(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Graduate Catalog / the University of Maryland, College Park"

nJUSTE-STHiOpX' CATALOG 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT COLLEGE PARK 




s^Yfl. 



1 




k 







.V. > 



1990-1991 




• :/< 






."• . '.S. 




BOARD OF 
REGENTS 



Mr. George V. McGowan, Chairperson 

Mr. Roger Blunt, Vice Chairperson 

Dr. Albert N. Whiting, Secretary 

Mrs. Ilona M. Hogan, Treasurer 

Ms. Constance M. Unseld, Assistant Secretary 

Mr. Wayne A. Cawley, Jr., Ex-Officio 

Ms. Margaret Alton 

Mr. Richard O. Berndt 

Mr. Benjamin L. Brown 

Mr. Earle Palmer Brown 

Mr. Charles W. Cole, Jr. 

Mr. Frank A. Gunther, Jr. 

Ms. Ann Hull 

Mr. Henry R. Lord 

Ms. Joann M. McCartney 

Mr. John W.T. Webb 



OFFICERS OF THE 
UNIVERSITY SYSTEM 



Dr. Donald N. Langenberg, Chancellor 

Dr. Jean E. Spencer, Deputy Chancellor 

Dr. Raymond J. Miller, Vice Chancellor for 

Agricultural and Natural Resources 

Mr. Donald L. Myers, Vice Chancellor for 

Management Services and Finance 

Dr. David S. Sparks, Vice Chancellor for Academics/ 

Planning/ A ccountability 

Mr. John K. Martin, Acting Vice Chancellor for 

External Affairs 



OFFICERS OF THE 
COLLEGE PARK 
CAMPUS 



Dr. William E. Kirwan, President 

Dr. J. Robert Dorfman, Vice President for Academic 

Affairs and Provost 

Mr. Charles F. Sturtz, Vice President for 

Administrative Affairs 

Ms. Kathryn Castello, Vice President for Institutional 

Advancement 

Dr. William L. Thomas, Jr., Vice President for 

Student Affairs 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 



Dr. Jacob K. Goldhaber, Acting Dean for Graduate 
Studies and Research 



GRADUATE CATALOG 



The University of Maryland 
College Park 



1990-1991 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/graduatecatalogu1990univ 



A Guide to Graduate Programs 



A Guide to Graduate Programs 



Graduate Program 
(course code) 

Aerospace Engineering 

(ENAE) 



Degrees Offered Page 



M.S., Ph.d. 



Graduate Studies 
Office and Telephone 

Rm. 0151 

Engineering Classroom Bldg. 

405-1121 



Agricultural & Extension Education 
(AEED) 


M.S., Ph.D. 
A.G.S. Certificate 


Agricultural & Resource Economics 
(AREC) 


M.S.. Ph.D. 


Agricultural Engineering 

(ENAG) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


Agronomy 
(AGRO) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


American Studies 
(AMST) 


M.A.. Ph.D. 


Animal Sciences 
(ADVP) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


Anthropology 
(ANTH) 


M.A.A. 


Applied Mathematics 
(MAPL) 


MA, Ph.D. 


Architecture 
(ARCH) 


M.Arch 


Art History 
(ARTH) 


M.A., Ph.D. 


Art 
(ARTT) 


M.F.A. 


Astronomy 
(ASTR) 


M.S.. Ph.D. 


Biochemistry 
(BCHM) 


M.S.. Ph.D. 


Botany 
(BOTN) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


Business & Management 
(BMGT) 


M.S.. MB. A.. 
Ph.D 



78 Rm. 0220, Symons Hall 
405-1255 

79 Rm. 2200, Symons Hall 
405-1291 

81 Rm. 1130 Shriver Lab 
405-1198 

82 Rm. 1109. H.J. Patterson Hall 
405-1306 

83 Rm. 2140, Taliaferro 
405-1354 

85 Rm. 2131, Animal Science 
Bldg. 

405-1391 

86 Rm. 1111. Woods Hall 
405-1423 

87 Rm. 1108 Mathematics Bldg. 
405-5062 

90 Rm. 1298, Architec. Bldg. 

405-6284 

92 Rm. 1211. Art/ Soc. 

405-1479 

94 Rm. 1211E, Art/ Soc. 
405-1442 

95 Rm. 1231, Computer & Space 
Sciences Bldg. 

405-3001 

97 Rm. 1320, Chemistry Bldg. 
405-1796 

98 Rm. 3236, H.J. Patterson Hall 
405-1649 

99 MBA Coordinator 
Rm. 3104, Tydings Hall 

405-2278 



A Guide to Graduate Programs 



Business/Law Combined 
(LMBA) 


M.B.A., J.D. 


102 


Rm. 3104, Tydings Hall 

405-2278 


Business/Public Affairs 
(BMPM) 


M.B.A., M.P.M. 


102 


Rm. 3104, Tydings Hall 

405-2278 


Chemical Engineering 
(ENCH) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


103 


Rm. 1223B, Chemical Engr. 

Bldg. 

405-1935 


Chemical Physics 
(CHPH) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


104 


Rm. 2120, Inst, for Physical 
Science & Technology 
405-4781 


Chemistry 
(CHEM) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


106 


Rm. 1320 Chemistry Bldg. 

405-1796 


Civil Engineering 
(ENCE) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


107 


Rm. 1179, Engineering 

Classroom 

405-1980 


Classics 
(CLAS) 


MA. 


108 


Rm. 4220, Jimenez Hall 

405-2013 


Community Planning 
(CMPL) 


M.C.P. 


207 


Rm. 1117 LeFrak Hall 
405-6790 


Comparative Literature 
(CMLT) 


MA, Ph.D. 


109 


Rm. 4220, Jimenez Hall 

405-3809 


Computer Science 
(CMSC) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


111 


Rm. 1105, Computing & 
Space Sciences Bldg. 



Counseling & Personnel Services 
(EDCP) 



M.Ed. , MA, Ph.D. 113 
Integrated Master's 
AGS Certificate 



Rm. 1210, Benjamin Bldg. 

405-2858 



Creative Writing 
(CRWR) 



M.F.A. 



126 



Rm. 1133 Taliaferro Hall 

405-3798 



Criminal Justice & Criminology 
(CRIM) 



MA, Ph.D. 116 



Rm. 2220, LeFrak Hall 
405-4699 



Curriculum & Instruction 


M.Ed., M. A. 


117 


(EDCI) 




Ed.D., Ph.D. 




AGS Certificate 








Dance 




M.F.A. 


118 


(Dance) 








Economics 




M.A., Ph.D. 


120 


(ECON) 








Education Policy, 


Planning & 


M.A., M.Ed., 


121 


Administration 




Ed.D., PhD, 




(EDPA) 




AGS Certificate 




Electrical Engineering 


M.S., Ph.D. 


122 


(ENEE) 









Rm. 1210, Benjamin Bldg. 
405-3324 



Rm. 1116, Bldg. EE/058 
405-3180 

Rm. 3115J, Tydings Hall 

405-3512 

Rm. 1210, Benjamin Bldg. 

405-3574 



Rm. 3179B, Engineering 
Classroom Bldg. 
405-3681 



A Guide to Graduate Programs 



Engineering Materials 
(ENMA) 



M.S., Ph.D. 



125 Rm. 1110, Chemical Engr. 

Bldg. 

405-5207 



English Language & Literature 
(ENGL) 



M.A., Ph.D. 



Rm. 1133, Taliaferro 
405-3798 



Entomology 


M.S., 


Ph.D. 


(ENTM) 






Family & Community 


M.S. 




Development 






(FMCD) 






Fire Protection 


M.S. 




Engineering 






(ENFP) 






Food Science 


M.S., 


Ph.D. 


(FDSC) 






French Language & Literature 


M.A. 


, Ph.D. 


(FRIT) 






Geography 


M.A. 


, Ph.D. 


(GEOG) 






Geography/Library & 


M.A. 


, M.L.S. 


Information Services 






(GELS) 






Geology 


M.S., 


Ph.D. 


(GEOL) 







127 Rm. 1330B, Symons Hall 
405-3912 

128 Suite 1204, Marie 
Mount Hall 
405-3672 

130 Rm. 0147, Eng. 
Classroom Bldg. 
405-3991 

131 Rm. 2113, Animal Science 
Center 405-1377 

133 Rm. 3122, Jimenez Hall 
405-4024 

134 Rm. 1173, LeFrak Hall 
405-4057 

135 Rm. 4110, Hornbake Library 
405-2038 



136 Rm. 4103, Geology Bldg. 

405-4365 



Germanic Language & Literature 
(GERS) 



M.A., Ph.D. 



Rm. 3215 Jimenez Hall 
405-4091 



Government & Politics 
(GVPT) 



Health Education 
(HLTH) 



M.A. .Ph.D. 



138 



Rm. 2I81F, LeFrak Hall 
405-4161 



139 Rm. 2387, Physical Education, 

Recreation and Health 

405-2464 



Hearing & Speech Science 
(HESP) 

History 
(HIST) 



M.A., Ph.D. 



Rm. 0100, LeFrak Hall 
405-4214 

Rm. 2115, 

Francis Scott Key Hall 

405-4264 



History/Library & Information 
(HILS) 



M.A., M.L.S. 



Rm. 4110, Hornbake Lrbrary 
405-2038 



Horticulture 
(HORT) 

Human Development 
(EDHD) 



M.Ed. , M.A, Ed. D., 147 

Ph.D., AGS 

Certificate 



Rm. 2109A, Holzapfel Hall 

405-4357 

Rm. 1210, Benjamin Bldg. 
405-2354 



A Guide to Graduate Programs 



Human Nutrition & Food Systems 
(HNFS) 

Industrial, Technological & 
Occupational Education 
(EDIT) 



M.S.. Ph.D 



M.Ed., M.A., Ed.D. 
Ph.D., AGS 

Certificate 



Rm. 1204, Marie Mount Hall 
405-4928 

Rm. 1210, Benjamin Building 

405-4539 



Journalism 


MA, (Ph.D. s 


(JOUR) 


Public 
Communicatio 


Kinesiology 


MA, Ph.D. 


(KNES) 




Law/Public Management 


M.P.M.. J.D. 


Combined 




(LMPM) 




Library & Information 


M.L.S.. Ph.D. 


Services 




(LBSC) 




Linguistics 


M.A., Ph.D. 


(LING) 




Marine-Esturine-Environmental 


M.S., Ph.D. 


Sciences 




(MEES) 




Mathematical Statistics 


M.A.. Ph.D. 


(STAT) 




Mathematics 


M.A., Ph.D. 


(MATH) 




Measurement. Statistics 


M.A., Ph.D. 


and Evaluation 




(EDMS) 




Mechanical Engineering 


M.S., Ph.D. 


(ENME) 




Meterology 


M.S., Ph.D. 


(METO) ' 




Microbiology 


M.S.. Ph.D. 


(MICE) 




Molecular and 


Ph.D. 


Cellular Biology 




(MOCB) 




Music 


MM., D.M.;^ 


(MUSC) 


Ph.D. 



Rm. 2104, Journalism 
405-2380 



Rm. 2343, Phys. Ed., 
Recreation & Health Bldg. 
405-2455 

Suite 2102B, Morrill Hall 
405-6330 



Rm, 4110, Hornbake 
Library 

405-2038 

Rm. 1101, Mill Bldg. 
405-7002 

Rm. 0313, Symons Hall 

405-5343 



Rm. 11U8, Mathematics Bldg. 

405-5061 

Rm. 1108, Mathematics Bldg. 
405-5058 

Rm. 1210, Benjamm Bldg. 

405-2354 



Rm. 2168, Eng. Classroom 
Bldg. 

405-4216 

Rm. 2227. Computer & Space 
Science Bldg. 

405-5373 

Rm. 3117, Micorbiology Bldg. 

405-5435 

Rm. 2504, Chemistry Bldg. 

405-1407 



Rm. 1219C, Tawes Fine Arts 

Bldg. 

405-5870 



A Guide to Graduate Programs 



Nuclear Engineering 
(ENNU) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


178 


Rm. 2309, Chemical 

Engineering 

405-5208 


Nutritional Sciences 
(NUSC) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


179 


Rm. 1108B, Marie Mount Hall 

405-2371 


Philosophy 
(PHIL) 


M.A., Ph.D. 


179 


Rm. 1117, Skinner Hall 
405-5693 


Physics 
(PHYS) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


181 


Rm. 1302D, Physics & Astr. 

Bldg. 

405-5982 


Policy Studies 
(POSI) 


Ph.D. 


188 


Suite 2102B, Morrill Hall 
405-6330 


Poultry Science 
(POUL) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


184 


Rm. 3129, Animal Science 
Bldg. 

405-5775 


Psychology 
(PSYC) 


M.S., M.A., Ph.D. 


185 


Rm. 1220, Zoo-Psych Bldg. 

405-5865 


School of Public Affairs 

(PUAF) 

(Public Management, 

and PubUc Policy) 


M.P.M.. M.P.P. 


187 


Suite 2102B, Morrill Hall 
405-6330 


Public Communication 
(PCOM) 


Ph.D. 


190 


Rm. 1206, Tawes Fine Arts 

Bldg. 

314-9573 


Radio & Television & 
Film (RTVF) 


MA. (Ph.D., see 
Public Communication) 


192 


Rm. 0123 Tawes Fine Arts 

Bldg. 

405-6261 


Recreation 
(RECR) 


M.A., Ph.D. 


193 


Rm. 2363, Phys. Ed. & Health 
405-2461 


Reliability Engineering 
(ENRE) 


M.S., Ph.D. 


194 


Rm. 2113 Chemical Eng. Bldg. 
405-5208 


Russian Language, 
Linguistics, Literature 
(RUSS) 


MA. 


195 


Rm. 3215 Jimenez Hall 
705-4091 


Sociology 
(SOCY) 


MA, Ph.D. 


196 


Rm. 2103 Art/Soc. Bldg. 
405-6390 


Spanish Language & Literature 
(SPAP) 


M.A., Ph.D. 


197 


Rm. 2215, Jimenez Hall 
405-6446 


Special Education 
(EDSP) 


M.Ed., M.A., Ed.D., 
Ph.D., AGS 
Certificate 


199 


Rm. 1210, Benjamin Hall 
405-6515 


Speech Communication 
(SPCM) 


M.A. (Ph.D., see 
Public Communication) 


201 


Rm. 0148A Tawes Fine Arts 

Bldg. 

314-9573 



8 A Guide to Graduate Programs 



Systems Engineering 
(ENSE) 



Textiles and Consumer Economics M.A.. Ph.D. 
(TXCE) 



203 Rm. 2101. A. V. Williams Bldg. 

405-6573 



203 Rm. 1204. Marie Mount Hall 

405-6657 



Theatre 
(THET) 



M.A., M.F.A., Ph.D. 205 Rm. 0240 Tawes Fine Arts 

Bldg. 

405-6676 



Toxicology 
(TOXI) 

Urban Studies 
(URBS) 

Zoology 
(ZOOL) 



M.S.. Ph.D. 



M.A.. M.C.P. 



M.S.. Ph.D. 



206 Rm. 0300. Symons Hall 
405-7134 

207 Rm. 1117, LeFrak Hall 
405-6790 

209 Rm. 2231. Zoo-Psych Bldg. 

405-6905 



Contents 



Contents 



Part 1: General Information 
Admission to Graduate School 

General 13 

Criteria for Admission 13 

Eligibility 14 

Categories of Admission to Degree Programs 14 

Non-degree Admission Categories 15 

Offer of Admission 17 

Change of Status or Program 18 

Termination of Admission 18 

The Admission Process 18 

Admission of Faculty 20 

Application Deadlines 20 

International Students 20 

Records Maintenance and Disposition 21 



Fees and Expenses 

Graduate Fees 21 

Determination of In-State Status for Admission, Tuition and 

Charge-differential Purposes 22 

Payment of Fees 22 

Refund of Fees 23 

University Refund Statement 23 



Fellowships, Assistantships and Financial Assistance 

Fellowships 24 

Graduate School Tuition Scholarships 25 

Assistantships 25 

Work-Study Program 26 

Loans and Part-time Employment 26 

Veterans Benefits 27 



1 Contents 

Registration and Credits 

Academic Calendar 27 

Developing a Program 28 

Course Numbering System 28 

Designation of Full and Part-time Students 28 

Minimum Registration Requirements 29 

Miminum Registration Requirements for Doctoral Students 29 

Partial Credit Course Registration for Handicapped Students 30 

The Inter-Campus Student 30 

Registration Through the Washington Consortium 

Arrangement 30 

Graduate Credit for Senior Undergraduates 31 

Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Level Courses 32 

Combined Bachelor's/Master's Programs 32 

Credit by Examination 32 

Transfer of Credit 33 

Criteria that Courses Must Meet to be Accepted for Graduate 

Credit 33 

Statement on Non-Participation by Students in Class Exercises that 

Involve Animals 33 

Course and Credit Changes 34 

Grades for Graduate Students 35 

Computation of Grade Point Average 36 

The Academic Record (Transcripts) 37 



Degree Requirements 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to all Master's 

Degrees 37 

Graduate School Requirements for M.A., M.S. 

Thesis Option 38 

Non-thesis Option 39 

Requirements for M.Ed. Degree 39 

Requirements Applicable to Other Master's Degrees 40 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to 

All Doctoral Degrees 40 

Graduate School Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of 

Philosophy 41 

Constitution of Dissertation Committee 41 

The Dissertation Committee and the Conduct of the 

Dissertation Defense 42 

Inclusion of Previously PubUshed Materials in a Thesis 

or Dissertation 43 



Contents 1 1 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education 43 

Requirements for Other Doctoral Degrees 43 

Time Extension Governing Degrees 43 

Waiver of Regulations 44 

Commencement 44 



Resources 

Location 44 

Special Research Resources 45 

Special Opportunities for Artists 46 

Libraries 46 

Associations, Bureaus, Centers and Institutes 48 

Consortia 67 



Student Services 

Office of Graduate Minority Affairs 71 

Graduate Legal Aid Office 71 

Graduate Student Government 72 

Campus Senate 72 

Housing 72 

Dining Services 74 

Career Development Center 74 

Counseling Center 74 

Health Care 75 

Health Insurance 76 

Publications of Interest to Graduate Students 76 



Part 2: Graduate Programs 

Degree Programs 77 

Certificate Programs 211 

Part 3: Graduate Course Descriptions 213 

Part 4: The Graduate Faculty 535 



1 2 Contents 

Part 5: Appendices 

University Policy Statements 643 

Policy on Student Participation in Class Exercises 

that Involve Animals 643 

Policies on Non-Discrimination 644 

Resolution on Academic Integrity 644 

Code of Student Conduct 646 

University Policy on Disclosure of Student Records 646 

Index 653 

Campus Map 



Admission to Graduate School 1 3 



General Information 



Admission to Graduate School 

General 

Responsibility for admitting applicants to graduate programs rests with the Dean for 
Graduate Studies and Research. Academic department and program officers along with 
faculty committees review admissions applications and credentials and make admissions 
recommendations to the Dean. In the cases where credentials were earned abroad, the 
staff of the International Education Services is consulted. The standards maintained 
by the Graduate School and individual departments and programs are applied to ensure 
that applicants admitted to the University are well qualified and trained to study at 
this institution and have a reasonable expectation of successfully completing a graduate 
program. Standards for admission to doctoral degree programs are frequently higher 
than those for admission to master's degree programs. In many degree programs, the 
number of applications received from qualified applicants for graduate study regularly 
exceed the number of applicants who can be accommodated. In such cases, only the 
most highly qualified are offered admission. The number of spaces available in various 
departments is limited according to the availability of faculty, special resources and 
funds for students requiring financial assistance. 

Criteria for Admission 

Those who have earned or will earn a bachelor's degree at a regionally accredited 
college or university in the United States, or the equivalent of this degree in another 
country, will be considered for admission to the Graduate School at UMCP. 

The decision to admit an applicant to a program is based primarily on a combination 
of the following criteria according to the requirements of a specific program or de- 
partment. 

1. Quality of previous undergraduate and graduate work. The Graduate 
School requires as a minimum standard a B average or 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, 
in a program of study resulting in the award of a baccalaureate degree 
from a regionally accredited college or university. If an applicant has 
studied at the graduate level elsewhere, less weight may, but not nec- 
essarily, be placed on the quality of the undergraduate academic record. 
Some programs may require a higher minimum grade average for ad- 
mission. 

2. Strength of letters of recommendation from persons competent to judge 
the applicant's probable success in graduate school. These letters are 
usually from the applicant's former professors who are able to give an 
in-depth evaluation of the applicant's strengths and weaknesses with 
respect to academic work. Additional recommendations may come from 
employers or supervisors who are familiar with the applicant's work 
experience. Applicants should instruct their references to send all letters 
of recommendation directly to the program in which they desire en- 
trance. 



14 Admission to Graduate School 



3. Scores on a nationally standardized examination. The three most widely 
used standardized examinations are the Graduate Record Examinations, 
Graduate Management Admissions Test and the Miller Analogies Test. 
Because the predictive utility of these test scores may vary from one 
group of applicants to another, a discriminating use of all relevant ma- 
terials will be made in each applicant's case. 

For information on the programs that require one of these tests, please 
see the List of Graduate programs in this catalog and the instructions 
that accompany application forms. 

4. Statement by the applicant of academic career objectives and their re- 
lation to the intended program of study. These statements help the de- 
partment or program identify students whose goals are consonant with 
its objectives. 

5. Other evidence of graduate potential. Some programs require other evi- 
dence of graduate potential, such as a portfolio of creative work, com- 
pletion of specialized examinations or personal interviews. 

Notes about Eligibility for Admission 

1 . Prospective students may apply for admission to the University of Mary- 
land during or after their final year of undergraduate study but must 
furnish proof of graduation before the end of their first term of enroll- 
ment at the University. 

2. Prospective students applying for admission to a graduate degree pro- 
gram in a field of specialization in which they already hold that same 
degree or its equivalent may do so only if the previous degree program 
was of substantially different character or was not accredited. 

3. Prospective Summer only-Students applying for entrance in either of 
the two summer sessions should check the Summer Sessions Bulletin to 
determine if the courses they wish to take will be offered. To obtain 
this publication, write to Summer Sessions Office, University of Mary- 
land, College Park, MD 20742. 

4. a. Non-U. S. Citizens who are legal permanent residents of the U.S. and/ 
or immigrants may use regular applications for admission. To assure full 
consideration, all credentials accompanied by English language trans- 
lations for all documents not written in English must be received by the 
Graduate School at least three months prior to the first day of classes 
of the semester for which the applicants are seeking admission. 

b. Foreign applicants (i.e., applicants who are not permanent residents 
of the U.S. and/or immigrants) must use the International Student Ap- 
plication Form obtainable from the Office of Graduate Admissions, 
Graduate School, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. 
To assure full consideration, all credentials accompanied by English 
language translations for all documents not written in English must be 
received by the Graduate School at least seven months prior to the first 
day of classes of the semester for which the applicants are seeking 
admission. 

Categories of Admission to Degree programs 

Applicants for degree programs may be admitted to either full or provisional status 

as outlined below: 



Admission to Graduate School 1 5 



Full Graduate Status 

Students admitted to full graduate status must have submitted official documents 
indicating a completed baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution 
and be otherwise fully qualified in the judgment of the individual program and the 
Graduate School. 

Provisional Graduate Status 

Students may be admitted to provisional status because: 

1. The previous academic record is borderline or the prerequisite course- 
work in the chosen field is insufficient; or 

2. The applicant has majored in another field with a creditable record but 
has not yet clearly demonstrated abilities in the proposed new field; or 

3. The applicant has completed the baccalaureate degree but has not yet 
submitted official verification of the last semester's work and receipt of 
the degree. 

Official transcripts indicating receipt of the degree must be submitted before the end 
of the first semester. 

Non-degree Admission Categories 

Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate Status 

The Advanced Graduate Specialist Program is designed to promote a high level of 
professional competence in an area of specialization in the field of education. The 
candidate must be able to show that he or she can operate as an effective counselor, 
administrator, teacher or skilled person in a major field of professional endeavor. The 
Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate is offered through most of the programs in 
the College of Education and the Agricultural and Extension Education program in 
the College of Agriculture. The Certificate is awarded by the College of Education or 
by the College of Agriculture. Requirements are as follows: 

1. Applicants must meet the same general criteria for admission as those 
prescribed for degree seekers. Additionally, the applicant must have 
completed a master's degree or the equivalent in credits earned either 
at the University of Maryland or at another regionally accredited insti- 
tution. The Miller Analogies Test scores are required at the time of 
application. 

2. Coursework totaling not more than 30 credits with grades of at least a 
"B" from an accredited institution may be transferred to the program 
at the University of Maryland. 

3. The program must be developed in cooperation with an adviser and 
filed with the Graduate Studies office in the College of Education. 

4. The Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate program requires a min- 
imum of 60 semester hours of credit with not less than 30 semester hours 
of credit completed with the University of Maryland. At least one half 
of the credits earned either at other institutions or at the University of 
Maryland must be in courses comparable to those in the 600-800 series. 
The student may be required to take a substantial portion of the program 
in departments other than those in the College of Education or the 
College of Agriculture. Registration in certain kinds of field study, field 
experience, apprenticeship or internship may also be required. 



1 6 Admission to Graduate School 



There will be a written examination of not less than six hours. A "B" average with 
no "D" or "F" grades will be required before the certificate can be awarded. 

For additional details see "Statement of Policies and Procedures; Advanced Graduate 
Specialist Program in Education," issued by the College of Education. 

Advanced Special Student Status 

The Advanced Special Student Status is designed to provide an opportunity to in- 
dividuals who do not have an immediate degree objective in mind to take graduate 
level courses. Although the primary mission of the Graduate School is to conduct 
programs of graduate instruction leading to advanced degrees, the Graduate Faculty 
welcomes qualified students who have no degree objectives to the extent that resources 
allow. Unofficial transcripts or photocopies of diplomas will be accepted with the 
application for evaluation purposes, but by the end of the first semester of enrollment, 
the student must submit official copies of all required documents. Official transcripts 
must be submitted from all institutions except the University of Maryland, College 
Park. 

Applicants for admission to Advanced Special Student Status must satisfy one of the 
following criteria: 

1 . Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution with 
an overall "B" (3.0) average. Applicants must submit official transcripts 
covering all credits used in satisfying the baccalaureate degree require- 
ments. 

2. Hold a master's or doctoral degree from a regionally accredited insti- 
tution. Applicants must submit an official transcript showing the award 
of a master's or doctoral degree. 

3. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution and 
have at least four years of successful post-baccalaureate work or profes- 
sional experience. Applicants must submit an official transcript showing 
the award of the baccalaureate degree. 

4. Achieve a score that places the applicant in the upper 50 percentile of 
appropriate national standardized aptitude examinations such as the 
Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test, the Miller's Analogies Test, 
the Graduate Management Admissions Test. Where different percentiles 
are possible, the Graduate School will determine which score is ac- 
ceptable. 

Admission to Advanced Special Student Status will normally continue for five years. 
If there is no registration in three consecutive academic semesters, the admitted status 
will lapse and a new application will be required. 

Advanced Special Students must maintain a 2.75 grade point average. 

Advanced Special Students must pay all standard graduate fees. Students in this 
status are not eligible to hold appointments as Graduate Teaching or Research As- 
sistants or Fellows, or receive other forms of financial aid. All other services, e.g. 
parking, library privileges, etc., are the same as those accorded to other graduate 
students. Advanced Special Student status is not available to those on "F" (student) 
or "J" (exchange visitor) visas. 



Admission to Graduate School 1 7 



Admission to Advanced Special Student Status is not intended to be used as a 
preparatory program for later admission to a doctoral or master's program nor to the 
Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate program. Consequently, no more than six 
credits earned while in this status may be applicable to a degree or certificate program 
at a later time, with the approval of the faculty in the desired program, if the student 
is subsequently accepted for degree or certificate study. For consideration of admission 
to a degree program at a later time, the student must submit a new application. 

Visiting Graduate Student Status 

A graduate student matriculated in another graduate school who wishes to enroll in 
the Graduate School of the University of Maryland at College Park and who intends 
to return to the graduate school in which he or she is matriculated, may be admitted 
as a Visiting Graduate Student. 

Criteria for enrollment as a visitor are admission to and good standing in another 
recognized graduate school. The applicant need not submit full transcripts of credits 
but must apply for admission to the UMCP Graduate School and pay the application 
fee. In lieu of transcripts, a student may have the graduate dean of the home institution 
certify to the Graduate School in writing that the student is in good standing and that 
the credits will be accepted toward the graduate degree. Unless otherwise specified, 
admission will be offered for one year only. 

Golden Identification Card for Senior Citizens of Maryland 

The purpose of this status is to make available without charge courses and services 
of the University's campuses to citizens who are 60 years of age or older, who are 
residents of the State of Maryland and who are retired (retired persons will be consid- 
ered those who affirm that they are not engaged in gainful employment for more than 
20 hours per week). People meeting these requirements may apply for graduate ad- 
mission either as degree or nondegree students, and they must meet the same admissions 
criteria pertaining to either category as do all applicants. Once admitted and issued 
the Golden Identification Card, people may register for courses in any sessions, subject 
to the same restrictions as any other student, and use the library and other campus 
facilities during the time they are enrolled in courses. Tuition fees will be waived for 
Golden Identification Card holders. 

Admission to an Institute 

Application for admission to an institute should be made directly to the director of 
the institute. If admission to the Graduate School is also necessary, the decision will 
be based on the same criteria for admitting other degree applicants. Admission to an 
institute does not imply that the individual will be automatically admitted in any other 
status at the University of Maryland at a later date. The status terminates upon com- 
pletion of the institute in which the student was enrolled. A new application must be 
submitted for admission to any other graduate status or program. 

Students already admitted to a regular graduate degree or nondegree status may also 
qualify for participation in an institute. 

Offer of Admission 

Applicants admitted to the Graduate School will receive a written offer of admission 
from the Graduate School that specifies the date of entrance. The offer of admission 



1 8 Admission to Graduate School 



requires a response. If the applicant wishes to accept, decline or change the effective 
date of the offer, the Graduate School must be notified or the offer of admission 
becomes void. Failure to register for the authorized term also voids the offer of ad- 
mission. If the offer is voided, the applicant must submit another application and may 
be required to submit additional credentials in order to be considered for admission in 
a subsequent semester. 

Graduate students must consult their academic department for precise registration 
information. 

Change of Status or Program 

Students are admitted only to specified programs for specified objectives. New ap- 
plications are required under the following conditions: 

1. If the student wishes to change programs (students may be admitted to 
only one graduate program at any one time); or 

2. If the student wishes to change status (from nondegree to degree); or 

3. If the student wishes to pursue a new degree objective (change from 
master's to doctoral degree). 

Admission to a new program and/or status is not granted automatically. Each ap- 
plication is subject to approval. 
Termination of Admission Status 

A student's admission terminates when the time limits for completion of the degree 
or nondegree status have been exceeded or when the student is no longer in "good 
standing". Students must maintain an average grade of B or better in all graduate 
courses taken and must otherwise satisfy all additional departmental and Graduate 
School program requirements. The admission of all students, both degree and non- 
degree, is continued at the discretion of the major professor, the department or program 
director and the Dean for Graduate Studies. 
The Admission Process 

To be considered for admission to the University of Maryland College Park Graduate 
School each applicant must obtain and complete the application form following all 
instructions. An application may be obtained by writing directly to the Graduate School, 
Lee Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. 

Each applicant must submit the following items in order to be considered for ad- 
mission: 

1. A completed application form. 

2. An application fee of twenty five dollars (do not send cash). 

3. Two complete sets of transcripts reflecting all undergraduate and grad- 
uate work elected or in progress. Each transcript must bear the signature 
of the registrar and the seal of the granting institution and should include 
the years of attendance, courses taken, grades received, class standing 
and the degree, certificate or diploma received. If the applicant attended 
UMCP, the Graduate School will obtain your records of courses com- 
pleted on the College Park campus. To facilitate the processing and 
review of an application, send two sets of unofficial copies of transcripts 
from institutions other than the University of Maryland College Park 
Campus. Official copies of those transcripts are required before full 
admission can be granted. 



Admission to Graduate School 1 9 



4. Three letters of recommendation submitted by professors or others who 
can assess the quality of the applicant's academic performance and scho- 
lastic potential. Letters of recommendation should be sent directly to 
the academic department in which the applicant is interested. Be certain 
that the applicant's full name is included on each recommendation. 

5. Each applicant must prepare a 300-500 word statement of her/his goals 
and objectives in pursuing graduate study. 

6. Standardized Test Scores Many departments and programs require ap- 
plicants to submit scores of standardized examinations, such as the Grad- 
uate Record Examination (GRE), the Graduate Management Admission 
Test (GMAT) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT). To determine if 
one of these examinations is required for admission to the department 
or program to which you are applying, please consult the listing at the 
end of the brochure. If standardized test scores are required, you may 
write to the following addresses for further information: 

Graduate Record Examinations 

CN 6004 Educational Testing Services 

Princeton, NJ 08541-6004 USA 

Graduate Management Admissions Test 

Box 966 

Princeton, NJ 08541 USA 

Miller Analogy Test 
Psychological Corporation 
7500 Old Oak Blvd. 
Cleveland, OH 44130 USA 

Examination scores should be sent directly to the department or program 
to which you are applying. 

7. Departmental Requirements Some departments and programs require 
additional information such as a portfolio or other supplementary ma- 
terials. It is important that applicants contact the department or program 
to which they are applying for information concerning additional ad- 
mission requirements. Failure to do so may resuh in an application not 
being considered. 

Calculation of Grade Point Average 

All applicants must calculate separate grade point averages for the following cate- 
gories: (1) all courses taken for the baccalaureate; (2) all credits earned after the first 
60 credits for the baccalaureate; (3) credits that constitute the undergraduate major; 
and (4) all credits taken beyond the bachelor's degree. All grades are to be converted 
to a four-point grading system. Pass/fail, satisfactory, completed credit and similar 
grades are not included in these calculations. Except as already noted, all numerical, 
alphabetical or equivalent grades must be calculated as follows: 

a. Multiply quarter credit hours by (.66) to convert to semester credit 
hours. 

b. Multiply the number of semester credit hours for each course by the 
number of quality or honor points earned, as follows: A = 4;B = 3;C = 2; 
D = I; F = 0. 



20 Admission to Graduate School 



c. Divide the total number of quality points by the total number of semester 
credit hours. The quotient will be your grade point average. 

Admission of Faculty 

No member of the faculty employed by the University of Maryland who has the rank 
of assistant professor or above is permitted to enroll in a program leading to an advanced 
degree at this institution. Faculty who wish to take coursework for personal enrichment 
may want to investigate the Advanced Special Student Status. 

Application Deadlines 

Applicants should pay special attention to the deadlines listed in each application 
booklet. It is generally to the applicant's advantage to apply well before the published 
deadline, particularly if the applicant wishes to be considered for fellowships, assist- 
antships or other forms of financial aid. The Graduate School recommends that ap- 
plicants time the submission of their applications, transcripts and letters of recommendation 
to arrive before February 1. Applicants are solely responsible for making certain their 
transcripts have been received by the Graduate School. 

If possible, the application should arrive before the transcripts and other supporting 
evidence of preparation if these materials cannot be attached to the application. 
Application deadline information for the Fall and Spring Semesters is listed below: 

1. Fall (Aug.) and Spring (Jan.) Semesters: Each department, in consul- 
tation with the Graduate School, sets its own deadlines for Fall semester 
entrances for U.S. citizens, resident aliens and refugees. 

2. International Students: All citizens of foreign countries must submit 
applications for admission by the following dates: 

a. Fall-February 1 of prior academic year (unless the department in 
which you are interested sets an earlier deadline). 

b. Spring-June 1 of prior academic year. 

Summer School 

Students applying for entrance in either of the two summer sessions are urged to 
check the Summer Sessions Bulletin to determine if the courses they wish to take will 
be offered in a particular session. To obtain this publication, write to Summer Sessions 
Office, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. 

International Students 

Foreign students seeking admission to the University of Maryland should not plan 
to leave their country before receiving an official offer of admission from the Graduate 
School. 

1. All citizens of foreign countries must submit applications for admission 
in accordance with stated deadlines. 

2. Special Notes for International Students: 

a. Academic Credentials: The complete application and official tran- 
scripts or mark sheets with English translations must be received in 
the Graduate Admissions Office prior to stated deadlines. 



Fees and Expenses 21 



b. English proficiency: Applicants must demonstrate English language 
proficiency by taking the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) since all foreign students are expected to read, speak, 
understand and write English fluently. 

c. Financial Resources: Each applicant must furnish a statement of fi- 
nancial status to the Office of International Education Services. Ap- 
proximately $13,750.00 is required for educational and living expenses 
each year. 

d. Immigration Documents: Applicants admitted for graduate study will 
be issued a student visa where appropriate. 

e. Non-U. S. Citizens should address any questions to the Director, In- 
ternational Education Services, University of Maryland, College Park, 
MD 20742, USA. 

Reporting Upon Arrival: 

Every foreign student is expected to report to the Office of International Education 
Services in the Mitchell Building as soon as possible after arrival at the University. 
This Office will be able to assist not only with various problems regarding immigration, 
housing and fees, but also with problems relating generally to orientation to university 
and community life. Questions concerning criteria and requirements for foreign ap- 
plicants should be addressed to the Director, International Education Services, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. 

Records Maintenance and Disposition 

All records including academic records from other institutions, become part of the 
official file and can neither be returned nor duplicated for any purpose. Students should 
obtain an additional copy of their official credentials to keep in their possession for 
advisory purposes and for other personal requirements. 

The admission credentials and the application data of applicants are retained for 18 
months only and then destroyed in the following cases: 1) Applicants who do not 
register for courses at the time for which they have been admitted; 2) Those whose 
applications have been disapproved; 3) Applicants who do not respond to the depart- 
mental requests for additional information; and 4) Those whose applications are not 
complete with respect to the receipt of all transcripts or test results. 



Fees and Expenses 

Graduate Fees* 

Application fee $25.00 

A non-refundable $25 application fee and a separate application must be submitted 
for each program in which entrance is sought. 

The University is pleased to waive the application fee if the student has been admitted 
to and has attended the University of Maryland, College Park Graduate School pre- 
viously. 



22 Fees and Expenses 



Tuition Per Credit Hour:(Acadeinic year 1990-91) 

Resident Student $128.00 

Non-Resident Student $229.00 

Students admitted to the Graduate School must pay graduate tuition fees whether 
or not the credit will be used to satisfy program requirements. A graduate student who 
wishes to audit a course must pay the usual graduate tuition. 

Continuous Registration Fee (per semester) $10.00 

Graduation Fee 

Master's Degree $25.00 

Graduation Fee 

Doctor's Degree $50.00 

Mandatory Fees"*" 

(Students taking one to eight credits) $88.00 

(Students taking nine or more credits) $134.50 

The fees and waivers listed here are those charged at the time this Catalog went to 
press and are offered as a general guide. They are subject to change. Fees charged in 
a particular semester are published in the Schedule of Classes for that semester. 

"*"For a breakdown of the "Mandatory Fees," consult the "Schedule of Classes." 
Determination of In-State Status for Admission, Tuition and Charge- 
Differential Purposes 

An initial determination of in-state status for admission, tuition and charge-differ- 
ential purposes will be made by the University at the time a student's application for 
admission is under consideration. The determination made at that time and any de- 
termination made thereafter shall prevail in each semester until the determination is 
successfully challenged. The deadline for meeting all requirements for an in-state status 
and for submitting all documents for reclassification is the last day of registration for the 
semester the student wishes to be classified as an in-state student. 

The volume of requests for reclassification may necessitate a delay in completing the 
review process. It is hoped that a decision in each case will be made within ninety (90) 
days of a request for determination. During this period of time, or any further period 
of time required by the University, fees and charges based on the previous determination 
must be paid. If the determination is changed, any excess fees and charges will be 
refunded. 

Persons who are interested in obtaining a copy of the regulations or who want 
assistance with their classification should contact: Office of Residency Classification, 
Room 0405B Marie Mount Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 

20742. 

Payment of Fees - See Schedule of Classes for detailed information. 

Registration is not completed or official until all financial obligations are satisfied. 
Although the University regularly mails bills to students, it cannot assume responsibility 
for their receipt. If a student does not receive a bill on or before the beginning of each 



Fees and Expenses 23 



semester, it is the student's responsibility to obtain a copy of the bill at Room 1103, 
Lee Building, 8:30-4:15, Monday through Friday. 

The University of Maryland does not have a deferred payment plan. Payment for 
previous balances and current semester fees are due on or before the first day of classes. 
Please Note: Payments for student accounts may be made by Visa or Mastercard. 
Credit card payments may be made in person or by mail. However, phone-in payments 
will not be accepted at this time. 

It is the policy of the University not to defer payment on the basis of a pending 
application for financial assistance to an outside agency, including Veterans Admin- 
istration benefits, bank loans, guaranteed student loan programs, etc. 

Students will be severed from University services for delinquent indebtedness to the 
University. In the event that severance occurs, the individual may make payment during 
the semester in which services were severed and all services except housing will be 
restored. A 5 percent Late Payment Fee and a $25.00 Severance of Service Fee will 
be assessed if payment due dates are not followed. 

State of Maryland legislation has established a State Central Collections Unit, and 
in accordance with State law, the University is required to turn over all delinquent 
accounts to that office for collection and subsequent legal action. The minimum Col- 
lection Fee is 15 percent plus any attorney and/or court costs. 

Refund of Fees 

A Cancellation of Registration submitted to the Registrations Office before the 
official first day of classes entitles the student to a full credit or refund of semester 
tuition and fees. 

After classes begin students who wish to terminate their registration must follow the 
withdrawal procedures stated in the "Schedule of Classes" Students will find the nec- 
essary forms for withdrawal in the Records Office. The effective date used in computing 
refunds is the date the withdrawal form is filed. "Stop Payment" on a check, failure 
to pay the semester bill, or failure to attend classes does not constitute withdrawal. 

A student must file a request for a refund with the Office of the Bursar or any credit 
on the student account will automatically be carried over to the next semester. 

Students withdrawing from the University will be credited for tuition in accordance 
with the following schedule: 

Period from date Refundable tuition 

Instruction begins only (Additional 

fees nan refundable) 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No refund 
University Refund Statement 

Tuition, refundable fees and refundable deposits are authorized for refund only if 
the student completes the prescribed withdrawal procedures or is dismissed from the 



24 Fellowships, Asslstantships and Financial Assistance 



University. Residence Hail and Dining Services charges are autiiorized for refund only 
if the student completes the prescribed residence hall and dining services contract 
release procedures. Please refer to current "Schedule of Classes" for complete refund 
information and procedures. 



Fellowships, Asslstantships and Financial Assistance 

The University of Maryland recognizes the high cost of education today and makes 
every effort to offer financial assistance to qualified students through a variety of 
programs. Seventy percent of all full-time graduate students receive financial support, 
which may include remission of tuition fees, teaching and research asslstantships, work- 
study support, and University and state fellowships. Referrals for on-campus or area 
employment opportunities for students and students' spouses are also available in 
various departments and in specific student service centers on campus. 

Admission to a graduate degree program is a prerequisite for the award of a teaching 
or research assistantship, a fellowship, a traineeship, a loan or a work-study award. 
Please be sure that all required documents for your application for admission, as well 
as the application for departmental financial support, have been submitted. Some 
awards are made on the basis of the applicant's academic merit, others on the basis of 
need. 

There are three campus units that administer the primary forms of financial support: 
the Graduate School, the individual programs and the Office of Student Financial Aid. 
The Graduate School processes applications for the Other Race Grants (application 
deadlines: early November and May). The Graduate School also has a Fellowship 
Information Office that lists fellowship opportunities from government agencies, foun- 
dations and industry. 

The individual programs and departments award graduate teaching and research 
assistantships (priority application deadline: March 1) and nominate students for tuition 
scholarships and Graduate School Fellowships (to be considered for nomination, apply 
by February 1). 

The Office of Student Financial Aid processes College Work-Study and National 
Direct Student Loans (priority date for consideration; February 15). To be considered 
for the priority date in the Office of Student Financial Aid, you must have submitted 
a completed Financial Aid Form (available at most colleges throughout the country 
and by request from the Office of Student Financial Aid), financial aid transcripts, if 
appropriate, and any other required documentation to be received by the Office of 
Student Financial Aid by February 15. Note that the Financial Aid Form must be sent 
to the College Scholarship Service in Princeton for analysis, which takes approximately 
four weeks. 

A more detailed description of the various forms of financial assistance is given 
below. 

Fellowships 

A fellowship is an award bestowed on a student who displays academic merit and 
promise. Fellowships are awarded only to students admitted to a degree program at 
UMCP who are willing to devote full-time to their study. All fellowship applicants must 



Fellowships, Assistantships and Financial Assistance 25 



be admitted to a degree program in the Graduate School on a full-time basis to be 
eligible. Departments nominate students for the various fellowships; students should 
try to submit all material for admission by February 1 since the Fellowship competition 
for new students is held in February and March. 

The Graduate School Fellowships are awarded annually on a competitive basis. Stu- 
dents cannot apply directly for the award; rather they must be nominated by the 
department in which they intend to enroll. The minimum stipend was $9,200 for the 
1990-91 academic year; fellows also receive remission of tuition. The standard appli- 
cation for departmental financial aid will serve as an application for this fellowship 
program and should be submitted directly to the department in which admission is 
sought. Awards are based solely on academic merit. Fellowships may be awarded to 
any qualified in-state, out-of-state, or international student. 

Black Graduate Student Fellowships. To help recruit, retain and graduate black 
graduate students, UMCP offers a fellowship program that provides multi- year support 
only to black citizens and permanent resident aliens. Students must be nominated by 
departments. 

Other Race Grants This grant is intended to increase the participation of black 
students in graduate education at the College Park campus. Students who are first-year 
students and students in disciplines in which blacks are underrepresented will be given 
preference. 

Applicants for the Other Race grant must: 

1. be citizens or permanent resident aliens who are classified as Maryland 
residents; 

2. be admitted as degree-seeking students; 

3. be wilHng to devote full-time to their study; 

4. be able to demonstrate special merit or need. 

The individual educational grants vary, and have ranged from $300 - $9,000. Tuition 
is also remitted for up to 10 credits per semester. Students may apply for reappointment 
on a yearly basis for up to three years. Additional details and application materials are 
available from the Fellowship Office of the Graduate School. 

Graduate School Tuition Scholarships 

First-time graduate students in degree programs who are residents of the state of 
Maryland and have an undergraduate GPA of 3.75 or better from an accredited Amer- 
ican college or university may ask their departments to nominate them for a Graduate 
Tuition Scholarship. Students who believe they qualify for the scholarship should mark 
the appropriate space on the departmentally administered financial aid form. Depart- 
ments may have additional criteria, e.g., full-time status, for nomination of students 
in their program. Tuition scholarships are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis 
for as long as funds are available. 

Assistantships 

Offers of assistantships, which are made by the individual departments, are contingent 
upon the applicant's acceptance as a graduate student in a degree program by the 
Graduate School. Departments may set additional criteria. 



26 Fellowships, Assistantshlps and Financial Assistance 



Graduate Teaching Assistantshlps are available to qualified graduate students in many 
departments and programs. In addition to remission of tuition, these carry 10 or 12- 
month stipends ranging from $9,200 to $12,360 as of the 1990-91 academic year. Ap- 
plications for assistantships should be made directly to the department in which the 
applicant will study. 

Graduate Research Assistantships, with comparable stipends, are available in some 
departments on a 10 or 12-month basis. For information, contact the individual de- 
partment or program. 

Resident Graduate Assistantships are also available in limited numbers. In 1990-91, 
the 12-month stipend was $11,040, plus remission of tuition, in exchange for part-time 
work in undergraduate residence halls as Residence Halls staff members. These Res- 
ident Assistantships are open to both men and women. Applications for a Resident 
Graduate Assistantship should be made to the Office of Human Resources, Department 
of Resident Life, Cumberland Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. 

Administrative Assistantships Many offices on campus currently offer graduate as- 
sistant positions. For further information, contact the Fellowships Office, the individual 
office or department or check employment announcements outside the Personnel Office 
in the Lee Building. 

Work-Study Program 

The College Work-Study Program, through the Office of Student Financial Aid 
(OSFA) , offers part-time opportunities for students who demonstrate sufficient financial 
need. Graduate students who are awarded work-study and accept it are sent work 
authorization forms stating the amount they can earn during the academic year. Job 
openings will be listed at the Job Referral Service (JRS), Room 3120 Hornbake Build- 
ing, South Wing. The student is responsible for visiting the JRS to review job listings 
and for setting up interviews with those departments where they are interested in 
working. Once hired, they must submit a Work Authorization Form to the hiring 
department and give a copy of the form to the JRS. The student and job supervisor 
must both agree on the student's work schedule, which must not conflict with the 
student's class schedule. Contact the JRS at 314-8324 for more information about the 
College Work-Study Program. 

Loans and Part-Time Employment 

Robert T. Stafford Student Loan. The Robert T. Stafford Student Loan (formerly 
the Guaranteed Student Loan) is a need-based, low interest loan program. Students 
must file a Financial Aid Form (FAF) to determine their eligibility. Graduate students 
may be eligible to borrow up to $7500 per year and a cumulative maximum amount of 

$54,750. 

Beginning July 1, 1988, first-time borrowers for Stafford Student Loans will have an 
interest rate of 8 percent for the first four years of repayment and 10 percent for the 
remainder of the repayment period. Borrowers with unpaid balances may borrow at 
their previous interest rate. Repayment begins six months after graduating or ceasing 
to be enrolled at least half-time. Graduate eligibility is as defined by the graduate 
school. Full-time status is defined in the graduate catalog; 24 units equals half-time 
status. Applicants must also make satisfactory academic progress. 



Registration and Credits 27 



If the student is eligible according to the FAF, the student will receive accompanying 
information with an awards letter from the Office of Student Financial Aid to complete 
the loan application process. For more detailed information see the Financial Facts 
handbook. 

SLS/PLUS. Effective August 17, 1988, all students applying for a Supplemental Loan 
for Students (SLS) are required to complete a FAF processed by the College Scholarship 
Service (CSS) in order to determine if the student is eligible for a Stafford Student 
Loan. Beginning July 1, 1988, first-time borrowers have a variable interest rate starting 
at 12 percent. This rate is determined each year. 

Applicants for the SLS must be independent (self-supporting), admitted to the Uni- 
versity, a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen, enrolled at least half- time and making 
satisfactory academic progress. 

Repayment usually begins 60 days after receipt of the check. Certain lenders will 
defer payment until the student graduates or is no longer enrolled at least half-time. 
Students must make specific arrangements with their lenders for deferment. Plus loans 
are for parents of dependent students. A FAF is not required. 

Applications for Plus or SLS can be obtained at the Public Inquiry counter of the 
Office of Student Financial Aid, Room 2130 Mitchell Building. For more detailed 
information, see the Financial Facts handbook. 

Job Referral Service. The Job Referral Service, an extension of the Office of Student 
Financial Aid, serves without charge as a clearinghouse for students seeking part-time, 
temporary and summer employment opportunities. Positions are available both on and 
off campus. All currently enrolled University of Maryland at College Park or University 
College students seeking work are welcome to visit the office and consult referral lists. 
Additional information may be obtained from Room 3120 of the Hornbake Building, 
South Wing, or by caUing 314-8324. 

Veterans Benefits 

Students who attend the University under the Veteran's Education Assistance Act 
may receive assistance and enrollment certification at the Veterans Certification Office 
in Rm. 1118 Mitchell Building. The staff is available to help with monthly educational 
assistance checks as well as other benefits such as tutoring assistance. Telephone 314- 
8237. 



Registration and Credits 

Registration for courses is ongoing during most of the time that the University is in 
session. Information concerning registration procedures, deadlines and current tuition 
and expenses is found in the "Schedule of Classes," published regularly by the Office 
of Registration and Records. Students interested in summer session courses should 
obtain the Summer Session "Schedule of Classes," from the Office of Summer Sessions, 
Reckord Armory. 

Academic Calendar 

The Academic Calendar is printed in the "Schedule of Classes" for each semester. 
The Graduate School has an "Important Dates" card for graduate students, which lists 
deadlines for submitting requirements for degrees in a particular academic year. 



28 Registration and Credits 



Developing a Program 

The student is responsible for ascertaining and complying with the rules and pro- 
cedures of the Graduate School and all applicable department or graduate program 
requirements that govern the individual program of study. 

Registration for the newly admitted graduate student seeking a degree or certificate 
begins with a visit to the student's academic adviser in the graduate program or de- 
partment to which the student has been admitted. There the student will obtain infor- 
mation about specific degree or certificate requirements that supplement those of the 
Graduate School. 

The student will consult the "Schedule of Classes" and will develop an individual 
program of study and research in consultation with a graduate faculty adviser. 

Students admitted to Advanced Special Status may seek advice from the Office of 
the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research or from appropriate faculty members. 

The Associate Dean for Graduate Student Affairs is the individual to whom requests 
or petitions for exceptions or waivers of regulations or graduate degree requirements 
should be addressed and to whom appeals of decisions of departmental or program 
faculty or administrators should be directed. 

Course Numbering System 

Courses are designated as follows: 

000-099 Non-credit courses. 
100-199 primarily first-year courses. 
200-299 primarily sophomore courses. 

300-399 Junior and senior courses not acceptable for credit toward graduate degrees. 
400-499 Junior and senior courses acceptable for credit toward some graduate de- 
grees. 

500-599 professional school courses (Dentistry, Law, Medicine) and post- baccalau- 
reate courses not for graduate degree credit. 
600-898 Courses restricted to graduate students. 
799 Master's thesis credit. 
899 Doctoral dissertation credit. 

The first character of the numeric position determines the level of the course and 
the last two digits are used for course identification. Courses ending with an 8 or 9 are 
courses that are repeatable for credit. All non-repeatable courses must end in through 

7. 

Designation of Full and Part-time Graduate Students 

In order to reflect accurately the involvement of graduate students in their programs 
of study and research and the use of University resources in those programs, the 
Graduate School uses the graduate unit in making calculations to determine full or 
part-time student status in the administration of the minimum registration requirements 
described below and in responding to student requests for certification of full-time 
student status. The number of graduate units per semester credit hour is calculated in 
the following manner: 



Registration and Credits 29 



Courses in the series: 000-399 carry 2 units/credit hour. 
Courses in the series: 400-499 carry 4 units/credit hour. 
Courses in the series: 500-599 carry 5 units/credit hour. 
Courses in the series: 600-898 carry 6 units/credit hour. 
Research course: 799 carries 12 units/credit hour. 
Research course: 899 carries 18 units/credit hour. 

To be certified as full-time, a graduate student must be officially registered for a 
combination of courses equivalent to 48 units per semester. Graduate assistants holding 
regular appointments are full-time students if they are registered for at least 24 units 
in addition to the assistantship. Audited courses do not generate graduate units and 
cannot be used in calculating full- time or part-time status. The University of Maryland 
may alter this system in the near future. 

Minimum Registration Requirements 

All graduate students, masters and doctoral, making any demand upon the academic 
or support services of the University, whether taking courses, using University libraries, 
laboratories, computer facilities, office space or housing, consulting with faculty ad- 
visers, taking comprehensive or final oral examinations, or filing a diploma application, 
must register for the number of graduate units that will, in the faculty adviser's judg- 
ment, accurately reflect the student's involvement in graduate study and use of Uni- 
versity resources. In no case will registration be for less than one credit. 

Minimum Registration Requirements for Doctoral Candidates 

Doctoral students who have been advanced to candidacy must register each semester, 
except summer sessions, until the degree is awarded. 

Dissertation Research 

Those who have not completed the required semester credit hours of Dissertation 
Research (899) must register for a minimum of one credit of research each semester. 
(See the following sections for specific doctoral degree registration requirements.) 
Doctoral candidates whose demands upon the University are greater than that repre- 
sented by this minimum registration will be expected to register for the number of units 
that reflects their use of University resources. 

Continuous Registration 

Doctoral candidates who have completed the required minimum of credit hours of 
Dissertation Research (899) and are making no use of University resources must meet 
a Continuous Registration requirement during each semester, except for summer ses- 
sions, until the degree is awarded. This requirement is met by submitting the Continuous 
Registration Form and paying the $10.00 Continuous Registration fee directly to the 
Graduate School either in person or by mail. Forms and fees must be received before 
the end of the eighth week of classes during the fall and spring semesters. Continuous 
Registration forms may be obtained from the Graduate School, Room 2117, Lee Build- 
ing, University of Maryland, College Park. MD 20742. 

Failure to comply with the requirement of maintaining Continuous Registration will 
be taken as evidence that the student has terminated the doctoral program, and admitted 
status to the Graduate School will be terminated. A new application for admission, 



30 Registration and Credits 



with the consequent reevaluation of the student's performance, will be required of a 
student who wishes to resume a graduate program but whose admission has been 
terminated under this regulation. 

Partial Credit Course Registration for Handicapped Students 

The Graduate School recognizes that students with documented physical handicaps 
may derive considerable educational benefit from courses that include laboratories or 
other non-classroom activities in which the student is prevented from participating 
because of the handicap. Therefore, it is the Graduate School's policy to allow hand- 
icapped students to enroll in such courses, complete only those parts of the course that 
their physical capabilities permit, and receive credit for the course proportionate to 
their levels of participation. 

Physically handicapped graduate students who wish to enroll in such courses but 
participate only in certain aspects of them should consult the Associate Dean for Student 
Affairs in the Graduate School. The Dean will assist the student in making the necessary 
arrangements with the department offering the course, the department supervising the 
student's graduate program and the Registration Office. The final agreement as to the 
student's level of participation and the amount of credit to be awarded will be specified 
in an agreement to be drawn up by the Graduate School and signed by all parties 
concerned. 

The Inter-Campus Student 

A student admitted to the Graduate School on any campus of the University of 
Maryland is eligible to take courses on any other campus of the University of Maryland 
with the approval of the academic adviser and the graduate deans on the home and 
host campuses. Credits earned on a host campus are considered resident credit at the 
home campus and may meet all degree requirements with adviser approval. Transcripts 
of courses taken at another campus will be maintained on the home campus and fees 
will be paid to the home campus. Forms for registration as an inter-campus student 
may be obtained from the Graduate School offices on any campus of the University. 
Registration Through the Washington Consortium Arrangement 

The University of Maryland at College Park is a member of the Consortium of 
Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. Other institutions currently asso- 
ciated with the consortium include American University, The Catholic University of 
America, the University of the District of Columbia, Gallaudet College, George Mason 
University, Georgetown University, George Washington University, Howard Univer- 
sity, Marymount College, Mount Vernon College and Trinity College. Students enrolled 
in these institutions are able to attend certain classes at the other campuses and have 
the credit considered "residence" credits at their own institutions. The consortium 
permits both undergraduate and graduate students to participate in programs such as 
the Research Fellows Program and the National Institute for Citizen Education in the 
Law. The policies governing registration through the Consortium Arrangement are 
listed below. 
UMCP Graduate Students 

1. UMCP degree-seeking graduate students may take courses at other 
consortium schools, which are to be treated as UMCP residence credits 
with the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies of the degree 
program in which they are enrolled. 



Registration and Credits 31 



2. No more than 25 percent of the course credits required for the UMCP 
graduate degree may be taken at other consortium schools through the 
consortium arrangement. Practica, internships, workshops and similar 
experiential learning courses cannot be taken at other consortium schools. 

3. Significant factors to be considered by the Director of Graduate Studies 
may include but are not limited to: 

a. Unavailability of a similar or comparable course at UMCP within a 
reasonable time frame. Mere convenience is not adequate justifica- 
tion. 

b. Possible enhancement of the student's overall program in a way not 
possible at UMCP, as by the presence of unique faculty or the avail- 
ability of a course not offered at UMCP. 

c. The level and content of the course, including the nature of prereq- 
uisite coursework. 

Visiting Students 

1 . Students from other consortium schools may register for UMCP courses 
on a space-available basis beginning with the first day of classes. 

2. Courses for majors in departments or colleges at UMCP that have se- 
lective admission programs will not normally be available to students 
from other consortium schools. 

3. Students from other consortium schools are expected to meet all pre- 
requisites for UMCP courses for which they wish to enroll. 

4. Students from other consortium schools will not normally be permitted 
to register for practica, workshops, internships and other experiential 
courses at UMCP. 

5. Students from other consortium schools who have previously applied 
for admission to a UMCP graduate degree program and have been 
denied admission will be permitted to register for graduate courses in 
that program only with the specific approval of the Director of Graduate 
Studies of the program. 

6. Students from other consortium schools who have been dismissed from 
UMCP for disciplinary or financial reasons will not be permitted to enroll 
in courses at UMCP under the consortium arrangement. 

Graduate Credit for Senior Undergraduates 

A senior in the final semester at UMCP who is within seven credit hours of completing 
the requirements for an undergraduate degree may register for courses with the appproval 
of the undergraduate dean, the department or program offering the course and the 
Graduate School. Normally, a 3.0 grade point average for all courses is required for 
students seeking to exercise this option. Courses elected through this program may 
later be counted for graduate credit toward an advanced degree at the University if 
the student is offered admission to the Graduate School. The total of undergraduate 
and graduate courses must not exceed 15 credits for the semester. Excess credits in 
the senior year cannot be used for graduate credit unless proper prearrangement is 
made. Seniors who wish to register for graduate credit can receive information about 



32 Registration and Credits 



the procedure from the Graduate School, Office of the Associate Dean for Student 
Affairs, 2125 Lee Building. 

Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Level Courses 

Subject to requirements determined by the graduate faculty members of the de- 
partment or program offering the course, undergraduate students may register for 
graduate level courses, i.e., those numbered from 600 to 898, with the exception of 
799 and 899, for undergraduate credit. 

A student who seeks to use this option will normally be in the senior year, have 
earned an accumulated grade point average of 3.0, have successfully completed the 
prerequisite and correlative courses with a grade of "B" or better, and be a major in 
the appropriate or a closely related department. The student will be required to obtain 
prior approval from the department offering the course. 

Enrollment in a graduate level course does not in any way imply subsequent de- 
partmental or Graduate School approval for admission into a graduate program, nor 
may the course be used as credit for a graduate degree at the University of Maryland. 

Combined Bachelor's/Master's Programs 

A combined bachelor's/master's program may be developed for the individual stu- 
dent. A combined degree program should be an integrated learning experience for the 
student, not simply the completion of a required number of undergraduate and graduate 
credits. It is available only to students whose academic performance is exceptional, 
i.e., a stipulated grade point average and faculty evaluations and recommendations. 
The program must be approved by the undergraduate dean, the department or program 
offering the undergraduate major, the department or program offering the graduate 
program and the Graduate School. Normally, no more than nine credits of courses 
taken at the advanced level (600- level courses and above) may be applied to both 
degree programs. No more than one master's degree may be earned through a combined 
bachelor's/master's degree program. See your undergraduate adviser for more details. 

Credit by Examination 

A graduate student may obtain graduate credit by examination in courses at the 400 
level previously identified by the appropriate department or program. In the judgment 
of the Graduate Council, credit by examination is not generally available for courses 
at the 600, 700, or 800 levels because courses at these levels require a continuing 
interaction between faculty and students to achieve the educational goals of advanced 
study. 

Students may receive credit by examination only for courses for which they are 
otherwise eligible to receive graduate credit. The department or program in which the 
student is enrolled may establish a limit on the number of credits that may be earned 
in this manner. Graduate students seeking credit by examination must obtain the 
consent of their adviser and of the instructor currently responsible for the course. Once 
the student begins the examination, the grade earned will be recorded. 

The Graduate School maintains a list of courses for which examinations are available 
or will be prepared. The fee for credit by examination is $30.00 per course regardless 
of the number of credits or units to be earned. 



Registration and Credits 33 



Transfer of Credit 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate level course credits earned at regionally 
accredited institutions prior to or after matriculation in the Graduate School may be 
applied toward master's degrees at the University of Maryland. Due to academic and 
procedural differences between foreign and U.S. regionally accredited institutions, 
credit from foreign universities is not acceptable for transfer. There is no need for 
transfer of credit at the doctoral level. All graduate study credits offered as transfer 
credit must meet the following criteria: 

1. They must have received graduate credit for courses taken at the other 
institution. 

2. They must not have been used to meet the requirements for any degree 
previously earned. 

3. They must have been elected within the time limit framework of the 
student's program here. 

4. The department or program to which the student has been admitted at 
Maryland must certify the courses are appropriate to the degree program 
the student is pursuing at Maryland. 

5. The student must have earned a "B" or better in the courses offered 
for transfer credit, and have a "B" or better average on all the graduate 
coursework taken at the institution from which the transfer is requested. 

6. Transfer work normally satisfies only the 400-level requirements for the 
master's degree and does not apply to the upper-level requirement. 

A student seeking acceptance of transfer credit is advised to submit the necessary 
transcripts and certification of department or program approval to the Graduate School 
as promptly as possible for its review and decision. It should be noted that graduate 
departments and programs may impose more stringent requirements and time limita- 
tions concerning the transfer of credits. In such cases the Graduate School must be 
notified accordingly. 
Criteria that Courses Must Meet to be Accepted for Graduate Credit 

Any courses, workshops or seminars planned to take place in a span of time less 
than a normal academic semester or summer session and offering graduate credit to 
the participants must meet the following criteria: 

1. There must be 15 "contact hours" per graduate credit. 

a. Lectures: one contact hour per 50 minutes lecture. 

b. Non-lecture contact (laboratory, workshops, discussion and problem- 
working sessions, etc.): one contact hour per two or three-hour ses- 
sion. 

2. No more than three "contact hours" per day will be permitted. (Three 
"contact hours" are equivalent to 0.2 credits) 

3. Credit may be accumulated at the rate of no more than one credit per 
week. 

Statement on UMCP Policy on Non-participation by Students in Class 
Exercises that Involve Animals 

Students who are concerned about the use of animals in teaching have the respon- 
sibility to contact the instructor prior to course enrollment to determine if animals are 



34 Registration and Credits 



to be used in the course, whether class exercises involving animals are optional or 
required and what alternatives, if any, are available. If no alternatives are available, 
the refusal to participate in required activities involving animals may result in a failing 
grade in the course. 

The University of Maryland at College Park affirms the right of the faculty to de- 
termine course content and curriculum requirements. The University, however, also 
encourages faculty to consider offering alternatives to the use of animals in their courses. 
In each course, the instructor determines whether the use of animals in the classroom 
exercises will be a course requirement or optional activity. The following departments 
currently have courses that may require animals to be used in class activities: Animal 
Sciences, Human Nutrition and Food Science, Microbiology, Poultry Science, Psy- 
chology, Veterinary Medicine and Zoology. For UMCP's policy statement on animal 
use and care, see the catalog's Appendices section. 

Course and Credit Changes 

A graduate student may drop a course, add a course, change between audit and 
credit status, change the number of credits for a course within the listed range, cancel 
registration or withdraw from the University by obtaining the necessary approvals and 
observing the published deadlines and procedures. The deadlines are published each 
term in the Schedule of Classes; the procedures governing each of these transactions 
are listed below. 

Procedures for Schedule Adjustment 

A graduate student may transact the following schedule adjustments through the 
tenth week of classes in a term by submitting a Schedule Adjustment Form to the 
Registrations Office, Mitchell Building: add a course; drop a course; change grading 
option; and change credit level. There is currently a $2.00 charge for each drop and 
add form processed after the tenth day of class. There is no refund of tuition and fees 
for drops processed after the fifth class day (see "Schedule of Classes" for further 
details). 

After the tenth day of classes, all graduate students are required to obtain Depart- 
mental and instructor authorization to be stamped or written on the add slip. Approved 
requests must be promptly delivered to the Registrar's Office, Mitchell Building. 

Procedures for Late Registration 

Students registering after the established registration period may need an appoint- 
ment to register. Call the Office of Registrations and Records for information. For 
current registration procedures consult the Schedule of Classes. Students who register 
after the established registration period (i.e., beginning with the schedule adjustment 
period) will be assessed a $20 late registration fee. 

Procedures for Credit Level Change and Change of Grading Option 

Students who wish to change their grading option or credit level in a course may do 
so without special approval until the tenth class day each term. After the tenth class 
day, departmental authorization is required until the end of the tenth week. No credit 
level changes or grading options are permitted after the tenth week of classes. 

1 . Exceptions to this deadline require the written approval of the instructor 
and the approval of the Graduate School. 



Registration and Credits 35 



2. The departmental stamp must be placed on the change of grading option/ 
credit level form. 

3. Approved forms should be submitted to the Registrar's Office, Mitchell 
Building. 

Procedures for Withdrawal from Classes 

The term withdrawal means termination of enrollment for a given term. The date 
of the withdrawal is indicated on a graduate student's academic record. To withdraw 
from a term on or before the last day of classes a graduate student must notify the 
Records Office, 1101 Mitchell Building, in writing or in person. Withdrawal becomes 
effective on the date notification is received in the Records Office. Additional infor- 
mation concerning withdrawal from classes can be found in the "Schedule of Classes". 

If the time limits in a master's or pre-candidate doctoral student's program have not 
lapsed (5 years to obtain a master's degree and 5 years to reach doctoral candidacy,) 
a graduate student is eligible to enroll without readmission. In such cases the student 
should contact the department about registration dates and procedures. Doctoral can- 
didates typically do not withdraw. If a candidate believes he/she must withdraw, he/ 
she must contact the Office of the Associate Dean for Student Affairs. 

Resignation From the University 

A graduate student wishing to resign from the University (i.e., terminate his/her 
association with the University) may do so by submitting a letter to the Graduate School 
indicating the reasons for the resignation. The Graduate School will cancel the student's 
admitted status. If the student is registered for classes at the time of his/her resignation, 
the Office of Records and Registrations will be requested to withdraw the student 
effective the date of the resignation. 

A graduate student seeking to return to the University of Maryland must reapply 
for admission and is subject to all departmental and Graduate School requirements. 
He or she may be required to repeat previously elected courses. 

Procedure for CancelHng Registration for a Term 

To cancel a registration after the stated deadlines for a given term, a graduate student 
must provide a written explanation, which has been endorsed by the graduate director 
of his or her program to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs. If appropriate, the 
request will be processed and, if fees are involved, the necessary adjustments made. 
Please note that the cancellation of one's classes during the course of a given term is 
not meant to be used as a means of avoiding poor grades. 

Grades for Graduate Students 

A minimum grade point average of 3.0 for all graduate level courses taken is required 
in order to be in good academic standing and for graduation with a graduate degree. 
Graduate students are required to meet all departmental and program rules and reg- 
ulations. Departments and programs may stipulate requirements more stringent than 
those minimally expected by the Graduate School. 

Academic Discipline Policy 

Each graduate student is required to maintain a 3.0 grade point average for all 
graduate courses elected toward the degree program in which he or she is enrolled. 



36 Registration and Credits 



A Student whose cumulative grade point average fails below a "B" (3.0) upon or 
after the completion of nine credit hours of graduate level courses will be automatically 
placed on academic probation by the Graduate School for the following full semester. 

A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below a "B" (3.0) for a second 
and successive semester of enrollment for courses may, upon the recommendation of 
her or his graduate chair and with the consent of the Graduate School, be granted a 
final opportunity to correct the scholastic and/or academic deficiency in the next se- 
mester of enrollment for courses. 

A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below a "B" (3.0) average for 
three consecutive semesters of enrollment will not be permitted to re-enroll and will 
be required to withdraw from the University. 

Both the graduate student and the Graduate Director of each department or program 
will be notified whenever a graduate student is placed on academic probation. If a 
graduate student is placed on probation for a second consecutive semester, both the 
graduate student and the student's Graduate Director will be informed that the student 
may not continue beyond that semester unless the academic department or program 
presents compelling reasons for continuance. The request for continuance must be 
approved by the Graduate School. 

In addition to the minimum grade point average requirements, graduate departments 
and programs may require graduate students to maintain certain performance minima 
in their programs of study, and in all or in particular courses. A student who fails to 
make satisfactory progress in meeting some or all programmatic requirements, or who 
fails to demonstrate the ability to succeed in his or her course of studies or research, 
may be required to withdraw from the University. Determinations concerning such 
matters occur at the departmental level. 

Grading Systems 

The Conventional A through F grading system is used in graduate level courses. 

A "Satisfactory or Failure" (S-F) grading system may be used for certain types of 
graduate study at the discretion of the department or program. These include courses 
which require independent field work, special projects or independent study. Depart- 
mental seminars, workshops and departmental courses in instructional methods may 
also be appropriate for the S-F grading system. 

The "Pass-Fail" grading system is a grading option for undergraduates. However, a 
Department or program may give permission in certain cases for a graduate student 
to use the Pass-Fail option for any 100-300 level courses that a student takes. Graduate 
credit may not be earned for these courses. Either the A-F or the S-F grading system 
may be used in thesis and dissertation research, and courses labeled "Independent 
Study" or "Special Problems." 

Only one grading system will be used for a single course in a particular semester. 
The grading system will be designated by the department or program offering the 
course. 

Computation of Grade Point Average 

The A is calculated at 4 quality points, B at 3 quality points and C at 2 quality points. 
The grades of D, F and I receive no quality points. After a student is matriculated as 



Degree Requirements 37 



a graduate student, all courses taken that are numbered 400 and above (except 500- 
level courses, those numbered 799 or 899, and those graded with an S) will be used in 
the calculation of the grade point average. A student may repeat any course in an effort 
to earn a better grade. Whether higher or lower, the latter grade will be used in 
computing the grade point average. Grades for graduate students remain as part of 
the student's permanent record and may be changed only by the original instructor on 
certification that an actual mistake was made in determining or recording the grade. 
The change must be approved by the department chair and the Dean for Graduate 
Studies and Research. 

No course taken after August 23, 1974, will be considered "not applicable" for the 
purpose of computing the grade point average of a graduate student. No graduate credit 
transferred from another institution will be included in the calculation of the grade 
point average. 

The Academic Record (Transcript) 

A graduate student's academic record (transcript) is intended to serve as a complete 
history of the student's academic progress at the University of Maryland. As such, it 
cannot be altered except in conformance with stated Graduate School policies governing 
change of election. Under no circumstances will the academic records be altered because 
of dissatisfaction with a grade or other academic accomplishment. 



Degree Requirements 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to all Master's Degrees. 

Programs 

The entire course of study undertaken for any master's degree must constitute a 
unified, coherent program that is approved by the student's adviser and graduate di- 
rector and meets Graduate School requirements. 

A minimum of thirty semester hours in courses acceptable for credit towards a 
graduate degree is required (some degree programs require more than 30 credits); in 
certain cases, six of the 30 semester hours must be thesis research credits. The graduate 
program must include at least 12 hours of coursework at the 600 level or higher. If the 
student is inadequately prepared for the required graduate courses, additional courses 
may be required, which may not be considered as part of the student's graduate pro- 
gram. Credits to be applied to a student's program for a master's degree cannot have 
been used to satisfy any other previously earned degrees. 

Grade-Point Average 

The student seeking any master's degree must maintain an average grade of "B" 
(3.0) in all courses taken for graduate credit. 

Time Limitation 

All requirements for the master's degree must be completed within a five-year period. 
This time limit applies to any transfer work from other institutions to be included in 
a student's program. 



38 Degree Requirements 



Additional Requirements 

In addition to the above requirements, special departmental or collegiate require- 
ments may be imposed, especially for degrees that are offered only in one department, 
college or division. For these special requirements, consult the descriptions which 
appear under the departmental or collegiate listing in this catalog or the special pub- 
lications that can be obtained from the department or college. 

Graduate School Requirements for the Degrees of Master of Arts and Master 
of Science 

THESIS OPTION 

Research Assurances 

At the University of Maryland at College Park, all research, including thesis and 
dissertation research, must be conducted in accordance with federal guidelines for the 
use of animals, the use of human subjects and the use of materials that may pose 
biological or chemical hazards. All animal use protocols must be approved by the 
Animal Care and Use Committee. Research involving human subjects must be ap- 
proved by the departmental human subjects review board and/or the Institutional 
Review Board. Any research involving hazardous materials, either biological or chem- 
ical, or recombinant RNA/DNA research must have approval from the campus De- 
partment of Environmental Safety. 

Course Requirements 

A minimum of 30 semester hours including six hours of thesis research credit (799) 
is required for the degrees of Master of Arts and Master of Science. Of the 24 hours 
required in graduate courses, no less than 12 must be earned in the major subject. No 
less than one-half of the total required course credits for the degree, or a minimum of 
twelve, must be selected from courses number 600 or above. 

Thesis Requirement 

A thesis must be submitted for the Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees 
except for those programs in which a non-thesis option has been approved by the Dean 
in conformity with the policy of the Graduate Council. Approval of the thesis is the 
responsibility of an examining committee appointed by the Dean on the recommen- 
dation of the student's adviser. The adviser is the chairperson of the committee, and 
the remaining members of the committee are members of the graduate faculty who 
are familiar with the student's program of study. The chairperson and the candidate 
are informed of the membership of the examining committee by the Dean. 

Directions for the preparation and submission of theses will be found in the Theses 
Manual, which may be obtained from Room 2117, Lee Building. 

Oral Examination 

A final oral examination on the thesis shall be held when the student has completed 
the thesis to the satisfaction of the student's adviser, providing all other requirements 
for the degree have been completed and a 3.0 grade point average computed in ac- 
cordance with the regulations described under "Grades for Graduate Students" has 
been earned. 



Degree Requirements 39 



The examining committee, composed of a minimum of three members, conducts the 
oral examination (an additional comprehensive written examination may be required 
at the option of the department or program). The chairperson of the examining com- 
mittee selects the time and place for the examination and notifies other members of 
the committee and the candidate. Members of the committee must be given a minimum 
of seven school days in which to read the thesis. The duration of the examination is 
normally about an hour, but it may be longer if necessary to insure an adequate 
examination. 

The decision to accept the examination as satisfactory must be unanimous. Students 
may present themselves for examination only twice. The report of the committee, 
signed by each member, must be submitted to the Dean for Graduate Studies and 
Research no later than the appropriate date listed in the "Important Dates for Advisers 
and Students" if the student is to receive a diploma at the Commencement ceremony 
for the semester in which the examination is held. 

NON-THESIS OPTION 

The requirements for Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees without thesis 
vary slightly among departments and programs in which this option is available. Stand- 
ards for admission are, however, identical with those for admission to any other master's 
program. The quality of the work expected of the student is also identical to that 
expected in the thesis programs. 

The general requirements for those on the non-thesis program are a minimum of 30 
semester credit hours in courses approved for graduate credit with a minimum average 
grade of B in all course work taken; a minimum of 18 semester credit hours in courses 
numbered 600 or above; the submission of one or more scholarly papers; and successful 
completion of a comprehensive final examination, a portion of which must be written. 

A student following a non-thesis master's program will be expected to meet the same 
deadlines for application for a diploma and for final examination reports established 
for all other degree programs. 

For information on programs that offer the non-thesis option, see the list of Graduate 
programs in the Catalog. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Education 

Nearly all departments in Education offer the Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree 
with the following requirements: 

1. A minimum of 30 semester hours in coursework with a B grade average. 
Grades for courses not a part of the program but taken in graduate 
status will be computed in the average. 

2. A minimum of 15 hours in courses numbered 600-800 with the remainder 
at least in the 400 series. Some departments require courses in depart- 
ments other than Education. 

3. A comprehensive written examination taken at the end of coursework. 

4. EDMS 645. 

5. EDMS 646 or MUED 690 and one seminar paper; or two seminar 
papers. 



40 Degree Requirements 



For further details, see "Graduate Studies in the College of Education" issued by 
the College of Education and descriptions of departmental programs. 
Requirements Applicable to other Master's Degrees 

The particular requirements for the degrees of Master of Architecture, Master of 
Business Administration, Master of Library Science, Master of Music, Master of Fine 
Arts, Master of Public Policy, Master of Public Management and Master of Applied 
Anthropology are given under the individual graduate program entries in those fields. 
Graduate School Requirements Applicable to all Doctoral Degrees 
Credit Requirements 

The Graduate School requires that every student seeking the doctoral degree register 
for a minimum of 12 research credits, but the number of research and other credit 
hours required in the program varies with the degree and program in question. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Preliminary examinations, or such other substantial tests as the departments may 
elect, are frequently prerequisite for admission to candidacy. 

A student must be admitted to candidacy for the doctorate within five years after 
admission to the doctoral program and at least one academic year before the date on 
which the degree will be conferred. 

It is the responsibility of the student to submit an application for admission to 
candidacy when all the requirements for candidacy have been fulfilled. Applications 
for admission to candidacy are made in duplicate by the student and submitted to the 
major department for further action and transmission to the Graduate School. Appli- 
cation forms may be obtained at the Graduate School Records Office. 

Time Limitation 

The student must complete the entire program for the degree, including the disser- 
tation and final examination, during a four-year period after admission to candidacy. 
Extensions of time are granted only under the most unusual circumstances. If students 
fail to complete all requirements within the time allotted, they must submit another 
application for admission to the Graduate School and, if readmitted, another application 
for Advancement to Candidacy, after satisfying the usual program prerequisites prior 
to Advancement to Candidacy. 
Dissertation 

A dissertation or its equivalent is required of all candidates for a doctoral degree. 
The topic of the dissertation must be approved by the department or program com- 
mittee. 

During the preparation of the dissertation, all candidates for any doctoral degree 
must register for the prescribed number of semester hours of Doctoral Dissertation 
Research (899) at the University of Maryland. 

Directions for the preparation and submission of dissertations will be found in the 
Theses Manual, which may be obtained from the Graduate School Records Office. 

Additional Requirements 

In addition to the above requirements, special departmental or collegiate require- 
ments may be imposed, especially for those degrees that are offered in only one de- 



Degree Requirements 41 



partment or college. For these special requirements, consult the descriptions that appear 
under the departmental or collegiate listing in this catalog or the special publications 
that can be obtained from the department, college or division. 

Graduate School Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high 
attainment in scholarship and the ability to engage in independent research. It is not 
awarded for the completion of course and seminar requirements no matter how suc- 
cessfully completed. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

A number of departments have a foreign language requirement for the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree. The student should inquire in the department about this require- 
ment. Students must satisfy the departmental or program requirement before they can 
be admitted to candidacy for the doctorate. 

Program 

There is no Graduate School requirement stipulating a specific number of course 
credits in either a major or a minor subject. It is the policy of the Graduate School to 
encourage the development of individual programs for each student who seeks the 
Ph.D. To that end, the academic departments and interdisciplinary programs have been 
directed to determine major and minor requirements, levels or sequences of required 
courses and similar requirements for submission to the Graduate Council for approval. 

Admission to Candidacy 

See requirements for all doctoral degrees. 

Dissertation 

The ability to do independent research must be demonstrated by an original disser- 
tation on a topic approved by the department or program. 

During the preparation of the dissertation, all candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree must register for a minimum of 12 semester hours of doctoral research (899) 
at the University of Maryland. 

Constitution of Dissertation Committee 

1. A dissertation committee must consist of a minimum of five members, 
at least three of whom must be regular members of the University of 
Maryland at College Park Graduate Faculty. Additional committee 
members may be required or invited to serve at departmental discretion. 

2. Each dissertation committee will have a chairperson, who must be a 
regular member of the Graduate Faculty. Dissertation committees may 
be co-chaired upon written recommendation of the department graduate 
director or chair and the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies and 
Research. At least one of the co-chairs must be a regular member of 
the Graduate FacuUy. 



42 Degree Requirements 



3. Each committee shall have appointed to it a representative of the Dean 
for Graduate Studies and Research. This person, who is recommended 
by the student's home department, must be a regular member of the 
Graduate Faculty at the University of Maryland at College Park and 
must be from a department other than the student's home department. 
In cases where a student is in an interdisciplinary department or pro- 
gram, the Dean's Representative must be from a program outside the 
departments and programs involved in the interdisciplinary endeavors. 

4. Individuals from outside the University system may serve on dissertation 
committees provided that their credentials warrant this service and upon 
the written request of and justification by the department involved, 
including the individual's curriculum vitae. However, these individuals 
must be in addition to the minimum required number of regular mem- 
bers of the College Park Graduate Faculty. 

5. Emeriti and retired professors may serve on dissertation committees 
provided they are members of the Graduate Faculty. 

6. Graduate Faculty who terminate employment at UMCP may be re- 
garded for dissertation committee service purposes as members of the 
Graduate Faculty for a 12-month period following their termination. 
During that time they may chair individual dissertations and theses and 
work with students as necessary. After that time, they may no longer 
serve as chairs of dissertations, although they may be placed in the status 
of co-chair. After they leave UMCP, faculty may not serve as Dean's 
Representative. 

The Dissertation Committee and the Conduct of the Dissertation Defense 

Each doctoral candidate is required to orally defend his or her doctoral dissertation 
as a requirement in partial fulfillment of the doctoral degree. The final oral defense of 
the dissertation is conducted by a committee of the Graduate Faculty appointed by the 
Dean for Graduate Studies and Research upon the advice of the candidate's dissertation 
adviser and department graduate director. 

Oral defenses must be attended by all members of the officially estabhshed doctoral 
examining committee as approved by the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. 
Should a last-minute change in the constitution of the committee be required, the 
change must be sanctioned by the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research in con- 
sultation with the graduate director of the student's home department and the student's 
dissertation chair. 

Notice of doctoral defenses must be published in the student's home department at 
least five days before the scheduled event. The members of the examining committee 
should normally receive the dissertation at least two weeks before the scheduled de- 
fense. All doctoral defenses must be open to UMCP Graduate Faculty and any other 
interested parties whom the chair of the dissertation committee, in consultation with 
the Graduate Director of the department, believe to be appropriate. Departments may 
wish to routinely open dissertation defenses to a broader audience. In such cases, 
departmental policies must be established, recorded and made available to all doctoral 
students. 



Degree Requirements 43 



Oral defenses of dissertations must be held in University facilities that are readily 
accessible to all members of the committee and others attending the defense. 

Two or more negative votes constitute a failure of the candidate to meet the disser- 
tation requirement. In cases of failure, it is required that the examining committee 
specify in detail and in writing to the department graduate director, the Dean for 
Graduate Studies and Research and the student the exact nature of the deficiencies in 
the dissertation and/or the oral performance that led to failure. A second defense is 
permitted, which results in termination of the student's admitted status if it is failed. 

Inclusion of Previously Published Materials in a Thesis or Dissertation 

1. A graduate student may, upon the recommendation of the dissertation 
director, and with the endorsement of home department graduate di- 
rectors or chairs, include his or her own published works as part of the 
final dissertation. Appropriate citations within the dissertation including 
where the work was previously published are required. All such ma- 
terials must be produced in standard dissertation format. 

2. It is recognized that a graduate student may co-author work with faculty 
and colleagues that should be included in a dissertation. In such an 
event, a letter should be sent to the Dean of Graduate Studies and 
Research certifying that the student's examining committee has deter- 
mined that the student made a substantial contribution to that work. 
This letter should also note that inclusion of the work has the approval 
of the dissertation adviser and the department chair or graduate director. 
The format of such inclusions must conform to be standard dissertation 
format. A forward to the dissertation, as approved by the Dissertation 
Committee, must state that the student made the substantial contribu- 
tions to the relevant aspects of the jointly authored work included in 
the dissertation. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education 

The requirements for the Doctor of Education (Ed.D) degree are for the most part 
the same as those for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in the College of Education. 
The Ed.D. requires a minimum of six semester hours of dissertation credit while the 
Ph.D. requires a minimum of 12 semester hours of dissertation credit. Consult the 
Graduate Studies Office in the College of Education and the individual department 
for additional details. 

Requirements for other Doctoral Degrees 

The particular requirements for the degrees of Doctor of Musical Arts are given 
under the corresponding program description. 

Time Extensions Governing Degrees 

Students who fail to complete all requirements by the prescribed deadlines may 
petition their departments in order to seek up to a one-year extension of time in which 
to complete the outstanding requirements. This extension may be granted by the de- 
partment, which must then notify the Graduate School in writing of its decision. The 
Graduate School will confirm this decision in writing to the student and adjust the 
computer database accordingly. Students who fail to complete all requirements for the 



44 Resources 

degree following the granting of a time extension by the department must seek any 
additional extension by petitioning the department. If the department supports the 
request, it must forward the request to the Graduate School for review. In such cases, 
the Administrator of Graduate Admissions and Records evaluates the request in light 
of the written explanation provided and may grant up to one additional year's extension. 
The Graduate School decision will be communicated in writing to each petitioner and 
a copy will be sent to the student's home department. 

Petition for Waiver or Partial Waiver of a Regulation 

All policies of the Graduate School have been formulated by the Graduate Council, 
the governing body of the Graduate School, with the goal of ensuring academic quality. 
These policies must be equitably and uniformly enforced for all graduate students. 
Nevertheless, circumstances occasionally occur that warrant individual consideration. 
Therefore, if a graduate student believes there are compelling reasons for a specific 
regulation to be waived or modified, the student should submit a written petition to 
the Graduate School, Room 2125, Lee Building, explaining the facts and issues that 
bear on the case. In all instances, the petitions must be reviewed by the departmental 
graduate director or chair and, if the petition involves a course, by the course instructor. 
If both of these people recommend approval and so state in writing, it is then forwarded 
to the Graduate School for final review. 

Commencement 

Applications for the diploma must be filed with the Office of Admissions and Reg- 
istrations within the first three weeks of the semester in which the candidate expects 
to obtain a degree, except during summer session. During the summer session, the 
application must be filed during the first week of the second summer session. Exact 
dates are noted for each semester and the summer sessions in "Important Dates for 
Advisers and Students." Failure to meet specific deadlines may result in a delay of one 
or more semesters before graduation. 

If, for any reason, students do not graduate at the end of the semester in which they 
have applied for the diploma, they must re-apply for it in the semester in which they 
expect to graduate. 

Academic costume is required of all candidates at commencement exercises. Those 
who so desire may purchase or rent caps and gowns at the UMCP student supply store. 
Orders must be filed eight weeks before the date of commencement but may be can- 
celled later if students find themselves unable to complete the requirements for the 
degree. 



Resources 

Location 

Faculty and students at the University of Maryland enjoy the best of all possible 
worlds. Situated on 1,300 acres in Prince George's County, College Park is part of the 
larger metropolitan area of Washington, D.C., which is rapidly becoming thenation's 
capital in cultural and intellectual activity as well as political power. The Kennedy 
Center for the Performing Arts, the Filene Center and the many fine area theaters 
regularly present performances by the world's most exciting and renowned artists. The 



45 



Smithsonian Museums and the National Gallery of Art, among others, sponsor out- 
standing collections and special exhibits that attract national attention. In addition to 
cultural activities, the nation's capital provides interested students the opportunity to 
observe first hand the work of federal institutions; to sit in the galleries of Congress; 
to watch the Supreme Court in session; and to attend public Congressional hearings. 
The possibilities for personal enrichment offered in this exciting cosmopolitan area are 
indeed enormous. 

Outside the metropolitan area and just minutes from the campus, the Maryland 
countryside is pleasantly rural. Maryland offers a great variety of recreational and 
leisure activities in its many fine national and state parks, from the Catoctin Mountains 
in Western Maryland to the Assateague Island National Seashore on the Atlantic- 
bound Eastern Shore, all within a pleasant drive from the campus. Historic Annapolis, 
the state capital, is only a short drive away, and the city of Baltimore, with its rich 
variety of ethnic heritages, its cultural and educational institutions and its impressive 
urban transformation is only thirty miles from College Park. 

Special Research Resources 

The College Park Campus is in the midst of one of the greatest concentrations of 
research facilities and intellectual talent in the nation, if not in the world. Libraries 
and laboratories serving virtually every academic discipline are within easy commuting 
distance. There is a steady and growing exchange of ideas, information, technical skills 
and scholars between the University and these centers. The libraries and facilities of 
many of these centers are open to qualified graduate students. The resources of many 
more are available by special arrangement. 

In the humanities, the Library of Congress and the Folger Shakespeare Library, with 
its extensive collection of rare manuscripts, are among the world's most outstanding 
research libraries. In addition, Dumbarton Oaks; the National Archives; the Smith- 
sonian Institution; the World Bank; the National Library of Medicine; the National 
Agricultural Library; the Enoch Pratt Free Library of Baltimore; the libraries of the 
Federal Departments of Labor; Commerce; Interior; Health and Human Services; 
Housing and Urban Development; Transportation and approximately 500 other spe- 
cialized libraries are all within a few minutes drive of the College Park campus. The 
campus will soon be the site for Archives II, the largest archives in the world with the 
most complete set of records and documents about this nation's history. The facility is 
scheduled to be open in 1993. These resources make the University of Maryland at 
College Park one of the most attractive in the nation for scholars of all disciplines. 

The proximity of the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center of the United States 
Department of Agriculture has stimulated the development of both laboratories and 
opportunities for field research in the agricultural and life sciences. The National In- 
stitutes of Health offer unparalleled opportunities for collaboration in biomedical and 
behavior research. Opportunities are also available for collaborative graduate study 
programs with other major government laboratories, such as the National Institute of 
Science and Technology, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the U.S. Geological 
Survey. The long-standing involvement of the state of Maryland in the development 
of the commercial and recreational resources of the Chesapeake Bay has resulted in 
the establishment of outstanding research facilities for the study of marine science at 
the University of Maryland Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies, with 



46 Resources 

research facilities at Horn Point near Cambridge, at Cristield and at Solomons Island, 
Maryland. 

Campus facilities are also excellent for research in every discipline. Work in the 
behavioral sciences, particularly in learning, is centered in laboratories equipped for 
fully automated research on rats, pigeons and monkeys. 

Exceptional research facilities in the physical sciences include two small Van de 
Graaff accelerators; an assortment of computers, including a pDp 11/45, a UNI VAC 
1108 and a UNI VAC 1100/41; a 250 KW training nuclear reactor,; a full-scale low 
velocity wind tunnel; several small hypersonic helium wind tunnels; specialized facilities 
in the Institute for Physical Science and Technology; a psychopharmacology laboratory; 
shock tubes; a quiescent plasma device (Q-machine) and a spheromak compact fusion 
device for plasma research; and rotating tanks for laboratory studies of meteorological 
phenomena. 

Students also have access to research farms, greenhouses and even laboratory-equipped 
vessels for research in the Chesapeake Bay. The University also owns and operates 
one of the world's largest and most sophisticated long-wavelength radio telescopes as 
part of a three-university consortium known as the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Array 
(BIMA) located at Hat Creek in Northern California. 

Special Opportunities for Artists 

Advanced work in the creative and performing arts at College Park is concentrated 
in the Tawes Fine Arts Building and the recently completed Art-Sociology Building. 
Creative work is greatly stimulated by the close interaction that has developed between 
the students and faculty of the University and the artists and scholars at the National 
Gallery, the Corcoran Gallery, the Hirshhorn Museum, the Phillips Gallery, the Smith- 
sonian Institution, as well as the musicians of the National Symphony Orchestra, the 
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and small musical groups. The Kennedy Center for 
the Performing Arts and the Filene Center (Wolf Trap Farm Park) have further en- 
hanced the climate for creative artists attending the University. 

Outstanding work on campus in theater, dance, radio and television is aided by the 
proximity of the campus to the National Theater, the Arena Stage, the Morris Mechanic 
Theater and numerous little theater groups in the Washington and Baltimore area. 
There is a frequent and steady exchange of ideas and talent between students and 
faculty at the University with educational and commercial radio and television media, 
as a consequence of the large professional staffs that are maintained in the Washington 
area. 

Libraries 

The libraries on the College Park campus contain nearly two million volumes, and 
they subscribe to more than 22,000 periodicals and newspapers. Additional collections 
of research materials are available on microfilm, microfiche, phonograph records, tapes 
and films. 

The Theodore R. McKeldin Library is the largest library on campus and the principal 
library for graduate use in the humanities, social sciences and life sciences. Special 
collections include those of Thomas I. Cook in political science; Romeo Mansueti in 
the biological sciences; Katherine Anne Porter and Djuna Barnes; materials from the 
Bureau of Social Science Research; the archives of the Baltimore News- American; 



Resources 47 

Maryland documents; and the files of the Industrial Union of Marine and Shipbuilding 
Workers of America. The University is also a regional depository of U.S. Government 
publications, and the Government Documents/Maps Room in McKeldin includes U.S. 
Government publications, documents of the United Nations, the League of Nations 
and other international organizations, agricultural experiment station and extension 
service publications, and maps from the U.S. Army Map Service. The East Asia Col- 
lection is the world's largest repository of published and unpublished Japanese-language 
materials from the Allied Occupation period. The McKeldin collections also include 
microfilm productions of government documents, rare books, early journals and news- 
papers. 

Graduate students at UMCP are not served by McKeldin alone; the UMCP Libraries 
system also includes six branch libraries. Although the Hornbake Library's collection 
is primarily for the undergraduate student, this library does offer ample study space 
and a 24-hour study room during fall and spring semesters. Hornbake also houses 
Nonprint Media Services, the central location for audiovisual materials in the library 
system and the campus, and the Music Library with books, periodicals, music scores 
and parts and music recordings in both music and dance. The Music Library's special 
collections include items from the American Bandmasters Association Research Center, 
the National Association of College Wind and Percussion Instructors Research Center, 
the International Clarinet Society Research Library and the International Piano Ar- 
chives at Maryland. 

The Engineering and Physical Sciences Library (EPSL) contains materials in physics, 
engineering, mathematics and geology with other significant collections in computer 
science, environmental sciences, water resources and aerospace science. EPSL is also 
a U.S. patent depository and its large Technical Reports Center contains collections 
from NASA, ERDA, Rand Corporation, and other agencies and organizations. 

The Charles E. White Memorial Library is a collection of chemistry, biochemistry 
and microbiology materials. Materials include books, periodicals, major indexes and 
comprehensive spectra collections. 

Architecture students are served by the Architecture Library with materials on ar- 
chitectural design, theory and history, urban design, landscape architecture and building 
technology. This library's special collections include rare architecture books dating as 
far back as the seventeenth century, materials on world expositions from 1857 to 1937, 
and the collection of the National Trust for Historic Preservation Library. 

For art students, the Art Library collects materials in art history, studio art, art 
education, photography, graphic arts, interior design and textiles. Special collections 
include art reproductions and art exhibition catalogs. 

Research is supported in the UMCP Libraries with a variety of technological tools. 
An online catalog identifies library materials from the collections of libraries in the 
University of Maryland system including the UMBC, UMES, UMAB-Law and UMUC 
campuses. It provides access to this information through public terminals located 
throughout the library system and through network and telephone connections using 
terminals in homes or offices. Research is also supported through CARS (Computer 
Assisted Reference Services) for accessing hundreds of remote bibliographic, textual 
and numeric databases. 



48 Resources 

In the McKeldin, Hornbake, White Memorial, and Engineering and Physical Sciences 
Libraries, library users can run their own computer searches utilizing dial-in service 
and CD-ROM (Compact Disc-Read Only Memory) for database information in edu- 
cation, social sciences, life sciences, business and patents. Both McKeldin and Horn- 
bake Libraries offer microcomputers for the use of anyone in the UMCP community. 

Research is also supported through a variety of user consultation services, including 
directional assistance, basic reference help and in-depth consultations for complex 
information problems. Such help may be requested at the reference desk of any of the 
libraries. 

Borrowing library materials is aided by several services in addition to basic circulation 
assistance. Direct borrowing privileges are available for registered UMCP graduate 
students at the other University of Maryland campus libraries. Inter-Library loan ser- 
vices are available through McKeldin Library's ILL office to obtain loans or photocopies 
of materials from other libraries that are not available at UMCP. 

Associations, Bureaus, Centers, Institutes and Offices 

Acknowledging the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to knowledge, the 
University maintains organized research units outside the usual department structures. 
These associations, bureaus, centers and institutes offer valuable opportunities for 
faculty and students to engage in research and study in specialized areas and in public 
service activities. 

Associations 

American Studies Association: Executive Director: John Stephens. The College of Arts 
and Humanities and its Department of American Studies sponsor the national head- 
quarters of the American Studies Association. ASA plays an active role in international 
and national academic life and is open to those who are devoted to the interdisciplinary 
study of the United States. ASA is a constituent member of a number of national 
scholarship organizations, including the American Council of Learned Societies, the 
National Humanities Alliance and the National Coordinating Committee for the Pro- 
motion of History. ASA also supports and assists programs for teaching American 
Studies abroad, encourages the exchange of teachers and students and maintains re- 
lations with American Studies Associations throughout the world. University of Mary- 
land faculty serve on the managing editorial board of the "American Quarterly," ASA's 
guide to studies in United States culture, and graduate assistants serve as the ASA's 
Convention Coordinator, Newsletter Editor and Institutional Research Coordinator. 

Bureaus 

Bureau of Business and Economic Research: Director: John H. Cumberland. The Bu- 
reau of Business and Economic Research conducts economic research in the areas of 
regional and urban development, environmental and natural resources management, 
and state and local public finance, projects are funded by the University and by State 
and Federal Government agencies. Research is conducted by Bureau faculty members, 
who hold joint appointments with the Department of Economics, and by advanced 
graduate students working on degree programs. 

Bureau of Governmental Research: Director: Allen Schick. Bureau of Governmental 
Research activities relate primarily to the problems of state and local government in 
Maryland. The Bureau engages in research and publishes findings with reference to 



Resources 49 

local, state and national governments and their interrelationships. It undertakes surveys, 
sponsored programs and grants, and offers its assistance and service to units of gov- 
ernment in Maryland. The Bureau furnishes opportunities for qualified students inter- 
ested in research and career development in state and local administration. 

Centers 

Center on Aging: Director: Laura Wilson. Established in 1974, the Center on Aging 
has a university-wide mandate to promote aging-related activities. The Center's goals 
are to: (1) conduct disciplinary and interdisciplinary aging- related research; (2) en- 
courage departments, schools and colleges to pursue aging-related research and develop 
gerontologically-oriented courses; (3) provide students with educational programs, field 
experiences, training opportunities and job placements that will prepare them for ca- 
reers in aging-related occupations; and (4) conduct training programs, sponsor con- 
ferences and provide on and off-campus technical assistance to meet the needs of 
practitioners who serve older persons. In addition, the Center sponsors a colloquium 
series on aging-related topics that is open to students and the public, conducts training 
and conferences for community-level practitioners, and offers the annual Institute for 
Gerontological Practice for persons involved in direct service activities for the elderly. 
The Center coordinates the Graduate Gerontology Certificate for students pursuing 
master's and doctoral degrees in regular University departments as well as for those 
who return to the campus as advanced special students. 

Agriculture Trade Policy Center: Director: Earl Brown. Housed in the Department of 
Agricultural and Resource Economics, the Center's purpose is to produce cutting edge 
policy research that will be used to increase the understanding of the complex web of 
economic and political forces that affect worldwide trade flows of agricultural, fishery 
and biotechnology food products and services. The Center, which was established in 
1990, will support graduate students, visiting scholars and faculty from other campus 
departments who are interested in collaborating on an important issue in agricultural 
trade policy. The Center will also support a modest outreach program for policymakers, 
business executives and policy researchers to facilitate the implementation of the Cen- 
ter's research findings. 

Center for Archaeology: Acting Director: Robert J. Rowland, Jr. The Center for Ar- 
chaeology involves faculty in the departments of Anthropology, Art History, Classics, 
History and Physics as well as the School of Architecture. The Center seeks to foster 
interdisciplinary research in archaeology by sponsoring lectures and symposia. Students 
are also encouraged to participate in the archaeological research being conducted on 
four different continents by members of the Center. 

Center for Architectural Design and Research (CADRE): Director: John W. Hill. Hou- 
sed in the School of Architecture, CADRE was established in 1978 to permit faculty 
and students of the School of Architecture to offer services and gain experience in 
areas not accessible through the University of Maryland's customary channels for funded 
research. A wide range of planning and design problems, usually small in scale, exists 
throughout the state in communities and towns that find themselves deteriorating or 
threatened by uncontrolled expansion. These problems often require capabilities and 
approaches not usually offered by architectural and engineering firms. Town or country 
officials and local citizens call upon CADRE to assist in evaluating problems, making 
recommendations for action and implementing solutions. Examples of past projects 



50 Resources 

include a master plan proposed on the historic National Colonial Farm; the Hyattsville 
Main Street revitalization study; the Colmar Manor and Cottage City commercial 
corridor study; and the Brookville historic study and plan. CADRE is a non-profit 
corporation, chartered by the State of Maryland. 

Architecture and Engineering Performance Information Center (AEPIC): Director: John 
Loss. A joint center of the School of Architecture and the College of Engineering, 
AEPIC was founded in 1982 to develop the systems, programs, software and storage 
networks for the systematic collection, collation, analysis and dissemination of infor- 
mation about the performance (dysfunction) of buildings, civil structures and other 
constructed facilities. 

Architects, engineers, contractors, developers, manufacturers, lawyers, building owners 
and users, federal and state agencies, insurance underwriters, university and private 
research organizations and others interested in the objectives of AEPIC can use this 
computer-based collection of performance information for: (1) planning new projects; 
(2) reviewing existing structures for rehabilitation or restoration; (3) teaching (case 
studies); (4) modifying codes and regulations; (5) planning research; (6) preparing 
professional texts; (7) investigating for dispute resolution; (8) developing new products 
for the industry; (9) implementing effective quality control measures; (10) improving 
professional and industry practice; and (11) creating an in-house resource base with 
lessons learned from project performance. 

Center for Automation Research: Director: Dr. Azriel Rosenfeld. The Center for Au- 
tomation Research, established in 1983, conducts interdisciplinary research in many 
areas of automation. The Center currently consists of three laboratories: Computer 
Vision, Human/Computer Interaction, and Robotics. Some of the principal areas of 
interest of these laboratories are as follows: 

• Computer Vision: robot navigation; industrial computer vision; knowl- 
edge-based vision systems; machine architectures for vision; image pro- 
cessing algorithms and software. 

• Human/Computer Interaction: experimental studies of human perform- 
ance with computers; user interfaces for expert systems; programmer 
workstation and system development tools; training; on-line assistance; 
and documentation. 

• Robotics: control systems; kinematics; dynamics; computer-aided de- 
sign; manufacturing automation; modeling and identification; artificial 
intelligence; locomotion; structural design; applications. 

Center for Business and Public Policy: Director: Frank E. McLaughlin. Housed in the 
College of Business and Management, the Center seeks to encourage more effective 
public policy development in the contemporary social and political environment. It 
conducts and promotes research and dialogue among members of the affected groups 
and public officials concerning the broad pattern and changing character of business 
and society relationships. The Center also directs attention to specific public policy 
issues through conferences and seminars, and it emphasizes the study of more effective 
approaches to the resolution of disputes involving business and society. In addition, 
the Center publishes and distributes a wide range of documents reflecting its work. 

Comparative Education Center: Director: George A. Male. Established in 1967, the 
Comparative Education Center provides cross-cultural encouragement and assistance 



Resources 51 

to faculty and students with international education interests. Center staff members 
represent special competence on Western Europe, Africa and the Near East as well 
as international organizations. 

The Center arranges study visits for educators from other countries, holds symposia 
and occasional lectures and periodically publishes research essays on international 
education topics. The Center is associated with the Department of Education Policy, 
Planning, and Administration. 

Computer Science Center: Director: Dr. Glenn Ricart. The Computer Science Center 
(CSC) is responsible for providing the academic computing infrastructure for the Uni- 
versity. The Center provides a wide array of computing hardware, software and support 
services to faculty, staff and students. 

The University's research and instructional needs are served by IBM 3081 and 4381 
systems, a Unisys 1100/92 system and three DEC UNIX-based computer systems. 
Languages (e.g., FORTRAN, Pascal, COBOL, C), statistical software (e.g., SAS, 
SAS/GRAPH, SPSSx, BMDP) and a relational database (SQL) are among the services 
available on these systems. For qualified users with large-scale computing needs, the 
Center provides access to a Cray Y-MP8/864 at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. 

The Center serves as a role model in the field of networking. Networking at UMCP 
is based on the TCP/IP protocol, with broad band coaxial cable serving as the main 
campus network backbone, which provides high-speed Ethernet communications. This 
network, UMDNET, also provides access to national and international networks such 
as the Internet, BITNET, ARPAnet, NSFnet and SURAnet. Dial-up ports are available 
at 300, 1200, 2400 and 9600 baud rates. Access to the Center's computers is also 
supported by local connections to a data Gandalf switch. Electronic mail is available 
on machines connected to the campus network. A campus-wide fiber optic telecom- 
munication system is currently being installed around the campus with a completion 
date of August 1990. 

The Center currently maintains five public Workstations at Maryland (WAM) labs 
located in the Computer Science Center, Hornbake Library, the Engineering and 
Physical Sciences Library (EPSL), and Worcester and Centreville Halls. These labs 
are open to students and faculty seven days a week and feature IBM PS/2 model 50s, 
Apple Macintosh lis, DEC VAXstation 2000s and First-Aid, with NeXT machines in 
selected labs. In addition, the Center supports numerous other public computing labs 
across the College Park campus. The free handout. Where to Go to Find ... a Com- 
puter, available in the CSC Program Library, features locations, hours and equipment 
available in all of these facilities. 

Many support services are available for faculty, staff and graduate researchers using 
Center-sponsored computing resources. The CSC Consulting Lab (405-1500, Room 
3326) provides phone-in and walk-in consulting service. The Program Library (405- 
4261, Room 3326) provides access to documentation, manuals, books and software. 
The Program Library also administers the distribution of site-licensed software and a 
PC-loaner program for UMCP faculty and staff. Non-credit Short Courses are given 
each semester in the CSC Faculty/Staff MicroLab. The CSC Link newsletter informs 
CSC users of new software, hardware and policies, and Computer Swapshop provides 
a means for campus groups and individuals to advertise used or needed equipment. 



52 Resources 

The Computer Emporium (405-5825) sells computer, software and related peripherals 
to UMCP faculty, staff and students at prices reflecting educational discounts. 

For more information about the Computer Science Center services, call the CSC 
Consulting Lab at 405-1500. 

Council for Curriculum Development and Change: Director: Steve Selden. The Council 
is committed to working with pubhc and private schools, schools of nursing and med- 
icine, business and industrial organizations, museums, and governmental and private 
agencies on issues pertaining to curriculum development and change. 

The Council serves these groups on plans for designing, implementing and evaluating 
curriculum programs; advanced study and inservice education for faculty and admin- 
istrators; networking and identification of specialized experts in the curriculum field; 
and development of national and international curriculum programs and exchanges. 
The Council is associated with the Department of Education Policy, Planning and 
Administration. 

Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship: Director: Dr. Charles Heller. The Center is 
part of the College of Business and Management. Established in 1988, the Center 
furnishes direct assistance to new and emerging growth business in the Mid-Atlantic 
region, provides entrepreneurship courses to business students and develops a body of 
scholarly research on timely entrepreneurial topics. 

The Dingman Center's academic program consists of a concentration in New Venture 
Creation and Entrepreneurship. Composed of five courses, the concentration is based 
on a proven model of entrepreneurship that maintains that new business success is the 
result of how well the entrepreneur, his or her business idea and the financing of that 
idea all fit together. 

For more information about the Center, call 405-2149. 

International Center for the Study of Education Policy and Human Values: Director: 
Barbara Finkelstein. The Center organizes research and development programs that 
engage humanities scholars, teachers, school administrators, public officials and edu- 
cators from several nations in cooperative research and development programs focussing 
on issues of compelling ethical and political importance in the study and practice of 
education. The Center organizes studies, creates programs, generates publications and 
provides consulting services in three areas: 

• Intercultural Education and Communication 

• The Child, the Family, Education and the State 

• Humanities and Civic Learning Policy 

The Center organized and directs the Mid-Atlantic Region Japan-in-the-Schools 
Program, a National Intercultural Education Leadership Institute and a National Pre- 
coUegiate Japan Projects Network. It has organized teacher education programs for 
National History Day, provides consulting services to museums, educational television 
stations, global education agencies and school systems, and cultivates research and 
curriculum development partnerships between Humanities scholars, school systems, 
the diplomatic corps and educators in the United States and in Japan. 

The Center is part of the Department of Education Policy, Planning and Adminis- 
tration. 



Resources 53 

Center for Educational Research and Development (CERD): Director: Dr. John T. 
Guthrie. The Center for Educational Research and Development (CERD) is a research 
facihty devoted to promoting the study of analysis and complex issues in education. 
The problems addressed include student learning and development, teacher effective- 
ness, curriculum theory, policy analysis and the social context of education. Issues are 
examined through a variety of methodologies including qualitative approaches, surveys, 
correlational studies, experiments and philosophical/literary analysis. The Center com- 
municates its findings broadly, attempting to bring new knowledge to the attention of 
educational decision makers and the public through a variety of publication outlets. 

The Center provides service to College staff in the development of scholarly activities. 
Assistance is given in the areas of literature retrieval and review, research design and 
analysis, and the communication of findings. Preparation of grant proposals including 
financial preparation, monitoring and accounting is supported. In order to conduct 
research activities and sustain communication on the application of new knowledge to 
educational problems, the Center provides a liaison with local, state and national 
education agencies. Collaborations of educational, corporate and university commu- 
nities engaged in common research pursuits are facilitated. 

Family Service Center: Director: Dr. Carol A. Werlinich. The Family Service Center 
(FSC) was established in 1980 by the Department of Family and Community Devel- 
opment. The mission of the Center's multifaceted programs is to enhance the quality 
of life for Maryland families and the communities in which they reside. 

The Center offers: (1) direct marital and family therapy service; (2) a variety of 
therapy groups for couples, single parents, adolescents and their families, etc.; (3) 
publication of The Maryland Family, a vehicle for the optimal functioning of families 
in the community; (4) the locus for clinical data collection and research; and (5) the 
primary training site for the department's clinical students. 

Of these activities, therapy training and direct services to families are central. For 
10 years, the Center has helped train more than 100 family therapy professionals, and 
the Center provides marriage and family therapy services to over 350 Maryland families 
each year. No family is refused service because of an inability to pay. The Center has 
a full-time staff as well as associated faculty members and graduate students. 

Family Research Center: Director: Dr. Roger H. Rubin. The purpose of the Family 
Research Center (FRC) is to enhance family research opportunities by securing extra- 
mural funding and encouraging cooperative ventures within the University and with 
other institutions. A variety of ongoing and special research projects are operated in 
the Center from its facility on Knox Road. The current components of the center 
include the office of the District of Columbia Metropolitan Area Council on Family 
Relations; the international office of the Groves Conference on Marriage and the 
Family; the Marriage and Family Therapy Group project; the Anne Arundel County 
Drug and Alcohol Training and Prevention Program; and the Ford Foundation/Lilly 
Foundation study of the role of the Black Church in Family and Community Life. 

The Family Research Center is associated with the Department of Family and Com- 
munity Development. 

Center for Global Change: Director: Alan S. Miller. The Center for Global Change 
received a two-year $1.8 million grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to 



54 



address global environmental issues by integrating relevant scientific research on at- 
mospheric change with policy and technological options that might serve to abate or 
ameliorate such changes. By coordinating and interacting with the University's scientific 
and academic resources, the Center brings together scientists and policy analysts from 
a range of fields to define programs of scientific research, policy analysis and education. 
Building on its scientific base, the Center identifies technologies and policy strategies 
that reduce pollution and support important societal goals, particularly economic growth. 
The Center funds University faculty to conduct primary scientific research focused on 
global change and it also supports several graduate students. The Center is jointly 
sponsored by the College of Behavioral and Social Science and the Colleges of Agri- 
cultural and Life Sciences. 

Industrial Relations and Labor Studies Center: Director: Paul A. Weinstein. The pro- 
gram of Industrial Relations and Labor Studies at UMCP is concerned with two kinds 
of activities. The first is interdisciplinary research directed primarily toward the study 
of labor-management relations, wages and related problems, the labor market, com- 
parative studies and personnel problems. The Center draws on the expertise and in- 
terests of faculty from the College of Business and Management, the School of Law 
and the Departments of Economics, History, Psychology and Sociology. The second 
main activity consists of community and labor relations education projects serving 
management, unions, the public and other groups interested in industrial relations and 
labor-related activities. These projects consist of public lectures, conferences, and sym- 
posia as well as non-credit courses. Planning for the development of a Master's degree 
in Industrial Relations and Labor Studies is underway. 

Center for Innovation: Director: Jerald Hage, Co-director: Phil Favero. The Center 
for Innovation has two major programs of research. The first looks at the consequences 
of investments in human capital and in technology or more generally the growth in 
knowledge on the nature of organizations, including their performances, and on eco- 
nomic growth in the larger society. Special attention is given to the role of innovation 
for both of these problems. The second program examines the political economy of 
local economic and institutional development in Maryland and in various developing 
countries. While the two programs overlap in the intellectual content, they involve 
quite different research agendas. The first program is primarily concerned with the 
development of new sociological and social science theories while the second involves 
action research projects designed to create institutional and economic change. Both 
are interdisciplinary. The Center is an active member of the Science, Technology and 
Society program at the University of Maryland and is supported by both the College 
of Behavioral and Social Sciences and the College of Agriculture as well as grants from 
various funding agencies. 

Center for International Development and Conflict Management (CIDCM): Acting Di- 
rector: Abdel R. Omran. Established in 1981, the Center is a think tank and research 
unit that focuses on the study, management and resolution of protracted institutional 
conflict, population pressures and related issues of political, economic and social de- 
velopment. 

The Center's activities pursue three goals, consistent with the mission of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland: research, service and teaching. 

Research at the Center is organized in projects, which currently include: a) Conflict 
Theory and Management Strategies; b) Regional and Country Studies; and c) Popu- 



Resources 55 

lation and Development. The Center's current area studies and projects include: Central 
American Project, Studies on Reproductive Health in Latin America, Studies on Israel, 
Studies on Korea, Studies on Lebanon, and the Middle East and South Africa Projects. 

Composed of university faculty and visiting fellows and associates, the Center's staff 
studies dozens of contemporary international and intercommunal conflicts, their causes, 
dynamics, management strategies and peaceful resolutions. Through the Conflict and 
Peace Data Bank and Minorities at Risk Project, the Center also identifies communities 
potentially involved in conflict and also maintains a comprehensive global data bank 
featuring events data on 140 nation-states and more than 250 ethnic communities 
worldwide. 

Service to the wider community of scholars and to the public includes: sponsoring public 
lectures, seminars and policy round-table discussions on a variety of contemporary 
issues, and hosting resident and visiting scholars and fellows from the United States 
and other parts of the world. 

Teaching faculty members and fellows of the Center work closely with the teaching 
departments of the University of Maryland in organizing and teaching undergraduate 
and graduate courses and seminars. 

Center for International Security Studies at Maryland: Director: Catherine M. Kelleher. 
First established in 1984 as the Maryland International Security Project, the Center 
for International Security Studies at Maryland provides university-wide opportunities 
for research, training and publication in the field of international security and foreign 
pohcy. The Center works with many campus colleges and departments to provide 
conferences, guest lectures and special seminars throughout the year on topics that 
relate to the complex challenges of achieving peace and security in the 1990s. Curriculum 
development includes such courses as: Economic Analysis and International Security; 
AlHance Relations; Science, Technology and National Security; and Ethics and National 
Security Policy. Each year, the Center invites a multinational group of junior and senior 
scholars here to work with the Center's faculty, staff and students on a variety of 
individual and collaborative projects. The Center also maintains an archive of selected 
historical materials in international security affairs. Current collaborative projects in- 
clude Economics and National Security, the Nuclear History Program and Women in 
International Security. 

Latin American Studies Center: Director: Saul Sosnowski. Housed in the Department 
of Spanish and Portuguese, the Center promotes and coordinates research and conducts 
related activities among Latin Americanist scholars from the University and institutions 
in Latin America and the Caribbean. The Center encourages the development of 
academic programs and seeks to enrich the University's intellectual life through its 
multidisciplinary approach to the study of the region. The Center also holds conferences 
and symposia on a variety of issues and sponsors the publication and distribution of 
the resulting volumes and of occasional papers. The Center is the home of the wide- 
ranging "Discovering the Americas" program (1987-1993) and the residency site for 
the Rockefeller Foundation Fellowships in the Humanities. 

The Maryland Center for Quality and Productivity: Director: Tom Tuttle. The Maryland 
Center for Quality and Productivity operates within the College of Business and Man- 
agement. Established in 1977, the Maryland Center promotes productivity, quaUty and 
labor-management cooperation in Maryland. The Center helps organizations develop 



56 Resources 

productivity measurement systems, employee involvement programs, productivity gain- 
sharing systems, joint labor-management projects and other "tactical" improvements. 

The Center has four major functions: 1) to foster increased quality and productivity 
and to increase competitiveness through direct technical assistance to public and private 
sector organizations in Maryland; 2) to act as a clearinghouse for information about 
quality and productivity and publish a bimonthly newsletter, "The Maryland Work- 
place"; 3) to increase knowledge levels about quality and productivity in Maryland 
through the regular curriculum of the University, as well as through training programs 
sponsored by the Center; and 4) to conduct research that adds to the body of knowledge 
about quality and productivity. 

The Center has two offices; the College Park office handles consulting and training 
activities and the Baltimore office conducts quality and productivity assessments for 
Maryland manufacturing firms. 

Center for Mathematics Education: Director: Dr. James T. Fey. The Center for Math- 
ematics Education facilitates a graduate program in mathematics education relating 
mathematics, psychology and learning. The Center provides a setting in which graduate 
students, faculty, participating children, parents and appropriate visitors can become 
involved in the formal and informal interactions so essential to applied research on the 
learning and teaching of mathematics. 

In support of its graduate program, the Center sponsors two major projects: the 
Mathematics Clinic and the Mathematics Teaching Laboratory. The Mathematics Clinic 
provides a setting where graduate students can study the teaching and learning of 
mathematics as they work directly with students in grades 1-12 who have difficulty 
learning mathematics. Models and procedures for the diagnosis and remediation of 
learning difficulties in mathematics are tested and refined in the Clinic. 

The Mathematics Teaching Laboratory provides an extensive array of materials for 
teaching elementary school mathematics that Center faculty and graduate students not 
only evaluate but also use in their work with children or pre-service teachers. 

Center for Studies in Nineteenth-Century Music: Director: H. Robert Cohen; Associate 
Director: Luke Jensen; Research Coordinator: Gaetan Martel. The Center promotes 
research focusing on nineteenth-century music and musical life. The center's programs 
are designed to facilitate the study, collection, editing, indexing and publication of 
documentary source materials considered invaluable for furthering research in this area. 
The Center also promotes research focusing on the development of computer programs 
and laser printing techniques that permit both the realization of internationally coor- 
dinated scholarly undertakings deahng with immense amounts of documentation and 
the production of scholarly publications in a camera-ready format. The Center currently 
produces the Repertoire international de la presse musicale (100 projected volumes, 
under the auspices of the International Musicological Society and the International 
Association of Music Libraries); the First Edition of the Music Criticism of Hector 
Berlioz (11 projected volumes in collaboration with France's Ministry of Culture and 
scholars at the Paris Conservatory and at the University of Quebec in Montreal); the 
monograph series Musical Life in Nineteenth-Century France and the journal Periodica 
Musica. The Center welcomes the participation of graduate students, offering an op- 
portunity to participate in internationally sanctioned research programs. 



Resources 57 

Center for Neurosciences: Director: Dr. William Hodos. The Center for Neurosciences 
coordinates a program of training and research to bridge the communication gaps 
between campus departments by providing introductory minicourses, individual tuto- 
rials, coUoquia and a journal club so that students can acquire fundamental principles 
and data in fields of neuroscience specialization other than their own. 

Advanced training and research opportunities exist in areas such as computer science; 
behavioral and neuro-endocrinology; neurophysiology and membrane biophysics; neu- 
roanatomy; ethology and neuro-ethology; ingestive behavior, ingestive physiology and 
nutrition; sensation, perception and psychophysics of humans and animals; neurolin- 
guistics and communication in animals and humans; visuo-motor control systems; sen- 
sory biology; cognitive neuroscience; and neural- network modeling. Graduate students 
may apply to become Center Fellows and receive support for travel to scientific meetings 
and research support. Individual departments offer teaching and research assistantships, 
fellowships and support for minorities. Post-doctoral research and training opportunities 
exist as well. 

Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions: Director: Dr. J. Shukla. Housed in 
the Department of Meteorology, the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions 
(COLA) was established to foster interdisciplinary research and to increase our un- 
derstanding of the physical processes and interactions of the oceans, atmosphere and 
the land surface. A better understanding is essential to enable us to distinguish between 
the natural variability of the coupled system and changes caused by external forces or 
human activities. Some of the important objectives of the Center are to study the 
contributions of internal dynamic processes and the slowly varying boundary conditions 
at the earth's surface in determining the variability and predictability of short-term 
climate, and to explore the feasibility of dynamic prediction of monthly and seasonal 
averages. Specific atmospheric, biospheric and oceanic studies currently conducted by 
the Center are Usted below: 

1. Study of physical mechanisms that determine the interannual variability 
and predictability of monthly and seasonal averages. 

2. Mathematical modeling of large-scale atmospheric processes and pre- 
dictability of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system. 

3. Study of climatically significant feedbacks operating between the land 
surface and the regional and global circulation using a biologically and 
physically realistic model of the atmosphere and biosphere. 

4. Investigation of the use of satellite remote sensing data in initializing 
and validating the combined atmosphere-biosphere model. 

5. Research on mesoscale coastal modeling and tropical ocean modeling. 

6. Four-dimensional assimilation of ocean data using realistic ocean models. 

Center for Political Participation and Leadership: Director: Georgia Sorenson. The 
Center was established in 1989 to foster and encourage young people to prepare for 
elective office and community service. Special attention is paid to students from groups 
historically under-represented in the political spectrum. In addition, the Maryland 
Project for Women and Politics operates as an independent program within the Center. 
Closely affiliated with the academic departments in the College of Behavioral and 
Social Sciences, the Center has established internships and Fellowships for undergrad- 
uate and graduate students with Maryland senators and delegates, the Women's Leg- 



58 



islators of Maryland, the Offices of the Governor and Lt. Governor and Cabinet 
members. The Center also has placements on Capitol Hill and in county and elected 
offices around the state. Special research fellowships have also been funded. 

Other Center activities include seminars, technical assistance and prominent speakers 
related to political leadership. An annual training program for political leadership, the 
"Evolutionary Leadership Conference," attracts participants from across the country 
and around the world. 

National Center for Postsecondary Governance and Finance: The National Center for 
Postsecondary Governance and Finance conducts programs of policy research and 
disseminates its conclusions to those who can use these findings, including the general 
public. The Center's work focuses on improvement of governance, management and 
finance practices in higher education. Its activities in these areas are expected to con- 
tribute to the broader goal of improving the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of 
postsecondary teaching, research and public service. 

The Center serves two primary audiences. Its principal audience is those who govern 
colleges and universities and those who formulate and approve policies that guide these 
institutions' development. Another major audience is the researchers and scholars who 
are concerned with higher education governance, management, and finance. Practi- 
tioners in higher education are relied on for help in selecting project topics, carrying 
out research, and disseminating findings. The Center's National Advisory panel pro- 
vides critical guidance on the Center's activities and its selection of new projects and 
future program priorities. 

Reading Center: Director: Linda B. Gambrell. The Reading Center provides support 
services for undergraduate and graduate students in the area of reading education. The 
Center's faculty believe that a positive learning environment facilitates learning; they 
are continuously searching for ways to improve reading instruction. 

The Center operates a diagnostic and remedial clinic in which graduate students work 
with children who have mild to severe reading difficulties. Clinical diagnosis and in- 
struction are of the highest quality and are closely supervised. Hundreds of graduate 
students have refined their diagnostic and remedial instructional skills in the clinic, 
which has assisted more than 2,000 children. The clinic also provides a pool of research 
subjects for faculty and graduate students. 

The Center facilitates faculty research through awarding small grants, obtaining 
research subjects and sponsoring staff development in such areas as research design 
and statistical procedures. 

Collaborative efforts are made with other UMCP faculty as well as with the Maryland 
State Department of Education and the local schools. These efforts have resulted in 
interdisciplinary classes, conferences and research projects. Faculty and graduate stu- 
dents aid local schools by conducting inservice activities, consulting on curriculum 
development and providing support to parent organizations. 

Center for Renaissance & Baroque Studies: Director: S. Schoenbaum (UMCP). Ex- 
ecutive Director: Adele Seeff (UMCP). Housed in the campus' College of Arts and 
Humanities, the Center for Renaissance & Baroque Studies was established in 1981 to 
serve all disciplines within the College of Arts and Humanities. 



Resources 59 

The Center has several objectives: to promote interdisciplinary research and teaching 
among faculty in Renaissance and Baroque studies; to support and publicize faculty 
research projects; to promote closer relations with major research centers in the Wash- 
ington and Baltimore areas; to strengthen ties with faculty in humanities disciplines 
from regional colleges and universities; to enrich the life of the University and area 
community through lectures, conferences, exhibitions, concerts and other public pres- 
entations; and to consolidate ties between university and secondary school faculty in 
Maryland. 

The Center sponsors projects such as the scholar-in-residence program, which ap- 
points a distinguished scholar for a semester to teach, lecture and conduct faculty 
coUoquia; a visiting actor program; an annual interdisciplinary symposium; the Mary- 
land Handel Festival; and yearlong programs and summer institutes for secondary 
school teachers in Fine Arts and Shakespeare. 

Center for Research in Public Communication: Director: Michael Gurevitch. Associate 
Director: Jay Blumler. Estabhshed in 1972, the Center for Research in Public Com- 
munication serves today as an institute dedicated to the study of the structure and 
processes of journalism, public relations, advertising and other forms of mass com- 
munications. 

The Center's philosophy has three elements: 1) stress on the holistic character of 
the public communication process; 2) concern with comparative cross-cultural research; 
and 3) policy orientation. This philosophy underlies such studies as the relationship 
between journalists and their news sources; the interactions between public relations 
departments, activist groups and government; and the role of mass media in different 
societies. 

Some examples of planned and on-going projects include a study of the role of the 
media as sources of interpretative frameworks by which people give meaning to their 
awareness of social issues; a study of interactions between candidates and journalists 
in setting the agenda of campaign issues in recent British and U.S. elections; and a 
five-year study, funded by the foundation of the International Association of Business 
Communicators (lABC), on the characteristics of "excellent" public relations depart- 
ments and how those departments contribute to the effectiveness of their organizations; 
a study of the structure and the contents of television news exchanges among members 
of the European Broadcasting Union; and a study of "The New Television Program 
Marketplace" that examines the implications of changes in the marketplace for tele- 
vision programs upon the diversity, innovation, quality and creative freedom in Amer- 
ican television programming. 

Center for Rotorcraft Education and Research: Director: Prof. Alfred Gessow. The 
Center for Rotorcraft Education and Research operates within the Department of 
Aerospace Engineering and is one of three Centers of Excellence in Rotorcraft Tech- 
nology created by the U.S. Army Research Office. The purpose of the Center is to 
expand the rotorcraft technology base through the conduct of research and the training 
of M.S. and Ph.D. rotorcraft specialists. 

Graduate studies and research are conducted in rotorcraft aeroelasticity, vibrations, 
structural dynamics and composite structures. The Center conducts a broad range of 
analytical, computational and experimental research, with major projects in helicopter 
rotor blade tip aerodynamics, rotor-body interactional aerodynamics, rotor aeroelastic 



60 Resources 

Stability, delamination of composite structures, structural couplings of composite blades, 
and unsteady and circulation control aerodynamics. The studies are conducted by the 
faculty and graduate students and are supported primarily by grants and contracts from 
a number of federal agencies. 

The facilities for experimental research include several wind tunnels, the Composite 
Research Laboratory (CORE), a rotorcraft model rig, a rotorcraft hover test facility, 
a rotor vacuum chamber, a structural dynamics laboratory, two shops for model and 
fixture fabrication and a laboratory computer network for data acquisition, reduction 
and presentation. The Glenn L. Martin wind tunnel, with its 8 foot high by 11 foot 
wide test section has a speed range of up to 330 feet/second. It is maintained as an up- 
to-date facility used extensively for development testing by industry as well as for 
research work. There are two smaller subsonic tunnels that are heavily used in de- 
partmental research programs. Extensive instrumentation is available, including flow 
visualization systems and a laser anemometer. The Composite Laboratory is composed 
of an autoclave, a filament winding machine, an MTS 220 KiP uniaxial testing machine, 
an x-ray machine and an environmental chamber. It allows a full spectrum of specimen 
manufacture, preparation, inspection and testing. Two rotor rigs are available to test 
articulated and bearingless rotors in the wind tunnel. The hover facility was developed 
to accommodate rotors up to six feet in diameter. A 10-foot diameter vacuum chamber 
provides a capability to study the structural dynamics characteristics of spinning rotors. 
Blades can be excited by piezoelectric crystals. 

The Center offers a broad range of financial aid options to graduate students. Grad- 
uate teaching and research assistantships are available that begin at $12,000 per year 
plus tuition and fees. In addition, numerous high paying fellowships are available, such 
as the Glenn L. Martin Fellowship ($15,000) and Rotorcraft Fellowships ($14,000 and 
up). These fellowships pay for tuition and fees in addition to the noted stipends. 

For additional information concerning the graduate program or application proce- 
dures, please write or call: 405-1129 
Professor Alfred Gessow 
Department of Aerospace Engineering 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 

Science Teaching Center: Director: Dr. John W. Layman. The Science Teaching Center, 
through the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, offers master's and doctoral 
degrees specializing in science education. Students may focus their studies on research 
in: 

science curriculum development, evaluation and implementation 

interactive computer systems 

problem solving and inquiry processes 

science classroom processes and management 

learning science in non-school settings 

studying how students learn science 

science and learning from texts and visuals 

science teacher development 



Resources 61 

In addition, other education topics at the elementary, secondary and post- secondary 
levels directly related to the learning and teaching of science can be pursued. 

Currently, the Center consists of six professors, a support staff and 40 active master's 
and doctoral students. Faculty members collaborate with graduate students to actively 
engage in research in new technologies, reading comprehension and classroom proc- 
esses. A comprehensive collection of curriculum materials and documents enhances 
the functioning of the Center. 

Flexible course requirements allow students to develop competence in the theory 
and research of science education, as well as in a science discipline. Graduate students 
consult with a faculty adviser to develop a program of study that meets their needs and 
interests . The core of the student's program consists of coursework in science education , 
research methodology and science. 

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention and Control: Acting Director: Dr. Charles 
Wellford. Housed in the Colleges of Health and Human Performance, and Behavioral 
and Social Sciences, the Center provides a locus for research on substance abuse for 
faculty at College Park and throughout the University system. The Center also assists 
in the translation of research and related analysis into effective public policy. In ad- 
dition, the Center promotes collaboration among researchers across the campus, the 
UM system, the state and the nation. 

Center for Superconductivity Research: Director: Richard L. Greene. The Center for 
Superconductivity Research directs interdisciplinary research in basic and applied su- 
perconductivity. The more than 15 faculty members associated with the Center have 
appointments in the Physics, Chemistry, Electrical Engineering and Materials Science 
departments. The Center's goals are: 1) to increase knowledge of the phenomena of 
superconductivity and of superconducting materials; 2) to train students needed for 
future superconducting technologies; and 3) to interact with industry in the development 
of superconducting applications. 

The Center emphasizes graduate programs and research although undergraduate 
participation is encouraged. The active research program of the faculty, research as- 
sociates, students and visiting scientists is recognized worldwide and serves as a focus 
for the latest information on the science and technology of superconductivity. 

Survey Research Center: Director: Stanley Presser. The Survey Research Center was 
created in 1980 as a research facility within the College of Behavioral and Social 
Sciences. The Center specializes in the design of questionnaires and the conduct of 
surveys for scholarly and policy purposes. The Center provides assistance to researchers 
in sample design, questionnaire construction, survey administration, and data entry 
and coding of questionnaires. 

The Center provides both technical training and practical experience to students. It 
also has a strong community service mission; it provides technical assistance on survey 
methods and survey design to units of state and local government, and it conducts 
surveys on a contract or grant basis for these government units. Twice a year, the 
Center conducts the Maryland Poll, a statewide survey regarding public policy issues. 

Systems Research Center: Director: John S. Baras. The Systems Research Center (SRC) 
at the University of Maryland and Harvard University promotes a unique approach to 
fundamental systems engineering research and education. Established in 1985 in the 



62 



National Science Foundation as one of the six original Engineering Research Centers, 
the SRC fosters basic study in the applications of advanced computer technology in 
the engineering design of high performance, complex automatic control and commu- 
nications systems. Three colleges at the University of Maryland are involved in the 
Center: College of Engineering, College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences, and College of Business and Management. Harvard University's Division of 
Applied Mathematics is also involved. The Center's research activities are built around 
five interrelated focus application areas: Intelligent Servomechanisms, Chemical Proc- 
ess Systems, Manufacturing Systems, Communications and Signal Processing Systems 
and Expert Systems and Parallel Architectures. 

Transportation Studies Center: Director: Everett C. Carter (UMCP). Housed in the 
College of Engineering, the Center acts as a catalyst to foster research, development 
and interdisciplinary studies in transportation. With the input from other departments 
of College Park and other campuses, the Center also provides the means for investi- 
gators from different disciplines to work together on a wide range of transportation- 
related problems. The Center's objectives are: to identify potential research projects 
by establishing a dialogue and rapport with sponsoring agencies and offices; to provide 
coordination between the various disciplines engaged in or having the potential to 
engage in transportation research and between potential research sponsors and Uni- 
versity researchers; to facilitate cooperation for joint undertakings between the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and other universities and industry; to promote and, where 
appropriate, to supervise specific educational programs of an interdisciplinary nature. 

Among the areas identified for interest and research potential are transportation 
systems management, transportation planning, public policy, public utilities, systems 
analysis, mass transit systems, conservation of energy, terminal location, bridge and 
pavement design, traffic flow coordination, traffic safety and efficiency, transportation 
economics, air transportation, air pollution, noise control, highway design, environ- 
mental considerations, and air, rail, water and highway alternatives. 

Water Resources Research Center: Director: Glen E. Gordon, Acting. The Water 
Resources Research Center sponsors and coordinates research on all aspects of water 
supply, demand, distribution, utilization, quality enhancement or degradation, and 
allocation or management. The Center joins University researchers and educators with 
water resource user groups, such as citizens groups and local, state and federal man- 
agement and regulatory agencies to solve both basic and applied water resources prob- 
lems. The Center sponsors research proposals that address water problems within the 
state and region and uses advisory committees to determine water resources problems 
that confront management, regulatory and health agencies and/or citizens of the state. 
The Center also brings together the technical expertise, financial resources and other 
contributions necessary to help solve existing water resources problems and to generate 
basic scientific information that may contribute to solutions of future problems or may 
prevent development of new water resource problems. The Center's funds are derived 
from the Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, under PL 98-242, and 
from substantial University contributions in faculty time and other expenses. Funds 
are made available for research projects on a competitive basis. The Center also trains 
graduate and undergraduate students in water resources and the transfer of existing 
water resources knowledge to user groups. 



Resources 63 



Center for Young Children: Director: Dr. Elisa Klein. The Center for Young Children 
is under the direction of the Early Childhood Unit of the Department of Curriculum 
and Instruction. It serves as a model of developmentally appropriate early childhood 
education and offers half-day and full-day programs for children three, four, and five 
years old whose parents are affiliated with the University. The Center is a research 
center and a teacher training site for the College of Education. Located in the Cam- 
bridge Complex, the Center has four classrooms and two research rooms that may be 
scheduled by faculty and graduate students. 

Institutes 

Institute for Advanced Computer Studies: Director: Larry Davis. Since 1985, the In- 
stitute for Advanced Computer Studies (UNIACS) has been the campus focal point 
for research activities in computing. The Institute has more than 50 faculty members 
and is conducting research in parallel processing, artificial intelligence, software en- 
gineering, distributed real-time systems and database systems. The Center shares many 
of its research programs with other departments including Computer Science, Electrical 
Engineering, Physics, Linguistics, Mathematics, Business and Management, Philosophy 
and Pohtical Science. UMIACS jointly operates a Parallel Processing laboratory with 
the Center for Automation Research. This laboratory includes a 16000 processor Con- 
nection Machine. UMIACS annually publishes more than 100 Technical Reports and 
sponsors short courses, lecture series, workshops and conferences. 

Institute for Child Study: Director: Robert C. Hardy. Founded in 1947, the Institute 
for Child Study is affiliated with the Department of Human Development, which offers 
graduate programs leading to the Master of Education, Master of Arts, Doctor of 
Philosophy and Doctor of Education degrees and the Advanced Graduate Specialist 
Certificate in human development across the life span. These programs have an edu- 
cational psychology focus and provide a multidisciplinary approach to development 
across the life span. The Institute collects, interprets and synthesizes the scientific 
findings in various fields that are concerned with human growth, development, learning 
and behavior. Institute research is concerned primarily with social and cognitive aspects 
of development. The Institute provides extensive off-campus services to communicate 
current scientific findings in human development to those agencies and institutions that 
request such support. 

Cooperative Institute for Climate Studies (CICS): One of nine such centers established 
by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Institute fos- 
ters collaborative research between NOAA and the University in studies on radiation 
budget parameter estimation from space, climate diagnostics, modeling and prediction. 
The radiation budget estimation research is concerned with understanding and esti- 
mating the exchange of electromagnetic radiation within the global system, the major 
physical process driving its climate. The diagnosis and prediction studies are concerned 
with improving the understanding and prediction of climate anomalies on seasonal and 
monthly time scales. Technical advice is available on these and related atmospheric 
problems. 

Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology: Director: Charles Wellford. The Institute 
coordinates the University's interests and activities in the areas of law enforcement, 
criminology and corrections. The Institute has a very extensive and carefully integrated 



64 Resources 

undergraduate program. Special emphasis, however, is placed on graduate programs 
and on research. 

The research capabilities and the academic programs of the Institute make possible 
the achievement of its primary goal the education of social and behavioral scientists 
who have chosen the problem of crime and its prevention and controls as their spe- 
cialization. The Institute offers the M. A. degree with options in criminology or criminal 
justice and the Ph.D. degree in criminal justice and criminology. 

Institute for Governmental Service: Director: Dr. Brian M. Gardner. The Institute 
provides information, consulting, research and technical assistance services to county, 
municipal governments and state agencies in Maryland. Assistance is provided in such 
areas as program evaluation, survey research, preparation of charters and codes of 
ordinances, budgeting and financial management, information systems and related lo- 
cal, state or intergovernmental management activities. The Institute analyzes and shares 
with governmental officials information concerning professional developments and op- 
portunities for new or improved programs and activities. 

Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy: Director: Dr. Mark Sagoff. The Institute 
for Philosophy and Public Policy conducts an interdisciplinary program of research and 
curriculum development, and it investigates the structure of arguments and the nature 
of values relevant to the formation, justification, and criticism of public policy. Most 
research efforts are chosen from topics expected to be a focus of public policy debate 
during the next decade. They are coordinated by Institute research staff and conducted 
cooperatively by working groups composed of philosophers, policymakers, analysts, 
and other experts from within and without the government. This diversity permits 
comprehensive examination of the major aspects of the complex issues investigated. 
Current research areas include: regulatory policy, environmental ethics, the nature of 
ecology, the rationality of attitudes toward risk, equality of opportunity, the ethics of 
legal negotiation, and the mass media and democratic values. Research products are 
made available through commercial publication, distribution of model courses, a quart- 
erly newsletter, working papers, and workshops. 

The Institute's curriculum development seeks to bring philosophical issues before 
future policymakers and citizens. Courses dealing with contemporary normative issues 
in the national and international arenas are offered through the School of Law, School 
of Public Affairs, and various undergraduate programs. Courses that have been offered 
include: Hunger and Affluence, Philosophical Issues in Public Pohcy; Human Rights 
and Foreign Policy; Ethics and Energy Policy; The Endangered Species Problem; Risk 
and Consent; Ethics and the New International Order; The Morality of Forced Military 
Service; Theory of Regulatory Policy; Ethics and National Security; and Environmental 
Ethics. The Institute operates within the School of Public Affairs. 

Institute for Physical Science and Technology: Director: James A. Yorke. The Institute 
for Physical Science and Technology is a center for interdisciplinary research in pure 
and applied science problems that lie between those areas served by the academic 
departments. These interdisciplinary problems afford challenging opportunities for the- 
sis research and classroom instruction. Current research topics include a variety of 
problems in applied mathematics, statistical physics, optical physics, fluid mechanics, 
physics of condensed matter, space science, upper atmospheric physics, engineering 



Resources 65 

physics and biomathematics. Other areas of interest are remote sensing, the effect of 
ionizing radiation on chemical systems, and the history of science and technology. 

Courses and thesis research guidance by the faculty of the Institute are provided 
through the graduate programs in the academic departments of the College of Com- 
puter, Mathematical and Physical Sciences. The Institute sponsors a wide variety of 
seminars. Of principal interest are general seminars in statistical physics, applied math- 
ematics, fluid dynamics and in atomic and molecular physics. Information about these 
can be obtained by writing the Director or by calling (301) 454-2636. 

Institute for Research in Higher and Adult Education: Director: Robert O. Berdahl. 
The Institute's primary focus is to encourage and support the study of public policy 
issues concerning the relations between institutions of higher and adult education and 
their state and federal governments. The Institute concentrates on state level problems, 
including: 1) legislative performance audits of higher education; 2) evaluation of state- 
wide boards of higher education; 3) interactions among statewide boards, accrediting 
agencies and universities; 4) fundraising and research development; and 5) inter-insti- 
tutional cooperation. The Institute's location in College Park, next to the nation's 
capital, also facilitates monitoring and researching federal policies in postsecondary 
education. 

Most of the Institute's faculty members are from the Department of Education Policy, 
Planning and Administration; however, interaction with students and faculty from other 
relevant areas is strongly encouraged. 

Institute for the Study of Exceptional Children and Youth: Director: Philip J. Burke. 
Housed in the Department of Special Education in the College of Education, the 
Institute is a problem-centered organization engaged in innovation, research and eval- 
uation related to major issues affecting the lives of exceptional individuals, including 
the gifted and talented as well as the handicapped. The Institute has five interlocking 
task areas: policy studies, consumer involvement and evaluation, leadership develop- 
ment, interdisciplinary studies and dissemination. 

The Institute also administers research and demonstration programs in the areas of 
public policy urban special education, technology and international studies. In addition, 
it serves as a center for technical assistance to local schools and agencies with respect 
to needs of handicapped children and youth. The Institute focuses its resources on key 
issues, problems and research areas that will maintain a strong and independent voice 
in matters relating to exceptional children and youth. 

Institute for Urban Studies: Acting Director: Sidney Brower. The Institute's mission 
is to generate and disseminate new knowledge of urban processes and urban functions. 
Institute faculty have particular interest in the interdisciplinary analysis, planning and 
management of contemporary urbanization, including such forces as economic devel- 
opment, information-age technology and employment, organizational behavior, policy 
formulation and public-private services. Both domestic and international urban devel- 
opment issues are researched. 

The Institute for Urban Studies is an interdisciplinary bachelor's and master's degree 
granting unit. It was created to offer a learning program to educate urban professionals 
to plan, manage and develop metropolitan communities. The Washington-Baltimore 
urban corridor provides an excellent instructional and research setting for faculty and 



66 



students. Because contemporary urban problems must be solved by a multi-disciplinary 
approach, the master's programs are based on the Institute's core courses in combi- 
nation with the specialized substantive knowledge offered by the University's diverse 
departments and professional schools. NOTE: In July 1989 the Institute merged with 
the Community Planning Program of the University of Maryland at Baltimore to create 
a new Department of Urban Studies and Planning. The merger will enable students to 
work toward a professional, accredited Master of Community Planning (M.C.P.) de- 
gree. Graduate degree requirements will alter substantially under the proposed cur- 
riculum changes; applicants should contact the Department for more information. 

Offices 

US-USSR Office of Joint Academic Initiatives: Established in 1989, the Office promotes 
inter-institutional research and exchange arrangements with counterparts in the Soviet 
and Eastern Europe academic communities. The campus also promotes commercial 
joint ventures with these areas to support academic activity. Part of the responsibilities 
of the Office is to facilitate such opportunities for development, particularly in tech- 
nological and information science areas that may result through collaborations between 
Soviet and Eastern European scientists and their counterparts here. The Office's aims 
include: (1) to become a national center for the exchange of U.S. /Soviet sciences and 
technology; (2) to expand on inter-institutional arrangements extending undergraduate, 
graduate and faculty exchanges in all areas, including the humanities and sciences; (3) 
to foment faculty and program development in this area on the UMCP campus; (4) to 
conduct research on the structuring and operation of exchange between U.S. /Soviet 
science and technology; (5) to become a consulting organization to assist other U.S. 
universities develop similar programs. Thus far, the Office has signed two major agree- 
ments for research collaboration. 

Laboratories 

Laboratory for Coastal Research: Director: Stephen Leatherman. The Laboratory for 
Coastal Research is sponsored by the Department of Geography to support research 
and information dissemination about the processes and structure of coastal environ- 
ments of the world in general and Maryland's coasts in particular. This Laboratory 
serves as a vehicle to enhance and facilitate cooperative efforts among coastal re- 
searchers within the University of Maryland system. The principal focus of and unifying 
factor for the Laboratory's activities is physical process research in coastal areas and 
related environment/socio-economic implications. In addition to theoretical and con- 
ceptual considerations, practical problems raised by the State of Maryland and federal 
agencies are addressed by Laboratory projects. 

Laboratory for Global Remote Sensing Studies: Director: Samuel N. Goward. The 
Laboratory for Global Remote Sensing Studies is a research facility in the Department 
of Geography that is directed toward geographic research in regional, continental and 
global scale assessments of earth phenomena. Data sources include observations from 
earth-orbiting satellites such as the NOAA meteorological observatories, the NASA 
experimental Nimbus series, Landsat and SPOT. Current research focuses on spatio- 
temporal dynamics of terrestrial vegetation, its role in energy-mass exchange by the 
earth and the influence of human activities on the biospheric dynamics and on large 
area vegetation monitoring. This research is conducted with the support of grant funds 
from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foun- 



Resources 67 

dation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and other funding agencies. Four depart- 
ment faculty members, two research associates and 10 graduate research assistants 
currently participate in the laboratory. 

Laboratory for Plasma Research: Director: Dr. Victor Granatstein. The University of 
Maryland's Laboratory for Plasma Research is internationally recognized for its out- 
standing contributions in both basic and applied plasma physics. Laboratory members 
include 23 teaching faculty spanning five different departments as well as 35 research 
faculty, 16 visiting scientists and 50 graduate students. Research activity is centered in 
the new University of Maryland's Energy Research Building, which houses experi- 
mental and computer facilities as well as a research library. Major ongoing experiments 
include spheromak (a spherical tokamak), free electron lasers for heating magnetic 
fusion plasmas, intense relativistic electron beams, gyrotron amplifiers for driving su- 
percolliders and a low emittance electron beam transport experiment. Diagnostic equip- 
ment includes high power lasers and spectrographic apparatus covering the electromagnetic 
spectrum from x-rays to microwaves. Computational facilities include access to the 
CRAY XMP and II computers at the Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center as 
well as a number of in-house computers including the FPS 264. 

Research and Development Laboratory on School-Based Administration: Director: Ed- 
ward J. Andrews, Jr. This laboratory is the research and development unit of the 
Maryland Commission on School-Based Administration and the Maryland Assessment 
Center project. Housed in the campus Department of Education Policy, Planning and 
Administration, the Laboratory's focus is the professional preparation and inservice 
development of school principals. It collaborates in these efforts with the Maryland 
State Department of Education, other institutions of higher education and the 24 local 
school districts in Maryland. 

The Laboratory's mission is to devise and activate a systematic plan to strengthen the 
effectiveness of school principals in Maryland through programs of principal assessment , 
professional preparation and development, and research on principal assessment and 
development. 

Consortia 

The University of Maryland is a member of a number of national and local consortia 
concerned with advanced education and research. They offer a variety of opportunities 
for senior scholar and graduate student research. 

OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. (ORAU), is a non-profit 
educational and research consortium of 51 colleges and universities in the South formed 
in order to broaden the opportunities for member institutions collectively to participate 
in many fields of education and research in the natural sciences related to the envi- 
ronment, energy and health. Educational programs range from short term courses or 
institutes, conducted with ORAU facilities and staff, to fellowship programs admin- 
istered by ORAU for the U.S. Department of Energy. 

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was created to serve as a 
focal point of a vigorous and expanding national research effort in the atmospheric 
sciences. NCAR is operated under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation 
by the UNIVERSITY CORPORATION FOR ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH (UCAR), 
made up of 48 U.S. and Canadian universities with doctoral programs in the atmospheric 
sciences or related fields. The scientific staff includes meteorologists, astronomers. 



68 



chemists, physicists, mathematicians, and representatives of other discipHnes. Over the 
years, UMCP Meteorology department, faculty, and staff members have had an active 
collaboration with NCAR colleagues and have made use of NCAR facilities. The 
Meteorology Department maintains a mini-computer that allows access to NCAR's 
CRAY 1 computer. 

UNIVERSITIES RESEARCH ASSOCIATION, INC. (URA), a group of 52 uni- 
versities engaged in high energy research, is the sponsoring organization for the Fermi 
National Accelerator Laboratory, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The 
accelerator, located near Batavia, Illinois, is the world's highest-energy proton accel- 
erator. University of Maryland faculty and graduate students have been involved in 
experiments at Fermilab since its inception. 

The INTER-UNIVERSITY COMMUNICATIONS COUNCIL (EDUCOM) pro- 
vides a forum for the appraisal of the current state of the art in communications science 
and technology and its relation to the planning and programs of colleges and universities. 
The council particularly fosters inter-university cooperation in the area of communi- 
cations science. 

The Center for Excellence in Space Data and Information Sciences (CESDIS), which 
is located at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is jointly funded 
by the University of Maryland and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
through the UNIVERSITIES SPACE RESEARCH ASSOCIATION, a consortium 
of 62 universities. CESDIS has close ties to the Department of Computer Science at 
College Park. Two faculty members in the UMCP Department of Computer Science 
currently hold joint appointments with CESDIS and the director is a full professor in 
the department. 

The Center began formal operation in Spring 1988 and has awarded several contracts 
for research projects in the academic computer science research community. CESDIS 
supports computer scientists working in close collaboration with space and earth sci- 
entists on problems of joint interest and those of direct relevance to NASA. The focus 
is on processing and managing data from space observing systems and conducting 
research on other applications of computer science to space data. For more information, 
contact: Dr. Raymond Miller, Director, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 630.5, 
Greenbelt, MD 20771. 

The UNIVERSITIES SPACE RESEARCH ASSOCIATION (USRA) was designed 
to promote cooperation between universities, research organizations and the govern- 
ment in the development of space science and technology, and in the operation of 
laboratories and facilities for research, development and education in these fields. 
USRA currently has four active research programs. They focus on low gravity cloud 
physics, computer applications in science and engineering, lunar science and materials 
processing in space. 

The University of Maryland is a member of the INTER-UNIVERSITY CONSOR- 
TIUM FOR POLITICAL and SOCIAL RESEARCH (ICPSR). One purpose of the 
Consortium is to facilitate collection and distribution of useful data for social science 
research. The data include survey data from the University of Michigan Center for 
political Studies and from studies conducted by other organizations or by individuals, 
census data for the United States, election data, legislative roll calls, judicial decision 
results and biographical data. 



69 



The University of Maryland jointly participates in the CHESAPEAKE RESEARCH 
CONSORTIUM, INC., a wide scale environmental research program, with the Johns 
Hopkins University, the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and the Smithsonian 
Institution. The Consortium coordinates and integrates research on the Chesapeake 
Bay region and is compiling a vast amount of scientific data to assist in the management 
and control of the area. Each participating institution calls on faculty expertise in a 
diversity of disciplines including biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, geology, and 
the social and behavioral sciences. Through this interdisciplinary research program a 
computerized Management Resource Bank is being developed containing a biological 
inventory of the Chesapeake Bay region, a legal survey and socioeconomic data of the 
surrounding communities. The Consortium provides research opportunities for faculty 
members, graduate students and undergraduate students at the University. 

Officially chartered in 1969, the SEA GRANT ASSOCIATION is a growing orga- 
nization concerned with the development and wise use of ocean and Great Lakes 
resources. Composed of the nation's major colleges, universities and institutions with 
ocean programs, the Association works for the betterment of the management and 
utilization of marine resources. Maryland's research and education program is greatly 
involved with estuarine processes and commercial fisheries, especially oysters, in the 
Chesapeake Bay. Other important research efforts such as the joint cholera program 
with Florida, Louisiana and Oregon, represent strong national efforts. 

The University of Maryland was awarded its first institutional Sea Grant funding by 
the Department of Commerce for the calendar year 1977. Although 46 universities, 
colleges and non-profit organizations hold either regular or associate memberships in 
SGA, Maryland is one of only about 20 who have comprehensive institutional programs 
and who are eligible to become Sea Grant Colleges. 

The goal of the CONSORTIUM ON HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS IN EDUCA- 
TION is to involve all interested agencies in the State of Maryland in the identification, 
development and utilization of human resources for the purpose of improving human 
relationships in education. The consortium provides training activities for educational 
personnel, promotes the sharing of expertise among education professionals, dissem- 
inates information as to activities, personnel and materials concerning human rela- 
tionships, and promotes cooperative relationships among the agencies involved. 

Established in 1965, the UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL ON WATER RESOURCES 
(UCOWR), is a national consortium with approximately 80 members. UCOWR was 
created to provide a forum for interchange of information pertaining to water resources 
research in academic communities. Member institutions also exchange information on 
special conferences, seminars, symposia and graduate study opportunities. 

The University of Maryland is an associate member of the UNIVERSITY-NA- 
TIONAL OCEANOGRAPHIC LABORATORY SYSTEM (UNOLS) established to 
improve coordinated use of federally supported oceanographic facilities, bringing to- 
gether the Community of Academic Oceanographic Institutions that operate those 
facilities, and creating a mechanism for such coordinated utilization of and planning 
for oceanographic facilities. As an associate member, the University of Maryland op- 
erates research programs in the marine sciences and operates the University of Maryland 
Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies. 

Chartered in 1981-1982 with the University of Maryland among its founding members, 
the POTOMAC RIVER BASIN CONSORTIUM comprises 20 or so academic, gov- 



70 



ernmental and private sector institutions whose intent is to expand scholarly and popular 
interest and involvement with the many natural, cultural and historical dimensions of 
the Potomac Valley basin and its subregions and the Chesapeake Bay. Consortium 
interests range from agriculture, anthropology and engineering to historic preservation, 
environment, geography, history, public policy and urban studies. Consortium activi- 
ties, which are intermural and interdisciplinary, are aimed at enhancing opportunities 
for collaborative studies of the region in academic curricula, student exchange, intern- 
ships, workshops, seminars and a publication program of academic studies and papers. 

The University of Maryland is one of the charter members of THE SOUTHEAST- 
ERN UNIVERSITIES RESEARCH ASSOCIATION (SURA), a consortium of 35 
institutions of higher learning formed in 1980 for the purpose of managing large co- 
operative projects in science, engineering and medicine. SURA's first undertaking was 
the proposal for a National Electron Accelerator Laboratory (NEAL). Although NEAL's 
primary research potential is in nuclear science, research in condensed matter physics, 
medicine and industrial applications is a natural byproduct. 

The purpose of the SOUTH-EAST CONSORTIUM FOR INTERNATIONAL DE- 
VELOPMENT is to respond to the economic and social needs of limited resource 
peoples and less developed countries. Memberships in the organization is open to 
universities, research institutions and other organizations with capabilities related to 
rural and urban development and technology transfer. The University of Maryland is 
a charter member and has participated in several SECID technical assistance contracts 
including ones in Kenya, Sri Lanka, Sierra Leone, Guyana, Malawi, Zambia, Senegal 
and Mali. 

The goal of the CONSORTIUM FOR INTERNATIONAL CROP PROTECTION 
(CICP) is to promote economically efficient and environmentally sound crop protection 
practices in developing countries. CICP sponsors training for developmg country ex- 
tension workers, researchers, agricultural and health officials, and others to help reduce 
dependence on chemical insecticides and foster a more holistic approach to pest control; 
fields research teams to assess plant protection problems; and provides specialists for 
other technical assistance. 

The consortium, which operates under an $8.7 million, five-year authorization budget, 
most of which derives from the U.S. Agency for International Development, claims 
as members 13 U.S. universities and the U.S. Department of AgricuUure. UMCP 
entomologist Allen Steinhauer serves as the executive director of CICP, which this 
spring moved to its new headquarters in College Park. Entomology professor Dale 
Bottrell serves as one of CICP's key personnel in his role as technical assistance specialist 
in entomology. 

Incorporated in 1963, THE ORGANIZATION FOR TROPICAL STUDIES,INC. 
(OTS) is a growing consortium of 43 academic institutions, manages an annual budget 
of more than $2.5 million, owns one of the most well-equipped and best staffed tropical 
research stations in the world, and offers graduate courses in field ecology and agro- 
ecology. It is supported largely by major grants from NSF, several private foundations 
and member institutions. University of Marlyand was elected to membership in 1985; 
local OTS representatives are Douglas Gill, Zoology and Allen Steinhauer, Entomol- 
ogy- 

OTS is a leader in education and research in tropical biology. Its principal course is 
"The Fundamentals Course in Tropical Biology; an Ecological Approach." Offered 



student Sen^ices 71 



twice a year in English, this 8-week course is taught in Costa Rica by a team of two 
dozen expert faculty. Twenty superior graduate students are chosen competitively from 
member universities in Northern and Latin America. Research opportunities offered 
by OTS include field stations and research fellowships for graduate students. OTS 
manages three research stations in Costa Rica. 

The Laboratory for Milhmeter-Wave Astronomy is the Maryland part of a three- 
university consortium known as the BERKELEY-ILLINOIS-MARYLAND ARRAY 
(BIMA). The other two members of the consortium are the University of California 
at Berkeley and the University of Illinois; The array provides support for the design 
and construction of a six-element millimeter-wave radio telescope at Hat Creek in 
Northern California and undertakes astronomical observations with the array. Five 
faculty members, five postdoctoral fellows, two programmers and several graduate 
students are affiliated with the lab, which is headed by Leo Blitz and is a semi-auton- 
omous unit within the Astronomy Program. 

BIMA currently has three antennas of the array operating and collecting astronomical 
data. The telescope is remotely operable from the Maryland campus, and data are 
automatically transferred to the campus once a day. The major scientific interests of 
the members of the array are the Sun, planetary radio astronomy, the interstellar 
medium, star formation, normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei. Currently, the main 
thrust of the development effort at Maryland is in software design and in expanding 
the array to longer baselines. 



Student Services 

Office of Graduate Minority Affairs 

The Office of Graduate Minority Affairs, located in the Graduate School (2133 Lee 
Building), is charged with coordinating graduate recruitment and retention efforts 
campus-wide and advising minority students in all aspects of their programs. The Office 
acts as the student's liaison to the administration, reviews policies affecting the quality 
of graduate life and continues to improve academic opportunities for minorities. 

In an effort to provide a multicultural environment, the Office of Graduate Minority 
Affairs will also underwrite those initiatives that highlight the racial and cultural di- 
versity of the University community, promote interest in ethnic studies and multicultural 
programs and heighten awareness of issues pertaining to minority student identity. 
Although the main thrust of the Office's activities is directed toward students, it also 
assists the individual departments in addressing issues of diversity and the changing 
face of the graduate population. For more information, contact Dario Cortes (301-405- 
4183) or Carla Gary (301-405-4185). 

Graduate Legal Aid Office 

The Graduate Legal Aid Office provides free legal advice, referrals and assistance 
to currently registered University of Maryland graduate students. Staff members give 
general legal advice on a wide variety of matters, including landlord-tenant issues, 
consumer problems, traffic accidents, uncontested divorces and University-related mat- 
ters. The Office provides direct legal assistance in routine matters, but CANNOT SUE 
ON BEHALF OF STUDENTS OR REPRESENT THEM IN COURT. The Office is 
staffed eight hours a week for student interviews; staff members see students on a walk- 



72 Student Services 



in basis and by appointment. Walk-in and appointment schedules are posted on the 
Office door. For more information, contact the Office in Room 1221, Stamp Union. 

Graduate Student Government 

The Graduate Student Government (GSG) is the student government for graduate 
students. Its purposes are: (1) to improve the quaUty of education and enhance the 
quality of life of the graduate students; (2) to communicate and support research 
interests of graduate students; (3) to recommend members for policy-making and ad- 
ministrative committees of the campus; and (4) to act as the spokesbody for graduate 
student concerns. 

Membership is open to all full and part-time graduate students enrolled in degree 
programs on campus. The Assembly of the GSG consists of representatives from each 
graduate department, but its meetings are open to all interested graduate students. 
Elections to the Assembly are held every year in the Fall and occur within the de- 
partments. Officers of the GSG are elected at-large in the Spring. The President of 
GSG is a full Graduate Assistant position in the Graduate School but is elected by the 
graduate student body. 

The GSG has eight standing committees that perform the majority of governing 
responsibilities. Membership on these committees is open to all graduate students. 
Committees include the Executive, Elections, Social, Newsletter, Communication, Mi- 
nority Affairs, Legislative Action and Graduate Research Interaction Day. 

Departmental Graduate Student Organizations (GSOs) are active in most depart- 
ments on campus and are directly supported by the GSG. Involvement in a GSO is 
not a prerequisite for GSG membership but is encouraged. 

For more information, contact the Graduate Student Government, Box 105, Stamp 
Student Union. 

Campus Senate 

The Campus Senate, an integral part of the institution's system of governance, is 
somewhat unique in that it has representation from all segments of the campus com- 
munity: administrators, staff, faculty, and undergraduate and graduate students. Par- 
ticipation in the Senate or any of its 14 standing committees is an honor and a responsibility. 

The full Senate meets eight times a year to consider matters of concern to the 
institution, including academic issues. University policies, plans, facilities and the wel- 
fare of faculty, staff and students. The Senate advises the President, the Chancellor, 
or the Board of Regents as it deems appropriate. 

Graduate students who wish to serve in the Campus Senate are nominated by the 
deans of their academic colleges and elected in an at-large, campus-wide election held 
in the spring. Students are also encouraged to participate on a series of Senate standing 
committees, such as Student Affairs and Human Relations. These committees draw 
membership from the campus community at large and cover every aspect of campus 
life and function. Students are sought every spring to fill the committee appointments. 
Details on the election and appointment processes are available through the Campus 
Senate Office, Room 0104A, Reckord Armory, phone: 405-5805. 

Off-Campus Housing 

Housed in the Office of Commuter Affairs, the Off-Campus Housing Service (Room 
1195, Stamp Student Union, 454-3645) maintains an extensive and up-to-date com- 



Student Services 73 



puterized list of rooms, apartments and houses (both vacant and to share) that are for 
rent in the area; they are organized by cost, type of housing and distance to campus. 
Personalized printouts tailored to your individualized needs can be requested (in person) 
to simplify your housing search. Be sure to bring your letter of admission or student 
ID when requesting a printout. Average monthly rates for housing in the area are: 
$2(X)-$300 for a room in a private or student home; $400-$600 for an efficiency, basement 
apartment or one-bedroom apartment; $250-$300 for a shared apartment and $800- 
$1,250 for an unfurnished house. Maps of the College Park area, lists of local motels, 
real estate agents and furniture rental companies as well as information of general 
interest to commuter students are also available at the Service. 

Graduate Housing 

The University maintains 471 apartment units designated exclusively for eUgible 
graduate students enrolled full time at the College Park campus. The apartments are 
located in two separate apartment complexes (Lord Calvert and University Hills), both 
within walking distance of the campus. Efficiency units are assigned to single and 
unaccompanied students, one-bedroom apartments to a married student and spouse, 
and two-bedroom units are assigned to a married student and spouse with not more 
than two children. Also, single parents may be assigned to two bedroom units. All 
two-bedroom assignments involve age restrictions for children. 

To be ehgible for an efficiency unit, a student must be the recipient of a teaching or 
research assistantship or be in receipt of a qualified scholarship, fellowship or grant as 
approved by the Graduate School. Two-bedroom units are more plentiful than either 
one-bedroom apartments or efficiencies and possession of a TA, RA or an approved 
stipend has historically not been a requirement to obtain this type of unit. However, 
this policy is subject to change based upon demand by students with qualifying stipends. 

Assignment of all units is on a first-come, first-served basis. The waiting period for 
an efficiency averages 12 to 18 months, a one-bedroom usually takes two to four months, 
and the two-bedroom units average one month or less. Waiting periods often reflect a 
semester cyclic demand; waiting time for a one-bedroom unit is often longest in late 
summer and immediately after the start of the fall semester. Students pursuing a master's 
degree are eligible for 24 months of residency and Ph.D. students are allowed up to 
48 months, which is also the maximum for a combination or sequence of both degrees. 
Residency may also be terminated on the last day of the month in which all the 
requirements for the degree are completed if that date is earlier than the respective 24 
or 48-month eligibility limit. 

The programmed monthly rental rates, effective July 1, 1989 and for the subsequent 
12 months are: efficiencies, $341; one-bedroom units, $395 \ and two-bedroom units 
$441. Rental rates are adjusted (historically increased) on July 1 each year. All basic 
utilities (except phones) are furnished. The apartments are unfurnished with the ex- 
ception of a stove and refrigerator. All apartments are centrally heated and centrally 
air-conditioned. 

A $10.00 non-refundable application fee should be sent with the completed appli- 
cation, and a $200.00 security/damage deposit is required upon apartment assignment. 



74 Student Services 



All payments to the Graduate Apartments must be in check or money order form and 
should be made out to The University of Maryland. Cash is not accepted. For additional 
information and an application form, please write or call: 

University of Maryland 

Graduate Apartments 

3424 Tulane Drive #14 

Hyattsville, MD 20783 

Phone (301) 422-7445 

University Dining Services 

The University Department of Dining Services offers several dining options available 
to graduate students. The D.S. Cash Plan or the Resident Dining Plans offer students 
the ability to dine at various restaurants all over campus. The D.S. Cash Plan has a 
minimum deposit of only $50.00, which can be charged to Visa or Mastercard. The 
Resident Dining Plans start at about $975.00 per semester. Information on both plans 
is available from the Dining Services Contract Office (314- 



Dining Services features over 30 different restaurants and Eateries across campus. 
Menu offerings range from salad bars, grills, delis and fresh dough pizza to a sit-down 
restaurant and 18th century inn. All facilities are open to everyone, but students on 
board plans receive discounts and are entitled to specially priced meals. For more 
information, call 314-8054. 

Career Development Center 

The Career Development Center, located in Hornbake Library, offers a wide variety 
of services to graduate students. The goal of the Center is to assist students in exploring 
career opportunities and planning their career futures. Services include individual career 
counseling, a comprehensive Career Resource Center, frequent workshops at no charge 
and a variety of job search services, including the Credential Service, the On-Campus 
Recruiting Program, the Mini- Resume Referral Service and up-to-date job listings. 
Students interested in employment in the fields of education and library science will 
find the Credential Service especially valuable. 

Graduate students are encouraged to participate in any of the CDC programs and 
services. The professionally qualified staff is also available to present special programs 
to classes, seminars, coUoquia, and student associations. For more information, call 
314-7225 or stop by the Career Development Center located at 3121 Hornbake Library, 
South Wing. 

Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center provides comprehensive psychological and counseling ser- 
vices to meet the mental health and developmental needs of graduate and undergraduate 
students. Records kept as part of providing counseling services are confidential and 
are not part of the University's educational records. The Counseling Center, located 
in Shoemaker Building, is open Monday - Thursday 8:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. and Friday 
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

In order to meet the needs of the campus community, the Counseling Center provides 
the following special services and programs: 



Student Services 75 



1- Counseling Service. Psychologists provide professional individual and 
group counseling services for students with social-emotional and edu- 
cational-vocational concerns. Counseling is available for individuals and 
groups to overcome depression, career indecisiveness, anxiety, loneli- 
ness and other problems. Workshops ranging from developing assertive- 
ness and self-esteem to stress management are also offered. A 3:00 p.m. 
Minority Student Walk-in Hour is held daily. The Center also provides 
a series of tape-recorded interviews with all College Park department 
heads covering course and career options in their fields. Telephone: 314- 
7651. 

2. Disabled Student Service (DSS). Professionals provide a variety of as- 
sistance for students with physical and learning disabilities. Services must 
be arranged in advance and students are encouraged to contact the office 
as early as possible. Located in Room 0126 Shoemaker, office hours are 
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Monday - Friday. Telephone: 314-7682 (voice) or 
314-7683 (TDD). 

3. Learning Assistance Service (LAS). Educational Specialists offer indi- 
vidual and group sessions for improving academic skills such as reading, 
writing, listening, note taking and learning mathematics and science 
material. Workshops cover such topics as study skills, time management, 
learning math skills, exam anxiety and learning English as a second 
language. 

4. Returning Students Program. Ongoing consultation, counseling, refer- 
rals and orientation programs are provided to address the needs of 
students aged 25 or over who are beginning or coming back to school 
after a break in their formal education. Located in Room 2201 Shoe- 
maker. Telephone: 314-7693. 

5. Testing, Research and Data Processing Service. National testing pro- 
grams such as the CLEP, GRE, LSAT, MCAT, GMAT and Miller 
Analogies are administered through this office, as well as testing for 
counseling purposes, including vocational assessment. In addition, the 
staff members provide a wide variety of research reports of character- 
istics of students and the campus environment. Telephone: 314-7688. 

6. Parent Consultation and Child Evaluation. Professional help is available 
through consultation, testing and counseling for youngsters ages 5-14 
and families. Telephone: 314-7673. 

Health Care 

The University Health Center is located directly across from the Student Union on 
Campus Drive. The Center provides primary care of illness and injury, health education 
and consultation, dental care, a men's clinic, a women's health clinic, skin care, sports 
medicine, physical therapy (located in the PERH building), nutritional counseling, 
mental health counseling, social services, lab services and a pharmacy. Individual and 
group health education programs are available on topics such as sexual health and 
contraception, stress management, substance abuse and sexuality and communication. 



76 Student Services 



The Health Center is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with varied hours 
during semester breaks and holidays. Students are seen for routine care between 8:00 
a.m. and 6:00 p.m. weekdays. All currently registered students are eligible for care. 
The cost of Health Center services is included in the student's health fee. All students 
are encouraged to carry hospitalization insurance. While the health fee covers most 
routine costs at the Health Center, there are additional charges for x-rays, lab tests, 
dental treatments, allergy injections and pharmacy supplies. All students' medical rec- 
ords are strictly confidential and may only be released with the student's consent or 
through court-ordered subpoena. 

For information, call 314-8180 or 314-8182. Appointments, 314-8184; Pharmacy, 314- 
8167; Health Education, 314-8128; Health Insurance, 314-8165; Dental Clinic, 314- 
8178. 
Health Insurance 

Because the mandatory health fee is not a form of health insurance and many students 
do not have adequate coverage, a voluntary group insurance policy is available to 
students. This policy provides benefits at very reasonable rates for hospital, surgery, 
emergency, laboratory and x-ray purposes; some coverage for mental and nervous 
problems; and contains a major hospital provision. See information on your letter. 
Students may elect to have family coverage. For additional information and application 
forms, see the brochure available in the Health Center. 

Teaching, research and graduate assistants are also eligible for the State Employee 
Insurance Plan options. Please note that fellows and hourly employees are not eligible 
for the plan. For further information, contact your department or the personnel benefits 
office. 
Publications of Interest to Graduate Students 

In addition to the Catalog, the Graduate School prepares the following publications: 

Graduate Application Booklet. This booklet, which contains the application forms and 
information you need to complete the forms, is available on request from the Graduate 
School Mailing Office or from the individual departments. 

Guide to Graduate Life. This handbook, designed to provide the new graduate student 
with an introduction to the campus and the College Park area, is available from the 
office of the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. 

Graduate Assistant Handbook. This handbook sets forth policies, procedures, and ser- 
vices of interest to graduate assistants and is available from the departmental graduate 
offices and the office of the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. 
The Theses Manual. This manual contains the instructions for preparation of theses 
and dissertations and is available from the Graduate School (Room 2117, Lee Building). 

Important Dates for Advisers and Students. This calendar card of dates for submission 
of final documents is available from the various departmental graduate offices, as well 
as from the office of the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. 



Aerospace Engineering (ENAE) 77 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Aerospace Engineering (ENAE) 

Professor and Chair: Chopra 

Professors: Anderson, Donaldson, Gessow, Lee, Melnik 

Associate Professors: Barlow, Jones, Winklemann 

Assistant Professors: Celi, Lewis, Leishman, Vizzini 

Lecturers: Chander, Chien, Hagar, Heimerdinger, Kim, Korkegi, Lekoudis, Marks, 

Obrinski, Regan, Russell, Vamos, VanWie, Waltrup, Winblade, Yanta 

The Aerospace Engineering Department offers a broad program in graduate studies 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Those holding 
a B.S. in engineering, the physical sciences or mathematics are invited to apply to the 
program, which offers specializations in Aerodynamics and Propulsion, Structural Me- 
chanics, Rotorcraft, Space Systems and Flight Dynamics. Within these areas of spe- 
cialization, the student can tailor programs such as Computational Fluid Dynamics, 
Hypersonic Aerodynamics, Composite Structures, Finite Element Analysis, Aeroelas- 
ticity and Space Propulsion. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Both the master's and the doctoral programs are designed to meet the objectives 
and background of the individual student and are planned by the student and an adviser. 
No special Departmental requirements are imposed beyond the Graduate School re- 
quirements. The master's degree program offers both a thesis and a non-thesis option. 

For the Doctor of Philosophy degree, the Department requires a minimum of 42 
semester hours of coursework beyond the B.S. including: (1) not less than 18 hours 
within one Departmental area of specialization, (2) not less than six hours from among 
the other areas of specialization in the Department, and (3) not less than nine hours 
in courses that emphasize the physical sciences or mathematics. The total in (2) plus 
that in (3) must be at least 15 hours, 12 hours of which must be 600-level courses. 
Written qualifying and oral comprehensive examinations are also required. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Facilities and equipment that support experimental studies in low-speed aerodyn- 
amics, structural dynamics, helicopter dynamics and aerodynamics, and composite 
structures include the Glenn L. Martin Wind Tunnel with a 7-foot, 9-inch by 11 -foot 
test section, other open and closed section subsonic tunnels, a supersonic tunnel, a 
structural dynamics rig, a 10-foot diameter vacuum chamber for rotor tests, a model 
rotor test apparatus, a microprocessor controlled autoclave with a 3 by 4-foot working 
section, testing machines, including a 220,000-lb uniaxial test frame, and a laboratory 
minicomputer system for fully automated data acquisition. In addition to the mainframe 
computers available on campus, the Department currently maintains dedicated multi- 
user computer systems such as the Hewlett-Packard HPIOOO E, HP9000, HP1000/A900 
as well as 17 Sun Workstations, a file/computeserver and 12 Macintosh II computers. 



78 Agricultural and Extension Education Program (AEED) 



Financial Assistance 

A number of graduate assistantships and fellowships, including the Glenn L. Martin, 
Rotorcraft and Hypersonic fellowships, are available for financial assistance. 

Additional Information 

For more information on the graduate program, contact: 
Department Chair 

Department of Aerospace Engineering 
Engineering Classroom Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301)405-1121 
For courses, see code ENAE. 

Agricultural and Extension Education Program (AEED) 

Acting Chair: Miller 

Professors: Longest 

Associate Professors: Rivera, Seibel, M. Smith, N. Smith 

Affiliate Professors: Booth, Ingle, Oliver, Shelton 

Adjunct Professors: Adams, Brown, Cooper, Fiyger, Jarvis, Lear, Ross, Sieling, 

Soobitsky, Wisler 

The Agricultural and Extension Education Program offers multidisciplinary programs 
that are organized into Agricultural Education; Adult, Continuing and Extension Ed- 
ucation; Community Development; and Natural Resources Management majors. 

Faculty members specialize in: teacher education; program administration and su- 
pervision; extension program management; staff and leadership development; policy 
development and evaluation; community analysis, development and leadership; or- 
ganizational development and leadership; public affairs education; program manage- 
ment; natural resources management; and environmental education. Department facuhy 
and graduate students also participate in interdisciplinary programs such as international 
extension and research, (working with the International Development Management 
Center, IDMC), ruralsociology, and natural resources management and environmental 
education (working with Marine-Estuarine-Environment Science (MEES) programs). 
A joint MS degree is offered in Agricultural Education with the University of Maryland 
Eastern Shore campus. 

Admission Information 

Applicants for all programs must present transcripts and recommendations from three 
individuals qualified to assess the academic abilities of the applicant. Results of the 
Miller Analogies and/or GRE tests must also be included with the application. 

Degree Information 

Student academic programs are built around core Departmental and major field 
requirements. Courses may be included from other departments and colleges as ap- 
propriate to the student's special interests and career aspirations. 

The Department offers graduate degrees in Agricultural Education; Adult, Contin- 
uing, and Extension Education; Community Development; and Environmental Edu- 



Agricultural and Resource Economics Program (AREC) 79 



cation (M.S. only) with specializations in each. Both a thesis and non-thesis option are 
available for the Master of Science degree. An Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate 
requiring 30 credits beyond themaster's degree is also available. 

Doctor of Philosophy programs are designed to meet Graduate School and Depart- 
ment requirements and are planned according to the student's previouseducation, ex- 
perience, special interests, professional plans and aspirations. No specific number of 
credits is required but is dependent on the student's qualifications and area of concen- 
tration. No foreign language is required but it is encouraged for those interested in 
international development. Research and major competencies wiU be developed through 
specific courses, Department research projects, and/or projects developed by the stu- 
dent as part of his or her academic program. 

Facilities and Special Resources: 

The campus graduate library and Computer Center provide excellent research re- 
sources for the graduate education programs. The Department also emphasizes inter- 
action between faculty and graduate students representing an international and culturally 
diverse dimension. 

The Department's proximity to Washington, D.C., where the national headquarters 
of many organizations and agencies are located, allows access toand interaction with 
key leaders and data sources. Some of the resources include: USDA, EPA, USAID 
National Agricultural Library, Library of Congress, International Development Man- 
agement Center, World Bank, AEED Center for International Extension Develop- 
ment, NASULGC, National 4-H Center, andNational FFA Center. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate assistantships are offered to qualified applicants on the basis of past aca- 
demic performance and availability of funds. Many of the full-time students in the 
Department hold assistantships or other forms of financial aid. 

Additional Information 

For additional information on programs, admission procedures and financial aid 
contact: 

Chair 

Agricultural and Extension Education Department 

0222 Symons Hall 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-1255 
For courses, see code AEED. 

Agricultural and Resource Economics Program (AREC) 

Professor and Chair: Hueth 

Professors: Bender, Bockstael, Brown, Cain, Chambers, Foster, Gardner, Just, 

Lessley, McConnell, Stevens (Emeritus), Strand, Tuthill, Wysong 

Associate Professors: Hardie, Lopez, Russell 

Assistant Professors: Leathers, Lichtenberg, Horowitz 



80 Agricultural and Resource Economics Program (AREC) 



The Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics offers courses of study 
leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree. The graduate 
program prepares students through courses in traditional subject matter areas, research 
experiences designed to give technical and creative competency in applied economics, 
and seminar and discussion opportunities. 

The Department provides two areas of specialization, agricultural economics and 
resource economics. Study and research within these two areas of specialization can 
include agricultural development, international trade, agricultural marketing, produc- 
tion economics, agricultural policy, econometrics, land use, marine resources, water 
resources and environmental quaHty. 

Substantial employment opportunities exist for persons with advanced training in 
agricultural and resource economics. Graduates from the Department obtain employ- 
ment in government, industry and universities. Graduates are hired by such agencies 
as the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Interior and the Environmental Protection 
Agency, and some obtain positions with the World Bank and similar agencies. Industry 
positions include management or program responsibilities. Graduates with academic 
interests are usually hired as assistant professors (teaching, research, extension) at 
major universities. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The M.S. degree program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option in both areas 
of specialization. The thesis option requires a minimum of 24 credits of coursework 
and six credits of thesis. The student must also take a final oral examination, which is 
primarily a defense of the thesis. The non-thesis option requires 33 credits of course- 
work, a scholarly paper and a comprehensive written examination, which is primarily 
concerned with coursework taken during the program. 

The Ph.D. degree requires a minimum of 48 credits of coursework beyond the 
bachelor's degree and 12 credits of dissertation research. Qualifying examinations are 
administered on completion of core course requirements. An oral dissertation defense 
is also required. 

There is no foreign language requirement for any graduate degree. Students can 
generally finish a master's degree in two years; a Ph.D. usually adds a minimum of 
two years beyond the master's level. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Ap- 
titude Test scores are required with the application for admission. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department actively draws upon the resources of many state, federal and in- 
ternational agencies unique to the Washington, D.C. area to offer experience from the 
world of government and business. The Library of Congress in Washington and the 
National Agricultural Library in Beltsville (just north of the campus) enhance teaching 
and research efforts. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate assistantships are offered to qualified applicants on the basis of past aca- 
demic performance , research potential and availability of funds. Many full-time students 
in the Department hold assistantships or some other form of financial aid. Part-time 
and summer work is often available for students who do not have assistantships. Also, 
a large number of graduate fellowships are available. 



Agricultural Engineering Program (ENAG) 81 



Additional Information 

The Handbook of Policies for the Graduate Program provides course requirements, 
examination procedures and descriptive material for the M.S. and Ph.D. programs. 
For specific information contact: 

Dr. Richard E. Just 

Graduate Coordinator 

Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-1291 
For courses, see code AREC. 

Agricultural Engineering Program (ENAG) 

Associate Professor and Chair: Stewart 

Professors: Johnson, Wheaton 

Associate Professor: Grant, Ross 

Assistant Professors: Magette, Shirmohammadi 

Affiliate Assistant Professor: Brinsfield 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers a graduate program of study 
with specialization in either agricultural or aquacultural engineering leading to the 
degree of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy. Courses and research problems 
emphasize the engineering aspects of the production, harvesting, processing and mar- 
keting of terrestrial and aquatic food and fiber products. Concern for the conservation 
of land and water resources and the utilization and/or disposal of byproducts associated 
with biological systems is included in order to maintain and enhance the quality of our 
environment while contributing to efficient production of food and fiber to meet in- 
creasing population demands. 

Agricultural engineering graduate students can look forward to excellent employment 
opportunities. Recent estimates indicate three to five openings currently exist for every 
student completing an advanced degree in agriculturalengineering. Future projections 
indicate the demand for agricultural engineers with advanced degrees will be as good 
or better than it is now. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission is open to graduates in engineering, physical science or biological science 
who meet Graduate School requirements and who have satisfactorily completed a core 
of basic engineering courses. For the thesis M.S. program, aminimum of 30 semester 
credit hours are required, including at least nine hours of 600-level agricultural engi- 
neering courses, six hours of thesis research and three hours of biometrics. A non- 
thesis M.S. is also available requiring a minimum of 33 semester credit hours, which 
should include at least nine hours of 600-level ENAG courses, three hours for a required 
paper and three hours of biometrics. 

A minimum of 60 credit hours beyond a B.S. are required for the Ph.D. program, 
including 12 hours of 600-level agricultural engineering courses, 12 hours of thesis 
research and three hours of biometrics. Additional courses may be required depending 
on the student's background. 



82 Agronomy Program (AGRO) 



The Department has no language requirements for either graduate degree. Except 
for the above requirements, a M.S. or Ph.D. program is planned on a personal basis 
and is oriented toward the intellectual and professional objectives of the student. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to well-equipped laboratories in the department, the facilities of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station, the Computer Science Center and the College of 
Engineering are available. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance may be available to qualified candidates. 

Additional Information 

For additional information contact: 
Dr. Fredrick Wheaton 
Graduate Coordinator 
Agricultural Engineering Department 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301)405-1198 
For courses, see code EN AG. 

Agronomy Program (AGRO) 

Professor and Chair: Aycock 

Professors: Bandel, Decker, Fanning, McKee, Mulchi 

Associate Professors: Angle, Dernoeden, Glenn, Kenworthy, Mcintosh, Rabenhorst, 

Ritter, Sammons, Turner, Vough, Weil, Weismiller 

Assistant Professors: Carroll, Hill, James, Slaughter 

The Department of Agronomy offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The student may concentrate in the Department's 
crops division or in the soils division. Programs are offered in cereal crop production, 
forage management, turf management, plant breeding, tobacco production, crop phys- 
iology, weed science, soil chemistry, soil physics, soil fertility, soil and water conser- 
vation, soil genesis and classification, soil survey and land use, soil mineralogy, soil 
biochemistry, soil microbiology, air pollution, waste disposal and soil environment 
interactions. 

All graduates with advanced degrees in Agronomy from this University have found 
employment in areas of their interests. Most are teaching or conducting research at 
other universities or with the federal government; some are with international agencies 
and a few have advanced to administrative positions. A number are employed by 
industries in research or sales-related positions and some graduates are managing whole 
divisions of these corporations. Others are employed by consulting firms or are breeding 
new varieties of crops to sell to farmers. Opportunities for employment in the future 
appear to be excellent. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The master's program offers both a thesis and a non-thesis option. A bachelor's 
degree in agronomy is not required if the student has adequate training in the basic 



American Studies (AMST) 83 



sciences. All students must complete the Master of Science degree before admission 
to the doctoral program. Copies of Departmental regulations that have been assembled 
for the guidance of candidates for graduate degrees are available from the Department. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Agronomy Department has over 20 well-equipped laboratories to carry out basic 
and applied research in crop and soil science. Basic equipment in the laboratories 
includes: x-ray diffraction and mass spectrophotometer, atomic absorption gas chro- 
matograph, isotope counters, petrographic scopes and equipment for thin section prep- 
arations, neutron soil moisture probe and scaler, tissue culture equipment, grain quality 
analyzer and carbon furnace. Growth chambers, extensive greenhouse space and five 
research farms and/or research and education centers permit a wide range of soil and 
environmental conditions for research into plant growth processes. A complete com- 
plement of planting and harvesting equipment is also available for field research. Stu- 
dents have access to a computer center located on campus, and microcomputers within 
the Department are also available. The University and the National Agricultural Sci- 
ences Libraries, supplemented by the Library of Congress, make the library resources 
among the best in the nation. Many of the Department's projects are conducted in 
cooperation with other departments on campus and with the headquarters of the Ag- 
ricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture located 
three miles from campus. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of research assistantships and teaching assistantships are available 
for qualified applicants. 

Additional Information 

For more specific information on the program, contact: 
Chair 

Department of Agronomy 
1109 H.J. Patterson Hall 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-1306 
For courses, see code AGRO. 

American Studies (AMST) 

Associate Professor and Chair: Kelly 

Associate Chairman and Director of Graduate Studies: Caughey 

Associate Professors: Caughey, Diner, Lounsbury, Mintz 

Assistant Professor: Sies 

Adjunct Professor: Washburn 

American Studies offers an interdisciplinary program of study leading to the Master 
of Arts and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The Department is particularly oriented 
toward the study of 19th and 20th century American culture with special emphasis in 
the areas of popular culture, literature and society, women's studies, ethnography, 
material culture, film, art, and social and cultural change. By combining courses in 
American Studies with study in other departments and fields, students can tailor their 



84 American Studies (AMST) 



graduate program closely to their individual interests and career goals. Internship 
opportunities are available in area museums, archives, government agencies and local 
historical societies. Courses in material culture taught at the Smithsonian Institution 
and George Washington University are open to students in American Studies. The 
Department also cooperates with the Departments of History, Anthropology, Geog- 
raphy and Urban Studies, and the School of Architecture in sponsoring a certificate 
program in Historic Preservation. Students interested in that program are admitted to 
one of the cooperating departments and, upon successful application to the Committee 
on Historic Preservation, must then complete 24 additional credit hours in preservation- 
related courses. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Applicants to the program should have a broad liberal arts background appropriate 
to the interdisciplinary study of American culture at the graduate level. 

The master's program requires completion of 30 credit hours. Students who elect to 
write a thesis take 24 hours of coursework and six hours of AMST 799 (thesis credit). 
To complete the non-thesis option, students must take 30 hours of coursework and 
submit a scholarly paper based on independent research in lieu of a thesis. In addition, 
all students must pass a written examination. 

Ph.D. candidates must complete beyond the master's degree at least 30 credit hours, 
which are organized around an area of concentration. Students must also pass three 
written comprehensive examinations, and write and defend a dissertation based on 
original research. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Washington area offers extraordinary research facilities for the study of past 
and present American culture, including the Library of Congress, the National Ar- 
chives, the National Museum of American History and the National Gallery, as well 
as numerous other museums, collections, archives and libraries. Through consortial 
arrangements with other schools in the area, including the George Washington Uni- 
versity and Georgetown University, students may augment their programs with courses 
otherwise unavailable at the University of Maryland. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of teaching assistantships are available in addition to graduate 
fellowships. Students who hold assistantships typically teach two sections of AMST 
201, Introduction to American Studies. Awards are generally made to students who 
have successfully completed one year in the graduate program. 

Additional Information 

Additional information on program offerings, degree requirements and financial aid 
can be obtained by writing to: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of American Studies 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-1354 
For courses, see code AMST. 



Animal Sciences Program (ADVP) 85 



Animal Sciences Program (ADVP) 

Professor and Program Chair: Vandersall 

Professors: Westhoff (Department Chair), Mather, Vandersall. Vijay, Williams, 

(Animal Science); Mohanty (Associate Dean), Marquardt (Veterinary Medicine) 

Professors Emeriti: Flyger, Keeney, King, Mattick 

Associate Professors: DeBarthe, Douglass, Erdman, Hartsock, Majeskie, Peters, 

Russek-Cohen, Stricklin, Varner (Animal Sciences), Dutta, Mallinson, Snyder 

(Veterinary Medicine) 

Affiliate Associate Professor: Stephenson (Veterinary Medicine) 

Assistant Professors: Alston-Mills, Barao, Marshall, (Animal Sciences); Carmel, 

Ingling, Samal, Vakharia (Veterinary Medicine) 

NOTE: Some courses in this program may require the use of animals. Please see the 

Statement on Animal Care and Use in the appendix and the policy statement for 

students under "Degree Requirements." 

The Graduate Program in the Animal Sciences offers graduate study leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The master's degree program 
offers both the thesis and non-thesis options. Faculty research interests include animal 
nutrition, physiology, behavior, virology, immunology and cell biology. Opportunities 
for study are primarily related to domestic animals, but studies with other species are 
possible. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Applicants are required to submit Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test 
scores and at least three letters of recommendation. 

During the first semester, students should select a chairman for their Advisory Com- 
mittee for program approval. With this Committee's advice, a proposed schedule of 
courses, including at least one credit of ADVP Seminar (ANSC 698A), must be filed. 
Committees may require remedial courses if students enter with inadequate prereq- 
uisites or deficiencies in undergraduate programs. By the third semester a thesis research 
or non-thesis scholarly paper must be approved and filed. The student must also present 
the thesis or scholarly paper in a public seminar and pass a final oral examination, 
which is given by the Advisory Committee, on the research. A written comprehensive 
examination is required of non-thesis students as well. A final bound copy of the thesis 
or scholarly paper must be submitted to the Program Office. Students with adequate 
undergraduate training usually complete the master's degree within two years. 

Ph.D. students with master's degrees from other institutions are expected to meet 
the requirements indicated above. The M.S. is not a prerequisite but is advantageous 
for admission to Ph.D. program. Two additional credits of the program seminar are 
required. An Advisory Committee must be formed for program approval early in the 
program. A plan of study and research proposal must be filed as in the master's program. 
At least one semester of teaching experience is required. The Admission to Candidacy 
Examinations are both written and oral. Prior to the final oral examination, the can- 
didate must present his/her dissertation in a public seminar. In addition to the disser- 
tation, at least one paper in form for publication in a referred scientific journal must 
be approved. A final bound copy of the dissertation must be submitted to the Program 
Office. The Ph.D. degree should be completed within three years after the M.S. degree. 



86 Anthropology Program (ANTH) 



Facilities and Special Resources 

The program's faculty represent research accomphshed in a wide variety of related 
fields. Excellent supporting courses in physiology, biochemistry and microbiology are 
available in the appropriate departments. Courses in biometrics (BIOM) provide a 
strong background in experimental design and statistical analysis. Terminals and mi- 
crocomputers are available in the Animal Sciences Center. The Computer Science 
Center offers extensive facilities for statistical analysis of thesis data. 

Modern new laboratory facilities are available. The College of Veterinary Medicine 
moved to the new Gudelsky Center in 1989 and the Department of Animal Sciences 
is scheduled to move this year into an addition that will more than double the laboratory 
space in the Animal Sciences Center. Facilities are available for cell culture, monoclonal 
antibody production and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays. Instrumentation is 
available to graduate students for gas liquid chromatography, amino acid analysis, 
atomic absorption, ultra violet and visible spectrophotometry, calorimetry, electron 
microscopy, liquid scintillation radioactivity measurements, electrophoresis, ultracen- 
trifugation, ovum micromanipulation, a variety of microbiological, extensive recom- 
binant DNA and an entire spectrum of biochemical techniques. Controlled environment 
facilities in the Center permit work with laboratory animals. 

Herdsof beef cattle, dairy cattle and swine are available for graduate research. While 
experiments with limited numbers of animals can be conducted on campus, those that 
require a large number of animals are carried out at one of three outlying farms. A 
cooperative agreement with the Agricultural Research Service at nearby Beltsville. 
Maryland (BARC) makes laboratory, animal and research personnel resources avail- 
able for the graduate program. 

In addition to excellent library facilities here, the National Agricultural Library, the 
National Library of Medicine and the Library of Congress constitute the best library 
resources for graduate study available anywhere and are all located within 10 miles of 
campus. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of graduate assistantships are available and awarded to students who 
present strong academic records and a capability and motivation to perform well in 
teaching or research assignments. 

Additional Information 

For specific information on the Program, admission procedures, or financial aid, 
contact: 

Dr. J. H. Vandersall, Chair 

Animal Sciences (ADVP) Graduate Committee 

Department of Animal Sciences 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-1391 
For courses, see code ANSC. 



Anthropology Program (ANTH) 

Associate Professor and Chair: Whitehead 
Professors: Agar, Chambers, Gonzalez, Williams 



Applied Mathematics Program (MAPL) 87 



Associate Professor: Leone 

Assistant Professors: Siedel, Stewart, Wali 

Lecturers: Cassidy, Crane, Eidson, McDaniel 

The Department of Anthropology offers graduate study leading to a Master of Ap- 
plied Anthropology (MAA) degree. This is a new professional program for students 
interested in an anthropology career outside academia. Core courses include prepa- 
ration in cultural analysis and management. Students intern with an agency or orga- 
nization suitable to their career interests. Specialization is flexible, permitting students 
to select from a variety of areas of career focus or to tailor course requirements to 
their special career requirements. 

Admission and Degree Requirements 

Students are required to submit Graduate Record Examination scores and fulfill the 
Graduate School admission requirements. The program requires 42 credit hours of 
coursework. All students must complete an internship. There is no thesis requirement. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

A Departmental computer lab, three teaching and research labs for physical an- 
thropology and archeology, and a photographic darkroom are available for student 
use. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of teaching assistantships are available to qualified graduate stu- 
dents. Part-time employment related to Department research is occasionally available. 

Additional Information 

For additional information please contact: 

Dr. Erve Chambers, Graduate Director 
Department of Anthropology 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-1423 
For courses, see code ANTH 

Applied Mathematics Program (MAPL) 

Professor and Director: J. Cooper (MATH) ANSC: 
Associate Professor: Russek-Cohen BMGT: 

Professors: Assad, Ball, Boden, Gass, Golden, Katz; Associate Professors: Alt, Fro- 
movitz, Widhelm CMSC: Professors: Agrawala, Basili, Edmundson, Kanal, Minker, 
O'Leary, Stewart; Associate Professor: Reggia; Assistant Professors: Elman, Gasarch, 
Stotts ECON: Professors: Almon, Betancourt, Ke\e']ian; Associate Professors: Coughlin, 
Prucha ENAE: Professors: Donaldson, Lee; Associate Professor: Jones ENCE: Profes- 
sor: Sternberg; Associate Professors: Garber, Schwartz ENCH: Professors: Cadman, 
Gentry, McAvoy; Associate Professor: Calabrese; Assistant Professor: Zafiriou ENEE: 
Professors: Baras, Blankenship, DeClaris, Davisson, Ephremides, Harger, Krishna- 
prasad, Mayergoyz, Newcomb, Ott, Taylor; Associate Professors: Makowski, Narayan, 
Shayman, Tits, Tretter ENME: Professors: Marks, Yang; Associate Professors: Bernard, 
Shih, Walston IPST: Research Professor: Babuska; Professors: Dorfman, Hubbard, 



88 Applied Mathematics Program (MAPL) 



Kellogg, Olver, Yorke MATH: Professors: Alexander, Antman, Benedetto, Beren- 
stein. Cooper, Evans, Fitzpatrick, Freidlin, Greenberg, Hummel, Johnson, Kueker, 
Liu, Osbom, Sweet, Wolfe; Associate Professors: Glaz, Green, Jones, Maddocks, Sather, 
Schneider, Vogelius METO: Professors: Baer, Wernekar; Associate Professor: Robock; 
Assistant Professor: Carton PHYS: Professors: Banerjee, Brill, Das Sarma, Dragt, Ein- 
stein, Ferrell, Glick, Gluckstern, Greenberg, Griffin, Hu, Korenman, MacDonald, 
Misner, Prange, Redish, Sucher, Wallace, Woo; Associate Professors: Fivel, Gates, 
Hassam, Kim, Wang PUAF: Professor: Young STAT: Professors: Mikulski, Yang; 
Associate Professors: Kedem, Slud, Smith 

The interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics Program, which is affiliated with the 
Department of Mathematics, offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. These are awarded for graduate study and research in 
mathematics and its applications in the engineering, physical and social sciences. In 
addition, the Applied Mathematics Program offers certified minors in applied mathe- 
matics for graduate students not enrolled in the Program. 

The Department of Mathematics assumes the responsibility for the administration 
of the applied mathematics courses under the MAPL label. The Graduate Office of 
the Department also maintains the records of all students in the Apphed Mathematics 
Program and handles correspondence with those applying for admission. However, it 
is important that any application for admission indicates clearly whether a student 
wishes to enter the Mathematics (MATH) or the Applied Mathematics (MAPL) Pro- 
gram. 

The Applied Mathematics Program trains individuals who are able to enhance their 
understanding of a wide spectrum of scientific phenomena through the application of 
rigorous mathematical analysis. At least half of the required work is expected to be in 
courses with primarily mathematical content; the remaining courses must apply to a 
field outside of the usual mathematics curriculum. Graduate students currently pursue 
various areas of physics, information structures, meteorology, operations research, 
pattern recognition, structural mechanics, and systems and control theory. Many other 
areas of study are available through the participating departments. All students must 
include courses on numerical and scientific computing in their programs; the faculty 
includes a strong group of specialists in numerical analysis. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, applicants with at least a B average 
(3.0 on a 4.0 scale) should have completed an undergraduate program of study that 
includes a strong emphasis on rigorous mathematics, preferably through the level of 
advanced calculus and abstract algebra. Admission will be based on the applicant's 
capability to do graduat' work in mathematics as demonstrated by the letters of rec- 
ommendation, grades in coursework and program of study. In some circumstances, a 
provisional admission may be given to applicants whose mathematical training is not 
sufficiently advanced. Previous education in an application area, such as physics, one 
of the engineering disciplines or economics, and a basic competence in computational 
techniques will be favorably considered in a student's application, although this is not 
a prerequisite. 

When a student has decided upon an area of specialization, an advisory committee 
is appointed by the Program Director. This committee is responsible for formulating 



Applied Mathematics Program (MAPL) 89 



with the student a course of study that leads toward the degree sought. This course of 
study must constitute a unified, coherent program in an acceptable field of specialization 
of applied mathematics and must meet with the approval of the Graduate Committee 
for Applied Mathematics. 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, the Applied Mathematics Program 
has the following degree requirements. 

For the master's degree, the Program offers a thesis and non-thesis option. In the 
thesis option, 24 credits of coursework are required with at least six more credits of 
thesis work. In the non-thesis option, 30 credits of coursework are required, and the 
student must pass a set of comprehensive examinations at the master's degree level. 
A scholarly paper is also required. In both options, the student must participate at 
least one semester in the Applied Mathematics Seminar. 

For the Ph.D. degree, the student must take 36 credits of coursework and pass a set 
of comprehensive written examinations at the Ph.D. level. In addition, the student 
must pass the Oral Candidacy Examination, which tests the student on advanced ma- 
terial to determine if he or she is prepared to do the research for a doctoral dissertation. 
At least 12 credits of dissertation work are required. The doctoral student must also 
participate at least two semesters in the Applied Mathematics Seminar. 

All M.A. and Ph.D. students must take at least one semester of numerical analysis. 
Details on the level and distribution of coursework and examinations in mathematics 
and in the applications area are given in the policy brochure of the Applied Mathematics 
Program available at the Applied Mathematics Office. 

Certified Minors 

The Applied Mathematics Program offers certified minors in applied mathematics 
to graduate students who are enrolled in other graduate degree programs at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. The successful completion of the requirements for such a minor 
will be recorded in the student's transcripts. A number of departments participating in 
the Applied Mathematics Program also permit the requirements of the certified minor 
to replace part of the degree requirements of the major department. 

A student who wishes to pursue a certified minor in applied mathematics must fill 
out an application form for participation in the Certified Minor Program. Such forms 
are available from the Office of the Director of the Applied Mathematics Program. 

Details on course requirements are contained in the policy brochure of the Applied 
Mathematics Program. 

Financial Assistance 

The Program offers teaching assistantships as the main source of support for graduate 
students in the Department of Mathematics. These assistantships carry a stipend plus 
remission of tuition of up to 10 hours each semester. Some research assistantships are 
also available through participating departments once a student has acquired advanced 
training. 

Additional Information 



For more specific information, contact: 
Director 
Applied Mathematics Program 



90 Architecture Program (ARCH) 



1104 Mathematics Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-5062 
For courses, see code MAPL. 

Architecture Program (ARCH) 

Professor and Acting Dean: Hill 

Graduate Director: Sachs 

Assistant to the Dean: Lapanne 

Professors: Bennett, Etlin, Hill, Lewis, Loss, Lu, Schlesinger, Steffian 

Associate Professors: Bechhoefer, DuPuy, Fogle, Schumacher, Vann 

Assistant Professors: Bell, Drost, Kelly, Masters, Thiratrakoolchai, Weiss 

Lecturers: Dynerman, Mclnturff, O'Meara, Wiedemann 

Instructor: Gardner 

The School of Architecture offers a graduate program leading to the Master of 
Architecture degree. The School's objective is to provide the highest possible quality 
professional education and training in architecture. Its program is organized around 
required courses in architectural and urban design, architectural history and theory, 
and architectural science and technology. Electives in architecture and related fields 
are available in a curriculum that is rigorous and challenging. The School is accredited 
by the National Architectural Accreditation Board and is a member of the Association 
of Collegiate Schools of Architecture assigned to the Northeastern Region. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission to the graduate program is competitive. In addition to the Graduate School 
requirements, candidates must submit the following: 1) three letters of recommendation 
from persons competent to judge the applicant's probable success in graduate archi- 
tectural school; 2) the Graduate Record Examination aptitude test results (not over 
five years old); and 3) evidence of creative ability in the form of a portfolio of drawings, 
photographs or other expressive media — details concerning format and content may 
be obtained from the School of Architecture. 

Three categories of students will be considered for admission: 1) students with a 
four-year bachelor's degree (architecture or equivalent major) from accredited archi- 
tecture schools; 2) students who do not have a bachelor's degree in architecture from 
an accredited college or university but have successfully completed specified under- 
graduate prerequisites that are outlined by the School of Architecture; and 3) students 
with an accredited professional bachelor's or master's degree in architecture. Students 
are expected to enroll on a full-time basis. For complete information on curricula 
requirements for these categories, write to the School of Architecture. 

1. Students entering the program with a four-year bachelor's degree in 
architecture from an accredited college or university normally need two 
years of graduate study to complete the requirements for the professional 
degree Master of Architecture. The established curriculum requires four 
semesters of academic work encompassing a total of 60 credits. Addi- 
tional credits may be required depending upon the admissions commit- 
tee's evaluation of the individual's academic and architectural experience. 



Architecture Program (ARCH) 91 



2. Students who enter the professional program without an architecture 
bachelor's degree will normally require seven semesters of design studio 
and other prerequisite courses. Students may be granted advanced stand- 
ing if they have completed the appropriate prerequisites. Information 
on required courses and curriculum may be obtained from the School 
of Architecture. 

3. A special option leading to the Master of Architecture degree is available 
for those students who already possess a professional degree in archi- 
tecture (B.Arch. or M.Arch.) from an accredited program. This option 
is designed to accommodate the needs of students who wish to do ad- 
vanced work beyond that required for the professional degree. Appli- 
cants must specify in detail the nature of the proposed course of study 
for review and approval by the admissions committee prior to their 
admission. The School currently provides resources for advanced work 
in international studies in architecture, arch'tectural history and pres- 
ervation, and architectural technology. 

4. A program leading to a Master's Certificate in Historic Preservation is 
available to M.Arch. candidates. The course of study includes 24 credits 
and an approved thesis, which may satisfy requirements of both the 
Architecture and Preservation curricula. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The School of Architecture is ideally located between Washington, D.C. and Bal- 
timore and surrounded by a number of historic communities and a varied physical 
environment. The resulting opportunity for environmental design study is unsurpassed. 
The School's resources include a modern physical plant that provides design worksta- 
tions for each student, a wood-working and model shop, an environmental testing 
laboratory, a computer-aided design facility and a darkroom. The School's library 
contains some 26,000 volumes and 6,000 current periodicals, making it one of the major 
architectural libraries in the nation. The National Trust Library for Historic Preser- 
vation, housed in the School, contains 11,000 volumes and 450 periodical titles. The 
slide collection numbers some 240,000 slides on architecture, landscape architecture, 
planning and technical subjects. The School also provides an opportunity for profes- 
sional experience and service through its nonprofit Center for Architectural Design 
and Research and CADRE Corporation, whose mission is to broaden the educational 
experience of students through environmental design services directed by faculty mem- 
bers and rendered to a variety of chents. 

Students continue to participate in field archaeology. Projects in the past have taken 
place in Tunisia, Turkey, Jordan, Israel and Sri Lanka. The School is a sponsoring 
member of CAHEP (Caesarea Ancient Harbor Excavation Project) now in its eleventh 
year. Qualified students participate in both land and underwater archaeology. 

Summer workshops for historic preservation are sponsored by the School in Cape 
May, NJ, a designated national historic landmark district, and Kiplin Hall, North 
Yorkshire, England. Students may earn credit doing hands-on restoration work and 
by attending lectures presented by visiting architects, preservationists and scholars. 

Financial Assistance 

The School of Architecture offers a limited and varying number of teaching and 
research assistantships, scholarships, fellowships and internships. Applicants should 
apply for financial assistance when submitting the application for admission. 



92 Art History Program (ARTH) 



Additional Information 

For more specific information on the program, contact: 
Graduate Director 
Arciiitecture Program 
School of Architecture 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301)405-6284 
For courses, see code ARCH. 

Art History Program (ARTH) 

Professors: Burnham, Denny, Driskell, Eyo, Farquhar, Miller, Rearick, Wheelock 

Associate Professors: Hargrove, Pressly, Spiro, Venit, Withers 

Assistant Professors: Colantuono, Kuo, Sandler 

Visiting Professor: Daniel Lettieri, C. Douglas Lewis (Fall), Marianna Schreve 

Simpson (Spring) 

The Department of Art History offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The Program is committed to the advanced study 
and scholarly interpretation of works of art from the prehistoric era to the present and 
is grounded in the concept of art as a humanistic experience. The faculty offer expertise 
in all phases of the history of Western art as well as the arts of Africa, Pre-Columbian 
America and East Asia. 

Admission and Degree Information 

For admission to the master's program, students should have an undergraduate 
degree from an accredited college or university, or its equivalent. Although the ap- 
plicant must demonstrate a general knowledge of art history, an undergraduate major 
in art history is not required. Students are required to submit the verbal and quantitative 
Graduate Record Examination scores for admission. 

For the master's degree, the student will: complete 30 credit hours at the 600 level, 
including ARTH 692, Methods of Art History; maintain a grade of B or better in 
coursework; pass the departmental language examination in either French, German or 
a language appropriate to the area studied, such as Japanese; complete a thesis that 
demonstrates competency in research and in original investigation; and pass a final oral 
examination on the thesis and the field that it represents. 

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree include 30 credit hours of courses 
taken at the 600 level or above with a grade of B or better; ARTH 692, Methods of 
Art History, if not previously taken; reading knowledge of both French and German 
or other languages appropriate to the area studied; oral and written qualifying exam- 
inations in the student's major and minor fields; a dissertation that demonstrates the 
student's capacity to perform independent research; and a final oral examination on 
the dissertation and the field it represents. 

All applicants are encouraged, and those seeking financial assistance are required, 
to submit their applications by February 1 for entrance in the fall term. For admission 
in the spring, applications must be completed by November 1. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Art Library houses approximately 70,000 volumes as well as a vast body of 
auxiliary material, including about a million sheets of microfiche. The Department's 



Art History Program (ARTH) 93 



visual aids facility contains an impressive 175,000 slides and a constantly growing battery 
of video technology. The Art Gallery, which is also located in the Art/Sociology Build- 
ing, maintains a lively and varied exhibition schedule and has a permanent collection 
of twentieth-century American paintings and prints and a study collection of African 
art. Graduate courses in museum studies are offered through the Gallery. For hands- 
on study of archaeological artifacts, the Department has the Lloyd and Jeanne Raport 
collection of some 130 objects from ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome and Pre-Columbian 
America. 

At the University of Maryland Caesarea Project, which is an ongoing archaeological 
project at Caesarea Maritima, Israel, qualified graduate students may take part in the 
excavations, and work at this site may lead to M.A. or Ph.D. dissertations. Students 
may also be eligible to participate in the archaeological fieldwork of Professor Eyo in 
Nigeria or Professor Miller at ancient Mexican sites. 

The University of Maryland is located in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. and is 30 
minutes from the National Gallery of Art and the National Gallery's Center for Ad- 
vanced Study in the Visual Arts, the Corcoran Gallery, the Phillips Collection, the 
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the National Museum of American Art, 
the Museum of African Art, the Freer and Arthur M. Sackler Galleries, which are 
devoted to the art of East Asia, the National Museum of Women in the Arts and many 
other major art museums. The campus is a 50-minute drive from such Baltimore in- 
stitutions as the Walters Art Gallery and the Baltimore Museum of Art. In addition 
to the University's library resources, graduate students have access to the Library of 
Congress, the Archives of American Art, the libraries of Dumbarton Oaks and other 
research facilities. In order to enhance the student's curricular choices, the Department 
maintains an arrangement for course exchange with the Art History department of the 
Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. To similar effect, the Department is a member 
of the Washington Area Art History Consortium, which unites the graduate art history 
departments of the greater Washington area. 

The Department organizes a variety of liaison activities with leading cultural insti- 
tutions in the Washington-BaUimore area. The Middle Atlantic Symposium in the 
History of Art is sponsored jointly by the Department and the National Gallery of 
Art; this annual event provides the opportunity for advanced graduate students from 
universities in the Middle Atlantic region to present their research at a professional 
forum. Special seminars are frequently given by curators of such local collections as 
the National Gallery of Art, the Freer Gallery or the Department of Prints and Pho- 
tographs at the Library of Congress. A program has been initiated whereby a Senior 
Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) will give two 
graduate courses in the Department. In a related program, CASVA Fellows will meet 
with our students for informal colloquia. Plans are now formed for an annual meeting, 
sponsored jointly by the Department and CASVA, that will bring together senior 
scholars from both institutions plus guest speakers, the papers to be published by 
CASVA. 

Financial Assistance 

Fellowships are awarded strictly on the basis of merit by the College of Arts and 
Humanities and by the Graduate School. Several graduate assistantships are awarded 
by the Department. Also, four Museum Fellowships are awarded each semester by the 
Department of Art History for research at major museums in the Washington-Baltimore 
area, and one Museum Fellowship is awarded for research in Europe. The Department's 



94 Art (ARTT) 

Frank Di Federico Fellowship, in memory of the late Professor Di Federico, is for 
work on the doctoral dissertation. In honor of its former chairman, the Department 
has established the George Levitine Art History Endowment, in support of research 
activities of graduate students as well as faculty. 

Additional Information 

A more detailed description of Departmental requirements for the above programs 
and other information may be obtained from: 

Graduate Secretary 

Department of Art History 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-1479 
For information on the Master of Education in Art Education, refer to the section of 
this catalog devoted to Secondary Education. For courses, see code ARTH. 

Art (ARTT) 

Professor and Chairman: Morrison 

Professors: DeMonte, Driskell, Lapinski, Morrison, Truitt 

Associate Professors: Craig, Forbes, Gelman, Kehoe, Klank, Krushenick, Niese, 

Pogue, Richardson 

Assistant Professors: Blotner, Humphrey, Ruppert 

The Department of Art offers a program of graduate study leading to the degree of 
Master of Fine Arts. The Art Department's Graduate Faculty consists of over 17 active 
professional artists specializing in the traditional studio areas of painting, sculpture, 
printmaking, drawing and photography. Additional interests are reflected in course 
offerings such as papermaking, environmental art and mixed media. 

Studio facilities are spacious and well-equipped. Painting students are able to work 
in oils, acrylic, watercolor, fresco and encaustic. An annual methods and materials 
course is of special interest. The sculpture area includes a woodshop, foundry, shops 
for welding, forging, stone and wood carving, and an environmental sculpture space. 
Printmakers can choose to work with intaglio, lithography, photo-etching, silkscreen 
or woodcuts. Drawing and papermaking facilities are also available as well as special 
project rooms. There is a complete darkroom for photography students. 

Each graduate student is provided with a studio and access to models and classroom 
facilities. Environmental works and sculptural installations may be built both indoors 
and outside on the grounds. 

There are two galleries and two libraries within the Art Department's building. The 
University of Maryland Art Gallery features national and international exhibitions as 
well as faculty and MFA thesis shows. The West Gallery provides student-organized 
exhibitions by and for undergraduate students and a space for social activities for both 
students and faculty members. The Art Library, which is shared by the Art and Art 
History Departments, provides both visual and literary reference volumes in addition 
to films and videos. The slide library boasts a growing collection of reproductions of 
artworks from significant art movements. 



Astronomy Program (ASTR) 95 



Admission and Degree Information 

The Art Department requires an undergraduate degree with an art major from an 
accredited college or university or its equivalent for admission to the graduate program. 
The candidate should have a minimum of 30 credit hours of undergraduate work in 
studio courses and 12 credit hours in art history courses. Undergraduate work should 
also include other humanities area courses. Special Departmental requirements must 
also be met. Candidates for the Master of Fine Arts degree will be required to present 
an exhibition of their thesis work, write an abstract based on the thesis and present an 
oral defense of the thesis. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department offers seven teaching assistantships and the College offers two- year 
fellowships. A number of Graduate School fellowships are also available. Applicants 
should submit their applications by February 1 for consideration for a graduate assist- 
antship or fellowship. 

Additional Information 

For further information, contact: 
The Art Department 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-1442 
For courses, see code ARTT. 

Astronomy Program (ASTR) 

Professor and Director: Bell 

Professors: A'Hearn, Blitz, Erickson (Emeritus), Harrington, Heckmann, Kerr 

(Emeritus), Kundu, Papadopoulos, Rose, Trimble, Wentzel, Wilson 

Adjunct Professors: Hauser, Holt, Westerhout 

Associate Professors: Eichler, Matthews, Vogel, Zipoy 

Assistant Professor: Mundy 

The Department of Astronomy offers programs of study leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The M.S. program includes both a thesis 
and non-thesis option. 

A full schedule of courses in all fields of astronomy is offered including galactic 
astronomy, general astrophysics, solar system astrophysics, observational astronomy, 
celestial mechanics, solar physics, study of the interstellar medium, extragalactic as- 
tronomy and plasma astrophysics. Some areas in which the faculty focus their research 
efforts are stellar atmospheres and spectra, comets, solar radio astronomy, the inter- 
stellar medium, active galaxies and plasma astrophysics. 

Admission and Degree Information 

No formal undergraduate course work in astronomy is required. However, an en- 
tering student should have a basic, working knowledge of the subject, which could be 
obtained from one of many elementary textbooks. A more advanced knowledge will 
of course enable a student to progress more rapidly during the first year of graduate 
work. 



96 Astronomy Program (ASTR) 



A satisfactory score on the GRE Advanced Test in Physics is required before an 
appHcant's admission to the Graduate School will be considered, but the Graduate 
Entrance Committee may waive this requirement in special cases. Instead, the com- 
mittee may set other conditions as a requirement for admission to be fulfilled either 
before admission or during the first year at Maryland. 

During the first two years of the Ph.D. program, full-time students must take at least 
four and normally will take all of the principal courses: ASTR 600, 605, 610, 620, 640 
and 670 plus the required courses in physics. Students will be aided at the end of the 
first year in choosing a suitable research project that is required during the second year. 
Students may qualify for the Ph.D. program based on their coursework and research 
project performance and on a written examination integrating the six principal courses. 
The examination is taken during the summer after the second year. 

Course requirements for the Ph.D. include the principal courses, at least two ad- 
ditional advanced astronomy courses and twelve credits of advanced physics. In ad- 
dition, students must acquire some personal experience with modern observational 
methods and analysis, normally by accompanying a faculty member to a suitable ob- 
ser\'atory. All of the principal courses are required before advancement to candidacy. 

Candidates for the Master of Science Degree with thesis are required to complete 
24 credits exclusive of registration for master's research. At least 12 of these credits 
must be in the major area and at least 12 must be at the 600 level (not necessarily the 
same 12). In addition, at least six credits must be in a related field (supporting area). 

The non-thesis option of M.S. degree requires six credits in the major at the 600 
level in addition to the general requirements described above. That is, a total of 30 
credits are required of which 18 must be in the major and at least 18 at the 600 level. 
The student must also pass a written examination, usually consisting of the written part 
of the Ph.D. qualifying Examination with appropriately chosen passing requirements. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Astronomy Program carries on an extensive research program in the areas 
discussed above with the graduate students playing an active role in this research. 
Approximately one-fourth of all research papers published have a graduate student as 
one of the authors. 

The Program has strong interaction with national astronomy observatories, where 
many students and faculty maintain observing programs, and also with neighboring 
scientific institutes. A major program of cooperative research has been established with 
the Goddard Space Flight Center, where a number of graduate students conduct re- 
search. There are also contacts with the Naval Observatory, the Naval Research Lab 
and other government agencies. 

The University of Maryland has recently joined with the University of California at 
Berkeley and the University of Illinois in a project to expand and upgrade the radio 
observatory located at Hat Creek in California. When the initial stages of the project 
are completed in a few years, the new array will be the largest such instrument operating 
at mm wavelengths. This will be a major tool for the exploration of the interstellar 
medium. When the system is fully operational, it will be possible to do remote observing 
from the Maryland site. Data reduction will be possible "in house" because of a major 
expansion in the computer facilities in the Astronomy Program. 



Biochemistry Program (BCHM) 97 



Financial Assistance 

The Astronomy Program offers both teaching and research assistantships. In 1989- 
90 there were 16 teaching assistants and 10 research assistants. Most students receive 
assistantships to cover the summer period. These are either with faculty in the Program 
or with staff members at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Some summer teaching 
assistantships are also available. 

The deadline for financial support applications is February 1 for assistantships and 
fellowships. 

Additional Information 

For more specific information, contact: 
Director 

Astronomy Program 

1207 Computer and Space Sciences Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-3001 
For courses, see code ASTR. 

Biochemistry Program (BCHM) 

Pro/<?xsors.-Armstrong, Dunaway-Mariano, Gerlt, Hansen, Munn, Ponnamperuma 
Professors Emeriti: Holmland, Keeney, Veitch 
Associate Professor: Sampugna 
Assistant Professor: Julin 

The Graduate Program in Biochemistry is the College Park component of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Graduate Program in Biochemistry, which also has components at 
the University of Maryland Baltimore County and at the University of Maryland Med- 
ical School and Dental School in Baltimore. The Program offers study leading to Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Research specialization at College Park 
is available in drug metabolism, enzyme mechanisms, bioorganic chemistry, lipid bio- 
chemistry, membrane structure and function, metabolic regulation, nucleic acid bio- 
chemistry, nutritional biochemistry and x-ray crystallography. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The M.S. degree program offers both the thesis and non-thesis options. Applicants 
should have completed an undergraduate program of study with strong emphasis on 
chemistry and/or biology and appropriate supporting courses in mathematics and phys- 
ics. Before obtaining a degree in the program, a student must demonstrate adequate 
preparation in biochemistry and in analytical, organic and physical chemistry. Diag- 
nostic examinations in these subjects are offered to students at the beginning of their 
first semester for this purpose. Students who perform unsatisfactorily on these exam- 
inations or who may not have had undergraduate preparation in one or more of these 
areas will be advised to register for appropriate courses. Information on coursework, 
comprehensive examinations and the research interests of the faculty is available for 
the guidance of degree candidates. 



98 Botany Program (BOTN) 



Facilities and Special Resources 

Biochemistry research is conducted in a new wing occupied in 1975. In addition to 
well-equipped research laboratories, the following central facilities are available: animal 
colony, fermentation pilot plant, analytical ultracentrifuge, PDP-11 and VAX com- 
puters, a computer graphics facility, liquid scintillation counters, nuclear magnetic 
resonance and mass spectrometers, and a chemistry- biochemistry library. 

Financial Assistance 

Entering graduate students are normally supported on graduate teaching assistant- 
ships. Teaching assistants usually instruct undergraduate laboratory and recitation classes 
and receive in return a tuition waiver for a 10-credit program of graduate study each 
semester. 

Additional Information 

Information on requirements and research interests of the faculty may be obtained 
from: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-1796 
For courses, see BCHM. 

Botany Program (BOTN) 

Professor and Acting Chair: Teramura 

Distinguished Professor: Diener 

Professors: Bean, Corbett, Gantt, Kantzes, Kennedy\ Krusberg, Kung, Lockard , 

Patterson, Reveal, Sisler 

Associate Professors: Barnett, Bottino, Cooke, Forseth, Grybauskas, Motta, 

Racusen, Steiner, Sze, Wolniak 

Assistant Professors: Dudash, Fenster, Hutcheson, Straney, Van Valkenburg, Watson 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Cohen 

Affiliated Associate Professor: Inouye 

Joint appointment with Horticulture 

Joint appointment with Secondary Education 

The Department of Botany offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. In consultation with faculty advisers, students de- 
velop course programs and research problems according to their individual intellectual 
and professional needs. The program's objective is to equip the student with the back- 
ground and techniques for a career in plant biology in academic, governmental, in- 
dustrial or private laboratories. 

Areas of specialization in plant biology include biochemistry, cell biology, devel- 
opmental biology, ecology, evolution, genetics and molecular biology, host- pathogen 
interactions, mycology, nematology, pathology, phycology, physiology, systematics and 
virology. 



Business and Management Program (BMGT) 99 



A wide range of job opportunities are available for M.S. and Ph.D. degree holders 
in botany. A high percentage of our graduates currently find appropriate positions 
within a short time of graduation. 

Admission and Degree Information 

There are no special admission requirements. A high degree of intellectual excellence 
is of greater consequence than the completion of a particular curriculum at the un- 
dergraduate level. While the degree requirements are flexible, they involve a dem- 
onstration of competence in the broad field of botany, as well as the completion of 
courses in other disciplines that support modern competence in this field. A foreign 
language is required only if it is deemed essential by the student's advisory committee. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department's laboratories are equipped to investigate most phases of botanical 
and molecular biological research. Field and greenhouse facilities are available for 
research. Major pieces of laboratory equipment include transmission and scanning 
electron microscopes, ultracentrifuges, liquid chromatographs, mass spectrometers, 
low-speed centrifuges, ultramicrotomes, infra-red spectrophotometers, recording spec- 
trophotometers, gas chromatographs and environmentally controlled growth chambers. 
Special facilities available for research include: a herbarium, biochemistry preparation 
rooms, dark rooms, cold rooms and special culture facilities for algae, fungi and higher 
plants. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance is available in the form of competitive fellowships and graduate 
assistantships for teaching and research. 
Additional Information 

The Department has a special brochure available upon request. For specific infor- 
mation on Departmental programs, admission procedures or financial aid contact: 

Chair 

Department of Botany 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-1649 
For courses, see code BOTN. 

Business and Management Program (BMGT) 

Dean: Lamone 

Associate Dean: Leete 

Assistant Deans: Kelly, Mattingly, Stocker 

Director of Doctoral Program: Sims 

Director of MBA & MS Programs: Waikart 

Assistant Director of MBA & MS Programs: Walsh 

Chairpersons: Kolodny, Loeb, Golden, Durand, Locke, Corsi, Hevner 

Professors Emeriti: Taff , Wright 

Professors: Assad, Ball, Bartol, Bodin, Bradford, Carroll, Chen, Durand, Gannon, 

Gass, Golden, Gordon, Greer, Haslem, Jolson, Kolodny, Kotz, Lamone, Leete, 

Levine, Locke, S. Loeb, Masi (Affiliated), Preston, Senbet, Simon, Sims, Yao 



1 00 Business and Management Program (BMGT) 



Associate Professors: Alavi, Alt, Bedingfield, Biehal, Chang, Corsi, Courtright (Ret), 
Edelson, Eun, Fromovitz, Grimm, Gupta, Hevner, Krapfel, M. Loeb, Nickels, 
Olian, Poist, Smith, Taylor, Widhelm 

Assistant Professors: Ali, Basu, Calfee, Dresner, Fu, Grimshaw, Jang, KaKu, 
LeClere, Mattingly (Affihated), Raschid, Scheraga, Schick, Scott, Seshadri, Soubra, 
Stephens, Stockdale, Unal, Windle 

The College of Business and Management offers graduate study leading to the degrees 
of Master of Business Administration (MBA), Master of Science in Business and 
Management (M.S.). and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). The College's MBA program 
is accredited nationally by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. 
Only about 30 percent of the more than 1 ,000 graduate programs in the country are 
accredited by the AACSB, a reflection of the quality of facuhy, students, curriculum, 
and facilities. 

Areas of faculty speciahzation include accounting, entrepreneurship, finance, man- 
agement science and statistics, information systems, international business, marketing, 
management and organization, transportation, and business and public policy. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission criteria for the MBA, M.S. and Ph.D. programs are based on: (1) quality 
of undergraduate and graduate coursework; (2) score on the Graduate Management 
Admission Test (GMAT); (3) letters of recommendation; (4) other relevant information 
and professional experience; and (5) written essays of objectives. Prospective applicants 
should contact the program at (301) 405-2278 for master's degree application materials 
and (301) 405-2213 for the Ph.D. program. 

MBA Program The College of Business and Management offers an MBA program 
designed to provide the educational foundation for those students with the potential 
to exhibit the highest degree of excellence in future careers as professional managers. 
The MBA program requires 54 credits of coursework (18 courses of which five are 
electives), which is normally four semesters for a full-time student. There is no thesis 
requirement. Successful students in the program are expected to demonstrate the fol- 
lowing: (1) a thorough and integrated knowledge of the basic tools, concepts and 
theories relating to professional management; (2) behavioral and analytical skills nec- 
essary to deal creatively and effectively with organizations and management problems; 
(3) an understanding of the economic, political, technological and social environments 
in which organizations operate; (4) a sense of professional and personal integrity and 
social responsibility in the conduct of managerial affairs both internal and external to 
the organization. 

Program prerequisites include a bachelor's degree, successful completion of a college- 
level calculus course and facility with the microcomputer. 

About one-half of the students enrolled are full-time; these students take 15 credits 
during each semester of the first year and 12 credits each semester of their second year. 
Part-time students take six credits each regular semester and during the summer. Most 
courses for part-time students are at night. Students whose cumulative grade point 
average falls below 3.0 will be placed on probation and will be given a specified amount 
of time to raise the average to a 3.0. Failure to do so will result in academic dismissal 
from the program. 



Business and Management Program (BMGT) 101 



Maryland MBA graduates obtain employment in a wide spectrum of organizations. 
Starting salaries typically range from $30,000 to $60,000 per year. 

M.S. Program The College offers an M.S. program for students wishing to concentrate 
in Accounting/Information Systems, Information Systems, Operations Research or Sta- 
tistics. The Program is designed for students with strong quantitative skills who desire 
a more technical management education. Students typically come to the program with 
undergraduate majors in business, engineering, sciences, information and computer 
systems, mathematics or economics. Prerequisites include calculus and a high-level 
computer language. Additional prerequisites in business and management fundamental 
courses are determined by the student's background. Depending on the concentration 
selected, the program calls for either 30 or 33 credit hours beyond the prerequisites. 
A thesis option is offered that may represent six credits in the area of concentration. 
Program progress and admission standards described above for the MBA program are 
also applicable to the M.S. program. 

Ph.D. Program The Ph.D. program is designed to produce outstanding scholars in 
management-related disciplines. Thus, a strong research philosophy pervades the entire 
program. Only full-time students are admitted. The low student-to- faculty ratio fosters 
a high degree of interaction between faculty and students on research projects of mutual 
interest, frequently culminating in journal articles. Students whose career aspirations 
are congruent with the program's research orientation can look forward to a learning 
experience that is not only demanding but also stimulating and enriching. Recent 
graduates are employed at the following academic institutions: Boston College, Co- 
lumbia University, Georgia Tech, Houston, Penn State, Syracuse, Texas A & M, 
Vanderbilt University, the University of Texas and the University of Washington. 

All Ph.D. students are provisionally admitted and must achieve a 3.25 GPA in each 
of their first two semesters. Failure to do so results in being placed on probation for 
one semester. The student will then be dismissed unless a 3.25 overall GPA is obtained. 

Ph.D. course requirements depend on the amount of relevant prior study. Prepa- 
ration in calculus is required for admission. 

The Ph.D. student may select a single major (18 credits), one minor (12 credits) and 
a set of research tools courses (12 credits). Major areas of concentration may be chosen 
from among such fields as accounting, finance, human resource management and labor 
relations, information systems, management science and statistics, marketing, orga- 
nizational behavior, management strategy and policy, and transportation and physical 
distribution. 

Minors and second majors may include areas inside or outside the College of Business 
and Management. Typical outside minors include computer science, economics, en- 
gineering, government and politics, mathematics, psychology and sociology. 

Students are required to take written comprehensive examinations in the major area 
and the minor or research tools subject area. After all coursework and written exams 
have been successfully completed, each student must pass a comprehensive oral ex- 
amination. Having passed the oral exam, the student is advanced to candidacy. 

Each Ph.D. candidate prepares a formal dissertation proposal and defends it at an 
open meeting of faculty and students. The proposal should clearly indicate how the 



1 02 Business and Management Program (BMGT) 



dissertation will make a contribution to the literature of the field. Every doctoral student 
must register for a minimum of 12 dissertation research credits during the program. 

MBA/JD Joint Program 

The College of Business and Management and the School of Law of the University 
of Maryland at Baltimore offer a joint program of studies leading to MBA and JD 
degrees. Under the terms of the joint program, a student may earn both degrees in 
four academic years. The accelerated program is possible because some courses can 
be credited toward both degrees. Candidates must apply for admission to the Law 
School at Baltimore as well as to the Graduate School at College Park and must be 
admitted to both programs. 

Under the joint program 75 credits in law school coupled with 39 credits in business 
courses are required for graduation. Fifteen credits of law will be substituted for MBA 
elective coursework. Grade point averages in each program will be computed separately 
and students must maintain minimum standards in each school to continue in the 
program. The Graduate School will not accept transfer credit from coursework taken 
outside the joint program. A student must complete both programs satisfactorily in 
order to receive both degrees. The MBA and the JD degrees must be awarded si- 
multaneously. A student whose enrollment in either program is terminated may elect 
to complete work for the degree in which he or she remains enrolled, but such com- 
pletion must be upon the same conditions as required of regular (nonjoint program) 
degree candidates. Student programs must be approved by the law school adviser for 
the joint program and the MBA Program Director. For further discussion of admission 
and degree requirements, students should see the above and consult the entry in the 
University of Maryland School of Law catalog. 

MBA/MPM Joint Program 

The College of Business and Management and the School of Public Affairs offer a 
joint program of studies leading to the MBA and MPM degrees. Under the terms of 
the joint program, a student may earn both degrees in approximately five semesters. 
The accelerated program is possible because some courses can be credited toward both 
degrees. Candidates must be admitted to both programs. 

Under the joint program, 66 credits are required for graduation, split roughly equally 
between the programs. Grade point averages in each program will be computed sep- 
arately and students must maintain minimum standards in each school to continue in 
the program. A student must complete both programs satisfactorily in order to receive 
both degrees. A student whose enrollment in either program is terminated may elect 
to complete work for the degree in which he or she remains enrolled, but such com- 
pletion must be upon the same conditions as required of regular (nonjoint program) 
degree candidates. Student programs must be approved by the Associate Dean of the 
School of Public Affairs and the MBA Program Director. For further discussion of 
admission and degree requirements, students should see the general admission require- 
ments for each program. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The College faculty has been recruited from the graduate programs of leading uni- 
versities in the nation. They are dedicated scholars, teachers and professional leaders 
with a strong commitment to academic excellence and the education of the professional 
manager and researcher. 



Chemical Engineering Program (ENCH) 1 03 



Special programs offered by the College include courses in entrepreneurship through 
the Michael D. Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship and an MBA practicum course, 
BMGT 791, in which students research a problem of significant management concern 
in a participating firm or agency. Through graduate program requirements and faculty 
research activities, students gain exposure to private enterprise, to the public sector 
and to the vast education, research, library and cultural resources of Washington, D.C. 

The students also have access to the exceptional academic and professional resources 
of the College Park campus including excellent library and computer facilities. A remote 
computer terminal and on-line teletype facilities are located in the building. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial aid is available to qualified students in the form of fellowships, graduate 
assistantships, work-study, scholarships, and for Ph.D. students, instructorships. 

Additional Information 

The College has available brochures that give specific degree requirements for the 
MBA and Ph.D. programs. Initial inquiries should be directed to: 

Director of the Masters Programs 

College of Business and Management 

or 

Director of the Doctoral Program 

College of Business and Management 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-2278 
For courses, see code BMGT. 

Chemical Engineering Program (ENCH) 

Professor and Director: McAvoy 

Professors: Asbjornsen, Cadman, Gentry, Regan, *Sengers, Smith, Weigand 

Associate Professor: Calabrese, Choi, Gasner 

Assistant Professors: Bentley, Lee, Mavrovouniotis, Payne, Rao, Wang, Zafiriou 

*Joint appointment with Institute for Physical Science and Technology 

The program director, an adviser and the student form an individual plan of graduate 
study compatible with the student's interest and background. The general chemical 
engineering program is focused on four major areas: applied polymer science, bio- 
chemical engineering, transport phenomena and process systems. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The programs leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are 
open to qualified students holding the Bachelor of Science degree. Admission may be 
granted to students with degrees in engineering and science areas from accredited 
programs, and it may be necessary in some cases to require courses to fulfill this 
background. The general regulations of the Graduate School apply in reviewing ap- 
plications. 

The M.S. program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option. The equivalent of at 
least three years of full-time study beyond the B.S. degree is required for the Ph.D. 



104 Chemical Physics Program (CHPH) 



degree. All students seeking graduate degrees in Chemical Engineering must enroll in 
ENCH 610, 620, 630 and 640 if they have not completed equivalent courses. In addition 
to Graduate School regulations, special degree requirements are included in Depart- 
mental publications. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

A number of special facilities are available for graduate study and research and are 
coordinated through the Polymer Reaction Engineering Laboratory, the Chemical Proc- 
ess Systems Laboratory, the Laboratory for Biochemical Engineering and the Bio- 
chemical Reactor Scale Up Facility. These laboratories contain advanced digital process 
control computers, AI computers, polymer processing equipment and polymerization 
reactors, polymer characterization instrumentation, a laser anemometry facility, a thermo- 
hydraulics facility and an aerosol characterization faciUty. 

Additional Information 

Director 

Chemical Engineering Program 
2115 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-1935 
For courses, see code ENCH. 

Chemical Physics Program (CHPH) 

Director: Mcllrath 

Associate Director: Alexander 

Professors: (CHEM) Alexander, Greer, Khanna, Mignerey, Miller, Moore, Tossell, 

Weiner; (ENCH) Gentry; (ENEE) Davis, HochuH, Lee; (ENME) Gupta; (IPST) 

Coplan, Dorfman, Ginter, Mcllrath, Sengers, Wilkerson; (PHYS) Das-Sarma, 

Einstein, Ferrell, Lynn 

Associate Professors: (ENCH) Calabrese; (ENEE) Dagenais; (ENME) Radermacher; 

(IPST) Gammon; (IPST/CHEM) Thirumalai; (IPST/PHYS) Kirkpatrick; (METO) 

Dickerson, Elhngson; (PHYS) Williams 

Assistant Professors: (CHEM) Reutt-Robey; (ENME) Herold; (IPST) Hill; (IPST/ 

ENEE) Milchberg 

Adjunct Professor: (IPST/NIH) Nossal 

The Chemical Physics Program offers graduate study leading to both the Master 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees for students who wish to establish a profes- 
sional career in which a knowledge of both physics and chemistry is needed. Students 
can concentrate their studies in chemistry, physics, chemical engineering, electrical 
engineering, mechanical engineering or meteorology. 

The Chemical Physics Program is under the joint sponsorship of the Institute for 
Physical Science and Technology and six academic departments: Chemistry, Physics, 
Electrical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Meteor- 
ology. The Chemical Physics Committee oversees the program and is made up of 
representatives from the sponsoring units with the program director as its chair. The 
Chemical Physics Program Office administers the program and is affiliated with the 



Chemical Physics Program (CHPH) 105 



Institute for Physical Science and Technology. A booklet describing Chemical Physics 
at Maryland (College Park) can be obtained from the Chemical Physics Office upon 
request. 

Faculty concentrate their research on a diversity of disciplines such as statistical 
mechanics, laser spectroscopy, intermolecular energy transfer, molecular dynamics, 
phase transitions, properties of fluids, fluctuation phenomena, biophysics, particle scat- 
tering, working fluid mixtures, thermodynamic cycles and surface science. Access to 
national research laboratories in the Washington metropolitan area is made possible 
through the joint research programs between these laboratories and the Chemical 
Physics faculty and through a cooperative graduate program in Molecular and Cellular 
Biophysics, which is jointly sponsored by the University of Maryland and the National 
Institutes of Health. 
Admission and Degree Information 

Students with an undergraduate major in physics, chemistry, engineering or math- 
ematics may apply. A strong background in physics and some background in chemistry 
is desirable for successful completion of the program. Students admitted to the Chemical 
Physics Program will also be listed in the department of their chosen area of concen- 
tration. 

The program will be adjusted to the needs of an individual student. For instance, if 
a candidate does not possess the required undergraduate background in both physics 
and chemistry, a faculty adviser will prescribe appropriate undergraduate courses. 
Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must pass the chemical physics qualifying examination. 
This exam is based on material covered by the physics qualifying examination in the 
areas of classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, thermody- 
namics, electricity and magnetism. It also covers chemical physics, atomic and molecular 
spectroscopy and structure, molecular bonding theory, chemical reaction dynamics and 
chemical thermodynamics. In addition to passing the Ph.D. qualifier exam, students 
must also take a graduate laboratory course, two semesters of seminar, two advanced 
courses and 12 credit hours of thesis research concluded by the presentation and defense 
of an original dissertation. 

The M.S. degree program offers both a thesis or non-thesis option and is arranged 
for students on an individual basis with the approval of an adviser associated with the 
Chemical Physics Program. The thesis option requires the completion of 30 credit hours 
of coursework , including six hours of thesis research credit , a graduate laboratory course 
unless specifically exempted, two semesters of seminar and two advanced courses. In 
addition, the student must complete a thesis and pass an oral examination, which 
includes a defense of the thesis. For the non-thesis option, the student must complete 
30 credit hours of coursework, including a graduate laboratory course unless specifically 
exempted, submission of a scholarly paper and a master's level pass on the Ph.D. 
qualifying exam. Students must maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average for both 
options. 
Financial Assistance 

Teaching and research assistantships are available for qualified students. 
Additional Information 

Requests for further information concerning the Chemical Physics Program can be 
obtained by writing to: 



106 Chemistry Program (CHEM) 



Professor T. J. Mcllrath, Director 
Chemical Physics Program (I.P.S.T.) 
I.P.S.T. Building, Rm. 1109 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-4781 
For courses, see code CHPH. 

Chemistry Program (CHEM) 

Professor and Chair: Greer 

Professor and Associate Chair: DeShong 

Professors: Alexander, Ammon, Armstrong, Bellama, Castellan, Dunaway-Mariano, 

Freeman, Gerlt, Gordon, Greer, Grim, Hansen, Helz, Huheey, Jarvis, Khanna, 

Kozarich, Mariano, Mazzocchi, Mignerey, Miller, Moore, Munn, O'Haver, 

Ponnamperuma, Poulos, Stewart, Tossell, Walters, Weeks, Weiner 

Professors Emeriti: Adler, Henery-Logan, Holmlund, Keeney, McNesby, Pratt, 

Rollinson, Stuntz, Svirbely, Vanderslice, Veitch 

Associate Professors: Boyd, DeShong, DeVoe, Kasler, Murphy, Ondov, Sampugna, 

Thirumalai 

Assistant Professors: Eichhorn, Falvey, Herndon, Julin, Poli, Reutt-Robey 

The Chemistry Department offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science 
or the Doctor of Philosophy degrees with specialization in the fields of analytical 
chemistry, biochemistry, bioorganic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, chemical phys- 
ics (in cooperation with the Institute of Physical Sciences & Technology and the De- 
partment of Physics and Astronomy), environmental chemistry, inorganic chemistry, 
nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry and physical chemistry. The graduate program in 
biochemistry is described separately in this catalog. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The M.S. degree program offers both the thesis and non-thesis option. Copies of 
regulations concerning diagnostic examinations, comprehensive examinations and other 
matters pertaining to coursework are available from the Department of Chemistry and 
Biochemistry. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has many special research facilities to support research in the fields 
listed above. Facilities include "clean" rooms for lunar and environmental sample 
analysis, X-ray crystallographic instrumentation, two mass spectrometers, eight NMR 
spectrometers including 60, 90, 200, 400 and 500 MHz Fourier-transform NMR spec- 
trometers, ESCA spectrometers, ultracentrifuges, analytical optical spectrometers, a 
VAX network and a computer graphics facility. Departmental research is supported 
on two computers in the Computer Science Building, a UNI VAC 1100/92 and an IBM 
3081, both of which are accessible by remote time-sharing terminals. The Department 
has an excellent glassblowing shop, a student-faculty machine shop and access to other 
campus machine shops. The Chemistry Library has an extensive collection in chemistry, 
biochemistry and other fields. A computer terminal is located in the Chemistry Library 
for literature searching. 



Civil Engineering Program (ENCE) 107 



Financial Assistance 

Entering graduate students are normally supported on graduate teaching assistant- 
ships. Teaching assistants usually instruct undergraduate laboratory and recitation classes 
and receive in return a tuition waiver for a 10 credit program of graduate study each 
semester. 

Additional Information 

A Department brochure describes the graduate program and the research interests 
of the faculty. For a copy of the brochure, or for specific information on graduate 
programs in chemistry, admissions procedures or financial aid, contact: 
Director of Graduate Studies 
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-1796 
For courses, see CHEM. 

Civil Engineering Program (ENCE) 

Professor and Chair: Colville 

Professors: Aggour, Albrecht, Birkner, Carter, McCuen, Pilcher, Ragan, Sternberg, 

Witczak, Wolde-Tinsae 

Associate Professors: Ayyub, P. Chang, Garber, Goodings, Hao, Schelling, 

Schonfeld, Schwartz, Vannoy 

Assistant Professors: Austin, Bernold, G. L. Chang, Davis, Kartam 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers graduate courses leading to the Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. All programs are planned on an individual 
basis by the student and an adviser taking into consideration the student's background 
and special interests. Course and research opportunities are available in the general 
areas of transportation and urban systems, environmental engineering, water resources, 
structural engineering, geotechnical engineering, and construction engineering and 
management. In general, emphasis is on learning sound engineering principles and 
applying them to human needs. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Applicants for admission should hold a B.S. degree in civil engineering. However, 
applicants with undergraduate degrees in other disciplines may be accepted with the 
stipulation that deficiencies in prerequisite undergraduate coursework be corrected 
before enrolling in graduate courses. There are no entrance examinations required for 
the program. 

The M.S. degree program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option. The Depart- 
ment's policies and requirements are the same as those of the Graduate School. 

The requirements for the Ph.D. degree are also the same as those posed by the 
Graduate School. The student and an adviser develop an approved program of study 
suited to his or her individual needs. Before admission to candidacy, the student must 
pass a qualifying examination, which is normally taken after the coursework is at least 
75 percent completed. There is no language requirement for the Ph.D. 



1 08 Classics Program (CLAS) 



Facilities and Special Resources 

Departmental research facilities include laboratories in the following areas: trans- 
portation, systems analysis, environmental engineering, hydraulics, remote sensing, 
structures and soil mechanics. Computer facilities include the Computer Science Cen- 
ter's Unisys 1100/92 and IBM 3081 computers complemented by remote terminals and 
mini- and micro-computer systems located within the department, and a joint Civil 
Engineering/Mechanical Engineering CAD Laboratory. 

The Washington and Baltimore metropolitan areas are easily accessible for data, 
field studies, library access, contacts with national organizations and attendance at 
national meetings. The location of the University of Maryland offers a unique oppor- 
tunity to obtain an advanced degree in civil engineering. 

Additional Information 

Chair 

Department of Civil Engineering 
Engineering Classroom Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-1980 
For courses, see code ENCE. 

Classics Program (CLAS) 

Professor and Chair: Rowland 

Associate Professors: Duffy, Hallett, Hubbe, Staley 

Assistant Professors: Doherty, Stehle 

Visiting Faculty (1990-91): Fiedler, Dexter, Jones, Mejer 

The Department of Classical Studies offers a graduate program of study with spe- 
cializations in Latin, Latin and Greek, and Classical Civilization leading to the Master 
of Arts degree. The program provides students with advanced study of the Latin and/ 
or Greek languages and literatures in the context of a broader and deeper knowledge 
and understanding of Greek and Roman culture and civilization. In addition to ad- 
vanced courses in language, each student will be required to take coursework in related 
disciplines outside of the Classics Department. Some individual programs may require 
more than 30 hours. Students may choose one of three tracks toward the degree: Latin, 
Latin and Greek, or Civilization of the Classical World. The Department of Ancient 
Studies at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County cooperates in offering this 
program; however, no more than 12 credits earned at UMBC will be accepted to satisfy 
the requirements for this degree. 

Requirements and Areas of Concentration 

The Latin program requires a minimum of 30 hours of approved coursework, in- 
cluding six credits of thesis research. Twelve of these credits must come from at least 
600-level Latin courses: six credits must be from period courses LATN 620-630. Two 
600-level or higher Latin courses may be substituted for the thesis with permission. An 
independent research project may also be an acceptable alternative for the thesis. Six 
of the 30 hours at the 400-level or above must be in aspects of classical civilization 



Comparative Literature Program (CMLT) 1 09 



offered in archaeology, art, history, Hnguistics, philosophy, Romance philology or in 
approved allied fields. 

The Latin and Greek Program requires a minimum of 33 hours of approved course- 
work, including six credit hours of thesis research. Nine hours of coursework in one 
language and three in the other must be at the 600-level or higher. Two courses in the 
languages at the 600-level or higher may be substituted for the thesis with permission. 
An independent research project may also be an acceptable alternative for the thesis. 
Six of the 33 hours at the 400-level or above must be in aspects of Classical civilization 
through courses offered in archaeology, art, history, linguistics, philosophy, Romance 
philology or in approved allied fields. 

The Civilization of the Classical World Program requires a minimum of 30 hours of 
approved coursework, including six credit hours of thesis research. Twelve of those 
hours must be at the 600-level or higher, and six of those twelve must be in either 
Latin or Greek language courses or in any combination of the two. The other six hours 
at the 600-level or higher will be in the study of Classical civilization or the classical 
tradition through courses offered in archaeology, art, classics, history, philosophy or 
in approved allied fields. An independent research project may be an acceptable al- 
ternative for the thesis. The remaining six hours, which must be at the 400-level or 
above, can be in aspects of Classical civilization in courses offered either by the Classics 
Department or in archaeology, art, history, linguistics, philosophy, Romance philology 
or in approved allied fields. Students in this concentration will have an advisory com- 
mittee of three faculty members appointed by the Departmental chair. For courses, 
see codes CLAS, GREK, and LATN. 

Comparative Literature Program (CMLT) 

Professor and Director: Heyndels 

Professors: Beck, Beicken, Bentley, Best, R.H. Brown, Bryer, Clignet, R. Cohen, 
Damrosch, David, Difederico, Freedman, Fuegi, Gillespie, Gramberg, Haber, 
Herin, Holton, Jones, Kerrigan, Kolker, Lifton, MacBain, Oster, Pacheco, 
Panichas, Patterson, Price, Rimer, Rowland, J. Russell, Schoenbaum, Sosnowski, 
Sutherland, Tarica, Therrien, Wittreich 

Visiting Professors: Bourdieu, Haarscher, Knox, Leenhardt, Logan, Semprun 
Associate Professors: Barry, Bennett, Berlin, Bilik. Birdsall, Caramello, Carretta, 
Caughey, Coogan, Diner, Duffy, Fink, Flieger, Fredericksen, Glad, Grimsted, 
Gullickson, Hage, Hallett, D. HamiUon, G. Hamilton, Handelman, J. Harris, 
Herman, Igel, Joyce, Kelly, Kerkham, Klein, Klumpp, Levinson, Loizeaux, Martin, 
Mintz, Odell, Peterson, Pfister, J. Robinson, C. Russell, Staley, Trousdale 
Assistant Professors: Aguilar-Mora, Blum, Falvo, Dungey, Kristal, Leinwand, 
Levine, Marchetti, E. Robinson, Stehle, Strauch, Zappala 

The Comparative Literature Program and Center for Critical Studies offer graduate 
study leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. A distinguished 
faculty offers concentrated coursework in major movements and genres, in literary 
theory and in literature and the other arts. The Program's greatest strength currently 
lies in the history and criticism of dramatic hterature, in the novel, in sociology of 
Uterature and culture, and in film studies. Interdisciplinary work as well as practical 
criticism in the arts are both encouraged. The three main priorities of the program are: 



110 Comparative Literature Program (CMLT) 



1. The critical theory and socio-philosophical approach of the Hterary proc- 
ess (including cultural anthropology); 

2. The study of literature as a part of the global "representation" and 
symbolic process (with an emphasis on film studies and drama); 

3. The historical and theoretical approach to the relationship between lit- 
erature and the arts (including painting, photography, music, architec- 
ture, etc.). 

The Program is concerned with the following fields: English, American, French and 
Italian, German, Russian, Spanish and Portuguese and Latino-American literatures; 
American, Women's, East Asian and Jewish studies; Classics, History, Sociology, 
Philosophy, Arts and History of the Arts, Theatre, Radio-Television-Film and Music. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Applicants should have a strong background in the arts and humanities. Advanced 
work in comparative literature is based on the premise that literature should be read 
in the original whenever possible; students are expected to be able to read at least one 
language other than English with a high degree of aesthetic appreciation. Ph.D. students 
should be able to use at least two foreign languages actively in their work, and it is 
assumed that efforts will be made to develop an acquaintance with one or two additional 
languages. Entrance examinations are not required, but high scores on GRE literature 
and language examinations will add weight to credentials. 

Students take courses in CMLT and affiliated departments and programs. The M.A. 
degree requires 30 credits, composed of 24 hours of coursework, a comprehensive 
examination and a thesis, or 30 hours of coursework and a comprehensive examination. 
To enter the Ph.D. program, the M.A. thesis is highly recommended. No specific 
number of credits is required for the Ph.D. as the number will vary according to the 
preparation and goals of the individual student. The average has been eight to 10 
courses beyond the master's degree, which is required for the Ph.D. The Ph.D. com- 
prehensive examinations, determined after consultation with the individual student's 
committee, cover four major areas, including a genre, a period, a required theory 
examination and a non-literary field. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The program regularly draws upon the resources of the Library of Congress, the 
Kennedy Center, the Folger Library, the American Film Institute, Kennan Institute 
and Dumbarton Oaks, and many internship possibilities exist in the greater Washington 
area. Internships are also available abroad (in the framework of the "Maryland in 
Europe/Europe at Maryland" program and the Visual Press, cf. infra) as are graduate 
exchange programs with European universities. Students have ready access to all the 
museums, galleries, libraries and cultural institutions of the Washington D.C. metro- 
politan area and the Washington-Baltimore-Philadelphia-New York corridor. 

The Center for Critical Studies is the research unit of the program and is designed 
to promote theoretical inquiry in literature and the other arts and to sponsor practical 
and engaged criticism. Its emphasis is on interdisciplinary scholarship rather than the 
study of texts in isolation. It is therefore particularly concerned with the arts in per- 
formance, with reception and communication theory, with contemporary theory of 
criticism and with the practice of criticism in the mass media. To achieve its intent of 



Computer Science Program (CMSC) 111 



mediating between theory and practice, the Center brings together theoreticians, artistic 
creators and working critics; it organizes scholarly symposia of which findings are 
broadly disseminated, and it sponsors internships for critics who either work or seek 
to work in the different fields of cultural and symbolic creation. 

Special ties link the Center for Critical Studies with Brussels' Center for Sociology 
of Literature, the Center for Sociology of Literature of the Ecole des Hautes Etudes 
en Sciences Sociales (Paris) and other similar European institutions. 

The CMLT Program and Center for Critical Studies, in cooperation with several 
departments and schools, are also running a comprehensive international academic, 
artistic and cultural exchange program called "Maryland in Europe/Europe at Mary- 
land". 

A special interdisciplinary visiting professorship is based in the Comparative Liter- 
ature Program, which is sponsored by the Perelman Foundation (Brussels - Jerusalem). 
Each academic year, a highly distinguished and internationally recognized scholar who 
comes from the U.S. or abroad is invited into the program as the Perelman Visiting 
Professor. 

The Comparative Literature Program also hosts the Brecht Yearbook (a CMLT 
faculty is the editor-in-chief) along with the campus-wide Visual Press of which the 
director is also a member of the CMLT faculty. The Visual Press is responsible for 
several international media/film/video projects, including "Beckett Directs Beckett," 
"Nothing Immoral: Brecht," "The Social History of Climate," "The Maryland Seminars 
on European Cultural Issues," etc. 

Financial Assistance 

Various teaching and research assistantships and university fellowships are available 
as well as some special fellowships. CMLT students may teach in various departments 
cooperating in the CMLT Program and may be considered for a year abroad as a 
teacher at cooperating European universities. 

Additional Information 

For more specific information about the program, contact: 

Director 

Comparative Literature Program 

Jimenez Hall 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-3809 
For courses, see code CMLT. 

Computer Science Program (CMSC) 

Professor and Chair: Tripathi 

Professors: Agrawala, Basili, Chu, Davis, Edmundson, Gannon, Kanal, Miller, 

Minker, O'Leary, Rosenfeld, Samet, Shneiderman, Stewart, Tripathi 

Affiliate Professors: JaJa, Vishkin 

Associate Professors: Austing, Kruskal, Nau, Perils, Reggia, Roussopoulos, Shankar, 

Smith, Zelkowitz 



112 Computer Science Program (CMSC) 



Assistant Professors: Aloimonos, Amir, Carson, Elman, Faloutsos, Furuta, Gasarch, 
Hendler, Jalote, Johnson, Kruskal, Mark, Mount, Pugh, Purtilo, Rombach, Salem, 
Sellis, Stotts, Subrahmanian 
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Ricart 

The Department of Computer Science offers graduate study leading to the Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with research emphasis in the following 
areas: artificial intelligence, data bases, computer vision, numerical analysis, program- 
ming languages, software engineering, computer systems and theory of computing. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission and degree requirements specific to the graduate programs in computer 
science are described in a brochure available through the Departmental Graduate 
Office. The master's program offers two options: 1) 24 hours of coursework and the 
completion of a thesis, or 2) 30 hours of coursework, a comprehensive examination 
and the completion of a scholarly paper. There are no explicit course requirements in 
the doctoral program. The number and variety of courses offered each semester enables 
students and their advisers to plan individualized programs. 

Facilities 

The Department is located in the A.V. Williams Building, a state-of-the-art research 
facility. The Department's research laboratories contain a DEC 8600, a VAX 11/785 
and an Encore Multimax 510. More than 80 Sun and DEC workstations are networked 
together running Sun UNIX. Workstations from several other manufacturers are also 
available. 

The Department has direct INTERNET and BITNET access (address: name 
mimsy.umd.edu). 

BITNET access is available through campus INTERNET/BITNET gateways. 

The Department maintains close ties with the campus' Center for Automation Re- 
search (CFAR) and the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer 
Studies (UMIACS). Many students and faculty have access to CfAR and UMIACS 
facilities and equipment. CfAR has two VAX ll/785s, several Symbolics 3600s and 
two Butterfly parallel processors, and UMIACS has a Connection Machine. The De- 
partment also has close ties to the Center for Excellence in Space Data and Information 
Sciences (CESDIS) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD, and 
research facilities there are available for collaborative projects. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate assistanthips in both the educational and research programs are offered to 
qualified applicants based on academic performance. CfAR, UMIACS, CESDIS and 
the Systems Research Center (SRC) offer a number of assistantships. Graduate School, 
departmental and minority fellowships are also available. 

Additional Information 

For information on degree programs and graduate assistantships contact: 
Graduate Office 

Department of Computer Science 
1119 A.V. Williams Building 



Counseling and Personnel Services Program (EDCP) 113 



University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-2664 
For courses, see code CMSC. 

Counseling and Personnel Services Program (EDCP) 

Professor and Chair: Hershenson 

Professors: Birk, Marx, Power, Pumroy , Schlossberg 

Associate Professors: Boyd^, Greenberg, Hoffman, Lawrence, Leonard', Medvene , 

Rhoads, Scales", Sedlacek", Strein, Teglasi, Westbrook" 

Assistant Professors: Bagwell', Clement , Cook, Cuyjet , Fassinger, Freeman", Gast , 

Hrutka , Jacoby , Komives, Kreiser", Lucas', McEwen, Mielke , Molla , Osteen , 

Otani", Schmidt , Stewart , Stimpson , Thomas 

joint appointment with Psychology 

joint appointment with Counseling Center 

joint appointment with Student Affairs 

joint appointment with Career Development Center 

joint appointment with College of Education Dean's Office 

The Department of Counseling and Personnel Services offers graduate programs 
designed to provide the knowledge and skills needed for practice and scholarship in 
counseling and related human service professions. These fields are concerned with 
assisting people individually, in groups and in organizations to attain their optimal level 
of personal, social, educational and career functioning. Graduates are employed in a 
variety of settings including schools, colleges and universities, mental health agencies, 
rehabilitation agencies, correctional facihties, business and industry, government agen- 
cies, other community service facilities and private practice. These professionals may 
serve any of several roles either at the practitioner's level or at an advanced level as 
supervisors, researchers, educators or program administrators. Master's level profes- 
sional entry-level programs are offered in five areas of specialization. 

1) The School Counseling program prepares students to become school counselors 
in elementary, middle and high school settings. School counselors provide individual 
and group counseling to school-aged children, coordinate pupil services in schools and 
function as consultants to classroom teachers, school administrators and parents. 2) 
The School Psychology program prepares students for certification as school psychol- 
ogists, whose principal duties are to assess intellectual and emotional factors that affect 
pupils' functioning in school settings and to devise intervention strategies to enhance 
the learning and behavioral adjustment of pupils. 3) The College Student Personnel 
program prepares specialists for service in higher education settings as counselors and 
as administrators of student affairs services. 4) The Community Counseling program 
prepares counselors to work in career counseling, community mental health and adult 
development. 5) The Rehabilitation Counseling program prepares counselors to work 
with persons who have mental, emotional, social or physical handicaps. 

Because of differences in certification, licensure and employment requirements across 
specialty areas, professional entry-level programs of two types are offered, depending 
on the area of specialization: 1) a master's degree program (M.A., thesis required or 
M.Ed., thesis not required), or 2) an integrated Master's/ Advanced Graduate Specialist 



114 Counseling and Personnel Services Program (EDCP) 



(A.G.S.) program. In this program, the student is admitted to the full sequence, takes 
the master's comprehensive examination after 24 hours of coursework, writes a master's 
thesis (for an M.A.) after about 24 more hours of coursework, then takes the A.G.S. 
comprehensive examination while completing the degree and A.G.S. certificate si- 
multaneously. The applicant should contact the Department for further information 
concerning the entry-level requirements and curriculum of each area of specialization. 

The A.G.S. certificate is offered in all of the aforementioned areas of specialization. 
For individuals who hold a master's degree in counseling or a closely related field, this 
certificate program may serve: 1) to provide the additional education required for 
professional certification or licensure in those specialty areas that require a program 
of two year's length, and/or 2) to provide the academic background for an advanced 
level of professional practice within a specialty area. 

The Ph.D. degree in Counseling and Personnel Services is offered in four areas of 
specialization: a) Counseling Psychology (in collaboration with the Psychology De- 
partment), b) School Psychology, c) College Student Personnel Administration, and 
d) Counseling and Consultation. Doctoral studies prepare students to achieve excep- 
tional competence in the theory and practice of their field; to develop a high level of 
skills as researchers, educators and administrators; and to assume positions of leadership 
in various relevant settings. Students in the Counseling Psychology specialization are 
educated to work as counseling psychologists and supervisors in such settings as college 
and university counseling centers, community mental health agencies and academic 
departments. Doctoral-level school psychologists serve as advanced level practitioners, 
supervisors, administrators, researchers and school psychology teachers. Students in 
College Student Personnel Administration are prepared to assume leadership positions 
as administrators of college or university student personnel services or as teachers and 
researchers of college student personnel work. Doctoral students in Counseling and 
Consultation are prepared to assume roles as supervisors, educators or researchers in 
school counseling, rehabilitation, career development or community counseling pro- 
grams. All Ph.D. students are expected to attain advanced skills as both practitioners 
and researchers in their area of specialization. 

Professionally accredited programs within the Department include the School Psy- 
chology and Counseling Psychology doctoral programs, which are accredited by the 
American Psychological Association. The Rehabilitation Counseling Masters (M.A. or 
M.Ed.) Program is accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education. The M.A./ 
A.G.S. Program in School Psychology and the Master's (M.A. or M.Ed.) Program in 
School Counseling are approved for certification by the Maryland State Department 
of Education and are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education. The Masters (M.A. or M. Ed.) Program in Community Counseling and 
the Ph.D. Program in Counseling and Consultation are accredited by the Council for 
Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a spe- 
cialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation 
(COPA). 

Admission and Degree Information 

Applicants for regular admission to master's degree programs must have an under- 
graduate average of B (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) and must submit their scores on the Miller 
Analogies Test or Graduate Record Examination (required for School Psychology 



Counseling and Personnel Services Program (EDCP) 115 



M.A./A.G.S. program). The undergraduate program must include at least 15 semester 
hours of coursework in behavioral science fields (anthropology, education, psychology, 
sociology and/or statistics). Applicants for admission to A.G.S. and Ph.D. programs 
must have a master's degree in counseling or a closely related field. A grade point 
average of 3.5 in prior graduate work is required with an acceptable score on the Miller 
Analogies Test or the Graduate Record Examination (for Counseling Psychology and 
School Psychology). Selective screening of qualified applicants is necessary in order to 
limit enrollment to the Department's available faculty resources. 

Departmental comprehensive examinations are required of all master's, A.G.S. and 
doctoral students. All doctoral students are required to take advanced courses in sta- 
tistics and research design. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

All master's, A.G.S. and doctoral students are required to include supervised field- 
work experiences in their degree programs. The Department has excellent cooperative 
relationships with the Division of Student Affairs (including such offices as the Coun- 
seHng Center, Orientation, Campus Activities, the Student Union, Resident Life and 
Commuter Affairs), with units in Academic Affairs (such as Advising, Career Devel- 
opment, Admissions and Experiential Learning) and with units in University College. 
Fieldwork may also be done at a wide variety of school systems, counseling services 
and mental health agencies in the Maryland/District of Columbia area. 

In addition to campus and Department resources, students also utilize the many 
major research and professional institutions that are easily accessible to the campus. 
These include the Library of Congress, the National Library of Medicine, the National 
Institutes of Health and of Education, the American Psychological Association and the 
American Association for Counseling and Development. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department offers several graduate assistantships, and paid experiences have 
been arranged for some students in the Department with a variety of on- campus and 
off-campus agencies. 

Additional Information 

For individual brochures describing the curriculum of each professional entry-level 
and each doctoral specialization, contact: 

Chair 

Counseling and Personnel Services Program 

3218 Benjamin Building 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-2858 
For courses, see code EDCP. 



116 Criminal Justice and Criminology Program (CRIM) 



Criminal Justice and Criminology Program (CRIM) 

(Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology) 

Director and Professor: Wellford 

Professor Emeritus: Lejins 

Professors: Loftin, Sherman 

Associate Professors: Ingraham, Maida, Paternoster, Smith 

Assistant Professors: Gottfredson, Simpson 

The program of graduate study leading to Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees in the area of Criminal Justice and Criminology is intended to prepare students 
for research, teaching and professional employment in the operational agencies of the 
criminal justice field. This program combines an intensive background in a social science 
discipline such as criminology, criminal justice, sociology, psychology and public admin- 
istration with graduate-level study of selected aspects of the criminal justice field. 

A recent study of Institute M.A. and Ph.D. alumni reveals that master's degree 
graduates have found employment in both public and private institutions in virtually 
every kind of activity associated with the criminal justice system: research; teaching; 
federal, state and local law enforcement; courts; corrections; private security; funded 
programs; etc. Ph.D. graduates have found employment mostly in teaching, research 
and government agency administration. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to the general Graduate School rules, special admission requirements 
include the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test, a major in a social science 
discipline and nine hours of coursework in the appropriate area of criminal justice. For 
the M.A. applicant, the undergraduate social science major must have included at least 
one course each in theory, statistics and research methods. The Ph.D. applicant must 
have completed two courses each in statistics, research methods and theory; one course 
in each area must be at the master's level. Admission to the Ph.D. program presupposes 
completion of the M.A. degree. At the discretion of the Institute's Graduate Admissions 
Committee, deficiencies in some of the above areas may be made up by noncredit work 
at the beginning of the program. 

M.A. students may choose either a criminology or a criminal justice option. The 
general plan of study for both options is as follows: 30 semester hours of courses 
consisting of: 1) at least six courses in criminology and criminal justice, four of which 
are required courses that must be passed with a "B" or better; 2) a graduate level 
course in statistics, the course to be selected from an approved list; 3) six hours of 
either thesis credit or additional coursework depending on the option selected by the 
student; and 4) one elective course. The M.A. degree offers both a thesis option and 
a non-thesis option with some additional requirements. 

In addition to the general Graduate School requirements, competence in research 
methodology and in quantitative techniques is expected for the completion of the Ph.D. 
degree, as well as competence in the general theory of the criminal justice field and in 
the specialization area selected by the student. The necessary coursework is determined 
on the basis of the student's previous preparation, needs and interests. The candidate 
is required to pass comprehensive examinations. 



Curriculum and Instruction Program (EDCI) 117 



Financial Assistance 

Graduate teaching assistantships are available on a competitive basis. Graduate re- 
search assistantships are also sometimes available for graduate students to participate 
in research projects directed by faculty members and funded by outside sources. 

Additional Information 

A brochure describing the Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology and its 
programs is available upon request. Inquiries should be directed to: 

Graduate Program Coordinator 

Institute of Criminal Justice 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-4699 
For courses, see code CRIM and CJUS. 

Curriculum and Instruction Program (EDCI) 

Chair: Ann C. Howe 

Professors: Arends, E.G. Campbell, Fein, Fey , Folstrom , Gambrell, Holliday, 

Howe, Jantz, Johnson, Layman , Lockard", Roderick, Weaver, Wilson 

Associate Professors: Amershek, Borko, Brigham, P. Campbell, Cirrincione , Craig, 

Davey, Davidson, DeLorenzo, Dreher, Eley, Farrell , Heidelbach, Henkelman, 

Herman, Klein, McCaleb , McWhinnie , Saracho, Slater 

Assistant Professors: Carey, Dierking, Graeber, Markham, O'Flahavan, Williams 

joint appointment with Music 

joint appointment with Botany 

joint appointment with Geography 

joint appointment with History 
"joint appointment with Mathematics 

joint appointment with Physics 

joint appointment with Communication Arts and Theatre 

joint appointment with Housing and Applied Design 

joint appointment with Library and Information Services 

The Department offers graduate study leading to the following degrees or certificates: 
Master of Arts (thesis and non-thesis). Master of Education, Advanced Graduate 
Specialist, Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy. The Department offers a 
variety of programs individually designed to meet the graduate students' personal and 
professional goals, which may include educational research, teaching, supervising, pro- 
viding leadership as curriculum specialists within the disciplines, teacher education or 
consulting at all levels of instruction; early childhood, elementary, secondary and higher 
education. Programs are offered to meet the needs of professionals in school and non- 
school settings and are available on the College Park campus. Some programs are 
available in off-campus centers. 

Areas of emphasis include art education, early childhood education (birth to eight 
years of age), elementary education, social studies education, language arts education 
(English education, foreign language education, English as a second language educa- 
tion, speech and theater education), mathematics education, music education, profes- 
sional development, reading education, science education and computers in education. 



118 Dance Program (DANC) 



Admission and Degree Information 

The master's degree requires a minimum of 30 to 36 semester hours. Students must 
complete 60 hours beyond the bachelor's degree for the A.G.S. certificate, and the 
doctorate requires a planned sequence of approximately 60 semester hours beyond the 
master's degree. Programs include both theory and practicum, professional work, re- 
search and academic courses. There are no foreign language requirements unless the 
dissertation is on a topic that requires it. Students must have a 3.0 undergraduate grade 
point average and submit either the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record 
Examination test scores for admission to the master's program. Admission to an A.G.S. 
or doctoral program requires a 3.5 grade point average in previous graduate studies 
and either a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average or at least a 40 percentile on the 
Miller Analogies Test or Graduate Record Examination. 

Master's degree students are required to take a six-hour comprehensive examination 
near the end of their program. Doctoral students are required to take a preliminary 
examination after approximately 12 semester hours of work and a comprehensive ex- 
amination near the completion of the program. An oral examination in defense of the 
dissertation constitutes the final step in completing the doctorate. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department's facilities in the Department that support graduate study include 
the Micro Teaching and Decision Making Laboratory, the Center for Mathematics 
Education, the Center for Young Children, the Reading Center and the Science Teach- 
ing Center. Additional facilities in the College of Education include the Educational 
Technology Center, the Curriculum Laboratory and Teacher Education Centers in 
local schools. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of graduate assistantships are available in the Department of Curriculum 
and Instruction. These assistants research, supervise student teachers and teach un- 
dergraduate classes. 

Additional Information 

For more specific information, contact: 
Chair 

Department of Curriculum and Instruction 
2311B Benjamin Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-3324 
For courses, see code EDCI. 

Dance Program (DANC) 

Professor and Chair: Wiltz 

Professors: Rosen, A. Warren, L. Warren 

Associate Professor: Dunn 

Professor Emeritus: Madden 

Assistant Professor: Frosch-Schroder 



Dance Program (DANC) 1 1 9 



Lecturer: Jackson 

The Department of Dance offers a Master of Fine Arts degree in Dance with an 
emphasis on either performance or choreography. It is designed to give outstanding 
students advanced training and opportunities for creative growth. The program will 
prepare the student for the professional world as a dancer, choreographer or teacher 
on the college level. 

The competencies that students learn during the program will allow them to teach 
a broad range of dance and dance-related subjects after they graduate. They should 
be able to present and produce dance in a number of contexts and modalities both on 
the campus and in the community. The program is designed to broaden all aspects of 
the artist's understanding of dance. Important emphasis will be given to dance history 
and philosophy and the study of current issues in the field. We wish our graduates to 
exhibit a high degree of insight into the cultural contexts in which dance has developed 
in the past and continues to develop today. 

Students in both the performance and choreography emphases will be expected to 
spend a significant amount of time learning about stage lighting, costuming and sound, 
as well as promotion and house management and the myriad of other organizational 
details that go into producing a dance performance. They will be actively involved in 
the practical application of this knowledge as part of their training. Graduates who 
understand every aspect of the theater needed to successfully present a dance per- 
formance will find themselves more highly employable both in the performance and 
educational fields of the profession. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Students enrolled in the program must complete a total of 60 credit hours of study 
to graduate and will be juried on a regular basis to determine their progress. 

Graduation from the program requires the successful completion of a final project 
demonstrating a synthesis of craft and artistic understanding as well as professional 
competence in the area of concentration. Final projects may follow two emphases: (1) 
the thesis project for the choreographic emphasis will consist of the public presentation 
of a body of dance works choreographed by the candidate; (2) the thesis project for 
the performance emphasis will consist of the public presentation of a body of dance 
works featuring the candidate in performance. 

For both emphases the total performance time is to be equivalent to a substantial 
dance concert. A written report documenting the project must be submitted, consisting 
of a thorough analysis and evaluation of the process through which the project was 
realized. 

Facilities and Resources 

The location of campus, eight miles away from Washington D.C., places the De- 
partment a half hour away from America's second city of dance where one may study 
and enjoy a wide variety of offerings of ballet, modern and ethnic dance. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of teaching assistantships that include partial or full tuition re- 
mission is available. Minority candidates may apply for Graduate School fellowships; 
the deadline is February 1. 



1 20 Economics Program (ECON) 



Additional Information 

The Guidelines for the Graduate Program provide course requirements, examination 
procedures and descriptive materials for the M.F.A. program. For specific information, 
contact: 

Professor Alcine J. Wiltz, Chair 

Department of Dance 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-3180 
For courses, see code DANC 

Economics Program (ECON) 

Professor and Chair: Straszheim 

Professors: Aaron, Adams, Almon, Baily, Betancourt, Brechling, Clague, 

Cumberland, Dorsey, Harris, Hulten, Kelejian, McGuire, Mueller, Murrell, Myers, 

Oates, Olson, Panagariya, Polakoff, Schelling, Wonnacott 

Professors Emeriti: Bergmann, Dillard, O'Connell, Ulmer 

Associate Professors: Abraham, Bennett, Coughlin, Cropper, Haltiwanger, Knight, 

Meyer, Montgomery, Poetscher, Prucha, Schwab, Wallis, Weinstein 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Delias, Evans, Haliassos, Hoff, Kessides, Lyon, 

Williams 

The Economics Program offers graduate study leading to both the Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Areas of specialization include: economic theory, 
advanced macro, advanced micro, comparative economic systems and planning, econ- 
ometrics, economic development, economic history, environmental and natural re- 
source economics, history of economic thought, industrial organization, institutional 
economics, international economics, labor economics, monetary economics, public choice, 
public finance, regional economics and urban economics. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Applicants should have taken (or should plan to take immediately) advanced un- 
dergraduate courses in microeconomics, macroeconomics and statistics. Applicants are 
also expected to have completed two or more semesters in calculus and additional 
mathematics. The Aptitude Test section of the Graduate Record Examination is re- 
quired, and the Advanced Economics Test is strongly recommended. Letters of rec- 
ommendation from three persons competent to judge the probability of the applicant's 
success in graduate school should be sent directly to the Director of Graduate Studies 
in Economics. Part-time graduate study is not encouraged since few courses are taught 
at night. 

The M.A. degree program offers both a thesis option (24 hours plus a thesis) and a 
non-thesis option (30 hours, including Economics 621-622, a written examination in 
economic theory, and a research paper). The requirements for the M.A. non- thesis 
option are met automatically in the course of the Ph.D. program in Economics. 

The Ph.D. program requires: (1) a written examination in economic theory, normally 
taken at the beginning of the second year of study; (2) written examinations in two 
selected fields; (3) completion of a sequence of work in econometrics; and (4) a dis- 



Education Policy, Planning and Administration Program (EDPA) 121 

sertation. Additional work in theory, methods and fields is normally expected. In the 
third year, students begin directed research by participating in workshops appropriate 
to their dissertation research. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The graduate program in Economics is a comprehensive one. The Department is 
uniquely strong in the Economics of the Public Sector and Public Choice. The De- 
partment has strong focuses in industrial organizations, macroeconomics, natural re- 
sources and the environment, international economics and economic development and 
other applied areas as well. Faculty members also supervise special research projects 
in inter-industry forecasting and other fields. 

Financial Assistance 

Research assistantships are available in special projects. Numerous teaching assist- 
antships are also available. The Department can usually help graduate students find 
part-time employment in federal agencies engaged in economic research. There are a 
limited number of fellowships available, including several for members of groups who 
are under-represented among economists. 

Additional Information 

A complete description of the requirements of the degrees in economics and the 
admission process is available on request from: 

Director of Graduate Studies in Economics 

Department of Economics 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-3512 
For courses, see code ECON. 

Education Policy, Planning and Administration Program (EDPA) 

Professor and Chair: Warren 

Professors: V. Anderson (Emeritus), Ancrews, Berdahl, Berman, Birnbaum, 

Carbone, Chait, Clague, Dudley, Finkelstein, Male, McClure (Emeritus), McLoone, 

Newell (Emeritus), Stephens 

Associate Professors: Agre, Goldman, Hopkins, Huden, Lindsay, Noll, Schmidtlein, 

Selden, Splaine 

Assistant Professors: Heid, Leak 

Lecturer: Bensimin 

Affiliate Assistant Professor: Edelstein 

Adjunct Professors: Heynemann, Hickey 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Hogan 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: McKay 

The Department of Education Policy, Planning and Administration offers programs 
of study for the Master of Arts, Master of Education, Doctor of Education and Doctor 
of Philosophy degrees as well as the Advanced Graduate Specialist (A.G.S.) certificate. 
Areas of specialization include: administration and supervision, curriculum theory and 
development, education policy, higher and adult education, and social foundations of 



1 22 Electrical Engineering Program (ENEE) 



education. Ed.D. programs are offered at several off- campus sites as well as the College 
Park campus. Programs are tailored to students' objectives and backgrounds. Graduates 
enter careers in research, administration, policy making, planning, supervision or teach- 
ing in public or private schools, adult and higher education, non-school educational 
settings, government agencies or community organizations. Some graduates find career 
opportunities in other countries or with international organizations dealing with edu- 
cation. 
Admission and Degree Information 

Admission requirements for the master's program require a 3.0 undergraduate grade 
point average and at least a 40 percentile on the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate 
Record Examination. Admission to an A.G.S. or Doctoral program requires a 3.5 
grade point average in previous graduate studies, a 3.0 undergraduate grade point 
average and at least a 70 percentile on the Miller Analogies Test or Graduate Record 
Examination. Selective screening of qualified applicants is necessary to limit enrollment 
to the available faculty resources. Once a student is admitted, a program is tailored to 
meet his/her individual objectives and background. Doctoral students take a preliminary 
examination early in their programs, and all graduate students must take comprehensive 
examinations. 

A research, teaching or administrative internship is required in most department 
programs. The internship is performed under faculty supervision in schools, colleges 
or agencies appropriate to the student's professional interests. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has established a liaison with area schools, colleges and local, state 
and federal education agencies to facilitate the use of these agencies for research and 
field experiences. Embassies in Washington, D.C. provide access to materials for the 
study of foreign education systems. The Department is associated with the International 
Center for the Study of Education Policy and Human 'Values, the Comparative Edu- 
cation Center, the Institute for Research in Higher and Adult Education, the Research 
and Development Laboratory on School- Based Administration and the Council for 
Curriculum Development and Change. 
Financial Assistance 

Some graduate assistantships are available to qualified graduate students. 
Additional Information 
For information and a Departmental brochure, please contact: 

Department Chair 

Department of Education Policy, Planning and Administration 

Benjamin Building 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-3574 
For courses, see code EDPA. 

Electrical Engineering Program (ENEE) 

Professor and Chair: Destler 

Professors: Antonsen, Baras, Barbe, Blankenship, Chu, Davis, Davisson, DeClaris, 

Emad, Ephremides, Frey, Granatstein, Harger, Hochuli, Ja'Ja', Krishnaprasad, Lee, 



Electrical Engineering Program (ENEE) 123 



Levine, Ligomenides, Mayergoyz, Newcomb, Ott, Peckerar, Rabin, Reiser, Rhee, 

Striffier, Taylor, Vishkin, Zaki 

Associate Professors: Abed, Carter, Chen, Dagenais, Farvardin, Geraniotis, Gligor, 

Goldhar, Ho, Makowski, Menyuk, Nakajima, Narayan, Oruc, Pugsley, Shamma, 

Shayman, Silio, Tits, Tretter 

Assistant Professors: Chang, Dayawansa, Fuja, Goldsman, Greenberg, Ihadis, 

Lawson, Menezes, Milchberg, Papamarcou, Yang 

The Electrical Engineering Department offers graduate study leading to the Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. A diverse offering of courses, seminars, 
colloquia and thesis guidance encompasses a broad spectrum of topics. Specialization 
is possible in: (1) communication (random processes; detection, estimation, coding and 
information theories; digital signal processing; optical communications; communication 
networks; and remote sensing systems); (2) computers (computer architecture, net- 
working and digital system design; operating systems; and software engineering); (3) 
control (computer-aided design; nonlinear, sampled data and distributed parameter 
systems; system optimization; and optimal and stochastic control): (4) electrophysics 
(electromagnetic theory, plasmas, intense charged-particle beams and applications to 
accelerators and high-power microwave generation, quantum electronics, millimeter- 
and microwave-antenna and optical engineering, lasers, nonlinear optics, chemical 
physics and biophysics); and (5) microelectronics (circuits and devices; VLSI and com- 
puter-aided design; microwave and integrated circuits, semiconductor materials; and 
technology). 

Joint programs are maintained with the mathematics, physics and computer science 
departments and the chemical physics, material science and transportation programs. 
Opportunities also exist for programs of study in conjunction with many national lab- 
oratories and technical facilities. The Department has active theoretical research proj- 
ects in optica! communication, communication networks, coding theory, traffic control, 
remote sensing, solar energy conversion devices and many other areas. 

Employment opportunities for graduates have been exceptionally rich in recent years. 
Private industry, research laboratories, government agencies and labs, and academic 
institutions have been hiring at virtually unprecedented rates. This strong demand 
should continue through the coming decade. The accompanying salary scales have been 
and should continue to be very attractive. The growing demand for engineering faculty 
has created a large number of opportunities for those interested in teaching careers. 

Admission and Degree Requirements 

For admission to electrical engineering, students must possess at least an under- 
graduate degree from an ABET accredited undergraduate program in electrical engi- 
neering with a B + or better grade point average, or similar undergraduate preparation 
in mathematics, computer science, physics or other areas of engineering or science. 

Requirements for the master's thesis and non-thesis options are those of the Graduate 
School and must be completed within five years. In addition, students must have an 
average of B or better in all courses counted toward the degree. 

For the Ph.D. degree, students must complete a minimum of 42 semester hours of 
graduate approved courses with a B average or better, the Ph.D. qualifying examination 
and all dissertation and oral examination requirements. 



124 Electrical Engineering Program (ENEE) 



Facilities and Special Resources 

Modern research and project laboratories in the Department support a wide variety 
of research, including a microprocessor development laboratory, a gas laser laboratory 
(He-Ne and C02 laser stability and lifetime studies and applications), quantum elec- 
tronics laboratories (nonlinear optics, laser sensors, molecular energy transfer processes 
and laser millimeter wave systems), an electromagnetic laboratory (millimeter and 
microwave systems and interactions and dielectrometry), a semiconductor research 
laboratory with a clean room and a complete set of characterization equipment and 
techniques, and a charged-particle beam laboratory that includes four intense relativistic 
electron beam facilities as well as state-of-the-art equipment for vacuum component 
processing. The Electrical Engineering Department has extensive computer facilities 
to support its computational needs. These include two advanced computer laboratories, 
a Solbourne 2-processor SPARC 500 computer, distributed SUN workstations in faculty 
offices and PC laboratories. The Solarium advanced computer laboratory houses two 
UNIX-TCP/IP-based SUN 3/60-M-8 servers, 20 SUN 350 and 360 workstations, several 
laser and line printers. The SRC advanced computer laboratory houses one SUN 3/ 
180 server, one Macintosh II file server, six SUN 3/50 workstations, one SUN 3/110, 
a NeXT computer and three laser printers. The software support for the machines 
housed in these two laboratories includes numerous language compilers, CAD analysis 
programs, graphics libraries and text processing systems. The EE Fulcrum laboratory 
has 10 IBM PC-AT computers and two dot matrix computers The EE PC laboratory 
has 15 Zenith PCs and six dot matrix printers. These PCs support C. Pascal and Prolog 
among other languages. The department also has access to IBM 3081, 4381, UNISYS 
1100/92 and three DEC mainframe computers and numerous SUN, Macintosh, IBM 
and DEC workstations that are housed in the academic computing center on campus. 
In addition, the faculty and students who are affiliated with the University of Maryland 
Institute for Advanced Computer Studies have access to a Connection Machine that 
is housed in the institute. The communications and signal processing laboratory has a 
Masscomp 5500 computer and an IIS S575 image processing system. A complete en- 
gineering library is housed nearby in conjunction with the mathematics, computer and 
physical science collections. 
Financial Assistance 

Financial aid is available to graduate students in the form of research assistantships, 
teaching assistantships and fellowships. Applications for research and teaching assist- 
antships should be completed and sent to the Electrical Engineering Office of Graduate 
Studies. 

Research assistantships are awarded subject to availability of funds and are renewed 
subject to satisfactory research progress. Summer appointments are often available. 

Teaching assistantships are usually awarded in April. Preference is given to United 
States citizens. Duties may include laboratory teaching assignments, assistance in the 
computation facility or assistance in courses. Teaching assistants must register for at 
least nine credit hours per semester. 

Fellowships are available for highly qualified applicants in a number of areas. 

Local industries and government agencies have work-study programs in which some 
of the Electrical Engineering graduate student body participates. Application should 
be made directly to the agencies. 



Engineering Materials Program (ENMA) 1 25 



Additional Information 

Special brochures or publications offered by the Department may be obtained by 
contacting: 

Electrical Engineering Office of Graduate Studies 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-3681 
For courses, see code ENEE. 

Engineering Materials Program (ENMA) 

Professor and Director: Wuttig 

Professor and Dean: Dieter 

Professor and Department Chair: Roush 

Professors: Armstrong , Arsenault 

Assistant Professors: Ankem , Salamanca-Riba , Lloyd 

Chemical and Nuclear Engineering 

College of Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 

The Engineering Materials Program is administered by the Department of Chemical 
and Nuclear Engineering. Special areas of concentration include diffraction, dislocation 
and mechanical behavior of materials, x-ray and electron microscopic techniques, elec- 
tronic and magnetic behavior of materials and of thin films, phase transformations, the 
chemical physics of materials, and the properties and behavior of polymeric materials. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Program offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees and is open to qualified students holding a bachelor's degree in 
any of the engineering and science areas from accredited programs. In some cases it 
may be necessary to require courses to fulfill this background. The M.S. program offers 
both a thesis or non-thesis option. The Ph.D. program requires at least three years of 
full-time study beyond the B.S. degree. All students seeking graduate degrees in En- 
gineering Materials must enroll in ENMA 650, 660 and 671. In addition to Graduate 
School admission requirements, the Department outlines special degree requirements 
its departmental publications. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Special equipment includes scanning and transmission, electron microscopes, x-ray 
diffraction equipment, crystal growing, sample preparation and mechanical testing fa- 
cilities, and high pressure and cryogenic equipment. 

Additional Information 

Information is available from: 
Director 

Engineering Materials Program 
Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 



126 English Language and Literature Program (ENGL) 



(301) 405-5207 
For courses, see code ENMA. 

English Language and Literature Program (ENGL) 

Professor and Chair: David 

Professors: Bryer, Coletti, Cross, David, Freedman, Holton, Howard, Isaacs, 

Jellema, Kornblatt, Lawson, Miller, Panichas, Peterson, Plumly, Russell, 

Salamanca, Schoenbaum, Trousdale, Vitzthum, Winton, Wyatt 

Associate Professors: Auerbach, Auchard, Barry, Beauchamp, Bennett, Birdsall, 

Caramello, Carretta, Cartwright, Cate, Coleman, Collier, Coogan, Dobin, 

Donawerth, Fahnestock, Flieger, Fraistat, Fry, Grossman, D. Hamilton, G. 

Hamilton, Hammond, Handelman, Herman, Kauffman, Kleine, Lanser, Leinwand, 

Leonardi, Levine, Loizeaux, Mack, Marcuse, Norman, Pearson, Peterson, 

Robinson, Wilson 

Assistant Professors: Grant-Davie, James, Levin, Moser, Rutherford, Smith, Van 

Egmond, Wang 

The Department of English offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees with areas of specialization in English and American 
literature. The Department also offers a Master of Fine Arts degree in Creative Writing. 
In addition, candidates for the M.A. degree may take a minor in composition and 
rhetoric. Traditionally, most students enrolled in graduate programs in English Lan- 
guage and Literature have sought employment in post- secondary teaching. An in- 
creasing number of students are also seeking non- academic employment now in publishing, 
business and technical writing, administration and personnel management. For the 
student who decides to seek one of these alternatives, the University of Maryland offers 
a Career Development Center that helps place students in careers suitable to their 
interests and to their level of educational achievement. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, applicants to the M.A. program 
should present a 3.4 GPA in English and 24 hours of upper-level EngHsh courses. 
Applicants to the Ph.D. program should present a 3.7 GPA and an M.A. degree in 
English. All applicants should submit a writing sample to the Office of the Director of 
Graduate Studies. Applications must be received by January 15 for all programs. 
Admission is for the fall only. 

The M.A. degree requires completion of 30 credit hours and a distribution require- 
ment to assure coverage of the major historical fields. The student may either take 24 
hours of course credit and write a thesis for the other six hours, or take 30 hours and 
pass a written comprehensive examination. 

The M.F.A. degree requires completion of 36 hours of coursework. The program 
balances course requirements between writing workshops and literature courses and 
offers concentrations in fiction and poetry. A creative thesis (six credits) is also required. 

The Ph.D. requires a total of 51 hours of graduate work (normally 21 hours beyond 
the M.A.) and three further requirements: 1) a two-part exam (written and oral) in 
the student's two chosen areas of specialization; 2) an examination in a foreign language; 
and 3) the dissertation. 



Entomology Program (ENTM) 127 



Applicants to the Ph.D. program must have an M.A. Applicants who wish to pursue 
a Ph.D. but do not have an M.A. must apply to the M.A. program. 

Financial Assistance 

A small number of fellowships are awarded by the Graduate School to candidates 
nominated by the various departments. Most financial aid is in the form of teaching 
assistantships (three courses of composition per year) that the Department awards in 
March. About 90 assistantships are currently awarded each year, and about 25 of these 
go to new students or to others who have not held them previously. 

Additional Information 

Additional information on admission, financial aid and degree requirements can be 
obtained from: 

David Wyatt 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of English 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-3798 
For courses, see code ENGL. 

Entomology Program (ENTM) 

Professor and Chair: Steinhauer 

Professors: Barbosa, Bottrell, Davidson, Denno 

Associate Professors: Armstrong, Dively, Hellman, Linduska, Ma, Mitter, Nelson, 

Raupp, Regier, Reichelderfer, Scott 

Assistant Professors: Lamp, O'Brochta 

Adjunct Professors: Coddington, Erwin, Ferguson, Gwadze, Hsu, Miller, Raina, 

Thompson 

Professors Emeriti: Bickley, Bissell, Harrison, Haviland, Jones, Menzer, 

Messersmith, Wood 

The Department of Entomology offers both the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. Graduate students may specialize in physiology and morphology, 
toxicology, biosystematics, ecology and behavior, medical entomology, apiculture, in- 
sect pathology, economic entomology, and pest management. 

Employment opportunities for graduates exist in industry, academia, federal, state 
and local governments, and in international and national spheres. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Students applying for graduate work in entomology are expected to have strong 
backgrounds in the biological sciences, chemistry and mathematics. An undergraduate 
degree in entomology is not required, but a strong basic preparation is definitely pre- 
ferred for admission to the program. Students lacking certain specific courses in their 
undergraduate program may need to extend the normal period of time required for 
the degree. 

In the M.S. and Ph.D. programs, the student is given latitude in the selection of the 
advisory study committee, the choice of a major study area and supporting coursework, 



128 Family and Community Development Program (FMCD) 



and the selection of a research program. The M.S. degree is awarded following the 
successful completion of the course requirements and a satisfactory thesis. A non-thesis 
option is also available for those interested in qualifying as pest management specialists; 
a field experience course including a comprehensive report is substituted for the thesis 
in this option. 

Upon admission to the M.S. or Ph.D. program, the student is given a departmental 
examination to evaluate general knowledge of biology and entomology. After this 
examination the student's study committee suggests a program of coursework and 
approves a detailed research proposal. Following completion of most coursework, the 
Ph.D. student is given an oral qualifying examination before applying for admission 
to candidacy. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The department maintains facilities for research in all areas of specialization offered. 
In addition, cooperative programs with other departments in Agriculture and Life 
Sciences are possible. The department also maintains cooperative research programs 
with several government agencies such as the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, 
the U.S. National Museum of Natural History, and the Walter Reed Army Institute 
of Research. Students may also participate in the Maryland Center for Systematic 
Entomology where cooperative guidance toward advanced degrees has been established 
between the department and scientists in the Insect Identification and Beneficial Insect 
Introduction Institute, U.S.D.A. and the Department of Entomology, Smithsonian 
Institution. Specialized facilities are frequently made available to graduate students in 
these programs. In many instances graduates of the entomology programs find em- 
ployment in such government agencies because of the contacts made in these coop- 
erative projects. 

Financial Assistance 

There are a number of teaching and research assistantships available to entomology 
graduate students on a competitive basis. Several part-time employment opportunities 
are available in governmental and private research and developmental laboratories in 
the area. 

Additional Information 

The Department's "Guidelines for Graduate Students" gives additional information 
on the graduate program, including requirements for admission, course requirements, 
examinations, seminars, and research areas and facilities. Copies are available from: 

Department of Entomology 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-3912 
For courses, see code ENTM. 

Family and Community Development Program (FMCD) 

Professor and Chair: Billingsley 

Professors: Gaylin, Hanna, Koblinsky 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Epstein, Leslie, Myricks, Rubin 

Assistant Professors: Churaman, Randolph 



Family and Community Development Program (FMCD) 1 29 



Lecturers: Werlinich 

The Department of Family and Community Development is devoted to describing, 
explaining and improving the quality of family life by means of research, education, 
community outreach and public service. The curriculum places special emphasis upon 
the family and the community as mediating structures in determining life quality. The 
approach is holistic, i.e., human ecology. Departmental graduate training prepares 
students for jobs in research centers, consulting firms, voluntary and non-profit orga- 
nizations, business enterprises, private practice and federal, state and local govern- 
ments. 

The Department offers a Master of Science degree with individually designed areas 
of emphasis. These include a working knowledge of the growth of individuals through- 
out the life span, with particular emphases on inter- generational aspects of family 
living and the effective delivery of family- oriented services. A curriculum in marriage 
and family therapy is offered (accredited by the American Association for Marriage 
and Family Therapy), which draws upon a knowledge of family dynamics and change 
using the clinical techniques of therapy and consultation. Courses are available for 
students interested in the processes and methods of change for improving community 
services that impact upon families. A student may focus on the efficient utilization of 
available family and community resources, the relationship between available resources 
and governmental (and private sector) policies, and the development of expanded 
resources through citizen action. Specializations include management of human service 
programs, family policy analysis and consumer affairs. The Family Service Center 
provides clinical services to several hundred families. The Family Research Center is 
the research facility for the study of family life. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Department employs the Graduate School's policies as the criteria for admission 
to the master's program. In addition, applicants must take the GRE Aptitude Test and 
have adequate undergraduate preparation in one or more of the following areas: an- 
thropology, economics, geography, family development, planning, political science, 
psychology, public administration, social work, sociology or urban studies. An upper- 
level course in elementary statistics at the undergraduate level is required for gradu- 
ation. Students interested in the marriage and family therapy curriculum must submit 
a special application form available from the FMCD department. 

The master's program is 30 hours with additional hours for those in the marriage 
and family therapy curriculum. The student may choose either the thesis or non- thesis 
option. A student who chooses the thesis option must take six credit hours of thesis 
research while a student who picks the non-thesis option must complete 30 hours of 
coursework plus oral and written comprehensive examinations. 

Financial Assistance 

Due to the limited number of available graduate assistantships and the high demand 
for these positions, application for financial aid should be made prior to April 1 for 
the fall semester of the coming year. 

Additional Information 

For further information, contact: 

Department of Family and Community Development 



130 Fire Protection Engineering (ENFP) 



University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-3672 
For courses, see code FMCD. 

Fire Protection Engineering (ENFP) 

Professor and Chair: Bryan 
Assistant Professor: Mowrer 
Lecturer: Milke 

The Fire Protection Engineering Department offers a diversified program of graduate 
studies leading to the Master of Science degree. An individual study plan compatible 
with the student's interest and background is developed between the student and ad- 
viser. Two specialized areas involve the courses developed for graduate study. The first 
area focuses on engineering principles concerned with the fire modeling of the scientific 
fundamentals of diffusion flame combustion, the mechanics of flame propagation and 
the techniques of field or zone simulation for the prediction of fire development. The 
second area of study involves the application of simulation and risk analysis to the 
predictive and analytical procedures for the quantitative assessment of fire hazards and 
the probabilities of potential fire incidents. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The M.S. program is open to qualified students holding the B.S. degree. Full ad- 
mission may be granted to students with degrees in any of the engineering and physical 
science areas from accredited programs. In some cases it may be necessary to require 
undergraduate courses to fulfill the student's background. In addition to the Graduate 
School requirements, the GRE Aptitude Test may be required. 

The M.S. degree program offers both a thesis and a non-thesis option. The De- 
partment's admission requirements are included in its publications. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department provides laboratory facilities for graduate research. The laboratories 
contain radiant panels, a cone calorimeter and particle obscuration apparatus. The 
departmental computer laboratory contains PC's, AT's and PS2's. Sun workstations 
and a DEC-based CAD facility are provided by the College of Engineering. A UNIVAC 
1100/92 and an IBM 3081 in the Computer Science Building are available by remote 
access from the Department Computer Laboratory. Library facilities include one of 
the most extensive fire protection engineering-related collections in the country. The 
Department has computerized access to the National Institute for Standards and Tech- 
nology Center for Fire Research Library through FIREDOC. 
Financial Assistance 

Financial aid is available in the form of fellowships, and teaching and research 
assistantships. Research assistantships are awarded subject to the availability of research 
funds. Professional firms and governmental agencies in the area have work-study pro- 
grams available to graduate students. 
Additional Information 

Brochures and publications offered by the Department may be obtained by writing: 
Department of Fire Protection Engineering 



Food Science Program (FDSC) 131 



University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-3991 
For courses, see code ENFP. 

Food Science Program (FDSC) 

Professor and Chair: Westhoff 

Professors: Bean, Bender, Cook, Heath, Johnson, Keeney (Emeritus), King 

(Emeritus), Mattick (Emeritus), Quebedeaux, Solomos, Twigg (Emeritus), Vijay, 

Westhoff, Wheaton, Wiley 

Associate Professors: Chai, Doerr, Schlimme, Shehata, Stewart, Wabeck 

Assistant Professors: Choi, Kantor, Marshall 

The Food Science Program offers the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. The Graduate Program is interdepartmental with faculty representing de- 
partments of Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural and Resource Economics, Animal 
Sciences, Botany, Chemistry, Horticulture, Human Nutrition and Food Systems, Mi- 
crobiology, Poultry Science and the Sea Food Processing Laboratory of the Environ- 
mental and Estuarine Studies Center. Food Science is concerned with all the basic and 
fundamental principles of the physical, biological and behavioral sciences and engi- 
neering to better understand the complex and heterogeneous materials recognized as 
food. Graduates are needed as food scientists or food technologists by the commercial 
food manufacturing and packaging industry; by many allied industries such as equip- 
ment manufacturers and suppliers to the industry; by government agencies at local, 
state, national and international levels; and by educational institutions. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Program requires all applicants to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
Aptitude Test and achieve a minimum combined GRE score of 1500; international 
students must have a TOEFL score of at least 550. The Program also bases its evaluation 
for acceptance on the student's academic transcripts, letters of recommendation and 
professional experience. A background in food science, physical, chemical and biolog- 
ical sciences or engineering is desirable. Under certain conditions, the Food Science 
Admissions Committee may ask an applicant to come in for a personal interview. 
Students are only accepted into the program when they meet all necessary requirements 
and when a research adviser can be identified. The Program Chair may either rec- 
ommend to admit a student without condition, provisionally (with any of 20 conditions 
to be fulfilled) or deny admission with reasons stated. 

After a student is accepted into the program, he or she is assigned an adviser in 
accordance with the student's objectives, prior experience, coursework, etc. Within 
the first semester, students should acquaint themselves with faculty members and their 
fields of interest in order to form a Guidance Committee chaired by the adviser, which 
also consists of at least two M.S. or four Ph.D. faculty members. Students must also 
file an approved program of study by the end of the first year of graduate study, and 
any changes in the program must be approved by the adviser and the Guidance Com- 
mittee. 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, students who have a B.S. degree 
in Food Science or the equivalent must complete a minimum of 30 hours of graduate 



132 Food Science Program (FDSC) 



credit coursework including a minimum of 12 hours of 600-level courses and above, 
and three credit hours each in biochemistry and biometrics. Students who enter the 
program without a background in Food Science may be required to complete more 
than the minimum number of hours of graduate credit to obtain the M.S. degree. 
Students must also complete a mandatory colloquium (seminar) for which two pres- 
entations for credit must be made during the program of study and any other provisional 
requirements as necessary. 

The M.S. program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option. Students who write a 
thesis must complete six hours of FDSC 799 in addition to the other program course 
requirements. Students who choose the non-thesis option must complete all program 
course requirements and prepare a scholarly paper on a subject approved by the Guid- 
ance Committee. 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, the Ph.D. degree requires the 
completion of a program of study as approved by the Guidance Committee, including 
a minimum of 12 hours of FDSC 899 credit. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Laboratories, pilot plants and equipment are located in the Animal Sciences Center, 
Holzapfel Hall, H.J. Patterson Hall, Turner Laboratory and Shriver Hall. Facilities 
are available for experimental processing of fruits, vegetables, poultry, red meat, dairy 
products and seafood. Additional seafood processing facilities are located off campus. 
Laboratories are equipped for biochemical, biophysical and microbiological research 
and include facilities for laboratory animals. Instrumentation includes gas-liquid chrom- 
otographs, HPLC, atomic absorption spectrophotometer, rheology and texture meas- 
urement instrumentation, electron microscopes, super speed and ultra centrafuges, 
amino acid analyzers, slope extractor and UF/RO membrane separator, radioisotope 
counters and automated wet chemical analyzers. A broad range of modern facilities 
for cell culture, biochemistry and recombinant DNA work are also present. University 
research farms are available for both plant and animal production studies. Specialized 
facilities of nearby government and food industry laboratories are available for graduate 
student research. The Library of Congress, the National Agricultural Library and the 
National Library of Medicine are within easy access to the University. 

Financial Assistance 

Teaching and research assistantships are available from the participating depart- 
ments. These assistantships provide a stipend and remission of fees for up to 10 credit 
hours per semester. The stipends are increased according to time and progress in the 
graduate program. Funds from grants and contracts are also available for support of 
graduate research programs. 

Additional Information 



Dr. Dennis C. Westhoff 
Food Science Program 
Animal Sciences Building, Room 2113 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
Telephone: (301) 405-1377 
For courses, see code FDSC. 



French Language and Literature Program (FRIT) 133 



French Language and Literature Program (FRIT) 

Professor and Chair: Tarica 

Professors: MacBain, Therrien 

Associate Professors: Black, Cottenet-Hage, Demaitre, Fink, Joseph, Mossman, 

Russell, Verdaguer 

Assistant Professors: Ancekewicz, Brami, Falvo 

The Department of French and Italian prepares students for the Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in French language and literature. The composition of 
the graduate faculty and the variety of course offerings make it possible for students 
to specialize in any period or movement of French literature or any aspect of the French 
language, with the consent of their advisers. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The M.A. program, which offers both a thesis and non-thesis option, is open to 
students who have a solid grounding in French language and literature. It is strongly 
recommended that all applicants take the GRE General Examination. 

The students" knowledge of French is screened at the beginning of their first semester 
through a Language Proficiency Examination. Students usually take four semesters to 
finish the master's degree, which includes the successful completion of a thesis or a 
substantial research paper, and a comprehensive examination in French literature, 
French literature and civilization or French literature and linguistics (a six-hour written 
examination followed by a one-hour oral examination). 

The Ph.D. program is open only to the most highly motivated candidates who give 
evidence of strong qualifications to pursue an interest in individual research. 

All applicants for the Ph.D. program (except M.A. graduates of this Department) 
must pass a three-part preliminary examination administered at the start of the first 
semester, consisting of an explication de textes, an essay and an oral examination before 
being fully admitted to the program. Then, they must complete a program of seminars 
related to their field of interest. Finally, they must pass three Qualifying Examinations 
and a translation examination in a second foreign language before being admitted to 
candidacy and beginning work on their dissertation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to the University graduate and undergraduate libraries, the Department 
maintains a reference library. Area research facilities include the Library of Congress 
and the Folger Library (specializing in 16th, 17th and 18th-century Hterature). The 
Department has a chapter of the National Honor Society, Phi Sigma Iota. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial support is available in the form of fellowships and assistantships. For in- 
formation contact the Department of French and Italian. 

Additional Information 

For complete information concerning the Department's requirements set forth in the 
Guide to Graduate Programs in French, contact: 
Department of French and Italian 
Language and Literature 



134 Geography Program (GEOG) 



University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-4024 
For courses, see code FRIT. 

Geography Program (GEOG) 

Professor and Chair: Townshend 

Professors: Fonaroff, Wiedel 

Associate Professors: Brodsky, Christian, Cirrincione, Goward, Groves, Kearney, 

Leatherman, Mitchell, Prince, Thompson 

Assistant Professor: Marcus 

Lecturers: Broome, Chaves, Frieswyk 

Affiliate Faculty: Corsi 

The Department of Geography offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. All degree-seeking graduate students are required 
to complete the following courses during their first full year of study: GEOG 483 
(requires non-class time on campus), GEOG 600, GEOG 605, GEOG 610 and all 
prerequisites associated with these required courses. 

Students at both the master's and doctoral levels initiate their own program of 
coursework and submit a plan of study for approval. 

While the Washington job market is highly competitive, employment opportunities 
in applied geography remain strong. Would-be practicing geographers should stress 
such marketable studies as remote sensing, cartography, computer cartography, geo- 
graphic information services, international development and locational analysis. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Incoming M. A. students are expected to have an undergraduate degree in geography; 
students from other fields will be required to do additional remedial work. All graduate 
applicants should submit aptitude test scores of the Graduate Record Examination. 

The master's degree program can support specializations in: (1) physical geography 
— coastal and estuarine environments; (2) urban geography-metropolitan analysis; (3) 
human geography, especially historical geography; and (4) geographical analysis, in- 
cluding remote sensing, cartography, geographic information systems or spatial analysis 
(this specialization must be taken in combination with a systematic concentration). 
Geography internships are encouraged for students in each specialization. 

All master's degree students must take at least five courses in one of the four master's- 
level specialty areas. In addition, each master's student must take a combination of 
three courses outside the specialization designed to provide some breadth of knowledge 
in geography or in a related field. A regional or area studies focus can be taken as part 
of the three-course non-specialization combination. Master's students must complete 
at least 38 graduate credit hours. No more than 13 credit hours may be taken at the 
400 level. 

All master's students take an oral examination defense of a research proposal and 
a final oral examination based either on the thesis or the first of the two research papers. 



Geography Program (GEOG) 1 35 



The Ph.D. program usually requires three years to complete. The program is designed 
to meet the individual needs of the student; thus, few courses are required. Doctoral 
applicants must submit a written statement of study that is used to soHcit faculty 
sponsors. Because of the degree of specialization, the Department only considers Ph.D. 
applicants whose interests coincide with departmental faculty competence. 

The Department normally requires a grade point average higher than 3.0 and a 
master's degree from a recognized geography department for admission. Competency 
in terms of fields of study and a comparable level of achievement to the Department's 
master's degree may also be accepted. Students without a master's degree may petition 
the Department for admission and may be accepted upon approval of a faculty com- 
mittee appointed by the Department Chair. 

After completion of formal coursework for the Ph.D., students must take a two- 
part qualifying examination. Part one is a written examination on the student's knowl- 
edge of the general field of geography and a specific field of research specialization. 
Part two is an oral examination evaluating the dissertation proposal. Upon satisfactory 
completion of the dissertation there is also a final oral examination. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Departmental research facilities are contemporary and outstanding. They include 
cartographic laboratories, a computer mapping and spatial analysis facility, a coastal 
geomorphology laboratory and remote sensing facilities. Numerous microcomputers 
are housed in the Department. The Department publishes an Occasional Papers Series. 

Additional Information 

More detailed information on the M.A. and Ph.D. programs can be obtained from: 
Director of Graduate Studies 
Department of Geography 
1113 Lefrak Hall 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-4057 
For courses, see code GEOG. 

Dual Master's Degrees Programs in Geographic Information 
Systems 

This is a joint program of the College of Library and Information Services and the 
Department of Geography. It results in two master's degrees; the Master of Library 
Science (MLS) and the Master of Arts in Geography. The dual-degree program requires 
a minimum of 56 graduate credit hours. For a full-time student, the program requires 
two years of intensive study. Admission to the program is competitive and students 
must apply separately and be admitted both to Library and Information Services and 
to Geography. Contact either the Department of Geography (301) 405-4057 or the 
College of Library and Information Services (301) 405-2038 for more information. 



136 Geology Program (GEOL) 



Geology Program (GEOL) 

Professor and Chair: Brown 

Professor: Chang 

Associate Professors: Candela, McLellan, Ridky, Segovia, Siegrist, Stifel, Wylie 

The Department of Geology offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Broad research interests among faculty members 
make study and research available in all major fields of geological sciences with spe- 
cialization in economic geology, mineralogy; environmental geology; hydrology, pe- 
trology; crystal chemistry; geochemistry; sedimentation; stratigraphy; paleontology; 
structural geology; and tectonics. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Qualified students with a major in geology as well as in physics, chemistry, biology 
and related sciences and engineering are invited to apply for admission to the graduate 
programs. All students must submit the GRE General Aptitude Test scores to be 
considered for admission, and the GRE Advanced Test in Geology is recommended 
but not required. There is no single prescribed curriculum for all graduate students. 
The entire course of study is individually developed for each student by his/her graduate 
program committee. All students are required to take an entrance examination, results 
from which are used to design their academic schedules. 

The M.S. degree is awarded following the successful completion of the course re- 
quirements and a satisfactory thesis. For the Ph.D. degree, requirements include sat- 
isfactory course work, an oral candidacy examination, a research proposal and a successful 
dissertation defense. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has all standard laboratory equipment for rock, mineral, and fossil 
preparation and treatment. Special equipment includes a fully automated x-ray spec- 
trometer; an electron microprobe analyzer; x-ray diffractometers; atomic absorption 
spectrophotometer; research transmitted and reflected light microscopes; geophysical 
equipment of magnetic, seismic, resistivity and EM measurements; and a complete 
laboratory for mineral synthesis and phase equilibrium studies at high temperatures 
and high pressures including hydrothermal, internally heated piston-cylinder and Bridg- 
man opposed-anvil systems. Extensive library, computer and electron microscope fa- 
cilities are available on campus for graduate research. 

The campus is located within the Washington D.C. metropolitan area and close to 
Baltimore where a large number of outstanding institutions are located. These include 
the United States Geological Survey, Bureau of Mines, Department of Energy, En- 
vironmental Protection Agency, National Institute of Technology and Standards, NA- 
SA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Smithsonian Institution, the Carnegie Institute's 
Geophysical Laboratory and Department of Terrestrial Magnetism and the Geological 
Survey of Maryland. Opportunities exist for programs of study in cooperation with 
many of these institutions. 
Financial Assistance 

Graduate students are eligible for Departmental teaching assistantships. Graduate 
School fellowships and grant-supported fellowships and research assistantships. In ad- 
dition, some curatorial, library and other part-time work is available. 



Germanic Language and Literature Program (GERS) 137 



Additional Information 

The Department's "Graduate Programs in Geology at Maryland" gives additional 
information on the requirements, examinations, faculty research interests and publi- 
cations, research facilities and financial aids. Copies are available from: 

Department of Geology 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-4365 
For courses, see code GEOL. 

Germanic Language and Literature Program (GERS) 

Professor and Chair: Pfister 

Professors: Beicken, Best, Herin (Emeritus), Jones (Emeritus), Oster, Pfister 

Associate Professors: Bilik, Fleck, Frederiksen 

Assistant Professors: Fagan, Richter, Strauch 

The Germanic Section of the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and 
Literatures offers programs of study leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. Special- 
ization includes the following areas: Language Pedagogy and Applied Linguistics; Ger- 
manic Philology; Medieval Literature and Culture; and Literature of the German Speaking 
Countries from the Renaissance to the Present. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, candidates should have a bachelor's 
degree with a major in German language and literature or the equivalent and fluency 
in the written and spoken language. Candidates for the doctorate must have a master's 
degree in German or in a related discipline such as Germanic Studies, Scandinavian 
Studies, Language Education, Medieval Studies, etc. 

The M.A. degree program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option. For the thesis 
option, the student must complete 24 hours of coursework, the thesis and a written 
comprehensive examination. The non-thesis option requires 30 hours of coursework, 
a mini-thesis with oral defense and a written comprehensive examination. For both 
options the comprehensives consist of four two-hour examinations based on the course- 
work and the M.A. Reading List. 

Degree requirements for the Ph.D. are as follows: 1) completion of at least 30 hours 
of coursework beyond the master's degree over a period of at least one year at the 
University of Maryland and a further 12 hours of dissertation research; 2) a reading 
skill examination in a language other than English or German, which may be another 
Germanic language or a language related to the candidate's research; 3) comprehensive 
written examinations; 4) presentation of the dissertation topic to the Germanic Section 
graduate faculty before the topic is approved; and 5) the comprehensive examinations. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to its course offerings listed below, the Germanic Section of the De- 
partment of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures sponsors the German 
Club, the University of Maryland Chapter of Delta Phi Alpha (the national German 
language honors society). Distinguished scholars and lecturers, as well as visiting pro- 



1 38 Government and Politics Program (GVPT) 



fessors, visit the metropolitan area and campus regularly. College Park's proximity to 
Washington, D.C. facilitates participation in the many cultural functions of the capital 
with its wealth of German and Scandinavian social groups and national societies. 

Financial Assistance 

The Germanic Section offers graduate teaching and non-teaching assistantships as 
well as several fellowships. 

Additional Information 

For further information write to: 
Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literature 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-4091 
For courses, see code GERS. 

Government and Politics Program (GVPT) 

Professor and Chair: Quester 

Professors: Azar, Butterworth, Claude, Davidson, Dawisha, Elkin, Glass, Gurr, 

Hsueh, Marando, McNelly, Oppenheimer, PhilHps, Piper, Pirages, Reeves, Segal, 

Stone, Uslaner, Wilkenfeld 

Associate Professors: Alford, Glendening, Heisler, McCarrick, Mcintosh, Ranald, 

Soltan, Terchek 

Assistant Professors: Haufler, Herrnson, Kaminski, Lalman, Lanning, Swistak, 
Tismaneanu 

The Department of Government and Politics is a large and diverse department that 
offers graduate study leading to both the Master of Arts and the Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees in political science. The Department offers a variety of courses and program 
flexibility for students seeking academic careers as well as those seeking other profes- 
sional career interests in poUtical science. 

This diversity and flexibility enables students to pursue specializations in the broad 
fields of American politics, international relations, comparative politics, political econ- 
omy and political theory. In addition, students may pursue in depth more specialized 
fields such as formal theory, public administration, public law, Soviet-East European 
studies, national security. East Asian studies, political development, public policy, 
political behavior, political psychology, conflict management, politics of advanced in- 
dustrial societies and social choice. 

In addition to this coursework, students also participate in the activities of the Public 
Service Intern Program, Project ICONS, the Center for International Development 
and Conflict Management, the Maryland Social Choice Program and the Center for 
International Security Studies at Maryland. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission to both the M.A. and Ph.D. programs is competitive; the Department 
seeks to recruit highly qualified students and to admit the strongest students from the 
pool of applicants. Approximately 30-40 students enter graduate programs each year. 



Health Education Program (HLTH) 139 



Students seeking admission to the M.A. program who have an undergraduate GPA of 
at least 3.2 and aggregate GRE scores of about 1600 are within the competitive range. 
Admission to the doctoral program is even more restrictive and competitive than at 
the master's level. 

The M.A. program provides substantial flexibility to students and can generally be 
completed in three semesters of full-time study. It is a useful degree for those with 
career interests in public service or the private sector and is the first degree for those 
seeking an academic career. 

Master's degree candidates may select a thesis or a non-thesis option, both of which 
require six semester hours of political theory or political philosophy, six semester hours 
of methods courses and a comprehensive examination in one field. Both options require 
a total of 30 semester hours of credit. 

The doctoral program is intended to provide students with the knowledge, meth- 
odological skills and research experience appropriate for persons who intend to enter 
the discipline of political science. Once students are admitted to the program, they are 
expected to complete 42 hours of graduate work including courses in political theory 
and methods that are required for all students. Under an adviser's direction, students 
will identify two fields of specialization and must pass comprehensive written exami- 
nations in both fields and complete a dissertation. 

Financial Assistance 

In addition to teaching assistantships, the Department also has a government in- 
ternship program for students interested in public administration. There are also a 
hmited and variable number of research positions available through research grants. 

Additional Information 

Further information and a manual on graduate study can be secured from: 
Director of Graduate Studies 
Department of Government and Politics 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-4161 
For courses, see code GVPT. 

Health Education Program (HLTH) 

Professor and Chair: Gilbert 

Professors: Burt, Feldman, Gold, Greenberg, Leviton, Wilson 

Associate Professors: Allen, Beck, Clearwater, Miller 

Assistant Professors: Alexander, Desmond, Klos, Thomas 

Adjunct Professors: Schaeffer, Valente 

Affiliate Professor: Bridwell 

The Department of Health Education offers a program designed to prepare students 
to enter health education and related health professions in teaching, research, consulting 
and administrative roles. Career opportunities for graduates include professional ed- 
ucation, research, health maintenance, public schools, community health agencies, 
health care delivery and promotion, and private and governmental consulting settings. 



140 Hearing and Speech Sciences Program (HESP) 



Admissions and Degree Information 

The Department offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. The master's program offers both thesis and non-thesis options. 

The Department offers fully developed tracks of study and some field experience in 
several areas, including stress management, worksite health promotion, health behav- 
ior, safety education, school health education, sexuality, drug education, community 
health and others. Advanced degree study is not limited to these areas. Each student, 
in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies and the appropriate faculty 
member, designs an individual program of study to meet his/her projected professional 
needs. 

Students who hold at least a bachelor's degree in areas related to the social, psy- 
chological or biological basis of human health will be considered for admission to the 
M.A. program. Ph.D. applicants must have completed work on an appropriate master's 
level degree. Entrance requirements also include an undergraduate GPA of at least 
3.0 and a graduate GPA of 3.5, satisfactory GRE scores (quantitative and verbal 
sections) and letters of recommendation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The student may experience specific application of theory through numerous field 
studies and departmental service programs in the areas of controlling stress and tension, 
children's health and development, programs for the aged, weight control, women's 
health and safety education. Special departmental facilities include the Psychophy- 
siological Research Laboratory, the Minority Health Research Laboratory, the Inter- 
disciplinary Health Research Laboratory, the Safety Education Center and a college 
microcomputer laboratory. 

The proximity of the National Institutes of Health, the National Library of Medicine 
and the Library of Congress render the University of Maryland unusually well suited 
for graduate work in health education. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department offers a limited number of graduate teaching and research assist- 
antships. The Department may also recommend outstanding applicants to the Graduate 
School for University fellowships. 

Additional Information 

For more specific information on the program, contact: 
Dr. Robert S. Gold 
Director of Graduate Studies 
Department of Health Education 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-2464 
For courses, see code HLTH. 

Hearing and Speech Sciences Program (HESP) 

Professor and Acting Chair: McCall 
Professor: Yeni-Komshian 



Hearing and Speech Sciences Program (HESP) 141 



Associate Professors: Baker, Dingwall, Gordon-Salant, Ratner, Roth 
Professor Emeritus: Newby 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences offers the Master of Arts degree 
with either the thesis or the non-thesis option and with major emphasis either in speech 
and language pathology or in audiology. The Master's degree is required for individuals 
preparing for positions as speech pathologists or audiologists in schools, hospitals, 
rehabilitation facilities, hearing and speech centers or in other clinical settings. Aca- 
demic coursework is combined with supervised clinical practice in the University Speech 
and Hearing Clinic and in selected outside clinical facilities so that the graduate will 
meet the academic requirements for clinical certification by the American Speech and 
Hearing Association and for licensing in the State of Maryland. The Master's degree 
program is accredited by the American Boards of Examiners in Speech Pathology and 
Audiology. 

Applicants with an undergraduate degree in the hearing and speech sciences or a 
related field are considered for admission to the M.A. degree program, which usually 
requires two years of graduate study. Individuals without a background in the hearing 
and speech sciences may need more than two years to finish. Only full-time students 
are admitted to the program. 

The Department also offers the Doctor of Philosophy degree with a major emphasis 
in speech, language or hearing. Students with a B.A. or M.A. are considered for 
admission to the doctoral program. Matriculated doctoral students will choose within 
their major a special interest area, which may focus on the normal aspects of their 
major or disorders related to the major. A student must also select a minor area of 
study either from within or outside departmental offerings. There are no foreign lan- 
guage requirements, but advanced courses in statistics and experimental research design 
are required for the degree. Course programs are planned by the student and a com- 
mittee of at least four faculty members. All doctoral students are expected to participate 
for academic credit in varied research activities within the Department. Students must 
take written and oral comprehensive examinations for admission to candidacy after 
completing formal academic coursework. Doctoral students must register for at least 
12 semester hours of dissertation research credit before completing the degree. 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, the Department requires applicants 
to furnish scores on the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test. Prospective 
applicants should note that decisions on summer and fall admissions are made in early 
March and on spring admission in early November. Early application is encouraged. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department's facilities include: (1) several modem research laboratories equipped 
to support research in the areas of language, acoustic phonetics, physiological phonetics, 
psychoacoustics, speech perception, neuropsychology and brain stem evoked response 
audiometry; (2) an integrated audiovisual laboratory; (3) a departmental library; and 
(4) a hearing and speech clinic that includes several audiological test suites and diag- 
nostic/therapy rooms equipped for observation. Additional research and clinical facil- 
ities are available in the Washington and Baltimore metropolitan areas. The Library 
of Congress, the National Library of Medicine and the libraries of various medical 



142 History Program (HIST) 



schools in the Washington-Baltimore area supplement the University's libraries at Col- 
lege Park. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available through the Department. 
Assistantships that carry teaching, research or clinical responsibilities are awarded on 
a competitive basis. 

Additional Information 

Additional information about the M.A. and Ph.D. programs may be obtained by 
contacting: 

Chairman 

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-4214 
For courses, see code HESP. 

History Program (HIST) 

Professor and Chair: Price 

Professors: Belz, Berlin, Brush , Callcott, Cockburn, Cole, Cooperman, Foust, 

Gilbert, Haber, Harlan, Kent, Lampe, McCusker, A. Olson, K. Olson, Price, 

Smith, Sparks, Warren, Yaney 

Associate Professors: Bedos-Rezak, Breslow, Darden , Eckstein, Farreir, Flack, 

Flynn, Friedel, Grimsted, Gullickson, Harris, Hoffman, Holum, Kaufman, Majeska, 

Matossian, Mayo, Moss, Perinbaum, Ridgway, Rozenbilt, Spiegel, Stowasser, 

Sumida, Wright, Zilfi 

Assistant Professors: Bradbury, Nicklason, Thompson, Williams 

Joint appointment with Institute for Physical Sciences and Technology 

Joint appointment with Secondary Education 

Joint appointment with Philosophy 

The Department of History offers programs leading to the degrees of Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy. Areas of specialization include: United States, Ancient, 
Medieval, Early Modern European, Modern European, British, Russian, Latin Amer- 
ican, African*, Middle Eastern*, East Asian, Diplomatic, Economic, Science and 
Women's History 

*Fields at M.A. level only. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Master of Arts degree serves both as a firm grounding in a field of history for 
teaching purposes and as preparation for the pursuit of the doctorate. In addition to 
the Graduate School requirements, the GRE aptitude test is required. An undergrad- 
uate major in history is not required for admission. Thirty credit hours are required 
for the degree. 

The Department offers both a thesis and a non-thesis option. Departmental require- 
ments for the degree include one section of a general seminar (American, European 
or Comparative World History) and two 800-level research seminars. A maximum of 



History Program (HIST) 143 



nine hours of credit may be taken in 400-level courses. For those students who select 
a thesis option, six hours of M.A. thesis research courses (HIST 799) are required. 
There will be a final oral examination confined to the thesis and the area in which it 
lies. Students who select the non-thesis option must take 30 credits (15 in the major 
field, nine in the minor field and six hours of electives), submit two scholarly papers 
to their examining committee and pass a four-hour comprehensive examination in their 
major area. 

The student's M.A. examining committee will decide whether a student will be 
admitted to the doctoral program on the basis of the his or her record of achievement 
in coursework, a written examination (if required in the student's major area), and a 
thesis and oral defense of the thesis or two submitted research papers. Students with 
M.A. degrees awarded at other institutions will be asked to submit substantial evidence 
of their written work when they apply for admission to the doctoral program. Doctoral 
candidates must complete three sections of the General Seminar. Within five semesters 
after entering the doctoral program, every student must pass a general oral and a special 
field written examination in his or her major area and one written field examination 
in a minor area. These examinations will test for a broad, intelligent and informed 
handling of the major historical problems and literature of that field. 

An oral examination on the student's dissertation prospectus and a bibliography on 
the dissertation field are required. The dissertation is to be understood to constitute 
the largest single portion of the doctoral program; it is expected to be a distinct con- 
tribution to historical knowledge and/or interpretation. 

All doctoral students must show a reading competence in one foreign language. 
Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to the field concentrations described above, the Department of History 
offers several forms of specialized training. In the field of historical editing the De- 
partment has introduced a successful internship course in archival work in conjunction 
with the National Archives. Since 1970, the Department has sponsored a journal of 
history. The Maryland Historian, which features scholarly articles and reviews and 
provides practical experience for graduate students in the production of a journal. The 
journal was founded and is managed and produced by graduate students in the De- 
partment of History. The Department also sponsors major editorial projects: the Booker 
T. Washington Papers, the Samuel Gompers Papers, the Freedom and Southern Society 
project, and the Charles Carroll of Carrollton Papers. A number of history department 
graduate students have gained valuable research and editing experience on these proj- 
ects, all of which receive support from the National Historical Publications and Records 
Commission. In conjunction with the Department of Philosophy, the Department of 
History sponsors and participates in the Folger Institute of Renaissance and Eighteenth- 
Century Studies. The Institute offers seminars, workshops, conferences, colloquia and 
lectures for graduate students and faculty. The Institute also awards fellowships to 
graduate students, and several of these awards have gone to doctoral candidates from 
the University of Maryland's history department. The Department of History also 
participates in the Caesarea excavations. This project provides a rich source of thesis 
and dissertation topics for graduate students in Ancient History. 
Financial Assistance 

The Department offers financial assistance principally in the form of teaching as- 
sistantships to outstanding graduate students. These positions vary in number according 



144 History Program (HIST) 



to the availability of funds, but generally about 38 are awarded to students working 
toward the Ph.D. or M.A. degree. Appointment as a teaching assistant provides stu- 
dents an opportunity to work closely with faculty members in the teaching of under- 
graduate survey courses in history. Paid internships at regional historical institutions 
that carry tuition scholarships are also available. 

Additional Information 

For complete descriptions of programs and requirements, contact: 
Chair 

Department of History 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-4264 
For courses, see code HIST. 

Concentration in the History and Philosophy of Science 

The Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science supervises graduate study 
leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in History or Philos- 
ophy. Courses are offered in a wide range of subjects in the history and philosophy of 
science and technology, and research facilities are available on the College Park campus 
and in the Washington area. For advanced research, the emphasis is on the history and 
philosophy of physical and biological science in the 19th and 20th centuries; history of 
the philosophy of science and scientific ideas; genetics, computer science, geophysics 
and astronomy; and scientific institutions in the United States. Integration of historical 
and philosophical interpretations of science is stressed in both teaching and research. 

While academia is the traditional employer of historians and philosophers of science, 
other opportunities exist with museums, government and industry. Academic oppor- 
tunities for historians and philosophers of science recently have been more plentiful 
than for historians or philosophers in general. While the numbers are small, the Com- 
mittee has successfully placed all of its degree recipients. 

Students should apply for admission to either the History Department or the Phi- 
losophy Department, indicating History and Philosophy of Science as the field of spe- 
cialization. Since people with diverse backgrounds can be successful in this field, there 
are no rigid requirements for admission; the quality of a student's work in science, 
history and philosophy, as demonstrated not only by grades and test scores but also 
by papers and independent projects, is more important than the number of credit hours 
in these subjects. But prospective students should also be warned that the minimum 
requirement for doing research in the history and philosophy of science covers sub- 
stantially more areas than normally expected of Ph.D. 's in any one of the traditional 
fields of history, philosophy or a science; it includes training in a science equivalent to 
a B.S. (preferably M.S.) degree, proficiency in both oral and written expression and 
an ability to read at least one foreign language (preferably both French and German). 

The Committee also encourages applications from students who do not intend to 
obtain a Ph.D. in history and philosophy of science but desire only the M.A. as 
preparation for careers in science, teaching, government service, technical administra- 
tion, museum work, etc., or who plan to proceed to the Ph.D. in another field. 



History Program (HIST) 145 



A few teaching assistantships are available in the History and Philosophy Depart- 
ments for students who have adequate backgrounds in those subjects. 

Detailed information may be obtained by writing to: 
Chairperson 

Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science 
1131 Skinner Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
For courses, see code HIST. 

Studies Leading to the M.A. in History and the M.L.S. 

The Department of History and the College of Library and Information Services 
coordinate two master's degree programs to meet the need for multi-disciplinary grad- 
uate training for archivists, records managers, manuscript curators, rare book librarians, 
bibliographers, conservation administrators and those wishing to become subject and 
research specialists in academic, special and/or research libraries. Because of the cam- 
pus' proximity to a variety of immensely rich research collections, students are able to 
gain first-hand experiences through internships that reinforce their classroom instruc- 
tion. 

The sequence of courses leading to the two degrees prepares students to understand 
the intellectual approach of the research scholar through historic training and to meet 
those research needs through the information services offered in CLIS. The coordinated 
curricula provide four main options: 1) archives and records managements; 2) cura- 
torship of historical collections; 3) scholarly editing and publishing; and 4) reference 
research and bibliographic services. The 54 hours required for the degrees combine 24 
hours in each component plus six elective hours. The M.A. -M.L.S. is a non-thesis 
program, but students may choose to write a thesis when such research enhances their 
program. 
Admission and Degree Information 

Students may apply for admission under the rubric HILS (History-Library Science) 
either through the Department of History or CLIS. Each has a coordinator who serves 
as a student adviser. Since many of these courses are offered in sequence, it is important 
for students to work closely with these advisers. The two degrees are awarded simul- 
taneously, and a student who fails to complete the special requirements for the coor- 
dinated degree programs may not receive either degree. If students subsequently wish 
to receive only one degree, they must transfer from HILS either to the graduate program 
in History (HIST) or to the College of Library and Information Services (LBSC) and 
fulfill the normal requirements for the separate M.L.S. 
Financial Assistance 

A few teaching assistantships are available in the Department of History, and the 
College of Library and Information Services has some research assistantships and fel- 
lowship aid for students in this course of directed study. These are awarded on a 
competitive basis in both components. 

Additional Information 

Detailed information may be obtained by writing to the HILS Coordinator, in either 
the Department of History or the College of Library and Information Services. 



1 46 Horticulture Program (HORT) 



For courses, see code HIST. 
Horticulture Program (HORT) 

Professor and Acting Chair: Gouin 

Professors: Kennedy, Oliver, Quebedeaux, Solomos, Wiley 

Adjunct Professor: Anderson, Galletta, Gross, Kretchmer, Krizek 

Professors Emeriti: Link, Scott, Shanks, Stark, Thompson, Twigg 

Associate Professors: Beste, Bouwkamp, Deitzer, Gould, McClurg, Ng, Schales, 

Schlimme, Swartz, Walsh 

Assistant Professors: Graves, Hamed, Healy, Hershey, Scarfo, Stutte 

Lecturer: Mityga 

The Department of Horticulture offers graduate study leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The M.S. degree program offers both a 
thesis and non-thesis option. Candidates place major emphasis in the areas of fruit, 
vegetable or ornamental crops, or environmental and landscape horticulture. Within 
these commodity areas students may direct their studies and research efforts to mineral 
nutrition, postharvest physiology, genetics and breeding, genetic engineering, chemical 
growth regulation, water relations, tissue culture, plant propagation, histochemistry, 
photoperiodism and other factors affecting production, postharvest handling and pres- 
ervation of horticultural crops. The research activities required for the thesis or dis- 
sertation are normally carried out in conjunction with the research programs of the 
Departmental staff. 

The candidate's program may be directed toward a career in research, teaching, 
extension education or industry. Many recent graduates are currently involved in pro- 
grams at major universities; others are teaching at the vocational agriculture and com- 
munity college level. Still others are employed as county agents or specialists with the 
Cooperative Extension Service or work in research and development with the U.S. 
Government, private industry or international agriculture. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Students who seek admission should show undergraduate preparation in horticulture, 
botany, chemistry and supporting agricultural disciplines. Those without this back- 
ground are advised to enroll as undergraduate students to correct these deficiencies. 
Students entering the doctoral program should have or plan on completing a M.S. 
degree in Horticulture, although presentation of the M.S. in a related plant science 
field may be acceptable. The Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test is required. 

A graduate student is assigned a temporary adviser upon admission and arrival. 
During the first semester the student will select a major adviser, and an advisory 
committee will be appointed. This committee will help the candidate develop a program 
of courses and research to meet his or her goals and aspirations. A comprehensive, 
oral examination is given each candidate for the M.S.; candidates for the Ph.D. take 
an oral qualifying examination as well as a final oral exam covering the dissertation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The College Park campus offers modern laboratory and greenhouse facilities in which 
instrumentation provides for chromatography, spectrophotometry, elemental analysis. 



Human Development Education Program (EDHD) 1 47 



histology, biotechnology and other procedures. A system for automatically monitoring 
respiratory gases and volatiles is available in connection with controlled atmosphere 
chambers. Controlled-temperature storage and growth chambers provide facilities for 
postharvest and environmental control studies. A large tissue culture lab has been 
approved for transformation research in plants. Greenhouse and plot areas are available 
for research with floricultural and ornamental plants. Orchards for research with fruits 
are located at the Wye and Western Maryland Research and Education Centers; other 
research studies are conducted cooperatively with fruit growers in the western part of 
the state. Field research with vegetable crops is carried on at the Lower Eastern Shore 
Research and Education Center in SaHsbury, and with fruit and vegetable crops at 
both the Wye Research and Education Center in Queenstown and the Central Maryland 
Research and Education Center in Upper Marlboro. 

The Beltsville Agricultural Research Center of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
located three miles from the campus, provides opportunities to attend seminars, con- 
ferences and workshops, and to conduct cooperative research with the USDA Beltsville 
ARS Center scientists. In addition, the National Agricultural Library at the Research 
Center is available to graduate students and faculty. 

Financial Assistance 

Some graduate students are supported with financial aid. Research and teaching 
assistantships are offered on a competitive basis to students on full admission status, 
as available. All graduate assistants are expected to assist in the teaching program of 
the Department, and those in the M.S. program will follow the thesis option. 

Additional Information 

For more specific information, please contact: 
Chair 

Department of Horticulture 
1124 Holzapfel Hall 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-4264 
For courses, see code HORT. 

Human Development Education Program (Institute for Child 
Study) (EDHD) 

Professor and Chair: Hardy 

Professors: Eliot, Porges, Seefeldt, Torney-Purta 

Professors Emeriti: Bowie, Dittman, Goering, Grambs, Hatfield, Morgan 

Associate Professors: Bennett, Flatter, Fox, Gardner, Huebner, Koopman, Marcus, 

Robertson-Tchabo, Tyler 

Assistant Professors: Byrnes, Green, HoUoway, Hunt, Taylor, Wigfield 

The interdisciplinary programs of the Department of Human Development/Institute 
for Child Study attempt to collect, interpret, and synthesize the findings of the human 
sciences that are concerned with human growth, lifespan development, and learning, 
and to communicate this synthesis to persons who need such understandings as a basis 
for their practice and planning. Courses are psychological in nature and are intended 



148 Human Development Education Program (EDHD) 



to increase the student's understanding of learning theory and cognitive, social, and 
emotional development. Research thrusts are primarily concerned with the social as- 
pects of human development. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Department of Human Development/Institute for Child Study offers graduate 
programs leading to Master of Education, Master of Arts with thesis. Master of Arts 
without thesis. Doctor of Philosophy, and Doctor of Education degrees, and Advanced 
Graduate Specialist Certificate (a planned program of 30 graduate hours beyond the 
master's degree). Admission requirements for the master's program requires a 3.0 
undergraduate grade point average and the submission of the Miller Analogies Test or 
the Graduate Record Examination test scores. Admission to an A.G.S. or Doctoral 
program requires a 3.5 grade point average in previous graduate studies and either a 
3.0 undergraduate grade point average or at least a 40 percentile on the Miller Analogies 
Test or Graduate Record Examination. The research oriented M.A. and Ph.D. degree 
programs in human development are designed to develop student competencies in the 
theoretical areas of biological, psychological, learning, and sociocultural processes, and 
related research methods in human development. The practice oriented M.Ed., M.A. 
without thesis, and Ed.D. programs are designed to develop student competencies in 
identifying the implications of scientific knowledge for specific situations through train- 
ing in program design, management, delivery, and evaluation of human services con- 
sistent with current scientific knowledge of human development. 

The primary thrust of Department/Institute Programs is focused upon educational 
institutions and services and secondarily with other human services which might also 
draw upon scientific knowledge of human growth and development. The graduate 
program is intended to prepare educational psychologists for service in schools and 
other community agencies dealing with individuals of all ages, to prepare teachers of 
human development in higher education, and to prepare research-oriented individuals 
for service in public (county, state, or federal) or private organizations. A student's 
program is individually developed through consultation with advisers and appropriate 
committees to meet the unique needs of the student consistent with the purposes and 
goals of the Institute for Child Study. A listing of graduate degree requirements is 
available from the EDHD office. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Washington, D.C. area and the University of Maryland are particularly rich in 
resources for graduate study in human development. The faculty of the Institute is 
uniquely multi-disciplinary, representing the broad range of the human sciences and 
related applied fields. The Institute has ongoing in-service field programs in child and 
youth study, and opportunities for participating in research. Internship experiences are 
available through cooperation with various agencies and schools in the area. Resources 
of the College of Education include a Center for Young Children, a Curriculum Ma- 
terials Center, an Educational Technology Center, a Reading Center, Science Center, 
and financial and advisory support services for research and evaluation. In addition, 
the Institute has two major developmental assessment laboratories and a mobile de- 
velopmental assessment laboratory through which the student can gain first-hand ex- 
perience in making assessment of infants and young children. 

For courses, see code EDHD. 



Human Nutrition and Food Systems (HNFS) 149 



Human Nutrition and Food Systems (HNFS) 

Professor and Chair: Read 

Professors: Ahrens, Moser-Veillon, Prather, Sims 

Associate Professors: Castonguay, Jackson, Williams 

Assistant Professors: Choi, Karahadian, Noble, Taylor 

Lecturers: Curtis, Norton 

Adjunct Professors: Failla, Hamosh, Reiser, Reynolds, Trout 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Bathena, Goldberg, Pao, Szepesi 

Adjunct Assistant Professors: Behall, Conway, Deuster, Guenther, Hallfrisch, 

Michaelis, Miles, Monagan, Nolan, Patterson, Raiten, Sempos 

Affiliate Professors: Hansen, Heald 

Affiliate Assistant Professors: Kantor, McKenna 

NOTE: Some courses in this program may require the use of animals. Please see the 
Statement on Animal Care and use in the appendix and the policy statement for students 
under "Degree Requirements." 

The Department offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy degrees in each of the following major areas: food, nutrition and food- 
service administration. The food area includes studies in experimental foods, sensory 
evaluation and flavor chemistry as well as cultural, behavioral and consumer aspects 
of food. Nutrition includes the science of nutrition as well as the areas of community, 
international and clinical nutrition. Foodservice administration includes foodservice 
systems management. The Department also participates in an interdepartmental pro- 
gram for Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in nutritional science, 
which are described below. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to minimum Graduate School requirements, a satisfactory score on the 
aptitude portion of the Graduate Record Examination is required. A minimum com- 
bination of 1000 with a minimum of 450 on both the verbal and quantitative sections 
is required for admission. 

The master's degree program offers thesis and non-thesis options in food, nutrition 
or foodservice administration. 

All master's students are required to take a seminar, research methods, and statistics 
course. Other courses are selected with the guidance of an adviser and/or a committee. 
Non-thesis option students must prepare a research paper, present an additional seminar 
and take a written comprehensive examination in addition to an oral examination. An 
average of three or four semesters is usually required to complete the thesis option 
and two or three semesters for the non-thesis option. 

Students with bachelor's degrees may apply for the doctoral program but they are 
encouraged to complete requirements for the M.S. degree first. Applicants holding a 
master's degree with the appropriate background courses may be admitted directly into 
the doctoral program. Previous graduate work will be evaluated on an individual basis. 
'Written and oral comprehensive examinations are given upon completion of all course- 
work. A final oral examination is held for the student to defend the dissertation. 



1 50 Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education (EDIT) 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has well-equipped laboratories for research in all areas of special- 
ization. 

The Department also has special arrangements and cooperative agreements with 
laboratories at the Behsville Human Nutrition Center, A.R.S., U.S.D.A., the Uni- 
versity Affiliated Program in Child Development at Georgetown University Hospital 
Clinic and University of Maryland Hospital in Baltimore for students in nutrition and 
foods. Faculty members generally have advanced degrees in the areas of experimental 
foods and food chemistry, food-related behavior, community nutrition, clinical nutri- 
tion, human and animal nutrition and foodservice systems. Adjunct faculty extend 
these capabilities and resources to laboratories and clinics throughout the Washington- 
Baltimore area. 

Financial Assistance 

There are a limited number of graduate teaching assistantships, traineeships and 
research assistantships available. 

Additional Information 

Copies of a Department booklet with additional information concerning admission 
requirements, courses, faculty, facilities, etc. are available from: 

Chair 

Department of Human Nutrition and Food Systems 

3304 Marie Mount Hall 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-4928 
For courses, see code FOOD, FSAD, NUTR. 

Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education (EDIT) 

Professor and Chair: Erekson 

Professors: Hornbake (Emeritus), Maley (Emeritus) Luetkemeyer 

Associate Professors: Beatty, Herschbach, Hultgren, Mietus, Peters, Stough, Sullivan 

Assistant Professor: Boyce, Elkins, 

The graduate programs in Industrial Technological and Occupational Education are 
designed to prepare specialized personnel in a variety of fields related to positions in 
education as well as government, business, industry and labor. Programs related to 
education prepare personnel for teaching, administration, research and supervisory 
positions in secondary, post-secondary and higher education as well as education as- 
signments in government and military agencies. Programs designed for business and 
industry are in such fields as training, human resource development, production, su- 
pervision safety and fire science. 

Specific teaching and education majors include Business Education, Home Econom- 
ics Education, Industrial Arts/Technology Education, Marketing Education and Vo- 
cational-Industrial Education. The Industrial Technology program is directed toward 
the preparation of personnel for the business, industry and labor segments of society. 
These programs enjoy a national and international reputation. 



Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education (EDIT) 151 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission to the master's program requires a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average 
and the submission of the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record Examination 
test scores. Admission to an A.G.S. or doctoral program requires a 3.5 grade point 
average in previous graduate studies, a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average and at 
least a 40 percentile on the Miller Analogies Test or Graduate Record Examination. 

Programs are offered at the master's degree level in seven different areas: Business 
Education, Home Economics Education, Industrial Arts/Technology Education, In- 
dustrial Technology, Marketing Education, Technical Education and Vocational-In- 
dustrial Education. The Master of Arts and Master of Education degrees are offered 
in each of these program areas. 

The Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy degrees, as well as an Advanced 
Graduate Specialist certificate may be earned in the following areas: Business Edu- 
cation, Home Economics Education, Industrial Arts/Technology Education, Marketing 
Education and Vocational-Industrial Education. 

Every graduate program is developed to meet the individual needs of each student. 
At the same time, each student is expected to have achieved certain specified objectives 
upon completion of his/her program. The student should exhibit competence in a major 
field; analyze, conduct and report research; and attain a broad understanding of the 
relationships of his/her field of study to education and society. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department is housed in a large three-story structure fully accessible to the 
handicapped. The building includes an auditorium, research center, learning center, 
curriculum research center, seventeen laboratories, faculty and staff offices, seminar 
and classrooms. 

In addition to the extensive library and computer facilities available on the College 
Park campus, numerous institutions located in the Washington-Baltimore area enrich 
the scholarly and research potential for the student. These institutions include the 
Library of Congress, Smithsonian Institution, U.S. Department of Education, Inter- 
national Technology Education Association, American Home Economics Association, 
American Vocational Association and the National Business Education Association. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of graduate assistantships are available to qualified graduate students. 

Additional Information 

For information and a Departmental brochure, please contact: 
Chair 

Department of Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-4539 
For courses, see code EDIT. 



152 Journalism Program (JOUR) 



Journalism Program (JOUR) 

Professor and Dean: Cleghorn 

Professor and Associate Dean: Levy 

Professors: Beasley, Blumler, J. Grunig, Gurevitch, Hiebert, Holman 

Associate Professors: Barkin, Zanot, Stepp 

Assistant Professor: L. Grunig, McAdams, Paterson, Roche, Smith, Zerbinos 

Professors Emeriti: Croweli, Martin 

The College of Journalism offers a Master of Arts degree in Journalism and a Doctor 
of Philosophy degree, which is administered through the interdisciplinary program of 
Public Communication (see additional information under that program). The master's 
degree is designed for students who wish to deepen their understanding of communi- 
cation professions and their preparation for those professions. It thus includes advanced 
practical courses and courses in communication theory and research. M.A. students 
can specialize in public affairs reporting, public relations, international communication, 
science communication, broadcast journalism, advertising, opinion and evaluative re- 
search or political communication. 

The Ph.D. in Public Communication is an interdisciphnary program embracing the 
College of Journalism and three other departments: Radio-Television-Film, Speech 
Communication and Theatre. The Ph.D. prepares students for creative scholarship and 
research. It emphasizes both the necessary techniques and skills to conduct research 
and the ability to think innovatively about problems of public communication. Within 
this Ph.D. program, the College of Journalism stresses five fields: political and gov- 
ernmental communication, public relations and organizational communication, inter- 
national communication, mass communication history, and science and medical 
communication. Other areas of emphasis in the Public Communication program include 
rhetoric and public address, broadcast communication, theatrical theory and aesthetics, 
theatre history and cinema history and aesthetics. For complete information on ad- 
mission and degree requirements, see the "Public Communication Program" entry. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The master's degree is a 30-credit program with the typical student taking 12 hours 
of graduate work in the fall, 12 hours in the spring, and six hours of thesis or non- 
thesis option seminars in the summer or during an additional semester. Work on the 
degree may be started at any time. JOUR 600 and JOUR 601 are required for the 
M.A. in Journalism. 

Applicants seeking admission to the master's program should hold a bachelor's degree 
from a recognized institution of higher learning. Undergraduate study of journalism 
and professional experience in journalistic fields are helpful but not required. Students 
who have majored in some other field as undergraduates are required to make up 
professional deficiencies by taking up to five selected courses in journalism without 
graduate credit. Completion of the general aptitude portion of the Graduate Record 
Examination is required, and three letters of recommendation must be submitted. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The University of Maryland is in an advantageous location for the study of journalism. 
It is within easy reach of five of the nation's top newspapers: The Sun and Evening Sun 



Kinesiology Program (KNES) 153 



of Baltimore, The Washington Post, The Washington Times and USA Today. It is also 
near the Washington press corps, the large Washington bureaus of the Associated Press 
and United Press International, The New York Times and many important American 
and foreign newspapers; NBC, CBS, ABC and other broadcasting news bureaus; and 
news magazines, major book publishing offices, public relations departments in cor- 
porations, government agencies, associations, scientific organizations, and public re- 
lations and advertising agencies. In addition, it is at the doorstep of the nation's major 
news makers in the executive, legislative and judicial branches of the federal govern- 
ment. The College has recently opened a student- staffed news bureau in Annapolis, 
from which graduate students cover the legislature and state government for Maryland 
newspapers and radio stations. A similar, student-run news bureau is planned for 
Washington, DC. The College also publishes the Washington Journalism Review, a 
highly respected, national media magazine with a circulation of 30,000. 

Special facilities include photographic, electronic, broadcasting, news editing and 
advertising laboratories as well as a reading room with daily and weekly newspapers, 
magazines, clippings and bulletin files. The College's Center for Research in Public 
Communication engages in and supports a variety of research projects on topics of 
interest to the faculty and the Center's research associates. Knight Center for Specialized 
Journalism: Director: Howard Bray. The Knight Center was established in 1987 in the 
College of Journalism with a three- year grant from the Knight Foundation. The Center 
awards fellowships to experienced reporters and editors for intensive, specially-designed 
courses to enhance their understanding of complex subjects such as finance and eco- 
nomics, science, medicine and health, and the law. By mid-1989 the Center awarded 
104 fellowships to newspaper, magazine and broadcast journalists for four non-credit 
courses. A National Advisory Board of senior news executives and journalists provides 
guidance to the Center. 

Financial Assistance 

The College of Journalism offers a limited number of assistantships in exchange for 
teaching or research assistance in journalism of up to 20 hours per week. Internships 
in various offices both on and off campus also are available to journalism graduate 
students as are some fellowships and scholarships. 

For courses, see code JOUR. 

Kinesiology Program (KNES) 

Professor and Chair: Clarke 

Professors: Dotson, Kelley, Sloan, Steel, Vaccaro 

Associate Professors: Clark, Hagberg, Hatfield, Hult, Hurley, Phillips, Santa Maria, 

Struna, Wrenn 

Assistant Professors: Arrighi, Caldwell, Chalip, Ennis, Ryder, Scott, Tyler, 

VanderVelden 

The graduate student majoring in kinesiology may pursue the degree of Master of 
Arts (thesis and non-thesis options) or Doctor of Philosophy. The two major objectives 
of these programs are: (1) to study the discipline of kinesiology by examining the effects 
of physical activity on individuals from physiological, kinesiological, psychological, 
social and historical points of view; and (2) to acquaint the student with curricular 
aspects of physical education, to improve the quality of teaching and to offer the student 



1 54 Kinesiology Program (KNES) 



ways of improving the administration and supervision of programs in schools and 
colleges. 

The graduate program is organized into three divisions offering major emphasis as 
follows: (1) Division of Sport Studies including social history of sport, sport psychology, 
philosophy of sport and sociology of sport; (2) Division of Biophysical Studies with 
specialties in exercise physiology, motor learning (M.A. only), motor development and 
biomechanics; and (3) Division of Professional Studies with emphasis on curriculum/ 
instruction, and sport management (M.A. only). 

Admission and Degree Information 

The minimum requirement for admission to the M.A. program in kinesiology is a 
B or 3.0 average for the last two years of undergraduate study both in the major and 
related subject fields. Students who do not quite meet this requirement may be admitted 
provisionally. Undergraduate prerequisites for advanced study in kinesiology include 
physiology of exercise, kinesiology, statistics and two courses from a discretionary pool. 
Students without these courses may register as special students or be admitted provi- 
sionally with limited course deficiencies. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is 
required for admission (GMAT or GRE for Sport Management). 

Admission to the Ph.D. program is based on the satisfactory preparation for advanced 
graduate work and demonstrated potential for scholarly achievement. A grade point 
average of B + (3.5 on a 4.0 point scale) in previous graduate work, with at least a 3.0 
overall average in the final two years of undergraduate study is the scholastic standard 
for admission. The GRE is also required for admission. A student may be admitted 
on a provisional basis in those cases where special qualifications are apparent from 
letters of recommendation and documentation of special backgrounds but where the 
scholastic standards stated above are not met in their entirety. 

Completion of the master's degree (thesis option) requires a minimum of 24 semester 
hours, exclusive of the required six hours of thesis credit. Six credits are required in 
the KNES specialty area (Sport Psychology, Exercise Physiology, etc.) with six addi- 
tional KNES hours required. Six credits of research processes courses are also required. 
Twelve elective credits may also be taken within or outside the major department. 
Full-time students usually complete the master's degree in two years. 

Students who choose the non-thesis option must also complete a minimum of 30 
semester hours. Six credits of research processes courses that supports the major subject 
matter area are required as well as a minimum of six credit hours in the KNES major 
specialty. Fifteen elective credits may be taken within or outside the major department. 
Students must also complete an independent investigation project under the direction 
of a graduate faculty member. In addition, students must pass a final comprehensive 
examination. 

The doctoral degree requirements consist of coursework in the following areas: (1) 
a minimum of 12 credits in the area of specialization; (2) a minimum of six credits in 
an additional area within the graduate program to serve as a support area; and (3) a 
minimum of 15 credits in a related studies area selected from outside the Department. 
In some instances more credits may be required for completion of this requirement, 
which must support the dissertation's subject. Students may take from 12 to 18 dis- 
sertation credits. 



Library and Intormation Services Program (LBSC) 1 55 



Students must demonstrate competency in research, including the basic understand- 
ing of scientific method. Normally, this competency includes a demonstration and 
understanding of research processes, quantitative methods of analysis and the principles 
underlying statistical aspects of experimental and non-experimental designs in kine- 
siology. 

No foreign language is formally required for the Ph.D. degree, but it may be required 
by advisers whose students are doing extensive reading in German, Spanish, French, 
Russian or some other language. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department maintains a modern research laboratory including, but not limited 
to: psychophysiological influences in exercise and sport; graphical analysis and modeling 
of human movement; learning and developmental influences on performance of motor 
tasks; assessment of body composition, blood constituent variations, cardiovascular and 
pulmonary functions and environmental factors. In addition, small animal paradigms 
and quantitative and naturalistic examination of the teaching-learning process are also 
supported. The College of Health and Human Performance also supports a microcom- 
puter laboratory that includes two local networks (IBM and Apple), each of which is 
connected to the campus' mainframe network. Numerous IBM and Apple workstations 
are housed within the laboratory. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of graduate assistantships are offered each year. Specific responsibilities 
include teaching or assisting in the research laboratory. 

Additional Information 

For further information and application, contact: 
David L. Kelley 
Director of Graduate Studies 
Department of Kinesiology 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-2455 
For courses, see code KNES. 

Library and Information Services Program (LBSC) 

Professors: Burke, Kidd, Liesener, MacLeod, Soergel, Walston, Wasserman 

Associate Professors: Marchionini, White 

Assistant Professors: Aversa, Choi, Green, Jeng, Neuman, Williams (Joint 

Appointment with Curriculum and Instruction) 

Lecturer: Cunningham, Wilson (librarian/lecturer) 

The College offers programs leading to the Master of Library Science (M.L.S.) and 
the Ph.D. in Library Science; a joint degree of an Master of Arts in History and the 
M.L.S. for students who desire advanced studies in the field of archives, manuscripts 
and historical collections (for details see the entry in this catalog following History); 
and a joint degree of an M.A. in Geography and the M.L.S. (for details see the entry 
in this catalog under Geography). The College, which is fully accredited by the Amer- 



1 56 Library and Information Services Program (LBSC) 



ican Library Association, also provides courses, seminars and workshops for non-degree 
students who are seeking continuing education and professional development oppor- 
tunities. 

The degree programs emphasize the theoretical and conceptual foundations of the 
field. The application of the results of scholarly research are related to current practices 
and are analyzed with the goal of advancing the quality and scope of services in a 
variety of information settings. 

Specialized study opportunities are offered in such information organizations as pub- 
lic, academic, special and school libraries, and/or in subfields such as automated ap- 
plications, reference services (conventional and online), archival and records management, 
the organization of knowledge, and information storage and retrieval. Students who 
complete the school media specialization usually obtain Maryland state certification as 
Educational Media Generalists, Level IL 

The academic program can be augmented by a Field Study in Library Service option 
in which the student may obtain professional, supervised experience. More than 160 
field study sites have been approved including such federal agencies as the Library of 
Congress, the National Library of Medicine, the National Gallery of Art, corporations 
and professional associations. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Applicants must exhibit the capacity and motivation for graduate study and the 
potential to contribute to the library and information services profession. Accordingly, 
in addition to the Graduate School requirements, the Graduate Record Examination 
and letters of recommendation are required. The applicant's undergraduate record, 
major discipline, work experience and statement of purpose are also required to form 
the basis for the admission decision. The College's Committee on Admissions and 
Academic Standards may also request a personal interview and will consider requests 
for exceptions in unusual cases. 

Master's candidates plan their programs individually based on recommendations from 
faculty advisers on courses they consider most appropriate for each student. Upon entry 
into the program, all students are required to register for the Proseminar and intro- 
ductory courses in the organization of knowledge, reference and computer applications. 
These four core courses introduce the student to the broad range of disciplines fun- 
damental to library and information services. Assisted by the faculty adviser, the student 
then chooses the remaining 24 credit hours to fulfill his/her academic and professional 
goals. The student may, with the consent of the adviser, take courses in other campus 
departments and the consortium, and they may also pursue an area of particular interest 
as an independent study under the supervision of a faculty member. 

The Master of Library Science degree is awarded to the student who successfully 
completes a program of 36 hours with a 3.0 grade point average within three years 
from first registration in the program. The program accepts both part-time and full- 
time students, who can complete the necessary coursework within 12 months. While 
it is possible to begin the program in any semester, the faculty recommends that students 
who wish to complete the program within a calendar year start in the summer session 
with two required courses, take four courses in the fall and spring semesters and finish 
the program by taking two courses in the next summer session. All M.L.S. courses 



Library and Information Services Program (LBSC) 1 57 



except some very specialized ones with small enrollments are offered at night on a 
regular rotation. 

No thesis or comprehensive examination is required for the M.L.S. 

The doctoral program is interdisciplinary in nature and utilizes the resources not only 
of the College but of the entire campus. The student and adviser first design a program 
of study and research that support the student's professional objectives. Approximately 
three years of full-time study are then required, normally divided into two years of 
formal coursework (60 semester hours, or 36 beyond the master's) and one year of 
work on the dissertation. At least one year, usually the first, must be spent in full-time 
residence. 

A doctoral qualifying examination is required at the conclusion of the first year to 
determine the student's ability to complete the program. After completion of the 
required course credits and prior to admission to candidacy, the student must pass 
written comprehensive examinations in five areas. An oral defense of the dissertation 
is scheduled prior to the awarding of the degree. 

The College has no language requirements unless the individual student's speciali- 
zation or dissertation requires it. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The College maintains its own library, which is organized to give faculty, students 
and research staff the kind of modern support service provided by other forward-looking 
agencies. Students have access to the University of Maryland's excellent Computer 
Science facility and the College's Information Processing Laboratory, which serves as 
a resource for faculty and student research, as well as instruction in library automation 
and information processing. Thus, students have access not only to the University's 
large-scale computer systems, but to microcomputers housed within the College. The 
Instructional Development and Support Center, a non-print media facility, also provides 
equipment and materials, workshops and individual assistance to students, faculty and 
staff in all areas of audiovisual production. 

Financial Assistance 

The College and University offer a limited number of scholarships, fellowships and 
teaching and research assistantships. Other sources of aid include work-study (through 
the University and outside agencies), federally insured loans and grants from local and 
national agencies and organizations. 

The M.L.S. degree program has been accepted by the Southern Regional Educational 
Board Academic Market, so residents of Virginia and West Virginia are eligible for 
in-state tuition fees. In-state tuition fees for the CLIS Ph.D. program are also available 
for students from the states of Alabama, Mississippi, South Carolina, Virginia and 
West Virginia. 

Information on the availability of financial aid may be requested from the Director 
of Admissions, College of Library and Information Services. 

Additional Information 

For specific information on Departmental programs, admission procedures or finan- 
cial aid, contact: 

Director of Admissions 



158 Linguistics Department (LING) 



Room 4110, Hornbake Library 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-2038 
For courses, see code LBSC. 

M.A. in Geography and the M.L.S. Course of Study 

(See entry after Geography Program) 

M.A. in History and the M.L.S. Course of Study 

(See entry after History Program) 

Linguistics Department (LING) 

Professor and Chair: Lightfoot 

Professor: 

Associate Professor: Hornstein 

Assistant Professor: Gorrell, Inkelas, Lebeaux, Uriagereka, Weinberg 

The Linguistics Department offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Students are exposed to a research enterprise that seeks 
to discover what a person's linguistic capacity consists of: how it arises in children; how 
it functions in speaking, listening, etc.; how it relates to other cognitive capacities; and 
how it can be investigated by various methods including those of experimental psy- 
chology and computer sciences. 

The program has some distinctive emphases: 

1. Students must develop a minor area of specialization. 

2. The psychological embedding of linguistic theories and on cross-lan- 
guage work are emphasized. 

3. Special provisions are made for students who start graduate work with 
a thorough background in linguistics and clear ideas about their research 
plans. 

4. The Department desires students who are native speakers of a language 
that has not been extensively analyzed and who wish to work on a 
grammar of that language. 

5. The Department houses a new phonetics library and the Linguistics 
Research Laboratory for work in experimental psycholinguistics and 
computational linguistics. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Students with a strong undergraduate background in areas such as linguistics, math- 
ematics, psychology, computer science, philosophy, anthropology, English and foreign 
languages are invited to apply. Students must have a background equivalent to what 
is covered in the core of the bachelor's degree in Linguistics (essentially two semesters 
of generative syntax and two semesters of phonology). Students who lack this back- 
ground may be admitted with "Provisional Graduate Status" and take undergraduate 
courses in syntax and phonology along with graduate-level courses for which they meet 
the prerequisites. 



Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Sciences Program (MEES) 1 59 



M.A. students take a total of 36 credits: 21 credits in LING and nine credits in an 
area such as biology, computer science, language pathology, philosophy, psychology 
or a particular language for the minor area of specialization. In addition, either a thesis 
or two comprehensive papers in distinct areas of language study will be written. 

Ph.D. students normally satisfy the requirements for the M.A. although the thesis/ 
two comprehensive papers may be waived for students who have clear research plans 
and who apply successfully to proceed directly to the Ph.D. Students must complete 
12 LING credits at the 800-level and six 600-level credits in non-LING courses. After 
completing course requirements, students write a research paper that demonstrates a 
capacity for productive research, makes an original contribution to the field and nor- 
mally forms the basis for the dissertation research. After satisfactory completion of the 
research paper, students write a dissertation. 

Financial Assistance 

The Linguistics Department administers a number of teaching and research assist- 
antships. Students may also express an interest in teaching assistantships in other de- 
partments; our students often compete successfully for such teaching assistantships. 

Additional Information 

Application materials and a brochure outlining further details of the program can 
be obtained from: 

Chair 

Department of Linguistics 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-7002 
For courses, see code LING. 

Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Sciences Program (MEES) 

Interim Program Committee Director: Strand (AREC) 

Assistant Director: Rebach (UMES) 

Assistant Director: Bonar (ZOOL); Cronin (UMBC); Genys (Appalachian 

Environmental Lab); Gupta (UMES); Helz (CHEM); Brooks (UMES); Kennedy 

(Horn Point Environmental Lab); Naumann (UMAB); Roesijadi (Chesapeake 

Biological Lab) 

The university-wide graduate program in Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Sciences 
(MEES) offers Master of Science (with thesis) and Doctor of Philosophy degrees and 
is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to pursue studies on the interactions 
among biological, physico-chemical and human systems. Areas of emphasis will involve 
organisms living in marine, estuarine or terrestrial environments and their interactions 
with chemical and physical influences. Possible areas of specialization might include 
estuarine and marine science, environmental chemistry, environmental microbiology, 
environmental toxicology, environmental and resource economics, environmental man- 
agement, marine and environmental technology, and fisheries and wildlife management. 

Graduates find employment in various federal and state environmental agencies. In 
addition, academic and private research institutions and commercial interests concerned 



160 Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Sciences Program (MEES) 



with the development and use of coastal, estuarine and ocean resources find graduates 
well prepared for a variety of positions. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to the Graduate School admission requirements, applicants must submit 
scores from the GRE Aptitude Test. The applicant's written statement of personal 
goals is most important in the admissions process. Degree work may be pursued on a 
part-time basis. 

The program is interdisciplinary, and the course of study will be tailored to the 
individual student's needs as determined by that student's advisory committee. There 
are several specific prerequisites, but these may be satisfied through coursework after 
the student is admitted to the program. All degree candidates must take statistics and 
complete an approved graduate level course in each of the four distribution areas: 
biology, chemistry, physical sciences and management. Course credit requirements and 
research are not in excess of general Graduate School requirements for the M.S. and 
Ph.D. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Facilities and faculty throughout the statewide university system are available for the 
program. The degree candidate may take courses on any campus and may have an 
advisory committee composed of participating MEES faculty from several locations, 
including laboratories of the University's Center for Environmental and Estuarine 
Studies (CEES) and the Center of Marine Biotechnology (COMB). Research programs 
may also be conducted at off-campus sites, including the laboratories of CEES (Ches- 
apeake Biological Laboratory and Horn Point and Appalachian Environmental Lab- 
oratories) and COMB. 

Campus facilities include well-equipped laboratories for research in most areas of 
environmental sciences. Maryland has an active Sea Grant research program, and 
students in marine and estuarine work will have access to laboratory-equipped research 
vessels for work on the Chesapeake Bay and on other waters. 

In addition, students will find their work greatly enhanced by the ties most faculty 
members maintain with many government laboratories and agencies in the Washington- 
Baltimore areas. Library resources are among the best in the nation due to the proximity 
of the National Agricultural Library and the Library of Congress, along with several 
other specialized libraries unique to the area. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance in the form of teaching and research assistantships (through 
participating departments and the CEES laboratories) as well as some fellowships may 
be available to exceptionally qualified candidates. 

Additional Information 

For additional information, contact: 

Dr. Ivar E. Strand, Interim Director 
MEES Program 
3220 Symons Hall 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 



Mathematical Statistics Program (STAT) 1 61 



(301) 405-5343 
For courses, see code MEES. 

Mathematical Statistics Program (STAT) 

Director: Slud 

Professors: Freidlin, Kagan, Mikulski, Slud, Syski, Wei, Yang 

Associate Professors: Kedem, Smith 

Assistant Professors: Fakhre-Zakeri, Lee 

The Mathematical Statistics Program offers the Master of Arts and Doctor of Phi- 
losophy degrees for graduate study and research in statistics and probability. Areas of 
faculty research activity include statistical decision and estimation theory, biostatistics, 
stochastic modeling, robust and nonparametric inference, analysis of variance, theory 
and inference for stochastic processes, stochastic analysis and time series. Students may 
specialize in applied or theoretical statistics by selecting an appropriate sequence of 
courses and a research area to form an individual plan of study. The Program has been 
designed with sufficient flexibility to accommodate the student's background and in- 
terests. The Program also offers students from other disciplines an opportunity to select 
a variety of statistics courses to supplement their own study. 

The Program is administratively affiliated with the Department of Mathematics, 
which maintains the records of all students in the Mathematical Statistics Program and 
handles correspondence with those applying for admission. However, any application 
for admission must indicate clearly that the student wishes to enter the Statistics (STAT) 
Program. 

Employment prospects for statisticians continue to be extremely bright. All recent 
M.A. and Ph.D. graduates of Maryland's STAT Program have found jobs in univers- 
ities, government or private industry. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, applicants with at least a B average 
(3.0 on a 4.0 scale) should have completed an undergraduate program of study that 
includes a strong emphasis on rigorous mathematics or statistics. Mathematical prep- 
aration at least through the level of advanced calculus will normally be considered 
sufficient demonstration of the expected mathematical background. In special cases 
students may be provisionally admitted without having fulfilled the general admission 
requirements if other criteria present evidence of potential success in the Program. 
The Graduate Record Examination is not required for admission, but applicants who 
have taken this examination are required to supply their score. 

The M.A. degree program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option. For the non- 
thesis option, a student must complete 30 credit hours with at least a B average; at 
least 18 of these credits must be at the graduate level (600/700 level) and at least 12 
of the graduate credits must be in statistics. The student must also pass the Mathematics 
Department written examination in probability, mathematical statistics and apphed 
statistics or any field of mathematics. The student may take either the separate M.A. 
written examination or the Ph.D. written examination, which requires a lower score 
to pass. These examinations can be taken only twice, but any attempt during the first 



1 62 Mathematics Program (MATH) 



two years of graduate work is considered a "free try." The student must also submit 
a satisfactory short scholarly paper. 

For the thesis option, a student must: (1) complete 24 credit hours with at least 15 
at the 600/700 level (of these 15 hours, at least 12 hours must be in statistics); (2) 
maintain an average grade of B or better; (3) take six hours of STAT 799 (Research) 
in addition to (1); (4) write a satisfactory thesis; and (5) pass a final oral examination. 

There is no foreign language requirement for M.A. students. 

The M.A. degree is not required for admission to the Ph.D. program. A doctoral 
student must complete a minimum of 36 hours of formal courses (at least 27 at the 
600/700 level) with an average of B or better; at least 18 of the graduate credits must 
be taken in statistics. In addition, the University requires at least 12 hours of STAT 
899 (Doctoral Research). 

The Ph.D. student must take a written examination in probability, statistics and any 
third field of mathematics. Like the M.A. degree, the written examination can be taken 
only twice, but any attempt during the first two years of graduate work is considered 
a "free try." The written examination is given by the Mathematics Department twice 
a year in January and August. 

If successful in this written examination, the student must pass an oral examination. 
Administered by the statistics faculty, the oral examination usually takes place a year 
after the student passes the written examination. This examination serves as a test of 
the student's in-depth preparation in the area of specialization and his or her research 
potential. Successful completion of the oral exam indicates that the student is ready to 
begin writing the doctoral dissertation. In addition, the Department requires a reading 
competence in two foreign languages for the Ph.D. The student may select any two of 
three languages: French, German or Russian. Administered and graded by the Math- 
ematics Department, the language examination consists of translating foreign mathe- 
matical texts into competent English. 

To be admitted to candidacy, the Ph.D. student must pass the written examination, 
the oral examination and at least one of the two language examinations. The second 
language examination must be completed before the candidate's final oral examination 
on the dissertation. 

Additional Information 

For more information, contact: 
Director 

Mathematical Statistics Program 
1105 Mathematics Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20782 
(301) 405-5061 
For courses, see code STAT. 

Mathematics Program (MATH) 

Professor and Chair: Markley 

Professors: W. Adams, Alexander, Antman, Arnold, Auslander, Babuska , 

Benedetto, Berenstein, Brin, Chu, Cohen, Cook, Cooper, Correl, Edmundson , 



Mathematics Program (MATH) 163 



Ehrlich, Evans, Fey^ , Fitzpatrick, Freidlin, Goldberg, Goldhaber, Gray, 

Greenberg, Grove, Gulick, Herb, Horvath, Hubbardl, Hummel, Johnson, Kagan, 

Kellogg', King, Kirwan, Kleppner, Kudla, Kueker, Lay, Lehner, Lipsman, Liu, 

Lopez-Escobar, Markley, Mikulski, Millson, Neri, Olver', Osborn, Owings, 

Rosenberg, Rudolph, Schafer, Slud, Sweet, Syski, Vogelius, Washington, Wei, 

Wolfe, Wolpert, Yakobson, Yang, Yorke, Zagier, Zedek 

Adjunct Professor: Shanks 

Associate Professors: Berg, Boyle, Dancis, Ellis, Glaz, Goldman, Green, Hamilton, 

Helzer, Jones, Kedem, Maddocks, Sather, Schneider, Smith, Warner, 

Winkelnkemper 

Assistant Professors: J. Adams, Chang, Currier, Fakhre-Zakeri, Grillakis, Laskowski, 

Lee, Li, Nochetto', Stuck, Wang, Wu 

'joint appointment with the Institute for Physical Science and Technology 

^Joint appointment with Computer Science 

^Joint appointment with Secondary Education 

Three programs fall under the cognizance of the Mathematics Department: the Math- 
ematics Program proper (MATH), the Mathematical Statistics Program (STAT), and 
the Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics Program (MAPL). Students applying for 
admission should use the appropriate symbol to indicate their program of interest. The 
Statistics Program is concerned with mathematical statistics and probability. The In- 
terdisciplinary Applied Mathematics Program is described in detail elsewhere in this 
catalog, but, as its name implies, is concerned with the interaction between mathematics 
and applied areas. It is directed by the Graduate Applied Mathematics Committee but 
administered by the Mathematics Department. 

Students can earn Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in each of these 
three programs. The master's degree is not required for entrance to the Ph.D. program. 

The Department offers graduate programs in algebra, complex analysis, geometry, 
mathematical logic, number theory, numerical analysis, ordinary differential equations, 
partial differential equations, probability, real and functional analysis, statistics and 
topology. 

Graduates in both Ph.D. and M.A. programs continue to face a favorable employ- 
ment market. Academic opportunities are becoming more encouraging; our Ph.D.s 
have in some cases secured prestigious academic posts (MIT, Yale, NYU). Those in 
the applied programs face a very encouraging employment environment and have 
secured good positions in government and industry. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission is granted to applicants who show promise in mathematics as demonstrated 
by their undergraduate record. Unless courses in advanced calculus and (undergrad- 
uate) abstract algebra have been taken, admission may be on a provisional basis (passing 
MATH 410 and/or 403 with a grade of B). The Graduate Record Examination is not 
required for admission, but applicants who have taken this examination are required 
to supply their score. 

The M.A. degree program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option; most students 
choose the latter. The non-thesis option requires students to take 30 credit hours with 
an average of at least a B. At least 18 credits must be at the 600/700 level, including 



164 Mathematics Program (MATH) 



at least 12 hours in mathematics. Students must also complete two full-year sequences 
at the 600/700 level and must pass the Departmental written examinations in three 
mathematical fields. In addition, the University now requires a scholarly paper. 

Students may take the separate M.A. battery of written examinations or take the 
Ph.D. version and be scored at a lower level. These examinations can be taken only 
twice, but any attempt during the first two years of graduate work is considered a "free 
try." The M.A. degree includes no foreign language requirement. It generally takes 
from two to three years to earn the M.A. and almost 25-30 degrees are granted each 
year in mathematics (MATH, STAT, and MAPL combined). 

The Ph.D. program does not require an M.A. degree, but applicants who are accepted 
should show, on the basis of their undergraduate record and recommendations, that 
they possess not only marked promise in mathematical activities but the potential to 
perform on a creative level. Like the M.A. program, admission may be granted on a 
provisional basis. 

Students in the Ph.D. program must complete a minimum of 36 hours of formal 
coursework (at least 27 at the 600/700 level) with an average grade of B or better; at 
least 18 hours must be taken in the Department of Mathematics. In addition, the 
University requires at least 12 hours of MATH 899 (Doctoral Research). 

Ph.D. students must take a set of three written examinations in three mathematical 
fields. These examinations can be taken only twice, but an attempt during the first two 
years of graduate study constitutes a "free try." These examinations are given twice a 
year in January and August. If successful in these written examinations, students must 
satisfy the particular requirements of the field committee governing their special area 
of interest before they can be admitted to candidacy and engage in thesis research. 
The dissertation must represent an original contribution to mathematical knowledge 
and will usually be published in a mathematical journal. 

The average Ph.D. student will spend five years of graduate study before obtaining 
the degree. The Department awards from five to 10 Ph.D.s each year. 

The Ph.D. program has two foreign language requirements. Before the student can 
be admitted to candidacy, he or she must pass a written examination in either French, 
German or Russian and translate mathematical texts into competent English. The 
second language examination must be completed before the candidate's final oral ex- 
amination on the dissertation. Both language examinations are composed and graded 
within the Department. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department is very active in research in a number of areas, strengthened further 
by a complement of mathematicians from the Institute for Physical Science and Tech- 
nology. The Department fosters a lively program of seminars and colloquia; about half 
of these talks are given by outside specialists. 

The Engineering and Physical Sciences Library is located on the ground floor of the 
Mathematics Building and contains more than 95,000 volumes in mathematics, physics 
and engineering, and more than 280 journals in pure and apphed mathematics. The 
Library of Congress, with its extensive collection of books and technical reports, is 
only a half hour from the campus. 



Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation Program (EDMS) 165 



The Depailment cooperates closely with the Institute for Physical Science and Tech- 
nology and with the Department of Computer Science. FacuUy members of both groups 
offer courses in the Department, and the facilities of the computer center are available 
to serve the research needs of both faculty and graduate students. Members of the 
Department participate actively in the Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics Program 
and they also staff the Mathematical Statistics Program. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department is able to offer graduate assistantships to approximately 1 10 graduate 
students. The teaching load is six hours each semester plus the duties of meeting with 
students and grading papers. A number of fellowships and research assistantships are 
also available. 

Additional Information 

Special brochures and publications offered by the Department are: "Mathematics at 
Maryland, the Graduate Program," "Departmental Policies Concerning Graduate Stu- 
dents," and "Graduate Course Descriptions." 

Ms. Janet Cooper, the Administrator of the Graduate Committee of the Department, 
can be contacted regarding Departmental programs, admission procedures, and finan- 
cial aid. Call (301) 405-5058. For courses, see code MATH. 

Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation Program (EDMS) 

Professor and Chair: Lissitz 
Professors: Dayton, Macready, Stunkard 
Associate Professors: Benson, Johnson, Schafer 
Assistant Professor: DeAyala 

The Department of Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation offers graduate study 
leading to the Master of Arts and a Doctor of Philosophy degrees for students who 
desire an advanced degree in measurement, statistics or program evaluation. A doctoral 
minor is also offered for students majoring in other areas. 

Graduates have been very successful in finding employment because they are equipped 
to make contributions in a wide variety of fields. Thus, if the employment potential of 
one area tightens, the student has the requisite skills to move into another area where 
jobs are more available. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Students who seek admission to the master's program must have at least a 3.0 
undergraduate grade point average and submit the Graduate Record Examination test 
score. Admission to a doctoral program requires a 3.5 GPA in previous graduate studies 
and either a 3.0 undergraduate GPA or at least a 40 percentile on the GRE. The GRE 
aptitude test scores and other application information are used to reach a decision on 
each applicant. 

The doctoral major program is primarily intended to prepare individuals to teach at 
the college level in program evaluation, measurement and statistics; conduct research 
studies; advise in the conduct of research studies; and serve as applied statistics, meas- 
urement and evaluation specialists in school systems, industry and government. 



1 66 Mechanical Engineering Program (ENME) 



The master's level program is designed to produce qualified individuals to work in 
schools, industry and government. Both the thesis and the non-thesis option are offered 
and a program for each student is planned to take into account his/her own background 
and future aims. About half the work within the major is selected to meet the needs 
and interests of the individual student. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

For students who plan to teach at the college level, the Department offers supervised 
activities that are appropriate for future faculty whose specialization will be in these 
areas. Students who plan to conduct research can gain experience using the Depart- 
ment's mainframe and microcomputer equipment. 

The faculty are actively engaged in a large variety of research projects. Students are 
encouraged to become involved to gain experience from these activities. The Wash- 
ington and Baltimore areas have a large number of organizations that provide ready 
opportunity to become involved in projects that have national importance. 

Financial Assistance 

Some graduate assistantships and other funds are available. Once students have the 
equivalent of the first year of coursework, they can easily secure good part- time 
employment to support the continuation of the degree. In many cases, part- time jobs 
can lead to full-time career employment after the student finishes the degree objective. 
In other cases, students wait until they obtain their degree before seeking employment 
outside the University. 
Additional Information 
For information and a Departmental brochure, please write to: 

Dr. Robert W. Lissitz, Chairperson 

Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation 

College of Education 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-3624 
For courses, see code EDMS. 

Mechanical Engineering Program (ENME) 

Professor and Chairman: Fourney 

Professors: Allen, Anand, Armstrong, Berger, Buckley, Cunniff, Dally, Dieter, 

Durelli, Gupta, Holloway, Irwin, Kirk, Koh, Magrab, Marcinkowski, Marks, Sallet, 

Sanford, Sayre, Shreeve, Talaat, Wallace, Weske (Emeritus), Yang 

Associate Professors: Barker, Bernard, Dick, diMarzo, Duncan, Harhalakis, 

Krayterman, McCaffrey, Pecht, Poarbabai, Radermacher, Shih, Tsai, von Kerczek, 

Walston, Yanushevsky 

Assistant Professors: Abdelhamid, Anjanappa, Azarm, Bigio, Dasgupta, Gore, 

Haslach, Herold, Humphrey, Khan, Marash, Minis, Ohadi, Piomelli, Rao, Sirkis, 

Ssemakula, Tasch, Tsui, Wilner, Zhang 

Lecturers: Case, Coder, Cook, Ethridge, Russell, Werneth 

The Mechanical Engineering Department offers a broad-based program leading to 
the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with courses drawn from four 



Mechanical Engineering Program (ENME) 1 67 



different areas of specialization: energy, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics and computer 
integrated manufacturing and design. In certain cases students may wish to concentrate 
their studies early in their graduate work, and M.S. programs in each of the four areas 
of specialty are available. For the Ph.D. program, which stresses research capabilities, 
an area of specialization should be selected early so that the student can establish the 
depth of understanding in a given technical area necessary to begin thesis research. 

Program Specialties 

1. Energy. This area of specialization treats the transformation, transpor- 
tation, storage and utilization of all types of energy. The area encom- 
passes: combustion, energy conversion, heat and mass transfer, and 
thermodynamics. Combustion deals with the efficient combustion of 
petroleum, alternative and future low grade fuels without adverse effects 
of the emission of undesirable trace pollutants. Energy conversion covers 
gas turbines, internal combustion engines, furnaces, combustors, heat 
pumps, thermoelectrics, thermionics, photovoltaics, fuel cells and mag- 
netohydrodynamics. Analytical, empirical and experimental solutions 
are developed in solving heat and mass transfer problems. The coverage 
in thermodynamics includes macroscopic and microscopic considera- 
tions, statistical methods and irreversible processes. 

2. Fluid Mechanics. Students are prepared for study in advanced analytical 
and experimental methods in fluid mechanics. Areas of study include 
ground vehicle aerodynamics, hydrodynamics, two-phase flow, bound- 
ary layers and jets, vortex dynamics, fluid-structure interaction, tur- 
bulence, turbulence closure modeling and combustor flows. Laboratory 
facilities are available for research in turbulence, vehicle aerodynamics, 
two-phase flow, vortex motions and hydromechanics. 

3. SoUd Mechanics. This area of specialization emphasizes exposure to 
fundamental concepts in analytical and experimental methods of solid 
mechanics. Areas of study include theoretical and applied elasticity, 
fracture mechanics, experimental mechanics, noise and vibration con- 
trol, acoustics, numerical modeling, and linear and nonlinear mechanics. 
Laboratory facilities are available for research in stress analysis, fracture, 
vibrations, photoelasticity and holography. 

4. Computer Integrated Manufacturing and Design. The disciplines of con- 
trols, mechanical design, manufacturing processes and robotics are com- 
bined with a strong emphasis on computer application throughout the 
areas. A wide variety of courses and research topics are available and 
are supported by dedicated laboratories in microprocessors and inter- 
faces, manufacturing processes, robotics and computer-aided design/ 
computer-aided manufacturing. Typical research topics include the use 
of microprocessors for smart product design; the integration of a flexible 
manufacturing cell into the factory of the future; circuit board design; 
integration of CAD, CAM and manufacturing resource planning; and 
systems analysis, control and automation. 

Graduates with an M.S. or Ph.D. in mechanical engineering are in higher demand 
than ever by a wide variety of industries and the federal government. Career oppor- 



1 68 Mechanical Engineering Program (ENME) 



tunities in academia are also excellent for Ph.D. graduates because of the shortage of 
qualified persons in mechanical engineering. 

Admission and Degree Requirements 

The programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are open to qualified students 
holding the B.S. degree in mechanical engineering. Admission may also be granted to 
students with degrees from closely allied areas such as other branches of engineering 
and physics. In some cases students may be required to take undergraduate courses to 
satisfy a complete background on the subject. In addition to the Graduate School 
requirements, the GRE General (Aptitude) Test is also required. 

The M.S. degree program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option. The equivalent 
of at least three years of full-time study beyond the B.S. degree is required for the 
Ph.D. degree. Ph.D. students must take a qualifying examination upon entering the 
program. In addition to the Graduate School rules, the Department sets forth certain 
special degree requirements in its publications. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department maintains laboratory facilities for graduate research. Air guns, 
impact testers, vibration shaker tables and acoustic analysis equipment are available 
for studies in dynamic stress analysis and vibration. Static and dynamic stress analysis 
are conducted by photoelastic and holographic techniques. Experimental fluid dynamics 
studies are carried out in wind tunnels, on a water table and in a two-phase flow loop. 
Research in engineering materials is supported by a large complement of departmental 
mechanical testing equipment and by an electron microscope facility, an x-ray diffrac- 
tion facility and crystal growing equipment available from the Institute for Physical 
Science and Technology. Combustion research facilities include various types of com- 
bustors, heat exchangers, droplet generators, and a fouling and particulate deposition 
apparatus. Research in computer-integrated manufacturing and design is carried out 
in CAD/CAM, robotics, manufacturing processes and microprocessor laboratories. 
Departmental computational equipment consists of more than 100 modern microcom- 
puters. This includes a selection of PC's, AT's and PS2's. The Departmental CAD 
laboratory is DEC-based and has two VAX-servers, seven DEC-based VAXSTATION 
II Workstations, 8 VAX-Stations III workstations, two TEKTRONIX 4115B"s and a 
selection of dumb terminals that are used to access the various pieces of software 
located on the VAX cluster. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance is available to outstanding students in the form of fellowships, 
teaching assistantships and research assistantships. Preference is given to U.S. appli- 
cants. 

Additional Information 



Additional information may be obtained from: 
Graduate Adviser 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 
2168 Engineering Classroom Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-4216 



Meteorology Program (METO) 1 69 



For courses, see code ENME. 

Meteorology Program (METO) 

Professor and Chair: Vernekar (Acting) 

Professors: Baer, Shukla, Thompson 

Senior Research Scientists: Rasmusson, Schneider 

Associate Professors: Carton, Dickerson, EUingson, Pinker, Robock 

Associate Research Scientists: Sellers, Straus, van den Dool 

Assistant Research Scientists: Kinter, Nigam 

Research Associates: Cai, Canfield, Doddridge, Goswami, Gutman, Holland, Klein, 

Krishnamurthy, Laszlo, Luke, Oh, Raghunath, Rasmusson, Saha, Semazzi, Wang, 

Xue 

The Meteorology Department offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with speciaHzation in the atmospheric sciences. 
Coursework in meteorology is also offered at the upper division and graduate level as 
a service to other campus graduate programs. 

The educational program in the atmospheric sciences is broadly based and involves 
many applications of the mathematical, physical and applied sciences that characterize 
modern meteorology. Research specializations include atmospheric dynamics, atmos- 
pheric radiative transfer, global climate change, remote sensing of the atmosphere, 
climate dynamics, numerical weather prediction, atmospheric chemistry, synoptic me- 
teorology, air pollution, micrometeorology, tropical ocean circulation, ocean-atmos- 
phere interaction and biosphere-atmosphere interactions. 

The Meteorology Department houses the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere In- 
teractions (COLA) under the direction of Professor Shukla. The Center conducts a 
coordinated research program on the predictability of the coupled atmosphere- ocean- 
biosphere global climate system, especially toward establishing a physical basis for 
dynamical extended range forecasting. The Department also operates the Cooperative 
Institute for Climate Studies in conjunction with NOAA. Under the direction of Pro- 
fessor EUingson, the Institute conducts research in long-range forecasting and satellite 
remote sensing. In addition, the Department maintains close research and teaching 
associations with the Department of Chemistry and nearby government agencies in- 
cluding NOAA, NASA and NIST. 

The Department's close association with federal agencies in the Washington area 
provides graduates with good career opportunities in the atmospheric sciences. As a 
research assistant, the student often has the opportunity to develop a close working 
relationship with one or more of the scientific agencies, which can put the student in 
a good position to contend for jobs as they become available. 

Located in the Computer and Space Sciences Building, the Meteorology Department 
is part of the College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The advanced degree programs in meteorology are open to students who hold a 
bachelor's degree in meteorology, physics, chemistry, mathematics, astronomy, engi- 
neering or other programs with suitable emphasis in the sciences. Comprehensive, 



1 70 Meteorology Program (METO) 



undergraduate level courses in meteorology are provided for students from disciplines 
other than meteorology. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Special facilities that support the Department's teaching and research activities in- 
clude equipment for receiving facsimile maps and digital alphanumeric data from the 
National Weather Service, an instrumented weather station (a NO A A cooperative 
observing station), a laboratory for atmospheric chemistry and a mobile air pollution 
laboratory. 

Special data collections that support teaching and research activities include Northern 
Hemisphere meteorological data tabulations on microfilm, a unique historical daily 
weather map series dating back to 1899, a complete set of climatological data for the 
United States dating back to 1917, a Geosynchronous Operational Environmental 
Satellite data archive including visible and infrared photography, a meteorological data 
archive for four outlying weather stations on University farms and files of the State 
Climatologist for Maryland. 

The Department of Meteorology has a modern teaching laboratory in which edu- 
cational color video tapes and 16 mm films may be produced and replayed. Sufficient 
equipment is installed to allow students and faculty to produce their own educational 
materials for classroom and seminar use and record special experiments, field trials or 
lecture events for permanent use. 

The Department maintains a specialized library with several hundred text and ref- 
erence books in meteorology and allied sciences, many specialized series of research 
reports and many current journals. The campus provides a main library as well as 
libraries in chemistry, astronomy and engineering. Several excellent government li- 
braries in the area, including the Library of Congress and the NOAA library, also 
provide an unsurpassed resource. 

The Department has installed a UNIDATA computer graphics animation system 
that ingests, manages and displays current weather satellite, weather radar and weather 
map data in color for research, instruction and the preparation of videotape or film 
materials. 

The Department of Meteorology has access to a wide spectrum of computer re- 
sources, including its own Apollo scientific workstation network with more than 20 
nodes, part of which supports Unidata activities. The University's Computer Science 
Center (CSC), which is located in the same building as the Department, operates an 
IBM 4381, an IBM 3081 and a Unisys 1100/92. Access to CSC is via high-speed ter- 
minals, Ethernet and the Remote Job Entry emulator. Departmental personnel can 
communicate with various remote supercomputers at high speed through CSC, including 
the Cray XMP at San Diego Supercomputer Center (a satellite link), the Crays at 
NCAR (satellite link), the Amdahls and Cyber 205 at Goddard Space Flight Center 
(9600 baud terminal line) and the many computers attached to GSFC campus network 
(56 kilobaud land line). 

The University of Maryland is located in an area that is rich in a variety of beneficial 
professional resources. Because of its proximity to the nation's capital, the University 
of Maryland is able to interact closely with the many governmental groups interested 
in various aspects of the atmospheric sciences. Guest seminar speakers and visiting 



Meteorology Program (METO) 171 



lecturers here are frequently scientists invited from local government laboratories, and 
the Department faculty often attend and participate in the seminars, coUoquia and 
scientific workshops being held at these neighboring institutions. 

A wide spectrum of meteorological interests are represented in the local scientific 
community. For example, studies are being conducted on analytical techniques for 
atmospheric chemistry, air pollution calibration standards and the effect of weather 
and climate on energy supplies and agricultural productivity. There are several groups 
devoted to climate analysis and simulation, new technique development for long-range 
forecasting and studies in fluid dynamics. Studies of satellite applications to meteor- 
ology, solar and wind energy analyses and prediction of atmospheric diffusion and 
transport processes are also represented. 

The Washington, D.C. chapter of the American Meteorological Society consists of 
about 400 members who hold professional meetings each month. The Washington, 
D.C. area is frequently the site of national and international conferences, most notably 
of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Geo- 
physical Union. Although the University of Maryland is the only school in the region 
offering degrees in meteorology, there are professional and library resources at several 
other nearby major universities. In addition to the various government and academic 
institutions, the Washington metropolitan area contains numerous well-known private 
contractors and consulting companies involved in meteorology, which provide em- 
ployment opportunities for students both before and after graduation. 

The Department of Meteorology maintains professional interactions with scientists 
of major federal agencies in the atmospheric, oceanographic, and hydrologic sciences. 
For example, a formal Memorandum of Understanding with the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration provides for the development of special courses by visiting 
faculty from NOAA as well as opportunities for faculty and students to work on-site 
at NOAA facilities. Opportunities are also provided for interactions at nearby facilities, 
including the National Weather Service, the National Environmental SateUite and Data 
Information Service, the Naval Research Laboratory, the National Institute of Stand- 
ards and Technology and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. 

As a member of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, the De- 
partment enjoys the common facilities offered by the National Center for Atmospheric 
Research such as research aircraft and supercomputers. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate assistantships are available to qualified graduate students. Research as- 
sistants carry on research in the areas of global change, synoptic and dynamic mete- 
orology, satellite meteorology, climate dynamics, air pollution, atmospheric chemistry, 
theoretical fluid dynamics, atmospheric radiation, general circulation, oceanography 
and biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Fellowships are also awarded by the Graduate 
School to the most quahfied applicants. In addition, hourly employment is available in 
the Department and off campus. Stipends are maintained at a competitive level. 

Additional Information 

Application material or additional information may be obtained by writing: 
Chair, Admissions Committee 
Department of Meteorology 



1 72 Microbiology Program (MICB) 



University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-5373 
For courses, see code METO. 

Microbiology Program (MICB) 

Professor and Chair: Hetrick 

Professors: Colwell, Cook, Joseph, Roberson, Weiner, Yuan 
Professors Emeritus: Doetsch, Faber. Pelczar 
Associate Professors: MacQuillan, Robb , Stein, Vol! 
Assistant Professors: Benson, Capage 
Instructor: Smith 
Joint appointment with Center of Marine Biotechnology 

NOTE: Some courses in this program may require the use of animals. Please see the 
Statement on Animal Care and Use i the appendix and the policy statement for 
students under "Degree Requirements 

The Department of Microbiology oft rs programs leading to the Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees witf special emphasis in the biomedical, environ- 
mental and biotechnology areas. In tht biomedical area, a student may specialize in 
virology, immunology or medical bacter ology. Environmentally related research proj- 
ects are concerned with microbial ecolof v, marine microbiology, diseases of finfish and 
shellfish, and biodegradation of pollut; nts. Molecular studies involve bacterial and 
yeast genetics, genetic engineering, cellu ar immunology, immunochemistry, molecular 
systematics, DNA repair systems and tho control of bacterial morphogenesis. Many of 
the faculty are affiliated with federal and industrial laboratories in the greater Wash- 
ington area. 

Advanced degree graduates in microbiology are in demand, particularly in specialties 
involving recombinant DNA technology, immunology, virology-tissue culture, ecology, 
fermentation and medical microbiology. Positions become available in both the public 
and private sector and may involve research, quality control and/or product develop- 
ment. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Qualified students are accepted in either the M.S. or Ph.D. programs. Applicants 
for graduate programs must have acquired a thorough foundation in biological and 
physical sciences. A strong background in microbiology is desirable but not essential. 
However, a lack of specific courses may lengthen the time required to earn a degree. 
Scores on both the General Test and the Subject Test in Biology of the Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) must accompany applications. 

Requirements for the M.S. degree include a minimum of 24 semester hours exclusive 
of research credits. A written thesis based upon research is required, and all candidates 
must pass a final oral examination given by an advisory committee. All candidates for 
graduate degrees must serve as laboratory teaching assistants for at least one semester 
per degree. Candidates normally require about two years to complete the M.S. program, 
but quality of performance alone determines the awarding of the degree. 



Molecular and Cell Biology Program (MOCB) 1 73 



Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must successfully complete a core curriculum con- 
sisting of eight semester-hour credits in Microbiology graduate courses, including Mi- 
crobial Metabohsm, Immunology, Virology and Genetics. These courses may be satisfied 
by lateral transfer of equivalent credit or by evidence of competence in these areas. 
Two credits of graduate seminar or special topics course per year is required after 
admission to candidacy. A student's dissertation committee will decide what additional 
coursework, if any, is required. Twelve credits of doctoral research (MICE 899), ex- 
clusive of other required courses, must be taken while enrolled for the degree. 

Application for advancement to candidacy can be made after the following sequence: 
(1) The preparation and defense of a written research proposal on a topic chosen by 
the Graduate Program Committee; and (2) submission of a written proposal on planned 
doctoral research and its defense before the student's graduate dissertation committee. 
A student must be a candidate for at least one full year before the defense of the 
dissertation and graduation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Well-equipped laboratories are available for the conduct of modern molecular biology 
and for support of a variety of faculty research efforts. Special resources include a 
state-of-the-art electron microscopy facility housing two scanning/transmission scopes 
with image analysis capabilities, centralized animal facilities, computer support, a flu- 
orescence-activated cell sorter, fermentation equipment and a P3 biohazard contain- 
ment laboratory. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of teaching assistantships, research assistantships and fellowships are avail- 
able. The number varies and in part is contingent on faculty research support, but most 
full-time students in the department receive assistantships or some other form of fi- 
nancial support. 

Additional Information 

Interested individuals may request an information brochure describing in detail the 
program of graduate study in microbiology. For information contact: 
Chair, Graduate Program Committee 
Department of Microbiology 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-5435 
For courses, code MICE. 

Molecular and Cell Biology Program (MOCB) 

Professor and Director: Vijay 

Professors: Armstrong, Colombini, Dunnaway-Mariano, Gerlt, Hansen, Kozarich, 

Kuenzel, Kung, Levitan, Mather, Ottinger, Solomos 

Associate Professors: Angle, Deitzer, Dutta, Goode, Ma, Regier, Snyder, Sze, 

Wolniak 

Assistant Professors: Hutcheson, Julin, Payne, Samal, Shapiro, Vakharia, Watson 

The Graduate Program in Molecular and Cell Biology offers study leading to the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. It is an interdepartmental program involving the de- 



1 74 Molecular and Cell Biology Program (MOCB) 



partments of Botany, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Entomology, Microbiology and 
Zoology in the College of Life Sciences, the departments of Agronomy, Animal Sci- 
ences, Horticulture and Poultry Science in the College of Agriculture, Virginia-Mary- 
land Regional College of Veterinary Medicine and the Center for Agricultural 
Biotechnology, Maryland Biotechnology Institute. 

The Program faculty have a broad spectrum of expertise and represent some of the 
most outstanding biologists on campus. Many of the faculty are engaged in research 
that is being supported by extensive extramural grants from regional, national and 
international agencies. Research on regulation of gene expression during growth, dif- 
ferentiation and reproduction, endocrine-target cell/tissue interactions, ultrastructural- 
functional relationships, transport mechanisms, vision, signal transduction, photore- 
gulation, host-parasite interactions involving viruses, bacteria and fungi in plants as 
well as animal hosts, molecular genetics and analysis of protein/enzyme/nucleic acid 
structure, function and interactions are some of the areas under study. These investi- 
gations are being carried out in both eukaryotic and prokayotic systems. 

The Program in Molecular and Cell Biology has only recently been established at 
the College Park campus. A curriculum of courses is presently being developed for the 
Program and should be in place for Fall 1990. It will consist of core courses in bio- 
chemistry, cell and molecular biology and molecular genetics. Laboratory courses will 
include training in research methodologies in molecular and cell biology including 
recombinant DNA technology and rotation through the faculty's research laboratories. 
Additional advanced level courses in specialty areas and topical subjects will offer 
electives tailored to the development and needs of students affiliated with individual 
home departments. A research seminar presented by faculty, advanced level students 
and invited scientists who are authorities in their chosen areas of expertise will be 
required. Other requirements including a prelim examination, admission to the can- 
didacy, an original research project and a defense of dissertation research will be 
included in the curriculum. 

Admission Information 

Admission to the Graduate Program is competitive. Candidates must satisfy the 
Graduate School requirements and submit the following: (1) copies of diplomas of 
previous degree(s); (2) transcripts of previous college work; (3) statement of purpose 
and professional objectives; (4) three letters of recommendation from persons com- 
petent to judge the applicant's abilities and aptitude for graduate work; (5) scores of 
the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test; and (6) for international students, 
a score of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The Admissions 
Committee may require the student to take remedial courses if he or she enters with 
inadequate prerequisites or deficiencies in a previous program of study. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Excellent laboratory facilities are available for teaching both upper and advanced 
level courses in biochemistry, cell and molecular biology and biophysical structural 
analyses. Extensive facilities for cell culture, monoclonal antibody production, protein 
and nucleic acid analyses via modern methods such as peptide sequencing, oligonu- 
cleotide synthesis and sequencing, fluorescence, scanning and transmission and electron 
microscopy, computer graphics for molecular modehng, NMR, x-ray diffraction etc. 
are present in core facilities consisting of the Protein and Nucleic Acid Synthesis and 



Music Program (MUSC) 1 75 



Analysis (PNA) Laboratory, the Laboratory for Biological Ultrastructural Research, 
the Cell Technology (Hybridoma) Laboratory, research laboratories of participating 
departments and the five centers of the Maryland Biotechnology Institute (Center for 
Agricultural Biotechnology, Center of Marine Biotechnology, Medical Biotechnology 
Center, Center for Advanced Research in Biotechnology and Center for Bioprocessing 
and Manufacture). 

Financial Assistance 

The Program offers fellowships and teaching and research assistantships to admitted 
students on a competitive basis. Additionally, the Program will recommend outstanding 
applicants to the Graduate School for its fellowships. When supplemented with match- 
ing funds from the Program, these fellowships will enhance the financial support of the 
awardees at a level much higher than the regular fellowships and teaching and research 
assistantships. 

Additional Information 

For specific information on the program, admission procedures, financial support 
and other details, contact: 

Dr. Inder K. Vijay 

Program in Molecular and Cell Biology 

Animal Sciences Center 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 
The Program's courses are being developed and a list will be ready for Fall 1990. 

Music Program (MUSC) 

Professor and Chair: Major 

Associate Chair: Cooper 

Professors: Bernstein, Cohen, Cossa, Fischbach, Folstrom, Garvey, Guarneri String 

Quartet (Dally, Soyer, Steinhardt, Tree), Head, Heifitz, Heim, Helm, Hudson, 

Johnson, Koscielny, Major, McDonald, Montgomery, Moss, Schumacher, Serwer, 

Traver, Troth 

Associate Professors: Barnett, Davis, DeLio, Elliston, Elsing, Fanos, Fleming, 

Gibson, Gowen, Mabbs, McCoy, Olson, Robertson, Rodriquez, Ross, Urban, 

Wakefield, Wexler, Wilson 

Assistant Professors: Balthrop, Payerle, Saunders, Sparks 

Lecturer: Beicken 

Instructor: Walters 

The Department of Music offers programs of study leading to the Master of Music 
degree with specializations in performance, conducting, historical musicology, ethno- 
musicology, music theory, music education and composition; to the Doctor of Philos- 
ophy degree with specializations in historical musicology, ethnomusicology and music 
theory; and to the Doctor of Musical Arts degree with specializations in performance- 
literature and in composition. Doctoral programs in music education, offered coop- 
eratively with the College of Education, lead to Doctor of Education and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. 



1 76 Music Program (MUSC) 



Admission and Degree Information 

Admission to graduate degree programs in music is highly selective. It is determined 
primarily upon a performance audition, tapes and scores of original compositions, 
scholarly research papers, letters of recommendation, successful teaching experience 
and, in academic areas, GRE scores. 

Students must complete at least 30 semester credit hours for all master's degrees, 
earning at least one-third in the area of specialization and the remainder in supportive 
coursework in music and electives. A public recital or performance is required in 
performance, conducting and music education; a scholarly thesis is required in musi- 
cology, ethnomusicology, theory and composition. 

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy and the Doctor of Musical Arts degrees 
require no fixed number of earned credits. Rather, they require the satisfactory com- 
pletion of a significant body of coursework that, in the student and the Graduate 
Adviser's judgment, prepares the student for the Preliminary Examination that leads 
to the Admission to Candidacy. 

Libraries and Special Research Resources 

The University of Maryland, College Park offers musical scholars a variety of h- 
braries, archives, special collections and other research resources that few universities 
equal. 

The music library in Hornbake Library is maintained as a separate branch within 
the University's library system. Its main collection consists of approximately 22,000 
books, 70,000 scores, 2,200 microfilms, 3,500 microfiches, 45,000 phonodiscs, 3,000 
tapes and 2,400 piano rolls along with readers for all microforms, listening facilities 
for discs and tapes, and equipment for making photographic, microfilm, microfiche or 
xerographic copies. 

Special collections of particular musical interest are (1) the Jacob M. Coopersmith 
Collection consisting of his working library, which is rich in Handel materials (books, 
music, journals, reprints of articles, etc.); (2) microfilms of all Handel autographs at 
the British Library and the Fitzwilliam Museum, and of almost all other known au- 
tograph fragments of Handel's music; (3) the Alfred Wallenstein Collection, donated 
by the violoncellist and conductor, comprising the performance library (about 28,000 
titles) of radio station WOR in New York City and dating through the early 1950s; (4) 
Andre Kostelanetz's own working collection of orchestral scores and parts in manu- 
script, about 4,000 titles bequeathed by the conductor; (5) the archives of the American 
Bandmasters Association, the Music Educators National Conference, the National 
Association of College Wind and Percussion Instructors, the International Clarinet 
Society, the College Band Directors National Association and the Music Library As- 
sociation, among which is the oral history collection; the press books of Edwin Franko 
Goldman; an extensive gathering of clippings, programs, photographs and historic 
recordings relating to the history of the American band movement; the Contemporary 
Music Project Library of the Music Educators National Conference ; the Pillsbury Foun- 
dation School archives; the Frances Elliott Clark papers; the Luther Whiting Mason 
Collection; and the music education textbook collection; and (6) the International Piano 
Archives at Maryland (formerly the International Piano Library of New York City), 
which is a unique collection of tapes, phonodiscs, piano rolls, music scores, cylinders. 



Music Program (MUSC) 1 77 



record catalogues and manuscripts documenting the entire history of recorded piano 
literature and its performance. 

Also located at The University of Maryland is The Center for Studies in Nineteenth- 
Century Music. The Department's research activities include the C.P.E. Bach Edition 
and the American Handel Society. 

Within a few minutes of the College Park campus are research opportunities offered 
by the Library of Congress, the Folger Shakespeare Library, Dumbarton Oaks, the 
National Archives, the Smithsonian Institution, the Enoch Pratt Free Library of Bal- 
timore and about 500 specialized libraries. 

Special Resources 

The Department schedules a wide variety of student and faculty solo and ensemble 
recitals and concerts, including those of the internationally recognized Guarneri Quar- 
tet, which is in residence at College Park. The Department also cooperates with the 
campus in a year-long series of University Community concerts and in the summer 
International Piano Festival and William Kapell Competition. The University also 
sponsors an annual three-day Handel Festival that features the University of Maryland 
Chorus and scholars and performers from around the world. The musical environment 
of the entire Washington-Baltimore area is unusually varied and rewarding in perform- 
ances at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Constitution Hall, the 
National Gallery of Art, the Phillips Collection, the Library of Congress, Wolf Trap 
Farms Park, Smithsonian Institution, the Corcoran Gallery of Art and Joseph Mey- 
erhoff Symphony Hall in Baltimore. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of competitive fellowships, tuition waivers and assistantships are available. 
Preference may be given to those who have filed an application for admission to the 
University and have been officially admitted by February 1. 

Additional Information 

Music at Maryland: Graduate Programs provides descriptive information , details of 
course requirements, examination procedures and graduation requirements for the 
M.M., Ph.D. and D.M.A. degree programs. Specific information may be obtained 
from: 

Dr. Norman Heim 

Director of Graduate Admissions 

Department of Music 

Tawes Fine Arts Building 

The University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 20742 

(301) 405-5870 
For courses, see code MUSC. 



1 78 Nuclear Engineering Program (ENNU) 



Nuclear Engineering Program (ENNU) 

Professor and Director: Munno 

Professor and Department Chair: Roush 

Professors: Hsu, Silverman 

Associate Professors: Almenas, Modarres, Pertmer 

Assistant Professor: Mosleh 

Lecturers: Ebert, Graves, Lee, Rahejah, White 

Housed in the Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, the Nuclear En- 
gineering program's primary objective is to maintain and extend the ever- increasing 
degree of engineering sophistication. The courses and research programs strive to create 
an atmosphere of originality and creativity that prepares the student for future engi- 
neering leadership. 

The student, his or her adviser and the department head establish an individual plan 
of graduate study compatible with the student's interests and background. General 
areas of concentration include reactor safety, reactor thermal hydraulics, transport 
theory, activation analysis, probalistic risk assessment, reliability analysis, reactor phys- 
ics, radiation engineering, integrated thermal hydraulic effects and nuclear core design. 
The general nuclear engineering program is focused toward energy conversion and 
power engineering with additional specialties in radiation and polymer science and 
reliability analysis. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The programs leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosphy degrees 
are open to qualified students holding bachelor's degrees in any of the engineering and 
science areas from accredited programs, but in some cases it may be necessary to 
require courses to fulfill the background. The Graduate School admission requirements 
apply in reviewing applications. 

The M.S. degree program offers both the thesis or non-thesis option. The equivalent 
of at least three years of full-time study beyond the B.S. degree is required for the 
Ph.D. degree. All students seeking graduate degrees in Nuclear Engineering must enroll 
in ENNU 620, 630 and 440. Many of these courses are offered in the late afternoon 
and evening for part-time students. In addition to the Graduate School rules, the 
Department sets forth certain special degree requirements in its publications. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Special facilities available for graduate study in Nuclear Engineering include the 
nuclear reactor, a large scale integral thermal hydraulic facility a large gamma source, 
an 8 MeV Electron Linear Accelerator, and various analyzers and detectors. The 
nuclear reactor is a 250 KW swimming pool type using enriched uranium. In addition, 
there are considerable computer and graphics facilities available, including Sun Work- 
stations. 

Additional Information 

For more specific information, contact: 
Director of Graduate Studies 
Nuclear Engineering Program 



Philosophy Program (PHIL) 179 



Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-5208 
For courses, see code ENNU. 

Nutritional Sciences Program (NUSC) 

Professor and Chair: Ahrens 

Professors: Doerr, Heald, Kuenzel, Mather, Max, Moser-Veillon, Prather, Read, 

Soares, Thomas, Tildon, Vandersall, Vijay, Westoff 

Professor Emeritus: Keeney 

Associate Professors: Castonguay, DeBarthe, Douglass, Erdman, Hansen, Roeder, 

Russek-Cohen, Sampugna 

Assistant Professors: Alston-Mills, McKenna, Mench, Taylor 

The Graduate Program in Nutritional Sciences offers study leading to the Master of 
Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. It is an interdepartmental program 
involving faculty from the Departments of Animal Sciences, Chemistry and Biochem- 
istry, Human Nutrition and Food Systems, and Poultry Science on the College Park 
campus; Pediatrics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore City campus; and Human 
Ecology at the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore campus. In addition, there are 
affiliated scientists interacting with the program at federal laboratories in the USDA, 
FDA, NIH and Smithsonian Institution-National Zoological Park. Degree recipients 
in NUSC are employed equally in academia, government service or the private sector. 
This program emphasizes the basic science aspects of nutrition. For courses, see code 
NUSC. 

Philosophy Program (PHIL) 

Professor and Chair: Campbell 

Professors: Bub, Devitt, Greenspan, Lesher, Martin, Pasch, Slote, Suppe, Svenonius 

Professor Emeritus: Schlaretzki 

Associate Professors: Brown, Celarier, Cherniak, Darden, Johnson, Levinson, Odell, 

Rey, Stairs 

Assistant Professors: Horty, Taylor 

Affiliate Associate Professor: Hornstein 

The Department of Philosophy offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with emphasis on contemporary Anglo-American 
philosophy and philosophy's interaction with other disciplines. Students normally enter 
the doctorate program without an M.A. degree, but the M.A. may be earned on the 
way to the Ph.D. While the Ph.D. program is suitable primarily for students who wish 
to enter a career in teaching and research at the college or university level, the M.A. 
program is appropriate for those who want to deepen and expand the knowledge they 
gained as undergraduates or who wish to develop competence in philosophy to apply 
to some other professional field. 

In cooperation with the Department of History and under the supervision of the 
Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science, a special interdisciplinary cur- 



180 Philosophy Program (PHIL) 



riculum in the history and philosophy of science is also offered at the M.A. and Ph.D. 
levels. 

In addition, the Department of Philosophy offers a specialized curriculum in cognitive 
studies at the M.A. and PhD levels under the supervision of the Committee for Cog- 
nitive Studies in Philosophy and in cooperation with the Department of Computer 
Science, the Department of Linguistics and the Department of Psychology. 

The Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy, under the auspices of the School of 
Public Affairs, engages in research, teaching and curriculum development in the ethical 
and conceptual issues in public policy formation. The Center offers graduate students 
opportunities for coursework and research. 

The Department sponsors a series of colloquia by visiting and local speakers through- 
out the academic year. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Students who seek admission to the Ph.D. program should intend to pursue only 
full-time study toward that degree. Candidates with a high grade point average should 
normally have completed at least 18 credit hours (or the equivalent) of philosophy, 
including one course in logic, two courses in the history of philosophy and two courses 
from ethics, epistemology or metaphysics. The Department also requires for admission 
a Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test score, three letters of recommendation 
from previous instructors, at least one of whom is familiar with the applicant's work 
in philosophy and a sample of the student's written work on a philosophical topic. The 
GRE score, letters and work sample should be sent directly to the Department of 
Philosophy. 

A candidate may be admitted to the curriculum in the History and Philosophy of 
Science or Cognitive Studies in Philosophy with fewer than 18 hours in philosophy if 
the student has a strong background in science or in a cognate discipline in cognitive 
studies, respectively. For details, consuh the Chairperson of the Committee on the 
History and Philosophy of Science or of the Committee for Cognitive Studies in Phi- 
losophy. 

M.A. admission requirements are less stringent than those for admission to the Ph.D. 
program, but the same supporting documents must be provided. 

The M.A. program offers both a thesis and a non-thesis option. Candidates who 
pursue either option must demonstrate competence in symbolic logic and knowledge 
of modern philosophy. There are no specific course requirements beyond the Graduate 
School requirements. The individual student's research determines whether foreign 
language skills are required. For the non-thesis option, a student must pass a written 
comprehensive examination and must submit a collection of papers demonstrating 
competence in philosophical research and writing. 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, Ph.D. students in the regular 
philosophy program are required to demonstrate a competence in three philosophical 
fields selected from four broad philosophical areas: History of Philosophy, Episte- 
mology and Metaphysics, Logic and Philosophy of Science and Value Theory. Students 
demonstrate a competence by writing papers of substantial breadth and scope that 
indicate the student's grasp of some important problems in the field and connections 
to other issues in that field. These demonstrations must be completed within six se- 



Physics Program (PHYS) 181 



mesters of full-time study. Other requirements include: qualification in symbolic logic, 
course distribution in the above four philosophical areas and presentation of a research 
paper at a Departmental colloquium in the latter stages of dissertation research. All 
Ph.D. students are also required to teach undergraduates for two semesters at an 
institution of higher learning, normally through the Department's teaching assistantship 
program. 
Foreign language skills are required as demanded by the individual student's research. 

Partial credit toward the Ph.D. requirements will be awarded for relevant work done 
at other graduate institutions. The committee on Graduate Admissions will make a 
specific determination in each case. 

Philosophy students pursuing a Ph.D. in the History and Philosophy of Science are 
subject to certain special requirements. They must demonstrate competence by ex- 
amination and written papers in (1) the history of science and the contemporaneous 
philosophies of science; (2) the philosophy of science and related metaphysical and 
epistemological problems; and (3) a field of science (for students who do not possess 
an undergraduate science degree) or an area of philosophy. Coursework must include: 
(1) courses in the history of science and technology; (2) the philosophy of science; (3) 
graduate-level courses in an area of science; (4) a course on research methods in history 
and philosophy of science; and (5) either Philosophy 471 or 478. In addition, the student 
must demonstrate reading competency in a foreign language, normally French or Ger- 
man. 

Students who take the Cognitive Studies Specialization are also subject to certain 
special requirements. Ph.D. students must include an interdisciplinary field in cognitive 
studies as one of the three fields of competence. Both Ph.D. and M.A. students must 
include philosophy courses concerned with issues related to cognitive studies and courses 
in a secondary area of cognitive studies outside philosophy. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department administers a number of graduate assistantships. Promising students 
have a good chance of receiving financial support in the first year and are generally 
favored for reappointment through the fourth year of studies. 

Additional Information 

Brochures describing the regular M.A. and Ph.D. programs in philosophy may be 
obtained by writing to the Committee on Graduate Admissions and Awards, Depart- 
ment of Philosophy. Information concerning the curriculum in the History and Phi- 
losophy of Science may be obtained from the Chairperson, Committee on the History 
and Philosophy of Science. Information concerning the curriculum in Cognitive Studies 
may be obtained from the Chairperson, Committee for Cognitive Studies in Philosophy. 

For courses, see code PHIL. 

Physics Program (PHYS) 

Professor and Chair: Liu 

Professors and Associate Chairs: Bardasis, Boyd 

Professors Emeriti: Glover III 

Professors: Alley, Anderson, Antonsen, Banerjee, Bhagat, Brill, C.C. Chang, C.Y. 

Chang, Chant, Chen, Currie, Das Sarma, DeSilva, Dorfman, Dragt, Drake, Drew, 



182 Physics Program (PHYS) 



Earl, Einstein, Falk, Ferrell, Fisher, Gates, Glick, Gloeckler, Gluckstern, 

Goldenbaum, Greene, Greenberg, Griem, Griffin, Holmgren, Hornyak, Hu, Kelly, 

Korenman, Layman, Lee, Lynn, MacDonald, Mason, Misner, Mohapatra, Oneda, 

Ott, Paik, Papadopoulos, Park, Pati, Prange, Redish, Richard, Rocs, Skuja, Snow, 

Sucher, Toll, Wallace, Weber, Woo, Zorn 

Professors (part-time): Z. Slawsky, 

Visiting Professors: Franklin 

Adjunct Professors: Boldt, Ramaty, Ripin 

Associate Professors: Ellis, Fivel, Goodman, Hadley, Hassam, Kacser, Kim, 

Kirkpatrick, Wang, Williams 

Assistant Professors: Cohen, Hamilton, Jacobson, Jawahery, Skiff 

Lecturers: Menella, Rapport, M. Slawsky, Stern, Taggart 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy includes programs in many areas of 
current research interest. Those in astronomy are listed under the heading of Astron- 
omy. Those in the Physics program include: astrophysics, atomic physics, chemical 
physics, condensed matter physics, dynamical systems, elementary particle theory, fluid 
dynamics, general relativity, high energy physics, many- body theory, molecular physics, 
nuclear physics, particle accelerator research, plasma physics, quantum electronics and 
optics, quantum field theory, space physics and statistical mechanics. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Because of the large number of qualified applicants, the Department of Physics and 
Astronomy has had to restrict formal admission to the Graduate School to those who 
have shown particularly outstanding work in their undergraduate records or who have 
already done satisfactory work in key senior-level courses at the University of Maryland. 
Students who have less outstanding records, but who show special promise may be 
given provisional admission under special circumstances. Regular admission will then 
depend on the satisfactory completion of existing deficiencies. A faculty adviser will 
inform each of these students what background he or she lacks and what he or she 
must accomplish to achieve regular admission. Thus, the Department hopes to offer 
an opportunity for advanced study in physics to all qualified students. 

Students who enter the graduate program are normally expected to have strong 
backgrounds in physics, including intermediate-level courses in mechanics, electricity 
and magnetism, thermodynamics, physical optics and modern physics. A student with 
deficiencies in one or more of these areas may be admitted but will be expected to 
remedy such deficiencies as soon as possible. 

The Graduate Record Examination (GRE), including the Advanced Physics test, is 
required for admission. In rare instances, this requirement may be waived. The average 
GRE Advanced Physics test score is 700. A minimum overall score of 550 on the Test 
of English as a Foreign Language is required of applicants from non- English speaking 
countries. 

The Department offers both a thesis and non-thesis option for its Master of Science 
programs. The Departmental requirements for the non-thesis option include: at least 
four courses of the general physics sequence; a paper as evidence of ability to organize 
and present a written scholarly report on contemporary research; the passing at the 



Physics Program (PHYS) 1 83 



master's level of one section of the Ph.D. qualifying exam; and the passing of a final 
oral examination. 

The thesis option's requirements include at least four courses of the general physics 
sequence, the graduate laboratory unless specially exempted and the passing of an oral 
examination including a defense of thesis. 

The requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in physics are set in general 
terms to allow the individual student as much freedom as possible to prepare a course 
of study suited to individual needs. These requirements are: competence in basic physics 
indicated by a satisfactory performance on a Qualifying Examination and in the Grad- 
uate Laboratory; a paper as evidence of the ability to organize and present a written 
scholarly report on contemporary research prior to candidacy; advanced course study 
outside the student's field of specialization consisting of at least two courses (six credits) 
in physics at the 700 or 800 level and two graduate courses (six credits) outside the 
physics program (this may include astronomy); PHYS 624 or 625 for students with 
theoretical theses; and research competence through active participation in at least two 
hours of seminar, 12 hours of thesis research and the presentation and defense of an 
original dissertation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Current research in the Department spans an immense range of theoretical and 
experimental work on the forefront of knowledge, far too large to describe here. For 
details of the work in the various fields, and the faculty and facilities involved, the 
Department biannually releases a booklet entitled "Research in Physics" which can be 
obtained upon request. 

Out of the 77 professional faculty members, 66 engage in separately budgeted re- 
search; 111 faculty members at other ranks also engage in research. In 1987- 88, 107 
graduate students also participated in research under stipends. The current federal 
support for research amounts to approximately 15.5 million dollars annually, attesting 
to both the size and the quality of the program. 

The Department houses the Center for Theoretical Physics, which provides a means 
for outstanding theoretical physicists to visit the Department as postdoctoral fellows 
and visiting faculty members. 

There are close academic ties with the Institute of Physical Science and Technology 
on the campus; members of the Institute supervise graduate research and also teach 
physics courses. The Department also has ties with the University's Computer Science 
Center, which provides outstanding computer facilities for the University. 

In addition to using College Park campus facilities, graduate students can utilize 
resources of nearby federal laboratories under certain conditions. 

The University of Maryland is located within the metropolitan area of Washington, 
D.C. where it enjoys the proximity of a large number of outstanding institutions such 
as NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Naval Research Laboratory, the Naval 
Surface Weapons Center, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the 
Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, the Department of Energy, the National 
Institutes of Health, the Library of Congress and other federal institutions. The De- 
partment works closely with certain research groups at some of these institutions. In 



184 Poultry Science Program (POUL) 



order to facilitate graduate study in the Washington area, the Department of Physics 
and Astronomy has part-time professors in certain government laboratories. 

Students who desire to do graduate work in physics at a government agency should 
contact a member of the graduate faculty in the Department. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department offers both teaching and research assistantships. In 1989-90 ap- 
proximately 85 teaching assistants and 107 research assistants worked in the Depart- 
ment. Summer research stipends for advanced graduate students are customary, and 
a few summer teaching assistantships are available. 

The deadline for applications for financial support is February 1 for assistantships 
and fellowships. 

Graduate students also can seek full-time or part-time employment in the many 
government and industry laboratories located within a few miles of the campus. 

Additional Information 

A booklet is available regarding the graduate program in physics. "Graduate Study 
in Physics'" is a guidebook to procedural requirements and rules concerning the ac- 
quisition of higher degrees. "Research in Physics" describes the program's research 
activities and lists personnel involved. It gives the names of faculty and graduate students 
involved in various research projects, together with brief descriptions of those projects. 
For more information, contact: 

Mrs. Jean Clement, Secretary 

Graduate Entrance Committee 

Department of Physics 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-5982 
For courses, see code PHYS. 

Poultry Science Program (POUL) 

Associate Professor and Acting Chair: Doerr 

Professors: Heath, Kuenzel, Ottinger, Soares, Thomas 

Associate Professors: Murphy, Wabeck 

Adjunct Professor: Kotula 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Failla, Rattner 

Assistant Professor: Mench 

NOTE: Some courses in this program may require the use of animals. Please see the 
Statement on Animal Use and Care in the appendix and the policy statement for 
students under "Degree Requirements." 

The Department of f^oultry Science offers graduate study leading to the Master of 
Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The student may pursue a graduate 
degree specializing in biotechnology, ethology, nutrition, physiology, technology of 
eggs and poultry, value-added products or toxicology. 

There are many job opportunities for graduates in government research, industry or 
academia. 



Psychology Program (PSYC) 1 85 



Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to Graduate School and Departmental requirements, the Department 
also requires submission of Graduate Record Examination (GRE) results. Copies of 
requirements can be obtained from the Department. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has excellent facilities for broilers, layers, quail and mice (for 
hybridoma research). Laboratories are modern and well-equipped with instruments 
such as: an amino acid analyzer, atomic absorption spectrophotometer, scintillation 
counters, gas chromatographs, HPLCs, Instron food analyzer. Grass polygraph, EIA 
reader, fluorescence and light microscopes, etc. Specialized laboratories provide re- 
search capability in microbiology, molecular biology, nutrition, physiology and tissue 
culture. Students can also conduct research at an on-campus poultry farm. In addition, 
a new off-campus research facility in the heart of Maryland's poultry industry permits 
field studies and interaction with industry-based research. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate research assistantships and teaching assistantships are available. 
For courses, see code ANSC and others. 

Psychology Program (PSYC) 

Professor and Chair: Goldstein 

Professors: Anderson, Brauth, Dies, DooHng, Fretz, Gelso, Gollub, Hall, Hill, 

Hodos, Horton, Kruglanski, Locke, Lorion, Magoon , Martin, Mclntire, J. Mills, 

Penner, Pumroy, Schneider, Scholnick, Sigall, B. Smith, Steinman, Sternheim, 

Trickett, Tyler 

Associate Professors: Allen, R. Brown, Coursey, Freeman", Guzzo, Larkin, Norman, 

O'Grady, Steele 

Assistant Professors: Alexander, Hanges, Helms, Johnson, Klein, Plude, Stangor 

Joint appointment with Business and Management 
""Joint appointment with Counseling and Personnel Services 

NOTE: Some courses in this program may require the use of animals. Please see the 
Statement on Animal Use and Care in the appendix and the policy statement for 
students under "Degree Requirements." 

The Department of Psychology offers training leading to the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. The number of graduate students is limited by Departmental ruling to a ratio 
of four resident students per member of the Graduate faculty, ensuring close and 
intimate contact in research and seminars. 

Programs leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree are offered in the areas of 
clinical, counseling, experimental, industrial, applied developmental psychology and 
social psychology. The experimental area is further subdivided into three fields of study: 
biopsychology, cognitive and psycholinguistics, and sensory and perceptual processes. 
Many fields have a range of subspecialties (e.g., engineering psychology) in which the 
student may concentrate. The Department's doctoral programs in both Clinical and 
Counseling Psychology have been approved by the American Psychological Associa- 
tion. 



1 86 Psychology Program (PSYC) 



Admission and Degree Information 

The Department accepts only those applicants who have demonstrated superior 
aptitude and appear capable of completing the requirements for the doctoral degree. 
All of the specialty areas offer doctoral level programs and do not accept students who 
are interested in terminal Master of Arts degrees. The average scores of students 
admitted for the 1989-90 academic year were: GRE V + Q 1300, GRE Psychology 600, 
GPA 3.7, Psychology GPA 3.8. The Department of Psychology encourages applications 
from minority groups and women. 

Applicants must submit applications each year by January 1 (preferably December 
1) for entrance the next fall because available spaces are usually filled early. 

A minimum of 72 credit hours beyond the B.A. is required for a doctoral degree. 
All students who enter with a B.A. are required to take two courses in statistics and 
five courses in areas outside their specialty program. These five courses must be core 
courses designed to provide basic information in a variety of specialty areas. 

The remaining credit hours (approximately 50 hours) are devoted to research and 
coursework in the participant's specialty program. If the student chooses a second 
specialty, two advanced courses along with one core course may be taken in one 
coherent area. 

While the course of study in the Department of Psychology is at the doctoral level, 
most students choose to earn the M.A. or M.S. degree en route to the Ph.D. The 
M. A. or M.S. degree requirements are 30 hours of coursework including the two courses 
in statistics and three core courses. A research thesis is also required. Advancement 
to the third and the fourth year of doctoral level work is based upon satisfactory 
completion of core courses, work in the student's specialty area and completion of a 
research requirement. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department is housed in a large modern building with facilities designed by the 
Department's faculty for training graduate students. In addition, its geographic location 
in a suburb of Washington, D.C. makes accessible a wide variety of laboratory and 
training facilities in governmental and other agencies, as well as many prominent psy- 
chologists. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department gives financial aid to almost all incoming students. The Department 
of Psychology does not offer a part-time program. Students are required to attend 
classes, take part in research and teach as graduate assistants. Each of these assignments 
is considered a critical part of the graduate training program. It is not possible to obtain 
this type of education on a part-time basis. Thus, students are not permitted to hold 
off-campus jobs unless they are under the direct supervision of the faculty. 

Additional Information 

Additional information concerning the graduate program including specific program 
brochures and application materials may be obtained by writing: 
Graduate Secretary 

Department of Psychology - Room 1220 
University of Maryland 



School of Public Affairs (PUAF) 1 87 



College Park, MD 20742-4411 
(301) 405-5865 
For courses, see code PSYC. 

School of Public Affairs (Public Management and Public Policy 
Programs) (PUAF) 

Professor and Dean: Nacht 

Professors: Baily, Brown, Destler, Galston, Kelleher, Levy, Schelling, Schick, 

Young 

Assistant Professors: Cohen, Cronin, Fetter, Hedman 

Lecturers: Ards, Badgett, Slater 

The School of Public Affairs provides graduate-level, professional education in five 
disciplines: accounting, statistics, economics, politics and ethics. Students specialize in 
issues of government/private sector interaction, social policy, international security, 
environmental policy or public sector financial management. The program is open to 
pre-career and mid-career graduate students and builds on the School's location in the 
BaltimoreAVashington corridor. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The School offers three degrees: the Master of Public Management (MPM) the Mid- 
Career Master of Public Policy (MPP) and a small Ph.D. program in poHcy studies. 
The School also offers joint degree programs with the School of Business (MPM/MBA) 
and the Law School (MPM/JD). In addition, several non-degree certificates are avail- 
able. 

Master of Public Management 

The MPM is a two-year, 51 credit, full-time professional degree combining a rigorous 
applied course of study with practical experience. 

About 35 students enter the program each fall. Although this number is small, the 
candidates come from a wide variety of undergraduate schools and majors. The average 
undergraduate GPA is approximately 3.4 and the average GRE score is 620. All 
students are required to have successfully completed college level math before they 
enter the School. 

During the first year, students fulfill the core requirements that emphasize the tools 
of policy analysis: financial management, statistics, economics, politics and ethics. They 
are also introduced to the policy-making process and national, state and local policy 
makers. In addition to these core courses, first-year students take two elective courses 
during the second semester. 

During the summer between the first and second year, students are employed in 
federal, state or local government agencies or in private firms that deal extensively 
with government agencies. In addition to practical experience and the opportunity to 
use the skills acquired during the first year, this opportunity provides contacts and 
relationships useful for future projects and job placement. 

During the second year students specialize in one of five concentrations: Public Policy 
and Private Enterprise, Public Sector Financial Management, Environmental Policy, 
National Security Studies or Social Policy. 



1 88 School of Public Affairs (PUAF) 



Each concentration requires participation in a project course in which students worlc 
individually or in small groups conducting research on problems of interest to themselves 
and the government agency or private firm that sponsors them. 

Master of Public Policy 

The MPP is a 36-credit degree program designed for mid-career students. This pro- 
gram helps individuals in the middle stages of their careers to update their understanding 
of today's complex public issues and to move into positions of greater authority and 
responsibility. 

The typical MPP candidate has worked in the public or public-related sector for a 
minimum of three years and is capable of handling a rigorous academic program and 
excelling in his/her professional career. Candidates enter the School with varied aca- 
demic and professional backgrounds. Most have at least a 3.0 undergraduate GPA and 
have completed some college-level math and economics courses. If candidates do not 
have these courses in their background, admission may be contingent upon the suc- 
cessful completion of appropriate coursework. 

The MPP degree consists of two components: the core curriculum in Methods of 
Policy Analysis and a selected area of concentration in Public Sector Financial Man- 
agement, Public Policy and Private Enterprise. Environmental Policy, National Security 
Studies or Social Policy. 

Courses are offered throughout the day and late evening. Students are usually able 
to finish the degree in a maximum of three years by taking two courses each fall and 
spring semester, but they are allowed to accelerate their progress if they wish to do 
so. 

Master of Public Policy candidates may also be considered for the Mid-Career Fel- 
lowship Program. Under the joint auspices of the School, various federal agencies and 
state and local governments, this program recognizes high potential employees for 
accelerated career development and education. Fellows participate in the Master of 
Public Policy degree program as well as a professional development series, which 
includes special seminars, guest speakers and a management development retreat. 

Ph.D. in Policy Studies 

The School of Public Affairs Ph.D. in Policy Studies is directed at individuals who 
have received a Master of Public Management or Master of Public Policy degree from 
the School of Public Affairs, or a similar degree from a program comparable in content 
and quality to the School's program. Admission is also open to individuals with a 
distinguished academic record who are in their final year or have completed a master's 
degree program in a public policy related subject such as economics, political science, 
statistics, physics or philosophy. 

Ph.D. candidates are expected to maintain full-time student status until they have 
passed the core exams, and the draft dissertation prospectus has been approved. This 
process is expected to take between one and two full years. 

Ph.D. candidates are expected to complete six examinations: 

(a) three core examinations designed to test a candidate's knowledge at the master's 
level in the School's core curriculum; 

(b) two specialized field examinations containing both oral and written components; 



School of Public Affairs (PUAF) 1 89 



(c) a final examination on the candidate's dissertation prospectus. 

A faculty member at the School must agree to serve as the Ph.D. applicant's academic 
sponsor in the program. To facilitate the selection of a sponsor, applicants should 
include as part of their application a description of the general areas in which they 
want to study and write their dissertation. 

Certificate Programs 

The School offers 18 credit (6 courses) Certificate Programs in four areas: Methods 
of Policy Analysis, Pubhc Policy and Private Enterprise, Public Sector Financial Man- 
agement, Public Management and National Security Studies. 

MBA/MPM Joint Program 

The campus' College of Business and Management and the School of Public Affairs 
offer a joint program of studies leading to MBA and MPM degrees. Under the terms 
of the joint program, a student may earn both degrees in approximately five to six 
semesters. The accelerated program is possible because some courses can be credited 
toward both degrees. Candidates must be admitted to both programs separately. 

Under the joint program, 66 credits are required for graduation, split roughly equally 
between the programs. Grade point averages in each program will be computed sep- 
arately and students must maintain minimum standards in each school to continue in 
the program. A student must complete both programs satisfactorily in order to receive 
both degrees. A student whose enrollment in either program is terminated may elect 
to complete work for the degree in which he or she remains enrolled, but such com- 
pletion must be upon the same conditions as required of regular (nonjoint program) 
degree candidates. Student programs must be approved by the Assistant Dean of the 
School of Public Affairs and the MBA Program Director. For further discussion of 
admission and degree requirements, students should see the admissions requirements 
for each program. 

MPM/JD Joint Program 

The School of Public Affairs and the School of Law, which is located on the University 
of Maryland at Baltimore campus, offer a joint program of studies leading to MPM 
and JD degrees. Under the terms of the joint program, a student may earn both degrees 
in four academic years. The accelerated program is possible because some courses can 
be credited toward both degrees. Candidates must apply for admission to the Law 
School as well as the Graduate School at College Park and must be admitted to both 
programs. 

Under the joint program, 75 credits in the Law School coupled with 39 credits in 
the School of Public Affairs are required for graduation. Grade point averages in each 
program will be computed separately and students must maintain minimum standards 
in each school to continue in the program. A student must complete both programs 
satisfactorily in order to receive both degrees. A student whose enrollment in either 
program is terminated may elect to complete work for the degree in which he or she 
remains enrolled, but such completion must be upon the same conditions as required 
of regular (non-joint program) degree candidates. Student programs must be approved 
by the deans of each school. For further discussion of admission and degree require- 
ments, students should see the above and consult the entry in the University of Maryland 
School of Law catalog. 



190 Public Communication Program (PCOM) 



Financial Assistance 

The School has financial aid available in the form of fellowships and graduate as- 
sistantships. All qualified applicants are considered. 

Additional Information 

For additional information, contact: 

The Assistant Dean for Student Affairs 
School of Public Affairs 
2106 Morrill Hall 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-6330 
For courses, see code PUAF. 

Public Communication Program (PCOM) 

Associate Professor and Director: Klumpp 

(JOUR) Professors: Beasley, Blumler, Cleghorn (Dean, College of Journalism), J. 

Grunig, Gurevitch, Hiebert, Levy, Martin (Emeritus) Associate Professors: Barkin, 

Stepp, Zanot Assistant Professor: L. Grunig 

RTVF: Professors: Aylward, Ferguson, Gomery, Kolker Associate Professors: Blum, 

Kirkley, Weiss 

SPCH: Professors: Fink, Solomon, Wolvin Associate Professors: Falcione, Freimuth, 

Gaines, Klumpp, McCaleb 

THET: Professors: Gillespie, Meersman, Pugliese (Emeritus) 

The program in Public Communication provides disciplinary or cross-disciplinary 
doctoral study in Radio-Television-Film, Speech Communication, Theatre and Jour- 
nalism (Master's work in these disciplines is offered through the RTVF, SPCH, THET 
and JOUR graduate programs). The program prepares students for rigorous research 
through instruction in ways to think innovatively about problems in public communi- 
cation. 

Many students concentrate their studies in one of the disciplines associated with the 
program while others combine perspectives of a number of the disciplines. Individual 
programs result in a number of specific research areas: audience behavior; advertising; 
organizational communication; public relations; mass media theory; political commu- 
nication; health communication; instructional communication; rhetorical theory and 
criticism; international and cross-cultural communication; communication law and press 
freedom, broadcasting history, criticism and theory; documentary film and television; 
theatre history and criticism; public affairs; persuasion, cognition and communication; 
research methods; or visual communication. Students' programs often combine a num- 
ber of speciahies such as poHtical and governmental communication, public relations 
and organizational communication, science and health communication, cross-cultural 
and international propaganda, international communication and comparative media 
systems, communications law and critical studies of communication. The range of 
choices reflects the flexibility available within the public communication program. 

Employment opportunities include: careers as communication specialists in business, 
industry or government; careers in journalism, theatre or the media; and academic 



Public Communication Program (PCOM) 191 



positions in each of the disciplines. Historical, theoretical, experimental, practical and 
critical study of communication are among the fastest growing inquiries of the late 
twentieth century. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission to the program requires a Master's degree, generally in speech commu- 
nication, radio-television-film, theatre, journalism, public relations, mass communi- 
cation or related areas. Students with degrees in other areas may complete deficiencies 
to prepare for study. Students are admitted only for fall semester. GRE scores, samples 
of scholarly writing, and letters of recommendation supplement general information 
required for application. Students applying for the program should write the director 
for more complete descriptions of requirements and procedures for admission. 

In addition to a general framework of study, an individualized program approved 
by a committee of PCOM faculty guides students" preparation for a 12- hour (minimum) 
preliminary examination. Typical programs for those with prior degrees in communi- 
cation involve 36-45 hours beyond the master's degree. Following successful completion 
of the examination, students must complete a major dissertation project contributing 
significant new knowledge to the study of human communication. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Washington area is among America's outstanding environments for communi- 
cation research. Students in health communication and science journalism have access 
to many of the world's leading health professionals at the National Institutes of Health. 
Students working with historical collections call upon the resources of the Library of 
Congress, the Folger Shakespeare Library and the extensive archival collections of the 
National Archives. Students of governmental and political communication draw upon 
the aural and visual collections of the Library of Congress, the National Archives and 
the Smithsonian Institution to supplement the constant resource of the executive, 
congressional and judicial branches of the national government. Students in theatre 
have the laboratory of the Kennedy Center, the Folger and other classical, mainstream 
and experimental theatres including the Arena Stage, National Theatre and Fords 
Theatre. Our faculty and graduate students perform in many theatres throughout the 
Washington area in addition to our own Tawes and Pugliese Theaters. Those interested 
in organizational communication and public relations will find many commercial and 
nonprofit organizations have corporate headquarters in Washington, which provide 
opportunities for contact and research with communication professionals. Students of 
journalism and the media arts find Washington a hub for both national and world 
media. 

Among the special support facilities for research on the College Park campus are 
computer software support in content analysis and experimental statistics, the collection 
of the Media Resources Center, the Maryland-in-Europe, Europe- in-Maryland pro- 
gram, a state-of-the-art television post-production facility and three fine theaters. 

Financial Assistance 

Students may apply for graduate assistantships in the various disciplines. Outstanding 
students may be nominated for appropriate fellowships. Other university financial aid 
is also available. 



1 92 Radio-Television-Film Program (RTVF) 



Additional Information 

The PCOM program is a cross-disciplinary program among four cooperating units. 
Please correspond with the unit in which you will do your primary work: 

James F. Klumpp Mark Levy 

Director of Public Communication Program Director of Graduate Studies 

Director of Graduate Studies College of Journalism 

Dept. of Speech Communication University of Maryland 

1147 Tawes 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 314-9573 



College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-2380 



Gene Weiss 

Director of Graduate Studies 
Dept. of Radio-Television-Film 
0202 Tawes 

University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-6261 
For courses, see code PCOM. 



Harry Elam 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Dept. of Theatre 

1146 Tawes 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-6676 



Radio-Television-Film Program (RTVF) 

Professor and Chair: Kolker 

Professors: Aylward, Gomery 

Associate Professors: Blum, Ferguson, Kirkley, Weiss 

Assistant Professors: Brown, Parks, Pecora, Marchetti, Robinson 

Lecturer: Lancaster 

Instructors: Miller 

A student in the Department of Radio-Television-Film may concentrate in a partic- 
ular area (film or broadcasting, for example) or elect a more general program covering 
the multiple aspects of electronic and film communication. Students whose academic 
goals extend beyond the Department of Radio-Television-Film may, upon approval of 
their adviser, take as many as 12 credit hours in cognate fields in other departments 
of the University. Examples of such programs would include educational uses of media, 
broadcast management and electronic journalism. 

Admission and Degree Information 

For admission to the graduate program, the applicant must meet all requirements 
of the Graduate School and, normally, provide acceptable Graduate Record Exami- 
nation scores. If applicants do not have the equivalent of an undergraduate major in 
their feild of interest, opportunities exist for them to take coursework in preparation 
for subsequent admission. 

The Department offers the Master of Arts degree with thesis and non-thesis options. 
Along with the minimum requirements established by the Graduate School, RTVF has 
special requirements. For more admission and degree information on the Ph.D. pro- 
gram, see the Public Communication Program section of this catalog. 



Recreation Program (RECR) 193 



Facilities and Special Resources 

The University of Maryland is within a few miles of the Library of Congress, the 
National Archives, the Federal Communications Commission, the Broadcast Pioneers 
Library and more than 50 specialized libraries and institutions. Graduate students also 
have access to studio quality audio, video and film production facilities, and 16mm, 
35mm and video projection. 
Financial Assistance 

The Department awards the Eaton Graduate Fellowship in Broadcasting to one high- 
ranking gradute student and offers both teaching and research assistantships as well. 
The Department also nominates outstanding students for University fellowships. 

Additional Information 

For more specific information, please contact: 
Chair 

Department of Radio-Television-Film 
0202 Tawes Fine Arts Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-6261 
For courses, see code RTVF. 

Recreation Program (RECR) 

Professor and Acting Chair: Iso-Ahola 

Professor: Humphrey 

Associate Professors: Churchill, Kuss, Strobell, Verhoven 

Lecturers: Annand 

The Department of Recreation offers the Master of Arts degree with a thesis or non- 
thesis option, and the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Individual academic needs can be 
met in various areas such as: administration, therapeutic recreation, program planning, 
natural interpretation, resource planning and management, tourism and commercial 
recreation, and analysis of leisure behavior. The advanced studies program is designed 
to assist professional practitioners in the leisure services field and to prepare those who 
wish to enter the teaching and research profession, government, institutional and com- 
munity services. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Department strongly encourages both master's and doctoral students to have 
had full-time work experience in leisure services prior to applying for admission. All 
Ph.D. applicants are required to complete an interview with at least one faculty member. 
Doctoral students must complete core coursework in recreation/leisure studies and the 
chosen theoretical area as well as research methods, statistics and computer science. 
Master's students must produce a thesis or project, and doctoral students must complete 
a dissertation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Recreation students have access to the University's McKeldin Library, the College's 
Research Laboratory and statistical resources, the Computer Science Center, the almost 



194 Reliability Engineering Program (ENRE) 



unlimited facilities and programs of the metropolitan areas of Baltimore and Wash- 
ington, D.C. and the headquarters and offices of appropriate national organizations, 
agencies and federal governmental units in the nation's Capital. 

The Department sponsors a Leisure Research Unit that develops, supports and 
coordinates a broad-based research effort by faculty and students that addresses phe- 
nomena dealing with leisure behavior of individuals and groups. A Department Field 
Service Unit has been established to develop and coordinate the professional service 
activities of the Department in response to needs identified in cooperation with the 
leisure services agencies/institutions of the metropolitan area, state and region. The 
Department also works cooperatively with the Center on Aging in promoting research, 
course offerings and training programs. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of teaching and research assistantships are available to qualified 
graduate students. 

Additional Information 

For additional information about specific requirements, please contact: 
Dr. Seppo Iso-Ahola, Graduate Coordinator 
Department of Recreation 
The University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 
301) 405-2461 
For courses, see code RECR. 

Reliability Engineering Program (ENRE) 

Professor and Director: Roush 

Associate Professor: Modarres 

Assistant Professor: Mosleh 

Adjunct Faculty: Jones, Raheja, Weiss 

Affiliated Faculty: (ENAE) Professor: Chopra; Associate Professor: Barlow; (ENCE) 

Associate Professor: Ayyub; (ENCH) Professor: Asbjornsen; (ENEE) Professors: 

Frey, Ja'Ja'; Assistant Professors: Fuja, Goldsman; (ENFP) 

Professor: Bryan; (ENME) Professor: Dally, Harhalakis, Magrab; Associate 

Professor: Pecht; (ENNU) Professor: Silverman; Associate Professor: Pertmer; 

(BMGT) Professors: Ball, Kotz; (STAT) Professor: Smith 

The interdisciplinary Reliability Engineering Program, administratively part of the 
Nuclear Engineering Program, offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. An individual plan of graduate study compatible 
with the student's interest and background is established by the student in consultation 
with an adviser and the Program Director. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Students with a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering, physics or mathematics 
and who achieved a GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale are eligible to apply for admission 
to the program, which is competitive. 



Russian Language and Literature Program (RUSS) and (SLAV) 195 

In addition to the general Graduate School rules, certain special degree requirements 
are set forth in program publications. 

Financial Assistance 

Teaching and research assistantships as well as fellowships and scholarships are avail- 
able for qualified students. For those reliability engineering students who seek em- 
ployment in the area, the Program Director will provide assistance. 

Additional Information 

Requests for further information concerning the program can be obtained by writing: 
Director, ReUability Engineering Program 
Materials and Nuclear Engineering Unit 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742-2115 
For courses, see code ENRE. 

Russian Language and Literature Program (RUSS) and (SLAV) 

Professor and Chair: Pfister 

Professor: Brecht 

Associate Professors: Berry, Glad, Hitchcock 

Assistant Professors: Lekic, Martin 

The Russian Section of the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and 
Literatures offers graduate study leading the Master of Arts degree. Specialization 
includes the following areas: Language, Linguistics and Literature. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, candidates should have a bachelor's 
degree with a major in Russian Language and Literature, Russisan Language and 
Linguistics or the fluency in the written and spoken language. 

The M.A. degree program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option. For the thesis 
option, the student must complete 24 hours of coursework, the thesis and a written 
comprehensive examination. The non-thesis option requires 30 hours of coursework, 
a mini-thesis with oral defense and a written comprehensive examination. For both 
options the comprehensives consist of four two-hour examinations based on the course- 
work and the M.A. Reading List. 

In addition to its course offerings listed below, the Russian Section of the Department 
of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures sponsors the Russian Club and the 
University of Maryland Chapter of Dobro Slovo (the National Russian Language Hon- 
ors Society). Distinguished scholars and lecturers, as well as visiting professors, visit 
the metropolitan area and campus regularly. College Park's proximity to Washington 
D.C. facilitates participation in the many cultural functions of the capital as well as 
access to research facilities such as The Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies, 
the Library of Congress, etc. 

Financial Assistance 

The Russian Section offers graduate teaching and non-teaching assistantships as well 
as several fellowships. 



1 96 Sociology Program (SOCY) 



Additional Information 

For further information, write to: 

Director of Graduate Studies, Russian Section 
Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
For courses, see codes RUSS and SLAV. 

Sociology Program (SOCY) 

Professor and Chair: Falk 

Professors: R. Brown, Clignet, Dager, Hage, Janes (Emeritus), Kammeyer, Lejins 

(Emeritus), Meeker, H. Presser, Ritzer, Robinson, Rosenberg, D. Segal, Teachman 

Associate Professors: Finterbusch, Henkel, Hirzel, J. Hunt, L. Hunt, Landry, 

Lengermann, Mclntyre, Pease, M. Segal, Vanneman 

Assistant Professors: Harper, Kahn, Neustadtl 

Affiliate Professors: Billingsley, Favero, Fink, Gonzalez, Gurevitch, Levy, Loftin, 

Longest, Wilson 

The Graduate Program in Sociology offers coursework leading to the Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Areas of emphasis in the department include: 
Demography (with a particular stress placed on gender and equality); Family, Gender 
and Work; Military Sociology; Political Economy; Social Psychology; Theoretical So- 
ciology. 

Within the last three years, about half the students finishing Ph.D. degrees in the 
Sociology Department have found employment as college-level teachers, and about 
half are working in research, administration and consulting in federal, state or private 
organizations. Our location on the edge of the Washington D.C. area offers an unusual 
number of full-time research opportunities for our graduate students. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission to the graduate program is based upon the student's academic record, 
GRE scores, letters of recommendation and other information relevant to the appli- 
cant's chances of successfully completing the program. Although a previous major in 
sociology is not required, students entering the master's degree program should have 
had the following in undergraduate courses: mathematics through college algebra, 
elementary statistics, sociological theory and sociological research methods. Students 
entering the Ph.D. program should have had at least one graduate level course each 
in sociological theory, sociological research methods and statistics. Students deficient 
in any of these areas may be admitted to the program provisionally, but they must 
satisfy the requirements during their first year in the program. 

Both M.A. and Ph.D. students are required to have an adviser. The Director of 
Graduate Studies acts as Adviser ex-officio during the first semester after which students 
choose one among the faculty (they can change advisers over the course of their studies). 

A minimum of 30 hours is required for the master's degree to include 1) two courses 
in statistics; 2) one in methodology; 3) one in theory; 4) a one-hour course to learn 
how to use the University of Maryland computer facilities and 5) six credits of thesis 



Spanish Language and Literature Program (SPAP) 1 97 



research (799). A thesis is required. Usually, this phase of the program can be completed 
in two years. 

Ph.D. candidates must have met all the master's degree requirements. In addition, 
they must complete 30 credit hours beyond the M.A. courses. Specific Ph.D. require- 
ments include: 1) A set of three courses in each of two specialties (independent reading 
courses do not count and the same course cannot be counted twice); 2) one additional 
course in Theory; 3) one additional course in Methodology; 4) one course (SOCY 701) 
integrating methods and theory; 5) a one- credit course to get acquainted with the 
computer (if not taken at the master's level); 6) 12 credit hours of dissertation research. 

After completion of the coursework, doctorate students must pass two examinations 
qualifying them to write their dissertations in the specialties of their choice. Upon the 
recommendation of the appropriate faculty member, the Department Graduate Com- 
mittee approves the coursework qualifying students to present the two examinations. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Sociology Department's facilities include data processing and computer capa- 
bilities, the Center on Population, Gender and Inequality, the Survey Research Center, 
the Center on Innovations and a Department library. The campus has excellent com- 
puter facilities and computer time is readily available to faculty and graduate students. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance for graduate students is available through teaching and research 
assistantships, and for advanced students through part-time instructorships. All carry 
remission of tuition and fees. 

Additional Information 

For information and application forms, write or call: 
Director of Graduate Studies 
Sociology Department 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742-1315 
(301) 405-6390 
For courses, see code SOCY. 

Spanish Language and Literature Program (SPAP) 

Professor and Chair: Sosnowski 

Professors: Nemes, Pacheco, Sarlo 

Associate Professors: Aguilar-Mora (Director of Graduate Studies), Igel 

Affiliate Associate Professor: Cortes 

Assistant Professors: Benito- Vessels, Lavine, Naharro-Calderon, Rabasa, Sanjines, 

Zappala 

The Department of Spanish and Portuguese offers graduate programs leading to the 
degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in Spanish. The Department's 
offerings are designed to provide the required advanced training in language, literature, 
and linguistics for achieving professional excellence in high school and college teaching 
and for undertaking creative research in related fields of inquiry. 



1 98 Spanish Language and Literature Program (SPAP) 



Employment statistics show that opportunities for the Department's M.A. and Ph.D. 
graduates have been excellent during the last 10 years. All our M.A. graduates have 
found employment commensurate with their academic training. Most graduates have 
entered teaching careers while several work in government agencies and international 
organizations. During the same period, all of our Ph.D. graduates who wished to 
undertake a career in teaching and research have obtained satisfactory appointments 
at colleges and universities. The important role played in this country by Hispanics 
and the recognition of their cultural imprint bode well for future expansion in all areas 
related to this particular field. 

The Department participates actively in the program of the Center of Renaissance 
and Baroque Studies of the College of Arts and Humanities, and regularly offers courses 
of an interdisciplinary nature with the cooperation of faculty members of other de- 
partments. 

New academic program: "DISCOVERING THE AMERICAS." 

Since the fall of 1987, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Latin 
American Studies Center have been presenting a special six-year academic program 
titled "Discovering The Americas", which focuses on the cultural encounter of the 
worlds that shaped our modern history. 

The project has been divided into three two-year cycles that encompass the following 
areas: 1) Precolumbian cultures, 2) Africa in the Americas, and 3) Spain in the Amer- 
icas. Every year the Department holds symposia and offers lectures and graduate 
courses given by specialists in each area. Lectures are published in the "1992 Working 
Papers Series." 

The Department has also received a four-year award from the Rockefeller Foun- 
dation for Postdoctoral Fellowships in the Humanities. Fellows working on a variety 
of research projects on "The Languages and Cultures of Latin America" are distin- 
guished scholars from major Latin American, European and North American insti- 
tutions These scholars remain a semester or a year in residence and are available for 
consultation by faculty and graduate students. 1990-91 Fellows are Professors Oscar 
Teran (University of Buenos Aires), Luis H. Antezana (Universidad Mayor de San 
Simon, Bolivia) and Rafael Gutierrez Girardot (University of Bonn). 

For detailed information, please write to the Department Chair. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Department offers both a non-thesis option and the thesis option for the master's 
degree. A total of 30 credit hours are required for the non-thesis option with three 
credits in linguistics; three credits in literary theory and/or criticism; 15 credits in either 
Spanish or Spanish- American literature, one of which is to be considered the candidate's 
"major" literature; and nine credits in the other or "non-major" literature. Students 
must also submit a written scholarly paper in the final semester of their program which 
will be read and evaluated by at least two appropriate faculty members. 

The requirements for the thesis option are the same as for the non-thesis option with 
one exception; the course requirement in the "major" literature is reduced from 15 to 
nine credits with six hours of thesis research credit required. All M.A. candidates take 
comprehensive examinations. 



Special Education Program (EDSP) 1 99 



The doctoral degree is a research and specialized degree and it does not require a 
fixed number of credit hours. Before admission to candidacy, the student must dem- 
onstrate: 1) a thorough knowledge of the literary production in the chosen area (Spanish 
or Spanish- American Literature); 2) an in-depth knowledge of the field of specializa- 
tion; 3) proficiency in a minimum of two fields of the other Hispanic literature; 4) a 
reading knowledge of a language other than Spanish and English, to be used as a 
research tool in the field of specialization; 5) one course in linguistics, such as "History 
of the Spanish Language"; 6) a minimum of one course in literary theory and/or 
criticism; 7) acquaintance with a third literature (e.g. Luso-Brazilian, French, English, 
etc.); and 8) a background in supporting fields to be used as research tools (e.g. history, 
philosophy, political science, sociology, art, etc). Students must pass both a preliminary 
and a comprehensive examination for the Ph.D. in addition to presenting a dissertation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department maintains a special research and reference Ubrary for graduate 
students of Spanish in honor of one of its former instructors, the late Pedro F. Entenza. 
Dr. Sosnowski is the editor of the journal Hispamerica. 

Additional Information 

Financial assistance is available. For additional information please contact: 
Department Chair 

Department of Spanish and Portuguese 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-6446 
For courses, see code SPAP. 

Special Education Program (EDSP) 

Professor and Chair: Burke 

Professors: Hebeler, Simms 

Associate Professors: Beckman, Egel, Graham, Harris, Kohl, Leone 

Assistant Professors: Cooper, Harry-Belcher, Leiber, Neubert, Speece 

Instructor: Crowley 

Research Associates: Anderson-Jackson, Florian, Mac Arthur, Malouf, McLaughlin, 

Pilato, Rembacki 

Graduate studies in the Department of Special Education include programs leading 
to Master of Arts and Master of Education degrees, Advanced Graduate Specialist 
certificates, and Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Areas of 
concentration may include: Learning Disabilities; Behavior Disorders; Severely Hand- 
icapped (including Autism); Early Childhood (including Infancy); Gifted and Talented; 
Educationally Handicapped; and Secondary and Transition Special Education. Con- 
centrations in Special Education Administration and Supervision and Policy Studies 
are also available at the doctoral level. 

Historically, employment opportunities for special education graduates have been 
excellent. Students who graduate with a master's degree in special education may find 
many leadership positions in the public schools such as master teachers. Opportunities 
also exist in private settings in positions such as coordinators, administrators or other 



200 Special Education Program (EDSP) 



specialized support staff. Doctoral degree graduates may find university faculty positions 
or professional staff positions in state departments of education, the federal government 
and in the public schools. Private agencies and organizations may also seek doctoral 
graduates as directors or specialized support staff. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The master's program requires a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average and the 
submission of the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record Examination test 
scores. Admission to an A.G.S. or doctoral program requires a 3.5 grade point average 
in previous graduate studies and either a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average or at 
least a 40 percentile on the Miller Analogies Test or Graduate Record Examination. 

Graduate programs are planned individually by the student and adviser to reflect the 
individual student's background, goals and the level of competency he or she seeks. 
Individual programming by students and advisers allows wide latitude of career direction 
within the field of special education upon completion of graduate study. 

Graduate study in special education requires advanced competencies in the education 
of exceptional children. Students who enter the program with special education cer- 
tification are required to take a minimum of 36 credit hours. Students who enter without 
academic preparation in education are required to take a minimum of 60 credit hours; 
students who enter with early childhood, elementary or secondary education certifi- 
cation are required to take a minimum of 45 credit hours. Upon completion of the 
degree, students in each of these categories may qualify for Maryland State Certification 
in Special Education. 

Students who pursue a master's degree in special education may earn the Master of 
Arts degree or the Master of Education degree. Specific basic course requirements in 
special education are the same for either program with differentiation of thesis re- 
quirements. The student generally takes a minimum of 15 hours in special education 
and determines with his or her adviser the specific programs and number of credit 
hours required according to the student's background and career plans. 

The Advanced Graduate Specialist certificate in special education is available to 
students who wish to take graduate courses beyond the master's level. The minimum 
number of graduate hours for the A.G.S. is 60. The core of the program should be 
made up of special education courses and other work within the College of Education 
or other colleges of the University as approved by the student's adviser and the special 
education graduate faculty. 

The Ph.D. in special education is targeted primarily toward research, scholarship 
and educational leadership. The selection of areas of emphasis or the major concen- 
trations listed above achieve these goals. Graduate work at the doctoral level can also 
be done in educational administration and supervision, and policy development and 
implementation for the handicapped with a specialized national focus. The Ed.D. is 
focused on these same areas but has an emphasis on applied research and programming. 
A variety of minor specializations taken outside the Department is also possible. Con- 
tent coursework in the areas of administration and policy studies is developed in col- 
laboration with other departments in the College and University. 

Students pursuing the doctoral program in special education must have completed 
the Master of Arts degree or the Master of Education degree and may elect to work 



Speech Communication Program (SPCM) 201 



for either the Ed. D. or Ph.D. degree. A student in the doctoral program will generally 
complete a minimum of 90 hours of graduate study of which 30 to 40 hours will be in 
the major field. Candidates must develop doctoral-level competencies in research and 
in any of the areas of specialization listed above that fulfill their professional goals. 
Students should consult the Department Statement on Graduate Programs for more 
information. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The special education program's strengths include integrated field experiences, spe- 
cial education research facilities and faculty members whose diverse backgrounds enable 
the Department to maintain an integrated approach. 
Additional Information 

Prospective graduate students are requested to consult "Graduate Programs in Spe- 
cial Education," for additional specific information on Departmental programs, ad- 
missions procedures and financial aid. To obtain this brochure, please contact: 

Chair 

Special Education Program 

1308 Benjamin Building 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-6515 
For courses, see code EDSP. 

Speech Communication Program (SPCM) 

Professor and Chair: Wolvin 

Professors: Fink, Solomon, Wolvin 

Associate Professors: Falcione, Freimuth, Gaines, Klumpp, McCaleb 

Assistant Professor: Edgar 

The Department of Speech Communication offers graduate study leading to the 
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees (The Ph.D. program is administered 
through the interdisciplinary program of Public Communication; see additional infor- 
mation under that program). Areas of study include health communication, organi- 
zational communication, political communication, interpersonal communication, cognition 
and persuasion, and rhetoric and public address. In addition, students will find course- 
work in instructional communication, intercultural communication and communication 
research methodology, which may be associated with the major areas. 

Students with both research and pre-professional objectives enter the master's pro- 
gram and about one-half of them pursue doctoral study or an academic career. Others 
find employment after graduation in public health communication, personnel training 
and development, corporate communication, government policy research and speech- 
writing and other areas that require a highly developed knowledge of human com- 
munication. In the doctoral program, which is a research degree, over half the students 
pursue academic careers. Others work in public policy research, public health com- 
munication research and other professions requiring highly developed research skills. 
Admission and Degree Information 

Admission to the master's program is based on the student's prior academic record, 
GRE scores, letters of recommendation, statement of interest in graduate work and 



202 Speech Communication Program (SPCM) 



Other information relevant to tiie applicant's chances of successfully completing the 
program. Although most students will have an undergraduate degree in communication, 
others with an interest in studying communication are routinely admitted with additional 
courses assigned to remedy deficiencies. 

A minimum of 30 hours is required for the master's degree. All students study both 
humanistic and social scientific research methods. Students who select the thesis option 
complete an original research project that contributes significantly to our knowledge 
of human communication. Those who select the non- thesis option complete a com- 
prehensive examination and revise a research paper in their area of interest for public 
presentation or publication. For information on admissions and degree requirements 
for the Ph.D., see Public Communication. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The research and laboratory facilities for studying communication in the Washington 
metropolitan area are unmatched by other research departments in the discipHne. 
Students in health communication have opportunities to work with departmental re- 
search teams and participate in internship programs at the National Institutes of Health, 
the American Red Cross and other public health organizations. Students in organi- 
zational communication work with a broad range of voluntary, governmental, business 
and professional organizations that make the nation's capital their home. Students in 
political communication are immersed in the formal and informal institutions of Amer- 
ican government. Students in rhetoric and public address draw upon the holdings of 
the Library of Congress, the National Archives and many public and private archival 
collections such as the Smithsonian Institution or the George Meany Center for Labor 
Studies. 

Departmental research activity revolves around the communication research center 
with its library, computer and word processing resources. The campus also provides 
extensive mainframe and software computer resources and excellent library collections 
in communication. In addition the department provides the editing of journals, in- 
cluding two national journals, and the planning of important conferences and symposia. 
Students often work in conjunction with faculty members on these projects. 

Financial Assistance 

The department nominates outstanding applicants for competitive Graduate School 
fellowships. Most departmental financial aid is in the form of teaching assistantships, 
but research assistantships may be available in conjunction with research grants awarded 
to faculty members. Those applying for aid should complete their applications as early 
in the year as possible. 

Additional Information 

For additional information on graduate study in Speech Communication, contact: 
Director of Graduate Studies 
Department of Speech Communication 
1147 Tawes 

University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742-1221 
(301) 314-9573 
For courses, see code SPCH. 



Textiles and Consumer Economics Program (TXCE) 203 



Systems Engineering Program (ENSE) 

The Systems Research Center offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science 
degree in Systems Engineering. Specialization is possible in automation systems, com- 
puter systems, information systems, manufacturing systems, operations research and 
process systems. 

Admission and Degree Requirements 

Admission requirements include the GRE test and three letters of recommendation. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial aid is available to graduate students in the form of research assistantships, 
teaching assistantships and fellowships. Work-study opportunities are also available. 

Additional Information 

Because Systems Engineering is a new program this year, not all information on 
faculty, courses, admission requirements, special resources and financial aid was avail- 
able at the time of this catalog's printing. For more specific information, interested 
students should contact: 

Program Director 

Systems Engineering 

Room 2101 A.V. Williams Building 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-6613 
For courses, contact the Systems Engineering graduate program office. 

Textiles and Consumer Economics Program (TXCE) 

Professor and Chair: Smith 

Professors: Dardis, Spivak, Yeh 

Associate Professors: Block, Brannigan, Ettenson, Paoletti, Pourdeyhimi, Wagner 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Hacklander, Mokhtari, Soberon-Ferrer, Verma, 

Whittington 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Basiotis 

Lecturer: Morris 

The Department of Textiles and Consumer Economics offers programs of study 
leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with specialization 
fields in textiles and/or consumer economics. In the field of textiles, students may 
concentrate in textile science, textile economics and marketing, textile evaluation or 
historic textile/costume/conservation. In the field of consumer economics, students may 
concentrate in consumer economics, consumer policy, consumer behavior or con- 
sumption analysis. 

Students with M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in Textiles and Consumer Economics have 
strong employment opportunities with government, industry and educational institu- 
tions. 



204 Textiles and Consumer Economics Program (TXCE) 



Admission and Degree Information 

There are no rigid course requirements for admission to the graduate program in 
Textiles and Consumer Economics. A major in home economics, consumer economics, 
textiles and clothing, textiles or a relevant discipline such as chemistry, economics or 
psychology is acceptable as background for study in this field. Preparation in the basic 
physical and social sciences (chemistry, mathematics, economics, psychology and so- 
ciology) is highly recommended. Necessary course prerequisites (without graduate credit) 
can be completed after admission to the graduate program. All applicants are required 
to submit scores of the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test. 

The master's degree program offers both a thesis and non-thesis option. For the 
thesis option, students must complete a minimum of 24 hours of coursework, write a 
thesis and pass a final oral examination on the thesis. For the non-thesis option, students 
must complete a minimum of 30 hours of coursework, submit one scholarly paper and 
pass a written comprehensive final examination. Students who choose either option 
must present one Departmental seminar. 

Students with bachelor's degrees may apply for the doctoral program, although they 
are encouraged to complete requirements for the M.S. degree first. Applicants holding 
a master's degree in an equivalent field from an accredited institution may be admitted 
for doctoral study. Previous graduate work will be evaluated on an individual basis, 
but a minimum of 18 hours of coursework beyond the master's level is required for 
the Ph.D. degree in addition to 12 hours of dissertation research. Qualifying exami- 
nations are administered upon completion of basic course requirements in either textiles 
or consumer economics. Written and oral comprehensive examinations are given upon 
completion of all coursework. A final oral examination is held for the student to defend 
the dissertation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The graduate program is multidisciplinary in nature with graduate faculty from chem- 
istry, engineering, economics, behavioral sciences and the arts. Departmental research 
facilities include the historic textiles and costume collection and a number of fully 
equipped specialized research laboratories such as comfort research facilities, a textile 
conservation laboratory, several textile chemistry laboratories, a dark room for pho- 
tomicroscopy, several temperature and humidity-controlled textile evaluation labora- 
tories, a fiammability testing and evaluation laboratory, a color and environmental 
evaluation laboratory, an image analysis laboratory and a reference resource room. In 
addition, the Department has a computer-aided design and a microcomputer laboratory 
interfaced with the University's central computing facility. 

The members of our graduate faculty are active in a variety of fields, from textiles 
science to law. These faculty members, together with our graduate students and adjunct 
faculty, form a lively and intellectually stimulating community. Access to federal agen- 
cies where decisions affecting consumers are made provide graduate students with a 
unique opportunity to conduct consumer-related research. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate teaching and/or research assistantships are offered to qualified applicants 
on the basis of past academic performance and experience. Work study/tuition waivers 
are awarded by the Financial Aid Office on the basis of need. Graduate fellowships 



Theatre Program (THET) 205 



awarded on the basis of merit are available from the Graduate School. More than half 
of the full-time students in the Department hold assistantships or some form of financial 
aid. Part-time and summer work is often available for students who do not receive 
financial aid. 

Additional Information 

Additional information on Departmental programs, admissions, procedures and fi- 
nancial aid may be obtained by contacting: 

Chair 

Department of Textiles and Consumer Economics 

Room 2100, Marie Mount Hall 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-6657 
For courses see code TXCE. 

Theatre Program (THET) 

Professor and Chair: Meersman 

Professor: Gillespie 

Associate Professor: Elam, O'Leary 

Assistant Professors: Huang, Kriebs, Patterson, Patrick, Stowe, Ufema 

Lecturer: Donnelly 

The Department of Theatre offers graduate study leading to the degrees of Master 
of Arts, Master of Fine Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. Areas of emphasis in the 
master's program include directing, lighting design, costume design, stage design, tech- 
nical theatre, theatre management, history and criticism. The master's program is 
designed to provide students with the opportunities to enhance and develop their 
practical, historical and critical knowledge of theatre in order to go on to further 
graduate work in Ph.D. or MFA programs. 

The three-year MFA degree is designed to offer superior students advanced training 
and opportunities for creative activity. The program prepares the student for entrance 
into the professional theatre or for teaching in the creative area at college or university 
level. The areas of concentration are costume design, lighting design and theatre man- 
agement. 

The Ph.D. is a research-oriented degree. Areas of doctoral study include theatre 
history, theatre aesthetics, theatrical theory and theatre criticism. In conjunction with 
the language and literature departments of the College of Arts and Humanities, ex- 
tensive study in dramatic literature is also available. Students may also combine areas 
where desired. The majority of students pursue academic careers as teachers and 
researchers while others pursue careers in the various professional areas of theatre. 
(For Ph.D. admission and degree information, see the Public Communication Program 
information). 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, students must provide acceptable 
Graduate Record Examination scores, three letters of recommendation, prior academic 
transcripts and a statement of interest for admission to any program. MFA applicants 



206 Toxicology Program 



must also provide a portfolio. If applicants do not have the equivalent of an under- 
graduate major in their field of interest, opportunities exist for them to take coursework 
in preparation for subsequent admission. 

A minimum of 33 credit hours is required for the M.A. degree. The Department 
offers both the thesis and non-thesis options. All students undertaking the M.A. degree 
must pass a six-hour comprehensive exam on theatre history and criticism, performance 
and directing, and design and technical theatre. The MFA degree requires 60 credit 
hours and the completion of comprehensive exams and a thesis. (For Ph.D. admission 
and degree information, see the Public Communication Program information.) 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The campus is within a few miles of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing 
Arts, Arena Stage, the National Theatre, Ford's Theatre and Shakespeare Theatre at 
the Folger. In addition, a number of Equity and non- Equity theatres, dinner theatres 
and experimental theatres abound in the area. 

Two of the greatest libraries in the world, the Library of Congress and the Folger 
Shakespeare Library are in close proximity to campus. Students also regularly make 
use of the Smithsonian Institution, the Federal Theatre Project Archives and more 
than 50 specialized libraries and institutions in the Washington metropolitan area. 

The Department has use of the 1300-seat semi-thrust Tawes Fine Arts Theatre, the 
intimate 100-seat thrust stage, Pugliese Theatre and the 45-seat black-box Experimental 
Theatre. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department nominates outstanding applicants for competitive University fel- 
lowships. Most departmental aid is in the form of teaching assistantships. Those applying 
for aid should complete their applications as early in the year as possible. 

Additional Information 

For additional information on graduate study in Theatre at the University of Mary- 
land, contact: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Theatre 

1146 Tawes 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-6676 
For courses, see code THET. 

Toxicology Program 

The program in Toxicology is University-wide, using faculty and resources at College 
Park, Baltimore City and County, Eastern Shore campuses as well as the Chesapeake 
Biological Laboratory of the Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies. The 
Program's objectives are to provide educational and professional training opportunities 
in fundamental and applied fields of toxicology leading to Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy degrees. Graduates from this Program will be highly qualified to conduct 
research, teach and provide services to federal, state and local governments, industry, 
labor and the public. 



Institute for Urban Studies (URBS) 207 



Laboratory and lecture courses are offered in both basic and applied aspects of 
toxicology (occupational, environmental, clinical, analytical and regulatory) as well as 
in biochemistry, chemistry, epidemiology, pharmacology, pathology and biostatistics. 
Every effort is made to individualize the student's program and to encourage students 
to take advantage of appropriate graduate courses at all University of Maryland cam- 
puses. 

Specialization at the doctoral level will be available in various areas such as aquatic 
and marine toxicology, neurotoxicology, occupational toxicology, environmental tox- 
icology, regulatory toxicology, drug toxicology and others depending on the interest 
of the student. 

For further information, please contact: 
Dr. Judd Nelson 
Room 0300, Symons Hall 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-7134 
For courses, see code TXCE. 

Institute for Urban Studies (URBS) 

Acting Director: Brower 

Professors: Levin, Stone 

Associate Professors: Baum, Christian, Howland, Hula 

Assistant Professors: Chang, Mintz 

Affiliate and Adjunct Faculty: Chen, Dupuy, Fogle, Francescato, Giloth, Laidlaw, 

Reich, Werlin 

In July 1989, the Community Planning Program of the University of Maryland at 
Baltimore merged with the Institute for Urban Studies of the University of Maryland 
at College Park. The result is a new "Department of Urban Studies & Planning." 
Revisions to the graduate curricula for the Master of Arts degree in Urban Studies and 
the Master of Community Planning (MCP) will go into effect in Fall 1990. As these 
involve curriculum changes, applicants who are interested in either program should 
contact the Institute for more information. The M.A. degree is interdisciplinary and 
will serve students with a broad intellectual interest in how social sciences treat questions 
of urbanization and urban policy. The MCP program prepares practitioners to enter a 
career in for-profit, non- profit and government metropolitan organizations that relate 
to urban planning. The Institute's faculty specialize in: metropolitan and regional plan- 
ning, public policy analysis and management, quantitative planning methods, urban 
design and economic development planning. 

M.A. (Urban Studies) and M.C.P. graduate students (about half are part-time) have 
diverse personal and academic backgrounds (e.g., architecture, fine arts, English, his- 
tory, business, geography, sociology, economics and political science). This diverse 
student body provides a rich learning environment in which many types of experiences 
and ideas are exchanged. 

Along with core courses, students must develop concentrations through coursework 
in other University departments that offer instruction related to the study of urbani- 



208 Institute for Urban Studies (URBS) 



zation. Some of the departments that provide such opportunities include: Afro- Amer- 
ican Studies, Architecture, Business and Management, Civil Engineering, Computer 
Science, Criminal Justice and Criminology, Economics, Education, Family and Com- 
munity Development, Geography, Government and Politics, Health, Housing and 
Design, Journalism, Recreation, Sociology and Speech Communication. The student's 
concentration is developed in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies. 

Employment opportunities remain strong for Institute graduates in a highly com- 
petitive field. The Baltimore-Washington metropolitan region offers diverse employ- 
ment potential in urban analysis, program management, planning and computer 
applications. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Institute admits both experienced practitioners and recent graduates with a strong 
academic background. Recent graduates with an undergraduate grade point average 
lower than 3.25 must submit a Graduate Record Examination aptitude test score. All 
applicants should provide three letters of recommendation and a resume indicating 
their education and employment history. Experienced applicants may be admitted 
provisionally (subject to successful completion of initial coursework) if their under- 
graduate grade point average is below regular University requirements and if their 
employment experience indicates a high probability of success in the program. To 
accommodate part-time students, all required courses are offered in the late afternoon 
and evening. 

Students must complete 37 credit hours for the M.A. degree. In consultation with 
an urban studies adviser, students must design a coherent concentration from courses 
in urban studies and related departments. Concentrations might include: metropolitan 
planning, urban management, urban design, community development, urban geog- 
raphy, public management, international development, computer applications, urban 
history and many other designs of a cross-disciplinary nature. An urban internship is 
optional, but each student must take a set of written comprehensive examinations. 
Both a thesis and a non-thesis option are available and require successful completion 
of a written comprehensive examination covering the synthesis of core course knowl- 
edge. Students are eligible to take the comprehensive examination after completing 24 
credit hours, including core courses. No more than 13 credit hours at the 400-level may 
be applied towards the URBS M.A. degree. These requirements will alter substantially 
under the proposed curriculum changes. A degree in urban studies is not awarded 
solely on the basis of the accumulation of the minimum number of credit hours. Re- 
medial work may be required before the degree will be awarded to a degree candidate 
who, in the judgement of the faculty, needs to demonstrate additional academic per- 
formance. 

The Master of Community Planning degree is accredited by the American Institute 
of Certified Planners, the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning and the Amer- 
ican Planning Association. The program prepares practitioners who will be generalists 
with a specialization. Students receive a firm grounding in the concepts, process and 
practice of planning. They learn group process so they can work effectively with com- 
munity groups. They are taught to understand the relationship among physical, social, 
political and economic aspects of planning and development, and the connection be- 



Zoology Department (ZOOL) 209 

tween planning and implementation. Graduation requires satisfactory completion of 
58 credits. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to its regular faculty, the Institute draws on a number of outstanding 
adjunct faculty from the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area to teach courses. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of graduate assistantships and fellowships is available and the 
Institute assists students in finding work-study positions, internships and part-time jobs 
in government agencies. USED Public Service Fellowships for under-represented groups 
have been available in a joint program with the School of Public Affairs. 

Additional Information 

Further information and the graduate bulletin of the Institute for Urban Studies may 
be obtained from: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Institute for Urban Studies 

1113 Lefrak Hall 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-6790 
For courses, see code URBS. 

Zoology Department (ZOOL) 

Professor and Chair: Popper 

Professors: Allan, Carter, Clark, Colombini, Gill, Highton, Levitan, Pierce 

Associate Professors: Ades, Barnett, Bonar, Borgia, Goode, Higgins, Imberski, 

Inouye, Linder, Reaka, Small 

Assistant Professors: Chao, Dietz, Olek, Palmer, Payne, Shapiro, Stephan, Wilkinson 

Adjunct Professors: Kleiman, Manning, Morton, O'Brien, M. Potter, S. Smith-Gill 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Hines, Kelly, Piatt, Wemmer 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Braun 

NOTE: Some courses in this program may require the use of animals. Please see the 
Statement on Animal Care and Use in the appendix and the policy statement for 
students under "Degree Requirements." 

The Department of Zoology offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science 
(thesis and non-thesis) and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with specialization in the 
following fields: behavior, cell biology, developmental biology, ecology, estuarine and 
marine biology, genetics, neurobiology, physiology, systematics and evolutionary bi- 
ology. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission to the Department of Zoology's graduate program requires a bachelor's 
degree from a recognized undergraduate institution. In addition, coursework in cal- 
culus, physics and organic chemistry is required. Able students who lack preparation 
in a particular area may be admitted provided that the deficiency is corrected early 
during graduate study. The Department requires Graduate Record Examination scores, 
including the subject test, which should be taken in some area of biology. 



210 Zoology Department (ZOOL) 



The thesis option of the master's program enables a student to engage in advanced 
study and to undertake a research project. The degree may also demonstrate the 
student's research ability and lead to the continuation of graduate work for the Ph.D. 
in the same or related area. The general Graduate School rules are the only require- 
ments. All requirements for the master's degree are to be completed within a three- 
year period. A final oral examination on the thesis is given whenever the student has 
completed all other requirements for the degree. 

The non-thesis master's program provides opportunity for advanced education and 
a terminal degree for those who are not research-oriented. All non-thesis master's 
students are required to complete at least 30 hours of coursework, and 18 or more of 
these credits must be at the 600 level or above in zoology or appropriate related fields. 
No fewer than 16 hours of courses must be in zoology and three of these courses should 
be in a single area of specialization. In addition, at least one satisfactory scholarly 
paper must be written in an area approved by the student's adviser. A written com- 
prehensive examination in three areas of zoology must be passed before the degree is 
awarded. All requirements must be completed within a three-year period. 

The Ph.D. program in zoology is a research program providing maximal opportunity 
for the student to evolve and develop his or her capacity for scholarship and independent 
work. Opportunity is provided for in-depth study in an area of specialization. A doctoral 
candidate must complete at least 30 credit hours of advanced coursework, including a 
minimum of 12 semester hours of doctoral research. A formal preliminary examination 
is given to all doctoral students within the first two years of enrollment in the De- 
partment. This is an oral examination that focuses primarily on determining whether 
the student has the proper motivation, intellectual capacity and curiosity, and educa- 
tional background. The exam also determines if the student has or can develop the 
technical skills to successfully pursue the Ph.D. program. However, there is no formal 
restriction on the extent or the range of the questions asked of the candidate. The 
doctoral dissertation must be completed and defended usually within three, but pref- 
erably two, years after the passing of prelims. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Zoology Department's share of the Zoo-Psych Building provides adequate space 
for graduate instruction and research. The research laboratories are well equipped with 
a wide variety of scientific instrumentation. In addition, the Department has special 
suites for both transmission and scanning electronmicroscopy, constant temperature 
rooms, four sound-proof rooms (one being an anechoic chamber designed specifically 
for sophisticated research in ethology), photographic dark rooms, sterile transfer rooms 
and a histotechnology suite. Additional research opportunities are available to students 
through the Department's association with staff members of the National Institutes of 
Health, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Smithsonian Institution, National Zoo and 
several marine laboratories. 

Although the Department maintains no library of its own, the University has a fine 
graduate library housing a Science and Technology Division. In addition, facilities such 
as the National Library of Medicine and the Department of Agriculture Library as well 
as the Library of Congress greatly expand the library material within relatively easy 
access to the Department. 



Certificate Programs 21 1 



Additional Information 

Students are urged to communicate directly with the faculty in the area of their 
interest, but additional general information and a statement of particular Departmental 
requirements may be obtained by contacting: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Zoology 

2231 Zoology Psychology Building 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

(301) 405-6905 
For courses, see code ZOOL. 

Certificate Programs 
Historic Preservation 

Chair: Flack (History) 

Committee Members: Brower (Urban Studies), Evans (History), Fogle 
(Architecture), Groves (Geography), Leone (Anthropology), Price (History), Sies 
(American Studies), Stokes (National Trust for Historic Preservation Library) 

The Historic Preservation Graduate Certificate program augments the degree work 
of Master of Architecture, Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy students in the 
six cooperating academic units: American Studies, Anthropology, Architecture, Ge- 
ography, History and Urban Studies. 

Admission and Degree Information 

This 24 credit interdisciplinary program is designed to help prepare students for a 
range of careers in the planning, management and conservation of significant cultural, 
natural and historical resources. Through courses, seminars and internships, students 
develop the basic expertise to become researchers, interpreters, curators, restoration- 
ists, archaeologists, planners, conservators and administrators in the multi-faceted field 
of historic preservation. 

Students who seek the Certificate must meet general Graduate School requirements 
and normally they must have been admitted into one of the participating degree pro- 
grams. Application is in the form of a letter to the Committee on Historic Preservation. 
In making its evaluation, the Committee will review relevant material in the Graduate 
School application. If appropriate, the applicant's record as a graduate student or 
resume generated through professional experience will be considered. Interested per- 
sons are advised to consult in advance with the chair of the Committee. 

Certificate students, in conjunction with their degree programs, complete the required 
introductory seminar (HISP 600), a survey of preservation law, 15 credit hours of study 
focus courses and the final seminar (HISP 700). The total number of semester credit 
hours will vary according to the particular requirements of the specific degree program. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Certificate program is directly related to and substantially enhanced by the 
National Trust for Historic Preservation Library housed on the College Park campus 
since 1986. The program is further strengthened by close working relationships with 



212 Certificate Programs 



the National Park Service, the Maryland Historical Trust, the Maryland Hall of Rec- 
ords, the Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Historic Annap- 
olis, Inc., Preservation Maryland, the Baltimore Commission for Historical and 
Architectural Preservation, and the Montgomery and Prince George's County Historic 
Preservation Commissions. Practical experience can be gained through ongoing summer 
projects at the Chalfonte Hotel in Cape May, New Jersey and at Kiplin Hall in North 
Yorkshire, England. 

Financial Assistance 

There are possibilities of paid internships with the National Park Service and the 
Historic American Building Survey/History American Engineering Record. Certificate 
students may be teaching assistants in related academic units. Also, students in the 
Certificate program are specially eligible for the annual Margaret Cook Award, a cash 
prize endowed by Prince George's Heritage, Inc. and the Prince George's County 
Historical and Cultural Trust. 

Additional Information 

Complete descriptions of academic offerings and requirements may be obtained from 
the Committee on Historic Preservation. 

For courses, see code HISP. 

Gerontology Certificate 

The Graduate Gerontology Certificate program trains students at the master's and 
doctoral levels as specialists in aging and adult development. A student is eligible after 
having been accepted into a master's or doctoral program at the University of Maryland 
or having already earned a master's or doctoral degree. The master's student must 
complete 18 credit hours and the doctoral student must complete 21 credit hours for 
the program. Nine of these hours are selected from core areas including Physical Bases, 
Psychological Bases and Social Bases of aging. Three credits are taken to satisfy the 
internship requirement and the remaining credits may be chosen from either the core 
or complementary courses in gerontology. 



AASP - Afro-American Studies 213 



Course Descriptions 



AASP - Afro- American Studies 

AASP 400 Directed Readings in Afro-American Studies (3) 

The readings will be directed by the Director of Afro-American Studies. Topics to be covered: 
the topics will be chosen by the director to meet the needs and interests of individual students. 
AASP 402 Classic Readings in Afro-American Studies (3) 

Classic readings of the social, economic and political status of blacks and other minorities in the 
United States and the Americas. 
AASP 410 Contemporary African Ideologies (3) 

Analysis of contemporary African ideologies. Emphasis on philosophies of Nyerere, Nkrumah, 
Senghor, Sekou Toure, Kaunda, Cabral, et al. Discussion of the role of African ideologies on 
modernization and social change. 
AASP 411 Black Resistance Movements (3) 

A comparative study of the black resistance movements in Africa and America; analysis of their 
interrelationships as well as their impact on contemporary pan- Africanism. 
AASP 441 Science, Technology, and the Black Community (3) 

Prerequisite: AASP 100 or AASP 202 or HIST 255 or permission of department. Scientific knowl- 
edge and skills in solving technological and social problems, particularly those faced by the black 
community. Examines the evolution and development of African and Afro-American contri- 
butions to science. Surveys the impact of technological changes on minority communities. 
AASP 443 Blacks and the Law (3) 

Prerequisite: AASP 100 or AASP 202 or HIST 255 or permission of department. The relationship 
between black Americans and the law, particularly criminal law, criminal institutions and the 
criminal justice system. Examines historical changes in the legal status of blacks and changes in 
the causes of racial disparities in criminal involvement and punishments. 
AASP 497 Policy Seminar in Afro-American Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: AASP 301 or permission of department. Application of public policy analysis to 
important social problems and policy issues affecting black Americans. Policy research and 
analysis procedures through an in-depth study of a critical, national black policy issue. 
AASP 498 Special Topics in Black Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: AASP 100 or AASP 202. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Advanced study 
of the cultural and historical antecedents of contemporary African and Afro-American society. 
Emphasis on the social, political, economic and behavioral factors affecting blacks and their 
communities. Topics vary. 

AASP 499 Advanced Topics in Public Policy and the Black Community (3) 
Prerequisite: AASP 301 or permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
Examination of specific areas of policy development and evaluation in black and other com- 
munities. Application of advanced tools of policy analysis, especially quantitative, statistical and 
micro-economic analysis. 

AEED - Agricultural and Extension Education 

AEED 464 Rural Life in Modern Society (3) 

The historical and current nature of rural and agricultural areas and communities in the complex 
structure and culture of U.S. society. Basic structural, cultural, and functional concepts for 
analyses and contrasts of societies and the organizations and social systems within them. 



214 Course Descriptions 



AEED 466 Rural Poverty in an Affluent Society (3) 

Factors giving rise to conditions of rural poverty. Problems faced by the rural poor. Programs 
designed to alleviate rural poverty. 
AEED 488 Critique in Rural Education (1) 
Current problems and trends in rural education. 
AEED 489 Field Experience (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 4 credits. Planned field experience for both 
major and non-major students. 
AEED 499 Special Problems (1-3) 

AEED 606 Program Planning and Evaluation in Agricultural Education (2-3) 
Second semester. Analysis of community agricultural education needs, selection and organization 
of course content, criteria and procedures for evaluating programs. 
AEED 626 Program Development in Adult and Continuing Education (3) 

Concepts in program planning and development. Study and analysis of program design and 
implementation in adult and continuing education. 
AEED 627 Program Evaluation in Adult and Continuing Education (3) 

Prerequisite: AEED 626 or permission of department. An analysis of program evaluation concepts 
as they relate specifically to adult continuing education. Program evaluation concepts, issues and 
problems with emphasis on the use of evaluation procedures. 
AEED 630 Teaching-Learning in Adult and Continuing Education (3) 

The teaching/learning process in adult continuing education. Instructional techniques and meth- 
odologies appropriate for adults. The curriculum development process. Issues and priorities in 
adult continuing education. 

AEED 632 International Extension/ Adult Education (3) 

The state of extension/adult education in other countries. The social context of extension/adult 
education in selected countries. Analysis of existing extension/adult education programs and the 
contributions of these systems to the field. 
AEED 661 Rural Community Analysis (3) 

Communities as social systems composed of organizations which interact in a system of cultural 
institutions, norms, and values. Functional and structural linkages between organizations within 
as well as outside the community; rural vs. urban similarities and differences; and the role of 
the social processes such as competition, cooperation and conflict in the context of community 
power and leadership structure. 

AEED 691 Research Methods in Adult and Continuing Education (3) 

The scientific method, problem identification, survey of research literature, preparing research 
plans, design of studies, experimentation, analysis of data and thesis writing. 
AEED 699 Special Problems (1-3) 
AEED 789 Special Topics (1-3) 
Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. 
AEED 798 Seminar in Rural Education (1-3) 

Repeatable to 8 credits. Problems in the organization, administration, and supervision of the 
several agencies of rural and/or vocational education. 
AEED 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
AEED 888 Apprenticeship in Education (1-8) 

Prerequisites: experience, a master's degree, and at least six semester hours in education at the 
University of Maryland. Apprenticeships in the major area of study are available to selected 
students whose application for an apprenticeship has been approved by the education faculty. 



AGRI - Agriculture 215 



Each apprentice is assigned to work for at least a semester full-time or the equivalent with an 

appropriate agency. The sponsor of the apprentice maintains a close working relationship with 

the apprentice and the other persons involved. 

AEED 889 Internship in Education (3-8) 

Internships in the major area of study for experienced students who are assigned to an appropriate 

school system, educational institution, or agency in a situation different than that in which the 

student is regularly employed. 

AEED 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

AGRI - Agriculture 

AGRI 489 Special Topics in Agriculture (1-4) 

Credit according to time scheduled and organization of the course. A lecture series organized 

to study in depth a selected phase of agriculture not normally associated with one of the existing 

programs. 

AGRO - Agronomy 

AGRO 401 Pest Management Strategies for Turfgrass (3) 

Prerequisite: AGRO 305. Interdisciplinary view or week, disease, and insect management from 
an agronomy perspective. Plant responses to pest invasion, diagnosis of pest-related disorders, 
and principles of weed, disease and insect suppression through cultural, biological and chemical 
means are discussed. 

AGRO 402 Sports Turf Management (3) 

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: AGRO 305 and 
AGRO 401. Sports turf management, including design, construction, soil modification, soil cul- 
tural techniques, pesticide use, fertilization, and specialized equipment. 

AGRO 403 Crop Breeding (3) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 414 or ZOOL 213. Principles and methods of breeding annual self and 
cross-pollinated plant and perennial forage species. 

AGRO 406 Forage Crops (3) 

Prerequisite: BIOL 105. Recommended: BIOL 106. World grasslands and their influence on 
early civilizations; current impact on human food supply; role of forages in soil conservation and 
a sustainable agriculture. Production and management requirements of major grass and legume 
species for silage and pasture for livestock feed. Cultivar development; certified seed production 
and distribution. 

AGRO 407 Cereal and Oil Crops (3) 

Pre- or corequisites: BIOL 105 and AGRO 101. A study of principles and practices of corn, 
small grains, rice, millets, sorghums, and soybeans and other oil seed crops. A study of seed 
production, processing, distribution and federal and state seed control programs of com, small 
grains and soybeans. 

AGRO 410 Commercial Turf Maintenance and Production (3) 

Prerequisite: AGRO 305 and AGRO 401. Commercial lawn care industry, sod production and 
turfgrass seed production. Fertilizer, renovation programs, and weed and insect control programs 
used in professional lawn care. Environmental effects of lawn care programs. 

AGRO 411 Principles of SoU Fertility (3) 

Soil factors affecting plant growth and quality with emphasis on the bio-availability of mineral 
nutrients. The management of soil systems to enhance plant growth by means of crop rotations, 
microbial activities, and use of organic and inorganic amendments 



216 Course Descriptions 



AGRO 413 Soil and Water Conservation and Managment (3) 

Prerequisite: AGRO 302. Importance and causes of soil erosion, methods of soil erosion control. 
Effects of conservation practices on soil physical properities and the plant root environment. 
Irrigation and drainage as related to water use and conservation. 

AGRO 414 Soil Morphology, Genesis and Classification (4) 

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A GRO 302. Processes 
and factors of soil genesis. Taxonomy of soils of the world by U.S. System. Soil morphological 
characteristics, composition, classification, survey and field trips to examine and describe soils. 
AGRO 415 SoU Survey and Land Use (3) 

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: AGRO 302. Evaluation 
of soils in the uses of land and the environmental implications of soil utilization. Interpretation 
of soil information and soil surveys as applied to both agricultural and non-agricultural problems. 
Incorporation of soil data into legislation, environmental standards and land use plans. 
AGRO 417 SoU Physics (3) 

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: AGRO 302 and a 
course in physics; or permission of department. A study of physical properties of soils with special 
emphasis on relationship to soil productivity. 
AGRO 421 Soil Chemistry (4) 

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: AGRO 302. The 
chemistry and composition of mineral and organic colloids in soils, including ion exchange, 
oxidation-reduction, acidity, surface charge, and solution chemistry. Lectures and readings per- 
tain to plant nutrition, waste disposal, and groundwater quahty. 
AGRO 422 Soil Microbiology (3) 

Prerequisite: AGRO 302, CHEM 104 or permission of department. Relationship of soil micro- 
organisms to the soils' physical and chemical properties. Nirtogen fixation, mycorrhiza-plant 
interactions and microbially mediated cycHng. 
AGRO 423 Soil- Water Pollution (3) 

Prerequisites: AGRO 302 and CHEM 104 or permission of department. Reaction and fate of 
pesticides, agricultural fertilizers, industrial and animal wastes in soil and water with emphasis 
on their relation to the environment. 

AGRO 440 Crop, SoUs, and Civilization (3) 

Role and importance of crop and soil resources in the development of human civilization. History 
of crops and soils as they relate to the persistence of ancient and modern cultures. 
AGRO 441 Sustainable Agriculture (3) 

Environmental, social and economic needs for alternatives to the conventional, high-imput farm- 
ing systems which currently predominate in industrial countries. Strategies and practices that 
minimize the use of non-renewable resources. 

AGRO 444 Remote Sensing of Agriculture and Natural Resources (3) 

Interaction of electromagnetic radiation. Remote sensing technology to agriculture and natural 
resource inventory, monitoring and management and related environmental concerns. 
AGRO 451 Crop Culture and Development (3) 

Pre or corequisite: BOTN 441. Application of basic plant physiology to crop production. Pho- 
tosynthesis, respiration, mineral nutrition, water and temperature stress, and post-harvest phys- 
iology. 

AGRO 453 Weed Science (3) 

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Weed identification, ecology, and 
control (cultural, mechanical, biological, and chemical methods). 



AGRO- Agronomy 217 



AGRO 454 Air and Soil Pollution Effects on Crops (3) 

Effects of air pollutants such as ozone, sulfur dioxide, acid rain, etc., and soil pollutants such 
as toxic metals, pesticides, on the growth, productivity and quality of crops. 
AGRO 483 Plant Breeding Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisites: AGRO 403 and permission of department. Current plant breeding research being 
conducted at The University of Maryland and USDA at Beltsville. Discussion with plant breeders 
about pollination techniques, breeding methods, and program achievements and goals. Field 
trips to selected USDA laboratories. 
AGRO 499 Special Problems in Agronomy (1-3) 

Prerequisites: AGRO 302, AGRO406, AGRO 407 or permission of department. A detailed study, 
including a written report of an important problem in agronomy. 
AGRO 601 Advanced Crop Breeding I (2) 

Prerequisite: AGRO 403 or equivalent. Genetic and cytogenetic theories as related to plant 
breeding including interspecific and intergeneric hybridization, polyploidy, and sterility mech- 
anisms. 

AGRO 602 Advanced Crop Breeding II (2) 

Prerequisites: AGRO 601 and a graduate statistics course. Quantitative inheritance in plant breed- 
ing including genetic constitution of a population, continuous variation, estimation of genetic 
variances, heterosis and inbreeding, heritability, and population movement. 
AGRO 608 Research Methods (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 4 credits. Development of research view- 
point by detailed study and report on crop and soil research of the Maryland Agriculture Ex- 
periment Station or review and discussion of literature on specific agricultural problems or new 
research techniques. 

AGRO 711 Advanced Plant-SoU Relationship (2) 

Prerequisite: AGRO 411. Integration of the biological, physical, and chemical aspects of plant 
growth in soils. 

AGRO 722 Advanced SoU Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisites: AGRO 202 and permission of both department and instructor. A continuation of 
AGRO 421 with emphasis on soil chemistry of minor elements necessary for plant growth. 
AGRO 789 Advances in Agronomy Research (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 4 credits if content differs. A study of recent 
advances in agronomy research. 
AGRO 798 Agronomy Seminar (1) 

Total credit toward Master of Science degree, 2; toward Ph.D. degree, 6. Prerequisite: permission 
of both department and instructor. First and second semester. 
AGRO 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
AGRO 802 Breeding For ResisUnce to Plant Pests (3) 

Prerequisites: ENTM252, BOTN 221, AGRO 403 or permission of department. Spring semester, 
alternate years. Development of breeding techniques for selecting and utilizing resistance to 
insects and diseases in crop plants and the effect of resistance on the interrelationships of host 
and pest. 

AGRO 804 Design and Analysis of Crop Research (3) 

Prerequisite: BIOM 401. Field plot technique, application of statistical analysis to agronomic 
data, and preparation of the research project. 
AGRO 805 Factors Affecting Crop Yields (2) 

Prerequisites: BOTN 441 or BOTN 641; plus advanced training in plant sciences. Major emphasis 
will be on physiological processes affecting yield and productivity of major food fiber and in- 



218 Course Descriptions 



dustrial crops of the world. Topics such as photosynthesis, respiration, photorespiration, nitrogen 

metabolism will be related to crop growth as affected by management decisions. Topics of 

discussion will also include growth analysis and the use of computer modehng of crop growth 

by plant scientists. 

AGRO 806 Herbicide Chemistry and Physiology (2) 

Prerequisites: AGRO 453; and CHEM 104. The importance of chemical structure in relation to 

biologically significant reactions will be emphasized in more than 10 different herbicide groups. 

Recent advances in herbicidal metabolism, translocation, and mode of action will be reviewed. 

Absorption, decomposition and movement in the soil will also be studied. 

AGRO 821 Advanced Methods of Soil Investigation (3) 

Prerequisites: AGRO 302; permission of both department and instructor. First semester, alternate 

years. An advanced study of the theory of the chemical methods of soil investigation with emphasis 

on problems involving application of physical chemistry. 

AGRO 831 Soil Mineralogy (4) 

Soil minerals, with emphasis on clay minerals, are studied from the viewpoint of soil genesis and 

physical chemistry. Mineralogical analyses by x-ray and chemical techniques. 

AGRO 832 Advanced Soil Physics (3) 

Prerequisites: AGRO 417; and permission of both department and instructor. An advanced study 

of physical properties of soils. 

AGRO 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

AMST - American Studies 

AMST 418 Cultural Themes in America (3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Examination of structure and development of American 
culture through themes such as "growing up American", "culture and mental disorders", "race", 
"ethnicity", "regionalism", "landscape", "humor". 
AMST 426 Culture and the Arts in America (3) 

Analysis of development of American cultural institutions and artifacts. 
AMST 428 American Cultural Eras (3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Investigation of a decade, period, or generation as a 
case study in significant social change within an American context. Case studies include "An- 
tebellum America, 1840-1860", "American culture in the Great Depression". 
AMST 429 Perspectives on Popular Culture (3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Topics in popular culture studies, including the exam- 
ination of particular genres, themes, and issues. 
AMST 432 Literature and American Society (3) 

Prerequisite: prior course in AMST, SOCY, American literature, or American history. Exami- 
nation of the relationship between literature and society: including literature as cultural com- 
munication and the institutional framework governing its production, distribution, conservation 
and evaluation. 

AMST 450 Seminar in American Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Developments in theories and methods of American 
studies scholarship, with emphasis upon interaction between the humanities and the social sci- 
ences in the process of cultural analysis and evaluation. 
AMST 498 Special Topics in American Studies (3) 

Prereqidsite: a course in American history, literature, or government; or permission of department. 
Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Topics of special interest. 



ANSC - Animal Science 21 9 



AMST 618 Introductory Seminar in American Studies (3) 

AMST 628 Seminar in American Studies (3) 

AMST 629 Seminar in American Studies (3) 

AMST 638 Orientation Seminar: Material Aspects of American Civilization (3) 

Class meets at the Smithsonian. 

AMST 639 Reading Course in Selected Aspects of American Civilization (3) 

Class meets at the Smithsonian. 

AMST 698 Directed Readings in American Studies (3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. This course is designed to provide students with the 
opportunity to pursue independent, interdisciplinary research and reading in specific aspects of 
American culture under the supervision of a faculty member. 
AMST 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
AMST 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

ANSC - Animal Science 

Some of these courses may require the use of animals. See the statement on Animal Care and 
Use in the appendix and the policy statement for students under degree requirements. 

ANSC 401 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 104 and ANSC 212. Recommended: BCHM 261. A study of the fundamental 
role of all nutrients in the body including their digestion, absorption and metabolism. Dietary 
requirements and nutritional deficiency syndromes of laboratory and farm animals and humans. 

ANSC 402 Applied Animal Nutrition (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: MA TH 115 and ANSC 
401. A critical study of those factors which influence the nutritional requirements of ruminants, 
swine and poultry. Practical feeding methods and procedures used in formulation of economically 
efficient rations will be presented. 
ANSC 406 Environmental Physiology (3) 

Prerequisite: anatomy and physiology. The specific anatomical and physiological modifications 
employed by animals adapted to certain stressful environments will be considered. Particular 
emphasis will be placed on the problems of temperature regulation and water balance. Specific 
areas for consideration will include: animals in cold (including hibernation), animals in dry heat, 
diving animals and animals in high altitudes. 

ANSC 412 Introduction to Diseases of Animals (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prequisite: MICE 200 and BIOL 105. This 
course gives basic instruction in the nature of disease: including causation, immunity, methods 
of diagnosis, economic importance, public health aspects and prevention and control of the 
common diseases of sheep, cattle, swine, horses and poultry. 

ANSC 413 Laboratory Animal Management (3) 

A comprehensive course in care and management of laboratory animals. Emphasis will be placed 
on physiology, anatomy and special uses for the different species. Disease prevention and reg- 
ulations for maintaining animal colonies will be covered. Field trips will be required. 

ANSC 415 Parasitic Diseases of Domestic Animals (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 412 or equivalent. 
A study of parasitic diseases resulting from protozoan and helminth infection and arthropod 
infestation. Emphasis on parasites of veterinary importance: their identification; life cycles, 
pathological effects and control by management. 



220 Course Descriptions 



ANSC 421 Swine Production (3) 

Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 101: ANSC 
221; and ANSC 203 or ANSC 401. A study of swine production systems including the principles 
of animal science for the efficient and economical management of swine breeding, feeding, 
reproduction and marketing. 
ANSC 422 Meats (3) 

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 221. A course 
designed to give the basic facts about meat as a food and the factors influencing acceptability, 
marketing, and quality of fresh meats. It includes comparisons of characteristics of live animals 
with their carcasses, grading and evaluating carcasses as well as wholesale cuts, and the distri- 
bution and merchandising of the nation's meat supply. Laboratory periods are conducted in 
packing houses, meat distribution centers, retail outlets and University Meats Laboratory. 
ANSC 423 Beef Production (3) 

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 221 and ANSC 
203 or ANSC 401. Application of various phases of animal science to the management and 
production of beef cattle. 
ANSC 424 Sheep Production (3) 

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 221 and ANSC 
203 or ANSC 401. A study of sheep production systems including the principles of animal science 
for the efficient and economical management of sheep breeding, feeding, reproduction and 
marketing. 

ANSC 430 Topics in Equine Science (4) 

Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion/recitation per week. Prerequisites: ANSC 
211; ANSC 212 and ANSC 230. Preor corequisite: ANSC 401. Specific problems of importance 
to the equine industry, including such areas as nutrition, physiology, anatomy, genetics and 
pathology. 

ANSC 431 Horse Production (2) 

One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 101; ANSC 211; 
ANSC 212; ANSC 230 and permission of department. Laboratory and assigned project to be 
performed at University of Maryland Horse Farm, Ellicott City, Md. Field trips. Application of 
equine science principles to the management and production of horses. 
ANSC 432 Breeding Farm Management (2) 

One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 211; ANSC 212; 
ANSC 230 and permission of department. Animal equine science principles in the management 
of equine breeding establishments. Field trips. 
ANSC 443 Physiology and Biocliemistry of Lactation (3) 

Prerequisite: ANSC 212 or equivalent; and BCHM 261 or BCHM 461. The physiology and 
biochemistry of milk production in domestic animals, particularly cattle. Mammary gland de- 
velopment and maintenance from the embryo to the fully developed lactating gland. Abnor- 
malities of the mammary gland. 
ANSC 444 Analysis of Dairy Production Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: AREC 306 and ANSC 203. The business aspects of dairy farming including an 
evaluation of the costs and returns associated with each segment. The economic impact of 
pertinent management decisions is studied. Recent developments in animal nutrition and genetics, 
agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, and agronomic practices are discussed as they 
apply to management of a dairy herd. 
ANSC 446 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction (3) 

Prerequisite: ZOOL 422 or ANSC 212. Anatomy and physiology of reproductive processes in 
domesticated and wild mammals. 



ANSC - Animal Science 221 



ANSC 447 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction Laboratory (1) 

Three hours of laboratory per week. Pre- or corequisite: ANSC 446. Animal handling, artificial 
insemination procedures and analytical techniques useful in animal management and reproductive 
research. 

ANSC 452 Avian Physiology (2) 

Two two-hour lecture/laboratory/demonstration periods per week. Prequisite: a basic course in 
animal anatomy or physiology. The digestive, immune, excretory, respiratory, muscle, circula- 
tory, endocrine and nervous systems of avian species. Laboratory exercises include use of an- 
esthetics, suturing techniques, use of a polygraph and instrumentation for analyzing blood, urine, 
liver, kidney and brain tissue. 
ANSC 462 Physiology of Hatchability (1) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prequisite: BIOL 105. The physiology of 
embryonic development as related to principles of hatchability and problems of incubation 
encountered in the hatchery industry are discussed. 
ANSC 487 Special Topics in Animal Science (1) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. This course is designed primarily for teachers of vocational 
agriculture and extension service personnel. One primary topic to be selected mutually by the 
instructor and students will be presented each session. 
ANSC 601 Advanced Ruminant Nutrition (2) 

One hour of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 
Physiological, microbiological and biochemical aspects of the nutrition of ruminants as compared 
to other animals. 

ANSC 603 Mineral Metabolism (3) 

Prerequisites: BCHM 461 and BCHM 462. The role of minerals in metabolism of animals and 
man. Topics to be covered include the role of minerals in energy metabolism, bone structure, 
electrolyte balance, and as catalysts. 
ANSC 604 Vitamin Nutrition (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 401 and BCHM 
461. Advanced study of the fundamental role of vitamins and vitamin-like cofactors in nutrition 
including chemical properties, absorption, metabolism, excretion and deficiency syndromes. A 
critical study of the biochemical basis of vitamin function, interrelationship of vitamins with 
other substances and of certain laboratory techniques. 
ANSC 610 Electron Microscopy (4) 

Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: permission of both 
department and instructor. Theory of electron microscopy, electron optics, specimen preparation 
and techniques, operation of electron photography, interpretation of electron images, related 
instruments and techniques. 
ANSC 612 Energy Nutrition (2) 

One lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prequisite: ANSC 401 or NUSC 450, and 
BCHM 461. Basic concepts of animal energetics with quantitative descriptions of energy re- 
quirements and utilization. 
ANSC 614 Proteins (2) 

One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 401 and BCHM 
461. Advanced study of the roles of amino acids in nutrition and metabolism. Protein digestion, 
absorption, anabolism, catabolism and amino acid balance. 
ANSC 626 Advanced Animal Breeding (3) 

Prerequisite: /ANSC 327; and MATH 400; and BIOM 603] or permission of both department 
and instructor. Application of linear models to genetic evaluation of domestic livestock. Intro- 
duction to estimation of components of variance in mixed linear models. 



222 Course Descriptions 



ANSC 643 Research Methods (3) 

One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: permission of department and 
instructor. The application of biochemical, physio-chemical and statistical methods to problems 
in biological research. 
ANSC 660 Poultry Literature (1-4) 

Readings on individual topics are assigned. Written reports required. Methods of analysis and 
presentation of scientific material are discussed. 
ANSC 661 Physiology of Reproduction (3) 

Reproductive endocrinology of vertebrate species with attention to function of the male and 
female reproductive systems, neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction and cellular mecha- 
nisms. 

ANSC 663 Advanced Nutrition Laboratory (3) 

One hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC/NUSC 401; and 
either BCHM 462 or NUSC 670. Also offered as NUSC 663. Basic instrumentation and techniques 
desired for advanced nutritional research. The effect of various nutritional parameters upon 
intermediary metabolism, enzyme kinetics, endocrinology, and nutrient absorption in laboratory 
animals. 

ANSC 677 Advanced Animal Adaptations to the Environment (2) 

Prerequisite: ANSC 406 or permission of instructor. A detailed consideration of certain anatomical 
and physiological modifications employed by mammals adapted to cold, dry heat or altitude. 
Each student will submit for discussion a library paper concerning a specific adaptation to an 
environmental stress. 

ANSC 686 Veterinary Bacteriology and Mycology (3) 

Prerequisite: ANSC 412. The characteristics and role of pathogenic bacteria and fungi in diseases 
of domestic animals with emphasis upon their pathogenic properties, pathogenesis and types of 
disease, epizootiology, modes of transmission and prophylaxis. 
ANSC 687 Veterinary Virology (3) 

Prerequisite: MICB 460. A detailed study of viral and rickettsial diseases of domestic and lab- 
oratory animals. Emphasis on viruses of veterinary importance along with techniques for their 
propagation, characterization and identification. 
ANSC 698 Seminar (1) 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon current scientific publications relating to 
animal science, or upon their research work, for presentation before and discussion by the class; 
(1) recent advances; (2) nutrition; (3) physiology; (4) biochemistry. 
ANSC 699 Special Problems in Animal Science (1-2) 

Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. Prerequisite: approval of staff. Problems will 
be assigned which relate specifically to the character of work the student is pursuing. 
ANSC 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
ANSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

ANTH - Anthropology 

ANTH 401 Cultural Anthropology: Principles and Processes (3) 

Prerequisites: ANTH 101, ANTH 102. or ANTH 221. An examination of the nature of human 
culture and its processes, both historical and functional. The approach will be topical and the- 
oretical rather than descriptive. 

ANTH 402 Cultural Anthropology: World Ethnography (3) 

Prerequisites: ANTH 101, ANTH 102, or ANTH 221. A descriptive survey of the culture areas 
of the world through an examination of the ways of selected representative societies. 



ANTH - Anthropology 223 



ANTH 412 Peoples and Cultures of Oceania (3) 

A survey of the cultures of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia and Australia. Theoretical and 
cultural-historical problems will be emphasized. 
ANTH 414 Ethnology of Africa (3) 

Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and ANTH 102. The native peoples and cultures of Africa and their 
historical relationships, with emphasis on that portion of the continent south of the Sahara. 
ANTH 417 Peoples and Cultures of the Far East (3) 

A survey of the major sociopolitical systems of China, Korea and Japan. Major anthropological 
questions will be dealt with in presenting this material. 
ANTH 423 Ethnology of the Southwest (3) 

Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and ANTH 102. Culture history, economic and social institutions, 
religion, and mythology of the Indians of the southwest United States. 
ANTH 424 Ethnology of North America (3) 

Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and ANTH 102. The native people and cultures of North America 
north of Mexico and their historical relationships, including the effects of contact with European- 
derived populations. 

ANTH 426 Ethnology of Middle America (3) 

Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and ANTH 102. Cultural background and modern social, economic 
and religious life of Indian and Mesitzo groups in Mexico and central America; processes of 
acculturation and currents in cultural development. 
ANTH 431 Social Organization of Primitive Peoples (3) 

Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and ANTH 102. A comparative survey of the structures of non-literate 
and folk societies, covering both general principles and special regional developments. 
ANTH 434 Religion of Primitive Peoples (3) 

Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and ANTH 102. A survey of the religious systems of primitive and 
folk societies, with emphasis on the relation of religion to other aspects of culture. 
ANTH 436 Primitive Technology and Economy (3) 

A survey of technology, food economy and general economic processes in non-industrial societies. 
ANTH 437 Politics and Government in Primitive Society (3) 

A combined survey of politics in human societies and of important anthropological theories 
concerning this aspect of society. 
ANTH 441 Archaeology of the Old World (3) 

Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or ANTH 241. A survey of the archaeological materials of Europe, 
Asia and Africa, with emphasis on chronological and regional interrelationships. 
ANTH 451 Archaeology of the New Worid (3) 

Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or ANTH 241. A survey of the archaeological materials of North and 
South America with emphasis on chronological and regional interrelationships. 
ANTH 461 Human Osteology Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisite: ANTH 101. A laboratory study of the human skeleton, its morphology, measure- 
ment, and anatomic relationships. 
ANTH 462 Primate Anatomy Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisite: ANTH 101. The gross anatomy of non-human primates. Laboratory dissection of 
various primate cadavers under supervision. Occasional lectures. 
ANTH 463 Primate Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: ANTH 101. A combination lecture and laboratory examination of non-human 
primates. Major studies of various types that have been undertaken in the laboratory and in the 
field. 



224 Course Descriptions 



ANTH 465 Human Growth and Constitution (3) 

Prerequisite: ANTH 101. A laboratory study of the growth, development and age changes in the 
human body from conception through old age, including gross photographic, radiographic, and 
microscopic study of growth and variation. 
ANTH 466 Forensic Anthropology Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisite: ANTH 461 or permission of department. A laboratory study of the methods used 
to identify human remains by anthropological techniques and discussion of the role of the 
anthropologist in medico-legal investigation. 
ANTH 467 Human Population Biology Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisite: ANTH 101. A laboratory study of human population genetics, dynamics and var- 
iation, including anthropological seriology, biochemistry, dermatoglyphics and hair microscopy. 
ANTH 496 Field Methods in Archaeology (8) 

Formerly ANTH 499. Field training in the techniques of archaeological survey and excavation. 
ANTH 498 Field Methods in Ethnology (1-6) 
Field training in the collection and recording of ethnological data. 
ANTH 601 Applied Anthropology (3) 

History and theory of applied anthropology. The relationship between applied anthropology and 
other major subfields of the profession; the interdisciplinary and public context of application; 
problems of significance and utility in applied work. 
ANTH 605 Theory of Cultural Anthropology (3) 

History and current trends of cultural anthropological theory, as a basic orientation for graduate 
studies and research. 

ANTH 606 Methods of Cultural Analysis I (3) 

Objectives of cultural analysis and their relationship to policy and decision making. An intro- 
duction to problem formulation, qualitative and quantative research design, and the conduct of 
research; problems of reliability and validity in social research. 
ANTH 607 Methods of Cultural Analysis II (3) 

Advanced preparation in the analysis and review of social research. Case studies of the uses of 
cultural analysis in applied contexts (i.e., social indicators, evaluation, impact assessment, fore- 
casting). 

ANTH 611 Management and Cultural Process (3) 

Basic principles of managing cultural and human resources, decision-making in public and private 
contexts. The diversity and types of cultural resources (archeological, historical, folk and socio- 
cultural), and their recognition and value in contemporary society; introduction to the identifi- 
cation, protection and professional management of cultural resources. 
ANTH 620 Strategies for Cultural Understanding (3) 

The political, scientific, bureaucratic, and ideological background to decision making in the public 
and private sectors. 
ANTH 621 Cultural Ecology (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An examination of the nature of the interrelationships 
between human cultures and the natural environmentals in which they exist. 
ANTH 630 Quantitative Approaches to Applied Anthropology (3) 

Introduction to variety of statistical techniques applied to problems in policy and decision making. 
Practical experience in computer applications for problems in cultural analysis and management. 
The use of existing statistical data sources. 
ANTH 641 Method and Theory in Archaeology (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An examination of the principles and purposes involved 
in the gathering and interpretation of archaeological data. 



APDS - Applied Design 225 



ANTH 681 Processes of Culture Change (3) 

Change in culture due to contact, diffusion, innovation, fusion, integration, and cultural evo- 
lution. 
ANTH 688 Current Developments in Anthropology (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. Detailed investigation of a current problem or research 
technique, the topic to be chosen in accordance with faculty interests and student needs. 

ANTH 689 Special Problems in Anthropology (1-6) 

ANTH 696 Field Methods in Archaeology (8) 

Formerly ANTH 699. Field training in the techniques of archaeological survey and excavation. 

ANTH 698 Advanced Field Training in Ethnology (1-6) 
Offered in the summer session only. 
ANTH 701 Internship Preparation (3) 

Preparation for internship includes practicum training in development, presentation and eval- 
uation of position papers, proposals and work plans; literature search and use of secondary data 
sources in decision making affecting cultural analysis and management. Ethics and professional 
development for work in non-academic settings. 

ANTH 705 Internship (6-12) 

Prerequisite: ANTH 701. Problem-oriented internship with an appropriate public agency or 

private institution under the direction of a faculty and agency supervisor. 

ANTH 712 Internship Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: ANTH 705. The preparation and presentation of internship reports; development 
of skills in report writing and presentation. The completion of a professional quality report based 
on the internship experience. Review of problems in ethics and professional development. 

APDS - Applied Design 

APDS 430 Advanced Problems in Advertising Design (3) 

Two studio periods per week. Prequisites: APDS 320; and APDS 331. For advertising design 
majors only. Advanced problems in design and layout planned for developing competency in 
one or more areas of advertising design. 

APDS 431 Advanced Problems in Advertising Design (3) 

Two studio periods per week. Prequisite: APDS 430. For advertising design majors only. Ad- 
vanced problems in design and layout planned for developing competency in one or more areas 
of advertising design. 

APDS 437 Advanced Photography (3) 

Three studio periods per week. Continuation of APDS 337. 

APDS 499 Individual Problems in Applied Design (3-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 9 credits. Open only to advanced students 

who, with guidance, can work independently. 

ARCH - Architecture 

ARCH 400 Architecture Studio I (6) 

Three hours of lecture and nine hours of studio per week. Prequisite: ARCH majors only. 
Introduction to the processes of visual and architectural design including field problems. 

ARCH 401 Architecture Studio II (6) 

Three hours of lecture and nine hours of studio per week. Prequisite: ARCH 400 with a grade 
of C or better. For ARCH majors only. Continuation of ARCH 400. 



226 Course Descriptions 



ARCH 402 Architecture Studio m (6) 

Three hours of lecture and nine hours of studio per week. Prequisite: ARCH 401 with a grade 
of C or better. For ARCH majors only. Design projects involving the elements of environmental 
control, basic structural systems, building processes and materials. 
ARCH 403 Architecture Studio FV (6) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 402 with a grade of C or better. For ARCH majors only. Three hours of 
lecture and nine hours of studio per week. Design projects involving forms generated by different 
structural systems, environmental controls and methods of construction. 
ARCH 408 Selected Topics in Architecture Studio (1-6) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 403 or equivalent and permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if 
content differs. Topical problems in architecture and urban design. 
ARCH 412 Architectural Structures II (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 312, ARCH 400. For ARCH majors only. Design of steel, timber, and 
reinforced concrete elements, and subsystems; analysis of architectural building systems. Intro- 
duction to design for both natural and man-made hazards. 
ARCH 414 Solar Energy Applications For Buildings (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 313 or permission of department. Methods of utihzing solar energy to provide 
heating, coohng, hot water, and electricity for buildings and related techniques for reducing 
energy consumption. 

ARCH 415 Environniental Control and Systems II (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 313, ARCH 402. For ARCH majors only. Theory, quantification, and ar- 
chitectural design applications for water systems, fire protection, electrical systems, illumination, 
signal equipment, and transportation systems. 
ARCH 418 Selected Topics in Architectural Science (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 7 credits if content differs. 
ARCH 419 Independent Studies in Architectural Science (1-4) 

Repeatable to 7 credits. Proposed work must have a faculty sponsor and receive approval of the 
curriculum committee. 

ARCH 420 History of American Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 221 or permission of department. American architecture from the late 17th 
to the 20th century. 

ARCH 422 History of Greek Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 220 or permission of department. Survey of Greek architecture from 750- 
100 B.C. 

ARCH 423 History of Roman Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 220 or permission of department. Survey of Roman architecture from 500 
B.C. To A.D. 325. 

ARCH 427 Theories of Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 221 or permission of department. For ARCH majors only. Selected historical 
and modern theories of architectural design. 
ARCH 428 Selected Topics in Architectural History (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 7 credits if content differs. 
ARCH 429 Independent Studies in Architectural History (1-4) 

Repeatable to 6 credits. Proposed work must have a faculty sponsor and receive approval of the 
curriculum committee. 

ARCH 432 History of Medieval Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 220 or permission of department. Architecture of western Europe from the 
early Christian and Byzantine periods through the late Gothic, with consideration of parallel 
developments in the eastern world. 



ARCH - Architecture 227 



ARCH 433 History of Renaissance Arcliitecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 221 or permission of department. Renaissance architectural principles and 
trends in the 15th and 16th centuries and their modifications in the Baroque period. 
ARCH 434 History of Modern Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 221 or permission of department. Architectural trends and principles from 
1750 to the present, with emphasis on developments since the mid-19th century. 
ARCH 436 History of Islamic Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 220 or permission of department. Survey of Islamic architecture from the 
seventh through the eighteenth century. 
ARCH 437 History of Pre-Columbian Architecture (3) 

Architecture of Pre-Columbian Mexico and Central America from the Pre-Classic Period through 
the Spanish conquest. 
ARCH 442 Studies in Visual Design (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 401. Studio work in visual design independent of architectural problem 
solving. 

ARCH 445 Visual Analysis of Architecture (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of studio per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 401 and ARCH 
343, or permission of department. Visual principles of architectural design through graphic anal- 
ysis. 

ARCH 448 Selected Topics in Visual Studies (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 7 credits if content differs. 
ARCH 449 Independent Studies in Visual Studies (1-4) 

Repeatable to 6 credits. Proposed work must have a faculty sponsor and receive approval of the 
curriculum committee. 

ARCH 450 Introduction to Urban Planning (3) 

Introduction to city planning theory, methodology and techniques, dealing with normative, urban, 
structural, economic, social aspects of the city; urban planning as a process. Architectural majors 
or by permission of the instructor. Lecture, seminar, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 451 Urban Design Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 350 or permission of department. Advanced investigation into problems of 
analysis and evaluation of the design of urban areas, spaces and complexes with emphasis on 
physical and social considerations, effects of public policies, through case studies. Field obser- 
vations. 

ARCH 453 Urban Problems Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. A case study of urban development issues, dealing pri- 
marily with socio-economic aspects of changes in the built environment. 
ARCH 454 Theories of Urban Form (3) 

Theories of planning and design of urban spaces, building complexes, and new communities. 
ARCH 458 Selected Topics in Urban Planning (1-4) 
Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 7 credits if content differs. 

ARCH 459 Independent Studies in Urban Planning (1-4) 

Repeatable to 6 credits. Proposed work must have a faculty sponsor and receive approval of the 

curriculum committee. 

ARCH 460 Site Analysis and Design (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH majors only or permission of department. Principles and methods of site 
analysis; the influence of natural and man-made site factors on site design and architectural form. 



228 Course Descriptions 



ARCH 461 Design and Energy (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 402 and ARCH 
415. Energy strategies in building related to the broader context of architectural problem solving. 
ARCH 470 Computer Applications in Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 400 or permission of department. Introduction to computer programming 
and utilization, with emphasis on architectural applications. 
ARCH 472 Economic Determinants in Architecture (3) 

Introduction to economic factors influencing architectural form and design, including land eco- 
nomics, real estate, financing, project development, financial planning, construction and cost 
control. 

ARCH 478 Selected Topics in Architecture (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 7 credits if content differs. 
ARCH 479 Independent Studies in Architecture (1-4) 

Repeatable to 6 credits. Proposed work must have a faculty sponsor and receive approval of the 
curriculum committee. 

ARCH 480 Problems and Methods of Architectural Preservation (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 420 or permission of department. Theory and practice of preservation in 
America, with emphasis on the problems and techniques of community preservation. 
ARCH 481 The Architect in Archaeology (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. The role of the architect in field archaeology and the 
analysis of excavating, recording, and publishing selected archaeological expeditions. 
ARCH 482 The Archaeology of Roman and Byzantine Palestine (3) 

Archaeological sites in Palestine (Israel and Jordan) from the reign of Herod the Great to the 
Moslem conquest. 
ARCH 483 Field Archaeology (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Participation in field archaeology with an excavation 
officially recognized by proper authorities of local government. 
ARCH 488 Selected Topics in Architectural Preservation (1-4) 
Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 7 credits if content differs. 
ARCH 489 Independent Studies in Architectural Preservation (1-4) 

Repeatable to 6 credits. Proposed work must have a faculty sponsor and receive approval of the 
curriculum committee. 
ARCH 600 Architecture Studio V (6) 

Three hours of lecture and nine hours of studio per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 403 or equivalent. 
Comprehensive building and urban design; studio options in advanced topical problems. 
ARCH 601 Architecture Studio VI (6) 

Three hours of lecture and nine hours of studio per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 600. Continuation 
of ARCH 600. 

ARCH 610 Appropriate Technologies in Architecture (3) 

Historical and current theories, practices and attitudes regarding the application of technologies 
to design and construction of buildings, civil structures and other infrastructures in rural and 
urban environments. 

ARCH 612 Advanced Structural Analysis in Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 416. Qualitative and quantitative analysis and design of selected complex 
structural systems. 

ARCH 613 Structural Systems in Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 416 or permission of instructor. Theory and application of selected complex 
structural systems as they relate to architectural decisions. 



ARCH - Architecture 229 



ARCH 614 Environmental Systems in Arcliitecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 415 and ARCH 417 or permission of instructor. Qualitative analysis of 
selected environmental systems and design determinants. 
ARCH 616 Advanced Architectural Structures (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 375, ARCH 403. ARCH 412. ARCH 415 or equivalent. For ARCH majors 
only. Analysis of structural issues in architectural design; structure as an architectural form 
determinant; integration of architectural, structural and other technical disciplines in building 
design. 

ARCH 617 Advanced Environmental Control and Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 375. ARCH 403. ARCH 412, ARCH 415 or equivalent. For ARCH majors 
only. Analysis, computer applications, and integration of environmental control and systems in 
architectural design. 

ARCH 621 Seminar in History of American Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 221 or ARCH 222 or permission of instructor. Advanced investigation of 
historical problems in American architecture. 
ARCH 628 Selected Topics in Architectural History (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 7 credits if content differs. Special topics 
in the history of architecture. 

ARCH 629 Independent Studies in Architectural History (1-3) 

Repeatable to 7 credits if content differs. Proposed worlc must have faculty sponsor and receive 
approval of the Educational Policy Committee. 
ARCH 635 Seminar in the History of Modern Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 434 or permission of department. Advanced investigation of historical prob- 
lems in modern architecture. 

ARCH 654 Urban Development and Design Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Advanced investigation into planning, development, and 
urban design theory and practice. 
ARCH 674 Seminar in Regionalism (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Regional characterisitics of culture, climate, and land- 
scape as determinants of vernacular architecture, especially in Third World countries. 
ARCH 675 Advanced Architectural Construction and Materials (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 375. ARCH 403, ARCH 412. ARCH 415. For ARCH majors only. Processes 
of construction, assembly, integration, and coordination of architectural, mechanical, electrical, 
and structural aspects of building; special attention to design development of building details. 
ARCH 676 Field Research in Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Recording and analysis of significant architectural com- 
plexes in situ. 

ARCH 678 Selected Topics in Architecture (1-6) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
ARCH 679 Independent Studies in Architecture (1-6) 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits. 
ARCH 700 Architecture Studio VII (6) 

Three hours of lecture and nine hours of studio per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 601. Continuation 
of ARCH 601. 

ARCH 770 Professional Practice (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 601. Project management, organizational, legal, economic and ethical as- 
pects of architecture. 



230 Course Descriptions 



ARCH 797 Thesis Proseminar (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 601. Directed research and preparation of thesis program. 
ARCH 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

AREC - Agriculture and Resource Economics 

AREC 404 Prices of Agricultural Products (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 403. An introduction to agricultural price behavior. The use of price infor- 
mation in the decision-making process, the relation of supply and demand in determining ag- 
ricultural prices, and the relation of prices to grade, time, location, and stages of processing in 
the marketing system. Elementary methods of price analysis, the concept of parity and the role 
of price support programs in agricultural decisions. 
AREC 405 Economics of Agricultural Production (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 403 and MA TH 220. The use and application of production economics in 
agriculture and resource industries through graphical and mathematical approaches. Production 
functions, cost functions, multiple product and joint production, and production processes through 
time. 

AREC 407 Agricultural Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: AREC 250. Application of economic principles to develop criteria for a sound farm 
business, including credit source and use, preparing and filing income tax returns, methods of 
appraising farm properties, the summary and analysis of farm records, leading to effective control 
and profitable operation of the farm business. 
AREC 414 Agricultural Business Management (3) 

Prerequisite: AREC 250. The different forms of businesses. Management functions, business 
indicators, measures of performance, and operational analysis. Case studies are used to show 
applications of management techniques. 
AREC 427 Economics of Agricultural Marketing Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: AREC 250. Basic economic theory as applied to the marketing of agricultural 
products, including price, cost, and financial analysis. Current developments affecting market 
structure including effects of contractual arrangement, vertical integration, governmental policies 
and regulation. 

AREC 432 Introduction to Natural Resources Policy (3) 

Development of natural resource policy and analysis of the evolution of public intervention in 
the use of natural resources. Examination of present policies and of conflicts between private 
individuals, public interest groups, and government agencies. 
AREC 433 Food and Agricultural Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: AREC 250. Economic and political context of governmental involvement in the 
farm and food sector. Historical programs and current policy issues. Analysis of economic effects 
of agricultural programs, their benefits and costs, and comparison of policy alternatives. Analyzes 
the interrelationship among international development, agricultural trade and general economic 
and domestic agricultural policies. 

AREC 445 Agricultural Development in the Third World (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 203 or ECON 205 or AREC 250. Development theories, the role of agri- 
culture in economic development, the agricultural policy environment, policies impacting on 
rural income and equity, environmental impacts of agricultural development. 
AREC 453 Natural Resources and Public Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: AREC 250 and ECON 203. Rational use and reuse of natural resources. Theory, 
methodology, and policies concerned with the allocation of natural resources among alternative 
uses. Optimum state of conservation, market failure, safe minimum standard, and cost-benefit 
analysis. 



AREC - Agriculture and Resource Economics 231 



AREC 484 Introduction to Econometrics in Agriculture (3) 

An introduction to the application of econometric techniques to agricultural problems with 
emphasis on the assumptions and computational techniques necessary to derive statistical esti- 
mates, test hypotheses, and make predictions with the use of single equation models. Includes 
hnear and non-linear regression models, internal least squares, discriminant analysis and factor 
analysis. 

AREC 489 Special Topics in Agricultural and Resources Economics (3) 
Repeatable to 9 credits. 

AREC 610 Microeconomic Applications in Agricultural and Resource Markets (3) 
Prerequisite: ECON 603. Applications of graduate level microeconomic analysis to the problems 
of agricultural and natural resource production and distribution including demand for agricultural 
output, the nature of agricultural supply decisions, farm labor issues, land rental and aquisition, 
and exploitation of natural resources. 

AREC 615 Agricultural and Resource Economics Research Techniques (3) 
Philosophy and basic objectives of research in the field of agricultural and resource economics. 
Topics include definition of research problems, logical procedures for executing research in the 
social sciences, techniques and tools available to agricultural and resource economists, and 
appraisal of research documents from the standpoint of procedures and evaluation of research. 
AREC 620 Optimization in Agricultural and Resource Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: differential calculus and one course in matrix or linear algebra. Mathematical theory 
of optimization as it is used in agricultural and resource economics. Topics include necessary 
and sufficient conditions for nonlinear programming and related Kuhn-Tucker and saddle point 
theory, convexity and concavity, existence and uniqueness, duality and the envelope theorem, 
the discrete maximum principle, and control theory and dynamic optimization. 
AREC 625 Economic Welfare Analysis (3) 

Credit will be granted for only one of the following: AREC 625 or AREC 825. The measurement 
of economic well-being for producers, consumers, and resource owners. Topics include com- 
petitive equilibrium, Pareto optimality, market failure, public goods and nonmarket welfare 
measurement, multimarket considerations, existing distortions, and second best. Applications 
in economic welfare analysis of agricultural and resource policies are discussed. 
AREC 632 Agricultural Policy Analysis (3) 

Credit will be granted for only one of the following: AREC 632 or AREC 832. The economics 
of agricultural policies. Methods for analyzing costs and benifits of price supports, import re- 
straints, and other policies for producers, consumers, and taxpayers. Farm programs of the U.S., 
other industrial countries and developing countries including interventions in both domestic 
markets and international are covered along with their consequences for factor owners and related 
commodity markets. Theories of the farm problem and possible remedies are offered. 
AREC 644 International Agricultural and Resource Trade (3) 

Credit will be granted for only one of the following: AREC 644 or AREC 844. An introduction 
to trade in agricultural products and natural resources. Partial and general equilibrium models 
as applied to problems in agricultural and and natural resource trade and in analyzing related 
trade policies of various countries to understand the impact of macroeconomic policy on inter- 
national agricultural and resource markets through exchange rates, interest rates and inflation. 
AREC 645 International Agricultural Development (3) 

Credit will be granted for only one of the following: AREC 645 or AREC 845. Microeconomic 
foundations of agricultural development, the behavior of the farm household as an economic 
unit, and the functioning of the agricultural product, input, and labor markets in developing 
economies. The role of agriculture in economic development is discussed with emphasis on the 
basic linkages between agriculture and the rest of the economy. 



232 Course Descriptions 



AREC 685 Applications of Mathematical Programming in Agriculture Business and Analysis 

(3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 403 or permission of department. Application of mathematical programming 
to problems in agriculture and resource economics. Emphasis on modeling large-scale systems 
and interpreting results in economic terms. 

AREC 689 Special Topics in Agricultural and Resource Economics (3) 

Subject matter taught will be varied and will depend on the persons available for teaching unique 
and specialized phases of agricultural and resource economics. The course will he taught by the 
staff or visiting agricultural and resource economists who may be secured on lectureship or 
visiting professor basis. 

AREC 699 Special Problems in Agricultural and Resource Economics (1-2) 
Intensive study and analysis of specific problems in the field of agricultural and resource eco- 
nomics, which provide information in depth in areas of special interest to the student. 
AREC 753 Economics of Renewable Natural Resources (3) 

Prerequisite: AREC 610; and AREC 620: or permission of department. Basic models of renewable 
natural resources. Current research issues concerning natural resources with emphasis on prob- 
lems in commercial and recreational fisheries, forestry, water, fugitive wildlife, and agriculture. 
Policies to correct related market failures. 

AREC 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

AREC 804 Advanced Agricultural Price and Demand Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 603 and AREC 610. Theories of household behavior and mechanisms of 
price determination. Static as well as intertemporal optimization problems arising from the 
simultaneous determination of savings and commodity demand with habit formation. Role of 
inventories in price formation, factors determining the degree of price flexibility, and price 
formation in noncompetitive industries. 

AREC 806 Advanced Agricultural Production Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 603 and AREC 610. Theory and methods of applied production analysis. 
Use of dual methods in the analysis of agricultural production problems, cost and profit functions, 
separability, technical change, aggregation, index numbers, and dynamic decision making. 

AREC 825 Advanced Economic Welfare Analysis (3) 

Credit will he granted for only one of the following: AREC 625 or AREC 825. Theory of economic 
welfare measurement, problems of path dependence in evaluating multiple price changes, welfare 
measurement under risk, general equilibrium welfare measurement with multiple distortions, 
and applications in evaluation of agricultural and resource policies. 

AREC 832 Advanced Agricultural Policy Analysis (3) 

Credit will be granted for only one of the following: AREC 632 or AREC 832. Research problems 
in agricultural policy that include models and methods for explaining the consequences and 
causes of intervention in agricultural commodity markets. Quantitative, market level analysis of 
the implications of uncertainty, strategic behavior in international trade, second-best policies, 
the general equilibrium analysis of intervention, and the political economy of collective action 
in farm policy. 

AREC 844 Advanced International Agricultural and Resource Trade (3) 

Credit will be granted for only one of the following: AREC 644 or AREC 844. Issues and problems 
of current interest in agricultural trade policy and research. Use of dual methods in international 
trade, the effect of international financial markets on agricultural trade and agriculture in general, 
the efficient design of agricultural trade policy, trade in resources, and measuring the gains from 
trade in any economy distorted by sectoral policies. 



ARTH - Art History 233 



AREC 845 Advanced International Agricultural Development (3) 

Credit will be granted for only one of the following: AREC 645 or AREC 845. Economic ine- 
qualities and market forces in economic development along with strategies and policies for 
economic development. Export oriented versus import substitution strategies, the role of foreign 
capital and debt accumulation in the agricultural sector, and the effects of government inter- 
vention on agricultural development. Case studies of selected Latin American, Asian and African 
countries. 

AREC 859 Advanced Topics in Natural Resource Economics (1-3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. Intertemporal considerations in natural resource problems 
including irreversibility and stochastic control. Nonmarket welfare measurement and noncon- 
sumptive values, option/quasi-option and existence values, applications to extinction and un- 
certainty, and alternative expectations in common property resource problems. 
AREC 869 Advanced Topics in Agricultural Economics (1-3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. Frontiers of research in agricultural policy, agricultural 
production, international trade, and agricultural development. Decision making under risk and 
related market institutions, principal agent analysis, optimal policy design, technology adoption, 
market structure, land and credit markets, information markets, and income distribution. 
AREC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

ARTH - Art History 

ARTH 400 Egyptian Art and Archaeology (3) 

Formerly ARTH 404. Sites and monuments of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor 

arts of ancient Egypt from earliest times through the Roman conquest. Emphasis on the pharaonic 

period. 

ARTH 401 Aegean Art and Archaeology (3) 

Formerly ARTH 404. Sites and monuments of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor 

arts of Crete, the Cycladic islands, and the Greek mainland from the earliest times to the downfall 

of the Mycenaean. 

ARTH 402 Greek Art and Archaeology (3) 

Sites and monuments of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts from the Geometric 

through the Hellenistic period with emphasis on mainland Greece in the Archaic and Classical 

periods. 

ARTH 403 Roman Art and Archaeology (3) 

Sites and monuments of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts from the earliest 

times through the third century A.D. with emphasis on the Italian peninsula from the Etruscan 

period through that of Imperial Rome. 

ARTH 405 Late Roman and Early Christian Art (3) 

Formerly ARTH 410. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts from the early third 

century through the sixth century A.D. 

ARTH 406 Byzantine Art (3) 

Formerly ARTH 411. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts from the seventh 

century to 1453 A.D. 

ARTH 410 Early Medieval Art (3) 

Formerly ARTH 412. Painting, sculpture and architecture in Western Europe, ca. 500-1150. 

ARTH 411 Gothic Art (3) 

Formerly ARTH 413. Painting, sculpture and architecture in Western Europe, ca. 1150-1400. 

ARTH 415 Italian Renaissance Art (3) 

Formerly ARTH 424. Painting, sculpture and architecture of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. 



234 Course Descriptions 



ARTH 418 Special Problems in Italian Renaissance Art (3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Focus upon Aspects of painting, sculpture, and archi- 
tecture of Renaissance. 

ARTH 420 Fourteenth and Fifteenth-Century Northern European Art (3) 
Formerly ARTH 416. The art of northern Europe with an emphasis on painting in the Netherlands 
and France. 

ARTH 425 Sixteenth-Century Northern European Painting (3) 

Formerly ARTH 417. Painting in France, Germany, England, and the Low Countries during the 
Renaissance and Reformation. 

ARTH 426 Renaissance and Baroque Sculpture in Northern Europe (3) 

Sculpture in France, Germany, England, and the Low Countries from the fourteenth to the 
seventeenth century. 

ARTH 430 Seventeenth-Century European Art (3) 

Painting, sculpture and architecture concentrating on Italy, Spain, France, and England. 
ARTH 435 Seventeenth-Century Art in the Netherlands (3) 

Formerly ARTH 431. Painting, sculpture and architecture in seventeenth-century Netherlands. 
ARTH 443 Eighteenth-Century European Art (3) 

From the Rococo to Neo-classicism, major developments in painting, architecture, sculpture, 
and the landscape garden in eighteenth-century France, England, Italy, Spain, and Germany. 
ARTH 444 British Painting, Hogarth to the Pre-Raphaelites (3) 

A survey of British painting focusing on the establishment of a strong native school in the genres 
of history painting, narrative subjects, portraiture, sporting art, and landscape. 
ARTH 445 Nineteenth-Century European Art to 1850 (3) 

Formerly ARTH 440. The major trends from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism in painting, sculp- 
ture and architecture in Europe. 

ARTH 446 Nineteenth-Century European Art from 1850 (3) 

Formerly ARTH 441. The major trends from Realism through Impressionism to Symbolism and 
Art Nouveau, in painting, sculpture, and architecture. 
ARTH 452 Nineteenth-Century Black American Art (3) 

Formerly ARTH 473. The visual arts of Black Americans from the Colonial period through the 
nineteenth century, including crafts and decorative arts. 
ARTH 453 History of American Art to 1876 (3) 

Painting, sculpture, architecture, and decorative arts in North America from the colonial period 
to 1876. 

ARTH 454 Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Sculpture (3) 
Trends in sculpture from Neo-Classicism to the present. 
ARTH 455 Twentieth-Century Art to 1945 (3) 

Formerly ARTH 450. Painting, sculpture and architecture in Europe and America from the late 
nineteenth century to the end of World War II. 
ARTH 456 Twentieth-Century Art from 1945 (3) 

Formerly ARTH 451. Painting, sculpture and architecture in Europe and America from 1945 to 
the present. 

ARTH 457 History of Photography (3) 

Formerly ARTH 452. History of photography as art from its inception in 1839 to the present. 
ARTH 460 American Art Since 1876 (3) 

Formerly ARTH 477. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts in North America 
after 1876. 



ARTH - Art History 235 



ARTH 462 Twentieth-Century Black American Art (3) 

Formerly ARTH 474. The visual arts of Black Americans in the twentieth century, including 
crafts and decorative arts. 

ARTH 466 Feminist Perspectives on Women in Art (3) 

Principal focus on European and American women artists of the 19th and 20th centuries, in the 
context of the new scholarship on women. 
ARTH 470 Latin American Art and Archaeology before 1500 (3) 

Pre-Hispanic painting, sculpture, and architecture, with a focus on the major archaeological 
monuments of Mexico. 

ARTH 471 Latin American Art and Archaeology after 1500 (3) 

The effect of mingling European visual ideas with pre-Hispanic traditions. The formation of 
Latin American colonial art. How native American people transformed European ideas and 
forms. 

ARTH 475 Ancient Art of Africa (3) 

Formerly ARTH 462. Art of the African continent from rock art through the nineteenth century. 
The cultural meaning of painting, sculpture, architecture, and artifacts from major archeological 
sites. 

ARTH 476 Living Art of Africa (3) 

Formerly ARTH 463. Art styles among the segmentary, centralised and nomadic people of Africa. 
The iconography and function of their art and its relationship to their various societies, cults 
and ceremonies. 

ARTH 483 Structure and Analysis of Art (3) 

Basic concepts of structuralism applied to the analysis of art. Visual examples, including pho- 
tography, cartoons, painting, and sculpture, emphasize the underlying logic of narrative themes 
in Western art ranging from the time of Giotto to the present. 
ARTH 489 Special Topics in Art History (3) 
Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. 
ARTH 490 Chinese Painting (3) 

Chinese painting history from the second century B.C. through the twentieth century, covering 
cultural, stylistic and theoretical aspects. 
ARTH 495 Japanese Painting (3) 

Formerly ARTH 405. Japanese painting from the sixth through the nineteenth century, including 
Buddhist icon painting, narrative scrolls, and Zen-related ink painting. 
ARTH 498 Directed Studies in Art History I (2-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable if content differs. Junior standing. 
ARTH 499 Directed Studies in Art History II (2-3) 
ARTH 608 Studies in Ancient Art and Archaeology (3) 
Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 
ARTH 609 Studies in Late Roman, Early Christian, and Byzantine Art (3) 
Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 
ARTH 618 Studies in Medieval Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 
ARTH 619 Studies in Italian Renaissance Art (3) 
Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 
ARTH 628 Studies in Fourteenth and Fifteenth Century Northern European Art (3) 
Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 



236 Course Descriptions 



ARTH 629 Studies in Sixteentli-Century Northern European Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 638 Studies in Seventeenth-Century Southern European Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 639 Studies in Seventeenth-Century Northern European Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 648 Studies in Eighteenth-Century European Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 649 Studies in Nineteenth-Century European Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 658 Studies in American Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 659 Studies in Twentieth-Century Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 668 Studies in Latin American Art and Archaeology (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 669 Studies in African Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 678 Studies in Chinese Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 679 Studies in Japanese Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 689 Selected Topics in Art History (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 692 Methods of Art History (3) 

Methods of research and criticism applied to typical art-historical problems; bibliography and 

other research tools. May be taken for credit one or two semesters. 

ARTH 695 Museum Colloquium (3) 

Formerly ARTH 698. 

ARTH 699 Special Topics in Art History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department head or instructor. 

ARTH 708 Seminar in Ancient Art and Archaeology (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. progratns. 

ARTH 709 Seminar in Late Roman, Early Christian, and Byzantine Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 718 Seminar in Medieval Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 719 Seminar in Italian Renaissance Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 728 Seminar in Fourteenth and Fifteenth-Century Northern European Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 729 Seminar in Sixteenth-Century Northern European Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 738 Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Southern European Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 



ARTT - Art Studio 237 



ARTH 739 Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Northern European Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 748 Seminar in Eighteenth-Century European Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 749 Seminar in Nineteenth-Century European Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 758 Seminar in American Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 759 Seminar in Twentieth-Century Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 768 Seminar in Latin American Art and Archaeology (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 769 Seminar in African Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 778 Seminar in Chinese Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 779 Seminar in Japanese Art (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 789 Selected Topics in Art History (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits each in the Master's and Ph.D. programs. 

ARTH 798 Directed Graduate Studies in Art History (3) 

ARTH 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

ARTH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

ARTT - Art Studio 

ARTT 404 Experiments in Visual Processes (3) 

Six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ARTT 220 or ARTT 330 or ARTT 340. Formerly 
ARTS 404. Investigation and execution of process oriented art. Group and individual experi- 
mental projects. 

ARTT 418 Drawing (3) 

Six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ARTT 210. Repeatable to 12 credits. Formerly 

ARTS 418. Original compositions from the figure and nature, supplemented by problems of 

personal and expressive drawing. 

ARTT 428 Painting (3) 

Six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ARTT 320. Repeatable to 12 credits. Formerly 

ARTS 428. Original compositions based upon nature, figure, still life and expressive painting 

emphasizing development of personal directions. 

ARTT 438 Sculpture (3) 

Six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: one 300-level sculpture course; and permission 
of department. Repeatable to 12 credits. Formerly ARTS 438. Continuation of 3CK)-level elements 
of sculpture courses with emphasis on developing personal directions in chosen media. 

ARTT 448 Printmaking (3) 

Six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: one 300-level printmaking course; and permission 
of department. Repeatable to 12 credits. Formerly ARTS 448. Continuation of 300-level elements 
of printmaking courses with emphasis on developing personal directions in chosen media. 



238 Course Descriptions 



ARTT 468 Advanced Seminar in Studio Art (3) 

Three hours of laboratory and three hours of discussion/recitation per week. Prerequisite: per- 
mission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. Formerly ARTS 468. Relationship of student's 
work to historical and contemporary context. 
ARTT 489 Special Problems in Studio Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. Formerly ARTS 489. 
ARTT 498 Directed Studies in Studio Art (2-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. For advanced students. Repeatable if content differs. 
Formerly ARTS 498. 
ARTT 610 Drawing (3) 

Formerly ARTS 610. Sustained treatment of a theme chosen by student. Wide variety of media. 
ARTT 614 Drawing (3) 

Formerly ARTS 614. Traditional materials and methods including oriental, sumi ink drawing 
and techniques of classical european masters. 
ARTT 616 Drawing (3) 

Formerly ARTS 616. Detailed anatomical study of the human figure and preparation of large 
scale mural compositions. 
ARTT 620 Painting (3) 
Formerly ARTS 620. 
ARTT 624 Painting (3) 
Formerly ARTS 624. 
ARTT 626 Painting (3) 
Formerly ARTS 626. 
ARTT 627 Painting (3) 
Formerly ARTS 627. 

ARTT 630 Experimentation in Sculpture (3) 
Formerly ARTS 630. 

ARTT 634 Experimentation in Sculpture (3) 
Formerly ARTS 634. 

ARTT 636 Materials and Techniques in Sculpture (3) 

For advanced students. Formerly ARTS 636. Methods of armature building, and the use of a 
variety of stone, wood, metal and plastic materials. 
ARTT 637 Sculpture: Casting and Foundry (3) 

Formerly ARTS 637. The traditional methods of plaster casting and the complicated types in- 
volving metal, cire perdue, sand-casting and newer methods, such as cold metal process. 
ARTT 640 Printmaking (3) 

Formerly ARTS 640. Advanced problems. Relief process. 
ARTT 644 Printmaking (3) 

Formerly ARTS 644. Advanced problems. Intaglio process. 
ARTT 646 Printmaking (3) 

Formerly ARTS 646. Advanced problems. Lithographic process. 
ARTT 647 Seminar in Printmaking (3) 
Formerly ARTS 647. 

ARTT 689 Special Problems in Studio Art (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits. Formerly ARTS 689. 
ARTT 690 Drawing and Painting (3) 
Formerly ARTS 690. Preparation and execution of a wall decoration. 



ASTR - Astronomy 239 



ARTT 698 Directed Graduate Studies in Studio Art (3) 

Prerequisites: for advanced graduate students by permission of department head. Course may be 
repeated for credit if content differs. Formerly ARTS 698. 

ARTT 798 Directed Graduate Studies in Studio Art (3) 

Formerly ARTS 798. 

ARTT 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

Formerly ARTS 799. 

ASTR - Astronomy 

ASTR 400 Stellar Astrophysics (3) 

Prerequisite: ASTR 350. Corequisite: PHYS 420 or PHYS 421. Radiation processes in stars and 
interstellar space, stellar atmospheres, stellar structure and evolution. 

ASTR 410 Observational Astronomy I (3) 

Prerequisites: PHYS 294 or PHYS 263; and 3 credits in astronomy. An introduction to current 
methods of obtaining astronomical information. Emphasis on optical and radio techniques, with 
brief coverage of X-ray, ultraviolet, and infrared techniques. Emphasis on understanding how 
instruments affect the data. 

ASTR 411 Observational Astronomy 11 (3) 

Prerequisite: ASTR 410. Laboratory work with photographic and photoelectric techniques and 
with components of radio telescopes. Two longer individual projects involving observations with 
various instruments. Often requires all-night observing sessions. 

ASTR 420 Introduction to Galactic Research (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 272 and ASTR 350 or equivalent or permission of department. Methods of 
galactic research, stellar motions, clusters of stars, evolution of the galaxy, study of our own and 
nearby galaxies. 

ASTR 430 The Solar System (3) 

Prerequisite: MA TH 246 and either PHYS 263 or PHYS 273, or permission of department. The 
structure of planetary atmospheres, radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres, remote sensing 
of planetary surfaces, interior structure of planets. Structure of comets. Brief discussions of 
asteroids, satellite systems, and solar system evolution. Intended for students majoring in any 
of the physical sciences. 

ASTR 440 Introduction to Extra-Galactic Astronomy (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 272 and ASTR 350 or equivalent, or permission of department. Properties 
of normal and peculiar galaxies, including radio galaxies and quasars; expansion of the universe 
and cosmology. 

ASTR 450 Celestial Mechanics (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 410 or permission of department. Celestial mechanics, orbit theory, equations 
of motion. 

ASTR 498 Special Problems in Astronomy (1-6) 

Prerequisite: major in physics or astronomy or permission of department. Research or special 

study. Credit according to work done. 

ASTR 600 Stellar Atmospheres (3) 

Prerequisite: ASTR 422 or permission of department. Structure of stellar atmospheres, survey of 
atomic and molecular physics, absorption coefficients and radiative transfer, numerical tech- 
niques, calculation of model atmospheres and comparison with observations, discussion of line 
profiles, stellar winds and coronae. 



240 Course Descriptions 



ASTR 605 Stellar Interiors and Evolution (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 410, PHYS 422 or equivalent. Energy transfer and generation in the interior 
of a star, evolution of stars, nucleosynthesis, variable stars, explosive stars, neutron stars and 
black holes. 

ASTR 610 Astronomical Instrumentation and Techniques (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 405 or permission of department. Review of Maxwell's equations; designs of 
telescopes, spectrographs, modern detectors; basic concepts for radio detectors and telescopes; 
interferometry and data processing. 
ASTR 620 Galaxies (3) 

Prerequisite: ASTR 400 or permission of department. Galaxy classifications; Milky way: basic 
data, distribution of stars, gas, dust and relativistic particles, large-scale structure and rotation; 
Spiral galaxies: stellar dynamics and stability, density waves, star bursts, galactic center; Elliptical 
galaxies: stellar dynamics, cannabalism; galaxy formation. 
ASTR 630 Physics of the Solar System (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 422. A survey of the problems of interplanetary space, the solar wind, comets 
and meteors, planetary structure and atmospheres, motions of particles in the earth's magnetic 
field. 

ASTR 640 Radiation and Plasma Processes (3) 

Corequisite: PHYS 606 or permission of department. Radiation processes with emphasis on 
radiation from energetic electrons, synchrotron and inverse-Compton radiation, bremsstrahlung 
and astrophysical applications. The plasma dielectric and the "zoo" of plasma waves. Use of 
kinetic theory to derive fluid dynamics; discussion of MHD in its various limits of astrophysical 
use; some instabilities. 
ASTR 670 Interstellar Matter (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 422 or permission of department. Photo-ionization processes, classical di- 
agnostics of the interstellar medium, physics of supernova remnants, molecules, dynamics of the 
formation of clouds and stars, cosmic rays and their acceleration. 
ASTR 688 Special Topics in Modern Astronomy (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Special topics such as extragalactic radio sources, plasma 
astrophysics, the H.R. diagram, chemistry of the interstellar medium, radiophysics of the sun. 
ASTR 690 Reasearch Project I (3) 
ASTR 691 Research Project II (3) 

ASTR 699 Special Problems in Advanced Astronomy (1-6) 
ASTR 760 Solar Physics (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 606. Corequisite: ASTR 640 or PHYS 761, or permission of department. The 
structure of the solar atmosphere, observations and theoretical interpretation of the solar corona, 
solar flares, solar cycles and oscillations, and their relationship to other stars. 
ASTR 788 Selected Topics in Modern Astronomy (1-3) 
ASTR 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
ASTR 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

BCHM - Biochemistry 

BCHM 461 Biochemistry I (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 243 or CHEM 245. A comprehensive introduction to general biochemistry. 

The chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. 

BCHM 462 Biochemistry II (3) 

Prerequisite: BCHM 46L A continuation of BCHM 461. 



BIOL -Biology 241 



BCHM 463 Biochemistry Laboratory I (2) 

Six hours of laboratory per week. Pre- or corequisite: BCHM 461. 
BCHM 464 Biochemistry Laboratory II (2) 

Six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 483 or BCHM 463. Pre- or corequisite: 
BCHM 462. 

BCHM 666 Biophysical Chemistry (2) 
Prerequisites: BCHM 461 and CHEM 482. 
BCHM 668 Special Problems in Biochemistry (2-4) 

Two to four three-hour laboratory periods per week Prerequisite: BCHM 464 or equivalent. 
BCHM 669 Special Topics in Biochemistry (2) 
Prerequisite: BCHM 462 or equivalent. 
BCHM 671 Protein Chemistry and Enzymic Catalysis (3) 

Principles of protein structure and function, characterization of active sites, enzyme mechanisms 
and kinetics, antibody structure. 
BCHM 672 Biological Membranes (3) 

Organization of biological membranes, metabolism of membrane lipids, membrane proteins, 
including receptors, membrane functions including bioenergetics and transport, assembly of 
membranes. 

BCHM 673 Regulation of Metabolism (3) 

Intracellular milieu, compartmentation, metabolic and enzymic approaches to identifying control 
points, regulation by covalent modification of enzymes, metabolic disorders. 
BCHM 674 Nucleic Acids (3) 

Chemistry of nucleotides and polynucleotides, organization of cells and genomes from viruses 
to eukaryotes, DNA replication, RNA synthesis, ribosome biogenesis, regulation of protein 
synthesis. 

BCHM 699 Special Problems in Biochemistry (1-6) 

Prerequisite: one semester of graduate study in biochemistry. Repeatable to 6 credits if content 
differs. Laboratory experience in a research environment. Restricted to students in the non- 
thesis M.S. option. 

BCHM 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
BCHM 898 Seminar (1) 
BCHM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

BIOL - Biology 

BIOL 501 Life Science for Middle School Teachers I (4) 

Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. An introductory lecture/laboratory course 

for teachers emphasizing the process and interdependence of living organisms, their general 

organization and association with humans in natural ecosystems. Discussion of the genetic and 

evolutionary process involved in the continuity of life. 

BIOL 502 Life Science for Middle School Teachers II (4) 

Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 501 . A second-level 

lecture/laboratory course that provides a general introduction to the classification, anatomy and 

physiology of plants and animals, with a special emphasis on humans. 

BIOL 503 Life Science for Middle School Teachers III (4) 

Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 502. A third-level 

laboratory/field course that investigates the ecology and natural history of the Chesapeake Bay 

and human's relationship to it. 



242 Course Descriptions 



BIOM - Biometrics 

BIOM 401 Biostatistics I (4) 

Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion/recitation per week. Prerequisite: BIOM 301. 
Descriptive statistics, probability models useful in biology, expectations, hypothesis testing, 
goodness of fit tests, central limit theorem, point and interval estimates, analysis of variance, 
regression, correlation, sampling, rank tests. Emphasis on the uses and the limitations of these 
methods in biology. 

BIOM 405 Computer Applications in Biometrics (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: BIOM 401. An introduction to computer usage 
in statistical analyses. Topics include file manipulation, formatting data, transformations, de- 
scriptive statistics, graphical displays of data, and several introductory inferential statistical pro- 
cedures. 

BIOM 420 Sampling Techniques in Biometrics (3) 

Prerequisite: BIOM 401. Methods of sampling: probability, random, cluster, stratified, inverse; 
ratio estimates; methods in field surveys: mark recapture studies, line transect sampling; surveys, 
design of collection forms; sample size calculations. Emphasis on the use of these methods in 
biological research. 
BIOM 602 Biostatistics II (3) 

Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion/recitation per week. Prerequisite: BIOM 401 
or equivalent. The principles of experimental design and analysis of variance and covariance. 
BIOM 603 Biostatistics m (3) 

Corequisite: BIOM 604. Prerequisite: BIOM 602; and BIOM 405 or equivalent. Applications 
of the general linear model to the life sciences. 
BIOM 604 Linear Models Computer Laboratory (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: BIOM 603. Prerequisite: BIOM 405. Imple- 
mentation of linear model analyses common to the life sciences. 
BIOM 688 Topics in Biometrics (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Advanced topics 
of current interest in various areas of biometrics. Credit assigned will depend on lecture and/or 
laboratory time scheduled and organization of the course. 
BIOM 698 Special Problems in Biometrics (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of both department and instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
Individual study of a particular topic in biostatistics or biomathematics. 
BIOM 699 Seminar in Biometrics (1) 

BMGT - Business and Management 

BMGT 402 Database and Data Communication Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 302. Introduction to database and data communications systems. Modeling 
and database construction using the three data models: network, relational and hierarchical. 
Implementation project using DMS 1100 database system. Data communications protocols and 
communications support software. Analysis of distributed systems and computer networks. Em- 
phasis on new technologies. 
BMGT 403 Systems Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 402. Techniques and tools applicable to the analysis and design of computer 
based information systems. System life cycle, requirements analysis, logical design of data bases, 
performance evaluation. Emphasis on case studies. Project required that involves the design, 
analysis and implementation of an information system. 



BMGT - Business and Management 243 



BMGT 404 Seminar in Decision Support Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 301. Design of computer systems to solve business problems and to support 
decision making. Human and organizational factors are considered. Emphasis on case studies. 
BMGT 410 Fund Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 310. An introduction to the fund-based theory and practice of accounting 
as applied to governmental entities and not-for-profit associations. 
BMGT 417 Advanced Tax Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 311: and BMGT 323. Federal taxation of corporations, partnerships, fi- 
duciaries, and gratuitous transfers. Tools and techniques of tax research for compliance and 
planning. 

BMGT 420 Undergraduate Accounting Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing as an accounting major or permission of department. Enrollment 
limited to upper one-third of senior class. Seminar coverage of outstanding current non-text 
literature, current problems and case studies in accounting. 

BMGT 421 Undergraduate Accounting Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing as an accounting major or permission of department. Enrollment 
limited to upper one-third of senior class. Seminar coverage of outstanding current non-text 
literature, current problems and case studies in accounting. 

BMGT 422 Auditing Theory and Practice (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 311. A study of the independent accountant's attest function, generally 
accepted auditing standards, compliance and substantive tests, and report forms and opinions. 

BMGT 424 Advanced Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 311 . Advanced accounting theory applied to specialized topics and current 
problems. Emphasis on consolidated statements and partnership accounting. 

BMGT 426 Advanced Cost Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 321. Advanced cost accounting with emphasis on managerial aspects of 
internal record-keeping and control systems. 

BMGT 427 Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 422. An examination and in-depth study of special auditing topics such as 
statistical sampHng, professional ethics, ED? auditing, legal liability, and SEC accounting. 

BMGT 430 Linear Statistical Models in Business (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 230 or BMGT 231 or permission of department. Model building involving 
an intensive study of the general linear stochastic model and the applications of this model to 
business problems. The model is derived in matrix form and this form is used to analyze both 
the regression and ANOVA formulations of the general linear model. 

BMGT 431 Design of Statistical Experiments in Business (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 230 or BMGT 231. Surveys ANOVA models, basic and advanced experi- 
mental design concepts. Non-parametric tests and correlations are emphasized. Applications of 
these techniques to business problems in primarily the marketing and behavioral sciences are 
stressed. 

BMGT 432 Sample Survey Design For Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 230; or BMGT 231. Design of probability samples. Simple random sampling, 
stratified random sampling, systematic sampling, and cluster sampling designs are developed and 
compared for efficiency under varying assumptions about the population sampled. Advanced 
designs such as multistage cluster sampling and replicated sampling are surveyed. Implementing 
these techniques in estimating parameters of business models is stressed. 



244 Course Descriptions 



BMGT 434 Introduction to Optimization Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: MA TH 220; or permission of department. Primarily for students majoring in man- 
agement science and statistics. Linear programming, postoptimality analysis, network algorithms, 
dynamic programming, nonlinear programming and single variable minimization. 
BMGT 435 Introduction to Applied Probability Models (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 231 or permission of department. Statistical models in management. Review 
of probability theory, Monte Carlo methods, discrete event simulation, Markov chains, queueing 
analysis, other topics depending upon time. Guass, a higher-level computer language, will be 
introduced in the class and the students will carry out various exercises using this language. 
BMGT 440 Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 340. Analysis and discussion of cases and readings relating to financial 
decisions of the firm. The application of finance concepts to the solution of financial problems 
is emphasized. 

BMGT 443 Security Analysis and Valuation (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 343. Study and application of the concepts, methods, models, and empirical 
findings to the analysis, valuation, and selection of securities, especially common stock. 
BMGT 444 Futures Contracts and Options (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 343. The institutional features and economic rationale underlying markets 
in futures and options. Hedging, speculation, structure of futures prices, interest rate futures, 
efficiency in futures markets, and stock and commodity options. 
BMGT 445 Commercial Bank Management (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 340; and ECON 430. Analysis and discussion of cases and readings in 
commercial bank management. The loan function is emphasized; also the management of liquidity 
reserves, investments for income, and source of funds. Bank objectives, functions, policies, 
organization, structure, services, and regulation are considered. 
BMGT 451 Consumer Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 350. Recommended: PSYC 100; and PSYC 221. Not open to students who 
have completed CNEC 437. Credit will he granted for only one of the following: BMGT 451 or 
CNEC 437. American consumers in the marketing system. Underlying consumer behavior such 
as economic, social, psychological and cultural factors. Analysis of consumers in marketing 
situations - as a buyer and user of products and services - and in relation to the various individual 
social and marketing factors affecting their behavior. The influence of marketing communications 
is also considered. 

BMGT 452 Marketing Research Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 230; and BMGT 451. Formerly BMGT 450. Develops skills in the use of 
scientific methods in the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of marketing data. It covers the 
specialized fields of marketing research; the planning of survey projects, sample design, tabulation 
procedure and report preparation. 
BMGT 453 Industrial Marketing (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 350 plus one other marketing course. The industrial and business sector of 
the marketing system is considered rather than the household or ultimate consumer sector. 
Industrial products range from raw materials and supplies to the major equipment in a plant, 
business office, or institution. Topics include product planning and introduction, market analysis 
and forecasting, channels, pricing, field sales force management, advertising, marketing cost 
analysis, and government relations. Particular attention is given to industrial, business and in- 
stitutional buying policies and practice and to the analysis of buyer behavior. 
BMGT 454 International Marketing (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 350 plus one other marketing course. Marketing functions from the inter- 
national executive's viewpoint, including coverage of international marketing policies relating to 



BMGT - Business and Management 245 



product adaptation, data collection and analysis, channels of distribution, pricing, communica- 
tions, and cost analysis. Consideration is given to the cultural, legal, financial, and organizational 
aspects of international marketing. 
BMGT 455 Sales Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 350. The role of the sales manager, both at headquarters and in the field, 
in the management of people, resources and marketing functions. An analysis of the problems 
involved in sales organization, forecasting, planning, communicating, evaluating and controlling. 
The application of quantitative techniques and pertinent behavioral science concepts in the 
management of the sales effort and sales force. 
BMGT 456 Advertising (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 350. The role of advertising in the American economy; the impact of 
advertising on our economic and social life, the methods and techniques currently applied by 
advertising practitioners; the role of the newspaper, magazine, and other media in the devel- 
opment of an advertising campaign, modem research methods to improve the effectiveness of 
advertising and the organization of the advertising business. 
BMGT 457 Marketing Policies and Strategies (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 452. Integrative decision making in marketing. Emphasis on consumer and 
market analysis and the appropriate decision models. Case studies are included. 
BMGT 460 Personnel Management: Analysis and Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 360. Recommended: BMGT 230. Research findings, special readings, case 
analysis, simulation, and field investigations are used to develop a better understanding of 
personnel problems, alternative solutions and their practical ramifications. 
BMGT 461 Entrepreneurship (3) 

Process of creating new ventures, including evaluating the entrepreneurial team, the opportunity 
and the financing requirements. Skills, concepts, mental attitudes and knowledge relevant for 
starting a new business. 
BMGT 462 Labor Legislation (3) 

Case method analysis of the modern law of industrial relations. Cases include the decisions of 
administrative agencies, courts and arbitration tribunals. 
BMGT 463 Public Sector Labor Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 362; or permission of department. Development and structure of labor 
relations in public sector employment; federal, state, and local government responses to union- 
ization and collective bargaining. 
BMGT 464 Organizational Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 364. An examination of research and theory concerning the forces which 
contribute to the behavior of organizational members. Topics covered include: work group 
behavior, supervisory behavior, intergroup relations, employee goals and attitudes, communi- 
cation problems, organizational change, and organizational goals and design. 
BMGT 467 Undergraduate Seminar in Personnel Management (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. This course is open only to the top one-third of under- 
graduate majors in personnel and labor relations and is offered during the fall semester of each 
year. Highlights major developments. Guest lecturers make periodic presentations. 
BMGT 470 Carrier Management (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 370: and BMGT 372. Integration of the functions available to managers 
in transportation companies including planning, directing and implemention of policies. Emphasis 
on the changing environment in which managers of transportation carriers function. 
BMGT 473 Advanced Transportation Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 370. A critical examination of current government transportation policy 
and proposed solutions. Urban and intercity managerial transport problems are also considered. 



246 Course Descriptions 



BMGT 474 Urban Transport and Urban Development (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 203: or ECON 205. An analysis of the role of urban transportation in present 

and future urban development. The interaction of transport pricing and service, urban planning, 

institutional restraints, and public land uses is studied. 

BMGT 475 Advanced Logistics Management (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 370; and BMGT 372. Application of the concepts of BMGT 372 to problem 

solving and special projects in logistics management. Case analysis is stressed. 

BMGT 476 Applied Computer Models in Transportation and Logistics (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 370: and BMGT 372. Introduction to the expanding base of computer 
software in the transportation and logistics fields. Applications of particular relevance to carrier 
and shipper issues in a deregulated environment. 
BMGT 477 International Transportation and Logistics (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 370; and BMGT 372. Analysis of the structure, service, pricing and com- 
petitive relationship of U.S. international carriers and transport intermediaries. Examination of 
the role of foreign competitors, managerial and economic factors and politically imposed re- 
strictions. Business and public policy implications of transportation in developing countries and 
their interface with international trade and development. 
BMGT 480 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

Junior standing. Principal ideas in law stressing those relevant for the modern business executive 
with focus on legal reasoning as it has evolved in this country. Leading antitrust cases illustrating 
the reasoning process as well as the interplay of business, philosophy, and the various conceptions 
of the nature of law which give direction to the process. Examination of contemporary legal 
problems and proposed solutions, especially those most likely to affect the business community. 

BMGT 481 Public Utilities (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 203; or ECON 205. Using the regulated industries as specific examples, 
attention is focused on broad and general problems in such diverse fields as constitutional law, 
administrative law, public administration, government control of business, advanced economic 
theory, accounting, valuation and depreciation, taxation, finance, engineering, and management. 

BMGT 482 Business and Government (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 203; or ECON 205. A study of the role of government in modern economic 
life. Social control of business as a remedy for the abuses of business enterprise arising from the 
decline of competition. Criteria of limitations on government regulation of private enterprise. 
BMGT 485 Advanced Production Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 385. A study of typical problems encountered by the factory manager. The 
objective is to develop the ability to analyze and solve problems in management control of 
production and in the formulation of production policies. Among the topics covered are plant 
location, production planning and control, methods analysis, and time study. 

BMGT 490 Urban Land Management (3) 

Covers the managerial and decision making aspects of urban land and property. Included are 
such subjects as land use and valuation matters. 

BMGT 493 Honors Study (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. First semester of the senior year. The course is designed 
for honors students who have elected to conduct intensive study (independent or group). The 
student will work under the direct guidance of a faculty advisor and the Director of Undergraduate 
Studies. They shall determine that the area of study is of a scope and intensity deserving of a 
candidate's attention. Formal written and/or oral reports on the study may be required by the 
faculty advisor. 



BMGT - Business and Management 247 



BMGT 494 Honors Study (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 493, and continued candidacy for honors in Business and Management. 
Second semester of the senior year. The student shall continue and complete the research initiated 
in BMGT 493, additional reports may be required at the discretion of the faculty advisor and 
Director of Undergraduate Studies. 
BMGT 495 Business Policies (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 340; and BMGT 350; and BMGT 364. A case study course where students 
apply what they have learned of general management principles and their specialized functional 
applications to the overall management function in the enterprise. 
BMGT 496 Business and Society (3) 

Prerequisite: one course in BMGT; or permission of department. Normative role of business in 
society; consideration of the sometimes conflicting interests and claims on the firm and its 
objectives. 

BMGT 498 Special Topics in Business and Management (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Special topics 
in business and management designed to meet the changing needs and interests of students and 
faculty. 

BMGT 501 Business Functions (4) 

Intensive review of marketing and finance functions in the business enterprise. Credit not ap- 
plicable to graduate degrees. 

BMGT 505 Organizational Behavior and Strategic Management (3) 

Intensive review of organizational behavior theory, and administrative processes and policy in 
the business enterprise. Credit not applicable to graduate degrees. 
BMGT 610 Financial Accounting (3) 

Intensive review of the technical and conceptual aspects of financial accounting and accounting 
information systems as they apply to the business enterprise. 

BMGT 611 Managerial Accounting I (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 610. The use of accounting data for corporate financial planning and control. 
Organization for control, profit planning, budgeting, relevant costing, return on investment, and 
administration of the controUership function in smaller organizations. 
BMGT 620 Management Information Systems (3) 

The concepts, theory and techniques of information systems. The system life cycle. The role of 
information systems in the management and control of the organization. Effectiveness measures 
of information systems. Case studies of information systems as developed by industry and gov- 
ernment. Societal impact. 
BMGT 630 Managerial Statistics I (3) 

Application of statistical concepts to solution of business problems; laboratory use of computer 
packages. 

BMGT 631 Operations Research and Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 630. Application of operations research and operations management con- 
cepts to solution of business problems. Emphasis on integrated approach to management decision 
making. 

BMGT 640 Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 610; and BMGT 630. The role of financial management in the firm. Val- 
uation and leverage, capital budgeting, cost of capital, dividend policy, long-term financing, 
working capital management, short-term financing, intermediate-term financing and leasing, 
mergers and international financial management topics. 



248 Course Descriptions 



BMGT 650 Marketing Management (3) 

Analysis of marketing problems and evaluation of specific marketing efforts regarding the or- 
ganization's products and services, pricing activities, channel selection, and promotion strategies 
in both domestic and international markets. 
BMGT 660 Management and Organizational Behavior (3) 

The influence of the behavioral sciences on the theory and practice of management. Motivation, 
leadership, and international styles of management. 
BMGT 661 Human Resources Management (3) 

The human resource function in organizations. Human resource planning, procurement and 
selection, training and development, performance appraisal, wage and salary administration, 
and equal employment opportunity. 
BMGT 670 Economic Environment (3) 

The macroeconomic environment and its impact on the business enterprise. Nature of economic 
fluctuations, analysis of consumer spending, theory and analysis of investment spending, supply 
and demand for money and capital, modern macroeconomic theory, international problems, 
forecasting and an analysis of economic conditions. 
BMGT 671 Managerial Economics (3) 

The application of economic theory to the business enterprise in respect to the determination 
of policy and the handling of management problems with particular reference to the firm pro- 
ducing a complex line of products, nature of competition, pricing policy, interrelationship of 
production and marketing problems, basic types of cost, control systems, theories of depreciation 
and investment and the impact of each upon costs. 
BMGT 672 Physical Distribution Management (3) 

Managerial practices required to fulfil the physical movement needs of extractive, manufacturing, 
and merchandising firms. The total cost approach to physical distribution. Interrelations among 
purchased transport services, privately-supplied transport services, warehousing, inventory con- 
trol, materials handling, packaging, and plant location. The communications network to support 
physical distribution. The problems of coordination between the physical movement management 
function and other functional areas within the business firm, such as accounting, finance, mar- 
keting, and production. 
BMGT 680 Business and Public Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 670. Survey of conceptual and legal aspects of the business-environment 
relationship; nature of public policy; major historic and current policy issues; business role in 
the policy process; developing and managing corporate social policy and impact; special problems 
of the multinational corporation. 
BMGT 690 Strategic Management (3) 

Prerequisites: permission of department: and completion of all other MBA core courses before 
registering for this course. Case studies and research in the identification of management problems, 
the evaluation of alternative solutions, and the recommendation for management implementa- 
tion. 

BMGT 702 Applied Security Analysis and Portfolio Management (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 640; and BMGT 743: and permission of department. Applications in def- 
inition of investment objectives, security analysis, portfolio analysis, portfolio selection, and 
portfolio management as they relate to the MBA Educational Investment Fund. Emphasis on 
analysis and recommendations. 
BMGT 710 Advanced Accounting Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 610. Contemporary issues in financial accounting. The nature of income, 
the relationship between asset valuation and income determination, and various approaches to 



BMGT - Business and Management 249 



accounting for inflation. The accounting standards setting process. The measurement and val- 
uation of assets (e.g., foreign investments) and liabilities (e.g., leases and pensions). 
BMGT 711 Advanced Managerial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: permission of department; and completion of all first year MBA courses before 
registering for this course. Study of advanced topics such as residual income, transfer pricing, 
information inductance, break-even analysis under uncertainty, statistical significance of standard 
cost variance, cost analysis and pricing decisions, distribution cost accounting, accounting data 
and managerial incentive contracts, and decision support systems for capital budgeting. 
BMGT 712 Accounting in Regulated Industries (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 611. Study of the unique accounting problems of industrial regulation by 
governmental agencies. 

BMGT 713 The Impact of Taxation On Business Decisions (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 611. The impact of tax law and regulations on alternative strategies with 
particular emphasis on the large, multidivisional firm. Problems of acquisitions, mergers, spinoffs, 
and other divestitures from the viewpoint of profit planning, cash flow, and tax deferment. 
BMGT 715 International Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 611. International accounting, its problems and organization with the study 
of the issues involved; international standards of accounting and auditing; national differences 
in accounting thought and practice. 
BMGT 721 File Processing and Database Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Concepts and techniques for structuring data on secondary 
storage devices. Experience in the use of these techniques. The basic data structures necessary 
for these techniques. Typical file processing applications. 
BMGT 724 Economics of Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 620; or BMGT 721. Methods for the economic construction and operation 
of computer systems. Techniques for sizing and costing system components and for optimizing 
system design. Methods for efficient utilization of computer resources with particular consid- 
eration of relevant economic topics such as transfer pricing, joint costs, peak load pricing problems 
and public goods problems. 

BMGT 725 Information Systems Analysis and Design (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 620; or BMGT 721. Introduction to practical techniques for information 
systems and design. Design requirements for information processing systems. Models and tools 
for requirement analysis. Case studies for actual systems and applications. 
BMGT 726 Distributed Data Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 620; or BMGT 721. Introduction to distributed data processing concepts. 
The building blocks of distributed systems: computers, terminals, and communications; the 
interface and protocols that allow them to function as an integrated system. Major categories 
of distributed systems; resource-sharing networks, multiple-processor networks, and tightly cou- 
pled multiprocessors. 

BMGT 727 Security and Control of Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 620; or BMGT 721. The information control risks faced by corporations. 
Techniques for enhancing the security and integrity of corporate information resources. The 
auditing and control procedures for corporate information systems. Actual case studies. 

BMGT 731 Theory of Survey Design (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 630. The usefulness of statistical principles in survey design. The nature of 
statistical estimation, the differential attributes of different estimators, the merits and weaknesses 
of available sampling methods and designs, the distinctive aspects of simple random samples, 



250 Course Descriptions 



stratified random samples, and cluster samples, ratio estimates and the problems posed by biases 
and non-sampling errors. 
BMGT 733 Managerial Statistics II (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 630 or equivalent. Covers simple and multiple regression, including poly- 
nomial regression, residual analysis, multicoUinearity, autocorrelation, model selection tech- 
niques, analysis of variance and experimental design. 
BMGT 735 Application of Management Science (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 631. Selected topics and case studies in the application of management 
science to decision making in various functional fields. 
BMGT 736 Philosophy and Practice of Management Science (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 630; and BMGT 632. Critical examination of the philosophy underlining 
the techniques and methodology of management science from a systems analysis point of view. 
BMGT 737 Management Simulation (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 631. Methodology of systems simulation, Monte Carlo simulation, and 
discrete simulation. Verification and validation of simulation models with computer applications. 
BMGT 740 New Venture Financing (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 640 or permission of department. Development of skills for financing new 
ventures (both small and potentially large). Exploration of various funding sources. Criteria used 
in evaluation and decision process, including commercial banks, venture capital companies, small 
business investment companies, underwriters, private placement-financial consultants, mortgage 
bankers, and small business innovative research grants (U.S. Government). Topics will include: 
methods of financing, techniques for valuing new businesses, financial structure, and evaluation 
methods used by investors and lenders. 
BMGT 741 Advanced Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 640. Concepts underlying financial decision making in the firm. Case studies, 
model building and applications in financial theory and management. 
BMGT 742 Financial Planning and Strategy (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 640. Integration and extension of financial theory to financial planning and 
strategy. Financial decision making through case analysis and financial planning models. 
BMGT 743 Investment Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 640. Methods of security selection and portfolio management in the debt 
and equity markets. Investment alternatives, securities markets, bond and common stock val- 
uation, options, portfolio theory, and behavior of stock prices. 
BMGT 744 Futures Contracts and Options Management (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 640. The institutional features and economic rationale underlying markets 
in futures and options. Hedging, speculation, structure of futures prices, interest rate futures, 
efficiency in futures markets, and stock and commodity options. Current journal literature. 
BMGT 745 Financial Institutions Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 640. The role of financial management in financial institutions. The economic 
role and regulation of financial institutions, analysis of risks and returns on financial assets and 
habilities, and the structure of assets, liabilities and capital. 
BMGT 746 International Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 640. The role of financial management in the multinational firm. The fi- 
nancing and managing of foreign investments, assets, currencies, imports and exports. National 
and international financial institutions and markets. 
BMGT 751 Marketing Communications Management (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 650. The role of advertising, promotion, public relations and related efforts 
in the accomplishment of a firm's total marketing objectives. The development of competence 



BMGT - Business and Management 251 



in the formulation of mass communications, objectives in budget optimization, media appraisal, 
theme selection, program implementation and management, and results measurement. 
BMGT 752 Marketing Research Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: BMGT 630; and BMGT 650. The process of acquiring, classifying and interpreting 
primary and secondary marketing data needed for intelligent, profitable marketing decisions. 
Evaluation of the appropriateness of alternative methodologies such as the inductive, deductive, 
survey, observational, and experimental. Recent developments in the systematic recording and 
use of internal and external data needed for marketing decisions. 
BMGT 753 International Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 650. Environmental, organizational, and financial aspects of international 
marketing as well as problems of marketing research, pricing, channels of distribution, product 
policy, and communications which face U.S. firms trading with foreign firms or which face foreign 
firms in their operations. 
BMGT 754 Buyer Behavior Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 650. A systematic examination and evaluation of the literature, research 
tradition and theory of buyer behavior in the market place from a fundamental and applied 
perspective. The cognitive and behavioral bases underlying the buying process of individuals and 
institutions. 

BMGT 756 Business-to-Business Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 650. Problems and processes in marketing to organizational customers rather 
than final consumers. Basic marketing strategies and behavioral models adjusted to accommodate 
the unique requirements of marketing to business and governmental customers. 
BMGT 761 Problems and Applications in Personnel Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 661. Applications in the design, implementation, and evaluation of human 
resource management programs. Experiential learning activities and simulations. 
BMGT 762 Problems and Issues in Collective Bargaining (3) 

Current problems and issues in collective bargaining, including methods of handling industrial 
disputes, legal restrictions on various collective bargaining activities, theory and philosophy of 
collective bargaining, and internal union problems. 
BMGT 763 Administration of Labor Relations (3) 

Analysis of labor relations at the plant level with emphasis on the negotiation and administration 
of labor contracts. Union policy and influence on personnel management activities. 
BMGT 765 Application of Behaviorial Science to Business (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 660. Case analysis of behavioral knowledge apphed to management prob- 
lems. Analysis of modes for introducing change, group versus organizational goals, organizational 
barriers to personal growth, the effect of authority systems on behavior, and the relationship 
between technology and social structure. 
BMGT 766 Management Planning and Control Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 660. Analysis of planning and control systems as they relate to the fulfillment 
of organizational objectives. Identification of organizational objectives, responsibility centers, 
information needs, and information networks. Case studies of integrated planning and control 
systems. 

BMGT 767 Implementing Strategy: Organizing to Compete (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of the MBA core requirements or permission of department. Recom- 
mended: BMGT 690. Organizational dynamics of competitive advantage. Impact of alternative 
organizational structures, planning and control systems, human resource management practices, 
and executive leadership styles on the implementation of archetypically different strategies. 



252 Course Descriptions 



BMGT 770 Transportation Theory and Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 672. The transportation system and its components. The development and 
present form of transportation in both the United States and other countries. Theoretical concepts 
employed in the analysis of transport problems. 

BMGT 771 Transportation and Public Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 672. The nature and consequences of relations between governments and 
agencies thereof, carriers in the various modes, and users of transport. The control of transport 
firms by regulatory bodies, taxation of carriers, methods employed in the allocation of funds to 
the construction, operation, and maintenance of publicly-provided transport facihties, and the 
direct subsidization of services supplied by privately-owned entities. Labor and safety. Com- 
parative international transport policies and problems. 

BMGT 773 Transportation Strategies (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 672. Organization structure, policies, and procedures employed in the 
administration of inter- and intraurban transport firms. Managerial development, operational 
and financial planning and control, demand analysis, pricing, promotional policies, intraand 
intermodal competitive and complementary relationships, and methods for accommodating pubhc 
policies designed to delimit the managerial discretion of carrier executives. Administrative prob- 
lems peculiar to publicly-owned and operated transport entities. 

BMGT 776 Management of High Technology, Research and Development (3) 

The creation of competitive advantages through the use of new technology. The integration of 
technological strategy with business strategy within the internal corporate culture. Research and 
development in the context of this strategy-structure of the firm. The nature of R & D, the 
management of creativity, and new product development are also discussed. 

BMGT 777 Policy Issues in Public Utilities: Energy and the Environment (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 671. Current developments in regulatory policy and issues arising among 
public utilities, regulatory agencies, and the general public. Emphasis on the electric, gas, water, 
and communications industries in both the public and private sectors of the economy. Changing 
and emerging problems such as cost analysis, depreciation, finance, taxes, rate of return, the 
rate base, differential rate-making, and labor. The growing importance of technological devel- 
opments and their impact on state and federal regulatory agencies. 

BMGT 780 New Venture Creation (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of MBA core requirements or permission of department. Creating new 
ventures, including evaluating the entrepreneurial team, the opportunity and financing require- 
ments. Skills, concepts, attitudes and know-how relevant for creating and building a venture; 
and preparation of a business plan. These approaches are not limited to new or growing enter- 
prises. 

BMGT 781 The Entrepreneur and the Entrepreneurial Team (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of MBA core requirements or permission of department. The entrepre- 
neur and the entrepreneurial team: the entrepreneur and the team as it relates to innovation, 
change, power, and risk-taking. Entrepreneurs and their teams from a variety of different firms 
present and discuss their views on leadership. 

BMGT 782 Corporate Venturing and Intrepreneurship (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of MBA core or permission of department. Corporate venturing and 
intrepreneurship: overview of the venture process in corporations and the unique problems and 
opportunities for corporate entrepreneurs in the venturing process to reduce the cost of failure 
and increasing the chance of success. Emphasis is on the internal corporate venturing process, 
from selection to new venture creation. 



BMGT - Business and Management 253 



BMGT 791 MBA Field Project (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Experiental research project in the identification of man- 
agement problems, the evaluation of alternative solutions, and the recommendation for man- 
agement. 

BMGT 794 The Environment of International Business (3) 

The international business environment as it affects company policy and procedures. In-depth 
analysis and comprehensive case studies of the business functions undertaken in international 
operations. 

BMGT 795 Management of the Multinational Firm (3) 

The problems and policies of international business enterprise at the management level. Man- 
agement of a multinational enterprise as well as management within foreign units. The multi- 
national firm as a socio-econometric institution. Cases in comparative management. 
BMGT 798 Special Topics in Business and Management (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Selected advanced 
topics in the various fields of graduate study in business and management. 
BMGT 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
BMGT 808 Doctoral Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to the D.B.A. Program or permission of department. Repeatable if content 
differs. Selected advanced topics in the various fields of doctoral study in business and manage- 
ment. 

BMGT 811 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 710 or equivalent. Seminar in the continuing development of the fundamental 
theoretical framework of accounting. 
BMGT 814 Current Problems of Professional Practice (3) 

Generally accepted auditing standards, auditing practices, legal and ethical responsibilities, and 
the accounting and reporting requirements of the securities and exchange commission. 
BMGT 821 Seminar in Management Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: RMGT 711 or equivalent. Design and use of accounting information systems for 
managerial planning and controllership. 
BMGT 823 Data Base Design (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 721. The problem of database design in the development of information 
systems. An integrated database design methodology. Techniques for different phases of database 
design. Computer-aided tools for data base design. 
BMGT 824 Database Systems Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 721. The important design issues in the software architecture of a database 
management system. Group projects for the purpose of designing and implementing subsystems 
of a simple relational database system. Database types and applications. 
BMGT 825 Knowledge-Based Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 721. For BMGT majors only. Use of artificial intelligence techniques in 
developing knowledge-based systems in Management Information Systems and Decision Support 
Systems. Knowledge representation formalisms, inference and control mechanisms for data in- 
tensive applications, object-oriented systems, expert database systems, intelligent user interfaces 
for DSS, and special problems (eg. plausible reasoning, non-monotonic reasoning, heterogeneous 
knowledge bases and explanation support). 
BMGT 828 Independent Study in Business and Management (1-9) 
BMGT 830 Operations Research: Linear Programming (3) 

Prerequisites: MA TH 240 or equivalent: or permission of department. Concepts and applications 
of linear programming models, theoretical development of the simplex algorithm, and primal- 
dual problems and theory. 



254 Course Descriptions 



BMGT 831 Operations Research: Extension of Linear Programming and Network Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 830 or equivalent; or permission of department. Concepts and applications 
of network and graph theory in Hnear and combinatorial models with emphasis on computational 
algorithms. 

BMGT 832 Operations Research: Optimization and Nonlinear Programming (3) 
Prerequisites: IBMGT 830; and MATH 241; or equivalenti; or permission of department. Theory 
and applications of algorithmic approaches to solving unconstrained and constrained non-hnear 
optimization problems. The Kuhn Tucker conditions, Lagrangian and Duality Theory, types of 
convexity, and convergence criteria. Feasible direction procedures, penalty and barrier tech- 
niques, and cutting plane procedures. 
BMGT 833 Operations Research: Integer Programming (3) 

Prerequisites: [BMGT 830; and MATH 241 or equivalent}; or permission of department. Theory, 
applications, and computational methods of integer optimization. Zero-one implicit enumeration, 
branch and bound methods, and cutting plane methods. 
BMGT 834 Operations Research: Probabilistic Models (3) 

Prerequisites: [MA TH 241; and STAT 400 or equivalent! or permission of department. Theoretical 
foundations for the construction, optimization, and applications of probabilistic models. Queuing 
theory, inventory theory, Markov processes, renewal theory, and stochastic linear programming. 
BMGT 835 Simulation and Design of Experiments (3) 

Prerequisites: knowledge of Fortran programming; [BMGT 630; and BMGT 631 or eqtdvalentj 
or permission of department. Statistical design and analysis of simulation experiments. 
BMGT 840 Seminar in Financial Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Seminar in selected classic and current theoretical and 
empirical research in the foundations of finance. 
BMGT 841 Seminar in Corporate Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Seminar in selected classic and current theoretical and 
empirical research in corporate finance. 
BMGT 843 Seminar in Portfolio Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Seminar in selected classic and current theoretical and 
empirical research in portfolio theory. 
BMGT 845 Seminar in Financial Institutions and Markets (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Seminar in selected classic and current theoretical and 
empirical research in financial institutions and markets. 
BMGT 850 Marketing Channels Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: permission of department. MBA candidates only. Focuses on the fundamental 
alternative channels of distribution, the roles played by various intermediaries, evolution of 
business structures in marketing, reasons for change, and projected marketing scenarios. 
BMGT 851 Quantitative Methods in Marketing: Demand and Cost Analysis (3) 
Quantitative methods in the analysis and prediction of market demand and marketing costs. 
Demand related topics include estimating market potential, sales forecasting methods, buyer 
analysis, promotional and pricing impacts, and related issues. Cost analysis focuses on allocation 
of costs by marketing functions, products, territories, customers and marketing personnel. Sta- 
tistical techniques, models and other quantitative methods are utilized to solve various marketing 
problems. M.B.A. candidates may register with permission of department. 
BMGT 852 Theory in Marketing (3) 

An inquiry into the problems and elements of theory development in general with specific 
reference to the field of marketing. A critical analysis and evaluation of past and contemporary 
efforts to formulate theories of marketing and to integrate theories from the social sciences into 



BMGT - Business and Management 255 



a marketing framework. Attention is given to the development of concepts in all areas of 
marketing thought and to their potential application in the business firm. 
BMGT 860 Seminar in Human Resource Planning and Selection (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 760 or permission of department. Seminar in selected theoretical and em- 
pirical literature in human resource planning, forecasting, and staffing. 
BMGT 861 Seminar in Performance Appraisal and Training (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 760 or permission of department. Seminar in selected theoretical and em- 
pirical literature in performance appraisal and training. 
BMGT 862 Seminar in Compensation Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 760 or permission of department. Seminar in selected theoretical and em- 
pirical literature in the compensation of human resources. 
BMGT 863 Seminar: The Organization and the Individual (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 764 or equivalent; or permission of department. Seminar in the literature 
on the relationship between individual and organizational characteristics, with emphasis on work 
motivation theories. 

BMGT 864 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations and the Group Process in Organization (3) 
Prerequisite: BMGT 764 or equivalent; or permission of department. Examines the literature of 
small group behavior relevant to industrial work groups, white-collar work groups, professional 
staff, and managerial units. Includes group structure and process variables, as well as the lead- 
ership function. 

BMGT 865 Seminar in Comparative Theories of Organization (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 764 or equivalent; or permission of department. Emphasis on the interdis- 
ciplinary hterature on classical management, systems, and contingency theories of organization. 
BMGT 866 Seminar in Organizational Conflict and Change (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 764 or equivalent; or permission of department. Emphasis on the introduction 
of planned and systematic changes in small work groups, organizational subsystems, and the 
entire organization through the use of behavioral science techniques and theories of intra- and 
inter-group conflict. 
BMGT 872 Business Logistics (3) 

Concentrates on the design and application of methods for the solution of advanced physical 
movement problems of business firms. Provides thorough coverage of a variety of analytical 
techniques relevant to the solution of these problems. Where appropriate, experience will be 
provided in the utilization of computers to assist in managerial logistical decision-making. 
BMGT 873 Transportation Science (3) 

Focuses on the appHcation of quantitative and qualitative techniques of analysis to managerial 
problems drawn from firms in each of the various modes of transport. Included is the application 
of simulation to areas such as the control of equipment selection and terminal and line operations. 
The application of advanced analytical techniques to problems involving resource use efficiency 
within the transportation industry and between transportation and other sectors of the economy 
is an integral part of the course. 
BMGT 880 Business Research Methodology (3) 

Covers the nature, scope, and application of research methodology. The identification and 
formulation of research designs applicable to business and related fields. Required of D.B.A. 
students. 

BMGT 882 Applied Multivariate Analysis I (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 733 or equivalent. Topics include elementary properties of matrices, mul- 
tivariate distributions, the multivariate linear model, path analysis. The examination of business 
data using existing computer programs is an integral part of the course. 



256 Course Descriptions 



BMGT 883 Applied Multivariate Analysis II (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 882. Topics include discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, principal com- 
ponent analysis, canonical analysis, factor analysis and other current multivariate statistical 
methods. 

BMGT 884 Univariate Forecasting Models (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 630 or equivalent. Traditional approaches to forecasting such as trend models 
and smoothing techniques. Models for stationary and nonstationary time series, their identifi- 
cation, estimation, forecasts and use in a business environment. All students are required to do 
a project utilizing these models in the analysis of business data. 
BMGT 885 Multiple Time Series Model Building (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 884. Recommended: BMGT 882. Identification, estimation, and forecasting 
of dynamic systems, the application of intervention techniques to business problems, and the 
properties and fitting of multiple time series models to business data. All students are required 
to do a project using these techniques in analyzing business data. 
BMGT 886 Statistical Quality Control (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 733 or equivalent. Lot acceptance sampling plans, rectifying inspection, 
control charts, reliability, dependence fitting, parameter estimation, false and incomplete in- 
spection models, and model verification based on actual data. 
BMGT 887 Bayesian Inference and Decision Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 733 or equivalent. Bayesian Methodologies in statistical inference and de- 
cision theory. Includes discussion of subjective probability and coherence, elicitation of distri- 
butions conjugate distributions, estimation, testing, preposterior analysis and regression analysis. 
Applications are drawn from the functional business areas. 
BMGT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

BOTN - Botany 

BOTN 401 Origins of Modern Botany (1) 

Prerequisite: 20 credit hours in biological science including BIOL 105 or permission of department. 
History of botany as a science, from ancient Greece through the 18th century; emphasis on 
botany as an intellectual and cultural pursuit. 
BOTN 403 Medicinal and Poisonous Plants (2) 

Prerequisite: BIOL 105 and CHEM 104. A study of plants important to humans that have 
medicinal or poisonous properties. Emphasis on plant source, plant description, the active agent 
and its beneficial or detrimental physiological action and effects. 
BOTN 405 Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BOTN 202: and BOTN 212, or equiv- 
alent. A review of the history and principles of plant taxonomy with emphasis on monographic 
and floristic research. A detailed laboratory review of the families of flowering plants. 
BOTN 407 Teaching Methods in Botany (2) 

Four two-hour laboratory demonstration periods per week, for eight weeks. Prerequisite: BIOL 
105 or permission of department. A study of the biological principles of common plants, and 
demonstrations, projects, and visual aids suitable for teaching in primary and secondary schools. 
BOTN 411 Evolutionary Biology of Plants (3) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 202 or equivalent. Evolution of basic plant biological systems, major struc- 
tural adaptations of plant organs, and origins of vascular plant groups. The pace, patterns and 
mechanisms of evolution, discussed within a genetic, systematic and paleontological framework. 
BOTN 413 Plant Geography (2) 

Prerequisite: BIOL 105. A study of plant distribution throughout the world and the factors 
generally associated with such distribution. 



BOTN - Botany 257 



BOTN 414 Plant Genetics (3) 

Prerequisite: BIOL 105. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: ZOOL 213. ANSC 
201, BOTN 414, HORT 274. The basic principles of plant genetics are presented; the mechanics 
of transmission of the hereditary factors in relation to the life cycle of seed plants, the genetics 
of specialized organs and tissues, spontaneous and induced mutations of basic and economic 
significance gene action, genetic maps, the fundamentals of polyploidy, and genetics in relation 
to methods of plant breeding. 
BOTN 416 Plant Structure (4) 

Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 105. A survey 
of the basic structural features of vascular plants, including subcellular organelles, cells, tissues, 
and organs. Emphasis on structural phenomena as they relate to physiological processes of 
agricultural importance. 
BOTN 420 Plant CeU Biology (3) 

Prerequisite: organic chemistry and two years of botany. A study of eucaryotic cell organization, 
integrating structure with function and concentrating on subcellular organelles and the mecha- 
nisms of physiological regulation at the cellular level. 
BOTN 421 Principles of Plant Disease Management (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BOTN 221 or equivalent. 
A logical, holistic approach to understanding and planning disease control using multiple strat- 
egies and tactics to prevent crop losses from exceeding economic damage levels. 
BOTN 426 Mycology (4) 

Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 105. An intro- 
ductory course in the biology, morphology and taxonomy of the fungi. 
BOTN 441 Plant Physiology (4) 

Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 105; and 
CHEM 113. Recommended: Organic chemistry. A survey of the general physiological activities 
of plants. 

BOTN 456 Principles of Microscopy (2) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 420 or equivalent. An introduction to optical principles that underlie light 
and electron microscopic image formation. Brightfield, darkfield, phase contrast, differential 
interference contrast, fluorescence and polarized light microscopy. Comparison of light and 
electron microscopy. The application of these techniques to problems in biological research. 
BOTN 462 Plant Ecology (2) 

Prerequisite: BIOL 105. The dynamics of populations as affected by environmental factors with 
special emphasis on the structure and composition of natural plant communities, both terrestial 
and aquatic. 

BOTN 463 Ecology of Marsh and Dune Vegetation (2) 

Prerequisite: BIOL 105. An examination of the biology of higher plants in dune and marsh 
ecosystems. 

BOTN 464 Plant Ecology Laboratory (2) 

Three hours of laboratory per week. Pre- or corequisite: BOTN 462 or equivalent. Two or three 
field trips per semester. The application of field and experimental methods to the qualitative 
and quantitative study of vegatation and ecosystems. 
BOTN 476 Biology of Phytoplankton (4) 

Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and an 
introductory course in ecology (ZOOL 212 or equivalent). Collection, identification, culture, 
physical and chemical requirements, life cycles, community structure, specialized environments, 
blooms of phytoplankton. 



258 Course Descriptions 



BOTN 484 Plant Biochemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 441: and CHEM 233. Biochemical processes characteristic of plants, in- 
cluding photosysnthesis, nitrogen fixation and biosynthesis of plant macromolecules. 
BOTN 620 Methods in Plant Tissue Culture (2) 

One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: permission of both de- 
partment and instructor. A methodology and techniques course designed to give the student 
background and experience in plant tissue culture. 

BOTN 621 Physiology of Fungi (2) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 243; and BOTN 441 or equivalent in bacterial or animal physiology. A study 
of various aspects of fungal metabolism, nutrition, biochemical transformation, fungal products, 
and mechanism of fungicidal action. 
BOTN 623 Physiology of Fungi Laboratory (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Pre- or corequisite: BOTN 621. Application of equipment 
and techniques in the study of fungal physiology. 
BOTN 624 Prokaryotic Plant Pathogens (2) 

Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion/recitation per week. Prerequisite: BOTN 221 
and permission of both department and instructor. A study of plant-pathogenic prokaryotes with 
emphasis on systematics, etiology, cytological and physiological characteristics of the plant- 
pathogen interaction, ecology, epidemiology, control, and genetics. 
BOTN 625 Prokaryotic Plant Pathogens Laboratory (2) 

One four-hour laboratory and discussion period per week. Pre- or corequisite: BOTN 221; and 
BOTN 624; and permission of both department and instructor. Emphasis on techniques and 
methods applicable to clinical studies and research on prokaryotic plant pathogens. 
BOTN 632 Plant Virology (2) 

Prerequisite: permission of both department and instructor. Second semester. Biological, bio- 
chemical, and biophysical aspects of viruses and viral diseases of plants. 
BOTN 634 Plant Virology Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisites: bachelor's degree in any biological science or equivalent and permission of both 
department and instructor. Pre- or corequisite: BOTN 632. Second semester. Two laboratories 
per week on the application and techniques for studying the biological, biochemical and bio- 
physical aspects of plant viruses. 
BOTN 636 Plant Nematology (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite: BOTN 221 or permission of both 
department and instructor. The study of plant-parasitic nematodes, their morphology, anatomy, 
taxonomy, genetics, physiology, ecology, host-parasite relations and control. Emphasis on recent 
advances. 

BOTN 640 Molecular Mechanisms of Plant Pathogenesis (2) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 461. Evaluation of current evidence on the role in plant disease development 
of various molecules produced by hosts and parasites. Examination of the molecular basis of 
microbial pathogenicity and plant disease resistance. 
BOTN 645 Growth and Development (2) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 441. Physiology of plant hormones, control of morphogenesis and regulation 
of biosynthesis, photomorphogenesis and photoperiodism. 
BOTN 646 Plant Morphogenesis (2) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 416 or equivalent. Biophysical aspects of plant development with particular 
focus on such structural phenomena as molecular self-assembly, polarity, cell division, cell ex- 
pansion, meristem organization, phyllotaxis, and organ formation. 



CHEM - Chemistry 259 



BOTN 650 Nutrition and Transport in Plants (2) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 441. The uptake, partioning and utilization of the materials of the plant 
body. Transport of ions across cell membranes, fixation and metabolism of carbon and nitrogen, 
and long distance transport of inorganic chemicals and photosynthates in vascular plants. Special 
emphasis on control and regulatory mechanisms that are unique to plant systems. 

BOTN 662 Physiological Plant Ecology (2) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 462 or equivalent. Environmental effects on plant ecophysiology. Microcli- 
matology, leaf energy balance, plant responses to temperature and radiation, physiological adap- 
tions, water relations, plant gas exchange and resistance. 
BOTN 684 Plant Membrane Physiology (2) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 441; and BOTN 484 or equivalent. Biochemical and biophysical approaches 
to plant membrane structure and function. 
BOTN 685 Advanced Plant Physiology Laboratory (2) 

One lecture and one four-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: BOTN 441. Biochemical 
and biophysical approaches to the study of the physiological processes of plants. 
BOTN 686 Molecular Genetics of Plants (2) 

Prerequisite: /BOTN 414; and BOTN 441; and BOTN 484} or equivalent. Current status of 
research on the structure, expression, and in vitro manipulation of plant nuclear genes and on 
the molecular genetics of plant organelles. 
BOTN 689 Special Topics in Botany (1-3) 

Maximum credit toward an advanced degree for the individual student with permission of de- 
partment. Credit according to time scheduled and organization of course. This course is organized 
as lectures, discussions or literature surveys on specialized advanced topics under the direction 
of visiting lecturers or resident faculty. 
BOTN 698 Seminar in Botany (1) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Discussion of special topics and current literature in all 
phases of botany. 

BOTN 699 Special Problems in Botany (1-3) 

Credit according to time scheduled and organization of course. Maximum credit towards an 
advanced degree for the individual student at the discretion of the student's advisor. This course 
emphasizes research on a specialized advanced topic and may consist primarily of experimental 
procedures under the direction of visiting lecturers or resident faculty. 
BOTN 721 Clinical and Field Plant Pathology (1-2) 

Diagnosis of plant diseases under clinical conditions, observation of symptoms and disease pat- 
terns in the field, collecting specimens, and writing control recommendations. Student electing 
one credit hour may emphasize either field or clinical aspects. 
BOTN 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
BOTN 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

CHEM - Chemistry 

CHEM 401 Inorganic Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 481. 

CHEM 403 Radiochemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: one year of college chemistry and one year of college physics. Radioactive decay; 
introduction to properties of atomic nuclei; nuclear processes in cosmology; chemical, biomedical 
and environmental applications of radioactivity; nuclear processes as chemical tools; interaction 
of radiation with matter. 



260 Course Descriptions 



CHEM 421 Advanced Quantitative Analysis (3) 

Pre- or corequisites: CHEM 482 and CHEM 483. An examination of some advanced topics in 
quantitative analysis including nonaqueous titrations, precipitation phenomena, complex equi- 
libria, and the analytical chemistry of the less familiar elements. 
CHEM 425 Instrumental Methods of Analysis (3) 

One hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 321. An intro- 
duction to modern instrumentation in analytical chemistry. Electronics, spectroscopy, chroma- 
tography and electrochemistry. 
CHEM 433 Chemical Synthesis (3) 

One hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 113 or CHEM 
115; and CHEM 243 or CHEM 245. 
CHEM 441 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 481 . An advanced study of the compounds of carbon, with special emphasis 
on molecular orbital theory and organic reaction mechanisms. 
CHEM 443 Qualitative Organic Analysis (3) 

One hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 113 or CHEM 
115, and CHEM 243 or CHEM 245. The systematic identification of organic compounds. 
CHEM 473 Geochemistry of Solids (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 482 or GEOL 422. Principles of crystal chemistry applied to structures, 
properties and reactions of minerals and non-metallic solids. Emphasis is placed on the relation 
of structural stability to bonding, ionic size, charge, order-disorder, polymorphism, and iso- 
morphism. 

CHEM 474 Environmental Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 481 or equivalent. The sources of various elements and chemical reactions 
between them in the atmosphere and hydrosphere are treated. Causes and biological effects of 
air and water pollution by certain elements are discussed. 
CHEM 481 Physical Chemistry I (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 113 or CHEM 115; CHEM 243 or CHEM 245; MATH 141; and PHYS 142 
or PHYS 263. (PHYS 263 may be taken concurrently). A course primarily for chemists and 
chemical engineers. 
CHEM 482 Physical Chemistry II (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 481. A course primarily for chemists and chemical engineers. 
CHEM 483 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I (2) 

One hour lecture-recitation and one three-hour laboratory period per week Corequisite: CHEM 
481. An introduction to the principles and application of quantitative techniques in physical 
chemical measurements. Experiments will be coordinated with topics in CHEM 481. 
CHEM 484 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II (2) 

One hour lecture-recitation and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 
481 and CHEM 483. Corequisite: CHEM 482. A continuation of CHEM 483. Advanced quan- 
titative techniques necessary in physical chemical measurements. Experiments will be coordinated 
with topics in CHEM 482. 
CHEM 485 Advanced Physical Chemistry (2) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 482. Quantum chemistry and other selected topics. 
CHEM 486 Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2) 

Six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 482 and permission of instructor. 
CHEM 487 Computer Applications in the Biological and Chemical Sciences (4) 
Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory, and one hour of discussion/recitation per 
week. Prerequisite: CHEM 113 and CHEM 287 or equivalent; and knowledge of a scientific 



CHEM - Chemistry 261 



programming language (PASCAL, FORTRAN or "C"). The utilization of computers to solve 
chemical and biological problems, with emphasis on the utilization of available software rather 
than "de novo" programming. 
CHEM 498 Special Topics in Chemistry (3) 

Three lectures or two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite varies with 
the nature of the topic being considered. Course may be repeated for credit if the subject matter 
is substantially different, but not more than three credits may be accepted in satisfaction of major 
supporting area requirements for chemistry majors. 
CHEM 504 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (4) 

Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 503 or equivalent. 
A one-semester survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry. The chemistry of carbon: aliphatic 
compounds, aromatic compounds, stereochemistry, halides, amines, amides, acids, esters, car- 
bohydrates, and natural products. The laboratory experiments deal with synthetic and analytical 
organic activities. 

CHEM 513 Principles of Chemistry II (4) 

Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 503 or equivalent. 
A continuation of the advanced survey of topics started in CHEM 503. Kinetics, thermodynamics, 
ionic equilibria, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, and the chemistry of common metals and 
nonmetals. Quantitative problem solving. Laboratory experiments, mostly quantitative in nature, 
support the topics developed in the lectures. 

CHEM 521 Quantitative Analysis (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratories per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 115 or equivalent. 
Volumetric, gravimetric, electrometric and colorimetric methods in analytical inorganic chem- 
istry. 

CHEM 601 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 401 or equivalent. A survey of the fundamentals of modern inorganic 
chemistry as a basis for more advanced work. 

CHEM 602 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 601. A continuation of CHEM 601 with more emphasis on current work 
in inorganic chemistry. 

CHEM 605 Chemistry of Coordination Compounds (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 601. Structure and properties of coordination compounds and the theoretical 
bases on which these are interpreted. 

CHEM 606 Chemistry of Organometallic Compounds (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 601. An in-depth treatment of the properties of compounds having metal- 
carbon bonds. 

CHEM 608 Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (1-3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 601 and CHEM 602, or equivalent. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
Topics of special interest and current importance. 

CHEM 623 Optical Methods of Quantitative Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 421 and CHEM 482 or equivalent. The quantitative applications of various 

methods of optical spectroscopy. 

CHEM 624 Electrical Methods of Quantitative Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 421 and CHEM 482 or equivalent. The use of conductivity, potentiometry, 

polarography, voltammetry, amperometry, coulometry, and chronopotentiometry in quantitative 

analysis. 



262 Course Descriptions 



CHEM 625 Separation Methods in Quantitative Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 421 and CHEM 482 or equivalent. The theory and application for quan- 
titative analysis of various forms of chromatography, ion exchange, solvent extraction, distillation, 
and mass spectroscopy. 

CHEM 640 Problems in Organic Reaction Mechanisms (1) 

A tutorial type course dealing with the basic description of the fundamentals of writing organic 
reaction mechanisms. 

CHEM 641 Organic Reaction Mechanisms (3) 
CHEM 643 Organic Chemistry of High Polymers (2) 

An advanced course covering the synthesis of monomers, mechanisms of polymerization, and 
the correlation between structure and properties in high polymers. 
CHEM 647 Organic Synthesis (3) 

The use of new reagents in organic reactions; multistep syntheses leading to natural products of 
biological interest; stereospecific and regiospecific reactions and their use in total synthesis. 
CHEM 648 Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (1-3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. Topics of special interest and current importance. 
CHEM 650 Problems in Organic Synthesis (1) 

A tutorial type course dealing with mechanistic problems from the current literature of organic 
sysnthesis. 

CHEM 660 Spectral Methods (2) 

The use of infrared, ultraviolet-visible, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance and 
mass spectroscopy for structure determination in organic chemistry. 
CHEM 678 Special Topics in Environmental Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 474. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. In-depth treatment of envi- 
ronmental chemistry problem areas of current research interest. The topics will vary somewhat 
from year to year. 

CHEM 681 Infra-red and Raman Spectroscopy (2) 
Prerequisite: permission of department. 
CHEM 682 Reaction Kinetics (3) 
CHEM 684 Chemical Thermodynamics (3) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 482 or equivalent. 
CHEM 686 Chemical CrystaUography (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A detailed treatment of single-crystal X-ray methods. 
CHEM 687 Statistical Mechanics and Chemistry (3) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 684 or equivalent. 
CHEM 688 Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry (2) 
Repeatable to 6 credits If content differs. 
CHEM 689 Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (3) 
Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. 
CHEM 690 Quantum Chemistry I (3) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 485. 
CHEM 691 Quantum Chemistry II (3) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 690 or PHYS 622. 
CHEM 699 Special Problems in Chemistry (1-6) 

Prerequisite: one semester of graduate study in chemistry. Restricted to students in the non-thesis 
M.S. option. Repeatable to 6 credits. Laboratory experience in a research environment. 



CHIN - Chinese 263 



CHEM 702 Radiochemistry Laboratory (1-2) 

One or two four-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- or corequisites: CHEM 403. 
CHEM 705 Nuclear Chemistry (3) 

Nuclear structure models, radioactive decay processes, nuclear reactions in complex nuclei, 
fission, nucleosynthesis and nuclear particle accelerators. 
CHEM 718 Special Topics in Nuclear Chemistry (1-3) 
Repeatable to 6 credits. A discussion of current research problems. 
CHEM 722 Cosmochemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 482 or equivalent. Current theories of origin and evolution of the solar 
system with emphasis on the experimental data available to chemists from examination of me- 
teorites, the moon, and the earth. 
CHEM 723 Marine Geochemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 481 or equivalent. The geochemical evolution of the ocean; composition of 
sea water, density-chlorinity-salinity relationship and carbon dioxide system. The geochemistry 
of sedimentation with emphasis on the chemical stability and inorganic and biological production 
of carbonate, siUcate and phosphate containing minerals. 
CHEM 729 Special Topics in Geochemistry (1-3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. A discussion of current research problems. 
CHEM 750 Chemical Evolution (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 441 and/or BCHM 462, or CHEM 721, or ZOOL 446, or BOTN 616. The 
chemical processes leading to the appearances of life on earth. Theoretical and experimental 
considerations related to the geochemical, organic, and biochemical phenomena of chemical 
evolution. 

CHEM 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
CHEM 898 Seminar (1) 
CHEM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

CHIN - Chinese 

CHIN 401 Readings in Modern Chinese I (3) 

Prerequisite: CHIN 302 or equivalent. Non-majors admitted only after a placement interview. 
Readings in history, politics, economics, sociology, and literature. Emphasis on wide-ranging, 
rapid reading, reinforced by conversations and compositions. 
CHIN 402 Readings in Modern Chinese II (3) 

Prerequisite: CHIN 401 or equivalent. Non-majors admitted only after a placement interview. 
Continuation of CHIN401. 
CHIN 403 Classical Chinese I (3) 

Prerequisite: CHIN 302. Introductory classical Chinese using literary and historical sources in 
the original language. 
CHIN 404 Classical Chinese II (3) 

Prerequisite: CHIN 302. Further classical studies by various writers from famous ancient phi- 
losophers to prominent scholars before the new culture movement. 
CHIN 405 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: CHIN 302 or permission of instructor. Non-majors admitted only after a placement 
interview. Practice in writing essays, letters, and reports on selected topics. Conversation directed 
toward everyday situations and topics related to life in China. Conducted in Chinese. 
CHIN 415 Readings in Current Newspapers and Periodicals (3) 

Prerequisite: CHIN 402 or equivalent. Non-majors admitted only after a placement interview. 
Reading of periodical literature on selected topics with discussions and essays in Chinese. 



264 Course Descriptions 



CHIN 421 Sounds and Transcriptions of Mandarin Chinese (3) 

Production and recognition of Mandarin speech sounds and tones, their phonological patterns, 

comparison with English, and representation by the various Romanization systems. 

CHIN 422 Advanced Chinese Grammar (3) 

Chinese sentence patterns studied contrasted with English and in terms of current pedagogical 

as well as linguistic theories. 

CHIN 431 Translation and Interpretation I (3) 

Prerequisite: CHIN 202 or equivalent. Introduction to the history and theories of translation/ 

interpretation; contrasts the structures of English and Chinese. 

CHIN 432 Translation and Interpretation II (3) 

Prerequisite: CHIN 431 or equivalent. 

CHIN 441 Traditional Chinese Fiction (3) 

Prerequisite: CHIN 314 or permission of instructor. Major works of fiction from the 4th century 

tales of the marvelous through the 19th century Ching novel. Taught in Chinese. 

CHIN 442 Modern Chinese Fiction (3) 

Prerequisite: CHIN 315 or permission of instructor. Examination, through selected texts, of the 

writer's role as shaper and reflector of the Republican and Communist revolutions. Taught in 

Chinese. 

CHIN 499 Directed Study in Chinese (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Readings in Chinese 

under faculty supervision. 

CHPH - Chemical Physics 

CHPH 61 1 Fundamentals of Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (3) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 622 or equivalent. Atomic and molecular physics. Energy levels of multi- 
electron atoms and diatomic molecules; transition between energy levels. 
CHPH 612 Molecular Structure and Kinetics (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Molecular structure, atomic and molecular collisions and 
chemical kinetics including experimental techniques. 
CHPH 618 Special Projects in Chemical Physics (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits. Independent reading and study 
covering chemical physics subject areas not available in other courses. 
CHPH 709 Seminar in Chemical Physics (1) 
Current research and developments in chemical physics. 
CHPH 718 Special Topics in Chemical Physics (1-3) 

Repeatable if content differs with permission of department. A discussion of current research 
problems in chemical physics. 
CHPH 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
CHPH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

ejus - Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology 

ejus 400 Criminal Courts (3) 

Prerequisite: CJUS 100 or permission of department. Criminal courts in the United States at all 
levels; judges, prosecutors, defenders, clerks, court administrators, and the nature of their jobs; 
problems facing courts and prosecutors today and problems of administration; reforms. 
CJUS 444 Advanced Law Enforcement Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: CJUS 340 or permission of department. The structuring of manpower, material, and 
systems to accomplish the major goals of social control. Personnel and systems management. 
Political controls and limitations on authority and jurisdiction. 



CLAS - Classics 265 



ejus 4S5 Dynamics of Planned Change in Criminal Justice I (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. An examination of conceptual and practical issues related 
to planned change in criminal justice. Emphasis on the development of innovative ideas using 
a research and development approach to change. 
ejus 456 Dynamics of Planned Change in Criminal Justice II (3) 

Prerequisite: CJUS 455 or permission of department. An examination of conceptual and practical 
issues related to planned change in criminal justice. Emphasis on change strategies and tactics 
which are appropriate for criminal justice personnel in entry level positions. 
CJUS 462 Special Problems in Security Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: CJUS 360. An advanced course for students desiring to focus on specific concerns 
in the study of private security organizations; business intelligence and espionage; vulnerability 
and criticality analyses in physical security; transportation, banking, hospital and military security 
problems; uniformed security forces; national defense information; and others. 
CJUS 498 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice (1-6) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Supervised study 
of a selected topic to be announced in the field of criminal justice. 
CJUS 600 Criminal Justice (3) 

Prerequisites: admission to the graduate program in criminal justice or permission of department. 
Current concept of criminal justice in relationship to other concepts in the field. Historical 
perspective. Criminal justice and social control. Operational implications. Systemic aspects. 
Issues of evaluation. 

CJUS 630 Seminar in Criminal Law and Society (3) 

Prerequisite: CJUS 230 or or equivalent; and a course in introductory criminology. The criminal 
law is studied in the context of general studies in the area of the sociology of law. The evolution 
and social and psychological factors affecting the formulation and administration of criminal laws 
are discussed. Also examined is the impact of criminal laws and their sanctions on behavior in 
the hght of recent empirical evidence. 
CJUS 640 Seminar in Criminal Justice Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: one course in the theory of groups or organizations; and one course in administration; 
or permission of department. Examination of external and internal factors that currently impact 
on pohce administration. Intra-organizational relationships and policy formulation; the conver- 
sion of inputs into decisions and policies. Strategies for formulating, implementing and assessing 
administrative decisions. 

CJUS 650 Research Seminar in Public Policy and Crime Control (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Analysis of the political and organizational process of 
policy development and implementation in criminal justice. Collection, analysis and interpre- 
tation of research data on current and ongoing efforts to form and implement policy. 
CJUS 699 Special Problems in Criminal Justice (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. Supervised study of a selected 
problem in the field of criminal justice. 
CJUS 720 Criminal Justice System Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: one course in criminal justice and one course in research methodology. System 
theory and method; examination of planning methods and models based primarily on a systems 
approach to the operations of the criminal justice system. 
CJUS 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

CLAS - Classics 

CLAS 411 Greek Drama (3) 

Also offered as CMLT 411. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: CLAS 411 or 
CMLT 411. The chief works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes in English 
translations. 



266 Course Descriptions 



CLAS 420 The Classical Tradition (3) 

Examination of the role of classical tradition in western thought, with particular regard to 
literature. 

CLAS 470 Advanced Greek and Roman Mythology (3) 

Prerequisite: CLAS 170 or permission of department. Selected themes and characters of Greek 
and Roman myth. History of the study of myth and research methods in mythology. 
CLAS 488 Independent Study in Classical Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
CLAS 494 Senior Seminar in Classics (3) 

Limited to graduating classics majors. To be taken in the last year and preferably the last semester 
of the undergraduate program. Topics will vary each semester; most will be interdisciplinary or 
will cross historical periods. The course will provide a seminar experience in material or meth- 
odologies not otherwise available to the major. 
CLAS 495 Senior Thesis in Classics (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Prior departmental approval of research topic is required. 
Available to all students who wish to pursue a specific research topic. 
CLAS 499 Independent Study in Classical Languages and Literatures (1-3) 
Prerequisite: permission of department. 
CLAS 601 Intro to Graduate Study in Classics (3) 

Introduction to the central problems and methods of investigation in the main fields of Classical 
studies. 

CLAS 620 Classical Epic (3) 

The nature of ancient epic, its development through a close reading of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, 
the Argonautica of Apollonius of Rhodes, and Vergil's Aeneid. Selections from other examples 
of epic as a basis for further comparison of the techniques of composition, the poet's objectives, 
and the influence of historical context and literary precedent upon the poems. Comparison with 
Near Eastern epics such as the Gilgamesh poem, or with post-Classical texts. Epic conventions. 
CLAS 621 The Classical Tradition (3) 

The role the classics have played in western thought, with particular attention to literature. 
CLAS 640 Women in Antiquity (3) 
Study of role of women in Greek and Roman society. 
CLAS 670 Classical Myth and Literature (3) 

The nature and function of myth in Greek culture. Consideration of a variety of theoretical 
approaches to myth, beginning with those developed by the Greeks, allegory and euhemerism, 
and including Jungian and Freudian psychology, structuralism, and the myth-ritual school. 
CLAS 688 Special Topics in Classical Civilization (3) 
Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. 
CLAS 699 Independent Study in Classical Civilization (1-3) 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
CLAS 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

CMLT - Comparative Literature 

CMLT 402 Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3) 

Study of the medieval and modem continental literature. 

CMLT 411 The Greek Drama (3) 

Also offered as CLAS 411. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: CMLT 411 or 

CLAS 411. The chief works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes in English 



CMLT - Comparative Literature 267 



translations. Emphasis on the historic bacicground, on dramatic structure, and on the effect of 

the Attic drama upon the mind of the civilized world. 

CMLT 415 The Old Testament As Literature (3) 

A study of sources, development and hterary types. 

CMLT 416 New Testament As Literature (3) 

A knowledge of Greek is helpful, but not essential. A study of the books of the New Testament, 

with attention to the relevant historical background and to the transmission of the text. 

CMLT 421 The Classical Tradition and Its Influence in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance 

(3) 

Reading knowledge of Greek or Latin required. Emphasis on major writers. 

CMLT 422 The Classical Tradition and Its Influence in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance 

(3) 

Reading knowledge of Greek and Latin required. Emphasis on major writers. 

CMLT 430 Literature of the Middle Ages (3) 

Narrative, dramatic and lyric literature of the middle ages studied in translation. 

CMLT 433 Dante and the Romance Tradition (3) 

A reading of the divine comedy to enlighten the discovery of reality in western literature. 

CMLT 461 Romanticism: Early Stages (3) 

Reading knowledge of French of German required. Emphasis on England, France and Germany. 

CMLT 462 Romanticism: Flowering and Influence (3) 

Reading knowledge of French and German required. Emphasis on England, France and Germany. 

CMLT 469 The Continental Novel (3) 

The novel in translation from Stendhal through the existentialists, selected from literatures of 

France, Germany, Italy, Russia, and Spain. 

CMLT 470 Ibsen and the Continental Drama (3) 

Emphasis on the major work of Ibsen, with some attention given to selected predecessors, 

contemporaries and successors. 

CMLT 479 Major Contemporary Authors (3) 

CMLT 488 Genres (3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. A study of a recognized literary form, such as tragedy, 

epic, satire, literary criticism, comedy, tragicomedy, etc. 

CMLT 489 Major Writers (3) 

Each semester two major writers from different cultures and languages will be studied. Authors 

will be chosen on the basis of significant relationships of cultural and aesthetic contexts, analogies 

between their respective works, and the importance of each writer to his literary tradition. 

CMLT 498 Selected Topics in Comparative Literature (3) 

CMLT 601 Problems in Comparative Literature (3) 

CMLT 610 Folklore in Literature (3) 

CMLT 631 The Medieval Epic (3) 

CMLT 632 The Medieval Romance (3) 

CMLT 639 Studies in the Renaissance (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits. 

CMLT 642 Problems of the Baroque in Literature (3) 

CMLT 649 Studies in Eighteenth Century Literature (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits. Studies in eighteenth century literature; as announced. 



268 Course Descriptions 



CMLT 658 Studies in Romanticism (3) 

Repeaiuble to 9 credits. Studies in romanticism: as announced. 

CMLT 679 Seminar in Modern and Contemporary Literature (3) 

Repeatable to 9 credits. Seminar in modern and contemporary literature; as announced. 

CMLT 681 Literary Criticism: Ancient and Medieval (3) 

CMLT 682 Literary Criticism: Renaissance and Modern (3) 

CMLT 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

CMLT 801 Seminar in Themes and Types (3) 

CMLT 899 Doctoral Diss -tation Research (1-8) 

CMSC - Computer Science 

CMSC 400 Introduction to Computer Systems and Software (3) 

Prerequisite: MA TH 141 and expreience with a high-level programming language and (graduate 
standing or permission of department). Assembly language and instruction execution for Von 
Neumann Architectures. Records, arrays, pointers, parameters, and recursive procedures. I/O 
structures and interrupt handling. Finite state automata. Course is intended primarily for graduate 
students in other disciplines. CMSC 400 may not be counted for credit in the graduate or 
undergraduate program in computer science. 
CMSC 411 Computer Systems Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 311 or CMSC 400. Input/output processors and techniques. Intra-system 
communication, buses, caches. Addressing and memory hierarchies. Microprogramming, par- 
allelism, and pipelining. 
CMSC 412 Operating Systems (4) 

Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: (CMSC 311 and 
CMSC 330) or CMSC 400. Recommended: CMSC 411. An introduction to batch systems, spooling 
systems, and third-generation multiprogramming systems. Description of the parts of an operating 
system in terms of function, structure, and implementation. Basic resource allocation policies. 
CMSC 415 Systems Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 412. Basic algorithms of operating system software. Memory management 
using linkage editors and loaders, dynamic relocation with base registers, paging. File systems 
and input/output control. Processor allocation for multiprogramming, timesharing. Emphasis on 
practical systems programming, including projects such as a simple linkage editor, a stand-alone 
executive, a file system, etc. 
CMSC 420 Data Structures (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 251 or CMSC 400. Description, properties, and storage allocation of data 
structures including lists and trees. Algorithms for manipulating structures. Applications from 
areas such as data processing, information retrieval, symbol manipulation, and operating systems. 
CMSC 421 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 251 ; and CMSC 330. Recommended: CMSC 420. Areas and issues in artificial 
intelligence, including search, inference, knowledge representation, learning, vision, natural 
languages, expert systems, robotics. Implementation and application of programming languages 
(e.g. LISP. PROLOG, SMALLTALK), programming techniques (e.g. pattern matching, dis- 
crimination networks) and control structures (e.g. agendas, data dependencies). 
CMSC 424 Database Design (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 420. Recommended: CMSC 450. Motivation for the database approach as 
a mechanism for modeling the real world. Review of the three popular data models: relational, 
network, and hierarchical. Comparison of permissible structures, integrity constraints, storage 
strategies, and query facilities. Theory of database design logic. 



CMSC - Computer Science 269 



CMSC 426 Image Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 420. An introduction to basic techniques of analysis and manipulation of 
pictorial data by computer. Image input/output devices, image processing software, enhancement, 
segmentation, property measurement, Fourier analysis. Computer encoding, processing, and 
analysis of curves. 

CMSC 430 Theory of Language Translation (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 330 or CMSC 400. Formal translation of programming languages, program 
syntax and semantics. Finite state recognizers and regular grammers. Contextfree parsing tech- 
niques such as recursive descent, precedence, LL(k) and LR(k). Code generation, improvement, 
syntax-directed translation schema. 

CMSC 434 Human Factors in Computer and Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 330; and PSYC 100; and STAT 400. Human factors issues in the development 
of software, the use of database systems, and the design of interactive computer systems. Ex- 
perimentation on programming language control and data structures, programming style issues, 
documentation, program development strategies, debugging, and readability. Interactive system 
design issues such as response time, display rates, graphics, on-line assistance, command lan- 
guage, menu selection, or speech input/output. 
CMSC 435 Software Design and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 420 and CMSC 430 or equivalent. State-of-the-art techniques in software 
design and development. Laboratory experience in applying the techniques covered. Structured 
design, structured programming, top-down design and development, segmentation and modu- 
larization techniques, iterative enhancement, design and code inspection techniques, correctness, 
and chief-programmer teams. The development of a large software project. 
CMSC 450 Elementary Logic and Algorithms (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 240 or CMSC 250 or CMSC 150. Also offered as MATH 444. Credit will 
be granted for only one of the following: MATH 444 or CMSC 450. An elementary development 
of propositional logic, predicate logic, with an introductory treatment of Turing machines, re- 
cursive functions, unavoidable problems, and applications of logic in artificial intelligence. 
CMSC 451 Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms (3) 

Prerequisites: CMSC 113; and CMSC 251. Fundamental techniques for designing and analyzing 
computer algorithms. Greedy methods, divide-and-conquer techniques, search and traversal 
techniques, dynamic programming, backtracking methods, branch-and-bound methods, and al- 
gebraic transformations. 

CMSC 452 Elementary Theory of Computation (3) 

Prerequisites: CMSC 113; and CMSC 251. Alternative theoretical models of computation, types 
of automata, and their relations to formal grammars and languages. 
CMSC 456 Data Encryption and Security (3) 

Prerequisites: CMSC 420. Recommended: CMSC 451. Methods of protecting computer data from 
unauthorized use and users by data encryption and by access and information controls. Classical 
cryptographic systems. Introduction to several modern systems such as Data Encryption Standard 
and public-key cryptosystems. 
CMSC 460 Computational Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: MA TH 240 and MA TH 241 ; and (CMSC 110 or CMSC 113). A Iso offered as MA PL 
460. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: CMSCIMAPL 460 or CMSCIMAPL 
466. Basic computational methods for interpolation, least squares, approximation, numerical 
quadrature, numerical solution of polynomial and transcendental equations, systems of linear 
equations and initial value problems for ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is on methods 
and their computational properties rather than their analytic aspects. Intended primarily for 
students in the physical and engineering sciences. 



270 Course Descriptions 



CMSC 466 Introduction to Numerical Analysis I (3) 

Prerequisite: MA TH 240; and MA TH 241 : and (CMSC 1 10 or equivalent) . Also offered as MAPL 
466. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: CMSCIMAPL 460 or CMSCIMAPL 
466. Floating point computations, direct methods for linear systems, interpolation, solution of 
nonlinear equations. 

CMSC 467 Introduction to Numerical Analysis II (3) 

Prerequisite: MAPLICMSC 466. Also offered as MAPL 467. Advanced interpolation, linear least 
squares, eigenvalue problems, ordinary differential equations. Fast Fourier Transforms. 
CMSC 475 Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 240 and MATH 241. Also offered as MATH 475. General enumeration 
methods, difference equations, generating functions. Elements of graph theory, matrix repre- 
sentations of graphs, applications of graph theory to transport networks, matching theory and 
graphical algorithms. 
CMSC 477 Optimization (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSCIMAPL 460, or CMSCIMAPL 466. or CMSCIMAPL 467. Also offered as 
MAPL477. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: CMSC 477 or MAPL 477. Linear 
programming including the simplex algorithm and dual linear programs; convex sets and elements 
of convex programming; combinatorial optimization, integer programming. 
CMSC 498 Special Problems in Computer Science (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. An individualized course designed to allow a student or 
students to pursue a specialized topic or project under the supervision of the senior staff. Credit 
according to work done. 
CMSC 612 Computer Systems Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: CMSC 411: and CMSC 412; and STAT 400. Basic theoretical results in computer 
systems, including synthetic models of system structure, analytical (probabilistic) models of 
system structure, analysis of computer system mechanisms, analysis of operating system mech- 
anisms, and analysis of resource allocation policies. 
CMSC 620 Problem Solving Methods in Artificial Intelligence (3) 

Prerequisites: CMSC 420; and CMSC 450. Underlying theoretical concepts in solving problems 
by heuristically guided trial and error search methods. State-space problem reduction, and first- 
order predicate calculus representations for solving problems. Search algorithms and their op- 
timality proofs. 

CMSC 624 Database Management Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 424 or permission of instructor. Theoretical and implementation issues of 
database systems. Topics include: data semantics and models, deduction and expert database 
systems, implementation techniques of database management systems, advanced access methods 
and query optimization, distributed databases, and database machine architecture. 
CMSC 630 Theory of Programming Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 430. Contemporary topics in the theory of programming languages. Formal 
specification and program correctness. Axiomatic proof systems (both Floyd-Hoare and Dijkstra's 
predicate transformers). Mills' functional correctness approach, abstract data types (both abstract 
model and algebraic specifications), and Scott-style denotational semantics based on least fixed 
points. 

CMSC 650 Theory of Computing (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 452. Formal treatment of theoretical models of computation, computable 
and uncomputable functions, unsolvable decision problems, and computational complexity. 
CMSC 651 Analysis of Algorithms (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 451. Efficiency of algorithms, orders of magnitude, recurrence relations, 
lower-bound techniques, time and space resources, NP-complete problems, polynomial hierar- 



CMSC - Computer Science 271 



chies, and approximation algorithms. Sorting, searching, set manipulation, graph theory, matrix 
multiplication, fast Fourier transform, pattern matching, and integer and polynomial arithmetic. 
CMSC 660 Algorithmic Numerical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: MATHICMSC 460 OR 470, and CMSC 110. Detailed study of problems arising 
in the implementation of numerical algorithms on a computer. Typical problems include rounding 
errors, their estimation and control; numerical stability considerations; stopping criteria for 
converging processes; parallel methods. Examples from linear algebra, differential equations, 
minimization. (Also listed as MATH 684). 
CMSC 666 Numerical Analysis I (3) 

Prerequisites: CMSCIMAPL 466; and MA TH 410. Also offered as MAPL 666. Iterative methods 
for linear systems, piecewise interpolation, eigenvalue problems, numerical integration. 
CMSC 667 Numerical Analysis II (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSCIMAPL 666. Also offered as MAPL 667. Nonlinear systems of equations, 
ordinary differential equations, boundary value problems. 
CMSC 710 Performance Evaluation of Computer Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 412, MATH 141, and STAT 400 or equivalent. Performance evaluation 
methodologies. Methods for evaluating computer/communication systems. Analytical modeUng 
using queueing theoretic approach. Simulation for performance evaluation. Applying theoretical 
methods by modeling computer system components. Case studies using analytical and simulation 
techniques. 

CMSC 711 Computer Networks (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 412 or equivalent. Priciples, design, and performance evaluation of computer 
networks. Network architectures including the ISO model and local area networks (LANs). 
Communication protocols and network topology. 
CMSC 712 Distributed Algorithms and Verification (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 612 or equivalent. Study of algorithms from the distributed and concurrent 
systems literature. Formal approach to specifying, verifying, and deriving such algorithms. Areas 
selected from mutual exclusion, resource allocation, quiescence detection, election, Byzantine 
agreements, routing, network protocols, and fault-tolerence. Formal approaches will handle 
system specification and verification of safety, liveness, and real-time properties. 
CMSC 720 Logic for Problem Solving (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 620. Logic programming and its use in problem solving, natural language 
recognition and parsing, and robotics. The PROLOG language. Meta-level and parallel logic 
programming. Expert systems. Term project in logic programming. 
CMSC 723 Computational Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 420. Introductory course on applications of computational techniques to 
linguistics and natural-language processing. Research cycle of corpus selection, pre-editing, key- 
punching, processing, post-editing, and evaluation. General-purpose input, processing, and out- 
put routines. Special-purpose programs for sentence parsing and generation, segmentation, idiom 
recognition, paraphrasing, and stylistic and discourse analysis. Programs for dictionary, thesau- 
rus, and concordance compilation, and editing. Systems for automatic abstracting, translation, 
and question-answering. 

CMSC 727 Connectionist Models of Intelligent Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 240 and MATH 241; and permission of instructor. Fundamental methods 
of connectionist modelling (neural modelling). Surveys historical development and recent re- 
search results from both the computational and dynamical systems perspective. Logical neurons, 
perceptrons, linear adaptive networks, adaptive resonance, energy minimizing models, compet- 
itive activation methods, error back-propagation, and tensor models. Applications in artificial 
intelligence, cognitive science, and neuroscience. 



272 Course Descriptions 



CMSC 730 Artificial Intelligence (3) 

Prerequisites: CMSC 620: and STAT 401. Heuristic programming; tree search procedures. Pro- 
grams for game playing, theorem finding and proving, and problem solving. Conversation with 
computers; question-answering programs. Trainable pattern classifiers;linear, piecewise linear, 
quadratic, and multilayer machines. Statistical decision theory, decision functions, likelihood 
ratios; mathematical taxonomy, cluster detection. Neural models, computational properties of 
neural nets, processing of sensory information, representative conceptual models of the brain. 
CMSC 733 Computer Processing of Pictorial Information (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 420. Input, output, and storage of pictorial information. Pictures as infor- 
mation sources, efficient encoding, sampling, quantization, approximation. Position-invariant 
operations on pictures, digital and optical implementations, the pax language, applications to 
matched and spatial frequency filtering. Picture quality, image enhancement and image resto- 
ration. Picture properties and pictorial pattern recognition. Processing of complex pictures; figure 
extraction, properties of figures. Data structures for pictures description and manipulation; 
picture languages. Graphics systems for alphanumeric and other symbols, line drawings of two- 
and three-dimensional objects, cartoons and movies. 

CMSC 735 A Quantitative Approach to Software Management and Engineering (3) 
Prerequisites: CMSC 435; and STA T 400 or permission of instructor. Introduction to the fun- 
damental ideas for measuring and evaluating the software development process and product. 
Types of models and metrics currently in use. Paradigms for using practical measurement for 
managing and engineering the software development and maintenance process; evaluating soft- 
ware methods and tools; and improving productivity, quality and the effective use of method- 
ology. 

CMSC 750 Advanced Theory of Computation (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 650. Continuation of CMSC 650. Relevant results and techniques from 
recursive function theory such as priority arguments. Current research topics in the foundation 
of computing, such as inductive inference and polynomial terseness. 
CMSC 751 Parallel Algorithms (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 451 or equivalent. A presentation of the theory of parallel computers and 
parallel processing. Models of parallel processing and the relationships between these models. 
Techniques for the design and analysis of efficient parallel algorithms including parallel prefix, 
searching, sorting, graph problems, and algebraic problems. Theoretical limits of parallelism, 
inherently sequential problems, and the theory of P-completeness. 
CMSC 753 Mathematical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisites: CMSC 650 and STAT 400. Introductory course on applications of mathematics to 
linguistics. Elementary ideas in phonology, grammar and semantics. Automata, formal grammars 
and languages. Chomsky's theory of transformational grammars, Yngve's depth hypothesis and 
syntactic complexity. Markov-chain models of word and sentence generation. Shannon's infor- 
mation theory Carnap and Bar-Hillel's semantic theory, lexicostatistics and stylostatistics, Zipf s 
law of frequency and Mandelbrot's rank hypothesis. Mathematical models as theoretical foun- 
dation for computational linguistics. 
CMSC 760 Advanced Linear Numerical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSCIMAPL 666 or permission of instructor. Also offered as MAPL 600. Formerly 
CMSC 770. Advanced topics in numerical linear algebra, such as dense eigenvalue problems, 
sparse elimination, iterative methods, and other topics. 
CMSC 762 Numerical Solution of Nonlinear Equations (3) 

Prerequisites: CMSCIMAPL 666, and CMSCIMAPL 667 or permission of instructor. Also offered 
as MAPL 604. Formerly CMSC 772. Numerical solution of nonlinear equations in one and 
several variables. Existence questions. Minimization methods. Selected applications. 



CNEC - Consumer Economics 273 



CMSC 782 Modeling and Simulation of Physical Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: CMSC 420: and STA T400. Monte-Carlo and other methods of investigating models 
of interest to physical scientists. Generation and testing of random numbers. Probabilistic, de- 
terministic and incomplete models. 
CMSC 798 Graduate Seminar in Computer Science (1-3) 
CMSC 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
CMSC 818 Advanced Topics in Computer Systems (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit. Advanced topics selected by the 
faculty from the literature of computer systems to suit the interest and background of students. 
CMSC 828 Advanced Topics in Information Processing (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit. Advanced topics selected by the 
faculty from the literature of information processing to suit the interest and background of 
students. 

CMSC 838 Advanced Topics in Programming Languages (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit. Advanced topics selected by faculty 

from the literature of programming languages to suit the interest and background of students. 

CMSC 858 Advanced Topics in Theory of Computing (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit. Advanced topics selected by the 

faculty from the literature of theory of computing to suit the interest and background of students. 

CMSC 878 Advanced Topics in Numerical Methods (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit. Advanced topics selected by the 

faculty from the literature of numerical methods to suit the interest and background of students. 

CMSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

CNEC - Consumer Economics 

CNEC 400 Research Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 110 or MATH 115. Not open to students who have completed TEXT 400 
or BMGT 230. Research methodology in textiles and consumer economics, with particular 
emphasis on the application of statistical concepts and techniques to the analysis of data from 
the areas of textiles and consumer economics. 

CNEC 410 Consumer Finance (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 201: and ECON 203. Not open to students who have completed FMCD 441. 
An economic approach to the problems of income allocation and consumer financial planning, 
including income maximization, principles of asset choice, financial management and risk man- 
agement. The effects of fiscal and monetary policies on lifetime economic planning. 
CNEC 431 The Consumer and the Law (3) 

A study of legislation affecting consumer goods and services. Topics covered include product 
safety and liability, packaging and labeling, deceptive advertising, and consumer credit. The 
implications of such legislation for consumer welfare with particular emphasis on the disadvan- 
taged groups in our society will be examined. 
CNEC 433 Consumer Law: Advertising and Solicitation (3) 

Prerequisite: CNEC 431 or permission of department. An advanced study of the legal consequences 
of inducing consumers to enter into commercial transactions. Individual consumer remedies, 
collective consumer remedies and government regulation. 

CNEC 435 Economics of Consumption (3) 

Prerequisites: jECON 201; and ECON 203 J or /ECON 205 for non-majors I . The application of 
economic theory to a study of consumer decision-making and its role in a market economy at 



274 Course Descriptions 



both the individual and aggregate levels. Topics covered include empirical studies of consumer 
spending and saving, the consumer in the market and collective consumption. 
CNEC 437 Consumer Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: PSYC 100; and SOCY 100. An application of the behavioral sciences to a study 
of consumer behavior. Current theories, models and empirical research findings are explored. 
CNEC 455 Product Standards (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. The process of product standard development, and the 
significance of such standards to the consumer. History, procedures and uses of standards by 
industry and government, including both voluntary and regulatory standardization; the impact 
of product standards, and mechanisms for obtaining consumer input in the standardization 
process. 

CNEC 456 Product Liability and Government Regulation (3) 

Prerequisite: CNEC 431 or permission of department. Legal concepts involved in society's de- 
termination of consumer's rights to product safety. Litigation determining the obligation of 
manufacturers and sellers to injured consumers. Government regulations defining the obligations 
of manufacturers to design and construct products in accordance with government standards. 
CNEC 457 Product Safety (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. An interdisciplinary investigation of consumer product 
safety. Major statutes and agencies regulating safety. Alternative means of promoting consumer 
product safety. The appHcation of product liability and cost benefit analysis to the economics of 
product safety. Consumer response to safety labeling, advertising and educational efforts. 
CNEC 488 Senior Honors Thesis (1-4) 

Limited to undergraduate students in the departmental honors program. An independent literary, 
laboratory or field study, conducted throughout the student's senior year. Student should register 
in both fall and spring. 
CNEC 498 Special Studies (2-4) 

Independent study by an individual student or by a group of students in advanced work not 
otherwise provided in the department. Students must prepare a description of the study they 
wish to undertake. The plan must be approved by the faculty directing the study and the de- 
partment chairman. 

CRIM - Criminology 

CRIM 432 Law of Corrections (3) 

Prerequisite: CJUS 230 or CJUS 234; and CRIM 220. A review of the law of criminal corrections 

from sentencing to final release or release on parole. Probation, punishments, special treatments 

for special offenders, parole and pardon, and the prisoner's civil rights are also examined. 

CRIM 450 Juvenile Delinquency (3) 

Prerequisite: CRIM 220. Juvenile delinquency in relation to the general problem of crime; analysis 

of factors underlying juvenile delinquency; treatment and prevention. 

CRIM 451 Crime and Delinquency Prevention (3) 

Prerequisite: CRIM 220 or CRIM 450 or permission of department. Methods and programs in 

prevention of crime and delinquency. 

CRIM 452 Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents (3) 

Prerequisite: CRIM 220 or CRIM 450 or permission of department. Processes and methods used 

to modify criminal and delinquent behavior. 

CRIM 454 Contemporary Criminological Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: (CRIM 220; and CRIM 450; and CRIM 451/ or [CRIM 452 or CRIM 453}. Brief 

historical overview of criminological theory up to the 50's. Deviance. Labeling. Typologies. Most 



DANC - Dance 275 



recent research in criminalistic subcultures and middle class delinquency. Recent proposals for 
"decriminalization". 

CRIM 455 Psychology of Criminal Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: CRIM 220 or equivalent; and PSYC 331 or equivalent. Biological, environmental, 
and personality factors which influence criminal behaviors. Biophysiology and crime, stress and 
crime, maladjustment patterns, psychoses, personality disorders, aggression and violent crime, 
sex-motivated crime and sexual deviations, alcohol and drug abuse, and criminal behavior. 
CRIM 456 White Collar and Organized Crime (3) 

Prerequisite: CRIM 220 or CRIM 450. Definition, detection, prosecution, sentencing and impact 
of white collar and organized crime. Special consideration given to the role of federal law and 
enforcement practices. 
CRIM 457 Comparative Criminology (3) 

Prerequisite: CRIM 220 or CRIM 450. Comparison of law and criminal justice systems in different 
countries. Special emphasis on the methods of comparative legal analysis, international coop- 
eration in criminal justice, and crime and development. 
CRIM 498 Selected Topics in Criminology (3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Topics of special interest to advanced undergraduates 
in criminology. Such courses will be offered in response to student request and faculty interest. 
CRIM 610 Research Methods in Criminal Justice and Criminology (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of research methods and statistics requirements for the M.A. Degree. 
Examination of special research problems and techniques. 
CRIM 650 Advanced Criminology (3) 

Survey of the principal issues in contemporary criminological theory and research. 
CRIM 651 Seminar in Criminology (3) 
Analysis of significant recent issues in Criminology. 
CRIM 652 Seminar in Juvenile Delinquency (3) 
Analysis of delinquency and its control. 

CRIM 653 Crime and Delinquency as a Community Problem (3) 

An intensive study of selected problems in adult crime and juvenile delinquency in Maryland. 
CRIM 654 History of Criminological Thought (3) 

Prerequisite: CRIM 454 or equivalent. A study of the development of criminological thought 
from antiquity to the present. 
CRIM 699 Special Criminological Problems (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Supervised study 
of selected problems in the field of criminology. 
CRIM 710 Advanced Research Methods in Criminology (3) 

Prerequisite: approved doctoral level statistics course. Application of advanced research methods 
and data analysis strategies to criminological and criminal justice problems. 
CRIM 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
CRIM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 
Doctoral dissertation research in criminal justice and criminology. 

DANC - Dance 

DANC 410 Technical Theater Production for Dance (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: DANC 210 or equivalent 
(or permission of department). A study of the theoretical principles of production and the practical 
application of those principles to the presentation of dance works. 



276 Course Descriptions 



DANC 411 Dance Management and Administration (3) 

Principles of dance management and administration, including organization of touring, bookings, 

budgets, public relations, grantsmanship and audience development. 

DANC 428 Advanced Ballet Technique 1(1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: DANC 329 or audition. Repeatable to 3 credits. 

Advanced ballet technique with emphasis on physical and expressive skills. 

DANC 429 Advanced Ballet Technique II (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: DANC 428. Repeatable to 3 credits. Intensive 

work in ballet technique for the professionally-oriented dancer. 

DANC 448 Modern Dance V for Majors (3) 

Prerequisite: DANC 349 or audition. Repeatable to 6 credits. Complex phrases of modern dance 
movement with emphasis on articulation and expression. 
DANC 449 Modern Dance VI for Majors (3) 

Prerequisite: DANC 448 or audition. Repeatable to 6 credits. Continuation of DANC 448. 
DANC 466 Laban Movement Analysis (3) 

Introduction to Rudolf Laban's system of qualitative movement analysis in relation to under- 
standing personal movement style. Application to dance performance, teaching, composition 
and research. 

DANC 468 Modern Repertory (3) 

Prerequisite: DANC 349 or permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
Form, content, music, design and performance of modern dance works. 
DANC 471 Movement Behavior (3) 

The social psychology of movement; reciprocity of physical and emotional behavior. 
DANC 479 Advanced Practicum in Dance (1-3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits. Advanced level performing experience for the student dancer who has 
developed an advanced professional level of competence. 
DANC 482 History of Dance I (3) 

Prerequisite: DANC 200. The development of dance from primitive times to the Middle Ages 
and the relationship of dance forms to patterns of culture. 
DANC 483 History of Dance II (3) 

Prerequisite: DANC 200. The development of dance from the Renaissance period to the present 
time and the relationship of dance forms to patterns of culture. 
DANC 484 Philosophy of Dance (3) 

Prerequisite: DANC 200 or permission of department. Critical analysis of dance as a creative 
experience and the role of professional, educational and recreational dance in our society. 
Selected approaches to current developments in dance. 
DANC 489 Special Topics in Dance (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Theoretical, 
choreographic, pedagogic, or performance study. 

DANC 499 Practicum in Choreography, Production and Performance IV (1-6) 
Prerequisite: permission of permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. Advanced workshop 
in dance presentation, including performing, production and planned field experiences. 
DANC 600 Introduction to Graduate Studies in Dance (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Supervised writing of reports and articles on selected 
dance subjects. Study of library resources and interviewing techniques. Preparation for written 
documentation of thesis project. 



ECON - Economics 277 



DANC 608 Choreography for Groups (3) 

One hour of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: DANC 388 or equivalent. 
Repeatable to 6 credits. An advanced course in the development of choreographic ideas for groups 
emphasizing the exploration of different approaches to choreographic form. 
DANC 610 Workshop in the Direction of Dance Production (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: DANC 410 or equivalent. 
A lecture/laboratory course dealing with the relationship of the director to all of the activities 
involved in the presentation of a dance concert. 
DANC 648 Advanced Modern Dance Technique I (2) 

Four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: DANC 449 or equivalent. Repeatable to 6 credits. 
Professional level training in contemporary dance techniques. 
DANC 649 Advanced Modern Dance Technique II (2) 

Four hours of laboratory per week . Prerequisite: DANC 648 or equivalent. Repeatable to 6 credits. 
A continuation of DANC 648. 
DANC 679 Graduate Dance Performance (1-3) 

One hour of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week . Prerequisite: permission of department. 
Repeatable to 6 credits. An advanced performance course focusing on the restagings from noted 
scores of the choreographic works of significant artists in the field. 
DANC 698 Independent Study in Dance (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. Directed independent study in 
theoretical topics. 

DANC 708 Advanced Seminar in Choreography (1-3) 

One hour of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: DANC 608 or permission 
of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. 
DANC 779 Master's Tutorial for Performance (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. Supervised performance expe- 
rience for advanced dancers. 
DANC 782 Historical Perspectives in Dance (3) 

Prerequisite: DANC 483 or equivalent. An advanced survey of the development of thearetical 
dance in the Western world with a special emphasis on the relationship between dance and other 
performing arts. 

DANC 783 Current Trends in Dance (3) 

Prerequisite: DANC 483 or equivalent. A survey of current trends in dance with an emphasis on 
developments in the United States covering choreographic and performance practice, theory and 
criticism, education, economics, and the mass media. 
DANC 788 Master's Tutorial for Choreography (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. Supervised production and pres- 
entation of a significant choreographic project. 
DANC 799 Master's Thesis Project (1-6) 
Prerequisite: permission of department. 

ECON - Economics 

ECON 402 Macroeconomic Models and Forecasting (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 305 or ECON 405. Analysis of the fluctuations in economic activity and the 

formulation and use of forecasting models of the economy. Illustrations of computer macro 

models and forecasting problems. 

ECON 405 Advanced Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 201; and ECON 203; and MATH 220 or equivalent. Credit will he granted 

for only one of the following: ECON 305 or ECON 405. Advanced treatment of the theory of 



278 Course Descriptions 



national income determination, employment, prices and growth. Models of the role of money 
and expectations, the impact of fiscal and monetary policies, and exchange rates. 
ECON 406 Advanced Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 201; and ECON 203: and MATH 220 or equivalent. Credit will be granted 
for only one of the following: ECON 306 or ECON 406. Advanced treatment of the theory of 
prices and markets. Analysis of the theory of the household and of the firm, concepts of general 
equilibrium and welfare economics and principles of efficient and equitable allocations. 
ECON 416 Theory of Economic Development (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 305 or ECON 405. Credit will he granted for only one of the following: 
ECON 315 or ECON 416. Economic theory of the developing nations; role of innovation, capital 
formation, resources, institutions, trade and exchange rates, and governmental policies. 
ECON 418 Economic Development of Selected Areas (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 315 or ECON 416. Institutional characteristics of a specific area are discussed 
and alternate strategies and policies for development are analyzed. 
ECON 422 Quantitative Methods in Economics I (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 201; and ECON 203: and [ECON 321 or BMGT 230:] or permission of 
department. Emphasizes the interaction between economic problems and the assumptions em- 
ployed in statistical theory. Formulation, estimation, and testing of economic models, including 
single variable and multiple variable regression techniques, theory of identification, and issues 
relating to inference. Independent work relating the material in the course to an economic 
problem chosen by the student is required. 
ECON 423 Quantitative Methods in Economics II (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 422. Interaction between economic problems and specification and esti- 
mation of econometric models. Topics include issues of autocorrelation, heteroscedasticity , func- 
tional form, simultaneous equation models, and qualitative choice models. 
ECON 424 Computer Methods in Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 201; and ECON 203; and (ECON 321 or BMGT 230). Computer modelling 
of economic problems, including household and firm behavior, macroeconomic relationships, 
statistical models of economy, and simulation models. 
ECON 425 Mathematical Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 305 or ECON 405. and ECON 306 or ECON 406. and MATH 220 or 
equivalent. Mathematical developments of theory of household and firm, general equilibrium 
and welfare economics, market imperfections, and role of information. 

ECON 430 Money and Banking (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: 

ECON 430 or ECON 431. The structure of financial institutions and their role in the provision 

of money and near money. Analysis of the Federal Reserve System, the techniques of central 

banks, and the control of supply of financial assets in stabilization policy. Relationship of money 

and credit to economic activity and the price level. 

ECON 431 Theory of Money, Prices and Economic Activity (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 305 or ECON 405. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: 

ECON 430 or ECON 431. Monetary theory and the role of money, financial institutions and 

interest rates in macro models. Analysis of money demand and supply and of the Monetarist- 

Keynesian debate as they affect inflation and stabilization policy. 

ECON 440 International Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: 

ECON 440 or ECON 441. A description of international trade and the analysis of international 



ECON - Economics 279 



transactions, exchange rates, and balance of payments. Analysis of policies of protection, de- 
valuation, and exchange rate stabilization and their consequences. 
ECON 441 Theory of International Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 305 or ECON 405; and ECON 306 or ECON 406. Credit will be granted 
for only one of the following: ECON 440 or ECON 441. Theoretical treatment of international 
trade and international finance. Includes Ricardian and Heckscher-Ohlin theories of comparative 
advantage, analysis of tariffs and other trade barriers, international factor mobility, balance of 
payments adjustments, exchange rate determination, and fiscal and monetary policy in an open 
economy. 

ECON 450 Introduction to Public Sector Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: [ECON 201; and ECON 203] or ECON 205. Credit will be granted for only one of 
the following: ECON 450 or ECON 454. The role of federal, state, and local governments in 
meeting public wants. Analysis of theories of taxation, public expenditures, government budg- 
eting, benefit-cost analysis and income redistribution, and their policy applications. 
ECON 451 Public Choice and Public Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: (ECON 201; and ECON 203], or ECON 205. Analysis of collective decision making, 
economic models of government, program budgeting, and policy implementation; emphasis on 
models of public choice and institutions which affect decision making. 
ECON 454 Theory of Public Finance and Fiscal Federalism (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 306 or ECON 406. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: 
ECON 450 or ECON 454. Study of welfare economics and the theory of public goods, taxation, 
public expenditures, benefit-cost analysis, and state and local finance. Applications of theory to 
current policy issues. 
ECON 460 Industrial Organization (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 306 or ECON 406. Changing structure of the American economy; price 
policies in different industrial classifications of monopoly and competition in relation to problems 
of public policy. 

ECON 465 Health Care Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 203 or ECON 205. Analysis of health care, the organization of its delivery 
and financing. Access to care; the role of insurance; regulation of hospitals, physicians, and the 
drug industry; role of technology; and limits on health care spending. 
ECON 470 Theory of Labor Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 306 or ECON 406. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: 
ECON 370 or ECON 470. An analytical treatment of theories of labor markets. The theory of 
human capital and allocation of time in household labor supply models; marginal productivity 
theory of labor demand; market structure and the efficiency of labor markets; information theory 
and screening; discrimination; distribution of income; and unemployment. 
ECON 471 Current Problems in Labor Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 470. For students who wish to pursue, in depth, selected topics in the labor 
field. Issues and topics selected for detailed examination may include; manpower training and 
development, unemployment compensation and social security, race and sex discrimination in 
employment, wage theory, productivity analysis, the problems of collective bargaining in public 
employment, wage-price controls and incomes policy. 
ECON 482 Economics of the Soviet Union (3) 

Prerequisite: [ECON 201 and ECON 203] or ECON 205. An analysis of the organization, 
operating principles and performance of the Soviet economy with attention to the historical and 
ideological background, planning, resources, industry, agricuhure, domestic and foreign trade, 
finance, labor, and the structure and growth of national income. 



280 Course Descriptions 



ECON 484 The Economy of China (3) 

Prerequisite: [ECON 201; and ECON 203] or ECON 205. Policies and performances of the 
Chinese economy since 1949. A survey of modern China's economic history. Emphasizes the 
strategies and institutional innovations that the Chinese have adopted to overcome the problems 
of economic development. Some economic controversies raised during the "Cultural Revolution" 
will be covered in review of the problems and prospects of the present Chinese economy. 

ECON 486 The Economics of National Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: (ECON 201; and ECON 203 j; or ECON 205. An analysis of the principles and 
practice of economic planning with special reference to the planning problems of West European 
countries and the United States. 

ECON 490 Survey of Urban Economic Problems and Policies (3) 

Prerequisites: [ECON 201 and ECON 2031 or ECON 205. An introduction to the study of urban 
economics through the examination of current policy issues. Topics may include suburbanization 
of jobs and residences, housing and urban renewal, urban transportation, development of new 
towns, ghetto economic development, problems in services such as education and police. 

ECON 492 Economics of Location and Regional Growth (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 306 or ECON 406 or permission of department. Study of the theories, 
problems, and policies of regional economic development and the location of economic activity 
for both rural and metropolitan regions. Methods of regional analysis. 

ECON 600 Analytical Techniques for Economists (3) 

Vectors, matrices and determinants to model static equilibrium. Comparative statics using dif- 
ferential calculus. Problems in microeconomics and macroeconomics involving unconstrained 
optimization. Problems in microeconomics and macroeconomics involving constrained optimi- 
zation. Economic dynamics using differential and difference equations, and Kuhn-Tucker Theory. 

ECON 601 Macroeconomic Analysis I (3) 

Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ECON 600 or 
permission of instructor. Introductory technical treatment of standard Keynesian, classical and 
new classical macroeconomic models. Expectations formation and microeconomic foundations 
of consumption, investment, money demand, and labor market behavior. 

ECON 602 Macroeconomic Analysis II (3) 

Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ECON 601. Rational 
expectations: the Lucas critique, misperceptions, business cycles, and persistence; real business 
cycles; pohcy ineffectiveness and effectiveness; optimal policy rules and time inconsistency; 
efficient markets hypothesis. Unemployment theory: unemployment and wage behavior in fix- 
price models, implicit contracts, and efficiency wage models; hysteresis. Theory of production; 
aggregation and index number theory; capital theory; theory of economic growth and asociated 
measurement issues. 

ECON 603 Microeconomic Analysis I (3) 

Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ECON 600 or 
permission of instructor. A detailed treatment of the theory of the consumer and of the firm, 
particularly emphasizing the duality approach. Topics include uncertainty, the household pro- 
duction model, imperfect competition, monopolilstic and oligopolistic markets. 

ECON 604 Microeconomic Analysis II (3) 

Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ECON 603. Analysis 
of markets and market equilibria; the Arrow-Debreu model of general equilibrium, the two- 
sector model, welfare theorems, externalities, public goods, markets with incomplete and asym- 
metric information, game theory. 



ECON - Economics 281 



ECON 605 Welfare Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 603. First semester. The topics covered include Pareto optimality, social 
welfare funtions, indivisibilities, consumer surplus, output and price policy in public enterprise, 
and welfare aspects of the theory of public expenditures. 
ECON 606 History of Economic Thought (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 403 or permission of department. First semester. A study of the development 
of economic thought and theories including the Greeks, Romans, Canonists, Mercantilists, Phy- 
siocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo. Relation of ideas to economic policy. 
ECON 607 Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 606 or permission of department. Second semester. A study of nineteenth- 
century and twentieth-century schools of economic thought, particularly the Classicists, Neo- 
Classicists, Austrians, German historical school, American economic thought, the Socialists, and 
Keynes. 

ECON 611 Seminar in American Economic Development (3) 
ECON 613 Origins and Development of Capitalism (3) 

Second semester. Studies the transition from feudalism to modern capitalistic economies in 
Western Europe. Whenever possible, this economic history is analyzed with the aid of tools of 
modern economics, and in the light of comparisons and contrasts with the less developed areas 
of the present day. 

ECON 615 Economic Development of Underdeveloped Areas (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 401 and ECON 403. First semester. An analysis of the forces contributing 
to and retarding economic progress in underdeveloped areas. Macro and microeconomic aspects 
of development planning and strategy are emphasized. 
ECON 616 Seminar in Economic Development (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 615 or permission of department. Second semester. A continuation of ECON 
615. Special emphasis on the application of economic theory in the institutional setting of a 
country or area of particular interest to the student. 
ECON 621 Quantitative Economics I (3) 

First semester. An introduction to the theory and practice of statistical inference. Elements of 
computer programming and a review of mathematics germane to this and other graduate eco- 
nomics courses are included. 
ECON 622 Quantitative Economics II (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 621. Techniques of estimating relationships among economic variables. 
Multiple regression, the analysis of variance and covariance, and techniques for dealing with 
time series. Further topics in mathematics. 
ECON 623 Econometrics I (3) 

Introduction to and development of aspects of mathematical statistics relevant for econometrics; 
distribution theory and inference. Topics considered include: random variables, density functions, 
moment generating functions, maximum likelihood estimators, sufficient statistics. 

ECON 624 Econometrics II (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 623. Formal treatment of regression analysis; emphasis on formulation, 

specifications, and estimation of single equation models; elementsof computer usage; experience 

with problems and examples. 

ECON 625 Quantitative Methods in Practice (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 621 or equivalent. Practical experience in applying quantitative methods to 

economic data using computers. Proficiency in techniques, creativity in model formulation, and 

judgment in model evaluation are stressed. 



282 Course Descriptions 



ECON 661 The Corporate Firm (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 603, and ECON 662 or ECON 624. The modern firm; review of the theory 
of profit; neoclassical and managerial theories of the firm. Decisions of the firm: investment, 
research and development, advertising, mergers; analysis of determinants and effects of these 
decisions. Theoretical and empirical studies of the firm. 
ECON 662 Industry Structure, Conduct, and Performance (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 603, and ECON 622 or ECON 624. Determinants of industry structures; 
structural effects on firm conduct and performance. Plant and firm economies of scale and their 
relation to concentration levels. Industry entry barriers; competitive, oligopolistic, and monop- 
olistic pricing. Impact of concentration, entry barriers, and other structure variables on prices 
and profits of the industry. Social cost of market power. 
ECON 663 Antitrust Policy and Regulation (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 603; and ECON 622 or ECON 624. U.S. antitrust policy after 1890; actual 
policies compared to theoretical policies to promote economic efficiency. Development of policy 
toward monopolies, cartels, mergers, and patents. Models of the regulatory process and empirical 
evidence. Studies of regulation of electricity, transportation, airlines, and other industries. Eco- 
nomics of product safety. Regulation of drugs, automobiles, food, and other products. 
ECON 670 The Economics of Labor Markets (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 603 or permission of department. Economics of labor markets with trade 
unions and governmental control. Employer-employee relations in the public, voluntary, and 
private sectors. Nature of unions in bargaining and their impact on relative wages, wage levels, 
productivity, employment, inflation. Economic goals and consequences of public control, bar- 
gaining, and employment conditions. 

ECON 681 Comparative Economic Systems and Economic Planning (3) 

Theory and practice of economic systems that differ markedly from competitive capitalist system; 
command economies, in particular the Soviet Union; planned capitalist economies, including 
French and Dutch experience; self-managed systems (Yugoslavia); and market socialism (Hun- 
gary). Emphasis on the nature of institutions and on applying economic tools. 
ECON 682 Topics in Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 681. Detailed analysis of planned economic systems; theoretical study of 
neoclassical, input-output, and development planning models; use of economic analysis to un- 
derstand the behavior and development of the economies of Western Europe, the USSR, Eastern 
Europe, and China. 

ECON 684 Seminar in Economic Development of the Soviet Union (3) 

Measurement and evaluation of Soviet economic growth; interpretation and use of Soviet sta- 
tistics; planning and economic administration; manpower and wage policies; foreign trade and 
aid. Selected topics in Bloc development and reform. 
ECON 698 Selected Topics in Economics (3) 
ECON 700 Applied Economic Theory (3) 

Applied economic theory designed primarily for master's degree students. Topics from micro- 
economic and macroeconomic theory, including applied welfare economics, consumer surplus, 
public goods and externalities, investment theory, economic growth, and a review of IS-LM 
analysis. 

ECON 701 Advanced Macroeconomics I (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 601; and ECON 602. Recent developments in macroeconomics with an 
emphasis on topics and techniques useful for conducting research in macroeconomics. Topics 
include advanced treatment of fiscal and monetary policy issues; the role of imperfect competition; 
real, sectoral and nominal business cycle models. 



ECON - Economics 283 



ECON 702 Advanced Macroeconomics II (3) 

Disequilibrium macroeconomic models; models of persistence and hysteresis; models of nominal 
and real rigidities; macroeconomic time series estimation techniques including cointegration and 
method-of-moments estimation procedures. 
ECON 703 Advanced Microeconomics I (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 603 and ECON 604. Normative and descriptive theory of social choice: 
including alternative axiomatizations, possibility theorems, and impossibility theorems. The im- 
plications of uncertainty for microeconomic behavior using axioms of choice and the expected 
utility theorem. Noncooperative games, including extensive and normal forms, Nash equilibrium, 
and applications to voting models and imperfect competition. 
ECON 704 Advanced Microeconomics II (3) 

Prerequisites: ECON 603 and ECON 604. General equilibrium theory and its relation to the 
core, the convergence theorem, and temporary equilibrium in a sequence of markets. The role 
of information in various economic organizations: including coordination and incentives under 
incomplete information, the principal-agent problem, search, and signaling. Principles of efficient 
and optimal allocation over time, and applications to capital accumulation and taxation. 
ECON 705 Seminar in Institutional Economic Theory (3) 

Second semester. A study of the recent developments in the field of institutional economic theory 
in the United States and abroad. 

ECON 706 Seminar in Institutional Economic Theory (3) 
ECON 721 Econometrics III (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 624. Additional topics on the single equation model, including autocorre- 
lation, heteroskedasticity, dunr.my variables, maximum likelihood estimation, and functional 
forms. Consideration of systems problems. 
ECON 722 Econometrics IV (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 721. Nonlinear econometric systems, simulation, dynamic properties of 
models, disequilibrium systems, random parameter models, Bayesian analysis. Stochastic control, 
and other topics. Emphasis on applications to micro and macro models, to value-of-information 
problems, and to other problems. 
ECON 731 Monetary Economics (3) 

Implementation of monetary policy: targets and instruments. Tobin's asset accumulation models. 
Transactions demand for money: Glower constraints, cash-in-advance models, legal restrictions. 
Asset demand for money, portfolio diversification, and overlapping generations models. Ele- 
ments of finance: Capital Asset Pricing Models, arbitrage pricing theory, pricing of state-con- 
tingent claims. The term structure of interest rates. 
ECON 732 Seminar in Monetary Theory and Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 731 or permission of department. Second semester. Theory of the mechanisms 
through which central banking affects economic activity and prices; formation and implemen- 
tation of of monetary policy; theoretical topics in monetary policy. 

ECON 741 Advanced International Economics I (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 601. The international mechanism of adjustment: price, exchange rate, and 
income changes. The flexible exchange rate system, international monetary reform and inter- 
national investment and capital flows. 
ECON 742 Advanced International Economics II (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 603 and ECON 741. The pure theory of international trade. Comparative 
costs, the Heckscher-Ohlin Theorem, and the effect of trade on factor prices. Tariff analysis, 
commercial policy and customs unions. The gains from trade and ranking of policy interventions. 



284 Course Descriptions 



ECON 751 Advanced Theory of Public Finance (3) 

Review of utility analysis to include the theory of individual consumer resource allocation and 
exchange and welfare implications. Effects of alternative tax and subsidy techniques upon al- 
location, exchange, and welfare outcomes. Theories of public goods, their production, exchange 
and consumption. Principles of benefit-cost analysis for government decisions. 
ECON 752 Seminar in Public Finance (3) 

Second semester. Theory of taxation and tax policy, with particular emphasis on income taxation; 
empirical studies; the burden of the public debt. Research paper by each student to be presented 
to seminar. 

ECON 755 Theory of Public Choice I (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. An examination of rationality in individual and collective 
decision-making with particular reference to the theory of games. The reasons why nonmarket 
collective decision procedures are required, the properties of several voting rules, and their 
normative implications. Majority rule, the unanimity rule, the Borda rule, and the demand 
revealing process. The properties of various representative voting mechanisms. 
ECON 756 Theory of Public Choice II (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 755 or permission of department. The normative properties of collective 
choice procedures. Specific reference to the theories of justice advanced by Rawls, Nozick and 
others; and the import of contractarian theories in general. The impossibility theorems of Arrow 
and Sen. Problems raised by voter ignorance and bounded rationality. The theory of bureaucracy. 
ECON 771 Advanced Labor Economics: Theory and Evidence (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 603. and ECON 622, or ECON 624, or permission of instructor. Modern 
analytical and quantitative labor economics. Labor supply decisions of individuals and house- 
holds; human capital model and distribution of income. Demand for labor; marginal productivity 
theory, imperfect information and screening. Interaction of labor demand and supply; unem- 
ployment; relative and absolute wages; macroeconomic aspects of the labor market. 
ECON 772 Government Policy and the Labor Market (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 771 or permission of department. Impact of governmental programs on the 
labor market. Programs examined chosen from among: employment training and public em- 
ployment programs; public assistance; unemployment insurance, social security, wage-setting 
policies such as fair labor standards act and Davis-Bacon act; policies toward unionization; anti- 
discrimination programs. 

ECON 781 Advanced Environmental Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 603; and ECON 621, or permission of department. Theory of externalities, 
microeconomic models of pollution damage functions, benefits and costs of alternative pollution 
control measures, macroeconomic models of material and energy balance, limits to economic 
growth and long-run problems of intergenerational and interregional efficiency and equity. 
ECON 785 Advanced Economics of Natural Resources (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 603 and ECON 621, or permission of department. The rate of use of re- 
newable and non-renewable resources from the normative and positive points of view; evaluation 
of alternative uses of natural environments; irreversibilities, discounting and intergenerational 
transfers. Discussion of natural resource problems and policies. 
ECON 790 Advanced Urban Economics (3) 

Market processes and public policies as related to urban problems and metropolitan change. 
Employment, housing, discrimination, transportation and the local public sector. 
ECON 792 Regional and Urban Economics (3) 

Theoretical and empirical analysis of the location and spatial distribution of economic activity. 
Analysis of regional growth and development. The study of analytical methods and forecasting 
models. 



EDCI - Curriculum and Instruction 285 



ECON 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

ECON 808 Workshop on Macroeconomics and Growth (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 

ECON 828 Workshop in Econometrics (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 

ECON 848 Workshop in International Development, and Comparative Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 

ECON 858 Workshop in Public Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 

ECON 868 Workshop in Industrial Organization (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 

ECON 878 Workshop in Labor Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 

ECON 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

EDCI - Curriculum and Instruction 

EDCI 401 Student Teaching in Elementary School: Art (4-8) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 300. Limited to art education majors who have previously applied. Fulfills 
elementary teaching requirements in K-12 art education program. 
EDCI 402 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Art (2-8) 
Prerequisite: EDCI 300. 

EDCI 403 Teaching of Art Criticism in Public Schools (3) 

Introduction to theories of art criticism. Trips to galleries and museums. Open to fine arts majors 
and students from other disciplines. 

EDCI 406 Practicum in Art Education: Two-Dimensional (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Theory and practical experience in two-dimensional de- 
sign in various art media; development of teaching procedures and presentation of materials in 
school settings. 

EDCI 407 Practicum in Art Education: Three-Dimensional (3) 

For pre-art education and art education majors only. A lecture-studio course to develop skills, 
material resources, and educational strategies for three-dimensional projects in school settings. 

EDCI 410 The Child and the Curriculum: Early Childhood (3) 

Relationship of the nursery school curriculum to child growth and development. Recent trends 

in curriculum organization; the effect of environment on learning; readiness to learn; and adapting 

curriculum content and methods to maturity levels of children. Primarily for in-service teachers, 

nursery school through grade 3. 

EDCI 411 Student Teaching: Preschool (4) 

For EDCI majors only. 

EDCI 412 Student Teaching: Kindergarten (4) 

For EDCI majors only. 

EDCI 413 Student Teaching: Primary Grades (8) 

For EDCI majors only. 

EDCI 416 Mainstreaming in Early Childhood Educational Settings (3) 

Theoretical bases and applied practices for integrating handicapped children into regular early 

childhood programs. 



286 Course Descriptions 



EDCI 420 Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: Social Studies (3) 

Corequisite: EDCI 421 or EDCI 422. An analysis of teaching theory, strategies, and techniques 
in the student teaching experience. 

EDCI 421 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Social Studies/History (12) 
Prerequisite: EDCI 320. Corequisite: EDCI 420. 

EDCI 422 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Social Studies/Geography (12) 
Prerequisite: EDCI 321. Corequisite: EDCI 420. 
EDCI 423 Social Studies in Early Childhood Education (3) 

Curriculum, organization and methods of teaching, evaluation of materials and utilization of 
environmental resources. Emphasis on multicultural education. Primarily for in-service teachers, 
nursery school through grade 3. 
EDCI 424 Social Studies in the Elementary School (3) 

Curriculum, organization and methods of teaching, evaluation of materials and utilization of 
environmental resources. Emphasis on multicultural education. Primarily for in-service teachers, 
grades 1-6. 

EDCI 425 Social Studies and Multicultural Education (3) 

Seminar in general social science principles applicable to multicultural education. Cultural ex- 
periences arranged for each participant. 

EDCI 426 Methods of Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools (3) 

Prerequisites: EDHD 300; and EDCI 390. Objectives, selection and organization of subject 
matter, appropriate methods, lesson plans, textbooks and other instructional materials, meas- 
urement and topics pertinent to social studies education. Includes emphasis on multicultural 
education. For in-service teachers. 

EDCI 430 Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: Foreign Language (3) 
Prerequisite: EDCI 330. Corequisite: EDCI 431. An analysis of teaching theory, strategies and 
techniques in the student teaching experience. 

EDCI 431 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Foreign Language (12) 
Prerequisite: EDCI 330. Corequisite: EDCI 430. 
EDCI 432 Foreign Language Methods in the Elementary School (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Methods and techniques for developmental approach to 
the teaching of modern foreign languages in elementary schools. Development of oral-aural skills 
in language development. 

EDCI 433 Introduction to Foreign Language Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: EDHD 300; and EDCI 390; or permission of department. Objectives, selection 
and organization of subject matter, appropriate methods, lesson plans, textbooks and other 
instructional materials, measurement and topics pertinent to foreign language education. For in- 
service teachers. 

EDCI 434 Methods of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3) 
Methods for teaching listening, speaking, reading and writing techniques and a review of research 
findings. 

EDCI 435 Teaching Reading in a Second Language (3) 

Prerequisite- permission of department. Analysis of selected theories and practices in first language 
reading applied to second language teaching/learning; diagnostic and prescriptive techniques and 
analysis of the student's cultural background as a factor in evaluating reading achievement in 
the second language. 

EDCI 436 Teaching for Multicultural Understanding (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. The techniques and content for teaching culture in foreign 
language classes and English as a Second Language (ESL) classes. Research and evaluation of 
selected aspects of a culture as basis for creating teaching materials. 



EDCI - Curriculum and Instruction 287 



EDCI 437 BUingual-Bicultural Education (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Analysis of bilingual-bicultural education in the U.S. and 
abroad with emphasis on TESOL. Methods of teaching, goals, instructional materials and main- 
streaming of bihngual students. 
EDCI 438 Field Experience in TESOL (3) 

Prerequisites: EDCI 434 or equivalent; and permission of department. Systematic observations, 
tutoring and teaching in a TESOL field setting. 

EDCI 440 Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: English, Speech, Theatre (1) 
Prerequisite: EDCI 340. Corequisite: EDCI 441. An analysis of teaching theory, strategies and 
techniques in relation to the student teaching experience. 
EDCI 441 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: English (6-12) 
Prerequisite: EDCI 340 or EDCI 442 or EDCI 448. Corequisite: EDCI 440. 
EDCI 442 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Speech (6-12) 
Prerequisite: EDCI 340. Corequisite: EDCI 440. 
EDCI 443 Literature for ChUdren and Youth (3) 

For elementary education and pre-elementary education majors only. Analysis of literary ma- 
terials for children and youth. Timeless and ageless books, and outstanding examples of con- 
temporary pubUshing. Evaluation of the contributions of individual authors, illustrators and 
children's book awards. 

EDCI 444 Language Arts in Early Childhood Education (3) 

Teaching of spelling, handwriting, oral and written expression and creative expression. Primarily 
for in-service teachers, nursery school through grade 3. 
EDCI 445 Language Arts in the Elementary School (3) 

Teaching of spelling, handwriting, oral and written expression and creative expression. Primarily 
for in-service teachers, grades 1-6. 

EDCI 446 Methods of Teaching English, Speech, Theatre in Secondary Schools (3) 
Prerequisites: EDHD 300; and EDCI 390; or permission of department. Objectives, selection 
and organization of subject matter, appropriate methods, lesson plans, textbooks and other 
instructional materials, measurement and topics pertinent to English, speech, and drama edu- 
cation. For in-service teachers. 

EDCI 447 Field Experience in English, Speech, Theatre Teaching (1) 

Corequisite: EDCI 340. Practical experience as an aide to a regular English, Speech or Drama 
teacher; assigned responsibilities and participation in a variety of teaching/learning activities. 

EDCI 448 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Theatre (6-12) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 340. Persons student teaching in theatre only should register for 12 credits. 

Persons in the Theatre and EngUsh Education Program should register for 6 credits of EDCI 

441 and 6 credits of EDCI 448. 

EDCI 450 Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: Mathematics (3) 

Corequisite: EDCI 451. An analysis of teaching theory, strategies and techniques in the student 

teaching experience. 

EDCI 451 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Mathematics (12) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 350. 

EDCI 452 Mathematics in Early Childhood Education (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 210 or equivalent. Emphasis on materials and procedures which help pupils 
sense arithmetic meanings and relationships. Primarily for in-service teachers, nursery school 
through grade 3. 



288 Course Descriptions 



EDCI 453 Mathematics in the Elementary School (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 210 or equivalent. Emphasis on materials and procedures which help pupils 
sense arithmetic meanings and relationships. Primarily for in-service teachers, grades 1-6. 
EDCI 455 Methods of Teaching Mathematics in Secondary Schools (3) 

Prerequisites: EDHD 300; and EDCI 390; and 2 semesters of calculus. Objectives, selection and 
organization of subject matter, appropriate methods, lesson plans, textbooks and other instruc- 
tional materials, measurement, and topics pertinent to mathematics education. 
EDCI 456 Teaching Mathematics to the Educationally Handicapped (3) 

Prerequisites: [EDSP 331; and EDSP 332; and EDSP 333; and EDSP 443; and MATH 210} or 
permission of department. Development of skills in diagnosing and identifying learning disabilities 
in mathematics and planning for individualized instruction. Clinic participation required. 
EDCI 457 Teaching Secondary Students with Difficulties in Learning Mathematics (3) 
Corequlsite: EDCI 390 or permission of department. Diagnosis, prescription and implementation 
of instruction for less able secondary school mathematics students. Participation in a clinical 
experience. 

EDCI 461 Reading in Early Childhood Education (3) 

Fundamentals of developmental reading instruction, including reading readiness, use of expe- 
rience stories, procedures in using basal readers, the improvement of comprehension, word 
analysis, and procedures for determining individual needs. Primarily for in-service teachers, 
nursery school through grade 3. 
EDCI 462 Reading in the Elementary School (3) 

Fundamentals of developmental reading instruction, including reading readiness, use of expe- 
rience stories, procedures in using basal readers, the improvement of comprehension, word 
analysis, and procedures for determining individual needs. Primarily for in-service teachers, 
grades 1-8. 

EDCI 463 The Teaching of Reading in the Secondary School (3) 

The fundamentals of secondary reading instruction, including emphasis on content reading in- 
struction. 

EDCI 464 Clinical Practices in Reading Diagnosis and Instruction (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 362 or EDCI 463. A laboratory course in which each student has one or 
more pupils for analysis and instruction. At least one class meeting per week to diagnose individual 
cases and to plan instruction. 

EDCI 465 Language, Culture, and Education (3) 

Prerequisite: LING 200 or permission of department. Survey of sociolinguistic and psycholinguistic 
perspectives for the study of language and education; examines pragmatics, speech act theory, 
and dimensions of language variation (dialects, codes, and registers); implications for educational 
research and instructional practice. 
EDCI 466 Literature for Adolescents (3) 

Reading and analysis of fiction and nonfiction ; methods for critically assessing quality and appeal ; 
current theory and methods of instruction; research on response to literature; curriculum design 
and selection of books. 

EDCI 467 Teaching Writing (3) 

Sources and procedures for developing curriculum objectives and materials for teaching written 
composition; prewriting, composing, and revision procedures; contemporary directions in rhe- 
torical theory; survey of research on composition instruction. 

EDCI 471 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Science (12) 
Prerequisite: EDCI 352. 



EDCI - Curriculum and Instruction 289 



EDCI 472 Methods of Teaching Science in Secondary Schools (3) 

Prerequisites: EDHD 300; and EDCI 390; and permission of department. Methods for classroom 
and laboratory instruction, determining appropriate teaching methods, selecting instructional 
materials, evaluating student achievement. Includes lab and field experience. For in-service 
teachers. 

EDCI 473 Environmental Education (3) 

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. An interdisciplinary course covering 
the literature, techniques and strategies of environmental education. 
EDCI 474 Science in Early Childhood Education (3) 

Objectives, methods, materials and activities for teaching science in the elementary school. 
Primarily for in-service teachers, nursery school through grade 3. 
EDCI 475 Science in the Elementary School (3) 

Objectives, methods, materials, and activities for teaching science in the elementary school. 
Primarily for in-service teachers, grades 1-6. 
EDCI 476 Teaching Ecology and Natural History (3) 

An introduction to the teaching of natural history in the classroom and in the field. Ecological 
principles; resources and instructional materials; curricular materials. Primarily for teachers, 
park naturalists, and outdoor educators. 
EDCI 480 The Child and the Curriculum: Elementary (3) 

Relationship of the school curriculum, grades 1-6, to child growth and development. Recent 
trends in curriculum organization; the effect of environment on learning; readiness to learn; and 
adapting curriculum content and methods to maturity levels of children. Primarily for in-service 
teachers, grades 1-6. 

EDCI 481 Student Teaching: Elementary (12) 
For EDCI majors only. 

EDCI 484 Student Teaching in Elementary School: Music (4-6) 

For EDCI majors only. Fulfills elementary teaching requirements in K-12 music education pro- 
grams. 

EDCI 485 Student Teaching in Elementary School: Physical Education (4-8) 
For EDCI majors only. Fulfills elementary teaching requirements in K-12 physical education 
programs. 

EDCI 487 Introduction to Computers in Instructional Settings (3) 

Prerequisite: six hours of education or permission of department. A first-level survey of instruc- 
tional uses of computers, software, and related technology especially for in-service teachers. 
EDCI 488 Selected Topics in Teacher Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI major or permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
EDCI 489 Field Experiences in Education (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Corequisite: EDCI 497. Repeatable to 4 credits. 
EDCI 491 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Health (12) 
For EDCI majors only. 

EDCI 494 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Music (2-8) 
For EDCI majors only. 

EDCI 495 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Physical Education (2-8) 
For EDCI majors only. 
EDCI 497 The Study of Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 481. Corequisite: EDCI 489. Identification and examination of learner and 
teacher outcome variables related to teaching systems, methods, and processes. Methods of 
conducting classroom research. 



290 Course Descriptions 



EDCI 498 Special Problems in Teacher Education (1-6) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. For EDCI majors only. Repeatable to 6 credits. Individual 
study of approved problems. 
EDCI 499 Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes (1-6) 

Repeatable to 6 credits. The following types of educational enterprise may be scheduled under 
this course heading: workshops conducted by the College of Education (or developed cooper- 
atively with other colleges and universities) and not otherwise covered in the present course 
listing; clinical experiences in pupil testing centers, reading clinics, speech therapy laboratories, 
and special education centers; institutes developed around specific topics or problems and in- 
tended for designated groups such as school superintendents, principals and supervisors. 
EDCI 600 Trends in Art Education Curriculum (3) 
Recent developments in art education. 
EDCI 601 History of Art Education (3) 

Perspective on art education philosophy as viewed through an historical survey. 
EDCI 602 The Teaching of Aesthetics in the Public Schools (3) 
Critical investigation of art, and curriculum implications. 
EDCI 610 Curriculum for Early Childhood Education (3) 

Curriculum theory, research and practice in educational settings for infants and children to age 
eight. 

EDCI 611 The Young ChUd in the Community (3) 

Impact of major social and economic trends on young children and on community agencies, 
commercial enterprises and social experiences. 
EDCI 612 Teaching Strategies in Early ChUdhood Education (3) 

Theory and research of teacher-learner interaction. Analysis of planning, organization of learning 
environments, evaluation of learning, general classroom management, and inter-personal rela- 
tionships. 

EDCI 613 Teacher-Parent Relationships (3) 

Research in parental involvement in school activities and processes. 
EDCI 614 Intellectual and Creative Experiences in Early Childhood Education (3) 
A critical examination of theories of intellectual and creative development, language develop- 
ment, problem solving and critical thinking. 

EDCI 620 Trends in Secondary School Curriculum: Social Studies (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice on the curriculum in social studies. 
EDCI 621 Trends in Secondary School Curriculum: Geography (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice on the curriculum in geography. 
EDCI 622 Teaching Social Studies in Elementary Schools (3) 

Examination of current literature and research in the social sciences as they relate to social 
studies curriculum and instruction. 

EDCI 630 Trends in Secondary School Curriculum: Foreign Language (3) 
Recent developments in educational thinking and practice on the curriculum in foreign language 
education. 

EDCI 631 Testing in the Foreign Language/ESL Classroom (3) 

Analysis of standardized and teacher-made FL/ESL tests; emphasis on principles of FL/ESL test 
construction. Field testing of commercial and teacher-made materials. 
EDCI 634 Advanced TESOL Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 434 or equivalent. Methods of teaching reading, writing, listening and speaking 
skills. Diagnosis of student skills in English; development of ESOL instructional materials. 
TESOL research projects. 



EDCI - Curriculum and Instruction 291 



EDCI 635 Advanced Foreign Language Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 330, EDCI 443. or permission of deparlment. Theory and implementation 
of the current methods and curricular trends in the foreign language classroom. 
EDCI 637 Advanced Laboratory Practice in Foreign Language/TESOL Education (2-6) 
Prerequisites: EDCI 434; and EDCI 634; or permission of department. Supervised internship in 
TESOL setting. 

EDCI 640 Trends in Secondary School Curriculum: English (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice on the curriculum in English education. 
EDCI 641 Trends in Secondary School Curriculum: Speech (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice on the curriculum in speech. 
EDCI 642 Communications and the School Curriculum (3) 

Curriculum development based on communication as the major vehicle for describing the learn- 
er's interactions with persons, knowledge, and materials in the classroom and school environment. 
EDCI 643 Teaching Language Arts in Elementary Schools (3) 
Analysis of current issues, trends, and problems in language-arts instruction. 
EDCI 644 Issues and Trends in Children's Literature (3) 

Contemporary social conditions and problems, trends in publishing, advertising, censorship, 
media adaptation, and reading habits. 
EDCI 650 Trends in Mathematics Education (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice which have affected the curriculum 
in mathematics. 

EDCI 653 Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning Disabilities in Mathematics I (3) 
Prerequisite: EDCI 352 or permission of department. Diagnosis and treatment of disabilities in 
mathematics. Theoretical models, specific diagnostic and instructional techniques and materials 
for working with children in both clinical and classroom settings. Clinic hours to be arranged. 
EDCI 654 Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning Disabilities in Mathematics II (3) 
Prerequisite: EDCI 653 or permission of department. Diagnosis and treatment of severe learning 
disabilities in elementary school mathematics. Theoretical models, relevant research and specific 
techniques. Clinic hours to be arranged. 

EDCI 657 Diagnosis and Treatment of Secondary Students with Misconceptions of Mathematics 
(3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 450; and EDCI 451; or permission of department. Research and theory 
concerning common misconceptions in secondary school mathematics. Participation in a clinical 
experience. 

EDCI 660 Corrective Reading Instruction (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 362 or EDCI 463 or equivalent. Diagnostic techniques, instructional materials 
and teaching procedures useful in the regular classroom; appropriate for teachers, supervisors, 
and administrators. 

EDCI 661 Teaching Reading in the Content Areas (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 362 or EDCI 463. Focus on improving student achievement in content 
disciplines where reading materials are used as instructional resources. 
EDCI 662 Reading Diagnostic Assessment and Prescription (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Survey course in reading diagnosis and prescription for 
graduate students not majoring in reading. 
EDCI 663 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School (3) 
Implications of current theory and research for the teaching of reading in the elementary school. 



292 Course Descriptions 



EDCI 664 Clinical Assessment in Reading (3) 

Prerequisites: EDCI 660; and [EDCI 663 or EDCI 667}. Clinical diagnostic techniques and 
materials for assessing serious reading difficulties. 
EDCI 665 Clinical Remediation of Reading Disabilities (3) 

Prerequisites: EDCI 660; and [EDCI 663 or EDCI 667]. Remedial procedures and materials for 
programs of individual and small group instruction. 
EDCI 666 The Role of the Reading Resource Teacher (3) 

Prerequisites: [EDCI 663 or EDCI 667} ; and EDMS 645. Preparation of reading personnel to 
function as resource persons to classroom teachers, administrators and the school community. 
EDCI 667 Teaching Reading in Secondary Schools (3) 

Implications of current theory and research for the teaching of reading in the secondary school. 
EDCI 670 Trends in School Curriculum: Science (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice on the curriculum in science education. 
EDCI 671 Teaching Science in Elementary Schools (3) 

Identification of problems in teaching science. Methods for improving the effectiveness of science 
education. 

EDCI 672 Curriculum Innovations in Early Childhood-Elementary Science Education (3) 
Analysis of curricula in early childhood-elementary science. 
EDCI 677 Computers in Science Education (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 487 or equivalent. Current and projected methods by which computers can 
augment classroom and laboratory-based science instruction in school and non-school settings. 
EDCI 680 Trends in Secondary School Curriculum (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice on the curriculum. 
EDCI 681 Trends in Elementary School Curriculum (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice which have affected the curriculum 
in elementary education. 

EDCI 683 Implementation of Curricular Specialties (3) 

Research methods applied in curriculum implementation; societal values, ethics and responsi- 
bilities associated with the implementation of curricular specialties; and personal capabihties to 
successfully implement curriculum. 

EDCI 684 Introduction to Field Methods in School and Community (3) 

Application of selected field research methods to problems of professional practice. Students 
plan and conduct field study utilizing quahtative field techniques. 
EDCI 685 Research Methods (3) 

The interpretation and conduct of research in curriculum and instruction. 
EDCI 686 Competency-Based Curricula in Early Childhood Education (3) 
Prerequisite: EDCI 487 or permission of department. Theoretical issues in the use of computers 
in early childhood education. Applications of elementary computer languages with children 
including curriculum development, teaching methods, integration of the computer into the class- 
room and problem solving. 

EDCI 687 Applications of Computers in Instructional Settings (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 487 or permission of department. Review and analysis of instructional software 
and computer-based learning environments from the standpoint of teaching, learning, and design 
theories. Integration of instructional and tool software into classroom settings. 
EDCI 690 Teaching as a Profession (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. The profession of teaching and the knowledge base that 
defines teaching. Current and social issues that affect teaching and learning; role of research and 
experience in learning to teach. 



EDCI - Curriculum and Instruction 293 



EDCI 691 Models of Teaching: Theories and Applications (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Theory and research on teaching as apphed to models 
of instruction. Practice in developing an initial repertoire of teaching models and in providing 
thoughtful critique of teaching based on these models. 
EDCI 693 Research on Effective Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Survey of the research literature on effective teaching 
and schools. Observation and analysis of teaching in a variety of school and classroom settings. 
EDCI 695 Teaching Science and Social Studies through Environmental Study (3) 
For EDCI majors only. Curriculum and instruction for science and social studies within a mul- 
ticultural and environmental context; analysis of social studies and science curriculum materials; 
utilization of school and community resources. 
EDCI 696 Conducting Research on Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Application of the knowledge base on effective teaching 
to the analysis and improvement of educational practice. Research methods used in the study 
of classroom teaching. Design and conduct of an action research project. 
EDCI 700 Theory and Research in Art Education (3) 

A survey of the research literature; evaluation of research techniques; consideration of relevant 
instructional curriculum theory; evaluation of modern teaching methods and techniques. 
EDCI 701 Theory and Research in Music Education (3) 

A survey of the research literature; evaluation of research techniques; consideration of relevant 
instructional curriculum theory; evaluation of modem teaching methods and techniques. 
EDCI 710 Staffing in Early ChUdhood Programs (3) 

For advanced students in early childhood education. Problems involved in administration of 
faculty and staff in programs for young children. 

EDCI 711 Education and Group Care of the Infant and Young Child (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 645 or permission of department. The historical, theoretical and empirical 
basis for the group care and education of young children with special emphasis on the child 
under the age of three. 

EDCI 713 Research in Early ChUdhood Education (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 645 or permission of department. The design and conduct of research with 
infants and children to age eight; reviews, evaluations and discussions of significant and relevant 
early childhood research literature. 

EDCI 720 Theory and Research in Social Studies Education (3) 

Prerequisites: [EDCI 620 or EDCI 622]; and EDMS 645. A survey of the research literature; 
evaluation of research techniques; consideration of relevant instructional curriculum theory; 
evaluation of modern teaching methods and techniques. 
EDCI 730 Theory and Research in Foreign Language/ESOL Education (3) 
A survey of the research literature; evaluation of research techniques; consideration of relevant 
instructional curriculum theory; evaluation of modern teaching methods and techniques. 
EDCI 731 Advanced Teaching of Reading in a Second Language (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 435 or equivalent. A survey of research literature and evaluation of research 
techniques applied in second language teaching/learning. 
EDCI 740 Theory and Research in English Education (3) 

A survey of the research literature; evaluation of research techniques; consideration of relevant 
instructional curriculum theory; evaluation of modern teaching methods and techniques. 
EDCI 741 Theory and Research in Speech Education (3) 

A survey of the research literature; evaluation of research techniques; consideration of relevant 
instructional curriculum theory; evaluation of modern teaching methods and techniques. 



294 Course Descriptions 



EDCI 745 Theory and Research in Written Communication (3) 

Recommended: EDCI 685. Analysis and synthesis of recent theoretical trends in writing research; 

the reading and critiquing of representative research studies. The study of research methods for 

conducting disciplined inquiry in written communication. 

EDCI 750 Theory and Research in Mathematics Education (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 650. A survey of the research literature; evaluation of research techniques; 

consideration of relevant instructional curriculum theory; evaluation of modern teaching methods 

and techniques. 

EDCI 761 Advanced Clinical Practices in Reading Diagnosis (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 665. Corequisite: EDCI 762. Diagnostic work with children in clinic and 

school situations. Case report writing and conferences. 

EDCI 762 Advanced Clinical Practices in Reading Instruction (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 665. Corequisite: EDCI 761. Remedial instruction with children in clinic and 
school situations. Remedial techniques, diagnostic teaching and evaluation. 

EDCI 769 Theory and Research in Reading (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Survey of the 
literature in reading and allied fields, and an examination of current research trends and meth- 
odologies. 

EDCI 770 Foundations of Science Education (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 670 or EDCI 671; or permission of department. Development of science 
education; pre-kindergarten through college; the influences on current and future practices; and 
the identification and critical analysis of topics in science education. 

EDCI 771 Theory and Research in Science Education (3) 

Prerequisites: EDCI 770; and EDMS 646; or permission of department. A study of various 
techniques and paradigms for research in science education, pre-kindergarten through college. 
Identification and critical analysis of a researchable topic in science education and the devel- 
opment of a proposal. 

EDCI 780 Theory and Research on Teaching (3) 

Analysis of the interactive process of instruction; preschool through higher education in school 
and non-school settings; future directions and needed research. 

EDCI 783 Theory and Research in Computer Education (3) 

Prerequisites: [EDCI 685; and EDCI 687; and EDMS 645] or permission of department. Ex- 
amination of the current research and theory in the instructional uses of computers, instructional 
tutoring systems, computer programing environments, computer-based laboratories and problem 
solving environments in educational settings. 

EDCI 787 Computer Courseware Development (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCI 687 or permission of department. The theory and practice of designing, 

creating, and analyzing computer-based instruction and tutoring systems. Advanced programming 

techniques using BASIC and author languages such as PILOT. 

EDCI 788 Selected Topics in Teacher Education (1-3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Current topics and issues in teacher education. 

EDCI 798 Special Problems in Teacher Education (1-6) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Intended for Masters, AGS, or doctoral students in 
education who desire to pursue a research problem. 



EDCP - Education Counseling and Personnel Services 295 



EDCI 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
EDCI 800 Seminar in Art Education (3) 
EDCI 810 Seminar in Early Childhood Education (3) 
EDCI 820 Seminar in Social Studies Education (3) 
EDCI 822 Seminar in Secondary Education (3) 
EDCI 830 Seminar in Foreign Language Education (3) 
EDCI 840 Seminar in English Education (3) 
EDCI 841 Seminar in Speech Education (3) 
EDCI 858 Seminar in Mathematics Education (1-3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits. Survey and analysis of literature on an identified research topic in 
mathematics education. Design and implementation of a research study to investigate the iden- 
tified topic. 

EDCI 860 Seminar in Reading Education (3) 
EDCI 861 Research Methods in Reading (3) 

Prerequisites: [EDCI 769; and EDMS 646] or permission of department. Current research ques- 
tions and methods culminating in a study suitable for submission to journals. Emphasis on using 
and conducting research. 
EDCI 870 Seminar in Science Education (3) 
EDCI 880 Doctoral Proposal Semuiar (3) 

Prerequisites: EDCI 685; and EDCI 780; and permission of department. Definition of the problem, 
development of research design, data collection processes, and writing and critiquing dissertation 
proposals. 

EDCI 881 Seminar in Instructional Computing (3) 

Prerequisites: EDCI 685; and EDCI 687; or permission of department. Group and individual 
participation in the study of theoretical issues of instructional computing. 
EDCI 888 Apprenticeship in Education (1-8) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Apprentice practice under professional supervision. Credit 
not to be granted for experience accrued prior to registration. Open only to degree- and certificate- 
seeking graduate students. 
EDCI 889 Internship in Education (3-8) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Internship experiences with appropriate supervision. 
Credit not to be granted for experience accrued prior to registration. Open only to students 
advanced to candidacy for doctoral degree. 
EDCI 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

EDCP - Education Counseling and Personnel Services 

EDCP 410 Introduction to Counseling and Personnel Services (3) 

Overview of counselor functions and skills that lead to effective helping. 
EDCP 411 Principles of Mental Health (3) 

Prerequisite: nine semester hours in the behavioral sciences or permission of department. Mech- 
anisms involved with personal adjustment, coping skills, and the behaviors that lead to malad- 
justment. 

EDCP 413 Behavior Modification (3) 

Knowledge and techniques of intervention in a variety of social situations, including contingency 
contracting and time out will be acquired. 



296 Course Descriptions 



EDCP 416 Theories of Counseling (3) 

An overview and comparison of the major theories of counsehng, includmg an appraisal of their 
utihty and empirical support. 
EDCP 417 Group Dynamics and Leadership (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: permission of depart- 
ment. The nature and property of groups, interaction analysis, developmental phases, leadership 
dynamics and styles, roles of members and interpersonal communications. Laboratory involves 
experimental based learning. 
EDCP 420 Education and Racism (3) 

Strategy development for counselors and educators to deal with problems of racism. 
EDCP 460 Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling (3) 

Survey of principles and practices involved in the vocational rehabilitation of persons with 
disabilities. 

EDCP 461 Psycho-Social Aspects of Disability (3) 

Theory and research concerning disability, with emphasis on crisis theory, loss and mourning, 
handicapped as a deviant group, sexuality and functional loss, attitude formation, dying process 
and coping. Implications for counseling and the rehabilitation process. 
EDCP 462 The Disabled Person in American Society (3) 

Critical examination of the history of legislation and analysis of current policies toward severely 
physically and mentally disabled persons. 
EDCP 470 Introduction to Student Personnel (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. A systematic analysis of research and theoretical literature 
on a variety of major problems in the organization and administration of student personnel 
services in higher education. Included will be discussion of such topics as the student personnel 
philosophy in education, counseling services, discipline, housing, student activities, financial aid, 
health, remedial services, etc. 

EDCP 489 Field Experiences in Counseling and Personnel Services (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Planned field experience in education-related activities. 
Credit not to be granted for experiences accrued prior to registration. 
EDCP 498 Special Problems in Counseling and Personnel Services (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Available only to major students who have formal plans 
for individual study of approved problems. 
EDCP 499 Workshops, Clinics, Institutes (1-6) 

Repeatable to 6 credits. The following type of educational enterprise may be scheduled under 
this course heading: workshops conducted by the Department of Counseling and Personnel 
Services (or developed cooperatively with other departments, colleges and universities) and not 
otherwise covered in the present course listing; clinical experiences in counseling and testing 
centers, reading clinics, speech therapy laboratories, and special education centers; institutues 
developed around specific topics or problems and intended for designated groups. 
EDCP 605 Issues in Counseling Adults (3) 

Theoretical approaches to adult development. The scope and variety of settings (industry, ed- 
ucation, government) in which programs of adult counseling and guidance take place, and the 
nature of such programs. 
EDCP 606 Counseling Adults in Transition (3) 

Theoretical background for understanding adult transitions such as divorce, promotion, major 
illness and bereavement. Strategies for helping adult clients cope with major life changes. 
EDCP 610 Professional Orientation (3) 

Survey of knowledge base and practices in counseling and personnel services specializations, 
professional ethics, credentialling relevant legislation, current issues. 



EDCP - Education Counseling and Personnel Services 297 



EDCP 611 Career Development Theory and Programs (3) 

Research and theory related to career and educational decisions; programs of related information 
and other activities in career decision. 

EDCP 612 Cross-Cultural Issues in Counseling and Personnel Services (3) 

Prerequisites: ED MS 646; and EDCP 616; or permission of department. Socio-psychological , 
philosophical, clinical, and research topics related to the provision of counseling and personnel 
services, academic support, and career development for minority students on predominantly 
white college and university campuses. Implications of race and/or national origin on opportun- 
ities for personal, social, academic, and career development in educational settings. 
EDCP 614 Personality Theories in Counseling and Personnel Services (3) 

Examination of constructs and research relating to major personality theories with emphasis on 
their significance for working with the behaviors of individuals. 
EDCP 615 Counseling I: Appraisal (3) 

Corequisite: EDCP 618. For EDCP majors only. Collection and interpretation of appraisal data, 
synthesis of data through case study procedures. Development of interview skills. 
EDCP 616 Counseling II: Theory and Practice (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCP 615. Corequisite: EDCP 618. Counseling theories and the practices which 
stem from such theories. 
EDCP 617 Group Counseling (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCP 616. A survey of theory, research and practice of group counsehng and 
psychotherapy with an introduction to growth groups and the laboratory approach, therapeutic 
factors in groups, composition of therapeutic groups, problem clients, therapeutic techniques, 
research methods, theories, ethics and training of group counselors and therapists. 
EDCP 618 Counseling Skills: Introduction to Practicum (1) 

Corequisite: EDCP 615 and EDCP 616. Repeatable to 2 credits. Development and utilization of 
counseling skills. 

EDCP 619 Practicum in Counseling (2-6) 

Prerequisites: EDCP 616 and permission of department. Sequence of supervised counseling ex- 
periences of increasing complexity. Limited to eight applicants in advance. Two hours class plus 
laboratory. 

EDCP 625 Counseling the Chemically Dependent (3) 

Chemical dependency and its effects on the individual's personal, social, and work functioning. 
Counseling procedures for persons with drug and alcohol problems. 
EDCP 626 Group Counseling Practicum (3) 

Prerequisites: EDCP 617: and EDCP 619; and permission of department. A supervised field 
experience in group counseling. 
EDCP 627 Process Consultation (3) 

Graduate course in group process required. Study of case consultation, systems consultation, 
mental health consultation and the professional's role in systems intervention strategies. 
EDCP 633 Diagnostic Appraisal of Children I (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCP 726. Corequisite: EDCP 738. Assessment of development, emotional and 
learning problems of children. 
EDCP 634 Diagnostic Appraisal of Children II (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCP 633. Corequisite: EDCP 738. Assessment of development, emotional, and 
learning problems of children. 

EDCP 635 Therapeutic Techniques and Classroom Management I (3) 
Diagnosis and treatment of problems presented by teachers and parents. Practicum experience. 



298 Course Descriptions 



EDCP 636 Therapeutic Techniques and Classroom Management II (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCP 635. Understanding and treatment of children's problems. Focus primarily 
on the older child in secondary school. Orientation essentially behavioral. Practicum experience 
provided. 

EDCP 655 Organization and Administration of Personnel Services (2) 

Prerequisite: EDCP 619 or permission of department. Exploration of personnel services programs 
and implementing personnel services practices. 
EDCP 656 Counseling and Personnel Services Seminar (2) 

Examination of issues that bear on professional issues such as ethics, interprofessional relation- 
ships and research. 

EDCP 662 Medical Aspects of DisabUity (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCP 610 or equivalent. Appraisal of medical aspects in rehabilitation; nature, 
cause, treatment, limitations, prognosis of most common disabilities; medical terminology; role 
of the medical speciahties. 
EDCP 663 Psychiatric Aspects of DisabUity (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCP 610 or permission of department. Part of core curriculum in rehabilitation 
counseling. The psychiatric rehabilitation client: understanding the client's needs, available treat- 
ment approaches and society's reaction to the client. 
EDCP 664 Vocational Evaluation (3) 

Principles and strategies for the vocational assessment of adult disabled persons. Administration 
and interpretation of relevant measures. 
EDCP 665 Social Support Systems for Counseling (3) 

Principles and methods involved in understanding the role of social and environmental support 
systems in the rehabilitation, school, and community counseling process. Emphasis on the de- 
velopment of specialized skills for working with the impaired adolescent or adult in the home 
and community context and for mobilizing these resources to support the client. 
EDCP 668 Special Topics in Rehabilitation (1-6) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
EDCP 681 Counseling Adults in the Workplace (3) 

Needs and entitlements of employees over the life span and the changing responsibilities of the 
workplace in meeting these needs. Role of counselors in helping employees and organizations 
to address these issues. 

EDCP 715 Appraisal Measures in Counseling (3) 

Prerequisites: EDCP 615 and EDMS 646 or their equivalents. Interpretation and utilization in 
counseling of the career interest and personality measures. 
EDCP 716 Advanced Counseling Theory Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: Master's degree in counseling or permission of department. Systematic investigation 
of methods of theory analysis and their application to counseling theory. 
EDCP 717 Evaluation of Research in Counseling (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Research on process and outcome in counseling. A review 
of research and appropriate research methodologies. 

EDCP 718 Advanced Seminar in Group Processes (2-6) 
Prerequisite: EDCP 626. Repeatable to 6 credits. 

EDCP 726 Practicum in Individual Testing I (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 622. The administration and interpretation of the Stanford-Binet and Wechs- 
ler scales of intelligence. 



EDCP - Education Counseling and Personnel Services 299 



EDCP 735 Seminar in Rehabilitation Counseling (3) 

Part of the core curriculum for rehabilitation counselors. Designed to provide the advanced 
rehabilitation counseling student with a formal seminar to discuss, evaluate and attempt to reach 
personal resolution regarding pertinent professional problems and issues in the field. 
EDCP 738 Practicum in Child Assessment (1-6) 

Corequisiie: EDCP 633 or EDCP 634. Repeatable to 6 credits. Administration of complete test 
batteries to children; supervision of initial interviews; test administration and scoring; interpre- 
tation and synthesis of test battery and interview material; the psychological report; verbal 
interpretation of test results; and recommendations. Taken initially with EDCP 633; repeated 
with EDCP 634 in the subsequent semester. 
EDCP 771 The College Student (3) 

A demographic study of the characteristics of college students as well as a study of their aspi- 
rations, values, and purposes. 

EDCP 776 Modification of Human Behavior: Laboratory and Practicum (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Individual and group supervised introduction to intake 
and counseling relationships. 

EDCP 777 Modification of Human Behavior: Laboratory and Practicum (3) 

Prerequisites: EDCP 776 and permission of department. Continuation of EDCP 776. Further 

experience under direct supervision of more varied forms of counseling relationships. 

EDCP 778 Research Proposal Seminar (3) 

The deve! 'iiment of thesis, dissertation or other research proposals. 

EDCP 788 idvanced Practicum (1-6) 

Prerequisiii previous practicum experience and permission of department. Individual supervision 

in one of ;hf following areas: (a) individual counseling, (b) group counseling, (c) consultation, 

or (d) administration. 

EDCP 789 Advanced Topics in Counseling and Personnel Services (1-6) 

Repeatable o < 6 credits. 

EDCP 794 (;\ rider-Related Issues in Counseling (3) 

The implications of gender roles and conflicts on the counseling process: philosophical, clinical, 

and research issues. 

EDCP 798 Special Problems in Counseling and Personnel Services (1-6) 

Master's AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special research problems under the 

direction of their advisers may register for credit under this number. 

EDCP 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

Registration required to the extent of six hours for Master's thesis. 

EDCP 888 Apprenticeship in Counseling and Personnel Services (1-8) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Apprentice practice under professional supervision in an 

area of competence compatible with the student's professional goals. Credit not to be granted 

for experience accrued prior to registration. Open only to degree- and certificate-seeking graduate 

students. 

EDCP 889 Internship in Counseling and Personnel Services (3-8) 

Prerequisite: pernmsion of department. Internship experiences at a professional level of com- 
petence in a particular role with appropriate supervision. Credit not to be granted for experience 
accrued prior to registration. Open only to students advanced to candidacy for doctoral degree. 

EDCP 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

Registration required to the extent of 12-18 hours for a Ph.D. Dissertation. 



300 Course Descriptions 



EDHD - Education, Human Development 

EDHD 400 Introduction to Gerontology (3) 

Multidisciplinary survey of the processes of aging. Physiological changes, cultural forces, and 
self-processes that bear on quality of life in later years. Field study of programs, institutions for 
elderly, individual elders, their families and care providers. 
EDHD 411 ChUd Growth and Development (3) 

Theoretical approaches to and empirical studies of physical, psychological and social development 
from conception to puberty. Implications for home, school and community. 
EDHD 413 Adolescent Development (3) 

Adolescent development, including special problems encountered in contemporary culture. Ob- 
servational component and individual case study. Does not satisfy requirement for professional 
teacher education program. 

EDHD 416 Scientific Concepts in Human Development (3) 

Guided reading and observation of students through the school year. Impact of family, school, 
society, and peer group on individual. Analysis of field data in terms of behavioral patterns. 
EDHD 417 Laboratory in Behavior Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: EDHD 416. Continuation of analysis of field observations; emphasis on cognitive 
processes, motivation, self-concept, attitudes and values. 
EDHD 419 Human Development and Learning in School Settings (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Advanced study 
of human development and learning in different phases of school program over a period of time. 
EDHD 420 Cognitive Development and Learning (3) 

Prerequisite: EDHD 300 or EDHD 320 or EDHD 411 or PSYC 355 or PSYC 341 or permission 
of department. Current developmental theories of cognitive processes such as language, memory, 
and intelligence and how differences in cognitive level (infancy through adolescence) mediate 
learning of educational subject matters. 
EDHD 445 Guidance of Young ChUdren (3) 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or EDHD 306 or permission of department. Practical aspects for helping 
and working with children, drawing on research, clinical studies, and observation. Implications 
for day care and other public issues. 
EDHD 460 Educational Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or EDHD 306 or permission of department. Application of psychology 
to learning processes and theories. Individual differences, measurement, motivation, emotions, 
intelligence, attitudes, problem solving, thinking and communicating in educational settings. 
(May not be substituted for EDHD 300 by students in professional teacher education programs.) 
EDHD 489 Field Experiences in Education (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 4 credits. Planned field experience in ed- 
ucation-related activities. Credit not to be granted for experiences accrued prior to registration. 

EDHD 498 Special Problems in Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Available only to students who have definite plans for 

individual study of approved problems. 

EDHD 499 Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes (1-6) 

Repeatable to 6 credits. The following type of educational enterprise may be scheduled under 
this course heading: workshops conducted by the College of Education (or developed cooper- 
atively with other colleges and universities) and not otherwise covered in the present course 
listing; clinical experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading clinics, speech therapy laboratories. 



EDHD - Education, Human Development 301 



and special education centers; institutes developed around specific topics or problems and in- 
tended for designated groups such as school superintendents, principals and supervisors. 
EDHD 600 Introduction to Human Development and Child Study (3) 

An overview of the multidisciplinary, scientific principles which describe human development 
and behavior and an application of these principles in an analysis of a behavioral record. Tech- 
niques of observation, recording, and analysis of human behavior. Emphasis on critiquing and 
applying research findings. 
EDHD 601 Biological Bases of Behavior (3) 

Pre- orcorequisite: EDHD 600. Emphasizes that understanding human life, growth and behavior 
depends on understanding the ways in which the body is able to capture, control and expend 
energy. Application throughout is made to human body processes and implications for under- 
standing and working with people. 
EDHD 602 Social Bases of Behavior (3) 

The social forces and expectations that influence behavior from infancy through old age and 
death. The effects of ethnicity, social learning values, attitudes, historical events and mass media 
on perception and behavior in societal interactions. 
EDHD 603 Integrative Bases of Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: EDHD 600 or equivalent; and EDHD 601; and EDHD 602. Analyzes the organized 
and integrated pattern of feeling, thinking and behaving which emerges from the interaction of 
basic biological drives and potentials with one's unique experience growing up in a social group. 
EDHD 610 Physiological Aspects of Aging (3) 

Prerequisite: EDHD 601: and [ZOOL 201 or ZOOL 202 or equivalent! or permission of de- 
partment. Physiological changes with advancing age including cells and tissues; metabolism; 
homeostasis; and sensorium, with implications with respect to coping with these changes. 
EDHD 613 Advanced Laboratory in Behavior Analysis I (3) 

First of a three-hour sequence in the study of behavior. Analysis focuses upon the major forces 
which shape the development and learning of children and youth. 
EDHD 615 Advanced Laboratory in Behavior Analysis II (3) 

Prerequisite: EDHD 613 or equivalent. Second of a three-course sequence in the behavior analysis 
of children and youth focusing on self-developmental and self-adjustive processes. 
EDHD 619 Advanced Scientific Concepts in Human Development (3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. A critical examination of concepts and issues in con- 
temporary culture as these relate to the development and learning of children and youth. 
EDHD 620 Aging in the Cultural Context (3) 

The factors and forces that affect life quality in the late years. Identification of economic, social 
and governmental influences in the cultural context that enhance or impede continued growth 
of the person. Individual projects involving direct field experience. 
EDHD 630 Cognitive Processes During Aging (3) 

Cognitive functioning of the aged. The roles of cultural, environmental and affectional variables 
as they contribute to the healthy functioning of cognitive processes. On-site field trips. 

EDHD 640 The Adult Learner (3) 

Changes in adult learning/cognitive processes and factors that may affect an individual's selection 

and performance of learning tasks; includes discussion of both theoretical issues and proposed 

applications of research on adult learning. 

EDHD 659 Direct Study of Individuals (3) 

Observational techniques to record the behavior of an individual. Procedures to ensure objectivity 

in data collection. Methods used to analyze, categorize, quantify observational data in research. 



302 Course Descriptions 



EDHD 692 Cognitive Basis of Instruction (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Psychological and educational research literature on 
human cognition, especially as applied to learning and teaching in classroom settings. 
EDHD 700 Infant Development (3) 

An examination of recent research findings in physical, social, emotional and language devel- 
opment during infancy. A review of prenatal and perinatal factors in relation to their influence 
on later development. 

EDHD 701 Training the Parent Educator (3) 

Recommended: course in child development. History, philosophy, and ethics of parent education, 
and examination of issues critical to the design, implementation, and evaluation of parent ed- 
ucation programs. Training in communication and leadership skills. 
EDHD 710 Affectional Relationships and Processes in Human Development (3) 
Pre- or corequisite: EDHD 600 or equivalent. The normal development, expression and influence 
of love in infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood. The influence of parent-child rela- 
tionship involving normal acceptance, neglect, rejection, inconsistency, and over-protection upon 
health, learning, emotional behavior and personality adjustment and development. 
EDHD 711 Peer-Culture and Group Processes in Human Development (3) 
Pre- or corequisite: EDHD 600 or equivalent. The process of group formation, role-taking and 
status-winning, and the emergence of the peer-culture during childhood and the evolution of the 
child society at different maturity levels to adulthood. The developmental tasks and adjustment 
problems associated with winning, belonging, and playing roles in the peer group. 
EDHD 721 Learning Theory and the Educative Process I (3) 

Major theories, issues and research in learning and cognitive development. Emphasis on the 
application of these theories to education and the helping professions. 
EDHD 722 Learning Theory and the Educative Process II (3) 

Prerequisite: EDHD 721 or permission of department. Advanced study of theories, issues and 
research in several categories of cognition and learning applied to education and the helping 
professions. 

EDHD 730 Field Program in Child Study I (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Introductory training and apprenticeship preparing per- 
sons to become staff members in human development workshops, consultants in child study field 
programs and coordinators of municipal or regional child study programs for teachers or parents. 
Extensive field experience is provided. In general, open only to persons who have passed their 
preliminary examinations for the doctorate with a major in human development or psychology. 
EDHD 731 Field Program in Child Study II (3) 

Prereqidsite: EDHD 730 or permission of department. Advanced training and apprenticeship 
preparing persons to become staff members in human development workshops, consultants to 
child study field programs and coordinators of municipal or regional child study programs for 
teachers or parents. Extensive field experience is provided. In general, open only to persons 
who have passed their preliminary examinations for the doctorate with a major in human de- 
velopment or psychology. 

EDHD 740 Theories of Conflict Resolution in Human Development (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Psychological and sociological theories regarding the 
nature of human conflict and its resolution and research regarding bargaining and negotiation 
techniques. Applications to students' professional work. 
EDHD 741 Conflict Resolution in Divorce Settlement (3) 

Prereqidsite: permission of department. Conflict resolution and negotiation techniques to the 
divorce settlement process. Neutral third party negotiation in conjunction with legal professionals 



EDHD - Education, Human Development 303 



in resolving issues of child custody and visitation, division of marital property, spousal support, 
and child support. 

EDHD 779 Special Topics in Human Development (1-6) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
EDHD 780 Research Methods in Human Development (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 651 or permission of department. Potentials and limitations of empirical 
observation for contributing to human development knowledge, locating and evaluating relevant 
human development research, and choosing and applying statistical techniques to human de- 
velopment problems. 

EDHD 789 Internship in Human Development (3-8) 

Prerequisites: nine credits of human development; and permission of department. Repeatable to 
9 credits. Internship experience in one or more human service agencies in the community. 
EDHD 798 Special Problems in Education (1-6) 

Master's, AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special research problems under 
the direction of their advisors may register for credit under this number. 
EDHD 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

Registration required to the extent of six hours for master's thesis. 
EDHD 810 Physical Processes in Human Development I (3) 

Prerequisite: EDHD 601 or permission of department. Doctoral core course focused on the 
biological bases of human behavior including physiological processes which have an impact on 
human development and behavior. Emphasis on theoretical perspectives and identification of 
research problems. 

EDHD 811 Physical Processes in Human Development II (3) 

Prerequisite: EDHD 810 or permission of department. Advanced doctoral seminar in the biological 
bases of behavior with consideration of selected topics introduced in EDHD 810. Identification 
of research problems and areas of application. 
EDHD 820 Socialization Processes in Human Development I (3) 

Prerequisite: EDHD 602 or permission of department. Doctoral core course focused on the 
socialization of human beings. Emphasis on theoretical perspectives from sociology, anthropol- 
ogy, and psychology; examination of the outcomes of socialization. 
EDHD 821 Socialization Processes in Human Development II (3) 

Prerequisite: EDHD 820 or permission of department. Advanced doctoral seminar on socialization 
and social development with consideration of selected topics introduced in EDHD 820. Iden- 
tification of research problems and areas of application. 
EDHD 830 Self Processes in Human Development I (3) 

Prerequisite: EDHD 603 or permission of department. Doctoral core course focused on personality 
theories - their history, constructs, and methods; examination of the reciprocal relation between 
self and the social environment; consideration of different conceptuaHzation of self-processes 
and related personality research. 
EDHD 831 Self Processes in Human Development II (3) 

Prerequisite: EDHD 830 or permission of department. Advanced doctoral seminar on current 
theoretical perspectives in self-processes, with consideration of selected topics introduced in 
EDHD 830. Identification of research problems and areas of application. 
EDHD 860 Synthesis of Human Development Concepts (3) 

Prerequisites: EDHD 810; and EDHD 820; and EDHD 830. A seminar for advanced students 
who work toward a synthesis of their own concepts in human growth and development. Emphasis 
on seeing the dynamic interrelations among all processes in the behavior and development of 
an individual. 



304 Course Descriptions 



EDHD 878 Team Research in Human Development (3) 

Pre- or corequisite: EDMS 651 or permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. Current 
research literature in human development. Definition of a research problem. Design and im- 
plemention of a research study in collaboration with faculty, with completed project presented 
to colloquium of faculty/students. Must be taken in consecutive fall and spring terms. 
EDHD 884 Laboratory in Emotional Development (3) 

Prerequisite: EDHD 811 or permission of department. Techniques for measuring emotions in a 
laboratory setting, including electroencephalography, heart rate measurement, and facial and 
vocal behavior analysis. For students engaged in research on emotional development of infants 
and young children. 

EDHD 888 Apprenticeship in Education (1-8) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Apprentice practice under professional supervision in an 
area of competence compatible with the student's professional goals. Credit not to be granted 
for experience accrued prior to registration. Open only to degree- and certificate-seeking graduate 
students. 

EDHD 889 Internship in Education (3-8) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Internship experiences at a professional level of com- 
petence in a particular role with appropriate supervision. Credit not to be granted for experience 
accrued prior to registration. Open only to students advanced to candidacy for doctoral degree. 
EDHD 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

Registration required to the extent of 6-9 hours for an Ed.D. project and 12-18 hours for a 
Ph.D. dissertation. 

EDIT - Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 

EDIT 400 Technology Activities For the Elementary School (3) 

Experience in the development and use of technology and career education instructional materials 
for construction activities in an interdisciplinary approach to elementary school education. 

EDIT 401 Essentials of Design (2) 

Four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: EDIT 101. A study of the basic principles of 
design and practice with application to the construction of laboratory projects. 
EDIT 402 Methods and Materials in Teaching Bookkeeping and Related Subjects (3) 
Problems and procedures in the mastery of bookkeeping and related office knowledge and skills. 
Consideration of materials and teaching procedures. 
EDIT 403 Problems in Teaching Office Skills (3) 

Problems in development of occupational competency, achievement tests, standards of achieve- 
ment, instructional materials, transcription, and the integration of office skills. 
EDIT 404 Basic Business Education in the Secondary Schools (3) 

Subject matter selection; methods of organization; and presenting business principles, knowledge 
and practices. 

EDIT 405 Business Communications (3) 

The fundamental principles of effective written communication. Word usage, grammar, punc- 
tuation, principles and procedures for writing business letters, and formal research reports. 

EDIT 406 Word Processing (3) 

An introduction to the word processing field with emphasis on word processing theory and 
concepts including hands-on equipment training. Management of office personnel, procedures, 
and equipment; the incorporation of word processing into the school curriculum, the automated 
office of the future and career opportunities. 



EDIT - Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 305 

EDIT 410 Administration and Program Development for Industrial Arts and Vocational 
Education (3) 

Principles and practices of program development and supervision with reference to the role of 
the departmental chairperson in vocational, technical, and industrial arts programs at the sec- 
ondary and post-secondary levels. 

EDIT 412 Management of Physical Facilities in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (3) 
Principles, practices, and theory related to the role of the departmental chairperson charged 
with the management of the physical facilities in vocational, technical, and industrial arts lab- 
oratories. 

EDIT 414 Organization and Coordination of Cooperative Education Programs (3) 
The organization of a cooperative distributive education program; the development of an effective 
cooperative relationship between coordinator and training sponsor; the selection, orientation, 
and training of sponsors; analysis of training opportunities, reports and records; the evaluation 
and selection of students for part-time cooperative work assignments; and the evaluation of the 
program. 

EDIT 415 Financial and Economic Education I (3) 

Problems of teaching courses in personal finance and economics in the public schools, including 
materials and resources. 

EDIT 416 Financial and Economic Education II (3) 
Continuation of EDIT 415. 
EDIT 421 Industrial Arts in Special Education (3) 

One hour of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: [EDSP 470; and EDSP 
471 j or permission of department. Experiences of a technical and theoretical nature in industrial 
processes applicable for classroom use. Emphasis on individual research in the specific area of 
major interest in special education. 

EDIT 422 Student Teaching: Industrial Arts Education (2-12) 
EDIT 425 Analysis of Industrial Training Programs I (3) 

An overview of the function of industrial training, including methods of instruction, types of 
programs and their organization, objectives, and evaluation. 
EDIT 426 Analysis of Industrial Training Programs II (3) 

Prerequisite: EDIT 425. Continuation of EDIT 425. Studies of training programs in a variety of 
industries, including plant program visitation, training program development, and analysis of 
industrial training research. 
EDIT 427 Experimental Electronics (2) 

Six hours of laboratory per week. Student investigation of an area of electronics of particular 
interest or usefulness at a depth appropriate for student-based objectives relating to one or more 
of the following: digital circuitry, communication, energy conversion, test equipment utilization, 
analog circuitry. 

EDIT 432 Student Teaching: Business Education (2-12) 
EDIT 433 Advanced Topics in Power Technology (3) 

Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: EDIT 233 or equivalent. 
The development of a competency in building and evaluating the performance of energy trans- 
mission, control and converter systems. Methane digestors, solar collectors, electric motors, 
steam turbines, and fluid power systems. 
EDIT 434 Color Reproduction in Graphic Communications (3) 

Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: [EDIT 234: and 
EDIT 334: and EDIT 335J or equivalent. An advanced course in the theory and processes of 
color graphic reproduction. Continuous tone color photography, flat color preparation, process 



306 Course Descriptions 



color separations and the reproduction of a multi-color product on a semi-automatic or automatic 
printing pi ess. 

EDIT 435 Curriculum Development in Home Economics (3) 

An analysis of curriculum development including the tools for planning, managing, and evaluating 
the teaching/learning environment of conceptual curriculum design. 
EDIT 436 Analysis of Child Development Laboratory Practices (3) 

Prerequisite: FMCD 332 or EDHD 411. Integration of child development theories with laboratory 
practices; observation and participation in a secondary school child development laboratory 
arranged to alternate with class meetings. 
EDIT 440 Industrial Hygiene (3) 

Introduction to the concept of industrial hygiene and environmental health. Evaluation tech- 
niques, instrumentation for identification of problems; design parameters for achieving control 
over environmental epidemiological and toxicological hazards. 
EDIT 442 Student Teaching: Home Economics Education (2-12) 

EDIT 443 Industrial Safety I (3) 

The history and development of effective safety programs in modern industry including causes, 
effects and values of industrial safety education including fire prevention and hazard controls. 

EDIT 444 Industrial Safety H (3) 

Study of exemplary safety practices through conference discussions, group demonstration, and 
organized plant visits to selected industrial situations. Methods of fire precautions and safety 
practices. Evaluative criteria in safety programs. 
EDIT 445 Systems Safety Analysis (3) 

The development of systems safety, a review of probability concepts and the application of 
systems technique to industrial safety problems. Hazard mode and effect, fault free analysis and 
human factors considerations. 
EDIT 450 Training Aids Development (3) 

Study of instructional materials, sources and applications; emphasis on principles for making 
aids useful to laboratory teachers. Actual construction and application of materials will be 
required. 

EDIT 451 Research and Experimentation in Industrial Arts (3) 

A laboratory-seminar course designed to develop persons capable of planning, directing and 
evaluating effective research and experimentation procedures with the materials, products and 
processes of industry. 

EDIT 453 Fire Safety Research and Transfer (3) 

The technological transfer of scientific findings to private sector fire safety. Review of research 
applicable to the adequacy and reliability of fire safety in industry. 
EDIT 454 Private Fire Protection Analysis I (3) 

Risk analysis, life safety and property conservation from fire in industrial properties and com- 
plexes. Emphasis on a systems approach for implementing private fire protection. 

EDIT 455 Private Fire Protection Analysis II (3) 

Prerequisite: EDIT 448. Internal property detection and fire suppression systems that can mitigate 
a fire in the incipient stage. Review of systems, with emphasis on the performance objectives of 
preventing, controlling, and extinguishing fires. 

EDIT 457 Tests and Measurements (3) 

The construction of objective tests for occupational and vocational subjects. Use of measures in 
domains of learning and examination of test analysis techniques. 



EDIT - Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 307 

EDIT 460 Design Illustrating II (2) 

Four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: EDIT 160. Advanced drawing, rendering, 
shadow construction, lettering techniques and advanced pictorial representation techniques. 
EDIT 461 Principles of Vocational Guidance (3) 

The underlying principles of guidance and their application to the problems of educational and 
occupational adjustment of students of all ages. 
EDIT 462 Occupational Analysis and Course Construction (3) 

Application of the techniques of occupational and job analysis concepts to instructional devel- 
opment and the design of occupational programs. 
EDIT 464 Laboratory Organization and Management (3) 

The basic elements of organizing and managing an industrial education program, the selection 
of equipment, facility development, legal responsibilities of laboratory instructors, inventory, 
storage control and safety. 
EDIT 465 Modern Industry (3) 

The manufacturing, service, and extractive industries in American social, economic, and cultural 
patterns. Representative basic industries studied from the viewpoints of personnel and manage- 
ment organization, industrial relations, production procedures, distribution of products, etc. 
EDIT 466 Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts (3) 

A study of the factors which place industrial arts education in a well-rounded program of general 
education. 

EDIT 467 Problems in Occupational Education (3) 

The procurement, assembly, organization, and interpretation of data relative to the scope, 
character and effectiveness of occupational education. 
EDIT 470 Numerical Control in Manufacturing (3) 

The historical development of numerical control (N/C) in manufacturing, recent industrial trends 
in N/C, and a variety of N/C equipment and support services. N/C machine operations: machine 
motions, positioning control systems, N/C tapes and their preparation, manual and computer 
assisted (APT III) part programming. Experience in product design, part programming, and 
product machining. 

EDIT 471 History and Principles of Vocational Education (3) 

The development of vocational education from primitive times to the present with special em- 
phasis given to the vocational education movement with the American program of pubUc edu- 
cation. 

EDIT 472 Quality Control and Assurance in Industrial Settings (3) 

Principles and theory of quality control and assurance, with focus on "quality of conformance." 
Organizational aspects of QC/QA, data collection and analysis, quality control in input, process 
and output functions, and human and cultural dimensions of quality control. 
EDIT 474 Organization and Administration of Youth Groups (3) 

Principles, practices, and theoretical considerations related to youth organizations as a co-cur- 
ricular function of the subject areas of industrial arts, business and marketing education, home 
economics, health occupations and trades and industry. 
EDIT 475 Recent Technological Developments in Products and Processes (3) 
Recent technological developments as they pertain to the products and processes of industry. 
The nature of newer products and processes and their effect upon modern industry and/or society. 
EDIT 476 Application of Technology to Societal Problems (3) 

A study of alternative solutions of a technological nature with respect to such areas as housing, 
transportation, energy, communications, production, trash and waste disposal, water develop- 
ment, and pollution control. 



308 Course Descriptions 



EDIT 477 Microcomputer Applications in Technology and Industry (3) 

Prerequisite: EDCl 487 or CMSC 103 or permission of department. Manufacturing, safety, and 
training applications in industrial settings included in programming and software utilization. 
EDIT 481 Manufacture and Use of Inorganic Nonmetallic Materials (3) 

Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: EDIT 381 or equivalent. 
Fabrication of products from calculated compositions; application of forming process; utilization 
of compositions; experiences with property analysis and product design. 
EDIT 482 Student Teaching: Trade and Industrial Education (2-12) 
EDIT 484 - 486 Field Experiences in Vocational Areas. 

Supervised work experience in an occupation related to vocational education. Application of 
theory to work situations as a basis for teaching in vocational education programs. By individual 
arrangement with advisor. 

EDIT 485 Field Experiences in Business Education (3) 
EDIT 488 Selected Topics in Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatabk to 6 credits if content differs. 
EDIT 489 Field Experiences in Education (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Planned field experience in education-related activities. 
Credit not to be granted for experiences accrued prior to registration. 
EDIT 491 Plastics Design and Equipment Selection (3) 

Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: EDIT 391 or permission 
of department. Experience with material selection, product design, mold design, auxiliary equip- 
ment and fixtures. 

EDIT 492 Issues Encountered in Daily Living in the Home (3) 

Junior standing. Addresses issues such as differing values, orientations, communication styles 
and the integration of family living, work, and parenting. 
EDIT 493 Home Economics for Special Need Learners (3) 

Mental, emotional, social and physical handicaps affecting learners in home economics education 
settings. The unique needs and abiHties of special learners and methods of teaching daily living 
skills. 

EDIT 498 Special Problems in Education (1-6) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Available only to majors who have definite plans for 
individual study of approved problems. Credit according to extent of work. 
EDIT 499 Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes (1-6) 

Repeatable to 6 credits. The following type of educational enterprise may be scheduled under 
this course heading: Workshops conducted by the College of Education (or developed cooper- 
atively with other colleges and universities) and not otherwise covered in the present course 
hsting; clinical experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading clinics, speech therapy laboratories, 
and special education centers; institutes developed around specific topics or problems and in- 
tended for designated groups such as school superintendents, principals and supervisors. 
EDIT 600 Administration and Supervision of Business Education (3) 

Major emphasis on departmental organization and its role in the school program, curriculum, 
equipment, budget-making, supervision, guidance, placement and follow-up, school-community 
relationships, qualifications and selection of teaching staff, visual aids, and in-service programs 
for teacher development. For administrators, supervisors, and teachers. 
EDIT 605 Principles and Problems of Business Education (3) 

Principles, objectives, and practices in business education; occupational foundations; current 
attitudes of business, labor and school leaders; general business education in relation to consumer 
business education and to education in general. 



EDIT - Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 309 

EDIT 606 Curriculum Development in Business Education (3) 

Study of curriculum planning in business education. Emphasis on the philosophy and objectives 
of the business education program, and on curriculum research and organization of appropriate 
course content. 

EDIT 607 Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education (3) 

An overview of the development of the industrial arts movement and the philosophical framework 
upon which it was founded. Special emphasis on contemporary movements in industrial arts and 
their theoretical foundations. 

EDIT 614 School Laboratory Planning and Equipment Selection (3) 

The principles and problems of providing the physical facilities for industrial education programs. 
The selection, arrangement and placement of equipment, and the determination of laboratory 
space requirements, utility services and storage requirements for various types of industrial 
education programs. 

EDIT 616 Supervision of Industrial Arts (3) 

The nature and function of the supervisor in the industrial arts field. Administrative and super- 
visory responsibilities, techniques, practices and personal qualifications of the industrial arts 
supervisor. 

EDIT 620 Organization, Administration and Supervision of Vocational Education (3) 
A theoretical and research base for the study of practices in vocational and technical education. 
Examination of administrative processes. 
EDIT 636 Evaluation in Home Economics Education (3) 
Construction and use of evaluation processes in home economics programs. 
EDIT 640 Research in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (1-3) 

A seminar for students conducting research in industrial arts, vocational education, and industrial 
technology. 

EDIT 641 Content and Method of Industrial Arts (3) 

Examination of methods and procedures used in curriculum development. Application of those 
suited to the field of industrial arts education. Methods and devices for industrial arts instruction. 
EDIT 642 Coordination in Work-Experience Programs (3) 

Philosophy and practices of cooperative programs. Methods and techniques of coordination in 
comprehensive and part-time programs. 

EDIT 643 Curriculum Trends in Marketing and Distributive Education (3) 
Recent developments in educational thinking and practice which have affected the curriculum 
in distributive education. 

EDIT 644 Curriculum Trends in Business Education (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice which have affected the curriculum 
in business education. 

EDIT 647 Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (1-3) 

A seminar for students conducting and developing research in industrial arts, vocational edu- 
cation, and industrial technology. 
EDIT 650 Teacher Education in Industrial Arts (3) 

The function and historical development of industrial arts teacher education. Program admin- 
istration and development, physical facilities and requirements, staff organization and relation- 
ships, college-secondary school relationships, philosophy and evaluation. 
EDIT 676 Planning and Policy Issues in Vocational and Technical Education (3) 
Prerequisite: EDIT 471 or permission of department. Current problems and issues in policy 
planning, including training, social, and economic functions of vocational and technical education. 



310 Course Descriptions 



Characteristics of youth, adult client populations, training in public, private, domestic and in- 
ternational settings. 

EDIT 705 Trends in the Teaching and Supervision of Home Economics Education (3) 
Study of home economics programs and practices in light of current educational trends. Inter- 
pretation and analysis of democratic teaching procedures, outcomes of instruction, and super- 
visory practices. 

EDIT 742 Theory and Research in Business Education (1-3) 

A survey of the research literature; evaluation of research techniques; consideration of relevant 
instructional curriculum theory; evaluation of modern teaching methods and techniques. 
EDIT 746 Theory and Research in Home Economics Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 645 or permission of department. A survey of the research literature; eval- 
uation of research techniques; consideration of relevant instructional curriculum theory; eval- 
uation of modern teaching methods and techniques. 
EDIT 760 Modes of Inquiry in Industrial and Social Institutions (3) 

Modes of inquiry used to conduct research in industrial and social institutions in the interest of 
human context in these settings. Interpretive and critical science as alternatives to the empirical 
orientation. 

EDIT 780 Leadership Seminar in Vocational Education (3) 

Seminar in the contributions of local, state, and national agencies to the formulation of vocational/ 
technical education program.s. 
EDIT 788 Selected Topics in Education (1-3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Current topics and issues in education. 
EDIT 798 Special Problems in Education (1-6) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Intended for Master's, AGS, or doctoral students in 
education who desire to pursue a research problem. 
EDIT 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
EDIT 821 Seminar in Business Education (3) 
EDIT 826 Seminar in Home Economics Education (3) 
EDIT 888 Apprenticeship in Education (1-8) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Apprentice practice under professional supervision in an 
area of competence compatible with the student's professional goals. Credit not to be granted 
for experience accrued prior to registration. Open only to degree-and certificate-seeking graduate 
students. 

EDIT 889 Internship in Education (3-8) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Internship experiences at a professional level of com- 
petence in a particular role with appropriate supervision. Credit not to be granted for experience 
accrued prior to registration. Open only to students advanced to candidacy for doctoral degree. 

EDIT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

EDMS - Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation 

EDMS 410 Principles of Testing and Evaluation (3) 

Basic principles including the steps in the specification of instructional objectives and subsequent 
development of teacher-made tests; problems in the use and interpretation of achievement and 
aptitude tests; introduction to the development and use of non-testing evaluation procedures; 
basic consideration in the assignment of marks and grades; introduction to computer technology 
as applied tc measurement. 



EDMS - Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation 311 



EDMS 451 Introduction to Educational Statistics (3) 

Designed as a first course in statistics for students in education. Emphasis is upon educational 
applications of descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency, variability and 
association. Also included are inferential statistics through one-way ANOVA. 
EDMS 465 Algorithmic Methods in Educational Research (3) 

Introduction to the use of the computer as a tool in educational research. Instruction in a basic 
scientific computer source language as well as practical experience in program writing for solving 
statistical and educational research problems. 
EDMS 489 Field Experiences in Measurement and Statistics (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 4 credits. Planned field experience in ed- 
ucation-related activities. Credit not to be granted for experiences accrued prior to registration. 
EDMS 498 Special Problems in Measurement and Statistics (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. Available only to education majors 
who have formal plans for individual study of approved problems. 
EDMS 622 Theory and Practice of Standardized Testing (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 451; or EDMS 645. Study of group tests typically employed in school testing 
programs; discussion of evidence relating to the measurement of abilities; practice in standardized 
group test administrations. 

EDMS 623 Applied Measurement: Issues and Practices (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 646. Current research and applications in Measurement Theory. 
EDMS 626 Measurement Techniques For Research (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 646. Theory, development and applications of various measurement instru- 
ments and procedures. Questionnaires, interviews, rating scales, attitude scales, observational 
procedures, ecological approaches, Q-sort, semantic-differential, sociometry and other tech- 
niques. 

EDMS 635 Computer-Based Measurement (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 651; and EDMS 623. Theory and technological developments in computer- 
based measurement, including computer adaptive testing, instructional testing, item banking, 
applications to non-cognitive measures, as well as comparisons to traditional methods. 
EDMS 645 Quantitative Research Methods I (3) 

Introduction to research design principles and the scientific method as applied to behavioral 
phenomena. Instrumentation procedures including the planning and construction of simple data 
collection instruments and their analysis, and assessment of the reliability and validity of such 
instruments. Statistical procedures appropriate to the analysis of data from simple research 
designs. Laboratory experiences in instrumentation and research design are emphasized. 
EDMS 646 Quantitative Research Methods II (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 645. Special problems arising in the implementation of educational research 
designs. Instrumentation to measure attitudes and collection of questionnaire data. Additional 
statistical procedures appropriate to the analysis of education research designs. Laboratory ex- 
periences in instrumentation and research design are emphasized. 
EDMS 647 Introduction to Evaluation Models (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 646 or equivalent. Explores the principal approaches to evaluation research. 
EDMS 651 Intermediate Statistics in Education (3) 

Distributional theory; Chi-square analysis of contingency tables; analysis of variance; introduction 
to multiple correlation and regression. 
EDMS 653 Correlation and Regression Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 651. Systematic development of simple regression, multiple regression, and 
non-linear regression as applied to educational research problems. Emphasis is on underlying 
theory of procedures and on analytical approaches which are amenable to computerization. 



312 Course Descriptions 



EDMS 657 Factor Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 651. Development of models for factor analysis and their practical appli- 
cations. Treatment of factor extraction, rotation, second-order factor analysis, and factor scores. 
Introduction to linear structural relations models. 
EDMS 723 Measurement Theory I (3) 

Prerequisites: EDMS 623; and EDMS 651. Theoretical development of the fundamentals of 
measurement. 

EDMS 724 Measurement Theory II (3) 

Theoretical formulations of measurement such as latent class and item response models. 
EDMS 738 Seminar in Special Problems in Measurement (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 3 credits. An opportunity for students with 
special interests to focus in depth on contemporary topics in measurement. Topics to be an- 
nounced, but will typically be related to applied and theoretical measurement. 
EDMS 747 Design of Program Evaluations (3) 

Prerequisites: EDMS 626: and EDMS 647; and EDMS 651 or permission of both department and 
instructor. Analysis of measurement and design problems in program evaluations. 
EDMS 769 Special Topics in Applied Statistics in Education (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Designed primarily for students majoring or minoring in 
measurement, statistics or evaluation. 

EDMS 771 Design of Experiments (3) 

Prerequisite: EDMS 651. Major types of statistical designs; application of multivariate statistical 

techniques; introduction to log linear models. 

EDMS 779 Seminar in Applied Statistics (1-3) 

Repeatable to 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to doctoral students with a major or minor in 

measurement, statistics or evaluation. Seminar topics will be chosen by individual student interest. 

EDMS 780 Research Methods and Materials (3) 

Research methodology for case studies, surveys, and experiments; measurements and statistical 

techniques. Primarily for advanced students and doctoral candidates. 

EDMS 798 Special Problems in Education (1-6) 

Master's, AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special research problems under 

the direction of their advisors may register for credit under this number. 

EDMS 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

Registration required to the extent of 6 credits. 

EDMS 879 Doctoral Seminar (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Analysis of doctoral projects and theses, and of other 

on-going research projects. Doctoral candidates may participate in the seminar during as many 

university sessions as they desire, but may earn no more than three semester hours of credit 

accumulated one hour at a time in the seminar. A Ph.D. candidate may repeat to a combined 

maximum of eighteen credits in the seminar and in EDMS 899. 

EDMS 889 Internship in Measurement and Statistics (3-12) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Provides internship experiences at a professional level 

of competence in a particular role with appropriate supervision. Credit not to be granted for 

experience accrued prior to registration. Open only to students advanced to candidacy for doctoral 

degree. 

EDMS 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

Registration required to the extent of 12-18 credits. 



EDPA- Education Policy, Planning and Administration 313 



EDPA - Education Policy, Planning and Administration 

EDPA 400 The Future of the Human Community (3) 

Examination of the future of our social and cultural institutions for education and child rearing, 
social and family relationships, health and leisure, information exchange, and the provision of 
food, clothing, and shelter. 

EDPA 401 Educational Technology, Policy, and Social Change (3) 

Junior standing. Examines technology as a complex force which influences social change and the 
educational development of individuals. 
EDPA 412 Logic of Teaching (3) 

An analysis of the structure of basic subject matters in the curriculum and of the standard logical 
moves in teaching. 
EDPA 440 Educational Media (3) 

Survey of classroom uses of instructional media. Techniques for integrating media into instruction. 
Includes preparation of a unit of instruction utilizing professional and teacher produced media. 
EDPA 471 The Legal Rights and Obligations of Teachers and Students (3) 
Selected state and federal court decisions, legislation, and executive guidelines regulating public 
education: speech and other forms of expression, privacy, suspensions, expulsions, search and 
seizure, tort liability for neghgence (including education malpractice), hiring, promotion, dis- 
missal and non-renewal of teachers. No prior legal training required. 
EDPA 488 Special Topics in Education Policy and Administration (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. Special and intensive treatment 
of current topics and issues in education policy and administration. 
EDPA 489 Field Experiences in Education (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Planned field experience in education-related activities. 
Credit not to be granted for experiences accrued prior to registration. 
EDPA 498 Special Problems in Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Available only to students who have definite plans for 
individual study of approved problems. 
EDPA 499 Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes (1-6) 

Repeatable to 6 credits. The following type of educational enterprise may be scheduled under 
this course heading: Workshops conducted by the College of Education (or developed cooper- 
atively with other colleges and universities) and not otherwise covered in the present course 
listing; clinical experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading clinics, speech therapy laboratories, 
and special education centers: institutes developed around specific topics or problems and in- 
tended for designated groups such as school superintendents, principals and supervisors. 
EDPA 601 Contemporary Social Issues in Education (3) 

Theoretical and practical consideration of vital social issues currently affecting education. 
EDPA 605 Comparative Education (3) 

Analyzes and compares leading issues in education in various countries of the world, particularly 
as they relate to crucial problems in American education. 
EDPA 610 History of Western Education (3) 

Educational institutions through the ancient, medieval and early modern periods in western 
civilization, as seen against a background of socio-economic development. 
EDPA 611 History of Education in the United States (3) 

A study of the origins and development of education in the United States, emphasizing the 
variety of interpretive and methodological concerns that define the field. 



314 Course Descriptions 



EDPA 612 Philosophy of Education (3) 

A study of the great educational philosophers and systems of thought affecting the development 
of modern education, with particular emphasis on recent scholarship on philosophical problems 
in education. 

EDPA 613 Educational Sociology (3) 

The sociological study of education as an evolving set of methods and procedures, and body of 
knowledge. Focuses on several major theoretical perspectives used by sociologists studying ed- 
ucation. 

EDPA 614 Politics of Education (3) 

Educational institutions as political entities with an emphasis on their relationships with federal, 
state, and local governments as well as with interest groups. The application of competing models 
of the political process to the passing of laws, development of budgets, and the control of the 
formulation, implementation, and evaluation of education policies. 
EDPA 620 Education Policy Analysis (3) 

Policy making in education from planning to evaluation with emphasis on the identification of 
policy problems and the resources available to analysts through multi-disciplinary approaches. 
An introductory experience with education policy analysis. 
EDPA 621 Decision Making and Education Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: EDPA 620. Organizational decision processes and policy formation within educa- 
tional organizations - schools, colleges, universities, government agencies and industry. 
EDPA 622 Education Policy, Values, and Social Change (3) 

Prerequisite: EDPA 620. Examination of relationships among educational policy, values, and 
social change. Roles of educational organizations and institutional change in such social issues 
as equity and cultural diversity. 

EDPA 623 Education Policy and Theories of Change (3) 

Prerequisite: EDPA 620. The work of change theorists in history, economics, political science, 
philosophy, sociology and anthropology as it impinges upon education policy. 

EDPA 625 Federal Education Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: EDPA 620. Federal involvement in education in the United States from 1780 to 
the present, emphasizing the effects of legislation, court decisions, agencies, and presidential 
initiatives on the distribution of education opportunities. 
EDPA 626 Education Policy and the Young (3) 

The systematic exploration of education policy as it has organized, reflected and influenced the 
lives of children, youth, and families, with particular emphasis on American policies and systems. 
EDPA 627 Education Policy: An International Perspective (3) 

An analysis of education policy issues in various parts of the world. Comparisons with the United 
States. Teachers' organizations and citizen participation in policy determination. Ethnic and 
racial group pressures and attempts to control education policy. 
EDPA 634 The School Curriculum (3) 

A foundations course embracing the curriculum as a whole from early childhood through ado- 
lescence, including a review of historical developments, an analysis of conditions affecting cur- 
riculum change, an examination of issues in curriculum making, and a consideration of current 
trends in curriculum design. 

EDPA 635 Principles of Curriculum Development (3) 

Curriculum planning, improvement, and evaluation in the schools; principles for the selection 
and organization of the content and learning experiences; ways of working in classroom and 
school on curriculum improvement. 



EDPA - Education Policy, Planning and Administration 31 5 



EDPA 636 Communication and the School Curriculum (3) 

Curriculum development based on communication as the major vehicle for describing the learn- 
er's interactions with persons, knowledge, and materials in the classroom and school environment. 
(Listed also as EDEL 636.) 

EDPA 650 Professional Seminar in Higher and Adult Education (3) 

Introduction to higher and adult education as a field of study. Origins, current dimensions and 
problems, and emerging issues. Field trips to state and national capitols, and involvement in 
professional conferences. 
EDPA 651 Higher Education Law (3) 

Selected court opinions, legislation and executive guidelines regulating higher education. First 
and fourth amendment rights of students and faculty, procedural due process, equal educational 
opportunity, equal protection in hiring, promotion, non-renewal and salaries, individual and 
institutional liability for civil rights violations and common law torts. No prior legal training 
required. 

EDPA 652 Higher Education in American Society (3) 

Examines the concepts of academic freedom, corporate autonomy and institutional accountability 
with emphasis on twentieth century relationships between higher education and government in 
the United States. 

EDPA 653 Organization and Administration of Higher Education (3) 

Basic concepts and terminology related to organizational behavior and institutional governance 
structures. The governance and organization of higher education in the United States. 
EDPA 654 The Community and Junior College (3) 

Historical development and philosophical foundations of community and junior colleges in Amer- 
ica with emphasis on organizational and administrative structures in two year institutions and 
the clientele they serve. 

EDPA 655 Administration of Adult and Continuing Education (3) 

An overview of the field of Adult/Continuing Education focusing on the administration of in- 
stitutions and organizations that provide both credit and non-credit educational experiences for 
adult learners. 

EDPA 657 History of Higher Education in the United States (3) 

History of higher education in America from colonial times to the present with emphasis on 
expansion of higher education and the growing complexity of its structures, organization, and 
purposes. 

EDPA 660 Administrative Foundations (3) 

Develops a theoretical and research based structure for the study and practice of administration 
in the field of education. 

EDPA 661 Administrative Behavior and Organizational Management (3) 

Critical analysis of organizational governance and management (informal and formal dimen- 
sions), and of contributions from other fields (traditional and emerging) to the study of admin- 
istrative behavior. 

EDPA 662 Administrative Processes (3) 

Develops competence with respect to selected administrative process areas. 
EDPA 663 Policy Formulation in Education (3) 

Various levels of school governance. Analysis of policy formation, administration and evaluation 
issues. 

EDPA 664 School Surveys (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Study of the design, administration and evaluation of 
school surveys. 



316 Course Descriptions 



EDPA 665 The Organization and Administration of Secondary Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. The work of the secondary school principal. Includes 
topics such as personnel problems, school-community relationships, student activities, schedule 
making, and internal financial accounting. 

EDPA 666 Organization and Administration of Elementary Schools (3) 
Problems in administering elementary schools and improving instruction. 
EDPA 667 Public School Supervision (3) 

The nature and functions of supervision; various supervisory techniques and procedures; human 
relationship factors; and personal qualities for supervision. 
EDPA 671 Elementary and Secondary School Law (3) 

Selected court opinions, legislation and executive guidelines regulating elementary and secondary 
education. Equal educational opportunity, first and fourth amendment rights of students and 
teachers, tort liablity for negligence, equal protection in hiring, firing and non-renewal of teachers, 
individual and institutional liablity for federal civil rights violations and common law torts. No 
prior legal training required. 

EDPA 673 Collective Bargaining in Elementary-Secondary Education (3) 
Evolution and impact of collective bargaining in elementary and secondary education. Impact 
of collective bargaining on the educational power structure, third-party community interests and 
education policy making. 

EDPA 675 Public School Personnel Administration (3) 

A comparison of practices with principles governing the satisfaction of school personnel needs, 
including a study of tenure, salary schedules, supervision, rewards, and other benefits. 
EDPA 676 School Finance and Business Administration (3) 

Introduction to principles and practices in the administration of the public school finance activity. 
Sources of tax revenue, the budget, and the function of finance in the educational program are 
considered. 

EDPA 679 Master's Seminar (3) 

Directed study for master's degree students writing seminar papers. 
EDPA 690 Research in Education Policy, Planning and Administra tion (3) 
Introduction to research methods and designs used in studies of education pohcy, planning, and 
administration. 

EDPA 700 Qualitative Research Methods in Education (3) 

Qualitative methods in education research, emphasizing the paradigms of philosophy, history, 
sociology, anthropology, and comparative studies as they rely on narrative rather than quanti- 
tative ordering of data. 

EDPA 705 International Educational Change (3) 

Exploration and analysis of major trends in education in several parts of the world, with attention 
directed to educational change as the outcome of deliberate efforts by nations and international 
organizations as well as those which occur without central planning or direction. 
EDPA 706 Education in Developing Countries (3) 

Examination of the development of modern educational systems in Africa, Asia and Latin 
America out of the colonial and traditional past into the independent present and future. Focus 
on research on changing philosophies and persistent education problems in these societies. 
EDPA 707 Education in the Near East (3) 

Current educational problems of the Near East as they have emerged from the confrontation of 
the traditional Muslim educational heritage with the foreign educational activities and the forces 
of nationalism and modernization. 



EDPA - Education Policy, Planning and Administration 31 7 



EDPA 712 Analysis of Educational Concepts (3) 

Analyses of selected concepts used in thinking about education. 
EDPA 732 History of Curriculum Theory and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: EDPA 635 or permission of department. The writings of major educators in cur- 
riculum. Conceptual and formal similarities and differences between current curriculum projects 
and historical antecedents. Survey of curriculum materials for classroom use in their relationship 
to the curriculum theory of their time. 

EDPA 738 Scholarly Thought and Contemporary Curriculum (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. Current curricular trends, issues, 
theory, and research in the light of past curricular and social thought. 
EDPA 750 International Higher Education (3) 

Comparison of higher education systems in several countries, and of the problems and issues in 
higher education faced by these countries. 
EDPA 751 Law and Equity in Education (3) 

Prerequisite: EDPA 651 or permission of department. Analysis and evaluation of judicial and 
executive branch attempts to give operational meaning to federal equity legislation and to develop 
remedial policies relating to equal educational and employment opportunity in post-secondary 
education. 

EDPA 752 State Systems of Higher Education (3) 

Creation, operation, alteration and evaluation of state systems of higher education. Campus 
autonomy versus public accountability. Analysis of topics such as state planning, budget and 
program review, and administration of student aid and federal programs. 
EDPA 753 Higher Education Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: EDPA 653 or permission of department. Social science concepts underlying planning. 
Applications of planning concepts and techniques to higher education at institutional, state and 
national levels. 

EDPA 754 Higher Education Finance (3) 

Economic perspectives on higher education. Ways of financing higher education and current 
finance issues. Higher education budget concepts and processes. 
EDPA 755 Federal Policies in Post-Secondary Education (3) 

Evolution of the federal role, its current scope and funding. Policy issues associated with federal 
student aid programs, research grants and social equity regulations. 
EDPA 756 Curriculum in Higher Education (3) 

Conditions affecting curriculum change in higher education, including critical analysis of various 
bases for the college curriculum in the context of college and university hfe. 
EDPA 757 College Teaching (3) 

Critical review of literature on teaching in higher education from conceptual and practical view- 
points. Designed for current and prospective adult educators. Focused on research and improve- 
ment of instruction. 

EDPA 759 Seminar in Adult and Continuing Education (3) 

Current issues and problems in adult and continuing education and lifelong learning in America. 
EDPA 760 The Human Dimension in Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: EDPA 660 or permission of department. Theory, research findings, and laboratory 
experiences in human skills in organizations. 
EDPA 761 Group Relationships in Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: EDPA 660 or permission of department. Group relationships and relevant admin- 
istrative skills in educational settings. The role of authority, group maturation, group member 
roles, group decision-making, and intra-group and inter-group conflict. 



318 Course Descriptions 



EDPA 767 The Effective Principal (3) 

Prerequisite: EDPA 665 or EDPA 666. Research on school principal effectiveness emphasizing 
conditions of and methodologies for assessing principal/school effectiveness. 
EDPA 772 Practicum in Leadership Behaviors (3) 

Prerequisites: EDPA 660 and EDPA 661, or permission of department. Practicum in the use of 
social exchange behaviors in administrative/leadersh ip situations. Emphasis on development 
and refinement of exchange behaviors enhancing employee commitment and productivity in 
human service organizations. 

EDPA 788 Special Topics in Education Policy and Administration (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. Special and intensive treatment 
of current topics and issues in education policy and administration. 
EDPA 798 Special Problems in Education (1-6) 

Master's, AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special research problems under 
the direction of their advisors may register for credit under this number. 
EDPA 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

Registration required to the extent of six hours for master's thesis. 
EDPA 805 Seminar in Comparative Education (3) 

Analysis of educational issues on a worldwide basis with opportunities to focus on a particular 
country on an individual basis. Analysis of qualitative research methods as used in cross-cultural 
and comparative education studies. 
EDPA 809 Intermediate Research Methods (3) 
Specific methodologies employed in educational studies. 
EDPA 811 Seminar in History of Education (3) 

Examination of current developments and continuing controversies in the field of history of 
education. The analysis of the various ways in which history of education is approached meth- 
odologically and interpretatively. 
EDPA 812 Seminar in Philosophy of Education (3) 

Examination of current developments and continuing controversies in the field of philosophy of 
education. The function of educational philosophy, methodological approaches, and current 
research trends. 

EDPA 813 Seminar in Educational Sociology (3) 

Sociological analysis of educational processes and institutions; emphasis on the social effects of 
formal organizations. 

EDPA 837 Curriculum Theory and Research (3) 

Prerequisite: EDPA 635. Critical and analytic review of major themes, concepts and language 
forms relevant to current curriculum theory and research. 
EDPA 839 Seminar in Teacher Education (3-6) 
Repeatable to 6 credits. A problem seminar in teacher education. 
EDPA 850 Seminar in Problems of Higher Education (3) 

Contemporary issues and problems in post-secondary education relevant to the interests of both 
administrators and college/university faculty members. 
EDPA 851 College and University Development (3) 

Identification and acquisition of extramural fiscal resources for institutions of higher education. 
The nature of philanthropy, foundation solicitation, alumni administration, publications and 
public relations, and funding agency relationships. 
EDPA 855 Lifelong Learning Policy (3) 

Policies and programs for training and continued learning in business and industry, government 
agencies, unions, professional societies, and nonprofit organizations. 



EDSP - Education, Special 31 9 



EDPA 861 Seminar: Research in Scliool Effectiveness (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Examination of organizational effectiveness and the meth- 
odologies for assessing organizational effectiveness. An individual research project is required. 
EDPA 862 Seminar: Theoretical Basis of Administrative Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Study of administrative behavior in educational institu- 
tions. Development of a research design for the study of administrative behavior in one edu- 
cational institution. 

EDPA 888 Apprenticeship in Education (1-8) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Apprentice practice under professional supervision in an 
area of competence compatible with the student's professional goals. Credit not to be granted 
for experience accrued prior to registration. Open only to degree- and certificate-seeking graduate 
students. 

EDPA 889 Internship in Education (3-8) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Internship experiences at a professional level of com- 
petence in a particular role with appropriate supervision. Credit not to be granted for experience 
accrued prior to registration. Open only to students advanced to candidacy for doctoral degree. 
EDPA 895 Research Critique Seminar (3) 

Critiques of research designs in preparation for the doctoral dissertation. 
EDPA 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

Registration required to the extent of 6-9 hours for an Ed.D. Project and 12-18 hours for a 
Ph.D. Dissertation. 

EDSP - Education, Special 

EDSP 400 Assessment, Curriculum and Instructional Methods For Students with Severe 
Handicaps (3) 

Corequisites: [EDSP 402; and EDSP 431] or permission of department. Examination of functional 
assessment procedures, curriculum development and analysis, and instructional techniques for 
students with severe handicaps. 

EDSP 401 Environmental Adaptations for Severely Handicapped Students (3) 
Pre- or corequisites: /EDSP 411; and EDSP 412J or {EDSP 430; and EDSP 431 j. Management 
problems of and alternatives for severely handicapped individuals. 
EDSP 402 Field Placement: Severely Handicapped I (2-5) 

Pre- or corequisites: [EDSP 400; and EDSP 404] or permission of department. Practicum ex- 
perience in settings serving severely handicapped individuals. Enrollment limited to those ad- 
mitted to severely handicapped specialty area. Field placement for two to five half-days per 
week. 

EDSP 403 Physical and Communication Adaptations for Students with Severe Handicaps (3) 
Prerequisites: [EDSP 400; and EDSP 404[ or permission of department. Corequisites: [EDSP 
330; and EDSP 405; and EDSP 410] or permission of department. Development, assessment, 
and instruction of mobility, feeding, grooming, and communication techniques to increase in- 
dependent functioning for students with severe handicaps. 
EDSP 404 Education of Students with Autism (3) 

Pre- or corequisites: [EDSP 400 and EDSP 402] or permission of department. Characteristics, 
needs, assessment, and educational methods for students diagnosed as autistic. 
EDSP 405 Field Placement: Severely Handicapped II (2-5) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 402 or permission of department. Pre- or corequisites: EDSP 330; and EDSP 
403; and EDSP 410 or permission of department. Practicum experience in settings serving severely 
handicapped individuals. Field placement for two to five half-days per week. 



320 Course Descriptions 



EDSP 410 Community Functioning Skills for Students with Severe Handicaps (3) 

Prerequisites: [EDSP 400; and EDSP 404 j or permission of department. Corequmtes: EDSP 330; 
and EDSP 403; and EDSP 405. Assessment, instructional techniques, and curriculum devel- 
opment related to community functioning skills for students with severe handicaps. 

EDSP 411 Field Placement: Severely Handicapped III (2-5) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 405. Pre- or corequisites: (EDSP 412; and (EDSP 420 or EDSP 460)1 or 
permission of department. Practicum experience in settings serving severely handicapped indi- 
viduals. Field placement for two to five half-days per week. 

EDSP 412 Vocational and Transitional Instruction For Students with Severe Handicaps (3) 

Corequisites: I EDSP 411; and EDSP 465] or permission of department. Assessment and instruc- 
tional strategies for developing the vocational and transitional skills of students with severe 
handicaps. 

EDSP 417 Student Teaching: Severely Handicapped (4-11) 

Student teaching, full-time for twelve weeks, with severely handicapped individuals. Limited to 
special education majors admitted to severely handicapped specialty area. 

EDSP 418 Seminar: Issues and Research Related to the Instruction of Severely Handicapped 
Students (1-3) 

For EDSP majors only. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Examines the current research 
related to the instruction of severely handicapped individuals. 

EDSP 420 Developmental and Behavioral Characteristics of Nonhandicapped and Handicapped 
Infants and Young Children (3) 

Corequisites: [EDSP 421; and EDSP 411/ or permission of department. Study of the develop- 
mental, behavioral, and learning characteristics of nonhandicapped and handicapped infants and 
young preschool children. 

EDSP 421 Field Placement: Early ChUdhood Special Education I (2-3) 

Pre- or corequisite: [EDSP 410 and EDSP 420] or permission of department. Practicum experience 
in settings serving preschool handicapped children. Opportunities for studying the patterns of 
development and learning among nonhandicapped and handicapped infants and older pre- 
schoolers. Enrollment limited to students admitted to early childhood specialty. Field placement 
for two or three half-days per week. 

EDSP 422 Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood Special Education (Moderate to 
Mild: 3-8 Years) (3) 

Prerequisites: EDSP 410; and EDSP 420 or permission of department. Corequisites: EDSP 330; 
and EDSP 424. Characteristics, methods and materials for the instruction of young children 
(ages 3-8) traditionally labeled mild to moderately handicapped. 

EDSP 423 Assessment of Preschool Handicapped Children and Infants (3) 

Prerequisites: EDSP 330; and EDSP 422. Corequisites: EDSP 430; and EDSP 431; and; EDSP 
400 or EDSP 441. Current psychoeducational assessment and evaluation procedures used with 
profoundly to moderately handicapped infants and young preschool children. Psychometric, 
criterion-referenced, developmental checklists, and automated and ecological assessment pro- 
cedures. Administration of selected assessment instruments. 

EDSP 424 Field Placement: Early ChUdhood Special Education II (Moderate to Mild) (2-4) 
Prerequisite: EDSP 421 or permission of department. Pre- or corequisites: EDSP 350; and EDSP 
422. Practicum experience in settings serving young (ages 3 to 8) mild to moderately handicapped 
children in self-contained and integrated early childhood programs. Opportunities to apply ed- 
ucational methods and materials. Field placement for two to four half-days per week. 



EDSP- Education, Special 321 



EDSP 430 Intervention Techniques and Strategies For Preschool Handicapped Children and 
Infants( Severe to Moderate, Birth-6 Years)(3) 

Prerequisites: EDSP 330; and EDSP 422. Corequisites: EDSP 423; and EDSP 431; and (EDSP 
440 or EDSP 441). Current approaches to the treatment of preschool severely to moderately 
handicapped children. 

EDSP 431 Field Placement: Early Childhood Special Education III (Severe to Moderate) (2-4) 
Prerequisite: EDSP 424 or permission of department. Pre- or corequisites: EDSP 430; and EDSP 
423; and (EDSP 400 or EDSP 441). Opportunities to apply techniques, strategies, methods and 
materials for educating severely to moderately handicapped infants and young children. Field 
placement for two to four half-days per week. 

EDSP 437 Student Teaching: Early Childhood Special Education (4-11) 

Student teaching, full-time for twelve weeks, with handicapped infants and preschool children. 
Limited to special education majors in early childhood special education specialty area. 
EDSP 438 Seminar: Special Issues in Early Childhood Special Education (1-3) 
Prerequisite: permission of department. For EDSP majors only. Repeatable to 6 credits if content 
differs. Study of current issues and research concerning education of preschool handicapped 
children. 

EDSP 440 Assessment and Instructional Design for the Educationally Handicapped: Cognitive 
and Psychosocial Development (3) 

Prerequisites: {EDSP 441; and EDCl 456] or permission of department. Pre- or corequisites: 
EDSP 330; and EDSP 445; and EDHD 413. Learning style, cognitive, and problem-solving 
strategies, and psychosocial behavior of educationally handicapped individuals at elementary to 
secondary levels. Characteristics, assessment and instruction. Enrollment limited to Special Ed- 
ucation majors accepted into educationally handicapped area of specialization. 
EDSP 441 Assessment and Instructional Design for the Educationally Handicapped: Oral 
Language and Communication Disorders (3) 

Corequisites: [EDSP 442; and EDSP 431/ or permission of department. Characteristics of indi- 
viduals with oral language and communication disorders, assessment of such disorders and in- 
structional strategies, curricula and materials. 
EDSP 442 Field Placement: Educationally Handicapped I (2-3) 

Pre- or corequisite: [EDSP 441 and EDCI 456J or permission of department. Practicum experience 
in settings serving educationally handicapped individuals. Demonstration of the content of EDSP 
44L Enrollment limited to students admitted to educationally handicapped specialty. Field place- 
ment for two or three half-days per week. 

EDSP 443 Assessment and Instructional Design for the Handicapped: Reading and Written 
Communication Disorders (3) 

Prerequisites: [EDSP 320; and EDSP 321] or permission of department. Pre- or corequisites: 
EDSP 331; and EDSP 332; and EDSP 333. Characteristics and assessments of individuals with 
reading and written communication disorders at elementary to secondary levels, and methods 
of teaching reading and written language skills to such individuals. Adaptation of regular in- 
structional methods and curricula. 

EDSP 445 Field Placement: Educationally Handicapped II (2-4) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 442 or permission of department. Pre- or corequisites: EDSP 330; and EDSP 
440; and EDSP 443; and EDHD 413. Practicum experience in settings serving educationally 
handicapped. The application of instructional design and assessment in cognitive development. 
Field placement for 2-4 half-days per week. 

EDSP 446 Instructional Design for the Educationally Handicapped: Functional Living Skills (3) 
Pre- or corequisites: [EDSP 447; and EDSP 465] or permission of department. Instructional 
methods, curricula and materials designed to teach functional living skills to educationally hand- 



322 Course Descriptions 



icapped individuals at elementary to secondary levels. Curricula and teaching strategies in science 
and social studies used in general education and adaptations for educationally handicapped 
individuals. 

EDSP 447 Field Placement: Educationally Handicapped III (2-4) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 445 or permission of departttient. Pre- or corequisites: EDSP 446; and EDSP 
450; and EDSP 460. Practieum experience in settings serving educationally handicapped indi- 
viduals. The application of the content of EDSP 446, EDSP 450 and EDSP 460. Field placement 
for two to four half-days per week. 

EDSP 450 Program Management for the Educationally Handicapped (3) 

Corequisites: [EDSP 411; and EDSP 447; and EDSP 465] or permission of department. Emphasis 
on skills in managing programs for educationally handicapped individuals. Service delivery models; 
scheduling; estabhshing referral, assessment and follow through procedures; methods for main- 
streaming; training aides and volunteers. 
EDSP 457 Student Teaching: Educationally Handicapped (4-11) 

For EDSP majors only. Student teaching, full-time for twelve weeks, with educationally hand- 
icapped individuals. 

EDSP 458 Seminar: Special Issues and Research Related to the Educationally Handicapped (1- 
3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Current issues and research concerning the education 
of educationally handicapped individuals. 
EDSP 460 Career A'ocational Education For the Handicapped (3) 

Corequisites: [EDSP 461; and EDSP 411; and EDSP 447] or permission of department. Intro- 
duction to career/vocational education for the handicapped. Historical and current issues and 
trends, characteristics and training needs of handicapped individuals and review of existing 
programs. 

EDSP 461 Field Placement: Career/Vocational I (2-3) 

Pre- or corequisite: [EDSP 460; and EDSP 456; and EDIT 421 J or permission of department. 
For EDSP majors only. Practieum experience in career vocational education for the handicapped. 
Field placement for two or three half-days per week. 
EDSP 462 Vocational Assessment and Instruction in Special Education (3) 
Prerequisite: EDSP 460 or permission of department. Current vocational assessment strategies, 
interpretation of assessment results, and planning, delivery and evaluation of instruction in 
vocational education for secondary students with disabilities. 
EDSP 463 Field Placement: CareerA'ocational II (2-3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 461 or permission of department. Pre- or corequisites: EDSP 330; and EDSP 
462. Practieum experience in career/vocational programs for the handicapped. Field placement 
for two or three half-days per week. 

EDSP 464 Secondary and Transition Methods in Special Education (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 462 or permission of department. Current secondary vocational/special ed- 
ucation issues and transition methods including work-study programming, job development, and 
job coaching. 

EDSP 465 Field Placement: Career/Vocational IH (2-3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 463; pre- or corequisite: EDSP 450. Practieum experience in career/vocational 
programs for the handicapped. Field placement for two or three half days per week. 
EDSP 467 Student Teaching: Career/Vocational (4-11) 

A full-time twelve week field assignment in a setting providing career/vocational education for 
handicapped students. Enrollment limited to Special Education majors who have successfully 
completed coursework in career/vocational area of specialization. 



EDSP - Education, Special 323 



EDSP 468 Special Topics Seminar in Career/Vocational Education For tiie Handicapped (1-3) 
Prerequisite: permission of department. For EDSP majors only. Repeatable to 6 credits if content 
differs. Current issues and research relating to career/vocational education of the handicapped. 

EDSP 470 Introduction to Special Education (3) 

Designed to give an understanding of the needs of all types of exceptional children. 

EDSP 471 Characteristics of Exceptional Children: Mentally Retarded (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 470 or equivalent. Studies the diagnosis etiology, physical, social and emo- 
tional characteristics of exceptional children. 

EDSP 472 Education of Exceptional Children: Mentally Retarded (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 471 or equivalent. Offers practical and specific methods of teaching excep- 
tional children. Selected observation of actual teaching may be arranged. 
EDSP 473 Curriculum For Exceptional Children: Mentally Retarded (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 471 or equivalent. Examines the principles and objectives guiding curriculum 
for exceptional children; gives experience in developing curriculum; studies various curricula 
currently in use. 

EDSP 475 Education of the Slow Learner (3) 

Studies the characteristics of the slow learner and those educational practices which are appro- 
priate for the child who is functioning as a slow learner. 

EDSP 476 Communicating with Sign Language (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 376 or permission of department. Intermediate level receptive! expressive skills 
in American Sign Language. Aspects of the culture, history, and research perspectives of the deaf 
community. 

EDSP 480 Microcomputers in Special Education (3) 
Microcomputers for the education of handicapped individuals. 
EDSP 481 Characteristics of Exceptional Children: Gifted and Talented (3) 
Prerequisite: EDSP 470 or equivalent. Studies the diagnosis, etiology, physical, social, and emo- 
tional characteristics of gifted and talented children. 

EDSP 482 Education of Exceptional Children: Gifted and Talented (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 481 or equivalent. Offers practical and specific methods of teaching gifted 
and talented children. Selected observation of actual teaching may be arranged. 

EDSP 483 Curriculum For Exceptional Children: Gifted and Talented (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 481 or equivalent. Examines the principles and objectives guiding current 
curriculum for gifted and talented children; gives experience in developing curriculum; studies 
various curricula currently in use. 

EDSP 488 Selected Topics in Teacher Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: major in education or permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content 

differs. 

EDSP 489 Field Experiences in Special Education (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Planned field experience in education-related activities. 

Credit not to be granted for experiences accrued prior to registration. 

EDSP 491 Characteristics of Learning Disabled Students: Perceptual Learning Problems (3) 

Diagnosis, etiology, physical, social, and emotional characteristics of learning disabled students. 

EDSP 492 Education of Learning Disabled Students (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 491 or permission of department. Methods of teaching learning disabled 

children. 



324 Course Descriptions 



EDSP 493 Curriculum For Exceptional Children: Perceptual Learning Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 492 or equivalent. Examines the principles and objectives guiding curriculum 
for children with perceptual learning disabilities; gives experience in developing curriculum; 
studies various curricula currently in use. 
EDSP 498 Special Problems in Special Education (1-6) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Available only to education majors who have definite 
plans for individual study of approved problems. Credit according to extent of work. 
EDSP 499 Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes in Special Education (1-6) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. The following type of educational enterprise may be 
scheduled under this course heading: workshops conducted by the special education department 
(or developed cooperatively with other departments, colleges and universities) and not otherwise 
covered in the present course listing. Laboratories, and special education centers; institutes 
developed around specific topics or problems and intended for designated groups such as school 
superintendents, principals and supervisors. 
EDSP 600 Exceptional Children and Youth (3) 

Prerequisite: 9 hours in special education and permission of department. Examines research 
relevant to the education of exceptional children and youth. 
EDSP 601 Characteristics of Behaviorally Disordered Students (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 600 or permission of department. Characteristics and theoretical perspectives 
related to students with behavioral disorders. 
EDSP 605 The Exceptional Child and Society (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 600 or permission of department. Relationship of the role and adjustment 
of the child with an exceptionality to societal characteristics. 
EDSP 610 Administration and Supervision of Special Education Programs (3) 
Prerequisite: EDSP 600 and permission of department. Consideration of the determination, 
establishment and function of educational programs to exceptional children for administrative 
and supervisory personnel. 

EDSP 615 Evaluation and Measurement of Exceptional Children and Youth (3) 
Prerequisites: [EDMS 446; and EDMS 646; and EDSP 600 j or permission of department. Deals 
with the understanding and interpretation of the results of psychological and educational tests 
applicable for use with exceptional children and youth. 

EDSP 620 Educational Diagnosis and Planning For Learning Disabled Students (3) 
Prerequisites: [EDSP 491; and EDSP 615] or permission of department. Identification of learning 
characteristics of learning disabled students and planning of educational programs. 
EDSP 621 Social and Academic Skill Development for Behaviorally Disordered Students (3) 
Prerequisites: [EDSP 600; and EDSP 601} or permission of department. Prerequisite: EDSP 600, 
EDSP 601 or consent of instructor. Strategies to teach social and academic skills to behaviorally 
disordered students. 

EDSP 625 Seminar on Severely Handicapping Conditions (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 600 or permission of department. Research and theories relevant to the 
education of severely handicapped individuals. 
EDSP 630 Problems in the Education of the Gifted (3) 

Prerequisite: 9 hours in Special Education including EDSP 600 or permission of department. 
Consideration of the pertinent psychological, educational, medical, sociological and other re- 
search and theoretical material relevant to the determination of trends and practices regarding 
the gifted. 

EDSP 635 Seminar: Behavioral Disorders (3) 

Prerequisites: [EDSP 601; and EDSP 621 j or permission of department. Methodological and 
theoretical issues related to behaviorally disordered students. 



EDSP - Education, Special 325 



EDSP 640 Seminar: Learning Disabilities (3) 

Prerequisites: [EDSP 492; and EDSP 600: and EDSP 615 j or permission of department. Research 

and theoretical material relevant to trends and practices regarding the learning disabled. 

EDSP 650 Seminar in Early Childhood Special Education (3) 

Prerequisite: 9 hours in Special Education including EDSP 600 and EDSP 420, or permission of 

department. Pertinent psychological, educational, medical, and sociological material relevant to 

trends and practices regarding handicapped infants and preschool children. 

EDSP 651 Program Planning and Instruction for Handicapped Infants and Children (3) 

Pre- orcorequisite: EDSP 430 or equivalent. Program design for serving high risk and handicapped 

infants from birth to three years of age. 

EDSP 655 Seminar in Secondary and Transition Special Education (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 600 or permission of department. Review of research pertaining to individuals 

with disabilities in secondary and post-secondary vocational and transitional settings. 

EDSP 665 Working with Families of Handicapped Children and Youth (3) 

Prerequisite: EDSP 600 or permission of department. Review of current practices and research 
pertaining to families of handicapped children and youth. 

EDSP 666 Educating Handicapped Children and Youth with Communication Disabilitie (3) 
Prerequisite: EDSP 600 or permission of department. Current practices and research pertaining 
to communication development, assessment, and intervention for children and youth with dis- 
abilities. 

EDSP 675 Policy Issues Impacting Persons with Disabilities (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Public policy issues regarding persons with disabilities 
including deinstitutionalization, special education and employment, as well as research and 
evaluation. 

EDSP 678 Seminar in Special Education (3) 
EDSP 680 Advanced Use of Computers in Special Education (3) 

Prerequisites: EDSP 480 or permission of department. Advanced course on computer applications 
with handicapped individuals emphasizing research, theoretical and practical issues. 

EDSP 685 Policy Formulation and Persons with Disabilities (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Research into the process by which policies regarding 
persons with disabilities are formulated, implemented and evaluated. 

EDSP 788 Selected Topics in Special Education (1-3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Current topics and issues in teacher education. 

EDSP 798 Special Problems in Special Education (1-6) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Intended for Master's, AGS, or doctoral students in 

education who desire to pursue a research problem. 

EDSP 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

Registration required to the extent of six hours for Master's thesis. 

EDSP 860 Doctoral Research Seminar (3) 

Issues and procedures relevant to conducting and analyzing research in special education. 

EDSP 888 Apprenticeship in Special Education (1-8) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Apprentice practice under professional supervision in an 

area of competence compatible with the student's professional goals. Credit not to be granted 

for experience accrued prior to registration. Open only to degree- and certificate-seeking graduate 

students. 



326 Course Descriptions 



EDSP 889 Internship in Special Education (3-8) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Internship experiences at a professional level of com- 
petence in a particular role with appropriate supervision. Credit not to be granted for experience 
accrued prior to registration. Open only to students advanced to candidacy for doctoral degree. 

EDSP 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

Registration required to the extent of 6-9 hours for an Ed.D. Project and 12-18 hours for a 

Ph.D. dissertation. 

ENAE - Engineering, Aerospace 

ENAE 401 Aerospace Laboratory II (2) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 305; and ENAE 345. Corequisites: ENAE 452; and ENAE 47]. Application 
of fundamental measurement techniques to experiments in aerospace engineering, structural, 
aerodynamic, and propulsion tests, correlation of theory with experimental results. 

ENAE 402 Aerospace Laboratory III (1) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 305; and ENAE 345. Corequisites: ENAE 452; and ENAE 471; and ENAE 
475. Application of fundamental measurement techniques to experiments in aerospace engi- 
neering, structural, aerodynamic, flight simulation, and heat transfer tests. Correlation of theory 
with experimental results. 

ENAE 411 Aircraft Design (3) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 345; and ENAE 451; and ENAE 371. Theory, background and methods 

of airplane design, subsonic and supersonic. 

ENAE 412 Design of Aerospace Vehicles (3) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 345; and ENAE 371. Theory, background and methods of space vehicle 

design for manned orbiting vehicles, manned lunar and planetary landing systems. 

ENAE 415 Computer-Aided Structural Design Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 452 or permission of both department and instructor. Introduction to struc- 
tural design concepts and analysis techniques. Introduction to computer software for structural 
analysis which is utilized to verify exact solutions and perform parametric design studies of 
aerospace structures. 

ENAE 445 Stability and Control of Aerospace Vehicles (3) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 345; and ENAE 371. Dynamics of flight vehicles with emphasis on stability 

and control of vehicles in the atmosphere. 

ENAE 451 Flight Structures I: Introduction to Solid Mechanics (4) 

Prerequisite: ENES 220. An introduction to the analysis of aircraft structural members. Intro- 
duction to theory of elasticity, mechanical behavior of materials, thermal effects, finite-difference 
approximations, virtual work, variational and energy principles for static systems. 

ENAE 452 Flight Structures H: Structural Elements (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 451. Application of variational and energy principles to analysis of elastic 
bodies; stresses and deflections of beams including effects of non-principal axes, non-homo- 
geneity, and thermal gradients; differential equations of beams, bars, and cables. Stresses and 
deflections of torsional members, stresses due to shear. Deflection analysis of structures. 

ENAE 453 Matrix Methods in Computational Mechanics (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 452 or permission of both department and instructor. Introduction to the 
concepts of computational analysis of continuous media by use of matrix methods. Foundation 
for use of finite elements in any field of continuum mechanics, with emphasis on the use of the 
displacement method to solve thermal and structural problems. 



ENAE - Engineering, Aerospace 327 



ENA£ 461 Flight Propulsion 1 (3) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 217; and ENAE 471. Operating principles of piston, turbojet, turboprop, 
ramjet and rocket engines, thermodynamic cycle analysis and engine performance, aerother- 
mochemistry of combustion, fuels, and propellants. 
ENAE 462 FUght Propulsion U (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 461. Advanced and current topics in flight propulsion. 
ENAE 471 Aerodynamics II (3) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 371; and ENME 217. Elements of compressible flow with applications to 
aerospace engineering problems. 
ENAE 472 Aerodynamics ni (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 371. Theory of the flow of an incompressible fluid. 
ENAE 473 Aerodynamics of High-Speed FUght (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 471 or equivalent. An advanced course dealing with aerodynamic problems 
of flight at supersonic and hypersonic velocities. Unified hypersonic and supersonic small dis- 
turbance theories, real gas effects, aerodynamic heating and mass transfer with applications to 
hypersonic flight and re-entry. 

ENAE 475 Viscous Flow and Aerodynamic Heating (3) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 371; and ENAE 471; and ENME 217. Fundamental aspects of viscous flow, 
Navier-Stokes equations, similarity, boundary layer equations; laminar, transitional and turbulent 
incompressible flows on airfoils, thermal boundary layers and convective heat transfer; conduction 
through solids, introduction to radiative heat transfer. 
ENAE 488 Topics in Aerospace Engineering (1-4) 

Technical elective taken with the permission of the student's advisor and instructor. Lecture and 
conference courses designed to extend the student's understanding of aerospace engineering. 
Current topics are emphasized. 
ENAE 499 Elective Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing in ENAE major and permission of department, instructor, and 
student's advisor. Repeatable to 6 credits. Original research projects terminating in a written 
report. 

ENAE 631 Helicopter Aerodynamics I (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of both department and instructor. Introduction to hovering theory. 
Hovering and vertical-flight performance analyses. Factors affecting hovering and vertical-flight 
performance. Autorotation and vertical descent. Physical concepts of blade motion and rotor 
control. Aerodynamics of forward flight and performance calculations. Prediction and effects of 
rotor blade stall. 

ENAE 632 Helicopter Aerodynamics II (3) 

Prerequisites: [ENAE 631; and ENAE 371 or equivalent} or permission of both department and 
instructor. Basic inviscid incompressible aerodynamic theory with application to the calculation 
of the flowfield and loads for rotary wings. 
ENAE 633 Helicopter Dynamics (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 631 or permission of both department and instructor. Flap dynamics. Math- 
ematical methods to solve rotor dynamics problems. Flap-lag-torsion dynamics and identify 
structural and inertial coupling terms. Overview on rotary wing unsteady aerodynamics. Basic 
theory of blade aero-elastic stability and ground resonance problems. 
ENAE 634 Helicopter Design (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 631 or permission of both department and instructor. Principles and practice 
of the preliminary design of helicopters and similar rotary wing aircrafts. Design trend studies, 
configuration selection and sizing methods, performance and handling qualities analyses, struc- 



328 Course Descriptions 



tural concepts, vibration reduction and noise. Required independent design project conforming 
to a standard helicopter request for proposal (RFP). 
ENAE 635 Helicopter Stability and Control (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 631 or permission of both department and instructor. Advanced dynamics 
as required to model rotorcraft for flight dynamic studies. Development of appropriate models 
for the helicopter and study of stability, control, requirements for various applications, and 
handling qualities as determined by mission requirements. 
ENAE 640 Flight Mechanics I (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 445 or permission of both department and instructor. Studies in the dynamics 
and control of flight vehicles. Fundamentals of the dynamics of rigid and non-rigid bodies and 
their motion under the influence of aerodynamic and gravitational forces. 
ENAE 641 Flight Mechanics II (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 640 or permission of both department and instructor. A continuation of 
ENAE 640. 

ENAE 650 Variational Methods in Structural Mechanics <3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 452 or equivalent. Review of theory of linear elasticity with introduction to 
cartesian tensors; application of calculus of variations and variational principles of elasticity; 
Castigliano's theorems; applications to aerospace structures. 
ENAE 652 Finite Element Method in Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 650 or permission of both department and instructor. Development of finite 
element representation of continua using Galerkin and variational techniques. Derivation of 
shell elements and parametric representation of two and three dimensional elements. Application 
to aerospace structures, fluids and diffusion processes. 
ENAE 653 Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Continua (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 652. Finite element formulation of nonlinear and time dependent processes. 
Introduction to tensors, nonlinear elasticity, plasticity and creep. Application to nonlinear con- 
tinua including aerospace structures, shells, radiation heat transfer, creep. 
ENAE 654 Composite Structures (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 452 or permission of both department and instructor. Stiffness of unidirec- 
tional composites, stress and strain transformation, inplane and bending stiffness of symmetric 
laminates, properties of general laminates, strength of composite structures, environmental ef- 
fect. 

ENAE 655 Structural Dynamics I (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 452 or equivalent or permission of both department and instructor. Advanced 
principles of dynamics necessary for structural analysis; solutions of eigenvalue problems for 
discrete and continuous elastic systems, solutions to forced response boundary value problems 
by direct, modal, and transform methods. 
ENAE 656 Structural Dynamics II (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 655 or permission of both department and instructor. Topics in aeroelasticity: 
wing divergence; aileron reversal; flexibility effects on aircraft stability derivatives; wing, em- 
pennage and aircraft flutter; aircraft gust response. 
ENAE 657 Theory of Structural Stability (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 452 or equivalent. Static and dynamic stability of structural systems. Clas- 
sification of leading systems: linear and nonlinear post-buckling behavior. Perfect and imperfect 
system behavior. Buckling and failure of columns and plates. 
ENAE 661 Advanced Propulsion I (3) 

Prerequisites: ENAE 461; and ENAE 462. Special problems of thermodynamics and dynamics 
of aircraft power plants; jet, rocket and ramjet engines. Plasma, ion and nuclear propulsion for 
space vehicles. 



ENAG - Engineering Agricultural 329 



ENAE 662 Advanced Propulsion II (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 661. Special problems of thermodynamics and dynamics of aircraft power 
plants; jet, rocket and ramjet engines. Plasma, ion and nuclear propulsion for space vehicles. 
ENAE 671 Aerodynamics of Incompressible Fluids (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 463 or permission of instructor. Fundamental equations in fluid mechanics. 
Irrotational motion. Circulation theory of lift. Thin airfoil theory. Lifting line theory. Wind 
tunnel corrections. Perturbation methods. 
ENAE 672 Aerodynamics of Incompressible Fluids (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 463 or permission of instructor. Fundamental equations in fluid mechanics. 
Irrotational motion. Circulation theory of lift. Thin airfoil theory. Lifting line theory. Wind 
tunnel corrections. Perturbation methods. 
ENAE 673 Aerodynamics of Compressible Fluids I (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 471; or permission of both department and instructor. One-dimensional flow 
of a perfect compressible fluid. Shock waves. Two-dimensional linearized theory of compressible 
flow. Two-dimensional transonic and hypersonic flows. Exact solutions of two-dimensional is- 
otropic flow. Linearized theory of three-dimensional potential flow. Exact solution of axially 
symmetrical potential flow. One-dimensional flow with friction and heat addition. 
ENAE 674 Aerodynamics of Compressible Fluids II (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 673. One-dimensional flow of a perfect compressible fluid. Shock waves. 
Two-dimensional linearized theory of compressible flow. Two-dimensional transonic and hy- 
personic flows. Exact solutions of two-dimensional isotropic flow. Linearized theory of three- 
dimensional potential flow. Exact solution of axially symetrical potential flow. One-dimensional 
flow with friction and heat addition. 

ENAE 675 Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids I (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 475 or permission of department. Derivation of navier stokes equations, 
some exact solutions: boundary layer equations. Laminar flow-similar solutions, compressibility, 
transformations, analytic approximations, numerical methods, stability and transition of turbulent 
flow. Turbulent flow-isotropic turbulence, boundary layer flows, free mixing flows. 
ENAE 676 Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids II (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 675. Derivation of navier stokes equations, some exact solutions: boundary 
layer equations. Laminar flow-similar solutions, compressibility, transformations, analytic ap- 
proximations, numerical methods, stability and transition to turbulent flow. Turbulent flow- 
istropic turbulence, boundary layer flows, free mixing flows. 
ENAE 688 Seminar (1-3) 
ENAE 757 Advanced Structural Dynamics (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAE 655 or equivalent. Fundamentals of probability theory pertinent to random 
vibrations, including correlation functions, and spectral densities; example random processes; 
response of single degree and multidegree of freedom systems. 
ENAE 788 Selected Topics in Aerospace Engineering (1-3) 
ENAE 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
ENAE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

ENAG - Engineering Agricultural 

ENAG 414 Mechanics of Food Processing (4) 

Prerequisite: PHYS 121. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Applications in the pro- 
cessing and preservation of foods, of power transmission, hydraulics, electricity, thermodynamics, 
refrigeration, instruments and controls, materials handling and time and motion analysis. 



330 Course Descriptions 



ENAG 421 Power Systems (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ENME 217 and ENEE 

300 and [ENME 342 or ENCE 330]. Analysis of energy conversion devices including internal 

combustion engines, electrical and hydraulic motors. Fundamentals of power transmission and 

coordination of power sources with methods of power transmission. 

ENAG 422 Soil and Water Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: ENME 342 or ENCE 330. Applications of engineering and soil sciences in erosion 

control, drainage, irrigation and watershed management. Principles of agricultural hydrology 

and design of water control and conveyance systems. 

ENAG 424 Functional and Environmental Design of Agricultural Structures (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ENAG 454. An 

analytical approach to the design and planning of functional and environmental requirements of 

plants and animals in semior completely enclosed structures. 

ENAG 435 Aquacultural Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. A study of the engineering aspects of development, 

utilization and conservation of aquatic systems. Emphasis will be on harvesting and processing 

aquatic animals or plants as related to other facets of water resources management. 

ENAG 444 Functional Design of Machinery and Equipment (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ENES 221. Senior 

standing. Theory and methods of agricultural machine design. Apphcation of machine design 

principles and physical properties of soils and agricultural products in designing machines to 

perform specific tasks. 

ENAG 454 Biological Process Engineering (4) 

Prerequisite: ENME 342 or ENCE 330. Design of systems to pump, heat, cool, dry and control 

biological materials as part of food and agricultural engineering. The effect of physical parameters 

on biological material response to these processes. 

ENAG 488 Topics in Agricultural Engineering Technology (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Selected topics in agricultural engineering technology of 

current need and interest. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits if topics are different. 

Not acceptable for credit towards major in agricultural engineering. 

ENAG 489 Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Student will select an engineering problem and prepare 

a technical report. The problem may include design, experimentation, and/or data analysis. 

ENAG 499 Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering Technology (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Not acceptable for majors in agricultural engineering. 

Problems assigned in proportion to credit. 

ENAG 601 Instrumentation Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Analysis of instrumentation requirements and techniques 

for research and operational agricultural or biological systems. 

ENAG 602 Laboratory Applications of Microcomputers (3) 

Laboratory instrumentation emphasizing microcomputers. Programming in BASIC, with all ap- 
plications directed toward data acquisition and analysis. Program documentation, user-friendli- 
ness features, file handling, graphics, A/D conversion, digital filtering, and digital image processing. 
ENAG 631 Land and Water Resource Development Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: ENAG 422 or permission of department. A comprehensive study of engineering 
aspects of orderly development for land and water resources. Emphasis on project formulation, 
data acquisition, project analysis and engineering economy. 



ENCE - Engineering, Civil 331 



ENAG 688 Advanced Topics in Agricultural Engineering (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Advanced topics of current interest in the various areas 

of agricultural engineering. Maximum eight credits. 

ENAG 698 Seminar (1) 

First and second semesters. 

ENAG 699 Special Problems in Agricultural and Aquacultural Engineering (1-6) 

First and second semester and summer school. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 

ENAG 701 Bioengineering Analysis of Human Physiological Response (3) 

Modeling of human physiology yields insight, understanding and the ability to predict responses. 

This course will present physiological principles from a bioengineering viewpoint; survey basic 

models appearing in the literature and the mechanics and control of energetics, biomechanics, 

cardiovascular, thermal, and respiratory responses. 

ENAG 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

ENAG 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8) 

ENCE - Engineering, Civil 

ENCE 410 Advanced Strength of Materials (3) 

Prerequisites: ENCE 350; and MATH 246. Behavior of structural members under load. Straight 
and curved beam analysis, unsymmetrical bending, shear center, beams on elastic foundation. 
Torsion of solid and thin walled members. Applied elasticity and stress-strain relations. Advanced 
topics in mechanics. 

ENCE 411 Construction Scheduling and Estimating (4) 

Two hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week. Use of critical path