit 
requires approval of tlie student's super- 
visory committee and the Department 
Chiair. Petitions for transfer of credit for 
a master's degree must be made during 
the student's first term of enrollment in 
tfie master's program. Nonresident or 
extension work taken at another institu- 
tion may not be transferred to Rorida In- 
ternational University for graduate 
credit. No courses taken by correspon- 
dence or as part of another degree may 
be used toward a graduate degree. 

Supervisory Committee 

The student's supervisory committee 
should be appointed as soon as possi- 
ble after the student has been admitted 
to the master's program but in no case 
later thian the second semester of gradu- 
ate study. Supervisory committees for 
graduate degree programs are nomi- 
nated by ttie student's selected gradu- 
ate advisor and approved by the 
Department Chairperson. The student's 
proposed plan of study must be ap- 
proved, in writing, by frie student's 
graduate advisor, tfie supervisory com- 
mittee and the Department Chair. 

Master's Thesis/Report 

A student, as part of his/her plan of 
study, must prepare a written proposal 
for presentation to his/her graduate advi- 
sor, supervisory committee, and the 
Chair of the Department. This proposal 
must adhere to all University and 
Department regulations concerning for- 
mat and content. Once this proposal is 
approved, in writing, by tfie student's 
graduate advisor, his/her supervisory 
committee, and the Department Chair, 



the student will be permitted to register 
for master's ttiesis or master's report. 

Examination 

A final comprehensive examination, 
oral, written or both, must be passed by 
the candidate. This excimination, held 
on campus with all participants present, 
will cover at least tfie candidate's field of 
concentration and may include any 
other topics of general construction 
knowledge. In no case may it be sched- 
uled eariier tfian the term preceding the 
semester in which tfie degree is to be 
conferred. 

Time Limitation 

All work, including transferred credit, 
counted toward ttie master's degree 
must be completed during the seven 
years immediately preceding tfie date 
on which tie degree is awarded. 

General Regulations 

Registration 

Each student must meet with his/her ad- 
visor each semester, prior to registering 
for tfie next semester. This meeting is in- 
tended to review and update tfie stu- 
dent's file. 

Normal Loads 

Students taking a minimum of nine se- 
mester credit hours per semester are 
considered full time students at the 
graduate level. Students taking under 
nine hours are considered part-time and 
should be aware tfiat certain university 
privileges and benefits may not be appli- 
cable to part time students. Students 
are not recommended to take excessive 
loads. Special exceptions may be 
made, at the option of tfie Department, 
in tfie case of students wflth a grade 
point average of 3.5 or greater. Stu- 
dents that meet these aiteria wishing to 
take over 15 semester credit hours must 
fiave the approval of both tfie Chairman 
of the Department and tlie Dean of the 
College of Engineering and Design, 
prior to registering for an overioad. 

Students Rights and 
Responsibilities 

It is the student's responsibility to ob- 
tain, become familiar with, and abide by 
all Departmental, College and University 
requirements and regulations. These in- 
clude, but are not limited to: 

1 . Tfie Florida International Univer- 
sity Catalog. 

2. Division of Student Affairs' Hand- 
book on Rights and Responsibilities of 
Students. 

3. Florida International University 
Student Grievance Procedure. 



Graduate Catalog 



4. Department of Construction Man- 
agement Curriculum and Progrsim 
sfieets. 

5. All Department of Construction 
fktenagement policies and regulations. 

Grades 

Ttie Department of Construction Man- 
agement requires a minimum grade of 
'B' or better in all graduate work. 
Grade of Irwomplete: A grade of 'I' (In- 
complete) may be granted, at tfie option 
of tfie Instructor and the Department 
Cfiair, to a student who, due to serious, 
documented, and verifiable extenuating 
circumstances beyond his/her control 
(such as an illness requiring fiospitaliza- 
tion) is unable to complete the work re- 
quired to obtain a grade for a course. In 
no case shall a grade of T be granted to 
a student because tie/she is not passing 
a course and desires additional time to 
attempt to obtain a pasang grade. A stu- 
dent granted a grade of 'I' must com- 
plete the work deemed by the Instructor 
necessary to complete ttie course no 
later tfian two semesters after ttie grade 
was assigned to tfie student, or the 
grade shall automatically revert to a 
grade of 'F (failing grade). 

Credit By Examination 

Tfie Department does not generally of- 
fer credit by examination for required 
core courses or elective courses. A stu- 
dent with outstanding, exceptional and 
documented skills in a particular subject 
as well as an outstanding academic re- 
cord may request credit by examination, 
and it is the option of tfie Department 
Faculty and tfie Department Chairper- 
son wfietfier to grant the request. 

Credit For Non-College Learning 

The Department does not award aedit 
for credit for non-college learning (life 
work experience). 

Student Work 

Tfie Department reserves tfie right to re- 
tain any and all student work for tfie pur- 
poses of record, exhibition or instruction. 

Normal Academic Progress 

Tfie student will have maintained nor- 
mal academic progress when tfie stu- 
dent earns a minimum grade point 
average of 3.0 for all graduate wori< at- 
tempted. 

Course Sequence and Prerequisites 

Course prerequisites are cleariy indi- 
cated on the Graduate Program sheets, 
available in the Department office. It is 
tfie students' responsibility, not tfie advi- 
sor's, to ascertain tfiat required prereq- 
uisites fiave been taken and passed 
prior to registering for a course. Failure 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Engineering and Design / 153 



to comply with prerequisite require- 
ments may result in the student being 
dropped from or failed in a class without 
prior warning from the Insttuctor. 

Probation or Suspension 

Students who do not make satisfactory 
academic progress may be excluded 
from further registration. 

Class Attendance 

Class attendance may be required and 
may be used for grade determination at 
the option of the instructor. 

Graduation 

In order to be eligible to graduate thie 
student must have successfully com- 
pleted his/her plan of study as estab- 
lislied with the student's graduate 
advisor, his/her supervisory committee, 
and the Department Chairperson. This 
includes completion of all applicable 
coursev/ork with at least a grade of 'B' 
or better and a final grade point average 
of at least 3.0. A student must also have 
submitted a complete master's ttiesis or 
report, whose format, content, and pres- 
entation must be acceptable to and ap- 
proved by his/her graduate advisor, 
supervisory committee, and Department 
Cfiairperson. The student must addition- 
ally have successfully passed his/her fi- 
nal examination (See Examination, 
above). 

Students should contact an advisor 
at least one semester prior to their pro- 
jected graduation and request a review 
of his or her file. At ttie start of the final 
semester the student is required to com- 
plete and have his advisor approve an 
Application for Graduation, available 
from the Department. (See catalog for 
additional infonnation on graduation pro- 
cedures and scheduling.) If for any rea- 
son a student fails to graduate in the 
semester after applying for graduation, 
that student must reapply for gradu- 
ation. 

It is the student's responsibility, not 
his/her advisor's responsibility, to ascer- 
tain that all requirements for graduation, 
as stated in the University Catalog and 
in the Department Program sheets, 
have been met. 

Core Courses: (21) 
BCN 5716 Productivity in 

Construction 3 

QH^B 6603 Quantitative f^ethods in 

(vieinagement ' 3 

ECP 6705 Managerial Economics ' 3 
Approved Graduate level Research 3 
ARC 591 6 Innovations in Building 

Technology 3 

BCN 6642 Value Engineering in 

Construction 3 



BCN 5784 Constmction Information 

Sen/ices 3 

^ Refer to the Catalog section under Col- 
lege of Business Administration for 
course descriptions and prerequisites. 
BCN 6971 Thesis 6 

or 
BCN 5905 Independent Study 

(Research with 

Construction 

Application) 

Directed Electives: 

(minimum 9 semester hours) 

BCN 5755 Construction Accounting 

and Finance 3 

BCN 6785 Computer Estimating and 

Cost Analysis 3 

BCN 5771 l^anagement and 

Marketing of 

Construction Services 3 
BCN 6935 Graduate Seminar 3 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

BCN-Building Construction 
Student programs of study in the gradu- 
ate level program are carefully designed 
and sequenced following consultation 
with a graduate faculty advisor. Appro- 
priate prerequisite coursework is as- 
signed on thie basis of individual needs. 

BCN 5626 Construction Cost Analy- 
sis and Control (3). Description of dif- 
ferent types of estimating techniques in 
relation to different stages in a construc- 
tion project. Productivity analysis, meas- 
urement of progress, and techniques of 
cost control are covered. Prerequisites: 
BCN 4612 and BCN 4260. 

BCN 5716 Productivity In Construc- 
tion (3). An in-depth study of common 
issues relating to productivity improve- 
ments in construction. Prerequisite: 
BCN 4612 or equivalent. 

BCN 5735 Hazardous Materials and 
Waste in construction (3). Discussion 
of ttie common tiazardous materials and 
waste regulations found in construction 
activities. Prerequisites: ARC 3463 and 
BCN 3762. 

BCN 5755 Construction Accounting 
and Finance (3). Money management 
in constmction operations: financing, 
funding, sources of money, cash flow, 
disbursement, liability and bonding, cost 
and managerial accounting, and profit 
analysis. 

BCN 5771 Management ar>d Market- 
ing of Construction Services (3). Hu- 
man effectiveness in marketing 



construction management services in 
ttie public and private sectors. 

BCN 5772 Managenwnt of Construc- 
tion Organizations (3). This course 
studies the management of a construc- 
tion company. Topics included are: com- 
pany organization, incorporation 
structures, policies and procedures, fi- 
nance, accounting, information model- 
ing, bidding strategies, and operation. 
Prerequisite: BCN 3753 or BUL 41 1 1 or 
BCN 3740. 

BCN 5784 Construction Information 
Services (3). The application of informa- 
tion management techniques, including 
computer hardware and software sys- 
tems, to the analysis and solution of typi- 
cal problems in the practice of cons- 
truction management. 

BCN 5905 Directed Independent Stud- 
ies (VAR). Individual studies under su- 
pervision of faculty, tutor, or advisor. 

BCN 5906 Special Topics (VAR). Inten- 
sive study for small group of students in 
a particular topic, or a limited number of 
topics not otherwise offered in the 
curriculum. 

BCN 6473 Systems Approach for 
Housing Planning (3). Discussions of 
basic concepts of systems analysis and 
systems approach to the field of hous- 
ing planning. The advantage of systems 
approach. Case studies. 

BCN 6642 Value Engineering in Con- 
struction (3). Relationship of costs to 
time and life cycle of construction pro- 
jects, and methods to improve tfie eco- 
nomic value of construction projects. 

BCN 6775 Decision arKl Risk Analy- 
sis in Construction (3). Techniques of 
decision analysis for the medium to top 
level management personnel in the con- 
struction industry. Typical construction 
related problems tliat involve risk and 
uncertainty are studied. Prerequisites: 
STA 3132, BCN 3640, and BCN 4612. 

BCN 6785 Computer Estimating and 
Cost Analysis (3). Application of com- 
puter software to rigorous exercises in 
construction estimating. Cost informa- 
tion related to construction with applica- 
tions in current practice. 

BCN 6786 Artificial Intelligence Appli- 
cations In Construction Management 
(3). The course presents a study of tfie 
concepts, techniques, and applications 
of Al technology in the construction man- 
agement domain. Prerequisites: COP 
2172 and BCN 5784. 

BCN 6916 Developments in Construc- 
tion Technologies (3). Study of ad- 
vanced field techniques and emerging 



154 / College of Engineering and Design 



Graduate Catalog 



uses worldwide. Information flow and 
creativity are highlighted as crucial ele- 
ments which stimulate new develop- 
ments. This course prepares the 
students to understand and deal with 
concepts of change. Prerequisite: BCN 
5716. 

BCN 6935 Seminar on Construction 
Management (3). Advanced study of 
problems, trends, and issues in a time 
of rapid change in building and manage- 
ment technology. Topics selected or de- 
veloped by class. 

BCN 6971 Thesis (3-6). Students de- 
velop a thesis under the direction of a 
senior faculty mentor and advance and 
defend their propositions before an audi- 
ence of peers and scholars. 



Landscape Architecture 
and Architectural Studies 

Leonardo Alvarez, Assistant Professor 

and Chairperson 
J. A. Bueno, Assistant Professor and 

Program Coordinator 
Jaime Canaves, Associate Professor 
Marta Canaves, Visiting Lecturer 
GIsela Lopez-Mata, Assistant Professor 
Jose Lozano, Assistant Professor 
Ira] Majzub, Professor 

The Department of Landscape Architec- 
ture and Architectural Studies is dedi- 
cated to advancing tfie professions of 
architecture, landscape architecture, 
and interior design. In keeping with the 
nature of these professions, the pro- 
grams are taugfit in an interdisciplinary 
manner, taking full advantage of the re- 
sources and areas of expertise offered 
by each. The department offers two un- 
dergraduate programs, a Bachelor of 
Science in Architectural Technology and 
a Bacfielor of Science in Interior Design, 
and one graduate program, a t»^aster of 
Landscape Architecture. 

Master of Landscape 
Architecture 

The graduate program in Landscape Ar- 
chitecture is designed to prepare gradu- 
ates for professional practice as well as 
advance the kmwiedge base of the field 
through research. By applying thteir un- 
derstanding of the natural and cultural 
environments, landscape architects plan 
and design projects which range from 
gardens to regional space systems to 
national parks. Whether for public or pri- 
vate use, the landscape architect is con- 



cemed with tfie quality of relationships 
between people and their environment. 
The Department offers two options 
in tfie Landscape Architecture graduate 
program. Tfie Professional Degree Op- 
tion is intended for individuals with an 
undergraduate degree in a major other 
tfian a design discipline, or with a pre- 
professional undergraduate degree in a 
design discipline. The Post-professional 
Degree Option is intended for individu- 
als with an undergraduate degree in 
landscape architecture who wish to pur- 
sue advanced professional study. 

Professional Degree Option 

Individuals with a Bacfielor of Arts or a 
Bachelor of Science, or equivalent, from 
an accredited institution are eligible for 
admission to tfie program. Three years 
of full-time study in residence and three 
months of full-time professional intern- 
ship are normally required. However, a 
part-time study option is available sub- 
ject to tfie review of tfie Department. 
Satisfactory completion of 90 credits in 
tfie follovtfl'ng course of study is required. 
Landscape Architectural Design 36 

Design Implementation 21 

History and Theroy 12 

Professional Practice Studies 6 

Research Specialization 15 

Individuals with an undergraduate 
degree in architecture from an accred- 
ited professional program, or with a pre- 
professional undergraduate degree in 
architecture, landscape architecture, or 
environmental design may be granted 
advanced standing, not to exceed 30 
credits for undergraduate courses with a 
grade of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 point 
scale. 

Post-Professional Degree Option 

Individuals with an undergraduate de- 
gree in landscape architecture from an 
accredited professional program are eli- 
gible for admission to the program. Two 
years of full-time study in residency are 
nomially required. However, a part-time 
study option is available subject to the 
review of the Department. Satisfactory 
completion of 60 credits in the following 
course of study is required. 
Landscape Archictural Design 24 

Elective Courses 36 

Scholarships and Awards 

The following scholarships and awards 
are presented to students fully admitted 
to the graduate program in Landscape 
Architecture wtio have demonstrated 
outstanding achievements in their stud- 
ies. 

The Adele E Smith Outstanding 
Student Award. Each year, upon nomi- 
nation by tfie Program faculty, the 



Sdyiol of Design gives this award to the 
outstanding graduating student. 

American Society of Landscape 
Architects Awards. On nomination by 
the Program faculty, tfie American Soci- 
ety of Landscape Architects awards a 
Certificate of Honor and a Certificate of 
Merit to tfie two students who tiave dem- 
onstrated a high degree of academic 
scholarship and of accomplishments in 
skills related to the art and technology 
of landscape architecture. 

Department of Landscape Archi- 
tecture and Architectural Studies 
Awards. These awards are annually 
presented by tfie Department, upon tfie 
recommendation of the Program faculty, 
to the students who have demonstrated 
outstanding achievement in scholarship, 
research, and design. 

The Ernest and Virginia Makem- 
son Memorial Endowed Scholarship 
Fund. This fund provides support for stu- 
dents who fiave demonstrated interest 
and experience in restoring anchor pre- 
serving Rorida's natural and cultural en- 
vironment through tfie practice of 
landscape ctrchitecture and design. 

Ownership of Student Wori( 

Student work, submitted to tfie Depart- 
ment in satisfaction of course or degree 
requirements, becomes tfie physical 
fjroperty of tfie Department. However, 
students retain all rights to tfie intellec- 
tual property of such wort<. This work 
may include papers, drawings, models, 
and other materials. The Department 
assumes no responsibility for safeguard- 
ing such materials. At its discretion, tfie 
department may retain, return, or dis- 
card such materials. The Department 
will not normally discard the materials of 
currently enrolled students witfiout giv- 
ing the student a chance to reclaim 
tfiem. 



Ck>urse Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

ARG-Architecture; IND-lnterior Design; 
LAA-Landscape Architecture 

ARC 5176C Computer Practices In 
Design II (3). Advanced study in con- 
cepts, issues and methods in computer- 
aided architectural design. Application of 
ARC 5175. Prerequisite: ARC 5175 or 
equivalent. 

ARC 5916 Innovations in Building 
Technology (3). Experimental approach 
to new materials and metfiods applica- 
ble to the field of construction. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

LAA 5235 Theory of Landscape Archi- 
tecture (3). Critical review of tf>e envi- 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Engineering and Design / 155 



ronmental parameters, morphological 
concepts and Ideological principles that 
generate fomi and meaning in land- 
scape architecture. Prerequisite: Depart- 
mental approval. 

LAA 5335 Site Development (3). Is- 
sues, controls, and methods pertinent to 
the physiographic, topographical, and 
cultural determinants of site develop- 
ment. Prerequisite: LAA 5652 or equiva- 
lent. 

LAA 5371 Computer Practices In De- 
sign I (3). Introduction to computer ap- 
plications and to computer utilization in 
Landscape Architecture. Explore both 
the potenticils and limitations of com- 
puter usage in the profession. Prereq- 
uisites: COC 3300 or equivalent and 
departmental approval. 

LAA 5424 Landscape Construction I 
(3). Study of materials and methods 
used in landscape construction. Intro- 
duction to manipulation and calculation 
of site work. Prerequisite: LAA 5335. 

LAA 5425 Landscape Construction II 
(3). Production of complete set of land- 
scape constnjction documents, includ- 
ing drawings and project manual with 
tjtdding documents, contract documents 
and technical specifications. Prereq- 
uisite: LAA 5424. 

LAA 5521 Natural Landscape Sys- 
tems (3). Environmental planning and 
landscape design issues will be related 
to an overview of tjasic ecosystems, 
plant materials and earth science con- 
cepts. Prerequisite: Departmental ap- 
proval. 

LAA 5652 Interdisciplinary Design 
Studio I (6). Introduction to two- and 
three-dimensional representational tech- 
niques. Fundamental geometric con- 
structions, spatial theory, three- 
dimensional perception and color the- 
ory. Programmed designs are executed. 
Prerequisite: Departmental approval. 

LAA 5653 Landscape Architectural 
Design I (6). Introduction to the design 
process and sources of form in land- 
scape architecture. Projects focus on 
spatial composition and the use of land- 
scape materials in ttie solution of design 
problems. Prerequisite: LAA 5652. 

LAA 5715 Architectural History and 
Theory (3). An overview of architectural 
Nslory, from the beginnings of western 
architecture and urtjan design to the 
20th century, including current trends. 
Departmental approval. 

LAA 5716 History of Landscape Archi- 
tecture (3). Historical survey of the prin- 
cipal sites and traditions manifested in 



the evolution of landscape architecture 
and urban design from antiquity to the 
present. Prerequisite: Departmental ap- 
proval. 

LAA 6215 Landscape Architectural 
Practice (3). Topics to be covered in- 
clude economic viability, organizational 
structure, intra-office relationships, man- 
agement systems, task definition, and 
computer applications. Prerequisite: 
LAA 5371. 

LAA 6222 Landscape Architecture 
Communication (3). This course devel- 
ops methods and techniques for the ef- 
fective communication of landscape 
planning and design values to the con- 
sumer. Prerequisite: Departmental ap- 
proval. 

LAA 6245 Theory of Uit>an Design 
(3). Critical review of the principal theo- 
ries of urbanism tfiat have influenced 
the fabric and image of the city in West- 
ern history. Prerequisite: LAA 5235 and 
LAA 571 6. 

LAA 6246 Typology of Landscape Ar- 
chitecture (3). Critical examination of 
the origin, development and transforma- 
tion of form and meaning in modem and 
post modern landscape architecture and 
urban design. Prerequisite: LAA 5235 
and LAA 571 6. 

LAA 6342 Landscape Aesthetics (3). 

This course explores values of natural, 
rural, industrial and urtan landscapes. 
Emphasis is on aesthetic perception 
and the relationship to the design proc- 
ess. Prerequisites: LAA 5235 and LAA 
5716. 

LAA 6382 Methods of Environmental 
Analysis (3). Primarily through case 
studies, this course will explore the 
methods available to the landscape ar- 
chitect for analyzing land resource data 
and applying the results to land manage- 
ment and environmental design. Prereq- 
uisites: LAA 5521. 

LAA 6541 Tropical/Subtropical Land- 
scape (3). In-depth study of tropical and 
subtropical landscapes. Topics to be 
covered include natural resource, 
unique climatic conditions, plant materi- 
als, natural processes, and the interac- 
tion of man with the environment. 
Prerequisite: LAA 5521. 

LAA 6654 Landscape Architectural 
Design 2 (6). This course will focus 
upon housing issues as they relate to 
design. Project scale varies from single 
family homes to high density multi-fam- 
ily housing development of residential 
environments in urtMn and rural set- 
tings. Prerequisite: LAA 5653. 



LAA 6655 Landscape Architectural 
Design 3 (6). This course will explore a 
range of land etnd site design problems 
at tfie planning and project scales. Em- 
phasis will be on resolution of complex 
problems through analysis of natural, 
physical, and social factors. Prereq- 
uisites: LAA 6654 and LAA 6382. 

LAA 6745 Preservation of Landscape 
Architecture (3). Critical examination of 
the formation and preservation of his- 
toric sites with emphasis on interpreta- 
tion, analysis and evaluation of cultural 
landscapes and urtian places. Prereq- 
uisite: LAA 5235 and LAA 571 6. 

LAA 6835 Interdisciplinary Design 
Studio 2 (6). Work on selected projects 
with graduate students in architecture, 
urt>an and regional planning and/or 
twilding construction. Landscape archi- 
tecture faculty involvement. Prereq- 
uisite: LAA 6655. 

LAA 6875 Research Methods in Land- 
scape Architecture (3). Advanced re- 
search methodology for landscape 
architecture students. Focus will be on 
data acquisition, interpretation and pres- 
entation formats. Prerequisite: LAA 
5371 and Departmental approval. 

LAA 6905 Independent Study (1-3). In- 
dividual studies under supervision of fac- 
ulty, tutor, or advisor. Consent of tutor 
and faculty chairperson required. Prereq- 
uisite: Departmental approval. 

LAA 6915 Supervised Research (1-5). 

Each student must engage in super- 
vised wori< under a principal investigator 
on either a proposal for funding or a 
funded project. Assigned duties must be 
agreed to by student and principal inves- 
tigator prior to t)eginning the supervised 
work. Prerequisite: Department ap- 
proval. 

LAA 6935 Graduate Seminars (1-3). 

Topical seminar designed especially for 
direction by visiting professionals or visit- 
ing faculty from other disciplines. Prereq- 
uisite: Departmental approval. 

LAA 6936 Special Topics (1-3). 

Course to address current special topics 
of interest. It may tie developed in coop- 
eration with a private or public sector of- 
fice, industry, or environmental 
association. 

LAA 6971 Terminal Project/Thesis (6). 
Individual or group terminal project may 
be approved in lieu of a ttiesis where 
the resejirch does not suit the conven- 
tional thesis format. Prerequisites: LAA 
6655 and departmental approval. 



156 / College of Engineering and Design 



Graduate Catalog 



Drinking Water 
Research Center 

William J. Cooper, Director 

The Drinking Water Research Center 
conducts basic and applied studies In 
the area of water resources as It relates 
to drinldng water quality and quantity. 
The Center also provides the opportu- 
nity for undergraduate arxl graduate stu- 
dents to conduct independent research 
In cooperation with other departments in 
ttie University. See ttie General Informa- 
tion section 'Centers and Institutes' for 
more details regarding the Center. 

Staff 

William J. Cooper, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Associate Research 

Sctmlar/Scientist and Director 
Ronald D. Jones, Ph.D. (Oregon State 

University), Assistant Professor 
Frances Parsons, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Associate Research 

Scholar/Scientist. 
Jose A. Amador, Ph.D. (Cornell 

University), Postdoctoral Research 

Associate 
Laurie L Richardson, Ph.D. (Oregon 

State University), Assistant Professor 



College of Engineering 
and Design 

Dean Gordon R. Hopkins 

School of Engineering 
Associate Dean Gautam Ray 

Acting Associate Dean Gustavo Roig 
Director, Information Systems and 
External Programs Neil Hout-Cooper 

School of Design 

Associate Dean Adele Smith 

Chairpersons: 

School of Engineering 

Civil and Environmental 

Engineering Oktay Ural 

Electrical and Computer 

Engineering James R. Story 

Industrial Systems 

and Engineering Fredrick Swift 

Mecharvcal Engineering M. AM Ebadian 

School of Design 

Retailing and Apparel 

Studies John KonarskI, III 

Construction 

Management Jos6 D. Mitrani, P.E. 



Landscape Architecture/ 

Architectural 

Studies Leonardo Alvarez 

Directors: 
Drinking Water 

Research Center William J. Cooper 
International Institute 

for Housing and Buildings Oktay Ural 
Computer-Aided 

Engineering 

Center Neil Hout-Cooper 

Coordinators: 

FEEDS (Florida Engineering 

Educational Delivery 

Systems) Osiris Villacampa 

STAC (Southern 

Technology Application 

Center) Osiris Villacampa 

Faculty 

Adjouadi, Maiek, Ph.D. (University of 
Florida), Assistant Professor, 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Ahmad, Irtishad, Ph.D., P.E 

(University of Cindnnati), Assistant 
Professor, Construction Management 

Alvarez, Leonardo, MLA, AIA, ASLA 
(Harvard University), Assistant 
Professor, Chairperson, Landscape 
Architecture and Architectural 
Studies 

Andrian, Jean, Ph.D. (University of 
Florida), Associate Professor, 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Auricles, Gat>riel, Ed.D. (Rorida 
Atlantic University), Associate 
Professor, Constniction Management 

Babij, Tadeusz, Ph.D. (Technical 
University, Wroclaw, Poland), 
Associate Professor, Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 

Barnes, Wilson C, M.Arch, A.I.A. 
(University of Pennsylvania), 
Assistant Professor and Coordinator, 
Construction Management, Broward 

Bueno, J. A., MLA, ASLA, P.E. 
(Harvard University) As^stant 
Professor, Landscape Architecture 
and Coordinator, Graduate Program 
in Landscape Architecture 

Canaves, Jaime, MArch, AIA 
(University of f^orida). Associate 
Professor, Interior 
Design/Architectural Studies 

Canaves, Marta, MLA (Florida 
International University), Visiting 
Lecturer, Landscape 
Architecture/ArcNtectural Studies 

Carrasco, Hector R., Ph.D. P.E. (Texas 
A&M), Assistant Professor, Industrial 
Systems and Engineering 

Cereljo, Manuel R., D.Sc.,P.E 
(Universidad Central), MSEE 
(Georgia Institute of Technology), 



Professor, Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 

Chaudhari, Bhaskar S., Ph.D., P.E. 
(University of Pennsylvania), 
Professor, Construction Management 

Chellalah, S., Ph.D. (Purdue 
University), Assistant Professor, 
Mechanical Engineering 

Chen, Chin Sheng, Ph.D. (Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute and State 
University), Associate Professor, 
Irxiustrial Systems and Engineering 

Cooper, William, Ph.D. (University of 
Miami), Director, Drinking Water 
Research Center 

Dong, Zhifeng, Ph.D. (Xi'an Jiaotong 
University), Visiting Research 
Associate Professor, Mechanical 
Engineering 

Ebadian, Mohammed A., Ph.D. 
(Louisiana State University), 
Professor and Chairman, 
Mechanical Engineering 

Farmer, Eugene D., M.Arch., A.I.A. 
(University of Illinois), Assistant 
Professor, Construction /[Management 

Fennema, Robert J., Ph.D. 
(Washington State University), 
Assistant Professor, Civil and 
Environmental Engineering 

Greenfield, Jeffrey H., Ph.D. 

(University of Pittsburgh), Assistant 
Professor, Civil and Environmental 
Engineering 

Grossbard, Judy, Ph.D. (Florida State 
University), Assistant Professor, 
Retailing and Apparel Studies 

Hagniann, Mark J., Ph.D. (University of 
Utah), Associate Professor, 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Heimer, Malcolm L, Ph.D. (Penn State 
University), Associate Professor, 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Hopkins, Gordon R., Ph.D. (Urvversity 
of Alabama), Professor, Mechanical 
Engineering, and Dean, College of 
Engineering and Design 

Hout-Cooper, Neil M., Ph.D. (Fhrida 
Atlantic University), Assistant 
Professor and Director, Computer 
Aided Engineering Center, and 
Information Systems and External 
Programs 

Howard, Greta, M.Sc. (Florida 
International University), Lecturer, 
Retailing and Apparel Studies 

Jiang, Wei, Ph.D. (University of Illinois), 
Visiting Assistant Professor, 
Mechanical Engineering 

Jones, Ronald, Ph.D. (Oregon State 
University), Associate Professor, 
Drinking Water Research Center 

Jones, William K., Ph.O. 
(Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology), Associate Professor, 
Mecharuck Engineering/ Electrical 
and Computer Engineering 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Engineering and Design / 157 



Kengskool, Khokiat, Ph.D. (University 
of Missouri), Associate Professor, 
Industrial Systems and Engineering 

Konarski III, John Ph.D. (Syracuse 
University), Chairperson and 
Assistant Professor , Retailing and 
Apparel Studies 

Larklns, Grover L., Ph.D. (Case 
Western Reserve University), 
Assistant Professor, Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 

Lee, Edward T., Ph.D. (University of 
Caltfomla at Berkeley), Professor, 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Lee, Shih-Ming, Ph.D. (Iowa State 
University), Associate Professor, 
Industrial Systems and Engineering 

Leonard, Rene J., D.A., P.E. 
(University of Mami), Associate 
Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

iMiy, Cesar, Ph.D. (Stanford 
University), Associate Professor, 
Mechanic^ Engineering 

Lopez-Mata, Giseia, M.S. (Pratt 
Institute), Assistant Professor, 
Interior IDesign and Coordinator, 
Undergraduate Program in Interior 
Design 

Lozano, Jose M., MArch, AIA (Kent 
State University), Assistant 
Professor, Interior 
Design/Architectural Studies 

Lulu, Menbem, Ph.D. (University of 
Alabama), Associate Professor, 
Industrial Systems and Engineering 

Majzub, Iraj E., D Arch, RA (University 
of Torino), Professor, Landscape 
ArcNtecture and Architectural 
Studies 

Martinez, Sergio, D.Sc. (New York 
University), Associate Chairperson, 
Industrial Systems Engineering 

Merkel, Robert S., Ph.D. (Institute of 
Textile Technology), Associate 
Professor, Retailing and Apparel 
Studies 

Mltfanl, Jos6 D., M.S.,P.E, Engr. 
(University of Florida), Associate 
Professor and Chairperson, 
Construction Management 

Mohammed, Osama A., Ph.D. (Virginia 
Polytech.), Professor, Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 

Morad, A. Ayman Ph.D. (Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute and State 
University), Assistant Professor, 
Construction Management 

Nunez, German, Ph.D. (Texas A&M 
University), Associate Professor, 
Industrie^ Systems and Engineering 

Otazo, Julk> O., M.A. Arch., BA. 
(University of Florida), Assistant 
Professor, Construction Management 

Park, Dong C, Ph.D. (University of 
Washington), Visiting Assistant 
Professor, Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 



Prieto-Portar, Luis A., Ph.D. P.E 

(Princeton University), Professor, 
Civil and Environmental Engineering 

Radin, Ian, Ph.D. (University of 
Missouri), Visiting Associate 
Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

Ray, Gautam, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania 
State University), Professor, 
Mechanical Engineering, and 
Associate Dean, School of 
Engineering 

Richardson, Laurie, Ph.D. (University 
of Oregon), Assistant Professor, 
Drinking Water Research Center 

Roig, Gustavo, Ph.D. (University of 
Florida), Associate Professor, 
Electrical and Computer 
Engineering, and Acting Associate 
Dean, School of Engineering 

Ruiz, Laura, M.S. (Florida International 
University), Instructor and Advisor, 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Schmidt, Pierre, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania 
State University), Professor, 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Schoepiwerster, Richard, Ph.D. 
(University of Iowa), Visiting 
Assistant Professor, Mechanical 
Engineering 

Shen, Lon-ll D., Ph.D., P.E. (Clemson 
University), Associate Professor, 
Civil and Environmental Engineering 

Shirazlnedjad, Ebrahim, Ph.D. 
(Technical University of Clausthal, 
West Germany), Visiting Assistant 
Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

Smith, Adele E., M.S. (Auburn 

University), Associate Dean, School 
of Design and Associate Professor, 
Retailing and Apparel Studies 

Stoiy, James R., Ph.D. (Urvversity of 
Alabama), Chairperson and 
Associate Professor, Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 

Subbarao, WunnavaV., Ph.D., P.E 
(Andhra University), Professor, 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Surti, Vasant H., Ph.D. RE. (Catholic 
University of America), Professor, 
Civil and Environmental Engineering 

Swift, Fredrick, Ph.D. RE (Oklahoma 
State University), Professor, 
Mechanical Engineering, Chairman 
and Professor, Industrial Systems 
and Engineering 

Tall, Lantbert, Ph.D., RE (Lehigh 
University), Professor, Civil and 
Environmental Engineering 

Tansel, Berrin, Ph.D., RE (University 
of Wisconsin-Madison), Visiting 
Assistant Professor, Civil and 
Environmental Engineering 

Tansel, Ibrahim, Ph.D. (University of 
Wisconsin-Madison), Assistant 
Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

Thompson, LeRoy E., Ph.D., P.E 
(Rice University), Professor, Civil 
and Environmental Engineering 



TInoco, Fernando, Ph.D., (Iowa State 
University), Visiting Professor, Civil 
and Environmental Engineering 

Ural, Oktay, Ph.D., RE (North Carolina 
State University), Director, 
International Institute for Housing 
and Buildings, Chairman and 
Professor, Civil and Environmental 
Engineering 

Urban, Frank K., Ph.D., (University of 
Florida), Associate Professor, 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Wang,Ton-Lo, Ph.D., RE (Illinois 
Institute of Technology), Assistant 
Professor, Civil and Environmental 
Engineering 

Wu, Kuang-Hsl, Ph.D. P.E (Urvversity 
of Illinois), Associate Professor, 
Mechanical Engineering 

Yang, Gao, Ph.D. (The Catholic 
University of America), Visiting 
Assistant Professor, Mechanical 
Engineering 

Yen, Kang K., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt 
University), Associate Professor, 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Yih, Tachung, Ph.D. (Catholic 
University of America) Assistant 
Professor, fulechanical Engineering 



158 /College of Health 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Health 

The College of Health offers programs 
of professional study in ttie health pro- 
fessions and promotes articulation be- 
tween the academic units and clinical, 
experiential settings. Approximately 300 
different clinical centers are utilized in 
ttie various degree programs. The aca- 
demic departments of the College offer 
courses of study leading to a baccalau- 
reate degree in Dietetics and Nutrition, 
Medical Laboratory Sciences, Medical 
Record Administration, Occupational 
Tfierapy, Physical Therapy arxl Pnostfiet- 
ics and Ortiiotics. Master's degrees are 
offered in Dietetics and Nuti-ition, Medi- 
cal Laboratory Science, Occupational 
Therapy, Physical Tfierapy, and Public 
Healtin. All degree programs are appro- 
priately accredited by tiieir respective 
professional accrediting txsdy. 

Applicants to the College must sub- 
mit an Application for Admission to the 
University and must follow regular Uni- 
versity procedures. Applicants must be 
eligible for admission to the University 
before being admitted to any degree pro- 
gram. Students interested in admission 
to any department or program in tiie Col- 
lege sfiould contact tfie unit for specific 
prerequisites and admission require- 
ments. Specialized admission proce- 
dures are required for tiie Dietetics 
Programs, Medical Laboratory Science, 
Occupational Therapy, Physical Ther- 
apy, and Prosthetics and Orthotics pro- 
grams. 

The mission of the College of Health 
is to: 

1 . Prepare health professionals at 
the undergraduate and graduate levels. 

2. Perform basic applied research. 

3. Provide services which respond to 
health needs at local, state, national, 
and international levels. 

Wote;The programs, policies, require- 
ments and regulations listed in this cata- 
log are continually subject to review, in 
order to serve ttie needs of the Univer- 
sity's various publics, and to respond to 
tfie mandates of tiie Rorida Board of Re- 
gents and the Rorida Legislature, 
changes may be made witiiout advance 
notice. Please refer to the General Infor- 
mation section for the University's poli- 
cies, requirements, euid regulations. 



Dietetics and Nutrition 

Katharine R. Curry, Professor. 

Chairperson artd AP Director 
Penelope S. Easton, Professor 

Emeritus 



Evelyn B. Enrione, Assistant Professor 
Susan P. Himburg, Associate Professor 

and Director, Coordinated 

Undergraduate Program 
Michele W. Keane, Assistant Professor 
Nancy S. Wellman, Associate 

Professor 

The Defjartment offers a graduate pro- 
gram leading to a Master of Science in 
Dietetics arxd Nutrition. The program is 
designed to meet the needs of profes- 
sional practitioners as vieW as students 
witii undergraduate degrees in related 
fields. There is an opportunity for stu- 
dents to complete ttie requirements to 
sit for the National Registration Exam 
for Dietitians by enrolling in tiie Ap- 
proved Preprofessional Practice Pro- 
gram in conjunction vwth the master's 
program. In some cases prerequisites 
must be met before enrolling in gradu- 
ate courses. Interested stijdents should 
contact the department prior to applying 
for admission. 

Minimum entrance requirements un- 
der current Board of Regents policy 
must be met. This includes a combined 
score of 1000 on ttie Vertial and Quanti- 
tative Aptitude Test of tfie Graduate Re- 
cord Examination or a least a "B" (3.0 
on a 4.0 scale) average in ail upper divi- 
sion work. Application procedures for ad- 
mission are detailed in tiie discussion of 
the University procedures for admission 
to graduate study. 

Students have ttie option of select- 
ing a Clinical/Community Nub-ition or 
Dietetic Management empfiasis in tiieir 
coursework. The Clinical/Community 
track allows emphasis in nutrition re- 
search or applied nutrition. Students 
may also prepare themselves for posi- 
tions of responsibility in nutritional care 
community healtti agencies or private 
practice. The Management track broad- 
ens the concepts of management and 
develop managerial skills and expertise. 
Advanced courses in tiie School of Hos- 
pitality Management and College of 
Business Administration are recom- 
mended in tiie program of stijdy. 

Students who are candidates for ttie 
Master of Science degree in Dietetics 
and Nutrition must complete a minimum 
of 37 semester hours of graduate study 
including at least 30 hours at this Univer- 
sity. All coursewori< must be recent 
enough to be relevant to die contempo- 
rary field of nuti-ition. 

The Preprofessional Practfce Pro- 
gram is currentiy granted approval 
status by The American Dietetic Associa- 
tion's Council on Education, Division of 
Education Accreditation/Approval, a spe- 
cialized accrediting body recognized by 
the Council on Post Secondary Accredit- 



ing and ttie United States Department of 
Education. 

The program begins each Pall se- 
mester and is completed by tfie follow- 
ing June. StiJdents have ttie opportunity 
for supervised dietetic practice in out- 
standing healtii facilities in South Ror- 
ida. Enrollment is limited to 6 students 
per year and requires a sep)arate appli- 
cation available from the department. 
Application deadline is March 1 for Fall 
admission. Students wtio never at- 
tended FlU must complete six fiours of 
graduate wori< at FlU prior to tiie Fall ad- 
mission date. To be eligible students 
must have completed an ADA Plan IV or 
V program and be admissible to tiie 
graduate program. 

Students' programs will be planned 
to support ttieir career goals In consult- 
ation witti tfie assigned faculty advisor. 
Retention and graduation in the mas- 
ter's program requires maintenance of a 
3.0 GPA. 

Master of Science in Dietetics 
and Nutrition 

Students' programs will be planned to 
support their career goals in consult- 
ation witti the assigned faculty advisor. 
Retention and graduation in ttie mas- 
ter's program requires maintenance of a ^ 
3.0 GPA. 

Course Requirements 

Required Research Core: (13-16) 
DIE 6568 Research Methods in 

Dietetics 3 

DIE 6937 Graduate Seminar In 

Dietetics 1 

STA 61 66 Statistical Mettiods in 

Research 3 

DIE 6971 Thesis In Dietetics 3-6 

or 
DIE 6908 Supervised Reld Study in 

Dietetics 3 -j 

Scientific Knowledge: (6-12) 
Application to Discipline: (6-12) 

Clinical/Community Track 

DIE 6368 Advanced Techniques in 

Dietetic 

Practice 2 

DIE 6368L Advanced Techniques in 

Dietetic 

Practice Lab 1 

Management Tracit 

DIE 6128 Advanced Management of 
Dietary Systems 3 

Recommended Electlves 

DIE 6593 Special Topics In Dietetics 3 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Health / 159 



HUN 6521 Advanced Community 

Nutrition^ 

or 
HUN 6408 Advanced Ufe Cycle 

Nutrition 3 

HUN 5123 Ethnic Foods and Nutrition 3 
HUN 561 1 Nutrition Education in the 

Community 3 

HUN 5621 Food, Nutrition and 

Communication 3 

Master of Public Health 

An MPH degree is offered by the Depart- 
ment of Health Services Administration, 
School of Public Affairs and Services, 
with a concentration in Nutrition in con- 
junction with the Department of Dietet- 
ics and Nutrition. The goal of this 
degree program is to prepare the public 
health nutritionist to take a leadership 
role on the public health management 
team and to become an expert technical 
resource person. 

The specialty concentration in Nutri- 
tion is designed to provide a back- 
ground in the science and practice of 
public health including program plan- 
ning, management, and evaluation; hu- 
man nutrition and food science and their 
relationships to health; and a working 
knowledge of public health nutrition pro- 
grams and services. 

The MPH Nutrition concentration re- 
quires 45 hours of graduate coursework 
including: 

Public Health core curriculum 15-18 

Nutrition required courses 15-18 

Nutrition electives 3-6 

Reld experience 3 

Reld research project 3 

Pursuit of this degree requires class 
attendance on both University cam- 
puses. Reld experiences require trans- 
portatkin availability. Prospective 
students shoukJ contact both depart- 
ments. 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

DIE-Dietetics; FOS-Food Science; FSS- 
Food Service Systems; HUN-Human Nu- 
trition 

DIE 5247 Trends In Therapeutic Nutri- 
tion (3). Evaluation and interpretation of 
current research in dietary care of meta- 
bolic diseases. 

DIE 5946 Advanced Practicum In 
Community Nutrition (1-6). Pre- 
planned clinical experience at tiie profes- 
sional level in community nutrition. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instoictor 



DIE 5947 Advanced Practicum in Die- 
tetic Administration and Management 
(1-6). Pre-planned clinical experience at 
the professional level in dietetic admini- 
stration and management. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

DIE 5948 Advanced Practicum in 
Clinical Nutrition (1-6). Pre-planned 
clinical experience at the professional 
level in clinical therapeutic nutrition. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

DIE 6128 Advanced Management of 
Dietary Systems (3). Application of 
management and organizational ttieory 
to dietetic systems in health and commu- 
nity institutions. Completion of ADA Plan 
IV (witii two management courses) and 
permission of insti-uctor. 

DIE 6256 Enteral Nutrition (3). The 

specific indications for enteral feeding 
are discussed with special emphasis on 
the unique requirements, and feeding 
techniques for specific disease states. 

DIE 6257 Parenteral Nutrition (3). Clini- 
cal and metabolic advances in the par- 
enteral feeding of the adult patient in 
relation to specific disease states. 

DIE 6368 Advanced Techniques in 
Dietetic Practice (2). Techniques and 
approacfies in changing nutritional be- 
havior, establishing private practice, pro- 
viding dietetic services in various size 
institutions, hospitals, nursing homes, 
and in tiie community. Prerequisites: 
DIE 4435, DIE 4435L or equivalent. 
Corequisite: DIE 6368. 

DIE 6368L Advanced Techniques Die- 
tetic Practice Lab (1 ). Individual prac- 
tice in conducting interviews, planning 
nutiitional care, changing nutritional be- 
havior, and providing dietetic consult- 
ation. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. Corequisite: DIE 6368. 

DIE 6568 Research Methods in Dietet- 
ics (3). Consideration of scientific metii- 
ods and tiieoretical orientation as 
applied to research In dietetics. Special 
consideration given to various tech- 
niques of investigation, data collection, 
data organization, and interpretation. 
Prerequisites: Admission to graduate 
program and permission of insO-ucfor. 

DIE 6578 Field Research Methods in 
Dietetics (2). Application of field re- 
search methods In interpreting and de- 
signing research studies. Inti'oduction to 
interdisclplirary research approaches. 
Prerequisite: DIE 6568. 

DIE 6906 Readings In Dietetics and 
Nutrition (1-3). Individual advanced 
study in a comprehensive overview of 
dietetics and nutiitlon or in-depth ad- 



vanced study of a specialty. Prereq- 
uisites: Permission of insti'uctor and ad- 
Vcinced standing In graduate program. 

DIE 6907 Individual Study in Dietetics 
(1-3). Intensive individual investigation 
of a phase of dietetics. Emphasis on re- 
cent findings in dietetics and allied disci- 
plines. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
Chairperson of the Department. 

DIE 6908 Supervised Field Study in 
Dietetics (3). Pre-planned practical ex- 
perience at the professional level in an 
area of dietetics. Critical written evalu- 
ation by the student, developed with fre- 
quent consultation and super^sion of 
insti-uctor. Prerequisites: DIE 6578, 12 
hours of graduate study, and permission 
of Instructor. 

DIE 6915 Supervised Research (1). 

Continuation of tiiesis or field research 
under thesis director or field study super- 
visor. Repeatable. Prerequisite: Com- 
pletion of all ottier required coursework. 

DIE 6935 Special Topics in Dietetics 
(3). In-depth study of historical, epidemi- 
ological, prevention, and treatment as- 
pects of topics related to dietetics. 
Prerequisites: ADA Plan IV competence 
in topic covered, admission to graduate 
program. 

DIE 6937 Graduate Seminar In Dietet- 
ics and Nutrition (1). Presentations by 
researchers, practitioners, and graduate 
majors related to advances In tiieories 
and applications in nutrition and dietet- 
ics. Two semester enrollment required 
of all graduate stijdents. 

DIE 6971 Thesis in Dietetics and Nu- 
trition (3-6). Prerequisites: DIE 6578 or 
HUN 681 1, 12 hours of graduate study 
and permission of Thesis Director. 

HUN 5123 Ethnic Influences on Nutri- 
ture and Food Haliits (3). Systematic 
study of food habits of various cultural 
groups. Emphasis on methodology, 
analysis of data, relationship of food 
habits to nutiitional standards, and cor- 
rective measures. Includes laboratory. 
Prerequisite: Competency In food prepa- 
ration and nutrition. Recommended for 
non-majors. 

HUN 5195 international Nutrition: 
Prot>lems, Policies, and Planning (3). 

Advanced study of magnihjde, causes 
and nature of undernutrition in low In- 
come countries; emphasis on programs, 
planning and policies directed toward al- 
leviating hunger. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 

HUN 5245 Nutrition and Biochemistry 
(3). Advanced stijdy of the relationship 
of nutrition and biochemisti7 with em- 



160 /College of Health 



Graduate Catalog 



phasis on digestion, absorption, metabo- 
lism of nutrients, and determination of 
norms. Prerequisites: ADA Plan IV and 
permission of Instructor. 

HUN 5295 Contemporary Issues In 
Food and Nutrition (3). Updating food 
and nutrition information through the 
study of current research. Recom- 
mended for non-majors. 

HUN 5611 Nutrition Education in the 
Community (3). In-depth study of nutri- 
tion education information and methods 
in the community including the nutrition 
education component of school food 
service and other congregate meal pro- 
grams. Prerequisite: Recent courses in 
nutrition education or permission of in- 
structor. 

HUN 5621 Food, Nutrition and Com- 
munication (3). Concepts and tech- 
niques for effective professional 
communication with individuals, groups 
and other professionals. Emphasis on 
communication via mass media. Prereq- 
uisites: Advanced standing, competency 
in food and nutrition knowledge. 

HUN 6248 Sports Nutrition (3). The re- 
lationship between nutrition, fitness and 
athletic performance for trained and un- 
trained athletes will be examined. 

HUN 6254 Drug and Nutrient Interac- 
tion (3). The Interaction of drug and nu- 
trient metabolism in relation to nutrition. 

HUN 6335 Functions of Vitamins (3). 

Integration of chemical, biological and 
physiological functions of vitamins as re- 
lated to human nutrition. 

HUN 6355 Minerals in Human Nutri- 
tion (3). Jbe physiological and metabo- 
lic functions of selected macro- and 
trace minerals as they relate to nutri- 
tional status in humans. 

HUN 6408 Advanced Ufe Cycle Nutri- 
tion (3). In-depth study of nutrient 
needs of individuals and groups at differ- 
ent stages of life. Emphasis on nutrient 
inter-relationships and effects of defi- 
ciencies and excesses on metabolism. 
Prerequisite: HUN 4241 or equivalent. 

HUN 6521 Advanced Community Nu- 
trition (3). In-depth study of assess- 
ment of nutriture in population groups 
and needs of public for nutrition informa- 
tion. Emphasis on nutrition consultation 
for health professionals and dietary 
care. Prerequisite: DIE 3317 or 
equivalent. 

HUN 6811 Lal>oratory Research Meth- 
ods in Dietetics (2). Laboratory applica- 
tion of research methods in dietetics. 
Prerequisites: DIE 6568 and consent of 
department chairperson. 



Medical Laboratory 
Sciences 

Janet A. Llnebacl(, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson 
Barbara V. Anderson, Assistarrt 

Professor and Director, Medical 

Tectmology Program 
Jerry A. Bash, Associate Professor 
Manoucher Dezfulian, Associate 

Professor 
William J. Keppier, Professor and Dean 
Patricl( F. Shen, Associate Professor 
Sylvia L. Smith, Associate Professor 
Beverly A. Warden, Assistant Professor 

Master of Science in Medical 
Laboratory Sciences 

Admission to the Master of Science de- 
gree program in Medical Latxiratory Sci- 
ences represents a judgment as to the 
probability of the student's success in 
graduate wori^. This judgment is usually 
biased on a variety of factors including 
the student's undergraduate academic 
record, specific admission test scores, 
letters of recommendation, and letter of 
intent. To be admitted, a student must 
meet ttie follownng minimum require- 
ments: 

1. Satisfactorily meet the University's 
general requirements for admission. 
(Consult the General Information sec- 
tion for details.) 

2. Hold a bachelor's degree, or 
equivalent, in medical techrxjiogy or re- 
lated scientific discipline from an accred- 
ited institution. Students entering the 
program should have completed a mini- 
mum of two years of chemistry, one 
year of mathematics including statistics, 
two years of kiiology including immunol- 
ogy and biochemistry. A minimum of 1 2 
semester hours of undergraduate clini- 
cal courseworit in one of the specialty ar- 
eas is also required for individuals wfx> 
do not possess a bachelor's degree In 
medical technology or equivalent clinical 
experience. An applicant lacking in 
course backgrourid may be admitted 
with deficiencjes on condition that tfiese 
deficiencies be made up within one year 
of the date of admission. Credits 
eamed in making up these deficiencies 
will not count toward the graduate de- 
gree. 

3. Have a minimum cumulative GPA 
of 3.0 during the last two years of the un- 
dergraduate program or a minimum 
combined score of 1000 on the quantita- 
tive and vert)al portions of tfie Graduate 
Record Examination (ORE) (or a mini- 
mum combined score of 1500 on the 
three-part GRE). 

4. Submit at least two letters of rec- 
ommendation from academic profes- 



sors, supervisors/employers and/or pro- 
fessional associates who are in a posi- 
tion to comment on tfie applicant's 
potential for graduate work. 

5. Submit an autobiographical state- 
ment or letter of intent (not to exceed 
1000 words) which includes educational 
goals and career projections. Appli- 
cants may also include copies of pre- 
vious written scientific work. 

6. Students whose native language 
is other thiein English must demonstrate 
an adequate level of proficiency in Eng- 
lish as judged by a minimum score of 
550 on the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL). Foreign students 
wtx) have not met this requirement may 
be conditionally admitted and allowed to 
enroll in an intensive English language 
program prior to beginning coursework 
in medical laboratory sciences. Satisfac- 
tory English proficiency must be demon- 
strated within the first year of study. 

7. Approval from the Departmental 
Graduate Committee. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Science in Medical Labo- 
ratory Sciences consists of a minimum 
of 37 credits, including a thesis based 
upon the student's original research. A 
maximum of six credits of graduate 
coursewori^ may be transferred from 
other institutions subject to approval of 
the Graduate Committee. It is expected 
that a full-time student taking nine cred- 
its per semester should be able to com- 
plete the program in two years. 

Core Courses 1 2 

Specialty Courses 9 

Electives 6 

Graduate Seminars 4 

Thesis 6 

Core Courses 

MLS 51 75 Advanced Clinical 

Pathology 3 

MLS 5515 Advanced Diagnostic 

Immunology 3 

MLS 5615 Research Instrumentation 
and Techniques in 
Medical Laboratory 
Sciences 3 

MLS 5785 Research Methods in 
Medical Laboratory 
Sciences 3 

Specialty Courses: 
Clinical Chemistry 

MLS 6645 Advanced Clinical 

Analytical Systems 3 

MLS 6665 Clinical Endocrinology 3 
MLS 5675 Clinical Protein Chemistry 3 
MLS 5685 Therapeutic Drug 

Monitoring and Clinical 
Toxicology 3 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Health / 161 



Specialty Courses: 
Hematology 

MLS 5328 Diagnostic Hematological 

Cytology and 

Cytochemistry 3 

MLS 6329 Hematological Oncology 3 
MLS 5345 Advanced Hematology/ 

Hemostasis 3 

Specialty Courses: 
Immunohematology 

MLS 6575 Advanced Blood Banking 3 
MLS 6595 Advanced 

Immunohematology 3 

MLS 5590 Human Blood Group 

Systems 3 

MLS 6944, 6945, 6946 Advanced 

Blood Banking 

Practicum I, II, III 3 

MLS 5585 Human Histocompatibility 

Antigens 3 

Specialty Courses: 
Clinical Immunology 

MLS 6180 Immunopathology 3 

Specialty Courses: 
Clinical Microbiology 

MLS 6425 Advanced Clinical 

Mycology 3 

MLS 6468 Molecular Mechanisms 

of Infectious Diseases 3 

MLS 5475 Medical Virology 3 

Electives 

In consultation with ttie advisor, ttie stu- 
dent may select a maximum of six cred- 
its outside tfie Department of Medical 
Laboratory Sciences which are not lim- 
ited to but may include courses in bio- 
logical sciences, chemistry, health care 
administration, educational methodol- 
ogy, computer sciences, and business 
administration. 



Courses Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

MLS - Medical Laboratory Sciences 

MLS 5175 Advanced Clinical Pathol- 
ogy (3). Advanced study of pathokjgical 
conditions affecting the major organ sys- 
tems with emphasis on dinical diagno- 
sis using laboratory methods. 
Prerequisite: Graduate starxJing or per- 
mission of instructor. 

MLS 5328 DIagrwsUc Hematological 
Cytology/Cytochemistry (3). Morpho- 
logical, cytochemical, cytogenetic and 
Immunological techniques for precise 
and accurate blood cell identification 
that provide invaluable information for di- 
agnosis, treatment and prognosis. Pre- 



requisite: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

MLS 5345 Advanced Hematology/He- 
mostasls (3). An advanced course deal- 
ing with a number of selected topics of 
current interest in clinical hematology/he- 
mostasis. Emphasis will be placed on 
erythrocyte disorders and tjlood coagula- 
tion. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. 

MLS 5425 Medical Mycology (3). 

Study of the essential procedures and 
criteria in the identification of pathogenic 
fungi. Recognition of fungal contami- 
nants commonly encountered in clinical 
specimens. Actinomycetes. Antimycotic 
agents. Mycoserology. Stains, reagents, 
and media. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 

MLS 5495 Agents of Foodbome Dis- 
ease (3). Natural history of foodborne 
diseases. Microorganisms involved in 
food processing, food spoilage, food- 
bome illness and food intoxication. In- 
vestigation of foodtxime diseases 
outbreaks. Prerequisite: MLS 4405 or 
permission of instructor. 

MLS 5515 Advanced Diagnostic Im- 
munology (3). A course describing the 
principles, performance, quality control 
and applications of immunological meth- 
ods used in clinical laboratories arxJ re- 
search. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or permission of instructor. 

MLS 5585 Human Histocompatibility 
Antigens (3). A comprehensive study of 
the serology, dinical relevsince, immu- 
nology and genetics of the human histo- 
compatibility antigens. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of in- 
structor. 

MLS 5615 Research Instrumentation 
and Techniques (3). This course is de- 
signed to introduce the beginning gradu- 
ate student to research instrumentation 
and techniques in tfie specialized areas 
of tfie medical laboratory sdences. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

MLS 5675 Clinical Protein Chemistry 

(3). Lectures dealing with isolation and 
identification of dinically significant pro- 
teins and enzymes. Pathological condi- 
tions and interpretation of laboratory 
data. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. 

MLS 5685 Therapeutic Dmg Monitor- 
ing and Clinical Toxicology (3). Lec- 
tures dealing with (sharmacokinetic and 
pharmacodynamic principles, methods 
of analysis, medico-legal aspects of 
drug testing, quality assurance. Prereq- 



uisite: Graduate standing or permission 
of instructor. 

MLS 5785 Research Methods In Medi- 
cal Laboratory Sciences (3). Introduc- 
tion to dinical and industrial research 
mettxjds/experimental designs. Analysis 
of sdentific literature. Review of statisti- 
cal analysis of data. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing or permission of instructor. 

MLS 5690 Human Blood Group Sys- 
tems (3). An in-depth study of serology, 
dinical relevance, immunology, genetics 
and the tiiochemistry of ttie human red 
cell, white cell and platelet antigens and 
antibodies. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 

MLS 6180 Immunopathology (3). The 

student will study the pathology of immu- 
nological processes occurring naturally 
and/or under disease conditions. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or permission 
of instructor. 

MLS 6329 Hematology Oncology (3). 
A detailed study of MLS hematological 
neoplasms, in which the etiology, 
pathophysiology, dinical and laboratory 
diagnosis of leukemias, lymphomas and 
other malignant diseases will be consid- 
ered. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. 

MLS 6425 Advanced Clinical Mycol- 
ogy (3). Study of fungi wrtiich cause dis- 
ease in man and animals. Application of 
genetic, biocfiemical and ultrastructural 
procedures in the identification of fungi 
including the use of monoclonal antibod- 
ies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. 

MLS 6468 Molecular Mechanisms of 
Infectious Disease (3). Study of mo- 
lecular mechanisms of microbial patho- 
genicity as it relates to human 
infections. Examination of ttie processes 
by which infection leads to disease. Dis- 
ease prevention. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 

MLS 5475 Medical Virology (3). The 

nature of viruses and viral disease. 
Types of fiuman viral infections, tfieir de- 
tection and prevention. Current diagnos- 
tic procedures. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of instnjctor. 

MLS 6575 Advanced Btood Banking 
(3). A comprehensive study of the tech- 
niques and metfiods used to acquire, 
prepare, store, test and transfuse Wood 
and its components. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of in- 
structor. 

MLS 6595 Advanced Immunohematol- 
ogy (3). A comprehensive study of anti- 
gen-antibody reactions and analogous 



162 /College of Health 



Graduate Catalog 



phenomena as they relate to the patho- 
genesis and dinical manifestations of 
Wood disorders. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 

MLS 6645 Advanced Clinical Analyti- 
cal Systems (3). Current analytical con- 
cepts and analytical systems in dinical 
chemistry. Solid phase technology. Ion- 
specific electrodes. Centrifugal analyz- 
ers. Fluorescence polarization. 
Robotics. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing or permission of instmctor. 

MLS 6665 Clinical Endocrinology (3). 

Lectures dealing with the anatomy, 
physiology and biochemistry of endo- 
crine diseases. Laboratory testing proce- 
dures and approaches, dinical 
significance and interpretation of labora- 
tory data. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing or permission of instructor. 

MLS 6905 Independent Study (1-6). In- 
depth study of a spedai topic requiring 
assigned readings, optional laboratory 
assignments, seminar partidpation, and 
final report. Prerequisite: Pemission of 
instructor. 

MLS 691 OL Directed Independent Re- 
search (1-6). Investigation of a problem 
in the area of medical laboratory sci- 
ences requiring independent research 
at the graduate level. Supervision by 
graduate faculty. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of advisor/instructor. 

MLS 6938 Graduate Seminar (1). Oral 
presentation of literature review or re- 
search. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or permission of instructor. 

MLS 6939 Advanced Topics in Medi- 
cal Laboratory Sciences (3). Current 
topics in medical laboratory sciences 
not otherwise covered in the curriculum. 
Review of literature and discussion of 
the selected topics. May be repeated for 
credit with different subject content Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of professor. 

MLS 6944 Advanced Blood Banking 
Practicum I (3). A laboratory course pro- 
viding in-depth practical experience in 
tfie various aspects of Blood Banking in 
a community t>lood center and hospital 
transfusion service. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing or permission of instructor. 

MLS 6945 Advanced Blood Banking 
PracUcum II (3). A laboratory course 
providing in-depth practical experience 
in tine various aspects of Blood Banking 
in a community tslood center and hospi- 
tal transfusion service. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of in- 
structor. 



MLS 6946 Advanced Blood Banking 
Practicum III (3). A laboratory providing 
in-depth practical experience in the vari- 
ous aspects of Blood Banking in a com- 
munity blood center and hospital 
transfusion sen/ice. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing or permission of instructor. 

MLS 6971 Master's Thesis (1-6). Su- 
pervised research on an original re- 
search project submitted in partial 
fulfillment of Master's degree require- 
ment. Minimum requirement of six credit 
hours. Prerequisite: Permission of major 
instructor. 



Occupational Therapy 

Gall Hills Maguire, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Reba L Anderson, Associate 

Professor 
Susanne D'Agati, Assistant Professor 
Anne Dickerson, Assistant Professor 
Susan Kaplan, Associate Professor 
Suze Dudley, Assistant Professor 
Patricia Micliael, Assistant Professor 
Pamela Shaffner, Assistant Professor 

Master of Science in 
Occupational Tiierapy 

The curriculum is composed of three 
main components: a core of occupa- 
tional therapy courses to increase under- 
standing of thie theoretical bases and 
current issues of occupational therapy 
practice; a research core to develop criti- 
cal problem solving, research, and writ- 
ing skills; and a dinical specialty 
component thiat students design with ap- 
proval of faculty. In the dinical spedalty 
area, students have the opportunity to 
take four elective courses and develop 
projects and papers in addition to their 
theses in their area of clinical interest. 
The course of study is designed for ad- 
vanced study for certified occupational 
therapists and permits part-time enroll- 
ment. 

Admission Requirements: 

To be admitted to thie Master's degree 
program students must: 

1 . Hold a bachelor's degree from an 
accredited institution. Students wfxj do 
not hold a laachielor's degree in Occupa- 
tional Therapy mus complete the profes- 
sional certificate in Occupational 
Therapy after admission to the graduate 
progra.im 

2. Have completed an accredited cur- 
riculum in occupational tfierapy. Stu- 
dents 'Mho have not completed an 



accredited curriculum in occupationcti 
therapy can be admitted to tfie master's 
program, but must also complete the 
Professional Certificate in Occupational 
Therapy. 

3. Have a minimum of a 3.0 GPA av- 
erage based on a 4.0 scale (upper divi- 
sion) or a combined score of 1000 
(verbal and quantitative parts) on tfie 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE). 

4. Have a basic statistics course. 

5. Provide three letters of reference, 
a curriculum vitae/resume, a summary 
statement of professional and educa- 
tional goals and assessment of cun-ent 
professional activities. 

6. Receive approval from the depart- 
mental graduate admissions committee. 

7. International students are ac- 
cepted subject to space and fiscal limita- 
tions. Students must have a Bachelor's 
degree or equivalent in occupational 
therapy from an institution recognized in 
their own country as preparing students 
for graduate level study; academic eligi- 
bility for further study in their own coun- 
try; demonstrate proficiency in tfie 
English language by a minimum score 
of 550 on the Test of English as a For- 
eign Language (TOEFL). 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Science in Occupational 
Therapy consists of 36 credits including 
a thesis. Rfteen credits of core courses 
must be taken in the department plus a 
minimum of six credit hiours of thesis. 

A maximum of six credits of gradu- 
ate coursewori< may be transferred from 
other institutions, subject to the ap- 
proval of the departmental graduate 
committee. 

Required Courses: (36) 

Occupational Therapy Core 

OTH 6009 Current Issues and 

Theories of 

Occupational Therapy 3 
OTH 6265 Measurement and 

Assessment in 

Occupational Therapy 3 
OTH 621 5 Advanced Occupatbnal 

Therapy Intervention 

Strategies ' 3 

OTH 6948 Continuing Clinical 

Competence for 

Occupational Therapists 3 

Research Core 

STA 6167 Statistical Methods in 

Research II 3 

OTH 5760 Current Research in 

Occupatbnal Therapy 3 

OTH 6970 Master's Thesis 6 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Health / 163 



Clinical Specialty Component 

Combination of occupational therapy 
and university electives in an identified 
area of dinical interest approved by the 
faculty 12 

Professional Certificate in 
Occupational Therapy 

The certificate curriculum will enable stu- 
dents who do not fiave a bachelor's de- 
gree in Occupational Therapy to qualify 
for certification by the American Occupa- 
tional Therapy Certification Board. 
Graduate students who hold a tjache- 
lor's degree in a field other than occupa- 
tional ttierapy must complete this 
program. (For information on the pro- 
gram requirements, refer to the certifi- 
cate section at the end of thie College of 
Health listing. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefix 

OTH - Occupational Therapy 

OTH 5011 Theories and Practice of 
Occupational Theory (3). The theoreti- 
cal foundations of occupational therapy 
and Issues affecting profession practice. 

OTH 5162 Adaptation of Human Occu- 
pation (3). Thirough development of an 
understanding of tfie components and 
nuances of human occupation, students 
will develop skills needed to promote op- 
timal performance through simulation 
and adaptation of life tasks. 

OTH 5174 Advanced OT Techniques 
In Upper Limb Prosthetics and Orthot- 
ics (3). Clinical OT techniques and path- 
omechanics applied to upper limb 
dysfunction including utilization of bio- 
feedback and myoelectric components. 
Prerequisites: OTH 4421 and OTH 4170. 

OTH 5195 Occupational Therapy Job 
Modification (3). Analysis and adapta- 
tion of client's wori^place for the dis- 
abled. Prerequisite: Admission to 
program or permission of instructor. 

OTH 5326 Psychiatric O.T.: Contenv 
porary Theory ar>d Practice (3). Exami- 
natnn of contemporary knowledge 
relevant to tfie tfieory and practice of 
O.T. In psychiatry. Prerequisite: Admis- 
sion to Program or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

OTH 5340 Occupational Therapy Pro- 
gram Development In Psychiatry (3). 

Seminar discussion and practical experi- 
ence in occupational therapy program- 
ming in psychiatry. 



OTH 5345 Occupational Therapy Pro- 
gram Development In Psychiatry (3). 

Seminar discussion and practical experi- 
ence in OT programming in psychiatry. 
Prerequisite: Admission to program or 
permission of instixictor. 

OTH 5405 Analysis of Therapeutic 
Procedures In Physical Dlsat>ilitles 
(3). A lecture/lab course designed to in- 
troduce advanced students to tfieory 
based assessment problem identifica- 
tion and ti^atment for the physically dis- 
abled adult. 

OTH 5407 Theoretical Perspectives 
of Pain (3). Theoretical perspectives of 
pain: etiology, assessment, manage- 
ment and effects. Prerequisite: Admis- 
sion to the program or permission of 
instructor. 

OTH 5440 Treatment Approaches for 
the Neurologlcally Impaired (3). In de- 
pth instiTJCtion in approaches to the neu- 
rologlcally impaired patient. Emphasis 
will be on dysfunction due to stroke or 
head injury. Prerequisite: OTH 4422 or 
equivalent. 

OTH 5600 Study of Gerontology as 
Related to Occupational Therapy (3). 

An overview of current issues in the 
practice of occupational therapy for the 
aged. 

OTH 5613 Interdisciplinary Approach 
to Aging (3). Issues related to roles of 
specific healtii team members and appli- 
cation of interdisciplinary approach to 
care of ttie elderiy. Prerequisite: Aging 
course or wori< experience witii elderly, 
permission of instructor. 

OTH 56